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THE BOARD OF TRADE JOURNAL. : JANUARY 3, 1918. 


: 
. 


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Pee sly VELL LEDGE GL LON LRETO ONLA LENE COE AE HE ABE NE Rt Se me 





—— 


VW, 





AND 


COMMERCIAL GAZETTE 


[REGISTERED AS A NEWSPAPER.] 








Vol. C. (stts.) No. 1101.] JANUARY 8rd, 1918. [Price Sixpence. 








SPECIAL CONTENTS. 





FOREWORD— 
BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE BOARD OF TRADE, 


AFTER-WAR TRADE: 
REPORTS OF DEPARTMENTAL COMMITTEES. 


THE NEW PATENTS AND DESIGNS BILL—I. 


COMMERCIAL INFORMATION: METHODS OF DISTRIBUTION. 








LONDON : 
PUBLISHED BY HIS MAJESTY’S STATIONERY OFFICE. 





To be purchased through any Bookseller or direct from 
H.M. STATIONERY OFFICE at the following addresses: 
IMPERIAL Hovusk, Kincsway, Lonpon, W.C.2, and 28, ABINGDON STREET, LONDON, S.W.1; 
37, PETER STREET, MANCHESTER; 1, ST. ANDREW’S CRESCENT, CARDIFF; 
23, ForTH STREET, EDINBURGH ; 
or from E. PONSONBY, Lrp., 116, GRAFTON STREET, DUBLIN. 

















THE 


BOARD OF TRADE JOURNAL—Advertisements. 


JAN. 3, 1912 





WE MAKE Gem Rings, Signets, 


Medals and Masonics. 


Catalogue by 
return post. 





+s wih aT 





Samples on Receipt of Trade Reference. 





Write us— 


J.W. TIPTAFT & SON 


(on arenes neem TENET PL) 











Northampton Street 
BIRMINGHAM 








"Phone Central 6661. Telegraphic Address, “ Tiptaft,’ Birmingham. 


Cable Code, A, B. C. 5th Edition. 


Contractors to H.M. Government. 





SACKS & BAGS 
and JUTE 
GOODS 


Of all descriptions 
for all purposes for 


HOME & FOREIGN 
MARKETS. 


J. De PAIVA & CO. 


(TOM A. MACFARLANE—P. PARNHAM) 


11, DRURY LANE, LIVERPOOL. 


Telegrams—“ DEPAIVA,” LIVERPOOL. Telephone—i343 & 1363 Central, 
LONDON OFFICE: 


165, Mansion House Chambers, 11, Queen Victoria Street, E.C, 

















John Riley& Sons 


LIMITED 


HAPTON, LANCASHIRE. 





Manufacturers and Shippers of: 





Sulphuric Acid (all grades), 
Hydrochloric and Nitric Acids, 
Caustic Soda, 

Chlorides of Zinc and Magnesium, 
Arseniates of Soda, 

Tin Crystals, Stannate of Soda, 
Bisulphite of Soda, &c., &c. 











BRADFORD: 
7, Charles Street. 


MANCHESTER : 
28, Barton Arcade. 


GLASGOW : 
13, Bath Street. 


BELFAST :. 
11/13, Fountain Street. 


R. A. LISTER & CO., Ltd. 


(C1 Dept.), DURSLEY, GLOS. 





ESTABLISED 
1867. 








The Lister-Bruston | 
Automatic Electric Lighting Plant. 





Lister Engine. 





Manufacturers of 
High-Class Petrol, 
Oil and Gas Engines, 
Pumping and Lighting Sets, &c. 





wan 8 
The Lister 
Pumping Plant. 


—————— 








Shields & Ramsay 


ES LIMITED 


104, WEST GEORGE ST., GLASGOW. 


EXPORTERS OF 


Tar for Road Making. Pitch for 
Anthracene Oil. 
Carbolic and 











Sulphate of Ammonia. 

Briquette Making. Pitch f.¢ Roofing, &c. 

Carbolineum. Napthaline. Benzole. Benzine, 
Cresylic Acid. 


High Boiling Point Acids and all other Coal Tar Products. 


FUEL OIL IN BULK 
as supplied to the BRITISH NAVY 


STOCKS HELD AT VARIOUS PORTS IN THE UNITED KINGDOM. 


Managers for British Creosote Co., Ltd. 
CREOSOTE OIL for Preserving Timber supplied in bulk 
from Stocks held at Grangemouth, Middlesboro’, Hull, 
and Manchester. 
CARGOES of any size up to 8,000 tons can be loaded at 
short notice. 





Aveling & Porter 


LIMITED 











Steam Road Rollers, Traction Engines, 
Road Locomotives, Steam Wagons, 
Tractors, Portables, Cc. 


. KENT 


— 





ROCHESTER 

















Fe Co? a Ae 


1a 


ae 





JAN. 3, 1918 


THE BOARD OF 


wee 


TRADE JOURNAL. 











uo 


LIST OF THE PRINCIPAL PUBLICATIONS OF 
THE BOARD OF TRADE. 


To be purchased through any Bookseller or directly from 
H.M. Stationery Office at the following addresses : Imperial 
House, Kingsway, Londen, W.C., and 28, Abingdon Street, 
London, S.W.; 37, Peter Street, Manchester ; 1, St. Andrew's 
Crescent, Cardiff; 23, Forth Street, Edinburgh ; or from 
E. Ponsonby, Ltd., 116, Grafton Street, Dublin; er from 
the Agencies in the Britizsh Colonies and Dependencies, the 
United States of America, and vther Foreign Countries, of 
T. Fisher Unwin, Ltd... London, W.C. 


I.—ANNUAI. PUBLICATIONS ;— : 
Annual Statement of the Foreign Trade of the United Kingdom. 
1916. Vol. I. [Cd. 8632/17. | Price 6s. (post free 6s. 6d.) ; Vol. II. 
1916. [Cd. 8714/17.) Price 4s. 6d. (post free 5s. 2d.). 
Annual Statement of the Navigation aud Shipping of the United 


Kingdom for the year 1913. [Cd. 7616/l4.] Price 3s. (post free 
3s. od.). 
Assurance Companie ‘s’ Return, 1915. Part A. [H.C. 397.} Price 6s. 


(post free 6s. 7d.) 

Australia. —Re eal by Hi.M. 
the Import Trade of the Commonwealth in July, 1917. 
Price 3d. (post free 4d.). 

Bankruptcy.—Report for the year 1915. 
(post free 53d.). 

Canada.—Report by TI.M. Trade Commissioner for the year 
[Cd. 8679/17.] Price 3d. (post free 4d.) 

*Coal Shipments, 1914 and 1915. [Cd. $288/16.] 
3d.) 


Trade Commissioner on the Position of 
Cd. 8841. ] 
C. 136/16.]  Priee 23d. 
1916. 
Price 23d. (post free 


*Coal ‘Tables.—Statistical Tables relating to Coal and Petroleum Pro- 


duction in the World, 1886-1912. [H.C. 285/13.} Price 5$d. (post 
free 7d.). 

*Colonial Import Duties Return, 1915. Cd. 8094/]14.] Price 4s. 2d. 
(post free 4s. 9d.). 

Comranies.—Twenty-sixth General Annual Report, 1916. [H.C. 


120/17.) Price 4d. (post free 5d.) 
"Consular Reports Index, 1914. (Ca. 8003/15.] Price 53d. (post free 
id.). 
*Emigration and Immigration. a Tables and Report, 1913. 
{H.C. 295/14.] Price 6d. (post free 8d.) 
—— Import Duties, 1913. [Cd. 7180/14.) 


- 


Price 5s. (post free 
1900. (Cd. 7432/14.) 


and Statistical Tables. [H.C. 


cena and Exports, 1900-13, at prices of 
Price 4d. (post free 5d.). 

*Iron and Steel, 1912. Memorandum 
284/13. } Price 7d. (post free 9d.) 

*Merehant Shipping, 1881-1911. — Tables showing the Progress of 
Merchant Shipping in the United Kingdom and the principal Mari- 
time Countries. [Cd. 7033/13.} Price 93d. (post free Is.). 

New Zealand —Report by H.M. Trade C ommissione r for the year 1916. 
(Cd. 8686/17.) Price 6d. (post free 8d. 

Patents, Designs. and Trade Marks. 


2eport for the year 1916. [II.C. 


79/17.) Price 2d. (post free 23d.). 
*Railway i eturns of the United Kingdom for the year 1914. [Cd. 
8059/15.}] Price id. (post free 1d. ; 
/ *Railway epee apital, Traffic, Receipts. E —z cte.—of the 
oo Kingdom for 1913. (Cd 8938/15. Price Is. Sd. (post 
ree 2s.)}, 


South Africa. —RKeport on the Trade of South Africa for 1915 and 1916 
by H.M. Trade Commissioner [Cd. 8614.} Price 3i. (post tree 4d.) 
Statistical Abstract for the United Kingdom. 1901-1915. [Cd. $448.] 

Price Is. 9d. (post free 2s, 2d.) , 

*Statistical Abstract for the ‘Bri! ish Empire. i Ca. 7827/15. 
Price 1s. 34. (post tree ls. 7d.) 

Statistical Abstract for the British Self-Governing eens tee Colonies, 
Posses-ions and Protectorates. 1900-1914. (Cd. 8329/16.) Price 
ls. 11d. (post free 2s. 4d.) : 

*Statistical Abstract for Foreign Countries. 
Price 28. 2d. (post free 2s _84.). 

*Statistical ‘Tables relating to British Selt-Governing Dominions, 
Colonies, Possessions and Protectorates. Part XXXVIII. 1912. 
{Cd. 7667/14.) Price 6s. 11d. (post free 7s. 6d.). 

*Weights and Measures, Report for 1914. (H.C. 148/15.) 
{1 ost free 5d.). 

Il.—MonTuiy PUBLICATIONS :— 

Trade and Commerce of certain Foreign Countries and British 
sions. 29—IX. Price 4d. (post free 5d.). 
Trade and Navigation of the United Kingdom. 

Price 9d. (post free lid.). 
HI.—Wrexty PusLicatrion :— 

Board of Trade Journal and Commercial Gazette. 
free 63d.). 

IV.—OccasioNaL Pus.icaTions :— 

British and loreign Trade and Industry. Statistical Tables and 
Charts, 1854/1908. (Cd, 4954, 09.) Price 5s, 3d. (post tree 5s. 6d.). 
British Trade after the War. Cd. 8181/15.] Price 23d, (post free 3d.) 

(Cd. 8275/16.] Price 4d Dost free 5d.). : 

British Trade in british We-t Africa, Straits Settlements, British 

_Guiani, and Bermuda. [Cd. 6771/15.) Price td. (post free 744.) 

Consus of Production (1907).—Final Re ‘port, with Tables. [Cd.6320/ 12.) } 
Price 7s. 6d. (post free 8s. 1d.) 

Commercial Intelligence Committee.—Re ‘port for period October, 1913 
to October, 1917. (Cd. 8815/17.] Price 2d. (post free 24d.) 


1899-1913, 


J 


1901-1912. [Cd. 7525/14.) 


Price 3$4. 


Possec- 


August, 1917. 351—1X. 


Price 6d. ‘post 


Commercial "Travellers : Memorandum as to Regulations in force 
Abroad. [Cd, 7031/14.) Price 9d. (post free 11d. 

Exports (Manufactured and Partly Manufactured Articles (H.C. 
536/13.) Price $d. (post free 1d.). ; 

Financial Facilities for Trade. (Cd. 8346/16.) Price ld. (post free 
14d.). 

Food renin (Imported), 1904-12. [H.L. 83/13.] Price 2d. (post free 
23d.) 

Foreign Trade of the Umited Kingdom with Certain Countries. 
(H.C, 225/14.) Price 3d. (post free 1d.). 


iden * Rustcali i und New 
(post free Id ) 

Imports and E ixports ( United Kingdom and Certain Foreign Countries). 
[417/13.] Price $d. (post free 1d.) 

Inter-Imperial Trade. [H.C. 226/14.) Price 3d. (post free 1d.) 

Merchant Shipping. List of Principal Acts, Re gulations, ete., re] elating 
thereto in force November, 1916. Price 3d. (post free 34d.), 

Shipping Subsidies: Report on Bounties and Subsidies in re spect of 
Shipbuilding, Shipping and Navigation in Foreign Countries. 
_ {Cd. 6899/13. } Price 5d. (post free 6d.). 


Zealand). [{H.C. 249/13.) Price 24. 














* Publication sus pended dur ing the period of the War. 














State Railways (British Possessions and Foreign Countries). [H.C. 
287/13.] Price 7$d. (post free 9d.). 

Sugar.—Return showing production, imports and exports, consump- 
tion, etc., of various countries. [H.C. 281/11.] Price 3d. (post 
free 4d.). 

Tariffs (New)-—Brazil (Proposed). [cs 7094/13.] Price 1s. 3d. (post 
free ls. 7a4.); Bulgaria. [Cd. 2862/06.] Price 6d. (post free 73d.) ; 
Chile. [Cd. 8364/16.} Trice 1s. (post free 1s. 5d.); Colombia. 
Cd. 7353/14.] Price 6d. (post free 73d.) ; Denmark. ([Cd. 4267/08. , 
Price 6d. (post free 73d.); Netherlands (Proposed). Vg a 

Price 43d. (post free 6d.) ; Philippine Islands. [Cd. 4903/ 

Price 63. (post free 8d.); Roumania. [Cd. 2828/06.) Price 7d. sot 

free 94.) ; Russia (Temporary). (Cd. 7854,] Price 7d. (post free 9d.) : 
Servia. [Cd. 3749/08.) Price 8d. (post free wet — (Cd. 6940/11.) 
Price 43d. (post free 6d.); Sweden. [Cd. 4 64/11 .] Price 94d. ieee 
free 11} ‘d.); Switzerland. [Cd. 2765/06.] Price 7d. (post free 8 d.); 

United States. (Cd. 7128/13.] Price 1s 1d. (post free 1s. 5d.). 

*United Kingdom (Trade, Commerce, and Condition of People). 
(11.C. 320/15.| Price 3d. (post free 1d,). 

Wheat Prices, International: Return showing average prices for 1840- 
1912. [H. C. ee - Price 3d. vet free 1d. ) 








ES 


FOREIGN AND COLONIAL PUBLICATIONS. 


The following is alist of the more important Articles on Trade 
subjects contained in the Foreign and Colonial Publications 
recently received and filed for reference at the Department of 
Overseas Trade, and which are available for inspection at the 
Offices of the Department, 73, Basinghall Street, London, E.C. 2 :— 


NEWSPAPERS AND PERIODICALS. 
Commercial, Financial, and Economic. 
French Morocco: The Rabat Fair, 1917. 
“ La Dépéche Coloniale’ (Paris), 3rd November. 
British India: Report for 1916-17 of Indian Currency Department. 
Report for 1916-17 of Indian Postal Department. 
‘* Indian Trade Journal” (Calcutta), 16th November, 
China: Monetary and Exchange Situation. 
“‘ Commerce Reports”? (Washington), 20th November. 
Japan: Development of Chemical Industries. 
¥inancial and Economic Mission to the United States. 
Trade with Russia. 
‘© Yokohama Chamber of Commerce Journal,” October. 


Minerals and Metals. 
Mineral Production in Japan in 1916. 
Zine Production in Italy. 
‘* Commerce Rsports’’ (Washington), 17th November. 
Expansion of Japanese Government’s Steel Works at Yawata. 
*“* Yokohama Chamber of Commerce Journal,”? October. 
Engineering. 
Irrigation of the Niger Valley. 
** La Presse Coloniale’’ (Paris), 19th December. 
First Electric Steel-melting Furnace in South Africa. 
‘“§ Transactions of S.A. Institute of Electrical 
(Johannesburg), September. 


Engineer °’ 


Shipping and Transport. 
Effect of Decreased Lake Tonnage on Grain Carrying. 
**Oommerce Reports’? (Wasnington), 13th November. 
Increased Subsidies for Brazilian Steamship Services. 
‘* Journal of Commerce’? (New York), 26th October. 


Textiles and Textile Materials. 
Situation in Knitting Yarn Trade in South China. 


‘Commerce Reports’? (Washington), 21st November, 


Agricultural and Forest Products. 
Commercial Value of the Babul ‘Trees of British India. 
** Indian Tr ide Journal” (Calcutta), 16th November. 
Agricultural Products of Morocco. 
“* Le Lulletin des Halles”? (Paris), 3rd November. 
Balata Production in Venezuela. 


“Commerce Reports”’ (Washington), 20th November. 


OTHER PUBLICATIONS RECEIVED. 


British Indla—Report for 1916-17 on the External Land Trade of the 
Punjab. 
British North Borneo— 
Manual of Statistics for 1915. 
British North Borneo State Ruilways: 
Department of Forestry: Bulletin No. 1, ‘Timbers of British North 
Borneo and Minor Forest Products and Jungle Produce. Bulletin 
No. 2, British North Borneo Forests: Opportuniues for Lumber 
Investment. 
Canada— 
Reports of the 


Railway Rules. 


Department of Trade and Commerce for 1915-16: 
Part III., Canadian ‘lrade with British and Foreign Countries ; 
Part 1V., Mi-cellaneous JInformation--Lounties, Kevenue and 
Expenditure, Statistical Record of the Progress of Canada, etc. ; 
Part V., Grain Statistics; Part VI.. Subsidised Steamship Ser- 
vices, with Statistics showing Steamship Traffic in 1916 and Esti- 
mates for 1917-18. 

Report of the Royal Commission to Enquire into Railways and Trans- 
portation in Canada. 


Reports, Returns, and Statistics of the Inland Revenues for 1917. 
Part I., Excise. 

Eleventh Report of the Board of Railway Commissioners of Canada, 
1915-16. 1 


Abstract of Statements for 1916 of Insurance Companies in Canada. 


East Africa Protecterate—Trade Report for 1916-17 of the Uganda 
Protectorate. 
Argentina—Keport for 1916 of the Minister of Finance. 


Italy—International Year-Book of Agricultural Legislation 
Panama —Budget Report for 1918. 


(in French). 


° Publ icailon suspen: dea during the pe eriod of the War. 





it . _* HE BOARD OF TRADE JOURNAL —Advertisements. JAN. 8, 14 






















iene Gabeteniecnnebemial maneiaedh | B OJAN. 
Citas 
THE BUYERS’ GUID: 
| FOR | 
———— smut ieee § _ Merchants, Manufacturers & Shipper 
lar 8 f F ass Stean-rs taking cargo to and from London an¢ at,, Larache, Tangiers | . 
sella od B. - yn “ Steamer - Sing AR | tes Wharf, Wapping. ' | Charges for entries under this head; 
SAILINGS FORTNIGHTLY. 3s. each per week. 
The hull of the abov> steamers ire insared under tre Governmen t War Risk. | 
Fer Rates of Freight, Sailing Dates, etc., ipply to -THE POWER STEAM ee CO., Lid. (James Power and Qo.), _ 
16, CEADENEALL STRSSE, eae a 1525 Avenue and 54) Cit | Absorbent Siettings— 
Telegraphic Address—t Povvore,” London. nil , _ Tullis, Russell & Co., Markinch, Fife. 
Accoutrements, Military (Leather and Web)— 
Hazel & Co., 16, Nile Street, London, N. 
a { Accumulators— 
am 2 | Vandervell, C. A., & Co., Ltd., Warple Wi; 
sad : Acton Vale, W. 
| Acetylene Lighting and Welding Plant. Flares 
' i: Handiamps— 
52 The Acetylene Corporation, Ltd., 49, Victor 
BS Street, Westminster, London. * 


Acetylene Lighting and Welding Piants— 
Imperial Light, Limited, 123, Victoria Str 
London, 8.W. 





Acid Jars— 
Kennedy, H., & Sons, Ltd., Barrowfield P 
teries, Glasgow. 


Gas ON 
lee ie lie. ead Ct etd. ECONOMI SERS | 
PETROL al * LK ae ae fae) SUPER HEATERS 


Aerial Ropeways— 
Cradock, G., & Co., Ltd., Wakefield, Engla 


Aerial Wire Ropeways— 

White, R., & Sons, Widnes, Lancs. 
Aeroplane Accessories— 

Cradock, &., & Co., Ltd., Wakefield, Engla 
Aeroplane Tubes— 

Accles & Pollock, Lid., Oldbury, Birmingh: 


Albumen and Yolks— 
Miller, Jas., Son & Co., 79, West Nile § 


O1L,. we agg OS a | C4 : ’ » 4 : A | REFLEX GHAGES 
ACID. «3 = wide bef iF Mae PETROL MOTORS 
aor Y eaci. Oe 4 ie Wit a OIL ENGINES 
SUPERCEDE 4 Sa ee om | EL TANI PREDSES 

| FOR HYDRA ULE 5 a ik 1. Al S171 OR ¢Sh x jg ETC ETC™ 


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etn RNR RR a ee ate ror 
SS Se ee ee peak ae RRS es soak tee 
— - .* . —s —- 
———— 


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Glasgow. 

Albums— a 

Chapman & Sons, 5, 6, and 7, Elisak 
Place, Rivington Street, London, E.C. 4 
: 2h ; . 

AA legram 6 IDON  # Alkali Manutacturers— 

ea LOND ONE, OE IERIE a io er, aes oP, Brunner, Mond & Co., Northwich, Chesbi 
Alloys— « 

Bingham, Charles & Co., 11, Queen Victe 
WRITE FOR CATALOGUF 44. Street, London, E.C. Works:—Manchest™ 
England, and Notodden, Norway. ’ 
Blackwell, G. G., Sons & Co., Lid., \ 


é rq 9 > | Albany, Liverpool, and at 10, Eastche 
Reg. ys LU A Ee om ed Brit. London, E.C. Molybdenum, Tungsid 
Vanadium, Chromium, Aluminium 1 


all other alloys used in the manufactw 





Makes Cement and Concrete Waterproof. of High-grade steels. . 
. Thermit, Ltd., 675, Commercial k 
Preserves Reinforcement from Rust. London, E. 










Aium and Sulphate of Alumina— 


AQUAREP” is a paste, which when dissolved in water for | Australian Alum Co., Ltd., Works: i 
mixing Cement and Concrete renders the whole mass PERFECTLY | nM, ae < 0 op rams: ‘Alum B. 
and PERMANENTLY WATERPROOF at a small additional cost. | 20, ig EC3 Manufacturers 





“Special Alum” for Paper Makers, 


» 2 | Clear Crystal Alum. 
© Be, ii a aad FP RB ©  @ ] EF { N G Limited, | moe, James C., we Ghewnicel ont ae 
20, High Holborn, London, W.C. 1. a 


Telephone: Holborn 6333. Aluminium— 


Blackwell, G. G., Sons & Co., Ltd, 
Albany, Liverpool, and at 10, Eastehes 
oy a London, E.C. 
| Ammonla— 

Brotherton & Co., Ltd., Leeds. 


Ammunition Manufacturers— 
Curtis's & Harvey, Ltd., Cannon St 
House, London, E.C. 
Nobel’s Explosives Co., Ltd., Nobel Ho 
195, West George Street, Glasgow. 


Anglo-Dutch Tiles— 


Carter & Co., Ltd., Encaustic Tile Wor 
Poole. 





"rnaTt 2 tw. T= aN‘ Eh hlUCK ET FE UT 







Aniline Colour Manufacturers— 
Barr, James C., Ltd., Chemical and Coli™ 
Merchants, 27, Blythswood Square, . 
gow. Acid dyes, direct, basic, sulphur, 
soluble, pigment, and Pure Dyes for {0 
colouring. 
_wia 7 Levinstein, Ltd. Works: Blackley and Cle 
SS ton, Manchester, Ellesmere Port, ™ 


aL 


i } Ki s ae ! Chester, Framingham, Mass., U. Ae 
ee PREPARING MACHINERY xv The be st Th World | Wiguards, Itai.” Aloo makers of Krome 


Telegrams: “Levinstein, Manchester.” 

















ife. 
n, N. 
rple W; 


Flares 


|, Victoy 


ia Stre 


field F 














Jan. 3, 1918 THE BOARD OF TRADE JOURNAL—Advertisements. iii 





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Longitudinal Section of 160 tons Rolling Furnace, showing rela 


position of Magnesite Bricks, Chrome Bricks, 
























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BUYERS’ GUIDE— continued. 


Anti-Fouling Compositions— 
Dampney, J., & Co., Ltd., Cardiff, London, ete. 
Proprietors of the well-known “ Enameline” 
and “ Sword ” Brand Compositions for Home 
and Baltic, and _ badly-fouling waters, 
respectively. 


Anti-Friction Metal— 
Magnolia Anti-friction Metal Company of 
Great Britain, Ltd., 49, Queen Victoria 
Street, E.C. Telegrams: Magnolier, Londoa. 


Aperient and Table Waiter Bottlers (Aquaperia, Etc.j— 
Camwal, Lid., Harrogate, England. 


Artificia! Flower Manufacturer— 
Lynch, John, 2, Spear Street, Manchester, 
Leaves, Foliages, Seeds, Badges for Flower 
days, Preserver of Natural Ferns, Grasses, 
Moss, ete. 


Art Pottery (Hand-made), Porcelain and Earthenware, 
Useful and Decorative— 
Moorcroft, W., Ltd., Potters. Burslem, Stoke- 
on-Trent. 


Art Pottery (High Class)— 
James McIntyre & Co., Ltd., Washingtea 
China Works, Burslem. 


Art Publishers— 
Faulkner, C. W., & C., Ltd., 79, Golden Lane, 
London, E.C. 1. Great Thoughts Series, 
Xmas Cards, Calendars, Post-Cards, ete. 
Also Pictures, Show-Cards, etc. 


Asbestos Coverings— 
Newall’s Insulation Company, Ltd., Newcastle- 
upon-Tyne, and branches. 


Asphalte— 
Val de Travers Asphalte Paving Company, 
Ltd.,Hamilton House, 155, ishopsgate, 
London, E.C. Branch in Alexandria (Egypt). 
Asphalte Mines at Ragusa (Sicily). Sole 
proprietor of the Seyssel Asphalte Mines, 
Pyrimont (Ain), France. 


Autogenous Welding Supplies— 
Blackwell, G. G., Sons & Co., Ltd., The 
Albany, Liverpool, and at 10, Eastcheap, 
London, E.C. 


Automatic Coin Weighing Machine Manutfacturer— 
Oertling, L., Turnmill Street, London. 


Automatic Scale Manufacturers— 
Pooley, Henry, & Son, Ltd., John Bright 
Street, Birmingham. 


Automatic Weighing Machines— 
Denison, Saml., & Son, Ltd., ‘Middlewood, 
Leeds, Auto-Weighers for Conveyors, Aerial 
Rope Ways, Railway Tracks, and Overhead 
Mono-rails. 


Balances (Assay. Chemical and Bullion)— 
Oertling, L., Turnmill Street, London. Two 
Highest Awards Turin, 1911. 


Baling Presses— 
Hindle, Son & Co., Beaver Works, Cornbrook 
Road, Manchester. Sole makers of Hindle’s 
Patent Electric Baling Presses for all pur- 
poses. 100 Bales packed for One Unit. 
“ To operate, simply press the button.” Tele- 
phone—Trafford Park 566. 
H. I. Roberts, 42/9, Castle Street, Liverpool. 
Patentee of Improved Baling Presses to 
make up to 300 bales per day by hand- 
power. Require no skilled labour. Especially 
adapted for Colonial use; also Patent 
Hydraulic Pump and Patent Adjustable 
Buckles for lashing bales, Telegrams—In- 
genious, Liverpool. Codes A.B.C, and 
Engineering. 


Barium— 
Hedworth ‘Barium Co., Ltd., Newcastle-on- 
Tyne. 


Barometers and Thermometers— 
Hicks, James J. (Incorporated with W. F. 
Stanley & Co., Ltd.), 8, 9 and 10, Hatton 
Garden, London, E.C. 


Basketware and Wicker Furniture— 
Scott, G. W., & Sons, 144, Charing ‘Crosa 
Road, London, W.C. Telephone: Regent 
154. T. A.: Picnic, London. Fitted 
Luncheon and Tea Baskets, Motor Cases. 
Baths and Sanitary Castings— 
Planet Foundry Co., Ltd., Guide Bridge, near 
Manchester. 
Bedsteads— 


Taunton, John and Joseph, Ltd., Sherbourna 
Road, Birmingham. 


MOORCROFT WARE. 
HAND-MADE DECORATIVE OBJECTS. — ieccration of the House, 


THROWN and TURNED POTTERY, comprising Vases, Bowls, Jardinitres—Tea, Coffee and 
Dessert Sets—Karly Morning Sets—Coquetiers—Muffineers—Inkstands—Pen Trays—Candle- 
sticks—Toilet Table Accessories—Children’s Mugs— Dress Buttons— Brooches—Hat-pins. 


GOLD MEDALS ST. LOUIS, 1904 BRUSSELS, 1910 | GHENT, 1913. 


W. MOORCROFT, L!®- 
porTrerRS. BURSLEM. 


WORKS ADJOINING COBRIDGE STATION (N.S. Railway). 







Telegraphic Address: 
* Moorcrort, Burslem.’’ 
Code used, A.B.C. 


Telephone: 423, Porrerires CentTRAL. 


THE EYRE SMELTING CO., L.td., 
ORES, ASHES, DROSS, SKIMMINGS, 


or metallic residues or bye-products of any kind of 
TIN, LEAD, or ANTIMONY. 


Send a sample to us before disposing of your material elsewhere. 
MAXIMUM PRICES—-SPOT CASH. 
Head Office: Merton Abbey, London S.W. 19. 


Telephone —- Wimbledon 591. Telegrams —“ Analyzing, Mert, London.” Cables—*‘ Analyzing, Lendon.’ 
Codes—A. B. C. 5th Edition. ; Liebers; Western Union; Bentley’s. 


Tandem Works, Merton Abbey, London, S.W. 19. 
Barden Road Works, Tonbridge, Kent. 





works = - { 





Cables: **‘ HYMO,’’ BRADFORD. 


JAMES HYMANS 


MANUFACTURER OF 


WOOLLEN, WORSTED and 
COTTON PIECE GOODS for 
MEN'S & WOMEN'S WEAR. 


Gabardines, Mixtures, Cheviots, Coverts, 
Linings and interlinings, Art Silk Fancies, 
|Plain and Figured Poplins, Venetians, Corkscrews, etc., etc. 








Tropicals, 


Serges, 





Milis: -- 
Morthbeck, Keighley, Portiand Street, and 
Croft Street, BRADFORD. 


BRUSHES & 
BROOMS. 


S. LUDBROOK & Co., Ltd., 
MILE END, 
LONDON. 


Selling Offices :— 
24, Bolton Road, 
BRADFORD. 








iv THE BOARD OF TRADE JOURNAL—Advertisements. 





Telegrains : 
Paget, Aldersgate, 
London, 


Telephones : 


Oentral 5700 (2 lines) R. G. PAGET & SON, Ltd. 


Private Exchange. EST. 1780. 
48-49-50, ALDERSGATE STREET, LONDON, E.C. 1. 


facturers of: MARQUEES, GARDEN TENTS, TARPAULINS, LORRY COVERS, CAMP EQUIPMENT, 
ee 9 and all classes of CANVAS and ROPE GOODS. P 


Srpecialitv: AERONAUTICAL SHEDS & FRAME TENTS. 


Factories—NEWINGTON GREEN Rp. and ALBION RD.. N. 
Telephone ~—Dalston 1587 and extension. 


Contractors to THE ADMIRALTY, WAR OFFICE. 
HM. OFFICE OF Works, etc. 





JAN. 3, 19]8 
BUYERS’ GUID E—continued. 


Beltings (Solid Woven Hair, Cotton and Conveyer)- 
Bright, John, & Bros., Ltd., Rochdale. 


Bevelled and Bent Glass— 

Stevens, James, & Son, Victoria Glass Works 

Dartmouth Street, Birmingham. 
Billiard Cloths— 

Mitchell, Inman & Co. (Proprietors: W. ¥. 
Jarvis, Hy. Langley), 39 and 40, Cloth 
Fair, London, E.C. 

Binocular Glass Manufacturers— 

Ross’ Optical Works, 3, North Side, Clapham 

Common, 8.W. 
Binoxide of Barium— 
Hedworth Barium Co., Ltd., Newcastle. 


Biacking (Nubian) Black and Brown— 
The Nubian Manuiacturing Co., Lorrimore 
Street, S.E. 
Biankets and Rugs— 
Leopold, Frank, 1 aud 2, Addle Street, 
London, K.C. 
Biasting Gelignite and Gelignite— 
Curtiss & Harvey, Cannon 
London, L.C. 
Nobels t.xplosives Co., Nobel House, 1%, 
West George Street, Glasgow. 


Street House, 


Bieaching Powder-— 

Barr, James C., Litd., Chemical and Colow 
Merchants, 27, Blythswood ‘Square, 
Glasgow. 

Brunner, Mond & Co., Northwich, Cheshire. 

Electro Bleach and By-Products, Ltd, 
Middlewich, Cheshire. 


Boats (Seamiess Stee! Life Boats and Motor Boats)— 
Seamless Stee] Boat Co., Ltd., Wakefield. 


Boiler Compounds— 

Dampney, J., & Co., Lid., Cardiff. London 
Otiice, 87, Bishopsgate, EK.C.; also at Liver- 
pool, Manchester, Leeds, Newcastile-on- 
‘'yne, and Paris. “ Apexior” Compound, 
basis 98 per cent. carbon. Not a Boiler 
Fluid. Applied to internal surfaces like 
paint. Wrice tor interesting bookiet. 


Boiler Compounds (Barton’s Patent Boiler Briquettes, te 
Prevent Pitting, Corrosion and for ihe Removal and 
Prevention of Scale)— 

Bartoline (huli), Ltd., 2, Myton Place, Hull. 


Boiler and Steam Pipe Coverings— 
Newalls Insulation Company, Ltd., New: 
castle-upon-T'yne, and branches. 
Boilers (Water-Tube)— 


Howden, J., & Co., Lid., 195, Scotland 
Street, Glasgow. 


Book Cloth and Tracing Cloth Manufacturers— 

The Winterbottom Book Cloth Co., Ltd., 12, 
Newton Street, Manchester. Manufacturers 
of Bookbinders’ Cloth (speciality ‘“ Winvis 
Brand”), Art Fabrics, Morocco Cloths, 
Buckrams, etc., also Imperial, Excelsior, 
Sagars, Dowse, Reliance, and Universal 
brands of Tracing Cloth. 

Boot Polish, ‘‘ Baimoral Giass,’’ Nubian ‘‘Ojo Paste’— 

The Nubian Manufacturing Co., Lorrimore 
Street, London, 8.E 

Boot Protectur Manufacturers— 

Giles, John, ‘& ‘Sons, Ltd., Bristol, Tele- 
graphic Address: “Giles, Bristol.” Makers 
ot the “Giles” Boot Protectors and Hob 
Nails. 

Boots and Shoes— 

Clemson, John, Ltd., Derby, England. Manu- 
facturers of the “ Victory” Brand of Boys’, 
Maids’, and Children’s Footwear. 

Riley, B. (Desborough), Ltd., Desborough. 
Established 1868. Manufacturer of Men’s 
and Boys’ Boots. Export to all Markets. 

Wall, Howard, Ltd., 25/37, Hackney Road, 
London, E.2. Makers of Infants’ Soit 
Shoes, “ Jolie Bebe” in all materials. 

Borax anc Boracic Acid— 

Borax Consolidated, Ltd., 16, 

London, E.C. 
Brassfoundry (Builders)— 
May & Padmore, Lid., 
Street, Birmingham. 
Brass and Copper— 
Clifford, Charles, & Son, Ltd., Birmingham. 
Briar Pipes and Tobacconists’ Fancy Goods— 

Perkins, H., & Sons, Ltd., Compton Works, 
33, Compton Street, Goswell Road, 
London, E.C. 


Eastchee2p, 


118/123, Leopold 





Jan. 3, 


MAI 
HO 





Tau 





¢ 


Metals 











.§ 
Cloth 


phan 


mb0re 


os 


Peet, 


Ouse 


~ 


ylour 


ew- 


ind 


ers 
vis 
hs, 


ga! 


re 


le- 
Ts 
ob 











jay. 8, 1918 


THE BOARD OF 


MAID, MATRON, COLONIAL, IDRI COSTUME CLOTHS 
HOUSE WIFE APRONS and other well known brands. 





ROSE, HEWITT & CO., Manufacturers, 


Ta.aeecaam coenane 7—ARCTIC, MANCHESTER. 
2886. 


Dyed Satins, White and Dyed Satteens, Drills, 

Piques Royal Ribs, Fancy Cotton Dress Goods, 

Zephyrs, Galateas, Oxfords, Harvards, Flannelettes, 
White and Grey Sheetings, Caliooes, Ko. 








Minshull Street, MANCHESTER. 


Mitas:~SKIPTON, YORKS. 
LONDON, 11, Atpermmansury Avenve, 2.6. 


io, 


Nat. Ter. No. 





FATTY ACIDS, GREASE, 





ALL CHEMICALS, BARYTES, LITHOPONE. 


362, CITY ROAD 





DEXTERS Limited, LONDON, E.C. 











(ee 


AS ‘4 


WENGERS, LE: 


_ 
rr 


a 


7” ‘ 
fa MA Cris Nita CIDR he 
ETRURIA, 
STOKE-ON-TRENT, Engiand. 


MANUFACTURERS OF 





hd LE, 


Pid 





COL.OURSD W& CHEMICALS, 


for Potters, Clazed Brick Manufacturers, Classmakers, and Enamellers on Metals. 





Enamel and Underglaze Colours. Liquid Gold and Lustres. 


RAW MATERIALS. METALLIC OXIDES. GLAZES & FRITTS, PLUMBIC & LEADLESS. 


PHOSPHOR BRONZE LAWN SIEVES. 





PRICE LISTS AND SAMPLES SENT ON DEMAND. 





J, B. GARN i | an M By 
182, Upper Thames St., LONDON, E.C. 4. 
Cash Buyers ot every description of O}« 
Metals and Residues, viz., Copper, Brass, 


BMERY BROS., 


Manufacturers of ROLLED METALS, Brass, 

Dipping, Gilding, Princes, Composition for Engray- 

ing Purposes, Clock Wheels, &c., and Cartridge 

Metals, Blanks for Percussion Caps, Cartridges, 
Buttons, &c. 


Victoria Rolling Mills and Meta! Works, 
LICHFIELD ROAD, BIRMINGHAM. 


TON, near 
TELEPHONE—EAST 10, 


METALS. 
SONS, 





Lead, Zinc, &c., &c. 
Sellers of New Metals. 























Ha 

















WN 


Were 1873 


x 


sTartdrmeanla Protects, — *ral Chemicals aMotals 


CRESOL S 
NAPRTHAL INE. 
& POTASH. 
MURIATE of AMMONIA. 

YROPHOSPHORIC ACID for Dyeing & Tanning. 


OUNN BROTHERS & CO. 


tia ve 






RO s ul! 
BR nO SkOe 


‘ . ital - ; 
4 =t at . ‘ “os ~ = re paw fa + Beyer 
? . a, * ; 7? iv aes : 
‘ ‘ , , ut 
. a @ “ ae &. 8 x. » we i? * Bd 
Y ‘ hes ye i J »'¥ by fan * 
4 i " 
; * % ? ry ‘ : . ® ' 
; re oe ‘ ‘ 
a ¥, 2 ye 4 . 
J “y . 
: < 
i sy ¢ 4 +s 


NN BROs, 


NORTHERN 
veces 
LAN RT SQUARE 


“AN, HEST 











—— 


a>. 
re a ETT 





ANILINE PYRIDINE. BENZOLE. *° TOLUOLE. 
CREOSOTE. PITCH. TAR. CAUSTIC & CARBONATE of SODA 
SALYCILIC ACID. SULPHATE, CARBONATE PHOSPHATE & 
TINPLATES, ELACKSHEETS, etc. PHOSPHATE of SODA. 
TRI-BASIC PHOSPHATE of SODA, etc. 


Telegrams: **DUNNS, MANCHESTER,” 
A.B.C. (4th & Sth Editions); A. B.C. (5 letters, ; LIEBERS; LIEBERS (3 letters). 
Northera Assurance Buildings, AL BERT SQUARE, ‘MANCHESTER, 


PHENOL 


Codes ; 









































© weeaee “ 
Se eS ES. ear» an wae 


TRADE JO URNAL—Advertisemen ts. Vv 


~—_—— ——/|™ 


BUYERS’ GUIDE—continued. 


Bridges, Suspension— 
Cradock, G., & 
England. 
Briqueties (See Patent Fuel)— 
The Crown Preserved Coal Co., Ltd., Cardiff, 
Brush and Broom Manufacturers— 
‘eee S., & Co., Ltd., Mile End, London, 


Co., Ltd., Wakefield, 


Brush Making Machinery— 
Hill & Herbert, Ltd., 
Leicester. 
Brush Making Materials— 
Metzger, S., & Co., 16, Market Street, Ber- 
mondsey, London, S.E. 
Brush Manufacturers— 
M. Neuhafer & Levi. Cily Showrooms: 
Fore Street, London, E.C. 


