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Board of lrade 


ournal 


Contents 
Review of Wholesale Prices in 
1946 


Revised Coal Allocations for In- 
dustry 

Mulberry Harbour Equipment 
for Disposal aie ie 


Mulberry Harbour Disposal of 
Radio Components Kn 


Output of Cotton —! in 
November ee is 


Makers of Perambulators and 


Push Chairs 


Experts Reports on heieen In- 
dustries 


The Week’s sail of Films 


Official Announcements 


Contents 


Trade Mission Report on Visit to 
Middle East . 

Market for United Kingdom 
Goods in Saudi Arabia 


Canadian Wood and Wood Pro- 
ducts Industry 


Growth of Palestine Trade, Janu- 
ary—June, 1946 


Overseas Trade of 
Uganda 


Classified Index me 1946 


Customs Regulations and Tariff 
Changes 


ae and 


British India ioe iateinhiene 
French West African Export Taxes 
Exhibitions and Fairs 
Nationalized Polish Firms 





Volume 153 No. 2615 


Price 6d. net ; 26s. per annum ; post free 30s. 


18 January 1947 





Review of Wholesale Prices 


in 1946 


HOLESALE prices, as measured by the Board 
W.:: Trade index number, showed considerably 

more activity during 1946 than in any year 
since 1940, when price control began to be fully 
effective. The rise of 6-2 per cent. between December 
1945 and December 1946 was the 
of an almost unbroken upward movement throughout 


cumulative result 


the year. 


Though increased wage rates and transport costs, 
shorter working hours and other economic factors 
in industry all contributed in some degree, the 
rising cost of imported raw materials 
had a widespread effect on prices 
in this country. This is illustrated 
by the marked contrast between the fall of nearly 
1 per cent. in food prices, which are heavily sub- 
sidized, and the rise of 10 per cent. shown for 
industrial materials and manufactures, where the 
element of subsidy is of far less importance. 


Of the 200 individual commodities included in 
the index, 143 price changes were recorded over 
the year (112 increases, 85 of which related to 
industrial materials, and 31 decreases—17 for in- 
dustrial materials); compensating changes took 
place for two further items. The movements were 
widely dispersed, ranging from a rise of 86 per cent. 


Cost of Raw 
Materials 


in the price of jute, to a fall of 34 per cent. in that 


of potatoes. 
Food prices as a whole were 
1946 
very slightly 
the 
prices for 


cent. 
1945. 
half of 
higher 


about 1 per 
December 
the 
owing to 


lower in December than in 


Prices rose during first 


year mainly 


Food Prices cereals. Subsequently, 
subsidized 


more heavily than a year ago, and despite a sub- 


prices of potatoes were 
stantial advance in the price of poultry in September, 
the index declined by the end of the year to rather 
below that of December 1945. 
the end of 1942 have, however, shown very little 
change. The only decline in the month to month 
movement of the industrial index was 
in February, when there was a reduction in the 
prices of wood pulp. 


The annual 
groups, with the exception of coal, 


Average prices since 


materials 


increases shown for the various 
other textiles 
and miscellaneous, were greater than in any year 
since 1940. Iron and steel and non-ferrous metals 
have risen more during 1946 than in the whole of 
the five pre years; previously they had 
been controlled very rigidly in the interests of price 
stability of war-time contracts, but they have now 


been permitted to come more into line with market 


vious 






























































82 THE BOARD OF TRADE JOURNAL 18 January 1947 
conditions. * 
: : gre 
The annual increases from 1939 to 1946 for the main Dec. ’38 | Dec. ’39 | Dec. ’40 | Dec. °44 Deo. "45 pee 
. . 7 . 4 eae Group to ) to to dec. 38 
index numbers are shown in the following table: Gi Dec ’39 | Dec 40 | Dec. °44| Dec. °45| Dec "461 to 
ee ee —— Dec. °46 
| es 
Percentage increases compared with Food and Tobacco ; 
a year earlier ereals sie “ke 39-7 14-0 13-0 hd 2-3 81-0 
ity Meat, fish and eggs... | 19-7 | 15-0 0-9 0-3*| 31 | 42-9 
Date : Other food and tobacco} 27-5 33-6 10-7 5-9% | 84-4 
Food and Industrial | Total—All ‘ ; 
Tobacco {Materials and} Articles Industrial Materials 
and Manufactures 
| Manufactures Coal i = 3-8 19°5 8-8 0-2 98-9 
— —— — —— Iron and steel sine 2-6 26-6 2-3 13-5 56-0 
‘ 92.6 99.9 94.5 Non-ferrous metals ... 17-4 8-1 0-8* 41-5 84-8 
December 1939... cee 28-6 | mashed 24-3 Cotton 51-7 4-7 1-4 20-1 | 142-6 
tax Ay Gee = heer: Oo a om 32-3 27-3 1-0* 5:8 94-7 
December 1940... oo | 22-4 | 21-0 | 21-5 Other textiles | 49°6 7-9 6-0 12-6 | 137-9 
aa Sa 7 Chemicals and oils ... 12-8 16-2 4-7* 9-9 69-8 
= Miscellaneous ae 40-5 28-4 2-2 0-4 113-1 
Yecember 1941... at 4-2 | 5-3 | 4-9 
] ‘ | ee, ee a - eI 
od as Jecrease, 
December 1942... see 5-7 2-3 | 3-4 
Tike EF ————— | average barley (weight of 3) fell in price by about 1% per 
December 1943 (—) 0-5 23 | 13 unk 
December 1944 ei | 4-1 2-3 The rise of 3-1 per cent. in the meat, fish and eggs group, 
iat = ‘o | ote ‘a | ian 3 ~~ which had remained practically stable since 1940, was due 
December 1945... fect Nodal , nd he ees mainly to the substantial increase of 45 per cent. in the 
December 1946 (—) 0-9 | 10-0 | 6-2 price of poultry. The maximum price rather more than 
ce ec ‘ —_ ‘ - . . : 
a LLLLLCLCLCLCLCTSC~*és«sdounted in. September, butt dropped by nearly one-third 
Aggregate— in November. An authorized increase in August of 
Dec. 1938 to Dec. 1946... 70-2 89-7 82-9 23 per cent. in meat prices was the first change to be 
recorded for these items since December 1942. Canned 











The increases between August and December 1939 were 33, 183 
and 23 per cent., respectively. 


The regrouped data, in which the prices of industrial 
materials and manufactures (except fuel) are classified 
according to the stage of completion reached by the 
products concerned, showed very similar increases between 
December 1945 and December 1946 for the three sub- 
divisions—10 per cent. for basic materials, 11 per cent. 
for intermediate products and 12 per cent. for manu- 
factured articles. 

Building material prices rose rapidly up to September 
and at the end of the year were 15-8 per cent. higher 
than a year earlier. 

The changes in each year from 1939 to 1946 are shown 
in the following table :-— 
































Percentage increases compared with 
a year earlier 

Date a Se Sa onan 

Basic Inter- Manu- 3uilding 

Materials | mediate | factured | Materials 

Products | Articles 
December 1939 50-2 22-0 9-8 6-6 
December 1940 ae 17-2 28-6 18-3 20-4 
December 1941 7:8 4-4 4-2 6-8 
December 1942 (—)0-4 2-1 2-3 4-2 
December 1943 — 4-5 0-8 1-8 1-9 
December 1944 — 5-4 2-1 2-4 2-2 
December 1945 ra 0-6 4-1 0-7 3-7 
December 1946 10-0 11-2 11-9 15:8 
Aggregate :— 

Dec. 1938 to Dec. 1946 | 130-4 99-3 62-5 78-4 














The increases between August and December 1939 were 29, 20, 12 
and 6 per cent., respectively. 


Commodity Groups 


The annual increases from 1939 to 1946 for each group 
are shown in the table in the next column. The years 1941 
to 1944 have been combined ; most of the movements were 
relatively small, but increases exceeding 10 per cent. 
were recorded for cereals (13-9 in 1941 and 12-2 in 1942); 
coal (10-6 in 1942 and 20-6 in 1944); cotton (11-1 in 1941 
and 17-2 in 1944) and other textiles (14-7 in 1941). 


Cereal prices during 1946 were affected mainly by the 
alterations in the extraction rate of flour and the reduction 
which took place in May in the weight of the national 
loaf. The net changes over the year were increases of 
14 per cent. in the average price of bread, 10} per cent. 
for bakers’ flour and slightly over 3 per cent. for homegrown 
and imported wheat. Oats for feeding (weight of one-third) 
were dearer by about 43 per cent., but English Gazette 


salmon also rose in price, by 22} per cent., but wet fish 
was cheaper on the average by about 10 per cent. 


The ‘‘ other food’”’ group was outstanding with a fall 
of 5-9 per cent., the principal changes during the year 
being in respect of price-controlled commodities. Potatoes 
(weight of 3) were cheaper on the average by 34 per cent., 
while homegrown onions and butter fell in price over the 
year by 18 and 114 per cent., respectively. Tomato 
prices showed seasonal variations but were unchanged in 
December compared with a year ago. The only significant 
price rises were 12 per cent. for apples and 10} per cent. 
for cocoa. 


Industrial Materials and Manufactures 


There were two general advances in iron and steel 
prices—in January and August, but the latter movement 
was relatively small, being associated with the rise in 
transport costs. The largest increases recorded over the 
year were in respect of manufactured iron—48 per cent. 
for rainwater pipes, 33 per cent. for hoops and marked 
bars, and 29 per cent. for crown iron; nuts and bolts rose 
by 13 per cent. The various descriptions of pig iron 
included in the index were higher in price by 16 to 22 per 
cent. Smaller increases were shown for semi-finished 
steel, billets and wire rods rising by 5 per cent. and tin 
bars and sheet bars by 2 per cent. The only change in the 
price of heavy melting scrap was an increase of 5 per cent. 
in August, due entireley to higher transport costs. High- 
speed tool steel was not affected by either of the general 
rises and fell over the year by about 4} per cent. Among 
the finished steel items, the largest increases in home 
market prices were :—Blackplates (20}$ per cent.), gal- 
vanized corrugated sheets (18 per cent.), tinplates (17 per 
cent.), rolled steel joists (144 per cent.), rivets for ship- 
building (12 per cent.) and black sheets (10 per cent.). 
For the remaining items, the increases ranged from 5} to 
84 per cent. but the export price of tinplates, which is 
not controlled, rose by 51 per cent. 


The rise of 41-5 per cent. during 1946, in non-ferrous 
metal prices compares with an aggregate increase of 
26-1 per cent. from the outbreak of war up to the end of 
1945. The price index for this group is accordingly now 
more in line with that of other industrial materials. There 
were three increases during the year in the prices of copper, 
zine and lead, amounting in the aggregate to 58 per cent. 
for electrolytic copper, 76 per cent. for zinc and 79 per 
cent. for lead. The corresponding rises for lead pipes 
and lead sheets were 614 and 65 per cent. respectively, 
while that for brass was about 43 per cent. Tin prices 
advanced in September by 27 per cent. 


Raw cotton prices were substantially higher in December 
1946 than a year ago. The controlled prices were raised 
in June and October, the aggregate increases over the 
year being 56} per cent. for American and 43 per cent. for 
Egyptian. Yarn prices showed several upward move- 
ments during the year as a result of increased wage rates 
and other factors, in addition to the rises due to the in- 
creased cost of raw materials; for the types included in 


18 J 


Indu 
Ba 
Int 
Me 


Builc 
































































































































47 18 January 1947 THE BOARD OF TRADE JOURNAL 83 
be Wholesale Pri 
" olesale Price Index Numbers for 1946 
"38 
46 Average for the Year 1930 = 100 
0 1945 1946 
7 Group a SS oe) Ya BO 2 Pe ee Re oe Pee ee 
| Dec. Jan. | Feb. | Mar. | Apr. | May Jane | | July Aug r, | Se pt. | Oct. | Nov. | Dec. 
I. Cereals wee 163-9 | 163-2 | 163-4 | 165-4 | 165-6 | 168-4 | 169- | 168- 6 | 168: 3 | 168-9 | 167-0 | 167-2 | 167-7 
0 II. Meat, fish and. eggs or 121-4 | 121-4 | 121-9 | 122-0 | 121-9 | 121-8 | 121-8 | 121-8 | 122-4 | 127-9 | 127-6 | 126-4 | 125-2 
8 Itt. Other food and tobacco 185-0 | 185-0 | 184-3 | 184-7 | 185-4 | 183-7 182-4 | 190-0 | 184-4 | 175-9 | 174-9 | 174-8 | 174:1 
6 -- —— | ——-— | | | | | | _-— —_—— — — ———- _ — —_ — —— - 
9 Total—Food and tobacco 157-6 157-4 | 157-4 | 158-2 | 158-5 | 158-7 | 158-5 | 160-9 | 159-1 | 158-2 | 157-2 | 156-7 | 156-3 
Rg —_——_ | |] J DS ee ee —— —-— - —- — —!| — ~ 
1 fy. ‘Goal .... : fee ce ... | 243-7 | 243-7 | 243-7 | 243-7 | 243-7 | 243-7 | 243-7 | 244-2 | 244-2 | 244-2 | 244-2 | 244-2 | 244-2 
— V. Iron and steel 189-9 | 205-3 | 205-3 | 205-3 | 205-3 | 205-2 | 205-2 | 206-4 | 211-0 | 214-8 | 215-6 | 215-6 | 215-6 
VI. Non-ferrous metals 126-9 | 128-8 | 130-4 | 130-4 | 139-8 | 143-4 | 143-4 | 161-2 | 161-4 | 163-3 | 167-1 | 174-6 | 179-5 
Der VII. Cotton... 162-9 | 164-1 | 164-7 | 164-9 | 165-8 | 165-8 | 171-8 | 171-8 | 171-8 | 171-8 | 180-4 | 195-4 | 195-7 
VIII. Wool 182-6 | 182-6 | 182-6 | 182-6 | 182-6 | 182-6 | 182-7 | 187-2 | 188-2 | 191-4 | 191-4 | 191-7 | 193-0 
IX. Other te xtiles.. 144-3 | 144-3 | 144-4 | 145-7 | 145-4 | 146-0 | 146-9 | 153-2 | 154-1 | 154-1 | 154-1 | 164-6 | 162-5 
1 X. Chemicals and oils 144-3 | 145-1 | 145-4 | 145-4 | 145-7 | 145-9 | 146-1 | 147-8 | 148-2 | 151-3 | 150-1 | 150-3 | 158-6 
- XI. Miscellaneous 189-9 | 189-5 | 186-6 | 186-3 | 186-2 | 187-5 | 187-5 | 190-0 | 190-3 | 190-4 | 189-9 | 189-7 | 190-7 
he Total—Industrial materials and 
an manufactures ae ... | 175-4] 179-5 | 179-1 | 179-1 | 179-9 | 180-6 | 181-2 | 184-7 | 186-2 | 187-8 | 188-7 | 191-2 | 192-9 
ird SS ee ee a | ee eee eee eee eee ae eS ee 
of ToraLt—aAll articles 169-5 | 172-0 | 171-8 172-1 1| 172-7 | 173-2 | 173-4 | 176-5 176-8 | 177-4 | 177-6 | 179-0 | 179-9 
be — | —— | ae See a a ————— —___—_—| —__- —— ——— —|-—- -_—-— 
ed Industrial materials (e nigiaties was —= | 
sh Basic materials : ies 188-4 | 187-3 | 184-5 | 184-6 | 185-1 | 185-8 | 186-9 | 192-6 | 192-9 | 194-2 | 196-2 | 203-3 | 207-2 
Intermediate products 183-5 | 189-5 | 190-1 | 190-2 | 191-1 | 191-5 | 192-2 | 196-0 | 197-8 | 193-8 | 199-9 | 201-8 | 204-1 
Manufactured articles 161-4 | 168-4 | 168-5 | 168-6 | 169-6 | 170- 6 171-0 | 173-4 | 175-7 | 178-9 | 179-5 | 180-3 | 180-7 
| ay POSE Pe PPE POSEHy PPTRPS PSOeeE Fee EEE ET PPS we Pee PP 
Building materials... ww. ewes | 159-5 | 163-1 | 164-3 164-3 | 165-7 1 | 168-2 sd in 1-7 | 178-8 | 184-3 184-9 | wail 184-6 
eS — a anna ana - } a mene 
vo 
he Average Index Numbers 1938-1946 
to (1930 = 100) 
in — — ++ 
“4 seited | 1938 | 1939 | 1940 | 1941 | 1942 | 1943 | 1944 1945 1946 
it. Seed ec ee Ad eh a (ee ens eee eee every Maerua as es & ee aE Pee i 
I. Cereals ; saa aie 109. 9 96-5 138-0 150-4 188-8 179-3 167°3 164-7 166- 9 
Il. Meats, fish and eggs ae ses 85-9 88-7 114-6 118-1 116-7 121-7 121-8 121-8 123-5 
- II. Other food and tobacco ... — ... 97-5 104-6 143-3 166-5 171-3 179-0 182-4 184-7 181-6 
Total—Food and tobacco... as 97-3 97-3 | 132-7 146- 1 157-5 159-8 157-8 157-9 158-1 
e cA | Sie eC | ee Sees aoem | ema SAE sees eed ES Dena Be sos, 
at iV... oat. ..; 123-2 121-1 140-1 159-5 171-1 185°8 209-1 237-0 244-0 
in V. Iron and steel 139-1 131-5 159-2 181-1 182-5 182-8 184-1 188-8 209-2 
1e VI. Non-ferrous metals . Riene 94-4 100-4 123-2 123-9 125-8 126-0 127°8 127-1 150-9 
t. VII. Cotton nite as oes sas 83-6 88:5 125-3 138-2 140-9 136-7 153-6 161-9 173°3 
di VIII. Wool... sae rp see x 101-4 105°-8 157°3 170-1 172-9 177°3 183-7 183-2 186-5 
; IX. Other textiles es ae ae 68-7 79-7 108-5 120-2 128-4 132-8 134-3 139°1 151-1 
1a X. Chemicals and oils ... ts sets 94-7 95°3 po 126-9 136-0 146°3 151-4 149-3 148-3 
nm XI. Miscellaneous oe ‘itis cee 93-2 98-7 42-6 169-1 172-0 177-1 184-2 188-6 188-7 
or Ease en eee | eae Vee: eae: A E ee 
d Total—Industrial materials and 
n manufactures... Ss a 103-5 105-5 138-4 155°8 160-1 164-0 170-2 174-7 184-2 
e — |__| a= —|—_-—_——_—|——- — - enemas 
t Torat—AIll articles | 101 i | 102-8 136-6 152-6 159-4 162-8 166-2 169-0 75-2 
J es a cas rT pee Veneers. Cre - = 
Industrial materials (excluding fuel) :— 
M Basic materials 92:9 | 99-7 147-3 166-7 168-8 173-8 184-1] 187-7 191-6 
g Intermediate products ae oF 104-5 | = 106-5 145-0 165-1 169-2 171-5 175-2 181-0 195-2 
ie Manufactured articles... ror ie 112-1 111-3 133-7 148-4 152-2 154-9 158-6 160-9 173-7 
|- an ansaid See! SS a Eee _— 
Tr Building materials 104: 1 | 104. 8 121-8 139-4 144-9 149-6 153-3 157-5 “173 9 
= _ ( 
). 
: the index the advances ranged from 284 per cent. for The principal changes among ‘‘ chemicals and oils” 
, Egyptian to 37 per cent. for American yarns. Quotations were increases of 36 and 63 per cent. respectively, in 
for the various descriptions of cotton piece-goods used December in the average prices of refined groundnut oil and 
g for clothing were unchanged throughout the year, rises crude palm kernel oil, these being the only changes recorded 
f in yarn prices being offset by increased subsidies. The for these commodities. White lead paint, which advanced in 
f price of industrial canvas, which is not subsidized, advanced _ price several times during the year, was nearly 35 per cent. 
"4 by 27 per cent. higher in December 1946 than at the end of the previous 
0 The changes recorded in wool prices all took place in year, while varnish rose by 30} per cent. Other increases 
; the latter half of the year. The withdrawal of the subsidies recorded were in respect of lubricating oil (9 per cent.), 
on raw wool and tops caused a general rise in July, followed household soap (74 per cent.), coal tar products (54 per 
by subsequent movements in later months. By December cent.) and general chemicals (43 per cent.). On the other 
1946, raw wool, noils and merino tops were dearer by 11, hand, there was a reduction of about 15 per cent. in the 
’ 15 and 7 per cent., respectively. The increases in yarn price of fuel oil, following the changes in October in the 
; prices varied from 4} per cent. for crossbred weaving to zonal price system and the subsidy of 1d. per gallon to 
nearly 9 per cent. for worsted. consumers. Prices of drugs were also lower on the average 
The ‘‘ other textile’? group, for which the index rose by about 2 per cent. 
: by 12-6 per cent., was influenced mainly by the substantial Among the ‘‘ miscellaneous”? items, the majority of 
advance of 86 per cent. in the price of jute. As a result the price increases were in respect of building materials. 
of the decontrol of export prices in India and the raising These included bathstone, 253 per cent.; bricks, 17 per 
of the export duties, prices in this country increased in cent. for pressed and 74 per cent. for stocks; earthenware 
November by 82 per cent., falling in December by 11 per __ pipes, 164 per cent.; tiles, 15 per cent.; slates, 14 per 
cent. A sharp rise of 40 per cent. occurred in July in the  cent.; chalk lime, 114 per cent.; Thames ballast, 84 per 
price of sisal, and linen yarns were dearer over the year cent.; and glass, 4 per cent. Cement, however, fell in 
by about 3 per cent. price by 3% per cent. The only other significant rises 











84 THE BOARD OF TRADE JOURNAL 


related to hides and skins; imported and native hides 
advanced in price by about 3 per cent. and calfskins by 
34 per cent. These upward movements, however, were 
largely offset by a reduction in the early months of the 
year in the prices of rubber (11 per cent.) and of wood 
dulp (8}—12 per cent.). 


Percentage Changes: The following table shows the 
increases and decreases in December 1946 compared with 
December 1945 among the price averages for food and 
industrial materials. 


DECEMBER 1946 COMPARED WITH DECEMBER 1945 


| Food and tobacco 
(68 items) 


| : : 
Industrial materials 
(132 items) 


Per cent. 


| 
ee ee ee 
nereases | Decreases | Increases | Decreases 
Over 70... | 2 | 
60—70 A | . 2 
50—60 ... | 3 
40—50 i | 4 
30—40 ... | 3 9 
20—30 | - | 6 
10-20 ... | 6 5 21 7 
Under 10 20 | 6 8 10 
Total ... | 27 14 85 17 
| 


Note.—({1) In cases where the Government buys a commodity at 
one price and resells it at a lower one (e.g., home-produced meat), the 
subsidized price is the one used for the index ; where different prices 
are charged according to the use to which the article is put (e.g., in the 
case of sugar and flour) a weighted average of these is taken. 

(2) The commodities in groups V to XI are regrouped to give the 
index numbers for basic materials, intermediate products and manu- 
factured articles. In many cases quotations are available for basic 
materials, but not for corresponding products at later stages of manu- 
facture; the very large rise for some of these (e.g., paper-making 
materials) largely accounts for the fact that this index has risen most 
compared with 1938. Similarly, the greater rise for intermediate 
products than for manufactured articles is largely due to the timber 
items included in this index. 


(3) The index for building materials is based on a selection of 
commodities from groups V, VI, X and XI. 











EXPORT TO NEW ZEALAND 





A RICH EMPIRE MARKET 


Mr. Ronald E. Murray, Principal of the Murray Organization, arrives 
from Wellington early February, 1947, with definite buying orders 
for the undermentioned goods :— 


HAT MATERIALS : Hoods and felt bodies for men’s and women's 
: hats of wooland fur. Capelines, hat leathers, ribbons, galloons 
for men’s hats, silk, satin and art. silk linings, muslins, velvets, 

elastics, and any other hat-makers’ and millinery material. 

TEXTILES : Gaberdines, cotton, union and wool, shirting poplins 
serges, flannels, suitings, women’s dress, costume and mantling, 
cloth, Harris tweeds, woollen worsted for women’s and men’s 
wear, tie cloth, scarf cloth, handkerchief material, lingerie 
fabrics, fancy dress fabrics, opal organdie, linings of all types 
of art. silk, cotton brilliantine, alpaca, etc. 

WATERPROOF MATERIAL for clothing. 

LEATHERCLOTH for book-binding, furnishing upholstery. 

FURNISHING MATERIALS: Moquettes, carpets. 

PLASTICS : for local manufacture by licence, or royalty, or straight- 
out importation where permitted. 


Art jewellery, ornaments, costume jewellery, watch straps, cigarette 
cases, powder compacts and similar lines. 


Manufacturers or their representatives should arrange an appointment 
now, as Mr. Murray can give full particulars of the Import Licensing 
Scheme and how best to secure a share of the rich market offered by 
Britain's third largest customer. 


'n view of Mr. Murray's limited stay, It is advisable to make an early 
appointment so that his itinerary may be arranged. 


Address in first instance to :— 
Mr. Ronald E. Murray 
Representing 


The Murray Organization of New Zealand, 
c/o Chalcroft Ltd., 54 Fleet St., London, E.C.4 

















18 January 1947 


Coupon-free Rights of 
Registered Exporters 


EGISTERED exporters of woven piece goods have 
R:: a considerable period been permitted to acquire 
supplies of these goods for export without the 
surrender of coupons. These privileges are being extended 
under the provisions of Article 1 (4) (d) of the Consumer 
Rationing (Consolidation) Order, 1947, which comes into 
operation on January 20, 1947, to permit registered ex- 
porters to acquire any rationed goods in respect of which 
they are registered, without the surrender of coupons. 
Registers are in course of preparation by the Board of 

Trade under Article 39 of the Order as follows :— 

Register of Exporters of Woven Piece Goods and Rationed 
Goods wholly or partly manu- 
factured therefrom. 

Knitted Goods, and rationed goods 
(other than gloves) made from 


. 


knitted, netted or crocheted 
cloth. 

a > is s, Corsets. 

. = 5s », Gloves. 

ss . an » Fur Apparel. 

ss ne = 3», Footwear. 

i. = ‘5 » Hand-knitting yarn not containing 


more than 15 
weight of wool. 


per cent. by 


The Register of Exporters of Woven Piece Goods and 
Rationed Goods wholly or partly manufactured therefrom 
will be identical with the Register of Exporters of Woven 
Piece Goods compiled under the Consumer Rationing Order, 
1945. The other Registers will be identical with those kept 
under the corresponding classes of the List of Registered 
Exporters compiled under the provisions of the Apparel 
and Textiles Order, 1942. 

It should be noted that registered exporters may not 
acquire coupon-free supplies of Hand Knitting Yarn 
containing more than 15 per cent. by weight of wool except 
in accordance with the provisions of S. R. & O. 1944, No. 81, 





British Postal Traffic 


The average daily receipts of the Post Office in the 
United Kingdom from postal traffic per working day in 
each month from January 1945 to November 1946 are 
shown below. ‘Telegraph and telephone receipts, savings 
bank and money and postal order business are excluded, 
but the value of postage stamps used for receipt stamps and 
other revenue duties is included. 

















Proportion to 
Average Amount Average Receipts 
of Money in the corresponding | Increase 
Period Received Daily period of 1924-34 or 
(except 1926) Decrease 
—————_$ ———_—\——_—_ 1945-46 
1945 1946 1945 1946 
£ £ Per cent. | Per cent. | Per cent 
January 218,862 | 214,083 176-5 172-6 — 2:2 
February 215,290 | 212,721 178-1 175-9 — 1-23 
March 231,239 | 222,133 186-0 178-6 — 3-9 
April 210,322 | 228,088 166-9 181-0 + 8-4 
May... 212,517 | 219,977 169-1 175-0 + 3:5 
June 208,571 | 232,577 167-3 186-6 +11-5 
July... 227,152 | 226,815 179-5 179-3 — 0:1 
August .. | 208,706 | 226,743 173-6 188-6 + 8-6 
September ... | 209,255 | 235,634 164-4 185-1 +12-6 
October .. | 214,880 | 241,279 161-6 181°4 +12°3 
November ... 221,440 |} 245,780 166-8 185-2 +11-0 
December 277,318 164-3 
Year 221,296 170-9 




















Daily postal receipts in November showed a rise of 1-9 
per cent. compared with October. There is normally very 
little movement between the two months, and accordingly 
the index number based on the corresponding period of 
1924-34 (except 1926) increased from 181-4 to 185-2. This 
figure has only been exceeded twice during the year. 

Compared with a year ago, November receipts were 
greater by 11 per cent., the average increase in the value 
of traffic for the eleven months to date being 5-4 per cent. 








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18 January 1947 


HOME 


THE BOARD OF TRADE JOURNAL 85 


NEWS SECTION 





Revised Coal Allocations for Industry 


EVISED allocations of coal to industry during the 

next six critical weeks, were announced by the 

President of the Board of Trade, Sir Stafford Cripps, 
and the Minister of Fuel and Power, Mr. Shinwell, in 
London on Monday. 

The President explained that in some districts actual 
deliveries of coal had only amounted to 55-60 per cent. of 
existing allocations. Increasing shortage had meant the 
need for ad hoc help to various firms coupled with general 
uncertainty as to what was going to happen. From 
January 20, smaller allocations would be made to all 
industries on a realistic basis of the actual deliveries which 
could be anticipated. Subject to any special and unavoid- 
able transport difficulties, industry could reasonably 
expect to receive the amounts laid down in the new 
allocations. 

The new allocations amounted to about one-half of the 
former allocations. This did not, however, mean that 
undertakings would only receive one-half of former 
deliveries. While in some instances there might be a big 
reduction, in others there would be very little. 


Work of National Importance 


In addition to this flat overall allocation, special addi- 
tional supplies would be made available to firms of national 
importance. Subject to general guidance from head- 
quarters, the amount of these additional supplies would 
be decided by the Regional Fuel Allocation Committees 
who could best judge the needs and importance of individual 
firms. The undertakings which qualify for these extra 
supplies would be notified as soon as possible. 

It was hoped that the new system of allocations would 
give a greater degree of certainty to industry and would 
mean that the more important producers would be able 
to get sufficient coal to continue production. Special 
priority road and rail transport arrangements had been 
made to carry the coal. 

Earlier, the President had shown that the miners were 
playing their part. The latest figures showed an increase 
of 170,000 tons per week witha labour force 3,400 fewer than 
the same period of last year. The Christmas and New 
Year fortnight was particularly striking, production being 
about one million tons more than last year. 


Increased Industrial Consumption 


Consumption had been very much increased compared 
with the previous year, however, owing to the starting 
up of many new factories, the increased tempo of produc- 


tion in existing factories and mechanization on a con- 
siderable scale. 
All this meant bigger consumption, particularly of 


Increased domestic consumption, partly due 
had 
week 


electricity. 
to increased use of convenient electric appliances, 
resulted in electricity consumption in Christmas 
last month being 33 per cent. higher than in 1945. 

As well as using more coal, this extra load put an 
impossible strain on generating capacity—one of the 
renewals we had had to neglect during the war years. 
Transport—which had also had to be neglected during 
the war—was another difficulty, winter being notoriously 
the worst time of year. 

The President gave the following round figures of weekly 
coal consumption excluding colliery usage :— 

Thousand tons 
per week. 


Electricity 650 
Gas... re ‘ie Ks wie 530 
Coke Ovens (domestic & industrial) 400 
Tron and steel ; 200 
AH other industrial uses 800 
Domestic 600 
Railways assis he's er 300 


Of these, the electricity power stations would be made an 
absolute first priority. They would be given enough coal 
to work full out. This was essential because of the impossi- 
bility of making selective cuts. Cuts might still have to 
be made, however, owing to shortage of capacity. They 


could only be avoided if the utmost economy were practised 
by individuals and firms throughout the country. 

Gas would be similarly maintained. Nor were transport 
or domestic consumers being reduced. 


Scope for Economy 


The scope for economy was not, therefore, very great. 
The amount that could be cut down represented the 
1,150,000 tons used weekly by industry in general including 
iron and steel and the industrial coke ovens. On present 
estimates there would not be enough coal to meet the 
requirements of this group by about 300,000 tons a week. 

In reply to questions it was stated that no firm would be 
entirely deprived of coal. New allocations for iron and 
steel and coke ovens would amount to about four-fifths 
of the old. Total weekly deliveries to industry during the 
next six weeks were expected to be about 87 per cent. of 
weekly deliveries in November. Gas and electricity would 
receive more coal than in November (this might also be 
the case with some of the essential industries). Estimated 
total weekly coal production was 3,720,000 tons. Essential 
food industries would be very high in the list of priorities 
for special allowances, and in industries such as laundries, 
cars and clothing, consideration, would be given, on their 
merits, to individual firms. 

It was thought that the amount of total unemployment 
would be quite small, though some short time and 
re-arrangement of hours would be involved. Export 
would be affected, though it was hoped not seriously. 

The scheme would only operate for six weeks. By the 
end of that time the position should have improved, as 
domestic requirements would have been reduced. 


° 
Higher Coal Output 

Since the above statement, the Ministry of Fuel and 
Power have announced that output of deep-mined coal in 
the United Kingdom in the week ended January 11—the 
first full weck’s operation under Nationalisation—amounted 
to 3,790,900 tons as compared with 3,552,400 tons in the 
corresponding week last year, an increase of 238,500 tons 
secured with 3,400 fewer men. 


oe a a a er a 
Cloth and Clothing 


The amendments necessary to bring into force the 
reductions in retail margins of which full details were 
given on page 43 of last week’s issue, are comprised in the 
following Orders now available through any bookseller 
or newsagent or direct from H M. Stationery Office, Kings- 
way, London, W.C.2, and branches. 

Utility Cloth and Clothing 

The Cloth and Household Textiles (Utility) (Maximum 
Prices) Order 1947 (S. R. & O. 1947 No. 59), price Id. 

The Utility Apparel (Maximum Prices and Charges) 
Order 1947 (S. R. & O. 1947 No. 57). This Order also 
substitutes Related Schedule I.F. (Men’s, Youths’ and 
Boys’ Outerwear) for Related Schedule I.E., price 1d. and 
3d. respectively. 

Non- Utility Cloth and Clothing 
The General Apparel, Furnishings and Textiles (Whole- 


salers’ and Retailers’ Maximum Prices and Charges) 
Order 1947 (S. R. & O. 1947 No. 58), price ld. 


Industrial Coupons for more 
Workers 


The industrial Ten coupons have been made available 
this year to clothing factories where less than ten workers 
are employed. The conditions are that the workers must 
be engaged wholly in the making up of cloth into clothing 
or other textile made-up goods and of hats and hoods, 
but only where these occupations are carried on in factories 
exclusively devoted to them. Private dressmakers and. 
persons engaged in repair and alteration work are not 
eligible. 








86 THE BOARD OF TRADE JOURNAL 





18 January 1947 


Mulberry Harbour Equipment for 
Disposal 


EGOTIATIONS have been concluded whereby the 
Nitreneh Mission in the United Kingdom are 

purchasing on behalf of the Ministry of French 
Colonies, a considerable amount of equipment from the 
** Mulberry ’’ Harbour which will be used in the con- 
struction of a prefabricated port off the French West 
African coast. 

There is, however, still a quantity of ‘‘ Mulberry ’ 
Harbour equipment with the Ministry of Supply available 
for disposal which might wholly, or in part, be suitable 
for providing sea coast and other facilities. 

Most of the equipment designed in the war is capable 
of loading in sections on rail or road. Fulfilment of this 
requirement whilst making certain items elaborate and 
therefore expensive for the purpose in view, has the 
advantage that movement to remote and awkward sites 
becomes possible. 

Whilst there might be schemes where the components 
could be employed in the manner for which they were 
originally designed, they could also be used in combination, 
in part, or again in combination with more ordinary 
materials and means of construction. 

Being designed for war purposes, cost of maintenance 
did not enter into consideration. 

Some of the equipment, moreover, would have a long 
life and some of it a comparatively short one. In the 
latter case, installation might, therefore, be accepted as a 
temporary expedient for creating development. 

Some of the items still available for disposal are :— 


Spud Pierheads 


These are specially designed self-mooring pierheads. 
They are elaborate pieces of equipment, the use of which 
might, however, be justified in exposed waters for develop- 
ing industry where the berthing of steamers of up to say 
5,000 tons, or possibly more, might be required. 


Floating Roadway 


This specially designed equipment is a floating pontoon 
bridge which is exceptionally flexible, also strong enough to 
take loadings of 25 tons (Mark I type) or 40 tons (Mark II 
type); it can ride out in a seaway with waves arising 
from winds of Force 5. It consists primarily of 80 feet 
span bridges carried on floats or pontoons, some of which 
are made of concrete and some of steel. 

The concrete floats can only be transported by water, 
but as the steel floats are made in sections, they can be 
transported by road and can, therefore, be taken to, and 
assembled at, difficult sites. 

The bridge spans and roadway complete weigh about 
32 tons for the 80 feet span, but as they are built of members 
bolted together, they are capable of transport by road and 
easy erection at the site. Some of the spans are telescopic 
to permit adjustments for various purposes. 

