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Mini-Ma g 

THE EXCLUSIVE MAGAZINE FOR TI-99/4A USERS 

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February 28, 1985 

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Volume 1, No. 1 



March, 1985 



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THEEX&VStVB MAGAZINE FOR TJ-99MA USERS 




Dear Readers: 

Welcome to the first issue of MINI-MAG 99! 

MINI-MAG 99 is a major national publication ex- 
clusively written for TI-99/4A users. We will cover all 
levels of information, including application, education, 
how-tos, product news, practical hints, etc. 

We have received support from key dealers and users 
groups, as well as third party manufacturers, who have 
assured us of continued product and software availability 

for the 99/4A. 

Since the so-called "death of the 99," there has been 
more activity than ever before. More companies have pro- 
vided product support, since they are not up against Texas 

Instruments. 

At the recent CES, new products were announced that 
will bring the capability level of the 99/4A to that of the 
IBM PC—products like MAC Paint and module screen 

dumps. 
MINI-MAG 99 is dedicated to the TI user— YOU! We 

look foward to providing you with information and news 

that will help you to use your TI-99/4A to its fullest! 

Thank you for your support. 

Sincerely, 



C^J^y^^mO 



Leslyn Tepper 

Editor 
MINI-MAG 99 



MINI-MAG 99 March. 1985 



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MINI-MAG 99 is published monthly by 
S.O.S. PUBLISHERS, 21777 Ventura Blvd., 
Suite 203, Woodland Hills, CA 91364. (Tel. 
818-704-0145). Subscription rates in U.S. and 
its possessions are $20.00 for one year* In 
Canada and Mexico, add $8.00 per year. 
Other foreign countries $35.00 for one year 
(surface mail). Single copy price in U.S. and 
its possessions is $2.50 and $3.00 in Canada 
and Mexico. Foreign subscription payment 
should be in United States funds drawn on a 
U.S. bank. Second class postage paid at 
Woodland Hills, CA 91364. 

POSTMASTER: Send address changes 
to S.O.S. PUBLISHERS, 21777 Ventura 
Blvd., Suite 203, Woodland Hills, CA 91364. 

Manuscripts will be returned only if 
accompanied by sufficient first class postage 
and a self-addressed envelope. S.O.S. 
PUBLISHERS are not responsible for lost 
manuscripts, photos, or program media. 

Opinions expressed by the authors are not 
necessarily those of MINI-MAG 99. All mail 
directed to the "Letters to the Editor** col- 
umn are treated as unconditionally assigned 
for publication, copyright purposes, and for 
use in any other publication or brochure, and 
are subject to MINI-MAG 99's unrestricted 
right to edit and comment. MINI-MAG 99 
assumes no liability for errors in articles or 
advertisements. The mention of products by 
trade name in editorial material or adver- 
tisements contained in MINI-MAG 99 in no 
way constitutes endorsement of the product 
or products by MINI-MAG 99 or the 
publisher, unless so stated. 

Each separate contribution to this issue 
and the issue as a collective work: 
Copyright © 1985 by S.O.S PUBLISHERS 

Copying done for other than personal or 
internal reference use without the permission 
of S.O.S. PUBLISHERS is prohibited. 
Requests for special permission or bulk 
orders should be addressed to the publisher. 
MINI-MAG 99 is a trademark of 
S.O.S. PUBLISHERS 

MINI-MAG STAFF 

Editor In Chief Leslyn Tepper 

Production Manager Iris Franklin 

Advertising Director. Kimberley Guest 

Contributing Editors Jim Labriola 

Stuart O. Adler 

Cartoonist ■ Gregory Franklin 

© 1985 S-O.S. PUBLISHERS 



TABLE 

OF 

CONTENTS 



1 



The Great One-Day Sale 
by Leslyn Tepper 4 



CorComp Continues 



Tl-Writer (The Value File 

& Form Letter) 

by Leslyn Tepper 8 

The Care & Feeding of a 
Diskette 

by Stuart O. Adler 13 

Typing Tutor — A Review 
by Kimberley Anne Guest 16 

Bits & Other Pieces 

by Jim Labriola 17 

99 Puzzle of the Month 21 

Tid Bytes to Wet Your 
Appetite 22 

Education from Navarone . . 24 

Notes 25 




LETTERS OF WELCOME 



We have received an incredible 
response to our announcement of 
MINI-MAG 99's birth. 

We don 't have room to put all of 
the terrific letters that we've 
received from everyone, but the 
following are a few to share with 
you the great support and well 
wishes we've had. 

Thanks to all of you 99 loyalists! 




Please send me information regarding your 
soon to be released magazine. I understand 
that the first issue is FREE. If this is so, 
please send me a copy. I now subscribe to 
"Compute," "Home Computer Magazine" 
and "MICROpendium." I find that I need all 
sources to get a well rounded view of all 
99/4A computer related information. I hope 
it is of a high quality and shows originality. I 
have a deep interest in Assembly Language 
and Extended Basic. 
Respectfully, 
R.W., Arcadia, CA 

I am pleased that someone new is starting up 
another new TI-99/4A computer magazine. 
We need it! ! I hope it goes over good. Thanks 
very much for your support to Till Hope this 
magazine is a success 1 
Sincerely yours, 
L.W.K., Bensenville, IL 

I read about your "Mini-Mag 99" on the 
Source. Please send me a free copy of your 
first issue. 

Good luck on your new venture* It's efforts 
like yours that will keep the 99/4A alive and 
well. 

Thank you, 

J.S.p Port Allegany, PA 



Please send me the free issue of your TI 

Magazine. I am always looking for new 

publications on the TI-99 computer. I will be 

looking forward to receiving it. 

Thank you, 

I.G., Vancouver, WA 

I would be grateful for a free sample copy of 
your upcoming Mini-Mag 99. Hope the pro- 
ject turns out successfully for you and all us 
orphaned 99'ers. 
Thanks. 
R.S., Scranton, PA 

I would like to take you up on your offer for 
a free copy of Mini-Mag 99. We TPers need 
ail the support we can get! Good luck and 

thanks. 

A.S., Waterbury, CT 

We (TI Users) need a new and fresh approach 
to what is new and product reviews. I have 
subscribed to another magazine for quite 
some time now and have recently become 
very dissatisfied with the new format 
(published whenever they want to). Thanking 
you in advance, I am looking forward to 
receiving your first issue. 
Sincerely, 
D.P., Vallejo, Ca 

We are pleased to learn of your new pub- 
lication serving the continuing needs of the 
TI-99/4A owner. 

Best of luck with this venture. 
Keith Lewis 
Texas Instruments 

Consumer Products Division 
Irvine, California 




MINI-MAG 99 March, 19*5 



MINI-MAG 99 March, 1985 



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The line forms to the rear— ALL DA Y LONG 



The Great 

ONE-DAY SALE 



By Leslyn Tepper 



Hundreds of people stood in a 
line that wrapped around an in- 
dustrial park building waiting for a 
chance to take advantage of a one- 
day sale of the TI-99/4A computer 
at only $99.95. 

Included in the package was the 
console, 4 books, a cassette of 32 
games, the Oscar w/programs, and 
the opportunity to buy the "Home 
Financial Decisions" command 
module for an additional $1.99. 

Tex-Comp, the company that 
held the sale, had to limit the pur- 
chase of the TI-99/4A to two per 
person, since there was such a 
phenomenal response to the full- 
page Los Angeles Times ad. 





,i';:- : -K:;:.;™;a!P;3SS 



MINI-MAG 99 March, 1985 



I arrived on the scene at 10 a.m. 
to find that the line already 
stretched from the front door of 
HEAD Computer Products, Inc. 
(where the sale took place), down 
the front walk, a block to the cor- 
ner, around the corner, and a block 
past the rear of the building. 

It took four (4) hours for that 
portion of the line to get in and buy 
their equipment; all the while, the 
line kept getting longer. 

Only five people were allowed to 
enter the facility at any one time. 
They were then given their invoice 
and sent to the pickup window to 
receive their new computer. 




