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Gerrnany Dk\, S.50 

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N«tn«ffaod$ OFi 8,90 

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fttew Zealand N2S 3.70 

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► OCTOBER 1986 VOL. 6 NO. 10 



BRITAIN'S BIGGEST-SEUING HOME COMPUTER MAGAZINE 

AMSTRAD PC 

THE HOME COMPUTER 

COMES OF AGE i 




\ 



I 



W^l'^J^T 



1 " t> 



eiNSTEIN Mk II 

kilVIEWED 





1 ^ 




'i^.J<2- 1 



/ 



r i ^.ll*^ l^^' 




THE EXPERT WAY 

CfGHT SIMULATORS 
REVIEWED 




HINTS & TIPS • SOFT FILE * CLUBS • NfIVS • SOFTWARi 




MONSTER MEM 






Get your hands on the 
new sinclair i28k+1 



BffORE EVERTBODir 




The new 128K ZX Spectrum +2 is more 
than just a monster memory. 
Ifs the ultimate family computer. 
With a built-in datacorder for easier loading, superb 
^ graphics capability, two joystick ports, a proper 

typewriter keyboard and more gamesavailable than you 

can shake a joystick at (well over 1000 software titles, 

in fact). 

Better get your hands on the new 

1 28K ZX Spectrum +2 soon. 

Before the y do. 



A Oror- MONSTER VALUE 

Available from: Allder s, Boots, Clydesdale, Comet, Connect, Co-op, Currys, 
Dixons, Electric Supreme, Laskys, John Lewis, John Menzies, Power City, 
Rumbelows, Ultimate, WH Smith, Wigfalts, and good independent stores, 

: We recommend Sinclair Quality Control Software. 



r 



lo Sindarf. PC) Box 462, Brtniwood, Essex CJ4 4EF 

P*ui^*j send me more infofmation about the Sindaif 128K ZX SpKjafum +2. 

fsiame «- 

Addre^ 



inczlair: 




Editor 

Gary Evans 
Softwore Editor 
Francis jago 
Staff Writer 
Anthony Thompson 
Sub Editor 
Harold Mayes MBE 
Production Editor 
Jim McClure 
Production Assistants 
Nick Fry 

Editorial Secretary 

Sheila Boker 
Designer 
Chris Winch 
Design Assistant 

Neil Tookey 



Group Advertisement Manager 

David Lake 

Advertisement Executives 

Amber Russell 

Bal Dhillon 

Ciossified 

Poul Monof 



Publisher 

Paul Coster 
Finoncial Director 
Brendon McGrath 
Managing Director 

RiChord Heose 

Your Computer, 

79-80 Petty France, 

LONDON SW1H 9ED 

TELEPHONE: 01-222 9090 

FAX: 01-222 0461 

TELEX: 9419564 FOCUS G 

ISSN 0263 088S 

© 1986 fotui iftvujhnonu (jmifod. 

Prinlod t*y The Rivefi<Jo Ptoss. Eng^ono 

Typ^ir^yt Uy TmMi Gf optica uo., NOfTr>arpp?on 

Mefn*3ef ct mo Audtt euoou ot Circulc^oa 

Di9rf«xrto<t bv Buir»055 Ptms miwxitionol 
Quodront Houso. Sisn&/, SW2 &AS ToJec*x)np 
01 "661 3^39 

Roosoootrf^ care i% ttjJten to ovoid mton g\ fhs 
moQa^ine buJ no loO^ty \i occepted foe ony orrcfs 
which rtKiy occur No ft^oferjol :n Itvj pobfccotcn 
nK3v be re0*odix:od in cny way vwJhout the wniton 
consent of th© ptibtsixrrs. Iho pubbshOfs wM nol 
occop} fosoonsiblrty lor the ro^Jfn of unsn«crt©d 
mongjicriots. l»3finos, doto fotxn or discs 

V\^ v^ll a»umc p<}f mo^Qf) to publoii dH urksc^iiod 
mofefKif umo&s o4iYerM/ise sfcrted. Wo coertot bo 
heid fes0onvt>ie for the soto i otum of orr/ motof c! 
sutxniJted fa pubfcooton Plooio koop o copy of 
ofl your work end do noJ sood us onoroi ortwofic 

Untodunoeufy we ore iriobto to onsw*^ ien^th^ 
onqutfi^s by i«4Qpiy>no. Any wnNm quety ioqCH ng 
O per»onol iXi»/HH MUST be occorr^Xiniod by a 
stamped setf-oddresaad envotopu; pk^os^ ottow 
up to 2d dciy» fof a iogi^y, 

Subicrtpttom; UX £16 tor 12 «su05, CVofseos 
(suioco moif) £26 - osmxH rotes on reque$r Boos^ 
moko choQDOS/pojTot ofders poyobie jo focus 
invoi*nr>efit5 (allow 5 wee^ from receipt o^ ordof 
to dettvery o* W subscoptico copy). Send otdei s 
to vour Computef Subsoipltom. OokTiefd Hcuso, 
Petrynficutt Rood Hoywordi HeofK RH16 30H 
Telephone (0444) 459188. 

Bock I3SU05 o« the fnogaiwx? from Jarnirxy 1986 
onwtwdi um ovalobte for £1^ {IJ K), £3 
(Overseas) fiom sr>e Bock J»ue$ Departnvena, 79.80 
f^tty Fronce. Lonooa SWlH 9€0 




AMSTRA 
SPECTRl Jl 

Full details of the 
revolutionise ttte 
Amstrad/Sinclair . 



28 



THE SOUND OF MUSIC 

A drum synth for CPC tnochines and a 
CBM sound sampler reviewed. 



33 





GEHING MORE FROM 
YOUR PRINTER 

Hints, tips and listing to improve the 
appearance of your tiardcopy. 



USEFUL UTILITIES 

A range of utilities come under our 
scrutiny. 





ADVENTURE SECTION 



^ The usual mix ot reviews plus hints and 
r tips. 



PROGRAMMING THE 
EXPERT WAY 

Wetalkto tlietop games programmers 
and discover some of their 
programming secrets. 



4 YOUR COMPUTER. OCTOBER 1988 




■l 




D PCI 51 2 AND 
llm PLUS 2 REVIEWED 

the range ofAmstrad computers set to 
^f PC market - page $4 - and ttie new 
oir computer - page SO. 



^ 






1156 



FLIGHTS OF FANCY 

l< I Take to the air with a top flight 
simulator. 





60 



PC BUYER'S GUIDE 

The Amstrad PCI 51 2 is not the only low 
cost clone as we reveal. 



U.S. GOLD COMPETITION 

Win a top- prize in this easy-to-enfer 
competition. 



86 





EINSTEIN TAKE TWO 

Will the new version of the Einstein 
computer succeed where the original 
failed? 




NEWS 



1 A New developments in micro 



' cooiputing. 



CHARTS 

^ Top selling games listed. 



17 

sonw* 
XOi 

sonw/ 

21 

COMMl 

23: 



SOFTWARE PREVIEWS 

G^mes to remember for 
^ November. 

SOFTWARE NEWS 

Behind the scenes gossip. 



COMMUNICATTONS NEWS 

ComrTTCftH on cotnms 
matters. 



NEW PRODUCTS 

The PCW show saw a bonanza 
' of new comptiter bott-«n$. 



25 



SOFTWARE SHORTUST 

^O latest full price and budget 

"t^ software reviewed, 

LETTERS 

^O a chance to air your views. 

EDUCATION AND CAREERS 

I Computers tn the classroom. 



70 



CLUES 

7^ Flying high with the RAF. 



SOFTWARE EXCHANGE 
High quatrty rei 
at budget prices. 



7^ High quality reader software 



PROGRAfHniE 

^/* Short programs for the top 

* W machines. 

COMPANY PROHLE 

A A we visit the HQ of prolific 



^ U.S. Gold. 



DIARY 



[ 98 



Forthcoming computer shows 
and exhibitions. 



AUTUMN GOLD 
Turn to page 14 for details of our £1 ,000 
competition 

This months 25 runner-up prizes are Your 
Computer binders. 




i;^ 



YOUR COMPUTER. OCTOBER 1986 " 5 



T LAST YOU CAN REALLY fCHT 



J A fit $. 



casudeoamesud., 
harrogate, hg15bg, 

ENGLAND. 
TO: (0«31 50-1663 



"I JUST COULDN'T BELIEVE HOW MUCH THERE WAS IN IT" zza^i^ 

"ACE IS ONE OF THE BEST SIMULATORS I HAVE EVER PLAYED" co 

"THERE ARE FLIGHT SIMULATORS AND THERE ARE FLIGHT 



RAFPILOTa 



4 

i 



'M 



'}>..-S' 



SIMULATORS - AND THEN TH ERj'SACE " 



>P'>.^''^ci 



COMPUTER AND VIDEO GAME 



"S<rMnihonar«laktnfremriMO' 64van«an 



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<5- O 




' ' ' ' ; 



* f it ^ ^ t m ^ r'r*' * 




PROTEXT 



FOR AMSTRAD 
464/664, 6128 

THE ULTIMATE AMSTRAD WORD PROCESSOR!! 

SPELLING CHECKER AND MAIL-MERGE NOW AVAILABLE 



PROTEXT is without doubt the most sophisticated word processor you will find on any home micro. It is of 
comparable standard to business packages costing over £200 but has been developed for the AMSTRAD 
464/664 and 61 82 machines and is 1 00% machine-code. We know that PROTEXT is the fastest program of its 
type currently available (eg. global search and replace on a three page file in under a second!). Bearing in mind 
the range of features included and their ease of use, this package is rightly acclaimed as the No. 1 word 
processor for Amstrad owners Compare these features and benchmarks with any other similar products. 



PROTEXT FEATURE SUMMARY 

Filii commancfs — Super fast Lo<i<l Merge and Save» Cat Prrni (to printer/screen/liJe) 

Cursor Movement — By character/ word/ime/paragraph/screen. to start or end of line, to start Of efKJ of 

text, to Jine numt>er. to place martter, to margia 
inserting and deleting — Insert/overwrite mode, msert character or line, defete character forwards or 

backwards delete word Delete to end of line. 
Fl N D a nd R EPLACE ~ Wi!dcArd!s all or part of text case specific, whole word or part ol word, find control 

codes 
Btock commands — Move/copy/dclete/save/pnnV*ormat 
Markers — 2 block nvarKcrs and 10 place markers may be set anywhere. 
Formatting - Word wrap, right justify, variable left and right margins 
Ruler Mnes — Unlimited number of ruler lines, to define margms and tabs Decimal tabs 
Print options— Headers/footers, page numbera variable line spacing, variable page length and margin 

stzesv conditional page throws^ odd and even page features, continuous or single sheets 

multiple copies 
Printer features — Includinq emphasizedl condensed, double-strike, elite, aaltcs. enlarged, pica, MLQ. 

subscript superscript underlina Built in Epson printer driver, ability to easily define your own 

pnnter driver and save to disc 
Help feature — Optional on screen command summaries. 
Built In character sets — Oanish/French/Gcrman/Italian/Spanish/Swedish 
Other features — Non break space, display tabs; returns and hard spaces, soft hyphens, word count 

case conversion, copy ruler. 60 page easy to read manual with full index and glossary of terms. 



'7 AM STUNNED AT PBOTEXT-fT KNOCKS POCKET WORDSTAR INTO A 
COCKED HAT' - AMTIX ISSUE 1 "DON'T MISS IT IT IS SUPERB" 
— POPULAR COMPUTING WEEKLY "MILES AHEAD OF THE AMSWORD 
TYPE PROGRAMS'* - AMSTRAD USER 



BENCHTESTS 

A standard file of 775 words 
{4,785 characters) was used to 
carry out the following benchtests 
(all timings are in seconds): 


1 L0A€tnllli 


U 


112 


I un till fh 


n 


lit 


1 ij-R)ilAT Mf>inph 


u 


1&3 


4 lt-R)IIIAT »«n m 


t% 


u^fwm 


S HmlncSilt 
itvtff tat 


HI 


zz 


1 KMindvli 
mil led 


tz 


tz 


7 llfUCE *t •» mc 
14^ Kctmct^ 


11 


34.1 


t SCAW «bn nil 


tt 


72 


9 MEflCE QU n Cittni 
If ttd 


4.0 


Nlt^ttsm 


10 ■EttEttilii^itlitt 


It 


U4 


M ttOnsVwtffmiQii 


mm 

01 


6J 


12 mmm lOAD TIME 
lt$C 


irs 


US 



PROMERGE/PROMERGE PLUS 

This nrtajor addition to the PROTEXT word processor combines a fully flexible 
mail merge program allowing PROTEXT to produce individualised documents 

in one single print rur>. 

PROMERGE — 

COMPREHENSrVE MAIL MERGE 

Read data from file or keyboard. 

Merged files of varying lengths are automatically reformatted. 

File merge - insert file while printing. 

Conditional printing ^ select from input data (eg. you could print letters to all 

customers whose name is not Smith). 

Print file direct from disc or memory. 

Auto configuration - you can set up a disc to configure PROTEXT to your 

preferred options with a single keystroke. 

Typewriter mode - for envelopes etc. 

PROMERGE PLUS — 

PROTEXT ENHANCEMENTS (ROM version only) 

Ali the features of PROMERGE together with - 

Background printing - edit one file while you print another. 

Two file editing - switch between two files in memory. 

Cut and paste - any block of text can be moved to any position * allows 

multiple column layout. 

Tasword users - automatically converts your old text files. 

Calculator - a simple on screen calculator for those Invoice totals etc. 

*6128 OWNERS* 

PROMERGE PLUS MAKES full and sensible use of your extra 64K memory 

but also functions with smaller files on the 464 and 644 machines. 

Also uses D K Tronics 64K RAM expansions. 



STOP PRESS 

PCW versions now 

available - phone 

for details 



PRICES 

PROTEXT 
PROMERGE 
PROMERGE PLUS 
PROSPELL 



DISC ROM 

26.95 39.95 

24.95 — 

— 34.95 

24.95 34.95 



(ALLINCL VAT. P & P) 



PROSPELL 

* Ch«ck» your sp«lling # Proof reads your documAntt if 
it Solv«t your word puzzt«s it 

- How to os« PROSPEtL - 

Jym speniny cneckar can De called directly from wrtti*n PROTEXT to c*iecK the cufrent 
m in memofy Of any fi&e on dtsc Allemaitveiv. PROSPtLL wll check any ASCn hie 
produced by other Amstrad wofd processor^ tnciudmg Wordstar type files 

— Features availabfe — 

Add wofds to the dictionary/Correct word/ignore wof(VLookupcofTeci$p«*iin^»ew 
word in contoxt/Dcioio wordA/Li9t words/ imtia^tse new dictionaty^PLUS- 

— Word Puiiie Features — 

The 30j0OO word Dictiomiry can be used in a number of uselut wayft 

FINO WORD — Your can entOf a word pattern ujtmo*? for an unknown letter and* lo' a 
QfQuDOf unknown lettefs PROSPHlt w^O h$t an wO'ds in the dtctionary wncn match 
this pattern 

ANAGRAMS — PROSPELL writ even dst atJ anagra/ns of any wofd pattc?fn you type t ft 

Together these features wi" prove «nvaiuabie to cosswo^d soi^eni ^t\6 compjtc^ 

- THE POWER OF PROSPELL - 

Some speifiog checKcrs work as sk>w»y as t50 words oe^ mmuie 
PROSPELL wo*ks at JO to 2000 w.txm 

Some speRtng checkers limit your dictionary m%. PROSPELL wttf work with an untimtted 
numijer o* d«ct»onanes. each ol which can hoki around 45000 word^ 

N a AW ROM software r«<iu<re3 a ROM expanvon syst^^m We recommend and Si*i>(>'y 
the new SUPERPOWER SWAY ROM BOX at £34.95 (incl i/AT P& Pt 

PROSPtLL reQu»res at *east one disc d^tve 

Available from selected branches of 

4S^ WHSMITH 

and all good computer stockists^ or directly 

FROM: ARNOR LTD 

118 WHITEHORSE ROAD 
CROYDON 
CRO 2JF 
01-684 8009 



24 HOUR CREDIT CARD HOTLINE - ACCESS/VISA 




d 



Fbotbaler of the Year 

tOQo^ ^fl^ e >oiir pooan tie 4oe6dnq 
tniuc^ ^ ^ «id "kwm :^ tnfeti 

CKXig^ lie titon* «xcte)r 

q<^oixyoa!he rouU l er 




m First Division 
liants and opted to 
stay with Rovers. 
This promising 
centre-back has sigr 
ed a new contra 
team manager D ^ 
X Thorpe annoi^ J 
today. 

Ci>\, Attr*v , ihc 

.T i^T' ith 
ml Vfaruginp 









jay's Ma 






overs 
for 




oa 

to 

h»s 
City 

injury, bn 
\*eeli to mi 

nKxtieaJ ire 
e.xpcn Pierre 
ha^ treated oci 
Pcan Stari. 

HcLsHkch 
Cry arc 
iransf 
>m the 
weve 



nicnacm 




couWoeo" j^^ 

National =**"*; I 

Wcrmihcycar ^ has mis/ 

Morgan. a«w ^^ bccaj 



y4LH^y4rSi4/i&4D 



FbollKier of the Year 

CI6 + 4 n$XSpectnim48K 

£6.95 £7.95 

Amstrad, BBOEkctron 
Atari CBM 64/128 

ib9>95 

Avenger 

lC16 +4 CBM 64^128 
"5X Spectrum 48K 
Amstrad 

;9.95 



'"owrorl 
coUectcd' 

^ has Wi^ 

^^^^^'*^^* OJ.H 
JteSf after not^ 
'^''^ ^ contract. 

|/ J His depart il 
■I ^ end of an era! 
signalling the i« 
remarkable scorijL 
^vhich ha<; made ih 
born pbycr the duh» 
prolific icoRT in rhdr J 
^^r league history. 



1 






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■iiMwaMU yw toiap iCiB rt^sfk 
mo ndta <it Ssoli ol Ktfftm You tHMT 
nQfn rtfte (jod t^MX) tm ^ ^asige 
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jeo^ Al wcu #tfe cnungt an) nnvtifdr Cflkd 
i|nn iftci you tegci tv md cor#cx ci t» (ji* 

Avenger(Wi9 of theHgerH) 





Way of 

CIS 

£9 

AvagaMe 

Thing on 



Avajlable November 



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lOCamfStreet» 


V I 


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•m boaicD ihn im wmA Hotkk htiAjx^ *^\ 

-ru hokNCff ^ oipion. Mend jouarf 
c<y jgom Qie Bcncxo 
roiji Kign voif wiy ' 

tllDuO- 

■loid li test dy Qjii* 
'tftty odbraMByk 




ou nder 

216 +4 

6 -95 

}b\t November 



Ihindtr Mb 

tMfmvii iposl 

ptahngyourfiAaa 

jow 

fCf Mf« not cnt for fo 

MMdflQ tic <0^tat €b3B!Q> of 
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Available November 



-^ 



EDITORIAL 



^ ,. ..w^rJi..ii^r Ht .^t.ilLLii£iJS!J f , 




The worsi-kcpt secret of ifie coinpuling year. 
the fact that Amslrad was lc> launch a P(' 
conipaliblc computer, became public 
knowledge on September 2 when the range 
ot new machines was launched otTicially. The 
degree of inieresi in the act ivi lies of Alan Sugar's 
company was apparent from the fact that the launch 
was one oi the biggest in the U.K. for many years. 
journalists from all over the country and many from 
jiiany Fiuropean eounirics crowded into a central 
London conference centre to be treated to a 
half-hour audiii-visual show singing the praises of the 
company and outlining its plans. A tier that show, 
those present were treated to a skilful performance 
from ihe man himself during a short Q&A session, 
llie series of Amstrad PCs is reviewed elsewhere 
in this issue but those familiar with the PC 
specillcahon will find few surprises among the details 



c 



E N T 



of the hardware. Of far more interest is the Amstrad 
pricing structure and the way the hardware is to be 
marketed. 

With the P(1512, Amstrad is following its 
successful pi>liey of taking a technology which is tried 
and tested and ai>plying its production engineering 
skills to design a system which performs as well or 
better than similar products yet can be manufactured, 
in the Far East, at very low cost. The aggressive 
pricing will be achieved with marketing campaigns 
tailored to the perceived needs of the market. 

The arrival. of the low-cost Amslrad PC will have 
a dramatic effect on the PC market in general. In 
particular, many companies will have to re-assess 
their software prices. Many software producers have 
already indicated that the price of many of their 
prt)ducts will be reduced dramatically in the near 
future. 

Hie combination of low-cost hardware and 
competitively-priced software will stimulate the PC 
market, bt)ih in the business area and in the home. 
It remains to be seen what the reaction of IBM will 
be to the erosion of its market share but, as Sugar 
pointed out at the launch of the PC1512, the 
overheads ofa multi-national company like Big Blue 
mean that it will be unable to compete with Amstrad 



on prices 



Tandy challenge the 
Amstrad price war 



Amslrad may have declared 
the sub i5(H) PC price war 
officially open Inii ii docs m>l 
look as if ii will be the only 
major company in ihal area of 
Ihe markcl lor lonii. randy Ikk 
just announced ihe release t>f 
ils new t44V KKKlEX. a fast, 
small compatible witti 256K 
RAM, bundled moncjchrome 
nionili>r and bundled 
DcKkmatv inlegraled s<*flware. 
*rhe company also offers a 
version wiili a colour monitor 
for only £I(K) more. 

Perhaps even nu»re 
important than the fael ihal 
Tandy has a major competitor 
to the Amslrad PC. however, 
is what il does to the 
relationship between Tandy 
ami Amstrad. For the last 
year, Tandy has sold and 
distributed Amslrad CPC and 
PCW home computers l>ut it 
will not be slocking the 
Amstrad PC, for obvious 
reasons. 

Tlierc is also a question- 
mark about whether or not 
Tandy will continue to slock 
older Ainstrad computers, or 
the new Spectrum Plus 2. *Wc 
have slocks of the 4643, 612H 
anti PCW machines but it h 
ntnv unlikely that we will buv 



any more prculucls from 
Amstrad," says Vimrc llolton 
of Tandy, 'il is a while-stocks- 
last situation. " 

The collapse of the Amstrad 
relationship with Tandy must 
have some etfect on the ability 
of Amslrad lo gel its products 
to customers, as the vast 
Tandy disiribulion network 
includes a number of 
prominent high -street shops 
and a not inconsiderable 
advertising budget. 

Tandy, meanwhile, is 
looking forward lo com pe ling 
with Amslrad in the PC 
market and says it herpes the 
r.X will 'bridge the gap 
between home and business 
computing, being also ideal 
for i»sc in education 
environments." 

1 he only real advantage 
Amslrad mav have overTandv 
on the mmx is thai the EX 
docs not take standard PC 
expansion cards, although it 
offers proprietary 1 andy slois 
for extra memory, RS232 
connnunicalions, mouse and 
external drives. The EX can 
also only use a single drive 
internally; additional drives or 
a hard disc must be added as 
external boxes. 




NEWS 




From computer 

peripherals to PC 

clones 



Peripheral giant Opus hu> 
finallv released iis hiuigei PC 
donc\ the PC 11 . At £4W, the 
machine ct>mparcs 
unfavourably in terms of price 
to some on the inai kcl but it is 
buih to a very high 
specificulion. The 
motherboard contains the 
NFC V20 processor which is 
swiichablc between 4.77 and 
SMIlz, three limes faster than 
the standard IBM PC\ 

N4osi machines in the 
low-civsl PC class allow 



u w nuiry expansion up lo MOK 
on the motherboard. On the 
PC 11. hovveNcr, expansion up 
to 1.U24R is possible, which 
creates a ."84 K RAM disc 
givini! much faster access limes 
than a conventional disc drive. 
The base model, known as 
System One, has six free 
expansion slots, two having 
been used by the graphics caid 
and parallel printer port The 
motherboard also features a 
built-in. ballcry-powered 
clock/calendar and a joystick 



interface . 

At a time when many 
companies are faciiiii legal 
action (ram IBM regarding the 
Icgahiy of the BIOS of then 
products. ( )pus has develi>petl 
its enhanced vcrsit>n. lully- 
eopy righted and registered in 
the Slates. Opus is confident 
of an extremely high level *>f 
compatibility and publishes a 
full list of the programs which 
will run on ihc machine, 
inchulinp titles such as Loim 
t'2-J and SUlcKick, two elassie 
tests oi compatibility. 

Complete witli a high- 
quality keybivard and 12in. 
monitor, the Opus machine is 
certainly one the other 
manufacturers will have to 
watch. 




tj^==^^ 



Rivals to Amstrad 



In a move {o repeat the success 
of the Amstrad CP/M based 
PCW word processing 
machines, an army of new 
CP/M machines looks as it it 
will be unleashed on the 
increasingly overcrowded 
small busincss/liome market. 

Commodore, Tatung, 
Memoiech and Saga veteran 
Spectrum keyboard 
manufacturer - have all cither 
announced t>r arc rumoured to 
be planning new all-in-one 




CP/M office otferings in time 
for Christmas. 

The first such bundle arrives 
w^ith the semi-new - i.e. . it has 
iievei been really launched 
properly -Commodore 12KD, 
which is bundled with the 
MPSHKK* near letter quality 
printer, a mon<Khrome 
monitor and an integrated 
software suite lor £749.95. 

The Commodt>re 12SD is 
essentially a Conunodore 128 
with a detached keyboard and 
built-in disc drive see review 
in the March Your Computer 
- while the integrated suite 
comprises word processor, 
daiaba.sc. spreadsheet, 
high-resolution graphics and 
integrated accounts 
applications. 

Ct>mmtKlorc is doing the 
bundling jointly with Total 
Office Software Ltd, which 
wrote the bundled software 
and starteii selling it by 
mail t>rder and lhri>ugli 
selected stores in Sepieml>er. 
The move is not, however, 
regarded as a major plank in 
Commodore long-term plans 
but as a way of slightly blunting 
the massive edge Alan Sugar 
seems to have with tlie 
Amstrad offerings, 

Hvents at S|K'ctrum 
peripheral manufacturer Saga 
ltH>k a goiul deal more 
interesting. Saga has said it 
hopes to have a Nub-£35n 



Amstrad PCVV-killer known as 
the Compliment available 
before Christmas. The 
Z-SO-based system is likely to 
start as an upgrade kit which 
effectively turns the Spectrum 
into a business machine. 

The package is rumoured to 
include a new keybi>ard, 3.5in. 
256K discdiive, NLO printer. 
the Saga Ialm Word won! 
processing software and 
utilitv which allows the 



t ransfer of cassette software t<^ 
disc. It is expected the system 
will retail at about the £350 
level. 

I he least clear plans among 
the new CT/M entrants are the 
haiiiKMuiigs at Mcmotcch. 
which now seems to be 
attempting lo re-establish 
itself in the sub-C400 small 
business CP/M market after 
early attempts forced the firm 
to the tinaneial brmk. 





r— 



/ f f I I 



till 



r- 1 - I - V 



/, , 



.XMW 



YOUR COMPUTEn, OCTOBER 1986 H 



Nexus 
competition 



The winner of ihc Nexus 
eompeiiiion held in the July 
issue of Y{}Nr C ontpuhr wns S. 
W. lliUchcr from Winncrsli, 
Berkshire. Hib lie break 
senlenee was: Digilisersarc to 
graph ies what mierowave 
ovens are to cookery - not 
absolutely essential but more 
than useful. Twenty-five 
runners up will reeeive eopics 
of the game: Marl in Thurlow, 
Coventry: Jolyson Graee, 
Chester: Miss Joy Nieholson. 
Torquay; Mr. I). Williams, 
Thornton; Mr. C, Lewis, 
Kingham; Jason Shipnian, 
Ellesmcre Port: Gordon 
Shearer, Rothes; Mr. J. M. 



firyson. Swindon: iason 
Salter. Sea lord: (jerry 
(jallovvuy, Liver{X>ol: Rod 
Shaw. Nailsea: f>>niiaie 
Bourn. Wolverhampton: Mr. 
W, S. Youngs* Shoeburyncss; 
Adrain Smith, Morpeth; Mr. 

F. A. r<K>k, Cwmbran: Mr. 

G. Newman, Co Tyrone; Ian 
Peter Douglas. Plymouth: 
Lars Chrislensen, Oenmark; 
Roiier Fleuiv. Eastbourne: D. 
R. Williams, lOW; Jason 
Dobbs, Newton Abbot; Ian D. 
Flory. Banff: Ola Sjocstrand, 
Sweden; Luis Miguel Pereira, 
Portugal: Lee Russell. London 
E7. 



The ST becomes a PC 



Apple vs the rest of 
the world 



Apple is set luultaek llie Atari 
SI' and Commodore Amiga 
markets with a fast, new 16-bit 
Apple 11 maehine which will 
sell for less than £1,0()0. The 
Apple IIGS is a radieally- 
updated version of the Apple 
IL with256K RAM 
expandable to 8MB, full 
Apple II eompalibility, 
bundled 3. Sin. SOOK disc drive 
and Macintosh-style mouse- 
driven software, mouse and 
monochrome monitor for £995. 

The IKjS seems aimed 
stjuarely at the Atari ST 
market, with its smart 
Mac-style colour graphics, fast 
processor - the 16-bil 65C816 
running at 2,8MHz - and 
built-in Hnsoniq 32-osci!lator 
synthesiser chip with (viK of 
dedicated RAM. 

While the IIGS is later to 
market than either the Amiga 
or ST, its graphics and sound 
capabilities eoni|)arc very 
favourably and ihere is already 
a software base t^f more than 
KMMX* Apple II packages 
which it can run from the time 
Apple U.K. starts delivery of 



the machines in December. 

I'nfortunaTcly, Apple is not 
really targetting the iiGS as 
the excellent games machine it 
could be - likewise the Amiga 
and ST - but rather as a 
Mac-style business solution for 
budgcl-eonscious small 
businesses and professionals 
who cannot take the alleged 
crudity of low-cost Amsirador 
PC offerings. 

Neither does the release of 
the machine mean that existing 
Apple li products will fall 
substantially in price. Apple 
U.K. is discountinuing the 
Apple lie and Apple He in the 
U.K., although the machines 
will still be sold in the I I.S, , so 
while there may be some 
bargains on Apple It 
equipment in the next few- 
wee ks as Apple clears its 
shelves to make way for the 
IIC5S, no kmg-term cheap 
Apples will be available. 

The IIGS should give Atari 
and commodore a good run 
for their money. Ihc ST is, 
after all. based on the ideas 
Apple refined iti the Lisa and 



Atari wall not be following 
Amstradinto the t*( arena but 
it looks as if the long-awaited 
Atari IBMcompalibiliiy 
add-on for the ST should he 
ready and in the shops in time 
for Christmas. 

According to sources inside 
Atari, the add-on will sell lot 
less than 0(K> and should alknv 
the ST tts run most standard 
packages written for the PC. 
Tlic device was previewed at 
the F*ersonal Computer World 
Show in I .ondon, where eager 
Sr owners were able to sec the 
hardware/software emulation 
system in action. 

The add-on l>ox provides an 
8086 priKcssor- the same fast 
processor as used in the 
Amstrad PC - a standard 
5.25in. floppy disc drive for 
loading PC programs and 
some proprietary software to 
drive the system. Like the 
Commodore Sidecar for the 
Amiga, there arc limits to the 
PC compatibility the device 
can provide : there is no way it 



can offer the full number of 
IBM expansi^m card slots of a 
siandartl PC\ 

For mt>st jobs, the IBM ?C 
add-on of the ST shotild be 
more than equal to the task. 
Atari says the move is not an 
attempt to turn the ST into a 
cheap PC* ckme but rather to 
make the vast library of PC 
si>ftvvLire available to its users. 

The Atari delay in shipping 
the device - it was promised 
early this year and first show^n 
in the spring - is probably tine 
just as much to a desire not to 
inhibit the development of 
true ST software as it is a factor 
o! development problems on 
the add-on device. 

Atari has also had to make 
sure that the adtl-on box was 
sufficiently cheap that people 
could not say it would be 
cheaper for I hem to buy an 
inexpensive PC clone than it 
would be to buy the ST IBM 
PC add-on. Atari appears to 
have solved thai problem 
succcssfullv. 




Macintosh machines. Now 
that Apple is offering that, 
some type of software 
technology and power in a box 
which starts to compete with 
the SI tor prtce, people may 
opt for *the original* instead of 
the imitative Atari ST. 

Atari may coimter the new 
Apple machine with its 
rtimourcd TF- a sequel to the 
ST -^ 2MB, 68020 processor- 
based machine which should 
offer even more speed and 
power than the existing 104(1 at 
only a slightly higher price. 



Moving in a new machine 
above the UUO ST would uivc 
Atari the chance to reduce 
prices on the rest of its line and 
make the ST seem even more 
eom{>elilive against the new- 
Apple . 

Commod(>rc, meanwhile, 
will be increasing pressure to 
reduce the price of the Amiga, 
with machines which oiler 
more software and a similar 
specification available at 
cheaiKr prices than that ot 
Commodore. 



YOUR COMPUTER. OCTOBER 1986 13 





TREASURE HUNT 






Rules and Instructions 



eglnning this month, Your Computer is sponsoring 
the Autumn Gold Treasure Hunt Competition. With 
the October, November and December issues of the 
magazine, special treasure hunt cards, like the one 
on the front of this issue, are to be given away. By 
collecting the cards, using the numbers and solving the 
three picture puzzles, you could find the secret location 
of the hidden treasure chest and win the first prize of 
£1,000. There are also 25 instant prizes offered each 
month, with the chance to win more prizes in the New Year. 
Before you attempt to uncover any of the boxes, read 
the instructions on the card carefully. There are three 
possible ways to win. The first involves revealing the 
hidden boxes on your card by scratching off seven of the 
eight gold leaves, taking care to leave one intact. When 
you have done that, if there are six numbers plus one 
instant prize token you have a winning treasure hunt card. 
To claim your prize, send your card with your name 
and address and details of where you bought the magazine 
to Your Computer 79-80 Petty France, London SWIH 9ED, 
remembering to keep a record of the numbers on your 
card. Details of each month*s instant prizes are to be 
found on the contents page of this, the November and 
December issues. Remember that to claim using this 
method no black leaves must be uncovered on your card* 
If you have removed all of the gold leaves on your card 
you still have a chance of winning an instant prize. Pro- 



vided that one of the boxes you have revealed contains 
an instant prize token you can save it and try to collect 
another card with an instant prize token on it, thereby 
creating another winning combination. The January, 1987 
issue of Your Computer wilt have details of the prizes and 
how to claim using this method. 

Whether or not your treasure hunt card entitles you to 
one of the instant prizes, it always contains a set of six 
numbers which will help in your quest for the hidden 
treasure* Each month there will be a different set of num*- 
bers to incover which relate to that month's picture puzzle. 

Study the picture opposite carefully. There is a way of 
using the numbers from your card and the clues in the 
picture to find a single clue word somewhere - not in the 
picture or on the card. Quite simply the picture leads to 
a source of information and the numbers lead to a specific 
item within that source. What to do with the numbers is 
also contained in the picture. The source of information 
can be found in any good bookshop or public library or 
viewed at the Your Computer offices. You must telephone 
us first to tell us what it is you require so that we can 
ensure nobody gains an unfair advantage. Once we have 
checked your solution we will arrange an appointment. 
Each month ultimately leads to a single word and the 
three words will tell you where the treasure is hidden. 
Write and tell us the secret location and the first correct 
answer out of the hat will win the £1 ,000 prize. 



/ 



Competition Rules 



The winner of the competition will be the first 
correct answer pulled out of the hat. 

The name of the winner will be announced in 
the February Issue of Your Computer. 

All entries must arrive at the Your Computer 
offices by the 19th December, 1986. 



^r<^ 



•» *■ 





Only one entry per household. 

Entries to the competition cannot be 
acknowledged. 

No employees of Focus Investments nor their 
agents or close relatives may enter the 
competition. 

The decision of the Editor in all respects of 
the competition will be final. 

No correspondence with regard to any aspect 
of the competition will be entered into. 

Focus investments assumes no responsibility 
or liability for any complaints arising from this 
competition. 




mil 



m 



M: 



mm^^ 



•^ 



i»ik_^* 



%#% 



tX.^ 




.."lie 






AVAILABLE NOW FROM VIRGIN GAMES ON SPECTRUM 48/128. 

COMMODORE 64/128 AND AMSTRAD CPC RANGE OF COMPUTERS 

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PLEASE SEND ME DAN DARE - PILOT OF THE FUTURE IMMEDIATELY! 
SPECTRUM 48/128 CASSETTE £9.95 D COMMODORE 64/128 CASSETTE £9.95 D 
AMSTRAD CPC CASSETTE £9.95 D AMSTRAD CPC DISC £14.95 D 

Name 

Address 



Please make cheques or postal orders to Virgin Games Ltd. Please do not post cash. 
VIRGIN GAMES LTD. 2/4 VERNON YARD. PORTOBELLO ROAD. LONDON W11 20X 




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GHOSTS AND GOBUNS 


ELITE 


AMSPCO 






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CASCADE 


COC16SPV2+4 






3 


DRAGONS LAIR 


SOFTWARE PROJECTS 


AMCOSP 






4 


GREEN BERET 


IMAGINE 


AMCOSP 






5 


KNIGHT RIDER 


OCEAN 


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JACK THE RIPPER 


GREMLIN GRAPHICS 


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DAN BEAR 


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11 


PARALAX 


OCEAN 


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12 


KNIGHT GAMES 


ENGUSH 


AM CO 






13 


FULL THROTTLE - 


MICRO MEGA 


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]A 


SUPER CYCLE 


EPIX 


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DYNAMITE DAN 


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AMCOSP 












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SYSTEMS 


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CAULDRON II 


PALACE 


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VIDEO OLYMPICS 


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YCWJR COMPUTER, OCTOBER 1 086 1 7 



SOFTWARE PREVIEWS 




IAlleykat 




► C64 Hewson • Shoot-'em-up # Francis Jago • £8.95 



Everyone almost expected this game to 
fail. After Paradroidand Uridium, both of 
which were real classics. Alleykathad to 
be a let-down, didn't it? Contrary to what 
everyone expected, Alleycat is another 
great game from Andrew Braybrook. 
Undoubtedly it is simpler than Paradroid 
but Uridium was scarcely the most 
complex game of all time, yet it was still 
one of the most playable. 

Describing Alleykat is almost 
impossible. It is a space-racing 
simulation. It features some of the 
smoothest vertical scrolling seen on the 
Commodore 64 and should keep 
trigger-happy gamesters happy for 
hours. 

Once the game is started, you must 
choose which race you will enter first. At 
the beginning, as you have no money, 
only five races can be entered. They are 
set on various landscapes, with various 
objectives. Each race is measured in laps 
and to make life a great deal more 




The race is on , . . 

difficult, there is a large variety of aliens 
who would rather you failed to complete 
the course. 

If the player manages to complete a 
race, he is awarded bonus points for 
speed, aliens killed and race completion. 
They are added to the player's points 
tally, and money varying from 400 to 
20,000 guineas, depending on the 



difficulty and length of the race. 

As with all Braybrook games, the 
background and sprite animation is 
faultless and in one section of Alleykat it 
is truly superb. When pulling back on the 
joystick during the race, your craft does 
a loop-the-loop - very useful if being 
chased by a Katerkiller. 

GRAPHICS 

# # • # 

SOUND 

# # • # 

PLAYABIUTY 

# # • # 
VALUE FOR MONnr 

# # • # 

OVERALL 



Without doubt, Braybrook is one of the 
programming talents of the moment and 
this game reflects that. It lacks the depth 
of Paradroid but it has the immediacy 
which made Uridium such a smash. 



Coming to earth soon 



Aclivisioii lias announced that 
a has acquired the rights to the 
film which will be one of the 
biggest hits this year. 

Produced by ( jcorgc Lucas, 
famous for such blockbusters 
as Stnr Wnm and Knidcrs of 
the Lout Ark. llie fihii is called 
llowatd the Duck, and si> is 
the game. 



Accidentally brought to earth 
by a scientist, Howard is an 
English-speaking, walking, 
eating duck. Being only 3ft, 
tall, be has his problems and 
they are not helped by the fact 
that he has no super-powers. 

You play Howard, in a 
fantasy arcade adventure, and 
with just branis. and a little 




Any self-respecting fan of 
M:irvcl comics will recognise 
Howard the Duck imniediately 
as one of the most famous 
anli heroes of all time* 



Duck-Fu, you must save the 
earth. As well as Howard. 
Aclivision is also offering 
Hacker IL a new golf program 
for MS-DOS machines 




The Druid cometh 



One game which looks set to 
take the market by storm in the 
next two months is the new one 
from Firebird, ('ailed Druid, it 
uses a well-known arcade 
game as the idea for a classic 
arcade adventure. Released 
initially on the Commodore 
64, with Spectrum and 



AinsliaU versions to follow, it 
combines elements of 
shoot-'cm-up, and a massive 
playing area, to create an 
excellent all-round game, 
l.ook for a full review in next 
month's issue of Your 
Computer. 



18 YOUR COMPUTER, OCTOeER iSeS 




SOFTWARE NEWS 



Knight Rider sees daylight 



Just as everyone has begun to 
forget that it existed. Ocean 
has decided finally to release 
Knight Rider and it should be 
in the shops soon. Based, as 
everyone must know, on ihe 
television scries, i( places the 
player in Michael Knight's 
shoes. At first glance, it looks 
as if the game may have been 
worth the wait but all will be 
revealed in a full review next 
month. 

A$ well as Knight Rider, 
another long-awaited game is 
almost ready, Sirca Hawk. 
Using a scrolling screen, you 
must scream round the screen 



on your superbike, shooting 
baddies and dodging goodies. 
The Spectrum version had 
ver\' good graphics and good 
attention to detail. 

Ocean has also announced 
two more film deals. Fans of 
Sly Stallone will be glad to hear 
that Cobra is soon to be a game 
and if the film is any criterion 
it should have a great deal of 
shooting in it. The other film. 
Top Gun, has not yet been 
released in the U.K. but is 
based on the U.S. Navy, so 
that gives some clues to the 
scenario* 



Asterix is on his way 



Melbourne House, the 
company responsible for 
starting the Karate craxc with 
Way iyfthc Explodinii Fist, has 
leapt back into the same 
market with the release of Fist 
//. Intended to carry on where 
its predecessor left off, it has 
moved from sialic 
backgrounds to a horizontally- 
scrolling one, which adds 
greatly to the game's visual 
impression. 

The graphics have , as would 
be expected, increased in size 
and quality, and surely must 
be the best seen on a Karate 
game. As wiih the original 
game, the player is required to 
dispose of various enemies but 
in this game you must also 
cope vviih a few inannti:ttt' 



which need to be split, 
objects, such as pieces of wood 

Also new from Melbourne 
House, and one of the 
longest-awaited new games, is 
Asterix iind the Magic 
Cauldron. Set in Gaul about 50 
BC\ you play Asterix and you 
must find all eight pieces of the 
magic cauldron to keep the 
Romans at bay. Featuring 
many of the well-known 
characters, such as Obelix and 
Geliifix* the game should be 
released in the not-too-distant 
future. 

Those two titles are 
complemented by a nev\ 
adventure from the 
programmers of ihmpstcad 
and Tcrrormolinos. 




Jack attack 



In one of the most ambitious 
moves yet in the games 
software indusirv' Elite, 
producer of such classics as 
Commando and Ghosts and 
Goblins, has announced that it 
is converting Space Harrier lor 
home machines. Fhis coin-op 
machine which, with its 
revolutionar)' graphics and 
sound, has been taking the 
arcades by storm, will be 
converted for a range of home 
computers. 

Anyone who has seen the 
original game will wonder 
whether a conversion is 
possible but Elite promises the 
game lor Christmas, so all wc 
can do is wail, 

Ahhough Space Harrier is 
Ihe really big news, Flite has 
also announced a number of 
other releases which should 
ensure popularity in the 
run-up to Christmas and 
bevond. As well as the 



long awaited Scroohy Doo 
and Paperboy, Elite will be 
releasing three new CajKom 
games. Commando 86, Bomb 
Jack II and 1942. 
Commando 86 is a new, 
improved version of the 
original, with the added bonus 
of simultaneous two-playcr 
mode. Bomb Jack 11 is another 
update, with further 
adventures of our cute little 
hero. 1942 is an aerial 
shoot-'em-up, with excellent 
graphics. 

lb finish the round-up of 
new Elite products is Ikari 
Warriors, its first licensing 
deal with a new arcade 
company, SNK Cor|K)ration. 
Similar in some respects to 
Commando, it features 
two-player mode, and should 
be available in November. 



YOUR COMPUTER. OCTOBER 1986 19 



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20 YOUR COMPUTER. OCTOBER 1986 




SOFTWARE NEWS 



Karate hits the Amstrad 



However many fighting 
games there have been* it 
seems that more are just 
round the comer. As 
Melbourne House talks about 
Fist Hand Endurance releases 
International Karate for the 
Amstrad. Martech has 
decided to launch UchiMata, 
a judo game based on the 
experience of Brian Jacks 



who, when not competing in 
Superstars, was apparently a 
judo player. 

To be released 
simultaneously on the 64, 
Spectrum. Amstrad and MSX, 
it promises to contain 
everything Rock and Wrestle 
did not - and some more. As 
you can see from the 
screenshot, a great deal of 



Martech con 



HI I 




miaiiiii(iii(ui!iii|(umu(uiiiHmu{n 




Ask any knowledgeable 
Commodore 64 games player 
what was the best karate 
game and he would probably 
say it was International Karate 
by System 3, Unfortunately, 
System 3 never released a 
version for the Amstrad, 
finding it much easier to 
license the name to a new 
company, Endurance Games. 

After a surprisingly short 
wait. Endurance has released 
a version of the game and it 
should keep many budding 
Bruce Lees happy forever. 



Although the graphics are not 
so colourful as the 
CJommodore version, nor is 
the music so good, it is still a 
very playable game and 
consequently should keep 
dedicated Amstrad gamers 
happy for many hours. 

there are six 
backgrounds, including 
London and the Pyramids and 
with more than 15 moves, all 
superbly animated, even The 
Way Of The Exploding F/sf by 
Melbourne House looks a little 
dated beside it. 



The Great Escape 



As well as such smashes as 
Miami Wee and Parallax, both 
reviewed in this issue» Ocean 
has secured three new 
licensing deals to release 
during the run-up to 
Christmas. 

The only problem with 
licences now is that they are 
tending to become a little 
diverse and some companies 
are licensing almost anything, 
only to produce a game with 
little if any similarities to the 



licensed product. 

One new and exciting 
licence for Ocean is The Great 
Escape, Using the storyline of 
the film, there is vast potential 
for both an arcade and an 
adventure. 

Another family favourite^ It's 
A Knockout, is also to be 
turned into a game, courtesy 
of Ocean, but hopefully the 
game will not contain the 
nauseating commentary of 
Stuart Hall. 



care has been taken over the 
graphics, which are as realistic 
as possible. 

Attention to detail is 
obvious, as Martech took 
extensive videos of judo 
players to make sure each 
move was reflected 
accurately. Programmed by 
two ex-Taskset programmers, 
it should be available very 
soon. 

As well as Uchi Mata, 
Martech has a range of 
exciting products leading up 
to Christmas, which should 
establish it as one of the 
premier U.K, software 
houses. The first title after 
Uchi Mata will be Nimitz, 
Based on life atx»ard the 
U.S.S. Nimitz, an aircraft 
carrier, it will allow the player 
to control anything aboard, 
including the ability to fly any 
of a number of aircraft stored 




on deck. Much more than a 
simulator, it should be ready 
in the not-too-distant future. 

After Nimitz will be Catch 
23, a completely three- 
dimensional adventure which 
will use line-drawing 
techniques to view every area 
you visit. On a lighter note. 
Martech will be releasing 
Cosmic Shock Absort>ers, a 
spoof on the whole shoot- 
*em-up syndrome, placing 
you as a fourth division 
superhero who has to shoot 
carrots to survive. 

Finally, and in a surprise 
licensing deal, Martech has 
announced that for Christmas 
it has the rights to Tarzan. No 
details of the game are 
available. 



