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This unretouched photograph is of trash discharge 
scooped from a Super-Jet lint cleaner in actual opera- 
tion on moderately trashy machine picked cotton. You 
can see plenty of trash... leaves, stems, motes... and 
a lot of nep-stock. But there’s no spinable fiber. 
Super-Jet gives you a better net turnout of good spin- 
ning-quality fiber because it takes out trash; leaves 
lint in. 


AND NO MOVING PARTS IS THE REASON 


Here is a cross section of a Super-Jet. 
It has no moving parts — no beaters, 
no saws — nothing to create neps, 
nothing to wear out. A Lummus de- 
velopment of gentle air-streams does 
the work. Write for Bulletin 639. 


LUMMUS COTTON GIN CO. 


Established 1869 
COLUMBUS, GEORGIA ° DALLAS FRESNO MEMPHIS. 


Patented 








CONTINENTAL'S | ap Cleaner 


{np 


Has No Screens to Restrict Discharge 
of Sticks, Stems, Hulls and Motes 


Outstanding success and extremely heavy demand for this efficient 
cleaner have been due to its tremendous cleaning capacity. This cross sec- 
tion view shows arrangement of revolving serrated discs which effec- 
tively extract foreign matter from roughly picked cotton in quantities 
that no conventional cylinder cleaner can remove. The recurring problem 
of cleaning screens — always a nuisance — is also eliminated. 


Write for Bulletin 190-B which gives complete description. 


Entered as second-class matter February 4, 1905, at the Post O/fice at Dallas, Texas, Under Act of Congress of March 3, 1897 











BOSS, IT'S THESE LATE SOLVENT SHIPMENTS 
THAT ARE HOLDING UP PRODUCTION! WE'RE 
GETTING SO USED TO LATE DELIVERIES, WE 


CALL OUR PURCHASING AGENT 
THE LATE MR. AKERBY! 





LATE SOLVENT 
SHIPMENTS HUH? 
LEAVE IT TO 
ME! 











MISS JONES, 
TAKE A MEMO 
TO AKERBY! 














AND IF YOU 
CAN’T FIND A 
SUPPLIER WHO'LL 
GET OUR SOLVENT 
HERE ON TIME 
YOU'LL BE THE 
LATE MR. AKERBY 
IN YOUR JOB! 


a@, 
re 
ae 
PFrancansine_ROte 


YOU COULDN’T HAVE 
SHOWN UP AT A 
BETTER TIME! MAYBE 
YOU CAN HELP ME 
OUT OF A JAM OUR 
SOLVENT 

SUPPLIER \; 


MR. WEBER 
OF SKELLYSOLVE 
TO SEE YOU 
MR. AKERBY. 


























...AND YOU CAN 
FORGET YOUR SOLVENT 
DELIVERY WORRIES 
WHEN YOU SWITCH TO 
SKELLYSOLVE ... 














BOY! AM | GLAD 
| LEARNED ABOUT 


NICE WORK! THERE 
SKELLYSOLVE IN TIME! 


WON'T BE ANY MORE 
“LATE” MR. AKERBY 
TALK SINCE YOU 
SWITCHED TO SKELLYSOLVE 
EVERY SHIPMENT’S ON TIME 
—AND NOT ONE CASE OF 
CONTAMINATION! 





It may pay you to get further information about 








Skellysolve for Animal and Vegetable Oil Extraction 
APPLICATIONS 


SKELLYSOLVE-B. Making edible oils and 
meals from soybeans, corn germs, flax- 
seed, peanuts, cottonseed and the like. 
Closed cup flash point about -25°F. 
SKELLYSOLVE-C. Making both edible 
and inedible oils and meals, particu- 
larly where lower volatility than that 
of Skellysolve-B is desired because of 
warm condenser water. Closed cup 
flash point about 13°F. 
SKELLYSOLVE-F. Extracting cottonseed, 
soybean meals and other products in 
laboratory analytical work. Originally 
made to conform to A.O.C.S. specifica- 
tions for petroleum ether, and pharma- 


ceutical extractions, where finest qual- 
ity solvent is desired. Closed cup flash 
point about -50°F. 
SKELLYSOLVE-H. Making edible and in- 
edible oils and meals where greater 
volatility is desired than that o 
Skellysolve C or L. Closed cup flash 
point about -16°F. 
SKELLYSOLVE-L. For degreasing meat 
scraps, extracting oil-saturated fuller’s 
earth or other general extraction. Closed 
cup flash point about 12°F. 


Ask about our new 
Skelly Petroleum Insoluble Grease. 


Skellysolve. Why not. write or.call us.today? 


@Skellysolve 


SKELLY OIL COMPANY 


Industrial Division 
605 West 47th Street, Kansas City 41, Mo. 








3 COTTON GIN AND OIL MILL PRESS 


JUNE 2, 1956 


































The Cotten Gin ond Oi Mill 
* ON OUR COVER: 


PR INN School's out! And, don’t let the demure behaviour 


af y She of the young lady on our cover fool you for a 
See ; minute. As soon as she rounds the corner out of 
mother’s sight she will cut loose and display all 
the joy that she feels because there’s no more 
school for days and days and days. Of course, if 
she were a boy he wouldn't wait to cut loose and 
mother already would be wondering what on 
earth she is going to find to keep him occupied 
until next September. Don’t worry, though, both 
the boys and girls will manage to keep busy and 
fall will come all too soon for them, if not for 
mother. 


Photograph by A. Devaney 


Rok nasi eae 
a sks. 





JUNE 2, 1956 No. 11 


The Cotton Gin and 
Oil Mill PRESS... 


READ BY COTTON 
GINNERS, COTTONSEED 
CRUSHERS AND OTHER 
OILSEED PROCESSORS 
FROM CALIFORNIA TO 
THE CAROLINAS 






THE COTTON GIN AND 
Oil MILL PRESS 











WALTER B. MOORE 
Editor 





WASHINGTON REPRESENTATIVE 
(EDITORIAL ONLY) 


FRED BAILEY 


744 Jackson Place, N.W. 
Washington 6, D. C. 







kk 
OFFICIAL 
MAGAZINE OF: 


National Cottonseed 
Products Association 





National Cotton Ginners’ ; 
Association j 


Published by 
HAUGHTON PUBLISHING COMPANY 


Alabama Cotton Ginners’ 
Association 


Arizona Ginners’ 
Association # 


RICHARD HAUGHTON 
Chairman of the Board 


Arkansas-Missouri Ginners’ 
Association 


DICK HAUGHTON, JR. 


California Cotton Ginners’ ; a 
President and Advertising Manager 


Association 





The Carolinas Ginners’ 
Association 


GEORGE H. TRAYLOR 


Executive Vice-President and 
Secretary-Treasurer 


a. : 
Georgia Cotton Ginners’ 
Association é 





Louisiana-Mississippi Cotton 
Ginners’ Association 


New Mexico Cotton 
Ginners’ Association 


IVAN } CAMPBELL 
Vice-President 


B. P. RIDGWAY 


Vice-President and 
General Superintendent 


« 


SUBSCRIPTION RATES: 


Domestic: 1 year $3; 2 years $5; 3 years $7. Foreign: Latin- 
American countries $10; all others $15 per year. (Not accepted 
for “Iron Curtain” countries.) All subscriptions cash with order. 











Oklahoma Cotton Ginners’ 
Association 








Tennessee Cotton Ginners’ 
Association 








Texas Cotton Ginners’ 
Association 









* 


Tue Cotton GIN AND 
Om Mit Press is the Official 
Magazine of the foregoing 
associations for official 
communications and news 
releases, but the associations 
are in no way responsible 
for the editorial expressions 
or policies contained herein. 











x * * 





EXECUTIVE AND EDITORIAL OFFICES: 
3116 COMMERCE STREET, DALLAS 26, TEXAS 






A PROGRESSIVE AND RESPONSIBLE PUBLICATION 


JUNE 2, 1956 



















































It’s Sturdy! 


After more than five years 
research, Watson has perfected 
a STORMPROOF cotton strain. 
Easily adapted to mechanical 
harvesting or hand snapping. 
Watson’s STORMPROOF is 
quality bred cotton and will 
not waste away in the field. 


@ MATURES EARLY 
@ A LIGHTER FOLIAGE 
@ HIGHLY PROLIFIC 


AS POPULAR AS EVER 
WATSON’S 


QUALITY 
STRAINS 








@ WATSON’S PEDIGREED 

@ WATSON’S NEW ROWDEN 
@ WATSON’S STONEVILLE 62 
@ WATSON’S EMPIRE 


















FERRIS WATSON 


SEED COMPANY 







GARLAND (Dallas County) TEXAS 





THE COTTON GIN AND OIL MILL PRESS 








Here’s Quality 
at Its Best! 


INDO 


LB. — 21 LB. TARE 


The Best Buy 
in Bagging 





LUDLOW MANUFACTURING & SALES COMPANY 


Atlanta, Ga. ® Stockton, Calif. © Los Angeles 58, Calif. © Memphis, Tenn. ® Galveston, Texas ® Gulfport, Miss. ® Needham Heights, Mass. 


THE COTTON GIN AND OIL MILL PRESS * JUNE 2, 1956 











Greater production from gins 


HERE’S HOWS Use Texaco Texspray Com- 


pound —the outstanding cotton conditioner for over 
20 years. Now in use in more than 1600 gins from 
coast to coast, Texaco Texspray Compound assures — 


* greater production 

*& better lint quality 

* lower dryer temperatures 
* elimination of saw clogging 
* reduction of static electricity 


Texaco Texspray Compound is applied automati- 





cally to the seed cotton. Your Texaco Man will gladly 
give you full details. 

For diesel engine lubrication, use one of the famous 
Texaco Ursa Oils—a complete line especially refined 
and processed to assure more power with less fuel 
over longer periods between overhauls. 

Just call the nearest of the more than 2,000 Texaco 
Distributing Plants in the 48 States, or write: 

bd wv Ww 

The Texas Company, 135 East 42nd Street, New 

York 17, N. Y. 


TEXACO Lubricants and Fuels 


FOR COTTON GINS AND OIL MILLS 





TUNE IN... TEXACO STAR THEATER starring JIMMY DURANTE on television . . 


JUNE 2, 1956 





. Saturday nights, NBC. 


THE COTTON GIN AND OIL MILL PRESS 


Oklahoma Has 
Unique Research 
Foundation 


Since 1948, cotton has benefited 
from industry’s united backing 
of a broad program of aid for 
state’s research institutions. 


KLAHOMA Cotton Research Foun- 

dation is contributing much toward 
making King Cotton’s throne more se- 
cure in Oklahoma. 

The Research Foundation, the dream 
of the late Horace Hayden, ginning and 
crushing leader, was established in 1948. 
It had as its primary objective helping 
Oklahoma cotton farmers produce and 
market a higher yield of a better grade 
of cotton. The progress that the cotton 
industry of the state has made during 
the past eight years is due in no small 
part to the Cotton Research Founda- 
tion’s efforts. 

Marion Lucas of the Chickasha Cot- 
ton Oil Mill is president of the Foun- 
dation, but is quick to give credit for 
any results of the organization to oth- 
ers of the Foundation and to work of 
Oklahoma Experiment Station and Ex- 


MARION LUCAS, Chickasha, has contributed much to 
the research program as president of the Foundation, but 
emphasizes that the work is a result of the efforts of 


many persons. 


tension Service for carrying this infor- 
mation to the field. 

Among its many activities is the 
work done in encouraging in a financial 
way cotton research projects by Okla- 
homa Experiment Station. Help has been 
extended to the Cotton Research Sta- 
tion at Chickasha to the extent that the 
Station now has a modern gin and 
greenhouse among its other facilities to 
be used in conducting cotton research. 
Approximately 90 percent of the Foun- 
dation’s money is spent for research fa- 
cilities in connection with cotton pro- 
duction and marketing, according to 
Lucas. 

The Foundation sponsors demonstra- 
tion farms over the state in which Ex- 
periment Station personnel, working 
with local county agents and farmers, 
further test and apply the latest de- 


THIS EXHIBIT, prepared by Oklahoma Cotton Ginners’ Association, helped to 
tell visitors at the recent Southwestern Exposition of the importance of cotton 
and the work that the Foundation and other organizations are doing. 


THE COTTON GIN AND OIL MILL PRESS 


* JUNE 2, 1956 


velopments of research under farm ba- 
sis conditions. These demonstration 
farms can be credited with a faster ac- 
ceptance and use of cotton research. 

The Foundation has teamed up with 
entomologists of A. & M. to assist with 
research in insect control work. The 
effectiveness of this work is indicated 
by the fact that many Oklahoma farm- 
ers report a return of $4 for $1 invested 
in cotton insect control measures. Irri- 
gation and fertilization, as well as the 
use of improved machinery in produc- 
tion and harvesting, have helped the 
cotton farmer stay on top of the cost- 
price situation in cotton the past few 
years. 

The Foundation has not limited its 
activities to work with adults. A junior 
program that involves in part sponsor- 
ship of 4-H and FFA educational tours 
to major cotton producing areas of the 
country gives junior cotton growers an 
opportunity to learn more about cotton 
production from their neighbors to the 
south and west first hand. The first 
trip was to the Mississippi Delta coun- 
try and this year’s trip will include 
Arizona and other sections where irri- 
gation and mechanical production and 
harvesting play major roles in cotton 
production. 