Huntrade Works, 


11, 


Singleton, Flint & Co., Newland Works, 
Lincoln. 

Buttons (Fancy, of all kinds)— 

Barber, J., & Co., Ltd., 2, St. George's 


Crescent, Brearley Street, Birmingham. 

Cable Making Machinery— 

Glover, W. T., & Co., 
Manchester. 

Cables and Wires— 
Glover, W. T., & Co., Lid., Trafford Fark, 
Manchester. 
Henley’s, W. T., 
London, E.C. 
Hooper's Tele or aph and India-Rubber Works, 


Ltd., London, 

Western Electric Company, Ltd., Norfolk 
House, ‘Norfolk Street, London, W.C.; 
Works—North Woolwich, E. 

Cableways and Runways— 
Cradock, G., & Co., Lid., Wakefield, England. 
Calcium Carbide— 

Acetylene Corporation, 
Street, Westminster, London. 

Bingham, Charles, & Co., 11, Queen Victoria 
Street, London, E.C. Works :—Manchester, 
England, and Notodden, Norway. 

Imperial Light, Ltd., 123, Victoria Street, 
London, SW. 


Camera and Shutter Manufacturers— 
Ross’ Optical Works, 3, North Side, Clapham 
Common, 
Thornton-Pickard Manufacturing Co., Lid., 
Altrincham, England. Telegraphic Address : 
“ Pickard, Altrincham.” Telephone nunm- 
ber: 69 Altrincham. 


Candie Manutfacturers— 
Prices Patent Candle Co., Ltd., Belmont 
Works, Battersea, London, S.W. 


Candle Shades— 
Henry Wolff & Co., 
E.C. 1. 
Canvas (Cotton), Motor Ducks and Fabrics— 
Bright, John, & Bros., Ltd., Rochdale. 


Carbolic and Cresylic Acid— 
Miller. Jas., Son, & Co., 79, West Nile Street, 
Glasgow. 
Carbonate of Ammonia— 


Western Chemical Co., Greenock, Scotland. 
Sole makers of “ Thistle Brand.” (Regd.). 


Ltd., Trafford Park, 


Telegraph Works Co., Ltd., 


Ltd., 49, Victoria 


13, Bunhll Row, London, 


Card Index Cabinets— 
Chapman & Sons, Ltd., 1 and 3, Ebor Street, 
Shoreditch, London, E. 
Cartridge Manufacturers— 
Curtis's & Harvey, Ltd., Cannon Street 


House, London, E. 
Nobel’s Explosives Co., Ltd., Glasgow. 


Casein and Milk Food Products— 
Casein, Ltd., Culvert Works, Battersea, 
London. Manufacturers of Casein for aN 
known uses, milk products and by-products. 


Cattle and Pig Troughs— 


W. P. Butterfield’s, Ltd., Shipley, Yorks. 
Telegrams: “Tanks, Shipley.” Telephone: 
35 Shipley. 


Caustic Soda— 


Barr, James C., Ltd., Chemical and Colour 


Merchants, 27, Blythswood Square, 
Glasgow. 
Chains, Cables and Anchors— 
Green, John, Crown Chain Works, Old Hill, 


Staffordshire. Chain, Chain Cables, and 
Anchors of all descriptions. Telegrams: 
Green, Old Hill. Telephone: 14 Cradley. 











vi THE BOARD OF TRADE JOURNAL—Advertisements. JAN. 3, 19185 
BUYERS’ GUIDE—continued. 
Telegraphic Address :—‘‘ VULCAN, BIRMINGHAN,”’ Chair Seats (Plywood)— 
Venesta, Ltd., 1, Great Tower Street, 
DUGARD BROS. nit, 
MANUFACTURERS OF ALL KINOS OF 9 Chemicai Brokers and Merchants— 


JAN. 3, 





TEL 





Barr, James C., Lid., 27, Blythswood Square, 

ROLLED METALS, WIRE, AND TUBES, Glasgow. Alum Cake, Bloaching Powder 
| icarb, Bisulphate, Caustic and Sulphite 

VULCAN MILLS, BIRMINGHAM. Soda, Epsoms, Commercial and Dress 
Glauber’s Salt, Sulphate Alumina, Mag. 
nesium Chloride, Chloride of Ammonia, 
Carbonate of Ammonia, Oxalic Acid. Also 
Dyes, Direct, Basic, Sulphur, Oil Soluble, 
Pigment and Pure Dyes tor food colouring, 


etc. 
Dexter’s, Ltd., 362, City Road, London, E.C. 
Chemical and Dye Plant— 





Chemical Engineering Co., 49, Deansgate, 
Manchester. ‘Telegrams: “Calling, Man. 
chester.” 


Chemical Manufacturers— 

Acme Chemical Co., Ltd., Tonbridge, Kent, 
and River Street, Bolton, Lancashire. 
Arsenite of Soda, Arseniate of Lead, paste 
and powder, Powder Sheep Dip (Arsenical), 
approved by Board of Agriculture, for Scab 
in Great Britain. “Acme” Weed Killer, 
permanently destroys Weeds. Quassia 
Chips. “Fumerite,” tor Destroying Ground 
Vermin, such as Ants, Slugs, Wireworm, 
etc. Tree Washes. 

IN THE Anglo-Continental Guano Works, Ltd., Dock 
House, Billeter Street, E.C 


Blythe, Wm., & Co., Ltd., Church, Lancs. 
BRI } ISH EM PIRE Boots Pure Drug Co., Ltd., The Laboratories, 
e : Nottingham, Contractors to H.M. Govern- 
ment. Manufacturers of Acetyl Salicylic 
: Acid, ‘Atropin, Beta Eucaine, Chloral for- 
Proprietary Brands— MANTLES for all systems of mamide, Chloramine-T, Chrloroform, Digi- 


talin, Hexamine, Homatropin, Hyoscine 
IRONCLAD, DREADNOUGHT, Lighting, High and Low Hydrobromide, Paraldehyde, Phenacetin, 
IRIS AD s Phenazone Salicylate, Saccharin, Salol, 
, AL DIN. Pressure Gas, Oil, Petrol, &C. oe Soda agi =. me’ ’Phone, 
, elegrams: Drug, Nottingham. 
EXPORT ENQUIRIES A SPECIALITY. Siti Deen, 1Ad., Mnddocsiell. 

| Brunner, Mond & Co., Ltd., Northwich, 

H Cheshire. 
ead Office: Factories: Electro Bleach and By-Products, Ltd., Middle- 


wich, Cheshire. 


GANNON STREET HOUSE, | DARTFORD, EARLSFIELD, — gstvc:s3r3cy, 245 Nott 


Manchester. Sheep Dips and Cattle Dress- 
LONDON, E.C.4. KENT. LONDON. ings, Arsenite of Soda, Veterinary Prepare 
tions, Disinfectants of all kinds, Fruit Tree 
Washes and Weed Killers, etc. jf 
Riley, John, & Sons, Ltd., Hapton, Lancashire. 




















31, L 


Hoope 
fer El 


PUF 
TELESRA 





Chemical Manure Manufacturers— . ON G 


Cross, Alexander, & Sons, Ltd., 19, Hope 


Street, Glasgow. 
Chemical Plant and Machinery— 


=: U i Li VA N ; Ge | Scott, George, & Son (London), Ltd., Kings- 
| way House, Kingsway, London, W.C. 
China Clay— 
Lovering, John, & Co., St. Austell. 
_ Christmas Stockings, Crackers, & Surprise Packets, 
&c.— 
5 Jones, G. E., 79, 81 and 814, Mortimer Road, 


- “ Kingsland, London, N. 
Durable and Reliable. 


| Cleaning Machinery for Miners’ Safety Lamps— 
Ackroyd & Best, Ltd., Morley, near Leeds. 


Blocks, Pulleys, Crab-Winches “ric: sia" “nee Gm 


m <r & _ eed Glee 5 tS 

. ) ington Street, _W. rac 
and all appliances for working (ote wir otiee sanity, i 
. ——, mage of Trade, _ noone 
WwW | orce, Police, Tramway, etc. Fac 
154/164, Tool Street, London, 8.E, 

ire Ropes. and High aia Sntiaine. Woolwich. 

Smith, James, & Co. (Derby), Ltd., Drewry 
Lane Works, Derby. Contractors to the 


BULLIVAN r War Office, Principal Railways, Police and 
AND Trams, etc. 
ab j ® | Clothing Manufacturers (Army, Police and Railway)- 
WIRE ROPE MAKE | ~~ John, & Co., Ltd., Newcastle, 
RS, ENGIN taffs. 
g EERS AND CONTRACTORS. Hazel & Co., 16 Nil Stree London, x. 
; end, ©. * o., Ltd., Burde oad, 
Reg. Offices ; 72, MARK LANE, LON DON, E.C. | London, E. Contractors to the War Office, 


Post Office, Railways, Police, Docks and 














Works : : MILLWALL, LONDON, E. Trams, ete. London and South Africa. 
' Coal and Coke— 
Tele. No. 2108 Avenue (3 Lines). Tel. Add.: Bullivants(Fen.), London, | ©°ry Bros. & Co., Ltd., Cardiff. 


Wigan Coal and Iron Co., Lid., Wigan. 











CHI 


Sl 
TIN 


ARS 
Al 


918 Bax, 3, 1918 THE BOARD OF TRADE JOURNAL—Advertisements. vii 


BUYERS’ GUIDE—continued. 


5 Coa! Depot Proprietors— 
| Cory Bros. & Co.. Lid., Cardiff. 


TELEGRAPH AND INDIA RUBBER WORKS, LTD. Coal Tar Colours and Products— 


British Dyes, Ltd., Huddersfield. 
are, (Established 1860), 


reet, 





Coal Tar Prcducts— 





der, Greenshields, James, & Co., Ltd., 54, Gordon 

bite " | Street, Glasgow. 

gist, OFFICES : i WORKS : | Miller, Jas., & Co., 79, West Nile Street, 

ag. S | Glasgow. 

Ae 31, LOMSARD ST., E. Cc. MILLWALL DOCKS, €E. cutente 

80 ’ | 

bk, BHooper’s Vulcanized India Rubber Cables and iInsutated Wires | Johuson, J., Hodgkinson & Pearson, Ltd., Man- 

ing, Bor Electric Light and other work maintain the highest quality, | chester. 

B.C and their duravility nas been established, | Cold Store Insulation— 

= —. | Newalls Insulation Company, Ltd., New- 
PURE INDIA RUBBcCAR STRIPS, PREPARED TAPE, ae. castle-upon-Tyne, and branches. 

ate, TELEGRAMS—** LINEAR. LONDON.” TELEPHONES —AVENUE 1169 ; EASTE CN $4. Collapsible Tubes— 

lan- Venesta, Ltd., 1, Great Tower Street, 

London, E.C. Plain, Printed or Enamelled. 

— Colliery Owners— 

ent, Cory Bros. & Co., Ltd., Cardiff. 





The Wigan Coal and Iron Co., Ltd., Wigan. 


=" Comb Manufacturers— 
al), | Aberdeen Comb Works Co., Ltd., The, Aber- 
cab a | ceen. Makers of Real Horn and “ Keronyx” 


ler, Dressing Combs, _1a:*er Combs, Ladies 
Real Horn Fancy Combs, and combs of 


and ! description, all -infl ble. 
“|\JOHN LOVERING & CO., Tet Be Bieta Bi ane 
ock .C. . 

Cc iM tic) — 
ST. AUSTELL, CORNWALL, "oo F., & Son, 12, Clerkenwell Road, E.C. 
ies, 7 = - Concertinas (English), ol d Duet Concerti 
=|  Ghina Clay and China Stone Works.  Wheatstone, C., & G0, 15, West Street, 


London, W.C. 














ylic | 
or- ePpints 1 Conveyors and Elevators for the Economic Handling 
i Producers of every Description and Quality of China Olay et See to Se Gat 
i, | SAMPLES AND PRICES SENT FREE ON APPLICATION. ————eeeeee 
“ Copper Alloys— 
Thermit, Ltd., 675, Commercial Road, 

| London, E. 

ch, Copper Plates (Perforated)— 





Barns, W., & Sons, Globe Works, Queensland 
Road, Holloway, London, 
| Copper Tape, Wire Rope, &c.— 
| Henley’s, W. T., Telegraph Works Co., Ltd., 
London, E.C. 
Cork Insulation— 


Newalls Insulation Company, Ltd., New- 
castle-upon-Tyne, and branches. 


» BAAC WEBSTER & SONS, LTD., 


MANUFACTURERS OF 
¢,Beamless Steel Oilcans and Lamps 
of every description. 


\ 
wey 
AW a 
\\ View vy 
) \ a 
A ail 
fitiini if p f 
J ft 
if 


/ 
HHT 
H 
fill; | 
H) 
i 
/ 
/ 





Abbey Works, 


=> 
— = 
———= 





* KIRKSTALL, LEEDS. ane: 
) | eatons (Leeds), : eatons Buildings, 
» ON GOVERNMENT LISTS. Telegrame—Isaac Weneran. KieKevaLt. | North Street, Leeds. Ladies’ and Maids’ 


pe | Tailor-Made Costumes, Coats and Skirts. 
| Registered Trade Marks: “ Alwetha” Rain- 


coats, “ EKSIW” Serges. 
Cotton Bags 


| Feltham, W. H., & Son, Imperial Works, 
| Tower Bridge Road, London. 
| Judge, T. & W., London, S.E. 
g a y | Cotton Cleaning Waste— 
4 a | Spencer & Curedale, Lid., Bury Ground 


| Works, Bury. 


' cS - U R C H 5 LAN CAS + } fe E.. “fan, See, oe and 14, Town Hall St., 


Blackburn; Lambeth Rope Works, Black- 


MM burn. Telephone: 10, Blackburn.  Tele- 
ancfacturers of graphic Address, “ Hart, Blackburn.” 


y > HGH TEST SULPHATE of SODA, or SALT CAKE, in Bulk, or Ground and Paeked. “love & Barlow, Ltd., 103, Portland Street, 





r- 





ts, 








5, | Manchester. Zephyrs, Shirtings, Butter 
: SULPHURIC, HYDROCHLORIC & NITRIC ACIDS. | Muslins, 54 donate cmnaintien —ad 
i. __ i . | Cords, etc. 
. ARSENIC ACID—Liquid and Solid. | Towthian, Drake, & Co., 15, Aytoup Street 
i ‘ “ | “4 an fancies, Linings, Shirtings, 
'| CHLORIDE of ZINC—Liquid, Solid, and Granulated. = ==.) ones Sams miming 
Spinner, E., & Co., Manchester. 
; TINNING FLUX. Cotton Motor Tyre Ducks, Sailcloth and General Cotton 
Goods— 
d SULPHATE OF ZINC. WHITE COPPERAS. Bright, John, & Bros., Ltd., Rochdale. 
_| TIN CRYSTALS. STANNOUS CHLORIDE. STANNINE. Cotton Spinners and Manufacturers— 
| Partington, R. & J., Lid., 40, Portland Street, 
" EPSOM SALTS. GLAUBER’S SALT. Manchester. Dengarest F smnerp Ceeadene 
» White and Khaki Drills, : 
STANNATE of SODA and POTASH. Pocketings, Harvard Shirtings, Galateas, 
; Dyed and Printed Linings. 
: ARSENIATE of SODA. WEED KILLER. SOLDERING CRYSTALS. crane Weighing Machines— 
POTASH. rT) FLUID. Salter, Geo., & Co., West Bromwich: 
Cranes— 
ARSENITE of SODA. SHEEP DIP (Arsenioal), Waygood-Otis, ‘‘s Falmouth men London, 
S.E. Est. 1835. ‘sented i l and 
ARSENIATE of LEAD, Paste and Powder, ae Serene 

















Vill THE BOARD OF TRADE JOURNAL. 


JAN. 3, 1918 


The Department of Overseas Trade 


(Development and Intelligence), 
73, Basinghall Street, London, E.C. 2. 


* Advantage, Stock, London.” 
Copr: A.B.C., 5th Edition. 


TELEGRAMS 


London Wall, 4713 and 4717. 


‘TELEPHONE : 
PELEPUON bs} (Private Branch Exchange.) 


has recently been formed and comprises :— 


The DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL INTELLIGENCE of the BOARD OF TRADE, including the service of H.M. Trade 


Commissioners and Imperial Trade Correspondents in the Dominions, India, and Crown Colonies.—Address as above. 


The management of the Board of Trade’s BRITISH INDUSTRIES FAIRS.—Address : 10, Basinghall Street, London, BC. 2. 
Telegrams: “Shoforsamp, London. Code: A.B.C., 5th Edition. Telephone: London Wall, 4713. 


THE WAR TRADE INTELLIGENCE DEPARTMENT.—Address: Lake Buildings, London, 5.W. 1. 
THE SECTION OF THE FOREIGN TRADE DEPARTMENT OF THE FOREIGN OFFICE dealing with Form k, 


aud with other matters relating to the promotion of Trade abroad. 
And certain functions formerly performed at the FOREIGN OFFICE in connection with COMMERCIAL INTELLIGENCE, and 
with the COMMERCIAL ATTACHE AND CONSULAR SERVICES in foreign countries. 


Direct Communication with Traders. 


The DEPARTMENT OF OVERSEAS TRADE (DEVELOP- 
MENT AND INTELLIGENCE) is a centre at which information 
on all subjects of commercial interest is collected and 
classified in a form convenient for reference, and at 
which, so far as the interests of British trade permit, 
replies are given tv enquiries by traders on commercial 
matters. As far as is possible, the Department supplies, 
on personal or written application, information with 
regard to the following subjects ; Foreign and Colonial Con- 
tracts open to Tender, and other openings for British Trade ; 
Lists of manufacturers at home and lists of firms abroad 
engaged in particular lines of business in different localities ; 
Foreign and Cvlonial Tariff and Customs Regulations ; 
Commercial Statistics; Forms of Certificates of Origin ; 
Regulations concerning Commercial Travellers ; Sources of 
Supply, Prices, etc., of Trade Products; Shipping and Trans- 
port, etc. 

Samples of foreign competitive goods and commercial 
products which are received from abroad from time to time 
are exhibited at the Offices of the Department. 


Samples of goods of German and Austrian manufacture 
which were sold in British markets abroad and in certain 
foreign markets are on exhibition in the Sample Rooms of the 
Department. 


The BRITISH INDUSTRIES FATR, 1918, will be held in 
the Pennington Street premises of the London Docks, which 
have been placed at the disposal of the Board of ‘Trade by the 
Port of Londoa Authority, from 25th February until 8th 
March. The office dealing with Fair matters is at 10, Basing- 
hall Street, London, E.C. 2. Concurrently with the London 
Fair, a Fair will be held at Glasgow. This Fair, which will 
again be organised by the Corporation of the City of Glasgow, 
under the auspices and with the support of the Board of 
Trade, will be confined to the same trades as the 1917 Fair. 


All communications intended for the Department of Over- 
seas ‘Trade (Development and _ Intelligence) should be 
addressed to; The Comptroller-General, Department of 
Overseas Trade (Development and Intelligence), 73, 
Basinghall Street, London, E.C. 2. 


OPENINGS FOR TRADE AND NAMES OF TRADERS IN 
COUNTRIES ABROAD. 





Confidential Information. 


SPECIAL REGISTER. 

The Special Register affords early information te manu- 
facturers and traders of new trade openings abroad before 
they become public property. It is alsoa vehicle for circulating 
reports on foreign competition, and any other matters lik+ly 
to be of importance and interest to particular trades. The 
information, which is private and coufidential, is supplied 
to the Department by His Majesty’s Trade Commissioners 
within the Kmpire, and by His Majesty’s Diplomatic and 
Consular Representatives in foreign countries, and is circu- 
lated to firms on the Register as quickly as possible after its 
receipt. 

The Register is open to any approved British firm on the 
payment of a fee of two guineas per annum (which includes 
the annual subscription to the “ board of Trade Journal”). 
It is not open to non- British traders. 

Information is supplied solely for the purpose of extending 
trade in British-made goods. 

Those British firms who desire their names to be included 
in the Special Register shouid communicate with The 
Comptroller-Gereral, Department of Overseas Trade 
(Development and Intelligence), 73, Basinghall Street, 
London, E.C. 2. 





FORM K. 

H.M. Consular Officers have received instructions to furnish 
the Department of Overseas Trade (Development and Intelli- 
gence) with commercial information respecting all firms in 
their respective Consular Districts who can be recommended 
as possible importers of goods of Britith manufacture. This 





information, which includes the commercial and financial status 
of the firms concerned, their local and Eur spean references, 
goods particularly required, terms of trading and language in 
which correspondence should be carried on, is furnished to the 
Department on a prescribed form, which is kuown as Form K. 

In order tu obtain the fullest possible advantages from the 
“Form K” system of information a wide circulation Is 
ESSENTIAL. ee 

A system of co-operation between the Department of Over- 
seas Trade (Development and Intelligence) and British traders 
is therefore necessary, and this co-operation is being attained 
as follows :-~ 

1. The Department collects and edits the information. 
__ 2. The Trade Associations distribute the informatioa. 
That is, the Department issues the information to— 
(a) The Association of Chambers of Commerce. 
(6) The Federation of British Industries. 

The bodies comprised in these organisations have their 
various component trades classified as shown in “ Form K,’ 
and lists of traders are therefore only circulated to those 
firms which come under that classification, thus avoiding 
circulation-tu trades which are not interested. 

The system is safeguarded by agreements with the distribut- 
ing organisations against the issue of the information to any 
outside firms. All firms who wish to receive the information 
have to be approved by the Department. At present over 
10,000 firms have joined, and any other firms who wish to 
participate should apply through their Chamber of Commerce 
or the Federation of British Industries, or through bodies 
attiliated to the latter. 





























Jan. 3, 1918 


THE BOARD OF TRADE JOURNAL. | 


| Crown Copyright Reserved. 


Extracts may be published if the 
source be duly acknowledged. 


Che 


Hoard of Grade Journal 


AND 
Vou. C.  (strie.) No. 1101.] 


CONTENTS. 


PAGE 


FOREWORD wie _ iin 


(By THE PRESIDENT OF THE BOARD OF T'RADE,) 


SPECIAL ARTICLES ..... ose ove 3-7 


After War Trade ; The Departmental Committees. 
The New Patents and Designs Bill—I. 
Commercial Information; Methods of Distribution. 


NOTES ON TRADE ove ina yes 78 


The Sale of Matches. 

‘Tramway Materials and Plant, 
The Branch Mint in Bombay. 
Crop Estimates. 

Industrial Census in South Africa. 
Coal Mines Department. 


IMPERIAL AND FOREIGN TRADE .. 9-14 


Australia: War Time Profits Tax Assessment Act. 
1917. | 

Malay States: Mining Act Amendment. 

New Zealand: Industries. 

Brazil: Economic ‘ onditions. 

China: Currency, Mining, and Communications, 

France: Regulations Affecting Trade: Extension 
of Moratorium. 

Japan: Encouragement of Inventions; Soya Beans ; 
Upland Cotton 

Netherlands East Indies: New Petroleum Company. 

Sweden: Embargoes on Textile Waste. 


OPENINGS FOR BRITISH TRADE. 


The United Kingdom. 

Canada. 

Morocco (French Zone). 

3razil; Agencies. 

Textiles in Egy. t. 

E .emy Properties in Gold Coast, 

Scent for Soap in Japan. 

Woollea Cloths in United States of America. 

United States: Trading with the Enemy Act 
Additions to * Conservation List,” 


GOVERNMENT NOTICES AFFECT- 
ING TRADE... _... — + 15-17 
EXPORT SECTION, 
Grants of Priority Certificates. 
Exemptions from Steel Regulations, 
DEFENCE OF REALM REGULATIONS 


Tramway Materials and Plant. 
Powers of the Food Controller, 
Powers of the Board of Agriculture, 
Powers of the Minister of Munitions, 


GENERAL SECTION. 
Fiax: Restriction of Consumption. 


Passports for South Africa. 
Heavy Motor Car Amendment Order. 


FOOD ORDERS. 


JANUARY 3rd, 1918. 


COMMERCIAL GAZETTE. 


| Prick SIXPENCE, 


CUSTOMS REGULATIONS & TARIFF | 
CHANGES .. ... . 16-19 


Australia: Declaration on Invoices: Prohibited 
Exports, 

Canada: The Anglo-Portuguese Commercial Treaty, 

Nigeria: Adulteration of Produce, 

France and French Colonies : Export Prohibitions, 

Morocco: Imports from Spanish Zone: Sugar Con- 
sumption Tax (French Zone), 

Netherlands: Factory Salt and Excise Duty, 

Norway: Export Prohibitions. 

Sweden: Exemption of Condensed Milk: Export 
Prohibitions.§ 


SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE 19-20 
Notice to Ships’ Stores Dealers. 

South Africa: The Floating Dock at Durban. 

Brazil: Release of British Cargoes. 

French Morocco: Harbour Works. 

Spain: Free Depot at Barcelona, 


THE CENTRAL POWERS 20-23 


Germany: Economic and Financial Items, 
Austria-Hungary: Economic and Financial Items. 
Textile Substitutes: Experiments with Nettle Fibre. 


COMMERCIAL RETURNS eee ons 23 


Cotton Imports and Exports. 
Corn Prices. 


NOTICE : 
Subscriptions and Advertisements. 





The price of the new issue of the “ Board of Trade 
Journal” is 6d. (63d. post free). Annual subscription 
(post free) 27s. Od. in the United Kingdom. Overseas 
subscription 31s. 6d. per annum, post free. Subscribers 
will continue to receive their copies without increase of 
price until their current subscriptions expire. 


No trade advertisements will be inserted in the 





“ Journal” afier 51st March, upon which date existing 





con racts terminate. 








The Editorial Offices are at 73, Basinghall Street. 
London, B.C. 2. All editorial communications should 
be addressed to ‘“‘ The Hditor.”’ 

The Publishers (to whom should be addressed all 
communications concerning subscriptions and sales) are 


H.M. Stationery Office. 








Foretuord. 


BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE 
BOARD OF TRADE. 





The “ Board of Trade Journal” begins a new 
series with this issue. Hitherto the ‘ Journal’’ 
has been in the main the medium through which 
intelligence collected by the Department of Com- 
mercial Intelligence, and intended for general 
information, is conveyed to the public. It is now 
proposed to widen its scope by including articles 
dealing generally with all of the activities of the 
Board of Trade, as well as those of the new joint 
Department of the Foreign Office and Board of 
Trade—the Department of Overseas Trade 
(Development and Intelligence)—in which the 
former Department of Commercial Intelligence is 
now comprised. 

The war has not only brought to the Board of 
Trade new responsibilities which must in some 
instances be continued for some time after the 
war, but has, in my opinion, emphasised the need 
of greatly enlarging and strengthening this 
Government Department, which is responsible for 
dealing with all questions affecting trade, and of 
adapting it to meet the larger demands which will 
in future be made upon it in respect of the ever- 
growing needs of British commerce and industry. 
To meet these increased services, the Board of 
Trade is being re-organised and strengthened and 
in an early issue of the ‘‘ Journal” a full explana- 
tion of the changes will be published. It is 
essential that the widest publicity consistent with 
the national interests should be given to all of the 
activities of this great business Department of the 
Government, and the ‘“‘ Journal’’ will be the organ 
for securing this publicity. 

While I hope that we shall make the “‘ Journal ’”’ 
in its new form of greater interest and value to 
business men, I do not propose that it should be 
run on the ordinary commercial lines. After 
March 3lst next all trade advertisements will be 
excluded from its pages, and its columns will be 
devoted solely to the object of assisting com- 
mercial and industrial interests by giving informa- 
tion as promptly and as completely as possible. 
In order that the information which it contains 
may gain the widest publicity, all original articles 
containing matter obtained from official sources 
will be circulated to the Press, including trade 
journals, in time for simultaneous publication or 
quotations. 

Our aim is to establish the most amicable rela- 
tions with producers, manufacturers and distri- 
butors, and to assist by friendly advice and co- 
operation in the gigantic task of re-establishing 
and increasing our trade and industries after the 
war. In pursuance of this aim we shall endeavour, 
through the medium of the ‘‘Journal,’”’ to keep 
those interested as fully informed as possible of 
the steps which from time to time we are taking 


2 THE BOARD OF TRADE JOURNAL. 


JAN. 3, 1918 


to deal with the many problems that confront us, 
and of the reasons for our action. We propose 
also to secure for our business men, whether they 
are manufacturers, merchants or carriers, informa- 
tion from all parts of the world. The commercial 
intelligence system will be developed and ex- 
tended; reports from Trade Commissioners, Com- 
mercial Attachés and Consular Officers will be 
constantly received and promptly circulated, and 
every effort made to secure reliable and up-to-date 
information. Some of this information must 
necessarily be for private circulation and some 
for special classes of traders, but a_ great 
proportion of the commercial news will be of wide 
public interest and will be presented in a concise 
and readable form in the ‘‘ Journal.”’ 

I hope that this publication, placed at the dis- 
posal of our traders and of the whole of the Press, 
will stimulate interest in our post-war problems 
and more especially in the stupendous national 
effort which will be necessary to revive and in- 
crease Our Overseas commerce, now completely 
dislocated or suspended in consequence of the 
War; to re-establish and expand our industries ; 
and to place upon a sound and permanent basis 
those particular key industries essential to our 
national welfare. 

The great task of assisting in the restoration of 
our trade and industries after the war, which will 
largely fall upon the Board of Trade, depends 
for its success upon the closest co-operation with 
the business community. At best we can only 
assist by giving early and reliable information on 
all matters affecting trade and by taking such 
steps in collaboration with the interests concerned 
as the circumstances may require. No Govern- 
ment Department, no matter how efficiently it 
may be conducted, can in my opinion secure 
success for our trade unless the traders and manu- 
facturers themselves simultaneously put forth 
strong efforts on their own behalf. The ultimate 
success must depend upon the traders and manu- 
facturers themselves. As I have already said, 
we propose to make our organisation and adminis- 
trative machinery as efficient as possible, so that 
we may be able to cope successfully with the 
problems that will face us in the future. We pro- 
pose to give the widest publicity possible to our 
daily work and to open the door to suggestions 


and advice, and in return we ask for the great 
business world—men with big businesses and little 


businesses alike—to meet with us frequently in a 
spirit of friendliness and co-operation actuated by 
one motive only—the advancement of our trading 
interests in al! parts of the world. While the main 
appeal of the ‘“‘ Journal” is necessarily addressed 
to the business community, I hope that we shall 
never overlook the all-important interests of 
Labour, whose whole-hearted co-operation is 
vitally necessary in rebuilding British industries 
after the War. 

Help us to make it possible, month by month and 
year by year, to show through the pages of the 
‘‘Journal”’ a constant and steady growth in our 
trade, and to secure for this country and the 
Empire their rightful place among the commerci@: 
nations of the world. 


ALBERT STANLEY. 














Jan. 3, 1918 


Special Articles. 





AFTER-WAR TRADE. 





THE DEPARTMENTAL 
COMMITTEES. 


Early in 1916 the President of the Board of Trade 
appointed a number of Departmental Committees 
to consider the probable position of various impor- 
tant branches of British industry after the war, 
‘especially in relation to International competi- 
tion, and to report what measures, if any, are 
necessary or desirable in order to safeguard that 
position.”” The branches of British industry for 
which separate Committees were so appointed were 
the Coal Trades; the Iron and Steel Trades; the 
Engineering Trades; the Electrical Trades; the 
Non-Ferrous Metal Trades ; the Shipping and Ship- 
building Industries ; and the Textile Trades. 

Che primary object in view in setting up the Com- 
uuttees was to obtain, through representative 
manutacturers and others engaged in the trades 
themselves, a considered statement of the views 
of those trades as to the position in which, having 
regard to the general trend immediately before 
the war and changes during the war, they would 
be likely to find themselves after the cessation of 
hostilities, especially in respect of their overseas 
markets, and as to the action which might advan- 
tageously be taken, both by those engaged in the 
industries and by the Government, with a view to 
the strengthening of their position and the recovery 
of any ground which might have been lost in conse- 
quence of the war. 

Most of the Committees have now presented their 
Final Reports ; in other cases Interim Reports have 
been furnished; and whilst for various reasons it 
has been deemed inexpedient to publish these Re- 
ports in full at the present time, it has nevertheless 
appeared desirable to publish in the ‘‘ Board of 
Trade Journal’”’ the views and recommendations 
of the Committees on a number of subjects of a 
general character, which whilst they do not raise 
controversial questions of State policy are of great 
and immediate practical importance to the various 
trades and are being widely discussed at the pre- 
sent time. It is hoped that this will serve a useful 
purpose in helping to focus discussion amongst 
those actively engaged in the trades and industries 
concerned, and to consolidate opinion. 

It is accordingly proposed to bring together in a 
series of articles the conclusions formulated by the 
Committees on a number of subjects of the kind 
indicated, which are of common interest to all 
the industries brought under review, and in so 
doing care will be taken to state those conclusions 
in the actual words of the Committees, and in 
cases where any particular Committee is not unan1- 
mous to indicate clearly the views of the minority. 
As a preliminary the present article will set out 
the constitution of the Committees and indicate 
briefly the nature of the enquiries which they car- 
ried out and the material on which they worked. 


Tue Coat TRADE. 


This Committee, which was concerned solely 
with the export trade after the war, consisted 
(after the resignation of Lord Rhondda on his ap- 
pointment to the Local Government Board) of 
Mr. Adam Nimmo (Chairman), Mr. A. E. Bowen, 
Mr. Newton Dunn, Mr. F. J. Jones, Mr. Arthur F. 
Pease, Sir D. M. Stevenson, Bart., and Mr. Ridley 
Warham. It took a large amount of evidence from 
representative exporters. 


Tue IRoN AND STEEL TRADES. 


This Committee consisted of Mr. G. Scoby Smith 
(Yhairman); Sir Hugh Bell, Bart., Mr. Archibald 


THE BOARD OF TRADE JOURNAL. 3 


SPECIAL ARTICLES—continued. 





Colville (who died before the Committee had com- 
pleted its work), Mr. John E. Davison, Mr. James 
Gavin, the Rt. Hon. John Hodge, M.P., Mr. John 
King, Mr. G. Mure Ritchie, Mr. Henry Summers, 
and Mr. Benjamin Talbot. The Committee re- 
ceived, in response to a questionnaire, detailed 
statements from a considerable number of manu- 
facturers’ associations and a large amount of oral 
evidence from individual manufacturers and mer- 
chants, representatives of labour unions, and 
technical and education experts. 


Tue ENGINEERING TRADES. 


The Committee reporting on the Engineering 
Trades comprised Sir Clarendon Hyde (Chairman), 
Mr. Arthur Balfour (Sheffield), Mr. Albert J. Hob- 
son, Mr. W. B. Lang, Sir Hallewell Rogers, Mr. 
H. B. Rowell, and Mr. Douglas Vickers. In order 
clearly to demarcate its enquiry from that of the 
Iron and Steel Committee, it left to that body the 
problems relating to the trade in beams, girders, 
sections, shapes, joists, plates, rails, chains and 
anchors, forgings, castings, tinplates and wire- 
drawing, but took evidence on high speed steel 
(and the connected questions of wolfram ore sup- 
plies and the manufacture of tungsten), crucible 
steel and crucible steel wire. The Committee re- 
ceived a very large number of detailed replies to 
a questionnaire issued to representative firms in 
all branches of the engineering trades ; and supple- 
mented and elaborated these by a large body of 
oral evidence. 


Tue Exectricat TRADES. 


For the Electrical Trades the Committee con- 
sisted of the Hon. Sir Charles Parsons, K.C.B., 
F.R.S. (Chairman), Mr. J. A. Bryce, M.P., Mr. T. 
O. Callender, Mr. James Devonshire, Mr. B. M. 
Drake, and Sir John Snell. It heard evidence from 
a number of representative associations, both 
technical and commercial, engaged in the various 
branches of the electrical industries, and from re- 
presentative consultant and other engineers and 
manufacturers of electrical material. 

Tue Non-Ferrovs Metat Trapes. 

This Committee, whose Final Report is now 
being completed, consisted originally of Sir Gerald 
A. Muntz, Bart. (Chairman), Mr. Cecil Budd, Mr. 
Clive Cookson, Sir Charles W. Fielding, K.B.E., 
Colonel A. J. Foster, Mr. A. W. Tait, and Mr. A. 
H. Wiggin. Ata later date some of the Dominion 
Governments were invited to nominate representa- 
tives to confer with the Committee on certain 
special matters, and accordingly the Hon. J. D. 
Hazen (Canada), Mr. W. 8S. Robinson (Australia) 
and Professor Lawn (South Africa) were added to 
the Committee. 

Tur SHIPPING AND SHIPBUILDING INDUSTRIES. 


The Committee to consider the position of the 
Shipping and Shipbuilding Industries consists of 
Sir Alfred Booth (Chairman), Professor W. SS. 
Abell, Sir Archibald Denny, Bart., Sir, Edward 
Hain (who died recently), Sir George 8S. Clark, 
Bart., Mr. James Brown, Captain H. B. Hooper, 
Mr. James Readhead, Mr. John A. Roxburgh, and 
Mr. Oswald Sanderson. It has presented an 
Interim Report on the position of Shipbuilding 
after the war, but has not yet completed its report 
upon the general problems of Shipping. 


Tue Textite TRADES. 


This Committee, whose enquiry covered a very 
wide range, including as it did the cotton, woollen, 
silk, linen and jute industries generally and such 
special branches as the carpet, lace and embroid- 
ery, hosiery and fabric glove trades, consisted of 
Sir Henry Birchenough, K.C.M.G. (Chairman), Sir 
F. Forbes Adam, Bart., C.I.E., Mr. James Beattie, 
Mr. T. Craig-Brown, Lord Colwyn, Mr. E. B. 
Fielden, Mr. J. W. Hill, Mr. J. H. Kaye, Mr. E. H. 
Langdon, Mr J. W. McConnel, Mr. H. Norman 
Rae, Mr. T. C. Taylor, M.P., Mr. C. Thomas Smith, 
the Rt. Hon. Robert Thompson, M.P., and Mr. 








{ THE BOARD OF TRADE JOURNAL. 


JAN. o. LOLS 





SPECIAL ARTICLES—continued. 





Frank Warner. The Committee heard evidence 
from over two hundred witnesses engaged in vari- 
ous branches of the trade as merchants or manu- 
facturers in all parts of the United Kingdom, and 
for this purpose held a number of sittings in Man- 
chester and Bradford. 

In subsequent articles the views and recommenda- 
tions of the Committees, whose constitution and 
work has thus been briefly indicated, will be given 
on such subjects as Industrial and Business Organi- 
sation; Technical Training and Apprenticeship ; 
Patents, Designs and Trade Marks; the Supply 
of Raw Materials ; Commercial Intelligence ; Depre- 
ciation Allowances ; Financial Facilities for Trade ; 
and other matters affecting British trade and in- 
dustry generally. 


_ — 
——— 


THE PATENTS AND DESIGNS 
BILL. 








ITS PROVISIONS AND PURPOSE. 
> 


This Bill, which was presented to the House ol 
Commons by Sir Albert Stanley on November 19th 
last, seeks to amend the Patents and Designs Act, 
1907, in the light of the experience gained from 
working the existing Act and also the Temporary 
Rules for which authority was given by Parliament 
in 1914. Under the Patents, Designs and Trade 
Marks (Temporary Rules) Acts licences have been 
granted for the working of enemy-owned patents 
and designs, and permission given to use enemy 
trade marks, and considerable information has 
beeh thus obtained as to the eifect of our Patent 
and Trade Marks !aw on business undertakings, 
and in particular, on those under {foreign control. 
in view of this experience it appeared to the board 
of Trade necessary that the principal Act of 1907 
relating to patents should be amended in several 
important particulars. ‘The whole question was 
considered trom the commercial point of view by a 
Sub-Committee of the Advisory Committee ou 
Commercia! Intelligence, and the Board of ‘Trade 
had also the advantage of the advice of a special 
Committee under the Presidency of Lord Parker 
containing representatives of the legal profession, 
inventors, and practising Patent Agents. The 
Bill is the result of their eiforts. 

A patent to an inventor is the grant of a 
temporary monopoly which serves the double 
purpose of enabling the inventor to secure the 
support of capital to develop and work his inven- 
tion, and of giving to the public and trade gener- 
ally the benefit of new discoveries. Human brains 
need the stimulus of human ambition to make 
money and to get on in life, if the community is 
to get full value from their exercise. The inventor 
must, therefore, be encouraged and rewarded so 
that he may exercise his skill, and those with 
capital who desire to assist him must be afforded 
protection in their enterprise. But _ since 
monopolies are liable to abuse, the State must 
endeavour to make sure that no monopoly granted 
to a private person by the Crown shall be wrongly 
used to the detriment of national trade or of 
national interests generally. 