8-bit Atari - 
Alive and Iciclcing 




Far from being dead, the 8-bit 
Atari range is alive and 
kicking, with new software 
appearing every day. CRLhas 
announced the imminent 
launch of Sunstar, a new 
space travel game which 
looks to follow where Elite left 
off. 

As well as CRL» there is Red 
Rat Software^ a new house 
started by two memt>ers of 
the Atari Worid team. They are 
dedicated to producing 
high-quality software for 8-brt 
Ataris and eventually for the 
ST. One of the first titles. 
Screaming Wings, has just 
been released. 

Although most of the 
products are games. Red Rat 
has also produced an art 
package which allows the 
user to draw with all 256 
colours simultaneously, 
something other packages 
had failed to achieve. 
Interested parties should 
contact Red Rat on 061 834 
4941. 



YOUR COMPUTER. OCTOBER 1986 21 




I enclose a cheque/PO for C ^^'^ l^^'^easlf) ^^^^^ ^""^ multiface One £39.95 D multifaCE two 

^ , aqq ^.1 overseas t^;^ SELENE & AN ACHROKISM £ 9,95 D STEEPLEJACK 

or debit my W^ ^S No 



Name,,... , ,,,.... Card expiry 

Address,, , , trans EXPfiESS carthdgon 



NEVERMIND... Amstrad £ 
MUSiC TYPEWRITER £ 

WRIGGLER Amstrad tape £ 



£46,95 D 

£ 4.95 D 

9,95 D or disk version £ 14.95 D 

7.95 D WRIGGLER Spectrum £ 2.95 D 

7.95 D or disk version £ 11.95 D 

diskP waferp £9.95 ca 



■•HAi^Tir ■•3«T ^C Lvd 



77 Dyne Road London NW6 7DR 



24hrs 



01-625 9463 [XH 



MICRO MAIL 



53 FENNEL STREET 
MANCHESTER M4 3DU 
TEL: 061 834 5780 



COMMODORE 



COMMODORE 





RRP 


OUR PRICE 




RRP 


OUR PRICE 


Music Syfttems 






Commodore 64 


£199.95 


£185.00 


(includes Commodore 64) 


£329.99 


£309.99 


Commodore 128 


£269.95 


C250.00 


Cunrah Speech 


£21.95 


£19.95 


Commodore 1 28 D 


£499.00 


£470.00 


1 570 Dfsc Drive 


£199.99 


£179.99 


Commodore 1 28 D & Monitor 
Music Expansion 
1541 Disc DHve 


£631.00 
£150.00 
£159.95 


£545.00 
£140.00 
£149.95 


SOFTWARE ON DISC ■ 




£12.95 




1571 Disc Drive 
Modem 


£299.95 

£79.95 


£279.95 
£69.95 


lexipro *- WOfoprdciftssar — 




Datapro- Database - 


£12.^ 




Mouse 


£69.95 


£59.95 


Zorfcl 


£1139 




Light Pen 


£29.95 


£24.95 


Zorkll 


£11. OS 




Sketch Pad 


£49.95 


£44.95 


Zorkill 


£11. d5 




Speech Synthesiser 


£24.95 


£21.95 


HHch Hikers Gulda 


£24.95 




Blank Discs- Sony SS BoxotIO 


£12.95 


£10.95 


Gemini- Home Accounts 


£24.95 




OS Box of 10 


£16.95 


£12.95 


Database 


£24.95 
^4*95 
£24.95 
£S4.95 










Casbbook 
VAT File 


GENERAL 


Final Account 




RRP 


OUR PRICE 


Supert>a8e-128 
Superscript 


£99.95 

£79.95 




Cheetah 1 25 Joystick 
Pro 5000 Joystick 


£8.95 
£18.95 


£7.95 
£16.50 


If the title you want is not tisted aN 


you have to do is send your cheouc 


Comd rum Tape or Disc 


£29.95 


C2(S*95 


or P.O. for the retail price less our 1 0% Discount and state whether 


Sound Sampler - Commodora 


£49.95 


£44.95 


disc or cassette. 






Data Recorders forall 












Commodores 


£39.95 


£^3.95 











ALL Disc AND CASSETTE TTTLES 

10% OFF. 

JUST TBLL US ^AT YOU WAHTl 



Post and Packing: FUBE, ALL Computers ADD £6 for value U^K>ER£250 
All payments ct>eque or P.O. to: I. M, PRIESTLEY 

SHOWROOM NOW OPEN 



22 YOUR COMPUTER, OCTOBER 1986 



COMMUNICATIONS NEWS 




New York, New York 
on BT Gold 



The Database Publicaiion 
MicroUnk service on Telecom 
Gold has aanounccd thai its 
subscribers now have the 
option of linking with a New 
York database, Mnemaliot, 
which, besides offering a direct 
hnk to American users on 
various chatHncs and bulletin 
boards, also opens an 
electronic mail link lo other 
U.S. databases* including The 
Source and CompuServe. 
The advantage of the 



Microlink/Mnematics is that 
individual users do not need 
their own fairly cosily 
International PSS accounts but 
the cost is still 25 pence per 
minute on top of normal 
Microlink charges » or £15 an 
hour for heavy users. 

Micronet on Prestel has also 
announced the intention lo 
offer a similar link with 
Mnematics in the near future. 
Tlic Micronet version of the 
gateway link will use the 



special scrolling text to the 
Prestel viewdata conversion 
sytstem which last month we 
revealed would be ihc visual 
interface iKtwecn Micronet 
and its gateway to the Shades 
MUD game. 

Tlic Mieronet/Mncmatics 
link is expected to cost roughly 
the same as the Microlink 
service, though on-line time 
charges at the U.K. end should 
be cheaper depending on v^ hen 
the system is used. 



The 102 - a dandy Tandy 



The much-loved Tandy i()0 
lap- top portable computer is 
officially dead but long live its 
replacement. The 1(K) was 
probably the most favourite 
portable comms terminal, 
though an external modem 
was always needed to go 
on-line. Now. with the new 
£299 Tandy Model 102, there 
is no need to carr>' around 



extra pieces of equipment as a 
V21 3(Kl-baud auto-dial 
modem is built-in. 

At £299, the 102 is no more 
expensive than its predecessor 
and so represents improved 
value. Down to slightly less 
ihan 41b., the portable is also 
slimmer but retains the 
familiar 40-column, eight-line 
LCD screen display. Also as 



before, the built-in ulility 
software, scheduler, dvdry and 
Basic remain. 

ITie 24K RAM machine, 
which can be upgraded, is 
largely as of old but more 
compact, even with its built-in 
modem. BABT approval 
apparently looks unlikely in 
the foreseeable future. 



Prestel for radio hams 



The independent area on 
Prestel set aside for computer 
club activities, Clubspoi 810, 
recently became a new home 
for the Radio Society of Great 
Britain, RSGB members arc 
taking advantage of Prestel 
facilities lo keep in touch via 



Drinking 

taiicfroni 

Tandata 

What has eomms to do with the 
pub? Tandata. between hard 
selling into the educational 
market, has broken into the 
brewery market successfully. 
It is not a Tandata effort at 
brewing real ale but apparently 
it has won a contract to supply 
1,600 Tdl616GT terminals to 
Whitbread for use in its 
network of public houses. 

Next time you local docs not 
have your favourite brew, the 
landlord will have no excuses. 



mailbox, and their own area on 
Clubspot pages w ill act as a 
central information service for 
meml>ers, which it is hoped 
will reduce the RSGB's large 
amounts of paperwork and 
mailing costs. 

RSGB members do not just 
talk to each other on air- they 
exchange computer data - 
programs and text - over the 



airways. The dedicated radio 
ham of the 1980s, it would 
seem, would not be without a 
micro to keep tabs on the 
rather complicated equipment 
used. RSGB members on-line 
will also have access to the 
Micronet database, as do all 
other Clubspot members. 

RGB on Clubspot can be 
found on Prestel page 81070. 



Modems for all 



Commodore 64/12H owners 
can claim a free modem if they 
subscribe to the Compunct 
database* a C'ommotlore- 
specific database service. 
Prospective subscribers must 
take a year's subscriptiuon - 
£15 per quarter- to qualify for 
a free modern, the only other 
cost being O.50 postage and 
packaging. 

It follows in the footsteps of 
Micronet, which launched its 
free modem offer for mainly 



BBC and Spectrum owners - 
other makes of micro, 
including the M, may require 
an extra interface to 
accompany the give-away 
modem. 

Comms watchers may 
remember that when 
Compunet started about two 
years ago, a year*s subscription 
was given away when a modem 
was bought. This time the 
marketing strategists appear to 
be opcraling in reverse. 




The Psion Ori^aniscr. 

Poclcet 



cations 

Psion Software, maker of the 
Psion Organiser IT pocket 
computer, claims that 20 
percent of its sales arc for 
comms-oricntatcd 
applications. Launched earlier 
this year. Organiser II sales 
have now passed lhe£l million 
barrier svith one in five being 
sold complete with ihc 
optional RS232 comms 
interface. 

When we first provided 
news of the Organiser II we 
mused that there was no 
modem small enough to match 
the natty lillle pocket 
computer but with last month's 
news of the Miracle Systems 
cigarette packet-sized modem, 
perhaps Psion and MS should 
get together. 



Scliool 
discounts 

Wooing schools and colleges 
which have not taken 
advantage of the recent 
Government-subsidised 
Modems for Schools scheme, 
Tandata is offering several of 
its products at special 
educational discounts. 

Almost halved in price, the 
TM512TP modem, as offered 
in the MPS scheme and used 
by the Times Network for 
Schools, is being i)ffcrcd for 
£135 instead of the normal 
£255. 

The Hayes-compatible 
version, the TM512, normally 
£255. is down to £150, Several 
pricier Tandata modems, 
along with software packs, arc 
also on special educational 
discount. 



YOUR COMPliTER. OCTOBER 1986 23 




TECHNOLOGY mODEM 



V2123 



Within 
>four 

Reach 



£1 49.95 • for a Hayes compatible, autodial, 
autoanswer with speed seeking smart modem from 
one of the UKs best-known modem manufacturers 
— that really brings the world of data 
communications within your reach! 
If that wasn't enough, the new WS4000 is also fully 
intelligent and speed buffered. And you can add your 

choice of optional extras now or 
later, taking it right up to full V22 
or even the 2400 bps V22 bis 
standard. 

For only £149.95' you can reach 
out to Prestel. Telecom Gold. 
Micronet. Microlink and the 
world's databases, bulletin boards 
and telex links through your own 
telephone line. User-user file 
transfer too. 

WS4000 is made to the same high 
quality as ail our products. The 
price breakthrough is a direct 
result of our massive component 
buying power through high 
volume sales to business, home, 
educational and Government 
users throughout the world. 

If £149.95* is within your reach 
— then so is the world. 



APPROVED 

lor connoclon to 

teieoommuniciuioft 

■n in« Mistrucwifts 
ror gs« »ub|«CI to 
. 1h« ccxMiont M« ^ 
out intti«fn 




• Price excludes VAT. Total delivered price. UK 
mainland, is £t 78.19. Prestel. Telecom Cold. 
Micronet and Microlink are registered trade marks 
of those companies. Access & Visa cards accepted 



IVIIRACIE TECHNOLOGY 

MIRACLE TECHNOLOGY (UK) LTD ST PETERS STREET IPSWICH IPI 1XB ENGLAND 
r (0473) 216141 6 LINES TELECOM GOLD 79: KEY 001 (Dealerlink 72: DTB 10135) 
l?'2 946240 CWEASY G 19002985 PRESTEL MAILBOX 919992265 



I. 




PRODUCT NEWS 




The Thing - 
AVDU 
operator's 
best friend 



Incredible bul true is the 
phrase which springs to mind 
when you talk afx)ut ihe 
Thingi. The claims made aboui 
this pioneering peripheral arc 
nothing short of extraordinary 
- virluaHy indcstniciihic, the 
greatest advance in office 
efficiency since the paperclip, 
and improved typing speeds. 
lt> name a few. 

The Thingi. produced by 
Overbase Ltd, WirraK is a 
twisted plastic strips complete 
with a copy clip, which can be 
attached lo the side of a 
computer monitor and used lo 
support securely anything 
from a single sheet lo a 
complete magazine for a bulky 
document. Although the main 
supporting strip is available 
only in white, a range of 
colours ts available for the 
copy clip. 

Using the Thingi will 
increase the space on your 
desk while you type-in listings 
and is ideal for supporting 
maps or instructions while 
playing games. It fastens 
securely to the monitor by 
means of a Vclcro strip and 
holds the copy in the optimum 
position to avoid eyestrain or 
neck -ache. It is also available 
in left- or right-hand versions. 



It is often said that the best 
ideas are the simplest and that 
is certainly true of the Thingi. 
Since its launch in March, 
demand has been great and the 
company claims that total sales 
are fast approaching the 
50,000 mark, h would seem 
thai few people can really be 
happy without a Thingi. 



MastertroniG 
move into 
hardware wtth 
the Magnum 
Joysticic 



The phrase "Termor rcnv's 
technology today" is over-used 
but it is valid when used to 
describe the Magnum 



joystick, the first piece of 
computer hardware from the 
budget software giant 
Mastertronic. 

The design is in no way 
conventional and the control 
mechanism is based on the 
latest electronic microswitch 
technology to combine 
sensitivity with a fast response 
time. 

Tlic ergonomic styling, 
combined with the latest 
moulding techniques, have 
prompted the nianufaclurcr to 
claim that hours of fatigue- free 
use arc ensured with the 
product. Suitable for left- or 
right-handed users, the main 
handgrip features a non-slip, 
short-travel thumb trigger and 
a platform in front of it 
supports the control stick . The 
Magnum is supplied with an 
extra long 5 ft. cable and is 
fully-compaliblc with most 
popular home comj)uicrs. 

Costing £12.50. it is a linle 
more expensive than other 
joysticks offering similar 
facilities. Its unconventional 
appearance may deter a few 
prospective buyers bul those 
who dare to break with 
tradition will find that 
tomorrow^ technology is 
worth wailing for. 



Gotosclioolat 
home 



School Software Ltd is an 
Irish company which has 
recently released a range of 
educational software for 
Amstrad, BBC and 




Commodore computers. 
Several programs arc available 
designed to give a gentle 
int roducticm to a subject or lo 
help a student prepare for 
examinations, 

Mapwork, for example, is a 
geography tuition program for 
12- 17-year-olds. It displays 
certain areas of Great Britain 
and Ireland and asks the user 
to identify them. Tlie graphics 
arc superb and the program is 
very challenging yet enjoyable . 

The Physics tuition 
program, aimed at the 12-to-16 
age group, produces a 
colourful way of revising for 
the O level standard 
examination. Oucstions on all 
subjects in the curriculum are 
available and a running score 
is displayed on the screen so 
that you can see how you are 
faring. 

If you should give an 
incorrect answer you are given 
a small clue, such as the first 
letter ofthe correct answer. If 
you arc incorrect a second 
time, the correct answer is 
given. With all the programs in 
the range, the manufacturer 
states that the answers used 
are not the only possible 
responses - they arc merely 
the best or most commonly- 
used. 

Overall there are 1 1 
programs available from 
School Software for all ages 
from three to adult - a good 
excuse to play with your 
computer and have fun while 
revising for your examinations. 

All the programs are 
available on cassette or disc 
fronu SchcK)l Software Ltd. 
Meadowvale Estate. Raheen, 
Limerick, Republic of Ireland. 
Tel: 353 61 27994. 



Two 

computers are 
better than one 



One of the latest trends in 
the computer market is the 
Unking of two computers for 
multiple-player games. In 
keeping with the fashion. 
Dinosaur Software has 
developed Musk-lmk. It 
consists of a control program. 



YOUR COMPUTER, OCTOBER 1 986 25 



available on disc or casscUe, 
and a cable allowing two BBC 
micros to be conncclcd via 
their RS425 pons. Using it 
doubles the number of sound 
channels available to budding 
BBC musicians, allowing them 
to utilise up to eight voices and 
then hear them all played back 
at once via the two machines. 

Pulses sent through the 
connecting cable ensure that 
the two computers are always 
synchronised and never out of 
step, regardless of any 
differences between their 
interval clocks. 

The controlling program is 
also sent down the RS423 link, 
meaning that only one of the 
machines needs to load the 
program. Music-link is 
designed as a utility for the 
Dinosaur Software Musicpen 
processor which can be used 
on one of the computers to 
create and edit music files for 
playback. 

Music-link costs £9. A 
ready-made connecting cable 
is available for an additional 
£3.50, although the instruction 
booklet includes details of how 
to save money by making your 
own. The Musicpen chip costs 
£28.75 and both arc available 
direct from the manufacturer. 
Dinosaur Software, 41 
Cheney Way, -Chesterton, 
Cambridge CB4 lUE. 
Tel: 0223 322244. 



The Opus 
Challenger 3 - 
A wolf in rams 
clothing 



Even though the boffins at 
Opus ha- e been kept busy 
producing the PCI I machine, a 
low-cost PC compatible, some 
have managed to find the time 
to prtxlucc Challenger 3, the 
latest addition to the 
company^s many add-on disc 
drives for the BBC machine. 

Challenger 3 is a double- 
sided, 40/80-1 rack disc drive 
with an integral solid state 
RAM disc capable of 
performing several times 
faster than a conventional 
drive . Challenger 3 gives up to 
1 .2 MB of usable capacity. The 
system provides the perfect 



answer to the problems of 
processing long documents 
when using the BBC as a word 
processor. 

Normally, the disc would 
have to be accessed at various 
intervals, a time-consuming 
process but, using Challenger 
3. up to 5 1 2K can be stored in 
the RAM disc of the drive, 
allowing you to edit that much 
faster before saving the 
finished product to disc. Even 
when that is done, a back-up 
is still maintained on the 
machine RAM. Costing £250, 
Challenger 3 can give nil the 
benefits of a two-disc-drive 
machine for considerably less 
than the normal expenditure. 



The joystick 
Joyce - more 
than a games 
machine for 
less than most 
typewriters 



When it was launched, the 
Amstrad PCW computer was 
billed as more than a word 



processor for less than 
the price of most typewriters. 
It is only now, more than a 
year later, that software 
companies arc beginning to 
realise how much more than a 
word processor the machine 
is. Several games have been 
converted to the PCW and 
many more arc expected in the 
near future. All those 
available are keyboard- 
controlled but that minor 
limitation may soon be a thing 
of the past. 

Kempston Micro Electronics 
Ltd is stx)n to release a joystick 
and interface for the PCW 
range. The interface plugs on 
to the expansion port at the 
back of the machine and 
incorporates a standard 9-pin 
connector, allowing almost a 
standard joystick to be used. 

The interface alone costs 
£14.95 inc, VAT and a 
package which includes a 
high-quality, arcade-style 
joystick is also available for 
£29.95, 

Batman and Fairli^ht are 
two of the games being 
rc-programmcd for joystick 
control but many more arc 
expected to follow as the full 
potential fo the PCW machine 
is recognised. 



Applying 
technology for 
a sporting 
chance in the 
PC marlcet 



The long-awaited Amstrad PC 
was launched finally at the 
PCW Show and the company 
is now expected to lake the 
major share of the low-cosl PC 
market. That, however, has 
not prevented many other 
companies making incxpcnsiv^c 
clones in an attempt to share 
in the expected Amstrad 
success. 

Applied Microsystems 
Technology Ltd is one such 
company. At the PCW Show 
in the shadow of the Amstrad 
stand, it launched the PC 
Sport, a low-cost, truly 
portable PC clone. Although 
the appearance is deceptive, 
looking very much like a 
standard home computer, it is 
a fully compatible machine 
built to a high specification, 

Tlie standard features 
include 256K memorv. 




2e YOUR COMPUTER, OCTOBER 1986 



PRODUCT NEWS 



expandable lo 640K on (he 
motherboard; an integral 
360K floppy disc drive with an 
internal controller for a second 
already built-in; a graphics 
card, serial and parallel 
interface are all supplied as 
standard, making the PC Sport 
a very versatile machine. 

A carrying handle at the 
rear of the main unit makes 
moving the machine far easier 
than some of the other claimed 
portables on the market. An 
optional modulator ctiminares 
the need to carry around a 
monitor as the machine can be 
plugged into any television set. 

With all PC clones, a major 
consideration is the cost of 
upgrading. With the PC Sport, 
it is surprisingly cheap; the 
standard configuration is £399, 
while the machine with a 
monitor, second drive and 
640K costs £665. 



From 

Cambridge - 
A soluGon to 
the problems 
of connection 



Cambridge-based Tyepro Ltd 
offers an unusual service which 
will be music to the ears of 
many a frustrated computer 
owner. The company 
specialises in solving the 
connection problems which 
can arise between different 
types and combinations of 
printers and computers. Ian 
Tyes, the technical director, 
says: 

"People are often annoyed 
to find that their newly bought 
printer will not connect to an 
existing computer or that 
combinations of computers 
and printers cannot be linked. 
We will try lo solve any 
connection problem a 
customer brings to us. To 
improve the point, he has a 
telephone hot-line service to 
answer connection difficulties. 

Tyepro will customise its 
standard products to suit a 
particular need, even for single 
item orders. Cables of virtually 





any length can be provided and 
designed lo connect almost 
any eomhtnation of machines. 
A converter will solve the 
seriai-to-parallcl problem and 
a data switch allows more than 
one printer to be attached to a 
computer and vice versa, all 
supplied complete with output 
cables where applicable. 
Tyepro also makes a converter 
and data switch combined 



which will allow mixing and 
matching. 

For further details, contact 
Tyepro Ltd at 30 Campkin 
Road, Cambridge CB4 2NG. 
The hot-tine number is 0223 
322394. 



Oopsli 



The guide to modem suppliers 



in the August issue of Your 
Computer contained an error. 
The company names as Jansz 
Computer Communications 
will be launched in the near 
future under the name RCF<. 
It will be distributing a wide 
range of modems for most 
home and business computers. 
The company address will be 
471a Hornsey Road, London 
NI9 30L. Tel: 01 281 4777. 



YOUR COMPUTER. OCTOBER 1986 27 




he CommtHiorc 64/128 is 
becoming a noisy bcasi. 
In the List two years 
more than a score of 
software and hardware 
offerings have emerged, all 
designed lo give ihe micro a 
musical voice. At the most 
basic level there are programs 
which coax the SID chip to sing 
but the aurally more 
impressive packages hook 
pieces of hardware on to the 
Ct>mmodorc lo set it free of 
SID limitations. 

So , via a Midi interface . the 
64/128 can be used to control 
external musical synthesisers, 
while plugging- in the 
Commodore Sound Expander 
effectively converts it into a 
synthesiser. Perhaps most fun 
arc the packages which turn 
the Commodore into a digital 
sound recorder, using its 
memory to store sounds. They 
arc in two varieties -samplers, 
which both store and play back 
sounds; and drum machines, 
which use simpler circuitry to 
rc-crcatc prc-rccordcd 
percussive noises. 

Date! Electronics has two 
packages which offer both 
those possibilities and permit 
some swapping between the 
rotes of sampler and drum 
machine. 

Datcl produced one of the 
first samplers for a home micro 
- the Spcctnim -several years 
ago. It was rather crude, both 
in hardware and software 
terms, and has since been 
upgraded. 

Sophisticated 

The Commodore sampler is 
a far more sophisticated 
system than the original 
Spectrum device. The 
hardware is contained in a 
package, half the size of a 
paperback book, which 
snuggles into the micro user 
port. Sounds are fed into it 
cither via a microphone - 
supplied with the sampler- or 
by plugging-in a lead from a 
musical instrument or hi-fi. 
ITic sampled sounds are 
played back later either via a 
television loudspeaker or, 
much more impressively, 
through a hi-fi system. 

So, once you have plugged- 
in everything, what can you do 
with the sampler? A main 



menu presents you with eight 
options and some of them 
produce sub-menus. The 
simplest option is to record a 
sound. If you choose that, the 
screen goes blank, waiting for 
you lo provide a sound via the 
microphone or line input. 
When it senses a strong 
enough input, it starts to 
record, stopping when it runs 
out of memory a few seconds 
later. Press option 2 -playback 
- and your solid-slate 
recording blasts back at you. 
You can alter the sampling 
rate, called confusingly the 
loop rate, to give you short, 
high-quality recordings or 
longer, lower-quality versions. 
An interesting option allows 
you to store two sounds 



simultaneously by recording 
one on top of another. You can 
use that to create a two-note 
chord. 

Another option, the 
sequencer, turns the 
QWERTY keyboard into a 



piano- type keyboard on which 
you can play tunes with your 
sample. Keys in the top two 
rows of the keyboard form one 
octave while keys in the 
bottom rows form a lower 
octave. As you play, the tunc 



Tony Sacks reports on two 

new products from Datel 

Electronics. If you want to 

sound like a Daiek, echo your 

voice or produce realistic 

drum sounds on a 
Commodore - read on. 



A sophisticate 




28 YOUR COMPUTER. OCTOBER 1986 



is stored in the micro memory, 
along with the sample, and 
subsequently can be played 
back as if it had been 
taped-recorded. If you are 
particularly pleased with your 
effort, you can dump it on to 
tape or disc. 

This sub-menu also allows 
you to tinker with the sampled 
sound. The sample memory is 
divided arbitrarily into eight 
blocks which can be swapped 
around to provide curious 
variations on the original 
sound. You can also choose to 
chop blocks from cither the 
end of the sample to eliminate 
unwanted noises or blank 
sections. 

This sample editing 
procedure is more crude than 



that offered by other samplers 
such as the Commodore 
system or the considerably 
more expensive Supcrsoft 
Microvox sampler. The 
packages produce 
oscilloscope'likc displays of 
the whole sample, making the 
editing process far easier and 
more precise. Datcl is, 
however, planning to release 
improved software which 
would offer that type of editing 
function. 

Another option, live effects, 
little imagination - a good 
deal, in fact - you can persuade 
prtxlucc a choice of 
reverberation, echoes, or a 
gimmicky Daiek voice. By 
twiddling a knob on the back 
of the sampler module, you 



can affect the depth of the 
reverberation or the echo* 
Both affect the depth of the 
reverberation or the echo. 
Both effects seem to work 
better with the microphone 
than with Hne inputs. With a 
little imagination - a good deal, 
in fact - you can persuade 
yourself you arc in a vast 
echoing cavern or centre-stage 

?in the Roval Albert Hall. 

\ The drum machine, called 
"O^mDrum, looks similar to 
^e sampler. It does not have 
the microphone or line sockets 
but provides a trigger out 
socket for synchronising with 
external instruments. 

As with other micro-based 
drum machines on the market 
- the Cheetah SpccDrum and 



i 



sound sampler 




Amdrum and the Tron 
Dtgidrum - the ComDrum 
holds a kit of eight percussive 
sounds simultaneously in the 
micro memory. They arc read 
out of mcmor>' by the 
controlling software at 
suitably-staggered intervals to 
give the impression of a drum 
kit being played. 

The ComDrum is supplied 
with three kits of eight sounds 
but some instruments appear 
in more than one kit. A little 
more variety would have been 
welcome. The short, middle* 
frequency sounds such as 
tom-toms, claps and cowbells 
are most successful. The 
longer and extreme frequency 
sounds, such as the bass drums 
and cymbals, arc less 
convincing. 

One option is to use 
QWERTY keys I to 8 to play 
the sounds live. Alternatively, 
those keys can be used to 
record a pattern of up to 32 
beats in 4/4 time or 24 beats in 
3/4 lime - unfortunately the 
only two time signatures 
offered. The recording can he 
cither in real-time « guided by 
an irritating metronome pulse 
- or step time, in which case 
llie instruments are placed on 
a time-vcrsus-instrument grid 



using the cursor controls. The 
results of both types of 
recording can be edited 
subsequently to move, remove 
or add instruments. 

Up to eight patterns can be 
held simultaneously and strung 
together in any order to form 
a song. The completed song 
can be saved to tape or disc. 

At present the instruments 
in the ComDrum kits cannot 
be swapped around but Date! 
is planning to issue an editor 
package which will allow 
sounds to be mixed and 
matched to create tailor-made 
drum kits. This £5.99 package 
will include 16 more 
instruments. 

Another add-on will be a 
£24.99 Midi interface to plug 
into the 64 cartridge port, h 
will link the sampler and 
ComDrum packages to other 
electronic instruments. It is 
particuarly good news for 
owners of the Firebird 
Advanced Music System 
which supports Midi but, until 
now, has worked only with 
intcrfaccscosting around £100. 

So to prices. The Datel 
sampler package costs £44.99, 
while the ComDrum retails at 
£29.99. The ComDrum 
software will run on the 
sampler hardware, not vice 
versa, so Datel is also 
supplying the drum software 
separately for £9.99. 

Rivals 

Although the packages offer 
good value they face stiff 
competition. On the sampler 
front there is the C*omm<xtore 
system which will soon be 
joined by a low-cost package 
from Supcrsoft - a slimmed- 
down version of its 
professional Microvox 
sampler. Supcrsoft is also 
offering a rival for the 
ComDrum with its £39.95 
Rhythm King, while the 
well-established Dutch 
product, the Tron Digidrum, 
available in Britain from 
Syndromic Music, has 
already reached a Mark III 
version and is backed by 
dozens of high-quality sounds. 

Each of the packages has its 
strengths and weaknesses. 
If possible, you should try to 
use and listen to each of the 
rivals before choosing. 



YOUR COMPUTER. OCTOBER 1986 ^9 



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THE VOLEX TELETEXT-TELESOFTWARE ADAPTOR 



FOR USE WITH SPECTRUM, PBC & AMSTRAD MODELS 

FflEE COMPUTEfl PROGRAMS INSTANT SPORTS RESULTS CONSTANT l.V. UPDATE 
A WORLD OF INFORMATION AT YOUR FINGERS 



TEETEXT 

Extra information available day Of night whilst television transmitters are on air and 

without any charge can now be enjoyed without the need of having a special 

Teletext TV. set. All you need is to plug in your VOLEX ADAPTOR to receive 4-Tel 

from Channel 4. CEEFAX or ORACLE services. 

TELESOFTWRE 

Telesoftware is the name for computer programs which are broadcast on Teletext. 

Thus they may be loaded OFF AIR into the appropriate niicro computef instead of 

being loaded from say TAPE or DISC, Both Channel 4 and BBC are broadcasting 

Tel^oftware. however there are the following limitations:- 

(a). Spectrum Adaptor:- All Tetetext Channels but Channel 4 Telesoftware only. 

(b). BBC Adaptor:* All T^lext Channels but BBC Telesoftware only. 

(c). Amstrad Adaptor:- All Tetetext Channels. Channel 4 Telesoftware programs 

and BBC Telesoftware data files including the Education Newsletter. 

*Channel 4 is cur r evilly expanding its Tetesoftware programs particularly 

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Because of the special nature of Teletext these proyams are frequently 

updated-So you will not see the same thing each time you run the program. 

STORING RAGES 

With the Voiex Adaptor it is possible to send received pages to your printer or to 

disc or cassette for storage and later recov^. 

E*SY TO SET UP AND USE 

A simple procedure tunes the Volex Adaptor to your local tdetext ch^neb. 

All loading of Telesoftware is via an index page wt\ich the Adaptor will 

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30 YOUR COMPUTCR. OCTOBER 1966 








he Amslrad Clan of 
conipulcrs has been 
ignored by producers of 
musicul add-ons and 
software. While music-making 
packages have flourished for 
the Commodore 64/ 128, the 
BBC and even the Spectrum. 
Ainstrad machines have had to 
wail mutely on the sidehncs. 

The lack of attention is 
difficult to understand. In 
many ways the Amstrad is the 
perfect music-making micro, 
especially for the conipulcr- 
ilhteratc musician for whom 
the low-cost, ptug*it-in-and- 
run design is ideal. 

Now, at last, there arc signs 
that some software and 
hardware producers are 
realising it. In the last few 
nioiiths a clutch of packages 
designed to make the Amslrad 
sing and dance has arrived. As 
with much Amstrad software, 
the packages are mainly 
hand-me-downs, converted 
from versions of other 
machines, but they arc 
nonetheless welcome. 

New standards 

Rainbird, for example, has 
converted The Music System, 
the package which set new 
standards for music-making on 
the BBC and Commodore 
machines. T^S puts the 
Amslrad buitt-in sound chip 
through its musical paces* Two 
other new arrivals are 
designed lo link the computer 
through Midi, the mu?iical 
instrument digital interface, to 
external electronic music 
instruments such as 
synthesisers and drum 
machines. 

The first of those packages 
is another conversion from 
Midi speeiahsl EMR while the 
second is a Midi hardware and 
software package purpose- 
designed for the Amstrad by 
Dl ICP Electronics, We plan to 
look more closely at this 
package, which will offer 
several software option*;, in a 
later issue. 

The Midi packages will 
allow you to link your 
computer to a variety of 
electronic rhythm machines. 
Those dedicated drum 
machines can produce 
siartlingly life-like replications 
of drum sounds but, although 



Boom Boom 

on the 

Amstrad 

Can the Amdrum be beaten? Tony Sacks finds out 



prices have fallen dramatically 
in recent years, you must 
expect to pay at least £200 for 
the pleasure. 

There is now a far cheaper 
way to produce realistic 
rhythms with the Amstrad, the 
Cheetah Marketing £34.95 
Amdrum, It, too, is a 
conversion from the company's 
SpecDrum and if you have 
heard one of the 18.000 
SpecDrums in circulation, you 
will probably have ordered 
your Amdrum already. 

If you have not heard a 
SpecDrum, an exciting aural 
experience awaits you. Forget 
the wishy-washy noises usually 
generated by the Amstrad 
sound chip; the Amdrum 
produces real sounds. It turns 
the computer memory into a 
solid-state tape recorder 
capable of storing eight 
recordings of percussive 
sounds simultaneously. The 
sounds arc read out of memory 
at staggered intervals to 
produce stunningly realistic 
drum sounds, it is Ukc sitting 
in a room with a dnmimer. 

The Amdrum consists of a 
hardware interface which 
plugs into the computer 
expansion port with software 
on cassette. TIic interface 
converts the digitally-recorded 
sounds stored in the micro 
memory into analogue signals 
which arc then fed through an 
audio cable to a hi-fi amplitier. 
No sound is produced by the 
built-in computer speaker. 
That is a mixed blessing 
because, although the tiny 
Amstrad speaker would 
scarcely do justice to the 
A mdrumsoundsjt means that 



you must have an amplifier 
near your computer. 

The software consists of a 
main control program, a kit of 
digitally-encoded drum 
sounds, and a set of songs 
which demonstrate how the 
sounds can be combined to 
produce driving rhythms. A 
utility for booting the sounds 
to disc is also provided. 

The control software 
presents itself as four pages, 
one of which has three 
sub-pages. A menu-driven 
main page acts as the 
nerve centre from which all 
other operations start and to 
which they usually return. 
Among other actions, that 
page allows you to set tempos 
- in beats per minute - lo 
name, copy and delete songs, 
and to switch a syncro function 
on or off. 

Stays in time 

This useful device 
synchronises the Amdrum 
with a multi-track tape 
recorder connected via the 
tape socket. One track of the 
tape recorder is used to record 
pulses which govern the speed 
of the Amdrum so that it stays 
in lime with instruments or 
voices recorded on the other 
tracks. 

The Pattern page is where 
the percussive sounds are 
assembled into rhythmic 
patterns. The eight sounds in 
the kit with the Amdrum arc a 
bass and snare drum, a pair of 
tom-toms, a cowbell, an open 
and closed hi-hat (cymbal) and 
claps. They arc divided into 
three groups, from each of 
which only one sound can be 



played at a lime. That is not so 
much of a limitation as it 
appears at first. 

There are two ways of 
forming the si>un<ls into 
patterns. First, they can be 
entered on a timc-vcrsus- 
instrumcnt grid which defines 
when each sound is heard. 
That allows rhythms to be 
defined precisely. The 
alternative method is to tap 
out the rhythms on the 
computer keyboard, a more 
natural approach which will 
suit people with a good sense 
of rhythm but which is less 
precise than the grid 
technique. 

Any complexity 

Patterns are defined in 
two-bar lengths. To form a 
song, several patterns are 
strung together on the Edit 
Song page. I n any one song up 
to 64 patterns can be used . By 
varying the order in which they 
appear and the number of 
times they are repeated, songs 
of almost any complexity can 
be constructed. 

The fourth page, Load/Save, 
does just what you would 
expect. Songs can be stored 
and retrieved from disc or 
tape, individually or in groups. 
This page will also be used to 
load different kits of drum 
sounds when Cheetah makes 
them available. The company 
has already produced some 
interesting variants for the 
SpecDrum, including 
collections of Latin and 
electronic percussion sounds, 
and similar kits should soon be 
available for the Amdrum at 
£3.99 and £4.99 respectively. 

Cheetah is planning other 
musical offerings for the 
Amstrad machines, including 
a sampler which will allow you 
to digitise your own sounds, 
and a Midi interface and 
software. If the Amdrum had 
such an interface built-in » it 
would make it even more 
attractive, especially for 
serious musicians, but would 
probably add considerably to 
its cost. 

Even without a Midi port, 
the Amdrum should give hours 
of pleasure. It will impress 
your friends and probably 
annoy your neighbours * they 
will want one. too. 



YOUR COMPUTER, OCTOBER 1986 31 




^ 







w Msm^/^mMT ^? 




*^/^7//^ 



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subscribe to Yoar Crnnpulm' 



While the scenes at your local newsagent are 
unlikely to be so frantic as those depicted in our 
cartoon, it is a fact that copies of the latest issue 
of Your Computer disappear fast from the shelves. 
If you cannot go to the shops on our publication 
date, you could miss the mixture of news and 
practical features which make Your Computer one 
of the most popular home computer magazines. 
The only way to avoid possible disappointment 
is to take a subscription to the magazine. In that 
way a copy will drop on to your doormat each and 
every month. Copies are sent direct by our printer 



so by subscribing you should receive the magazine 
even before it reaches newsagents. 

A subscription also makes an ideal present for 
a friend or relative. If you know someone who 
takes computing seriously, why not make them a 
present of a subscription? 

To subscribe to Your Computer, complete the 
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32 YOUR COMPUTER. OCTOBER 1986 



APPUCATIONS 




More from your printer 



Many people fail to fully utilise the peripherals they 
purchase. In this, the first part of a new series, 

we show you how. 



mM !> computer uscr^ begin 

^TB to aspire towards 

^P^H upgracltng fheir systems, 

m " it soon becomes appa- 

^rcnt that a printer is one of, if 

not the most important, asset. 

In tlie last five years, <ioi matrix 

printers have bea>me the most 

popular for a variety of 

reasons. Priced as they are at 

anything from £100 upwards. 

they offer flexibility of print 

styles, speed and graphics. 

Even so. only a very small 
percentage of dot matrix 
printer owners even go close to 
using all the facilities offered. 
Without doubt, the main 
reason is the incomprehcnsibiU 
ity of most manuals provided 
with printers. Generally, as 
well as being badly written, the 
examples arc only in Microsoft 
Basic which, although accepted 
as a standard* is not used by 
any of the four top-selling com- 
puters in the U.K. - the 
Spectrum, BBC, Amstrad and 
Commodore (>4. 

Epson 

Experienced users of dot 
matrix printers will be familiar 
with the one word which lets 
the user dictate the actions of 
the primer - control codes. 
With the exception of dedi- 
cated printers, those designed 
to produce specific characters 
from specific computers, most 
printers use the control codes 
which were first used on the 
Epson range of printers. 

To make printers such its the 
Epson range compatible with 
a wide variety of computers, it 
seemed sensible to use the 
same codes to send text to the 
printer as were l>eing used to 
send characters to the printer. 
The basis for that coding is 
ASCII - the American Stand- 
ard Code for Information In- 
terchange. 

Apart from Commodore, 
which decided to use its own 
internal coding system, almost 
all computer manufacturers 



based their coding systems on 
ASCII . As well as codes to pro- 
duce text on the printer, there 
are also codes to give the 
printer dedicated instructions. 
Known as control codes, they 
are necessary to produce such 
results as a forced carriage 
return and tine feed. 

Communication between 
computers and printers takes 
place by means of an eight- bit 
binary data transmission link. 
This link means that there are 
256 possible codes, anwherc 



from to 255, which can be 
transmitted. Although that is 
generally accepted as the 
norm, there are computers 
such as the Amstrad range 
which use a seven-bit printer 
port, meaning it can send codes 
only from to 127. Examina- 
tion of any keyboard, however, 
will show iliat leaves about 20 
codes for control characters. 

One of the most common 
problems when starling to use 
an Epson-compatible printer is 
caused by control code 32 - 20 



CONTROL CODES 

CcKle - TTiis is the null code. It is Ignored by the printer. 

Codes 1 - 6 - At present these codes are not used. 

Code 7 - Ttite causa a beU, buzz^ or be^er to sound in ttie 



Code 8 - Causes the printer to backspace by one character. 

Code 9 - When this code is received, the print head moves to 
the next horizontal tabulation position. 

Code 10 - This causes the paper to be f^ by one line. 

Code 11 - The print head moves to ttie next pre-set vertical 
tabulation setting on receipt of this code. 

Code 12 - Regardless of the position of Hie paper in the printer, 
tills code will cause ft to be fed one comptote page 
length. 

Code 13 - This is the carriage return code. 

Code 14 - Used in combination with other codes, this will pro- 
duce double width characters. Used on its own» the 
enlarged characters will automatically cancel at the 
end of each line* 

Code 15- This code produces characters in con- 
densed mode - approximatety 17 characters per inch 
on most printers. 

Code 1 6 - Deletes the last character sent to the printer from the 
print buffer. 

Code 17 - Is used to activate the printer, enabling it to receive 
and print data. It is only valid when used to counteract 
code 19. 

Code 18 - Cancels ttie condensed mode setting. 

Code 19 - Disables the printer. 

Code 20 - Cancels the enlarged mode setting. 

Codes 21-23 - These codes are not presentiy in use. 

Code 24 - Cancels ttie current line sent to the printer but not 
yet printed. 

Codes 25-26 - These codK are not used. 

Code 27 - This te the escape code. By itself It does nothing but 
it causes the code following it to be treated as a 
control code, even if it is normally a character code. 
This Is the basis of all printer control. 

The remaining codes from 28 to 1 27 are used to produce keyboard 

characters and full details can tie found in your printer manual. 



in hexadccimah Used lo eope 
with the differences in monet- 
ary symbols, it is usually 
adjusted by a series of DIP 
switches, although it can also 
be done in software. 

To control a printer from 
Basic* usually it is necessary to 
use the CflRSCN) function, 
where N is the code to be sent. 
Most standard Basics use com- 
mands such as LPRINT and 
LLIST, which act in the same 
way as an ordinar\' LIST or 
PRINT, except that the output 
is directed towards the primer 
rather than the screen. To send 
a line fccti you would type: 
U&m GHR$(10) 

To send more than one code 
at once, they can cither be 
separated by a semicolon, or 
by using the plus sign: 

U&m CHR$(10);CHfi$(13) 
or 

LPRon cms cnBS(io}+ 

CHR$(I3) 

Some computers, such as the 
Sinclair OL, do not have 
LLIST or LPRINT commands 
and therefore you need loopcn 
a channel to the particular 
device: thereafter all output 
will be directed through that 
channel 

Escape sequences 

Oeating special effects on a 
printer requires comprehen- 
sive knowledge of escape 
codes. An escape code on its 
own does nothing and only 
when the character which fol- 
lows is a Ci>ntrol code is the 
printer forced lo react. 

To set certain functions on 
printers, it is neccssar)' to send 
a string of escape codes, first 
selecting the option and then 
giving certain values. In some 
cases, Ihe user must determine 
the length of the control string 
and that is done bv sending a 

NULL character -'(^nRS(O). 
• (tctring The Most From 
Your Primer is written by R. 
J. Penfold and published by 
Bernard Babani. Costing 
12,95, it is order number 
BP18L Bernard Babani can be 
contacted at The Cirampians, 
Shepherds Bush Road* Lon- 
don VV6 7NF. 



YOUR COMPUTER. OCTOBER 1986 33 



Vnmhe 
nuts to wksMs show 




There's q bumper crop^f goodies 
for the Spectrum ond QL User at 
this yeoKs Autumn MicroFair m the 
Central HalL Westminster, on 
Soturday 25th October 86'. 

See oil the New Season's 
products including the New 
Spectrvms, — plus the usual 
fantostic Microfoir borgoins, with 
big reductions on selected 
hard wore and software. 

The Show offers full support 
for oil the SINCLAIR mochines(and 
compatibles), with a huge range 



of softwore, peripherok boots 
and magazines on sole — just 
about all you wonted for your 
computer under one roof! 

Talk to the experts on the 
User Club stands or find speciol 
bargains at the bring-ond-buy. 
You'll en|oy o great day out in a 
friendly otmosphere 

Send NOW for the reduced 
price advance tickets on the 
coupon bebw. 

You'll b« nuts to mis* 
this ihow. 



THE AUTUMN MICROFAIR 







v^i^r. 







25th October 86' 

At the Central Hall, 
Westminster SW1 

10am — 6pm 

Admission £2.00 (Adults) 
£1.50 (Kids under 14) 



I SEND FOR SEDUCED PRICE TICKETS TODAY 

■ Scad lo Mike l«faou«o (Or^mct}, Dcpi 7J< MICKOFAIKS. 71 Parit Ijuur. l.Midon N17 OHG 

I note Mad BC advwKC ockct* Please aead ac adnnce odcctt 

I {Kiiia «t CI JO) (CiuU nnScr H ((C £1M> 



I 



zx 




' Please bdodc s sumpedL sdlniddrestcd cnirelopc sod make dKtqocft^PO* paynbk (o ZX Mkraftir 

L— — — ^ — — — — — • ^ ^ — -^ ^ ^ — -^ ^ — — — ^ ^ ^J 

Exhibitors ring Mike or Moira on 01-801 9172 for details of stand availability. 



ATARI COMPUTERS 




•ivd ©•m in fom dnd loiM. btftc fttotfi'orwe. 
r»r»lwora. dto motlof o#»*, o«Odl« •i»d fTi«ii«ro»d«, 
1040STF wtlh dfK driv«, mocne ftnd monttoi:- 
monochromii i»» (C«3d) C9ie. ciAMf Cl04d 
(tt94C} DtfiC^ AUn &30 STM Compuiw (&t»K v«r 
M»A) C3S0 (C3431 C3IK. Alari &30 STM i n M««abyxo 
vanion) £444 (t4?4) £466. 1 ftKi(}«tM« u\^f*^ fO< 
fh« Alvf i GtaSTM £90 (£W) C 1 09. Cumsnn «COfM}#iiy 
IQOOIC di«c <lnv(M for lh# S^ STM - s^rvoSe TTSI 
fClfrl) f 173. a.1^1 f?44 (n44» €776 AUr. SOiSK ST 
dtoc driv« CI 3^ (f 135) fl^ Alan 1O0OK ST dcK 
<Mv« C183 (ri75> f^96. Aufi ST nw»ocfwoin« 
mon«lo# C13d (C14$) CIdS. economy Fidtlilv ST ed- 
our rr>on*ior C203 tCTOH) C269. Atari I4«r inadtuni 
fMOlutXK^ ST colour rnonitor £M1 (£M«» C407. » 
Mea3|y>t« ST hard iSiK CI46 <C713) £7S4 Alan 
130XE coftipotor * 0M)#Ctl7(£123)Ct44 ISOXt 

CO'HOuIAf * CAtSAtta f«fiO«dftr * MV(tV^af« Cibi 

(CISC) C1 H, 130 XE computer * *»c d*«vo ► loft 
M .iro £239f£239) £260. 1 30XL computer * diic df tv« 
« 1037 primar I toftw^re C?13 (£3 •&» £373. AlA^i 

1 07!* n It (fi ?4> m V AT*f . 1 050 n 1 8 in?4) nsi , 
SINCLAIR COMPUTERS 



I cauatia « 4Q4mv«t t K>vitictw>ihimorr»caC129 
<£l31i £162. eia«V microdrivo c»ftfi<>9e> C2.50 (£31 
f4 So«cinum fto^p^ diac mietlaoe 4S«it Cumana 
^tc v<^«on for auilaUe <)t»c dri v»^ £107 (£991 £109, 
Sp«ar um Oint f CKwcs pc i nl«f intcff aco C4€ ( £42 1 £47. 