It is obvious that the floating roadway, apart from its 
primary use as a shore connection to pierheads might be 
used in place of a bridge for crossing waters, where the 
difficulties and cost of forming permanent bridges, or 
causeways could not be justified by the traffic. 

Bridge Floats 

There are various components intended for use as floats 
which could be utilized in shallow water by sinking them 
as the block ships were sunk in ‘‘ Mulberry,’ or they 
could be used as a ‘‘ core”? over which rubble could be 
tipped to form a breakwater or mole to the required 
dimensions. 


Shore Ramp Float 


This was used for the shore connections of the floating 
roadway. It could be towed already attached to five 
spans of the bridge if necessary and being of very shallow 
draught, could be floated up the beach to high tide level. 
The shore abutment could be made more simple, however, if 
the roadway was for use in non-tidal water. 

Erection Tanks 

These cylindrical tanks, 36 feet long by 8 feet diameter, 
are fitted with sluice valves and hose connections for sinking 
and raising with compressed air. They were oricinally 
used in the assembly of the floating roadway, but could also 
be used to provide floats for an opening span in a length 
of bridging as referred to in the last paragraph under “Floating 
Roadway”’ above. 


Port Construction Pontoons 


P.C. pontoons are made up from small tank units and 
may be connected up in various ways for different uses. 
The units, of which there are two types, e.g., standard unit 


ry 
and Scow end unit, are constructed in the following 
dimensions :— 


Standard unit 13 feet 6 inches long, 5 feet 6 inches deep, 

5 feet 6 inches wide, approximate weight 2} tons each unit. 

Scow end unit 7 feet long, 5 feet 6 inches deep, 5 feet 

6 inches wide, approximate weight 14 tons. 

The draught light of each unit is 1 feet 2 inches and the 
maximum load !4 cwts. per square foot. 

These units can easily be bolted together in any com- 
bination to form pontoons of various sizes up to 108 feet 
6 inches by 38 feet 6 inches. 

Further details of the foregoing may be obtained on 
application to Ministry of Supply, Directorate of Disposals 
(RE), Great Westminster House, Horseferry Road, London, 
S.W.1. 


Export of Government 
Surplus Machine Tools 


HEN the scheme for disposal of Government 

surplus machine tools was put into effect in March 

1945, factories were still engaged on war production 
and such tools as became available were required for the 
reconversion of British industry. It was not possible at 
that time to provide for exports, but at the end of the war 
with Germany, surpluses became available in increasing 
quantities until by October of that year sufficient stocks 
had accumulated to justify the introduction of a scheme for 
exports on a limited scale. 

In order that British industrialists should be given 
every opportunity to equip their factories with good 
quality tools at attractive prices, only machines which 
had been on offer through the Disposal Centres for a period 
of two months were made available for export and then 
subject to an addition of 20 per cent. to the fixed disposal 
price. These limitations tended to discourage overseas 
buyers, but first consideration had to be given to encourag- 
ing British firms to replace worn and obsolete plant and the 
restrictions were retained until August 1946. 

By that date stocks had increased to the extent that it 
was possible to meet the needs of users in this country 
and at the same time make a contribution to the rehabilita- 
tion of industry abroad by making machines more freely 
available for export. At the present time machine tools 
may be acquired for export as soon as they appear in the 
stock records in the Disposal Centres and Selling Depots 
and at the same fixed prices as for users in United Kingdom. 
American machines acquired under Lend-Lease arrange- 
ments may not be exported for five years from the end of 
hostilities in Europe, but those to which the restriction 
does not apply are available to overseas buyers. 

Present stocks consist of some 40,000 tools of most types 
such as plain grinders, plain and vertical millers, drilling 
machines, automatics, centre lathes and capstan and 
turret lathes, ete. Certain types are in short supply ; for 
example, presses, universal millers and grinders, jig bores 
and radial drilling machines, all of which are in demand 
by contractors engaged on production carrying a high 
priority in the national interest and for the time being 
these are not available for export. Whilst purchasers not 
unnaturally prefer universal machines if they are obtain- 
able, a range of components can be produced on plain 
machines of which there are large quantities in stock and 
in many cases it is unnecessary to instal the more costly 
universal types. Fresh additions to the stock are made at 
the rate of about 1,000 machines every week and there are 
many thousands still to be priced and made available. 

Publicity to the export arrangements has been given in 
the Press and technical journals and in other countries 
through Dominion and Foreign Governments, and sales 
are showing an upward trend. The number of enquiries 
being received from firms abroad, particularly from 
European countries, suggests that there is a very large 
demand to be satisfied. Here is an opportunity for enter- 
prising firms to send representatives abroad to explore the 


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18 January 1947 


markets and secure the tools whilst they are still available. 

Merchants and others in the export trade may purchase 
the machines outright at the fixed prices for resale without 
restrictions as to the resale price on giving an undertaking 
that they will be exported and not offered for sale in the 
home market. Machines are sold ‘‘ as they lie’’ on the 
basis of payment on acceptance of an offer to purchase, 
the purchaser undertaking packing, transport and any 
reconditioning necessary at his own cost. The facilities 
for purchasing for stock enable exporters to reserve 
machines for their overseas customers and in general to 
resume export trading under normal conditions. 

Specifications of the machines available, including the 
price, permits to inspect the machines in the storage depots, 
and any information regarding the selling arrangements 
may be obtained from any of the following offices :— 


Ministry of Supply Regional Disposal Centres 

Birmingham: C. M. L. Buildings, Great Charles Street. 

Bristol: Elmdale Hotel, Elmdale Road. 

Cardiff: G. E. C. Buildings, Kingsway. 

Glasgow: 21, Glassford Street. 

Leeds: 10 Bank Street, off Boar Lane. 

London: Room 0088, Ground Floor, Thames 
North, Millbank, S.W.1. 

Manchester: Britannia House, Fountain Street. 
*Belfast: 14 James Street South. 

*At this office the record is limited to machine tools in store 
in Northern Ireland. 


House 


Ministry of Supply Selling Depots 

Burghfield, near Reading, Berks. 

Thorp Arch, near Boston Spa, Yorks. 

Church Road, Erith, Kent. 

Summerfield, near Kidderminster. 

Willow Tree Lane, Yeading, Middlesex. 

Elstow, Kempston Hardwick, Bedford. 

Capenhurst, near Chester. 

Saltney Ferry, near Chester. 

Theale, near Reading. 

Featherstone, near Wolverhampton. 

M. O. S. Store, No. 2 Factory, Brown’s Lane, Allesley, 
Coventry. 

Stormy Down, near Cardiff. 

M. O. S. Depot, Madingley Road, Cambridge. 

Large quantities of machine tool equipment, cutting 
tools and testing and measuring machines are available 
and enquiries in respect of these items should be addressed 
to the Ministry of Supply, Directorate of Disposals (T), 
Portland House, Tothill Street, London, S.W.1, and not 
to the above offices. : 


THE BOARD OF TRADE JOURNAL 87 


Disposal of Radio 
Components 


ARGE quantities of radio components are among the 

Government surplus stores for which the Ministry of 

Supply is responsible. Already £500,000 worth of 
these stocks have been sold, including twelve million fixed 
condensers, eight hundred thousand variable condensers, 
twenty-three million resistances, and one million valve 
holders. In addition, components to the approximate value 
of £30,000 have been sold to Universities, technical schools 
and other educational establishments. 

Making this statement, a Ministry of Supply official said : 
‘“‘The Ministry’s policy is to satisfy public demand. But 
where the surplus is very heavy in relation to current 
production and requirements, it may be against the national 
interest to release the whole of the surplus stocks, especially 
if they could be sold only at such low prices as would cause 
serious harm to the industry concerned, and lead to unem- 
ployment. Unfortunately, it is not a proposition to hold 
surpluses for any long period, because of shortage of accom- 
modation and, sometimes, the risk of deterioration in 
store. For those reasons it is occasionally necessary to 
scrap goods in serviceable condition, although this seldom 
happens. 

Certain types of fixed condensers, such as paper tubular, 
are a case in point. The stocks represent many months’ 
normal] production. It has been decided after full enquiry 
to release for sale another twelve million of these types. The 
balance will be disposed of by dumping in disused mineshafts, 
as it is impracticable and uneconomical to break the con- 
densers down to recover raw materials. 

All stocks and future arisings of types still in com- 
paratively short supply, such as electrolytics, will, wherever 
possible, be segregated for sale.” 





Export Credits Guarantees 


The following statement from the Export Credit Guar- 
antee Department of the Board of Trade shows the aggregate 
amount of the guarantees given during the quarter ended 
December 28, 1946, under Section 1 of the Export Guarantees 
Act, 1939, and under Section 2 of the Export Guarantees 
Act, 1945 :— 

During the quarter ended December 28, 1946, the 
Department assumed liability up to a maximum of 
£15,584,373 in respect of contracts, policies and guarantees 
amounting to £30,915,492. 





Ministry of Supply Forthcoming Auction Sales 





| 


Date. Stores. 





January 21-24 Miscellaneous Stores. 


January 22 ... 
eous Plant. 


January 22 and 23... Miscellaneous Plant andStores. 


Vehicles. 


January 22-February 6 


Marine Engines and Miscella- | 
neous Plant 


January 23 ... 


January 27-February 5 Vehicles, 


Janvary 28-31, February 4-7, 


February 11-14 ment, Tools, etc. 


January 28 and 29... Machine Tools. 


| M.O.S. Depot No. 124, Cambridge | Mr. Chas. H. Webb, 68 St. Andrew’s 
Brickworks, 

| Cambridge. 
Marine Engines and Miscellan- | M.O.S. Depot No. 68, J. & J. Siddons, | 
| Ltd., Hill Top, West Bromwich. 

| M.O.S. Depot No. 45, Cannel Street, 
| Ancoats, Manchester. 


| 
| M.O.S. Storage Depot, Winterslow, 
| 3entley Woods, Salisbury. 


| M.O.S. Depot No. 111, Gibson’s Fore- | 
| cast Concrete, Ltd., Union Street, | 
| West Bromwich 
| M.O.S. Storage Depot, Mount Farm 

Aerodrome, Dorchester. | 


Tyres, Tubes, Medical Equip- | M.O.S. Depot No. 121, Ashchurch, 
Tewkesbury. 


| M.O.S. Depot. Queen’s Road Kilmar- 


Location. | Auctioneers. 


Street, Cambridge. 
Tel. Cambridge 1436. 

Messrs. Walters & Son, Bingley Hall, 
Birmingham. ‘Tel. Midland 6271. 
Messrs. Edward Rushton & Son, 

Kenyon, York House, 12 York 
Street, Manchester, 2. Tel. Central 
1937/8. 
Messrs. Woolley & Wallis, The Castle 
| Auction Mart, Salisbury. Tel. 
| Salisbury 2491/2/3. 
Messrs. Walters & Son, Bingley Hall. 
3irmingham. ‘Tel. Midland 6271. 


| 
Coldhams Lane, | 
| 


Messrs. Simmons & Son, 12 Station 
Road, Reading. Tel. Reading 
| 4025/6 
Messrs. Bruton, Know!es & Co., Albion 
Chambers, King Street, Gloucester. 
| ‘Tel. Gloucester 226-7. 
| Mr. George Hone, 120 High Street, 
Tewkesbury. Tel. Tewkesbury 10. 
| Messrs. Shirlaw Allen & Co., Hamilton. 


bridge Street. Newcastle-on-Tyne. 


nock. | Tel. Hamilton 63. 
January 29 ... sina Miscellaneous Plant and | M.O.S. Depot No. 91, Bainton, Stam- | Messrs Richardson, 15 Bara Hill 
Equipment. ford. | Lines. Tel. Stamford 3315. 
January 29 and 30... Miscellaneous Tools and Stores} M.O.S Depot No. 118, Roseleighs Messrs. Bourn & Bowman, 61 New- 


February 5 ... 
Bic ye les. 





Garage Newcastle-on-Tyne. 


| 

Miscellaneous Plant & Stores, | M.O.S. Disposal Depot, Challow Sta- | 
| tion, Challow, Berks. 
| 


Tel. Newcastle 26678. 

Messrs. Adkin, Belcher & Bowen, 
Market Place, Wantage. Tel. 
Wantage 48; and 10 «ligh Strest, 
Abingdon. Tel. Abingdon 25, 


For further information see Daily Press, or apply to the Auctioneers, from whom Catalogues are obtainable. 
















































































































































































88 THE BOARD OF TRADE JOURNAL 18 January 1947 1a J 
in N b 
MPLOYMENT and output of the cotton industry, Labour on Cotton and Spun Rayon T 
shown in the accompanying tables, relate to the four (excluding Waste) supe 
weeks ended November 30. The number actually -_— A 
at work in November increased by 700 in the spinning Number on Spinners’ Number actually at Bre! 
section (of which 300 were in single spinning) and by 2,000 M: nth Books Work B 
(1,300 being women) in the weaving section. This increase | | : Roa 
can be partly attributed to the return of some of those Males | Females Total | Males | Females} otal B 
who left when the Essential Works Order was removed = ————~;—————"! z B 
on September 30—a movement which had already begun — Thousands Squ 
> the im reek "Oc Y, 946 
by the third week of October Apeil | 34-62 | 57-49 92-11 32-95 | 48-84 81-79 B 
Output May 36:30 | 58-74 | 95-04 34°69 | 51-10 | 85-79 gat 
The average weekly beak of ais elton warn 1 June 37-21 59-06 96-27 35-09 50-56 85-65 B 
1e average wee y ou pu 16) Singie cotton yarn -m July . 37°70 59-20 96°90 33°04 46°36 19°40 C 
November at 14-11 million Ibs. was much the same as in August ... | 38°25 59°30 97°55 32°46 44°82 77°28 J 
October and 11 per cent. higher than in November 1945; September | 38°62 | 59°62 | 98-24 35°60 | 49°59 85°19 if 
the average for single yarn of all types of 16-47 million Ibs. October... | 38-49 58°59 97°08 36°85 51:36 88-2] C 
was very little more than in October and 13 per cent. more November | 38-78 | 58-54 | 97-32 | 37-15 | 51-41 | 88-56 Glc 
than a year ago ee Se : 
. BV. $ ] 
Doubled cotton yarn in November with a weekly average Number of Workers Placed per Fortnight - = Ess 
output of 4-4 million Ibs. was 14 per cent. above the average } ly ¥: 
; 2|Weavi ] 
for October, but 2 per cent. below that of a year ago. Period peated eesaitcne tbat Grand Lu 
This reduction was entirely in the coarser counts (the under Ex- Inex- ' Total ; : 
26’s) which show a decline of 8 per cent. The output of essen waamecost Rico. Rlerseol, eerie 
r 26s is 115 pere P 7 » average Nove yp «= «1946: Jan.—Mar:... 438 308 741 71 297 | 1,109 
~ J 26’s is now 15 per cent. above the average for November ies... 310 308 si2 ae 308 | 1,000 
aes —, i. sr 165 52 417 48 313 778 
ae ee ee : August a 6 252 l 
_n the weaving section the average weekly output of 4 . = ped oa6 306 73 247 716 for 
43-5 million linear yards was 6 per cent. higher than in Sept. «@ ~ 184 302 436 66 230 jay | 
, op ¢ d Yr ce ig av ag a 152 226 7 4 8 
October and 14} per cent. higher than a year ago. Both waa = er 4 aa 50 212 702 
cotton cloth and rayon, etc., and mixture cloths contributed + | ae: 174 = - 4 pod ~f Er 
be Semen at since , a 186 7 4 
to this increase. It should be noted that since August wet te 161 267 428 172 168 766 
(Continued at foot of next page) eee ern eee 278 | 472 146 232 i 850 G: 
Employment and Machine Activity 
cs, aie ee aay 7 Cx 
NUMBER ACTUALLY AT WORK MACHINE ACTIVITY 
| Srinate Yarn SPINDLES DovuBLING M 
SPINNING AND DovUBLING WEAVING RUNNING SPINDLES WEAVING 
Period ' | —| ; — E 
| Per cent. Per cent. 
| | Total | of No. of No. 
Mule in _|No. Run- in Looms : 
Male | Female} Total of which:— | Male | Female} Total | Mule | Ring | Equi- | Running) ning on | Running; Running* 5 
| Spinning| Doubling; | | valent | Miils* | Cotton | Mills 
eee eee as = Se SS ee — S 
Thousands Million /Million| Million | Per cent.| Million | Per cent.| Thousande 
1945 | ) | | | | | } 
| | | | 
Jan.-June | 32-4 | 63-5 95-9 73°5 | 22°3 28-8 | 66-0 94°8 9-15, 5:25 | 17:00 | 70 | 2-18 72 | 217 
July-Dec. | 33-2 | 62-9 | 96-1 74-8 | 3 29-4 | 66-1 | 95-5] 9-4 | 5-2 17-1 | 66 | 2-06 67 | 215 
1946 } | | 
Jan.-June | 41-1 | 67-7 |108-8| 86-2 | 226 | 325 | 665 | 9901 113] 5-6 | 19.7 | 63 | 221 | 72 | 218 
} | | | | 
1946 | | | i oe | | | 
July 42-9 | 66:2 | 1091 | 85:2 | 23:9 | 35-0] 66-6 |101-7] 11-6 | 5-4 | 19°6 | 58 | os) | wi 4 222 
August... | 424 | 64°8 | 107-1 | 83-1 24°0 | 35°8 | 67°6 | 103-4] 117 | 52 | 195 | 57 | 234 | 72 | 229 
September} 45°6 | 70°1 115°6 91-1 24°5 36°4 | 68°2 | 1046 | 12°5 | 58 | 21°1 62 | wao | gd |} 229 ( 
October | 47-0| 72-0 }119-0} 94-2 | 24-8 | 37-1 | 69-2 |1063] 13-1 | 59 | 22-0 65 | 243 | 73 | 334 
November} 47-4 | 72-3 | 119-7 94-6 | 25:1 37-8 | 70-5 | 108-3 | 13-2 | 5-9 22-1 | 65 | 246 | 7 | 238 ( 
! | | | i | 
For definitions see the article in the Board of T'rade Journal for September 1, 1945. * Including reopened mills and weaving sheds. 
Yarn and Cloth Production ;' 
(All figures are weekly averages ; million lbs. for yarn and million linear yards for cloth.) 
SINGLE YARN WEAVING 
DOUBLED COTTON | 
——__—__— a= YARN —_—— + - 
Cotton (excluding waste yarns) Cloth Produced | Yarn Consumed 
Period Spun - 
Waste | Rayon Rayon* | Cotton 
Upto | 27’sto | Over Total | Yarns |Yarns and] Up to Over Total Cotton and | and Rayon* 
26's 80's 80’s Mixtures}| 26's 26s Mixtures | Waste 
oe | 
1945 | 
Jan.-June 7-94 3-39 0-30 11-63 1-17 0-52 3°14 1-31 4-44 30°4 | 6-0 | 9-98 1°58 
July-Dec. 7-67 3°38 0-33 11-37 1-17 0-52 2-89 1-23 4-12 23:7 | 569 | 941 1°61 
1946 | } 
Jan.-June | 7-94 4-07 0-42 | 12-43 | 1-33 0-62 2-66 1-34 4-00 31-0 | 65 =| 9-72 1-79 
| 
1946 | : | } 
July oo. | 7°93 4°29 0-46 12-68 1-34 0-65 2°51 1-35 3°86 26°7 } 58 | 8-60 1°66 
August 7°25 4°20 0°50 11°95 1°37 0°70 2°45 1°27 3°72 33°0 70 10°39 1-92 
September | 812 | 428 | 049 | 1280] 1-45 | 0-73 | 263 | 1-44 | 4:07 | 30-7 69 | 1008 | 3-03 
October ... | 8-71 4°85 0-54 14-10 1-53 0-77 2-81 1-53 4-34 33°7 | 7:4 | 10-90 | 2°07 
November 8-71 4-87 0-53 14-11 | 1-58 0-78 2-83 1-57 4-40 35:6 | 7-9 | 11-47 | 2-98 
\ H . 























* Including nylon, etc. 











1947 








18 January 1947 


THE BOARD OF TRADE 


JOURNAL 89 


Makers of Perambulators and Push Chairs 


HE following is a list of firms holding licences from 
the Board of Trade to supply perambulators and/or 
push chairs of their own manufacture. This list 
supersedes any previous.lists which have been published :— 
Alltoys, Ltd., 125 Harlequin Road, Great West Road, 
Brentford, Middlesex. 
Baby Carriage Manufacturing Co., 30 Stamford New 
Road, Altrincham. 
B. & L. W. Motors, 131b Kilburn Lane, Willesden, W.10. 
Brasington & Cooke (Manchester), Ltd., 11 Albert 
Square, Manchester, 2. 
British Classic Appliances, 55 Whitehall Park, High- 
gate, N.19. 
British Tubex Co., 7 Park Street, Market Place, Stockport. 
C. B. (Prams), Ltd., 484 St. Vincent Street, Glasgow, C.3. 
J. H. Cook, 43 Manor Road, Hastings, Sussex. 
H. Cook, 27 Butler Road, West Harrow, Middlesex. 


Cotswold Metal Crafts, Ltd., 69 Lansdown Road, 
Gloucester. 

Donald Cowan, Ultra Works, River Road, Barking, 
Essex. 


Dallow Engineering Co., Val Works, 4 Beechwood Road, 
Luton. 

Dixon & Blackburn, 78 Lombard Street, Birmingham, 12. 

J. Dobson, 58 Dewsbury Road, Wakefield. 

Dorka Special Furniture Co., 26 Milton Street, Coventry. 

Electrical Assemblies & Manufacturing Co., 3a Bloem- 
fontein Avenue, London, W.12. 

J. K. C. Emery, 48 Inglow Road, Sheffield, 3. 

E. Engert, T/A Corvette Products, c/o Blean 
Empire Buildings, Harrogate. 

Engineering Stores & Services, Ltd., Mss] Works, Ashton 
Gate, Bristol, 3. 

English Instruments & Engineering Co., Guiseley, Leeds. 

Finham Metallic Productions, 26 Anchorway Road, 
Coventry. 

‘** Francis,”’ 

Franbrec, Ltd., 
Middlesex. 

K. M. Geere, Ltd., 534 Ipswich Road, Slough Trading 
Estate, Bucks. 

G. B. Productions, Clwydyfagwyr, Merthyr Tydfil. 

Gordon Aircraft Components, 52 Grove Road, Sutton, 
Surrey. 

Grosvenor Prams, Ltd., 
S.E.5. 

Hansel Components, 
Hants. 

Hayward Bros., 28 Sidcup Road, Lee, 8.1.12. 

H. V. Heath, 148 Woodland Park Road, Bournville, 


Birmingham, 3. 


Motors, 


1703 London Road, Leigh-on-Sea. 


18 Grasmere Gardens, Harrow Weald, 


68 Camberwell Road, London, 


Ltd., Durley Avenue, Cowplain, 





Cotton Output 


(Continued from previous page) 


last a small proportion of cloth woven from nylon yarn and 
yarns made from certain other synthetic fibres have been 
included in the figures for rayon and mixture cloths. 


Machine Activity 

During November the mule equivalent of single spindles 
in action rose by 70,000 and doubling spindles by 30,000, 
in both cases to record figures. In the weaving section the 
number of looms running, including those in mills reopened 
during the month, increased by 4,000, also to a new peak. 


Employment 

In single spinning of cotton and rayon, the number on 
the spinners’ books rose by 240, an increase of 290 in 
male workers being offset by a small decline in female 
workers. The total was still 920 below the high September 
figure of 98,240. The number actually at work in Novem- 
ber rose by 350, and for both male and female workers 
was the highest recorded. 

The number of workers placed in the industry by the 
Employment Exchanges rose slightly during the first 
fortnight in November but was as high as 850 in the second, 
the highest figure since the first fortnight in May. Increases 
in the numbers placed in the doubling section were par- 
ticularly noticeable, the fortnightly average being more than 
double that of any month since May. 


Hyglo Spraying Co., 104 Southchurch Road, Southend- 
on-Sea. 

Lawrence & Sons, Willes Road, Leamington Spa. 

Leader Metal Industries (1938), Ltd., Bridge Works, 
East Clinton Street, Nottingham. 


G. Man & Co., 63-65 Princelet Street, Birch Lane, 
London, E.1. 

Marl Bank Sheet Metal Co., Ltd., 198 Bath Road, 
Worcester. 

Mauldeths, Ltd., Domex Works, Hartington Road, 


Broadheath, near Manchester. 

Mechanistra, Ltd., Millison Wood Hill, Allesley, Coventry. 

A. Mirecki, 873 Foleshill Road, Coventry. 

Nufold Productions, Ltd., 31 Bridge Row, London, E.C.1. 

Oakmills (Timber), Ltd., Brimscombe, Stroud, Gloucester. 

Oldham Welding (& Central Motors), Ltd., Greenacres 
Works, Greenacres Road, Oldham. 

Place Bros., 263 Lorsship Lane, 
S.E.22. 

J.T. Prince Engineering Co., Ltd., 5-9 Hamilton Parade, 
Feltham Hill Road, Feltham, Middlesex. 

Radford Steel Unit Construction, Ltd., 93 
Avenue, Radford, Coventry. 

S. & G. Richardson, 457 Cable Street, Stepney, E.1. 

Rogercraft, 54 Court Road, Kingswood, Bristol. 

Rosevear & Cobb, Ltd., 35 St. Pauls Road, Southsea, 
Hants. 

Rugby Welding Co., 7 Station Road, Twickenham. 


fast Dulwich, London, 


London 


Ryton Manufacturing Co., Ltd., Park Street Garage, 
Worksop. 
Stamford Engineering Co., Ltd., Rainsford Works, 


Rainsford Road, Park Royal, London, N.W.10. 

Jasper Steer & Co., 2 Harts Close, Bushey, Herts. 

‘* Superline,” 5a Clayton Road, Peckham, 8.E.15. 

The Three Star Manufacturing Co., 142 Midland Road, 
Luton. 

Trebel Products, 103 Promenade, Cheltenham. 

T. W. N. Products, 9 Canterbury Avenue, Sholing, 
Southampton. 

Alex. Williamson, 399 Parliamentary Road, Glasgow, C.4. 

W. & A. Williamson & Co., Ltd., 56-61 Portland Place, 
London, W.1. 

A. Wilson, 16 Ambleside Road, Flixton, Manchester. 

Winston & Ward, Ltd., 43 Staines Road, 
Sunbury-on-Thames, Middlesex. 

York Raising & Dyeing Co., Ltd., 
Beswick, Manchester, 11. 


Robinson 


Mills, 


Reservoir 


Selling Prices of Copper, Lead 
ye 
and Zine 

With reference to the announcement of new selling 
prices of copper, lead and zinc, which appeared on page 12 
of the Board of Trade Journal for January 4, the Ministry 
of Supply now announces the withdrawal of the notifica- 
tion that holders of outstanding licences (for copper, lead 
and zinc metal as sold by the Directorate of Non-Ferrous 
Metals) granted on or before December 31, 1946, would 
only be covered at the new prices. 

Following with the British Non-Ferrous 
Metals Federation, the Ministry is now prepared to con- 
sider covering these outstanding licences at the prices 
ruling on December 31. 

Holders of such licences (including those who have, since 
January 1, converted their licences into contracts at the 
new prices) should apply to the Directorate of Non-Ferrous 
Metals, 20 Albert Street, Rugby, not later than January 21. 


discussions 





‘SERVICES and CHARGES of the 
PHOTO-UNION ORGANISATION “ 


is the title of a booklet giving full details of a range of photographic 
and publicity services of interest to the manufacturer and trader. 
A copy of this publication will be sent to any business house oa 
application to 
Photo-Union Limited, 
Studio House 
12 Soho Square, London, W.1. 
Gerrard 7184 














90 THE BOARD OF TRADE JOURNAL 18 January 1947 18 Jz 
Experts Report on German In i 
xperts Report G Industries 
URTHER Reports submitted by teams of industrial Office at:—York House, Kingsway, London, W.C.2; 
i niente, who have visited Germany under the auspices I3a Castle Street, Kdinburgh, 2; 39/41 King Street, 
of the Combined Intelligence Objectives  Sub- Manchester, 2; 1 St. Andrews Crescent, Cardiff: and 
Committee, the sritish Intelligence Objectives Sub- 80 Chichester Street, Belfast. 
Committee and the Field Information Agency, Technical, Canadian subscribers should apply for these reports to :— 
for the collection of scientific and technical intelligence The Liaison Office, National Research Council, Ottawa. 
from German industry, are now available for publication. All enquiries relating to scientific and technical intelli- Road ' 
teports, as they are published, will be distributed to the = gence from German industry should be addressed to 
chief Public Libraries and Chambers of Commerce, to B.1.0.S. Information Section, 37 Bryanston Square, This \ 
Universities and to Professional and Scientific Institutions London, W.1. . Hut 
and to the Trade Associations concerned. \ limited The following additional Reports are now available for — 
number of copies will also be en public sale and may be — distribution as described and for purthase at His Majestv’s The Vi 
ordered from the Sales Offices of His Majesty’s Stationery Stationery Office at the prices indicated : 
- This ) 
lor 
No. of Report. Title. Price. Hung! 
CIOS XX XITI-51 ses Report on the firm of Carl Zeiss, Jena. Details of 16s. Od. (post free 16s. 4d.) N rboc 
Organization. ge 
BIOS 628 an slats Investigation of the German Paint Industry ... see eis ea Dhe0d. 4; «> Las. Sd. That ' 
BIOS 700 as oe The German Centrifugal Castings Industry. With special reference 8s. Od. ( ,, ,. 8s. 3d.) Mv O 
to the Production of Cast Iron Pipe, Cylinder Liners and Piston , 
Rings. Margi 
BIOS 705 ie Ree Mechanical Stokers for Shell Type Boilers... Kins oes cae os. '6d..{ ,, so: ton; 6d.) Che ¢ 
BIOS 729 eis oy German Aluminium and Bronze Flake Powder Industry ... 25s. Od. ( 5, 208. 8d.) : 
BIOS 783 tee tee Manufactures at Hiag, Mainz-Mombach. Particularly Acetone 2s. Od. ( 2s. 2d Inside 
Cyanhydrin, Acrolein and Acetonitrile. b tai 
BIOS 784 ban: ag Interrogation of Dr. Gross, Prof. Flury and Dr. Wirth on Industrial 28.00. 5, 55 28. 2d.) ° 
Hygiene and Toxicology. The § 
BIOS 788 See sb The German Vitreous Enamel Industry es we Kee see 5s. Od. ( ,, » 08. 2d.) The I 
BIOS 828 pee aod Teatile Waste Reclamation (Wool, Rayon) ... ie aia bow is. Od. ( ,, ae. 9d.) LH pise 
BIOS 857 ann ey German Comb Industry sek _— ee os cbs ts 2s. Gd. { ,, >> 28. Sd.) ; 
BIOS 910 vats oe Investigation converning Design, Material Technique and Production 2s. 6d. ( ,, 49. ee. Bd.) Epis 
Methods for Valves in Germany. For Internal Combustion = ae 
Engines. The | 
BIOS 911 s eos German Fountain Pen Industry oe cai es ee oe 7 OL ae >> 38. 2d.) The | 
BIOS 920 — oa Manufacture of Desmodurs and Desmophens. Interrogation of Os. 6d. ( ,, os) ey 7d.) Morn 
Professor Otto Bayer at Beltane Schools, Wimbledon. Forti 
BIOS 921 see se Hydrogen Peroxide and Sodium Perborate. Interrogation of Dr. Os. 6d. ( ,, 5 Os. Td) 
Baerwind at Beltane Schools, Wimbledon. a 
BIOS 927 Vinyl Chloride, Vinyl Polymers and Copolymers. Interrogation of Os;'6d. { .«, », Os. 7d.) Bre] 
Dr. Carl Wulff at Beltane Schools, Wimbledon. * 
BIOS 934 a a Emschergenossenschaft, Essen. Phenol Recovery... ee wh te: 0a. { ., 4 28. 2d.) of Ja 
BIOS 936 _ aes Lothringen Bergbau A. G. Bochum Gerthe-Schaft) No. 1. Pitch isms ( ~; aes Ae.) Pi Pe 
Coking. 
BIOS 938 — pare Lurgi Gesellschaft) Iuer Waermetechnik, Frankfurt A/Main. is-0d.{ 4; ss As. id.) 
Dephenolation and Carbonization. 
BIOS 942 5 = Gesellschaft fuer Teerverwertung. Castrop-Rawrel. Tar Distillation Is. Od. ( ,, 38. 102) we 
BIOS 949 7 See Investigation of Cast Basalt... Bek ue sa ste ak Os: Gd. { «. 5, Os. 7d.) Re 
BIOS 950 oe ned Synthetic Rubber Laticés. Interview with Dr. Bachle of the Latex s.00..1{ «5 - Me. das) FIA 
Laboratories of the I. G. Farbenindustrie, Leverkusen. FL! 
BIOS 954 bee a German Steel Rolling Mill Practice... me ee bis ae la. On. { .; ae de) te 
BIOS 959 ae wee 1.G. Farbenindustrie. Manufacture of Triphenylmethane Dye- Os: 0d..( .., 5s 9s. 3d.) 
stuffs and Intermediates at Ludwigshafen und Hoechst. Cla 
BIOS 961 oe a German Dyestuffs and Dyestuffs Intermediates. Azo and Lake 15s. 0d. ( ,, », L5s. 4d.) 
Dyestuffs. Te 
BIOS 967 ie — Deutsche Vacuum Ocl A.G. Hamburg-Germany. Fuels and 14s. Od. ( ,, 3, 14s. 4d.) 
Lubricants. ‘ 
BIOS 972 ae rie German Small Nail and Tack Manufacture = esi “he 28.00. 4 » 2s. 2d.) Fu 
BIOS 988 see pei German Dyestuffs and Dyestuffs Intermediates. Azoic Products 4s. 0d.( ,, », 4s, 2d.) 
including Napthols, Fast Salts, Nitrosamines and Rapid Fast Ger 
Salts, Rapidogens. 
BIOS 998 — = Investigation into the Design and Performance of the Volkswagen or 12s.0d.( ,, — ,, 12s. 4d.) 
German People’s Car. 
FIAT 432 ees sen The Manufacture of Refractories and Information concerning their 12s. 6d. ( ,, », 12s. 10d.) 
use in the Iron and Steel Industry of Western Germany. ia 
FLAT 718 ry ek Fertilizers made by I.G. Farbenindustrie A.G. at Leuna and os: Od. ( 5, ~.  fa. 2a.) 
Piesteritz. DP 
FIAT 720 German Techniques for Handling Acetylene in Chemical Operations 11s. 0d. ( ,, 5, lls. 3d.) 
FIAT 724 Miscellaneous Chemical Processes and Plastics Machinery _ 4s. Od. ( ,, 5, 48. 2d.) 
FIAT 7438 * K-3’ Silicon Dioxide for Rubber Filler ... ioe ie res Is. 6d. ( ,, »» 28. 90;) B 
FIAT 746 Synthetic Mica Research bos SoH va ae ~ ven 28:00. { ., sy 2B. 2a.) 
FIAT 773 Titanium Products in Germany ee wa Bae we eat 6s, 6d. { ., s Os. 8d.) 
FIAT 774 Anhydrous Chlorides Manufacture... bow a oe pale Sa Oa. ( ., 9 o8. 2d.) | 
FIAT 787 Precious Metal Refining and Fabrication ne se Sus. ee Sa a. { ., >» 2a. 6a.) i 
FIAT 806 Gesellschaft fuer Linde’s Eismaschinen (Linde-Frankl Oxygen 1 ae 55 38.90.) \ 
Apparatus) Hollriegelskreuth. 
FIAT 831 _ Ses Sodium Sulfate Electrolysis with a Mercury Cathode ear ed 2s: 6d. ., =; 2A. Bd.) 
FIAT 832 bee bie Hydrochloric Acid Electrolysis at Wolfen... cee — —_ is: @d.{ .. ss 28. 2d.) 
FIAT 833 che sew Experimental Production of Chlorine by Oxidation of Hydrogen 28; 0d. { 4, >, 28. 2d.) 
Chloride. I.G. Farbenindustrie, Oppau. 
FIAT 844 cas bee German Concrete Shipbuilding during the war fee vas con 2s. Od. ( ,, gs | bis 
FIAT 860 = ke The Production of Mono- Vinylacetate bas cae _ Mae i a ao 4. 2S, Ba.) es 
FIAT 866 — — The Manufacture of Luvitherm Film. Unplacticized Polyvinyl 2s. 0d. ( ,, 28 2a.) ing 


Chloride Film. =-- 











Ws 


1947 


January 


THE BOARD OF 


TRADE JOURN 


VAL 


91 


The 


HI following are details of British and Foreign films registered by the Board of Trade under 
the Cinematograph Films Act, 1938, during the week ended, Tuesday, January 14, 1947 :— 


Week’s Registrations of Films 


Date of 


| | 
| Length | 


Title of Film 














Registered in the Name of | Maker’s Name tegistered No. (feet) | Registration 
BRITISH 
Road To The Isles isa ine ... | Federated Film Corp. | Federated Film Corp. | Br/E 9885 3,104 January 9 
| Ltd. | Ltd. 
his Modern Age No. 4: Fabrics of The | General Film Distributors | This Modern Age Ltd | Br/R 9887 1,906 January 9 
Future. Ltd. | | } 
New Pathe Pictorial No. 118/130 (Series): | | 
New Pathe Pictorial No. 125 | Pathe Pictures Ltd. Pathe Pictures Ltd. | Br/R 9888 758 January 10 
I'he Way To The West ... | General Film Distributors | Paul Barralet Productions | Br/R 9891 1,o45 January 1! 
| Ltd. | Ltd. | 
This Modern Age No. 5: Thoroughbreds | a - | This Modern Age Lt Pr/R 9892 1,895 January 11 
lor the World. 
Hungry Hill a 3 Two Cities Films Ltd. | Br/TR 98965 | 9,825 January 11 
FOREIGN 
Nobody Lives =~ ver | Warner Bros, Pictures Ltd. | Warner Bros. Pictures Inc.| F 9878 8,969 January 8 
Cloak And Da; gge | ‘ ee | Sp ” | #9879 9,557 January 5 
The Time, The P “fl e hind The Girl - ee | a js | I 9880 9,140 January $ 
That Way With Women... | 56 - ES F 988] 7,538 January & 
My Old Kentucky Home | Twenticth Century Fox | Twentieth Century Fox | F 9882 587 January $ 
| Film Co., Ltd. | Film Corp. 
Margie | oi | a ~ I 9883 8,425 January 8 
Che Outlaw Ww | Unite d Artis ts Corp. Ltd. | Howard Hughes Produc If 9884 |) LO,451 January 8 
| | tions Inc. | 
Inside Job ... | General Vilm Distributors | Universal International F 9886 5,922 January 9 
} Ltd. | Films Ine. 
| Love My Husband But! | Metro - Goldwyn - Mayer | Metro - Goldwyn - Mayer F 9889 897 January LO 
| Pictures Ltd. 
The Secret Heart ... ; | Ay 5 | oy - I 9890 8,720 January 10 
The Royal Mounted Rides ‘Ag vin ‘(Se rit il) : | 
Hpisode 1. Canaska Gold | General Film Distributors | Universal International | F 9893 1,771 January LI 
| Ltd. | Films Ine. | 
Kpisode 2, The Avalanche Trap | = oe i oe F 9894 1,633 January Il 
Episode 3. River of Fire... | = 5 | ; F 9895 1,506 January Il 
Che Late George Apley | Twenticth Century Fox | Twe vabiia “th Century Fox I 9897 8,862 January 13 
Film Co., Ltd, | Film Corp 
The Razor’s Edge ‘ - ‘ ‘ | EF 9898 | 12,914 January 13 
Mormon Trails = - a 2 F 9899 818 January 13 
fortune Hunters | ra ee a sg os Fk 9900 540 January 13 
| \ \ | 
Br-E indicates ‘“ for the exhibitors’ quota only.” Br/R indicates ‘ for the exhibitors’ and renters’ quotas.” 