ABUSES OF THE PaTENT-. MONOPOLY. 


The new Bill aims at preventing—or at least of 
making very difficult—the chief abuses to which 
patent monopolies are subject. First, an inventor 
may from ulterior motives try to prevent the usc 
altogether of the patented invention within the 
United Kingdom. Secondly, an inventor may be a 
foreigner who wishes to manufacture the inven- 
tion in his own country and to export the 
products to Great Britain which would, mean- 
while, be prevented by him from manufacturing 
the products itself; this would be to encourage 


SPECIAL ARTICLES—coniinued. 





trade abroad and hamper it in Great Britain. 
Thirdly, while not going so far as to try 
to prevent the use of the manuiacture of an 
invention in this country, an inventor may, in 
‘act, restrict british trade by keeping the invention 
entirely in his own hands and unreasonably reius- 
ing to grant licences for its manulacture by others. 
lt is in the interests of our National trade that 
these abuses of the grants of patents should be 
stopped, and that every encouragement should be 
given for the early manufacture within this country 
of promising inventions. The Act of 1907 sought 
to effect these purposes ; what the new Bill does is 
to provide a-complete and comprehensive scheme 
and to make good the discovered defects in the 
existing Act. 
Compuisory LiceENcES AND REVOCATION. 

Clauses 1 and 2 of the new Bill are in substitution 
of Section 27 (Revocation of Patents worked out- 
side the United Kingdom) and Section 24 (Com- 
pulsory Licences and Revocation) of the Act of 
i907. It was found that the procedure under 
Section 24 was cumbrous and expensive and 
has been rarely used. And as regards Section 27 
the standard of comparison between British and 
foreign manufacture was one which has been diffi- 
cult to work out in practice owing to the absence 
of the necessary data. It is theretore proposed in 
Clause 1 of the Bill to amalgamate these 
two Sections of the Act of 1907 and to 
replace them by one clause. Simplicity and inex- 
pensiveness are aimed at. Clause 1 provides that 
any abuse of his patent rights by the patentee— 
either by failure to work his patent or to grant 
licences on reasonable terms whenever the public 
interest demands, or by unfair conditions imposed 
on the use or sale of the patented article—will 
render him liable to have his patent revoked, or a 
compulsory licence granted on reasonable terms 
whenever the latter course appears to be the fairer 
or more appropriate remedy. In comparison with 
Section 24 of the existing Act the procedure for 
obtaining licences has been greatly simplified and 
the grounds for applications for licences much 
enlarged and made more definite. Application is 
in the first instance to be made to the Comptroller 
with an appeal to the Court. The intention is to 
provide adequately against a patent being hung 
up. The provisions of the Clause do not operate 
until after the expiry of four years in the life of 
a patent, and this period of freedom may be ex- 
tended if the Comptroller judges that the time 
which has elapsed has been insufficient to enable 
the invention to be worked within the United King- 
dom on a commercial scale. 


Tue Two Marin Ctuiasses or INVENTIONS. 


Inventions may be roughly divided into two 
classes: those which do and those which do not 
require for their development large amounts of 
capital. A small patented article of general utility, 
cheaply made | put on sale, may become profit- 
able quickly and at little initial cost. On the other 
hand a machine, ultimately of great importance and 
value, may absorb £100,000 in capital and several 
years in time before the patentee or capitalist reaps 
the fruit of his enterprise. In the new Bill 
Clauses 1 and 2 are framed so that the tribunal— 
the Comptroller, the Court (on appeal), or in cases 
of agreement an arbitrator—may exercise adequate 
discrimination in deciding whether in any parti- 
cular case there has been abuse of the patent mono- 
poly. Revocation of a patent is not always, or 
even most often, the best course to adopt in the 
public interest. In very many cases the grant of 
compulsory licences is the most effective remedy 
and will secure the working in the United 
Kingdom of the patent. Suppose, for example, a 
foreign patentee wanted to prevent his patent from 
being worked in this country: if compulsory 
licences were granted to manufacturers here then 
the patent would be worked and British trade be 
benefited ; but if it were revoked altogether then 














JAN. 3, 1918 


SPECIAL ARTICLES—continued. 





the foreign patentee might secure a practical mono- 
poly, in spite of this revocation, by importing the 
article from abroad on terms making British com- 
petition practically impossible without the assist- 
ance of the Patent monopoly by which the holder 
of a compulsory licence would be protected. 

A ‘Licence Patent.’’ 

Clause 2, which is substituted for Section 24 of 
the Act of 1907, proposes that the patentee should 
be allowed to declare his patent to be a “licence 
patent © and to have it endorsed with the words 
‘licences of right.’’ In that event anyone who 
wishes may claim a licence under it as a right. 
This provision is intended to encourage the com- 
mercial working of inventions, and to be of possible 
assistance to inventors who have no means of 
exploiting their inventions themselves or of coming 
into contact with those who wish to use the inven- 
tion commercially. In default of agreement the 
terms of the licence are to be settled by the Comp- 
troller or the Court. Care will be taken, when 
framing the Rules to carry out the provisions of 
this Clause, that a patentee does not evade the 
possibility of the revocation of his patent by con- 
verting it into a “licence patent.”’ 

Oprositions TO GRANT oF PATENTS. 

It has been frequently represented to the Patent 
Office that the present search through British 
specifications of the preceding fifty years is insuffi- 
cient, and that an attempt should be made to make 
the search universal. The experience of other 
countries, which profess to make a universal search, 
suggests that so catholic and ideal an aim is not 
possible of attainment in practice. It is, however, 
felt that in order to guard against the grant of 
invalid patents certain grounds of opposition 
might usefully be allowed in addition to those 
provided under Section 11 of the Act of 1907. 
Clause 4 of the new Bill provides that opposition 
to a patent may be filed:—({1) on the ground that 
the invention has been published in any 
printed document before the date of applica- 
tion for a patent; and (2) in the _ case 
of applications under the International Convention 
when the invention described in the application 
filed in this country differs from that described in 
the specification filed in the country of origin, and 
when the additional matter forms the subject of 
an application made by the opponent in the inter- 
val between the deposit of the application in the 
foreign State and the deposit of the application in 
this country. The remainder of Clause 4 consists 
of re-drafting made necessary by these proposed 
amendments. 

ASSIGNMENTS OF PaTENT RIGHTS. 

Clause 5 amends Section 12 of the Act of 1907 
relating to the grant and sealing of patents. It 
provides a remedy for a breach of agreement by 
an applicant who has undertaken in writing to 
assign the patent, when granted, to another person 
or joint-applicant, but who refuses to proceed with 
the application. In such an event the patent appli- 
cation may, under the new Clause 5, go forward 
at the request of the person to whom the invention 


has been assigned when the original inventor 
declines to carry out his agreement. 
Tue Term or Parents: Exrension. 


The present duration of a patent is 14 years 
from the date of the original application. The 
term is less than has been adopted by most other 
countries signatory to the International Conven- 
tion. It has been frequently urged by other 
countries—and among them our principal Allies— 
that we should extend our term of 14 years. 
Inventors generally have supported this request. 
It has been felt by those responsible for the new 
Bill that opportunity should be taken now for 
extending the term of British patents to 15 years 
at least. The Bill, by Clause 6, grants the term 
of 15 years, and gives power by Order in Council 
for a further extension to 16 years should this 
extension become expedient—in view of any con- 
ventions with foreign countries. It is important 


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THE BOARD OF TRADE JOURNAL. 5 





SPECIAL ARTICLES—<ontinued. 





to note that the proposed extension under Clause 6 
is granted to all patents in force when the Bill 
becomes an Act, and not only to new patents. 


THe SvuGGEsTeED War EXTENSION. 


_ The point which has just been mentioned has an 
important bearing on Clause 7 dealing with the 
power of the Court to extend for special reasons 
the term of a patent beyond the date of its normal 
expiry. At present if, after enquiry, the Court 
finds that a patentee has not been adequately remu- 
nerated by his patent—if, for example, it has been 
an important and worthy machine, or process, that 
has taken several years to develop before becoming 
revenue earning—the Court has power to extend 
the patent for seven years and even, in very excep- 
tional cases, for fourteen years. The War has 
introduced a new factor, and it has been urged on 
the part of inventors that the term of all existing 
patents should be extended automatically for the 
period of the war. The Board of Trade did not 
feel able to recommend this general war extension 
of all patents, as it would not discriminate 
between those inventors who had made large 
war profits—as many of them have done—and 
those who had suffered losses. General war-period 
extension of patents cannot be defended. What 
the new Bill proposes to do is to provide for an 
extension in the case of those inventors who can 
establish a just claim to it. Power is given to the 
Court under Clause 7 to extend the patent term of 
those patentees who can prove that loss has been 
due to hostilities. Patentees who are subjects of 
enemy States are excluded from benefits of this 
Clause. In view of the general extension of patent 
terms by one or two years under Clause 6 of the 
Bill the period of extension within the discretion 
of the Court is reduced. Instead of being, as at 
present, for seven and, in exceptional cases, four- 
teen years, it becomes under the new Bill for six 
and twelve years respectively. 

The remaining Clauses of the new Patents Bill 
which aim at reducing the cost and rendering more 
simple the trials of patents actions, and those 
Clauses which deal with the grant of patents for 
articles of food and drugs, the registration of 
designs, the compulsory registration of assign- 
ment of patents and designs, the registration of 
patent agents and certain minor amendments to 
the Act of 1907 will be described and explained in 
a second article to be published next week. 


tts 
ee 


COMMERCIAL INFORMATION. 








METHODS OF DISTRIBUTION. 

One of the special objects of H. M. Government 
in constituting the new joint Department of the 
Foreign Office and the Board of Trade—the 
Department of Overseas Trade (Development and 


Intelligence)—is to focus in a _ single office 
the functions of collection and_ dissemination 
of information of all kinds which may be 


of service in the promotion of British trade. 
The new Department controls the Board of Trade’s 
Trade Commissioner service within the Empire and 
the Foreign Office's Commercial Attaché service in 
foreign countries, and will thus be the reservoir 
into which streams of intelligence will flow 
steadily from all quarters of the globe, and in 
increasing volume as the work of strengthening and 
expanding the overseas services proceeds. 

The Trade Commissioner service, which has 
hitherto been restricted to the Self-governing 
Dominions, will shortly cover in addition India and 
some of the principal Crown Colonies ; the number 
of Commercial Attachés in foreign countries will 
be greatly increased ; and the Consular Service is 
being strengthened, so as to facilitate its more 
active utilisation for commercial purposes. All 








6 THE BOARD OF TRADE JOURNAL. 


SPECIAL ARTICLES—continued. 





these services will enjoy a greatly improved status 
and will have wider opportunities of gaining 
information. There should be no lack, therefore, 
in the Department of valuable information, 
especially when the restoration of peace has swept 
away the many obstacles which now fetter trade. 
Equally important, however, is the efficiency of the 
channels through which the multifarious items 
of information are redistributed among the 
eommercial community. 

Much of the information is necessarily con- 
fidential, so that machinery is required which, while 
safeguarding the confidential nature of the in- 
telligence, will not preclude its reaching freely 
those to whom it will be of interest and value in 
the prosecution of their trade. Two main methods 
of distribution emerge. The first is by direct com- 
munication between the British business community 
who have inquiries to make relating to overseas 
trade and the officers of the Department whose 
duty it is to reply to such inquiries. The 
second is by distribution on the initiative of the 
Department itself. 


I.—INQUIRIES ADDRESSED TO THE 
DEPARTMENT OF OVERSEAS TRADE 
(DEVELOPMENT AND INTELLIGENCE). 


In order to facilitate and encourage the address 
of inquiries to the Department, it has been 
organised, as explained by Sir Arthur Steel- 
Maitland, M.P., to a deputation of representatives 
of the general and trades Press, into two main 
divisions, the Overseas Division and the United 
Kingdom Division, the former being sub-divided 
geographically by groups of countries and the 
latter by groups of industries. It is the function, 
therefore, of particular officers to specialise in 
particular markets, and by drawing on the overseas 
services, and in other ways, it has been possible 
at the moment to secure for certain areas, such as 
Canada, Latin America, the Near East, the United 
States of Americi1, and Russia, officers having 
personal knowledge of the countries with which 
they are concerned. There has been a marked 
increase of late years in the number of inquiries 
received in the Basinghall Street offices, but it is 
hoped that, with the further facilities now pro- 
vided, the commercial community will consult the 
Department with still greater freedom in the 
future. 

PrERsoNAL CONSULTATION. 

Additional opportunities for personal consulta- 
tion in respect of overseas markets are afforded 
by the visits to the United Kingdom of Trade 
Commissioners and Commercial Attachés. It 1s 
part of the functions of these officers to visit this 
country from time to time, and tours are arranged 
for them, in co-operation with the Chambers of 
Commerce, who have given generous and in- 
valuable help, to the principal commercial and 
industrial centres of the United Kingdom. They 
are thus enabled to meet business men in personal 
interviews; to give addresses to Chambers of Com- 
merce ard other industrial and mercantile bodies ; 
and to visit works and factories, where they can 
give advice as to the types of goods likely to be 
successful in theic respective markets. The experi- 
ence of the former Department of Commercial 
Intelligence has shown that in the principal centres 
there has been a very general desire to seek the 
advice of these officers on their tours, and the 
system will become of increasing importance as the 
extension of the overseas services progresses 





JAN. 3, 1918 


SPECIAL ARTICLES—continued. 





ff.—CONFIDENTIAL DISTRIBUTION BY 
THE DEPARTMENT: ‘FORM K.”’ 

One channel of confidential distribution is by 
means of ‘‘ Form K.”’ This is a system for supply- 
ing traders and manufacturers with information in 
regard to possible importers in certain foreign 
countries of goods of British manufacture. Specific 
data about such firms are supplied to traders under 
this scheme which has worked successfully for more 
than a year, and considering its embryonic 
character, gives good promise of exerting a valuable 
influence on our future success. The letter ‘‘K”’ 
is used for the word ‘‘ Key.”’. Intelligence of this 
character can most conveniently be communicated 
through a medium which is known and understood 
by interested parties. A Form was therefore intro- 
duced. It is used by our representatives overseas 
in compiling their reports on firms in their dis- 
tricts; 1t ensures uniformity and thoroughness in 
the reports; it is in possession of the authorities 
who have undertaken the dissemination of the 
information ; it is in the safe of every trader who 
has joined under the scheme. A business man by 
using the Form can see at a glance whether the 
matter on the Form is worth his consideration, as 
uniformity and brevity are its characteristics. 

The idea originated in 1916 as the result of the 
Trading with the Enemy (Extension of Powers) 
Act, 1£15, in order to supply British traders with 
lists of firms in various parts of the world with 
which they could trade. It was decided to send 
a definite set of questions to Consular Officers, 
which would entail definite and short answers, and 
would provide the Department with almost com- 
plete information with regard to all firms in a 
Consul’s district. It was at once apparent that this 
would add immensely to the work of British 
Consuls, and consequently a system was sought 
which was at once simple, uniform all over the 
world, and one that required the least possible 
amount of labour. The result was the Key Form 
or Form K. 

WORKING OF THE SYSTEM. 

It is hardly necessary to describe the Form, since 
over 10,000 traders have already been brought into 
contact with it. Emphasis should, however, be laid 
on the need which arose for a partnership of effort 
between the Department and the business com- 
munity if full value was to be extracted from its 
use. The collectors of the information overseas 
might have done their utmost in the interests of 
trade, but the scheme would have been of little 
value if its method of distribution had been un- 
satisfactory. This problem has, happily, been 
solved by the trading community itself, for the 
Association of Chambers of Commerce of the United 
Kingdom and the Federation of British Industries 
have undertaken the responsibility of communi- 
cating the information to every interested firm. 
This partnership between the Department of 
Overseas Trade (Development and Intelligence) 
and these great organisations has resulted 
both in great economy in distribution, and 
in preserving the information from undesirable 
publicity. The various firms who desired to benefit 
under the scheme, have been doubly checked, 
before admission, by their respective Chambers of 
Commerce or Associations and by the Department. 
The Form itself makes it easy for the Chambers or 
the Associations to circulate reports only to those 
firms coming within the category of trades referred 
to in a particular report, since all firms are 
classified under categories and will receive and, of 
course, desire, only information which appertains 
to their own industry. Secrecy is also obtained by 














JAN. 3, 1918 THE BOARD OF 


TRADE JOURNAL. 7 








SPECIAL ARTICLES—continued. 





a declaration, to which all firms under the scheme 
subscribe, that the information received will not 
be passed on to any other firm. 

It is quite simple for firms to join the scheme 
by applying in the first instance through their 
Chambers of Commerce or through the Federation 
of British Industries, or one of the Associations 
affiliated to the Federation. All genuine British 
firms trading in British goods are eligible. 

Form K is not intended to take the place of com- 
mercial travellers. It supplies information of a 
preliminary character, which must be followed up 
by the firms who are interested. The Department 
breaks up the ground, but the traders themselves 
must cultivate it. 


THE ‘*SPECIAL REGISTER.” 


More confidential and more secret is the next 
channe!—the Special Register—which is kept in the 
Department, for the purpose of passing on to firms 
confidential intelligence of a more general scope 
than that provided under Form K. While Form K, 
as has been explained above, is confined to lists of 
firms in certain foreign countries, with relevant 
information relating to them, the intelligence 
supplied through the Special Register includes 
openings for trade abroad ; reports on foreign com- 
petition ; reports on various industries in countries 
overseas, and on general commercial and financial 
conditions. The early receipt of information is 
often of vital importance, and in such cases reports 
are cabled to the Department. Reports on par- 
ticular trades or markets, which are obtained from 
time to time as a result of special commercial 
missions, are also circulated to firms on the Special 
Register. 

As soon as possible after information is received, 
it is passed to these firms. The Department has a 
staff of officers, who classify these reports and 
present them i. concise and readable form. They 
are then circulated to the traders interested. 
Where necessary, the reports are supplemented by 
particulars of foreign buyers, import duties, 
shipping services, and any other item which has an 
important bearing on the subject matter. 

In view of the importance of commercial develop- 
ment after the war, the Special Register is 
becoming of increasing value. Although owing to 
the war there may aot at present be opportunities 
for trade in certain markets or certain classes 
of goods, information bearing on the future is 
steadily accumulating, and firms may deem it 
themselves now for future 


advisable to equip 
openings. Firms are therefore invited to write to 
the Department for application forms, on 


which they will enter the nature of their bust- 
ness, the goods they handle or manufacture, the 
markets in which they are interested, and the 
channels through which their export trade is con- 
ducted—whether direct with overseas buyers or 
agents, or through export houses or agents in this 
country. Firms are at liberty to enter their names 
f r the receipt of information on as many trades as 
they wish. A fee of two guineas per annum 1s 
charged for the cost of the service, and this will 
include the supply of the new ‘‘ Board of Trade 
Journal,’’ post free, to the firms enrolled. 

It is hoped that these methods of distributing 
information in the possession of the Department 
will be utilised as fully as possible by British 
manufacturers and merchants. The Department 
proposes to deal with commercial questions, not in 
an aloof and cryptic manner, but as a helpful 
partner deeply interested in the future of this 
country’s trade activities. 








— ae ae 





HNotes on Crade. 


_Whuile every care is ewercised to ensure the accuracy of 
any explanatory articles or notes relating to Acts, Regu- 





. lations, Orders, etc., published in the “ Journal,” it must 


be understood that such explanations are necessurily in 
the nature of summaries, and cannot be quoted as authori- 
tative legal interpretations of the teat of the documents 
themselves. | 





THE SALE OF MATCHES. 


A new Order regulating the manufacture, pur- 
chase, sale, and distribution of matches has been 
issued to take effect on and after lst January, 
{ts main purpose is to prohibit the sale after 
December 2ist, 1917, of any matches which are not 
included in the existing maximum prices schedule 
without the written consent of the Tobacco and 
Matches Control Board. It also provides that all 
persons shall obey the instructions of the Control 
Board in regard to the manufacture, purchase, 
sales, and distribution of matches. 





TRAMWAY MATERIALS AND PLANT. 


As the result of consultations which have taken 
place between the Board of Trade and the Ministry 
of Munitions with regard to the serious drawbacks 
which certain tramway undertakings at present 
experience, owing mainly to the difficulty which 
they find in obtaining materials for urgently neces- 
sary repairs and maintenance, it has been decided, 
after consultation with the Municipal Tramways 
Association and the Tramways and Light Railways 
Association, to set up an expert Committee to con- 
sider the needs of tramway undertakings as a 
whole, and, where sufficient materials are not forth- 
coming, to decide upon the allocation of available 
supplies. It will probably become necessary in 
connection with this work that rolling stock, 
material and plant should be transferred from the 
less important undertakings to those undertakings 
which are of greater national importance. Some 
undertakings or portions of undertakings may have 
to be closed in order to economise rolling stock and 
labour, and in such cases it may be desirable that 
the track should be transferred elsewhere. Com- 
pulsory powers will be necessary in order that 
these objects may be carried out, and the Regula- 
tion (published elsewhere in this issue) has been 
made in order to confer the necessary powers on 
the Board of Trade and the Committee referred to 
above. 

Tne Tramways CoMMITTEE. 

The Committee, as at present constituted, con- 
sists of :—Mr. James Devonshire (Chairman), Mr. 
A. R. Fearnley, Mr. A. Ll. C. Fell, Mr. J. B. 
Hamilton, Mr. R. J. Howley, Mr. J. M. McElroy, 
and Mr. Stephen Sellon. The terms of reference to 
the Committee provide that representatives of the 
Board of Trade and the Ministry of Munitions will 
attend the meetings in an advisory capacity when 
necessary. It is proposed to add a member repre- 
senting Scottish tramways undertakings. 

The Committee has been appointed to consider 
the needs in respect of rolling stock, materials and 
plant of tramways and light railways which are 
essential to the prosecution of the war, and, subject 
to the approval of the Board of Trade, to take 
such steps as may be necessary or desirable to 
supply those needs by means of transferring rolling 
stock, materials or plant from less essential tram- 
ways or light railways or otherwise as may be 
practicable. ee ; 

It is expected that the principal duties of the 
Committee will be: 

(1) To take steps to provide where necessary 
for the loan or transfer of rolling stock, 
materials or plant from one undertaking to 
another. 








8 THE BOARD OF 


NOTES ON TRADE—continued. 





(2) To determine the relative priority of the 
demands of various tramway and light railway 
undertakings for necessary materials and 
supplies, and to make the necessary arrange- 
ments. in the matter. 

(3) To deal with questions 
increased services and the maintenance of 
existing services, and if considered necessary 
to make recommendations for the closing of the 
traffic of any undertaking, either wholly or in 
part. 

(4) To consider the question of the construc- 
tion of new lines or the extension of existing 
lines and to make recommendations as to the 
supply of the necessary materials, plant, etc., 
therefor. 

(5) To value the materials and plant which 
may be released by the reduction of services or 
the closing of any existing lines, and to advise 
as to the amount of compensation payable in 
respect thereof and the loss in revenue 
involved, if any. 

(6) To consider such applications for the 
revision of existing statutory tolls and charges 
on tramways and light railways as may be 
referred to them by the Board of Trade, and to 
mene recommendations as to the action to be 
taken. 





THE BRANCH MINT AT BOMBAY. 


‘The heavy and continuous demand by the United 

Kingdom and the Allies for Indian products which 
are of importance for the prosecution of the war, 
together with military expenditure in the East 
debitable to the War Office and involving the in- 
direct remittance of very large sums, has caused 
an unprecedented expansion in the normally 
favourable trade balance of India. During the 
past six months, remittances in liquidation of this 
trade balance have been partly made by the ship- 
ment from debtor countries of gold coin and 
bullion. The gold held in the Paper Currency 
Reserve in India rose from £6,623,000 on 3lst May 
to £17,069,000 on the 15th December. In order that 
all the gold so imported’ may be available to main- 
tain the metallic portion of the Government of 
India’s Paper Currency Reserve held for the en- 
cashment of Currency Notes, it was notified on the 
29th June that all gold imported into India on 
private account would be subject to licence and 
would be acquired by the Government of India at 
the rate of Rs. 15=£1 or 1 rupee=7-53344 grains 
troy of fine gold. On 26th September, pursuant to 
the raising of the rate for the sale by the Secretary 
of State of telegraphic transfers on India from 
ls. 44d. to ls. 5d. the rupee, these rates were 
altered to Rs. 144=£1 or 1 rupee=7-79321 grains 
troy of fine gold. The British sovereign is legal 
tender in India and sovereigns imported and sold 
to the Government are therefore immediately avail- 
able for the purpose mentioned above. But the 
active trade demand for coin to finance heavy 
movements of exports, and the requirements of 
Government to make disbursements to troops, im- 
pose a considerable strain on the Government of 
India’s metallic resources and make it desirable to 
hold the gold, no less than the silver, in the 
metallic portion of the Paper Currency Reserve as 
far as possible in the form of legal tender coin. 
Since the beginning of the war the Government of 
India’s currency note circulation has expanded 
from Rs. 75,44,00,000 to Rs. 110,83,00,000. It has 
therefore been decided to provide facilities for 
coining into sovereigns the gold bullion and foreign 
coin coming into the Paper Currency Reserve 
under the provision mentioned above. The estab- 
lishment of a branch of the Royal Mint at Bombay 
was accordingly authorised by Royal Proclamation 
dated the 2ist December to take effect from the 
date of promulgation in India. 





of new or. 


TRADE JOURNAL. 


i 
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j 


| 


i 














JAN. 3, 1918 


NOTES ON TRADE—coniinued. 





CROP ESTIMATES. 


The following information respecting the esti- 
mated yields of crops in certain countries in 1917 
has been received from the International Institute 
of Agriculture at Rome :— 


Wheat.—In Denmark, Spain, France, Great 
Britain, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, Norway, 
Holland, Sweden, Switzerland, Canada, United 


States, India, Japan, Algeria, Egypt and Tunis, 
the total yield of wheat is estimated at 998,638,000 
cwt., or 8.9 per cent. below the 1916 production. 

Rye.—The total production of rye in 1917 in the 
following countries is estimated at 80,103,000 cwt. 
or 3-8 per cent. below the 1916 production :—Den- 
mark, Spain, France, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, 
Norway, Holland, Sweden, Switzerland, Canada 
and United States. 

Barley.—The production of barley in 1917 is esti- 
mated at 261,728,000 cwt., or 0.1 per cent. above the 
1916 production in Denmark, Spain, France, Ire- 
land, Italy, Luxembourg, Norway, Holland, 
Sweden, Switzerland, Canada, United States, 
Great Britain, Japan, Algeria, Egypt and Tunis. 

Oats.—The production of oats in 1917 is estimated 
at 780,463,000 cwt., or 12-1 per cent. above the 
1916 production, in Denmark, Spain, France, Ire- 
land, Italy, Luxembourg, orway, Holland, 
Sweden, Switzerland, Canada, United States, 
Great Britain, Algeria and Tunis. 

Maize.—The production of maize in Spain, Italy, 
Switzerland, Canada, United States and Japan 
is estimated at 1,641,909,000. cwt., or 21-4 per cent. 
above the output in 1916. 

Rice.—The production of rice in Spain, Italy, 
United States, Japan and Egypt is estimated at 
190,345,000 cwt., or 19°7 per cent. below production 
in 1916. 

Linseed.—The production of linseed in Italy, 
Holland, Canada, United States and India is esti- 
mated at 18,332,000 cwt., or 13.4 per cent. below 
production in 1916. 

Potatoes.—The production of potatoes in England, 
Wales, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, Norway, Hol- 
land, Sweden, Switzerland, Canada, United States 
and Japan is estimated at 599,287,000 cwt., or 
36.4 per cent. above the 1916 production. 





INDUSTRIAL CENSUS IN SOUTH AFRICA. 


A preliminary report on the census of factories 
and productive industries in the Union of South 
Africa in 1915-16, which has been published by the 
Census Office at Pretoria, shows that the value 
of the gross production of the various industries 
was £40,300,000. Of this amount £4,300,000 is 
credited to railway workshops. The total number 
of separate factories which made returns was 4,047, 
made up as follows:—Cape Province, 2,006; Natal, 
604, Transvaal, 1,153; and Orange Free State, 
284. Capital invested amounts to £45,465,000; the 
value of the materials used is given as £21,978,000, 
and the value of articles produced and work done 
as £39,691,000, the value added in process of manu- 
facture thus being £17,713,000. The principal in- 
dustries, according to the numbers of the factories 
or concerns engaged are: Preparation, treatment, 
and preserving of foods, drink and condiments, 
1,330; metals, engineering machinery, and cutlery, 
492; and production of clothing, textile fabrics, and 
similar articles, 479. 





COAL MINES DEPARTMENT. 


The Coal Mines Department of the Board of 
Trade has moved into new quarters at the Holborn 
Viaduct Hotel, London, W.C. 2, where all enquiries 
and correspondence must in future be addressed. 

















JAN. 3, 1918 








Imperial and Foreign 


@rave. 





AUSTRALIA. 





WAR-TIME PROFIT TAX ASSESSMEN'I 


ACT, 1917. 


This Act applies, with certain exceptions, to businesses 
of every description which derive their profits from 
sources within Australia—including the business of any 
person taking commissions in respect of transactions or 
services, and of any agent, not being a commercial traveller, 
or an agent whose remuneration consists wholly of a fixed 
and definite sum not depending on the amount of business 
done. Among the businesses exempted from the pro- 
visions of the Act are :—Agricultural, fruit-growing and 
other industries engaged in the manufacture, preparation, 
and distribution of foodstuffs the produce of Australia, 
mining for certain minerals used in the manufacture of 
munitions of war, if the output of the mine is disposed of 
to the Imperial Government, and life insurance (Sect. 8). 

It is provided, however, that profits accruing to a 
person not resident in Australia from sales of his goods 
by an agent in the Commonwealth, will not be deemed to 
be profits for the purposes of this Act unless the prin- 
cipal has a branch and carries stock in Australia, or con- 
signs his goods to an agent for sale there (Sect. 15). 

The tax is to be levied, at a rate to be determined by 
the Australian Parliament, on all war-time profits realised 
after 30th June, 1915 (Sect. 2), and will continue to be 
levied until the 30th June next after the declaration of 
peace (Sect. 7). 


CALCULATION OF WAR-TIME PROFITS. 


War-time profits arising in a financial year will be 
calculated in the following manner. 

(a) By ascertaining the monthly average of the profit 
or loss arising in the accounting period ending in the 
financial year, and separately the monthly average of the 
profit or loss arising in the accounting period beginning 
in the financial year; 

(5) By multipiying the respective monthly averages 
of profit or loss by the number of months of the respective 
accounting periods falling within the financial year; 

(c) By adding together the amounts of the profit or 
deducting the loss, and deducting from the sum so 
obtained the pre-war standard of profits; and 

(4) By making the fol'owing deductions from the sum 
remaining under (c) above :—(i.) £200 in the case of a 
business in which the pre-war standard of profits does not 
exceed £500; (ii.) up to £200 where the sum remaining 
under (c) does not exceed £200; and (ill.) where the sum 
remaining exceeds £200—£200 less £1 for every £2 of 
excess in 1915-16, and £1 for every £4 in excess in 
succeeding financial years. (Sect. 7). 


ACCOUNTING PERIOD. 


The accounting period will be taken to be the period 
of twelve months for which business accounts have been 
made up for the purposes of the Australian Income Tax 
Assessment Act, 1915-16 (Sect. 7). | 

Profits arising from a business will be separately deter- 
mined for the purposes of the Act, and will generally be 
determined on the same principles as those on which 
profits and gains are determined for assessment under the 
Income Tax Act (Sect. 10). 

Profits of any pre-war trade year will be computed on 
the same principles as the profits of the accounting period ; 
and the pre-war standard of profits will be taken to be 


THE BOARD OF TRADE JOURNAL. 9 














IMPERIAL AND FOREIGN TRADE — continued. 





the amount of the profits arising from the dusiness on the 
average of any two of the last three pre-war years, to be 
selected by the taxpayer (Sect. 16). 

APPORTIONMENT OF Tax 

Where profits are taxed under this Act and are also 
charged with excess profits duty in the United Kingdom, 
the tax or the duty, whichever may be the greater, may 
by agreement between the respective authorities be appor- 
tioned between the Imperial and the Commonwealth 
Governments (Sect. 9). 

British firms interested may consult a copy of the Act, 
whose main provisions are summarised above, in the 
Enquiry Office of the Department of Overseas Trade (De- 
velopment and Intelligence). 





NEW ZEALAND. 





AGRICULTURAL, HORTICULTURAL, AND 
DAIRYING INDUSTRIES IN 1916-17. 
(From H.M, Trade Commissioner.) 

WELLINGTON. 


The issue for the year 1916-17 of the Annual Report of 
the Department of Agriculture, Industries and Commerce 
of the New Zealand Government contains the following 
passages, which appear to be of special interest to British 
oversea traders and others. 


MEAT INDUSTRY. 
The industries connected with the leading primary pro- 





ducts of the Dominion—meat and dairy-produce—have, 
reports the Minister of Agriculture, evidenced great 


activity during the year under review. Several additional 
meat-works were completed, and commenced operations in 
that year, and others are in course of construction. As 
regards stock slaughtered for export, another substantial 
increase has been recorded for cattle, but sheep and lambs 
(especially the latter) showed heavy decreases compared 
with the exceptional high numbers of the previous year 


I RUIT-GROWING. 


Further marked progress has characterised the tfruit- 
growing industry, both in the planting of commercial 
orchards and in the organisation of the interests centering 
in the newly-formed Fruit-growers’ Federation. With the 
exception of certain districts, light crops were the rule 
in the 1916-17 season, but as shipping difficulties precluded 
exportation, this was not an altogether adverse factor for 
the growers’ A feature of the year was the enactment 
and bringing into operation of the Orchard Tax Act, under 
which funds are provided for the Fruit-growers’ Federa- 
tion. A registration of all orchards throughout the 
Dominion was also carried out, giving a basis for thorough 
control of diseases, etc. Another measure calculated to 
operate greatly to the advantage of the fruit industry 
was the registration of nurseries, involving a careful in 
spection of young trees. The organisation of the Horti- 
tural Division of the Department has been strengthened, 
and the horticultural stations are being improved on lines 
enabling them to give the most effective assistance to the 
fruit-growing industry. 


SHIPPING AND STORAGE OF PRODUCE. 


With regard to the question of storage and shipping 
space for perishable products—meat, butter and cheese 
—the Report states that the tonnage recently allotted to 
New Zealand was very considerable, and it was antici- 
pated that sufficient space would be set free to enable the 
new season’s business to open without being disastrously 
hampered. The wisdom of the action taken by the 
majority of the meat-freezing companies in extend 
ing their cold storage accommodation has been amply 
demonstrated, and further extensions are in hand at cer- 
tain establishments. The dairy industry has hardly 
shown the same readiness in providing refrigerated storage 
for its output, though extensions to cheese stores have 
been made recently at several ports, and others are now 
in hand, at Wellington in particular. Much more must 
be done, however, before the dairy industry can feel 
reasonably secure, and a measure of financial support for 
the construction of cheese cool storage for Wellington 
and certain other ports has been decided on by the 
Government. 








10 


IMPERIAL AND FOREIGN TRADE—continued. 





DAIRYING INDUSTRY AND EXPORTS. 


In the report of the Director ot the Dairy Division it 
it is stated that although the production of butter has 
been well maintained, the quantities exported for the 
year show a decrease as compared with the previous year’s 
figures. Owing to the scarcity of shipping-space large 
quantities of butter throughout the Dominion were await- 
ing shipment, and, consequently, the quantities in cold 
stores at the end of March (259,936 boxes) far exceede | 
the total at the end of March, 1916 (87,678 boxes). On 
the other hand, cheese exports show a slight increase, the 
quantity exported amounting to 849,478 cwt., or 4,035 cwt. 
in excess of the 1915-16 total. The major portion of the 
butter and cheese exported was shipped to the United 
Kingdom. 


CREAMERY BUTTER. 
The system of separating milk on the farms showed 
a further extension during the year, and there are now 


few butter factories in New Zealand which are not 
receiving supplies of home-separated cream. As_ the 


delivery of this cream is accepted every second day by 
the majority of the dairy companies—and in some cases 
delivery extends to a longer period—the quality of the 
butter made therefrom does not come up to the high stan- 
dard of butter made at a factory where whole-millk is 
received daily. At the same time, there has been some 
improvement during the year in the butter made fiom 
cream which has been separated on the farms. ‘This im- 
provement is no doubt due in part to the method of graJ- 
ing cream which has been adopted by a number of dairy 
companies, and more especially where a low price is paid 
for cream which does not come up to the highest grade. 
This has had the effect of inducing the dairy-farmer to 
take great care in the handling of his cream; and 
an extension of the system of grading is required in order 
that the improvement in the quality of the butter made 
may continue. 

In the case of those dairy companies that have adhered 
to the method of skimming the milk at their own factories 
or skimming-stations, what may be termed a fancy butter 
has been made during the year, and this product has 
been, and will continue to be, in greater demand than tiat 
made under the system of home separation. It would be 
well, however, for producers of butter in New Zealand 
seriously to consider the question of improving their cream 
supplies by a stricter method of supervision on the fe ms 
—greater cleanliness in regard to the utensils used and 
the cooling of the cream, together with a more frequent 
delivery to the factory. 


INCREASED DEMAND FOR SMALL CREAM SEPARATORS. 


With regard to the foregoing, H.M. Trade Commissioner 
in New Zealand remarks that, with the means of transport 
so difficult in many districts, it is not unlikely that home 
separation for the time being will increase with the growth 
of the dairying industry. This increase ts |.kely to lead to 
a wider demand for small separators, the trade tn which, 
even at present, is very considerable. The position of 
United Kingdom firms in this trade is, however, very 
unsatisfactory; in fact, British separators are extremely 
rare in the Dominion. In order that United Kingdom firms 
may understand the position of farmers in relation to the 
very great development of the dairying industry in New 
Zealand, it may be stated that many of the dairying dis- 
tricts are entirely dependent on road transport to get their 
milk or cream to the factory. In districts where roads are 
bad and the factory is scme distance from the farm, it 
is obvious that it is better, if possible, to deliver cream 
rather than milk, partly because of the saving in trans- 
port to the factory, but also because of the custom of 
farmers who deliver whole milk to collect their milk from 
the factory again after separation. Home separation. 
therefore, obviates the collection of this milk. 

Therefore, apart from the demand which arises for 
separators to deal with the milk for butter production on 
the farm itself, there is a large demand, which is likely 
to continue for some considerable time, and to increase 
with the growth of the dairying industry, for separators 
to deal with the milk, the cream from which is to be 
delivered to the butter factories. 


SuPPLY OF RENNET AND USE OF PEPSIN. 
Returning to the Report, the Director of the Dairy 
Division observes that when the season opened it was 
feared, on account of a threatened shortage of rennet, that 
the production of cheese might be seriously interfered 
with. Fortunately this did not happen. It was ascer- 
tained later that the majority of the dairy companies 


THE BOARD OF TRADE JOURNAL. ° 


JAN. 3, 1918 























IMPERIAL AND FOREIGN TRADE—continued. 





had taken the precaution to obtain stocks of rennet in 
advance of their requirements. Subsequently shipments 


of later orders, about the arrival of which there had 
been some doubt, came to hand. Further relief was 
afforded when it became known that a substitute in the 


form of pepsin could be used. 

Karly in the season the question of utilising pepsin was 
considered, and information having been received from 
the Dairy and Cool Storage Commissioner of Canada as 
to the success which had attended trials of pepsin in 
that country, the New Zealand Dairy Division was able 
io take the matter up without delay. A series of trials 
were then made at the Kaponga Dairy Factory, which 
proved conclusively that pepsin of the right quality was 
suitable for supplementing the supply of rennet, or for 
replacing the latter if found necessary. Pepsin in quan- 
tities being available about this time, many of the dairy 
companies decided to procure a sufficient amount of it for 
early use. The instructors in cheese-making have since 
visited many of the factories in order to introduce the 
use of pepsin, and, taken altogether, the result has been 
quite satisfactory. 

The newly-formed New Zealand Co-operative Rennet 
Company was fairly successful in collecting calves’ vells 
during the early months of the season, and some 25,000 
of them were shipped to the United Kingdom to be made 
into rennet for return to the Dominion. 


BRAZIL. 


EKCONOMIC CONDITIONS. 
(From H.M. Minister.) 
RIO DE JANEIRO. 


An important address on present economic conditions 
in Brazil was recently delivered to the Industrial Associa- 
tion of that country by Dr, Antonio Carlos, the Braziliam 
Minister of Finance. 