COMMODORE COMPUTERS 

Cbmmwio*© 13« C2S0 taM> C28S. H^h Con^mo- 
dora 128 eompandium r»4ch r779 (fTSt) fJiG 
CommotfOf* 1390 £466 (£470) fS^O 1&71 D^ 
drivs £257 (f7S5) £776. Coi'^^tocteru 64 + recor* 
dff* * ff>u»'itmak*/ k«vbo«fd -t &oftvy.Afii £131 
m99) f740, Convitnof to ^ikkm' mo»»l Ofdln^ry 
rrtooo cauiAtia r«ocx<iarc io Xm u«4k1 wlt^ tha 
Convnodora 178 and (^a C0miT>O(lor« 64 C9.78 
If*) £11. C«niroA»Ci orifitar mtarfaoalof Commo- 
dora 12« and tha Commodore 64 £30 (£31) C36. 
MPS«a3 I>not«f C138 (C14a> £179l 




SiiKlalf SpMUum 12S £ 136 i£l41) £t6l. Si Ad^tr QL 
Coffipiuiar £td4 ICI9G) £239lOL Flonfiv <fr«c tniorf 9C« 
(Saa Cumana ditc aaction batow for tuttattio d«fc 
drrvvs) £8S (£861 £96^ S*nd«tr Spectrum Plus Com- 
palvf 4d*<; 06 (£101) £121 . SpactrufTi Piw» Cotitpvtar 



AMSTRAD COMPUTERS 

N(TW Am«tf«d teM C^rnpati^la ContfHita'- wf«l« 
ro# pric«. Amiu«d PCWeSl2 <164 tCSVT) 0W4. 
Afnit/«d PCWa7S6 £449 (£474) CSgl. Amatrad 464 
<:k>kH*r£297(i:32S1£4lO Amtirad4646ra«nri97 
t£23$> £316. AiTiMf«Kl 61 7S Colour £397 If 478) 
£$10. Armtrad 6170 Gr*«^ £397 (£32tl £410 
Amstf *d OMWOOO prirnar £1 56 <£162) £196, E*wa 
ditc drtva for Am»irad CH 2« 139 (C lObi I ! ^ 



CUMANA DISC DRIVES 

To Mill driic kfiterfaci^ ot SifKl^iU OU Spectrum, 
^fvtiMt>^)%4> Arvd filKt 8 90 trjck ctouM* «.«d*d. 
cnsad and w*ih power «upplr> »r*»Qla 35" £^34 
Itli/) tli9, dual 3.&- £224 (£229) £261, ttfiglt 
fr.?!>- f W2 (CtT^i f^OS^ <iual 6s2S- 1310 ((316) 
£3^/. 



PRINTERS 

N>w tpwK> LXaO £249 (£254) E28B. Tfactor for 
LX80 1 k> (£21 1 £31 . Brother HR5 £ 11 ? in 1 W f » 31. 
B»oih*r Ml!09 £720 (£324| f26S. Sbmwa CTI 
CPA90. £193 (£196) £233. Carwor^ PWIOeOA 
£309 1012) £363. Mtoopertottof^ MPt6& 023 
(C227I £269. DrotKe« £IU4 £^4 |£224) £24S 



Dept. 



SWANLEY ELECTRONICS 
The Computer Export Specialists 
YC, 32 Goldsel Rd.. Swanley, Kent BR8 8E2, England 
Tel: SWANLEY (0322) 64851 



OtfiCi^i Qt^en M««omia. UK pficxt* Jh'tt shCF^m f.v*r srta tnck/fSe pc^t flf kJ VA L 7M $eeOt*a ^rwe *rt bt»€**t* 
i» for axporf cuffomarf *n iufOfi* *tia tnetuikts tnutrvd mfm»l ppsti^fffi. The third price i* lOf «JCpOrr 
ctatomvfB ocjrfffdf Ci/r o^ (mek/dtmff Aaffrst^ acd aoa inciv^cm tntitred mrmad poa*^. 



THE PRICE OF TAPES TO COME 

Beach Head (Spectrum) £3.25 

Elite (Spectrum) £9.15 

C16 Classics (2 tapes/4 games) £4.85 

Beach Head (BBC) £3.75 

Flight Path 737 (Amstrad) £2.49 

Spitfire Ace Simulator (CBM) £3.89 

Zaxxon (Commodore 64) £3.45 

Lord of the Rings (2 cass. plus book) .. £5.69 
Please send S.A.E. (state machine) 

FACULTY ENTERPRISES LTD 

29 Rutland Court, Ponders End 
Enfield, Middx EN3 4BJ 01-805 8054 



THE PRICE OF TAPES TO COME 

Beach Head (Spectrum) C3.25 

Elite (Spectrum).. .., £9.15 

CI 6 Classics (2 tapes/4 games).......,. £4.85 

Beach Head (BBC) , £3.75 

Flight Path 737 (Amstrad) £2.49 

Spitfire Ace Simulator (CBM) , £3.89 

Zaxxon (Commodore 64) £3.45 

Lord of the Rings (2 cass. plus book) .. £5.69 
Please send S,A,£. (state machine) 

FACULTY ENTERPRISES LTD 

29 Rutland Court, Ponders End 
Enfield, Middx EN3 4BJ 01 -805 8054 



34 YOUR COMPUTER. OCTOBER 1986 



niipro city 




1A QUEENS ROAD, NUNEATON, WARKS CV11 6NN 

IBM COMPATIBLES FROM £399 

AMSTRAD PC 1512 SD + Mono Monitor £399 

AMSTRAD PC 1512 SD + Colour Monitor £549 

AMSTRAD PC 1512 DD + Mono Monitor £499 

AMSTRAD PC 1512 DD + Colour Monitor £649 

HARD DISC VERSION 

10 Megabyte PC 1512 HD10 + Mono Monitor £699 

10 Megabyte PC 1512 HD10 + Colour Monitor £849 

20 Megabyte PC 1512 H20 + Mono Monitor £799 

20 Megabyte PC 1512 H20 + Colour Monitor £949 

* TECHNICAL SUPPORT TEAM 

• HIGHLY COMPETITIVE PRICES 

* AFTER SALES SUPPORT SERVICE 

• REPAIR SERVICE ON AMSTRAD PRODUCTS 



AMSTRAD CPC6128/PCW 8256/ 
PCW 8512 SOFTWARE 



CREDIT CARD HOT-LINE 

0203-382049 

All prices exclude VAT 
Export Enquiries Welcome 




^Mk Ikesb 



1 €16 - PLUS 4 CENTRE 




Books - Games - Budget Games 

Text Aventures - Graphic Adv 

Sport Simulators - Flight Simulators 

Utilities - Music Makers - Paint Prog 

Graphic Designers - Data Bases 

Spread Sheets - Word Processors 

Business Progs ► Joysticks 
Ram Packs - Dust Covers - Leads 

Interfaces 
In fact anything to do with 

C16 or Plus 4. 

Scml S.A.I-:, for a detail leaflet. 




CI6/PIUS 4 Centre. ANCO Marketing! I.til. 

4. We.sr Gate House. Spiial Street. 

Dariford. Kent. DAI 2KH. Td: 0322 -92513/925 1« 

24 Hour hot line: 0322/522631 







SIREN SOFTWARE 



NEW ** MASTER DISC ** NEW 



Th« only Disc UtIlHy 
IMAGE 

DIRECTORY EDITOR 
SPEEDFORM 
SECTOR EDITOR 
DE PROTtCTOR 
Disc HEADER 
TAPE HEADER 
TRANS FILE 
DISC MAP 
TYPE FILE 
DUMP FILE 
ZIP DISC 



Package you will evar naad This disc doaa It allfl 

Back up your d*scs (mcluding funny formats etc,> 
Unerase files, show tiicJden files, secure files etc. 
Lightning fasi formatter. 

- Complete sector editor. 

- DeProtect Basic progranns. 

- Display start, length, execute addresses etc, 

- As disc header but for tape. 

- Transfer individual files from dtsc to disc/disc to tape. 

- Displays how fifes are stored on disc. 

- Displays on screen/printer any Ascii file. 

- Display In Hex/Aseii format the contents of a tile. 

- Speed up your drive by upto 20%. 

464/664/6128 DISC ONLY £12.99 



WHAT THE REVIEWS HAVE SAID 

"The Master Disc utilities disc from Siren Software is a 
definite must for all disc owners" Amttx June *86 

'Some of the utilities are excellently done" Popular 
Computing Weekly 

"The package seems to work quite well on the full range of 
machines" Amtix, June '86 

"This Siren package really does offer you quite a lot for your 
money" Amstrad Action, June '86 

**Each section is fully documented with clear and precise 
instructions" Amtix. June '86 



DISCOVERY -Tape to Disc Transfer 

The only tape to disc transfer program to handle Turbo 

Loaders and alters Basic programs. 

Adds relocaters, automatic and manual mode. Catalogue, 

full catalogue, erase, rename etc. 

Tape header reader. 

"Probably the best of the tape-to-disc copiers" Afn$tr«d Action. 

March. 

"Discovery does it best across the widest range of games'* 

Amsirw) Action. Feb. '86 

484, 664, 6128 DISC £t1.99 TAPE £7.99 

< DISCUS 5 now available £2 

This program will allow you to run more programs from disc 
than any similar program. 



** 464 OWNERS** 

Load in your software at upto 4 times the 
normal speed. Tape Utility V3.4 allows you to 
back up the majority of your software (about 
90%) and load it back in 4 times faster. 
Extremely easy to use, no knowledge 
required. 

CPC 464 only £6.99 



For speedy delivery 

5end your cheques/P.O.s etc. to: 



SIREN SOFTWARE 
76Brkig*StrMt,ManchaatarM32RJ.Tal:061.7966874 PUmmMamhit 



SIREN SOFTWARE 



YOUR COMPUTER. OCTOBER 1986 SS 



^^^^ven though there are 
^^^ more than 5,(HK) com- 
M mercial software pack- 

M^^^ ages available for the 
Spectrum computer, there is 
nothing so satisfying as creat- 
ing your own. Writing a 
machine code shoot-'em-up or 
platform game, while greatly 
rewarding, is often a frustrat- 
ing and dull affair. 

Using Arauk Creator, even 
the novice programmer is able 
to produce fuU-lcngth machine 
code games to professional 
qualification with up to 40 
screens. The time taken to pro- 
duce a finished game, complete 
with backgrounds- animated 
sprites and interactive sound 
can be as little as an hour. 

Arcade Creator is supplied 
on two tapes. Loading side one 
of the first produces the open- 
ing menu. Choosing option I. 
the user-defined graphics 
designer allows you to create 
the screen scene on which the 
game will take place. Using the 
cursor keys or a joystick, you 
can create your shape and then 
rotate, invert or produce a mir- 
ror image of ii before saving it 
in the program files. Arcade 
Creator is complete with its 
own files of sprites and UDGs 
and they can be used in prefer- 
ence to your own designs. 

The sprite designer has little 
to distinguish it from the others 
on the market. It enables you 
either to produce your own 
designs or select from the 30 
or so retained on file. Once you 
have drawn four images oJ 
your character, the progran 
switches between them to show 
you how it wilt look when ani- 
mated. 

The sound designer is self- 
explanatory and can be used to 
create background noises while 
the game is in progress. The 
final option on this side of the 
cassette is the screen designer 
which allows yi>u to select 
which UDGs are to be used 
and choose which background 
colour will appear in the 
finished ganie. 

The second tape is con- 
cerned with the structure of the 
game. Two types are available. 



Arcade games creator 



Anthony Thompson reviews a software 

utility from Argus which allows 

Spectrum owners to create the games 

of their dreams. 



chase-'n-shooi or platfornt. 
Both types have set patterns to 
follow, making the creation 
process less complicated. For 
chase-*n-shooi games, the 
players fire missiles at the 
aliens while attempting to 
avoid barriers and obstacles 
and collecting as much treasure 
as possible. 



In the platform games, the 
player can avoid the aliens and 
killer monsters onlv while col- 
lecting the treasure. Although 
those formats may seen to 
restrict the game play, even the 
most exciting professional 
games are based on similar 
principles. 

After you have chosen the 



sprites for the aliens, missiles 
and other items you can selecl 
which, if any, sounds are to l>e 
produced when a missile is 
fired, treasure collected or an 
alien is killed. Finishing 
touches such as a loading 
screen and title tune are added 
using the second side of the 
tape, which is also used to pre- 
pare the final game tape. 

Overall, Arcade Creator is a 
quality. tow-cost product 
whieh can produce enjoyable 
games in a short time. As the 
packaging indicates, the only 
limit is your imagination. 




3e YOUR COMPUTER. OCTOBER 1 966 



Ian Duerden looks 
at the latest 

package from the 

Ocean/Oasis 

label, 

^m ollowing the launch of 
M^LasiT Basic Laser Com- 
■ piler. Laser Genius is the 
P third in the scries uf util- 
ity paekages from Ocean I Q/ 
Oasis. Laser Genius is a full 
package for machine code 
development and includes an 
Editor, Assembler, Monitor 
and a new concept in programs 
of this type, an Analyser. 

The package arrives in the 
Ocean standard big box con- 
taining cassettes or disc and a 
fairly comprehensive 150-pagc 
manual. Many of the com- 
tnands and facilities are 
standard and can be found on 
most other Assembler/Dis- 
assembler packages but it is all 
the extra commands and ser- 
vices not found on other 
utilities which make Laser 
Genius an out-and-out winner. 

A Basic loader provides the 
option of changing colours or 
altering line feed charaelcrs 
before loading the three pro- 
grams comprising the Assem- 
bly part of the package - the 
assembler, the toolkit and the 
hash (#) extension. The toolkit 
contains most of the commands 

mm. 



Super software 



provide an integer-based com- 
piled language called F*hocnix. 

Using this language it is pos- 
sible to produce prt>grams to 
test ideas or algorithms before 
compiling them li> machine 
code without losing speed or 
prt>gram si/e. Phoenix can be 
mixed with machine code or 
used as a stand-alone program, 
so if you have difficulty using 
or learning assembly code it is 
possible to write your pri>- 
grams using it. 

Because Phoenix is a fully- 
structured language i: is rela- 
tively complex and will take a 
fair amount of time to learn. 
The commands available are 
numerous but well- 

documented and the manual 
contains a number of examples 
written in Basic, machine code 
and Phoenix' for you to study 
and use. 

The Editor contained in the 
Assembler is a hybrid of the 
l^cst of the edit*)rs on the 
market, mixing Ime and screen 
editing functions in one pro- 
gram. 

Each source code must have 
a line number - not unusual - 
but where Laser (jcnius again 
differs is that it checks the syn- 
tax of each line as it is entered « 
inakinu for extremciv fast 



more easily. Where errors 
occur a message w'ill appear on 
the screen explaining the type 
of error; you can then use the 
cursor keys to make correc- 
tions. 

It is possible to assemble 
code in a variety of ways - 
stand-alone, linked with a pre- 
viously-as:>embled program, or 
to assemble selected sub- 
routines from a library; each 
can be displayed on the screen 
or dumped to a printer, or 
both, but you do lose assem- 
bler speed with those two 
options. 

I'irst impressions of the 
Monitor are similar to those of 
the Assembler. It is typical of 
others already on the market 
and anyone who has stayed up 
half the night single-stepping 
through a program in an 
attempt to find a bug will know 
what I mean but again Ocean 
have a new idea, an Analyser. 

It allows up to U\ selective 
*stop* conditions to be defmcd. 
With the stop condition set you 
can nm your programs nor- 
mally; the analyser then traces 
each step of the program 
automnatically. If you wish to 
find a particular value ft>r a par- 
ticular register l>eforc it writes 
to the screen ihc ;in;itvscr will 



bugs which tend to perpetrate 
many machine code programs. 

The Analyser uses a dialect 
of Forth as the controlling 
language. First, it executes 
much faster than Basic and. 
second, it is compact and rela- 
tively easy to learn. Anyone 
with some knowledge of Forth 
should be able to find their way 
around reasonably ((uickly: 
others who have not used the 
language will be able to glean 
sufficient information from the 
manual to be able to master the 
analyser in a short time. 

The manual contains a fair 
amount of information. It is 
not perfect by any means but 
explains the workings of both 
programs reasonably well. If 
there is a criticism it is that the 
section on PlK)enix could have 
been more explicit. Apart from 
that it allows you to experiment 
as you proceed. 

The package is suitable for 
the inexperienced user, who 
will not need lo upgrade to 
something belter, and the 
experienced programmer who 
needs more than mt>st other 
packages can offer. 

Laser Cienius must be the 
best vutue package on the 
market in terms of price and 
what it has to offer. W^horc else 




needed lo use the assembler: 
the hash extension civniains a 
number of psuedo-ope rat ions, 
with the '#' character printed 
in front, their purpose being to 



mmtm 

assembling olMHirce ciHlc- The 
line numbers are arbitrary as 
you can input source code in 
paragraphs, enabling you lo 
structure your programs much 



(race (he program to that point 
and then list all the values on 
tti the screen for you to 
examine. That can save hours 
or even days in tracking elusive 



could you find such a time-sav- 
ing, debugging tool plus a new 
language and compiler all in 
one Assembler/Disassembler 
package? 



YOUR COMPUTER, OCTOBER 1906 37 



ONE PROGRAM THAT'LL 
NEVER BECOME EXTINa. 



^mm^—^ 



-i 



^A'-tiii. -^ 



^~ ^ f f^ — f-_. 



^N^ 



f r r 



Dofwin s TVteory of Evolution, first 
puWished in 1859, states that a 
new spedes is produced by 
adoptk>n to a dTonging 
environment Just to prove him 
right ogaia DffX)sour hos evolved 
a nev^ tool for the computer oge 

Experts have descnb^ it as 
simply the best music progrom on 
the mqiket. Vs called MUSCPEN. 
and ifsQ new processor cNp for 
tfke BBC Micro, designed by o 
musicksn for musicions. h*s ©osy to 
use and hos severol unique 
features indudirvg fost musk: 
writing using lightpen, jo^^^idc or 
keyboard, sinnuttaneous 4 channel 
display and ptaybock, a 
syrrthesizer and a pnnfer. 

It s an extendable 
system, so you con 



write and pby up to 8 ports by 
linking to a second Artiao, or use 
an extra disc or tape in 
oonjuncHon wHh the MUSCPB^ 
dhip for fTKXjse editing, real-time 
input vvfw:h is outomaticolty 
transcribed into full music notation, 
and even more amazing fodlities 
now being devebped. 

V\fe can t guarantee to be 
around in anotf>ef mfflion years' 
time, but this is a system that's 
destined to outkastttieotfx^- it's 
in tune with the woy mu^ is 
nrK>vinq. Send £2ft75 for a 16K 
MUStCPEN chip ond 60i5oge 
instruction monuol to; 
D«r>osaur Softwore, 41 Cheney 
Way, Chesterton, Cambridge 
^ CB41UE(tetephoneQ^ 
i322244l 






AMSTRAD 


CPC6128Green 

CPC 6128 Colour 


P.O.A. 

P.O.A. 


PCW8256 

PCW8512 

CF2 Floppy Disc 


... £399 + VAT 
... £499 + VAT 
.. £3.75 + VAT 
.. £5.00 + VAT 


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38 YOUR COMPUTER, OCTOBER 1986 



ADveimm 






Adventureline 



§ m cllo, all you advent urcn*, would-be 
^^m adventurers, demi-wizards. and 
W p wizards and welcome to Adven- 
" tureline. One thing 1 have noticed 
in the last year is the tremendous growth 
in the adventure market. More and more 
people seem to be turning to this form of 
computer entertainment and because of 
the nature of an adventure we arc now 
beginning to sec what can only be de- 
scribed as a cottage indusirj' of adventure 
clubs springing up all over the place. 

That is satisfactory for the dedicated 
adventurer and also for novices who invar- 
iably become confused and need a gentle 
push in the proper direction now and 
again. It seems to me that if there is a 
shortage of adventures in a particular 
month, the clubs arc written about and 
not always in a complimentary manner. 

My feeling about these small organisa- 
tions i^ tliat they sliouid be encouraged as 
much as possible. Anybody who spends 
spare time helping other enthusiasts to 
enjoy their chosen hobby is satisfying to 
me. 

Sound advice 

What is puzzling is that reviewers of the 
clubs seem to talk only about whether the 
club produces a magazine and then review 
the magazine as if it were an adventure 
game. I would have thought thai the pub- 
lication is only one part of a club, there 
to inform members about new games and 
to give hints, not, as it would appear, the 
be all and end alt of the individual club. 

My advice to anyone who intends to 
join an adventurers' club is first to find 
what level of help is obtainable, whether 
or not a good telephone hclplinc/s is read- 
ily available and, after satisfying yourself 
on those points, buy a copy of the club 
magazine. 

Most clubs produce some form of 
magazine ranging in price from 50 pence 



to £1 and it matters not one tola if the 
punctuation is not exact, or if the pages 
are not proi>erly formatted. The main 
thing is the help which the magazines con- 
tain. There are many clubs and I do not 
think you can define which is the be.si. 
All arc good in their own right and so 
long as they give adventurers valuable 
help they should be supported in any way 
they can - not dissected and compared. 
The decision, after all. is for the adven- 
turer and, as most genuine clubs will send 
information, they should be allowed lo 
make up their own minds about the one 
they feel is correct for Them. 

If you run a club, send mc information 
and I will make sure other adventurers 
will he informed. 



Adventure News 



atch for a new release from the CRL 
group called Dracula, 1 know there 
have been countless adventures 
written using the Count as the vil- 
lain of the piece but this version, written 
by Rod Pike, author of the excellent PH- 
grim, is based on the Bram Stoker novel. 

Incentive has informed me that because 
of the extra work involved in converting 
iiraphic Adventure Creator lo most 
popular micros, /4.u', based on the Frank 
Oliver sci-fi bcK)k, and The Ket Trilogy 
have had to take something of a back seat 
but production of those adventures is now 
going ahead full steam. 

In axe you play the part of a fantasy 
warrior out to save the world, to l>e re- 
leased initially on the Spectrum with con- 
versions at a later date. Ket. first seen on 
the Spectrum, will be released on the 
CBM64 and will contain a new auto-map- 
ping feature - ideal for anyone who does 
not like mapping. 

Time of the £nrf author Kcithcr Milncr 
promises a sequel called The Bottomless 
Pit, released in two parts. Part 1, The 
Minister for Alien Affairs, is set for Sep- 
tember. Part 2, Inio the Abyss, follows in 
October. If those new games are half as 
good as Time we are in for a treat. 

St Brides is also set to frustrate us again, 
this time with a three-foot rabbit as the 
hero. Titled Bugsy. we should be seeing 
it soon. 



Readers' Forum 

As this is Dnly ihc second Adven- 
tureline column, I did not expect many 
letters and I was proved correct but, I am 
looking forward to reading your letters. 



Infocom Corner 

Some more amusmg uiput for you lo 
try, Jackie Wright of Ashlon-under-Lyne 
writes; *in Zork /, type **Say Plugh" and 
sec what happens. Alan Davis of 
Stockport was delighted when in En- 
chanter he used the Zifmia* spell to "Zif- 
mia Creators". 

In Zork II try asking tlie robot to read 
or eat the cakes. 

If you are confused by an Infocom ad- 
venture, fear not; help is only a telephone 
call away. 

Geoff Rcns has joined the Helpline 
team. He is an expert on Infocom and has 
a vast knowledge of most popular games. 

The helpline is open five days aweek 
from 1900 lo 2100 hours. The numbers 
are Jackie,. 061-339-0092; Geoff,.0695- 
73141. 



Adventureline Hints 

OUESTPROBli 111 

Tarpit posing a problem, in the form of 
Torch. Gel Candle, Give the Candle to 
Thing, Change to Ihmg, Hold Breath 
Time your moves first, though; wait until 
Thing sinks; wait for 15 moves then Feel 
Around. 

REBEL PLANET 

To enter Airlock examine Limcom, 
press TH Button. To get through Customs, 
pay your taxes. In the jail make sure you 
have the wrench. Give the Angry Arca- 
dians your ticket to impress them, 

THE SNOW OUEEN 
To leave granny's house, gel shoes, gel 
doU. wash, kiss granny. 
To get past the Rough Girls give doll. 
On the Boat throw shoes. 

THE PRICE OF MAGIK 

Examine Knucklebone 
Feldspar Lens - break curtains with 
knife. 
Give robes lo Golem. 
Throw salt at slug. 



YOUR COMPUTER. OCTOBER 1986 39 





► CBM64/Speitnim 48K/Ams(n2d CK 

• CRL Group 

• Text Adventure 

• £7.95 Cass £12,95 Disc 

Ever since Bram Stoker wrote her immor- 
tal late about Dracida, countless people 
have sat glued either to a cinema screen 
or at home in front of a television set and 
watched tlie gory tale unfold. Scott 
Adams was one of the first programmers 
to use the idea for a computer adventure. 
Named The Count, it was the first step 
into gothie horror. Since then the infam- 
ous Count has appeared in many disguises 
in many adventures. 

It was only a matter of lime before a 
game based on Stoker's novel would be 
produced. The problem, I think, was get- 
ting the proper person to convey to a 
micro adventure Stoker's ghastly story. It 
needed a word-painter of the highest 
calibre and who belter ihan the author of 
the superb Pilgrim, Rod Pike. 

From the opening paragraphs you know 
this adventure is stpecial. There are not 
many authors in the adventure world who 
can write the way this man docs. The 
scene is set immediately when , on loading, 
you arc presented by a chilling picture of 
the evil Count's shadow slowly climbing 
the stairs. Written in the first person, you 
play the part of Jonathan Marker. 

After receiving a request from Count 
Dracula regarding the purchase of some 
property you travel to the Count's home 
in far-off Carpathia. Pike begins to set the 
mood from the outset with his skilful man- 
ipulation of the English language and the 
crafty way he creates the problems for 

GRAPHICS 

None 

ATMOSPHERE 

m m m 

PLAYABIUTY 
• # # • 

VALUE FOR MONEY 

# # # # # 

OVERALL 



you to overcome, but they are purely 
logical and that adds immensely to the 
playability of the game. 

There are no graphics apart from the 
loading screen but no amount of graphics 
could impart the sinister atmosphere 
which Pike's words conjure fur you. One 
example of the type of description you 
can look forward to is after reaching the 
hotel and eating a meal you decide to 
retire for the night and it is while you are 
asleep that a nightmare unfolds Ixiforc 
you. To put some of it into Pike's words: 
*'lt towers above me. 1 smell its putrid 



breath - so close. Burning red eyes sear 
into the ver>' inner being of my mind, A 
scream destroys my mental focus - my 
brain cannot cope". That continues for 
sometimes up to two screens- marvellous 
stuff. 

The clever and sometimes frustrating 
way Pike creates problems is shown in the 
nightmare scene. If you do not do certain 
actions there arc three possible conclu- 
sions, so it is very important to lake notice 
of everything you read on-screen. 

With the imminent release of Dracula, 
CRL and Pike have proved once again 
that graphics add nothing to a well-con- 
structed text-only adventure and I feel 
certain that Pike is destined to become a 
cult figure in the adventure world. As a 
final word all 1 can say is '*More please - 
soon". 

miME OF THE 



► CBM64/Spatmm 48K 

# Mandarin Adventures 

• Text Adventure 
m £27.99 

When that excellent adventure -writing 
utility Tlte Quill first appeared it seemed 
that adventure players would never be 
short of games to play. It added a new 
dimension to the adventure world. Over- 
night hundreds of enthusiastic would-be 
authors seemed to spring from the wood- 
work. Unfortunately many of the games 
were rubbish but that in no-way deterred 
people from trying. 1 am pleased to say 
that among the plethora of 'quilted* 
adventures there were and arc some ter- 
rific games. 

One of the more interesting and enjoy- 
able is from Mandarin Adventures. Under 
the auspices of Keith Milner. a true adven- 
ture purist, it released Time of the End 
for the Spectrum. Now CBM64 users can 
enjoy this adventure - and not before 
time. 

Once again it is time to take up the 
gauntlet and save the world from those 
proverbial aliens who seem lo take great 
pleasure in upsetting poor unfortunate 
mortals. This time the aliens arc intcrfcr- 
ring with the earth's weather: giant tidal 
waves arc washing away cities, earth- 
quakes are devastating whole areas which, 
in turn, is creating utter chaos for all. We 
were warned many years ago by a rebel 
alien called Kilroy. who came to the earth 
and left messages on walls in what ho 
thought were public inccling-pluccs. but 
as we alf know who listens to anybody 
called Kilroy » I suppose Kilroy's mother 
would. 

It happens that one day while out taking 



GRAPHICS 

None 

ATMOSPHERE 

# • # # 
PLAYABILITY 

# # # # # 

VALUE FOR MONEY 

# # # 

OVERALL 

# # • # 

the air you are transported suddenly to 
the aliens' planet and learn all about their 
dirty tricks and, naturally, l>eing the kind 
of person you arc, you decide to do some- 
thing about it. 

You will have the chance lo do a bit of 
lime-travelling, find and change into 
different people and do a little flying - as 
in feathered variety. Text descriptions are 
just what the doctor ordered and the prob- 
lems are well-thought-out without being 
too difficult. 

Overall, an excellent first attempt and 
with sequels hovering in the not-too-dis- 
tant future, plus the very low price, makes 
this adventure essential. 



mONSTERS 0& 



► Ait^trad. CFC464/6M/6128 

# Global Software 

# Adventure 

m £7.9ry tape, £14,95 disc and 8256/8512 
£19,95 Disc 

Am'strad owners starved recently of really 
good adventures should now sit up. 
Global Software is releasing the best 
adventure I have seen for a long lime on 
the Amstrad, Forthcoming games will be 
Kingdom of HamiL BBC owners will 
know it, as well as Countdown, another 
classic from the BBC stable. 

The plot set in the mysterious land of 
Murdac is the usual find treasures, kill 
monsters, solve non-logical and logical 
problems and, in general, have a good 
time. There is nothing like a good old 
Ore-bashing, Troll-slaying adventure and 
this game has it all 

Starting your quest once more outside 
the obligatory small brick house, it is wise 
to look quickly through the graveyard and 
flower-beds, or you svill be faced with a 
blank wall, which happens to have been 
built by two nol-so-friendly Ore 
bricklayers. If you were wise, all will be 
revealed but remember what happened in 
Jerico and one problem will be overcome. 
After your little sojourn outside it is time 
to enter the house. By that time you 
should have the means and off you go into 
the favourite realms of adventurers - dark 
gloomy caves* vast underground rivers 
and those nasty little dungeons which 
always seem to trap you. 



40 YOUR COMPUTER. OCTOBER 1 986 



ADVENTURE REVIEWS 




Not unlike an Tnfocom game in text 
descriptions and screen layout, the adven- 
ture moves along at a steady pace, llie 
problems are not difficult but need to be 

GRAPHICS 

None 

ATMOSPHERE 



PLAYABIUTY 



VALUE FOR MONEY 



OVERALL 



worked out carefully. There is no need to 
examine anything as everything h 
described fully. All you need to work out 
is where the item is to be used. 

One thing I like alx>ut the game is the 
way you are allowed to explore freely 
before the need to start saving and solving 
the problems; and save you must, because 
the authors, John Thackr>' and Jon Par- 
tington, have devised some mean ways of 
killing you. They include being strangled 
by The Old Man of the Sea, eaten by 
cannibals, meeting a rather poisonous 
Manticorc and other novel ways of pre- 
venting you reaching your goal. 

Mofisters of Murdac has instant appeal 
and will keep most players pounding away 
at the keyboard to the early hours of the 
morning. I can only hope that the game 
is converted to other machines so that 
everybody can enjoy it. 



3)EWELSOF 



DARKNESS i 



> AU 

# Rainbird 

# Graphic/Text Adventure 
m£14.95'£19SS 

In the adventure world there arc not many 
games which could be called tnie classics. 
A few have earned the accolatc but few 
are more deserving of it than the early 
adventures from Ixvel 9. For sheer enjoy- 
ment with a wealth of problems, massive 
locations and terrific atmospheric text 
descriptions, few games, even of today's 
standard, could match the excitement 
generated by Pete Austin and company. 

It appeared to be impossible to improve 
them in any way hut with the release of 
Jewels of Darkness they certainly have 
been, ^^ 

Jewels is an omnibus of the Colos,sal 
Trilogy containing Colossal Adventure, 
Advenufre Quest and Dungeon Adven- 
ture, enhanced and with graphics 
included, but before wc deal wiih the 
additional features, let us look at the 
adventures. 



Colossal Adventure is the re-make of 
the original Crovvthcr and Wood Adven- 
ture with an additional 7U locations for 
good measure. That is like an adventure 
itself. Starting in the old stone hut, you 
must make your way into the massive 
underground cave system, where you will 
find much to amuse and confuse you. The 
main objective is to find all the various 
treasures and return with them to the hut. 
It sounds easy but with the devious mind 
of the author at work, I can assure it is not. 

Adventure Quest is set some 100 years 
after the caves have l>ccn robbed. As an 
apprentice magician your task is to find 
and defeat the evil Lord Agaliarept, who 
happens to have a murderous band of 
Ores camped conveniently outside your 
king's door. The evil Lord has issued an 
ultimatum - siui*ender now and die with 
dignity; and you have only one week to 
decide. 

The king has only one alternative. 
Quickly calling the leader of the Wizard's 
Guild, he reminds him of all the favours 

GRAPHICS 



ATMOSPHERE 



PLAYABILITY 



VALUE FOR MONEY 



OVERALL 



bestowed on the Guild through the years 
and now is the time to repay them. Either 
defeat the Lord in one week or it is head- 
chopping lime - and thai is where you 
come in. 

Once again, the imagination of the wri- 
ter presents you with all kinds of weird 



and wonderful problems to overcome 
before yuou find and defeat Agaliarept. 
They include having to find the four ele- 
ment stones, keep out of the way of a 
giant sand worm, cross burning deserts, 
climb Ore-infested mountains, cross 
swamps where magical hands grab you 
from all sides until you eventually reach 
the Black Tower - and guess who lies in 
wait for you there? 

Dungeon Adventure continues the day 
after the defeat of Agatiarept. Playing the 
part of a soldier of fortune, it dawns on 
you quickly that there must be plenty of 
loot in the Black Tower, so off you go as 
fast as possible to do some old-fashioned 
pillaging. By far the most atmospheric of 
the three. Dungeon barely lets you catch 
your breath before some other frustrating 
problem faces you. Once again there are 
many locations and some distinctly dis- 
tasteful characters and things to overcome 
makes for smashing adventuring. 

All (hrec games are written using the 
new parser system. Newxommands added 
are the OOPS command - vcrv useful 
when, having made an incorrect move; 
typing OOPs takes you back to the pre- 
vious location; RAM save which, as it 
suggests, saves to RAM, therefore dis- 
pensing with the need to save to tape until 
you decide to quit the session; and multi- 
tasking. 

It was strange seeing graphics but they 
are a cut above the normal Level 9 
graphics and enhance the overall playabil- 
ity of the games. 

My opinion is that with the release of 
Jewels, Level 9 has once again brought 
back fun to adventuring, so even though 
you may have played the games in their 
earlier forms, do not let that deter you 
from buying them again. For those who 
have not yet played them, buy a copy as 
soon as possible. 




^^IbS^S^SE 



'*^S5P 



mmended byAmstrad 



BBc,«5;,^'^«'. 



NO HIGH 

FIXED 

PRICE 

REPAIR! 



SOFTWARE WORTH 



WITH EVERY 

SPECTRUM 

REPAIR 



The established 

company with a proven reputation 

Over the years we have built up an enviable reputation 
^ in the UK for computer repairs, which is second to 
none. This is based on many years experience in 
repairing Spectrum^ Commodore, BBC and other 
leading makef; - and we were the first AMSTRAD 
repair centre anywhere. This is why we have 
customers all over 



the worid- 



We are the best, forget the rest, look what we offer. 



OON 



I rSo high fixed price - you only 
pay what the repair actually 
costs. 

I While-Cl-Wait Service - spare 
parts for all leading computers 
- available over the counter, 

I State of the art test equipment 
to provide comprehensive lest 
report and locate faults. 

I Repairs to all leading makes of 
computer. 

1 Amstrad specialist 

1 Spectrum rubber keytx>ards 
repaired for only £8.95. 




I Commodore 64*s, Vic 20 s. 
Atari, Commodore 16 s emd 
Plus 4 s repaired. 

I Discounts for colleges, 
schools etc. 

I Every computer repaired by us 
is completely overhauled and 
tested before return. 

I All computers returned 
carriage paid and covered by 
insurance. 

I Three noonths guarantee 
included. 

I Free Software worth £35 with 
every Spectrum repair* 



IISGflUNTCOMPONENTSi 



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REPAIRS 

from 

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It 



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,^a TODAY 




Simpfy send your computer 
I securely packed, together 
with a cheque or postal order for the 
maximum fee to the address betow. 
Your computer will be repaired and 
returned ^o you within 24 hours 
together wth the balance of the fee 
and your FREE £35 worth of 
software* 

I Or if you prefer a written 
I quotation just send £2.50 to 
cover post & packing. 



□ 



I AJtcmativeiy just quote your 
Access or Visa card number. 



ComiTKxtore £29.00 

ISpcctnimj 
£9.95 

♦ £1.50 p.p7 






^ 



SPECIALIST COMI 



Dept. 12, 28 College Street, WORCESTER WRl 2LS 
Telephone: 0905-611072/613023 



WE SET THE STANDARD BY WHICH EVERYONE ELSE IS JUDGED 



42 YOUR COMPUTER. OCTOBER 1986 



GUIDE TO THIS MONTH'S 
REVIEWS 

AMSTRAD 
Speed King 

COMMODORE 64 

Thoi Boxing 

Hole m One 

Infiftfolor 

Super Cycle 

Parallax 

Beyond The Forbidden Forest 

Miami Vice 

COMMODORE 1 28 
Tboi Boxing 

COMMODORE CI 6 

Joilbreak 
Leoper 

SPECTRUM 

lop Of The Gods 

Xarq 

Tennis 

Need Cooch 

Octagon Squad 

VARIOUS 
Triviol Pursuits 



Software 
Shortlist 

Each of the games reviewed in Software 
Shortlist has been reviewed exter^sively by 

our team of reviewers. 

We do not include reviews of unfinished 

products in this section of Your Computer: 

they are the games you can buy now or in 

the near future. 

* See the Software News and Preview features 

for advance news of games being 

developed. 




Watch for the Your 
Computer Soft j 
Stars. They are | 
awarded to gannes 
which, in our i 

opinion, offer 
outstanding value. 




INFILTRATOR 



► C64 us. Gold • Simuiatior^ • Frarrcis Jago • £9.95 



Boulderdash, Chris Gray's first well- 
known computer game, never achieved 
the amount of success it deserved in the 
U.K. Although it reached number one in 
the U.S. .it barely made the top 40 here. 

Consequently there was no real fuss 
in the U.K. when U.S. Gold announced 
that it had obtained the rights to 
Infiltrator the newest game by the author 
of Boulderdash. There should have been. 

You play Johnny '*Jimbo-Baby" 
McGibbits, also known as The Infiltrator. 
In a usual day for Jimbo-Baby, you must 
save the wortd from destruction. To do 
so you must complete various gruelling 
tasks, starting with flying the Whizbang 
Enterprises Gizmo DHX-1 attack 
helicopter. 

To complete Infiltrator successfully 
you must fly the helicopter into enemy 
territory* land, bluff your way into the 
enemy base, save the world and then 



GRAPHICS 

m m m m m 

SOUND 
• • • 

PLAYABILnY 

• # # # 
VALUE FOR MONEY 

# # • # 
OVERALL 



escape. At first the control panel looks 
dauntingly complicated but soon, as the 
sweal on your palm increases, your 
reactions take over and flying becomes 
nothing but pure instinct. Well, that is the 
idea. In practice, a few hours at the 
manual proves essential. 

Using the tactical maps you navigate, 
especially as Jimbo-Baby's sense of 
direction is almost as bad as that of a 
blind lemming. Graphically^ the 




simulation ts the most impressive part of 
the game, with moving fingers, animated 
thumbs and impressive 3D. 

It is only on landing, however, that you 
discover the tnje depth of Infiltrator. 
Using a variety of pieces of equipment, 
you must avoid the enemy and perhaps 
then you might complete the game - but 
only perhaps. 

Graphically, the second and third 
sections of Infiltrator are not as good as 
the original flight simulation. On the other 
hand, for people who are not fans of flight 
simulations, however pretty, will be 
pleased to see much more arcade 
orientated sections. 

My only criticism ot this game would 
be that it attempts to be all things to all 
people, and in doing so has had to 
compromise its position as a game that 
requires thought as well as an itchy 
finger, but thjs is not a major failing. 

Infiltrator is a game which should 
appeal to simulation fans and arcade 
players. For the money, there is plenty of 
game and that bodes well for the future 
of full-priced games. 



YOUR COMPUTER, OCTOBER 1986 



► spectrum Electric Dreams • Arcade # Francis Jago £9,99 



Computers running wild seems to be an 
excellent topic for games, even if it is 
now a little over-used. In Xarq, the latest 
release from Electric Dreams, a 
computer-created island is about to be 
destroyed by the computer which 
created it. 

There is one chance. If you can get 
into the main area and destroy the central 
power reactor, the world on which you 
live will be saved. To help you in that 
arduous task is an impressive Nik-Nik 
Hi-Speed Hydraboat which, in fact, looks 
like a small white splodge. 

On loading, and having spent a time 
poring over the instnictions, a problem 
is encountered. Although a pleasant 
scenario has been written, the game has 
been ignored, thus making playing very 
difficult. 



GRAPHICS 

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SOUND 

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PLAYABIUTY 

m m m 

VALUE FOR mmEY 

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OVBtAU 



That criticism apart, Xarq has some 
excellent features which should make it 
appeal to a wide variety of Soectrum 
game-players. Control of your Nik-Nik is 
via keyboard or joystick, although even 
the most dextrous gamers will find using 
the keyboard almost impossible. To 
destroy the variety of enemies you 
encountef requires use not only of lasers 




but guided miss;ies. mojtars. and m 
special cases* depth charges. 

The graphics and sound are good, with 
obvious attention to detail, and help to 
make Xarq an above-average game 
which, although by no means perfect, 
will certainty provide a challenge. 



iSlUPER CYCLE 



► CS4 # EpyxAJ.S. Gold Arc^d^ Francis Jago £9,95 

Motorcyclists everywhere at last can 
really experience the sensation of 
screaming round a left-hander with your 
knee scraping the tarmac. Arcade goers 
immediately will recognise Super Cycle 
as an excellent copy of the arcade 
sensation, Hang-On, Looking at first very 
similar to Pole Position, Super Cycle has 



GRAPHICS 

^ m m m i 

SOUND 



PLAYABILHY 

m m m m 

VALUE FOR MONEY 

m m m m 

OVERAU 




sufficient extra features to hook almost 
any ganr\es player. 

Programmed by the premier U.S. 
software house, Epyx, as usual the 
attention to detail is phenomenal. The 
ability to choose not only the colour of 
your motorcycle but also the colour and 
pattern of your leathers allows you to 
mimic perfectly such starts of Kenny 



Roberts and Kork Ballington. 

The graphics are fairly standard, 
especially when compared to games 
such as Revs, but when you corner hard 
and the little man leans right over you 
can almost feel the tension. 

Supposedly based on the 750cc. 
class, although having only three-speed 
gears puts an end to any attempt at 
reality, the revolution counter red -lines at 
10,000 revs, which amounts to about 
140mph in top gear. 

With three levels and many different 
tracks, including such obstacles as 
closed lanes, ice, oil and rain, not to 
mention the other machines, it proves 
extremely challenging. 

Games from Epyx can t>e relied on to 
l>e excellent and Super Cycle is no 
exception. It is a game which makes you 
want to play again and again until you 
have beaten it» and that will take a long 
time. 



}PjARALLAX 



> CS4 Ocean Arcade Franas Jaoo £8,95 



At first glance. Parallax looks to be a 
combination of two classic shoot- 'em- 
ups. Chris Butler's Z, and Andrew 
Braybrook's Uridium. It has the familiar 
mettalix graphics, combined with some 
excellent four-way scrolling, and the ship 
climbs and dives in a very similar way. 

As with most shoot- 'em-ups, starting 
to play Parallax is very simple - you pick 
up a joystick and blast. Parallax has the 
added dimension that you must guess 
the height at which the enemy is flying 
and then adjust your height accordingly. 

If you land on any of the strips, you 
can choose to leave your spaceship 
so long as you have sufficient oxygen. 

In this mode you are seen as a 



GRAPHICS 

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SOUND 

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PlAYAaUTY 

m m m m 

VALUE FOR mONEY 

m m m m 

OVERAU 



Commando-esque little character, 
scuttling round the surface. At that point 
the object is to get in to one of the many 
hangars and obtain sections of the 
password to allow you to the next stage 
of the game. 

To gain those passwords you must 
stun a few scientists and then use their 



access cards to gain entrance to the 
main computer bank» also known as The 
Big One. As the length of the passwords 
seems to be five characters it can take 
a long time to leave each level. 

The music and sound effects are 
absolutely stunning, with Marfin Galway 
getting better all the time. Those points, 
added to an already great game, make 
it one of the best shoot -'em -ups this year. 



YOUR COMPUTEfl. OCTOBER 1906 





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SOFTWARE SHORTLIST 



► C64 • Ocean • Arcade Francis Jago • £8.95 



Crockett and Tubbs, the oniy cops to 
have Pierre Cardin warrant cards, have 
finally been turned into multi-coloured 
sprites. Ocean, the company responsible 
for many of the best licensed games, has 
converted the popular cop series into a 
fast-moving arcade game and it is set to 
take the market by storm. 

For probably the first time in any game, 
the player has the chance to drive a 




criminals always drive red cars. 

To apprehend a criminal, you must 
arrive at the correct meeting place, which 
could be any of eight bars, enter the bar, 
and start quizzing him. Points are scored 
for collecting contrabands eliciting 
information, or shooting his getaway 
vehicle. 

Graphically, Miami Vice is good 
though not outstanding. Most of the time 
is spent controlling the car, whereas the 
best graphics are reserved for when you 
are in the bars. Once again Martin 



r 



Ferrari Daytona round the streets of 
Miami, chasing, quizzing and killing a 
variety of criminals at the same time. 
In the game there are three specific 
sections - driving the car, searching 
various bars and clubs, and chasing the 
criminals. The last section is made 
considerably easier by the fact that 




game becomes enthralling and 
frustrating. Whether or not you were a 
fan of the TV series, the game should 
appeal Unlike many games being 
produced, the value of this game is 
more than skin-deep. 

GRAPHICS 

m m 

SOUND 



PLAY ABILITY 



VALUE FOR MONEY 



OVERALL 



wmm 



Galway has produced an impressive 
soundtrack, v/ith both a version of jhe 
program theme tune and some good 
incidental music. 

Once accustomed to controlling the 
car, a matter of extreme precision, the 




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Spectrum • Imagine • Simui^tjon • Danief McGrath # £8.95 



Of all the Konami conversions Imagine 
has undertaken, Tenn/s must have been 
the most unrewarding. Unlike many of 
the other Konami arcade games, there 
have been plenty of good tennis games 
for the Spectrum, culminating with the 
excellent Psion Match Point 

To compete with Match Point, Tennis 
had to be fast, playable and graphically 
superb. What is a surprise is that Imagine 
has taken an obvious amount of care to 
make sure this is the ultimate simulation 
of a sport which gave us such stars as 
John McEnroe, although without the 
tantnjms. 

What makes this game so enjoyable is 
the ease with which you can get into it. 
Unlike many games, there is no need to 
be a professional player to give the 



GRAPHICS 

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SOUND 

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PtAYABIUTY 

# • # • 

VALUE FOR MONEY 

# # # • 
OVERALL 



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computer a relatively good run for its 
money. 

