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©ENEALCGY  COLLECTIOK 


f,Lt,f,N„|COUNTY  public  LIBRARY 


3 1833  01268  3501 


GENEALOGY 
974.9 
N421D 
v.  19 


Digitized  by  the  Internet  Archive 
in  2016 


https://archive.org/details/someaccountofame19newj 


ARCHIVES 


OF  THE 

State  of  New  Jersey. 


FIRST  SERIES. 


Vol.  XIX. 


This  volume  was  prepared  and  edited  by  authority 
of  the  State  of  New  Jersey,  at  the  request  of  the 
New  Jersey  Historical  Society,  and  under  the  direc- 
tion of  the  following  Committee  of  the  Society  : 

William  Nelson, 

Garret  D.  W.  Vroom, 
Frederick  W.  Ricord, 
William  S.  Stryker, 
Edmund  D.  Halsey. 


DOCUMENTS 

RELATING  TO  THE 

COLONIAL  HISTORY 

OF  THE 

State  of  New  Jersey, 


EDITED  BY 

WILLIAM  NELSON. 


VOLUME  XIX. 


I.  Some  Account  of  Early  American  Newspapers, 
and  Libraries  in  which  they  may  be  found. 
Part  III. — Michigan-New-Hampshire. 

II.  Extracts  from  American  Newspapers,  relating 
to  New  Jersey. 

VOL.  III.  1751-1755. 


PATERSON,  N.  J.: 

The  Press  Printing  and  Publishing  Co.,  269  Main  St. 


PREFACE. 


1136411 

The  collection  of  Newspaper  Extracts  relating  to  New  Jer- 
sey, presented  in  Volume  XI  and  Volume  XII  of  the  New  Jer- 
sey Archives,  has  met  with  such  general  favor  that  a third  Vol- 
ume is  now  issued,  and  a fourth  is  in  the  press. 

The  Extracts  herewith  given  are,  of  course,  similar  in  gen- 
eral character  to  those  contained  in  the  two  previous  Volumes. 
The  advertisements  of  runaway  servants  are  even  more  numer- 
ous, indicating  both  an  increase  in  that  class  of  population,  and 
a growing  spirit  in  favor  of  personal  liberty,  that  aided  and 
abetted  these  unfortunates  in  their  efforts  for  freedom.  They 
seem  to  have  been  better  clad  than  formerly.  It  will  be  no- 
ticed, too,  that  they  are  described  in  less  contemptuous  terms 
than  in  earlier  years.  They  are  more  varied  in  their  national- 
ity^ also. 

The  controversies  with  the  East  Jersey  Proprietors  increase 
in  number  and  bitterness,  as  the  settlers  dispute  any  title  to  land 
but  that  of  actual  possession.  The  offers  of  extensive  new 
tracts  to  purchasers  show  that  the  Proprietors  are  anxious  to 
realize  before  their  title  is  more  generally  questioned.  It  is 
apparent,  moreover,  that  the  population  is  rapidly  . increasing, 
and  seeking  new  opportunities  for  settlement.  Occasionally 
now  a house  with  “sash  windows”  is  advertised  for  sale,  and 
even  street  lamps,  so  rapid  is  the  progress  toward  hitherto  un- 
dreamed of  luxuries.  With  much  tribulation  the  line  of  “stage- 
boats”  and  “stage- waggons”  is  maintained  between  Philadel- 
phia and  Amboy. 

The  differences  between  the  people’s  representatives  in  the 
Legislature,  and  the  Royal  appointees  in  the  seat  of  Governor 
and  Council,  are  becoming  more  positive.  Men  are  groping 
darkly  toward  the  light.  “A  strict  union  among  all  his  Majes- 


VI 


PREFACE. 


ty’s  Colonies”  is  favored  by  New  Jersey,  foreshadowed  in  the 
Albany  Congress  of  1754.  The  nominal  motive  is  united  ac- 
tion against  the  French  and  Indian  aggressions.  But  the  idea 
of  a “more  perfect  union”  is  taking  root.  New  Jersey  is  en- 
thusiastically prompt  in  furnishing  men  and  money  to  resist  the 
threatened  attacks  which  presently  are  to  break  out,  in  the  Win- 
ter of  1755-56,  on  her  northwestern  frontier. 

Social  progress  is  shown  in  the  generous  space  devoted  in 
the  newspapers  of  the  day  to  the  affairs  of  the  College  of  New 
Jersey,  still  located  at  Newark.  We  have  graphic  accounts  of 
the  commencements  ; encouraging  reports  of  the  foreign  mis- 
sion of  Messrs.  Tennent  and  Davies,  who  are  to  bring  back 
messages  of  loving  sympathy,  and  substantial  financial  support. 
The  Connecticut  lottery  for  the  benefit  of  the  College  is  vigor- 
ously exploited,  but  we  are  left  in  doubt  as  to  its  pecuniary  re- 
sults. 

Other  lotteries  are  announced,  for  the  benefit  of  the  Trenton 
church;  for  the  “English  and  Grammar  School”  at  the  same 
place ; in  behalf  of  the  Bordentown  church,  and  in  other  in- 
stances simply  “for  the  promotion  of  religion  and  virtue.” 

Some  of  the  crimes  reported  have  quite  an  air  of  romance — 
not  to  say  of  romancing — about  them.  But  no  doubt  it  was 
all  too  true  that  a negro  was  deliberately  burnt  alive,  by  due 
process  of  law,  for  murder.  Wrecks  are  lamentably  frequent 
along  the  Jersey  coast,  where  light-houses  are  still  unknown. 
The  venerable  joke  appears  in  these  pages,  of  a magistrate  ap- 
portioning punishment  to  be  equally  divided  between  an  impe- 
cunious criminal  and  the  informer,  in  lieu  of  the  fine  which  the 
latter  hoped  to  share.  For  the  first  time  in  New  Jersey  we 
have  a course  of  lectures  on  surgery  announced — more  than  a 
decade  before  the  New  Jersey  Medical  Society  was  formed. 

These  are  but  a few  of  the  themes  presented  to  the  reader  in 
the  ensuing  pages.  The  student  will  find  innumerable  other 
topics  and  facts  meriting  his  attention. 


American  Newspapers  of  the  Eighteenth  Century . 
Chronology  and  History  ; Lists  of  Files , and 
Libraries  in  which  they  may  be  found. 

With  Some  Notices  of  the  First  Printing  and  the 
First  Newspaper  in  each  State. 

Part  III.  - - Michigan  - - New - Hampshire. 


ABBREVIATIONS. 


In  the  use  of  abbreviations  to  indicate  the  libraries  in  which 
certain  files  are  to  be  found,  any  arbitrary  or  conventional  sys- 
tem has  been  avoided.  The  customary  abbreviations  are  em- 
ployed to  signify  names  of  States ; where  they  are  used  alone, 
the  meaning  is  that  the  files  are  in  the  State  Library.  The  let- 
ters “ H.  S.”  added,  indicate  the  Historical  Society  called  by 
the  name  of  the  State.  It  will  be  noticed  that  in  the  follow- 
ing table  the  letter  “ L.”  stands  for  “ Library,”  and  u S.”  for 
“ Society.” 

A.  A.  S. — American  Antiquarian  Society. 

B.  A. — Boston  Athenaeum. 

B.  P.  L. — Boston  Public  Library. 

C.  H.  S.  or  Conn.  H.  S. — Connecticut  Historical  Society. 

Essex  Inst. — Essex  Institute,  Salem,  Mass. 

H.  U. — Harvard  University  Library. 

L.  C. — Library  of  Congress. 

L.  C.  P. — Library  Company  of  Philadelphia. 

L.  I.  H.  S. — Long  Island  Historical  Society. 

L.  L. — Lenox  Library. 

Mass. — Massachusetts  State  Library. 

Mass.  H.  S. — Massachusetts  Historical  Society. 

Md.  H.  S. — Maryland  Historical  Society. 

Me.  H.  S. — Maine  Historical  Society. 

N.  — Library  of  William  Nelson. 

N.  E.  H.  G.  S. — New  England  Historic  Genealogical  Society. 

N.  J. — New  Jersey  State  Library. 

N.  J.  H.  S. — New  Jersey  Historical  Society. 

N.  Y. — New  York  State  Library. 

N.  Y.  H.  S. — New  York  Historical  Society. 

P.  L.  F. — Library  of  Paul  Leicester  Ford,  of  Brooklyn. 

Penn.— Pennsylvania  State  Library. 

Penn.  H.  S. — Historical  Society  of  Pennsylvania. 

S.  L. — The  Society  Library  of  New  York. 

Wis.  H.  S. — State  Historical  Society  of  Wisconsin. 

Y.  U. — Yale  University  Library. 


2 


History  of  American  Newspapers 


Michigan,1 

During  the  Revolution,  Lieutenant-Governor  Hamilton,  of  Canada, 
distributed  to  the  “Rebel  Colonists”  large  numbers  of  proclamations  dated 
Detroit,  1777.  From  this  date  it  has  been  conjectured  that  perhaps  these 
proclamations  were  printed  at  Detroit.  If  so,  they  must  have  been  print- 
ed on  a small  press  carried  with  the  army.  There  is  no  evidence  of  this, 
however,  and  there  is  every  reason  to  believe  they  were  actually  printed  at 
Quebec  or  at  Montreal. 

“The  earliest  account  of  a printing  press  in  this  region  is  contained  in 
a manuscript  letter-book  of  Alexander  & William  Macomb.  A letter  there- 
in, written  in  1785,  to  one  of  their  correspondents  at  London,  refers  to  a 
printing  press  they  have  received,  and  their  correspondent  is  reminded 
that  no  directions  have  been  sent  for  putting  it  in  working  order.” — 
Farmer. 

1809 — Introduction  of  printing. 

A press  and  type  were  brought  from  Baltimore,  in  1809,  by  the  Rev. 
Gabriel  Richard,  and  immediately  rented  or  sold  to  James  Miller.  The 
first  book  printed  on  this  press  was: 

The  Child’s  Spelling  Book,  or  Michigan  Instructor,  being 
compiled  from  the  most  approved  authors  by  a teach- 
er of  Detroit. 

Detroit , Printed  by  James  M.  Miller . 

120  Pp.  12. 

It  is  dated  August  1,  1809. 

The  same  year,  Miller  printed  a small  prayer  book  in  French: 

L’ame  penitente,  ou  la  nouveau  consideration  sur  les 
verities  eternelles,  etc.,  etc. 

Jacques  Miller , Imprimeur , Detroit , 1809. 

1 6°  Pp.  300. 

1 Authorities: 

The  History  of  Detroit,  Michigan;  or,  The  Metropolis  Illustrated.  By  Silas  Farmer. 
Detroit,  1884.  8°. 

Michigan  Pioneer  Collections. 

Outlines  of  the  Political  History  of  Michigan.  By  James  V.  Campbell,  Detroit.  8°. 


Xll 


NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS 


“A  Presentment  by  the  Grand  Jury  of  the  territory  of  Michigan,  Su- 
preme Court,  September  Term,  1809,  Against  Governor  Holt,  remitting  a 
fine,  etc.,  also  presenting  an  act  of  the  Legislature,  etc.,  etc.,  dated  Sep- 
tember 26,  1809,  Miller,  Printer,  Detroit,  was  issued  from  the  press  the 
same  year.” 

History  and  Chronology  of  Newspapers. 

1809,  August  31 — Michigan  Essay ; Or , The  Impartial 

Observer , at  Detroit,  by  James  M.  Miller. 

Printed  on  a whole  sheet,  folio  size,  four  pages,  each  9^  by  16  inches, 
four  columns  to  a page.  The  following  shows  the  arrangement  of  the 
title,  the  imprint,  etc.,  as  carefully  taken  from  a copy  in  the  library  of  the 
American  Antiquarian  Society,  at  Worcester: 

Michigan  Essay  ; 

Or,  The  Impartial  Observer. 

Detroit,  Territory  of  Michigan: — Printed  and  Published  by  James  M. 

Miller. 

Yol.  I.]  Thursday,  August  31,  1809.  [No.  I. 

In  the  upper  left  hand  column  of  the  first  page  appears  the  following: 

Terms 

of  the  Michigan  Essay. 

It  will  be  published  every  Thursday  ; and  handed  to  City  Subscribers,  at  5 dollars  per 
ann  Payable  half-yearly,  in  advance. 

Other  Subscribers,  resident  in  any  part  of  the  Territory  of  Michigan,  or  Upper  Can- 
ada, 4 dollars  and  50  cents,  delivered  at  the  Office — to  be  paid  in  advance. 

Distant  Subscribers,  who  receive  their  papers  by  mail,  4 dollars — in  advance. 

Advertisements,  not  exceeding  a square,  inserted  3 weeks  for  1 dol.  and  50  cts.  For 
every  subsequent  insertion  25  cts. 

All  advertisements  must  be  accompanied  by  the  cash. 

In  the  editorial  column  is  the  announcement: 

The  public  are  respectfully  informed  that  the  Essay  will  be  conducted  with  the  utmost 
impartiality;  that  it  will  not  espouse  any  political  party,  but  fairly  and  candidly  communi- 
cate whatever  may  be  deemed  worthy  of  information,  whether  foreign,  domestic,  or  local. 

Gentlemen  of  talents  are  invited  to  contribute  to  our  columns  whatever  they  suppose 
will  be  acceptable  and  beneficial  to  the  public,  yet  always  remembering  that  nothing  of  a 
controversial  nature  will  be  admissible. 

So  far  as  ascertained  only  one  number  of  this  paper  was  ever  issued, 
and  only  five  copies  of  that  number  are  known  to  be  in  existence.1 

1 The  statement  has  been  widely  published  that  the  title  of  this  paper  was:  “Essai  du 
Michigan,  ou  Observateur  Impartial,”  and  that  it  was  mainly  in  French,  with  an  English 
department.  As  a matter  of  fact,  only  a column  and  a half,  or  one-tenth  of  the  paper,  was 
in  French,  and  the  title  was  in  English,  as  given  above,  in  the  text.  It  is  not  unlikely  that 
Father  Richard,  in  writing  to  some  French  brother,  may  have  given  a French  translation 
of  the  title. 


HISTORY  OF  AMERICAN  NEWSPAPERS. 


Xlll 


Mr.  Miller,  the  publisher,  came  to  Detroit  from  Utica,  N.  Y.,  and  died 
at  Ithaca,  N.  Y.,  in  the  spring  of  1838. 

Father  Gabriel  Richard,  a priest  of  the  order  of  St.  Sulpice,  came  to 
Detroit  in  1798,  as  resident  pastor  of  the  Roman  Catholic  Church  of  St. 
Anne.  He  compiled  and  published  some  religious  and  educational  works 
for  his  own  flock,  and  selections  for  reading  from  French  authors.  He 
was  a man  of  fine  education  and  strong  character,  liked  and  respected  by 
all  classes.  He  was  early  an  officer  of  the  University  (organized  about 
1818),  also  a professor  therein.  He  was  elected  the  third  delegate  to 
Congress,  from  Michigan,  in  1823;  he  died  in  1833. 

In  1812,  while  Detroit  was  held  by  the  British,  Judge  Campbell,  of 
the  Court  of  King’s  Bench,  in  Upper  Canada,  holding  the  assizes  at  Sand- 
wich, addressed  to  the  Grand  Jury  a charge,  wdiich  that  body  caused  to  be 
printed  by  Theophilus  Mettez.  He  was  a private  in  Capt.  Antoine  De- 
quindre’s  company,  mustered  in  June  21,  1812,  for  five  months,  and  sur- 
rendered at  Detroit,  Aug.  16,  1812,  to  Gen.  Hull.  He  printed  “Some 
Acts”  of  the  Michigan  Legislature  in  1816.  Subsequently  he  kept  a 
butcher  stall  in  the  Detroit  market. 

1817,  July  25. — The  Detroit  Gazette , at  Detroit,  by  Sheldon 
& Reed. 

This  was  the  second,  but  the  first  permanent,  newspaper  published  in 
Michigan.  It  was  printed  on  a folio  sheet,  four  pages,  each  9^x16^ 
inches,  three  columns  to  the  page,  and  was  issued  weekly.  In  recognition 
of  the  mixed  population  of  the  country,  one  page  was  in  French,  and  the 
other  three  in  English.  The  subscription  price  was  $4  a year  to  city  sub- 
scribers, and  $3.50  to  those  out  of  town.  In  the  issue  for  July  14,  1820,  it 
was  stated  that  the  paper  had  152  subscribers,  only  90  of  whom  had  paid, 
and  that  not  a single  advertisement  had  been  paid  for.  In  July,  1828,  it 
was  leased  to  H.  L.  Ball  for  nine  years,  and  John  B.  Sheldon  became  ed- 
itor, being  succeeded  in  April,  1829,  by  Ebenezer  Reed.  The  last  number 
was  issued  April  22,  1830.  The  establishment  was  destroyed  by  fire  four 
days  later. 

1825,  May  10. — The  Michigan  Herald , at  Detroit,  by  H. 
Chipman  and  Joseph  Seymour. 

This  paper  was  continued  until  April  30,  1829. 


XIV 


NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS. 


Minnesota.1 

1849 — Printing  introduced  at  St.  Paul. 

History  and  Chronology  of  Newspapers. 

1849,  April  27. — Minnesota  Register , at  Cincinnati,  by  A. 
Randall  and  John  P.  Owens. 

The  first  steps  to  commence  the  publication  of  a newspaper  in  Minne- 
sota were  taken  in  August,  1848,  by  Dr.  A.  Randall,  then  an  attache  of 
Dr.  Owen’s  Geological  Corps,  engaged  in  a survey  of  this  region  by  order 
of  Government.  The  project  grew  out  of  the  celebrated  “Stillwater  Con- 
vention” of  that  year.  It  was  this  political  event  which  first  suggested  to 
the  mind  of  Dr.  Randall  that,  if  there  was  to  be  a Territorial  organization 
there,  whether  it  be  a new  Territory,  or  the  rightful  inheritor  of  the  aban- 
doned Territorial  government  of  that  State — it  would  be  necessary  to  have 
a newspaper.  Having  the  capacity  and  means  to  undertake  the  enterprise, 
he  set  about  it,  and  was  promised  ample  aid  by  leading  men  of  the  Terri- 
tory. Randall  soon  after  proceeded  to  Cincinnati,  which  was  at  that  .time 
his  home,  to  purchase  his  press  and  material,  designing  to  return  that  fall. 
Winter  set  in  unusually  early  that  year,  however,  and  he  found  navigation 
would  be  closed  before  he  could  do  so.  Meantime  he  concluded  to  await 
ihe  issue  of  the  bill  to  organize  the  Territory,  which  had  been  introduced 
into  Congress,  but  did  not  finally  pass  until  the  last  day  of  the  session. 
By  this  time,  Randall,  annoyed  at  the  delays,  concluded  to  set  up  his  press 
in  Cincinnati,  and  get  out  a number  or  two  of  his  paper  there.  While  in 
Cincinnati,  he  formed  the  acquaintance  of  John  P.  Owens,2  a young  man 
engaged  in  the  printing  business,  who  had  already  imbibed  the  Minnesota 
fever  by  reading  the  debates  in  Congress  on  the  Organic  Act,  and  a part- 
nership between  them  was  the  result.  They  at  once  set  to  work  to  get  out 

1 Authorities: 

A History  of  the  City  of  Saint  Paul,  and  of  the  County  of  Ramsay,  Minnesota.  By 
J.  Fletcher  Williams.  (Collections  of  the  Minnesota  Historical  Society,  Vol.  IV.)  Saint 
Paul:  Published  by  the  Society.  1876.  8°  Pp.  475. 

Collections  of  the  Minnesota  Historical  Society,  Volume  I.  Being  a Republication 
of  the  Original  Parts  Issued  in  1850-51-52-53-56.  St.  Paul:  Ramaley,  Chavey  & Co., 
Printers,  1872.  8°  Pp.  519. 

W.  R.  Marshall,  Secretary  and  Librarian  of  the  Minnesota  Historical  Society.  MS. 

- John  Phillips  Owens  was  born  near  Dayton,  Ohio,  January  6, 1818.  His  father,  who 
was  a native  of  Wales,  died  when  John  was  seven  years  old,  and  the  latter,  during  his 
younger  years,  worked  on  a farm,  with  occasional  schooling,  until  the  age  of  15.  He  then 
attended  Woodward  College,  at  Cincinnati,  about  two  years,  when  he  concluded  to  learn 
the  printing  business,  which  he  did.  Mr.  Owens  continued  in  the  newspaper  business  in 
Saint  Paul  for  twelve  or  thirteen  years,  being  seven  years  editor  of  the  Minnesotian , a 
leading  journal  of  the  Territory. 


HISTORY  OF  AMERICAN  NEWSPAPERS. 


xv 


a number  of  their  paper,  which  was  to  be  called  the  Minnesota  Register. 
It  was  dated  “Saint  Paul,  April  27,  1849,”  but  was  rea-Uy  printed  about  two 
weeks  earlier  than  that  date,  so  as  to  reach  Saint  Paul  by  the  day  named 
for  publication. 

Mr.  Randall,  being  a man  of  unsettled  purpose  and  roving  disposition, 
caught  the  California  fever  just  at  this  juncture,  and  sold  out  his  interest 
in  the  newspaper  to  Major  Nathaniel  McLean,  of  Lebanon,  Ohio,  who 
had  determined  to  remove  to  Minnesota,  and  there  resume  the  business  of 
printing,  to  which  he  had  been  bred,  but  had  not  followed  for  some  years. 
The  publishers  and  editors,  under  this  arrangement,  became  “McLean  & 
Owens.”  As  soon  as  the  river  opened,  the  press  and  material  of  the  office 
were  shipped  to  Saint  Paul.  J.  P.  Owens  accompanied  it,  arriving  in  May. 
Maj.  McLean1  being  detained  by  illness  in  Cincinnati,  did  not  arrive  un- 
til August.  In  the  meantime,  Col.  Owens  went  to  work  to  get  the  paper 
out,  and  on  July  14,  issued  No.  2.  Capt.  E.  Y.  Shelley,  the  veteran  typo 
of  Saint  Paul,  was  foreman.  The  paper  was  printed  in  a small  office  on 
upper  Third  street.  About  this  time  The  Chronicle  had  been  started  by 
Col.  Hughes,  making  three  newspapers  in  the  little  town.  When  five  or 
six  numbers  of  the  Register  had  been  issued,  it  became  evident  that  there 
were  too  many  newspapers  in  Saint  Paul,  and,  on  the  arrival  of  Maj. 
McLean  in  August,  a consolidation  was  effected  with  the  Chronicle.  Col. 
Hughes  sold  out  and  went  to  Hudson,  Wisconsin,  where  he  died  about 
1875.  His  foreman,  S.  A.  Quay,  took  an  interest  with  McLean  & Owens 
in  the  Chronicle  and  Register.  The  first  number  of  this  paper  was  issued 
on  August  25,  from  the  Chronicle  office,  a well-printed  seven-column 
sheet.  Mr.  Quay  withdrew  after  a few  weeks,  and  left  the  Territory. 
The  paper  became  the  Whig  organ,  and  soon  had  a good  patronage  from 
that  party. 

1849,  April  28. — The  Minnesota  Pioneer , at  St.  Paul,  by 
James  M.  Goodhue. 

This  was  the  first  newspaper  printed  in  the  Territory.  It  was  a week- 

1 Nathaniel  McLean  was  born  in  Morris  county,  New  Jersey,  May  16,  1787.  He  was  a 
brother  of  John  McLean,  one  of  the  Justices  of  the  Supreme  Court  of  the  United  States. 
His  father  removed  to  Ohio  in  1789,  settling  in  Warren  county.  Nathaniel  McLean 
learned  the  printing  business  at  Cincinnati,  and,  as  early  as  1807,  published  a paper  at 
Lebanon.  In  1810,  he  was  elected  a member  of  the  Ohio  Legislature,  serving  two  or 
three  sessions.'  He  was  also  an  officer  in  the  war  of  1812.  In  the  spring  of  1849,  he  de- 
termined to  remove  to  Saint  Paul  and  embark  in  the  newspaper  business.  He  was  then 
60  years  of  age,  but  remarkably  strong  and  active.  On  November  3,  1849,  he  was  ap- 
pointed by  President  Taylor,  Sioux  Agent  at  Fort  Snelling,  which  office  he  held  until  the 
spring  of  1853.  In  the  fall  of  1855,  he  was  elected  one  of  the  Commissioners  of  Ramsey 
county.  This  was  the  last  public  office  he  held.  He  retained  his  physical  powers  almost 
unimpaired  until  a short  time  before  his  death,  when  he  was  attacked  with  cancer,  and 
suffered  greatly  before  his  end  came,  April  n,  1871 , aged  84  years.  He  was  an  honest  and 
good  man.  The  township  of  McLean,  in  Ramsey  county,  Minn.,  was  named  in  honor  of 
him. 


XVI 


NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS. 


ly,  four  pages,  four  columns  to  a page.  In  the  Pioneer  of  April  18,  1852, 
the  publisher  gave  this  graphic  account  of  the  beginning  of  his  paper: 

Thei8thdayof  April,  1849,  was  a raw,  cloudy  day.  The  steamboat  Senator,  Capt. 
Smith,  landed  at  Randall’s  warehouse,  Lower  Landing,  the  only  building  then  there,  ex- 
cept Robert’s  old  store.  Of  the  people  on  shore,  we  recognize  but  one  person  as  an  ac- 
quaintance, Henry  Jackson.  Took  our  press,  types,  printing  apparatus  all  ashore.  Went 
with  our  men  to  the  house  of  Mr.  Bass,,  corner  of  Third  and  Jackson  streets.  He  kept  the 
only  public  house  in  St.  Paul,  and  it  was  crowded  full  from  cellar  to  garret.  Mr.  Bass  was 
very  obliging,  and  did  everything  possible  for  our  encouragement.  The  next  thing  was  a 
printing  office;  and  that  it  seemed  impossible  to  obtain.  Made  the  acquaintance  of  C.  P. 
V.  Lull  and  his  partner,  Gilbert.  They  furnished  us,  gratuitously,  the  lower  story  of 
their  building  for  an  office — the  only  vacant  room  in  town — being  the  building  on  Third 
street,  since  finished  off  and  now  occupied  as  a saloon  by  Mr.  Calder.  The  weather  was 
cold  and  stormy,  and  our  office  was  as  open  as  a corn-rick  ; however,  we  picked  our  types 
up,  and  made  ready  for  the  issue  of  the  first  paper  ever  printed  in  Minnesota,  or  within 
many  hundreds  of  miles  of  it;  but  upon  search,  we  found  our  news  chase  was  left  behind. 
Wm.  Nobles,  blacksmith,  made  us  a very  good  one,  after  a delay  of  two  or  three  days. 
The  paper  was  to  be  named  “The  Epistle  of  St.  Paul,”  as  announced  in  our  prospectus, 
published  in  the  February  preceding;  but  we  found  so  many  little  Saints  in  the  Territory, 
jealous  of  Saint  Paul,  that  we  determined  to  call  our  paper  “The  Minnesota  Pioneer.” 
One  hindrance  after  another  delayed  our  first  issue  to  the  28th  of  April,  ten  days.  We 
bought  a fractional  lot  with  Dr.  Dewey ; and  on  our  half  of  it  built  the  middle  section  of 
the  building  where  the  Pioneer  office  is,  for  a dwelling  house,  and  lived  in  it  through  the 
next  year,  without  having  it  lathed  or  plastered. 

James  M.  Goodhue  was  born  in  Hebron,  N.  H.,  March  31,  1810, 
graduated  from  Amherst  College  in  1832,  studied  law,  and  entered  upon 
the  practice  of  the  profession.  Having  been  invited  to  take  the  oversight 
of  a press  in  the  lead  region  of  Wisconsin,  during  the  temporary  absence 
of  its  conductor,  he  discovered  that  he  increased  the  interest  of  the  read- 
ers in  the  paper.  From  that  time  he  began  to  pay  less  attention  to  the 
legal  profession,  and  was  soon  known  among  the  citizens  of  the  mines  as 
the  editor  of  the  Grant  County  Herald , published  at  Lancaster,  Wis. 
When  the  news  of  the  organization  of  Minnesota  Territory  was  received, 
he  resolved  to  remove  thither  and  start  a paper;  he  immediately  pur- 
chased a press  and  type,  and  as  soon  as  navigation  opened  shipped  them 
to  St.  Paul,  meantime  issuing  a prospectus  for  a journal,  which  he  pro- 
posed to  call  The  Epistle  of  St.  Patil,  but,  at  the  advice  of  some  friends 
who  objected  to  the  irreligious  tone,  changed  the  name,  before  its  first 
issue,  to  The  Minnesota  Pioneer.  He  died  August  27,  1852. 

The  Pioneer  was  issued  as  a daily  May  1,  1854,  and  has  been  contin- 
ued as  a daily  and  weekly  ever  since.  On  April  11,  1875,  it  was  consoli- 
dated with  the  Daily  Press , established  Jan.  1,  1861,  by  J.  Fletcher  Wil- 
liams, and  is  now  published  as  the  Pioneer  Press. 

The  first  book : 

Acts,  | Joint  Resolutions  and  Memorials  | passed  by  the  | 
First  Legislative  Assembly  | of  the  | Territory  of  Min- 


HISTORY  OF  AMERICAN  NEWSPAPERS. 


XVll 


nesota ; | at  its  first  session,  begun  and  held  at  St.  Paul, 
on  the  third  day  of  | September,  one  thousand  eight 
hundred  and  seventy-nine.  | Published  by  Authority  of 
the  Legislative  Assembly.  | 

Saint  Paul:  \ Printed  by  ya?nes  M.  Goodhue  and 
Nathaniel  McLean.  | 1850.  | 

Collation:  Constitution  of  the  United  States.  Acts  of  Congress. 
Laws  for  the  government  of  the  Northwest  Territory.  Act  dividing  the 
Northwest  Territory — constituting  Indiana  Territory.  Acts  setting  off 
Michigan,  Illinois,  Wisconsin  and  Iowa.  [Dated]  Minnesota  Territory, 
March  3,  1849.  Pp*  xxxvil.  [The  foregoing  was  probably  printed  out- 
side of  Minnesota]. 

Title  (as  above)  and  verso,  one  leaf.  Certificate  of  Secretary  of 
State,  Nov.  8,  1849,  and  verso,  one  leaf.  ' Acts  of  a General  Charac- 
ter, pp.  5-105.  Chap.  44,  An  act  to  incorporate  the  Historical  Society  of 
Minnesota,  approved  Oct.  20,  1849,  PP-  106-7.  Certificate  of  Secretary  of 
State,  March  4,  1850,  p.  [108].  Republication  | of  | Important  General  | 
Laws  of  Wisconsin,  | now  in  force  in  the  | Territory  of  Minnesota,  | by 
provision  of  the  organic  act.  | Saint  Paul:  Printed  by  James  M.  Goodhue.  | 
1850.  | Pp.  [io5]-i6o.  Joint  Resolutions,  pp.  161-4.  Memorials,  pp. 
165-174.  The  Explanation  of  words  and  terms  used  in  the  Statutes,  pp. 
175-180.  Index,  pp.  181-213. 

Mississippi.1 

1797  or. 1798. — Printing  introduced,  at  Walnut  Hills,  two 
miles  above  Vicksburg,  by  Andrew  Marschalk. 

The  account  of  the  introduction  of  the  art  into  Mississippi  appears  in 
the  following  letter  by  this  pioneer  printer: 

Washington,  September  2, 1837. 

Dear  Sir — The  first  press  in  Mississippi  was  a small  mahogany  one,  brought  by  me 
1 Authorities: 

Mississippi,  as  a Province,  Territory  and  State,  &c.  By  J.  F.  H.  Claiborne.  Jack- 
son,  Miss.,  1880.  Vol.  I. 

Proceedings  of  the  Mississippi  Press  Association,  from  its  organization,  May,  1866, 
to  May,  1884.  Jackson,  Miss. , 1885.  (This  well-printed  volume,  from  the  Clarion  steam 
book  and  job  printing  establishment,  contains  Chap.  24,  Vol.  IV.,  of  Claiborne’s  History, 
treating  especially  of  the  Press  of  Mississippi.) 

History  of  Mississippi,  by  Robert  Lowry  and  Wm.  H.  McCardle.  Jackson,  Miss. , 

1891. 

Natchez,  Miss.,  by  Maj.  Thomas  Grafton. 

The  precise  dates  and  detailed  descriptions  of  newspapers  are  from  copies  of  the 
papers  themselves.  The  reproduction  of  the  title  of  the  Herald  is  from  a copy  in  the  au- 
thor’s collection.  So  far  as  the  writer  is  aware  no  copies  of  the  papers  here  mentioned  are 
to  be  found  in  Mississippi. 

3 


XV111 


NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS. 


from  London,  in  September,  1790.  It  was  out  of  my  possession  for  six  years,  when  or- 
dered to  this  (then)  territory  (I  was  an  officer  in ; the  United  States  army.)  In  the  year 
’97  or  ’98, 1 regained  possession  of  it  and  obtained  a small  font  of  type — say  30  lbs., — and 
while  at  the  Walnut  Hills,  printed  a ballad,  (the  Galley  Slave.)  Great  excitement  was 
caused  in  Natchez  by  the  knowledge  of  a press  being  in  the  country,  and  strong  induce- 
ments were  held  out  for  me  to  remove  to  that  place.  Finally  I constructed  a large  press 
capable  of  printing  a foolscap  sheet,  and  printed  the  territorial  laws.  The  press  was  sold 
by  me  to  Ben.  M.  Stokes,  and  he  commenced  in  Natchez,  and  continued  some  time,  the 
Mississippi  Gazette,  on  a foolscap  sheet.  This  was  some  time  in  the  summer  of  1799;  but 
he  soon  failed. 

About  March  or  April,  1800,  a Mr.  Green,  from  Baltimore,  brought  a press  to  Natchez. 
I do  not  recollect  the  title  of  his  pajJSr  ; it  ceased  while  I was  at  the  North,  and  the  press 
fell  into  the  hands  of  James  Ferrell,  who  with  one  Moffat,  published  a paper  for  a short 
time. 

I arrived  from  Philadelphia  the  last  of  July,  1802,  and  commenced  the  Mississippi  Her- 
ald, I think  the  26th  of  July,  the  same  year.  I cannot  conveniently  lay  my  hand  on  the 
first  volume;  but  send  you,  as  a specimen  of  the  poverty  of  those  days,  a small  file  of  1803 
and  ’4.  I commenced  on  medium  but  was  reduced  for  want  of  paper,  to  cap. 

I am  yours  etc. 

Andrew  Marschalk. 

Andrew  Marschalk  was  probably  a descendant  of  an  early  settler  of 
the  same  name  in  New  York,  who  figures  in  the  annals  of  that  town  in  the 
seventeenth  century.  He  was  an  ensign  in  the  United  States  army,  and 
accompanied  the  first  detachment  of  troops  that  descended  the  river  after 
the  withdrawal  of  the  Spaniards.  The  command  landed  at  and  occupied 
Fort  Nogales,  near  where  Vicksburg  now  stands.  He  was  all  his  life  en- 
gaged in  newspapers,  often  performing  the  duties  of  publisher,  editor, 
printer  and  pressman.  He  died  at  Natchez  between  1850  and  i860.  He 
had  a son  who  was  also  a newspaper  publisher  so  late  as  1859,  editing  the 
Hempstead  Courier .1 

George  Willey,  who  lived  in  Natchez  from  1788  to  1874,  notes  in  his 
Recollections:  “A  printing  press  also  arrived  about  this  time,  and  under 
the  management  of  Andrew  Marschalk,  was  soon  engaged  in  the,  to  us, 
strange  business  of  printing  the  laws.  The  printing  press  was  a strange 
thing,  but  printed  laws  was  no  less  novel.”2  So  late  as  Feb.  5,  1802,  Gov. 
Glaiborne  complained:  “The  only  printer  in  this  Territory^  (and  he  is  a 

novice  in  the  profession)  has  been  employed,  on  high  wages,  to  print  the 
laws.  The  work  is  going  on,  but  from  the  want  of  type,  and  good  press 
and  assistance,  it  cannot  be  completed  for  several  months.”  When  the 
Legislature  met,  some  months  later,  the  printer  not  having  completed  the 
printing  of  the  laws,  Edward  Turner,  a young  lawyer,  was  employed  to 
make  a number  of  copies  in  manuscript,  and  was  paid  $36  therefor. 

The  first  book : 

Laws  | of  the  | Mississippi  Territory;  | Published  at  a 
Session  of  the  Legislature  began  in  the  | Town  of  Nat- 

1 Historical  Magazine,  I.  (January,  i860),  17.  2 Quoted  by  Claiborne,  as  cited. 

3 James  Terrell  was  appointed  printer  to  the  Territorial  Legislature  in  1802. 


HISTORY  OF  AMERICAN  NEWSPAPERS. 


XIX 


chez,  in  the  County  of  Adams,  and  | Territory  aforesaid, 
upon  the  22d  Day  of  January,  | Anno  Domini  1799,  and 
in  the  23d  Year  of  | the  Independance  of  the  United 
States  | of  America:  and  continued  by  | Adjournments 
to  the  25th  Day  | of  May,  in  the  | same  year.  | By  Au- 
thority | 

Natchez : | Printed  by  A.  Marschalk , | and  Sold 
at  the  Store  0/  Messrs.  Hunts ^ & Co.1 

Sm.  40  Pp.  (2),  ii,  2-63,  65-209. 

History  and  Chronology  of  Newspapers. 

1800,  August  1 (est.)  — The  Mississippi  Gazette , at  Natchez, 
by  Benjamin  M.  Stokes. 

The  earliest  number  known  is  Vol.  II.,  Numb.  5,  September  10,  1801. 
If  the  paper  was  issued  regularly  from  the  beginning  this  would  indicate 
that  it  first  appeared  in  August,  1800,  instead  of  in  the  summer  of  1799,  as 
stated  by  Col.  Marschalk,  writing  from  recollection  in  1837.  The  number 
just  cited  consists  of  four  pages,  each  13^x8  inches,  three  columns  to  a page, 
and  has  the  following  heading  and  announcement  of  a change  of  pub- 
lishers: 

The 

Mississippi  Gazette. 

By  Sackett  & Wallace. 

Vol.  II.  Natchez,  Tuesday  September  10th,  1801.  Num  5 

To  The  Public 

Mr.  Benjamin  M.  Stokes,  the  late  editor  and  printer  ot  the  Mississippi  Gazette,  having 
declined  business,  we  purpose  continuing  the  publication  on  the  same  political  plan  that 
Mr.  Stokes  has  heretofore  printed,  and  will  furnish  all  the  subscribers  of  the  gazette  on 
the  terms  and  manner  hereinafter  mentioned. 

Those  gentlemen  who  are  subscribers,  in  the  Town  and  vicinity  of  Natchez,  shall  re- 
ceive their  papers  on  each  day  of  publication. 

Those  who  reside  on  the  post  road  leading  to  the  states,  will  be  supplied  once  a fort- 
night with  two  numbers,  which  shall  be  deposited  at  the  most  convenient  places. 

Those  subscribers  who  reside  in  the  lower  part  of  the  Territory,  and  below  the  line  of 
the  route  to  New-Orleans,  shall  be  regularly  furnished  by  post  once  in  two  weeks. 

We  solicit  the  patronage  of  a generous  public,  and  hope  they  will  encourage  the  pres- 
ent undertaking. 

We  intend  to  make  it  our  duty  to  render  the  gazette  a vehicle  of  useful  and  pleasing  in- 
formation—It  shall  contain  matter,  of  the  most  interesting  nature,  Foreign  & Domestic 
intelligence,  congressional  and  Legislative  occurrences,  particularly  such  as  respect  this 
Territory..  Essays  will  be  thankfully  received  and  published,  which  do  not  contain  im- 
moral, indecent  matter  or  personal  reflections.  Having  made  arrangements  to  procure  a 


1 In  the  Lenox  Library ; title  and  collation  furnished  by  Wilberforce  Eames. 


XX 


NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS. 


large  addition  of  Types  to  those  we  have  on  hand,  will  by  the  Month  of  April  next,  enable 
us  to  exhibit  to  the  public  as  large  a paper  as  any  published  in  the  Western  country. 

Terms  of  the  Gazette. 

Six  Dollars  per  annum,  one  half  at  the  expiration  of  six  months,  the  remainder  at  the 
end  of  the  year. 

Advertisements  not  exceeding  a square,  will  be  inserted  three  times  for  one  dollar  and 
fifty  cents,  if  above,  in  proportion  ; and  for  each  continuation  after,  fifty  cents. 

Sackett  & Wallace. 

The  new  arrangement  does  not  appear  to  have  been  satisfactory  to  the 
parties  concerned,  not  more  than  two  issues  appearing  under  the  names  of 
Sackett  & Wallace.  Then  there  was  an  intermission  of  three  or  four 
weeks,  when  the  paper  again  appeared  under  the  original  management,  as 
follows : 

The 

Missisippi  Gazette. 

By  B.  M.  Stokes. 

Sacred  to  virtue,  liberty,  science  and  civilization. 

Vol  II. — Tuesday,  October  13,  1801.  — No  7. 

The  latest  issue  known  is  Vol.  II.,  Num.  10,  Natchez,  Tuesday,  De- 
cember 1st,  1801.  It  is  not  probable  that  the  paper  was  continued  long 
after  that  date. 

1801,  August  ii  (est  ) — The  Intelligencer , at  Natchez,  by 

D.  Moffett  and  James  Ferrell. 

This  was  printed  on  a folio  sheet  19x23  inches,  four  pages,  four  col- 
umns to  a page.  The  appearance,  imprint,  etc.,  of  the  earliest  number 
known  are  shown  herewith  : 

The  Intelligencer. 

By  D.  Moffett  & Co. 

Six  Dollars  Per  Ann.  | Uninfluenced  By  Party — | Half  Paid  In  Advance. 
We  Aim  To  Be  Just. 

Vol.  I.  Natchez,  Tuesday,  Oct.  6,  1801.  | No.  IX. 

The  latest  number  known  is  Vol.  I.,  No.  XVII,  Natchez,  Tuesday,  De- 
cember 8,  1801.  This  paper  was  doubtless  printed  on  the  press  brought 
from  Baltimore  by  Mr.  Green,  as  stated  by  Col.  Marschalk.  As  in  the 
case  of  the  Gazette,  he  antedates  the  fact  by  about  a year. 

1802,  July  26  (cir.) — Mississippi  Herald , at  Natchez,  by 

Andrew  Marschalk. 

Printed  on  a sheet  18x28  inches,  four  pages,  three  wide  columns  to  a 
page.  The  following  is  a fac  simile  of  the  title  of  the  earliest  known  copy: 


HISTORY  OF  AMERICAN  NEWSPAPERS. 


XXl 


M1SSISIPP1  HERALD. 


PRINTER  jCWD  ?HBLYs£F.IX  BY  AttUREW  MARSCHALK,  PRINTER  OF  THE  LAWS  OF  THE  TERRITORY. 


When  these  things  you  relate,  spea\  cf  them  ' as  they  are...,. Clothing  extenuate,  nif  set  down  aught  in  malice .” 

SHAKESPEARE. 

[No,  44,]..  NATCHEZ.  SATURDAY,  Mats  ti,  1803. 

• [Voi. 

Laws  qf  the.  MissisiAjd  Territory. 


POT  LI  BREL; 


AUTHORITY* 


An  a(J  appointing  aid  authorizing  eommiJJioners 
report  to  the  general  ajfemhly,  upon  the  moj}  ad- 
vantageous and  convenient  pojfitien  far  <x  permanent 
feat  of  jujlicefor  the  coUnty  of  Adams.  _ 

S-£c.  I.  Be  it  enaficd  by  the,  legijlative  council 
and  fluff  cf  geprefentatives  of  the  Mijffppi  territo - 
ry:  in  geketdl  cjfemhly convened,  and  it  is  hereby 
eiaffrd  bythe  authority  of  the  feme.  That  Thomas 
Wil3cuis, AWjah-Htintjjftafc  GaiHardJobn  Bowles, 
Adam  Tooley,  Benjamin  Farrar  and  Ifrael  Luce, 
be,  and  the?  art*  hereby  appointed  CQmtmf&oners, 
which  faid.  laid  tomtniflioners,  or  a majority 
*»F - ihem  . arc  . hereby  dire&ed  by  all  ways 
ihd-  rneaiw  within'' their  power,  to  inform 
ihfatfelves  fefpe&ing  th'e  moft  advantageous  and 
convenient  pofition  for  a permanent  feat  cf  juftice 
lor-lbe-eounty  of  Adams*  and  the  faid  commiffion- 
ers  a ra  herooy  required  to-  report  their  opinion, 
louchinethe  prensifes  to  thojcneral  2/Iembly  2t 

. isEC.'  2*  And  he  it  farther  endued,  That  it  fhall 
he  the  duty  of  the  faid-cOmmiffioners  to  affemble 
tocher  ofl  the  firft  monday  in  June  next,  at  the 
<6urt-houfe  of  the  county  of  Adams^  then  and 
{fterfc  to  confer  arwd'fopfult  wich  'each -other  jjgon 
t^e.  rtwTl "-proper  means  c*  carrying1  into  effefl  the 
dfre&f6a*r>f  thteadk*- 

Wrd>  GORDON  FORMAN,  < 

-Jpeqfero^  the  i 

Prejtto}  \ be  Council 
Approved,  March  1 2th,  1803.’  , 

Wnr.  C.  C.  CLAIBORNE, 

IxSyifMpr  of  the  Mifffippiflerriotary. 


PROCEEDINGS. 

"guard  of  Trujltes  of  fiff erf  on  College 


«c  Relaford  by  the.BoaXa.of  Truf,  ei\  f 
€^*£t*thaiThc  bUikfihgS  for  the  ule  or'w.d  Col- 
lege, Ihall  be  erefted  in  Jefterfon  county,  near  the 
town  of  Greenville,  on  the  lands  propofed  by 
Mordeica  Throgmotton,  for  ttyf  purpofe.  ” 

-Paflcd  in  the  affirmative. 

On  motion : Refolv^d  by  thl  board  of  T ruftees, 
that  theTjuildrbgs  for  the  Jeffcrion  college  ftsajf  be 
made  of  Sriclr;  and  that  a eommit|ee  of,  three 
members  Be  appointed  to  prepire  a pHa  of  the  faid 
buildings,  -and.  report  the  faqie  rn  the^boatd  at 
thcif-iSECS  TreEUn^Mg ether  jfctB  an  eft  i mate  of 
the- probable  expence  tnc.cc^. 

• Ordered,  That  Mefirs.  JJrezealjJ  Weft  and 
Kirkland,  be  a committee  for  tpea^pVe  purpofe. 

. Adjourned  urt til. the  fecohd*  Morfday  in  April 
next,  to  meew  at  the  town’ of  jGreeilville. 

CreenviUe^Apribiith,  180(3. 

A quorum  nf  the  board  met?  ptfrli{3nt  toadjqurn- 

Mr.  Weft  from  the  committee  appointed  to  pro- 
pofe  a plan  and  eftimate  of  the  probable  expcnceof 
the  buildings  for  Jcfferfbn  College  reported  as  fol- 

K<  The  committee  appointed  rn  punuance  of  a 
refolution  of  the  fciard  of  their  laft  meeting,  for  the 
purpofe  of  preparing  a plan  of  the  builiing*  for 
Jeffierfon  college,  refpe&fally  fubmit  the  a^ove,  and 
alfo  on<;  for  a building  to  be  occupied  by  the  ftew- 
« % ' 

, c<*  The  probable  ex  pen  re  of  thefe  Viildings, 
from  the  mofracurate-eftrmate  the  committee  have 
been  sbhijto  mike,  will  be  tea  ihoufand  dollars-  for 
the  principal  buildi  g \ four  thoufand  for  each 
wing ; and  two  thoufand  for  the  Steward’s  houfe  •, 
making  in  th*  whole,  twenty  rhoufand  dollars.  • 
u As  this  fum  farexreeds  the  prefent  funds  of 
the  College,  or  anyprofpefi  of  immediate  fupplies 
to  that  amount,  committee  takes  leave  to  re- 
commend (fhdttld  the^prbjjofed  plan  mfre^  the  ap- 
probation of  she  board)  that  they  commence  with 
i contract  for  chi?  erection  of  one  win®,  and  the 
Steward’s  fcotife;  which  wijl  probably  ^Sardac- 
1 f&dlUlpdatioD  (or  ftu^* 


of  land  fot  the  ftte  of  Tefterfon^  colieg«j.2nd  to  re- 
port rheiame  to  -the  new  roe  sig  *»f* 

Ordered,  That  Meflrs.  Lattimore,  Weft,  El- 
lis, Tooly  and  Burnet,  be  a committee  for  the  above 
purpofe. 

On  motion, — That  the  next  meeting  of  the 
board  of  truftees  be  on  the  firft  Monday  in  June 
next,  at  Sulfer's  town. 

On  motion, — Ordered,  That  thedecrefar^  of 
the  board  furnifh  a copy  of  the  proceedings  of 
the.Iaft  ard  prefent  met  tings,  ihat  the.  fame  may 
be  printed  and  oublifhed. 

(Atteft)  FELIX  HUGHES. 

Secretary  of  the  Board* 


FOR  THE  MISSJSIPP*  HERALD. 

Mr.  Printer, 

REASON  and  experience  prove  that  virtue 
conftitutes  the  fupreme  happinefs,  not  only 
of  individuals  but  of  nations, — and  that  vice 
and  immorality  oosrate  not  lefs  cenainlyr,the 
rrliTc?)  and  dcftudimn  oTtlre-LTne  rhrS'urTnc-- 
other.  Virtue,  therefore,  at  aft  tim-:5  de- 
ferVedly  meets  the  higheft  praife  and  patro- 
nage of  every-well  wither  of  the  human  face, 
whiift  vice  and  immorality  are  ‘juftlv  the 
cbjecls  of  the  moVahfts  reiterated  cenfure 
and  invedliye/  At  a time  vyhen  ihcle  jaft 
are  univcrfally  acknowledged  tfe  abound1  m 
the  territory ; every  pfaufible  attempt, 
whether* by  government  or  pamotid  indi- 
viduals to  remedy  the  evil,  (hOuld  excfte 
our  warmed  gratitude,  while  he  whi?  could 
point  out  a rational  n ncV  complete  correc- 
tive, would  deferve  to  b *confidertd  tpremo^r 
among  the  patrons  of  mankind,  - 
We  have  little  doilbk  but' 

^ 


This  is  a well-printed  paper  with  an  excellent  variety  of  reading  mat- 
ter, and  an  advertising  patronage  filling  six  columns.  Nowheie  appears 
any  statement  of  the  terms. 

With  a spirit  of  friendly  toleration  not  common  in  the  journalism  of 
those  days,  a whole  column  on  the  fourth  page  is  devoted  to  the  piospec- 
tus  of  an  intended  rival  of  the  Herald , to  be  called  the  Mississippi  Repub- 
lican and  Natchez  Advertiser , which  W.  H.  Beaumont  announced  his  in- 
tention of  publishing.  He  had  “been  long  in  the  habit  of  editing  news- 
papers,” he  stated,  and  “if  a suitable  support,  adequate  to  the  undeitak- 
ing,”  of  which  he  does  not  permit  himself  to  doubt,  “is  promptly  received, 
the  materials  will  be  immediately  ordered,  and  it  is  presumable,  the  pub- 
lication will  commence  in  September  next.”  No  copy  of  this  papei  has 
been  found,  and  probably  the  confident  hopes  of  its  projector  were  never 


realized. 

With  the  issue  of  the  Herald  for  Monday,  Nov.  14?  N°*  i6> 

Vol.  2,  the  line  And  Natchez  City  Gazette , was  added  under  the  first  line  of 
the  title.  We  learn  from  No.  52,  Vol.  2,  Thursday,  April  26,  1804,  that 
Marschalk  had  attempted  to  issue  it  semi-weekly,  and  that  it  was  Pub- 
lished Wednesdays  And  Saturdays.”  As  Marschalk  was  not  an  Irishman, 
of  whom  the  perpetration  of  bulls  could  be  expected,  it  is  not  easy  to  rec- 


XXII 


NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS. 


oncile  this  announcement  with  the  date.  The  semi-weekly  was  reduced  in 
size,  being  on  a sheet  13x16  inches,  four  pages,  two  columns  to  a page.  It 
would  seem  that  this  ambitious  effort  crippled  the  printer,  as  No.  14,  Vol. 
III.,  instead  of  coming  out  on  August  2,  as  it  would  in  natural  sequence, 
bears  date  Oct.  5,  indicating  an  occasional  intermission,  if  not  a temporary 
suspension.  This  number  shows  a slight  change  in  the  heading,  thus  : 

Missisippi  Herald  & Natchez  Gazette. 

Printed  And  Published  By  Andrew  Marschalk, 

At  The  Corner  of  Third,  And  South  First  Streets. 

[Vol.  in.]  Natchez,  Friday,  October,  5,  1804.  [No.  14.] 

It  was  now  printed  on  a sheet  18x22  inches,  four  pages,  four  columns 
to  a page,  and,  of  course,  only  weekly.  Vol.  IV.,  No.  41,  Tuesday,  Octo- 
ber 8,  1805,  gives  the  place  of  publication  as  “North  First,  Near  Second 
Street.”  No.  6,  Vol.  V.,  Whole  No.  215,  Tuesday,  February  4,  1806,  an- 
nounces the  following  . 

Terms  of  the  Mississippi  Herald. 

Six  Dollars  per  annum,  payable  one  half  in  advance,  the  remainder  at  the  end  of  the 
year. — 

Advertisements  not  exceeding  fifteen  lines  inserted  once  for  one  dollar  : — and  fifty 
cents  for  subsequent  insertions. — 

Payments  will  be  received  in  cotton,  provisions  and  produce  of  all  kind,  at  the  market 
price. — 

Such  of  our  mechanical  brethren  who  wish  the  Herald — and  would  prefer  making  pay- 
ment in  work,  may  also  be  accommodated. — 

B-2?" Advertising  customers  are  particularly  requested  to  note  the  number  of  insertions 
requested — otherwise  they  will  be  considered  as  intended  for  publication  until  counter- 
manded— 

No.  41,  Vol.  V.,  Tuesday,  October  21,  1807,  Whole  No.  302,  shows  no 
change  in  heading  or  size,  except  that  an  “s”  is  lacking  in  the  second 
group  of  sibilants  in  the  title.  The  old  files  kept  by  Col.  Marschalk  are 
still  in  existence,  and  show  that  the  Herald  was  continued  by  him  under 
the  following  changes  of  title  : Mississippi  Herald  and  Natchez  Gazette , 
1806-7;  Natchez  Gazette , 1808;  Washington  Republican , 1813-16;  Wash- 
ington Repiiblican  dr  Natchez  Intelligencer , 1816;  State  Gazette , 1818;  Mis- 
sissippi Republican,  1818-20;  State  Gazette , 1821-25;  Mississippi  Reptibli- 
can , 1822-23;  Natchez  Newspaper  and  Piiblic  Advertiser,  1826;  Mississippi 
Statesman , 1827;  Mississippi  Statesman  and  Natchez  Gazette , 1827;  The 
Natchez  Gazette , 1828. 1 

1 For  this  memorandum  of  Col.  Marschalk’s  files  the  author  is  indebted  to  Thomas  M. 
Owen,  now  of  Washington,  D.  C.,who  made  the  same  from  a personal  examination  of 
the  files  in  1892.  Mr.  Owen  adds  : “In  regard  to  Mr.  Marschalk,  you  can  say  certainly 
that  he  was  born  in  New  York  State,  and  that  he  died  in  1839,  and  is  buried  in  the  city  of 
Natchez.  His  wife  was  Susan  McDonald,  born  in  Scotland.  The  son  to  whom  you  refer  as 
editing  a paper  in  1859  was  Andrew  Marschalk,  Jr.  The  old  original  press  of  Col.  Mar- 


HISTORY  OF  AMERICAN  NEWSPAPERS. 


xxiii 


1802,  October  16  (est.) — The  Constitutional  Conservator , 
at  Natchez,  by  John  Wade. 

Printed  on  a folio  sheet  19^x23  inches,  four  pages,  four  columns  to  a 
page.  The  arrangement  of  heading,  etc.,  is  shown  herewith  from  the  only 
copy  known  : 

The  Constitutional  Conservator. 


******  ****** 

* Vol.  I.  * By  John  Wade.  * No.  27  * 


****** 


****** 


“But  yet  I say,  if  imputation  and  strong  circumstance  which  lead 
directly  to  the  door  of  truth,  will  give  you  satisfaction,  you 
shall  have  it.”  Shakespeare. 


Five  Dollars 
per  Annum] 


Natchez,  Saturday,  April  16,  1803. 


[Three  Dollars 
in  Advance. 


1804,  September  1 (est.)  — The  Mississippi  Messenger,  at 
Natchez,  by  John  Shaw  and  Timothy  Terrell. 

“Dr.  John  Shaw  succeeded  Terrell  and  Moffet.  His  paper  was  the 
Halcyon , afterwards  the  Messenger , in  which  he  had  as  associates  Timothy 
and  Samuel  Terrell,  men  of  some  means  from  North  Carolina.  Dr.  Shaw 
was  an  educated,  but  eccentric  man  ; a caustic  writer,  whose  editorials 
abounded  in  Italics  and  were  often  written  in  doggerel  verse.” — Claiborne . 

The  only  copy  of  this  paper  known  to  the  writer  exhibits  the  title,  im- 
print and  terms  as  follows  : 


The  Mississippi  Messenger. 

Published  every  Tuesday  Morning,  by  John  Shaw  and  Timothy  Terrell. 
(Vol.  III.)  Natchez,  Tuesday,  June  9,  1807.  (Number  145.) 

The  Price  of  this  Paper  is  Four  Dollars  a year,  payable  half  yearly  in  advance  by  Sub- 


schalkisnowin  Natchez,  but  in  bad  preservation.”  Mr.  Owen  is  the  only  Southern  gentle- 
man from  whom  the  author  has  been  able  to  get  any  information  regarding  early  printing 
in  Mississippi,  and  it  is  with  peculiar  pleasure  that  this  indebtedness  is  here' acknowledged. 
He  also  called  the  author’s  attention  to 'this  sketch  of  Edward  Turner,  the  young  lawyer 
who  furnished  copies  of  the  laws  in  manuscript : “ He  was  born  in  Fairfax  County,  Va., 
Nov.  25, 1778,  and  removing  to  Kentucky  at  the  age  of  eight  years,  he  was  partly  educated 
at  the  Transylvania  University.  After  reading  law,  in  1802  he  went  to  Natchez,  Miss., 
where  he  began  the  practice.  Beginning  his  career  with  the  post  of  private  secretary  to  the 
Governor,  he  became  successively  Clerk  of  the  Territorial  House  of  Representatives;  Clerk 
of  the  County  Court  of  Jefferson  County,  Miss.;  in  1803-5,  he  was  Register  of  the  Land  Office; 
in  1811  member  of  the  Legislative  House  of  Representatives  from  Warren  County;  and  in 
1815  from  Adams  County;  in  1815-16,  under  Legislative  appointment  he  prepared  a Digest 
of  the  Statutes  of  the  Mississippi  Territory;  was  a member  of  the  Mississippi  Constitu- 
tional Convention,  1817;  in  1820,  Attorney  General;  in  1822  he  was  made  Judge  of  the 
Criminal  Court  at  Natchez;  in  1824  was  elevated  to  the  State  Supreme  Bench,  and  in  1829 
he  became  Chief  Justice;  in  1834-39,  be  was  State  Chancellor;  and  again  in  1840,  he  went  on 
the  Supreme  Bench.  In  ali  his  career  he  was  ever  noble,  and  true  to  the  trusts  reposed 
in  him  by  the  people.” — Lynch's  Bench  and  Bar  of  Mississippi,  p.  84. 


XXIV 


NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS. 


scribers  residing  within  the  Territory  — Distant  Subscribers  to  pay  the  whole  in  ad- 
vance. 

Subscribers  will  not  be  discontinued  until  they  give  notice,  and  pay  off  all  arrearages. 

1808-9  (cir .) — The  Chronicle , at  Natchez,  by  John  A. 
Winn  & Co. 

1812. — The  Republican , at  Liberty,  by  Ludwig  Hall. 


Missouri.1 

1808. — Printing  introduced. 

The  first  book : 

The  | Laws  | of  | The  Territory  of  | Louisiana.  | Com- 
prising | All  those  which  are  now  | Actually  in  Force  | 
within  the  same.  | Published  by  Authority.  | 

St.  Louis , (L.)  | Printed  by  Joseph  Charless  | 
Printer  to  the  Territory.  | 1808.  | 

8»  Pp.  376,  (58). 

Collation  : Title  and  verso,  one  leaf.  A law  establishing  the  office  of 
Sheriff  [enacted  Oct.  1,  1804,  by  William  Henry  Harrison,  Governor,  and 
Thomas  T.  Davis,  Henry  Vander  Burgh  and  John  Griffin,  Judges  of  the  In- 
dianna  Territory],  pp.  3-30.  A law  creating  the  office  of  Attorney  General 
and  defining  the  duties  of  the  same  [enacted  May  6,  1806,  by  Ja.  Wilkin- 
son, Governor,  and  John  B.  C.  Lucas  and  Return  J.  Meigs,  Jr.,  Judges],  p. 
31.  Certificate  of  Frederick  Bates,  Secretary  of  Louisiana,  April  29,  1809, 
p.  373.  Act  establishing  a seal  of  the  Territory  of  Louisiana,  Nov.  11, 
1808,  p.  372.  Table  of  Contents,  pp.  374-5.  Index  (58). 2 

Mr.  William  F.  Switzler,  editor  amhpublisher  of  the  Missouri  Demo- 
crat, Boonville,  Mo.,  writes  me  : “The  first  book  for  general  reading  pub- 

lished in  Missouri  after  it  was  made  a State,  was  ‘Missouri  Lays,’  a book 
of  poems,  by  Agnes  Umphraville.  The  first  published  sermon  was  by 
Rev.  Salmon  Gidding,  a Presbyterian  minister,  on  the  death  of  Edward 
Hempstead,  who  died  in  St.  Louis,  Aug.  10,  1817.” 

1 Authorities: 

Historical  Magazine. 

History  of  St.  Louis,  by  J.  Thomas  Scharf.  St.  Louis,  1883,  Vol.  I. 

William  F.  Switzler.  (MS.) 

2 For  this  title  and  collation  the  author  is  indebted  to  W.  J.  C.  Berry,  Librarian  of  the 
Bar  Association  of  New  York. 


HISTORY  OF  AMERICAN  NEWSPAPERS. 


XXV 


History  and  Chronology  of  Newspapers. 

1808,  July  12. — Missouri  Gazette , at  St.  Louis,  by  Joseph 
Charless. 

Printed  on  a half  sheet,  two  pages,  each  9^x12  inches,  three  columns 
to  the  page.  This  modest  venture  in  journalism  was  about  the  size  of 
a large  letter-sheet.  The  heading  was  like  this  : 

MISSOURI  GAZETTE. 

[Vol.  I.]  WEDNESDAY,  OCTOBER  5,  180S.  [No.  12.] 


The  imprint  was  at  the  head  of  the  first  column,  on  the  first  page,  as 
follows  : 

St.  Louis,  Louisiana, 

Published  by  Joseph  Charless, 

Printer  to  the  Territory. 

This,  the  first  newspaper  west  of  the  Mississippi  river,  was  printed  on 
an  old-fashioned  Ramage  press,  “a  rude,  diminutive  machine,  made  most- 
ly of  wood,  with  a stone  bed,  and  worked  by  hand.”  In  operating  the 
press  Mr.  Charless  was  assisted  by  Jacob  Hinkle,  a printer  who  had  come 
from  Louisville,  Ky.,  to  assist  in  starting  the  Gazette.  The  publication 
office  was  in  the  northern  portion  of  the  old  Robidoux  house  of  posts,  on 
the  east  side  of  South  Main  street,  between  the  present  Elm  and  Myrtle 
streets,  and  continued  there  until  1816.  St.  Louis  was  then  a village  of 
1,000  inhabitants,  with  a weekly  mail.  The  subscription  price  of  the 
Gazette  was  $3  per  annum,  “paid  in  advance;”  and  “advertisements  not 
exceeding  a square  will  be  inserted  one  week  for  one  dollar,  and  fifty  cents 
for  every  continuance,  those  of  a greater  length  in  proportion.”  The  san- 
guine publisher  started  with  174  subscribers.  In  No.  3,  July  26,  1808,  it 
is  announced  that  Samuel  Solomon  would  “receive  subscriptions  and  ad- 
vertisements for  this  Gazette  during  the  editor’s  absence  to  Kentucky” — 
probably  in  quest  of  paper  and  other  material,  the  nearest  paper  mill 
and  printing-office  being  at  Lexington.  On  August  10  the  day  of  publica- 
tion was  changed  from  Tuesday  to  Wednesday.  On  Sept.  21,  the  issue 
was  omitted,  owing  to  the  illness  of  the  editor,  who  made  amends  to  some 
extent  a week  later  by  giving  his  readers  a slightly  enlarged  paper.  On 
March  29,  1809,  the  paper  was  again  enlarged,  being  11x16  inches,  two 
pages,  four  columns  to  a page;  the  issue  for  May  24,  1809,  has  four  pages, 
18x22  inches,  four  columns,  without  rules,  to  a page.  In  the  paper  for 
November  9,  1809,  the  editor  called  upon  those  subscribers  who  had  given 
their  notes  or  word  of  honor  to  pay  in  flour  or  corn,  “to  bring  it  in  direct- 
ly,” and. upon  others  who  had  promised  to  pay  in  beef  or  pork,  to  deliver 
it  as  soon  as  possible,  or  their  accounts  would  be  placed  in  a magistrate’s 
hands.  On  December  7,  1809,  in  order  “to  change  the  title  from  a local 


XXVI 


NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS. 


to  a more  general  one,”  the  paper  came  out  as  the  Louisiana  Gazette , but 
when  Missouri  was  set  off  from  Louisiana  as  a separate  territory,  Mr. 
Charless  returned,  July  u,  1812,  to  the  original  name,  Missouri  Gazette. 
The  editor  took  his  readers  into  his  confidence  in  the  issue  for  Dec.  19, 
1809,  thus:  “To  our  patrons:  The  weekly  expense  of  publishing  the  Lou- 
isiana Gazette  is  upwards  of  twenty  dollars.  When  this  is  duly  considered, 
our  subscribers  will  see  the  propriety  of  our  requiring  of  them  payment  in 
advance.  Neither  paper,  types,  nor  ink  can  be  had  without  cash,  and  that, 
too,  before  a single  paper  can  be  issued.”  With  the  issue  for  Dec.  17, 
1813,  a suspension  of  the  paper  for  a few  weeks  was  announced  as  neces- 
sary, “ by  the  most  cruel  and  unfortunate  disappointment  in  the  receipt 
of  paper,”  but  “every  Saturday  a handbill  will  be  printed  and  sent  to 
subscribers  gratis  giving  a summary  of  the  news  received  by  the  mails.” 
Notwithstanding  the  bitterest  rivalry,  and  the  most  determined  efforts  of 
his  political  opponents  to  crush  him,  Mr.  Charless  continued  the  Gaz- 
ette , and  on  June  24,  1815,  boasted  that  his  paper  had  five  hundred  “gen- 
uine subscribers  who  received  it  regularly  every  week;”  also  that  “a  new 
press  of  the  largest  size”  was  “expected  shortly,  by  Mr.  Moses  Scott, 
from  Pittsburgh,  and  when  it  arrives  the  Gazette  will  assume  the  size  of 
the  Kentucky  papers,  super-royal.”  On  July  3,  1817,  the  Gazetteer's,  en- 
larged, and  claimed  to  be  “equal  in  size  and  type  to  any  six-column  paper 
in  the  United  States.”  Charless  retired  from  the  paper  Sept.  13,  1820, 
having  sold  out  to  James  C.  Cummins,  who  in  turn  disposed  of  it,  March 
13,  1822,  to  Edward  Charless,  who  changed  the  name  to  Missouri  Repub- 
lican, which  it  still  retains.  It  became  a daily,  Sept.  20,  1836.  It  was 
one  of  the  last  of  the  great  papers  of  the  West  to  retain  the  old-fashioned 
blanket-sheet,  four  pages,  with  eleven  or  more  columns  to  a page. 

Joseph  Charless  was  born  in  Westmeath,  Ireland,  July  16,  1772,  the 
only  son  of  Capt.  Edward  Charles,  whose  paternal  ancestor,  John  Charles, 
was  born  in  Wales,  and  emigrated  to  Ireland  in  1663.  Joseph  Charles 
learned  the  printer’s  art,  but  having  been  implicated  in  the  Irish  Rebellion 
of  1795,  fled  to  France,  and  sailed  thence  to  the  United  States,  in  1796. 
On  reaching  this  country  he  added  an  “s”  to  his  name,  making  it  Charless, 
to  secure  the  Irish  pronunciation  of  Charles.  He  settled  in  Philadelphia, 
where  he  worked  for  Mathew  Carey,  the  eminent  printer  of  that  city. 
The  second  edition  of  Carey’s  quarto  Bible  has  the  imprint:  “ Philadel- 
phia: Printed  for  Mathew  Carey,  No.  118  Market  Street,  by  Joseph  Charless. 
October  20,  1801.  ”1  In  1798  he  married  Mrs.  Sarah  McCloud,  a widow 
with  one  child;  she  was  born  Jam  28,  1771,  near  Wilmington,  Del.  About 
1802,  accompanied  by  his  family,  he  removed  from  Philadelphia  to  Lex- 
ington, Ky.,  and  thence  in  1806  to  Louisville,  from  which  place  he  pro- 

1 See  O’Callaghan,  p.  59.  The  statement  that  Mr.  Charless  assisted  in  printing  the 
first  quarto  Bible  in  America  is,  of  course,  an  error,  several  editions  in  quarto  size  having 
been  printed  in  the  United  States  before  he  left  Ireland. 


HISTORY  OF  AMERICAN  NEWSPAPERS. 


XXVll 


ceeded  in  1808  to  St.  Louis,  where  he  started  the  Gazette  in  the  same  year. 
After  retiring  from  the  paper,  in  1820,  he  engaged  in  the  drug  business. 
He  died  in  1834,  aged  sixty-two  years.  His  widow  died  March  3,  1852. 

1815,  May. — Western  Journal , at  St.  Louis,  by  Joshua 
Norveil. 

In  order  to  break  down  Charless,  a number  of  his  political  opponents 
raised  a fund  of  $1,000,  and  advertised  in  the  Lexington  (Ky.)  Reporter 
for  a Republican  printer.  In  response  came  young  Norveil,  from  Nash- 
ville, Tenn.  He  was  soon  succeeded  by  Sergeant  Hall,  of  Cincinnati, 
who  issued  his  first  number  of  the  paper  under  a change  of  name,  Western 
Emigrant , May  17,  1817.  Two  years  later  the  title  was  St.  Louis  Enquirer. 

Montana.1 

1864 — Printing  introduced. 

The  first  books  :2 

Montana  as  it  is ; being  a general  description  of  its  re- 
sources both  Mineral  and  Agricultural,  including  a de- 
scription of  the  Face  of  the  Country,  its  Climate  &c. 
illustrated  with  a Map  of  the  Territory,  drawn  by  Capt. 
W.  W.  de  Lacy;  to  which  is  appended  a complete  Dic- 
tionary of  the  Snake  (Indian)  Language,  and  also  of 
the  famous  Chinook  Jargon,  &c.  &c.  By  Granville 
Stuart. 

C.  S.  Westcoie  & Co .,  New  York,  1S65. 

4°  Pp-  i75- 

The  Vigilantes  of  Montreal.  By  Prof.  Thomas  J.  Dims- 
dale. 

Virginia  City , Montana , 1866. 

Acts,  Resolutions  and  Memorials,  | of  the  j Territory  of 
Montana,  | Passed  by  the  | First  Legislative  Assembly,  | 
Convened  at  Bannack,  December  12,  1864. 

Virginia  City , Montana ; | D.  W.  Tilton  & Co.  | 
1866.  | 

8°  Pp.  viii,  721,  xii. 

1 Authorities: 

William  F.  Wheeler,  Librarian  of  the  Historical  Society  of  Montana.  (MS.) 

History  of  Washington,  Idaho  and  Montana,  by  Hubert  H.  Bancroft. 

2 The  first  two  titles  are  furnished  by  William  F.  Wheeler. 


XXV111 


NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS. 


Collation:  Title,  i leaf;  Preface,  i leaf;  Table  of  Contents,  pp.  v- 
viii;  Acts,  etc.,  pp.  1-721;  Index,  pp.  i-xii. 


History  and  Chronology  of  Newspapers. 

1864,  August  27. — The  Montana  Post , at  Virginia  City,  by 

John  Buchanan. 

“In  1864  John  Buchanan  brought  a press  and  material  from  St.  Louis 
to  Fort  Benton,  with  a view  to  locating  at  some  point  in  the  new  common- 
wealth. lie  fixed  upon  Virginia  City,  where  the  first  number  of  the  Post 
was  issued  August  27,  1864.  After  printing  two  numbers  Buchanan  sold 
to  D.  W.  Tilton  and  Benjamin  R.  Dittes.  Dittes  was  a native  of  Leipsic, 
Saxony,  born  in  1833.  He  was  for  a number  of  years  on  the  upper  Mis- 
souri at  the  various  trading  posts,  and  in  Colorado,  in  1863,  when  Alder 
Gulch  was  discovered,  to  which  he  removed  that  year,  building  one  of  the 
first  houses  in  Virginia  City.  The  firm  of  D.  W.  Tilton  & Co.  continued 
to  publish  the  Post  at  Virginia  City  until  the  winter  of  1867-8,  when 
Dittes  purchased  Tilton’s  interest,  and  in  conjunction  with  Mr.  Pinney, 
removed  it  to  Helena.  The  change  was  not  favorable,  and  Dittes  with- 
drew, and  the  paper  suspended  in  the  spring  of  1869.” — Bancroft' s Mon- 
tana , 652. 

A file  of  the  paper  for  1864-5-6-7-8,  five  volumes,  is  in  the  library  of 
the  Historical  Society  of  Montana. 

1865,  — Montana  Democrat , at  Virginia  City,  by  John  P. 

Bruce. 

The  material  had  been  used  by  Kirk  Anderson  in  the  printing  of  The 
Valley  Tan , a Gentile  newspaper,  in  Salt  Lake  City,  in  1857-8.  The 
Democrat  became  a daily  in  March,  1868. 

1866,  March. — Montana  Radiator,  at  Helena,  by  T.  J. 
Favorite. 

This  paper  had  been  previously  published  at  Lewiston,  Idaho.  In 
November,  1866,  it  was  sold  to  Posnainsky  & House,  who  changed  the 
name  to  Helena  Herald,  and  employed  R.  Emmet  Fisk  to  edit  it.  In  1867 
it  became  a daily. 

1866,  July  7. — Tri-Weekly  Republican,  at  Helena,  by  Til- 
ton & Dittes. 

The  publishers  continued  The  Montana  Post  at  Virginia  City  at  the 
same  time.  After  printing  thirty-two  numbers  of  the  Republican  they  re- 
moved it  to  Virginia  City,  and  continued  it  as  the  Tri-Weekly  Post.  It 
became  a daily  April  20,  1868. 


HISTORY  OF  AMERICAN  NEWSPAPERS. 


XXIX 


Nebraska,1 

1854 — Printing  introduced,  at  Bellevue,  Omaha  hnd  Ne- 
braska City. 

The  first  book : 

Territory  of  Nebraska.  [ Laws,  Resolutions  and  Memo- 
rials, | passed  at  the  | Regular  Session  | of  the  | First 
General  Assembly  | of  the  | Territory  of  Nebraska,  | 
Convened  at  Omaha  City,  on  the  16th  day  of  January, 
anno  domini,  1855.  | Together  with  | the  constitution  of 
the  United  States,  the  organic  | law,  and  the  proclama- 
tions issued  in  the  or-  | ganization  of  the  territorial  gov- 
ernment. | Published  by  authority.  | 

Sherman  & Strickland , Territorial  Printers.  \ 
Omaha  City , N.  T.,  | 1855. 

8°Pp.  (2),  [7] -5 1 7. 

Collation:  Title;  verso,  certificate  of  Secretary  of  the  Territory,  dated 
July  13,  1855.  Constitution  of  the  United  States,  pp.- [7]— 20.  Organic 
Law,  pp.  [21J-38. ' Blank  leaf  (39-40).  Proclamations  issued  during  the 
organization  of  the  Territorial  Government,  pp.  [41]— 53.  Laws  of 

Nebraska,  pp.  [55F449.  Joint  Resolutions  and  Memorials,  pp.  [451J-460. 
Blank  leaf  (461-2).  Index,  pp.  [463F516.  An  act  to  incorporate  the 
Pacific  Emigration  Company,  approved  March  2,  1855,  p.  517;  verso, 
blank.  Errata,  printed  slip,  inserted  after  p.  [518].  By  act  approved 
March  13,  1855,  the  Secretary  of  the  Territory  was  authorized  to  have 
1,000  copies  of  the  joint  resolutions  and  laws  passed  at  that  session  to  be 
printed  in  pamphlet  form.  [P.  203.] 

History  and  Chronology  of  Newspapers. 

1846.  July  28  — Omaha  Arrow , dated  at  Nebraska  City,  by 
J.  W.  Pattison  and  J.  E.  Johnson. 

In  the  first  number  Mr.  Pattison,  the  editor,  had  this  breezy  address: 

Well,  strangers,  friends,  patrons,  and  the  good  people  generally,  wherever  in  the  wide 
world  your  lot  may  be  cast,  and  in  whatever  clime  this  Arrow  may  reach  you,  here  we  are, 
upon  Nebraska  soil,  seated  upon  the  stump  of  an  ancient  oak,  which  serves  for  the  edito- 
rial chair,  and  the  top  of  our  badly  abused  beaver  for  a table,  we  purpose  inditing  a leader 
for  the  Omaha  Arrow. 

1 Authorities: 

Transactions  of  the  Nebraska  State  Historical  Society,  Vols.  I.,  II.,  V.,  Lincoln, 
Nebraska,  1885, 1887,  1893.  8°  Pp.  233,  383,  295. 


XXX 


NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS. 


An  elevated  table  land  surrounds  us;  the  majestic  Missouri,  just  off  on  our  left,  goes 
sweeping  its  muddy  course  down  towards  the  Mexican  Gulf,  whilst  the  background  of  the 
pleasing  picture  is  filled  in  with  the  loveliest,  richest  scenery.  Away  upon  our  left* 
spread  far  away  in  the  distance,  lies  one  of  the  loveliest  sections  of  Nebraska.  Yon  rich, 
rolling,  widespread  and  beautiful  prairie,  dotted  with  timber,  looks  lovely  enough  just 
now,  as  Heaven’s  fair  sunlight  touches  off  in  beauty  the  lights  and  shades,  to  be  literally 
entitled  the  Eden  land  of  the  world,  and  inspire  us  with  flights  of  fancy  upon  this  anti- 
quated beaver,  but  it  wont  pay.  There  sticks  our  axe  in  the  trunk  of  an  old  oak,  whos 
branches  have  for  years  been  fanned  by  the  breezes  that  constantly  sweep  from  over  th 
ofttimes  flower  dotted  prairie  lea,  and  from  which  we  purpose  making  a log  cabin  for  ou 
claim. 

Yonder  go  two  stalwart  sons  of  the  forest,  poetic  in  their  native  fancy.  They  ap- 
proach, and  stand  before  us  in  our  sanctum.  The  dancing  feathers  which  adorn  thei 
heads  once  decked  the  gaudy  plumage  of  the  mountain  eagle.  The  shades  of  the  rainbow 
appear  on  their  faces.  They  extend  the  hand  of  friendship  with  an  emphatic  “Cuggy 
how”  (How  are  you,  friend  ?),  and  knowing  their  business,  request  us,  by  signs  and  ges- 
ticulations, to  write  in  the  Arrow  to  the  Great  Father  that  the  Omahas  want  what  he  has 
promised  them,  and  they  also  ask  us  to  write  no  bad  about  them.  We  promise  compliance, 
whilst  they  watch  the  progress  of  our  pencil  back  and  forth  over  the  paper.  But  let  us 
proceed.  What  shall  we  say  ? But  little. 

The  Arrow's  target  will  be  the  general  interest  and  welfare  of  this  highly  favored,  new 
and  beautiful  territory  upon  which  we  have  now  for  the  first  established  a regular  weekly 
paper.  Our  cast  is  decidedly  Young  American  in  spirit  and  politics.  We  are  in  favor  o 
anything  that  runs  by  steam  or  electricity,  and  the  unflinching  advocates  of  the  “Sover- 
eigns of  the  Soil.” 

The  pioneering  squatter  and  the  uncivilized  red  man  are  our  constituents  and  neigh- 
bors, the  wolves  and  deers  are  our  traveling  companions,  and  the  wild  birds  and  prairie 
winds  our  musicians — more  highly  appreciated  than  all  the  carefully  prepared  con- 
certs of  earth.  Surrounded  by  associations,  circumstances  and  scenes  like  these,  what  do 
you  expect  from  us,  anxious  reader  ? 

Do  not  be  disappointed  if  you  do  not  always  get  that  which  is  enjoyable  and  polished 
from  our  pens  (we  mean  those  of  the  East  and  South,  the  pioneers  understanding  our  dia- 
lect). Take,  therefore,  what  you  get  with  a kindly  heart  and  no  grumbling.  In  the  sup- 
port of  the  National  Democratic  party,  the  advocacy  of  the  Pacific  railroad  upon  the  only 
feasible  route — the  Platte  valley — the  progress  of  Nebraska,  and  the  interest  of  the  people 
among  whom  we  live,  always  count  the  Arrow  flying,  hitting,  cutting.  We  shoulder  our 
axe,  and  bid  you  adieu  until  next  week. 

This  paper,  thus  started  avowedly  and  actually  in  the  interest  of  Ne- 
braska settlers,  was  in  fact  not  printed  in  Nebraska,  but  at  Council  Bluffs, 
Iowa.  It  succeeded  in  its  object  of  attracting  attention  to  Nebraska,  and 
to  itself,  for  in  the  eleventh  number,  issued  November  3,  1846,  it  published 
five  columns  of  flattering  notices  of  the  Arrow , clipped  from  other  papers. 
It  was  discontinued  with  the  next  issue,  No.  12.  J.  E.  Johnson,  who  was 
the  business  manager,  was  a Mormon,  with  three  or  four  wives.  He  also 
practiced  law,  ran  a blacksmith  shop,  an  insurance  agency  and  a general 
merchandise  trade.  In  1856,  upon  an  intimation  from  his  neighbors  that 
they  they  did  not  like  his  religion,  he  returned  to  Utah.  He  was  probably 
Joseph  E.  Johnson,  son  of  Ezekiel  Johnson  and  Julia  Hills,  of  Westford, 
Chittenden  county,  Vermont,  and  afterwards  of  Pomfret,  Chatauqua  coun- 


HISTORY  OF  AMERICAN  NEWSPAPERS. 


XXXI 


ty,  N.  Y.,  and  whose  sister,  Almera,  became  a plural  wife  of  Joseph  Smith, 
the  Mormon  prophet,  at  Nauvoo,  Ills.,  in  August,  1843. 1 

1854,  May  5. — Nebraska  Republican , at  Omaha,  by  E.  F. 
Schneider  and  H.  J.  Brown. 

This  paper  was  probably  printed  at  first  at  Council  Bluffs,  Iowa.  In 
1858  it  passed  into  the  control  of  Dr.  Gilbert  C.  Monell,  and  in  August, 
1859,  E.  D.  Webster  became  the  owner,  changing  the  name  to  Omaha  Re- 
publican. 

1854,  November  1 5. — Nebraska  Palladium , at  Bellevue,  by 
Julius  Sterling  Morton. 

This  was  the  first  paper  actually  printed  in  Nebraska.  It  was  worked 
off  on  a rude  hand-press.  A number  of  prominent  citizens  were  present  to 
witness  the  production  of  the  initial  number,  and  Dr.  E.  N.  Upjohn  gave 
a dollar  for  the  privilege  of  turning  the  press  for  the  first  paper,  which  was 
then  removed  by  Gov.  Thomas  B.  Cuming,  and  passed  to  Chief  Justice 
Ferguson,  who  read  the  following  editorial: 

This  event,  although  to  some  it  may  seem  unimportant  now,  will  form  an  epoch  in  his- 
tory which  will  be  remembered  ages  after  those  present  on  this  interesting  occasion  are 
no  more.  The  Palladium  is  issued  from  Bellevue,  a beautiful  spot,  amid  the  far  off  wilds 
of  Nebraska;  issued  in  the  very  wake  of  heathen  darkness,  and,  we  might  say,  in  its  midst. 
We  have  taken  joint  possession  with  the  aboriginal  inhabitants  of  the  soil.  Our  office  is 
visited  by  the  dark  children  of  the  prairie,  whose  curiosity  prompts  them  to  witness  the 
operation  of  the  art  by  which  thought  is  symbolized  and  repeated  in  ever  enduring  forms 
on  the  printed  page.  As  the  Indian  disappears  before  the  light  of  civilization,  so  may  the 
darkness  and  error  of  the  human  mind  flee  before  the  light  of  the  press  in  Nebraska. 

Gov.  Cuming  convened  the  first  Legislature  at  Omaha,  which  damp- 
ened the  hopes  of  Bellevue,  and  in  April,  1855,  Mr.  Morton  removed  to 
Nebraska  City,  to  take  charge  of  a paper  there. 

J.  Sterling  Morton,  having  been  educated  at  the  University  of  Michi- 
gan and  Union  College,  was  married  Oct.  30,  1854,  to  Caroline  Joy,  at 
Detroit,  Mich.,  and  the  same  day  the  young  couple  set  out  for 'Nebraska, 
where  Mr.  Morton  was  bent  on  engaging  in  journalism.  After  seven  days 
and  nights  of  hard  travel  they  arrived  at  Council  Bluffs,  and  a few  days 
later  at  Bellevue,  where  their  home  was  a log  cabin  of  two  rooms.  At  the 
first  election  for  State  officers,  June  21,  1866,  Mr.  Morton,  the  Democratic 
candidate  for  Governor,  received  3,948  votes,  to  4,093  for  David  Butler, 
Republican.  He  was  Secretary  of  Agriculture,  under  President  Cleveland, 

i893'6- 

1854. — The  Nebraska  City  News , dated  at  Nebraska  City. 

This  paper,  started  in  the  autumn  of  1854,  was  printed  at  Sidney, 
Iowa;  but  in  December,  1854,  was  removed  to  Nebraska  City,  and  thence- 

1 The  Historical  Record,  Salt  Lake  City,  May,  1887,  p.  236. 


XXX11 


NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS. 


forth  was  printed  there.  It  was  the  property  of  the  Nebraska  City  Town 
Site  Company,  and  was  projected  to  “boom”  the  land  speculations  of  that 
corporation.  In  April,  1855,  J.  Sterling  Morton  was  engaged  for  one  year 
to  manage  the  paper,  at  a salary  of  $50  per  week,  with  the  privilege  of 
employing  and  discharging  all  printers  and  other  help.  He  called  Thomas 
Hamilton — who  had  set  the  first  stick  of  type  in  Nebraska,  for  the  Nebraska 
Palladium , at  Bellevue — to  come  and  act  as  his  foreman,  and  they  two 
issued  their  first  number  of  the  News,  on  April  12,  1855,  from  the  original 
old  block-house  of  old  Fort  Kearny,  which  had  been  built  in  1847.  The 
News  is  still  published. 

1854. — The  Nebraskian , at  Omaha. 

This  paper  was  continued  until  1865. 

i860,  December  n. — Daily  Telegraph , at  Omaha,  by 
Henry  Z.  Curtis. 

This  is  said  to  have  been  the  first  daily  in  Nebraska.  It  was  pub- 
lished a little  more  than  six  months. 

Nevada.1 

* 1852. — Printing  introduced,  at  Genoa. 

The  first  books : 

Laws  | of  the  | Territory  of  Nevada,  | passed  at  the  | first 
regular  session  | of  the  | Legislative  Assembly,  | be- 
gun | the  first  day  of  October  and  ended  on  the  twenty- 
ninth  day  | of  November,  1861,  at  Carson  City.  | Print- 
ed under  the  supervision  of  | VVm.  Martin  Gillespie.  | 
San  Francisco:  \ Valentine  & Co.:  commercial 
steam  printing  establishment , | Nos.  517  Clay 
and  514  Commercial  Streets.  \ 1S62.  | 

8°  Pp.  xviii,  1—608. 

Collation  : Title ; verso,  certificate  of  Orion  Clemens,  Secretary  of 
the  Territory,  dated  Jan.  15,  1862.  Contents,  pp.  [iii]— viii.  Act  of  Con- 
gress organizing  the  Territory  of  Nevada,  pp.  [ix]-xvi.  List  of  officers, 
Federal  and  Territorial,  located  at  Carson  City,  pp.  [xviij-xviii.  Laws, 
one  leaf.  Laws  of  the  Territory  of  Nevada,  pp.  [1L509;  verso,  blank. 
Resolutions,  one  leaf.  Joint  and  Concurrent  Resolutions,  pp.  [513]— 5 18. 

1 Authorities: 

History  of  Nevada,  Colorado,  and  Wyoming, by  Hubert  Howe  Bancroft.  San  Fran- 
cisco, 1890.  8»  Pp.  828. 

Session  Laws,  in  the  library  of  the  Bar  Association  of  New  York. 


HISTORY  OF  AMERICAN  NEWSPAPERS. 


XXXlll 


Index,  verso  blank.  Index,  pp.  [52i]-6o8.  Chap.  LXXXVII,  approved 
November  25,  1861,  provides:  “For  the  purpose  of  securing  the  early 
printing  and  distribution  of  laws  and  journals  of  the  legislative  assembly, 
the  secretary  of  the  territory  is  hereby  authorized  and  required  to  contract 
with  one  or  more  printing  establishments  in  the  state  of  California,  for  the 
printing  of  said  laws  and  journals.”  (P.  294.) 

Laws  ] of  the  | Territory  of  Nevada,  | passed  at  the  | 
Second  Regular  Session  of  the  Legislative  Assembly,  | 
begun  | the  eleventh  day  of  November,  and  ended  on 
the  twentieth  day  of  j December,  | eighteen  hundred  and 
sixty-two,  at  Carson  City.  | 

Virginia : | J.  T.  Goodman  & Co . , Territorial 
Printers.  | 1863.  | 

8°  Pp.  xiv,  1-215. 

Collation  : Title;  verso,  certificate  of  Orion  Clemens,  Secretary  of 
State,  dated  June  10,  1863.  Contents,  pp.  [iii]-x.  List  of  officers,  Feder 
al  and  Territorial,  located  at  Carson  City,  pp.  [x2]-xiv.  Laws,  one  leaf. 
2 Should  be  xi. 

Laws  of  the  Territory  of  Nevada,-  pp.  [ij-igo.  Resolutions,  one  leaf. 
Concurrent  and  Joint  Resolutions,  pp.  [T93J-195.  Memorial  to  Congress, 
relative  to  depredations  committed  by  Indians,  etc.,  p.  196.  Index,  one 
leaf.  Index,  pp.  199-215.  By  act  approved  Dec.  19,  1862  (p.  76),  the 
Secretary  was  authorized  “to  subscribe  for  one  copy  of  each  of  the  news- 
papers at  present  published  in  the  Territory  of  Nevada,  to  wit:  The 
Daily  Territorial  Enterprise , the  Virginia  City  Daily  Union , the  Washoe 
Times , and  the  Esmeralda  StarT 

History  and  Chronology  of  Newspapers. 

1858,  December  18. — The  Territorial  Enterprise , at  Genoa, 
by  William  L.  Jernegan  and  A.  James. 

This  pioneer  of  Nevada  journalism  was  removed  to  Carson  City,  Nov. 
5,  1859.  In  i860  it  was  printed  on  a sheet  21x28  inches,  four  pages,  five 
columns  to  a page.  Jonathan  Williams  and  J.  B.  Wollard  having  bought 
it,  removed  it  to  Virginia.  City,  and  made  it  a daily,  in  1862.  It  is  still 
published. 

i860. — The  Silver  Age , at  Carson  City,  by  John  C.  Lewis 
and  Sewall. 

It  was  printed  on  a sheet  24x36  inches.  In  1871  it  became  a daily, 
printed  on  a sheet  16x20  inches.  In  1861  it  was  favored  with  the  State 
printing.  Having  been  sold  to  John  Church,  S.  A.  Glessner  and  J.  L. 
4 


XXXIV 


NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS. 


Laird,  they  removed  it  in  November,  1861,  to  Virginia  City,  and  changed 
its  name,  July  4,  1862,  to  The  Virginia  City  Daily  Union . 

1862,  May  10. — Esmeralda  Star , at  Esmeralda,  by  E.  A. 
Sherman  & Co. 

This  was  a small  weekly.  It  ceased  in  January,  1866. 

1862,  October  18. — Washoe  Times , at  Washoe,  by  G.  W. 

Derickson. 

The  Times  was  published  weekly,  until  December  12,  1863,  when  it 
was  discontinued. 

1863,  April. — Aurora  Times , at  Aurora,  by  R.  E.  Draper 

& R.  Glenn. 

It  was  published  daily  and  weekly,  until  April,  1865. 

1863,  May  2. — Unionville  Humboldt  Register , at  Union- 
ville,  Humboldt  county,  by  W.  J.  Forbes  and  L. 
Perkins. 

Discontinued  in  May,  1869. 

1863,  May  16. — Reese  River  Reveille , at  Reese  River,  by 
W.  C.  Phillips,  jun. 

This  was  a semi-weekly,  of  brief  duration. 

1863,  July  7. — Virginia  Evening  Bulletin , at  Virginia  City, 
by  H.  B.  Taylor  & Co. 

This  was  a daily  paper.  It  ceased  in  May,  1864. 

1863,  July  27. — Daily  Independent , at  Carson  City,  by  W. 
W.  Ross. 

This  was  the  third  paper  started  at  Carson  City.  It  was  21x27  inches 
in  size,  four  pages,  six  columns  to  a page.  Israel  Crawford  became  man- 
ager in  August,  and  proprietor  in  October,  and  enlarged  the  paper  ,to 
twenty-eight  columns.  It  was  discontinued  October  11,  1864. 

1863,  August  10. — Daily  Democratic  Standard,  at  Virginia 

City,  by  E.  O.  Hatch  and  J.  F.  Linthicum. 

It  was  published  for  about  two  months. 

1864,  August  27. — Daily  Evening  Post , at  Carson  City,  by 

John  C.  Lewis. 

It  was  printed  on  a sheet  23x32  inches,  four  pages,  seven  columns  to  a 
page.  It  was  discontinued  in  January,  1865. 


HISTORY  OF  AMERICAN  NEWSPAPERS. 


XXXV 


1864,  October  25. — Daily  State  Democrat , at  Carson  City, 
by  A.  C.  Ellis. 

This  was  a campaign  paper,  issued  only  until  the  Presidental  election 
was  held. 


New  Hampshire.1 


1756 — Printing  introduced  at  Portsmouth  in  July  or  August, 
by  Daniel  Fowle. 

It  has  been  thought  by  some  that  Daniel  Fowle  began  printing  at  Bos- 
ton, his  “Appendix  to  the  Total  Eclipse  of  Liberty,”  and  finished  it  at 
Portsmouth.  But  it  has  the  imprint,  “Boston:  Printed  1756.” 


1136411 


1 Authorities: 

Thomas — History  of  Printing. 

Buckingham — Specimens  of  Newspaper  Literature. 

Alden’s  Century  Sermon.  Full  title:  “The  Glory  of  America.  A Century  Sermon 
Delivered  in  the  South  Church,  in  Portsmouth,  Newhampshire.  IV  January, 
MDCCCI.  Together  with  a number  of  historical  notes,  and  an  Appendix,  containing  an 
account  of  the  newspapers  printed  in  the  State.  By  Timothy  Alden,  Jun.  A.  M.  Col- 
league Pastor  with  the  Reverend  Samuel  Haven,  D.  D.  Presented  to  the  Public,  at  the 
solicitation  of  a number  of  the  hearers,  to  whom  it  is  respectfully  dedicated.”  Ports- 
mouth, Printed  by  William  Treadwell  and  Co.  1801.  Pp.  47  (5). 

The  appendix  to  this  sermon  (pp.  5)  gives  a brief  account  of  twenty-nine  or  thirty 
different  newspapers  printed  in  New  Hampshire  up  to  the  close  of  the  year  1800.  The 
particulars  are  fairly  accurate  in  the  main.  It  is  to  be  regretted  that  Mr.  Alden  did  not 
devote  more  space  to  the  subject.  As  in  other  cases,  Mr.  Alden’s  account,  imperfect  as  it 
is,  is  really  the  best  we  have,  mentioning  more  New  Hampshire  newspapers  of  the  Eight- 
eenth Century  than  any  other  narrative  published  prior  to  the  present  work. 

Moore’s  Historical , Biographical,  and  Miscellaneous  Gatherings,  in  the  form  of  discon- 
nected notes  relative  to  Printers,  Printing,  Publishing,  and  Editing  of  Books,  Newspapers, 
Magazines  and  other  Literary  Productions,  such  as  the  early  Publications  of  New  Eng- 
land, the  United  States,  and  the  World,  from  the  Discovery  of  the  Art,  or  from  1420  to 
1886:  With  many  brief  notices  of  Authors,  Publishers,  Editors,  Printers,  and  Inventors. 
Compiled  by  John  W.  Moore,  Author  of  Moore’s  Complete  Encyclopedia  of  Music,  and 
other  works.  [Two  lines  of  quotations.]  Concord,  N.  H.  Printed  by  the  Republican 
Press  Association.  1886.  8°  Pp.  604. 

This  handsomely-printed  work  is,  as  its  title  indicates,  a melange,  principally  com- 
piled from  the  flotsam  and  jetsam  of  the  newspaper  press,  with  little  or  no  attempt  to 
verify  the  statements. 

Collections,  Topographical,  Historical  and  Biographical,  relating  particularly  to 
New  Hampshire,  edited  by  J B.  Moore.  Concord,  1822,  etc.  8»  . 

Collections  of  the  New  Hampshire  Historical  Society.  Concord,  1837,  etc. 

History  of  the  Town  of  Amherst.  By  Daniel  F.  Secomb.  Concord,  N.  H.,  1883.  8°  . 

Gazetteer  of  Grafton  County,  N.  H.  By  Hamilton  Child.  Syracuse,  N.  Y.,  June, 


1886.  40  . 

History  of  Merrimac  and  Belknap,  New  Hampshire.  Edited  by  D.  Hamilton  Hurd. 
Philadelphia,  1885.  40  . 

History  of  Rockingham  and  Strafford  Counties.  Compiled  under  the  supervision  of 
D.  Hamilton  Hurd.  Philadelphia,  1882.  4°  . 

Other  local  histories,  as  cited. 


XXXVI 


NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS. 


In  the  Brinley  Catalogue,  No.  2496,  Dr.  Trumbull  says  the  following 
is  “probably  the  first  book  that  was  printed  throughout  in  New  Hamp- 
shire:” 

The  Excellency  of  the  Word  of  God,  in  the  Mouth  of  a 
Faithful  Minister.  Sermon  of  Rev.  Samuel  Langdon 
at  the  Ordination  of  Rev.  Samuel  M’Clintock,  Colleague 
with  the  Rev.  William  Allen,  in  Greenland,  N.  H., 
Nov.  3,  1756. 

Portsmouth , Daniel  Fowle , 1756. 

8°  Pp-  47- 

There  is  reason  to  believe,  however,  that  the  following  is  an  earlier 
imprint: 

Good  News  From  a Far  Country.  In  Seven  Discourses 
from  1 Tim  I.  15.  Delivered  at  the  Presbyterian 
Church  in  Newbury  : And  now  published  at  the  Desire 
of  many  of  the  Hearers  and  Others.  By  Jonathan 
Parsons,  A.  M.  And  Minister  of  the  Gospel  there. 

Portsmouth , in  New  - Hampshire : Printed  and  Sold 
by  Daniel  Fowle.  1756.1 

S®  Pp.  viii,  168. 

In  the  New  Hampshire  Gazette , No.  5,  Nov.  4,  1756,  it  is  stated  that 
five  of  Parsons’  sermons  had  been  already  printed,  apd  the  rest  only  wait- 
ed for  the  arrival  of  more  paper  from  London.  This,  it  will  be  observed, 
was  only  a month  after  Fowle  commenced  printing  his  paper  in  Ports- 
mouth. 

It  is  stated  that  an  almanac  for  1757  was  also  printed  at  this  office  in 

I756-2 

History  and  Chronology  of  Newspapers.3 * 

1756,  October  7 (Thursday) — The  New -Hampshire  Gazette , 
With  the  Freshest  Advices  Foreign  and  Domestick, 
at  Portsmouth,  by  Daniel  Fowle. 

The  imprint  is  at  the  bottom  of  the  last  page:  “Portsmouth,  in  New- 
Hampshire:  Printed  by  Daniel  Fowle,  where  this  Paper  may  be  had  at 
One  Dollar  per  Annum,  or  an  Equivalent  in  Bills  of  Credit,  computing  a 

1 Title  from  Stevens’s  Hist.  Nuggets,  No.  2092. 

2 For  Portsmouth  imprints  of  1756  and  1757  see  Brinley,  Nos.  8687,  2497,  2498,  2499. 

3 For  the  present  work  very  full  notes  have  been  taken  from  scores  of  files  in  various 

ibraries,  thus  insuring  accuracy  as  to  names  of  printers  and  as  to  dates, 


HISTORY  OF  AMERICAN  NEWSPAPERS. 


xxxvil 


Dollar  this  Year  at  Four  Pounds  Old  Tenor.”  The  paper  is  a small  quar- 
to, 9x16  inches,  four  pages,  each  9x8  inches,  two  wide  columns  to  the  page. 


Friday,  May  13.  *757. 

The  New-Hampjbire 

With  the  Frejbejl  Advices 


Numb.  32 

GAZETTE, 

oes*3ssee9»»s93«08®*r®®«i*e*ftsse9 

Foreign  and  Domeflick 


From.tb«  AutiOTJa  Gazbttc.  cbett  a Mitt  Jijfanf  J/9mn\lr*otbcr.  Fnm the  i6r&  Company  when  the. Hc/culfyfjnSe  ocr6f«  them,  fcTif 

£xfrm&  »fa  Lftttr  frtm  Gtfyeikar.  Ftb.jFar.  Fibruan  totbt.  tab  .*  bitr-  ’ * J tapfetl-PiJfih  •wen  -.Night  coming  r - •'  -«i  ~On&bed. 


In  the  first  number,  the  “Printer  to  the  Public”  gives  the  following 
Prospectus: 

Upon  the  Encouragement  given  by  a Number  of  Subscribers  agreeable  to  printed  Pro- 
posals, I now  publish  the  first  Weekly  Gazette,  for  the  Province  of  New-Hampshire  ; de- 
pending upon  the  Favour  of  all  Gentlemen  who  are  Friends  to  Learning,  Religion  and 
Liberty  to  countenance  my  Undertaking,  as  this  is  the  beginning  of  Printing  in  this  Prov- 
ince, so  that  I may  go  on  cheerfully,  and  continue  this  Paper  in  a useful  and  entertaining 
Manner. 

Fondness  of  News  may  be  carried  to  an  extreme ; but  every  Lover  of  Mankind  must 
feel  a strong  Desire  to  know  what  passes  in  the  World,  as  well  as  within  his  own  private 
Sphere  ; and  particularly  to  be  acquainted  with  the  Affairs  of  his  own  Nation  and  Coun- 
try— Especially  at  such  a Time  as  This,  when  the  British  Nation  is  engaged  in  a just  and 
necessary  War  with  a powerful  Enemy,  the  French , a War  in  which  these  American  Col- 
onies are  most  nearly  interested,  the  Event  of  which  must  be  of  the  utmost  Importance 
both  to  us  and  all  the  British  Dominions,  every  true  Englishman,  must  be  anxious  to 
know  from  Time  to  Time  the  State  of  our  Affairs,  at  Home  and  in  the  Colonies. 

I shall  therefore  take  Pains  to  furnish  my  Readers  with  the  most  material  News  which 
can  be  collected  from  every  Part  of  the  World,  particularly  from  Great- Britain,  and  its 
Dependencies:  And  great  Care  will  be  taken  that  no  Facts  of  Importance  shall  be  pub- 
lished but  such  as  are  well  attended,  and  these  shall  be  as  particular  as  may  be  neces- 
sary. 

But  besides  the  common  News,  whenever  there  shall  be  Room,  and  as  there  may  be 
Occasion,  this  Paper  will  contain  Extracts  from  the  best  Authors  on  Points  of  the  most 
useful  Knowledge,  moral,  religious  or  political  Essays,  and  other  such  Speculations  as 
may  have  a Tendency  to  improve  the  Mind,  afford  and  Help  to  Trade,  Manufactures, 
Husbandry,  and  other  useful  Arts,  and  promote  the  public  Welfare  in  any  Respect. 

As  the  Press  always  claims  Liberty  in  Free  Countries,  it  is  presumed  that  none  will  be 
offended  if  this  Paper  discovers  that  Spirit  of  Freedom  which  so  remarkably  prevails  in 
the  English  Nation:  But  as  Liberty  ought  not  to  be  abus’d,  no  Encouragement  will  be 
given  by  the  Publisher  to  any  Thing  which  is  apparently  to  foment  Divisions  in  Church 
or  State,  nor  to  any  Thing  profane,  or  tending  to  encourage  Immorality,  nor  to  such 
Writings  as  are  produced  by  private  Pique,  and  fill’d  with  personal  Reflections  and  inso- 
lent scurrilous  Language.  It  is  a great  Abuse  of  good  Sense  as  well  as  good  Manners  to 
employ  those  Means  which  may  be  serviceable  to  the  best  Purposes,  in  the  service  of  Vice 
or  any  thing  Indecent,  or  which  may  give  just  Occasion  of  Offence  to  any  persons  of  true 
Taste  and  Judgment.  And  therefore  proper  Caution  will  be  always  us’d  to  avoid  all 
reasonable  Grounds  of  Complaint  on  that  Score. 

The  Publisher  will  esteem  it  a great  Favour  to  be  well  supplied  by  Correspondents  of 
Genius  and  generous,Sentiments  with  such  Speculations  or  Essays  as  may  be  pleasing  and 
instructive  to  the  Public,  agreeable  to  the  Design  of  this  Paper,  and  acknowledge  himself 
obliged  to  any  Gentleman  who  will  take  the  Pains  to  communicate  to  him  any  good  Intel- 
ligence, provided  they  be  sent  free  from  Charge. 


XXXV1U 


NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS. 


The  circumstances  which  induced  Fowle  to  leave  Boston  and  take  up 
his  residence  in  Portsmouth  are  related  in  connection  with  the  history  of 
Massachusetts  newspapers.1 2 * 

The  Gazette  was  at  first  printed  from  a long  primer  type,  on  half  a 
sheet  foolscap,  in  quarto;  but  was  soon  enlarged  to  half  a crown  sheet, 
folio,  and  it  sometimes  appeared  on  a whole  sheet  crown.  Samuel  Hall, 
afterwards  a printer  and  bookseller  in  Boston,  came  with  Fowle,  and  exe- 
cuted the  first  impressions  in  the  State.  From  March  n,  1763,  to  January 
9,  1776,  the  title  was  The  New  Hampshire  Gazette , and  Historical  Chronicle , 
with  a badly  engraved  cut  of  the  royal  arms  in  the  title.  In  September, 
1764,  Robert  Fowle  became  a partner  of  Daniel  in  the  publication  of  the 
Gazette , and  the  heading  was  like  this: 


The 

Gm 

New-Hampshire  (p 
and 

H ISTORICAL 

Friday,  October  18,  1765.  No.  471  {W“ksSSI>uMsPr 

Portsmouth,  in  New  Hampshire,  Printed  by  Daniel  & Robert  Fowle. 


Gazette, 

Chronicle. 


Two  weeks  later  the  Gazette  came  out  with  a black  border  around  it, 
and  announced  that  it  would  be  published  no  longer,  as  the  printers  could 
not  afford  to  pay  the  obnoxious  stamp  tax,  which  it  vigorously  denounced. 
This  gained  for  the  paper  the  cordial  support  of  many  who  had  thought  it 
lukewarm  in  its  defence  of  American  liberties. 

Robert  Fowle  withdrew  from  the  firm  in  1774.  In  1776  there  was 
some  irregularity  in  the  publication,  on  account  of  the  war,  but  Daniel 
soon  resumed  the  issue,  and  continued  it  much  as  usual,  with  a leaning 
toward  the  American  cause.  During  this  year  he  published  a communica- 
tion urging  the  Provincial  Congress,  then  in  session  at  Exeter,  not  to  es- 
tablish an  independent  government,  lest  such  a proceeding  should  be  con- 
strued into  a design  to  throw  off  British  rule.  He  was  at  once  summoned 
before  the  Provincial  Congress  and  severely  censured,  and  also  admon- 
ished never  to  publish  any  article  reflecting  upon  that  body,  the  Conti- 
nental Congress,  or  the  cause  of  American  independence.  With  the  issue 
for  May  25,  1776,  Benjamin  Dearborn, 2 whom  Fowle  had  taught  the  print- 
er’s art,  became  the  publisher,  changing  the  title  to  The  Freeman's  Journ- 
al,, or  New  Hampshire  Gazette , and  beginning  a new  series  of  numeration. 
The  imprint  was  : Portsmouth:  Printed  by  Benjamin  Dearborn,  near  the 


1 See  N.  J.  Archives,  XII.,  cxlvi. 

2 Dearborn  subsequently  invented  several  improvements  in  printing  presses;  also  in 

scales. 


HISTORY  OF  AMERICAN  NEWSPAPERS. 


XXXIX 


Parade,  where  this  Paper  may  be  had  at  Eight  Shillings,  L.  M.2  Dear- 
2 Lawful  money. 

born  continued  in  charge  until  May  31,  1777,  when  Daniel  Fowle,  who  had 
all  the  while  retained  the  ownership,  resumed  the  management.  The  is- 
sue for  Tuesday,  January  14,  1777,  is  Vol.  I.,  No.  34;  and  is  printed  on  a 
whole  sheet,  15^x20  inches,  four  pages,  three  columns  to  a page.  The 
Freeman's  Journal , or  New  Hampshire  Gazette , Vol.  II.,  No.  42,  Tuesday, 
March  31,  1778,  is  printed  on  a sheet  13x16  inches,  four  pages,  two  col- 
umns to  a page,  and  has  the  imprint  in  the  colophon:  “Portsmouth,  print- 
ed by  Daniel  Fowle.”  With  the  issue  for  March  27,  1784,  the  title  was 
changed  to  The  New  Hampshire  Gazette  and  General  Advertiser , and  the 
publishers  were  Melcher  & Osborne.  Fowle  died  in  June,  1787,  aged 
seventy-two  years.  He  had  made  a fair  living,  but  did  not  acquire  much 
property.  Thomas  says:  “He  was  a correct  printer,  and  industrious.  In 
his  disposition  he  was  pacific,  agreeable  in  his  manners,  liberal  in  his  sen- 
timents, and  attached  to  the  cause  of  his  country.”  His  wife  died  before 
him;  he  had  no  children,  and  he  therefore  gave  his  property  to  his  ap- 
prentice, John  Melcher,  whom  he  had  adopted  as  a son.  Here  is  the  title 
of  a number  issued  by  the  latter : 

[Thursday,  May  17,  1792.]  The  [Vol.  xxxv.,  Numb.  1844.] 

New-Hampshire  Gazette, 
and  the 

General  Advertiser. 

Containing  the  Laws,  See.  of  the  United  States,  as  well  as  those  of  this 
State  passed  since  1787,  with  a variety  of  other  matters,  both  useful 
and  entertaining. 

Portsmouth:  Printed  by  John  Melcher,  at  his  Office  in  Market- Street,  at 
nine  shillings  per  Annum. 

This  number  is  printed  on  a whole  sheet,  with  two,  three  and  four  col- 
umns on  a page,  each  page  16x10  inches. 

The  issue  for  Tuesday,  October  15,  1793,  Volume  xxxvn.,  Numb. 
1925,  has  the  title  reduced  to  simply  The  New  Hampshire  Gazette.  Im- 
print: “Portsmouth:  Printed  by  John  Melcher,  Printer  to  the  Hon.  Gen- 
eral-Court of  the  State  of  New  Hampshire,  at  his  Office  in  Market-Street, 
at  nine  shillings  per  Annum.”  Vol.  XL.,  Numb.  2048,  Saturday,  Febru- 
ury  27,  1796,  has  under  the  title  the  motto:  “Here  truth  is  welcome — 
Candour  guides  the  way.”  Vol.  XLII.,  Numb.  2142,  Wednesday,  Decem- 
ber 13,  1797,  shows  a change  to  the  sentiment:  “Our  Country’s  Good  our 
constant  aim,”  which  underwent  a modest  variation  from  the  editorial 
plural  to  this  form:  “My  country’s  good  shall  be  my  constant  aim,”  in 
Vol.  xlii.,  Numb.  2173,  Tuesday,  July  24,  1798.  The  heading  and  motto 


xl 


NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS. 


remained  unchanged  so  late  as  Vol.  xlix.,  No.  i,  Whole  Numb.  2341, 
December  30,  1800.  Melcher  sold  the  establishment  in  1802.  The 

Gazette  did  the  State  printing  from  1787  to  1814.  It  celebrated  its  centen- 
nial in  1856  with  becoming  eclat.  Since  1861  it  has  been  published  as  the 
weekly  edition  of  the  Portsmouth  Daily  Chroiiicle , and  is  one  of  the  oldest 
newspapers  in  the  United  States. 

“John  Melcher  was  born  in  Portsmouth  in  1759.  He  was  a good 
printer,  shrewd,  and  sharp  at  a bargain,  and  was  seldom  deceived  or 
cheated.  He  was  active  through  life,  and  was  a good  liver,  but  abstemi- 
ous. He  died  June  9,  1850,  aged  90  years.  He  was  the  first  State  printer 
of  New  Hampshire.” — Moore. 

176 5,  January  21. — The  Portsmouth  Mercury  and  Weekly 
Advertiser , at  Portsmouth,  by  Thomas  Furber. 

This  was  the  second  newspaper  printed  in  New  Hampshire.  It  was 
printed  generally  on  a crown  sheet,  folio,  16x23  inches,  four  pages,  four 
columns  to  a page,  but  sometimes  appeared  on  a half  sheet,  broadside, 
with  only  three  columns.  A new  large-faced  small  pica  type  was  used. 
The  title  of  the  first  number  is  thus  arranged: 

Monday,  Jan.  21, 1765.  The  Numb.  I. 

Portsmouth  Mercury 
and 

Weekly  Advertiser. 

Containing  the  freshest  and  most  important  Advice,  both  Foreign  and 

Domestic. 


In  the  colophon  is  the  imprint:  “Portsmouth,  in  New  Hampshire, 
Printed  by  Thomas  Furber,  at  the  New  Printing-Office  near  the  Parade.” 
In  No.  8 is  added:  “where  this  paper  may  be  had  for  one  Dollar  or  Six 
Pounds,  O.  T.  per  year;  one  half  to  be  paid  at  Entrance.”  The  paper 
was  started  at  the  instigation  of  some  ardent  patriots  who  thought  the 
Fowles  were  not  sufficiently  pronounced  in  favor  of  the  American  cause. 
The  editor  promised  to  print  “nothing  tending  to  subvert  good  order  in 
society;  but  to  steer  clear  of  ill-natured  and  trifling  disputes,  and  yet  to  be 
ever  ready  in  exposing  arbitrary  power,  public  injuries,  and  all  attempts  to 
prevent  the  Liberties  of  the  people,  which  are  dearer  to  them  than  their 
lives.”  In  point  of  typography,  news  or  reading  matter,  the  Mercury  was 
in  no  way  superior  to  the  Gazette , and  did  not  gain  any  better  support. 
Before  the  end  of  the  year  Furber  took  in  Ezekiel  Russell,  of  Boston,  as  a 
partner.  The  issue  for  Monday,  Feb.  17,  1766,  Numb.  57,  has  the  im- 
print in  the  colophon:  “Published  and  Printed  by  Furber  and  Russell,  at 
the  New  Printing-Office,  near  the  Parade,  where  the  Printing  and  Book- 


HISTORY  OF  AMERICAN  NEWSPAPERS. 


xli 


Binding  Business  are  carried  on  with  the  greatest  Care,  Fidelity  and  Dis- 
patch.” A change  soon  after  appears  in  the  title  and  imprint,  as  follows: 


Containing  the  Freshest  Advices,  Both  Foreign  and  Domestic. 

From  Monday,  April  28,  to  Monday,  May  5,  1766.  [Price  four  pence. 

Portsmouth,  (New  Hampshire.)  Printed  by  Furber  & Russell,  at  the  New 
Printing-Office,  near  the  Parade,  where  the  Printing  and  Book-Bind- 
ing Business,  are  carried  on  with  the  greatest  Care,  Fidelity,  and  Des- 
patch, and  where  all  Letters  of  Intelligence  are  requested  to  be  left. 


Thomas  says:  “The  Mercury  did  not  gain  that  circulation  which  it 
might  have  obtained  had  its  editors  taken  a more  decided  part,  and  either 
defended  government  with  energy,  or  made  the  paper  generally  interesting 
to  the  public  by  a zealous  support  of  the  rights  and  liberties  of  the  colonies. 
In  consequence  of  the  neglect  of  the  publishers  to  render  the  Mercury 
worthy  of  public  attention,  the  customers  withdrew,  and  the  paper,  after 
having  been  published  about  three  years,  was  discontinued.”  According 
to  Alden,  the  Mercury  was  published  in  the  years  1765-6-7.  The  latest 
copy  which  the  writer  has  been  able  to  discover  is  Vol.  II.,  No.  89,  From 
Monday,  September  22,  to  Monday,  September  29,  1766.  The  price  was 
then  “Four  pence  single.”  It  is  doubtful  if  the  paper  was  continued 
many  weeks  after  this.  The  printing  material  was  bought  by  the  Fowles. 

“Thomas  Furber  was  born  in  Portsmouth  and  served  his  apprentice- 
ship with  Daniel  Fowle.  He  had  been  taught  plain  binding;  he  under- 
took to  connect  it  with  printing,  and  although  he  was  not  very  skilful,  either 
as  a printer  or  a binder,  he  began  the  world  under  favorable  circum- 
stances,” but  neglected  his  business  for  passing  enjoyment.  Upon  the 
dissolution  of  the  Mercury , he  again  entered  the  employ  of  the  Messrs. 
Fowle,  of  the  Gazette. — Thomas , II.,  434.  He  subsequently  went  to  Bal- 
timore, where  he  was  employed  by  William  Goddard,  and  died  at  his 
house  in  that  city.  Russell  returned  to  Boston. 

1775. — A New  Hampshire  Gazette , at  Exeter,  by  Robert 
Luist  Fowle. 

It  was  printed  on  a large  type,  small  paper,  and  often  on  half  a sheet. 
Thomas' says  it  was  first  issued  toward  the  close  of  the  year  1775,  and  that 
during  its  first  year  it  underwent  many  changes  in  its  appearance,  besides 
these  alterations  in  the  title:  The  New  Ha?7ipshire  Gazette;  The  Nezu 


voi  in  The 
Portsmouth 
and 

Weekly 


( Cut  of  ) 
l Mercury  ) 


Advertiser 


[Numb.  68 

Mercury 


xlii 


NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS. 


Hampshire  Gazette , or  Exeter  Morning  Chronicle ; The  New  Hampshire 
(State)  Gazette , or,  Exeter  Circulating  Morning  Chronicle ; The  State 
Journal ’ or  The  New  Hampshire  Gazette  and  Tuesday's  Liberty  Advertiser. 
It  was  published  generally  without  an  imprint. 

Robert  Luist  Fowle  was  the  son  of  John  Fowle,  who  was  several  years 
a silent  partner  with  Rogers  and  Fowle  in  Boston,  and  afterwards  an  Epis- 
copal clergyman  at  Norwalk  in  Connecticut.  Robert  served  his  appren- 
ticeship with  his  uncle,  Daniel  Fowle,  at  Portsmouth,  and  when  of  age  be- 
came his  partner.  During  the  troubles  of  1774,  Robert  favored  the  min- 
isterial party.  This  led  to  a rupture  with  his  uncle,  and  a dissolution  of 
the  partnership.  They  divided  their  printing  materials,  and  Robert  took 
the  press  and  types  which  had  been  used  by  Furber,  and  removed  with 
them  to  Exeter,  where  he  established  himself  in  business  in  the  same 
year.  He  did  some  work  for  the  old  government,  and,  in  1775,  some  for 
the  new.  He  made  several  attempts  to  start  a newspaper,  which  finally 
culminated  in  the  latter  part  of  1775  or  the  early  part  of  1776,  in  the  pub- 
lication of  the  Gazette , at  Exeter.  He  continued  the  paper  until  early  in 
1 7 78,  when  his  Tory  proclivities  became  so  strong  that  he  had  to  leave  the 
town.  Moreover,  having  been  employed  to  print  some  of  the  new  paper 
currency  for  New  Hampshire,  he  was  suspected  of  printing  an  excessive 
quantity,  or  of  forging  the  signatures.  Instead  of  awaiting  investigation, 
he  fled  to  New  York,  which  confirmed  the  popular  suspicion.  With  other 
refugees  from  the  United  States,  he  was  placed  on  the  British  pension  list. 
Soon  after  the  war,  Robert  Fowle  returned  to  New  Hampshire,  and  in  1789 
married  Sarah,  the  widow  of  his  deceased  brother,  Zechariah.  He  con- 
tinued at  Exeter  about  six  years,  when  he  removed  to  Brentwood,  where 
he  died  about  1802.  Thomas  says  that  he  “was  neither  a skilful  nor  a 
correct  printer.” 

1778,  February  17  (est.)  — The  Exeter  Journal , Or,  New - 
Hampshire  Gazette,  at  Exeter,  by  Zechariah  Fowle. 

Printed  on  a sheet  14x20  inches,  four  pages,  two  columns  to  a page. 
When  Robert  Luist  Fowle  fled  from  Exeter,  his  printing  establishment 
was  taken  over  by  his  younger  brother,  Zechariah  Fowle,  who  continued 
the  paper  under  the  above  title,  with  a new  numeration.  He  continued 
the  paper  until  his  death,  near  the  close  of  the  war.  He  is  said  to  have 
been  a tolerable  printer,  but  lacked  application  and  business  capacity.  He 
was  born  in  Charlestown,  Mass.,  and  served  his  apprenticeship  with  his 
brother,  Daniel  Fowle.  He  started  a small  office  for  himself,  in  Boston, 
printing  ballads  and  pamphlets;  in  1757  he  printed  an  edition  of  the 
Psalter  for  booksellers. 1 He  then  formed  a partnership  with  Samuel 


1 So  says  Thomas,  I.,  339.  This  edition  is  not  mentioned  by  either  O’Callaghan  or 
Wright,  and  so  accomplished  a bibliographer  as  Wilberforce  Eames  writes  me  (February, 
1896)  that  he  knows  of  no  such  edition. 


HISTORY  OF  AMERICAN  NEWSPAPERS. 


xliii 


fc  Draper,  which  continued  some  years,  when  he  resumed  business  on  his 
I own  account,  until  1770,  in  which  year  he  formed  a partnership  with 
I Isaiah  Thomas,  and  issued  The  Massachusetts  Spy,  August  7,  1770.  Three 
I months  later  Thomas  bought  his  press  and  types.  Fowle  continued  his 
I bookselling  until  1775,  and  then  removed  to  Exeter,  where  he  started  The 
I Exeter  Journal.  He  printed  at  Exeter  a Thanksgiving  Proclamation  of 

■ the  Legislature,  dated  December,  1778,  and  various  other  minor  publica- 
tions in  1783. 1 Thomas  says  he  died  at  the  house  of  his  brother  Daniel, 

1“  in  Portsmouth,  in  1776,  which  is  manifestly  an  error.  He  was  twice  mar- 
ried, first  in  1759,  but  had  no  children.  In  1780  he  printed  an  edition  of 
the  laws  of  the  State  in  a volume  of  180  folio  pages.2  Isaiah  Thomas  was 

I one  of  his  apprentices.  The  following  shows  the  heading,  etc.,  of  one  of 
the  few  numbers  known  of  the  Journal'. 

The  Exeter  Journal, 

Or, 

New  Hampshire  Gazette. 

Vol.  I.]  Tuesday,  April  7,  1778.  [No.  8. 

The  entire  Prosperity  of  every  State,  depends  upon  the  Discipline  of  its 

Armies. 

Exeter:  Printed  by  Zechariah  Fowle,  near  the  Town-House. 

| 1779,  May  5 (est.)  — The  Dresden  Mercury , at  Hanover,  by 
Judah-Padock  Spooner  and  Alden  Spooner. 

Printed  on  a sheet  13x16  inches,  four  pages,  two  columns  to  a page. 
The  precise  appearance  of  the  title,  etc.,  is  shown  herewith: 

The 

Dresden  { Figure  of  Mercury. | Mercury 
and  the 

Universal  Intelligencer 

Tuesday,  August  3,  1779.  [Number  14. 

Free  as  the  Savage  roams  his  native  Wood, — Or  finny  Nations  cleave  the  briny  Flood. 
Dresden:  Printed  by  Judah-Padock  and  Alden  Spooner,  in  the  South  end 
of  Dartmouth  College. 

The  latest  number  known  is  that  for  Monday,  Aug.  9,  1779,  Number  15. 

1784,  June  10  (est.) — The  Exeter  Chronicle , or  Weekly  Ad- 
vertiser, at  Exeter,  by  John  Melcher  and  George 
Jerry  Osborne. 


1 See  Brinley,  Nos.  2471, 2482,  8680. 


2 Moore.  It  is  not  in  the  Tower  Collection. 


xliv 


NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS. 


Printed  on  a sheet  17x24  inches,  four  pages,  three  columns  to  a page.  | 
The  earliest  number  known  shows  the  title,  imprint,  etc.,  in  this  form:  j|j; 

The 


Exeter  Chronicle, 


or 


Weekly  Advertiser. 


“Open  your  Ears;  for  which  of  you  will  stop  the  bent  of  hearing,  when 
loud  Rumour  speak?” 

Printed  and  Published  by  Melcher  and  Osborne. 

Vol.  I.]  Thursday,  September  2,  1784.  [No.  13. 


Subscriptions  for  this  Paper,  at  Four  Shillings  & six  pence  per  six  Months  (exclusive 
of  postage)  are  taken  in  by  the  Publishers,  by  whom  Essays,  Letters  of  Intelligence,  Adi 
vertisements,  &c.  are  thankfully  received,  and  all  kinds  of  Printing  performed  at  a reason- 
able rate. — This  Paper  to  contain  a copy  of  the  Laws  of  this  State. 

Alden  says  it  was  discontinued  in  December,  1784.  The  latest  numl 
ber  known  is  Vol.  I.,  No.  24,  Friday,  Nov.  19,  1784. 


1784,  December  24  (est.)  — The  New  Hampshire  Mercury t 
and  General  Advertiser , at  Portsmouth,  by  Robert 
Gerrish. 

Printed  on  a sheet,  18x22  inches,  three  and  four  columns  to  a page.| 
The  following  is  the  arrangement  of  heading,  etc.,  of  the  earliest  copy: 
known  : 

The 

New-Hampshire  Mercury, 
and 

General  Advertiser. 


Vol.  1. 


Friday,  December  31,  1784. 


[No.  II. 


The  Liberty  of  the  Press  is  essential  to  the  security  of  freedom  in  a state — it  ought 
therefore  to  be  inviolably  preserved.  Const.  N.  H. 


Portsmouth:  Printed  and  Published  by' Robert  Gerrish,  in  Congress-Street. 

At  the  foot  of  the  fourth  page  appears  the  following: 

Subscriptions  for  the  Paper,  at  Nine  Shillings  per  annum,  exclusive  of  postage,  are 
taken  in  by  the  Publisher,  next  door  to  the  Buck  and  Glove,  in  Congress-Street ; where' 
Advertisements  are  received,  the  Favors  of  Correspondents  carefully  attended  to,  and 
the  Printing  Business  carried  on  at  a reasonable  rate.  E^”Those  who  wish  to  become 
subscribers  for  this  paper,  are  requested  to  let  their  pleasure  be  known  as  soon  as  possible. 

In  No.  XI,  of  Vol.  I.,  a device  appears  in  the  centre  of  the  caption 
representing  Mercury  flying  over  a fortified  harbor.  The  following  fac 
simile  gives  an  excellent  idea  of  the  appearance  of  the  paper: 


HISTORY  OF  AMERICAN  NEWSPAPERS. 


xlv 


Vew-Hampjbirt  | 


-A  N d- 

GENERAL 


FOR  I S M 0 If  T H . ; 

Br  RCJBERT.GERRiSM, 


MERCURY ; 

. T IT  T 

advertiser: 

PRFNTED  and  PUBZJSHED 
in  Congress -Street. 

it-3; 


W E D.N  E S D AY,  AS  e p t_€  * b e r 6,  1786. 