The delay began when the credit 
card authorization system broke 
down (maybe they should have used 
a TI-99/4A!). After several hours, 
the "cash only" people were 
allowed to go ahead of the rest of 
the line. Even with this quicker 
method, the line remained until well 
after dark. 





Tl-99er's make new friends and get a great buy 

I spoke with several people who 
waited patiently (some sent friends 
and relatives to the nearest fast food 
restaurant for provisions). Why 
were they waiting so long? "Where 
else would I be able to get a com- 
puter so inexpensively?" most 
answered. 




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MINI-MAG 99 March, 1985 




Although there were people there 
who already owned a TI-99/4A and 
were getting a second or third con- 
sole, the majority of the crowd, I 
found, were getting their first com- 
puter. 




There were a few who had 
another kind of computer and 
wanted to buy this one for someone 
else (i.e., their children, etc.). 




As for Tex-Comp, they sold over 
1,000 units, creating for themselves 
a tremendous January for their local 
warehouse store. "We had a run on 
cassette recorders,'* said Jerry 
Price. "Fortunately, we were able to 
provide a GE recorder that had the 
same settings as the original TI 
recorder, and for only $39.95." 




Jerry Price, Tex-Comp 



"Since the sale, business has con- 
tinued at a consistent pace." Price 
said. "With so many new consoles 
in use, we're getting alot of users in 
the store who are now beginning to 
expand their systems." 




Happy faces say, "it was worth the wait!" 

In addition to the business the 
sale brought Tex-Comp for soft- 
ware and peripherals, they have also 
had many of the people who were 
only allowed to buy two consoles, 
return to the warehouse store to buy 
one or two more "while they last." 

How long would you wait to buy 
a computer? Well, I was there all 
day, and believe me, I got my twol 



!i 



CORCOMP CONTINUES 




•;•;■ 



vv. 



In an effort to make TI-99/4A 
users aware of what is really hap- 
pening at CorComp, we axe reprint- 
ing the following excerpts from Cor- 
Comp's newsletter, "CorComp 

Cursors" 

"Our anniversary celebration was 
one of positive attitudes mixed with 
the challenge of reorganization. The 
decision to reorganize was based 
upon faith in the products, persis- 
tent demands by the 99/4A user 
worldwide and the incredible sup- 
port of the distribution network. 

"CorComp's second lease on life 
was made possible through the sup- 
port of the distributor network. Re- 
quests for 99/4A peripherals were 



constant and determined. The spirit 
of the user groups may have been 
daunted, but it was definitely not 
broken! 

"The acceptance of the Disk Con- 
troller gave CorComp its third lease 
on life. 

"Few companies earn even a 
second chance, much less a third, 
but CorComp 's driving force has 
been the spirit of the users who are 
convinced that the 99/4A is a 
phenomenal computer! 

"The rumors of reorganization 
are true. It is a positive action. We 
have the support of our component 
vendors. The employees have an op- 
tim istic and dedicated attitude 

Continued on Page 24 



MINI-MAG 99 March, 1985 



MINI-MAG 99 

NOW ACCEPTING 

ARTICLES AND PROGRAMS 

MINI-MAG 99 is looking for articles and/or programs that would 
be of interest to TI-99/4A Computer Owners and Users. 

If you have any new ideas or fresh approaches to the use and/or 
programming of the TI-99/4A, we would be happy to consider 
publishing your Information. 

Suggested subjects are: Applications, hardware, software, 
education, and games, just to name a few. 

Manuscripts must be typed double-spaced and, if your article in- 
cludes a program, submitted with disks or cassettes (you may use 
both sides). Manuscripts will be returned only if accompanied by 
sufficient first class postage and a self-addressed envelope. 

SEND TO: 

S.O.S. PUBLISHERS 

MINI-MAG 99 

21777 Ventura Blvd., Suite 203 
Woodland Hills, CA 91364 



MINI-MAG 99 March, 1985 




TI-WRITER 

The Value File & Form Letter 



By Leslyn Tapper 





In this month's column on 
Tl-Writer, we will discuss setting up 
a "value file" for use with a form 
letter which contains variables, 

t 

The use of form letters with 
variables will save a tremendous 
amount of time and effort and will 
"personalize" the letters you send 
out. 

There are many instances that call 
for variables: account balances, 
names and addresses, part numbers, 
prices, etc. In order to change these 
variables with the least amount of 
effort, you simply set up a "value 
file" with the different information 
(data) that you need for each of the 
variables you need in your form 
letter. 

The most common type of 
variables are the name and address. 
In order to set up your file properly, 
you must first determine exactly 
how you are going to use the infor- 
mation contained in it. 

For instance, if you are going to 
place the name and address of each 
person only at the beginning of the 
letter, followed by, "Dear Sir:," 
you can set up the value file with the 
full name in one variable: 

1 Mr. John Jones 



If, however, you wish to follow 
the inside address with, "Dear Mr. 
Jones," you will have to approach 
the set up of the value file differ- 
ently: 

1 Mr. 

2 John 

3 Jones 

In this way, you can call out 
specific variables within the letter. 
For example, the variable numbers 1 
and 3 placed in consecutive order 
will produce "Mr. Jones," while the 
variable 2 will produce "John," or 
the first name of the person to 
whom you are writing. 

When you are ready to print your 
form letter, and have given the 
proper information for the insertion 
of the value file, the Formatter will 
look at each variable number and 
replace it with the information that 
you entered after its corresponding 
number in the value file. 

SETTING UP THE VALUE FILE 

To start a new file, select the Text 



option of the Tl-Writer main 
menu. You will already be in the 
"command level." At this point, 
you can use Command 3 to change 
the screen color. Then type an "E" 
and enter to place the cursor on the 
first line. 



This is the point at which you will 
begin your value file, entering each 
line of each set as follows: 

Enter the variable number 
(the first one will be 1) and a 
space, then enter the informa- 
tion that will be represented by 
that variable (up to 78 col- 
umns). When you have typed 
your information" for the 
variable, push enter(CR), and 
a carriage return symbol will 
appear on the screen. 
NOTE: This carriage return 
symbol is extremely impor- 
tant, and must follow each 
and every line you enter in 
your value file. In this article, 
I will use (CR) to represent the 
carriage return. 

You will now see your cur- 
sor on the second line. Enter 
the variable number 2, a 
space, the information 
represented by this variable, 
and (CR). 

Continue to enter each line 
until all of the information 
you need for the form letter is 
entered for this one person. 

When you have completed 
the information for one per- 
son, you will have entered a 
"data set." On the very next 
line, following the last line of 
the data set, type an asterisk 
(*) and a (CR). This asterisk 
will tell the Formatter that this 
is the end of a data set. 

Now, begin a new data set 
by entering the first variable 
number, a space, and the new 
information for that variable. 

Continue this process 
(separating each data set by an 
asterisk and (CR)) until all of 
your data sets are entered. 

Now, save the file by enter- 
ing command level (Function 
9), typing SF (enter), and nam- 
ing the file (i.e., DSK2.UST), 
then press enter. 



VARIATIONS IN VALUE FILES 

We have discussed the simplest of 
value files here; however, since you 
can use up to 99 separate variables 
within a form, you can see that a 
value file can become quite exten- 
sive. If you do have an extensive file 
like this, be sure to keep a list of 
what each variable represents (i.e., 
phone number, account number, 
part number, codes, names, 
balances, etc.). 

In this way, whenever you wish to 
use the value file for any purpose, 
you will know which variable 
numbers to insert in any given form 
or letter. 

SETTING UP 
YOUR FORM LETTER 

When you have completed your 
value file (and saved it), the cursor 
will flash, and your file will still be 
on the screen. To begin your form 
letter, enter command level, again 
(Function 9), "Q" for Quit, then 
"P" for Purge, and "Y" for Yes. 
This process will clear the screen 
and place the cursor on Line 1, 
ready for new entry. 

IMPORTANT: Be sure that you 
have saved your value file before 
you Purge, or you will lose all of the 
data you have entered. 

You are now ready to begin the 
entry of your form letter. The first 
thing you need to do is format the 
letter. By this, I mean place certain 
"format" commands within the text 
of the letter to tell the Formatter 
how you want the letter to appear 
after it is printed. 