Br/TR indicates “ for the exhibitors’ quota and trebled for the renters’ quota.’ ’ 


«*, The registered length of the film ‘‘ Love Laughs At Andy Hardy” (I 9377), notilication of which appeared in the Board of Trale Journal 
of January 11, 1947, should read 8,417 feet. 
a*, The registration particulars of the film ‘“‘ Walking On Air” (Br/R 9756). notification of which appeared in the Board of Trade Journal 


of November 30, 1946, have been amended as follows :— 
Long Version 


Short Version 


5,643 feet. 
4,259 feet 





Reports on German Industries (continued) 


FIAT 870 The Production of Styreflex Film. Oriented Polystyrene Film 28: Ods ( 4; 
FLAT 889 Urea Manufacture at the 1.G. Farbenindustree Piant al Oppau ‘ 39. On. €: 45 
FIAT 891 Duxochrome Photo C ‘olour Prints ie ies ae odie eK te. 60s Ay, 








Classified List No. 2 of Industrialists’ Reports on Germany (consolidated list of all reports published up to 
October 26, 1946), price 6d. (post free 8d.). 

Technical Index of Reports on German Industry (veports published up to and including July 27, 1946), 
free 5s. 3d.). 

Further reports, as they become available for publication, will be notified in the Board of Trade 
then be available for re ference at the principal Public Libraries and Chambers of Commerce. 


Journal 


German Patent Specifications, accepted by the Berlin Patent Office during the war, 
Library, 25 Southampton Buildings, Chancery Lane, London, W.C.2. 
drawings may be obtained at the rate of 6d. per page. 


can be seen at the 
Photographi 


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DISTINCTIVE 
BEACH GLASSES 


The BEAUCATCHER 


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well made and well designed sunglasses. Available from 
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HOLBORN VIADUCT, LONDON, E.C.1 


Telegrams: ;_Hocoptics, Cent, Londen 


SSS = 


Die Nit =seeae 








92 THE BOARD OF TRADE JOURNAL 


18 January 1947 


Official Announcements 





Key Certificates for Utility Ticking: The Board of 
Trade announce the discontinuance as from January 31, 
1947, of the Key Certificate system of allocation of Utility 
ticking to bedding manufacturers. 

Manufacturers will in future be free to make their own 
arrangements with suppliers to obtain Utility ticking, which 
is, by virtue of a General Licence (S. R. & O. 1943 No. 1618) 
coupon-free between traders. 

It should be noted that Utility ticking may only be used 
for making Utility bedding under the provisions of the 
Bedding (Manufacture and Supply) (Consolidation) 
Directions 1946 (S. R. & O. 1946 No. 1926), or for recondi- 
tioning work, or for making Utility mattress and pillow 
ticks under the authority of individual Directions issued 
by the Board of Trade. 

* 


Revised Maximum Prices for Paper: The Board of 
Trade have issued the Control of Paper (No. 80) Order*, 
which comes into force on January 20, 1947, and provides 
revised maximum prices for certain light substance papers, 
including papers containing hemp, flax or cotton linters 
fibre. The new maximum prices are designed to take 
account of the increased cost of these raw materials. In 
addition, the Order provides that the fibre content to which 
the maximum prices for M.G. Envelope Paper are related 
may be derived from sulphate as well as sulphite pulp. 

* Copies of the Order (S. R. & O. 1947 No. 63) may be obtained 
price 1d., through any bookseller or newsagent or direct from H.M. 
Stationery Office, Kingsway, London, W.C.2, and branches. 


* 


Official Receiver : The Board of Trade have appointed 
Mr. Felix Beresford Goodman to be Official Receiver for 
the Bankruptcy District of the Plymouth County Court 
with effect from January 1, 1947, in place of Mr. Arthur 
Harold Ward, O.B.E. 

* 


POSTAL SECTION 


Gift Parcel Service to Germany : The Postmaster-General 
announces that, on and after January 15, gift parcels 
restricted to essential relief items only may, subject to the 
usual conditions, be sent by post to the whole of Germany. 
The rates of postage will be :—Up to 2 Ib. 2s. 6d; 2-7 Ib. 
3s. 9d.; and 7-11 Ib. 4s. 9d. 

No books or written or printed matter of any kind may be 
enclosed and parcels will be subject to censorship and 
customs examination in Germany. 


* 


Restoration of Public Telegraph Service with Cyrenaica : 
The Post Office and Cable and Wireless, Ltd., announce that 
the public telegraph service with Cyrenaica is now restored. 

The use of code and cipher is not allowed. ‘Telegrams for 
places other than Benghazi and Derna are forwarded from 
Benghazi by post without additional charge at the risk of 
the sender. 

The rate for ordinary telegrams is 6d. a word. FEuropean 
Letter Telegrams (ELT) are accepted at the rate of 6s. 3d. 
for 25 words and 3d. for each additional word. 


* 


Gift Parcel Service to Albania and Bulgaria: The 
Postmaster-General announces that, subject to the usual 
conditions, gift parcels may now be sent to Albania and 
Bulgaria. The rates of postage are :— 


Upto2lb. 2-7 lb. 7-11 lb. 11-22 lb. 
Albania 6/- 7/9 9/3 16/- 
Bulgaria... 4/6 6/3 7/9 13/6 


* 
MISCELLANEOUS 


Essential Work Orders: The Minister of Labour and 
National Service has informed organizations representing 
employers and workers concerned that the Limestone 
Section of the Quarrying Industry will be withdrawn from 
the scope of the Essential Work Orders on or about March 31 
next. The Slag, Igneous Rock, Sandstone and Roofing 


Slate Sections of the Quarrying Industry have already been 
withdrawn from the scope of the Orders. 

Notices will be issued to the individual undertakings 
which are to be de-scheduled, giving them at least a month’s 
notice. Until individual de-scheduling takes effect the 
provisions of the Essential Work Orders remain in force 
for all employers and workers in scheduled undertakings. 


* 


Sir Robert Watson-Watt : Sir Robert Watson-Watt has 
relinquished the full-time appointments which he held ag 
Vice-Controller of Communications Equipment under the 
Ministry of Aircraft Production and Scientific Adviser on 
Telecommunications under the Air Ministry. 

Sir Robert is taking up private work, but he will also 
continue to devote part of his time to consultant work for 
the Government, and will act as Scientific Adviser on 
Telecommunications to the Ministry of Supply, Air Ministry, 
Ministry of Civil Aviation and Ministry of Transport. 


* 


Corn Prices in England and Wales: The Ministry of 
Agriculture and Fisheries state that the average prices of 
British corn per cwt., in the week ended January 11, 
were: wheat, 15s. 2d., barley, 24s. 3d., and oats, 16s. 6d. 


* 
PUBLICATIONS RECEIVED 


Monthly Bulletin of the Canadian Chamber of Commerce 
in Great Britain, Inc., Vol. 25, No. 1, January, 1947. 
Offices of the Chamber are situated at British Columbia 
House, 3 Regent Street, London, S.W.1. 


The Welder, Vol. XV., No. 89, July-September, 1946 
(Special Shipbuilding Number). Published by Murex 
Welding Processes, Ltd., Waltham Cross, Herts. 


Bulletin of the Imperial Institute, Vol. XLIV., No. 3, 
July-September, 1946. Published by the Imperial Institute 
South Kensington, London, S.W.7. Price 2s. 6d. net, by 


post 2s. 9d. (Annual Subscription, including postage, 10s.) 


Fortnightly Review of Business and Economic Conditions 
in South and Central America, Portugal, Spain, etc., Vol. 12, 
No. 268, January 4, 1946. Published by the Bank of Lon- 
don and South America, Limited, 6, 7, and 8, Tokenhouse 
Yard, London, E.C.2. 


Tropical Agriculture, Vol. XXIII, No. 8, August, 1946. 
Published monthly by the Imperial College of ‘Tropical 
Agriculture, St. Augustine, Trinidad, West Indies, price 
6d. net. (Copies can also be obtained from the Secretary 
of the College, Grand Buildings, Trafalgar Square, London, 
W.C.2, England.) 


Markets for you in Australia. Published by the Bank of 
New South Wales, Sydney, Australia. (This is the first 
of three booklets to be published by the Bank. The 
subjects of the remaining two will be Buying from Australia 
and Investment Opportunities in Australia). 


The Story of the Telephone by J. H. Robertson. Published 
by Sir Isaac Pitman & Sons, Ltd., Pitman House, Parker 
Street, Kingsway, London, W.C.2, price 10s. 6d. net. 

Business Conditions in Argentina, quarterly report, 
No. 252, October-November 1946. Published by Ernesto 
Tornquist & Co., Limitada, Bartolome Mitre, 531, Buenos 
Aires. 

Middle East Economic Service, Vol. 1, No. 1, January 
1947. Published by the MiddleEast Economic Service, P.O. B. 
1748, Haifa, Palestine. 


SACKS and BAGS——— 


BOUGHT, SOLD, REPAIRED 
AND STORED 
J. DOWNEY 


Church Street, Blagdon, 
Bristol. Phone Blagdon 356 











IMPORT & 
EXPORT 











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1947 


18 January 


OVERSEAS TRADE 


THE BOARD OF TRADE JOURNAL 93 


SECTION 





Trade Mission Report on Visit to 
Middle East 


some of the countries on the eastern borders of the 
Mediterranean are discussed in the Report of the 
British Goodwill Trade Mission to Iraq, Syria, the Lebanon 
and Cyprus, April-May, 1946, published by H.M. Stationery 
Office, price 2s. net. 
The report consists of 68 pages with four coloured inset 
maps of the areas visited. 
The Mission was appointed by the President of the Board 
of Trade, Sir Stafford Cripps, and consisted of Viscount 


(ry possibilities between the United Kingdom and 


Davidson (Chairman), Brig. Gen. Sir Godfrey Rhodes 
(Deputy Chairman), Messrs. A. M. Gibb (Partner, Sir 


Alexander Gibb & Partners), G. L. Wilkinson (representative 
of the T.U.C.), J. F. Perry (Director and General Manager, 
Metropolitan Vickers Electrical Export Co., Ltd.) and 
S. Castle-Smith (Director of Samuel Courtauld & Co., Ltd.). 
The Secretary was Mr. A. W. Nicholson of the Board of 
Trade and Assistant Secretaries were Mrs. E. K. Lowndes 
and Mrs. M. B. P. Burges. 

The Mission’s terms of reference were to encourage 
interest in the United Kingdom as a source of supply for 
capital and consumer goods and to express the keen desire 
of United Kingdom industry to assist the economic progress 
and development of Iraq. The Mission was instructed to 
return via Syria and the Lebanon and also to visit Cyprus to 
convey to the Colony the goodwill of United Kingdom 
industry and its desire to provide the present and future 
needs of the island. 

The Mission left this country 
visited Damascus, Bagdad, Basra, Homs, Hama, Aleppo, 
Latakia, Tripoli, Beirut, Nicosia, Kyrenia, Famagusta, 
Limassol and Larnica. 


by air on April 16, 1946, and 





Demand for British Goods 


Everywhere, states the report, the Mission found an 
abundance of goodwill and a keen desire to purchase a wide 
range of British goods. There appeared to be ample 
sterling exchange in private hands for the conduct of current 
There was no need to encourage these countries to 
There was an almost un- 


trade. 
buy British consumer goods. 
limited demand for them every where. 

Throughout the report runs the theme that a rise in the 
earning power, standard of Jife and the output of each 
individual, brought about by careful planning and economic 
development, will do more in the long run to increase the 
demand for goods, both capital and consumer, of these 
markets, than any other factor. It is, therefore, not only 
Great Britain’s wish, but one of her vital commercial 
interests that these countries should be economically sound, 
and progressive. 

The report means and 
economic conditions in the countries concerned and. their 
trade with this country. Great emphasis is placed on the 
need for proper co-ordination of economic projects and 
warnings are given against rash ventures into industrial- 
ization. Advice is also given on labour problems and the 
organization of Trade Unions sincerely devoted to the 
welfare of the worker. 

To the British exporter the report suggests that, by a 
sympathetic understanding of the economic conditions in 
these countries, both their prosperity and the exporters’ 
future markets can be furthered. Many indications are 
given of the possible lines of development for specific 
British exports, but the exporter is urged to go and seek out 
the details of his particular trade for himself. The report is 
also written with the object of arousing the interest of 
British manufacturers and traders who have not yet 
exported to these markets by giving them the essential 
economic and social background of the countries concerned 
in the shortest possible form. 

The report, therefore, deals with each country indepen- 
dently, and in each instance describes briefly the essence of 
the country’s economy, history, labour and social conditions, 
communications, agriculture, industry, marketing methods 
and its future economic development. <As special attention 


suggests ways of improving 


was also given by the Mission to the possibilities of public 
works, chapters are also included for each country on power 
and irrigation. A map of each country is included. 

Some of the Mission’s recommendations apply, in the 
greater or lesser degree, to all the four countries. The 
greatest care is advised in the selection and supervision of 
agents for British firms, and the Mission strongly recom- 
mends the appointment of separate agents for each country. 
Questions of agriculture have been dealt with in some detail 
because of the great possibilities of future markets for 
agricultural equipment, provided it is of the type required 
for Middle Mastern conditions. Where industrial plant is 
covered the Mission recommends British firms to try to 
train artisans from these countries in their own workshops in 
England, in order to raise the local standards of skill in 
mechanized industry. 


Air Communications 


At the end of the report, special chapters are devoted to 
air communications in the Middle East, and to the export 
market of British motor cars. The Mission recommends 
that consideration be given to the establishment in Cyprus 
of a centre for the training of civil air line pilots and 
personnel from Middle Eastern countries. It also recom- 
mends the provision of more air passages for British business 
men visiting the Middle Kast, and especially more return air 
for such business men and for traders from Middle 
In the chapter on the export market for 


passages 
East countries. 
motor cars, the Mission strongly recommends the British 
Government and the motor trade to consider building a 
special car for export. The type of car required is described 
in this chapter and the Mission considers that the time has 
come to decide whether or not serious attempt should be 
made to enter the vast potential market for appropriate cars 
in the countries which it visited. 

The report includes some lists of goods representing the 
immediate local demand in the countries concerned, but it 
concentrates on the long-term prospects in view of the 
sellers’ market existing at present in all four territories. 


New Italian Company Legislation 


Italian Legislative Decree No. 241 of September 13, 
1946, the full text of which is contained in the Italian 
Official Gazelte No. 245 of October 28, 1946, imposes on 
limited companies the obligation to surrender to the 
State 25 per cent. of the credit items, when transferred 
to capital after August 30, 1946, of the monetary revalua- 
tion of plant carried out in accordance with the Royal 
Legislative Decree No. 436 of May 27, 1946. 

The tax is to be paid within 60 days of the passing of 
the resolution to transfer the amount to capital. The 
companies are entitled to recoup themselves from the 
shareholders. If payment is not made within the given 
period the amount due to the State plus 10 per cent. 
interest is collected by a direct tax assessment. 

The tax may be paid by the surrender of shares instead 
nominal 


of in cash. If this is done bonus shares of the 


value of the tax must be handed over, such shares being 
redeemable within a year against payment of their nominal 
value plus interest of 5 per cent. per annum. The Decree 
applies to credit items transferred to capital after August 30, 
1946. 

A further Decree is to lay down the rules and regulations 
for the application of this Decree. 


British Chamber of Commerce, 
Recife, Pernambuco 


United Kingdom firms are advised that the British 
Chamber of Commerce, Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil, ceased 
to exist in 1924. 








O4 THE BOARD OF TRADE JOURNAL 


Market for British Goods 
in Saudi Arabia 


KFORE the war Saudi Arabia * imported 
about £24 millions worth of merchandise, of which 


the United Kingdom contribution averaged less than 
£100,000, states His Majesty’s Second Secretary (Commer- 
cial) at 
Promotion Department. The country’s principal commercial 
connection was traditionaily with India. The bulk ofimports 
passed through the Red Sea port of Jedda, and was handled 
by the large, 
and Mecca. 


Jedda, in the course of his Report to the Iexport 


cosmopolitan mereantile communities of Jedda 


During the war years, normal commercial connections 
were severed. Imports were provided largely through the 
agency of the Middle Kast Supply Centre. At the same 
time, the country experienced a severe rise in the internal 
price level. 


Recovery of Oil 


Largely as the result’ of oil developments, the pros- 
pective foreign exchange earnings of Saudi Arabia over 
the next five years may be estimated to average over 
£15 millions a year. This sum, perhaps six-fold the 
pre-1939 average, may well be available for the purchase cf 
consumer and capital goods. 


It is difficult to predict the channels into which this 
unprecedented volume of purchasing power will flow. It 
may be doubted whether the local mercantile community 
is yet fully alive to the situation. Apart from such major 
foreign enterprises as the Arabian American Oil Company 
and the Saudi Arabian Mining Syndicate, local industry 
is undeveloped, being confined to small soap and tile-making 
concerns and small workshops. Given the state of technical 
education, manufacturing progress will probably be slower 
than the material means available for its development would 
warrant. 


British exporters wishing to establish trade connections 
in Saudi Arabia would be well advised to direct: enquiries 
regarding the commercial standing and resources of their 
clients to the Commercial Secretariat, British Legation, 
Jedda. 


more advantageous to transact business through the London 


In many cases, however, exporters may find it 


offices of firms with well-established branches or agencies 
in Jedda. At the present time direct: shipping facilities 
to Jedda are provided occasionally only by the Blue Funnel 
Line. 


Goods in Demand 
The following list outlines those categories of imports 


at’ present in greatest demand. It is derived from a 


questionnaire circulated among local merchants, but is 
doubtless biased by the nature of the goods these mer- 
chants were accustomed to import from the United Kingdom 


before the war. Such bias takes no account of relative 
present-day price 
It is therefore a very conservative indication of present 
market possibilities : 


levels and manufacturing standards. 


Foodstuffs, cte.: Tinned fruits and vegetables, confee- 
tionery, jams and syrups, biscuits, cigarettes. 
Constructional Materials: Constructional 


pipes, sanitaryware, 


steelwork, 


cement. glass (plate and window). 


Textiles: Piece-goods and fabrics of all varieties, but 
particularly of cotton and artificial silk, furnishing fabrics, 
sewing thread and haberdashery, carpets. 

Vehicles: Trucks, cars, cycles, tyres and tubes. 

Miscellaneous: Llectric wires and cables, telephone 
and wireless apparatus, electrical generators, accumulators, 
electric lighting equipment, electric fans, 
oil lamps and lanterns, refrigerators, electrical and me- 
chanical workshop equipment, hand tools, pumps (1.C. or 
electric), machines, typewriters (Arabic and 
English), watehes and clocks, shotguns and cartridges, 


sundries, 


fittings and 


sewing 


hollow-ware and 
hardware of all varieties pottery, aluminium 
and enamelware, furniture, cutlery, nails, 
boots and shoes, paints, distempers and varnishes, matches, 
soap, perfumeries and toiletries, starch (laundry), washing 
blue, drugs, pharmaceuticals, surgical and dental instru- 
ments and apparatus, sun-glasses, spectacles. 


stationer’s fountain pens, 
glas sware, 


domestic 


18 January 1947 


British India Cloth and 


Sugar Exports 
cotton piece-goods export allocation laid down 


( ) 
by the Government of India for the period July- 


December 1946, was 14,995 tons, states H.M. Senior 
Trade Commissioner in India at Delhi. 
distributed as under: 


This amount was 


Countr Quantity Country Quantity 
Ton Tons 
Aden,it ling Yemen, Iraq ies oe 660 
Hadramaut.. ; 175 Mauritiu = = 280 
Saudi Arabia .. bs 190 New Zealand 5% 140) 
ethiopia _ , 300 North and South 
Kritrea as , 11) Rhodesia... a fl 90 
Afghanistan ... ied 1.520 Persia cor a 340 
Arab State in the Portuguese Kast 
Persian Gulf pis 475 Africa Ne ae 15 
Australia - “e 1,500 Syvehelles . <a 4{) 
British East Africa, Sudan i ae | 710 
Nyasaland ... "= 1,800 Turkey ee cae 40) 
Northern Somalia... 2) | Nepal a .. | 1,040 
Beitich West Africa, Tibet me wie 
including Nigeria ... 760 British Pacific Islands} 30 
Ceylon ‘ey ast 1,095 Burma = ae ee 
Cyprus . ae 40 Other Far Eastern | 
Netherlands Kast territorics aoe 670 
Indies . sat 95 French Colonies 7h0 


Sugar Exports 


Exports of sugar for the year 1945-46 (December 1, 1945, 
to November 30, 1946) amounted to 17,453-3 tons, of which 
7,741-2 tons went to Persian Gulf Sheikhdoms and 9,712-1 
tons to neighbouring countries. The distribution was as 
under: 


Destinations Quantity 

Persian Gulf Sheikhdoms : Tons 
Bahrain 3,274-°8 
Trucial Coast 1,998 -0 
Muscat 302-4 
Kowait ; - 2,106-0 
Gwadur ; 60-0 
Total . = : 7,741 -2 

Neighbouring countrit 

Afghanistan 7,200-0 
Nepal : ; 1,405°3 
Sikkin 5 230-4 
Bhutan pa ‘ : 198-0 
Tibet : 216-0 
French Possessions in India , ; a 462-4 
Total . oes oe 9,712-1 


Information for U.K. 
Exporters 


As an information service to exporters, details are 
given below of enquiries received from overseas for 
United Manufacturers and 
exporters may obtain the names and addresses of the 
persons or firms referred to by applying to the Export 
Department, 35 Old Queen Street, 
London, S.W.1 (and quoting the reference number.) 


Kingdom products. 


Promotion 


Men’s felt hats: United States of America. An old- 
established Company of retailers and distributors of men’s 
hats and ties in Detroit, Michigan, is desirous of contacting 
United Kingdom manufacturers of men’s felt hats with a 
view to purchase for own account. (12.P.D. Ref.—Z79259.) 

Drugs, ete.: Trinidad. British West Indies. \ firm of 
wholesale chemists and druggists in Trinidad wish to pur- 
small quantities of oil of alum xtals, 
bromide, cream of tartar, nitre (saltpetre), 
naphthalene balls, balsam copaiba, oil of cloves, oil of cassia, 
oil of bergamottae, salol, rochelle saltd. (powder), gum aloes 
(cape), gum asafoetidae, gum elemi, gum myrrh, gum 
olibanum (tears 3) in the United Kingdom. (K.P.D. Ref. 
568/47.) 


chase myrbane, 


ammonium 








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fuly- 
‘nior 
Was 


S{) 
1) 


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{js January 


1QA7 THE BOARD OF TRADE JOURNAL 95 


Canadian Wood and Wood Products 
Industry 


as the most important group of Canadian exports, states 

the Dominion Bureau of Statistics, Ottawa. Ship- 
ments of wood, wood products and paper during the first 
ten months of 1946 had a value of $496 million, which 
represents 27 per cent. of total exports for the period. The 
value for the ten months ended October 31, 1945, was 
$399-6 million and for the corresponding period of 1937-39 


| ee products have regained their pre-war position 


was $196-4 million. 

It will be noted that shipments of forest products exceeded 
in value those for the corresponding period of 1945 ; in fact, 
they constitute the only group that records a rise over the 
1945 figures. 

These figures fail to present a true impression of the 
situation, however, as it is estimated that the export prices for 
wood products were 82 per cent. higher in 1946 than in 1939, 
The change in unit values, declared on the export entry 
forms, provides a fairly reliable guide to the changes that 
have occurred in the export prices of various types of 
Canadian wood products. 


Comparative Figures 


\ comparison of these units declared values in the first 
ten months of 1946 with those of 1939, for the main items 
in the wood products group, confirms the widely held 
opinion that very substantial price increases have been 
recorded. The survey embraces planks and boards, wood 
pulp, pulpwood and newsprint, the aggregate value of which 
is more than 85 per cent. of the total 1946 exports in the 
wood products group. The following table indicates vhe 
i916 index of unit declared values for each of the four main 
sections, on the basis or 1939 values being equal to 100. 
The composite index, as shown, is 82 per cent. higher than 
in 1939. 


1946 Index Weight 

Planks and boards bee , ae 233-3 22-4 
Woodpulp 186-1 21-9 
Pulpwood ve 207-6 | 6-0 
Newsprint : ; - 154-0 19-7 
Composite index Sets ss 182-0 100-0 


The indices given above are based upon current weights. 


In other words, the index is derived from a comparison of 


1946 quantities, valued at 1946 and 1939 price levels. With 
the exception of newsprint, each single index shown above is 
a composite index of the various sub-groups, such as spruce, 
fir and pine planks and boards (nine items in all), bleached 
sulphite, sulphate and unbleached wood pulp (nine items in 
all), and poplar, other peeled, and other unpeeled pulpwood. 
In using this index, it should be noted that it is not a true 
price index, as the values declared on the export entry are 
subject to a variety of extraneous influences. They may 
include a proportion of freight charges, and may take into 
account variations in grade and quality, as well as trade 
allowances. for which no eomparable price can be set. 

It should also be noted that some items of importance, 
exportea in 1946, may not have been shipped abroad in 
1939, invalidating any comparison for these particular items. 
With these reservations, the unit value price index does 
provide a guide to price increases, and is an indication of 
the proportion of the increased value of exports in the wood 
products group, which may be entirely attributed to the 


rise in prices. 


Newsprint Values 


Recorded values for 1946 have been recalculated on the 
basis of 1989 unit values and particulars are given in the 
table below. With the price inflation eliminated, a more 
accurate comparison is obtained of volume changes. It will 
be noted that, at 1939 prices, newsprint comprised approxi- 
mately one-half the total value of shipments in this group 
for both years under review. The volume increase of 50 per 
cent, in newsprint, from 19389 to 1946, is representative of 
the volume change for the group as a whole. 

Of the other items, only wood pulp showed any substantial 
quantitative changes, more than doubling in volume. In 
the table below, the composite index of 182-0 for the four 


main items has been applied arbitrarily to the remainder of 


the group. 


1946 
exports in| 
Index of terms of | 
Jan.-Oct. | unit values L939 | Jan.-Oct. 
Particulars 19-46 1939= 100 |unit values} 1939 


$ million $ million { $ million 


Wood, wood pro | 


ducts and paper 


total , 496-0 | 279-3 197-3 
Newsprint... 211-4 1540 | 137°3 | 93-2 
Planks and boards 95-3 233°3 10-3 | 41-0 
Woo dpulp ; ne 92-9 Ls86-1 19-9 | 23-6 
Pulpwood 25-3 207-6 12-2 10-3 
Shingles ; , 8-6 182-0 | 4-7 7:3 
Pit props of wood ie 7°2 182-0 1-0 0-1 
Veneers and ply | 

woods... wee 9-7 182-0 5:3 1-3 
Pulpwood, wall 

board and paper- 

board... no 6-5 182-0 3°6 3°56 
Books and printed 

matter ... wee 5-2 182-0 2-9 1-0 
Other sis we 33°9 182-0 8-6 | 15-9 


Nova Scotia Apples 


For many years progressive growers and government 
officials have advocated the desirability of introducing the 
apple box into Nova Scotia, states the Department of Trade 
and Commerce, Ottawa. llowever, the barrel was the 
historic container, and tbe introduction of any new method 
was bound to encounter a great many difficulties. 

The box pack is a more expensive pack, and in order to 
sell it to the public, it must be a high quality product. In 
Nova Scotia, it meant that only a few of the two hundred 
odd varieties would be acceptable. It meant that a new 
technique in picking, handling, grading and packing would 
have to be acquired. It meant that efficient cold storage 
was practically a requisite. It is therefore a tribute to the 
people of the Annapolis Valley that high quality boxed 
apples are now appearing on the market. 


Government Aid 


The Minister of Agriculture has announced that the 
provincial government has budgeted $1,000,000 to loan 
Annapolis Valley growers to aid in the financing of cold 
storage facilities. Under this plan one-half the cost of the 
completed construction will be 
interest with the principal repayable over a term of years. 
The United Fruit Companies of Nova Scotia was the first 
organization to take advantage of the policy, and its cold 
storage and box packing plant at Coldbrook is now in 
operation. This is the first of a series of such storages 
planned by this company to look after the needs of growers. 
Lawrencetown and Falmouth have been mentioned as 
possible points for the next two plants, and it is expected 
that other locations in order of urgency will soon be chosen 


> 


provided at 83 per cent. 


for the orderly development of this policy. 

Located on the Post Road, four miles west of Kentville, 
near Coldbrook, the new cold storage plant is reputed to be 
the most modern of its kind in North America, and. is ideally 
situated on the Dominion Atlantic Railway so that it can 
easily handle the crop by road or by rail. The capacity of 
the plant is 838,588 cubic feet with refrigeration space of 
663,802 cubic feet, divided into five separate chambers. 
\llowing ample space for corridors and ventilation between 
the rows of boxes, the net storage capacity of the plant is 
estimated at 150,000 boxes. 

A major problem in producing a satisfactory box pack 
was the training of packing crews, but local help is fast 
becoming proficient under the guidance of three key per- 
sonnel who have been brought in from British Columbia and 
Washington State, and who are in a position to contribute 
a wealth of knowledge and experience to the new enterprise. 

Two thousand boxes of MeIntosh Reds, grown and 
packaged in Nova Scotia, arrived in Liverpool during the 
early part of November and this consignment, which was the 
first received from Nova Scotia in boxed form, arrived in 
good condition, and was suitable for sale to wholesalers at 


the highest maximum price. 








96 THE BOARD OF TRADE JOURNAL 


18 January 1947 


Growth of Palestine’s Trade 
January—June, 1946 


HE value of imports into Palestine during the first 
"Tinaie of 1946 was £P.29,553,781, as compared with 

£P.19,508,863 during the same period of 1945, an 
increase of £P.10 million, or 51 per cent., states the Depart- 
ment of Statistics, Jerusalem. Compared with the figures 
for the same period of 1939 imports increased by 284 per 
cent. 

Exports during the first half of last year were 
£P.12,839,159, as compared with £P.9,150,052 in the same 
period of 1945, an increase of £P.3-7 million or 40 per cent. 

The value of imports of food, drink and tobacco in the 
six months under review was £P.8,288,000, as against 
£P.14,245,000 in the year 1945; articles mainly unmanu- 
factured £P.10,487,000 (£P.16,251,000) ; articles mainly 
manufactured £P.10,183,000 (£P.8,304,000) ; animals, living 
£P.103,000 (£P.290,000). 


As regards exports, food, drink and tobacco shipments 
in the six months ended June 30, 1916, totalled £P.3,427,000, 
as against £P.3,033,000 in the year 1945; articles mainly 
unmanufactured, £P.6,699.000 (£P.9,870,000); articles 
mainly manufactured £P.2,707,000 (£P.7,472,000). 


Chief Imports and Exports 
The following table gives particulars of the principal 
imports and exports during the first half of 1946 :— 
January-June 


Commodits Imports Exports 


EP. cr. 
Food, drink and tobacco 8,287,475 3.427.059 
Grain and flour _ —_ es 3,484,500 11,451 
Animals, living, for food . nae 1,271,536 
Dairy produce = pe ar 627,863 1,348 
Fresh fruits nutsand vegetables... 738,715 2,740,37 
Feeding stuffs for animals . . 224.773 1] 
Tobacco and tombae ‘ 294,958 20,849 
Beverages ou vss , s 31,010 187,112 
Raw materials and articles mainly 
unmanufactured ... 10 486.564 6,699,121 
Wood and timber _ ; a 596,286 
Textile material 7 : ar 622,223 11,716 
Seeds, beans and nuts for oil, oils, 
fats, gums and resins 6.735.534 3,014,863 


Hides and skins, undressed ... oat 213,995 21,979 
Articles wholly or mainly manufactured | 10,183,120 2,706,943 
Ceramic ware, glass and manu- 


factured quarry products... ek 368,015 67,600 
Iron and steel and manufactures 
thereof ; see bon 
Non-ferrous metals and 
factures thereof ~ oe ss 
Cutlery, hardware, implements, | 
instruments and photographic film 
Electrical goods and apparatus 
Machinery si = = 
Manufactures of wood and timber ... 


ee. 1,214,067 32,240 
manu 
387,590 25,702 
391,316 
374,867 
984,057 


32,739 
10,210 
17,073 


723,217 2,562 

Cotton yarns and manufactures 1,143,062 5,607 
Woollen and worsted yarn and manu- 

factures thereof nae in 363,657 11,858 
Silk yarn, artificial silk yarn and 

manufactures thereof 412,188 1.116 


Manufactures of textile materials, 

other bs oe = eee 285,878 1,035 
Apparel oe cine eee ae 650,334 131,169 
Chemicals, drugs, dyes and colours... 696,137 646,144 
194,087 1,444,641 


Oils, fats and waxes, manufactured... 


Leather and manufactures thereof... 123,721 15,024 
Paper and cardboard and manufae 
tures thereof _— io sist 467,575 9,594 
Aircraft, ships and vehicles 581.289 8.715 
Rubber manufactures F see 243,957 5,276 
Animals, living ... 103,198 157 
= a = eee ene eee 
Distribution of Trade 


British Empire countries and Mandated Territories 
supplied imports during the first half of 1946 to the value 
of £P.11,552.361,madeup chiefly as follows: the United King- 
dom, £P.4,961,113 ; Australia and New Zealand, £P.356,200; 
British India, £P.1,247,396 ; Canada, £P.1.738,386 ; 
£P.148,996 ; Cyprus, £P.250,441; Sudan, £P.128,205 ; 
Irish Free State, £P.35,233 ; Tanganyika, £P.19.834 ; and 
the Union of South Africa, £P.2,164,615. 