The Foundation is by no means a 
one-man show. The funds used in organ- 
izing the Foundation were contributed 
mostly by the cotton industry as is the 
money with which it continues to op- 
erate. According to Lucas, most state 
gins made initial conrtibutions of $50 
each toward establishing the Founda- 
tion; the cotton oil mills of the state 
set aside 10 cents per ton on all cotton- 
seed processed for Foundation funds; 
the cotton compresses gave $250 for 
each compress; and cotton merchants, 
banks, and allied interests ail pitched 
in funds to get the Foundation under 
way on a workable basis. 

It is maintained by voluntary contri- 
butions. Farmers pay five cents per 
bale, the oil mills set aside five cents 
per ton of cottonseed processed, and 


(Continued on Page 49) 


7 








legend 
—~—- Gir lines 















































































_ | temperature 
| recording -~—+— capillary lines cotton 
controller oogans 
4 
temperature 
transmitter 
wad to burner 
operotor 
f Se ae 
or ( 
temperature (¢ 2 "aa overflow 
transmitter pickup 
from t 
temperature 
a pit ie distributer 
dryer bur t dryer ' extractor 
extractor 
" burner 
operator 
burner 
operator ana 

































































SJ) ft SSI tt 


blower 
== — 





Taleler-tim a) ol geohZ-ToM fal-tiaeleal-Jalt-tilola Milo) m= aaleli-ti01a- Mietol ali fed | 





flaney well 








Air-O-Motor operators 


Temperature controllers 

(Fig. 1 in diagram) give flex- 
ible pneumatic control to 
actuate a diaphragm-motor 
type of final control device. 
Bypass panel lets the operator 
take over on manual control 
instantaneously. Can be lo- 
cated anywhere in the mill. 





Tel-O-Set transmitter 

(Fig. 2 in diagram) detects 
temperature at the dryer, re- 
lays a pneumatic signal to the 
control instrument. Simple, 
rugged construction features 
easy calibration and range 
changing in the field. Located 
near point of measurement. 


(Fig. 3 in diagram) move 
dampers, louvres or valves in 
response to control signals 
from the instrument. Mounted 
near burner. 


For better ginning... 


control your 


cotton moisture 


with Honeywell instrumentation 


| engeeonae CONTENT of raw cotton makes 
a big difference in efficiency of ginning 
and cleaning. And in the quality of cotton 
fiber, too. 


When cotton is too wet, it’s difficult to clean. 
Dirt and foreign matter stick to it. Wet 
cotton gets matted on ginning blades... 
interferes with ginning . . . often causes shut- 
downs for cleaning. 


Overdried cotton, on the other hand, 
becomes so brittle that it’s hard to handle in 
spinning and weaving. It won’t take dyes 
properly. Dried foreign matter breaks up 
into small fragments that can’t be readily 
removed. 

With Honeywell instrumentation you can 
feed your ginning process cotton of just the 
right moisture content. Heat input to the air 
heaters is automatically controlled to com- 


H 


BROWN 


pensate for variations in the moisture con- 
tent of cotton from the fields. 


A staff of Honeywell textile process control 
specialists will design a system to match the 
requirements of your ginning equipment. 
The instruments used are standard Honey- 
well products now at work in thousands of 
textile mills all over the world. 


Investigate Honeywell control now . . . before 
the ginning season starts. Your local Honey- 
well sales engineer will be glad to give com- 
plete facts, and to arrange for installation in 
time to put it to work in this year’s produc- 
tion. Call him today . . . he’s as near as your 
phone. 


MINNEAPOLIS-HONEYWELL REGULATOR Co., 
Industrial Division, Wayne and Windrim 
Avenues, Philadelphia 44, Pa.—in Canada, 
Toronto 17, Ontario. 


MINNEAPOLIS 


Honeywell 


INSTRUMENTS 


Tout we Coitiol 









J 


~*~ 





PRESIDENT Harry S. Baker, Fresno, Calif., is shown on the left as he is handed the gavel by Retiring President E. H. 


Lawton of Hartsville, S.C., at the final session of the National Cottonseed Products Association convention in Dallas. 
The picture on the right shows, in usual order, E. L. Puckett, Amory, Miss., and D. B. Denney, Wolfe City, Texas, as 


they welcome Charles B. 


At Dallas Convention 





Cottonseed Crushers Elect 
Harry Baker President 


= LARGE ATTENDANCE at NCPA meeting as oil millers and 
guests enjoy many entertainment features and business discussions. 


OTTONSEED PROCESSORS and 
guests from all parts of the Cotton 
Belt met in Dallas May 21-22 at the 
sixtieth convention of National Cotton- 
seed Products Association, chose Harry 
S. Baker of Fresno, Calif., as president, 
and enjoyed discussions of industry de- 
velopments and the entertainment fea- 
tures. 
The Statler Hilton Hotel, convention 
headquarters, was the site of a number 


TWO LEADERS who have been at- 
tending NCPA meetings for 51 years 
are shown below: E. R. Barrow of 
Memphis and T. C. Law of Atlanta. 
These two chemists have contributed 
much to the industry’s progress. 

































of pre-convention committee meetings, 
including those of the rules and chem- 
ists’ committees, and of a reception on 
Sunday, given by Mr. and Mrs. J. Kirby 
McDonough and The Murray Co. of 
Texas, before the formal opening of the 
convention on Monday morning. 
Monday Session 

Joe Flaig, Dallas, a director and past 
president of NCPA and leader in local 
arrangements for the convention, called 
the initial business session to order. 
T. J. Harrell, Forth Worth, welcomed 
the visitors and Robert F. Patterson, 
Trenton, Tenn., responded to the wel- 
come address. 

Following announcements and other 
business, the convention heard the an- 
nual report of the 1955-56 president, 
E. H. Lawton of Hartsville, S.C. 


e Wiggins Address — “Economic Falla- 
cies and State Socialism” was the title 
of a featured address by A. L. M. Wig- 
gins, industrial leader from Hartsville, 
S.C., who warned that this country, 
sooner or later, must pay the price of 
“our desertion of the principles of indi- 
vidual freedom and responsibility upon 
which this nation was founded. 

“The real test,” said Wiggins, “will 
then come as to whether this nation will 
take the path that has been followed by 
so many others—the broad highway of 
more and more socialism.” 

He quoted Herbert Hoover’s recent 
statement: “Our greatest danger is not 
from invasion by foreign armies... but 
that we commit suicide from within by 
complaisance with evil,” and asked: 
“Will the American people have the 
moral fortitude, the political courage 
and the stamina to resist popular clam- 
or and re-anchor our government to the 
foundations of individual freedom and 


Shuman, president, American Farm Bureau, one of the guest speakers. 


opportunity and incentive under the 
system of democratic government as 
conceived and established by our found- 
ing fathers?” 

The answer, Wiggins concluded, de- 
pends upon the political, business and 
moral leadership of such men as those 
in his audience. 


e Bethke Address — A representative of 
one of the nation’s leading formula feed 
firms, Dr. R. M. Bethke, Ralston Pu- 
rina Co., St. Louis, warned the cotton- 
seed crushers that they must do a bet- 
ter job of producing quality meal to 
meet competition and the requirements 
of users of their product. His address 
is summarized in a separate article in 
this issue of The Press. 


e Industry Reports — Committee re- 
ports during the first business session 
included those of the rules, research, 
charter and by-laws and public rela- 
tions committees. 

The annual report of the Association’s 
Educational Service was presented by 
A. L. Ward, director, and his staff, and 
depicted some of the many activities to 
aid the production of better quality 
products and encourage wider use of 
these feed products. 

John F. Moloney, Memphis, made a 
report on his first full year as secre- 
tary-treasurer of the organization. 

Committee activity, Moloney pointed 
out, is one of the keys to the Associa- 
tion’s effectiveness, and the committee 
system makes it possible for all mem- 
bers who are able and willing to do so 
to participate in Association work. 

The secretary-treasurer reviewed other 
activities of the organization and called 
the membership’s attention to the com- 
plete information which will appear in 
the convention proceedings. As in the 
past, these will be published soon by 
The Cotton Gin and Oil Mill Press, of- 
ficial publication of NCPA, and sent to 
all members. The proceedings this year 
will be dedicated to the memory of the 
late A. J. Chapman, who for more than 
30 years had been the official reporter 
of these annual meetings of NCPA. 


Tuesday Session 


Trent C. Root, vice-president, South- 
ern Methodist University, Dallas, was 
the first guest speaker on the program 
Tuesday morning. 

He reviewed some of the current 














trends in government and proposed a 
four-point program: 
1. Re-definition of the division of 


powers between the federal government 
and the state. 

2. Re-definition of the anti-trust and 
monopoly laws so that large size, alone, 
will not be a violation of the law. 

3. A limit on the percentage of a 
single income that can be taxed away 
by the federal government. 

4. A resolution on the part of every- 
one to ask the federal government for 
less. 


e Shuman Address — Political motives, 
rather than a real desire to solve farm 
problems, have dominated recent con- 
gressional actions, it was charged by 
the other guest speaker at this session, 
Charles B. Shuman, president of the 
American Farm Bureau Federation. 

Shuman blamed most of the current 
farm difficulties on government pro- 
grams which have encouraged the ac- 
cumulation of price-depressing  sur- 
pluses. 

“Cotton gives us a tragic example of 
the danger in government price fixing,” 
he said. “We have had price supports 
on cotton at 90 percent of parity or 
higher for many years. In spite of dras- 
tic cuts in acreage, the supply is near 
an all-time record. Prices are down. 

“And what about our markets? 

“Our high price supports have en- 
couraged cotton production abroad to 


CONVENTION 


SCENES BELOW are: 


such an extent that foreign cotton pro- 


duction will meet foreign demand in 
the next two years if present trends 
continue. 


“At the same time, cotton price sup- 
ports have encouraged substitution of 
synthetics for cotton in this country. 
We have lost a large part of both our 
domestic and our foreign market. 

“It is hard to gain a market back 
once it is lost. Once competition is es- 
tablished it is difficult to overcome.” 

Shuman said one danger in high price 
supports is that they distort the rela- 
tionship between prices of competing 
commodities. 

“One factor in the tremendous growth 
of the soybean industry has been the 
cottonseed price support program. The 
cottonseed industry got the support but 
the soybean industry got an advantage 
in the market.” 

The Farm Bureau spokesman praised 
aggressive disposal programs as _ es- 
sential, but added that, at the same 
time, “we must have means of halting 
additions to the surplus stockpile. We 


must shrink our total agricultural 
plant.” 
Farm price support programs, he 


concluded, “should enhance the farmer’s 
right to earn a good income. This is 
quite different from price fixing pro- 
grams, which curtail, rather than ex- 
pand, opportunities in agriculture.’ 


’ 


e Activity Reports — Committees re- 


Top left, presidents of two national 


organizations 


porting at this session included insur- 
ance, traffic, uniform feed laws and 
special committees. 

Executive Vice-President T. H. Greg- 
ory in his annual report called atten- 
tion to the fact that the past season 
was the first in five years when all of 
the industry’s products were sold in the 
markets rather than to the govern- 
ment. 

Gregory outlined the outlook for the 
season ahead. from the standpoint of 
governmental policies, and discussed the 
situation with regard to the basic prod- 
ucts of the cotton oil mill. 

“Let’s not make the error,” 
Gregory in speaking of the 1956-57 
son, “of becoming involved in any 
gram that will accumulate new 
pluses of our products and turn 
markets over to competitors.” 

Work of the general counsel of the 
Association during the past year was 
summarized by A. B. Pittman in his re- 
port at this session. 

Other business was completed during 
this final session, including the setting 
of dues for 1956-57. 

Dues for crushing mills in the U.S. 
are the same as last year, and other 
dues are the same as in 1955-56 except 
for minor variations. 


said 
sea- 
pro- 
sur- 

our 


e Officers and Directors — The election 
of Harry S. Baker as president took 
place at this session. A brief biograph- 


(Continued on Page 38) 


visit between sessions— 


Colonel Francis J. Beatty, Charlotte, N.C., left, head of the National Cotton Council; and Winston Lovelace, Loving, N.M., 
head of National Cotton Ginners’ Association. Top right: Jo Jackson, Dallas, discusses the market situation with E. F. 


Czichos, Chicago; and J. Ben Perry, Grenada, Miss. Bottom left, W. T. 


Melvin, 


Rocky Mount, N.C.; E. G. McKenzie, 


Macon, Ga.; and H. L. McPherson, Kershaw, S.C., examine one of the prizes. Bottom right, W. P. Hayne, Alexandria, 


La., waits at the registration desk as Mrs. Joe Flaig and Mrs. J. S. 
Florence Martin of NCPA to be sure they have tickets to everything. 


LeClereq, 





Jr., both of Dallas, check with Mrs. 





\ 


NATIONAL 


} COTTONSE 


PRODU" 
‘soc! 


























Advertisements Feature 


Cotton Cushioning 


Cotton cushioning is being featured 
in advertising appearing frequently in 


trade and consumer publications, the 
National Cotton Batting Institute re- 
ports. Advertising draws a parallel be- 


tween the clothing and cushioning fields, 
with such headlines as “You dress cool- 
er in cotton and you sleep cooler on cot- 
ton cushioning.”’ 