All of your format commands 
must be 1) preceded by a period (.), 

2) typed in capital letters, and 

3) followed by a, carriage return 
symbol (CR). The line that the com- 
mands are written on do not take up 
actual space in the printed text; 
however, they will appear on the 
screen to take up space. 



8 



MINI-MAG 99 March, 198S 



MINI-MAG 99 March, 1985 



9 



THE "FILL" COMMAND 

The first format command should 
be .FI(CR). This command tells the 
Formatter to "fill" the lines. Since 
your variables are just that, each 
one will vary in line length and will 
need to change spacing. If you don't 
use this command, only the actual 
amount of space in each line on the 
screen will be alloted, and, 
therefore, the variables will not 
necessarily fit. 

SETTING THE MARGINS 

The format command for setting 
the left and right margins can be put 
on the same line, separated by a 
semicolon. Type XM followed by a 
space and the number of the left 
margin column, a semicolon, .RM 
followed by a space and the number 
of the right margin column, and a 
(CR). 

Example: 

.LM 8;RM 72(CR) 

The above setting, by the way, is a 
real nice one for most letters and 
forms. ' 

SPACING 

Depending on the type of paper 
you are using for your letters, you 
may or may not wish to enter some 
space as your next command. 

The Formatter is preset to start 
printing on Line 6 of any page. If 
you have letterhead stationery, 
printing on Line 6 may interfere 
with the letterhead. To alleviate that 
problem, add some space by using 
the .SP command. Type .SP fol- 
lowed by a space, the number of 
lines you wish to skip before your 
first printed line and (CR). 

For example, if you wish to print 
on Line 10 instead of Line 6, enter 
•SP 4(CR). 



THE LETTER 

It is at this point that you enter 
the date of the letter and return to 
the next line. On the next line you 
use the space command to leave 
space between the date and the in- 
side address. The best (and ac- 
cepted) amount of space is 5 lines. 
Since the return after the date causes 
one line already, simply enter 

.SP 4(CR) 

On the next line, we will begin to 
enter the variables for the inside 
address. Again, this procedure will 
vary depending on what kind of 
value file you set up. We will assume 
that you have chosen to use the first 
name somewhere in the letter and 
have already set up your value file 
with 5 variables like this: 

1 Mr. 

2 John 

3 Jones 

4 555 Main Street 

5 Anywhere, CA 90069 

* 

1 Mrs. 

2 Mary 

3 Smith 

4 222 Central 

5 Someplace, MI 48135, 

* 

etc. 

Since you will want the first three 
variables to appear on the same line, 
you type in the following: 

*1* *2* *3* 



The second line of your inside ad- 
dress is the street address (variable 
4), so enter *4* and (CR) on that 
line. The third and last line of the in- 
side address will then be *5* and 
(CR). 



When the Formatter picks up 
each variable number, it will print 
out the name and address of each 
person you have entered in your 
value file. 

Example: 

Mr. John Jones " 
555 Main Street 
Anywhere, CA 90069 

The next command is the space 
command, again: 

.SP 2(CR). 

Then, on the next line: 

Dear *2*:(CR) 

This will place the first name of 
each of your people after the 
"Dear." 

Since you will only need one line 
of space following the "Dear" line, 
simply press the enter key once on 
this line. On the following line you 
begin your letter. Place a (CR) at the 
end of each paragraph, and one on 
the line between each paragraph. 

At the point in the letter where 
you wish to insert each persons first 
name, just type *2* instead of a 
name — the Formatter will take care 
of the rest. 

After your last paragraph, enter 

.SP 2(CR) 
Sincerely,(CR) 
.SP 4(CR) 
your name(CR) 

This leaves the proper amount of 
space for signing your name. 

As with any other file, you must 
save this one by entering command 
level (Function 9), SF(enter), the 
name of this file and enter. 
, Once the file is saved, you may 
exit to the Formatter by entering 



"Q" at command level (Function 9) 
and "E" for Exit. 

You will then be ready to enter 
the Text Formatter (Number 2 on 
the Tl-Writer main menu). 

Follow the instructions for print- 
ing from the Formatter and when 
asked the question, "MAILIST?" 
say yes (Y). The Formatter will then 
ask you the name of your Mailist. 
This is where you type in the same 
filename you gave to the value file 
when you saved it. Include the loca- 
tion of the file (i.e., DSK1, DSK2, 
etc.). 

SETTING UP AN ENVELOPE 

It is possible for you to set up a 
text file with a format that will use 
the same value file to produce 
envelopes. 

Take the Text Editor option on 
the menu and then enter an "E" to 
place the cursor on the first line of 
the text editor. Enter the following 
format commands: 

XM 8;RM 72(CR) 
.IN +32(CR) 

Then, depending on the type of 
value file you set up, enter the 
variable numbers where they are to 
appear on the envelope. 

Example: 

*1* *2* *3* 
*4* 

*5* 



OR 



♦1* 

♦2* 

*3* 



NOTE: Be sure to foUow each 
line with a carriage return. 

At this point, save your file as you 
would any other. 



10 



MINI-MAG 99 March, 1985 



MINI-MAG 99 March, 1985 



11 



PRINTING THE ENVELOPE 

If your printer only works on 
tractor feed, there are envelopes 
available at computer supply stores 
with the continuous forms. 

If you are using individual 
envelopes, you will have to hand 
feed them, so be sure to answer "Y" 
to the "Pause at end of page?" 
question. 

After entering the Text Formatter 
option of the Tl-Writer menu, enter 
the name of the file, the print 
device, etc. When you are asked if 
you have a mailist, answer "Y." 
Use the filename of your value file 
when it asks for filename. 

In next month's column I will 
show you how to make three kinds 
of value files from one for use with 
variables, mailists and labels. O 





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12 



MINI-MAG 99 March, 1985 



THE CARE & FEEDING 

OF A DISKETTE 





By Stuart O. Adler 



When you first receive any new 
software package, it is important 
that you copy the disk(s) and put the 
original(s) away in a safe place (if 
the software hasn't been protected 
against you making a copy). It is 
preferable that you keep your 
originals somewhere away from 
your other computer equipment. In 
case of fire or theft, you are then 
assured of keeping a copy of your 
software so that you can resume 
operations as soon as possible. 

It is also advisable to make copies 
of your working disks once a week 
so that your data is protected. 

This is called backing up your 
disks. The back-up copy is put into 
service and the original is put away 
with your master copy. Generally, 
three cycles of back-ups are kept 
and then the oldest disks are re-used 
for the next copy. If possible, 

NEVER USE YOUR ORIGINAL 
DISK, EXCEPT IN MAKING A 
MASTER COPY. 

The following are guidelines of 
how to keep your disks in the best 
possible condition: 

1. To load a disk, remove it from its 
protective jacket. Insert the disk 
with the side you are using facing 
the right. Slide gently into place 
until you hear a click. Gently 
close the door lever. 

2. ALWAYS place the disk back 
into its protective envelope after 
use. NEVER place your fingers 

, or thumb on the disk through the 
window slot exposing the 
magnetic surface. 



3. DO NOT leave the disk lying 
around. Dirt, dust, or stains on 
the disk could cause the loss of 
data. Never leave the disk lying 
on the video unit or near an elec- 
tronic motor, since the presence 
of a magnetic field may also 
cause loss or scrambling of data. 
If you have a magnetic paper clip 
dispenser, KEEP IT AWAY 
from the disks for the same 
reason. 

4. DO use a FELT-TIP pen to make 
any notes on the label of the 
disk. Using a ballpoint pen or 
pencil could damage the diskette 
inside the envelope. 

5. NEVER load the diskette with 
the disk drive power off. 

6. NEVER remove the diskette 
from the disk drive compartment 
with the red "busy" light on. 

7. ALWAYS remove the disk 
before turning off the power. 
Never leave the disk in the disk 
drive with the power off. 

8. Preserve the disks by storing 
them at 10 to 52 degrees Cen- 
tigrade or from 40 to 125 degrees 
Fahrenheit. D 




MINI-MAG 99 March, 1985 



13 



: 9 



Teas* Instruments Tt-9&4A - COMPUTERS. COMPONENTS AHD SOFTWARE 




INTRODUCTORY SPECIAL 



America's Number One TI computer retailer 



Proudly Introduces 






i 



ON CASSETTE OR DISKS 

- Never Before Pricing! 