The ability to have two-player games 
is a much-overlooked option but Tennis 
compensates for that with tv/o differing 
double-player options. Not only can one 
player play a friend but two friends can 
tackle the computer in a demon game of 



doubles. 

The accuracy of the flight of the ball is 
something of a marvel, especially with 
the well-defined shadow. Extras such as 
realistic net-cords and some thrilling net 
play makes it the definitive tennis 
simulation for Spectmm owners: the only 
question is if it is not too late. 



Trivial pursuits 



► Various Domark Quiz # f rands Jago £14,95 



The reputation of Domark for producing 
high-qualrty games is not particutariy 
enviable. Releases such as Friday the 
Thirteenth have done little to endear it to 
the buying public. Contrary to popular 
opinion, however, Domark has never 
been short of good ideas; unfortunately 
it may have been short of good 
programmers. 

With Trivial Pursuits, its latest release. 
It has managed to change that. Not only 
has it acquired an extremely-sought- 
after licence but it has had it programmed 
by an excellent group of programmers. 
Oxford Digital Enterprises. 

Packaged in the familiar colour of the 
original Gent/s version, it remains faithful 
to the principle of the game, while adding 
extras only a computer game can 
provide. To answer the critics who 
doubted the ability of any computer 
game to ask questions, Domark has 
managed to produce a data-tape which 
increases the total questions to around 




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' £oir options 




3.000. with 500 being stored in the 
computer at any time. 

By adding a character, Tee Pee, who 
acts as a random number generator, and 
a question master, Domark has made 
sure that the game will appeal to quiz 



GRAPHICS 

# • # # 
SOUND 

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PLAYABlLnr 

# # # • # 
VALUE FOR MONEY 

# # # # 
OVERALL 



fanatics of all ages. In play, the game is 
divided into two sections, the board area 
and the question area. 

The board is identical to the original, 
as are the categories, but when you have 
chosen, you are asked the question in a 
separate room. In an attempt to make 
the game more social, you are required 
to be honest with the game, telling the 
computer whether or not you answered 
correctly. Although that is satisfactory for 
group play, it leads to massive cheating 
when you play alone. 

One very attractive feature of the 
computer game is the visual and musical 
questions, which vary from the "Who 
composed this overture?" to "Which 
game uses this pitch?*' 

At ei4,95. Trivial Pursuits, the 
computer game, cannot be called 
inexpensive but it is head and shoulders 
above any other quiz game available. In 
one fell swoop. Domark has re- 
established itself as one of the top 
software houses and if it keeps its 
promise and produces more data tapes, 
this game will become an all-time classic. 



/<JUR COMPUTER. OCTOBER 1986 



SOFTWARE SHORTLIST 



► Spectrum • AOdfCtive Games # Strategy # Francis Jago • £8.95 



With American football booming in the 
U.K., it was only a matter of time before 
someone released a strategy game 
based on running a team; and who better 
than Addictive Games, producer of the 
nov/ legendary Football Manager? 

Fans of other strategy by Addictive 
Games will soon feel at home with the 
set-up of Head Coach, to the extent that 
knowledge of the game is by no means 
essential; the small but informative 
manual gives a glossary of what's what. 

Play is divided into three sections - 
choosing the team, playing a match, and 
examining statistics. Unlike an English 
soccer team, an American football team 
can have anything up to 50 players, with 
specific players for offence, defence, 
and field goals. 

Once you have chosen which team 
you wish to represent, and at what level. 




GRAPHICS 

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PtAYABIUTY 

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VALUE FOR MONEY 
# # • • 

OVBtALL 



the season starts in earnest. Before 
reaching the SuperbowL you must play 
no fewer than 15 matches, beating the 
tikes of the Chicago Bears - and crushing 
the Fridge. 

Criticising a game such as this is all 
too easy but in many ways Addictive has 
tackled a difficult job well. Why each play 
has only two downs, rather than the more 




usual four. I am not sure, but that is only 
a minor detail. 

In the match simulation . there are four 
offensive and four defensive options, 
although extras, such as punting, have 
been omitted. Head Coach is not 
everything it should have been but for 
the off-season it should provide a few 
weeks* fun. 



IBlEYOND THE FORBIDDEN FOREST 



► Commodore S4 # US. Gold • Arcade • Daniel McGrath # £9S5 

GRAPHICS 

m m m 

SOUND 


PLAYABILITY 

VALUE FOR MONEY 


OVERAU 



There are certain games which, however 
crude in execution, have something to 
make them both addictive and 
frustratingv It is nothing to do with either 
the graphics or the sound but instead is 
the thought put into the game before it 
was programmed. 

Beyond the Forbidden Forest is one 
such game, except that the sound and 



graphics are excellent as well. The player 
must travel through two levels, killing 
various assorted monsters, which range 
from evil-looking scorpions to something 
which can best be described as an 
animated hamburger. 

Each time one animal is slain, the 
player is rewarded with a golden arrow. 
The anrow has two purposes; first, it will 



allow you to be rejuvenated, should you 
have the misfortune to die and. second, 
the arrows must be used in the second 
section. That means that the more 
creatures you kill early the further you are 
likely to progress in the game. 

Fans of Hammer Horror films will relish 
the chance to watch some of the most 
gruesome death scenes since the Texas 
Chainsaw Massacre, with gallons of 
blood everywhere. 

Using a technique called - wait for it 
-Omnidimension 4D. the character can 
be moved into and out of the screen, 
travelling behind certain objects, and 
changing size. The score is worthy of a 
John Carpenter film, with real 
atmosphere. 

Beyond The Forbidden Forest is a 
game perfectly suited to the Commodore 
64 and it is also great fun. 



Thai boxing 



► Commodore 64/128 • ANCO # Arcade Daniel McGrath £7.95 



It is easy to be critical of 128 games 
because you expect them to be so much 
better than those for the 64. There is, of 
course, no reason for such high 
expectations, as the 128 graphics 
capability is similar to that of the 64. So 
will be no surprise that 7?7a/ Sox/np looks, 
sounds and plays like a 64 martial arts 
game - a fairly good one. 

The background, as you would expect, 
changes after every bout. What makes 
Thai Boxing different is that the angle 
changes every few minutes. That 
probably needs more explanation. 
Initially you grapple with your opponent 
from opposite sides of the screen. Then 
you face each other from a 45-degree 



angle, giving a 3D perspective with your 
line of attack coming out of the screen. 
Another spectacular feature which will 
appeal to gore lovers is the contestants* 
faces at the lop of the screen. They 
become more cut. bruised and bloody 
as the combat progresses, though ey/ery 
now and then the miniature towel man 



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VALUE FOR MONEY 


OVERALL 



appears and wipses away the lacerations. 
Anco has done a good job. If you want 
a martial arts game for your 1 28 and are 
not already playing Fist in 64 mode, the 
new features like gore make it well worth 
examination. 



till 



YOUR COMPUIBB. OCTOBl 



BUDGET SOFTWARE REVIEWS 



► Cf6 Bug Byte Piatform Francis Jago £1.99 



True ledge games seem to have faded 
into oblivion recently. Consequently, 
when Leaper arrived from Bug Byte» it 
was received very well. As we all know, 
old ideas never die - they are just 
re-programmed and Leaper is one such 
game. 
The idea is to jump upwards as fast as 



possible through a series of small gaps. 
Unfortunately you can also fall down 
those gaps and life is therefore made 
very difficult. Although neither the 
graphics nor the sound is outstanding, 
leaper is very playable and that helps a 
great deal. Baddies abound and CI 6 
owners could do much worse. 



(mttAu 



t « A P <r >^ 




UI VLBREAK 



> C16 Bug Byte Action Francis Jago £1,99 



OVERALL 



Remember Breakout? It was a game 
released many many years ago which 
involved using a bat to deflect a ball on 
ID a walL From it, new ideas sprung and. 
together with Pong, it was one of the 
earliest computer games. 

Jaiibreak is another version of 
hre ;out. It might have pretty colours 



and it might have some pleasant sounds 
but it is still a standard and extremely 
unexceptional game. 

Therefore games such as this cannot, 
and will not, succeed. Uninspiring 
graphics and boring game play make it 
a game to avoid. 



:iy I, 1. 





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'Oj TAGON SQUAD 



► Spectrum Mastertronic Arcade Adventure 
Spectrum owners who wish they owned 



an Amiga will immediately be endeared 
to Octagon Squad because of the 
complicated use of icons to control most 
aspects of the game. 

After a heavy chemical warfare attack, 
planet 54.7 is in dire need of some help 
which you are expected to give. Using a 



Francis Jago 0£U99 

heavy dose of strategy, together with an 
arcade adventure feel, Octagon Squad 
manages to involve the player at once, 
although some of the icon uses are less 
than obvious. 

Graphically, it is good though not 
remarkable. It is left to the game, rather 
than its presentation, to sell it. 



OVERALL 




J SI PEED KING 



Amstrad Mastertronic Arcade Francis Jago £h99 



OVERALL 



Amstrad owners green with envy at the 
thought of Commodore owners playing 
Super Cycle from Epyx will be pleased 
to see that Mastertronic has converted 
Speed King to the 464 and 6128. 

Although by no means as impressive 
technically as Super Cycle it stiil 
ma nages to create an impressive feel of 



motorcycling. Graphically good, and 
with effective sound effects, it represents 
superb value. 

With maps of all the different tracks, 
and sensitive joystick control, it is really 
difficult to get into the top 20 and, even 
after many hours of practice, victory is 
unlikely. 




JL lAP OF THE GODS 



> Spectrum Mastertronic Arcade Adventure Francis Jago £1.99 



OVERALL 



Arcade adventures have proved to be the 
staple diet of many a software house and 
Mastertronic has produced some of the 
best, especially on the Spectrum. 
Although Lap of the Gods is not up to 
the standard of Knight Tyme, it is still a 
highly-challenging and enjoyable romp. 
As the name would suggest, it involves 



tasks for the gods and in this case it is 
for the player to deliver the crystals of 
ZZam or remain there forever. As with 
most games of this ilk, extra powers can 
be gained along the way which, when 
used correctly, can either help or hinder 
The graphics and sound are good and 
for a budget game it is a bargain. 




Mole in one 



► C64 Mastertronic Simufation Francis Jago £2,99 



Commodore 64 owners have had more 
than their fair share of golf games 
recently, with Leader Board and Golf 
Construction Set both topping the 
charts. The inevitable question, 
therefore, about Hole in One, is what 
makes it different? 
Graphically, it uses a three- 



dimensional perspective throughout, 
with an excellent piece of animation as 
the player removes his chosen club and 
plays the shot. 

Only when you land on the green does 
the view change, with an overall look at 
the green to make the shot easier. With 
a variety of holes and great graphics. 




YOUR COMPUTER. OCTOBER 1986 



■v^v SmcUiir Research^ Sinclair had 
V ■ completely lo^t its way in the com- 
^ ^ puier indusiry. The two previous 
Sinclair releases, the Spcctnim+. and the 
Spectrum 128, had both failed to fill the 
obvious gap for the upgrading Specirum 
owner. 

It was no surprise therefore when 
rumours spread that Amstrad was plan- 
ning to release a new Spectrum. As with 
all new taunclte>'%. there was a great deal 
of speculation as to what the machine 
would be like. There was even talk of a 
GEM-like environment, the first for a iruc 
home computer. 

What was a surprise was the arrival of 
ihc Spectrum 128+2. Similar cosmcticaHy 
to any of the cassette-based Amstrads« 
rather than the more cluttered Sinclair, 
its name alone suggested that Amstrad 
had not wasted a great deal of money in 
advancing the spccirication of the 
Speciruni 128, 

On inspection, it becomes apparent that 
what Amstrad has done h to upgrade a 
Spectrum 128 into a computer which can 
compete with the likes of the Amstrad 
464. although why it would want to do 
that is a mystery. A full- travel OWERTY 
keyboard is the first improvement, along 
with a more attractive grey colour scheme. 
By including an internal tape recorder, 
many of the notorious loading problems 
should also be over. 

, Underneath the new facade lies the 
same 128 which received such strong crili- 



The 48K Spectrum Is the top selling 

games machine in the U.K. In this, its 

latest guise, Amstrad hope to continue 

to maintain its success. Francis Jago 

investigates the latest addition to the 

Sinclair stable. 




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cism from software houses for its incom- 
patibility problems. Thankfully Amstrad 
has removed the dictionary usually 
engraved on the Spectrum keyboard but 
all the functions are still there for use in 
48K mode, while the manual lists them 
ail very clearly. 

On powcr-up, users of the Spectrum i28 
will recognise the four choices, although 
not surprisingly there is no tape test. 
Those options - Tape loader, 128 Basic, 
Calculator and 48 Basic - are obtained by 
moving the bar over one and pressing 
return. 

lape loader allows any 128 games to 
be loaded directly and in use with ofricial 
128 games there were no difficulties. Cal- 
culator allows the computer to be used in 
best Casio style and both Basics act as 
would be expected. 

For port the 1284-2 is almost identical 
to the original 128, apart from two 
important additions, joystick ports. 
Placed neatly on the left-hand side of the 
machine, it seems that Amstrad has paid 
some attention to critics v-ho pointed out 
that the 128 could never be taken seriously 



50 YOUR COMPUTER. OCTTOSER 1986 



usaaaa 



MACHINE REVIEW 




as a games machine without some 
standard 9'pin ports, 

Unfonunatcly. ific non-standard lelc- 
phone socket Midi output is siili the same. 
Using the 128+ with 48K games, the 
sound is now wired thiuuglt the television 
and, using Tilters. even the humble BEHP 
J>ecomes something to noiiee. 

In use, the keyboard will be a real bonus 
to anyone who has survived through the 
origin^il *dead flesh* and the newer OL* 
style keyboards, ll is positive, without 
being loo firm, and is spaced sufficiently 
si> that even the most fussy typist would 
approve. Again^ as with rhe I2S, there is 
a port at the back for a numcrte keypad, 
although Amstrad, tmv, has decided that 
addition is not worth including. 

5,000 games 

Unlike many previous Sinclair com- 
puicrs, Amstrad has made the 128+2 look 
and, in use, feel like a wcll-niadc and well- 
assembled computer. No longer can you 
make all the keys drop off by holding 
the computer upside down and tapping it. 

With a software base of considerably 
more than 5,(K)() games and utilities, it 
must be accc(netl that many people will 
buy the 1284-2 purely as a 48K Spectrum 
with a few extras. So it was a surprise that 
the new 128 still seemed to have the com- 
patibility problems of its predecessor. 
When loading the games which caused the 
problems in the first place, it was obvious 
tlial Amstrad saw the problem as the 
resixnisibility of programmers rather than 
its own. 

In an effort to ensure that programs 
released hcneeftirward do not share those 
problems, Amstrad has initiated the 
Sinclair Oualiiy C ontrol system of check- 




An insiders view. 

tng. Unlike other companies, Amstrad 
seems to recognise the ini[>ortanceof soft* 
ware houses. 

One of the first games to have been 
stamped with the Oualiiy (\>nirot seal of 
approval is Moonlight Madness from 
Bubble Bus and, sure enough, it worked 
perfectly, loading either directly from the 
first options screen or by first going into 
48K Basic and the entering LOAD "*\ 
Commenting on that. Bubble Bus 
remarked on how simple the prt>cedure 
is, and that bodes well for the future. 

For people unfamiliar with the 



Spectrum style - (he new Amstrad packaging. 




improvements the original 128 provided, 
the 128+2 will stand out as having 
involved a great deal of thought. One of 
the most impressive new features of the 
machine is the sound. It uses a port 
designed specifically for sound output and 
a ptjwerful new sound chip, the AY-3- 
8912. 1o make the most of the chip, a 
new command has been included, PLAY. 
As the chip is the same as in the Amstrad 
range of micros, on which a great deal of 
good music has been written, and the 
1 28+2 has a far superior means of amplifi- 
cation, any programs used to exploit it 
could give the Commodore 64 a run for 
its money. 

For anyone considering the first-time 
purchase of a computer, the Spectrum 
128+2 will be one of the main contenders. 
It provides neither the monitor nor 
graphics of the Amstrad 464 but instead 
it has a library tjf programs which runs 
into thousands, even if only a few exploit 
the full capabilities of the machine. 

Priced very competitively at £149.9,5, it 
must represent an excellent purchase, 
especially for people who consider 
monitors an unnecessary piece of equip- 
ment. There are criticisms of the machine 
but few, if any, can be levelled at 
Amstrad, which has done an excellent job 
of re-packaging a computer which had 
begun to look distinctly staid. 

Whether the 128+2 will l>e seen by 48K 
Spectrum owners as a perfect route for 
upgrading is another mailer, depending 
mainly on how willing they would be to 
throw away some of the programs which 
refuse to run on the new machine. 



YOUR COMPtJTER. OCTOBER 1986 51 




THIS LITTLE monEY- 




^Om^S Much QUALITY. 





^^immm 



Unbeatable quality at outstanding prices ... 
Americana Software is now available for more 
systems than ever, bringing more 
titles, more value for money, 
to mure games cnthu:siasts. 
Don't settle for less, 
look for the best 
. 15 new titles 
just released. 




For xrf S MANY ^ YsTEmq 



DISK £4:99 



UCENSED TO THRILL 




SOFTWARE 



£299 TAPE 



AMERICANA Software, Umis 2/3. , HoIforU Way, HoUor<J. BIRuMINCiUAM B67AX. Td: 021 ^Se ^3»8, 



PHOGRAMMING 




»IHE EIPEM WAY« 



/n the first of a series. 
Your Computer, with the 
hcip of a few well-known 
programmers, will pro- 
vide an insight into how they 
manage to produce such amaz- 
ing games. We hope it will also 
stimulate you so that you might 

Attacked by mutant potato ringx in Sanxion 




o o 



kk^ A Mi,..,!: r>"4 



k:^:^ 



v<^^^ 



be the next star of the pro- 
gramming world. 

This listing for the Commo- 
dore 64/128 was written by 
Gar\' Liddon, technical execu- 
tive with a new and exciting 
software house. Thalamus. 
Regular readers of Your Com- 
puter will recognise Thalamus 
as the company featured in 
software previews in August. 

Liddon started his pro- 
gramming career at Domark, 
where he was the technical 
assistant. Soon, however, he 
A pproachinti civiii nation . 



TItIs monfti Thalamus gives clues 

and tips for graphics on the 

Commodore 64, Including sprites 

in the border. 



Tlialanms. it had only one level 
and lacked finesse. After 
many months of hard work, 
with Liddon spending hour 
after hour with programmer 
Stavros Fasoulas, the game has 
now reached a stage where it 
wilt soon be published and it 
looks as if it will take ihe games 
W4»rld by storm. 

Bar-o-Mauc, the listing Lid* 
don has provided for Commo* 
dore owners, will run on the 
(fommodorc 64 or on llic 128 
in (>4 mode. To use it, you will 
need an assembler, preferably 
Laser Genius of Machine 
Lightning, although it will 
work with others. 

Once you have loaded the 
assembler, you should set the 
Nii^ht patrol. 



left to work for Zzap 64, a gam- 
ers* magazine. It was in that 
role that his flair for pro- 
gramming became obvit>us and 
when Newsficld, publisher of 
Zzap. decided to start a soft- 
ware company, he seemed the 
obvious choice for a technical 
man. 

The first release from 
Thalamus was orginally titled 
Finnhlast but that has been 
altered to the eminently more 
suitable Sanxion. When the 
game was fir^t seen by 



by typing SYS START. If you 
save it as machine code, you 
will be able to load it without 
the need for an assembler. 

If you do not own an assem- 
bler but one of your friends 
does, ask him either to make 
a tape or a Basic DATA listing 
for you to use. As you can sec, 
the listing is already well- 
documented but many people 
will find that by altering certain 
undocumented areas of the 
code, new effects can be 
created easily. 

What Bar-o-Matic shows 
well is how smooth movement 
can be achieved using assem- 
bler and how it is possible it) 
write a program to use the bor- 
der area of the Commodore 
screen, something not many 
[Kople have achieved success- 
fully. 

Using the joystick in port 
two, Bar-o-Matic lets you con- 
trol the movement of the bars 
up and down the screen, with 
the t>ne you control Ixring 'ch- 





tcxt memory to S5(KKJ,S8(KK). 
Once you have typed-in all the 
listing you should assemble it 
- on Laser Genius you would 
use ASM,M - and then run it 



ascd' by various others. 
Although there is little point to 
the program, it is interesting 
for anyone trying to get the 
most from Commodore 
graphics. 



LISTING OVER 



YOUR COMPUTER. OCTOBER 1986 53 




S30 




, 




5H0 


START 


-soon 




550 




•-START- 


-SIO 


5GO 




* 




570 




.BYTE 


SOF . SOS 


seo 




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SCF , S07 


S90 




.BYTE 


19E 


&00 




.BYTE 


'2065 ' 


610 




.BYTE 


*GRL* 


eao 




• BYTE 


0,0.0 


630 




t 




610 




I -SETS ^ 


SYS 2065 


650 




iAS A BASIC LINE | 


660 




I 




670 




• 




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TR 


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630 


BR 


-S33 




700 


UEC 


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710 


rwx 


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7ao 


nAX2 


-5 




730 


SPEED 


-»10 




740 


U 


-SDOOO 




7S0 








760 








770 




I -CONSTANTS 1 


760 








790 








600 








810 


PSYC 


'.OEFflAC 


X 


620 








830 




LDY iX 




B40 




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860 




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670 




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880 




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B90 




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900 




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3X0 




NOP 




seo 




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930 




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960 




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970 








980 








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1010 




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1070 


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1060 








1090 








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ADC AA 




UHO 




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1150 




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1160 




1 




1170 




; 




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SUB 


1190 




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1200 




PHA 




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1220 




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1230 




PLA 




12H0 




.ENOUAC 




12S0 




I 




1260 


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1270 




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1260 




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1290 




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I 




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1320 




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1330 




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1360 




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1370 




t 




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t 




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1110 










1150 






i 




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1 




1170 




1 




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BEGIN 


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1800 1 






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2220 


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1 




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2250 


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8 


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10 


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18 


2310 


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56 


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61 


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2120 


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111 


2130 


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152 


2110 


iPSYC 


160 


2150 


iPSYC 


168 


21&0 


I PSYC 


176 



54 YOUR COMPUTER. OCTOBER 1986 



PROGRAMMING 




eH70 




iPSYC 184 


BMBO 




:PSYC 192 


2H30 




t PSYC 200 


esoo 




! 




asio 




tPOKe ft0021«& 1 


2SB0 




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?S40 




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2SSO 




• 




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CLI 




es7o 




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CLCBF 


BS80 




- 




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t 




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PLA 




2610 




TftY 




E&EQ 




PLA 




ee30 




1 




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mri 




esso 




1 




2660 




1 




£670 




1 




£660 




t 




e&90 




t 




2700 


PI 


CLC 




2710 




LOA 


t7 


2720 


LP9a 


SBC 


«1 


2730 




BHE 


Lpsa 


2740 




RTS 




27S0 




t 




2760 




i 




2770 




1 




2780 




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N 


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FINAL 


tADD YS0*1.Y0 


2840 




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28S0 




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2BB0 




:AO0 YS3^1,Y3 


2870 




:ftOD YS4*1.Y4 


2B80 




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2B30 




:A00 YS5*l,Y6 


230O 




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i 




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2330 


LP71 


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2940 




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2950 




TXA 




2360 




PHA 




2970 




1 




2980 




LDX 


•SPF-SP-1 


2990 


LPSl 


LOA 


SP,X 


3000 




STA 


T.Y 


3010 




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3020 




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3030 




BPL 


LPSl 


3040 




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3050 




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3070 




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3080 




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3030 




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i 




3110 




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1 




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1 




3140 




I 




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RTS 




3180 




1 




3170 




i 




3180 








3I90 


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LDA 


IDCOO 


3200 




: STICK UP 


3210 




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r 




3240 


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cnp 


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3260 




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3270 




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3280 




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3230 




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3300 




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3310 




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3320 




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3330 




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3340 




1 




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3380 










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4120 










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4220 










4230 










4240 










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FIN 









YOUR COMPUTER, OCTOBER 1906 55 



r, I f 



Of all the games available for computers, flight 

simulators are some of the most consistently 

successful. Tom Courtney traces the history of these 

exciting software packages, remembering some of 

the classics and comparing them to their new 

competitors. 



iLUi 



^K re you made of ihc proper 
mm material? Could you handle 
^^v yourself in a modem supersonic 
M W fighter? Those questions and more 
arc answered when you are behind the 
joystick of a eompuier flight simulator. 
These days, when a jumbo gets into 
difficulty as the pilot and co-pilot go down 
with he ri l>eri, people are trampled in the 
rush as Solo tlighr aces elbow aside 
Aviaior hot-shots, only to be beaten lo 
the cockpit by a Flight Sbmdatkm 
veteran. So next time you find yourself 
on the way to Torrcmolinos and in thai 
predicament, in which of the maniacs- if 
any - should you put your trust? If of a 
self-reliant bent, where is the best training 
for you and your micro? 

Flight simulators and micros were 
viaually made for one another. In one 
end is fed the flight data of the aircraft, 
the law's of aerodynamics and the pilot*s 
frantic heaving at the controls, and out ot 
the other there is a graphical display and 
readouts of height, speed, direction and 
so on - pure mrmber-erunching. 

Unfortunately, unless someone straps 
a Cray to a micro, there will have to be 
compromises on the simulation of flight 
and it is on how well those compromises 
are made that the success of any flight 
simulator depends. There arc three types 
-emulators which are shooi'em-ups with 
a faint suggestion of flying: fighter 
simulators where the main object i$ to 
deal death and destruction but go further 
down the tine when it comes to 
performance and accuracy; and finally the 
purist simulator which is normally far 
more accurate, if a little on the dull side. 

Sky fox from Ariolasoft is available on 
the popular formats and is basically a 
shooi-'em-up with flying overtones. 



Despite no aerodynamics and Hitlc 
realism, the game achieved great 
popularity. Itsexceplional selling point is 
the way the enemy moves. There arc 
various levels and various types of game . 
such as walL massive onslaught and so on. 
Each of those tacticii requires a different 



the enemy while protecting your bases. 
The problem is that the bases are too 
widely-scattered to be defended. That 
means your first task is the rather dull one 
of placing minefields round all the bases. 
ITicn it is a matter of returning to the 
central base and waiting for messages 
from the computer about enemy attacks 
and going to deal with them. Including 
mines, there are nine types of payload. 
with trcH)ps to reinforce positions under 
attack, and you can also evacuate 
wounded men to the hospital at the 
central base. 

If running round like a wet nurse 
sounds a little tame, there is always the 




approach as the enemy attacks in a 
different way. 

The instrumentation is satisfactory' and 
there arc many on-board flight aidb and 
a navigational computer to give the game 
a high-tech, futuristic feel. My favourite 
in this class is Combat Lynx from Durell. 
It is not a sintulator by any stretch of the 
imagination, m>rdocs it try to be. Durell 
calls it a banlcfield simulator. A certain 
amount of resources are scattered round 
the battlefield and there is a large numl>er 
of enemy trying to ovcr^run some bases. 

You fly a helicopter and try to destroy 



/7ir /Ue flight simulator. 

shoot- 'em -up method. There are tanks, 
guns and trucks - some friend, some foe. 
Each can best be dealt with by a different 
weapon and some are far more aggressive 
than others. There are also enemy 
helicopters and jets. Leaving the t>aseslo 
their own devices, you can use the 
on-board map to reveal enemy units and 
clatter off to blow them away; select the 
appropriate weapon and stalk them over 
the undulating countryside as you hug the 
contours. 

That is the feature which makes I.ynx 
exceptional: the countryside is in 3D 




56 YOUR COMPUTER, OCTOBER 1986 



r 







relief, a Ulllc like the effect you gel 
looking through an electron microscope. 
The hcHcoplcr controls are simple - left , 
right, up, down, forward, back; it is not 
realistic but it was never meant to be . For 
the beginner* it is a pleasitnt shooi-*cm- 
up; for the experienced and patient old 
hand, it is a complex battle of cat and 
mouse with the enemy which can last for 
hours. 

Moving to fighter simulators, the daddy 
of them all is Fighter Pilot from Digital 
Integration. Programmed by l>avid 
Marshall, who used lo do that kind of 
thing for the MoD, it was way ahead of 
its time when it appeared on the Spectrum 
almost two years ago, and the various 
conversions which have appeared since 
still look good compared to the 
opposition. 

i'hc scenario for Fighter Pilot is simple: 
an area containing five bases must be 
defended from enemy bombers. 
Fortunately, the bases arc attacked in 
order, so it is obvious where the enemy 
aircraft arc headed. So wind up the 
throttle, put in the afterburners, hurtle 
down the runway, and retract the 
undercarriage. Turn on the radar, locate 
the enemy. Once at maximum alliludc, 
the aircraft levels out: then steer for the 
enemy. Once over enemy territory, roll 
inverted, cut the throttle and pull back. 
With a little luck all that Nhould allow the 
aircraft to be rolled out right behind the 
enemy at the same altitude. 

What happens next depends on the skill 
level. On novice, the enemy will swan 
along happily, straight and level while you 
close the range and put some lead up his 
tailpipe. On the higher levels, culminating 
with ace, the aircraft will take evasive 
action. Now there is the problem -close 
tm> fast and the enemy will out-turn you; 
close loo slowly and the base will be a 
heap of rubble before you reach him. 

If that is not sufficicni, they keep 
cc^ming. Sooner or later, the bullets and 
gaswillrunoui. 

The game was still the best thing for 
the frustrated fighter pilot until earlier 
this year when Marshall did it again. The 
product was Tomahawk and, to my mind, 
it stands head and shoulders above the 
rest. It is a simulation of the Hughes 
Apache attack helicopter, a mean piece 
of hardware equipped with radar homing 
missiles, rockets and cannon. 

There are the usual four levels but now 
there arc four scenarios as well, lliey 
dictate the disposition of enemy forces 
and what has to be done to win the game. 
The game is mainly about ground attack. 
Obviously if you want to simulate an 
aircraft correctly, you must simulate 
its major role; the Apache is nol designed 
to chase other helicopters. There are guns 
and tanks strewn round the balllefield. 



some friendly, others enemy. The 
helicopter is used to destrojf the enemy 
forces and thus help the friendly forces 
win the ground battle. A large number of 
landing pads are available which become 
friendly, ix*, usable, if the area is under 
your control. Once on Ihe ground, you 
can leleport from base to base wherever 
danger threatens. 

The game should appeal to a wide 
spcctnim of games players. It is easy to 
play, fast, with plenty of action. It takes 
a little time for even the hardened 
simulations man to become accustomed 
u> the controls. Pushing down the nose 
increases speed ; the collective - a kind of 
throttle - changes lift. The fa,sler the 
helicopter is going, the more collective 
required for level flight. I ending is fairly 
easy -slow reduction of the collective and 
ace level, it is p<^ssible to do this only if 
going flat out at 180 knots. The enemy 
guns outrange you, so you must cover the 
dead zone fast. If all that sounds a little 
too easy, add stime low cloud, trees, 
mountains, buildings, winds, turbulence 
and night flying. There is a real thrill 
about skimming along at 180 knots below 
the trcctops with the enemy in your 
sights. It is a simulation which will take 




^ 




305 



^ 




beating. If all this high-tech stuff sounds 
a little lame, perhaps the Spitfire 
simulators could be up your street. 
Aviator is for the BBC micro only. The 
wireframe black-and-white graphics look 
a little out-of-date these days, like 
watching an old black-and-white war film. 
Unfortunately, the Huns have undergone 
a nasty transformation and now appear as 




A ground attack in Tomahawk. 

a linle tweakmgback on the slick. There 
is also a ground effect which means that 
if the helicopter sinks slowly from around 
HK)fl. it will ny level once it reaches lOfl. 
That makes landing easy and, once down, 
the chopper can be tnmdicd around until 
the pad is reached. 

Ijicri, if you are feeling lazy, let fly with 
a fire-and-forget radar homer at a safe 
distance of two miles or so, or get close 
and mix it with r<Kkets and cannon. At 



alien beasties attacking a town and have 
to be cannoned into oblivion. 

Apart from the odd bridge to fly under, 
this offers very little but Acornsoft sa\^ 
it is accurate and has crusty old men with 
walrus faces and handlebar moustaches to 
vouch for it. 

Similar claims arc made for ihc 
Mirrorsoft Spitfire 40. You start as a lowly 
recruit and the idea is. by killing Krauts, 
to work your way up the ranks to (iroup 



YOUR COMPUTER. OCTOBER 1986 57 



FLIGHT SIMULATION 





Captain, OBE, VC, DFC and bar and 
just about cvcrv* other gong available. So 
off you go; strap yourself in and take off. 
There is a map which shows tlic number 
and portion of the enemy; instruetion 
messages, like the real ground control 
would have been much nn>re satisfactory. 

Onee a I the appropriate loeatit>n and 
height, the enemy begin to appear. That 
is really where rhings become a httle 
rough. Instead of diving on to a formation 
of enemy aircraft spotted as dim specks 
on the horizon, the sploggy great sprite 
lands on top of you and off you go 
dog-fighting. Chase after it, get close, gel 
it in your sights, and let fly. Then, onee 
one is disposed of, another turns up; it is 
so accommodating of them to wait their 
turn. 

It always struck mc as a lovely 
simulation of a Spitfire ruined by a rather 
nasty combat portion which seemed to 
have l>een stuck on as an afterthought. 
The Spitfire seems to handle very well, 
with all the foibles you read about in the 
wartime stories. There are two displays, 
the out-of-the-cockpii view used for 
landing and fighting, and an instrument 
panel, more useful during navigation. It 
has gcK)d sound effects of the engine, and 
even wheels when on the ground, and has 
a separate rudder permitting all kinds of 
fancy turns and rolls. 

The other Mirrorsoft sortie init) the 
simulator business is Harrier Attack. It is 
really at the other extreme; no more 
seat-of-thc-pants, it is all bells and 
whistles now, and loud ones at that. 
Along with such useful messages as 
"Someone is shooting at you" and *You 
arc about to crash" are ear*splitting 
warning sounds which will have you 
putting wires off the computer 
lotidspcakcr in no time. 

When we deal the purist flight 
simulator, ihe cIkhcc is clear, it is either 



Soto Flight, on the CBM-64 and Atari 
from Mieroprose, or Flight Smmlator II 
on I he CBM-64, Atari and IBM PC from 
Sublogic, Which you prefer is a matter of 
taste. Both arc beautifully-detailed and 
accurate; they really feel like flying. Both 
have received cndorcscments from 
various Hying schools suggesting that they 
help leach the real thing. 

Of the two. Solo Flight is far easier to 
learn but Right Simulator II has l>eller 
graphics, inside and outside the cockpit. 
In night Simulator II, you have a 
conventional out-of-the-cockpit view, 
with a full array of dials and gauges as 
would be seen if in the cockpit of a real 
aircraft. 

Outside, the scenery is full of wire 
frame graphics, including the Empire 
Stale building and the World Trade 
C^cntrc. So if you have ever had a desire 
lo crash into a major public building, this 
is your chance . Sub Logic claims to have 
a policy of releasing further scenery discs 
to allow aviators to fly round other 
stretches of the country. So far* one has 
appeared but has not been released in the 
U.K. 

Solo Flight has a slightly 
unconventional view from behind the 
aircraft, although the view can be 
switched to the side and the rear. The 
latest version of Solo Flight has a total of 
six states to fly around and even has an 
instructor pilot mode where digitised 
speed guides the novice round the first 
circuit of the airfield. There is also contest 
mode to allow several players to sec how 



good a landing they can do. and an 
instrument flying test. The real guts of the 
game is the mail pilot scenario, in which 
an underpowered bucket has to be flown 
around the state delivering mail, rhul 
introduces all kinds of things like 
navigation, route planning, fuel 
requirements and so<ui. To make matters 
worse, as the game proceeds at the higher 
skill levels, the wear her l>cgins to close in 
and instruments start to fail. 

The latcsi Microprosc simulator is 
Acroftt, It is like Solo Hight tntt the 
aircraft being modelled is a stunt jet, like 
that used in the James Bond Octopussy 
film. The idea is to attempt various events 
at an air show - citlier single events or a 
bunch against other pet>ple. Points are 
scored for time and efficiency. 

It is really only for the true afficianado. 
To get the best times, the aircraft and 
pilot must be pushed to the absolute limit. 
There is wind to contend with as welK 
though fortunately no cloud. There is a 
big instruction manual dealing with all Ihe 
standard stunts, with hints on how not to 
have any unfortunate encounters with the 
old cumulo granite. 

Picking one from this collection is 
obviously a difficult lask. My preference 
is Combat Lynx from the emulators. 
Tomahawk from the fighters and Solo 
Flight from the simulators. They arc not 
the kind of games which can be picked up 
and immcdtateiy understood but if you 
are the kind of games player who likes to 
keep brain as well as trigger finger busy, 
they could be what you seek. 




This ankle apptuiral last 
month but tvfmxluifion prob- 
lems meam thai a vrucittl sec* 
mm was ille*^ihU\ ViV are. 
therefore, reprothtan^ the 
feature, Ed. 



m ^k raphics utilities arc in 
m^n many forms. They range 
M' m itom the basic draw-a- 
M^^ circle, colour-il'in-lypc 
through to those for the more 
serious, advanced user. We 
look al three types of drawing 
aids. The Mouse, The 
Graphpad and, finally. The 
Conventional manner, i.e., 
keyboard input. 

Three ways of creating 
whatever your imagination 
allows, they do not represent 
the best of what is available - 
only you can be the judge of 
that. Suffice it to say they 
represent some of the graphics 
utilities which are available. 
Of the three packages at 
which 1 looked I must confess 
the one which pleased me most 
in terms of user- friendliness 
was the AMX Mouse; 
combining ease of use with 
very good software, it offers 
the budding artist all that is 
needed to create excellent 
graphics on-screen. It will also 
allow more serious 
programmers to create their 
own designs for use in their 
programs. 



Segments 

On loading, you are 
presented with a well-defined 
art-screen. The screen is split 
into five segments which 
include the pull-down menu 
bars, the mode icons, the 
pattern bar* the currently- 
selected pattern area and the 
drawing area. The pull-down 
bars are situated al the top of 
the screen and consist of four 
menus - File, Options, Texr 
and Lines. By moving the 
mouse -controlled cursor to the 
barof your choice and pressing 
the Execute button you are 
shown a graphic window listing 
the various commands. 

On the far right of the screen 
are the mode and fill icons, 
which include the various icons 
for use in drawing circles, 
boxes, filling designs. The far 
left of the screen contains the 
pattern mode. Numerous 
patterns are available for your 
use or, if you prefer, you can 
design your own by using the 
pattern design grid. One really 
pleasant feature is the Zoom 
facility, which permits you to 
work on your picture in small 
areas at a time and helps to 




^Roger Garr&tt reports on utilities any 
^ good artist sftouid not t>e wttltout. 

Graphics on 
the Amstrad 



give it that professional touch. 

I found the utility very easy 
to use and in no time al all 1 
was drawing pictures. Even 1 
was impressed with it and T am 
no artist. Overall this package 
represents everything the 
amateur and professional 
artist could require. 

A different type of utility 
but offering similar 
characteristics is the Graf sales 
Graphpad 2. The package is 
complete with graphpad. 
digitalised pen and software. 
The first difference noted is 
that all functions are carried- 
ouf on the pad, not on the 
screen. The overall size of the 
pad measures I4in. x 9in. but 
the drawing area isonly 8in. x 
4.5in. That in no way detracts 
from the picture reproduced 
on the screen but as one of the 
selling points is the ability to 
trace from the pad. it means 
that you need small pictures 
from which to trace. 

Simplicity 

That is by no means the only 
function of the package. ITie 
case of use of the pen, even 
though it resembles a large 
cigar, enables any age group 
quickly to master the ability to 
draw circles* triangles, 
polygons and ellipses and to 
produce reasonably good 
pictures. 

To draw a circle is simplicity 
itself. After moving the pen to 
the appropriate icon on the 
pad, you press a button located 
on the pen, move the pen to 
where you want the ccnire of 
the circle, press the button 



again, move the pen to the 
desired radius, once more 
press the button and your 
circle is drawn. 

Erasing is achieved quickly 
by selecting the rubber icon, 
then the size of mbbcr 
required, i.e., small for 
detailed erasing and in varying 
thicknesses depending on what 
you want to erase. The use of 
a pen has slight advantages 
over the use of a mouse, mainly 
because you do not need a 
large working area but the 
difference is not so great as to 
deter people from buying a 
mouse. My only 
disappointment with the 
Graphpad was the lack of a 
Tjoom facility. Other than that 
it is excellent. 

The latest utility from CRL 
Group is called Tlie Image 
System but that is the only 
simple thing about it, I am not 
saying that the package is 
difficult to use hut mainly that 
it is a very powerful designing 
utility. All commands arc 
controlled through the 
keyboard and even though 
that method is slow at first, 
using the keyboard permits 
perfect control of the cursor. 

After loading, you are 
confronted with a large 
drawing area. The bottom 
quarter of the screen contains 
the drawing menu. Most 
commands are accessed from 
there. Among the commands 
are the colour palette , showing 
16 blocks of colour which arc 
changeable. That allows you to 
use all 27 colours, A status 
mndow shows what command 
you are using and a memory 



IBUYERS' li^l 



\9f:Pk9% 



meter informs you of memory 
used. 

Other features include a 
Zoom, so close, precise work 
can be carricd-out; Rotation, 
which is self-explanator)'; 
there is also the ability to store 
up to 255 pictures in memory, 
which can be re-called at any 
time. One very good use is in 
the way you can give a shadow 
relief effect to your pictures, 
by using the define filters and 
transparent colours. 

Rtters 

Ihc way in which it is done 
is simple. Having created your 
graphic and coloured it, you 
then change the colours by 
using the filters. When that is 
done your graphic will be all 
blue -or whatever colour you 
want the background to be - 
but you still have the original 
picture stored in memory, so 
the first thing to do is make 
transparent the which border 
on the original . Then load the 
original on to the top of the 
shadow graphic, but moved 
slightly up and to the right, 
which gives tlie impression of 
the shadow relief - and very 
striking it is, too. 

Each is superb in its own 
right. Each offers almost the 
same functions, even though 
they arc carried-oul in a 
different manner and with 
different degrees of 
sophistication. 



AMX Mouse. 

Advanced Memorv Systems 

Ltd, 

Green Lane, Appleton, 

Warrington WA4 5NU. 

Tel: (W25 mihm. 

Price £69.95. 

Graphpad* 
Grafsalcs Ltd, 
Unit 02, 
Penfold Works, 
Imperial Way. 
Watford, 
HcrtsWD2 4YY. 
Tel: 0923 43942. 
Price £65.95, 

The Image System, 

CRL Group pic, 

CRL House, 9 Kings Yard, 

Carpenters Road, 

London E15 2HD. 

Tel: 01-533 2918. 

Price £19.95 cass, £24.95 disc 



I 



YOUR COMPUTER. OCTOBER 198$ 59 



7mitation is the sincerest form of nailery. If that is true* 
business computer giant IBM must be feeling very flat- 
tercd. While its machines continue to seEl in vast 
numbers* far more than its closest rival* a large propor- 
tion of sales at the lower end of the market are bcinj; tost to 
smaller companies offering similar machines at greatly-reduced 
prices. Many of the clone machines are cheap imitations with 
a far inferior construction but today there arc many ntachines 
just as good as the IBM machine and many are a good deal 
better, hut cost up to £1,000 less. 

Although that is gm>d news for the enthusiastic home user 
who can now share in the legandary software base of the MS* 
DOS operating system* it unearths a new set of problems. For 
those who could afford it, buying an IBM machine was a safe 
option. You could guarantee full compatibility* long-term 
support through a local dealer* and had the company reputa- 
tion for reliability* all of which to some extent justified the price. 

With the cheaper clone machines, however* many arc 
imported from overseas or produced by companies unknown 
in the PC world* so what you gain in saved funds you stand 
to lose in peace of mind. 

There are several definitions of what makes a PC compatible 
but the most important factor in the non-corporate market is 
the ability to run IBM software. Three classic tests of compati- 
bility exist - the Microsoft Flight Simulaior, iMtus I -2-3 and 
the Borland SideKick. Those three programs operate in such 
a way that, should the basic input/output system of a machine 
differ too greatly from that of IBM • the program will not run. 

Many things need to be considered when buying a PC. 
Although the initial price for a single disc drive unit with 256K 
may be low* much of tlie applications software available 



requires a twin drive and 640K to operate. A good example is 
Lotus 1-2-3* where much of the data Ls kept in the computer 
RAM, Having only 256K would mean that the program would 
be continually accessing the disc white running. Upgrading a 
standard machine to that specification can cost up to £300. 

Processing speed also needs to be considered. The original 
IBM PC had a clock speed of slightly less than 3MUz. That is 
now considered terminally slow and can be tedious when 
running many of the available software packages. The new 
standard is 4.77MH^ but even that is becoming outdated* with 
most machines now being able to run at 8MHz. As not all 
software is compatible at that speed, the machines use the 
dual-speed 8088/2 processor which can run at both. 

Even the compatibility of the keyboard needs to be consi- 
dered. So well*established is the IBM format that many 
programs require certain combinations of keys to be struck at 
once; if the design of the keyboard detracts too much from the 
standard, that may cause difTiculties. 

The final consideration relates to the potential for expansion. 
The IBM PC has a huge desk footprint and needs a large area 
to he used comfortably. Many conipanie:^ are now producing 
smaller machines which occupy far less space but they suffer 
from the inability to accept full-size expansion cards which 
carry additions such as interfaces* extra memory and internal 
modems. The number of free expansion slots should also be 
considered. 

While it has lost sales* IBM Ls still the most popular choice 
for small businesses but the cheaper clones are likely to do 
well in the home market. We compare some of the leading 
competitors. 



Cut-price clones 




AZ PC/XT 
compatible 

In the past, I he Sussex-based company 
AZ Computers concentrated on pro- 
ducing PC clones in kit form. A box con- 
taining an unassembled jungle of disc 
drives, cables* RAM chips and circuit 
boards could be bought for £499. com- 



plete with a comprehensive manual telling 
you how to assemble it. Two hours was 
quoted as the average time to do so but 
a competition at the 19tS5 PC User Show 
yielded a record lime of slightly more than 
10 minutes. 

To put itself in line with other manu- 
facturers and in an effort to appeal to 
small businesses lacking the time or neces- 
sary skill to assemble a machine, AZ has 
replaced its range of DIY kit computers 
in favour of a ready-assembled PC7XT 
compatible. 

Main rivals 

At first the price of £399 seems loo good 
to he true but closer inspection of the con- 
figuration of the machine makes it easier 
to understand. First, and for the first-time 
buyer most important, MS-DOS is not 
supplied with the machine but has to be 
bought separately for around £50. Except 
for one or two programs which use their 
own operating systems, all PC software 
requires MS-DOS: without it, a machine 
is virtually useless. A monitor is not 
included in the package price but has to 
be bought separately for £80. 



The specification of the AZ PC is fairly 
standards with no special features to set 
it apart from its main rivals. The main 
unit houses a single 36()K disc drive, with 
provision for a second internal drive or a 
iiard disc. The motherboard has 256K 
RAM expandable to 640K by inserting 
extra RAM chips. Once removed, the cas- 
ing reveals a remarkable amount of free 
space, necessary to allow room for full- 
size expansion cards to be used in any of 
the eight available slots. 

[;ven when the cost of the MSDOS is 
taken into consideration, the AZ PC still 
ccmipares very favourably lo machines 
such as the Tandy 1(XK)EX. It retails for 
around the same price but is not compat- 
ible with standard IBM expansion cards. 

In its standard form, however, the 
machine is best-suited to an office or simi- 
lar environment where other PCs exist. It 
would then form the ideal complement to 
other more powerful machines and would 
be ideal as a basic terminal in pan of a 
networking system. Until October 3 the 
machine will be available for a special 
offer price of 1299 with the matching com- 
posite monitor reduced to £45. 



60 YOUR COMPUTER. OCTOBER 1906 



PC SUPPLEMENT 




Bondwell PC 34 

Spectrum Group pic is bcsl^known for 
its large number of peripherals for a 
wide range of home computers bui now 
the company is attempting to move into 
the business sector with inexpensive 
imported PC compatibles from the 
American company Bondwell. 