The 1956 advertising schedule in- 
cludes the following publications: 


House Beautiful, February, April, 
August. 

Ladies’ Home Journal, April, June, 
October. 


McCall’s, May, 
Bedding Merchandiser, 


July, September. 
March, April, 


May, June, September, October. 
Furniture Retailer, January, March, 
April, June, August, October. 


Furniture Retailer, January through 
December. 

Retailing Daily, peng 20, April 24, 
May 22, June 19, Aug. Sept. 25. 

Upholstering, Farce Beg Merch, April, 
June, August, September. 


Data Available on PL 480 
Sales of Edible Oils 


Detailed information of sales of cot- 
tonseed oil and soybean oil under Public 
Law 480 financing for exports has been 
published by USDA. This information 
a circular is- 
Foreign Agricultural Ser- 
USDA, Washington 25. 


is available in FFO 4-56, 
sued by the 
vice, 








e Short Course Planned 


. 

For Superintendents 
PLANS for the twenty-fourth short 
course for oil mill operators at Texas 
A. & M. College, College Station, have 
been completed by the sponsoring 
groups—Texas A. & M., Texas Cotton- 
seed Crushers’ Association and the In- 
ternational Oil Mill Superintendents’ As- 
sociation. The short course will be held 
June 25-26-27 on the college campus, 
with the visitors staying at Memorial 
Student Center. 

Reservations should be made with Dr. 
J. D. Lindsay, head, chemical engineer- 
ing department, Texas A. & M. Regis- 
tration fee is $10 per person, and rooms 
will average about $3.50 nightly per 
person. 

General meetings for discussion will be 
heid in the Student Center each morn- 
ing. Laboratory work will be conducted 
in the Cottonseed Products Research 
Laboratory in the afternoons. In addi- 
tion, there will be sessions held in the 
afternoons and evenings in the Student 
Center so that mill operations may be 
discussed in small groups on individual 
problems of interest. 

There will be a banquet and a barbe- 
cue. The barbecue will be furnished by 
Texas Cottonseed Crushers’ Association. 

Doctor Lindsay will preside at the 
opening session June 25 and Gibb Gil- 
christ, chancellor emeritus of Texas A. 


& M., will welcome the group. 
H. D. Reeves, Simmons Cotton Oil 
Mills, T. S. Pryor, South Texas Cotton 


Oil Co., and O. J. Jones, Western Cotton- 
oil Co., will share the responsibilities of 


program chairman at the three sessions. 


Twenty-Fifth Anniversary 
For Research Center 


Hercules Powder Co. Research Center 
recently observed its twenty-fifth an- 
niversary. 

Located seven miles west of Wilming- 
ton, Del., Hercules Research Center to- 
day employs approximately 750 men 
and women, under the direction of Dr. 
Peter Van Wyck. Most of the staff are 
specialists and technicians, and almost 
300 of them professional scientists and 
engineers. In 1931, there were 125 em- 
ployes, most of whom were transferred 
from Hercules’ laboratories at Kenvil, 
N.J, established in 1915. 

The company’s expenditures for re- 
search at the time of opening of the 
Experiment Station were about $450,- 
000 annually. At the present time, the 
rate is almost $8 million annually for 
the Hercules research program. 

“The basic concept is still the same 
—the extension of man’s useful knowl- 
edge concerning chemical materials for 
industry,” pointed out Dr. Robert W. 
Cairns, Hercules’ director of research. 

“In this first quarter century we 
have built an organization of skilled 
scientists and engineers, backed by the 
finest buildings and research equip- 
ment, to perform truly as a research 
center for Hercules and the industries 
we serve. Our work covers all phases of 
the research process, from the search 
for new chemical ideas to the commer- 
cial development of new manufacturing 
processes and product application,” 
Doctor Cairns said. 














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JUNE 2, 1956 ° 








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The COTTON GIN and OIL MILL PRESS 





e No Joy over Farm Law — The longest 
and one of the hottest farm battles in 
years is over, for this year, but there 
is no joy of victory in Washington. 
The new law changes little for farmers, 
and politically it was a draw. 

The Administration got pretty much 
what it asked for, but the Democrats 
forced the President to back away from 
the flexible price support system so 
dear to the heart of Secretary Benson. 

The Democratic Congress couldn’t get 
the 90 percent of parity supports it 
asked for, but didn’t really want very 
badly. The leaders had expected the 
veto and had intended to let it stand, 
but Eisenhower out-maneuvered them 
with an executive order boosting props 
for several politically important com- 
modities. 

There is no sign now of any signifi- 
cant “farm belt revolt.” Democrats lost 
the opportunity to lead one and Eisen- 
hower squelched the threat by putting 
Benson in the background. 


e Farm Issue Secondary Top political 
strategists of both parties here think 





farm issues will be demoted to a sec- 
ondary role in the political campaign, at 
least so far as the Presidential election 
is concerned. Peace and prosperity will 
be restored to top political billing. 

The feeling here is that Eisenhower 
will walk away with the election, but 
that Democrats very probably will re- 
tain a majority in both the Senate and 
House. Some Democrats, privately, are 
conceding that. 

Democratic campaign strategy seems 
to be shifting. According to some in- 
siders, here is what is now going on 
back of the scenes in high party coun- 
cils. 

There is a life-and-death struggle, so 


the story goes, for Democratic party 
control. That is between the Southern 
conservatives and the extreme labor- 


liberal group of the North. That strug- 
gle is paramount to the election of the 
next President. 

These same sources hint strongly 
that Kefauver is backed by some peo- 
ple who expect to put Governor Averill 
Harriman over as the nominee. They 
say the strategy is to “kill off” Steven- 





son, politically, ahead of the conven- 
tion. 

There is no intention among those 
political strategists to let Kefauger 
have first place on the ticket. They 
may, however, let him have the vice- 
presidential nomination, with Harriman 
heading the ticket. 

The farm bill battle, to a considera- 
ble extent, reflects the political think- 
ing and direction of both major parties. 
Southern Democrats, who retain control 
of Congress, put everything they had 
into the first farm bill. It passed only 
because they drew more support from 
corn and wheat Republicans than they 
lost among liberal Democrats. 

Eisenhower in his veto message cut 
sharply into that support by boosting 
wheat props this year to $2 a bushel, 
upping corn to $1.50 a bushel and in- 
cluding a new provision for supporting 
corn grown by those who flount the 
acreage control program. 

He eased the dairyland resentment by 
boosting milk spports and by suspend- 
ing the usual summer drop in fluid 
milk prices in most milk marketing or- 
der areas. That compensated, in part at 
least, for the upping of feed grain sup- 
ports, especially corn. 

The Republican idea was to gain 
votes in the politically critical Midwest, 
without losing too many elsewhere. The 
Soil Bank, it was conceded, will not win 
votes for either party, in any part of 
the country. Enthusiasm for the Soil 
Bank died a slow death, but no one 
wanted to say anything bad about it. 


e Some Gains for South — Southern 
Democrats did succeed in forcing Eisen- 
(Continued on Page 39) 


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JUNE 2, 1956 ° 


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From Carolina to California, DrxistEeL Cotton Ties are a 
favorite with ginners, because they're tough and strong, yet 
easy to work, and have no sharp edges to cut gloves or hands. 
Made from our own special-analysis steel, they are rolled to 
uniform thickness, width and finish. 
New, re-designed DixisteEL Arrow Buckles are now being fur- 
nished with DixisTEEL Cotton Ties. They have a greater seating 
surface and are reinforced with a heavy bead on each end. 
These buckles will not snap at the eye, are 
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weights available without buckles. Buckles 
shipped in kegs or carload bulk lots. 


Also available, when requested, is the sturdy 


time in 1955. It, too, has been improved and 


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SHOWN HERE are A. J. Mills, Stamford, president, and J. Carlyle Newberry, 
Gonzales, vice-president of Texas Cottonseed Crushers’ Association, which will 
meet for the sixty-second time on June 10-12 in Dallas. 


In Dallas, June 10-12 





Plan Many Features 
For Texas Crushers 


@ TEAMWORK will be the 
theme for business and enter- 
tainment at 1956 convention. 


Texas Cottonseed Crushers’ Associa- 
tion officials have announced the com- 
pletion of a business and entertainment 
program for the 1956 convention that 
promises to be one of the best in his- 
tory. 

This year’s meeting will be held June 
10-11-12 at the Statler Hilton Hotel in 
Dallas. 

Registration will begin Saturday, 
June 9 and should be completed by Sun- 
day evening, June 10, says Jack Whet- 
stone, Dallas, secretary-treasurer. 


e Entertainment — The entertainment 
program starts at 7 p.m. Sunday with 
a get-together party, bingo and special 
features planned in the Junior Ball- 
room. Preceding this party for every- 
one, the Past President’s Club will hold 
its annual luncheon Sunday at 1 p.m. 


Monday’s entertainment will include 
a ladies’ luncheon, Neiman Marcus 
style show and special entertainment 


at 1 p.m., and at 2 p.m. a Skeet Shoot at 
Dallas Gun Club and golf tournament 
at Northwood Country Club. The presi- 
dent’s dinner and dance will be that 
evening, starting at 7 p.m. 


e Monday Session — President A. J. 
Mills of Stamford will call the first 
business session to order at 9 a.m. Mon- 
day and will make his annual address. 

“The Result of Teamwork” will be 
the subject for C. B. Spencer, Dallas, 
agricultural director of the Association. 

Dr. Carl M. Lyman, Texas A. & M. 
College, will discuss ‘Research on Cot- 
tonseed Meal—Past, Present and Fu- 
ture.” 

Dr. William H. Alexander, pastor, 
First Christian Church, Oklahoma City, 
will be the final speaker at this session. 
“Life’s Quiz Program” will be his topic. 


e Tuesday Session — W. T. Wynn, 





16 








Greenville, Miss., chairman of the 
board and past president of the Na- 
tional Cotton Council, will be a featur- 
ed speaker at the final business session 
on the morning of June 12. “Cotton’s 
Option—Research or Recession,” will be 
his subject. 

Committees will make their reports 
at this session. Committee chairman are 
T. J. Harrell, Roy B. Davis, R. H. 
Sterling, John Burroughs, Dixon White, 
R. P. Tull, W. L. Goble, Jr., J. W. Sim- 
mons, Jr., and J. H. Fox. 

Reports also will be made by Ed P. 
Byars, Fort Worth, traffic manager, 
and Secretary-Treasurer Whetstone. 

Resolutions, the election of officers 
and directors and other business will 
conclude the convention that morning. 

J. Carlyle Newberry of Gonzales is 
vice-president of the Association. Di- 
rectors of the organization during the 
past year, in addition to Mills and New- 
berry, have been: B. W. Beckham, Jr., 
D. B. Denney, W. L. Goble, Jr., T. J. 
Harrell, James W. Simmons, Jr., R. P. 
Tull, S. J. Vaughan, Jr.. W. D. Wat- 
kins and W. B. Vaughan. 


Wise Land Use Increases 


Mississippian’s Yields 


Intelligent land use is increasing cct- 
ton yields and paying in other ways for 
Troy Odom and his son, Lee, near Cleve- 
land, Miss., the Extension Service re- 
ports. 

The Odom farm consists of 468 acres, 
most of which is open land. Its cotton 
allotment for 1956 is 124 acres. 

They make soil-building practices more 
than pay for themselves in several ways. 

One way is through ample grazing 
most of the year for their dairy herd. 
Another is in increased yields when im- 
proved areas are rotated back to row 
crops. Add to these the increased value 
of the land with water and soil being 
controlled and saved. 

The value of giving the land a rest 
from cotton was proved in 1954 on a 
14.75 acre cut where they planted cotton 
that year after having had it in pasture 
for several years. This 14.75 acres pro- 
duced 28 bales of cotton in 1954, com- 
pared to three-fourths of a bale per 
acre on most of the other sandy loam 
soil of this farm. The same higher yield- 
ing area produced 30 bales in 1955. 


JUNE 2, 1956 - 


e Clyde Allen Selected 


By National Ginners 


APPOINTMENT of Clyde R. Allen as 
executive officer for the National Cot- 
ton Ginners’ Association has been an- 
nounced by Winston Lovelace, Loving, 
N.M., president of the nationwide or- 
ganization of ginners. 

Allen also recently was appointed ex- 
ecutive secretary of the Carolinas Gin- 
ners’ Association. He succeeds Clifford 
H. Hardy in both of these positions. 

The ginners’ group official lives on a 
farm between Bennettsville and Latta, 
S.C. He graduated from high school at 
Latta and received a degree in 
agricultural engineering from Clemson 
College. While at Clemson he was a 
member of the Society of Agricultural 
Engineers, was agricultural engineer- 
ing editor of the Agrarian, a member 
of the National Literary Society, YMCA 
cabinet and Baptist Student Union. 

Allen served in the U.S. Navy after 
graduation from college and has had 
experience as a farmer, farm machin- 
ery salesman and with the D. M. Dew 
Gin in Latta before his present appoint- 
ments. 


e Hardy in New Job — Clifford H. 
Hardy, whom Allen succeeds, became ex- 
ecutive secretary of the Tennessee Agri- 
cultural Council on June 1. Hardy and 
Oliver P. Hale of Milan, Tenn., new pres- 
ident of the Council, have announced that 
the organization will maintain offices in 
the Hickman Building in Memphis. 