[Numb.  XCI. 


MeACTIRV. 

Mr.  GtRKiSH, 
infer  ting  tbefclloviing  you  -Jiill 
oblige  a cofreff  undent : 

* INHABITANTS  r.nhe  State  of 
Kn-Btvs«iu. 

O tdfr.pcra'J  O !h‘.res  ! 

rHF.  pieces  ^known  by 
the  fignaturi'  of  Honef- 
las  in  the  Maflbcha  feces 
Gazette,  have  occaGon- 
ally  attraSed  myaiten- 
tion.  Their  operations 

wn.  _ His  remarks  in  fome  points,  are 
in  others,  ill-r.atored.  The  whole 
appears  to  be  wrote  by  a 


actuated  by 
ry  dilFe 
that  commonwealth 


Tim. 


moment-  in  which  he  left-writ- 
has  been  enfortunasefor  hinr.  How- 
, I view  the  writer  as  a man  o£iftge-. 
y*  and  oull  acknowledge*  that  in 
i of  his  p^tcer^ere  has  been  a veiir 
blarvation.  worthY-of  attention  ; and 
it  bec^  differently,  applied,  mufc 
: iaterefiea  cvqry  fubjott  of  the  ftatp 
New-Hamofhl',e.  Ke  argues,  with 
priery,  that ' ppSPflr;  thrown  into  the 
ds  of^partg!alaifry)fijr  Qt,men,  is 


ry.  The  only  motive  which  induces 
e to  make  an  appearance  in  thi:  paper, 
an  earned  iv-Jh,  r."  anxious  feeling  for 
le  welfare  of  the  people. 

Eut  a few  weeks  Gnce,  I 
through  three  counties  of  this  lb 
" : .1  trmics  of  ^politics.  ' 

hoaefc  ciriz 


The 


enrougn  cnrec  counties oi 
principal  topics  of  j>ol 

ciliated  among ’ 1 

as  follow  : * 

L*  To  reduce  the  Fees  of  Attornies. 

.2-.  Tb  raife  the  Jurifdiction  of  the  Jaf- 
tices  to  hear  and  determine  Actions  of  all 
kinds,  and  to  any  amount  ; and 

5.  ..To  give  thejuitices  power  to  grant 
an  appeal  immediately  to  the  Supreme 

Upon  a enquiry  how,  and  by  what 
means,  thefe  fubjeds  became  agitated, 

I found  they  were  firil  put  in  motion  by 
(bare  izodest  Jufticesof theFeacc.  The 
Court  of  Common  Pleas,  and  Attornies, 
were  held  up  as  a falfe  medium,  -chroogh 
which,  by  coutrafti ng,  they  difeovered  2 
more  lpeedv  determination  of  civil  dis- 
putes, and  a lefs  expenGve  mode  of  trial. 
But  to  fpeak  in  brder  : 

It  appears  too  late  a period  to  begin 
with  AUornlts.  To  reduce  their  fees^ 
in  expedition  of  rendering  a benefit  to 
the  Public,  is  like  applying  a remedy 
when  the  difcaGr  is  removed.  Had  the 
legiflature,  in  the  year  <732,  taken  it  un- 
cer/conGderation,  it  probably  might  have 
'■~s  e -cacd- effed*  .The  insndau a <£, 


pends,  when  the  juftice  at  the  fame  time, 
is  ignoraa:  of  the  nature  of  the  caufc  he- 
takes  cognizance  of ; who  cannot  even 
tell  you,  why  an  adion  of  debt  differs 
from  ai«  adion  on  the  cafe  ; I fay,  to 
fubmlt  your  property  tb  the  judgment  of 
this  ignoramus,  is  Inch  a wanton  facrifice 
of  Liberty,  that*  if  it  was  permitted;  I 
lhould  ever  hereafter  efteem  it  a trifle,  a 
bauble,  a rattle,  calculated  only  for  babes, 
maniacs,-  and  fbets.  is  this  the  method, 
myfcllow-citizees;  In  which  you  propefe 
to  enjoy  the  Freedom  yoa  dearly  pur- 
chafed  in  the  coorfe  of ’a  long  and  bloody 
war  ? And  will  yoc*bag,  in  your  befoms, 
an  order  men,  who  are  endeavoring  to 
plunge  a poniard  into  the  very  vitals  of 
our  Confutation,  [or  the  fake  of  a tempo- 
rary advantage  i*— Where  is  that  fpirit 
of  Liberty  which  pervaded  our  atmofphere 
in  the  year  1775  r— Did  it  abfeond  when 
the  Ten  pound  c3,  6 at  precious  bantling 
of -she  Jufliccs,  nude  it  s appearance  ? 
The  rimes  are  bad  taongh,  without  graf- 
ping  this  additional:  evil.  I appeal  -to 
moment 

eprefentarives,  who 
mg  to  this  order,  to  be  a little  more 
modeft  in  their  demands  and  wifhes  for 
power.  XhCr'o’JEce  of  a JufHce  of  the 
Peace  wasVonce,  an  honorable  one  ; it 
was  the  fafoguard  of  the  people  ; but..ic 


decorum,  as  to  make  a motion  in  the 
honorable  houfc,  that  ftrikes  aC’tbe  rooc 
of  Liberty? — Who,  among  yo2-.can  afle 
for  this  Rod  of  Power,  to  whip  the"  back* 
of  your  fellow-citizens,  without  btiflh-i 


ing  r 


-I  Hufh  for  the  l 


as  the  monfter  of  mankind  ; and  Wbeft 
one,  more  wicked  than  the  refl,  ffaiki 
through  the*  earth,' and  we  are  at  a lofs  to 
draw  a comparifon  of  infamy, . we  will 
call  him  by  the  name  of  that  man,  who 
has  the  raihnels  to  encroach  on  our  Con- 
fHtation. 

1 1 " Is  thrrt  not Jcmt' tbofen  curje , 

Some  bidden  thunder  in  the  Jlores  of  hea  ven. 
Red with uncommon  wrath,  to  blafttbeman 
Who  owes  his greatnefs  to  bis  country* s ruin.** 
JIJNiUS. 


For  the  New-Hampshire  Mercurt.  - 
' Oif  PATfeR  MONEY. 

AS  Tapew  Money,  or  rather  a paper 
medium,  has  now  become  the  debate 
of  the  day,  and  is  warmly  recommended 
and  difeommended,  by  the  affluent  and  the 
indigent,  the  worthy  and  the  worthlefs, 
it  is  not  only  the  privilege,  but  the  duty  . 
of  every  diGntercfted  citizen,  freely  to 
give  his  opinion  on  fo  important  Vfohjefr*. 


This  issue  has  the  imprint  in  the  colophon: 

Subscriptions  for  this  Paper,  at  Nine  Shillings  per  annum,  exclusive  of  postage,  are 
iken  in  by  the  Publisher,  at  his  Printing-Office  in  Congress-Street,  Portsmouth,  and  by 
amson  and  Ranlet,  at  their  Printing-Office  in  Exeter ; where  Advertisements  are  re- 
ived, the  Favors  of  Correspondents  carefully  attended  to,  and  the  Printing  Business 
arried  on  at  a reasonable  rate. 

In  the  same  paper  is  the  following  emphatic  and  pathetic  appeal  of 
he  publisher: 

All  Persons  indebted  to  the  Printer  hereof,  in  town  and  country,  particularly  for 
lews  Papers,  are  once  more,  earnestly  solicited  to  make  immediate  payment,  to  enable 
im  to  discharge  his  own  debts,  and  to  continue  and  improve  bis  paper  agreeable  to  his 
rishes. — Those  who  now  generously  comply  with  this  reasonable  request  will  highly 
'blige  him,  and  animate  him  to  exert  his  utmost  abilities  in  their  service. — But,  the  little 
.ttention  which  hath  been  paid  to  his  repeated  solicitations,  constrains  him  to  add,  on  this 
ccasion,  his  resolution  to  discontinue  sending  papers  to  those  who  shall  neglect  to  make 
. lim  some  kind  of  payment,  by  way  of  recompense  for  his  labour  and  expence. — Those 
vho  may  have  occasion  to  ADVERTISE  in  this  paper,  (which  is  well  known  to  have  an 

xtensive  circulation)  are  requested  to  accompany  their  advertisements  with  the  pay. 

'he  Printer  feels  himself  impressed  with  sentiments  of  lively  gratitude  to  his  old  sted- 
st  friends  and  punctual  customers,  and  offers  them  his  most  grateful  acknowledgments 
or  their  reiterated  favors  and  kind  offices,  and  wishes  a continuance  thereof. 

The  heading  remained  unchanged  so  late  as  Vol.  III.,  Numb.  Cl. XVI., 


xlvi 


NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS. 


Wednesday,  February  27,  1788,  the  latest  number  known.  Beginning  in 
the  summer  of  1786  the  subscription  rate  is  given  at  “Two  shillings  and 
three  pence  per  quarter.”  Alden  says  the  paper  “was  published  four  or 
five  years  between  1780  and  1790.”  It  probably  ceased  early  in  1788. 

1786,  June  27  (est.) — The  Freeman's  Oracle , and  New 
Hampshire  Advertiser , at  Exeter,  by  John  Lamson 
and  Henry  Ranlet. 

Printed  on  a sheet  15^x20  inches,  four  pages,  three  or  four  columns 
to  a page.  The  earliest  number  known  has  the  title,  etc.,  in  this^form: 

The 

Freeman’s  Oracle, 
and 

New-Hampshire  Advertiser. 

Tuesday,  August  29,  1786.  [Nub.  10.  — Vol.  I. 

The  Independence  of  a State  cannot  be  supported,  but  may  be  destroyed  by  the 
importation  of  Foreign  Luxuries. 

Exeter:  Printed  and  Published  by  Lamson  and  Ranlet,  in  Dearborn’s 
New  Constructed  Press. 

At  the  foot  of  the  fourth  page  appears  the  following: — 

Subscriptions  for  this  Paper,  at  eight  shillings  per  annum,  exclusive  of  postage,  are 
taken  in  by  the  Publishers;  where  Advertisements  will  be  thankfully  received,  and  careful- 
ly inserted  ; the  favors  of  Correspondents  punctually  attended  to  and  the  Printing  busi- 
ness performed  with  fidelity  and  dispatch. 

In  July,  1789,  Ranlet  withdrew  from  the  concern,  and  embarked  in  an 
independent  venture — The  New  Hampshire  Gazetteer  (which  see,  under 
the  date  just  given),  while  John  Lamson  continued  The  Freeman's  Oracle. 
The  latest  number  known  of  the  latter  is  Vol.  IV.,  No.  170,  Wednesday, 
November  11,  1789.  The  little  town  was  not  large  enough  to  support  two 
rival  newspapers,  and  after  a while — probably  about  the  date  just  men- 
tioned— Ranlet  bought  out  Lamson  and  consolidated  The  Freeman' s Oracle 
with  his  Gazetteer , retaining  the  latter  name,  but  continuing  the  numera- 
tion of  the  former.  Lamson  continued  to  print  at  Exeter;  in  1793  he  was 
in  partnership  with  Thomas  Odiorne;  in  1794  he  was  alone. 

1786,  October  3 (est.) — New-Hampshire  Spy,  at  Ports- 
mouth, by  George  Jerry  Osborne. 

Printed  on  a sheet  14^x18  inches,  four  pages,  three  columns  to  a page. 
The  heading  was  very  simple  in  style: 


HISTORY  OF  AMERICAN  NEWSPAPERS. 


xlvii 


New-Hampshire  Spy. 

Vol.  I.)  Tuesday,  November,  14,  1786.  (No.  7. 

Published  every  Tuesday  and  Friday,  by  George  Jerry  Osborne,  at  his 
Office,  near  the  State-House,  Portsmouth: 

Wrhere  Subscriptions,  Advertisements,  Articles  of  Intelligence,  &c.  for 
this  Paper,  are  gratefully  received. 

On  some  of  the  early  papers  the  following  motto  appears: 

The  Printer’s  Heart  should  ever  be  of  steel: — 

Whate’er  the  Man,  the  Printer  must  not  feel; 

But  paint  the  growing  fool,  and  paint  the  wise, 

And  catch  the  manners  living  as  they  rise. 

This  was  the  first  semi-weekly  in  the  State.  Some  weeks,  for  want  of 
news  or  paper,  it  was  published  but  once.  No.  39,  Vol.  V.,  March  6,  1789, 
is  called  Osborne's  New  Hampshire  Spy.  Sometimes  the  motto  is  : “A 
free  and  impartial  paper.”  The  days  of  publication  were  frequently 
changed  to  suit  the  convenience  of  the  mails.  The  files  consulted  show 
that  Vols.  XI.-XII.,  running  from  November,  1791,  to  May,  1792,  were 
published  by  George  and  John  Osborne.  With  the  issue  for  Wednesday, 
June  20,  1792,  Vol.  XII.,  No.  XVII.,  the  seal  of  New  Hampshire  takes  its 
place  in  the  centre  of  the  caption;  it  was  now  published  on  Wednesday  and 
Saturday,  by  John  Osborne,  at  12  shillings  per  annum,  and  still  professed 
to  be  “A  Free  and  Impartial  Paper.”  It  was  printed  on  a sheet  14x18 
inches,  four  pages,  three  columns  to  a page.  With  the  issue  for  Saturday, 
September  12,  1792,  Vol.  XII.,  No.  40,  the  paper  changed  to  a weekly, 
the  price  being  nine  shillings  per  annum,  and  the  device  in  the  caption  was 
an  eye  surrounded  by  a scroll  and  thirteen  stars.  The  latest  number 
known  is  Vol.  XIII.,  No.  10,  Saturday,  February  16,  1793.  Alden  says 
the  paper  was  discontinued  early  in  1793. 

Osborne  learned  his  trade  in  the  office  of  Daniel  Fowle,  and  became 
one  his  successors  in  1784,  in  partnership  with  John  Melcher.  Another  of 
his  New  Hampshire  newspaper  ventures  will  be  found  recounted  under  date 
of  August  31,  1799. 

1789,  August  7 (est.)  — The  New-Hampshire  Recorder,  and 
the  Weekly  Advertiser , at  Keene,  by  James  Dav- 
enport Griffith. 

This  was  the  first  newspaper  in  Cheshire  county.  It  was  printed  on 
a whole  sheet,  20x15  inches,  four  pages,  three  columns  to  a page.  The 
appearance  of  the  paper  is  thus  shown: 


Xlviii 


NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS. 


[Volume  I.] 


The  [Number  3.] 


New-Hampshire  ( Seal  ) 
And  J of  the  | 

W eekly  (United  States.} 


Recorder, 

The 

Advertiser. 


Keene  : (State  of  New-Hampshire  Printed  and  Published 

By  James  D.  Griffith,  A few  Rods  below  Mr.  Ralston’s  Tavern. 

Tuesday,  August  21,  1789. 

At  the  bottom  of  the  fourth  page  was  the  following: — “ Subscriptions 
for  this  Paper,  at  Nine  Shillings  per  Annum — and  Advertisements,  (which 
will  be  inserted  reasonably)  are  gratefully  received  by  the  Publisher — Also, 
Letters  of  Intelligence — Speculative  Pieces — Essays,  &c.- — and  the  several 
Branches  of  Printing  executed  with  Neatness  and  Dispatch. — ^^Hand- 
Bills  printed  at  an  Hours  Notice.”  The  office  was  afterwards  “ In  the 
Main-Street.”  The  paper  continued  without  other  change  until  Vol.  III., 
No.  33,  Jan.  6,  1791,  the  latest  number  known.  Alden  says  the  Recorder 
was  published  for  about  two  years  and  a half. 

1789,  August  (est). — The  New  Hampshire  Gazetteer , at 
Exeter,  by  Henry  Ranlet. 

Printed  on  a sheet  15x20  inches,  four  pages,  four  columns  to  a page. 
This  was  an  outgrowth  of  Ranlet’s  separation  from  his  partner,  John 
Lamson.  He  seems  to  have  thrown  a good  deal  of  energy  into  the  new 
enterprise,  which  shows  much  vigor  from  the  start.  The  title  was  in  this 
form: 

The 

New-Hampshire  Gazetteer. 

Saturday,  September  5,  1789.]  [Vol.  I.  Numb.  4. 

Published  by  II.  Ranlet,  in  the  Main  Street,  Exeter;  tSUT where  Subscrip- 
tion, Advertisements,  and  all  Favours,  are  gratefully  received. 

Here  you  may  range  the  world  from  pole  to  pole,  Increase  your  knowledge,  and  delight 
your  soul;  Travel  all  countries,  and  inform  your  sense.  With  ease  and  safety  at  a small 
expense. 

With  a consistency  very  unusual  among  the  newspapers  of  the  day, 
Ranlet  adhered  to  his  title  and  motto  until  the  end  of  the  fourth  volume,  1 
about  which  time  he  omitted  the  poetical  quotation.  In  No.  36,  Vol.  V., 
Saturday,  April  9,  1791,  the  U.  S.  arms  appear  in  the  centre  of  the  cap- 
tion, and  the  subscription  rate  is  given  as  nine  shillings  per  annum.  No. 

1 As  already  explained,  he  adopted  the  numeration  of  The  Freeman' s Oracle  when  he 
again  assumed  control  of  the  latter,  after  starting  the  Gazetteer. 


HISTORY  OF  AMERICAN  NEWSPAPERS. 


xlix 


2,  Vol.  VII.,  July  II,  1792,  has  the  New  Hampshire  arms  in  the  title, 
which  remains  unchanged  until  the  last  number,  No.  32,  Vol.  VII.,  Febru- 
ary 13,  1793.  With  the  next  issue  Ranlet  adopted  a new  title: 

The  Herald  of  Liberty. 

Exeter  (New  Hampshire)  Printed  by  Henry  Ranlet,  in  Main-Street,  at  six 

shillings  and  eight  pence  per  annum. 

Vol.  VII.]  Wednesday,  February  20,  1793.  [Numb.  33. 

The  paper  was  of  the  same  size  as  formerly,  15^x20  inches,  four  pages, 
four  columns  to  a page.  No.  44,  Vol.  VII.,  Wednesday,  May  8,  1793, 
shows  no  change,  but  the  issue  for  Tuesday,  May  14,  1793,  Vol.  VII.,  No. 
45,  has  a modified  title:  The  American  Herald  of  Liberty , and  is  enlarged 
to  18x21  inches.  Vol.  VIII.,  No.  27,  Tuesday,  January  7,  1794,  is  pub- 
lished by  [William]  Sterns  & Winslow.1  Vol.  IX.,  No.  27,  Saturday,  Jan- 
uary 3,  1795,  has  the  imprint  “Published  on  Saturdays,  by  Samuel  Win- 
slow, in  Main  Street,  Exeter,  (New-Hampshire)  at  7 | 6 per  annum.”  The 
issue  for  Tuesday,  June  21,  1796,  Vol.  X.,  No.  52  (the  latest  copy  known), 
shows  a reversion  to  an  earlier  title:  The  Herald  of  Liberty;  or , Exeter 
Gazette.  It  is  said  to  have  ceased  in  1797.  Ranlet  added  to  his  equip- 
ment the  types  for  printing  music,  and  published  ten  or  twelve  volumes  of 
collections  of  vocal  and  instrumental  music.  He  continued  in  business 
until  his  death,  which  occurred  in  1807. 2 

1790,  January  6,  Wednesday  (est.) — The  Conccrd  Herald , 
and  Ne wha m psh ire  Intelligencer , at  Concord,  by 
George  Hough. 

Printed  on  a sheet  14x20  inches,  four  pages,  three  columns  to  a page. 
The  paper  was  neatly  printed  on  a thin  fashionable  sheet  of  a blueish  cast. 
In  1794  it  was  enlarged  to  18x20  inches.  This  was  the  first  newspaper  in 
Concord,  and  was  supposed  to  start  under  favorable  circumstances,  as  a 
town  house  was  erected  at  the  time,  a one-story  building,  with  a spacious 
hall  through  the  center,  and  two  large  rooms  for  the  accommodation  of  the 
“Great  and  General  Court,”  the  north  room  for  the  House  of  Representa- 
tives and  the  south  room  for  the  Senate.  The  prospective  growth  and  in- 

1 In  1794  Sterns  & Winslow  brought  out  a few  books.  Mr.  Sterns  is  said  (by  Pierce, 
History  of  Rockingham  and  Strafford  Counties,  p.  274)  to  have  printed  in  1795-96,  the  first 
edition  of  the  New  Testament  issued  in  New  Hampshire.  This  is  probably  erroneous,  as 
neither  O’Callaghan  nor  Wright  mentions  any  Exeter  Testament  of  earlier  date  than  1827. 

2 For  collections  of  music  printed  by  Henry  Ranlet  at  Exeter  in  1802  (Abraham  Max- 
im’s “The  Oriental  Harmony”),  in  1803  (“The  Village  Harmony”),  and  in  1805  (Samuel 
Holyoke’s  “The  Columbian  Repository  of  Sacred  Harmony,”  and  Jeremiah  Ingalls’s 
“The  Christian  Harmony”),  see  Brinley,  Nos.  5949,  5960,  5924,  5929.  In  1807,  Ranlet  & 
Norris  printed  Amos  Blanchard’s  “The  Newburyport  Collection  of  Sacred  European  Mu- 
sic” (Brinley,  No.  5905) ; this  firm  was  succeeded  by  Norris  & Sawyer  in  the  same  year 
(Brinley,  No.  5926). 

5 


1 


NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS. 


fluence  of  Concord  induced  Mr.  Hough  to  open  a printing  office4  and  to 
commence  his  newspaper.  He  at  once  advocated  the  establishment  of 
post-routes  from  Concord  to  the  chief  towns,  and  in  1791  was  appointed 
post  master,  and  opened  the  first  post-office  in  Concord.  The  second 
number  of  the  paper  had  the  heading,  motto,  etc.,  arranged  thus  : 

The  Concord  Herald,  and 

Newhampshire  Intelligencer. 

No.  2.]  The  Press  is  the  Cradle  of  Science,  [Vol.  I. 

the  Nurse  of  Genius,  and  the  Shield  of  Liberty. 

Printed  at  Concord,  (Newhampshire) 
by  George  Hough. 

Concord,  Wednesday,  January  13,  1790. 

No.  15,  of  Vol.  I.,  changes  the  motto  to  the  following:  “The  Liberty 
of  the  Press  is  essential  to  the  Security  of  Freedom  in  a State — it  ought 
therefore  to  be  inviolably  preserved.--  Constitution  of  Newhampshire.” 

No  other  change  was  made  throughout  Vol.  L Early  in  Vol.  II.  the 
heading  and  imprint  were  altered,  as  follows  : 

Concord  Herald. 

The  Liberty  of  the  Press  is  essential  to  the  Security  of  Freedom  in 
a State. — Constitution  of  New  Hampshire. 

Printed  and  published  by  George  Hough, 
at  Concord,  New  Hampshire. 

No.  10.  Vol.  II.  Wednesday,  March  23,  1791.  [Whole  No.  62. 

In  the  caption  the  U.  S.  arms  appear  on  the  left,  and  the  New  Hamp- 
shire arms  on  the  right,  both  in  very  small  cuts.  The  paper  was  printed 
on  a sheet  17x22  inches,  four  pages,  four  columns  to  a page.  No.  16, 
Vol.  III.,  Wednesday,  May  16,  1792,  Whole  No.  120,  omits  the  motto,  and 
substitutes  for  the  arms  in  the  caption,  an  eagle  on  the  left  and  a marine 
scene  on  the  right.  The  Herald  continued  without  further  change  until 
Vol.  III.,  No.  23,  July  4,  1792,  when  the  imprint  informs  us  that  Elijah 
Russell  was  associated  with  George  Hough  in  the  publication.  This  part- 
nership was  of  very  brief  duration,  and  the  retirement  of  Russell  was  em- 
phasized by  a change  in  the  title,  thus  : 

Houeh’s 

o 

Concord  Herald. 

A Political  State  Paper:  Printed  and  Published  by 
George  Hough,  at  Concord,  New  Hampshire. 

No.  31.  Vol.  III.]  Saturday,  September  8,  1792.  [Whole  No.  135. 

4 The  earliest  Concord  imprint  known  to  the  writer  is  Eckley’s  Sermon  at  the  Installa- 
tion of  Israel  Evans,  printed  in  1789. — Brinley , No.  2477.  Nathaniel  Coverly  printed  T. 
Priestly’s  “The  Christian’s  Looking  Glass,”  etc.,  in  1794. — Brinley , No.  2478. 


HISTORY  OF  AMERICAN  NEWSPAPERS. 


li 


The  device  in  the  heading  remained  as  formerly,  and  there  was  no  al- 
teration in  the  size  of  the  paper.  On  March  20,  1794,  Hough  changed  the 
name  to  Cottrier  of  New  Hampshire.  Below  the  heading  was  the  line  : 
“Devoted  to  News  and  National  Politics.”  That  Hough  was  not  without 
humor  is  indicated  by  a notice  in  his  paper  of  March  20,  1797,  when  he 
gravely  informs  the  subscribers  to  the  Coeirier,  who  propose  to  pay  for  it 
in  wood,  wheat,  rye,  corn  or  flax,  that  “though  these  articles  are  very 
much  needed,  even  cash  will  be  received  if  it  should  be  more  plenty  than 
these  things.”  The  last  issue  in  the  eighteenth  century,  Vol.  XI.,  No. 
48,  Friday,  December  26,  1800,  Whole  No.  568,  has  the  imprint : “Printed 
every  Friday,  at  Concord,  by  George  Hough,  Printer  of  the  Laws  of  the 
United  States,  except  those  which  relate  to  commerce,  for  the  District  of 
New  Hampshire.”  The  paper  was  discontinued  October  30,  1805.  In 
January,  1819,  he  commenced  the  Concord  Observer , the  first  religious 
newspaper  printed  in  the  State.  In  1824  he  commenced  the  Concord 
Register , which  he  continued  for  several  years. 

“Daniel  Hough  was  born  at  Bozrah,  Conn.,  June  15,  1757.  He  learned 
the  printer’s  trade  under  Alexander  Robertson  and  John  and  James  Trum- 
bull, of  the  Norwich  Packet.  In  1783  he  became  a partner  of  Alden 
Spooner,  at  Windsor,  Vermont,  and  there  commenced  the  Vermont  Journ- 
al, but  in  1789  removed  to  Concord.  He  was  small  but  very  erect,  precise 
and  deliberate  in  his  movements  as  in  his  conversation,  and  seemed  to 
punctuate  all  his  doings  as  if  a strict  account  of  them  might  be  required 
for  the  next  newspaper.  He  possessed  good  mechanical  skill,  combined 
with  uniform  kindness.  He  was  so  very  precise  that  it  was  said  that  ‘he 
seemed  to  put  a comma  after  every  step  he  took.’  He  died  February  8, 
1830.” — Moore , 104-5. 

17 90,  July  15,  Thursday  (est  ) — Political  and  Sentimental 
Repository , or  Strafford  Recorder , at  Dover,  by  Eliph- 
alet  Ladd. 

This  was  the  first  newspaper  issued  at  Dover.  It  was  printed  on  a 
sheet  15^x20  inches,  four  pages,  three  columns  to  a page'.  The  heading 
and  imprint  appear  below  : 

Political  and  Sentimental 
Repository,  or  Strafford  Recorder. 

Vol.  I.]  Thursday,  July  29,  1790.  [Num.  III. 

Dover,  New-Hampshire  — Published  by 
Eliphalet  Ladd.  Near  the  landing,  at  8s.  per  Ann. 

Vol.  I.,  No.  4,  has  the  following  motto  : — “ The  Posts  come  tiring  on — 
but  not  a Man  of  them  brings  other  News  than  what  they’ve  learned  of 
me.” — Shakespear. 


lii 


NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS. 


Vol.  I.,  No.  XLVIII,  Thursday,  June  9,  1791,  shows  a slight  change 
in  the  title,  which  is  reduced  to:  The  Political  Repository , or  Strafford 
Recorder.  The  publication  office  is  “Near  the  Court-House.”  The  last 
issue  was  on  January  19,  1792,  when  the  establishment  was  destroyed  by 
fire.  Ladd  immediately  resumed  publication,  continuing  the  numeration, 
but  with  a new  name,  thus  : 

The  Phenix. 

Vol.  III.  Numb.  CIV.]  Thursday,  August  2,  1792. 

Dover,  (N.  H. ) Published  by  Eliphalet  LadJ, 
near  the  Court-House — 

At  8.r.  per.  ann. 

In  the  centre  of  the  caption  is  a cut  of  the  head  and  wings  of  a phenix 
rising  from  the  ashes.  The  size  of  the  paper  remained  unchanged — 15x20 
inches,  four  pages,  three  or  four  columns  to  a page.  Vol.  IV.,  No. 
CLXXIV.,  Saturday,  November  30,  1793,  announces  as  publishers,  E. 
Ladd  and  G.  S.  Homans.  They  retired  in  March,  1794,  in  favor  of  Sam- 
uel Bragg,  jun.,  a brother-in-law  of  Ladd,  who  had  served  his  apprentice- 
ship in  the  office.  He  continued  the  paper  until  August  29,  1795,  when  it 
ceased  publication,  according  to  Alden.  The  latest  issue  known  is  Vol. 
VI.,  No.  7,  Saturday,  August  22,  1795.  Early  in  1795  the  price  of  the  pa- 
per is  given  as  one  dollar  and  thirty-four  cents  per  annum. 

Ladd  came  to  Dover  from  Massachusetts,  in  1790,  and  married  a 
daughter  of  Samuel  Bragg,  sen.  He  died  in  Dover  about  1805. 

-1792,  January  1. — The  Cheshire  Advertiser , at  Keene,  by 
James  Davenport  Griffith. 

This  was  practically  a continuation  of  The  New  Hampshire  Recorder , 
begun  at  the  same  place  by  the  same  publisher  in  August,  1789.  Alden 
says  the  Advertiser  was  continued  about  a year. 

179 2,  October  28,  Monday  (est.) — The  Mirrour , at  Con- 
cord, by  Elijah  Russell. 

Printed  on  a small  sheet,  14^x12  inches,  four  pages,  three  columns  to 
a page,  each  page  being  but  six  inches  in  width.  The  earliest  number 
known  shows  this  arrangement  of  title,  together  with  the  imprint  and 
prospectus  : 

The  Mirrour. 

Vol.  I.]  Concord,  Monday,  November  12,  1792.  [No.  3. 

Published  by  Elijah  Russell,  at  his  Office,  near  Mr.  Hannaford’s 
Tavern,  in  Concord,  New  Hampshire. 

Conditions  on  which  the  Mirrour  is  published. 

I.  The  Mirrour  shall  be  printed  on  good  paper  and  published  weekly  on  such  day  as 
shall  be  most  conducive  to  the  earliest  conveyance  of  news. 

II.  The  price  besides  the  postage,  is  Five  Shillings  per  annum,  or  for  fifty-two  papers. 


HISTORY  OF  AMERICAN  NEWSPAPERS. 


liii 


One  Shilling  only  to  be  paid  yearly  in  Money,  on  receiving  the  first  paper  of  every 
year,  and  the  remainder  in  Country  Produce,  at  the  market  cash  price,  any  time  in 
the  course  of  the  year. 

III.  Of  those  who  cannot  pay  One  shilling  in  cash,  produce  will  be  received  for  the  whole, 
at  the  end  of  the  year. 

E^Cotton  or  Linen  Rags,  suitable  for  making  paper,  will  be  received  for  papers. 
The  Mirrour  was  printed  at  the  former  office  of  the  Herald.  The  is- 
sue for  Friday,  Feb.  20,  1795,  Vol.  III.,  No.  122,  shows  a new  partner  in 
the  enterprise,  the  imprint  reading  : — “Concord,  N.  H.,  Printed  and  Pub- 
lished by  Elijah  Russell  and  Moses  Davis.”  The  paper  was  then  printed 
on  a sheet  18x22  inches,  four  pages,  four  columns  to  a page.  In  the 
first  column  on  the  first  page  is  this  touching  appeal : 

Help  the  Printer. 

For,  as  “without  Rain  from  Heaven,  the  Corn  withers  on  the  stalk,”  and  cannot 
thrive  : So,  without  Pay,  the  Printer  cannot  live. 

The  subscriber  (being  earnestly  requested  by  the  Paper  Maker,  and  other  Creditors, 
to  make  payment  for  the  Stock  he  has  heretofore  expended)  Once  More  invites  those  who 
are  indebted  to  him  for  Newspapers,  to  discharge  their  respective  accounts. — 

Feb.  6, 1795.  Elijah  Russell. 

A change  was  soon  made  in  the  heading,  thus  : 

The  Federal  Mirror. 

New  Hampshire — Printed  and  Published  by  Russell  and  Davis, 
at  Concord. 

Vol.  III.]  Concord,  Friday,  April  24,  1795.  [Number  131. 

Printed  on  a whole  sheet,  18x24  inches,  four  pages,  four  columns  to  a 
page.  In  the  upper  left  hand  column  appears  the  following : — 

Hear  the  Editors. 

Mirror — No.  130. 

E^”This  number  completes  six  months  since  the  partnership  of  Russell  & Davis  com- 
menced— They  gratefully  acknowledge  the  favors  of  their  friends  and  Patrons — They  beg 
leave  to  urge  the  absolute  necessity  of  punctual  payments,  from  this  consideration  : Pa- 
per, and  other  necessary  materials  for  prosecuting  our  business,  are  costly  ; we  cannot 
procure  these,  without  at  least  making  quarterly  payments — Therefore  we  presume  our 
friends  will  readily  acquiesce,  and  make  the  small  payment  of  three  shillings  and  six 
pence  each,  who  may  be  in  arrear  for  the  six  months  above  mentioned. — They  are  also 
obliged,  from  the  enhanced  price  of  the  necessaries  of  Subsistence,  &c.  to  add  Three 
Pence  per  quarter  to  the  price  of  the  Mirror — which  will  make  it  eight  Shillings  per  an- 
num at  the  Office — Those  (if  any  there  are)  who  object  to  complying  with  this  addition, 
are  requested  to  give  information  to  the  Editors,  who  will  discontinue  their  papers  upon 
receiving  arrearage  money. — They  must  also,  in  future,  request  (and  will  depend  on) 
punctual  payments,  at  the  expiration  of  each  quarter. 

EW” Advertisements  of  12  lines,  or  under,  inserted  in  the  Mirror  (which  has  a very  ex- 
tensive circulation  in  the  counties  of  Rockingham,  Strafford,  Grafton  and  Hillsboro’) 
three  weeks  for  4s.  or  six  weeks  for  6s. — All  larger  ones  in  proportion. 

The  Mirrour , says  Moore,  was  sometimes  printed  upon  paper  of  so 
poor  a quality  that  the  Concord  minister,  the  Rev.  Israel  Evans,  com- 
plained of  it  to  Mr.  Davis,  who,  after  hearing  the  very  discouraging  re- 
marks concerning  his  newspaper,  said:  “I  know  the  Mirrour  is  sometimes 


liv 


NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS. 


printed  badly,  and  on  poor  paper,  because  we  could  not  procure  better,  but 
it  is  as  good  as  the  pay;  you  give  me  exceedingly  poor  preaching  and  I give 
you  a poor  paper  in  exchange.”  The  poverty  of  the  printers  was  fre- 
quently brought  to  the  attention  of  the  readers  most  directly.  In  the  issue 
for  Tuesday,  October  18,  1796,  Vol.  IV.,  Number  208,  is  this  notice: 
Concord,  Oct.  18. 

Mirror  208.  This  No.  completes  two  years  since  our  partnership  . . . Grateful 

for  favors  received,  we  beg  our  friends  to  remember  our  necessities,  and  make  payments 
of  the  small  sums  due  to  their  very  humble  servants.  Russel  & Davis. 

Four  weeks  later  the  Mirror  was  discontinued,  and  on  Nov.  22,  1796, 
Davis  started  a new  paper,  Republican  Gazetteer  (which  see  under  that 
date).  The  old  partnership  was  soon  resumed,  but  with  no  appreciative 
effect  in  improving  the  financial  condition  of  the  establishment.  Accord- 
ingly,  in  April,  1797,  a new  experiment  was  tried,  in  the  issue  of  The  New 
Star , in  octavo  form.  At  the  end  of  six  months  the  paper  was  again  issued 
in  folio  form,  with  a slight  change  in  the  appearance: 

Voi.  v.  The  Mirror.  no.  259. 

By  Russel  and  Davis. 

Concord,  [Newhampshire]  Tuesday,  October  io,  1797. 

Old  Things  shall  become  New. 

The  only  apology  we  shall  offer,  for  this  alteration  of  the  Form  of  our  paper,  is,  the 
decided  disapprobation  of  a large  majority  of  our  patrons  to  it  book  wise — 

Tho’  we  cannot  personate  the  weather-cock  so  far,  as  to  please  everybody,  yet  Interest 
at  least,  prompts  the  endeavor  to  displease  as  few  as  possible. 

The  Editors. 

With  the  issue  for  Tuesday,  October  17,  1797,  Vol.  V.,  No.  260,  the 
partnership  between  Russell  & Davis  was  dissolved,  by  mutual  agreement, 
Russell  retiring,  and  Moses  Davis  continuing  the  paper  alone,  as  The  Mir- 
ror•,  dropping  the  superfluous  “u.”  The  paper  remained  the  same  in  size 
as  previously.  In  1799  the  title  was  surrounded  by  a variety  of  political 
information,  after  the  style  of  the  French  Republic,  imitated  by  the  Re- 
publican newspapers  in  America  generally: 

Columbian  Independence,  Federal  Government, 

Twenty  Third  Year.  The  MlITOr.  Eleventh  Year. 

Printed  and  published  every  Monday  morning,  by  Moses  Davis, 
in  Concord,  Newhampshire. 

[Vol.  VII.]  Concord,  Monday,  April  29,  1799.  [No.  339] 

The  latest  number  known  is  Vol.  VII.,  No.  357,  Monday,  Sept.  21, 
1799.  The  paper  is  said  to  have  been  discontinued  in  1799.  The  fourth 
page  of  the  Mirror  was  headed:  “ The  Sentimental  Medley.  ‘To  Raise 
the  Genius,  and  to  Mend  the  Heart.’  ” 

1793,  April  3. — The  Columbian  Informer , and  Cheshire 
Journal , at  Keene,  by  Henry  Blake  & Co. 


HISTORY  OF  AMERICAN  NEWSPAPERS.  lv 

This  paper  was  conducted  by  the  original  publishers  for  two  years, 
and  then  for  two  months  by  William  Ward  Blake.  The  latest  number 
known  bears  date  April  21,  1795. 

1793)  April  n. — The  New  Hampshire  Journal:  Or , The 
Farmer  s Weekly  Museum , at  Walpole,  by  Isaiah 
Thomas  and  David  Carlisle. 

Printed  on  a whole  sheet,  16x21  inches,  four  pages,  four  columns  to  a 
page.  This  became  one  of  the  most  famous  of  New  England  newspapers. 
The  first  number  shows  the  arrangement  of  title,  etc. : 

The 

New  Hampshire  Journal : 

Or,  The  Farmer’s  Weekly  Museum. 

“Where  Liberty  is,  there  is  my  Country.”  Franklin. — 

The  Liberty  of  the  Press  is  essential  to  the  Rights  of  Man. 

Vol.  I.]  Walpole,  Thursday,  April  11,  1793.  [No.  I. 

At  the  foot  of  the  fourth  page  appears  the  following:  “Printed  at  Wal- 
pole, Newhampshire,  by  Isaiah  Thomas  and  David  Carlisle,  jun.  in  the 
Main  Street.  Printing,  performed  with  Care,  Neatness  and  Fidelity.  An 
Assortment  of  Books  for  sale  by  them;  and  a general  assortment  of  books 
and  stationary  to  be  sold  by  said  Thomas,  at  his  Bookstore  in  Worcester, 
and  by  said  Thomas  and  Andrews,  at  Faust’s  Statue,  No.  45,  Newbury 
Street,  Boston.” 

To  this  was  added  in  Vol.  II.,  Tuesday,  February  17,  1795,  No.  98: 
“ This  Paper  has  an  extensive  circulation  in  this,  and  the  State  of  Ver- 
mont, which  renders  it  useful  for  Advertising.”  This  number  shows  a 
change  in  the  heading,  to:  The  Newhampshire  and  Vermont  Journal:  Or , 
The  Farmer1  s Weekly  Museum.  The  mottos  remained  the  same.  With 
Vol.  IV.,  Tuesday,  April  5,  1796,  No.  157,  this  adaptation  of  scripture  is 
substituted  for  the  quotations  in  the  title:  “Ho,  every  one,  that  thirsteth 
for  novelty — come.”  Thomas  had  retired  from  the  establishment  now,  the 
imprint  (at  the  bottom  of  the  fourth  page)  being:  “Printed  at  Walpole^ 
Newhampshire,  by  David  Carlisle,  Jr.  By  whom  Advertisements  for  this 
paper,  which  has  an  extensive  circulation  in  the  states  of  Newhampshire 
and  Vermont,  are  gratefully  received  and  inserted  Reasonably.  ©ITSaid 
Carlisle  constantly  keeps  for  sale,  at  his  Bookstore  in  Walpole,  a general 
Assortment  of  Books,  which  he  will  sell  at  the  Boston  prices. 

“%*  Printing,  in  all  its  various  branches,  performed  with  neatness 
accuracy  and  dispatch,  and  on  the  most  moderate  terms.” 

The  next  change  in  the  name,  etc.,  begins  with  Vol.  V.,  and  appears 
below: 


lvi 


NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS. 


The  Farmers  Weekly  Museum: 
Newhampshire  and  Vermont  Journal. 

American  Independence,)  (Federal  Government, 

Twenty  first  Year.  ) ( Ninth  Year. 

“ Would’st  thou  remember 

From  New  Year’s  day  to  the  last  of  December? 

Then  read.”  Bunyan. 

Vol.  V.]  Walpole,  Newhampshire,  Tuesday,  April  4,  1797.  [No.  209. 

The  imprint  at  the  bottom  of  the  fourth  page  remained  as  above,  un- 
til Vol.  V.,  Tuesday,  February  20,  1798,  No.  255,  when  it  was  thus: 
“ Printed  at  Walpole,  N.  H,,  by  David  Carlisle,  for  Isaiah  Thomas.  Sub- 
scriptions and  Advertisements  for  this  Paper,  are  received  at  the  Printing 
Office  and  Bookstore,  in  Walpole,  and  by  said  Thomas,  in  Worcester. 
*HTA  General  Assortment  of  Books  by  Wholesale  and  Retail,  are  constant- 
ly kept  for  Sale,  by  said  Thomas  in  Walpole,  and  Worcester.  ***  Printing, 
in  all  its  various  branches,  performed  with  neatness,  correctness  and  dis- 
patch.” 

No.  257,  Tuesday,  March  6,  1798,  says  : “Printed  at  Walpole,  N.  H., 
for  Isaiah  Thomas,”  (Carlisle’s  name  being  omitted),  and  so  on  until  Vol. 
VI.,  No.  269,  Tuesday,  May  29,  1798,  when  Carlisle  is  mentioned  again  as 
printer  “for  Thomas  & Thomas.” 

Who  would  have  supposed  that  an  edition  de  hixe  of  a weekly  news- 
paper would  be  attempted  a century  ago?  Yet  in  the  issue  of  the  Museum 
for  Monday,  August  20,  1798,  Vol.  VI.,  No.  281,  is  this  announcement: 
Notice  to  the  Subscribers  for  this  Paper. 

The  price  of  the  Farmer’s  Museum,  delivered  at  the  Office,  is  one  Dollar  and  fifty 
Cents  per  annum,  and  two  Dollars  and  fifty  Cents  for  the  superfine  paper — to  be  paid  in 
semi  annual  payments. 

The  beginning  of  Vol.  VII.  witnessed  another  change  in  the  title, 
after  this  fashion: 

Vol.  VII.]  [No.  313 

Farmer’s  Museum,  or  Lay  Preacher’s  Gazette. 

American  Independence)  (Federal  Government, 

Twenty  third  Year.  (Eleventh  Year. 

“Hither  each  week,  the  peasant  shall  repair 
“To  sweet  oblivion  of  his  daily  care; 

“Again  the  Farmer’s  news,  the  barber’s  tale, 

Again  the  Woodman’s  ballad  shall  prevail.” 

Goldsmith. 

Walpole,  N.  H.,  Monday,  April  1,  1799. 

The  device  in  the  centre  of  the  caption  represents  an  eagle  perched 
upon  a medallion,  charged  with  the  chief;  below  the  chief  the  medallion 
is  divided  into  an  even  number  of  partitions  palewise,  paly  of  seventeen. 


HISTORY  OF  AMERICAN  NEWSPAPERS. 


lvii 


From  behind  the  medallion  protrude  to  the  left  and  right  grain  and  farm- 
ing implements. 

The  paper  was  now  printed  on  a sheet  20x24  inches,  four  pages,  four 
columns  to  a page,  each  printed  page  being  17^x11  inches  in  size.  There 
were  some  slight  changes  in  the  arrangement  of  the  title  during  the  rest 
of  the  century. 

David  Carlisle  was  a native  of  Walpole,  and  served  an  apprenticeship 
with  Isaiah  Thomas,  at  Worcester,  which  was  completed  about  the  end  of 
1792  or  the  beginning  of  1793.  Thomas  furnished  the  printing  office  with 
its  types  and  press,  and  a bookstore  with  a handsome  assortment  of  books. 
At  the  commencement  of  the  second  year,  Carlisle  being  the  sole  editor  of 
the  paper,  he  received  aid  from  several  correspondents,  one  of  whom  was 
the  Rev.  William  Fessenden,  a clergyman  at  Walpole,  who  wrote  a long 
series  of  articles  under  the  title  of  “The  Religionist.”  In  1795,  Joseph 
Dennie  took  up  his  residence  at  Walpole  and  began  to  write  for  the 
Mtisewn  a series  of  papers  entitled  “The  Lay  Preacher.”  It  is  believed 
that  these  contributions  were  first  entirely  voluntary  and  gratuitous,  but  in 
the  Spring  of  1796,  Carlisle  having  become  nominally  the  sole  editor  of  the 
paper,  an  agreement  was  made  with  Dennie  by  which  the  arrangement 
of  news  was  transferred  to  him.  These  “Lay  Sermons”  were  republished 
in  the  newspapers  throughout  the  country,  and  gave  the  paper  a wide  rep- 
utation. Royal  Tyler,  then  a lawyer  in  Guilford,  Vermont,  also  furnished 
a popular  series  of  articles,  purporting  to  be  “From  the  Shop  of  Messrs. 
Colon  & Spondee.”  Thomas  Green  Fessenden  (“Christopher  Caustic”), 
a graduate  of  Dartmouth  College,  in  August,  1796,  was  another  contribu- 
tor of  humorous  political  verse.  With  the  beginning  of  the  year  1800, 
Joseph  Dennie  went  to  Philadelphia,  and  the  editorial  management  of  the 
paper  was  given  to  Alexander  Thomas,  who  conducted  it  with  good  taste 
and  discretion,  but  without  the  wit  and  ability  which  had  characterized 
Dennie’s  management.  In  October,  1801,  the  proprietors,  Thomas  & 
Thomas,  announced  that  they  had  made  a temporary  disposal  of  the  paper 
to  David  Newhall.  In  1803  the  publication  was  resumed  by  Thomas  & 
Thomas.  It  was  discontinued  in  March,  1807,  but  was  revived  in  Octo- 
ber, 1808.  It  was  finally  suspended  in  October,  1810. 1 

1793,  June  4- — The  Oracle  of  the  Day , at  Portsmouth,  by 
Charles  Peirce. 

This  was  the  second  semi-weekly  in  the  State,  and  was  continued  as 
such  until  January  1,  1796,  when  it  became  a weekly.  The  following  ex- 
hibits the  appearance  of  the  earliest  number  known  to  the  author  : 

The  Oracle  of  the  Day. 

Published  on  Wednesdays  and  Saturdays,  by  Charles  Peirce, 

1 For  a very  full  and  interesting  account  of  the  contributions  and  contributors  to  this 
paper,  see  Buckingham,  II.,  174-220. 


Iviii 


NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS. 


in  Court-Street,  Portsmouth,  New-Hampshire. 

No.  22,  of  Vol.  IV.]  Wednesday,  February  14,  1795.  [3s.  Per  Quarter. 

This  number  was  printed  on  a sheet  15x21  inches,  four  pages,  four 
columns  to  a page.  No.  28,  of  Vol.  V.,  Saturday,  September  5,  1795,  has 
under  the  title  the  motto:  “Reason  and  Truth  impartial  guide  the  way,” 
and  the  issue  for  Saturday,  January  2,  1796,  No.  10,  of  Vol.  VI.,  adds: 
“Open  to  all,  and  influenced  by  none.”  The  price  was  “9s.  per  Annum, 
4^d.  Single.”  The  latter  number  also  announces  : 

The  Oracle  of  the  Day  will  in  future  be  Edited  on  the  following 

Conditions. 

I. 

It  shall  be  regularly  published  on  every  Saturday  Morning,  printed  upon  large  paper, 
of  a good  quality,  and  neatly  set  off,  by  the  excellence  of  the  Type. 

II. 

The  price  to  subscribers  will  be  Nine  Shillings  per  annum,  to  be  paid  semi-annually. 

III. 

As  the  expences  are  great,  he  solicits  the  payment  of  3/" at  the  time  of  subscription  ; a 
regular  entry  of  which  will  be  made,  and  credited  at  the  end  of  first  six  month. 

With  the  change  to  a weekly,  a larger  paper  was  given— a sheet  18x23 
inches,  four  pages,  five  columns  to  a page,  this  being  one  of  the  largest 
papers  in  the  country  at  the  time.  No.  49,  of  Vol.  VIII.,  Saturday,  Sep- 
tember 22,  1798,  has  this  imprint : “Printed  and  Published  every  Satur- 
day Morning,  by  Charles  Peirce,  No.  5 Daniel-Street,  Portsmouth,  New- 
Hampshire.  Where  Subscriptions, — Advertisements, — Articles  of  Intelli- 
gence,— Pieces  of  Sentiment, — Wit, — Humour, — and  Moral  Essays, — for 
this  Paper, — are  Thankfully  Received.”  Price — “1  Dol.  50  Cents  per 
Annum.”  With  the  year  1800,  probably,  a change  was  made  in  the  title, 
thus  : 


American  Independence, 

[Twenty-fourth  year 

She  Huitfil  States 


Federal  Government, 

[Eleventh  Year. 

(Drade  of  the  gay. 


Printed  and  Published  every  Saturday  Morning,  by  Charles  Peirce, 
No.  5.  Daniel-street,  Portsmouth,  N.  H. 


Saturday,  January  r^-  y j x -1  Price  i Dollar  50  Cents 
25,  1800  L • 5 •.}  per  Annum. 

Of  All  the  Dispositions  And  Habits  Which  Lead  to  Political 
Prosperity,  Religion  and  Morality  are  Indispensable 
Supports — Washington’s  Legacy. 

This  paper  was  now  printed  on  a sheet  21x26  inches,  four  pages,  five 
columns  to  a page.  No  other  alteration  was  made  until  July  4,  1801,  when 
Peirce  sold  the  establishment  to  William  Treadwell  & Co.  (his  brother, 
Daniel  Treadwell),  who  changed  the  title,  October  17,  1801,  to  United 


HISTORY  OF  AMERICAN  NEWSPAPERS. 


IX 


States  Oracle , and  Portsmouth  Advertiser ; on  Oct.  22,  1803,  Vol.  XIV., 
No.  3,  the  name  was  shortened  to  Portsmouth  Oracle.  Daniel  Treadwell 
retiring,  William  Treadwell  published  the  paper  alone  until  September, 
1813.  In  1821  the  name  was  again  changed  to  The  Portsmouth  Journal  of 
Literature  and  Politics.  It  is  still  published,  as  The  Portsmouth  Journal. 

Charles  Peirce  was  born  in  Kittery,  Me.,  and  learned  his  trade  as  a 
printer  under  Major  Russell,  of  Boston.  After  disposing  of  the  Oracle , he 
removed  to  Germantown,  Penn.,  where  he  died,  September  21,  1851,  aged 
81  years. 

Daniel  Treadwell  invented  and  patented  the  first  power  printing- 
press  in  America,  in  1826.  It  was  put  in  operation  in  Boston  in  1827. 
With  two  horses,  a driver,  and  two  hands  at  the  press,  five  or  six  hundred 
sheets  an  hour  could  be  run  off. 

The  Treadwells  (William  and  Daniel)  began  The  Piscataqua  Evangel- 
ical Magazine , on  Jan.  1,  1805  ; it  was  an  octavo,  40  pages,  published  bi- 
monthly. In  1806  it  was  removed  to  Amherst,  and  published  by  Joseph 
Cushing.  It  was  discontinued  in  1808. 

1 793,  July  22. — The  Eagle:  or , Dartmouth  Centinel , at 
Hanover,  by  Josiah  Dunham. 

The  first  number  was  printed  on  a whole  sheet,  17x20  inches,  four 
pages,  four  columns  to  a page.  Published  in  a College  town  (Dartmouth), 
the  paper  of  course  had  a classic  motto,  which  appeared  under  the  caption 
in  this  wise: 


“Quid  verum,  atque  decens  euro.” — Impartial  truth  and  usefulness  we 


It  is  probable  that  the  printer  had  been  disappointed  in  not  receiving 
in  time  a cut,  which  was  substituted  for  the  above  title  in  the  second  issue. 
This  was  the  figure  of  a flying  eagle,  holding  in  his  beak  a scroll,  bearing 
the  tijtle  of  the  paper.  At  the  foot  of  the  fourth  page  was  the  following 
imprint: 

Hanover,  (New  Hampshire,)  Printed  and  Published,  at  the  Northwest  Corner  of  Col- 
lege-Square, by  Josiah  Dunham. 

BtF”  Where  Advertisements  and  Subscriptions  for  this  paper  are  received.  The  Price 
of  the  Eagle  is  seven  Shillings  a Year,  delivered  at  the  Printing  Office,  or  for  fifty  two 
Newspapers ; Advertisements,  not  exceeding  twelve  lines,  are  inserted  three  weeks  for 
four  Shillings,  and  continued  three  weeks  longer  for  two  Shillings. 

On  March  2,  1795,  imprint  announces  that  the  paper  was  “Edited 
by  Josiah  Dunham,  and  Printed  at  the  Academy,  by  John  M.  Dunham.” 
With  the  issue  for  Monday,  April  6,  1795,  Vol.  II.,  No.  37,  the  printers  were 


or,  Dartmouth  Centinel. 


Vol.  I.] 


study. 

Hanover,  Printed  and  Published  by  Josiah  Dunham. 
Monday,  July  22,  1793. 


[No.  1. 


lx 


NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS. 


Dunham  and  True;  “Price,  eight  shillings  a year,  delivered  at  the  office.” 
In  Vol.  III.,  No.  xxix,  Monday,  February  8,  1796,  the  rates  were  reduced 
to  Federal  currency,  thus:  “The  Price  of  the  Eagle,  is  one  Dollar  and  fifty 
Cents  a Year,  delivered  at  the  Printing-Office  or  for  Fifty  two  Newspapers; 
Advertisements  not  exceeding  twelve  lines,  are  inserted  three  weeks  for 
sixtysix  Cents  and  six  Mills  and  continued  three  weeks  longer  for  thirty- 
three  Cents  and  three  Mills.”  With  the  issue  for  Monday,  March  20,  1797, 
Vol.  IV.,  Number  xxxv,  Dunham  retired,  and  the  paper  was  continued  by 
Benjamin  True  alone.  The  heading  was  now  much  simpler  in  form: 

The  Eaale. 

o 

Hanover,  Newhampshire, 

Printed  at  the  Northwest  Corner  of  College  Square,  in  the  Academy,  by 
Benjamin  True. 

No.  3.  Tuesday,  August  7,  1798.  Vol.  VI. 

It  was  printed  on  a sheet  18x21  inches.  From  July  24,  1798,  the 
paper  was  edited  by  Moses  Fiske,  A.  M.,  True  remaining  the  publisher. 
The  latest  number  known  is  Volume  VI.,  Saturday,  June  1,  1799,  Number 
45.  This  was  probably  the  last  number  issued.  Alden  says  that  it  was 
stopped  in  the  first  week  in  June. 

17 95,  January  16 — The  Amherst  Journal  and  the  Nezv- 
Hampshire  Advertiser , at  Amherst,  by  Nathaniel 
Coverly. 


The  Journal  was  printed  on  a sheet  17x21  inches,  four  pages,  four 
columns  to  a page,  and  was  the  first  newspaper  published  in  Amherst,  or 
in  Hillsborough  county.  An  early  number  shows  this  arrangement  of  the 
heading: 


The 


Amherst 

And 

New-Hampshire 

Printed,  and  Published  on 
Nathaniel  Coverly,  near  the 


( An  eagle  ) 
< holding  a > 
( shield  and  ) 
I having  these  ) 
1 words  on  a > 
( narrow  strip  ) 
( held  in  his  ) 
\ mouth:  f 

f E Pluribus  ) 
\ Unum.  / 


Journal 

The 

Advertiser. 

Fridays,  by 

Court-House,  in  Amherst, 


The  Public  Will  Our  Guide — The  Public  Good  Our  End. 


Vol.  I.]  Friday,  March,  13,  1795.  [No  9. 

***  Subscriptions  and  Advertisements,  for  this  Paper,  are  received  at  the  Printing 
Office,  in  Amherst, — Price  of  the  Paper,  is  Nine  Shillings  per  Annum,  [Exclusive  of  Post- 
age.] Where  all  kinds  Printing,  is  executed  in  a Correct  and  Neat  Manner. 

The  issue  for  Friday,  May  15,  1795,  Vol.  1,  No.  18,  announces  that  the 
paper  is  printed  and  published  by  Nathaniel  Coverly  and  Son,  and  the  sub- 
scription price  “One  Dollar  and  Fifty  Cents  per  Annum,  (Exclusive  of 
Postage.)”  No.  22,  Vol.  1,  Friday,  June  12,  1795,  retains  the  motto:  “The 


HISTORY  OF  AMERICAN  NEWSPAPERS. 


lxi 


Public  Will  our  Guide,  the  Public  Good  our  End.”  No.  50,  Vol.  I.,  Sat- 
urday, December  26,  1795,  has  in  the  title  two  small  devices — one  on  the 
left  similar  to  the  large  one  in  earlier  numbers,  and  one  on  the  right,  the 
New  Hampshire  arms.  This  is  the  latest  number  known,  and  it  is  under- 
stood that  the  paper  was  discontinued  at  the  close  of  the  year. 

1795,  May  5,  Tuesday. — Lamson' s Weekly  Visitor , at  Exe- 
ter, by  John  Lamson. 

Printed  on  a whole  sheet,  17x21  inches,  four  pages,  four  columns  to  a 
page.  ’ The  first  number  had  this  elaborate  title,  motto,  etc. : 

(Numb.  1 — Vol.  1.)  Lamson’s  (Price,  1 dollar  and  50  cents.) 

Weekly  Visitor. 

The  liberty  of  the  press  is  essential  to  the  security  of  freedom  in  a state, — it  ought 
therefore  to  be  inviolably  preserved.  Const.  N.  H. 

Justice  and  Truth,  We  make  our  only  Guide — We  scorn  controul,  and  print  for  every 
Side. 

Printed  at  Exeter,  in  Newhampshire  by  J.  Lamson,  at  his  Office  in 
Main  Street.  Tuesday,  May  5,  1795. 

Vs  Printed  at  Exeter,  in  Newhampshire,  once  every  week,  at  1 dollar  and  50  cents  per 
annum,  or  five  cents  single. 

Numb.  7,  Vol.  I.,  Tuesday,  June  16,  1795,  shows  a change  in  title  to: 
The  Weekly  Visitor:  Or,  Exeter  Gazette.  “Printed  and  Published  every 
Tuesday,  by  John  Lamson,  at  his  Printing-Office  in  Pleasant  Street;  price 
one  dollar  and  fifty  cents  per  ann.”  The  latest  issue  known  is  Numb.  18, 
Vol.  I.,  Tuesday,  July  28,  1795. 

1795,  August  4. — The  Rising  Sun , at  Keene,  by  Cornelius 
Sturtevant,  jun. 

Printed  on  a.  whole  sheet,  18x22  inches,  four  pages,  four  columns  to  a 
page.  Motto:  “Truth  our  Guide:  Impartiality  our  Object.”  Mr.  Sturte- 
vant published  the  paper  until  March,  1798,  some  of  the  time  in  partnership 
with  another,  the  firm  being  Cornelius  Sturtevant,  jun.  & Co.  Elijah 
Cooper  then  assumed  control,  and  continued  the  Szm  until  Saturday,  May 
19,  1798,  Vol.  III.,  No.  41,  which  is  probably  the  last  issue. 

“Cornelius  Sturtevant,  Junior,  was  born  in  Plympton,  Mass.,  May  8, 
1771.  He  was  an  excellent  printer  for  the  time,  and  quite  a prolific  writer, 
both  of  prose  and  poetry,  making  many  contributions  to  other  papers  at 
different  times.  He  was  a soldier  in  the  War  of  1812,  and  died  August  2, 
1821.  He  had  two  sons  who  were  practical  printers — Henry  and  Isaac.” — 
Moore. 

1795,  September  5. — The  Sun.  Dover  Gazette,  And  Coun- 
ty Advertiser,  at  Dover,  by  Samuel  Bragg,  jun. 

Printed  on  a whole  sheet,  18x22  inches,  four  pages,  four  columns  to  a 
page.  The  appearance  of  the  title  is  shown  herewith: 


lxii 


NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS. 


The  * Sun. 

Printed  on  Wednesdays  by  Samuel  Bragg,  jun.  at  his  Printing-Office, 
near  the  Court-House,  Dover. — at  one  Dollar,  and  fifty  Cents,  per  annum. 
Numb,  io,  ofVol.  I.]  Wednesday,  November  n,  1795.  [Whole  Numb.  10. 

The  device  in  the  centre,  indicated  above  by  a *,  is  a face  in  the  sun, 
with  the  motto  beneath:  “Here  Truth  unlicensed  Reigns.”  The  pub- 

lisher announced  the  following 

Conditions  on  which  The  Sun  is  published. 

I.  The  Sun  will  be  published  every  Saturday,  on  Demy  Paper,  and  a beautiful  new 
Type. 

II.  The  price  will  be  Eight  Shillings  and  Sixpence,  delivered  at  the  office — and  Nine 
Shillings  delivered  by  post. 

III.  The  Sun  will  contain  the  latest  News,  both  Foreign  and  Domestic — the  Laws  of 
the  United  States  and  of  this  state — the  Proceedings  of  Congress,  and  of  the  Legislature 
of  New-Hampshire — Miscellanies,  &c. 

Subscriptions,  Advertisements,  Articles  of  Intelligence,  &c. , thankfully  received. 

With  the  issue  for  Wednesday,  November  4,  1795,  Number  9,  of  Vol. 
I.,  Whole  Number  9,  the  title  had  this  addition  in  a separate  line:  Dover 
Gazette  and  County  Advertiser.  No  other  change  was  made  in  the  title 
during  the  century,  or  so  late  as  No.  17,  Vol.  VI.,  December  71,  1800, 
Whole  No.  278. 

“Bragg  purchased  The  Phoenix  from  his  father,  and  changed  its  name 
to  the  above  title,  beginning  a new  series  of  numeration.  He  published 
the  paper  until  December,  1811,  when  the  office  was  destroyed  by  fire. 
In  the  same  month,  soon  after  the  fire,  Mr.  Bragg  died.  On  July  4, 
1812,  John  Mann,  a former  apprentice  of  Samuel  Bragg,  succeeded 
to  the  proprietorship  and  changed  the  Sun  to  the  Strafford  Register , 
which  he  published  until  August,  1818,  when  it  became  the  Nev: 
Hampshire  Republican , and  was  edited  by  Charles  W.  Cutter,  of  Ports, 
mouth,  who  established  a law  office  at  Dover.  He  left  the  paper,  and  re- 
turned to  Portsmouth  in  1823,  but  Mr.  Mann  continued  printing  it  until 
October,  1829,  when  it  was  discontinued.” — Moore. 

1796 , January  5 (est.) — Village  Messenger , at  Amherst, 
by  William  Biglow  and  Samuel  Cushing. 

Printed  on  a whole  sheet,  18x22  inches,  four  pages,  four  columns  to  a 
page.  Alden  says  the  paper  was  first  issued  on  Saturday,  Jan.  9,  1796. 
The  earliest  number  known  exhibits  the  title,  date,  etc.,  thus: 

Village  Messenger. 

“Whatsoever  things  are  true — Whatsoever  things  are  pure.” 

By  Biglow  and  Cushing,  Amherst,  New-Hampshire. 

No.  6.]  Tuesday,  February  9,  1796.  [Vol.  I. 

Mr.  Biglovv  was  the  editor,  Mr.  Cushing  the  business  manager.  The 
paper  was  a decided  improvement  on  its  predecessor,  and  was  creditable 


HISTORY  OF  AMERICAN  NEWSPAPERS. 


lxiii 


in  appearance.  Mr.  Biglow  retired  in  July,  and  from  July  12,  1796,  to 
April  11,  1797,  it  was  carried  on  by  Mr.  Cushing  alone.  The  issue  for 
Tuesday,  April  18,  1797,  No.  16,  of  Vol.  II.,  Whole  No.  68,  contains  the 
following  announcement,  by  Samuel  Preston. : 

To  the  Public. 

The  Publisher  of  this  paper,  having  purchased  of  Mr.  Samuel  Cushing  the  whole  print- 
ing apparatus,  informs  the  public,  that  if  sufficient  encouragement  should  be  given,  he  will 
continue  its  publication  on  the  following 

— Conditions — 

I.  It  shall  be  printed  on  large  demi  paper,  with  a fair  type  and  good  ink. 

II.  The  price  will  be  only  one  dollar  and  fifty  cents,  for  fifty-two  numbers,  delivered 
at  the  printing-office. 

III.  The  pay  will  be  expected  at  the  expiration  of  the  first  quarter — afterwards  semi- 
annually. 

IV.  The  three  first  pages  shall  contain  the  most  important  news  in  circulation; — the 
last  page  will  be  entirely  devoted  to  miscellany. 

He  is  determined  that  this  paper  shall  contain  no  scurrilous  and  ignominious 
pieces  whatever,  nor  be  under  the  influence  of  any  party. — Pieces,  either  moral, 
geographical,  agricultural,  historical,  political  or  poetical,  will  be  gratefully  re- 
ceived.— Advertisements  inserted  reasonably. — He  solicits  the  patronage  of  the 
public,  and  assures  them,  that  he  will  endeavor  to  answer  their  reasonable  ex- 
pectations. 

V*  Printing  in  its  various  branches  done  neatly  as  usual. 

Notwithstanding  a change  in  the  motto  to:  “Old  things  shall  pass 

away — and  all  things  become  new,”  no  alteration  was  made  in  the  size  or 
appearance  of  the  paper,  or  in  its  title.  With  the  beginning  of  Yol.  III., 
an  elaborate  device  was  introduced  in  the  caption,  consisting  of  an  oval 
frame,  with  a face  peering  over  it,  the  title  and  imprint  being  within  the 
frame  or  border.  The  paper  was  now  published  on  Saturday.  It  thus 
continued  till  the  end  of  the  century,  the  last  number  in  1800  being  No.  1, 
Vol.  VI.,  December  27,  1800,  Whole  No.  261.  The  paper  was  discontin- 
ued by  Preston  with  the  issue  for  Dec.  5,  1801,  No.  310. 

William  Biglow  was  born  in  Natick,  Mass.,  Sept.  22,  1773.  He  has 
written  thus  humorously  of  himself:  “I  was  born  in  a small  country  vil- 
lage, of  reputable,  industrious  parents,  at  a time  when  they  were  as  poor 
as  poverty  herself.  Nothing  remarkable  was  at  that  time  observed  in  me, 
except  that  I was,  in  the  phrase  of  the  hamlet,  ‘a  desperate  cross  body.’ 
This,  however,  must  have  been  owing  to  some  indisposition  of  body;  for  I 
naturally  possess  a very  peaceable  temper.  At  a proper  age  I was  sent  to 
school — five  weeks,  in  winter,  to  a master,  who  could  read;  and  as  long,  in 
summer,  to  an  old  maid,  who  could  knit.  Possessing  a strong  attachment 
to  books,  I soon  passed  from  my  printer  to  my  psalter,  and  thence  in  a 
short  time  to  my  Bible,  which  were  the  only  books  we  used.”  Having 
gone  through  the  common  school  of  the  town,  he  was  fitted  for  College  by 
Parson  Brown,  of  Sherburne,  entered  Harvard  College  in  1790,  and  grad- 
uated in  1794.  He  was  distinguished  in  college  for  his  wit,  and  a knack 
at  turning  off  humorous  verse.  After  leaving  college  he  taught  school, 

\ 


XIV 


NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS. 


wrote  for  the  Federal  Orrery , of  Boston,  and  while  pursuing  his  studies 
preparatory  to  entering  the  ministry,  and  in  order  to  add  to  his  income,  in 
the  meantime,  he  edited  the  Village  Messeng(r.  In  1799  or  1800  he  began 
to  preach,  and  at  the  same  time  opened  a private  classical  school,  at  Salem, 
Mass.,  which  soon  attained  a wide  fame.  He  was  subsequently  in  charge 
of  the  Boston  Public  Latin  School  for  several  years.  He  also  published  a 
number  of  school  books,  and  local  histories.  He  died  at  Boston,  Jan.  12, 
1844.  He  was  a man  of  fine  scholarship,  charming  in  social  intercourse, 
of  a gentle  wit,  and  had  the  faculty  of  making  life-long  friends  of  his  stu- 
dents. 

1796,  March  3 (est.)  — The  Grafton  Minerva , and  Haver- 
hill Weekly  Bud , at  Haverhill,  by  Nathaniel  Cov- 
erly. 

Printed  on  a whole  sheet,  18x21  inches,  four  pages,  four  columns  to  a 
page.  The  heading,  imprint,  etc.,  of  an  early  number  are  shown  here- 
with: 

The 

Grafton  {Pictureofa}  Minerva, 

and  { ship  and  the  J Haverhill 

Weekly  { sunrising-  } Bud. 

Haverhill,  (New-Hampshire,)  Published  on  Thursdays,  by  Nathaniel 
Coverly  and  Son,  directly  opposite  the  Court-House. 

Truth  its  Guide — and  Liberty  its  Object. 

No.  4.]  Thursday,  March  24,  1796.  [Vol.  1. 

Printed  at  Haverhill,  [New-Hampshire]  by  Nathaniel  Coverly  & Son:  By 
whom  Advertisements  and  Subscriptions  for  this  Paper,  are  thankfully 
received.  The  Price  of  the  Minerva,  is  one  dollar  and  Fifty  cents  per 
annum,  delivered  at  the  Printing-Office;  Advertisements  inserted  at  a 
reasonable  Price. 

The  Coverlys  had  removed  from  Amherst  about  the  beginning  of  the 
year  1796,  to  start  this  paper  with  its  queer  title. 

With  the  issue  for  Thursday,  May  12,  1796,  No.  11,  Vol.  I,  Mr.  Cover- 
ly’s  son  no  longer  appears  as  a member  of  the  firm,  the  paper  being  pub- 
lished by  Nathaniel  Coverly  alone.  The  latest  issue  known  is  No.  46, 
Monday,  January  23,  1797,  Vol.  I,  which  was  published  “Near  the  Court 
House,”  instead  of  “Directly  opposite.”  The  paper  was  doubtless  discon- 
tinued about  this  time. 

1796,  September  24  (Saturday). — The  New-Hampshire 
Spy,  at  Exeter,  by  Henry  Ranlet. 

Printed  on  a whole  sheet,  18x23  inches,  four  pages,  four  columns  to  a 
page,  in  this  style. 


HISTORY  OF  AMERICAN  NEWSPAPERS. 


lxv 


The 

New-Hampshire  Spy. 

Exeter  (New-Hampshire)  Published  on  Saturdays,  by  Henry  Ranlet,  in 
Main-Street,  Where  Subscriptions  for  this  Paper,  Advertisements,  and 
Articles  of  Intelligence  are  gratefully  received. 

No.  I.  Vol.  I.  Saturday,  September  24,  1796.  Nine  Shillings  per  annum. 

BTS^The  price  of  the  Spy,  One  Dollar  and  Fifty  Cents  per  year,  delivered  at  the  office. 
Country  Produce  (which  we  congratulate  our  landed  brethren,  of  having  a bountiful 
share)  will  be  received  in  payment,  if  delivered  in  season  at  the  current  price. 

The  latest  issue  known  is  Vol.  I..  No.  26,  Saturday,  March  18,  1797. 
It  is  said  to  have  been  changed  to,  or  to  have  been  succeeded  by,  The  Polit- 
ical Banquet  and  Farmer' s Feast,  by  the  same  publisher,  but  no  copy  of  a 
paper  with  the  latter  title  is  known  to  the  author. 

1796,  November  22  (Tuesday). — Republican  Gazetteer , at 
Concord,  by  Moses  Davis. 

Printed  on  a whole  sheet,  17^x22^  inches,  four  pages,  four  columns  to 
a page.  The  title  was  unpretentious  in  appearance: 

Republican  Gazetteer. 

Vol.  I.]  [No.  1 

“Here  you  may  range  the  world  from  pole  to  pole ; 
increase  your  knowledge,  and  delight  your  soul.” — 

At  small  expense. 

By  Moses  Davis,  Concord,  New  Hampshire. 

Concord,  Tuesday,  November  22,  1796.  [1  Dollar  and  50  Cents  per  ann. 

These  announcements  were  made  in  the  opening  number: 

The  Federal  Mirror,  Is  No  More— It  expired  last  week  no.  212. 

A New  Paper,  in  Concord,  stiled 
Republican  Gazetteer. 

Will  in  future  be  published  by  the  subscriber — who  solicits  the  aid  of  his  Friends  and 
the  Public  in  his  indefatigable  exertions  to  merit  their  patronage.  Moses  Davis. 

St®” All  persons  indebted  to  Russell  and  Davis  are  desired  to  make  immediate  pay- 
ment, as  their  partnership  accounts  must  be  closed  as  soon  as  possible. 

E.  Russell, 

M.  Davis. 

Concord,  Nov.  22, 1796. 

Republican  Gazetteer. 

Candor,  Truth,  Decency,  Its  Guide. 

Concord,  Tuesday,  November  22,  1796. 

To  the  Public. 

As  the  publication  of  the  Federal  Mirror  has  ceased,  the  subscriber  proposes  to  publish 
weekly,  and  this  day  presents  the  first  number  of  a New  Paper  styled 
Republican  Gazetteer. 

Terms. 

The  high  prices  of  Stock,  Labor,  and  every  article  of  the  Necessaries  of  Subsistence, 
render  it  impossible  that  Printers  can  subsist  by  selling  Newspapers  on  terms  as  low  as  in 
former  times — The  subscriber  will  work  as  cheap  as  his  Brethren  of  the  Type  in  general. 

6 


lxvi 


NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS. 


— The  Price  of  his  Gazetteer  will  be  Nine  Shillings  for  every  fifty  two  papers,  or  twd 
shillings  and  three  pence  per  quarter,  at  the  Printing  Office — when  delivered  by  posts  the 
price  will  be  increased — and  payments  will  be  expected  quarterly. 

The  price  for  publishing  Advertisements  in  this  paper  will  be  the  same  as  in  others, 
viz.  4 | 6 for  12  (or  any  less  number)  lines,  and  larger  ones  in  proportion,  or  6 cents  for 
each  line. 

After  an  experience  of  a few  weeks  Davis  was  glad  to  resume  the  old 
partnership  with  Russell,  and  the  paper  for  Tuesday,  January  24,  1797, 
Vol.  I.,  No.  10,  was  issued  as  Russel  dr3  Davis'  Republican  Gazetteer , “By 
Russell  and  Davis,  Concord,  New  Hampshire.”  No.  16,  Vol.  I.,  omits 
the  motto.  The  latest  issue  known  is  No.  20,  Vol.  I.,  Tuesday,  April  4, 
1 797,  with  which  number  the  paper  was  doubtless  discontinued. 

1797,  April  11  (est.) — The  New  Star,  at  Concord,  by 
Russel  & Davis. 

This  was  practically  a magazine  in  form,  being  printed  on  a page 
8ix5i  inches,  eight  pages,  two  columns  to  a page,  the  printed  matter  be- 
ing 5|-x3|  inches  on  each  page.  This  new  venture  was  by  the  publishers 
of  the  Republican  Gazetteer , and  immediately  succeeded  that  paper,  but 
began  a new  series  of  numeration,  besides  exhibiting  a complete  change  in 
form.  The  heading  was  in  this  style: 

The 

TVc»\*r  TA  small  circle  with  sever--!  C «-Q  r 
i\CW  |_  al  lines  radiating  from  it  J olcl1  * 

A Republican,  Miscellaneous,  Literary  Paper. 

By  Russel  & Davis,  Concord,  Newh. 

No.  XIII. — July  4,  1797. 

Owing  to  some  typographical  freak,  or  oversight,  there  are  two  distinct 
issues  of  the  Star  for  July  11,  No.  XIV.,  one  having  the  heading  above, 
and  the  other  having  the  sub-head,  “A  Republican  Paper,”  with  the 
same  publishers’  names,  and  the  imprint:  “Concord,  Newhampshire,” 

but  the  reading  matter  is  entirely  different  in  the  two  issues.  The  same 
peculiarity  is  true  of  the  number  for  September  26,  1797.  Possibly  the 
printers  forgot  to  change  the  date-line  of  their  paper;  but  this  would  not 
account  for  the  modification  of  the  title.  The  latest  issue  known  is  No. 
XXV,  Sept.  26,  1797,  of  which,  as  just  stated,  there  are  two  different  edi- 
tions. The  S tar  ceased  to  twinkle,  with  this  issue,  or  a week  later,  be- 
ing merged  in  the  revived  The  Mirror , originally  started  October  28, 
1792. 

179S,  November  22  (est.) — Federal  Observer , at  Ports- 
mouth, by  William  Treadwell  and  Samuel  Hart. 

Printed  on  a whole  sheet,  20x25  inches,  four  pages,  four  columns  to  a 
page.  Its  aspect  was  unpretentious: 


HISTORY  OF  AMERICAN  NEWSPAPERS. 


lxvii 


Federal  Observer. 

Number  16.]  Thursday,  March  7,  1799-  [Volume  I. 

The  Federal  Observer 

is  regularly  published  every  Thursday  Morning,  at  One  Dollar  and  Fifty  Cents  per  ann. 
by  Treadwell  & Hart,  at  their  Printing  Office,  opposite  Mr.  Greenleaf’s  Inn,  Congress- 
street,  Portsmouth,  where  Subscriptions  are  thankfully  received,  and  Communications 
duly  attended  to.  Advertisements,  will  be  reasonably  and  conspicuously  inserted. 
***Printing  of  every  kind  executed  with  neatness  and  dispatch. 

Hart  withdrew  from  the  establishment  in  the  course  of  a few  months, 
and  Treadwell  continued  the  paper  alone  until  the  end,  June  12,  1800. 

1798,  December  5 (Wednesday,  est  ) — Runlet's  Federal 
Miscellany , at  Exeter,  by  Henry  Ranlet. 

Printed  on  a whole  sheet,  2o§-x23  inches,  four  pages,  four  columns  to 
a page.  The  second  number  shows  this  arrangement  of  the  title,  etc.: 

Ranlet’s  Federal  Miscellany. 

Exeter  Printed  By  H.  Ranlet,  At  His  Office  In  Main-Street— Where  Ad* 
vertisements  And  Articles  Of  Intelligence  Are  Gratefully  Received. 
No.  2— Vol.  I.  Wednesday,  December  12,  1798.  Price,  1 doll.  50 
cents  a Year. 

No.  7,  Vol.  I.,  Wednesday,  January  16,  1799,  shows  a change  in  title 
to  Exeter  Federal  Miscellany.  Numb.  21,  Wednesday,  April  24,  1 799, 
Vol.  I.,  has  the  imprint: 

The  Exeter  Federal  Miscellancy  is  Published  every  Wednesday  morning  by  Henry 
Ranlet,  At  His  Printing  Office,  Water  Street,  Exeter. 

Where  all  kinds  of  Musick — Books — Blanks,  and  Hand-bills,  are  done  in  modern  per- 
fection, on  moderate  terms.  Advertisements,  from  any  quarters,  will  be  conspicuously 
inserted  very  low  for  cash. 

As  with  his  numerous  previous  newspaper  ventures,  this  attempt  of 
Ranlet’s  was  of  but  short  duration,  ending'in  the  summer  of  i799)  it  is  Un- 
derstood. 

1799,  March  23  (est.) — -Newhamp shire  Sentinel , at  Keene, 

by  John  Prentiss. 

Printed  on  a whole  sheet,  19x23  inches,  four  pages,  four  columns  to  a 
page.  The  earliest  number  known  shows  this  arrangement  of  heading, 
together  with  the  prospectus  of  the  experienced  printer: 

Newhampshire  Sentinel.  ’ 

—My  Country’s  Good — A Faithful  Watch  I Stand. — 

Keene:— Published  Every  Saturday,  By  John  Prentiss,  at  the  Old  Printing 

Office. 

Saturday,  April  6,  1799* 


Vol.  I.— No.  3.] 


[1  dol.  50  cts.  per  ann. 


lxviii 


NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS. 


This  Paper  will  continue  to  be  published  every  Saturday  morning,  on  paper  of  the 
present  size  and  quality,  and  with  the  type  now  exhibited.  Payments  must  be  made 
quarterly,  to  enable  the  Editor  to  satisfy  the  demands  of  the  paper  makers,  the  boarding 
house,  and  various  other  necessary  creditors.  Wood,  Butter.  Cheese,  Grain,  and  almost 
every  article  used  in  a family,  will  be  as  acceptable  as  the  cash,  if  brought  in  season.  Ad- 
vertisements will  be  inserted  conspicuously,  and  on  as  reasonable  terms  as  in  any  paper 
in  the  State.  Printing  executed  with  neatness  and  dispatch. 

The  Sentinel  is  still  published. 

“John  Prentiss  was  born  as  Reading,  Mass. , March  21,  1778.  He  was  apprenticed  to 
the  art  of  printing  in  the  old  Chronicle  office,  in  Boston,  in  May,  1792,  to  Thomas  Adams, 
and  worked  with  Benjamin  Edes,  Isaiah  Thomas,  and  Richard  Draper.  In  1795  he  left 
the  Chronicle  office  to  assist  his  brother,  Charles  Prentiss,  in  the  publication  of  the  Rural 
Repository , at  Leominster,  Mass.  When  he  began  the  Sentinel  he  bought,  on  credit,  an 
old  press,  some  old  type,  and  a few  reams  of  paper,  having  but  five  dollars  in  cash  at  the 
time.  He  also  bought  on  credit,  a small  stock  of  goods,  and  opened  a book  store  in 
Keene.  He  began  the  paper  with  about  seventy  subscribers.  From  that  day  he  dictated 
the  contents  of  the  Sentinel , made  up  the  matter  from  the  gallies,  kept  the  book  store, 
made  all  his  payments  as  they  became  due,  and  for  forty-eight  years  was  detained  from 
active  labor  scarcely  one  week.  After  carrying  on  the  paper  for  that  period  he  resigned 
its  control  to  his  son,  John  W.  Prentiss.  Mr.  Prentiss  died  at  Keene,  June  3, 1873, having 
passed  the  age  of  ninety-five  years.  He  had  the  reputation  of  being  a model  printer,  a 
good  citizen,  a sincere  Christian. ”1 — Moore , 529-30. 

1799,  August  27 — Dartmouth  Gazette , at  Hanover,  by 
Moses  Davis. 

Printed  on  a whole  sheet,  18x23  inches,  four  pages,  four  columns  to  a 
page,  the  printed  page  being  15^x9  inches.  The  first  number  shows  the 
title,  motto  and  imprint  thus: 


Here  Range  the  World — Explore  the  Dense  and  Rare; 

And  View  All  Nature  in  your  Elbow  Chair. 

Published  by  Moses  Davis,  on  College  Plain, 
west  of  the  Meeting- House— Hanover,  Newhampshire. 

Vol.  I.]  Tuesday,  August  27,  1799.  [No.  1. 

The  issue  for  Monday,  April  21,  1800,  Vol.  I.,  No.  34,  contains  the 
following  notice  to  subscribers: 

Attention  ! 

Such  subscribers  for  the  Dartmouth  Gazette  as  may  be  ignorant  of  the  Conditions  of 
Publication,  are  desired  to  give  attention  to  what  follows. 

The  price  of  the  Dartmouth  Gazette,  delivered  at  the  Printing-Office,  is  one  dollar  and 
fifty  per  annum,  or  for  52  papers  ; and  in  that  proportion  for  a greater  or  less  number. 
Twenty-five  cents  to  be  paid  on  receiving  the  first  No.  50  at  the  expiration  of  six  months, 
and  the  remaining  75  cents  at  the  end  of  the  year. 

Those,  who  perceive  by  this,  that  they  are  delinquent,  will  remember,  that  prompt  pay 
is  the  life  of  business. 


1 See  History  and  Genealogy  of  the  Prentiss  Family  of  New  England,  from  1631  to 
1852,  collected  by  C.  J.  F.  Binney,  Boston,  1852,  pp.  125-7. 


HISTORY  OF  AMERICAN  NEWSPAPERS. 


lxix 


Companies  from  the  adjacent  towns,  who  take  and  pay  for  papers  weekly,  receive 
them  at  a reduced  price. 

Moses  Davis  was  born  at  Concord,  N.  H.,  February  23,  1777,  and 
learned  his  trade  as  printer  with  George  Hough,  at  Concord.  He  was  a 
brother-in-law  of  Elijah  Russell.  He  printed  the  Farmer’s  Almanac  for 
1789,  before  leaving  Concord.  At  Hanover  he  also  published  The  Literary 
Tablet , purporting  to  be  edited  by  Nicholas  Orlando,  1803-1806.  This 
was  a folio,  four  pages,  three  columns  to  a page,  about  14x12  inches  in 
size,  printed  every  other  Wednesday.  Vol.  III.  dates  from  August,  1805, 
to  August,  1806.  Davis  continued  the  Dartmouth  Gazette  until  his  death, 
which  occurred  in  July,  1806.  The  paper  then  passed  into  the  hands  of 
Charles  Spear,  who  continued  it  until  1819,  when  it  ceased  publication. 
The  latest  number  known  is  No.  XLIII.,  Vol.  19,  June  23,  1819,  Whole 
No.  1025.  The  day  of  publication  was  frequently  changed,  for  the  con- 
venience of  the  mails.  Vol.  II.,  No.  78,  is  dated  Saturday,  Feb.  21,  1801 ; 
Vol.  VI.,  No.  263,  was  issued  Friday,  Sept.  7,  1804.  Most  of  the  earlier 
numbers  contained  no  editorial  matter.  The  political  contributions, 
though  decidedly  favorable  to  the  Federal  party,  were  moderate  in  tone. 
During  its  first  two  or  three  years,  Daniel  Webster,  then  a student  at 
Dartmouth  College,  was  a frequent  contributor  to  the  paper.  The  issue 
for  Dec.  9,  1799,  contains  a poem  by  him,  on  Winter.  The  Gazette  was 
the  champion  of  the  College  during  its  controversy  with  the  State,  many 
of  the  ablest  articles  in  defence  of  the  College  appearing  in  the  columns 
of  that  paper. 

17 99,  September. — The  Republican  Ledger , at  Portsmouth, 
by  George  Jerry  Osborne. 

The  paper  had  for  its  motto:  “When  you  shall  these  deeds  relate, 
speak  of  them  as  they  are.  Nothing  extenuate,  nor  set  down  ought  in 
malice.”  Mr.  Osborne  died  in  the  summer  of  1800,  whereupon  the  paper 
passed  into  the  hands  of  Nutting  & Whitelock.  The  last  issue  in  the 
eighteenth  century  was  No.  19,  Vol.  II.,  December  30,  1800,  Whole  No. 
71.  The  paper  was  discontinued,  December  27,  1803. 

17 99,  October  28,  Monday  (est.)  — Gilmanton  Rural  Mu- 
seum, at  Gilmanton,  by  Elijah  Russell. 

Printed  on  a whole  sheet,  17x23  inches,  four  pages,  four  columns  to  a 
page,  in  this  form,  and  with  the  appended  terms  to  subscribers: 

Gilmanton  Rural  Museum. 

Devoted  to  the  Good  of  the  Public. 

Printed  and  published  weekly,  by  Elijah  Russell,  near  the  Academy  in 
Gilmanton,  (Newhampshire.) 

Monday  Morning,  November  11,  1799. 


No.  3.] 


[Vol.  I. 


XX 


NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS. 


Gilmanton  Rural  Museum. 

Conditions. 

£3r>The  Museum  shall  be  printed  on  good  paper,  at  the  price  of  One  Dollar  and  a Half 
per  ann.  at  the  Office — and  where  companies  of  thirteen  or  more,  in  adjacent  towns,  will 
come  after  them  by  turns,  and  pay  weekly,  they  shall  have  them  at  two  pence  each  paper, 
or  8 | 8.  per  annum. 

give  a good  start  to  the  business,  two  shillings  and  three  pence  is  requested  of 
each  customer  at  the  beginning. 

U^”To  accommodate  all  persons,  so  that  the  poorest  family  in  town  may  enjoy  the 
great  benefits  of  a public  newspaper,  of  those  who  cannot  pay  all  the  cash,  produce  will 
be  received. — Good  wheat,  rye,  corn,  oats,  butter,  flax,  cheese,  or  wool,  will  be  very 
readily  received  at  the  office. 

very  person  who  enters  for  the  Museum  will  be  considered  a customer  till  he 
pays  up,  and  desires  the  paper  discontinued. 

The  Rural  Museum  was  continued  for  about  six  months. 

1800,  August  29  (est.)  — The  Gilmanton  Gazette  and  Farm- 
er's Weekly  Magazine , at  Gilmanton,  by  Dudley, 
Leavitt  and  Clough. 

This  was  the  successor  of  the  Rural  Museum, , published  by  Elijah 
Russell.  The  Gazette  was  issued  every  Saturday.  It  had  for  its  motto 
this  scriptural  quotation:  “By  knowledge  shall  the  chambers  be  filled  with 
all  precious  and  pleasant  riches.  Moreover  the  profit  of  the  earth  is  for 
all.  The  king  himself  is  served  by  the  field.  Bible.”  No.  18,  Vol.  L, 
bears  date  December  26,  1800.  The  paper  was  continued  only  a few 
months  longer. 

Alden  says  that  in  1799  the  prospectus  of  a paper  which  was  to  have 
been  published  at  Charleston,  was  issued,  but  the  paper  never  appeared. 

He  also  states  that  “three  or  four  numbers  of  a magazine  were,  two 
or  three  years  since  [i.  e.,  about  1797  or  1798],  published  by  Moseley  Dun- 
ham, at  Haverhill.” 


List  of  Files  of  New  Hampshire  Newspapers. 

Amherst — The  Amherst  Journal  and  the  New-Hampshire 
Advertiser,  1795 — H.  U. 

1795,  Feb.  6,  13,  20,  Mar.  13,  20,  April  3,  10,  17, 
May  22,  29,  June  5,  12,  19,  26,  31,  Aug.  28,  Sept. 
5,  12,  19,  26,  Oct.  3,  10,  17,  24,  3 L Nov.  7,  14,  21, 
28,  Dec.  5,  12,  19,  26 — DARTMOUTH  COLLEGE. 
Amherst — Village  Messenger,  1796 — H.  u. 

1796-99 — B.  P.  L. 

1796-1801,  one  vol. — A.  A.  S. 


HISTORY  OF  AMERICAN  NEWSPAPERS. 


lxxi 


Concord — The  Concord  Herald,  and  Newhampshire  Intelli- 
gencer; changed  to 

Concord  Herald,  early  in  1791  ; changed  to 

Hough’s  Concord  Herald,  about  Sept.  8,  1792; 

changed  to 

Courier  of  New  Hampshire,  March  20,  1794. 

1791,  Sept.  7,  14,  28,  Oct.  5,  12,  19.  Nov.  9,  16, 
23,  Dec.  7,  27  ; 1792.  Jan.  4,  1 1,  18,  Mar.  28,  April 
4,  11,  May  2,  16,  23,  30,  Oct.  25,  Nov.  1,  8,  14,  22, 
29,  Dec.  6,  13,  20,  27;  1793-Jan.  3,  10,  17,  24,  31, 
Feb.  7,  14,  21,  28,  Mar.  7,  14,  21,  28;  April  3,  11, 
25,  May  2,  9,  16,  25, 3c,  June  6,  13,  20,  27,  July  1 1, 
18,  25,  Aug.  1,  8,  15,  22,  29,  Sept.  12,  19,  26,  Oct. 
3,  10,  17,  24,  31,  Nov.  7,  14,  20,  28,  Dec.  5 ; 1794- 
Jan.  2-March — DARTMOUTH  COLLEGE. 

1792,  1795-96 — H.  U. 

l79c~ 93*  one  vol. ; 1795—98,  one  vol. — A.  A.  s. 

1798,  April  17-Dec.  31,  1799 — B.  P.  L. 

Concord — Courier  of  New  Hampshire — see  Concord  Her- 
ald. 

Concord — The  Mirrour,  Oct.  28,  1792,  to  April  17,  1795; 
changed  to 

The  Federal  Mirrour,  April  24,  1795  ; continued  as  the 

Republican  Gazetteer,  Nov.  22,  1796;  merged  in 

The  Mirror,  Oct.  10,  1797. 

1 795-99— h.  u. 

1794-99,  one  vol. — A.  A.  S. 

Concord — New  Star,  1797 — H.  u. 

Co7icord — Russell  & Davis’s  Republican  Gazette,  1796— 97 
— H.  u. 

Dover — The  Friend  of  the  People,  1799 — H.  u. 

Dover — Political  and  Sentimental  Repository,  or  Strafford 
Recorder;  changed  to 

The  Phenix,  Aug.  2,  1792. 


lxxii 


NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS. 


1791 —  H.  U. 

1792- 95,  one  vol. — A.  A.  S. 

1792,  Aug.  2 — Dec.  6,  1794 — wis. 

Dover — -The  Sun,  Dover  Gazette,  and  County  Advertiser. 

1 795 —  1 8 1 5 , one  vol. — A.  A.  s. 

1796- 99 — H.  U. 

Exeter — The  Exeter  Chronicle,  or  Weekly  Advertiser, 
1784 — A.  A.  S. 

Exeter — The  American  Herald  of  Liberty.  See  The  New- 
Hampshire  Gazetteer. 

1795 — L.  C.  P. 

1784,  June  10.  17,  July  1,  8,  15,  22,  29,  Aug.  5,  12, 
19,  26,  Sept.  9,  16,  23,  30,  Oct.  7,  14,  21,  28,  Nov. 
4,  12,  19,  26,  Dec.  3— DARTMOUTH  COLLEGE. 

Exeter — Exeter  Federal  Miscellany,  1799 — H.  u. 

The  Freeman’s  Oracle,  and  New-Hampshire  Adver- 
tiser; consolidated  with 

The  New  Hampshire  Gazetteer,  November,  1789. 

1786-89,  one  vol. — A.  A S. 

1787,  Jan.  20;  1788,  June  27;  1789-Feb.  24,  Mar. 

31,  April  7,  14,  28,  May  5,  12,  26,  June  9,  16,  23, 
30,  July  7,  14,  21,  28,  Aug.  4,  I I,  Nov.  12. — DART- 
MOUTH COLLEGE. 

Exeter — The  Exeter  Journal,  Or,  New-Hampshire  Gazette, 
1778,  few  numbers — L.  c.  P. 

Exeter — Lamson’s  Weekly  Visitor;  changed  to 

The  Weekly  Visitor : Or,  Exeter  Gazette,  from  June 
1 6,  1795- 

1795. — H.  U. 

Exeter — The  New-Hampshire  Gazetteer;,  changed  to 

The  Herald  of  Liberty,  Feb.  20,  1793;  changed  to 

The  American  Herald  of  Liberty,  May  14,  1793; 
changed  to 

The  Herald  of  Liberty;  or,  Exeter  Gazette,  about 


HISTORY  OF  AMERICAN  NEWSPAPERS. 


lxxiii 


June,  1796. 

1789-95 — A.  A.  S. 

1789-93,  few  numbers — L.  C.  P. 

1789,  Aug.  18,  22,  29,  Sept.  5,  19,  26,  Oct.  3,  10,  17, 
24,  31,  Nov.  7,  14,  Dec.  19,  26;  1790-Jan.  2,  9,  16, 
23,  30,  Feb.  13,  27,  Mar.  13,  20,  27,  April  3,  10, 
17,  24,  30,  May  28,  June  4,  11,  July  2,  9,  16,  23, 
Aug.  1,  3,  20,  27,  Sept.  3,  10,  24,  Oct.  1,  9,  16,  30, 
Nov.  6,  13,  20,  Dec.  11,  18,  25;  1791-Oct.  21; 

1792- July  18,  27,  Aug.  10,  17,  31,  Sept.  14,  21,  28, 
Oct.  5,  19,  Nov.  7,  14,  21,  28,  Dec.  5,  12,  19,  26; 

1793- Jan-  2>  9,  16,  23,  30,  Feb.  6,  13,  20,  27  Mar. 
6,  13,  20,  27,  April  3,  10,  17,  May  1,  4;  1793- 
May  14,  21,  28,  June  4 11,  18,  25,  July  2,  16,  23, 
Aug.  6,  20,  27,  Sept.  3,  10,  17,  24,  Oct.  8,  15, 
22,  29,  Nov.  5,  12,  19,  26,  Dec.  3,  10,  17,  24; 

1794- Jan.  7,  14,  21,  28,  Feb.  4,  11,  18,  25, 
Mar.  4,  11,  18,  25,  April  1,  8,  15,  22,  29,  May  6,  1 3, 

20,  27,  June  3,  10,  17,  24,  July  1,  8,  15,  22,  29, 
Aug.  5,  12,  19,  26,  Sept.  2,  9,  16,  23,  30,  Oct.  7,  14, 

21,  28,  Nov.  4,  11,  18,  22,  29,  Dec.  6 — DARTMOUTH 
- COLLEGE. 

1792,  April  18 — WIS. 

Exeter — The  New  Hampshire  Gazette,  1786-96,  one  vol. — 
A.  A.  S. 

Exeter — The  New  Hampshire  Spy,  1796 — H.  U. 

Exeter — Ranlet’s  Federal  Miscellany,  1798 — H.  U. 
Gilmanton — Gilmanton  Rural  Museum,  1799 — H.  u. 
Hanover — Dartmouth  Gazette. 

1799 — h.  u. 

1800,  Dec.  1 7,  to  Sept.  7,  1804 — N.  Y.  H.  S. 

Hanover — The  Dresden  Mercury,  1779,  few  numbers — A. 
. A.  S. 


; 


lxxiv  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS. 

Hanover — The  Eagle  ; or,  Dartmouth  Centinel,  Aug.,  1 793— 

1 795 — p-  L- 

1793- 99,  one  vol.- — A.  A.  S. 

1794- 99— H.  u. 

Haverhill — The  Grafton  Minerva,  and  Haverhill  Weekly 
Bud,  1796-97 — H.  u. 

1 796-97  — L.  C.  P. 

Keene — Columbian  Informer  & Cheshire  Journal,  1793, 

Jan.  13,  Aug.  14,  21,  28,  Sept.  4,  11,  18,  25,  Oct. 

2,  9,  1 6,  Nov.  27;  1794-Feb.  19,  July  1,  8, 

15,  22,  29,  Aug.  5,  12,  19,  26,  Sept.  9,  1 6,  23,  30, 

Oct.  7,  14,  21,  Nov.  4,  11,  18,  25,  Dec.  2,9,  16,  24  ; 

1 79 5 — J an . 6,  20,  27,  Feb.  3,  ic,  17,  24,  Mar.  8,  17, 

24,  31,  April  7,  14,  21. — DARTMOUTH  COLLEGE. 

Keene — New  Hampshire  Centinel,  1799 — H.  u. 

1799-1873,  12  vols. — A.  A.  S. 

1799,  March  23-Dec.  28,  inclusive — DARTMOUTH  COL- 
LEGE. 

Keene — The  New-Hampshire  Recorder,  and  The  Weekly 
Advertiser,  1787-90,  one  vol. — A.  A.  S. 

Keene — The  Rising  Sun,  1796-99 — H.  U. 

1798-99 — A.  A.  S.  W\ 

Portsmouth — Federal  Observer,  1798-99 — B.  A. 

1799 — h.  U. 

Portsmouth — Freeman’s  Journal,  or,  New  Hampshire  Ga- 
zette. See  Portsmouth — New-Hampshire  Gazette. 
Portsmouth — New-Hampshire  Gazette,  Oct.  7,  1756; 

changed  to 

The  New-Hampshire  Gazette,  and  Historical  Chron- 
icle, March  11,  1763;  changed  to 
The  Freeman’s  Journal,  or  New  Hampshire  Gazette, 

May  25,  1776;  changed  to 

The  New-Hampshire  Gazette  and  the  General  Adver- 
tiser, March  27,  1784;  changed  to 


HISTORY  OF  AMERICAN  NEWSPAPERS. 


lxxv 


The  New  Hampshire  Gazette,  Oct.  15,  1793. 

T7 56 — II.  s.  P. 

1756,  1762,  1776-77 — B.  P.  L. 

1 756-92,  8 vols.,  quarto  and  folio,  incomplete. — M.  H.  S. 

1756-1801,  complete — DARTMOUTH  COLLEGE. 

1761-62,  1766-67,  1776-1871,  9 vols. — A.  A.  S. 

1761-64,  7 nos.;  Nov.  30,  Dec.  28,  1770;  June  5, 
1772;  1774,  10  nos. ; 1776-77,  5 nos. ; Sept.,  1784, 
to  Nov.,  1786 — WIS. 

1765,  May  24,  July  12,  Aug.  16-Sept.  27,  Oct.  1 1- 
Nov.  15,  29,  Dec.  13-27;  1766-Jan.  17-Feb.  7,  21, 
March  14,  28,  April  4,  Sept.  4,  Nov.  17,  24. — Y.  U. 

1766,  March  28-Dec.  19  ; 1770-Jan.  5-Dec.  25,  1772  ; 
Jan.  6-June  9,  1775 — L.  c. 

1772,  Sept.  25 — Dec.  30,  1774;  1778,  June  16-May 
6,  1780;  1785-86,  March  25-Sept.  14,  1786 — N.  Y. 
H.  S. 

1778,  Feb.  3,  Vol.  II.,  No.  32 — L.  L. 

1780-1782,  one  vol.;  1791-95,  one  vol.;  1796-98, 
one  vol. — H-GEN. 

1788,  1795-99 — B.  A. 

i'789“99 — H*  u- 

Portsmouth — The  New  Hampshire  Mercury  and  General 
Advertiser,  1784-87,  one  vol. — A.  A.  S. 

1784-1788,  one  vol. — H-GEN. 

1786,  May  8 — DARTMOUTH  COLLEGE. 

Portsmouth — New-Hampshire  Spy  ; changed  to 

Osborne’s  New  Hampshire  Spy,  early  in  1789. 

1786- 93,  3 vols. — A.  A.  S. 

1787- 88,  1791 — B.  P.  L. 

1786,  Oct-1787,  Oct. — wis. 

1790,  June  2,  16,  23,  30,  July  14,  18,  21,  28;  1791- 
Feb.  26,  April  16,  20,  23,  27,  30,  May  4,  7,  n,  14, 

■ 19,  21,  26,  28,  June  2,  4,  8,  11,  15,  18,  22,  25,  29, 


Ixxvi 


NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS. 


July  2,  6,  9,  13,  1 6,  20,  23,  27,  30,  Aug.  3,  6,  10,  13, 
1 7,  20,  24,  27,  31;  1792,  May  16 — DARTMOUTH 

COLLEGE. 

Portsmouth — The  Oracle  of  the  Day,  1793-1800;  changed 
to 

The  United  States  Oracle  of  the  Day,  1800. 

1793- 99,  one  vol. — A.  A.  S. 

1794,  Dec.  24 — wis. 

1794- 95,  one  vol.;  1798,  Jan-July — H-GEN. 

1795- 99— H.  u. 

1798 — L.  C.  P. 

1800,  Jan.  4,  Vol.  10,  No.  12 — CONN.  H.  S. 

1800,  Jan.  18-Oct.  10,  1801;  Oct.  17,  1801-Oct.  15, 
1803;  Oct.  22,  i8c3-Jan.  14,  1809 — N.  Y.  H.  S. 

1 794,  May  to  December,  inclusive  ; 1 795-96,  complete  ; 
1797,  complete,  except  April  27th,  June  10th  ; 1798, 
complete;  1799,  complete,  except  April  13;  1800, 
complete — DARTMOUTH  COLLEGE. 

Portsmouth — The  Portsmouth  Mercury  and  Weekly  Ad- 
vertiser, 1765,  one  vol. — A.  A.  S. 

1765,  Sept.  2,  23,  Oct.  7,  14,  28,  Nov.  13-Dec.  2,  16- 
30;  1766,  Jan.  27,  Feb.  10,  17 — Y.  u. 

Portsmouth — Republican  Ledger,  1799,  Sept.  19,  26,  Oct. 
Nov.  23,  6,  13,  20,  27,  Dec.  4,  n,  18,  25;  1800, 
complete,  except  June  24,  July  1,  8,  Aug.  5,  Oct. 
14  —DARTMOUTH  COLLEGE. 

Walpole — The  New  Hampshire  Journal : Or,  The  Farmer’s 
Weekly  Museum,  April  11,  1793  ; changed  to 

The  Newhampshire  and  Vermont  Journal:  Or,  The 
Farmer’s  Weekly  Museum,  Feb.  17,  1795  ; changed 
to 

The  Farmer’s  Weekly  Museum:  Newhampshire  and 
Vermont  Journal,  April  4,  1797;  changed  to 

Farmer’s  Museum,  or  Lay  Preacher’s  Gazette,  April 


HISTORY  OF  AMERICAN  NEWSPAPERS. 


lxxvii 


i,  1799 ; changed  to 

Farmer’s  Museum,  and  Literary  Gazette,  February, 
1800. 

1793,  April  11,  to  April  4,  1794,  Vol.  1,  Nos.  1-52 
— N.  Y.  II.  S. 

1793,  April-Dee.,  1799 — B.  P.  L. 
i793~i8io,  15  vols. — A.  A.  S. 

1795- 99— H.  U. 

1795,  Nov.  24-Oct.  19,  1805  — CONN.  H.  S. 

1 796,  Feb. -March,  1 797,  one  vol. ; 1 796-98,  two  vols  ; 
1797,  April  11,  to  April  24,  1798,  one  vol.;  1799, 
April  1,  to  Sept.  29,  1801 — H-GEN. 

1796- 1800 — MD.  II.  S. 

1796,  Nov.  15-Sept.  15,  1801 — N.  Y.  H.  S. 

1797,  April  18,  Sept.  18;  1798-Jan.  2,  16,  23,  30, 
Feb.  6,  13,  20,  27,  March  6,  13,  20,  27,  April 
3,  10,  17,  24,  28,  May  8,  15,  22,  29,  June  5,  12, 
16,  19,  26,  July  3,  10,  17,  24,  Aug.  6,  13,  20, 
September  3,  10,  17,  24,  October  1,  15,  22,  29, 
Nov.  5,  12,  19,  26,  December  3,  10,  17,  24,  31  ; 
1799-January  7,  14,  21,  28,  Feb.  4,  18,  25,  March 

-4,  11,  18,  25,  April  8,  15,  22,  May  6,  13,  2C,  27, 
June  10,  17,  24,  July  1,  8,  15,  22,  29,  Aug.  5,  12,  19, 
Sept.  2,  9,  16,  23,  30,  Oct.  7,  14,  21,  28,  Nov.  4,  1 1, 
18  25,  Dec.  2,  9,  16,  23,  30;  1800-Jan.  6,  13,  27, 
Feb  3,  10,  17,  24,  Mar.  10,  17,  24,  31  ; April  7,  14, 

21,  28,  May  5,  12,  19,  26,  June  2,  9,  16,  23,  3c, 
July  7,  14,  21,  28,  Aug.  4,  11,25,  Sept.  1,  8,  15,  22, 
29,  Oct.  6,  13,  20,  27,  Nov.  3,  10,  17,  Dec.  1,  8,  15, 

22,  29 — DARTMOUTH  COLLEGE. 

17-97,  April  4,  to  July  17,  1798 — L C. 

1797,  April  11,  No.  210 — June  26,  1798,  wanting  10 
nos. — Y.  U. 

1797,  April  n,tc  March  27,  1798;  1799,  April  1,  to 


lxxviii  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS. 

Oct.  21,  1799 — L.  C.  P. 

1 797-99,  inclusive — ESSEX  INST. 

1797,  Feb.  28,  to  Feb.,  1799 — B.  A. 

1798,  Jan.-April,  1799;  April,  1799-April,  1801,  2 

vols. WIS. 

Walpole — Political  Observatory,  1794-1804,  and  Miscel- 
laneous papers— H— GEN. 


11 

Extracts  from  American  Newspapers  relating  to 
New-Jersey,  1751-1755. 


Newspaper  Extracts. 


To  be  sold  or  lett  for  a term  of  years  by  Benjamin 
Biles,  at  Trenton,  a tanyard,  well  accustomed,  with  a 
lot  of  ground  of  two  acres,  and  a third  of  an  acre,  a 
good  bark-house,  mill-house,  bark-mill,  beam-house, 
a good  stone  currying  shop,  and  leather-house,  vatts 
enough  to  tan  8co  hides,  besides  calf-skins,  per  year  ; 
the  Works  in  good  Repair,  a constant  stream  of 
spring  water1  running  through  the  yard  ; also  a good 
hay-house,  stable,  and  chaise-house. 

Likewise  a good  dwelling-house  adjoining  to  the 
tan-yard,  situate  on  the  west  side  of  King-street,2  near 
the  middle  of  the  town,  four  rooms  on  a floor,  the  lot 
whereon  it  stands  contains  half  an  acre,  a good  gard- 
en, a new  fence  of  cedar  Posts  and  boards,  with  a 
fine  stream  running  at  the  end  of  it. 

Any  person  inclining  to  purchase,  or  rent  the 
same  may  know  the  terms,  by  applying  to  Benjamin 
Biles,  living  on  the  premises. — Pennsylvania  Gazette , 
Jan.  i,  1750-1.  No.  1 1 5 1 . 

To  be  Sold  by  the  subscriber, 

A Large  and  commodious  well  built  grist-mill, 
wdth  two  pairs  of  stones,  two  water  wheels,  within 


1 Petty’s  run. 

2 Now  Warren  street. 


2 NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [ 1 75 1 

the  house,  turned  by  a constant  stream  of  water, 
three  boulting-  chests,  with  conveniencies  for  screen- 
ing  the  wheat,  boulting  and  hoisting  the  meal  by 
water,  with  all  other  utensils  necessary  for  the  same, 
A plantation  whereon  the  said  mill  stands,  containing 
300  acres  of  land,  bounded  one  way  upon  a navigable 
creek,  upon  or  near  which  is  a good  frame  storediouse, 
and  landing,  about  a quarter  of  a mile  from  the  said 
mill,  from  whence  flour  may  be  sent  (at  a small  ex- 
pence) to  Philadelphia,  by  water;  or  to  York  market, 
by  the  way  of  Brunswick,  which  is  about  30  miles 
from  the  said  mill  and  plantation,  whereon  is  3 dwell- 
ing-houses, stables,  barns,  smith’s  shop,  cooper’s  shop, 
store-house  and  all  in  good  repair  ; a waggon  and  5 
horses,  a good  orchard,  about  30  acres  of  meadow 
cleared,  most  of  which  is  in  good  grass,  and  a large 
quantity  of  rich  swamp,  capable  of  making  consider- 
able more ; part  of  the  premises  now  rents  for  120  1. 
proclamation  money  a year,  and  is  situate  about  6 
miles  from  Trenton,  2 miles  and  a half  from  Burdens- 
town,1  in  the  township  of  Nottingham,  Burlington 
county,  and  western  division  of  the  province  of  New- 
Jersey.  Any  person  inclining  to  purchase,  may  know 
the  terms  of  sale  and  payments  (and  have  indisput- 
able title  to  the  premises)  by  applying  to  the  sub- 
scriber at  Trenton,  William  Morris. — Penn . Gazette , 
Jan . 1,  1 750-1.  No.  1151. 

STolen  from  Samuel  Taylor,  of  Chesterfield,  Bur- 
lington County,  on  the  4th  of  this  inst.  December,  A 
dark  brown  horse,  about  13  hands  and  a half  high, 
branded  on  the  near  shoulder  S T,  a star,  and  a small 


i Bordentown, 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


3 


1751] 

snip  down  to  his  nose,  small  switch  tail  ; he  goes  a 
fast  travel,  but  goes  short,  and  hand  gallops  well. 
Whoever  takes  up  the  said  horse,  and  secures  him, 
so  that  the  owner  may  have  him  again,  shall  have 
Thirty  Shillings  reward,  and  reasonable  charges,  paid 
by  me. 

Samuel  Taylor. 

— Penn.  Gazette,  Jan.  1,  1750-1.  No.  1151. 

Run  away  on  the  14th  ult.  from  Abraham  Lord,  of 
Piles-Grove,  Salem  county,  an  Irish  servant  man, 
named  Daniel  Foy,  of  a middle  stature,  pale  com- 
plexion, about  26  years  of  age,  well-set,  speaks  but 
middling  English,  and  has  been  on  the  expedition  ;x 
Had  on  when  he  went  away,  a linsey-woolsey  blue 
grey  coat,  with  large  brass  buttons,  a grey  cloth 
jacket,  buck-skin  breeches,  felt  hat,  grey  cotton  cap, 
and  a red  silk  handkerchief ; he  has  two  pair  of  stock- 
ings with  him,  one  grey  worsted,  ribb’d,  the  other  blue 
yarn.  Whoever  takes  up  and  secures  said  servant, 
so  that  his  master  may  have  him  again,  shall  have 
Three  Pounds  reward,  and  reasonable  charges,  paid  by 

Abraham  Lord. 

— Penn.  Gazette,  Jan.  1,  1 750-1.  No.  ijr.51. 

To  be  sold,  by  Thomas  Cadwalader,  at  Trenton, 
a tract  of  land,  of  nine  hundred  acres,  lying  about  a 
mile  and  a half  north  of  the  Town,  it  will  be  either 
disposed  of  all  together,  or  divided  into  four  equal 
parts,  it  is  exceedingly  well  timbered  and  watered  by 
several  fine  streams,  one  of  which  the  Trenton  mills 
stand  on,  it  has  also  very  good  conveniencies  either 


1 Against  Canada. 


4 


NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [ I 75  I 

for  a grist-mill,  forge  or  saw-mill.  Three  hundred 
acres,  and  upwards,  of  it,  will  make  extraordinary 
good  meadow,  the  timber  is  very  fit  for  ship-building 
or  scantling  for  houses,  and  lies  very  convenient,  near 
the  river  Delaware,  for  transporting  to  Philadelphia, 
large  quantities  of  cord  wood. 

Also,  a large  commodious  corner  brick  house,  two 
stories  high,  well  finished,  with  three  good  rooms  on 
the  lower  floor,  and  a large  entry  through  it,  four 
good  rooms  on  the  upper  floor,  and  four  lodging 
rooms  plaistered,  in  the  uppermost  story,  with  good 
cellars,  stone  kitchen,  garden  and  stables,  situate  in 
Queen-street1  in  a very  publick  part  of  the  town  of 
Trenton,  very  convenient  for  any  publick  business. 

Likewise,  twenty-five  acres  of  pasture  land,  on  the 
upper  end  of  Queen-street  in  Trenton,  Sixteen  acres 
of  it  cleared,  and  in  good  fence,  with  a good  new  barn, 
twenty- six  feet  by  twenty. 

And  five  acres  and  a half  of  excellent  meadow, 
well  cleared,  and  in  good  fence  in  Trenton. 

Any  persons  who  have  an  inclination  to  purchase 
the  above  mentioned  premises,  may  have  a reason- 
able time  allowed  for  the  payments. — Penn.  Gazette , 
Jan.  1,  1 750-1.  No.  1 1 51. 

New-York,  Dec.  27.  1750 

Mr.  Alexander,  Sir, 

This  is  to  notify  you,  That  we  the  Subscribers  have 
in  Behalf,  of  ourselves  and  the  Rest  of  the  Purchasers 
in  Essex  County,  and  Places  adjacent  in  the  northern 
Part  of  the  Province  of  New-Jersey,  determined  to 
?nake  the  best  and  clearest  Pleas  to  his  Majesty  in 


\ Until  recently  called  Greene,  but  now  Broad  street, 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


5 


1750 

Council , in  Vindication  of  our  Purchase  Rights  lying 
in  Dispute  between  the  Proprietors  and  us  the  Pur- 
chasers, as  Speedily  as  we  can. 

Yours  to  serve,  Joseph  Day, 

Thomas  Williams, 
Stephen  Morris, 

John  Cundict, 

John  Vincent. 

— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly  Post 
Boy , Jan.  7,  1751. 

New- York,  December  $1.  About  Ten  Days  ago, 
the  Brigg  Bell  Savage,  Capt.  Lewis,  coming  in  here 
from  the  Virgin-Islands,  was  drove  ashore  in  a violent 
Gale  of  Wind,  with  in  Sandy  Hook:  . . . We  hear 
about  one  Quarter  of  her  Cargo  is  lost  ; the  rest  is 
got  ashore,  and  ’Tis  hoped  the  Vessel  will  be  got 
off  again. — Penna.  Journal , Jan.  8,  1750.  No.  425. 

To  be  sold  by  Isaac  Greenleafe,  in  Philadelphia 
* * * * * In  West-Jersey,  A tract  of  2500 
acres  timber’d  land,  lying  upon  the  heads  of  the  south 
branches  of  Rarington,  near  Muskonetkong  river,  in 
Hunterdon  county  ; also  a tract  of  833  acres,  bounded 
on  Muskonetkong  river,  and  joining  to  Jonathan 
Robinson’s  forge,  in  said  county. 

N.  B.  To  be  sold  very  cheap  by  said  Greenleafe, 
at  his  store,  in  Second-street,  near  Stretch’s  corner, 
Variety  of  European  and  East-India  goods,  glass 
lamps  for  streets,  4,  6,  8,  10,  12  and  2od  nails,  and 
sundry  sorts  of  ironmongery,  imported  in  the  last  ship 
from  London. — Penn.  Gazette , Jan.  8,  1 750-1.  No. 
1152. 


6 


NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [175  I 


To  be  sold  by  the  subscriber,  a good  stone  house, 
two  story  high,  with  a very  good  shop  in  it,  three  fire 
places,  either  fit  for  merchant  or  tradesman,  the  house 
being  40  feet  front,  and  lot  100  feet  back,  with  a good 
yard  to  it,  and  good  close  fence.  Also  another  lot 
joining  to  it  of  50  feet  front,  and  100  feet  back,  in 
close  fence.  The  whole  paying  one  shilling  per  foot 
ground  rent  for  the  front.  There  is  also  a very  good 
brook  running  through  the  whole,  coming  from  a liv- 
ing  spring,  which  is  never  dry.  Whoever  inclines  to 
purchase  the  same,  may  apply  to  said  subscriber,  liv- 
ing on  the  premises,  who  will  dispose  of  the  house 
and  lot  on  reasonable  terms. 

N.  B.  Said  house  and  lot  are  situate  in  Albany 
street,  in  New  Brunswick. 

Jacob  Kemper. 

— Penn.  Gazette , Jan.  8,  1 750-1.  No.  1152. 

To  be  Sold, 

Several  Tracts  and  Parcels  of  Land,  in  East  and 
West-New-Jersey,  belonging  to  the  Estate  of  the 
late  Honorable  John  Hamilton,  Esq  ; deceased.  Any 
Persons  inclining  to  purchase  any  or  either  of  them, 
may  apply  to  Mrs.  Elizabeth  Hamilton,  Widow,  and 
sole  Executrix  to  the  said  Estate,  at  Col.  Abraham  De 
Peyster’s,  in  New-York,  who  will  dispose  of  the  same 
on  reasonable  Terms.  What’s  not  sold  before  the 
fourth  Tuesday  of  March  next,  will,  on  that  Day,  be 
sold  at  publick  Vendue,  at  the  Market-House  at  Perth- 
Amboy,  to  the  highest  Bidder.  And  particularly, 

1 st,  The  Dwelling-House  late  of  the  said  John 
Hamilton,  at  Perth-Amboy,  with  Out-Houses,  Stable 
and  Pidgeon,  Garden  and  Orchard,  with  the  Lot  on 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


7 


1750 

which  those  stand,  being  two  Chains  and  a Half,  or 
165  Feet  in  Breadth,  and  ten  Chains,  or  660  Feet  in 
Length,  fronting  Water  Street  and  High  Street;  to- 
gether wi  h the  Bank-Lot  fronting  the  same. 

2dly,  Seven  Acre  Lots  in  Perth-Amboy  fronting 
Dock-Street  and  Back  S;reet. 

3dly,  All  the  Remainder  of  one  third  of  a Propriety, 
and  of  one  Twentieth  of  a Propriety  of  East-New-Jer- 
sey,  upon  which  the  third  Pine  Dividend  now  remains 
due,  besides  all  future  Dividends. 

4thly,  525  Acres  of  Land  in  the  Blue-Hills,  in  the 
Valley  between  the  first  and  second  Mountains,  in 
County  of  Somerset ; the  Road  thro’  Johnston’s  Gap, 
from  Dr.  Mercer’s  Mills,  passes  thro’  it. 

5 thly,  825  Acres  of  Land  on  Devil’s  Brook,  a Branch 
of  Milston  River,  lying  about  two  Miles  from  Kings- 
Town,  in  the  County  of  Middlesex  — The  N.  Y.  Ga- 
zette Revived  in  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , Jan.  14,  1751. 

By  order  of  the  General  Assembly  of  the  Province 
of  New  Jersey.  There  is  now  ready  for  the  Press, 
and  speedily  will  be  Published  in  One  Volumn  in 
Folio. 

The  LAWS  of  the  Province  of  NEW  JERSEY. 

From  the  Time  of  the  Surrender  of  the  Government 
in  1 700 

To  the  present  Year  1750. 

The  Body  of  the  Book  will  contain  all  the  Acts 
and  Laws  now  in  P'orce  in  the  said  Province  with 
proper  marginal  Notes.  To  which  will  be  added, 
three  Compleat  Tables  of  the  whole  Work  : The 
First  containing  the  Titles  of  all  the  Publick  Acts 
now  in  Force,  with  proper  References  distinguishing 


8 NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [ 1 75  I 

therein  such  as  have  had  the  Royal  Assent:  The 
Second  containing  the  Titles  of  all  th private  Acts , 
passed  since  the  surrender,  inserted  in  their  proper 
Order,  which  are  not  Printed  at  large  : The  Third 
containing  the  Titles  of  such  Acts  as  are  Repealed , 
Expired , or  Disallowed  by  the  Crown  : Together 
with  a complete  Index,  which  may  serve  as  an 
Abridgement  of  the  Laws,  containing  all  the  princi- 
pal Matter  in  the  Body  of  the  Book,  Alphabetically 
digested,  with  exact  Referrences  to  each  matter  in 
every  Act  and  Section  ; so  that  the  Reader  may  at 
one  View  discover  any  particular  Matter  in  the  whole 
Body  of  Laws. 

The  whole  Work  hath  been  carefully  prepared, 
examined,  and  corrected  by  the  Original  Laws,  by 
Samuel  Nevill,  Esq  ; Speaker  of  the  Mouse  of  Re- 
presentatives of  New  Jersey;  and  is  now  commited 
to  the  Press  by  Order  of  the  House,  under  his  cor- 
rection and  Inspection. 

And  that  the  Publick  may  be  duly  supply’d  with 
the  said  Lav  s (when  printed)  the  Editor  doth  hereby 
make  the  following 

PROPOSALS 

For  printing  the  same  by  subscription,  viz. 

I.  That  the  said  Work  will  contain  about  one 
Hundred  and  Twenty  Sheets  in  Folio,  and  shall 
be  Printed  upon  a good  Paper,  and  in  a fair 
Character. 

II.  That  a complete  Book  neatly  Bound,  shall  be 
delivered  to  the  Subscribers,  by  the  Persons 
hereafter  mentioned,  so  soon  as  the  same  shall 
be  finished. 


1751]  NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS.  9 

III.  That  the  Price  to  the  Subscribers  shall  be 
One  Pound  five  Shillings,1  Proclamation  Money 
New- Jersey,  which  is  no  more  than  the  Price 
agreed  upon  by  the  House  of  Representatives 
of  the  Province  for  a large  Number. 

IV.  That  for  the  better  enabeling  the  Editor  to 
carry  on  the  said  Work  (which  will  be  very  ex- 
pensive) twelve  Shillings  shall  be  paid  down  at 
the  Time  of  Subscribing,  and  the  Remainder 
upon  the  Delivery  of  the  Book. 

V.  That  to  prevent  as  much  as  possible  the  Errors 
of  the  Press,  the  Sheets  shall  be  carefully  cor- 
rected by  the  Editor  before  they  are  Printed. 

VI.  That  the  Work  shall  be  committed  to  the  Press 
by  the  beginning  of  January  next,  and  shall  be 
forwarded  with  all  the  Dispatch  so  great  an 
undertaking  will  admit  of. 

VII.  That  those  Persons,  who  shall  not  fetch  away 
their  Books  within  three  Months  after  the  same 
shall  be  published  and  delivered  to  the  Persons 
hereafter  appointed  to  take  in  Subscriptions, 
shall  forfeit  their  first  Subscription  Money,  to 
the  use  of  the  Editor,  in  order  to  make  good  the 
Damages  he  may  sustain  by  having  the  Books 
left  upon  his  Elands. 

Subscriptions  will  be  taken  in,  and  the  Books,  de- 
livered to  the  subscribers,  by  the  following  Per- 
sons, viz. 

Middlesex  County,  James  Smith  and  John  Wether- 
ill  Esqrs  ; William  Ouke , Esq;  in  New-Bruns- 


1 $3.12^. 


to 


NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS. 


[1751 


wick;  Thomas  Bartow,  Esq;  in  Perth  Amboy; 
and  Mr.  Francis  Braiser  at  the  Upper-Landing-. 

Monmouth  County,  Robert  Lawrence,  Esq  ; in 
Upper-Freehold  ; John  Taylor  Esq  ; in  Middle- 
Town  ; and  John  Redford,  Esq ; in  Shrews- 
bury. 

Essex  County,  John  Crane  and  Joseph  Camp, 
Esqrs  ; David  Ogdom1  Esq;  in  Newark;  and 
Mr.  Robert  Ogdon,  in  the  Borough  of  Eliza- 
beth. 

'Somerset  County,  John  Van  Middlesworth  and 
Hendrick  Fisher  Plsq ; and  Robert  Leitice 
Hooper,  Esq  ; at  Rocky-Hill. 

Bergen  County,  Lawrence  Vanbuskirk  and  Derick 
Dey1  Esqrs  ; and  David  Provost,  Esq  ; at  Hack- 
insack. 

Burlington  County,  Richard  Smith  jun.  and  Daniel 
Smith  Esqrs;  in  Burlington,  William  Cook  Esq; 
in  Croswicks  ; Joshua  Bispham,  Esq;  in  Moores-  | 
Town  ; and  Mr.  Samuel  Woodward  at  Cros-  j 
wicks  Bridge. 

Gloucestor  County,  William  Mickle  and  Samuel 
Harrison  Esqrs. 

Salem  County,  William  Hancock  and  Nicholas 
Gibbon  Esqrs. 

Cumberland  County,  John  Brick,  sen.  and  John  | 
Brick  jun,  Esqrs. 

Cape-May  County,  Aaron  Learning  and  Jacob 
Spicer,  Esqrs. 


1 Ogden. 

2 Derick  (Richard)  Dey  lived  at  Preakness. 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


1751] 


I I 


Hunterdon  County,  William  Mott  and  John  Emly, 
Esq  ; and  Mr.  Bond  at  Trenton. 

Morris  County,  Jacob  Ford,  and  John  Keney,  Esqrs  ; 

Subscriptions  will  also  be  taken  in  and  the  Books 
delivered  to  the  Subscribers  by  the  Editor  Samuel 
Nevil.  Esq  ; in  Perth  Amboy,  Wiliiam  Bradford  in 
Philadelphia,  and  by  Mr.  James  Hayward,  living  at 
Mr.  David  Provost’s  Wnarfin  New  York. 