Few PCs are astounding to Ux>k at and 
the models in the Bondwell range arc no 
exception. Having said that, few people 
buy a machine on the basis of looks. It is 
a combination of value, compatibility and 
expansion capability which form the 
major considerations when buying such a 
machine, three features which the 
Bondwell range satisfies easily. 

The company has not attempted to 
incor{M)rate any new technology but 
instead has worked from the traditional 
three-box design of monitor, base unit and 
keyboard. Such a configuration causes the 
least difficulty in providing a high level of 
IBM compatibility, both on the software 
and hardware side. 

Because of the ability of the main unit 
to accept full-size expansion cards, the 
machine has a huge desk fcwtprint of I9in. 
by I6in. excluding the keyboard. 
Although that seems massive compared 
to certain other models, it is the standard 
size for most PC clones. 

Robust 

The keyboard is based on the standard 
IBM design, a typing section bordered by 
a numeric keypad and 10 programmable 
function keys. Its most striking feature is 
the size of the return key which, in com- 
mon with many other PC clones, is no 
bigger than the other keys on the board; 
it can seem hopelessly inadequate for 
those used to other keyboards but after a 
lime it becomes tolerable. At first the 
keyboard seems ix>orly-construcied. as if 
the keys might fall out if it were turned 
upside down but, in reality it is solid and 
very rcsiK>nsive. 

Value is one area where the Bondwell 
range of machines really stands out. The 



standard configuration of the model 34 
machine includes a monochrome monitor, 
multi-function card which features a video 
output, parallel printer interface and a 
disc controller. The seven free expansion 
slots can be filled, either with the three 
Bondwell cards or the wide range of third- 
party products available. 

The central processor is the classic Intel 
8()8H as used on the original IBM. It gives 
a clock speed of 4J7MHz, fast becoming 
too slow to handle much of today's PC 
software comfortably. The package also 
features 256K, expandable to 640K on the 
motherboard, and two half-height .W)K, 
5.25in. floppy disc drives. 

For an additional £400, model 36 can 
be purchased. It has only one disc drive 
but has a 20MB hard disc unit which com- 
bines vast storage space with a fast access 
lime. 

The machine is aimed at the small area 
between the home user and the small bus- 
iness. Although not so cheap or so fast as 
some of its competitors, the Bondwell 34 
is an attractive buy because of its high 
specification and robust construction but 
as a relative newcomer to the British 
market, it may lose sales to several of the 
better-established companies producing 
their own machines. 



Comcen 



Technology 

Tf the idea of a PC inkit form appeals 
Xo you, such a machine is available from 
Comcen Technology for £499, There is, 
however, one small snag if you want to 
take advantage of this special low-price 
offer - you must be a member of the IBM 
PC User Group. From the point of view 
of the home user that mav not be such a 




bad thing. The group undertakes first io 
keep all its members fully-informed of the 
latest developments in the PC world with 
a monthly newsletter and regular meet- 
ings and seminars. Second, membership 
of the group gives access to an extensive 
library of user-supported and public 
domain software containing around 4,(MK) 
programs. 

Contrary to the name, the group wel- 
comes users of all PC compatibles - the 
Comcen model included, of course. The 
£4W price includes MS-DOS and cither 
a monochrome or colour graphics card but 
docs not include a monitor. The XT-slylc 
motherboard gives eight vacant slots 
before asiicmbly. One of them is filled 
immediately by the multi-function card 
included in the price, which features a disc 
controller, serial, parallel and games ports 
and a clock-calendar which issues a 
request for the current lime and date each 
time the machine is switched on. 

For Ian Fraser, chairman of the IBM 
PC User Group, the decision to choose 
Comcen PC was easy. "I had been follow- 




ing with interest the appearance in the 
U.K. of Unv<osl compatibles during the 
last six months. There were many ques- 
tions concerning compatibility, reliability^ 
support and, most important, the legality 
of the ROM BIOS and software. 

"1 believe Comccn Technology has 
addressed and will continue to address 
those matters fully and will stand by and 
support the equipment it sells. Other 
suppliers of compatibles may claim lower 
prices but the equipment here is of the 



2(K) stores throughout the country, since 
the success ol its colour home computer 
range it has managed to slip from the pub- 
lic eye* while stilt maintaining its status as 
the most successful computer retailer in 
the world. The new range of computers 
from Tandy is, however* Hkcly to bring 
renewed recognition. 

Aimed at the home, educational and 
small business market, the Tandy ItXWEX 
is the product of the company *s decade of 
PC manufacturing experience. All PC 




highest quality." 

Praise indeed, especially when it origi- 
nates from the chairman of one of the 
biggest PC user groups in the country. At 
present. Comccn dtKs not plan to reduce 
the price of the machine for the public - 
for non-members it costs £599 - but if the 
company attempts to follow the trend of 
the others* it is certain to be a major com- 
petitor for a large share of the market. 



Tandy li 






Tandy is something of a dark horse in 
the computer industry. Although it is 
the third biggest microcomputer manu- 
facturer in the U.K. and has more than 



clone manutacturcrs have their interpre- 
tations of IBM compatibility. For many 
companies it means running IBM soft- 
ware, taking standard expansion cards 
and having a similar keyboard layout. 

Tandy, however, says thai the market 
at which the KKWEX is aimed requires 
only the ability lo run IBM software, a 
factor wl)ich accounts for the unusual 
appearance of the machine, and has 
helped to keep the cost low. The overall 
package offered by Tandy is very good. 
The buritJled systems/applications soft- 
ware includes a word processor, spread- 
shccL database and a simple graphic 
editor. One year's software support and 
one hour's introductory training arc also 



available free when a machine is bought. 

The KKXIEX has departed somewhat 
from the traditional PC format. Instead 
of the usual three-box design, the 
keyboard and central processor unit are 
built as one. The separate high-resolution 
display unit, either a I2in. monochrome 
monitor or a 13in. colour unit, can rest 
on top of the main unit but a separate 
monitor stand is available as an optional 
extra. 

The major disadvantage of the sleek, 
space-saving dimensions of the machine 
is thai they prevent it accepting full-sizx 
expansion cards and limit the user lo the 
two produced by Tandy. The first is a 
RS232, essential for all communications 
applications, and the second permits the 
use of a mouse and provides a battery- 
powered clock/calendar. 

Central unit 

To insert a card into the lOOOEX you 
first need to buy a Plus Upgrade Adaptor 
Board for £99.95 which provides a single 
miserly expansion slot. If you want to use 
the two cards at the same time, a Memory 
Plus Expansion Adaptor provides an addi- 
tional 128K of memory and allows two 
Plus-style upgrade boards lo be used. 

The keyboard features 9i) full-travel 
keys divided between a QWERTY typing 
section, 12 function keys and a numeric 
pad. The standard configuration of the 
machine includes one 360K, 5.25in. disc 
drive built into the right-hand side of the 
central unit. There is no provision for a 
second internal drive but an external erne 
may be fitted. That may be either a 36()K, 
5.25in. drivcora720K,3.5in. drive allow- 
ing for greater data storage in a more com- 
pact form. 

Saving grace 

An external hard disc will also soon be 
available. The standard l(K)()hX carries 
256K which is expandable to 640K, using 
a cotnbination of additional RAM chips 
and the Memory Plus Expansion Board. 

When Tandy announced the new 
machine, many expected it to be a simple 
upgrade of the popular HMM) machine. In 
reality, the lOOOEX is a completely new 
design concept, aimed at a different 
market and employing the Intel S08S/2 
processor, allowing software to be run at 
the standard 4;77MHz or ihe faster 
7.16MHz- 

OveralK the Tandy UKMiliX is a well- 
built, highly-compatible machine which 
should do well in its intended market. For 
those who want a low-cost , basic PC' clone 
which they can expand, the lOOOEX is an 
expensive option. Its saving grace is the 
high level of customer support offered by 
Tandy, something few other clone manu- 
facturers will be able to match. 



62 YOUR COMPUTER. OCTOBER 198$ 




PC SUPPLEMENT 



has a positive feet. Other than that, it 
holds few surprises and annoyinply it fca- 
lures the IBM-style miniature return and 
shift keys. Even bearing thai in niind, the 
keyboard is still one of the best available. 

Although it may seem expensive eom- 
pared to machines such as the Tandy or 
Bondvvell PCs. the machine has the dis- 
tincl advantage of combining a high level 
of hardware and software compatibility 
with a well-csiablishcd market into which 
its competition may find it difficult to 
break 



Watters PC 

In recent months. Wallers has kept its 
machines in the public eye by reducing 
prices continuously. The company's rcpu* 
lation for reliability and eompatibilily has 
always been high but the low prices being 
charged certainly makes it worth looking 
at. 

The Wallers PC can only be described 
as an average PC clone. It follows the 
usual ihrcc-box design and, from an 
appearance viewpoint, has little to distin- 
guish it from other clones, or for that mat- 
ter the original IBM PC. The 8088 proces- 
sor running at 4.77MHz and the ability to 
expand the 256K memor\' to a maximum 
of 640K on the moiherlH)ard arc all fea- 
tures foimd on the majority of PC clones 
on the market. 

Even the price of £599 fails to prompt 
immediate purchase and it seems posi- 
tively expensive compared to some other 
models. It is, however, the fact that the 
machine is such a standard PC clone which 
makes it so attractive. In addition to hav- 
ing a high level of software compatibility, 
the machine has six full-size expansion 
slots to accept standard IBM cards and 
has two more short slots for the smaller 
cards being manufactured for the IBM 
portable. 

TuriMi option 

For an additional £4<J, one of the full- 
size slots can be filled with a turbo board, 
giving the machine the ability to run at 
8MHz or the standard 4.77MHz. 

To add a second disc drive and extra 
RAM to the basic machine to enable it lo 
run many tif the commercial programs 
available would cost an additional £140 
plus VAT, increasing the total price to 
more than £<StKi. That reflects the strength 
of the W^alters reputation in the PC 
market and the successful sales record 
shows that many people are prepared to 
pay more for a well-known name, a theory 
which IBM has proved beyond doubt. 

The keyboard provided with the Wal- 
ters machine is robustlv-constructcd and 




Watters Portable 
PC 

Although it is based mostly on the full- 
size PC machine, the Waiters Porta- 
ble is a far more interesting computer. It 
combines a monochrome monitor, disc 
drive and keyboard in a single box which 
is iitttc bigger than the main unit of the 
IBM PC. The p*>rtable is simply a full-size 
machine built into a smaller box around 
a 9in. monitor and, because of that, while 
one would normally expect a reduction in 
price, costs more. 

Although advertised as portable, the 
unit weighs 341b. and is not suitable for 
moving *)ver greater distances than a few 
hundred yards - from an office to a car, 
for example. 

Removing the keyboard which forms 
the base of the machine reveals the front 
panel which houses the monitor and disc 
drive. Next to the display brightness con- 
trol is a key switch, allowing the machine 
to be disabled when unattended. Despite 
its size, the display is very easy to read, 
certainly big enough for most common 
applications such as word processing or 
using a spreadsheet. The resolution is 
good, giving a sharp picture with little dis- 
tortion. 

Although the monitor unit is inside the 
machine, the cable which connects it to 
video output is under a side panel and has 
to be plugged-in each lime the machine 
is used. That may seem like an oversight 
by Walters but having this configuration 
gives the user the option of using a biggei 
monitor or a colour display. 




The front panel of the standard machine 
has plenty of space for adding a second 
disc drive or hard disc unit and also has 
the all-too-rare re-sei key. Thai is nor- 
mally a strong feature of a PC, being use- 
ful when the usual method of holding 
down the control, alt arid delete keys fails 
to work but, on the Walters machine, the 
button is very sensitive tt) touch and is 
located far too close to the do<ir of the 
disc drive. Inserting a new disc into the 
machine could all too easily cause an unin- 
tentional re-set. 

The main circuit Iward is identical to 
that fitted into the lull-size machine, using 
the 8088 processor running at 4.77MHz, 
and offers six free expansion slots, two 
being used by the internal monitor. Even 
then, for a machine its size, the potential 
for expansion is excellent. 

The only major complaint is the rather 
haphazard construction. When you con- 
sider that the machine is expected to be 
moved a great deal, the panels seem sur- 
prisingly thin and flimsy. Ilie small fold- 
away legs on the base of the main unit 
which are expected to support the entire 
weight of the machine seem hopelessly 
inadequate and began to buckle slightly 
on the machine we tested. 

The W^alters Portable PC has its faults 
- what machine diK*s not? - but still stands 
out as one of the better low-cost PC com- 
patibles available. 




ARC World PC 

American Research Corporation 
entered the U.K* lo spread the suc- 
cess which it had been enjoying in the 
States. There, the company had been con- 
centrating im prtHlucing full-size, fast* 
powerful machines but now is to break 
into the low-cost PC market with a budget 



YOUR COMPtJTER. OCTOBeR 1986 63 



version of its larger machines, the World 
PC. 

Many manufiicturers advertise their 
machines as l>eing {K>riablc wlieii only an 
intense weight training course will provide 
tlic average person with sufficienl strength 
to carry one. By calling the World PC 
transportable rather than portable* ARC 
has managed to avoid thai form of crili- 
eism and even to include a fashionable 
backpack with llic computer to assist in 
moving if. 

Compact design 

Without doubt, the World PC is one of 
the most transportable PCs on the market, 
partially because of its compact design » 
partially because of high-lech construc- 
tion, but mainly because it is supplied 
without a monitor. The matching ARC 
monochrome monitor can be purchased 
for £120 but compatible third-party pro- 
ducts cost as little as £60, so the World 
PC is still a value buy. 

It is supplied in two parts. The main 
unit, which houses the central processor, 
disc drives and circuit board, is rather odd 
in appearance. To make the machine as 
portable as possible, ARC decided to 
reduce the number of expansion slots on 
the motherboard from eight to five. As a 
result, the base unit is about half the width 
of a standard PC but still retains the full 



height, allowing it to accept full-size 
expansion cards in any of its avaihible 
slots. 

The keyboard, in common with many 
low-cost PCs. feels a little cheap but that 
is probably due to weight-saving construc- 
tion and the unit iswcll-laid-out and pleas- 
ant to use with 83 standard keys including 
the numeric keypad and 10 programmable 
function keys. The large enter and shift 
keys arc a pleasing sight and make the 
task of becoming accustomed to this 
keyboard far less difficult than with some 
others on the market. 

The World PC is one of the few 
machines to include any applications soft- 
ware. In addition to version 3.10 of MS- 
DOS, the word processing program PC- 
Write is also included. Thus an effective 
word processing system would comple- 
ment any existing software library and is 
an ideal first software package for the 
first-time buyer. 

Comprehensive manual 

ARC is best- known for its turbo 
machines which run as speeds up to 
cSMI Iz. The Wi>rld PC is no exception and 
uses the K088/2 processor, allowing it to 
switch between the standard 4.77MHz 
and the turbo at the user's will. 

The manual supplied with the machine 
is comprehensive but has been imported 



direct from the U.S. Therefore it makes 
several references to items not available 
on the British version of the machine, 
namely the 4. Sin. monitor unit which fits 
beneath it t(* the disc drive and forms a 
similar unit ii> the Walters Portable PC. 
The monitor is not being sold in the 
U.K. as it occupies the space which could 
be used for a second drive or a hard disc. 
Like many other PC manufacturers, ARC 
does not believe there is a large market 
for a single-drive machine, especially as 
much modern software requires a two- 
drive ctni figuration. 

Ideal machine 

The circuit bt>ard provides five expan- 
sion slots but one is used by the turbo 
card and another by the monochrome dis- 
play and printer card. The remaining 
cards can be swallowcd-up quickly when 
additional drives, graphics and interfaces 
are added but. at this stage, the World 
PC would be able to tackle almost any 
piece of applications software. 

Considering its specification, the price 
of £475 seems laughable, even when the 
additional cost of a mimiior is considered- 
Complete with the MS-DOS operating 
system, something missing from many 
clone machines, and word processing soft- 
ware, the World PC is an ideal machine 
for business and home users. 




NAME 


PRICE 


CLOCK 
SPEED 


STANDARD 
CONFIGURATION 


SUPPLIER 


AZPC 


£299 


4.77Mttz 


Single disc drive, no monitor 
MS-DOS version 3.2, 256K 


AZ Computers 
0892665606 


Bond\vcll34 


£599 


4.77MHz 


Twin disc drives, mono monitor 
640K RAM. 5 free expansion slots 


Spectrum Group pic 
0462 37171 


Tandy lOOOEX 


£449 


4.77/8MHZ 


Single di.sc drive , mono monitor | 
256KRAM, I free expansion slot 


Tandv Stores Ltd 
0922477778 


Walters PC 

. .. . 


£599 


4.77MHz 


Single disc drive, mono monitor 
256K R A M . 5 free expansion slots 


Walters International 
049432751 


Walters Portable 


£65(1 


4.77MHz 


Twin disc drive, integral monitor 
256K R A M , 5 free expansion slots 


Walters International 
049432751 


ARC 


£475 


4.77/8MHZ 


2.56 RAM. single disc drive 

No monitor, 3 free expansion slots 


ARC (U.K.) Ltd 

01-6844144 


Comcen PC 


£599 


4.77MHz 


Supplied 3.1 kit. Single disc drive. 
1 256K. memory, 5 free expansion slots 


C?omcen Technology 

07927960{X) 



64 YOUn COMPUTER. OCTOBER 1986 



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QL World 



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YOUR COMPUTER, OCTOBER 1 986 65 




lACKSTAR 




► PCW8256 m CRL Ltd. # Adventuro # Tom Courtney €t4M 



Pure text adventures are one area where 
rt was always thought the PCW machine 
would come into its own. Its large 
memory, disc drive and big display 
makes it ideal for dealing with the 
screeds of text these games often 
involve. From the time one picks up the 
inlay» with its lurid artwork to its mystical 
plotline, there is no doubt that we are in 
familiar adventure territory full of heroic 
deeds to be done and monsters to be 
slain. 

Blackstar is the name of a rather 
forbidding castle. The hero has wakened 
from a dream to find himself near this 
great edifice. His quest is to enter and 
find the power ort> and return it to 
Artemis, who seems to be some kind of 
big noise around those parts. Being the 
chivalrous type, the idea of asking her 
why, if she is such a top dog she cannot 
do it herself and let you get some sleep 
never crosses your mind and forward 
you go. 

Possibly ft may have something to do 
with her promise to let you keep any 
other odd baubles you may find around 
the place. That, of course, is meat and 
drink to the average kleptomaniac 
adventurer. 

This is a text adventure in the grand 



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# # # # # 
OVERAU 



tradition. The experienced adventure 
player will soon be at home with the kind 
of problems posed. What of the novice? 
Adventure games have a reputation as 
some of the most user-hostile games on 
the market. Written by an exclusive 
cache ot authors for a small, specialist 
following, the average member of the 
public can feel excluded from this cosy 
little set-up. 

On the face of it. this adventure is not 
very promising. The game makes little 
attempt to guide the novice. For the first 
few attempts he will soon find himself 
lost in a maze-like forest. As any 
adventurer worth his salt will tell you, he 
solved that kind of problem before he cut 
his milk teeth. You must wait until you 
have gathered a fair number of objects 
and then leave them lying around to 
guide you. 



Having reached the castle, things 
improve. You are virtually spoon-fed the 
first problem and instant death does not 
lurk at every tum. A few problems later 
the novice adventurer is becoming 
confident. They reach the more difficult 
part in the underground labyrinths. 

Players of all levels will be glad of the 
RAM save facility. Save your position 
often and. should disaster strike, you can 
resurrect your man quickly. Despite 
some pleasant features, it is a game 
more for the old hand than the novice. 
Exits are not pointed out and it is very 
much a question ot trial and error. The 
parser is scarcely sophisticated and the 
vocabulary is somewhat limited, another 
fact which can easily lead to frustration. 

The game also fails to take advantage 
of the amount ot memory supplied with 
the PCW and is simply run under CP/M, 
all of it being resident in memory at the 
same time. 

What does the game offer the 
connoisseur? The text descriptions are 
rather terse but are fairiy good and 
conveying some of the atmosphere. 
Some of the in jokes are amusing. The 
problems are more a matter of taste. 
Possibly a little too easy to present the 
expert with little more than a little 
lunch-hour relaxation. 



IfIairught 



*"^ ► PCWa2i>(? ( 




J he Edge # Arcade • Tom Courtney # £P*.95 



In case anyone had doubts atx)ut the 
games-playing potential of the PCW 
since Batmar}, The Edge has released 
Fairlight an arcade adventure which has 
yet to find an equ^l even on the so-called 
games machines. 

The game uses a system which The 
Edge has christened 3D Woridmaker. 
Behind that grandoise title lies a real 
achievement in games design. Whereas 
most isometric adventures fail to give 
you that true three-dimensional feel, in 
Fairlight all entrances and exits to rooms 
or screens have a height associated with 
them. That makes mapping a great deal 
easier - you can tell the likely 
arrangement of rooms by the number of 
steps you have to climb as you move 
around. 

Another aspect of the technique is the 
way the state of a room is stored. Instead 
of being re-set every time it is entered, 
the exact position of ail objects in a room 
is stored. Considering there can be a 
more than a dozen objects in a room at 
the same time; keeping track of where 
they are, even how they are stacked on 
one another, is some feat. 

Putting technical bangs and whistles 
to one side for a moment, what is it like 
as a game? The object is to rescue the 
wizard who has been imprisoned by the 
nasty old king. That is not entirely an act 
of philanthropy - the wizard has trapped 



GRAPHICS 

m m m m m 

SOUND 



PLAYAaUTY 



VALUE FOR MONEY 


OVERALL 




the intrepid traveller in the castle and will 
not let him out until he is released. 

Fortunately, clues are spread fairly 
liberally throughout the packaging, the 
loading screen, and the accompanying 



short story. Objects scattered round the 
castle have to be picked up. The first 
thing to get hold of is the Crown. Five 
objects can be held at once. Those 
objects can be picked up, dropped, used 
or kicked around. The effect of pushing 
an object varies, A piece of chicken when 
given a swift kick tends to sail under the 
nearest table and thus becomes totally 
inaccessible. Kicking the banrel will 
barely move it. 

Naturally, the old castle is almost 
chock full of ghouls, wraiths and goblins. 
Sometimes objects are required to ward 
them off; at other times, it is a question 
of getting out the trusty sword and 
making the Errol Flynn imitations. 

Although not a huge place, containing 
50 rooms or so, the game is complex 
but, like all games of this type, fairly fast 
once you know how. The game has lost 
little in its conversion to the PCW. The 
sound effects of the original were 
minimal and colour most of the time 
served only to confuse. Obviously 
making a map is important but difficult, 
due to the 3D nature of the place. The 
lack of a save facility is irritating. That is 
explained by the way the position of all 
objects is stored. It is also rather slow 
switching between rooms and little 
indication is given of which directions it 
is possible to move. Despite that, it is a 
fascinating game which features the best 
graphics yet seen on the PCW. 



66 YOUR COMPUTER. OCTOBER t986 



I 



iStasM 



PCW SOFTWARE 




► PCWa256 # CRL Ltd # Strategy Game # Tom Courtney • C 14,95 



There seems no end to the talents of the 
PCW for playing games. First adventures, 
then arcade games, now a little 
brain-teasing strategy is coming your 
way courtesy of CRL. A strategy game 
can be loosely-defined as an adventure 
game without all the magic, monsters 
and leather-bound machismo, in 
strategy games it is you against the 
computer, usually trying to organise your 
resources in the most efficient manner. 

The scenario is that the enemy - we 
are not told who, but I am sure you can 
make a shrewd guess - has stolen the 
plans to your base. Fortunately, they 
have decided to rest for an hour or so, 
presumably to celebrate the birthday of 
some obscure hero of the revolution. 
That gives you. bravest of the brave, 
swiftest of the swift and so on, the 
opportunity you need to break into the 
enemy castle, steal the plans and get out 
again, pausing only to create as much 
mayhem as possible. 

Should you be caught or be too slow, 
the fiends will open the plans and thus 
discover the whereabouts of your base 
and deliver a swift and fatal blow. 

The game is played on an eight-by- 
eight grid. The player can see the 
location he is on and the eight adjacent 
ones. After two attempts, the radio and 
map can be found - two essential aids 



GRAPHICS 

m 

SOUfiD 

NONE 

PLAYABIUTY 

• • • # 

VALUE FOR MONEY 

m m m 

OVERAU 



1 


1 


1 


t 


• 


1 


1 


f 
A 


1 


t 


1 


i 


1 


1 


t 


1 


1 


1 



with which one would have thought no 
SAS man worth his salt would have set 
off. Those pieces of equipment allow you 
to detect enemy patrols and see the 
numbers on the grid, without which you 
will not get far. 

The enemy patrols? The number of 
them depends on the level of difficulty 
selected. Obviously while their friends 
celebrated the glorious revolution of May 



5 or whenever, they got on with the 
serious business of roughing-up armed 
desperados. The player is told on which 
grid points the patrols are. The patrols 
move only when you do, so by working- 
out to which grid point you are atwDut to 
move, it is a fairly simple business to 
decide it that might involve you in 
unpleasantness with the local heavy 
mob. 

White trudging round the grid* the 
player finds various pieces of equipment. 
Uniforms or pistols allow you to escape 
from the patrols; ropes, compasses, 
dinghies and torches are handy when it 
comes to cracking the castle. It will 
virtually be a question of trial and error 
to discover which thing in which location 
will get you into the central castle 
stronghold. 

There, safe from the marauding 
patrols^ it is you against the clock as you 
attempt to grab the plans and run. While 
not a classic of its times, it is a pleasant 
little game which should appeal to 
people who perhaps find that dexterity 
and timing is not their forte and that 
endless jokes about Ores and fairy 
princesses tend to pall after an hour or 
two. It may do little to further the legend 
of the lads from Hereford but it is another 
interesting addition to the burgeoning 
Joyce games library. 



I^ROSPELL 




► PCW 8256 Amor Utility • Dan McGrath £29.9$ 

One of many criticisms of Locoscript is 
the failure to provide a spell checker or 
word count. With Prospell, the first spell 
checker designed specifically to work in 
conjunction with Locoscript. both those 
facilities are provided. Prospell is on one 
disc which is not bootable with the main 
program on one side and the dictionary 
on the other. 

To use Prospell you must first boot 
CP/M and then enter the Prospell main 
menu. That provides a top-level menu 
giving various options. Those options 
allow you to catalogue any Locoscript 
group. Spellcheck a text file, and various 
associated utilities. Also included with 
Prospell is a two-pass spell checker, 
which first list all the mistakes, then 
passes through them again for editing 
purposes. 

Once you have started to check a file 
you are prompted to insert the text disc 
and the dictionary disc and Prospell will 
then start moving through the file. When 
an enror. or an unrecognised word, is 
found, you are given a new series of 
options. At thai stage you can Store the 
word in the dictionary. Ignore the word. 
Change the spelling of a word. Look up 
the connect spelling, or View the word in 
context. 

Of those, it is the Look-up options 




which is the most important. It allows 
Prospell to search through its dictionary 
for any word which it thinks you might 
have been trying to spell, but which you 
eilhert mis- typed, or spelt incorrectly. It 
will then prompt you either for a 
correction or to continue. Using the 
dictionary. Prospell was surpnsingly 
good at correcting mis-spelt words, even 
relatively unusual ones. 

Once you have corrected all the words 
in your document, Prospell tells you how 
many words the file contained and 
creates a new file with all the changes 
included. 



Having used Prospell for a time, you 
find that soon you have built in the 
correct spelling of a variety of words your 
work requires and it is that function 
which makes Prospell so powerful. 

For users of Locoscript, or any of the 
other word processors for the 8256 and 
8512. who intend to write long 
documents and need their spelling 
checked, or a non^emotional proof 
reader, Prospell is essential. The only 
criticism is the speed of operation from 
disc but that can be avoided easily using 
a RAM disc. 



YOUR COMPUTER. OCTOBER 1986 67 




COMING 
SOON... 

A new magazine for everyone 
interested in personal computers 




YOUR COMPLETE GUIDE TO 
HARDWARE • SOFTWARE • SERVICES 



» 



Inside 
Issue 
One . • • 






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LETTERS 




Write to: Your Letters, 
Your Computer, 
79-80 Petty France, 
London, SW1H9ED. 
Tel: 01-222 9090 



The MSX factor 

When will you seriously 
recognise the existence of 
MSX computers? For 
example, in your cxccllcni 
article about Gremlin 
Graphics, you make a passing 
mention of the company^ 
plans to convert several of its 
games to C16 and MSX 
formats. 

You then state that llic C16 
sold more than 50,(XH) units at 
Christmas without even 
mentioning that Toshiba alone 
sold more than 70,0(M) MSX 
machines in the same period 
and that total MSX sales 
topped the 100.000 mark. 

Even when a game is 
reviewed which is available for 
the MSX formal, this fact is 
not mentioned. My Toshiba is 
not the first computer which I 
have owned, though is it most 
certainly the best. It is, 
however, frustrating to have 
an excellent computer 
virtually ignored by so many 
magazinci^. 

K. Neil, 
Lincolnshire. 
Editors reply: The percentage 
of MSX coverage in our 
rtiagazinc reflects the tmmber 
of tisers we feel read our 
magazine. Having said this, 
however, we will be featuring a 
full review of the new MSX 2 
machine when it is released and 
from flow will ensure that all 
available formats for games are 
mentioned. 



Intent on Nintendo 



As a regular reader of Your 
Computer, I was very excited 
about the Nintendo Consul 
mentioned in the August issue. 
By now I must have re-read the 
article many times but T still 
want to learn more about it. 
When will it be available in the 
U.K. and what software titles 
will be available; also is it 
possible to import a machine 
from overseas? 

Matthew Tazzyman, 
Cowling. 
Editor's reply: The response to 
our feaUire on the Nintendo 
Consul has been staggering. 



Many people, ourselves 
included, arc keen to discover 
more about the machine and we 
will publish full details as soon 
as they are available. 

There are many games 
available for the Nintendo in its 
native country of Japan, As yet, 
no company has announced 
plans to import the Consul hut 
to use one in this country would 
first involve buying a U,S, 
standard television set to allow 
for the difference in scanning 
speeds. Such a set would also 
require a mains adaptor to cope 
with the differences in current. 



Larger characters than Locoscript 



I am employed by the MSC on 
a project to introduce 
computers to physically- 
disabled adults in a Leonard 
Cheshire Home. The computer 
whichlthc MSC has supplied 
for the purpose is an Amslrad 
PCWK25b. I appreciate that it 
is not an obvious choice for this 
application and I have two 
problems which are seriously 
affecting the success of the 
project; 

The size of the characters 
used in Locoscript. Is there 
any word processing package 
available for the PCW8256 
which can produce larger type 
size? 

Can you recommend any 
sc^ftwarc of a non-business 
nature which could be of 
interest? 

S. Barta, 
Wiltshire. 



Editor's reply: Locoscript, in 
common with most word 
processing packages, can 
product double-width 
characters on paper but such 
effects are not shown on the 
screen. If the size you require 
is bigger $iili you have no 
option but to abandon word 
processing and use a graphics 
sigtiwritittg package. They 
allow you to produce very large 
characters indeed -big enough 
to be used for labels or posters. 

Alternatively, usitig a 
lightpen and graphics software 
will allow you to produce large 
characters on the screen as well 
as in print. Full details of those 
and tnany other products can 
be found in our sister 
publication. Putting Your 
AmsiradTo Work, which also 
contaisn information on 
non-business software for the 
PCW. 



We called this magazine 
Your Computer precisely 
because we v^elcome your 
views, programs, hints and 
even your criticisms of 
machines and software in 
general. 

Letters can be hand- 
written but if you want to 
submit a program, a listing 
vi^ould be of great assistance 
to us. Please indicate on 
what machine the program 
runs and enclose a loaded 
version on cassette or disc. 

We regret that we are 
unable to return any 
submissions sent without 
stamped addressed 
enveiopes. 



North-east 



repairs 



I read with interest the article* 
Puttingyourcomputerbackon 
the road, in the September 
issue of Your Computer, I was, 
however, disappointed to sec 
that you did not have a 
company representing the 
north-east and surmised that it 
could only be because you 
were not aware of the services 
wc provide in this area. 

Conislon Computers Ltd 
provides a full repair service 
for most home and business 
micros. Our charges are based 
on the parts used and the 
average time is three days. 

David Simpsoiit 
Coniston Computers Ltd,, 
Durham. 
Editor's reply: The feature you 
mentioned was by no means 
in ten fled to cover all areas of 
the country but otdy to give an 
idea of the ratige of services 
available, so that, if someotie 
needed a repair, they would 
have a better idea of how much 
it would cost and how long it 
would take. 



MAN LOGIC 



By NHL BRADLEY 



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YOUR COMPUTER. OCTOBER 1986 60 



Iff^B high level it is comforting 
H B to discover that many of 
^ ^ the institutions involved 
in education arc attempting to 
prepare their students better 
to compete for the few jobs 
available. 

Thames Polytechnic is one 
such institution and a good 
example of this form of 
leaching can be found in the 
ScluKil of Computing and 
Information Technology. Its 
styles and methods owe much 
to the industrial expertise of its 
staff, many of wIkhii have a 
good deal of experience in 
many areas of the industry. 

Founded in 18<X) with the aid 
of private capital from 
weil-wishers in the Woolwich 
area, niame^ Polytechnic was 
set up to help young people 
acquire tlie necessary technical 
qualifications which local 
many employers demanded. 
The college, then known as 
Woolwich Polytechnic, 
concentrated at first on fairly 
low-level subjects with heavy 
technical bias but as the 
demand for education grew. 
University of London degree 
courses became available and 
research work was also 
undertaken. 

Sandwich course 

Ibday, Thames Polytechnic 
teaches a wide range of 
subjects to its 5.(KX) full and 
part-time students. It still 
stands on the site of the 
original house where the 
institution Avas founded nearly 
1 00 years ago and many of the 
original buildings are stilt in 
use. The initial ideal of 
providing the necessary skills 
needed in a business and 
industrial environment 
persists and practical 
application of a subject is a 
mtijor part of the course 
curriculum. 

In one part of their course, 
students studying computmg 
science are split into teams 
which arc then given 
scenarios for imaginary 
firms. Each student is 
allocated an individual ideniity 
in the firm, such as the chief 
programmer or systems 
analyst and the team is then 
taken through the design and 
I implementation of a system. 



The scenario is based on an 
available system which the 
Polytechnic acquired as a 
result of its links with industry 
and consultancies; having a 
working example available 
allows the lecturers to indicate 
students' mistakes and pi^nl 
them on the correct path so 
that they reach the required 
solution. 

The role-playing also 



department at Thames the 
lowest student dropout figures 
in the country and few of its 
graduates have difficulty 
finding employment on 
completing their courses. 
While reasons for the 
success of the Polytechnic are 
many, a major contributory 
factor must be the structure of 
the department. Its staff is 
from many backgrounds; st)mc 



The Computing Science Course at 

Ttiames Polytechnic 1$ geared 
towards the needs of the industry. 



Tales from 
the river bank 



extends to the lecturers. Pam 
Morton, a course tutor in the 
School of Computing and 
Information Technology, 
explains: **1Tic staff play the 
roles of project managers, 
which gives the students the 
opportunity to practise their 
conmiunications skills for 
senior management in an 
industrial environment. They 
are not able to walk up to us 
with a question as they would 
in a sixth form college: instead 
they must make an 
appointment or write a proper 
memo/' 

Those regulations, however, 
apply only to matters relating 
to coursework; any personal 
problems which the students 
might have are given lop 
priority. 

Many assume incorrectly 
that the role-playing does not 
appear until late in the course 
l>ut it is one of the first 
assignments for ncw^ students. 
In addition to providing them 
with the communication skills 
they will need in industry, it 
also provides them with more 
information about the type of 
jobs which await them. 

It is there that many will find 
exciting challenges to a job 
never considered previously 
and adjust their options 
accordingly. Although to some 
they may seem revolutionary, 
even egotistical, those 
teaching methods have given 
the computing science 



have been systems analysts 
or consultants; others were 
involved in software 
engineering; white others have 
backgrounds in 
telecommunications. That 
combination of experience is 
important because combining 
the skills of computing and 
telecommunications is. after 
all, what information 
technology is about. 

Requirements 

Morton feels that the course 
title of Computing Science 
deters many prospective 
students, especially those with 
arts qualifications. **Thc 
subjects arc, to a certain 
degree, irrelevant provided 
that they are solid academic 
qualifications", she says. 

**Many universities place A 
level mathematics as a prime 
requirement when recruiting 
students: that is often 
necessar)' as the courses are 
mathematically-orientated as 
opposed to the industrial bias 
at Thames. 

Although the coursework 
aims the students towards 
industry, it docs not inhibit 
their interests in other areas 
and many go to work in the 
public sector or research. 
Having a wide range of 
subjects at O level is also very 
important. An in-housc survey 
of students studying the 
computing science course at 



Thames showed that of those 
who had achieved first class 
degrees, half had no previous 
computing experience but all 
had a number of O levels 
covering a wide range of 
subjects. 

For those who fait to reach 
the required standard at A 
level, a HND course also 
exists. Many mature students 

- in legal terms those over 21 

- favour the course as the two 
years of study represent a 
lesser commitment than the 
four years of the degree 
course. Many, however, 
accept the option to transfer to 
the degree course at the end of 
the first year. 

As the initial parts of both 
courses arc similar in nature, 
only a short bridging course in 
the summer is necessary to 
lake them to the necessary 
level to join the second year of 
the degree course. That also 
gives Thames the distinction of 
being one of the fcw^ 
polytechnics to have a second 
year bigger than the first. 
Students are given the 
opportunity to switch courses 
if only their tutors feel that 
they have the ability to do well 
on the degree course ; many of 
them do and the competition 
between students is very keen. 

The department is also keen 
to expand the part-lime 
courses. There are now more 
than 3(K1 students studying 
computing science and 
information technology alone. 

Male dominated 

Although no qualifications 
arc necessary, it is possible to 
obtain a fully-recognised 
degree in about seven years. 
Thames is the only place in 
London offering such a course 
and many of the part-time 
students travel long distances 
to study there. 

As with most industries at 
present, computing is 
male-dominated and that is 
reflected in the prop<irtion of 
women students studying the 
course, a matter of much 
concern for Morton, 'in 1980, 
the number reached a peak at 
25 percent. Thereafter it has 
dropped consistently to its 
present level of 16 percent" 
she savs. 



70 YOUR COMPUTER. OCTOBER 1986 




CAREERS 




The main tape library. Other data is held <m disc. 



^^^ verybody seems lo be 
A^^ doing it - using com- 
M putcrs, that is. For a 

^^^ paranoid few who arc 
icrrified al the prospect of an 
electronic world thai may seem 
a bad thing but for those seek- 
ing careers in the computer 
industry it can only be g(K>d 
news. 

Ah hough the use of com- 
puters is spreading fast and 
many thousands of pounds arc 



ping. With this system, com- 
puters record each item purch- 
ased and recorder slock 
automatically from the com- 
pany warehouses. 

The computing division at 
Tesco is one of the biggest cent- 
ral departments in the com- 
pany, employing more than 
4(X) staff. They are split 
between two IcKations. The 
head office at Cheshunt houses 
the company's latest IBM 



require A levels. They carry- 
out vital systems support work 
for the entire company. 

Operators also have the 
oppori unity to apply for in- 
house vacancies and move up 
the careers ladder. Most of the 
company's systems program- 
mers arc recruited direct from 
the operations department. 

As with most modern com- 
panics, graduates arc given the 
best opportunities to progress. 
The training course at Tcsco is 
one of the best in the country 
and there is never a shortage 
of potential applicants. The 
recruitment department visits a 
large number of universities 
towards the end of each 
academic year, in search of 
prospective staff. Promising 
students are intcviewed and 
made to take an aptitude test. 

It is interesting to note that 



When selection is complete, 
I hey undergo an intensive 
three-month training course 
which gives them :i solid 
grounding in the working of the 
company and introduces them 
to a fourth-generation language. 
The content of the course is 
changed regularly to keep it in 
tune with the latest needs of 
the company - 

On completing the course, 
the graduates are formed into 
a team of trainee analyisi-prog- 
rammcr^ and study a one-year 
course in systems analysis 
before being promoted to 
analyst-programmer level. Up 
to that point, most of the orig- 
inal rccniiis arc kept together 
but they then move to their 
respective specialist areas. 

Some will go into research 
and development of new 
systems, others may become 



being spent developing new 
systems* often little evidence of 
change is seen. The large 
supermarket chains are a prime 
example; even though their 
total spending on research and 
development of computing 
technology runs to many mill- 
ions of pou;ids» the casual cus- 
tomer buying weekend 
groceries would be hard-pres- 
sed to spot the difference, 

Tcsco is one of Britain's 
best-known supermarket chains 
and is also the biggest multiple 
food retailer in the U.K. Much 
of its success is a result of its 
massive investment in data 
processing technology. Since 
1954 when its first computer 
division was established at 
Chcshunt with an ICT 1300 
computer, its investment is in 
excess of £30 million, with 
further expenditure planned in 
the future. 

Computers have many uses 
in a supermarket environment. 
In addition to administration 
and payroll, they arc used for 
financial modelling, account- 
ing, re-ordering stock and con- 
trolling distribution. CAD 
packages are also used in 
designing new stores. One of 
the most exciting projects 
iKing developed deals with 
electronic point-of-sale shop- 



Shopping for a job 



We look at computing careers within a supermarket environment. 



mainframe computer. It can 
handle 28 million instructions 
each second and has a storage 
capacity of 208,000 million 
characters. 

Richard Parsons is director 
of the computing division. 
"One of the most important of 
the division's tasks is lo ensure 
that software and hardware 
give the performance expected 
of them and lo do that, every 
aspect of the users' needs must 
be thoroughly examined and 
understood," he explains. 

Good liaison 

"That is why good liaison 
and working relationships are 
so essential. Computer people 
know computers and retail 
people know retailing. So we 
must always bring the two 
together to find the best way 
of dealing with anything where 
the computer has an applica- 
tion in the business/' 

Staff for the computer divi- 
sion are recruited at several 
levels. Data control clerks can 
enter at 16 with O levels. If 
they work well, they have the 
opportunity to apply for any in- 
house vacancies which occur 
and can thus move into the 
operations department. 

Trainee computer operators 



today more and more com 
panics arc looking for people 
with business skill combined 
with computing talent. The 
days when the best hi-tech 
programmers gets the best jobs 
are numbered, Tcsco is careful 
to ensure th*it its rccrtiits have 
an interest in the business of 
the company as a whole, in 
addition to developing tlieir 
programming skills. 

Tesco recruits only eight 
graduates each year. Those 
who do well in the aptitude 
tests go to an assessment centre 
where they arc given a series 
of problem-solving exercises in 
a group situation. That tests 
their ability to work as part of 
a team, something which will 
be of great importance should 
thev be succcssfiil. 



involved in supporting existing 
systems. Depending on which 
route they lake, they may need 
to attend several of the 200 
courses which Tesco runs for 
its computing staff which will 
provide them with the know- 
ledge they need to carry-oul 
the allotted tasks. 

Most other large supermar* 
ket chains have made a huge 
investment in technology and 
they will have similar patterns 
of recruitment. Tesco, how- 
ever, is undoubtedly one of the 
most advanced in combining 
information lechni>logy in the 
supermarket environment. 



# We wixh to tlnmk Tesco 
Stores Ltd far its help in pro- 
ducing this article. 

A vn'w of the machine room for System 36, 



I 




CLUBS 




■V^V i^ a way; simihrly, where 

V B there is a computer more 

V W often than not there is a 
^xjmpuier club. Until now our 

elubs feature has concentrated 
on clubs set up by members of 
the pubUc but many other 
groups exist, each with their 
own computer enthusiasts and 
many with their own clubs. 

The Royal Air Force 
employs more than 100^000 
staff at home and overseas and 
it is not surprising that some of 
them have more than a passing 
interest in computers. As with 
most other organisations, the 
RAF was becoming increas- 
ingly computerised and, as the 
influence spread slowly 
through the organisation, it 
was thought that many of the 
staff should be given the oppor- 
tunity to become computer lit- 
erate. 

As a result, the education 
centre at each station was pro- 
vided with a BBC micro- 
computer and tutorial soft- 
ware. Tliosc who wished were 
then able to educate them- 
selves in their spare tunc. That 
stimulated an already-growing 
interest in a>mputcrs in the 
' RAF and, in 1982, a memo was 
sent to staff members introduc- 
ing the idea of a computer club 
for servicemen and their 
dependents. 

Wide range 

A few months later, the 
Royal Air Force Personal 
Computer Association was 
bom and today it consists of 55 
member clubs with more than 
6(X) members. There is, how- 
ever, great difficulty in main- 
taining some clubs. As staff arc 
usually assigned to three-year 
lours of dutv, the most 
enthusiastic members are often 
posted elsewhere, leaving the 
club to fold slowly. 

Most of the clubs grew from 
an interest in the original BBC 
machine and most meet, after 
working hours, at station edu- 
cation centres. They discuss 
problems, swap software and 
organise competitions and dis- 
cussion on a range of subjects. 
Most clubs meet once or twice 
each month, although indi- 
vidual members may work with 
station equipment on a more 
regular basis. 



RAFPCA- 

The Sky High 

Computer 

Club 

Anthony 'Biggies' Thompson investigates 
the RAF Computer Association 



Many clubs also hold their 
own open days and a few per- 
mit members of the public to 
visit them. In some areas, the 
standard issue BBC machine is 
the only computer to which 
club members have access, 
though many others have their 
own machines. Thev range 
from ZX-Sls to IBM PCs, 
depending on rank and salary, 
but the majority of members 
own BBC machines. 

In addition to money pro- 
vided by ta.xpayers, the RAF 
also has access to non-public 
funds which originate transac- 
tions within the organisation. 
Applications may be made for 
a grant from those funds which 
could go towards buying com- 
munications equipment or 
peripherals, on any other 
equipment desired by club 
members. As a result, many 
clubs have expanded their orig- 
inal equipment to cope with the 
demand for greater computing 
power as the level of skill 
among its members increases. 

Bulletin board 

Each club member pays a 
yearly subscription to his club 
and each club, in turn, pays a 
yearly fee to the association. 
For that they receive inform- 
ation on how to start and main- 
tain a club, how to apply for 
grants from non-public funds, 
and a quarterly magazine, 
Computair, is issued free to all 
members. 

It contains a good deal of 



information of interest to all 
but it has its own problems. 
Wing Commander Archbold, 
chairman of the Association 
explains: 

"Because of the wide range 
of machines in use by mem- 
bers, it is difncuU to provide 
information, listings and news 
for them all." In reality, the 
magazine content tends 
towards the BBC machine 
more than any other but a 
recent issue also contained fea- 
tures on the Data Protection 
Act, writing simple games pro- 
grams and using the Super- 
script word processing pack- 
age. 

The magazine is developing 
quickly and it is hoped that in 
the near future competitions 
will also form part of its con- 
tent. Although the association 
is the ruling body, the clubs are 
left to their own devices. In 
addition to producing the 
magazine, the association also 
organises a discount scheme 
for a range of peripherals. 
They, however* can be ordered 
only when requested as the 
wide range of computers in use 
makes it impracticable to keep 
a large amount of equipment 
in stock. 

More recently, a bulletin 
board scr\'ice was set up and 
runs on association equipment. 
It uses the serx'ice telephone 
network - outside working 
hours - which means that mem- 
bers are not charged. It is 
regarded as a major develop- 



ment as it is a very efficient 
method of encouraging inter- 
club communication, especi- 
ally when the distances which 
separate some of the clubs are 
considerable. At present the 
service contains the usual chat 
lines, news and information 
but it is developing quickly, 
and more pages will soon be 
available. 

The inexpensive nature of 
the operation is perhaps the 
major reason the bulletin 
board is run on service tele- 
phone Hnes but it is also the 
major disadvantage. Members 
can access the service only 
from an RAF station and only 
after working hours. 