Corpus Christi Classing 


Office Head Appointed 


Appointment of Ralph M. Brownlee 
as head of the USDA cotton classing 
office in Corpus Christi is announced 
by John L. McCollum, Dallas, manager, 
southwest cotton division, Agricultural 
Marketing Service. 

A graduate of Oklahoma A. & M. 
College at Stillwater, Brownlee has 
been employed by USDA’s cotton divi- 
sion since 1946. Earlier he spent three 
years with the U.S. Army Air Force. 

Brownlee goes to Corpus Christi from 
Little Rock, where he has been assistant 
to the officer in charge of the classing 
office. He replaces Ersel H. Matthews, 
recently transferred to the Altus, Okla., 
classing office. 


Brook Motor Corp. Stocks 


Many Sizes of Motors 


Brook Motor Corp., 3553 W. Peter- 
son Ave., Chicago 45, has announced 
that large a.c. electric motors up to 600 
HP are being stocked at its warehouses 
in principal cities. Motors of 500 and 
600 HP are available in drip-proof and 
fan-cooled types; depending on _ size, 
in either squirrel cage or slip ring. 

These large, heavy duty motors have 
found such ready acceptance that Brook 
now stocks them in many of their 14 
warehouses. They feature the same rug- 
ged cast frames and end bell as well as 
oversize bearings and shafts as their 
smaller integral horsepower counter- 
parts. Being conservatively rated, they 
are cool and quiet running and feature 
ease of installation such as extra large 
conduit boxes as well as ready access- 
ibility for lubrication and maintenance, 
the firm says. 






THE COTTON GIN AND OIL MILL PRESS 








THE COTTON GIN AND OIL MILL PREss * 


WEEVIL BREEDING GROUND —This photo of a Texas cotton field shows how snow helped 
protect the heavy weevil population which went into hibernation. Conditions in many 
cotton-growing areas were ideal for high survival of boll weevils and other cotton insect pests, 


WEEVILS SLEPT HERE LAST WINTER; 
PROTECT YOUR CROP WITH TOXAPHENE 


Ideal conditions for the overwintered boll weevil and a 
mixed population of other pests—coupled with new 
government regulations—make it more important than 
ever before to get the most from every acre planted to 
cotton this season. 

Cotton growers have learned from last year’s expe- 
rience that early-season control of insects with toxa- 
phene pays off in higher yields at picking time. Many 
farmers who used toxaphene regularly throughout the 


TOXAPHENE dusts- sprays 


THE CHEMICAL BASE FOR TOXAPHENE IS PRODUCED BY HERCULES FROM THE SOUTHERN PINE 


JUNE 2, 1956 


season obtained excellent weevil control—even in those 
sections of the cotton belt where infestations were ex- 
tremely heavy. Some of these farmers reported the 
highest yields per acre in their experience. 

This year every boll counts. Protect your crop all 


through the season with toxaphene, the insecticide 


you can depend on. See your dealer now. He can supply 


you now with the formulation recommended for your 


particular area. 


Agricultural Chemicals Division 
Vaval Stores Department 


HERCULES POWDER COMPANY 


943 King Street, Wilmington 99, Del. 


Plants at Brunswick, Ga., Hattiesburg, Miss. Offices at Atlanta, 
Birmingham, Brownsville, Dallas, Greenville, Los Angeles, Raleigh 








© Gin Lab Dedication 


THE NEW USDA Cotton Ginning Lab- 
oratory at Clemson, S.C., will be form- 
ally dedicated next Aug. 14 during 
Farmers’ Week at Clemson College 
James A. Luscombe is in charge of the 
laboratory, which operates under the 
direction of Charles A. Bennett and 
Wilbur M. Hurst. 


© Tax Unfairness Cited 


WHICH SHIRT HAS THE TAX? This 
is the question asked on a leaflet being 
distributed by Oklahoma ginners and 
crushers. It points out the unfairness of 
the state sales tax to the cotton industry 
by showing that a cotton shirt pays tax 
whereas a synthetic does not. It says, 
in part: 

“One shirt is a synthetic fiber—born 
in a test tube. The other is cotton— 
born in the soil. It has the tax. 

“Oklahoma sales tax law exempts 
from sales tax the chemicals and other 
raw materials (also manufacturing ma- 
chines) that go into such articles as 
synthetic shirts. Yet those same laws 
force the cotton farmer to pay sales tax 
on his cottonseed and fertilizer—his raw 
materials, and on his farm implements— 
his manufacturing machinery. 

“Cotton farmers pay this tax—their 
competitors do not. It doesn’t seem quite 


right, does it? Suppose we try to do 
something about it.” 


© Even Reds Wear Cotton 


NEW YORK PAPERS gave cotton full 
treatment on the occasion of the open- 


ing of National Cotton Week, when 
Colonel Francis J. Beatty, president, 
National Cotton Council, participated 


in activities at Gracie Mansion, home of 
Mayor Robert F. Wagner, at the New 
York Cotton Exchange and elsewhere. 
Every New York paper carried stories 
about Cotton Week—even the Commun- 
ist publication, “The Daily Worker.” 





© Interplant Soybeans 


SOYBEANS qualify as a competing 
crop for interplanting with cotton, 
John F. Bradley, Georgia state admin- 
istrative officer, ASC, has ruled. His 
reply to a query from Georgia Cotton- 
seed Crushers’ Association follows: 
“You stated that soybeans occupied 
the land and are normally cultivated 
during the same growing period as 
cotton. This information was also furn- 
ised by an agronomist at the Georgia 
Agricultural Extension Service. There- 
fore, it would seem that soybeans would 
qualify as a competing crop. Of course, 
you realize that if the strip not planted 
to cotton is four or more normal cotton 





rows in width, there is no requirement 
that a competing crop be planted in the 
strips; but, if the strips are less than 
four normal cotton rows, then they 
must be planted to an intertilled crop 
that will mature at approximately the 
same time as the cotton.” 


© Color-Sealed Nylon 


A NEW NYLON development, a col- 
or-sealed black nylon, is announced by 
Du Pont’s textile fibers department. It 
is described as a basic advance which 
“opens a broader range of creative pos- 
sibilities’ for nylon. Initial use of fa- 
brics of color-sealed black nylon is ex- 
pected to be greatest in automobile and 
home upholstery, but it also is being 
studied for use in a great variety of 
products, including men’s, women’s 
and children’s wear, general and indus- 
trial uses. The black color is locked in 
the yarn when manufactured and with- 
stands strong sunlight and countless 
washings, the manufacturer says. 


© Cotton at Spanish Fair 


A COTTON EXHIBIT is one of the 
features of U.S. participation in the 
International Trade Fair at Barcelona, 
June 1-20. It features a continuous 
style show of U.S. cotton in both U.S. 
and Spanish manufacture and design— 
staged cooperatively by the U.S. and 
Spanish cotton industries. Representa- 
tive decorative and dress fabrics made 
by more than 30 leading U.S. manu- 
facturers are on display. A highlight of 
the cotton show will be the appearance 
of Patricia Anne Cowden, 1956 Maid of 
Cotton. She will lead two cotton style 
shows during the fair. 





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JUNE 2, 1956 °- 


THE COTTON GIN AND OIL MILL PRESS 





THE COTTON GIN AND OIL MILL PRESS 

















a nm) Ee It 


CUTS ITS POWER COSTS 407! 


This is the Toney Brothers’ gin at Doerun, Georgia. 
With a Continental 4/90, it gins an average of six bales 
an hour—5000 a season. All its power comes from a 
single engine, a CAT* D364 Diesel Engine. 

The Toney Brothers had electric power in other 
gins, but here they decided to try Caterpillar Diesel 
power. Result? Power costs per bale are running 
40% less with the D364. “It’s a very good ginning 
engine,” says J. W. Toney. “It’s already given us per- 
fect service for three full seasons.” 

Like all Caterpillar-built Engines, the D364 de- 
livers full, steady power on money-saving non-pre- 
mium fuel. It needs little attention and runs smoothly 
with a minimum of maintenance. It’s thoroughly de- 
pendable, with oversize oil and air filters to protect 
it from lint and dust. And it’s a long-term investment: 
such features as special aluminum-alloy bearings and 


JUNE 2, 1956 


“Hi-Electro” hardened cylinder liners add many extra 
ginning seasons to its life. 

Your Caterpillar Dealer has the right ginning en- 
gine to fit your exact needs. He understands your 
problems, and he’s always on call. Let him show you 
in detail why Caterpillar Engines are preferred by 
so many gin operators. 

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At Meeting in Lubbock 





Congress Told Cotton Must 
Develop More Markets 


@ KEYNOTE ADDRESS and other papers emphasize vital need for 
better quality, lower costs of production and aggressive promotion 
to enable fiber to meet the attacks of its strong competitors. 


ORE, not less, markets and acreage 

are the answer to the cotton prob- 
lem—we must have “a dynamic con- 
sumption geared to our dynamic pro- 
duction capacity,” Burris C. Jackson, 
general chairman of the American Cot- 
ton Congress, told the opening session 
the three-day meeting in Lubbock on 
May 31. 

Cotton producers, research leaders, 
industry spokesmen and others at the 
Congress, sponsored for 17 years by the 
Statewide Cotton Committee of Texas 
and cooperating groups, were agreed 
in their views as to the seriousness of 
the cotton problem, but also agreed that 
cotton can work out its problems. 

Lower costs, improved quality and 
aggressive promotion made up a three- 
point formula advocated by Jackson for 
building greater markets. The goal of 
this effort is a rich prize, the keynote 
speaker told the meeting. 

“The world is using the equivalent of 
55 million bales of fiber a year. 
cotton now is supplying only 12 mil- 
lion bales of this. Looking to the future, 
we know that fiber consumption is go- 
ing up and up—by millions of bales a 
year. Then and right now, the custom- 
er will buy what appeals to him most 
through price, through quality, and 
promotion. Will he buy our cotton? That 
depends on us. It depends on the ex- 
depends on us. It depends how each of 
us accepts his responsibility toward the 
objectives we have outlined.” 


While it is true that every effort 
must be made to increase cotton pro- 
duction efficiency in a way that will 
give the farmer a _ reasonable profit 
and still not price his fiber out of the 
market, the industry must look past 
that immediate goal, he added. It must 
continue to press toward greater gin- 
ning efficiency and cost savings in 
processing cottonseed, to economies in 
merchandising and in handling bales 
and in manufacturing the raw fiber in- 
to the finished textile. 

Jackson cited the promotional pro- 
gram of the National Cotton Council, 
which has spearheaded the ascendancy 
of cotton in apparel and_ household 
furnishings, as an example of the kind 
of progress that can be made through 
a united industry effort. This has been 
achieved, he noted, despite a disparity 
in dollars between the cotton industry’s 
promotional program and those of syn- 
thetics. 

“Think,” he challenged, “what we 
could do if we really opened up the 
throttle and began moving abreast of 
our competitors. 

“Customers prefer cotton. They have 
learned to rely on it over the years. 
Its popularity is built on its many in- 
herent natural advantages — comfort, 
launderability, durability, and all-round 
versatility. 

“Science is giving us new and dif- 
ferent treatments and fabrics, further 
enhancing a fiber that already is un- 


equalled. These are only a few reasons 
why we have been able to gain such 
phenomenal acceptance of cotton with 
only a drop in the bucket as far as pro- 
motional funds are concerned. Envision, 
if you will, what could happen if we 
really opened the gates and _ started 
spending the kind of money that Du 
Pont, American Viscose, and our other 
competitors are shelling out for promo- 
tion.’ 


e Fleming Address — The world cotton 
situation was analyzed by Lamar Flem- 
ing, Jr., Houston, chairman of the 
board of Anderson, Clayton & Co., 
worldwide cotton firm, in a major ad- 
dress at the opening session of the Con- 
gress, which was held at the Caprock 
and Lubbock Hotels, with the Saturday 
morning session at Texas Technological 
College. 

Lubbock banks were hosts Thursday 
afternoon at a barbecue at the large 
plant of Western Cottonoil Co. 


e Looking Ahead at Markets — Dr. M. 
K. Horne, Memphis, chief economist for 
the National Cotton Council, re-empha- 
sized the necessity for more research 
and promotion for cotton in his ad- 
dress at the second morning session. 

He warned the cotton people that the 
synthetic industry is on a long-term 
campaign to capture a larger and larg- 
er share of the fiber market. “There 
can be no doubt,’ he added, “that the 
campaign is succeeding.” 

The Council economist quoted from 
numerous statements by synthetic offi- 
cials and statistical reports to show the 
scope and seriousness of the drive to 
regain markets; and said, “we face the 
threat of extinction or the chance of 
enormous progress for our markets. 


“If cotton is to have any future,” 
Doctor Horne concluded, “the farmer 
must have an income situation which 
enables him to compete for labor and 
the other resources of production, and 
which encourages the big investments 
that are required for efficiency, and 
which will attract and hold the able 
management that efficient cotton farm- 


SOME of the featured speakers at the 1956 American Cotton Congress in Lubbock, May 31-June 1-2, are shown here. 
Burris C. Jackson, Hillsboro, Texas, general chairman of the Congress, gave the keynote address on the 1956 theme, 
“Cotton’s High Plains.” Dr. M. K. Horne, chief economist, National Cotton Council, Memphis, discussed “Looking Ahead 
at Our Markets.” “The History and Role of Research in High Plains Cotton,” was the subject for Don L. Jones, superin- 
tendent of the Lubbock Substation of the Texas Experiment Station. 