N.  B.  Those  Persons  who  incline  to  be  furnished 
with  the  said  Laws,  are  desired  to  give  in  their  Names, 
and  pay  their  first  Subscription  Money,  before  the 
first  of  January  next,  when  the  Subscriptions  will  be 
closed,  and  the  several  Lists  of  the  Subscribers  be 
sent  to  the  Editor,  that  he  may  know  what  Number 
to  print,  and  the  Work  put  to  the  Press  ; but  few 
more  will  be  printed  than  what  are  subscribed  for, 
and  those  will  be  sold  at  an  advanced  Price.  This 
Public  method  therefore  hath  been  approved  of  and 
recommended  by  the  General  Assembly,  for  the  more 
effectual  supplying  the  Publick  with  the  said  Laws, 
which  will  soon  be  out  of  Print  and  not  be  afterwards 
obtained.1 — The  Penn.  Journal , Jan.  15,1  750.  [1751] 


To  be  sold  by  the  subscriber,  in  Burlington,  a 
plantation,  situate  above  a quarter  of  a mile  below 
the  town,  and  fronting  the  river  Delaware,  near  three 
quarters  of  a mile,  and  runs  a mile  and  a quarter  back, 
containing  208  acres,  upwards  of  40  acres  of  good 
meadow,  and  mowing  ground,  and  more  may  be 
made  ; near  six  acres  of  orchard,  a good  brick  house, 
50  feet  front,  2 stories  high,  finished  in  the  best  man- 

1 This  is  known  as  Nevill’s  Laws,  Vol.  I.  It  was  printed  by  William  Bradford,  at 
Philadelphia,  and  was  published  in  in  1752.  Vol.  II.  was  printed  by  James  Parker,  at 
Woodbridge,  in  1761. 


12  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [ 1 75 1 

ner,  a large  kitchen,  wash-house,  all  2 stories  high, 
good  cellars,  and  vaults,  a fine  piazza,  back  store 
room,  Darey-house,  coach-house,  chaise-house,  a fine 
stable,  a large  barn,  barrocks,  hovels,  a well  in  the 
cow-yard,  2 large  gardens,  containing  2 acres,  one 
walled  in  with  brick,  the  other  fenced  in  with  cedar, 

7 feet  high  ; This  place,  with  the  conveniences,  and 
about  one  third  of  the  land,  now  rents  to  our  present 
Governor  Belcher,  for  100  1.  per  annum,  and  it  may  [ 
suit  a gentleman  of  the  highest  taste.  Some  distance 
from  the  house,  on  the  other  side  of  the  creek  ad- 
joining, a small  stone  house,  with  a cellar,  and  fire-  | 
place  above  and  below,  a peach-orchard,  with  500  | 

trees  of  the  best  collection  of  that  fruit.  Also  a tract  f, 
of  cedar  swamp,  near  300  acres,  lying  in  Gloucester 
countv,  within  10  miles  of  Timber-creek  landing-,  I 
where  a 6 coard  flat  may  come.  Also  upwards  of  i 
20  acres  of  wood-land,  within  a mile  of  Burlington. 
Also,  a corner  lot  in  the  town,  upwards  of  two  acres, 
fenced  in  with  cedar  rails  and  posts,  formerly  belong-  j 
ing  to  the  estate  of  Peter  Banton.  * * * * * ; 

Any  person  inclining  to  purchase  any  of  the  above- 
mentioned  premises,  may  apply  to  Joseph  Oldman, 
or  Isaac  Conarow,  in  Burlington. — Penn . Gazette , I 

Jan.  15,  1 750-1.  No.  1153. 

To  be  sold  by  Morris  Morgan,  of  the  city  of  Phila- 
delphia 

A Plantation,  situate  on  Rackoon  creek,  in  the 
township  of  Greenwich,  in  the  county  of  Gloucester, 
and  province  of  West-Jersey,  containing  425  acres, 
with  good  dwelling-house  thereon,  wherein  Morris 
Connor  now  keeps  tavern  (and  which  has  been  a 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


3 


1751] 

well  accustomed  tavern  above  40  years  past)  Also,  a 
good  bearing  orchard,  about  60  acres  of  the  land  is 
cleared,  40  whereof  is  within  good  fence,  20  acres  of 
which  is  good  meadow,  and  more  may  be  made  ; 
what  upland  is  not  cleared,  is  well  timbered.  Any 
person  inclining  to  purchase  all  or  part  of  the  above- 
mentioned  land  and  premises,  may  apply  to  the  said 
Morgan,  and  know  the  title  and  terms  of  sale.  The 
title  is  indisputable. — Penn.  Gazette , Jan.  15,  1 750-1, 
No.  1153. 

Mr.  Parker. 

By  giving  a Place  to  the  following  Letter  in  your 
next , which  was  wrote  by  a countryman  to  his  friend , 
concerning  the  publick  Affairs  of  the  Province  of  N — 
J — , you  will  oblige  many  of  your  readers , and  par- 
ticularly, Your  Humble  Servant,  A — >n. 

Sir, 

This  Government  has  been  now  upwards  of  two 
Years  without  any  Support  which  may  be  said  to  be 
a great  Hardship,  not  only  as  it  is  an  Injury  to  the 
Government  in  particular,  and  the  several  other 
Officers  of  the  Government  having  been  now  so  long 
without  pay  ; but  also,  as  this  Neglect  of  paying  the 
publick  Debts,  involves  the  Inhabitants  of  the  Prov- 
ince under  certain  Inconveniences,  which  they  will 
but  too  sensibly  experience  hereafter,  when  they 
come  to  feel  the  Weight  of  those  accumulated  Debts, 
by  a heavy  Tax  ; which  would  be  less  felt,  and  much 
easier  paid  at  different  Periods,  than  all  at  once. 

Was  I asked,  whence  doth  arise  this  unhappy 
Delay  of  discharging  those  Debts,  which  is  so  essen- 


1 See  N.  J.  Archives,  XVI.,  240,  note. 


14  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [ I 75  I 

tially  necessary  to  maintain  the  publick  Credit,  and 
to  support  the  Honour  and  Dignity  of  his  Majesty’s 
Government?  I would  answer  by  observing  the 
following  Particulars,  viz.  That  the  Treasury  being 
empty,  and  the  usual  Method  for  supplying  the  same 
from  the  Interest  of  Paper  Money  upon  Loan,  being 
stopt ; as  the  last  Resource  therefore,  it  became 
necessary  to  levy  Money  by  a Tax  on  Lands  for  that 
Purpose ; and  to  this  End  the  Assembly  seemed 
heartily  inclined,  and  accordingly  prepared  a Bill,  en- 
titled, An  Act  to  enable  the  Legislature  to  settle  the 
Quotas  of  the  several  Counties,  for  levying  of  Taxes , 
&c.  By  which  it  was  provided,  That  all  such  Lands 
as  are  held  by  Patent,  Deed  or  Survey,  on  which  any 
Improvement  was  made,  should  be  subject  to  be 
taxed:  A Bill,  tho’ in  itself  reasonable  and  just, 

and  at  the  same  Time  so  absolutely  necessary,  met, 
nevertheless,  with  frequent  and  repeated  Obstruc- 
tions from  the  C — 1,  insomuch  as  to  hinder  its  pass- 
ing, tho’  the  same  has  been  now  upwards  of  three 
Years  upon  the  Carpet. 

The  C — ’s  Objections  or  Reasons  against  the  Bill, 
as  far  as  I am  able  to  judge,  appears  in  their  Mess- 
age to  the  House  of  Assembly,  in  the  last  Session  at 
A — — ; and  they  say,  the  same  breaks  in  upon  one 
of  his  Majesty’s  Instructions  to  the  Governor  ; that 
Part  thereof  which  is  to  clear  up  this  Matter,  is  re- 
cited in  the  C — ’s  Amendment  to  the  Bill  ; the  whole 
Amendment  is  in  these  Words:  “Whereas  by  the 
“Royal  Instructions  to  his  Excellency  the  Governor, 
“he  is  directed  in  these  Words:  Provided  always, 
“ that  you  do  not  consent  to  any  Act  or  Acts , to  lay 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


15 


1751] 

“any  Tax  upon  unprofitable  Lands.  It  is  hereby 
“ declared,  That  nothing  in  this  Act  is  meant  or  in- 
tended to  break  in  upon  the  said  Instruction,  or  to 
“warrant  the  Assessors  to  put  any  unprofitable 
“Lands  into  the  said  List,  or  Account  of  Things  to 
“be  taxed.”  Now,  nothing  appears  to  me  more  obvi- 
ous, than  that  said  Instruction  means  or  intends  no 
other,  than  that  barren  Lands,  not  worth  the  clearing, 
and  consequently,  on  which  no  Improvement  could 
reasonably  be  expected,  should  be  made,  nor  any 
other  Tracts  of  unimproved  Wood-Lands,  which 
brought  no  Income  or  Profit  to  the  Owner,  should 
not  be  taxed,  neither  of  which  being  the  Object  of 
this  Bill,  the  pretended  Contrariety  or  breaking  in 
upon  his  Majesty’s  Instruction,  therefore  entirely 
vanishes. 

The  C — 1 in  their  said  Message,  seem  to  Charge 
the  Assembly  with  Innovation,  and  that  by  their  Bill 
they  lay  aside  the  accustomed  Method  ; and  that  they 
seem  to  intend,  Lands  shall  hereafter  be  t3xed  by  the 
Acre  ; what  this  is  mentioned  for,  or  intended  by  it, 
I can’t  see;  for  suppose  the  Bill  doth  differ  from  the 
Accustomed  Method  in  this  particular  Respect,  yet 
the  C — 1,  at  least,  tacitly  admit  of  this  new  Method 
(if  it  may  be  called  so)  of  taxing  Lands  for  the  Future, 
by  the  Acre,  because  themselves  allow,  that  by  an- 
other particular  Clause  in  the  Bill,  the  Number  of 
Acres  of  each  Tract  is  required  to  be  taken,  which  is 
no  Way  taken  off  by  the  said  Amendment;  all  then, 
that  the  C — 1 seem  especially  to  guard  against,  is 
not  to  warrant  the  Assessors  to  put  any  unprofitable 
Lands  into  their  Lists,  or  Account  of  Things  to  be 


1 6 NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [ 1 75  I 

taxed:  But,  in  that  Case,  I conceive  the  Law  would 
have  been  very  precarious  and  uncertain,  as  it  leaves 
the  Point,  with  Regard  to  what  the  Words*  profitable 
and  unprofitable  shall  mean,  undetermined;  and 
what  would  be  the  Consequence,  is  not  at  all  difficult 
to  foresee.  The  Hardships  and  Difficulties  it  would 
lay  the  Assessors  under,  are  very  great,  who  in  that 
Case,  must  be  obliged  to  take  a Survey  of  every 
Man’s  Tract  of  Land  throughout  the  Province,  in 
order  to  find  out  the  exact  Quantity  of  Acres,  or 
rather  what  shall  be  deemed  profitable  Acres  ; for 
the  Law  tells  him,  he  is  not  warranted  to  put  any 
other  than  such  into  his  List : But  how  shall  he  dis- 
tinguish the  profitable  trom  the  unprofitable,  since  the 
Law  doth  not  distinguish,  and  gives  him  no  Direction 
in  this  Case?  No  Matter,  he  is  obliged  to  do  it 
nevertheless  ; and  what  is  worse,  in  Case  he  errs, 
that  is,  if  he  happens  to  put  any  unprofitable  Acres 
in  his  LNt,  he  incurs  the  Penalty  of  the  Law.  The 
sad  Dilemma,  therefore,  that  Officer  would  lay  under, 
had  the  Bill  passed  with  said  Amendment,  as  well  as 
the  almost  endless  Complaints  he  would  be  exposed 
to,  are  too  glaring  to  need  any  farther  enlarging 
upon  ; besides,  that  in  order  to  have  Lands  to  be 
taxed  thus  adjusted,  if  at  all  practicable,  would  be  a 
Work  of  long  Time,  and  great  Expence.  These 
Things  being  so  extraordinary,  makes  some  People 
shrewdly  suspect,  that  even  a general  Re-survey  of 
all  Lands  in  the  Province , which  has  been  often  spoke 
of,  and  is  so  much  dreaded,  was  also  intended  by  said 
Amendment ; but  be  that  as  it  will,  I am  persuaded 

*Its  pity  Fords  of  such  easy  Construction,  and  among  all  Conditions  of  Men  so 
well  understood should  occasion  so  much  Dispute. 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


I 7 


1751] 

it  would  have  been  a noble  Turn  for  Surveyors,  not 
to  mention  Others,  and  have  put  a Plough  into  their 
Hands,  from  which  they  might  expect  to  reap  a most 
plentiful  Harvest,  a Way,  indeed,  of  raising  Money 
to  a fine  Purpose. 

The  C — 1 in  another  Part  of  said  Message,  seem 
with  some  Ardour,  to  express  a Regard  for  the  poor 
People  of  the  Province,  and  then  say,  should  a Tract 
contain  nineteen  Acres  of  unprofitable  Lands,  for  one 
Acre  of  profitable,  the  whole  twenty  Acres  shall  pay  as 
much  Tax , as  if  it  were  all  profitable : This  Argu- 
ment, if  it  be  taken  according  to  the  plain  Meaning 
of  the  Words,  it  may  be  made  a great  Question, 
whether  any  such  Tract  of  Land  can  be  found  in  the 
Province,  that  bears  any  Thing  like  so  great  Dispro- 
portion, as  nineteen  to  one  ; I mean,  on  which  any  Im- 
provement has  been  made ; but,  suppose  it  be  taken 
in  a different  Sense  from  what  the  Words  will  natural- 
ly bear,  viz.  That  a proper  Difference  should  be  made 
in  Lands  more  and  less  profitable,  according  to  their 
Goodness  or  Quality ; in  this  Respect  I am  ready  to 
think,  that  almost  every  Tract  of  Land  in  the  Province 
will  differ  from  another,  and  even  every  particular 
Tract  from  itself ; but  in  order  to  find  the  exact  or  true 
mean  Proportion,  &c.  would  be  a Work  attended  with 
such  extraordinary  Expence,  and  extreme  Difficulty,  as 
I can’t  see  how  could  be  well  got  over,  at  least  the  C — 1 
have  not  pointed  out  how,  or  which  Way,  it  shall  or 
may  be  done.  After  all,  I think  it  would  be  no  un- 
reasonable Condescension  in  the  C — 1,  to  let  the 
People  themselves  find  Fault  or  complain  ; but  the 
Truth  is,  tho’  this  Matter  has  been  so  long  under 
2 


1 8 NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [ 1 75  I 

Consideration,  we  have  heard  of  no  Complaints  in 
this  Respect,  either  by  Way  of  Petition,  or  otherways; 
this  I think  to  be  an  undeniable  Proof,  that  the  good 
People  of  the  Province,  and  their  Representatives  are 
equally  satisfied  in  the  Taxation  proposed  by  the 
Bill ; therefore  it  is  but  reasonable  to  conclude,  the 
C — 1 had  something  else  in  View,  than  what  is  pre- 
tended, and  what  can  we  suppose,  or  think  more 
obvious,  than  that  two  or  three  G — t — m — n that  are 
of  the  C — 1,  only  may  be  said  to  have  large  Estates 
in  Lands  in  the  Province,  on  some  of  which,  no 
Doubt,  Improvements  have  been  made,  and  from 
which  they  may  reap  proportionable  Advantages 
with  other  People,  whose  Lands  are  thus  improved, 
that  notwithstanding  they  are  willing,  if  possible,  to 
avoid  paying  a proportionable  tax  for  those  Lands. 
Here,  therefore,  we  may  suppose  the  Shoe  pinches, 
and  is  the  thing  They  have  at  Stake:  But,  who  will 
say,  it  is  either  unreasonable,  partial,  or  unjust,  to 
have  those  Lands  taxed  in  common,  with  other 
People’s  Lands  ? Is  not  the  putting  People  upon  a 
Level  with  respect  to  paying  Taxes  to  support  his 
Majesty’s  Government,  who  reigns  impartially  over 
all  his  People,  a coming  up  full  to  the  never-failing 
Rule  of  the  Gospel,  in  doing  by  one  Neighbour  as  we 
do  by  another , and  even  so  as  we  would  have  done  by 
ourselves  ? 

That  two  or  three  G-t-m-n  of  the  C — 1,  for  the 
Sake  of  their  own  private  and  particular  Interest, 
should  have  the  Address  and  Influence,  to  embarrass 
an  Affair  of  so  much  Importance  to  the  Publick,  in 
opposition  to  a great  Majority,  not  under  any  such 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


19 


1751] 

Bias,  so  as  to  hinder  the  passing-  said  Bill,  tho’  as  I 
said  before,  it  has  been  above  three  Years  under 
Consideration,  is  extremely  unhappy  as  well  as  sur- 
prising. It  is  not  without  Concern  that  I am  going 
to  give  you  some  further  Account  of  this  efficacious 
and  powerful  Influence  ; you  shall  have  it  as  I was 
informed,  and  I think  from  too  good  Authority  not  to 
mention  it,  that  in  a former  Session,  five  C — s were 
unanimously  agreed  in  Sentiments  in  favour  of  the 
Bill,  as  sent  up,  but  no  sooner  did  other  three  appear, 
when  Eloquence,  and  I know  not  what,  got  the  Vic- 
tory of  Reason,  and  all  Hopes  and  Expectations  with 
regard  to  its  passing,  ended  in  Disappointment,  so 
that  it  was  commonly  spoke  of  amongst  those  ac- 
quainted with  the  Affair,  that  three  had  out-voted  five. 
And  perhaps  it  might  be  from  this  remarkable  Instance 
of  Success  in  the  first,  and  Prostitution  of  better 
Judgment  in  the  latter,  that  one  of  those  G-t-m-n, 
now  in  E — d,  took  Occasion  there  to  say,  that  this 
Government  would  go  zmsupported  for  ten  Years  to 
come.  I suppose  he  said  this  without  the  Spirit  of 
Prophecy,  not  only,  as  he  pretty  well  knew  the  Sen- 
timents of  the  People  in  favour  of  the  Bill,  on  the  one 
Hand,  but  more  especially  their  own  Power  and  In- 
terest, either  to  embarrass  or  intirely  to  defeat  it,  on 
the  other. 

I have  now,  so  far  as  the  Bounds  of  my  Letter 
would  permit,  laid  before  you,  the  Occasion  and  Rise 
of  the  aforesaid  Delay  or  Neglect  of  paying  the  pub- 
lick  Debts,  and  the  Reasons  upon  which  it  is  founded  ; 
which  at  the  same  Time,  may  represent  to  us  in  some 
Measure,  the  present  unhappy  State  of  the  Province, 


20  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [ 1 75 1 

with  regard  to  its  publick  Affairs  ; and  when  we  may 
hope  for,  or  see  better  Times,  as  long  as  our  C — s 
remain  or  continue  under  P y Direction  and  In- 

fluence, God  only  Knows,  and  Time  must  discover. 

I am,  &c. 

— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly  Post 
Boy , Jan.  21,  1751. 

To  Be  Sold, 

A good  Farm  at  Rocky-Hill,  in  East  New-Jersey, 
containing  between  13  and  14  Hundred  Acres  of 
choice  Land,  now  in  the  Possession  of  James  Van- 
horne  ; There  is  on  it  a good  Dwelling-House,  Barn, 
Waggon  and  Negro  Houses,  an  Orchard  of  700  Apple 
Trees,  and  about  60  or  70  Acres  of  the  Land  is  good 
English  Meadow.  Any  Person  inclining  to  purchase, 
may  apply  to  William  Bayard,  Merchant  in  New- 
York,  or  to  the  said  James  Vanhorne  on  the  Premises. 
An  indisputable  Title  will  be  given. — The  N.  Y.  Ga- 
zette Revived  in  the  Weekly  Post  Boy,  Jan.  21,  1751. 

By  Order  of  the  General  Assembly  of  the  Province  of 
New-Jersey, 

There  is  now  ready  for  the  Press,  and  speedily  will 
be  published,  in  one  Volume  in  Folio. 

The  Laws  of  the  Province  of  New-Jersey  ; 

From  the  Time  of  the  Surrender  of  the  Government, 
in  the  Year  1702,  to  present  Year  1750. 

N.  B.  The  Subscriptions  not  being  yet  returned  to 
the  Editor  from  the  several  Parts  of  the  Province  of 
New-Jersey,  (which  he  attributes  to  the  Severity  of 
the  Season)  he  hath  thought  it  convenient  to  delay 
the  putting  of  the  Work  to  the  Press,  until  the  first 


1751]  NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS.  21 

of  April  next ; when  it  will  certainly  go  forward  with- 
out further  delay. — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the 
Weekly  Post  Boy , Jan.  21,  1751. 

Philadelphia  January  29.  1 750-1. 

Ran  away  on  the  20th  inst.  from  Nathan  Watson, 
of  Mount-Holly,  an  Irish  servant  man,  named  Chris- 
topher Cooney,  a short  well-set  fellow,  about  26  years 
of  age,  of  a pale  complexion,  short  brown  curl’d  hair, 
had  lost  one  of  his  under  fore  teeth,  and  has  had  his 
right  leg  broke,  and  walks  with  his  toe  turned  out- 
ward : Had  on  when  he  went  away,  a new  castor 
hat.  a red  great  coat,  a light  coloured  fustian  coat  and 
jacket,  new  copper  colour’d  broadcloth  breeches,  lined 
with  leather,  new  black  and  white  yarn  stockings,  old 
shoes,  newly  soled  ; he  was  some  time  past  a hostler 
at  Jonathan  Thomas’s,  in  Burlington  ; and  formerly 
a servant  near  Willington.  Whoever  takes  up  and 
secures  said  servant,  so  as  his  master  may  have  him 
again,  shall  have  Forty  Shillings  reward,  and  reason- 
able charges,  paid  by 

Nathan  Watson. 

— Penn.  Gazette , Jan.  29,  1 750-1.  No.  1155. 

Notice  is  hereby  given,  That,  pursuant  to  an  Award 
lately  made  by  Messrs.  Andrew  Johnston,  James 
Hude,  and  William  Ouke,  of  New  Jersey,  Merchants, 
and  Simon  Johnson,  Esq ; and  Christopher  Banker, 
Merchant,  of  New  York,  between  Jacob  Isaacs,  Mer- 
chant of  the  one  Part,  and  Samuel  Nevil,  Esq  ; and 
John  Nevil,  Gent,  of  the  other  Part,  bearing  Date  the 
26th  of  June  1747  ; there  will  be  exposed  to  sale  at 
public  Vendue,  by  the  said  Jacob  Isaacs,  at  the  Mar- 


22  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [175! 

ket  House  in  the  City  of  Perth-Amboy,  on  Friday 
the  2 2d  Day  of  March  next,  the  Tracts  and  Lots  of 
Land  late  of  Peter  Sonmans,  Esq  ; deceased  to  wit. 

A Tract  of  Meadow  and  Upland  in  Monmouth 
County,  lying-  at  a Place  called  Barnegat,  on  Scate 
Bay  and  Egg  Harbour  Beach,  beginning  on  the 
North  Cape  of  Scate  Bay,  which  is  the  South  Point 
of  an  Island  of  Meadow,  and  running  West  84 
Chains,  thence  West  North  West  166  Chains  to  the 
Upland,  thence  North  West  180  Chains,  thence 
South  West  140  Chains,  thence  South  East  and 
by  South  500  Chains,  or  six  Miles  and  a quarter  over 
the  Sound  and  Beach  to  the  Sea,  be  it  more  or  less  ; 
thence  North  East  along  the  Beach  1 to  Chains,  to 
the  Whole-Quarter  and  Line  of  Augustine  Gordon’s 
Lands,  or  his  Assigns  ; Thence  North  West  over  the 
Beach  from  the  Sea  to  the  main  Channel  of  the 
Sound ; thence  along  the  said  Channel,  including 
the  Islands  on  the  West  Side  thereof  to  the  Place 
where  it  began. 

Also  a Tract  of  Land  lying  in  Amboy,  containing 
46  Acres,  beginning  at  the  white  Oak  Tree  marked 
on  both  Sides,  standing  by  the  old  Path,  which  is  the 
North  East  Corner  of  the  late  Peter  Sonman’s  Land, 
and  running  North  North  East,  and  one  Degree 
more  easterly,  16  Chains  15  Links;  thence  West 
North  West,  and  by  half  a Point  more  northerly,  17 
Chains;  thence  West  and  by  North  16  Chains; 
thence  South  and  by  West  14  Chains  ; thence  as  the 
Line  of  said  Sonman’s  Lands  runs,  to  the  Place 
where  it  began. 

Also  one  other  Tract  of  Land  within  the  Bounds 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


23 


1751] 

of  Amboy,  containing  46  Acres,  begining  at  a red 
Oak  Tree  on  the  Top  of  the  Bank  of  Rariton  River, 
marked  on  four  Sides,  being  the  Corner  of  Amboy 
Bounds,  and  running  South  East  27  Degrees,  as  the 
River  runs  9 Chains,  to  Sonmans  Creek  or  Brook  ; 
thence  North  East  as  the  said  Brook  goes  40  Chains 
to  a white  Oak  Tree  marked  on  four  Sides,  standing 
by  the  Brook  and  Path;  thence  North  West  63 
Degrees  to  the  boundary  Line  of  Amboy  ; thence 
South  West  12  Degrees  along  the  said  Line,  to  the 
Place  where  it  be^an. — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in 
the  Weekly  Post  Boy , Feb.  4,  1751. 

New  York,  January  23.  Last  Monday  Night  and 
Tuesday  Morning,  we  had  here  a very  violent  Gale 
of  Wind  at  South  East-East,  which  has  done  consid- 
erable Damage  to  several  Vessels  and  Craft  being 
at  our  Wharfs  ; and  had  not  the  Wind  suddenly 
chop’d  about,  to  the  West,  as  it  did  a few  Hours 
before  High-Water,  and  check’d  the  Tides,  to  all 
Appearance,  most  of  the  Wharffs  would  have  been 
quite  overflow’d. 

We  hear  that  in  the  above  Storm,  a Rhode-Island 
Sloop,  from  St.  Kitts , was  cast  away  near  Sandy 
Hook  ; the  Men  saved  and  only  eight  or  ten  Casks 
of  Rum  of  the  Cargo  ; but  have  not  yet  heard  the 
Name  of  Vessel  or  Master. — Penna.  Journal , Feb.  5, 
1 750-1.  Wh.  429. 

Custom-House  Philadelphia,  Cleared. — Sloop  Bruns- 
wick, Joshua  Townsend,  to  Cape-May. — Penna. 
Journal , Feb.  5,  1 750-1.  No.  429. 


24  New  jerseV  colonial  Documents.  [1751 

New  York , February  11.  February  2,  1 750-1  ; 
Died  at  New  Brunswick,  the  Rev.  Mr.  Thomas 
Arthur,  Pastor  of  the  Presbyterian  Church  in  that 
City  ; in  the  Twenty-seventh  Year  of  his  Age.1 
A good  Scholar,  a graceful  Orator,  a finish’d 
Preacher,  an  exemplary  Christian  ; steadfast  in  the 
Faith , without  a Tincture  of  Bigotry  ; cheerful 
in  Conversation  without  the  appearance  of  Levity. 
He  discharg’d  the  various  Branches  of  the  pas- 
toral Care,  with  Diligence  and  Fidelity ; and 
adorn’d  the  several  Relations  of  Life,  by  an  aim- 
able  and  engaging  Behaviour.  He  was  the  Darling 
of  the  People  under  his  peculiar  Charge,  and  highly 
valued  by  all  that  had  the  Happiness  of  his  Ac- 
quaintance. He  had  a quick  Transition  from  the 
Labours  of  the  Church  Militant  on  Earth,  to  the 
Joys  of  the  Church  Triumphant  in  Heaven.  His 
Distemper  was  violent,  and  soon  effected  his  Head  : 
But  as  Death  approached,  the  Clouds  scattered,  and 
he  beheld  the  Dawnings  of  Celestial  Day.  He  re- 
ceived the  mortal  Summons  with  unruffled  Com- 
posure of  Mind,  and  honour’d  his  sacred  Character 
in  the  Presence  of  the  King  of  Terrors , and  finish? d 
his  Course  with  Serenity  and  foy  ; cheerfully  com- 
mitting his  Body  to  the  Dust,  “leaving  (as  he  him- 
self express’d  it)  his  Soul  in  the  Hands  of  Christ, 
not  afraid  to  depend  on  His  all  sufficient  Merits 
alone,  lor  Eternal  Life.”  The  Church  bewails  its 

1 Thomas  Arthur  was  graduated  from  Yale  in  1743,  and  preached  for  a time  at  Shat- 
field,  Conn.  He  was  ordained  and  installed  pastor  at  New  Brunswick  in  1746.  He  was 
one  of  the  original  Trustees  of  Princeton  College.  His  sermon  at  the  ordination  of 
Thane,  in  August,  1750,  was  printed,  and  the  trustees  of  the  New  York  church  requested 
for  publication  a copy  of  his  sermon  at  the  ordination  of  Cumming  as  their  pastor  in  Oc- 
tober, 1750. — Webster's  Hist.  Pres.  Church , 504. 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


25 


1 75  i J 

Loss,  and  Civil  Society  is  deprived  of  one  of  its 
brightest  Ornaments  : But  a new  Star  is  added  to 
the  Redeemers  Crown,  and  one  Member  more 
admitted  to  the  General  Assembly  of  Perfected 
Spirits — His  vertuous  and  beloved  Consort,  died  a 
few  Days  before  him,  and  took  Farewell  of  the 
World,  in  the  full  Appearance  of  Faith , and  tri- 
umphant Expectation  of  eternal  Felicity. — The  N. 
Ym  Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , Feb.  1 1 , 
051- 

Run  away  on  Sunday  Night,  the  3d  Instant,  from 
Judah  Hays,  a Negro  Wench,  named  Sarah,  aged 
about  30  Years ; she  is  a likely  Wench  of  a Mulatto 
Complexion,  was  brought  up  at  Amboy  in  Col.  Ham- 
ilton’s Family,  and  has  had  several  Masters  in  the 
Jerseys  : She  dresses  very  well,  has  a good  Parcel  of 
Cloaths,  and  speaks  good  English.  Whoever  takes 
up  the  said  Wench,  and  brings  her  to  her  said  Mas- 
ter, or  secures  her  in  any  Country  Goal,  so  that  he 
may  have  her  again,  shall  receive  Forty  Shillings  Re- 
ward, and  all  reasonable  Charges.  Whoever  enter- 
tertains  said  Wench,  shall  be  prosecuted  with  the  ut- 
most Rigour  of  the  Law.  All  Masters  of  Vessels, 
Boat  men,  &c.  are  forewarned  of  conveying  said 
Wench  away,  as  they  shall  answer  the  same. 

Judah  Hays. 

N.  B.  Said  Wench  has  robb’d  her  said  Master,  in 
Apparel,  &c.  upwards  of  fifty  Pounds. — The  N.  Y. 
Gazette^  Revived  in  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , Feb.  1 1, 

'751- 


26 


NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [ 1 75  i 


To  be  Sold, 

A Tract  of  Land  on  the  Paltry  Creek,  in  Ulster 
County,  containing  upwards  of  1000  Acres,  distant 
sixteen  Miles  from  Ellis’s  Landing,  on  the  North 
River,  to  which  is  a very  good  Road  ; the  Land  is  all 
good,  and  is  to  be  sold  altogether,  or  in  Farms  of  two 
or  three  Hundred  Acres.  Enquire  of  Frances  Bar- 
berie,  at  the  House  of  the  late  Col.  Moore’s,  in  New- 
York;  or. John  Barberie  in  Amboy,  who  has  to  sell, 
a good  House,  Stoie  House,  Bake  House  and  Oven, 
and  fifty-five  ol  Acres  of  Up-Land  and  Meadow,  with 
a good  Barn  and  Orchard  thereon,  situated  at  Rariton 
Landing,  in  New-Jersey,  very  convenient  for  a Mer- 
chant or  Store-Keeper,  a Store  having  been  kept 
there  many  Years.  The  Title  indisputable. — The 
N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , Feb. 
IL  I75i- 

Whereas  Gerteret  the  Wife  of  John  Beesely,  of 
Piles  Grove,  Salem  County,  has  eloped  from  her  said 
Husband  and  ran  away  with  one  William  Anderson, 
this  is  therefore  to  forewarn  any  Person  from  trust- 
ing her,  for  he  will  pay  no  Debts  by  her  contracted, 
And  whereas  said  Gerteret  & Wm.  Anderson  has 
taken  sundry  Things  from  said  Beesely  any  Person 
that  shall  take  them  up  shall  have  Twenty  Shillings 
Reward  for  each  paid  by  Jn.  Beesely. — -Penna.  Journal, 
Feb.  12,  1 750  1 . No.  430. 

By  order  of  the  General  Assembly  of  the  province 
of  New-Jersey,  there  is  now  ready  for  the  Press,  and 
speedily  will  be  published,  in  one  volume,  in  folio, 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


27 


1751] 

The  Laws  of  the  Province  of  New  Jersey,  From  the 
time  of  the  surrender  of  the  government  in  1702,  to 
the  present  year  1750. 

The  body  of  the  book  will  contain  all  the  acts  and 
laws  now  in  force  in  the  said  province,  with  proper  mar- 
ginal notes,  and  compleat  tables  of  the  titles  of  all  the 
publick  acts,  now  in  force,  of  all  the  private  acts,  and 
of  all  such  acts  as  are  repealed,  expired  or  disal- 
lowed by  the  crown  : Together  with  a proper  index, 
containing  all  the  principal  matters  in  the  body 
of  the  book.  The  whole  work,  which  will  contain 
about  one  hundred  and  twenty  sheets  in  folio,  hath 
been  carefully  prepared,  examined  and  corrected  by 
the  original  laws,  by  Samuel  Nevill,  Esq.  speaker  of 
the  house  of  representatives  of  New-Jersey  ; and  is 
now  committed  to  the  press,  by  order  of  the  house, 
under  his  correction  and  inspection.  The  work  will 
be  put  to  the  press  by  the  beginning  of  April  next, 
and  the  price  to  the  Subscribers  will  be  One  Pound 
Five  Shillings,  proclamation  money  of  New  Jersey: 
Twelve  Shillings  to  be  paid  at  the  time  of  subscrib- 
ing, and  the  remainder  on  the  delivery  of  the  book. 
And  those  persons  who  incline  to  be  furnished  with 
said  laws,  are  desired  to  give  in  their  names,  and  to 
pay  their  first  subscription  money  before  the  first  of 
April  next,  when  the  subscriptions  will  certainly  be 
closed,  and  the  several  lists  of  the  subscribers  will  be 
sent  to  the  Editor,  that  he  may  know  what  number 
to  print.  But  a few  more  will  be  printed  than  what 
are  subscribed  for,  and  those  will  be  sold  at  an  ad- 
vanced price.  This  publick  method  hath  been  ap- 
proved and  recommended  by  the  general  assembly 


28  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [175! 

for  the  more  effectual  supplying  the  publick  with  the 
said  laws,  which  will  soon  be  out  of  print,  and  nqt  to  be 
afterwards  obtained.  Subscriptions  will  be  taken  in, 
and  the  books  delivered  to  the  subscribers,  by  the 
following  Persons,  viz — Middlesex  County,  James 
Smith  and  John  Wetherill,  Esqrs  ; William  Ouke, 
Esq;  in  New  Brunswick;  Thomas  Barbour,  Esq;  in 
Perth  Amboy;  and  Mr.  Francis  Braiser,  at  the 
Upper  Landing.  Monmouth  County,  Robert  Law- 
rence, Esq;  in  Upper  Freehold;  John  Taylor,  in 
Middle  Town  ; and  John  Redford,  Esq  ; in  Shrews- 
bury. Essex  County,  John  Crane  and  Joseph  Camp, 
Esqrs ; David  Ogdon,  Esq  ; in  Newark  ; and  Mr. 
Robert  Ogdon,  in  the  borough  of  Elizabeth.  Somer- 
set County,  John  Van  Middlesworth, 

Note.  Whereas  it  hath  been  reported,  that  the  said 
Laws  will  be  sold  at  a cheaper  rate  by  the  printer 
(after  the  publication  thereof)  than  they  are  now  of- 
fered to  the  subscribers  ; to  prevent  such  an  imposi- 
tion upon  the  publick  by  the  said  report,  which  is 
without  foundation,  these  are  to  give  notice,  that  said 
laws  will  only  be  sold  by  the  editor  Samuel  Nevill, 
or  his  order,  and  that  the  price  to  all  persons,  except 
the  subscribers,  will  be  One  Pound  Ten  Shillings, 
which  the  said  book  (according  to  the  common  price 
of  books)  will  be  honestly  worth  So  that  after  this 
fair  publick  notice,  if  any  persons  shall  be  deprived 
of  them,  they  can  blame  none  but  themselves. — Penn . 
Gazette , Feb.  12,  1750-1.  No.  1157. 

THere  will  be  sold,  by  publick  vendue,  on  the  sixth 
day  of  March  next,  Oxen,  cows,  young  cattle,  a horse 
and  mares,  sheep,  hogs,  household  goods,  and  uten- 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


29 


1751] 

sils  for  husbandry,  at  the  late  dwelling-house  of 
Martin  Bickham,  deceased,  in  Greenwich,  Gloucester 
county,  and  province  of  New  Jersey,  near  the  mouth 
of  Raccoon  creek,  over  against  Chester.  The  high- 
est bidder  to  be  the  buyer,  and  six  months  credit  for 
all  sums  above  Twenty  Shiilings,  giving  good  secur- 
ity ; and  all  sums  under  Twenty  Shillings  ready 
money. 

Also  a plantation  containing  250  acres  of  land, 
swamp  and  meadow  ground,  of  which  is  supposed 
near  100  acres  of  good  drained  meadow  ground,  and 
some  cedar  swamp,  good  and  convenient  for  fencing, 
with  many  other  advantages  and  conveniences  too 
tedious  to  mention  ; the  said  plantation  adjoining  on 
Delaware,  over  against  Chester.  The  conditions 
may  be  known  at  the  time,  and  place  above-said. 

Sarah  Bickham,  Executrix. 

— Penn.  Gazette,  Feb.  12,  1 750-1.  No.  1157. 

New-York , February  25. — On  Thursday  last,  some 
Persons  who  had  lost  sundry  Things,  having  got  Intelli- 
gence, that  one  Elizabeth  Herbert , a suspected  Per- 
son, who  came  from  Philadelphia , with  a Man  at 
whose  House  she  lodged  here,  had  gone  off  in  a 
Boat  with  some  Bundles  for  New-Brunswick : They 
got  a Pettiauger  and  went  after  them  : They  came  up 
with  the  Boat  near  Elizabeth-Town  Point,  and  on 
searching  the  Bundles  found  most  of  the  Things 
they  had  miss’d  ; whereupon  they  brought  them  both 
back,  and  committed  them  to  Jail. — The  N.  Y.  Ga- 
zette' Revived  in  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , Feb.  25,  1751. 


30 


NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1751 


To  Samuel  Nevill,  Esq  ; 

Sir, 

This  is  to  notify  you,  That  I the  Subscriber,  have, 
in  behalf  of  my  Self,  and  the  People  that  have  pur- 
chased Lands  of  John  Harrison,  Esq  ; in  the  County 
of  Somerset  and  Middlesex,  and  Province  of  New- 
Jersey,  determin’d  to  make  the  best  and  clearest 
Pleas  to  his  Majesty  in  Council,  in  Vindication  of  the 
purchase  Rights  of  John  Harrison,  Esq  ; as  speedily 
as  I can. 

Yours  to  serve, 

Jan.  5.  1750-1.  Dollins  Hagerman. 

— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly 
Post  Boy , Feb.  25,  1751. 

By  His  Excellency  Jonathan  Belcher,  Esq  ; Cap- 
tain General  and  Governor  in  Chief  in  and  over  His 
Majesty  s Province  of  Nova  Csesara,  or  New-Jersey, 
and  Territories  thereon  depending , in  America , Chan- 
cellor, and  Vice-Admiral  in  the  same . 

A Proclamation. 

Whereas  the  General  Assembly  of  the  Prov- 
ince of  JSlew-Jersey , have  for  a long  Time 
neglected  to  support  His  Majesty  s Government , not- 
withstanding I have,  by  His  Majesty’s  Orders,  made 
repeated  Application  to  them  on  that  Head ; for 
which,  and  other  Reasons,  the  good  People  of  this 
Province  are  in  great  Danger  of  drawing  on  them  the 
just  Resentment  of  his  Majesty,  unless  the  Legisla- 
ture shall  restore  the  Credit  and  Peace  of  the  Prov- 
ince ; of  which  I thought  it  my  Duty  to  inform  the 
Hou  se  of  Representatives  by  a Message  of  the  22d 
Instant,  and  therein  I inserted  a Paragraph  of  a Letter 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


3 


1751] 

I had  the  Honour  of  receiving  from  the  Right  Hon- 
ourable the  Lords  Commissioners  for  Trade  and 
Plantations,  in  the  following  Words  ; 

“In  the  State  of  Rebellion  in  which  your  Colony 
“is  so  unhappily  involved.  Order  and  good  Govern- 
ment seem  to  be  intirely  subverted,  and  the  Law  is 
“no  longer  a Protection  either  to  the  Persons  or  Prop- 
erties of  his  Majesty’s  well-affected  Subjects  ; What 
“can  be  said  of  an  Assembly  who  in  this  distressed 
“Situation  of  their  Country,  have  so  often  obstinately 
“refused  to  supply  the  Exigencies  of  the  Govern- 
ment? &c.” 

And  whereas  the  House  of  Assembly  have  treated 
the  subject  Matter  of  the  said  Message  with  Neglect, 
and  in  their  Answer  thereto,  have  given  it  as  their 
Opinion,  That  their  Lordships  have  received  false 
Representations from  certain  Gentlemen  of  this  Colony  ; 
and  that  they  are  not  duly  acquainted  with  the  Truth 
of  Facts , &c.  But  as  their  Lordships  Letter  bears 
date  the  first  Day  of  September  last,  and  I acquainted 
the  House,  that  it  came  to  my  Hands  last  Month  ; it 
was  evident,  that  this  was  an  Opinion  their  Lordships 
had  formed,  after  the  Journals  of  both  Houses  (which 
I have  duly  transmitted)  had  been  considered  by 
them,  and  after  the  Petition  of  the  Assembly  to  his 
I-  Majesty  of  October , 1749,  had  a solemn  Hearing 
before  them. 

And  whereas  the  House  of  Assembly  further  ac- 
quaint me,  in  their  said  Answer  to  my  Message,  that 
all  friendly  Communication  between  them  and  the 
Council  (without  whom  no  Legislative  Act  can  pass) 
is  intirely  cut  off : Therefore  in  this  calamitous 


32  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [ 1 75 1 

Situation  of  the  Affairs  of  this  Province,  in  Duty  to 
His  Majesty,  and  from  a tender  Regard  to  the  good 
People  of  this  Colony  ; I have  thought  it  necessary 
to  give  them  an  Opportunity  of  a new  Choice  of  Re- 
presentatives; who,  by  their  Dutifulness  to  His  Maj- 
jesty,  and  prudent  Behaviour,  may,  if  possible,  avert 
the  Effect  of  that  Resentment,  which  there  is  great 
Reason  to  apprehend  our  Sovereign  may  entertain, 
by  Occasion  of  the  past  Misbehaviour  of  some  People 
of  this  Province;  which  cannot,  by  reasonable  Men,  be 
attributed  to  any  Part  of  my  Conduct  in  the  Admin- 
istration of  the  Government,  with  which  the  King 
has  been  pleased  to  entrust  me,  since  I have  done 
every  Thing  in  my  Power,  consistent  with  his  Maj- 
esty’s Honour,  towards  restoring  and  preserving  the 
Peace  of  the  Province,  and  for  the  Advancement  of 
the  Welfare  and  Prosperity  of  the  People  under  my 
Care  : I therefore  cannot  think  the  with-holding  the 
Support  of  Government,  is  agreeable  to  the  Senti- 
ments of  the  good  People  of  this  Province,  or  for 
their  Credit  or  real  Interest.  Therefore,  by  the 
Powers  and  Authorities  to  me  granted  by  his  Majesty, 
under  the  Great  Seal  of  Great- Britain,  I do  dissolve 
the  General  Assembly  of  this  Province  of  New- Jersey', 
and  they  are  accordingly  dissolved. 

Given  under  my  Hand  and  Seal  at  Arms,  at  Bur- 
lington, the  Twenty-fifth  Day  tf/"  February,  in  the 
Twenty-fourth  Year  of  His  Majesty  s Reign, 
Anno  Dom,  MDCCL. 

By  his  Excellency  s Command  J.  Belcher. 

Cha.  Read,  Secry. 

— The  N Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly 
Tost  Boy,  March  4,  1751. 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


33 


1751] 

To  Be  Sold. 

A Tract  of  Land  lying-  in  Middletown , in  the 
County  of  Monmouth , East-New-Jersey,  containing 
about  500  Acres,  300  of  it  cleared,  with  two  good 
Dwelling  Houses,  Kitchens,  a good  Barn,  two  good 
Orchards,  and  about  30  Acres  of  Salt  Meadow:  It 
lies  joining  to  Shrewsbury  River,  and  is  fenc’d  about 
a Mile  and  a Half  by  the  Water.  The  Whole  or 
Part  to  be  sold  by  James  Grover,  Jun.  at  Middletown 
aforesaid.  — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the 
Weekly  Post  Boy , March  4,  1751. 

To  Be  Sold. 

The  Plantation  of  Thomas  Davis,  lying  in  Middle- 
town,  East-New-Jersey,  bounded  on  the  Nevesink’s 
River,  containing  240  Acres,  of  Up-Land  and  Mead- 
ow. There  is  on  the  said  Plantation,  a good  Dwell- 
ing-House and  Barn,  with  two  good  Orchards.  It 
also  lies  convenient  for  fishing  and  fowling.  Who- 
ever inclines  to  buy  the  same,  may  apply  to  Thomas 
Davis,  living  in  Freehold. — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Re- 
vived in  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , March  4,  1751. 

To  Be  Sold. 

A good  Dwelling-House  and  Lot  of  Ground,  with 
a good  Wharff  thereon,  at  Rariton  Landing.  The 
Lot  is  about  60  Foot  fronting  the  River,  and  about 
170  Feet  deep.  There  is  on  it  a good  Bolting- 
House,  with  two  good  Bolting  Cloths,  and  an  Out- 
House,  and  a House  back  of  the  Lot,  tit  for  a Bake 
House.  Boats  may  come  up  along  Side  the  Wharf : 

And  is  very  fit  for  either  Merchant,  Bolter  or  Baker. 
3 


34  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1751 

Any  Person  inclining  to  purchase,  may  apply  to 
Henry  Kip,  living  on  the  Premises,  or  of  Richard 
Kip  in  New-York. — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in 
the  Weekly  Post  Boy,  March  4,  1751. 

New  York , Feb.  25. 

On  Thursday  last,  some  Persons  who  had  lost 
sundry  Things,  having  got  Intelligence,  that  Eliza- 
beth Herbert,  a suspected  Person,  who  came  from 
Philadelphia,  with  a Man  at  whose  House  she  lodged 
here,  had  gone  off  in  a Boat  with  some  Bundles  for 
New-Brunswick,  They  got  a Pettiauger  and  went 
after  them  : They  came  up  with  the  Boat  near  Eliza- 
beth-Town  Point,  and  on  searching  the  Bundles, 
found  most  of  the  Things  they  had  miss’d;  where- 
upon they  brought  them  back,  and  committed  them  to 
Jail: — They  have  been  since  examin’d  and  the  Proof 
seems  full  against  them.  This  Woman  was  tried  here 
a few  Weeks  ago  for  stealing,  and  would  have  then 
been  burnt  in  the  Hand,  but  was  begor’d  off : There 

£>0 

appears  to  be  a Gang  of  them,  tho’  it’s  supposed 
these  two  are  the  Chiefs  : and  ’tis  hoped  will  meet 
with  the  Reward  their  Merits  deserve  : There  is  a 
piece  of  blue  and  white  Handkerchiefs  found  among 
the  Goods  supposed  to  be  stolen,  for  which  no  Own- 
er has  yet  appeared,  and  sundry  other  Goods. 
- — Penna.  Journal,  March  5,  1 750-1.  No.  433. 

To  the  Freeholders  of  New  Jersey. 

My  dear  Friends  and  honest  Countrymen , 

THE  Governor’s  Reasons  set  forth  in  the 
Proclamation  for  the  Dissolution  of  the 
late  Assembly,  rous’d  my  Spirits  (as  it  were)  out  of 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


35 


1751] 

a Lethargy,  and  put  me  on  an  Enquiry,  Why  are 
Things  thus  f By  what  fatal  Misteps  have  we  drawn 
upon  us  the  Displeasure  of  our  most  gracious  King , and 
his  Ministry  ? Whilst  I was  reasoning  and  rumin- 
ating upon  these  Questions  within  myself,  I was 
agreeably  surprized  with  a Visit  by  a Neighbor  of 
mine,  and  one  of  our  late  Representatives  ; and  the 
more  so,  because,  from  the  familiar  Conversation  with 
which  we  have  entertained  each  other  for  many 
Years,  I have  always  esteemed  him  a Man  of  Sin- 
cerity and  Truth,  a true  Lover  of  his  Country,  and 
(during  the  Time  he  hath  acted  in  that  Station,  which 
is  now  near  twenty  Years)1  behaving  with  earnest 
Zeal  and  steady  Resolutions  for  the  Interest  of  his 
Country.  We  soon  enter’d  into  a Debate  upon  the 
public  Affairs;  and  that  I may  illustrate  every  Part  of 
our  Arguments  to  my  honest  Countrymen,  I shall  in- 
sert the  Dialogue  here  at  large  as  it  pass’d  between 
us  ; only,  for  Distinction  sake,  I shall  call  my  Friend 
by  the  name  of  Freeman , and  myself  by  the  Name 
of  Lovetruth . 

Love.  Sir,  you’re  welcome  ! Pray  sit  down  ! I heard 
of  your  Return,  and  fully  intended  to  pay  you  a Visit 
to  enquire  of  your  Welfare. 

Free.  I am  glad  I have  prevented  you,  which  would 
have  been  sooner,  but  my  long  Absence  necessarily 
required  three  or  four  Days  upon  my  Family  Affairs. 

Love.  Well,  what  News  from  Court?  I fear  Noth- 
ing agreeable  or  beneficial  for  us.  I have  here  in  my 

1 The  following  men  served  continuously  in  the  Assembly  from  1730  to  1749  ; John  Ea- 
ton, Monmouth;  Lawrence  Van  Buskirk,  Bergen;  Joseph  Cooper,  Gloucester.  Aaron 
Learning  represented  Cape  May  for  the  same  period,  excepting  one  year,  1744.  The  ref- 
erence is  probable  to  John  Eaton. 


3 6 NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1751 

Hand  the  Governor’s  Proclamation  for  your  Dissolu- 
tion ; and  when  you  knock’d  at  the  Door,  was  mus- 
ing- what  might  be  the  Consequences  of  these  unac- 
countable Proceedings  ! The  Governor  here  gives  us 
an  Extract  of  a Letter  from  the  Lords  of  Trade, 
wherein  their  Lordships  seem  highly  displeased) 
which  (he  says)  he  laid  before  your  Assembly  ; and 
that  you  paid  little  or  no  Regard  to  it. 

Free.  I wish,  Sir,  my  Report  could  be  more  to  your 
Satisfaction. — No  Hopes  of  Reconciliation  remain’d 
betwixt  the  Council  and  the  late  Assembly,  when  we, 
by  our  last  Message  to  the  Governor,  plainly  ac- 
quainted him,  That  all  friendly  Communication  be- 
tween the  Council  and  the  Assembly  was  intirely  cut  off. 

Love.  It  is  so  set  forth  in  the  Proclamation. 

Free.  Who  can  blame  the  Governor  then  for  dis- 
solving us?  When  the  publick  Money  was  squand- 
ered in  fruitless  Debates  ; and  nothing  but  useless 
Reflections  and  exasperating  Messages  pass’d  be- 
tween the  Council  and  us. 

Love.  But  why  will  the  Council  embarrass  the 
Affairs  of  Government  in  this  Manner,  in  obstinately 
refusing  to  pass  the  Quota  Bill? 

Free.  Though  I esteem  arid  honour  my  late  Breth- 
ren, as  the  Representatives  of  the  People,  and  have 
been  as  careful  and  watchful  of  the  Council’s  extend- 
ing their  Power  beyond  its  due  Limits,  to  the  Preju- 
dice ol  the  Publick,  as  any  Member  of  that  House  ; 
yet  I must  own  (in  regard  to  Truth)  that  the  Council 
are  not  so  much  to  blame  as  some  may  imagine. 

Love , Read  the  Letter  in  Parker  and  Bradford. 
Does  it  not  plainly  tell  you,  (and  I pay  the  greater 


175  tj  NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS.  37 

Regard  to  the  Truth  of  the  Information,  because  I 
believe  it  came  from  some  of  the  Members  of  your 
House,  who  certainly  would  not  impose  a Falsehood 
upon  the  Publick.)  I say,  does  it  not  plainly  tell 
you,  That  in  a former  Session,  five  C — s were  unani- 
mously agreed  in  Sentiments  in  Favour  of  the  Bill  as 
sent  up  ; but  no  sooner  did  other  Three  appear , when 
Eloquence , and  I know  not  what , got  the  Victory  of 
Reason , and  all  Hopes  and  Expectation , in  regard  to 
its  passing , ended  in  Disappointment ; so  that  it  was 
commonly  spoke  of  amongst  those  acquainted  with  the 
Affair , that  Three  Had  Out-Voted  Five  ! What 
Doings  are  here  ? How  do  those  Gentlemen  fulfil  the 
Oaths  (they  say)  they  have  taken  for  the  Performance 
of  their  Duty,  when  they  prostitute  their  Reason  and 
Judgment  to  Eloquence , and  I know  not  what? 

Free.  Patience  my  good  Friend  ! Let  not  this  hon- 
est Zeal  for  the  Interest  of  your  Country  grow  too 
warm.  Suspend  your  Judgment  a while,  whilst  I 
truly  relate  to  you  Matters  of  Fact,  without  Prejudice 
or  Partiality. 

Love.  I am  cool.  I have  hitherto  found  you  a Man 
of  Veracity,  and  have  always  confided  in  your  Senti- 
ments, as  well  as  Relation  of  Things.  I know  you 
will  not  varnish  your  Proceedings,  to  make  them 
appear  in  a false  Light. 

Free.  I scorn  such  little  mean  Artifices  ! Truth 
and  Plain-dealing  are  the  surest  Guides,  and  will  al- 
ways Keep  a Man  upright. — You  say,  You  pay  the 
greater  Regard  to  this  Information , because  you  be- 
lieve it  came  from  some  of  the  Members  of  our  House , 
who  certainly  would  not  impose  a Falsehood  upon  the 


38  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [ 1 75  I 

Public.  I do  assure  you,  my  Friend,  let  the  In* 
formation  come  from  whom  it  will,  it  is  An  Imposi- 
tion upon  the  Public;  because,  I am  fully  convinced, 
there  is  not  one  Word  of  Truth  in  it,  if  there  be  any 
Truth  in  the  Gentlemen  of  his  Majesty’s  Council;  for 
they  have  assured  me  again  and  again,  That  they 
were  always  unanimous  in  the  Amendment  of  the 
Bill  : Nay,  that  Two  of  these  pretended  Five  were 
the  first  Projectors  and  Proposers  of  the  said  Amend- 
ment, when  they  were  at  a Loss  how  to  preserve  the 
Bill,  and  yet  to  conform  to  his  Majesty’s  Instruction. 
So  that  this  Paragraph  in  the  said  Letter,  is  a false 
and  scandalous  Aspersion , and  an  inveterate  Libel 
upon  his  Majesty  s Council , and  a gross  Imposition 
upon  the  good  People  of  this  Province , practised  with 
Design  to  deceive  them,  and  to  widen  the  Breach 
between  the  Council  and  the  late  Assembly,  and  to 
render  the  same  incurable.  The  Event  hath  shared 
the  Success  ; for  some  warm  Disputes  arising  be- 
tween the  two  Houses  about  the  said  Letter,  the 
Assembly  at  last  declared,  That  all  friendly  Commu- 
nication was  intirely  cut  off  between  them  and  the 
Council . The  other  Parts  of  the  said  Letter,  in  my 
Opinion,  consist  of  Falsities,  Absurdities,  mean  Re- 
flections, and  groundless  Suspicions;  calculated  only 
to  raise  popular  Discontents,  and  promote  Sedition, 
that  the  impending  Ruin  of  our  Country  may  be  the 
sooner  accomplish’d : Such  are  the  Notions  of  gen- 
eral Re  survey s ! Hardships  and  Difficulties  of  the 
Assessors  taking  the  Value  of  Lands  f Proprietors 
influencing  the  Council  to  screen  their  Lands 
from  Taxation!  and  such  like  terrible  Bug- 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


39 


1751] 

bears,  to  affright  the  People,  and  lead  them  into 
Errors  and  Confusion ! What  Regard  is  to  be 
paid  to  the  Credit  of  an  Author,  who  sets  off  with  a 
notorious  Falsehood  in  the  Front  of  his  Paper,  (as  I 
find  it  printed  in  Bradford' s Journal  of  the  5 th  of 
February  last)  to  wit,  This  Government  has  been 
now  upwards  of  two  Years  without  any  Support : 
Don’t  we  all  know  this  to  be  false?  Didn’t  the  fol- 
lowing Bill  pass  into  a Law  the  16th  of  December 
1748.  viz.  An  Act  for  the  Support  of  his  Majesty s 
Colony  of  New-Jersey  for  one  Year , to  commence  the 
tenth  Day  of  August , One  Thousand  Seven  Hundred 
and  Forty  Eight , and  to  end  the  tenth  Day  of 
August , One  Thousand  Seven  Hundred  and  Forty 
Nine , and  to  discharge  the  publick  Debts  and  con- 
tingent  Charges  thereof.  So  that  by  this  very 
Law  the  Government  was  supported  until  the  Tenth 
Day  of  Aug  test,  One  Thousand  Seven  Hundred  and 
Forty  Nine ; which  cannot  be  much  above  Seventeen 
Months , to  the  Time  of  publishing  the  said  Letter  in 
the  New-York  Gazette , though  this  Author  confidently 
asserts,  The  Government  has  been  now  upward  of  Two 
Years  without  any  Support.  I say,  what  Regard  is 
to  be  paid  to  such  an  Author?  who,  not  content  with 
libelling  one  Branch  of  the  Legislature,  begins  his 
elaborate  Essay  with  a false  and  scandalous  Libel  upon 
the  whole  Government ! Thereby  aggravating  our 
Misfortunes,  and  inducing  the  World  to  believe,  that 
we  are  several  Hundred  Pounds  in  Debt  to  the  Gov- 
ernor and  to  the  officers  of  the  Government,  more 
than  we  really  are. 

Love.  I must  confess,  Sir,  you  have  lessened  the 


46  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [ 1 75 1 

Credit  of  this  Author  very  much  in  my  Esteem  ; for 
if  he  will  begin  his  Work  with  a palpable  Falshood, 
it  is  a sufficient  Reason  for  me  to  suspect  him  through- 
out the  Whole.  And  so  much  for  this  Affair.  Now, 
Sir,  I would  be  glad  to  know  your  real  Sentiments  of 
the  Quota  Bill , as  it  hath  been  so  often  offered  to  the 
Council  by  your  House,  and  as  it  stands  with  their 
Amendments  to  it. 

Free.  That  you  shall  have,  my  Friend,  very  can- 
didly and  honestly.  I must  own  I do  not  approve  of 
the  Bill  either  Way.  The  Assembly  by  their  Bill, 
direct  only  the  Quantity  of  Lands  to  be  taken,  to  set- 
tle the  Quotas,  without  regard  to  the  Quality: 
The  Council  propose  to  help  that  Irregularity  by  in- 
serting the  King’s  Instruction,  and  giving  a Caution 
to  the  Assessors  relating  to  that  Instruction.  But  in 
my  Opinion,  neither  the  one  nor  the  other  come  up 
to  that  Justice  and  Equity  with  which  a Bill  of  this 
Nature  ought  to  be  cloath’d.  Indeed,  the  Council  in 
the  latter  Part  of  their  Message  sent  to  the  Assembly 
on  the  19th  of  October  1749,  relating  to  the  Quota- 
Bill , (which  had  been  sent  up  to  them  a fourth  Time, 
and  sent  back  to  us  with  their  old  Amendment)  make 
use  of  these  Expressions  ; That  there  is  Nothing  in 
the  Quota-Bill  relating  to  the  Value  of  Lands,  is 
the  very  Objection  we  offered  to  it ; for  the  Value 
of  a Thing  ought  to  be  the  Rule  for  Taxation,  and 
not  the  Quantity  of  it,  as  by  the  Quota-Bill  is  now 
intended.  However  the  Assembly  took  no  Notice  of 
this,  and  that  Sitting  broke  up  without  doing  any 
Thing.  In  the  Meeting  at  Perth- Amboy,  in  Sept- 
ember 1750,  some  of  the  Gentlemen  of  the  Council 


newspaper  extracts. 


1 75 1 j 


4t 


intimated  to  some  of  our  Members,  That  if  the 
Quota-Bill  was  formed  in  an  equitable  Manner , so 
that  the  Quality  as  well  as  Quantity  of  Lands  might 
be  consider’d,  in  order  to  lay  an  equal  Tax  upon  the 
People,  they  imagined  the  Difficulties  might  be  re- 
moved, and  the  Bill  pass  into  a Law.  The  Commit- 
tee of  our  House,  appointed  at  that  Time  to  pre- 
pare a Quota-Bill,  being  Men  of  Reason  and  Con- 
sideration, form’d  that  Bill  agreeable  to  their  own 
Sentiments,  according  to  Equity  and  Justice ; in 
which  they  proposed,  that  in  every  Township  or 
Precinct  the  People  should  chuse  Two  or  Three  sub- 
stantial Freeholders , to  assist  the  Assessors  in  taking 
the  Value  of  the  said  Townships  ; that  all  of  them 
should  be  under  Qualifications  for  the  Performance 
of  their  Duty  ; that  when  this  was  done,  all  the  As- 
sessors of  the  County  should  meet  together,  and 
make  an  Estimate  of  the  Value  of  the  County,  in 
order  to  be  transmitted  to  the  General  Assembly, 
that  the  Quota  of  every  County  might  be  settled  for 
a provincial  Tax  ; with  several  other  Provisoes,  which 
I thought,  for  my  own  Part,  most  equitable  and  just. 
This  Bill  (according  to  Custom)  was  committed  to  a 
Committee  of  the  whole  House : Then  began  that 
Clamour  and  Uproar  hinted  at  by  our  Author  in  the 
New-  York  Gazette , and  Pennsylvania  Journal,  of 
Difficulties ! Re  surveys ! Impossibilities ! and  what 
not ! In  short,  the  Confusion  was  so  great,  and  the 
Noise  so  astonishing,  that  the  Member  who  brought 
the  Bill  into  the  House  (though  an  honest  well-mean- 
ing Man)  was  so  scared  and  terrified,  that  he  voted 
against  that  very  Bill  of  which  he  had  been  one  of 


42  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1751 

the  Compilers  ! So  this  good  Bill  was  thrown  out, 
and  one  ( conducted  in  the  old  Track)  was  brought  in, 
pass’d,  and  sent  up  to  the  Council  ; which  met  the 
same  Fate  with  the  others  ; and  so  that  Session  ended 
without  any  Good  done  for  the  Publick.  Now,  Sir, 
will  any  Man  in  his  Senses  pretend  to  say,  that  it  is 
unjust,  that  every  Country,  every  City,  every  Town- 
ship, every  Precinct,  should  be  rated  in  a general 
Tax,  according  to  its  Circumstances.  Let  us  draw  a 
Parallel  Case  ! One  of  our  late  worthy  Representa- 
tives lives  in  the  Corporation  of  A/ ew- Brunswick, 
upon  a Farm  which  contains  five  Times  the  Quantity 
of  Acres  as  the  Town  Spot  stands  upon  ; would  this 
Gentleman  think  it  equitable,  in  a general  Land-Tax, 
that  he  should  pay  five  Times  as  much  as  the  Town 
Spot  of  New-Brunswick  ? and  yet  this  is  the  obvious 
Consequence,  of  settling  the  Quotas  by  the  Quantity, 
and  not  the  Quality.  But,  say  the  Assembly,  when 
the  Quantities  of  Land  are  returned  from  the  several 
Counties,  the  Values  may  be  settled  in  the  House, 
by  the  Assistance  of  the  Members  of  each  County. 
Mere  Springes  to  catch  Woodcocks  ! They  may  then 
sit  cavilling  and  disputing  about  the  Values  of  their 
several  Counties,  as  long  as  they  have  been  contend- 
ing whether  the  Lands  shall  be  valued  or  not.  But 
can  any  Thing  be  more  reasonable  than  the  Method 
proposed  in  the  Bill  brought  in  by  the  select  Com- 
mittee, that  two  or  three  honest  Freeholders  in  every 
Township,  should  assist  the  Assessors  in  valuing 
their  said  Townships?  Will  not  these  Men  be  more 
capable  of  making  a just  Estimation,  than  a couple 
of  Men  who  perhaps  never  saw  a tenth  Part  of  their 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


43 


t75i] 

County  during  the  whole  Course  of  their  Lives  ? As 
ridiculous  is  their  Clamour  about  Resurveys  ! Can- 
not you,  Mr.  Love  truth,  and  two  or  three  of  my  hon- 
est Neighbours,  by  considering  and  taking  a View  of 
the  good,  bad,  and  indifferent  Land,  upon  my  Planta- 
tion, put  a reasonable  Value  upon  it,  without  the 
Help  of  a Chain  and  a Compass  ? or  without  so 
many  pretended  Difficulties  and  Hardships  ? 

Love.  Without  doubt,  Sir!  I myself  am  so  well  ac- 
quainted with  the  Farms  in  our  Township,  by  the 
many  friendly  Visits  I have  paid  to  my  Neighbours, 
and  my  Curiosity  in  viewing  their  Plantations,  that  I 
will  undertake  to  make  a near  Estimate  of  the  Value 
of  most  of  them,  without  stirring  out  of  my  Chimney 
Corner ; and  I dare  say,  that  fifty  Men  in  our  Town 
can  do  the  like. 

Free.  But  can  you,  Sir,  adjust  the  Quantity  of 
Acres  contained  in  each  Farm,  without  a Resurvey? 

Love.  Not  to  any  Certainty. 

Free.  Then  why  all  this  Clamour  and  Noise  ! Why 
is  my  poor  Country  thus  deluded,  and  led  into  Dis- 
tress ! Why  is  the  Government  so  long  unsupported, 
to  our  Scandal  and  Reproach  ? Why  are  our  Debts 
increasing,  the  Credit  of  our  Money  sinking,  and  our 
whole  Province  in  Danger  of  becoming  Bankrupt ! 
It  is  all  owing  to  the  over-bearing  Obstinacy  of  a few 
particular  Men  ! who,  though  they  are  convinced  of 
their  Error,  still  persist  in  it ; and  had  rather  give  up 
their  Country , than  give  zip  a Point ! 

Love.  A fine  Point  indeed  ! To  ruin  their  Country  ! 

Free.  I am  overwhelmed  with  Grief,  when  I con- 
sider what  a miserable  State  we  have  brought  our- 


44  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1751 

selves  into ! To  think,  that  after  the  expending  so 
much  Money  and  Time,  we  have  gained  nothing  but 
Reproach  to  ourselves,  and  Discredit  to  our  Country  ! 
And,  what  is  beyond  all,  in  very  great  Danger  of  his 
Majesty’s  Displeasure,  by  obstinately  refusing  to  sup- 
port his  Government. 

Love.  Be  comforted  ; all  is  not  lost  yet:  The  hon- 
est Freeholders  may  exert  themselves  at  the  ensuing 
Elections  ; and  thereby  restore  the  Credit  and  Peace 
of  the  Province  : I’ll  write  a few  Lines  to  them  by 
way  of  Advice.  I perceive  we  have  been  in  Perils 
amongst  false  Bret  hern  ! But,  Mr.  Freeman , what 
hath  the  poor  Governor  done  amidst  all  these  Dis- 
tractions ? Why  wou’d  you  not  shew  your  goodwill 
to  him,  by  passing  a Support  Bill ? that  he,  and  the 
Officers  of  the  Government,  might  have  some  Secur- 
ity at  least,  for  what  is  justly  due  to  them  : I fear 
more  fatal  Consequences  from  this,  than  all  your  other 
Proceedings.  It  implies  a Disloyalty  to  our  Sov- 
ereign, and  a Contempt  of  Authority  ! 

Free.  What  can  be  expected,  when  Men  abandon 
their  Reason,  to  Passions  and  Prejudices  ! Several 
worthy  Members  proposed,  That  the  Support  Bill , 
and  Quota  Bill , should  be  sent  up  to  the  Council  to- 
gether, that  we  might  express  our  Duty  to  his  Majesty, 
whilst  we  were  contending  for  the  Privileges  of  the 
People.  This  occasioned  another  Clamour  and  Up- 
roar. An  empty  Treasury ! Lavish  in  giving , and 
nothing  to  pay  with ! Mortgaging  the  Country ! 
Grievances  ! Keeping  Governors  at  Bay  ! and  the  like 
frightful  Scarecrows. 

Love.  An  empty  Treasury  ! An  empty  Brain-Pan  ! 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


45 


I75i] 

Keeping  Governors  at  Bay ! Keeping  ourselves  in 
Disgrace  ! Mortgaging  our  Country  f — Mortgaging 
our  Wits  ! Why,  if  we  owe  an  honest  just  Debt,  and 
cannot  pay  it,  ought  we  not,  at  least,  to  give  some 
Security,  that  it  shall  be  paid  so  soon  as  we  are  able  ? 
Is  not  this  the  Practice  of  every  fair  Dealer  ? Besides, 
his  Excellency  hath  been  a good  Governor,  and  hath 
served  the  People  to  his  own  Prejudice  ; nay,  even 
to  the  Hazard  of  losing  his  Government : And  it  is 
the  highest  Ingratitude  thus  to  distress  him. 

Free.  No  Arguments  of  this  Kind  were  wanting  : 
But  all  to  no  Purpose.  They  retreated  to  their  old 
Trenches,  and  there  was  no  beating  them  out — The 
Council ! and  their  Constituents  ! — The  Council  would 
not  let  them  do  any  Thing  ! And  their  Constituents 
would  let  them  do  nothing  till  the  former  had  pass’d 
the  Quota  Bill  ! Therefore  they  would  not  betray 
the  Trust  reposed  in  them,  by  passing  a Support 
Bill  contrary  to  the  Minds  of  People. 

Love.  It  is  not  so,  Mr.  Freeman  : I am  much  con- 
versant in  the  Country.  The  general  Cry  is,  We 
have  a kind  Governor  ! It  is  Pity  he  should  suffer  ! 
We  desire  he  may  be  supported  ! If  they  cannot  do  it  in 
the  Marnier  they  ought , yet  let  them  do  it  the  best  Way 
they  can. 

Free.  And  as  for  the  Council ; to  my  Knowledge, 
they  would  have  given  them  no  Molestation  in  this 
Matter : They  in  general  express’d  their  Dissatisfac- 
tion, that  no  Support  Bill  was  offered  to  them.  The 
Governor  was  very  Kind,  and  mild  in  his  Speech  and 
Messages : Nay,  he  offered  privately,  that  if  they 
would  now  shew  their  Loyalty  to  his  Majesty  (in  the 


4 6 NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [ 1 75  I 

distressed  State  of  their  Country)  by  passing  a Sup- 
port Act,  as  a Bill  of  Credit , it  should  be  no  Moth  to 
the  Publick  ; for  he  would  pay  the  Interest  out  of  his 
own  Pocket : And  had  the  Thing  been  done,  it  might 
have  been  of  singular  Service  to  the  Province,  by 
moderating  the  King’s  Displeasure,  taking  off  the 
Reproach  we  lie  under  to  the  World,  and  laying  a 
Foundation  for  restoring  the  broken  Peace  of  the 
Province.  And,  what  is  more,  the  Assembly  would 
have  been  continued;  and  the  Pseuds,  Expences,  and 
Confusions,  which  must  attend  Elections  in  such  a 
distracted  Time  as  this,  would  have  been  avoided. 

Love.  Sir,  I am  convinced  ! I thank  you  for  this 
honest,  candid  History  of  your  Proceedings  ; which 
I shall  endeavour  to  communicate  to  my  Country- 
men, to  open  their  Eyes  against  the  ensuing  elec- 
tion. 

Free.  In  that,  Sir,  use  your  Pleasure.  For  my 
Part,  I am  grown  weary  of  Clamour  and  Railing, 
Obstinacy  and  Self-Will.  I have  served  my  Country  ! 
faithfully  in  this  Station  near  twenty  Years.  Time  ! 
was,  when  my  Arguments  carry’d  some  Weight  in 
an  Assembly  ; but  that  Time  is  no  more.  These  j 
Considerations,  with  the  declining  State  of  Health 
in  which  I find  myself  at  present,  have  fully  deter- 
mined me  to  withdraw  from  publick  Affairs;  yet  I am 
a hearty  Well-wisher  to  my  King  and  Country  ; and 
hope  the  Freeholders  will  be  wise  in  their  future 
Choice,  and  prefer  the  Man  of  Sense  ; who  will  not 
give  up  his  Reason  to  Passion  and  Prejudice.  I 
think,  my  Friend,  you  are  now  a Visit  indebted  to  | 
me.  And  so  I bid  you  heartily  farewel. 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


47 


1751] 

Love.  Farewell,  Good  Sir.  Your  Conversation 
hath  always  been  so  agreeable  to  me,  that  I will  soon 
be  out  of  your  Debt. 

My  Dear  Countrymen , 

I have  laid  this  friendly  Conversation  before  you, 
distinctly  as  it  pass’d,  for  a Monitor  in  the  Choice  of 
your  Representatives;  with  whom  you  must  entrust 
your  Estates,  Lives,  and  Liberties  ; and  on  whom  all 
your  Happiness,  Safety,  and  Well-being,  depends: 
The  only  Way  therefore  to  attain  the  End,  is  to  look 
well  to  the  Means.  The  Fate  of  our  Country  is  now 
drawing  near  to  a Crisis.  The  present  Posture  of 
Affairs  carries  too  melancholy  a Countenance,  to  be 
any  longer  flattered  by  false  Appearances  ; and  the 
Common  Danger  requires  Regard  for  the  Common 
Safety . This  is  no  vain  Surmise,  or  idle  Specula- 
tion ; but  the  very  Truth  of  the  Case  : The  weakest 
Countryman,  who  hath  Eyes  in  his  Head,  and  will 
use  them,  cannot  but  see  it.  Be  not  deceived  : Let 
not  Noise  and  Uproar,  Clamour,  and  Falsehood,  Ob- 
stinacy and  Self-Will,  pass  any  longer  upon  you  for 
Zeal  and  Patriotism.  The  Representatives  of  the 
People  ought  to  be  wise,  sober,  and  Judicious  ; not 
Men  of  mean  Spirits  and  sordid  Passions,  who  have 
enter’d  into  a Combination  against  all  good  Sense 
and  Reason. 

Avoid  the  rising,  obstinate,  Twittle-Twattler.  No 
one  can  imagine  the  Influence  that  one  busy,  talk- 
ative Man,  (though  void  of  Sense)  may  gain  over 
the  rest  of  the  House ; especially  over  those  who 
weigh  Words  more  than  Reason. 

Beware  of  false  Patriots  ! For  though  many  talk 


48  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1751 

high,  and  keep  a great  Noise  about  Conscience,  and 
Love  to  their  Country  ; yet  when  you  understand 
Mankind  rightly,  you  will  find  that  private  Interests, 
and  Self-Views,  are  their  prevailing  Passions.  Such 
Men  will  make  you  the  fairest  Promises,  but  are  the 
most  apt  to  deceive  you. 

Use  your  endeavours,  to  chuse  Men  of  Wisdom 
and  Courage,  who  are  capable  of  distinguishing  be- 
twixt the  Powers  and  Rights  of  the  Government , and 
the  Liberties  and  Privileges  of  the  People.  The  Man 
of  Sense,  will  judge  properly,  because  he  can  dis- 
tinguish properly.  He  will  have  Wisdom  enough 
not  to  break  in  upon  the  Prerogative  of  the  Crown  ; 
and  Courage  enough  to  withstand  any  Infringement 
upon  the  Properties  of  the  People  : But,  will  keep 
both  in  that  even  Ballance,  as  may  preserve  the 
Union,  which  is  the  Foundation  and  Support  of  our 
most  excellent  Constitution. 

If  you  conduct  your  selves  prudently , you  will  not 
fail  of  a good  Assembly:  The  Consequence  of  which 
will  re-establish  Peace  and  Prosperity  in  your  Coun- 
try; and  entail  a lasting  Happiness  upon  your  selves 
and  your  Posterity;  which  is  the  sincere  Wish,  of 
Your  hearty  Friend , 

New- Jersey,  March  6,  1750,  1.  Lovetruth. 

— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly 
Post  Boy , March  1 1 , 1751. 

Mr.  Parker , 

To  oblige  your  Friends  in  New-Jersey,  be  pleased 
to  insert  the  following  in  your  next,  &c. 

To  the  Freeholders  and  Electors  of  the  several  Coun- 
ties and  Corporatio7is  of  the  Province  of  New-Jersey, 


175 1] 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


49 


The  Assembly  being  now  dissolved,  and  as  Writs 
are  already  issued  for  a new  Election,  I beg  Leave 
on  this  Occasion,  to  offer  a few  Hints  to  your  Con- 
sideration. That  which  essentially  constitutes  the 
Happiness  of  a free  People,  is  their  being*  governed 
by  Laws  of  their  own  making,  or  to  which  they  have 
assented  or  agreed  ; and  as  it  is  impracticable  to  col- 
lect the  Suffrages  of  every  Individual,  the  House  of 
Commons  in  England , is  no  more  than  a Court  of 
Delegates,  appointed  by  the  diffused  Body  of  the 
People,  to  speak  their  Sense,  and  act  in  their  Name. 
As  this  is  the  principal  Part  of  the  happy  Constitu- 
tion of  our  Mother  Country,  so  it  is  the  same  in  this 
Country,  and  in  this  Province  in  particular,  with 
Regard  to  the  particular  Laws  of  it.  Here  the  As- 
sembly speak  and  act  in  the  same  Manner,  and  seem 
to  have  here,  as  well  as  there,  an  unlimited  Power 
for  that  Purpose  ; and  have,  in  a great  Measure,  the 
Liberties  and  Properties  of  the  People  at  their  Dis- 
posal. Here  you  see  then,  My  Fellow  Countrymen , 
how  weighty,  and  how  great  is  that  Trust  which  you 
repose  in  your  Representatives : Proportionably 

great  then  ought  to  be  your  Care  and  Circumspec- 
tion, in  the  Choice  you  make.  Common  Sense,  as 
well  as  your  Duty  and  Interest,  require  that  you 
should  be  well  acquainted  with  the  Characters  and 
Abilities  of  those  Persons  that  offer  themselves  to  your 
Choice.  Be  careful  also,  in  examining-  into,  and  to 
know  their  Opinions  and  Intentions  : See  to  it,  that 
their  Designs  and  Interests  are  at  present  the  same 
with  your  own  ; that  they  are  not  already  pre  engaged, 
nor  likely  to  be  engaged  in  a contrary  Interest : 
4 


50  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [ 1 75  I 

And  let  them  be  Men  well-affected  to  the  present 
Establishment ; ready  and  willing  to  support  his 
Majesty’s  Government ; and  at  the  same  Time,  strictly 
tenacious  in  maintaining  your  Liberties.  This  is  but 
equitable  and  reasonable,  and  naturally  tends  to  make 
the  several  Parts  of  the  Government,  to  controul  and 
counterpoise  one  another.  Avoid  chusing  those,  who 
in  a former  Assembly  have  acted  a contrary  Part, 
and  against  such  Measures  as  have  tended  to  sup- 
port the  Cause  of  Liberty  and  Trade,  and  to  free  the 
People  from  unequal  Taxes.  Let  me  give  you  some 
further  Caution.  Chuse  not  Men  whose  Abilities, 
Probity  and  Fortune,  are  not  well  known  to  you  ; 
for  when  you  have  chosen  them,  it  will  be  too  late 
to  know  them.  Shun  the  proud  and  ambitious  Men  ; 
these  have  Passions  which  are  seldom  gratified  by  an 
honest  Integrity,  and  proper  Zeal  for  your  Good. 
Neither  are  Men  in  Posts  or  Employments,  the  prop- 
erest  Men  for  your  Choice  ; for  should  your  Interest 
come  in  Competition  with  their  Places,  you  may  easily 
guess  which  is  most  likely  to  give  way. — Reject  all 
those  of  timorous  and  dastardly  Spirits ; for  Men 
who  having  good  Principles,  and  dare  not  own  them, 
or  dare  not  act  according  to  them  (of  which  there  are. 
but  too  many  Instances)  had  as  good  be  without 
them.  Lastly,  reject  with  Indignation,  all  Ignores; 
for  these  are  absolutely  incapable  of  doing  you  any 
Service,  but  may  do  a great  deal  of  Mischief.  As 
there  are  many  of  this  Class  talked  of,  and  its  said, 
making  Interest,  there  is  but  too  much  Reason  for 
the  Caution — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  iri  the  j 
Weekly  Post  Boy , March  1 8,  1751. 


1751]  NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS.  5 1 

To  be  sold  at  publick  Vendue,  to  the  highest  Bidder, 
on  Monday  the  6th  Day  of  May  next ; 

The  Plantation  whereon  Isaac  Noe,  dwells,  lying  in 
Raway  Neck,  in  the  County  of  Middlesex,  East-New- 
Jersey,  near  the  Sound  that  runs  between  Staten- 
Island  and  New-Jersey.  It  is  well  situated,  and  lies 
convenient  for  Mills,  Markets,  Fishing,  Oystering, 
&c.  It  contains  103  Acres  ot  Up  land,  and  salt 
Meadow,  which  joins  to  the  Up  land,  and  both  very 
good;  a large  Piece  of  mowing  Ground,  which  bears 
a good  Burden  of  English  Hay  ; a young  Orchard, 
and  a good  House  and  Barn;  part  of  said  Land  is 
well  Timber’d,  and  one  Side  of  the  Whole  fenc’d  by 
a Creek.  . Several  Cattle,  Horses  and  Sheep  to  be 
sold  likewise.  A Title  indisputable  will  be  given  ; 
and  the  Conditions  of  said  Vendue  to  be  seen  the 

Day  of  Sale. The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the 

Weekly  Post  Boy , March  18,  1751. 

RuN-away,  the  seventh  Day  of  this  Instant,  from 
the  Subscriber,  in  Trenton,  a Negro  Fellow  named 
Lot,  about  24  Years  of  Age,  five  Feet  five  Inches 
high,  or  thereabouts:  Had  on  when  he  went  away, 
an  old  Coat  mended  with  white  patches,  an  old  Lin- 
nen  striped  Jacket,  Leather  Breeches,  Yarn  Stock- 
ings, and  good  Shoes.  Whoever  takes  up  and  se- 
cures the  said  Negro,  so  that  his  Master  may  have 
him  again,  shall  have  Forty  Shillings  Reward,  and  all 
reasonable  Charges  paid  by  me. 

Elijah  Bond 

N.-  B.  All  Masters  of  Vessels,  and  others,  are  for- 
bid to  carry  him  off  at  their  Peril. — The  N.  Y.  Ga- 
zette Revived  in  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , March  18,  1751. 


52 


NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [ 1 75  I 


To  be  sold  by  John  Beaumont  and  William  Pidgeon. 

A Tract  of  land  and  plantation,  whereon  William 
Gammon  formerly  lived,  and  is  commodiously  situate 
on  the  river  Delaware,  being  one  mile  and  half  front 
on  the  said  river,  in  the  township  of  Bethlehem,  in 
Hunterdon  county,  and  province  of  West-New-Jer- 
sey,  containing  about  600  acres,  200  thereof  is  low 
land  clear’d  and  in  good  fence,  near  15  acres  of  ex- 
cellent meadow  clear’d,  and  in  good  fence,  and  a 
great  quantity  more  may  be  made,  all  well  water’d 
and  timber’d,  with  a good  frame  barn,  log  house  &c, 
and  is  about  the  distance  of  Thirty  miles  from  Tren- 
ton, and  lies  very  convenient  for  transporting  by 
water.  An  indisputable  title  will  be  given.,  with  suffi- 
cint  warrantee  deeds  to  the  purchaser  or  purchasers, 
and  reasonable  time  given  for  the  payment  of  part  of 
the  money.  Any  person  inclining  to  purchase,  may 
apply  to  John  Beaumont,  of  Bucks  county,  John  Allen,  , 
Esq  ; or  William  Pidgeon,  in  Trenton,  and  Know 
further. — Penn.  Gazette , March  19,  1 750-1.  No.  j 

1 1 62. 

Notice  is  hereby  given,  that  all  persons  indebted 
to  surveyor  general’s  office  in  Burlington,  kept  by 
Isaac  De  Cow,  late  deceased,  are  required  to  come 
and  pay  their  respective  debts,  to  Joseph  De  Cow, 
in  Trenton,  or  Isaac  De  Cow,  in  Burlington,  on  or 
before  the  first  day  of  June  next,  without  further 
delay. — Penn.  Gazette,  March  19,  1 750-1.  No.  1162. 

Notice  is  hereby  given  to  the  publick,  that  in  pur-  ? 
suance  of  Letters  Patent,  granted  by  his  excellency 
Jonathan  Belcher,  Esq  ; governor  &c.  of  the  province 


53 


I75l]  NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 

of  New  Jersey,  under  the  great  seal  of  the  said  prov- 
ince, two  fairs  are  to  be  held  annually  at  Prince-town, 
in  the  township  of  Windsor,  in  the  county  of  Middle- 
sex, on  the  third  Wednesdays  in  April  and  October. 
— Penn.  Gazette , March  19,  1 750-1.  No.  1162. 

To  the  Freeholders  of  the  Province  of  New-Jersey 
Having  understood  a Report  is  industriously  spread 
in  some  Parts  of  the  Province,  that  the  Publication  of 
the  Votes  of  General  Assembly  last  Session,  was  de- 
signedly delayed  to  serve  some  Purpose  at  the  ap- 
proaching Elections.  To  do  Justice  to  all  concern’d, 
I think  proper  to  acquaint  the  publick,  that  the  Votes 
and  proceedings  of  the  House  were  examined  and 
ready  for  the  Press  the  Day  after  the  Prorogation, 
and  sent  by  me  to  the  Printer  in  two  Days  after- 
wards, and  that  the  sole  Reason  of  the  Delay  was 
(as  he  tells  me)  their  length  and  the  sickness  of  his 
principal  workmen. 

Samuel  Smith. 

— Penn.  Journal,  March  19,  1 750-1.  No.  435. 
Mr.  Parker , 

IT  seems  a Principle  in  human  Nature,  to  incline 
one  Way  more  than  another,  even  in  Matters 
where  we  happen  to  be  not  at  all  connerned : And  it 
is  a common  Observation,  that  seeing  Men  engaged 
in  any  kind  of  Exercise,  tho’  perfect  Strangers  to  us, 
we  are  apt  to  find  our  Hopes  and  Wishes  of  a sud- 
den engaged  more  on  one  Side  than  another.  No 
wonder  then,  that  we  should  more  particularly  inter- 
est our  selves  in  Matters  which  relate  to  the  publick 
Affairs  of  the  Country,  or  Community  of  which  we 
are  Members. 


$4  NEW  jersey  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1751 

After  having  read  the  Country-Man’s  Letter,  in 
your  News-Paper  of  the  20th  of  January  last,  and 
also  Mr.  Lovetrutlis  Dialogue  of  the  nth  Inst,  ad- 
dressed to  the  Freeholders  of  New-Jersey ; both 
which  are  said  to  be  wrote  by  different  Members  of 
the  late  Assembly  ; I thought  the  Countryman,  with 
Regard  to  the  Matters  contained  in  his  Letter, 
scandalously,  and  undeservedly  abused  by  the  Other : 
I shall  therefore,  for  the  Sake  of  Truth,  and  in  Vindi- 
cation of  my  Friend,  for  once  draw  my  Pen  in  favour 
of  the  First ; and  I think  I shall  be  able  to  shew,  that 
the  latter  hath  not  had  that  Regard  for  Truth,  of 
which  he  hath  impiously  assumed  the  Title,  by  sub- 
scribing- himself  a Lover  of  it,  to  his  Dialogue.  In 
order  to  do  this,  let  me  here  recite  the  Paragraph  of 
the  Letter,  against  which  he  seems  more  particularly 
to  vent  his  Spleen,  and  spit  his  Venom  : It  is  men- 

tioned in  the  Dialogue  by  Lovetruth , and  is  in  the 
Words  following,  viz.  “ That  in  a former  Session, 
“five  C — 5 were  unanimously  agreed  in  Sentiments  in 
“favour  of  the  bill  as  sent  up  ; but  no  sooner  did  other 
“ three  appear , when  Eloquence,  and  I know  not  what, 
“ got  the  Victory  of  Reason,  and  all  Hopes  and  Expec- 
“tations  in  Regard  to  its  passage,  ended  in  Disap- 
“pointment ; so  that  it  was  commonly  spoke  of  amongst 
those  acquainted  with  the  Affair,  that  three  had  out- 
voted five.” 

To  which  Freeman,  in  his  Turn  replies,  “That  it  is 
“ an  Imposition  upon  the  Publick  ; a false  and 
“ scandalous  Aspersion,  and  an  inveterate  Libel 
“upon  his  Majesty’s  Council,  and  a gross  Imposition 
“ upon  the  good  People  of  the  Province,  practiced 


175  1 ] NEWSPAPER  extracts.  55 

“with  Design  to  deceive  them,  &c.”  These  are  big 
swelling  Words  ; but  how  does  he  prove  this  ? “ Be- 

“ cause,  says  he , I am  fully  convinced  there  is  not  one 
“Word  of  Truth  in  it,  if  there  be  any  Truth  in  the 
“Gentlemen  of  his  Majesty’s  Council;  for  they  have 
“assured  me  (not  only  once)  but  again  and  again* 
“ that  they  were  always  unanimous  in  the  Admend- 
“ ment  of  the  Bill ; nay,  that  two  of  these  pretended 
“five  were  the  first  Projectors  and  Proposers  of  said 
“Amendment.”  This  now  is  the  Sum  of  all  the 
Evidence  he  brings  to  support  this  bitter  Outcry  and 
mighty  Clamour,  and  to  prove  the  said  Letter  to  be 
a false  and  scandalous  Libel,  &c.  Was  this  notable 
Scribbler  asked,  whether  he  doesn’t  believe  that  his 
Brother  Assembly-Man,  the  supposed  Author  of 
said  Letter,  had  his  Information  from  the  same 
Quarter,  with  Respect  to  three  out-voting  five,  i.  e. 
from  one  or  more  Members  of  his  Majesty’s  Council  ? 
If  he  has  any  Modesty  left,  he  must  own,  that  he  had  ; 
for  many  besides  himself,  knows  it  to  be  true : With 

Reverence  and  Respect  therefore  to  his  Majesty’s 
Council,  who  are  but  Men,  liable  to  the  same  Passions 
with  the  rest  of  Mankind,  let  me  put  this  Query, 
Whether  a greater  Degree  of  Credibility  is  not  due 
to  that  remarkable  Passage  in  said  Letter,  than  any 
Information  or  Declaration  that  mig-ht  come  from 
any  of  the  Council,  to  the  Author  of  the  Dialogue, 
since  that  Time  ? Because,  as  the  Matter  then  stood, 
none  of  the  Council  could  be  supposed  to  be  under 
any  Temptation  whatsoever,  to  deviate  in  the  least 
from  the  Truth.  Yet  we  find  my  Friend  introduces 
his  Information  with  a becoming  Caution,  like  a Man 


56  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [ 1 7 5 I 

of  Sense  and  good  Manners;  for,  says  he,  “You 
shall  have  it  as  I was  informed  &cC  But  this 
wretched  Scribbler  begins  and  ends  with  the  Letter, 
by  loading  it  with  all  the  heavy  Calumnies  and  Re- 
proaches he  could  invent,  in  order  to  render  the 
Author  odious  and  contemptible.  Was  this  base 
Slanderer  capable  of  entertaining  any  Sentiments  of 
Honour,  would  he  not  blush?  But  perhaps  Shame 
is  no  Quality  for  a Man  of  his  Kidney.  Or  should 
he  think  that  what  the  Council  did  may  plead  his 
Excuse,  because  they  in  their  Minutes  call  it,  a base , 
false , scandalous  and  an  injurious  Libel.  But  surely 
he  would  not  dare  to  put  himself  upon  a Level  with 
his  Majesty’s  Council.  For  suppose  they  thought 
they  had  a Right,  as  being  within  the  Pale  of  the  old 
Doctrine,  viz.  That  a Libel  is  never  the  less  a Libel 
for  being  true , to  call  it  so  ; must  he  have  the  Assur- 
ance to  take  it  up,  and  even  to  carry  it  to  a greater 
Length  than  ever  they  did  ? 

He  further  says,  “That  the  Letter  sets  off  with  a 
“ notorious  Falshood  in  the  Front  of  it,  viz.  That 
this  Government  has  been  now  upwards  of  two  Years 
without  any  Support.  And  to  prove  his  Assertion 
says,  “ That  there  was  a Bill  passed  into  a Law, 
the  1 6th  December  1748,  viz.  An  Act  for  the  Sup- 
“ port  of  his  Majesty's  Colony  of  New-Jersey  for 
“ one  Year , to  commence  the  10 th  Day  of  Aug- 
“ ust,  1748,  and  to  end  the  10 th  Day  of  August,  1749, 
“ and  to  discharge  the  public  Debts  and  contingent 
“ Charges  thereof  ; so  that  by  this  very  Law,  (says 
“he)  the  Government  was  supported  until  the  ioth 
“ Day  of  August,  1749.” 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


175O 


57 


This  may  appear  to  have  the  Garb  of  Truth,  to 
those  unacquainted  with  the  Circumstances  of  this 
Province,  so  long  only  until  it  comes  to  be  stript  of 
its  false  Appearance.  That  Government  can’t  be 
supported  without  Money  no  Body  will  deny.  Now 
it  is  well  known  that  the  Treasury  was  near,  if  not 
quite  exhausted,  before  the  Time  of  passing  the  said 
Bill.  For  Proof,  can  he  say,  or  can  he  bring  any  one 
else  to  say,  that  all  those  who  had  Demands  upon 
the  Government,  were  paid  to  the  10th  of  August , 
1749.  No;  he  cannot;  the  Contrary  being  mani- 
fest: Even  some  of  the  Warrants  in  1747  are  yet 
unpaid  ; and  yet  this  Slanderer  has  the  Audacious- 
ness to  affirm,  the  Government  was  supported  to 
about  seventeen  Months  ago  ; and  that  the  Letter 
asserting  the  contrary,  is  not  to  be  regarded  any 
other  than  what  he  is  pleased  to  call  it,  a false  and 
scandalous  Libel  upon  the  Government , &c.  If  this 
virulent  Author  of  the  Dialogue  looks  into  his  own 
Breast,  he  must  say,  he  has  neither  Honour  nor 
Probity  ; this,  I think,  fully  appears  from  what  hath 
been  said  : But  I doubt  whether  any  Thing  will  make 
his  Forehead  blush,  except  his  Mortification,  that  he 
is  not  able  to  gain  his  Point.  I am  afraid  I spend 
too  much  Time  about  him ; but  my  Readers  will 
excuse  it ; Necessity  compels  me  to  expose  his 
Character,  who,  I think  without  Cause,  has  been  let 
loose  against  my  Friend.  I shall  however  pass  by 
a good  many  of  his  scribbling  Absurdities,  and  vain 
and  low  Witticisms  ; but  must  not  forbear  mention- 
ing ai  notable  Passage  which  relates  to  the  Governor, 
as  a Mark  of  his  professed  Sense,  or  rather  Nonsense  : 


58  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [175! 

He  tells  us,  “ His  Excellency  hath  been  a good  Gov- 
“ ernor,  and  hath  served  the  People  to  his  own  Pceju- 
“ dice  ; nay , even  to  the  Hazard  of  losing  his  Govern- 
“ mentP 

What  is  the  Meaning  of  this  ? The  Kino-  we 
know,  is  the  indulgent  Father  of  all  his  People  : If 
then  his  Governor  should  lose,  or  run  the  Hazard  of 
losing  his  Government,  for  being  good  or  serviceable 
to  his  People ; even  the  very  Supposal  of  such  a 
Thing,  is  an  abominable  Reflection  upon  his  Majesty, 
who  never  did  send  any  Governor  abroad  but  for 
the  Good  of  his  People.  But  query,  Whether  he  had 
not  his  Eye  upon  the  late  Disturbances  respecting 
the  Rioters  ? If  he  had,  it  contains  a false  and  im- 
pudent Reflection  upon  his  Excellency,  who,  it  is 
well  known,  governs  with  much  Prudence,  and  agree- 
able  to  Equity  and  Justice.  But  did  the  Governor 
act  a contrary  Part,  and  favoured  those  disorderly 
People  ; in  that  Case  he  would  betray  the  Trust  his 
Majesty  has  reposed  in  him,  deserves  to  be  displaced, 
and  consequently  is  no  good  Governor.  After  this 
same  individual  Mr  Lovetiuth  has  dismissed  his  Dia- 
logue, and  taken  Leave  of  his  Friend,  he  then  in  a 
particular  Manner,  addresses  himself  to  the  Freehold- 
ers,  by  the  captivating  Expressions  of  My  dear 
Countrymen:  The  whole  of  what  he  tells  them,  is 
nothing  but  mere  Cajole  ; and  to  say  no  more,  than 
only  to  apply  that  common  Saying  which  he  improp- 
erly mentions,  mere  Springes , not  to  catch  Wood- 
Cocks,  but  Votes  in  the  ensuing  Election.  At  first  I 
intended  to  have  said  something  as  to  his  being 
rous’d  (as  it  were)  out  of  a Lethargy,  and  introduc- 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


59 


I75i] 

ing  the  Governor’s  Proclamation,  and  also  concern- 
ing what  may  be  said  to  be  the  true  Cause  of  draw- 
ing upon  us,  the  Displeasure  of  our  most  gracious 
Sovereign,  and  his  Ministry,  &c,  but  forbear.  I shall 
have  put  an  End  to  my  Observations,  and  leave  him, 
with  the  Freeholders  of  New -Jersey,  to  think  of  him 
as  they  think  fit. 

I am,  &c. 

J-N. 

— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly  Post 
Boy , March  25,  1751. 

Lost,  last  Fall,  in  Morris-Town,  in  East-Jersey,  a 
Dog,  of  the  Pointer  kind,  all  white,  his  Tail  dockt, 
and  has  had  his  off  Thigh  broke  ; answers  to  the  Name 
of  Cato.  Whoever  brings  the  said  Dog  to  Mr. 
Waters  at  Elizabeth-Town  Point,  shall  have  Five 
Shillings  Reward. — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in 
the  Weekly  Post  Boy , March  25,  1751. 

To  be  Sold, 

A Good  Dwelling-House,  Stable,  and  Lot  of 
Ground,  very  convenient  for  a Shopkeeper  or  Trades- 
man, lying  at  Bound-Brook  Bridge,  in  East-New- 
Jersey,  within  14  or  15  Rods  of  Raritan  River,  and 
bounded  on  Raritan  Road.  Any  Person  inclining  to 
purchase  the  same,  may  apply  to  John  Anderson, 
living  on  the  Premises,  who  will  give  a good  War- 
rantee for  the  same. — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in 
the  Weekly  Post  Boy , March  25,  1751. 

Notice  is  hereby  given,  to  all  Persons  whatsoever, 
that  may  have  Occasion  to  transport  themselves, 


6o  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1751 

Goods,  or  Merchandizes,  from  New-York  to  Phila- 
delphia ; That  by  the  Subscriber,  there  is  a Stage 
Boat,  well  fitted  for  the  Purpose,  kept,  and  if  Weather 
permit  shall  attend  at  the  late  Col.  Moore’s  Wharf, 
in  New-York,  every  Wednesday,  in  every  Week, 
(and  on  Saturday  also  if  Freight  offers)  and  to  pro- 
ceed to  Mr.  John  Cluck’s,  near  Amboy  Ferry,  on 
Thursday  ; where  there  is  a Wharf,  Storehouse,  and 
good  Entertainment ; and  on  Friday  Morning,  a 
Stage-Waggon,  well  fitted,  shall  be  ready  to  receive 
them,  to  proceed  directly  to  Borden’s-Town,  where 
there  is  another  Stage  Boat  ready  to  receive  them, 
and  to  proceed  directly  to  Philadelphia  : — And  what- 
ever Goods  or  Passengers  shall  come  in  the  Stage- 
Waggon  to  Mr.  Cluck’s,  shall  be  immediately  taken 
off  by  the  Boat  on  Friday  Morning,  and  brought  to 
New-York.  All  Persons  may  depend  on  the  best 
Usage,  and  all  Passengers  and  Merchandize  carried 
at  the  most  reasonable  Rate — The  said  Waggon  will 
attend  at  Mr.  Cluck’s  on  Tuesday  Mornings  also, 
provided  a Freight  offers  of  not  less  than  Fifteen 
Shillings  Value.  And  as  Passages  this  Way  are 
generally  perform’d  in  48  Hours  less  than  they  can 
be  by  Way  of  New-Brunswick,  it  is  hoped  the  Un- 
dertaking will  meet  with  the  Encouragement  it  de- 
serves. 

Daniel  O Brien. 

N.  B.  The  said  Obrien  will  touch  at  Amboy  every 
Friday  Morning,  at  Capt.  Stevens’s  Wharf;  and  will 
do  Business  for  any  Gentlemen  or  others,  at  reason- 
able Rates  : — He  likewise  will  do  Business  for  any 
Persons,  living  on  the  Stage- Waggon  Road,  with  the 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


6 1 


1751] 

utmost  Care,  at  a reasonable  Rate,  they  sending 
their  Orders  in  Writing,  with  the  Money. — The  N. 
Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , March 
25.  I75I- 

To  be  Sold  by  Robert  Lettis  Hooper,  at  Rocky- 
Hill,  in  the  County  of  Somerset,  East-New-Jersey, 
and  now  living  on  the  Premisses  ; 

Four  Plantations,  each  containing  about  300  Acres 
of  Land,  three  of  said  Places  having  large  Orchards 
on  them  of  fine  bearing  Fruit.  There  is  cleared  on 
each  Plantation,  about  170  Acres,  which  is  divided  in 
four  Follows  ; the  Remainder  of  each  of  the  Farms 
Wood-Land,  and  well  timber’d.  There  is  on  two  of 
the  Places,  large  Dwelling-Houses,  and  each  a large 
Barn,  and  other  useful  Buildings  on  them,  well 
finished.  The  other  two  Places  have  good  Dwelling- 
Houses  on  each  of  them  ; and  on  one  of  the  Places 
there  is  about  85  Acres  of  rich  Low-Lands  ; part 
thereof  Meadow,  and  is  mowed  yearly  from  sixty  to 
seventy  Load  a Year,  and  with  a little  more  Im- 
provement, may  be  mowed  100  Loads  a Year,  all 
good  English  Grass.  Also  two  Grist-Mills,  the  one 
with  two  Pair  of  Stones,  and  three  bolting  Boxes, 
with  good  Cloths  therein  : The  said  bolting  Works 

all  go  by  Water,  with  Cogs  and  Bounds,  except  the 
Country  Cloth  : The  Meal  is  hoisted  up  by  Water, 

in  a large  Box.  The  other  Grist-Mill  has  one  Pair 
of  Stones,  with  a Fulling-Mill  under  the  same.  Roof ; 
the  Works  of  both  being  carried  on  by  the  Water 
of  .one  Dam  that  crosses  Millstone  River : The 

Houses  and  Works  of  both  Mills  are  new,  and  the 
Mill-Houses  are  50  by  33,  with  good  Conveniences 


62  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [i 75 1 

for  storing  of  Wheat.  And  also  a good  Stone 
Dwelling-House,  with  three  Rooms  on  a Floor,  and 
a large  Stone  Kitchen  to  the  same,  well  finish’d  ; it 
is  very  fit  for  a Merchant,  being  near  the  Mills. 
Also  one  other  Stone  Dwelling-House,  and  Cooper’s 
Shop,  with  two  Rooms  on  a Floor,  about  Twenty 
Yards  from  the  Mills,  all  new.  The  whole  Premisses 
lies  on  both  Sides  of  Millstone  River,  at  Rocky-Hill, 
at  12  Miles  from  New  Brunswick,  and  1 6 from  Tren- 
ton, and  in  a fine  Wheat  Country.  And  also  a 
Warrant  from  the  Council  of  Proprietors,  for  taking 
up  of  937  Acres  of  Land,  of  good  Rights,  in  the 
Eastern  Division  of  the  Province  of  New-Jersey. 
The  whole  will  be  sold  together,  or  in  Parts,  as  may 
best  suit  the  Buyer  ; by 

Robert  Lettis  Hooper.1 

— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly  Post 
Boy , March  25,  1751. 

To  be  Sold, 

A Good  large  Dwelling-House,  two  Story  high, 
containing  several  Fire-Rooms  well-finish’d,  with  a 
good  Stone-Cellar  under  it,  and  a large  Kitchen  and 
Milk-FIouse  joining  to  it.  The  Lot  belongingto  said 
House,  consists  of  near  four  Acres  of  choice  Land, 
upon  which  there  is  a very  good  young  bearing 
Orchard,  two  Gardens,  a good  Stone  Well,  a large 
new  Storehouse,  Chaise  House,  Stable,  and  several 
other  Out  buildings.  The  said  House  and  Appur- 
tenances, are  situated  in  the  Centre  of  the  Town  of 

1 Mr.  Hooper  advertised  three  of  the  above  plantations  for  sale  in  the  Gazette  for  Sept. 
23,  1751. 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


63 


I75IJ 

Shrewsbury,  in  the  Province  of  East-New-Jersey, 
near  the  English  Church,  Presbyterian  and  Quaker 
Meeting-Houses,  being  very  convenient  for  a Gentle- 
man, or  Merchant,  lying  within  two  Miles  of  three 
Landings  and  several  Mills,  and  in  a good  Neighbour- 
hood ; there  is  also  belonging  to  the  same,  40  Acres 
of  excellent  Land,  well  timber’d,  within  a Mile  of 
said  House.  Those  who  have  a Mind  to  purchase, 
may  enquire  of  Samuel  Stillwell,  at  New-York  ; or  of 
Catherine  Stillwell,  on  the  Premisses,  and  know  the 
Conditions. — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the  Week- 
ly Post  Boy , March  25,  1751. 

Run  away  the  1 7th  of  this  inst.  from  the  Subscriber, 
living  in  Pilesgrove  township,  Salem  county,  a 
servant  man,  named  Roger  Noland,  came  from  Ire- 
land, of  middle  stature,  speaks  good  Itnglish  : he 
served  4 years  in  this  province  before,  then  went  on 
the  expeditions  to  Cape  Breton  and  Canada ; he  is 
a likely  fellow,  of  a fresh  complexion,  has  black  hair, 
and  is  slim  ; he  is  a drunken,  impudent,  forward 
fellow  in  company,  and  talks  much  ; Had  on  when 
he  went  away,  a good  coat,  between  a dove  and  ash 
colour,  breeches  of  the  same,  the  coat  is  trimmed 
with  3 holes  in  the  flap,  and  3 in  the  sleeve,  a good 
holland  shirt,  grey  yarn  stockings,  neate  leather 
shoes,  a small  brimm’d  hat,  more  than  half-worn,  and 
a very  old  lightish  colour’d  jacket.  Whoever  takes 
up  and  secures  said  servant  in  any  goal,  so  that  his 
master  may  have  him  again,  shall  have  Fifty  Shillings 
reward,  and  reasonable  charges,  paid  by 

Nounce  Keen. 

-r—Penn,  Gazette , March  28,  1 750-1,  No.  1163. 


6 4 NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [175 1 

Philadelphia,  March  28,  1751. 

Run-away  the  21st  Instant,  From  Jacob  Reador  of 
AmwelL  in  Hunterdon  County , West  New -Jersey  ; an 
English  Servant  Man  named  Benjamin  Hingham, 
about  23  Years  of  Age,  about  five  Feet  six  Inches 
high,  strait  Limb’d  and  slender,  a dark  completion  : 
Had  on  when  he  went  away,  a dark  colour’d  Cloth 
homespun  Coat,  Buttons  and  Button -holes  the  same, 
lined  with  a striped  Linsey-woolsey,  a blew  Jacket 
with  leather  Buttons,  an  old  pair  of  leather  Breeches, 
old  Cap  and  Shoes,  a Tow  Shirt,  generally  wears  a 
short  black  Wim  and  has  been  used  to  the  Water. 
Whoever  takes  him  up,  and  secures  him  in  any  Goal, 
so  that  his  Master  may  have  him  again,  shall  receive 
Thirty  Shilling  Reward,  and  reasonable  Charges 
paid  by  me. 

Jacob  Reador. 

N.  b.  All  Masters  of  Vessels  and  others,  are  for- 
bid to  carry  him  off  at  their  peril.— Penna.  Journal , 
March  28,  1751.  No.  436. 

Custom  House , Philadelphia,  Entered  In.  Schooner 
Bayley,  Isaac  Randel,  from  Salem. — Penna.  Journal , 
April  4,  1751.  No.  437. 

Run  away  on  the  24th  of  last  month,  from  the  sub- 
scriber, hereof,  living  in  Trenton,  an  apprentice  lad, 
named  Benjamin  Alburtis,  a cooper  by  trade,  aged 
about  20  years,  5 foot  7 inches  high  or  thereabouts  : 
Had  on  when  he  went  away,  a brown  kersy  coat, 
with  brass  buttons,  a brown  forrest  cloth  jacket 
with  pewter  buttons,  a pair  of  leather  breeches,  with 
brass  buttons,  grey  yarn  stockings,  new  shoes,  with 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


65 


1751] 

white  metal  buckles,  a castor  hat  about  half- worn  ; 
had  a very  sore  shin.  Whoever  takes  up  and 
secures  the  said  apprentice,  so  that  his  master  may 
have  him  again,  shall  have  Three  Pounds  reward, 
and  all  reasonable  charges  paid  by 

John  Evans. 

— Penn.  Gazette , April  4,  1751.  No.  1164. 

This  is  to  give  notice  that  all  persons  that  shall 
have  occasion  of  transporting  themselves,  goods, 
wares  or  merchandize  from  Philadelphia  to  New 
York,  or  from  the  latter  to  the  former,  That  by 
Joseph  Borden,  jun.  there  is  a stage-boat,  well-fitted, 
and  kept  for  that  purpose,  and  if  wind  and  weather 
permit,  will  attend  at  the  Crooked  Billet  wharff,  in 
Philadelphia,  every  Tuesday  in  every  week,  and  pro- 
ceed up  to  Bordentown,  on  Wednesday,  and  on 
Thursday  morning  a stage-waggon,  with  a good  awn- 
ing, kept  by  Joseph  Richards,  will  be  ready  to  receive 
them,  and  proceed  directly  to  John  Cluck’s  opposite 
the  city  of  Perth- Amboy,  who  keeps  a house  of  good 
entertainment ; and  on  Friday  morning,  a stage-boat 
well  fitted  and  kept  by  Daniel  Obryant,  will  be  ready 
to  receive  them,  and  proceed  directly  to  New  York, 
and  give  her  attendance  at  the  White  hall  slip  near 
the  Half-moon  battery.  If  people  be  ready  at  the 
stage  days  and  places  ’tis  believ’d  they  may  pass  the 
quickest  30  or  40  hours  the  [cheapest  and  safest 
way  that  has  yet  been  made  use  of,  if  due  attendance 
be  given  by  us,  the  subscribers  which  we  shall  en- 
deavour to  do  as  near  as  possible  : Also  people 

living  on  or  near  the  road,  may  have  business  done 
5 


66  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1751 

by  letters  or  otherwise.  Due  care  shall  be  taken  in 
the  delivery  of  letters,  verbile  messages,  &c.  by  us 

Joseph  Borden,  jun.  Joseph  Richards  and  Daniel 
Obryant. 

N.  B.  All  passengers  or  goods,  that  shall  come 
to  Bordentown,  on  Sunday  or  Monday,  in  every  or 
any  week,  by  any  Trenton  shallops ; White-hill 
shallop,  or  Bordentown  shallops  or  boats,  or  in  any 
other  whatsoever,  whose  waggon  hire  shall  amount 
to  Sixteen  Shillings  or  upwards,  shall  upon  first 
notice  have  a waggon  and  be  transported  to  the 
above  John  Cluck’s,  opposite  Amboy,  where  if  the 
stage-boat  is  not  ready  to  receive  them  (but  ’ tis  in- 
tended she  shall)  it  must  be  allowed  they  have  the 
greatest  chance  for  dispatch  of  any  other  place  what- 
soever, for  all  the  Brunswick,  the  place  above  Bruns- 
wick, called  the  landing  ; and  all  the  river  boats  must 
pass  that  place,  in  whom  people  may  have  passage. 

Joseph  Richards. 

— Penn . Gazette , April  4,  1751.  No.  1 1 64. 

New-York,  April  8.  We  have  Intelligence  from  the  ! 
Jersies , that  some  Men  who  belonged  to  one  of  the  f 
Vessels  .that  attempted  to  carry  off  some  of  the  I 
Money  belonging  to  the  Spanish  Wrecks  at  Ocacock 
inNorth  Carolina  ; were  last  Week  apprehended,  and 
committed  to  Amboy  Jail,  as  ’tis  said,  by  Orders 
from  the  Government. — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived 
in  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , April  8,  1751. 

Whereas  it  appears  by  the  New-York  Gazette  of 
March  25,  1751,  that  William  Jackson  was  murdered 
in  February  last : The  said  Jackson  was  a Freeholder 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


67 


1751] 

in  Augusta  County,  at  Jackson’s  River  in  Virginia, 
and  left  a Wife  orgeat  w£th  Child  last  Fall  ; He  had 
when  he  left  my  House  in  Newark  the  30th  of  Nov- 
ember last,  about  184  Skins  of  Wash-Leather,  one 
Shirt  mark’d  W.  I.  with  white  Ilet  Holes  ; his  great 
Coat,  Waistcoat,  Breeches  and  Hanger,  as  is  described 
in  the  said  Gazette  right ; his  Horse  that  he  had 
when  he  went  from  us  was  of  a ronish  and  sorrel 
Colour;  as  for  his  other  Goods,  I can’t  give  any  par- 
ticular Account.  It  would  be  very  agreeable  to  me, 
and  no  doubt  to  all  his  Relations,  to  hear  how  the  Trial 
went,  and  what  Effects  are  or  may  be  found  for  the 
Widow  and  Heirs  of  the  Deceas’d.  These  are  to 
interest  his  Majesty’s  liege  Subjects  of  South-Kings- 
ton,  to  be  aiding  by  publick  or  private  Letter ; the 
which  if  it  comes  to  my  Knowledge,  I shall  be  as  ex- 
peditious as  I can  to  convey  it  to  the  Widow.  Given 
under  my  Hand  the  1st  of  April  1 75 1 A 

Thomas  Bows. 

— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly  Tost 
Boy , April  18,  1751. 

Whereas  the  following  Persons  have  made  their 
Escape  from  the  County  Goal  of  Middlesex,  at  Perth 
Amboy,  this  10th  Instant  April,  viz : 

Lawrence  Ruth,  about  30  Years  of  Age,  middle 
Stature,  a Shoe-maker  by  Trade  ; Had  on  when  he 
went  away,  a brown  Bearskin  Coat,  a short  black 
Wig  or  Cap,  the  Hair  of  his  Eye  Lids  white. 

John  Shotwell,  aged  about  22  Years,  a Taylor  by 

1 The  Gazette  of  March  25,  has  the  advertisement  of  the  murder  of  William  Jackson, 
(on  Jan.  1st)  from  the  same  part  of  Virginia,  with  notice  to  his  heirs  to  apply  for  his  prop- 
erty, signed  by  Josh  Babcock,  C.  Justice,  of  Rhode  Island.  He  was  muidered  at  South 
Kensington,  R.  I. 


68  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1751 

Trade,  of  a middle  Stature  ; he  had  on  a brown  Coat, 
a Linen  Cap,  and  is  lame  in  one  of  his  Legs.  Who- 
ever apprehends  or  secures  said  Men,  or  either  of 
them,  so  that  they  be  brought  to  the  County  Goal, 
at  Perth-Amboy,  shall  receive  Five  Pounds  Reward 
for  Lawrence  Ruth,  and  Forty  Shillings  Reward  for 
John  Shotwell,  with  reasonable  Charges  paid  by 

John  Deare. 

— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly  Post 
Boy , April  15,  1751. 

To  Be  Sold, 

A Plantation  containing  600  Acres  of  Land,  situate 
in  the  County  of  Hunterdon  in  West-New-Jersey, 
fronting  on  the  River  Delaware  near  two  Miles, 
and  has  within  Fence  200  Acres  of  Low-Land, 
mostly  cleared,  and  is  extraordinary  good,  either  for 
Grazing  or  raising  Wheat,  and  includes  about  15 
Acres  of  good  Meadow,  fit  for  the  Scyth,  and  more 
may  be  made  ; the  Up-Land  is  also  well  wooded,  and 
exceeding  good  for  Wheat ; with  a good  fram’d 
Barn,  a Log-House  of  two  Rooms,  and  a Stream 
running  before  the  Door  sufficient  to  turn  a small 
Mill,  and  is  about  40  Miles  from  Philadelphia,  40 
Miles  from  Brunswick,  and  30  from  Trenton.  Any 
Person  inclining  to  purchase,  may  apply  to  William 
Pidgeon  at  Trenton,  and  be  inform’d  of  the  Title 
and  Terms  of  Sale ; and  may  have  half  the  Money 
some  years  on  Interest,  paying  the  one  Half  down, 
and  the  Interest  of  the  other  yearly. — The  N.  Y. 
Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , April  15, 
I75i- 


69 


I751]  NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 

Run  away  on  the  4th  inst.  from  John  French,  at 
Mount-Holly,  a servant  man,  named  Reuben  Jones, 
this  country-born,  about  six  foot  high,  fresh  complex- 
ion : Had  on  when  he  went  away  an  ozen-brigs  shirt, 
old  brown  jacket,  an  old  beaver  hat,  old  calf  skin 
pumps,  tied  with  leather  strings,  old  brown  yarn 
stockings  and  leather  breeches.  Whoever  takes  up 
and  secures  said  servant,  so  that  his  master  may 
have  him  again,  shall  have  Fifty  Shillings  reward, 
and  reasonable  charges,  paid  by 

John  French. 

— Penn.  Gazette , April  18,  1751.  No.  1166. 

New-  York , April  2 2 . Extract  of  a Letter  from 
South-Kingston,  dated  April  16,  1751,  in  Answer  to 
an  Advertisement  of  Thomas  Bows,  ^/Newark,  inserted 
in  this  Paper  a Fortnight  ago. 

“ At  the  Superior  Court  held  here  on  the  first 
Tuesday  of  this  Month,  Thomas  Carter  was  convicted 
of  murdering  and  robbing  William  Jackson  of  Vir- 
ginia \ for  which  Crimes  he  received  Sentence  of 
Death,  and  to  be  hung  in  Chains.  Since  his  Tryal 
he  has  confess’d  the  Facts ; and  that  he  took  from 
Jackson , his  Horse,  107  Deer  Skins,  in  Silver  and 
Gold  to  the  amount  of  about  Eighty  Dollars,  and 
about  Forty  Shillings  Pennsylvania  Paper  Money. 
Notwithstanding  he  has  spent  and  squander’d  away 
great  Part  of  the  Money  and  Effects,  there  is  so  much 
to  be  yet  had,  that  it  would  be  advisable  for  the  Rep- 
resentatives of  Mr.  Jacks  on,  to  take  Letters  of  Ad- 
minstration  in  Virginia , and  either  come  in  Person, 
or  send  a Power  to  some  proper  Person  here,  to 
secure  the  same  Mr.  Bows  is  desired  to  inform, 


7° 


NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [175! 


whether  Mr.  Jackson  had  a Wench  with  him  or  not.” 
— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly  Post 
Boy , April  22,  1751. 

To  be  Sold  at  publick  Vendue,  in  the  City  of  New 

Brunswick , on  Monday,  the  20th  of  May  next. 

The  Dwelling  House  and  Lot,  belonging  to  the 
Estate  of  Abraham  Ouke,  deceased  ; also  a Store- 
House  near  the  Still- Wharff ; and  also  the  quarter 
Share  of  a well-found  new-built  Shallop,  called  the 
Four  Partners,  with  many  other  Particulars.  The 
said  Dwelling-House  is  conveniently  situated  for 
Shop-Keeping,  on  the  North  Side  of  French  Street, 
is  two  Stories  high,  with  Cellar  and  Kitchen  under 
it ; besides  has  had  an  Addition  built  to  it,  to  the 
Extent  of  the  Lot  at  front,  for  storing  of  Goods, 
under  which  is  a convenient  Passage  from  the  Street 
to  the  Back  Close  ; has  a good  Pump  in  the  Yard, 
and  a good  Stable  with  a Hay-Loft,  upon  the  Back 
of  the  Lot.  The  Lot  is  25  Feet  at  front,  and  150 
Feet  back,  and  is  held  by  Lease  for  a Term  of  Years, 
of  which  there  is  Sixty-two  to  come,  and  pays  a 
Ground  Rent  only  of  25s.  per  Annum.  Any  Person 
that  has  a Mind  to  purchase  the  Premises,  or  any 
Part  thereof  before  the  Day  of  Sale  may  treat  with 
the  Executors  to  the  said  Estate. — The  N.  Y. 
Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , April  29, 
I75I- 

To  be  sold  by  Joshua  Wright,  or  Samuel  Atkin- 
son, A tract  of  land,  and  a large  quantity  of  meadow 
ground,  containing  270  acres,  with  usual  allowance, 
situate  on  Oldman’s  Creek,  in  Piles-grove,  Salem 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


1751] 


7 1 


county  ; Also  another  tract  of  land,  containing- about 
140  acres,  both  near  a navigable  landing. — Penn. 
Gazette , May  2,  1751.  No.  1168. 


FOund  on  the  Jersey-shore  opposite  to  Philadel- 
phia, a barrel  of  pork,  supposed  to  have  been  stolen  ; 
the  owner  describing  the  marks,  and  paying  the 
charges  of  this  advertisement,  may  have  it  again. 

Daniel  Cooper. 

— Penn.  Gazette , May  9,  1751.  No.  1169. 

Run  away  in  July  last,  from  Nicholas  Everson, 
living  in  East  New-Jersey,  two  miles  from  Perth 
Amboy  ferry,  A mulatto  Negroe,  named. Tom,  about 
37  years  of  age,  short,  well-set,  thick  lips,  flat-nose, 
black  curled  hair,  and  can  play  well  upon  the  fiddle  : 
Had  on  when  he  went  away,  a red-coloured  watch- 
coat,  without  a cape,  a brown  coloured  leather 
jacket,  a hat,  blue  and  white  twisted  yarn  leggings  ; 
speaks  good  English  and  Low  Dutch,  and  is  a good 
Shoemaker  ; his  said  master  has  been  informed  that 
he  intends  to  cut  his  watch-coat,  to  make  him  Indian 
stockings,  and  to  cut  off  his  hair,  and  get  a blanket, 
to  pass  for  an  Indian  ; that  he  enquired  for  one  John 
and  Thomas  Nutus,  Indians  at  Susquehanna,  and 
about  the  Moravians,  and  the  way  there.  Whoever 
secures  him  in  the  nearest  goal  or  otherwise,  so  that 
his  master  may  have  him  again,  shall  have  Forty 
Shillings  reward,  and  reasonable  charges  paid  by 

Nicholas  Everson. 

— Penn.  Gazette , May  9,  1751.  No.  1169. 

Run  away  from  William  and  John  Robert,  of 
Manington,  in  Salem  county,  Two  Irish  servant  men, 


72  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1751 

one  named  George  Monrow,  about  30  years  of  age, 
of  a fair  complexion,  short  nose,  speaks  with  a 
Scotch  Accent,  and  has  been  a soldier,  and  can  give 
a good  account  of  several  countries  : Had  on  when 

he  went  away,  a wool  hat,  a light  colour’d  jacket, 
and  a red  ditto,  without  sleeves,  buck-skin  breeches, 
black  stockings  and  a wallet,  with  two  fine  shirts, 
and  two  bob  wigs. 

The  other  named  James  Tracy,  about  28  years  of 
age,  a tall  full  faced  subtle  fellow,  big  browed  : Had 

on  when  he  went  away,  a brown  coat  with  slash 
sleeves,  a blue  jacket,  buckskin  breeches,  white  wool 
stockings  ; they  have  strings  in  their  shoes.  Who- 
ever takes  up  and  secures  said  servants,  so  that 
their  masters  may  have  them  again,  shall  have 
Twenty  Shillings  reward  for  each,  paid  by 

William  and  John  Roberts. 

— Penn.  Gazette , May  9,  1751.  No.  1169. 

Run  away  on  the  19th  of  last  month  from  Edward 
Hill,  living  at  Duncks’s  Ferry,  a servant  man  named 
Moses  Tharp,  says  he  was  born  in  Woodbridge,  in 
East  Jersey,  about  21  years  of  age,  about  6 foot  high, 
ol  a fresh  Complexion,  his  hair  lately  cut  off,  and 
wears  a white  linnen  cap  : Had  on  when  he  went 

away,  a cloth  coat  of  a lead  colour,  lined  with  blue,  a 
short  white-flannel  jacket,  a pair  of  buckskin  breeches, 
about  half  worn,  a pair  of  woolen  stockings,  of  a 
mix’d  bluish  colour,  a pair  of  neats  leather  shoes, 
almost  new  with  buckles  in  them  ; took  with  him  two 
ozenbrigs  shirts,  almost  new,  and  wears  a Twenty 
Shilling  hat,  this  country  make,  almost  new.  Who- 
ever takes  up  and  secures  said  servant,  so  that  his 


I751]  NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS.  73 

master  may  have  him  again,  shall  have  Twenty  Shil- 
lings reward,  and  reasonable  charges,  paid  by 

Edward  Hill. 

— Penn.  Gazette,  May  9,  1751.  No,  1169. 

Custom  House , New  York.  Cleared  for  Departure. 
Sloop  William,  Asa  King  to  N.  Jersey. — The  N.  Y. 
Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , May  13,  1751. 

All  Persons  that  have  any  Demands  on  the 
Estate  of  Isaac  Fitz  Randle,  lately  deceased,  of 
Tom’s  River,  in  the  County  of  Monmouth,  are  desired 
to  bring  in  their  Accounts  to  Samuel  Dove,  Admin- 
istrator, in  Freehold,  in  the  County  aforesaid,  in 
order  that  the  same  may  be  settled : And  any  Per- 

sons that  are  indebted  to  the  said  Estate,  are  desired 
to  discharge  the  same  forthwith,  to  prevent  further 
Trouble. — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly 
Post  Boy , May  13,  1751. 

Run  away  from  Mount-Holly,  in  West-New-Jersey, 
from  us  the  subscribers,  Two  English  servant  men, 
viz,  William  Blumefield,  a Carpenter  about  35  years 
of  age,  swarthy  complexion,  about  5 feet  jo  inches 
high  : Had  on  a green  jacket,  black  wig,  and  a silk 

handkerchief  round  his  neck,  his  other  clothes  un- 
known ; he  was  lately  taken  out  of  Philadelphia  goal. 

Also  James  Morgan,  a Wheel  Wright,  about  27 
years  of  age,  a likely  fellow,  about  5 feet,  8 inches 
high : Had  on  a snuff-colour’d  coat,  with  a cape, 

and  a linnen  jacket.  Whoever  brings  them  to  their 
masters  or  secures  them  in  any  goal,  so  that  they 
may  be  had  again,  shall  have  Two  Pistoles  reward 
for  each,  and  all  reasonable  charges  paid  by  Peter 


74  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1751 

Bard,  in  Philadelphia,  or  Patrick  Renalds,  in  Mount- 
Holly. — Penn.  Gazette,  May  16,  1751.  No.  1170. 

Broke  out  of  the  goal  of  the  county  of  Gloucester, 
and  escaped,  one  Thomas  Morgan,  born  in  East- 
New-Jersey,  about  30  years  of  age,  of  a thin  visage 
and  brown  complexion,  about  5 feet  8 inches  high  : 
Had  on  when  he  went  away,  a blue  great-coat, 
brown  coat  and  waist  coat,  leather  breeches,  a half 
worn  beaver  hat,  either  a brown  wig  or  a worsted 
cap,  check’d  shirt,  old  shoes  and  stockings  Also 
one  Adam  Somers,  a Palatine,  about  60  years  of  age, 
of  short  stature,  by  trade  a Collier  : Had  on  when 

he  went  away,  an  old  felt  hat,  a yarn  cap,  a red  great 
coat,  two  close  bodied  coats,  of  a copper  colour,  the 
outermost  with  white  metal  buttons,  check’d  shirt, 
striped  ticken  trowsers,  grey  yarn  stockings,  and 
new  calf  skin  shoes.  Whoever  takes  up  and  secures 
the  said  prisoners,  so  that  they  may  be  had  again, 
shall  have  Three  Pounds  reward  for  each,  and 
reasonable  charges,  paid  by 

John  Mickle,  Sheriff. 