APAdventure 




erws 



Vi6^^ For the Texas Instruments Home Computer . . . by SCOTT ADAMS 



ATTENTION TI OWNERS ', 

Bv special arrangement with Texas Instruments 
and Adventure International . TEX-COMP is now 
able to offer the entire 12 volume series of Scott 
Adam's Adventure for the TI-99 4A Home 
Computer. At a special package price of only 
$49.95 f you are saving hundreds of dollars off 
of the original suggested retail price for these 
adventures when purchased separately. The 
Scott Adams Adventure Series has been 



produced for every major brand of home and 
personal computer and is recognized as the lead- 
ing name in adventure gaming. 

If you are tired of shooting down aliens or 
running around mazes, then the intellectual chal- 
lenge that comes with adventure gaming, may be 
waiting for you. No special equipment other than 
the TI-99/4A for 99 y 4) console and a tape re- 
corder or disk drive storage capability. You just 
insert the TI Adventure Module" into the 



console and load the particular game you want 
to play from cassette or disk. You will rmme- 
diately be transported to another time and place 
where two word commands allow you to mani- 
pulate objects and perform acts just as if you 
were actually there. The object of each game is 
as varied as the games themselves and to win 
the game you must complete it. This may take 
hours, days or even months. Like a good novel 
you can lay it down and then continue where 



you had left off. The program provides for 
saving the game on cassette or disk and then 
recalling it. 

TEX-COMP has made getting into TI ad- 
venturing inexpensive and exciting. If you are 
ready for adventuring then TEX-COMP is ready 
for you with complete supporting products such 
as the Ti Adventure Command Module at only 
$6.95. and the Official Scott Adams Adventure 
Hint Book at only $7.97. 



THE ADVENTURES . . . 



#1 AOVENTURELANO — W*n<j#f through an enchanted realm and try to 
utcover ina 13 fctsi treasures. There are wild aftimer* ano magical beings 
to reckon with as w*i a* many other perils sod mysteries This is tn« 
Adams Classic that sianed il aiH f>tttcutly Laval: Moderaie 

#2 HPtATE ADVENTURE — Only by exploring this suange island will you 
oe able to uncover the Chios necesaery 10 lead you to yom etouve goal — 
recovering the 10*1 treasures 0< Long John Silver D*f*»cuHy Level. Beginner 

0% ADVENTURE #3 — In this excrimg Adveniute. time is or ihe essence 
as you race Ihe clock to compters your m*ssion m lime — or else the 
worlds lirst automated nuclear reactor is doomed > H you survive ihi$ chat* 
lengwg missMMi. consider yourself * Ifue Adventurer' Difficulty Level. 
Advanced 

#4 VOOOOO CASTLE — The Count has fallen victim to a fiendish curse 
placed on h*m by hn enemws There he lies, with you his only possible 
hope. Will you puH o« a rescue, or is he really down tor the Count" 
Oifncurty Level. Moderate 

#fi TM€ COUNT — it oegm* when you awake ia a large brass bed in a 

castle somewhere tn Transylvania Who are you. what are you doing here 
and WHY did ihe postman deliver a botlfe of taood? DiMicuity Level 
Moderate 

#• STRANGE 0OYSS6V — Al Ihe gaia-ys run. there are rewards 

aplenty to be harvested from a long dead alien civilization, including fabu- 
lous treasures and advanced technologies 1»r beyond human ken 1 Prepare 
yourseh* for the mcredibte* Difficulty Level Moderate 

e? THE MYSTEKY FUN HOUSE — As Adventure #7 begins, you find 



yourself hopelessly lost m the middle ot a carnival k*n house While es- 
cape may elude you. one thing is very clear — you re NOT here to have a 
good time* Difficulty Level Moderate 

#• PYRAMID Of DOOM — This is an Adventure that will transport you to 
a dangerous land of crumbling turns and trackless desert wastes mio me 
PYRAMID OF DOOM! Jewels, gold — its aw here for the plundering — IF 
you can find the way Difficulty Level. Moderate 

eg GHOST TOWN — You must explore a once 'thriving mining town m 
search of the 13 hidden treasures With everything horn rattlesnakes to 
runaway horses, it Sure ain't going to be easy* includes a special bonus 
scoring system too 1 Difficulty Level: Advanced 

#10 SAVAGE ISLAND PART i — A small island hoWs an awesome 
secret — will you be able to discover it* This is the beginning of a two-part 
Adventure iThe story continue* «n SAVAGE ISLAND PART 2. 
ADVENTURE ell.) NOTE Th*s ones a toughte — for experienced Ad- 
venturers oniy( Difficulty Level Advanced 

•11 SAVAGE ISLAND PART M — The suspense begun in Adventure #10 
now comes loan mcredibte conclusion w»1h SAVAGE tSLAND PART II 1 
This Adventure requires you to have successfully finished #10. wherein 
you were given the secret password to begin this final hall NOTE ft>i 
eipenenced Adventurers only 1 Difficulty Level Advanced 

#12 G04.DEN VOYAGE — The king lies neat deatn in the royal palace 
You have only three days 10 bring back ihe elixir needed io rejuv«n«re 
him Journey through the lands ol mag*c fountains, sacred temples, slormy 
seas and go*d. go*d. GOLD* This one is for OMpe'ienced Adventurers only 1 
Diilicutty Level Advanced 



HINT BOOK 

Our hint book provides Clues and solutions to help you out of those sticky spots you have gotten into, while still enabling you io solve ttte 
Adventure yourself. So if you can't seem to gel oul of the bog. or locale the Pharoah a near), then you've come to the right place lor heip. This 
edition includes hints lor all SCOTT ADAMS Adventures 1 - 12. There is also a special section on the making ol Adventure Maps. For those that 
just want answers, there is a solution section, too. But don't worry. AH clues and solutions are specially encoded so thai the only time you can 
g«*Cli*or«i*Mri$«Mnyou««nti>i». Hint Book $r.9S 

Buy now and SAVE 



I 




TI ADVENTURE COMMAND MODULE 

This module is required to use the games advertised on this page. If you do 
not already have il, it may be purchased from TEX-COMP for only $6,95. 
Adventure Module PHM3041 $6.95 

RETURN TO PIRATE'S ISLAND 

The sequel to Pirates Adventure is now available from TEX-COMP on a self 

contained module with graphics! 

PHM3189 $11.95 

EXTRA VALUE BONUS 

WITH EACH ADVENTURE SERIES ORDER ON CASSETTE OR DISK, 

TEX-COMP IS INCLUDING THE LATEST ADVENTURE FROM 

EUROPE. . . "KNIGHT IRON HE ART\ . . WHICH SELLS FOR S9.95 

IN THE BIG TEX-COMP CATALOG . . . (REQUIRES MODULE) 





•44 J*» ha tirtH i«<l «<bn 



VISA antf MASTERCARD 
HOLDERS CALL DIRECT: 

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AUTMOMZED DEALER 



TERMS: Alt prices FOB. Los Angeles, For laatest service use 
castiMse check or money order. Add 3% ehipping and handing 
($3.00 fAJntmufiu. East ol Mississippi 4H%. (free shipping on all 
software orders over IHKLOOt* rMces and availability subject io 
change wtthom notice We reserve Ihe rfgW *o IbnH ousntrUes. 



MOTE: P»ym*ni m fi*w mutt accompany atf order*. ^Credif-Certf. 
Company Chec* or *on*y Order lot imrrtetfieJe t/Upmerrt. Person* 
checks fa*** up to 4 w**ks (o &•**. CaWorrva &<*** stftf ev*% ***** 
rax. 