Ceylon, 


Foreign sources included Belgium, £P.223.478 ; 
£P.93,515; Finland, £P.106,845; France, £P.60,909 ; 
Holland, £P.126,423; Italy, £P.174,692 ; Norway, 
£P.185,794; Portugal, £P.447,167; the Soviet Union, 
£P.153,864 ; Sweden, £P.288,667 ; Switzerland, £P.214,613; 
Abyssinia, £P.143,074; Egypt, £P.769.986; Arabia, 
£P.74,156; Iraq, £P.5,430,986; Iran, £P.1,697,480 ; 
Syria and Lebanon, £P.1,220,351 ; Turkey, £P.2,033,814 ; 
Trans-Jordan, £P.640,430 ; Argentina, £P.165.494 ; Brazil, 
£P.285,591; and the United States, £P.3,005,354. 


Exports to U.K. 


As regards exports the share of the British Hmpire 
and Mandated Territories in the six months ended June 30, 
1946, was valued at £P.3,230,843, distributed chiefly as 
follows: the United Kingdom, £P.1,812,828 ; Australia and 
New Zealand, £P.113,918:; British India, £P.310,435 ; 
Cyprus, £P.250,595 ; Irish Free State, £P.244,678 ; Malta, 
£P.234,794 ; and the Union of South Africa, £P.128,873. 


Bulgaria, 


The principal foreign recipients of exports were, Belgium, 
£12?.344,710; Denmark, £P.125,667; France, £P.73,904 ; 
£P.925,307 ; Holland, £P.220,658 ; Sweden, 
£P.302,241 ; Switzerland, £P.70,317 ; Egypt, £P.2,533,060 ; 
Syria and Lebanon, £P.425,736; Turkey, £P.385,821 ; 
Trans-Jordan, £P.366,661; and the U.S., £P.3,429,853. 


Greece, 


Re-Exports and Transit Trade 


The total value of re-exports (previously included in 
lmaports) during the half year under 
and went mainly to Italy, 


view was £P.753,389, 
CP.168S.826 ° Iraq, £P,203.283 : 


£P.139,164 ; 





Syria and Lebanon, £P.97.388 : Trans-Jordan, 
id the United States, £2P.20.237. 
Pransit trade during th ume period was valued at 

EP.2,435,559. 








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18 January 1947 


Overseas Trade of Kenya 


and Uganda 


MPORTS into and exports from Kenya and Uganda 

in the first seven months of 1946 were valued at 

245,260,715 shillings and 211,618,631 shillings res- 
pectively, while re-exports of imported merchandise totalled 
46,262,166 shillings, states the acting Commissioner of 
Customs at Mombasa. 


Chief Imports 


The leading imports were: fruits, preserved, dried and 
fresh, 1,250,995 shs.; milk, condensed or otherwise pre- 
served, 843,639 shs.; spices, 1,361,099 shs.; coffee, 
9,135,782 shs. ; spirits, 1,756,893 sbs. ; wines, 616,318 shs. ; 
cigarettes, 1,185,585 shs. ; tobacco, 3,550,679 shs. ; cement, 
building, 1,143,294 shs.; tubes, pipes and their fittings, 
1,540,440 shs. ; iron and steel manufactures, 9,252,919 shs. ; 
shovels, spades, axes, matchets and hoes, 1,449,578 shs. ; 
hardware, cutlery, etc., 6,165,379 shs.; electrical goods, 
3,091,638 shs.; machines and machinery, 12,394,112 shs. ; 
cotton piece-goods :—(a) grey, unbleached, (i) American, 
9,164,487 shs.; (ii) grey drill, 3,650,061 shs.; (b) bleached, 
7,915,143 shs.; (c) printed, (i) khangas, 432,803 shs. ; 
(ii) other sorts, 8,809,821 shs.; (d) dyed in the piece, (i) 
khaki drill, 3,404,282 shs.; (ii) other, 9,533,822, shs.; 
(e) coloured (manufactured wholly or in part of dyed 
yarn), 7,585,985 shs.; cotton blankets, 5,508,035 shs. ; 
woollen and worsted goods, 1,936,054 shs.; jute bags and 
sacks, 4,381,411 shs.; artificial silk piece-goods, 2,037,437 
shs.; other manufactures of ordinary textile materials, 
5,304,142 shs.; apparel, 7,425,564 shs.; disinfectants and 
insecticides, 751,555 shs.; drugs, medicines and medical 
preparations, 4,229,525 shs. ; paints, colours and varnishes, 
1,307,123 shs.; other chemicals, 1,947,132 shs.; fuel oil, 
7,134,563 shs.; lubricating oil, 3,330,788 shs.; motor 
spirit (petrol), 8,451,915 shs.; mineral oil, illuminating 
or burning (kerosene), 2,205,143 shs.; soap, 504,589 shs. ; 
stationery and paper manufactures, 6,005,564 shs. ; cycles, 
not motor, 816,313 shs.; motor cars, 2,273,346 shs. ; 
motor lorries, 1,572,852 shs.; other motor vehicles and 
motor vehicle parts, 4,649,395 shs.; other vehicle parts 
and accessories, 2,660,779 shs. ; tyres and tubes, 4,494,921 
shs.; fertilizers and manures, 684,085 shs.; matches, 
553,062 shs. ; bullion and specie, 9,359,565 shs. ; perfumery, 
cosmetics and toilet preparations, 2,368,070 shs. 


Leading Exports 


The principal articles exported from Kenya and Uganda 
during the seven months ended July 31, 1946, included: 
wheat, 521,742 shs.; maize, 1,970,762 shs.; wheat meal 
and flour, 2,778,810 shs.; maize meal and flour, 643,521 
shs.; bacon and ham, 451,946 shs.; ale, beer and stout, 
334,953 shs.; butter, 1,411,981 shs. ; chillies, 816,079 shs. ; 
coffee, raw, 40,204,893 shs.; ghee, 293,841 shs.; potatoes, 
420,135 shs. ; sugar, refined, 2,840,806 shs. ; tea, 6,023,067 
shs.; cigarettes, 8,625,842 shs.; wood and timber, 
1,881,515 shs.; tin ore, 557,624 shs.; raw _ cotton, 
79,971,229 shs.; flax fibre and tow, 505,300 shs.; sisal 
fibre and tow, 8,406,684 shs. ; seeds, cotton, 1,653,850 shs. ; 
hides, dry and dry-salted, 1,991,014 shs. ; skins, sheep and 
goat, 2,414,923 shs.; rubber, 588,051 shs.; wattle bark, 
1,233,540 shs.; wattle extracts, 3,296,720 shs.; ivory, 
elephant, 1,415,676 shs.; pyrethrum, 14,876,278 shs. ; 
wool, 320,215 shs.; sodium carbonate, 4,743,463 shs. ; 
gold bullion, 3,863,750 shs. 

As regards re-exports of imported merchandise the 
principal items were coffee, raw, 11,270,642 shs. ; tobacco, 
302,374 shs.; tin ore, 717,052 shs.; raw cotton, 558,108 
shs.; hides, dry and dry-salted, 399,463 shs.; ivory, 
elephant, 1,955,138 shs.; papain, 1,020,388 shs.; jute 
bags and sacks, 332,241 shs.; fuel oil, 7,137,610 shs. ; 
motor spirit (petrol), 3,226,956 shs. ; mineral oil, illuminat- 
ing or burning (kerosene), 1,056.652 shs. 


THE BOARD OF TRADE JOURNAL 97 


Malayan Rubber and Palm 
J 
Oil 
MPORTS of rubber into Malaya during December 
last were as follows :—dry rubber, 20,275 tons and wet 
rubber (dry weight) 5,332 tons, states the Malayan 


Government in London. The leading sources of supply 
are shown in the following table :— 











Country Dry Rubber | Wet Rubber 
Tons Tons 

Sumatra 9,254 4,924 
Dutch Borneo : ee i 2,426 162 
Java and other Dutch Islands ... 1,528 27 
Sarawak a <a ves us 2,938 16 
British North Borneo _... ae 83 — 
Burma ‘aie os a 516 37 
Siam ree a re ae 2,856 63 
French Indo-China foe wae 398 103 
Other countries a 256 — 

Total 20,275 5,332 











Estates Rubber: The production and stocks of rubber 
in Malaya at November 30, 1946, from estates of 100 acres 
and over was as under :— 




















Total Produc- Stocks at 
States tion, May to | November 30 
November 

Perak 24,556 3,118 
Selangor 24,697 4,033 
Negri Sembilan 17,883 2,815 
Pahang 9,410 1,178 
Malacca ; ag io 205 8,586 1,252 
Province Wellesley and Penang... 2,270 268 
Johore 24,636 3,022 
Kedah 18,985 2,303 
Perlis 136 31 
Kelantar 1.942 247 
Trengganu ... 494 90 

Total 133,595 18,657 








Rubber Exports: Ocean shipments of rubber from 


Malaya in December 1946 were as under :— 











Sheet Latex concentrated 
Country and Latex reverted 

crepe (Dry rubber content) 
Tons Tons 
United Kingdom 4,311 485 
United States... 4 43,061 —- 
Continent of Europe... 6,434 36 
British Possessions ... 5,541 1 
Other Countries 9,294 — 
Total 68,641 522 











Palm Oil: In the period May to November 30, 1946, 
production of palm oil in Malaya (states of Perak, Selangor, 
Negri Sembilan, Pahang, Johore and Kelantar,) amounted 
to 9,206-1 long tons as compared with 37,836-1 long tons 
and 34,141 long tons at the corresponding date of 1940 and 
1939. 


The production of palm kernels in these periods totalled 
549-3 long tons, 2,975-3 long tons and 3,883-6 long tons. 

Stocks of palm oil at the end of November 1946 totalled 
1,751-0 long tons and of palm kernels, 346-9 long tons. 


In November last 29 estates were in production out of a 
total of 46 oil palm estates. 











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available to approved new firms or visiting representatives of Provincial or Overseas concerns 


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98 


CLASSIFIED 





THE BOARD OF TRADE JOURNAL 





18 January 1947 


INDEX 


January—December, 1946 


Dev  segaeeeee areas as centres of peace time industry, 


T oF 8 estates’ place in changing industrial 
structure, 69. 
South Wales is turning over to new industries, 93. 
Big factory schemes approved for North-East 
coast, 125. 
Scotland’s capital asset of skill in engineering, 157. 
West Cumberland offers opportunities for new light 
industries, 189. 
Belgian trade recovery from German occupation, 
2 89. 
Profitable Danish market for U.K. 
consumer goods, 321. 
Fusion of Department of Overseas Trade with 
Board of Trade, 353. 
Proposed international exhibition in London in 
1951, 385. 
Preparing the ground for international conference 
on trade, 45: 


capital and 








Special Articles 


French progress toward industrial recovery from 
war, 


aes: States as post-war market for British exports» 


am... in industrial building, 641. 
= part in the recovery of liberated peoples, 


How Board of Trade Regional] Offices help industry, 
Regional Board’s service to peace-time industry, 
849 


Why industrial research is essential to Britain’s 
prosperity, 965. 

on = industry has a three-fold part to play, 
10 

Onpettentines for industry in a new development 
area, 1113. 


Industrial pce in the Wrexham development 
area, 1189 





Wartime factory and storage premises returned to 
industry, 1221. 

Northern Ireland profits by wartime industrial 
lessons, 1253 

at ganad for new industries on Merseyside, 


—* assets of coal and skilled population, 


Aputentain of design tradition to machine-produced 
furniture, 1529. 


Problems of design in plastics, 1613. 
An analysis of the raw materials position, 1653. 
Industrial opportunities in North Staffordshire, 1757 


Opportunities for industrialists in the Furness 
area, 1805. 


Progress in the development areas, 1849. 
rine ee the partial census of production for 1946, 
te. 





Great Britain and Northern Ireland 


Agricultural machinery : control modified, 726. 
Implements: exports, 1070. 
Air services: 576, 698, 731, 783, 

1255, 1327, 1405, 1444. 
Freight rates: 758. 

Aircraft engine testing, 30. 

Anglo-Greek Property Agreement, 378 

Anglo-Swiss Monetary Agreement, 1667. 

Animals: imports of live, 8. 

Assurance Companies Act, 1946, 1222. 

Beeswax : distribution of, 141. 

Bedding Manufacture Directions, 
1536 

Biscuits: exports, 109, 336. 

Bicycles: part in war-time transport, 24. 

Production, 1765. 

Board of Trade : 

Appointments and resignations : 
Central Price Regulation Committee, 691. 
1.M.2B., 862. 
Official Receivers, 52, 270, 1300. 
Pottery Working Party, 5 5. 
Public Relations, 1714. 
Resignations, 109, 323, 328, 386, 531. 
Secretariat, 814, 1233. 
Timber control, 433, 788, 819. 

I. & M.1.: change of address, 1300. 

Hosiery Control: address, 1082. 

Raw Materials Department: transfer, 354, 402. 
Scandinavia: Mr. Marquand’s visit, 13. 
Borrowing programme : Government, 1479. 

Bristles : purchase, 1946. 

Procedure under Control Order, 1443. 

“ Britain Can Make It” Exhibition, 131, 238, 265, 
458, 659, 782, 1019, 1362, 1592, 1656, 1664, 1816. 

British E xport Trade Research Organization, 364. 

British Industries Fair, 603, 1809. 

British Institute of Management, 328, 386. 

British Standards Specifications, 9, 31, 53, 110, 140, 
167, 198, 233, 301, 337, 402, 433, 532, 575, 621, 
691, 730, 758, 789, 819, 864, 939, 984, 1082, 112 22, 

1199, 1265, 1300, 1367, 1408, 1444, 1488, 15. 51, 
1596, 1777, 1816, 1907. 
Bromine : purchases, 660. 
Builders’ joinery, 111, 466. 
Manufactured goods, 864, 1223. 
Building : 
Control of civil, 111, 984. 
Materials, 47, 661, 684, 818. 
Priorities, 299. 
Regulations, 1030. 

Bunting: coupon free cotton, 660. 

Business Training Scheme, 570, 930. 

Capital issues, 26, 394, 861, 1083, 1295, 1405, 


1019, 1083, 1234, 


167, 270, 1401, 


1660, 


Cash registers: controls lifted, 903. 
New industry, 29. 
Catering Wages Commission, 966. 
Census of Distribution, 355, 780, 1115 
Census of Production, 356, 1897. 
Cinema audiences : structure of, 688. 
Civil aviation, 496, 576, 1327. 
Technical radio equipment, 738. 
Chain and cable, 75, 140, 1483 
Chemical engineering courses, 1234. 
Claims against enemy countries, 851, 931 1067. 
Clothes’ rationing, 6, 164, 192, 255, 294, 336, 389, 
457, 520, 656, 720, 758, 780, 819, 890, 893, 980, 
984, 1067, 1122, 1233. 
Clothing, service : reconditioned, 107, 1082. 
Stocks, 1856. 
Coal: 
Assessment tribunal, 164. 
Board: National, 293, 864, 936, 1367, 1444, 1817. 
Output : 
British, 104, 230, 332, 462, 648, 786, 972, 1196, 
1834, 1620, 1855. 
European, 114, 238, 937, 
Prices, 903. 
Reserves and production survey, 851. 





Coal to fuel oil conversion, 1077. 

Cochin-China : exports to, 1871. 

Consumer goods: supplies, 74, 196, 230, 331, 533, 
721, 929, 1116, 1291, 1497, 1661, 1851. 

Consumer Rationing (Amendment) Order, 167, 1531. 

Containers and packaging, 788, 1809. 

Containers and Straps Order, 108. 

Corn prices in England and Wales, 10, 31, 53, 110, 
141, 168, 199, 284, 271, 301, 387, 373, 466, 532, 
620, 692, 731, 759, 820, 864, 903, 940, 984, 1082, 
1123, 1170, 1200, 1234, 1301, 1336, 1367, 1408, 
1444, 1489, 1552, 1626, 1668, 1714, 1777, 1817, 
1867, 1 

Corsets, 338, 1193. 

Cost of living index, 73, 225 
1190, 1327, 1481, 

Cotton : 

American: offers of, 108, 198, 901. 

Shipments, 53. 

Balloon and dinghy fabrics, 421. 

Control, 30, 373, 1407, 1596, 1907. 

Cover for spinners, 337. 

Deputation, 520. 

Industry : statistics, 28, 139, 296, 397, 525, 685, 

896, 1078, 1262, 1398, 1594, 1772. 
Government proposals to assist, 1769. 

Manufacturing Commission, 1816, 1866. 

Open Export Scheme, 1435. 

Piece goods for export, 73, 295. 

Prices, 1441. 

Production in the Empire, cal 

Purchase of raw, 322, 692, 

Centralized, 389. 
Weaving Commission : . ee 1714. 

Raw : Committee, 1192, 17 
Council of Industrial Design, 238, 819, 1399. 

ign ’46,” 1656. 

Refresher course for young designers, 1444. 
Coupon floats, 563. 
Coupons : 

Bank account in N - Irel land, 1030, 1263. 

Banking loose, 850, 1331. 

For demobilized, 1443, 1816. 

From Germany and Austria, 1704. 

“ Industria] ten,”’ 1193, 1703. 

Refunds on 0.8. outerwear, 1019. 

Replacements, 1067. 

Retailers, 602. 

Turquoise: invalid, 1407. 

Type E Certificates, 1619. 

Type K Certificates, 1122. 

Currency notes: import and export, 1488. 

Cutlery : spoons and forks control, 930. 

Damar and gum damar: control, 1233. 

Deaf aids, 433, 574. 

Demobilization Outfits Advisory Panel, 1119. 

Derequisitioning of warehouses, 812, 854 

Development areas : see special articles. 

Factory building progress, 936. 

Factory building schemes in N.E., 615. 

Financial aid for firms, 1582. 

Industria] o portunities, 569. 

Proposals of new, 46. 

Treasury Advisory Committee, 1667. 
Diamonds, 354, 1033. 

Disabled Persons Quota Scheme, 

Dish-cloth yarn, 1816. 

Eastern Group Supply Council: dissolution, 407. 

Economic information: exchange of, 891. 

Elastic, 372, 814. 

Electric torch dry batteries, 1853. 

Employment and unemployment figures, 71, 229, 
a 613, 784, 979, 1296, 1533, 1593, 1709, 


322, 497, 689, 820, 976, 
1706, 1898. 


232, 1231. 


Enemy countries : claims against, 851, 931, 1067. 
Enemy stocks: Shanghai, 118. 
Engineering standards, 271, 302. 
Work Order, 132, 237, 402, 428, 466, 498, 
621, 781, 898, 1083, 1192, 1327, 1868. 





Exchange control, 660. 
Excess Profits Tax Advisory Panel, 1616. 
Exhibitions and Fairs, 16, 63, 89, 120, 153, 185, 211, 
249, 281, 317, 347, 382, 411, 447, 476, 512, 548, 
592, 637, 672, 704, 744, 773, 802, 840, 881, 917, 
953, 1008, 1046, 1107, 1152, 1180, 1216, "1249, 
1279, 1318, 1349, 1384, 1417, 1469, 1510, 1561, 
1606, 1639, 1673, 1739, 1801, 1831, 1880, 1917. 
Export : conference on, 1615. 
Export Credits Guarantees, 24, 280, 434, 469, 630, 
795, 931, 1192, 1405. 
Export groups, 477, 617, 902. 
Export licensing 
Biscuits, 109, 336. 
Changes, 468, 603, 1227, 1435, 1708. 
Change of address, 531. 
Confectionery, 1075. 
Harris tweed, 1777. 
Parcels for abroad, 389, 1359, 1788. 
Past and present, 779. 
Processed foods, 571. 
Export Officers appointed to assist industry, 99. 
Export Officers: Regional, 1815, 1914. 
Export targets, 255. 
Exports: payments outside sterling area for, 1223. 
Factory and storage : 
Control, 98, 109. 
Allocation, 268, 1115, 1125, 1292, 1434, 1532, 1806 
Building projects, 618, 1328, 1550. 


Fertilizers : control of, 862. 
Films: 
British : for circuit exhibition, 1396. 


Industry, 323. 

Photographic, 1663. 

Quota returns for 1945, 642. 

Raw cinema stock, 861, 1123. 

Registration of British and foreign, 720, 952, 1004! 
1047, 1108, 1120, a 1196, 1232, 1261, 1293, 
1334, 1364, 1401, 42) 1490, 1550, 1587, 1624 
1662, 1710, 1765, i814, "1863, 1901. , 

Sound prints, 108. 

Studio equipment : 

Fishery statistics : 

Kire, 110, 234. 

England and Wales, 141, 
1019, 1535. 

Palestine, 273, 737. 

Scotland, 110, 191. 

Food Machinery Industrial and Export Group, 223. 
Footwear production: control, 729. 
Footwear : 

Coupon-free, oo 1164, 1488. 

Coupon rates, ¢ 

Cricket boots, oop. 

Forged purchase orders, 465. 

Prices, 1162, 

Profits, 30. 

ir licences, 9, 167, 862. 

Rubber, 980, 1443, 1488. 

Safety boots, 1366. 

Slipper and sandal soles, 1663. 

Style restrictions, 372. 

Wooden-soled, 1293. 

Fuel Efficiency “aang 861. 

Gas producers, 938. 

Fur apparel: register of manufacturers, 30. 

Directions, 750, 972, 1479, 1907. 

Furniture : 

Dutch, 1777. 

Fireguards, 939. 

Prices of Government surplus, 4. 

Reconstruction licences, 98. 

Special occasional, 863, 891. 

Utility, 259, 269, 270, 300, 301, 302, 336, 372, 521 
2, 620, ’812, ‘928, 1119, 1122, 1195, 1298, 1336, 

vite. 1487, 1479, 1480, 1708, 1815, 853. 

y: makers of, 334, 435, 582, 
1075, 1422, 1440, 1705 78, 074, 1068, 
Furniture and timber : imports, 902, 
Gall nuts: imports, 984. 


surplus, 107, 935, 1018. 


265, 394, 520, 688, 861 








[947 


es oes S 














18 January 1947 


Gin, 7 
Glue, n= and size: Order, 86 
a action in Wales ey “Monmouthshire, 


Government’s borrowing programme, 1470. 
9 


Handkerchiefs for the forces, 2 

Hand-knitting yarn, 1703. 

Hardware and ironmongery prices, 1198. 

Hire P aaa and credit sale agreement, 233, 531, 


Hollow-ware aluminium, 620. 
Galvanized, 1765. 
Hotel equipment, 323, 1808, 1899. 
Import Duties Order, 1444, 1667. 
—_ licensing : 
nimals, live, 8. 
Books and printed matter, 660, 1899. 
Bulbs, 464, 645, 1486. 
Canes and rattans, 1407. 
Caviare, 1703. 
Chicory, endive and lettuce, 620. + 
Cobalt oxide, 1407, 
Consolidation of regulations 753. 
Consumer goods, 1397, 1441. 
Cotton and rayon yarns, 1486. 
Crystallized fruits, flowers, etc., 1551. 
Dates, walnuts and chestnuts, 1336. 
Dressed goose skins, 1853. 
Fancy goods from France, 1776. 
Fish and fish products, 1537. 
Flowers, cut, and mistletoe, 1625. 
Fresh grapes, pearg and tomatoes, 1291, 1407. 
Fruit and vegetables, 279, 464, 939, 1532. 
Gherkins and onions, 433, 1666. 
Gift parcels, 1117. 
Goods for repair and re-export, 26. 
Returned in same state as exported, 279. 
Grapes, 782. 
Hollow-ware, 1765. 
Mandarines and clementines, 1336. 
Mercury, 1615. 
Monazite sand, 1300. 
Onions, 788. 
Open general a. 1899. 
Periodicals, 112 
Prawns, Secwamia, 730. 
Precious and semi- -precious stones, 782. 
Raw drugs and gherkins, 1666. 
Raw materials and raw drugs, 279. 
Silk and rayon, 357, 602. 
Spices, 1770. 
Transhipment licences, 1199. 
Walnuts in brine, 660, 782. 
Wet walnuts in shell, 1336, 1667. 
Woolled sheepskins, 691. 
Wool yarn, 337. 
Yerba mate, 1407. 
Import trade, re-opening, 425. 
Imports and exports, narrowing gap : 
Mr, Marquand, 781. 
Imports from countries hit by the war, 1480. 
Industrial projects in South Wales, 563. 
Industrial property, International convention for 
protection, 301, 1083, 1817. 
Industrial salvage and recovery, 237. 
Information for exporters on overseas markets, 364. 
Information for U.K. exporters, 14, 38, 56, 212, 364, 
738, 833, 913, 949, 1034, 1094, 1131, 1175, 1239, 
1273, 1316, 1345 —_ 1415, 1554, 1608, 1629, 
1668, 1720, 1873, 19 
International trade a cece 1364, 1437, 


statement by 


Tronfounding industry, labour for, 4. 
Tron and Steel Board: appointment, 1256. 
Iron and Steel : 
Control of, 8, 642, 863, 984, 1122, een 1359, 1551. 
Government. proposals, 496, 617, 116 
Production, 191, 464, 787, "937, 1170, "1299, 1441, 
1666, 1851. 
Jute, raw, and jute goods, 30, 1029, 1223. 
Kerosene (paraffin), priority ‘scheme, 966. 
a duty: see Safeguarding of Industries 
er. 
Labelling Order : pecgemed extension, 1170. 
Lace, 140, 1018, 13 
Lactic casein, 730, 788, 
Laundry, dyeing and i directorates, 76, 1067, 
1199, a + 488. 
Lead, 50, 76, 2 
Leather, ’30, Py ‘574, 603, 864, 891, 935, 1199. 
lighters, mechanical, 225, 336. 
“ Lighting and Colour in Industry, ” 642. 
Light metals industry, 689, 1259. 
Linoleum and floorcloth, 1814. 
Liverpool, employment needs, 1067. 
Local Purchase Orders, 903. 
Location of Industry (Restriction) Order, 98. 
Lyons, transport delegation, 1290. 
Machine tools, 109, 354, 498, 657, 788, 940, 1029, 
1122, 1124, 1162, 1170, 1223, 1404, 1664, 1851. 
Machine Tools "Advisory Council, 434, 820, 903. 
Main line traffic receipts, 857, 1079, 1194, 1331, 1487, 
1663, 1906. 
Mercury, control, 1170, 1615. 
Metal polishers, 1867. 
Mica, directorate, 10, 1714. 
Disposal of stocks, 755. 
Mineral development committee, 1074. 
Mining scholarships, 164, 937 
Ministry of Food : 
Almeria grapes, 159 
yo age ogg 863, Sos, 1030. 
Apples, 12 
Ascorbic suid (Vitamin C), 1866. 
Boxed fresh fish, 1030, 1199, 1366, 1551. 
Cauliflower and broccoli, 1625. 
Cocoa, raw, 939. 
Concessions for travellers, 1580. 
Dutch mussels and cockles, 1366. 
Fels, 1083, 1551. 
Egg contract with Canada, 1407. 
Eggs from Poland, 1488. 
Feeding stuffs, 788, 1366, 1551. 
Foodstuffs, export. sales, 621. 
Food supplies from Eire, 1407. 
Fresh fruit and vegetables, 1121. 
Fresh-water fish, 1625. 
Glace cherries, om 
Ginger, preserved, 1 
Imported fruit and titans 
— imported, 788. 
home-grown, 1407. 
jal 1625. 


allocations, 1479. 





Ministry of Food—(continued) : 
Meat from Denmark, 1488, 
Oils and a 863, 1443. 
Onions, 1596. 
Oysters from Holland, 1551. 
Plums, 1596. 
Pepper, 7 766. 
Rum, 984, 1817, 1907. 
Salmon, 903. 
Sausage casings, 1907. 
Soap, hard, 939. 
Soft Drinks Order, 863. 
Soft Fruit Orders, 788. 
Tangarine and Mandarin oranges, 1407. 
Tomatoes, 938, 1443. 
Trout from Denmark, 1907. 
Wine from Spain and Portugal, 1300. 
Wines and spirits: Cyprus, 1336. 
Ministry of Fuel and Power : 
Appointments, 53, 1817. 
Fuel Efficiency Committee, 8 
South Wales Mines and pon Division, 936. 
Miners’ Welfare Commission, 937. 
oe Coal Board: appointments, 1367, 1444, 
1 


Ministry of Labour: 
Catering Wages Commission : 
Factories Act, 1937: 271. 
Help for Employers, 617. 
Paper and paper board industry, 498. 

Releases from the forces, 1534, 1908. 

Resettlement advice, 199. 

Ministry of Supply : 

Appointments, 389, 648, 863, 1817. 

Aluminium, 433, 575, 1070, 1265. 

American army socks, 1193. 

Binder twine, 336. 

Bolts, nuts and screws, 789, 1122. 

Brass scrap, 1233 

Cadmium, 819. 

Cash registers, 903. 

Chrome ores and concentrates, 10, 863. 

Clocks and watches, 1328. 

Clothing for demobilised servicemen, 6. 

Copper, 576, 1854. 

Cotton, 30. 

Cotton spinning, 373. 

Council of Industrial Design, 819. 

Diamond wire drawing dies, 52. 

Electrical equipment, 198. 

Electrode position, 498. 

Gauge and tool Advisory a. 1759. 

Hides, skins and leather, 3 

Tron and steel control, 8, 45, 863, 984, 1122, 1336, 
1359, 1551. 

Kapok, 336. 

Lactic casein, 76. 

Lead: ar and scrap, 76. 

Light metals, 1233 

Machinery, plant ‘and appliances, 903. 

Machine tools, 498, 788, 903, 940, 1029, 1122, 1124. 
1162, 1170, 1228, 1664. 

Mission in Washington, 52. 

Newsprint, 31. 

Non-ferrous metals, 302, 402, 433, 434, 464, 730, 
858, 863, 1123, 1170, 1266, 1481, 1626, 1663, 
1666. 

Paper, 372. 

Penicillin, 621, 689, 984, 1488. 

Pre-fabricated roadway, 1625. 

Rag control, 372. 

Regional auction sales, 1710, 1713. 

Regional controllers, 10, 30, 270, 1714. 

Roval Ordnance Factory, Hayes, 1123. 

Rubber, 337. 

Scrap metal prices, 10. 

Sheet steel for motor industry, 1480. 

Surplus vehicles, 1593. 

Surplus garments, 119: 

Tale and pyrophyllite, i098, 402. 

Textile bags, 372. 

Timber, 433. 

Tin, 31, 337, 378, 1233. 

Tungsten and molybdenum ores, 1170. 

Weaving margins, 76. 

Woodworking * eamaaeie 1233. 

Wool, 402. 43 

Ministry of anaes rt: 

Appointments, 10, 575, 864, 940, 984. 

Drivers’ hours, 164. 

Express coach services, 29. 

Tnsurance of motor goods vehicles, 73. 

Motor vehicle licence duties, 1863. 

Reconditioned load-carriers, 164. 

Road haulage and hire charges, 1706. 

Road transport of goods, 1123. 

Sea passages, 1539, 1855. 

Taxation receipts from road vehicles, 143. 

Wider public passenger vehicles, 164. 

Miscellaneous Goods Order, 1704. 

Molasses and — Alcohol Control Order, 8, 

141, 819, 1714, 190 
meee? Agreement, G nited Kingdom—Portugal, 


report, 199. 


Monthi Digest of Statistics, 269. 
Motor Vehicles, 328, 455, 531, 562, 1364, 1593. 
Musical instrnments, 620. 
Music While You Work Agreement, 108, 140. 
National gas turbine establishment, 864. 
National Production Advisory — 1704. 
Narrow fabrics control, 1083, 1714 
Navicerts and certificates of origin, 897, 1362. 
Nickel supplies, 270. 
Non-ferrous metals, consumption in 1945, 300. 
Nucleus certificates, cancellation, 862. 
Nylon, 1397. 
Overseas trade guarantees, 381, 1241. 
Packaging. conference on, 1617. 
Packing of “ hazardous” cargoes, 660. 
Paint distribution scheme, 1019. 
Paver: 
Advertising posters, 1 
Control of, 372, 758, 1333, 1366, 1580, 1662, 1706. 
For local elections, 1165. 
Newsprint, 31. 
Periodicals, 1404. 
Prices, 8, 164, 1067. 
Toilet, 8. 
Paper-making, straw for, 1082. 
Parachute canopies, disposal, 4, 520, 566, 1617, 1812. 
Parliamentary Questions, 73, 102, 136, 165, 193, 226, 
297, 329, 370, 387, 423, 456, 495, 519, 561, 600, 
643, 682, 717, 751, 780, 815, 859, 899, 932, 982, 





THE BOARD OF TRADE JOURNAL 99 





Parlia tary Questi (continued) : 
1021, 1079, 1403, 1438, 1484, 1538, 1588, 1624, 
1656, 1707, 1763, 1813, 1864, 1900. 

Patent applications by ‘German and Japanese 
nationals, 1620. 

Patents and Designs Acts—See Statutory Notices. 

Patent laws, revision, 426, 655. 

Pelts, control of, 939, 984. 

Penicillin, 621, 689, 984, 1488. 

Pens, fountain, 425, 465. 

Pepper, exports to Latin America, 766. 

Perambulators, 372, 895, 981, 1256, 1480, 1614, 

Petrol rationing relaxations, 937. 

Pine tar, 788, 1764. 

Photographic pee 73, 1663. 

Plastic sheeting, 1531, 1534. 

Postal information : 

—" under-payment on letters, 1580,°1617, 

166 


Austria, correspondence with, 13, 31, 141, 1029. 
Christmas mails, 1336, 1408, 1817 
Commemorative peace stamps, 758. 
Denmark, postage rates, 234. 
Dutch East Indies, mail, 302, 903. 
European = summary, 1533. 
Formosa, 
French Tado-China, 373, 1233. 
Germany, 403, 1408, 1817. 
Gifts from overseas, 199, 234. 
Hong Kong, insured letter and box service, 31. 
Italy and Vatican City gift service, 1266. 
Japan, 1443. 
H.M. Forces in Australia and New Zealand, 31. 
H.M. Forces in Germany, 1199. 
Korea, 1336. 
Loss of mails, 234, 271, 1443. 
Mail services, 687. 
Persian Gulf, mail service, 9. 
Philippines mail — 168, 1123. 
Poland, postal, 6 
Postal rates, 780 
Radio, extension of frequency bands, $37. 
Sending gifts abroad, 6. 
Telecommunication Conference, 731. 
Wireless licences, 234. 
World communications, 686. 
Air mail: 

Baltic States, 621. 

Canada, 1170. 

Central America, 863, 1170. 

Czechoslovakia, 621. 

Dutch East Indies, 234. 

Eire, 26. 

Faroe Islands, 1234. 

French Indo-China, 661. 

Foreign countries, 1115, 1266. 

Germany, 1233 

Hungary, 621. 

Korea, 1443. 

Labels, 199. 

Leaflets, 758. 

Liberia, 1123. 

Portuguese Timor, 144 

South America, 110, a7: 3, 863, 1170. 

Macao, 403. 

West Africa, 234 

West mcr 373, 863, 1170. 

U.S.A., 
Postal a motey order service : 

Belgium, 7 

Gibraltar, 76. 

Hong Kong and Malaya, 76, 109. 

Switzerland, 575. 
Postal order shortage, 1866. 
Parcel post : 

Austria, 1200. 

Brunei, 1301. 

Burma, 789, 1301. 

Ceylon, 575. 

China, 234. 

Czechoslovakia, 31. 

Far East, 76. 

Gibraltar (C.0.D.), 109. 

Greece, 1443, 1862, 1899. 

Hong Kong, 440. 

Hungary, 1266. 

India, 1712, 1855, 1899. 

Malay States, 498. 

North Borneo, 1301. 

Overseas, 1359. 

Sarawak, 1301. 

Siam, 498. 

Straits Settlements, 498. 

Telephone enquiries about parcels, 1866. 

U.S.S.R., 1688. 

Yugoslavia, 1082. 
Telegraph service : 

Albania, 271. 

Italian Somaliland, 9. 

Japan, 498, 532. 

Poland, 661, 199. 

Radio telegrams with ships at sea, 9. 

U.S.A., 53, 

U.S. Zone in Germany, 1 1552, 
Telephone : 

Argentina, 373. 

Atlantic liners, 863. 

Austria, 984. 

Barbados, 1777. 

Bermuda, 234. 

Bolivia, 1552. 

Brazil, 302. 

Bulgaria, 1443. 

Canada, 1199. 

Ceylon, 10. 

Chile, 1170. 

Continental telephones, 1552 

Czechoslovakia, 1233. 

Denmark, 110, 234. 

Dutch Guiana, 731. 

Gibraltar, 789. 

Holland, 110, 498. 

Hungary, 1233. 

Iceland, 1170. 

International telephone service, 688, 1816. 

Traq, 1866. 

Italy and Vatican City Bank, 110, 1408. 

Ttalian Somaliland, 9. 

Luxemburg, 31. 

Newfoundland, 434, 1199. 

North America, 692. 

Norway, 110, 234. 

“On the phone”’ postcards, 1336, 








100 


Postal Information (continued): 
Palestine, 373. 
Paraguay, 1170. 
Peru, 1170. 
Portugal, 302. 
Rumania, 1908. 
Spain, 789. 