— Penn.  Gazette , May  16,  1751.  No.  1 1 70. 

Upper-Freehold,  May  16.  1751 

Whereas  Margaret,  the  Wife  of  John  Hunnewell, 
hath  eloped  from  her  said  Husband,  this  is  to  warn 
all  Persons  from  trusting  her  on  his  Account,  for  he 
will  pay  no  Debts  she  shall  contract  after  the  Date. 

John  Hunnewell. 

n.  b.  She  has  liv’d  with  one  James  Hayburn  in 
Amboy  Township. — Penna.  Journal , May  23,  1751. 
No.  444. 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


75 


1751J 

Philadelphia,  May  30,  1751. 

Run  away  on  the  17th  inst.  from  George  Miller, 
at  Lebanon,  in  the  county  of  Hunterdon,  in  the  pro- 
vince of  N.  Jersey,  A servant  lad,  named  Hans  Wil- 
liam Kabe,  about  16  years  of  age,  of  a fair  com- 
plexion, has  black  curl’d  hair,  little  black  eyes,  all 
round  his  neck  and  above  his  shirt  collar  is  blackish, 
and  all  over  his  body,  his  skin  is  greyish,  somewhat 
like  a fish-scale  : It  is  supposed  the  said  servant  is 

gone  toward  N.  Carolina,  with  one  Frederick  Isen, 
and  Philip  Sbout.  Whoever  takes  up  the  said  ser- 
vant, and  secures  him  in  any  goal,  and  sends  his 
master  word,  so  that  his  master  may  have  him 
again,  or  brings  him  to  his  said  master  shall  have 
Five  Pounds  for  their  trouble,  and  reasonable  charges, 
paid  by 

George  Miller. 

— Penn.  Gazette , May  30,  1751.  No.  1172. 

Run  away  on  the  28th  of  last  month,  from  his  bail, 
Samuel  Jaques,  and  James  Marshall,  of  Elizabeth- 
town, Essex  county,  in  East  New-Jersey,  one  Ed- 
ward Kite,  an  English  man,  about  30  years  of  age, 
of  middle  stature,  brown  complexion,  has  a fresh 
colour,  black  eyes,  and  has  a bold  look  : Had  on 

when  he  went  away,  an  old  green  jacket,  an  old  bob 
wig,  and  a speckled  shirt.  He  some  time  ago  broke 
one  of  his  Legs,  which  by  observing,  will  be  found  to 
be  a little  crooked,  and  is  somewhat  thicker  than  the 
other.  He  is  a cooper  by  trade,  but  has  lately 
taught  school,  and  writes  a good  round  hand.  Who- 
ever takes  up  and  secures  said  Edward  Kite,  so  as 


/6  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [_  175! 

his  bail  may  have  him  again,  shall  have  Four  Pounds 
reward,  and  reasonable  Charges,  paid  by 

Samuel  Jaques  and  James  Marshall 

N.  B.  All  masters  of  vessels,  and  others,  are  for- 
bid to  harbour  or  carry  him  off,  at  their  peril. — Penn. 
Gazette , June  6,  1751.  No.  1173. 

To  be  Sold. 

A Plantation  in  the  Jerseys,  containing  176  acres 
of  land,  about  seven  miles  from  Philadelphia, 
right  back  from  Cooper’s  Ferry,  near  Haddonfield. 
This  place  is  in  good  order,  the  land  fresh  and  good, 
with  meadow  sufficient  to  keep  20  head  of  cattle. 
There  is  on  it  a good  dwelling-house,  a stone-cellar 
under  it,  and  a kitchen  at  the  end  of  it,  a large  barn, 
a young  thriving  orchard,  containing  350  apple-trees, 
which  have  bore  several  years  past.  Any  person  in- 
clining to  purchase,  may  apply  to  Samuel  Boggs, 
living  on  the  premises,  who  will  agree  on  reasonable 
terms. — Penn.  Gazette , June  6,  1751.  No.  1173. 

New  York , June  10.  We  hear  from  Burlington, 
that  two  Men  were  to  be  executed  there  on  Saturday 
last  for  Horse-stealing. — The  N Y.  Gazette , Revived 
in  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , June  10,  1751. 

Philadelphia,  June  13. 

The  two  Men  that  were  to  have  been  executed  on 
Saturday  last,  at  Burlington,  for  Horse-stealing  are 
both  repriev’d.  One  of  them  was  repriev’d  some 
Days  before  the  Time  appointed  for  his  Execution  ; 
the  other  under  the  Gallows.  John  Crow  (who  was 
lately  repriev’d  under  the  Gallows  by  our  Governor) 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


77 


i75i] 

is  again  in  Jail  here  ; he  was  taken  at  Gloucester 
Point,  and  had  a Mare  with  him,  supposed  to  be 
stolen. — Penn.  Gazette , June  13,  1751.  No.  1174. 

John  Crow,  now  in  the  goal  of  this  city,  says  he 
borrowed  a mare  of  one  John  Scogan,  of  Salem 
county,  West-Jersey,  which  mare  is  in  the  Pound  of 
this  city : If  so,  said  Scogan  is  desired  to  come  and 

prove  his  property,  pay  charges,  and  take  her  away. 
— Penn.  Gazette , June  13,  1751.  No.  1174. 

Now  in  the  custody  of  Thomas  Smith,  Sheriff  of 
Cape-May  county,  a run  away  Negro  man,  who  goes 
by  the  name  of  Jupiter  Hazard,  is  about  27  years  of 
age,  not  very  black,  of  a middle  size,  and  well  built. 
Had  on  when  taken  up,  a flannel  shirt,  leather 
breeches  with  a fob  in  the  waist-band,  shoes  and  stock- 
ings, both  very  good,  the  stockings  of  a blue  colour, 
bathmetal  buckles,  a good  felt  hat  and  worsted  cap  ; 
he  speaks  English  like  a country  born  Negroe,  who 
has  lived  some  time  among  the  Dutch.  He  had  a 
bundle  with  him,  which  contain’d  two  white  shirts,  a 
demity  jacket  and  breeches,  a white  handkerchief,  a 
linnen  cap,  and  a pocket  book,  with  four  dollars  in  it, 
and  a pair  of  silver  knee  buckles,  marked  N.  S.  He 
seems  to  have  travell’d  pretty  much,  for  he  gives  a 
good  account  of  Rhode-Island,  New  York,  Pennsyl- 
vania, Shrewsbury,  and  other  places  : says  his  mas- 
ter’s name  is  John  Bannister,  and  lives  at  Piscataway, 
in  Rhode  Island  Government. — Penn.  Gazette , June 
‘3.  1 75 1 • No-  1 1 74- 

To  be  Sold— 

A Tract  of  land,  situate  in  Woodbury-creek,  in 


78 


NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [ I 75  I 


Gloucester  county,  containing  328  acres,  with  a house 
thereon,  20  acres  of  upland  cleared,  a young  orchard 
planted,  and  about  1 2 acres  of  meadow  on  the  tide, 
the  rest  extraordinarly  well-timbered,  with  a stream 
through  the  said  land,  fit  for  building  a saw-mill  on. 
Any  persons  inclining  to  purchase  the  same,  may 
apply  to  John  Cooper,  or  David  Cooper,  living  on 
part  of  the  said  tract,  or  to  Timothy  Matlack,  in 
Philadelphia,  and  be  informed  of  the  title  and  terms. 
— Penn.  Gazette , June  13,  1751.  No.  1174. 

Perth-Amboy,  New- Jersey,  June  6. 

A Message  from  his  Excellency  J.  Belcher,  Esq  ; 
Governor  and  Commander  in  Chief  of  the  Province 
of  New-Jersey. 

Gentlemen  of  the  Council  and  General  Assembly. 

The  28  of  the  last  Month  I had  the  Honour  to  re- 
ceive a Letter  from  his  Grace  the  Duke  of  Bedford, 
one  of  His  Majesty’s  principal  Secretaries  of  State, 
of  the  2 1 st  of  March  last,  and  which  is  couch’d  in  the 
following  terms, 

Sir  Whitehall , March  21.  1751. 

“It  is  with  great  Concern  that  lam  now  to  acquaint 
“you  with  the  Death  of  His  Royal  Highness  the  Prince 
“ of  Wales , who  expired  of  a violent  Pleuritick  Fever 
“about  10  o’Clock  last  Night;  The  grief  upon  this 
“ melancholy  Occasion  is  great  and  general : It  is 
“ however  a great  Comfort  to  His  Majesty’s  faithful 
“Servants,  to  find  that  his  Health  is  entirely  reestab- 
lished, and  that  her  Royal  Highness  the  Princess  of 
“ Wales  and  the  rest  of  the  Royal  Family  are  as  well 
“ as  can  be  expected  in  the  present  Circumstances. 


175 1 j 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


79 


“ I most  heartily  condole  with  you  upon  this  unfor- 
“tunate  Occasion,  and  am,  Sir, 

Your  most  obedient  humble  Servant , 
Governor  Belcher,  Newr Jersey,  Bedford. 

The  Death  of  this  Prince,  who  next  under  His  Maj- 
esty, was  the  Darling-  and  Delight  of  the  British 
Nation,  has  drawn  a gloomy  Scene  for  the  Prospect 
of  all  His  Majesty’s  Dominions,  and  I think  it  my 
Duty  to  say,  I shall  be  glad  to  join  with  you,  as 
speedily  as  may  be,  in  an  Address  of  Condolence,  to 
our  most  gracious  Sovereign,  upon  this  very  melan- 
choly Occasion,  and  at  the  same  Time,  to  Congratu- 
late His  Majesty  upon  the  entire  reestablishment  of 
His  Health,  (after  His  late  Indisposition)  the  value 
of  whose  precious  Life  is  doubly  enhanced  to  all  His 
good  and  faithful  Subjects,  by  the  Death  of  the  late 
Heir  Apparent  to  His  Crown  and  Kingdom. 

J.  Belcher. 

—Penna.  Journal , June  13,  1751.  No.  447. 


Scheme — 

Of  the  Trenton  (in  New-Jersey)  Lottery,  for  raising 
Three  Hundred,  Ninety-Three  Pounds,  Fifteen  Shil- 
lings, for  finishing  and  compleating  the  Church,  in 
said  town,  consisting  of  3,500  Tickets,  at  Fifteen 
Shilling’s  Proc.  money  each,  641  of  which  to  be  for- 
tunate, as  follows,  viz — 


Number  of  Prizes. 

2 of 

4 of 

4 of 

4 of 


Value  of  each. 

/. 

100  are 
50  are 
40  are 


Total  Value. 
/.  j. 
200-0 
200-0 
160-0 

I 20—0 


30 


are 


8o 


NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS 


[1751 


5 

of 

20 

are 

100-0 

7 

of 

15 

are 

0 

1 

0 

20 

of 

10 

are 

200-0 

25 

of 

7 

are 

i75-o 

70 

of 

3 

are 

210-0 

5°° 

of 

1 1 

. 1 os  are 

750-0 

Prizes  641 

First  drawn  6-0 

Blanks  2859 

Last 

drawn  5-5 

3500  Tickets,  at  Fifteen  Shillings  £22^1-  5 
each,  are  2625  1.  £2231-  5 

From  which  deduct  15  per  Cent  £ 393-15 


^2625-  o 


The  drawing  to  commence  on  or  before  the  second 


day  of  September  next,  at  the  house  of  Nathaniel 
Parker,  in  Bucks  county,  in  the  province  of  Pennsyl- 
vania, if  filled  by  that  time,  under  the  care  and  man- 
agement of  Messieurs  Robert  Pearson,  Robert  Let- 
tice  Hooper,  John  Allen,  David  Dunbar,  Elijah  Bond,  j 
John  Dagworthy,  Jun.  Daniel  Biles,  and  William 
Pidgeon  ; who  are  to  dispose  of  the  tickets,  and  be 
under  oath  for  the  faithful  management  of  the  same. 


The  fortunate  are  to  receive  their  prizes  entire,  the 
15  per  Cent,  being  deducted  from  the  whole  sum 
produced  by  the  sale  of  the  tickets,  before  the  draw- 
ing begins,  and  not  from  the  prizes  after  they  are 
drawn.  Fourteen  days  notice  at  least  to  be  given 
before  the  day  of  drawing.  The  prizes  to  be  printed 
in  this  paper,  when  the  drawing  is  concluded.  The 
tickets  are  to  be  sold  by  the  several  managers,  and 
by  Messieurs  David  Martin,  Andrew  Read,  William 


1751]  NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS.  8[ 

Coxe,  William  Franklin,  and  David  Hall  in  Phila- 
delphia ; John  Garrison,  in  Amwell ; Peter  Kimble 
and  Francis  Costigin,  in  Brunswick  ; Daniel  Coxe  in 
Hopewell,  John  Berrian,  in  Rocky-hill  ; Lewis  Ash- 
field,  and  John  Stevens  in  Amboy  ; and  James  Parker, 
in  New  York. — - Penn . Gazette , June  20,  1751.  No. 
1 175* 


To  be  Sold 

A Large  brick  house,  situate  and  being  in  the 
Water-street,  in  Trenton,  near  the  Mills,  with  a large 
lot  back,  running  to  the  other  street,  containing- 
about  one  acre  of  ground  ; the  house  stands  very 
commodious  for  trade,  and  the  lot  very  commodious 
to  build  on  in  both  streets,  front  sufficient  for  2 or  3 
houses  in  each  street.  Any  person  inclining  to  pur- 
chase said  house  and  lot,  may  apply  to  John  Allen, 
in  Trenton,  and  see  the  boundries,  and  know  the 
conditions  of  sale. — Penn.  Gazette , June  20,  1751. 
No.  1175. 


Custom  House,  Philadelphia,  Entered  In.  Brig. 
Sally,  William  Hazleton  from  Perth  Amboy. — Penna. 
Journal , June  20,  1751.  No.  448. 


Custom  House , Philadelphia.  Entered  In.  Hazel- 
ton  from  Perth- Amboy. — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived 
in  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , June  24,  1751. 

Whereas  I the  Subscriber,  late  Sheriff  of  Middle- 
sex County,  in  New-Jersey,  having  in  Executions  be- 
longing to  Jacob  Ouk^,  sundry  Lots  of  Land  lying  on 

a Street  near  the  Market-House  in  the  City  of  New- 
6 


82  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [175  I 

Brunswick ; and  also  the  Equity  of  Redemption  of  a 
large  Dwelling-House  and  Lot  fronting  both  Burnet 
and  Peace-Street ; And  having  heretofore  advertised 
the  Sale  thereof  at  publick  Vendue,  and  for  want  of 
Bidders,  continued  the  same  by  several  Adjourn- 
ments, to  the  19th  Instant;  in  said  Time  there  was 
bid  for  all  said  several  Lots,  ^100  York  Money,  and 
for  said  Dwelling-House  and  Lot,  ^417.  Now  this 
is  to  give  Notice,  that  by  and  with  the  Consent  of 
said  last  Bidder,  the  said  Vendue  is  postponed  to  the 
first  Monday  in  July  next,  then  to  be  held  at  the 
Premises  ; at  which  Time,  in  Case  no  more  is  bid, 
the  said  Lots  will  be  struck  off  to  the  Person  that  bid 
the  £.  roo,  and  the  said  Dwelling-House  and  Lot  to 
him  that  bid  the  £.417. 

John  Deare. 

— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly 
Post  Boy , June  24,  1751. 


Run  away  the  15th  inst.  from  Valentine  Bryant, 
of  West  Jersey,  a Negroe  man,  named  Joe,  about  28 
years  of  age,  of  middle  size,  much  bow-legged,  and 
speaks  very  good  English  : Had  on  when  he  went 
away,  an  old  felt  hat,  grey  kersey  jacket,  with  a home- 
spun  striped  lining,  new  ozenbrigs  shirt,  and  old  oz- 
enbrigs  trowsers  ; he  has  with  him  a black  dog,  with 
a short  tail.  Whoever  takes  up  said  negroe,  and 
secures  him,  so  as  his  master  may  have  him  again, 
shall  have  Twenty  Shillings  reward,  and  reasonable 
charges,  paid  by 


1 


r 


; 

: 


Valentine  Bryant. 

— Penn.  Gazette , June  27,  1751.  No.  1176. 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


175C 


New-York , July  1.  A Scheme  of  a Lottery  for 
raising  J-393~l  5~o,  for  finishing  a Church  at  Tren- 
town , is  advertised  in  the  Philadelphia  Papers,  con- 
sisting of  3500  Tickets,  at  15  s.  each,  641  of  which 
are  to  be  fortunate:  There  are  two  Prizes  of  ^.100 
each,  the  rest  gradually  decreasing : (The  Scheme 
itself  is  designed  to  be  inserted  in  our  next.)  The 
Prizes  are  to  be  paid  entire,  and  the  drawing  to 
commence  on  the  second  Day  of  September  next,  if 
possible  : The  Managers  are  Messrs.  Robert  Pearson , 
Robert  Lettice  Hooper , John  Allen , David  Dunbar, 
Elijah  Bond , John  Dagworthy , Jun.  Daniel  Byles , 
and  William  Pidgeon ; who  are  to  be  under  the 
usual  Obligations  for  the  faithful  Discharge  of  their 
Trust : Tickets  to  be  sold  by  the  Managers,  and  sev- 
eral others  as  advertised ; as  also  by  the  Printer 
hereof. — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly 
Post  Boy , July  1 , 1751. 

Run  away  on  the  1st  instant,  from  Daniel  Bates  of 
Gloucester  county,  an  English  servant  man,  named 
George  M’Cartney,  about  19  years  of  age,  a short 
fellow,  pretty  well  set,  of  a yellow  complexion,  a little 
pitted  with  small  pox ; Had  on  when  he  went  away, 
an  old  felt  hat,  with  a piece  sewed  on  part  of  the  brim 
of  it,  a ragged  linnen  cap,  a blue  jacket,  without  lin- 
ing, with  soal-leather  buttons  on  it,  coarse,  dirty  oz- 
enbrigs  trowsers,  a check  shirt,  and  an  old  pair  of 
women’s  shoes,  with  the  heels  out,  and  pieces  of 
leather  put  in  the  room  of  them.  Whoever  takes  up 
and  secures  said  servant,  so  that  his  master  may  have 
him  again,  shall  have  Forty  Shillings  reward,  and 
reasonable  charges,  paid  by 


Daniel  Bates. 


84  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [ I 75  I 

N.  B.  All  masters  of  vessels  are  forbid  to  carry  him 
off  at  their  peril. — Penn.  Gazette , July  4,  1751.  No. 
1177. 

Broke  out  of  Somerset  goal,  on  Wednesday  night 
the  26th  of  June  last,  John  Websley,  a criminal  of 
middle  stature,  somewhat  round  shoulder’d  ; Had  on 
when  he  went  away,  a light  colour’d  fustian  coat, 
blue  camblet  jacket,  a fine  ruffled  shirt,  leather 
breeches,  a pair  of  striped  trowsers,  grey  worsted 
stockings,  a pair  of  pumps,  with  large  carved  buckles, 
a ruffled  cap  or  brown  rig,  and  a beaver  hat.  Also 
a servant  boy,  named  George  Adams,  about  19  years 
of  age  : Had  on  when  he  went  away,  an  old  beaver 
hat  sewed  with  white  thread,  old  tow  shirt,  very  much 
patched,  new  ozenbrigs  trowsers,  brown  yarn  leggins, 
and  a women’s  short  gown,  cuffed  with  check  linnen, 
instead  of  a jacket.  Whoever  takes  up  and  secures 
the  said  Websley,  shall  have  Five  Pounds  reward, 
and  reasonable  charges,  and  Fifteen  Shilling's  for  the 
said  Adams,  paid  by 

Francis  Hollinshead,  Sheriff. 

— Penn.  Gazette , July  4,  1751.  No.  11 77. 

Philadelphia,  July  18,  1751. 

Taken  out  of  the  pasture  of  John  Vancleave,  of 
Maidenhead,  in  the  Jerseys,  the  fifth  day  of  this  inst., 
a black  gelding,  six  years  old,  paces  a good  travel, 
and  trots  well,  about  fourteen  hands  and  a half  high, 
neither  mark’d  nor  brand’d  ; his  mane  hangs  on  the 
right  side,  and  a large  feather  along  the  left-side  of 
his  neck.  Whoever  takes  up  and  secures  said  horse 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


75 1 j 


$5 


and  thief,  shall  have  Ten  Pounds  reward,  or  Five 
Pounds  for  each,  paid  by  me 

John  Vancleave. 

— Penn.  Gazette , July  18,  1751.  No.  1179. 


Run  away  on  the  12th  inst.,  from  William  Oakford, 
at  the  head  of  Alloway’s  Creek,  Salem  county,  a 
servant  man,  named  Joseph  Steell,  of  a middle  stat- 
ure, short  black  curl’d  hair,  about  28  years  of  age  : 
Had  on  when  he  went  away,  a blue  coat,  with  metal 
buttons,  new  ozenbrigs  shirt,  short  trowsers,  yarn 
stockings,  Calf-skin  shoes,  had  two  hats,  one  castor, 
the  other  felt,  a leather  jacket,  leather  breeches,  and 
sundry  other  clothes.  He  took  with  him  a Negro’e 
boy  named  Caesar : Had  on  when  he  went  away,  a 
new  lead  colour’d  thick  cloth  coat  and  vest,  leather 
breeches,  short  trowsers,  thread  stockings  and  half- 
worn  shoes  ; he  had  also  two  felt  hats,  and  two  shirts, 
one  white  the  other  brown.  The  said  servants  took 
with  them  a bay  horse,  has  got  the  pole-evil,  and 
paces  well  ; a rifle  barrel  gun,  and  a large  yellow  dog, 
with  a white  ring  round  his  neck.  Whoever  takes 
up  and  secures  said  servants,  so  that  their  master 
may  have  them  again,  shall  have  Forty  Shillings  re- 
ward for  each,  and  reasonable  charges,  paid  by 

William  Oakford. 

N.  B.  The  said  Steell  has  serv’d  a time  in  Bucks 
county,  about  17  miles  from  Philadelphia,  on  Bristol 
road  ; and  the  Negroe  boy  was  bought  out  of  Phila- 
delphia, about  two  years  since. — Penn.  Gazette , July 
18,1751.  No.  1179. 


86  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [ I 75  I 

Philadelphia,  July  25,  1751. 

STray’d  or  stolen,  out  of  a pasture  in  Trenton,  the 
fifteenth  day  of  this  instant,  July,  a brown  gelding, 
much  sweated,  his  colour  much  chang’d,  about  five 
years  old,  near  14  hands  and  a half  high,  a small  star 
in  his  forehead,  one  white  foot  behind,  a small  switch 
tail,  his  tail  and  mane  very  black,  his  hip  bones  sharp, 
shod  before,  paces  a good  travel,  trots  and  gallops, 
and  carries  himself  well.  Whoever  takes  up  and 
secures  the  said  horse  and  thief,  so  that  the  thief  may 
be  brought  to  justice,  and  the  owner  have  his  horse 
again,  shall  have  Five  Pounds  reward,  and  for  the 
horse  only  Thirty  Shillings,  and  reasonable  charges, 
paid  by 

John  Allen  or  William  Pidgeon. 

— Penn.  Gazette , July  25,  1751.  No.  1180. 

Trenton  Lottery  Tickets  sold  by  David  Hall,  at 
the  Post  Office. — Penn.  Gazette , July  25,  1751.  No. 
1180. 

NOtice  is  hereby  given  to  all  persons  that  intend  to 
convey  themselves,  goods,  wares  or  merchandize,  from 
Philadelphia  to  New  York,  or  from  New  York  to  Phila- 
delphia : That  there  will  be  a stage-boat,  well  fitted,  and 
kept  by  Patrick  Cowan,  living  in  Burlington,  that  will 
attend  every  Tuesday  in  every  week,  at  the  Crooked 
Billet  Wharff,  in  Philadelphia,  for  the  same  business, 
and  will  proceed  the  same  day,  up  to  Burlington, 
wind  and  weather  permitting.  And  on  Wednesday 
morning  a stage  waggon,  with  a good  awning,  kept 
by  Fretwell  Wright,  at  the  Blue  Anchor,  in  Burlington, 
and  John  Predmore,  at  Cranberry,  and  James  Wilson, 


I75l]  NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS.  87 

at  Amboy  Ferry  ; will  proceed  to  Obadiah  Ayers’s, 
Inn-keeper  at  Amboy  Ferry  ; where  good  entertain- 
ment for  man  and  horse  is,  and  will  be  kept.  And 
on  Thursday,  a stage  passage-boat,  with  a fine  com- 
modious cabbin,  fitted  with  a tea-table,  and  sundry 
other  conveniences,  kept  by  Matthias  Ifelstine,  will 
be  ready  to  receive  the  passengers  or  goods,  and  pro- 
ceed directly  to  New  York,  and  give  her  attendance 
at  Whitehall  Battery.  If  Passengers  are  ready  at  the 
places  on  stage  days,  ’tis  believ’d  they  will  go  sooner 
from  Philadelphia  to  New  York,  by  24  or  30  hours, 
than  by  any  other  way  that  has  been  made  use  of  by 
stage,  the  boat  from  Philadelphia  to  Burlington  sel- 
dom being  above  four  hours  on  her  passage,  and 
often  but  two  or  three  hours.  All  persons  on  or 
near  the  road,  that  have  business,  may  have  it  done 
with  due  care  and  attendance.  The  price  of  passen- 
gers or  goods,  that  shall  come  to  Burlington,  will  be 
no  more  per  mile  than  from  Bordentown.  On  Sun- 
days or  Mondays  in  any  week,  passengers  trading 
up  and  down  the  river,  or  any  other  manner,  whose 
waggon  hire  shall  amount  to  Sixteen  Shillings,  or 
upwards,  shall,  upon  the  first  notice,  have  a waggon, 
and  be  transported  to  the  stage-boat,  which  will  be 
ready  to  receive  them  at  the  landing,  and  is  the  most 
handy  and  convenient,  of  any  thereabouts,  there  being 
a good  wharf!  to  step  into  the  boat.  The  boat,  for 
the  first  time,  will  begin  to  attend  at  the  Crooked 
Billet  on  Tuesday,  the  13th  day  of  August,  1751,  and 
the  waggon  will  proceed  the  day  following.  Further, 
if  the  ice,  or  any  thing  else,  should  at  any  time  pre- 
vent the  passage-boat  from  going  from  Burlington 


88  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [175I 

to  Philadelphia,  the  stage-waggon  will,  if  requir’d 
proceed  from  Burlington  to  Cooper’s  Ferry. 

Fretwell  Wright,  John  Predmore,  James  Wilson 

Patrick  Cowan. 

— Penn.  Gazette , July  25,  1751.  No.  1180. 

Run  away  from  Elijah  Bond,  a Negroeman,  nam’d 
Lot,  about  five  feet  eight  inches  high,  about  24  years 
old,  speaks  very  good  English,  and  has  a down  look  : 
Had  on  when  he  went  away,  an  old  red  great  coat, 
old  shirt,  and  a pair  of  breeches.  Whoever  takes  up 
and  secures  said  Negroe  fellow,  so  that  his  master 
may  have  him  again,  shall  have  Three  Pounds  reward, 
and  reasonable  charges,  paid  by 

Elijah  Bond,  living  near  Trenton. 

N.  B.  All  masters  of  vessels,  and  others,  are  for- 
bid to  carry  him  off  at  their  peril. — Penn . Gazette , 
Aug.  1,  1751.  No.  1 1 8 1 . 

To  be  sold  by  vendue,  on  the  19th  inst.  a lot  of 
ground  with  four  dwelling-houses  thereon  erected, 
situate  in  the  city  of  Burlington,  and  being  the  estate 
of  James  Venee  deceased,  extending  in  breadth  on 
the  river  Delaware  557  feet,  and  in  length  or  depth 
640  feet,  bounded  southward  by  Pearl-street,  and 
eastward  by  Grubb-street.  One  of  the  messuages  is 
of  brick,  the  other  three  of  wood,  all  having  good 
cellars,  wall’d  with  stone.  The  said  premises  is  well 
accommodated  with  a good  orchard  of  choice  grafted 
trees,  and  gardens,  well  paled  in  with  cedar  posts, 
and  boards  in  the  front.  The  whole  premises  is  in 
good  repair,  and  very  convenient  for  a ship  wright 
part  thereof  having  been  long  made  use  of  in  that 


•75'] 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


89 


business.  There  is  also  to  be  sold,  at  the  same  time 
and  place,  a good  sett  of  joiners  and  carpenter’s 
tools,  and  household  goods.  Any  person  inclining 
to  purchase  the  whole,  or  any  part  of  the  premises, 
may  be  informed  of  the  title  and  terms  of  sale  by 
Rachel  Venee  or  James  Venee  on  the  place  proposed 
for  sale,  executors  of  James  Venee,  deceased,  or  of 
Moses  Thomas,  in  the  city  of  Philadelphia,  where  a 
plan  of  the  whole  may  be  seen. 

All  persons  that  have  demands  on  said  estate  are 
desir’d  to  bring  in  their  accounts,  that  they  may  be 
adjusted  : And  those  that  are  indebted  to  said  estate, 
are  desir’d  to  discharge  the  same. — Penn.  Gazette, . 
Aug.  1 , 1751.  No.  1 1 8 1 . 

Tms  is  to  give  publick  notice,  that  there  is  now  in 
the  common  goal  of  Perth- Amboy,  in  New  Jersey,  a 
young  man,  who  was  taken  up  some  days  ago  on 
suspicion  of  being  a run  away  servant ; he  acknowl- 
edges himself  to  be  an  Irishman,  about  21  years  of 
age,  and  that  his  name  is  Michael  Foely  ; and  that  he 
serv’d  part  of  his  time  with  one  Daniel  Britt,  at  St. 
George’s,  Newcastle  county,  and  then  his  uncle 
bought  his  time,  and  set  him  free.  He  is  of  middle 
stature,  thin  visage,  fair  complexion,  blue  eyes,  short 
brown  hair,  has  on  a brown  homespun  coat,  light 
colour’d  homespun  vest,  with  brass  buttons,  linnen 
breeches  and  trowsers,  an  old  felt  hat.  If  any  per- 
son lays  claim  to  the  said  man,  he  is  desir’d  to  do  it 
soon,  by  applying  to  William  Deare,  Esq  ; at  Perth- 
Amboy,  High-Sheriff  of  Middlesex  county,  New-Jer- 
sey.  Also  any  person  that  can  certify  that  the  said 
man  is  a free  man,  will  do  well  to  send  a proper  cer- 


go  NEW  JERSEY  COLONiAL  DOCUMENTS.  [_ 17$  I 

tificate  to  certify  the  same. — Penn.  Gazette , Aug.  i, 
1751.  No.  1 1 8 1 . 

New-  York. 

Tuesday  last  Majesty’s  Ship  Greyhound,  Capt. 
Robert  Roddam  Commander,  fell  down  to  Sandy 
Hook,  in  order  to  return  to  Great  Britain. — Penna. 
Journal , Aug.  1,  1751.  No.  454. 

New-York,  August  5.  Tuesday  last  one  James 
Bill , alias  Bradford \ a Narraganset  Man,  was  appre- 
hended near  Second  River  in  New-  Jersey , and  com- 
mitted to  our  Jail,  as  one  of  those  concerned  with 
Jonathan  Woodman , mentioned  in  our  last,  in  coun- 
terfeiting the  Twenty  Shillings  Bills  of  Credit  of  this 
Province : The  other  called  Dr.  Dunstan , is  not  yet 
taken.  ’Tis  said,  this  Bill  had  been  taken  up  and 
committed  to  Jail  at  Hackinsack  a few  years  ago,  for 
uttering  Counterfeit  Jersey  Bills,  from  whence  he 
made  his  Escape ; but  tis  hoped  he  will  now  meet 
with  the  Reward  of  his  Ingenuity.  Their  Trials  we 
hear,  are  put  off  till  next  Term. — The  N.  Y.  Gazette 
Revived  in  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , Aug.  5,  1751. 

Run  away  from  the  subscriber,  in  Amwell,  Hunter- 
terdon  county  on  the  3rd  of  last  month,  a servant 
man,  named  Peter  Clearwater,  this  country  born  : 
Had  on  when  he  went  away,  a new  brownish  col- 
our’d homespun  coat,  ozenbrigs  trowsers,  a fine  lin- 
nen  shirt,  a pair  of  calf-skin  pumps,  a broad  brimmed 
beaver  hat,  he  is  about  6 feet  high,  about  34  years  of 
age,  thin  faced,  light  colour’d  thin  hair,  blue  eyes, 
down  look,  and  has  an  impediment  in  his  speech,  if 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


91 


1750 

surpriz’d  Whoever  takes  and  secures  the  said  serv- 
ant, so  as  his  master  may  have  him  again,  shall  have 
Three  Pounds  reward,  and  charges,  paid  by 

Ephraim  Oliphant. 

—Penn.  Gazette,  Aug.  8,  1751.  No.  1182. 

New  York , August  12.  We  hear  from  Elizabeth - 
Town , that  two  women  have  been  kill’d  within  these 
few  Weeks  past,  near  that  Place,  by  falling  out  of  rid- 
ing Chairs. 

Tuesday’Evening  last  Thomas  Clark,  a Boatman 
from  the  Jerseys , returning  from  this  City,  lost  his 
Hat  in  the  Bay,  and  in  attempting  to  recover  it,  fell 
overboard  and  was  drowned — The  N.  Y.  Gazette 
Revived  in  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , Aug.  12,  1751. 

On  Wednesday  the  7th  Instant,  came  to  the  House 
of  Jacobus  Van  Duyn,  of  Somerset  County  in  New- 
Jersey,  and  are  now  with  William  Ouke,  of  New- 
Brunswick:  Two  Negro  Boys,  supposed  to  be  lately 
imported : Whoever  hath  a just  Claim  to  the  said 
Negroes,  on  applying  to  the  said  William  Ouke,  pay- 
ing the  Charges,  may  have  them  again. — The  N.  Y. 
Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly  Post  Boy,  Aug.  12, 
1751- 

Run  away,  on  Thursday  the  8th  Instant,  from 
Samuel  Slone,  Brewer,  of  Millstone,  in  the  County  of 
Somerset,  and  Province  of  East-New-Jersey,  an  Irish 
Servant  Man  named  Daniel  Miller,  about  36  years  of 
Age,  round  fac’d,  of  a brown  Complexion,  and  black 
Hair : Had  on  when  he  went  away,  a brown  Jacket, 
Check  Trowsers,  Shoes  and  Stockings,  an  old  Castor 
Hat,  and  white  Linnen  Shirt ; he  has  stolen  from  his 


92  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [175 1 

said  Master,  a dark  grey  Coat,  a Silk  Jacket  of  an 
orange  and  purple  Colour,  with  the  back  Parts  of 
light  colour’d  Fustian,  a scarlet  Waistcoat,  two  gray 
Wigs,  and  several  other  Things,  and  ’tis  thought  may 
change  his  Cloaths.  He  was  a Soldier  upon  the  late 
Expedition  against  Canada.  Whoever  takes  up  and 
secures  said  Servant,  so  that  his  Master  may  have 
him  again,  shall  have  Three  Pounds  Reward,  and  all 
reasonable  Charges  paid  by 

Samuel  Slone. 

— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly 
Post  Boy , Aug.  12,  1751. 

To  be  sold  by  the  Subscriber,  in  Burlington,  a 
Plantation  situate  about  a Quarter  of  a Mile  below 
the  Town,  and  fronting  the  River  Delaware  near 
three  Quarters  of  a Mile,  and  runs  a Mile  and  a 
Quarter  back,  containing  208  Acres,  upwards  of  40 
Acres  of  good  Meadow  and  mowing  Ground,  and 
more  may  be  made  ; near  six  Acres  of  Orchard,  a 
good  Brick  House,  50  Feet  Front,  two  Stories  high, 
finished  in  the  best  Manner,  a large  Kitchen,  Wash- 
House,  all  two  Stories  high,  good  Cellars  and  Vaults, 
a fine  Piazza,  back  Store-Room,  Dairy-House,  Coach- 
. House,  Chaise-House,  a fine  Stable,  a large  Barn, 
Barracks,  Hovels,  a well  in  the  Cow-yard,  2 large 
Gardens  containing  2 Acres,  one  walled  in  with 
Brick,  the  other  fenced  in  with  Cedar  7 Feet  high  : 
This  Place,  with  the  Conveniences,  and  about  one 
Third  of  the  Land,  now  Rents  to  the  present  Gov- 
ernor Belcher,  for  100  1.  per  Annum,  and  it  may  suit 
a Gentleman  of  the  highest  Taste.  Some  Distance 
from  the  House,  on  the  other  Side  of  the  Creek  ad- 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


93 


1751] 

joining-,  a small  Stone  House,  with  a Cellar,  and  Fire- 
Place  above  and  below,  a Peach-Orchard,  with  500 
Trees  of  the  best  Collection  of  that  Fruit.  Also,  a 
Tract  of  Cedar-Swamp,  near  300  Acres,  lying  in 
Gloucester  County,  within  10  miles  of  Timber-Creek 
Landing,  where  a six-board  Flat  may  come.  Also, 
upwards  of  20  Acres  of  Wood-Land  within  a Mile  of 
Burlington.  Also,  in  Bucks  County,  a stone  Quarry, 
with  about  Half  an  Acre  of  Land,  and  a small  Stone- 
House.  Any  Person  inclining  to  purchase  any  of  the 
above  mentioned  Premises,  may  apply  to  Joseph  Old- 
man, or  Isaac  Conarow,  in  Burlington.  N.  B. 

Any  Gentleman  that  purchases  the  House,  &c.  may 
have  Possession  of  it  the  first  of  November  next,  the 
Governor  intending  to  leave  it  the  last  Week  in  Oc- 
tober next. — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly 
Post  Boy , Aug.  12,  1751. 

New-York,  August  12.  The  Brig  Young  Daniel, 
Capt.  Evertson  bound  for  Amsterdam,  sailed  from 
Sandy-Hook  last  Wednesday,  but  having  got  about 
50  Leagues  at  Sea  sprung  a Leak,  so  that  all  Hands 
had  hard  Work  to  keep  her  above  Water;  which 
obliged  them  to  put  back  again,  and  happily  got  safe 
in  last  Night. — Penna.  Journal , Aug . 15,  1751.  No. 
456. 

New-York , August  26.  We  hear  from  Shrews- 
bury, that  last  Tuesday  in  the  Afternoon,  the  House 
of  Joseph  Price  in  that  Town,  was  struck  with  Light- 
ning, accompanied  by  a violent  Clap  of  Thunder, 
which  went  thro’  and  shatter’d  the  House  pretty 
much,  knock’d  down  three  of  his  People,  and  kill’d 


94 


NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1751 

two  Horses  that  stood  at  the  Door. — The  N.  Y. 
Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly  Post , Aug.  26,  1751. 

Trenton  Lottery  Tickets  to  be  sold  by  the  Printer 
hereof,  at  Fifteen  Shillings,  Proclamation,  each. — The 
N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly  Rost  Boy , Aug. 
1 9>  ' 7 5 1 • 

Philadelphia 

Last  week  came  to  Town  five  Indians  from  the  back 
Parts,  having  done  their  Business,  and  being  on  their 
return  home  yesterday,  at  Germantown  they  met  an 
old  Indian  from  the  Jerseys,  and  after  drinking  to- 
gether they  quarrelled  and  shot  the  old  Man,  on 
which  the  others  were  secured  and  brought  to  Town 
last  Night. — Penna.  Journal , Aug.  22,  1751.  No. 
457- 

Custom  House,  Philadelphia,  Entered  In.  Sloop 
Dolphin,  James  Savage  from  Salem. — Penna.  Journal , 
Aug.  22,  1751.  No.  457. 

To  be  Sold  by  the  Subscriber,  living  in  Philadel- 
phia, the  following  Tracts  of  Land,  in  West-New-Jer- 
sey,  viz.  Twenty  Lots  in  the  County  of  Morris  near 
the  little  Pond,  Two  Hundred  Acres  in  each  Lot ; 
they  are  finely  timber’d  and  water’d,  and  a large 
Quantity  of  natural  Meadow  belonging  to  each  Lot  ; 
the  Soil  is  rich  and  capable  of  producing  great  Crops 
of  Wheat,  situated  in  a beautiful  Part  of  the  Country, 
and  in  the  Neighbourhood  of  Wealthy  Farmers,  sev- 
eral of  whom  are  Dutch,  the  great  Road  to  Bruns- 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


95 


i75i] 

wick  Runs  through  the  Body  of  said  Lots,  to  which 
Place  they  are  about  Thirty  Miles  distant ; and  from 
whence  there  is  a direct  Navigation  to  New-York. 

Five  Plantations  of  two  Hundred  Acres  each,  in 
the  County  of  Hunterdon,  on  the  North  Branch  of 
Rarington  River  (commonly  call’d  Lamoertonk)  ad- 
joining to  Land  of  James  Logan,  Esq ; each  Planta- 
tion being  bounded  on  the  River  ; said  Land  is  well 
timber’d  and  in  a fine  Wheat  Country  ; within  two 
Miles  of  a Presbyterian  Meeting  House,  and  one 
from  a Dutch  Church ; there  are  several  Grist-Mills 
round  it,  and  one  on  the  Tract ; which  is  a new  one 
and  in  good  order,  distant  but  Twenty  Miles  from 
Brunswick. 

Four  Plantations  at  Tohocanetkong  in  the  County 
of  Morris,  of  two  Hundred  Acres  each ; they  are 
well  wooded  and  water’d  and  in  a very  growing  Part 
of  the  County.  Exact  Plans  of  the  above  Tracts 
may  be  seen  by  those  who  are  inclinable  to  purchase, 
and  Conditions  of  Sale  known,  at 

John  Bayntons. 

N.  B.  The  Titles  to  the  above  Lands,  are  indis- 
putable.  Penn.  Journal \ Aug.  29,  1751.  No.  458. 

Philadelphia,  August  29-1751 
Whereas  on  the  18th  instant,  one  John  Connor, 
about  30  years  of  age,  a short,  chunkey,  well  set  fel- 
low, of  a red  complexion,  wears  a wig,  blue  coat,  and 
brown  double  breasted  jacket,  stole  from  Andrew 
Hays,  of  Alloway’s-creek,  Salem  county  the  sum  of 
Five  Pounds,  eight  Shillings.  Whoever  takes  up 


9 6 NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [175 1 

and  secures  said  Connor,  so  as  he  is  brought  to 
Justice,  shall  have  Three  Pounds  reward,  paid  by 

Andrew  Hays. 

— Penn.  Gazette , Aug.  29,  1751.  No.  1185. 

To  be  sold  by  John  Rockhill,  living  at  Dr.  Cad- 
walader’s,  in  Philadelphia,  A tract  of  land,  contain  - 
ing  539  acres,  lying  in  Morris  County,  West-Jersey, 
near  Oxford  furnace,  it  is  exceedingly  well  watered 
and  timbered  ; there  are  several  very  fine  swamps  in 
the  same,  which  will  make  extraordinary  good 
meadow,  it  lies  in  form  of  a long  square,  which  may 
be  conveniently  divided  into  two  plantations  ; it  will 
either  be  disposed  of  all  together,  or  divided  into  two 
equal  parts.  Any  person  who  has  a mind  to  pur- 
chase the  same,  may  know  the  terms,  by  applying  to 
Maurice  Roberson,  at  Oxford  furnace,  Joseph  Clay- 
ton, at  Trenton,  or  John  Rockhill,  at  Philadelphia. — 
Penn.  Gazette , Aug.  29,  i75r.  No.  1185. 

Run  away  from  the  Subscriber  in  Monmouth 
County,  in  New  Jersey,  a Servant  Man  named  Neil 
M”Fall,  aged  about  40  Years,  of  a short  Stature, 
round  Shoulders,  and  has  a large  Nose;  a Taylor  by 
Trade  ; had  on  when  he  went  away,  a light  colour’d 
Frize  Coat,  a light  colour’d  Broad-cloth  Jacket,  blue 
Camblet  Breeches,  and  a short  brown  Wig.  Who- 
ever takes  up  and  secures  the  said  Servant,  so  that 
his  Master  may  have  him  again,  shall  have  Three 
Pounds  Reward,  and  all  reasonable  Charges,  paid 
by  me, 

William  M”concky. 

— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly  Post 
Boy , Sept.  2,  1751. 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


97 


1751] 

To  be  sold  in  the  City  of  Perth-Amboy,  a very 
good  Bake  House,  and  Dwelling-House,  two  Stories 
and  an  half  high,  has  three  Fire-Places  one  above 
another,  a very  good  large  Kitchen  and  a Cellar,  with  a 
Well  at  the  Door  of  the  House  ; as  also  Out-Houses, 
well-accustomed  for  a Baker,  with  good  Convenien- 
ces for  Bolting  and  Packing.  Likewise  a very  good 
Garden. — Whoever  inclines  to  purchase  the  above- 
mentioned  Premisses  may  apply  to  Thomas  Skin- 
ner, Baker,  thereon. — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived 
in  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , Sept.  2.  1751. 

TO  be  sold  at  publick  Vendue,  on  Tuesday  the 
first  Day  of  October  next,  two  good  Dwelling- 
Houses,  with  the  Land  tnereunto  belonging,  in  Pis- 
cattaway  in  East-New-Jersey  : One  is  a good  large 
Stone-House,  formerly  belonging  to  Benjamin  Hull, 
and  lately  to  Israel  Folsom,  situate  two  Miles  and  a 
half  from  New-Brunswick,  on  the  High-Road  to 
Woodbridge,  the  other  is  adjoining,  and  lately  be- 
longed to  Phineas  Potter,  and  has  been  a noted 
Tavern  for  several  Years  ; there  are  good  Orchards 
adjoining  to  both  Places,  with  about  20  Acres  of 
good  Land:  Also  about  100  Acres  of  Land,  one 
Mile  back,  of  which  20  Acres  is  cleared,  and  the  rest 
all  Wood-Land:  The  Houses  are  within  three 
Quarters  of  a Mile  of  a Landing,  and  both  or  either 
very  convenient  for  a Merchant,  Tavern,  or  Trades- 
man, and  will  be  sold  all  together  or  separate,  as 
rr  j be  agreed  on,  at  the  Day  of  Sale.  Any  Per- 
son inclining  to  purchase  before  the  Time  of  Sale, 

may  apply  to  Timothy  Conner,  now  living  on  the 
7 


NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [ 1 75  I 


Premisses,  and  know  the  Tide  and  Conditions  of 
Sale. — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly  Post 
Boy , Sept.  2,  1751. 

Philadelphia, 

We  hear  that  the  General  Assembly,  of  the  Pro- 
vince of  New -Jersey,  are  to  meet  at  Burlington , on 
Tuesday  the  10th  of  this  Instant,  for  the  Dispatch  of 
Business. — Penn.  Journal,  Sept.  5,  1751.  No.  459. 

Custom-House , Philadelphia , Entered  In.  Sloop 
Dolphin,  James  Savage  to  Salem. — Penn.  Journal, 
Sept.  12,  1751.  No.  460. 

Custom-House , New-York.  Inward  Entries.  Brie 

7 o 

Elizabeth  and  Anne,  Morley  Harrison  from  N.  Jer- 
sey.— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly  Post 
Boy,  Sept.  16,  1751. 

Custom-House,  Philadelphia,  Entered  In.  Schoon- 
er Two  Brothers,  Pvichard  Stevens  from  Salem. — 
Penna.  Journal,  Sept.  19,  1751. 

Philadelphia,  September  19. 

We  hear  that  the  latter  End  of  last  month,  died  at 
Amwell,  in  the  Jerseys,  George  Hatton,  in  the  103d 
Year  of  his  Age  ; he  was  born  at  Nansemond,  in  Vir- 
ginia, and  retained  his  Sight  and  Senses  to  the  Time 
of  his  Death.  He  walked  on  Foot  to  visit  a Neigh- 
bour at  a considerable  Distance  but  a few  Days 
before  he  died.  He  said  that  he  was  a Man  in  Bacon’s 
Wars  and  a Soldier  under  him.— Penn.  Gazette , Sept. 
19,  1751.  No.  1 188, 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


99 


1751] 

Bartholomew  Rowley  (at  his  School,  in  Burlington) 
professes  to  teach  the  Latin  and  English  Grammar, 
Albany’s  Syntax  and  Prosodia,  School  Authors, 
Rhetorick,  Gordon’s  Geographical  Grammar,  Arith- 
metic, &c. 

N.  B.  That  universal  Comprehension  of  Natural 
and  Civil  Story,  i.  e.  Cosmography,  may  be  read  in 
said  school  .—Penn.  Gazette , Sept.  19,  1751.  No. 
1188. 

To  be  sold  by  the  way  of  vendue,  on  the  24th  of 
October  next,  being  the  fifth  day  of  the  week,  at  2 
o’clock  in  the  afternoon,  at  Joseph  Woods  at  the  sign 
of  the  Seven  Stars,  in  Pilesgroove,  Salem  county, 
near  Oldman’s  creek.  Two  tracts  of  land,  one  tract 
containing  near  300  acres,  with  a large  quantity  of 
meadow  ground  ; the  other  containing  near  1 40  acres  ; 
both  said  tracts  ate  fronting  on  Oldman’s  creek,  and 
near  a navigable  landing;  which  said  land  did  belong 
to  Mahlon  Stacy,  Esq.  deceased. 

Joshua  Bispham. 

— Penn. Gazette , Sept.  19,  1751.  No.  1188. 

Whereas  one  Pelegf  Willbour,  born  in  New-Ene- 
land,  and  was  a Wheel-wright  by  Trade,  died  lately 
at  Amboy  : This  is  to  inform  his  Heirs  or  Relations, 
that  on  their  applying  to  Mr.  Thomas  Fox,  Post- 
Master,  in  Amboy,  and  proving  their  Right,  they  may 
receive  the  Effects  left  by  him ; which  is  something 
considerable. — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the 
Weekly  Post  Boy , Sept.  23,  1751. 

TO  be  sold  at  publick  Vendue,  on  Wednesday  the 
6th  of  November  next,  on  the  Premises,  a small 


100  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [_  17S1 

Plantation  in  Elizabeth-Towrj,  two  Miles  from  Eng- 
lish Church,  and  on  the  Post  Road  to  Philadephia, 
containing  Twenty-six  Acres  of  Land,  about  seven  or 
Eight  of  which  are  Meadow,  and  Ten  good  Wood- 
Land,  with  a good  Stream  running  by  the  Door,  very 
convenient  for  a Tan- Yard  ; there  is  on  said  Planta- 
tion, a good  Dwelling-House,  with  four  Rooms  and 
three  Fire-Places,  a Stable,  an  orchard  of  200  good 
bearing  Apple-Trees,  and  a Peach  Orchard.  The 
title  indisputable.  There  is  to  be  sold  at  the  same 
Time  and  Place,  Cows,  Horses,  Hay,  and  sundry 
Kinds  of  Household  Furniture.  Any  Person  inclin- 
ing to  purchase  before  the  Day  of  Sale,  may  apply  to 
Jonathan  Higgins,  at  John  Ellis’s  in  New-York,  or  at 
the  said  Plantation.  Said  Higgins,  who  keeps  a 
Timber-Yard  at  Ellis’s  Slip,  is  willing  to  supply  any 
Gentlemen,  or  others,  with  all  the  kinds  of  Timber, 
Boards  or  Plank,  Sash  Windows,  with  Sashes  and 
Shutters  to  them,  ready  made,  and  at  the  cheapest 
Rates  ; he  also  makes  Hatter’s  Blocks  in  the  best 
Manner,  likewise  all  sorts  of  Shop  Joyner’s  Ware,  ' 
and  will  take  Timber,  or  merchantable  Produce,  in 
all  Payments. — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the 
Weekly  Post  Boy , Sept.  23,  1751. 


On  Friday,  the  first  day  of  November  next,  at 
Trenton,  will  be  sold  by  public  vendue,  to  the 
highest  bidder,  the  plantation  of  Barefoot  Brunson 
deceased,  containing  about  300  acres,  situate,  on 
Millstone  River  Bridge,  on  the  Brunswick  road, 
together  with  about  150  acres  of  land  near  the  same, 
in  Middlesex  county,  about  a mile  from  Kingston. 
Dated  this  24th  of  September,  1751.  Mary  Brun- 


175  I j NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS.  1 01 

son,  Thomas  Lawrence,  Executors. — Penn.  Gazette , 
Sept.  26,  1751.  No.  1189. 

September  23d,  1751. 

Run-away  last  Night  from  Nathan  Watson  of 
Mount  Holley  in  Burlington  County,  West-Jersey, 
an  Irish  Servant  Man,  Named  Christopher  Cooney, 
of  short  Stature,  pale  Complexion,  short  brown  Hair, 
has  a scarr  on  his  lefc  Cheek,  near  his  Nose,  has  lost 
one  of  his  under  fore  Teeth,  has  had  his  Right  Leg 
broke,  and  walks  with  his  Toes  turning  outwards  ; 
had  on  when  he  went  away,  a new  Caster  Hat,  a 
new  red  Ozenbrigs  Shirt  and  Drawers,  yarn  Stock- 
ings and  Neats  Leather-Shoes  : He  took  with  him, 

a small  Roan  pacing  Horse,  with  a trimmed  Main, 
and  shod  before,  an  old  hunting  Saddle  with  blue 
Cloth  Housens.  Whoever  takes  up  said  Servant 
and  Secures  him  so  that  his  Master  may  have  him 
again,  shall  have  three  pounds  Reward  and  reason- 
able Charges  paid  by  Nathan  Watson. — Penn . 
Journal , Sept.  26,  1751.  No.  462. 

New- York,  September  30.  By  several  private  Let- 
ters from  London  came  in  Capt.  Troup,  we  have 
Advice,  that  the  Honourable  Robert  Hunter  Mor- 
ris, Esq.;  Chief  Justice  of  the  Province  of  New-Jersey, 
is  appointed  Lieutenant  Governor  of  this  Province. — 
The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , 
Sept.  30,  1751. 

These  are  to  give  Notice  to  all  Persons  whatso- 
ever, that  have  dealt  and  traded  with  Robert  Savage, 
and  Duncan  Robertson,  at  Middletown  Point,  in 
Monmouth  County,  in  Company  with  Mr.  Tunis 


102  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [ 1 75  I 

Denis  of  Freehold,  that  the  Time  of  their  Continua- 
tion in  joint  Partnership,  is  expired  the  Twenty  third 
of  last  August ; and  that  all  the  Goods  or  Produce 
that  either  of  them  buy  for  the  future,  shall  be  at 
each  One’s  particular  Risque  and  Account.  There- 
fore, all  Persons  indebted  to  said  Company,  are 
desired  forthwith  to  come  and  discharge  their  several 
Debts,  or  at  least  to  settle  them,  and  give  Security, 
if  required,  in  order  to  enable  said  Partners  to  pay 
their  own  Debts,  and  adjust  then  with  their  Credit- 
ors, otherwise  they  that  don’t  come  within  a Month’s 
Space  after  this  Notice,  may  expect  the  Consequence 
attending  Debtors  refusing  Payment,  or  giving  Se- 
curity. 

Tunis  Denis,  Robert  Savage,  Duncan  Robertson. 

— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly  Post 
Boy , Sept.  30,  1757. 

Run  away  from  on  board  the  Ship  Lydia,  Peter 
Reeve,  Commander,  on  the  13th  of  October,  two 
Servant  Men,  one  named  Alexander  Johnston,  a 
Taylor  by  Trade,  but  has  been  in  the  Navy  all  the 
War  aged  36  Years,  about  5 feet  3 Inches  high,  a 
thick  fat  well  set  fellow,  much  pock  broken,  with  a 
hard  look,  wears  a blue  Jacket,  and  sometimes  a 
striped  Waistcoat,  a brown  Wig,  an  old  felt  Hat.  and 
sometimes  a blue  Cap  with  white  stripes,  and  said  he 
was  married  at  Newark  in  East  Jersey.  The  other 
named  Joseph  Wilcocks,  a Sailmaker  by  Trade,  aged 
about  34  Years &c  & c.  &c 

Whoever  takes  up  and  secures  said  servants  so 
that  they  may  be  had  again,  shall  have  Forty  Shill- 
lings  for  each,  and  reasonable  Charges  paid  by  James 


I75l]  NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS.  IO3 

Pemberton  or  Peter  Reeve. — Penna.  Journal,  Oct. 
17,  1751.  No.  465. 

To  be  Sold — 

A Plantation  in  the  Jerseys,  opposite  Marcus- 
Hook,  containing  about  400  acres  of  land,  70  acres 
of  which  drain’d  meadow  ; there  is  on  said  place,  two 
good  log-dwelling-houses,  a good  barn,  stables,  and 
other  out-houses,  and  a very  good  bearing  orchard  ; 
there  is  a good  ferry,  kept  at  said  plantation,  and  it 
■is  very  convenient  for  a tavern-keeper,  having  been 
long  used  in  that  way  of  business.  Any  person  in- 
clining to  purchase,  may  apply  to  Timothy  Rain,  liv- 
ing on  the  premises,  and  be  inform’d  of  the  terms  of 
sale.  Timothy  Rain. 

— Penn.  Gazette , Oct.  24,  1751.  No.  1193. 

Trenton  Lottery  Tickets  sold  by  William  Franklin, 
in  Market-street,  between  Third  and  Fourth-streets. 
— Penn.  Gazette,  Oct.  24,  1751.  No.  1193. 

To  be  sold  by  publick  vendue,  on  Wednesday  the 
20th  of  November,  on  the  premises,  A lot  of  land, 
situate  and  lying  about  four  miles  from  Trenton,  con- 
taining one  acre,  upon  the  river  road,  with  a good 
frame  house,  twenty  by  sixteen  feet,  and  a cellar 
under  the  whole,  well  pointed,  in  the  possession  of 
Mr.  Thomas  Sutton,  and  a well  of  constant  water, 
and  a good  stable  ; with  divers  fruit  trees  planted. 
The  said  place  is  very  commodious  for  either  a shoe- 
maker, or  blacksmith,  both  being  very  much  wanted 
on  said  place.  The  said  lot  makes  a handsome 
corner  between  two  roads,  the  one  leading  to  Tren- 


104  NEW  jersey  colonial  documents.  [1751 

ton  and  the  other  to  Brunswick.  Also  to  be  sold,  a 
lot  of  land  containing  twelve  acres  and  one  rod,  about 
four  miles  from  Trenton,  joining  the  aforesaid  lot, 
which  will  be  sold  with  the  said  lot,  or  separate  (as 
best  suits  the  purchasers)  there  are  three  acres  of 
fine  meadow  on  it,  and  a fine  conveniency  for  a brick 
yard,  the  clay  being  said  to  be  the  best  in  the  town- 
ship Any  person  inclining  to  purchase  the  above 
said  premises,  may  be  farther  informed  by  applying 
to  Andrew  Reed,  in  Philadelphia,  next  door  to  the 
Jersey  Ferry,  or  Joseph  Reed  and  Moore  Furman  at 
Trenton,  and  of  said  Thomas  Sutton. 

N.  B.  The  purchasers  may  have  a reasonable  time 
for  the  payment,  giving  good  security,  with  interest : 
The  title  is  indisputable. — Penn . Gazette , Oct.  24, 

1 75 1 - N° • rl93- 

Run  away  on  the  26th  of  May  last,  from  Robert 
Savage,  of  Middletown  Point,  Monmouth  County,  A 
servant  man,  named  Ferdinande  Hughes,  by  trade  a 
taylor,  of  a low  stature,  round  visage,  fair  complex- 
ion, about  25  years  of  age,  very  forward  full  of  talk. 
He  took  with  him,  a large  bay  horse,  in  good  order. 
Had  on  when  he  went  away,  a fine  cloth  turn’d  coat, 
of  a yellowish  colour,  red  everlasting  breeches  ; and 
is  supposed  to  have  a new  cloth  suit,  pepper  and  salt 
lined  with  red,  wooden  heel’d  shoes  uncommonly 
high.  Whoever  takes  up  said  servant,  and  secures 
him,  so  as  his  master  may  have  him  again,  shall  have 
Three  Pounds  reward,  and  reasonable  charges,  paid 
by  Patrick  Hanlon,  at  Bristol,  in  Bucks  county,  or  by 
Robert  Savage. — Penn.  Gazette , Oct.  24,  i/5r.  No. 
H93- 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


105 


1750 

Run  away  from  Daniel  Cooper,  at  the  ferry,  oppo- 
site to  Philadelphia,  on  the  18th  of  September  last,  a 
Negro  man,  named  Criff ; he  belonged  near  two  years 
ago  to  Anthony  Morris,  junior,  he  is  about  30  years  of 
age,  a middling  lusty  fellow,  pitted  about  the  nose 
with  the  small-pox  : He  took  with  him  two  jackets,  of 
a black  and  white  twilled  homespun,  the  back  of  the 
upper  one  is  lined  with  tow  cloth,  a pair  of  good 
leather  breeches,  a pair  of  trowsers,  and  a pair  of 
shoes.  Whoever  secures  said  negroe,  so  that  his 
master  may  have  him  again,  if  within  five  miles  from 
home,  shall  have  Twenty  Shillings  reward,  and  if 
farther  off  Thirty  Shillings,  and  reasonable  charges, 
paid  by 

Daniel  Cooper. 

— Penn.  Gazette , Oct.  24,  1751.  No.  1193. 

Custom  House,  Philadelphia,  Entered  In.  Sloop 
Mairmaid,  Peter  Groves  from  Salem. — Penna.  Jour- 
nal, Oct.  31,  1751.  No.  467. 

Twelve  Pistoles,  Reward — 

STray’d  or  Stolen  away  on  the  27th  inst.  at  night, 
from  Isaac  Cooper,  in  Newtown  township,  Glouces- 
ter county,  about  two  miles  from  the  ferry  over 
against  Philadelphia,  the  following  creatures,  viz,  a 
bright,  bay  mare,  about  14  hands  high,  with  a black 
mane  and  tail,  a broad  well  set  creature,  her  two  hind 
feet  white,  is  used  to  drawing  and  cannot  pace,  being 
about  ten  years  old  : and  a large  well  set  chestnut 
sorrel  mare,  about  four  years  old,  her  mane  and  tail 
of  the  same  colour,  a natural  pacer,  with  two  or  three 
white  feet,  a blaze  in  her  face,  a little  saddle  back’d, 


10 6 NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [175! 

about  14  hands  two  inches  high,  and  it  is  believed 
they  are  branded  I.  C.  on  the  near  shoulder.  Who- 
ever takes  up  the  said  mares  and  brings  them  to 
Samuel  Noble,  at  the  upper  end  of  Second-street, 
Philadelphia,  or  to  said  Isaac  Cooper,  shall  have  a 
Pistole  reward  for  each,  and  for  the  thief,  if  stolen,  so 
as  he  be  brought  to  justice,  Ten  Pistoles  reward,  and 
reasonable  charges,  paid  by 

Isaac  Cooper. 

— Penn.  Gazette , Oct.  31,  1751.  No.  1194. 

Mr.  Parker. 

IN  your  Paper  of  the  29th  [25th]  March  last,  I 
see  some  of  your  Correspondents  have  given 
us  a Paper  upon  Jersie  Politicks  ; I must  allow,  as  he 
says.  That  it  is  a common  Observation , that  seeing 
Men  engaged  in  any  kind  of  Exercise , tho ’ perfect 
Strangers  to  us , we  are  apt  to  find  our  Hopes  and 
Wishes  of  a sudden  engaged  more  on  one  side  than 
another ; which  is  a good  Reason  why  we  should  in- 
terest ourselves  in  the  public  Affairs  of  a Country 
more  especially  where  we  are  Members  of  the  Com- 
munity ; but  as  I am  not  a Member  of  the  Jersie  Com- 
munity, nor  an  Inhabitant  among  them,  I give  myself 
little  Concern  about  their  Politicks,  any  farther  than 
they  relate  to  those  in  New-York:  But  to  hear  the 
Sentiments  of  some  of  our  Connoisseurs  upon  their 
public  Proceedings,  is  sometimes  merry  enough,  and 
shows  you  that  they  are  not  such  great  Connoisseurs 
of  their  own  Interest  as  People  would  imagine : 
Some  of  them  I have  heard  assert,  that,  the  Assembly 
were  certainly  right,  and  the  Council  as  certainly 
wrong,  and  some  assert  the  contrary  ; which  naturally 


1751]  NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS.  IO7 

led  me  to  imagine,  they  were  swayed  by  the  Merits 
of  the  Cause;  but  when  I found  the  whole  Dispute 
turned  upon  the  Method  of  laying  the  Land-Tax, 
that  is,  whether  bad  Land  should  pay  as  much  as 
good,  it  convinced  me,  that  it  was  the  Men  and  not 
the  Cause  that  biassed  them  in  their  Judgments  : 
Had  those  Councillors  been  Assemblymen,  and  in- 
sisted as  they  had  insisted,  they  would  have  been  still 
wrong  in  these  Gentlemen’s  Opinions  ; all  whichledme 
to  consider  the  Situation  of  our  own  Province,  how  far 
what  the  Assembly  insisted  on  there,  may  not  in  some 
Measure  answer  our  Ends  here  ; I would  not  be  un- 
derstood to  mean  their  starving  a Governor,  or  giv- 
ing Countenance  to  the  Invaders  of  private  Property  ; 
what  I mean  is  their  insisting  upon  a Land-Tax,  which 
is  certainly  right,  provided  it  be  done  in  an  equitable 
Manner ; that  is,  to  Tax  good  Lands  at  such  a cer- 
tain Price,  and  bad  Lands  at  a less,  that  is,  in  Pro- 
portion : I shall  be  told,  that  there  is  no  Proportion 
between  bad  Lands  and  good  ; but  I beg  to  be  ex- 
cused it  I deny  the  Consequence  : 

I am  told,  that  in  Jersie,  they  have  an  Instruction 
from  his  Majesty  to  the  Governor,  Not  to  lay  any 
Tax  upon  unprofitable  La'ids : The  meaning  of  that 
Instruction,  I suppose,  the  Person  or  Persons  bound 
by  it,  are  the  proper  Judges  : In  New-York,  there  is 
no  Instruction  about  it;  and  therefore,  I cannot  see 
any  Injustice  it  would  be,  t,o  lay  one  Penny  an  Acre 
upon  all  the  good  Land  in  the  Province,  and  one 
Farthing  an  Acre  upon  all  the  barren  Lands  : This 
will  be  called,  a monstrous,  hideous,  terrible  Tax  by 
some  Folks  ; but  at  the  same  Time,  if  these  P'olks 


108  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [ 1 75  I 

will  but  consider,  what  an  Advantage  it  will  be  to  the 
Province  in  general ; how  soon  it  will  sink  all  the 
Paper-Money  in  the  Country,  pay  off  all  the  publick 
Debts,  establish  our  Credit  upon  the  firmest  Founda- 
tion, encourage  our  Trade,  put  us  in  the  best  Posture 
of  Defence,  and  soon  make  us  a powerfull  and  flour- 
ishing People  : I say,  when  they  cooly  consider  these 
Things,  they  will  think  it  the  most  equitable  Tax  in 
the  World  : First,  let  us  consider  what  this  Tax  would 
bring  in,  and  next,  the  Equity  of  it ; First ; then  the 
Province  is  supposed  to  contain  Ten  Million  of  Acres, 
Two  Million  of  which  are  barren,  Eight  Millions  at 
one  penny  an  Acre,  would  bring  in  yearly  33333  1.  6 
s.  8 d.  and  the  Two  Millions  of  Barrens  would  come 
to  2033  : 6 : 8 which  in  the  whole  would  amount  to 

354ib:  13  : 4 

As  to  the  Equity,  many  Merchants  in  the  City  that 
carry  on  any  considerable  Trade,  are  taxed  at  40  or 
50  1.  a Year,  besides  near  4 or  500  a Year,  for  the 
Duties  on  their  Trade,  while  a Man  that  is  worth 
30,000  1.  in  Lands,  shall  not  pay  any  Thing : There 
certainly  can  be  no  Equity  in  such  an  unequal  Tax; 
I have  heard  it  asserted,  the  Buyer  pays  the  Duty 
and  not  the  Seller,  but  I have  always  observed  in  the 
little  Trade  I have  carried  on,  that  the  Dearness  or 
Cheapness  of  a Commodity,  is  intirely  owing  to  the 
Scarcity  or  Plenty  of  it,  and  not  to  the  Duties  : This 
Tax  of  a penny  an  Acre,  is  very  far  from  being  a 
Hardship,  as  will  appear  by  the  following  Example  ; 
an  Owner  Leases  out  100  Acres  of  Land,  at  10  1.  a 
year  Rent,  the  Tenant  to  pay  the  Taxes,  which  will 
amount  to  8 s.  4 per  Annum  ; so  that  if  he  Leases 


1751]  NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS.  109 

10,000  Acres,  his  Tenants  will  pay  1.  41  13  4 Taxes, 
and  he  receive  1 1000  per.  Annum  Rent,  while  a 
Citizen  that  only  trades  for  that  Sum  a Year,  shall 
pay  almost  double  that  Tax,  besides  his  Duties,  Ris- 
que, and  Insurance  ; while  these  Gentlemen  of  large 
Tracts  pay  Nothing  : Whether  this  be  reasonable,  I 
must  leave  to  the  unbiassed  and  unprejudiced  to  de- 
termine. 

This  Scheme  may  be  looked  upon,  as  one  con- 
trived to  distress  those  that  possess  large  Tracts  of 
Land  : It  has  no  such  View,  but  is  designed  to  make 
every  Man  pay  in  proportion  to  his  Estate,  and  equally 
bear  the  Burthen  : It  is  an  Observation  in  all  Gov- 
ernments, that  those  possessed  of  the  largest  Share 
of  Prosperity,  will  have  the  largest  Share  of  Power ; 
I believe  the  Observation  is  true,  but  at  the  same 
Time,  tho’  they  are  possessed  of  the  Power,  let  them 
not  load  the  Poor  and  Industrious  with  the  Taxes  ; 
but  as  they  feed  upon  the  Fat  of  the  Land,  let  them 
generously,  out  of  their  Abundance,  contribute  their 
Mites,  (tho’  it  be  against  their  Wills)  to  the  Preserva- 
tion, Defence,  and  Prosperity  of  their  Country  ; 
Salus  Populi  suprema  Lex  esto , is  what  every  Man  in 
a publick  Station  ought  strictly  to  adhere  to,  and 
Nothing  will  so  effectually  contribute  to  that  End,  as 
to  fall  upon  proper  Methods  to  pay  the  publick  Debts, 
imploy  the  industrious  Poor,  give  our  Posterity  a 
liberal  Education,  and  make  them  wiser  than  our- 
selves. 

To  this  Scheme,  I foresee  many  Objections  will  be 
raised,  to  persuade  the  People,  that  it  is  Nothing  but 
Pique  and  Resentment,  but  the  several  Objections 


IIO  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1751 

may  be  easily  answered;  first,  it  will  be  said,  that 
many  People  are  possessed  of  great  Quantities  of 
barren  Land,  that  it  would  be  unreasonable  to  make 
them  pay  one  farthing  an  Acre  for  Land  not  worth 
any  Thing  : Most  of  the  barren  Lands  in  this  Pro- 
vince, are  what  are  called  Pine  Lands,  and  every 
Man  that  knows  any  Thing  of  them,  knows  the  great 
Quantities  of  Boards  that  are  made  of  the  Pine 
Trees,  and  the  Profit  they  bring  to  their  owners. 
Another  Objection  will  be,  that  Lands  pay  already 
2s.  6d.  Proclamation,  for  every  ioo  Acres,  to  his 
Majesty,  for  a Quit-Rent,  and  to  add  8s.  4J.  more, 
will  make  it  too  large  and  heavy  a Tax  : This  may 

be  some  Objection  to  the  Patents  granted  since  the 
Year  1710,  but  all  those  granted  before,  pay  such  an 
inconsiderable  Quit-Rent,  that  it  is  scarce  worth 
mentioning ; besides,  no  Person  since  that  Year 
could  obtain  a Patent  for  more  than  200  Acres  of 
Land  ; which  with  the  Addition  of  2s.  6d.  Proclama- 
tion, will  make  the  whole  Tax  for  the  2000  Acres, 
come  but  to  ill.  which  is  but  a moderate  Tax  for 
what  is  worth  a Thousand,  at  a reasonable  Computa- 
tion : Another  Objection  will  be,  how  is  this  Tax  to 

be  collected  ; that  it  will  be  so  great  a Charge,  that 
it  will  take  away  the  greatest  Part,  if  not  all  the  Tax  ; 
but  it  can  be  collected  in  a very  easy  and  unexpen- 
sive  Method  ; let  every  Man  by  Law,  be  obliged  to 
give  in  upon  Oath,  to  the  Treasurer  of  the  County, 
where  his  Land  lies,  the  Quantity  of  Acres  in  his 
Patent  or  Deed  ; and  to  prevent  any  future  Trouble, 
let  the  Treasurer  keep  a Book,  and  enter  every 
Man’s  Name,  with  the  Quantity  of  Acres  he  pos- 
sesses ; and  to  prevent  Frauds,  let  it  be  Perjury  for 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


1751] 


J I I 


any  Man  to  swear,  that  his  Lands  do  contain  fewer 
Acres  than  the  real  Quantity  in  the  Bounds  of  his 
Patent  or  Conveyance. 

I have  been  told,  that  a Country-Man  that  pos- 
sesses but  500  Acres  of  Land,  which  is  improved, 
and  a good  Stock  of  Creatures  upon  it,  shall  pay  5I. 
or  61.  a Year,  while  one  that  possesses  50,000,  shall 
not  pay  any  Thing : And  in  the  City,  he  that  pos- 
sesses a House,  and  is  a Trader,  he  shall  pay  20I.  or 
30I.  a year,  besides  the  Tax  upon  the  Trade.  Now 
why  a Man  who  trades  for  1.  500  a year  should  pay 
five  Times  as  much  as  a Man  that  is  possessed  of  a 
1000  Acres  of  Land,  I can’t  comprehend;  I know  I 
shall  be  told,  the  trading  Man  gets  more  ; so  he  may 
if  he  makes  good  Voyages  ; but  if  he  makes  bad, 
he  will  soon  lose  all  ; while  the  Countryman’s  Land 
rises  in  Value,  and  can’t  run  away,  except  it  be 
attacked  with  those  violent  Distempers  of  Luxury 
and  Extravagance,  which  will  inevitably  bring  on  a 
Mortgage,  which  is  seldom  or  ever  removed,  but  by 
the  most  diligent  Application,  or  some  surprising 
turn  of  Fortune. 

I do  not  take  upon  me  to  dictate  to  my  Superiors  ; 
they  certainly  are  the  best  Judges  what  is  proper  to 
be  done  for  the  Good  of  the  Country  ; but  at  the 
same  Time,  every  Member  of  the  Community  ought 
to  have  the  Liberty  of  offering  any  Scheme  to  the 
Publick  he  may  conceive  for  their  Benefit ; if  it 
should  appear  hurtful  to  the  Publick,  they  ought  to 
point  out  his  Errors,  in  order  to  set  him  right,  and 
induce  him  to  contrive  a more  beneficial  one  ; yet  I 
conceive  this  Scheme  can  meet  with  no  Opposition 


1 12  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1751 

from  our  City  Members,  in  whatsoever  Light  it  may 
be  represented  to  the  Members  of  the  Country. — 

The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , 
Nov.  ii,  1751. 

TO  be  sold,  Four  Lots  of  Land,  lying  and  being 
near  Rocky-Hill,  in  Somerset  County,  in  the  Pro- 
vince of  East-New-Jersey,  13  Miles  from  New-Bruns- 
wick,  known  by  the  Lots,  Number  1,  2,  3,  and  4. 

Lot  No.  r.  contains  240  Acres  of  good  Land,  30 
of  which  can  be  made  in  good  Clover  Meadow 
Ground,  and  all  in  good  fence;  there  is  also  an 
Orchard  planted  thereon,  of  about  150  Apple  Trees, 
choice  Fruit  for  making  Cyder,  and  is  about  a Mile 
and  a Quarter  from  two  Grist-Mills. 

Lot  No.  2.  contains  516  Acres,  150  of  which  can 
be  made  extraordinary  good  Meadow  Ground,  60 
of  the  same  is  twice  a Year  mowed,  and  produces 
large  Quantities  of  Hay ; it’s  all  in  good  Fence, 
with  a good  Dwelling-House,  new  Barn,  Waggon  . 
and  Negro  Houses  thereon  : As  also  an  Orchard  » 
with  500  Apple-Trees,  a great  Part  of  which  is 
grafted  with  Newtown  Pippins,  as  Spitzenberg,  [ 
Runpitans,  and  Pearmains,  which  would  have  pro-  j 
duced,  at  least  50  Hogsheads  of  Cyder,  and  lies  one 
Mile  from  the  aforesaid  Mills.  . [ 

Lot  No.  3,  contains  200  Acres  of  choice  Wheat- 
Land,  not  yet  cleared.  Thirty  ot  which  can  be  made  ! 
very  good  Meadow,  and  lies  one  Mile  and  an  Half  ' 
from  said  Mills. 

Lot  No.  4.  contains  377  Acres,  all  good  Land,  > 
adjoining  Millstone  River.  Whoever  inclines  to 
purchase  the  Whole,  or  any  Part,  may  apply  to 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


1751] 


1 13 


Mr.  James  Vanhorn,  on  the  Premises,  or  to  Mr. 
Abraham  Vanhorne,  Merchant  in  New  York,  and 
know  the  Conditions  and  Title  which  is  indisputable. 

As  also  two  Houses,  the  one  opposite  Mr.  Jacob 
Franks,  now  in  the  Possession  of  Mr.  Dirck  Brinker- 
hooff,  the  other  in  the  back  Street,  commonly  called 
or  known  by  the  Name  of  Bayard’s-Street,  now  in 
the  Possession  of  Mr.  Nicholas  Van  Dyke. — The  N. 
Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , Nov.  1 1 , 


1751- 


Just  imported  from  Bristol,  in  the  Ship  Two 
Friends,  Capt.  Wadmore,  by  John  and  Uzal  Ogden, 
and  to  be  Sold  cheap  Wholesale  and  Retail  at  their 
Store  at  Newark,  for  ready  Money  or  Country  Pro- 
duce at  Market  price.  A choice  Assortment  of 
European  Goods  fit  for  the  Season. — The  N.  Y. 
Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly  Post  Boy,  Nov.  1 1, 
1 75  1 • 


Run  away  from  Elijah  Bond,  at  Trentown,  in  West 
New-Jersey,  a Negro  Man  named  Lott,  about  five 
Feet  nine  Inches  high,  a down  Look,  a well  set  Lusty 
Fellow,  about  24  years  of  Age  : Had  on  when  he 
went  away  a red  great  Coat ; his  other  Cloaths  are 
suppos’d  to  be  chang’d,  or  wore  out.  He  is  sup- 
posed to  be  in  Stamford,  in  New  England.  He  went 
from  Egg-Harbour  in  a Shingle-Shallop,  or  some  other 
Vessel. — Whoever  takes  up  said  Negro,  and  secures 
him  so  that  his  Master  may  have  him  again,  shall 


I 14  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [ I 75  I 

have  Three  Pounds  Reward,  by  me 

Elijah  Bond. 

— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly  Post 
Boy , Nov.  11,  1751. 

Philadelphia,  November  21. 

Last  Week  Richard  Smith,  Esq.  of  Burlington,  in 
West  New  Jersey,  was  buried  in  the  Friends  Bury- 
ing Ground,  in  that  City ; in  whom  the  Characters  of 
a Generous  Good  natur’d  Hospitable  Man,  of  a True 
Patriot,  and  of  a Good  Christian,  were  so  truly  united, 
that  he  liv’d  belov’d  and  esteem’d  by  all  that  knew 
him,  and  his  Death  is  lamented  as  a publick  Loss  by 
the  People  of  that  Province.1  * * * * * — Penn. 

Gazette , Nov . 21,  1751.  No.  1197. 

The  managers  of  the  lottery,  set  on  foot  to  finish 
the  church  at  Trenton,  beg  leave  to  acquaint  the 
publick,  that  the  true  reason  of  the  lottery’s  not 
being  drawn  at  the  time  limited,  was  intirely  owing 
to  the  want  of  intelligence  of  the  sale  of  a number  of 
tickets  dispersed  in  different  hands  about  the  coun- 
try ; and  that  they  now  request  of  those  gentlemen 
who  shall  have  any  tickets  left  unsold  by  the  first  of 
February,  that  they  would  return  them  to  the  man- 
agers ; and  the  lottery  will  peremptorily  be  drawn  in 
one  week  after. — Penn.  Gazette , Nov,  21,  1751.  No. 
1197. 


1 Richard  Smith,  son  of  Samuel  Smith,  of  Bramham,  was  born  July  5, 1699  ; he  married 
August  20,  1719,  Abigail,  daughter  of  Thomas  Rapier,  and  in  1720  erected  a handsome 
dwelling  for  his  biide,  in  Burlington,  which  was  subsequently  occupied  by  Gov.  Belcher. 
Smith  was  extensively  engaged  in  commerce,  his  wharves  and  storehouses  being  on 
“ Green  Bank,”  Burlington.  From  1730  until  1748  he  was  one  of  Burlington  city’s  two 
representatives  in  the  Assembly.  Samuel  Smith,  the  historian,  was  qne  of  his  sons. 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


1751] 


1 15 


To  his  Excellency  Jonathan  Belcher,  Esq.  Captain 
General  and  Governor  in  Chief  of  the  Colony  of 
New-Jersey,  and  Territories  thereon  depending  in 
America , Chancellor , and  Vice  Admiral  of  the 
same. 

The  Humble  Address  of  the  Mayor,  Recorder,  Ald- 
ermen, and  Common-Council,  of  the  Borough  of 

Elizabeth. 

May  it  please  your  Excellency , 

WE  His  Majesty’s  dutiful  and  loyal  Subjects, 
beg  Leave  to  give  your  Excellency,  with 
your  Honourable  Lady,  a hearty  welcome  to  the 
Borough  of  Elizabeth  ; and  to  express  our  utmost 
Satisfaction  in  the  Hopes  of  your  long  residing 
among-  us.1 

The  happy  Experience  we  have  had  for  more  than 
four  Years,  of  your  mild,  wise,  and  just  Administra- 
tion ; the  Vigilance,  Zeal,  and  Prudence,  you  have  at 
all  Times  discovered,  in  protecting  our  Liberties  and 
Privileges;  proceeding  with  that  mixture  of  Justice, 
and  Levity,  which  have  in  a great  Measure  been  ef- 
fectual, to  calm  and  heal  the  unhappy  Disorders,  that 
have  so  long  disturb’d  this  Province. 

Your  manifest  Concern  and  Care,  to  do  every 
Thing  to  promote  the  religious,  and  civil  Interest  of 
this  People  ; hath  raised  in  us  the  highest  Gratitude 
to  Divine  Providence. 

May  God  in  singular  Goodness  to  us,  grant  you 

long  to  preside  over  this  Province  ; which  is  now  very 
- — 

1 Gov.  Belcher  had  found  that  the  air  of  Burlington  did  not  agree  with  him,  and  there- 
fore decided  to  remove  to  Elizabethtown,  where  he  engaged  a house  on  Jersey  street, 
which  met  the  approval  of  Mrs.  Belcher  and  his  daughter  on  their  inspecting  it  on  March 

1x9, 1751.  The  family  arrived  Nov.  1 , the  date  of  this  address. 


II 6 NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [ 1 75  I 

happy,  under  the  best  of  Kings,  committed  to  the 
Care  of  one  truly  worthy  to  represent  him. 

Borough  0/ Elizabeth 
1st  Nov.  1 75 1 

John  Stites,  Samuel  Woodruff , 

John  Radley , Robert  Ogden , 

Stephen  Crane , Thomas  Clark , 
John  Chandler , John  Halsted. 

His  Excellency  s Answer , 

Gentlemen, 

kindly  and  gratefully  own  your  respectful 
Address  ; and  take  this  Opportunity  to  assure 
you,  by  the  Favour  and  Assistance  of  Almighty  God, 
I will  at  all  Times  endeavor  to  my  utmost , to  promote 
His  Majesty  s Honour , and  Interest , Prosper- 

ity and  Happiness  of  this  Province ; — shall  be 
glad , to  contribute  in  any  Thing  you  can  point  out  to 
me , to  make  the  Borough  of  Elizabeth,  still  a more 
flourishing  Town. 

J.  Belcher. 

— 77h?  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly  Post 
Boy , AW.  25,  1751. 

Afeze>  November  25.  We  hear  from  Kings- 

ton, in  East  New-Jersey,  that  on  Sunday  the  loth  of 
this  Instant,  in  the  Evening,  after  having  been  twice 
published  the  same  Day,  Daniel  Balay.  aged  68 
Years,  was  married  there  to  Elizabeth  Waters, 
aged  78  Years  : — the  first  had  been  a Widower  8 
Months,  and  the  other  a Widow  35  Years: — The 
Ceremony  was  performed  with  the  utmost  Solemnity 
before  a very  crowded  Audience. — The  N.  Y.  Gaz- 
ette Revived  in  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , Nov.  25,  1751. 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


1750 


11 7 


Lost,  between  Dr.  Mercer’s  Mills  and  New-Bruns- 
wick,  a small  black  Bitch  with  long-  Ears,  a little 
White  on  Toes  and  Breast,  (commonly  called  King 
Charles’s  Breed)  she  comes  to  the  Name  of  Dutch- 
ess, and  had  a Brass  Collar  and  Lock,  when  lost,  in- 
graved,  S.  Hainsworth,  New-York,  1751.  Whoever 
will  bring  the  Bitch  to  S.  Hainsworth’s  Store  at  New- 
York,  or  New-Brunswick,  shall  receive  Five  Shillings 
Reward. — A largfe  Assortment  of  Gun-Powder,  and 
European  Goods  to  be  sold  cheap  at  the  above 
Stores  — And,  ready  Money  for  Buck-Horns  and 
Bees-Wax. — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly 
Post  Boy,  Nov.  25,  1751. 


To  be  sold  by  Elizabeth  Biles,  near  Trenton  A 
Plantation  containing  about  700  acres  of  land,  200  of 
which  is  excellent  meadow,  a large  house,  orchard, 
barn,  stables,  and  other  out  houses,  most  pleasantly 
situate  on  the  river  Delaware,  with  a variety  of 
delightful  prospects,  a mile  south  of  Trenton  Ferry, 
being  a commodious  seat  for  a gentleman  or  farmer, 
fishing  and  fowling  in  as  great  perfection  as  on  any 
part  of  the  river,  and  is  a very  suitable  place  to  raise 
a large  flock  of  cattle,  sheep  and  hogs.  Any  person 
inclining  to  purchase,  may  know  the  terms  of  sale, 
by  applying  to  Elizabeth  Biles,  living  on  the 
premises. — Penn.  Gazette , Nov.  28,  1751.  No.  1198. 

Run  away  on  the  2nd  inst.  from  Arthur  M’llveen, 
near  Woodberry,  in  Deptford  township,  Gloucester 
county,  in  the  Province  of  West  Jersey:  A servant 

man,  named  John  Welch,  about  25  years  of  age,  a 
likely  well-set  fellow,  about  5 feet,  6 inches  high  : 


I 1 8 NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [i^i 

Had  on  when  he  went  away,  a blue  cloth  jacket, 
white  shirt,  old  buckskin  breeches,  blue  worsted 
stockings,  a pair  of  pumps  with  brass  buttons  ; he 
was  born  in  Ireland,  and  speaks  with  the  brogue. 
He  took  with  him  a white  mare,  about  twelve  hands 
high,  with  wall  eyes.  Said  Welch  is  a weaver  by 
trade,  and  was  formerly  a servant  to  John  Cooper, 
weaver,  of  Chester  county,  in  Pennsylvania.  Who- 
ever takes  up  said  servant,  and  secures  him  in 
Gloucester  goal,  so  that  his  master  may  have  him 
again,  shall  have  Twenty  Shillings  reward,  and 
reasonable  charges,  paid  by 

Arthur  M’llveen. 

— Pmn.  Gazette , Dec.  5,  1751.  No.  1199. 

New  York , December  2.  We  hear  from  Elizabeth 
Town  in  New-Jersey  that  several  Mad  Dogs  have 
infested  that  Neighbourhood  within  these  few  Weeks 
past ; some  of  which  have  been  killed  before  any 
Mischief  had  been  done  ; but  that  a Girl  had  been 
Bit  by  one  of  them  which  had  flung  her  into  that  ter- 
rible Condition,  which  all  Accounts  agree  is  common 
to  those  bit  in  Europe  ; — As  these  are  the  first  that 
ever  appeared  in  these  Parts,  it  has  much  alarmed 
the  Inhabitants  ; and  has  also  occasioned  the  follow- 
ing Letter,  and  Receipe’s  being  sent  to  the  Printers, 
viz. 

Mr.  Parker , 

AS  we  hear,  there  are  a great  Number  of  Mad  Dogs 
in  the  County  of  Essex,  not  twenty  Miles  from  this 
Place,  and  that  some  People  have  been  already  bit  by 
them  ; I think  it  the  Duty  of  every  one,  if  they  know  of 
any  Thing,  that  may  be  a Cure  of  that  most  terrible 


1 75  I H NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS.  lip 


Distemper,  to  communicate  it  for  that  Purpose  ; I 
send  you  herewith,  No.  474,  of  the  Philosophical 
Transactions  in  order  to  publish. 


Part  of  a Letter  from  Alexander  Reid,  Esq  ; to  Dr. 
Wilmot. 


London,  Nov.  5,  1745. 


Dear  Sir , 

AS  your  Zeal  and  Abilities  for  promoting  the  Good  of  Man- 
kind are  my  principal  Inducements,  they  must  be  my  only 
Apology,  for  troubling  you  with  the  following  Account  of 
what  I know  concerning  the  internal  Use  of  Musk  in  large 
Quantities. 

About  15  Years  ago,  I learn’d  in  China,  that  the  Tonquinese 
had  an  infallible  Cure  for  the  Bite  of  a mad  Dog ; and  being 
very  desirous  of  possessing  so  valuable  a Recipe,  I was  two  or 
three  Years  after,  favoured  with  it  by  the  late  Mr.  Hart. 

They  take  of  the  best  Musk  about  sixteen  Grains ; of  the 
purest  native  Cinnabar,  and  finest  Vermillion,  each  about 
twenty  four  Grains  ; and,  having  reduced  them  separately  to 
impalpable  Powders,  mix  and  administer  them  in  about  a Gill 
of  Arrack;  {Rum  'will  Answer  the  End  as  well ) which,  in 
two  or  three  Hours,  generally  throws  the  Patient,  into  a sound 
Sleep,  and  Perspiration,  if  not,  they  repeat  the  Dose,  and 
think  the  Cure  certain. 


— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly  Post 
Boy , Dec . 9,  1751. 


The  Drawing  the  Lottery  at  Trentown,  for  finish- 
ing the  Church  there,  is  fixed  certainly  the  Beginning 
of  February  next. — There  is  still  remaining  to  sell, 
some  tickets  in  the  Hands  of  the  Printer  hereof ; and 
those  that  remain  unsold  by  the  Middle  of  January, 
will  be  then  returned  without  Fail. — The  N.  Y. 
Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , Dec.  9, 
*75D 


120  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [ I 75  I 

TO  Be  Sold.  A tract  of  Land,  situate  in  the 
County  of  Ulster,  bounded  on  the  Paltz  River,  con- 
taining about  1000  Acres,  being  Part  of  a Tract  for- 
merly patented  to  Mr.  Barberie,  about  16  Miles  from 
this’s  Landing,  to  which  is  a good  Road  : It’s  to  be 
sold  all  together,  or  in  Farms,  beingalready  divided  into 
six  Lots  of  about  250  Acres,  one  of  which  is  sold.  For 
further  Particulars  enquire  of  Francis  Barberie,  in 
Nevv-York,  or  of  John  Barberie,  in  Perth-Amboy,  who 
has  to  sell,  a small  Farm,  situate  at  Rariton-Landing, 
a Mile  above  New-Brunswick,  in  New- Jersey,  whereon 
is  a good  House,  two  Stories  high,  Sash-window’d,  a 
Shop  adjoining,  and  a Cellar  under  it ; a good  Store- 
House,  Bake-House  and  Oven  ; a Barn,  an  Orchard, 
and  large  Garden:  the  whole  containing  55  Acres, 
nine  whereof  are  fine  English  Meadow  Ground,  join- 
ing to  the  River,  being  a convenient  Place  for  a 
Store-Keeper,  a Store  having  been  kept  there  many 
years,  and  will  be  sold  altogether,  or  in  3 Parts,  thus  ; 
The  Meadow,  consisting  of  9 Acres  ; The  Buildings, 
with  the  Garden  and  orchard,  consisting  of  about 
4 Acres  ; and  the  Up-land,  Part  whereof  is  Wood- 
Land. — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly 
Post  Boy , Dec.  16,  1752. 

TO  be  sold  at  publick  Vendue,  on  Tuesday  the 
31st  of  March  next,  a Plantation  in  the  Borough  of 
Elizabeth-Town,  County  of  Essex,  and  Province  of 
East-New-Jersey,  containing  upwards  of  60  Acres  of 
Land,  ten  of  which  are  very  good  Mowing  Ground, 
afnd  20  Acres  good  Wood-Land  ; it  lies  very  commo- 
dious on  the  East  Side  of  Rahway  River,  within  less 
than  Half  a Mile  of  Hubbel’s  Mill,  and  on  the  Road 


lj$l\  NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS.  J2I 

to  Rariton : There  is  on  said  Plantation  a good 
Dwelling  House,  a young  Orchard,  and  a very  good 
Well.  Any  Person  inclining  to  purchase  said  Planta- 
tion before  the  Day  of  Sale,  may  apply  to  Ebenezer 
Sayre,  near  the  Premisses,  by  whom  an  indisputable 
Title  will  be  given. 

Said  Sayre  has  to  dispose  of,  13  Acres  of  Land, 
within  less  than  a Quarter  of  a Mile  of  the  above 
mentioned  Plantation  ; the  greatest  Part  of  which  is 
very  good  Wood-Land. — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived 
in  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , Dec.  23,  1751. 

TO  be  sold,  a good  Dwelling-House  and  Lot  of 
Land  belonging  to  the  same,  bounding  on  Rariton 
River,  at  the  east  End  of  New-Brunswick,  commonly 
known  by  the  Name  of  the  Ship-yard,  and  is  very 
convenient  for  the  same.  Any  Person  or  Persons 
inclining  to  purchase  the  aforesaid  Premises  may 
apply  to  William  Blaine,  who  lives  on  the  same,  and 
agree  on  reasonable  Terms. — The  N.  Y.  Gazette 
Revived  in  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , Dec.  23,  1751. 

New-York,  December  30.  Last  Wednesday  Morn- 
ing, about  3 o’clock,  a Shrewsbury  Boat  with  three 
Men  on  board,  two  of  whom  w^ere  Brothers  of  the 
Name  of  Parker , returning  home  from  this  City,  was 
overset  near  Red-Hook , by  a sudden  Flaw  of  Wind  ; 
by  which  Accident  two  of  the  Men  were  drowned  ; 
but  as  she  was  going  over,  one  of  the  Parkers  hap- 
pily got  on  her  Bottom,  where  he  continued  till  the 
Boat  drove  down,  with  the  Tide,  to  the  Narrows  ; 
where,  just  at  Day  light,  he  was  discovered  by  some 
People  on  Shore,  who  went  off  with  a Periauger  and 


122  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1751 

took  him  up.  The  Boat  afterwards  drove  on  some 
Shoals  near  the  Ferry,  and  ’tis  probable  may  be  re- 
covered, if  the  Ice  don’t  destroy  her. — The  N.  Y. 
Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , Dec.  30, 
1751- 

Whereas  there  hath  been  a Stage  carried  on  for 
one  whole  Year  past,  by  Boats  and  Waggons,  from 
New-York  to  Philadelphia,  by  way  of  Amboy  and 
Borden’s  Town,  and  by  Experience  been  found  to 
answer  the  End  it  was  designed  for,  as  much  as  we 
could  expect  in  so  short  a Time  : These  are  therefore 
to  inform  the  Publick,  that  I,  Daniel  O’ Brian,  being 
provided  with  a Boat  exceedingly  well  fitted,  with  a 
very  handsome  Cabbin,  and  all  necessary  Accommo- 
dations, propose  to  give  my  Attendance  at  the  late 
Col.  Moore’s  Wharf,  every  Monday  (and  may  be 
spoke  with  at  the  House  of  Scotch  Johney,)  and  next 
Day,  Wind  and  Weather  permitting,  to  proceed  for 
Amboy  Ferry,  to  John  Cluck’s,  where  a Waggon 
kept  by  John  Richards,  will  be  ready  to  receive  either 
Goods  or  Passenger’s,  and  to  proceed  with  them  to 
Borden’s-Town,  where  a Stage  Boat  will  be  ready  to 
carry  them  to  Philadelphia  ; and  the  same  Method 
will  be  followed  from  the  Crooked-Billet  Wharf  at 
Philadelphia,  up  to  Borden’s-Town,  and  shall  proceed 
Load  or  no  Load ; and  we  propose  going  twice  a 
Week  after  the  25th  March  next,  by  which  Means 
Passengers  or  Goods  may  never  be  detained  on  the 
Road.  We  expect  to  give  better  Satisfaction  this 
Year,  than  last,  by  Reason  we  are  more  acquainted 
with  the  Nature  of  the  Business,  and  have  more  con- 
venient Boats,  Waggons,  and  Stages,  and  will  en- 


1 75  I J NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS.  1^3 

deavour  to  use  People  in  the  best  Manner  we  are  ca- 
pable of,  and  hope  all  good  People  will  give  it  the 
Encouragement  it  deserves.  So  with  Respect,  we 
remain  Friends  to  the  Publick. 

Daniel  O’Brien. 

Joseph  Richards. 

Joseph  Borden,  Jun. 

— TheN.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly  Post 
Boy , Dec . 30,  1751. 

Run  away  on  the  29th  of  December  last,  from 
Thomas  Blair,  of  Bethlehem  township,  Hunterdon 
county,  West  Jersey,  an  Irish  servant  man,  named 
John  Newcomb,  about  22  years  of  age,  a well  set 
fellow,  about  five  feet  nine  inches  high,  full  faced  : 
Had  on  when  he  went  away,  a brown  pea  jacket, 
and  a blue  one  under  it,  two  check  - shirts,  two  pair 
of  stockings,  one  light  blue  worsted,  the  other  dark 
colour’d  wool,  wide  sailor  trowsers  and  fustian 
breeches  under  them,  good  shoes  with  pewter 
buckles,  short  brown  wig,  and  a felt  hat,  perhaps  he 
may  pass  for  a sailor.  Whoever  takes  up  and 
secures  said  servant,  so  that  his  master  may  have 
him  again,  shall  have  Forty  Shillings  reward,  and 
reasonable  charges,  paid  by 

Thomas  Blair. 

N.  B.  All  masters  of  Vessels  are  forbid  to  carry 
him  off  at  their  peril. — Penn . Gazette , Jan . 7,  1752. 
No.  1204. 

New  York , December  16. — We  hear  Capt.  Shoals, 
in  a Brig  from  Europe,  arrived  some  days  ago  within 
Sandy-Hook,  but  was  prevented  coming  up,  by  the 
Ice. — Penn . Journal , Jan.  7,  1752.  No.  477. 


124  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1752 

Run  away  on  Wednesday  the  8th  Instant,  from 
Hartshorne  Fitz  Randolph,  of  Woodbridge,  living 
near  the  Blazing-Star,  in  Middlesex  County,  and 
Province  of  East  New-Jersey,  an  Irish  Servant  Lad, 
named  Michael  Hibbets,  about  16  or  17  Years  old, 
of  a dark  Complexion,  has  black  curled  Hair,  of  a 
middle  Size,  and  is  a Chimney-Sweeper  by  Trade. 
Had  on  when  he  went  away,  an  old  wide  brim’d 
Wool  Hat,  a very  ragged  brown  Great- Coat,  a 
Homespun  Kersey  Coat  and  Jacket,  with  Mettal 
Buttons,  Leather  Breeches,  coarse  Yarn  Stockings, 
and  Shoes  ty’d  with  Leather  Strings ; he  speaks 
very  good  English.  He  was  seen  in  New-York, 
and  ’tis  thought  is  in  or  about  said  City.  ’ Tis  sup- 
posed he  has  Silver  about  him  to  the  Value  of  three 
Pounds.  All  Masters  of  Vessels  are  forewarned  to 
carry  him  off,  at  their  Peril : And,  whoever  takes  up 

the  said  Servant,  so  that  his  Master  may  have  him 
again,  shall  have  Thirty  Shillings  Reward,  and  all 
reasonable  Charges,  paid  by 

Hartshorne  Fitz  Randolph. 

— N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , 
Jan.  13,  .175?. 

Broke  open  in  the  Night,  between  the  6th  and  7th 
Instant,  the  House  of  James  Rutherfoord,  in  Tren- 
ton, and  stolen  out  of  said  House,  the  following 
Goods,  viz.  One  Women’s  new  fine  Purple  Cloth 
Short  Cloak,  1 new  Silk  Bath  Jockey  Bonnet  with 
black  Lining,  r new  dark  purple  and  white  Callico 
Gown,  2 new  Shifts,  2 new  shirts  mark’d  R.  R.  1 
ditto  mark’d  I.  B.  1 Muslin  Handkerchief,  1 very  fine 
Check  ditto,  very  small  Check,  1 Napkin,  1 Man’s 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


125 


1752] 

Linnen  Cap,  with  Ruffels,  mark'd  A.  W.  1 plain 
Linnen  Cap  mark’d  M.  F.  6 Stocks,  and  several 
other  small  Things  : Also  about  40  Pounds  in  Cash, 

Pennsylvania  and  Jersey  Paper,  and  some  Silver ; 
amongst  which  is  about  20s.  in  English  Shillings  and 
Six-pences.  Whoever  takes  up  the  Thief,  with  the 
Goods,  so  that  the  Owner  may  have  them  again, 
shall  have  Ten  Pounds  Reward ; and  for  the  Thief 
only,  so  that  he,  she,  or  they  may  be  brought  to 
Justice,  Five  Pounds  Reward,  per 

James  Rutherfoord. 

— AT.  Y.  Gazette , Revived  in  the  l Weekly  Post  Boy , 
Jan.  13,  1752. 

TO  Be  Sold,  or  Lett.  A very  good  Dwelling- 
House,  containing  several  Fine-Rooms  well  finished, 
a good  Stone  Cellar  under  it,  and  a Kitchen  and 
Milk-House  adjoining  to  it.  The  Lot  belonging  to 
said  House,  consists  of  near  four  Acres  of  uood 

o 

Land,  upon  which  there  is  a very  good  bearing 
Orchard,  two  Gardens,  a very  good  Stone  Well,  a 
large  Store-House,  Chaise-House,  and  Stable,  &c. 
Which  House  and  Appurtenances,  are  situated  in 
the  Centre  of  the  Town  of  Shrewsberry,  in  New- 
Jersey,  near  the  English  Church,  the  Presbyterian’s 
and  Quaker  Meeting-Houses,  being  very  convenient 
for  a Gentleman  or  Merchant,  lying  within  two  or 
three  Miles  of  several  Landings  and  Mills  : There  is 
also  belonging  to  the  same,  forty  Acres  of  good 
Land,  well  timber’d,  within  a Mile  of  said  House. 
Those  who  have  a Mind  to  purchase  or  hire,  may  en- 
quire of  Samuel  or  Catherine  Stilwell,  at  New  York, 


126  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1752 

and  know  further. — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in 
the  Weekly  Post  Boy)  Jan.  20,  1752. 

TO  be  sold,  two  good  Houses  and  a Lot  of  Ground, 
together  or  separate,  one  in  Hanover-Square,  now  in 
the  Tenure  of  Jasper  Farmar,  the  other  joining 
thereto,  fronting  Hunter’s-Key,  now  in  the  Tenure 
of  Mrs.  Gomez.  Apply  to  Mr.  Nicholas  Governeur, 

or  said  Farmar There  is  also  to  be 

sold  by  the  said  Governeur  and  Farmar,  a Parcel  of 
Lots  of  Meadow  ; and  an  Island,  lying  on  the  East 
Side  of  Hackinsack  River,  in  East-New-Jersey,  join- 
ing to  the  North  Boundaries  of  a Tract  belonging  to 
the  Corporation  of  Bergen,  on  the  East  Side,  joining 
to  a Tract  of  Land  formerly  Mr.  Samuel  Edsal’s. 
Good  Titles  will  be  given  by  the  Executors  of  Mrs. 
Maria  Governeur. — The  N.  Ym  Gazette  Revived  in 
the  Weekly  Post  Boy , Jan.  20,  1752. 

Philadelphia,  January  21,  1752. 

We  hear  from  Trenton,  that  in  the  Night  between 
the  6th  and  7th  Instant,  the  House  of  James  Ruther- 
ford was  broke  open  there,  and  Goods  to  a consid- 
erable Value  carried  off,  with  about  Forty  Pounds  in 
Cash. — Pennsylvania  Gazette , Jan.  21,  1752.  No. 

1 206. 

There  is  still  remaining  in  the  Hands  of  the  Printer 
hereof,  Ten  of  the  Trentown  Lottery  Tickets  ; such 
of  them  as  are  not  taken  away  before  next  Saturday, 
will  be  then  returned  : The  said  Lottery  is  to  be 
drawn  the  first  Week  in  February. — The  N.  Y.  Ga- 
zette Revived  in  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , Jan.  27,  1752. 


1 75  2 J NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS.  12  J 

Whereas  Anotomy  is  allowed  on  all  Hands,  to  be 
the  Foundation  of  Physick  and  Surgery,  and  conse- 
quently, without  Some  Knowledge  of  it,  no  Person 
can  be  duly  qualified  to  practice  either  : This  is 

therefore  to  inform  the  Public,  That  a Course  of 
Osteology  and  Myology,  is  intended  to  be  begun, 
some  Time  in  February  next,  in  the  City  of  New- 
Brunswick,  (of  which  Notice  will  be  given  in  this 
Paper,  as  soon  as  a proper  Number  have  subscribed 
towards  it.)  In  which  Course,  all  the  human  Bones 
will  be  separately  examined,  and  their  Constructions 
and  Dependencies  on  each  other  demonstrated  ; and 
all  the  Musci.es  of  a human  Body  dissected ; the 
Origin , Insertion , and  Use  of  each,  plainly  shewn, 
&c.  This  Course  is  propos’d  to  be  finished  in  the 
Space  of  a Month,  By 

Thomas  Wood,  Surgeon 

Such  Gentlemen  who  are  willing  to  attend  this 
Course,  are  desired  to  subscribe  their  Names  as 
soon  as  possible,  with  Mr.  Richard  Ayscough , 
Surgeon,  at  New.  York , or  said  Thomas  Wood , at 
New  Brunswick , paying  at  the  same  'Time,  Three 
Pounds,  Proc.  and  engaging  to  pay  the  said  Sum  of 
Three  Pounds  more,  when  the  Course  is  half  finished. 

N.  B.  If  proper  Encouragement  is  given  in  this 
Course,  he  proposes  soon  a/ter,  to  go  thro’  a 
Course  of  Angiology  and  Newrology;  and  con- 
clude, with  performing  all  the  Operations  of 
Surgery,  on  a dead  Body:  The  Use  of  which  will 

appear  to  every  Person,  who  considers  the  Neces- 
sity of  having  (at  least)  Seen  them  perform’d  ; 
before  h presumes  to  perform  them  himself  on  any 


128  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [_ 1 75 2 

living  Fellow-Creature. — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived 
in  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , Jan.  27,  1752. 

To  be  Lett. 

The  dwelling-house  and  plantation  where  Robert 
Field  now  lives,  at  White  hill  in  West-New-Jersey, 
being  a beautiful  seat  by  the  river  Delaware,  a very 
good  dwelling-house,  and  good  barn,  a good  and 
very  convenient  bake-house,  under  the  bank  by  the 
river,  with  a wharff  to  the  Channel  to  accommodate 
it,  about  150  acres  of  cleared  land  and  meadow;  a 
good  orchard,  garden  and  all  in  good  order  and 
good  fence  ; to  be  lett  for  the  term  of  4 or  5 years. 
The  person  inclining  to  rent  the  same,  may  know 
the  terms,  by  applying  to  Robert  Field,  living  on  the 
place. — Penn.  Gazette , Jan.  28,  1752.  No.  1207. 

STolen  on  Wednesday  night,  the  22nd  inst. 
out  of  the  stable  of  Joshua  Howel,  of  Am- 
well  in  New  Jersey.  A dark  bay,  pacing  horse,  in 
very  good  order,  about  14  hands  and  a half  high, 
has  very  crooked  hind  legs  and  scringes  like  a deer, 
when  he  is  mounted,  without  mark  or  brand,  short 
switch  tail,  shod  all  round  with  new  shoes,  and  is 
about  5 years  old.  Whoever  takes  up  the  said  horse 
and  thief,  so  that  the# thief  may  be  brought  to  justice, 
shall  have  Two  Pistoles  reward  for  each,  and  reason- 
able charges,  paid  by 

Joshua  Howel. 

— Penna.  Gazette , Jan.  28,  1752.  No.  1207. 

Run  away  from  Benjamin  Morgan,  in  Waterford 
Township,  Gloucester  county,  a Dutch  servant  man, 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


129 


1752] 

named  Andrew  Head,  about  22  years  of  age,  mid- 
dling tall,  round  shouldered,  with  black  curl’d  hair. 
Had  on  when  he  went  away  an  old  felt  hat,  brown 
linnen  coat,  with  hooks  instead  of  buttons,  a light 
colour’d  jacket,  and  a red  one  under  it,  light  colour’d 
cloth  breeches,  yarn  stockings,  and  half  worn  shoes. 
Whoever  takes  up  and  secures  said  servant,  so  that 
his  master  may  have  him  again,  shall  have  Three 
Pounds  reward,  and  reasonable  charges,  paid  by 

Benjamin  Morgan 

N.  B.  Said  servant  has  lost  part  of  his  nose,  so 
that  he  has  but  one  nostril,  which  causes  a defect  in 
his  speech. — Pennsylvania  Gazette , Jan.  28,  1752. 

To  be  sold,  by  publick  vendue,  on  the  second  of 
March  next,  by  the  executrix  of  Robert  Hubbs,  de- 
ceased, the  plantation,  where  he  lived,  in  Gloucester 
county,  about  four  miles  from  Cooper’s  Ferry,  con- 
taining about  200  acres  of  good  land,  well  water’d 
and  timber’d,  with  about  15  acres  of  meadow,  and 
more  may  be  made,  a good  orchard,  dwelling-house, 
barn,  and  other  outhouses ; also  cows,  horses,  and 
other  utensils  for  farming:  Said  place  lies  about  one 
mile  from  a landing,  where  attendance,  and  reason- 
able credit  will  be  given,  giving  security,  if  required, 
by  Lucy  Hubbs. 

— Pennsylvania  Gazette , Jan . 28,  1752. 

Run  away  from  John  Phillips  of  this  City,  4th  of 
May  last,  a Negro  Man  named  Sampson,  about  40 
Years  of  Age,  a short  well  set  Fellow,  much  pitted 
with  the  Small  Pox,  has  a very  old  look,  had  on  when 

he  went  away  a blue  Fearnothing  Jacket,  Oznabrigs 

9 


130  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [ I 75  2 

Shirt  and  Trowsers,  and  an  old  Felt  Hat.  He  has 
made  a Practice  of  Running  away  and  Sculking  in  the 
Woods  near  Plantations,  he  was  taken  up  last  Year 
and  put  in  Amboy  Goal.  Whoever  takes  up  and 
secures  said  Negro  so  that  his  Master  may  have  him 
again  shall  have  Five  Pounds,  Reward  and  reason- 
able Charges  paid,  by 

John  Philips. 

—Penna.  Journal , Jan.  28,  1752.  No.  480. 

Philadelphia,  January  29,  1752. 

Last  night  broke  out  of  the  goal  of  the  county  of 
Gloucester,  the  two  following  prisoners,  viz ; one 
named  Sylvanus  Gosling,  son  of  John  Gosling  of 
Greenwich  of  the  county  aforesaid,  by  trade,  a black- 
smith, has  been  used  to  tend  a saw-mill  and  can  do 
most  sorts  of  plantation  work,  of  a middle  stature, 
and  tawny  complexion  : Had  on  and  took  with  him  a 
new  beaver  hat,  and  an  old  one,  linnen  cap,  dark 
coloured  camblet  coat,  and  waistcoat,  an  old  brown 
cloth  coat,  and  an  old  bluish  coloured  cloth  waistcoat, 
check  shirt,  leather  breeches,  old  light  colour’d 
worsted  stockings,  new  shoes,  with  a pair  of  square 
metal  buckles.  The  other  named  Morgan  Rorke, 
an  Irishman  of  short  stature,  speaks  tolerable  good 
English,  served  his  time  to  plantation  business,  in 
East  Jersey : Had  on  a half  worn  beaver  hat,  linnen 
cap,  lightish  colour’d  homespun  coat,  about  half 
worn,  a homespun  greenish  colour’d  Jacket,  check 
shirt,  old  leather  breeches,  gray  yarn  stockings, 
double  soal’d  shoes,  with  steel  buckles.  Whoever 
takes  up  and  secures  said  Prisoners,  in  any  goal,  sq 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


I752J 


13  I 


that  they  may  be  had  again,  shall  have  Three  Pounds 
reward  for  each,  and  reasonable  charges,  paid  by 

John  Mickle,  Sheriff. 

— Pennsylvania  Gazette , Feb.  4,  1752.  No.  1108. 


To  Be  Sold, 

A Farm  containing  200  Acres  of  Land,  all  within 
Fence,  except  about  8 or  10  Acres,  whereon  are  five 
Orchards,  which  makes  the  best  of  Cyder  ; and  where- 
on has  been  mowed,  between  30  and  40  Loads  of 
English  and  fresh  Hay  ; with  a good  Stone  House, 
with  twoFire-places,  and  a good  double  Barn,  and  a 
new  Saw-Mill  ; the  River  that  supplies  the  Mill  runs 
through  the  Middle  of  the  Land,  and  can  drown  be- 
tween 25  and  30  Acres,  well  timber’d  and  wooded: 
Whoever  inclines  to  purchase  the  same,  may  apply 
to  James  Banks,1  of  Newark,  or  David  Cox,  near  the 
Long-Bridge  in  New- York. 

N.  B.  The  said  Farm  lies  about  2 Miles  and  a half 
from  Newark,  in  the  County  of  Essex,  New-Jersey. 
The  Title  indisputable. — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived 
in  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , Feb.  10,  1752. 


Philadelphia,  February  11. 
Saturday  last,  one  William  Kerr  was  committed 
to  the  Jail  of  this  City  on  Suspicion  of  having 
counterfeited  the  Mill’d  Pieces  of  Eight.  There 

<_5 

were  several  bad  Ones  found  upon  him,  and  a 
Receipt  for  mixing  of  Metals.  He  pretends  to  be  a 
Weaver,  and  says  he  lives  at  Bethlehem,  in  the 

1 Banks  had  been  a resident  of  Newark  many  yeais.  At  the  town  meeting,  March  8, 
i736~7,  “ the  feed  of  the  burying  Place  was  sold  to  James  Banks,  for  the  insuing  Year  for 
40s.  to  be  paid  to  the  support  of  the  Poor,  except  so  much  as  is  necessary,  to  repair  the 
Fence  of  s’d  burying  Place." — Newark  Town  Records , 133. 


132 


NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1752 


Jerseys,  with  one  William  M’Crackken.  The  Pieces 
are  cast  in  Sand,  and  are  filed  upon  the  Milling  ; 
they  look  very  rough,  and  are  more  of  a Lead  than 
Silver  Colour,  and  sound  like  Brass. — Penn.  Gazette , 
Feb.  11,  1752.  No.  1209. 

TO  be  sold  by  Elizabeth  Leslie,  Widow,  and 
Executrix  of  the  last  Will  and  Testament  of  George 
Leslie,1  late  of  the  City  of  Perth-Amboy,  deceas’d, 
A Tract  of  Land  lying  on  the  South  Side  of  Rariton 
River,  opposite  to  the  City  of  Perth-Amboy,  contain- 
ing about  1200  Acres  of  Up  land  and  Meadow,  with 
a large  Dwelling-House  thereon,  well  finished,  46 
Foot  in  Length,  and  40  in  Breadth,  four  Rooms  on  a 
Floor,  eight  Fire-places  with  suitable  Conveniencies, 
&c.  One  Barn  40  Feet  square,  an  Orchard  of  600 
Apple  Trees,  most  Part  of  said  Tract  may  be  fenc’d 
in  with  about  a Mile  and  an  half  of  Fence ; 
the  other  three  Sides  being  enclosed  with  Water, 
viz.  two  Creeks  and  the  Bay.  There  is  convenient 
Landings  for  Exportation  either  to  New-York  or 
Amboy.  It  lies  commodious  for  any  foreign  or 
other  Trade,  well  situated  for  Business,  and  fit  for 
either  a Gentleman  or  Farmer.  The  Soil  is  good, 
and  the  Place  well  timber’d  and  watered,  and  very 
convenient  for  raising  large  Stock.  There  is  also 
Fishing,  Fowling,  and  Oystering,  in  plenty,  the  Right 

1 George  Leslie  was  a nephew  of  George  Willocks,  one  of  the  Twenty-four  Proprietors 
of  East  Jersey.  He  was  a native  of  Scotland,  but  with  his  sister  Anna,  afterwards  wife 
of  John  Ritchie,  came  to  this  country  and  settled  at  South  Amboy.  He  was  vestryman 
of  St.  Peter’s  church,  Perth  Amboy,  1722-29,  and  1750-51.  George  Willocks,  who  died  in 
1729,  left  the  bulk  of  his  property  to  George  Leslie  and  Anna  Ritchie  ; his  sister,  their 
mother,  was  living  in  Scotland  at  the  time.  George  Leslie  died  at  South  Amboy,  in  1751. 
Although  he  had  been  obliged  to  part  with  much  of  the  land  in  1742  or  1743,  it  is  evident 
from  the  above  advertisement  that  he  retained  a large  estate, 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


33 


1752] 

thereof  being-  particularly  comprehended  in  the 
Patent.  Likewise  a Prospect  of  a Sea-Coal  Mine, 
some  whereof  has  been  tried.  Also  one  other  Tract 
of  1000  Acres,  lying  at  Peapack,  on  the  North-east 
Side  of  Lamaton  Falls,  in  the  County  of  Somerset, 
whereon  are  several  Settlements  and  Improvements. 
The  Land  is  exceeding  good  for  Pasture,  and  rais- 
ing all  Sorts  of  Grain.  It  lyes  about  16  Miles  from 
Rariton-Landing.  The  same  will  be  sold  in  Lots, 
or  the  Whole  together — All  Persons  who  have  any 
Demands  on  the  said  Estate,  are  hereby  desired  to 
bring  or  send  an  Account  thereof  to  the  said  Execu- 
trix, that  proper  Care  may  be  taken  to  discharge  the 
same : And  those  who  are  indebted  to  the  said 
Estate,  are  also  desired  to  come  and  pay  their 
respective  Debts. — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in 
the  Weekly  Post  Boy , Feb.  17,  1752. 

TO  be  sold  at  Publick  Vendue,  on  Wednesday, 
the  first  Day  of  April  next,  by  Samuel  Fitz  Ran- 
dolph,1 The  Plantation  whereon  Samuel  Barron  now 
lives,  in  the  Town  of  Woodbridge,  containing  90 
Acres  of  good  Land  and  Meadow,  with  a large 
Brick  House,  a new  Barn  and  Kitchen,  and  a good 
Orchard  thereon.  A great  Part  of  the  Land  is 
fenced  by  Water.  The  Salt-Meadow,  joining  to  the 
Up-land,  is  very  convenient  for  keeping  Stock,  or 
Trade,  there  being  a Landing  where  a Sloop  of  80 
Tons  has  been  within  four  Rods  of  the  said  Land, 

1 Probably  the  Samuel  Fitz  Randolph,  Jun.,  whose  marriage  to  Joanna  Kinsey  was 
reported  to  Woodbridge  Monthly  meeting,  ioth  month,  18th,  1729.  He  was  perhaps  a 
grandson  of  Nathaniel,  b.  at  Barnstable,  Mass.,  in  1642  ; m.  Mary,  dau.  of  Joseph  Holley, 
in  1662,  and  about  1679  removed  with  his  family  to  Woodbridge;  he  and  his  descendants 
are  believed  to  have  been  the  only  persons  of  the  name  who  were  Friends. 


134  NEW  JERSEY  colonial  documents.  [i  752 

which  is  in  a public  Part  of  the  Country. — The  N.  Y. 
Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , Feb.  17, 
1752. 

STolen  out  of  the  pocket  of  Thomas  Robbs,  of  this 
city,  on  the  4th  inst.  at  the  house  of  John  Smith, 
Tavernkeeper,  at  the  sign  of  the  Lamb,  about  a mile 
from  this  city,  on  Frankford  road,  a pocket-book, 
containing  about  Twenty-five  Shillings  in  money, 
and  five  Trenton  lottery  tickets,  the  numbers  are 
3056,  3057,  3095,  3096,  and  3097.  Whoever  secures 
the  thief,  so  as  he  may  be  brought  to  justice,  and  the 
money  and  tickets,  had  again,  shall  have  Ten  Shillings 
reward,  paid  by 

Thomas  Robbs. 

N.  B.  The  tickets  if  offered  to  sale,  are  desired  to 
be  stopped,  and  sent  to  George  Poolley’s  in  Chest- 
nut street. — Pennsylvania  Gazette , Feb.  18,  1752. 
No.  1210. 

To  be  sold,  A large  Tract  of  Meadow,  lying  in 
East  New-Jersey,  on  the  East  side  of  Hackinsack 
River,  bounded  on  the  N.  E.  Side  by  Overpeck’s 
Creek,  on  the  East  by  Edsel’s  or  the  Mill-Creek,  on 
the  South  by  Bellamont’s  or  Esperten1  Creek,  and  on 
the  West  by  Hackinsack  River  ; there  is  an  Island 
on  the  North  End  of  said  Meadows,  which  has 
Meadows  added  to,  that  make  137  Acres,  on  a Neck 
that  a Ditch  of  thirty — odd  Chain  will  make  it  entirely 
divided  from  the  rest.  It  will  be  sold  in  such  Parcels, 
as  the  Purchasers  shall  chuse.  Persons  inclining  to 
purchase  may  see  the  Plan  and  know  the  Conditions, 


1 Espating,  an  Indian  word  for  “ hill.” 


1 75 NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS.  135 

by  applying  to  Jasper  Farmer  at  New-York. — The 
N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , Feb . 
24,  1752. 

TO  be  sold  all  together  or  in  Parcels,  a Tract  of 
extraordinary  good  Land,  situate,  lying  and  being 
near  Rocky-Hill,  in  the  County  of  Somerset,  and 
Eastern  Division  of  the  Province  of  New-Jersey, 
about  15  Miles  from  New-Brunswick,  containing 
about  1000  Acres,  near  Half  whereof  being  clear’d 
and  in  good  Fence,  now  in  the  Possession  of  John 
Sartor,  Henry  Sartor,  Henry  Snider  and  Thomas 
Ring,  being  settled  in  four  Plantations,  with  a very 
good  young  bearing  Orchard  upon  one  of  them,  and 
sundry  other  Improvements  upon  them  all.  Who- 
ever inclines  to  purchase  the  Whole,  or  any  Part 
thereof,  may  apply  to  Messrs.  Abraham  Van  Horne, 
of  this  City,  (who  is  the  Owner  thereof)  James  Van 
Horne,1  or  John  Berrien  near  the  Premises,  and  know 
the  Conditions  and  Title,  which  is  indisputable.  As 
also  another  Lot,  situate  in  Tappan,  commonly  known 
by  the  Name  of  Lot  No.  35.  containing  370  Acres, 
whereon  Hendrick  Young-  now  lives.  N.  B.  The 
abovesaid  Abraham  Van  Horne  has  very  good  Cho- 
colate to  sell  2od.  by  the  single  Pound,  and  some- 
thing less  by  the  Quantity. — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Re- 
vived in  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , Feb . 24,  1752. 

To  be  lett,  for  a term  of  ten  years,  from  the  first 
of  March  next  ensuing,  a plantation  in  the  township 

1 Abraham  Van  Horne  (bap.  Oct.  13,  1708)  and  Jacobus  or  James  Van  Horne  (bap.  June 
29, 1712)  were  sons  of  Johannes  Cornelissen  van  Hoorn,  of  New  York,  who  m.  in  1693 
Catrymie,  dau.  of  Andries  Jansen  and  Vrontie  (van  Vorst)  Meyer.  The  oldest  child  of 
Johannes  and  Catryntie  was  Cornelis,  bap.  Dec.  17,  1696,  who  was  Mayor  of  New  York, 
and  member  of  the  Council  of  New  Jersey  many  years,  and  who  m.  Elizabeth,  dau.  of 
Philip  and  Anne  (Philipse)  French,  of  New  Brunswick. 


136  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1752 

of  Newton,  and  county  of  Gloucester,  situate  on 
Delaware  river,  and  Cooper’s  Creek,  where  Isaac 
Cooper1  lately  dwelt,  about  a mile  and  half  from 
Philadelphia  ; consisting  of  about  80  acres  of  plow- 
ingdand  ; 20  acres  of  drained  meadows  ; 30  acres  of 
good  orchard,  and  half  an  acre  sparrow-grass  ; a 
good  dwelling-house ; a well  of  good  water,  with  a 
pump ; a barn  ; still-house  and  still,  and  a good 
store-house,  with  a convenient  cellar  underneath  ; 
cyder-house,  and  utensils  for  making  of  cyder ; milk 
house  and  other  out  houses ; the  place  is  convenient 
for  keeping  a dairy,  and  the  soil  is  good  for  the  rais- 
ing of  vegetables  for  the  market : Any  person  in- 
clining to  rent  the  same,  may  know  the  terms,  by 
applying  to  Isaac  Cooper,  aforesaid,  at  his  dwelling, 
two  miles  from  said  place. 

Also  to  be  lett,  for  the  term  of  ten  years,  a certain 
quantity  of  land,  situate  on  Delaware  river,  about 
fourteen  miles  from  Philadelphia,  called  Billens-port, 
in  the  township  of  Greenwich,  and  county  of  Glou- 
cester; containing  ioo  acres  or  more,  of  tide-swamp, 
and  marsh  ; now  in  the  rough,  well  bank’d  in  and 
drain’d,  with  a piece  of  upland  adjoining  ; the  land 
is  rich  when  clear’d,  is  suitable  for  the  raising  of 
Indian  corn,  Hemp,  Flax,  &c.  for  mowing  or  feeding 
of  cattle.  Any  Person  or  Persons  inclining  to  take 
the  same,  to  cause  it  to  be  put  and  left,  at  the 

1 Isaac  Cooper  was  the  oldest  son  of  Joseph  Cooper  (b.  seventh  month,  22d,  1666)  and 
Lydia  Riggs,  whom  he  married  in  1688,  she  being  then  a resident  of  Philadelphia,  but  of 
Irish  birth  or  parentage.  Joseph  Cooper  was  the  third  child  of  William  Cooper,  b.  in 
1632  in  Coleshill,  Amersham,  Herts,  England,  who  probably  came  to  Burlington  in  1679  or 
1680,  when  he  bought  50  acres  of  land  in  that  town ; in  1682  he  secured  a tract  of  300  acres 
at  Pyne  Point,  the  junction  of  Cooper’s  creek  with  the  Delaware  river;  in  1708  he  con- 
veyed 200  acres  of  this  tract  to  his  son  Joseph;  he  died  in  1710.  Joseph  died  in  1731. 
Isaac  married  Hannah  Coates. — Clement's  First  Settlers  in  Newton  Township , 85-99. 


1752] 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


137 


expiration  of  said  term,  in  a good  soard  of  grass  and 
mowing  order  (shall  be  for  rent)  may  apply  to  Isaac 
Cooper  aforesaid,  and  be  further  informed. 

TO  be  sold,  A good  Plantation  in  the  Township 
of  Middletown,  in  East-New-Jersey,  on  the  North 
Side  of  Shrewsbury-River,  containing  upwards  of 
200  Acres,  with  a very  good  Dwelling-House, 
Kitchen,  Barn,  and  Stables  ; salt  and  fresh  Meadow, 
and  two  good  Orchards.  Any  one  inclining  to  buy, 
may  apply  to  Jonathan  Burgd,  now  living  on  the 
Premisses. — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly 
Post  Boy , March  9,  1752. 

New  York , March  1 6.  Extract  of  a Letter  from 
Kingston , in  New-Jersey , March  10,  1752. 

“Mr.  Parker , In  your  Paper  Numb.  462,  we  had 
an  Account  of  the  Marriage  of  Daniel  Baley  and 
Elizabeth  Waters,  solemnized  on  the  10th  of  Novem- 
ber last,  in  this  Town  ; which  Couple  have  eversince 
lived  in  the  happy  Enjoyment  of  each  other,  for  the 
most  Part,  until  the  9th  of  this  Month  ; when,  by 
Consent  of  both  Parties,  in  the  Presence  of  a Num- 
ber of  Spectators,  after  having  given  Security  never 
to  be  burthensom  to  each  other,  as  likewise  for  their 
Loyalty  while  absent,  parted,  never  to  meet  again  in 
the  State  of  Matrimony. — What  the  Cause  was  we 
know  not ; but  some  who  pretend  to  know,  say, 
they  had  not  courted  long  enough  before  Marriage/’ 
— N.  Y.  Gazette , Revived  in  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , 
March  16,  1752. 