14 



MINI-MAG 99 March, 1985 



MINI-MAG 99 March, 1985 



15 



TYPING TUTOR— A Review 




BITS & OTHER PIECES 



By Kimberley Anne Guest 



I know that there are alot of you 
TI users out there who love your 
computers and love to work with 
them, but isn't it a little frustrating, 
not to mention embarrassing, to sit 
at your keyboard and punch 
everything in with your two index 
fingers? 

It seems like there must be some 
way to improve your typing skills 
without going back to High School, 
right? 

I have found that Touch Typing 
Tutor, a command module program 
by Texas Instruments is a terrific aid 
for both adults and children. 

It is set up in three main 
sections: Lessons, Diagnostic, and 
Game. 

LESSONS 

You are given a choice of 8 
different levels in this section, rang- 
ing from the learning of the basic 
keys to learning all the numbers and 
symbols on the TI-99/4A. 

DIAGNOSTIC 

The three subsections within this 
part of Typing Tutor are: WPM 
(word per minute) Timing, 
Analysis, and Practice. 

WPM Timing 

The screen displays a sentence or 
a combination of sentences for you 
to type in. When you have com- 
pleted this section, you are given the 
number of errors that you made, as 
well as your wpm timing. 

Analysis 

After you are given a combina- 
tion of letters, numbers, and/or 
symbols, you type them in. When 



16 



you are finished with this portion, 
Typing Tutor informs you as to 
which keys you will need to practice 
more. 

Practice 

For a practice session, several 
keys are displayed on the screen, 
one at a time. Your task is 
simple: type in the keys as they are 
shown. 

GAME 

This is my favorite part! 

Again, you are given the choice as 
to which level you wish to try. Then, 
as an airplane (which is flying across 
the screen from left to right) passes 
over a little cloud, it leaves a word 
from the Lessons inside the cloud. 
As soon as you see a word, you 
must type it in correctly to make it 
disappear. 

There is, however, a "catch" to 
this task: If the airplane (on its next 
flight over that cloud) finds the 
word is still there, it counts as an 
error. The plane flies faster, and the 
words become more difficult as the 
play continues. You must avoid 
allowing three errors to occur con- 
secutively, because, at that point, 
the game ends. 

Typing Tutor's game is not only 
challenging (and nerve-racking, at 
times), but it will help you to build 
up your speed. 

My overall view of Typing Tutor? 
It's an excellent tool for learning. 
And it may be just what you need to 
stop the two-fingered farse! □ 



MINI-MAG 99 March, 1985 



By Jim Labriola 




Over the past 30 years, computers 
have helped man to achieve goals in 
many aspects of life — from the 
home, to running businesses, to 
developing new devices and 
medicines. 

Most often, the developments 
made in human achievements are 
done first on computers, whether 
preconceived and refined on the 
computer or developed from 
parameters given to the computer. 

In this article, and articles to 
follow, we will try to build an 
understanding of computer logic 
and digital technology. 

From the beginning, a method of 
turning pertinent information into 
electronic information was needed. 

With the inception of Univac, a 
gigantic vacuum tube computer, it 
was conceived that either a signal of 
predetermined voltage, or no signal, 
in a certain amount of time would 
represent information. 

These signals were called "bits" 
of information, and all information 
was to be broken down and used in 
this manner. 

In digital logic, a "one" (1) or a 
"zero" (0) is used to represent an on 
or off signal in the bit's format. 
This numerical format is referred to 
as the Base Two Number System. 
There are no two's (2's) in Base 
Two, because in our everyday 
system, Base Ten, a two is equal to 
"ten" (10). 

Strings of ones and zeros are read 
by computers as numerical words. 
Different types of computers may 



use different numerical word 
lengths — from four-bit words to 
32-bit words. The TI-99/4A uses 

16-bit words. 

Eight (8) bits is equal to a byte. A 
32-bit computer uses words that are 
4 bytes wide. The TI-99/4A is a 
16-bit computer and uses words that 
are 2 bytes wide. A four-bit word is 
called a nibble. 

If a computer is said to have a 
capacity of 16K (as is the 
TI-99/4A), it means that there is a 
memory capacity of 16,000 bytes. 

Small computers are called 
microprocessors and were designed 
to personalize the mainframes. The 
Microprocessors use basically the 
same logic process as the larger 
mainframes, except that they have 
limitations as to work and storage 
capacity. 

For example, a microprocessor 
may range from 8K to 64K (with 
some going as high as S12K), and a 
mainframe may start its storage 
capacity at 512K and go up from 
there. 

With recent developments, the 
once "not so capable" 
microprocessor is fast approaching 
the mainframe's capabilities. 

Next month, we will discuss the 
terminology used to refer to the 
different part^ of the 
microprocessor. 

You are given a choice of eight 
different levels in this section, rang- 
ing from the learning of the basic 
keys to learning all the numbers and 
symbols on the TI-99/4A. □ 



MINI-MAG 99 March, 1985 



17 



A LOOK AT MINI-WRITER 



By Leslyn Tepper 



Mini- Writer is a cassette-based, 
easy-to-use word processor that 
works with the Mini-Memory 
Module and an optional printer. 

Mini-Writer was authored by 
W.R. Moseid, who says that 9500 + 
characters can be stored in the 
console. 

Much like Tl-Writer, Mini- Writer 
uses a "window" display of three 
(3) overlapping windows. Its files 
are compatible with those of TI- 
Writer and the Editor /Assembler 
(Dis/Var 80) and are, therefore, 
capable of being edited by either of 
them. 

There are, however, several dif- 
ferences between Mini- Writer and 
TI- Writer. One is that the tabs are 
preset at 8-column intervals. 

Another preset function is the bell 
which rings when you reach column 
75 (of the 80-column line) to let you 
know that you are about to 
approach the end of the line. This 
function is set up to provide the user 
with a chance to hyphenate or 
change to the next line, since there is 
no "word-wrap" function in this 
program. 

Both of these preset functions can 
be changed, and the publisher will 
give you the information as to how 
to change them if you get in touch 
with them. 

There are up to 1 19 lines usable in 
Mini-Writer (that's about two pages 
long). The last line (120) must be left 
blank to allow for room for the 
"move" and "copy" functions. 

The "move" function is really 
unique in Mini- Writer. It was made 
to be used with complete ease, while 



the screen tells the user to move the 
cursor to the beginning of the copy 
that is to be moved, then to the end 
of the copy to be moved, then to the 
position at which the copy should be 
placed. 

Instead of giving specific file 
commands as in Tl-Writer, Mini- 
Writer uses Control keys for these 
commands (i.e., Control 1 for Save; 
Control 2 for Load, etc.). 

The "search" command will 
search for up to an 80-character 
string, placing the cursor at the 
beginning of the string when it is 
found. 

To print hard copy, the user sim- 
ply uses the "save" command and 
indicates the device to which the 
copy should be saved. For instance, 
RS232, PIO, DSK, CS, etc. 

Mini-Writer comes with full 
screen text editing. 

You can take a blank overlay that 
you received when you got your 
TI-99/4A console, and mark the 
respective boxes with the commands 
that they perform with either the 
Control key (row with red dot to the 
right) or the Function key (row with 
the grey dot to the right). The 
author of Mini- Writer suggests that 
instead of writing on the blank 
overlay, you should use rub-on let- 
ters (available at most art stores or 
stationers), and then, cover the 
overlay with magic transparent 
tape. Finally, trim the excess tape 

with an X-Acto knife. 
Moseid states, "Mini-Writer is 

like putting 10 pounds in a one- 
pound bag!" The retail price is 
$19.95.0 




18 



. Tem» M 
Instruments 






i 



TEX^COMP 

America's Number One TEXAS INSTRUMENTS dealer- 

Proudly Introduces 

A COMPLETE IM PRICE 



*Vft 



■.*' 



l-.-il 



For the Texas Instruments Home Computer 

I 

i 

TEX-COMP now offers the first professional quality word processing available for the T1-99/4A 
equipped with only a cassette recorder. The MINI-WRITER Cassette Program makes use of the extra 
memory power of thef I MINt-MEMORY Command Module. Now you have the full power of professional 
wordprocessing without the need for a disk drive or memory expansion. By adding the new axiom printer 
which requires no RS232 interface, low cost quality printing on plain paper (not sub-standard thermal 
paper) can be combined for a complete word processing system at a very modest cost. 