Dr. Carlos said that as President of the Finance Com- 
mittee, Reporter on Treasury Estimates, and Reporter 
on Revenue, he could testity to the valuable service 
rendered to the country by industrial developments in 
recent years. It might be said that since 1913 the Treasury 
had subsisted on revenue derived from taxation on pro- 
ducts for national consumption. The war had occasioned 
a great reduction in imports into Brazil, which had auto- 
matically produced a diminution of revenue from customs 
duties. This diminution, which represented some 
150,060,000 milreis currency per annum, would place the 
Treasury in an insupportable situation were it not for the 
compensation derived from a consumption tax on 
national produce, During 1916 this tax produced over 
83,000,000 milreis, and during 1917 it was estimated that 
it would amount to about 120,000,000 milreis. 

Large demands had been made on national industry, 
which had rapidly increased its capacity and variety of 
production to meet as far as possible the deficiency of 
imports of essential supplies. In spite of all obstacles— 
transport difficulties, increased cost of machinery and 
tools, high prices of raw materials, etc.—Brazilian pro- 
ducers had shown an indomitable spirit of enterprise and 
industry. Factories had increased their activity and 
widened their field of production, and thousands of fresh 
workmen were employed. The large increase in the 
quantity and the variety of national products had con- 
tributed greatly to modify the cost of living in Brazil. 

The Minister of Finance recognised in this progress in 
national industry the justification of the customs policy 
of Brazil in favouring production. The fruits now being 
derived from it were the result of enormous sacrifices in 
the past, for much capital had been lost in efforts to 
establish industrial enterprises before experience led to 
suecess. Brazil had set herself boldly to the work of 
economic reform, and her intelligence and initiative in the 
various branches of production were aimed both at satis- 
fying the necessities of internal consumption and at 
increasing as far as rossible her export trade. 


COMMERCIAL DEVELOPMENT. 


Notwithstanding the diminution of immigration caused 
by the war, Brazitian agriculturists had succeeded in 
increasing the areas under cultivation, and in developing 
fresh lines of production, as a result of which exports of 
cereals became possible. It was interesting to note that 














JAN. 3, 1918 


THE BOARD OF TRADE JOURNAL. i] 











IMPERIAL AND FOREIGN TRADE—continued. 





this vigorous development otf the agricultural industry 
extended to nearly every region of the country, and that 
all sorts of produce were being brought into the market 
in considerable quantities. 

Dr. Antonio Carlos went on to say that they must 
congratulate themselves on seeing their country definitely 
entering the path which must lead to liberation from the 
vicissitudes consequent on their national economy having 
been hitherto mainly dependent on two products, coffee 
and rubber. Universal agricultural statistics indicated 
the prospect of harvests proving insufficient, Not only 
had the war withdrawn multitudes of rural labourers 
from farming, but it had also taken away men from mills 
and other wurks to munition factories, for which purpose 
many mills and factories had been utilised. The re- 
adaption of these to their original use wou!d take some 
time after the termination of the war. The difficulties 
arising from the consequent depletion of stocks of raw 
materials and foodstuffs gave an opportunity to such 
countries as Brazii to employ their resources in meeting 
the demand which would arise, a matter of the first 
economic importance to the country. 

Brazil’s exportation of frozen meat was a proof of 
the impulse given by the refrigerating process to the 
pastoral industry. [The Minister here made reference to 
the great economic possibilities which the demand for 
meat offers to Brazil. ] 


COLLECTION OF ‘TAXES. 


From the tributary point of view the Minister of 
Finance laid emphasis on the fact that the benefit derived 
by the ‘Treasury from the national activity he had 
referred to, lay chiefly in the increased industrial produc- 
tion from which the tax on consumption was drawn. The 
increased export duties, he said, went chiefly to the 
Governments of the individual States. This, however, he 
did not regret, for an addition to the prosperity of the 
various States was a contribution to the general prosperity 
of the country. With respect to the future he referred 
to the statement by the President to the Federation 
of Commercial Associations, when he said that the phase 
of new taxes or increase of existing taxation might 
for the present at least be considered as closed, and 
Dr. Carlos added that, in his opinion, many of the taxes 
had already reached their extreme limit or gone beyond 
their natural limit. The problem now was to obtain the 
best results from existing duties and taxes by perfecting 
the system of collection. For success in this effort the 
Minister of Finance expressed himself as counting largely 
upon the probity and the patriotism of manufacturers, 
and upon the collaboration of the Centro Industrial do 
Brazil, an Association which had already rendered 
important services to the Government. 

[1 milreis (1,000 reis) tarrency =nearly 1s. 2d. at present 
exchange. | 





CHINA. 


——— 


CURRENCY, MINING, AND 
COMMUNICATIONS. 
(From H.M. Commercial Attaché in China.) 
SHANGHAI. 


For some time past the British Chamber of Commerce 
at Shanghai has had under consideration the question of 
the improvement of Chinese produce, and has appointed 
Sub-Committees which will meet in conference with Sub- 
Committees of the Chinese Chamber of Commerce, to 
consider what methods can be devised to bring about the 
desired improvement. The products which will be con- 
sidered by the Sub-Committees are silk, cotton, tea, 
minerals, and sundry exports. 

To inaugurate this project members of the Committees 
of the two Chambers recently met and discussed a number 
of subjects of interest to merchants of both nationalities. 

A message from H.M. Consul-General' at Shanghai was 
read to the meeting. It touched upon the obstacles to 
trading with China, which still hamper a commerce ex- 
panded to a large variety of articles, and to a volume 
and value that would have seemed incredible twenty-five 
years ago. Industrial development and the exploitation 
of the mineral resources of China were also prevented 
from progressing as they should. H.M. Consul-General 
referred particularly to the arbitrary or uncertain taxa- 





IMPERIAL AND FOREIGN TRADE—continued. 





tion, the absence of a uniform currency, and the difficulty 
and slowness of communication. 


CURRENCY REFORM. 


The President of the Bank of China said that the subject 
‘‘currency reform’ had been talked about for many 
years but nothing had been done effectively. The internal 
troubles of recent years in China were the principal 
reasons why the Government had been unable to reform 
the currency of China or other revenue sources. 

In dealing with the reform of the Chinese currency, he 
asked what would be the suitable currency for the nation. 
The old currency of China was the copper cash. The 
copper cash currency was no longer in existence, although 
in some districts in the Provinces of Hupeh, Chihli, etc., 
copper cash was still used by people for buying or selling 
goods. As regards the silver standard, the sycee system 
was so cumbersome and intricate that he strongly recom- 
mended that it should be abolished. ‘The silver doilar 
money had been in greater demand since the Chinese Gov- 
ernment altered the formation of the budget by basing it 
on the silver doilar, the old Kuping tael system having 
been done away with, China had a large volume of trade 
with foreign nations, but the silver dollar money, which 
was useful for domestic trade in China, was not suited 
t» foreign trade. To adopt the gold standard China 
must have a gold reserve. Where would she obtain such 
@ reserve. Supposing she were able to float a gold loan 
abroad out of which she brought a portion of the gold to 
be used as reserve, leaving the balance abroad on deposit, 
would the people welcome it. At any rate, if the gold 
standard was adopted, the cost of living wouald risa 
higher and higher. 

He was of opinion that the Chinese Government should 
follow the plan adopted in regard to the British-Indian 
currency. Let the standard be gold, but let the silver 
dollar, or the dollar, commonly known as the “new 
republican dollar,’ be the monetary basis and _ legal 
tender. The Powers interested in the gold exchange of 
money should be approached by the Chinese Government 
for the arrangement of a fixed ratio between foreign 
moneys and this kind of silver dollar money. Fluctua- 
tions in rates of exchange would thus be avoided; and 
there was reason to believe that China’s trade would 
improve in the future. The President of the Bank of 
China then made the following suggestions :— 

The two mints at Tientsin and Nanking should be 
allowed to remain, and the other mints at Wuchang, 
Canton, Fengtien and Yunnan should be discontinued. 
The management of the two mints at Calcutta and Bombay 
should be taken as examples, except that the management 
should be entrusted to a bank. under the supervision of 
the Minister of Finance. The new kind of silver dollar 
money coined at these two mints should always be the 
same in weight and fineness of silver, according to rules 
fixed upon. 

The Chinese Government should allow only one bank 
to issue notes, payable in the new kind of silver dollar 
money. The cash reserve against note issue should be 
100 per cent. for a number of years. When the people 
were in the habit of using these notes, a reduction in the 
amount of cash reserve could be made. 

In addition to the ten-copper-cash coins there should 
be coined one-copper-cash coins. The ten-copper-cash 
coins, and the ten, twenty and fifty cents silver pieces 
should be allowed to remain unaltered, but the Chinese 
Government should take steps to withdraw such portion 
of these coins as have been found in excessive circulation 
in the market. There should be a limit to the circulation 
of these subsidiary coins in future, and the introduction of 
exchange based at the rate of ten 10-cent. silver pieces 
to a dollar and so forth should be enforced, thereby 
avoiding any premium or discount existing among them. 
Unless rigorous measures were taken relating to the cir- 
culation and application of these subsidiary coins, the 
new kind of silver dollar money could never be treated 
as legal tender. 

The time in which sycee shou!d be abolished should 
be fixed by the Chinese Government. In the branch 
offices of the bank which had been entrusted with the 
management of the two mints at Tientsin and Nanking, 
sycee could be exchanged for the new dollars. 


MINING LAWS. 


A member of the Chinese Chamber discussed the 
elaborate mining laws of China, and ealled attention to 
some of the provisions in the laws of which foreign and 
Chinese investors should take notice. 

Article III. of the mining laws, he said, provided that 
any citizen of Chira, or any person duly constituted under 
the Republican laws, might, by conforming to these laws, 
obtain mining rights. Article IV. provided that any 








12 THE BOARD OF TRADE JOURNAL. 


IMPERIAL AND FOREIGN TRADE—continued. 





citizen of Powers in treaty with China might join with 
Chinese citizens in raising capital to obtain mining 
rights, but they must abide by the mining laws and other 
laws relating thereto. It was also provided that foreign 
capital might not exceed fifty per cent. of the total capital 
raised for such enterprises. Foreign citizens should present 
certificates signed by their Diplomatic or Consular Officials 
to the Chinese Minister of Agriculture and Commerce 
or to the Chief of the Mining Bureau, testifying that they 
would conform to the various laws. It was at first pro- 
vided that foreign capital should not exceed forty per 
cent., but this was afterwards increased to fifty per cent. 
At the same time the Chinese showed some opposition to 
the arrangement, but the Government adopted the open 
door policy to safeguard mining development. 

In recent years the Japanese, who had conformed to 
Chinese laws and practice, had paid great attention to 
mining in China. 

The speaker expressed the hope that British merchants 
would make an effort to co-operate with the Chinese in 
the development of the vast mineral resources of the 
country. 


CHINA’S COMMUNICATIONS. 


Speaking of the need for improvement in the rail and 
water communications of China, another member of tke 
Chinese Chamber of Commerce said that capitalists we12 
not lacking in China who would develop these communica- 
tions, but they were not persuaded that the guarantees 
were sufficient. 





FRANCE. 


REGULATIONS AFFECTING TRADE. 


H.M. Embassy in Paris calls attention to the following 
Decrees and Orders relative to trade which have appeared 
in recent issues of the “‘ Journal Officiel ’’ :— 


DECLARATIONS REQUIRED OF STOCKS OF CERTAIN 
COMMODITIES. 

The following Presidential Decrees provide for declara- 
tions of stocks of certain commodities :—A Decree, dated 
Sth December (published 6th December), required a declar- 
ation before 3lst December, 1917, of certain stocks in 
France and Algeria of raw cotton; cotton sheetings, tapes 
and wicks; cotton thread, ginned cotton; cotton waste; 
etc., held on 15th December, 

A Decree, dated 5th December (published 7th December) 
required a declaration before 20th December, 1917, of all 
cistern trucks used for the transport of wine, beer, etc. 

A Decree, dated 27th November (published 28th 
November) submits to requisition all industrial establish- 
ments concerned in the extraction and production of 
starch; all machinery and plant used in these establish- 
ments; all raw materials (potatoes, etc.) or products 
employed in the manvfacture of starch: and all starch 
and manufactured starch products. Declarations made 
out in the prescribed form relative to the position of the 
above on 15th December were required before Ist January, 
1918. This Decree also required a declaration before 31st 
December, 1917, of all stocks in France and Algeria of 


starch and manufactured starch products exceeding 300 
kilogs., held on 15th December. 


CONTROL OF MANUFACTURE OF CHOCOLATE, ETC. 


A Ministerial Order, dated 12th November (published 
16th November), establishes a Technical Commission of six 
members to advise on the Government regulations for the 
manufacture and sale of chocolate ;and another Ministerial! 
Order of the same date and publication fixes maximum 
prices for chocolate and chocolate confectionery. 

The text (in French) of the above-mentioned Decrees, 
etc., may be consulted by British firms interested at the 
Department of Overseas Trade (Development and Intelli- 
gence). 

EXTENSION OF MORATORIUM. 

A recent issue of the French “Journal Officiel ”’ 
announces that the Moratorium in respect of insurance 
companies, loan societies and savings banks (“ enterprises 
d’assurance, de capitalisution, et d’épargne), which was 


originally imposed on 27th December, 1914, has heen ex- 
tended until the end of February, 1918. 








JAN. 3, 1918 


IMPERIAL AND FOREIGN TRADE—continued. 


JAPAN. 








KNCOURAGEMENT OF INVENTIONS. 

H.M. Embassy at Tokio writes that the Japanese 
Department of Agriculture and Commerce has drawn up 
a scheme for the encouragement of inventors and scientists 
in Japan. Under this scheme a sum of money will be 
provided and will be devoted to the manufacture of 
models, the conduct of experiments, the provision of 
lectures, the grant of -prizes for inventions, and to reward- 
ing notable inventors. The Department will also give 
financial assistance to promoters of exhibitions of inven- 
tions. 





JAPAN (Corea). 


SOYA BEANS.—H.M. Consul-General at Seoul writes 
that the 1917 crop of soya beans in Corea is estimated 
at 14,094,545 bushels, as compared with 14,668,197 bushels 
in 1916. The decrease in the crop is attributed to scarcity 


of rain in the spring. UPLAND COTTON: There was 
a very notable increase in the output of upland cotton 
in Corea last year, the yield being placed as high as 
74,839,233 lb., as compared with 41,443,669 lb. in 1916. 








MALAY STATES. 





AMENDMENT OF MINING ENACTMENT, 
1911. 


A Supplement to the Federated Malay States ‘‘ Govern- 
ment Gazette’’ of 28th September publishes the text of 
Enactment No. 11 of 1917, being an Enactment further 
to amend ‘‘ The Mining Enactment, 1911.”’ 

This Enactment, which may be cited as the ‘‘ Mining 
Enactment, 1911, Amendment Enactment, 1917,’ came 
into force on the day of its publication in the “ Gazette,” 
and, inter alia, lays down the procedure to be followed 
for rendering lands available for working under a com- 
prehensive scheme. Provision is also made for the con- 
tinuation of mining operations from one block to another 
through intervening land; for the record of water licence 
on titles affected ; and the removal of dredging-machinery 
from one mining block to another. 

The text of the amending Enactment, together with a 
copy of the principal Enactment of 1911, may be consulted 
by British firms interested at the Department of Overseas 
Trade (Development and Intelligence). 





NETHERLANDS EAST INDIES. 





PROPOSED NEW PETROLEUM COMPANY. 


H.M. Minister at The Hague reports that a Bill has 
been introduced into the States-General having for its 
object the establishment of a joint stock company for 
the exploitation of petroleum fields in the Netherlands 
East Indies. In an explanatory Memorandum appended 
to the Bill it is stated that the objections attaching to 
State exploitation are avoided by placing .the enterprise 
in the hands of a company under certain conditions. The 
conditions mentioned are: (1) That the national character 
of the company is guaranteed in the sense that the foreign 
capital participating in the enterprise cannot, by such 
participation, cause international disputes; (2) that the 
Colony obtains a measure of control proportionate to its 
interests, receives a considerable share of the profits, and 
has power to take over, at fixed prices, crude petroleum 
and products manufactured therefrom; and (8) that the 
Administration of the Colony are able at any time to 
subject the company to their influence in such a manner 
that its legal character is not changed. The Jambi 
Petroleum Company, which is the name of the concern 
proposed to be established, will, it is said, fulfil these 
conditions. 

A capital of 5,000,000 florins (about £420,000 at par 
exchange) is considered necessary for the exploitation of 
the fields, and in order to assure this amount guarantees 
are to be given by the State. The first issue will be for 
500,000 florins in registered shares, the holders of which 














JAN. 3, 1918 


IMPERIAL AND FOREIGN TRADE—continved. 





will have a voice in the management of the Company. 
As need arises, the Company will subsequently issue 
bearer shares to a maximum amount of 4,500,000 florins, 
also under State guarantee. Other shares will be placed 
on the market when the business is in operation; these 
will not be guaranteed, but a higher dividend will be 
paid upon them. 


British firms interested may-consult the text of the Bill 
(in Dutch), together with a map of the petroleum fields, 
in the Enquiry Office of the Department of Overseas 
Trade (Development and Intelligence). 

[NotE.—During the last twenty years the petroleum 
industry in the Netherlands East Indies has undergone 
a complete change. Indeed, prior to 1901, kerosene was 
the only product of importance; but now benzine, liquid 
fuel, lubricating oil, asphalt and paraffin wax are pro- 
duced. The output of crude petroleum in 1915 was 
1,616,645 metric tons, and 1,569,216 tons in 1914. ] 





SWEDEN. 





KMBARGOES ON TEXTILE WASTE. 

By Royal Decrees of recent date, copies of which have 
been forwarded by H.M. Minister at Stockholm, embar- 
goes have been placed in Sweden on stocks of waste 
articles of wool, cotton, and animal hair, aggregating 50 
kilogs.( about 110 lb.), and also on cotton wool of the 
kind used for placing between double windows. The 
manufacture of such wool from waste has also been pro- 
hibited. This action has been taken in order to regulate 
prices of waste, to ensure a supply of it to industries which 
are now obliged to utilise waste to a greater extent than 
heretofore, and to reserve cotton for the more important 
uses, particularly for the manufacture of clothing, and 
for medical supplies. 

[Note.-—‘‘ Embargo’’ in the sense used here signifies 
restrictions on the uses of goods, and is not equivalent 
to expropriation. | 





UNITED STATES. 





TRADING WITH THE ENEMY. 

The United States Government have published, under 
their Trading with the Enemy Act, an “Enemy Trading 
List ’’ for Central America (including Mexico) and South 
America. The List contains some 1,600 names. It is 
understood that the List is in the main identical with, 
while somewhat larger than, the British Statutory List 
for the countries affected. 

The Foreign Trade Department of the Foreign Office 
announces that every effort will be made to co-ordinate 
as nearly as possible the future action of H.M. Govern- 
ment in the administration of the Statutory List with 
-that of the Government of the United States. 

President Wilson has established a War Trade Board, 
with wide powers, under the Acts relating to trading 
with the enemy and interference with foreign relations. 
The Board is the licensing authority for exports and 
imports of such goods as are under restrictions, and also 
for trading with certain persons. The powers and per- 
sonnel of the Exports Administrative Board have been 
transferred to the War Trade Board. An advisory War 
Trade Council has also been established. 

Executive administration is vested in the Secretary of the 
United States Treasury as regards any investigation, regu- 
lation or prohibition of any transaction in foreign ex- 
change, transfers of credit,and transfers of indebtedness or 
of the ownership of property between the United States 
and any foreign country. The Secretary is also the 
licensing authority in respect of an enemy or ally of 
enemy insurance or reinsurance company doing business 
with the United States through an agency or branch 
office or otherwise. 

In the Fede‘al Trade Commission is vested power (1) to 
license the filing and prosecution in enemy or ally of 
enemy country of applications for patents, trade marks 
and copyrights, and (2) to license the manufacture and 
production of goods and articles under any patent, or the 
use of any trade mark owned or controlled by an enemy 
or ally of enemy. 

Provision has also been made for the appointment of 
a Custodian of Alien Property. 








THE BOARD OF TRADE JOURNAL. 13 


~— ——— - ee 


IMPERIAL AND FOREIGN TRADE—continued. 





ADDITIONS TO THE “CONSERVATION 
LIST.” 


With reference to the notice at pp. 584-585 of the “‘ Board 
of Trade Journal’’ for the 138th December last, it is 
notified in the issue of the “ Commerce Reports ’’ (Wash- 
ington) for the 9th November that the War Trade Board 
has added the undermentioned articles to the list of goods 
licences for the export of which from the United States 
may only be granted when they are destined for actual 
war purposes, or when they will directly contribute thereto, 
. in certain exceptional cases (the ‘“ Conservation 
sist “ ae 
Wire rope; arsenic and compounds thereof; carbon 
electrodes; high-speed steel; and tool steel. 





OPENINGS FOR BRITISH TRADE. 





[NOTICE TO MANUFACTURERS AND _ EX- 
PORTERS.—Strict precautions should be taken against 
trading with the enemy, and regard had to the restrictions 
on trading in certain goods (including Priority Certificate 
requirements) and to the special regulations governing 
trade with certain countries. In cases of doubt or diffi- 
culty reference should be made personally or by letter to 
the Department of Overseas Trade (Development and 
Intelligence). 


British firms may obtain the names and addresses of the 
persons or firms referred to in the following notices of 
‘* Openings’’ by applying to the Department and quoting 
the specific reference number. Even though trade may 
not at present be possible, it may be worth while for 
British firms to open up communications now with a 
view to future trade. | 


UNITED KINGDOM. 


NEW SOURCES OF SUPPLIES REQUIRED.- 


Since the outbreak of the war applications have been 
received at the Department of Overseas Trade (Develop- 
ment and Intelligence) from a large number of firms in 
all parts of the United Kingdom, and abroad, who wish 
to get into communication with British manufacturers or 
—— of various classes of goods which have previously 
een obtained from Germany and Austria-Hungary. 

An application nas been recorded during the past week 
for the names of manufacturers or producers of machinery 
for covering copper wire with india-rubber insulation. 
British manufacturers or producers of such machinery now 
in a position to supply are invited to make application 
for the name of the enquirer. 





CANADA. 


The following enquiries have been received at the 
Canadian Government Trade Commissioner’s Oftice, Port- 
land House, Basinghall Street, London, E,.C.2, whence 
further information may be obtained :—- 


FOOD PRODUCTS, BOTTLES, KITCHEN WARE, 
ETC.—A Vancouver firm of manufacturers’ agents desires 
to obtain agencies for United Kingdom manufacturers 
who are seeking a market in British Columbia, and par- 
ticularly suggests preserved food products, confectionery, 
glass bottles, enamelled iron kitchen ware, ete. 

MARKET SOUGHT FOR CANADIAN CANNED 
FOODSTUFFS.—A firm of exporters in British Columbia 


asks to be placed in correspondence with United Kingdom 
brokers importing canned salmon, peaches, tomatoes, etc. 





MOROCCO (French Zone). 
(From the Acting British Consul.) 


CASABLANCA. 

WOOLLEN GOODS.—The demand for woollen goods 
is a growing one, both as regards the natives and the 
European population, although it is not nearly so impor- 
tant as the demand for cottons. The natives’ require- 
ments should receive special attention. There would 
appear to be a very likely opportunity for British manufac- 
turers to regain their former position in the market. 








JAN. 3, 1918 





14, THE BOARD OF TRADE JOURNAL. 


IMPERIAL AND FOREIGN TRADE—continued. 





HOSIERY, MEN’S WEAR, LACE, YARNS.—The 
trade in these goods is chiefly in the hands of native 
firms and agents. ‘Trade in these goods—if dealt with in 
bulk—would probably give a fair profit. 


BAGS, TARPAULINS, Etc.-—British firms desirous 
of doing business in jute and canvas goods, bags, sacks, 
etc., and in tarpaulins and other waterproof coverings, 
would require to take the matter up with great thorough- 
ness in order to compete. Direct quotations to local 
British firms might lead to business. 


HEATING APPARATUS.—Houses in Morocco are 
constructed without any provision for heating. Hitherto, 
portable oil-stoves have usually been employed during 
the comparatively short cold season, A cheap, compact 
apparatus would most likely meet with success. 

JOISTS.—Scottish and steel 
joists should have a better opportunity than formerly 
of doing business in these goods. They will have to 
face keen competition from the United States. 


manufacturers of iron 


MACHINERY.—There is a steadily increasing number 
of mills in the principal towns, which are engaged in the 
manufacture of flour, semolina, macaroni, ete. The 
development of this industry may afford an opportunity 
for sales of various types of milling machinery. Possible 
openings for crushing machinery may arise in connection 
with works engaged in the manufacture of cement and 
plaster. Machinery is occasionally required for other 
industries, such as saw-milling, mineral water manufac- 
ture, repair shops, etc., all of which should develop con- 
siderably after the war. 


VEHICLES AND CYCLES.—The demand for car- 
riages and accessories, incl.ding cart. and lorries, has 
grown rapidly during the iast tew years, and is being 
met mainly by local makers. The prospects for business 
in motor cars, motor cycles, and accessories, deserve the 
special attention of Jbritish manufacturers. Various 
foreign makes are already established. The Moroccan 
market is ready for the introduction of a cheap motor cycle 
and a low-priced ordinary cycle. Casablanca is connected 
by metalled roads with Rabat and Mazagan, and with 
Marrakesh. Motor passenger and postal services have been 
established between the towns mentioned. Touring motor 
cars and commercial motor lorries are used over these 


roads. 
Horse-drawn carts used in the French Zone are lighter 
in build than those empluyed in the United Kingdom. 


MOTOR TYRES.—In view of the important develop- 
ment of the motor vehicle trade in French Morocco, the 
market for tyres should be carefully watched. 


PAINTS, OILS, Etc.—Paints, varnishes, soap, 
common oils are important articles of commerce with 
French Morocco. Thee is a good opening for soap, 
lubricating oils and greases. British firms dealing in 
these goods are advised by !ocal commission agents to 
furnish samples, and to send out small stocks, which must 
be carried if trading is to be successful.—The usual! terms 
are both cash against documents, and bills of three months 
against documents. 


BOOTS AND SHOES.—There is a 
opportunity for trade in boots and shoes. The native 
demand is for a cheap boot, brown or black. The Moors 
wear the heel-less slippers of native manufacture, but will 
no doubt gradually adopt some forms of European foot- 
wear, although no immediate developments can be looked 
for in this respect. The demand for better class boots 
is increasing 


and 


very valuable 


g. 

STATIONERY.—There is also an attractive opening 
for the better class of stationery, ink, etc., and for small 
portable typewriters fitted preferably with the accents 
for the French language. The demand for these goods 
cannot fail to increase after the war, in proportion as the 
trade and industry of the French Zone develop. Account 
books shoula be ruled to suit the French currency, and 
should be strongly bound. There is also a good demand 


for packing paper. 
PROVISIONS.—There is a large business done in green 
and black China teas. The demand for black tea is 


growing. On the Moroccan market tea is usually sold 
by sample, on three to four months’ bills, or for cash 





IMPERIAL AND FOREIGN TRADE—continued. 





against documents with two and a half per cent. discount. 
There is a very good trade in black pepper and ginger, 
as well as in all kinds of spices. Competition is very 
keen.—The trade in rice is likely to increase. The 
demand already is good, aithough the natives as yet con- 
sume but little —Large quantities of bean and cottonseed 
oils are used in cooking. 

[Note.—In reading the foregoing regard should be had 
to the existing restrictions on exports from the United 
Kingdom.| (See Notice to Manufacturers and Exporters 
on p. 13.) 








TEXTILES, HARDWARE, Etc., IN EGYPT AND 
SUDAN.—-H.M. Consul-General at Alexandria writes 
that a firm in that city, which has a branch at Khartoum, 
desires to get into communication with United Kingdom 
firms who wish to open up trade with Egypt and the 
Sudan. The goods in which the firm is chiefiy interested 
are :— 

Cotton, linen and silk goods; velvet cloth; ticking for 

mattresses ; hosiery, stockings and socks. 

Boots and shoes; leather of all kinds for boots and shoes, 

and harness; boot polish. 

Lubricating oils and greases. 

Linoleum and waxed cloth. 

Metal bedsteads, ironmongery and hardware, earthen- 

ware and porcelain, brushes, and soap. 

Aniline dyes and indigo colours. 

Locomotives and wagons. 

[Reference No. 1. ] 

(See Notice to Manufacturers and Exporters on page 13.) 





SALE OF ENEMY PROPERTIES IN GOLD COAST 
COLONY. The Crown Agents for the Colonies announce 
that the several properties of well-known business firms, 
including the German West African Trading Company, 
Thomas Morgan & Son, Chevalier & Co,, Luther & Seyfert, 
Schenck & Barker, F. W. Rust & Co., Henry Dietrich & 
Co., F. Oloff & Co., The Bremen Factory, Bodecker & 
Meyer, Augener & Mau, and Mayer and Richter (com- 
prising factories, bungalows, and cocoa storage sheds), 
situated in leading business positions at the principal 
trading centres in the Gold Coast Colony, wil! be sold 
by auction at Accra and other places in the Gold Coast 
Colony on Ist February and the following days. Pur- 
chasers must be British subjects not acting for or con- 
trolled by any foreign interest. 

A list of the properties may be obtained from, and the 
Ordinance under which they are to be sold may he ccn- 
sulted at, the Office of the Crown Agents for the Colonies, 
4, Millbank, London, S.W.1, and further certiculars 
may be obtained from the Controlling Officer of Enemy 
Property, Accra, Gold Coast Colony. 





AGENCIES DESIRED IN BRAZIL.—A firm of mer- 
chants established at Liverpool, with a branch house in 
Rio de Janeiro, wishes to undertake the representation in 
Brazil of United Kingdom manufacturers of goods suitable 
for sale in the Brazilian market. The branch business 
employs travellers who visit the interior of Brazil, and 
sales could therefore be effected over a wide area. [Refer- 
ence No. 2.] (See Notice to Manufacturers and Exporters 


on p. 138.) 





SCENT FOR SOAP, ETC., IN JAPAN.—An old- 
established firm of manufacturers, exporters and importers 
at Kyoto, claiming to be well-known throughout Japan, 
wishes to receive samples, catalogues and quotations from 
United Kingdom manufacturers of goods suitable for the 
Japanese market, who are desirous of exporting their 
products to that country. A line in which the firm 1s 
particularly interested is perfume for soap, and twelve 
samples of perfumes, with prices attached, are required. 
Terms of business—cash against documents, [Reference 
No. 3.] (See Notice to Manufacturers and Exporters 


on p. 13.) 





WOOLLEN - CLOTHS IN U.S.A.—-H.M. Consul- 
General at Boston reports that a tailor in that city wishes 
to represent manufacturers of low-priced grades of Scotch 
woollen cloths. The enquirer. who considers that con- 
nections with small mills would suit his purpose best, 
would either purchase direct on his own account, or sell 
on commission. [Reference No. 4.] (See Notice to 
Manufacturers and Exporters on p. 13.) 














Jan. 3, 1918 





| 














Gobernment Notices 
altecting Grade. 





EXPORT SECTION. 





PRIORITY CERTIFICATES FOR 
EXPORT OF GOODS. 


GRANT OF 


IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT. 


(1) The Director of the War Department 
announces that it has been arranged with the Priority 
Departments of the Admiralty and of the Ministry of 
Munitions that, except as after-mentioned, in the case 
of all goods subject to Priority control by those Depart- 
ments, and intended for export 

(i.) to neutral countries, or 
(ii.) to Allied countries (unless the goods are pur- 
chased directly, by or on behalf of Allied 
Governments or are required for the execution 
of specific Allied Government contracts), 
applications for Priority Certificates should not, after 
l4th January, be addressed to the Priority Departments. 
li:stead of application being made to these Departments, 
application tor an export licence should, on and after 
l4th January, be made iw duplicate on the ordinary 
War ‘Trade Department application forms to the 
Secretary, War Trade Department, 4, Central Buildings, 
London, $.W.1. One of the two applications should be 
marked “ Duplicate,’’ and the two forms should be securely 
pinned together, one inside the other. It should be 
expressly stated, in answer to Question “n,’’ page 2, 
that a Priority Certificate is required by the applicant. 

This procedure should be followed in all cases in which 
a Priority Certificate is required in respect of goods 
intended for export to destinations (i) and (ii) above, 
whether the export of the goods to these destinations is 
prohibited or not. 

If the War Trade Department have no objection to the 
export, they will communicate with the Priority Department 
concerned, with a view to the grant of a Priority Certi- 
ficate, and, if a Priority Certificate is granted, it will be 
forwarded by the War Trade Department to the applicants, 
who should not communicate with the Priority Depart- 
ments direct. As soon as the goods covered by the 
Priority Certificate are manufactured and ready for ship- 
ment (if they are such as require an export licence), the 
applicants should so inform the War ‘Trade Department, 
whereupon, apart from unforeseen contingencies, the 
necessary licence will be issued to them. If the goods 
do not require an export licence, the War Trade Depart- 
ment need not be approached, and the goods may he 
exported subject to Customs regulations. 


Trade 


(2) The foregoing procedure does not apply to (1) ship- 
building materials of all descriptions intended for export 
to the United States of America, and (2) anchors, chain 
eables, chain cable gear, and chain cable iron intended 
for export to any destination. In the case of such goods, 
the existing procedure remains unaltered, and is not 
affected by anything contained in this announcement. 


(8) In the case of exports to British Possessions, appli- 
eations for Priority Certificates should continue to be 
made to the Priority Department, Ministry of Munitions, 
1, Caxton Street, London, S.W. 1. (accompanied by a re- 
commendation from the lccal Prioritv Authority), or to the 
Priority Department of the Admiralty (accompanied by a 
certificate from the local Senior Naval Officer or other 
local Naval Authority) in accordance with the existing 
practice; and application for an export licence should 
not be made to the War Trade Department until a 
Priority Certificate has been obtained from the competert 
Priority Department. The certificate should be produced 
in original to the War Trade Department when applica- 
tion is made for an export livence. In such cases a dupli- 
cate application is, of course, unnecessary. 


(4) In the case of exports to Allied countries of goods 
purchased directly by, or on behalf of, an Allied Govern- 
ment, or required for the execution of specific Allied 
Government contracts, application for a priority certifi- 


THE BOARD OF TRADE JOURNAL. 15 








GOVERNMENT NOTICES AFFECTING TRADE— 


continued. 





cate should be made to the Commission Internationale 
de Ravitaillement, India House, Kingsway, London, 
W.C. 2., who, if prepared to support the case, will arrange 
for the issue of a Priority Certificate. 

(5) Intending exporters are warned that care should be 
taken in submitting applications, to state any special 
reasons which may exist, in support of their request fer 
permission to manufacture and export goods subject to 
Priority Control. In the absence of such special reasors, 
it is improbable, under existing circumstances, that the 
desired facilities will be granted. 





EXEMPTIONS FROM STEEL REGULATIONS. 


The Director of the War Trace Department draws atten- 
tion to the following revised list of articles which it has 
been decided may be exported without Privy Council 
Licence or Cutlers’ Company or Chamber of Commerce 
Certificate so far as concerns the prohibitions on the 
export of :— 

(A) Steel containing tungsten or molydenum, and 

(A) Steel containing chrome, cobalt, nickel, or vana- 
dium, | 

It should be clearly understood, however, that if the 
articles mentioned fall within the terms of any other 
heading in the list of prohibited exports, e.g., copper, etc., 
malleable hematite iron castings, steel or iron wire and 
articles wholly manutactured of steel or iron wire, a licence 
from the War Trade Department must be obtained. 

It is further to be noted ‘hat these exemptions cannot 
be applied to exports to Norway, Sweden, Denmark or 
Holland, or in the case of goods sent from the United 
Kingdom through France to Switzerland, Spain or Italy, 
when such goods appear on the French prohibited list of 
exports. 


Balances, spring, for domestic purposes. 

Bands, steel, for walking sticks and umbrellas. 

Bicycles, complete. 

Box irons and sad irons for domestic and laundry pur- 
poses. 

Caps, steel, for tubacco pipes. 

Clips, steel, for penholders, pencil holders, letters and 
papers, and for photographic purposes. 

Clips, steel, for umbrellas, hats, trousers and clothing 
generally, 

Coffee and maize handmills for domestic and shop use. 

Compasses for school use. 

Corset. shields, steels and busks. 

Crochet hooks 

Cutlery, table 

Dental lathes. 

Dental engines. 

Dental spittoons. 

Dental burs. 

Dishes, steel, for photographic purposes. 

Domestic weighing machines and spring balances. 

Drawing instruments, steel. for school use. 

Drums, steel, when used as containers for goods. 

Electricity meters, the following— 

Meters (svitchhoard). 

Power factor meters. 

Prepayment meters. 

Relays 

Svnchroscopes, 

Time sw'tches. 


Ammeters. 

Ampere-hour meters (house 
service) 

Ampere-honr meters 
(switchboard ) 

House service meters. 


Idle current meters. 

Indicating wattmeters, 

Induction instruments. 

Induction relays. 

Integrating meters (house 
service). 

Integrating meters (switch- 
board). 

Meters (house service). 


T:me-limit re'ays 
Traction meters. 
Two-rate meters, 
Voltmeters, 
Wattm-ters, 
Watt-hour 
service). 
Watt-hour meters (switch- 
board). 


meters (house 


Met:1s (power factor). 


Eyeglass frames. 

Eyelets. 

Ferrules, steel, for walking sticks or umbrellas. 

Fittings, steel, for wearing apparel. 

Fittings, steel, for writing desks. 

Fruit crushers for domestic and shop use. 

Gate hooks. 

Gate hinges. . 

Handmills for domestic and snop use. 

Hinges for gates. Jovurs (except railway carriage doors), 
shutters, windows, and articles of furniture. 

Irons for domestic and laundry purposes. 








TRADE JOURNAL. Jan. 3, 1918 








16 THE BOARD OF 
GOVERNMENT NOTICES AFFECTING TRADE— 
continued. 

Keys. 
Latches. 
Locks. 


Manicure sets. 

Meat mincers, hand, for domestic and shop use. 

Motor cars, complete. 

Motor cycles and sidecars, complete 

Mouse traps. 

Nibs. 

Paint scrapers. 

Pencil holders. 

Penholders. 

Pens. 

Print cutters, steel, for photographic purposes. 

Razors. 

Razor blades (including safety razors, but not frames). 

Rabbit traps. 

Rat traps. 

Rickshaws and their parts. 

Roller skates. 

Scissors. 

Sewing machines (domestic). 

Sheif brackets. 

Spectacle frames. 

Spring balances, domestic. 

Surgical instruments. 

Tacks. 

Thimbles (domestic). 

Toys, steel. 

Trinkets for personal wear. 

Trouser stretchers and fittings. 

Umbrella ferrules, notches, catches, clips and handle 

bands. 

Weighing machines, domestic. 

Whips. 

X-ray apparatus. 

All steel manufactured goods not otherwise prohibited 
in which the steel is less than 5 per cent. of the total 
weight. 


f Notes.—The original itst of exempted articles was pub- 
lished on pp. 546-8 of the “ Board of Trade Journal’”’ of 
22nd February, 1917. 

Goods marked (A) on the list of export prohibitions are 
prohibited to be exported to all destinations, ] 





NEW DEFENCE OF THE REALM 
REGULATIONS. 





An Order-in-Council dated 21st December further 
amends the Defence of the Realm Regulations, in the 
following, amongst other, respects :— 


TRAMWAY MATERIALS AND PLANT. 


After Regulation 7BB the following regulation is 
inserted :— 

“ 7pBB. (1) The Board of Trade, for the purpose 
of making the most efficient use of the materials or 
plant belonging to a tramway or light railway under- 
taking with a view to the successful prosecution of 
the war, may by order require the whole or a part 
of the rolling-stock, materials and plant, including 
permanent way, of any such undertaking to be placed 
at their disposal or at the disposal of any person or 
body of persons named by them. 

Where any such order has been made the Board 
of any such person or body of persons may take pos- 
session of such portions of the rolling-stock, materiats 
or plant of such undertaking as they may require and 
may remove them and make use of them for the 
purpose of any other tramway or light railway. 

(2) Any order made under this regulation may be 
revoked, extended or varied as occasion requires. 

(3) If any person fails to comply with the provisions 
of any alee made under this regulation or wilfully 
hinders or impedes the execution of any such order 
he shall be guilty of a summary offence against these 
regulations.”’ 


‘ 
‘ 


GOVERNMENT NOTICES AFFECTING TRADE— 


continued. 


POWERS OF FOOD CONTROLLER. 


#9GG. The provisions of this Regulation may be applied 
to premises which are used for the purpose of the distri- 
bution of any article of food. 

304. This Regulation is amended to give the Food 
Controller the same powers as the Admiralty, Army 
Council, and Minister of Munitions, as regards the 
making of safety rules for factories to which his powers 
extend under Regulation 94a. 