The association is now look- 
ing at the possibility of setting- 
up another board running on 
British Telecom lines. It would 
be available on a 24-hr. basis 
and could also be accessed by 
members of the public. 
Although it would be more 
expensive to run and use. the 
members of the eommitiec arc 
certain it will be more popular 
and will encourage the many 
club members who have com- 
puters and modems at home to 
log on more frequently. 

Brief wobble 

A good deal of information 
about the association can be 
found on the club spot pages 
of Micronet and that service is 
also used to encourage inter- 
club communication. The 
other major activity organised 
by the association for the 
benefit of the clubs is an open 
day. There are software com- 
petitions and demonstrations 
by members and commercial 
companies. The last was staged 
during the Easter holiday at 
Ilendon and played host to a 
superb presentation of produc- 
ing music and sound effects on 
the BBC niicriK-omputer. 

The R AFPCA has been nm- 
ning for four years and, after 
a brief wobble caused by the 
end of the computer boom, is 
now stronger than ever. With 
so many new ideas and projects 
under way and, of course, the 
combined computing expertise 
of club members, many of 
whom arc employed full-time 
in the RAF computer divi- 
sions, a long, prosperous 
future seems assured. 



72 YOUR COMPUTEFl. OCTOBER 1986 



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Full Address 



..Post Code 



L.. 



n m ( >KFIC'1AL USK ONLY 
MKMBEieSHlPNO. 





A/c Name and No. (if known) ., 

Please pay to National Wesin^iiLster Bank PLC (60- 1843T), 
2 St Alphage Highwalk, London WaU, London EC2 for Uie 
account of Penny Share Ffx-iLs. Accmmt numln^r 4fi07P948 
the sum of i39.50 on receipt of tliis order and therciifler 
iif>9.5() on the same date each year until countermanded by 
me. 



Date.. 



..Signed 



iiSottivone dxchcuiqefc 




The length and comptexiti* of mai^ computer pro- 
grains makes it impossible to publish them without 
losing valuable space which could otherwise be 
devoted to editorial features. To combat this, Your 
Computer has introduced Software Exchange, a 
new semce for readers offering them ttie opportun- 
ity to purchase quality sof!v*'are at l>argain prices. 

Each tape Icalurcs Wio programs, cither games 
or utilities, sent by readers and evaluated fully by 
our staff before being offered for sale. 



If you waild like your program considered for 
this feature, please send it to Software Exchange, 
Your Ckmputer, 79-80 Petty France. London SWI H 
9ED. Full instructions should be enclosed and 
ptease ensure tl>e tape or disc is imiked clearly 
v/ith your name and address. A fee of £50 per 
program used is paid after publication and royalties 
of 25 pence each arc paid for each tape nwe 
than lOOsokJ. 




SORCERERS' QUEST 

Machine: CommcNlore 

Program Tyiie: TextAdvefitiire 
Aiittor. DanYiiLavdnr 

in this enjoyable adventure game, you play the part 
of a fearfess knight, sent on a near-impossible task 
of destroying an evil sorcerer who is rampaging 
round the country, casting v^'cked spells, spreading 
mayhem and leaving a trail of havoc and destruction 
in his path. 

To assist you in doing battle v/ith this master of 
evil, you must first find three magical obiects - a 
cup, sword and shield. That will give you the neces- 
sary powers to cast a spell on the evil wizard and 
put an end to his reign for all time. 

As with most adventures, the inputs are entered 



in the verb-noun format so to pick up a certain 
object, say a sword, you would type in 'get sword*. 
The vocabulary is by no means large compared 
to many of the other professkraJ adventure games 
on the market but that minor point m no way 
detracts from the enjoyment ol the adventure; 
cunning, luck and lateral thinking are major require- 
inefils for IIk^ who wish to complete the 
Sorcerers' Quest, 

FAST FOOD LASER 

Madihie; Cofimiodore 

Program Type: Steot-'em-up 
Autiiorz Frank Tottt 

In a lonely fast food cafe, far Uom civilisation, a 
sole laser gun is in fierce battle with an assortment 
of mouth -watcnng monstrc^ities. Due to a spillage 



of radioactive ketchup, normal everyday nibbles 
have been turned into vicious, blood-thirsty 
monsters vrtw will stop at nothing, except their 
own destruction, to free themselves from the cafe 
and teke over the wortd. 

You control a laser base near tlie cafe where 
the accident occurred and only you can save earth 
from imminent destruction. Thirteen waves of 
kamakazi hamburgers and vigilante hot dogs fling 
themselv^ desperately at >'our statton in their bid 
for freedom. To assist you with this seemingly 
impossible task, the laser <^n fire in any direction 
with an untimitetl supply of bullets. You can also 
decide how long e^ch atladc wave will last and 
have five levels of difficulty from which to choose. 

Only your skill and courage as a laser base 
operator stand between the civilised vi'orld and a 
pickled gherkin for Prime Minister. 



AMSTRAD UTILITIES 




MacMno' 

Pro^^mType: 

Aiitiior: 



AmstradCPC 

Utility 

Midiaef Mangion 



This useful program adds 18 resident system 
extensions to Amstiad Basic. White many such 
programs add commands which are combinations 
of Basic commands, the RSXs in this program can 
be achieved only thmugh machine code and are 
aimed mainly at those with disc drives. 

The commands given are all useful and include 
many standard functions like Format. Read and 
Write commands. They make use ol certain routines 
in the CPC computer disc operating system white 
the rest of the commands are dedicated to using 
the second bank of memory on the 6128 model. 

The non^disc commands include such functions 
as SWAP, which cm be used to swap the location 



of the screen RAM between its two possible 
addresses, it is very useful because it allOk'/s one 
to store a graphics screen in one location and a 
text screen holding instructions in another. Another 
command. COPYM, allows the user to copy one 
sectton of RAM to another. It is specially useful in 
animation for copying certain parts of a program, 
fe all the commands used are BSXs. They must 
be preceded by the bar sign, generated by holding 
down the shift and (w k^ together. 

CASTLE 

Machine: Amstrad CPC range 

Program Type: Arcade Adventure 
Auttion NkdcCanastois 

While certSn undesirable citizens would argue that 
things are not so good now. life was even harder 
for the average crintinal in medieval times. What 
with the wars, crusades, dragons and damsels in 



distress, it is difficult enough for anybody to make 
a decent living, let atone the average petty thief. 

As Cad the cat burglar, your task seems simple 
in theory. Make your vray to the deserted castle, 
steal ail the jewellery and then escape to live the 
rest of your life in luxury. In reality, the route to 
the castle is littered with an assortment of deadly 
weapons. On the first saeen you are attacked by 
hordes of copyright symbols. Should you escape 
the initial waves of vicious onslaughts, mantraps. 
arrows and an assortment of other nasties await 
you. 

This challenging game requires skill, detenmina- 
tion. courage but, above all. plenty of luck as you 
attempt to leap, duck and dodge your way to the 
caslte. Should you succeed, you wilt be rewarded 
with riches beyond your wildest dreams but then 
of course, you have to return. Although the graphics 
used in Castle are not particularly outstanding, the 
game is nonetheless very enjoyable. 



74 YOUR COMPUTER, OCTOBER 1986 




PARACOPTER 

Machine: Spectnim 

PmgramTyiie: Slioot-'eni*up 
Author: AltstairWebfa 

In this aciioivpacked game, you are in charge of 
the last anti-aircraft gun in the country when, 
sutWenly, squadrons ol enemy helicopters are 
sighted on the horizon. Their mission is to destroy 
your gun and then invade the country, whatever 
the cost. As the eoerrty aircraft fly overhead, titeir 
troops, armed with higJi explo^ves, jump out to 
begin their deadly mission. 

You must shoot the helicopters and paratroopers 
to prevent them landing. Should four manage to 
reach the ground on either side o( the gun. they 
climb on to iwr gun and b\m it up. Five points 
are gained for each helicopter destroyed and two 



for each parachutist out one point is lost (or each 
bullet fired, so it is important to make eveiy shot 
count. Luckily, your gun is equrpped with two types 
of bullets; standard ones which move only in straight 
lin^ or stecraWe ones which follow the direction 
of the gun turret 

Ninety-nine levels of shoot-*em-up acticKi lie 
betv/een you and the successful defer>ce of your 
countrv; only the best will sunwe. 

BALTHAZAR 
ADVENTURE 

Machine: Spactrnm 

Proprain Type: Text Adventure 
Author: Alex Andrews 

Written usirwj the Oy/// adventure cr<^tion program. 
BalOmar Adventure is a superb example of how 



effective the system can be for producing profes- 
sional-style adventure games. Using a machine 
code datat)ase. Ouili interprets the inputs and pro- 
duces the appropriate responses. All the program- 
mer need do is to key-in the locafion descriptions 
and decide how the advemure will run. 

In Balthazar Adventure, you play the role of King 
Balthazar, a kindly monarch who has been thrown 
into prison and whose treasures have been taken 
from him and placed under guard in a castle. Your 
task is to escape and recover your riches. That. 
however, is not so easy as it seems. There are 
n^ny problems in your way, some simple, some 
obscure, some deadly, but all enjoyable. Adventure 
addicts v^ill appreciate the humorous dialogue, the 
pleasant surpfises and Hie speed at which 
response are given, made possible by the Ouill 
database. 




PANDOMONIUM 

Machine: BBC 

Program Type: Arcade Adventure 

Authon Peter Scott 

Picture yourself in the heart of a strange new world 
filled with springs, platforms, deadly lasers and 
teleport stations disguised as telephor>e boxes. 
Somewhere in Ujat world, a big, bad nasty lives; 
it is your missiori to d^roy him. The only way you 
can do so is to travel round the 75 screens, collect- 
ing the 12 components of a deadly bomb ^vith 
which to blast the nasty which is. after alt. no less 
than he deserves. 

To help you travel round the huge maze of 
screens it \s possible to teleport using the several 
telephone boxes which are placed conveniently at 
various ntervals. You dimb into one. dial a number, 
and before you can say "Reverse charges' you find 
yourself in another kiosk. Once the 12 pieces of 
bomb are in your possession, you must first assem- 
ble them and then make your way to ttie last 
screen, ivhere you are face to face with the nasty 



for the final conflict. 

This jolly program also features condnuous 
background music, 16 types of animated aliens 
and a high-score table. 

ADDRESS DOOK 

Machine: BBC model B 

Program Type: Database 
Author Bryan Hobson 

If you are one of those people who are not treridy 
enough to own a Filofax and r>ot rich enough to 
own a Psion Organiser, this could be the program 
for you. Address Book for the BBC is llie ideal way 
Of keeping in touch with your correspondents. On 
loading, the program presents a list of optior^. You 
can load a file of previously-saved addresses, add 
new addresses to a file or print-out a list o( 
addresses. One particularly interesting feature 
allows you to search through your files with a 
wildcard. Using this, you can, for example, print-out 
all the addresses beginning with a certain tetter or 
number. 



The program also featurt^ an edit mode which 
allows you to delete records from a file or alter an 
address if somebody has nrioved. A sample data 
file showing how the program works is also included 
at the end of the cassette after the main program 
and this can be run by using optton 1 on tt^e main 
menu. 

A useful program for all those who feel their 
lives are in need of organisation. 




ORDER FORM 



I enclose a cheque/Postal Order value £ (please 

Please send me the following Software Exchange tapes (print remember to add 40p p&p per tape). 

tape reference number clearly). 

NAME 

ADDRESS 



Send orders to Software Exchange, 79-80 Petty France, 
London SW1H 9E0 - please allow 28 days for delivery. 



YOUR COMPUTEfi. OCTOBER 1986 75 



MICRO MARKET 



TAYLOR MADE SYSTEMS 




tm 

t£f "Of»i*r ^Klk^ Pimm rr-urw 

SPECIAL PACKAGE PRICES 

£1249 iOM^rtOOfwhAQrvftfUr 0*^gntl4etor«»i» 

APRICOT 

A0rtCirtf3l*aMHi FT«uw9»K*«M« f^4/«>w<«M4v^Jt Ou*CkM{^ lO&^CHK* 

£1195 
Accounting Package I 

£1400 iO««^tlCOfwM.Ol^4«lw 0««,Klt14d^»Q« 

Accounting Package II 

*m mm m^\^ * Urn i«sft mm mp»0d>fm*^^ ^^^^mI j?^^ 
S648 prt^tKt»M*«ad« 



FIW) A LOWIft Pft1C£ aSEWWERE AWO WE V/E'U MATCH IT 



S. I. TAILOR 

8. ONRA ROAO, LONCX>N E17 aJO TB.: Ot-SSe 1260 



SOFTWARE CREATIONS 

ARE LOOKING FOR 
PROGRAMMERS! 

• HAVE YOU THE ABIUTY AND 

COMMITMENT TO MAKE A CAREER IN THE 

COMPUTER INDUSTRY? 

* HAVE YOU WRITTEN ANY HIGH CALIBRE 

GAMES OR UTILITIES FOR YOUR HOME 

COMPUTER AND WOULD LIKE TO RECEIVE 

TOP ROYALTIES OR OUTRIGHT 

PAYMENTS? 

9oT immediate evaluation contact: 

SOFTWARE CREATIONS 
061 766 5053 

6 ParWancJs, Wliitefield. Manchester M25 7WT 



GOEL 
COMPUTER SERVICES 

45 Boston Road, London W7 3SH 
01 579 6133 

MAIL ORDER PRICES 

R.RP. OUR PRICE 

£14.95 £10.75 

£9,95 £7.20 

C8.95 £6.60 

£7,95 £6.00 

£6.95 £5.40 

AMSTRAD 464/6128/8256/8512 

ATARI. BBC. ELECTRON, 

COMMODORE 16/64/+4/I28. 

SPECTRUM, MSX 

Ovef 1000 titles in stock. Just write the title 

required with a 2nd choice and enclose 

cheque/P.O. and you shall have your game 

by return. Of call in at the shop. 

SPECTRUM -K FROM £84 



76 YOUR COMPUTER. OCTOBER 19S6 




CC-7>"Z:eOT01 

-2:PRINT 
YOU CRED5FAIL 

YOU OUGHT TO 



O T-3H9:Din X^^OSS) : Z-Oi GOSUBaOOO: GOSUBIOOO 

10 X^C2>-RNDC1)»5+1 

EO FORD-OTOZ : ON X?iCD) GOSUB 700 , 7S0 . BOO , B50 

,900,950:NEXTD 

eS GETJS: IFJS<>-"THEN2S 

30 F0RD-0T02 

3S GETAS:0-UALCAS>: IF Q-O OR Q>B THEN3S 

40 IF 0<>X:tCD) THEN SCO 

50 ONOGOSUB 700. 750 » BOO, ©SO, 300, 950: NEXTD: 2 

-Z^^l : T*T+10»C2<eS> : F0RE-0T033: NEXTE 

GO POKES* 1 . 158 : POKES+4 , 17 : F0RE-0T09 : NEXTE : P 

OKES+4 , 16 : F0RE-0T0139 : NEXTE 

70 PRINT"CCYN}<HOnE> SCORE 



500 PRINT "CHOHEJCCYNJ SCORE 

510 PRINT: PRINT; PRINT^CGRNJ 

EDC6RN> BUT SCORED "2"P0 I NTS" 

SaO PRINT:PRINT:PRINT''CC-7} 

HAUE PLAYED NOTE"X^CD) ; FORE-OTOaSS: NEXTE 

530 ON GOSUB 700 » 750,800, 850,900, 9S0: POKE 

U*38*Q» 10: F0RE-0T099 : NEXTE 

550 F0RE-0TDll:PRINT;NEXTE:INPUT"CC-3> PR 

ESS RETURN TO PLAY . CBLK3 *• ; AS; RUN 

700 P0KE2040 , 13: PDKE1594 , 32; P0KE1S34 , IBO : PO 

KES , 36 • POKES* 1 , 08 : P0KES*4 , 33 

710 FORC-OTOT : NEXTC : POKES+4 , 33 : P0KE2040 , 14 : 

POKE 1534 , ISO : P0KE1G34 , 32 : RETURN 

750 P0KE204 1,13: P0KE1S38 , 32 : P0KE163B , 160 ; PO 

KES , 048 : POKES^^l ,11: POKES+4 , 33 

7G0 FORC-OTOT : NEXTC ; POXES+4 , 32 : P0KE204 1 , 1*4 : 

POKE 1598 . ISO: POKE 1S38 , 32: RETURN 

800 P0KE2042,13:PDKE1602,32:P0KE1B42.160:P0 

KES , 24 : POKES* 1 . 14 : POKES+4 , 33 

810 FORC-OTOT : NEXTC : P0KES*4 , 32: P0KE2042, 14 : 

POKEl 602 , ISO : POKE 1642 , 32 : RETURN 

850 P0KE2043, 13: PDKEIBOB, 32: P0KE1B4B, 160: PO 

KES , 194 : POKES*! , 16 ; POKES+4 , 33 

860 FORC-OTOT : NEXTC : P0KES*4 , 32 : P0KE2043 . 14 : 

P0KE1G06 , IGO : P0KE164G , 32 : RETURN 

900 POKE2044 ,13: POKE IG 10 , 32 : POKE 1650 , 160 : PO 

KES , 96 : POKES* 1 , 22 : POKES-^4 , 33 

910 FORC-OTOT : NEXTC : POKES+4 , 32 : P0KE2044 , 14 : 

POKE 1610 , 160 : POKE 1650 , 32 : RETURN 

950 P0KE204S , 13 : P0KE1614 , 32 : P0KE1654 . 160 : PO 

KES , 48 : POKES* 1 , 28 : P0KES*4 , 33 

960 FORC-OTOT : NEXTC : P0KES*4 , 32 ; P0KE2045 , 14 : 

P0KE1614, 160: P0KE1B54, 32: RETURN 

1000 F0RC-832T0C*44 : READD : POKEC , D : NEXTC 

1010 DATA1,8, ,3,156, ,7,122, ,31.123.128.127, 

255.224.49.248, 192.28.3, 128 

1020 DATA14 , 7 . , 15 . 15 . , 7 , 158 , , 7 , 254 , . 3 , 204 , , 



^ Commodore 64 
# Andrew Gordon 

This interesting nnemory game 
employs an unusual graphical 
twist. Instead of the normal 
flashing lights and ambiguous 
bleeps, the computer displays 
six mouths, each of which 
sings a different note when its 
conresponding key is pressed. 

The object is to follow a 
sequence of notes produced 
at random by the computer. 
You then have to repeat the 
sequence, a task which 
becomes increasingly difficurt 
as time passes. When you 



--1 

9 



9 




^ 



-AnjuejC^fteW^Gi^ 



f^RCHERYi 




^ Spectrum Aker Brothers 

Your skills may never match 
those of Robin Hood but 
Archery is an enjoyable 
shoot-'em-up game which 
involves shooting at assorted 
moving targets with a bow 
and anrow. To score a point 
the centre of each target must 
be hit, demanding accuracy, 
skill and plenty of luck. Ten 
thousand bonus points, a 
lifetime supply of venison and 
the hand of Lady Marion are 
awarded for hitting all 10 
targets. 



3 60PDER 

BORDER O: 
' THEN CO T 



lUK 



1 REH ***^**^* APCHCftV *4.**T^* 

2 REM By AKER BROTHERS . 19S6 

3 REM tT^***-^**************** 

4 REM 

5 GO TO 5 

6 BORDER i BORDER 
X BORDER 5 : BORDER 6 

PAUSE 1: IP INKEY««"- 
6 

7 RETURN 

8 POKE £365^ . * 

9 BORDER © RhRER C 
L5 

10 REM *♦ SET UP VARIABLES *- 

IS LET L«0 LET SsO: LET M«0 
GO 5UB S0O0 

20 GO SUB 130 

30 LET 0«-l: LET X«3e; LET =J«- 
X 

36 REM *ACTIOri AND MOU«EMENTS» 

a5 FOR B»l TO 2 

50 GO SUd 30 

B0 PRI?4T AT Y^X, INK I;'* AB "' 
BEEP ,002,:<+X 

B5 INK (RKD*^> +1 PLOT 123.23: 
DRAU 0,24: PLOT 15S,24: DRAU 0, 
2 PLOT 129. •13 DRAU 0.2 

70 IF INKEy«»"0'* THEN 00 TO 20 


75 GO TO 50 

eO LET XmXW 

90 IF X«0 THEN GO SUB 100 

95 RETURN 
100 PRINT AT Y*X;" " LET 0« 
30: LET X«-lr LET U«l: GO SUB 13 



[PROGRAM LISTINGS 



make a mistake, the computer 
will tell you which key you 
should have pressed and, by 
turning the mouth pink, the 
incorrect choice you made. 
The game also incorporates a 
continuous score which 
appears at the top of the 
screen. 

The mouths are produced 
using sprites and open and 
close as their respective notes 
are produced. The overall 
effect is very pleasing and the 
game very challenging. 




3»e0H..l.ei6. ..240, 

1030 F0RC-877Taa94 : POKEC , : NEXTC 

1040 F0RC-a36T0C* 3E : READD : POKEC , D : NEXTC 

1050 DATA1,8. ,3.1SB, ,7,182, .31,123,128,127, 

2SS , 2S4 , 29 , 87 . 1 2S . 7 . 254 , , 3 , 204 , , 3 

1060 DATA204, ,1.21B, , ,240, 

1070 F0RC-929T0958 : POKEC . : NEXTC 

1200 y-S324e : FQRC-UTOC+46 : REAOD : POKEC . : NEX 

TC 

1210 DATAe7 . ISO , 1 IS , ISO , 151 , ISO , 183 , ISO , 215 

,150,247,150,, , , . ,27, , ,,255,8,255,21 

1220 DATA121,240, , ,255 2,2,2,2,2,2 

1230 FORC-2040TOC+S: POKEC, 14:NEXTC 
1300 PRINT"CUIHT><CLR>":F0RC-1T012: PRINT :NEX 
TC 

1310 PRINT TAB<9>; :FaRC-0TG5:PRINT"CC*C^CC- 
U}CC-U> "; : NEXTC 

1320 PRINT:PRINTTABC10):FDRC-0T05:PRINT'*CRU 
S5 CDFF> '':: NEXTC 

1330 PRINT: PRINT: PRINTTABC10)-CBLU>1 2 
3 4 5 6" 

1400 S-S4272 : POKES+24 , IS : POKES^S , 1 36 : POKES^^ 
6, 137: RETURN 

2000 P0KES328O , : P0KE53281 . : P0KE532B9 , O : PR 
INT"CCLR^**: PRINT: PRINT; PRINT 
2005 PRINT"CC-3} CSH S^CRED^ SinONE 

CC"35CSH S5": PRINT 
2010 PRINT"CGRN> THE COttPUTER yiLL SING A 

SERIES OF" 
2020 PRINT- NOTES WHICH YOU HUST COPY EXACT 
LY.-: PRINT 

2030 PRINT** BY PRESSING KEYS 1-6 ON THE T 
OP ROU" 

2040 PRINT" YOU WILL OPERATE THE MOUTHS LAB 
ELLED " 

20S0 PRINT" ONE TO SIX.": PR INT 
2060 PRINT" EACH TIME YOU SUCCESSFULLY CO 
nPLETE" 

2070 PRINT" A SEQUENCE OF NOTES YOU WILL SC 
ORE ONE*' 

2080 PRINT" POINT. THE NEXT SEQUENCE YOU WI 
LL BE" 

2090 PRINT" 6IUEN WILL BE A COPY OF THE PRE 
UIQUS " 
2100 PRINT" ONE EXEPT THAT A NOTE WILL HAUE 

BEEN " 
2110 PRINT" ADDED TO THE END. ": PRINT: PRINT: 
PRINT: PRINT 

eiSO INPUT"CC-3> PRESS RETURN TO PLAY.CBL 
K> - ; AS : PR I NT " CCLR> - : RETURN 



IF Y;4 



O NE-T B: GO TO 30 

130 LET V-INT .RND#15J 
THEN GO TO 130 

133 TF Hsl© THEN CL5 ' GO TO aa 

135 LET Mart^.: 

140 LET I=INT •PND*7>+£ 

145 RETURN 

200 REM ♦ FIP£ SUTTON ftCTXON * 

205 FOR T*1A TO 3 5TCP -1 

ai0 IF SCREENl tT+l,15)<>" " TH 
EN QO TO 260 

220 PRINT AT T . 15 : INK. 7, "C" • B 
EEP *G03.T+T PRINT RT T,15," " 

230 PRINT AT y.x. INK I; * AB * 

B^EP •O02.X*y 

240 GO SUB SO 

250 NEXT T 

25S GO TO oC 

265 FOR A«0 TO 5 PRINT AT T+1 
15-1. INK ?; eRIGMT i;*'GOOD" Ct 
ZP .01, A. PPIfJT' AT T + 1,15-1." 
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270 LET S»S+1O0 LET LaL^l GO 
«UB 13600: GO TC 20 

:.05 FOR A«50 TO ^ STEP -2: BEEP 
, D02, A+3 ?EEP .00c. P. -e BEEP 



C-20 PRINT AT 20, 5. FLASH 1; INK 

4: PRESS AN,' KCV" 

322 FOR H«l TO 7: BO»DER A SOP 
Z'EP PP INT AT 11 11; INH A; "10 
O^i?'* BBBP .002 Pl-rP NEvj p IF 

INKEY$5"'' THEN GO TO 322 

525 LET S=Si-lOO90 
ET i.*-iO 

330 EOPDER 0" Cu5 
GO TO 20 

400 PEN *#»** END 

405 PRINT AT 4 10; 



LET 112-10 L 

GO SU8 9500 

OF GAME y#««» 
INK 7; BRIGH 



INK 7, PAPER 
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BEEP -003.-5 
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TARGETS" /OU 

GAIN 10000 B0NU5 POINTS" 
:iS PRINT ftT i:;.0: INK A^^'FOR . 
OUP SECOND ATTEMPT VOU WILL HAVE 
TO SHOOT 20 HCRE TO GAIN 

THE BONUS Poitrr^" 



1. 'UELL DONE 

410 PRINT AT 7.4; 
1.^ YOU SCORED .S 

420 BEER ,002 10: 

J-2? PRINT AT 10.6 
ER GAME? CY/N3 ' 

430 IF INKEY»s"Y'- 
T Ma0 LET Sx© LET LsO. CD SUE 
9000. GO TO 20 

43S IF IfMEYf-^-'N- THEN STOP 

440 BEEP .02.66 

445 PRINT AT 10,6; INK 2; '*ANOTH 
EP GAME^ Cv .N3 ■• 

450 GO TO 405 
5000 REM *■ SET UP UGD GRAPHICS ♦ 
SOOS FOR C*144 TO 153. FOR A-0 T 
O 7: READ N: PO»^.E USR CHR» C +A , N 

BEEP . 001, C-:O0 NEXT A NEXT 
C 

8010 DATA 0,0.6.29.53,0.125,15 
S020 DATA 0.0.1^6.220,174.0,95.2 
46 

5030 DATA 6 , 25 . 25 . 8 . 8 > 6> 20 . 20 
3040 DATA 34.34.255.34,34.34,255 
,34 
6050 DATA 82,130,173*75,10.144.0 



For details of this new section 
for advertisers please call 
PAUL MONAF 0J222 9090 



ACCOUNTS + PAYROLL 

For Commodore 64, 128, 

8000 Series etc. 

and larger computers 

Very comprehensive but easy to 
use. 

Available on 21 days approval. 

Also contract programming 

ELECTRONIC AIDS 
fTewkes) Ltd 

Dept YC, 62 High Street 

Evesham. Worcs. WR11 4HG 

Telephone: 0386 49339 



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ZX81 &ZX PRINTTER £15.50 

SPECTRUM 16K. 48K. & 128K ...... £19.50 

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16K TO 48K RAM UPGRADE £25.00 

SPECTRUM TO SPECTRUM+ £3S 

UPGRADE 

ALL PRICES ARE FULLY INCLUSIVE, 

Computers are returned by 1st class 

registered C.O.D. Post 

24 HR GUARANTEED TURNROUND OR 
25% DEDUCTED FROM BILL 

SEND COMPUTER ONLY. WITH DES- 
CRIPTION OF FAULT TO: 
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WE ALSO REPAIR AMSTRAD. COMMODORE, 

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PHONE FOR DETAILS 



PRE-SCHOOL, PRIMARY, JUNIOR 



Education 

By a Teacher. Tested by Pupils 

Approved by PBrents and 

Schools for Home use on all 

Amstrad CPC models 



£6-00 Per Set 



Chofce of more than 
FIFTY programs 



■ 



Ins 



SAE for Usts to: Dept YC3 

ARC 

53 Bentley Street 

Cieethorpes, Sth. Humberside 

DN35 SDL (0472) 699632 



YOUR COMPUTER. OCTOBER 1986 77 



MICRO MARKET 



ATLANTIS 

SOFTWARE LTD 

DON'T RISK IT! 



If you can write 
high quality 
arcade games 
for Amstrad, 
Atari, 

Commodorep 
Efectron, MSX 
or Spectrum 
computers* we 
woufd like to talk 
to you. 
Contact Mike 
Cole at Atlantis 
Software, 



THERE ARE 
SAFER WAYS 
OF EARNING 
I MONEY. 




28 STATION ROAD LONDON SE25 SAG 




SOFTWARE LTD. 

MdAdowvaie Estate, RjiKcen^ Limerjck, Ireland 
Telephone; (061) 27994, (UK) 01 0-353^ 61-27994 

Amstrad, BBC, Commodore MAIL 

Amslrad PCW cassettes & discs ORDER 

Music Invaders {Age 7-Adult) 

Magic Maths (Age 4-8) 

Maths Mania (Age 8-12} 

Better Maths (Age 12-16) 

^Better Spelling (Age (9-14) 

♦Better Spelling (Age 8-Adult> 

♦Physics 1 (Age 12-16) CSE/0 Level 

•Biology 1 (Age 12-16) CSEO Level 

♦Chemistry 1 (Age 12-16) CSE/0 Level 

Weather/Climate (Age 12-17) 

Playschool Malhs'Letlers (Age 3-7) 

Read our excaUent reviews in all the major 

magazines. 

Caccottcs £9.95 each. Di5C« £12-95 each 

4a hour MAIL 0RD£R * AvarlaDtA 

CPC464/ee4/6129/FCW 82S6 {SOOfil for PCWS256 




MODEMS 

NIGHTINGALE 
COMSTAR BBC 

£139 

NIGHTINGALE 

8256/8512 + AMSTRAD 

INTERFACE + CHIT CHAT. 

E-MAIL OR VIEWDATA 

£1 84.00 

Prices inc. VAT and carriage 
JOHN HOLMES COMPUTERS 

^■^ FULBECK. GRANTHAM, LINCS MB 
Fv^ TEL: (0400) 72818 FTl 



78 YOUR COMPUTER. OCTOBER 1986 



,0 

6060 DRTR 45 ,45> 65.99 . S4 .20 , 72 . A 

a ^ 

8070 DRTR 0,0>l,l,i.i.3.3 

eoao DRTR s.'j.7,e,6. i4,i4.ae 

q090 DfiTR eO,iae.S55*£23,20e.a3S 

iloQ^ C RTA 59 . 65 . 3 1 . 30 . 14 . 12 .. , 
CffOO I^EM #- SET UP TITUE SCREEN ♦ 

900C PRINT AT 4,ia: INK 7; 5PIi?M 
T 1. RftCHEftY" 

9005 PR2NT ftT S.O. INK 7 : ''YOU TR 
KE THE PLRCE OF RN ftRCHER , " . INK 
6, ' " UMO MUST SHOOT TEN TRRGE 
TS", INK 5:'" SO YOU CRN C 
OLLECT"': INK 4. '* TME 10000 
BONUS POINTS" 

i-oic PRitrr rt 11,0; ink 7; SPIGH 

T l:-TH£ TRRGETS are MOUING FPOH 

ONE SIDE OF THE SCREEN TO THE 

THER SIDE RND THEN BfiCK RGRIN 

902O PRINT RT 17,2; INK 6; INVER 
5E 1,"US£ '0' TO FIRE YOUR ARROU 

502S PRINT AT 0.0. INK 2;"RBfiBRe 

ABRBR6fleRBA6RBReflBRBReRBRB'* 

^027 PRINT AT 21. O INK 7; BRIGM 

T l; "CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC 

CCCCC" 

9030 PRINT AT 21,9: FLASH 1; INK 

e; PAPER 2; -PRESS ANY KEY' 
9035 PRINT AT 2,4. INK 6, INUERS 
£ 1;''-AK£R BROTHERS PRESENTS-" 
9040 PRINT AT 4,7; INK 4:" A6 ", 
AT 4,20, " AB " 



9050 GO SUB 6 
9360 CLS 

9500 REM ^T BACKGROUND SET UP ♦* 
9505 PRINT AT l.O; INK 7, BRIGHT 
l; ••DDDDOODDDDDC'DDDDDDDDODDCDDOD 
DDDD ■ 

9510 PRINT AT 2.0: INK 4.'EE£EEE 
EEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE*' 
9520 PRINT mT 20.0. INK 6."H^K 

20.0; OVER l; "EEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE 

EEEEEEEEEEEEEE" 

9530 PRIhJT AT 2 1 Q: INK 2: BPI^H 

T 1 : "■■■^^■^■■iHHBl^^^B 



9535 REM *** SET UP FL0UER5 #** 

9540 LET Eal3: LET Ka0 

9545 FOR H»l TO 2 

9550 FOR N«l TO 10 

9560 LET A=INT 'RND»4J+16 

9S6S LET BsINT tRND^£>+K 

9570 PRINT AT A,S; INK (RND*5) r2 

; BRIGHT l;-F'* 

9575 NEXT N: LET Esl4. LET Kal7. 

NEXT H 
9530 REM **♦* fET UP »":r,ZHER **** 
9590 PRINT AT 16.15: BRIGHT 0; I 
NK 7;-G";AT 17,15: -^H". AT 13,15, 
INK 2; "I"; AT 19,15. INK 7; " J" 
9600 REM *•-»• SET SCORE DISPLAY tt 
9610 PRINT AT £1,1, INK 2, PAPER 

e: BRIGHT 1; INUERSE Ir'SCORE?- 



3 

9820 IF LslO THEN CL5 

9999 RETURN 



GO 



30 





^ Amstrad • D. Harrison 

A demonstration of how to 
produce snaooth-scrolling 
screens on Amstrad CPC 
computers. It allows 
messages to be scrolled using 



the format !Scroll,x,yJ,(n>A$ 
where x and y are the 
character co-ordinates, I the 
number of characters in the 
line, and (« A$ is the text string. 



10 ' *^ SCROLL DEMO by D.Harrison ** 

20 ' 

30 IF HII1En> 33939 THEN MEnDRY 33333 

40 IF PEEKC4000B)<>&BC THEN MODE 1 : LOCATE 

5,5:PRINT "Loading SCROLL code":LOAD " ! '\ 40 

000: CALL 40000 

50 GOSUB 1000 

BO RESTORE 1090 

70 READ aSiFOR x-0 TO 2:nDDE x :! SCROLL , 1 , 1+ 

x*12,BO,0a$:NEXT 

BO MODE 1: LOCATE 2, 15: PEN 3: PRINT ycl$;» 

*'yclS 
90 t-t-l:IF t>0 THEN IF INKEYS-"" THEN 90 E 
LSE 100 

100 READ aS,coll$:FOR x-1 TO 500: NEXT: J SCRO 
LL , 10 , 15 , 21 , ea$ , Gcol IS 
110 MODE 2: READ aS, bS: a$-aS+ycS^bS 
120 PEN 1:INK 1 , : FOR x-1 TO 400:PRINT CHRS 
C203) ;: NEXT: INK 1,24: FDR x-1 TO 1000; NEXT;! 
SCROLL , 3 , 3 , 7B , SaS : a$-STR I NGS C BO , " " ) : I SCROL 
L,3,3,7B,ea$ 

130 MODE 0:FDR x-1 TO 100:PRINT CHRSCIBB);: 
NEXT: LOCATE 1,15: FOR x-1 TO 100: PRINT CHRSC 
IBB); :NEXT 
140 READ a$,col2$: 1 SCROLL. 1,8,20, 0aS,(§col2S 

150 READ a$: [SCROLL, 3, 22,17, eaS, Has 

IGO aS"ycS+yc$+yc$-«-ycS+yc$+yc£+ycI+ycI+" 

170 ;SCR0LL,4,12.15,@aS,eaS 

IBO GOTO 60 

990 ' 

1000 SYMBOL 240,132,B0,3S,3E,47,9,9,15 



i 




1010 SYMBOL 241, BO, BO, 80,1 IB, B, 5, B, 5 
lOEO SYHBOL 542,7,7.4.4.4.132,7,135 
1030 SYMBOL 243,224,32,0,0,15.9,41,233 
1040 SYMBOL 244.0.0,0,126,90,66,66,0 
1050 SYMBOL 245, 0. 2, 250 , 13B, 251 , 12B, 12B, 
1060 SYMBOL 246,16,187.146,147,154.3,0,0 
1070 SYMBOL 249,0,192,34,209,30,220,22,17 
lOBO yclS-CHRSC240)+CHRSC241D+CHRSC242)+CHR 
SC243D+CHR$C244)+CHRSC245D+CHR$C246)+CHRSC2 
43D:ycS-ycl$+" " 

1090 DATA "This is a DEMD dF ths 'SCROLL' 
routine For YOUR COMPUTER 

1100 DATA "TEXT can be scrollBd uiit 
hin a line and also in 
COLOUR 

1110 DATA "2 

1313131 2 3x" 

1120 DATA " In mode YOU ca 

n USB all 15 PENS, By using a 'colo 
ur string' with the numbers '1-9' an 
d 'a-F' upper or LOWER case. Also re 
deFined charcters :- e.g " 
1130 DATA " are alloued to .be us 
ed ." 

1140 DATA "IF you make the 'X co-ord ' oFFs 

creen >20,40 or 80 then ' * OFF RIGHT ♦ ' 

will be printed and, the routine exits. 

IF 'X' or 'L' have values oF ZERO then ' 

♦ ZERO UALUE » ' is printed. This was uir 



itten by 


David 


Harrison. 




1150 DATA 


"F 




£ 


d 






c 



a 9 B h 7 6 2 

5 2 2 3 b 

B 9 a b ex" 
1160 DATA "this is what happens when you us 
e the 'message' STRING AS the colour st 
ring at the same time : — pressing any key 
brings you back to BASIC. An *X' or 

the colour string disables 
TION 

1170 SPEED INK 15, IS: FOR x-O 
x:NEXT:INK 1,24: INK 2. 12: INK 
R 12 
IIBO RETURN 



'X' in 



the colour OP 

TO 15: INK x.x, 
15,10, IBtBORDE 



IffbUCH TYPE 



# Spectrum # S. Langford 

A simple yet immensely useful 
program, Touch Type 
produces a scrolling string of 
random characters which 
must then be typed-in 
con^ectly, Onty the 
awkwardness of the Spectrum 
keyboard reduces the 
practicability of the program. 




1© RCM ♦'**TOUCH TYPE**^ 
G0 POKE 2365^.5 

90 LET aS» '^ABCDEFGHIJKLHNOPOR 
STU«.»UXYZ" 
100 LET ^$sd$.£ TO *+CMft« f INT 

110 PRINT AT iD.0;as 

1£C LET t.S»INK£Y» 

120 IF b$3" ' THEN GO TO liC 

14G IF b« >*Stl) THEN BEE*^ .1,0 
: GO TO 120 

ISO BEEP .1.43 

160 IF INKEiS' •*'• THEN 60 TO 15 


170 GO TO 100 



MICRO MARKET 



SPECTRUM - AMSTRAD - COMMODORE 



gc 

< 



K 



i 

Z 
Ul 



O 

S 
o 

I 
o 

o 
I 



s 
1 

z 

CO 

z 
Si 
I 

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E 
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I 



K 
CO 



NOBLES 

COMPUTER 

REPAIRS 

• Repairs carried out by our own en- 
gineers on site. 
* Ail repairs can7 a 4 MONTH 
GUARANTEE 
For estimates phone or send your 
computer to NOBLES 
SPECTRUM PLUS 

£18.95 

inc. parts, post and pack 
COMMODORE 64A^IC 20 

from lUSfaVd 

plus parts 

BBC 

from£l8B95 

plus parts 

Also repair specialists for Amstrad and 

MSX computers 

NO HIDDEN CHARGES 

^ SPECIAL OFFER 

5 FREE GAMES WORTH £25 

with each Spectrum repair Trade/School 

and Club discounts an'anged 
For free, no obligation BStimates phone 
or send your computer to NOBLES for 
the fastest, cheapest repairs in ESSEX. 

NOBLES 

14-17 Eastern Esplanade, 
Southend -on-Sea, Essex 
0702 63377/8 63336/7/8/9 

(Ask tor DCfok) 
7 days a wook. 24-hCHjr Answorvio Sorvioe 



I 

S 

CO 
K 

t 

> 
> 

I 
O 

i 

O 

o 

u 

o 
1 
m 

z 

s? 



5 

O 

o 

z 

I 
o 

3 
O 
i 

m 

z 

53 

m 

z 
I 



> 
3) 



aaoaowwoD - ovuiswv - wnuxoads 



BOX CLEVER WITH 




®w^^ 



Ko Qimmtcks but genuine programs for people wtio like a 
bet. Written by a mathennaticlan wHti extensive RnowkKlQC 
and ixact»cal e^tpeftence of the subjects covefed. 

BOXFORM - truly massrve data base enables records of 
over 3000 horses covering 3 years to be displayed. 
Race summary' ^ho-Afs the horse with the b«st chance. 

FOOTBALL BOXFORM - artalyscs football form and shows 

the tme odds for any match. 

Gives best homes. aways« draws and sekscts treWe chance 

matches. 

PUNTERS PARTNER - calculates almost any bet So good 
It's us^Hi^ fty bookies. 

BOXFORM, . £12 FOOTBAU BAXFORM, . £8M 

PUNTERS FARTHER , . £5 (ZtS wiUt BOXFORM) 

Of SAE. for fiffthcr detatls. 

BOXOFT (DEPT C) 

65 ALLANS MEADOW, NESTON 
SOUTH WIRRALL L64 9SQ 

All iKOgrams are for 48K Spectrum. 



YOUR COMPUTER. OCTOBER 1986 79 







#F*/ ^SBB^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ ^^^ 


MICRO MARKET 


il^ar' -^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 




f ■ 






^ Commodore 64 A. Gordon 

As a top space ferryman , your untimely end to the game, 
task is to guide a cargo ship Smooth scrolling and 




1 




WDSoffware 1 




FOR THE SINCLAIR QIa 




JOSS £15 on miiv or 5'/4" Op, £17 on 3'/i" flp 


through a treacherous pleasant background music 




^^^1 




Forget syntax errors and mistyped names in tile com- 


asteroid belt. The ship is too make Fueler a challenging 




^^^1 




mands! Just move a cursor and press SPACE. Cursor 


small to canry sufficient fuel to and enjoyable game which 




^^H 




keys or joystick allow access to op to 8 mtcrodrives 
and ai) the discs your interface s^ll handte. with up to 
150 files on each. Scroll & print directories. COPY. 


complete the journey, so more will provide many hours of 
must be gathered on the way. entertainment. 




H 




DELETE Of PRINT any file, select TV or Monitor mode 


Fuel canisters float between 




^^H 




before LOADmgmUNning a program. Use KeytK)ard only 


the minature planets; failure to 




^^H 




to set date or label a medium. Easy to use with Pskmi 


catch them will result in an 




^^^H 




or other software No silly icons to leam - JOSS will 






^^^H 




tell you what It's doing! Mass a>pylng/printing utilities 






^^^H 




and programmer's toolkit Specify* disc size, tracks and 






^^^H 




interlace (CST, Comana. PCML. MicroPeripherals) or 


PRINT"CREO>CCLR>":POKE53EB1,0:POKE53S80,0 




^^^H 




microdfive only. 


: P0KE53ES1 ,0: G0SU81D00 : Y-1H6 




^^^H 




UcfQhl £ 1 1 on 2 md V!i or I 3W' flp. £9 on 5Vr flp 


10 SYS49158:GOSUB100:PDKEU*25,5:GOSUB100:PO 




^^^H 




For use with ARCHIVE 2. contains 1300 useful QL 


KEU^ae , 3 : GOSUBIOO i POKEU^Sa , 1 : GOSUBIOO 




^^^H 




references and a search/print program. Find programs, 


50 SC-SC-^1 : I FRND CI ) < . 03THENP0KE1383 , 91 




^^^H 




articles and reviews buried in the magazines on your 


30 IFPEEKCU*B)-OTH£NPDKEU*3.RNDC1>»173^50: I 




^^^H 




shelf! Cheap updates of earlier editkxis. 


FCPEEKCU+30>AN03)<>3THENB0O 




^^^H 




Mdv Extension Cable (8") £5.50 


40 GOTOIO 




^^^H 




Add 2X Micfodrives to your OL 


100 J-PEEKC5S380>:Y-Y-S*CCJ-12S)>+CCJ-12G>) 




^^^1 




Joystick Adaptor £4.99 


:P0KEU+1,Y 




^^^H 




FOR THK QL. SPECTRUM (ALL), 

BBC & ELECTRON: 

WO Morse Tutor £4 cass, £6 mdv or 5 W\ £« 5'>^" 


lEO IFCPEEK(U-«-31>ANDl><>0THEN400 

130 POKES+4 . 183 : POKES^H . 1 88 : RETURf^ 

800 FORC-PEEK CU*1 >T08SS : F0RD-0T09 : NEXTD : POK 

EU+1,C:NEXTC 

810 POKEU-i^ei.OrPRINT^CCLR^": PRINT: PRINT: PR! 

NT-PRINT- PRINT" YOU RAN OUT OF FUEL !" 




■ 




Teach yourself to read Morse Code. From afc^ute 
beginning to 18 words/minute. Feedback on screen or 




^1 




printer. Random letters, numbers or mixed, 100 random 
sentences, many helpful features include phonetic 


880 PRINT"CCYN> HOWEUER YOU SCORED "5C"P0 I ^ 

TS" 

830 PRINT:PRINT:PR1NT:PRINT:PRINT'-CBLU5 PR 

ESS ANY KEY TO PLAY." 




^H 




speech via CuriBh Micro-Speech i;Spectrum). Dtscs un* 
suitable for BBC 8+ . 




H 




FOR THE SINCLAIR SPECTRUM (48/128K): 


240 GET A$:IFAS'"''THEN840 




^^^H 




WorDfinder 2 £8 on cassette 


8S0 RUN 




^^^H 




16.000 word vocabulary. 3 to 10 letters long. 


400 PaKES*S,ll:POKES*e,ll 




^^^1 




WorDHnder 3 


410 POKES+84 , IS : POKES , 188 : P0KES*4 , ISS : POKES 




^^^H 




£10 on mdv or SVr disc, £12 on Wr 


-^4 , 188 : POKE8040 , 1 : F0RC-0T04SS ; NEXTC 




^^^H 




19.000 word vocabulary. 3 to 12 letters long. Solves 


480 POKEU+ei , : PRINT"<CLR> ": PRINT : PRINT : PRI 




^^H 




ar^grams and missing-letter words. Very fast machine 


NT: PRINT: PRINT" YOU CRASHED'* :G0T0880 




^^^H 




code. Update WorDfinder 1 for £2. 


1000 FOR C-49158T0C+73:READD:SUn-SUfH^D:P0KE 




^^^H 




Spectrum Disc Versions are Opus, TR (Beta) and 


C,D; NEXTC 




^^^H 




SPOl. 


1005 DATA 169,108,141,831,7.141,39,4,173,18 
. 808 . 801 . BSe * 144 . 849 . IBS . 7 




^^1 




We export hardware and third-party software. Ask 


1010 DATA 141,88,808,173.8,809,833,4.141,8, 




^^^1 




for rtsts. 