Mmr»Writ«r 



to 



** 



ii «it-mi 



CUftlHI MtHlU 



«*«ft 



S-1 



*+*/££** 



//'^>,< 



MM>* 



-. tfC&iJ* * 



X 



HINI-MEMQRY 



IINI-WRI 
SYSTEH T0TALW44 



Two-year 

warranty 

Graphics 
capabilities 

AXIOM 

Printer, Griam 

(no interface required) 

SPECIAL 

Add $50 to Upgrade to Axiom 550 or 
GLP Models. 



Ho Mora EraaJng, 

StrffcMwrt or 

MM«y Correcting Fluids! 



DESCRIPTION: A "MINI" Word Processor which features; 
Full Screen Text Editing: 24 x 40 Character "Window" ,80 Character Line; 
9500 Characters Storeo Per Fife; Add/Delete Characters or Unes; 
Movable Copy; Upper and Lower Case Characters; Save or Load To or 
From Any Storage Device Print Via the Printer 

Searches for Desired Information; Scroll's Screen (Up, Down, Left, Right). 
Purges Text Buffer and Has Cancel Commands. TI-MINIWRITER 
is Designed to Load from Cassette Into the Mini-Memory 
Cartridge. J^_ 

Makes Report and Letter Writing Easy and Fast. dfik/^'V* 

Low Cost to Consumer for Word Processing Capability. ^wfc » *t 

Easy to Learn and Use ffam 

SPECIAL Buy the Entire System (3 Pieces) and We Include FREE Ship. & Ins. 
(UPS Only), A FREE TI Dual Cassette Cable and h Starter Pack of Printer Paper. 
A $40.00+ Retail Value! 



MINI-MAG 99 March, 1985 



Add 3% SH&I and 4.5% W of Miss. ($3.00 mln). All 
orders subject to current availability. We reserve the 
right to limit quantities. Send $2.00 for our new 99/4A 
30-page catalog and buyers guide. Visit our 
warehouse outlet. Call (818) 366-6631 for hours. 



Send Order* To.' 

TEX+COMP- 

P. \ O. BOX S3Q84 1 
GRANADA HILLS, CA 91344. 



\mm4MAiTB&m 

Haumcmmtcr: 

i 

i 

AJI Prices Reflect a 3% Discount for Cash 
Add 3% If Paying By Credit Card 



NOTE- Payment In full must accompany ail orders. Credit Card, Company Check or Money Order for Immediate 
snipment. Persona* Checks Require up to 4 Weeks to Clear. California orders add 6.5% sales tax. 



MINI-MAG 99 Mareh, 1985 



19 



TEX^COMP 

Tl Utllf SUtVtT 

PRESENTSi 



DRAW 'N PLOT® 
CHART MAKER® 



DATABASE 99® 

For the Texas Instruments Home Computer . . 
FROM QUALITY 99 SOFTWARE 

Now get more out of your 
TI 99/4A Home Computer 



DRAW 'N PLOT® 



^\ 



v: 



V* 



V, 



Now you can draw any Image on the screen with PIXEL accuracy and assembly language SPEED. 
You can also save any image or drawing you create to disk and read it into another program. Mix 
any combination of text and graphics, specify background and line colors. PRINT any image from 
the screen on an EPSQN or GEMINI 10x compatible printer. This Is the ultimate TI-S9MA screen 
dump program! !i Lets you use your screen or printer like a expensive plotter, with plotting com- 
mands. Create and print drawings, graphs, designs, and Illustrations. The only limitation is your 
imagination. 

Requfr**: Disk Drive, 32K, EX-BASIC ft JOYSTICK $39.95 pOST pSlQ 



/ 

i 



V 



U , 



CHART MAKER® 



This Is an accessory program for use with the new "Draw 'N Plot" program. Lets you quickly and 
easily create graphs and charts from ordinary figures. Produces both screen dispiays and printed 

copies- 



Menu driven 



$19.95 



(postpaid) 



DATABASE 99® 



The Database Manager 



At Last I A fast flexible, friendly DataBase Management Program for the TI-99MA. Quality 90 soft- 
ware has created this ail new program which contains everything you ever wanted from Tl f s per- 
sonal record keeping but couldn't have due to memory limitations. Now you can create records 
with up to 28 fields with up to 28 characters each. You can sort on any field and print any field In 
any column on any line. Very, very fasti Store 360 records on a single density disk or 1400 records 
on a DD/DS disk. Can be expanded to multiple drives! Create custom mail lists, keep track of 
collections, appointments, reservations etc. Finally, high powered Data Base Management can be 
yours on a TI-99/4A. Requires; Disk, 32K, EX.BASIC *Oft AC 

$39-95 POSTPAID 

Ail hardware required to run these programs and Extended Basic are available from TEX-COMP at 
the lowest possible prices!!! 



SEND ORDER AND MAKE CHECKS PAYABLE TO: 



\ 



TEX^COMP 



Mill 



*OkOtmCMl*MCt: 

(•18) 3664631 



P.O. BOX 33064— GRANADA HILLS, C A 91344 

NOTE: 

Payment in fuFt must accompany all orders. Credit Card, Company 
Check or Money Order for immediate shipment. Personal checks re- 
quire up to 4 weeks to clear. California orders add 6 1 A% sales tax. 
When in the Los Angeles area visit our modern warehouse outlet store 
where you can purchase all Tl Hems at our regular discount prices. Call 
for location a hours! 

Send $2.00 for our new 99/4A 30-page catalog & buyer's guide. 



All prices reflect a 3% discount 
for cash. Add 3% if paying by 
Oedit Card. 



"CONTINENTAL US ONLY 



MINI-MAG 99 March, 1985 



99 PUZZLE OF THE MONTH 



G N I N W S 


H C A S S 


ETTEJLFOW 


Q J N Y R E 


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H M L, T H H 


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M N A L P I 


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C K W D O C 


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P W E L E S E I A 


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TERMGMWWD 
CASSETTE 








BASIC 
PASCAL 
FORTH 
PLATO 


DIRECTIONS 






MULTIPLAN 
TIWRITER 


There are 20 words hidden in the 




MODULE 


above puzzle. You may : 


find them 




■» ■" ^ ^i^ ™ ^ ^ta^ ^^^ ^^^ 

PRINTER 


horizontally, vertically or 


diagonal- 




CONSOLE 


ly, and they may be either frontward 




DISK 


or backward. 






PEBOX 


The word list is at the right. 




HARDWARE 


Check each one off as you locate it 




SOFTWARE 


in the puzzle. Good luck! 






PERIPHERALS 
MINIMEMORY 






MINIMAG 








COMPUTER 








MODEM 








JOYSTICK 



MINI-MAG 99 Marc., 1985 



21 



T ID- BYTES 

TO WET 

YOUR APPETITE 




DataBioTics Plans for '85 



RENOIR 

A company spokesman from 
DataBioTics, Inc., a Southern 
California based corporation, told 
us about the companies' plans to 
release several new products for the 
TI-99/4A sometime in the first 
quarter of 1985. 

The first of these new products is 
a cartridge called, "Renoir," which 
includes a 64K memory and a menu- 
driven choice of either FORTH or 
RENOIR. This version of FORTH 
is supposed to work with "blinding 
speed," according to the 
spokesman. The RENOIR portion 
of the cartridge will work with 
Mouse and Joystick to create 

graphics. 

RENOIR will have the ability to 

save graphics to any desired device 
(RS232, PIO, DSK, TP, etc.). It is 
hoped that the unit, which plugs in- 
to the front of the computer like any 
other command module, will cost 
$99.95,.' " , 

MINI-WRITER I 

Mini-Writer I is a cassette-based 
word processor that is to be used 
with Mini-Memory. There will be no 
joyprint interface in this program; 
however, DataBioTics spokesman 
said, "Mini-Writer I wiU use the 
same formatting that Tl-Writer 
does, with all codes on the screen." 



y 



"The added attraction to this 
word processor, though, is the use 
of the 32 ASCII codes to direct the 
printer to do whatever the user 
wants — underscore, bold print, 
compressed print, expanded, etc." 