To  Be  Sold, 

By  Samuel  Nevill,  of  the  City  of  Perth- Amboy, 


138  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1752 

Esq  ; who  is  determined  to  leave  off  the  Farm- 
ing Business,  and  to  live  retired. 

THE  Plantation  whereon  he  now  liveth  in  Perth- 
Amboy,  lying  partly  in  the  City  of  Perth-Amboy, 
and  partly  in  the  Township  of  Woodbridge,  contain- 
ing upwards  of  280  Acres  ; upon  which  is  a good 
Dwelling-House,  a compleat  Dairy-House,  with  a 
Spring  running  thro’  the  same,  Wash-House,  and 
Bake-House,  and  other  convenient  Out-Houses,  a 
very  good  Barn  and  Stable,  and  convenient  Yards 
for  Cattle.  The  Land  is  esteemed  as  good  Arable 
and  Pasture  Land,  as  any  in  the  Township  of 
Woodbridge  ; a great  part  of  it  hath  never  been 
tilled,  and  the  rest  little  or  nothing  the  worse  for 
Use;  there  are  several  improved  Spots  of  Meadow, 
well  ditch’d,  and  in  good  Fence,  off  of  which  may  be 
got  40  Loads  of  Hay  a Year.  The  Whole  is  very 
well  watered  by  a great  many  living  Springs  ; and 
is  bounded  for  near  Half  a Mile  by  the  River 
Rariton,  and  all  along  the  Front  of  the  Plantation 
are  Beds  of  very  good  Oysters. 

N.  B.  The  said  Plantation  being  situate  near  the 
Mouth  of  the  River  Rariton,  is  most  commodious 
for  a Merchant,  and  is  capable  of  the  greatest  Im- 
provements, there  being  most  convenient  Places  lor 
building  Wharfs  and  Store-Houses,  the  Channel  of 
the  River  running  within  8 or  10  Rods  of  the  Up- 
land; so  that  Vessels  of  4 or  5 Hundred  Tons  may 
come  up  to  the  said  Wharfs,  and  unload  ; and  the 
River  forming  there  a little  Bay  or  Harbour,  which 
is  Land-lock’d,  a Vessel  may  ride  there  safe  in  the 
greatest  Storms.  And  as  the  Publick  need  not  be 


1 752]  NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS.  1 39 

informed,  that  a chief  Part  of  the  Produce  of  the 
Province  of  New-Jersey,  comes  down  the  said  River, 
and  consequently  must  pass  by  this  Plantation,  in  its 
Way  to  a Market,  so  if  any  Merchant  should  be  dis- 
posed to  settle  in  this  Province,  he  cannot  fix  upon  a 
more  promising-,  commodious,  beautiful  Situation. 
The  Title  will  be  made  indisputable,  and  to  the  Pur- 
chaser’s Satisfaction. — 1 he  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in 
the  Weekly  Post  Boy,-  March  1 6,  1752. 

[Extract  of  a letter  published  in  London  Sept. 

1-1751-] 

Sir, 

The  French  since  the  last  Peace,  have  been  so 
much  encroaching  on  the  Trade  and  Territories  of 
our  British  Northern  Colonies,  that  we  are  anxious 
to  hear  of  the  Success  of  our  Negociations  at  Paris. 
As  I have  had  some  Oppertunity,  I have  done  all  in 
my  Power  that  our  Commissaries  be  well  informed, 
as  I have  been  particularly  applied  to  for  that  Pur- 
pose. I am  fully  persuaded  that  the  Northern 
Colonies  are  of  much  greater  Consequence  to  the 
Naval  Force  and  Trade  of  Great  Britain,  than  the 
Sugar  Islands,  though  it  seems  that  there  has  been 
much  Pains  taken  to  make  it  appear  otherwise. 

There  is  no  Comparison  in  the  Quantity  of  the 
English  Manufactures,  that  are  annually  consumed 
in  the  Northern  Colonies,  and  the  Sugar  Islands. 
Besides,  the  West  India  Trade  is  a perpetual 
Destruction  of  Seamen,  whereas  the  Nothern  Colony 
Trade,  and  the  Fishery  especially,  is  a continued 
Nursery  for  their  Increase;  and  therefore  it  is  my 
humble  Opinion,  that  an  exclusive  Fishery  alone, 


140  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [ I 752 

would  be  of  more  Benefit  to  the  Nation  than  all  the 
Sugar  Islands  put  together ; for  whatever  Nation 
has  the  greatest  naval  Force  will  always  command 
the  Trade.  This  is  evident  from  the  Case  of  Spain, 
which  has  decayed  in  its  Trade  and  Naval  Force, 
ever  since  their  Settlement  of  their  numerous  South- 
ern Colonies.  The  French  were  made  very  sensible 
in  the  last  War,  of  the  Naval  Force  of  the  Northern 
Colonies,  though  it  had  no  other  Support  but  that  of 
private  Adventurers.  The  French  think  our  Minis- 
try will  suffer  a thousand  little  Injuries  at  a Distance, 
rather  than  go  into  another  War,  for  they  reap  more 
Advantages  by  a Peace,  which  gives  them  fresh  Oppor- 
tunities to  make  Encroachments,  in  order  to  lay  Founda- 
tions to  carry  on  the  next  War  more  to  their  Interest. 
I have  heard  it  reported,  that  Printing-Presses  are  by 
all  means  to  be  discouraged  in  our  Colonies  ; I am 
amazed  at  it ; I wish  it  may  not  be  true.  That  the 
Colonies  ought  to  be  kept  in  Ignorance,  is  not  the 
just  Sentiment  of  a Mother  Country  towards  its 
Children,  but  of  a Master  Country  towards  its 
Servants.  Love  us,  encourage  and  educate  us  as 
Children,  and  we  shall  always  give  you  the  Honour, 
Love  and  Obedience,  that  is  due  to  a Parent.  But 
if  you  begin  to  consider  us  merely  as  your  Tenants, 
your  Labourers,  or  your  Slaves,  we  must  of  Course 
by  Degrees  lose  all  true  Respect  and  Affection  for 
you.  I am,  dear  Sir, 

Your  most  humble  Servant 

Publicus. 

— Penn.  Gazette , March  17,  1752.  No,  1214. 


1752]  NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS.  141 

Run  away  on  the  7th  inst.  from  Samuel  Large,  of 
Kingwood,  in  West  Jersey,  A servant  lad,  this  country 
born,  named  James  Reily,  about  16  years  of  age,  son 
of  Hugh  Reily,  formerly  of  Bethlehem,  now  of  Am- 
well,  wears  his  own  hair : Had  on  when  he  went 
away,  a greenish  homespun  jacket,  woollen  breeches, 
old  felt  hat,  two  shirts,  half-worn  shoes  and  stockings. 
Whoever  takes  up  said  servant,  so  that  his  master 
may  have  him  again,  shall  have  Forty  Shillings 
reward,  and  reasonable  charges,  paid  by 

Samuel  Large. 

— Penn.  Gazette,  March  17,  1752.  No.  1214. 

WHereas  by  reason  of  the  severity  of  the  season, 
and  fluctuating  condition  the  ice  was  in,  it  was  im- 
practicable either  to  pass  the  river  Delaware,  to  the 
place  appointed  for  drawing  the  Trenton  Lottery  on 
the  Pennsylvania  side,  or  to  get  an  account  of  the 
tickets  sold,  remitted  to  the  managers,  at  the  time 
fixed  for  drawing  the  lottery,  in  so  particular  a man- 
ner as  was  necessary,  to  enable  them  to  proceed  in 
the  execution  of  that  design  ; tho’  they  have  had 
general  intelligence  of%  a very  successful  sale,  for 
which  they  are  obliged  to  the  publick.  The  manag- 
ers therefore  find  themselves  under  a necessity  to 
delay  the  drawing  for  some  small  space  of  time,  till 
they  can  with  convenience  get  the  tickets  returned, 
and  make  the  necessary  preparations;  and  hereby  de- 
sire all  gentlemen  who  have  done  them  the  favour  to 
sell  tickets,  to  send  in  an  account  of  what  tickets  they 
have  sold,  and  give  back  the  tickets  remaining  in 
their  hands  undisposed  of  by  the  twentieth  day  of 
April,  that  they  may  do  justice  to  the  purchasers  by 


142  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  Lr752 

drawing  the  same  ; they  are  determin’d  to  begin  on 
the  twenty-seventh  of  said  month,  and  continue  the 
same  from  that  time  till  finish’d,  at  the  house  of  Na- 
thaniel Parker,  in  Bucks  county,  being  the  ferry- 
house  from  the  Pennsylvania  side  over  to  Trenton. — 
Pennsylvania  Gazette,  March  17,  1752.  No.  1214. 

Custom-House,  Philadelphia  Entered  In. — Schoon- 
er Eagle,  James  Butler  from  Salem. Two  Broth- 

ers, Michael  Wormsted  from  Salem. — Penna.  Journal , 
March  17,  1752.  No.  487. 

New- York,  March  23.  Last  Tuesday  we  had  here 
a considerable  Shower  of  Rain.  About  a Week 
before  that,  we  had  a pretty  smart  Snow  Storm, 
attended  with  a great  deal  of  Thunder,  to  the  Sur- 
prize of  most,  as  it  is  no  common  Thing  here  to  have 
Snow  and  Thunder  both  at  once ; and  we  hear,  the 
Thunder  was  so  violent  at  that  Time  near  Wood- 
bridge,  that  a Boy  in  the  Field,  was  struck  down  and 
stunned,  but  happily  without  further  Damage. — The 
N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly  Post  Boy,  March 
23.  1 752.  # 

To  be  sold  by  Benjamin  Smith,  the  house  wherein 
he  now  dwells,  situate  in  Amwell,  Hunterdon  county, 
in  West  Jersey,  about  fifteen  miles  from  Trenton,  and 
thirty  from  Philadelphia,  containing  near  forty  feet 
in  front,  is  two  stories  high,  with  a piazza,  the  whole 
length  of  the  house,  and  ten  feet  wide,  with  cellars 
underneath,  and  a large  kitchen,  joining  to  the  end  of 
the  house ; also  a store  house,  containing  twenty- 
eight  feet  square,  with  a cooper’s  shop,  which  has  a 


752] 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


143 


pleasant  prospect  from  the  door,  several  miles  up 
and  down  the  river,  together  with  two  grist  mills, 
well  built  with  stone  laid  in  lime  and  sand,  situate 
within  eighty  feet  of  the  house,  one  of  which  can  go 
continually,  day  and  night,  when  the  river  is  low,  and 
the  other  when  it  is  high,  except  in  a great  fresh,  and 
both  can  go  when  the  river  is  of  a middling  height, 
they  are  capable  of  very  great  improvements,  and 
with  a small  charge,  a sufficient  quantity  of  water 
may  be  brought  to  serve  as  many  pair  of  stones  as  is 
necessary  to  put  up,  they  are  exceedingly  well  situate 
for  procuring  wheat,  besides  the  advantage  of  being 
in  the  neighborhood  of  a large  thick  settled  and  fer- 
tile country,  which  raises  vast  quantities  of  wheat, 
and  may  be  brought  down  the  river  Delaware,  from 
the  most  navigable  parts,  and  landed  within  twenty 
feet  of  the  mill  door,  thereby  avoiding  the  risque  of 
passing  through  the  dangerous  falls,  and  flour  may 
be  taken  from  thence,  when  the  river  is  of  a suitable 
height,  in  boats,  that  will  carry  fifty  or  sixty  casks  to 
Trenton,  or  Philadelphia,  and  may  transport  at  any 
time  by  water  from  the  foot  of  the  Falls,  which  is 
near  a quarter  of  a mile’s  land  carriage,  from  the  said 
mills  ; there  is  fifty-seven  acres  of  land,  adjoining  to 
the  said  mills,  between  twenty  and  thirty  acres  of 
which  is  cleared  ; also  twenty  two  acres  more,  about 
half  a mile  southward,  joining  to  the  river,  below  the 
foot  of  the  falls,  a very  suitable  place  for  the  settle- 
ment of  a boat  man,  nineteen  acres  of  swamp,  between 
five  and  six  of  which  is  cleared,  and  in  good  fence, 
fit  for  mowing,  being  sowed  with  timothy-grass,  and 
but  a little  more,  than  a mile  to  the  eastward,  and  ten 


144  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1752 

acres  of  exceeding  good  pasture  land,  seven  of  which 
is  cleared  and  in  good  fence,  covered  with  clover, 
timothy,  and  spear  grass,  a little  more  than  a mile 
toward  the  north-east,  all  of  which  lots,  may  be  sold 
together,  with  the  said  mills,  if  the  purchaser  thinks 
proper  ; an  advantage  may  also  be  had  by  trade  in 
New-York,  when  markets  suit  best  there,  it  being 
about  thirty  miles  to  Brunswick,  on  a very  good  road, 
considerable  quantities  of  flour  have  been  transported 
to  that  market. 

Also  to  be  sold,  another  grist  mill,  situate  in  an 
extraordinary  thick  settled  part  of  Amwell,  four 
miles  eastward,  from  the  river  Delaware,  on  York 
road,  about  sixteen  miles  from  Trenton,  lately  re- 
built, and  goes  exceeding  well,  being  overshot,  and 
upwards  of  four  feet  head  of  water,  above  the  wheel, 
together  with  a dwelling-house,  stable,  and  fifty  six 
acres  of  extraordinary  good  land,  about  seven  acres 
of  meadow  is  cleared  and  in  fence,  covered  with 
clover,  and  spear  grass,  seven  or  eight  acres  of 
interval  land  more  to  clear,  most  of  which  may  be 
watered,  it  lying  on  a fine  gradual  descent,  from  the 
mill-race,  the  stream  as  good  as  any  in  Amwell, 
with  a good  living  spring,  just  by  the  house,  which 
is  exceeding  well  situate  for  a store,  considering 
what  great  advantage  the  mill  will  give  in  trade  and 
custom,  by  purchasing  wheat,  the  mill  being  able  to 
do  more  than  the  country  work : If  the  purchaser 

thinks  proper,  he  may  have  them  a year  on  rent,  for 
trial,  and  enter  the  premises  immediately. 

Also  to  be  sold,  about  fifty  three  acres  of  wood 
land,  exceeding  thick  of  fine  young  timber,  near  two 


1752] 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


J45 

miles  distant  from  the  last  mentioned  mills.  Like- 
wise, between  forty  and  fifty  acres  of  land  in  Tren- 
ton, a considerable  quantity  of  which  is  meadow, 
and  the  greatest  part  cleared,  with  a good  barn,  and 
young  orchard,  grafted  with  a collection  of  best 
fruit ; a stone-quarry  and  brick  kiln,  with  very  good 
clay  for  making  brick,  and  several  streams  of  water 
runs  through  the  land. 

Like  wise  to  be  Sold,  a Stone  house  in  Trenton, 
two  stories  high,  with  a hundred  and  twenty  feet 
lot,  fronting  Queen-street,  convenient  for  two  tene- 
ments, with  sundry  lots  fronting  King-street,  and 
sundry  lots  fronting  Queen-street. 

Also  to  be  Sold,  the  plantation  whereon  Thomas 
Scant,  now  dwells,  in  Hanover  township,  Burlington 
county,  containing  near  five  hundred  acres,  a con- 
siderable quantity  of  which  is  meadow,  the  whole  is 
at  present  under  lease  to  said  Scant;  any  person  in- 
clining to  purchase,  may  have  the  greatest  part  of 
the  purchase  money  on  intrest,  giving  security,  if 
required  '—Penn.  Gazette , March  24,  1752.  No. 
1234- 

Custom-House,  Philadelphia,  Entered  in.  Sloop 
Diamond,  Joshua  Titcomb  from  Salem. — Penna. 
Journal , March  25,  1752.  No.  488. 

Custom-House,  Philadelphia,  Entered  In.  Sloop 
Unity,  Timothy  Stanley  from  Salem. — Penna.  Journal , 
April  2,  1752.  No.  489. 

Custom-House,  Philadelphia,  Cleared.  Schooner 
Two  Brothers,  M.  Wormstead  for  Salem. — Penna. 

Journal , April  2,  1752.  No.  489. 

10 


146  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1752 

Run  away  on  the  8th  of  March,  last  from  Joseph 
Hackney,  of  Chester  township,  Burlington  county, 
an  Irish  servant  lad,  named  Joseph  Simmons,  about 
1 8 years  of  age,  about  5 feet  6 inches  high,  of  a sandy 
complexion  : Had  on  when  he  went  away,  an  old  hat, 
cotton  cap,  light  colour’d  kersey  jacket,  pretty  much 
wore,  and  a blue  and  white  striped  under  jacket,  oz- 
enbrigs  shirt,  old  leather  breeches,  blue  grey  yarn 
stockings,  and  old  shoes,  with  large  brass  buckles. 
Whoever  takes  up  and  secures  said  servant,  so  that 
his  master  may  have  him  again,  shall  have  Three 
Pounds  reward,  and  reasonable  charges,  paid  by 

Joseph  Hackney. 

N.  B.  He  formerly  belong’d  to  John  Ogburn,  carter, 
in  Kensington. — Pennsylvania  Gazette,  April  2,  1752. 
No.  1216. 

New -York,  April  6.  Last  Monday  died,  in  the 
Eightieth  Year  of  her  Age,  and  on  Thursday  was 
decently  interred,  in  the  Family  Vault  at  Morrisania  ; 
Isabella  Morris,1  Widow,  and  Relict  of  his  Excellen- 
cy Lewis  Morris,  Esq  ; late  Governor  of  the  Prov- 
ince of  New-Jersey : A Lady  endowed  with  every 
Qualification  requisite  to  render  the  Sex  agreeable, 
and  entertaining,  through  all  the  various  Scenes  of 
Life:  She  was  a Pattern  of  conjugal  Affection;  a 
tender  Parent,  a sincere  Friend,  and  an  excellent  Oe- 
conomist. 

She  was 

Liberal,  without  Prodigality';  In  Person,  Amiable, 
Frugal,  without  Parsimony  ; In  Conversation,  Affable  ; 


1 She  was  a daughter  of  James  Graham,  Attorney  General  of  New  York.  The  marriage 
license  to  L,ewis  Morris  and  Isabella  Graham  is  dated  Nov,  3, 1691, 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


147 


1752] 

Chearful,  without  Levity  ; In  Friendship,  Faithful ; 
Exalted,  without  Pride.  Of  Envy,  void. 

That, 

She  pass’d  through  Life,  endow’d  with  every  Grace, 
Her  Vertues  ! black  Detraction  can’t  deface  ; 

Or  cruel  Envy  e’re  eclipse  her  Fame, 

Nor,  mouldering  Time,  obliterate  her  Name. 

In  Honour  to  her  Memory,  this  is  offered,  by  an 
Admirer  of  her  transcendant  Virtues. — The  N.  Y. 
Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , April  6, 
1752. 

Custom-House , New -York.  Inward  Entiles.  Brig. 
Spadil,  Alex.  Hope  from  New-Jersey. — The  N.  Y. 
Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , April  6, 
G52. 

Philadelphia, 

We  have  Advice  from  Trenton  in  New-Jersey,  that 
on  Monday  Night  last,  a Fire  broke  out  in  the  Stable 
of  Mr.  Bond , which  consumed  the  same  with  14 
Horses  in  it,  and  also  three  Dwelling  Houses,  adja- 
cent to  the  Stable. — Penna.  Journal , April  9,  1752. 
No.  490. 

Custom-House,  Philadelphia,  Entered  In.  Sloop 
Gordon,  Benjamin  Lunt  from  Salem.  Schooner  Two 
Friends,  William  Burroughs  from  Salem. — Penna. 
Journal , April  9,  1752.  No.  490. 

New-Jersey,  ss.  Public  Notice  is  hereby  given 
that  the  Circuit  Courts  or  Courts  for  Tryal  of  Causes 
brought  to  issue  in  the  Supream  Court  of  this  Prov- 
ince, will  for  this  present  Year  be  held  in  the  West- 


148  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1752 

ern  Division  as  follows  : At  Salem , on  the  third  Tues- 
day and  at  Cumberland , on  the  four  Tuesday  in  April. 

At  Gloucester  on  the  first  Tuesday  and  at  Hunterdon , 
the  third  Tuesday  in  May. 

By  Order  of  the  Judges. 

Penna.  Journal , April  9,  1752.  No.  490. 

Run  away  on  Sunday,  the  12th  inst.  from  Cornel- 
ius Quick,  living  in  the  Great-Swamp,  in  Hunterdon 
county  ; A servant  man,  this  country  born,  named 
Moses  Witten,  about  22  years  of  age,  a middle  sized 
man,  of  a dark  complexion,  black  eyes,  somewhat  of 
a stoop  in  his  shoulders  ; Had  on  when  he  went  away, 

A light  blue  worsted  jacket,  lined  in  the  skirts  with 
shalloon,  and  the  back  side  with  brown  linnen,  leather 
breeches,  with  carved  metal  buttons,  a pair  of  half- 
worn  shoes,  lately  soal’d,  tied  with  strings.  Who- 
ever takes  up  and  secures  said  servant,  so  that  his 
master  may  have  him  again,  shall  have  Three  Pounds 
reward,  paid  by 

Cornelius  Quick. 

— Pemisylvania  Gazette , April  16,  1752.  No. 

1218. 

To  be  Sold 

A Plantation,  lying  in  Kingswood,  in  Hunterdon 
county,  West  Jersey,  containing  200  acres,  about  50 
acres  of  which  are  cleared  ; a good  new  stone  house 
and  barn,  with  a good  young  orchard,  about  150  U 
trees,  100  of  which  are  grafted;  also  a tanyard,  bark 
house  and  other  conveniencies,  for  carrying  on  the  I 
tanning  trade,  late  the  property  of  William  Emley, 
deceased.  John  Emley,  Elisha  Emley  and  John 


i;|2] 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


149 


Emley,  Junior.  Executors. — Pennsylvania  Gazette , 
April  16,  1752.  No.  1218. 

New- York,  April  20.  We  have  Advice  from 
Perth  Amboy , that  one  of  the  reputed  Chiefs1  of  the 
Essex  Rioters,  having  appeared  there  at  the 
Supreme  Court,  last  Month,  as  an  Evidence  on  a 
Land-Trial,  he  was  apprehended  and  committed ; 
but  some  Time  after  admitted  to  Bail. — He  then  re- 
turned home,  but  in  a few  Days  came  back  again 
and  surrendered  himself  Prisoner,  and  discharged 
his  Bail  ; and  on  Monday  Morning  last,  upwards  of 
200  Men,  well  mounted,  appeared  on  the  Skirts  of 
that  City;  when  about  30  of  them  left  the  Company, 
and  went  to  the  Jail,  where  without  further  Cere- 
mony, they  set  the  Prisoner  free,  and  then  rejoined 
their  Party  again,  and  returned  peaceably  back  from 
whence  they  came. — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in 
the  Weekly  Post  Boy , April  20,  1752. 

Philadelphia , April  23.  We  hear  from  Cape 
May  that  they  have  taken  Six  Whales  there  this 
Spring. — Penn.  Journal , April  23,  [752.  No.  492. 

Custom-House , Phila.  Outwards.  Ship  Beulah, 
John  Ritchie  for  Jersey. — Penn.  Journal , April  23, 
1752.  No.  492. 

The  Trentown  Lottery  is  to  begin  drawing  this 
Day  ; there  are  a few  Tickets  in  the  Hands  of  the 
Printer  hereof;  which  will  be  continued  to  be  sold 

1 Simon  Wykoff,  a Captain  or  leader  of  the  rioters,  in  their  resistance  to  the  efforts  of 
the  Proprietors  to  exact  quit-rents,  was  indicted  for  high  treason.  Details  of  his  rescue 
are  given  in  N.  J.  Archives,  VIII.,  38-52. 


ijd  new  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1752 

till  To-morrow  Night;  when  such  as  remain  unsold, 
will  be  seal’d  up,  and  return’d  to  the  Managers. — The 
N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , April 
27,  1752. 

TO  be  sold,  Two  Hundred  Acres  of  Wood-Land 
within  the  Limits  of  the  City  of  New-Brunswick,  and 
within  a Mile  of  the  Town,  joining  on  Lawrence’s 
Brook,  being  very  well  water’d  and  timber’d,  with  a 
good  deal  of  fine  Swamp  fit  to  make  English 
Meadow  of;  in  which  is  a great  Quantity  of  Shag- 
bark,  Walnut- Wood  fit  for  Fire-Wood,  with  a great 
deal  of  Wallnut  Saplen-Wood  on  the  Upland.  Also 
about  fifty  or  sixty  Acres  of  very  good  Meadow, 
which  is  yearly  mowed,  situate  at  Cranberry  ; to  be 
sold  reasonable  for  ready  Money ; Any  Person  in- 
clining to  purchase  either  of  the  said  Tracts  of  Land, 
may  apply  to  Henry  Longfield,  living  near  the  first 
mentioned  Premisses,  who  will  give  a good  Title  to 
the  same. — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly 
Post  Boy , April  27,  1752. 

Just  Published,  and  to  be  sold  by  the  Printer  here- 
of, Price  2s.  3d.  by  the  Dozen,  or  2s.  6d.  single. 

A Complete  Introduction  to  the  Latin  Tongue  : 
Wherein  is  contained,  all  that  is  necessary  to  be 
learn’d  on  the  several  Parts  of  Grammar,  in  a plain, 
easy,  rational  Method  : Comprehending  the  Sub- 
stance of  what  has  been  taught  by  some  of  the  best 
Grammarians, viz.  Lilly,  Ruddiman,  Phillipps,  Holmes, 
Bp.  Wettenhall,  Cheever,  Clarke,  Read,  &c.  Pub- 
lish d principally  for  the  Use  of  the  Grammar-School 
at  Newark  ; and  recommended  to  all  who  design  to 


752] 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


IS* 

send  their  Children  to  New-Jersey  College. — The  N. 
Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , April 

27,  1752. 

To  be  sold,  by  Andrew  Smith,  of  Hopewell,  in 
Hunterdon  county,  West  Jersey,  A very  good 
plantation,  containing  400  acres  of  land,  situate  part 
in  Hopewell,  aforesaid,  and  part  in  the  bounds  of  Tren- 
ton, within  5 miles  of  the  town  spot,  the  land  is 
exceeding  fertile  and  good  for  any  sort  of  grain,  and 
near  200  acres  cleared,  and  in  good  fence,  with 
a considerable  piece  of  meadow,  and  more  may  be 
made,  with  a fine  young  orchard  : There  is  likewise 

on  the  said  premises,  a very  good  grist-mill,  with 
two  pair  of  stones,  boulting  mills,  and  all  con- 
veniencies  for  making  flour  ; the  mill  grinds  exceed- 
ing well  and  fast,  and  hath  a large  mill  house,  well 
built  with  stone,  with  conveniencies  to  store  a large 
quantity  of  wheat,  flour  &c.  and  there  is  likewise  a 
good  stone  dwelling-house  on  the  said  premises, 
with  a cellar  under  it,  and  a large  kitchen  adjoining 
one  end  said  house,  with  a barn,  stable,  cooper’s 
shop,  smoke-house,  garden,  and  other  conveniencies, 
&c.  all  commodiously  situate  on  the  east-side  of 
Delaware  river ; and  when  the  river  is  of  a suitable 
height,  flour  can  be  transported  from  the  mill-tail  by 
water,  down  the  said  river  to  Trenton,  or  Philadel- 
phia. Any  person  inclining  to  purchase  the  planta- 
tion and  mills,  may  enquire  of  said  Smith,  and  know 
the  terms  of  sale,  with  an  indisputable  title  for  the 
whole. — Penn.  Gazette , April  30,  1752.  No.  1220. 


152  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [ I 752 

Mr.  Parker , 

“You  have  been  pleased  to  insert  in  your  Paper  of 
April  the  20th,  an  Account  of  the  late  Riot  at  Perth- 
Amboy ; and  as  the  Author  of  your  Advice  from  that 
Place,  has  (no  Doubt  with  interested  Views,  and  to 
colour  over  the  Cowardice  of  the  mean  spirited  Am- 
b )\ans)  furnished  you  with  a very  formidable  Repre- 
sentation of  the  Affair,  which  is,  in  some  Respects, 
not  true,  and,  upon  the  Whole,  very  defective  ; it 
will  be  but  just  to  the  publick  you  should,  in  your 
next,  give  Place  to  a few  Corrections  relating  to  that 
wretched  Business.  The  Man  who  was  committed 
in  the  Manner  set  forth  in  your  Gazette,  lived  to  the 
Westward  of  New- Brunswick,  in  the  County  of  Som- 
erset; and  his  being  brought  upon  the  Stage  as  a re- 
puted Chief  of  the  Essex  Rioters,  may  be  easily  ac- 
counted for,  by  such  as  know  the  Situation  of  Things 
in  this  Province,  and  the  Spirit  of  that  Quarter  whence 
your  Information  came.  I am  credibly  informed  that 
Essex  had  no  Hand  at  all  in  this  detestable  Riot ; 
and  that  even  the  former  Rioters  of  that  County, 
look  upon  it  with  the  utmost  Abhorrence.  He  was 
imprisoned  upon  an  Indictment  of  High-Treason,  for 
having  been  convicted  in  some  of  the  Riots  with  which 
this  Province  was  infested  about  five  Years  ago. 
Some  Time  after  his  Imprisonment  about  thirty  Per- 
sons, all  or  most  ignorant  High- Dutchmen,  from  the 
back  Parts  of  this,  and  the  neighbouring  Province, 
came  within  five  or  six  Miles  of  Amboy , when  thir- 
teen of  those  presumptuous  Banditi  went  into  the 
City,  and  in  a trembling  Pannic,  broke  open  the  Jail, 
and  carried  off  the  Prisoner,  who,  by  the  way,  has 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


153 


1752] 

since  gone  back  and  surrendered  himself  Prisoner 
again,  being  acquainted,  by  some  Messengers  sent  for 
that  Purpose,  that  those  in  Essex  County,  who  have 
been  heretofore  concerned  in  Riots,  had  a Detesta- 
tion of  the  Thing,  and  have  fully  resolved  never  again 
to  be  concerned  in  one  ; so  that  it  is  hoped  we  shall 
no  more  have  any  Thing  of  the  like  in  this  Province  : 
Tho’  let  it  be  remarked,  that  this  open  Villany  was 
committed  in  the  Presence  of  about  forty  of  the  In- 
habitants, who  stood  near  by,  in  Company  with  the 
Sheriff,  which  worthy  officer  had  Notice  of  their 
Design  some  Days  before,  and  received  express 
Warrant  from  the  Governor,  to  guard  the  Jail  with 
all  possible  Force,  and  yet  never  made  the  least  Re- 
sistance. This  Piece  of  Conduct  in  the  Amboy  Offic- 
ers and  Gentlemen,  does  in  a very  bare-faced  Man- 
ner show  what  Party  it  is  that  still  wishes  to  have 
mobbing  continued. ” 

Yours , &c,  &c. 

(It  is  but  fustice  to  acquaint  the  Publick , that  the 
Gentleman  who  gave  the  first  Account  of  that  Riot , 
was  no  Way  concerned  in  either  Side ; and  that  it 
could  be  no  Malice  in  him , however  his  Infor7nation 
might  be  wrong.) — AT.  Y.  Gazette , Revived  in  the 
Weekly  Post  Boy , May  4,  1752. 

New-York,  May  4.  We  hear  the  Trenton  Lottery 

is  now  drawing. Phe  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the 

Weekly  Post  Boy , May  4,  1752. 

TO  be  sold  by  William  Allan,  at  Baskenridge, 
A good  Grist-Mill,  with  20  Acres  of  Land  belonging 
to  it,  with  a good  Warrantee  Deed,  and  situate  on 


154  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1752 

Peapack  Brook,  near  the  North-Branch  of  Rariton, 
in  Somerset  County,  lying  on  the  great  Road  that 
leads  from  Black-River  and  Foxhill  to  Brunswick 
Landing,  and  in  the  Heart  of  a good  Wheat  Country, 
and  is  approved  of  for  making  Flour,  both  in  New- 
York  and  Brunswick. — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived 
in  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , May  4,  1752. 

Run  away  on  the  2d  inst.  from  James  Hinchman, 
of  West  New  Jersey,  about  7 miles  from  Cooper’s 
ferry,  An  Irish  servant  man,  named  Edward  Coffery, 
about  20  years  of  age,  of  middle  stature,  middling 
fair  complexion,  short  black  hair  ; his-  right  hand  is 
less  than  the  other,  and  a scar  upon  his  right  arm  : 
Had  on  when  he  went  away,  a castor  hat,  lightish 
colour’d  kersey  jacket,  with  brass  buttons,  and  a 
striped  under,  ditto,  a pair  of  wide  trowsers,  yarn 
stockings,  and  a pair  of  pumps.  Whoever  takes  up 
and  secures  said  servant,  so  as  his  master  may  have 
him  again,  shall  have  Forty  Shillings  reward,  and 
reasonable  charges,  paid  by 

James  Hinchman. 

— Pennsylvania  Gazette , May  7,  1752.  No.  1221. 

Philadelphia,  April  23,  1752. 

Run  away  on  Sunday,  the  19th  inst.  from  the  sub- 
scriber hereof,  living  in  Trenton,  An  Apprentice  lad, 
named  Hugh  Steward,  about  18  years  of  age,  of 
middle  stature  and  fair  complexion,  a cooper  by  trade, 
and  works  with  his  left  hand  ; Had  on  when  he  went 
away,  a grey  drugget  cloth  coat,  with  white  mettal 
buttons,  a pair  of  leather  breeches,  grey  stockings, 
and  good  shoes,  with  steel  buckles  ; and  took  with  him 
three  shirts,  and  one  silk  handerchief.  Whoever 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


155 


1 75  ^ J 

takes  up  and  secures  said  apprentice,  so  that  his 
master  may  have  him  again,  shall  have  Forty  Shill- 
ings reward,  and  reasonable  charges,  paid  by 

Samuel  Hart. 

— Pennsylvania  Gazette , May  14,  1752.  No. 

1 222. 

TO  be  sold  by  Andrew  Smitpi  of  Hopewell,  in 
Hunterdon  County,  West  New-Jersey  : A Planta- 

tion very  commodiously  situate  on  the  River  Dela- 
ware, about  four  Miles  from  Trenton  ; containing 
between  three  and  four  Hundred  Acres  of  very  good 
Land,  near  200  cleared,  and  within  good  Fence,  and 
the  other  well  timber’d  ; with  a very  good  Grist-Mill  on 
the  said  Premisses,  with  two  Pair  of  Stones,  grinds 
exceedingly  fast  and  well  ; with  a large  Store  Mill- 
House,  Bolting-Mill,  and  two  Dwelling-Houses,  one 
built  with  Stone,  with  a large  Kitchen,  and  a Smoke- 
House,  Cooper’s  Shop,  Barn,  Stable  and  Chaise- 
House  ; with  a young  Orchard  of  bearing  Trees, 
chiefly  grafted  with  the  best  Fruits.  Any  Person  in- 
clining to  purchase  the  said  Place  and  Mills,  may 
apply  to  said  Andrew  Smith,  (who  will  give  an  indis- 
putable Title)  and  know  the  Terms  of  Sale. — The 
N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , May 
18,  1752. 

New-York,  May  25.  Last  Thursday  Capt.  Bean- 
char , in  a Sloop  from  Jamaica  for  Rhode- Island,  put 
into  Elizabeth-  Town,  in  Distress  ; she  had  been  60 
Days  out,  30  whereof  was  on  our  Coast,  where  all 
her  Sails  were  beat  to  Pieces  : She  is  since  come 

up  here. — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly 
Post  Boy,  May  25,  1752. 


156  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1752 

To  Be  Sold, 

A Plantation  in  the  Bounds  of  Middletown,  East- 
New-Jersey,  near  the  Water  Side  ; containing  about 
150  Acres  of  Land,  6 Acres  of  Salt  Meadow,  a new 
Dwelling-House  40  Foot  long,  with  two  Brick- 
Chimneys,  three  Fire-Places,  a good  Cellar  under  it, 
a small  Orchard,  a good  old  House,  within  Call  of 
two  Grist-Mills,  and  two  Saw-Mills  ; convenient  for 
any  Tradesman,  and  very  suitable  for  a Merchant  ; 
to  be  sold  reasonable  : Whoever  has  a Mind  for 

the  same,  may  apply  to  Joseph  Dennis,  living  on  the 
Premisses,  or  James  Alexander,  in  New-York,  who 
will  give  a good  Title.  — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived 
in  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , May  25,  1752. 

Run  away  from  Samuel  Neilson  of  Kingston,  on 
the  1 ith  Day  of  this  Instant,  a High  Dutch  or  Polish 
Servant  Lad,  about  19  Years  of  Age,  named  John 
Daniel  Ragen,  speaks  but  poor  English,  he  is  about 
five  Feet  and  a half  high,  pretty  well  set,  had  on 
when  he  went  away,  a blew  Cloth  Coat,  a striped 
Flannel  Waistcoat,  new  Oznaburg  Shirt  and  Trows- 
ers,  a pretty  good  Felt  Hat,  and  a pair  of  new 
Shoes,  with  Steel  Buckles,  and  he  is  thought  to  go 
towards  New-York  ; whoever  takes  up  said  Servant 
and  secures  him,  so  that  his  Master  may  have  him 
again,  shall  have  Forty  Shillings  Reward,  and  all 
reasonable  Charges  paid,  by  said 

Samuel  Neilson. 

N.  B.  The  said  Servant  has  been  in  this  Country 
before. 

— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly  Post 
Boy , May  25,  1752. 


752] 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


57 


To  be  sold  by  Garret  and  Cornelius  Dewees,  about 
a thousand  acres  of  land,  with  orchards,  being  divided 
into  two  plantations,  well  improv’d,  lying  in  Glouces- 
ter county,  on  Delaware  river,  between  Little  Man- 
tua and  Great  Mantua  Creeks,  having  about  300 
acres  of  marsh  and  meadow-ground,  mostly  bank’d 
in.  Enquire  of  Edward  Shippen,  Esq  ; in  Philadel- 
phia, or  John  Lad  Esq  ; in  Gloucester,  or  of  said 
Deweeses  on.  the  premises. — P Pennsylvania  Gazette , 
May  28,  1752.  No.  1224. 

The  Numbers  of  the  Prizes  in  the  Trenton  Lottery 
are  come  to  Hand,  and  will  be  printed  by  Wednes- 
day Evening  next ; when  all  those  who  are  desirous 
to  see  them,  may  either  come  or  send:  And  whoever 
have  purchased  their  Tickets  of  the  Printer  hereof, 
and  have  drawn  Prizes,  are  desired  to  call  for  their 
Money  within  ten  Days,  or  the  Money  will  be  paid 
out  of  his  Hands. — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the 
Weekly  Post  Boy , June  1,  1752. 

Custom-House,  Philadelphia,  Entered  In.  Sloop 
Experiment,  Daniel  Dole  from  Brunswick.  Cleared. 
Sloop  Hannah  and  Meriam,  Benjamin  Dorchester  to 
Egg  Harbour. — Penna.  Journal , June  4,  1752.  No. 
498. 

To  be  Sold. 

A Lot  of  land,  with  4 dwelling-houses  thereon 
erected,  formerly  the  estate  of  James  Venee,  late  of 
the  city  of  Burlington,  joiner,  deceased,  containing 
about  8 acres  of  land,  within  good  fence,  situate  on 
the  banks  of  the  river  Delaware,  one  dwelling  house 
of  brick,  the  other  3 of  wood,  all  compleatly  finished, 


158  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1752 

and  have  good  stone-cellars  under  them,  and  large 
gardens,  fenced  off  to  each  house ; most  of  the  land 
being  improv’d  and  planted  out  into  an  orchard,  with 
a collection  of  the  best  fruit  trees,  which  makes  the 
best  of  cyder,  having  a nursery  of  about  1500  of  very 
fine  apple  trees  upon  the  premises  ; the  whole  lot 
fronts  on  the  Delaware  river,  and  extends  to  low 
water  mark,  being  bounded  eastward  by  Grub-street, 
southward  by  Pearl  street,  westward  by  the  land  late 
Henry  Ballinger’s,  and  northward  by  the  aforesaid 
Delaware  river,  being  a very  convenient  place  for  a, 
ship-wright,  having  for  many  years  past  been  made 
use  of  that  way.  It  will  be  sold,  either  altogether  or 
in  parcels,  as  it  may  suit  the  purchasers  conveniency. 
Enquire  of  Rachel  Venee,  executrix,  or  Ebenezer 
Large,  in  Burlington,  and  be  further  informed. 

N.  B.  The  purchaser  paying  part  of  the  money 
down,  may  have  time  for  the  rest,  paying  interest. — 
Penn.  Gazette , June  4,1752.  No.  1225. 

This  is  to  give  notice  to  all  persons  that  shall  have 
occasion  of  themselves,  goods,  wares  or  merchan- 
dize, from  Philadelphia  to  New  York.,  or  from  the 
latter  to  the  former.  That  by  Joseph  Borden  jun. 
there  is  a stage-boat,  well-fitted,  and  kept  for  that 
purpose,  and  if  wind  and  weather  permit,  will  attend 
at  the  Crooked  Billet  wharff  in  Philadelphia,  every 
Tuesday  in  every  week,  and  proceed  up  to  Borden- 
Town  on  Wednesday,  and  on  Thursday  morning 
a stage-waggon  with  a good  arning,1  kept  by  Joseph 
Richard  will  be  ready  to  receive  them,  and  proceed 
directly  to  John  Cluck’s  opposite  the  city  of  Perth 


1 awning. 


1752]  NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS.  159 

Amboy,  who  keeps  a house  of  good  entertainment  ; 
and  on  Friday  morning,  a stage-boat  well  fitted  and 
kept  by  Daniel  Obryant,  will  be  ready  to  receive 
them,  and  proceed  direct  to  New  York,  and  give  her 
attendance  at  the  White-hall  slip,  near  the  Half- 
moon battery.  If  people  be  ready  at  the  stage  days 
and  places,  ’tis  believ’d  they  may  pass  the  quickest 
30  or  40  hours  the  cheapest  and  safest  way  that  has 
yet  been  made  use  of,  if  due  attendance  be  given  by 
us  the  subscribers,  which  we  shall  endeavour  to  do 
as  near  as  possible : Also  people  living  on  or  near 

the  road,  may  have  business  done  by  letters  or  other- 
wise. Due  care  shall  be  taken  in  the  delivery  of 
letters,  verbile  messages,  &c.  by  us  Joseph  Borden, 
jun.  Joseph  Richards,  Daniel  Obryant. 

All  passengers  or  goods,  that  shall  come  to  Bor- 
dentown,  on  Sunday  or  Monday,  in  every  week  or  any 
week,  by  any  Trenton  shallop,  White-hill  shallop,  or 
Bordentown  shallops  or  boats,  or  in  any  other  what- 
soever, whose  waggon  hire  shall  amount  to  Sixteen 
Shillings  or  upwards,  shall  upon  first  notice  have  a 
waggon,  and  be  transported  to  the  above  John 
Cluck’s,  opposite  Amboy,  where  if  the  stage  boat  is 
not  ready  to  receive  them  (but  ’tis  intended  she 
shall)  it  must  be  allowed  they  have  the  greatest 
chance  for  dispatch  of  any  other  place  whatsoever, 
for  all  the  Brunswick,  the  place  above  Brunswick, 
called  the  landing  ; and  all  the  river  boats  must  pass 
that  place,  in  whom  people  may  have  passage. 

Joseph  Richards. 

N.  B.  For  the  future  attendance  will  be  also 
given  at  the  Crooked  Billet  Wharff,  in  Philadelphia, 


l60  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1752 

every  Friday  and  Saturday,  and  proceed  to  Borden- 
town  on  Sunday,  and  on  Monday  the  stage-waggon 
will  set  out  for  Amboy,  passengers  or  not. — Penn. 
Gazette , May  14,  1752.  No.  T222. 

Those  who  had  Trentown  Lottery-Tickets  of  the 
Printer  hereof,  and  have  drawn  Prizes,  are  desired  to 
call  for  their  Money,  if  they  have  not  yet  seen  the 
Numbers,  they  may  have  them  for  sending  for. — The 
N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , June 

8,  1752. 

Taken  up  adrift  near  Sandy-Hook,  a Pettiauger, 
without  Sails  or  Oars,  and  had  a Graplin  on  board : 
Whoever  owns  the  said  Pettiauger,  on  applying  to 
Robert  Hartshorne,  of  Middletown  High  Point,1  de- 
scribing the  other  Marks,  and  paying  the  Charges 
may  have  her  again. — The  N . Y.  Gazette  Revived  in 
the  Weekly  Post  Boy , June  8,  1752. 

TO  be  sold,  a Dwelling-House  and  Kitchen,  with 
a Garden,  Yard,  Barn,  Stable  and  Chair-House,  in 
Elizabeth-Town,  situated  in  one  of  the  most  publick 
Places  in  the  Town,  at  the  south  End  of  the  Bridge, 
and  fit  for  any  publick  Business  or  Tradesman.  Any 
Person  inclining  to  purchase,  may  apply  to  Matthias 
Williamson,  who  lives  in  the  said  House. — The  N. 
Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , June  8, 
1752. 

Strayed  or  stolen  out  of  the  pasture  of  Thomas 
Tindall,  in  Trenton,  A little  bay  horse,  about  13 
hands  and  a half  high,  5 years  old,  small  switch  tail, 


1 Navesink  Highlands. 


1752]  NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS.  l6l 

blaze  in  his  face,  branded  on  the  near  shoulder  i,  shod 
all  round,  and  can  pace  and  trot.  Whoever  takes  up 
the  said  creature,  and  brings  him  to  Thomas  Tindall, 
in  Trenton,  or  Joseph  Coburn,  in  Philadelphia,  shall 
have  Twenty  Shillings  reward,  andreasonable  charges, 
paid  by 

John  Sharpless. 

— Penn.  Gazette , June  n,  1752.  No.  1226. 

Run  away  on  the  7th  inst.  at  night  from  Joseph 
Frazier,  living  at  Timber-Creek,  Gloucester  county, 
An  Irish  Servant  man,  named  William  Davis,  about 
21  years  of  age,  low  stature,  and  slim,  with  sandy 
colour’d  hair  ; Had  on  when  he  went  away,  a lightish 
colour’d  old  jacket,  check  shirt,  good  buckskin 
breeches,  blue  worsted  stockings,  good  neats  leather 
shoes,  a flag  handkerchief,  and  an  old  hat ; he  has  a 
sore  shin. 

Also  went  away  with  him,  An  Irish  servant  woman, 
belonging  to  Samuel  Boggs,  near  Haddonfield,  in 
Gloucester  county,  nam’d  Mary  Kelly,  of  low  stature, 
fresh  colour’d,  about  20  years  of  age : Had  on  when 
she  went  away,  an  ozenbrigs  shirt,  with  white  sleeves, 
and  also  a coarse  tow  shirt,  with  white  sleeves,  old 
calimancoe  gown  of  a light  brown  colour,  and  an  old 
red  cloak  ; has  a large  scar  on  her  arm,  and  another 
on  the  back  part  of  one  of  her  legs.  ’Tis  suppos’d 
they  will  pass  for  man  and  wife.  Whoever  takes  up 
and  secures  said  servants,  so  that  their  masters  may 
have  them  again,  shall  have  Three  Pounds  reward, 
and  reasonable  charges,  paid  by  Joseph  Frazier,  Samuel 

Boggs. — Penn.  Gazette , June  1:,  1752.  No.  1226. 

11 


1 62  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1752 

Custom  House,  Philadelphia,  Entered  In.  Schoon- 
er Salley,  Thomas  Deane  from  Salem. — Pemta. 
Journal,  June  n,  1752.  No.  499. 

* 

Run  away  from  Joseph  Shepherd,  of  Middle- 
Town,  on  the  7th  Inst.  June,  at  Night,  in  a Canoe 
belonging  to  said  Shepherd ; two  Men  Servants,  the 
One  named  James  Killsey,  an  Irish-Man,  about  22 
Years  old;  had  on  when  he  went  away,  a homespun 
grey  Suit : ^The  other  named  Thomas  Killing, 
cloathed  like  the  other,  a spare  Man,  very  much 
Pock-fretten.  Whoever  secures  any  one  of  them, 
so  as  their  Master  may  have  him  or  them  again, 
shall  have  Fifty  Shillings  Reward  for  one,  or  Five 
Pounds  for  both,  and  all  reasonable  Charges,  paid  by 

Joseph  Shepherd. 

— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly  Post 
Boy,  June  15,  1752. 

New  York,  June  1 5.  j 

We  have  an  Account  from  Goshen,  that  on  the 
1 8th  of  last  Month,  lour  of  the  inhabitants  of  that 
Place,  viz,  Robert  Thompson,  Anthony  Car,  Silas 
Houlse,  and  Abraham  Finch,  set  out  from  thence 
with  Design  to  view  the  Land  called  the  Great 
Patent  at  the  Head  of  Delaware  River  ; and  five 
Days  after,  in  the  long  dark  wet  weather  we  had  at 
that  Time,  they  all  got  lost  in  the  Woods:  They 

continued  wandering  about  twelve  Days  almost 
starved ; and  in  their  Rambling  met  with  an  old 
Indian  Hut,  where  they  found  a Piece  of  a raw  Deer- 
skin, which  they  roasted  and  eat  as  a delicious 
Morsel,  having  nothing  else  for  above  six  Days,  but 


1752]  NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS.  1 63 

a few  wild  Herbs  they  picked  up  ; at  length  grow- 
ing faint,  they  killed  one  of  their  Horses  to  eat  : 
In  this  Extremity,  they  at  last  perceiv’d  a high  Hill  ; 
to  the  Top  of  which  they  travelled,  and  from  thence 
happily  discovered  a House  at  the  Minisinks. — 
Penn.  Gazette , June  1 8,  1752.  No.  1227. 

Run  away  from  the  subscriber,  living  at  Woodberry 
creek,  in  West  Jersey,  an  Irish  servant  man,  named 
Thomas  Bunn,  a thick  well  set  fellow,  of  middle  stat- 
ure, full  faced,  a little  pock  mark’d,  and  his  hair  cut 
off ; he  speaks  pretty  good  English,  and  pretends  to 
be  something  of  a shoemaker,  he  has  a scar  on  his 
belly,  and  is  mark’d  on  the  upper  side  of  his  right 
thumb  with  T B : Had  on  when  he  went  away,  a new 
homespun  blue  grey  jacket,  a good  felt  hat,  a new 
homespun  shirt,  and  petticoat  trowsers,  a pair  of 
good  brogues,  with  large  brass  buckles  ; took  with 
him  some  shoe  makers  tools.  Whoever  takes  up 
and  secures  said  servant,  so  as  his  master  may  have 
him  again,  shall  have  Five  Pounds  reward,  and  rea- 
sonable charges,  paid  by 

William  Wilkins. 

— Pennsylvania  Gazette , June  18,  1752.  No. 

1227. 

Run  away  on  the  12th  of  May  last  from  Joseph 
James,  at  Cohanesey  Bridge,  in  Cumberland  county, 
A Negroe  man  named  Frank,  about  5 feet  6 inches 
high,  well  set,  about  26  or  28  years  of  age,  speaks 
good  English : Had  on  when  he  went  away,  A 
bearskin  frock  coat,  and  a double-breasted  vest,  of 
the  same  of  the  coat,  with  buttons  on  the  sleeves, 


1 64  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1752 

two  vests  and  an  under  waistcoat,  leather  breeches 
with  brass  buttons,  check  trowsers,  worsted  stock- 
ings, a pair  of  pumps,  and  strong  shoes,  with  large 
brass  buckles,  large  felt  hat,  a fine  cap,  and  a worsted 
ditto,  fine  ruffled  shirt,  and  ’tis  probable  may  have 
more  shirts  with  him,  and  an  old  black  wig ; he  has  a 
scar  on  one  of  his  legs.  Whoever  takes  up  said 
Negro,  and  secures  him  so  as  his  master  may  have 
him  again,  shall  have  Thirty  Shillings  reward,  and 
reasonable  charges,  paid  by 

Joseph  James. 

N.  B.  The  coat  and  vest  are  too  long  for  him. 

All  masters  of  vessels  are  forbid  to  carry  him  off  at  i 

their  peril. Pennsylvania  Gazette,  June  1 8,  1752.  j 

No.  1227.  I 

I 

Annapolis  in  Maryland,  June  4.  About  a Fort- 
night ago  there  happened  in  Frederick  County  in 
this  Province,  as  comical  a Wedding,  as  we  remem- 
ber to  have  heard  of:  A Couple,  with  their  Guests,  j 

(having  obtain’d  a Licence)  came  to  the  House  of  a • 
reverend  Clergyman,  late  in  the  Evening,  after  he 
had  been  in  Bed  some  time  with  his  Wife,  and 
desired  to  be  married  ; he  willing  to  oblige  them, 
got  up  and  dress’d  himself,  in  order  to  perform  the 
Ceremony ; but  the  Bridegroom  having  imbib’d  a 
Notion,  that  if  he  married  a Woman  with  any  thing, 
he  should  be  obliged  to  pay  all  her  Debts,  and  not 
otherwise,  and  as  she  came  from  the  Province  of 
New  Jersey,  he  was  doubtful  about  her  Circum- 
stances ; the  obliging  Bride,  to  remove  all  incom-  j 
brances,  stripp’d  to  her  Buff,  and  two  Women  held 
a Sheet  between  her  and  the  Clergyman  while  he 


1752]  NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS.  165 

performed  his  Office ; but  she  having  forgot  her  Cap 
at  undressing,  in  the  midst  of  the  Ceremony  it  came 
into  her  Mind,  and  she  pulled  that  off  too,  and  flung 
it  on  the  Bed,  and  was  married  to  her  Spouse  (if 
not  in  a Wedding  Suit)  in  ’her  Birth  Day  Suit: 
After  the  Ceremony  was  over,  the  Bridegroom  put 
on  her  one  of  his  own  Shirts  to  cover  her — This  Ac- 
count the  Reader  may  perhaps  look  on  as  improba- 
ble and  untrue,  but  he  may  be  assured,  it  is  a cer- 
tain and  naked  Truth. — Penn.  Journal , June  1 8, 
1752.  No.  500. 

Custom-House,  Philadelphia.  Cleared.  Sloop 
Tarter,  William  Nichols  to  West  Jersey. — Penn. 
Journal , June  18,  1752.  No.  500. 

Custom  House , Philadelphia.  Cleared.  Nicholls 
to  West-Jersey. — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the 
Weekly  Post  Boy , June  22,  1752. 

Philadelphia,  June  23,  1752. 

Run  away  on  the  22nd  instant,  from  the  subscri- 
ber, of  Gloucester  county,  West  Jersey,  A Scotch 
servant  man,  nam’d  George  Monrow,  about  30 
years  of  age,  a thick  well  set  fellow,  of  about  5 feet 
9 inches  high,  down  look,  fresh  complexion,  talks 
broad  Scotch,  and  can  talk  Dutch  and  Irish,  and  has 
brown  hair ; Had  on  when  he  went  away,  a felt  hat, 
half  worn,  thick  home  spun  jacket,  much  worn,  new 
tow  trowsers,  and  good  shoes,  with  brass  buckles. 
Whoever  takes  up  and  secures  said  servant,  so  that 
his  master  may  have  him  again,  shall  have  Three 
Pounds  reward,  and  reasonable  charges,  paid  by 

John  Brown. 


1 66  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1752 

N.  B.  It  is  supposed  he  will  forge  a pass,  and 
change  his  name. — Penn.  Gazette , June  25,  1752. 
No.  1228. 

Whereas  Benjamin  Hunter,  in  his  life-time,  was 
seiz’d  and  possessed  of  one  certain  tract  of  land  in 
New  West  Jersey,  in  America,  containing  750  acres  ; 
which  said  tract  he  mortgaged  to  one  Daniel  Smith, 
of  Burlington,  in  said  Jerseys,  for  Forty-one  Pounds 
Fourteen  Shillings  silver  money  of  America,  with  the 
lawful  interest  thereon  : And  whereas  the  heir  of 
said  Smith  alledges,  that  the  said  lands  are  forfeited 
thro’  the  length  of  time,  and  that  he  will  pursuant 
put  said  lands  to  sale:  Now  I Thomas  Hunter,  only 
son  and  heir  of  said  Benjamin,  do  give  this  publick 
notice,  cautioning  and  forbidding  any  person  or  per- 
sons whatever,  to  deal  with,  or  buy  said  lands,  from 
said  heir,  or  any  deriving  under  him,  or  them,  or  any 
of  them,  as  they  shall  answer  the  contrary,  I having 
an  eminent  lawyer’s  opinion  that  said  lands  are  not 
forfeited,  as  falsely  alledged,  therefore  intend  to  sue 
properly  for  the  same. 

Thomas  Hunter. 

— Pennsylvania  Gazette , June  25,  1752.  No. 

1228. 

Custom-House , Philadelphia,  Entered  In.  Sloop 
Union,  Nathaniel  Newman  from  Salem.  Cleared. 
Schooner  Salley,  Thomas  Deane  to  Salem. — Penna. 
Journal , June  25,  1752.  No.  501. 

Custom-house,  Philadelphia,  Entered  In.  Schooner 
Good  Intent,  Ebenezer  Bowditch  from  Salem. — 
Penna.  Journal , July  2,  1752.  No.  502. 


1 67 


I752J  NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 

Run  away,  on  the  14th  of  June , from  Jonathan 
Fitz  Randolph , of  Piscattawxy , in  New- Jersey  ; a 
Servant  Man,  named  Christian  Cutlip  Shiver  lean,  a 
High- Dutchman  ; he  is  about  19  Years  of  Age,  of  a 
fair  Complexion,  light  colour’d  Hair  and  Eyes,  he  is 
of  middle  Stature,  and  much  pock-fretten  : Had  on 
when  he  went  away,  a black  Jacket,  Linnen  Breeches 
with  some  Patches,  grey  Yarn  Stockings,  old  Shoes 
with  Strings,  Felt  Hat,  and  Ozenbrigs  Shirt  Who- 
ever takes  up  said  Servant  and  secures  him,  so  that 
his  said  Master  may  have  him  again,  shall  have  Forty 
Shillings  as  a Reward,  and  all  reasonable  Charges, 
paid  by 

Jonathan  Fitz  Randolph. 

N.  B.  He  talks  much  and  speaks  broken  English. 
— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly  Post 
Boy , July  6,  1752. 

Run  away  from  the  subscriber,  living  at  Cool- 
Springs,  Sussex  county,  upon  Delaware,  A servant 
man,  named  Edward  Proger,  by  trade  a Taylor,  about 
20  years  ol  age,  about  5 feet  and  a half  high,  swarthy 
complexion,  his  lips  are  very  thick,  and  his  face 
somewhat  bump’d,  born  in  England  ; Had  on  when 
he  went  away,  A blue  waistcoat,  without  sleeves, 
white  ruffled  shirt,  black  wig,  new  felt  hat,  new  shoes, 
one  brass  buckle,  and  one  steel  ditto,  and  grey  yarn 
stockings.  ’Tis  supposed  he  went  aboard  of  a vessel 
bound  to  Rhode  Island,  Joseph  Hadley,  commander. 
Whoever  takes  up  and  secures  said  servant,  so  as 
his  master  may  have  him  again,  shall  have  Forty 


1 68  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1752 

Shillings  reward,  and  reasonable  Charges,  paid  by 

James  M’llvaine. 

— Pennsylvania  Gazette , July  9,  1752.  No. 

1230. 

Custom  House,  Philadelphia,  Cleared.  Schooner 
Good  Intent,  Ebenezer  Bowditch  to  Salem. — Penn. 
Journal , July  9,  1752.  No.  503. 

New  York,  July  13. 

We  have  Advice  from  New-Brunswick,  that  on 
Thursday  Evening  last,  they  had  a hard  Gust,  with 
Thunder,  Lightning  and  Rain,  wherein  the  Presby- 
terian Meeting-house,  in  that  Town,  was  struck  with  the 
Lightning,  and  shatter’d  pretty  much  ; Mr.  Schuyler’s 
Still-house  was  also  struck  and  the  Mast  of  a Boat 
shiver’d  to  Pieces  ; and  across  the  River,  a Brew- 
house  of  Mr.  AntiFs  was  also  shatter’d. 

And  the  Friday  before  that,  there  was  a violent 
Storm  of  Hail  and  Thunder,  at  Trenton,  which 
damaged  many  Trees,  as  well  as  grain,  many  of  the 
Hailstones  being  bigger  than  Pidgeon’s  Eggs. — 
Penn.  Gazette , July  16,  1752.  No.  1231. 

WHereas  Samuel  Barnes,  of  Cumberland,  in  New 
Jersey,  hath  in  his  possession  two  certain  bonds,  viz. 
One  of  Three  Hundred  Pounds,  and  the  other  of 
Two  Hundred  and  Fifty  Pounds,  condition  each  ; 
the  which  money  specified  in  said  bonds,  is  not  just, 
nor  legally  due,  nor  will  be  paid  by  the  bounden  ; 
and  therefore  these  are  to  forewarn  all  persons  not 
to  take  the  said  bonds  by  way  of  assignment,  or 


1752]  NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS.  1 69 

otherways,  at  their  peril  of  losing-  their  money,  for 
they  will  not  be  paid  by  the  bounden. 

Enoch  Haines. 

— Penn.  Gazette , July  16,  1752.  No.  1231. 

Mr  Parker, 

Please  to  give  the  following  Letter  a Place  in  your 
next  Paper , and  believe  you  wont  disoblige  the 
Publick , by  obliging  your  constant  Reader , &c. 

A Letter  to  a Gentleman  from  his  Friend,  July 
7>  1752. 

“Sir,” 

AS  you  are  a known  and  peculiar  Votary  to  a 
State  of  Celibacy , I judged  it  would  do  you  no  Dis- 
service, to  acquaint  you  of  a late  Occurence,  which 
sufficiently  Evidences,  that  after  the  most  mature 
Consideration,  some  of  our  wisest  and  best  Men,  do 
prefer  the  Endearments  of  the  Nuptial  Bed- — About 
eight  Days  since,  the  Rev.  Mr.  Aaron  Burr,  Presi- 
dent of  the  College  of  New  Jersey , was  wedded  to  a 
Daughter  of  the  renowned  Mr.  Jonathan  Edwards , 
late  of  Northampton : She  is  a young  Lady  of 

about  Twenty-one  ; her  Person  may  be  called  agree- 
able, her  natural  Genius  seems  to  be  sprightly  ; and 
no  doubt,  is  greatly  improved  by  a very  virtuous 
Education  : In  short,  she  appears  to  be  one,  every 

way  qualified,  to  make  a Man  of  Sense  and  Piety 
happy  in  the  conjugal  Relation.  As  to  the  Court- 
ship, or  Marriage,  I shall  not  descend  to  Particulars, 
but  only  observe  in  general,  that  for  some  Centuries, 
suppose  there  has  not  been  one  more  than1  Patri- 


1 in  the. 


ijo  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1752 

archial  Mode } I hope,  Sir,  that  this  Instance,  both 
as  to  Matter  and  Form,  will  have  its  genuine  In- 
fluence upon  you,  and  as  well,  bear  a Part  in  con- 
vincing you,  that  Wedlock  is  incomparably  prefer- 
able to  the  roving  Uneasinesses  of  the  single  State  ; 
as  to  direct  you,  when  you  are  chusing  your  Mate, 
that  instead  of  acting  the  modern  Gallant,  wisely,  to 
imitate  the  present  Example ; and  so  have  the 
Honour  of  being  another,  who,  in  this  Day  of 
Degeneracy,  has  endeavored  to  restore  Courtship 
and  Marriage,  to  their  original  Simplicity  and 
DesignC  I am,  Sir,  &c. 

Philogamus. 

— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly  Post 
Boy,  July  20,  1752. 

Run  away  from  his  Bail,  James  Hamilton,  who 
may  be  easily  discover’d  by  the  following  Marks, 
viz.  a likely  well-limb’d  Fellow,  pitted  with  the  Small- 
Pox,  fresh  colour’d,  about  27  Years  of  Age,  by  Trade 
a Shoe-maker,  grey-headed,  notwithstanding  his 
Youth;  very  ignorant,  and  apt  to  laugh  at  his  own 
Expressions,  an  Irishman,  had  on  a blue  Camblet 
Coat  and  black  Wig.  Whoever  apprehends  and 
sends  him  to  M.  John  Durham,  at  the  Sign  of  the 
Boat,  near  the  Old-Slip-Market,  in  New- York,  or  to 
Mr.  J.  Thompson,  in  New-Brunswick,  or  F.  Halins- 
head,  Esq  ; at  the  Court-House,  of  Somerset,  New- 


1 The  story  is  that  Mr.  Burr  proposed  and  was  accepted  after  a courtship  of  three 
days,  at  her  father’s  house,  at  Stockbridge,  and  a fortnight  after  returning  to  Newark 
sent  a young  man  to  bring  her  on  to  the  latter  place,  where  the  wedding  immediately 
took  place.  The  communication  in  the  Gazette  was  probably  written  by  J.  Shippen,  jr., 
two  of  whose  amusing  letters  to  his  parents  on  the  subject  are  given  in  Stearns’s  Hist. 
First  Pres.  Church,  of  Newark,  N.  J.,  192. 


newspaper  extracts. 


1752] 


ifi 


Jersey,  shall  have  One  Pistole  Reward,  and  reason- 
able Charges,  paid  by 

Francis  Hall. 

N.  B.  It  is  thought  he  is  gone  towards  Albany. — 

The  N Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , 
July  20,  1752. 

This  Day  is  published,  the  Second  Edition,  of  A 
Map  of  Pennsylvania,  New-Jersey,  New  York  and 
the  Three  Lower  Counties  on  Delaware  by  Lewis 
Evans. — Pennsylvania  Gazette,  July  23,  1752.  No. 
1232. 

Just  Published  and  to  be  sold  by  the  Printer  here- 
of, (Price  4 s.) 

AN  Answer  to  a Bill  in  the  Chancery  of  New- 
Jersey , at  the  Suit  of  John  Earl  of  Stair, 
and  others,  commonly  called  Proprietors  of  the  East- 
ern Division  of  New-Jersey , against  Benjamin  Bond, 
and  others  claiming  under  the  original  Proprietors 
and  Associates  of  Elizabeth-Town.  To  which  is  ad- 
ded, Nothing  either  of  the  Publications  of  the  Coun- 
cil of  Proprietors  of  East  New-Jersey , or  of  the  Pre- 
tences of  the  Rioters,  and  their  Seducers  ; except 
so  far  as  the  Persons  meant  by  Rioters , pretend  title 
against  the  Parties  to  the  above  Answer  ; but  a great 
Deal  of  the  Controversy,  tho’  much  less  of  the  His- 
tory and  Constitution  of  New-Jersey  than  the  said 
Bill. — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly 
Post  Boy , July  27,  1752. 


Trenton,  July  29,  1752. 

This  is  to  give  notice  to  those  persons,  who  have 
had  tickets  in  the  late  lottery,  for  finishing  the  church 


ij2  new  Jersey  colonial  documents.  [1752 

at  Trenton,  and  not  paid  for  them,  that  unless  they 
pay  them  off  by  the  12th  day  of  August  next,  they 
will  oblige  the  managers  to  proceed  against  them  as 
the  law  directs. — The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , July  30, 
1752.  No.  1233. 

Run  away,  on  the  19th  inst.  from  Cornelius  Bogart, 
tavern-keeper  in  Rariton,  a High  Dutch  servant  man, 
named  Hendrick  Theodorous  Tedman : Had  on 

when  he  went  away,  a brown  kersey  coat,  lined  with 
home  made  linsey  woolsey,  with  home  made  flat  pew- 
ter buttons,  a pale  blue  jacket,  made  of  worsted,  his 
stockings  mixed  with  blue,  an  old  pair  of  pumps,  and 
a new  felt  hat ; he  is  very  remarkable,  by  having  a 
large  scar  right  across  the  ball  of  his  left  hand,  oc- 
casioned by  being  shot  in  that  part.  Whoever  takes 
up  said  servant,  and  secures  him,  so  as  his  master 
may  have  him  again,  shall  have  Three  Pounds  re- 
ward, and  reasonable  charges,  paid  by 

Cornelius  Bogart. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , July  30,  1752.  No. 

1233- 

Philadelphia,  July  30,  1752. 

WHereas,  Margaret,  the  wife  of  John  Mon- 
row, of  New  Hanover,  in  Burlington 
county,  in  New  Jersey,  hath  not  only  contracted  di- 
vers debts  against  her  said  husband,  contrary  to  his 
will  and  knowledge,  but  hath  also,  for  several  years 
past,  behav’d  herself  in  a very  imprudent  and  abusive 
manner  to  her  said  husband  and  family,  and  her  base 
way  of  behaving  daily  increasing  : These  are  there- 
fore to  forewarn  all  persons  from  trusting  her  on  my 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


173 


i;52] 

account,  for  I will  pay  no  debts  of  her  contracting 
from  the  date  hereto. 

John  Monrow. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette,  July  30,  1752.  No. 
1233. 

Philadelphia,  July  30,  1752. 

RUn  away  on  the  26th  inst.  from  Nathaniel 
Parker,  of  Trenton  Ferry,  a native  Irish 
servant  man,  named  John  Casey,  about  40  years  of 
age,  about  five  feet  and  a half  high,  one  of  his  eyes 
black,  the  other  grey,  talks  very  thick,  has  much  of 
the  brogue,  is  a well  set  fellow,  and  has  dark  brown 
bushy  hair : Had  on  when  he  went  away,  a dark 
colour’d  fustian  jacket,  old  castor  hat,  ozenbrigs  shirt 
and  trowsers,  and  old  shoes.  Whoever  takes  up  and 
secures  said  servant  so  as  his  master  may  have  him 
again,  shall  have  Three  Pounds  reward,  and  reason- 
able charges,  paid  by 

Nathaniel  Parker. 

N.  B.  There  was  stole  from  said  Parker,  about  six 
weeks  ago,  a small  brown  horse,  branded  B.  E.  on 
the  near  thigh,  paces  and  trots,  about  ten  years  old, 
lame  in  one  of  his  hind  legs,  about  13  hands  high,  a 
stocky  well  set  horse.  Whoever  brings  home  said 
horse,  shall  have  Twenty  Shillings  reward,  and  if  the 
horse  and  thief,  Five  Pounds  from 

Nathaniel  Parker. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , July  30,  1752.  No. 

1233* 

Philadelphia,  July  30,  1752. 
To  be  sold,  by  way  of  public  vendue,  on  the  29th 
of  August  next,  at  2 o’clock  in  the  afternoon,  a lot 


174  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1752 

of  ground,  containing  an  acre  and  a quarter,  situate 
in  Haddonfield,  Gloucester  County,  there  is  a young 
orchard  on  it,  a good  brick  house,  a shop,  fit  for  any 
tradesman,  a barn,  stables,  &c.  late  the  property  of 
Samuel  Mickle,  deceased.  The  vendue  to  be  held 
on  the  premises,  and  those  inclining  to  purchase,  may 
know  the  title  and  conditions  of  sale,  by  applying  to 
John  Mickle,  or  David  Cooper,  executors. — The 
Pennsylvania  Gazette , July  30,  1752.  No.  1233. 

New-York , August  3.  By  the  Philadelphia  Post 
we  have  an  Account,  that  last  Wednesday  afternoon, 
Mr.  Richard  Perot , a West- India  Gentleman,  now 
living  at  Elizabeth- Town,  in  returning  from  Philadel- 
phia, was  set  upon  by  two  Highway-men,  in  the 
Wood  called  Penn  s Manor,  about  two  Miles  and  a 
Half  from  Trentown  Ferry,  who  bound  him  Neck  and 
Heels,  and  then  robbed  him  of  a green  Purse,  where- 
in was  38  Pistoles,  5 Doubloons,  and  some  Dollars  ; 
together  with  two  Pair  of  Ear-Rings,  two  Neck-La- 
ces,  and  two  Solitares,  all  Paste  set  in  Gold.  They 
left  him  in  that  Condition,  where  he  was  found  some 
Time  after  by  one  James  Odear,  who  loosed  him. 
One  of  the  Rogues  was  mounted  on  a Bay-Horse  ; 
with  a brown  Great-Coat  behind  him,  and  had  a 
large  Scar  on  his  right  Cheek ; the  other  had  a 
Horse  between  a Mouse  Colour  and  a Bay,  and  a 
brown  Great-Coat  on  : They  talk’d  Irish , and  were 
both  well  set  lusty  Men,  and  had  on  ruffled  Caps. 
A Reward  of  Ten  Pounds  is  offered  for  the  appre- 
hending either  of  them  : And  if  any  of  the  Jewels 
should  be  offered  to  Sale,  a proper  Reward  will  be 
given  for  stopping  them. 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


175 


1752] 

We  hear  that  Mr.  Isaac  De  Cow  narrowly  escaped 
being  robbed  in  the  same  Place  ; and  that  the  Inhab- 
itants thereabouts  have  lost  eight  Horses  within  a 
Week  past. — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the  Week- 
ly Post  Boy , Aug.  3,  1752. 

Just  imported  in  the  Nebuchadnezer , a choice  As- 
sortment of  Medicines,  calculated  for  Practice  in  the 
Country,  and  are  genuine,  from  the  Hall  in  London  ; 
they  are  quite  fresh,  and  allowed  to  come  from  the 
most  eminent  Hand,  subjected  to  the  Inspection  of 
the  Royal  College  of  Physicians  ; to  be  sold  very 
cheap  by  Charles  Sc  ham  Leslie , M.  D.  at  his  House 
in  Connecticut-Far  ms,  a few  Miles  from  Elizabeth- 
Town  in  the  Jersies. — The  said  Dr.  Leslie  intending 
to  deal  for  the  Future  in  that  Branch  of  Business, 
will  always  take  Care  to  have  fresh  Assortments 
from  London,  and  to  give  the  usual  Credit ; tho’  now 
he  proposes  for  Cash,  to  sell  20  per  Cent,  cheaper 
than  shall  appear  from  any  Invoices  or  Bills  of  Par- 
cels, for  the  same  Kind  of  Medicines  in  any  trading 
Place  in  America,  where  Practitioners  are  serv’d  at 
second-hand. — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the 
Weekly  Post  Boy , Aug.  3,  1752. 

Philadelphia,  August  6.  We  hear  from  Spring- 
field,  in  the  Jerseys,  that  the  house  of  William  Den- 
nis, there,  was  broke  open  on  the  29th  of  last  Month, 
and  sundry  Things  carried  off. — The  Pennsylvania 
Gazette,  Aug.  6,  1752.  No.  1234. 

Philadelphia,  August  5.  We  have  an  Account 
from  Trenton  that  on  Wednesday  the  39th  of  July 


176  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1752 

Richard  Perrot  was  attacked  and  robbed  by  two 
Men  on  Horseback,  in  the  Woods  between  Trenton 
and  Bi'istol , who  took  from  him,  as  he  says,  a Purse 
in  which  was  38  Pistoles,  5 Double  Loons,  and  some 
Dollars,  and  two  pair  of  Earings,  two  Necklaces,  and 
two  Solataires,  all  set  in  Gold — He  says  they  were 
two  lusty  well  set  Men,  one  of  which  had  a large 
Scar  on  his  right  Cheek  and  talked  Irish.  They  tyed 
him  with  his  own  Garter,  and  so  left  him.  Upon  ex- 
amination of  the  above  Account , it  is  generally  thdt 
the  Person  bound  himself  in  order  to  impose  upon  Peo- 
ple and  that  he  was  not  robb' d. — The  Pennsylvania 
Journal , August  6,  1752.  No.  507. 

Philadelphia,  August  5.  Yesterday  a Man  was 
found  floating  in  the  River  near  Point  no  Point,  hav- 
ing both  his  Hands  cut  of,  and  it  is  supposed  he  was 
murdered.  By  Letters  found  in  his  Pocket,  it  ap- 
pears that  he  was  going  up  to  Trenton. — The  Penn- 
sylvania Journal , August  6,  1752.  No.  507. 

New  York , August  10.  By  some  Advices  brought 
by  the  Philadelphia  Post , we  have  Reason  to  believe, 
that  the  Account  inserted  in  our  last,  of  the  Robbery 
of  Richard  Perot,  in  Penn  s Manor,  is  false,  there 
being  great  Grounds  to  suspect  said  Perot  bound 
himself  purposely,  in  order  to  impose  on  the  Publick. 
— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly  Post  Boy, 
Aug.  10,  1752. 

This  is  to  give  Notice. 

That  the  Commencement  of  New-Jersey  Colledge, 
which  is  appointed  to  be  held  at  Newark,  the  last 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


1 77 


1752] 

Wednesday  in  September  is  to  be  according  to  New 
Stile  which  will  happen  the  16th  day  from  the  be- 
ginning of  the  Month. — The  Pennsylvania  Journal , 
Aug.  13,  1752.  No.  508. 

Run  away  on  the  9th  inst.  at  night,  from  Trenton, 
an  Irish  servant  man,  belonging  to  William  Wood- 
ward, of  Cros wicks,  named  Nicholas  Magahey,  a 
short  well  set  man,  about  five  feet  five  inches  high, 
swarthy  complexion,  black  eyes,  his  hair  lately  cutoff, 
and  talks  much  upon  the  brogue : Had  on  when  he 

went  away,  a brown  cloth  coat,  check  shirt,  old  buck- 
skin breeches,  a pair  of  trowsers,  half  worn  felt  hat, 
new  shoes,  and  old  speckled  worsted  stockings  ; he 
understands  all  sorts  of  plantation  work,  but  has 
lately  been  used  to  cut  cord  wood  at  Messieurs  Allen 
and  Turner’s  works  : His  wife  also  went  with  him, 
named  Catherine,  a likely  woman,  fresh  colour’d, 
about  the  same  height  of  her  husband,  and  wears  a 
calico  gown.  Whoever  takes  up  and  secures  said  ser- 
vant, so  as  his  master  may  have  him  again,  shall  have 
three  Pounds  reward,  and  reasonable  charges,  paid 
by  William  Woodward,  of  Croswicks,  or  John  Allen, 
of  Trenton. — Pennsylvania  Gazette , Aug.  13,  1752. 
No.  1235. 

Philadelphia,  July  30,  1752. 

Made  his  escape,  on  the  26th  inst.  from  David 
Arnett,  goal-keeper  of  the  borough  of  Elizabeth,  an 
Irishman,  named  James  Tolford,  about  six  feet  two 
inches  high,  with  short  black  hair,  and  a down  look, 

The  “New  Stile”  of  reckoning  went  nto  effect,  by  Act  of  Parliament,  on  August  25, 

i752- 


12 


178  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1752 

pretends  to  be  a blacksmith,  and  was  committed  for 
passing-  counterfeit  Pieces  of  Eight:  Had  on  when 

he  made  his  escape,  a blue  cloth  jacket,  tow  shirt, 
grey  stockings,  old  shoes,  and  an  old  felt  hat.  Who- 
ever takes  up  and  secures  said  James  Tolford,  so 
that  he  may  be  had  again,  shall  have  Five  Pounds 
reward,  and  reasonable  charges,  paid  by  David  Ar- 
nett.— Pennsylvania  Gazette , Aug.  13,  1752.  No. 

1 235- 

Just  published,  (in  Philadelphia,)  the  Second  Edi- 
tion, of  a Map  of  Pennsilvania,  New-Jersey,  New- 
York,  and  the  Three  Lower  Counties  on  Delaware: 

By  Lewis  Evans. 

The  Determination  of  the  Bounds  of  Pensilvania 
and  Maryland,  by  a Decree  in  Chancery ; a new 
Purchase  made  of  the  Indians , and  the  Erecting  four 
new  Counties  in  P 'ennsilvania,  since  the  first  Publica- 
tion of  the  Map,  have  made  this  Edition  necessary. 
And  Care  has  been  taken  to  supply  the  Omissions, 
and  to  rectify  the  Errors  which  have  escaped  in  the 
former  Impression  ; and  the  Sozith  Side  of  Lake  On- 
tario is  now  added. 

The  several  Provinces  and  Countries  are  distin- 
guished in  the  plain  Maps  by  Division  Lines,  and  in 
the  colour’d  Ones,  by  different  Colours. 

Besides  what  are  common  to  other  Maps,  as  the 
Sea-Coast,  Rivers,  Creeks,  Mountains,  Roads,  inter- 
mediate Distance  of  Places,  and  the  Situation  of 
Cities,  Towns,  Villages,  &c.  there  are  inserted  in 
this,  how  far  the  Tide  runs  up  the  several  Rivers, 
and  the  Time  of  High-water,  Full  and  Change,  of 
the  greatest  Use  in  Commerce  ; the  Variation  of  the 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


179 


I752J 

Needle,  by  several  accurate  Observations,  and  the 
Rate  of  its  Decrease,  of  Use  in  adjusting  old  Surveys 
of  Land  ; the  greatest  Length  of  Days  and  Nights  ; 
a Table  of  the  Distances  between  the  most  consider- 
able Towns  ; besides  the  Barometrical  and  Thermo- 
metrical  Observations,  Accounts  of  the  Weather  in 
this  Climate,  the  Production  of  Lightning  and  Fogs 
accounted  for  ; with  several  other  Articles  recom- 
mended by  the  Curious  to  the  Enquiry  of  the 
Travellers. 

The  Smallness  of  this  Map  has  been  very  often 
objected  to  the  Author;  but  if  Gentlemen  would  con- 
sider, that  they  seldom  have  seen  Maps  of  any  Parts 
of  Europe  to  a larger  Scale,  and  that  there  is  not  a 
City,  Town,  or  even  a Village  of  six  Houses  within 
the  Compass  of  the  Map,  that  are  not  inserted  in  it, 
and  that  Pensilvania , as  far  as  tolerably  settled,  which 
in  between  Delaware  River,  the  Lower  Counties,  Ma- 
riland,  and  the  Kittatinny  Mountains , tho’  now  divi- 
ded into  eight  Counties,  is  not  of  Extent  equal  to 
Yorkshire  in  South- Britain,  they  would  be  induced 
to  think  a larger  Map  impertinent ; if  they  did  not 
expect  it  for  other  Uses  than  Geography,  Physics, 
History  and  Commerce. 

The  Price  of  the  Plain  Maps  is  One  Spanish  Dol- 
lar ; of  the  colour’d  Ones,  on  superfine  Writing-pa- 
per, Two  Dollars ; and  there  are  a few  on  fine  Cali- 
co, at  a Dollar  and  a Half  each. 

In  Justice  to  the  Buyers  of  the  former  Impression, 
their  colour’d  Maps,  tho’  torn  or  defaced,  will  be  ex- 
changed for  the  new  Edition  at  Five  Shillings,  and 
their  plain  Ones  at  Two  Shillings  and  Sixpence. 


180  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [ I 75 2 

To  be  sold  or  exchanged  by  the  Author  in  Phila- 
delphia, and  by  the  Printer  hereof. — The  N.  Y.  Ga- 
zette Revived  in  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , Aug.  17,  1752. 

Run  away  from  Peter  Bard,  and  Company,  owners 
of  the  Holly  iron-works,1  An  Irish  servant  man, 
named  John  M’Claughlin,  about  35  years  of  age,  of 
a middle  stature  : Had  on  when  he  went  away,  a half 
worn  beaver  hat,  check  shirt,  red  jacket,  without 
sleeves,  silk  handkerchief,  new  shoes,  and  blue  worst- 
ed or  yarn  stockings.  Whoever  takes  up  and  se- 
cures the  said  servant,  so  as  his  masters,  may  have 
him  again,  and  gives  notice  to  Peter  Bard  at  Mount- 
holly,  John  Abraham  Denormandie,  Esq;  at  Bristol, 
or  Morris  Morgan,  in  Philadelphia,  shall  have  Thirty 
Shillings  reward,  and  all  reasonable  charges,  paid  by 
Peter  Bard,  John  Abraham  Denormandie,  or  Morris 
Morgan. 

N.  B.  ’Tis  supposed  he  is  gone  to  New  York. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , August  20,  1752. 

No.  1236. 


Philadelphia,  August  20,  1752. 

STolen  from  William  Green  of  Trenton,  a 
young  black  mare,  three  years  old  past, 
about  fifteen  hands  high,  paces  and  trots,  branded  R. 
G.  one  of  her  hind  feet  part  white,  carries  her  nose 
out,  a short  mane,  hangs  on  both  sides  her  neck,  and 
a short  switch  tail.  Whoever  takes  up  and  secures 
said  mare  and  thief,  so  as  she  may  be  had  again,  and 


- For  a notice  of  the  Mt.  Holly  iron  works,  see  N J.  Archives,  XI.,  544. 


1752]  NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS.  1 8 i 

the  thief  brought  to  justice,  shall  have  Forty  Shil- 
lings reward,  and  reasonable  charges  paid  by 

William  Green. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , August  20,  1752. 

No.  1236. 

Bucks  County,  On  the  15th  Day  of  August  1752, 

to  wit.  personally  appeared  before  us, 

John  Abraham  Denormandie,  and  Alexander  Gray- 
don  Esquires,  two  of  his  Majesty’s  Justices  of  the 
Peace,  for  said  county,  James  Adair,  of  the  Falls 
township,  who  being  duly  sworn,  &c.  did  declare  and 
say  “That  as  he,  this  Deponent,  was  travelling  in  his 
Wagon,  between  Bristol  and  his  own  House,  on 
Wednesday,  the  29th  Day  of  July  last,  between  the 
Hours  of  Five  and  Six  a Clock,  of  same  Day,  within 
about  Half  a Mile  of  his  own  House,  he  came  up 
with  a Man  on  Horseback,  whose  Name  he  after- 
wards learn’d  to  be  Perot,  who  called  to  this  depon- 
ent, and  beee’d  him  to  unbind  him,  telling  him  he 
had  been  robb’d  ; this  Deponent,  supposing  he  only 
jested,  replied,  That  perhaps  he  might  charge  him 
with  the  Robbery,  if  he  unbound  him  ; that  upon  this 
Deponent’s  asking  his  Wife,  who  was  with  him,  what 
he  had  best  to  do  ? for  that  he  believed  he  was  a 
Rogue,  she  told  him  to  do  as  he  pleased  ; that  this 
Deponent  then  went  out  of  his  Waggon,  and  found 
the  said  Perot  setting  on  his  Horse,  with  his  Hands 
bound  under  his  Hams  with  a Garter,  which,  said 
Perot  told  him  was  his  own  Garter,  wrapp’d  several 
Times  round  his  Wrists,  but  without  any  Knot  tied 
on  it;  that  the  Wrists  were  swelled  by  the  Tight- 
ness of  the  Binding : That  the  said  Perot,  after  he 


182  new  Jersey  colonial  documents.  [1752 

was  unbound,  seemed  to  be  very  weak  and  faint,  or 
pretended  to  be  so,  and  said  he  could  not  ride  ; but 
by  the  Assistance  of  a Foot  Traveller,  who  then  come 
up,  this  Deponent  helped  the  said  Perot  into  his 
Waggon,  and  carried  him  to  his  House  : That  the 
said  Perot  told  this  Deponent,  that  two  Men  on 
Horseback,  which  said  Perot  described,  had  robb’d 
him  of  between  Thirty  and  Forty  Pistoles,  Four 
Doubloons,  and  some  Jewels  and  Necklaces,  and 
that  one  of  the  Rogues  had  knocked  him  down  from 
his  Horse,  by  a Blow  on  the  Head,  altho’  this  Depo- 
nent, upon  Examination,  could  not  discover  any  Sign 
of  Hurt,  Wound  or  bruise  in  the  Place  where  said 
Perot  alleged  he  received  the  Blow.  And  this  De- 

o 

ponent  further  saith,  That  on  Wednesday  the  12th  of 
this  instant  August,  the  said  Perot  came  to  this  De- 
ponent’s House,  and  desired  him  to  go  with  him  to 
Trenton,  and  declare  before  some  Magistrates  there, 
the  Condition  he  had  found  the  said  Perot  in,  on  the 
29th  Day  of  July  last;  that  accordingly  this  Depon- 
ent did  go  with  him  before  Theophilus  Severns,  Esq; 
in  Trenton,  where  the  said  Perot  did  write  a Paper, 
which  was  read  to  this  Deponent,  but  not  so  distinct- 
ly that  he  could  sufficiently  apprehend  the  meaning 
of  it ; and  altho’  this  Deponent  expressed  an  unwil- 
lingness to  sign  said  Paper,  yet  he  was  sollicited  so 
much  that  at  length  he  was  prevailed  upon  to  sign  it, 
but  refused  to  swear  to  it : That  afterwards  this  De- 
ponent being  informed  that  he  had  been  imposed  on, 
in  signing  the  said  Paper,  he  procured  a Copy  of  the 
same,  and  now  declares.  That  such  Part  of  the 
Contents  of  said  Paper  which  contradicts  this  pres- 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


i;52] 


183 


ent  Deposition,  to  be  entirely  false  ; and  farther  this 
Deponent  saith  not 

james  Adair. 

Sworn  the  Day  and  Year  above 
written,  before  us 

John  Abraham  Denormandie 
Alexander  Graydon. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , August  27,  1752. 
No.  1237. 

To  be  Sold,  A certain  tract  of  land,  situate  on 
Timber  creek,  in  Gloucester  county  West-New  Jer- 
sey, containing  96  acres,  16  of  which  is  very  good 
meadow,  and  more  may  be  made,  with  a log  house, 
and  a fine  young  orchard  thereon  ; it  is  within  a mile 
of  Gloucester,  and  adjoining  to  a plantation  of  Wil- 
liam Masters’s.  For  title  and  terms  of  sale, 
enquire  of  Joseph  Hogg,  joiner,  in  Race  street,  Phil- 
adelphia.— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , August  27, 
1752.  No.  1237. 

Custom-House,  Philadelphia,  Entered  In.  Sloop 
Swallow,  James  Savage  from  Salem. — The  Pennsyl- 
vania Journal  August  20,  1752.  No.  509. 

New-York.  August  27.  We  hear  from  Philadel- 
phia, that  John  Jones,  who  is  committed  to  Jail  there, 
as  mentioned  in  the  Philadelphia  News,  is  suspected 
to  be  one  of  the  Fellows  who  robb’d  Mr.  Perot,  in 
Penn’s  Manor. — The  N Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the 
Weekly  Post  Boy , August  24,  1752. 


A Young  Man  qualified  for  a School-Master,  is 
wanting  at  Rariton,  in  the  Township  of  Bridge-water, 


1 84  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1752 

in  the  County  of  Somerset,  and  may  hear  of  Encour- 
ment,  by  applying  to  John  Broughton,  Esq;  of  said 
Township. — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly 
Post  Boy,  August  24,  1752. 

This  may  give  Notice,  that  the  Commencement  of 
New-Jersey  College,  which  is  stated  the  last  Wednes- 
day in  September,  will  this  Year  happen  on  the  third 
Wednesday,  according  to  the  New-Style  : And  that 
there  will  be  but  one  Exercise,  beginning  at  1 1 
o’Clock,  A.  M. — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the 
Weekly  Post  Boy , August  24,  1752. 

Custom-House,  Philadelphia,  Entered  In.  Schoon- 
er Salley,  Thomas  Dean  from  Salem. — The  Pennsyl- 
vania Journal , August  27,  1752.  No.  510. 

All  Persons  indebted  to  the  Estate  of  Joseph 
Field,  late  of  Monmouth  County,  in  New-Jersey,  de- 
ceas’d, are  desired  to  pay  ; and  those  that  have  any 
Demands  against  the  said  Estate,  are  also  desired  to 
bring  in  their  Accounts,  that  they  may  be  adjusted 
without  further  Notice  ; the  Estate  will  be  disposed 
to  the  Legatees  as  directed,  by 

Mercy  Field,  his  Executrix. 

— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly  Post 
Boy , Augiist  31,  1752. 

Custom-House,  Philadelphia,  Entered  In.  Brigt 
Rebecca,  Charles  Giles  from  Salem. — The  Pennsyl- 
vania Journal,  Sept.  14,  1752.  No.  51 1. 

Made  his  escape  from  Patrick  Hamilton,  on  Sun- 
day night  last  Florence  M’Carty,  a convict  servant 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


35 


1752] 

lad,  who  was  taken  out  of  Trenton  goal,  and  belongs 
to  John  Flannigan,  in  Cecil  county,  Maryland,  and 
was  going  home  ; he  is  of  a middle  size,  pale  com- 
plexion, wears  a cap,  and  a lock  of  hair  behind,  has 
light  grey  eyes  ; has  two  green  jackets  on,  one  of 
good  cloth,  white  trousers,  thread  stockings  and 
pumps,  with  large  carved  pewter  buckles.  Any  body 
that  will  secure  him  in  any  goal,  and  give  notice  to 
James  Whitehead,  keeper  of  the  work-house,  in  Phil- 
adelphia, so  as  he  may  be  had  again,  shall  have  Three 
Pounds  reward,  and  if  brought  to  him,  all  charges, 
paid  by  James  Whitehead. 

N.  B.  All  masters  of  vessels  are  forbid  to  carry 
him  off  at  their  peril. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette,  Sept.  14,  1752.  No. 
1238. 

Will  be  Run  for  in  Elizabeth-Town,  the  first  Tues- 
day in  October  next ; a Purse  of  about  Fifteen  Pounds 
Value,  by  any  Horse,  Mare,  or  Gelding,  (except  such 
as  have  won  a Prize,)  carrying  Ten  Stone,  Bridle  and 
Saddle  included,  the  best  in  three  Heats,  one  Mile 
and  a Half  each  Heat. — Horses  to  be  entered  with 
Matthias  Williamson,  or  David  Arnet,  at  Elizabeth- 
Town,  five  Days  before  the  Day  of  Running,  paying 
Two  Dollars  each,  or  at  the  Post  the  Day  of  Run- 
ning Three  Dollars.  The  Entrance  Money  to  be  run 
for  on  Thursday  following,  by  any  of  the  Horses,  ex- 
cept the  Winner  and  those  distanc’d. 

If  any  Foul-play  be  shewn  by  any  of  the  Riders, 
that  Horse  to  be  deemed  distanc’d  by  the  Judges,  as 
is  express’d  in  the  written  Articles. — The  N.  Y.  Ga- 
zette Revived  in  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , Sept.  18,  1752. 


1 86  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1752 

Custom-House,  Philadelphia,  Outwards.  Schoon- 
er Salley,  Thos.  Dean  for  Salem. — The  Pennsylvania 
Journal , Sept.  21,  1752.  No.  512. 

TO  be  sold  by  Thomas  Kearny,  Two  Tracts 
of  Land,  at  a Place  commonly  call’d  YVay- 
Cake,  in  the  Township  of  Middle-Town,  and  County 
of  Monmouth,  New -Jersey:  The  first  Tract  contain- 
ing 450  Acres,  well  timber’d,  partly  joining  Nave- 
Sinks  Bay,  and  partly  by  a Navigable  Creek,  about 
30  Acres  of  clear  Land,  and  a small  Orchard,  the 
greatest  Part  arable  and  choice  Pasturage,  several 
Acres  whereof,  may  be  made  good  Meadow  ; it  is  very 
commodious  for  Foreign  or  Domestick  Trade,  being 
a noted  Landing;  likewise,  fit  for  Fowling,  Fishing, 
Hunting,  Oystering,  and  Clamming;  also,  the  other 
Tract  containing  350  Acres,  well  timber’d,  with  a good 
Stream  suitable  for  a Grist-Mill  and  a Saw-Mill,  not 
above  30  Chains  distant  from  the  former  Tract,  with 
the  like  Conveniencies,  30  Acres  thereof  may  be 
made  choice  fresh  Meadow,  and  may  go  daily  to 
New-York  Market,  with  their  produce.  Any  Person 
inclining  to  purchase  the  Whole,  or  Part  of  the  said 
Tracts,  may  apply  to  said  Thomas  Kearny,  living  in 
said  Township,  where  they  may  see  the  Premises, 
and  get  an  indisputable  Title,  and  may  expect  a 
reasonable  Bargain,  and  moderate  Payments,  of 

Thomas  Kearny. 

— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly 
Post  Boy , Sept.  25,  1752. 

Custom-House,  Philadelphia,  Cleared.  Schooner 
Salley,  Thomas  Dean  to  Salem. — The  Pennsylvania 
Journal,  Sept.  28,  1752.  No.  513. 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


18; 


1752] 

From  Minisink  there  is  Advice,  that  on  the  21st, 
ult.  three  children  were  burnt  to  Death  there.  The 
Mother  of  them  had  Occasion  to  go  to  a Neighbor’s 
House,  and  left  them  shut  up  for  fear  of  their  getting 
out ; but  while  she  was  gone  her  House  took  Fire, 
and  before  any  Help  could  be  got,  the  Children  per- 
ish’d in  the  Flames. — The  P ennsylvania  Gazette , Sept. 
28,  1752.  No.  1240. 

Whereas  the  inhabitants  of  Prince-town,  in  the 
township  of  Windsor,  in  Middlesex  county,  New  Jer- 
sey, have  obtained  a patent  for  the  holding  of  two 
fairs  in  every  year,  each  to  continue  two  days,  viz. 
the  one  on  the  third  Wednesday  in  October,  and  the 
other  on  the  third  Wednesday  in  April : These  are  to 
inform  the  publick,  that,  pursuant  to  the  said  patent, 
there  will  to  be  sold  on  the  1 8th  of  October  next,  at 
Prince-town  aforesaid,  All  sorts  of  goods,  wares  and 
merchandize,  lawful  to  be  bought  and  sold  ; likewise 
cattle,  horses,  sheep,  and  other  country  produce. — 
The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , Sept.  28,  1752.  No.  1240. 

Philadelphia,  Sept.  28,  1752. 

Run  away  on  the  25th  of  August  last,  from  the  sub- 
scriber, in  Peters’s  Township,  in  Cumberland  county, 
A servant  lad,  called  James  M’Cuny,  about  18  years 
of  age,  of  a ruddy  complexion,  is  fair,  and  smooth 
fac’d,  and  is  well  set  of  his  age  : Had  on  when  he 
went  away,  An  old  greesy  hat,  and  half  worn  grey 
jacket,  it  being  worn  before  it  was  made  into  a jack- 
et, and  had  two  old  Shirts,  one  tow,  the  other  linnen, 
leather  breeches  and  trowsers,  and  new  shoes,  with 
large  brass  buckles.  Whoever  takes  up  and  secures 


1 88  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1752 

said  servant,  so  as  his  master  may  have  him  again, 
shall  have  Twenty  Shillings  reward,  and  reasonable 
charges,  paid  by 

Philip  Davis. 

N.  B.  He  formerly  runaway,  and  changed  his  name 
from  Peter  M’Cuny,  to  Crackwood.  All  masters  of 
vessels  are  forbid  to  carry  him  off  at  their  peril. — 
The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , Sept.  28,  1752.  No.  1240. 

Philadelphia,  Sept.  28,  1752. 

Run  away  on  the  19th  inst.  from  Joseph  Ludlam, 
of  Cape  May  county,  An  Irish  servant  lad,  named 
John  Burk,  about  19  years  of  age,  is  short  and  well- 
made,  has  short  brown  hair,  and  brown  eyes  : Had 
on,  a felt  hat,  and  white  worsted  cap,  with  red  and 
blue  stripes,  brown  Irish  linnen  jacket,  ozenbrigs 
shirt,  coarse  trowsers,  and  a pair  of  calf  skin  shoes, 
much  too  large  for  him,  the  grain  much  eaten  : He 
has  with  him  a long  fowling  piece,  with  a bell  muzzle, 
and  has  been  jump’d  together,  near  the  breech.  ’Tis 
probable  he  has  a forg’d  pass.  Whoever  takes  up 
and  secures  said  servant,  so  as  his  master  may  have 
him  again,  shall  have  Forty  Shillings  reward,  and 
reasonable  charges,  paid  by 

Joseph  Ludlam 

N.  B.  All  masters  of  vessels  are  forbid  to  carry 
him  off  at  their  peril.  He  came  from  Dublin,  and 
can  neither  read  nor  write. — The  Pennslvania  Ga- 
zette•,  Sept.  28,  1752.  No.  1240. 

Bucks  County,  August  26,  1752. 
To  the  Publishers  of  the  Pensylvania  Gazette 

If  you  think  the  inclosed , as  relative  to  the  Publick , 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


1752] 


189 


deserves  a Place  in  your  Paper , you  will  please  to  pub- 
lish it , and  oblige  many  of  your  Subscribers. 

AT  a Time  when  we  of  this  Province  have 
been  so  unfortunate  as  to  have  real  Crimes 
of  the  most  atrocious  Kind  committed  amongst  us, 
as  appears  in  two  late  Instances,  it  behoves  us,  to 
prevent  the  Publick  being  imposed  upon  by  the  Be- 
lief of  such  as,  upon  very  good  Grounds,  we  may 
pronounce  fictitious.  Most  People  have  heard  a Re- 
port of  a High-way  Robbery  being  committed  on  a 
certain  Richard  Perot,  in  the  Manor  of  Pennsbury, 
on  the  29th  of  the  last  Month,  an  Account  of  which 
was  inserted  in  the  New-York  Gazette  of  August  3, 
and  Advertisements  put  up  by  the  said  Perot,  at 
Trenton  Ferry,  describing  the  Robbers,  and  offering 
a Reward  for  the  Discovery  and  apprehending  of 
them.  An  Article  in  your  Paper  of  August  6,  dis- 
crediting the  Report  of  any  such  Crime  being  perpe- 
trated, has  produced  another  in  the  York  Gazette  of 
August  1 7,  informing  us,  that  your  Intelligencers  were 
evil-minded  Persons,  intending  great  Damage  to  the 
said  Mr.  Perot ; that  the  People  of  Philadelphia,  hard- 
hearted and  incredulous,  and  no  Way  regarding  his 
Misfortune,  had  suffered  two  suspicious  Persons, 
flush  of  Gold,  to  slip  through  their  Fingers,  and  es- 
cape : But  that  now  several  Affidavits  were  in  the 
Printer’s  Hands  at  New-York,  to  prove  the  Truth  of 
said  Robbery.  Of  what  Force  the  Evidence  con- 
tained in  those  Affidavits  may  be  to  alter  the  com- 
monly leceived  Opinion  here  relating  to  the  Affair, 
we  cannot  pretend  certainly  to  judge,  before  they  are 
made  publick  ; but  we  may  venture  to  assert,  that  the 
Evidence  resulting  from  the  following  Facts,  which 


IQO  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  ^1752 

are  well  (and  can  be  still  better)  supported  by  Wit- 
nesses of  unquestionable  Reputation,  and  the  Ob- 
servations naturally  deducible  from  those  Facts, 
must  convince  every  unprejudiced  Person,  that  the 
whole  was  a Contrivance,  tho’  not  cunningly  enough 
laid,  to  answer  some  bad  Purpose  ; and  it  is  but  act- 
ing in  Character  for  the  Author  of  such  a Scheme,  to 
make  a mighty  Bustle  and  Stir,  in  order  to  persuade 
a general  belief  of  it. 

And  first,  from  the  Deposition  of  Mr.  Patrick 
O Hanlon,  transmitted  herewith,  very  strong  Pre- 
sumptions may  be  gathered,  that  the  whole  Business, 
was  premeditated,  and  that  Mr.  Perot  had  resolved 
upon  a Place  very  proper,  as  he  thought,  for  the 
Scene  of  a Robbery.  The  Deposition  of  James 
Adair,  already  published  in  your  Paper,  will  speak  for 
itself, — only  let  it  be  observed,  That  said  Perot  was 
on  Horse-back,  with  his  Hands  tied  under  his  Hams, 
when  Adair  came  up  to  him,  tho’  as  he  told  him,  he 
had  been  dismounted  by  the  Robbers,  and  left  by 
them  tied,  on  the  Ground.  We  don’t  say  it  was  im- 
possible for  a Man,  in  such  a Situation,  to  recover  the 
Back  of  an  uncommonly  tall  Horse,  which  it  is  said 
Perot  rode,  but  it  must  be  allowed  to  be  very  diffi- 
cult, and  to  require  more  Time  perhaps,  than  we  can 
afford  him  for  this  Feat  of  Activity,  as  will  appear  by 
and  by.  If  one  might  venture  to  guess  in  so  tick- 
lish a Point,  would  it  not  have  been  much  easier  for 
Mr.  Perot,  first  to  have  tied  his  Hands,  as  he  sat  on 
Horse-back,  and  then  hoisting  his  Legs  upon  his 
Pummel,  pass  them  thro’  his  Arms,  which  any  Person, 
not  too  stiff  and  cumbersome,  might  effect?  But 


1752]  NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS.  19! 

what  will  still  greatly  strengthen  the  Credit  of  our 
Side  of  the  Question,  is  a Relation  which  Ennion 
Bristol,  Esq;  gives  us  upon  his  own  Knowledge,  and 
for  the  publishing  of  which,  very  near  as  he  wrote  it 
down,  we  have  his  own  Sanction  and  Authority,  viz. 
“That  on  the  29th  Day  of  July  last,  between  the 
‘hours  of  five  and  six  in  the  Afternoon,  as  he  was 
“returning  homewards,  soon  after  entering  the 
“Woods,  next  to  the  Plantation  of  William  Allen, 
“Esq;  he  met  two  Men  travelling,  one  of  whom  he 
“knew  to  be  Mr.  William  Yard,  of  Trenton  ; after 
“riding  about  Three-quarters  of  a Mile  farther,  he 
“met  two  young  Gentlemen,  Sons  of  Mr.  Morris  and 
“Mr.  Powell,  riding  towards  Trenton,  with  whom  he 
“made  a Halt  of  a few  Minutes.  Parting  from  them 
‘ he  had  Occasion  to  alight  from  his  Horse,  which  de- 
cayed him  some  Minutes  more ; remounting  his 
“Horse  again,  in  a few  Minutes  riding  he  met  a 
“Stranger,  whom  afterwards  upon  Recollection,  and 
“by  Description,  he  judged  to  be  the  Person  pretend- 
“ed  to  be  robbed  : And  that  in  about  four  or  five 
“Minutes  afterwards,  he  met  James  Adair  and  his 
“Wife  in  a Waggon  just  at  the  Run  of  Water,  com- 
monly called  Lambour’s  Run.  That  it  was  his  Opin- 
ion, there  being  about  2 Miles  Distance,  between  the 
“Place  he  met  the  first  Company,  and  James  Adair, 
“and  so  many  Travellers  within  that  short  Distance, 
“there  was  neither  Time  nor  Opportunity  for  such  a 
“Robbery  as  was  pretended,  and  that  if  any  Rogues 
“had  been  lying  in  Wait,  he  was  more  likely  to  be- 
come their  Prey  than  any  other  at  that  Time,  having 
“Saddle-Bags  behind  him,  and  travelling  alone  the 


192  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1752 

“contrary  Road.  Now  it  appears,  from  this  Rela- 
tion, that  Perot  was  but  a very  little  Way  before 
Adair’s  Waggon,  within  two  Miles  of  the  Place  he 
said  he  was  robbed.  So  that  he  must  have  rode  very 
hard  indeed  to  get  so  far  a Head  of  a light  Waggon, 
as  to  give  the  Rogues  Time  to  dismount  him,  rifle 
him  of  his  Money,  &c.  tie  him,  and  afterwards  for 
him  to  be  remounted,  which  last  one  would  think 
must  have  been  a pretty  tedious  Piece  of  Business. 
But  if  Mr.  Perot  had  really  been  robbed,  why  did  he 
not  immediately  apply  to  the  next  Justice  of  Peace 
for  the  County  where  the  Offence  was  committed, 
and  raise  the  Neighbourhood  in  Pursuit  of  the  Rob- 
bers ? The  River  Delaware  secured  one  Side,  the 
Country  is  thick  settled  on  the  other,  and  if  they 
were  not  invisible  to  every  Body  besides  Mr.  Perot, 
they  could  not  possibly  escaped  being  seen  by  some 
Person,  if  a fresh  Pursuit  had  been  made  ? but  in- 
stead of  doing  what  any  Man  would  naturally  do  in 
such  Circumstances,  he  has  made  all  his  Applications 
to  Magistrates  in  another  Government,  conscious 
perhaps  that  those  in  Pensylvania  would  have  better 
Opportunities  of  finding  out  the  Truth.  To  conclude, 
if  Mr.  Perot  thinks  himself  injured  by  this  Represen- 
tation, we  have  Authority  to  acquaint  him,  that  upon 
his  Application  to  any  Magistrate  of  Bucks  County, 
they  will  endeavour  to  see  Justice  done  him,  as  the 
Nature  of  his  Case  may  require. 

Bucks  County  A^\N  the  26th  Day  of  August  1752, 
\J  personally  appeared  before  me, 
Alexander  Graydon,  Esq;  one  of  his  Majesty’s  Jus- 
tices of  the  Peace  for  said  County,  Patrick  O Han- 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


193 


1752] 

Ion,  of  Bristol,  Innholder,  who  being  duly  sworn,  &c. 
doth  declare  and  say,  That  a Man,  who  called  him- 
self Richard  Perot,  did  stop  and  dine  at  this  Depo- 
nent’s House  on  the  Day  on  which  he  was  said  to  be 
robbed  in  Pennsbury  Manor;  and  enquiring  from 
this  Deponent  if  any  Company  were  going  towards 
Trenton,  he  was  informed  by  this  Deponent  of  sev- 
eral Gentlemen  travelling  that  Way,  at  which  he  ex- 
pressed himself  much  pleased  : And  when  the  Com- 
pany he  had  told  him  of,  were  setting  out,  this  De- 
ponent told  the  said  Perot  of  it,  ,but  he  seemed  to 
take  little  Notice,  and  delayed  at  least  Half  an  Hour 
after  the  said  Company  were  gone,  before  he  followed 
them. 

Patrick  O Hanlon. 

Sworn  before  me,  Alexander  Graydon. 

— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly  Post 
Boy , Oct.  2,  1752. 

New- York,  October  2.  We  hear  from  Newark, 
that  on  Tuesday  last,  Amos  Roberds,  one  of  the 
Chiefs  of  the  Jersey  Rioters,  was  committed  to  their 
County  Jail : This  Man  was  a few  Years  ago  indicted 
in  the  Supreme  Court  for  High-Treason,  which  In- 
dictment still  lies  against  him  ; and  Samuel  Nevil, 
Esq;  one  of  the  Judges  of  the  Supreme  Court,  going 
the  Circuits  to  Morris-County,  attended  by  a great 
Number  of  Magistrates  and  Gentlemen,  Roberds  had 
the  Imprudence,  or  rather  Impudence,  boldly  to 
intrude  into  their  Company  and  Presence,  as  if  in 
Defiance  of  Justice  ; whereupon  he  was  immediately 

ordered  into  Custody,  and  committed  to  Jail. — The 
13 


194  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1752 

N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , Oct . 2, 
1752. 

On  Thursday  last  a New-Jersey  Man  tall  and  pock- 
fretten,  paid  ten  Pieces  of  Eight  in  a Shop  in  this 
City  ; and  on  Friday  it  was  discovered  that  three  of 
them  were  counterfeited:  The  Bulk,  Impression  and 
Letters  are  so  well  imitated,  that  one  would  scarcely 
suspect  them  ; they  ring  almost  as  other  Pieces  of 
Eight ; the  Colour  nearly  but  not  quite  the  same ; 
but  on  cutting  they  are  soft  almost  as  Pewter,  and  on 
weighing  they  are  2 s.  lighter  than  Pieces  of  Eight ; 
which  are  the  only  sure  Means  we  know  of  discov- 
ing  them.  This  is  published  to  put  People  upon 
their  Guard,  and  that  if  possible  the  Authors  of  this 
Villainy  may  be  discovered.  — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Re- 
vived in  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , Oct.  2,  1752. 

New  York,  October  2. 

By  Capt.  Emott,  arrived  last  Week  at  Elizabeth- 
town in  14  Days  from  Barbados,  we  hear  that  Ad- 
miral Knowles,  in  the  Wager  Man  of  War,  from  Eng- 
land, in  Company  with  another  Man  of  War  station’d 
at  Barbados,  arrived  at  that  Island  the  27th  of  Au- 
gust, and  was  to  sail  again  in  two  or  three  Days  for 
his  Government  of  Jamaica — The  Pennsylvania  Ga- 
zette, Oct.  5,  1752.  No.  1241. 

To  be  Sold. 

A Plantation,  containing  250  acres,  with  30  acres 
of  meadow,  well  bank’d  and  drain’d,  and  a great 
deal  more  may  be  made,  with  a good  house  and  or- 
chard, and  about  60  acres  of  upland  cleared,  and  as 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


95 


1752] 

good  as  100  acres  of  choice  timber  swamp,  lying  and 
bounded  on  Mantua  creek,  in  Greenwich  township, 
Gloucester  county,  being  very  convenient  to  Phila- 
delphia market,  or  for  keeping  store,  with  an  indis- 
putable title,  which  may  be  seen  on  the  premises,  and 
when  the  terms  of  sale  may  be  known. 

James  Currie. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , Oct . 5,  1752.  No. 

1 241 . 

Custom-House , New- York,  Inward  Entries.  Snow 
Johannes,  Robt.  Pickman  from  Deal. — The  Pennsyl- 
vania Journal , Oct.  5,  1752.  No.  514. 

ATew-York , October  9.  Yesterday  sen’ night  the 
Brig  Elizabeth,  Capt.  Burnet  Richards,  outward 
bound  from  this  Port,  being  at  Anchor  at  Sandy- 
Hook,  was  by  the  Violence  of  the  Wind  forced  adrift 
with  both  Anchors  ahead ; and  the  People  on  board 
finding  all  Endeavours  to  prevent  her  going  ashore 
were  in  vain,  they  slipt  their  Cable,  and  ran  her 
ashore  in  a small  Byte  just  within  the  Hook  ; by 
which  Means  they  saved  the  Vessel,  tho’  obliged  to 
unload  the  most  Part  of  her  Cargo,  in  order  to  get 
her  off  again. — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the 
Weekly  Post  Boy , Oct.  9,  1752. 

We  are  well  assured,  that  Richard  Perot,  the  Per- 
son who  has  lately  made  so  much  Noise  on  Pretence 
of  being  robb’d  in  Penn’s  Manor,  has  turned  out  al- 
most a second  Tom  Bell  ; but  having  attempted  to 
play  some  Pranks  here,  a few  Days  ago,  he  was' dis- 
covered; whereupon  he  thought  fit  to  decamp,  and 


196 


NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1752 


on  Thursday  Night  last  went  quite  off. — The  N.  Y. 
Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , October  9, 
1752. 

Last  Week  a Jersey  One  Shilling  Bill  was  Pass’d 
in  this  City  for  Six  Shillings  ; the  Word  One  being 
Cut  out,  and  the  Word  Six  put  in,  and  the  other 
Parts  of  the  Bill  so  defac’d,  as  not  to  be  distinguished 
at  first  Sight,  but  may  easily  be  known  on  close  Ex- 
amination : As  there  may  possibly  be  more  of  the 
same  sort,  People  are  caution’d  to  beware  of  them. — 
The  Pennsylvania  Gazette,  Oct.  12,  1752.  No.  1242. 

Remainder  of  the  Election  for  Representatives  &c. 

For  Sussex  County,  Representatives,  Jacob  Kol- 
lock,  Ryves  Holt,  Benjamin  Burton,  Abraham  Wyn- 
coop,  John  Clowes,  David  Hall,  Sheriff,  William 
Shankland,  Coroner,  John  Rodney. 

For  Cumberland  County,  Representatives,  Joseph 
Armstrong,  John  Armstrong.  Sheriff,  Ezekiel  Dun- 
ning. Coroner,  Tobias  Hendricks.  * * * * * 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , October  12,  1752.  No. 
1 242. 

Thursday  Night  last,  some  Rogues  got  into  the 
Cabin  of  the  Boat  of  Solomon  Davis,  of  Newark, 
whilst  he  lay  asleep,  and  carried  off  upwards  of  Thir- 
ty Shillings  in  Money. — The  Pennsylvania  Journal, 
Oct.  12,  1752.  No.  515. 

New  York,  October  16 

One  Night  last  Week,  the  Boat  of  Mr.  Alexander 
Blair,  of  Brunswick,  lying  in  this  Harbour,  was  robb’d 
of  Cash,  to  the  Value  of  Five  Pounds  ; The  Thief 


i;52]  NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS.  igf 

was  next  Day  detected,  with  the  greatest  Part  of  the 
Money  about  him. — The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , Oct . 
19,  1752.  No.  1243. 

Philadelphia,  Oct.  19. 

Tuesday  last,  James  Rice,  alias  Dillon,  one  of  the 
Murderers  of  John  Thomas,  and  Eleanor  Davis, 
mentioned  in  our  last,  was  brought  to  Town,  from 
the  Union  Iron-works,  in  the  Jerseys,  and  put  into 
the  Dungeon.  He  confessed  the  horrid  Fact  imme- 
diately  upon  his  being  taken  up. — The  Pennsylvania 
Gazette , Oct.  19,  1752.  No.  1243. 

Run  away  from  the  subscriber,  living  near  Cona- 
gogee,  in  Cumberland  county,  the  25th  of  August 
last,  An  English  servant  Man,  named  Wiliam  Kitch- 
en, about  35  years  of  age,  about  5 feet  5 or  6 inches 
high,  well  set,  much  mark’d  with  the  small  pox,  has 
short  brown  hair,  and  is  a little  bald  before  : Had  on 
when  he  went  away,  A brown  cloth  jacket,  lined  with 
striped  linsey,  with  brass  buttons,  coarse  shirt  and 
trowsers,  has  shoes  on,  and  no  stockings,  an  old  furr 
hat,  cut  in  the  form  of  a cap  ; and  he  may  have  oth- 
er things,  tho’  yet  unknown.  Whoever  takes  up  and 
secures  said  servant,  so  as  his  master  may  have  him 
again,  shall  have  Three  Pounds  reward,  and  reason- 
able charges,  paid  by 

Alexander  Miller. 

N.  B.  All  masters  of  vessels  are  forbid  to  carry 
him  off  at  their  peril. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette,  Oct.  T9,  1752.  No. 

1243- 


t9S  new  jersey  coLONiAL  Documents.  [1752 

Custom  House , New-York.  Cleared  for  Departure. 
Sloop  Black  Jake,  Th.  Tucker  to  N.  Jersey  & St. 
Kitts. — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly  Post 
Boy , Oct.  16,  1752. 

Run  away  on  the  14th  instant,  from  Jacob  Chand- 
ler, in  this  city,  a servant  man,  named  William  Blake, 
he  is  a Taylor  and  Stay-maker  by  trade;  Had  on 
when  he  went  away,  a red  lapel  jacket,  a black  and 
white  grey  coat,  with  carv’d  metal  buttons  tells  vari- 
ous stories  concerning  the  place  of  his  birth  : Who- 
ever takes  up  said  servant,  and  brings  him  to  the 
workhouse  in  Philadelphia,  or  any  other  prison  in  this 
province,  shall  have  Twenty  Shillings  reward,  and 
reasonable  charges,  paid  by 

Jacob  Chandler. 

N.  B.  Said  Chandler  lives  in  Kingwood,  in  Hun- 
terdon county,  in  the  Jerseys. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , Oct.  19,  1752.  No. 

1243- 

We  hear  that  Capt.  Mash,  in  a Sloop  belonging  to 
New-Jersey,  is  arrived  at  Elizabeth-Town  from  Anti- 
gua : He  was  obliged  to  cut  away  his  Mast  on  Sun- 
day the  first  Instant,  in  a very  hard  Gale  of  Wind  at 
South. — The  Pennsylvania  Journal , Oct.  19,  1752. 
No.  516. 

Custom-House,  New  York,  Cleared  for  Departure. 
Tucker  to  N.  J.  and  St.  Kitts. — The  Pennsylvania 
Journal , Oct.  19,  1752.  No.  516. 

A Parcel  of  seasoned  Deck  Plank  of  30  Feet  long 
very  hearty,  and  a Quantity  of  choice  seasoned  Cead- 


I752]  NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS.  1 99 

er  and  Pine  Board  to  be  sold,  enquire  of  Fretwel 
Wright  in  Burlington. — The  Pennsylvania  Journal , 
Oct.  19,  1752.  No.  516. 

Just  publish" d and  to  be  sold  by  the  Printer  hereof 
Faithful  Ministers  the  Fathers  of  the  Church. 

A Sermon  preached  at  Foggs-Manor , on  occasion* 
of  the  Death  of  the  Reverend  Mr.  Samuel  Blair, 
who  departed  this  Life  July  5th,  1751. 

By  Samuel  Finley,  A.  M.  Minister  of  the  Gospel 
at  Nottingham  in  Pennsylvania. 

Also  may  be  had  at  the  same  Place , 

A Sermon  Preached  in  Woodbury,  at  the  Ordina- 
tion of  the  Reverend  Mr.  Chestnut  there,  By  Charles 
Beatty,  Minister  of  the  Gospel  at  Neshaminey. — 
The  Pennsylvania  Journal , Oct.  19,  1752.  No.  516. 

Philadelphia. 

We  have  advice  that  a Brigg  loaded  with  Pitch  and 
Tar,  without  Masts  or  People,  is  drove  ashore  at 
Squan.  — The  Pennsylvania  Journal ’,  Oct.  26,  1752. 
No.  517. 

Custom  House,  Philadelphia,  Entered  In.  Sloop 
Salisbury,  William  Burrows  from  Salem. — The  Penn- 
sylvania Journal , Oct.  26,  1752.  No.  517. 

RUN  away  on  the  15th  October,  from  David 
Kent,  of  Woodbridge,  in  East  New-Jersey; 
A Negro  Man,  named  Caesar,  a middling  thick  short 
Fellow,  his  right  Foot  twisting,  and  the  Toe  of  the 
same  inclining  to  turn  outward  as  he  walks,  and  his 
right  Knee  bending  inward  towards  the  Left ; he 
talks  but  poor  English,  and  is  about  22  Years  of 


200  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1752 

Age  : Had  on  when  he  went  away,  an  old  blue  Coat, 
a Felt  Hat,  a homespun  Linnen  Shirt,  a Pair  of  Tow- 
Cloth  Trowsers,  a Pair  of  old  Stockings,  and  a Pair 
of  Shoes  something  too  large  for  his  Feet.  Whoever 
takes  up  said  Negro,  and  brings  him  to  his  said  Mas- 
ter, shall  have  Thirty  Shillings  Reward,  and  all  reas- 
onable Charges,  paid  by 

David  Kent. 

— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly  Post 
Boy , Oct.  30,  1752. 

Run  away  some  Time  in  August  last,  from 
Abraham  Van  Buskirk,  of  Bergen  County 
in  New-Jersey,  a Negro  Man,  named  Jack,  aged  about 
25  Years,  middlsiz’d,  and  not  very  black,  pretty  thick 
Lips,  speaks  very  slow,  and  talks  both  English  and 
Dutch,  and  ’tis  suppos’d  he  has  a false  Pass  : Had  on 
a grey  homespun  Linsey  W olsey  Coat,  red  Linsey 
Wolsey  Jacket,  a Tow  Shirt  and  a Linnen  Shirt ; and 
has  two  or  three  Pair  of  Breeches  with  him  ; white 
Woolen  Stockings,  and  a Leather  Hat.  Whoever 
takes  up  said  Negro,  and  secures  him,  so  that  his 
Master  may  have  him  again,  shall  have  Three 
Pounds  Reward,  and  all  reasonable  Charges,  paid  by 

Abraham  Van  Buskirk. 

— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly  Post 
Boy , Oct.  30,  1752. 

Custom-House , Philadelphia,  Inward  Entries. 

Schooner  Good  Intent,  Ebenezer  Bowditch  from  Sa- 
lem.— The  Pennsylvania  Journal,  Nov.  2,  1752.  No. 

518. 


1 75 i]  frEWSPAPfcR  jEXtkACtS.  201 

New- York,  November  6.  We  are  told  that  Capt. 
Bryant  was  coming  down  the  River  when  Capt. 
Corne  left  Cowes,  on  board  of  whom,  we  hear  the 
Honourable  Robert  Hunter  Morris,  Esq;  Chief- 
Justice  of  New-Jersey,  is  coming  Passenger. — The 
N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , Nov. 
6,  1752. 

WHEREAS  Mary,  Wife  of  Thomas  Mont- 
gomery, of  New-Brunswick,  has  eloped 
from  her  Husband ; this  is  to  forewarn  all  Persons 
whatsoever,  from  trusting  her  on  his  Account ; for  he 
will  not  pay  any  Debts  she  shall  contract  from  the 
Date  hereof.  October  30,  1752. 

Thomas  Montgomery. 

— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly  Post 
Boy , Nov.  6,  1752. 

Run  away  from  John  Carman,  of  Northampton,  in 
Burlington  county,  on  the  6th  of  October  last,  an 
English  servant  man,  nam’d  William  Taylor,  about  5 
foot  6 inches  high,  of  a biown  complexion,  is  a thin 
man,  his  hair  cut  off,  and  stutters  much  when  he  talks 
fast : Had  on  when  he  went  away,  an  old  light  col- 
our’d camblet  jacket,  old  worsted  breeches,  partly  of 
the  same  colour,  old  homespun  shirt,  old  blue  stock- 
ings, and  old  shoes,  with  a patch  on  each.  Whoever 
takes  up  said  servant  and  secures  him  so  that  his  mas- 
ter may  have  him  again  shall  have  Forty  Shillings  re- 
ward, and  reasonable  charges,  paid  by 

John  Carman. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , November  9,  1752. 
No.  1246. 


202  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1752 

New- York,  November  6. 

Capt.  Corne  informs  us,  that  Capt.  Bryant  in  the 
Ship  Joseph,  of  this  Port  was  to  sail  in  a few  Days 
after  him  [from  London]  ; with  whom  it  is  said  Rob- 
ert Hunter  Morris,  Esq;  Chief  Justice  of  the  Jerseys, 
is  coming  Passenger. — The  Pennsylvania  Journal , 
Nov.  9,  1752.  No.  519. 

Custom-House,  Philadelphia,  Cleared.  Schooner 
Good  Intent,  E.  Bowditch  to  Salem. — The  Pennsylva-  . 
nia  Journal , Nov.  9,  1752.  No.  519. 


WHEREAS  Bathsheba,  Wife  of  Nicholas 
Dally,  of  Bound-Brook  in  East-New-Jer- 
sey,  by  reason  of  Age  and  Infirmity,  growing 
silly,  attempts  to  run  her  Husband  in  Debt,  to  his 
great  Detriment.  This  is  therefore  to  forewarn  all 
Persons  whatsoever  from  trusting  the  said  Bathshe- 
ba upon  his  Account,  for  he  will  pay  no  Debts  she 
shall  contract  from  the  Date  hereof. 

November  10,  1752. 


Nicholas  Dally. 

— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly  Post 
Boy , Nov.  13,  1752. 


Land  To  Be  Sold, 

TWO  Hundred  Acres  or  more,  of  Timber 
and  Wood-Land,  well  water’d,  fit  for  Grain 
or  Meadow,  within  a Mile  of  New-Brunswick,  to  be 
sold  by  Henry  Longfield,  living  near  the  Premises, 
who  will  o five  a clear  and  good  Title  for  the  same. 
Also  a Piece  of  good  Meadow,  containing  about  fifty 
Acres,  at  Cranberry,  the  chief  Part  of  which  is  mowed 


1 75 2 J newspaper  Extracts.  203 

every  Year  — The  N Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the  Week- 
ly Post  Boy , Nov.  20,  1752. 

TO  be  Sold,  a Grist-Mill  on  Rocky-Brook,  in 
the  Township  of  Windsor,  in  Middlesex 
County,  East-New-Jersey,  on  the  old  Post-Road,  that 
leads  from  Amboy  to  Burlington;  15  Miles  from 
South-River  Landing,  and  15  Miles  from  Borden- 
Town  Landing,  and  is  about  Mid-way  between  New- 
York  and  Philadelphia,  on  a constant  Stream  of  Wa- 
ter, Summer  and  Winter;  together  with  about  10 
Acres  of  good  Meadow:  Whoever  inclines  to  pur- 
chase the  said  Mill,  may  apply  to  Godfrey  Peters, 
living  at  the  same,  who  will  agree  on  reasonable 
Terms.  Also,  a Tract  of  Land  of  1 50  Acres,  in  Am- 
well,  in  the  County  of  Hunterdon,  in  West  New- 
Jersey,  whereon  is  a Dwelling-House,  a Frame-Barn, 
and  an  Orchard  of  1 50  Apple-Trees,  pretty  large, 
about  80  Acres  of  it  is  clear’d,  the  rest  is  very  good 
Timber  Land  ; to  be  Sold  by  the  said  Peters. — The 
N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , Nov. 
20,  1752. 