Ships at sea, 1366, 1866. 
Sweden, 9, 110, 234 
Switzerland, 9. 
Sudan, 52. 
U.S.A., 53, 76, ge 1714. 
US8.S8. R., 1029, 1123. 
Y ugoslavia, 1234. 
Postal traffic, 29, 144, 271, 435, 719, 858, 897, 1163, 
1263, 1437, 1666, 1806. 
Post Office Advisory Council, 168. 
Appointments, 168. 
Pottery : 
Decorated, 891. 
Domestic, 298. 
Regulations, 966. 
Working party, 75, 132, 646, 681. 
Price contro] : 
Alarm clocks, 980. 
Apparel and textiles, 262, 812, 1582 
Apparel, non-Utility, 331, 937. 
Bedding, 1660, 1662. 
Bristles, 935. 
Carpets, 574. 
Cloth, 684, 1407. 
Electric torch dry batteries, 1265. 
Footwear, 1162. 
Fountain pens, 425, 465. 
Furniture, 300, 891. 
Gloves, 1029, 1199. 
Girdles, pyjama, 1907. 
Harris tweed, 428. 
Hemstitching, 903. 
Handkerchiefs, 691. 
Hardware and’ ironmongery, 531, 862, 1198. 
Knitting pins, 1407. 
Laundry charges, 582, 1199. 
Linoleum and floorcloth, 1814 
Narrow fabrics, 939. 
Nylon stockings, 1397. 
Perambulators, 372. 
Regulations, 101, 457, 984. 
Rubber hot water bottles, 1199. 
Sulphuric acid, 1765. 
Textiles, household, 1407, 1814. 
Woodware, domestic, 1368. 

Price regulation committees, local, 1853. 

Production efficiency service, 365, 569, 1436, 1714. 

Publishers Advisory Committee, 930. 

Purchase tax : 

Alterations and exemptions, 976, 1777. 

Bedpans and urinals, 1552. 

Belts, 1301. 

Budget changes, 422. 

Canteens and cases of cutlery, 9. 

Caravans, 1667, 1866. 

Carnival goods, 9. 

Composite goods, 1488. 

Deaf aids, 574. 

Furniture, 731, 820. 

Hair-waving machines, 465. 

Jewellery and imitation jewellery, 1809. 

Meat and food safes, 620. 

Metal lockers, 403, 1083, 1265. 

Miniature medals, 975, 1265. 

Office machinery, 938. 

Organ blowers, 109, 232. 

Passenger gliders, 1667, 1866. 

Rulers, 373. 

Surplus stores, 1301. 

Table tops, 1668. 
Publications received, 17, 


64, 89, 120, 282, 315, 346, 
403, 507, 


549, 635, 674, 737, 771, 800, 842, 878, 






916, 940, § 1083, 1123, 1200, 1241, 1266, 
1301, 1336, 2, 1408, 1437, 1489, 1559, 1626, 
1668, 1720, 1777, 1817, 1867, 1908. 


Radio active substance es, 1364. 
Ramie, 270. 
Raw materials : 
Charges, 400. 
Supplies, 1068. 
Guide, 1708. 
See special articles. 
Rayon cloth goods for export, 135. 
Rayon industry, 28, 100, 265, 399, 569, 723, 893, 
1070, 1164, 1263, 1399, 15) 5, 1776. 
Reconversion and civilian expansion, 
429, 608, 660, 813, 1069, 1482, 1537. 
Red squill imports, 52, 1266, 1768. 
Refresher course for young designers, 144 
Regional Boards for industry, 109, 140, 1082, 1162, 





1, 100, 259, 


Registered exporters, 140. 
Reparations from Germany, 1024, 1080, 1124, 1166, 
1198, 1770. 
Research : 
The firm with a research department, 390. 
a research affects production costs, 
af 
Modernization of processes and plant, 499. 
Conversion of the results of research into produc- 
tion, 526. 
Why indust rial research is essential to Britain’s 
prosperity, 965. 
Retail margins on apparel and textiles, 1019. 
Rochester, alternative industries for, 818, 854. 
Rolls Royce, Hillington factory, 234, 1814. 
Resin, control of natural, 1233. 
Reviews of British trade prospects overseas, 13. 
Rosin, gum and wood, 167, 1759. 
R.0.F. Exhibition, 1764. 
Rubber: 
Allocations, 1405. 
Consultative committee, 337. 
Delegation to U.S.A., 1290. 
Malayan, purchase, 518, 1359. 
Statistics, 1449. 


Argentina: 


BELGIUM : 
Commercial Protocol, 998. 
Financial Agreement, 999. 





THE BOARD OF TRADE JOURNAL 


Rubber (continued): 

Prices, 337, 851. 

Private trade to be resumed, 1580. 

Purchase agreement, 730. 

Purchase of Far East, 824. 

Relaxation of controls, 814, 1663. 

Study group, 1619. 

Thread, 1714. 

Tyres, 684. 

Rugs, 1366. 
Ruhr coalfields, technical mission, 1866. 
Safeguarding of Industries Order 
Key industry duty, 7, 232, 520, 819, 1120, 1623, 
1660, 1714, 1906. 
— instruments, inter-departmental committee, 
> 2. 
Site clearance in Wales, 1299. 
Shanghai, enemy stocks, 118. 
Shipbuilding : 

British, FP sare 195, 530, 1586. 

Foreign, 5 | 
Shipping 1 a 89, 237, 357, 495, 688, 814 | 
901, 1130, 1835, 1587, 1703, 1862. | 
Shipping documents, delay in delivery, 782. 

Shipping movements at United Kingdom ports, 





150d, 1780 895, 604, 724, 855, 1025, 1229, 1360, 

154 

Shipping on the prohibited list, 91, 214, 251, 414 
551, 746, 878. 


Shipping services, 723. 

Ships’ stores dealers, 30, 108, 574, 1082, 1808. 

Silk duties (drawback) Order, 1366. 

Sisal, 758, 862. 

Sports goods, 657, 691, 1667. 

Steel shelters, 1714. 

Soviet trade representation in United Kingdom, 1359. 

Staggering of holidays, 130. 

Statutory Notices : 

Patents and designs acts, $9, 121, 154, 184, 316, 

846, 365, 407, 446, 465, 472, 549, 685, 706, 771, 
800, 842, 915, 1006, 1047, 1095, 1125, 1217, 
1277, 1315, 1418, 1451, 1511, 1563, 1608, 
1674, 1788, 1880, 1878, 1914. 

Streptomy cin, 1 1328. 

Btyle resteiotions, 262, 889, 465, 569, 719 

8 





urplus 
Aircraft, 726, 1812. 
Blankets, 1532. 
Clocks and watches, 1328. 
Garments, 1193. 
Machine tools, 312, 657, 788, 820, 940, 1124, 1162, 
1170, 1223, 1851. 
Stores, 198, 368, 889, 1300, 1301, 1480, 1654. 
Utility furniture, 602, 812. 
Vehicles, 323, 1364, 1593. 
Wool pile cloth, 1255. 
Technical staff training, 935. 
Textile bags, 76, 574. 
Designs, 1257. 
Machinery industry, 817. 
Textiles, restrictions on export, 814. 
“ Thermos ”’ flasks, 372, 691, 1082. 
Timber : 
Controls, 498, 930, 1265 
1660, 1854. 
Hardwood supplies, 1665. 
Home-production department, 1759. 
Imported softwood prices, 141, 270, 660. 
Mining, 1018. 
Production, home, 52, 1759. 
Trade in Scotland, 689. 
Tin, 240, 759, 910, 1164, 1197, 1233, 1255, 
i397, 1415, 1420, 1483, 1532, 1549, 1768, 
Toilet preparations, 130, 788, 1119, 1407. 
Token imports : 
Belgium, 1034. 
Canada, 425. 
France, Denmark and Sweden, 1582. 
Holland, 1615. 
Luxemburg, 1865. 
Supplementary list, 1330, 1536, 1655, 
Switzerland, 1194. 
United States of America, 907. 
Torch and lamp cases, 620. 
Tourist trade, 1067, 1368. 
Towels and udder cloths for milk producers, 498. 
Toys, 26, 101, 
Trade agreements and arrangements : 
United Kingdom : 
Argentina, 315, 780, 1290, 1435. 
Chile, 915. 
European countries, 438. 
France, 1290, 1590 
Siam, 13. 
U.S.S.R., 1256 
Trade, British : 
Imports and exports price index, 417, 522, 612, 
688, 901, 1020, 1194, 1330, 1550, 1712, 1903. 
Overseas : November (1945), 2, 
February, 324, March, 489, April, 650, 
May, 809, June, 925, July, 1157, August, 
1285, September, 1473, October, 1657, Novem- 
ber, 1857. 
Distribution: Ist quarter, 654, 
1160, 3rd quarter, 1701. 
Reviews of trade, 256, 292, 489, 
Retail: (1945), November, 21, December, 133, 
(1946), January, 260, Annual review, 358, 
February, 392, March, 564, April, 713, May, 
852, June, 1072, July, 1224, August, 1393, 
September, 1577, October, 1773, Independent 
retailers, 1433, 1481, 1581, 1766. 
Wholesale prices: (1945), December, 25, Year, 
48, (1946), January, 142, February, 266, 
March, 432, April, 568, May, 756, June, 
894, July, 1076, August, 1260, September, 
1400, October, 1584, November, 1811. 
Wholesale textiles, 27, 138, 264, 398, 567, 
892, 1071, 1228, 1402, 1591, 1771. 


, 1300, 1366, 1488, 1551, 


1362, 
1770. 


1854. 


, 1307, 1587. 


January, 224, 


2nd quarter, 
557, 967, 1013. 


722, 





Buyers, special facilities at “‘ Britain Can Make 
It,” 1593. 


18 January 1947 


Trade : 
Discussions between United Kingdom, Brazil and 
Argentina, 1339. 

International, and employment, 1364, 1437, 1764. 

Literature overseas, 349, 506, 698. 

Openings for British, 14, 38, 56, 212. 364, 738, 833, 
$13, 949, 1034, 1094, 1131, 1175, 1239, 1273, 
1316, 1345, rg 1415, 1554, 1608, 1629, 1668, 
1720, 1873, 19 

Registers for British, 76, 198, 402. 

Research department, 223. 

Reviews of British trade prospects overseas, 13. 

Trade and shipping publications, 213. 
Trade with : 

Austria, 1117, 1204. 

French Indo-China, 762. 

Holland, 307. 

Hungary, 1204, 1627, 1655. 

Japan, 1204, 1853. 

Malaya, 147, 1718. 

Netherlands East Indies, 1023, 1117. 

Polan@, 908. 

Siam, 309, 345, 795. 

Transport delegation from Lyons, 1290. 
Tung oil, 1199 

Turpentine, increase in prices, 1531. 
Trading with the Enemy : 

Black List Amendments, 191, 462, 771. 

China, 55. 

Claims against + wen debtors (Treuhand 

agency), 377, 

Denmark, war fae 759. 

German assets outside Germany, 232. 

Removals of more T.W.E. controls : 

Trade with Austria, 1117. 
French Indo-China, 762. 
Hungary, 1204. 
Japan, 1204 
Netherlands’ East Indies, 1117. 
Poland, 
7 ithdrawal of statutory list, 897. 
ugoslavia, restoration Vf property, 77, 1033. 
-R.A, exports by, 572, 808, 1084 
villiy 
Apparel, 8, 76, 301, 609, 684, 812, 
934, 939, 981, 1029, 1162, 1233, 1582, 
1663, 1708, 1759. 


919, 893, 
1615, 


907. 

Bedding, 167, 270, 1401, 1536. 

Chairs, 29. 

Cloth allocations, 498. 

Cloth and household textiles, 295, 851, 862, 1199, 

1255, 1300, 1407, — 

Cotton parachute quilts, 6 

Curtain cloths, 198, 354, S74; 1082, 1615, 1704. 

Furniture, see ‘under F. 

Gloves, 1115, 1199. 

Handkerchiefs, 660. 

Knitted fabrics, 730. 

Knitted goods, 270, 939, 1536, 1620. 

Metal fittings and handles, 903. 

Non-wool apparel cloth, 109, 570, 1759. 

Rugs, pram, 1366. 

Towels, 301. 

Upholstery cloth, 52, 301, 

1615, 1704. 

Waterproofs, 903. 

Wool blankets, 465, 497, 563, 984 
Visas, France, 1435, 1615. 
Wales and Monmouthshire, 

1549. 

Site clearance, 1299. 

War Damage Commission, 31, 46, 72, 
620, 1030, 1364, 1487. 

Welsh Industries Fair, 752, 1359. 

Wheat, 200. 

World production, 666, 765, 910. 

United Kingdom—Canada Agreement, 1088. 
Whisky, 730. 

Protection of “ Scotch,”’ 1443. 

Why Britain has to Export 75 per cent. more than 
before the war, 1329. 
Wool: 

Auctions, 1255. 

Cloth allocations, 30, 337 

Cloth for export, 1150. 

International talks, 1396. 

Khaki and R.A.F. clippings, 1122. 

Levy, revocation, 862. 

Pile cloth, 1255. 

Prices of 1946 clip, 727. 

Prices orders, 1119, 1712. 

Relaxation of control, 1223. 

Textile industry, 611. 

War-time stocks, 1119. 

United Kingdom—Dominion Wool 

Ltd., 645, 1164. 
Yarn and cloth, 30. 
Woolled sheepskins, 691. 
Woollen and worsted clippings, 727, 1082. 
Working parties, 5, 29, 290, 421, 495, 758, 895. 

Boot and shoe, 1191. 

Carpet, 455. 

China clay, 532. 

Clothing, 130, 386, 455, 720. 

Cotton, 532, 677, 716. 

Cutlery, 1759. 

Furniture, 194, 1618. 

Glassware, 457. 

Hosiery, 46, 1288. 

Jewellery and silverware, 1807. 

Jute, 520. 

Lace, 162, 657. 

Linoleum, 656. 

Pottery, 75, 132, 646, 681. 

Scots woollen, 851. 

Wool, 571. 

World communications, 686. 
Woven non-wool cloth, 1328, 1366. 
X-ray analysis group, 110. 

Yarn, hand-knitting, 1703. 


354, 464, 531, 1082, 


Government action, 


162, 233, 237, 





Customs duty, 59, 408, 591, 949, 1150. 
Exchange rates, 1558. 

Export of hides, 1877. 

Import restrictions, 1721, 1823. 

Motor vehicles, 5, 45, 700, 1414. 


Overseas Countries 


Nationalization of bagging material, 914, 949, 1450. 


Storage of goods in customs warehouses, 87. 
Trade discussions with U.K. and Brazil, 1839. 
Trade relationships, 780. 
Wrapping regulations, 87. 


Disposals, 








18. 


Aus 
Cer 
Cus 
Det 
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and 


93, 
15, 








18 January 1947 


Australia: 
Certificates of origin and interest, 
Customs and excise tariff Fano my 1824, 1874. 
Deferred duties, 173, 633. 
Double taxation relief agreement, 1087, 1626. 
Economic potentialities, 732. 


Imports from sterling areas, restrictions on, 15, 61, 
1anD 1 379, Ye 875, 1247, 1315, 1414, 1670, 
1 


honnehe prohibited, 769. 

Primage duties, 1674, 1827. 

Quarantine prohibitions, 589. 

Queensland sugar output, 587. 

Royal Easter Show, 1913. 

Sales tax, 15, 700. 

Special war duty, 1827. 

Tariff Board references, 119, 379, 409, 444, 475, 670, 
875, 949, 1275, 1382, 1506, 1559, 1602, 1791, 1877. 

Tariff decisions, 443, 740, 1000, 1505, 1671, 1874. 

Trade, 56, 148, 172, 206, 378, 406, 697, 698, 767, 
911, 1131, 1177, 1268, 1271, 1273, 1411, 1630, 
1632, 1870. 

Wool cagume, 56, 172, 1268 1420. 


Austria: 
Payments agreement, 946. 
Restitution laws, 1316. 
Trade, 1117, 1204. 
Trade delegation, 1204, 1256. 


Belgium: 

ARGENTINA 
Commercial Protocol, 998. , 
Financial agreement, 999. 
Import duties, 634, 1308, 1348. 


— and export restrictions, 950, 1343, 1493, 
1559, 


Bermuda: 
Customs tariff modifications, 153. 


Brazil: 

Consumption tax, 209, 545. 

Customs dnties, 173, 278, 914, 1002, 1452. 

Customs clearance charges, 702. 

Import restrictions, 87, 1627. 

Industry and foreign trade, 1171. 

Payments for imports, 1791. 

Tax on merchandise, 153. 

Trade : 
Discusions with U.K and Argentina, 1339. 
With Europe, 274. 


British East Africa: 

KENYA AND UGANDA: 
Bonded stocks, 506, 1410. 
Customs tariff amendments, 1721, 1793. 
Fisheries project, Shimoni, 1629, 1668. 
Invoicing procedure, 669, "1507. 
Trade, 272, 695, 832, 1235, 1509, 1781, 1820. 
Trade requirements and prospects, 693, 

TANGANYIKA: 
Customs tariff amendments, 1721, 1793. 
Import restrictions, 633. 

ZANZIBAR : 
Customs tariff, 1003. 


British Guiana: 
Customs tariff modifications, 1002. 


British India: 

Budget proposals, 589, 1243. 

Capital goods registration scheme, 1414. 

Consumer goods scheme, 242. 

Crop conditions, 34, 58, 80, 118, 274, 303, 376, 
437, 506, 542, 591, 663, 697, 737, 762, 792, 825, 
870, 906, 942, 1130, 1316, 1411, 1446, 1554, 
1601, 1634, 1719, 1783, 1871. 

Oilseed, 1086. 

Rice and jute, 1385. 

Drugs, import and marketing, 1342, 1374. 

Economic controls, 1603. 

Export duty, 1674. 

— restrictions, 380, 510, 875, 1039, 

1374, 1828. 
Open general licence, 209, 243, 380, 445, 669, 
1096, 1376. 

Industrial planning, 376. 

Jute control order, 1448, 1557. 

Market for British goods, 1085. 

Post-war problems, 865. 

Protecive duties, 380, 589. 

Tariff Board, 15, 174, 247, 669, 1039, 1508. 

Tariff values, 152. 

Textile industry, 1912. 

Trade, 149, 170, 241, 274, 303, 1129. 

Trade arrangement, South Africa, 1247. 

Trade Commissioner at Calcutta, 1580, 1907. 

Wholesale price index, 1338. 


1135, 


British West Africa: 


GAMBIA : 
Customs tariff modifications, 59, 1245. 
GOLD COAST: 
Import restrictions, 247. 
NIGERIA : 
Certificates of origin = _— 381. 
Customs tariff, 1002, 
Import restrictions, 7, 
STERRA LEONE: 
Customs tariff, 836, 1093. 


British West Indies: 
ANTIGUA : 
Customs tariff modifications, 313, 1791. 
BAHAMAS : 
Britain's opportunity, 869. 
DOMINICA : 
Exemption of Sea Island cotton, 1791. 
GRENADA: 
Customs duties, 59. 
JAMAIOA: 
Customs tariff modifications, 88, 700, 1174 
Import restrictions, 835. 





THE BOARD OF TRADE JOURNAL 


British West Indies—continued. 


Outlook for expansion of U.K. trade, 1302. 
Tonnage tax, 835. 
ST, LUCIA: 
Customs tariff modifications, 1150. 
St. VINCENT : 
Import restrictions, 1672. 
TRINIDAD : 
Customs tariff modifications, 1039. 
Outlook for British trade, 1337. 
TURKS AND CaIcos ISLANDS: 
Tonnage tax, 590. 


Bulgaria: 
— to shareholders in Bulgarian companies, | 
506. | 


Burma: 
Cargoes shipped for, 634. 
Certificates of origin, 1635. 
Customs tariff, 1636, 1675, 1724. 
Export control, 875. 
Import control, 173, 278, 473, 1002, 1915. 
Tin and wolfram stocks, 275. 


Canada: 

Agricultural programme for 1946, 32. 

Apple production, 1555. 

Book publishing, 798. 

British and foreign investments, 54. 

Budget for 1946, 1133. 

Cattle, importation of, 279. 

Credit agreements, 34. 

Customs rulings, 87. 

Customs tariff, 36, 87, 247, 475, 741, 875, 914, 
1098, 1208, 1450, 1506, 1558, 1722. 

Fur production, 84. 

Goods made in Canada : 
Acids, 158 | 
Axles, 510. | 
Hydraulic bumper jacks, 875 | 
Milling machines, 546. | 
Precision tool room lathes, 173. 

Hydro-electric progress, 109, 118. 

Impact of war and peace on Canadian economy, 

90. 





790. 

Tadustrial diamonds, 1033. 

Industrial expansion, 794. 

Industrial reconversion, 1338. 

Increased selling prospects in , 1304. 

Invoices, preparation of, 1602. 

Marking of imported goods, 914. 

Mexico, commercial treaty, 315. 

Movement of population, 169. 

National accounts, 631. 

National Research “- 57. 

Penicillin, exports of, 6 

Prohibited imports, 36, oo, 879, 475, 545, 769, 914, 
1275, 1374. 

Pulp and paper industry, 826. 

Sterling position 1939-1945, 828. 

Trade with 
Cuba, 11. 
Ecuador, 115. 
Great Britain, 106. 
Latin America, 1306. 
Peru, 201. 
Uruguay, 542. 

Export groups, 84, 151, 171, 1088, 1784. 

Import groups, = 151, 242, 912, 1598, 1634. 

Overseas, 13, 85, 151, 170, 240, 242, 273, 307, 341, 
377, 441, 470, "607, 541, 587, 696, 734, 738, 764, 
767, 824, 833, 912, 946, 1128, 1176, 1206, 1239, 
1241, 1270, 1304, 1447, 1554, 1598, 1633, 1719, 
1783, 1821, 1911. 

Trade Commissioner service, 1634, 1667. 

Valuation for duty purposes, 740. 

Wage rates and labour hours, 1910. 

Wartime Prices and Trade Board, 112, 146, 304, 
624, 763, 909, 987, 1040, 1093, 1118, 1784, 1872. 

Wheat agreement with U.K., 1088. 


Ceylon: 

Import restrictions, 207, 342, 379, 633, 701, 740, 
875, 1001, 1039, 1174, 1275, 1315, 1414, 1722, 
1793, 1878. 

Trade, 768, 871, 1305, 1448, 1871, 1912. 

‘Trade Commissioner, 946, 1410. 


Chile: 
Commercial Treaties : 

Cuba, 174. 

United Kingdom, 915. 
Import restrictions, 1310, 1506. 
Market for U.K. goods, 1201. 
Tariff modifications, 174. 

China: 
Customs regulations, 471, 741. 
Customs tariff, 1174. 
Exchange regulations, 344. 
Import licensing, 1723, 1875. 
Trade mission, 1023, 1122, 1256, 1362, 1911. 


Colombia: 
Exchange regulations, 590. 
Import licensing, 409, 634, 797, 877, 1315, 1829. 
Importation of merchandise by air, 1208. 
Market for U.K. goods, 1715. 
Price control, 546. 


Costa Rica: 
Payments for imports, 1037, 1371. 
Vehicles, standard requirements for imports of, 
7 


Cuba: 
Commercial treaty—Chile, 174. 
Customs duties, 1039. 
Market for U.K. textiles, 1909. 
Sales tax, 545. 
Tax relief, 173. 
Tariff surcharge, 109. 


Cyprus: 
Certificates of origin and interest, 313. 
Customs tariff, 37. 
Importation : 
Jertain mining materials, 769. 
Special boiling point benzine, 1002. 





Water softening apparatus, 1793. 


101 


Czechoslovakia: 

Consignment of goods to, 376. 

Financial claims, 472. 

Import and export duties, 174, 1208, 1828. 

Industrial production, 1033, 1199, 1271, 1341, 
1413, 1600. 

Nationalization, claims for compensation, 1035, 
1 


Securities, declaration and registration, 14, 341. 
Trade, 869, 1033, 1129, 1241, 1373, 1555, 1556. 
Trade revival with U.K., prospects, 1409. 


Dominican Republic: 
Customs tariff modifieations, 1559. 
Economic outlook, 1869. 

Import permits, 59, 278. 


Denmark: 
Danish-British talks, 1667. 
Import licensing, 1238, 1368. 
Trade with South Wales, 407. 
War Damage clains, 759. 


Ecuador: 
Consular Fee Law, 591. 
Customs duties, 62. 
Motor vehicles, tyres and tubes, imports of, 949. 


Egypt: 
British goodwill trade mission, 652. 
Import control, 1002. 
Trade, development of, 821. 


Eire: 

Crop production, 470. 

Customs duties, 86, 87, 546, 703, 741, 834, 1002. 
1672, 1879, 1916. 

Imports, control of, 15, 119, 669. 

Import quotas, 87, 209, 446, 741, 877, 1002, 1208, 
1315, 1414, 1878. 

Shipping, 544. 

Stocks in bonded warehouses, 58, 1338, 1681. 

Trade, 58, 150, 276, 507, 695, 908, 1130, 1845, 
1413, 1631. 


Faroe Islands: 
Import restrictions, 1603. 


Fiji: 
Customs tariff, 36, 278, 702. 
Import restrictions, 88, 669, 741. 


France: 
Currency regulations, 275 
Customs duties, 37. 
Exports to Cochin-China, 1871. 
Import trade, 79, 907, 943 
Import levies, 81. 
Industries : 
Cotton industry in Alsace, 766. 
Electricity, 586. 
Glass, 663. 
Leather, 829. 
Textile, 440. 
Ministry of National Economy, 1817. 
National solidarity tax, 1585. 
Perequation tax, 342. 
Utility manufactures, 586. 


Finland: 


Economic conditions, 1778. 


Germany: 

Banking accounts, 277. 

B.L.0.8. exhibition, 1762, 1809, 1905. 

British purchasing agency, 1483. 

Business visits, 975. 

Enemy assets outside Germany, 232, 1372, 1407. 

Industrial intelligence : 

Abrasives industry, discoveries in, 400. 

Allies’ pooled secrets of German industry, 366. 

Casein plastic production, 1231. 

Cellulose plastic production, 857. 

Dairying methods, 528. 

Fluid power transmission, 459. 

Light metal industry, 430. 

Machine tools, 1583. 

Optical centering and grinding machines, 496. 

Plywood and related products, 1861. 

Pulp, paper, cardboard and related industries, 
1294 

Textile fibre shortage, 728. 

Industrial teams’ reports, 5, 33, 51, 78, 111, 145, 
163, 197, 235, 267, 299, 338, 367, 401, 431, 
460, 497, 529, 5 73, 614, 658, 690, 729, 757, 785, 
818, 858, 902, 931, 977, 1024, 1081, 1125, 1169, 
1198 1232, 1264, 1297, 1331, 1363, 1406, 1442, 
1490 1535, es 1622, 1664, 1711, 1762, 1810, 
1860, 1904. 

Machine tools, 1332, 1905. 

Patents, 1024, 1619, 1762, 1810, 1812, 1856, 1905. 

Reparations, 1024, 1080, 1124, 1166, 1198, 1770. 

Technical mission to the Ruhr coalfield, 1204, 1256. 


Greece: 
Anglo-Greek Property agreement, 378. 
Economic recovery, 1369. 
Import duties, 1450. 
Import restrictions, 344, 1000, 1275, 1789, 1829. 


Guatemala: 
Customs tariff modifications, 88, 634, 1039. 


Hungary: 
Possibilities of early renewal of trade with U.K., 
1627. 


Iceland: 
Import restrictions, 546. 


Iraq 
eeaun licensing, 147, 546, 765, 1245, 1819. 
Resumption of trade with U. K., 662. 
Trade mission, 464. 








102 


Iran (Persia) : 
Economic development, 10381. 
Exchange permits for exports, 1034. 
Import licences, 309. 
Warranty dates on packages, 344. 


Italy: 
British property, 77, 531, 1164. 
Registration and marking of shares of Italian 
companies, 1487 
Trade re-opening, 132. 
Trade discussions, 1809. 


Japan: 
British property, 1385. 
Future of Japanese industries, 1534. 
Textile industry, 240. 
Textile mission, 737, 946. 
Trade with United Kingdom, 1204, 1853. 


Liberia: 


Opportunities for United Kingdom trade, 1236. 


Malaya: 
Customs tariff modifications, 838. 
Imports into Malayan Union, 1412. 
Palm Oil production and stocks, 1633, 1785. 
Rubber statistics, 1600, 1720, 1781, 1786. 
Tin Stocks, 13, 275. 
Trade, 147. 
Trading with aon, 1718. 
SINGAPOR 
( te hai 1243. 


Mauritius: 
Customs tariff modifications, 248, 1275. 
Exchange rates, 702. 
Spirits, importation, 741. 


Mexico: 
Canada, commercial treaty, 315. 
Customs tariff modifications, 62, 311, 409, 508. 
Effects of war on industry and ‘trade, 985. 
Import restrictions, 60, 153, 174, 381, 546, 877, 
1414. 


Shipping documents, 446. 


Middle East: 


Disposal of fixed assets, 


Netherlands, the: 


Economic position, 664. 

New Zealand, trade arrangement, 64. 
Production figures, 666. 
Reconstruction of industry, 504. 
Registration of securities, 1788. 
Rehabilitation, one year, 696. 
Trade, 505, 547, 946. 

Retail textile prices, 442. 

Wholesale prices, 825. 


Newfoundland: 
Customs tariff, 1347, 1791. 
Economic conditions, 14, 997. 
Footwear imports, 1214. 
Herring fishery, 542. 

Revenue and expenditure, 542. 
War exchange duty, 545. 


503, 549 


New Zealand: 
Agricultural prospects, 200. 
Customs : 

Decisions, 59, 670, 1208, 1602. 
Reciprocity, 35. 

Dairy factory statistics, 1237. 

Economic conditions, 760. 

Import licensing, 314, 408, 589, 670, 741, 838, 
1036, 1150, 1312, 1415, 1450, 1493, 1559, 1637 
1723, 1830. 

Importation of live fish, 797. 

Marking of footwear, 914. 

Trade arrangements: 

Netherlands, 64. 
aoe 35. 
Trade, 57, 150, 204, 205, 275, 377, 698, 831, 
72, ‘toe, 1210, 1412, 1718, 1830, 1919. 
Imports of piece goods, 1035. 
Transport and Public Utilities : 
Civil aviation, 440. 
Electricity, 406. 
Gas, 439. 
Railways, 55, 275, 378, 1095, 1412. 
Shipping 1241, 1412. 
Tramways, 32. 





THE BOARD OF TRADE JOURNAL 


Nicaragua: 
Customs tariff, 1343, 1878. 
Regulation of trade, 153. 


Norway: 
Assets in United Kingdom, 276. 
Dependence on foreign trade, 467. 
Customs tariff, 1039, 1451. 
Lumbering industry, 628. 


Nyasaland: 
Customs tariff, 175,475. 
= 307, 504, 663, 832, 1094, 1212, 1314, 1785, 
1822. 


Palestine: 
Crop production, 629, 739, 1214. 
Customs tariff, 310, 408. 
Imports of goods by parcel post, 1620. 
Railroad traffic, 586. 
Operations, 764. 
Trade, 147, 171, 274, 505, 
1236, 1413, 1556. 


630, 827, 873, 1214, 


Panama: 
Tariff modifications, 797. 


Paraguay: 
Import and export taxes, 1315. 


Peru: 

Biological products, 546. 

Economic conditions, 1126. 

Exports to, 472. 

Import control, 209, - “Wasa 1829. 

Insecticides : import, 1 

Pharmaceutical eauans; 
Registration, 1604. 
Sale, 1093. 

Trade, 735. 


Philippine Islands: 


Export control, 1414. 


Poland: 

Coal production, 799. 

Commercial debts, 1712. 

Nationalization: British interests, 1453, 1512, 

1565, 1644, 1684, 1743, 1795, 1833, 1883, 1920. 

Claims for compensation, 1035. 

Trade: 
Development of post-war, 1818. 
Relaxation of control, 908. 


Portugal: 
Customs tariff, 915. 
Import regulations, 380, 1791. 
Market for British goods, 501. 
Monetary Agreement, 498. 
Preservatives and colouring matter in foodstuffs, 


Portuguese Colonies: 
ANGOLA: market for British goods, 793. 
MOZAMBIQUE: Customs tariff, 278, 1174. 


Saudi Arabia: 


Import control, 542, 1599. 


Siam: 
United Kingdom Trade Agreement, 13. 
Tin, 1863. 
Private trade, 309, 345, 792. 


South Africa: 
Certificates of essentiality, 248, 769, 1174, 1245. 
Customs duties, 248, 508, 670, 769, 877, 1002, 
1247, 1342, 1672, 1723. 
Double Taxation Agreement, 1535. 
Import control, 89, 1672. 
Import of jute goods, 1506 
Merchandise Marks Act, 510, 797, 1174. 
Sailing Barque: auction, 1908. 
Textile imports, 765. 
Trade arrangement, India, 1247. 
Weights and Measures Regulations, 1506. 
United Kingdom export trade: development, 904. 





18 January 1947 


Southern Rhodesia: 

Certificates of origin and age tT) 209. 

Customs tariff modifications, 1174. 
Rebate of duty, 1150, 1245, dia, 1637, 1878. 
Suspension of duty, 153. 

Dairy production, 507, 1446. 

Double Taxation Ty 1301. 

Gro’ import trade, 1 

Import restrictions, 37, 209, “510, 1343. 

Importation of tomato and maize seeds, 1672. 

Livestock and animal products—1945, 1303 

Meat output, 793. 

Mineral production, 80, 115, 505, 668, 1176, 1212, 
1372, 1601. 

Mining industry, 870. 

Railways, 504, 762, 1341. 

Tobacco crop, 1718, 1870, 1913 

Trade, 83, 116, 117, 171, 206, 308, 340, 502, 543, 
622, 632, 736, 793, 796, 912, 1269, 1307, 1445, 
1599, 1717, 1868, 

Trade, development of nite Kingdom, 941. 


St. Helena: 
Customs tariff modifications 15, 88. 


Sudan: 
Import licences, 741, 1315. 
Trade, 1178. 


Sweden: 
Import duty, 475, 1000. 2 
Besteistions, 36, 345, 446, 545, 742, 797, 1000, 
Market ae United’ Kingdom exports, 404. 
Rope texture, new tariff item, 1000. 


Switzerland: 
Customs duties, 209, 446, 1916 
Import restrictions, 1093, 1722. 
Post-war market for British goods, 374. 
Tariff ee aa 1038, 1602. 
Token imports, 1 
Trade prs on Ime a Zealand, 35. 
Turnover tax, 1150. 


Syria and Lebanon: 
Import licences, 276, 406, 628, 946. 
Customs regulations, 1074. 


Tunisia: 
British Chamber of Commerce, 307. 
Economic conditions and trade possibilities, 1669. 


Turkey: 
pee A Mixed Arbitral Tribunal, 239. 
Cotton and woollen yarn production, 629. 
Economic conditions, 584. 
Export trade regulations, 239, 2 
—— regulations, 202, 590, a7, 1374, 1415, 


Textile industry, 588. 


Uruguay: 
Import permits, 210. 
Import Fraluation and duty tariffs: modification 
174. 
Pharmaceutical preparations, 1671. 
Trade prospects, 1267 


United States of America: 
Consular invoices, 797. 
Double Taxation Convention, 1362. 
Excise tax on coal, 1175. 
Import control, 37, 87, 877, 1039, 1721. 
Importation of. shaving brushes, 1450. 
Marking regulations, 119, 702, 1315, 1382. 
Maximum Import Price Regulations, 546. 
— market for United Kingdom exports, 


1553 

Simplification of clothing, 877, 1174, 1506. 

South California and Los Angeles, market for 
British exports, 1597. 

Tariff classifications, 62, 119, 702, 915, 1174, 1315, 
187: 


879. 
Token imports, 907. 
Trade Agreement Negotiations, 1823. 
Trade Practice Rules, 1277, 1879. 
United Kingdom Purchase Tax, 408, 1245. 


Venezuela: 
Classification for customs duties, 174, 1208. 
Customs Law, 381, 797, 835. 
Customs tariff modifications, 700, 915, 1343, 1722. 
Importation of “‘ special cargo,” 1343. 








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18 January 1947 


THE BOARD OF TRADE JOURNAL 103 


Customs Regulations and Tariff Changes 





New Zealand Customs 
Decisions 


ARTICULARS are given below of some further 

decisions of the New Zealand Customs Department 

regarding the classification of various articles under the 
New Zealand Tariff :— 








Classified | Rate of duty 
under under the 
Goods Tariff British 
Item Preferential 
No. Tariff 
Animal glands or tissues, preparations 
made from, viz :— 
Pytalin Mig 120 '(}) ;.- — 
Articles, n.e.i., viz. :— 
Asphalt blocks, consisting of bitu- 
men mixed with crushed limestone, 
sand, gravel or rock oo 449 (2) Free 


Toys, materials for manufacture of viz.: 
Clockwork mechanisms, and stamp- 
ings as may be approved by the 
Minister, suited only for the manu- 
facture of clockwork toys ... aed 448 Free 
Mouldings of plastic materials, un- 
assembled, for the manufacture of 
dolls... Bee hie = =a 448 Free 
(NorE.—This decision will be re- 
viewed after September 30, 1947.) 
Hoists, viz. :-— 

Hoists (other than tipping hoists), 
and winches specially suited for 
fitting to tractors or motor vehicles 
and to be operated by the tractor or 
motor vehicle engine, even when 
imported with the motor vehicles 


or tractors mie ae 352 — 
(Norr.—Revised decision.) 
Preforming machine for forming plastic 
moulding powder into pellets ae 352 — 











Cyprus Tariff Modifications 


HE Board of Trade have received a copy of the 

Customs (Amendment) Law,1946, dated December 4, 

1946, which provides for the following modifications 
to the Cyprus Customs Tariff :— 


First SCHEDULE. 