The planned price for this prod- 
uct is $19.95. 

MINI-WRITER II 

Another planned module is Mini- 
Writer II, a combination of Mini- 
Memory and Mini-Writer. It is a 
word processor in a single cartridge. 
This will be closer to Tl-Writer in 
performance and will sell for $39.95 

MINI- WRITER III 

Mini-Writer III, like Mini-Writer 
II, will contain all of the same ad- 
vantages, plus, on the front of the 
cartridge is a 16-pin connector for 
direct printer hook-up. The 
DataBioTics spokesman calls this 
module, "a word processor in a 
can." The planned price is $99.95. 

SUPER DISK 

Now, let's move from the module 
portion of the TI-99/4A into the 
PEB (Peripheral Expansion Box). 
Here, DataBioTics is planning to 
release a new product called, 
"Super Disk." According to the 



22 



MINI-MAG 99 March, 1985 



spokesman, Super Disk is a card to 
be inserted like any other card in the 
PEB. To the system, this card will 
appear to be a disk controller; 
however, in reality, the card will 
contain 64K of memory expansion, 
with the option of adding more 
memory to it in 64K increments, up 
to 5T2K total. 

The "workshed" portion of 
Super Disk will include several func- 
tions—Catalog, BLoad, BSave, 
PEEK, POKE, etc. Within the 

utilities section, the user will have a 
Disk Manager, Sorter, Screen 
Dump, ability to move memory and 
write to VDP and more. 

Super Disk uses advanced 
technology to afford the ability of 
obtaining 512K on a 5" x 7" card. 
The price? At the time of this 
writing, the price has not been set. 

However, the company hopes to 
offer Super Disk with 128K for 
under $300. 

4A/TALK 

4A/Talk is a diskette-based ter- 
minal emulator that will use Baud 
rate 110/2400. 

DataBioTics is planning to in- 
clude three (3) separate and distinct 
protocals: 

1. X-Modem 
Allowing the user to 
up and down load from 
any CP/M data base. 

2. TE II 

Allowing the user to 
connect to DEC (Digital 
Equipment Corporation) 
Computer. 

3. KERMIT 

At no additional charge. 

The cost of 4A/TALK will be 
under $35.00. 



4 A /PAINT 

According to DataBioTics 
spokesman, "Look out PC Jr. 
Paint I" This disk-based program 
will do everything PC Jr. Paint does 
& more, with less memory consump- 
tion (under 50K, currently). 

"You can save your graphics to 
disk and call them back in from the 
keyboard anytime." 4A/ Paint will 
interface with Mouse and track ball. 
The plan is to sell 4A /Paint for 
$69.95. 

PILOT 

DataBioTics' educational release 
will be, "Pilot," a disk containing 
the high-level language referred to 
as PILOT. It is a language which 
enables teachers who are not really 
that familiar with computer pro- 
gramming to prepare computer- 
aided instruction by use of only 7 or 
8 commands. Not only a language, 
this disk also works as a compiler, 
compiling the PILOT into machine 
language. The result: high-speed 
processing. Pilot will be priced 
reasonably at under $50. 




EDITOR'S NOTE 

It is our hope that these products 
not only go through the planning 
stage, but come to fruition. The 
99 /4A could use a real boost like 
this! 



If you know of any plans for new 
products, send details to: 

S.O.S. Publishers 

Product News 
21777 Ventura #203 
Woodland Hills, CA 91364 



MINI-MAG 99 March, 1985 



23 



CORCOMP 

Continued from Page 7 

toward their job and the future of 
CorComp. New engineer expertise is 
being brought on board. Revitaliz- 
ing imagination and strategy are be- 
ing introduced by new engineers and 
management. Our distributors are 
standing behind us and have con- 
tinued to work with us and make 
sure the99er's can fulfill their com- 
puting expectations. 

"We at CorComp are grateful for 

our third chance and promise quali- 
ty products, professional support 
services and innovative ideas for the 



future of the 99 /4A loyalist. We are 
looking optimistically towards our 
second year anniversary and wish to 
offer a premature Thank You to all 

99er's." 

According to Jackirae Sagouspe, 
president of CorComp, the 9900 
Micro Expansion System is well into 
production, with'many units already 
sent to distributors. Even though 
there have been delays from time to 
time in obtaining parts from their 
suppliers, CorComp is completing 
production. D 




EDUCATION 
FROM NAVARONE 



HOMEWORK HELPER, by 

Navarone Industries of Sunnyvale, 

California, was designed to make 

homework fun, while developing 

basic computer skills. 
An educational program for 

children 8 years and older, 
Homework Helper features a built- 
in 20,500 word spelling checker dic- 
tionary to identify spelling errors. 

According to Navarone, it is a 
simple-to-use tool for improving 
study habits, written work quality, 
and planning class assignments. 

Homework Helper contains a 
word processor which includes stan- 
dard format book reports and class 
projects. This software uses the 
Peripheral expansion features of the 
TI-99/4A. 



Navarone's SPEED READING 
was designed to improve reading 
speed and comprehension. Versions 
are available for both children and 
adults. 

This program comes complete in 
a cartridge, no additional 
peripherals or memory are required; 
however, special features can be 
used if a disk drive is available. 

The program provides extensive 
practice in taking in more print, 
faster. Included with the cartridge is 
a complete workbook. 

Both Homework Helper and 
Speed Reading sell for $49.95 and 
can be found at most distributors. 




f 




*' 



24 



MINI-MAG 99 March, 1985 



P-CODE PROBLEMS 

We have heard that several users 
of the P-Code card have had prob- 
lems with the card "burning out,*' 
and sometimes affecting other cards 
in the box. W.R. Moseid says, "The 
P-Code card does generate the most 
heat of any card." 

There is, however, a solution to 
the problem. Moseid says, "To 
obtain the needed adequate ventila- 
tion, remove the fan from the 
expansion box and replace it with a 
fan from the TI Professional com- 
puter. This fan not only moves more 
air, but also runs much quieter." 

Mr. Moseid also suggests another 
method of quieting the existing fan 
in the PEB. He says, "simply cut a 
circle out in the PEB and place a 
wire shield in the hole." 

RUMORS ABOUND 

Myarc, Inc., in Basking Ridge, 
New Jersey has a limited number of 
hard disks for the 99/4A. These 
disks contain 10 mega bytes and a 
clock option. They cable to a per- 
sonality card which connects to the 
PEB. To take advantage of full 
capabilities, the user should have 
Extended Basic. Price is set at 
$895 .00/ each. 

It is also rumored that Myarc may 
be manufacturing a new cost- 
reduced hard disk. If anyone is in- 
terested, you should call or write to 

Myarc. 



ISOBAR POWER LINE 
FILTER 4/6 

Suppresses spikes, transients, 

radio frequency 

interference (RF1) on 

power line, and electro 

magnetic interference (EMI). 

4 Sockets 
6-Foot Cord 

REG. $79.00 
SALE $69.00 

Send Check or Money Order to: 

Adler Computer Technology 
21777 Ventura Blvd., Suite 228 

Woodland Hills, CA 91364 
(818) 703-0350 

Allow 14 additional days for 
clearance of personal checks. 



MINI-MAG 99 March, 1985 



FREE BBS 

According to Terry Atkinson and 
Paul Degner of Canada, there is a 
database on a Canadian Network 
called DATAPAC. The database is 
called UMBBS and is maintained by 
Mafk Evans of the University of 
Manitoba's Computer Science 
Department. 

UMBBS is featured as a multiple 
board BBS which rivals the Source 
as being multi-user capable. 

Currently, this is a free system, 

but due to the cost factor, there may 

eventually be a yearly membership 

charge and /or a fee 1 charge per call. 