808. 168. ,199,1,4,157, ,4.838.808,847 




^^^H 




Payment: In advance, in STERLING on British bank 


1080 DATA 189. 1»S. 157, .5,838,808,847 




^^^1 




branches. International Giro. Postal Order or ACCESS/ 


1030 DATA 189,1,6.157, ,6,838,808,847 




^^^H 




MasterCard. Add £t outside Europe for AIRMAIL 


1040 DATA 189,1,7.157, ,7,838,884.831.808,84 




^^^1 




WDSoftware (YC), Htlltop. St Mary, 


1 5,169,38,141,191,7,96 

8000 F0RC-e38TOB94:POKEC,O: NEXTC 




^^1 




Jersey, CJ. Tel: 0534 81392 


SO 10 F0RC-832T0C+83 : READD : POKEC . D : NEXTC 
8080 DATA . 118, . 1 ,804, ,3, 194, ,7,841 ., 95,885 




^M 










. ,159,855. .95.855. ,1,854, 

8030 U-53848:PQKEU,40:P0KE U-«^l . 14S: POKEU^-ei 

.3:P0KEU+39,5:PQKE 8040,13 




" 




DISCOUNT COMPUTERS 




Eximples: ex*vat Incvat 


8040 F0RC-0T060 : P0KE1054+RNDC 1 >*980 , 91 : NEXT 








B8C Master 128 £400 £460iW 


C: F0RC-1S0ST0C*S: POKEC , 38: NEXTC 








AMSTRAD PCW 8256 £379 £435.85 


80S0 F0RC-0T039 : P0KEC^5S836 . 3 : P0KE56856+C , 3 








AMSTRAD PCW 8512 ...... , £475 £546.25 


: NEXTC 








AJyiSTRAD CPC 61 28 COkXif £325 £373 75 


8060 F0RC-896T0C*8G : READD : POKEC , D : NEXTC 
8070 DATA187 , 855 , 198 , 188 , . 38 , 154 , 154 , 38, 168 








AI -SAGE' & 'CAXTON' software .. ™ . _... 10% oft 




COMMOOORt PClO/20 „„« 10% OtI 


,168.38,178,178.38.168,168.38 








COMMODORE AMIGft systems 10% off 


8080 DATA161,8S,160,ie8, ,38,187,855,198 
8030 F0RC-983T09SB: POKEC. 0: NEXTC 








PACEOMANA Disc Drives from £90 £103^ 




PHIUPS TVt 1 U TV/Monftor . £170 £195.00 


8100 POKEU+8 . 858: POKEU+3 , 58+RNDC 1 >»1S3: POKE 








MICROVnTC MonifOfS „ -..„»,.„...^ 10% Off 


U-1^40 , 14 : POKE 8041 , 14 : X-PEEKC U+31 > 


« 






MANNESNWNN Printers „.™......«™.„,...„.....„ 10% Off 


3010 S-54878: PRINT" CHOPIEJ CRED>CSH 03 REA 








CANON Printers ^_ „^.„ ,„„ 10% off 


DY-':6OSUB4000 








EPSON Primers ,.... „„. „ — „ 10% off 


3080 PRINT"CH0nE> CYEL5CSH QJ STEADY" :GDS 








JUKI Prifltefs „.. „.„ 10% off 


iiRunnn 








SHNWA Prtntefs _.„... „ 10% oft 


3030 PRINT"CHOnE> CGRN>CSH Q> GO -> CRE 








All prices Inc. p&p 


D>-:G0SUB4000 

3040 POKES^l . 6 : P0KES*e4 . 5 : POKES+5 . : POKES*S 








WILLOW SOh 1 WARE (YC) 


.0: RETURN 








The Willows, Wrington Lane, 


4000 PDKES+84 , 15 : POKES* 1 , 30 : PQKES^G . 8 : POKES 
+4 , 33 : P0KES-»^4 . 38 : F0RC-0T0399 : NEXTC : RETURN 








Congresbury, BRISTOL BS19 5BQ 


5000 REM >>> FUELER 








Telephone: (0934) 834058 


5010 REn >» BY 








Many mers avaHabte: Pfease ask (oca quote. 


ANDREW SORDON 








80 YOUR COMPUTER, OCTOBER 1986 






MICRO MARKET 



TW KilSONAL QUIZ PACKAQW, 

Hew loMIOIHtM lOI?^^ 

*ra yoo w ^m iMJ irtm»%Mtailmimi Coof^mm or my? A 
lMd6r Of i ioioiiif? Ftipttltf or tiortniQ - md m4ij^ 

PtirtOQtlOutKbfntft inn lust iQiim« rt is a ptckage of tests wtilch 
<laif you to Q uirtto ttnly asstes yotf maaftioaiKS aftd omwonmf - 



and o9w ptopte'st 

YOUR TOUGH SJO€ I 

fTM adtitry. YOUR TBCet SDE anatasft ww p 

and sodfij sicjits Tht iOBUGaCE W$ 0m an omi » soon 



I yo** dwit oofvipaMhwwts mil tnanagt- 



fs vour wtMi, mMfltrlea) and 
ITiay srt ttnad ira coorsd vffffi prtdksion nmmt mpossAlt w«^ 
Sitf<«*itMUmd ts^ THE X FACTOR omsfMs an MMti wtsty 
of QMStfom o« tffflscint typ«t and csn bs plsyvtf oo g ysW t ¥S> y not 

ths»slsii<mdii*onsObyioonsultsrti(Ssiawi>ii*Ptriaooeof 
psHOTsj »wly ai on in i iBiiga-cofnpofy smlranmint HnUb itb 
dlplQWJ In ^C'l^ pftfltotA and tar dwts. You wif bt stili to 
and compsrs Ihsnn wlh Vioso of frtoraH fanffy 

Tho Pirsonal OuU PiekaQs c«) bo usod tcr sortoui siJ aassssnisnt 
lor MUduK amussfFwrtt. «id as a party gama. 

^MsiiAff Ai3m 0O<xf sothi^Mf St o cki s t s now Jbr 

BBC B eOMMOOORE 64+128 ELECTRON 

ofdsr drect troRi us M no Ma divps by IcUbq tfia boit and 

— wribi yoif nams, addrass and cftsquvfO to OOUSOit. t 

ftoa< Oxtonf 0X2 eUHV* />IMs» st40p^ 

Panonal OUz c*ss«CI« ^ B8Da£CTnOM £»J6 tod 

Pirsonai QUI cassmt «or COMMODORE 64/128 caJS fnoL 

*aHrlKaiaii#a#tVAT.atedi wilwf ^Mptftfwtf^nlwpo^ Tn^ 



E 




S. p. ELECTRONICS 



Ams»ad6128&tcn tZSf.OO 
Am)aid82S6 



CPAIOPnnttrdnccabit}.. 
0Qc0pef9inaS^«leme8C. . 

Full Ci;n*ro range 
ACOBHIfTOOfS. 



Cc :i>f 099.00 
£i».00 



J199.O0 



- SMM 

Fwittg.w 

G3 VflORTTY PROGRAM (lAPt). £7,50 

(^moffnypmmAOPfm^f^s^ £2Q.oo 

Ciroui bovd forRTTy 4^xSkf Mk 3 (<k tmmjdiom} H M 

CAWONOotMHIriilGOcnNlQ .12».(n 

ioy!»cfcs(pair)se«ecflM«(] ^ anatoouc fromCtT.iS 

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VVOROWJSt Wore Processor t39M 

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BY THE 

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be r0|xiiii*d ihnd i«(wTvod th« suno cUy or sAcid (or a froe 

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or simpty tMvud your computor too<th«r with tho coupon bc^v 

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COMPUTER REPAIRS 



fast S expert repair scmce oy 3n esmusnvd Company 
M\ prices (nc* p«rts, carr. VAT & 3 months warranty 

Spectrum _„.... £18.96 

Intertace 1/2 .....„,„^.*.-.,.„„-™«. „..^...» €19.95 

MIcfOdrtv© ..„..,^«.«,.«„™™««^™^«««„««^.., £16,95 

ZX0t... „„„..»..„„.. ..£14.95 

Spoctnjm Plus , ,*.«.» £16.95 

Specm*ii 48K upgrade ,,,.,.,«^ « — £29,95 

Spectnm 16K Ram pack ..... „„ ^» £9,95 

O.L *,„....™ ,.£34.95 

Commodore 64 *..,...„.„ £19.95 + parts 

Commodore 16 .„...„ „.„« £29.95 

Commodore V1C20 ..„,«..,«,„... £17^ -f parts 

Commodore C2N Cassette £14.95 

B8C-B ....„.*...,i £21 « + parts 

Electron ...» .„..„...„ £1dJ6 -f parts 

Amstrad C464 {Keytwaid only) .«.»... £34.95 

Dragon 32 £34.95 

ANY COMPl/THR . . .. Wn9 for prices 

fn exceptional cases iw msenm tM ffj^t to va/y 

tti$S9 pffc$$ 

To Qiftain these pfke$, piesso ^fKfose athtrt 

ARC Electronics 

54 Heron Drive, Wakefield, W. YorKs 
Tel: (0924) 253145 



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RS232/C«nt.ronlcm 

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I 1 



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(Authorised NEC dealers) 

Come to us for your software and 

hardware . . . 

Atari. Amstrad. BBC. Commodore (inc. the 
new Amiga) 

IBM/NEC PCs and compatibles, pnnters, 

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• Low cost repairs (from Ct2} for BBCs, 
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SS/OD 90 TPI 80 TRACK «-.,«...,.„.„.«,.,^ £17.96 

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3^^- SS,1>D 135 TPi .„ £17.50 

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YOUR COMPLnrER. OCTOBER 1986 81 



SUPERTEC ATARI USER OFFERS 




oeHSiT^. 



u^A^^„e;°P.slS.^ 



OBNES 



Telepfl0[!2 



for 



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POST YOUR ORDER 

OR CALL TONY OWYER ON 0263 232308 



Ptease serxJ me ihe iiems mart^ed, I otKtose ChoQoe^Bostai 
(xOor (or !ho full amoiml. inctuding VAT £. 

OR D6t)it my Access Caid 

Numbef:. 



^ SUPERTEC LTD. 
I CORNWALLIS HOUSE, 

— ' HOWARD CHASE. 

BASILDON. ESSEX. SS14 3BB Tel: 0268 282308 



Or 



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PLEASE AUOW 28 DAYS FOR DELIVERY 



Wkat to look for in the next issue of 



November 
issue on sale 
October 10. 

Content subject to revision. 



PUTTINCI 
JCMR 

UmlTP 



[IIQlWORK 



The 

magazine for PCW 

owners. 



Focus on financial software 

The suppliers' index in this issue lists more software 
under the accounting and financial headings than 
any other area of application. In the next issue of 
Putting Your Amstrad To Work we shall review a 
selection of financial software from basic cash 
recording packages to fully-Integrated suites of 
software which provide a complete solution to the 
accounting requirements of a small business. 



Menagerie of nHMiems 

Having the correct information at your fingertips is the 
key to success in business. An increasing number of 
on-line databases and electronic mail messaging 
systems mean that the businessman equipped with a 
modem and suitable Interface for the PCW computer 
can often stay ahead of competitors in the 
information stakes. In the next issue we review some 
of the modems and communications software 
available for the PCW8256 and 8256 machines. 



I Dear IMeiVSagent . Please reserve me a copy of the November 
! issue of Putting Your Amstrad To Work - on sale October 10. 

Name 



I 
I 
I Address 

I 



i 



I 
I 



82 YOUR COMPUTER, OCTOBER 1 986 



COMPETITION 



WIN A COPY OF GAUNTLET, THE 



LONG-AWAITED ARCADE RELEASE 



BY U.S. GOLD 



Arcade fans will recognise the name Gauntlet as 
one of the most popular games. In one of the most . 
exciting licence deals of all time. ILS. (fOld has 
secured the rights to the computer game* To be 
released during the run-up to (^hristmas, it 
promises to be one of the biggest-selling games of 
all time. 

In this exclusive competition, Your Computer will 
be giving away 10 teeshirts, plus 10 copies of the 
game, to the first 10 correct entries, and copies of 
the game to the 10 runners-up. 

To win, all you need to do is answer three simple 
questions and send your answers, together with 
your chest size and what computer you own, to 
YourComputer. 79-80 Petty France, London SWIH 
9KI). The winners and runners-up will be the first 
20 correct answers drawn from all those received 
bv the closing date of the competition. October 30. 
1986. 



QUESTIONS 



/. How many number one hits has U.S. Gold had 
so far this year? 

2, What major motor racing first recently took 
place in Birmingham? 

3, Name two other arcade licences U.S. Gold has 
acquired recently? 





COMPETITION RULES 

* Hir Hitiurr^(»f rhr rnmpctittnn will fprihr prr%<)iivuliii M>fi<l Ihr lir%ta9*corrrct 
cntricN flr4i% II front ^t (hi»sr rtM ci%iHi bcr«>rt' Itir cti»stii|3 dulr uf the coasprCitkMi. 

* Thr tsaii>r\ af ftir Hiiitiri% MtU br aomHificrd In Ihr No^rmhrr issw cif Yirur 
i^ompuirr. 

* %ll mlries miLM arrive 'At Mie y'ojir i innpulrr officer In llu* hcnl i»urld0g day 
III 4Ktiil*rr. t«946, 

* l-:;itii perwHi nu> tmler I be compecilM>n chiI> oner. 

* Fiitries l4) the comprfition canmit t»r ;it-|n(mle<l$»ed. 

* Nil eiiipki>i*4^ of |iicu\ lti%r>lnirn<A ii(»r ttirir jgriit% or ckiMr rrlsitivc?i mav 
ctiirr the rtiiiiprfttiyii. 

* Tlie tteckloti at l\w F4it(ir in all f<S|Mn't\ iif lltr ccmip«*fl(UMi ^ ill be fttiiJ. 

* Ntiriirrr%|»<MidetH-r miIIi rei^ril ti> uny 3i%per1 of itie n»iiiprlttiiiu h ill t»e enlered 
iiitu. 

* F<K-ii3. lii%e»tiDeoU UMune^ no rcspoBilMNtit in li«btlii% r«»r mny ccimiiliiiiils 



U.S. GOLD COMPETITION 



Do nut forget to enclose this coupon, or a photocopy of it, when vou send your entry, marked U.S. Gold Competition, to the 
Your Computer editorial officer at the address show n at the front of the magazine. 



Answers 



Name 



1 



Age 



Address 



POSTCODE 



Day Tel. Ncl 



YOUR COMPUTER. OCTOBER 1986 83 



TheAmstradPC15l2 
range of computers look 
set to take f/ie PC market 
by storm. A combination 
of aggressive pricing 
and excellent 
specifi 








!PC 





King of the clones 





wo major products 
aimed at the same 
market were launched 
within a week of each 
olher, I he Amstrad and Tandy 
P(' clones, after a long static 
period with little real cxctie- 
ment in the computer industry. 
Unfortunately the computers* 
will not arrive in the shops for 
some lime yet, although it is 
rumoured that Dixons flew a 
hatch from Taiwan for demon- 
stration purposes at ilii London 
stores. 

'Ilic cost of the basic 
Amstrad svstem is C3W - £45') 
inc, VAT - for whtch the pur- 
chaser acquires an S0S6 Intel 

niirrnpnu'r^^ipr "^^^^ Ul 

RAM .tir>f)Kdkc drive: hh.ek 
and white monitor, mouse and 
^ccvtx>ard. ft significant saving 
at present on any comparable 
alternative clone or the IBM, 

Hardware 

The cream-coloured console 
contains the main printed cir- 
cuit board which houses the 
Intel 8086 processor running at 
KMH^. a socket for the 8(KS7 

tii!ilhv rn.prnri^<:<nr iju: 

memory cliit>s witli space fox 

an ^mx\ 12^K s^n-b^arU. and 

three expansi(>n slots for IBM- 
compatible cxi^ansion cards , A 
recess on top of the console 



unit accepts the monitor foot 
which covers the four penliiihl 
cells used to i>ower thc batter v- 
haf krrl n al tim<^ rlru'k^ 

The rear connectors provide 
support for ;> Parallel Printer. 
the default list device, a s criaL 
R5;232(^ port rormaiteru atkc 

ftH in!r*r-t!Ofitpiilt-,i^ 



pfiiuwr 



commuiiications or an extyn^s*! 
nuHJem. The video so( ktM pni 

^i4^> \}}^ HO-Kl Ma»ai> foi the. 



colour or black and white 
monitor, the DC IN socket 
provides the main power 

^wurvc for ihc consalc. 
The power is augmented by 

the addition of four pen-light 
cells, housed on top of the con- 
sole under the monitor foot; 
they drive the battery-backed 
real-lime clock and maintain a 
small number of system vari- 
ables when the system is 
svvitcheti-off. Mounted on the 
left -hand side of the console 
arc the nn>use and keyboard. 
connection and an addittoiiaL 
volume coi}tr(»l for the iniernal 
speaker of the PC eonsotc 

The console also houses the 
system floppy disc tirive. 360 K 

tVrmiinvvt capaciiv- ^>thcr 

models in the range contain an 
additional floppy drive on 
either a 10 or 20MB hard disc 

■drive. 

The 85-kcv keyboard is of 
average quality and feel . It is 



divided into three main areas: 
the centre h\nrk of Ityi fnl-ir^L 
the standard tvpevvritrr tor- 
mat. To the left of centre is a. 
set ol 1 unction kevs and to the 
H^^hT n nnmrnr ^^^^yp-"* The 
rear i>f the keyboard houses the 
joystick connector, 

PC colours 

The monitor unit also con- 
tains the system |H)vver supply 
and tends to restrict tfie purch- 
aser to his original choice of 
monitor but T expect some en- 
terprising company will pro- 
tluce a separate power su[)ply 
allowing alte rnalive RC i B I 
numitorsto be used. The black 
and while mo r^t^^r djspi:ty^ rhr 
1 6 colours in vurioy^ shades nf. 



urcy, there being no direct 
equivalent to the IBM PC 
mono display. 

The Amstrad PC handles the 
standard IBM Ci^lour «*raphir 



Uir^phiy nnHk>i M)^Zf' unU, 



Wx2> Kvcolour text. Ciraphic 
modes are r'^^^^Nr^J^KfOMl itiruc. 
four-colour palettes and 

^3'K^x2()<i in t\y^? wolourh^ The 

Amslrad also has a special ex- 

ttfndv^^ ^ij^pliiy moth- which 

puts the machine in th«- high-- 
gualitv ^ames class but 
whether it can compete with 
the new Atari blitter ehip-dri- 
ven software for t»peed i^ nuesr 
tionahle. liven so, f>40x2()0xl6 



84 YOUR COMPUTER. OCTOBER 1986 



AMSTRAD PC1512 REVIEW 



Amstrad PC - colour monitor and double disc drives. 



beats 64(Jx20Ux4 on colours and 
i s extremely close to the Amiga 
interlaced w\i}^^r mod^ nf 



640x400x16. 

Four software discs arc 
supplied with the PC, Disc 1 
holds t)ie Microsoft MS-DOS^ 
3.3 m'TiUin^ .'>v^k'nl; diH' .; 



contains the (j§^ M^rt-up 
ilis^; disc 3 is the Q ^}^ Hiihi 
^op disc which also contains 



nrovides tiic DOs-Phls system 

Operating system 

nic MS-DOS and GEM im- 
plcmcntations arc fairly 
standard but the main interest 
surrounds the Digital Research 
DOS-Pius operating system 
and I.cKomoiive Basic U. 

DOS-Plus is a mixture of PC- 
DOS, the IBM operating 
system, and CP/M-86. the only 
olhcr ahcrnative i>pe rating 
system of note ti> that of IBM, 
Tlie configuration chosen en- 
ables the Amstrad PC to run 
the vast majority of PC-DOS 
and CP/M-Sf> softw^are. Fhal is 
iiehievcd in part through a disc 
operating system which is able 
lo read anti write a number ol* 
disc formats - single-sided 
eight sectors per track 160K; 
single-sided nine sectors jx-r 
track ISOK; double-sided eight 
sectors per track 320K ; duuble- 
sided nine sectors per track 
3«>K. DOS-Plus can even con- 
vert from one formal lo 
another. 

The DOS-plus commands 
comprise virtually the com- 
plete set of native PC-DOS and 
CP/M-Sb commands except for 
one or two very minor ones. 

The user has the choice of 
hatidling files and directories 
either through OEM. using the 
mouse to manipulate icons and 
select functions from a series 
of pull-down menus, or DOS- 
Plus, using the keyboard to 



enter commands and argu- 
ments into the command line 
interpreter. The system is very 
impressive and a delight to use. 
Basie II is a much-extended^ 



Unm of structured Basic , with 
optional line numbers, which 
operates from within the OEM 
windows environment of pull- 
down menus. The facilities are 
comprehensive and far surpass 
those of the Basic supplied with 
the IBM. 

There is direct control of 
I/O* access to OEM graphic 
facilities, full string-handling 
and comprehensive access to 
disc files, A full review of the 
Basic including speed tests will 
follow but present indications 
are that Basic U is fa.sl. 

Doeumentatioti 

The Basic manual seems in- 
tent on indicating that if the 
user wants the advance 
facilities, he should either buy 
the Basic technical reference or 
the Basic user guide, as the 
documentation provided pur- 
ports to give an overview. I felt 
it could have been presented 
better and no doubt nuuiy 
authors will dt* that. 

A number of smaller soft- 
ware packages are already 
available to the pi>tential 
Amstrad PC^ owner at prices 
significantly lower than those 
quoted for IBM PC vefsionsof 
the products. I admit to being 



baffled by the philosophy be- 
hind supplying cut-down ver- 
sions of the software. How do 
you produce a cut-down ver- 
sion for a machine which in its 
basic form has significantly 
more mcmor>', much better 
graphics and is much faster to 
boot? 

Extra memonf 

Suppliers' margins arc ex- 
tremely low on the basic 
machine, so perhaps it is chur- 
lish to complain, but £l(K> for 
the e?^lra disc drive or £-100 for 
a 20MB drive seems excessive . 
At present, an alternative 
3i*MB IBM expansion slot- 
C9tnpv*tit)lv Wiji disy drjvy is„ 
advertised ft>r £350. 

The user is supplied with 
cither a ei>od black and white 
SO-column text disnlav or an 



used for business, I would 
suggest the black and white 
monitor, although I would 
have preferred a display similar 



to the Atari ST monochrome 
screen which runs at a faster 
screen refresh rate and is by far 
the best low-cost screen for 
business use. 

Virtually all other clones are 
switchablc between 4.7 and 
8MHz, which seems an odd 
thing to do if it is not necessary 
when you are trying to reduce 
costs to the bone. 

CVmpaiibility ^vith all aMi: 




ware is not possible as some 
applications use the ^naughty* 
pieces of the IBM ROM- The 
Amstrad achieves an ex- 
tremely high degree of com- 
patibility. 

The loW'Cosl entry model 
represents outstanding value, 
with an exceptional operating 
system. All the complaints arc 
minor and of no real signifi- 
cance taken in the conicxt of 
the price of the machine. 

It is unusual to find a product 
aimed a I the business market 
which tlt>es not contain a word 
processor in the bundleil soft- 
ware. If required . it will add 
another t70 to the price of the 
ctmiputer. 



\!/ifi Su^ar nuui fychuul machint. 



YOUR COMPUTER. OCTOBER 1986 85 




'hen the original Tatung Einstein 
compuier wa^i launched in August, 
1984, the press swiftly descended on 
its m;iny faults - the over-inflated 
the huge desk footprint, bulky 
appearance and its claims of CP/M com- 
patibility. Despite the early bad publicity, 
the machine sold well and established a 
dedicated group of devoted users who still 
support the machine. 



price 



Now. Tatung has produced the Einstein 
256, a completely rc-dcsigned micro, com- 
petitively-priced and aimed at the small 
niche market between the home and bus- 
iness computer. The original machine cost 
£499 plus VAT with a dedicated colour 
monitor available for an extra £240. a total 
package price of more than £9(M). The 256 
machine, complete with monitor, costs 



Einstein s 



£399 plus VAT* reflecting not only the 
high level of competition among manu- 




86 YOUR COMPUTER. OCTOBER 1 986 



MACHINE REVIEW 



I 



Strikes again 



faclurcrsbui improved marketing strategy 
by Tutung. 

Compared to the old machine, the new 
Einstein is much smaller and more pleas- 
ant to look at. The monitor is a result of 
the many years of experience whicli 
Tatung has in the design and manufacture 
of television sets. It houses the power 
supply for (he computer, a feature which 
has reduced the size of the main unit dras* 
tically ;md helped keep down the cost but* 
should you prefer lo use your own 
monitor, a television adapter lo interface 
lo another display is available as an 
optional extra. 

The sound, generated originally by a 
loudspeaker on the main unit, is now also 
channelled through the monitor, and vol- 
unie and brightness controls are located 
on the front panel, hidden under a small 
protective flap. The sound produced is 
similar lo the Amslrad CPC612S which. 
considering they both use the same chip, 
is scarcely surprising. 

The keyboard features 69 keys - 4S 
alphanumeric, eight function and nine 
eonlrol. A single 3in. disc drive is located 
to the right of the OWHRTY typing sec- 
tion of the keyboard. Unlike ihe old 
machine, which had a space where a 
second internal drive could be fitted, a 
second drive for the new Einsiein would 
have to l>e external The drive is truly 
dedicated as the machine has no facility 
to save programs to tape, although they 
can be loaded via a read-only port on the 
rear of the computer. Below the drive are 
four triangular MSX-slyle cursor keys. 

Although many of the features of the 

new machine are the result of 

Tatung cost-cutting 

exercises, some 

of them are 

extremely practical 

aimed at giving 

the machine 




greater appeal 
than its competitors. As 
the name suggests, the machine 
has 256K of internal memory, which is 
allotted to various tasks; 64K is dedicated 
to the CPU. the wcll-esiablished 2-80A 
processor. Even when the DOS has iK-en 



Anthony Thompson 
reviews the new 256K 
computer from Tatung, 



loaded, a rcspeciable 56K of programm- 
ing space remains. 

Another 16K of ROM is required by 
the machine operating system which will 
allow manipulation of memory data and 
simple disc access. The low-level machine 
code monilor features copy and back-up 
utility programs and can also be used for 
many other functions, such as decimal to 
hexidccimal conversion and examining 
blocks of memory. Such features will be 
of great use to machine code programmers 
when debugging their work. There is a 
provision to expand the ROM to 32K. 

The final 192K of RAM can be fully- 
utilised by the video display processor, 
giving the machine a considerable amount 
of graphics potential. Seven modes are 
available for graphics and the two addi- 
tional text modes allow for a 40- or 80- 
column display. In most modes, a palette 
of lb colours is chosen from a total of 512 
available. The machine also allows up 
to eight sprites on each hori7.t>ntal ^ow^ 
giving the new Einstein a greater sprite 
ability than the Commodore 64. At pre- 
sent, however, few software houses have 
utilised the graphics potential of the 
machine fully. 

The left-hand siite of the machine has 
two joystick ports which. l)ccause o( their 
pin configuration, will work only with 
Atari- or MSX-style joysticks. That lack 
of compaiibihty for the most essential 
game-player's peripheral could be mis- 
taken for an oversight on the part of the 
manufacturer but there is a method in the 
apparent madness. 

Using a special cable, the two ports can 
be used to output data to a serial or 
parallel printer, the default being set by 
internal DIP switches before the machine 
is switched on. That allowed Tatung to 
save on the cost of providing a separate 
port and is based on the theory* that few 
people would need to use a printer and 
joystick at the same time. 

To the left of the joystick ports is an 
RS232C serial port. The machine operat- 
ing system allows the baud rale transmit- 
ted and received through that port lo be 
set on a range of values between 75 and 
9.6(K1 baud and also permits adjustment 
of the number of data bits, the parity and 
the number of stop bits used in a transmis- 
sion. 



On the back of the machine, more I/O 
devices can be found - a stereo output 
capable of driving low impedance head- 
phones, a read-only cassette port and, 
finally, a video, mouse and lightpen inter- 
face. 

The machine is provided with a master 
disc containing five arcade games and the 
Xtal DOS operating s\^tem. The games 
are simple conversions of Pacman and 
GalaxUms and have been included only as 
a token gesture to give new users some- 
thing to do when they switch. 

Xial DOS - pronounced Oysial DOS 
- is a CP/M-style operating system geared 
lowjirds beginners, with more under- 
standable error messages and a more 
logical command structure. The disc also 
contains the Einstein Basic interpreter, 
EBasic. 

In terms of price, the Einstein 256 is a 
direct competitor to the colour version of 
the Amsirad CP('6128. Both are designed 
to strike a happy medium between the 
home games machine and the serious bus- 
iness computer, a market where the 
Amslrad, wiih its wide range of CP/M 
titles, has l>ecn very successful. 

Tatung would not release ihe sales 
figures for the old Einstein but claims lo 
have more than 20,CMK> owners who have 
registered with its user group. 

Being compatible with most existing 
Einstein software gives the machine a base 
of about 5(K) titles but many more are 
promised by way of supptirt for the new 
machine, with several lop titles now being 
converted, .^n the Einstein uses the Z-S()A 
processor, the machine can run some 
to more than 2,5(K) additional titles. 

One development which will increase 
the software base of the now machine, 
soon to be released by ACC computers 
of North Wales, is Ammt, This software 
utility will allow the user to run Amslrad 
CP/M di.scs on the Einsiein machine. Con- 
sidering the growing number of titles 
available for the CPC range of computers, 
such a develt>pment will have a significant 
effect on the success of the new machine. 

Despite Tatung claims of greater relia- 
bility and value, choosing between the 
Einstein 256 and the Amslrad CPC612iS 
is not easy. The Amslrad is a well-estab- 
lished machine with a fast-growing soft- 
ware base. The number of titles available 
for the Einstein, however, is also increas- 
ing but it is unlikely that many softwjire 
houses will create programs specifically 
for the machine and make good use of its 
graphics potential or exploit all the avail- 
able memory fully. 

Plenty of suppi>rt for the machine is 
promised. A hard disc unil will soon be 
launched and Konami is converting many 
of its games but how successful it may be 
is a matter of conjecture, 
of conjecture. 



L 



YOUR COMPl/TER. OCTOBeft 1 986 87 



iG4MES AF THE 



\' 



snEED OF ucmt:: 




LIGHTFORCE is for VENGEANCE 

LIGHTFORCE is the Punishment Arm of 
Galactic Fighter Command, 
When a Terran-settled system at the edge of 
the galaxy is seized by an alien force .revenge 
comes in the form of a lo»e 
LIGHTFORCE fighter. 
LIGHTFORCE confronts alien in a dazzling 
battle above the strange landscapes of the 
Ice-Plaijet.the Jungle Planet.Alien factories 
and the impassable Asteroid Belt. . 
LIGHTFORCE — at the speed of Light 
-fromFT^. : ' , 



:ii^ 






• '41^ 



SHOCKWAY RIDERS areiJte pick of t^e 

street gangs ATHLETIC.AGGRESSIVE & 

* ARROGANT --as they cruise along the 

t»iple-speod moving walkways that circle 

the great MEG ACITYSof-the 21st Century. 

TRE ULTIMATE AIM OF EVERY RIDER 

is to gfo "FULL CIRCLE" - to do that. he musf 

fight off the-Block Boys.the Cops and the 

Vigilantes - as well as negotiating the Speed 

Traps and Rider Ramps erected by the angry 

local residents! 

SHOCKWAY RIDER is the mo^t oiiginal 

arcade gam5 of thQ y^^ - 

THE ULTIMATE FUTURE SHOCK!! 





LIGHTFORCE AVAILABLE SEPT. '86 ' 
SHOCKWAY RIDER AVAILABLE OCT. '86 

* SPECTRUM £7. 95 

AMSTRAD & COMMODORE £ 8 .95 



fASf£to*THAN •ilGHT FTL FASTER THAN LIGHT, CARTER FOLLIS GROUP OF COMPANIES, 

SEDGLEY ROAD EAST. TIPTON, WEST MIDLANDS DY4 7UJ. Tel: 021 520 2981 (4 lines) 



cur< 



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5,25" 'Universal' 

suits all drives - 

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• No Exiras - vat & delivery included 






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89 




hen U.S. Gold moves, 
the world takes notice. 
Not only has it produced 
five number one hits in 
the last six months but it has 
announced a number of re- 
leases which will ensure success 
well into 1987. Four years ago. 
when Geoff Brown started 
Ccntrcsoft to import and distri- 
bute Atari games from the 
U-S., he can scarcely have ex- 
pected the company to grow at 
such an incredible rate. When 
U.S. Gold was formed, to take 
over the import and marketing 
of American games, it was only 
a matter of months before 
many of the premier U.S. soft- 
ware houses had signed. 

Instead only of importing 
and selling the games per se. 
the gamcN were re-packaged, 
and given an identity which 
would soon be recoiinised al! 




U.S. GOLD 



SUCCESS 



In the run-up to Christmas^ one company plans to 

dominate the market completely. If it were anyone else, 

there might be doubts, but this Birmingham-based 

company has not yet failed. 



over Europe, h was becoming 
obvious that U.S. Gold would 
soon be the biggest software 
house in the U.K. and between 
1982 and 1986 it had moved 
three times to larger premises, 
yet still needed more room to 
expand. 

When Holford. a new £28 
million industrial estate was 
built in Birmingham, U.S* 
CJold saw the potential and 
look two units, lotalling a 
mammoth 35,iKH» st|.ft., to 
house both U.S. Gold and 
Ceniresoft. As Geoff Brown 
comments: "Now at Hoi ford 
we shall have premises which 
will allow for our future expan- 
sion into manufacturing in 
every major European country 
and also to expand our leisure 
distribution". 

One inevitable problem with 
being the most successful soft- 
ware house in Europe is main* 
laining the high standard of re- 
leases. When U.S. Gold only 
imported software, it could 
pick and choose any of the 
huge amount of high-quality 
software already available in 



the U.S. Companies such as 
Epyx. Microprose and First 
Star had all pri>dueed number 
one hits, with games which 
scarcely could fail in the U.K. 

When, after two years, the 
supply of software slowed, 
U.S. Gold took control and 
started to produce its own soft- 
ware in-house» It is only now, 
however, approaching Christ- 
mas 19K6, ihai U.S. Gold has 
really made an effort to pro- 
luce top't|uality games of its 
^wn, as well as importing the 
best of the rest. 

This will undoubtedly be re- 
membered as the Christmas of 
licences. Almost every soft 
ware company has managed to 
license a well-Iovcd product 
and is busy turning it into a 
game, ready to woo the public. 

Unfortunately for everyone 
else. U.S. Gold has managed 
to obtain not only the best ar- 
cade deals but also the most 
popular children's cartoon, 
He-Man and the .\f asters ofihf 
Universe, Although the licence 
was agreed in 1985, only now 
has U.S. Gold settled on the 
form the game should take. 

Using Advcnluresoft. one of 
the many software houses in 
which it has an interest, U.S. 
Gold plans to produce both an 
adventure and an arcade game. 
r\illowing closely the television 
program storyline, you will be 
He-Man, defender of the weak 
and. together with your trusty 
Balllecal. you must prevent 
Skeletor capturing your home. 
Castle Grcyskull. 

He-Man may well be a 
popular cartoon character but 
Iiis popularity counts for wo- 




w *►% 



III! 



■tar ^ v' %^ <• ^ -m wr 



v^ «p • w*'- 






r 



thing hi computer games icnns 
compared to an Atari arcade 
game called Gauntlet. 

\n one of the hardest-fought 
licence deals, U.S. Gold 
gained the rights in the middle 
of 19H(> and ever since a team 
of programmers, supplied by 
Gremlin Graphics, has been 
getting 10 grips with the task of 
reproducing this stunning 
game. 

Originally a four-player 
game, with teamwork being its 
essential part, U.S. Gold has 
had to settle for a two- player 
version, solely for reasons of 
playability. With the program- 
mers having moved in-house, 
where there are not one but 
two Gauntlet machines for 
them to study, it is hoped the 
conversion will retain all the 
original scenarios. 



^^9 4f* 



With other arcade licences, 
including Express Raider, 
Break thru and XeviiUdS all 
being written and all promising 
to he hits, the claim of U.S. 
Gold that it might have 10 
more number ones in the next 
six months does not seem so 
improbable. 

Although known as a com- 
pany at the forefront of Hccns- 




/ 




90 YOUR COMPUTER, OCTOBER 1986 



I 



COMPANY PROFILE 




feci to a bouncing roller hall. 
Tlic software market will be 
vcr\' full of high-quatily soft- 
ware this Christmas. Ciremlin 
and Ocean both liave a number 
of high-profile releases. For 
U.S. (Jold* it is all a mailer of 
quality. If its arcade conver- 
sions live up to the original 
games, it really will be a Christ- 
mas lo remember. 



ing deals, U.S. Gold is m>i S4> 
ftK)lhardy as lo forget whai 
made it so successful and com- 
panies such as Epyx are still 
verj' valued customers. Tliis 
year, five new Epx-x titles will 
be released, including World 
Games^ the fourth in the in- 
credibly successful games 
series. That, together with 
Super Cycle - reviewed 
elsewhere in the issue - Wresth 
ing. The Movie Monster Game 
and Hot Wheels, should keep 
even the most avid game- 
player happy. 

Although U.S. Gold could 



be accused of making lilc dit- 
ficult for the smaller software 
houses, deals such as the recent 
one with V^ortex show that it 
also sees pi}tentiat in a small 
company environmenl. 

Vortex is a small and rela- 
tively well-established soft- 
ware house but. because of its 
size, could not achieve the 
market penetration il would 
have liked and ccmsequently its 
games did not achieve the sales 
they should have done. Having 
now agreed lo be manu* 
fact u red. promoted at:d mar- 
keted by U.S. Gold, it is hoped 



tliat Vortex will have more 
time lo produce games of the 
quality of Alien Highway, 

The first release from Vortex 
under the new deal is lo be Re- 
volution. Thankfully nothing 
to do with I he film of the same 
name, it uses spectacular three- 
dimensional animation tech- 
niques lo give a more reulistie 







CLASSIFIED 



01- 

222 9090 

Contact: Paul Monaf 



COPY DATES: NOVEMBER ISSUE: 30th Sept; DECEMBER ISSUE: 28th October 



ADVERTISEMENT RATES QUOTED BELOW ARE SUBJECT TO THE ADDITION OF 15% VAT, 

CANCELLATIONS. THREE WEEKS PRIOR TO COPY DATE 
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EJox No: £7.00 extra One insertion £10.00 

Lineage advertisements are Three Insertions £9.70 

prepayable and the order form Six insertions £9.50 

published in this section should Twoivo insertions £9.00 

be completed and returned Display advertisers should 

with remittance. preferably reserve space by phone. 



Post to: 

Your Computer, 
Classified Department, 
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IBM® is a registered trade mark of International Business Machines Ltd, 

92 YOUR COMPUTER OCTOBER t986 




HOW TO GET YOUR 
SPECTRUM REPAIRED FORONLY£19.95 



COnPUTER SPARES 




SPECIAL OFFER! 



T---^ w^ 



^.~v rr;* js^raot your otoinarvSptanim « 

r-rf .>fv, £51 50 irtc*iidtr*a fittmo vat a«fl 
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^ seti £7.50 

vU moudng po&t i 




SPARES FROM OUR D.I.Y. SECTION 

WHY NOT PURCHASE THE SPARES FOR YOUR 

COMPUTERS FROM US. THE ONLY MAIL ORDER 

W"\ COMPANY SELLING SPECTRUM SPARES. 
t\ T Same day despatch service on receipt of orders. 

You can order by Access card or call at our Reception 

to collect. 




TEN -k REPAIR SERVICE 





While you wait service includmr) 
comouter spare parts over the counter 
All computers fully overhauteci and fully 
tested tiefore return 
Fully insured for the return journey. 
Fixed low orita^ of tl9.95 mciudino post, 
packing and vat, rwot a t>etween price 
of reauy up to £^.00 which some of our 
competitors are Quotingj. 
Discounts for schools and coiicqcs 



BEST SERVICE - 



Five top games worth £55 00 for you to 

eniov and play with every spectrum repair 

we repair Commodore $4's, Vic 20's. 

Commodore 16 s and Plus 4's. 

me most up to date test equipment 

developed byustofullytestand find all 

faults witftin your computer. 

Keyboard repairs. Spectrum rubber icev 

boards only £S,95. 

3 month wnnen guarantee on an repairs 



BEST PRICES! / - 





ARE YOU ANOTHER CUSTOMER - fed up 

waiting weeks for your estimate? 

Need your computer repaired fast? Then send it now to tne Number One Repair 

Company in the U.K., or call in and see us 4l our new fully 

equipocd 2.5O0 square foot workshop, with ati the latest test equipment available. 

Mi* more than welcome 

VIP wtii repair your computer while you wait and help vou with any of your technical problems. 

Commodore computpr<; rf^xipur^ for only £SS 00. Please note we give you a 100^. low fixed 

price of £19,95 wh ir h tncUides return post and packtng. VAT, not a between price like some 

other Repair companies offer We don't shock you with repair bills £50 00 upwards wr 

d on_r lu sr repair the fauit and send your computer back we qive your computer a- 

^^^ OVERHAUL WITH EVERY REPAIR WE DO:- 

we correct Colour. Sound, Keyboard, check the loading and saving chip. Put new feet on 
tne base if required. Check for funmi^'mon/ Chrrkaiisocketsincludinq oar mike and replace 
Where needed. All for an inclusive price of £i 9.95 Including vat. all pa rts, insurance and post 
and packing. No hidden extras whatsoever we don t have to boast too much about our 
service as we have thousands of c usromers from an over thc^ world highly delighted with our 
service. A first class reputation for speed and accuracy. Don t forget we are only twenty 
minutes from Manchostcr City Centre so why not call in. have a coffee with us and see your 
computer being repaired 




SPECIAL OFFER! 



Of or»v£l6.5&nciui»na P & D 
KrfirK • *^mii»r *i ytpmmt ii«ni£1 0.9S| 




D.I.Y. 

CORNER 

We regret wc cannot 
snow ait me components 
available Just give us a 
call and we can quote you 
over the phone delivery 
by Kt Class post. 



SPECTRUM SPARES 

zBoeci^u S.00 

4116 Rami 1,00 

zrxGSO oco 

rTX2n OGo 

Power 5<JDpry Transf ortna'S 9 » 

wA6coot leso 

Rom 

KevDoy a memorane 

Soectrum 

Kcvlxura memDmnr 

Soectrum Mus memor Arn? 

Mi*ld]TFm[»i4te$ 

iffVljojtfaMiK 

2xai mcmbanc 



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$526- CI A 

6510 PfdCPS SOT 

65ftt SrflChip 

906ti4 Mouw Keeper 

SOU^S-Cr^pNc Rom 

901226 easic Rom 

<)0l227-K«rn4iRom 

6S6d"VIC 

4164 Rams- Memory 

Power Supply 

Tr-iirtfoiftuffv 




\ 



Spectrum replacement 
power transformer 
suitable for all makes 
of computer £9 95 
plus £1 50 p & p 



75 00 
2500 

2500 
25.00 
2500 
25 00 
25 00 
25 00 
500 



Spectrum keyboard 

membranes 

£5.50 plus £1.50 p & p 

Spearum Plus spare 
keyboard membranes 
£12.90 piu$£i. 50 pap 

ZX 81 membranes 
£5.00 plus £1. 50 p& 






WE needs the ORIC-CALLS 

Wf E has lots of goodies for the 
ORIC 

Please coniact us. 

W.E. (Software), Foley Bank* Worcester Road, 

Great Malvern, Worcestershire WKH 40W. 

Telephone (06845) 69059 Piestel MBX - 684569059 

W.E. (Software) 

UX Agents for Eureka Infomiaiique'Oric Products 



COMPUTER BROKEN 

Have it repaired and worktr>g again tn no time. Al a fixed price^ All pans oiclude 
parts, latxDur. VAT and return postage. 

Spectrum/Plus £16.95 QL .„ , £34*95 

Amstrad 464/664 £34.95 BBC{Aof B) £29.95 

Electron £24.95 C64,Vk::?0,PSU<exchan9e). £29.95 

C64 (not PSU^ £29.95 

Please send computer with cheque or Postal Order. 

MiCRO;MEND 

The Old School. Main Street* FARCET, Peterborough PE7 3DB. 
Telephone: (0733) 241718 



omc 1 & omc atmos sottwarc 

OVER 100 rm-CS AVAJLASUt 



fiW OiBSi^ & O^ent. 0»rt-K* f^^^n. Ck>waa nMMr<^ 
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IW.«* Ik* ^apMS ««f f riCC Mil 1M 



SINCLAIR REPAIR 
SPECIALISTS 

SP6CTRUM/+ REPAIRS £12,00 

KEYBOARD FAULTS £9.00 - £13.00 

PERIPHERALS ........ Price on apfMlcation 

AU FmXS FULLY ifiCLUSIVE Of iASOUR. 
PAfifS. VAT-^PSF 

3 MONTHS GUARANTEE 

L T. (WESTERN) ELECTROIItCS 
mn F2A 4 F3 

AVOHSIOE ENTERPRISE PARK 
NEW BROUaHTOH ROAO 
MEUCSRAM, WILTSHIRE 
022S 705017 



LETTA-HEAD PLUS 



«tf peM inr Mpft Biiikw$& « ^itfSoM lUlCiiciy; ifOi^adl^ 

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DUMPY 3.0 



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«l n»0i tfflosfr Hd Ml a cftoicft H ^ &a<X£. twm |Qk« Spci^tnn 
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■nno fi tm>i ST Mndno sfKft noio&- 

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ASTRUM+ 






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< Mwtrw an} «P$r to ii» 



CoinldMilMMltlAr -^ 



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HV B!3dv^ S^Stmrw pfogmns (khm fy$m 

Ptkm MB lot casseHe & tnchide pap viritlan 

Meed iLcti a few bbelt bui nt^oni 



oaoVtitM/yMMS ^laftr, Star. if-F; Stunm. Citmn^ e^i m wWwSon KBmsfon, Tasam, Mom. WsiSadwc, Aitorfaa KZXifif^Ht .i^^ 

feepft. Pliast sM £150 fof mtafodriw canndoe. t2 50 Opus due, ?2 CO wertdwWft ainnaa postage. Upfiotfcs from previosi versions {^^vhere ^joropnatc) £2,00. 
vi^ sed less iron lOCO? Try Sfsdway <k)(*v/arij 'OlMJJWOfiTH- %m^.^ f- o «fcvs*»ft tabds ^ft^f! A(Wf*« l!**K frfVtT m PSP 50p f*r 5 guiftTwomn 



Bradway Software (YC), 33 Conalan Avenue, Sheffield, SI 7 4PG 



SPECTRUM SOFTWARE 



ftet wa OAtAOASf & mfomA^^ sysuh 
■ T i wo i w i i mi M itiinOT *m McowenT 



MMMK OOei SfSflM lilM «il^ f7 JS) 
^ ea«m«Ci«. Int. 4i6i« tin taihm On-lat 

noYaoT voa^ 45 KULLBmooe FtoAo 

AAVLIIQii Essex SSe f>KL 



Spectrum Repairs 

C14.90 inclusive of l4]t>our, parts 
+ pip. Fast fcliobie service by 
qualified englnoers. Avorii9o ropoir 
24 hrs- 3 mths guar0me«. For help 
or odvicc ring: 

HS Computer S^rvtces 
2 The Orchard, Warion 
Preston, Lories. PR4 IBE 
Tel: 0772 632686 327 



ZX SPECTRUM UTILITIES 



iK,v,vf^vm mm uMPCGocm mm 

JWrn-DSttSS UM TA.SCOPV .tSJQ 

OMflllATl te. UM A Pi* Cfw^ ISJ5 

ttCW* OWmOUW M*Y c<rwninil ttJA 

Mmumust^mi^bHmMm .... am 

HlXHiLtfi &jm S*^tW*LOW —fJJS 

CmMCTEft9tmOt$«N^f>MCK n» 

SAE/Viccmalogmotetfi»h^taatm 
toe dMsuAto vu^Tea$9te9 tC^ Jtxoxf) 



SD MICROSYSTEMS (DEPT YC) 
P.O. BOX 24, HITCHIN, HERTS, UK 



ABC COMPUTER 
SOFTWARE . 



FULL RANGE OF SOFTWARE 
FOR MOST MACHINES 

Phone for Price Ust stating 
computer 

0296 34822 



AMSTRAD 3 DISKETTES 



1... 