BURRIS C. JACKSON 


20 





DR. M. K. HORNE, JR. 


JUNE 2, 1956 





DON L. JONES 


THE COTTON GIN AND OIL MILL PRESS 














ing requires today. This surely means 
that net farm income must not point 
downward, must not hold where it is, 
but must point strongly upward for 
future years. This seems impossible 
without the combination of expanding 
markets and declining costs—and these 
things in turn seem impossible to 
achieve by price alone or research alone 
or promotion alone. They only seem 
possible if we find the resources and 
the vision to construct an adequate pro- 
gram of all three and to give it enough 
time to do its work.” 

Cotton production developments were 
discussed by other speakers at this ses- 
sion. “The History and Role of Re- 
search in High Plains Cotton” was the 
topic for Don L. Jones, superintendent 
of the Lubbock Experiment Substation. 
Isaac Holmes, a producer, discussed 
High Plains production methods. W. F. 
Hughes, USDA, Washington, talked on 
the economic aspects of irrigated cotton 
production. 

Plains Cotton Compress and Ware- 
house Association was host at a lunch- 
eon at noon, and the three Lubbock oil 
mills—Lubbock Cotton Oil Co., Plains 
Cooperative Oil Mill and Western Cot- 
tonoil Co.—were hosts at dinner in 
the evening. “The Challenge Facing 
Cotton” was the subject of the dinner 
speaker, Assistant Secretary of Agri- 
culture Marvin McLain. 

On the program Friday afternoon 
were F. Marion Rhodes, USDA, Wash- 
ington; Carl Cox, U.S. Testing Labor- 
atory, Dallas; Jack Towery, Cotton Re- 
search Committee of Texas, Lubbock; 
and George Pfeiffenberger, now with 
the National Cotton Council but sched- 
uled to become executive for Plains 
Cotton Growers on July 1, as reported 
elsewhere in this issue. 


e Final Session — The Congress ended 
Saturday with a morning session at 
Texas Tech, which featured a panel dis- 
cussion on the use of cotton from the 
High Plains of Texas. Participants were 
Earl Heard, West Point Manufacturing 
Co., Shawmut, Ala.; E. W. S. Calkins, 
U.S. Rubber Co., Winnsboro, S.C.; and 
George Bass, Swift Manufacturing Co., 
Columbus, Ga. 

As the last event of the meeting, the 
visitors were given a choice of visiting 
the Tech Engineering Building, seeing 
irrigation and planting equipment in 
use on a field trip, or inspecting an 
exhibit of new farm implements. 

Lubbock and South Plains leaders in 
the cotton industry and other types of 
business served on committees arrang- 
ing the varied entertainment features 
for the visitors. 


Record Number Complete 
1955 Cotton Contest 


A record number of cotton contest- 
ants (885) completed their projects and 
reported results in the South Carolina 
1955 5-Acre Cotton Contest, the Ex- 
tension Service reports in Circular 412. 
Yields per acre and staple lengths av- 
eraged higher in 1955 than in previous 
years. 

First prize winner in the contest made 
6,310 pounds of lint on five acres; the 
staple averaged 1 1/16 inches in length. 
Awards in the contest are provided by 
South Carolina Cotton Seed Crushers’ 
Association, South Carolina Textile 
Manufacturers’ Association and Atlan- 
tic Cotton Association. 


THE COTTON GIN AND OIL MILL PRESS 











Champagne of Cottons 
A HOPE SKILLMAN CHIFFON made 


from Supima cotton is shown here in a 
dress by Luis Estevez of Grenelle and 
a photo distributed by Mary Alice 
Stewart of the Supima Association of 
America in the program to aid this 
American-grown, long-staple cotton. The 
dress is described as “a covered up day- 
time dress which opens down the back to 
reveal a low ‘v’ neck when the sheer 
jacket is removed.” The Supima Associ- 
ation is made up of 5,000 growers in 
Arizona, New Mexico and Texas of Pima 
S-1 “champagne of cottons.” 


Food and Drug Observance 


Food industry leaders and govern- 
ment officials will participate in cere- 
monies on June 27 observing the fiftieth 
anniversary of the Federal Food, Drug 
and Cosmetics Act. Persons interested 
in attending can obtain information 
from Siert F. Riepma, president, Na- 
tional Association of Margarine Manu- 
facturers, Munsey Building, Washing- 
ton. 


Linters Meeting Held 


A number of representatives of the 
cottonseed crushing and linters indus- 
tries are in Washington for the June 
4-5 conference at USDA on new stand- 
ards for cotton linters which will be- 
come effective July 1. 


@ L. PALMER BROWN, L. P. 
Brown Co., Memphis, an alumnus of 
Southwestern and Washington and Lee, 
has been appointed to Southwestern’s 
executive committee. His many civic 
activities include serving on the board of 
stewards of St. John’s Methodist Church, 
as a trustee of Methodist Hospital and 
in many Red Cross programs. 





JUNE 2, 1956 





® Research Is Needed 


Despite Surpluses 


WHY DO RESEARCH when there are 
surpluses of agricultural products? 
This question is answered in a recent 
USDA publication, which points out 
that it makes sense to continue to spend 
money on agricultural research be- 
cause: 

“Cost cutting is one of the main ef- 
forts in research today. That’s one way 
of getting at the cost-price squeeze. The 
broiler industry shows what cost reduc- 
tion can do. The amount of feed requir- 
ed to produce a broiler has been cut 
25 percent since 1940, and lower-cost 
handling and packaging have cut prices. 
As a result, poultry meat is no higher 
than it was in 1930. 

“The fact that research improves 
quality and broadens markets is illus- 


trated by our new extra-long-staple 
cotton, Pima S-1. It’s competing well 
with imported cottons. 

“Research creates new industries. 


Soybeans are an outstanding example. 
Research not only developed the varie- 
ties that now occupy 18 million acres 
but also established the soybean in food 
markets and in hundreds of industrial 
uses. 

“And we all know research strength- 
ens the whole nation. We’ve produced 
enough food for every emergency. Our 
diets rank high and we are free from 
many diseases associated with poor nu- 
trition. Gains in agricultural technolo- 
gy have given us manpower and mate- 
rials to become the nation we are. 

“Can we assume that farmers are 
ahead of the times, that we can slow 
down their progress? We dare not. Ac- 
tually, as the Korean conflict demon- 
strated, the margin is relatively thin. 


“No, nature doesn’t stand still: look 
at insects’ resistance to chemicals. In- 
dustry doesn’t stand still; take what 


synthetic fibers did to the cotton mar- 
ket. Our country doesn’t stand still: 
check the latest census estimates. 
“Research can’t stand still, either. To- 
day’s research will have a great deal to 
do with our agricultural prosperity of 
5 to 10 years from now. We have a 
responsibility to the future.” 


McGhee Moore Now With 


Standard Commission 


McGhee Moore,, broker of cottonseed 
and soybean preducts, has become as- 
sociated with Standard Commission Co., 
Memphis. Moore, a broker since 1934, 
is rejoining an organization with which 
he was affiliated early in his career. 
After graduating from Southwestern 
University in Memphis, Moore was with 
Swift & Co. Oil Mill for several years, 
then with Standard until he went into 
business for himself. 


Men’s Cottons Featured 
On New Television Film 


“Men’s Cottons for Fall” is the title 
of a five-minute television fashion film 
to be released to TV stations in August, 
the National Cotton Council has an- 
nounced. 

Written and produced by the Council 
staff, it is the first men’s wear film 
ever made for the cotton industry. It 
is expected to be used by 100 stations 
throughout the nation. 





21 















For Joint Convention 


Crushers To Meet at 


Lookout Mountain 
@ PROGRAM for Georgia and 


Alabama-Florida Asscciations 
announced by officials of groups. 





Representatives of Future Farmers 
of America, the National Cotton Coun- 
cil and National Cottonseed Products 
Association will be among the guest 


speakers on the program for the 1956 
joint 


convention of Alabama-Florida 






Cottonseed Products Association and 
Georgia Cottonseed Crushers’ Associa- 
tion. The meeting will be held June 18- 
19 at Lookout Mountain Hotel, Lookout 
Mountain, Tenn. 

Officers of the two organizations that 
are meeting together are: Georgia, 
J. P. George, Macon, president; G. C. 
Davis, Arlington, vice-president; and 
J. E. Moses, Atlanta, secretary-treasur- 


er; and Alabama-Florida, J. S. Long, 
Cullman, Ala., president; and C. M. 
Scales, Montgomery, executive secre- 


tary. 

A buffet supper on Sunday, June 17, 
will precede the formal opening of the 
convention on Monday morning. 

Presidents George and Long will bring 
greetings to the crushers and their 
guests at the opening business session; 


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Fire Insurance rate credits for magnetic fire pro- 
tection. Rate credit action is now pending in other 
cotton states in view of the standards recently 
set up by their rate governing bodies appointed 
committee. 

One important requirement of those standards is 
that the permanent magnet installed must bear 
this label “Listed Under Re-examination Service 
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Wooster, Ohio 


JUNE 2, 1956 


gis 





0. W. SEVERENCE 


and Alabama’s Maid of Cotton, Joanna 
Sharp of Montevallo, will be presented. 

“The Importance of Time” will be 
the subject of an address by W. 
Severence, regional manager, Pen-Dix- 
ie Cement Corp., Atlanta, who has been 
a leader in charitable and civic activi- 
ties and a popular humorous speaker at 
meetings, 

Terrell Benton, Jr., Jefferson, Ga., 
national student secretary, Future 
Farmers of America, will speak on “To- 
day’s Youth, the Future Citizens of 
America.” 

A new convention feature this year 
will be a “coffee break” during the 
business session, with coffee served in 
the convention hall. 

“Research and Education Create 
Sales” will be the subject for Garlon A. 
Harper, Dallas, assistant director, Ed- 
ucational Service, National Cottonseed 
Products Association. 

Carlton H. Power, National Cotton 
Council, Memphis, will talk on “Mel- 
lorine, a Potential Market for Cotton- 
seed Oil.” 

On the second day of the convention, 
the two state crushers’ organizations 
will hold separate meetings at which 
officers will be elected and other bus- 
iness transacted. 


e Entertainment — In addition to the 
buffet supper on Sunday evening, a 
number of special features have been 
planned to entertain the crushers, their 
families and guests. 

These will include a ladies’ luncheon 
at 1 p.m., golf tournament at 2 p.m., 
tour of Central Soya processing plant 
at 2:30 p.m., bingo party at 3 p.m., so- 
cial hour from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m., and 
the annual banquet and dance at 7:30 
p.m. Monday. 


© Soap Firms Seeking 


European Markets 


EFFORTS of three leading manufac- 
turers in the European market for de- 
tergents and soap were the subject of 
an article in the May 22 issue of The 
Wall Street Journal. 

The financial publication, in a staff 
article from London, discussed the com- 
petition between Unilever, Procter & 
Gamble and Colgate-Palmolive. 


THE COTTON GIN AND OIL MILL PRESS 





Ginners Are 
Enthusiastic About 
New Side Opening Buckle! 





Every place it has been shown, every 


\ place it has been tried, ginners and 
compress operators have been en- 
thusiastic about the prospect of 


faster operation and better service 
with the new, high quality TCI Side 


BRAND NEW baci 
: Here's Why 


The side opening on the buckle dras- 
tically reduces bale hooking time be- 


LY ° cause each tie slips into place quickly 
and easily. Workers’ hands are safe 
since there’s no need to twist the 
buckle in hooking operations. The 


curved seat helps eliminate edge tears, 
gives the tie a solid seat and guaran- 
: tees that every tie will work at peak 
, ¢ efficiency. Hot punched from rugged 
BEATS T i & tet A L L carbon steel, the side opening buckle 
ad won't spread or break . . . even under 
enormous pressure. Take advantage 
of these features by letting the new 
TCI Side Opening Buckle help you 
have a faster, smoother, more econom- 

ical ginning operation. 


i ee 


POM a Asem SEAL iy 


The new TCI Side Opening Buckle is a uni- 
versal buckle suitable for use in gin, standard 
compress or high density compress baling. Its 
unique design drastically reduces bale hook- 
ing time. 

This Side Opening Buckle is hot punched from carbon steel. Its new 

side ing design speeds up bale hooking time. The curved seat came 

helps eliminate edge tears and gives every tie a solid seat, making Look for the “'T 

it work at peak efficiency. on all TCI Side Opening Buckles. 


TC! SIDE OPENING BUCKLES 
and TCI COTTON TIES 


TENNESSEE COAL & IRON 


DIVISION 
UNITED STATES STEEL CORPORATION, FAIRFIELD, ALABAMA ~- UNITED STATES STEEL EXPORT COMPANY, NEW YORK 


UNIT? DD 5 yet) ss. STEEL 





THE COTTON GIN AND OIL MILL PRESS + JUNE 2, 1956 











JOHN JUNGKIND 


e Council Staff Men 


In New Positions 


JOHN JUNGKIND, a National Cotton 
Council public relations staff member 
in Memphis since 1953, became Wash- 
ington public relations representative 
of the Council on June 1. 