Item 75 now reads as follows :— 
75. Milk, preserved and milk foods. 


SECOND SCHEDULE—TABLE OF EXEMPTIONS. 


Item 9 is amended by the insertion of the following 
proviso immediately after the first paragraph :— 


Provided that, in any special case where, for reasons 
beyond the control of the passenger, such baggage is not 
imported within the afore-mentioned period after the 
arrival of such passenger, the Colonial Secretary may, 
if he deems fit, extend this period for a further period not 
exceeding six months. 


Item 324A is deleted and the following item substituted :— 
32A. Essences for the manufacture of perfumery. 


The following item is inserted :— 
77A. Pyrethrum flowers. 


Importation of Certain Mining Materials: The Board 
of Trade have received a copy of the Import Duty (Certain 
Mining Material) Exemption (Amendment) Order, 1946, 
which provides for the following amendment, as from 
October 12, 1946, to the Import Duty (Certain Mining 
Material) Exemption Order, 1946 (see Board of Trade 
Journal dated June 15, 1946, page 769). 


Item (b) of the exemption now reads as follows :— 


(b) expanded metal and steel to be used for the support 
of underground workings. 








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British India 


Import Restrictions : The Board of Trade have received 
a copy of Department of Commerce Notification No. 28— 
I.T.C./46, dated December 7, 1946, which amends the 
Import Trade Control Schedule annexed to Notification 
No. 23—I.T.C./43, reproduced in the Board of Trade 
Journal of August 17, 1946, pages 1135-1148, as follows :— 
In Part IV of the Schedule. 
(a) delete the following items :— 
Serial No. 86. Proprietary and patent medicines 
taining spirit. 
Serial No. 107. Proprietary and patent medicines. 
(6) delete the words ‘‘ excluding proprietary and patent 
medicines” from item against Serial No. 87, which 
will now read ‘‘ Drugs and medicines containing 
spirit.” 


con- 





Eire 


Importation of Onions: The United Kingdom Trade 
Commissioner at Dublin reports that the Minister for 
Agriculture has made an Order revoking as on and from 
January 16, 1947, the Onions (Regulation of Import) 
Order, 1941 (see Board of Trade Journal of August 30, 
1941, page 121). 

The effect of the new Order is that as from the date 
mentioned licences will not be required for the importation 
of onions. 





Switzerland 


Customs Drawback on Automobile Chassis: The Board 
of Trade Journal of August 17, 1939 (page 296) gave 
information of a drawback of 20 per cent. of the duty paid 
by importers on chassis on which are built, in Switzerland, 
commercial motor vehicles of up to 800 kilogs. loading 
capacity. The Swiss Commercial Gazette of December 24, 
1946, announces that the decree authorizing this drawback 
has been prolonged until the end of 1949. 


THE BOARD OF TRADE JOURNAL 


18 January 1947 


Guadaloupe and Dependencies 


Removal of Levies on Certain Imports : Attention is 
drawn to four decrees issued on November 26, 1946, by the 
Ministere de la France d’Outre Mer, Paris, and published 
in the Journal Officiel de la République Frangaise on 
December 1, 1946. 


The effect of these decrees is to free certain commodities 
imported into Guadaloupe and dependencies from liability 
to octroi-de-mer and import tax. 


Decree No. 46.2755 exempts imported animal feeding- 
stuffs from octroi-de-mer. 


Decree No. 46.2756 exempts from octroi-de-mer tobacco 
imported on the account of the Ministere de la France 
d’Outre Mer. 


Decree No. 46.2757 exempts from import tax tobacco 
imported on the account of the colony. 


Decree No. 46.2758 exempts from import tax certain 
animal feeding-stuffs. 





Portugal 


Import Licences: H.M. Representative in Lisbon reports 
that by Order No. 11,612 of December 6, 1946, published 
in the Official Gazette of the same date, importation of the 
following items are subject to the previous issue of a licence 
by the Technical Corporative Council. 


Starch Items 222 and 223 of the Import Tariff. 
Glucose Item 623 of the Import Tariff. 
Dextrins Item 288 of the Import Tariff. 
Feculae Item 223 of the Import Tariff. 


Import Duties: H.M. Representative also reports that 
Decree Law No. 36,027 of December 12, 1946, published 
in the Official Gazette of the same date authorizes the 
Minister of Finance in consultation with the Ministry of 
Economy to exempt from duty or to reduce the duty on 
frozen meat, lard, bacon and butter from any source. 
This decree to come into force immediately and is valid 
until June 30, 1947. 











mone peeenianmenntidie een 








BARCLAYS BANK 


LIMITED 


EDWIN FISHER, Chairman. ; 
SIR WILLIAM MACNAMARA GOODENOUGH, Bart, Deputy Chairman. 
WALTER OSBORNE STEVENSON, \ 
ANTHONY WIL LIAM TUKE, Vice-Chairmen. 


General Managers : C. ELLERTON, 
General A cre (Staff) : 


G. F. Lewis, R. G. THORNTON. 
C. FITzHERBERT. 





Statement of Accounts 


31st December, 1946. 


LIABILITIES. 


Current, Deposit and other Accounts 
Balances in account with Subsidiary Banks 


Acceptances, Guarantees, Indemnities, etc., 
Paid-up Capital 
Reserve Fund 


ASSETS. 


Cash in Hand and with the Bank of England 


Balances with other British Banks and Cheques in course of collection 


Money at Call and Short Notice 
Bills Discounted sel 
Treasury Deposit Receipts .. 
Investments ... 


Investment in Industrial and Commercial Fi inance ¢ Corporation Limited : — 


2,638 Shares of £1,000 each, £100 paid up 


for account of Customers 


£ 
. 1,160,295,097 
11,431,011 
iano eaten 1,171,726,108 
30,981,332 
15,858,217 
12,250,000 





98,964,528 
47,625,900 
67,270,600 
156,015,890 
339,000,000 
278,619,773 


263,800 


Investments in Subsidiary Banks (at cost, Jess amounts written vn 


The British Linen Bank—/1,242,295 5s. Od. Stock 


Other Banks—(including fully paid Stock and 500,000 “BR? 


oe bss a 3,726,886 
” Shares of £5 each, {1 per 


Share paid up, in Barclays Bank (Dominion, Colonial and Overse: is) and 1,000,000 


Shares of {1 each, 5s. per Share paid up, in Barclays Bank when aang” 


Advances :—Customers and other Accounts 


Balances in account with Subsidiary Banks 


Liability of Customers for Acceptances, Guarantees, Indemnities, etc. 
Bank Premises and Adjoining Properties (at cost, Jess amounts written off) 


2,497,019 
- 197, 001, 053 
*'959, 885 








197,960,938 
30,981,332 
7,888,991 





Head Office : 54, LOMBARD STREET, LONDON, E.C.3. 














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1946 
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18 January 1947 


French West Africa 


Increases in Export Taxes: Attention is drawn to 
Decree No. 46.2866, issued on November 27, 1946, by the 
Ministere de la France d’Outre Mer, Paris, and published 
in the Journal de la Republique Mrancaise on December 10, 


THE BOARD OF TRADE JOURNAL 


1946, which gives notice of an increase in the tax levied on | 


French West African exports: of coffee and cocoa of the 
1945-46 crop. 





Guatemala 


Customs Tariff Modifications : H. M. Representative at 
Guatemala has reported particulars of recently published 
Decree-laws :— 

No. 275 dated September 12, 1946, which creates the 
following new heading in the Customs Tariff :— 
484-1-3-11 Currugated aluminium sheets for roofing or 

walls per kilo gross QO.02. 

No. 277 dated September 19, 
following item :— 
483-3-4-48 Tinplate stamped in relief, in sheets, glossy, 

enamelled, or varnished, and iron or steel 
imitation tiles per kilo gross QO.LO. 


1946, which modifies the 


And the following new heading : 
427-3-0-15 Special synthetic cements for sticking per kilo 
gross QO.10. 





Sweden 
Revised Import Restriction: The following corrections 
are made to the notice issued under the above heading in 


the Board of Trade Journal for January 11, 1947 (page 62): 
: : } 


List of Goods requiring a licence from the State Trade 
Cominission : 

Line 6 After the word ‘‘ Starch’ insert ‘ Syrup.” 
Delete the word “syrup at the end of 
the lu 

Lines 17 Boi Certain Hides and ‘Skins; Leathers ; 

nd 18 Leather Manufacture ‘ead ** Certain 
hid and Skins, Leathers and Leather 
Manufactures.”’ 

Line 31 For ‘* Windows and Window-glass’’ read 

‘Window and Mirror Glass.” 


Union of South Africa 


Application for increase in Customs Duty : Notice No. 1081 
of 1946, published in the Union of South Africa Government 
Gazette of December 6, 1946, states that the Board of Trade 
and Industries has received representations for an increase 
in Customs Duties as follows : 

Ethyl chloride: rated duty 9d. per tube of 50 gm. 

Any United Kingdom firm or trade association desiring 
to make representations to the Board of Trade and Industries 
in respect of the above item should communicate as soon as 
possible with the Board of Trade, Export Promotion 
Department, 35 Old Queen Street, London, S.W.1, quoting 
reference 16039/109B/46, and supplying copies of all letters 
and enclosures in quadruplicate. 


Canadian Export Groups 


The values of the principal trading groups during the ten 
months ended October, 19145 and 1946, are shown in the 
following table, states the Dominion Bureau of Statistics. 
Ottawa. 


January-October 

Group | 1945 1946 

S$ thousand 

649,539 452,663 
Shigtio 301,583 
49,027 45,990 
399,636 495,975 
520,569 191,824 
307,317 | 196,160 
| 45,973 


Agricultural and vegetable products 
Animals and animal products 
Fibres, textiles and textile products 
Wood, wood products and paper 
Iron and its products”... 


Non-ferrous metals and products -| 


| 
| 


HAPORT 
FACILITATED 
with the aid of 


CRONER’S 
REFERENCE BOOK 
FOR SHIPPERS 


4th Edition now ready 


| This Loose-Leaf Handbook is designed to cover 


the 
REGULATIONS AND PROCEDURE 
in respect of 


EXPORT LICENSING 


This section includes the complete list of 
goods for which export licences are required 


IMPORT LICENSING 
CUSTOMS CLEARANCE 
EXCHANGE CONTROL 

SHIPPING AND INSURANCE} 
PARCEL POST AND AIR MAIL ‘RATES 


CONSULAR AND CUSTOMS REQUIREMENTS 
for all Empire and foreign destinations, as well as all forms 
necessary for the shipment of goods, are listed in a 
special section for each country. 


All information is given in a concise and easily 
understandable form and is kept up to date by a 


TWO-PART SERVICE 


(a) the monthly exchange of leaves in the case 
of alterations ; and 


(b) the supply of a Fortnightly News Service 
(“International Trading & Shipping ’’) 
containing the latest information on all 
subjects an exporter requires for his 
business, including sales opportunities and 
a guide to overseas connections. 





To U. H. E. CRONER, 
22 High Street, Teddington, Middlesex 


Please supply copies of ‘‘ Croner’s Reference Book for 
Shippers ”’ (4th Edition) at the price of 25s. (including loose-leaf 
binder), and register us for the Two-Part Amendment Service at 
the price of 12s. 6d. quarterly until countermanded. 


Name 


Address 


Non-metallic minerals and products... | 51,533 | 
Chemicals and allied products ... a 99,328 | 56,567 Attention of.......... 
Miscellaneous commodities . | 350,145 | 81,360 

















106 THE BOARD OF TRADE JOURNAL 


Statutory Notices 


Patents and Designs Acts, 1907 to 1946 


Proceedings under Section 24 of the Acts: ‘‘ Licences of Right.’ 


The following patents were indorsed ‘‘ Licences of 
Right ’” on January 4, 1947:— 
i=) . 


No. of 


Patent Grantee Subject-matter 
471325 | Hfield, R.. 
492587 | Ifield, R.. 


- Differential or balance mechanism. 
2 
{97028 lfield, R. J 
J. 
J. 


Automatically reversible free-wheel. 
Restricted differential gears. 
Restricted differential gears. 
N Restricted differential gears. 

538507 | Ifield, R. J. Automatically reversible free-wheel. 
512224 | Lodge-Cotterell, | Electrical precipitation of suspended 

Ltd. particles from gaseous fluids, 
Barnet Instru- Pressure gauges, 

ments, Ltd. 
Grant, C. R. A.... | Pressure gauges. 
Grant, C. R. A. 


907534 Ifield, R.. 


535515 Hield, R 


562621 


DOALSD 
565272 Pressure gauges 
Any person alleging that indorsement of any of the above- 
mentioned patents has been made contrary to some contract 
in which he is interested may make application for the can- 
cellation of the indorsement by lodging Patents Form No. 2, 
stamped £2, at The Patent Office, 25 Southampton 
Buildings, London, W.C.2. 
The Patent Office. (Sgd.) H. L. SAUNDERS, 
Comptroller- General. 


Cancellations of Indorsements 
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Applications have been 
made for the cancellation of the Indorsements * Licences 
of Right ”’ on the following patents. 


No. of 


Date of Subject matter 
Patent Grantees | Patent 
451295 | The English | March 18, An improved fluid flow 
Electric Co., 1935 meter. 





Ltd. (Seewer | 
P.W.). | 
| 


453207 | The English March 6, Improvements in speed 
| Electric Co., 1935 control systems for elec- 
Ltd. tric generating plant 
driven by an internal 
combustion engine, 
459052 Do. June 26, Improvements in Ward 
1935 Leonard and like elec 
trical systems. 
467690 Do February 21. Improvements in the con 
1936 | struction of — vehicle 
bodies. 
470660 I*o April 17, Improvements in magne 
1936 tic circuits for dynamo 
electric machines. 
470815 Do, February 18, | Improvements in means 
1936 for controlling the ex 
citation of dyna: 10 elec 
tric machines. 
$7 1615 Do. May 15, Improvements in and re 
1936 lating to the control of 
direct current electric 


traction motors. 


No. of Date of 
Patent Grantees Patent Subject-matter 
£73367 Do. April 17, Improvements in and rx 
1936 lating to the control of 
direct current electric 
traction motors 
173539 Do April 17, Improvements in flexible 
1936 torque transmitting 
cou; lings. 
514789 Do May 16, Improvements in electri 
1938 motor control systems. 
25454 Do February 21, Improvements in electri 
1939 motor control systems. 
525832 Do March 1, Improvements in means 
1939 for controlling electric 
vehicles 
537191 Do January 30. Improvements in and re 
1940 lating to the cooling of 
dynamo electric mach 
ines. 
37311 Do February 19, Improvements in electric 


1940 | circuit breakers of the 


air-break type. 


537717 | The English | January 15, Improvements in electric 
Electric Co., | 1940 | motor control systems 
Ltd., & anr. 


Any person may give notice of opposition to any of the 
Applications by lodging Patents Form No. 24 at the Patent 
Office, 25 Southampton Buildings, London, W.C.2, on or 
before February 8, 1947. 

The Patent Office. H. L. SAUNDERS, 
Comptroller General. 





The Board of Trade Journal is published by His 
Majesty’s Stationery Office and is obtainable directly 
from the following addresses: York House, 
Kingsway, London, W.C.2; 13a, Castle Street, 
Edinburgh, 2; 39-41 King Street, Manchester, 2; 
1 St. Andrew’s Crescent, Cardiff; 80 Chichester 
Street, Belfast; or through any bookseller. 


Crown copyright reserved. Extracts may be 
published if the source is duly acknowledged. 


EDITORIAL COMMUNICATIONS should be addressed 
to The Editor, Board of Trade Journal, Millbank, 
London, S.W.1 (Telephone: Whitehall 5140, 
extension 306). 


SUBSCRIPTIONS (26s. PER ANNUM; 308. POST FREB) 
AND SALES ENQUIRIES should be addressed to the 
publishers at any of the above addresses. 


ADVERTISEMENTS. Applications concerning the 
insertion of advertisements in the Board of Trade 
Journal should be addressed to the Director of 
Publications, H.M. Stationery Office, 421-9 Oxford 
Street, London, W.1 (Telephone: Mayfair 7755). 


The Government accepts no reaponsibility for any of 
the slatementa in the advertisements and the inclusion 
of any particular advertisement is no guarantee that 
the gooda or services advertised herein have received 
official approval. 














Phone: 

AVE 5160 

Cables : 
Adoskel, Ldn. 





NOTICE TO ALL MANUFACTURERS 


If you wish to expand your Export Trade you should communicate with 
ry wh 
A. HESKEL 
ESTABLISHED 1919 
General Exporter, Confirmer and Shipper 
TO ALL OVERSEAS MARKETS 


Buyer of Woollen, cotton, rayon piece goods, knitwear, hosiery and general merchandise. 
PAYMENT in London when goods are ready for shipment. 


36 Camomile Street, London, E.C.3. 


Bankers: 
Barclays Bank Ltd. 
126, Bishopsgate, 

E.C 








18 January 1947 











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18 January 1047 


Exhibitions and Fairs 





Scientific Instruments at 


B.LF. 


HE Seientific Instruments Section of the 1947 British 

Industries Fair will be a composite Exhibit which is 

expected to cover about 14,500 sq. ft. of the ground 
floor at Olympia. It is hoped that 86 firms under the aegis 
of the Scientific Instruments Manufacturers Association of 
Great Britain, Ltd., will display scientific instruments of 
almost every kind. In addition, over 40 firms, not members 
of the S.I.M.A., have applied for a further 6,500 sq. ft. of 
space. This more than triplicates the number of Exhibitors 
for 1939, when 31 firms, occupying just over 6,000 sq. ft., 
were represented. . 

‘To achieve the best possible display, the non-members of 
S.1.M.A. are included in the arrangements made by S.1.M.A. 
for the composite stand. This will ensure that the largest 
and most comprehensive exhibition of Scientific Instru- 
ments will be displayed and buyers from all over the world 
will see the industry’s great range and variety of products 
noted for their design, quality and craftsmanship. The 
industry will also show how the experience gained in war has 
been applied to peace-time use. 

Industrial precision instruments, optical instruments, 
radar, aeronautical and surveying instruments, fire control, 
electronic instruments, laboratory. research and medical 
apparatus, ophthalmic apparatus, are included in the 
products exhibited by the British Scientific instrument 
manufacturers. 


Company of Shipwrights Exhibition 

This Exhibition which opens on January 28, has been 
organized by the Worshipful Company of Shipwrights, one 
of the largest and most ancient of the City Guilds, still in 
the vigour of youth after 700 years of existence. It will 
demonstrate how the traditional skill of our shipbuilders has 
been enhanced by the enormous technical progress achieved 
in recent years. The industry is energetically engaged in 
making good the heavy losses which were suffered during the 
war by our own merchant navy and those of other 
countries and is thus contributing to both our visible and 
our invisible exports. 

The Export Promotion Department is installing an 
information stand at the Exhibition (No. 95) for the assist- 
ance of exporters and overseas buyers. 
products used in connection with shipping who are not 
themselves exhibiting may care to supply for use on this 
stand a few copies of any suitable literature ; this should be 
sent to the Exhibitions and Fairs Branch of the Department 
at 35 Old Queen Street, S.W.1, under reference KH. & F. 


6224/46. 


British Industries Fair, 1947, May 5—16 


London (Olympia and Earls Court) 

Organized by the Board of Trade, Export Promotion 
Department, 35 Old Queen Street, London, S.W.1L (Tele- 
phone: Victoria 9040), where full information as to the 
trades participating can be obtained. 


Engineering and Hardware Section, 
Birmingham 

Organized by the Birmingham Chamber of Commerce (under 
the auspices of the Board of Trade, Export Promotion 
Department), 95 New Street, Birmingham, 2. 

Overseas Buyers should address enquiries about the 1947 
Fair to the nearest British Commercial Diplomatic Officer 
or Consular Officer, or the British Trade Commissioner in 


their area. 


Castle Bromwich, 


United Kingdom 
1947 


NotTe.— Organizers of exhibitions in this country which are 
likely to be of interest to overseas buyers are invited to send 
copies of the catalogue to the Export Promotion Department 
for the information of overseas visitore to the Department's 
offices. 

The Company of Shipwrights Exhibition 

January 28-February 8, 1947, at The Royal Horticultural 
Hall, Westminster, S.W.1. Apply to the Chairman, 
Exhibition Committee, The Worshipful Company of Ship- 
wrights, 3 Lloyds Avenue, E.C.3. (Tel.: Royal 4226.) 


Manufacturers, of 


THE BOARD OF TRADE JOURNAL L07 


Amusement Trades Exhibition, London 

February 24-26, 1947. At Royal Horticultural Hall, 
Westminster, London, S.W.1. Apply to the Amusement 
Trades Exhibitions Ltd., 19 Charing Cross Road, London, 
W.C.2. (Tel.: Whitehall 2524.) 
** Dally Mail” Ideal Home Exhibition 

March 4-29, 1947, at Olympia, London, W. Apply to the 
Associated Newspapers, Ltd., Carmelite House, London, 
E.C.4. 
Radio and Communications Components Exhibition, London 

March 10-13, 1947. At Royal Horticultural Hall, West- 
minster, London, S.W.1. Apply to the Radio Component 
Manufacturers’ Federation, 22 Surrey Street, London, 
W.C.2. (Tel.: Temple Bar 6740.) 
** Britain’s Best” Engineering and Metalcraft Exhibition, 

London 

March 14-26, 1947. 
Westminster, S.W.1. 

Apply to the British Bulletin of Commerce, Henrietta 
House, Henrietta Street, London, W.C.2. (Tel.: Temple 
Bar 4728.) 
British Industries Fair, London and Birmingham 

May 5-16,1947 (See special announcement on this page ) 


Watford Industrial Exhibition 
June 5-18, 1947. At the Town Hall, Watford, Herts. 
Apply to Mr. G. R. Barclay, c/o 114 High Street, Watford, 
Herts. (Tel. Watford 6091/2.) 
Royal Agricultura! Show, Lincoln 
July 1-4, 1947. Organized by the Royal Agricultural 
Society of England, 16 Bedford Square, London, W.C.1. 
(Tel.: Museum 0535.) 
* Industrial Wales ’’—‘ All 
Exhibition,’’ London 
August 28 to September 13, 1947. 


At the Royal Horticultural Hall, 


Wales and Monmouthshire 


At the E:mpire Hall 


Olympia. Apply to Exhibition Manager, South Wales and 
Monmouthshire Industries Association, 3 Castle Street, 
Cardiff. 


Engineering and Marine Exhibition, London 

August 28 to September 13, 1947. At Olympia, London. 
Apply to the Organizers, Messrs. F. W. Bridges & Sons, 
Ltd., Grand Buildings, Trafalgar Square, London, W.C.2 
(Tel. : Whitehall 0568-9.) 
Sussex Industries Exhibition, Brighton 

September 17-27, 1947. At the Corn Exchange, Brighton, 
Exhibits will comprise products of Sussex Manufacturers. 
Engineers and Boatbuilders, etc. Apply Sussex Engineers 
and Manufacturers Association, Ltd., 3 Marlborough Place 
Brighton, 1. 
Radiolympia—National Radio Exhibition, London 

October 1-11, 1947. At Olympia, London, W. Apply to 
the Radio Industry Council, 59 Russell Square, London, 
W.C.1. (Tel. Museum 6901.) 
Corsetry, Underwear, etc., Exhibition 

October 20-24, 1947. At Royal Horticultural Hall, 
London, S.W.1. Apply to the Corsetry and Underwear 
Journal, Carlton Llouse. 1lb Regent Street, London, S.W.1. 
(Tel.: Abbey 5143.) P 
London Medical Exhibition 


November 17-21, 1947. At New Horticultural Hall, 
Westminster, S.W.L. Apply to the British & Colonial 
Druggist, Ltd., 194-200 Bishopsgate, London, E.C.2. 


(Tel. : Bishopsgate 2148.) 


Overseas 
1947 


Note.— United Kingdom firma are invited to inform the 
Export Promohon Department of their decision to participate 
in any of the eventx mentioned below and also to inform the 
Department afterwards of the henefit derived, in order that an 
estimate of the relative value of the various events may be formed. 
International Heating and Ventilating Exposition, Cleveland 

January 27-31, 1947. At Lakeside Hall. Apply to Mr. 
Charles F. Roth, Grand Central Palace, New York City, 17. 
New York Aviation Show 

February 1-8, 19147. At Grand Central Palace, New 
York City. Apply to the United Expositions Corporation, 
145, East 53rd Street, New York, 22. 

National Boat Show, Chicago 

February 1-9, 1947. At Navy Pier, Chicago. 

to the Secretary at above address. 


Apply 








108 THE BOARD OF TRADE JOURNAL 


Spring Western Gift, Toy and Housewares Show, San 
Francisco 

February 9-13,1947. At Civic Auditorium, San Francisco. 

Apply to the Western Merchandise Exhibitors’ Association, 
San Francisco. 


Canadian Hardware Exposition, Toronto 

February 10-12, 1947. At the Royal York Hotel. 
Apply to Mr. Robert N. Lamb, Room 601, 210 Dundas 
Street, W. Toronto, Canada. 


National Sportsmen’s Show, New York 

February 15-23, 1947. At Grand Central Palace. 
Apply to Mr. Sheldon H. Fairbanks, Campbell-Fairbanks 
Exposition, 925, Park Square Building, Boston, Massachu- 
setts. 


Southwest Automobile Show, Houston 

February 27-March 2, 1947. At Sam Houston Coliseum. 
Apply Mr. Milton H. Cohen, Manager, Western Union 
Building, Houston, 2, Texas. 
Midwest Beauty Trade Show, Chicago 

March 2-4, 1947. At Hotel Sherman. Apply to Mr. 
Columbus D. Behan, 139, North Clark Street, Chicago. 


Agriculture and Industries Show, Cape Town 
March 4-7, 1947. At Rosebank, Cape Town. Apply to 
Major C. Goodshild-Brown, J.P., Secretary, Western 
Province Agricultural Society, P.O. Box 1134, Barclays 
Bank Buildings, Adderley Street, Cape Town. 
19th International Exhibition of Agricultural Machinery 
Paris 
March 4-9, 1947. Apply to the Union des Exposants de 
Machines et d’Outillage Agricoles, 38 rue de Chateaudun, 
Paris IX. 


Chemical and Instrument Technology Exhibition : ** Chemex 
1947,’ Melbourne 
March 6-25, 1947. At Exhibition Building, Melbourne. 
Apply to the Australian Society of Instrument Technology, 
Melbourne. 


American Toy Fair, New York 

March 10-22, 1947. At Hotel McAlpin. Apply to Mr. 
H. D. Clark, 200, Fifth Avenue, New York City, 10. 
Midwest Hotel Show, Chicago 

March 11-13, 1947. At Stevens Hotel. Apply to Mr. 
A. B. Coffman, 111, West Jackson Boulevard, Chicago, 4. 
Royal Netheriands Industries Fair, Utrecht 

March 11-20, 1947. Apply to Mr. W. Friedhoff c/o 
Netherlands Chamber of Commerce in London, 1 Grosvenor 
Crescent, London, S.W.1. (Tel. : Sloane 6225.) 
17th Exposition Internationale de l’Automodblie, Geneva 

March 13-23, 1947. Apply to the Secretariat General, 
1 Place du Lac, 1, Geneva, Switzerland. 
Prague International Fair 

March 14-23, 1947. Apply to the Secretary, The Czecho- 
siovak Economic Association, 64 Great Cumberland Place, 
London, W.1. (Tel.: Ambassador 1801.) 


Western Metal Congress and Exposition, San Francisco 

March 22-28, 1947. At the Civic Auditoriums, Oakland. 
Exhibits will comprise a complete cycle of equipment 
relating to the metals industries, including Machinery, 
Foundry Supplies, Oil Field Equipment, small tools and 
finished products. Apply to M . W. H. Eiseman, Managing 
Director of Exposition, Oakland, California. 
International Trade Fair, Vienna 

March 23-30, 1947. Apply to the British and Central 
European Chamber of Commerce, 28 Craven Street, Charing 
Cross, London, W.C.2. (Tel.: Whitehall 8827.) Final 
date for space applications, February 10, 1947. 
Witwatersrand Agricultural Show, Johannesburg 

March 31 to April 7, 1947. At Milner Park, Johannes- 
burg. Apply to the Secretary, Witwatersrand Agricultural 
Society, Johannesburg, South Africa. 
Royal Annual Agricultural Show, Sydney 

March 31-April 9. 1947. Apply to the Secretary, Koyal 
Agricultura! Society of New South Wales, 33 Macquarie 
Place, Sydney. 
Royal Adelaide Exhibition 

March 21 to May 17, 1947. Wayville, South Australia, 
at Centennial Hall and Grounds, Wayville. Apply to 
South Australian Chamber of Manufactures, Inc., Pirie 
Street, Adelaide, Australia. 
8th Triennial International Exhibition of Decorative and 

Industrial Arts and Modern Architecture, Milan 

April to July 15, 1947, at the Arts Palace, Milan. 
to the Palazzo dell’Arte al Parco, Milan, Italy. 
International Beauty Show, New York City 

April 9-13, 1947. At Grand Central Palace. Apply to 
Mr. Joseph Byrne, 19 West 44th Street, New York City. 


Apply 


18 January 1947 


International Fur and Leather Fair, Basle 

April 10-17, 1947. Apply to Manager, Internationa] Fur 
and Leather Fair, Isteinerstrasse 24, Basle, Switzerland, 
Final date for space applications, January 15, 1947. 


25th International Samples Fair, Milan 

April 12-27, 1947. Apply to the Italian General Shipping 
Ltd., 1 Hanover Square, London, W.1. (Tel.: Mayfair 
6834.) Final date for space applications, February 28, 1947. 


Finnish Spring Fair, Helsingfors 

April 19-27, 1947. At the Messuhalli, Helsingfors, 
Apply to Direktionen for Finlands Massa, Messuhallen, 
Helsingfors, Finland. Final date for space applications, 
March 1, 1947. 


Canadian Restaurant Association Convention and Exhibition, 
Toronto 

April 21-23, 1947. _At Royal York Hotel. Apply to 
Mrs. F. G. Montgomery, Room 803, 6 Adelaide Street E. 
Toronto, 1, Ontario. 
International Commercial Fair, Brussels 

April 26-May 11, 1947. Apply to Brussels International 
Fair, 200 rue Marie Christine, Brussels. 


Lyons International Fair 

April 12-21, 1947. Apply to Messrs. Clifford Martin 
Ltd., Piccadilly House, 33 Regent Street, London, S.W.1. 
(Tel. : Regent 3051.) 
International Fair, Poznan 

April 28-May 4, 1947. Apply to Zarzad Miedzynarodo- 
wych Targow Poznanskich, Marsz Focha 14, ‘‘Belweder,”’ 
Poznan, Poland. 
New England Hotel and Restaurant Show, Boston 

April 30-May 2, 1947. At Hotel Statler. Apply to Mr. 
Harold R. Dolby, Hotel Service Inc., Room 462, Park 
Square Building, Boston, Massachusetts. 
International Trade and Samples Fair, Lisbon 

May 1 to September 30, 1947. Apply to United Kingdom 
Agent, Miss Rh. EK. Prince-Bishop, Rua Garrett 74, Lisbon, 


Portugal}, 


National Plastics Exposition, Chicago 

May 5-11, 1947. At the Coliseum. Apply to Messrs. 
Clapp and Poliak, Empire State Building, New York City, 1. 
Paris International Trade Fair 

May 10-26, 1917. At Porte de Versailles, Paris. Apply 
to Miss EK. Lambert, LL-13 Rusby Chambers, 2 Rugby Street 
London, W.C.1. (Tel. : Chancery 6794.) Final date for 
space applications, January 31, 1947. 
international Reconstruction Exhibition, Paris 

May and June, 1947. At the Grand Palais and Cours la 
Reine, Paris. Apply to the Commissariat General, Grand 
Palais (Porte UU). Avenue Alexandre III, Paris. 

Radio Parts and Electronic Equipment Conference and Show, 
Chicago 

May 11-16, 1947. Apply to Mr. Kenneth C. Prince, 111 
West Washington Street, Chicago. 

National Marine Exposition, San Francisco 

May 12-17, 1947. At Civic Auditorium. Apply to Mr. 
Roger E. Montgomery, 17 Battery Place, New York City, 4. 
International Reconstruction Exhibition, Tournai 

May 24-June 15, 1947. Apply to Secretary, Foire 
Internationale de la Reconstruction, 22 Rue des "Corriers, 
Tournai, Belgium. Final date for space applications, 
March 15, 1947. 

Valencia International Trade Fair 

May 10-25, 1947. Apply to Feria Muestrario Inter- 
nacional de Valencia, Valencia, Spain. Final date for space 
applications, March 15, 1947. 

Barcelona International Trade Fair 

June 10-25, 1947. Apply to Feria Oficial e Internacional 
de Muestras de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. 

Norre.—I/t is understood that Spanish importers have been 
invited to inform the Ministry of Industry and Commerce 
before January 31, 1947, what goods are likely to be shown at 
the Valencia and Barcelona Faira, in order thai the allocation 
of foreign currency may be considered. 

Technical and Scientific Exposition, Atlantic City 

June 9-13, 1947. At Atlantic City Auditorium. Apply 
to Dr. Thomas R. Gardiner, 535 North Dearborn Street, 
Chicago, 10. 

Automobile Accessories Exposition, Chicago 

Augustl-8, 1947. At Stevens Hotel, Chicago. Apply, 
Mr. R. G. Ames, Secretary, 1414 South Michigan Avenue 
Chicago. 

(Continued on page 110) 
































B47 


Tur 
nd, 


ing 


air 


al 


)- 


” 














1s danuary 1947 











THE BOARD OF TRADE JOURNAL 























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110 





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THE BOARD OF TRADE JOURNAL 





18 January 1°47 


Exhibitions and Fairs (Continued from page 10s) 


New Zealand Industries Fair, Christchurch 

August 1-14, 1947. Apply to the Manager, Mr. R. T, 
Alston, P.O. Box 381, H. B. Buildings, High Street, Christ- 
church, New Zealand. 
Canadian National Exhibition, Toronto 

August 22 to Se, tember 6, 1947. Apply to Mr. G. H, 
Ward, United Kingdom representative, Canadian Chamber 
of Commerce, in Great Britain, Inc., British Columbia 
House, 3 Regent Street. London, S.W.1. (Tel.: Whitehall 
2794.) 
jth St. Erik’s International Fair, Stockholm 

August 23-September 7, 1947. Apply to St. 
Massan, Stockholm, 5, Sweden. 
Pacific National Exhibition, Vancouver 

August 25-September 1, 1947. Apply to Mr. V. Ben 
Williams, Exhibition Park, Vancouver, B.C. 
Quinzaine des Industries Alimentaires Exhibition, Brussels 


Erik's. 


September 1947. At Grands Palais du Quartier du 
Centenaire, Brussels. Apply to the Secretaire General, 


Confederation de l Alimentation Belge, 55 Rue de La Loi, 

Brussels. 

Royal Netherlands Industries Fair, Utrecht 
September 9-18, 1947. Apply to Mr. W. 

c/o Netherlands Chamber of Commerce in 


Friedhoff, 
London, 1 


Grosvenor Crescent, London, S.W.1. (Tel. : Sloane 6225.) 
1948 
International Trade Fair, Toronto 
May 3l-June 12, 1948. Apply to the Trade Commiis- 


sioner, Canada House, Trafalgar Square, London, 8.W.1. 


(Tel. : Whitehall 9741.) 


Note.— No responsibility is accepted with regard to the 
standing of any firms, companies or individuals mentioned. 

While the utmost care has been taken in the compilation 
of this list, it will be understood that the dates given are 
those decided upon by the organizers concerned and may 
be subject to alteration. 

The list is not intended to include all forthcoming 
Exhibitions and Fairs throughout the world, but only 
to cover the more important ones likely to be 
of interest to British manufacturers. Information re- 
garding Exhibitions and Fairs other than those mentioned 
above may be obtained on application to the Export 
Promotion Department ( Exhibitions and Fairs Branch), 35 
Old Queen Street, London, S.W.1. (Tel.: Victoria 9040). 


United Kingdom Tin Position 


The following figures issued by the Ministry of Supply 
give the United Kingdom tin metal and ore position for the 
month of November 1946, showing stocks, deliveries and 
consumption. All figures are in long tons. 