RUN  away  from  Joseph  Wood,  of  Piscataway, 
in  New-Jersey,  an  Irish  Servant  Man  named 
Richard  Malone,  near  6 Foot  high,  had  on  a check 
Shirt,  a brown  Jacket,  dark  olive-colour’d  Coat,  old 
Leather  Breeches,  and  Felt-Hat;  he  took  with  him 
his  Wife,  aged  about  24  Years,  well-set,  ruddy  and 
pock  fretten  ; They  are  suppos’d  to  be  gone  to  Rock- 
away  or  Barnagat.  Twenty  Shillings  Reward  and  all 


2o4  new  Jersey  colonial  documents.  [if 5^ 

reasonable  Charges  for  apprehending  said  Malone, 
will  be  paid  by  Jos.  Wood. 

— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly  Post 
Boy , Nov.  20,  1752. 

RUN  away  from  Dr.  Matthias  Dehart,  of 
Elizabeth-Town,  an  Irish  Servant  Man 
named  William  Davis,  but,  changes  his  Name  to  Da- 

1 o 

vidson,  a small  Fellow,  lanthorn  jaw’d,  his  left  Shoul- 
der out  of  Joint,  pretends  to  be  an  Englishman  and 
a Sailor,  red  Complexion,  red  Hair  & Beard,  about 
24  Years  old,  had  on  an  old  Bever  Hat  cut  across  the 
Crown,  a light  Ratteen  Jacket,  a striped  Under-Jack- 
et, new  Shirt,  Leather  Breeches,  & new  Shoes  : tis 
like  he  has  Tar-Spots  on  most  of  his  Cloaths,  as  he 
workt  on  board  a Vessel  for  some  Time. 

Also  run  away  with  him,  a Servant  Irish  Woman, 
named  Mary  Kelley,  belonging  to  Capt.  Jonathan 
Hampton,  of  the  same  Town  ; a likely  Girl,  about  20 
Years  old  ; ’tis  supposed  they  will  pass  for  Man  and 
Wife  : She  is  short  and  well  set ; had  on  an  old  short 
red  Cloak,  old  brown  Callimanco  Gown,  no  Bonnet, 
and  otherways  but  very  poorly  cloathed  ; They  were 
lately  advertised  in  the  Pennsylvania  Gazette  ; have 
run  away  twice  before  this  since  last  May,  once  from 
New-Castle,  and  once  from  Gloucester  County: 
They  used  to  travel  by  Night,  and  steal  Fowl,  &c. 
for  Sustenance.  Any  Person  that  shall  bring  them 
back  to  their  Masters,  shall  have  Three  Pound,  and 
all  reasonable  Charges,  paid  by 

Mathias  DeHart,  & Jonathan  Hampton. 

— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly  Post 
Boy , Nov.  29,  1752. 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


205 


1752] 

Last  W eek  came  to  this  City,  two  French  Soldiers, 
who  say  that  19  more,  with  an  old  Indian,  deserted 
the  French  Forces  at  Missisipi,  and  have  been  8 
Months  on  their  Journey  hither  over  land  : They  in- 
form us,  that  they,  with  many  others,  were  sent  from 
Old  France,  about  18  months  ago,  to  settle  at  New 
Orleans,  but  not  liking  the  country,  they  chose  to 
come  this  Way  ; the  rest  of  their  Company,  they  say, 
are  in  the  Jerseys. — The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , Nov. 
23,  1752.  No.  1248. 

New-York , November  27.  Last  Monday  arrived 
here  the  Captains  Bryant  and  Garrison  from  London. 
The  Chief  Justice  of  New-Jersey  is  not  come  in  these 
Vessels,  as  was  lately  mentioned. — -1  he  N.  Y.  Ga- 
zette Revived  in  the  Weekly  Post  Boy,  Nov.  2/,  1752. 

TO  be  Sold,  a very  good  Grist-Mill  and  Saw- 
Mill,  lying  a little  below  the  Falls  of  Passa- 
ick  River,  in  the  County  of  Essex,  in  East  New-Jer- 
sey ; as  also  a good  Dwelling-House  and  six  Acres 
of  Land  : The  Grist-Mill  has  a good  Bolting-Cloth  in 
it,  and  is  very  convenient  for  a Store-keeper,  having 
a good  Wheat  Country  round  it,  and  pretty  plenty  of 
Country-work.1  Any  Persons  inclining  to  purchase 
said  House  and  Mills,  may  apply  to  John  Tiebout, 
in  New-York,  who  will  dispose  of  the  same  on  reas- 
onable Terms. — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the 
Weekly  Post  Boy,  Nov.  27,  1752. 

New-York,  November  27. 

Last  Monday  arrived  here  the  Captains  Bryant 

1 This  mill  was  in  River  street,  near  the  foot  of  Mulberry  street,  Paterson.  It  was 
swept  away  by  a flood  in  the  river  in  November,  1810, 


20 6 NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1752 

and  Garrison  from  London.  John  Penn,  Esq;  a 
Grand-Son  of  the  late  William  Penn,  Esq;  Proprietor 
of  Pennsylvania,  came  Passenger  with  Capt.  Bryant, 
and  is  since  set  out  for  Philadelphia.  The  Chief  Jus- 
tice of  New  Jersey  is  not  come  in  these  Vessels,  as 
was  lately  mentioned. — The  Pennsylvania  Journal , 

Nov . 30,  1752  No.  522. 

Philadelphia. 

We  hear  that  the  Assembly  of  the  Province  of 
New  Jersey,  are  to  meet  at  Elizabeth  on  Thursday 
the  14th  of  December. — The  Pennsylvania  Journal , 
Nov.  30,  1752.  No.  522. 

; 

Custom-House,  Philadelphia,  Entered  In,  Schoon- 
er Pembroke,  Nicholas  Gordon  from  Salem. — The 
Pennsylvania  Journal , Nov.  30,  1752.  No.  522. 

i 

THESE  are  to  desire  the  Legatees,  and  all 
others  that  have  any  Demands  on  the  Es- 
tate of  Joseph  Field,  late  of  Monmouth  County,  de- 
ceas’d, to  meet  the  Executors  at  Burlington , in  order 
to  settle  the  Estate  as  the  Will  directs,  on  the  27th 
of  this  Month,  at  which  Time  and  Place,  Attendance 
will  be  given,  by 

Mercy  Field,  Executrix. 

Richard  Fitz-Randolph,  Executor. 

— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly 
Post  Boy , Dec.  4,  1752. 

New- York,  December  4. 

On  Monday  the  13th  of  last  Month,  the  Schooner 
Charming  Peggy,  Alexander  Sloan  Master,  bound 
in  here  from  Cape-Fare,  with  237  Barrels  of  Tar  on 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


20  7 


1752] 

board,  was  drove  ashore  in  a Violent  Gale  of  Wind 
at  Hast,  on  the  Outside  of  Sandy-Hook  : the  Vessel 
lost,  but  the  Men  and  Cargo  saved  ; the  Capt.  after- 
wards hired  some  small  Vessel  to  bring  up  the  Car- 
go to  this  City,  and  arrived  with  it  last  Week. — The 
Pennsylvania  Journal , Dec.  6,  1752.  No.  523. 

Custom  House,  Philadelphia,  Entered  In.  Schoon- 
er Endeavor,  Samuel  Allen  from  Salem. 

Cleared.  Schooner  Pembroke,  Nicholas  Gordon 
to  Salem. — The  Pennsylvania  Journal , Dec.  6,  1752. 
No.  523. 

New  York,  December  4. 

Yesterday  Morning  Capt.  Lyell  arrived  here  in  13 
Days  from  Virginia,  who  last  Tuesday,  off  of  Sandy 
Hook,  in  a great  Swell  of  a Sea,  lost  his  Mast  close 
by  the  Board. — The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , Dec.  7, 
1752.  No.  1250. 

Lost,  about  ten  days  ago,  a small  ship’s  yawl,  13 
feet  keel,  an  old  turpentine  bottom  ; is  supposed  to 
be  taken  away  by  some  of  the  Jersey  people  from 
Thomas  Lawrence,  Esquire’s  Wharff.  Whoever 
takes  up  said  yawl,  and  brings  her  to  Andrew  Os- 
wald, or  Joseph  Warner,  boat  builder,  shall  have  a 
Pistole  reward,  and  no  questions  ask’d 

Andrew  Oswald. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , December  7,  1752. 

No.  1250. 

New-York , December  11.  On  Saturday  last  a 
Newark  Shallop  was  drove  ashore  on  Oyster- 1 stand, 
in  our  Bay,  and  continued  there  all  Day  Yesterday, 


208  new  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1752 

very  much  exposed  to  the  Fury  of  the  Wind,  but  we 
can’t  as  yet  tell  whether  she  is  damaged  or  not. — 
The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , 
Dec.  11,  1752. 

Custom  House , P Philadelphia.  Entered  hi.  Sar- 
jant  from  Amboy. — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the 
Weekly  Post  Boy , Dec.  11,  1752. 

To  Be  Sold, 

A Good  and  profitable  Farm,  whereon  Ed- 
ward Antill  now  lives,  situated  about  a 
Mile  from  New-Brunswick,  adjoining  Raraton  River, 
on  the  South,  and  Raraton  Landing-  on  the  West, 
containing  370  odd  Acres,  about  40  of  which  is  Eng- 
lish Meadow,  a good  Part  of  which  may  be  water’d 
at  pleasure  ; about  100  Acres  of  it  is  Timber,  that 
has  not  been  much  cull’d ; on  it,  is  an  easy  well- 
built  Farm-House,  a Barn,  Baracks  and  Out-Houses, 
and  the  Whole  in  good  Fence  ; there  is  a large  Gar- 
den with  a Prim  Hedge  round  it,  and  an  Orchard 
containing  near  500  Apple-Trees,  the  greatest  Part 
of  which  are  grafted  with  variety  of  good  Fruit,  and 
begin  to  bear  ; there  is  also  a large  new  Brew- House, 
60  P'eet  long,  and  38  wide,  with  a new  Copper,  con- 
taining 22  Barrels,  with  all  the  Utensils  proper  for 
Brewing ; the  Whole  contrived  for  carrying  the  Liq- 
our  from  Place  to  Place  with  ease,  by  turning  of  a 
Cock,  or  taking  out  of  a Plug  ; the  Works  are  all 
complete,  and  the  brewing  Business  is  now  carried 
on,  and  will  continue  to  be  carried  on  by  the  Owner 
till  sold  : The  Water  is  exceeding  good,  is  soft,  and 
washes  well,  and  there  is  a sufficient  Quantity  of  it ; 


1752]  NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS.  209 

The  Farm  may  be  had  with,  or  without  the  Brew- 
House  ; the  Land  is  clear  of  all  foul  or  pernicious 
Weeds  and  Trash  ; and  the  Title  is  good,  and  has 
never  been  disputed.— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in 
the  Weekly  Post  Boy , Dec.  n,  1752. 

This  Day  is  published, 

In  one  Volume  in  Folio,  (Price  One  Pound  Ten 
Shillings ,) 

THE  Laws  of  the  Province  of  New-Jersey; 
from  the  Time  of  the  Surrender  of  the 
Government  in  1 702,  to  the  present  Year  1752.  The 
Body  of  the  Book  contains  all  the  Acts  and  Laws 
now  in  Force  in  die  said  Province,  with  proper  Mar- 
ginal Notes,  and  complete  Tables.  First , Of  all  the 
publick  Acts  now  in  Force.  Secondly,  Of  all  the  pri- 
vate Acts.  Thirdly,  Of  all  such  Acts  as  are  repealed, 
expired,  or  disallow’d  by  the  Crown.  Together  with 
a proper  Alphabetical  Index,  comprehending  all  the 
principal  Matters  in  the  Body  of  the  Book.  The 
whole  Work,  containing  One  Hundred  and  Twenty- 
eight  Sheets,  hath  been  carefully  prepared,  examined, 
and  corrected  by  the  original  Laws,  by  Samuel  Ne- 
vill,  Fsq;  Second  Justice  of  the  Supreme  Court  of 
Judicature  of  the  said  Province.  Published  by  Order 
of  the  late  House  of  Assembly  ; and  Sold  by  Sarmiel 
Nevill,  in  Perth-Amboy,  and  Joseph  Scattergood,  in 
Burlington. 

N.  B.  The  Books  are  now  ready  to  be  delivered 
to  the  Subscribers,  by  the  Persons  with  whom  they 
severally  subscribed. 

— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly  Post 
Boy,  Dec.  1 1,  1752. 


14 


210  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1752 

TO  be  Sold  at  publick  Vendue,  on  the  twen- 
ty-second Day  of  March  next,  or  at  private 
Sale  any  Time  before  ; A Plantation  (situate  in  Mor- 
ris County,  East  New-Jersey,  near  Black  River,)  con- 
taining 186  Acres,  formerly  possess’d  by  Jacob  Be- 
sharer,  deceas’d,  whereon  is  a good  Dwelling-House, 
a large  Barn,  a young  Orchard,  and  about  60  Acres 
thereof  good  Meadow  and  Meadow  Ground,  it  being 
formerly  an  Iron-Works,  and  a Saw-Mill  Pond  ; about 
50  Acres  thereof  cleared  and  in  good  Fence,  with 
One-third  Part  of  a Saw-Mill,  adjoining  to  the  Prem- 
isses ; the  Place  is  exceeding  well  timber’d,  and  the 
Title  indisputable  : Any  Person  inclining  to  purchase 
the  same,  may  apply  to  the  Widow  of  the  Deceased, 
on  the  Premisses,  by 

Brice  Rikey,  Executor , 
and  Barbara  Besharer,  Execiitrix. 

— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly  Post 
Boy , Dec.  11,  1752. 

To  be  Sold  by 

John  Abraham  Denormandie, 

One  undivided  quarter  part  of  Mount  Holly  Iron 
Works,  consisting  of  a furnace,  two  forges,  in  which 
there  are  three  fineries,  and  a chasery,  several  dwell- 
ing-houses, and  about  400  acres  of  land,  amongst 
which  good  meadow  ground  and  wood-land ; there 
are  also  stores,  and  all  other  necessary  improvements 
for  carrying  on  the  said  works  to  advantage.  A par- 
ticular inventory  of  the  whole,  with  the  terms  of  sale, 
may  be  seen  at  Mr.  Andrew  Reed’s  in  Philadelphia, 
or  at  the  said  John  Abraham  Deijormandie’s  living  in 


1 752  J NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS.  21  I 

Bristol,  Bucks  county. — The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , 
Dec.  14,  1752.  No.  1251. 

Somerset  Goal , Dec.  7,  1752. 

Mr.  Parker, 

AS  it  is  the  Privilege  of  the  Subjects  to  petition 
the  King , and  to  shew  the  Grievances  they 
lie  ttnder ; especially , when  it  is  brought  on  them , by 
the  Magistrates  Disregard  of  the  Laws , thereby 

prevent  the  Right  and  Privilege  of  the  Subject ; which 
I conceive  to  be  the  State  of  my  present  Circumstances  ; 
being  divested  of  my  Estate , by  an  unlawful  and  dis- 
qualified, Sheriff ; and  now , am  confiri d in  Goal  jor 
the  Payment  of  my  Debts : And , notwithstanding  my 
repeated  Applications  to  the  Legislature  of  this  Prov- 
ince, for  Relief  pom  my  unjust  Confinement , cannot 
obtain  it : And  therefore , am  obliged  to  appeal  to  the 
Publick , whose  Aid , and  Charitable  Assistance  I hum- 
bly crave  ; so  that  thereby , / enabled  to  represent 

my  deplorable_  State  and  Circumstances ; and  the  ir- 
regular and  unjust  Proceedings,  to  his  Majesty  in 
Council ; and  also  my  Remarks  on  each  Head. — Giv- 
ing the  same  a Place  in  your  Paper,  will  oblige, 

Your  most  distressed  humble  Servant, 

Joseph  Bonny. 

Sir, 

I thought  proper  to  insert  these  two  Sections  of  the  Law, 
to  shew  what  our  Laws  be,  relating  to  Sheriffs. 

“ And  be  it  further  Enacted  and  Provided  by  the  Author- 
ity aforesaid , That  when  such  Sheriff  hath  given  Bond,  as 
aforesaid,  he  shall  take  the  Oaths,  and  make  and  subscribe  the 
Declaration,  as  they  are  appointed  to  be  taken  made,  and  sub- 
scribed, by  an  Act  of  General  Assembly,  passed  in  the  Eighth 
Year  of  the  Reign  of  our  Sovereign  Lord  George  the  First, 


212 


NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1752 


entitled,  An  Act  for  securing  his  Majesty's  Government  of 
New-Jersey.” 

tiAnd  be  it  Enacted  and  declared  by  the  Authority  afore- 
said, That  unless  the  Person  or  Persons  so  obtaining  a Com- 
mission, or  being  appointed  Sheriff  or  Sheriffs  as  aforesaid, 
shall  enter  into  Bond  and  give  Security,  and  take  Oaths  or 
Affirmation,  as  herein  is  directed;  it  shall  be  unlawful  for  any 
Person  so  obtaining  a Commission,  or  being  appointed  Sheriff 
as  aforesaid,  of,  or  in  any  County,  City,  Borough,  or  Town 
corporate  in  this  Colony,  to  execute  the  Office  of  a Sheriff  or 
any  Part  thereof : And  any  Thing  done  by  such  Sheriff  or  his 
Deputy,  not  having  entered  into  Bond,  and  taken  the  Oaths  or 
Affirmation  aforesaid,  under  Colour,  or  pretended  to  be  done 
by  Virtue  of  such  Commission  or  Appointment,  shall  be 
deemed,  esteemed,  and  adjudged  to  be  illegal,  null  and  void.” 

January  the  30th,  1750. 

A Petition  was  presented  to  the  House  from  Joseph 
Bonney , a Prisoner  in  the  Goal  of  Somerset , setting 
forth  the  Calamities  of  himself,  his  Wife,  and  Children,  occa- 
sioned by  the  illegal  Proceedings  of  John  Riddell , late  Sheriff 
of  Somerset  County,  or  by  Neglect  of  the  Person  entrusted  to 
see  the  Sheriff  qualified  according  to  Law  : The  said  Riddel, 
having  removed  himself  out  of  the  Province,  with  the  Money 
he  had  as  Sheriff,  obtained  by  selling  the  Mills  and  Estate  of 
said  Bonny.  And  the  said  Riddel,  not  being  qualified  accord- 
ing to  Law  ; the  Petitioner  apprehends  himself  unlawfully  dis- 
possess’d of  his  said  Mills  and  Estate  ; and  alledging  that  he  is 
thereby,  not  only  unable  to  get  his  Estate  again,  but  his  Cred- 
itors are  also  deprived  of  their  just  Dues  ; and  praying  that 
some  Way  may  be  found  to  relieve  him  from  his  Imprisonment, 
and  that  his  Creditors  may  get  their  Money,  and  himself  have 
suitable  Satisfaction  for  the  Injuries  he  has  received. 

Ordered , That  Mr.  Van  Middlesworth  and  Mr.  Fisher , 
wait  on  his  Excellency,  and  acquaint  him,  that  Thomas  Leon- 
ard, as  Judge  or  Chief  Magistrate  of  the  County  of  Somerset , 
undertook  to  take  Security  of,  and  qualify  the  said  John  Rid- 
del, as  Sheriff  of  said  County, 


1752] 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


213 


Representation  to  his  Excellency , February  11,  1 752- 

That  it  plainly  appears,  the  Securities  so  taken,  were  neither 
of  them  Freeholders  of  the  said  County,  as  the  Law  requires 
they  should  have  been  ; and  that  this  was  well  known  to  the 
said  Judge  Leonard. 

That  by  inspecting  the  Roll  of  said  County,  and  from  other 
good  Evidence;  it  plainly  appears,  the  said  pretended  Sheriff* 
neither  signed  the  said  Roll,  nor  took  the  Oaths  to  the  Govern- 
ment, as  by  Law  he  ought  to  have  done. 

That  it  plainly  appears,  the  said  pretended  Sheriff  did  not 
take  the  Oath  for  Performance  of  his  Duty,  as  by  Law  pre- 
scribed. 

That  there  is  much  Reason  to  believe,  the  said  pretended 
Sheriff,  was  not  a Freeholder  of  said  County,  in  the  Manner 
the  Law  required,  in  order  to  have  qualified  for  his  Office. 

That  it  plainly  appears,  the  said  pretended  Sheriff,  both  be- 
fore and  since  his  being  appointed  to  that  Office,  was  a Person 
of  an  infamous  Character,  and  vicious  Behaviour,  and  had  little 
or  no  Estate  ; to  all  which,  the  said  Judge  Leonard , could  not 
be  a Stranger  ; and  that  his  being  appointed  to  the  said  Office, 
was  therefore  a Matter  of  Surprize,  Concern  and  Dissatisfaction 
to  the  Generality  of  the  principal  Inhabitants  of  the  said  County  ; 
and  that  he  was  generally  suppos’d,  to  have  been  recommended 
to  his  Excellency,  by  the  said  Judge  Leonard. 

That  from  the  best  Lights  hitherto  received,  it  appears,  the 
said  Judge  Leonard , suffered  the  said  pretended  Sheriff  to  act 
under  the  Colour  of  his  Commission,  before  he  had  taken  one 
Step  towards  a Qualification  ; and,  that  he  continued  so  to  act, 
until  the  Clerk  of  said  County,  refused  to  seal  and  deliver  him 
any  more  Writs,  upon  Account  of  his  not  being  qualified; 
and  that  afterwards,  notwithstanding  the  Disqualifications  be- 
fore mentioned,  the  said  Judge  Leonard , suffered  him,  the  said 
pretended  Sheriff,  to  exercise  the  said  Office  ; by  Colour  of 
which,  among  other  illegal  Proceedings,  he  sold  the  Mills,  and 
other  Estate,  of  one  yoseph  Bonney.  And  by  credible  Inform- 
ation, hath  run  away,  with  upwards  of  Two  Hundred  Pounds 
of  the  Money,  arising  from  the  Sale  thereof ; for  want  of  which, 
the  said  Bonny , is  now  confined  in  the  Goal  of  the  County 


214 


NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1752 


aforesaid,  and  his  Wife  and  Family  in  deep  Distress;  and  had 
the  said  pretended  Sheriff,  not  run  away,  or  otherwise,  had 
been  of  Ability,  or  if  his  Securities  were  sufficient,  according 
to  Law,  to  make  good  the  Damages  ; the  said  Bonny's  Credit- 
ors, ’tis  conceived,  might  have  received  their  just  Debts,  and 
himself  been  at  Liberty  to  make  an  ample  Provision,  for  the 
Support  of  his  distressed  Wife  and  Family  ; but,  as  it  is,  the 
said  Bonny  is  confined,  his  Creditors  defrauded,  and  his  Wife 
and  Family  in  great  Distress. 

That  it  appears  to  this  House,  by  such  Information,  as  they 
have  just  Reason  to  believe,  that  the  said  pretended  Sheriff,  as- 
sisted by  the  said  Judge  Leonard , under  false  Colours  and  Pre 
tences,  inveigled,  and  drew  in  one  yohn  Horner , (who  at  that 
Time,  lay  sick  at  the  said  Riddell's  House)  to  become  Security 
for  him  the  said  pretended  Sheriff ; as  an  Inducement  to  which, 
the  said  pretended  Sheriff,  told  the  said  Horner , that  one  yohn 
Denison , a Freeholder  in  the  County  of  Middlesex , and  a Man 
in  good  Circumstances,  was  also  to  be  one  of  his  Securities  ; 
and  to  complete  the  Deceit,  the  Name  of  the  said  Denison  was 
inserted  in  the  original  Bond  when  brought  to  be  executed  by 
the  said  Horner.  That  he,  the  said  Horner , being  scrupulous 
of  entering  into  the  said  Bond  ; Judge  Leonard  promised,  that 
he  would  take  Care,  that  the  said  Denison  should  do  it ; upon 
which  Promise,  Horner , and  one  Montier , became  the  said 
pretended  Sheriff’s  Securities  : And  together  with  the  said  pre- 
tended Sheriff,  executed  the  said  Bond  : That  the  said  Bond  be- 
ing sealed,  delivered,  and  acknowledged,  before  the  said  Judge  ; 
then  became  by  the  Law,  a Matter  of  Record,  and  was  to  be 
delivered  by  the  said  Judge,  to  the  Clerk  of  the  said  County  of 
Somerset , to  be  entered  upon  the  Records  of  the  said  County  ; 
and  afterwards,  the  said  original  Bond,  was  to  be  transmitted 
by  the  said  Clerk,  to  the  Clerk  of  the  Supreme  Court,  there  to 
remain  among  the  publick  Records  of  this  Colony. 

And  this  House  are  further  inform’d,  That  the  said  original 
Bond,  is  in  the  Secretary’s  Office  at  Perth- Amboy , but  that  the 
Name  of  yohn  Denison , is  now  eras’d  in  the  said  Bond. 

That  his  Excellency  being  newly  come  to  his  Government, 
and  unacquainted  with  the  said  yohn  Riddell's  true  Character 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


215 


1752] 


and  Behaviour,  at  the  Time  of  his  being  appointed  Sheriff ; 
there  is  good  Reason  to  believe,  his  Excellency  was  prevailed 
on  to  appoint  him  to  that  Office,  by  the  Recommendation  of  the 
said  Judge  Leonard , and  the  Advice  of  Council. 

That  the  House  being  willing  to  act  in  this  Affair,  with  the 
utmost  Candour  and  Impartiality  ; ordered  two  of  their  Mem- 
bers to  inform  the  said  Judge  Leonard , in  a private  Way,  that 
they  desired,  he  would  give  such  Information  as  was  in  his 
Power,  relating  to  the  Qualifications  of  the  said  late  pretended 
Sheriff ; but  the  said  Judge,  having  refused  to  give  any  such 
Information  ; his  Omission,  loudly  implies  his  Misbehaviour 
therein. 

That,  to  say  no  more,  the  foregoing  Representation  of  Facts, 
doth,  at  least,  discover  the  said  Judge  Leoitard's  Neglect,  and 
Breach  of  Duty  to  the  King,  and  his  liege  People  ; as  also,  his 
Disregard  to,  and  Violation  of  the  Law  of  this  Colony : 
Wherefore,  we  cannot  think  it  for  his  Majesty’s  Service,  or 
the  publick  Good,  for  the  said  Judge  Leonard , to  retain  his  re- 
spective Offices  any  longer  ; which  is  humbly  submitted  to  his 
Excellency’s  mature  Consideration. 

That  the  aforesaid  illegal  Proceedings  of  the  said  Judge  Leon- 
ard, have  been  productive  of  several  insupportable  Grievances  ; 
for  which,  the  House  humbly  prays  his  Excellency’s  speedy 
Redress  ; not  only  for  the  Relief  of  the  injured,  but  also  for  the 
Discouragement  of  such  illegal  Proceedings  for  the  Future: 
For  what  will  it  avail  for  the  Legislature,  to  enact  Laws  for 
the  public  Good,  unless  those  Laws  are  duly  executed  ; for  if 
they  may  be  dispensed  with  at  the  Will  and  pleasure  of  those, 
with  whom  they  are  intrusted ; Surely,  this  will  inevitably 
subvert  the  Constitution,  and  to  introduce  the  unwieldy  Strokes 
of  Oppression,  and  despotic  Powers,  so  carefully  to  be  guarded 
against  by  all  Persons  in  general ; but  more  particularly,  by 
those,  who  either  foresee  its  gradual  Progress,  or  fear  its  dread- 
ful Effects ; and  who  are  immediately  intrusted  to  prevent  its 
Growth  and  Increase. 

That  the  House  humbly  beg  Leave  to  observe  to  his  Excel- 
lency, That  the  Enquiry  into  this  Affair,  cannot  be  esteemed 
by  Men  of  Reason,  an  over  grasping  Attempt  at  unlimited 


NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1752 


216 

Power : By  it,  the  House  have  not  the  least  Intention  of  ex- 
tending their  Authority  beyond  its  due  Bounds,  or  to  take  upon 
themselves  the  executive  Part  of  the  Laws  ; but,  as  they  are 
appointed  by  the  People  they  represent,  the  Guardians  and 
Trustees  of  their  Liberties  and  Properties,  to  watch  and  nour- 
ish those  tender  Vines,  lest,  by  receiving  a Wound,  they  should 
bleed  to  Death,  (and  our  happy  Constitution  confirms  this  Ap- 
pointment;) So,  when  these  Guardians  discover  any  such 
Wound,  it  is  their  Duty  immediately  to  seek  a Remedy  where 
it  may  be  found,  for  fear  it  should  gangre  and  become  mortal : 
This  Allegory  requires  no  Explanation,  to  a Person  of  your 
Excellency’s  Wisdom  and  Understanding,  only  the  House 
think  the  Application  very  proper  in  the  present  Case  ; for  it 
must  be  allowed  that  the  High-Sheriff  of  a County,  is  an 
Officer  of  great  Power  and  Authority  in  that  County,  and  is 
instrusted  with  some  of  the  most  valuable  Branches  of  the 
Privileges  of  the  People  ; such  as  the  Execution  of  all  Pro- 
cesses, criminal  and  civil;  the  Summoning  of  Juries,  to  try 
Men’s  Properties;  the  Charge  of  the  public  Goals,  and  the 
Care  of  all  Prisoners  committed  thereto,  whether  Traitors,  Fel- 
ons or  other  Offenders  ; and  what  is  yet  more,  the  Laws  have  dele- 
gated to  this  Officer,  the  Authority  of  raising  and  commanding 
Posse  Comitatus , or  the  Power  of  the  County,  upon  certain 
Immergencies  and  Occasions : Therefore,  whether  to  repose 
this  important  Trust  in  a Person  loose  in  his  Behaviour,  cor- 
rupt in  his  Principles,  immoral  in  his  Life  and  Conversation, 
vicious  in  his  Inclinations,  and  lately,  not  much  better  than  a 
Vagrant  in  his  Station  of  Life : And  further,  whether  a Magis- 
trate intrusted  with  the  Power  of  qualifying  a Person  for  this 
high  Station,  and  of  taking  Care  that  the  Securities  should  be 
good  and  sufficient  (as  the  Law  required)  neglecting  his  Duty 
in  almost  every  Particular,  and  not  so  much  as  securing  and 
strengthening  the  said  Person,  in  his  Duty  and  Ferity  to  his 
Majesty,  by  tendring  and  ad  ministring  to  him  the  Oaths  of  the 
Government,  as  the  Law  in  this  Case  particularly  requires  he 
should  do;  be  not  a dangerous  Blow  and  Wound  to  the  Con- 
stitution, the  House  humbly  submits  to  his  Excellency’s  further 
Consideration  ? 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


217 


1752] 

(The  above  Representation  to  his  Excellency  by  the  Assem- 
bly, you  may  conceive  thereby,  my  Case  to  be  most  distressed. 
The  Assembly  not  offering  Proofs,  altho’  requested  by  the  Coun- 
cil. And  as  the  Assembly,  hath  given  a just  Representation 
of  my  Case,  excepting  the  Money  arising  from  my  Estate,  for 
which  I have  had  no  Account  of  one  Penny,  which  I deem  easy 
to  be  made  appear.) 

Judge  Leonard  to  the  Governor , February  21,  1 75°* 

May  it  please  your  Excellency  : 

TN  Obedience  to  your  Excellence’s  Order  in  Council,  of 
the  Thirteenth  Instant,  ordering  me  to  give  my  Answer 
in  Writing,  to  the  Petition  of  Joseph  Bonny , and  the  Message  of 
the  House  of  Assembly  to  your  Excellency,  of  the  nth  Instant ; 
Do  humbly  say.  That  I am  heartily  sorry  for  the  unfortunate 
Circumstances  of  the  said  Joseph  Bonny , set  forth  in  his  Peti- 
tion, and  think  his  Case  deserves  Compassion.  That  John 
Riddell , late  pretended  Sheriff'  of  Somerset  County,  came 
many  Years  ago  to  live  in  Prince-  Town , in  the  said  County,  and 
kept  a Store  of  Goods  there ; and  afterwards,  married  a 
Woman  there,  with  a good  Estate,  real  and  personal:  Of  real 
Estate,  she  had  one  Tenement,  that  let  for  Twenty-Jive 
Pozinds  per  Annum , another  that  let  for  Eight  Pounds  per 
Annum , and  another  for  Six  Pounds  per  Annum  ; and  of 
personal  Estate,  she  had  sundry  Negroes,  and  other  consider- 
able, visible  personal  Estate.  That  some  Time  after,  he,  the 
said  Riddell  married,  he  bought  a Lot  in  Prince-Town , and 
built  a Dwelling-House  upon  it,  in  which  Dwelling-House  so 
built  by  him,  he  and  his  Family  lived  long  before  he  was  Sheriff, 
where  John  Horner , lodged  and  boarded  with  him  ; and  the 
said  Riddell , also  purchased  a Thirty  Years  Lease  of  another 
Tenement  in  Prince-Town , which  is  now  let  by  the  Wife  of 
the  said  John  Riddell , for  Six  Pounds  per  Annum.  That 
while  the  said  John  Riddell , was  in  the  Circumstances  before 
set  forth,  and  having  all  along,  so  far  as  I know,  behaved  him- 
self well,  and  obtained  a good  Reputation,  and  general  Respect 
in  the  County  of  Somerset.  Bearfoot  Brinson  J then  Sheriff 
of  the  said  County,  died,  whereupon  the  said  John  Riddell , 


1 Barefoot  Brunson. 


218 


NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1752 


obtained  Recommendations  to  Your  Excellency,  in  Writing, 
to  succeed  the  said  Brinson , in  the  Office  of  Sheriff,  from  most 
of  the  Magistrates,  and  principal  Freeholders  of  the  County  of 
Somerset , among  which  I was  one,  in  no  ways  doubting  of  his 
Ability  and  Fitness  for  the  said  Office,  as  by  those  Recom- 
mendations, which  I doubt  not,  he  delivered  to  your  Excel- 
lency, may  appear.  That  upon  those  Recommendations,  with 
the  Advice  of  his  Majesty’s  Council,  I believe,  it  was  that  your 
Excellency,  gave  the  said  John  Riddell , a Commission  for 
the  Office  of  Sheriff  of  Somerset , without  any  Application 
from  me,  otherwise,  than  by  signing  the  said  Recommendation, 
along  with  others  as  before,  to  my  Remembrance,  Knowledge, 
or  Belief.  That  the  said  John  Riddell , having  so  obtained 
the  said  Commission,  came  to  me,  as  the  nearest  Judge  of  the 
said  County,  to  give  in  Security,  for  the  due  Execution  of  the 
said  Office  according  to  Law  ; and  because  no  Copy  of  the 
Sheriff’s  Act  had  then  come  to  my  Hands,  I desired  him  to  get 
the  Bond  drawn,  either  by  Mr.  Cotman , who  acted  as  Deputy 
in  the  County  of  Somerset , for  the  Attorney  General,  or  by 
Mr.  Hooper , Clerk  of  the  said  County  ; and  accordingly,  he 
brought  the  said  Bond  drawn,  as  he  said,  and  I verily  believe 
by  the  said  Mr.  Cotman. 

That  the  said  Riddell  told  me,  that  John  Horner , William 
Mountier , and  John  Denison , would  be  his  Securities  ; which 
John  Horner  was  then  in  Possession,  and  generally  deemed 
Owner  of  a real  Estate  in  the  County  of  Middlesex , worth 
several  Thousand  Pounds.  That  the  said  John  Horner  has 
since  sold  of  his  Somerset  County  Estate,  to  the  Value  of  sev- 
eral Hundred  Pounds;  and  the  Remainder  of  that  Estate,  I 
believe  is  still  worth  Seven  or  Eight  Hundred  Pounds:  And 
his  real  Estate  in  Middlesex  County,  which  is  separated  from 
his  Somerset  Estate  only  by  a High- Way,  is,  I believe,  now 
worth  several  Thousand  Pounds  ; and  then,  or  as  yet,  I should 
in  no  Ways  have  scrupled  to  have  taken,  or  now  to  take  him, 
as  sufficient  Security  to  myself  for  a Thousand  Pounds,  and 
much  more. 

That  then  William  Mountier , rented  a House  of  me  in 
Prince  Town,  in  the  County  of  Somerset , at  Twenty  Pounds 


1752] 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


219 


per  Annum  ; and  was  building  a House  in  Middlesex , on  a 
Lot  of  his  own,  on  the  other  Side  of  the  Street,  where  he  now 
lives  ; and  tho’  no  Freeholder  in  Somerset , was  deemed  by  me 
as  sufficient  to  join  with  the  said  Horner  in  the  said  Bond. 

That  after  the  said  three  Names  were  filled  up  as  Securities 
in  the  said  Bond,  the  said  Riddell  told  me,  that  he  could  not 
get  the  said  Dennison  to  be  bound  with  him  ; whereupon  the 
said  Riddell  put  the  Name  of  Dennison  out  of  the  said  Bond  ; 
and  after  the  Name  of  Dennison  was  so  put  out  of  said  Bond, 
the  same  was  executed  by  the  said  Riddell , Horner  and 
Mountier ; which  Bond  was  soon  after  delivered  to  the  Clerk 
of  the  County  of  Somerset . 

That  I had  no  Copy  of  the  Sheriff’s  Act,  to  enable  me  to  ad- 
minister the  Oath  of  Office  of  Sheriff  thereby  prescribed  ; and 
the  Rolls  for  the  Oaths  to  the  Government,  were  then  in  the 
Hands  of  Paul  Miller , another  of  the  Judges  of  the  County  of 
Somerset , who  had  for  many  Years  before  and  since,  usually 
administred  those  Oaths ; wherefore  I ordered  the  said  Riddell 
to  go  [to]  the  Clerk  of  the  County  with  his  Commission,  and 
to  see  the  Sheriff’s  Act.  And  I do  solemnly  declare,  that  until 
Riddell  run  away,  I never,  to  my  Knowledge  or  Belief,  heard 
that  he  had  not  taken  the  Oath,  and  fully  complied  with  the 
Directions  of  the  Act  of  Assembly. 

That  ’till  a small  Time  before  the  said  Riddell  run  away,  I 
never,  to  my  Knowledge,  heard  of  any  Blot  in  his  Character, 
or  of  any  vicious  Behaviour.  But  then  I was  informed,  that  he 
had  taken  to  drink  privately,  but  never  heard  of  any  other  Vice 
he  had  taken  to  : And  when  he  run  away,  he  was,  and  still  is, 
30  Pounds  indebted  to  me,  which  I had  no  doubt  of  till  he  run 
away. 

That  I make  no  doubt,  but  that  the  Security  for  said  Riddell 
is  good  and  sufficient : Whoever  has  been  injured  by  the  said 
Riddell , as  Sheriff,  may,  I believe,  by  that  Security,  obtain 
Relief  and  Redress. 

I do  deny,  that  any  Thing  in  the  said  Petition  and  Message, 
material  concerning  me,  and  not  hereby  sufficiently  answered, 
is  true,  to  my  Knowledge  or  Belief.  And  I do  declare,  that 
whatever  I acted  in  this  Affair,  was  done  Bona  fide , and  ac- 


220 


NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1752 


cording  to  the  best  of  my  Knowledge,  without  any  the  least 
Thought  of  injuring  any  Man,  or  of  the  Neglect  or  Breach  of 
any  Duty  incumbent  upon  me. 

(As  for  the  said  Judge  Leonard' s excusing  himself,  plainly 
demonstrates,  that  he  did  not  conceive  it  his  Duty,  whether  the 
King’s  Officers  were  lawfully  qualified  or  not ; or  whether  the 
Subject  apply’d  to  King’s  Officers  or  not;  and  had  as  little 
Regard  to  the  Law,  because  there  could  be  nothing  to  give  him 
a Right  to  hold  any  Person  lawfully  brought  in  to  answer,  but 
his  knowing  the  Sheriff  duly  qualified.) 

February  21,  1750.  A Message  from  his  Excellency  by  Mr. 
Secretary,  in  the  following  Words: 

Gentlemen  of  the  General  Assembly. 

T Have  read  and  considered  your  Message  to  me  of  the 
nth  Instant,  respecting  John  Riddell , appointed 
some  Years  ago,  to  be  Sheriff  of  the  County  of  So?nerset , who 
was  recommended  to  me  for  the  said  Office,  by  Thomas  Leon-  ,j 
ard , Esq ; with  most  of  the  other  Magistrates,  and  a good 
Number  of  Freeholders  of  the  said  County.  I have  also  con- 
sidered the  many  Allegations  you  have  laid  before  me,  against 
the  said  Thomas  Leonard , Esq ; on  your  supposing  his  not 
having  done  his  Duty  as  the  Law  requires,  with  Respect  to  the  j 
Qualifying  of  the  said  Riddell , to  the  Office  of  Sheriff  of  the  I 

said  County,  and  I gave  your  Message  to  me  on  this  Subject,  1 

to  the  said  Leonard , and  to  which  I requir’d  an  Answer,  and 
the  same  he  accordingly  brought  me:  These  Things,  together 
with  Joseph  Bonny's  Petition  to  your  House,  I laid  before  his  ; 
Majesty’s  Council  of  this  Province,  for  their  Opinion  and 
Advice,  as  to  my  further  Proceeding,  with  Respect  to  the  said 
Thomas  Leonard , Esq  ; which  Advice,  with  the  said  Leon- 
ard's Answer,  I send  you  herewith. 

(In  the  above,  his  Excellency  informs  the  Assembly,  that  he 
hath  acted  according  to  his  Majesty’s  Royal  Instructions  ; but 
am  sorry  that  it  gives  no  Reasons  to  think,  that  his  Majesty 
hath  given  no  Instructions  for  the  Preserving  of  the  Laws, 
Rights,  and  Liberties  of  the  Subject.) 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


221 


1752] 

The  Council  to  the  Governor. 

May  it  f lease  your  Excellency. 

IN  Obedience  to  your  Excellency’s  Order  in  Council  of 
the  13th  Instant,  referring  to  us,  the  Petition  of  Joseph 
Bonny , and  the  Message  of  the  House  of  Assembly  to  your 
Excellency,  of  the  nth  Instant,  for  our  Advice  thereon:  VVe 
have  considered  the  same,  and  the  Answer  of  Thomas  Leon- 
ard, Esq  ; to  the  Matters  therein  alledged  against  him  : And  if 
what  he  answers  be  true,  it  does  not  appear  to  us,  that  he  is 
guilty  of  the  Neglects,  and  Breaches  of  Duty  alledged  against 
him  : But  as  we  are  no  proper  Judges  of  such  Facts,  alledged 
by  the  said  Message  on  the  one  Hand,  and  avoided,  or  denied 
by  the  said  Answer,  on  the  other  Part;  we  are  humbly  of 
Opinion,  that  your  Excellency,  do  lay  the  same  Answer  before 
the  House  of  Assembly,  in  order  that  they  may  reply  to  the 
said  Answer,  and  point  out,  and  insist  on  such  Facts  denied  by 
it,  as  they  shall  think  proper;  and  if  those  insisted  on,  shall 
appear  to  us,  to  be  in  any  Way,  a Breach  or  Neglect  of  Duty, 
incumbent  on  him  to  have  performed:  We  shall  then  humbly 
advise  your  Excellency  to  order  the  Attorney  General,  to  file 
an  Information  against  him,  for  the  Trial  of  the  Truth  of  the 
Facts  insisted  on  ; and  when  Mr.  Leonard  is  found  guilty,  or 
acquitted  of  those  Facts,  we  can,  with  Safety,  firmly  advise 
your  Excellency  in  this  Matter. 

(I  find  by  the  Minutes  of  the  Assembly,  October  17,  1749, 
that  the  Council  saith  : It  is  the  Knowledge  of  Facts,  that 
should  induce  us  to  assert  them  ; and  not  knowing  but  they 
may  be  true : Therefore,  I cannot  conceive  how  Judge  Leon- 
ard, declaring  his  not  knowing  Riddell  being  duly  qualified, 
can  be  any  Excuse  to  him  : For  the  Magistrates  are  bound  to 
see  that  none  exercise  the  King’s  Authority,  but  his  known 
lawful  Officers ; That  the  Subjects  are  bound  to  apply  to  them  ; 
and  this  is  not  the  Knowledge  of  Facts.  And  I would  further 
ask,  whether  the  Laws  and  Records  of  this  Province  are  to  de- 
termine Facts?  But  the  Honourable  Council,  in  the  said  Min- 
utes, tell  us,  that  they  are  proper  Judges  of  such  Facts;  and 
certainly,  the  Facts  here  meant,  were?  whether  the  Laws  were 
observed  or  not.) 


222 


NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1752 


May  the  29th , 1751. 

fTIHE  Petition  of  Joseph  Bonny , was  read  a second 
Time,  and  the  House  taking  the  same  into  Considera- 
tion, are  inclined  to  pass  an  Act  of  General  Assembly  for  his 
Relief  next  Sitting,  upon  the  Principles  of  Mercy  and  Justice, 
provided  no  reasonable  Objections  can  be  made  against  such 
Act ; therefore  ordered,  that  Copies  of  this  Minute,  be  set  up 
at  the  Court  House  in  So?nerset  County,  in  Prince  Town , at 
New-Brunswick  ; at  the  Clerk’s  Office  of  said  County,  and  at 
Bound  Brook , for  at  least  One  Month  preceding  such  Sitting, 
that  all  Persons  concerned,  may  have  due  Notice  thereof,  and 
make  their  Objections,  if  any  they  have. 

(I  would  inform  here,  that  the  Assembly  was  prorogued, 
and  after  dissolv’d,  and  so  ensued  a new  Election,  which  met 
May  the  20th,  1751,  to  which  I sent  my  Petition,  praying  for 
Redress,  as  you  may  see  by  the  above  Minutes,  in  which  I beg 
Leave  to  observe,  that  the  Thing,  and  only  Thing  proposed,  to 
pass  an  Act  at  the  next  Sitting,  for  my  Relief,  on  the  Principles 
of  Mercy  and  Justice,  provided  no  reasonable  Objections  can 
be  made  against  such  Act : In  which  Proviso  I conceive  it  car- 
ries a strong  Supposition,  that  Reason  can  oppose  Mercy  and 
Justice  ; and  therefore  Advertisements  were  ordered  to  be  af- 
fixed up,  for  all  such  Persons  as  would  oppose  Mercy  and  Jus- 
tice; pursuant  to  which,  I find  that  Mary  Force  and  her  At- 
torney, the  only  two  Persons  on  this  side,  presented  a Petition 
to  the  Assembly,  as  hereafter  appears.) 

May  30,  1751.  A Message  from  his  Excellency,  by  the 
Deputy  Clerk  of  the  Council ; which  was  read,  and  is  as  follows. 

Geittlemen  of  the  Council  and  General  Assembly. 

YOU  may  remember,  that  in  the  last  Session  of  the  late 
Assembly,  one  Joseph  Bonny , then  a Prisoner  in 
Somerset  Goal,  made  his  Application  to  this  Legislature,  for 
some  Redress  under  his  difficult  Circumstances;  and  I have 
this  Day,  received  his  repeated  Complaint  of  the  Severity  of 
bis  Case,  which  I now  lay  before  you  ; and  upon  Reading  it,  I 
believe  you  will  think  it  will  well  become  this  Legislature,  as 
Fathers  of  the  People,  to  make  a thorough  and  effectual  Exam- 
ination into  the  Matter ; and  this  I desire  you  to  do,  by  a Joint 


752] 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


223 


Committee  of  the  Council  and  Assembly,  as  soon  as  the  more 
necessary  Affairs  of  this  Session  are  dispatch’d;  and  when  it  is 
consider’d,  how  long-  the  Man  has  been  held  in  Durance,  I 
hope  the  Court  will  not  rise,  before  they  do  what  may  be 
proper  on  their  Part,  for  his  Relief,  or  that  he  may,  in  some 
other  Course  obtain  Justice. 

That  I heartily  agree  with  his  Excellency  in  the  above  Mes- 
sage, and  can  not  but  think,  that  it  is  incumbent  on  the  Legis- 
lature, to  see  their  Laws  observ’d ; but  conceived,  none  have 
Power  to  make  Laws,  unless  they  have  a Power  to  see,  that  the 
Magistrates  observe  them. 

Sept.  19,  1751.  A Petition  was  presented  to  the  House, 
from  Mary  Force , setting  forth,  That  she  is  a considerable 
Creditor  to  Joseph  Bonny , and  praying  for  that,  and  other 
Reasons,  therein  given,  that  the  House  will  not  pass  an  Act  to 
release  the  said  Bonny , from  his  Confinement ; which  was 
read,  and  ordered  a second  Reading. 

(I  apprehend,  notwithstanding  the  words  Mercy  and  Justice 
are  not  mentioned  in  the  above  Petition ; yet,  I humbly  con- 
ceive, that  her  Praying,  no  Act  may  pass  for  my  Relief,  as 
aforesaid,  plainly  demonstrates  their  Aversion  to  Mercy  and 
Justice , but  choose  rather  to  keep  me  confin’d  than  to  have 
their  Money,  or  otherwise  they  might  have  had  it  long  ago.) 

Jan.  31,  i752*  The  Petition  of  Joseph  Bonny  was  read  a 
second  Time,  and  the  House  taking  the  same  into  Consideration. 

Ordered , That  Mr.  Van  Middles™  or  th , and  Mr.  Fisher , 
wait  on  his  Excellency  with  the  said  Petition,  and  acquaint  him, 
that  this  House  see  with  Concern,  that  a proper  Notice  has  not 
been  taken  of  the  Message  of  this  House,  of  the  6th  of  June 
last ; and  that  this  House  are  still  of  Opinion,  that  his  Excel- 
lency is  invested  with  a Power  of  Ordering  a Prosecution 
against  such  of  the  Officers  of  the  County  of  Somerset , to 
whose  Neglect  the  present  unhappy  Circumstances  of  the  said 
Joseph  Bonny , are  to  be  attributed  ; and  to  request  his  Excel- 
lency that  he  will  be  pleased  to  issue  those  Orders. 

(I  wou’d  observe  here,  that  if  the  Supreme  Court  hath  a 
Right  to  admit  any  Sheriff,  but  upon  his  Qualifications  ; the 


224 


NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [ 1 752 


Law  for  qualifying  Sheriffs  must  be  void  ; which  I humbly 
conceive,  that  the  Assembly  hath  taken  too  little  Notice  of.) 

Feb.  12,  1752*  A Message  from  his  Excellency,  by  the 
Deputy  Clerk  of  the  Council,  in  the  following  Words. 

Gentlemen  of  the  General  Assembly. 

T Am  sorry,  that  what  I have  said  to  you,  once  and 
again,  on  the  Affair  of  Joseph  Bonny , a Prisoner  in 
Somerset  Goal,  has  not  been  to  your  full  Satisfaction,  but  that 
you  should  say  to  me,  in  your  Message  of  the  31st  of  January , 
That  a proper  Notice  has  not  been  taken  of  the  Message  of  this 
House,  of  the  6th  June  last,  since  I thought  I had  taken  the 
proper  Steps  for  the  Relief  of  the  said  Joseph  Bo?iny ; how- 
ever, upon  your  bringing  to  me,  all  the  Papers  laying  with 
you,  relating  to  this  Matter,  I will  carefully  peruse  them,  and 
shall  do.  in  Redress  thereof,  what  may  be  in  my  Power,  con- 
sistent with  his  Majesty’s  royal  Orders  for  my  Direction  in  such 
Cases. 

The  Gentlemen  who  brought  me  your  Message,  intimated, 
that  they  thought  it  might  be  best,  my  Answer  should  not  be 
made,  so  as  to  interrupt  or  delay  the  Proceeding  of  the  General 
Assembly,  in  the  main  Affairs  of  this  Session,  or  you  would 
otherways  have  heard  from  me  before  now  on  this  Head. 

(Pursuant  to  the  above  Message,  I presented  my  humble 
Petition  to  his  Excellency  ; but  that  not  being  directed  to  him 
in  Council,  it  was  returned,  and  the  Messenger  told  me  that  I 
must  direct  to  his  Excellency  in  Council ; which  I did  accord- 
ingly, and  lodged  the  same  in  the  Secretary’s  Office  at  Perth 
Amboy,  as  the  Messenger  told  me;  and  cannot  obtain  a Hear- 
ing : I am  sorry  I have  not  had,  by  all  the  Means  I could  use, 
a Verdict  of  a Jury  for  or  against  me,  since  the  year  1746  ; for 
which  I appeal  to  the  Records  of  the  Courts  ; and  it  appears 
by  this  Narrative,  that  I cannot  get  any  Relief  by  the  Legisla- 
ture : Notwithstanding  they  have  taken  out  of  my  Hands  by 
Pretext  ot  Law,  I humbly  conceive,  as  good  as  1500  1.  or  1600 
1.  and  not  one  Penny  of  my  Debts  paid  with  it ; and  I do  be- 
seech all  my  loving  Countrymen  that  have  a Regard  to  Pity  and 
Compassion  for  their  Fellow-Creature,  to  assist  me  in  bringing 


752] 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


225 


my  Case  before  his  Majesty  in  Council ; for  which  Reason 
only  this  my  Condition  is  made  publick  in  this  Manner.) 

Joseph  Bonny. 

— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly  Post 
Boy , Dec.  18-25,.  1752. 

New-  York,  December  18.  A few  weeks  ago  a 
small  French  Sloop,  having  sprung  her  Mast,  put  in- 
to Amboy  in  Distress,  and  was  there  permitted  to  get 
her  necessary  Repairs  ; but  last  Week,  just  as  she 
was  on  Sailing,  been  suspected  to  have  gone  beyond 
her  Permission,  one  of  the  King’s  Officers  seized  her, 
and  carried  her  up  to  Elizabeth-Town ; where  she  is 
secured  either  to  be  cleared  or  condemn’d  by  a due 
Course  of  Law. 

We  hear  from  Elizabeth-Town , that  an  odd  Sect  of 
People  have  lately  appeared  there,  who  go  under  the 
Denomination  of  Regulars  ; there  are  near  a Dozen 
of  them,  who  dress  themselves  in  Women’s  Cloaths, 
and  painting  their  Faces,  go  in  the  Evening  to  the 
Houses  of  such  as  are  reported  to  have  beat  their 
Wives ; where  one  of  them  entering  in  first,  seizes 
the  Delinquent,  while  the  rest  follow,  strip  him,  turn 
up  his  Posteriors,  and  flog  him  with  Rods  most  se- 
verely, crying  out  all  the  Time,  Wo  to  the  Men  that 

beat  their  Wives ; It  seems  that  several  Persons 

in  that  Borough,  (and  tis  said  some  very  deservedly) 
have  undergone  the  Discipline,  to  the  no  small  Ter- 
ror of  others,  who  are  any  Way  conscious  of  deserv- 
ing the  same  Punishment.  ’Twere  to  be  wish’d,  that 
in  order  for  the  more  equal  Distribution  of  Justice, 

there  wou’d  arise  another  Sect,  under  the  Title  of 
15 


226  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1752 

Regulatrixes.  who  should  dress  themselves  in  Men’s 
Cloathes,  and  flagilate  the  Posteriors  of  the  Scolds, 
Termagants,  &c.  Zkc.—  TheN.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in 
the  Weekly  Post  Boy,  Dec.  1 8,  1752. 

Whereas  James  Nicholson,  on  the  Thirteenth 
Day  of  December,  Instant,  made  his 
Escape  from  the  common  Goal  for  the  County  of  Essex, 
in  the  Province  of  New-Jersey,  being  in  Custody  of  the 
Sheriff  of  said  County  under  the  several  Executions 
for  Debt : He  is  of  a small  Stature,  something  pitted 
with  the  small  Pox;  Had  on  a blue  Plush  Coat,  a 
Pair  Leather  Breeches,  has  short  curled  Hair,  and 
his  Head  in  part  bald,  he  is  a West  Country  Man, 
and  has  in  his  Speech  something  of  the  Brogue  of 
that  Country.  Whoever  takes  up  the  said  Nichol- 
son, and  brings  him  to  Mathias  Hatfield,  Esq;  High 
Sheriff  of  said  County,  or  to  Richard  Coomes,  his 
under  Sheriff,  or  secure  him  in  some  Goal  where  he 
may  be  had  and  brought  to  the  Coal  for  said  County 
of  Essex,  shall  have  Thirty  Pounds  lawful  Money  of 
said  Province,  paid  to  him  or  them,  by  us 

Matthias  Hatfield,  Richard  Coomes. 

— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly  Post 
Boy , Dec.  18,  1752. 

Twenty  Pieces  of  Eight  Reward. 

Run  away  about  the  first  of  November  last, 
from  Dr.  Mathias  Dehart,  of  Elizabeth 
Town,  an  Irish  Servant  Man  named  William  Davis, 
but  changes  his  Name  often  ; a small  ill-favoured  Fel- 
low, 24  Years  of  Age,  red  Hair  and  Beard,  his  left 
Shoulder  out  of  Joint,  pretends  he  was  born  in  Eng- 


1752]  NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS.  22J 

land,  but  has  the  Brogue  on  his  Tongue.  Had  on 
an  old  Beaver  Hat  cut  a cross  the  Crown,  a light  Rat- 
teen Vest,  striped  under  Jacket,  new  Shirt,  Leather 
Breeches  and  new  Shoes,  and  some  other  old  Cloaths. 

Also  run  away  with  him,  a Servant  Irish  Woman, 
named  Mary  Kelly,  belonging  to  Capt.  Jonathan 
Hampton,  of  the  same  Town  ; She  is  about  20  Years 
old,  short  and  well  set,  having  on  an  old  red  Cloak, 
brown  Callimanco  Gown,  no  Bonnet,  and  otherwise 
but  poorly  cloathed,  without  they  are  stolen  : She  is 
a likely  Girl,  and  tis  supposed  they  will  pass  for  Man 
and  Wife.  This  is  the  third  Time  they  have  run 
away  together,  since  last  May,  once  from  New- Cast- 
tie,  and  once  from  Gloucester,  they  were  then  adver- 
tized in  the  Pennsylvania  Gazette. 

Any  Person  that  shall  bring  them  or  either  of 
them  to  their  Masters,  or  send  word  where  they  are  se- 
cured, shall  have  for  the  Man  Twelve  Pieces,  and  for 
the  Woman  Eight,  and  reasonable  Charges  paid  by 

Mathias  Dehart,  and 
Jonathan  Hampton. 

— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly  Post 
Boy , Dec.  18,  1752. 

New  York,  December  11. 

Last  Saturday,  a dead  Whale  45  Feet  9 inches 
long,  and  9 Feet  thick,  was  found  floating  in  our  Bay, 
by  a Jersey  Boatman,  and  has  since  been  tow’d  over 
upon  the  Jersey  Shore. — Pennsylvania  Gazette , Dec. 
i9>  1752. 

New-York , December  25.  We  have  an  account 
from  the  North  Branch  of  Rariton,  in  New-Jersey,  of 


228  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1752 

a barbarous  and  cruel  Murder  committed  there  on 
Wednesday  the  13th  Instant,  on  the  Body  of  Mr. 
Jacob  Vaneste,  by  his  own  Negro,  in  Conjunction  with 
another  of  his  Neighbours  : It  seems  all  the  Provoca- 
tion was  Mr.  Vaneste’s  taking  a little  of  the  Fellow’s 
Tobacco  ; and  that  Evening  having  been  on  a Visit 
to  Dr.  Van  Wagenen’s,  his  Neighbour,  the  two 
Negroes  Way-laid  him,  and  knock’d  him  off  his 
Horse  ; they  then  with  an  Ax  split  his  Skull,  and 
drag’d  him  a little  out  of  the  Road  : The  Horse 

coming  home  soon  after  without  his  Master,  gave 
some  Alarm,  and  the  next  Day  proper  Search  being 
made,  he  was  found.  His  Negro  was  thereupon 
taken  up,  and  brought  before  the  Coroner’s  Inquest ; 
and  being  made  to  touch  his  Master’s  Body,  the 
Blood  suddenly  gush’d  out  of  the  dead  Man’s  Nose 
and  Ears,  as  it  likewise  did  from  the  Negro’s,  who 
thereupon  being  stung  with  Guilt,  confessed  the 
Crime,  and  was,  together  with  his  Accomplice, 
directly  sent  to  Jail,  in  order  to  receive  their  just 
Demerits. — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly 
Post  Boy,  Dec.  25,  1752. 

Run  away  the  18th  of  December,  Inst,  from 
Robert  Milburn,  of  Elizabeth  Town,  Black  smith,  a 
Servant  Man  named  Samuel  Cooper,  of  a middle 
Stature,  black  Complexion,  full  Face,  and  very  talka- 
tive ; had  on  when  he  went  away,  a blue  Broad 
Cloth  Jacket,  an  old  Check  Shirt,  an  old  Pair  of 
Ozenbrigs  Trousers,  blue  yarn  Stockings,  old  Shoes, 
with  large  brass  Buckles.  There  is  gone  with  him  a 
Journeyman  Black  smith  named  Daniel  Eatton,  and 
jhey  are  both  addicted  to  drinking.  Whoever  se- 


1752]  NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS.  229 

cures  said  Servant  and  Journeyman,  so  that  they 
may  be  had  again,  shall  have  Three  Pounds  Reward, 
and  all  reasonable  Charges  paid  by 

Robert  Milburn. 

— The  N.  Ym  Gazette  Revived  in  the  Weekly  Post 
Boy,  Dec.  25,  1752. 

Chester,  December  18-1752. 

Run  aways  in  Chester  county  goal,  Viz.  Andrew 
Dun,  born  in  Ireland,  as  he  says  ; he  was  bought  by 
one  Joshua  Roberts,  in  West  New  Jersey,  and  sold 
by  the  said  Roberts  to  one  William  Walker,  in 
Northampton  township,  Burlington  province  afore- 
said. Thomas  Wood,  an  English  man,  19  years  of 
age,  a short  set  fellow,  about  5 feet  5 inches  high, 
swarthy  complexion,  pretends  to  be  a sailor.  Had 
on  when  committed,  an  iron  collar,  about  his  neck  ; 
brought  with  him  a brown  gelding,  and  says  his 
master’s  name  is  John  Smith,  and  lives  in  Maryland, 
within  four  miles  of  Patapsco.  John  Simmonds, 
born  in  England,  in  the  city  of  Norwich,  20  years  of 
age,  of  a sandy  complexion,  and  says  he  runaway 
from  John  Boham,  in  Lancaster  county,  Brickmaker 
by  trade.  David  Greenwood,  about  60  years  of  age, 
born  in  England,  and  speaks  broad  English,  a 
weaver  by  trade,  a lusty,  big-boned  man,  and  says 
he  has  been  in  the  country  1 1 years,  but  will  not 
give  any  account  where  he  lived,  or  from  whence  he 
came. 

These  are  to  desire  the  owners  to  come  and  pay 
the  charges,  otherwise  they  will  be  sold  out  for  their 
keeping. 


William  Hay,  Goal  Keeper. 


230  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [ 1 752 

Custom-House,  Philadelphia,  Entred  In.  Schooner 
Judith,  Phillip  Babson  from  Salem. — The  Pennsyl- 
vania Journal,  Dec.  26,  1752.  No.  525. 

Philadelphia , Sept.  19.  [1751]  We  hear  that  the 
latter  End  of  last  Month,  died  at  Amwell,  in  the 
Jerseys,  George  Hetton,  in  the  103d  Year  of  his 
Age  ; he  was  born  at  Nansemond,  in  Virginia,  and 
retained  his  Sight  and  Senses  to  the  Time  of  his 
Death.  He  walked  on  Foot  to  visit  a Neighbour  at 
a considerable  Distance  but  a few  Days  before  he 
died.  He  said  that  he  was  a Man  in  Bacon’s  Wars, 
and  a Soldier  under  him.  — Uphams  Collection  of 
English  Newspaper  Cuttings. 

Letters  from  New-York  of  the  25th  of  December, 
mention  the  Murder  of  Mr.  Jacob  Van  Este,  a 
wealthy  Farmer  in  Somerset-County  in  New-Jersey, 
by  one  of  his  Negroes.  The  Fellow  way-laid  him  as 
he  was  returning  from  a Neighbour’s,  knock’d  him 
off  his  Horse,  and  cleav’d  his  Scull  with  an  Axe. 
The  Horse  coming  home  without  his  Rider,  gave  an 
Alarm  ; and  next  Morning  the  Body  was  found, 
dragg’d  about  thirty  Yards  from  the  Road.  Some 
Part  of  the  Negioe’s  Behaviour  raising  a Suspicion, 
he  was  brought  before  the  Coroner’s  Inquest,  and 
being  ordered  to  touch  the  Corpse,  the  Blood  gushed 
from  the  dead  Man’s  Nose  and  Ears  (so  say  the 
Letters  from  New-York)  as  it  did  likewise  from  the 
Negroe’s  ; who  was  immediately  stung  with  his 
Guilt,  and  confessed  the  F'act. — Upham  s Collection 
of  English  Newspaper  Cuttings. 


1^53]  NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS.  ^3 1 

New-York,  January  \ . We  hear  from  New- 
Jersey,  that  the  Negro  Fellow  who  committed  the 
Murder  on  the  Body  of  Mr.  Jacob  Van  Este,  his 
Master  (as  lately  mentioned)  was  burnt  at  Mill- 
stone, on  Wednesday  last:  He  stood  the  Fire  with 

the  greatest  Intrepidity,  and  said,  they  had  taken  the 
Root,  but  left  the  Branches. — Up  ham s Collection  of 
English  Newspaper  Cut  tines. 

Run  away  from  William  Walker,  of  the  Township 
of  Northampton,  Burlington  County,  in  the  night  of 
the  4th  Day  of  September,  an  Irish  servant  man, 
named  Andrew  Dnn,1  aged  about  22  Years,  5 feet,  8 
inches  high,  of  a brown  complection,  has  a down  look, 
pretty  much  pitted  with  the  small  pox,  wears  his  own 
black  hair,  and  has  a white  lock  of  his  hair  on  the 
back  part  of  his  head  about  the  bigness  of  a penney, 
had  on  and  took  with  him  when  he  went  away,  a 
coarse  red  jacket,  two  ozenbrigs  shirts,  and  a pair  of 
ozenbrigs  trowsers,  a pair  of  leather  breeches  much 
worn,  a new  white  linnen  shirt,  and  a new  homespun 
brown  cloth  jacket  lined  with  green  Bristol  stuff,  and 
has  white  metal  buttons,  a pair  of  new  calfskin  shoes, 
with  broad  toes,  and  new  brass  buckles,  one  pair  of 
light  blue  worsted  and  one  pair  white  thread  stock- 
ings, a new  caster  hat,  a short  black  curl’d  wigg,  and 
a pocket  book  with  nine  shillings  in  cash,  with  his 
own  indentures  and  several  other  writings  therein. 
Whoever  takes  up  and  secures  said  servant,  so  that 
his  master  may  have  him  again,  shall  have  Three 


1 ? Dunn. 


232  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1753 

Pounds  reward  and  all  reasonable  charges  paid  by 

William  Walker. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Journal , Jan.  2,  1753.  No. 

526. 

This  is  to  give  notice  to  all  persons  that  shall  have 
occasion  of  transporting  themselves,  goods,  wares,  or 
merchandize,  from  Philadelphia,  to  New  York,  or  from 
the  latter  to  the  former,  That  by  Joseph  Borden,  jun, 
there  is  a stage  boat,  well  fitted,  and  kept  for  that 
purpose,  Nicholas  George,  Master,  and  if  wind  and 
weather  permit,  will  attend  at  the  Crooked  Billet 
wharff  in  Philadelphia,  every  Monday  and  Tuesday 
in  every  week,  and  proceed  up  to  Bordentown  on 
Wednesday,  and  on  Thursday  morning,  a stage  wag- 
gon with  a choice  good  arning,1  kept  by  Joseph  Rich- 
ards, will  be  ready  to  receive  them,  and  proceed  di- 
rectly to  John  Cluck’s,  opposite  the  city  of  Perth  Am- 
boy, who  keeps  a house  of  good  entertainment : and  on 
Friday  a stage  boat  with  a large  commodious  cabbin 
kept  by  Daniel  Obryant,  will  be  ready  to  receive 
them,  and  proceed  directly  to  New  York,  and  give 
her  attendance  at  the  Whitehall  slip,  near  the  Half 
moon  battery.  If  .people  be  ready  at  the  stage  day 
and  places,  ’tis  believed  they  may  pass  the  quickest 
24  hours  than  any  other  way,  as  our  land  carriage  is 
only  10  miles  shorter  than  by  the  way  of  Burlington, 
our  waggon  does  not  fail  to  go  through  in  a day  We 
expect  to  give  better  satisfaction  this  Year  than  Last, 
by  reason  we  are  more  acquainted  with  the  nature  of 
the  Business,  and  have  more  convenient  boats,  wag- 
gons and  stages,  and  will  endeavour  to  use  people  in 

1 awning. 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


233 


i753j 

the  best  manner  we  are  capable  of,  and  hope  all  good 
people  will  give  it  the  Encouragement  it  deserves 
and  us  as  the  promoter  of  such  a publick  good. 

Joseph  Borden,  jun,  Joseph  Richards  and 
Daniel  Obryant. 

N.  B.  Joseph  Bordens  shallop,  Charles  Vandike, 
Master,  will  also  be  at  Philadelphia  every  Friday  and 
Saturday  in  every  week,  enquire  for  him  at  the 
Queen’s  Head,  he  proceeds  up  to  Bordentown  on 
Sunday,  and  the  stage  waggon  also  proceeds  to  Am- 
boy every  Monday  in  every  week. — The  Pennsylva- 
nia Journal,  Jan.  2,  1753.  No.  526. 

New  York,  January  1. 

We  hear  from  New  Jersey,  that  the  Negroe  Fellow 
who  committed  the  murder  on  the  Body  of  Mr.  Ja- 
cob Van  Nesse,  his  Master  (as  mentioned  in  our  last) 
was  burnt  at  Millstone  on  Wednesday  last;  He 
stood  the  Fire  with  the  greatest  Intrepitidy,  and  said 
they  had  taken  the  Root  but  left  the  Branches. — 
The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , Jan.  9,  1753.  No.  1255. 

Run  away  on  the  27th  of  November  last,  from  the 
subscriber,  living  in  Manington  township,  Salem 
County,  an  Irish  servant,  nam’d  Cornelius  Collins, 
about  22  years  of  age,  of  a low  stature,  a thin,  pale 
fac’d  man,  with  short  hair  : Had  on  when  he  went 
away,  a felt  hat,  lightish  colour’d  Jacket,  pieced  at 
the  elbows  with  new  cloth,  a pair  of  yellowish 
colour’d  stockings,  and  shoes,  with  strings.  Who- 
ever takes  up  and  secures  said  servant  so  that  his 


234  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [*753 

master  may  have  him  again,  shall  have  Forty  Shil- 
lings reward,  and  reasonable  charges,  paid  by 

Abel  Harris. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , Jan  9,  1753.  No. 

1255. 

To  be  Sold— 

Sundry  valuable  tracts  of  land,  with  large  quanti- 
ties of  meadow,  in  Gloucester  county,  in  West  New 
Jersey,  belonging  to  Colonel  Alford,  in  Boston,  to  be 
sold  by  Edward  Shippen. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette,  Jan.  9,  1753.  No. 

1 255. 

Philadelphia,  January  16,  1753 

Whereas  Louisa,  the  wife  of  William  Leddel,  has 
eloped  from  her  said  husband’s  bed  and  board  ; these 
are  to  forwarn  all  persons  giving  any  credit  to  the 
said  Louisa,  for  he  will  pay  no  debts  she  shall  con- 
tract. William  Leddel. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , Jan.  16,  1753. 

No.  1256. 

» 

New  York,  January  9. 

We  hear,  that  on  Christmas  Day,  as  three  Persons 
were  attempting  to  cross  Rariton  in  a Canoe,  they 
were  overset  by  the  Ice,  and  two  of  them  drowned. 
— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , Jan.  16,  1753.  No. 
1256. 

Philadelphia,  January  16. 

We  hear  from  Rocky  Hill  in  the  Jersies,  that  a val- 
uable Copper  Vein  of  Six  Foot  Square,  is  very  lately 
found  there. — The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , Jan.  16, 
1753.  No.  1256. 


i753] 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


235 


Last  Week  a Servant  Man,  was  found  hanging  in 
the  Woods  in  Newtown  Township,  Gloucester  coun- 
ty ; who,  his  thought,  has  hung  there  since  Septem- 
ber last,  when  he  ran  away  from  his  Master. — The 
Pennsylvania  Gazette , Jan.  16,  1753.  No,  1256. 

Burlington,  December  20,  1752. 

Run  away  on  Monday  last,  from  the  subscriber,  an 
apprentice  lad,  named  William  Prosser,  by  trade,  a 
Shoemaker,  aged  about  18  years,  about  5 feet  8 inch- 
es high,  but  middling  slender,  of  a dark  complexion, 
down  look,  and  wears  his  own  hair,  of  a dark  colour  ; 
Had  on  when  he  went  away,  A dark  colour’d  cloth 
coat,  with  broad  metal  buttons,  a cloth  jacket,  with 
small  pewter  buttons,  leather  breeches,  half  worn, 
blue  grey  yarn  stockings,  and  good  shoes,  with  odd 
buckles,  and  a castor  hat,  almost  new.  Whoever 
takes  up  said  apprentice,  and  secures  him,  so  that  his 
master  may  have  him  again,  shall  have  Forty  Shil- 
lings reward,  and  reasonable  charges,  paid  by 

Thomas  Witherill,  junior. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , Jan.  16,  1753. 

No.  1256. 

Philadelphia,  January  2,  1753. 

STolen  out  of  a pasture  belonging  to  the  sub- 
scriber, living  in  Springfield,  Burlington 
county,  on  the  19th  of  December  last,  A bright  bay 
mare,  without  any  brand  or  ear  mark,  a natural  pa- 
cer, goes  well,  suckles  a young  colt,  which  is  left  be- 
hind, has  a small  comb  cut  in  her  mane,  about  14 
hands  high,  and  six  years  old,  she  is  supposed  to  be 
stole  by  one  John  Jones,  the  same  man  that  stole 


236  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [ 1 753 

Morris  Gwin’s  mare,  at  Abington,  near  Philadelphia, 
and  sold  her  to  Robert  Chambers,  near  Trenton  ; he 
is  of  a middle  stature,  dark  complexion,  black  hair,  is 
a bold  fellow,  a notorious  thief,  and  carries  a rifle 
barrel  gun  with  him.  Whoever  takes  up  and  secures 
the  thief  and  mare,  shall  have  Three  Pounds  reward, 
or  Thirty  Shillings  for  the  mare  alone,  and  reasona- 
ble charges,  paid  by 

Jacob  Wanick. 

N.  B.  It  is  supposed  he  has  disposed  of  the  mare. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , Jan.  16,  1753. 

No.  1256. 

Philadelphia,  January  23. 

We  hear  from  Burlington  county,  in  the  Jersies, 
That  a Man,  about  80  Years  of  Age,  who  had  been 
in  a bad  State  of  Health,  for  some  Time,  and  at 
Times  delirious,  cut  his  Throat,  on  the  11th  Instant, 
in  so  terrible  a manner,  that  notwithstanding  imme- 
diate Help  was  got  for  him,  he  died  soon  after. — 
The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , Jan.  23,  1753.  No.  1257. 

Philadelphia,  January  23,  1753. 

TXTHereas  the  subscriber,  wife  of  doctor  Wil- 
V V liam  Leddel,1  of  Elizabeth-Town,  was  ad- 
vertis’d last  week  in  this  paper,  as  having  eloped 
from  her  husband’s  bed  and  board,  which  is  known  by 
the  major  part  of  the  people  in  said  town  to  be  false  ; 

1 Dr.  William  Leddel  was  a naval  surgeon  of  the  French  Government,  stationed  at 
Cuba.  Having  left  the  service  he  came  from  Cuba  and  settled  in  or  near  Elizabethtown, 
where  he  died  prior  to  1766,  having  several  children,  among  them  John,  a physician  in  New 
York  before  1760,  and  William.  After  his  father’s  death  the  latter  went  to  Mendham, 
Morris  county,  and  “ bound  himself”  to  study  medicine  with  Dr.  Ebenezer  Blachley,  se- 
cundus,  of  that  place.  He  practised  there  till  his  death,  August  10,  1827,  at  the  age  of 
eighty  years.  He  married  Peebe,dau.  of  Henry  Wick. — Wickes's  Hist.  Medicine  in  N.J., 
312. 


753] 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


237 


she  hereby  gives  notice,  that  the  reason  of  her  leav- 
ing him  was,  that  her  life  was  in  danger  from  the  ill 
usage  she  received  from  him  ; that  he  kept  another 
woman,  by  whom  he  had  two  children,  and  after  hav- 
ing spent  Four  Hundred  and  Fifty  Pounds  Sterling, 
of  her  money,  obliged  her  to  leave  his  house. 

Louisa  Leddel. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , Jan.  23,  1753. 

No.  1257. 

Whereas  William  Richardson  was  employ’d  by 
James  Baldwin  to  flat  some  wood  to  Philadelphia  on 
the  25th  of  December  last,  and  having  received  the 
money  for  the  same,  has  not  been  heard  of  since  ; 
He  is  a thick  well  set  fellow,  about  24  years  of  age, 
pock  mark’d,  pale  complexion,  broad  face,  has  short 
black  curled  hair : Had  on  a half  worn  castor  hat, 
check  shirt  and  trowsers,  with  leather  breeches  under 
them,  milled  stockings,  calf-skin  shoes,  with  large 
brass  buckles,  blue  coat  and  jacket,  with  white  metal 
buttons  on  the  coat.  Whoever  takes  up  said  Wil- 
liam Richardson,  so  as  he  may  be  brought  to  justice, 
shall  have  Three  Pounds  reward,  paid  by  James 
Baldwin,  of  Watertown  township,  in  the  Jerseys,  three 
Miles  from  Philadelphia 

N.  B.  It  is  supposed  he  has  gone  towards  New 
York.  He  was  born  in  Amwell,  in  the  Jerseys. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , Jan.  23,  1753. 

No.  1257. 


Philadelphia,  January  22,  1753. 
Run  away  last  night  from  Samuel  Cole  living  in 
Gloucester  county,  in  New-Jersey,  a servant  man 


238  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1753 

named  John  Macwier,  about  18  years  of  Age,  a short 
thick  set  fellow,  fair  complection,  and  sandy  hair  ; ’tis 
suppos’d  he  will  cut  it  off,  had  on  when  he  went  away, 
a brown  homespun  coat,  two  Jackets,  one  striped,  the 
other  grey,  leather  breeches,  an  ozenbrigs  and  check 
shirt,  a double  silk  cap,  grey  stockings,  and  two  or 
three  pair  of  shoes  ; one  of  his  legs  is  larger  than 
the  other,  and  has  a large  scar  on  the  inside  of  the 
small  ; and  took  with  him  a new  ax,  whoever  takes 
up  said  run  away,  and  secures  him  so  that  he  may  be 
had  again,  shall  have  Forty  Shillings  reward  and  rea- 
sonable Charges  paid  by 

Samuel  Cole. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Journal , Jan.  23,  1753. 

No.  529. 

Whereas  Thomas  Ageman,  late  of  the  city  of 
Burlington,  in  the  western  division  of  the  province  of 
New-  Jersey,  hath  been  missing,  ever  since  the  30th 
of  March  last,  and  no  one  hereabouts  being  able  to 
give  any  account  of  him,  hath  induced  his  son  Wil- 
liam Ageman,  and  most  of  his  neighbors,  to  be  sus- 
picious that  he  is  murder’d  : These  are  to  desire  the 
favour  of  the  readers  hereof,  that  if  they,  or  any  of 
them,  can  give  any  account  of  the  said  Thomas  Age- 
man,  either  living  or  dead,  that  if  they  will  be  so  good 
as  to  communicate  the  same  to  his  son  William  Age- 
man,  by  directing  their  letters  to  George  Eyre,1  Esq; 
in  Burlington,  it  will  very  much  oblige  him  and  his 
neighbours  ; and  likewise  clear  the  person  who  is 
suspected  to  be  guilty  of  the  murder ; who,  upon  ex- 


1 For  a sketch  of  George  Eyre,  see  N.  J.  Archives,  XI.,  495-6,  note. 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


239 


I753J 

amination,  denies  the  fact.  He  is  a lusty  man,  if  liv- 
ing-, about  80  years  of  age,  a labouring  man. 

Burlington,  January  31,  1753. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , Feb.  13,  1753. 

No.  1260. 

New  York,  February  5. 

Last  Tuesday  Night,  the  Boat  of  Mr.  Blain,  of 
South  River,  in  the  Jersies,  lying  at  the  Old-Slip,  in 
our  Harbour,  was  robbed  of  Nine  Pounds  in  Cash,  a 
Check  Shirt  and  a Knife : Barnabas  Morgan,  a Man 
who  went  in  the  Boat,  being  absent  next  Day,  was 
suspected,  and  Search  being  made,  he  was  found 
with  the  Shirt  on  his  Back,  and  Knife  in  his  Pocket ; 
but  denies  he  took  the  Money:  Afte'r  Examination 
he  was  committed  to  Goal. — The  Pennsylvania  Ga- 
zette, Feb.  13,  1753.  No.  1260. 

To  be  Sold. 

A Plantation,  situate  in  the  township  of  Amwell, 
Hunterdon  county,  West-New-Jersey,  near  Dela- 
ware, containing  180  acres  of  good  land,  20  acres 
whereof  is  good  meadow,  and  more  may  be  made, 
and  a good  orchard,  with  a good  house  and  barn,  and 
a good  still  and  still-house,  to  be  sold  either  with  the 
place,  or  the  place  without  the  still,  as  the  purchaser 
or  purchasers  pleases,  at  a reasonable  rate,  and  a 
reasonable  time  for  payment.  Any  person  inclining 
to  purchase  the  same,  may  apply  to  the  subscriber 
hereof,  and  be  informed  of  the  conditions  of  sale. 

John  Burcham. 

N.  B.  Likewise  sundry  tracts  of  good  land  to  be 
sold  by  said  Burcham. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , Feb.  27,  1753. 

No,  1261. 


240  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1753 

New-York,  February  12. 

On  Saturday  last  Richard  Roche,  born  in  Ireland 
and  about  26  Years  of  Age,  was  executed  here  per- 
suant  to  his  Sentence.  He  acknowledged  that  he 
was  whipp’d  in  Dublin,  for  keeping  Company  with  an 
Idle  Woman,  who  had  stole  some  Goods  there,  and 
that  they  had  some  Time  after,  came  over  in  a Trans- 
port Vessel  to  America.  That  he  broke  open  and 
robb’d  a house  at  Salem,  in  N.  J.  for  which  he  was 
whipped  there  also — The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , Feb. 
27,  1 7 5 3*  No.  1262. 

N.  York,  Feb.  12. 

By  the  Philadelphia  Post  we  learn,  that  the  late 
high  Tide  has  done  considerable  Damage  at  New 
Brunswick,  most  of  the  Houses,  nigh  the  River,  flow- 
ing with  Water;  that  at  Elizabeth-Town  Point  the 
Wharffs  are  much  hurt ; that  the  Bridge  on  Staten- 
Island  is  almost  render’d  impassable,  for  Man  and 
Horse  ; and  that  a Negro  Boy,  of  about  15  Years  of 
Age,  was  drove  upon  Staten  Island  Beech,  suppos’d 
to  be  drown’d  by  the  Tide,  on  Thursday  Night  last, 
and  that  the  Coroner’s  Inquest  was  holding  upon  him 
as  he  came  along. — The  Pennsylvania  Journal,  Feb. 
27,  '753-  N°-  534- 

To  be  Lett. 

A Plantation,  in  the  township  of  Gloucester,  in  the 
western  division  of  the  province  of  New  Jersey, 
situate  on  the  navigable  part  of  Newtown  creek, 
within  about  four  miles  of  the  city  of  Philadelphia, 
containing  250  acres  of  land,  100  cleared,  30  of 
which  is  good  drained  meadow;  a house,  barn,  orch- 


1753] 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


24I 


ard  and  sundry  other  conveniencies.  Any  person 
inclining  to  rent  the  above-mentioned  premises,  may 
apply  to  Mary  Lane,  or  Thomas  Clifford,  in  Phila- 
delphia, and  know  the  terms. — The  Pennsylvania  Ga- 
zette, March  13,  1753.  No.  1264. 

To  be  Sold  or  Lett. 

A Plantation,  situate  on  Newtown  Creek,  in  Glou- 
cester county,  four  miles  from  Cooper’s  ferry,  by  land, 
and  seven  miles  from  Philadelphia,  by  water,  contain- 
ing 400  acres,  with  a good  landing ; there  is  two  set- 
tlements on  the  place,  two  houses,  two  orchards,  a 
good  barn,  100  acres  cleared  land,  and  300  of  wood- 
land, well  timber’d,  there  is  40  acres  of  meadow  that 
has  been  mow’d,  38  of  which  is  drain’d  from  the  tide, 
and  ten  acres  of  upland  meadow.  Any  person  in- 
clining to  purchase  or  rent  the  same,  may  apply  to 

James  Graisbury. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , March  13,  1753. 

No.  1264. 

New  York,  March  12. 

We  hear  from  Elizabelh-Town  in  New  Jersey,  that 
Mr.  John  May  of  that  Place,  and  his  Wife,  going  in- 
to one  of  the  Neighbouring  Houses,  left  a young  In- 
fant in  Bed  asleep,  to  the  care  of  a Negro  Wench 
who,  ’tis  supposed,  looking  carelessly,  round  the  Bed, 
with  the  Candle  in  her  Hand,  set  fire  to  the  Curtains, 
which  soon  communicated  itself  to  the  Blankets  ; and 
had  not  some  People,  who  were  accidentally  going 
past,  discovered  the  Fire,  and  took  the  Child 

out  of  the  Bed  (tho’  much  burnt)  it  must  undoubted* 

16 


242  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [ 1 753 

ly  have  perish’d  in  the  Flames. — The  Pennsylvania 
Gazette , March  20,  1753.  No.  1265. 

Last  Wednesday,  Capt.  Jones  of  this  Port,  arrived 
at  Sandy  Hook,  in  18  Days  from  the  Bay  of  Hon- 
duras, and  came  up  here  on  Saturday. — The  Penn- 
sylvania Gazette , March  20,  1753.  No.  1265. 

New  York,  March  19. 

By  an  Act  lately  passed  in  New  Jersey,  any  Per- 
son seeing  another  carry  a Gun  over  any  inclosed 
Land,  not  his  own,  by  Information  against  him,  obli- 
ges him  to  pay  Five  Pounds,  and  be  bound  over  to 
his  good  Behaviour,  one  Half  to  the  Informer;  and  in 
case  of  Failure,  to  be  dealt  with  at  the  Justice’s  Dis- 
cretion : In  Consequence  of  this  Act,  we  hear,  a few 
Weeks  ago,  a poor  Fellow,  in  Fast  New  Jersey,  was 
taken  in  the  Fact,  and  brought  to  a Justice  : The  Jus- 
tice accordingly  was  obliged  to  give  Judgment;  but 
the  poor  Fellow,  Gun  and  all,  not  being  worth  Half 
the  Money,  the  Justice  was  at  a Stand  what  to  do  ; at 
last  determined  him  a Whipping  of  30  Lashes,  and 
as  the  Informer  was  entitled  to  one  Half  the  Fine, 
very  judiciously  ordered  him  to  receive  one  Half  the 
Lashes. — The  Pennsylvania  Gazette,  March  27,  1753. 
No.  1266. 

We  hear  from  Great-Egg-FIarbour,  that  about  a 
Fortnight  ago,  a French  Sloop,  bound  to  Cape  Bre- 
ton, from  Cape  Francois,  was  lost  on  Absecom  Bar, 
in  a violent  North-east  Storm  ; and  that  the  people 
were  all  drown’d  but  two  : And  the  Cargo,  which  con- 
sisted of  Indigo,  Sugar  and  Rum,  was  intirely  lost  — 


1753] 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


2*3 


The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , March  27,  1753.  No. 
1 266. 

To  be  Lett. 

A Messuage  and  plantation,  situate  about  half  a 
mile  above  Great  Timber-creek-bridge,  in  the  county 
of  Gloucester,  in  West-New-Jersey,  containing  about 
150  acres,  25  acres  of  which  is  good  drained  meadow, 
well  banked  in,  with  a young  orchard,  &c.  Whoever 
is  inclined  to  rent  the  said  premises,  may  apply  to 
John  Ladd,1  Esq;  near  Gloucester,  and  know  the 
terms. — The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , March  27,  1753. 
No.  1266. 

WHereas,  Jane  the  wife  of  John  Moody,  of 
Bethlehem  township,  hath  eloped  from 
her  said  husband  ; these  are  to  warn  all  persons  not 
to  trust  her  on  his  account,  for  he  will  pay  no  debts 
of  her  contracting  after  the  date  hereof. 

John  Moody. 

April  5,  1753. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , March  27,  1753. 
No.  1267. 

The  French  Sloop  cast  away  on  Absecom  Bar, 
proves  to  be  the  Mary  Magdalen,  Capt.  Dugea,  from 
Cape  Francois;  who  on  the  10th  ult.  lying  too  in  a 
violent  Gale  at  N.  E.  was  drove  upon  said  Bar;  The 
Vessel  is  entirely  lost,  and  the  Capt.  Merchant,  with 
four  white  Men  and  a Negro  drown’d  ; the  two  that 
were  saved,  fortunately  getting  upon  the  Round 
House,  were  happily  taken  off  by  a Whale  Boat  from 
the  Shore. — The  Pennsylvania  ^Journal,  April  12, 
■753-  No.  540. 

1 For  a sketch  of  John  Ladd,  see  N.  J.  Archives,  X.,  224,  note. 


244  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1753 

N.  York,  April  16. 

We  have  an  Account  from  Morris  County  in  the 
Jersies,  that  about  a Fortnight  ago,  a poor  Man  and 
his  Son  of  about  seven  Years  of  Age,  being  burning 
some  old  Brush  in  a Swamp,  found  some  Roots  that 
look’d  like  Parsnips,  which  they  roasted  and  eat : 
Soon  after  returning  home  they  found  themselves  un- 
well, and  died  both  together  in  a few  Minutes,  with- 
out any  visible  Tokens  of  Hurt  — The  Pennsylvania 
Journal , April  19,  1753.  No.  541. 

Last  Sunday  se’nnight,  at  Night,  a shower  of  Hail 
(attended  with  terrible  Thunder  and  Lightening)  fell 
at  Sandy  Hook,  some  of  which  was,  ’twas  said  as  big 
as  Pidgeons  Eggs : One  of  our  Pilot  Boats  then  ly- 
ing in  the  Cove ; was  struck  with  the  Lightning, 
which  shattered  her  Topmast  all  to  Pieces,  and  did 
her  considerable  other  Damage.  What  is  very  re- 
markable, a Boy  that  lay  asleep  in  the  Fore-Castle 
close  to  the  Bulk-Heads,  received  no  hurt,  whilst 
they  were  split  in  a surprizing  Manner. — The  Penn- 
sylvania Journal , Apnl  19,  1753.  No.  541, 

The  General  Assembly  of  the  Province  of  New 
Jersey,  are  to  meet  at  Burlington  on  Wednesday  the 
1 6th  of  May  next. — The  Pennsylvania  Journal , April 
1 753-  No.  54i - 

Phila.  Apr.  9,  1753. 

Run  away  last  night  from  George  Marple  of  Eves- 
ham in  the  County  of  Burlington,  a servant  man 
named  Robert  Stewart,  a short,  well  set  fellow,  about 
27  years  of  age,  square  faced  and  light  complection  ; 
had  on  when  he  went  away,  a light  coloured  cloath 


753] 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


245 


coat,  leather  breeches  with  silver  buttons  (or  broad 
cloth  the  same  of  the  coat)  a large  beaver  hatt  with 
a knock  in  the  brim  ; took  with  him  a large  bay 
horse,  with  a blase  in  his  face,  and  some  white  feet. 
Whoever  takes  up  the  said  Servant,  and  secures 
him,  so  as  his  master  may  have  him  again  shall  have 
Three  Pistoles  reward  and  reasonable  charges  paid 
by  George  Marple. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Journal , April  19,  175  3. 

No.  541. 

We  whose  names  are  hereunto  subscribed,  sons  of 
some  of  the  principal  families  in  and  about  Trenton, 
being  in  some  measure  sensible  of  the  advantages  of 
Learning,  and  desirous  that  those  who  are  deprived 
of  it  thro’  the  poverty  of  their  parents,  might  taste 
the  sweetness  of  it  with  ourselves,  can  thimk  of  no 
better  or  other  method  for  that  purpose,  than  the  fol- 
lowing 

Scheme 

Of  a Delaware-Island  Lottery, 

For  raising  225  Pieces  of  Eight,  towards  building  a 
house  to  accommodate  an  English  and  Grammar- 
school,  and  paying  a master  to  teach  such  children 
whose  parents  are  unable  to  pay  for  schooling.  It  is 
proposed  that  the  house  be  30  feet  long,  20  feet 
wide,  and  one  story  high,  and  built  on  the  South  east 
corner,  of  the  Meeting-house  yard,  in  Trenton,1  under 
the  direction  of  Messeurs  Joseph  Reed,  Benjamin 
Yard,  Alexander  Chambers,  and  John  Chambers,  all 
of  Trenton  aforesaid. 

1 The  building  was  so  erected,  and  remained  until  1804  or  1805,  when  it  was  removed 
to  make  way  for  the  present  First  Presbyterian  church  edifice,  on  State  street. 


246  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS. 

[1753 

Num- 

Value  in 

ber  of  Prizes. 

Pieces  of  Eight.  Total  Value. 

1 

of 

32  is 

32 

2 

of 

1 6 are 

32 

4 

of 

10  are 

40 

6 

of 

8 are 

48 

1 2 

of 

4 are 

48 

53i 

of 

2 are 

1062 

First  drawn, 

6 

556  Prizes 

Last  drawn, 

7 

944  Blanks 

For  the  School, 

225 

1 500  Tickets, 

1500 

Less  than  two  Blanks  to  a Prize. 


The  managers  of  the  lottery  are  Reynald  Hooper, 
son  of  R.  Lettice  Hooper,  Esq  ; Joseph  Warrell, 
junior,  son  of  Joseph  Warrell,  Esq  ; Joseph  Reed, 
junior,  son  of  Andrew  Reed,  Esq  ; Theophilus  Sev- 
ern junior,  son  of  Theophilus  Severn,  Esq;  John  Al- 
len,, junior,  son  of  John  Allen,  Esq  ; William  Paxton, 
son  of  Joseph  Paxton,  Esq;  deceased ; and  John 
Cleayton,  son  of  William  Cleayton,  Esq  ; who  here- 
by assure  the  adventurers  in  this  lottery,  that  the 
prize  money  shall  be  paid  by  the  persons  hereafter 
appointed  to  sell  tickets,  immediately  after  the  lotte- 
ry is  drawn,  without  any  deduction  ; and  such  prizes 
as  are  not  demanded  in  three  months  after  the  lotte- 
ry is  drawn,  shall  be  taken  as  generously  given  to 
the  school.  The  drawing  will  be  on  the  i ith  day  of 
June  next,  on  the  Fish-Island,1  in  the  river  Delaware, 
opposite  to  the  town  of  Trenton  : and  the  money 

1 Lotteries  were  prohibited  in  New  Jersey,  and  the  managers,  in  (or  in  despite  of  ?) 
heir  “innocence,”  resorted  to  this  method  of  evading  the  law. 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


247 


I753J 

raised  by  this  lottery  shall  be  paid  into  the  hands  of 
Moore  Furman,  of  Trenton,  merchant,  who  is  under 
bond  for  the  faithful  laying  out  the  money  for  the 
uses  above. 

And  we  the  managers  assure  the  adventurers  up- 
on our  honour,  that  this  scheme,  in  all  its  parts,  shall 
be  as  punctually  observed,  as  if  we  were  under  the 
formalities  usual  in  lotteries  ; and  we  flatter  ourselves, 
the  publick,  considering  our  laudable  design,  our  age, 
and  our  innocence,  will  give  credit  to  this  our  pub- 
lick  declaration. 

Tickets  are  to  be  sold  at  Seven  Shillings  and  Six- 
pence each,  at  Philadelphia,  by  Andrew  Reed,  Esq; 
and  at  Trenton,  by  Moore  Furman  merchant,  Reyn- 
ald  Hooper,  Joseph  Warrell,  junior,  Joseph  Reed, 
junior,  Theophilus  Severn,  junior,  John  Allen,  junior, 
William  Paxton,  John  Cleayton. — The  Pennsylvania 
Gazette , April  26,  1753.  No.  1276. 

New  York,  April  23. 

By  a private  letter  from  Trenton-Ferry,  we  are 
assured  that  upwards  of  Twenty  PTenchmen  have 
passed  over  there  within  a few  Weeks  past,  who  all 
said  they  were  Deserters  from  Mississippi,  and 
represent  that  Country  to  be  in  a deplorable  Condi- 
tion for  want  of  Supplies  from  France  ; and  that  at 
this  Time  a Conquest  of  their  whole  Dominion 
might  be  made  with  far  less  than  500  Men. — The 
Pennsylvania  Gazette , April  26,  1753.  No.  1276. 

Philadelphia,  April  26,  1753. 

Run  away  on  the  2 2d  instant,  from  Thomas  Ram- 
bo,  of  Mantua-Creek,  Gloucester  county,  an  Irish 
servant  man,  named  Philip  Cantlow,  about  30  years 


248  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1753 

of  age,  of  a middle  size,  thin  face,  pitted  with  small- 
pox, and  has  a down-look : Had  on  a dark  color’d 

homespun  jacket,  with  an  old  greyish  color’d  jacket, 
loneer  than  the  outside  one,  half-worn  tine  hat,  with- 
out  loops,  cotton  cap,  old  leather  breeches,  old 
grey  stockings,  half  worn  double  soald  Shoes,  pretty 
much  ripped  at  the  soles,  with  sharp  toes.  Who- 
ever takes  up  and  secures  said  servant,  so  that  his 
master  may  have  him  again,  shall  have  Thirty  Shil- 
lings reward,  and  reasonable  charges,  paid  by, 

Thomas  Rambo. 

N.  B.  All  masters  of  vessels  are  forbid  to  carry 
him  off. — The  Pennsylvania  Gazette,  April  26,  1753. 
No,  1276. 

Run  away  on  the  2 2d  inst.  April,  from  Isaac  Con- 
roe, of  the  city  of  Burlington,  in  the  Province  of 
New  Jersey,  A servant  man,  named  Thomas  Brown, 
a thick,  short,  well-set  fellow,  about  25  or  26  years 
of  age,  born  in  the  province  of  Pennsylvania,  about 
Lancaster  ; he  is  a bold  spoken,  red  faced  fellow, 
with  short  black  bushy  hair : Had  on,  An  old  felt 

hat,  old  blue  jacket,  leather  breeches,  old  grey  yarn 
stockings,  and  old  shoes,  with  large  brass  buckles  ; 
he’s  very  much  addicted  to  drink,  talkative  and 
quarrelsom  ; hath  been  a traveller  thro’  most  of  the 
neighbouring  provinces,  &c.  Whoever  takes  up 
and  secures  said  servant,  so  as  his  master  may  have 
him  again,  shall  have  Forty  Shillings  reward,  and 
reasonable  charges,  paid  by 

Isaac  Conroe. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , April  26,  1753. 
No.  1276. 


1753]  NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS.  249 

Run  away  on  the  12th  of  February,  last,  from  John 
Burroughs,  of  Trenton,  Hunterdon  county,  New  Jer- 
sey, An  English  servant  man,  named  Robert  White- 
head,  about  5 feet  high:  Had  on  when  he  went  away, 
A good  beaver  hat,  silk  cap,  baragon  coat,  and  jacket, 
of  a reddish  brown  colour,  the  skirts  lined  with  sha- 
loon,  and  the  back  part  with  ozenbrigs,  new  buck- 
skin breeches,  two  fine  shirts,  blue  worsted  stockings, 
and  a pair  of  pumps,  with  silver  buckles,  which  were 
all  stolen,  he  being  a notorious  thief,  and  has  been 
both  whipped  and  branded  at  Trenton.  Whoever 
takes  up  and  secures  said  servant,  in  any  goal,  so  as 
his  master  may  have  again,  shall  have  Forty  Shillings 
reward,  and  reasonable  charges,  paid  by 

John  Burroughs. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , April  26,  1753. 
No.  1276. 

A General  Account  of  the  Rise  and  State  of  the 
College  lately  established  in  the  Province  of  New- 
Jersey,  in  America  ; And  of  the  End  and  Design  of 
its  Institution.  Published  by  Order  of  the  Trustees 
of  the  said  College  ; for  the  Information  of  the  Friends 
of  Learning  and  Virtue  in  Great  Britain  and  America. 

Nothing  has  a more  direct  Tendency  to  advance 
the  Happiness  and  Glory  of  a Community,  than  the 
founding  ot  publick  Schools  and  Seminaries  of  Learn- 
ing, for  the  Education  of  Youth,  and  adorning  their 
Minds  w«th  useful  Knowledge  and  Virtue.  Hereby 
the  Rude  and  ignorant  are  civiliz’d  and  render’d 
humane;  Persons,  who  would  otherwise  be  useless 
Members  of  Society,  are  qualified  to  sustain  with 
Honour,  the  Offices  they  may  be  invested  with,  for 


2$0  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1753 

the  public  Service  : Reverence  of  the  Deity,  Filial 
Piety,  and  Obedience  to  the  Laws,  are  inculcated  and 
promoted. 

The  Sciences  have  no  where  flourish’d  with  more 
Success  than  in  our  Mother- Country.  The  Univer- 
sities and  Seminaries  of  Learning  in  England  and 
Scotland  are  annually  sending  abroad  into  the  King- 
dom, Proficients  in  all  kinds  of  Literature  ; Men  of 
refin’d  Sentiments,  solid  Judgments,  and  noble  Prin- 
ciples ; who  spread  (if  the  Expression  may  be  al- 
lowed) a kind  of  literary  Glory  over  the  British  Nation. 

America  remain’d,  during  a long  Period,  in  the 
thickest  Darkness  of  Ignorance  and  Barbarism,  till 
Christianity,  at  the  Introduction  of  the  Europeans, 
enlightened  her  Hemisphere  with  the  salutary  Beams 
of  Life  and  Immortality  Science,  her  constant  Attend- 
ant, soon  rais’d  her  depress’d  Head,  and  the  Arts 
began  to  flourish.  New  England  first  felt  her  benign 
Influences,  whose  Sons  she  inspired  with  a generous 
Emulation  of  erecting  Schools  and  Colleges,  for  the 
Instruction  of  their  Youth,  and  instilling  into  the  ten- 
der  Mind,  the  Principles  of  Piety  and  Learning.  The 
Western  Colonies,  except  Virginia,  continued  a con- 
siderable Number  of  Years,  without  any  public  In- 
stitutions for  the  Cultivation  of  the  Sciences.  At 
length,  several  Gentlemen  residing  in  the  Province 
of  New-Jersey,  who  are  Well  Wishers  to  the  Felicity 
of  their  Country,  and  the  real  Friends  of  Religion  and 
Learning,  having  observ’d  the  vast  Increase  of  these 
Colonies,  with  the  Rudeness,  Incivility  and  Ignorance 
of  their  Inhabitants,  for  want  of  the  necessary  Means 
of  Improvement,  first  projected  the  Scheme  of  a Col- 
legiate Education  in  that  Province. 


1753] 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


251 


The  immediate  Motives  to  this  generous  Design, 
were  the  great  Number  of  Societies  then  lately 
form’d  in  various  Parts  of  the  Country,  where 
several  Thousands  of  the  inhabitants,  ardently  de- 
sirous of  the  Administration  of  religious  Ordinances, 
were  entirely  destitute  of  the  necessary  Means  of 
Instruction,  and  incapable  of  being  releived  ; — the 
strenuous  Applications  that  were  annually  made  by 
those  vacant  Congregations  to  the  Clergy  in  their 
collective  Bodies  ; warmly  complaining  of  their  un- 
happy Circumstances,  in  being  depriv’d  of  the  com- 
mon Aids  of  Salvation,  and  left  to  grope  after  Hap- 
piness, almost  in  the  Obscurity  of  Paganism,  tho’  the 
Light  of  Revelation  shone  on  their  surrounding 
Neighbours, — the  uncommon  Scarcity  of  Candidates 
for  the  Ministerial  Function,  to  comply  with  these 
pious  and  Christian  Demands  ; the  Colleges  of  New 
England  educating  hardly  a competent  Number  for 
the  Service  of  its  own  Churches. — These  Considera- 
tions were  the  most  urgent  Arguments  for  the 
immediate  Prosecution  of  the  above  mentioned 
Scheme  of  Education. 

Accordingly,  in  the  Year  1 747,1  a Petition  was  pre- 
sented to  his  Excellency  Jonathan  Belcher,  Esq  ; 
Governor  of  that  Province,  (a  Gentleman,  who  has 
long  signaliz’d  himself,  as  a Patron  of  Religion  and 
Learning)  praying  his  Majesty’s  Grant  of  a Charter, 
for  the  Establishment  of  a public  Seminary  of  Litera- 
ture in  New  Jersey.  His  Excellency  was  pleased  to 
comply  with  their  Request,  and  order’d  a Charter  to 
pass  the  Seals  incorporating  sundry  Gentlemen  to 


1 The  first  charter  was  granted  Oct.  22, 1746.  See  N.  J.  Archives,  XII.,  331,  384. 


2 52  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1753 

the  Number  of  Twenty-three  ; the  Majority  of  whom 
were  of  the  Clergy,  by  the  Name  of  the  Trustees  of 
the  College  of  New-Jersey,  and  appointing  the  Gov- 
ernor of  New  Jersey,  for  the  Time  being,  to  act  as 
their  President,  when  convened.  This  Charter  places 
the  Society  upon  the  most  catholic  Foundation  : Per- 

sons of  every  religious  Denomination  are  admitted 
to  Enjoyment  of  all  its  Priviledges  and  allowed,  the 
unlimitted  Exercise  of  their  Religion  ; provided,  that 
Liberty  be  not  made  a cloak  of  Licentiousness. 

'Idle  Trustees,  thus  authorized  with  ample  Powers, 
for  the  Execution  of  this  laudable  Design  ; in  Conform- 
ity to  the  Plan  of  their  Charter,  applied  themselves 
with  the  utmost  Deliberation,  to  form  and  enact  such 
Rules  and  Orders  for  the  Regulation  of  the  Methods 
of  Instruction  and  Conduct  of  the  Students,  as  mieht 
tend  to  prevent  the  Entrance  of  Corruption  in  the 
Society,  and  the  Introduction  of  Idleness,  Effeminacy, 
Vanity,  and  extravagant  Expenses  amongst  its 
Members.  It  would  be  repugnant  to  the  Design  of 
a general  Narrative,  as  well  as  impertinent  to  the 
Reader,  to  enter  into  a minute  Detail  of  these  several 
private  Regulations.  It  will  suffice  to  say,  that  the 
two  principal  Objects  the  Trustees  had  in  View, 
were  Science  and  Religion.  Their  first  Concern  was 
to  cultivate  the  Minds  of  the  Pupils,  in  all  those 
Branches  of  Education,  which  are  generally  taught  in 
the  Universities  abroad : And  to  perfect  their  De- 

sign, their  next  Care  was  to  rectify  the  Heart,  by 
inculcating  the  great  Precepts  of  Christianity,  in 
order  to  make  them  good  Men. 

Upon  these  Views  this  Society  was  founded. 


1753] 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


253 


Providence  so  far  smil’d  upon  the  Undertaking,  in  the 
first  Instance,  as  to  point  out  a Gentleman,  possess’d 
of  every  requisite  Endowment,  to  be  placed  at  the 
Head  of  such  an  Academy.  The  Reverend  Mr. 
Aaron  Burr,  has  been  long  known  in  these  Parts  of 
America,  for  his  Piety,  Affability,  universal  Acquaint- 
ance with  the  Arts  and  Sciences,  and  his  easy,  fami- 
liar Methods  of  Instruction.  Under  his  immediate 
Tuition  and  Government,  this  Society  has  flourished 
far  beyond  the  most  raised  and  sanguine  Expecta- 
tions. The  Number  of  Students  have  increased,  in 
the  short  space  of  four  Years,  from  Eight  or  Ten,  to 
upwards  of  Fifty. 

As  no  human  Institutions  in  a World  of  Imperfec- 
tion and  Error,  are  so  compleatly  model’d,  as  to  ex- 
clude the  Possibility  of  farther  Emendation  ; it  may 
be  said,  without  any  Intention  of  Disparagement  to 
other  learned  Seminaries,  that  the  Governors  of  this 
College  have  endeavour’d  to  improve  upon  the  com 
monly  received  Plans  of  Education.  They  proceed 
not  so  much  in  the  Method  of  a dogmatic  Institution, 
by  prolix  Discourses  on  the  different  Branches  of  the 
Sciences,  by  burdening  the  Memory,  and  imposing 
heavy  and  diagreeable  Tasks  ; as  in  the  Socratic 
Way  of  free  Dialogue,  between  Teacher  and  Pupil  or 
between  the  Students  themselves,  under  the  Inspec- 
tion of  their  Tutors.  In  this  Manner,  the  Attention 
is  engaged,  the  Mind  entertained,  and  the  Scholar 
animated  in  the  Pursuit  of  Knowledge.  In  fine,  the 
Arts  and  Sciences  are  convey’d  into  the  Minds  of 
Youth,  in  a Method,  the  most  easy,  natural  and  fa- 
miliar. but  as  Religion  ought  to  be  the  end  of  all  In- 

o o 


254  NEW  JERSEY  colonial  DOCUMENTS.  [1753 

struction,  and  gives  it  the  best  Degree  of  Perfection  : 
As  one  of  the  primary  Views  of  this  Foundation,  was 
to  educate  young  Gentlemen  for  the  sacred  office  of 
the  Ministry,  and  fit  them  for  the  Discharge  of  so 
noble  an  Employment ; Divinity,  the  Mistress  of  the 
Sciences  engages  the  peculiar  Attention  of  the  Gov- 
ernors of  this  Society.  Stated  Times  are  set  apart 
for  the  study  of  the  Holy  Scriptures,  in  the  Original 
Languages,  and  stated  Hours  daily  consecrated  to 
the  Service  of  Religion.  The  utmost  Care  is  taken 
to  discountenance  Vice  and  to  encourage  the  Prac- 
tice of  Virtue  ; and  a manly,  rational,  and  Christian 
Behaviour  in  the  Students.  Enthusiasm  on  the  one 
Hand,  and  Prophaness  on  the  other,  are  equally 
guarded  against,  and  meet  with  the  severest  Checks. 

Under  such  Management,  this  Seminary,  from  the 
smallest  Beginnings,  quickly  drew  the  public  Atten- 
tion, enlarged  the  Number  of  her  Pupils,  raised  her 
Reputation  ; and  now,  tho’  in  her  Infancy,  almost 
rivals  her  ancient  Sisters  upon  the  Continent. 

Daily  observation  evinces,  that  in  Proportion  as 
Learning  makes  its  Progress  in  a Country,  it  softens 
the  natural  Roughness,  eradicates  the  Prejudices, 
and  transforms  the  Genius  and  Disposition  of  its 
Inhabitants.  New  Jersey,  and  the  adjacent  Pro- 
vinces, already  feel  the  happy  Effects  of  this  useful 
Institution.  A general  Desire  of  Knowledge  seems 
to  be  spreading  among  the  People  : Parents  are 

inspired  with  an  Emulation  of  Cultivating  the  Minds 
of  their  Offspring  : Public  Stations  are  honourably 

fill’d  by  Gentlemen,  who  have  received  their  Educa- 
tion here  ; And  from  hence,  many  Christian  Assem- 


753  j 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


255 


blies  are  furnished  with  Men  of  distinguished  Talents 
for  the  Discharge  of  the  Pastoral  Office. 

The  Trustees  acknowledge,  with  the  utmost  Grati- 
tude, the  several  Benefactions  that  have  been  made 
to  this  Infant  Society  by  the  Lovers  of  Piety  and 
Learning.  But  notwithstanding  any  Assistances 
they  have  obtained ; considering  the  constant  an- 
nual Provision  for  the  Governors  of  the  College  ; the 
Expence  that  must  unavoidably  attend  the  Erection 
of  an  Edifice,  with  a requisite  Number  of  Apart- 
ments ; the  building  a House  for  the  Residence  of 
the  President ; furnishing  the  Library  ; and  procuring 
a proper  Apparatus  for  philosophical  Experiments  ; 
— the  State  of  their  Treasury  is  altogether  inade- 
quate to  those  chargeable  Demands.  These  Things 
so  absolutely  necessary  to  the  Well-being  of  the 
Society,  must  remain  uneffected  until  Providence  is 
pleased,  to  excite  the  Beneficence  of  those,  who  wish 
the  Prosperity  of  Religion  and  Literature,  in  the 
uncultivated  Parts  of  the  World.  The  Members  of 
the  College,  who  are  annually  growing  more  numer- 
ous, for  want  of  a public  Building  for  their  Recep- 
tion, must  struggle  under  the  greatest  Difficulties,  in 
procuring  Accommodations  in  private  Families  ; and 
that  too,  in  a dispersed  Village,  where  their  daily 
Attendance  on  the  Collegiate  Exercises  is  subject  to 
numberless  Inconveniencies. 

From  the  above  Representation  of  the  Ends  for 
which  this  Society  was  founded  ; the  happy  Effects  of 
its  Institution  ; the  present  Necessities  and  Circum- 
stances ; it  is  hoped,  that  the  Pious  and  the  Benevo- 
lent in  Great-Britain  or  America  into  whose  Hands 


256  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1753 

these  Papers  may  fall,  will  extend  their  generous  Aid, 

in  the  Prosecution  and  Completion  of  so  excellent 

and  useful  an  Establishment. 

Next  to  the  Advancement  of  the  Divine  Honour, 

the  noblest  Pursuit  of  Man ! surely  nothing  can 

afford  the  human  Mind  a more  pleasing  Reflection, 

than  the  being  instrumental  in  promoting  the  general 

Felicity  of  Mankind.  These  important  Ends,  can  by 

no  Means.be  so  effectually  served,  as  by  forming  the 

rising  Generation,  to  be  useful  Members  of  the  Com- 

p 

munity;  and  by  diffusing  the  Light  of  Christianity, 
among  the  Ignorant  and  uncivilized  Nations  of  the 
Earth. — The  Pennsylvania  Journal,  April  26,  1753. 

No.  542. 

Run  away  on  the  20th  of  March  from  Patiick 
Reynolds  of  Mount  Holly,  in  the  Province  of  New  , 
Jersey,  a servant  man  named  Thomas  James,  aged 
about  19  years,  born  in  Philadelphia,  or  thereabouts, 
had  on  when  he  went  away,  an  old  felt  hat,  bearskin 
jacket,  new  shoes,  has  a large  scar  on  his  right  cheek, 
and  has  been  used  to  driving  a team,  and  has  drove 
team  for  Ben  net  Bard  in  the  county  of  Burlington. 
Whoever  takes  up  and  secures  the  said  servant,  so 
that  his  master  may  have  him  again,  shall  have  Forty 
Shillings  reward  and  reasonable  charges  paid  by 

Patrick  Reynolds. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Journal , May  3,  1753.  No. 

543- 

Run  away  on  the  28th  ult.  from  the  subscriber, 
living  in  Amwell,  A Molatto  man,  named  Boot,  about 
25  years  of  age,  about  5 feet  ten  inches  high,  and 


1753] 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


257 


has  had  the  small  pox : Had  on  when  he  went  away, 
a light  colour’d  jacket,  pretty  ragged,  and  a mouse 
colour’d  jacket  under  it,  the  skirts  has  been  cut  short, 
good  buckskin  breeches,  with  brass  buttons,  some  of 
the  tops  of  them  are  off,  blue  grey  yarn  stockings, 
good  shoes,  and  felt  hat,  torn  in  the  brim.  Whoever 
takes  up  said  slave,  and  secures  him,  so  that  his  mas- 
ter may  have  him  again,  shall  have  Forty  Shillings 
reward,  and  if  above  20  miles  from  home,  Three 
Pounds,  and  all  reasonable  charges,  paid  by 

Thomas  Hunt. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , May  3,  1753.  No. 
1271. 

To  be  sold  by  way  of  publick  vendue,  on  the  21st 
of  May  instant ; by  Samuel  Morris,  administrator  to 
the  estate  of  David  Morris,  deceased — One  Third 
part  of  a certain  Iron  Forge,  together  with  the  land 
thereto  belonging,  situate  upon  Muskoneconk  creek, 
in  West-New-Jersey,  near  the  mouth  of  said  creek, 
where  it  empties  itself  into  Delaware,  between  two 
and  three  miles  from  Durham  furnace  ; it  has  extra- 
ordinary conveniencies  for  drawing  bar  iron,  the 
stream  being  very  large  and  constant,  and  the  car- 
riage from  thence  to  Philadelphia  frequently  by  water 
down  the  said  river. 

Samuel  Morris. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , May  3,  1753.  No. 

1271. 

Run  away  on  the  31st  of  March  last,  from  the  sub- 
scriber, living  in  Hunterdon  county,  East  New  Jersey, 
17 


258  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [ 1 753 

a Molattoe  slave,  named  Jack,  about  22  years  of  age, 
understands  the  coopers  trade,  pretty  tall  and  lusty : 
Had  on  when  he  went  away,  a yellowish  homespun 
coat,  vest  and  breeches,  and  a felt  hat ; he  was  born 
in  Alien-town,  Monmouth  county,  and  intends  to 
pass  for  a free  Negroe.  Whoever  takes  up  and 
brings  said  slave  to  his  master,  or  to  James  Newell, 
in  Alien-town,  or  secures  him,  so  that  he  may  be  had 
again,  shall  have  Three  Pounds  reward,  and  reason- 
able charges,  paid  by 

Robert  Newell. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , May  3,  1753.  No. 
1271. 

Custom  House,  Philadelphia,  Inward  Entries  Snow 
Lucullus,  Francis  Ingraham  from  Salem. — The  Penn- 
sylvania Journal , May  10,  1753.  No.  544. 

New-York , May  14.  We  are  assured  from  Wood- 
bridge,  by  an  Eye-Witness,  That  on  the  28th  of 
April  last,  a Woman  with  her  Child  of  about  15 
Months  old,  being  at  a Neighbour’s  House,  the 
Child  playing  about  the  Yard,  unnoticed  fell  into  a 
Well  without  a Curb,  of  18  Feet  deep;  the  Parents 
soon  after  missing-  it  hastened  to  the  Well,  when  the 
Father,  notwithstanding  his  Infirmities,  ventured 
down,  and  with  much  Difficulty  got  it  out,  after  its 
having  been  in  the  Water,  which  was  three  Feet 
deep,  and  as  cold  as  most  Wells  are,  upwards  of  ten 
Minutes ; It  being  immediately  shifted  and  kept 
warm,  reviv’d,  and  is  likely  to^do  well. — The  N Y. 
Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , May  14,  1753. 


1753] 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


259 


TO  be  Sold,  a One  Acre  Lot  of  Land,  joining  to 
the  River  at  the  South-East  End  of  the  City  of  New- 
Brunswick,  whereon  is  a good  Dwelling-House  : It 

may  be  render’d  very  convenient  for  a Wharf  and 
Store,  being  the  deepest  Water  along  that  City. 
Whoever  inclines  to  purchase,  may  apply  to  Wil- 
liam Blane,  on  the  Premisses,  and  agree  upon 
reasonable  terms. — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly 
Post  Boy , May  14,  1753. 

Run  away  a few  Days  ago,  in  a small  Sloop  of 
about  six  Cord,  or  drove  out  to  Sea,  the  two  follow- 
ing Persons,  viz.  One  named  Thomas  Weebley, 
about  5 Feet  and  a Half  High,  well  set,  freckled  and 
Pock-fretten,  with  light  colour’d  short  Hair : The 

other  Benjamin  Pelton,  a short  well  set  Fellow,  with 
a surly  Countenance : They  have  a Parcel  of 

Goods,  to  the  Value  of  about  One  Hundred  Pounds, 
put  on  board  in  New-York,  by  Catherin  Griffith, 
Wife  of  Samuel  Griffith,  of  Mensequan1;  to  which 
Place  she  was  bound : — The  Vessel  is  called  the 
Charity,  John  Havens,  owner,  of  Manesquan.  Who- 
ever takes  up  the  said  Men,  or  secures  the  Sloop  in 
any  Harbour,  so  that  the  Goods  may  be  had  again, 
shall  have  Ten  Pounds  Reward,  and  all  reasonable 
Charges  paid,  by 

Samuel  Griffith. 

— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , 
May  14,  1753. 


Manasquan,  near  Long  Branch,  N.  J, 


26o 


NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [ 1 753 


To  be  Sold  by  JOHN  BARBERIE,  in  Amboy. 

A Small  Farm,  situate  at  Rariton  Landing-, 
one  Mile  above  New-Brunswick,  in  East 
New-Jersey,  whereon  is  a good  House,  two  Stories 
high,  with  Sash  Windows,  having  a good  Cellar  under 
• it,  a good  Store  House,  Bake  House  and  Oven,  a 
Barn,  Orchard,  and  large  Garden,  the  whole  contain- 
ing  55  Acres,  9 whereof  are  fine  English  Meadow 
Ground,  joining  to  the  River,  being  a convenient 
Place  for  a Store  Keeper,  a Store  having  been  kept 
there  many  years.  It  will  be  sold  altogether,  or  in 
three  Parts,  thus,  the  Meadow  consisting  of  nine 
Acres,  the  Buildings  with  the  Garden  and  Orchard, 
and  the  Up-Land,  part  whereof  is  Wood-Land. — The 
N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , May  14, 

1 753- 

TO  be  Sold  very  reasonable,  by  Cornelius 
Hatfield,  at  Elizabeth-Town,  East  New- 

1 

Jersey,  A Parcel  of  likely  healthy  Negro  Men  and 
Women,  from  between  14  and  22  Years  of  Age. — 

The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , May  14, 

1753- 

To  Be  Sold 

AVery  convenient  Plantation  adjoining  to  the 
High  Lands  of  Navesinks  in  Middletown 
East  New-Jersey,  about  T70  Acres  of  Land  and 
meadow ; there  is  on  said  Plantation,  two  good 
Dwelling-Houses,  two  Barns,  with  two  good  bearing 
Orchards,  out  of  which  may  be  made  in  a fruitful 
year,  100  Barrels  of  Cyder.  The  said  Plantation  is 
joining  to  the  Bay,  right  opposite  the  Road  of  Sandy- 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


26l 


I753J 

Hook,  where  all  Vessels  bound  to  or  from  New- 
York,  or  Perth- Amboy,  stops  in  contrary  Winds, 
which  renders  it  a very  good  Market  for  all  kinds  of 
Poultry,  and  other  Country  Produce.  It  is  also  very 
convenient  for  Fishing,  Oystering,  and  Claming : 
There  is  also  a great  advantage  of  manuring  the 
Land  with  Sea-Weed,  which  in  the  Season  comes 
upon  the  Shore  in  great  Plenty.  There  is  a Creek 
adjoining  to  said  Land,  very  convenient  for  harbour- 
ing Connoes,  or  Pettiaugers,  and  a fine  Spring  of 
Water  within  a few  Rods  of  the  Door.  If  any  Per- 
son hath  a mind  to  buy  Said  Plantation,  may  be 
inform’d  further,  by  applying  to  Samuel  Bowne,  jun. 
Living  on  the  Premisses.  The  Title  is  indisputable. 
— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , May 
IT  1 753* 

Run  away  the  12th  Inst.  April,  from  Isaac 
Kingsland1  of  Saddle-River,  in  Bergen 
County,  East  New-Jersey,  a Negro  Wrench  named 
Nell,  who  formerly  belonged  to  Robert  J.  Livingston, 
Merchant  in  New-York:  She  is  a tall  slim  Wench, 

has  three  Diamonds  in  her  Face,  one  on  each  Side 
and  the  other  on  her  Forehead : Had  on  and  taken 

with  her  when  she  went  away,  three  Petticoats,  one 
is  an  old  quilted  one,  and  the  other  two  homespun, 
one  striped  and  the  other  mixed  ; a blue  and  white 
striped  short  Gown,  a bluish  homespun  Waist  Coat, 
and  an  Ozenbrigs  Shift,  with  homespun  Sleeves,  a 
short  blue  Cloke,  a new  Pair  of  blue  Stockings,  a 

1 Son  of  Edmund  Kingsland  and  Maria  Pinhorne,  dau.  of  Judge  William  Pinhorne. 
He  m.  Elizabeth  Dow,  widow  of  Alexander  Gaelt.  He  was  Sheriff  of  Bergen  county  in 
1764. 


262  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [ 1 75  3 

Pair  of  old  crooked  Shoes,  and  several  other  Things 
too  tedious  to  mention.  These  are  therefore  to  fore- 
warn all  Masters  of  Vessels  and  others,  of  carrying 
off,  concealing  or  harbouring  said  Wench,  as  they  will 
answer  it  at  their  Peril  with  the  utmost  Rigour  of  the 
Law.  Whoever  takes  up  the  foremention’d  Negroe, 
and  secures  her  in  any  Goal,  so  that  her  Master  may 
have  her  again,  shall  have  Forty  Shillings  Reward, 
and  all  reasonable  Charges  paid,  by 

Isaac  Kingsland. 

— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , 
May  14,  1753. 

To  be  Sold,  together  or  in  Parcels, 

TWO  Tracts  of  Land,  lying  about  seven  or 
eight  Miles  from  the  City  of  New-Bruns- 
wick,  near  and  on  the  South  East  Side  of  the  main 
Road  that  leads  from  New-Brunswick  to  Trenton, 
adjoining  to  the  Rear  of  the  Lands  of  Nicholas 
Johnson, — Barcalowe,  John  Van  Dike,  and  others. 
The  one  of  which  Tracts  contains  about  One  Thou- 
sand Acres,  and  the  other  about  Four  Hundred  and 
Fifty : the  chief  of  the  Land  is  good,  well  timbered 
and  watered,  and  lies  very  commodious  for  a Market. 
Any  Person  inclining  to  purchase,  upon  Application 
to  Samuel  Nevill  or  Philip  Kearney,  Esqrs  in  the 
City  of  Perth-Amboy,  or  to  Joseph  Murray,  in  the 
City  of  New-York,  Esq;  may  know  further. — The 
N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , May  14,  1753. 

Run  away  from  Peter  Garritson,  of  West-N- 
Jersey,  on  Saturday  the  7th  April  last,  a Ne- 
groe Man  named  Caeser,  about  30  Years  of  Age,  of  a 


ty 53 J NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS.  263 

yellow  Complexion,  bushy  Hair,  and  stutters  pretty 
much  when  he  talks  : Whoever  takes  up  said  Negroe, 
and  secures  him  so  that  his  Master  may  have  him  again, 
or  gives  Information  to  David  Abeel  in  New- York, 
shall  have  Forty  Shillings  Reward,  and  all  reasonable 
Charges  paid.  N.  B.  All  Masters  of  Vessels  are 
forbid  to  carry  him  off  at  their  peril. — The  N.  Y.  Ga- 
zette or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , May  14,  1753. 

Philadelphia,  May  17,  1753. 

From  Burlington  we  have  Advice,  that  one  John 
Shores,  was  tried  at  the  Supreme  Court,  held  there, 
for  stealing  a cow,  of  which  he  was  convicted,  and 
burnt  in  the  Hand. — The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , 
May  17,  1753.  No.  1273. 

To  be  Sold 

A Tract  of  land,  in  Morris  county,  in  the  Western- 
division  of  New  Jersey,  about  4 miles  from  the  river 
Delaware,  containing  1250  acres,  with  the  usual  al- 
lowance ; late  the  property  of  William  Biddle  : It  is 
divided  in  four  parts,  each  containing  312  acres  and 
a half,  with  good  conveniency  for  meadows,  is  well 
wooded  and  watered.  Any  person  inclining  to  pur- 
chase the  whole  or  part,  may  apply  to  Samuel  Smith, 
William  Lawrence,  or  Joshua  Fisher,  in  Philadelphia. 
— The  Pennsylvajiia  Gazette , May  17,  1753.  No. 
1273. 

N.  York,  May  28. 

Last  Tuesday  Evening,  Thomas  Martin  and  Gil- 
bert King,  both  of  this  City,  having  been  at  a tipling 
House  in  Elizabeth  Town,  in  returning  to  their  Lodg- 
ing, Martin  grew  noisy,  and  being  reproved  by  King 


2D4  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1753 

for  it,  he  started  up  and  suddenly  stabb’d  him  in  the 
Breast  with  a Pen-Knife  ; a Surgeon  was  immediately 
sent  for,  and  apprehending  the  Wound  to  be  mortal, 
Martin  was  committed  to  Jail:  But  we  hear  that  on 
Thursday  last  there  was  some  Hopes  of  King’s  Re- 
covery.— The  Pennsylvania  Journal \ May  31,  1753. 
No.  547. 

A Child  last  Week,  within  ten  Miles  of  Brunswick 
was  crush’d  to  Death  with  the  Wheel  of  a Grist-Mill. 
— The  Pennsylvania  Journal , May  31,  1753.  No. 
547- 

Philadelphia , May  28.  We  hear  from  Salem,  that 
the  House  of  William  Tufts  was  burnt  by  Lightning 
last  [week]  ; also  a Barn  in  Gloucester  County. — The 
N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , June  4,  1753. 