The; charges, however, should be 

minimal compared to the Source or 

Coriipuserve. '■ 
You can access this database by 

either Telenet or Tymnet. I have 

received two separate access 

Continued on Page 27 



25 



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ty adapt alt or portton* to your own program*. Eacft oam* i ■ axptalnatf In ctaar aimpla lormt— *Jto*tog 
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Th* moat popular introduction to lha WMA avar publlihad. 33 atap-by-atap laatona intfoduca tha 
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$19.06 TEX^OMP prtaa l*^ 

TWE ELEMENTAL THW4A 
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both achooia and computer carnpa. Contstas sampls programa and leeeona on how to modify and 
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D GAMES TT* KAY Including caa*wtta,wlth 32 programa 

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KIDS AND THE T l * WH J to c)aaa*l !■ $AM for aach. 

THE ECEMENTABY Tl^ncToaad I* UM tor aach. 

COMPUTER PLAYGROUND ON THE TI-W4A 

Encioaad fa $1.96 for each. 
Q SHIPPING AND HANDUNO— CONTINENTAL US 
Endoaad la i2.95 for any numbar of book* up to 4. 
ADD $3.00 for HI, AK, APO. f PO A CANADA. 
NOTE: Payment In fuH muaj accompany all ordara. Credit Card, Company I 
Chech or Money Order for immadlata anipmant » 

Paraonai chacha ragutra up to 4 weeha to clear. California order* 
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Sand S2.D0 for our new 9674A 30-paga catalog A buyer** guide. 



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VhierfMMDCH. HaMi 



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26 



MINI-MAG 99 March, 1985 



NOTES 

Continued from Page 25 



numbers and, at the time of this 
writing, have still been unable to 
"hook-up." 

Terry*s instructions are as 
follows: 

If you have access to TELENET, 
get into the service by normal 
means, when you get the "@" 
prompt, type in: 

C 030209320023 3 (enter) 

If you get connected, type in: 

TLOGON UMBBS 

and follow the prompts from there. 
Paul Degner's instructions are as 
follows: 

Once you have access to either 
TELENET or TYMNET, specify 

3101 



then 



93200233 



then, finally: 

TLOGON UMBBS 

I was unable to connect with the 
instructions given by Paul; however, 



Programmer's Tool Box 

TUTOR Assembly Language Tutorial 

For your Tt $14.50 

EXAMPLES 10 Assembly Programs/ 

Utilities on disk $19,00 

DISASSEMBLER Written in Assembly 
(or Great speed. Screen, disk. 
and printer output $14.50 

PROGRAM WRITER Converts text 

tiles to basic programs $18.00 

GAME Maze Game in 

Assembiy/Basic $12.50 

UNPHOTECT Extended Basic 

Programs $3.50 

Special 

All Products tor Only $42.50 

THE SOFTIES INC. 

P.O. Box 26484 

Mpls.. MN 5S426 

612-593-9857 



MINI-MAG 99 March, 1985 



I did connect with Terry's instruc- 
tions. The furthest I got was con- 
nect, though, still being unable to 
actually log on, to UMBBS. 

Upon my last attempt, I got the 
following message: 

UMBBS has been moved to 470 .. . 
Use BLOGON UMBBS. 

When I used these instructions, I 
got the message, "ID in use,'* and 
was automatically disconnected. 

According to Terry, "This is a 
free service, and is very busy, with 
callers from all over Canada and the 
USA. If you get prompts such as 
'insufficient units' or 'user ID not 
responding' and the like, this just 
means it is BUSY, so keep trying." 



It seems that there are only 10 in- 
put lines with over 2000 users. If 
you have the time to keep trying, go 
for it ! □ 






> > \ ^^ \X t VVX\.^V\\\\\N%NV\X\V 



ANCHOR MARK XII 

MODEM 

1200/300 Baud 

• Hayes Compatible 

• Auto Answer 

• Auto Dial 

• LED Display 

• Serial Port Compatible 

• Complete with 
Connecting Cable 

ONLY $349.00 

Send Check or Money Order to: 
Adler Computer Technology 

21777 Ventura Blvd., Suite 228 

Woodland Hills, CA 91364 

(818) 703-0350 

: Allow 14 additional days for 
clearance of personal checks. 



SV\\*\SV\\V\SVXNNVVXV V \. V \_ \ 



27 



Te"^ 



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3030 
3031 
3032 
3052 
3053 
3054 

3056 

3057 
3095 
3096 
3099 
3100 
3101 
3229 

3112 



Early Learning Fun 

Beginning Grammar 

Number Magic 

Tax Investment Rec. Keeping 

Video Games 

Personal Real Estate 

Hunt The Wumpus 

Amazing 

Attack 

Btasto 

Tombstone City 

Tl Invaders 

Car Wars 

Alptner 

Munchman 

Fractions (Mill) 

Number Readyness (Mill) 

Laws of Arithmetic (Mill) 

Equations (Mill) 

Formulas (Mill) 

Hopper 

Parsec 



$495 



PHM 3042 
PHM 3041 
PHM 3114 
PHM 3115 
PHM 3118 
PHM 3119 
PHM 3169 
PHM 3034 
PHM 3037 



Tunnels of Doom {Cass, or Disk) 
Adventure (Cass, or Disk) 
Alligator Mix 
Allen Addition 
Minus Mission 
Meteor Multiplication 

Word Invasion 

Hustle 

Hangman 



Disk) 

$6 95 

in ^^^ 



$995 

PHM 3009 Football 

PHM 3010 Physical Fitness 

PHM 30t5 Early Reading (Speech) 

PHM 3043 Reading Fun 

PHM 3046 Reading On 

PHM 3047 Reading Roundup 

PHM 3046 Reading Rally 

PHM 3062 Reading Flight 

PHM 3027 Addition & Subtraction 1 

PHM 3028 Addition & Subtraction 2 

PHM 3029 Multiplication 1 

PHM 3049 Division 1 

PHM 3050 Numeration 1 

PHM 3051 Numerations 

PHM 3088 Computer Math Games 6 

PHM 3059 Scholastic Spelling 3 

PHM 3060 Scholastic Spelling 4 

PHM 3062 Scholastic Spelling 6 

PHM 3090 Addition (Mill) 

PHM 3091 Subtraction (Mill) 

PHM 3092 Multiplication (MIH) 

PHM 3093 Division (Mill) 

PHM 3094 Integers (Mlti) 

PHM 3020 Music Maker 

PHM 3067 Othello 

PHM 3064 Typing Tutor 

PHM 3220 Micro Surgeon 

PHM 3219 Super Demon Attack 



Subscribe 
Before Feb. 28, 1985 and 

SAVE $5.00 

on a 
12-month subscription 

Regularly $20.00 



FREE SHIPPING ON AU SOFTWARE ORDERS OVER F100.00* 



SEMD ORDER AND MAKE CHECKS PA YABLE TO: TV*** IflntrnwrnU 



D Yes. Please sign me up as a subscriber 
to MINI-MAG 99. 

□ Yes. I would like to take advantage of the 
special $15.00 subscription. 

(If subscribing before Feb. 28, 1985, check both boxes above.) 



Enclosed Is my payment for $ 









! 



I 



« 






I 



CHECK □ MONEY ORDER □ 



i 






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<AtiMMiM m4 



TEX*COMP 



TERMS: AH prices FOB Los Anflele*. For fastest service use 
cashiers check, or money order. Personal checka take at least ten 
days to clear. Add 3% shipping and handling ($3.00 minimum). 
East of Mississippi, 4% (free shipping on all software orders over 
$100.00). We will ship UPS COD. with 25% deposit. COD to be 
paid by cash or certified check. All products are sold with the 
original manufacturer's guarantee (sent on request). Prices and 
availability subject to change without notice. We reserve the right 
to limrt quantities. 



l(81t) 36+6631 



■ 



MOW 
MMftUM 



i r 



Payment In full must accompany all orders. Credit Card, 
Company Check or Money Order for immediate shipment. Personal 
checks require up to 4 weeks to clear. California orders add 6%% 
sales tax. 



Send $2.00 for our new 09/4A 30-page catalog & buyer's Qulde. 



MINI-MAG 99 March, 1985 




Address 



PLEASE MAKE CHECKS PAYABLE TO 



S.O.S. PUBLISHERS 

21777 VENTURA BLVD. #203 

WOODLAND HILLS, CA 91364 



s