Tin METAL. Ministry. Consumers. 





Stocks at 1.11.46 ... 9,022 1.274 
Arrivals 
Production 1,897 
10,919 41.274 
Deliveries : 
to U.K. consumers ose pene - 2,217 
for export 238 2,455 
6,491 
Consumption sis ee ae ~— 2,401 
Stocks at 30.11.46 7 ” 8,464 1,090* 
* Calculated. Reported: 3,603. 
Tin ORE (Tin Content). 
Stock in United Kingdom 1.11.46 7,727 tons. 
Stock in United Kingdom 30.11.46 9,253 tons. 
RECONDITIONED 
FOR THE 


WOOLLEN & WORSTED INDUSTRIES 


RICHARD FIRTH & SONS, LIMITED 
BROOK MILLS, CLECKHEATON 
Telephones : 516-7 Cleckheaton Teiegrams : “ Textiles"’ Cleckheaton 























H. 
ber 
bia 
hall 


ng 
ly 
be 
re- 
ed 
ort 
35 


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ile 


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18 January 1947 


THE BOARD OF TRADE JOURNAL 


111 


Further Lists of Nationalized Properties 
in Poland 


AZETTES published in various provincial capitals 
in Poland give further lists of properties scheduled 
to be nationalized in these areas and from lists 
published in the Monitor Polski of other firms scheduled 
to be nationalized. British 
whether in respect of capital 
outstandings, in 


firms are advised 








tionals who have interests, 
investments or in 
any of the scheduled 
to communicate urgently with Trading 
with the Enemy Department, 24 Kingsway, London, W.C.2. 

British nationals with such interests in firms scheduled 
either in these lists or in the lists published in the preceding 
issues Of the Board of Trade Journal are advised to complete 
immediately the legitimation of their claims in accordance 
with the procedure described in the third paragraph of the 
article on 1458 of the Board of Trade Journal for 
October 19. Documents when completed should be sent to 
Trading with the Enemy Department, who will arrange for 
their despatch to Poland. 





respect 
of commercial 


page 


Any enquiries arising out of the above should be addressed 
to Trading with the Enemy Department, telephone number 
Holborn 4300. 


Lodz District (No. 21) 
Order No. 7 


Name and place 


PowrAT RADOMSZCZANSKI,. 

67 | Huta Szkla ,,Edwardow,** Sw. Rozalii 13. 
68 | Miyn Elektryczny, Radomsko, gm, Kruszyna. 

69 | Mlyn Motorowy, Rzejowiec, gm. Przerab. 


Radomsko, ul. 
i] 
t 


70 | Huta Szkla i Krysztalow »Morawski B,‘S Radomsko, ul. 
| Mila 5. 

a | Browar Parowy, Folwarki. 

72 | Olejarnia, Radomsko, ul. Narutowicza 22. 

73. | Klomnicka Fabryka Cykorii, Klomnice, p-ta Aurclow. 


Powrar Rawsko-MAzowleck! 
4 | Mlyn Wodny, Borowiec Duzy. 

PoWIAT STPERADZET. 
75 | Fabryka Pzianych, im. ,,K. 
Zdunska-Wola, ul. Krolewska 6/8, 

76 | Mlyn Motorowy, Sieradz. 


Vyrobow Kaluzowskiego,* 


77 | Cegielnia ,,Krobanow, Krobanow, gm. Zd. Wola, p-ta 
Karsznice, 
78 | Cegielnia Mechaniczna ,,W. Oczechowshi,“* Krobanow, gm. 


Za. Wola. 
79 } Miyn Udzialowy, Zdunska-Wola, ul. Sieradzka 31. 
80 Mlyn, Zloczew. 
S81 | Tkalnia Mechaniczna ,,Herszberg, Goldberg i Pik,** Zdunska 
Wola, ul. Zlotnickiego 14. 
PoWIAT SKIERNIEWICKI. 
82 | Mlyn, Skierniewice, ul. Batorego 42. 
; Powtat WIELUNSKI. 
$3 1 Mlyn Czarnozyly, Czarnozyly. 
84 | Cegielnia Parowa ,,Mokrsko,”” Mokrsko. 





Szczecin District (No. 14) 


Order No. 2 


674 } Baugeschaft ,.Ernst Beincke’’ Stettin 
Szczecin, Boh. Warszawy 32. 


Mackensenstr. 32 


675 | Techn.- Buro u. Baugeschaft Stettin, Grunstr. 11 Szezecin, 
5-go Lipea 11. 
676 | Techn.- Buro u. Baugeschaft ,,Rohe Edward’’, Stettin, 


Bismarkstr. 21 Szezecin, Ledochowskiego 21. 
677 | Baugeschaft, Stettin, Konig Albertstr. 9 Szczecin, Slaska 9. 


678 | Ubernahme all. Bauarbeiten ,,Traugott Jurk’”’, Stettin 
Gabelsbergstr. 5 Szezecin, ul. Poeztowa 5. 

679 | Ziegelei, Stettin, Berlinerstr. 25 Szczecin, Mieszka I 25. 

G80 | Ziegelwerk Zabelsdorf ,,Bruno Wurfel’’, Stettin, Harmstr. 50 


Szezecin, Hallera 50. 
681 | Ziegele, Holzhagen bei Stettin Drzewcee kolo Szeczecina. 


682 | Katielfabrik, Belgard Bialogrod, Swietochowskiego 26. 

683 | Zementfabrik. Krs. Belgard Rambin Duzy, pow. Bialogrod. 

684 | Ziegelei, Nemnin, Krs. Belgard Umienino, gm. Bialy-Zdroj, 
pow. Bialogrod. 

685 } Ziegelei, Schievelbei, Krs. Belgrad Swidwin, pow. Bialogrod. 

686 | Ziegelei, Leutzig, Gem. Vorbruch Ludzicko, pow. Bialogrod. 

687 } Ziegelei Leutzen, Gem. Parfin Leutzen, gm. Rarwino, pow. 
Bialogrod. 

688 | Ziegelei Siberberg, Krs. Arsnwalde Siberg, gm. Nowe nad 
Rawa, pow. Choszczno. 

689 | Beton, Klosterfelde, Krs. Arnswalide Klosterfelde, om. 
Renbum, pow. Choszczno. 

690 | Kachelfabrik, Arswalde Choszczno, ul. Klasztorna. 


691 | Ziegelei, Wilhelmsthal bei Reotz Wilhelmsthal pod Rzeczyea 
pow. Choszezno. 

Ziegelei, Gohren, Krs. Arnswalde Gorzno, gm. Marzenin 
pow. Choszezno. 


692 





70S 
709 
710 


711 











738 
739 


74 
74 
74: 


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oe ee 
Ce Ut 


~1I-+1 


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vane 


749 


750 





Name and place 


Dachdeckunsfabrik, Arnswalde Choszezno, Waleeznych 20. 

Ziegelei Krs. Arswalde Osiedle Wschodnie 1, k. Choszezna, 

Ziegelei, Helenowo, Krs. Arswalde Helenowo, gm. Marzenin 
pow. Choszezno. 

Ziegelei, Konigsberg Choinice, Szosa Osmanska. 

Ziegelei, Krs. Konigsberg Trzcinsko-Zdroj, pow. Chojnice. 

Ziegelei, Ladickendorf, Krs. Konigsberg Ladickendorf. pow. 
Chojnna. 

Betonfabrik, Konigsberg Chojna, Rogozinskicego 4. 

Dachziegel u. Betonfabrik, Barwalde 
Barwice, ul. Dworcowa, pow. Chojna. 

Ziegelei, Vigland, Krs. Dramburg Vigland, pow. Drawsko. 

Ziegelei, Falkenburg, Krs. Dramburg Zlocienicc, pow. Draw- 
sko. 

Ziecelei, Virchow, 
Drawsko. 

Ziegelei, Zulshagen, Krs. Dramburg Suliszewo, pow. Drawsko. 


Krs 


Konigsberg 


Krs. Dramburg Wierzchowo, pow. 





‘gclei, Falkenburg, Krs. Dramburg Zlocieniec, pow. 
M/TAWSKO. 

Ziegelei, Chrobcezyn, K. Greifenhage Chrobezyn, gm. Dziczy 

pow. Gryiino. 

1, Hasenberg, 
Radziszewo, pow. Gryfino. 

Ziegclei, Woltin, Krs. Greifenhagen Wlotin, pow. Gryfino. 

Ziegelei, Muhlenbeck Smierdnica, pow. Grytino. 

Ziegelei, Muhlenbeck 





Gem. Retzowsfelde Daleszewo, gm. 






Smierdnica, pow. Crytino. 


Ziegelei, Uchtdorf, Gem. Wildenbruch Uchtdorf, gm. 
Wildenbruch, pow. Grytino. 
Ziegelei, Buchholz, Gem. Muhlenbeck Bukowo, gm. Smier 


t=) 
dnica, pow. Grytino. 
Dachziegel u. Betonfabrik, Stopenitz, Krs. Camin Stobnice, 
pow. Kamien. 
Dachziegel u. Zementfabrik, Cammin Kamien, ul. Pocztowa. 
Sagewerk, Klommen, Krs. Camin Kleby, pow. Kamien. 
Ziegelei ,,Oestrreich Johanes”, Koslin) Buchwaldstr. 33 
Koszalin, Morska 33. 
Kosliner Ziegelwerke Wunder Willy Koslin, Korlinerstr. 
34-38 Koszalin, Rokossowssiego 34-38. 
Ziegelei von Klosowski, Koslin, Wilhelmstr. 
ul. Bieruta 56. 

Pappenfabrik .,Paul Werner’, 
Koszalin, Rokossowskiego 13. 

Betonfabrik, Nedlin, Krs. Koslin Niedalino, pow. Koszalin. 

Ziegelwerk, ,,Luise Buchholz’, Koslin Korlinerstr 23-25 
Koszalin, Rokossowskiego 23-25. 

Ziegelei, Koslin Koszalin, ul. Niepodleglosci. 

Ziegelei, Amalienhof, Krs. Koslin Amalienhof, gm. Borkow, 
pow. Koszalin. 
Kalkziegelei, Bublitz, Krs. Koslin Bobolice, pow. Koszalin 
Ziegelei, ,,Klitzke Emmy’’, Koslin, Korlinerstr. 53 Koszalin, 
Rokossowskiego 53. 
Ziegelei, Fuchtenhagen 
Koszalin. 

Ziegelei, ,, Tuchtenhagen Gustaw’’, 
194 Koszalin, Morska 194. 

Ziegelei, Arndt, Krs. Koslin Ardnt, pow. Koszalin. 

Ziegelei, ,,Mischke Georg Zulsenhof”, Krs. Koslin Zulsenhof 
pow. Koszalin. 

Ziegelei, ,,Ludtke Willy”, Koslin, Basterweg 44, Koszalin, 
Mieszka I 44. 

3etonfabrik, Regenwalde Resko (Lawiczka). 

Ziegelei, ,,W. Quandt”, Labes Lobez, ul. Rynowska. 

Ziegel —u. ,,Hohlsteinwerk”, ,,Gerhard Schatz’, 
Ploty, pow. Lawiczka, ul. Nowogrodzka. 

Dachziegelei, ,,Koepp”, Labes Lobez, ul. Bieruta. 

Kalksandsteinwerk ,,Negropp”, Labes Lobez, ul. Rapackiego. 

Dachziegelei ,,Strey’’, Wangerin Wegorzyn, ul. Rynowska, 
pow. Lawiczka. 

Kalksandsteinwerk u. Zementwerke ,,Franz Krohn’, Zowen 
Zowen, gm. Ploty. 

Dachziegelei, Wangerin Wegorzyn, pow. Lawiczka. 

Zement Ziegelei, Plathe, Stettinerstr. Ploty, ul. Szczecinska. 

Ziegelei, Plathe, Naugarstr. Ploty, szosa Nowogrodzka, 
pow. Lawiczka. 

Kalk Ziegelei, Labes Lobez, ul. Rynkowa. 

Ziegelei Plathe Coven Ploty Coven, pow. Lawiczka. 

Zementfabrik, Berlinek, Krs. Soldin Berlinek, pow. Mysli- 
borz. 

Ziegelei Berlinek, Krs. Soldin Berlinek, pow. Mysliborz 

Betonfabrik, Mutzelburg Mysliborz, Luzycke 13. 

Kache! u. Schamotfabrik, Mutzelburg Mysliborz, Zymiers- 
kiego 13. 

Betonfabrik, Mutzelburg Mysliborz, Luzycka 25. 

Betonfabrik, Gollnow Golonoy, ul. Maszewskiego, 
Nowogrod, 

Ziegelei Gollnow, Krs. Neugard Golonog, ul. Stalina, pow. 
Nowogrod. 

Zementfabrik, Stargard, Stargard, Oswiecimska 18. 

Ziegelei, Neustettin, Am Bahnhof 8 Szczecinek, Dworcoy a8 


56 Koszalin, 


Koslin Korlinerstr. 13 


Fuchtenhagen, ul. Morska, pow. 


Koslin, Buchwaldstr. 


Plathe 





pow. 


(Continued on page 115 








THE BOARD OF TRADE JOURNAL 








old 








A comprehensive range of 


RAW MATERIAL 


for the Textile Industry 
is available through the 
established firm of 


HUTTON & CO., LTD. 


BRADFORD 
Telegrams : ‘Paquito”’ 

















GRACIA 


Tel. ; 89643/4 
Grams ; YARNS 


LIMITED 


GENERAL EXPORTERS 


Overseas Buyers and Importers 


REFER YOUR ENQUIRIES and IN- 
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to Quote 


2/4 BRIDGFORD ROAD 
WEST BRIDGFORD 
NOTTINGHAM 








iF THERE A FOREIGN BODY IN THE MILK? 


pene safeguards your health in | 


more ways than from under a 
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As man progresses so he finds 
new uses for iodine. Iodine is used 
in heat-sensitive and germicidal 
paints, X-ray analysis, dyes, insecti- 
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SHAW'S 
EXPORTERS’ GUIDE 


(22nd YEAR OF PUBLICATION) 
Published Monthly at £1 -11-6 


12 consecutive issues - Post Paid 


Full information as to:— 


IMPORT LICENSING. 

CONSULAR INVOICES. 

ASSESSMENT OF DUTIES. 

CUSTOMS DECLARATIONS 

DISCOUNTS & REBATES. 

PARCELS POST REGULATIONS. 

EXPORT CERTIFIED INVOICES. 

BRITISH EMPIRE PREFERENCE. 
LEGALIZATION OF DOCUMENTS & FEES. 
CERTIFICATION OF COMMERCIAL INVOICES. 
CERTIFICATES OF ORIGIN as issued by British Chambers 
of Commerce & F.B.I. 

DEFENCE (FINANCE) REGULATIONS—SB. 
Prescribed manner of payment of goods. 


Published In two Sections owing to Paper Restrictions. 


Section 1. Foreign Countries—January, March, May, 
July, September and November. 


Section 2. British Dominions and Overseas 
Possessions—Feb., April, June, Aug., Oct. and Dec. 


The Shipping Dept. Bulletin appears in each Issue, 
containing information on matters relative to Export 
conditions and items of interest at time of Press. 


Printed and Published by 


A, C. SHAW & CO., LTD.,, 
127 CHEAPSIDE, LONDON, E.C.2. 








37, St. 


Telephone: City 3564. 





WE ARE EXPORTERS 
of 
Engineering & General Goods 


Agencies arranged. 


Offer your products to: 


NATIONAL SYNDICATE (LONDON) LTD. 
Paul’s Churchyard, London, E.C.4, 


Telegrams : Syndinai 


» 6873. Central London 


18 January 1947 














SIEMENS HROTHERS € CO.,LIMITED 


WOOLWICH £4 0 Camera) TEL. WOOLWICH 2020 






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18 J 


ee 


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ea} ay aj oe} 


~~ 





1947 

















18 January 1947 THE BOARD OF 


Nationalization in Poland 
(Continued from page 111) 





No. Name and place 
752 | Zementfabrik, Neustcttin, Am Bahnhof 27 Szczecinek, 


Kalejowa 27. 

753 | Zementfabrik, JRatibor (Ratzebuhr Raciborz, pow. 
Szcezecinek. 

754 | Ziegelei, Tempelburg, Krs. Neustettin Czaplinek, pow. 
Szezecinek. 

755 | Zementfabrik, Lindenhoff Lindenhoff, pow Walez. 
Kieserei, Nassenberg, Nassenberg, pow. Walcz. 

Kieserei Mellentin, Mielecino, pow. Walecz. 

Kieserei Tutz Tuczno, pow. Walcz. 

Ziegelei Schloppe, Czlopa, pow. Walez. 

Betonfabrik Deutsch Krone Walcz. 

761 | Zementfabrik Tutz, Tuczno, pow. Walcz. 

762 | Ziegclei Bierholz Bierholz, Walcz. 

763 | Ziegelei Deutsch Krone, Walez. 

764 | Ziegelei u. Betonnfabrik Brotzen Bruczyna, pow. Walcz 
765 | Ziegelei Ziegelbusch, Ziegielbusch, pow. Walcz. 

766 | Mech.-Tischlerei, ,,Karl Koch’, Swinemunde, Gr. Kirchenstr 
33, Swinoujscie, pow. Wolyn. 

767 | Dachziegelei, Misdroy, Elisabethstr, Miedzyzdroje, pow. 
Wolyn. 

768 | Portland-Cementfabrik, Lebbin, Lubien (Abt. Kalkofen 
Kreidegrube Kalkofen auf Wollin, Misdroy.) 

769 | Schmiedewerkstatt ,,Boetcher Paul”, Pritter, Przytor. 

770 | Mobelfavrik, ,,Emil Barthel’, Swinemunde, Neuerstr. 4/5 
Swinoujscie, Piastowska 4/5. 
771 | Modeltischlerei ,,Willi Becker’, Swinemunde, Memlerstr. 5, 
Swinoujscie, Olsztynska 5. 

772 | Goldgiesserei ,,Backmetster”’, Swinemunde, Farberstr, 17, 
Swinoujscie, Zymierskiego 17. 

773 | Eisengiesserei ,,Falthinath’, Swinemunde, Kasseberger 
schousse, Swinoujscic, Szosa Kasiberska. 

774 | Seilfabrik » Szymanski’, Swinemunde, Farbersir., 
Swinoujscie, Zymierskiego 








775 | Ruckeswerke, Swinemunde, Swinouiscie. 
776 | Tischlerei ,,Karl Koch’’, Swinemunde, Kirchnerstr. 33, 


Swinoujscie, Grunwaldzka 33. 

777 | Bootbauunternehmen »Fridrich Richard”’, Wollin, 
Fischerstr. 32, Wolyn, Rybacka 32. 

778 | Landmaschinenfabrik, Fritz Winter, Wollin, Wolyn. 

779 | Zementfabrik, Misdroy, Elisabethstr., Miedzyzdroje. 

780 | Wagenfabrik, Schmidt, Stolp, Slupsk, Kopernika 4/5. 

781 | Sagewerk, Leckow, Lekowo, gm. Zambrowno, pow. Bialo- 
grod. 

782 | Sagewerk, Kolatz, Kolacz, gmina Peplow, pow. Bialogrod. 
783 | Sagewerk, Kreitzig, Krzycko, gm. Bialy Zdroj, pow. Bialo- 
grod. 

784 | Sagewerk, Jagetow, Jaworowo, pow. Bialogrod. 

785 | Sagewerk, Poltzin, Polezyn, pow. Bialogrod. 

786 | Sagewerk, Zadtkow, Sadkowo, gm. Debno, pow. Bialogrod. 
787 | Sageweerk, Konigsberg, Chojna, Szczecinska. 

788 | Sagewerk, Bahn, Krs. Greifenhagen, Babie, pow. Gryfino. 
789 | Sagewerk, Breudemuhle, Krs. Cammin, Breudemuhle 
pow. Kamien. 

790 | Elektrische Sagewerk, Cammin, Kamien, Armii Czerwonej. 
791 | Dampf Sagewerk, Pribburnow, Przyborowo, pow. Kamien. 
792 | Dampfsagewerk, Golinow, Goliszewo, pow. Kamien. 

793 | Sagewerk, Bublitz, Bobolice, pow. Koszalin, Piaskowa Gora. 
794 | Sagewerk, Bublitz, Bobolice, Zymierskiego 324, pow. 
Koszalin. 

795 | Sagewerk, Regenwalde, Lawiczka. 

796 | Sagewerk, Wangerin, Wegorzyn, pow. Lawiczka. 

797 | Sagewerk, Plathe, Zimmehausen, Ploty, pow. Lawiczka. 
798 | Dampfsagewerk, Plathe, Neugarstr., Ploty, Szosa Nowo- 
crodzka. 

799 | Sagewerk, Regenwalde, Lawiczka. 

800 | Sagewerk, Labes, Lobez. 

801 | Sagewerk, WaniJitz, Wolnica, pow. Walcz. 





Poznan District (No. 30) 
Order No. 12 





1 | ,,Barwa’’ Chemiczne farbowanie i ezyszczenie rzeczy, Mosina 

ul. Farbiarska. 

2 | Fabryka Parowa Ultramaryny Plocki Wasserman i Ska, 

Sp. z ogr. odp., Kalisz, ul. Dobrzecka 84. 

3 |} Tartak i stolarnia, Swarzedz. 

Tartak parowy. Fabryka drewniakow i szczotck, Skoki, 
pow. Wagrowiec. 

5 | Tartak parowy. Fabryka mebli, Rawicz. ul. Hallera 11. 

6 | Tartak parowy, Glinno, pow. Nowy Tomysl. 

7 | Tartak parowy, Buk, pow. Nowy Tomysl. 

8 | Tartak parowy, Miescisko, pow. Wagrowiec. 

) | Tartak parowy, Czerwonak, pow. Poznan. 

) | Tartak parowy, Chodziez. 

11 | Tartak i Fabryka mebli, Gostyn, Starogostynska 3. 

12 | Tartak parowy, Blotnica, pow. Wolsztyn. 

13 | Tartak parowy i fabryka obrobki drzewa, Srem, ul. Rzez- 

nicka 3. 

14 | Tartak parowy i sklad drzewa, Leszno, ul. 17 Stycznia 1. 

15 | Tartak i obrobka drzewa, Leszno, ul. 17 Stycznia 17. 








TRADE JOURNAL 113 


35 
36 
pees 
od 
38 


39 


40 


4] 


43 
tt 
45 
46 
47 


48 
49 
50 











Name and place 


Jan Rejewski, tartak parowy budownictwo, przemysl 
drzewny, materialy budowlane, Wagrowiec oraz Budzyn, 
pow. Chodziez. 

Stanislaw Musiol i Syn Tartaki parowe i handel drzewem, 
Wolsztyn i Powodowo. 

Tartak parowy i handel drzewa, Murowana Goslina, pow 
Oborniki. 


| Tartak parowy, Gniezno, ul. Witkowska. 











artak parowy, Janowiec, pow, Znin. 

Tartak parowy, Bnin, pow. Srem. 

Tartak parowy Szczepan, Czajka, Miedzychod. 

Tartak parowy, Rogozno, pow. Oborniki. 

Tartak parowy, Wrzesnia, Gnieznienska 5/6. 

Tartak i obrobka drzewa, Steszew. 

Tartak parowy i sklad drzewa, Pobiedziska. 

Tartak parowy — Fuhrmann, Krotoszyn, Raszkowska 26. 

Tartak parowy, Jarocin. 

Tartak parowy, Huta Paledzka, pow. Moglino. 

Szorski Jozef, Tartak parowy i mlyn, Odolanow, pow. 
Ostrow. 

Tartak parowy, fabryka drewniakow i okulakow, Franciszek 
Dondajewski, Oborniki, Szamotulska 23/24. 

Tartak i mlyn, Wilanow, pow. Turek. 

Wspolnota Pracownikow, Przemyslu Drzewnego, Or- 
zechowo, pow. Wrzesnia. 

Mechaniczna fabryka okulakow i drewniakow, Grodzisk, ul. 
Przemyslowa. 

Fabryka maszyn, Poznan, ul. Przemyslowa 39. 

B. Ziolkowski i Ska, Poznan, Em. Sezanieckiej 8. 

Fabryka maszyn, Pleszew. Sienkiewicza 34/36. 

Wytwornia aparatow miedzianych, Pleszew, Slowackiege 
12/14. 

,Mstera” Fabryka wyrobow blaszany ch, Poznan, Wars- 
zawska 37 

Fabryka maszyn i odlewow zelaznych ,,Orkan”, Kalisz, ul. 
Piskorzewie 7. 

Metalownia, Fabryka okuc metalowych, Poznan, Strumy- 
kowa 20. 

Zaklad Przemyslowy, Poznan 27, Grudnia 5. 

Mlyn parowy Szalejewski, Szalejewo, pow. Gostyn. 

Mlyn parowy, Mogilno. 

Mlyn parowy, Ryczywol, pow. Oborniki. 

Mlyn motorowy, Rychwal k. Konina, 

Mlyn parowy, Jaraczew, pow. Jarocin. 

Mlyn parowy — Fr. Krukowski, Jarocin. 

Mlyn parowy, inz. J. Boguszewicz, Znin. 

Mlyn parowy, Buk, pow. Nowy Tomysl. 

Mlyn parowy, Kobylin, pow. Krotoszyn. 

Mlyn parowy, Margonin, pow. Chodziez. 

Mlyn parowy, Krobia, pow. Gostyn. 

Mlyn parowy, Borek, pow. Gostyn. 

Miyn parowy, Kostrzyn, pow. Sroda. 

Mlyn parowy, Granowo, pow. N. Tomysl. 

Mlyn parowy Sp. z. 0. o., Lwowek, pow. N. Tomysl. 

Mlyn parowy, Krotoszyn Stary. 

Mlyn parowy, Wielichowo, pow. Koscian. 

Mlyn parowy, Koscian. 

Mlyn parowy, Poznan-Lazarz. 

Mlyn parowy, Poznan-Krzyzowniki. 

Mlyn parowy, Dopiewo, pow. Poznan. 

Mlyn parowy, Swarzedz. 

Mlyn parowy, Steszew, pow. Poznan. 

Mlyn parowy, Granowo, pow. N. Tomysl. 

Mlyn parowy, Miejska Gorka, pow. Rawicz, ul. Dworcowa 6. 

Mlyn parowy, Kazimierz, pow. Szamotuly. 

Mlyn parowy, Mroczen, pow. Kepno. 

Mlyn parowy, Damaslawek, pow. Wagrowiec. 

Mlyn parowy, Srem. 

Mlyn parowy, Grodzisk Wlkp., pow. Nowy Tomysl. 

Mlyn parowy, Kornik, pow. Srem. 

Mlyn parowy, Wrzesnia. 

Amerykanski Mlyn Parowy Sp. z. 0. 0., Miloslaw, pow. 
Wrzesnia. 

Mlyn motorowy, Kozmin, ul. Klasztorna 82, pow. Krotoszyn. 

Mlyn motorowy, Skoki, pow. Wagrowies. 

Mlyn motorowy, Gostyn. 

Mlyn motorowy, Zagorow, pow. Konin. 

Mlyn motorowy, Krobia, pow. Konin. 

Mlyn motorowy, Ksiaz, pow. Srem. 

Automatycezny mlyn motorowy, Pyzdry, pow. Konin. 

Mlyn motorowy, Slesin, pow. Konin. 

Mlyn wodno-motorowy,. Paprotnia, pow. Konin, 

Mlyn motorowy, Goluchow, pow. Kalisz. 

Mlyn motorowy, Russew, pow. Kalisz. 

Mlyn motorowy, Grodzisk, pow. N. Tomysl. 

Mlyn motorowy, Pleszew, pow. Jarocin. 

Mlyn motorowy, Czarnkow, pow. Konin. 

Mlyn motorowy, Wilezyn, pow. Konin. 

Mlyn motorowy, Konin. 

Mlyn motorowy, Goryszewo, pow. Mogilno. 

Gnieznienski mlyn motorowy, Gniezno, ul. Wrzesinska 9. 

Mlyn motorowy, Kiszkowo, pow. Gniezno. 

Mlyn motorowy, Sroczyn, pow. Gniezno. 

Mlyn motorowy, Zdziechowa, pow. Gniezno. 

Mivn motorowy, Dobre, pow. Turek. 

Mlyn motorowyv, Sady, pov’. Poznan. 

















(Continued on page 116) 








114 THE BOARD OF TRADE JOURNAL 


18 January 1947 



































it This powerful new “Staffa” hand The “ Staffa” precision bender 

i bar ge he a nage eat weighs 45 lbs. without formers, 

az capable of bending steel and cop- =e : sit : 

i \ per tubes from Zin. to 14in. dia- which are supplied separately - 

KS : meter through angles as great as sets according to customers fre- 
Se 180°-COLD AND UNLOADED. | quirements. 


SET 1 will bend Light Gauge 
and Copper tubes @in. o.d. to 
14in. o.d., throat radius 3zin. x 


od 14in. x 2in. to 3in. 


mediate sizes, and for bend- 
ing light angles and chan- 
nels, supplied to order. 


COMMERCIAL STRUCTURES 


PRICE £14.8.0 ex works. 
Send for catalogue. 


| “Quick shaping with this new 
Precision Bar and Tube Bender” 


says Sam Staffa. 


o.d. 

SET 2 will bend Gas and Steam pr 

tubes Zin. to 1in., throat radius = “4 

13in. x o.d. 

SET3willbend Rounds) Throat (> 
up tozin.; Squares up| radius a 2 
"~~ to 2in.; Flats up to|from1in. : ina 


= 
Special formers for inter- 


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london, 4.W.2 Postal enquiries to works : 230 SHANNON CORNER, NEW MALDEN, SURREY 
Gl Adstone 4211 | 07d at BIRMINGHAM, BRISTOL, LIVERPOOL, MANCHESTER, NEWCASTLE, GLASGOW 


(AGENTS) 














1947 








eee 





18 January 1947 THE BOARD OF TRADE JOURNAL 115 


Nationalization in Poland 
(Continued from page 113) 


No. Name and place 








99 | Mlyn motorowy, Konary, pow. Rawicz. 

100 | Mlyn motorowy i tartak, Odolanow, pow. Ostrow. 

101 | Mlyn motorowy, Klodawa, pow. Kolo. 

102 |} Mlyn motorowy, Wrzaca Wielka, pow. Kolo. 

103 | Mlyn motorowy, Lisow, pow. Kalisz. 

104 | Mlyn motorowy i elektr., Strzalkowo, pow. Wrzesnia. 

105 | Zbasynski mlyn i tartak parowy Sp. z. o. 0., Zbaszyn. pow. 
Nowy Tomysl. 

106 | Wielkopolski mlyn, Nowe Miasto, pow. Jarocin. 

107 | Miyn Wolsztynski, Wolsztyn. 

108 | Mlyn wodny, Murowana Goslina, pow. Oborniki. 

109 | Nowy Mlyn, Klecko, pow. Gniezno. 

110 | Mlyny centralne, Golancz, pow. Wagrowiec. 

111 | Automatyczny mlyn, Bierzwienna-Dluga, pow. Kolo. 

112 | Mlyn wodny, Borek, pow. Turek. 

113 | Mlyn elektryczny, Lubasz, pow. Czarnkow. 

114 | Mlyn walcowy, Wolsztyn. 

115 | Mlyn walcowy, Ostrzeszow, Kolejowa 46. 

116 | Fabryka makaronu ,,Germanini”’, Poznan, Gorczynska 46, 
Sp. Ake. . 

117 | Browar Bojanowo dawn, F. Junke Sp. z. 0. 0., Poznan- 
Bojanowo. 

118 | Browar Krotoszynski Sp. Ake., Krotoszyn. 

119 | Browar Huggera Sp. Ake., Poznan, Polwiejska 25. 

120 | Slodownia, Poznan, ul. Sucha 16. 

121 | Wino i soki owocowe, Sp. z. 0. 0. ,,Likwowin’”’, Poznan, 
Wierzbowa 5. 

122 | Olejarnia, Kalisz, ul. Gornoslaska 32. 

123 | Fabryka konserw ,,Bacon Factory” jawna sp. handl. 
J. Wroniecki i B. Jezierski. 

124 | Fabryka konserw ,,Pomona” Sp. Ake., Miedzychod, 17 
Stycznia 130. 

125 | Polska Bekoniarnia Zwiazkowa Sp. z. o. 0., Janowiec, ul. 
Kosciuszki 33. 

126 | Fabryka przetw. miesnych, Braci Dawidowskich, Poznan, 
Dabrowskiego 129/131. 

127 | ,,Kanold” Sp. z. 0. o., Leszno, Kr. Jadwigi 37. 

128 | S. Holdowski, Kostrzyn, ul. Dworcowa 1. 

129 | Cegielnia parowa, Junikowo, pow. Poznan. 

130 } ,,Agrad” R. H. B. 14 Sp. Ake., Augustowo, pow. Koscian. 
131 | Fabryka dachowek, cegiel i wyrobow cementowych, Krotos- 
zyn, Ceglarska 37. 

132 | Cegielnia, Rozdrazew, pow. Krotoszyn. 

133 | Cegielnia — Weber, Zduny, pow. Krotoszyn. 

134 | Huta szkla— Zaklady Przemyslowe, Parczew — oddzial 
zakl. glownego w. Antoninku. 

135 | ,,Centra’”” Zaklady Przemyslowe, Poznan, Grochowe Laki 4, 
Poznan, Grochowe Laki 6, Poznan, Sw. Michala. 

136 | Kozminskie Zaklady Roln.-Przemyslowe 8.A., Kozmin, pow. 
Krotoszyn. : 





Silesian-Dabrowa District (No. 34) 


1 | Towarzystwo Zakladow Przedzalni Bawelny, Tkalni i 
Blacharni ,,Zawiercie’ Spolka Akcyjna, Zawiercie. 

2} Zaklady Przemyslu Wlokienniczego C. G. Schon, Spolka 
Akcyjna, Sosnowiec. 

3 | Spolka Akcyjna Przemyslu Wlokienniczego H. Dietel, 
Sosnowiec. 

4 | Zaklady Przemyslowe Wlokiennicze —,,Lenko” Spolka 
Akcyjna, Bielsko. 


5 },,Unia” Spolka Akcyjna Przemyslu Jutowo-Lnianego, 
sielsko. 

6 | Zaklady Przemyslu Lnianego ,,Wilanowice’’, Wilanowice 
k/Bielska. 


7 | Wytwornia Maszyn inz. J. Banachiewicz i Spolka Akcyjna, 
Zawiercie. 

8 | Walcownia Metali Spolka Akeyjna, Dziedzice. 

9} Polskie Zaklady Babcock-Zieleniewski, Spolka Akcyjna, 
Sosnowiec. 

10 | H. Koetz. Nast. Spolka Akcyjna ,,Fabryka Maszyn i Kotlow 
Parowych’’, Katowice. 

11 | Oberschlesische Kesselwerke B. Meyer, Gesellschaft mit 
beschrankter Haftung, Gliwice. 

12 | ,,.MOJ”, Fabryka Maszyn i Odlewnia Zelaza i Metali, Kato- 
wice. 

13 | M. Lempicki, Spolka Akeyjna, Przedsiebiorstwo Gornicze 
Wiertnicze i Hydrotechniczne, Sosnowiec. 

14 | ,,Pik”, Przedsiebiorstwo Instalacyj Kopialnianych, Spolka 
z% ogr. odpow., Sosnowiec. 

15 | Ing. Stephan Schlenck et Co., Dabrowa Gornicza. 

16 | Towarzystwo Eksploatacji Piasku ,,Tep” Spolka Akcyjna, 
Sosnowiec. 

17 | Sandbahngesellschaft der Graflich von Ballerstremschen 
und A. Bersigschen Steinkohlenwerke, Pyskowice. 

18 | Vereinigte Holzindustrie Aktiengesellschaft, Gliwice. 

19 | Piotrowicka Fabryka Maszyn, Spolka Akcyjna, Piotrowice 
Slaskie. 

20 | ,.Rapid” Zaklady Przemyslowe, Katowice. 

21 | Slaska Fabryka Maszyn ,,Montana’’ Spolka z ograniczona 
odpow, Katowice. 

22 | Towarzystwo Fabryk Portland-Cementu ,,Wysoka”’, Spolka 
Akeyjna, Wysoka. 








28 


29 








Name and place 





» OTA” Fabryka Obuwia Spolka Akcyjna, Odmet. 

Goleszowska Fabryka Portland-Cementu Spolka Akcyjna, 
Goleszow. 

Giesche Fabryka Porcelany, Spolka Akcyjna, Bogucice- 
Katowice. 

Schlesische Portland-Zement-Industrie-Aktiengesellschaft, 
Opole. 

Portland-Zement- und Kalkwerke-Aktiengesellschaft, 
Opole. 

Glashutte Hermanstahl, Gesellschaft mit beschrankter 
Haftung, Hermanstahl-Murow. 

Deutsche Ton- et Steinzeug-Werke-Aktiengesellschaft, Ziem- 
bice. 