Emmett Robinson has been assigned 
to the office of public relations, filling 
the vacancy created by Jungkind. 

Fisher A. Rhymes, formerly in the in- 
dustrial products section, sales promo- 
tion division, in Memphis, goes to the 
Council’s New York office. 

Bill Nunn will be a member of the 
foreign trade division, in Memphis, 
where he will work primarily on sales 
promotion and public relations aimed at 
increasing cotton consumption abroad. 

Leslie A. Rogers has been named to 
the sales promotion staff in Memphis. 

Jungkind, before joining the Council 
staff, served two years as public re- 
lations director of the Memphis Com- 
munity Chest. He also had been on the 
staffs of the Arkansas Gazette in Little 
Rock and the Lafayette (La.) Adver- 
tiser. 

Robinson came to the Council’s sales 









* 


FISHER A. RHYMES 


EMMETT E. ROBINSON 


promotion staff in July, 1955, from 
Mississippi State College for Women, 
where he was director of public rela- 
tions and acting head of the journalism 
department. He formerly headed the 
journalism department and was direc- 
tor of public relations at Howard Col- 
lege in Birmingham. 

Rhymes joined the staff in 1954 as 
sales promotion assistant. After grad- 
uation from the University of Missis- 
sippi in 1952, he served two years in 
the infantry and the adjutant general 
corps at Fort Jackson, S.C 

Before joining the Council’s sales 
promotion staff last September, Nunn 
was makeup editor of the Memphis 
Press-Scimitar. He was news and farm 
editor for Radio Station WENK, Union 
City, Tenn., before joining the paper’s 
staff. 

Rogers, who joined the Council’s sales 
promotion division in March, was born 
in Greenwood, Miss., and was graduated 
cum laude from the University of Mis- 
sissippi. He served for two years as 
clerk for the House Committee on Flood 
Control. 

He joined the export department of 
the International Telephone and Tele- 
graph Corp. in 1947, and three years 
later was transferred to Puerto Rico 
where he managed various private in- 
terest for the IT&T board chairman. Be- 
fore coming to the Council, he was as- 
sociated with the Texas Transport and 
Terminal Corp. in New Orleans. 


Cotton Choppers Needed 


Cotton chopping is in full swing in 
the Midsouth, Extension leaders report, 
but progress has been slowed by a la- 
bor scarcity in some localities. At Jones- 
boro, Ark., farmers reported 15,000 
more workers needed. The need was in- 
creased by rapid growth of cotton and 
weeds after rains. 


Research Theme of Meeting 


Chemistry in Agriculture will be the 
theme of the eighty-third East Ten- 
nessee Farmers’ Convention at the Un- 
iversity of Tennessee Farm near Knox- 
ville on June 12. Dr. Byron T. Shaw, 
administrator, USDA Agricultural Re- 
search Administration, will speak. 


JUNE 2, 1956 


THE COTTON GIN AND OIL MILL PRESS 


e Cotton Shows Gains 
In Apparel Market 


COTTON is gaining significant strength 
in the booming apparel industry of Cal- 
ifornia, a survey by the National Cotton 
Council indicates. 

Gains by cotton are being made in 
such items as dresses, suits, shirts, 
trousers, and sportswear. Reasons for 
these gains include cotton’s inherent 
quality advantages, plus leadership in 
producing new fabrics and finishes. 

Manufacturers surveyed indicated an 
average increase of 25 percent in cot- 
ton’s share of their total fiber con- 
sumption since 1947. 

Specific quality advantages over com- 
peting materials named by manufactur- 
ers were launderability, wide color 
ranges, strength, comfort, crispness and 
softness, ease of handling, stability, and 
versatility. 

Significance is added to cotton’s in- 
creased strength by the fact that the 
apparel industry in California has ex- 
perienced tremendous growth. 

Located in two principal areas, Los 
Angeles and San Francisco, the indus- 
try has moved from a jobbers’ market 
to fourth place in the nation. It com- 
prises more than 1,700 establishments, 
and annual sales exceed $600 million. 

Climate, rapid population increase, a 
national trend to casual wear, develop- 
ment of new fabrics, willingness to try 
new ideas, and aggressive sales promo- 
tion have contributed to this growth, 
the survey shows. 

Cotton consumption can be expanded 
still more, the survey indicates. Meth- 
ods include development of rough tex- 
tured cottons, production of fabrics with 
better elastic properties, and develop- 
ment of new fabrics and finishes to pro- 
vide wash-and-wear qualities, luster, 
and better crease resistance. 

The Council survey included personal 
interviews with leading executives and 


designers in manufacturing establish- 
ments, trade associations, and allied 
groups. 


Dealers in Canvas Awnings 
Have New Ad Program 


Dallas canvas dealers are carrying 
on an advertising program for canvas 
awnings on television and radio and in 
newspapers during May and June. The 
program will reach its peak at a time 
when the Council and the Canvas Awn- 
ing Institute have contracted with NBC 
for a one-minute commercial on Dave 
Garraway’s TODAY television pro- 
gram with complete nationwide cov- 
erage. Scheduled for June 21, the Gar- 
raway announcement is timed when 
normally there is an end of the season 
slump in the awning business. 

Both the Dallas program and the na- 
tional television commercial will be used 
as yardsticks by which to measure the 
effectiveness of various advertising 
media for canvas awnings. Results will 
be carefully checked to see if there is 
an increase in business volume in the 
Dallas area following the combined 
promotions. 


@ DR. VIRGIL P. LEE, Hous- 
ton, is retiring during June from the 
position of president of the Production 
Credit Corporation of Houston, which 
he has headed since 1937. 














Automatic Ginning! 


Here’s what Harold Sharp (at left in plaid shirt), 
manager of Farmers Cooperative Association Gin 
of New Home, Texas, has to. say about the W. M. 
eo: ow Smith Electric Company installation at his plant: 
pce Ass 9 ae “At the present time we have been operating the 
plant for approximately four months and have not 
been stopped a single time due to motor failure. 
Taking into consideration that we will have no re- 
pair bill and had no downtime due to motor trouble, 
we have operated cheaper per bale than we did the 
previous year on a butane engine.” 


| * THE upper picture is shown the latest type of remote control panelboard for a modern cotton gin. 
Each gin stand and auxiliary equipment is individually driven and all controls are centrally located in 
the remote panel. Through a system of interlocks and red indicator lights the operator can be sure that 
the gin machinery is started in the required sequence, and by one glance at the panel he can tell what 
equipment is operating. If, for example, a motor in the overhead fails, the red light would go off on the 
control panel, indicating trouble with that particular piece of equipment. Overload conditions can even be 
indicated by a flashing light on the control which operates that particular motor or machine. 


Proof of the success of this method is the statement of Mr. Sharp (above) that he has had “no down- 
time due to motor failure” . .. this at a price competitive with butane engines and none of the headaches 
of having to locate mechanics or incur costly repair bills. For additional information call or write 


W. M. Smith Electric Company 


Dallas Fort Worth Lubbock Harlingen Sulphur, La. 
3200 Grand Ave. 203 South Main 514 Ave. M 502 E. Buchanan Highway 90 
HAmilton 8-4606 EDison 6-2372 POrter 5-6348 GArfield 3-6587 JAckson 7-7135 


THE COTTON GIN AND OIL MILL PRESS * JUNE 2, 1956 





e Propose Changes 
For Chickasha 


TWO PROPOSALS involving Chicka- 
sha Cotton Oil Co., which operates oil 
mills and gins in Oklahoma, Texas and 
Arizona, have been announced. 

A two-for-one split of the common 
stock is proposed by directors and will 
be submitted for the approval of stock- 
holders. The plan proposes a reduction 
in par value from $10 a share to $5. 

A committee also has been formed to 
study the possibility of merging Chick- 
asha with Flour Mills of America, a 
flour milling concern controlled by a 
group who also are Chickasha _stock- 
holders. 

An independent auditing and engi- 
neering firm has been employed to 
work with the committee, which con- 


sists of Fred Florence, president of Re- 
public National Bank of Dallas, Kay 
Kimbell, president of Kimbell Milling 
Co. of Fort Worth; John M. Ferguson, 
Jr., Fort Worth insurance executive, 
Claude Britain, vice-president of Chick- 
asha; and A. L. Durand, president of 
Chickasha. 


British Seek U.S. Sales 
For Cotton Products 


British cotton firms are paying more 
attention to American markets, and a 
group of the largest Lancashire com- 
panies has sent James Morris to New 
York as a design consultant. He is 
meeting with buyers to study American 
preferences and to show samples of 
British work. 





FOR A WELL-ROUNDED 
PROFIT PICTURE, 





Southwestern Peanut 
Shellers Meet 


Members of Southwestern Pea- 
nut Shellers’ Association will 
gather in Mineral Wells June 
6-7-8 for their thirteenth annual 
convention at the Baker Hotel. 
Details of plans for the business 
session and entertainment fea- 
tures appeared in an earlier issue 
of The Press. 

A. S. Moake is president of the 
organization, Ellis L. Ganey is 
vice-president and John Haskins 
is secretary-treasurer. Directors, 
in addition to the officers, are 
George Freeman, Melvin E. Shell 
and George Homer. 











Mexican Representative 
Appointed by French 
French Oil Mill Machinery’ Co., 


Piqua, Ohio, has announced the ap- 
pointment of A. Gonzales Flores as the 


firm’s sales engineer in Mexico. He 
will have his offices at Desarrollo In- 
dustrial, Beristain 47, Mexico, D. F 


round out your ginning business 
with custom grinding and mixing. 


20 to 150 
HP. 


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Protect Costly Machinery 


with Jacobson “Economy” Magnetic Separators 


A. GONZALES FLORES 


Gonzales will handle the complete 
line of equipment manufactured by The 
French Oil Mill Machinery Co.—in- 
cluding complete continuous mechanical 
screw press installations, stack cook- 
ers, flaking and crushing rolls and sol- 
vent extraction plants for the vegeta- 
ble oil mill industry. He is equipped 
to make complete engineering surveys 
for Mexican processors and work up 
recommendations for plant equipment. 

After graduating from the Universi- 
dad Nacional de Mexico in 1947 with a 
degree in chemical engineering, Gon- 
zales worked as_ production engineer 
for the United Sugar Co. in Los Mochis 
and as production engineer with Cela- 
nese Mexicana, S.A. Since 1951, his 
firm, Desarrollo Industrial, has worked 
closely with the oil mills, specializing 
in refinery equipment and the soap, fat 
and detergent industry. 


To prevent fires and damage 
to your ginning and other 
equipment, use Jacobson 
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JUNE 2 1956 THE COTTON GIN AND OIL MILL PRESS 





The Louisiana Purchase 


In 1803 the United States acquired from France 

the vast area known as the Louisiana Territory. The price 
was eighty million francs . . . about $15,000,000, and 

the purchase almost doubled the area of the United States. 


Since 1914 the Texas Employers’ Insurance Association 
has saved and returned to policyholders over 
$46,000,000 in Dividends and Guaranteed Cost Discounts 
... more than three times the amount involved in 

the Louisiana Purchase. $3,855,678 was saved and returned 
to employers of labor in Texas in 1955 alone. 


Many Texas Business and Industrial Firms are taking 
advantage of the SAVINGS on Workmen's 
Compensation Insurance offered by Texas’ 

largest writer. Are YOU? 


an —> @-\—e -1 | 0 Mod 4h 


Pca ely “ease ‘INSURANCE ASSOCIATION 


POLICYHOLDERS Service Offices: ABILENE « AMARILLO « AUSTIN e BEAUMONT e CORPUS CHRISTI 


DALLAS e EL PASO « FORT WORTH e« FREEPORT « GALVESTON « HARLINGEN 
HOUSTON e LUBBOCK e MIDLAND e ODESSA « PORT ARTHUR « SAN ANGELO 
SAN ANTONIO e SHERMAN e TYLER « WACO e« WICHITA FALLS 


HOME OFFICE e DALLAS, TEXAS 


HOMER R. MITCHELL, Chairman of Board A. F. ALLEN, President 


THE COTTON GIN AND OIL MILL PRESS + JUNE 2, 1956 
































































© World Crop Estimate 
Cut Million Bales 


WORLD cotton production is estimated 
at 39.3 million bales in the latest USDA 
figures. This total is a record high, but 
is only slightly larger than the 1953 
and 1937 world crops. The current es- 
timate is one million bales lower than 
that made last January, due to reduc- 
tions in Egypt, India and Russia. 

The 1955-56 crop is about 700,000 
bales larger than 1954-55 production. 

Foreign free world countries increas- 
ed acreage from 39.6 million acres in 
1953-54 to 45.6 million acres in 1955-56, 
with an accompanying rise in produc- 
tion from 13.9 to 15.9 million bales in 
the three-year period. Communist coun- 
tries (principally the Soviet Union and 
China) have more than doubled cotton 
production since World War II. Soviet 
production in 1955 was reportedly nine 
percent below 1954 due mostly to un- 
favorable weather. This is borne out by 
the fact that exports to Communist 
bloc countries from the foreign free 
world increased substantially in early 





months of 1955-56 and imports into 
Western Europe from the Soviet Union 
declined. 