POWERS OF BOARD OF AGRICULTURE. 

2M. Regulation 2m is amended so as to empower the 
Board of Agriculture and Fisheries to take possession 
of land or buildings for the accommodation of persons, 
machinery or stock; to require land to be adapted for 
cultivation by the repair of hedges, drains, etc.; to pro- 
hibit or regulate the use of land in respect of the cultiva- 
tion of crops, and require ploughing to be done; and to 
require certain returns as to cultivation, crops, and 
livestock. 





POWERS OF MINISTER OF MUNITIONS. 

114. The Minister of Munitions, with a view to mai.1- 
taining or increasing the supply of light, heat or power, 
may, under this Regulation, direct that lights shall be 
extinguished, or their use restricted. 





GENERAL SECTION. 





FLAX (RESTRICTION OF CONSUMPTION) 
ORDER, 1917. 


The Flax Control Board announces that in view of the 
increasing demands for linen goods required for naval, 
military and other national purposes, it has become 
necessary to take steps with a view to conserving the 
available supplies of raw material and yarn. Steps 
have therefore been taken by the Flax (Restriction of 
Consumption) Order, 1917, which is dated 27th December, 
to provide that, after 12th January, unless a permit has 
been obtained, no flax, flax line or flax tow may be spread 
or carded or otherwise put into process of manufacture; 
that no yarns composed wholly or partly of flax or flax tow 
may be wound or warped; and that after Sth January no 
yarns composed wholly or partly of flax or flax tow may ke 
boiled, bleached or put into any other process of treat- 
raent. 

Permits under this Order will be issued by the Scottish 
and Irish Sub-Committees of the Flax Control Board. 

The Irish Sub-Committee consists of five representa- 
tives of the Belfast Flax Spinners’ Association, five 
representatives of the Irish Power-Loom Manufacturers’ 
Association, and two persons auominated by the Council 
of the Linen Merchants’ Association, together with repre- 
sentatives of the Government Department concerned; and 
the Scottish Sub-Committee consists of seven repre- 
sentatives of the Scottish Flax Spinners and Manufac- 
turers’ Advisory Committee, together with representatives 
of the Government Department concerned. 

A Labour Advisory Committee will be constituted to 
sit with the Scottish and Irish Sub-Committees when 
questions involving the interests of labour are under 
consideration. 

Powers have been conferred on these Sub-Committees 
under the Defence of the Realm Regulations to require 
all necessary information and to issue permits under the 
Order. 

Finally, it is announced that all existing licences 69 
spin are cancelled as from the date when the Order 
comes into operation. Applications for further permits 
should be addressed to the Trish Sub-Committee of the 
Flax Control Board, Chamber of Commerce, Belfast, or 
to the Seottish Sub-Committee of the Flax Control 
Board, War Department. Flax Office, Victoria Chambers, 
Dundee. 


en 








ee ee ee ee ee ee. 


p< » ' —_ ior 








THE BOARD OF 


TRADE JOURNAL. ] 


~J 





JAN. 3, 1918 


—_—, 


GOVERNMENT NOTICES AFFECTING TRADE— 


continued. 





HEAVY MOTOR CAR (AMENDMENT) 
ORDER, 1917. 


A Local Government Board Order dated 18th December 
amends ior the duration of the war and twelve mofths 
thereafter that portion of Article VII. of the Heavy 
Motor Car Order, 1904, which limits the speed of a 
heavy motor car drawing a trailer, to five miles an hour. 
in the Order this will not apply to a car drawing a “ gas 
container trailer.’’ 

A “gas container trailer’’ is defined in the Order as 
a vehicle (a) constructed or adapted for use and used 
solely for carrying a bag or other receptacle for containing 
gas to be used for the purpose of propelling the vehicle, 
(b) not exceeding in weight, unladen, fifteen hundred- 
weight, and (c) having all its wheels fitted with pneumatic 
tyres or tyres made of a soft or elastic material. 





PASSPORFS FOR THE UNION OF SOUTH 
A FR I¢ } A ‘ 


It is notified by the Foreign Office that all persons 
proceeding to the Union of South Africa must be in 
possession of passports issued or visé by a competent 
British authority. British subjects embarking from the 
United Kingdom must carry valid passports issued or visé 
by the Passport Office, 59, Victoria Street, London, S.W. 1. 
Persons who are not British subjects must carry pass- 
ports issued by their own authorities and visé by the 
Passport Office. 

All persons embarking from foreign countries for the 
Union of South Africa must first have their passports visé 
by a British Consular Officer in the country of embarka- 
vion. 


— | 


FOOD ORDERS. 








The following Orders and Notifications have been 
issued by the Ministry of Food :— 


OILS AND FATS (REQUISITION) ORDER, 
1917. 

By this Order, which is dated 2lst December, posses- 
sion is taken of specified oils and fats, crude or refined, 
existing in the United Kingdom on Ist January. Posses- 
sion is also taken cf all residues and bye-products of 
refining and spitting, and, further. of all such goods as 
arrive in the United Kingdom or are made after Ist 
January. Returns of stocks on hand on Ist January, 
and of subsequent arrivals have to be made to the Food 
Controller. 


_—— 


REFINED VEGETABLE OILS (REQUISITION) 
ORDER, 1917. 


By the operation of this Order, which is dated 21st 
December, the occupier of every factory or workshop 
engaged in refining, bleaching, deodorising, pressing and 
finishing, or otherwise treating, specified vegetable oils, 
is required to place the whole of his producton at the 
disposal of the Food Controller for the manufacture of 
margarine and edible cooking compounds. 





MISCELLANEOUS ORDERS. 


Other Orders recently issued by the Food Controller 
are :-—— 
The Cattle (Sales) Order, 1917. 
The Cattle Feeding Stuffs (Committees) Order, 
1917. 
The Bacon and Ham Curers (Returns) Order, 1917. 
The Milk (Amendment) Order, 1917. 
The Margarine (Registration of Dealers) Order, 
1917. 
The British Onions Order, 1917. 
The Intoxicating Liquor (Output and Delivery) 
Order, No. 5, 1917. 
The Mangels and Swedes Prices (Ireland) Order, 
1917. 
Notifications have been issued respecting the operation 
of the Oats Products (Retail Prices) Order, 1917, the 
Cheese Order, 1917, and the Potatoes Order. No. 2, 1917. 


Customs Regulations and 
Gariff Changes. 


AUSTRALIA. 


DECLARATION ON INVOICES. 


The Board of Trade have received, from the ofifice of 
the High Commissioner for the Commonwealth of 
Australia, copy of a Notification (L.O. 14) dated 10th 
December, 1917, containing the approved form of 
declaration relative to home consumption value, which 
must be printed or stamped on invoices for goods exported 
to Australia. Particular attention is drawn to the state- 
ment in the Notification that although no date has been 
fixed for the compulsory operation of this requirement, 
early compliance by manufacturers and suppliers is recom- 
mended. 

The complete text of the Notification is as follows :— 


INVOICE DECLARATION AS TO HOME 
CONSUMPTION VALUE. 


1. The High Commissioner has been informed by the 
Commonwealth Department of Trade and Customs that 
the following form of declaration relative to home con- 
sumption value has been approved by that Department 
to be printed or stamped on invoices for goods exported 
to Australia, and duly signed and completed by a principal 
officer of the manufacturer or supplier. Although no date 
has been fixed for the compulsory operation of this 
requirement, exporters are urged in their own interests 
to adopt the declaration as soon as possible, in order to 
facilitate their Australian customers’ transactions. 

REE coe ee (manager, chief clerk, or as the 
CRED MON DEP vccccewssisccseces of (name of firm or company) 
hébsctesdensibuatiidiaainiel of (name of city and country).................. 
the manufacturer or supplier of the goods enumerated in 
this invoice, amounting t0.................666 have the means 
of knowing and do hereby declare :— 

1, That the said invoice is in all respects correct and 
true. 

2. That the said invoice contains a true and full state- 
ment showing the price actually paid or to be paid for the 
said goods, the actual quantity thereof, and all charges 
thereon. 

3. That the said invoice also exhibits in a separate 
column the actual price at the date of this declaration 
of equal quantities of identically similar goods to any 
purchaser for home consumption in this country. 

4. That no different invoice of the goods mentioned in 
the said invoice has been or will be furnished to anyone; 
and 

5. That no arrangement or understanding affecting the 
purchase price of the said goods has been or will be made 
or entered into between the said exporter and purchaser or 
by anyone on behalf of either of them, either by way of 
discount, rebate, salary, compensation, or in any manner 
whatsoever other than as shown in the said invoice. 








I ve: iss nacthscdcanmnienmmneannvens 
NN iii caiasikeunspsintinieipblscncaiiionee 
IDS sic casigiancaniniiiahdis can eee PME Gi scsccssanicn 
ee 


2. The witness need not necessarily be a magistrate, 
notary or other public official, but may be any person 
competent to sign as a witness to signatures on ordinary 
business documents. 

3. All declarations tendered to the Department must 
be made by the declarant in a personal capacity—that 
is, the declaration must run “I, John Jones,’ etc., and 
be subscribed “‘ John Jones*’ (or John Jones’ ordinary 
signature), and not e.g.. “Brown & Thomas, per John 
Jones.”” The ordinary signatures of declarants are 
sufficient at the foot of declarations, the full name of the 
declarant being stated at the head of the form. 

4. With regard to the words “ of equal quantities’’ in 
paragraph 3 of the declaration, it should be noted that 
if the shipment invoiced comprises portion of a large 
order split up into various shipments, the home con- 
sumption discount or home consumption net price applic- 
able to a similar large quantity would be recognised and 
may be inserted as the home consumption price of each 
shipment forming portion of the order, but any increase 
in the home consumption price between the date of accept- 
ance of order and date of making the declaration on invoice 
must be shown. 

5. It should be noted that the foregoing form of 
declaration refers to value only, and that where it is 
claimed that goods are entitled to entry under the Pre 
ferential Tariff, the necessarv declaration regarding Pre- 








18 THE BOARD OF 


CUSTOMS REGULATIONS AND TARIFF 
CHANGES—continued. 





ference must be made. The Department has, however, 
approved of the use in such cases of a composite form 
comprising the Preference declaration as hitherto in use, 
with the addition of clauses 2, 3, 4 and 5 of the foregoing 
form; the latter clauses being numbered 6, 7, 8 and 9 on 
the composite form. 

6. The heading to the separate column mentioned in 
para. 5 (or para. 7) of the declaration should make clear :— 

(2) That the Home Consumption prices shown are 
those in operation at date of export of the goods to 
avy Thy i.e., not at the date the order was accepted. 

The percentage, if any, of cash discount allowed 
on ye Pi for home consumption. 

(c) Whether for Home Consumption the prices 
shown would include cost of outside casing. 

(d) Whether the home consumption price as shown 
represents the price at factory or the price at which 
the goods would be delivered at the principal markets 
of the country of export. 

7. As covering these points the following heading has 
been adopted :— 


Factory :, 
Domestic value f.o b. : at dat ship- 
> value f Port of Export it date of ship 
ment to Australia subject to.......... ponesses % discount for 


cash Meluding cost of outside casing. 
PROHIBITED EXPORTS: AMENDMENTS 
TO LIST 


Adverting to the notice which appeared on pp. 252-5 
the “ Board of Trade Journal’ of the lst November, 
containing the list dated Ist August, 1917, issued by the 
Commonwealth Department of Trade and Customs, 
specifying the articles tor the exportation of which from 
the Commonwealth a Customs “‘ Permit’’ must be first 
obtained, the Board of Trade have received from the 
office of the High Commissioner for the Commonwealth 
of Australia, copy of a Customs List, dated 26th Sep- 
tember, 1917, amending the above-mentioned List as 
follows :— 

The following items have been deleted :— 

All goods for Norway. Sweden, Denmark, Nether- 
lands, Switzerland and Greece. 

Diamond.. 

Precious stones. 

Stones, Precious, 

The following items have been added : 

All goods for China. Denmark, Cresco, Liberia, 
Netherlands. Norway, Siam, Sweden and Switzerland. 

Apricots, dried. 

Diamonds (except to United Kingdom, New Zea- 

land and France. 

Tron, pig. 

Machinery of all kinds. 

Manufactures of metals. 

Peaches, dried. 

Precious stones (except to United Kingdom, New 
Zealand and France). 


CANADA. 


ANGLO-PORTT an TESE. COMMERCIAL 
TREATY, 1914. 


The Department of Customs, Canada, has issued a 
Memorandum, No. 2146B. dated Ist December, 1917. noti- 
fying that Canadian Customs Memorandum, No. 2116s, 
dated 17th September, 1917, respecting the Treaty with 
Portugal, is cancelled on and from 1st December, 1917, 
Canada having withdrawn its adhesion to the Anglo- 
Portuguese Commercial Treaty of 1914, as the Portuguese 
Government did not coneur with the conditions upon 
which adhesion to the Treaty was given. 

The provisions of the French Treaty, 1907, therefore, do 
not now app!y to the natural and manufactured products 
of Portugal and adjacent Islands (Madeira, Porto Santo 


and Azores). 
NIGERIA. 
ADULTERATION OF PRODUCE. 


The Board of Trade have received copy of the 
“ Adulteration ot Produc? Ordinance, 1917’ (No. LXVITI. 
of 1917). which came into operation on the 8th November, 
1917, prohibiting the adulteration of produce, and the 
export, or dealing in for export, from Nigeria of unclean 
or inferior produce. 

It is provided in the Ordinance that any person who 
shall have in his possession for export, or shall export, 
any adulterated produce, or produce which does not 











TRADE JOURNAL. 





JAN. 3, 1918 


CUSTOMS REGULATIONS AND TARIFF 
CHANGES—coniinued. 





comply with the prescribed standard of purity, shall be 
subject to the penalties specified in the Ordinance. 

The Governor may, by Order-in-Council, prohibit the 
export of produce vor of any specified kind of produce, 
either generally, or from any aie ports, or to any 
spec ified country, unless and until the produce has been 
examined and an authority in writing for the export of 
the same has been granted by an examiner. 

Provision is made for the appointment of examiners 
for the purpose of the Ordinance, 

The Governor in Council may make regulations for all 
or any of the purposes following :— 

(a) Prescribing the manner in which produce in 
transit intended for export or for sale for export shall 
be protected ; 

(6) Prescribing the manner in which produce in- 
tended for export or for sale for export is to be 
stored ; 

(c) Prescribing a standard of purity (including the 
amount of moisture which produce may contain) for 
produce of any specified kind ; 

(d) Prescribing the dues to be paid in respect of 
all or any kind of produce exported either generally 
or when exported from any specified port, or otherwise 
imposing fees and charges for the purpose of defray- 
ing the cust of the administration of this Ordinance; 

(e) Prescribing the fee to be paid to an expert for 
examining and reporting on produce; and 

(f) Prescribing the manner in which examination 
and tests shali be conducted. 

In the Ordinance “to adulterate’’ means to falsify, 
deteriorate or increase the apparent bulk or weight, or 
conceal the inferior quality of produce by the combination, 
admixture or addition therewith or thereto of some 
foreign, superfluous or inferior substance, matter or thing, 
whether deleterious or not, or by the use of artificial 
means, and includes abstracting from produce part of it 
SO as injuriously to affect its nature, substance or quality, 
or soaking or manipulating it so as to increase its bulk or 
weicht. 

The following enactments are repealed :—The Adultera- 
tion of Produce Ordinance, the Sale of Palm Kernels 
Ordinance, the Adulteration of Produce Amendment 
Ordinance, 1907, and the Adulteration of Rubber Pro- 


clamation. 
FRANCE. 
EXPOR'™ PROHIBITIONS 


The Board‘of Trade are in receipt, through the Foreign 
Office, of a copy of a French Presidential “Decree, dated 
the 17th December, which prohibits, as from 20th 
December, the exportation and re-exportation of the 
undermentioned articles from France :— 

Bolts; hydraulic lime; fluoride of sodium; metallic 
lattice (gullages) ; willow (osier), peeled or unpeeled; wire 
nails (pointes) of steel; wood or metal screws. 

A French Ministerial Decree of the 19th December 
abrogates the provision of the Decree of the 12th 
February, 1915, by which phosphate of lime was allowed 
to be exported from France, without special authorisa- 
tion, when destined for the United Kingdom, the British 
Dominions, Colonies and Protect sunhen, and certain other 


FRENCH COLONIES. 


WXPORT PROHIBITIONS. 

By three French Presidential Decrees, dated the 14th 
December, the exportation and re-exportation of the 
undermentioned articles from the French Colonies and 
Protectorates (other than Tunis and Morocco) has been 
prohibited to all destinations other than France and the 
French Colonies and Protectorates :— 

Rags (drilles) of all kinds. 
(Export from France was prohibited by a Decree 
of the 10th August, 1917.) 
Trees. shrubs, and other nursery products. 
(Export from France was prohibited by a Decree 
of the 24th August, 1917.) 
Alge, lichens, mosses, seaweed (varechs), of all kinds. 
(Export from /’rance was prohibited by a Decree 
of the 7th September, 1917.) 

A Ministerial Decree of the 13th December abrogates 
the provision of the Decree of the 24th February, 1915, 
by which carbons for electrical purposes were allowed to 
be exported from the French Colonies and Protectorates 
(other than Tunis and Morocco), without special author- 
isation, when destined for the United Kingdom and 
certain other countries. 























~_ f/f ~~, 


eo _ - tien Or 





J AN. 3, 1918 


CUSTOMS REGULATIONS AND TARIFF 
CHANGES—continued. 


MOROCCO. 








IMPORTS FROM THE SPANISH ZONE. 

The Board of Trade are in receipt, through the Foreign 
Office, of information to the effect that, in virtue of 
Viziriel Decrees published in the ‘ Bulletin Officiel ” of 
the French Zone for the 19th November, sugar and 
spirituous liquors imported into the French Zone ot 
Eastern Morocco from the Spanish Zone must pass by the 
Nador-Mechra Safsaf-Berkane road. The persons in 
charge of the consignments must declare the goods and pay 
the dues thereon at the Custom House at Berkane. 

Any sugar or spirituous liquors discovered on other 
roads within 16 kilometres of the frontier without a “‘ titre 
de mouvement ”’ will be seized. 

Another Decree, published in the same issue of the 
“ Bulletin,’’ prescribes that, during the war, all goods 
imported into the -French Zone of Eastern Morocco from 
the Spanish Zone must pass by the above-mentioned road, 
and be deposited in the Customs stores at Berkane. In 
order to withdraw the goods, the consignees must present 
the documents required under the Dahir of the 
2ist October, 1915. 


CONSUMPTION DUTY ON SUGAR. 

With reference to the notice at pp. 653-654 of the 
‘Board of Trade Journal’’ for the 2nd March, 1916, 
respecting the imposition of a consumption duty on sugar 
in the French Zone in Morocco, the Board of Trade are 
in receipt, through the Foreign Office, of information to 
the effect that, by a Dahir dated the 23rd November and 
published on the 26th November, the duty in question 
has been increased to 20 francs per 100 kilogs as from 
the latter date. 





NORWAY. 





EXPORT PROHIBITIONS. 

The Board of Trade are in receipt, through the Foreign 
Office, of telegraphic information from His Majesty’s 
Minister at Christiania to the effect that the exportation of 
the undermentioned articles from Norway has been pro- 
hibited :—Mica; metallic sodium; waste paper and card- 
board ; eiderdown ; patterns of arms and parts of such 
patterns. 





SWEDEN. 





EXEMPTION OF CONDENSED MILK FROM 
CUSTOMS DUTY. 


The Board of Trade are in receipt, through the Foreign 
Office, of information from His Majesty’s Minister at 
Stockholm to the effect that the Customs duty on con- 
densed milk (except milk in hermetically-sealed vessels) 
imported into Sweden has been suspended as from the 
10th December, 1917, to the 31st March, 1918. 


EXPORT PROHIBITIONS. 


The Board of Trade are in receipt, through the Foreign 
Office, of telegraphic information from His Majesty’s 
Minister at Stockholm to the effect that the exportation of 
the undermentioned goods from Sweden has_ been pro- 
hibited as from the 20th December :—Stone wares in com- 
bination with gold or silver [No. 46 of the Swedish 
Customs Tariff]; faience and -porcelain in combination 
with gold or silver; glass or enamel wares in combination 
with gold; pots and pans of non-malleable cast iron, 
enamelled ; plates and sheets of iron or steel, ground, with 
reflecting film of oxide (so-called lustre plates), polished, 
painted, varnished, nickelled, lacquered, enamelled, 
burnished,or with impressed patterns ; plates and sheets 
of iron or steel, curved, and with edges welded together. 

Parts, chiefly consisting of manufactures of iron or steel 
plates, for machines and apparatus coming under Section 
XIII. (A) of the Swedish Tariff (7.e., other than electric 
machines and apparatus—ex. Nos. 979 to 1059 of the 
Swedish Tariff. 

Articles of non-malleable iron, worked, weighing each 
less than 3 kilog. net: lamp burners, carbide, etc., lamps. 

Paper (other than phototype paper), impregnated or 
coated with chemicals, disinfectants, oils, fat, wax, glue, 
gum and similar substances not being colours, but exclud- 
ing asphalt. 


THE BOARD — OF 


TRADE ” OURNAL. 1 


—— a <= 








CUSTOMS REGULATIONS AND TARIFF 
CHANG ES—continued. 





| Note.—The above is an extension of an export prohi- 
bition already in force. ] 

Bicycles, parts of, not specially mentioned (in the Tariff), 
other than finished- off chains. 


NETHERLANDS. 


FACTORY SALT AND EXCISE DUTY. 

The Board of Trade are in receipt, through the Foreign 
Office, of information to the effect that by a Dutch Royal 
Decree of the 20th Nov ember, exemption from Excise duty 
has been accorded in respect of salt required in factories 
in the Netherlands for the manufacture of briquettes 
intended to be used as fuel. 











Shipping Intelligence. 


NOTICE TO SHIPS’ STORES DEALERS— 
UNITED KINGDOM. 


The Marine Department of the Board of Trade has 
issued a notice to ships’ stores dealers and other persons 
concerned respecting the provisions of the Ships’ Stores 
Order, 1917. 

Copies of the notice may be obtained on application to 
«a eee Department, 7, Whitehall Gardens, London, 
S 








SOUTH AFRICA. 





FLOATING DOCK AT DURBAN. 


The floating dock at Durban will be placed out of com- 
mission for a period of approximately five months from 
Ist April, 1918, for overhauling and repairs. 





BRAZIL. 





CARGOES FX GERMAN VESSELS. 

The Foreign Office announce the receipt of telegraphic 
information from H.M. Minister at Rio de Janeiro respect- 
ing cargoes ex German vessels in Brazilian ports. It will 
be remembered that for the purpose of obtaining the 
release of cargoes the owners were required to forward 
documents in support of their claims to their representa- 
tives in Brazil, for presentation to the Inspector of 
Brazilian Customs. H.M. Minister now reports that 
cargo discharged from some of the vessels has been already 
over six months in warehouse, and that the legal rate of 
charges payable on such cargo is therefore, in general, 
21 per cent., and on certain classes of cargo, 42 per cent. 
The ordinary rate will, however, probably be charged 
on all classes of cargo, 

An intimation will be published shortly by the Inspector- 
General of Customs at Rio de Janeiro to the effect that all 
goods must be claimed within 20 days, and that all un- 
claimed goods will be sold by public auction after that 
date. 

British cargo owners who have not already sent 
their documents of title to their representatives at Rio de 
Janeiro should therefore make a_ statement before a 
Brazilian Consular Officer, who will thereupon telegraph 
to the Inspector-General informing him that a claim will 
be made in respect of such cargo. 

It is added that the storage charges mentioned above 
are only to 7th January on a large part of the cargoes, 
and that thereafter a further 3 per cent. will be due for 
the month ending 7th February. 





HARBOUR WORKS IN FRENCH MOROCGO. 





PORT WORKS AND DUES AT MEHEDYA- 
KENITRA AND RABAT-SALE. 

H.M. Agent and Consul- General at Tangier has furnished 

an extract from a recent fssue of the “‘ Bulletin Officiel ”’ 

of the French Zone in Morocco, being a copy of the Con- 


vention, with Cahier des Charges annexed, between the 
Director of Public Works of the French Zone and the 








20 THE BOARD OF 


TRADE JOURNAL. 


JAN. 3, 1918 





SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE—contiinued. 





Compagnie Générale du Maroc, the Socicte Générale 
d’Entreprises au Maroc and the Societé Omnium d'Entre- 
prises, under which these companies obtain a concession 
for the construction, maintenance and exploitation of the 
ports of Mehedya-Kenitra and Rabat-Salé, previous infor- 
mation concerning which was published on p. 606 of the 
“Board of Trade Journal’’ of 14th June, and p. 742 of 
the “Journal”’ of 15th March last. The concession is 
for a term to expire on tae 3lst December, 1980, the Pro- 
tectorate Government reserving the right to buy out these 
companies, on the terms prescribed, at any time after 
the expiration of a term of eight years from the date of 
the opening of the account of exploitation. 
The works to be carried out are :— 


MEHEDYA-KENITRA.—The clearing of a channel 
through the bar at the mouth of the Sebou River and the 
sandbanks in the river itself between Mehedyaand Kenitra, 
and the construction of moles at the side or sides of 
the channel so as to maintain a required depth of water; 
the extension of the quay at Kenitra and the construction 
of “terre-pleins,’’ with roads of access, and sheds, stores, 
workshcps, etc.; the reclaiming of lands bordering the 
river; the placing of port lights, and the furnishing of 
all material, machinery, etc., necessary for the work of the 
ports. 


RABAT SALE.—The clearing of a channel through the 
bar of the Bou Regreg River, and the construction of moles 
at the side to maintain the required depth of water; 
the construction of a basin up the river 500 metres long 
and 20U metres wide; the erection of sheds, stores and 
workshops; the reclaiming of land bordering on the river; 
the construction of roads of access, etc.; the placing of 
port lights, buoys, etc.; and the furnishing of material, 
machinery, etc., for the work of the port. 

The Convention and Cahier des Charges are very similar 
to those in regard to the concession for the port of Casa- 
blanca, many articles being identical. The Cahier des 
Charges stipulates that the Government shall decide 
whether such work shall be executed “en régie” or »y 
contract after limited or public adjudication. 


PORT DUES.—H.M. Agent and Consul-General makes 
the following observations on the port dues as authorised in 
the Cahier des Charges, comparing them with those exist- 
ing at Casablanca. An examination of the various dues 
the concessionaire companies are entitled to levy shows 
that a new due is introduced, the “taxe de péage,’’ or 
toll, which does not exist at the other ports of the French 
Zone. The authority to levy this due is apparently 
accorded in compensation for the cost of clearing and 
maintaining the channel through the bar and sand banks. 

Another new departure is the cession to the companies 
ot the anchorage and mooring dues, The anchorage dues 
are considerably higher than those hitherto in force. 
Pilotage is obligatory, as is also towing for sailing vessels. 

The lighterage charges vary according to the position 
of the steamer, being naturally much higher when the 
vessels lie outside the bar, in the case of Rabat and 
Mehedya, or down river in the case of Kenitra. In the 
former case the tariff is the same as at Casablanca and the 
southern ports for articles specially named as taxed 
separately, but somewhat higher for those classed in 
categories. 

The tariff for goods discharged or loaded at the quay 
is also the same as at Casablanca and the southern ports 
for goods taxed separately, but higher for those classed in 
categories. The same remark applies to the tariff for 
transport. The stores dues are the same as at Casablanca, 
except that there is no separate tariff for exports, and the 
rules for warehousing are practically identical with those 
in force at Casablanca 

A separate Convention, also published in the “ Bulletin 
Officiel,’’ signed between the companies holding the con- 
cession and Messrs. Castanié Freres cedes to the latter 
company the pilotage, towing, lighterage, loading and 
cen transport, working of the cranes and stores 
services for a term of 12 years. The latter company is to 
receive a certain proportion of the total receipts. 

The text (in French) of the above-mentioned Conventio.1s 
and Cahier des Charges may be consulted by British firms 
interested at the Department of Overseas Trade. 


FREE DEPOT AT BARCELONA. 


A Royal Order published in the “Gaceta de Madrid” 
of 8th December gives formal authorisation for the estab- 
lishment of a Free Depot (“ Deposito Franco ’’) at Barce- 
lona. All merchandise will be admitted into this new 
depot at Barcelona, and all operations permitted therein, 
which were sanctioned for the Cadiz * a0 Depot by the 
Royal Order of 22nd October, 1914. 














Ghe Central Potvers. 


GERMANY. 


ECONOMIC AND FINANCIAL ITEMS. 











NEW CENSUS FOR FOOD DISTRIBUTION. 

A new census of population which was to be 
taken in Germany on 5th December (the last was 
taken on Ist December, 1916), was said to ke 
mainly intended by the authorities as a basis for 
the future distribution of food supplies. The 1916 


census did not provide any adequate register of the 
non-self-supplying population, as distinguished from the 
total population, in the several States and Communal 
Unions. For the new census households will be required 
to fill in the following particulars concerning not only the 
members present in the household but also members tem- 
porarily absent: Name, position in household, sex, birth- 
day, and family circumstances, together with the following 
particulars about civilians: place of residence (in the 
case of those present) or place of sojourn (in the case of 
those absent), and commune (as also Communal Union) 
in which the person in question is a self-supplier as 
regards bread-corn or from which he receives his bread- 
ticket; and the following particulars in the case of 
soldiers and prisoners of war or interned civilians: rank, 
whether soldier on leave or prisoner of war or interned 
civilian, and whether the person in question is fully sup- 
plied with food, or not so supplied at all, by his unit or 
internment camp. The questions regarding residence, 
bread supply, and military supply of food are directed 
expressly and solely to the object of obtaining a proper 
census of persons entitled to be supplied by the public 
authorities. The census extends to the whole present popu- 
lation of the German Empire, but not to occupied enemy 
territories.—(Miinchner Neueste Nachrichten.) 


STEELWORKS UNION IN 1916-17. 


The report of the German Steel Works Union for the 
year ending 30th June, 1917, does not furnish the usual 
returns of the deliveries for the year, although the state- 
ment is vouchsafed that the total sales of semi-manufac- 
tured goods, permanent-way material, and shape iron 
were less than in the previous year. The decline was 
most marked in foreign sales, which sank from 138 per 
cent. of the total in 1915-16 to 6 per cent. in 1916-17. 

The satisfaction of the demands of the military authori- 
ties, and of private firms working on war orders, has been 
regarded as the primary duty of the Union. Non-war 
requirements and the needs of neutrals had therefore to 
be relegated to a secondary position. For the purpose 
of ensuring a proper distribution of such commodities as 
could not be obtained in the open market, the Union 
admitted to its membership in October, 1916, the German 
Steel Association, which, being in close touch with the 
military authorities, acts as intermediary between manu- 
facturers and consumers. 

The steel works have been occupied to the utmost of 
their capacity, and prices have been augmented in pro- 
portion to the higher costs. Demand for semi-manufac- 
tured goods continued to be exacting, especially on the 
part of works engaged on turning out war raw materials, 
so much so that it was often exceedingly difficult to 
satisfy the most pressing needs. Foreign business in 
this branch had therefore to cease altogether. For per- 
manent-way material there was considerable demand, 
limited almost entirely to the railway and military 
authorities. Whereas only small quantities of grooved 
rails were required, the demand for rails for mines and 
field railways was considerable. Here, too, army orders 
alone could be catered for, and foreign business had to 
be entirely eliminated. The war demands for shape iron 
were likewise heavy, and as the railway truck and bridge 
building works came into the market with large orders, 
the Union could scarcely cope with the demands made 
upon it. Only small quantities of goods were available 
for other purposes, and the continued pressing demands 
from abroad could not therefore be more than partially 
met.—(Frankfurter Zeitung.) 


SUPPLY AND DEMAND J. REGULATION 
OF POTATO PRICKS. 


It has always been feared,says the Frankfurter Zeitung, 
that the premium granted to potato growers, in addition to 
the maximum price, which is nominally granted for early 
delivery, and therefore ceases to be payable on 15th Decem- 
ber, will be paid to some extent and in some form or other 
after that date. This fear now seems likely to be realised. 












































18 Jan. 8, 1918 THE BOARD OF TRADE) JOURNAL. 21 
THE CENTRAL POWERS—continued. | THE CENTRAL POWERS—conitinued. 
The Imperial Potato Office is formally entitled to require AUSTRIA-HUNGARY. 
the conclusion of delivery contracts. In a circular of the 
4th November the Office states quite explicitly that the 
grower is responsible tor the delivery of his potatoes, and ECONOMIC AND FINANCIAL ITEMS. 
therefore is not entitled in concluding a delivery contract 
to demand compensation for storage or loss of weight. The | 
OGiiice nevertheless considers tnat om aa oa 7 AUCOUNTS FOR 1914-17 AND MILITARY 
r sroperly be granted within reasonable limits. e Frank- YAN TI We m 
NN. ion a] M Food Office, following the example of the KSTIMATES FOR 1917-18. 
be Hessian State Potato Office, has therefore offered such The Austro-Hungarian Delegations have been furnished 
was compensation to the Communal Unions from which the with a series of financial statements, including the 
ke city draws its potato supplies, at the date of 30 piennigs revenue and expenditure accounts of the Dual Monarchy 
for per cwt. for potatoes delivered by the end of December, during the last three years, and the budget of Bosnia- 
316 and 10 pfennigs per cwt. per month for potatoes kept in Herzegovina. The last budget legally sanctioned by the 
the storage by them after that date. With one exception all Delegations was that for 1914-15 (approved 14th June, 
the these Communal Unions have refused the offer as too low. 1914), and since then the Departments common to both 
nal The Provincial Potato Office estimates the reasonable rate Monarchies have had to obtain on account the sums 
red of compensation at 1-25 marks per cwt., or 50 pfennigs required for their needs, the military and naval forces as 
the more than the combined amount of the early delivery pre- much as the exigencies of war demanded, the other 
2m - mium and transport premium granted down to 15th Departments on the basis of the last vote. 
th- December; this transport premium being 5 pfennigs per The following table shows the expenditure of the 
ing cwt. per kilometre, which may be reckoned on an average Departments common to both Monarchies during the 
the at 25 pfennigs per cwt. Some of the Communal Unions last three years :— 
of concerned are not satisfied even with the rate proposed by (In millions of kronen.) 
on) the Provincial Potato Office. Meanwhile, all Communal abdanenionitectinietidinaieniepa ‘ 
as Unions in the neighbourhood have refused to accept the re a Total 
ud- contractual penalty which the Imperial Potato Oflice ieee 1914-15, | L91d-16. | 1916-17, | otal, 
of regards as an indispensable condition of every delivery —_ - $$$ $$—__—_— 
nk, contract, The result is shat for the present Frankfurt ey | 
ed is unable to conclude delivery contracts at all. . ree tees 43.031 | 99.700 123.670 271.401 
‘ ° , , . AT coe — 5,Vo v5 20, aél, 
ip- The essential fact, as the Vrankfurter Zeitung points Ministry of Finance’ 5,051 5,340 | 6,523 16,914 
or out, is that apparently the growers are to be conceded a Sieaniel  Contual | | | 
8, further considerable increase of the grower’s price. The Office ... aa 347 | 352 | 387 1,086 
ed Imperial Potato Office shrinks from stating the fact, and | | | | 
er makes all sorts of reservations to conceal it, but knows Total ... | 53,429 | 105,392 | 180,580 289,401 
lie quite well what the — will be. Rg af soma ‘iain — | | — 
u- ’otato Office is clearly of the opinion that the bonus to Ministry ot War— | | | aoe 
my conan after 15th enains p see not be lower than Army (Ordinary) 543,944 | 607,434 | 485,184 1,536,562 
3 . : » (War) °..| 9,870,378 114,842,800 (7,789,000 42,502,178 
the premium payable to them before that date. Despite Navy (Ordinary) '128°338 | '107°848 | 142°961 3797149 
ail good intentions, therefore, the Imperial Potato Office ne (War) : 109.756 | 162°500 | 240,000 | 512256 
. ° ° : ; 2? adi ? oueye= Via ou 
has again turned upside down in favour of agriculturists | | | 
he the uniform regulation of prices 7 planned, and Total ... — .../10,652,416 |15,620,577 |18,657,145 44,930,138 
ial the confusion of last year will repeat itself. | —| | 
te- (The victory of supply and demand over State regulation Grand Total .../10,705,845 | 15,725,969 |18,787,725 45,219,539 
10- of prices, which has 7 aye eng +“ hac in eee: Hoe | . 
on the cases of oats and barley, appears thus to be making Sian dite 1917-18 ¢ ERA AE I ‘ 
oe ; pate i i year f the war expenditure has been fixed 
as itself ve the sphere of potato prices also).—(/ rank at 20,000 million kronen (19,500 million kronen for the 
er furter Sestung.) Army and 500 millions for the Navy). This sum has been 
~ 11 ao pn 4 z calculated on the basis of the last few months’ require- 
Fi- COINAGE RETURNS FOR NOVEMBER. ments, and on the assumption that the war will a be 
= During November, as in the last few previous months, over by the end of the financial year. The forecast of 
red no gold, nickel, or copper coins were struck in Germany. other expenditure for 1917-18 cannot, it is stated, be 
to The only coins issued were silver }-mark pieces to the placed before the Delegations, and means will have to be 
vos value of 1,056,248 marks; iron 10-pfennig pieces to the found temporarily to cover the outlay required. In order 
- value of 26,950 marks; iron 5-pfennig pieces to the value to meet the legal necessity of a budget the figures of the 
-_ of 874,334 marks; zinc 10-pfennig pieces to the value of 1914-1915 budget will be repeated. 
- 1,835,705 marks; and aluminium 1-pfennig pieces to the The respective shares of Austria and Hungary in the 
he value of 680 marks. common expenditure of the Dual Monarchy are given at 
- The following table shows the total value of the metal 63:6 per cent. and 36-4 per cent.—(Neue Freie Presse, Die 
currency at the end of November, as compared with the Zeit Fremdenblatt.) 
of end of October :— 
4 SOME EFFECTS OF THE COAL SHORTAGE 
“ Nov.. 1917. Oct., 1917. The Austrian Minister of Public Works, speaking on 
" | the 1lth November at the joint meeting of the three com- 
we bines of manufacturers (the League of Austrian Manufac- 
™ so —— or turers, the Manufacturers’ Club, and the Central Union 
ms Gold | 5.155,.804.010 5.155.804.4540 of Austrian Manufacturers) on the subject of the coal 
d, Silver ... Se in ... 1,228,226,645 — 1.230,681,623 supply, gave statistics of the quotas required per day by 
'Y Nickel ... - ei 7 107.917.070 107.917.342 varlous consumers, viZ., railways, 34,000 metric tons; 
d “owen ie or i it 36 555 482 25 854.214 Army, 2,800 ; Navy, 900; households, 30,000 ; industries 
d on. a sti ey 6.144.390 4.308.684 connected with food supply, 5,680; sugar industry, 470; 
°S toa. ni ve) ti 25 105 434 25 105.446 hospitals and charitable institutions and schools, 2,400; 
0 tt len a ne et 7 468-412 (67.733 public and other offices, 1,664; gas, electrical, and water 
Aluminium... ” wi 8,413 7,73: 
- , works, 8,000; coal mines, 9,790; coke industry, 11,000. 
e ee —— Just at the time when quotas of coal were being allotted 
. A Bundesrat Order of 29th November, 1917, empowers to the various groups, there was an extraordinary shortage 
“ the Imperial Chancellor to coin a further supply of zinc of trucks owing to military exigencies. Instead of the usual 
“ 10-pfennig pieces to the maximum value of 10,000,000 7,710 trucks ordinarily available for daily transport of 
™ marks, to take the place of the nickel 10-pfennig pieces coal, only 3,850, or about 50 per cent., wére to be had at 
y which are being called in.—(Deutscher Reichsanzeiger.) the end of October; enough, that is, to transport 52,000 
| tons out of 85,000 tons ready for despatch. In the last 
PURCHASING POWER OF MONEY. few days, the Minister said, conditions had improved. 
y The transport difficulties necessitated a curtailment of 
Prince Ernst Heinrich of Saxony attained his majority the coal quota assigned to industry. War industries, of 
on 9th December, and was then voted a_ separate course, have the greatest consideration; other industrial 
', allowance out of State funds. The customary grant groups are either Toft altogether without coal, or receive 
0 was fixed at 60,000 marks per annum, but in view of only a percentage of their ration. It was hoped to increase 
y the decreased purchasing power of money, the allowance the amounts in December. 
\- was raised in the current estimates to 85,000 marks.— Though the coal-ticket in Vienna does not entitle 
r (Leipziger Volkszeitung.) , holders to a specified amount, the ration provisionally 
> fixed was 20 kilogs. per room per week for cooking and 20 














22 THE BOARD OF TRADE JOURNAL. Jan. 5, 1918 


THE CENTRAL POWERS—continued. 





for heating, the former allowance is being continued, but 
the latter is now reduced by half. 