Imported  in  the  Samuel  and  Judith,  Capt.  Grif- 
fiths, from  London,  and  the  Grace,  Capt.  Neab 
son,  from  Bristol,  and  to  be  Sold  by  Capt.  Jacob  De- 
heart, in  Elizabeth-Town  : A large  Assortment  of 
European  and  East-India  Goods. — N.  Y.  Gazette  or 
the  Weekly  Post  Boy , June  4,  1753. 

Notice  is  hereby  given, 

That  Abraham  Webb,  being  provided  with  a 
Boat  exceeding  well  fitted,  with  a very 
handsome  Cabbin,  and  all  necessary  Accommoda- 
tions ; proposes  to  give  his  Attendance,  at  the  White- 
Hall-Slip,  every  Monday  and  Thursday;  and  the 
same  Day,  Wind  and  Weather  permitting,  to  pro- 
ceed for  Amboy-Ferry,  to  John  Cluck’s,  where  a 


1753] 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


265 


Wagon,  kept  by  John  Richards,  will  be  ready  to  re- 
ceive either  Goods  or  Passengers,  and  to  proceed 
with  them  to  Borden’s-Town,  where  a Stage-Boat 
will  be  ready  to  carry  them  to  Philadelphia  ; and  the 
same  Method  will  be  followed  from  the  Crooked- 
Billet  Wharf  at  Philadelphia,  up  to  Borden’s-Town, 
and  shall  proceed,  Load  or  no  Load,  twice  a Week, 
by  which  Means,  Passengers  or  Goods  may  never  be 
detained  on  the  Road.  As  they  purpose  to  endeav- 
our to  use  People  in  the  best  Manner  they  are  capa- 
ble of,  they  hope  all  good  Persons  will  give  it  the 
Encouragement  it  deserves.  So  with  Respect  they 
remain  Friends  to  the  Publick. 

Abraham  Webb. 

Joseph  Richards, 
and  Joseph  Borden,  jun. 

— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , 
June  4,  1753. 

This  is  to  give  Notice, 

TO  all  Travelers,  who  may  have  Occasion  to 
travel  between  New-Yorkand  Philadelphia, 
that  the  Trenton  Ferry  is  now  revived  by  Andrew 
Ramsay,1  late  of  Long-Island  Ferry  ; where  all  Trav- 
ellers, who  are  pleased  to  put  up  at  his  House,  may 
depend  on  having  good  Entertainment  for  themselves 
and  Horses  : Said  Ramsay  is  providing  a Stage 
Waggon  to  go  from  Brunswick  to  Trenton,  and  a 
Stage-Boat  from  Philadelphia  to  Trenton.  Such 
Passengers  as  are  pleased  to  favour  him  with  their 

1 Andrew  Ramsey,  innholder,  of  New  York,  received  a lease,  Sept.  26,  1750,  of  the 
Brooklyn  ferry,  for  the  term  of  two  years  and  six  months,  for  ^455.  He  was  bound  to 
keep  one  or  more  scows,  and  one  or  more  boats  for  the  transportation  of  cattle,  one  of 
which  was  to  be  always  in  readiness  on  the  New  York  side  of  the  river,  at  Wall  street. — 
Hist,  of  Brooklyn,  by  Henry  R.  Stiles,  Brooklyn,  1870,  III.,  526. 


266  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [175^ 

Custom,  may  depend  upon  being  forwarded  on  their 
Journey,  with  the  utmost  Expedition,  from  the  latter 
to  the  former,  or  from  the  former  to  the  latter. — N. 
B.  Notice  will  be  given,  what  Days  in  the  Week  the 
Boat  and  Waggon  will  proceed  from  Stage  to  Stage, 
per  me 

Andrew  Ramsay.  • 
— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , 
June  4,  1753. 

TO  be  Sold  by  James  Parker,  two  Lots  of 
Land,  (the  Title  indisputable)  situate  at  the 
Fresh  Ponds,  in  the  County  of  Middlesex,  and  Prov- 
ince of  New-Jersey,  several  Miles  from  New-Bruns- 
wick,  and  five  Miles  from  South-River  Landing  ; one 
bounded  on  Duncan  Campbell  and  William  Chees- 
man’s,  containing  280  Acres ; the  other  bounded  by 
said  Campbell  and  John  Ireland’s,  containing  210 
Acres  both  well  water’d  and  timber’d.  Whoever 
inclines  to  purchase  either  of  said  Lots,  may  apply 
to  Andrew  Johnston,  Esq ; at  Perth-Amboy,  or  said 
Parker  at  New- York. — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the 
Weekly  Post  Boy , June  4,  1753. 

Extract  of  a Letter  from  Middletown,  in  New  Jer- 
sey, dated  May  28,  1753. 

“As  the  following  Account  has  not  been  in  any  of 
the  publick  Papers  yet,  I think  it  ought  to  be  taken 
Notice  of:  It  is  really  Truth,  however  improbable  it 
may  appear,  and  was  discovered  but  a very  few  Days 
ago.  A farmer  in  this  neighbourhood  had  two  Servant 
Lads,  one  aged  about  1 1 Years,  the  other  1 7,  who  were 
commonly  sent  out  to  work  together  in  the  Fields : 


1753] 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


267 


One  Night  on  their  coming  home,  the  Boy  was  ob- 
served to  look  poorly,  and  on  being  asked  what  was 
the  Matter,  answered  he  durst  not  tell,  or  it  would  be 
the  worse  for  him ; but  some  of  the  House  observ- 
ing Blood  about  him,  he  was  stript,  and  discovered 
to  be  in  a most  deplorable  Condition,  having  the 
lower  Region  of  his  Belly  cut  and  skin’d  off,  and  the 
whole  cover’d  over  with  Ashes  and  Fat  to  prevent 
the  Bleeding  : On  his  Examination  he  said,  the  other 
had  done  it,  threatening  to  kill  him  if  he  ever  discov- 
er’d the  least  Hint  of  it ; that  he  had  frequently  us’d 
him  very  barbarously,  and  kept  him  in  continual 
Terror.  On  a Surgeon’s  being  sent  for,  his  Life  was 
declared  to  be  in  Danger,  when  the  other  was  com- 
mitted to  Jail,  where  he  now  lies,  in  order  to  receive 
his  Demerits,  if  such  can  be  possible.  We  don’t 
learn  that  the  little  One  ever  gave  him  any  Provoca- 
tion for  such  usage,  but  that  it  proceeded  from  his 
own  wicked  Heart.” — The  Pennsylvania  Journal , 
June  7,  1753.  No.  548. 

All  persons  indebted  to  the  estate  of  Thomas 
Shinn,  Esq  ; late  of  Mount  Holly,  deceased,  are  de- 
sired to  pay  their  respective  debts : And  those  who 
have  any  demands  against  said  estate,  are  desired  to 
bring  in  their  accounts,  that  they  may  be  adjusted  by 
Henry  Paxson  and  John  Woodman,1  executors. — The 
Pennsylvania  Gazette , June  7,  1753.  No.  1 276. 

Philadelphia,  May  24,  1753. 

To  be  sold  by  the  subscriber,  living  in  Race-street 
iPhiladelphia. 


1 Probably  John  Woolman  is  meant. 


268  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1753 

A Tract  of  land,  situate  in  Gloucester  county, 
West  New  Jersey,  on  Little-timber-creek,  about  a 
mile  from  Gloucester,  adjoining  the  ground  of  William 
Harrison,  containing  96  acres,  19  of  which  are  good 
meadow  ; the  title  is  indisputable. 

Joseph  Hogg. 

N.  B.  Any  person  giving  good  security,  and  pay- 
ing one  half,  may  have  6 month  credit  for  the  re- 
mainder.— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , June  7,  1753. 
No.  1 276. 

To  be  sold,  at  Nathaniel  Allen’s  junior,  in  Front 
street,  opposite  Joseph  Turners,  Esq  ; Pickled  stur- 
geon, at  Twenty-five  Shillings  the  five  gallon  keg, 
cured  in  the  same  manner  as  the  Baltick  sturgeon, 
and  is  thought  by  those  gentlemen  who  have  had  an 
opportunity  of  seeing  and  tasting  of  it,  to  be  of  an 
equal  goodness  ; done  by  Edward  Broadfield,  lately 
arrived  in  this  country  now  living  in  Bordentown, 
who  is  in  hopes  of  giving  a general  satisfaction  to  all 
persons  who  endeavour  to  encourage  the  same. 

N.  B.  Any  gentlemen  and  ladies  may  have  an  op- 
portunity of  seeing  and  tasting  the  same  before  they 
buy ; for  fear  of  imposition  the  kegs  will  all  be 
branded  with  my  name,  at  length. — The  Pennsylva- 
nia Gazette , June  14,  1753.  No.  1 277. 

The  managers  of  the  Delaware  Island  Lottery,  not 
having  disposed  of  all  their  Tickets,  hereby  give 
notice,  that  the  Drawing  is  put  off  till  Monday  the 
second  of  July  next,  when  it  will  certainly  be  Drawn 
without  further  Delay. — The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , 
June  14,1753.  No.  1277. 


1753]  NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS.  269 

Run  away  on  the  17th  inst.  from  his  bail,  living  at 
Cohansy-bridge,  in  Cumberland  county,  One  Isaac 
Garrison,  this  country  born,  about  32  years  of  age,  a 
well  set  fellow,  about  5 feet  9 inches  high,  one  of  his 
thumbs  short,  and  has  no  bone  half  the  length  of  it 
from  the  hand  to  the  nuckle  joint,  and  brown  straight 
hair  : Had  on,  A light  colour’d  coat,  with  round  metal 
buttons,  and  breeches  of  the  same  colour  of  the  coat  ; 
has  his  wife  with  him,  but  no  children,  nor  never  had 
any.  Also  run  away  with  him  one  John  Langley, 
Whoever  takes  up  said  Isaac  Garrison,  and  secures 
him  in  any  goal,  so  as  his  bail  may  have  him  again, 
shall  have  Three  Pounds  reward,  and  reasonable 
charges  paid  by  J.  James,  jun.  John  Lasey,  or  Joseph 
Garrison. — The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , June  14,  1753. 
No.  1277. 

Run  away  on  the  third  inst.  from  Jonas  Scoggin, 
of  Alloway’s  creek,  Salem  county,  A native  Irish  serv- 
ant man,  named  James  Dun,  alias  Dunnebo,  about 
35  years  of  age,  about  5 feet  ten  inches  high,  pretty 
lusty,  has  a scar  on  his  left  cheek,  and  wears  his  own 
black,  straight  hair : Had  on  when  he  went  away, 
An  old  brownish  cloth  jacket,  and  an  under  check, 
ditto,  with  red  strings,  good  leather  breeches,  yarn 
stockings,  good  shoes,  an  old  raccoon  hat.  Also 
took  a young  woman  with  him,  who  ’tis  supposed 
will  pass  for  his  wife.  Whoever  takes  and  secures 
said  servant,  so  as  his  master  may  have  him  again, 
shall  have  Three  Pounds  reward,  and  reasonable 
charges,  paid  by 

Jonas  Scoggin. 

N,  B.  He  speaks  much  on  the  brogue. — The  Penn- 


270  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1753 

sylvania  Gazette , June  14,  1753.  No.  1277. 

Run  away  on  the  5th  of  this  Instant  June,  a 
High-Dutch  Servant  Man  named  Jacob 
Rubb,  about  5 Feet  3 Inches  high,  he  is  of  a swarthy 
Complexion,  straight  black  Hair,  and  about  28  Years 
of  Age : Had  on  when  he  went  away,  an  old  Felt 

Hat,  an  old  Woolen  Coat  of  a dirty  Colour,  a home- 
spun  Linnen  Shirt,  a Pair  of  wide  Tow  Trowsers,  a 
Pair  of  Tow  Stockings,  and  a Pair  of  strong  Shoes 
with  Hob-Nails.  Whoever  takes  up  said  Servant, 
so  that  his  Master  may  have  him  again,  shall  have 
Thirty  Shillings  Reward,  and  reasonable  Charges, 
paid  by  me  Philip  Titus,  of  Hopewell,  in  Hunterdon 
County. — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , 
June  18,  1753. 

Run  away  on  the  2d  of  this  Instant  June,  from 
Samuel  Arnold,  of  Morris  County,  West 
New-Jersey,  a Mulatto  Fellow  named  Anthony,  is  22 
Years  of  Age,  about  six  Feet  high,  well-set,  with 
remarkable  large  PYet,  his  Hair  cut  off,  talks  good 
English,  is  very  ingenious,  and  probably  he  has  a 
forged  Pass  of  his  own  Writing:  Had  on  when  he 

went  away,  a Felt  Hat,  a Linnen  Cap,  a new  brown 
Worsted  Coat  with  a Rent  on  one  Shoulder,  a Lin- 
nen Jacket,  check’d  Linnen  Trowsers,  wollen  Stock- 
ings, new  Pumps  with  large  Brass  Buckles,  but  its 
likely  he  has  chang’d  his  Clothes,  and  is  dressed  in 
Indian  Apparel.  Whoever  takes  up  said  Fellow, 
and  secures  him,  so  that  his  Master  may  have  him 
again,  shall  have  Three  Pounds  Reward,  and  all 


271 


1753]  NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS, 

reasonable  Charges,  paid  per  me. 

Samuel  Arnold. 

— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , 
June  18,  1753. 

N.  York,  June  25. 

We  learn  from  Egg  Harbour,  That  about  ten  or 
twelve  Days  ago,  a Vessel  bound  in  there  from 
Virginia,  took  up  at  Sea  the  Boat  advertised  in  this 
Paper  last  Week  to  have  been  taken  from  Mr.  John 
Latham’s  Wharf,  with  only  one  Man  on  board,  and 
he  almost  starv’d  to  Death.  He  said,  that  as  he 
stole  the  Boat  he  Purposed  to  carry  her  round  into 
Delaware  River,  and  there  make  Use  of  her  as  a 
Passage  Boat.  For  this  Voyage  he  had  laid  in  but 
little  more  Provision  than  one  Loaf  of  Bread. — The 
Pennsylvania  Journal,  June  28,  1753.  No.  551. 

Joseph  Borden’s  stage  boat,  Nicholas  George, 
master,  gives  her  attendance,  at  the  Crooked-billet 
wharff,  in  Philadelphia,  every  Monday  and  Tuesday 
as  formerly  ; and  his  shallop,  Charles  Taylor,  mast- 
er, attends  at  the  same  place,  every  Friday  and  Sat- 
urday ; and  the  stage  waggon  shall  proceed  from 
Bordentown  to  Amboy  ferry,  on  Mondays  and  Tues- 
days. 

Joseph  Borden,  jun.  Joseph  Richards. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , June  28,  1753. 
No.  1 279. 

To  be  Lett. 

A Lulling-mill,  and  dye-house,  with  all  the  tools 
and  utensils,  for  carrying  on  the  business  of  a fuller 


272 


NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1753 


and  dyer,  at  Trenton,  now  in  the  possession  of  the 
subscriber,  living  in  Trenton,  on  reasonable  terms. 

Robert  Lettis  Hooper. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , June  28,  1753. 

No.  1279. 

To  be  Sold. 

The  Iron-works  at  Cohansie,  in  Cumberland  coun- 
ty, with  1000  acres  of  land,  well  timber’d  ; the  forge 
house  is  40  feet  long  and  30  feet  wide,  with  one  fire- 
place already  built,  and  a good  head  of  water.  Any 
person  inclining  to  purchase  the  same,  may  apply  to 
Samuel  Barnes,  living  on  the  premises. — The  Penn- 
sylvania Gazette , June  28,  1753.  No.  1279. 

TO  be  sold  at  publick  Vendue,  on  Wednes- 
day the  1 8th  of  July  next,  at  one  o’Clock  in 
the  Afternoon,  a neat  Farm  belonging  to  William 
Hooks,  lying  and  being  in  Piscataway,  in  New-Jersey, 
about  two  Miles  from  New-Brunswick,  containing 
100  Acres  on  which  there  is  a fine  Orchard,  good 
Pasture-Land,  all  in  good  Fence  and  well  watered, 
besides  many  other  Conveniencies.  An  indisputable 
Title  will  be  made  to  the  Purchaser ; concerning 
which  may  be  enquired  of  the  Rev.  Ebenezer  Pember- 
ton, at  New-York,  or  said  William  Hook.  Said 
Vendue  to  be  held  on  the  Premisses,  at  which  Time 
and  Place  the  Conditions  of  Sale  will  be  made 
known. — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy} 
July  2,  1753. 

To  be  sold  or  Jett,  by 
Benjamin  Morgan 

Living  in  Wateiford  township,  Gloucester  county,  in 
West-New-Jersey. 


1753] 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


273 


A Plantation,  situate  on  the  mouth  of  Pensonken 
creek,  containing  200  acres,  about  100  whereof  is 
cleared,  of  which  there  is  40  acres  of  good  drained 
meadow,  and  about  as  much  more  may  be  made  ; 
there  is  on  it  a good  orchard,  good  large  stone 
dwelling-house,  stone  kitchen,  barn,  stables,  coach- 
house, and  several  other  convenient  out-houses. 
Any  person  inclining  to  purchase  or  rent  the  same, 
may  apply  to  Benjamin  Morgan,  now  living  on  the 
said  premises,  and  be  informed  of  the  terms  on  which 
it  will  be  sold  or  lett. — The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , 
July  5>  1753-  No.  1280. 

Custom  House,  Philadelphia,  Cleared,  Sloop  Mary, 
John  Conway  to  Amboy. — The  Pennsylvania  Jour- 
naly  July  12,  1753.  No.  553. 

Custom  House , Philadelphia.  Cleared.  Convay 
to  Amboy. — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post 
Boy , July  16,  1753. 

Custom  House , New- York.  Cleared  for  Depar- 
ture. Schooner  Arnold,  Patrick  Boyle  to  New-Jer- 
sty.- -The  N Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy,  July 
16,  1 753- 

To  Be  Sold, 

BY  John  Pierson,  Minister  of  the  Gospel,  the 
Plantation  on  which  he  how  lives,  situate 
and  lying  about  the  Middle  of  the  Town  of  Wood- 
bridge  ; in  the  County  of  Middlesex,  in  East-Jersey, 
said  Plantation  consists  of  about  70  Acres  of  good 

Land,  some  Quantity  of  it  mowing  Meadow,  whereon 
18 


274 


NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS. 


[1753 

is  an  Orchard  of  a considerable  Number  of  Fruit- 
Trees,  a good  Dwelling-House,  Barn  and  Chair- 
House,  &c.  Whoever  hath  a Mind  to  purchase, 
may  apply  to  said  John  Pierson,1  living  on  the  Premis- 
ses.— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy,  July 
16,  1 753- 

TO  be  sold  at  publick  Vendue  on  Tuesday  the 
7th  of  August  next,  a good  large  new 
Dwelling-House,  with  four  Fire-Places  on  the  lower 

1 John  Pierson,  son  of  the  Rev.  Abraham  Pierson,  of  Killingworth,  Conn.,  the  first 
President  of  Yale  College,  was  born  in  1689  ; he  graduated  from  Yale  in  1711,  and  began 
preaching  at  Woodbridge  in  1714  or  1715,  and  was  ordained  there,  April  29,  1717,  “before  a 
very  great  assembly,”  by  the  Presbytery  of  Philadelphia.  He  m.  Ruth,  dau.  of  the  Rev. 
Timothy  Woodbridge,  of  Hartford,  Conn.;  she  d.  Jan.  7, 1732,  in  her  38th  year ; he  m.  2d, 
Judith  Smith,  of  Long  Island.  Mr.  Pierson’s  ministry  was  for  the  most  part  uneventful, 
and  apparently  not  noticeably  successful,  the  membership  of  his  church  never  exceeding 
thirty.  He  was  one  of  the  first  Trustees  of  Princeton  College,  under  the  charter  of  Oct. 
22,1746.  He  preached  the  funeral  sermon  on  the  Rev  Jonathan  Dickinson,  the  first  Presi- 
dent of  the  College,  in  October,  1747.  In  1752  he  was  dismissed  from  his  church,  at  his 
own  request,  and  settled  at  Mendham,  Morris  county,  where  he  preached  for  ten  years. 
He  then  removed  to  Long  Island,  where  he  lived  on  his  wife’s  farm,  until  her  death,  when 
he  returned  to  Morris  county,  ending  his  days  under  the  roof  of  his  son-in-law,  the  Rev. 
Jacob  Green.  He  d.  at  Hanover,  Morris  county,  August  23,  1770. — Daily's  Hist.  Wood- 
bridge,  173-6 ; Records  Presbyterian  Church , Philadelphia,  1841,  39-43;  Webster's  Hist. 
Pres.  Ch. , 357.  In  the  burying  ground  at  Hanover  are  two  tombstones  inscribed  as  follows  : 
The  Rev’d  Mr.  John  Pierson  died  Aug.  23d.  1770  M tat  81.  Who  was  a Minister  of  the 
Gospel  about  57  Years. 

He  was  an  eminent  Divine 
An  excellent  Casuist ; 

A Faithful  searching  Preacher, 

A devout  steadfast  Christian, 

An  undaunted  Reprover, 

A peculiar  Oeconomist, 

Stern  in  his  Behaviour, 

Yet  benevolent  & kind. 

He  past  the  meny  Scenes  of  Life, 

Without  a blemish  in  his  character. 

The  Memory  of  the  Just  is  Blessed. 

E.  G. 

Filial  affection  Erected  this  Monument  to  the  Memory  of  the  best  of  mothers,  Mrs. 
Elizabeth  Green,  Daughter  of  the  Rev’d  John  Pierson,  and  second  wife  of  the  Rev’d  Jacob 
Green. 

Worthy  of  her  father  and  her  husband,  Her  mortal  part  here  associates  with  their  kin- 
dred dust,  while  the  part  immortal  reunites  with  theirs  where  death  can  no  more  divide. 

Her  various  virtues  are  not  recorded  on  this  perishable  stone,  they  are  written  in  the 
Lambs  book  of  life,  and  in  the  hearts  of  her  children  and  her  friends. 

§he  died  Aug’t  3d  A.  D.  1810.  In  the  84th  year  of  her  age 


1753] 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


275 


Floor,  a good  new  Barn,  and  a good  Orchard  and  mow- 
ing Ground,  with  other  good  Conveniencies,  about  18 
Acres  of  Land  ; another  good  new  Dwelling-House 
with  two  Fire-Places,  both  of  them  joining  upon  Mr. 
Joseph  Shotwell  in  Raway,  and  the  upper  Landing 
on  Raway  River;  also  eight  building  Lots,  joining 
upon  the  former,  each  Lot  containing  one  Acre,  all 
beautiful  situate  for  Trade  of  the  Country  ; also  a 
good  Farm  containing  about  80  Acres  of  choice 
Land,  about  40  Acres  in  good  new  Fence,  with  suit- 
able Divisions,  a good  Dwelling-House,  a large  Barn, 
a good  young  Orchard,  mowing  Ground,  &c.  well 
water’d  : x^n  indisputable  Title  will  be  given,  and 

reasonable  Time  for  Payment,  by 

Nathaniel  Hubbell. 

— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , 
July  16,  1753. 

Run  away  on  the  15th  inst.  from  Alexander  Hill, 
of  Piles-grove,  in  Salem  county,  a servant  man,  named 
Michael  M’Laughlin,  about  five  feet  six  inches  high, 
full  faced,  and  well-set ; Had  on  when  he  went  away, 
a new  felt  hat,  white  demity  waistcoat,  leather  breeches, 
thick  grey  yarn  stockings,  and  a pair  of  brogues,  new 
soaled  and  capp’d.  Whoever  takes  up  and  secures 
said  servant,  so  that  his  master  may  have  him  again, 
shall  have  Three  Pounds  reward,  and  reasonable 
charges,  paid  by, 

Alexander  Hill. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , July  19,  1753. 
No.  1282. 

Burlington  Stage-Waggon,  revived. 

o o o o J 

Notice  is  hereby  given  to  all  persons  that  are  in- 


2 j6  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [ 1 753 

clinable  to  transport  themselves,  goods,  wares  and 
merchandize  from  the  city  of  Philadelphia,  to  the  city 
of  New  York,  or  from  New  York  to  Philadelphia  that 
they  may  have  the  opportunity  of  obliging  themselves 
that  way  twice  every  week,  wind  and  weather  per- 
mitting. James  Wells,  and  John  Weggery  with  a 
commodious  Stage-boat,  well  fitted  for  that  purpose, 
will  attend  at  the  Crooked  Billet  wharff,  in  Philadel- 
phia, in  order  to  receive  goods  and  passengers  on 
the  following  days  in  every  week,  viz.  on  Monday 
and  Tuesday,  likewise  on  Thursday  and  Friday ; 
and  on  Wednesday  and  Saturday  will  set  out  and 
proceed  with  them  to  the  house  of  Jonathan  Thomas, 
in  Burlington,  who  keeps  a good  stage-waggon,  ready 
to  receive  them,  which  on  Thursday  morning  will 
proceed  with  them  to  Perth-Amboy  Ferry,  where  a 
house  of  good  entertainment  is  kept,  and  a commo- 
dious stage-boat  waiting  for  their  reception,  Daniel 
O’ Bryant,  master,  who  will,  on  Friday  morning,  pro- 
ceed directly  for  New  York,  and  give  his  attendance 
at  the  Whitehall  slip,  near  the  Half-moon  battery,  at 
the  house  of  Scotch  John,  for  the  purposes  aforesaid, 
and  on  Saturday  proceed  from  New  York  to  Perth 
Amboy  ferry  house  again  ; and  on  Monday,  a stage- 
waggon  fitted  for  the  purposes  aforesaid,  kept  by 
John  Prigmore,  will  set  out  for  Burlington,  where  the 
said  Wells  and  Weggery  will  be  ready  to  receive 
passengers,  and  goods  and  convey  them  to  Phila- 
delphia, and  the  same  day,  Viz,  Monday,  Jonathan 
Thomas’s  stage  proceeds  to  Perth  Amboy  ferry, 
where  Daniel  O’ Bryant  receives  them  as  aforesaid  ; 
which  is  judged  to  be  the  cheapest,  best  and  quickest 


1753]  NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS.  277 

way,  that  merchants,  passengers  or  others,  can  con- 
vey themselves  or  their  effects,  from  one  city  to  the 
other. 

Altho’  the  owners  of  the  Bordentown  stage  have 
been  pleased,  by  way  of  hyperbole,  to  advertise, 
That  their  stage  can  perform  the  aforesaid  passage 
sooner  by  24  hours  than  any  other  stages,  but  have 
omitted  to  inform  the  publick,  that  their  stage  boat 
from  Philadelphia  to  Bordentown,  is  frequently  three 
tides  upon  the  water,  or  the  greatest  part  thereof, 
viz.  two  tides  of  flood,  and  one  of  ebb  ; during  which 
time  the  Burlington  stage  is  capable  of  landing  her 
passengers  at  Perth  Amboy,  and,  upon  cases  of 
emergency,  is  capable  of  performing  the  whole  stage 
from  Philadelphia  to  New  York,  in  the  space  of  24 
hours. 

And  as  an  undertaking  of  this  kind  tends  to  the 
general  o-ood  of  mankind,  in  increasing-  and  facilitat- 
ing  trade  and  commerce  between  the  two  places,  be- 
sides many  other  advantages  to  the  subject,  we  hope 
that  those  gentlemen  who  have  occasion  to  trans- 
port themselves  or  goods  from  either  of  the  places 
aforesaid  to  the  other,  will  encourage  so  publick  a 
good,  and  they  may  at  all  times  depend  upon  the 
best  usage,  and  utmost  despatch,  by  those  who  will 
gratefully  acknowledge  the  favour,  and  are  the  pub- 
lick’s  humble  servants,  Jonathan  Thomas,  John  Prig- 
more,  James  Wells,  John  Weggery,  Daniel  O’Bry- 
ant.— The  Pennsylvania  Journal,  July  19,  1753.  No. 
1 282. 

Last  Friday  Evening  the  House  of  John  Archer 
in  Gloucester  County,  New  Jersey,  was  struck  with 


iyS  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1753 

Lightning  and  set  on  Fire,  whereby  the  House  with 
most  of  the  Furniture  was  consum’d,  but  no  Person 
hurt. — The  Pennsylvania  Journal,  July  26,  1753. 
no.  555. 

Philadelphia , July  26.  On  Friday  Evening  last  a 
House  was  destroy’d  by  lightning  in  Gloucester 
County  ; and  though  there  were  several  Persons  in 
it,  yet  none  of  them  received  any  Damage. — The  N. 
Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , July  30,  1753. 

TO  be  Sold  at  publick  Vendue  on  Saturday 
the  1 8th  of  August  next,  or  at  private  Sale 
any  Time  before,  by  Samuel  Nevill,  Esq  ; at  Perth- 
Amboy,  in  the  County  of  Middlesex,  for  ready  Money 
or  short  Credit ; A House  and  Lot  of  Ground,  con- 
taining 2 Rooms  on  a Floor,  with  a Cellar,  and  Gar- 
rets, and  a Garden,  about  33  Feet  in  Breadth,  and  66 
Feet  in  Length,  near  the  Parsonage  House,  now  in 
the  Occupation  of  John  Titus,  Weaver;  the  Sale  to 
begin  at  Ten  o’clock  in  the  Morning.  The  Title  in- 
disputable.— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post 
Boy , July  30,  1753. 

TO  be  sold  at  publick  Vendue  on  Monday  the 
13th  Day  of  August  next,  at  Two  o’Clock 
in  the  Afternoon  on  the  Premises,  the  late  Dwelling- 
House  of  Mr.  Simon  Ely,  with  One  Acre  of  Land,  a 
good  Barn  and  Store-House  standing  thereon,  very 
commodious  for  a Merchant,  lying  about  five  Miles 
Westward  from  Elizabeth-Town,  at  a Place  called 
Connecticut  Farms,  in  a well-settled  Part  of  the 
Country,  on  the  publick  Road  from  Elizabeth-Town 


1753] 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


279 

to  Morris  County.  The  Title  and  Conditions  of  Sale 
will  be  then  published.-—  The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the 
Weekly  Post  Boy , July  30,  1753. 

TO  be  Sold  or  Let,  either  in  Part  or  the  Whole, 
on  very  reasonable  Terms  ; Nineteen  Acres 
of  choice  good  Land,  lying  on  the  Post-Road,  about 
a Mile  and  a Half  from  Elizabeth-Town-Church,  near 
5 of  which  is  good  Mowing-Ground,  together  with  a 
good  Dwelling-House  newly  repaired,  of  a Story  and 
a half  high,  two  good  Rooms  of  about  18  by  20  Feet, 
with  an  Entry  through  between  them,  and  a good 
Cellar  of  20  Feet  Square  under  one  End:  Also  a 
good  new  Barn  handy  to  the  House.  There  is  a 
Brook  of  a constant  Stream  running  thro’  the  Land : 
The  whole  lies  very  convenient  to  the  House,  and  is 
all  in  good  Fence.  The  House  will  be  Sold  or  Let 
with  or  without  the  Land,  as  the  Purchaser  pleases. 
The  Title  is  good.  Any  Person  inclining  to  purchase 
or  hire,  may  apply  to  Hannah  Mash,  living  on  the 
Premises. — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post 
Boy,  July  30,  1753. 

New- York,  August  6.  Last  Thursday  Afternoon 
a Shallop  belonging  to  'Elizabeth-Town,  in  returning 
home,  was  overset  in  our  Bay,  by  a sudden  Flaw  of 
Wind,  whereby  sundry  Goods  on  board  were  dam- 
aged and  destroyed ; but  several  other  Boats  being 
near,  their  timely  Assistance  saved  both  V essel  and 
People. 

We  hear  from  Freehold,  that  on  Thursday  the  26th 
of  last  Month,  one  Rachel  M’Koy,  went  out  in  good 
Health,  in  order  to  gather  Huckeberries,  and  after 


280  new  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1753 

being  in  the  Woods  some  Time,  complain’d  of  being 
out  of  Order,  which  increasing  that  Night,  she  died 
the  next  Morning;  it’s  suppos’d  she  had  been  pois- 
on’d. 

The  same  Night  a hard  Clap  of  Thunder  struck  a 
green  Tree  at  Freehold,  set  it  a Fire,  and  kill’d  a 
Horse  under  it,  which  belong’d  to  one  Sarah  Pearant. 
— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , Aug. 
6,  1 753- 

TO  be  sold  by  St.  George  Talbot,  in  East 
New-Jersey  ; His  Farm  at  Raway  Landing, 
joining  to  the  Mills  by  Mr.  Joseph  Shotwell’s,  Mer- 
chant, containing  95  Acres,  part  of  it  is  Meadow,  and 
a great  Part  may  be  immediately  made  exceeding 
good  Meadow,  with  a good  Dwelling-House,  two 
Stories  high,  with  4 Rooms  on  a Floor,  the  one-half 
built  of  Stone,  and  is  upwards  of  50  Foot  Front,  a 
good  Barn,  and  Still-House,  and  is  as  well  water’d 
as  any  Farm  in  the  Province,  a Brook  running  just 
by  the  Door,  and  another  on  the  Back  of  said  Land, 
meets  in  a Peninsula  and  is  never  dry ; with  an  Orchard 
that  makes  about  100  Barrels  of  Cvder  in  a bearing 

o'  o 

Year,  is  inclosed  with  a new  Cedar  Fence  between  the 
Neighbours:  The  Purchaser  paying  J^th  or  yi th  of 
the  purchase  Money,  or  as  much  as  suits  him,  &c. 
may  have  Time  to  pay  the  Remainder.  The  Title  is 
indisputable.  Also  a Pair  of  this  Country  Mill- 
Stones  4 Foot  7 Inches  and  a half  broad,  and  1 2 
Inches  thick,  to  dispose  of.  Enquire  of  Jonathan 
Hampton,1  Esq;  at  Elizabeth-Town,  or  to  said  Talbot 


1 Jonathan  Hampton,  born  at  Elizabethtown  in  1716  or  1717,  was  for  many  years  one 
of  the  most  prominent  citizens  of  the  town.  In  1739  he  was  one  of  the  petitioners  for  a 
municipal  charter,  and  was  named  an  alderman  in  the  first  charter  of  the  borough,  Feb.  8, 


1753] 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


281 


in  the  City  of  New-York,  or  on  Barne  Isle  at  Harlem. 
— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , Aug. 
1753- 

Thirty  Shillings  Reward,  besides  all  reasonable 
Charges,  to  be  paid  by  the  Subscriber,  for  taking  up, 
returning,  or  securing  of  Abraham  Terrel,  an  Ap- 
prentice, who  departed  from  his  Service  on  the  i8th 
of  May  last,  is  about  18  Years  of  Age,  middle  Size, 
of  a brown  Complexion,  his  Hair  grows  nearer  his 
Eyes  than  common,  a bold  awkward  Fellow,  apt  to 
swear : Had  on  when  he  went  away  (tho’  he  left  his 
out  Cloaths  behind)  a Beaver  Hat  but  little  worn,  a 
Vest  of  blue  and  white  Colour  lin’d  with  red;  he 
lately  was  seen  at  White-Stone  on  Long-Island,  and 
in  Service  of  Benjamin  Waters,  and  on  Thursday  the 
26th  of  July  last,  was  at  New-York.  All  Masters  of 
Vessels,  and  others,  are  hereby  forewarned,  either  to 

1739-40.  In  1749  he  was  one  of  the  wardens  of  St.  John’s  Episcopal  church,  and  was  one 
* of  the  vestrymen  when  Gov.  Josiah  Hardy  granted  a charter  to  the  church,  July  20, 1762. 
A letter  written  by  Hampton,  Aug.  28, 1751,  referring  to  Gov.  Belcher’s  intention  of  mak- 
ing Elizabethtown  his  residence,  shows  that  the  writer  was  anything  but  a sycophantic 
admirer  of  those  in  high  stations.  When  the  Western  frontiers  were  threatened  by  the 
French  and  \Indians,  he  was  appointed,  in  December,  1755,  one  of  the  commissioners  to 
superintend  the  purchase  of  supplies,  etc.,  for  the  soldiers;  at  this  time  and  subsequently 
he  was  spoken  of  as  “ Captain.”  He  wrote  an  interesting  letter  from  Cole’s  Fort,  Sussex 
county,  1758,  on  the  progress  of  the  w7ar  against  the  Indians.  In  1766  he  advertised  for 
sale  the  “ White  House,”  built  by  Gov.  Philip  Carteret  shortly  before  his  death.  He  was 
appointed  one  of  the  Judges  of  Essex  county  in  1768.  At  the  beginning  of  the  Revolution 
he  took  a decided  stand  against  the  aggressions  of  the  British  ministry,  and  ori  Dec.  1 , 
1774,  was  chosen  by  his  fellow  citizens  to  serve  on  the  Committee  of  Observation  for 
Essex  county,  the  Committee  promptly  choosing  him  chairman.  In  that  position  for  a 
year  or  more  he  rendered  conspicuous  service  to  the  patriot  cause,  being  active,  alert  and 
energetic  in  detecting  the  movements  of  the  enemy  and  frustrating  their  schemes.  But 
events  moved  too  rapidly  for  him.  Moreover,  as  a member  of  St.  John’s  church,  and  a 
parishioner  of  that  able  Loyalist,  the  Rev.  Dr.  Thomas  B.  Chandler,  his  surroundings 
were  largely  hostile  to  the  patriot  cause.  He  could  not  go  so  far  as  his  enthusiastic  neigh- 
bors, and  when  it  became  evident  that  open  hostilities  were  inevitable,  he  withdrew  from 
further  participation  in  public  affairs,  and  the  beginning  of  the  memorable  year  1776  found 
him  at  least  passively  favoring  the  British  cause.  He  is  spoken  of  as  “ living  in  that  hand- 
some style  of  a gentleman  of  the  old  school.”  He  died  Nov.  x,  1777,  in  his  61st  year.  He 

m.  1st,  Mary  Ann , who  d.  July  20, 1746,  aged  31  years : 2d,  Ann  Frances , wrho 

d.  Feb.  24, 1791,  in  her  77th  year. 


282  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1753 

harbour  or  carry  him  off,  on  pain  of  being-  prosecuted 
with  the  Rigour  of  the  Law,  by  his  Master,  James 
Mitchell,  of  Elizabeth-Town. — The  N.  Y.  Gazette 
or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , Aug.  6,  1753. 

Run  away  on  the  17th  of  April  last,  from  his  bail 
Joseph  Arney,  living  in  Burlington,  in  New  Jersey, 
An  Englishman  named  Henry  Clark,  of  a middle 
stature,  a smooth  spoken  man,  about  30  years  of 
age,  by  trade  a stocking  weaver,  but  it  is  said  he  now 
keeps  school  in  the  lower  Counties ; he  has  his  wife 
with  him,  of  a tall  slim  stature,  of  a pale  complexion 
and  dull  countenance  ; also  a lusty  boy  about  18  or 
20  months  old  : They  were  in  Philadelphia  about  a 
week  after  he  left  his  bail,  and  went  down  the  river 
towards  Dover,  in  Andrew  Doz’s  shallop,  and  per- 
haps may  have  changed  his  name.  Whoever  takes 
up  said  Henry  Clark,  and  secures  him  in  any  goal, 
so  that  he  may  be  had  again,  shall  have  Forty  Shil- 
lings reward,  or  One  Shilling  per  mile,  if  brought  to 
Philadelphia  or  Burlington  goal  paid  by 

Joseph  Arney. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , Aug.  9,  1753.  No. 

1285. 

Run  away,  on  the  25th  of  July  last,  from  Lawrence 
Debow,  of  Upper  Freehold,  a Welsh  servant  man, 
nam’d  Morgan  Evans,  about  5 foot  8 inches  high, 
and  of  a brown  complexion  ; Had  on,  and  took  with 
him,  an  old  felt  hat,  the  brim  trimm’d,  a homespun 
drugget  coat,  old  brown  jacket,  leather  breeches, 
black  worsted  stockings,  new  shoes,  and  ozenbrigs 
shirt.  Whoever  takes  up  and  secures  said  servant, 


1753]  NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS.  283 

so  that  his  master  may  have  him  again,  shall  have 
Forty  Shillings  reward,  and  reasonable  charges,  paid 
by  Lawrence  Debow. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , Aug.  9,  1753.  No. 
1285. 

Run  away  on  Saturday  the  4th  of  August,  Inst, 
from  John  Kingsland,  of  Bergen  County,  and  Prov- 
ince of  New-Jersey,  an  English  Servant  Man,  named 
William  Priest,  about  5 Foot  6 Inches  high,  20  Years 
old,  thin  visag’d  and  of  a swarthy  Complexion  : Had 
on  when  he  went  away,  a green  nap’d  Jacket,  much 
faded,  Oznabrigs  Shirt,  new  Drugget  Breeches,  and 
carried  a Pair  of  tarry  Duck  Trowsers  with  him,  and 
may  wear  them  over  his  Breeches,  white  ribb’d 
worsted  Stockings,  a Hat,  black  Wig,  and  Shoes  and 
Buckles. 

Whoever  takes  up  and  secures  the  said  Servant, 
so  that  his  Master  may  have  him  again,  shall  have 
Forty  Shillings  Reward  and  all  reasonable  Charges, 
paid  by  ijohn  Kingsland. 

— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , 
Aug.  13,  1753. 

To  be  Sold  on  reasonable  Terms  of  Payment, 

A Lot  of  Ground  on  the  North  Side  of  Little 
Queen-Street,  in  the  City  of  New-York, 
containing  33  Feet  front,  and  70  Feet  back  the 
whole  Breadth  ; it  bounds  easterly  on  the  House  and 
Lot  of  Mr.  John  Ellison.  ....  Any  Person 
inclining  to  purchase  may  apply  to  Jonathan  Hig- 
gins of  Elizabeth  Town,  or  Jonathan  Woodruff  in 


284  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1753 

New  York. — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post 
Boy , Aug.  13,  1753. 

To  be  Sold. 

A Plantation  in  Pilesgrove,  Salem  county,  near 
Richman’s  Mills  now  in  the  occupation  of  Barney 
M’Kinney,  containing  200  acres,  90  whereof  clear’d 
and  under  fence  ; there  is  on  it  a good  frame  dwell- 
ing-house, well-finished,  a large  frame  barn,  and 
stables,  two  orchards,  a large  quantity  of  meadow 
ground  made,  and  under  fence,  and  more  may  be 
made  ; a fine  spring  close  by  the  dwelling-house,  and 
water  in  every  field  on  said  plantation.  For  terms 
of  sale  apply  to  Samuel  Purveyance,  next  door  to 
Mr.  George  Mifflin,  Junior,  between  Chestnut  and 
Walnut  streets,  in  Front  street  Philadelphia. — The 
Pennsylvania  Gazette , Aug.  16,  1753.  No.  1286. 

Princetown,  August  14,  1753. 

Supposed  to  be  stolen  last  night,  from  Nathaniel 
Fitzrandolph,  of  Prince  Town,  in  New  Jersey,  A sor- 
rel pacing  gelding,  about  13  hands  and  a half  high, 
six  years  old,  branded  with  W on  the  left  thi^h,  has 
several  uncommon  features  on  both  sides  of  his  neck, 
a short  bob  tail.  Whoever  secures  the  thief  and 
horse,  shall  have  Three  Pounds  reward,  paid  by 

Nathaniel  Fitzrandolph, 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , Aug.  16,  1753. 

No.  1286. 

New-York,  August  20.  Captain  Clark  from  Phila- 
delphia, informs  us,  That  on  Friday  the  10th  Instant, 
off  of  Barnagat,  he  fell  in  with  a clean  white-bottom’d 
Sloop  of  about  70  Tons,  with  a Dutch  Jack  flying  at 


1753]  NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS.  S85 

her  Mast  Head  : She  appear’d  full  of  Men,  who  had 
all  Caps,  and  small  Trowsers  on:  They  hail’d  Capt. 
Clark,  and  ask’d  him  how  New-York  bore,  and  then 
order’d  him  to  run  under  their  Lee,  but  he  observing 
they  had  no  Guns  out,  took  no  farther  Notice  of 
their  Orders,  but  kept  his  Course,  whereupon  they 
left  him.  They  had  six  Ports  of  a Side,  and  were 
standing  to  the  South  East,  close  hawl,  the  Wind 
South. — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , 
Aug.  20,  1753. 

To  be  Sold,  by  Way  of  public  Vendue,  on  Thurs- 
day the  1 8th  Day  of  October  next,  by  Jeremiah  S til- 
well,  in  Upper  Freehold. 

AVery  good  Plantation,  containing  400  Acres, 
about  one  half  cleared,  and  some  very  good 
Meadow,  and  a good  Orchard  ; a good  Dwelling 
House  40  Feet  long,  and  30  Feet  wide,  and  two 
Story  high,  a good  Kitchen  and  Cellar/and  a good 
large  Barn.  The  Conditions  of  Sale  to  be  known  at 
said  Time  and  Place. 

Jeremiah  Stilwell. 

N.  B.  The  above  Plantation  formerly  belonged  to 
Richard  Stephens,  Esq. — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the 
Weekly  Post  Boy , Aug.  20,  1753. 

RUN  away  from  William  Curnegee,  of  Bed- 
minster,  in  the  County  of  Somerset,  and 
Province  of  New-Jersey,  the  12th  Instant  August,  A 
High  Dutch  Servant  Man  named  Hendrick  Krop,  a 
Stocking- Weaver  by  Trade,  aged  between  30  and  40 
years,  about  5 Foot  high,  short  thin  blackish  Hair, 
had  a Scar  on  the  first  Joint  of  his  Middle-finger  next 


286 


NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [ 1 75 3 


the  Hand : Had  on  when  he  went  away,  a bluish  col- 
our’d Coat  with  red  Lining,  Mohair  Buttons  and 
short-waisted,  a white  double-breasted  Blanketing 
Jacket,  a Pair  of  blue  Breeches,  white  Stockings,  old  1 
Calf-Skin  Shoes,  and  a black  Velvet  Stock  about  his 
N eck  with  Brass  Clasps  : Any  Person  who  shall  secure 
the  said  Servant  so  that  his  Master  may  have  him 
again,  shall  have  Forty  Shillings  Reward,  and  all 
reasonable  Charges  paid,  by  me 

William  Curnegee. 

— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy, 
Aug.  27,  1753. 

BROKE  out  of  the  Goal  of  the  County  of 
Middlesex,  in  Perth-Amboy,  on  Sunday  the 
Nineteenth  Instant  at  Night,  the  three  Prisoners 
following,  who  made  their  Escapes  from  the  said 
Goal,  to  wit,  Benjamin  Corle,  committed  for  a Riot 
and  Breach*  of  the  King’s  Peace  ; Lawrence  Ruth, 
and  Samuel  Cole,  Prisoners  for  Debt.  The  said 
Benjamin  Corle  is  a tall  slim  Man,  of  a black  Com- 
plexion, with  lank  black  Hair,  between  forty  and  fifty 
Years  of  Age:  Had  on  when  he  made  his  Escape,  a 
light  blue  Homespun  Cloth  Coat,andLinnen  Breeches. 
Lawrence  Ruth,  is  a middle  sized  Man  of  a dark 
Complexion,  the  Hair  of  his  right  Eye  Brow  is  grey; 

Had  on  when  he  made  his  Escape,  a brown  Camblet 
Coat  lin’d  with  yellow  Double  fold  Stuff,  a brown 
Camblet  Jacket,  and  blue  Cloth  Breeches,  and  wears 
a Wig  or  Cap,  is  by  Trade  a Shoemaker,  and  between 
thirty  and  forty  Years  of  Age.  Samuel  Cole  is  a 
well  set  lusty  Man,  of  a dark  Complexion,  between 
forty  and  fifty  Years  of  Age,  wears  generally  a blue 


1753] 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


287 


surtoot  Coat,  with  a Cape  to  it.  Whoever  takes  up 
and  secures  the  said  Prisoners,  so  they  may  be  had 
again,  shall  have  Nine  Pounds  Reward,  or  Three 
Pounds  for  either  of  them  taken  up  and  secured  as 
aforesaid,  and  reasonable  Charges,  paid  by 
Perth-Amboy,  August  20,  1753. 

William  Deare,  Sheriff. 

— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , 
Aug.  27,  1753. 

A FEW  Copies  of  a Map  of  Pennsylvania,  New- 
Jersey , New-York , and  the  Three  Lower 
Counties  on  Delaivare , by  Lewis  Evans,  are  to  be  sold 
at  the  New-Printing-Office,  in  Beaver-Street , New- 
York  ; or  by  the  Author  in  Arch-street , and  at  the  New- 
Printing-  Office,  in  Market-street,  Philadelphia.  Price 
of  the  colour’d  Ones,  on  superfine  Writing-paper, 
Two  Dollars  ; and  of  the  plain  Ones,  on  Printing- 
paper,  One  Dollar  each. — The  N.  Y,  Gazette  or  the 
Weekly  Post  Boy,  Aug.  27,  1753. 

Notice  is  hereby  given  to  those  who  have  occasion 
to  transport  themselves  or  goods,  from  Philadelphia 
to  New  York,  That  Patrick  Cowan,  master  of  two 
commodious  stage-boats,  gives  his  attendance  twice 
a week,  at  the  Crooked  Billet  wharff,  Viz.  on  Wed- 
nesdays and  Saturdays,  in  order  to  receive  passen- 
gers, or  goods  for  Burlington.  That  Jonathan  Thomas, 
at  Burlington,  has  an  exceeding  good  stage  waggon, 
well  fitted,  which  will  proceed  with  said  passengers 
and  goods  to  Amboy  on  Mondays  and  Thursdays, 
and  that  a very  convenient  stage-boat,  kept  by  Daniel 
0 Bryan,  at  Amboy,  will  be  always  ready  to  receive 


288  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [l/53 

them,  and  carry  them  immediately  to  New  York, 
without  any  loss  of  time.  Those  inclining  to  encour- 
age this  undertaking,  may  depend  on  the  quickest 
dispatch,  and  best  usage,  from  their  humble  servants 
Jonathan  Thomas,  Patrick  Cowan,  and  Daniel  O 
Bryan. — The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , Aug.  30,  j 75 3. 
No.  1288. 

Run  away,  on  the  24th  of  July  last,  from  Fiancis 
Batten,  of  Gloucester  county,  a Welch  servant  man, 
named  Richard  Morgan,  of  a small  stature,  pale 
complexion,  has  a blemish  on  one  eye,  speaks  with 
the  Welch  accent;  Had  on  when  he  went  away,  a 
new  felt  hat,  old  worsted  cap,  new  striped  linsey 
woolsey  jacket,  without  buttons,  two  homespun  shirts, 
leather  breeches,  blue  grey  yarn  stockings,  old  shoes, 
one  of  them  slipt  down  at  the  heel : took  with  him  a 
large  yellow  dog  Whoever  takes  and  secures  said 
Servant,  so  that  his  master  may  have  him  again,  shall 
have  Thirty  Shillings  reward,  paid  by 

Francis  Batten. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , Aug.  30,  1753. 

No.  1288. 

To  be  sold  by  publick  vendue,  on  the  23rd  of  Oc- 
tober next,  on  the  premises,  two  lots  of  land,  lying 
and  being  in  the  city  of  Burlington,  one  of  said  lots 
is  bounded  upon  High-street,  between  the  lots  of 
Thomas  Gardner,  and  that  late  of  Daniel  Smith 
senior,  deceased  ; the  other  is  that  lot  whereon  the 
smith’s  shop  of  Thomas  Rodman,  Esq;  stands  bound- 
ed upon  High  street,  aforesaid,  and  Broad-street,  late 
the  property  of  Sarah  Basnet,  deceased,  and  now  in 


753] 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


289 


the  hands  and  possession  of  Nathaniel  Thomas,  Esq  ; 
administrator,  &c.  and  taken  in  execution  at  the  suit 
of  the  executors  of  Thomas  Shaw,  deceased. 

Samuel  Woodward,  Sheriff. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , Aug.  30,  1753. 

No.  1288. 

New  York,  September  3. 

We  hear  from  Woodbridge  that  on  Wednesday 
last,  a Child  there,  about  two  Years  old,  attempting 
to  climb  up  a Ladder,  which  learfd  against  a Hay 
Stack,  he  unhappily  fell  from  thence  upon  a Scythe 
that  lay  at  Foot  of  it,  and  cut  himself  in  so  terrible  a 
Manner  a cross  the  Thigh,  that  he  died  in  a few  min- 
utes after. — The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , Sept.  6,  1753. 
No.  1289. 

All  persons  indebted  to  the  estate  of  John  Coxe, 
Esq;  late  of  Trenton,  New  Jersey,  deceased,  are  de- 
sired to  pay  the  same  ; And  those  who  have  any  de- 
mands against  said  estate,  are  desired  to  bring  in 
their  accounts,  in  order  to  be  adjusted  by  William 
Coxe,  and  Robert  Lettis  Hooper,  executors. — The 
Pennsylvania  Gazette , Sept.  6,  1753.  No.  1289. 

To  be  sold  by  the  subscriber,  a house  and  lot  of 
land,  situate  at  Prince  Town,  in  the  county  of  Middle- 
sex, containing  three  acres,  subject  to  Five  Pounds  a 
year,  ground  rent,  the  house  is  new,  and  well  finished, 
and  very  convenient  for  a tavern  (one  being  kept  in 
it  now)  or  any  other  publick  business,  being  well  sit- 
uated, and  near  where  the  college  is  to  be  built ; 
there  is  also  a eood  barn  and  stables  on  the  lot,  with 


290  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [ 1 753 

a fine  young  orchard,  of  about  70  bearing  trees  of 
good  fruit,  a good  well  &c.  the  whole  lot  is  good 
mowing  ground,  and  bears  fine  English  grass.  Also 
a lease  of  a lot  of  good  pasture  land,  of  about  nine 
acres  and  a half,  near  the  other  lot,  in  good  fence,  at 
Five  Pounds  Ten  Shillings,  per  annum  rent,  for  six- 
teen years  to  come,  of  said  lease.  Any  person  in- 
clining to  purchase,  the  above  premises,  may  know 
the  terms  by  applying  to  the  subscriber  in  Trenton, 
or  to  Samuel  Horner  in  Prince-town. 

William  Monteer. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , Sept.  6,  1753.  No. 
t 289. 


Philadelphia,  August  23,  1753. 

Run  away  on  the  24th  of  June  last,  from  the  sub- 
scriber, living  near  Trenton,  in  Burlington  county, 
an  Irish  servant  man,  named  Timothy  Linch,  about 
25  years  of  age,  about  five  feet  six  inches  high,  of  a 
reddish  complexion,  inclinable  to  be  freckled,  has  a 
down  look,  talks  very  thick,  with  the  brogue  on  his 
tongue,  and  has  several  scars  on  his  left  lep- : Had 

on  when  he  went  away,  a half  worn  bearskin  coat, 
with  flat  metal  buttons,  an  old  check  shirt,  with  a 
large  patch  on  the  shoulders,  new  ozenbrigs  trowsers, 
thread  stockings,  new  shoes,  an  old  felt  hat,  and  cap. 
Whoever  takes  up  and  secures  said  servant,  so  that 
his  master  may  have  him  again,  shall  have  P'orty 
Shillings  reward,  and  reasonable  charges,  paid  by 

Thomas  Hooton. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , Sept.  6,  1753.  No. 

1289. 


1753] 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


291 


Custom  House,  Philadelphia,  Entered  In. Phoe- 

nix, John  Stevenson  from  Salem. — The  Pennsylvania 
Journal , Sept.  6,  1753.  No.  561. 

New-  York,  September  10.  Last  Week  arrived  at 
Sandy  Hook,  and  is  since  gone  up  to  Amboy,  the 
Brig  Charming  Sally,  Capt.  Heyshaw,  of  this  Port, 
from  Hamburgh,  having  had  a Passage  of  16  Weeks 
from  Land  to  Land,  in  which  they  were  reduced  to 
the  short  Allo  wance  of  a Bisket  a Day  per  Man,  for 
a great  while,  and  in  all  Probability  some  of  them 
would  have  perished,  had  they  not  met  with  a Boston 
Vessel  a few  Weeks  ago,  who  help’d  them  to  a small 
Supply.  The  last  Piece  of  Meat  they  had  was  dress’d 
the  Day  they  got  into  the  Hook. — The  N.  Y.  Gazette 
or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , Sept.  10,  1753. 

RUN  away  from  Thomas  Hay,  of  Chesterfield, 
County  of  Burlington,  on  the  3d  Day  of 
this  Instant,  a Servant  Man,  named  James  Sims,  aged 
about  30  or  40  Years,  between  5 or  6 Feet  high  ; had 
on  when  he  went  away,  a lightish  colour’d  Kersey 
Coat,  a red  jacket  and  Leather  Breeches,  a good 
Pair  of  Shoes  with  pretty  large  Brass  Buckles,  and  a 
Pair  of  Worstead  Stockings,  a half-worn  Beaver  Hat, 
and  a Worstead  Cap  : He  took  with  him  two  Pair  of 
fine  Worstead  Stockings,  two  Silk  Handkerchiefs, 
two  Pair  of  Petticoat  Trowsers,  one  Check  Shirt  and 
one  white  Shirt,  a very  nice  Gun,  powder  Horn  and 
Shot  Bagg,  the  Horn  very  nicely  carv’d,  and  mark’d 
I.  W.  and  a very  remarkable  Knife  with  Wooden 
Handle  ; he’s  of  a dark  Complexion,  with  a large 
Nose,  and  very  much  addicted  to  Liquor.  Whoever 


292  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [ 1 75  3 

takes  up  and  secures  said  Servant,  so  that  his  Mas- 
ter may  have  him  again,  shall  have  Forty  Shillings 
Reward,  and  all  reasonable  Charges  paid  by  me. 

Thomas  Hay. 

— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , 
Sept.  10,  1753. 

To  Be  Sold 

A Good  and  profitable  Plantation,  commodious- 
ly  situated  on  Rariton  River,  in  East  New- 
Jersey,  being  within  a Mile  of  two  good  Markets, 
and  may  easily  be  made  a beautiful  Seat  for  any 
Gentleman  ; the  Dwelling-House  thereon  is  large 
and  well  built,  stands  high  in  a healthy  Situation  on 
a gravelly  Hill,  and  in  its  Prospect,  commands  the 
River,  and  a large  Body  of  fine  Meadows,  with  Rari- 
ton Landing  on  the  one  Hand,  and  New-Brunswick 
on  the  other;  the  Boats  to  and  from  New-York,  &c, 
almost  daily  passing  before  the  Door : the  Barn  and 
Out-Houses  are  shingled  and  in  good  Repair  ; The 
Garden  is  large,  and  the  Orchard  contains  500  Apple 
Trees,  some  grafted,  the  Rest  bearing  good  Winter 
Fruit  fit  for  Cyder  ; there  is  between  the  House  and 
the  River  about  50  Acres  of  Low-Land,  the  chief  of 
which  is  good  English  Meadow,  great  Part  of  which 
may  be  overflow’d  at  proper  Seasons,  from  the 
Springs  and  Brooks  that  lie  about  it:  There  is  a 
sufficient  Quantity  of  Timber  and  Wood  for  all  the 
Uses  of  the  Premisses  ; the  Whole  contains  near  370 
Acres  ; a Lot  of  6 Acres  of  exceeding  good  Salt 
Meadow,  conveniently  situated,  may  be  had  with  the 
same  ; also  a large  and  very  convenient  Brew-House 
may  be  had  with  the  Premises,  being  now  Part  thereof, 


1753] 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


293 


which  is  well  supply’d  with  the  best  of  Water,  its 
Works  are  compleat,  and  now  carried  on,  and  will 
continue  so  to  be  ’till  sold:  The  Title  is  good,  and 
never  was  yet  called  in  Question,  but  has  been 
peaceably  possessed  above  80  Years.  Enquire  of 
Edward  Antill,  living  on  the  Premises,  who  owns 
the  same,  and  will  give  a sufficient  Title  to  any  Pur- 
chaser.— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Tost  Boy , 
Sept.  10,  1753. 

To  be  sold  by  public  vendue,  on  the  23d  of  Octo- 
ber next,  on  the  premises,  two  lots  of  land,  lying  and 
being  in  the  city  of  Burlington,  one  of  said  lots  is 
bounded  by  High  Street,  between  the  lots  of  Thomas 
Gardner,  and  that  late  of  Daniel  Smith,  senior,  de- 
ceased ; the  other  is  that  lot  whereon  the  smith’s 
shop  of  Thomas  Rodman,  Esq.  stands,  bounded 
upon  High  Street,  aforesaid,  and  Broad-street,  late 
the  property  of  Sarah  Basnet,  deceased,  and  now  in 
the  hands  and  possession  of  Nathaniel  Thomas,  Esq  ; 
administrator,  &c,  and  taken  in  execution  at  the  suit 
of  the  executors  of  Thomas  Shaw,  deceased. 

Samuel  Woodward,  sheriff. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , Sept . 13,  1753. 

No.  1 290. 

To  be  sold,  by  Thomas  Cadwalader,1  at  Trenton,  a 
tract  of  land,  of  nine  hundred  acres,  lying  about  a mile 

J Thomas  Cadwalader  was  a son  of  John  Cadwalader,  a native  of  Wales,  who  becom- 
ing a Quaker  came,  at  the  age  of  20,  with  William  Penn  in  1699  to  Philadelphia.  Thomas 
was  b.  in  Philadelphia,  about  1807,  was  educated  at  the  French  Academy,  Philadelphia, 
and  received  a medical  and  surgical  education  in  London.  On  his  return  from  England 
he  soon  acquired  a large  practice  in  Philadelphia.  Removing  to  Trenton,  he  was  named 
its  first  burgess  when  it  was  chartered  as  a borough  in  1746.  In  1750  he  gave  .£500  to 
found  a public  library  in  Trenton.  He  was  a member  of  the  Governor’s  Council,  in 


294 


NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1753 


and  a half  north  of  the  town,  it  will  be  either  disposed 
of  all  together,  or  divided  into  four  equal  parts,  it  is 
exceedingly  well  timbered  and  watered  by  several 
fine  streams,  one  of  which  the  Trenton  mills  stand 
on,  it  has  also  very  good  conveniences  either  for  a 
grist-mill,  forge  or  saw-mill.  Three  hundred  acres, 
and  upwards  of  it,  will  make  extraordinary  good 
meadow,  the  timber  is  very  fit  for  ship-building,  or 
scantling  for  houses,  and  lies  very  convenient,  near 
the  river  Delaware,  for  transporting  to  Philadelphia, 
large  quanties  of  cordwood. 

Also  a large  commodious,  corner  brick-house,  two 
stories  high,  well  finished,  with  three  good  rooms  on 
the  lower  floor,  and  a large  entry  through  it,  four 
good  rooms  on  the  upper  floor,  and  four  lodging 
rooms  plaistered,  in  the  uppermost  story,  with  good 
cellars,  stone  kitchen,  garden  and  stables,  situate  in 
Queen  street,  in  a very  publick  part  of  the  town  of 
Trenton,  very  convenient  for  any  publick  business. 

Likewise  twenty-five  acres  of  pasture  land,  on  the 
upper  end  of  Oueen-street  in  Trenton,  Sixteen  acres 
of  it  cleared,  and  in  good  fence,  with  a good  new  barn, 
twenty-six  feet  by  twenty. 

And  five  acres  and  a half  of  excellent  meadow, 
well  cleared,  and  in  good  fence,  in  Trenton. 

Any  persons  who  have  an  inclination  to  purchase 
the  above-mentioned  premises,  may  have  a reason- 

Pennsylvania,  1755-74.  He  was  outspoken  in  his  denunciation  of  the  Stamp  Act  in  1765. 
He  died  Nov.  18, 1779,  in  his  73d  year.  He  m.  Hannah  Lambert,  of  Trenton.  Issue:  1. 
Martha,  m.  Brig-.  Gen.  John  Dagworthy;  2.  Lambert,  Colonel  in  the  Revolution,  and 
member  of  Congress,  1784-87,  1789-91,  1793-95;  d.  Sept.  13,  1823;  3.  John,  Brigadier- 
General  in  the  Revolution,  d.  1796,  aged  44  ; 4.  Mary,  m.  Maj.-Gen.  Philemon  Dickinson  ; 
5.  Rebecca,  Gem  Dickinson’s  second  wife;  6.  Elizabeth,  d.  unm.;  7.  Margaret,  m.  Brig. 
Gen.  Samuel  Meredith. — Cooley's  Early  Settlers  of  Trenton. 


1753]  NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS.  295 

able  time  allowed  for  the  payments. — The  Pennsyl- 
vania Gazette , Sept.  13,  1753.  No.  1290. 

To  be  sold, 

A tract  of  land,  in  Morris  county,  in  the  Western 
division  of  New  Jersey,  about  4 miles  from  the  river 
Delaware,  containing  1250  acres,  with  the  usual  al- 
lowance ; late  the  property  of  William  Biddle.  It  is 
divided  in  four  parts,  each  containing  312  acres  and 
a.  half,  with  good  conveniency  for  meadows,  is  well 
wooded  and  watered.  Any  person  inclining  to  pur- 
chase the  whole,  or  part,  may  apply  to  Samuel  Smith, 
William  Lawrence  or  Joshua  Fisher,  in  Philadelphia. 
— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , Sept.  13,  1753.  No. 
1 290. 

Joseph  Borden’s  stage  boat,  Nicholas  George, 
master,  gives  her  attendance,  at  the  Crooked-billet 
wharff,  in  Philadelphia,  every  Monday  and  Tuesday 
as  formerly  ; and  his  shallop,  Charles  Taylor,  master, 
attends  at  the  same  place,  every  Friday  and  Satur- 
day ; and  the  stage  waggon  shall  proceed  from  Bor- 
dentown  to  Amboy  ferry  on  Mondays  and  Tuesdays. 

Joseph  Borden,  jun.  Joseph  Richards. — The  Penn- 
sylvania Gazette , Sept.  13,  1753.  No.  1290. 

Run  away  from  Nottingham  township,  Burlington 
county,  An  Irish  servant  man,  named  William  Moore, 
he  called  himself  by  trade  a butcher,  about  5 feet 
and  a half  high  : Had  on  when  he  went  away,  A 
brown  homespun  coat,  towed  or  striped  like  in  the 
cross,  an  old  felt  hat,  old  shoes,  olive  stockings,  and 
ozenbrigs  shirt  and  trowsers  ; he  stoops  much  in  his 


296  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1753 

walk,  has  black  hair,  if  grown,  a thin  visage,  inclines 
to  sore  eyes,  and  talks  middling  good  English. 
Whoever  takes  him  up,  so  as  he  may  be  had  again, 
shall  have  Thirty  Shillings  reward,  and  reasonable 
charges,  paid  by 

Philip  Welsh. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , Sept.  13,  1753. 
No.  1290. 

WHEREAS  a certain  Note  of  Hand,  or  Re- 
ceipt for  Two  Hundred  Pounds,  New- 
York  Money,  was,  about  the  19th  of  August,  1751, 
given  by  Samuel  Moores,  of  Woodbridge  in  Middle- 
sex County,  to  Nicholas  Lake  of  Shrewsbery,  in 
Monmouth  County  ; which  Note  was  witnessed  by 
John  Redford  and  John  Brown,  and  the  Money  paid 
by  said  Lake,  on  the  Account  of  Thomas  Akin,  of 
Perth-Amboy ; and  inasmuch  as  the  said  Sum  was 
afterwards  accounted  for  with  said  Akin,  who  was 
thereupon  to  deliver  up  that  Note  to  said  Moores, 
which  he  has  nevertheless  delayed  to  do,  tho’  frequent- 
ly demanded  : This  is  to  request  any  Persons,  that 

may  know  any  Thing  of  said  Note,  or  may  have  it  in 
Possession,  that  they  make  it  known,  with  their 
Demands  upon  it,  if  any  they  have,  that  they  may 
be  convinced,  it  can  be  of  no  UseN  to  them  ; and 
that  if  they  have  been  deceived  with  it,  they  may 
seek  a timely  Remedy  ; since  they  will  find  the  same 
ought  to  have  been  long  ago  given  up  to  me. 

Samuel  Moores. 

— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , 
Sept.  1 7,  1753. 


1753] 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


2Q7 

Custom  House,  Philadelphia,  Entered  In,  Schooner 
Mary  and  Hannah,  Wm.  Coose,  from  Salem. — The 
Pennsylvania  Journal,  Sept.  20,  1753.  No.  563. 

Custom-House,  Philadelphia,  Inward  Entries,  Sloop 
Salisbury,  William  Burrows  from  Salem. — The  Penn- 
sylvania Gazette , Sept.  20,  1753.  No.  1291. 

Philadelphia , September  20.  Last  Week  three 
Persons  were  drown’d  in  Delaware  River : and  on 
Tuesday  a young  Gentleman,  Passenger  with  Capt. 
Smith  from  Bristol,  fell  over  Board,  and  was  drown’d, 
a little  above  Red-bank. — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the 
Weekly  Post  Boy,  Sept.  24,  1753. 

Custom-House,  Philadelphia.  Entred  Inwards. 
Coose  from  Salem,  Burrows  from  Salem. — The  N. 
Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy,  Sept.  24,  1753. 

Burlington  Stage-Waggon  reviv’d. 
V’OTICE  is  hereby  given  to  all  Persons  that 
_ N are  inclinable  to  transport  themselves, 
Goods,  Wares,  and  Merchantdize,  from  the  City  of 
New- York,  to  the  City  of  Philadelphia,  that  they 
may  have  the  Opportunity  of  obliging  themselves 
that  Way,  twice  a Week,  Wind  and  Weather  permit- 
ting: Daniel  O’ Bryant,  with  a commodious  Stage 
Boat,  well  fitted  for  that  Purpose,  will  attend  at  the 
White-Hall  Slip,  near  the  Half-Moon  Battery,  at  the 
House  of  Scots  Johnny,  in  New-York,  in  order  to 
receive  Goods  and  Passengers,  on  Saturday  and 
Wednesday  ; and  on  Mondays  and  Thursdays  will  set 
out,  and  proceed  with  them  to  Perth-Amboy  Ferry, 


298  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [ 1753 

where  there  is  kept  a good  Stage -Waggon  ready  to 
receive  them,  who  will  on  Tuesday  and  Friday 
Mornings,  set  out  and  proceed  with  them  to  the 
House  of  John  Predmore  in  Cranberry,  where  there 
is  kept  a fresh  Set  of  Horses  and  Driver,  who 
immediately  proceeds  with  them  the  same  Day,  to 
the  House  of  Jonathan  Thomas,  in  Burlington, 
where  there  is  kept  a commodious  Stage-Boat  wait- 
ing for  their  Reception,  Patrick  Cowan,  Master,  who 
immediately  sets  out  and  proceeds  with  them  to  the 
City  of  Philadelphia. 

John  Predmore, 
Daniel  O’Brian. 

— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , 
Sept.  24,  1753. 

Custom  House,  Philadelphia,  Inward  Entries. 
Schooner  Swallow,  James  Savage,  from  Salem. — 
The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , Sept.  27,  1753.  No.  1292. 

To  be  sold,  the  mills  and  plantation  of  Nathaniel 
Ware,  Esq;  6 miles  above  Trenton,  on  the  river 
Delaware,  West  Jersey;  the  plantation  contains 
about  400  acres,  200  of  which  is  clear’d,  the  land  is 
of  easy  culture,  and  the  soil  extremely  natural  to  all 
sorts  of  grain,  wheat  being  neither  liable  to  be  de- 
voured by  Insects,  nor  heav’d  out  by  the  frosts. 
There  are  twTo  good  dwelling-houses,  a large  barn,  cart- 
house,  smoke-house,  cooper’s  shop,  a neatgarden,  with 
cedar  poles,  a young  bearing  orchard,  and  the  whole 
under  good  fence.  The  mill  house  is  of  stone,  60  feet 
in  length,  24  in  breadth,  is  an  over-shot,  has  two  pair 
stones,  the  boulting  mill,  &c.  all  go  by  water  ; it  is 


1753]  NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS.  299 

» 

well  accustom’d,  and  known  to  make  as  good  work 
as  the  best  mills  in  the  Jerseys  ; it  may  always  com- 
mand wheat  enough,  and  is  conveniently  situated  for 
New-York  or  Philadelphia  markets,  being  less  than 
30  miles  of  good  waggon  road  from  Brunswick  ; 
and  boats,  carrying  fifty  or  sixty  casks,  may  load  at 
the  mill  door  for  Philadelphia.  Whoever  inclines  to 
purchase  the  same,  either  the  whole  or  part,  may 
apply  to  William  Clayton,  or  William  Pidgeon,  in 
Trenton,  and  be  by  them  inform’d  of  the  title  and 
conditions  of  sale. — The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , Sept. 
2 7,  1753-  No.  1292. 

To  be  sold  by  publick  vendue  on  the  premises,  in 
Pladdonfield,  Gloucester  county,  on  the  13th  of  Oc- 
tober next,  to  begin  at  ten  o’clock  in  the  forenoon, 
A brick  house,  two  stories  high,  well  finished,  two 
rooms  on  the  lower  floor,  and  three  on  the  upper, 
with  a good  cellar  under  the  whole  : Also  a lot  of 
ground  belonging  thereto,  containing  about  six  acres 
and  a quarter,  about  two  acres  of  orchard,  with  a 
very  good  spring  at  one  end  of  the  lot,  and  a well  of 
good  water  at  the  house.  Any  person  inclining  to 
view  the  place  before  the  day  of  sale,  may  apply  to 
Daniel  Hilman,jun.  living  at  Billingsport,  or  to  Dan- 
iel Hilman,  sen.  living  within  two  miles  of  the  prem- 
ises, and  know  the  conditions. — The  Pennsylvania 
Gazette , Sept.  2/,  1753.  No.  1292. 

Run  away  from  his  bail  in  April  last,  A man 
named  Jonathan  Smith,  about  40  years  of  age,  near 
6 feet  high,  pretends  to  be  a Carpenter  by  trade,  of 
a dark  complexion,  and  lived  in  the  Jerseys,  near 


300  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1753 

• 

Salem  ; it  is  said  he  was  well  dressed  when  he  went 
off.  Whoever  takes  up  said  Smith,  and  brings  him 
to  his  bail,  or  the  Sheriff  of  Newcastle,  shall  have 
Six  Pounds  reward,  and  reasonable  charges,  paid  by 
Thomas  Canby,  in  Wilmington. — The  Pennsylvania 
Gazette , Sept.  27,  1753.  No.  1292. 

All  persons  indebted  to  the  estate  of  John  Coxe, 
Esq  ; late  of  Trenton,  New  Jersey,  deceased,  are 
desired  to  pay  the  same  : And  those  who  have  any 

demands  against  said  estate,  are  desired  to  bring  in 
their  accounts,  in  order  to  be  adjusted  by  William 
Coxe,  and  Robert  Lettis  Hooper,  executors. — The 
Pennsylvania  Gazette , Sept.  27,  1753.  No.  1292. 

Run  away  from  Nottingham  township,  Burlington 
County,  An  Irish  servant  man,  named  William 
Moore,  he  called  himself  by  trade,  a butcher,  about 
5 feet  and  a half  high  : Had  on  when  he  wentaway, 

A brown  homespun  coat,  towed  or  striped  like  in  the 
cross,  old  felt  hat,  old  shoes,  olive  stockings,  and 
ozenbrigs  shirt  and  trowsers  ; he  stoops  much  in  his 
walk,  has  black  hair,  if  grown,  a thin  visage,  inclines 
to  sore  eyes,  and  talks  middling  good  English. 
Whoever  takes  him  up,  so  as  he  may  be  had  again, 
shall  have  Thirty  Shillings  reward,  and  reasonable 
charges  paid  by  Philip  Welsh. — The  Pennsylvania 
Gazette , Sept.  27,  1753.  No.  1292. 

To  be  sold  by 
Robert  Lettis  Hooper 

Now  living  at  Trenton,  in  the  province  of  New 
Jersey.  A grist-mill,  with  two  pairs  of  stones,  and 
three  bolting  boxes,  with  good  cloaths  therein  ; the 


1753] 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


301 


said  bolting  works  all  go  by  water  with  coggs  and 
rounds,  except  the  country  cloaths ; the  meal  is 
hoisted  up  by  water  in  a large  box  ; the  mill-house 
50  by  33,  with  good  conveniences  for  storing  of 
wheat.  Also  a good  stone  dwelling  house,  with 
three  rooms  on  a floor,  and  a large  stone  kitchen  to 
the  same  ; and  another  stone  house,  with  two  rooms 
on  a floor,  and  a large  cooper’s  shop  joining  to  the 
house,  lying  near  the  mills,  and  both  houses  well 
finished  and  convenient  for  merchant  and  cooper. 
Also  a fulling-mill,  dwelling-house  and  shop,  with  all 
the  tools  and  utensils  belonging  to  a fulling-mill  and 
dye-house  ; both  of  said  mills  lies  on  Millstone  river, 
opposite  to  each  other,  at  Rockey-hill,  in  the  county 
of  Somerset  and  province  of  East-Jersey  ; their  dams, 
houses  and  works  are  all  compleatly  finished,  and 
the  buyer  may  have  from  50  to  100  acres  of  very 
good  land,  with  a fine  piece  of  meadow  and  timber, 
joining  to  the  premises.  The  whole  will  be  sold 
together  or  separate  as  may  best  suit  the  buyer. — 
The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , Sept.  27,  1753.  No.  1292. 

Perth-Amboy,  August  20,  1753. 

Broke  out  of  the  goal  of  the  county  of  Middlesex, 
in  Perth-Amboy,  on  Sunday,  the  19th  inst ; at  night, 
the  three  following  men,  who  made  their  escapes 
from  said  goal,  viz,  Benjamin  Corle,  committed  for 
a riot  and  breach  of  the  King’s  peace  ; Lawrence 
Ruth  and  Samuel  Cole,  prisoners  for  debt.  The 
said  Benjamin  Corle  is  a tall  slim  man,  of  a black 
complexion,  with  lank  black  hair,  between  40  and  50 
years  of  age:  Had  on  when  he  made  his  escape,  A 

light  blue  homespun  cloth  coat  and  linnen  breeches, 


302  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1753 

The  said  Lawrence  Ruth  is  a middle  sized  man,  of  a 
dark  complexion,  the  hair  of  his  right  eye  brow  is 
grey : Had  on  when  he  made  his  escape,  A brown 
camblet  coat,  lined  with  yellow  double-stuff,  brown 
camblet  jacket,  blue  cloth  breeches,  and  wears  a wig 
or  cap  ; by  trade  a shoemaker,  and  between  30  and 
40  years  of  age.  Samuel  Cole  is  a well-set,  lusty 
man,  of  a dark  Complexion,  between  40  and  50 
years  of  age,  wears  generally  a blue  surtout  coat, 
with  a cape  to  it.  Whoever  takes  up  and  secures 
the  said  prisoners  so  that  they  may  be  had  again, 
shall  have  Nine  Pounds  reward,  or  Three  Pounds  for 
each  of  them,  taken  up  and  secur’d  as  aforesaid,  and 
reasonable  charges,  paid  by 

William  Deare,  Sheriff. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , Sept.  27,  1753.  No. 

1 292. 

Custom  House,  Phila,  Entered  In.  Schooner  Swal- 
low, James  Savage  from  Salem. — The  Pennsylvania 
Jonr7ial , Sept.  27,  1753.  No.  564. 

To  be  Sold,  by  Elizabeth  Brasher,  Widow  of  Cap- 
tain Abraham  Brasher,  late  of  the  City  of  New  York. 

A House  and  Lott  of  Ground,  at  Bound  Brook, 
East-New-Jersey,  joining  on  the  main  Road, 
containing  about  one  Half  of  an  Acre,  with  twelve 
Apple  and  two  Pear  Trees,  very  convenient  for  a 
Tradesman  or  Shop-keeper. — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or 
the  Weekly  Post  Boy , Oct.  1,  1753. 

RUN  away  in  the  Night  of  the  20th  of  Sept- 
ember last,  from  Robert  Milburn,  Black- 
Smith,  in  Elizabeth-Town,  in  the  Eastern  Division  of 


1753]  NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS.  303 

the  Province  of  New-Jersey,  two  Servant  Men,  both 
Black-Smiths  by  Trade ; the  one  named  Samuel 
Cooper,  born  in  Old-England,  about  30  Years  of  Age, 
of  a dark  Complexion,  about  5 Feet  7 Inches  ; had 
on  when  he  went  away,  a Swanskin  Jacket,  Tow 
Shirt,  Ozenbrigs  Trowsers,  and  a Pair  of  Brass  Buck- 
les in  his  Shoes,  with  a half-worn  Beaver  Hat,  and  is 
very  much  given  to  swearing.  The  other  named 
Richard  Brown,  born  in  Ireland  ; had  on  when  he 
went  away,  a blue  Broadcloth  Coat,  with  a small  Vel- 
vet Collar  and  Metal  Buttons,  a ligfht  colour’d  Ger- 
man  Serge  Jacket  with  Metal  Buttons,  an  Oznabrigs 
Shirt,  Tow  Cloth  Trowsers,  new  Shoes,  and  small 
Brass  Buckles,  is  about  5 Feet  8 Inches  high,  a strong 
made  Fellow,  with  a remarkable  brown  Spot  on  his 
right  Cheek;  took  along  with  them  two  Guns  with 
Ammunition  ; had  likewise  a large  Dog,  spotted 
brown  and  white,  and  its  suppos’d  they  have  taken 
with  them  two  or  three  Wiggs.  Whoever  takes  up, 
and  secures  both  or  either  of  said  Servants,  shall  re- 
ceive for  the  first  describ’d,  viz.  Cooper,  Forty  Shil- 
lings, and  for  the  other,  viz.  Brown,  Three  Pounds 
Reward,  and  all  reasonable  Charges,  paid  by  me 

Robert  Milburn. 

— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , 
Oct.  1,  1753. 

Custom  House,  Philada.  Outwards  Sloop  Salis- 
bury, William  Burrows  to  Salem. — The  Pennsylvania 
Journal , Oct.  4,  1753.  No.  565. 

Custom  House,  Philadelphia,  Cleared  Sloop  Sab 


304  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1753 

isbury,  William  Burrows  to  Salem. — The  Pennsylvania 
Gazette , Oct.  4,  1753.  No.  1293. 

To  be  sold  by 
Benjamin  Smith 

A grist  mill,  in  Amwell,  Hunterdon  county,  in 
West-Jersey,  extraordinary  well  situate  for  custom, 
about  four  miles  eastward  from  the  river  Delaware 
on  York  road,  26  from  Brunswick,  and  16  from  Tren- 
ton ; a dwelling  house,  stable  and  about  56  acres  of 
extraordinary  good  land;  ’tis  well  situate  for  a store, 
considering  what  great  advantages  may  be  had  in 
creating  trade  and  custom  by  purchasing  wheat,  they 
being  in  good  order  for  merchant  work,  the  boults 
going  by  water,  and  capable  to  grind  large  quantities 
more  than  the  country  work.  Likewise  about  30 
acres  of  land  in  Trenton,  bounded  on  the  west  by 
land  of  Thomas  Lawrence,  Esq  ; Elijah  Bond  and 
John  Holden  ; on  the  north  by  land  of  John  Allen  ; 
on  the  east  by  land  of  Isaac  Conerow  and  Joseph 
Green  ; on  the  south  by  land  of  Cornelius  Drude. 
A stone  house  in  Trenton,  two  stories  high,  with  a 
lot  fronting  Oueen  street,  120  feet  convenient  to 
make  two  tenements  ; likewise  sundry  lots  fronting 
King  street,  and  sundry  lots  fronting  Queen  street. 
Also  the  plantation  whereon  Thomas  Leant  now 
dwells,  in  Hanover  township,  Burlington  county, 
containing  near  500  acres,  a considerable  quantity 
of  it  is  meadow  ; it  is  at  present  under  a lease  to  the 
said  Leant.  Any  person  inclining  to  purchase,  ma/ 
have  the  greatest  part  of  the  purchase  money  on  in- 
terest ; if  required,  giving  security. 


1753] 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


305 


To  Be  Sold, 

By  James  Parker, 


WO  Lots  of  Land  (the  Title  indisputable)  sit- 


uate at  the  Fresh  Ponds,  in  the  County  of 
Middlesex,  and  Province  of  New-Jersey,  seven  Miles 
from  New-Brunswick,  and  five  from  South  River 
Landing;  one  bounded  on  Duncan  Campbell  and 
William  Cheesman,  containing  280  Acres,  the  other 
bounded  by  said  Campbell  and  John  Ireland,  contain- 
ing 210  Acres;  both  well  timber’d  and  water’d. 
Whoever  inclines  to  purchase  either  of  said  Lots, 
may  apply  to  Andrew  Johnston,  Esq  ; at  Perth- 
Amboy,  or  said  Parker  in  New- York. — The  N.  Y. 
Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , Oct.  8,  1753. 


Last  Saturday  arrived  at  Sandy  Hook,  his  Majes- 
ty’s Ship  the  Arundel,  Capt.  Lloyd,  Commander, 
having  on  board  his  Excellency  Sir  Danvers  Os- 
borne, Bart.  Captain  General  and  Governor  in  Chief 
of  this  Province. — The  Pennsylvania  Journal , Oct . 1 1, 
1 7 5 3.  Numb.  566. 

Custom-House,  Philadelphia,  Entered  Ir-Schocner 
Mercy,  William  Dolliver,  from  Salem  Cleared 
Schooner  Swallow,  James  Savage,  to  Sah  m — The 
Pennsylvania  Journal,  Oct.  11,  1753.  Numb.  566. 

A Sober  person  that  comes  well  recommenced  for 
keeping  of  school,  may  have  encouragement  in  that 
calling,  by  applying  to  William  Foster  of  Evesham 
township,  Burlington  county,  in  New-Jersey. — The 
Pennsylvania  Gazette,  Oct.  11,  1753.  Numb.  \ 294. 


New  York,  October,  8 


20 


3 06  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [ 1 753 

Philadelphia,  Oct.  1 1 , 1753. 

Run  away  on  the  30th  of  last  month,  from  Patrick 
Porter,  living  in  Chester  township,  Burlington  coun- 
ty, in  West-New-Jersey,  An  Irish  servant  man, 
named  John  Hanglin,  about  26  years  of  age,  a mid- 
dle sized  fellow,  pock-marked,  speaks  good  English : 
Had  on,  and  took  with  him,  Two  pair  of  trowsers,  one 
pair  check,  the  other  ozenbrigs,  check  shirt,  a kind  of 
striped  linen  jacket,  half-worn  castor  hat,  new  blue 
grey  worsted  stockings,  good  strong  shoes,  with  brass 
buckles,  wears  his  own  black  hair,  but  took  a white 
short  cut  wig,  and  had  Seven  Pounds  in  cash.  He 
had  been  almost  eight  years  in  the  country,  and 
served  his  time  with  Enoch  Roberts,  of  the  township 
aforesaid,  about  four  years  ago,  and  has  since  been  a 
servant  to  Thomas  Jarrard  at  Greenwich,  in  Glouces- 
ter county.  Whoever  takes  up  and  secures  said  ser- 
vant, so  as  his  master  mav  have  him  again,  shall  have 
Three  Pounds  reward,  and  reasonable  charges,  paid 

hy 

Patrick  Porter 

N.  B.  It  is  supposed  he  will  change  his  apparel. 
All  masters  of  vessels  are  forbid  to  carry  him  off  at 
their  peril. — The  Pennsylvania  Gazette,  Oct.  11,  1753. 
Numb.  1294. 

To  be  sold  by  publick  vendue  on  the  premises,  in 
Haddonfield,  Gloucester  county,  on  the  13th  of  Octo- 
ber inst.  to  begin  at  ten  o’clock  in  the  forenoon,  A 
brick  house,  two  stories  high,  well  finished,  two 
rooms  on  the  lower  floor,  and  three  on  the  upper, 
with  a good  cellar  under  the  whole  : Also  a lot  of 

ground  belonging  thereto  containing  about  six  acres 


1753] 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


307 


and  a quarter,  about  two  acres  of  orchard,  with  a 
very  good  spring  at  one  end  of  the  lot,  and  a well  of 
good  water  at  the  house.  Any  person  inclining  to 
view  the  place  before  the  day  of  sale  may  apply  to 
Daniel  Hilman,  jun.  living  at  Billingsport,  or  to  Dan- 
iel Hilman,  sen.  living  within  two  miles  of  the  prem- 
ises, and  know  the  conditions. — The  Pennsylvania 
Gazette , Oct.  11,  1753.  Numb.  1294. 

To  be  sold, 

A tract  of  land,  in  Morris  county,  in  the  Western- 
division  of  New  Jersey,  about  4 miles  from  the  river 
Delaware,  containing  1250  acres,  with  the  usual  al- 
lowance ; late  the  property  of  William  Biddle:  It  is 

divided  in  four  parts,  each  containing  312  acres  and 
a half,  with  good  conveniency  for  meadows,  is  well 
wooded  and  watered.  Any  person  inclining  to  pur- 
chase the  whole  or  part,  may  apply  to  Samuel  Smith, 
William  Lawrence  or  Joshua  Fisher,  in  Philadelphia. 
— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , Oct.  11,  1753.  Numb. 
1294. 

Custom  House , Philadelphia.  Inward  Entries. 
Dolliver  from  Salem. — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the 
Weekly  Post  Boy,  Oct.  15,  1753. 

To  Be  Sold  at  public  Vendue,  on  Wednesday  the 
24th  Day  of  October,  Inst,  at  two  o’Clock  in  the 
Afternoon,  on  the  Premises ; 

A Plantation  in  the  Township  of  Hanover,  in  the 
County  of  Morris,  in  East-New-Jersey,  con- 
taining 150  Acres  of  Land;  there  is  on  it  a good 
Dwelling  House  and  Barn,  a young  Orchard,  and  a 


308  new  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1753 

sufficient  Quantity  of  Meadow  Ground,  the  chief  Part 
of  which  is  cleared  ; the  said  Plantation  is  now  in  the 
Possession  of  Paul  Leonard,  by  whom  a good  Title 
will  be  given  for  the  same. — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or 

o 

the  Weekly  Post  Boy , Oct.  15,  1753. 

Amwell,  October  4th,  1753. 

LAST  Night  was  stolen  from  Peter  Tilts  and 
Harmon  Snider,  two  Mares,  one  black,  about 
14  Hands  high,  white  down  her  Face,  a short  Mane 
and  Fore  Top,  the  off  hind  Foot  white  almost  up  to  the 
Ham,  is  shod  before,  with  old  Shoes,  paces  and  trots, 
has  neither  Brand  nor  Ear  Mark.  The  other  a dark 
brown.  14  Hands  high  or  something  better,  has  a 
Star  in  her  Forehead,  a little  White  above  the  Hoof 
on  the  off  Foot,  her  Mane  is  trim’d  up  with  a Comb, 
paces  pretty  fast,  branded  on  the  near  Thigh  with  the 
Letter  C pretty  dull,  is  shod  before.  Whoever  takes 
up  and  secures  the  said  Mares,  shall  have  three 
Pounds  for  both,  or  thirty  Shillings  for  either,  paid  by 
Peter  Tilts  or  Harmon  Snider. 

— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , 
Oct.  15,  1753. 

New- York , October  22.  Wednesday  last  died  at 
New-Brunswick,  after  a very  lingering  Illness,  Henry 
Cosby,  Esq  ; Commander  of  his  Majesty’s  Ship  the 
Centaur,  now  on  this  Station : His  Remains  were 

next  Day  brought  to  this  City,  and  decently  interred 
in  the  Chancel  of  Trinity  Church. 

We  hear  from  Middletown,  in  East-New-Jersey, 
that  on  Wednesday  last  the  Son  of  one  William 
Rodgers,  of  that  Place,  returning  from  Gunning,  told 


i/53j 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


309 


his  Father  he  could  not  get  the  Gun  off,  who  there- 
upon taking  her  up  in  his  Arms,  snap’d  her,  when 
she  suddenly  went  off  and  kill’d  his  Wife  on  the  Spot. 
— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , Oct. 


TOLEN  from  the  Dutch  Meeting  House  at  Am~ 


well,  in  Hunterdon  County,  East-New-Jersey, 
on  Sunday  the  14th  Instant,  a light  colour’d  sorrel 
Horse,  with  a white  Mane,  Tail,  and  Foretop.  the 
Mane  trim’d  with  a Comb,  with  four  white  Feet, 
and  a Blaze  along  his  Forehead,  is  about  13  Hands 
high,  branded  on  the  near  Thigh  A P.  had  on  him  a 
good  Leather  hunting  Saddle,  and  snaffle  Bridle. 
The  Thief  is  supposed  to  have  been  seen  at  South- 
Branch  ; he  is  of  a small  Stature,  brown  Complexion, 
wore  a Cap,  and  light  colour’d  Coat  made  in  the 
newest  Fashion,  a blue  Jacket,  with  a short  red 
lapell’d  Jacket  under  it,  and  a large  brim’d  Hat.  If 
any  Person  secures  said  Horse  and  Thief,  or  either, 
so  as  the  owner  may  have  him  again,  shall  have  Fif- 
teen Shillings  Reward,  and  all  reasonable  Charges 
paid  by  me  Jacob  Winding,  living  in  Amwell  afore- 
said.— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , 
Oct.  22,  1753. 

Custom-House,  Philadelphia,  Entered  In.  Charm- 
ing Peggy.  E.  Allen  from  Virginia. — The  Pennsyl- 
vania Journal , Oct.  25,  1753.  Nurnb.  568. 

Custom-House;  Philadelphia,  Inward  Entries. 
Schooner  Pembroke,  Nicholas  Gordon  from  Salem. 
— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , Oct.  25,  1753.  Numb. 
1 296. 


3 io  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1753 

Run  away  on  the  ioth  of  August  last,  from  Wil- 
liam "Carnagie,  of  Bedminster  township,  Somer- 
set County  in  East-New-Jersey,  a Dutch  servant 
man,  named  Henry  Hrubb,  betwixt  30  and  40  years 
of  age,  about  5 feet  6 inches  high,  has  a large 
scar  on  one  of  his  middle  fingers,  thin  blackish  col- 
our’d hair,  can  talk  but  very  little  English,  and  is  by 
trade  a Stocking  Weaver : Had  on  when  he  went 

away,  A light  blue  coat,  with  red  lining,  and  light  col- 
our’d mohair  buttons,  two  jackets,  one  fustian,  the 
other  flannel,  blue  breeches  and  white  wool  stock- 
ings. Whoever  takes  up  and  secures  said  servant,  so 
as  his  master  may  have  him  again  shall  have  Three 
Pounds  reward,  and  reasonable  charges,  paid  by 

William  Carnaoje. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , Oct . 25,  1753. 

Numb.  1296. 

Philadelphia,  October  25,  1753. 

Run  away  on  the  16th  inst.  from  Archibald  Ham 
ilton  in  Mannington  township,  Salem  county,  A like- 
ly Irish  servant-man  named  John  M’Cabe,  about  23 
years  of  age,  about  5 feet  8 inches  high,  has  a pretty 
large  mouth,  large  eyes  and  stoops  as  he  walks : 
Had  on  when  he  went  away,  A light  blue  half  worn 
coat  with  slash  sleeves  and  cuffs,  blue  and  white 
striped  cotton  and  linen  jacket  and  breeches,  a pair 
of  thread  stockings,  and  a pair  of  black  and  white 
yarn  ditto,  felt  hat,  linen  cap,  and  a pair  of  brogues 
with  leather  fixings.  He  took  a pistol  with  him. 
Whoever  takes  up  and  secures  said  servant,  so  as 
his  master  may  have  him  again,  shall  have  Three 


1753]  NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS.  3 i I 

pounds  reward,  and  reasonable  charges,  paid  by 

Archibald  Hamilton. 

N.  B.  He  is  a Taylor  by  trade,  has  lost  one  of 
his  middle  toes,  and  can  work  well  at  plantation 
work.  All  masters  of  vessels  are  forbid  to  carry  him 
off. — The  Pennsylvania  Gazette,  Nov.  i,  1753.  Numb. 
1297. 

Trenton,  October  23,  1753. 

These  are  to  give  notice  that  there  is  now  in  goal 
in  Trenton,  in  the  county  of  Hunterdon,  in  West 
New  Jersey,  one  John  Godard,  who  says  he  is  a ser- 
vant to  Loveless  Goaset,  at  Chestnut-ridge  in  Mary- 
land, who  is  desir’d  to  come  and  fetch  him  within  six 
weeks  from  the  date  hereof,  or  else  he  will  be  dis- 
charged, paying  the  charges,  by  virtue  of  a rule  of 
court  held  at  Trenton,  the  day  abovesaid  by  me 

William  Brown,  Goal  keeper. 

— The Pennsylvania  Gazette,  Nov.  1,  1753.  Numb. 

1297. 

Notice  is  hereby  given  to  those  who  have  occasion 
to  transport  themselves  or  goods,  from  Philadelphia 
to  New  York,  That  Patrick  Cowan,  master  of  two 
commodious  stage  boats,  gives  his  attendance,  twice 
a week,  at  the  Crooked  Billet  wharff,  viz,  on  Wed- 
nesdays and  Saturdays,  in  order  to  receive  passen- 
gers or  goods  for  Burlington.  That  Jonathan 
Thomas,  at  Burlington  has  an  exceeding  good  stage 
waggon,  well-fitted,  which  will  proceed  with  passen- 
gers and  goods  to  Amboy  on  Mondays  and  Thurs- 
days. And  that  a very  convenient  stage  boat,  kept 
by  Daniel  O’Bryan,  at  Amboy,  will  be  always  ready 


312  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [l/53 

to  receive  them,  and  carry  them  immediately  to  New 
York,  without  loss  of  time.  Those  inclined  to  en- 
courage this  undertaking,  may  depend  on  the  quick- 
est dispatch,  and  best  usage  from  their  humble  ser- 
vants, Jonathan  Thomas,  Patrick  Cowan  and  Daniel 
O’Bryan. — The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , Nov.  i,  1753. 
Numb.  1297. 

New  York , November  5.  a small  Sloop  belonging 
to  Newark,  John  Bruen,  Master, was  castaway  a few 
Days  ago  on  Squan  Beach — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or 
the  Weekly  Post  Boy , Nov.  5,  1753. 

. To  Be  Sold, 

A Well-founded  Sloop  of  about  25  and  a half  Tons, 
York  Tonage,  with  all  her  Sails,  Rigging,  &c. 
as  she  now  lies  in  Raway  River,  East-New-Jersey. 
Enquire  of  Capt  Freeman,  living  in  Raway,  of  Capt. 
Phcefix  or  Mr.  Cunningham,  in  New-York. — The  N. 
Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post  Boyy  Nov.  5,  1753. 

To  be  sold,  by  Alexander  Thomson,  of  Piscataway, 

A Fine  Farm,  or  Plantation,  lying  in  Piscataway, 
in  the  County  of  Middlesex,  and  Province  of 
New-Jersey,  containing  about  250  Acres  of  choice 
Land,  well  timber’d  and  water’d,  about  80  Acres 
cleared,  in  which  is  a good  Barn,  and  a fine  young 
Orchard  of  upwards  of  200  bearing  Trees,  and  lies 
within  about  5 Miles  from  Raritan  Landing,  and 
within  the  same  Distance  from  several  other  publick 
Landings,  and  within  a Mile  of  a good  Grist-Mill  and 
Saw-Mill.  The  Title  is  indisputable,  and  is  free  from 
Quit-Rents,  and  all  other  Incumbrances.  Any  Per- 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


313 


1753] 

son  inclining  to  purchase  the  same,  may  agree  upon 
very  reasonable  Terms,  by  applying  to  the  said  Alex- 
ander Thomson,  living  on  the  Premises,  or  to  James 
Thomson,  Esq  ; at  Piscataway. — The  N.  Y.  Gazette 
or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy,  Nov.  5,  1753. 

As  some  Men  were  Hunting  last  Week  in  Glou- 
cester County,  New-Jersey,  one  of  them  took  his 
Companion  for  a Deer,  as  he  was  coming  through  a 
Swamp,  and  shot  at  him,  and  wounded  him  so  that 
he  died  on  Tuesday  last. — The  Pennsylvania  Journal , 
Nov.  8,  1753.  Numb.  570. 

Custom-House,  Philadelphia,  Cleared.  Brig  Salis- 
bury, Thomas  Deane,  to  Salem. — The  Pennsylvania 
Journal,  Nov.  8,  1753.  Numb.  570. 

Philadelphia,  Nov.  8.  Thursday  last  the  following 
melancholy  Accident  happen’d  in  the  Jerseys;  Some 
Neighbours  were  out  a Deer-hunting,  when  one  of 
them,  creeping  through  the  Bushes,  was  by  another 
of  the  Company  taken  for  the  Deer,  who  accordingly 
fir’d  at  him,  and  wounded  him  so  badly,  that  not- 
withstanding all  proper  Help  was  got  for  him,  he  died 
on  Monday. — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post 
Boy,  Nov , 12,  1753. 

New- York,  November  T2.  Monday  last  sailed  from 
Sandy-Hook,  for  Great-Britain,  his  Majesty’s  Ship 
Arundel,  Capt.  Lloyd,  Commander,  having  the  Hon- 
orable George  Clinton,  our  late  Governor,  with  his 
Family,  on  board. — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly 
Post  Boy,  Nov.  12,  1753. 


314  NEW  jersey  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1753 

Custom-House , New-  York , Cleared  for  Departure . 
Sloop  Catherine,  James  Van  Brakle  to  New-Jersey. 
— The  N.  Y%  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , Nov. 
19^1753* 

Whereas  the  lease  of  the  mills  at  Trenton,  lett  to 
Mr.  Andrew  Reed,  will  expire  the  first  day  of  May 
next ; and  whereas  the  subscriber,  the  owner  there- 
of, is  willing  to  let  them  for  a further  time,  until  his 
other  private  affairs  will  permit  him  to  take  them  into 
his  own  care  : And  for  the  better  carrying  on  of  the 

same,  the  sum  of  Five  Hundred  Pounds  will  be  lett 
therewith,  and  two  dwelling-houses,  with  a.  pasture 
lying  near  the  mills,  convenient  for  the  keeping  of  a 
store,  & c.  And  further,  the  subscriber  has  lately 
laid  out  from  his  said  mills  a street  down  to  the  ferry 
and  landing,  where  the  produce  of  the  country,  and 
the  trade  of  Trenton,  are  exported  from  thence  to 
the  city  of  Philadelphia.  Therefore  if  any  person  is 
desirous  of  renting  the  said  mills,  &c.  or  purchasing 
lots,  or  leasing  said  lots  for  a term  of  years,  they 
may,  by  applying  to  the  subscriber,  know  the  terms. 

Robert  Lettice  Hooper. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , Nov.  22,  1753. 

Numb.  1300. 

Scheme  of  a Lottery. 

In  Connecticut : For  the  Benefit  of  the  College  of 

New-Jersey. 

TXTHEREAS  on  the  Petition  of  the  Trustees  of 
V V the  College  of  New  Jersey , lately  present- 
ed to  the  General  Court  or  Assembly  of  the  Colony 
of  Connecticut , for  the  Erection  of  a publick  Lottery 


1753]  NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS.  3l$ 

in  that  Colony,  in  Favour  of  the  said  College ; the 
said  General  Court  or  Assembly  hath  generously 
empowered  the  Trustees  of  the  said  College  to  set 
up  a Lottery  in  their  Colony,  for  the  Purpose  above 
mentioned : The  said  Lottery  will  consist  of  8888 

Tickets,  of  which  3088  are  to  be  fortunate,  viz. 
Number  of  Prizes.  Value  of  each.  Total  Value 


I 

of 

1.  501, 

is 

1 501, 

2 

of 

250, 

are 

500. 

4 

of 

125, 

are 

500.. 

8 

of 

IOO, 

are 

800, 

16 

of 

50 

are 

800 

30 

of 

20, 

are 

600, 

50 

of 

10, 

are 

5°°> 

100 

of 

5 

are 

5°°> 

2877 

of 

n 

0 

are 

8 631 

3088  Prizes,)  8888  Tickets,  at  30s.  New\ 

5800  Blanks,)  York  Currency  each,  is  (1.  13332, 
Fifteen  per  Cent,  to  be  deducted  from  the  Prizes. 

AS  publick  Seminaries  of  Learning  not  only  tend 
to  promote  the  private  Welfare  of  the  Com- 
munities in  which  they  are  founded,  but  to  advance 
the  Honor,  the  Reputation,  and  the  Happiness  of  a 
Country  in  general ; it  is  hoped,  that  all  those  who 
would  encourage  the  Progress  of  the  Liberal 
Sciences,  and  are  Well-wishers  to  the  Propagation  of 
Christianity  in  these  Parts  of  the  World,  will  cheer- 
fully become  Adventurers  here ; and  the  more  freely, 
considering  the  above  Scheme  is  so  well  calculated 
for  the  benefit  of  the  Proprietors  of  Tickets,  as  not 
to  have  two  Blanks  to  a Prize.  Publick  Notice  will 
be  given  of  the  precise  Time  of  putting  the  Tickets 


316  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1753 

into  the  Boxes,  that  such  Adventurers  as  are  in- 
clined, may  be  present  when  the  same  shall  be  done. 
The  Drawing  to  commence  on  the  first  Tuesday  in 
June  next,  or  sooner  if  full,  at  the  Town  of  Stamford 
in  Connecticut , under  the  Inspection  of  two  Justices 
of  Peace  of  the  Colony  of  Connecticut , and  of  two 
Persons  who  shall  be  appointed  by  the  Trustees  of 
the  College  of  New- Jersey.  The  Publick  will  have 
Fourteen  Days  Notice  of  the  Time  of  Drawing.  The 
Managers  are  sworn  to  the  faithful  Discharge  of  the 
Trust  reposed  in  them,  and  also  given  Security  for 
the  same.  The  Prizes  will  be  published  in  the  New- 
York  Gazette , and  the  Money  paid  to  the  Possessors 
of  Benefit  Tickets,  as  soon  as  the  Drawing  is  finished. 
Tickets  are  to  be  had  at  the  Dwelling-Houses  of  Mr. 
John  Lloyd , Ephraim  Bostwick , Esq ; and  Dr.  Na- 
thaniel Hubbard , in  the  Town  of  Stamford , in  Con- 
necticut, who  are  appointed  Managers.  Tickets  will 
also  be  sold  by  Mr.  David  Vanhorne , in  New- York  ; 
Samuel  Woodruff,  Esq;  in  Elizabeth- Town  ; — Mr. 
Sergeant  Treasurer  of  the  College  of  New- Jersey,  in 
Newark;  the  Rev.  Mr.  Cowell,  in  Trenton, — and 
Mr.  Samuel  Hazard , in  Philadelphia.  The  Prizes 
will  be  paid  by  those  Gentlemen  who  shall  have  dis- 
posed of  the  Numbers  drawing  such  Prizes. — The  N. 
Y Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy,  Nov.  26,  1753. 

BROKE,  out  of  Burlington  Jail,  in  West-Jersey, 
about  the  26th  of  November  Inst,  one  John 
Johnson,  an  Irishman,  about  24  Years  of  Age,  mid- 
dle-sized, with  black  short  Hair  ; has  been  branded 
in  his  left  Hand,  is  a very  great  Rogue,  and  is  said 
to  be  out-lawed  in  Virginia,  and  wears  a blue  Coat. 


1753] 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


317 


Whoever  takes  up  and  secures  the  said  John  John- 
son, so  that  he  may  be  had  again,  shall  have  Six 
Pounds  Reward,  and  all  reasonable  Charges,  paid  by 

Samuel  Woodward,  Sheriff. 

— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , 
Dec.  3,  1753. 

Custom  House,  Philada-  Cleared.  Snow  Mon- 
mouth, John  Harrison  for  Amboy. — The  Pennsylvania 
Journal , Dec.  6,  1753.  Numb.  574. 

Marine  List 

Arrived,  Marlborough,  Barry  from  New  York  at 
Deal.  Myrtella,  Budden  from  Philadelphia  at  Deal. 
Industry,  Coward  and — Smith  from  Virginia  at  Deal. 
— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , Dec.  6,  1753.  Numb. 
1302. 

Philadelphia , December  6.  Tuesday  last  Captain 
Clarke  arrived  here  frorti  New-York,  who,  four  Miles 
to  the  Northward  of  Barnagat,  saw  the  Sloop  of 
Capt.  Shearman,  of  Rhode  Island,  high  and  dry 
ashore.  The  Vessel  has  received  no  Damage,  and 
all  her  Cargoe  is  got  safe  out. — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or 
the  Weekly  Post  Boy , Dec.  10,  1753. 

Custom  House , Philadelphia.  Cleared.  Harrison 
to  Amboy. — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post 
Boy , Dec.  10,  1753. 

New-York , December  10.  We  hear  from  Coles- 
Neck,  Monmouth  County,  in  East  New-Jersey,  That 
a Woman  in  that  Neighbourhood,  going  for  Water 
at  some  Distance  from  the  House,  upon  her  Return 


3 I 8 NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [l  753 

found  her  Child,  who  she  had  left  playing-  about  the 
Fire,  entirely  burnt  to  Cinders,  save  one  of  its 
Limbs. — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , 
Dec . io,  1753. 

Custom  House , New-  York.  Outward  Entries. 
Sloop  Katey,  John  Nicoll  for  West-Jersey. — The  N. 
Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , Dec.  io,  1753. 

MADE  his  Escape  in  this  City,  from  Samuel 
Moores,  of  Woodbridge,  East-New-Jersey, 
on  Friday  Night  last  the  7th  Instant,  December,  one 
William  Bayley,  a middle  siz’d  Person,  has  a thin 
Face,  with  a fresh  Scar  upon  his  Nose:  Had  on  a 

blue  Coat,  with  a green  Jacket,  and  a white  Linnen 
One  under,  a striped  silk  Cap,  half  worn  Hat, 
Leather  Breeches,  with  Brass  Buttons,  and  blue  and 
white  check  Stockings.  He  went  off  in  Company 
with  his  own  Servant,  who  is  a short  Person,  has 
thick  Lips,  and  remarkable  white  Eyes,  Bailey  him- 
self being  a Prisoner  to  the  Subscriber.  Whoever 
takes  up  and  secures  said  Bailey,  so  that  he  may  be 
had  again,  shall  have  Forty  Shillings  Reward,  and  all 
reasonable  Charges  paid  by 

Samuel  Moores. 

— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , 
Dec.  10,  1753. 

RUN  away  on  the  28th  Instant  from  the  Sub- 
scriber living  at  Newark  Mountains,  a Negro 
Man  named  Bristol,  about  5 Feet  6 Inches  high,  not 
very  black,  was  bred  at  the  East  End  of  Long- 
Islands,  and  lately  belonged  to  David  Ogden,  Esq  ; 


1753] 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


319 


at  Newark  : Had  on  when  he  went  away,  a grey 

Bearskin  Watch-Coat,  a yellow  Duroy  tight  bodied 
Coat,  Leather  Breeches,  black  and  white  speckled 
Yarn  Stockings,  and  a Hat  about  half-worn.  Who- 
ever takes  up  and  secures  said  Negro,  so  that  his 
Master  may  have  him  again,  shall  have  Forty  Shil- 
lings Jersey  Money,  and  all  reasonable  Charges, 
paid  by 

Joseph  Heddin. 

— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , 
Dec . 10,  1753. 

Broke  goal  and  made  their  escape  from  the  sheriff 
of  Monmouth  in  East-New-Jersey,  on  the  8th  of  this 
inst.  the  following  persons,  viz.  An  Irish  man,  named 
Bryan  Dome,  of  middle  stature,  fair  complexion,  blue 
eyes,  lightish  brown  hair  : Had  on  when  he  went 

away,  a lightish  colour’d  drugget  coat,  a brown  drug- 
get jacket,  leather  breeches,  lightish  blue  stockings, 
and  a felt  hat.  Also  a lad  named  James  W oiling,  about 
16  or  17  years  old,  swarthy  complexion,  down  look, 
in  a very  poor  apparel.  Likewise  an  Indian  fellow, 
named  William  Pumsher,  small  size,  talks  good  Eng- 
lish, can  read  and  write  : Had  on  when  he  went 

away,  A dark  kersey  jacket,  check  linen  breeches, 
woolen  spatter-dashes,  and  ozenbrigs  shirt.  Also  a 
servant  girl,  named  Catherine  Carle,  belonging  to 
Thomas  Leonard,  small  of  stature,  down  look:  Had 
on  and  carried  with  her,  A striped  linen  and  woollen 
gown,  dark  striped  cotton  gown,  new  Leghorn  hat, 
worsted  quilt,  and  sundry  other  clothes.  Any  per- 
son that  takes  up  the  said  persons,  and  secures  them, 
so  as  they  may  be  had  again,  shall  have  Six  Pounds 


320 


NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1753 


reward,  or  for  either  Thirty  Shillings,  and  all  reason- 
able charges,  paid  by  John  Taylor  Sheriff,  or  Thomas 
Leonard. — The  Pennsylvania  Gazette,  Dec.  13,  1753. 
No.  1303. 

Custom  House , New-York.  Cleared  for  Departure. 
Sloop  Unity,  Seth  Clark  to  New-Jersey. — The  N. 
Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy 9 Dec.  17,  1753. 

To  be  sold  at  publick  Vendue,  on  Friday  the  28th 
of  December,  at  10  o’Clock  in  the  Morning;  A good 

Dwelling-  House situate  on  the  West- 

Side  of  Die-Street,  in  this  City.  If  any  Person  in- 
cline to  purchase  before  the  Day  of  Sale,  they  may 
apply  to  Isaac  Ryckman,  in  New-York,  or  to  John 
Ryckman,  at  Hackinsack,  by  whom  an  indisputable 
Title  will  be  given. — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the 
Weekly  Post  Boy 3 Dec.  17,  1753. 

Run  away  on  the  14th  instant,  from  Nathan 
Haines  in  Evesham,  Burlington  county,  in  West- 
New-Jersey,  A servant  man,  named  John  Chalaner, 
country  born,  a very  assuming  fellow,  has  grey  eyes, 
about  5 feet  6 inches  high,  pretends  to  be  a Turner: 
Had  on  a dark  brown  country  cloth  coat,  a half-worn 
felt  hat,  and  a ragged,  ozenbrigs  shirt.  Whoever 
takes  up  and  secures  said  servant,  so  as  his  master 
may  have  him  again,  shall  have  Three  Pounds 
reward,  and  reasonable  charges,  paid  by 

Nathaniel  Haines. 

December  19,  1753. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , Dec.  20,  1753. 

No.  1304. 


1753] 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


321 


To  be  sold  by  publick  vendue,  on  Thursday  the 
10th  of  January  next,  at  the  house  of  John  Biddle, 
the  sign  of  the  Indian  King,  in  Market-street,  Phila- 
delphia, A tract  of  land  in  Morris  county,  in  the 
western  division  of  New-Jersey,  late  the  property  of 
William  Biddle,  containing  1250  acres,  with  the  usual 
allowance,  to  be  put  up  in  four  lots,  containing  312 
acres  each ; a plan  of  which  may  be  seen  by  apply- 
ing to  Samuel  Smith,  William  Lawrence  or  Joshua 
Fisher  in  Philadelphia,  who  are  impowered  to  sell  the 
same,  and  make  an  indisputable  title.  Samuel 
Smith,  William  Lawrence,  Joshua  Fisher. — -The  Penn- 
sylvania Gazette , Dec.  20,  1753.  Numb.  1304. 

Burlington,  November,  28- 
Last  night  broke  out  and  made  his  escape  from 
the  goal  of  the  county  of  Burlington,  one  John  John- 
ston, an  Irishman,  about  22  or  23  years  of  age,  about 
five  feet  eight  or  nine  inches  high,  of  a dark  com- 
plexion, down  look’d,  and  has  the  brogue  on  his 
tongue,  was  lately  branded  in  the  hand  with  the  let- 
ter T.,  which  is  yet  sore  : Had  on  or  with  him,  a 

good  blue  broadcloth  coat,  light  colour’d  cloth  waist- 
coat and  breeches,  with  metal  buttons,  worsted 
stockings,  half  worn  shoes  or  pumps,  with  large  brass 
buckles,  but  may  perhaps  have  changed  his  clothes 
and  name.  He  is  supposed  to  be  the  greatest  horse 
stealer  and  most  accomplished  villain  that  has  per- 
haps been  in  the  country.  Whoever  apprehends 

said  Johnston,  and  secures  him  in  any  goal,  so  that 
21 


322  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [ 1 753 

he  may  be  had  again,  shall  have  Five  Pounds  reward, 
and  reasonable  charges  paid  by 

Samuel  Woodward , Sheriff. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette,  Dec.  20,  1753. 

Numb.  1304. 

To  be  sold  by  the  subscriber,  a very  convenient 
house,  with  a good  kitchen  and  out  houses,  barn  and 
stables,  with  a large  orchard  of  fine  fruit  trees,  and 
about  fifteen  acres  of  good  mowing  meadow  adjoin- 
ing the  same.  Likewise  about  fifteen  acres  of  good- 
mowing meadow,  all,  or  the  greatest  part,  in  Tim- 
othy-grass and  clover,  about  a mile  from  said  house  ; 
it  is  very  commodious  and  fit  for  either  gentleman, 
merchant  or  tavern-keeper ; it  has  been  long  a well 
accustomed  tavern,  at  Crosswicks  on  the  great  road 
to  Amboy.  Any  person  inclining  to  purchase  the 
same,  may  apply  to  the  subscriber  at  Burlington, 
and  know  the  terms. 

Samuel  Woodward. 

N.  B.  The  title  is  indisputable. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , Dec.  20,  1753. 

Numb.  1 304. 

Custom  House , New-  York.  Cleared  for  Departure. 
Sloop  Mary,  Daniel  Higgins  to  West  Jersey. — The 
N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , Dec.  24, 
1753- 

TO  BE  SOLD,  a Plantation  belonging  to  the 
Estate  of  Aaron  Hewes,  deceased,  lying  in 
the  County  of  Somerset,  in  the  Province  of  East- 
New-Jersey,  within  "a  Mile  and^a  Half  from  Prince 


1753] 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


323 


Town,  containing  Three  Hundred  Acres  of  Land, 
One  Hundred  and  Fifty  cleared  and  under  good 
Fence,  Twenty  Acres  of  Meadow,  the  other  Part 
being  extraordinary  Timber  Land,  Two  good 
Orchards,  One  of  them  young,  and  of  choice  Fruit. 
There  is  on  the  said  Place,  a good  Stone  House,  30 
Feet  square,  compleatly  finished,  and  a large  Stone 
Kitchen,  joining  to  the  said  House,  having  also  a 
large  Shop  ; likewise  a large  Barn,  Stables,  a Sheep - 
House,  Waggon-House,  Smoke-House,  and  sundry 
other  useful  Buildings,  The  Place  is  well  water’d  by 
a Run  of  Water  running  through  the  same.  Any 
Person  inclining  to  purchase  the  said  Plantation,  by 
applying  to  Samuel  Worth  and  William  Worth,  the 
Executors,  may  know  the  Terms.—  The  N.  Y.  Ga- 
zette or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , Dec.  24,  1753. 

O be  Let  for  the  Term  of  Five  Years,  to  the 


highest  Bidder,  the  25th  of  January  next,  on 
the  Premisses,  The  Farm  at  Wehawk,  belonging  to 
Stephen  Bayard,  together  with  the  Ferry  from  thence 
to  this  City  : — The  House,  with  the  Locks,  Keys, 
Hinges,  Bolts,  Doors,  Casements,  Glass  Windows, 
with  the  Barn  and  Fence,  to  be  delivered  to  the  Ten- 
ant in  good  and  sufficient  Repair,  and  to  be  return’d 
in  the  same  Order  at  the  Expiration  of  the  Term  : 
The  Lease  to  commence  the  25th  of  March  next. 
The  Rent  to  be  paid  yearly  with  Security.  For 
further  particulars,  enquire  of  William  Bayard,  in 
New-York.—  The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  Weekly  Post  Boy , 
Dec.  24,  1753. 


Custom  House,  New  York,  Cleared  for  Departure 


324 


NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1753 


Sloop  Unity,  Seth  Clark  to  New-Jersey. — The  Penn- 
sylvania Journal,  Dec.  27,  1753.  Numb.  577. 


Twelve  hundred  acres  of  land  in  New  Jersey, 
within  a few  miles  of  oxford  furnace1  well  watered. 
Also  a house  and  lot  of  ground  in  German  Town. 
Etc,  etc  For  further  particulars  enquire  of  William 
Shippen  in  market  street,  or  Joseph  Shippen  at  his 
house  in  German  Town. — The  Pennsylvania  Journal , 
Dec . 27,  1753.  Numb.  577. 

Mr.  Parker,2 

S I understand  you  are  a Native  of  New-Jersey, 


I doubt  not  therefore  you  are  a Lover  of  your 
Country  ; and  as  such  a One  I now  address  you,  and 
pray  you  to  give  this  a Place  in  your  Paper,  which 
will  not  only  oblige  me  but  all  the  Good-Wives  that 
have  the  Misfortune  to  have  bad  Husbands  in  this 
Province. 

You  must  understand,  Sir,  that  I have  for  some 
Years  past  borne,  with  uncommon  Patience,  the 
Lashes  of  an  ill-natur’d  Husband,  who  constantly 
made  it  a Practice,  to  stay  at  a Slop-Shop  till  he  had 
drowned  his  Senses  in  Rum,  his  Darling  Delight, 
and  then  poor  I must  stand  clear  ; for  the  merciless 


1 Two  men,  Axford  and  Green,  came  into  the  present  Warren  county,  as  early  as  1730, 
the  former  locating  near  the  present  Oxford  iron  works,  and  the  latter  near  Green  pond. 
A few  years  later,  iron  ore  was  discovered  near  the  present  Oxford  mines,  and  Jonathan 
Robeson,  of  Philadelphia,  began  the  erection  of  a small  blast  furnace  in  1741,  and  by 
March  9,  1743,  made  the  first  pig-iron  therefrom.  The  weekly  product,  tradition  says, 
was  from  thirteen  to  fifteen  tons. — Hist.  Sussex  and  Warren  Counties , 78. 

2 James  Parker,  the  printer,  was  the  son  of  Samuel  Parker,  of  Woodbridge,  and  was 
born  in  that  town  in  1714.  After  along  career  as  a printer  in  New  York,  and  afterwards 
at  Woodbridge,  he  died  at  Burlington,  July  2, 1770,  and  was  buried  in  the  place  of  his  na*- 
tivity. 


To  Be  Sold 


1753] 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


325 


Wretch  wou’d  spare  neither  my  Tea  Cups  or  Saucers 
to  throw  at  my  Head,  besides  whipping  of  me  ; but 
I must  do  him  the  Justice  to  acknowledge,  that  he 
always  had  Compassion  on  the  Rum  Glasses,  which 
stood  close  by  them  ; and  tho’  we  have  had  but  two 
of  those  Glasses  for  these  Eight  or  Ten  Years,  yet 
they  have  liv’d  to  see  as  many  Dozen  of  Tea  Cups 
and  Saucers  broke  over  my  Head;  for  he  says  if  I 
can’t  drink  my  Tea  out  of  those  Glasses,  I shall  go 
without ; which  I had  rather  do  ; for  I shou’d  imag- 
ine I was  drinking  Rum  instead  of  Tea,  and  I think 
he  need  not  be  so  hard  upon  me,  for  they  never  cost 
him  a Penny  ; but  his  destroying  of  ’em  has  brought 
me  so  low,  that  I have  no  more  Apparel  than  I at 
present  have  on,  and  I will  have  Tea  Cups  and  Sau- 
cers if  I pawn  my  very  Shift;  for  I must  own  I love 
Tea  as  well  as  he  loves  Rum. 

Besides,  Sir,  I have  two  little  Children,  a Girl  and 
a Boy,  who  while  their  Father  was  whipping  of  me, 
were  frightened  to  such  a Degree  (for  fear  of  losing 
their  dear  Mother)  as  wou’d  make  them  fall  into 
Fits  in  each  others  little  Arms,  while  I could  not 
afford  them  the  least  Assistance,  and  they  might 
then  have  died  before  he  would  have  given  them 
any:  Was  not  this  hard,  Sir ; Ah!  cruel  hard,  not  only 
to  use  me  so  inhumanly,  but  to  be  so  void  of  Bow- 
els to  those  little  Ones,  that  derived  their  Existence 
from  him  ! and  he  would  tell  me,  when  I dar’d  to 
complain,  that  Man  had  the  Government  given  him 
over  the  Woman  ; but  I don’t  imagine  his  Authority 
was  so  extensive  as  to  impower  him,  to  beat  her 
Brains  out  without  Rhime  or  reason  ; and  as  often 


326  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [175$ 

as  I read  my  Bible  (my  greatest  Delight)  I never 
yet  found  that  Adam  ever  whipped  his  Wife  ; tho’  I 
must  confess  she  justly  deserved  it. 

My  Case  being  happily  nois’d  abroad,  induced 
several  generous  young  Men  to  discipline  him. 
These  young  Persons  do  stile,  or  are  stiled,  Regula- 
tors; and  so  they  are  with  Propriety;  for  they  have 
regulated  my  dear  Husband,  and  the  rest  of  the  bad 
Ones  hereabouts,  that  they  are  afraid  of  using  such 
Barbarity;  and  I must  with  Pleasure  acknowledge, 
that  since  my  Husband  has  felt  what  whipping  was, 
he  has  entirely  left  off  whipping  me,  and  promises 
faithfully  he  will  never  begin  again  ; which  I have 
reason  to  believe  ; for  there  never  was  a better  Har- 
mony subsisting  between  Man  and  Wife,  than  there 
is  at  present  betwixt  us,  and  we  are  as  happy  as  we 
were  in  our  Courting  Days ; and  He  does  with 
Pleasure  own  (as  well  as  my  self)  that  he  is  under 
infinite  Obligations  to  those  Persons  before  hinted 
of,  and  is  so  generous  as  to  say,  that  if  they  had  not 
done  what  they  did,  he  might  unhappily  in  his  Anger 
whipp’d  me  into  Eternity. 

I doubt  not  all  the  World  will  agree  with  me,  (es- 
pecially those  of  my  Sex,  and  those  that  have  any 
Regard  for  ’em,)  that  it  is  a most  Brutal  Action  for 
a Man,  who  Nature  has  endow’d  with  superior 
Strength  to  a Woman,  to  exercise  such  Severity 
over  her : While  I say  brutal,  I do  Injustice  to  the 
Brute  Creation ; for  they  shew  more  Compassion 
and  Tenderness  than  such  Monsters  do. 

Tho’  there  are  some  that  are  afraid  of  whipping 
their  Wives,  for  fear  of  dancing  the  same  Jigg ; yet 


1753] 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


32  7 


I understand,  they  are  not  afraid  of  making  Applica- 
tion, in  order  to  have  those  dear  Regulators  indicted  ; 
and  if  they  should,  it  might  discourage  them  for  the 
future,  to  appear  to  the  Assistance  of  the  Innocent 
and  Helpless  ; and  then  poor  Wives  who  have  the 
unhappiness  to  be  lockt  in  Wedlock  with  bad  Hus- 
bands, take  Care  of  your  tender  Hides  ; for  you  may 
depend  upon  being  bang’d  without  Mercy. 

I am,  Sir,  your  most  Humble  Servant, 

Prudence  Goodwife. 

New-Jersey,  December,  7,  1753. 

[/  would  beg,  that  the  Authors  of  such  Epistles  as 
the  above,  would  at  least  pay  the  Postage  when  they 
send  them  ; the  Charge  of  this  only  being  20 d.  to  the 
Printer,  tho  he  knows  not  from  whom  or  whence  it 
comes. ] — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy, 
Dec.  31,  1753. 

New- York,  December  31.  Last  Monday  Night,  we 
had  here  a very  hard  Gale,  or  rather  Storm  of  Wind 
and  Rain,  at  East,  in  which  several  Vessels  lying  at 
the  Wharfs,  received  considerable  Damage.  In  the 
Height  of  the  Gale,  one  Miles  Rigs,  a Newark  Boat 
Man,  going  on  board  of  his  Boat,  then  lying  in  Peck’s- 
Slip,  in  order  to  secure  her  better,  he  unhappily  fell 
overboard,  and  was  drowned ; We  hear  he  has  left  a 
Wife  with  eight  Children. — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the 
Weekly  Post  Boy , Dec.  31,  1753. 

New  York,  December  24.  We  hear  from  Bound- 
brook,  that  three  Women  in  that  Town,  Neighbours 
have  each  of  them  had  two  Children  at  a Birth,  all 


328  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [ 1 753 

living  and  well. — The  Pennsylva7iia  Gazette , Jan.  i, 
1754.  Numb.  1306. 

On  the  1 8th  of  last  month  was  committed  to  the 
goal  of  Northampton  county,  the  four  following  per- 
sons, viz.  Bryan  Dome,  James  Wolling,  an  Indian 
named  William  Pumsher  and  a girl,  named  Cathe- 
rine Carle,  being  those  who  made  their  escape  from 
the  sheriff  of  Monmouth  county,  in  East-New-Jersey, 
and  advertised  in  this  paper  some  time  ago.  The 
sheriff  is  desired  to  take  them  out,  otherwise  they 
will  be  discharged  on  paying  their  fees. 

Nicholas  Scull,  sheriff. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , Jan.  i,  1754. 

Numb.  1306. 