Production of Egyptian-type cotton 
declined slightly in 1955-56 from a year 





Moss-Gordin Enlarges Facilities 


years. As a result of excessive rainfall 
and insect damage, production increas- 
es in Mexico and most Central Amer- 
ican countries in 1955-56 only partially 
reflected the considerable expansion of 
acreage from a year earlier. Although 
earlier estimates for Brazil have been 
reduced because of lower than expected 
yields, production of 1.8 million bales 
was larger by nine percent than in 
1954-55. 

In the Near East, insects and plant 
diseases have reduced yields, particu- 
larly in Turkey and Iran. Syria, how- 
ever, is making significant progress in 
nearly all phases of cotton production 
and marketing in an effort to improve 
the competitive position of the Ameri- 
can-Upland type cotton produced there. 
African countries producing this type 
maintained acreage at about 5.4 mil- 
lion acres in 1955-56 while production 
increased about six percent from a year 
earlier to 1.3 million bales. Particularly 
good yields were obtained in Uganda 
and Mozambique. 

No further increase in foreign cotton 
production is expected in 1956-57, and 
production may even show a slight de- 
cline, although it is too early to make 
an accurate estimate. Early reports in- 
dicate that acreage is being reduced in 
Mexico, Central America, and Egypt. 
A return to normal yields in Central 
America and Egypt, however, should 
maintain production at about the same 
level as in 1955-56 when adverse con- 
ditions curbed yields substantially. The 
decline in world cotton prices in 1955 
may result in acreage reduction in some 
foreign countries in 1956, USDA says. 


earlier. Egypt’s 1955 crop, now esti- 
mated at 1.5 million bales, is down con- 
siderably from earlier estimates as a 
result of extensive cotton leafworm 
damage despite a 15 percent increase 
in acreage. In contrast, Sudan and Peru 
reduced acreage by 10 and 13 percent, 
respectively, from 1954, but higher 
yields resulted in a slight increase in 
production to 900,000 bales for the two 
countries combined. 

Countries producing the Asiatic type 
short-staples, mainly India, Pakistan, 
and Burma, as a group reported a de- 
crease in cotton production in 1955 of 
600,000 bales or 10 percent from the 
previous year. Practically all the re- 
duction occurred in India where damage 
from excessive rains last fall cut pro- 
duction to 3.8 million bales compared 
with 4.4 million bales in 1954-55, even 
though the 1955-56 acreage of 19.5 mil- 
lion was six percent above a year earl- 
ier, USDA reports. 


e More U.S. Competition — Cotton pro- 
duced in the remaining foreign non- 
Communist countries is similar to and 
generally competitive with American- 
Upland types. These countries as a 
whole increased acreage and_ produc- 
tion by nine percent in 1955-56 over the 
previous season, continuing the rise that 
has taken place during the past 10 


State-Federal Agencies 
Fight Grasshoppers 


Texas Department of Agriculture is 
spending an emergency appropriation 
of $25,009 during May and June in a 
federal-state spraying program to com- 
bat a major grasshopper threat in the 
Panhandle. 

More than eight million acres of 
range land in the Panhandle and South 
Plains were found to be heavily in- 
fested in a recent hopper egg count 
survey. This compares with only about 
four million acres last year. 

Early spraying is expected to prevent 
a serious build-up, Commissioner John 
White said. Migratory female hoppers 
lay 200 to 400 eggs a season. If a ma- 
jority of the eggs hatch and develop in- 
to adults, they can average about 23 
to 32 hoppers a square yard. Even 
lesser amounts can strip the land of 
crops and grass, White added. 


The hopper threat is especially seri- 
ous to cattle of West Texas this year. 
Dry weather has created ideal hatching 
conditions. White estimated every dol- 
lar spent in control may save ranchers 
and farmers of Texas some $38 in crops 
and grazing later. 









TO PROVIDE adequate facilities for the enlarged engineering department of Moss- 
Gordin Lint Cleaner Co., more than 1,350 square feet have been added to the 
Lubbock offices. Completion of the new structure gives Moss-Gordin one of the most 
efficient and architecturally attractive executive quarters to be found in the gin 
equipment manufacturing industry. Earlier expansion this year brought plant space 
up to 51,000 square feet devoted exclusively to the manufacture of Moss Lint 
Cleaners. The offices, which adjoin the Moss-Gordin plant, have an exterior finish 
of brick veneer. The new engineering department has rooms for drafting, preparing 
specifications and blue printing. An area for the engineering library is provided. 
Air conditioning and special lighting are found throughout. Moss-Gordin, specialist 
in the manufacture of lint cleaning equipment, has had a remarkable growth during 
the past three seasons according to company officials. First with many exclusive 
features, Moss-Gordin has introduced the new wrapped wire saw in all of the 1956 
Moss Lint Cleaners. In addition to the Lubbock plant and offices, other offices are 
in Dallas and Memphis. 





Gin Names New Directors 


Hart Camp Cooperative Gin at Little- 
field, Texas, has named the following 
new officers and directors: J. E. Mul- 
ler, president; K. W. Mahaffey, vice- 
president; Ivy Thompson, secretary; 
and Blanton Martin, J. P. Hukill and 
Dan Puckett, directors. Puckett repre- 
sents the gin on the board of Plains 
Cooperative Oil Mill and Farmers’ Co- 
operative Compress. S. O. Owens is gin 
manager. 










28 JUNE 2, 1956 + THE COTTON GIN AND OIL MILL PRESS 


















Presenting 


C. L. Walker, Jr. 


Temple, Texas —— 











C. L. WALKER, JR., Temple, Texas, was 
born into the oil mill business on July 6, 
1909, as his father was manager of the 
Southland Cotton Oil Co. at Temple, the 
mill which the son now manages. “Chick” 
began working around the mill when 15 
years of age, started regular work in 
1932 and became manager in 1940 when 
C. L. Walker, Sr., died. He was educated 
at Texas A. & M. and the University of 
Texas. 

“Chick” and his wife have two daugh- 
ters and one married son, serving in the 
U.S. Navy. 

He is very active in civic and agricul- 
tural programs, and has been mayor of 
Temple, president of the Lions Club and 
other groups, and served in the Farm 
and Ranch Club, 7-Step Cotton Commit- 
tee, and others. He is an honorary Lone 
Star Farmer of the Future Farmers; 
and has been a leader in cotton industry 
organizations, including the National 
Cotton Council, Texas Cotton Ginners’ 
Association, and Texas and National 
crushers’ associations. 

“Chick” says that he thinks oil milling 
and ginning are the two greatest indus- 
tries in the country and that both have 
a good future. His hobbies are kids and 
photography. 


Two Convention Dates Set 
By Cotton Institute 


The 1958 convention of the American 
Cotton Manufacturers’ Institute will be 
held April 10-12, at the Hollywood 
Beach Hotel, Hollywood, Fla. 

Announcement had been made pre- 
viously that the 1957 convention would 
be held April 4-6, 1957, at the Palm 
Beach Biltmore Hotel, Palm Beach, Fla. 

F. E. Grier of Greenwood, S.C., pres- 
ident of The Abney Mills and chairman 
of the board of Erwin Mills, Inc., is 
president of ACMI and will preside 
over the 1957 convention. L. G. Hard- 
man, Jr., of Commerce, Ga., president 
of Harmony Grove Mills, Inc., is first 
vice-president of ACMI and, if custom 
is followed, will become president next 
year and will preside over the 1958 con- 
vention. 


THE COTTON GIN AND OIL MILL PRESS * JUNE 2, 1956 





Valley Committee Lists 
Rules on First Bale 


Rules for the $2,500 minimum prize 
first bale contest sponsored by the spe- 
cial cotton committee of the Harlingen 
Chamber of Commerce are announced by 
the rules committee headed by Co-chair- 
men F. Earl Davis and Rex Steele, cot- 
tonseed crushers. 

The special cotton committee, headed 
by Chairman Vernon Murphy, is offer- 
ing a prize of $1,500 for the first bale 
of cotton grown in the U.S. this year, 
if it is delivered to Harlingen for pub- 
lic auction, and meets the requirements 
set by the rules committee. 

In addition to the $1,500, the grower 
will receive whatever the bale brings 
when it is auctioned off, with a guar- 
antee it will bring at least $1,000, thus 


assuring a minimum prize of $2,500. 


The bale must be delivered to the 
Harlingen Police Station, 110 West Jef- 
ferson, for official clocking as to time 
of arrival. The police dispatcher on 
duty will record the exact minute of 
the arrival—and in the past, in some 
close races, minutes determined the win- 
ner. 

To be eligible for the $2,500 mini- 
mum prize, the first bale must be U.S. 
grown, 1956 crop, and must not have 
been sold anywhere prior to reaching 
Harlingen. 

Last year the first bale was grown 
in a joint farming operation by Jerry 
Block of Sharyland and Will Wallace 
of Edinburg, and was delivered June 8. 
It brought $3.13 a pound, which with 
the $1,500 prize offered by the cotton 
committee, gave the growers $3,180.81 
for their bale. 





OUplings 


for ordinary, medium or 
heavy duty service 










Sure-Grip 
Flexible Coupling 





Compression Coupling 


Ribbed Type 
Compression Coupling 


Flange Couplings—designed to provide rigid, true 
running connections between shafts, for ordinary line- 
shaft service. Supplied in standard plain face type for 
joining shafts of same diameter, and the male and 
female type for joining shafts of different diameters. 
These couplings are not recommended for temporary 
or emergency replacement service. 


Compression Couplings— especially designed to pro- 
vide a simple method of joining medium or lightly 
loaded shafts. Easily mounted and removed. Can be 
made-to-order for 
diameters, not exceeding one inch difference. 


connecting shafts of different 


Ribbed Type Compression Couplings —recommended 
for emergency or regular service or heavily loaded 
shafts. Sufficient space may be left between shaft ends 
when mounting coupling to permit any replacement 
of belts. 


Sure-Grip Flexible Coupling—no costly reboring of 
flanges for different sized shafts. Cuts down installation 
time and allows easier removal for maintenance of 
connecting units. Plastic hard coating prevents rust. 
Either neoprene or leather intermediate discs furnished 
according to operating conditions. Sizes from #4 to 
#10. Write for Bulletin + 496. 


T.B. WOOD'S SONS CO. 





1117 W. Commerce St. « Dallas, Texas 





At Industry Meeting 





Margarine Outlook 
Called Favorable 


@ MANUFACTURERS told 
more research needed; farm 
policies will be major influence. 


A bright outlook for margarine, de- 
spite lower sales during the past 12 
months was forecast by A. C. Nielsen 
Co., market research organization, at 
the Margarine All-Industry Conference 
May 23-25 at The Homestead, Hot 
Springs, Va. 


Margarine sales are up 48 percent 
from five years ago, while butter shows 
an eight percent cutback, Carl J. Weber, 
vice-president of the firm, told the Na- 
tional Association of Margarine Manu- 
facturers. 

For the year ending April 1, 1956, 
however, margarine sales were nar- 
rowly under the previous 12 months 
as compared with a four percent in- 
crease in the consumer movement of 
butter, according to Nielsen figures. 
This reflected the lower average con- 
sumer prices of butter throughout the 
past year. 

The future outlook for the margar- 
ine industry seems highly favorable, 
Weber said. He listed among contrib- 
uting factors the continuing favorable 
price differential versus butter, the im- 
proved quality of product and greater 








Slinger Type 


Today you can reduce the mainte- 
nance costs of your machines more 
effectively through the application of 
Fafnir Power Transmission Units 
equipped with either slinger type or 
contact type seals. Both types are pre- 
lubricated at the factory with long- 
life, completely filtered grease. Relu- 
brication, therefore, is no longer a 
requisite, and cleaner bearing opera- 
tion is assured. 

Fafnir Plya-Seal and Mechani-Seal 


Flange Cartridges 
(Cast Iron) Standard 
and Heavy Series 


Pillow Blocks (Cast 
tron) Standard an 
Heavy Series. 


30 


- —-AChoice of 


EFFECTIVE SEALS 


/ i 


Contact Type 


Bearings are equipped with the 
famous Fafnir Self-Locking Collar— 
easiest of all to install. Counterbored, 
eccentric cam, mated-construction of 
collar and inner ring assures positive 
locking action without lock nuts, or 
adapters. Inner rings are bored to inch 
dimensions to fit standard shafting 
and slip-fit into place. For complete 
details, consult your authorized Fafnir 
Distributor or write The Fafnir 
Bearing Company, New Britain, Conn. 


FAFNIR 


BALL BEARINGS 


MOST COMPLETE cg LINE IN AMERICA 


JUNE 2, 1956 - 


attractiveness of package and the wid- 
ening recognition of the nutritional val- 
ues of margarine. Margarine was also 
shown to be one of the major food 
store sales items in terms of total con- 
sumer dollar volume. 


e Benson Talk — Secretary of Agricul- 
ture Ezra Benson told the conference 
that we are in the midst of an agricul- 
tural revolution and “must learn to live 
with abundance.” 

He said cotton producers elected to 
have rigid price supports and lost mar- 
kets everywhere, whereas the soybean 
industry gained markets because pro- 
ducers “risked the growing pains of a 
fluctuating price and an _ expanded 
market. 