A petition of the Union of Cinema Theatres to the 
Emperor, requesting permission to heat cinemas in order 
to avoid the ruin of the industry, has resulted in consent 
being given for the utilisation of old wood as fuel for the 
cinemas in Vienna. 

At Prague ali schools were to be closed for a full month, 
from 16th December to 15th January. At Zizkov (near 
Prague) the schools have already been closed for a month, 
and the holidays are likely to last three months. At 
Budenitz, close to coal mines, the school is closed. At 
Smichow stringent measures for economy in the use of 
electricity have been taken owing to the lack of coal; e.g., 
private consumers are ordered to restrict their consump- 
tion toa single lamp. The lighting of stairs and vestibules 
is restricted as much as possible, and must in no case be 
continued after 9 p.m. ; the closing of the electricity works 
is threatened. 

At Lemberg the electric trams ceased to run on and from 
23rd November owing to lack of coal. The municipal 
authorities are doing their utmost to secure sufficient trans- 
port for coal in order to resume the tramway service and 
maintain the gasworks and the waterworks. Shops close 
at 5 p.m., cafés at 9 p.m. Several schools have been shut. 

Railway carriages on long-distance trains will be heated 
up to 8lst March to a temperature of 12° Celsius (— 53}° 
Fahrenheit). Trains with a run of less than 1} hours will 
not be heated.—(Various Papers.) 


RHPORT OF THE WAR PRODUCTS 
COMPANY. 


The general meeting of the Hungarian War Products 
Company on the 27th November adopted the report of the 
directors, which showed a net profit of 6,918,205 kronen on 
the past year’s working. After deducting the statutory 
dividend of 5 per cent., i.e., 300,000 kronen, the remainder, 
6,615,000 kronen, was carried to reserve. 

The report stated that the Company had dealt in the 
past year with the following quantities (in millions of 
metric cwt.) : wheat 6-85, rye 1:64, barley 1-64, oats 3-12, 
maize 4-26; and 333,000 metric cwt. of pulse—in all, 17-84 
million cwt. From the corn taken over, 9,400,000 metric 
ewt. of flour, groats, and bran were produced. 

The report also stated that the foodstuffs imported from 
Roumania served exclusively to cover the army require- 
ments and to supply the population of Austria.— 
(“’remdenblatt.) 


SUGAR PRODUCTION IN 1917. 


The Central Association for the Beet-Sugar Industry in 
Austria-Hungary gives the following estimates of the 
1917-18 sugar production in Austria-Hungary in millions 
of metric cwt. : Total production 7, as compared with 9-35 
in the previous year. This estimate is distributed as 
follows: Bohemia, 3-1 (in previous year 4-6); Moravia, 
i-9 (2:6); Hungary, 2 (2-08). Though the area under 
cultivation has been increased since 1916 by 15,000 
hectares, bringing it up to 288,000 hectares, the sugar-beet 
harvest has fallen from 59 to 43-1 million metric cwt., 
Bohemia accounting for 18 (as compared with 27-3), 
Moravia 11-3 (17), and Hungary 13-7 (14-6) million metric 
ewt. In 1917-18, 84 sugar factories were working, as com- 
pared with 186 in 1916-17.—Neue Free Presse, Pester 
Lloyd.1 


AGRICULTURAL PROGRAMME. 


The Austrian Minister of Agriculture in the Lower 
House of the Reichsrat outlined reforms which would 
increase the value of the land by some 2 milliard kronen 
net after allowing some 3 milliard kronen as the cost of 
improvementes, an increase in production by more than 
“5 per cent. The cost of improvements should, he said, 
be spread over twenty-five to thirty years, and should be 
advanced by a new credit organisation. Closely con- 
uected with improvements in cultivation and seeds would 
be the intensive application of artificial manures. The 
war had proved that Austria-Hungary could be supplied 
with nitrogen entirely from its own resources without im- 
ports from abroad. In the use of artificial manure Austria 
was far behind other countries. It was now intended to 
put the organisation of the nitrogen and superphosphate 
industry of the country on a new basis with the co-opera- 
tion of the Government. The increased production of the 
whole harvest which would result from suitable manuring 
was estimated at roughly 4 milliard kronen. Hand in hand 
with these measures would go a uniform modernising of 
the law relating to irrigation.—(Neue Freie Presse; 
Wiener Abendpost.) 


A TEXTILE SUBSTITUTE. 





HXPERIMENT WITH NETTLE FIBRE. 





Stinging nettle fibre as raw material for the textile 
industry is in use in a varying degree in Germany, Austria, 
Denmark, and Switzerland. Originally intended as a sub- 
stitute, its use has been pressed forward in the Central 
Empires through the shortage of cotton caused by the 
war. 

THE GERMAN CLAIMS, 

The danger of ignoring a substitute is the possibility 
that by scientific experiments and research it may become 
@ Serious competitor with staple industries, before the full 
extent of the risk has been appreciated. Believing this to 
be the case with the stinging nettle, and hoping to seize an 
opportunity of making Germany independent of supplies 
of foreign cotton, the Germans have studied, tested, and 
adopted it as a war necessity; there is evidence available 
showing that they also claim to have discovered a new pro- 
cess for its utilisation which opens up a great future for 
the industry even after the war. Large quantities of net- 
tles were collected in the summer of 1916 (according to one 
authority) under the supervision of the ‘Nessel faser 
Verwertungsgesellschaft,’ the new German War Company, 
hulding an exclusive right to purchase, if necessary by 
compulsion, all stems of stinging netiles (Urtica Diocia), 
whether native or imported. This company claimed that a 
tissue comparing favourably with that manufactured from 
American cotton was obtained from the fibre. Mixed with 
wool, a cloth of soft texture, hardly distinguishable from 
expensive woollen material, much cheaper and easily dyed, 
is said to be produceable, the cloth being suitable for 
use in the manufacture of furniture covers, plush and 
suitings. There is, however, no confirmation of this claim, 
although there is no doubt that the fibre has been used 
to make linings for caps, coats, etc., for sandbags and 
probably for Army shirts and towels. 


AN ADVERSE REPORT. 

Before describing the method of cultivating and pre- 
paring the fibre, an adverse report on its possibilites 
should be noted, for it shows that some doubts exist con- 
cerning the future of nettle fibre even in Germany. A 
German agricultural expert states that the cost of produc- 
tion rules it out for purposes of cultivation, and will 
stand in the way of its general adoption, notwithstanding 
the fact that its cultivation is now a national necessity. 
In the first place, the only soil available is so-called 
fallow land—all other land being devoted to more profit- 
able use—and the cultivation of this land demands an 
immense amount of labour such as no farmer in the 
Central Empires can afford without special aid. Not only 
must the land be ploughed, but each plant has to be 
placed into the ground separately, because the nettle when 
cultivated either loses its power of propagation by seed 
or produces such a weak crop that it becomes of little use 
for fibre. This intensity of labour is required at the 
very time when farmers are engaged in preparing more 
valuable crops. The results of this authority’s experi- 
ments in the use of the fibre in placegof cotton were poor 
in the extreme, and he came to the conclusion that while 
it is hopeless to look to farmers for an adequate supply 
of nettles, something might be done to stimulate the 
natural growth of the nettles on their natural soil by 
assisting the spreading of seeds or by using prisoners 
of war for the cultivation of waste lands. 


CULTIVATION IN GERMANY. 

The present cultivation in Germany is entrusted to a 
company established by men from the textile industry 
and agriculture, which 1s supervised by the Ministries of 
War and Agriculture, This company supplies plants and 
money, free of interest, to cultivators. The nettle is 
propagated by slips and from seed. The slips develop 
more rapidly than the seedlings, but in shady woodlands 
seedlings grow even in the first year into strong plants, 
from which a crop can be gathered in October. Slips can 
be set in the spring and the autumn, seeds in the spring 
only. For slips the harvest may be two-fold—in July or 
August for the stems, in October for fodder. 

German and Austrian authorities estimate that a suffi- 
cient area of land is available within the Central Empires 
to meet their needs and to permit of a large export trade. 
According to the Association for Forwarding Trade 
Activity (Berlin) the yearly raw material available from 
a plant, yielding a quite practicable fibre, which can be 
used as a substitute for cotton and jute (and which is 
presumably the stinging nettle), can be reckoned at 
6.000.000 metric tons. In this connection it may be noted 
that in 1913 Germany imported 447,945 tons of raw cotton 
and 162,063 tons of jute: 




















JAN. 3, LYS 


THE BOARD OF TRADE JOURNAL. 23 








A TEXTILE SUBSTITUTE—continued. 





By a Bundesrat Order of 27th July, 1916, the War 
Nettie Company fixed the price of stinging nettles for fibre 
aat 14 marks per 100 kilogs. Subsequent evidence indicates 
that this rate is being paid for it, and that dried stinging 
nettle leaves, utilised for fodder and medicinal purposes, 
fetch 25 marks per 100 kilogs. The yield of fibre, again, 
varies from 10 per cent. in the case of wild nettles to as 
much as 30 per cent. in the cultivated plant. 


PREPARATION OF THE FIBRE. 


In the method of preparation for spinning which is 
adjudged best by the Royal Materials Testing Office, only 
nettles cut just above the ground are utilised. They are 
packed in bundles, dried, and the leaves removed. The 
stripping is satisfactorily done by the use of a lath set with 
nails in the form of a comb through which the stems are 
drawn lengthwise. After stripping the stems are bundled. 
An Austrian manufacturer declares that a process of 
obtaining the fibre, devised by Dr. Richter of Vienna 
University, by steeping and roasting the stems, yields 
fibre which should take the place of flax, hemp, and of 
cotton. Dr. Richter’s process appears to be carried 
out at ten factories in Bavaria, Silesia, and Alsace 
—that is, six rope factories, three jute factories, and a 
cotton spinning mill. The complaint against the process is 
that it is unsuitable for the production of the finer 
spinning stuffs as it does not remove the wood from the 
fibre. A newer process, however, appears to have been 
discovered giving better results, and a great future is 
anticipated for the product. 

Special machines have been built to deal with the 
fibre in the weaving industry. Several qualities of the 
stuff have been obtained by adding a suitable quantity 
of flax to the fibre. Moist-spun yarn up to No. 14, and 
dry-spun yarn up to No. 6 have been produced in large 
quantities in several factories. 


DANISH EXPERIMENTS 


In spite of these somewhat optimistic opinions it must 
be repeated that there is no clear evidence of the extensive 
adoption of the nettle fibre even under present conditions 
in Germany. Nevertheless, the following independent 
and reliable account of Danish experiments confirm the 
view that the stinging nettle, as in Hans Andersen’s 
tale of Elfride, may at any moment be convertible into 
shirts, and on a considerabie scale. 

In Denmark a Government Committee experimented 
with nettles, paying for them at the rate of 7 kr. per 
100 kilogs. For textiles only the fibrous part of the plants 
is necessary, and of the three known methods of separating 
this from the rest of the nettle—the mechanical, the 
chemical and putrefaction—the last-named is the one 
favoured by the Committee. 


METHODS OF TREATMENT. 


The treatment resembles the treatment of flax, and the 
main points of the method are: 

(i.) The nettles are harvested in September and October 
and stacked like straw through the winter. 

(ii.) The tops and leaves are removed. 

(iii.) The stalks are rotted either (a) in a ‘ retting dam’ 
consisting of a wooden cage sunk in a lake or other 
natural water, or (6) in hot water. The former process 
takes fourteen and the latter four days with the water 
at a temperature of 30 degrees centigrade. Experiments 
are still continuing to define the correct heat and time. 

(iv.) The stalks are dried in the open air. 

(v.) The stalks are cracked in a breaker. 

(vi.) The stalks are teased on a teasing board with a 
wooden knife. 

(vii.) The fibre is combed through a large iron comb 
or hackle, which finally remaves all the remaining wood. 

The fibre is then ready for the rope-walk or the spinning 
wheel. 

One of the difficulties of the putrefaction process is 
the presence of bacteria. It has been discovered that there 
are two sorts prevalent, a beneficial and a harmful. It 
is said that the harmful species can be removed by steep- 
ing the nettles in running water for two to five hours 
before commencing to treat them. Experiments are being 
conducted in the pure cultivation of these bacteria with 
a view to finding a simpler method of putrefaction. 





THE MANUFACTURED ARTICLE. 


Tt has been found possible to make from nettle fibre, 
fine rope, strong string, coarse linen, sail cloth, sacking, 
and binder twine. Sheets, cycle tyre covers, and fine 
material suitable tor clothing, can alsa be made, but have 
not as yet been produced in Denmark owing to lack of 
expensive delicate machinery. 





Gonunercial Returns. 


COTTON IMPORTS AND EXPORTS. 


Return of the Number of Bales of Cotton Imported and 
Exported at the Various Ports of the United Kingdom 
during the week and 52 weeks ended 27th December, 




















1917 ;<— 
Week 52 Weeks | Week 52 Weeks 
_ ended | ended || ended | ended 
27th Dec..|27th Dec.,||27th Dec.,|27th Dec., 
| 1917. 1917. 1917, | 1917, 
| a 
| IMPORTS. EXPORTS. 
| Bales. | Bales. Bales. Bales. 
American ..| 52,028 (2,426,299) — 39,361 
Brazilian ... | — | 305438 > — — 
Hast Indian wes) 13,244 169,709 — 6,680 
Egyptian | 16,251 | 350,416, — 121,189 
Miscellaneous 10,530* | 156,584F — 2,934 
Total 92,048 3,133,542 — 70,164 


| 

* Including 148 bales British West African. f Including 

2.968 bales British West Indian, 13,335 bales British West 

African, 29,239 bales British East African, and 1,822 bales 
foreign East African. 


CORN PRICES. 

Statement showing the Average Price of British Corn, per 
quarter of 8 bushels Imperial Measure,* as received from 
the Inspectors of Corn Returns in the week en‘ed 29th 
December, 1917, and corresponding weeks of the seven 
previous years, pursuant to the Corn Returns Act, 1882. 


Average Price. 





_ —_ 


| 


Wheat. | Barley. | Oats. 
} 

s. d s. d. s. 

Week ended 29th December, 
1917 eee _ 71 =] 57 67 44 10 

Corresponding week in— 

1910 eee a «| 2 & 23 11 17 © 
1911 eee pee .-| od 2 333 20 7 
1912 one one | 8 & 28 6 19 10 
1913 eee one mt mark 26° 2 Is 2 
1914 on _ | 44 4 29 10 26 6 
1915 oe — ooo} OF FD 47 5 30 10 
1916 75 10 67 35 47 4 


* Section 8 of tue Corn Keturns Act, 1882, provides that 
where returns of purchases of British Corn are made to the 
local Inspector of Corn Returns in any other measure than 
the Imperial bushel or by weight or by a weighed measure, 
that officer shall convert such returns into the Imperial 
Bushel, and in the case of weight or weighed measure the 
conversion is to be made at the rate of sixty Imperial pounds 
for every bushel of wheat, fifty Imperial pounds tor every 
bushel of barley, and thirty-nine Imperial pounds for every 
bushel of oats. 


_ 
aA 5 


INDEX. 








FOR QUARTER ENDED DECEMBER 31st, 
1917. 

The Index to the “ Board of Trade Journal” for 
the quarter ended December 31st, 1917, has been 
prepared. It will be printed in the old form so that 
it may be filed with the copies of the “ Journal” for 
that quarter. The Index will be to reqular 
subscribers, and may be obtained by others on applica- 
tion to H.M. Stationery Office, Imperial House. 


Kingsway, London, W.C. 2. 


sent 








24. THE BOARD OF 


BRITISH CHAMBERS OF COMMERCE IN 
FOREIGN COUNTRIES. 


The following is a list of Chambers of Commerce established 
in certain foreign countries in the interest of British trade :— 


Argentina.—British Chamber of Commerce for the Argentine 
Republic, Calle Reconquista 46, Buenos Aires. 
(Agent in London—Mr. J. Ballantyne, River Plate 
House, 13, South Place, H.C. 2.) 


Belgium.—British Chamber of Commerce in Belgium 
(Incorp.). During the war the address will be: c/o 
London Chamber of Commerce, 97, Cannon Street, E.C, 4. 


Brazil.—British Chamber of Commerce in Brazil, Rua da 
Quitanda, No. 143, Rio de Janeiro. 


British Chamber of Commerce of Séo Paulo, 26 Rua 15 
de Novembro, Séo Paulo. 


Chile.—British Chamber of Commerce in the Republic of 
Chile, Valparaiso. 


China.—British Chamber of Commerce, 1, The Bund, 
Shanghai. 
British Chamber of Commerce, British Municipal 
Council Buildings, Hankow. 
British Chamber of Commerce, Canton. 
Changsha Chamber of Commerce, Changsha. 
Chefoo Chamber of Commerce, Chefoo, 
Foochow Chamber of Commerce, Foochow. 
Mukden British Chamber of Commerce, c/o British 
Consulate-General, Mukden. 
Newchwang British Chamber of Commerce, c/o British 
Consulate, Newchwang. 
Swatow Chamber of Commerce, Swatow. 
Tientsin British Chamber of Commerce, Tientsin., 
Peking British Chamber of Commerce, Culty Chambers. 
Peking. 


Egypt.—British Chamber of Commerce of Egypt, 6, Rue de 
’Anciente Bourse, Alexandria, and Savoy Chambers, 
Cairo. 

(Agents in Suez and London— Messrs. Back & Manson, 
Egypt House, 36, New Broad Street, E.C, 2.) 


France.—-British Chamber of Commerce, Paris (Incorp.), 
6, Rue Halévy, Paris, 1Xeme. 

(Correspondents in all the principal towns of France. 
Commercia) Representative in France of the Com- 
monwealth of Australia.) 

British Chamber of Commerce for the French Riviera 
and Princ:pality of Monaco, 4, Avenue Massena, 

Nice. 

Italy.—British Chamber of Commerce for Italy, 7, Via 
Carlo Felice, Genoa (with Sample Show Rooms for 
British goods). 

Branches— 

75, Via Delle Terme, Rome. 

12, Via Silvio Pellico, Milan. 

Scali d’Azeglio 3 p. p., Leghorn. 

Via A Depretis, 31, Naples. 

Morocco.—British Chamber of Commerce for Morocco, 
Tangier. 

Persia.—- British Chamber of Commerce, Bushire. 

British Chamber of Commerce, Mohammerah. 


Persian Gulf.-—Basrah British Chamber of Commerce, c/o 
Eastern Bank, Basrah. 





TRADE JOURNAL. Jan. 3, 1918 
Portugal.—British Chamber of;Commerce in Portugal,’4, Rua 








Victor Cordon, Lisbon. 
Branches— 
39, Rua do Choupelo, Vila Nova de Gaia, Oporto. 
81, Rua dos Netos, Funchal, Madeira. 


Roumania.— Branch of the British Chamber of Commerce 
of Turkey and the Balkan States. Zemporary address— 
c/o the London Chamber of Commerce, 97, Cannon Street, 
E.C, 4. 

Russia.— Russo-British Chamber of Commerce, 4, Gorochovaia, 


Petrograd, 
Branch—Kondratenko St., No. 17-19, Odessa. 


Agency in Kiev. 
Spain.—British Chamber of Commerce for Spain, 9, Plaza 
de Catalufix, Barcelona. 
Branch—Avenida Conde Pefialver(Gran Via), 20,Madric. 
(Delegates at Cartagena, Valencia and Canary Islande. ) 
Tunis.—British Chamber of Commerce, Rue Hs-Sadikia, 35, 
Tunis. | 
Uruguay.—British Chamber of Commerce in Uruguay, Calle 
Rincon, 506, Montevideo. 
N.B.—Some of these Chambers issue periodically a Journal! 
or annual report, which may be suspected at the Department 
of Overseas Trade (Development and Intelligence). 





H.M. TRADE COMMISSIONERS IN THE 
SELF-GOVERNING DOMINIONS. 


Canada and Newfoundland.—H.M. Trade Commissioner, 363. 
Beaver Hall, Montreal, Telegraphic Address, “ Britcom.” 


Commonwealth of Australia.—H.M. Trade Commissioner. 
Commerce House, Melbourne; Telegraphic Address, 
“Combrit”’ : and Royal Exchange, Sydney ; Telegraphie 
Address, ** Combritto.” 

New Zealand.—H.M. P.O. Box 369, 
Wellington. Telegraphic Address, ‘“ Advantage.” 


South Africa.—H.M. Trade Commissioner, P.O. Box 1346. 
Telegraphic Address ‘“ Austere.” 


Trade Commissioner, 


Cape Town. 





TRADE ENQUIRY OFFICES IN LONDON OF 
THE SELF-GOVERNING DOMINIONS. 


These Enquiry Offices are maintained in London at the 
following addresses by the Governments indicated, viz. :-— 
Dominion of Canada.—19, Victoria Street, S.W. 1; aise 

Portland House, Basinghall Street, E.C. 2 (Office of the 


Canadian Government Trade Commissioner). 


Commonwealth of Australia.—Australia House, Strand, W.C. 2. 


New South Wales.—Sydney House, 26-7, Cockspur Streci. 


Trafalgar Square, S8.W. 1. 

Victoria.— Melbourne Place, Strand, W.C. 2. 

Queensland. —409, West Strand, W.C. 2. 

South Australia. —112, Strand, W.C, 2. 

Western Australia.—Savoy House, 115-6, Strand, W.C. 2 

Tasmania.—56, Victoria Street, S.W. 1. 
Dominion of New Zealand.—413, Strand, W.C, 2. 
Union of South Africa.—Trades Commissioner, 90, Cannun 

Street, E.C, 4. 

Trade enquiries in regard to Rhodesia may be made at the 

office of the British South Africa Co., 2, London Wall Buil:i- 
ings, H.C. 2. 








JAN. ) 








The Ant 








uy. 3, 1918 


ieD VEC ETABLES 
ABLE FLOURS 


SALTED VECETABLES 


For Ship Stores and 
Domestic Use. 


E-C-P. 


Limited, EVESHAM, WORC. 











USE THE BEST KNOWN 
LEANING AND POLISHING SOAP FOR ALi 
indy of Metals, Marble, Crockery, Lavatories, Baths, ux 


AN TT E-S C St GQ EE. 


abie to Hotel and Restaurant Keeperc. 
SUPPLIED TC THE ADMIRALTY. 
Manufactured by 
The Anti-Scrub Soap Co., Dewsbury Yorkshire. 
CONTRACTOSS TO A.M. GOVERNWENT STORES. 

















THE 
UNITED FLEXIBLE 
& METALLIC TUBING 

. Co., Ltd., 
ete 112 Queen Victoria Street 
London, &.C. 


er Pee 
a LeExIBLe 
METALLIC 
SUBIC. 


Me: is, 









Wonks: Pornotas Eno, 


MIO OLZoaeR, 





Ss AOR NYS WY ~ 

SIN 
WY SS) ¢ 

\\ \S 


CHECKS & sae ON 
STEEL NAME STAMPS, oy 





"soUusng . 
puBe sy; [f9Uus}sS 











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TNE? Be may = poe 


= ee ar a 
( dir in many pte, 


‘WMBERS *4 tTRONManiG ERGe 
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5e Ante ee Aas EERINGCS , 
‘Stock St St ttt p0: 








THE BOARD OF 


7 


TRADE 


BUYERS’ GUIDE—continued. 


Creosoting Plant— 

Black, George, & Sons, Tweedmouth Boiler 

Works, Berwick-on-T weed. 
Cylinder and Cistern Manufacturers— 

W. P. Butterfield’s, Ltd., Shipley, Yorks. 
Telegrams: “ Tanks, Shipley.” Telephone : 
35 Shipley. 

Decklights and Porthole Giasses— 

Stevens, James, & Son, Victoria Glass Works, 

Birmingham. 
Decorative Tiies— 

Carter & Co., Ltd., 

Poole. 
Dentists’ Materials Manufacturers— 

Claudius Ash, Sons, & Co., Ltd., 5 to 12, 
Broad Street, Golden Square, London, W. 
Elliott & Co. (Edinr.), Lid., 4, North Saint 

David Street, Edinburgh. 

The Dental Manufacturing Co., Ltd., “ Alston 
House,” Newman Street, Oxford Street, 
London, we oe 

Dermatine for various Purposes— 

Hose, Belting, Packing Rings, 
Valves, etc. Dermatine Co., 
Street, London, S.E. 5 

Detonators— 

Curtis’s & Harvey, Ltd., Cannon Street House, 
London, E.C. 

Nobel’s Explosives Co., Ltd., Nobel House, 
195, West George Sireet, Glasgow. 

Diamond Merchants— 

Backes & Strauss, 14, 15, and 16, Holborn 
Viaduct, London, E.C. (Also at Toronto, 
Canada.) 

Ehrmann & Bahlsen, 18/20, Holborn Viaduct, 
London, E.C. 1. Speciality: Diamonds and 
Carbons (Black Diamonds) for all Industrial 
and Mechanical Purposes. 

Diving Apparatus Manufacturers— 

Heinke, C. bk., & Co., 87/89, Grange Road, 

London, S.E. All British since 1884. 
Doll Manufacturers— 

Bell & Francis, Ltd., Willowbrook Works, 
Trafalgar Road, Peckham, London, 3S.E. 
Rag and Composition Dolls, dressed and 


Encaustic Tile Works, 


Air 
Ltd., 


Pump 


Neate 


undressed. 
Drawing Instrument Makers— 
Barker, F.. & Son, 12, Clerkenwell Road, B.C. 


Dredgers and Excavators— 

Rose, Downs & Thompson, Ltd., Old Foundry, 
Hull; and 12, Mark Lane, "London, C. 
Sole makers of the “ Kingston ” double- 
chain Grab Dredger and Excavator. 


Driers (Resinates and Linoleates)— 
Grindley & Co., Ltd., Poplar, London, E. 
Tele.: ‘“ Resinous Pop, London.” 


Drop Forgings (Brass and Bronze)— 
McKechnie brothers, Ltd., 


birminghaw. 
Druggists— 
Boots Pure Drug Co., Ltd., ‘the Laboratories, 
Nottingham. Manufacturers of Fine 


Chemicals, Drugs, and Pharmaceutical Pre- 


parations. Contractors to H.M. Govern- 
ment. ’Phone, 3160, Telegrams: Drug, 
Nottingham. 


Druggists—Manufacturing and Export— 

Baiss Brothers & Co., Ltd., Grange Works, 
Bermondsey, London, 8.E. Est. 1833. Manu- 
facturers and Exporters of Fine Chemicals 
and Drugs, Pharmaceutical Preparations, 
Essential Oils, Druggists’ Sundries, Surgical 
Instruments, ete. Government Contractors. 
Price Lists in various languages. Tel. 
Address: Ipecac, London. A. B. C. Code 
4th and Sth Eds. 

Bell, Sons & Co., Ltd., Liverpool. Established 

Drugs and medicines for 


over 70 years. 

Tropical Countries a Speciality. Telegrams: 
Bellson, Liverpool. A. B. ©. Code, Sth 
Edition. 


Dry Core Telephone Cable— 
Glover, W. T., & Co., Ltd., Trafford Park, 
Manchester. 
Dyes and Colours for Textile Trades— 
Barr, James C., Ltd., Chemical and Colour 
Merchants, 27, Bly thswood Square, Glasgow. 
Snowdon, Sons, *& Co., Ltd., Millwall, London, 
E. 


Dynamite— 
Curtis’s & Harvey, Ltd., Cannon Street House, 


London, E.C. 
Nobel’s Explosive Co., Ltd., Nobel House, 195, 


West George Street, Glasgow. 


kotton Park Street. 


JOURN AL —Advertisements. 


| 


| 


| 
































BUYERS’ GUIDE—continwed. 


Egg Yolk— 
Roxburgh, Robert, Ltd., Nineveh Road (off 
Soho Road), Birmingham. 


Electric Bellis, Indicators, Telephones and Clocks— 
Gent & Co., Ltd., Faraday Works, Leicester. 


Electric Fuses— 
Curtis’s & Harvey, Ltd., Cannon Street House, 
London, E.C. 
Nobel’s Explosives Co., Ltd., Nobel House, 
195, West George Street, Glasgow. 


Electric Lamp Makers (Drawn Wire and Carborn)— 
The Edison Swan Electric Co., Ltd., Ponders 
End, Middlesex. 


Electric Motor Vehicle Lamps— 
Vandervell, C. A., & Co., Ltd., Warple Way, 
Acton Vale, Ww. 


Electric Portable Pocket Lamps, &c. (Dry Batteries of 
all kinds)— 

Surrey Electrical Co., Ltd., Surrey Lane. 
Battersea, London, S.W. 

Electrical and General Engineers— 

Baxter & Caunter, Ltd., 219, Tottenham 
Court Road, London, Ww. Exporters of all 
kinds of Electrical Machinery, Accessories 
and small supplies. Write for general list. 
“ Everything Electrical,” Second Edition. 

Jackson, T. & J., Ltd., Claremont Road, 
Harrow. Small Electric Lighting Sets for 
Country Houses. 

The Edison Swan Electric Co., Ltd., Ponders 
End, Middlesex. 


Electrical and Mechanical Engineers and Contracters— 
Henley’s W. T., Telegraph Works Co., Ltd., 
Blomfie'd Street, London, E.C. 
Hooper’s Telegraph and India-Rubber Works 
Ltd., 31, Lombard Street, London, E.C. 


Electrical Insulating Material— 

Randall Bros., 22, Sherwood House, 
dilly Circus, London, W. 

Electrical Percelains for Every Purpose— 

James McIntyre & Co., Ltd., Washingtosz 
China Works, Burslem. 

Electro Piate on Britannia Metal and Nickel Silver— 

Sturges, Bladon & Middleton, 13 and 14, Wea- 
man Street, Birmingham. 

Electro Plate Manufacturers— 

Suckling, William, & Sons, Albion Street, 
Birmingham. (Kingsway Plate.) 

Electro Piating Machinery and Materlais— 

Canning, W., & Co., Great Hampton Street, 
Birmingham. 

Emery Wheels— 

Luke & Spencer, Ltd., Broadheath, near Man- 
chester, Tele. Address: “ Emery, Altrin- 
cham.” 

Sterne, L., & Co., 
Works, Glasgow. 

Enamel, Decorative and Protective— 

Randall Bros., 22, Sherwood House, Pieea- 
dilly Circus, London, 

Encaustic Tiles— 

Carter & Co., 
Poole. 

Engine Packings. S.E.A. Rings— 

Trist, Ronald, & Co., Ltd., 4, Lloyd’s Avenue, 
London, E.C. 

Engine Packings. Superheat— 


Picea 


Lid., The Crown Iron 


Ltd., Encaustic Tile Works, 


Snowdon, Sons, & Co., Ltd., Millwall, London, 
ki. Snowdons’ Metallic Packing. 
Engineers— 


Haslam Union Foundry, 175/177, Salisbury 
House, London Wall, E.C. 
Engineers, Constructional— 
ew, Ltd., Knightsbridge, London, 
S.W. 


Engineers and Contractors— 
Bullivant & Co., Ltd., Reg. Offices, 72, Mark 
Lane, London, E. C.; Works, Millwall, 
London, E. 
Engineers’ lronfounders— 
Wigan Coal and Iron Co., Ltd., Wigan. 
Engineers and Millwrights—General— 
Aveling & Porter, Rochester (Locomotives, 
Road ey etc.). 


Baird, W., & Co., Glasgow (Pig Iron, Coal, 
Coke, ete.), 
Gillott, John, & Son, Lancaster Works, 


Barnsley, Yorks, Eng. 

Palatine Engineering Co., Liverpool. 

Saxby & Farmer, Head Offices, 53, Victoria 
St., Westminster, S.W.; and "Works, Chip 


penham, Wilts. 








x THE 


BOARD © 








YCLONE 


Fans for every purpose. 





Over thirty years as builders and designers 
of Fans and Blowers for every conceivable 
purpose has given us a wealth of data and 
experience which we will place at your 
service on request. Get our Catalogue 
314A. 


os INTERNATIONAL EXHIBITION, 
2 Gold Medals and 1 Silver Medal. 


FIRST HORTHERN COUNTIES LAUNDRY EXHIBI- 
TION, 1918. Silver Meda! and Diploma. 


LAUNDRY 


SMITH & PACET, crown Works, KEIGHLEY. 


MACHINERY 


COTTON BAGS 


FOR ALL PURPOSES. 


W. rt. FELTHAM & SON, 


imperial Works. Tower Bridge Rd., LONDON 
And MANCHESTER. 








1916, 

















A. LOVELL « CoO., 
KINGSWOOD, BRISTOL, ENCLAND. 


Manutacturers of Nailed Boots for Miners, 
Diggers, &c. 
Manufacturers of the “‘HOLD-EM-TITE BOOT,” 
Registered and Patented. 
The most reliable NAILED BOOT made, 


Enquiries Solicited. 











Telegrams—-** Outbalance, London.” 
London Wall 2966. Centra! 12396, 


JOHN PHILLIPS & SONS, Ltd., 


DIRECT IMPORTERS OF 


SPONGES 


Dingiey Road, City Road, London, £.C. 
Contractors to the Admiralty and H.M.Government. 


Swieeree ano ter Traore Surety 


TOILET PREPARATIONS 
FOR HOME AND EXPORT. 


SPrrciaLitirs—Bay Rums, Brilliantines, 
Toilet Paraffins, Hair Creams, Face Creams, 
PacKRr AX» IN BULK (Wholesale), 


Wii. B0 RTHWIC Manufacturing 


Pertumer, 


1 & 2, STANIFORTH PLACE, HULL. 





Shampoo’s, 
omades, &c., 





Modern Laundry Machinery 
FRED. TOWNEND & CO., 


ALBION WORKS, ACTON, 
LONDON, W. 
Manufacturers 
of Laundry 
Machinery of all 
Descriptions. 


Awarded Exhibition Prize Medais. 


TELES ~ Sloman LONDON.” 








| 
| 

















BUYERS’ GUIDE—continued. 


Engravers for Printing Purposes— 

Garratt & Atkinson, Warwick Works, Ealing, 
London, W. 5, makers of Printing Blocks in 
black or colours. Artists, designers, illus- 
trators. Drawings for commercial use. 


Essence Manufacturers— 

Hay, William, Lid. (Concentrated Soluble and 
Fruit Essences). Head Office and Labora- 
tories: Hull. London Depot: 3, York 
Street. Waiworth, S.E. 


Idris & Co., Ltd., London, N.W. 
Exhibition Contractors (Home and Abroad)— 
Humphreys, Ltd., Knightsbridge, London, 
S.W. 
Explosives— 
Curtis’s & Harvey, Ltd., Cannon Street House, 
London, E.C. 


Nobel’s Explosives Co., Ltd., Nobel House, 
195, West George Street, Glasgow. 


Fancy Metal Goods— 
Walker, Joseph (Birmingham), Ltd., Augusta 
Works, Warstone Lane, Birmingham. 


Fans, Open Propellers or Blowers and Exhausters— 
Matthews & Yates, Ltd., Cyclone Works, 
Swinton, Manchester. Makers of Cyclone 
Fans, Cyclone Motors, direct or alternating 
current. Very High Class Machines. Write 

for catalogue 170. 


Fatty Acids— 
Dexters, Lid., 362, City Road, London, E.C. 
Feed Water Regulators or Controllers Thermofeeds— 
Trist, Ronald, & Co., Ltd., 4. Lloyd’s Avenue, 
London, E.C. 


Ferro-Alloys— 


Blackwell, G. G., Sons, & Co., Lid., The 
Albany, Liverpool, and at 10. HKastcheap, 
London, E.C. 


Thermit,Ltd., 675, Commercial Road, London, 


4e 


Fertilisers and Feeding Stuffs— 
Cross, Alexander, & Sons, Ltd., 19, Hope 
Street, Glasgow. 
Miller, Jas., Son, & Co., 79, West Nile Street, 
Glasgow. 


Field Glass and Telescope Manufacturers— 
Ross’ Optical Works, 3, North Side, Clapham 
Common, S.W. 


Fireplaces, Enamelled in Colours and in Brick Red— 
Carter & Co., Ltd., Encaustic Tile Works, 
Poole. 
Flarelights and Mand Lamps— 
Imperial Light, Ltd., 123, Victoria Street, 
London, S.W. 


Flarelights and Hand Lamps, Acetylene— 
The Acetylene Corporation, Ltd., 49, Victoria 
Street, Westminster. London. 
Flour Milling Engineers— 
Robinson, Thomas & Son, Ltd., Rochdale. 
London: 79, Queen Victoria Street, E.C. 
Turner, E. R. and F., Ltd. (169), Ipswich, and 


82, Mark Lane, London, E.C. 
Fluorspar— 
Blackwell, G. G., Sons & Co., Ltd., The 


Albany, Liverpool, and at 10, Eastcheap, 
London, E.C. 


The Stee] Maker and Iron Founders Flux. 


Fiygums and Birdlimes— 

Kay Brothers, Ltd., Manufacturing Chemists, 
Stockport. “ Cheshire ” and “ Dak.” Fly- 
papers (Non-poisonous)—"* Big Bat” and 
“Falcon” Brands. Flycatchers (Pendant) 
—“ Vampire,” “ Scorpion,” 
“Viper,” “Flipflap,” “ Orbite ” Banding 
Material for Fruit Trees. 


Forced Draft Apparatus— 
Howden, J., & Co., Ltd., 195, Scotland Street, 
Glasgow. 
Foundry— 


Haslam Union Foundry, 175/177, Salisbury 
House, London Wall, E.C. 


Foundry Requisites— 


Blackwell, G. G., Sons & Co., Ltd., The 
Albany, Liverpool. and at 10, Eastcheap, 
London, E.C. 


Plumbago, Ferro Silicon, Ferro Manganese, 
and all foundry requisites. 


French Chalk— 
Blackwell, G. G., Sons & Co., Ltd. The 
Albany, ee and at 10, Eastcheap, 
on, 


Largest Importers of all grades of Tale. 


OF TRADE JOURNAL—Ad vertis semenis. 


| 
} 
} 














JAN. 3, 1918s N. 3: 
BUYERS GUIDE—continued. eT 
Fuller’s Earth— 
Fuller’s Earth Union, Ltd., 163, Fenchurch 
Street, London, E.C. 4, Lioy 
Fuse— 
Curtis’s & Harvey, Ltd., Cannon Street House 5 


London, E.C. 
Galvanizers— 


AR a 





W. P. Eutterfield’s, Ltd., Shipley, aa 
Telegrams: “'Tanks, Shipley.” Tele. : 
Shipley. 

Galvanized Steel Barbed Wire Netting— cids 

Rowat, A., & Co., Ltd., Patentees and SobkF } 
Makers, 18, Watson Street, Glasgow, Sct? CYA 
land. 

Gas Engine Makers— PETR 

The Haslam Foundry and Engineering (Qo, hi 
Ltd., Pontifex & Wood, London, Unio peleé'@P 





Foundry, Derby. 
Gas Mantiles— 
Curtis’s & Harvey, Lid., Canon Street House, 
London, E.v. (“ Ironclad ” Mantles). 
Gauge Glasses — 
Butterworth Bros., 
chester. 
Guilbert-Martin (Beacon and Titan), 4, 
Edmund Place, London, E.C 
Tomey, Joseph, & Sons, Messrs. 





Newton Heath, Man 


63 by 12 in. 


Ib doz. 


Ltd., Mana ff 





Glass Works, Aston, Birmingham. — 1/6 5 
Gauge Glass Protectors— This price 
Tomey, Joseph, & Sons, Messrs., Ltd., ManoBsinted in 
Glass Works, Aston, Birmingham. rush; you 
Gauge Indicators— » This Clotl 
Trist, Ronald, & Co., Ltd., 4, Lloyd’s Avenue, es Englist 
London, E.C. Quotat 


Gauges (Rain and other Water Gauges)— 


HA 
<7" Geo., Ltd., High Holborn, London, 


11, 



















Gelatine-Dynamite— 
Curtis’s & Harvey, Ltd., Cannon Street Hous 


London, E.C. 
Nobel’s Explosives Co., Ltd., Nobel House, 
. 195, West George Street, Glasgow. 


Glass Manufacturers— 


Stevens, James, & Son, Dartmouth St, 
Birmingham. 

Glass Works— 

Stevens, James, & Son, Dartmouth S&t, 
Birmingham. 


Glazed Bricks— 

Carter & Co., Ltd., Encaustic Tile Works, 
Poole. 

Globes and Scientific Apparatus— 

Philip, George, & Son, Ltd., 32, Fleet Street | 
London. Tellurians, Planispheres, Meteor. 
ological and Surveying Sets. 