30 | Spolka Akcyjna Przemyslu Elektryeznego Czechowice, 
Czechowice. 
31 | Fabryka Kabli Clement Zahn, Spolka z ograniczona odpow, 
| Dziedzice. 
32 | Georg Schwabe Fabryka Maszyn i Odlewnia Zelaza, Bielsko. 
33 | Fabryka Kabli i Drutu Spolka z ograniczona odpowied- 
| zialnoscia, Bedzin. 
34 | S. W. Niemojewski, Fabryka Papieru i Tektury, Spolka 
| _Akcyjna. 
35 | Gornoslaska Fabryka Celulozy i papeiru Spolka Akcyjna, 
Czulow. 
36 | Kluczewska Fabryka Celulozy i Papeiru, Spolka Akcyjna, 
Klueze k/Olkusza. 
37 | Fabryka Miazgi Drzewnej i Tektur ,,Kostuchna”, Spolka z 
ograniczona odpow., Kostuchna. 
38 | ,,Thonet-Mundus”, Polskie Fabryki Mebli Gietych, Spolka 
Akeyjna, Bielsko. 
39 | ,,Brown-Boveri” et Co., Spolka Akcyjna, Katowice. 
40 | ,,Lignosa” Spolka Akcyjna, Katowice. 
41 | Siemens-Schuckertwerke-Aktiengesellschaft Berlin, Oddzialy 
w. Katowicach i w Chorzowie. 
Order No. 6 
1 | Fabryka kosmetyczna .,Kosma”, Nowy Rynek Nr. 3, 
Myslowice. 7 
2 | Parowa Pralnia, Chemiczne czyszezenie ,,Hero”’, Helmut 
Rozenberger, Sosnowiec, ul. Sielecka 37. 
3 | Pralnia Chemiczna i Farbiarnia ,,Czerny”, Chorzow II, 
ul. Krzyzowa 15-17, oraz filie :—Chorzow II, ul. Bytomska 
9, Chorzow II, ul. 3-go Maja 3, Chorzow III, ul. Siemiano- 
wicka 53, Chorzow-Batory, ul. Koscielna 9, Siemianowice, 
ul, Bytomska 9, Kat.-Zaleze, ul. Wojciechowskiego 47, 
Katowice, Rynek JI, Katowice, ul. Plebiscytowa 10, 
Katowice, ul. Pierackeigo 3, Zory, ul. Szeptyckiego 11, 
Brzezinka, ul. Oswiecimska 7, Nowa Wies, ul. Sien- 
kiewicza 1. 
4 | Pralnia Chemiczna i Farbiarnia_ ,,Frohlich”, Rybnik, 
Raciborska Nr. 7. 

5 | Pralnia Chemiczna i Farbiarnia ,,K. Schnur’, Chorzow, ul. 
| Redena Nr. 4, oraz filie:—-Chorzow, ul. Wolnosci 22, 
| Siemianowice, ul. Bytomska 16, Swietochlowice, ul. 

Bytomska 6, Nowa Wies, ul. Sienkiewicza 7. 
6 | Zjednoczone Zaklady Praln, Otto Weigman, Katowice, 
Francuska 10, oraz filie :—Szopienice, ul. Oswiecimska 2, 
|  Lubliniec, ul. Mickiewicza 4, Nowy-Bytom, ul. Niedurnego 
50, Tarnowskie-Gory, ul. Krakowska 12. 

7 | Zaklad Stolarski, E. Feld, Katowice-Ligota, ul. Zalezka 13. 

8 | Zaklad Stolarski, Witik Pawel, Lubliniec, ul. Korfantego 3. 

9 | Zaklad Stolarski, Matuszek, Katowice, ul. Jagiellonska 13. 

10 | Zaklad Stolarski, Furman, Katowice, ul. Andrzeja 10a. 
11 | Zaklad Stolarski, W. Wodisch, Katowice, ul. Andrzeja 3. 
12 | Zaklad Stolarski, Steuer, Katowice, ul. Kilinskiego 22. 
13 | Zaklad Stolarski, Myslowice, Glowackiego 2. 
14 | Zaklad Wyrobow Drzewnych H. G. Moller, Zawiercie, ul. 
| Gornoslaska Nr. 53. 
15 | Baildon Silesia-Stah] GmbH., Katowice, ul. Pierackiego 6. 
16 | Hurtownia Pierza ,,Sodzawica”’, Sonowiec, ul. Modrzejow 
ska 18. 
17 | Zaklad Stolarski, Fesser, Katowice, ul. Wojciechowskiego 44. 
18 | ,,Kamieniolomy” Blachowka Sp. z. 0. 0., pow. Tarnowskie 
Gory. 
19 senzburger Mobelfabrik Inh. Franz Wagner, Bedzin, ul. 
Modrzejowska Nr. 78. 
y CO 
WILD «& J 
(Proprietors:—William Wild Ltd.) 
MOSS MILL HEYWOOD 
Phone : 6207 Telegraphic Address : SPINNERS 











Spouge Cloth, Dorset and 
Scourer Manufacturers 


RAILWAY and GOVERNMENT CONTRACTORS 














% 

















116 THE BOARD OF 








TRADE JOURNAL 


MURAD H. GABBAY 


BAGHDAD, IRAQ 


Commission Agents, Import, Export, Banking, 
Insurance and Manufacturers’ Representatives. 
Established in 1913. 


desire Sole Agency Rights for : cotton, woollen linen, rayon and 


pure silk piece-goods, including mixture, rayon, cotton and woollen | 


hosiery and lingeries, rayon handkerchiefs, men’s ready-made 
shirts and pyjamas, trutenized collars for men’s shirts, Jadies’ 
dresses and fur coats, ladies’ and men’s raincoats, bed blankets, 
coarse grain shot, white sheeting and shirting, sewing thread, 
half-million yards Government khaki twill, stocks or quick delivery 
are preferred, iron ware, ironmongery, iron/steel joists, iron bars 
and angles, iron plates, plain and corveneied sheets, building 
materials and electrical fittings, irrigation and agricultural ma- 
chinery, cigarette booklets and bobbins, cardboard, kraft paper, 
paper of ali descriptions, cutlery, crockery, copper sheets } to 
13 mm., also round and rectangular sheets, sanitary ware, porcelain 


ware, glass ware, earthenware, radio sets, cooking stoves, 
refrigerators, automobiles and spare parts, pharmaceuticals 
and drugs, tubes, tyres, rubber heels, rubber hoses for garden, 


mechanica! and rubber toys, perfumery, mirrors, window glasses, 
emery paper, paints of all descriptions in paste paint form, varnishes, 
distemper and automobile paints. 

Also any other lines or commodities which may have a sale in iraq, 
Egypt, Iran (Persia), Syria, Palestine, Transjordan, Bahrein and 
Kuweit, where this Firm possesses Branches and Representatives. 
These territories are visited twice annually by special Travellers 
trained for this purpose. 


IMPORTANT. The Firm reserves the right to reject Agency | 


offers for those commodities in which they are engaged for one or 
more of the above territories. 
Agencies to the above countries, either individually or collectively, 
are herewith invited to submit offers. 

TERMS. Payment by confirmed and irrevocable letter of credit. 
REFERENCES. The Eastern Bank Ltd., Baghdad and London. 
Further first-class 1A references at request. Incorp. in Baghdad. 
Reg. Com. No. 1012. Telegraphic Address: Gabbay-Baghdad. 
*Phones : Office, 6457, Manager 7276. 


Suppliers who are free to grant their | 


Firms who are interested to Export to Egypt and Palestine may 


write direct to the following branches :— 
MURAD H. GABBAY, ?P.O.B. 
PALESTINE. 

MURAD H. GABBAY, L. Giordano Blg., 3 Sharia Manchaet 

Elkataba Street, CAIRO, EGYPT. 

EXPORT FROM !RAG, IRAN PALESTINE AND EGYPT. 
The firm is ready to export the following commodities : 
and cotton, seeds (barley, wheat and maize), gums, skins (goat and 
sheep) and dry fruits (apricots, raisins and figs), almonds and Persian 


1106, JERUSALEM, 


raw wool | 


carpets, dates (zahdi in jute bags and baskets) and any other dates | 


licensed for export. 
SPECIAL NOTICE 


Mr. Gabbay is at present in England. He may be contacted at the | 


Midland Hotel, Manchester, till end of January, and then at Mount 
Royal Hotel, London. 
Mr. Gabbay is ready to buy against cash payment the following 
piece goods :— 
(a) 10,000 pces x 40 yds. weight 11} to 12 Ibs. pce. of White 
Cotton shirting, 35/6 ins. price, 50/- to 60/- a pce. 
(b) 8,000 pces. x 40/50 yds., 61 ins. to 90 ins., price 26d. to 40d. 
yd. White Cotton sheeting. 
(c) 2,000 pces. Woven Cotton poplin for shirts and 4 ane 
2 x 2 or like tricoline quality also 2 x 1 fold. Price 2/- 
6/- per yd. 
(d) 1,000 pces. woollen, worsted and fancy suitings, 9 to 20 ozs. 
56/9 ins., price, 10/- to 26/- per yd. All prices F.o.b. London 
vary according to quality offered. 











Joseph Brennan 
& Co., Ltd. 
can supply an abundant variety of 


RAW MATERIAL 
for the 
TEXTILE INDUSTRY 





Send your enquiries 
178, Sunbridge Road, Bradford 
(ENGLAND) 


Telegrams: “ PERPETUAL” 








Or through the Eastern Bank Ltd., London. | 


18 January 1947 





hh ees com 


Industrial Index 


presents each month a concise, factual survey 
of British industry—news, statistics and 
informed comment, impartially compiled 
from authoritative sources and arranged for 
easy reference. The annual subscription is 
15s.; write now for a specimen copy: 
enclosing 23d. stamp and mentioning The 
Board of Trade Journal, to 


Tue INDEX 


93. Goldsmith Street. Nottingham 


INDUSTRIAL 








R. V. SPENCER & CO. 


8, ST. MARY-AT-HILL, LONDON, E.C.3. 


DISTRIBUTORS AND GENERAL 
EXPORTERS 


Our Services are at the Disposal of :— 


MANUFACTURERS 
Wishing to Develop Their Home & Export Trade. 


OVERSEAS BUYERS 


Wishing to purchase Electric Fires, Cookers, Irons, 
Kettles, etc. Radio Receivers, etc. Oil Burning 
Appliances, Plastic Products, Sheeting, Domestic 
Aluminium Ware, Rubber Products, Mirrors, 
Reconstruction Materials, etc. 








JAHN—STRADES LTD. 


EXPORTERS 
Cables: JASTRAD, London 


Iron and Steel: Non-Ferrous Metals: Tools 
and Machinery: Chemicals and Drugs: Raw 
Materials for Industry : Colonial Produce, etc. 


SOTERIADES & CO., LTD. 


IMPORTERS 
Cables: SOTERIADES, London 





Dried and Evaporated Fruits: Canned and 
Preserved Goods: Cereals : Raw Materials, etc. 


09-60, GRACECHURGH ST., LONDON, E.6.3 


h No.: M lon House 9720/2828 








Pp 














= a 


HOPKINSON 
Motors & Electric Co: Ltd 








are manufacturing engineers of 
electric motors &° other electrical equipment 
HEAD OFFICE: 


Grangeway - Kilburn - London -_N W6 
Phone: Maida Vale 9306 (3 lines) 




















18 « 


Arg! 


Belg 


Bra: 


Chi 


Chi 


Cul 


Eg 








947 








18 January 1947 


British Chambers of 


Argentina.—British Chamber of Commerce for the Argentine 
Republic (Inc.), Calle Bme. Mitre 441 (6 Piso), Buenos 
Aires. 

British Chamber of Commerce in Rosario (affiliated to 
the above), British Consulate, Rosario. 


Belgium.—British Chamber of Commerce in Belgium, 204 
Rue Royale, Bruxelles. 


Brazil.—British Chamber of Commerce in Brazil (Inc.), 
Rua Visconde de Inhauma No. 91, 2°, Caixa Postal 56 
Rio de Janeiro. (Telegraphic address: ‘‘ Chambrit, 
Riojaneiro.’’ ) 

(Representatives in of British 
Chambers of Commerce, Anne’s Gate, 
Westminster, S.W.1.) 

British Chamber of Commerce of Sao Paulo and Southern 


London.—Association 
14 Queen 


Brazil, Rua Barao de Paranapiacaba, 64, 3° Andar, 
Caixa, ‘‘ Postal, 1621,” Sao Paulo, Brazil. (Telegraphic 


address: ‘‘ Britchamb, Sao Paulo.’’) 


Chile.—British Chamber of Commerce in the Republic of 
Chile (Inc.), Calle Bandera 227 (Piso 4°), Casilla 4087, 


Santiago. 
P.S.N.C. Building Calle Blanco 689, P.O. Box 1676, 
Valparaiso. 
China.—The British Chamber of Commerce, 27 The Bund, 


Shanghai. 


Cuba.—British Chamber of Commerce in the Republic of 
Cuba, Apartado 2642, Havana. 


Denmark.—H onorary innit for Denmark of the 
Association of British Chambers of Commerce: British 
Import Union, Raadhuspladsen 45 Copenhagen 
(Absalonsgaard). (Telegraphic address ‘‘ Britunion.’’) 

Dominican Republic.—British Chamber of Commerce, 
Apartado 602, Ciudad Trujillo. 

Egypt.—British Chamber of Commerce of Egypt, 1 Rue 
Centrale, Alexandria; Gresham House, 20 Sharia 
Soliman Pasha, Cairo, and P.O.B. 65, Port Said. 

(Agents in the United Kingdom.—The Manchester 
Chamber of Commerce, Ship Canal House, King Street, 
Manchester. ) 


France.—British Chamber of Commerce, Franee (Incor- 
porated), 6 Rue Halevy, Place de L ‘Opera, Paris. 
British Chamber of Commerce, Marseilles (Incorporated), 
2 Rue | euteinietans Marseilles. 













INDUSTRIAL /eAdadde 


VACUUM CLEANERS 


command an_ever widening sphere of useful- 
ness in commerce. They are as indispensable 
to efficiency on the farm, in the flour-mill and 
the factory as they are in the electric power- 
house. Difficulties peculiar to each have 
been effectively solved by B.V.C. Systems. 
These are just four cases taken at random 
from along list. Other problems in other 
trades await their solution, and our staff of 
experts is always available for consultation. 
Write to-day to: 


British Vacuum Cleaner 
Engineering Co., Ltd. 
(Dept. 18F). Leatherhead, Surrey. Phone: Ashtead 866 
THE ORIGINATORS OF VACUUM CLEANING 


The and 


THE BOARD OF TRADE JOURNAL 


re I |. — 
[| \ |) pte ote 
; Lo food ; bo 

t nen seonnned. i 2 ne oe 


117 


Commerce Overseas 


Iraq.—British Chamber of Commerce in Rashid 
Street, Bagdad. 

Mexico.—Central British Chamber of Commerce, San Juan 
De Letran 21 (office 713), Mexico, D.F. 

Netherlands East Indies.—London Office.—Cecil Chambers, 
86 Strand, London, W.C.2 

Peru.—British Chamber of Commerce, Edificio ‘‘ La 
Nacional”? 402, Ayacucho 309, Casilla 1913, Lima. 

Portugal.—British of Commerce in Portugal 
(Inc.), 4 Rue Victor Cordon, Lisbon. (‘Telegraphic 
address: ‘‘ Britcham, Lisbon.’’) 

Branches.—6 Rua dos Clerigos, Oporto. 
13a Rue 5 de Junha, Funchal, Madeira. 

Rumania.—British Chamber of Commerce in Bucharest, c/o. 

Commercial Secretariat, British Legation, Bucharest. 


Spain.—Paseo de Gracia 11, Letra A, Barcelona, 
Avenida de Jose Antonio 31—G22, Madrid. 
Canary Islands.—Santa Catalina Mole, Puerto de la Luz, 
P.O. Box 72, Las Palmas. 
Tangier (International Zone) and Spanish 
Morocco.—British Chamber of Commerce, 
House, Tangier. 


Iraq, 


Chamber 


and 


Zone of 
P. ani ~ ‘ 
eninsular 


Switzerland.—British Chamber of Commerce in Switzerland 
(Inc.), 21 St. Jakobstrasse, Basle. 
Branch.—3 Place St. Francois, Lausanne. 


Tunis.—British Chamber of Commerce in Tunis, 35 Rue de 
Marseille, Tunis. 

Turkey.—British Chamber of Commerce of Turkey (Inc.), 
1 Istanbul Hani, Istanbul. (Postal address, Boite 
Postale 1190, Istanbul.) 


United States of America.—British Empire Chamber of 
Commerce in the United States of America, 587 Fifth 
Avenue, 7th Floor, New York City. 

Uruguay.—British Chamber of Commerce 
Calle Piedras, 357 (2° Piso), Montevideo. 





in. Uruguay, 


N.B.—Some of these Chambers, which are established in 
the interest of British Trade, issue a Journal periodically 
or an Annual Report, which may be inspected at the 
Export Promotion Department, 35 Old Queen Street, 
London, S.W.1. 


FOR ALL INDUSTRIES, PUBLIC SERVICES AND AGRICULTURE 

















eve 





are also makers of GOBLIN THE ELECTRIC CLEANER 


FOR EVERY HOME 





-#§) 

















118 THE BOARD OF 


ADVERTISEMENTS 


TRADE JOURNAL 





18 January 1947 


ADVERTISEMENTS 





REPRESENTATIVE of Foreign Government at present 
in this country wishes to contact merchants and manu- 
facturers of Road Machinery with a view to purchasing 


large quantities of the following :— 


Motor Graders — Scrapers — Tractors — Excavators — 
Bulldozers—Crushing plant—Road Rollers—Air Com- 
pressor Units — Scarifiers — Stone Distributors and 
Asphalt Sprinklers, etc. Please contact The Engineering 
and Industrial Exports Limited, 72 Horseferry Road, 


London, S.W.1. 





ASSISTANT BUYER required by London Export House | 


with experience of Colonial markets, particularly 


Australia, and knowledge of Textiles. Apply by letter 


stating age, experience and salary required to Box S.688, 


Board of Trade Journal, 429 Oxford Street, London, W.1. | 





PRINCIPALS of substantial United States West Coast | 


importer buying for own account only, will be in England 
early spring 1947, desire preliminary correspondence 
with British Manufacturers interested in export to the 
United States and not yet represented on West Coast. 
THALSON COMPANY, San Francisco. New York Office, 
12 East 31st St. 





BUSINESS MAN visiting principal cities of Eastern 
U.S.A. and Canada in February/March, 1947, paying own 
undertake Sale Contracts or other 
business on commission. Replies to Box No. S684 


Board of Trade Journal, 429 Oxford Street, London, W.1. 


expenses, will 





JOHN YUILLE (Metal Wools) LTD., 
Scottish Industrial Estate, 
GLASGOW, S.W.2. 


Telephone :—Halfway 1644. 


Manufacturers of ‘“ HILLINGTON ”’ ELECTRICAL 
CONVECTOR AND TUBULAR’ HEATERS. 


Please ask for our catalogue. 





TRADE MASTERS LTD., Colombo, wish to contact British 
Manufacturers interested in long term policy for 
Electrical Goods and Accessories, Hardware, Surgical 
Instruments, Drugs and Pharmaceuticals, Textiles and 
Crockery. All communications to 18 Skardu Road, 
London, N.W.2. 





BELNAND LTD., Manufacturing Jewellers, 2, Glenloch Road, 
N.W.3, offer Best Imitation Pearl Necklets and Pearl Stud Ear-rings 
for EXPORT. 

Also Silver and Rolled-Gold Cuff Links, Bangles, Charms, Brace- 
lets and Brooches available for Home Trade and Export. 








For good reconditioned Cotton Textile Spinning, Weaving 
write THOMAS 


HODGKINSON, 15 Kendal Street, Blackburn (Lancs.). 


and Preparation Machinery, also Accessories, 





BUSINESS EXECUTIVE, age 40, seeks permanent position 
Export Manager, Assistant to General Manager, Overseas 
Representative or similar. Experienced current export 
procedure, financial regulations and banking practice. 
Linguist, much travelled. First-class references. Write 
Box 2535, Board of Trade Journal, 429 Oxford Street, W.1. 





MICA from India, in 
immediate delivery. Please write to : 
BELNAND LTD., 2 Glenloch 


large quantities available for 


Messrs. 
N.W.3. 


Road, London, 








WOOLLEN & COTTON 
MACHINERY CLOTHS 


OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 


Manufactured by : 


PORRITTS & SPENCER LTD. 
PHONE : 607 BURY 








U.K. and U.S.A. GOVERNMENT 
SURPLUS STORES 


We invite enquiries for all types of stores and 
equipment for Home and Overseas Markets. 


PLATTS PAGE & CO. LTD. 
175 PICCADILLY, W.1. Phone REG. 5364/5 


On official tender lists of :— 


Admiralty, Ministry of Supply, Ministry of Works 





In 











\\willY 
3 777 


ait the da 








includ: 
Raha "tox 


: (HIN 
Obtainable only 3° Retailers 


JAMES NEILL & CO.(SHEFFIELD) LTD. 1938 





SOPRURURUURURANAVAAARALALIIAAAAAAAAARAAAAAAAAAAAS 





1947 


ving 


MAS 


or 














18 January 1947 


H.M. Trade Commissioners 


and 


THE BOARD OF TRADE JOURNAL 119 


Imperial Trade Correspondents 


N.B.—Telegraphic addresses are given in brackets. In any territory where a Trade Commissioner's post is in existence United 
Kingdom firms are invited to correspond with the Trade Commissioner and not with the Imperial Trade Correspondent. 


CANADA 


H.M. Trade Commissioners 
Orrawa.—Mr. A. M. Wiseman, C.M.G., M.C., H.M. 
Senior Trade Commissioner in Canada; Mr. A. R. Bruce, 
H.M. Trade Commissioner, 56 Sparks Street, Ottawa. 


(‘‘ Sencom Ottawa.’’) 
MonTREAL.—Mr. R. K. Jopson, O.B.E., H.M. Trade 
Lambie, H.M. Trade 


Commissioner; Mr. W. D. 
Commissioner; ( ) H.M. Trade Commissioner, 
1111 Beaver Hall Hill, Montreal. (‘‘Britcom, 
Montreal.’’) 

ToroNnTO.—Mr. J. Paterson, H.M. Trade Commissioner; 


( ) H.M. Trade Commissioner, 901-902 
Montreal Trust Building, 61-67 Yonge Street, 
Toronto. (‘* Toroncom, Toronto.’’) 


VANCOUVER.—Mr. H. Oldham, H.M. Trade Commissioner, 
850 West Hastings Street, Vancouver. (‘‘ Vancom, 
Vancouver.’’) 

WINNIPEG.—Mr. D. Broad, H.M. Trade Commissioner, 
703 Royal Bank Buildings, Winnipeg. (‘* Wincom, 
Winnipeg.’’) 

Imperial Trade Correspondents 

NEw BruNSWIcCK.—Mr. W. E. Anderson, 32 King Square, 
Saint John. 

Nova Scotia.—Mr. E. A. 


Halifax. 
AUSTRALIA 
H.M. Trade Commissioners 

SypNEY.—Sir R. W. Dalton, C.M.G., H.M. Senior Trade 
Commissioner in Australia; Mr. J. R. Adams, H.M. 
Trade Commissioner ; Mr. A. W. Burton, M.B.E., H.M. 
Trade Commissioner, Prudential Building, 39-49 Martin 
Place, Sydney. (‘‘ Combritto, Sydney.’’) 

MELBOURNE.—Mr. H. F. Gurney, O.B.E., H.M. Trade 
Commissioner, Henty House, 499 Little Collins Street, 
Melbourne, C.1. (‘* Combrit, Melbourne.’’) 

BRISBANE.—Mr. S. A. Deacon, H.M. Trade Com- 
missioner, Estates Chambers, 108 Creek Street, 
Brisbane. (‘‘ Combriton, Brisbane.’’) . 

Imperial Trade Correspondents 

Sours AusTRALIA.—Mr. C. B. Jennings, Mutual Life 
Chambers, 44 Grenfell Street, Adelaide. 

WESTERN AUSTRALIA.—Mr. H. C. Reid, c/o Messrs. 
Connor, Doherty and Durack, Ltd., Howard Street, 
Perth. (‘‘ Combritent, Perth.’’) 


NEW ZEALAND 
H.M. Trade Commissioners 
WELLINGTON.—Mr. R. Boulter, C.M.G., H.M. Senior 
Trade Commissioner; Mr. H. F. Stevens, H.M. Trade 
Commissioner (P.O. Box 369), T. & G. Building, Grey 
Street, Wellington, C.l. (‘‘ Wellingcom, Wellington.’’) 
SOUTH AFRICA 
H.M. Trade Commissioners 
CaPpE Town.—Mr. W. Peters, C.M.G., H.M. Senior Trade 
Commissioner in the Union of South Africa; Mr. C. 
Kemp, H.M. Trade Commissioner, P.O. Box 1346, 
Colonial Orphan Chamber Buildings, 41 Parliament 
Street, Cape Town. (‘‘ Austere, Cape Town.’’) 
JOHANNESBURG.—Mr. L. Harrison, H.M. Trade Commis- 
sioner, Prudential Assurance Buildings, 90 and 92 Fox 
Street, Johannesburg. (‘‘ Austere, Johannesburg.’’) 
Imperial Trade Correspondents 
CapPk ProvincE.—Mr. W.R. Fryer (P.O. Box 48), Port 
Elizabeth. 
NATAL PROVINCE.—Mr. David Strachan (P.O. Box 1858), 
78-82 Salisbury House, Smith Street, Durban. 
BaASUTOLAND.—The Deputy Resident Commissioner and 
Government Secretary, Maseru. 
South West Arrica.—Messrs. Lorentz and Bone 
(Solicitors) (P.O. Box 85), Kaiser Strasse, Windhoek. 


EIRE 


United Kingdom Trade Commissioner 
Dusuin.—Mr. E. S. A. Baynes, United Kingdom Trade 


Saunders, Board of Trade, 





Commissioner, 69 Merrion Square, Dublin, C.17. 
Telephone, Dublin 63566. (‘‘ Dubcom, Dublin.’’) 
NEWFOUNDLAND 


H.M. Trade Commissioner 
Mr. W. D. Lambie, H.M. Trade Commissioner for New- 
foundland, 1111 Beaver Hall Hill, Montreal. (‘‘ Brit- 
com, Montreal.’’) 
Imperial Trade Correspondent 
& Sr. Jonn’s.—Miss W. Caldwell, M.B.E., Second Secretary 
for Customs. 


INDIA, BURMA 
H.M. Trade Commissioners 
DELHI.—Mr. R. Owen, H.M. Senior Trade Commis- 
sioner in India, Burma and Ceylon. Mr. G. T. Dow- 
Smith, H.M. Trade Commissioner, 6 Albuquerque 
Road, New Delhi. (‘‘ Tradcom, Delhi.’’) 


AND CEYLON 


CaLcutTra.—Mr. W. Godfrey, H.M. Trade Commissioner; 
Mr. W. D. Montgomery Clarke, H.M. Trade 
Commissioner; Mr. J. H. O’Hagan, H.M. Trade 
Commissioner (P.O. Box 683), Hindusthan Buildings, 
(2nd Floor), 4, Chittaranjan Avenue, Calcutta, 1. 
(‘* Tradcom, Calcutta.’’) 

BoMBAY.—Mr. K. E. Mackenzie, 
missioner (P.O. Box 815), 
Outram Road, Fort, Bombay 1. 
Bombay.’’) 

CEYLON.—Mr. C. E. Thorogood, H.M. Trade Com- 
missioner, Hong Kong and Shanzhai Bank Building 
(P.O. Box 745), Fort Colombo. (‘‘Tradcom, Colombo.”’) 


SOUTHERN RHODESIA, NORTHERN 
RHODESIA AND NYASALAND 
H.M. Trade Commissioner 
SOUTHERN RHODESIA: SALISBURY.—Mr. A. W. H. Hall, 
O.B.E., H.M. Trade Commissioner (P.O. Box 984), 
Stanley House, Salisbury. (‘‘ Tradcom, Salisbury.’’) 
Imperial Trade Correspondents ‘ 
SOUTHERN RuHopEsIA.—Mr. W. A. Carnegie (P.O. Box 
244), 8 Scott’s Buildings, Main Street, Bulawayo. 
NORTHERN Rw#opEsIA.—The Controller of Customs, 
Livingstone. 
NYASALAND.—The Comptroller of Customs, Limbe. 


EAST AFRICA 
H.M. Trade Commissioner 
Natirosi.—Mr. A. G@. C. Deuber, H.M. Trade Commis- 
sioner (P.O. Box 220), Memorial Hall, Delamere 
Avenue, Nairobi, Kenya Colony. (‘* Britishers, 
Nairobi.’’) 
Imperial Trade Correspondents in the Trade Commissioner’s 
Area 
KENYA PROTECTORATE.—The Commissloner of Customs, Mombasa. 
TANGANYIKA TERRITORY (formerly German East Africa).—The 
Comptroller of Customs, Dar-es-Salaam. 
UGANDA _PRoTECTORATE.—The Collector of Customs (P.O. Box 
f 289), Kampala, Uganda. 
ZANZIBAR.—-Comptroller of Customs, Zanzibar. 


WEST AFRICA 
Imperial Trade Correspondents 

THE GAmBIA.—The Receiver-General, Customs Depart- 
ment, Bathurst. 

GoLp Coast.—The Comptroller of Customs, Accra. 

NIGERIA.—Director of Commerce and _ Industries, 
Lagos. Tel.: ‘‘ Dircomind, Lagos.’’ 

SIERRA LEONE.—The Comptroller of Customs, Freetown. 

CAMEROONS, BRITISH SPHERE OF.—The Resident, Came- 
roons Province. 


WEST INDIES & CENTRAL AMERICA 
H.M. Trade Commissioner in Trinidad 
mr. Ay Ri: Starck, H.M. Trade Commissioner (P.O. Box 
225), 4 St. Vincent Street. Port of Spain, Trinidad. 
(‘* Trincom, Port of Spain.’’) 
— Trade Correspondents in the Trade Commissioner’s 
rea 
ANTIGUA.—The Treasurer and Coliector of Customs, Antigua. 
BaRBADOS.—The Comptroller of Customs, Bridgetown. 
BERMUDA.—The Colonial Secretary, Bermuda. 
BRITISH GUIANA.—The Comptroller of Customs, Georgetown. 
DomINnica.—The Treasurer and Comptroller of Customs, Dominica. 
GRENADA.—The Treasurer, Grenada. 
MONTSERRAT.—The Aasistant Colonial Treasurer, Montserrat. 
i — Treasurer and Comptroller of Oustoms, 
ot. 1 e 
St. Lucta.—The Culonial Treasurer, St. Lucia. 
Sr. VINCENT.—The Treasurer and Collector of Customs, St. Vincent. 
VIRGIN I8LANDSs.—The Commissioner Virgin Islands. 


H.M. Trade Commissioner in Jamaica 
Mr. F. J. Gick, H.M. Trade Commissioner (P.O. Box 393), 
Royal Mail Building, 8 Port Royal Street, Kingston, 
Jamaica. (‘‘ Britecom, Kingston, Jamaica.’’) 
oe Trade Correspondents in the Trade Commissioner's 
rea 
BAHAMAS.—The Colonial Secretary, Nassau. 
British HonpuRAS.—The Colonial Secretary, Belise. 
MEDITERRANEAN 
Imperial Trade Correspondents 
GIBRALTAR.—The Colonial Secretary, Gibraltar. 
MAttAa.—The Trade Development Officer, Royal Malta 
Library Building, Queen’s Square, Valetta. (‘‘ 'Tra- 
develop, Malta.’’) 
Cyprus.—The Imperial Trade Correspondent, Nicosia. 
Tel. Address, ‘‘ Imptracor ’’ Cyprus. 


OTHER PARTS OF THE EMPIRE 
Imperial Trade Correspondents 
FALKLAND ISLANDS.—The Colonial Secretary, Stanley. 
F1s1.—The Comptroller of Customs, Suva. 
Mauritivus.—The Collector of Customs, Mauritiu:. 
Sr. HELENA.—The Collector of Customs. St. Helena. 
Samoa.—Mr. D. R. A. Eden, c/o New Zealand Reparation 
Estates, Apia, Samoa. 

SEYCHELLES.—The Clerk to the Governor, Seychelles. 
SoMALILAND.—The Secretary to the Government Sheikh. 


H.M. Trade Com- 
Menkwa Building, 10 
(‘* Tradcom, 








Members of United Kingdom firms are invited to call upon the Department’s representatives abroad when they visit an Overseas 
eountry. It is also important that they should make a point of their representatives abroad keeping in close touch with the 
Department’s officers. 





THE BOARD OF TRADE JOURNAL 


18 January 1947 





BRITISH GOVERNMENT CONTRACTORS 


These announcements are restricted to firms and companies on the lists of Contractors to 


H.M. Government Departments. 





‘For Better 
Letters” 


iS 
kmperial Typewriter Company * 

- - : a mar 
Bamited, Leicester " 


FRANK HORSELL 
& Co., Ltd. 


33 VICTORIA ROAD 
LEEDS, 11 


Printing Inks, Colours and 
Varnishes, Roller Skins, 
Lithographic Plates, te. 


SACKS °s BAGS 


Hessian, Twill and Paper-Lined Hessian 
bags. NEW and SECOND-HAND 


Every purpose: home and overseas 


W™ PALFREY 


(JUTE) LTD. 
tiaddon House, 66a, Fenchurch Street, 
London, E.C.3 


’Grams: 
« PALFSACK, FEN., LONDON” 


*Phone: 
ROYAL 7712 





SCAPA DRYERS 


LIMITED 
Manufacturers of 


MECHANICAL CLOTH 


(Machinery Clothing) 


WOOLLEN AND COTTON MACHINE 

FELTS FOR MANUFACTURE OF 

PAPER, BOARD, ASBESTOS—CEMENT 
SHEETS AND PIPES, ETC. 


Blackburn, Lancs. 


CATGUT BANDS 
For all PURPOSES 


ANDREW JOHNSON 
& SON LTD. 


BENNETT ST. WORKS, 
ARDWICK, MANCHESTER 12 


THOMAS 
HARDMAN & SONS, Ltd. 


FERNHILL MILLS 
BURY 
LANCASHIRE 


MACHINERY CLOTHING 
MANUFACTURERS 


Products Include: 

Blanketing, Felt and Sheeting for Laundry 

froning Machines and Presses. Woollen 

and Cotton Felts for the Pulp, Paper 
Board and Asbestos Industries 





SCREWING 


MACHINES 
For BOLTS and PIPES 


Portable, for Hand and Power. 
As used by Railways, Docks, 
Public Works and Engineers. 


JAMES N. DURIE & CO. LTD. 
Works : Chatsworth Road, LEEDS 8 


“OF COURSE IF 
IT’S TURNERY 
—IT’S MASSILS” 
To all Trades! 


REPETITION WOODTURNING 





H. MASSIE & SONS 
(WOODTURNERS) LTD. 
37 PITFIELD STREET, LONDON, N.1 
Tel. : Clerkenwell 2894 (2 lines) 


McLINTOCK AND 
SONS LIMITED 


Manufacturers of 
APPROVED LIFEJACKETS, 
LIFEBUOYS, FILLED KAPOK 

OR CORK WOOD, 
SHIPS’ BEDDING, ETC. 


APPROVED M.O.W.T. LISTS 
YORKS 


ON 
BARNSLEY, 





“Dri Bu TRADE AL 


SUPREME 
SPRAYERS & SYRINGES 
FOR 
ALL PURPOSES OF PEST CONTROL 
VETERINARY, MEDICAL BRINE 
OIL SYRINGES, ETC. 
HORTICULTURAL and 
AGRICULTURAL BRASS FOUNDRY 


TBE PHILIP B. WALDRON 0O., TYSELEY, BIRMINGHAM 
Telepbene : ACO 1784, Telegrams : “DRON-WAL” B’RAM 





Secondhand, Unused and Government Surplus 


OIL ENGINES 


10 h.p. to 500 h.p. 


RECONDITIONED, PACKED and 
SHIPPED to any Port in the World 


RUSTON NATIONAL CROSSLEY 
LISTER, ete. 


Horizontal or Vertical 
Alternators or Dynamos 


MACBRIDES, LTD. 
Engineers and Export Packers 
HARWICH, ESSEX 





MILNERS 


SAFE COMPANY LTD. 


58, HOLBORN VIADUCT, LONDON, E.C.1. 


SAFES - SAFE DEPOSITS - STRONG ROOMS 
ROLLING SHUTTERS - SHELVING - ETC. 
STEEL OFFICE FILING CABINETS - DESKS 
CUPBOARDS - LOCKERS - CHAIRS - ETC. 





PUBLISHED BY His Masesty’s StaTIoNERy Orrice, LONDON. 


(Registered as a newspaper) 


Printep By Merritt & Hatouer Lrp., Lonpon, S.F. 
a 


1 
Lf 


8.0. Cops No. 72-26