To  be  Lett,  for  a Term  of  Years, 

ACompleat  MILL,  the  House  60  by  40  Feet, 
with  two  Pair  of  Stones,  and  Room  for  a Third, 
or  Conveniency  for  a Fulling  Mill  under  the  same 
Roof,  either  of  which,  if  required,  will  be  erected  at 
the  Expence  of  the  Owner  ; situate  in  the  County  of 
Somerset,  and  Province  of  East-New-Jersey,  near  the 
North  Branch  of  the  Rariton  River,  on  a large 
Stream  ; in  the  driest  of  Seasons  there  is  no  Want 
of  Water  : Together  with  a Dwelling  House,  Store 
House,  Barn,  Stables,  and  about  200  Acres  of  Up 
and  Low-Land:  The  Utensils  are  all  new,  and  in 
good  Order.  Whoever  inclines  to  rent  the  same, 
may  have  all  the  Servants  both  White  and  Black, 
Horses,  Waggons,  &c.  that  are  now  employ’d  in 
carrying  on  the  Business  ; and  the  Persons  renting 
the  same,  may  have  Five  Hundred  Pounds,  on  good 


1754]  NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS.  329 

Security.  For  further  Particulars,  enquire  on  the 
Premisses,  or  of  the  Subscriber  living  in  New-York. 

William  Axtell. 

— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , 
Jan.  7,  1754. 

New  York,  December  31.  Last  Monday  Night, 
we  had  here  a very  hard  Gale  of  Wind  : It  began  to 
blow  about  eight  o’clock,  and  increased,  veering 
from  S.  E.  to  N.  W.  till  about  two  o’Clock  in  the 
Morning,  when  it  abated.  Several  Vessels  in  the 
Harbour  received  Damage,  and  we  hear  that  some 
Boats  are  drove  ashore  near  Elizabeth-Town  in 
New-Jersey.  About  12  o’clock  the  same  Night,  one 
Riggs,  a Newark  Boatman,  went  from  his  Lodgings 
to  look  after  his  Boat,  in  the  Gale,  and  as  he  has 
neither  been  heard  of,  nor  seen  since  ’ tis  imagined 
he  is  drown’d.- — The  Pennsylvania  Journal , Jan . 10, 
1754.  Numb.  579. 

TO  be  SOLD,  the  Plantation  whereon  John 
Worthley  lives,  in  Shrewsbury,  containing 
about  200  Acres  of  Land  and  Meadow,  also  a sepa- 
rate Lot  of  Salt  Meadow,  of  about  1 o Acres  ; the  Plan- 
tation is  situate,  lying  and  being  in  the  Township  of 
Shrewsbury,  near  the  Church  and  Quakers  Meeting- 
House,  and  lies  fronting  on  Shrewsbury  River,  very 
commodious  for  Fishing : Has  on  it  a Dwelling- 
H ouse  and  Orchard;  about  140  Acres  of  said  Land 
is  clear’d,  on  which  may  be  cut  60  Loads  of  English 
Hay  every  Year.  Whoever  has  a Mind  to  purchase 
the  said  Plantation,  may  apply  to  said  John  Worth- 


330  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [ 1 754 

ley,  on  the  Premisses. — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the 
Weekly  Post  Boy , Jan.  14,  1754. 

RUN  away  in  this  City,  on  Friday  the  5th 
Instant,  from  John  Miller,  of  German-Town, 
in  Hunterdon  County,  West-New-Jersey,  a Scotch 
Servant  Man,  named  Donald  M’Donald,  of  about  5 
Feet  8 Inches  high,  speaks  broad  Scotch,  has  a Cut 
on  his  under  Lip,  and  squints:  Had  on  when  he 
went  away,  a light  colour’d  Coat  with  red  Lining, 
strip’d  Jacket,  Check  Shirt,  and  wears  his  own  Hair. 
Whoever  takes  up  and  secures  said  Servant,  so  that 
his  Master  may  have  him  again,  and  gives  Notice 
either  to  Mr.  James  Newell  in  Amboy,  or  to  the 
Printers  hereof,  shall  have  Forty  Shillings  Reward, 
and  all  reasonable  Charges  paid,  by 

John  Miller. 

N.  B.  ’Tis  supposed  he  is  still  in  Town,  and  har- 
boured by  some  of  his  Acquaintance. — The  N.  Y. 
Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , Jfan.  14,  1754. 

RUN  away  the  25th  of  December  last,  from  John 
Scot,  of  Hanover  Township,  Morris  County, 
and  Province  of  New-Jersey,  a Servant  Man  named 
James  Murphy,  about  5 Feet  8 Inches  high,  much 
pitted  with  the  Small  Pox,  long  yellow  Hair  tyed 
behind  ; he  has  been  a Soldier  in  the  French  Service, 
talks  good  French.  Served  with  said  Scott,  as  a 
School-Master ; had  on  when  he  went  away  a new 
Bearskin  Coat  with  broad  Hair  Buttons,  a light  Col- 
our’d Rateen  Jacket,  Check  Shirt,  and  Leather 
Breeches  ; new  Worsted  Stockings,  and  new  Pumps. 
Whoever  secures  said  Servant,  so  as  his  Master  may 


1754] 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS.  331 

have  him  again,  shall  have  Forty  Shillings  Reward 
and  reasonable ’Charges  paid  by  me 

John  Scott, 

N.  B.  All  Masters  of  Vessels  are  discharged 
[forbid]  [sic]  on  their  Peril,  from  carrying  him  off. 
— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , Jan. 
I4>  1754- 

New  York,  January  7,  We  hear  from  Middle- 
town  in  New  Jersey,  that  John  Breton,  an  Inhabitant 
of  that  Place,  was  last  Week  found  frozen  to  Death 
in  a Meadow  near  Middletown  Creek.— The  Penn- 
sylvania Journal , Thursday , January  17,  1754. 

Numb.  580. 

Whereas  a certain  person  who  called  himself 
James  Butler,  of  a short  stature  pale  complection 
and  light  hair,  dressed  in  a snuff  coloured  old  coat 
and  waistcoat,  old  dirty  trowsers,  blue  grey  stockings 
and  very  old  shoes,  appearing  to  be  about  twenty 
five  years  of  age,  and  as  he  said  had  formerly  served 
his  time  with  a baker  in  Amboy,  came  to  the  house 
of  Mary  Ashford,  widow  in  New  Brunswick,  and  on 
Thursday,  the  13th  day  of  this  December,  did  felon- 
iously steal  and  carry  away  a box  of  the  wearing  ap- 
parel of  the  daughter  of  the  said  Mary  Ashford,  con- 
taining, several  caps,  shifts,  stockings,  some  new 
linen,  and  a new  velvet  hood,  and  ’tis  supposed  is 
gone  towards  Philadelphia,  These  are  therefore  to 
desire  all  persons,  who  may  happen  , to  travel  the 
publick  Road,  between  this  place  and  Philadelphia, 
and  are  inclined  to  relieve  the  injured  and  suppress 
such  villainy,  to  make  inquiry  after  said  James  But- 


332  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1754 

ler,  and  on  discovery  of  him  they  shall  be  handsome- 
ly rewarded  by  me,  the  subscriber.  New  Brunswick, 
December  20,  1753. 

Jean  Ashford. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Journal^  Jan.  17,  1753. 

Numb.  580. 

New-York , January  21.  We  hear  from  Sandy- 
Hook  that  on  Friday  last,  some  Whale  Men  Struck 
and  drove  ashore  a little  to  the  Southward  of  the 
High-Lands,  two  Whales,  one  of  which  was  a very 
large  One,  which  they  had  struck  at  several  Times 
before  they  kill’d  it.  ’Tis  said  they  have  bargained 
with  some  of  our  Pilots  to  assist  in  bringing  them 
into  a safe  Harbour. — The  N . Y.  Gazette  or  the 
Weekly  Post  Boy , Jan.  21,  1754. 

TO  be  sold  at  publick  Vendue,  on  Tuesday  the 
5th  of  March  next,  a very  good  Plantation, 
beautifully  situated  upon  Raway  River  Landing,  very 
convenient  to  Meetings,  Markets,  Schools,  &c.  con- 
taining about  80  Acres,  all  in  good  Fence,  and  well 
timber’d,  has  on  it  a large  new  Dwelling-House  well 
finish’d,  a good  Barn,  Shop,  Garden  and  Orchard, 
with  more  than  400  Fruit  Trees,  and  about  six  Acres 
of  good  English  Mowing  Ground.  Enquire  of  the 
Widow  Rebecca  Jacques,  living  on  the  Premises. 
The  Conditions  will  be  made  known,  by 

William  Deare,  Sheriff. 

— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , 
Jan.  21,  1754. 

Run  away  on  the  18th  instant,  at  night,  from  John 
Ladd,  of  Gloucester  county,  in  New  Jersey,  a servant 


1754] 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


333 


man,  named  John  Ermus,  alias-Huckaback,  of  a mid- 
dle size,  pale  complexion,  blind  of  one  eye,  it  being 
sunk  in  his  head,  about  28  years  of  age  : Had  on 

and  took  with  him,  a good  felt  hat,  worsted  cap,  or 
an  old  wig,  old  light  colour’d  coat,  with  brass  but- 
tons, but  no  lining,  a blue  and  white  linsey  woolsey 
jacket,  with  one  sleeve  all  blue,  half  worn  leather 
breeches,  ozenbrigs  trowsers,  two  ozenbrigs  shirts,  a 
homespun  black  and  white  under  jacket,  two  pair  of 
yarn  stockings,  one  pair  grey,  the  other  dark  col- 
our’d, neats  leather  shoes,  almost  new.  He  can 
speak  Dutch,  but  appears  to  be  this  country  born  ; 
he  lived  several  years  about  two  miles  eastward 
from  Germantown,  with  Thomas  Roberts,  junior. 
Whoever  secures  said  servant,  so  that  his  master 
may  have  him  again,  shall  have  Forty  Shillings  re- 
ward, paid  by 

John  Ladd. 

N.  B.  He  took  a falling-ax  with  him. — The  Penn- 
sylvania Gazette , Jan.  22,  1754.  Numb.  1309. 

New-  York , January  2 1 . We  hear  from  Elizabeth 
Town,  That  a Youth  about  16  years  old  was  missing 
from  that  Borough  on  Tuesday  last,  but  whether 
froze  to  Death  in  the  cold  Weather  which  we  had,  or 
not,  was  unknown.  Although  search  was  made  for 
him  by  Numbers  of  People,  he  was  not  found  on 
FYiday  last. — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post 
Boy , Jan.  28,  1754. 

TO  be  sold,  a Plantation  belonging  to  the  Estate 
of  the  Rev.  Theodoras  Jacobus  Frielinghuysen, 1 


1 See  N.  J.  Archives,  XII.,  658,  note. 


334  NEW  jersey  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1754 


deceased,  situate  in  the  Province  of  New-Jersey,  in 
the  County  of  Middlesex,  about  four  Miles  Distance 
from  the  City  of  New-Brunswick,  bounding-  on  the 
Road  which  leads  from  Brunswick  to  Trenton,  con- 
taining 200  Acres  of  good  arable  Land,  well  timber’d 
and  water’d,  on  which  there  is  a convenient  Dwell- 
ing-House and  Barn,  and  a very  good  Orchard,  of 
which  30  Barrels  of  Cyder  may  be  made  in  a good 
Apple  Year:  On  the  same,  in  a good  Summer,  may 
be  mowed  40  Loads  of  Hay,  and  much  more  after 
clearing  some  more  Land.  Also  to  be  sold,  a good 
Dwelling-House,  two  Story  high,  and  40  Feet  in 
Front,  together  with  a Stable  and  other  Appurten- 
ances, and  a Lot  of  Ground  40  Feet  broad,  and  100 
Feet  long,  in  the  City  of  New-Brunswick,  near  the 
House  and  Lot  of  Mr.  Henderick  Van  Deusen.  Any 
Person  or  Persons  inclining  to  purchase  both  or 
either  of  the  Premises,  may  apply  to  Mr.  Joris 
Brinckerhoff,  Merchant  in  New- York,  or  to  Mes- 
sieurs Theodoras  and  Johannes  Frielinghuysen , Min- 
isters of  the  Gospel  in  Albany  and  at  Rariton,  in 
order  to  be  acquainted  with  the  Conditions  of  Sale. 
An  indisputable  Title  will  be  given  by  Theodorus 
Frielinghuysen . — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly 
Post  Boy,  Jan.  28,  1754. 

WO  thousand  Acres  of  valuable  Land,  to  be 


Sold  very  reasonable,  lying  at  Greenwich , in 
the  County  of  Sussex , in  New-Jersey , about  two 
Mile  from  the  Court-House  in  said  County,  and  four 
Mile  from  a landine  Place  on  Delaware  River  above 

o 

Robinsons  Furnace,  ’ tis  well  stored  with  Black  walnut 
and  other  valuable  Timber,  which  may  be  transported 


1754] 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


335 


down  said  River,  in  Boats  or  Rafts,  to  Trenton  and 
P hiladelphia ; the  chief  Part,  upland,  fit  for  the 
Plough,  with  a sufficient  quantity  of  good  Swamp 
and  Meadow  ; there  is  two  Tenements  and  Farms 
begun,  a good  Saw  Mill  built,  and  very  good  Streams 
for  more  Mills  to  be  built  in  sundry  Places  on  said 
Land,  ’tis  a very  good  Place  for  raising  Stock,  hav- 
ing large  Mountains  very  near  the  Land,  is  exceed- 
ing  good  for  Grass  what  is  cleared,  and  likewise  for 
Grain,  a Publick  Road  from  Esopus  to  Philadelphia 
and  Lancaster , runs  through  this  Land  ; also  a Road 
from  Elizabeth-Town  Point  to  Pahaqualley , crosseth 
in  this  Tract.  For  further  Particulars,  enquire  of 
Jonathan  Ha7npton  in  Elizabeth  Town , or  of  Jona- 
than Hopkins  and  Barney  Swazey  on  the  Premisses, 
who  will  give  a good  Title  and  Time  for  Payment. 
Also  to  be  Sold  by  said  Hampton  500  Acres  of  Up- 
land and  Meadows,  in  Morris  County,  ten  Mile 
from  Elizabeth  Town , joining  Passaic  River,  on  the 
East,  and  the  Land  of  Messrs.  Penn  s on  the  West, 
which  will  be  Sold  either  together  or  in  small  Lotts, 
as  suits  the  Buyer.  Also  6 Acres  of  Land  with  a 
convenient  House,  and  small  Orchard,  with  the  half 
Part  of  a Saw  Mill,  Grist  Mill,  and  Boulting  Mill, 
and  one  Half  of  all  the  Utensils  belonging  to  the 
said  Mills,  joining  to  said  Land,  upon  Raway  River 
five  Miles  from  Elizabeth  Town.  Any  Person  inclin- 
ing to  purchase  either  of  the  two  last  Articles,  shall 
have  a clear  Title  and  Time  of  Payment  given. — The 
N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , Jan  28,  1754. 

New- York, -February  4.  The  least  of  the  two 
Whales,  mentioned  in  this  Paper  two  Weeks  since  to 


336 


NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [ 1 754 


be  run  ashore  a little  to  the  Southward  of  the  Hook, 
was  last  Thursday  brought  into  this  Harbour  by  a 
Sand  Boat  from  Rockaway  : Its  supposed  to  be  be- 

tween 15  and  20  Feet  long.  The  Cow,  we  are  told, 
was  not  seen  after  the  last  North-Wester. — The  N. 
Ym  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , Feb.  4,  1754. 

To  be  sold  by  Eleanor  Chew,  executrix  of  the  last 
will  and  testament  of  Joseph  Chew,  deceased,  the 
plantation  whereon  Archibald  Moffet  now  dwells, 
lying  on  great  Mantua  creek,  in  the  county  of  Glou- 
cester, in  West-New- Jersey,  containing  about  140 
acres  of  land,  40  whereof  is  cleared,  and  within  good 
fence,  with  about  ten  acres  of  meadow,  a young 
orchard  a good  house,  barracks  &c,  the  rest  choice 
good  wood  land.  Any  person  inclining  to  purchase 
the  same,  may  be  informed  of  the  terms,  by  applying 
to  Michal  Fisher,  Esq  ; living  on  Great  Timber  creek 
in  the  said  county,  or  to  the  said  executrix  in  Phila- 
delphia, And  all  persons  indebted  to  the  said  es- 
tate, are  desired  to  pay  ; and  those  that  have  any  de- 
mands against  the  said  estate,  to  bring  in  their  ac- 
counts, in  order  to  have  them  adjusted  by 


— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , Feb.  5,  1754. 
Numb.  1 3 1 1 . 


HREE  Hundred  and  Nineteen  Acres  of  Land, 


altogether,  or  in  100  Acre  Lots,  as  best  suits 
Purchaser,  it  being  the  Westermost  Part  of  the  High- 
lands of  Navesinks,  commodiously  situated  on 
Sandy-Hook  Bay  32  Chains,  and  fronting  the  Road 


Eleanor  Chew,  executrix. 


To  Be  Sold, 


1754] 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


337 


or  Harbour  of  Sandy-Hook  : There  is  on  the  said 

Land,  a very  convenient  watering  Place,  of  good 
Water,  being  much  used  by  Shipping,  which  makes 
it  a good  Market  for  all  Sorts  of  Poultery  and  Gar- 
den Truck  : It  is  also  very  convenient  for  Fishing, 

Oystering,  and  Clamming,  and  would  do  well  for  a 
publick  House : The  Land  is  well  watered  and  tim- 

bered, the  farthest  of  which  is  within  one  Mile  of  a 
good  Landing.  Any  Person  inclining  to  purchase, 
may  be  further  informed  by  applying  to  Robert 
Hartshorne,  living  near  the  Premises.  The  Title  in- 
disputable.1 

— -The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , 
Feb.  ii,  1754. 

New  York.  February  4.  Last  Week  a small 
Whale,  about  20  Feet  long,  was  towed  up  here  from 
Rocaway,  where  it  was  found  floating  near  the  Shore 
by  some  Men  who  were  there  a Clamming : It 

seems  this  with  another  much  larger,  were  both 
kill’d  by  some  Whalers  about  a Fortnight  ago  off 
Sandy  Hook,  but  were  drove  to  Sea  by  the  hard 
Weather  we  had  at  that  Time,  ’tho  ’tis  now  currently 
reported,  that  the  latter  is  also  found,  and  said  to  be 
very  valuable. — The  Pennsylvania  Journal , Feb.  12, 
1754.  Numb.  584. 

New  York,  February  4.  Captain  Searjant  who 
arrived  at  Amboy  on  Friday  last,  in  9 Weeks  from 
Madeira,  informs  us,  That  on  the  30th  ultimo,  he 
spoke  with  Captain  John  Taylor  of  this  Port,  about 
60  Leagues  West  for  Bermudas,  bound  for  Antigua, 

1 The  name  of  Ereck  Hartshorne  is  added  in  the  Gazette  for  Feb.  25. 

9*' 


338  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1754 

all  well  on  board. — The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , Feb . 
12,  1754.  Numb.  1312. 

To  be  sold  by  the  subscriber,  living-  in  Bridge-Town, 
commonly  called  Mount-holly,  in  Burlington  county, 
West-New  Jersey,  the  following  lots  of  land,  viz. 
A plantation  adjoining  to  the  said  town,  containing 
212  acres  of  land,  on  which  is  a good  house  and 
orchard,  with  50  or  60  acres  of  clear’d  land,  about 
30  acres  of  deep  meadow,  the  most  whereof  is  ditch’d 
and  dry,  near  T5  acres  clear’d  and  mowable,  also  12 
acres  of  dry  meadow,  very  good,  mostly  in  clover 
grass.  Another  tract  of  250  acres  of  good  land, 
about  a mile  from  the  above  town,  extending  to  the 
south  branch  of  Rancocas  creek,  where  the  tide  flows, 
adjoining  to  the  Old  Bridge,  on  the  country  road,  it 
has  a large  stream  of  water  running  thro’  it,  suffi- 
cient for  a mill,  and  is  supposed  to  have  40  acres  of 
good  meadow.  For  terms,  enquire  of 

Abraham  Farrington. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , Feb.  19,  1754. 

Numb.  1313. 

To  be  sold  by  publick  vendue  on  Wednesday,  the 
6th  of  March,  on  the  premises,  by  the  subscribers  A 
commodious  plantation,  situated  in  Piles-grove  town- 
ship, Salem  county,  now  in  the  occupation  of  John 
Keen,  containing  364  acres,  20  of  which  is  good 
meadow,  with  a good  brick  dwelling  house,  barn, 
stable,  &c.  great  part  of  the  land  well  timber’d. 
The  title  and  terms  of  sale  may  be  seen  on  said  day. 

Andrew  Tranberg,  Adolph  Benzel,  Olove  Parlin. 

N.  B.  To  be  sold  said  day  80  acres  of  timber  land, 


754] 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


339 


adjoining  said  plantation. — The  Pennsylvania  Gaz- 
etteFeb.  19,  1754.  No.  1313. 

New  York,  February  18. 

Last  Saturday,  se-night  the  Snow  Isabel,  Capt. 
Simmons,  from  Leith,  arrived  off  Sandy  Hook,  where 
she  came  to  an  Anchor,  and  rode  out  the  hard  Gale 
we  had  then  ; after  which  she  attempted  to  come  up, 
but  the  hard  and  cold  Winds  obliged  her  to  put  into 
Parmaceti  Cove,  where  we  hear  she  still  lies,  is  cov- 
er’d with  Ice,  as  endangers  her  coming  here  till 
warmer  Weather.- — The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , Feb. 
26,  1754.  Numb.  1314. 

Elizabeth-town,  New  Jersey,  Feb.  22,  1754. 

Twenty  Pieces  of  Eight  Reward 
Whereas  Isaac  Cory,  son  of  John  Cory,  of  Eliza- 
beth-town went  away  from  his  parents  that  very 
cold  Tuesday,  the  2 2d  of  January  last,  supposed  to 
be  something  disorder’d  in  his  mind,  which  caused 
diligent  search  to  be  made,  for  fear  he  was  frozen  to 
death  ; he  was  16  years  of  age,  of  a middle  size,  had 
dark  eyes  and  light  hair:  Had  on  two  dark  grey 
jackets,  with  pewter  buttons,  the  upper  one  with 
slash  sleeves,  old  wool  hat,  leather  breeches,  with 
brass  buttons,  old  shoes,  grey  stockings,  and  a 
coarse^  shirt.  If  fehe  be  living,  any  person  that  will 
bring  him  home,  shall  have  Twenty  Pieces  of  Eight 
reward  and  reasonable  charges,  paid  by 

John  Cory. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , Feb.  26,  1754. 
Numb.  1314. 


340 


NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1754 


Whereas  Athalanah  Douglass,  the  wife  of  George 
Douglass  has  behaved  to  her  said  husband  in  a very 
unbecoming  manner,  and  also  contracted  divers 
debts  without  his  knowledge  : These  are  therefore 

to  forewarn  all  persons  from  trusting  her  on  his  ac- 
count, for  he  will  pay  no  debts  of  her  contracting 
after  the  date  hereof. 


Bordentown,  February  25,  1754. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , Feb.  26,  1754. 

Numb.  1314. 

To  be  Sold, 

By  John  Scot,  of  the  Town  of  Hanover,  in  Morris 
County,  East- New- Jersey,  the  following  Tracts  of 
Land  lying  in  said  County,  viz. 

NE  of  450  Acres  in  Morris  Town,  about  one 


Mile  from  the  Court  House  and  Meeting 


House,  having  two  Houses  thereon,  with  a young 
Orchard,  has  50  Acres  of  good  Wheat  Ground, 
cleared  and  in  Fence,  four  Acres  of  mowing,  and 
thirty  more  may  be  made.  One  other  of  100  Acres 
in  the  Town  of  Mendon,1  one  Mile  from  a Meeting 
and  Mill,  has  30  Acres  of  Wheat  cleared  and  in 
Fence,  with  a House,  &c.  One  other  of  350  Acres 
in  Hanover  Town,  200  of  which  is  good  Meddow, 
three  Ouarters  of  a Mile  from  a Mill  and  Meeting. 
One  other  in  said  Town  joining  to  said  Scott’s  Plan- 
tation, of  300  Acres,  100  of  which  is  good  Meddow, 
and  40  of  that  good  English  mowing,  all  cleared, 
ditched  and  fenced.  He  has  also  to  dispose  of,  400 
Acres  of  Meadow,  lying  in  the  Township  of  Green- 


George  Douglass- 

c2>  O 


1 Mendham. 


1754] 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


341 


wich,  in  Cumberland  County,  West-New-Jersey, 
known  by  the  Name  of  Budd’s-Marsh,  and  adjoining 
Stutham’s  Neck,  &c.  Whoever  is  inclin’d  to  pur- 
chase any  of  the  said  Plantations,  may  apply  to  the 
said  John  Scott,  who  will  agree  on  reasonable  Terms, 
and  give  an  indisputable  Title  for  the  same.— -The  N. 
Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , Feb.  25,  1754. 

To  be  sold  at  publick  Vendue,  on  the  Premises,  on 
Monday  the  25th  Day  of  March  Inst,  at  two  of  the 
Clock  in  the  Afternoon  of  the  same  Day. 

Tract  of  Land,  lately  belonging  to  Francis 


Van  Dyke,  deceased,  situate  at  Second 


River,  in  the  County  of  Essex,  in  New  Jersey  : Con- 
taining about  Forty  Acres  of  good  Orchard  ; lying 
on  Passaic  River,  and  adjoining  to  the  Mills  of  Mr. 
Stephen  Van  Courtlandt. 

A good  and  clear  Title  will  be  given  for  the  same 
to  the  Purchaser. — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly 
Post  Boy , March  4,  1754. 

HIS  is  to  give  Notice,  that  there  is  to  be  Sold, 


a Lot  of  Land,  situate,  lying  and  being  in  the 
Township  of  Shrewsbury,  in  the  Province  of  East- 
New-Jersey,  containing  about  14  Acres,  with  a very 
good  Dwelling  House  thereon,  two  Stories  and  a 
half  high,  Sash  window’d,  with  a good  Kitchen  and 
Stable,  a good  Stone  Well,  and  about  20  bearing 
Apple  Trees  ; it’s  very  suitable  for  a Shopkeeper  or 
Tavern,  as  it  is  situate  within  a Quarter  of  a Mile  of 
the  Center  of  the  Township,  where  there  is  an  Eng- 
lish Church,  Presbyterian  and  Quaker  Meeting- 
Houses,  and  on  the  publick  Road.  For  further  Par- 


34-2  NE\V  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1754 

ticulars,  enquire  of  Richard  Burdg  and  Jonathan 
Holmes  in  New-York,  and  Jonathan  Burdg,  of  the 
Township  of  Lower  Freehold,  in  the  Province  of 
East  New-Jersey  aforesaid.  An  indisputable  Title 
will  be  given  by  Richard  Burdg  aforesaid. — The  N. 
Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , March  4,  1754. 

Philadelphia.  We  hear  that  the  Schooner  Storke, 
Captain  Flower,  from  North-Carolina,  was  drove 
ashore  near  Egg  Harbour,  and  beat  off  her  Rudder, 
after  which  he  got  into  the  Inlet,  and  was  repairing, 
in  order  to  proceed  on  his  Voyage  to  this  Place.  By 
him  we  have  an  Account  of  the  Arrival  of  the  Snow 
George,  Capt.  Rankin,  from  this  Place. — The  Penn- 
sylvania Journal,  March  5,  1754.  Numb.  587. 

Philadelphia,  March  5. 

We  hear  that  Captain  Flower,  inward  bound  from 
North  Carolina,  ran  ashore  on  Cape-May,  but  is  said 
to  be  got  off  again,  with  the  Loss  of  his  Rudder,  and 
other  damage. — The  Pennsylvania  Gazette,  March  5, 
1754.  Numb.  1315. 

To  be  sold  by  the  subscriber,  a plantation,  situated 
in  Greenwich  township,  Gloucester  county,  near  the 
mouth  of  Rackoon  creek,  containing  160  acres,  near 
one  half  of  which  may  be  made  good  meadow,  a con- 
siderable quantity  improved,  and  all  within  good 
bank,  with  a good  dwelling  house,  large  barn,  and  a 
fine  thriving  young  orchard ; also  a considerable 
quantity  of  cedar  swamp,  well  timber’d  with  good  rail 
timber,  lying  within  half  a mile  of  said  plantation. 
The  said  plantation  lies  pleasantly  fronting  the  river 


1754] 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


343 


Delaware,  and  almost  opposite  Chester.  Any  per- 
son inclining  to  purchase,  may  view  the  premises, 
and  know  the  conditions  of  sale,  by  applying  to 

Thomas  Birkham. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , March  5,  1754. 
Numb.  1315. 

RUN  away  the  10th  of  January  last,  from  John 
Wardell  of  Shrewsbury,  a small  Negro  Fel- 
low, named  Ash;  he  took  with  him  a red  Duffil 
Watch-Coat,  good  Bearskin  Under-Coat,  Camblet 
Jacket,  and  Kersey  Breeches,  with  Brass  Buttons  on 
them.  Whoever  takes  up  and  secures  said  Man,  so 
that  his  Master  may  have  him  again,  shall  have  Forty 
Shillings  Reward,  and  all  reasonable  Charges  paid, 
by  John  Wardell. 

— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , 
March  11,  1754. 

To  be  Sold  together  or  in  Parcels. 

SEVERAL  Tracts  of  Land,  situate  in  the  Town- 
ship of  Strafford,  in  the  County  of  Monmouth, 
at  a Place  called  Barnagat;  to  wit,  one  large  Tract, 
containing  between  Six  and  Seven  Thousand  Acres, 
with  a great  Quantity  of  Marsh  and  Meadow  be- 
longing to  the  same,  together  with  a great  Quantity 
of  Beach,  whereon  there  is  very  good  Range  and 
Feed  for  Horses  and  Cattle  ; there  are  three  large 
Farms  now  upon  the  said  Tract,  and  more  may  be 
made ; and  also  several  Swamps  within  the  said 
Tract,  abounding  with  Cedar,  Pine,  and  Oak,  &c.  it 
is  bounded  by  a large  Bay,  in  which  there  is  Plenty 
of  Fish,  and  Wild-Fowl  of  all  Sorts  in  the  Season  of 


344 


NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [17 54 


the  Year;  it  is  esteemed  as  advantageous  a Place 
for  raising  of  Stock  as  any  in  the  Province,  the  Crea- 
tures upon  the  Beach,  wintering  themselves  without 
the  Trouble  of  getting  Hay  for  them. — There  is  also 
to  be  Sold,  adjoining  to  the  above  Tract,  and  with 
or  without  the  same,  a good  Saw-Mill,  almost  new, 
which  goes  with  two  Saws,  and  hath  every  Thing  in 
compleat  Order  ; the  Pond  is  fed  by  living  Springs, 
retains  Plenty  of  Water  in  the  driest  Time,  inso- 
much, that  the  Mill  may  keep  constantly  going, 
and  Water  to  spare  for  other  Uses.  There  are  sev- 
eral Pieces  of  Cedar  Swamp,  and  Parcels  of  Pine  to 
be  Sold  with  the  said  Mill  for  the  Accommodation 
thereof,  so  that  the  mill  will  have  Plenty  of  Tim- 
ber for  many  Years:  Good  sufficient  Deeds  with 
Warrantees,  will  be  given  for  the  said  Lands  and 
Premises,  the  Title  being  indisputable.  Any  Person 
inclining  to  purchase  the  Whole  or  any  Part,  may  en- 
quire of  Philip  Kearny  or  John  Burnet  in  Perth-Am- 
boy,  or  of  John  Nevill,  or  James  Hey  wood,  near  the 
Premises,  and  know  further. 

N.  B.  If  three  or  four  Families  are  desirous  of 
settling  and  living  near  together,  they  cannot  have  a 
better  Opportunity. — The  N.Y.  Gazette  or  the  Week- 
ly Post  Boy , March  1 1,  1754. 

A School-Master  that  is  a young  Man,  is  wanted 
at  Rariton,  about  1 2 Miles  above  the  Landing.  Any 
Person  properly  qualified  may  apply  to  John  Brough- 
ton, Ksq;  on  the  Spot. — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the 
Weekly  Post  Boy , March  25,  1754. 


I754J 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


345 


Seven  Pistoles , Reward. 

Sent  out  with  tinware  to  sell,  on  the  31st  of  Janu- 
ary last,  by  the  subscriber,  living  in  Amwell,  Hunter- 
don county,  YVest-New-Jersey,  a sevant  man,  nam’d 
Nicholas  Goddard,  who  is  since  run  away  ; he  is  a 
tin-plate  worker  by  trade,  was  born  and  serv’d  his 
time  in  London,  is  about  28  years  of  age,  of  short 
stature,  and  walks  somewhat  stooping,  dark  com- 
plexion, full  mouth’d,  black  strait  hair,  and  much 
scarified  under  one  of  his  cheek-bones,  occasion’d  by 
the  king’s  evil,  and  very  much  given  to  drink.  Had 
with  him  an  old  black  mare,  short  dock’d  and  shod 
all  round,  an  old  saddle  and  two  baskets  of  tin  ware. 
Had  on  when  he  went  away,  a blue  bear  skin  coat, 
with  flower’d  brass  buttons,  whitish  cloth  jacket,  with 
the  same  sort  of  buttons,  buck-skin  breeches,  old 
white  tow  shirt,  half  worn  felt  hat,  lightish  colour’d 
stockings.  He  parted  from  his  comrade  at  the 
White  Horse,  on  Conestogue  road,  on  Tuesday,  the 
fifth  day  of  February  last,  and  is  supposed  to  be 
gone  towards  Virginia.  Whoever  takes  up  and 
secures  the  said  servant,  so  as  his  master  may  have 
him  again,  shall  have  Seven  Pistoles  reward,  and  rea- 
sonable charges,  paid  by 

Samuel  Kempton. 

N.  B.  He  formerly  belong’d  to  Isaac  Corin,  Tinner 
in  Philadelphia.  All  masters  of  vessels  are  forbid  to 
carry  him  off  at  their  peril. — The  Pennsylvania  Gaz- 
ette, March  26,  1754.  Numb.  1318. 

To  be  Lett  by  die  Subscribers  for  Seven  Years, 

A Small  Farm  or  Plantation  of  about  70  Acres, 
lying  in  Shrewsbury,  East  New-Jersey,  and  County 


34<5 


NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [ 1 754 


of  Monmouth  : There  is  on  it  a good  large  Dwelling- 
House,  has  two  Orchards,  a small  Barn,  Store- 
House,  and  Waggon-House  ; with  a Grist-Mill,  Full- 
ing-Mill, and  Bolting-Mill,  which  goes  by  Water,  and 
hoists  by  Water  : It  is  very  convenient  for  a Store- 
keeper being  within  four  Miles  of  a Public  Landing. 
Any  Person  inclining  to  hire  said  Premisses,  may  en- 
quire of  John  Abbot,  near  Trenton,  or  John  Williams, 
in  Shrewsbury  who  has  the  Disposal  of  the  same. 


— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , 
April  i,  1754. 

UN  away  from  George  Mumford,  of  Fisher’s- 


Island,  the  27th  Instant,  four  Men  Servants, 

a white  Man  and  three  Negroes The 

white  Man  named  Joseph  Heday,  says  he  is  a Native 
of  Newark,  in  the  Jerseys,  a short  well  set  Fellow, 
of  a ruddy  Complection  ; his  Cloathing  when  he 
went  away  was  a red  Whitney  Great  Coat,  red  and 
white  flower’d  Serge  Jacket,  a Swan-Skin  strip’d  dit- 
to, lapeil’d,  a Pair  of  Leather  Breeches,  a Pair  of 

Trowsers,  old  Shoes.  &c — The  N.  Y. 

Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , April  1,  1754. 


On  the  7th.  ult.  a Sloop  belonging  to  Norwalk  in 
New  England,  bound  in  from  the  West-Indies,  was 
cast  away  at  Barnegat ; but  the  People,  and  some  of 
the  Cargo,  ’tis  said,  are  saved. — The  Pennsylvania 
Gazette , April  4,  1754.  Numb.  1319. 


John  Abbot 
John  Williams. 


New  York,  April  1. 


1754] 


newspaper  Extracts. 


34 1 


Philadelphia  March  30,  1754 
All  persons  indebted  to  the  estate  of  Mr.  Daniel 
Hingston,  late  of  Gloucester  county,  deceased,  are 
desired  to  pay  their  respective  debts  : And  all  who 
have  any  demands  against  said  estate,  are  desired  to 
bring  in  their  accounts,  that  they  may  be  adjusted  by 
Joseph  Sims,  administrator  to  the  said  estate. — The 
Pennsylvania  Gazette , April  4,  1754.  Numb.  1319. 

Philadelphia,  April  4,  1754. 
Run  away  on  the  25th  of  last  month,  from  Peter 
{ones,  at  the  Lake,  in  Gloucester  county,  An  Irish 
servant  man,  named  Thomas  Deal  or  Dean,  about 
36  years  of  age,  about  5 feet  6 inches  high,  has  a 
scar  over  his  right  eye,  and  a cut  in  his  belly,  a little 
above  the  waistband  of  his  breeches,  which  was  sewed 
up,  wears  his  own  strait  hair : Took  with  him,  An 
old  whitish  colour’d  coat,  calicoe  jacket,  and  a green 
pea  jacket  coarse  white  trowsers,  old  stockings, 
middling  good  shoes,  with  steel  buckles,  and  may 
have  several  other  things.  ’Tis  supposed  he  may 
have  an  old  pass  ; knows  almost  all  parts  of  the 
country,  having  been,  as  he  says,  a pedlar.  Who- 
ever takes  up  and  secures  said  servant,  so  as  his 
master  may  have  him  again,  shall  have  Five  Pounds 
reward,  and  reasonable  charges,  paid  by 

Peter  Jones. 

N.  B.  All  masters  of  vessels  are  forbid  to  carry 
him  off  at  their  peril. — The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , 
April  4,  1754.  Numb.  1319. 

To  be  Lett,  for  seven  years, 

A Grist-mill,  fulling  mill,  and  boulting  mill,  all  goes 


348 


NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS. 


L 1 754 

by  water,  and  the  merchant-work  hoisted  by  water, 
with  a large  dwelling  house,  and  about  70  acres  of 
good  land,  two  good  orchards,  a small  barn,  stone 
house,  and  a waggon-house.  It  is  very  suitable  for 
a store-keeper,  being  situated  in  Shrewsbury,  in 
Monmouth  county,  East  New  Jersey,  about  five 
miles  from  a publick  landing.  Any  person  inclining 
to  rent  the  premises,  may  apply  to  John  Abbot  near 
Trenton,  or  to  John  Williams,  of  Shrewsbury,  who 
have  the  disposal  of  the  sam e. — The  Pennsylvania 
Gazette,  April  4,  1754.  Numb.  1319. 

- To  be  Sold. 

A lot  of  land,  situated  on  the  north  side  of  Mill- 
street,  in  Bridge  town,  commonly  called  Mount  holly, 
in  Burlington  county,  West-Jersey,  containing  one 
rod  and  seven  square  perches,  lying  just  against  the 
saw-mill,  with  a good  dwelling-house,  and  out  houses, 
very  commodious  for  store-keeping,  or  any  publick 
business;  the  lot  is  well  water’d  with  a constant 
stream  running  through  it.  Any  person  inclining  to 
purchase,  may  apply  to  Zebulon  Webb,  at  Mount- 
misery  saw  mill,  and  know  the  terms. — The  Penn- 
sylvania Gazette , April  4,  1754.  Numb . 1319. 

RUN  away  on  the  2d  of  this  Instant  April,  from 
James  Glover,  of  Middletown  in  Monmouth 
County,  two  Servant  Men  aged  each  about  19  Years, 
the  one  an  Irishman,  named  George  Tate,  who  hath 
lately  been  a Servant  to  Thomas  Rattoon  at  Amboy- 
Ferry,  and  hath  his  Indenture  for  a Pass  ; he  had 
when  he  went  away,  a new  homespun’  Coat  of  mix’d 
Cloth,  of  a bleuish  Colour,  also  a white  Jacket  and 


1754] 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


349 


Trowsers,  red  Great  Coat,  Felt  Hat,  his  Hair  is  of  a 
brownish  Colour,  he  is  well  Set,  and  of  middle  Stat- 
ure, he  has  a Scar  upon  one  Cheek,  believed  to  be 
the  Left ; the  other  an  Englishman  named  William 
Furr,  who  had  a Coat  of  the  same  Cloth  of  the  afore- 
said ; the  one  Coat  had  metal  Buttons,  the  other 
with  Buttons  covered  with  the  same  Cloth  ; he  had 
a brown  Jacket  of  homespun  Cloth,  Leather  Breeches  : 
they  had  a Bag  with  sundry  other  Cloaths,  had  a Felt 
Hat,  the  bottom  of  his  Shoes  full  of  Hob  Nails,  his 
Hair  black,  and  he  is  of  a brown  Complexion,  well 
set,  and  both  of  a Height  ; whoever  takes  up  said 
Servants,  and  secures  them  so  that  their  said  Master 
may  have  them  again,  shall  have  Forty  Shillings  Re- 
ward for  each,  and  all  reasonable  Charges  paid  b.y 


— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , 
April  8,  1754. 

ADE  his  Escape  from  his  Bail,  on  the  5th  of 


Edwards,  a Mason  by  Trade,  about  5 Feet  and  a 
half  High,  well  set,  black  Complection,  and  pitted 
with  the  Small  Pox,  and  fresh  Colour  ; had  on  when 
he  went  away,  a blue  Broad  Cloth  Coat  and 
Breeches,  green  Ratteen  jacket,  a good  Beaver  Hat 
and  black  Wig,  white  and  check’d  Shirts,  and  is  a 
lover  of  Strong  Liquor,  and  talkative  when  merry 
therewith,  but  silent  when  sober ; he  also  took  with 
him  a little  Bay  Horse  and  fashionable  Saddle,  with 
red  Plush  Housing  fring’d  ; and  has  left  the  Sub- 
scriber, who  is  his  special  Bail,  to  be  a very  great 
Sufferer  by  his  Escape  : Therefore  whoever  takes  up 


James  Glover. 


February  last,  an  Englishman,  named  John 


350  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1754 

said  Edwards,  and  secures  him  in  any  Goal,  so  as  he 
may  be  brought  to  Justice,  shall  have  Three  Pistoles 
Reward,  and  if  brought  back  to  the  Subscriber  living 
near  to  Samuel  Johnson,  Esq  ; in  Kingswood,  Hun- 
terdon County,  New  Jersey,  shall  have  Five  Pistols 
Reward  and  all  reasonable  Charges  paid  by 

Richard  Maybury. 

N.  B.  It  may  be  he  may  change  his  Name  and 
Apparel. 

— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Tost  Boy , 
April  8,  1754. 

Borden-Town  Stage  is  carried  on  as  formerly,  viz. 
Joseph  Borden’s  Stage  boat,  Nicholas  George,  Mas- 
ter, attends  at  the  Crooked  Billet  wharff  every  Mon- 
day and  Tuesday ; and  his  Shallop,  Charles  Taylor, 
Master,  at  the  same  wharff,  every  Friday  and  Satur- 
day ; the  Stage-waggon,  kept  by  Joseph  Richards, 
attends  the  same  boats  ; the  Stage-boat  at  Amboy, 
kept  by  James  Wells,  late  from  Philadelphia.  Our 
adversaries  have  been  pleased  to  advertise  that  they 
can  give  people  greater  dispatch  than  we  can,  so  that 
we  appeal  to  fact:  As  we  were  the  promoters  of 

this  scheme,  as  yet  of  no  advantage  to  any  but  the 
publick,  and  as  we  take  pay  for  13  miles  less  land 
carriage  than  the  Burlington  people  do,  we  hope  all 
well-minded  People  will  lay  their  commands  upon 
their  humble  Servants. 

Joseph  Borden,  jun. 

Joseph  Richards 

James  Wells. 

- — The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , April  11,  1754. 
Numb.  1320. 


1754] 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


351 


Philadelphia,  April  11,  1754. 

Notice  is  hereby  given,  that  George  Burns  is  re- 
mov’d from  New-York  to  Trenton  Ferry  ; where  he 
keeps  a house  of  good  entertainment  for  all  Gentle- 
men and  Travellers. -The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , 

April  11,  1754.  Numb.  1320. 

Run  away  on  the  first  of  March  last,  from  John 
Cuming  of  Trenton,  a Dutch  servant  woman,  nam’d 
Maria  Kummersfield,  about  26  years  of  age,  of  a 
sandy  complexion,  thick  and  fat,  talks  very  bad  Eng- 
lish, has  a hobling  walk,  and  stoops  pretty  much. 
Had  on  when  she  went  away,  a light  yellowish  col- 
our’d gown,  and  a worsted  damask  petticoat,  much 
the  colour  of  the  gown,  a short  calicoe  sack,  of  a pur- 
ple and  blue  colour,  and  dog-skin  shoes.  Whoever 
takes  up  and  secures  said  servant,  so  that  her  mas- 
ter may  have  her  again,  shall  have  Twenty  Shillings 
reward,  and  reasonable  charges,  paid  by 

John  Cuming. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , April  11,  1754. 

Numb.  1320. 

To  be  sold  or  lett,  by  the  subscriber,  living  in 
Trenton.  A Good  commodious  stone  house,  with 
very  good  cellars,  a good  yard  and  garden,  and  a 
very  good  stable  ; also  a very  good  brew  house,  with 
all  conveniences  for  carrying  on  the  brewing  trade, 
all  in  very  good  order.  Enquire  of  the  owner,  living 
in  said  house,  who  will  inform  the  condition  of  sale. 

Henry  Marseelis.1 

1 A brewer  in  Trenton  for  many  years.  Probably  of  the  Merselis  family  of  Preaknes§ 
and  Paterson. 


352 


NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [ 1/54 


N.  B.  The  title  is  indisputable. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , April  11,  1754. 
Numb.  1320. 

To  Be  Sold, 

A Grist-Mill  with  Two  Pair  of  Stones  ; a very 
good  Dwelling-House  and  Barn,  with  about 
180  Acres  of  Land  adjoining  the  same,  near  80 
Acres  of  which  is  well  timber’d  and  very  good  Wood- 
Land,  the  rest  being  cleared:  The  Whole  is  very 

conveniently  situated  near  upon  Rariton  River,  oppo- 
site to  Rariton  Landing,  and  within  a Mile  of  New- 
Brunswick  ; the  same  being  Part  of  the  Estate  late- 
ly belonging  to  Mr.  Matthew  Clarkson,  deceased, 
and  Mr.  Gerardus  Depeyster,  and  on  which  the  said 
Depeyster  lately  lived  ; together  with  which,  and  in 
order  to  accommodate  the  Purchaser,  if  he  inclines  to 
it,  will  be  sold  the  One-half  of  an  Island  of  Meadow, 
between  fresh  and  salt,  containing  about  16  Acres, 
being  as  good  and  as  conveniently  situated  as 
any  Meadow  of  the  like  Kind,  on  Rariton  River,  in 
which  it  lies,  and  within  a few  Stone’s  throw  of  Mr. 
Henry  Lonfield’s  House,  of  whom  the  same  was  pur- 
chased, Any  Person  inclining  to  purchase,  may  ap 
ply  to  Anthony  White,1  living  within  a Quarter  of  a 
Mile  of  the  Mill  and  Dwelling-House  above-men- 
tioned, by  whom  a good  sufficient  Title,  and  a reason- 

1 Anthony  White,  son  of  Anthony,  son  of  Leonard,  Chief  Justice  of  the  Bermudas, 
m.  Elizabeth,  dau.  of  Governor  Lewis  Morris,  of  New  Jersey,  and  held  various  offices  in 
the  Province,  being  commissioned  one  of  the  Surrogates  of  East  Jersey  in  1762,  and  in  the 
same  year  Judge  of  Admiralty,  to  succeed  his  brother-in-law,  Lewis  Morris,  jun.  In 
1751  he  was  commissioned  Lientenant-Colonel.  He  was  a considerable  property  owner 
in  and  near  New  Brunswick.  His  son,  Anthony  Walton  White,  was  a Colonel  of  Cavalry 
in  the  Continental  army,  doing  good  service  for  the  patriot  cause. 


1754] 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


353 


able  Time  for  the  Purchase  Money  will  be  given. — 
— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  Weekly  Post  Boy , April  15, 

1 754* 

RUN  away  from  Elisha  Bond,  of  Trenton,  in 
West-New-Jersey,  an  Irish  Servant  Woman, 
named  Ruth  Orr,  born  in  Dublin,  about  35  Years  of 
Age,  thin  Visage,  and  light  Hair,  of  a small  Stature, 
and  squints  ; supposed  to  have  changed  the  Cloaths 
she  had  on  when  she  went  away : She  has  been 

seen  in  New-York.  Whoever  takes  up  the  said  Ser- 
vant Woman,  and  secures  her  so  that  her  Master 
may  have  her  again,  shall  have  Twenty  Shillings 
Reward,  and  all  reasonable  Charges  paid  by  me, 

Elisha  Bond. 

— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , 
April  15,  1754. 

RUN  away  from  the  Subscriber,  living  at  Piscat- 
away,  on  the  19th  Day  of  February  last,  a 
negro  Fellow  named  Primus,  of  a yellow  Complec 
tion,  near  six  Foot  high,  speaks  good  English:  Had 

on  when  he  went  away,  a grey  Jacket  and  Breeches, 
white  Stockings  and  good  Shoes. 

Whoever  takes  up  and  secures  said  Negro,  so  that 
his  Master  may  have  him  again,  shall  have  Three 
Pounds  Reward,  and  all  reasonable  Charges,  paid  by 

John  Martin. 

— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy 
April  15,  1754. 

This  Is  To  Give  Notice, 

THAT  George  Burns,  late  of  New- York,  Tav- 
ern-Keeper, is  remov’d  to  Trenton  Ferry, 
23 


354  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1754 

where  Gentlemen,  Travellers  and  others,  who  will 
please  to  favour  him  with  their  Company,  may  de- 
pend upon  meeting-  with  as  good  Entertainment, 
both  for  themselves  and  Horses  as  at  any  Publick 
House  between  Philadelphia  and  New-  York, 

By  their  Humble  Servant , 

George  Burns. 

— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , 
April  15,  1754. 

March  9.  We  hear  it  is  proposed  to  annex  the 
Province  of  New-Jersey  to  that  of  New  York. — The 
Pennsylvania  Gazette , April  18,  1754.  Numb.  1321. 

Arrivals — From  South  Carolina — Prince  George, 
Bostock,  at  Deal. 

From  Virginia — Baltimore,  Randolph,  Charming- 
Nancy,  Tolman,  and  Becky,  Smith  at  Deal.(?) 

From  Rhode  Island.  The  Homer,  Galaty,  at 
Deal. — The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , April  18,  1754. 
Numb.  1321. 

Philadelphia,  March  27,  1754. 

Run  away  last  night,  from  William  Connely,  of 
Gilbert’s  manor,  New  Providence  township,  an  Irish 
servant  man,  named  Edward  Linnard,  pretty  lusty, 
about  5 feet,  3 inches  high,  has  black  hair,  fresh  com- 
plexion, and  about  24  years  of  age  : Had  on,  and 
took  with  him,  when  he  went  away,  a new  felt  hat, 
half  worn  brown  drugget  coat,  lightish  colour’d  linsey 
jacket,  a pair  of  new  buckskin  breeches,  with  flat 
metal  buttons,  new  shoes,  with  large  brass  buckles, 
coarse  tow  shirt,  and  a fine  linen  one,  check  trowsers, 


1754] 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


355 


and  a red  flag  handkerchief.  Whoever  takes  up 
and  secures  said  servant,  so  as  his  master  may  have 
him  again,  shall  have  Forty  Shillings  reward,  if  taken 
up  within  40  miles  of  Philadelphia,  if  further  Three 
Pounds,  and  reasonable  charges,  paid  by 


N.  B.  All  masters  of  vessels  are  forbid  to  carry 
him  off. — The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , April  18,  1754. 
Numb.  1321. 


HAT  James  Wells,  being  provided  with  a Boat 


exceeding  well  fitted,  with  a very  handsome 
Cabbin,  and  all  necessary  Accommodations,  proposes 
to  give  his  Attendance,  at  the  White- Hall-Slip,  every 
Monday  and  Thursday,  and  the  same  Day,  Wind 
and  Weather  permitting,  to  proceed  for  Amboy- Ferry , 
where  a Waggon,  will  be  ready  to  receive  either 
Goods  or  Passengers,  and  to  proceed  with  them  to 
Borden  s Town , where  a Stage-Boat  will  be  ready  to 
carry  them  to  Philadelphia;  and  the  same  Method 
will  be  followed  from  the  Crooked- Billet  Wharf  at 
Philadelphia , up  to  Borden  s Town , and  shall  pro- 
ceed, Load  or  no  Load,  twice  a Week,  by  which 
Means,  Passengers  or  Goods  may  never  be  detained 
on  the  Road.  As  he  purposes  to  endeavor  to  use 
People  in  the  best  Manner  he  is  capable  of,  he  hopes 
all  good  Persons  will  give  it  the  Encouragement  it 
deserves.  So  with  Respect  he  remains  a Friend  to 
the  Publick. 


N.  B.  He  is  to  be  spoke  with  every  Monday  and 
Thursday,  at  Capt.  Lewis  s,  at  the  Sign  of  the  Devon- 


William  Connely. 


Notice  is  hereby  given, 


James  Wells. 


356  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1754 

shire  Man  of  War,  opposite  to  Benjamin  Nicholls , 
Esq. — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , 
April  22,  1754. 

Perth-Amboy,  March  26th,  1754. 

By  Order  of  the  Judges. 

The  Circuit  Courts  for  the  Western  Counties  of 
New-Jersey , are  appointed  to  be  held  as-  follows,  viz. 

For  Hunterdon , on  the  first  Tuesday  in  May  at 
Trenton. 

For  Cumberland , on  the  fourth  Tuesday  in  May , 
at  Cohansey. 

For  Salem , on  the  first  Tuesday  in  June  at  Salem. 

For  Gloucester,  on  the  second  Tuesday  in  June , 
at  Gloucester. — The  Pennsylvania  Journal , April 
25.  1754-  Numb.  594. 

Custom  House,  Philadelphia  Inward  Entries. 
Schooner  Chance,  Francis  Benson  from  Salem. — The 
Pennsylvania  Gazette , April  25,  1754.  Numb.  1322. 

Notice  is  hereby  given,  That  Edward  Broadfield, 
is  removed  from  Bordentown  to  Trenton,  And  con- 
tinues to  pickle  sturgeon  in  the  safest  and  best  man- 
ner, and  with  more  conveniency  for  the  getting  the 
fish  alive  out  of  the  river,  than  at  Bordentown  ; and 
persons  who  did  favour  him  with  their  custom  last 
year,  may  depend  upon  being  equally  or  better 
served  now,  being  more  in  his  power  for  the  reasons 
aforesaid : And  all  persons  who  shall  buy  to  export 
abroad,  if  care  be  taken  that  the  kegs  lose  not  their 
pickle,  will  be  warranted  to  keep  good  in  the  hottest 
climate  for  two  years ; and  all  persons  who  shall 

1 The  warranty  “ to  keep  good  in  the  hottest  climate  ” was  doubtless,  meant  to  refer  to 
the  fish,  and  not  to  “ all  persons.” 


1754]  NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS.  357 

have  occasion  for  present  use,  and  home  consump- 
tion, when  they  open  the  kegs,  will  first  draw  off  the 
pickle  below  the  bung,  then  take  out  the  head,  put 
the  bung  in  tight,  harden  the  hoops  on,  put  the 
pickle  in,  and  cloth  on  the  keg,  with  the  head  upon 
that,  with  a small  weight  thereupon  to  keep  the  air 
out,  and  you  may  preserve  the  fish  as  long  as  you 
please.  The  said  fish  is  to  be  sold  by  no  other  per- 
sons than  Nathaniel  Allen,  jun.  in  Water-street,  op- 
posite William  Allen,  Esq  ; or  said  Broadfield,  at 
Trenton.  N.  B.  Whereas  one  William  Pancoast,  of 
Bordentown,  the  last  season,  having  my  brand  at  his 
house,  branded  a parcel  of  kegs  with  the  said  brand, 
which  has  given  me  great  reason  to  believe  it  was 
done  with  an  intent  of  imposing  his  fish  for  mine, 
therefore  I have  thought  proper  to  inform  the  pub- 
lick,  that  they  might  not  suffer  by  such  a deceit ; and 
if  the  said  William  Pancoast  shall  be  prov’d  to  offer 
any  of  the  said  kegs  in  my  name,  to  sale,  or  any 
other  person  for  him,  will  be  prosecuted  as  the  law 
directs. — The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , May  2,  1754. 
Numb.  1323. 

Custom  House,  Philad’a  Outwards — Schooner 
Chance,  Francis  Benson,  for  Salem. — The  Pennsyl- 
vania Gazette , May  2,  1754-  Numb.  1323. 

To  Be  Sold, 

TEN  Acres  of  good  Land,  situated,  lying  and 
being  in  Middlesex  County,  in  the  Province  of 
East-New-Jersey,  on  the  South  Side  of  the  Road 
that  leads  from  Brunswick  to  Trenton,  the  same  be- 
longing formerly  to  John  Fountaine,  and  is  very  con- 


358 


NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1754 


venient  for  any  Tradesman  or  Shop-keeper.  For 
further  Particulars,  enquire  of  Aaron  Louzada,  at 
Bound  Brook,  who  will  dispose  of  the  same  on  rea- 
sonable Terms. — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly 
Post  Boy , May  6,  1754. 

RUN  away  the  7th  of  last  Month,  from  Jacob 
Ford , of  Morris  County,  East-New- Jersey , an 
Irish  Servant  Man,  named  Philip  Clave  ; he  is 
about.  19  or  20  Years  of  Age,  and  5 Feet  6 Inches 
high,  thick  set,  square  Shouldered,  a down  Look,  and 
has  much  of  the  Brogue  upon  his  Tongue.  Had  on 
when  he  went  away,  a brown  Broadcloth  Vest,  a 
strip’d  Holland  One,  and  a small  Luft  Under-Waist- 
coat, Linnen  Shirt,  Toe  Trowsers,  new  Shoes,  Brass 
Buckles,  and  Felt  Hat;  but  its  likely  he  has  or  will 
change  his  Apparel,  as  he  did  when  he  run  away  from 
his  former  Master,  Hugh  M’  Clean,  of  Chester 
County.  Whoever  takes  up  and  secures  said  Serv- 
ant, so  that  his  Master  may  have  him  again,  shall 
have  Three  Pounds  Reward,  and  all  reasonable 
Charges,  paid  by  me 

Jacob  Ford. 

— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , 
May  6,  1754. 

Run  away  from  the  subscriber,  the  9th  inst,  an 
English  servant  man,  named  Thomas  Filer,  about  33 
years  of  age,  5 feet  and  half  high,  talks  West-country, 
of  a black  complexion,  black  hair  and  Beard,  pretty 
hairy  on  his  breast.  Had  on,  and  took  with  him, 
when  he  went  away,  two  jackets,  one  of  a grey  col- 
our, and  the  other  striped  moss  and  white,  with  brass 


1754] 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


350 


buttons,  fashionable  blue  broadcloth  coat,  with  broad 
metal  buttons,  daub’d  with  tar,  old  patch’d  leather 
breeches,  with  strings  at  the  knees,  two  shirts,  one 
check,  and  the  other  ozenbrigs,  two  pair  of  yarn 
stockings,  two  pair  of  shoes,  one  pair  new,  and  the 
other  pair  patch’d,  and  a felt  Hat.  Whoever  takes  up 
and  secures  said  servant,  so  as  his  master  may  have 
him  again,  shall  have  Six  Pounds  reward,  and  rea- 
sonable charges,  paid  by  Thomas  Andrews,  living  in 
Evesham  township,  Burlington  county,  in  West- 
New-Jersey. 

N.  B.  He  has  3 years  and  a half  to  serve.  All 
masters  of  vessels  are  forbid  to  carry  him  off. — The 
Pennsylvania  Gazette , May  9,  1759.  No.  1324. 

New-York , May  13.  On  Thursday  last  arrived  at 
Sandy-Hook,  the  Swan  Snow  Man  of  War,  Captain 
Langdon  Commander,  (formerly  Lieutenant  of  the 
Tavistock,)  who  has  brought  hither  the  Honourable 
Dudley  Digges,  Esq  ; appointed  Commander  of  the 
Centaur. — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post 
Boy9  May  13,  1754. 


r HERE  AS  some  Time  in  March  last,  a Pillow- 


Case,  with  sundry  Goods,  was  put  on  Board 
one  of  the  Amboy  Stage  Boats  without  Directions  : 
Whoever  owns  the  said  Pillow-Case,  by  applying  to 
Aaron  Edwards,  who  may  be  heard  of  at  Mr.  Abra- 
ham Bokee’s,  on  the  Dock  at  the  Whitehall  Slip  : 
On  describing  the  Goods,  and  paying  the  Charges  of 
advertising,  may  have  them  again. — The  N.  Y.  Gaz- 
ette or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , May  13,  1754* 


3 6o 


NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [ 1 754 


Custom-House,  Philada.  Cleared  Shnr.  Chance, 
Francis  Benson  to  Salem. — The  Pennsylvania  Journal, 
May  16,  1754.  Numb.  597. 

To  be  sold,  by  Reed  and  Furman  in  Trenton,  a 
likely  healthy  Negro  man,  about  24  years  of  age,  has 
been  brought  up  to  country  Business  ; the  purchaser 
may  have  a reasonable  time  for  payment.  Also  to 
be  sold  by  William  Douglas,  about  4 miles  from  Al- 
lenstown,  two  likely  young  Negro  men,  who  have 
been  brought  up  to  country  Business,  and  a Dutch 
servant  girl’s  time,  who  has  about  four  years  and  a 
half  to  serve.  Any  person  inclining  to  buy  any  of 
the  above  mentioned  servants,  may  know  the  terms 
by  applying  to  either  of  the  owners. — The  Pennsyl- 
vania Gazette , May  16,  1754.  No.  1325. 

New-York,  May  20.  We  hear  from  Flushing, 
and  several  other  Places  on  Long-Island,  that  last 
Tuesday  se’nnight  a very  hard  Shower  of  Hail,  fell 
in  these  Parts.  . . . Most  of  the  Hail-Stones 

being  as  big  as  a Pigeons  Egg  : ’Tis  said  the  Hail 
was  large  and  plentiful  also  at  many  places  up  the 
North  River,  as  well  as  in  the  Jerseys. — The  N.  Y. 
Gazttte  or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy,  May  20,  1754. 

New  York,  May  20. 

Last  Sunday  se’nnight  Capt  Seymour  saw  two 
large  Sloops  ashore  on  Barnegat. — The  Pennsylvania 
Journal , May  23,  1754.  Numb.  598. 

The  following  Order  is  an  Extract  from  the  Votes 
of  the  General  Assembly  of  the  Province  of  New- 


1754] 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


361 


Jersey,  in  Answer  to  the  Speech1  of  his  Excellency 
Jonathan  Belcher,  Esq  ; Governor  of  that  Province, 
deliver’d  April  25,  1754.  Ordered, 

That  Mr.  Lawrence  and  Mr.  Hancock  do  wait  on 
his  Excellency,  and  acquaint  him,  that  this  House 
had  his  Speech , under  Consideration  of  a Committee 
of  the  whole  House,  and  by  the  Papers  that  he  was 
pleased  to  order  to  be  laid  before  them,  it  does  not 
appear  what  Schemes  are  concerted  by  the  several 
Governors  of  the  Colonies  for  preventing  the  In- 
croachment  of  the  French  upon  his  Majesty’s  Do- 
minions ; nor  does  it  appear  that  the  Colonies  of 
Maryland  or  Pennsylvania  have  yet  done  any  Thing 
in  that  Affair  ; tho’  they  are  situated  much  nearer  to 
the  French  Forts:  That  this  House  is  of  Opinion, 
with  your  Excellency,  that  there  should  be  a strict 
Union  among  all  his  Majesty’s  Colonies,  on  this  im- 
portant Affair  : But  as  this  Colony  have  never  been 
Parties  with  the  Five  Nations  and  their  Allies,  nor 
partakers  of  the  Benefits  of  the  Indian  Trade,  and 
consequently  quite  unacquainted  with  the  Interest 
and  Trade  of  those  Nations  ; they  therefore  hope  it 
will  not  be  taken  as  a Neglect  of  the  common  Cause 
at  this  Time,  to  leave  the  Management  of  the 
Treaty  to  the  Colonies  that  are  accustomed  to 
carry  on  those  Negotiations  : They  are  of  Opinion, 
from  Lieutenant  Governor  Dinwiddie’s  Letters  to 
your  Pixcellency,  that  nothing  appears  in  them,  more 
than  a Design  to  build  a Fortification  in  the  Forks 
of  Ohio,  in  order  to  check  the  Incroachment  of  the 


1 Printed  in  N.  J.  Archives,  XVI.,  455. 


362  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [ 1 754 

French,  and  to  protect  the  Indians  in  Alliance 
with  Great-Britain,  in  that  part  of  the  Country. 
And  from  the  Time  these  Things  have  been  in 
Agitation,  in  the  Colony  of  Virginia,  they  are 
in  Hopes  they  are  before  this  Time  happily  com- 
pleted. However,  the  Duty  and  Loyalty  of  the  good 
People  of  this  Colony  sufficiently  appears  by  their 
Conduct  on  former  Expeditions.  This  Colony,  tho’ 
lying  under  a great  Load  of  Debts,  by  assisting  his 
Majesty  in  the  late  Wars,  against  Spain  and  France 
are,  however,  willing  cheerfully  to  contribute  to  the 
Assistance  of  the  other  Colonies,  in  what  is  neces- 
sary towards  preventing  the  Incroachments  of  the 
French  on  his  Majesty’s  Dominions  ; but  at  present 
are  not  of  Ability  to  do  it,  having  no  Money  in  the 
Treasury,  nor  any  Funds  upon  which  it  can  be 
raised  ; which  this  House  hopes  the  Colony  will  soon 
be  relieved  in,  by  his  Majesty’s  giving  Leave  to  your 
Excellency,  to  pass  a Bill  for  emitting  a Sum  of 
Money  on  Loan,  whereby  they  may  be  enabled,  not 
only  to  discharge  the  old  Debts,  but  to  have  a con- 
stant Fund  to  assist  his  Majesty  upon  Cases  of  the 
like  Emergency : And  that  this  House  return  his 

Excellency  Thanks  for  his  Care  in  calling  them  to- 
gether on  this  emergent  Affair;  and  should  have 
been  well  pleased,  had  his  Excellency’s  Health  per- 
mitted him,  to  have  met  at  Perth  Amboy.  As  it  is 
impracticable  at  this  Time  to  do  any  Thing  in  Assist- 
ance of  the  neighboring  Colonies,  they  beg  your  Ex- 
cellency would  be  pleased  to  dismiss  them  till  your 
Health  shall  permit  you  to  meet  them  at  Amboy, 
where  they  will  take  the  other  matters  of  your  Ex- 


1754] 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


363 


cellency’s  Speech  into  their  Consideration. 

By  order  of  the  General  Assembly, 

Abraham  Clark,  jun,  Clerk. 

— The  Pe7insylvania  Journal,  May  23,  1754. 

Numb.  598. 

Gentlemen  of  the  General  Assembly, 

In  answer  to  your  Message  of  the  27th  Day  of 
this  Instant,  by  Mr.  Lawrence  and  Hancock,  I must 
observe,  that  the  Method  you  have  taken  of  answer- 
ing my  Speech  by  a Message,  is  unusual  if  not  with- 
out Precedent,  and  is  treating  his  Majesty’s  Repre- 
sentative with  less  Respect  than  was  due  to  the  Com- 
mission he  has  the  Honour  to  bear,  or  to  his  own 
kind  and  benevolent  Intentions,  for  the  promoting 
the  Welfare  of  the  good  People  of  this  Province, 
whom  you  represent.  Nor  can  I think  you  should 
have  looked  into  the  Conduct  of  such  of  his  Majesty’s. 
Colonies  who  have  least  exerted  themselves,  in  order 
to  put  a Stop  to  the  Encroachments  of  the  French, 
for  an  Example  to  follow  in  this  critical  and  danger- 
ous Time.  There  is  no  Room  to  doubt,  but  that 
Pennsylvania  and  Maryland  have  appointed  Com- 
missioners to  represent  them  at  the  Treaty  to  be  held 
at  Albany,  in  June  next ; and  ’tis  probable  their 
Commissioners  may  be  instructed  to  concert  Meas- 
ures for  their  mutual  Defence,  in  Conjunction  with 
the  Commissioners  of  the  other  Colonies,  who  shall 
be  present  there.  As  the  House  of  Assembly  de- 
clare it  to  be  their  Opinion,  “That  there  should  be  a 
strict  Union  among  all  his  Majesty’s  Colonies  on  this 
important  Affair  I cannot  think  their  having  hith- 
erto escaped  the  Expense  of  treating  or  their  not  be- 


364  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1754 

ing  Partakers  in  the  Trade  with  the  Indians,  can  be  a 
sufficient  Excuse  for  their  declining  to  be  Parties  to 
an  Interview  so  strongly  recommended  by  the  Right 
Honorable  the  Lords  of  Trade. 

As  the  Alliance  and  Friendship  of  the  Six  Nations, 
and  their  Dependance  on  the  Crown  of  Great  Brit- 
ain, must,  -by  every  thinking  Man,  be  looked  upon  as 
the  greatest  Security  the  Settlers  on  the  Northern 
Boundary  of  this  Province  can  have,  to  prevent  the 
Incursions  of  those  Nations  of  Indians,  who,  unpro- 
voked, have  taken  up  the  Hatchet  against  us,  to- 
gether with  the  horrid  Murders  and  Confusions  con- 
sequent thereupon. 

If  nothing  more  should  be  intended  by  the  Gov- 
ernment of  Virginia,  than  building  a Fortification  in 
the  Forks  of  Ohio  (as  by  your  Message  you  suggest) 
the  very  Reason  you  assign  for  doing  it,  is  a very 
cogent  and  powerful  One,  viz,  To  check  the  In- 
croachments  of  the  French,  and  to  protect  the  Indians 
in  Alliance  with  Great  Britain  ; and  supposing  it 
should  be  by  this  Time  compleated  (which  is  not  to 
be  expected)  yet  the  whole  Expence  would  be  use- 
less, unless  it  should  have  a Garrison  sufficient  to 
answer  the  good  Purposes  of  its  Erection ; the 
Charge  of  which  ought  to  be  defrayed  by  all  the 
Colonies  on  the  Continent,  in  Proportion  to  the  Ad- 
vantage they  receive  from  the  Friendship  and  Pro- 
tection of  the  Six  Nations. 

I would  not  derogate,  in  the  least,  from  the  Loyalty 
the  good  People  of  this  Province  have  shewn,  by  the 
Aid  they  have  afforded  his  Majesty  in  former  Expe- 
ditions ; and  it  will  doubtless  have  its  due  Weight 

1 O 


1754] 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


365 


when  the  Petition  to  his  Majesty,  for  Leave  to  emit  a 
Sum  of  Money  on  Loan  shall  be  under  the  Consid- 
eration of  his  Ministers  : But  I am  sorry  so  fre- 
quently to  hear  the  Want  of  that  Bill  given  as  an 
Excuse  against  raising  such  Sums  of  Money  as  the 
Government  and  Honour  of  the  Province  necessarily 
require,  when  it  is  well  known  that  the  private  Cir- 
cumstances of  the  landed  Men,  and  other  Inhabitants 
in  it,  taken  in  general,  equal  those  of  any  other 
Governments  ; and  I am  afraid  your  entirely  declin- 
ing assisting  in  the  Common  Cause  at  this  perilous 
I.  Conjuncture,  may  be  an  Obstacle  to  your  obtaining 
his  Majesty’s  Favour  in  that  Particular. 

It  gives  me  a sensible  Satisfaction  to  find  you 
express  your  Gratitude  on  my  calling  you  together 
at  this  Time,  in  Obedience  to  the  royal  Orders  ; and 
am  sorry  you  esteem  it  impracticable  to  yield  any 
Assistance  to  the  other  Colonies  at  this  Time. 

There  are  very  few  Colonies  under  his  Majestys 
immediate  Government,  who  have  any  other  Method 
of  supplying  Money  for  necessary  and  immergent 
Services,  but  by  Tax  ; and  the  Method  of  raising  it 
here,  is  chiefly  your  province. 

I understood  at  the  last  Sessions  at  Burlington, 
from  many  of  the  Members  of  your  House,  that  the 
Middle  of  May,  was  a Season  at  which  you  could  as 
well  spare  a few  Weeks  from  your  private  Affairs, 
as  at  any  Time  of  the  Year,  and  I should  not  have 
called  you  sooner ; but  in  Obedience  to  the  Com- 
mands I had  received,  and  which  I have  communica- 
ted to  you  That  Season  of  the  Year  is  a Time  of 
Plenty,  the  Weather  agreeable  to  most  Constitutions, 


366  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1754 

and  the  Days  long.  The  last  happy  Season,  is  an 
evident  Proof  that  more  Business  may  be  done  in  a 
few  Weeks  at  that  Season,  than  has  commonly  been 
dispatched  in  as  many  Months  of  a Winter  Season, 
whereby  your  Constituents  are  eased  of  a great  Ex- 
pence. 

As  to  your  Desire  of  being  dismissed,  till  my 
Health  will  permit  my  attending  at  Amboy,  I am 
very  willing  to  gratify  you  ; but  I can  give  you  but 
little  Expectation  of  my  attending  there,  for  a long 
Time  to  come,  unless  it  should  please  the  Infinite 
Disposer  of  all  Things,  to  strengthen  me  beyond  my 
utmost  Expectations. 

The  Dispatch  I have  always  given  to  the  Business 
before  me,  the  Ease  which  the  Province  have  enjoyed 
under  my  Administration,  and  the  great  Weakness 
of  my  Body,  of  which  you  are  Eye-Witnesses,  gave 
me  Reason  to  think  the  House  could  not  have  been 
so  void  of  Humanity  and  Tenderness  to  me,  as  to 
complain  of  my  calling  them  here  on  this  Occasion  ; 
as  I always  have  paid  a punctual  Obedience  to  the 
general  Instruction,  when  my  Health  permitted  me 
so  to  do.  I doubt  whether  any  impartial  or  dispas- 
sionate Inhabitant  of  this  Province,  would  advise 
their  Representatives  to  make  my  not  coming  to 
Amboy,  when  prevented  by  the  Act  of  God,  a Pre- 
tence for  deferring  the  necessary  Business  of  the 
Government,  and  the  Recess  which  you  shall  have,  till 
the  first  Day  of  June  next,  then  to  meet  at  Amboy, 
without  Notice,  will  give  you  an  Opportunity,  and  I 
hope  you  will  consult  with  them  on  the  Matters  re- 
commended in  my  Speech,  and  then  by  your  Conduct 


1754] 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


367 


at  your  next  Meeting,  I shall  be  able  to  judge  whether 
the  good  People  of  this  Province  have  that  Regard 
to  a Governor,  who  has  exerted  his  publick  and.  pri- 
vate Interests,  for  the  Good  of  them  and  their  Poster- 
ity, that  such  a Conduct  deserves. — The  Pennsyl- 
vania Journal , May  23,  1754.  Numb.  598. 

On  Thursday  last  arrived  at  Sandy-Hook,  the 
Swan  Snow  Man  of  War,  Capt.  Langdon,  Com- 
mander (formerly  Lieutenant  of  the  Tavistock)  who 
has  brought  hither  the  Honourable  Dudley  Diggs, 
Esquire,  appointed  Commander  of  the  Centaur. — 
The  Pennsylvania  Journal , May  23,  1754.  Numb. 
598. 

THE  Tickets  in  the  Connecticut  Lottery,  for  the 
Benefit  of  the  College  of  New-Jersey,  not  be- 
ing all  sold,  the  Drawing  of  the  same  is  postponed  to 
the  Second  Day  of  September  next  when  it  will  cer- 
tainly be  drawn,  or  before,  if  the  Tickets  be  disposed 
of.  The  Publick  will  have  a Fortnight’s  Notice. — 
The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , May  27, 
1754- 

Philadelphia.  We  hear  from  Trenton  in  New- 
Jersey  that  on  Saturday  last  John  Crow,  (who  was 
condemned  with  Morrison  in  this  City,  and  pardon’d 
under  the  Gallows)  was  executed  there  for  Horse 
stealing. — The  Pennsylvania  Journal , May  30,  1754. 
Numb.  599. 

Philadelphia , May  30.  Saturday  last  the  notori- 
ous John  Crow  (who  a few  Years  ago  was  repriev’d 
here  under  the  Gallows,  and  had  been  several  Times 
in  Danger  of  being  hang’d  since)  and  one  Chester, 


368  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1754 

were  executed  at  Trenton  for  House  breaking. — 

— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , June 
3,  1 754‘ 

A Board- Yard, 

Kept  by  Thomas  Shreeve,  House  Carpenter  and 
Joiner,  from  Burlington,  West-New-Jersey,  living 
opposite  to  William  Waltons , Esq;  in  Queen-Street; 
and  has  to  dispose  of, 

'piTCH-Pine  Deck  Plank  for  Vessels,  and  sheath- 

JL  ing  Boards  for  ditto ; Pitch-Pine  and  Cedar  I 
Boards  of  Inch  three  Quarter,  and  half  Inch  ; also 
Joices  of  Cedar  and  Pitch-Pine,  of  sundry  Sizes  : like- 
wise Shingles  of  3 Feet,  and  those  of  18  Inches  in 
length  ; as  also  Cornish  and  Indian  Gutters,  and 
sundry  other  Sorts  of  Boards. 

N.  B.  The  Boards  are  on  a Lot  of  Ground  be- 
longing to  the  Estate  of  the  late  Major  Van  Horne, 
next  to  the  new  Building  of  the  said  William  Wal- 
ton , Esq  ; from  whence  they  may  be  taken  by  Water 
without  the  Help  of  a Cart. — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or 
the  Weekly  Post  Boy , June  3,  1754. 

To  Be  Sold, 

A Tract  of  Land  situate  in  Shrewsbury,  in  Mon- 
mouth County  New-Jersey,  call’d  and  known 
by  the  Name  of  the  Fall  Neck,  containing  about  450 
Acres  of  Land,  about  70  of  which  may  be  made  ex- 
cellent English  Meadow,  the  Tides  being  chiefly 
bank’d  out ; there  is  on  the  Premises  a good  Dwell- 
ing House  and  some  Out-Houses,  and  about  120 
Acres  of  cleared  Land,  the  whole  good  Wheat  Land, 
well  timber’d  and  water’d,  with  a good  Landing- 
Place  at  the  Door.  For  Price  and  Terms  of  Payment, 


1754] 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


369 


agree  with  James  Alexander,  Esq  ; at  New-York, 
Lewis  Morris,  at  Morrisania,  Philip  Van  Horne  at 
Boundbrook,  or  Richard  Salter  near  Trenton. — The 
N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , "June  3,  1754. 

ROKE  out  of  Somerset  Goal,  the  20th  of 


May  last,  two  Prisoners  who  were  committed 
on  Suspicion  of  Felony,  one  of  them  named  Enoch 
Hannawell,  23  Years  of  Age,  5 Foot  8 Inches  high, 
has  a young-like  Look  : Had  on  when  he  went  away, 

a blue-grey  homespun  Coat,  Waistcoat  and  Breeches, 
Stockings  almost  the  same  Colour,  and  a Linnen 
Cap ; he  was  born  at  Westchester,  in  New-York 
Government.  The  other  about  30  Years  of  Age,  5 
Foot  7 Inches  high,  thick  set,  with  black  Hair  and 
Beard,  thick  Legs,  sour  Look,  named  John  Murphy  : 
Had  on  when  he  went  away,  a light  colour’d  Kersey 
Jacket,  no  Coat,  old  bluish  mix’d  Stockings,  old 
Shoes.  Whoever  secures  the  above  mentioned  Per- 
sons, and  brings  them  to  the  Sheriff  of  Somerset,  or 
secures  them,  so  that  he  may  have  them  again,  shall 
have  Forty  Shillings  Reward  for  each  of  them,  and 
all  reasonable  Charges,  paid  by 


— -The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , 
June  3,  1754. 

Run  away  from  John  Scott,  of  Hanover  town,  in 
Morris  county,  East  New-Jersey,  An  Irish  Servant 
man  named  James  Murphey,  of  middle  stature, 
somewhat  long  visag’d,  sharp  nose,  much  pitted  with 
the  small-.pox,  grey  or  light  colour’d  eyes,  flaxen 


Abraham  Vandorn,  Sheriff. 


370  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1754 

hair  reddish  beard,  about  28  years  of  age  ;*  was  kept 
by  said  Scott  in  the  station  of  a school-master,  some- 
times ties  his  hair  behind  with  a string,  a very  proud 
fellow,  loves  drink  and  when  drunk  is  very  impudent 
and  talkative,  pretends  much,  and  knows  little,  was 
sometime  in  the  French  service  and  can  talk  French: 
Had  on  when  he  went  away  (which  was  the  25th  of 
December  last)  a new  light  or  grey  colour’d  bear- 
skin coat,  with  broad  flat  buttons,  cover’d  with 
shaloon,  a light  colour’d  half  worn  ratteen  jacket 
check  shirts,  leather  breeches,  several  pairs  of  blue 
and  grey  worsted  stockings  and  new  pumps.  He 
was  seen  the  first  of  April  last  in  Bucks  county,  Penn- 
sylvania, looking  for  a school,  and  about  the  first  of 
this  inst.  May,  in  Pilesgrove  near  Salem,  and  was 
taken  up,  but  by  pleading  of  having  a pass  from  a 
magistrate  got  off.  Whoever  takes  up  and  secures 
said  servant,  so  as  his  master  may  have  him  again, 
shall  have  Forty  Shillings  reward,  and  all  reasonable 
charges,  paid  by 

John  Scott. 

N.  B.  ’Tis  supposed  he  inclines  to  go  to  France ; 
all  masters  of  vessels  are  forbid  to  carry  him  off  at 
their  peril.  He  was  advertised  in  the  New  York 
gazette  the  25th  of  Dec’r  last. — The  N.  Y.  Gazette 
or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , April  3,  1754. 

Biles  Island,  May  14,  1754. 

I Joseph  Clayton  of  Biles  Island,  near  Borden- 
town,  being  sensible  of  the  great  necessity  there  was 
for  erecting  a house  for  the  publick  Worship  of  God 
in  the  said  town,  and  the  promotion  of  Religion  and 
Virtue ; and  whereas  several  of  the  well-minded  in- 


1754] 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


37t 


habitants  being  zealous  for  the  effecting  so  laudable 
a design,  did  undertake  the  same,  by  which  means 
they  are  become  considerably  in  debt ; now  for  their 
relief,  and  finishing  the  said  building,  I make  this  lot- 
tery, the  scheme  of  which  is  as  follows,  viz. 


Number  of 
Prizes 

Value 

in  Pieces  of  Eight 

Total  Value 

1 

of 

250 

is 

250 

'j 

3 

of 

150 

are 

450 

8 

of 

50 

are 

400 

1 2 

of 

20 

are 

240 

150 

of 

10 

are 

0 

0 

40 

850 

of 

6 

are 

5100 

1024  Prizes 

First  Drawn 

30 

2976  Blanks 

Last  Drawn 

30 

4000  Tickets  at  Two  Pieces  of  Eight  is  8000 
Fifteen  per  cent  to  be  deducted  from  the  prizes. 
The  drawing  to  commence  the  first  Tuesday  in 
August  or  sooner,  if  full  ; publick  notice  will  be  given 
at  least  14  days  before  the  drawing,  and  of  the  pre- 
cise time  of  putting  the  tickets  into  the  boxes.  The 
prizes  will  be  published  in  this  paper,  and  the  money 
paid  to  the  possessors  of  the  benefit  tickets,  as  soon 
as  the  drawing  is  over.  Tickets  are  to  be  sold  by 
William  Potts,  Thomas  Cox,  John  Imlay  and  Joseph 
Borden,  jun.  who  I appoint  manager  and  they  shall 
be  on  oath  for  the  true  performance  of  the  same. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , June  6,  1754. 

Numb.  1328. 


Philadelphia. 

On  Tuesday  last,  in  the  Afternoon,  we  had  a 


372  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [ 1 754 

Shower  of  exceeding  large  Hail  here,  which  however 
lasted  but  a short  Time  ; and  soon  after,  the  wind 
blowing  very  high,  continually  shifting,  and  attended 
with  Thunder,  a Water-Spout  appear’d  on  Delaware, 
opposite  to  Kensington,  which  was  carried  up  Coop- 
er’s Creek,  and  supposed  to  break  on  the  Shore, 
where  it  is  said,  considerable  damage  is  done,  tho’ 
we  have  no  particular  Account  thereof.  We  hear 
that  a School-House  was  beat  down  ; the  Roof  of  a 
Dwelling-house  blown  off,  a great  Deal  of  Garden 
Ground  destroy’d  ; that  a new  Wherry  was  lifted  up 
by  it,  and  broke  to  Pieces  by  the  Fall;  and  that  a 
great  many  Trees  were  torn  up  by  the  Roots. — The 
Pennsylvania  Gazette , June  6,  1754.  Numb.  1328. 

Run  away  on  the  27th  of  last  month,  from  Thomas 
Talman,  of  the  township  of  Evesham,  in  the  county 
of  Burlington,  New-Jersey,  A servant  man,  named 
William  Darbey,  about  19  years  of  age,  5 feet  8 
inches  high,  has  a Scar  under  one  of  his  eyes,  he’s  of 
a dark  complexion,  and  had  his  hair  lately  cut  off : 
Had  on  when  he  went  away,  An  old  castor  hat,  blue 
homespun  coat,  full  trimmed,  and  jacket  of  same, 
much  worn,  two  pair  of  ozenbrigs  trowsers,  has  two 
ozenbrigs  shirts,  almost  new,  and  a pair  of  double 
souled  shoes,  tied  with  strings.  Whoever  takes  up 
and  secures  said  servant,  so  as  his  master  may  have 
him  again,  or  gives  notice  thereof  to  Mr.  William 
Fishbourne,  in  Philadelphia,  shall  have  Three  Pounds 
reward,  and  all  reasonable  charges  paid  by. 

Thomas  Talman. 

N.  B.  All  masters  of  vessels  are,  at  their  peril, 


1754]  NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS.  373 

forbid  to  carry  him  off. — The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , 
June  6,  1754.  Numb.  1328. 

Philadelphia.  Tuesday  last  we  had  a violent 
Gale  of  Wind  with  Rain  and  Hail,  which  we  hear  has 
done  considerable  Damage  in  the  Country.  A 
Water-Spout  was  observed  on  our  River,  which  is 
said  to  have  broke  in  the  Jerseys,  and  almost  de- 
stroyed a House  just  by  the  Water  Side. — The  Penn- 
sylvania Journal,  Ju::e  6,  1754.  Numb.  600. 

New-York , June  10.  On  Tuesday  Afternoon  last 
we  had  here  a very  sudden  Gust  of  Wind  and  Rain, 
attended  with  Thunder  and  Lightning,  from  the  W. 

N.  W. 

A Brunswick  Boat,  in  coming  a-cross  our  Bay  at 
the  Time  the  Squall  happened,  was  overset  thereby, 
and  five  out  of  eighteen  Passengers  in  her,  drowned 
in  the  Cabbin,  entirely  owing  to  the  Obstinacy  (or 
rather  Unskilfulness)  of  the  Boatman,  in  not  prepar- 
ing for  the  same  when  desired  : The  other  thirteen 

were  taken  off  her  Deck  by  one  of  the  Staten-Island 
Passage  Boats,  who  being  near,  bore  away  to  their 
Relief.  We  are  told  she  had  on  board  between  a 
Thousand  and  Twelve  Hundred  Pounds  worth  of 
Linnen,  manufactured  in  the  Jersies,  and  bringing 
hither  for  Sale.  She  afterwards  drove  on  Shore  a 
little  on  the  Outside  of  the  Narrows,  and  the 
drowned  Persons  found  in  her  Cabbin.  Those 
drowned  were  Samuel  Berry,  of  Long-Island  ; two 
Persons  belonging  to  Germantown,  near  Philadel- 
phia ; one  other  from  the  Lower-Counties  of  Penn- 
sylvania ; and  the  Fifth  of  and  from  New- Brunswick. 


374  NEW  jersey  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1754 

— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , June 
10,  1754. 


New  York,  June  10. 

Tuesday  last  came  up  here  from  Sandy  Hook,  the 
Brig  Virgin  of  Light,  John  Van  Vard,  Master,  of 
Cape  Francois,  from  whence  she  sailed  bound  for 
Corocoa  ; but  on  the  17th  of  May  last  in  Lat.  26  and 
half,  having  the  Misfortune  to  lose  their  Main  Top- 
mast, and  the  Vessel  proving  very  leaky,  they  thought 
it  most  prudent  to  seek  Protection  in  this  hospit- 
able Country,  and  accordingly  bore  away  for  this 
Port.  We  hear  his  Honour  the  Governor,  and 
Council,  have  permitted  them  to  land  their  Cargo, 
but  to  remain  under  the  Care  of  the  Officers  of  his 
Majesty’s  Customs  of  this  Province,  until  the  Vessel 
is  repaired. — The  Pennsylvania  Journal , June  13, 
1754.  Numb.  601. 

New  York,  June  10.  We  hear  that  Capt.  Craw- 
ford, in  a Ship,  bound  for  London,  from  South  Caro- 
lina having  sprung  a Leak  at  Sea,  bore  away  for  this 
Port,  and  arrived  at  Sandy-Hook,  Yesterday. — The 
Pennsylvania  Journal,  Jitne  13,  1754.  Numb.  601. 

New- York,  June  24.  The  General  Assembly  of 
the  Province  of  New  Jersey,  was  dissolved  on  Friday 
last  the  2 1 st  Instant,  after  his  Excellency  Governor 
Belcher,  had  been  pleased  to  give  his  Assent  to,  a 
Support  Bill,  one  other  for  erecting  a Work-House 
in  Elizabeth-Town  ; and  a Third,  a Naturalization 
Bill. — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy> 
June  24,  1754. 


1 754]  NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS.  . 375 

Arrivals.  The  Delight , from  Boston  at  Deal. 
We  have  Advice  from  the  Capes,  that  a Sloop  be- 
longing to  Egg- Harbour,  was  drove  ashore,  three 
Leagues  to  the  Southward  of  the  Cape,  but  was  got 
off  again ; she  lost  her  Boat,  Cable  and  Anchor. — 
The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , June  27,  1754.  Numb . 
1331- 

New-York , July  i.  From  Woodbridge  and  Pis- 
cataway  in  New-Jerscy,  we  hear,  that  last  Saturday 
Sen’night,  the  greatest  Quantity  of  Rain  fell  for  the 
Time  it  lasted,  as  ever  was  known  in  those  Parts  ; 
which  has  broke  away  several  Mill-Dams,  and  done 
much  Damage  to  many  Fields  of  Corn,  Flax,  &c. — 
The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , July 
h 1754- 

Scheme  Of  A Lottery, 

In  Connecticut : For  the  Benefit  of  the  College  of 

N.  jersey. 

rpHE  said  Lottery  will  consist  of  8888  Tickets,  of 


which 

3088 

are  to  be  fortunate, 

viz. 

1 

of 

1.  501, 

is 

1.  501, 

2 

of 

250, 

are 

5°°> 

4 

of 

125, 

are 

500, 

8 

of 

100, 

are 

800, 

16 

of 

50, 

are 

800, 

30 

of 

20, 

are 

600, 

50 

of 

10, 

are 

500, 

100 

of 

5> 

are 

5°°, 

2877 

of 

3» 

are 

8631, 

3088  Prizes,)  8888  Tickets, at  30s. New-{^  T *2 
5800  Blanks,)  York  Currency  each,  is( ' 


3 76  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1754 

Fifteen  per  Cent,  to  be  deducted  from  the  Prizes. 
There  is  not  quite  two  Blanks  to  a Prize.  Publick 
Notice  will  be  given  of  the  precise  Time  of  putting 
the  Tickets  into  Boxes,  that  such  Adventurers  as 
are  inclined,  may  be  present  when  the  same  shall  be 
done.  The  Drawing  to  commence  on  the  2d  Day 
of  September  next,  or  sooner  if  full,  at  the  Town 
of  Stamford  in  Connecticut , under  the  Inspection 
of  two  Justices  of  Peace  of  the  Colony  of  Con- 
necticut, and  of  two  Persons  who  shall  be  ap- 
pointed by  the  Trustees  of  the  College  of  New- 
Jersey . The  Publick  will  have  Fourteen  Days 
Notice  of  the  Time  of  Drawing.  The  Managers  are 
sworn  to  the  faithful  Discharge  of  the  Trust  reposed 
in  them,  and  also  given  Security  for  the  same.  The 
Prizes  will  be  published  in  the  New  York  Gazette , 
and  the  Money  paid  to  the  Possessors  of  Benefit 
Tickets,  as  soon  as  the  Drawing  is  finished.  Tickets 
are  to  be  had  at  the  Dwelling-Houses  of  Mr.  John 
Lloyd , Ephraim  Bostwick,  Esq ; and  Dr.  Nathaniel 
Hubbard , in  the  Town  of  Stamford , in  Connecticut , 
who  are  appointed  Managers.  Tickets  will  also  be 
sold  by  Mr.  David  Vankor ne , Mr.  Daniel  Defoe , and 
Mr.  Noel,  in  New-York  ; the  Honourable  James 
Hude , Esq;  and  William  Ouke,  Esq;  and  Mr. 
Derick  Van  Veighten , at  New- Brunswick.  Samuel 
Woodruff,  Esq  ; in  Elizabeth-Town, — Mr.  Sergeant, 
Treasurer  of  the  College  of  New- Jersey,  in  Newark, 
— the  Rev.  Mr.  Cowell,  in  Trenton,  and  Mr.  Samuel 
Hazard,  in  Philadelphia.  The  Prizes  will  be  paid  by 
those  Gentlemen  who  shall  have  disposed  of  the  Num- 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


1754] 


377 


bers  drawing  such  Prizes. — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or 
the  Weekly  Post  Boy , July  1,  1754. 


This  is  to  inform  the  Publick, 

n^HAT  DANIEL  O’BRIEN,  being  provided  with 
.L  two  good  Boats,  exceeding  well  fitted,  with 
very  good  Accommodations  for  Passengers,  intends 
to  give  his  Attendance  at  the  White-Hall  Slip,  in 
New-York,  on  every  Wednesday  and  Saturday  ; and, 
Wind  and  Weather  permitting,  on  every  Monday 
and  Thursday  will  proceed  to  Amboy  Ferry,  at 
which  Place  the  Burlington  and  Bordentown  Stage 
Waggons  both  meet,  every  Monday  and  Thursday, 
and  on  Tuesdays  and  Fridays  proceed  to  their 
respective  Stages  at  Bordentown  and  Burlington  ; 
and  at  each  of  these  Places  a Boat  is  ready  to  carry 
Goods  and  Passengers  directly  to  Philadelphia,  and 
the  same  Conduct  is  to  be  observed  from  Philadel- 
phia to  New-York.  As  he  hath  two  Boats  to  attend 
with,  he  hopes  to  perform  his  Stages  so  as  to  occa- 
sion no  Delay  to  Passengers  or  Goods  ; and  if  any 
Thing  extraordinary  should  offer,  he  is  thereby  en- 
abled to  proceed  with  the  greatest  Dispatch  : And 

whatever  he  shall  transport  from  New-York  to  Am- 
boy Ferry  aforesaid,  may  be  sent  either  to  Borden- 
town or  Burlington,  as  shall  be  directed : And  he 

promises  that  due  Care  shall  be  taken  of  every 
Thing  committed  to  his  Charge,  whether  Letters, 
Goods,  &c.  He  may  be  spoke  with  on  board  one  of 
his  Boats,  or  at  the  House  of  Scotch  Johnney,  at  the 
said  White-Hall  Slip. 


Daniel  O Brien. 


3;8  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1754 

— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , 

July  8,  1754- 

To  Be  Sold, 

A ’EAR  200  Acres  of  Land  at  Coil’s  Neck,1  in 
„ . N Shrewsbury,  with  a small  House  and  Orchard, 

1 Colt’s  Neck. 

about  50  Acres  clear,  a good  Part  of  it  is  red  Wheat 
Land,  and  excellent  English  Grass  Meadow  Ground 
of  the  same  Colour  along  a Brook  extraordinary  well 
timber’d  and  water’d  : The  Roads  from  Shrewsbury 

and  Middletown  to  Burlington,  and  from  Amboy  to 
Egg-Harbour  crossing  each  other  by  it.  There  is 
two  Gristmills,  a Sawmill,  and  a Fullingmill  or  two 
within  a Mile  of  it,  about  four  Miles  from  a Landing  : I 

It  has  an  exceeding  good  Outlet ; The  Southward  End 
of  said  Tract,  joins  the  untaken  up  Pines.  For  fur- 
ther Particulars  and  the  Title  enquire  of  Anne  Den- 
nis, Widow,  living  near  the  said  Tract,  or  of  Jacob 
Dennis  of  Shrewsbury. 

— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , 
July  15,  1754. 

To  be  Sold  by  John  Anderson. 

A House  and  Lot  of  Ground,  situate  in  the 
Township  of  Bridge-Water,  at  Bound- 
Brook,  bounded  on  Rariton  Road,  and  within  15 
Roods  of  the  River  ; it  is  very  convenient  for  a 
Merchant  or  Storekeeper  ; the  House  is  43  Foot, 
and  28  Wide,  one  Story  and  a Half  high,  with  5 
Rooms  and  two  Fire-Places,  a Shop-Room  below, 
and  the  upper  Apartment  very  convenient  for  stor- 
ing some  Thousand  Bushels  of  Grain,  with  a small 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


379 


I754j 

Cellar  and  a Stable  for  Horses.  Any  Person  inclin- 
ing to  purchase  the  same,  may,  for  the  Title  and 
Condition  of  Sale,  apply  to  John  Anderson,  living  on 
the  Premises.  N.  B.  He  has  also  3 or^4  Acres  of 
good  Land  to  sell,  convenient  for  the  Purchaser  of 
the  above  House. — The  N Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly 
Post  Boy , July  15,  1754. 

Elizabeth-Town,  in  New  Jersey,  July  10. 

His  Excellency,  our  Governor  was  this  Day 
pleased  to  appoint  Courtland  Skinner,  Esq  ; of  Perth 
Amboy,  to  be  His  Majesty’s  Attorney  General  of 
this  Province,  in  the  room  of  Joseph  Worrel,  Esq  ; 
who  has  resigned.- — The  Pennsylvania  Journal , July 
18,  1754.  Numb . 606. 

Marine  List.  Eliz.  Miller  from  S.  Carolina  at 
Deal — The  Pennsylvania  Journal , July  18,  1754. 
Numb . 606. 

Run  away  from  John  Coryell,  at  his  ferry  in  Am- 
well,  15  miles  above  Trenton,  on  Sunday,  the  30th 
of  June  last,  A Dutch  servant  man,  named  Christian 
Frits,  about  5 feet,  4 inches  high,  of  a swarthy  com- 
plexion, 20  years  of  age,  black  eyes  and  eye-brows, 
and  wears  his  hair  : Had  on  when  he  went  away,  A 

brown  jacket,  white  shirt,  leather  breeches,  with 
brass  buttons,  blue  stockings,  with  single  channell’d 
pumps,  with  square  brass  buckles.  Whoever  takes 
up  and  secures  said  servant,  so  as  his  master  may 
have  him  again,  shall  have  Thirty  Shillings  reward 
and  reasonable  charges  paid  by 

John  Coryell. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , July  18,  1754. 

Numb.  T334. 


380  new  jersey  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1754 

Greenwich,  July  1,  1754. 

Made  his  escape,  on  the  30th  of  June,  in  the  night 
from  the  subscriber,  high  sheriff  of  the  county  of 
Cumberland,  one  Daniel  Beekman,  (being  in  the 
care  and  guard  of  one  William  Conner)  committed 
on  suspicion  of  feloniously  taking  a stone  horse  from 
one  John  Mall,  of  said  county.  Said  Beekman  is  a 
lusty  well-set  fellow,  about  five  feet,  ten  inches  high  ; 
he  calls  himself  a Swede,  talks  pretty  good  English, 
was  hand  cuffed  and  schackled  when  he  went  away  : 
Had  on  a linen  waistcoat,  wide  trowsers,  and  leather 
apron.  Whoever  takes  up  said  prisoner,  and  secures 
him,  so  that  he  may  be  had  again,  shall  have  Thirty 
Shillings  reward,  and  reasonable  charges,  paid  by 

Ananias  Sayre,  Sheriff. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , July  25,  1754. 
Numb.  1335. 


Philadelphia,  July  25,  1754. 

Run  away  on  the  22nd  instant,  from  Philip  Fitz- 
gerald, of  Edinburgh,  Salem  county,  West-New-Jer- 
sey,  an  Irish  servant  man,  named  Andrew  Lanin, 
about  23  years  of  age,  near  6 feet  high,  pock -mark’d, 
large  nose,  and  round  shoulder’d,  with  a scar  in  his 
forehead : Had  on  when  he  went  away,  a blue  cloth 

coat,  red  jacket,  without  sleeves,  blue  cloth  breeches, 
blue  worsted  stockings,  and  good  shoes,  with  brass 
buckles,  middling  fine  white  shirt,  and  a good  check 
ditto,  and  a new  large  felt  hat.  Whoever  takes  up, 
and  secures  the  said  servant,  so  as  his  master  may 
have  him  again,  shall  have  Forty  Shillings  reward, 
and  reasonable  charges,  paid  by 


Philip  Fitzgerald. 


1754] 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


381 


N.  B.  It  is  supposed  he  will  write  a counterfeit 
pass,  he  being  a pretty  good  scholar. — The  Pennsyl- 
vania Gazette , July  25,  1754.  Numb.  1335. 

New-  Yot k,  July  29.  The  Election  at  Woodbridge 
in  the  Jerseys,  of  Members  of  the  Assembly,  began 
on  Monday  last,  continued  three  Days,  and  ’twas 
thought  would  hardly  end  the  4th  : On  Wednesday 

Evening  the  Poll  stood  thus, 

For  Mr.  Wetheril,  301 
Mr.  Randolph,  262 
Mr.  Nevil,  264 
Mr.  Oouke,  184 

the  two  former  join  Interest.  ’Tis  thought  Mr.  Weth- 
eril and  Mr.  Nevil,  will  be  in,  tho’  on  opposite  Sides. 
— The  N Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , July 
29.  1 754- 

Philadelphia,  July  25. 
Five  Pounds  Reward 

RUN  aw7ay  on  the  6th  of  this  instant,  from 
Joshua  Bisphan,  (executor  to  the  estate  of 
Benjamin  Bisphan  deceased)  living  in  Chester  town- 
ship, Burlington  county,  in  the  province  of  West- 
New-Jersey,  a Scotch  servant  man,  named  Thomas 
Leitch,  near  40  years  of  age,  about  5 feet  9 inches 
high,  fresh  complexion,  thin  visage,  black  hair,  weak 
grey  eyes,  and  is  a carpenter  and  joiner  by  trade, 
speaks  good  English,  and  has  been  many  years  in 
the  country:  Had  on  when  he  went  away,  an  old 

hat,  red  jacket,  white  shirt,  and  ozenbrigs  trowsers, 
but  may  have  changed  his  clothes.  Whoever  takes 
up  and  secures  the  said  servant,  so  as  he  may  be  had 


382  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1754 

again,  shall  have  the  above  reward,  and  reasonable 
charges,  paid  by 

Joshua  Bisphan,  executor. 

— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , 
July  29,  1754. 

Philadelphia , August  /.  Extract  of  a Letter  from 
London  to  a Gentleman  here , dated  May  25,  1754. 
“Capt.  Hamilton  talks  of  sailing  next  Week:  I be- 

lieve he  will  have  the  Baggage  of  your  new  Gov- 
ernor, Robert  Hunter  Morris , Esq  ; who  is  expected 
to  proceed  for  your  Province  in  a few  Days,  in  the 
Mermaid  Man  of  War.” — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the 
Weekly  Post  Boy , Aug.  5,  1754. 

New- York,  August  5.  We  hear  from  several 
Parts  in  New-Jersey,  that  there  has  been  lately  the 
greatest  Struggles  in  electing  Representatives,  in 
some  of  the  Counties,  that  ever  were  known  : In 

Middlesex  County  they  were  four  whole  Days,  and 
694  Freeholders  polled,  when  the  Honourable  Sam- 
uel Nevil,  Esq  ; with  John  Wetheril,  Esq  ; were  re- 
turned duly  elected,  tho’  set  up  on  opposite  Sides. 
In  Monmouth  County,  the  Election  began  on  Mon- 
day last:  The  Candidates  were  Robert  Lawrence, 

Samuel  Holmes,  John  Taylor,  and  John  Anderson, 
Esqrs  ; when  after  three  Days,  the  two  first  were  de- 
clared duly  elected.  In  Somerset  were  six  Candi- 
dates ; the  Return  not  yet  known  : And  in  Hunter- 

don four,  and  by  the  Post  we  hear,  after  four  Days 
polling,  two  new  Members  were  elected.  In  Essex 
and  Bergen  are  both  new  Members  without  much 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


1754] 


383 


Opposition. — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post 
Boy , Aug . 5,  1754. 


MARGARET  POWELL,  living  at  Mrs.  Elbert- 
son’s  in  New-Street,  New-York,  hereby 
gives  Notice,  that  she  undertakes  the  Cure  of  all 
Rheumatic  Pains,  Sore  Legs,  and  Cataracts  of  the 
Eyes  ; but  above  all  the  Canker,  either  in  the  Nose, 
Month  or  Throat,  of  ever  so  long  standing,  or  to 
whatever  Height  the  Disease  might  have  run  She 
has  lately  made  a Cure  of  an  obstinate  Canker  in  the 
City  of  New-Brunswick.  — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the 
Weekly  Post  Boy , Aug.  5,  1754. 

Run  away  from  William  McKnight,  of  Upper 
Freehold,  in  the  county  of  Monmouth,  a High 
Dutch  servant  man,  nam’d  Baltus  Spackholtz,  of 
middle  stature,  about  25  years  of  age,  speaks  bad 
English,  pretends  to  be  a miller,  and  has  short  black 
hair  : Had  on  when  he  went  away,  a half  worn  felt 

hat,  white  linen  shirt,  blue  coat,  with  red  lining,  blue 
vest,  light  brown  breeches,  and  black  stockings. 
Whoever  takes  up  said  servant,  and  secures  him,  so 
that  his  master  may  have  him  again,  shall  have  Three 
Pounds  reward,  and  reasonable  charges  paid  by 

William  McKnight 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , August  8,  1754. 
Numb . 1337. 

Run  away  on  the  28th  of  July  last,  from  Derrick 
Aten,  of  Readens  town,  Hunterdon  county,  in  New 
Jersey,  a Negroe  man,  named  Jack,  about  30 
years  of  age,  near  five  feet  high,  has  a flat  nose, 
much  pock-marked,  a lover  of  white  women,  and  a 


384  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1754 

great  smoker : Had  on  when  he  went  away,  a red 

strait  bodied  coat,  striped  homespun  jacket,  and  an- 
other whitish  ditto.  Whoever  takes  up  and  secures 
said  Negroe,  so  that  his  master  may  have  him  again, 
shall  have  Three  Pounds  reward,  and  reasonable 
charges,  paid  by 

Derrick  Aten. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , August  8,  1754. 
Numb.  1337. 

Scheme 

Of  a Lottery,  in  Connecticut,  for  the  benefit  of  the 
College  in  New-Jersey. 

Whereas,  on  the  petition  of  the  trustees  of  the  col- 
lege of  New-Jersey,  lately  presented  to  the  General 
Court  or  Assembly  of  the  colony  of  Connecticut,  for 
the  erection  of  a publick  lottery  in  that  colony,  in 
favour  of  the  said  college,  the  said  General  Court  or 
Assembly  hath  generously  impowered  the  trustees  of 
the  said  college  to  set  up  a lottery  in  their  colony  for 
the  purpose  above-mentioned  : The  said  lottery  will 

consist  of  8888  tickets  of  which  3088  are  to  be  fortu- 
nate, viz. 

Numb.  York 


of  Prizes.  < 

Currency. 

Pieces  of  8. 

Total  Val. 

t 

of 

£'501, 

or 

1252  and  an 

half,  is  /501 

2 

of 

250 

or 

625 

are  500 

4 

of 

125 

or 

312  and  an 

half  are  500 

8 

of 

100 

or 

250 

are  800 

16 

of 

50 

or 

125 

are  800 

30 

of 

20 

or 

50 

are  600 

50 

of 

10 

or 

25 

are  500 

1754] 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


385 


100  of  5 or  1 2 and  an  half  are  500 

2877  of  3 or  7 and  an  half  are  8631 

3088  Prizes)  8888  Tickets  at  30s.  York  Currency 
5800  Blanks)  or  3 and  3 qrs.  Ps.  of  8 each  is  £1 3332 
Fifteen  per  Cent,  to  be  deducted  from  the  Prizes. 
As  publick  seminaries  of  learning  not  only  tend  to 
promote  the  private  welfare  of  the  communities  in 
which  they  are  founded,  but  to  advance  the  honour, 
the  reputation,  and  the  happiness  of  a country  in 
general  ; it  is  hoped,  that  all  those  who  would  en- 
courage the  progress  of  the  liberal  sciences,  and  are 
well  wishers  to  the  propagation  of  Christianity  in  these 
parts  of  the  world,  will  cheerfully  become  adventur- 
ers here  ; and  the  more  freely,  considering  the  above 
scheme  is  so  well  calculated  for  the  benefit  of  the 
proprietors  of  tickets,  as  not  to  have  two  blanks  to  a 
prize.  Publick  notice  will  be  given  of  the  precise  time 
of  putting  the  tickets  into  the  boxes,  that  such  adven- 
turers as  are  inclined  may  be  present  when  the  same 
shall  be  done.  The  drawing  to  commence  on  the 
second  of  September  next,  or  sooner  if  full,  at  the 
town  of  Stamford  in  Connecticut,  under  the  inspec- 
tion of  two  justices  of  peace  of  the  colony  of  Connec- 
ticut, and  of  two  persons  who  shall  be  appointed  by 
the  trustees  of  the  college  of  New  Jersey.  The  pub- 
lick will  have  fourteen  days  notice  of  the  time  of 
drawing.  The  managers  are  sworn  to  the  faithful 
discharge  of  the  trust  reposed  in  them,  and  have  also 
given  security  for  the  same.  The  prizes  will  be  pub- 
lished in  the  New  York  and  Pennsylvania  Gazettes, 

and  the  money  paid  to  the  possessors  of  benefit  tick- 
25 


386  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [ 1 754 

ets,  as  soon  as  the  drawing  is  finished.  Tickets  are 
to  be  had  at  the  dwelling-houses  of  Mr.  John  Lloyd, 
Ephraim  Bustwick  Esq.;  and  Dr.  Nathaniel  Hub- 
bard, in  the  town  of  Stamford  in  Connecticut,  who 
are  appointed  managers.  Tickets  will  also  be  sold 
by  Mr.  David  Vanhorne,  in  New  York  ; Samuel 
Woodruff,  Esq;  in  Elizabeth-town  ; Mr.  Sergeant, 
treasurer  of  the  college  of  New  Jersey,  in  Newark  ; 
John  Stockton,  Esq.  in  Prince-town  ; the  Rev.  Mr. 
Cowell,  and  messieurs  Reed  and  Furman  in  Tren- 
ton ; Mr.  Charles  Hoff,  junior,  in  Kingwood ; Mr. 
John  Imley,  in  Bordentown  ; and  messieurs  George 
Spofford,  Andrew  Reed,  William  Grant,  John  Sayre, 
Andrew  Hodge,  William  Henry,  Hugh  M’Cul- 
lough,  and  Samuel  Hazard  in  Philadelphia.  The 
prizes  will  be  paid  by  those  gentlemen  who  shall 
have  disposed  of  the  numbers  drawing  such  prizes. 
— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette , Augusts,  1754.  Numb. 
*337- 

London , May  22.  The  Hon. Hamilton,  Esq  ; 

having  resigned  as  Governor  of  Philadelphia,  the 
Hon.  Robert  Hunter  Morris,  Esq  ; lately  appointed, 
will  embark  at  Plymouth  in  a few  Days  on  board  a 
Man  of  War  for  that  Colony. — The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or 
the  Weekly  Post  Boy , Aug.  12,  1754. 

You  will  oblige  many  of  your  Readers  by  inserting 
the  inclosed , Part  of  what  was  delivered  by  the  Free- 
holders of  the  County  of  Hunterdon,  in  West-New- 
Jersey,  to  their  new  Representatives , into  the  Hands 
of  and  read  by  the  Sheriff,  at  the  Close  of  the  Poll \ in 
Amwell. 


1754] 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


387 


To  Messieurs  Joseph  Yard,  and  Peter  Medah. 
Gentlemen , 

THE  highest  Approbation  of  your  Integrity  and 
Abilities,  has  just  now  been  shown  you,  by 
the  general  Voice  of  your  County. 

The  Sense  you  must  have  of  so  general  a Suffrage, 
naturally  implies  our  Confidence  of  your  Acquaint- 
ance with  the  English  Constitution  (of  which  we  are 
an  Epitome)  and  the  Expectance  we  have  of  your 
proper  Exertion  and  Inforcement  of  all  its  invaluable 
Privileges,  more  immediately  that  of  frequent  choos- 
ing our  own  Representatives. — And  that  you  will  act 
in  that  Character  by  Principle,  and  from  a Persua- 
sion, that  those  you  have  the  Honour  to  represent 
are  Freemen,  tenacious  of  their  Properties — This, 
Gentlemen,  we  think  we  have  a Right  to  remind  you 
of,  at  so  critical  a Juncture,  when  the  unhappy  Situa- 
tion of  all  our  Northern  Colonies  in  America , under 
the  Allegiance  of  our  most  gracious  Sovereign  King 
George,  claims  your  first  Attention. 

Our  All  is  at  Stake  ; and  calls  loudly  on  you  to 
shew  your  Duty  to  your  God,  to  the  best  of  Kings, 
to  your  Constituents,  to  yourselves,  to  your  Poster- 
ity.— Secure  to  us  and  them,  Peace,  Commerce,  and 
of  course  Prosperity:  and,  with  your  whole  Influ- 
ence, endeavour  to  procure  such  a Bill  for  the  Pur- 
pose, as  may  be  for  the  Honour  of  a New-Jersey  As- 
sembly to  pass. 

The  Militia  Bill  is  incumbered  with  such  Difficul- 
ties, that  no  Person  of  Repute  or  Character  scarcely 
can  do  his  Duty  under  it: — But  the  Entanglements 
are  obvious,  and  the  Remedy  is  easy.  To  enable 


388  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [ 1 754 

the  Province  to  act  and  defray  the  Expences  (which 
a near,  cruel,  and  enterprizing  Neighbour,  the 
French,  involves  us  in)  your  Solitude  to  maintain  a 
Money-Bill  (the  most  easy  to  your  Constituents,  and 
the  Province  in  general)  cannot  be  forgot. 

You’ll  remember,  Gentlemen,  that  your  determin- 
ation may  possibly  determine  our  Properties  : — You 
will  therefore,  in  all  Debates,  exclude  personal  Pique 
and  Resentment. — Let  a rational  and  steady  Adher- 
rence  to  Truth,  stripped  of  all  late  Obstinacy,  and 
unjustifiable  Considerations,  be  your  Care  ; private 
Interest  seldom  has,  in  those  Cases,  a Connection 
with  the  Publick — The  Province  never  wanted  a 
Junction  of  Hearts  and  Hands  more  than  at  present. 
— Therefore,  Render  unto  Cczsar  the  Things  that  are 
Ccesars,  and  conduct  yourselves  agreeable  to  the 
Advice,  Wishes  and  Inclinations  of  your  Constituents. 
— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , Aug. 

12,  1754. 

Stanford,  August  9th,  1754. 

THE  Managers  of  the  Connecticut  Lottery,  for 
the  Benefit  of  the  College  of  New-Jersey,  do 
hereby  give  Notice,  that  the  Drawing  of  said  Lot- 
tery, will  certainly  begin  on  the  Second  Day  of  Sep- 
tember next,  at  the  Town  of  Stanford  in  Connecti- 
cut, and  the  Tickets  will  be  put  in  the  Boxes  on 
Monday  the  26th  Day  of  this  Instant  August,  that 
such  Adventurers  as  are  inclined  may  be  present. 

N.  B.  There  are  a few  Tickets  yet  remaining  to 
be  disposed  of  by  Mr.  David  Vanhorne,  Mr.  Daniel 
Defoe,  and  Mr.  Garret  Noel,  in  New  York. — The  N. 
Y.  Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy,  Aug.  12,  1754. 


t754j  newspaper  extracts.  389 

Just  Published,  and  to  be  sold  by  Henry  De  For- 
eest  in  King  Street,  in  New-York  ; also  by  Lawrence 
Van  Boskerk,  in  Hackensack,  (Price  4s.  6d.) 

Qoctor  Hector  Masius,  Professor  Theologiae, 
Kooninglyke  host  Predikant  en  Consistorial,  Asses- 
sor in  de  Kooninglycke  Residence  S tacit  Copenhagen , 
syne  Heylfaame  Onderwysinge  en  Heylige  Betragt- 
ingen  voor  Ckmstelyke  Communicanten,  voor,  by,  en 
naar  Het  waardige  Gebruyk  des  Hoogwaardige 
Avondmaals.  Uyt  het  Deensche  Spraak  overgeset 1 
Van  JocJium  Melchier  Magens.  In  this  Book,  any 
Person  that  understands  the  Low-Dutch  Language, 
will  find  no  Controversy,  but  a Voice  of  Repentance, 
which  our  present  Christian  World  wants  very  much; 
for  the  Want  thereof  makes  so  many  monstrous 
Christians.  The  present  Condition  we  live  in,  re- 
quires such  sort  of  Books  especially. — The  N.  Y. 
Gazette  or  the  Weekly  Post  Boy , Aug.  12,  1754. 

The  following  is  a List  of  the  Representatives  of 
the  Province  of  New  Jersey.2 

1 In  modern  Dutch  this  would  read  : Doctor  Hector  Masius,  Professor  Theologiae,  het 
Koninklijke  Predikant  en  Consistorial  Assessor  in  de  Koninklijke  Residentie  Stad  Copen- 
hagen, zijne  Heilzaame  onderwijzinge  en  heilige  betrachtinge  voor  Christelijke  Communi- 
canten, voor,  bij,  en  naar  het  waardige  gebruik  des  hoogwaardige  Avondmaals.  Uijt  den 
Deensche  spraak  overgezet.  Translation  : Doctor  Hector  Masius,  Professor  of  Theolo- 
gy, the  Royal  Preacher  and  Consistorial  Adsessor  in  the  Royal  Palace  in  the  city  of  Co- 
penhagen, his  sound  instructions  and  holy  meditations  for  Christian  communicants,  for, 
by  and  according  to  the  precious  custom  of  the  Lord’s  Supper.  Translated  from  the  Dan- 
ish language. 

2 John  Johnston,  grandson  of  Dr.  John  Johnstone,  of  Perth  Amboy,  was  commissioned 
a Colonel  in  the  Provincial  troops,  March  io,  1758,  Col.  Peter  Schuyler  and  Col.  John 
Parker  being  both  paroled  prisoners.  The  organization  was  known  as  “Col.  Johnston’s 
Jersey  Regiment,”  at  the  disastrous  attack  made  by  the  British  and  American  soldiers  on 
the  French  at  Ticonderoga,  July  8,  175S.  Col.  Johnston  was  second  in  rank  in  an  attack 
on  the  Oneida  station  in  August  of  that  year.  He  was  killed  by  a cannon  ball  at  fort 
Niagara  in  July,  1759.  He  married  his  cousin  Euphemia,  daughter  of  Andrew  Johnston. — 
See  Whitehead’s  Perth  Amboy,  68-75;  N.  Y.  Gen.  and  Biog.  Record,  V.,  171 ; American 
Historical  Register,  I. , 44  ; N.  J.  Archives,  IX.  ,184,  note ; N.  Y.  Hist.  Soc.  Coll. , XIV. , 85. 

John  Stevens — for  sketch,  see  N.  J.  Archives,  IX.,  335,  note. 


300  NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.  [1754 

Amboy,  John  Johnson,  John  Stevens. 

Middlesex,  Samuel  Nevill,  John  Wetherell. 

Essex,  Jacob  Dehart,  Mr.  Broadbury. 

Monmouth,  Robert  Lawrence.  James  Holmes. 
Somersett,  Hendrick  Fisher,  Mr.  Hoglandt. 
Bergen,  George  Vreelandt,  Mr.  Vangesen. 

Samuel  Nevill — see  N.  J.  Archives,  VI.,  323  ; XI.,  469,  note. 

John  Wetherill  was  first  elected  to  the  Assembly  in  1749,  and  was  returned  by  Middle- 
sex County  in  1751,  T754,  1761,  1769  and  1772.  In  1774  he  was  appointed  by  the  Assembly 
on  a Standing  Committee  of  Correspondence  and  Inquiry  to  correspond  with  the  other 
Colonies  for  the  common  advancement  of  American  liberty;  he  was  a member  of  the 
Provincial  Congress  which  met  in  May,  June  and  August,  177s,  and  in  January,  1776;  also 
of  the  Provincial  Convention  of  June,  1776.  He  was  also  commissioned  Colonel  of  the 
Second  Battalion  of  Militia  of  Middlesex  County,  but  on  account  of  indisposition  and  ad- 
vancing age  was  constrained  to  resign  his  commission  in  August,  1776.  During  the  Rev- 
olution his  home  at  South  Brunswick  was  raided  by  the  British,  and  he  was  damaged,  as 
he  estimated,  to  the  extent  of  ^n,  8s. 

Jacob  Dehart,  b.  in  1700,  was  the  son  of  Matthias  Dehart ; the  latter,  b.  1667,  was  the 
natural  son  of  Balthazar  De  Haerdt  and  Mrs.  Margaret  Backer,  wid.  of  Jacob  Backer,  a 
prominent  New  York  merchant,  and  sister  of  Petrus  Stuyvesant,  the  famous  Director-Gen- 
eral of  New  Amsterdam.  Jacob  was  a vestryman  in  St.  John’s  Episcopal  Church,  Eliza- 
bethtown, in  1749,  and  was  one  of  the  wardens  named  in  the  charter  of  July  20, 1762.  He 
was  elected  to  the  Assembly  in  1754,  but  accepting  an  office  of  profit,  soon  after  (prior  to 
August,  1757)  ,his  seat  was  vacated.  At  the  time  of  the  threatened  outbreak  on  the  west- 
ern frontier,  in  1756,  he  was  commissioned  Colonel  in  command  of  the  New  Jersey 
forces  along  the  Delaware  river.  He  m.  Abigail  Crane;  he  d.  Sept.  21,  1777;  she  d.  June 
10,  1770,  in  her  67th  year.  Of  their  children,  Matthias,  their  eldest  son,  was  a physi- 
cian, who  d.  April  29,  1766,  in  his  43d  year;  Jacob,  their  second  son,  was  a sea  captain,  and 
d.  at  Porto  Prince,  in  1758,  in  his  31st  year. 

Richard  Bradbury  was  the  only  son  of  John  Bradbury,  who  probably  built  the  first  mill 
on  Third  River,  near  the  present  Avondale,  in  1698  or  earlier.  John  Bradbury’s  will  was 
proved  Sept.  7,  1740.  Richard’s  seat  in  the  Legislature  was  vacated,  and  John  Ogden 
was  chosen  in  his  place,  appearing  as  a member  in  April,  1762.  Richard  died  intestate,  in 
1770  or  earlier.  For  a sketch  of  the  Bradbury  family  and  the  descendants  of  John  Brad- 
bury (the  Ludlow,  Berry,  Baldwin.  Van  Riper  and  other  families)',  see  History  of  Pat- 
erson, 158-9,  note. 

Robert  Lawrence  was  probably  a grandson  of  Elisha  Lawrence,  b.  in  1 666,  and  d.  May 
27,  1724,  who  settled  in  the  latter  part  of  the  seventeenth  century  at  Cheesequakes,  south 
of  the  Raritan,  and  engaged  in  business  as  a merchant,  but  afterwards  removed  to  Upper 
Freehold,  Monmouth  County.  Robert  was  first  elected  to  the  Assembly  from  that  Coun- 
ty in  1743,  and  was  re-elected  in  1744,  1745,  1746,  1749,  1751,  1754,  serving  continuously 
from  T743  until  1761  ; he  was  Speaker,  1746-47,  1754-58,  and  appears  to  have  taken  the 
side  of  the  people  in  their  controversies  with  the  Governor  and  the  Proprietors. 

James  Holmes  was  a merchant  in  New  York,  but  lived  in  Monmouth  County,  where 
he  married  Helena,  dau.  of  John  Lawrence,  son  of  Elisha.  In  1758  he  was  assessed  on  700 
acres  of  land  in  Upper  Freehold.  Holmes  was  elected  to  the  Assembly  from  Monmouth 
County  in  1751,  and  was  re-elected  in  1754  and  in  1761,  but  died  within  a year  or  two,  and 
was  succeeded  by  John  Anderson,  who  was  a member  in  May,  1763. 

Hendrick  Fisher  was  b.  in  1697,  in  the  Palatinate,  and  came  to  this  country  when 
young,  taking  up  his  residence  near  Bound  Brook.  He  was  received  into  the  Dutch 


1 754j 


NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS. 


39t 


Burlington,  Charles  Read,  Samuel  Smith. 
Burlington  County,  Barzillia  Newbold,  Henry 
Paxson. 

Gloucester,  John  Ladd,  Samuel  Clemens. 

Salem,  William  Hancock,  Ebenezer  Miller. 


church  in  1721,  and  held  various  offices  in  the  church  thereafter,  being  also  a lay  preacher. 
He  was  elected  to  the  Assembly  from  Somerset  in  1740,  but  was  declared  ineligible,  on  the 
ground  that  not  enough  time  had  elapsed  since  his  naturalization,  which  had  taken  place 
only  the  preceding  session.  He  stated  that  he  had  been  informed  he  had  a right  to  sit  as 
a member  of  the  Assembly  by  virtue  of  an  act  of  Parliament  passed  in  Queen  Anne’s 
reign,  which  naturalized  other  Germans,  the  provisions  of  the  same  act  being  thought  to 
include  him.  Thomas  Leonard,  however,  was  chosen  in  his  place,  and  took  his  seat  May 
28,  1740.  Mr.  Fisher  was  again  elected  in  1745,  and  took  his  seat  wdthout  objection.  He 
was  re-elected  in  1746, 1749,  1751, 1754,  1761, 1769  and  1772,  representing  his  county  con- 
tinuously for  thirty  years.  In  1775  he  was  elected  a member  of  the  first  Provincial  Con- 
gress of  New  Jersey,  of  which  body  he  was  chosen  President  at  the  sitting  in  May  of  that 
year.  At  the  session  in  October,  1775,  when  Samuel  Tucker  was  chosen  President,  Fisher 
was  elected  Vice  President.  He  was  also  a member  of  the  Committee  of  Safety,  appointed 
by  the  Provincial  Congress,  Oct.  28,  1775.  He  proved  himself  an  ardent,  able  and  coura- 
geous friend  of  his  country.  He  died  Aug.  16, 1779,  and  was  buried  on  his  farm. — 1 VIess- 
ler's  Hist.  Somerset  County , 56 ; Asse?nbly  Minutes , passim  ; etc. , etc. 

John  Hoagland  (Johannes  Hoogland),  son  of  Hendrick,  was  b.  at  Flatbush,  L.  I.,  about 
1712.  His  father  removed  with  his  family  to  New  Jersey  in  1719.  About  1745  John  bought 
176  acres  on  the  east  of  the  Millstone  river,  Somerset  county,  adding  40  acres  more  in 
1754.  He  was  re-elected  to  the  Assembly  in  1761.  His  will  was  proved  Dec.  16,  1777. 

'George  Vreeland  (son  of  Enoch,  son  of  Michael  Jansen,  the  progenitor  of  the  Vreelands 
of  New  Jersey)  was  b.  Sept.  25, 1710;  d.  June  21, 1795.  He  lived  near  Caven  Point,  nowin 
Hudson  county.  His  father,  Enoch  Michielsen  (i.  e. , Enoch,  son  of  Micbiel  Jansen),  was 
a member  of  the  Assembly  in  1707.  George  (he  was  baptized  Joris,  the  Dutch  for  George) 
Vreeland  was  appointed  a Judge  of  the  Essex  Court  of  Oyer  and  Terminer,  Dec.  17,  1744, 
and  was  one  of  the  members  of  the  Assembly  from  that  county  in  the  Thirteenth  and  Four- 
teenth Assemblies,  elected  in  1743  and  1744,  from  which  it  is  inferred  that  he  then  resided  in 
that  county.  If  so,  he  probably  lived  in  Acquackanonk,  which"  was  the  home  of  his  second 
wife,  Annetj