Glue Manufacturers— 


Bristol Manufacturers, Ltd., Bedminster 
Parade, Bristol. Tel. Address: “ Gela 
tine.” Telephone 900. Concentrated Sis 


in bulk. Pure Hide Glue only. 
Massey, C., & Son, Ltd. (Home and Export)| 
Noted “Castle Brand ” qualities. 12, St 
Mary Axe, London, E.C. 3. ’Phone: 
Avenue. Telegrams: ‘Twelmarax, London.” 
Glycerine— 
Price’s Patent Candle Co., Ltd., Londoa, | 
S.W. 
Golf Balis— 
Henley’s, W. T., Telegraph Works Co., Lid, 


Londou, EC, (* Melfort” and ~ Henley.”) 
Grease Manufacturers— 
Sandeman Brothers, Ruchill Oil Works, 
Glasgow. 





Stern’s, Ltd., Royal London House, Finsbury 
Square, London, E.C 


tlephone : 
Greaseproof Paper (British made)— 









Powell, Lane & Co., Paper Works, Gloucester) 7 * 
England. 
Grinding Machinery— VHOLES 
Chemical Engineering Co., 49, Deansgate, 
Manchester. “KEK” Patent Mill. Chemical 
and Dye Plant Specialists. Telegraphit} Contrac 
Address: “ Calling,” Manchester. 
Grindstones Mounted and Unmounted— 
Kell, Richard & Co., E. Exchange Buildings 
Queen Street, Newcastle-on-Tyne. AM| 
Gummed Paper Makers— 
Jones, Samuel & Co., 7, Bridewell Place, a 
London, E.C. (Patent Non-Curling Gummel} For Ai 
Paper). Medic 


Gunpow der— 
Curtis’s & es. Ltd., Cannon Street House, 
London, E.C. 
Hardware Merchants— 
Edwards Bros., Ormond Street, Liverpool. 


PEF 
16, Ca 


Work 





OF 


BUYERS’ GUIDE—continued. 


Hat Manufacturers’ Materials— 


Ogfay. 3. 1918 THE BOARD 
ICTOR BLAGDEN &CO., 
urch 


4, Lioyd’s Avenue, London, E.C. 3. 


Use, Suppliers of all grades of 


AR and AMMONIA PRODUCTS, 
DISINFECTANTS, 


auld Potash Salts, Soda Salts, 
' CYANOGEN PRODUCTS, 
i enemeee PRODUCTS. 


** Blagdenite, Fen, London.”’ 


orks, 


= 


legraphic Address: 


n10n 



























— aX 

Use, . “" Tae onsy PERMANENT ao VERTISEMENT a a . | 
= Treasured in every household. Ytrtany 7. | 

~ — iT KEEPS YOUR NAME ALWA\ ve | In FRONT E 

ore ; oe 

= 435 —— _——— a 

b> a 

lan- © of | 
, © { 

= SS | 

Do | 


30 doz. 60 doz. 


1/6 - 10/6 - 9/6 - 8/6 per doz. 


This price includes a Celluloid Tablet, 5§ inch by 1 inch, 
rinted in two colours, fixed in the back of the 
rush; your own sketch or wording. 


'This Cloth Brush is made of pure bristles, and is of 
English manufacture 


Quotations for larger quantities obtainable of 
, NEUHAFER & LEVI, Brush Manufacturers, 
11, Fore Street, London, E.C. 2. 


nor 





Weldiess steel Tubes 


Have the advantage of being the produc! 
of an organisation ot specialists. 
Used by all prominent Firms. 
Made in every size & shape for all purposes 
Permsat us to uote yo: 
ORIENTAL TUBE CO.. Ltd. 
Eetablished 1862.) 


West Bromwicn, 











BIRMINGHAM. 








‘detei SSaae aa 











MARK 
ry 
tlephone : 
| 362 Clty. 
yay 
HOLESALE. EXPORT. 
 ——— Arr NA a A NRTA NI 
2, 
1} Contractor to the War Office. 


ACTUAL MANUFACTURER OF 


‘PAMEL HAIR BRUSHES 


of every description, 
‘ For J Artists, Painters & Gilders. 
Medical Brushes a Speciality. 


PERCY P. BAKER, 
16, Carthusian St., London, E.C. 1. 


Works -- Walthamstow and Islington, N. 


6, 





Hat Materials, Limited, Collingdon Street, 
Luton. Every requisite for the Straw and 
Felt Hat Trades. Home and _ Export. 
Special attention given to Continental 
requirements. Telephone No. 456. 

Hats— 

Hall & Phillips, Ltd., Wholesale Felt Hat 
Manufacturers, Nuneaton, England, and 27, 
Milton Street, London, E.C. Specialities— 
Wool Felt Hats, Hard or Soft. Napped 
Hats, Fez and Malay Caps, etc., for Home 
and Export. Contractors to Home and 
Colonial Governments, Crown Agents, etc. 


’Phone: i7 Nuneaton; London Office: 
3445 City. Telegrams: Hall, Nuneaton. 
Cable Code: A. B. C. 5th Edition. 


High Speed Engines— 
Howden, J., & Co., Ltd., 195, Scotland Street, 
Glasgow. 
Hops (packed in any weight package to suit Buyers’ 
requirements)— 
Le May, W. H. & H., 
Street, London, S.E. 
Hydro Extractors— 
Thomas Broadbent & Sons, Ltd., Central Iron 


67, Borough High 


Works, Huddersfield. Telegrams: “ Broad- 
bent, Huddersfield.” Code: A. B. C. Sth 
Edition. 
Hypodermic Syringe Makers— 
Pelham Surgical Instrument Co., Ltd., Not- 


tingham, and 30, Craven Street, Strand, 
London, ’W.C. Makers of “ Record ” Hypo- 
dermic Syringes. Wholesale and Export 
only. In all the standard sizes. Sole Pro- 
prietors of “Valesco” brand of Surgical 
and Hospital Supplies. Manufacturers of 
Splints. Belts, Trusses, YTurniture and 
Artificial Limbs. Telephone: London 2221 
Gerrard; Nottingham 5319. Telegrams and 


Cables: “ Advuloid,” London; “ Medical,” 
Nottingham. 
ice Machine Manufacturers— 
Haslam Union Foundry, 175/177, Salisbury 
House. London Wall, E.C. 
ice-making oe 
Sterne. Go, lta, The Crown Tron 
Works, Ym 
India-rubber Goods Manufacturers— 
Franklin, J. G., & Sons, Lid., Birkbeck 
Works, Dalston, London, i.8. Offices: 


15/17, Colvestone Crescent, Dalston, E8. 
Manufacturers of all kinds of Surgical 
India-rubber Goods and Druggists’ Sundries, 
Seamless India-rubber Gloves, Feeding 
Bottle Teats, Vulcanite Goods, etc. 

Heinke, C. E., & Co., 87/89, Grange Road, 
London, S.E. All British since 1884. 

James Lyne Hancock, Lid., 266, Goswell 
Road, London, E.C. Established 1821. 
Surgical and Mechanical Goods of every 
description. Specialising best qualities. 

North British Rubber Co., Ltd., Edinburgh. 

The Isleworth Rubber Company, Ltd. Head 
Office and Works: Isleworth, Middlesex. 

insulated Cables— 

Henley, W. T., Telegraph Works Co., 
London Wall. 

Hooper’s Telegraph & India Rubber Works, 


Lid., 


Ltd., London, E.C. 
iron Buildings— 
Humphreys, Ltd., Knightsbridge, London, 
S.W. 
lronfounders— 


Saxby & Farmer, Head Offices, 53, Victoria 
Street, Westminster. 8 W. ’ and Works. Chip- 


penham, Wilts. 
lronmasters— 
Baird, Wm., & Co., Ltd., Gartsherrie, N.B. 
Parkgate Iron and Steel Co., Ltd., Rother- 


ham. 
Stewarts & Lioyds, Ltd., Glasgow and Bir- 
mingham. 
The Wigan Coal and Iron Co., Ltd., Wigan. 
Jam Jars— 
Kennedy, H., & Sons, Ltd., Barrowfield 
Potteries, Glasgow.. 


Jams, Jeliies, & Marmalades— 

Robertson, James, & Sons, Preserve Manu- 
facturers, Ltd., Droylsden, Manchester. 
Sole manufacturers of celebrated ‘“ Golden 
Shred ” Brand. A.: “ Marmalade,” 
Droylsden. 

Jewellers—Gilt and Itmitation— 

Timings, Charles, & Sons, Ltd., 85, Spencer 

Street, Birmingham. 








‘ 





TRADE JOURNAL—Advertisemenis. 


xl 


BUYERS’ GUIDE—coniinued. 


Jewellery— 

Tiptaft, J. W., & Son, Ltd., Northamp- 
ton Street, Birmingham (Rings, Medals, 
Masonics). Contractors to H.M. Govern- 
ment. Cable Code A. B. C. 5th Edition. 
’Phone: Central 6661. 


Jewellery Manufacturers— 

British Gold Plate Co., Commercial Buildings, 
Icknield Street, Birmingham. Rolled Gold, 
Necklets, Brooches, Pendants, etc. 

Pepper, Arthur J., & Co., Ltd., 54, Frederick 
Street, Birmingham. 


Jointing Materials— 
Trist, Ronald & Co., Ltd., 4, Lloyd’s Avenue, 
London, E.C. 
Khaki Cotton Goods— 


The Manchester Khaki 
Street, Manchester. 


Co., Ltd., 1, Booth 


Knife Cleaning Machine— 

Besway, Lid., 44/46, Eagle Street, London, 
W.C. (Small Size, Low Price, suitable 
Export.) 


Knitting Machinery— 
The Harrison Patent Knitting Machine Co., 
Lid., 113, Upper Brook Street, Manchester. 


Tel. Ad.: “ Patentee,” Manchester. ‘Tel. 
No., City 1373. 
Labels— 
Fisher, Clark & Co., Boston, England. 


Lace, Nettings, Hosiery— 
Trivett, L.O., Ltd., Nottingham. Plain and 
Fancy Nets, Hosiery, Veilings, Lace Assort- 
ments. Telegrams: “Trivett, Nottingham.” 
National Telephone 576. Codes: Liebers 
A. B. C. 4th Edition. 


Locquers (Manufacturers of every description)— 


Fredk. Crane Chemical Co., Ltd., Armoury 
Close, Bordesley Green, Birmingham. Tel. : 


Vic. 417/418. Telegraphic: Chemical Bir- 
mingham. 

Liewellyn Ryland, Ltd., Baskerville Place, 
Birmingham. 


Lampshades (Silk Beads, &c.)— 

Ellis, Simpson & Saunders, 3 and 4, St. 
Martin’s Court, Ludgate Hill, London, E.C. 
Laundry Engineers— 

Smith & Paget, Crown Works, Keighley. 


Townend, Fred., & Co.. Albion Works. Acton, 
London, W. 
Laundry Supplies— 
The Clenblumeil Co., Tockwith, York. 
Lawn Tennis Racket Manufacturers, &c.— 
Davis, F. A., Ltd., Brooke’s Markc:i, Brooke 


Street Holborn, London, E.C. 


Lead-Lined Flushing Cisterns for Water Closets— 
Claughton Bros., Ltd., Bramley, Leeds. 
Makers of “ Niagara ” and “ Japkap ” 
Syphon Water-waste Preventers. Hydraulic 
Solid Drawn Lead Traps, Bends, and Off- 


sets. Plumbers’ Cast Lead Goods, Socket 
Tacks, Terminals, etc. Telephone: Stan- 
ningley 93. ‘Telegraphic Address: “ Claugh- 


ton’s, Stanningley.” 


Lead Traps and Bends— 


Glover, W. T., & Co., Ltd., Trafford Park, 


Manchester. 
Leather Belting Manufacturers— 
Walker, Charles, & Co., Ltd., Concordia 


Works, Leeds. Manufacturers of Belting, 
Picking Straps, Loom Leathers and Leather 
for all Mechanical purposes. Specialising 
on Loom Leathers. Telephone: 1272 Leeds. 
Telegrams: ‘“ Original,” Leeds. 
Leather Beltings— 
Ashton, Thomas A., Ltd., Sheffield. 


Leather Cloth Manufacturers (Pegamoid Brand)— 
New Pegamoid, Lid., 134, Queen Victoria 
Street, London, E.C. 
Leather Goods (Fancy) Manufacturers— 
Birdsall & Son, 175, Piccadilly, London, W., 
and Northampton. 
Hunt & Co., Ltd., Progress Works, Hart 
Street, Southport. (Covered Basket Work.) 
James, G. H., & Co., 48, Old Bailey, London, 


Co., 294, City Road, 
. A? cc Ritomaylo,” 


Maylor, W. 
London, 
London 


Stiby, R. W.., 
E.C. 


A., & 
_ 
41/47a, Old Street, 
Woolnough, Draper & Co., Ltd., 12/13, Chis- 


well Street, London, E.C. Special atten- 
tion to Colonial Enquiries. 


London, 














Xil 


J. BARBER @& CO., LTD., 
2, St. George’s Crescent, Brearley Street 
BIRMINC HAM. 


Button Manufacturers 
From “ERINOID” the British improvement 
on Cerman Calalith; PEARL, CELLU- 
LOID, HORN, IVORY, and WOOD. 
Erinoid Slides, Hat Pins, and Fancy Articles. 





iN DIIGO, ali Qualities. 


ZINC DUST. “Beaver” 
The finest Quality in the World. 
ZINC OXIDES and Dyer’s Chemicals. 


H. S. WILLCOCKS & CO., LTD, 


56 Beaver St., Whitworth St., Manchester. 


Brand. 











A 
4 et L 
voy META 


“". 
wooo Men LON DON 'M-_ 








CRESYLIC ACID 


TAR, PITCH, CREOSOTE. 


JAMES CREENSHIELOS & CO., LTD., 
64, Gordon Street, Glasgow. 











REEDS, HEALDS and 
POLISHED REED WIRE. 


HO‘ e AND EXPORT. 


J. W. TURNER & COMPANY, 


Laisterdyke and Bradford. 
Established 1795. 


Geo. G. Blackwell, Sons & Co., Lad. 


Head Office: THE ALBANY, LIVERPOCL. 
10, Eastcheap, London, E.C. 


ESTABLISHED 40 YEARS. 


METALS & ALLOYS of all kinds 
FOR EVERY PURPOSE. 

We are the Headquarters in England for 
French Chalk, Piumbago, Fluorspa.r, 
Manganese, Magnesite, Chrome Ore. 

ALLUYS FOR ALL CLASSES OF STEEL, &c. 
TYPE, LINO & STEREO METALS. 
RErRACiIORY BRICKS & FURNACE LININGS. 
Remember we are Metallurgical Specialists. 
Write for our pamphiets. 








They will interest you. 


~BLACKWELL, LIVERPOOL. 


Att cop-<-s 


Castes 


THE BOARD OF 




















AGENCIES. 
J. H. Houpson y C1A, Calle Sarmiento, 471, 


Buenos Aires, Argentine. Representations and 


Agencies :—Reference—British Bank of South 
America, London ; London Agents: Messrs. D. 
G. Begg & Co., Salisbury House, London Wall 
#.C 











BUYERS’ GUIDE—continued. 


Leather Cloth Manufacturers— 

“ Rexine,” Limited, Hyde, near Manchester, 
manufacturers of Leather Cloths for Up- 
holsterers, Bookbinders, Shoe and 
Makers, etc. 

The British Pluviusin Co., Ltd., 12, Newton 
Street, Manchester. Manufacturers of Hos- 
pital Sheetings; also Leather Cloth for 
Bookbinders, Bag Makers, Upholsterers, 
Carriage and Motor Car Builders, etc., etc. 


Leather Goods (Fancy and Solid Leather)— 

Rendall, Underwood & Co., Ltd., Granville 
Street, Birmingham. 

Leather Manufacturers— 

Garnar, James, & Sons, The Grange, Ber- 
mondsey, London, S.E. Finished Skivers 
for Fancy Leather Goods Makers and Book- 
binders. 

George & Co., Soho, London, W. Moroccos, 
Roans, and all classes of Leather for the 
Furniture, Motor, Fancy and Bookbinding 
Trades. T. A.—‘‘ Morocco, London.” T. N.— 
1547 Gerrard. 

Gibbs, Henry, & Son, 29, St. Bride Street, 
E.C. Manufacturers of Coloured Calf and 
Skivers for Fancy Leather Goods and Book- 
binders; also Vellum and Parchment of 
every description. Works—Mitcham Com- 
mon, Surrey, and Long Lane, Bermondsey. 

Leather Oi! Manufacturers— 

Adolph Hess & Bro., 

Leeds. 
Leather Tanners, 


Litd., Kirkstall Road, 


Harness and Saddle Curriers— 


Holden, E. T., & Son, Ltd., 13, Park Street, 
Walsall. 
Leathers, Hydraulic— 
Ashton, Thomas A., Ltd., Sheffield. 


Lens Manufacturers for Ships and Railway Lamps— 

Stevens, James, & Son, Birmingham. 

Letter Files— 

King Brothers, 15, Bury Street, London, 
E.C. 3. Lever and Flat Files, Perforators 
and Clips. 

Lifts— 

Smith, Major, & Stevens, Ltd., Abbey Works, 
Northampton. 

Steven, A. & P., Provanside Works, Glasgow. 

Waygood Otis, Lid., Falmouth Ro: 1d, London 

S.E. M: skers by Royal Warrant. Est. 1833 
apres sented in Provinces and Abroad. 
Lime Juice— 

Idris & Co., Ltd., London, N.W. 

Lithographic Plates, Blanketing and Materials— 


Horsell, Frank, & Co., Ltd., Victoria Road, 
Holbeck, Leeds. 


Locks, Frames and Fittings for Leather Goods— 


Beddoes, J. G., 11, Great Hampton Street, 
Birmingham. (Manufacturer of all kinds.) 


Locomotive Engine Builders— 
Aveling & Porter, Ltd., Rochester. 
Lubricants— 

MacArthur & Jackson, Glasgow. 

Prices’ Company, Lid., Battersea, London, 
S.W. 

Lustre Tiles— 

Carter & Co., Lid., Encaustic Tile Works, 

Poole. 
Magnesia— 

Henry, T. & W., 
chester. 

The Washingion Chemical Co., 
ington Station, Co. Durham. 
facturers of “Pattinsons” brand Car- 
bonate of Magnesia, Calcined Magnesia 
(Light und Heavy) for Pharmaceutical and 
Manufacturing Purposes; also Fluid Mag- 
nesia. T. A.: “ Chemical,” Washington 
Station. 

Western Chemical Co., Greenock, Scotland, 
makers of “ Thistle Brand ” Carbonate of 
Magnesia, Calcined Magnesia (Light and 
Heavy), Magnesia Cement, and White 
Stone Facing Cement for manufacturing 
Rice Millstones and Grinding Discs. 

Magnesia Coverings for Steam Pipes and Boilers— 

Newalis Insulation Company, Ltd., New- 

castle-upon-T'yne, and branches. 


Magnesite Bricks, Chrome Bricks and Silica Bricks— 


East St., St. Peter’s, Man- 


Ltd., Wash- 
Sole Manu- 


The Eglhnton Silica Brick Co., Ltd., 45, 
Renfield Street, Glasgow. 
Magneto Manufacturers— 
British Lighting and Ignition Co., Lid. (Pro- 


prietors: Vickers, i. 
Court Road, London, 
The M-L Magneto Syndicate, Lid., Victoria 
Works, Coventry. Telegrams: “ Carlton, 

Coventry.” Telephone 1008. 


i Tottenham 


Slippe 
. 


TRADE JO UR N AL—Advertisements. 


} 


Se - 


ES a 

















JAN, 3 3, 191% 




















BUYERS’ GUIDE—continued, BRIT 
Magnetos and Magneto Spares— MANU 


Watson, Stanley J., Berners Work 
Sheen Road, Richmond. Telegn 
* Roussillon,” Richmond, Surrey, 
phones—1386 and 1733 Richmond. 


Manganese— 
Blackwell, G. G., Sons, & Co., Ltd, 
Albany, Liverpool, and at 10, East 
London, E.C. Manganese of all grag 

all purposes. Also Ferro Maney 
Metallic Manganese, etc. 


py Hous 


* 
,. 


_@@ 


Manganese Bronze Rods— 
McKechnie Brothers, 
Street, Birmingham. 


S WECHANIC 


Lid., 
ET 


Rotton 


‘* Manganesite,”’ for Steam, Water, and Gas Joi pe eat 
John Hudson & Co.’s Successors, 85 —* 
» SN Ml necial Atte 


Street., London, E. 1 


Mantles— 

Heatons (Leeds), Mid., 
North Street, Leeds. 
Tailor-Made Costumes, 
Registered Trade Mark: 
coats, “ ESIW ” Serges. 


Manures (Chemical)— 


Anglo-Continental Guano Works, Ltd., | Sand 
House, Billiter Street, E.C. j 
Cross, Alexander, & Sons, Ltd., 19, } 


Street, Glasgow. . 
Hedworth Barium Co., Ltd., Neweastle,j 


Map Makers— : 
Bacon, G. W., & Co., Ltd., 127, Stn \PHR 
London, W.C. ‘Telephone: Regent W ie AN 


Heatons Build 
Ladies’ and 

Coats and §&§ 
“ Alwetha ”} | 








Map Publishers— 


: ‘ 
Philip, George, & Son, Ltd., 32, Fleet § _ " 


London. Map and Colour Printers, 
graphers ENI) 
Stanford, Edward, Ltd., Cartographers t 


King, Map Sellers, Engravers, Printers, 
Mounters. Agents for the wal 
Survey, Geological Survey and W 
Maps, and Admiralty Charts, 12, 15 













5 @ARLES 


14, Long Acre, W.C. Telepho 

anufacturer 
rard 4284. mellery, 
Marine Motors and Motor Boats— mental : 
ette Cz 
Thornycroft, J. I., & Co., Ltd., Cal i 

House, London, S.W. — 
Spence: 
Marine Glue— ondon uff 


Jeffery, Alfred, & Co., Stratford, Londor, 
“ Marine Glue, London.” 





Telegrams: 








Measure Makers— 
Dean-Bedington, 25/37, Hackney 
London, E. 2. For Surveyors, Tailors, 
all trades for all nations. 


4 HOR7 


Warstor 
Birmingt 
lephone—175 
slegraphic J 
“Silversm 


Medalists— 
Tiptaft, J. W., & Son, 
Street, Birmingham. 


Ltd., Northamp 
Medals and Baég 


for Sports, Souvenirs, Societies, and @ALL Si 
purposes. Contractors to H.M. Gord WEDD 
ment. Cable Code A. B. C. 5th Editi 





’Phone: Central 6661. 

















Medical Plasters— ROCTC 
De St. Dalmas, A., & Co., Leicester. hapel We 
Metal Manufacturers— MANU 
Clifford, Charles, & Son, Ltd., Birmingb RA" 
Brass, Bronze, Copper, Gun Metal 
Tubes. Wire, Rods, Sheets, Castings, ¢ 
Emery Bros., Lichfield Road, Aston, “neral 
Birmingham. 


Magnolia Anti-Friction Metal Company ! SPECI 


Great Britain, Ltd., 49, Queen Victo 
Street, E.C. Telegrams: Magnolier, Lond 
Moore bBros., Ltd., Priory Works, Pri IRD 

Road, Aston, Birmingham. 
N¢ 


Metal + acca gr 
Garnham, J. & Sons, 132, Upper Tha 
Street, London, E.c. 4. 


Metal Merchants and Manufacturers— Seat aes 
Billington & Newton, Longport, Staffs. SS a 
Ducard Bros., Bridge Street, Birmingham. 


Metal Smaliwarese— 

Tiptaft, J. W., & Son, Ltd., Northam 
Street, Birmingham. Manufacturers 
every description of small Press-made Me 
Parts. Contractors to H.M. Governmé 
Cable Code A.B.C. 5th Edition. ’Phov® 
Central 6661. 


Motors (Water, Boiler, Feed, Steam, Alr or Gas)- 
—7" Geo., Ltd., High Holborn, Lot@@m troy 








9@ 3, 1918 


THE BOARD OF TRADE JOURNAL—Advertisements. 


X11 





—_——_—— —— -- 


a 


“f BRITISH METAL & TOY 


MANUFACTURERS, LIMITED, 












thiirey House Ely Place, LONDON, E.C. 
= 40) ~ 9oo0eee MWe, %,, 
a otk. 
d alll * >: *. 
f wat f BRN” 
: igreyp ee 
A Bor ot § Oeil ane? Quality 
"ade \ QW _ eel i 
Og *s, Mi a & 
~. - ~ oF 
7 


m ¥ 
*e © 
e 6 
Peveceone® 


| QMECHANICAL AND NON-MECHANICAL 
BETA IK To wy S$. 


aranteed entirely British Manufacture. British 
Capital, and superior to any German make. 
pecial Attention given to Export Orders. 


ATI-FRICTION GREASE 


q Sandeman Brothers, 
| Ruchill, GLASGOW. 
JAPHRAGM 


Fencac™ BUMPS 


»6,000 galicns per hour. 
ill pump aimost anything. 


FENIX "5" CHARD, tn 


sMARLES TIMINGS & SONS, LTC. 


anufacturers of all kinds of Gilt and Imitation 
wellery, Brooches, Earrings, Hinged Pins, 
gimental and Enamelled Badges, Souvenirs, . 
Bijarette Cases and Small E. P. N.S. Goods. 


Diesinkers, Stampers & Piercers. 
, Spencer St., Birmingham, England. 
ondon Uffice—9, Falcon Avenue, E.C. 








' t 





le, 
















HORTON & ALLDAY, 
Warstone Lane, 47, Poland Street 
Birmingham. Oxford Street, W. 
lephone—1755 Central. Telephone—97€2 City London 
tlegraphic Address Telegraphic Address~- 
Silversmiths.” ‘Hemicycle.” 
MANUPACTURERS OF 


ALL SILVERWARE suitable for 
WEDDING PRESENTS, &c. 





OCTOR, AVERY & WOOD, 
hapel Works, Bond St., Birmingham. 


MANUFACTURERS OF ALL KINDS OF 


RAWING PINS 


AND 
‘neral Stationers’ Smaliwares. 
&°ECIAL PRICES TO SHIPPERS. 


— 








IRDSALL & SON, 
NORTHAMPTON. 

HIGH GRADE 
Ladies’ Bags, 
Photo Frames, 
Blotting Books, 


Letter Cases, 
etc., etc. 





Show Rooms— 


fr: 34 & 35, NEW BOND ST., 
Ree rox ” LONDON, WwW. 1. 





; 
| 
{ 


ee 


j 
t 


. 
NO 


BUYERS’ GUIDE—continued. 


Military Equipment— 

Cliff, Jabez, & Co., Globe Saddlery Works, 
Walsall. 

Leckie, John, & Co., Goodall Street, Walsall. 
(Saddlery, Harness and Leather Goods.) 

Tiptaft, J. W., & Son, Ltd., Northampton 
Street, Birmingham. (Badges, Titles, 
Buttons, etc.) Contractors to H.M. Govern- 
Ment. Cable Code A. B. C. 5th Edition. 
‘Phone: Central 6661. 


Millstones (Corn Grinding Mills)— 
Barron, W.8., & Son, Kingsholm, Gloucester. 


Mine Owners— 
Wigan Coal & Iron Co., Lid., Wigan (Pro- 
ducers of Best House, Gas and Steam 
Coals, and Wigan Cannel). 


Mineral Water Manufacturers— 
Camwal, Limited, 112, Pembroke Street, N. 
ee Co., Ltd., Camden Town, London, 


Miners’ Safety Lamp Makers— 
Ackroyd & Best, Ltd., Morley, near Leeds. 


Mining Machinery Manufacturers— 
Gillott, John, & Son, Lancaster 
Barnsley, Yorks, Eng. 


Monastic Tiles— 
Carter & Co., Lid., Encaustic Tile Works, 
Poole. 
Mono-Bi- and Tri-Nitrotoluol— 
Leitch, John W., & Co., Milnsbridge Chemical] 
Works, Huddersfield (Eng.). 
Mosaic and Tiles Decoration— 
Carter & Co., Ltd., Encaustic Tile Works, 


Works, 


Poole. 
Mother o’ Pear! Articles (Manufacturers of) and Coral 
Dealers— 
Harvey, Henry, & Co, 68, Milton Street. London. 
EC. 
Mcther o° Pearl, Ivory, tvory and Composition 


Billiard Balls, Vegetable ivory, Tortoiseshell and 
General Merchant— 
Myers, M., 15/18, Tower Hill, London, E.C. 


Motor Car Lighting (Electric)— 

Vandervell, ©. A., & Co., Lid., Warple Way, 

Acton Vale, W. 
Motor Cars— 

Auto-Carriers (1911), Ltd., 181, Hercules Road, 
Westminster Bridge Road, London, S8.E. 
Works: Thames Ditton, Surrey. 

Motor Tyre Canvas, Cape Hoods, &c.— 

Bright, John, & Bros., Ltd., Rochdale. 

Myrbane Oi!— 

Leitch, John W.. & Co. Milnsbridge. Chemica! 
Works Huddersfield (Mng.). 

Nautical Instrument Manufacturers (Binoculars and 
Telescopes) — 

Henry Hughes & Son, Lid., 59, Fenchurch 

Street, London. 
Needies— 

Moore, George, National Works, Redditch. 

London and Export Agents, Wiltred Turner 


& Co., Ltd., 30, Craven Street, Strand, 
W.C. 2. Surgical Needles of every descrip- 
tion; specialists in Hypodermic Needles. 
Also for “ Record” and all other Hypo- 
Syringes. Wilfred Turner & Co., Ltd. 
‘Phone 2221 Gerrard. 
Nickel and Cobalt Refiners— 
Wiggin, Henry, & Co., Ltd., 55, George 


Street, Birmingham. 
Nickel and Nickel Salts— 
The Mond Nickel Co., 
Street, London, S.W. 
Nickel Silver and Electro Plate—Spoons and Forks— 
Tay, W., & Sons, Ltd., 30/34, Leopold Street, 


Ltd., 39, Victoria 


Birmingham. [Eureka Spoons and Forks. 
Night Lights— 
Prices’: Patent Candle Co., Ltd., London, 
S.W. 


Oii and Grease Manufacturers— 

Adolph Hess & Bro., Ltd., Kirkstall Road, 
Leeds. Oieines (Distilled and Soluble), 
Stearines, Pitches, Woolfats. 

Dexters, Ltd., 362, City Road, London, E.C. 

Grindley & Co., Lid., Poplar, London, E. 
Tels: “ Resinous Pop. London.” 

Snowdon, Sons, & Co., Ltd., Millwall, London, 
E. Manufacturers of Snowdrift, Snozone, 
Snowdene and Sino] (Cylinder) Lubricants. 

Stern’s Ltd., Royal London House, Finsbury 
Square, London, E.C. 


| 


BUYERS’ GUIDE—continued. 


Oil and Grease Merchants— 

Mead-King, Robinson & Co., Ltd., Liverpool! 
and Manchester. Whale Oil, Crude and 
Filtered, Fish Oil, Lubricating Oil and 
Grease. Petroleum, Paraffin Wax, “ Hydro- 
lene” Bitumen, Petroleum Jelly, Oleine, 
Stearine, Wool Grease—‘ Giant ” Vapour- 
ising Oil for Oil Engines—‘‘ Northern 
Light ” Kerosene specially packed in cases 
for export. 

Oi! Can and Lamp Manufacturers— 

Webster, Isaac, & Sons, Ltd., Abbey Works, 

Kirksta!], Leeds. 
Oil Exporters— 

Vickers, Benjn. R., & Sons, Ltd., Gascoigne 
Street, Leeds. Soap Oils, Fatty Acids, 
Oleine, Textile and Leather Oils, Woo! 
Grease, ete. 

Oil Mill Machinery— 


Middleton & Co., R., Sheepscar Foundry, 
Leeds. 
Rose, Downs & Thompson, Ltd., Old 


foundry, Hull, and 12, Mark Lane, London, 
F.C. Latest and most up-to-date systems 
of seed crushing oil extraction, refining, 
etc. 

Oil Press Bagging Manufacturers— 

Paley & Donkin, Ltd., Cottingham, near 
Hull. Telegrams: ‘“ Donkin, Cottingham- 
Yorks.” Code: 5th Fdition, A. B. C. Tele- 
phone: 200 Cottingham. 

Oi! Refiners, Distillers, and Manufacturers— 

Adolph Hess & Bro., Ltd., Kirkstall Road, 
Leeds. 

Prices’ Company, Lid., Battersea, London, 
S.W 


Reesoils, Ltd., 1, Eldon Square, Newcastle-on- 
Tyne. ‘“ Reesileo” Non-sludging Oil for 
Transformers, H.” T. Switches, Turbines, 
Motors. Cylinder Oil for Steam, Diesel, 
Gas, Air Compressors, etc. London House: 
17, Victoria Street, S.W. 

Stanley Earle & Co., Ltd., Coronet O21 
Works, Hull. Cables, “ Refiners,” Hull. 
Boiled Linseed Oils, Thickened Oils, Belt 
Paste, Soft Soap, etc. 

Stern’s, Ltd. (Soluble, Insulating, Trans- 
former, Turbine, Screw-cutting, Leather, 
Motor, etc. Oils), Royal London House, 
Finsbury Square, London, E.C. 

Oil Refiners, Grease and Insulating Varnish Manufac- 
turers— 

Bartoline (Huil}, Ltd., 2, Myton Place, Huli. 


Oils and Greases— 

Job Srothers, Tower Buildings, Liverpool. 
Whale Oi] (Crude and Filtered), Seal Oi) 
(White and Lower Grades), Cod Oils, Fish 
Oils, Fatty Acids, Wool Grease, Stearines. 

The Hillerest Oil Co. (Bradford), Ltd., Clav- 
ton, Manchester. Manufacturers of Oleines, 
Stearincs, ‘I'cxtile Oils and Leather Greases. 

Old and Obsolete Stores of every description— 

Phiilips. John, & Sons, Litd., Dingley Road, 

City Road, London, E.C. 
Ores— 

Blackwell, G. G., Sons, & Co., Ltd., The 
Albany, Liverpool, and at 10, Eastcheap, 
London, E.C. Purchasers and dealers in 
Wolfram, Molybdenite, Vanadium, Chrome, 
Manganese, and ail Metalliferous Ores. 

Overmanties, Girandoies, &c.— 

Withey, A. W., & Co., 7, 

Finsbury, London, F.C. 
Oxalic Acids— 

Barr, James C., Ltd., Chemical and Colour 
Merchants, 27, Blythswood Square, 
Glasgow. 

Overmantels, Girandoles, Etc.— 

The Acetylene Corporation, Lid., 49, Victoria 
Street, Westminster, London. 

Imperiai Light, Ltd., 123, Victoria Street, 
London, S.W. 

Packings, Hydraulic and Pump— 

Snowdon, Sons, & Co., Ltd., Millwa}l, 

London, E. Snowdon’s Metallic Packing. 
Packings, Hydraulic and Pump, S.E.A. Rings— 

Trist, Ronald & Co., Ltd., 4, Lloyd’s Avenue, 

London, E.C. 
Paint Manufacturers— 

Dampuey, J., & Co., Lid., Cardiff. Londen 

Office, 87, Bishopsgate, E.C.; also at Liver- 


Leonard Sireet, 


pool, Manchester, Leeds, Newcastle-on- 
Tyne, and Paris. Specialities for Iron and 
Steel Structures, Water Tanks, ete.. 


“ Miraculum ” Graphite Paint, “ Asphalt- 


ene ” bituminous paint, eic. 








X1V 


BUYERS’ GUIDE—continued. 


Paint Manufacturers—Continued. 


Farquhar & Gill, Aberdeen. KEstd. 1818. 
Makers of every description of Paints, 
Colours. Varnishes, and Enamels, 


Hanger, Watson & Harris, Ltd., Stoneferry 
Works, Hull; Wellclose Square, London, E. ; 
23, Bath Street, Liverpool. Paints, Colours, 
Varnishes, Enamels, Distemper and Oils. 
Sole Proprietors of the “Lady” Brand 
Specialities. 

Holden, Arthur, & Sons, Ltd., 218/219, Brad- 
ford Street, Birmingham. Paints, Colours, 
Enamels, Varnishes, Lacquers, Japans. 

Hoyle, Robson, Barnett & Co., Ltd. Estab- 
lished 1798. Head Office: Newcastle-on- 


Tyne. 

Mathews, John, & Co., Liverpool. 

Pilchers, Ltd., Morgan’s Lane, London, S.E. 
Colours, Paints, Varnishes, Enamels, Dis- 


tempers. Sole Proprietors “ Pilcher’s Stop- 
rot” and “ Pilcher’s Rustnot” Preserva- 
tives. 


Sanderson, A., & Co., Ltd., Kingston Paint. 
Colour and Varnish Works, Hull. Estab- 
lished 1853. Telegrams: “ Varnish, Hull.” 
Manufacturers of Paints, Colours, Varnishes, 
Enamels, Compositions, Distempers, etc. 


Paper Bag Makers— 
Crowther & Co., 
London. 
Smith, Stone & Knight, Ltd., Union Paper 
Mills, Landor Street, Birmingham. 


115, Middlesex Street, 


Paper Fasteners— 
Proctor, Avery & Wood, Chapel Works, Bond 
Street, Birmingham. 


Paper Makers and Stationers (Wholesale and Export)— 
Bowater, W. V., & Sons, Ltd., 159, Queen 
Victoria Street, London, E.C. 
Dickinson, J., & Co., Lt&., London, E.C. 
Hodgkinson, W. S., & Co., Wells, Somerset. 
Strong, Hanbury & Co., Ltd., 197, Upper 
Thames Street, London, E.C. 


Paper Makers— 
Lloyd, Edward, Ltd., 4 and 5, Salisbury 
Court, London, E.C. 
Tullis, Russell & Co., Markinch, Fife. 


Paper Shavings— 
Powell, Lane & Co., Paper Works, Gloucester, 
England. 


Paraffinium Liquidium and Petroleum Jellies— 
Snowdon, Sons, & Co., Ltd., Millwall, 
London, E. B.P. & Technica] qualities. 
Stern’s, Ltd., Royal London House, Finsbury 
Square, London, E.C. 
Patent Fuel Machinery— 
Middleton & Co., Robert, Sheepscar, Leeds. 


Patent Fuel Manufacturers and Shippers— 
The Crown Preserved Coal Co., Ltd., Cardiff. 


Pavement Light Lensee— 

Stevens, James, & Son, Victoria Glass Works, 
Birmingham. 

Pencils (Manufacturers of “‘C B’’ and all Classes for 
Home and Export)— 

Chambers & Co., Litd., Stapleford, Noits., 
England. 

Pen Manufacturers (Steel and Metal)— 

Hinks, Wells & Co., Buckingham Street dicel 
Pen Works, Birmingham. 

Perforated Metal— 

Barns. W., & Sons, Globe Works, Queensland 
Road, Holloway, London, N. 

Harvey, G. A., & Co. (London), Lid. (late of 
Lewisham), Greenwich Metal Works, Wool- 
wich Road, London, S8.E. 

Petroloum Jellies and Oils— 

Meade-King, Robinson & Co., Ltd., Liverpool. 

Stern’s, Ltd., Royal London House, Finsbury 
Square, London, E.C. 

Petrous Flooring Tiles— 
Carter & Co., Ltd., Encaustic Tile Works, 
Poole. 
Phosphor Bronze— 
Billington & Newton, Longport, Staffs. 
Clifford, Charles, & Son, Ltd., Birmingham. 
Photographic Lens and Camera Manufacturers— 

Ross’ Optical Works, 3, North Side, Clapham 

Common, S.W. 
Photographic Papers, Films and Plates— 
oT Limited, Mobberley, Cheshire (Estd. 


Pictorial Postcards— 
Hunt, Philip G., & Co., 332, Balham High 
Road, London, S.W. Real photos by auto- 


matic machinery. 


THE BOARD 


j 
} 
} 





OF 


BUYERS’ GUIDE—continued. 


Pitch— 
Miller, Jas., Son, & Co., 79, West Nile Street, 
Glasgow. 
Plate Polish—‘‘ Silveret ”’ 
The Nubian Manufacturing Co., Lorrimore 
Street, London, 8.E. 
Plumbago— 


Blackwell, G. G., Sons, & Co., Ltd., The 
Albany, Liverpool, and at 10, Eastcheap, 
London, E.C. 

Plywood— 

Venesta, Ltd., 1, Great Tower Street, London, 
EK. ‘“ Venesta ” Plywood in all woods. 

Write for Descriptive Booklet. 


Polishing Machinery and Materials— 
Canning, W., & Co., Great Hampton Street, 
Birmingham. 
Portable Buiidings— 
“er, Ltd., Knightsbridge, London, 


Post-Cards— 
E. W. savory, Ltd., Park Row Studios, 
Bristol. The “ Clifton” post-cards in a 


great variety of attractive styles. 


Potters— 
Kennedy, H., & Sons, 
Potteries, Glasgow. 