£4.70 
£40.00 



Also Dysdn, Proosson 3M desKetlos. 
Ptintof ritJbofts a speciality. 

PEARLDECK 
TRADING LTD. 

FRECPOST, Oillingturd, DISS, Noifoik 
IP21 4BR 



SINCLAIR SERVICE CENTRE 



Fast fcipair aecvico lor Spectrum: ZX81 
mt«rt«K» t : microodve. A» units repaired to 
oMhM Standard t>y our h.N.C. quoKTted 
mfav^roQe repair coat CiS.OO, Out forlroe 
aaoimai* sSnd £1.95 return postage nith n 
bfkif dosoription ol >x)ur fault: tumround 
approx 24 hours: established mtefnational 
lorvior oor vworK te fully cuafontcod. Per • 
^»Of^ call«f:i vin^coriKd. 

QUANTUM 33 City Arcade, 
CJoyentry CV1 3HX Tel: (0203) 24632 



ENFIELD 

COMMUNICATIONS 

The Computer Repair Centre 



COMMODORE 64 REPAIRS 

FAST RELIABLE SERVICE 

3 MONTHS GUARANTEE 

MAIL ORDER OR CALL IN 

135 HIGH STREET 

PONDERS END 

ENFIELD, 

MIDDLESEX ENS 4EB 

01-805 7772 



94 YOUR COMPUTER. OCTOBER 1986 



TAPE and DRIVE SPECTRUM and AMSTRAD UTIUnES 



CLASSIFIED 



y«s lERU. faffious for our SPCCf RUM programs, non 
hS£ ftW UtilrtitS for AMSnUD DMTt^. We ais« Otfff 
on ALL our ptoduds 

* A FUa MOKev BACK GUWWttE 

* nta MAfAJWLS 

* AN UPOAtl SUtWX toQct the litcsi v*er:icvi at 3 
f educed prtce 



* *SPECTRUM^ * 

TU8 - AU Sf^CmUM 4dK afXJ PLUS OWNE^ NEH) 
Qiis iptffWHt tapi tittVly. 
Send §AE ibf fUU. DETAftS tf «>is jWAZiiS propram 
for Tj^ (Kick*Qp and dms trtmsfor 

sioto incKtfng tasi/cici^/riom starHted toM inf- 
ers <»c 

* lAarages iOO% aociratofy MOST 4aK plus pro 

* fcx^udis TONE and Bud ni» {tpecd) motsurer 

* Ct(Cky/Jerl9 l«Qdei5 on to corwcrtiMl COM* 
PL0ELV to nomial 

* H^Kvkss He3d«rtes5 parts «*<:, rtc 

TW W TAPE Ee.99 (or n.99 on ni/arfvo 
cvTrtape) 

TAPE to DfllVE Uanslw for SPB^TTHJM 

OWNERS 

Transfer Pack ? - A 3^iitcat«<() nitc^uige of prognsn 

INCLUOtfiG TUB. ochcf uUiiifis. aHows dnvt &ans^ 

Ol iitany programs. 

* Extra ucitrti» {HCM k«, VA^ creaaer. RtM progciBn 
w 9Hfwni|(0nfnCCI>9'*i"pOiM'*w 

<0 popular programs. 
« Marta^^s wlijaiy aU iMtcy/^ 

* Fun fnanuai. saeipie tramHeis, ttdvicai Mom- 

Gftf «AWF at yew anve system ^ ownve. watt. 

Oou$S 

OKLY £1139 (t1^d9 on m/drtra cifCrklge) 

ififomutfQfi siiotts - up to oo. IS avMabte - 
£1 eacti Mudm MANY lop 20 MHi 

MtCAOTTUNS - 2 fKC^'*^^ ^ m.driv« OMnon^ FAST 
aM EAST OfttV^ io DftM ar^ TAPE ^ ORNE (nc 
HFAnrmf*^ - Dws mr ccnvect progmms^ Phis 

fr /!rp'* f^rnr-r rt^^nMii -nc tn« CAT pfSntef cutpi^ 

e>.- "Ii- 

OKLY £3.50 on Uipo. £4^ on drtrldgi - AMAZWGI 



• •AMSTRAD^ * 

TAPESPEED TV¥0 aS2> - ESStNTIAL fOR Aa 
AMSTR/J) OW€ftS 

Corircrt ydu slofi loadng scrttwve kom 1000 to a 
max or 3600 tend Slop «Kf sudjr proQfams 

* AMAZMG -ixmrr^naQes MOST or mrocicy lead - 
cf^ some will now rui on tfie 66^128 tor 1st 

* Fuiyaulomstic Kloodsvioanttniioualytipio-UK 

iF Save an r»i0e o( 9 spteds. 

* P«rmantntdbplayo(HC/(f)ER plus STATUS kiftym- 
aiion 

* Motor orifW Ir^sad PAUSE. Removes proteetOR. 

* HMilS HEAOEAUSS files, and ?\XSm't»Ckf 



* Handles AMSTKAD program;^ wrtri Spectrum bad 
wi. Speod <Baud ntte) detoctoi , 

* vEKif swm: TO ust - hal wa.sum 

PftrCt only rSM - stat» 464, 8$4, or 6128 



DISC MANAGER ONE. - lor 464 4 6128 f 664 
Essentcil 10 NHp you marwioe yov AMSTRAD Crtv? 
No nsk - try it and s«e how tittiu iC can be 

* Dobs a CAT wfucn can thtfi be ui«d 10 do ripeal 
ERASURES very tasiy Gm$ dec type Memory 
trfic^taixl. 

* 2 Disc odiors - idit or study tectors of a dfec 

* Recover FRASED <UiS. 

* Simpki and fȣl fAttt 0$c or sodor BACKir 
copier 

* Send outpiibtopiir«or (CAT, $ecWrce(iiifMr.,*<c; 

* unsecurto for easy adapton^dme iramfw. 

* MerHj orrvtso f Uti manual 

P(ttC£ any £&.« - anttxlngl 



THE PmC£S QUOTIO ARE AU INaUSfve EKCCH oversea; add £1 wittm Europe. 11.50 o<tws. SM: fcr 

more ifitormatjon 



LIflM, DEPT YC, 1 1 BEACOHSFtELD CLOSE, WHITLEY BAY, TYNE AND WEAK. 



ASTROLOGY 

for beginners 

only £11.50 

A Startii; P<K:k cofripris4r>g a ;»«ri)pl« 
ptcHji&m to cafcuidie d horoscope, 
on mifodMCtorv booktqt & 2 self- 
teaching programs (how to 
iniorprot iho horoscope). 

No previous 
knowledge required 

Spectrin, BSCIBeclron, One, Or^gckn, 

Tan^;Gc««e. CommodOfe 64/PET, Atari. 

Sharp, AfiBtr^diSchMsider, Cotmt Bvm, 

MSX. im, Apneor. etc 

many morn progrAms for 

experienced astrologers 

also other micros 

Cash wiih order (add 50p 
outside UK) or large sa© for free 

Catjl)Of}U0 to: - 

ASTROLCALC (Otpt VC) 
67 Petscreft Road. 
HmmI K«mpstu4. Herts HP3 8ER 
Tit 0442 S1i09 537 



GRAPHOLOGY 

HANDWRITING 

ANALYSIS ON 

COMPUTER 

For beginner ar>d expenertced 

af^a^/ST. A very comprGhensrve 

program. on}y £21 .65 

The progrnm io probalsty the only 

thing the beyifwtei will evur ntxKJ 

and reduces tt>e learning lime by 

months is not years. 

Th« program tets you deal with 

more scripts in a short lime and wit! 

prot>at>ty pay for \\^\i many tirTKSS 

aver in the first week of use. 

T?ie dear and precise instructions 
fli^abltt you to use the program im- 
medialely, allowing boginnors to 
earn while they learru Available for 
most home micros. 

Send Cheque/PO to 
ASTRALSOFT 

P.O. Box 838» Kins Green 
B34 6SO 



HOME ACCOUNTS. Pul your houw) in 
order! Protjobly the best riomc use for your 
compuiuf* Coinpfetieniiive covet dfje of 
l&ank dcounts, crodti cardt, HP, standirtg 
ortUff% etc inbuilt ACcurii^y check fnr all 
transactions. Cashflow projection, for all 
AmMrdds, Commodofes and SpecUiims. 
tU*K> or free details trom DISCUS, 18 
Bedford Road, lllord. IG1 ^EJ. Tel: 01014 
4141 (24 hours live't 477 



AMSTRAD TUITION 

LOW COST f^OrCSSK>MAL TRAmiNG 



for pto^pterm atid bocitjetgs IMiphoot' 
TlCNntMMO 0I««#4 7913 CM Hni 



SPECTRUM REPAIRS 

frorr, l3-£13 UKi all parts, iHboii" 

Qn6 3 month Ouarantoo. 

From 8nstot*B Sinclair Spednttsts 

MICRO FARE 

296 Giouccstor Road. Horfield, 

Bristol 

Tel: 0272 46575 



AMSTRAD Sofiwflfq. PacMan. Football 
Leagu4^, Winn mo Post. f4 each. Money 
badt 9ii«r«nil«o, Stoph*Tn GftskolL 32 
Chapel Street, Cotne. Lanci BBS OSE. 



FREE LIBRARY CASE 



A V .%i»r , l,.n '^t 7W n^E> Discs 
O-, £7.00 ijlij-^ t'l (>&p tiom. 

KBT (UK) Ltd. 

IDept YC) 1SS Thomhill Road. 
Hac^^wortti, Birmingham 821 98X 



C 

A 
L 
L 




1 



2 

2 



9 


9 




PC-SIG 
Library 

ONLY £10 per Disk 

Over 600 Disks 
30,000 Customers Worldwide 

Our Most Popular Disks 

DOS Help and oxplanetions for the now user. 

,' -; re \m\\\ ^^Av 

';i' CniMiml*;) 1m:o( i-,ir" P( DOS 
BASIC tutorial-A nice way to leam BASIC. 

Word Processing 

LI Wi Edit, sfiwU. lull loiilufcd 

n 3^ PC Wfit<i. pootiinr and power Jul 

I I 388 too knm k-tfiHs m disr 

n 194 PC ftt^^i i omiHHfs fji.KJe V'vi4 t)f IckI 

I : 3/D Wofd'itaf t;t)1,, colof, ASCI! t:u?U'cMiff 

Typing Tutor to train those digits to dorwe. 

, .3;?0 T<ni<-h \^\\** 
SpfOAdsheet 

I 1 lya PC Caic. simpJof than Lotus yel fltucuvt? 
I : ?l4,?i?»,?fi/,7i>t SpfPridsh«^;r, database 
Something for Lotus lovers: 
! * SA t oiiis 12 3 /rocros 

I I 301-300 Loltift linancial and bi*doc! aopJioitiOns 
(3 d'%'< '^'H 

Desk Orgamzef A great pop up helper, phone 
dialer, r>ote pad. calendar, and calculator. 

Powerful database management programs. 

I !i l>C Hit; III L.'jtxr'v U>rm.;, ^\\\%:<\. 

Housakoapiftg —Our favorite utitrties. 

[ 1 ;^/:i Bcf,rutii<iios 

I I ^mWnuX Dtsfc Utihtiri;, WHLRIJS h more 
Unpfotect popular software 

f ^ 4M HuuH"!r^ tu (ji'^itjli! i:t>;»y pfQlectioii 
Artificial ImelligenGe languages 

I Mi; i^joiofi 

L ! 14B XI ISP iixpeiirnenlai wtsiun ul Li^i 

I I 3138 tSII . rMX'^i *\^<M'm tj»*fwi.itfji 

Japanasa Art of Paperfotding 

I ' '108 Ol^^a'l^' '\ pi('''<* ** Hvj 1 1.<: 

Games — The most interesting games available 

* /!A.i Au«uki (i<Mii**'j (t *»iu: «)T.it»n.u'. J4^| i 

U 330 I ln|tit iWkJ cillMjrs (qr.i|>hi(*^ urtiutiitl) 

1 J jtrf PC Jr <iHifncs 

' I W Spncrwafs. grcai on Hercules card 

■ITTi Paint i *s i^'Sl i|-i(«w. Ifri{i',:lv nmfui ( 

Reover lost files - File examine^repair utility 
(floppies only.J 

! ' > I iitm I hi:iiM)H, fumilai tit fsh)rt<Mi\ 
Something for programmers: 

J lb b(1}j!| c CUfTtpjk'f 

A'iA i'tiMWfl ix>iMfi«k*t wrtii.li 111 Tiift>rj Par«cal 
[ J^.Xyt I iixon ami Prffy I ORIH 

I ifin Kr I t; : ; .»*"-. .Mid uhlilKs»U?disksl 



STARTER SPECIAL 

OUICK START rvtiri I MtN'G * OR \\}^ NtW 
UbtH Imiucki^ 

IWUCArAlOGS - OVEROXJPT. 



4(x3COMinjIlH IUU>I< 
/•B PC WHIT J 
ID9 PC CALC 
»KfcDtSKWATl 



b PC ML I 111 
7rxm%\ llTlHTlf ' 
l/tiPArHlCKS Rf 
GAM( S 



£70 VALUE - ONLY f40 



ADVERTISme 



(Inetitsk no JlMk:^ av 
.«A/ tV 00 f<ff ^HHumj VA 7 £X JfiA 
CHfOaiS ONI Y PilASC 
Nonw 



*^0' 



PhQiW ^__ 

Amount Endosed 

International Software 
Distributors Limited 

At-; A i flHi fW/l ly t*L S Ht DtAl t^- 



P BO* 872. 

Wint MniteTKis fl7& eup 

it-' 



YOUR COMPUTER. OCTOBER 1986 95 



BLANK CASSEnES 



WITH UB^AJlYCAStS 

CIO CIS C20 C30 
20 7.50 7.70 7.90 e.70 
50 16.00 ie.20 16.90 10,50 
100 20.00 30.00 31.00 35,00 
$up«rKX Tap«. Don't S«ttle for tes*J 



DISKS 



MEMOTECH COMPUTERS 
AND ACCESSORIES 



MTX 512 COMPUTCR C75.00 

DMX 80 PRIMTER £150.00 

RS232 C35.00 

PASCAL ROM £35.00 

SPECULATION ROM C35.00 

'A mb. OtSK DRIVE & IMTERFACE £110 
1 mb. DISK DR(VE I INTERFACE C160 

w nolle im ii iHg 

M -ir ^or«: Scrvw 0791 iOdO^ 



FAST COMPUTER 

REPAIR CENTRE - 
LONDON 

* BBC hhcw. Commodore. Spectrum 

* Amstrad, Qtf)er$ 
* We sell spare parts 

* Use0 Micro Bought and Sold 

PHONE 01-863 7166 
PROMPT ELECTRONICS 

Unit 4, 15 Spnng field Road, 
Harrow, Middx. HA4 1QF 



ADVERTISERS INDEX 



1^ 



AMSTRAD 2, 3 

ANCO 35. 49 

ARNOR 7 



BRITISH TELECOM 65 

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 
DIGEST 73 



CASCADE 6 

CHEETAH 20 

COMPUMART 12 

COMPUTER REPAIR CENTRE 42 
CYCA 38 



DINOSAUR 38 

DIRECT DISC 12 



FACULTY ENTERPRISES 34 



M 

MICROCITY 35 

MICROMAIL 22, 38 

MIDLAND 30 

MIRACLE TECHNOLOGY 



OCEAN 52, 100 



ROMANTIC ROBOT 22 

RSD 30 



SILICA SHOP 99 

SIREN SOFTWARE 35 

SUPERTEC 82 

SWANLEY 34 



VIRGIN 16 

VOLEX 30 



ZX MICROFAIR 34 



su/fwnir 




CLASSIFIED 



ORDER FORM 



Cfassified Rotes 


Pteoso Insert the following advertisement In Your Coirtputer Clossltled Section 
















LINAGE 


PLUS 
15% 
VAT 


TOTAL 


















Dt«|lioy — rot** pm %cc (Mm Tftcc) 




















On* !nt«rrion C 10.00 












£12.00 


£1.80 


£13.80 














e 15.00 


£2.25 


£17.25 




copy ond prcfcrabfv fi^itfrv^ spaC6 by 












£18.00 


£2.70 


£20.70 




Method of Payment 

OwM|vM •ic. tHovM b* mod# pov<ybl« 












£21.00 


£3.15 


£24.15 




CTOtsod 1 oikIom Ko^ewiiK 












£24.00 


£3.60 


£27.60 




ch«<Vv«/K> (or 
% 












£27.00 


£4.05 


£31.05 




Post to: 












£30.00 


£4.50 


£34.50 





Cut ovi thm orde* io**v^ o*vA r«tut'> 

Cla^viJi**fi Df'poftiiii*fi* You' Coiii»pu!<w, 
T9SQ PcHy f-fortcc. London SWl ^D. 



No. of Insertions required FH Box No. required YES/NO 



AOOPtSS 



THIS FORM SHOULD BE 
RETURNED BY SEPT. 30th 
FOR THE NOV. ISSUE 
OR BY OCTOBER 28th 
FOR THE DECEMBER ISSUE 



Daytime tel.no 



Co^tipa^ If^gtttm^ Ni^mb0* tB9S201. ff«0#ir«f«d Officm: U^pHm N»ia#, 169-17J R^^r^f S»^K tondon Wtff aNf 



96 YOUR COMPUTER, OCTOBER 1986 



WORLDWIDE PRICE LIST 




OLIVETTI 

PERSONAL 

COMPUTER 



^Personal 




ALSO 

AVAILABLE- EPSON COMPAQ AMSTRAD 



LONDON 



Wortdwwde House. CkJicks Road, 

Wmnbiiidon. lonckxy SWi9 1EX 

Te^ex 8955888 WOWICO 20 LINES 



BRIGHTON 



Regent House, 2, 3.4 NoMh Road, 

Brighton , 

Sussex BN1 1YA 5 LINES 



SCOTLAND 



14 Maritime Street. Leiir:. 
Edinburgh 6H6 6SB 



5 LINES 



01 543 221 1 0273 609331 031 554 4361 



Datsywheel Printers 



IBM PC 256Wb t X 360kb ♦ K/B Mono ^ DOS M $99.00 
IBM PCXnS 6A0kh 2x560kb DD 1175.00 

IRM PC-XTS 640kb ix^60kb DD ♦ 20mb HD t^99.00 

IBM PC-ArB 256kb Ix I :inb DD 21SO.0O 

IBM PCATE 5i:kb Ixl.^mb DD *70mb HD6mhi! 2400.00 
IBM PC-ATX 512kb lxL2mb DD + 30mb HD«mh2 2^0000 



IBM PC PC-XT Kcyboard/F.nhanccd 

IBM PC PCt\T Keyboard/ Enhanced 

IBM Mrtio Di!i)>tay 

IBM Base Colour Display 

IBM Colour Display 

IBM Enhanced Display 

IBM Colour Dispt3y;<iraphies Adaptor 

IBM Mono Display/Printer Adaptor 

IBM Enhanced Display Adaptor 2S6kb 

IBM Asvnc Comitn Adaptor (RS232) 



Olivetti 



Olivciii M\9 256kb U36Qkb ^ K/B Mono 

Olivetti Ml<) 2%kb 2ji360kb * K/B Nbno 

Olivetti M24 128kb Ix360kb 

Olivetti M24 1 JSkb :x360kb 

Olivetti M24 i:Skb UJ^SOkb ♦ 20mb HD 

Olivetti M24SP640kb Ix360kb 4 20mb HD 

Olivetti Mono Display Orcco/^liUc/Amber 

Olivetti Colour Display 

Olivetti Enhanced Colour Adaptor 

Olivetti M24 Keyboard IBM/ Ex tended 



115/ 145 00 
155/17000 
140.00 
210.00 
375,00 
47500 
13000 
140.00 
515-00 
7100 



99900 

1125.00 

9S0.OO 

1090.00 

1650.00 

1950.00 

16900 

39500 

455,00 

120.00 



Compaq 



Compaq Plu^ ?56kb lx360kb lOmb HD 1897.00 

Compaq Port II Ktod3 640kb U360kb lOmb HD :S9700 
Compaq Port 286 640kb l.\1.2mb20mbHD4Tape \6?7.00 
Compaq Dcsk-pfo286M2 5l2kblxL2mb30mbHD 3333.00 



Amstrad 



ComprUi-i- 5Uk RAM «<IS6 tmhM <{inL - vctUI/'p«fAlk1 |>««u 
ci»l,te«iM sr«p&i<4 «dipt«€ «o*»f • MS Da% %.l • C«m D#«iri»|i.paii»t 

Amitrad PC 5i:kb I x 360kb DD ♦ K/B Mono 399.00 

/Vmsirad PC 5l2kb 2 it ^60kb DD * K/B Mxko 499.00 
Amstrad PC 512kb I t( 360kb DD « lOmb HD 

* K H Mono 699,00 
Amiirad PC 5i:kb 1 x 360kb DD + 20mb HD 

»K;BMono 799.00 

Colour Monitor Option 150.00 



Epson 



Epson PC 256kb 2x360 kb ♦ K/B 72900 

Epson PC ^ 640kb 2x360 kb + K/B ♦ Taxi 1 399.00 

Epson PC*640kb 1x360 kb*20mb HD^K/B^Taxt 1699.00 



Software 



WofO PfOC^iting 



Sliiitmer^ J) 

Mwltimate v^.it 7 14 

Samn,! Ill v-»0 n> 

Samn.i • 4t> 

SpdkherV M 

bopCtvkuUf 144 

*ofd P<tUa ^* I ^70 

Vkxikrifi \\b 

^Hti\uv rriifcwioral *lt 

Wif«l4tar 60 

Ilofdiur2000ft2 :W 



Finjncidi Ptannmc integrdtco 



1 ianKwti*k 11 


us 


Open Ai\tvv 


290 


\m»it hull Swite vJO 


W 


Sy*wc*on> 


35? 


lavdiB 


UO 


LcXai i:> 


247 


Mallipliii v;jO 


169 




4.^/60 


SupcTeak4 


245 


\hc IwiatlJJiloftd 


HO 



jlniofmation 
Maoa9«ment /Account ft 



Csrdbo^ Pt^% 

dBa^ II 

dBjit 111 pt^ 

dHaic ill ."empilrr 

OipcKf 4<}Bi3c III CoiiWMlct) 

4Uiil Itl Plui 

Dclti 4 

Fttiftft A\%iNtant 

MtttiisoTl 

RB^5000 
RcBck 

^*|:c Bookccper 

Saw i*avro)l 
Sfturt Dataman>^f 



roiflCl Pl^rtning 



Brother HK15XL 


l9Cf» 


335.00 


Brolhci IIR25XL 


25cps 


590.00 


Brother HK35 


35CPS 


745.00 


DiaWo630API 


40«p 


1425.00 


IBM Wheel printer 


25cpi 


^95 00 


lEM Ouictwfiier 2 Graphics 


45cp5 


lOIO.OO 


luki 61 OC 


IScps 


255.00 


OlivcKt Dy450 


45cps 


795.00 


Olivetti DYSOO 


SOcps 


999.00 


Qunic Sprint Lettci Pro 12/20 


22CPS 


411.00 


Qumc Letter Pro PLUS 


45cps 


Special 


Qume 11/40 


40cps 


1175.00 


Oumc H/55 


55cps 


127500 


Qumc 11/90 


90cps 


1475.00 



Ink Jet Printers 



Epson SQ2000 272nicl 105/176cps 

Canon PJI080A SOmd 37cp5 

Hewlett Packard Thinkjct I60cps 



Laser Printers 



Canon Lawr LBP-SAJ 
Canon Laser LBP-SA2 
Hewlett Packard l^scr 
Hewlett Packard Laser Plus 
Qume Ten I-aser 
Qumc Icn Laser Plus 



Plotters 



Epson HI $0 
Hitachi 672 
Hewlett Packard 7440 
Hewlett Packard 7470A 
Hewlett Packard 7475 
Hewicn Packard V550A 
Ruland DXY 9S0 Plotter 
Roland DXY 880 Plotter 



l2Skb 
512kb 

12Skb 
512kb 
I28kb 
5i:i;h 



A4 
A3 
A4 
A4 
A3 
A3 
Al 
A3 



Zpptn 
Sppcn 

appixi 

8ppm 
I Oppm 
lOppm 



4pen 
4peo 
Spcn 
2pcn 
6pcn 
Spen 



IBM Typewriters SPECIALS 



IBM Act ion writer 6715 

IBM Super Seleetrtc 1 6746 

IBM Super Selcciric II 6747 

IBM I hermotronic 6750 



Tape Backup 



Christy External 20mb 
Cifer 5210 External 20mb 
Hvcfcx 20mb Internal 



\ulgcj4l : h:iK .wo 

(b:iri It* 

Oonm^ 165 

t>rawiiif MMM^int 91 

LnctKrapKkt 20.^ 

440 Ctm t>ra»X;rapli 99 Hn 

79 Gem »\a«dctiarf X9 

340 CjraplhiDf Alsif«3Dt ^i 

^4 Craptkwrit<f »>ik- n5 

WO 

450 ■■ifinira^.m^^tin 

175 ^ 



744 

440 
270 
>?5 
550 



270 Crosstalk XVn 

«6 IligM Siragljt.* 

W N^viOA Utihnrt 

99 Stdcktck (S<;k» 

yiQ l«P View 

\f\* Wind<Hn 
tl>1K 




Mjcru A>i«ititrkr 
l^val Co*np«lCf 
W Um VI.: 

PwvCetiMaaAl CoK4 

f*r«iCrv.»r^^1 I iii If iR 



Dca-*ci 



1450.00 
425.00 
39900 



199900 
Special 
2149.00 
255000 
2300.00 
2900.00 



34900 

475.00 

999.00 

899.00 

1499.00 

3415.00 

1079.00 

725.00 



235.00 

375.00 
475.00 
575.00 



899.00 
850.00 
620.00 



II : 

70 

IW 

Il9<i 



IBM Coriipatible Add -0ns 



Hercules Plus Mono/Graphicj Adaptor J 95.00 

Hercules MonoXiraphics Adaptor 14900 

Hercules Colour/Graphics Adaptor 105.00 

EGA Compat Adaptor 256kb + EGM VDU 699.00 

Intel /EMS Compat Ram Adaptor inc 1.5mb 399,00 

AST SixPnc Premium 2mb 575.00 

AST Advantage l.5mb 399.00 

AST Rampage l.5mb 499.00 

Oubic Sixshootcr 384kb Multifunction 199.00 

Cock Card wtlli Batt Back up 45.00 

XT Turbo 286 ^mhx 475.00 

AST l-laxhpak 954mhz nee v30 295.00 
Data Hex Eacelorator 8086 9.54mh2/640 Ram 16 Bit 455.00 

Orchid Tiny Turbo 80286 8mhx 399.00 

Racccard 286 80286 7.2mhi 465.00 

Orchid Turbo 286D 80286 8mhz Imgb Ram 645.00 

Maths CoJVo XT 808? 5mhx 120.00 

Maths Co-Pro AT 802S7 5mhz 1 55.00 

Maths Co^ro S0287 Smhx 250.00 

Sage Chit-Chat 29900 

Breakout Internal Modem 465.00 

Quattro 300*30012400-2400 lni/£xt Modem 699,00 

SummaOr aphid Mouse 95 00 

MierosolT M'>usf 143.00 



Hard Disks 



lOmb to 20mb Hard Disk Exciianfc 300,00 

360kb to lOmb Hard Disk txchangc 279 OO 

360kb to 20mb Hard Disk Exchange 375.00 

360kb to 30mb Hard Disk Exchange 445.00 

Beinoulli Box 2O^20mb 3030,00 

Bernoulli Box 2O*20mb ♦ 80mb 3596.00 

Fitting upgrade Hard Disks 15.00 



KUAAftcr 

ratmMCf 1000. :500 
rrofcct 

<L4i[<<frvO|iC^'1 Plui 



Lao9ua9«i ft 
Operatl#>9 Sy»t*m6 



4 JO 5'?^ &*>K fiira^Mki 
i>l I f'ftnn < c^tifHltw 



>5 
55 

115 
75 

70 



179 

31^ 

220 



Booii yiAMkcM 
DHta 4 

Oomifid 



60 
'ft 



I -I 
4.1 
♦7 
hi 
%7 



Hard Disk 
ir Specials if 

From 300.00 



Printers Dot Matrix 



Brother Ml 109 

Brother Ml 409 

Brother Ml 509 

Brother TwinWriter 5 

Brother 2024L 

Canon A50 (PW 10X0) 

Canon A55 (PW 1156> 

Epson LX86 

Epson FX85 

Ep^nn 1X105 

Epson EX 800 opt Coloiir 

EpiM>n EX 1000 

Epson LO800 

Epson l.QIOOO 

IBM Proprinter 

IBM Proprinter XL 

NEC P5 

NECP6 

NEC P7 

Oki Miaolinc 84p 

Oki Microline I82p 

OT( OT700 

Pana%onic KP 1091 

Pao.i5.on«c KP 1092 



l>7mci 
I87md 
212md 
203mcl 
272md 
SOmcl 
t56mcl 
l60nicJ 
I60mcl 
?72mcl 
I60mcl 
210mcl 



»60mcl 
272mcl 
23lmcl 
137mcl 



25/IOOcp\ 

45/180CP5 
45/180cm 
40/l60cp^ 
96/l60cps 
40/l70cps 
40/ 1 i'Ocps 
16/i:0c|n 
32/l60ci>s 
32/l60cps 
50/300cp^ 
50/ 300cm 
60/ISOciH 
60/ I SOcps 
40 20OCPS 
40/200cp% 
88/264cps 
77/2l6cps 
77/2I6cpt 
50/200cp\ 
60;i2acps 
35O/70Ocps 
24/I20CPS 
24/i:0cpi 



Terminals 



O'Jmc OVl 101 
OumeOVllOl* 
Qume QVT 103 
Qumc QV I 202 



Asni 

ASCII 
ANSI 
ANSI 



175.00 
295.00 
380,00 
975 00 
895.00 
285.00 
349 00 
210.00 
32500 
42000 
39*^.00 
499.00 
470.00 
59500 
363.00 
425.00 
799,00 
415.00 
485.00 
629.00 
230.00 
1750.00 
245.00 
385.00 



:otoo 

34000 
50500 
51800 



Special Offers 



20MB Olivetti 

M24 Base Urwt 

Con>pdt 20Ma Hard Disk 

380l(FlapoyOisfc 

$40KIUM 

7Slotfio$Conv«rtOf 

Oln^etn Monitor 

QlfveiTi/lBM Keyboard 

D0S2n 

£/zsa 



Allpt<«tt«ctu4«i9VAT*#idO€llVC1tY OCT A* 



ifyta.1" IV^i ?>»« Stmwvtv f(7*0! sifca 
Coxj ikgita i??Ot tna 



20MB IBM 

IBM XTS fO 3a^ Unit 

20MB Hard Disk 

360iC Floppy [Xsk 

640KRAM 

Hi^res Mono Grapbcs Ad^tor 

MonoOispiav 

IBM XTS Enhjr>ced Keyboord 

Parallel jnd Sem^ Port 

Calendar Clock 

0OS32 

£f9f9 

Htormll^70lie$)«inM Cl}0Oi^U« 
Ca«uU0MUr€2tttx(ii 



NEXT MONTH 



Highlights of our November issue 



Contents sUbioct to Mo r«vtskm 



PROGRAMMING THE EXPERT WAY 

David J ones, prograninicr ol Kfiiiihl Tynic aiul 
Spellbound, presents a Spectrum 
programming utility to help Your Computer 
readers create their own programs. 

DESK-TOP PUBUSHING 

Packages which allow text and graphics to be 
combined to produce professional-look ing 
newsieliers and reports are available for a 
number of computers. We look at some of the 
best available products. 

GETTING MORE FROM YOUR PRINTER 

In par I uvo of this new scries, our experts 
demonstrate the use of dot-addressable 
graphics. Such techniques are the key to the 
production of high-tjuality graphics dumps. 




HAMPSHIRE COMPUTER KAHt 
OCTOBER 30-31 

The Hampshire Computer Fair, now hiits fourth year, will 
again he held al SoulhampUm Gmldhali More than half 
the available space has been sold and the organisers expert 
to altraet a full complemeni ofvxhibiting companies fropu all 
aspects of office technolof^\ 

ATARI COMPUTER SHOW 
NOVEMBER 28-30 

Atari Corpftration will hold its second national U.K. simw 
in London. That is a direct result of the success of the first 
show, which attracted more than 1 5,00(1 visitors, 5JMH)more 
than were expected. New programs and add-ons far the 57* 
series and 8-bit range from both sides of the Atlantic will be 
launched and there will be opportunities to question the 
leading (iK, experts in the field of Atari computers. 

AMSTRAD COMPUTER SHOW 
OCTOBER 3-5 

Another Amstrad show will be held at London's Novotei 
Hammersmith, Approximately 85 exhibitors will give 
displays and demonstrations of all the latest hardware, 
software and peripherals for the Amstrad range of computers. 

EI,ECTRON & BBC MICRO USER SHOW 
NOVEMBER 7-9 

See the latest state-of-the-art technology for BBC and 
Electron computers. Acorn will be demonstrating its latest 
computers, including the MW PC clone and the new BBC 
Master computer. More than l7jHMi visitors arc expected 
at the New Horticultural Hall. London, 



PC SOFTWARE REVIEWS 

The launch of the Amstrad PC1512 with its 
£399 price lag has led to a dramatic reduction 
in the cost of many leading PC so ft ware titles. 
Next month we review a selection of those 
high-specification applications packages. 

PLUS 

Part two of the Autumn Gold competition 
with a pot of gold worth £1.000 as the first 
prize, 

NEWS • REVIEWS # HINTS & TIPS 
• CLUBS • SOFTWARE GUIDES 

November issue on sale October 27, 1986 



HARDWARE 



PCW 8256 
PCW 8512 
CPC 6128 green 
CPC 6123 colour 
CPC 464 green 
CPC 464 colour 



RRP 
£458.85 
£573.85 
£299.00 
£399.00 
£199.00 
£299.00 



WAVE 
£409.00 
£513.00 
£267.00 (a) 
£361.00 (a) 
£178.00 (a) 
£267.00 (a) 



SOFTWARE databases 

A Tate Dbase II - PCW £11 9.00 £87.00 (d) 

Sage retrieve- 61 28/PCW £69.99 £44.00 (d) 

Caxton condor ^1 6128 twin/PCW £99.99 £73.00 (d) 

Camsott Cambase PCW £49.95 £28.00 (c) 

Compsofl delta 6128 twin/PCW £99.99 £70.00 (d) 

Rat. Sol. Atlas 1 61 28/PCW £49.95 £33.00 (d 

Gemini datagem PCW £39.95 £26.50 d 

M.P.S KwlMile CPC — £10.00 {e) 

All prices include VAT. Please add carriage 

indicated as follows: 

(a) £5.00 (b) £4.00 (c) £3.00 (d) £2.00 {e) £1.00 

despatched by return of post 



I 



lAf.A.V.E. (mailorder) 

Walney Audio Video & Electrical 

53 Shearwater Crescent, 

Barrow-in-Furness, 

Cumbria LA1 4 3JP 

Telephone: 0229 44753 



f 



98 YOUR COMPUTFR, OCTOBER 1980 



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' ' '■' ■ ',\ 




ATARI 



520ST PACKAGES 



Ttuf 5/(,'5T-M Kt^ytKNifd COUti onry £346^^ | -VAI CS99] 
.loti tnrUK^At an nf moilulciCor «nd C4S^i«, dD^wmci you 
JO* cofifwc! >t to ao ojdi t.-i'v 'JrirrMntic TV Mtt' Th#» 

i**0 9**i of 3'V * dllkS CO ; fO.llK^S COtlWJfO. 

For i« li*n4t«i] period (rc^ tn 1966. wo rwvO 

somo special pacN9 ot'gr -ig cvtme>miiTton» ot 1h«i 

iirUearM] .ill AmH iiiunnoi (ttMfWf llw Mono SMT24. or 
Cohmr CM'J«5t?l rtmuf p^cka^e* oTf«* Mp 10 £200 
^nUA diftcoiJftt on • system. If ourcna^aS Irom SiJ*&a. 
tfiey also com© wrWi our troc liT STARTCfl KIT All o» 
t»>o !>»vk p* K^o ahown m !f>© cIvb*1 iriClutJtf VAl 

UPGRADE TO 1024K RAM 

Wc am piftiiMKi ta l>t» i»Wp to olfof a lMhyt»i uj;>gr*<l»« I 
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of trv«> Uift* p»cks can be upgf ft4eO to t Mbyte lor onty 
CtOO Jfym iMbyie ST offers a low p*w# alTOrruitivo to 
» 11140, t>ut atfto ^ii^a yuu trw ben^i! of on 111 
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FREE SOFTWARE] 

I WN^i you buy a &^ iv 1040 ST ceevpiiCar keybOA'tJ from Sihc4 [ 

I Snop. yoo wti recw^o a larpo and vftfted aoftware package ffev of 
cixirge tftia p-actca^o conatsw o< twelve pfograma, Iflmetevef you 
purcf^ase your Atan ST co«npu1ef. you ahOuld ivoe^'ve the firtt *ln 
software t>Ua» ai »ta7i<^rc}. ^iow«fv^. Vf you purcha*^ yoy ST from 

I Silica, you Will «i«o race^'ie a tutttkef um mU4 litKr», ^Mrtg you a lotai 
of tweiire. All $T*» now l^ve TOS/GeM alnMOy installed on ROM. to 

I the IHt of frfM* %o'tw«r« y<Hi «ih<Hii<$ r«c«fve t« at lettewt 

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I It you o^rcKe»e ym*! ST rrort* Sirica, m>i only will you receive the I 

standard ux p«ece« ot K^w«tr as listed above, but w« wai alio give 
I you iJie f«4low«ni *<* aiW'Icirwil ptogr^mt ^Httl OF OtAHGfe 
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on mp/io* Of cototjf systcms> 
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T,r r.TArn lm k\ t . rrtytr* tho ciHipon botow tor nmher detaili. 

FOUR FREE MANUALS 

i'» .tr^ji^ti-n TO r.e fro*. vDfT«varo wiuch will b« Qtvtfi to yoii when you | 
tnrf ytnir 5T T*o<Ti S'''C(*, yvw Will reooofe fOU^ Mo# rrtanoaia 

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lUmJ WE ME THE UK'S NOl ATARI SPECUUJSTS WM 

At S4»ca ^*tt ut4Q been sMCcoislulty d«<ic«l«d lo Atari «v«f >iiKt tnetr protfucii fifsl appaared on iho UK 
m«fk«i W4t ci%<i itttf ibute <mt% sucoMa lar^oly lo lh« Aiari «p«c«airtiUOA wtuob we pnctico and to the user 
back^^p we provide Hett AMurod that when you buy a p4ece Of AlAri ha/dwarc at C<ltca yOM wilt be fvHy 
toppof led Ovr mtitngfr 0«vir»9 nev^ o« software releaaea Ana developments wiit keep yoo up to dale witti 
me Atari martcei and Our tecnnic*! support teem «nd satea ttafi are at the end of the telepriOfYe ime lo 
deal with your pfoblemi and sopp^y yoor orery need With o^ir SpoCialtM bias, we aim to keep ttOC4S Of 
all the a\ra>lfib)e Atari hardware, software, pcnpneran and accesao^tes. We alio stock a wide ratrge of 
Atan dod*C4tod booka and through ua. the owners on om* \%%\ can %tih%crib«<» to wftf^ttA American Atari 
Oodicaivd ma^^lrtca. We can provide • fvA ierwice to aii Atari owners and are rM>w firmly osiab^isheo as 
I he UK's NUUef R ONE Atan sooctalcits. H«f» Are lust aomc of the th/n^s we can ofler to oor cusfo«*inrs 
A FREE POST & PACKING ON MAJL OftOCRS IT you wooM Me lo be ie g teie fe tf on our melNng 

# FREE NEXT DAY DELtV3RY Maf «e «n Atari OOfi^ultr owner, or av a parvor? 
A INFORMATION MAILING SERVICE kOm^md tn Auy#M m Aimfi mMcNnt^, M m 
aTECHNICAL SUPPORT TEAM JbKMr. We w* be pleased lo ^eep you up fo dele 

* H I G HLY COM PETITl VE PR I CES wm mm AtMi dmrnk^pm^ts tree of chmgm. So^ 
A AFTER SALES SUPPORT SERVICE reftm Ihe oowpon iod^ and Oe^ axp«f«ffidlr»9 

, A REPAIR SERVICE ON ATARI PRODUCTS a «#>eciafitf Atari aerv^ fhaf k second fo nor*e. 



REDUCED PRICES 



Atari s ST pe/EoriAl computers i^^ now firmty establUhed both tn tri« USA 
and Ct^rope The ma ^i attraction of the ST nn^e ts tne value fof money 
which these coreputers reproaent. gmr» both pnrvite and butmen users a I 
powertut essel at a very tnodest pnco more art now seii«*rai ST pacAeges 
avAilabie from SdkM ai a loduced pnc^, ludner entianctog the Ata/I Va^ae 
for Mooey' reptftation in add^iion. we are gitving away a f-Hht Siiica 'ST 
START P% KIT' w«lfi m^Tf $20 o* t040 ST p^chaaed at Sifica Shop. Th^e 
I offers wUi onty be iveiiabte for a iirmt««d pHtod ertd oomnienoe on i \JW9B 

POWER FOR BUSINESS 

I T tie list betow ahows von^ of the new businos3 products whKh t%avo been I 

I rocently lavfvched tor the Atan ST raoQe. it olires an tnoicaiion of the ST's | 

polenfial lo biismes* bvyert looking to inttalt a powerful, low cost sysui*ti 

CP/m KMULATOR ISM COMPATItttUTV 

30Mbyto HARD DISK VT100 EMULATOI* 

LOTUS 123 - CLONE MICROSOFT WRITE 

ctBA$E III CLONft dSASe 11 

I Any ST contputer wtd pfovid« its yeef vwih a very powi^af a^set, uti44!^ | 

a vast ninoe of appfccatione. p«rt»eyiarly in thn bustf^«ss wortd. Many 

software companiet have been t^MCk to rocognoo rt for it9 bustnces 

poteTi»4l. and n^k^c produced lyograms for the ST wh*cn hameM Tiii» 

pOfe'i|*al In 4fdd*t<Ofv thirfe «'« severe-' peftptwrai «nd Iwirdwaie pfOdmis 

becofntng A-raiiabie lo add lo th* ST's "Power For But tneea' Software now 

avjhiabie includes dOMan. a deASE III done u well m HAD Gese. a 

dBAbt II cfone. in fact Bm Softersfe have now launched Ashton T»te's 

or»g.n«1 dClASf II ptOQram for the ST. in mMUKmii. PC tr^1e«COfn4ii is a 
VTT I O&ernijta tor which enables you CO use any ST keyboard a^ a terminal 
conrected fo a fnamffatne or mim. Other progrems i-Kiude a powvtful 
accounts package bt Cashhak and a Lotus 'i*^-T' cton« called VIP 
Prof«v>k*riAi Microsoft have announced that ir>eir powerful word pfoceaaor 
MKroton V/rlte' Will soon be avufabie for fhe ST fMny packages are 
available for very specific matfcef «pplicatk>nt •nckiding a powrerfiil CAD 
fComputer Aided Design) progntm cailed E«sy Dfiw ffom Mi^raph in 
adclitiur. iTwre i» ifli) eng(n«ear>g t00< CtWOd PC fkMfd Designer by Abacus 
t;ottwaro wtitch ^iil enable tne user lo deaign printed Ci**.v^.t tv»u4f0^ for 
f jfthcf dnUttr- o* ^ow ih<* ST can heJp in your buslnass. routm tN* coupon 
t>riMw Wi' *»ii Jn' piv^ii»fl lo tend yot* oiir latest newsletter and pfice tat 

PRICE MATCH PROMISE 

We hope KOU wUl tkni thm fhe combinat»on of our low prioea. FREE 
deitvery lerwice, FR^l: Siartef Ktt and afte^ sales support, wMI bo enough 
10 make you buy your Aur i eoutpment from SHtcB Shop. \i however, there 
IS sofl>cthln^J you wi&h to pv»che>e. and yo%* ftrid o*te of o»jf competitors 
Offering it at a low^i ptice, pleitso contact Ow^Hn pintcoe (Office Manager]!, 
o^ or-e Of the telesales stall m our sale^ oepAitmenL When you toAophone 
us. pieaie piovtdo us wtih our competitort name. eddr^9 and i«4ophone 
number P»o»tding oyf competitor has the goods in slock, are pfovnise to 
rrMtch f**% otf«r ^on a same product - saihe price' i>A3.'«> ar^O stiil prort^oo 
you with Our nortnal tree dettvery. You will aito Oc ent'tSed to our fuK after ! 
«tlet servKO. mciudtng tree new$let(«ni and i«chnicai twif^trp •Mjpport 
We dtxit want you to go arywhere «!)« lor your Atari products So Shop at 
I Sikcti the U K a undlspvied Not Atan special' SI. 

FREE STARTER KIT] 

WITH EVERY 520 & 1040 ST 
PURCHASED AT SILICA SHOP 

RETURN THE COUPON FOR DETAILSJ 



SILICA SHOP LTD, 1-4 The Mews, Hatherley Road, Sldcup, Kent. DA14 4DX 

SEND FOR FREE ATARI ST LITERATURE 



# To: Slltca Shop Ltd. DepI YC 10M. 1-4 The Mewv Hathertey RPAd, SIdMp. KenL OAH 40X 

: PLEISE SEND ME FREE LITEMTURE 

I ON IHE NEW MME OF niH ST COMPUTERS 



ST NEWSLETTER! 

8 PAGES OF INFORMATION 
TO HELP YOU TO DECIDE i 
RETURN THE COUPON FOR A FREE COPYJ 



r o' *"'<) tHielne«,si«Min ar>d tfne more ^'(kIoim hwn^ taeer. tnor« . 
uiNft to-io:>T*r with io?eK mam rniik can tm t«s*d m « t>us«r>e«s I 

envlrOfimnnt |k% a tta/Hl'AVtn*- 4y«tMti nw f'An «.up0o*i a mA>nfrAm« 
Cornpote' as a tervnuvni Th*- i040^T'r ii,eytXMird with loleg^iil 
IMt* d.>k d^vo c«>»t» o#»!^ Cft** f *VAT-i:003 05) A» trw l04Obf-f 
was menufDctuted «olety with l>u^ir*i*x» u^*» ►!» rtumJ, It <to«e not \ 
come With em (If modulator t0€ utm w.lh a domt»>tic TV, Instead. 
It I'eQurres a moniior There are if^iee Atari rttorirliK» evellatifc' ] 
and ttvo prices fO' trro tCHO with llieeo mortitors lire *i> follOw» 
fQ40 K^ytMMftf Wyinoot MoffJtoi - ist0»(*VA T* £003 ^} I 

\04Q K^y^Kf*t0 * High «w t^H^fa motitHif - S790 i'VAT- €91S^} 
1040 Hifyfyomfa ' tOw /«• i^'0*ouf m*»fiiHM • tOtm (*VA T-CtOXt «^) 
1040 *feyOO#rtf * Me^ nts co*oue mortito^ - CMt (*VAT-Cf t4g *5; 
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I doublo mtOeif diAh d^lve mtstS m»ity^ irnniKtttrmef, hn4h htHtt into 

the kieyt>oard lo give a compeei and stylish unit, with only one 

inAirie leeU. Trte l0>*05T-r (s su|»plr;e<l wtfh e set of aeftware 

diaka as weti a* our own rnrr .^icm >$t &TAnTf*A pack* caii [ 

I imo your noareet branch of fvdK^ Shop for n <J«>fnon^trAt;4in 

1-e The Mew«, Helhe^ey #tc»«d, ftMeun. Kent. D;Aie aox 

f IT Ore^netOft f4li«>t Str^4>t. Ort>4rt|}i9«\. K*m.^ BRe 04.C> 

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*TM of>d O ^9®^ Untwersot Crty SfucJ»o$, ioc Ail Rights Reserved. Licensed by Mefchondistng Co^'poroftioo of AmcHco, fnc