Ltd., Barrowfield 


Power Transmission— 
Cradock, G., & Co., Ltd., Wakefield, England. 
Preserved Whole Egg— 
Roxburgh, Robert, Ltd., Nineveh Road (off Soho 
Read), Birmingham. 


Press Toois and Tin Box Making Machinery— 

Waller & Co., Ltd., 28/32, Vauxhall Walk, 
London. 38.E. Simple Canister-making 
Plants for double-seamed, slip-over, or 
lever-tins. Telegraphic Address — “ Stamp- 
ings, London.” 


Pressure Gauges— 
Salter, Geo., & Co., West Bromwich. 


Printers’ Leads and Clumps— 

Taylor & Watkinson, Belgrave Foundry, New 
Briggate, Leeds. Machine Cast and Planed 
Leads and Clumps. Cable: “ Pica,” Leeds. 
Telephone: 4011 Central. Code: A. B. C. 
Sth Edition. 


Printers’ Metals— 

Blackwell, G. G., Sons, & Co., Ltd., The 
Albany, Liverpool, and at 10, Eastcheap, 
London, E.C. 

Printing Ink Manufacturers— 

Dane & Co., Manufacturers of Printing Inks, 
Colour Varnishes, etc., London and Edin- 
burgh. 

Horsell, Frank, & Co., Ltd. Manufacturers, 
Printing Inks, Colours, Varnishes, etc. Vic- 
toria Road, Leeds, 8.; also London, Bir- 
mingham and Edinburgh, etc. 

Winstone, B., & Sons, Ltd., London. 

Prism Binocular Manufacturers— 

Ross’ Optical Works, 3, North Side, Clapham 
Common, 8.W. 

Proprietary Articles, Specialities, &c.— 

Dalmas, A. de St., & Co., Leicester. 
Plaisters.) 

Henry’s Calcined Magnesia (T. & W. Henry), 
Manchester. 

Provisions (Export and Import)— 

Pearson & Rutter, Ltd. Established 1812. 
41, Stanley Street, Liverpool. (Cable: 
“ Pearutter,” A. B. C. 5th Edition. 

Warren, Sons, & Co., Aldgate East, London, 
3. Ham, Bacon and Cheese Specialists, 
Cables: “ Daydawn, London.” C. 
Code, 5th Edition. 

Pump Governors— 

Trist, Ronald & Co., Ltd., 4, Lloyd’s Avenue, 

London, E.C. 
Rag Merchants— 

Jacobs Bros. & Co., West End Mills, Dews- 

bury. Cables: “ Whatever, Dewsbury.” 


Railway Appliances— 


(Medical 


Saxby & Farmer, Lid., Head Offices, 53, 
Victoria Street, Westminster, S. 1, and 
Works, Chippenham, Wilts. (Railway 
Signals, etc.) 

Railway Lamp Lenses— 
Stevens, James, & Son, Victoria Glass 


Works, Dartmouth Street, Birmingham. 


Railway Points and Crossings— 
White, R., & Sons, Widnes, Lancs. 


TRADE JOURNAL—Advertisements. 








Jan. 3, ] -_ 3, | 











, Y 

BUYERS’ GUIDE—continuea, § BU 

fi 

Railway Signals— ong 
Saxby & Farmer, Litd.. Head Offices Street, 

Victoria Street, Westminster, S.W.], 
Works, Chippenham, Wilts. 

a Bath, R 
ail Welding— Seed 
Thermit, Ltd., 675, Commercia! and Fi 

London, E. Seed I 

Rainproof Cloth Manufacturers— oy a 

Garnett, G., & Sons, Led., Apperley By Johnson, 
Yorkshire. Englan 

Ramie Yarns— Grower 

The Yorkshire Ramie Spinning Co., are in 
Kirkstall, Leeds. Garden 
| Kelway < 

Recorders (Mechanical or Electrical Level a Export 

Notch)— The be 
Kent, Geo., Ltd., High Holborn, Lo Seeds. 
W.C. King, J¢ 

’ . ; Pedigr 

Red Lead and Tin Oxide— © Englan 
Wiggin, Henry, & Co., Ltd., 55, George Sa = Parm 

Birmingham. ' export 

Refrigerating Machines— logues 

Sterne, L., & Co., Ltd., The Crown iM sheltbox Mz 
Works, Glasgow. Harvey, 

Refrigerators— Londo! 

Haslam Foundry & Lngineering Co., \@shipping Ag 
The, Derby. Davies, 

Retorts— ) a? | 
Stevens, J., & Son, Dartmouth Streety : 

“ee at , special! 
mingham. Londo: 

Ropes for Driving— lines). 
Hart, Thomas, 12 and 14, Town Hall Liverp 

Blackburn; Lambeth Rope Works, B Bristo 
burn. Telephone: 10 Blackburn. 1  Philad 
graphic Address: “ Hart, Blackburn.” Bank. 

nk, 

Ropes (Manila and Wire Ropes)— — Op 
Hall’s Barton Ropery Co., Lid., 83, } Close, 

Street, Hull. Manufacturers of & City | 
Hemp, Coir, Cotton and Steel Wire Ro And ; 

Ropes (Steel Wire)— eet 
Cradock, G., & Co., Lid., Wakefield, Engi 4° 

Ropes (Wire and Hemp), Cordage, Twines, &¢- Ship and | 
Wright, John & Edwin, Ltd., Universe Wa Aven 

Garrison Street, Birmingham. tracto 

Ropeways, Aerial— vue 
’ \ : y Ships’ Bloc 
Cradock, G., & Co., Ltd., Wakefield, Engl Loverid 

Rosin Distillers— tracto 
Grindley & Co., Ltd., Poplar, London¥,., 

- Wig Resinous, Pop. London.” Ships’ Lam 
Stevens. 

Rubber Bands and Erasers— Dartn 
Tennyson & Co., Ltd., Leeds. 

Sacks and Bags— — 

Nimmo! 
Judge, T. & W., London, E.C. (Cotton), Crowr 
Kalisky, 8., 50a, Princes Square, St. Ge and 

London, E. Telephone: Avenue 3134. Lond 
Paiva, J. de, & Co., 11, Drury Lane, 

pool. Shop Fittir 

, ' ' Harris 

Sacks, Bags, Jute, Hessians, Tarpaulins, Twines, 4 ming! 

Macdiarmid, A. M., & Co., Manufact Sage, 
165, Victoria Road, Dundee, Sco ‘ eci: 
Contractors to H.M. Government. 1 WC. 
grams: “ Expansion, Dundee.” parai: 

Sacks, Bags, Jute Hessians, Tarpaulins, Yatns—} shutters (1 
Duncan, George & Co., 94, Commercial St Dennis: 

Dundee. Clark 

Saddiery— toria 

Cliff, Jabez, & Co., Globe Saddlery Wo the, | 
Walsall. Rail 
Leckie, John, & Co., Goodall Street, Wal = . 
and 84, Fore Street, London, E.C. ove. 

Safe Manufacturers— — 
Hobbs, Hart & Co., Ltd., London, N. ot 
Withers, Samuel & Co., West Bromwich; ! “— 

Old and Original Firm. Established co 

Contractors to H.M. Government; all ya 

output over 3,000 safes. aval 

Safety Fuse Manufacturers— Perkins 
Nobel’s Explosives, Co., Ltd., Glasgow. Comy 

Salt (Vacuum) Manufacturers— Sizing Ma 
Electro Bleach and By-Products, Ltd., 4 ‘nowdc 

dlewich. Cheshire. Snow 

Sanitary Appliances—Stoneware— - Mer 
Mansfield, H. R., Church Gresley, Burtosq Davies 

Trent. Slate Quar 

Saw Mill Engineers— — 

Robinson, Thomas, & Son, Litd., Rochdi East, 


London: 79, Queen Victoria Street, B.0 





‘ i JAN. 3, 1915, 


BUYERS’ GUIDE—continued. 


7. 

scale Manufacturers— 

Pooley, Henry, & Son, Ltd., John Bright 
i‘ Street, Birmingham. 


Bath, R. H., Ltd., Wisbech, Cambs, England. 
Seed Growers and Exporters. Vegetable 
and Flower Seeds of the best quality only. 
Seed Potatoes from the famous alluvial 
soils of the Wash a speciality. Catalogues 

| and quotations free on application. 
Bi Johnson, W. W., & Son, Ltd., Boston, 

England (Estab. 1820), Wholesale Seed 

Growers and Exporters. Write to us if you 

are in need of our Pedigree Selections of 

' Garden, Farm and Flower Seeds. 
' Kelway & Son, Wholesale Seed Growers and 
| Exporters, Langport, Somerset, England. 

The best stocks (only) of Garden and Farm 

um Seeds. Special quotations on agplicotion. 
' King, John K., & Sons, Seed Experts and 
_ Pedigree Seed Growers. Coggeshall, Essex, 
England. Established 1793. All Seeds for 
Farm and Garden, also Seed Potatoes 
exported to all parts of the World. Oata- 
logues free. 


n Shellbox Manufacturers and Shell Merchants— 
Harvey, Henry, & Cc., 68, Milton Street, 
London, E.C. 


Shipping Agents— 

Davies, Turner & Co., Ltd. Estd. 1870. 
Foreign Carriers to and from all parts of 
the orld, and Underwriters. .O.D. a 

speciality. Chief Office: 52, Lime Street, 

London, E.C. 3. ‘Tel.: Avenue 4810 (4 
lines). Cables: “Spedition.” London, 
Liverpool, Manchester, Leeds, Glasgow, 
Bristol, Birmingahm, New York, Boston, 
Philadelphia, Chicago. Bankers for refer- 
ence—London County and Westminster 
Bank, St. Mary Axe, London, E.C. 3. 7 

Van Oppen & Co., Ltd., 90/91, Bartholomew 

Close, London, E.C.1. Telephones: 1770 

City (5 lines). Telegrams: “ Vanoppen.” 
| at Belfast, Birmingham, Bradford, 

Liverpool, Leeds, Leicester, Manchester, 

Montreal, Paris, Boulogne, Rotterdam, 

Amsterdam. 


Ship and Engineers’ Furnishers— 

Loveridge, Ltd., Cardiff (Admiralty Con- 
tractors.) 

Ships’ Block Manufacturers— 
Loveridge, Lid., Cardiff. 
tractors.) 


(Admiralty Con- 


Ships’ Lamp Lenses— 
Stevens, James, & Son, Victoria Glass Works, 
Dartmouth Street, Birmingham. 


Shirt and Collar Manufacturers— 

Nimmon, R., & Co., Ltd. Established 1898. 
Crown Factory, Londonderry. Telegraphic 
and Cable Address: “Nimmon Factory, 
Londonderry.” 


Shop Fittings— 
Harris & Sheldon, Ltd., Stafford St., Bir- 


mingham. 
Sage, Fredk., & Co., Ltd., Shopfitting 

ecialists, Gray’s Inn Road, London, 
W.C.; and at Paris, Buenos Aires, Val- 
paraiso and Johannesburg. 


Shutters (Revolving) Gates, &¢.— 

Dennison, Kett & Co., Ltd. (Successors to 
Clark, Bunnett. & Co., Ltd.), 11, Queen Vic- 
toria Street, London, E.C. As supplied to 

; the Admiralty, War Office, Home Office, 
L.C.C., Colonial and Foreign Governments, 
' Railway, Tramway and Dock Companies, 
etc. 


Sliversmiths 

Horton & Allday, 195, Warstone Lane, Bir- 

mingham. Telephone: 1755 Central. Tele- 

raphic Address: “ Silversmiths.” London 
Show Rooms: 47, Poland Street, Oxford 

Street, W. Telephone: 9762 City. Tele- 

graphic Address: “ Hemicycle.” 





_ 


Compton Street, Goswell Road, London, E.C. 
Sizing. Materials for Textile Milis— 


Snowdriit Brand. 


Slate Merchants and Manufacturers— 
4 Davies, Bros., Portmadpc, North Wales. 


Slate Quarry Owners— 

Oakeley Slate Quarries Co., Ltd., North 
Wales, and 26, Suffolk Street, Pall Mall 
East, London, S.W. 1. 





Perkins, H., & Sons, Ltd.. Compton Works, 33, | 





| 








| 


{ 
} 


§ Snowdon, Sons, & Co., Ltd., Millwall, London, E. | 


BUYERS’ GUIDE—continued. 


Slate Working Machinery and Manufacturers— 
Turner Bros., Newtown, North Wales. 


Soaps (Cleaning and Polishing)— 
Anti-Scrub Soap Co., Dewsbury, Yorks. 


Soap Manufacturers— 
Price’s Patent Candle Co., Ltd., Battersea, 
London, 8. 
Rowe, T. B., & Co., Litd., Thames Soap 
Works, Brentford, Middlesex. 


Soda— 
Brunner, Mond & Co., Northwich, Cheshire. 
Electro Bleach and By-Products, Ltd., Mid- 
dlewich, Cheshire. 


Spade and Shovel Manufacturers— 

Stockton Heath Forge, Warrington. Estab- 
lished 1770. T. N.: 8 T. A.: “ Stockton- 
heath Forge, Stocktonheath.” Sole Manfrs. 
of Caldwell’s Patent Spades and Shovels 
with Solid Blades and Straps. 


Sponges (importers and Exporters)— 
Phillips, John, & Sons, Ltd., Dingley Road, 
City Road, London, E.C. 


Sporting Cartridges— 
Curtiss & Harvey, Litd., 
House, London, E.C. 
Nobel’s Explosives Co., Lid., Nobel House, 
195, West George Street, Glasgow. 


Cannon Street 


Spring Balances— 
Salter, Geo., & Co., West Bromwich. 


Springs— 

Salter, Geo., & Co., West Bromwich. Tele- 
grams: “ Saiters, West Bromwich.” Makers 
of all kinds of Springs, including Railway 
Bearing and Buffer Springs, Agricultura! 
Machinery Springs, Brake Springs, Door 
Springs, Dashpot Springs, ~~ Room 
Floor Springs, Motor Springs, Nest Springs, 
Tines for Agricultural purposes, Valve 
Springs, Volute Springs, Thackray and 
Grover Washers, &c. Contractors to the 
War Office, Admiralty, Foreign and Colonia! 
Governments, English and Foreign Rail- 
were &e. London Office: 50, Lime Street, 
E.C. 3 


Sterne, L., & Co., Lid., The Crown Iron 
Works, Glasgow. 


Stationers’ Manufacturers tor Export, and Whole 
salers— 

Writing Pads and Compendiums in all sizes 
and to all requirements, Combined Letter- 
Envelopes, Indoor Games, &c.—Jarrold & 
Sons, Ltd., Norwich. London Showroom: 


11, Warwick Lane, E.C. 4. 


Stationers‘ Sundries Manufacturers— 

King Brothers, 15, Bury Street, London, 
E.C. 3. India Rubber Erasers, Ink Bottles 
and Stands, Letter Files, Perforators, Paper 
and Letter Clips, Rulers, Paper Weights 
and all kinds of Stationers’ Sundries and 
School Materials. 

Wright, Geo., & Co., 92, Clerkenwell Road, 
London, E.C. Blackboards and Easels, 
“ Wright’s” Dustless Chalk, Inkstands and 
Stationery Racks—New Designs—Wholesale 
and Export. 


Steam Turbines— 
Howden, J., & Co., Ltd., 195, Scotland Street, 
Glasgow. 


Steamship Owners and Breakers— 
The Power Steamship Co., Lid., 158, Leaden- 
hall Street, London, E 


Stee! Castings, Steel and Iron Forgings, &c.— 
Baird, W., & Co., Glasgow. 
Steel Company of Scotland, Ltd., Glasgow. 


Steel and Iron Castings— 
Gillott, John & Son, 
Barnsley, Yorks, Eng. 


Steel and tron Merchants— 
Eastern Export Co., Ltd., 5, Lloyds Avenue, 
London, E.C. 3. 


Steel and Iron Shafting, &c.— 
Steel Company of Scotland, Ltd., Glasgow. 


Steel Manufacturerse— 
Parkgate Iron & Steel Co., Lid., Rotherham. 
Steel Company of Scotland, Lid., Glasgow. 
Stewarts & Lloyds, Ltd., Glasgow and Bir- 
mingham. ; 
The Wigan Coal and Iron Co., Ltd., Wigan. 
Turton Brothers & Matthews, Ltd., Sheffield. 


Dominion Works, 


THE BOARD OF TRADE JOURNAL—Advertisements. 


| 
| 
} 
} 





KV 


BUYERS’ GUIDE—continued. 
Stee! Manufacturers (Nickel and other Alloy Steeis)— 
Cradock, G., & Co., Ltd., Wakefield, England. 


Steel Pipes— 
Piggott, Thos., & Co., Ltd., Atlas Works, 
Spring Hill, Birmingham. Telegrams— - 
“ Atlas, Birmingham.” Welded and Riveted 
Steel Pipes of large diameters. 


Stee! Sheets— 
Lysaght, John, Lid., Orb Works, Newport, 
Mon. Makers of all grades of Steel Sheets. 


Steel Tubes— 
Oriental Tube Co., Ltd., West Bromwich, 


_ Birmingham. 

Stewarts & Lloyds, Lid., Glasgow & 

Birmingham. 
Stone Bottles— 

Kennedy, H., & Son, Ltd., Barrowfield 


Potteries, Glasgow. 


Stoves and Grates of al! descriptions— 
Planet Foundry Co., Ltd., Guide Bridge, near 
Manchester. 


Strong Rooms— 
Hobbs, Hart & Co., Lid., London, N. 


Sulphate of Ammonia— 
Miller, Jas., Son & Co., 79, West Nile Street, 
Glasgow. 


Suiphate of Copper— 
The Mond Nickel Co., Ltd., 39, Victoria 
Street, London, 8.W. 


Sulphate of Soda Manufacturers— 
Blythe, Wm., & Co., Ltd., Church, Lancs. 


Sulphuric Acid Manufacturers— 
Blythe, Wm., & Co., Church, Lancs. 


Sulphuric Acid Manufacturers’ Retorts— 
Stevens, J., & Sons, Birmingham. 


Surgical Instrument Manufacturers— 

General Surgical Company, Ltd., 147 & 149, 
Farringdon Road, London, E.C. Manufac- 
turers to the Wholesale trade of Surgical 
Instrumenis, Hypedermic and Serum 
Syringes, in all varieties, particularly “ All 
Glass” (2 and 3 piece); “ Record”; “ Metal 
and Glass”; and Aseptic All Metal. Sole 
Proprietors of “ Tourniquet’ and “ Astra” 
Brands of Surgical Supplies. Telephone: 
Holborn 5398, 2 lines. Telegraphic Address: 
“Tourniquet, Smith, London.” 


Surgical Instruments— 

Holborn Surgicai Instrument Co., Ltd., 26, 
Thavies Inn, Holborn Circus, London, E.C. 
Manufacturers of high-class Surgical Instru- 
ments, Sterilisers, Hospital Furniture, 
Trusses, Elastic Stockings, Belts, Spectacles, 
Artificial] Limbs. 


Surveying Instrument Makers— 
Cooke, T., & Sons, Ltd., 3, Broadway, West- 
minster, S.W., and at York. 
John Davis & Son, Derby, Ltd., 12, All Sainte 
Works, Derby, & 17, Victoria Street, West- 
minster, S.W. 


Syphons and Seitzogenes— 
—_* Co., Ltd., Camden Town, London, 


Table Waters— 
es Co., Ltd., Camden Town, London, 


2 


Tank Makers— 

W. P. Butterfield’s Ltd., Shipley, Yorks. Tele- 
grams: “Tanks, Shipley.” Telephone: 36 
Shipley. 

Harvey, G. A., & Co. (London), Ltd. (late of 
Lewisham), Greenwich Metal Works, Wool- 
wich Road, London, S.E 


Tanners’ Emulsive Oils and Chrome Extracts— 
Earp, W. R., & Co., Preston Brook, near 
Warrington. 


Tanning Extracts and Materiale— 

Humphreys, Percival, Ellis & Co., 90, Tooley 
Street, London, S.E. Telephone No. Hop 
9277. Telegraphic Address: “ Quebracho,” 
London. 


Tape Manufacturers— 
The Prestwich Smaliware Co., 25, George 
Street, Manchester. T. A.: “Smallwares,” 
Manchester. T. N.: City, 3862. 


—— 








xvl 





BUYERS GUIDE—continued. 


Tar Distillere— 


Brotherton & Co., Lid., Leeds. 

Grindley & Co., Ltd., Poplar, London, E. 
Tels. : “ Resinous Pop. London.” 

Lord, J. E. C., Ship Canal Tar Works, 


Weaste, Manchester. 


Tea Merchants— 

Brooke, Bond & Co., Ltd. (Foreign Dept.), 
Goulston Street, Aldgate East, London; also 
at Calcutta and Colombo. Original and 
packet teas of every description. 

Tower Tea, Limited, 71, Eastcheap, London, 
E.C. Original, Blended and Pac et Teas. 


Telegraph Engineers— 
Henley’s, — T., Telegraph Works Co., Ltd., 
London, E. 
Hooper’s Telegraph and India-rubber Works, 
Ltd.. London, E.C. 


Telephones and Supplies— 

British L. M. Ericsson Manufacturing Co., 
Ltd., 4, Chancery Lane, London, W.C. 
Telephone: 5340 Holborn. Works: Beeston, 

ot 


ts. 

Peel-Conner Telephone Works, Ltd., Midland 
Bank Chambers, Queen Victoria Street, 
London, E.C. Works: Peel Works, Salford, 
Lancs. 

Western Electric Company, Lid., Norfolk 
House, Norfolk Street, London, W.C.; 
Works—North Woolwich, EF. 


Telescope Manufacturers— 
Cooke, T., & Sons, Ltd., 3, Broadway, West- 
minster, S.W., and at Yor k. 
Ross’ Optical Works, 3, North Side, Clapham 
Common, 8S. 


Tents and Marquees— 
Paget, R. G., & Son, Ltd., 48-50, Aldersgate 
Street, London, E.C. 1. 


Testing Machines— 


Denison, Saml., & Son, Ltd., Middlewood, 


Leeds. Vertical and Horizontal Testing 
Machines for hydraulic, belt and hand 

Textile Goods— 

Edwards Bros., Ormond Street, Liverpool. 
power. 

Thermit— 

Thermit, Ltd., 675, Commercial Road, 


London, E. 


Tiles, Tesselated and Glazed— 
Carter & Co., Ltd., Encaustic 
Poole. 


Tian Foil— 
Venesta, Ltd., 1, Great Tower Sirect, London, 
E.C. Plain, Coloured or Fmbossed Foils. 


Toilet Preparations— 
Borthwick, Wm., 
Hull. 


Tosimakers for small Wares and Fancy Trades— 
Simmons, Bernard R., 21, Vyse Street, Birm- 
ingham. 


Tile Works, 


1 and 2, Staniforth Place, 


Towels— 
Johnson, J., 
Manchester. 


Hodgkinson & Pearson, Lid., 


Tey Manutacturers— 

Bailey, W., 213-215, Brearley Street, Birming- 
ham, “Kliptiko” and “ Wenebrik,” Con- 
structional Toys. 

Christie & Co., 41, Charterhouse Square, 
London, E.C. Toy Printing Outfits (Rubber 
Type), “John Bull.” 

Jullien, H. J., & Son, 24-26, Edgbaston Street, 
Birmingham. Toy Guns, Toy Scales, and 
Eskimo Dolls. 

Roberts Bros,, Glevum Works, Gloucester. 

Picture Cubes, Educational Pastimes, In- 

door and Table Games, “Tiny Tots” series 

of Pastimes, and Plush Toys. 
Sloan & Co, 2, King Street, Liverpool. Tele- 
phone Bank 8551. (Felt Doll and Animal.) 
Terry, Wm., Welbury Works, Lavender 

Grove, Hackney, London, N.E. Soft Plush 

Toy Manufacturer. Novelties a speciality. 

Established 1890. Telephone: Dalston 154. 


Tramway Tipping Wagons— 
White, R., & Sons, Widnes, Lancs. 
Trays (Mahogany, Oak and Inlaid)— 


Van Wely, C., 11s, Kingsland Road, London, 
N.E. 














BUYERS’ GUIDE—continued. 


Tubes and Fittings— 
Clifford, Charles, & Son, Ltd., Birmingham. 
(Brass, Copper, &e. 
Dugard Bros., Birmingham. 
Stewarts & Lloyds, Ltd., Birmingham. 


Tubing, Fiexible and Metallic— 
The Interlock Metal Hose Co., River Park 
Road, Wood Green, London, N. 
United Flexible Metallic Tubing Co., Lid., 
112, Queen Victoria Street, London, E.C. 


Tubing (Weldiess Steel)— 
Accles & Pollock, Ltd., Oldbury, Birmingham. 
Oriental Tube Co., Lid., West Bromwich, 
Birmingham. 
Stewarts "ee Lloyds, Ltd., Glasgow and Birm- 
ingham. 


Typewriter Manufacturers— 
Imperial Typewriter Co., Ltd., London Street, 
North Evington, Leicester. 


Typewriting and Duplicating Supplies Manufactorers— 
Crusader Manufacturing Co., Berwick Road, 
Walthamstow, E. 


Underground Relighting Machinery for Miners’ Safety 
Lamps— 
Ackroyd & Best, Ltd., Morley, near Leeds. 


Valves (Regulating, Dosing, &c.)— 


Kent, Geo., Ltd., High Holborn, London, 
W.C. 


Varnish Manufacturers— 

Holden, Arthur, & Sons, Lid., 218/219, Brad- 
ford Street, Birmingham. Varnishes, Paints, 
Colours, Enamels, Lacquers, Japans. 

Mathews, ‘John, & Co., Liverpool. 


Varnishes, Paints and Colours—Manufacturers— 
Llewellyn Ryland, Ltd., Baisail Heath Works, 
Birmingham. 


Ventilating Fans— 
Howden, J., & Co., Lid., 195, Scotiand Street, 
Glasgow. 


Victoria Lawns and Nainseeks— 
Johnson, J. ilodgkinson, & Pearson, 
Manchester. 


Ltd., 


Waterproof Cover Manufacturers— 
Singleton, Viint & Co., Newland Works, 
fancoln. 
Water Taps— 
Palatine Engineering Co., Ltd., Liverpool. 
Waxed and Waterproof Paper Makers (Printed and 


Unprinted) — 

Church, G., & Co., Ltd., Star Mills, Nunhead 
Lane, London, S.E. "All kinds, in sheets, 
rolls, small coils or circles, in any colour 


or thickness. 
waxing. 


Specialists in printing before 


Webbing and Horse Ciething Manufacturers— 
Bird, R., & Co. (Proprietors: C. W. Haslock, 
x ie Haslock), Crewkerne, Somerset. 


Weighing Machine Manufacturers— 

Pooley, Henry, & Son, Litd., 
Street, Birmingham. 

Salter, Geo., & Co., West Bromwich. 

Weighing Machinery— 

Ashworth, Son, & Co., Ltd., Dewsbury. 
Makers of Weighing Machines and Weigh- 
bridges of all kinds. 

Denison, Saml., & Son, Ltd., Middlewood, 
Leeds. W eighing Machines and Weigh- 
bridges for all Home, Foreign and Colonial 
uses; 1 cwt. to 200 tons. 


Welding and Cutting Plants, Oxy-acetylene— 
Imperial Light, Ltd., 123, Victoria Street, 
London, S.W. 
Whaie Oil 
Meade-King, Robinson & Co., Ltd., Liverpool. 


White Oils and Paraffin Liquidum— 
Stern’s, Ltd., Royal London House, Finsbury 
Square, London, E.C. 


Wire Drawers and Coverers— 
Ormiston, P., & Sons, 79, Clerkenwell Road, 
London, E.G. Electric. Instrument Wires. 
Fuse Wires. 


John Brighi 


Wire and General Wire Goods— 
Baker, G., Cecil Street 
Birmingham. 
Wire, iron and Steei— 
Cradock, G., & Co., 


Wire Works, 


Lid., Wakefield, England. 








THE | BOARD OF TRADE vOURBAL—Asvertisoments. 


BUYERS’ GUIDE—continued. 


Wire Manufacturers— 
Dugard Bros., and 
Copper). 
Rigby, John, & Sons, Ltd., Salford; Adelphi 
Wire Mills, Salford, Manchester. Tron and 


Birmingham (Brass 


Steel Wires for almost all purposes. Textile 
Wires. Shaped Wire Specialists. Brass and 
Steel Pinion Wire. “Actric” Welding 


JAN. 3, 1918) 


Smith, Frederick, & Co., Anaconda Works, , 


Salford. Manchester. (H.C. Copper Wire, 
Trolley Wire. Bronze Telephone Wire.) 
Smith, Frederick, & Co., Wire Manufacturers, 


Ltd., Caledonia Works, Halifax. T. A, 
Smith, Halifax. Galvanized a 
Wire—all Specifications. Armature 


ing Wire. Steel Rope Wire up to 120 tons 


strain. 


Wire Rope Machines— 


Washington & Co., Ltd., Sowerby Bridge, 


Yorkshire. 

Wire Repes— zy 
Cradock, G., & Co., Ltd., Wakefield, England. 
Glaholm & Robson, Ltd., Sunderland; and 

- ose son Court, Finsbury Pavement, 
London, E.C. 2. 


Wire Ropes and Appiiances— 
Bullivant & Co., Ltd., Reg. 
Lane, London, E.C.; 

London, E. 
Wright, John & Edwin, Ltd., Universe Wire 
Rope Works, Birmingham. 
Wires (Brass, Copper, &c.) for all Trades and Markets, 
including the Kaffir Trade— 
Moore, W. Hi., & Sons, 103, Upper Trinity 
Street, Birmingham. 
Wire Workers— 
Harvey, G. A., & Co. (London), Ltd. (late of 
Lewisham), Greenwich Metal Works, Wool- 
wich Road, London, S8.E. 


Wood Turners— 

Wingrove, G., & Son, 
Birmingham. 

Wood Pulp— 

Becker & Co., 

London. I. ‘c. 
Wool and Sheepskins Brokers— 

Ward, A. O., & Co., Lid., 76, Coleman Street, 
E.C. 2, and 3/4, Exchange Buildings, Brad- 
ford, Yorks. 

Wool Brokers— 


Dawson, f1., 
A) 


Offices, 72, Mark 
Works, Millwall, 


85, Floodgate Street, 


Ltd., 34 to 40, Ludgate Hill, 


& Co., 74, Coleman St., London, 
Woollen Cloth Manufacturers— 

Taylor, J., T. & J., Ltd., Batley. Woollen 
Serges, Tweeds, Vicunas, Naps, Velaines, 
Coverts, Army Cloths and Blankets. 

Woollen Goods— 
Hymans, James, 24, Bolton Road, Bradford. 
Woollens and Worsteds— 


Dickinson, Herbert (and Mcht. of all classes 


of Textiles), 3, Northumberland Street, 
Huddersfield. T.N. 301 T.A. “ Dickinson.” 
Jones, G. C., & Son, Cliffe Mills, Leicester. 


Tropical Suitings from 10 ozs. Indigo Blue 
Serges all weights. Black and Coloured 
Corkscrews for Boot Tops. 


Worsted and Woollen Manufacturers— 


Garnett, G., & Sons, Ltd., Valley Mills, 
Apperley Bridge. Teclephone—101, Idle. Tele- 
grams—Garnet, Apperley Bridge. Garbir- 


cord Cloth, Covert Coatings, Pure Indigo 
and Rockfast Blue Serges, Worsted Suit- 
ings, Fancy Flannels and ‘Domestic Flannels. 
Contractors to all H.M. Government Offices. 

Scholefield, Herbert, & Co., Bradshaw Mills, 
Honley, Huddersfield. Manufacturers of 
Worsted Suitings, Indigo, Black, Grey, and 
Brown Botany Serges, Covert Coatings and 
Gabardines. Wholesale only. 


Wrought Iron Pullsys— 

Hanson, John T’., Grove Pulley and Millgear- 
ing Foundry, Longwood, Huddersfield, 
England, Wrought Iron Pulley Specialist. 

The Lightest, Strongest, Cheapest Pulley in 

the World, Code: 5th Edition, A. B. C. 
Telegrams: “ Pulleys, Longwood, York- 
shire.” Telephone: 16, Milnsbridge. 

Zinc Dust and Oxides— 

Willcocks, H. 8., & Co., Ltd., 5, Beaver 
Street, Whitworth Street, Manchester. 

Zinc Sheets and Workers— 

Harvey, G. A., & Co. (London), Ltd. (late of 
Lewisham), Greenwich Metal Works, Wool- 
wich Road, London, 8.E. 








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Jan. 3 


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—_— Pew Or a. a 





THE BOARD OF 


TRADE 


JOURNAL—Advertisements. 








D. BROWN & CO. 


81 MITCHELL ST. 
GLASGOW 


“CARBONIA, GLASGOW.” 


“TARBONIA’ 





Telegrams :: 


EXPORTERS OF: 


Pitch, Tar, Creosotes, Carbolics, Naphthaline, Benzol, 
Naphthas, Disinfectants, Sheep Dips, Cattle Dressings, 
Wood Preservative, Toluol. 


Scotch Coal—Patent Fuel—Bricks. 





JOHN MATHEWS & CO. 


HATTON GARDEN WORKS: : LIVERPOOL 
LONDON OFFICE : : 22 BILLITER ST., E.C.3 





“Oarnishes . . Paints 
Japans and Colours 


SHIPPERS TO ALL PARTS OF THE WORLD 
Government Contractors 





Telegrams : Mathews, Liverpool 





ARTHUR J. PEPPER & CO. 


LIMITED. 


54 FREDERICK STREET 
BIRMINGHAM 


Makers of 9, 15 and 18-ct. JEWELLERY :—Expanding 
Bracelets . Brooches . Pendants . Bracelets . Earrings, Gc. 
Diamond Rings . Brooches and Pendants . Cameo Jewellery 


Speciality .. WATCH BRACELETS 














Established 1840. “Phone 847. ‘Grams: “ Weaving, Birmingham.” 


BENT WIREPARTS, CHAINS, &c. 
FOR MILITARY EQUIPMENTS 


Absolute Reliability. 
Quotations for any Quantities. 





Lowest Prices. 
Quick Deliveries. 





CECIL STREET 
George Baker = wire WORKS, 


BIRMINGHAM 








regular Users in the United Kingdom at this 
8,300 date are treating their Belts and Ropes With 


“MAXA” 


The Standard British Belt and Rope Preservative 
for Slack Belt Driving. 


Supplied direct from our Factory, London, in 7]b., 14/b. 28lb. tins. 
Agents abroad wanted where not already represented. 


HEAD OFFICE: 
MAXA, LTD. 43 Cannon Street, London, E.C.4 
Also. . 20 Rosemary Street, Belfast — 355 Shields Road, Glasgow 





PARKIN, NESS & CO. 


Manufacturing Chemists . . Darlington 
Solicit inquiries for : 
DISINFECTANTS. GERMICIDES. 
CARBOLIC POWDERS AND FLUIDS. SOLUBLE CRESOLS. 
LIQUOR CRES.SAP. ENGLISH LYSO. HIGH CO-EFFICIENT FLUIDS. 
DISINFECTANT SOAPS (Hard, Soft and Liquid). 
SHEEP DIPS (Liquid, Paste and Powder). 
FORMALDEHYDE. NAPHTHALINE. 


Cables and Telegrams: A.B.C. Code, 4th-ith Edition 
**Ness, Darlington.” Telephone 2413 


INSECTICIDES. 





Shaving Sticks 


Also Tooth Powders, Dental Creams, Bay Rums, 
Brilliantines, Pomades, Lime Creams 
and all Toilet preparations. 


PRESCOTT & COMPANY 


(A. PRESCOTT .. PROPRIETOR) 


Rutland Mills, 1 Oswald Street, Hulme, Manchester 





ZINC DUST. ‘“PERBORIN” (Perborate of Soda). 

DYE AND TAN EXTRACTS. HEMATINE (Crystals and Paste). 
ULTRAMARINES. GUIGNETS GREEN & GREEN CHROMIUM OXIDE. 
ANILINE COLOURS (for Cotton, Silk, and Wool, Paper, Leather, etc.). 
STARCHES. WHITE and BROWN SUGAR OF LEAD. 
TARTAR EMETIC. 


Telegrams: “ Corncrake.” Telephone: 5470 City 





STOKES & CO., Ltd.,“Eclipsol’’ Works, Bristol 
and all FLECTRICAL 
INSULATING 


M C MATERIALS 


ATTWATER & SONS 


Contractors to Admiralty and War Office 


PRESTON, ENGLAND 


New Harrison Knitting Machines 


FOR SOCKS, STOCKINGS, GARMENTS, 
UNDERVESTS, GAS MANTLES, HAND 
OR POWER WINDERS, CARD WINDERS, 
PRESSES, BALLERS. MILLS EQUIPPED 








Harrison Patent Knitting Machine Company, Ltd. 


Works - 10 Upper Brook Street, Manchester 
Branch - - 54 Goodge Street, London, W. 1 











CHAS. CLIFFORD & SON 
Ltd.,. BIRMINGHAM. 
hs DE MANUFACTURERS OF: 
#5 Phosphor Bronze, Gun Metal, 
ae Manganese Bronze. 


Brass and Copper Tubes, 
Sheets, Rods. 


Brass Condenser Tubes for 
Standard Ships, etc. 


TRADE MARK. 





JAMES JOHNSON 


2a China Lane, Piccadilly, MANCHESTER 





MANUFACTURER OF 

Moleskins, Gorduroys, Thicksetts, Beavers, Bedford 
Cords, Whip Gords, Cantoons, Twills, Swandowns, 
Fast Khaki Drills (Government Dye) .. Zephyrs, 
Moleskins for Bookbinders and Brickmakers. 





Telegrams: “ Fustian” Telephone No. 3438 Central 











at 


THE..BOARD OF 


3 % ‘ 
a a : $e: 
‘“- 


ao 


TRADE JOUR NSD —-Aqvertaems ents: 





oo «ot Wnt 90% 





*WALLSEND-HOWDEN 
Ee TENT. SYSTEM OF OIL BURNIN( 





= —_ 





— = 





HOWDEN'S: FORCED DRAUGHT SYSTEM. 


og = Bich Speed Engines ... Steam Turbines 
2 ee ’ “Patent Combination Boilers iT as 





—_ 


é 
__ 





Fit MES HO WDEN 
‘Head Offices and, ‘Works ari iiaent 


& CO., LIMITED, 
SCOTLAND. STREET, GLASGOW; 





—_ ar 
— 


ee The ‘Highest Standard of 


GRINDING EFFICIENCY 


Is accomplished by The’ “KEK” 
Patent Universal Grinding Mill. 








The All- Round Machine. for Pulverising; Granulating, or 
Deeper Chemicals, Colours, Minerals; Ores, Cereals, &c. 


tn ondigie' BRITISH BUILT. 


_Installed in Works Throughout 
: GREAT BRITAIN. 





Plant for the, Manufacture of 
ANILINE DYES, 
Intermediate Products, &c. 


Chemical Engineering Co. 
49, DEANSGATE, MANCHESTER 


& CO., LIMITED, : 
Shipbuilders & Engineers 


Steam Cargo and ; 
Passenger Vessels ‘up 
to 3,500 tons. 


Shallow Draught 
Steam & Motor Craft. 


Marine Oil Engines. 
Water Tube Boilers, | 


&c.,; &c. 


SOUTHAMPTON. 


Head Office: | 
Caxton House, Westminster, London, S.W. 1) 


WOOLSTON .. 








Telegrams: . 


| Telephone: ~ 
~« *“Bastportico, London.”’ 


Avenue 3650. 


Eastern Export Co. 


LIMITED 


5, LLOYDS AVENUE, 
LONDON, E.C.3. 

















STEEL AND IRON 


NON - FERROUS METALS 


’ CLF. QUOTATIONS 





Japan, China, India, Burmah, Straits, and 


Allied Countries. 





BORAX IN 
BRITISH INDUSTRIES 


fills an important part and figures largely in the plans 
of Manufacturers striving for economy and supremacy. 
Its possibilities and those of Boric Acid and Borax 
Glass are not always fully realised, and their mani- 
fold uses and advantages should be systematically 
examined, particularly in the following industries :— 


Pottery & Glass;.Hollow=ware & Enamelled [ron 
Leather Making; Laundry; Soap Making; © 
Bleaching; Cycle Making ; Metallurgy, 





Information and Scientific Data gladly 
supplied on Application, mentioning Journal. 


BORAX CONSOLIDATED, Lid, 
16, EASTCHEAP, LONDON, E.G 


Proprietors of ‘‘ Twenty-Mule-Team ” Brand Borax, 
Boric Acid and Borax Glass. 








PRINTED UNDER THE AUTHORITY OF His MaJEsty’s STATIONERY OFFICE BY JAS. 


Truscott & Son, Lrp., SUFFOLK LANE, E.C, i,