“Today, after 25 years of the utmost 
government solicitude, cotton has lost 
markets everywhere. Its producers have 
lost freedom. Cottonseed crushers are 
limited in the availability of their raw 
material. Your cottonseed oil supply is 
limited and you are using a bigger and 
bigger proportion of soybean oil in your 
product. As a prominent Southern Sen- 
ator has said, it is not accidental that 
the big income-depressing surpluses in 
Commodity Credit stocks consist almost 
entirely of commodities for which the 
federal government has followed a rigid 
price support policy that has held prices 
at levels higher than effective demand. 
Certainly this is true in the case of 
cotton where prices have been and are 
considerably above those of our competi- 
tors. He further stated that it is his 
conviction that agriculture will be better 
off economically if the scope and extent 
of federal intervention in the price and 
marketing picture is reduced rather than 
expanded,” Benson continued. 

“The pity is that the road back is a 
long, long one, even if cotton should set 
its feet firmly in that direction. Markets 
once lost are not easily regained. Twenty- 
five sheltered years are poor conditioning 
for the rough-and-tumble of competitive 
life. Again quoting the Senator, “ as far 
as cotton is concerned, farm policies 
based only on price will, in the long run, 
destroy the industry.’ ” 


e More Research Needed — Increased 
basic research and education as to the 
significant values of food fats in the 
diet were advocated by Siert F. Riepma, 





Carolinas Crushers 
In Myrtle Beach 


North and South Carolina cot- 
tonseed crushers, their families 
and guests are at Myrtle Beach, 
S.C., for the joint convention of 
North Carolina Cottonseed Crush- 
ers’ Association and South Caro- 
lina Cotton Seed Crushers’ Asso- 
ciation. The meeting is at the 
Ocean Forest Hotel, June 4-5, but 
many of the group gathered there 
earlier to enjoy the vacation spot. 

The Press listed details of the 
entertainment and business pro- 
gram in its most recent issue. 

Association officers for 1955-56 
were, in North Carolina, T. F. 
Bridgers, president; D. R. Oliver, 
vice-president; and Mrs. M. U. 
Hogue, secretary - treasurer; in 
South Carolina, Wm. McD. Jones, 
president; and Mrs. Durrett L. 
Williams, vice-president. 











THE COTTON GIN AND OIL MILL PRESS 

















San Antonio Host to 


Superintendents 


San Antonio is the center of at- 
tention for many representatives 
of the crushing industry, as mem- 
bers of the International Oil Mill 
Superintendents’ Association meet 
at the Plaza Hotel on June 4-5-6 
for their annual convention. G. A. 
Ward, Phoenix, Ariz., is president 
of the Association; K. B. Smith, 
Fresno, Calif., vice-president; and 
H. E. Wilson, Wharton, Texas, is 
secretary-treasurer. Plans for the 
meeting were reported in detail 


in the May 19 issue of The Press. 














Association president, in his remarks. 

“We should tell over and over again,” 
said Riepma, “these two stories: (1) 
Food fats are not judged harmful by 
reputable authorities; and (2) Margar- 
ine offers the weight-watcher the great 
advantages of uniform food energy, 
vitamin A, and essential fatty acids— 
and at lower cost than any comparable 
food. Nor should we overlook the im- 
portant advantages of flavor and tex- 
ture, and the consequent increased pal- 
atability given to foods, which marga- 
rine provides, thanks to continuing im- 
provements in its manufacture.” 

While welcoming signs of the disap- 
pearance of the old margarine-butter 
controversy, the margarine official 
called attention to new types of dis- 
crimination which he described as fol- 
lows: 

“Extensive government ‘give-aways’ 
of surplus butter into _ institutional 
markets which margarine had substan- 
tially won on its own merits (school 
lunch programs, Army, welfare, insti- 
tutions, etc.) go on and on, amounting 
to an estimated 155 million pounds dis- 
posed of or earmarked in 1955. 

“Although margarine production dur- 
ing 1955 dropped for the first time in 
six years, by two percent under 1954 
(1,334 million pounds), this is not se- 
vere compared to the tremendous ton- 
nage of surplus, subsidized butter 
dumped into margarine markets. Fur- 
ther, production so far for the 12 
months just ending promises to reach 
about 1,375,000,000 pounds, about two 
percent more than the preceding same 
period. Creamery butter production this 
year is expected to increase from 1955 
by some 100 million pounds, or about 
seven percent.” 


e Fats in Diet — The problem of fats in 
the diet and what influence they may 
have on hardening of the arteries was 
reviewed by Dr. Charles D. May, Iowa 
State University, who warned against 
public excitement over “fragmentary 
knowledge” and said that it is impera- 
tive that a sound, orderly research and 
educational approach be made to studies 
and interpretation of the role of fats 
in the diet. 

Doctor May pointed out that fat is 
not a simple substance, but a complex 
mixture; that it now appears that a 
distinction must be made between ani- 
mal and vegetable fats in their influ- 
ence in the arteries; that many other 
factors enter into the problems; and 
that it usually is easier for the over- 
weight person to reduce on a diet con- 
taining the usual amounts of fats but 
fewer total calories. 





THE COTTON GIN AND OIL MILL PRESS 








e Agriculture and Margarine — Laur- 
ence K. Soth, Des Moines Register and 
Tribune, said that the great contro- 
versy currently raging over U.S. agri- 
cultural policy is a continuing great 
debate, similar to the 150-year debate 
over tariffs. 

He listed as two underlying forces or 
conditions (1) a persistent, powerful 
tendency for agricultural production to 
grow faster than demand for farm 
products; and (2) The failure of farm- 
ing to adjust itself automatically to 
market forces. 

“A period cf sharp changes is under 
way now in the fats and oils field,” 
Soth said. “Broadly speaking, consum- 
er demand is shifting away from animal 
fats, including butter and lard, and to- 





ward vegetable fats processed into 
margarine for table use and vegetable 
shortening for cooking. Governmental 
barriers have been interposed, both at 
state and national levels, tending to 
slow down this process of change. Many 
of these barriers have been eliminated 
now, and compeitition between the veg- 
etable and the animal fats is much 
freer than it was. There is every rea- 
son to believe that the trend toward 
more vegetable fats in tablespreads and 
shortening will continue.” 

The newspaper editor warned the 
group that any period of depression is 
likely to encourage restrictive measures, 
such as discrimination against marga- 
rine; and that the soil bank program 
tends to stimulate production of animal 
fats. 











BRADEN 
GRAIN STORAGE 


CONSTRUCTION VIEW OF GRAIN STORAGE BUILDING 


We will be happy to assist with your plans for low-cost wind- 
resistant, fire and lightning safe, rodent proof buildings. 
IMPLEMENT STORAGE — SEED HOUSES 
GIN BUILDINGS — COTTON HOUSES — WAREHOUSES 


MACHINE SHOPS — UTILITY BUILDINGS 
FEEDING AND LOAFING BARNS 


BUILDINGS 








ALUMINUM BUILDING ( 


J eo eee 














‘ MAIL THIS TODAY 

PLEASE SEND INFORMATION TO ME ABOUT 

1 ————TTYPE OF BUILDING YOU ARE INTERESTED IN) 
. STEEL BUILDING 

: SIZE 

: IN oS aa 

¢ FEET 

MS on ER a 

: ADDRESS avecsocioaias 


CREO OREO REE EERE EERE EE EEE EEE EEE EERE EEE EE EEE EEE EEE EEE EEE EEE EE EEE EEE 


1007 EAST ADMIRAL 
TULSA 1, OKLAHOMA 





-~HIGH ‘ 








* JUNE 2, 1956 






31 













RATES AND CLOSING DATES: Ten cents per word per insertion. Include your firm name 


and address in making word count. 


Minimum charge $2.00. Copy must be in our hands by 


Thursday morning of week of issue. Please write plainly. 





Oil Mill Equipment for Sale 


OIL MILL EQUIPMENT FOR SALE—Rebuilt 
twin motor Anderson high speed expellers, French 
screw presses, stack cookers, meal coolers, four- 
teen inch conditioners, filter presses, oil screening 





tanks, complete modern prepressing or single 
press expeller mills.—Pittock & Associates, Glen 
Riddle, Pa. 





FOR SALE — Filter presses; screening tanks; 
single and twin motor Anderson Super Duo ex- 
pellers, with conditioners; several extra 36” 
cooker dryers and conditioners. All steel] linter 
baling presses; 141-176 saw linters; seed cleaners ; 
No. 158 separating units; bar hullers; lint beat- 
hydraulic press room 


ers; stack cookers; rolls; 
Box 108, 


equipment.—V. A. Lessor & Co., P. O. 
Fort Worth, Texas. 


FOR SALE— -Anderson Super Duo expellers. Filter 


presses. 72” and 85” cookers. Butters milling ma- 
chine, Tru-line double box linter press. Attrition 
mills. Single drum hull beater. 20” to 70” fans. 
Motors: 75 h.p. and under.—Sproles & Cook 


Machinery Co., 151 Leslie St., Telephone PR-5958, 


Dallas Texas. 


INSPECTIONS and appraisal. Dismantle and in- 
stallation.—Oscar V. Shultz. Industrial Engineer- 
ing, Phone BUtler 9-2172, P. O. Box 357, Grape- 
vine, Texas. 


Gin Equipment for Sale 


FOR SALE—Cotton gins, oil mills, compresses 
Contact M. M. Phillips, Phone TE5-8555, P. O. 
Box 1288, Corpus Christi, Texas. 











FOR SALE—3-80 saw Murray gins; 3 LEF 60” 
feeders; 1 Murray triplex pump; 3 Continental 
2-X feeders 66”; 1 up-packing press ram; 1 Con- 
tinental seed hopper.—R. R. Norman, Ft. Deposit, 
Alabama. 





ELECTRIC MOTOR SALE! 


Rebuilt and New Ball Bearing Motors 
3/60/220-440/2300 Volts 


HP. Type Speed Price 
300 Slipring 900 $3500 
200 Slipring 900 New 3152 
200 Slipring 720 2368 
150 Slipring 900 New 2590 
150 Slipring 900 1566 
200 Sq. Cage 900 1481 
150 Sq. Cage 900 1188 
100 Slipring 1200 1076 
100 Slipring 900 1189 
100 Sq. Cage 1200 758 
100 Sq. Cage 900 879 
75 Sq. Cage 1800 490 
75 Slipring 1200 889 
75 Slipring 900 991 
75 Sq. Cage 1200 564 
60 Sq. Cage 1800 356 
50 Sq. Cage 1800 290 


All Sizes and Types Motors Up to 800 H.P. in 
Stock, LOAN MOTORS AVAILABLE AT NO 
CHARGE. 


Wholesale and Retail Distributors of 
DELCO — GENERAL ELECTRIC — ACEC 


W. M. SMITH 
ELECTRIC COMPANY 


LLAS FORT WORTH 
HAniiton 8-4606 EDison 6-2372 
LUBBOCK HARLINGEN 
POrter 5-6348 GArfield 3-6587 








FOR SALE—3-80 Cen-Tennial gins, $250 each. 
Special Mitchell Super units, 66” units, completely 
rebuilt, $750 each. Hardwicke-Etter short stroke 
tramper, complete with charge box, $500. Lum- 
mus iron bound steel, one-story down-packing 
tramper, $1250. Cen- Tennial tramper, $550. Con- 
tinental ram and casing, $150. 1144-M BTU Hard- 
wicke-Etter burner, $50. 1-M Mitchell burner, 
$400. No. 30 Mitchell vaporizer, $200. Complete 
3-80 Continental gins with FEC Mitchell feeders, 
Mitchell steel conveyor distributor, 6-cylinder 
horizontal Murray steel cleaner, 100 h.p. Fair- 
banks diesel, 1-M Mitchell burner, one Mitchell 
Jem-bo, Continental condenser, two-story iron 
bound press, unloader fan, all transitions items 
complete, $4500. A real buy for someone who 
wants to get in the gin business cheap. Priced to 
move.—Wonder State Manufacturing Company, 
Paragould, Arkansas. 


FOR SALE—Gins: 1-90 Murray Safety, 7-90 Gul- 
lett, 4-80 Lummus 1949 model, glass front double 
mote, 4-80 Continental Model C brush, 7-80 glass 
front loose roll dump gins, 4-80 Cen-Tennial air 
blast with loose roll boxes and glass fronts, 5-70 
Continental Model C brush with 30 fronts, 5-70 
Lummus automatic all-steel ball-bearing picker 
rollers. Lint cleaners: 2-80 saw 1949 Continental. 
Driers: 1 Murray big reel, four 4-trough 1951 
model Continental with burners, 5-80 Mitchell, two 
Lummus thermo cleaners. Bur machines: 1-10’ 
all-steel Continental with 14” overflow conveyor, 
one Hardwicke-Etter 14’ steel and one wood. Air- 
line cleaners: one 8-cylinder Stacy with hot air at- 
tachment, one 4-cylinder V-drive Stacy, one 6- 
cylinder Hardwicke-Etter. Cleaners: 1 Hardwicke- 
Etter 7-cylinder blow-in type, 2 Continental in- 
clined 4-cylinder all-steel. Huller-cleaner-feeders : 
5-60” V-drive Super Mitchells, 5-66” Hardwicke- 
Etter with 4-cylinder after-cleaner, 5-70 Lummus 
MEF, 7-80 Lummus MEF, 4-66” V-drive Super 
Mitchells. Condensers: 1-72” Murray down-dis- 
charge, 2-60” Continental all-steel side-discharge, 
1-60” Lummus up-discharge. Separators: 2 Conti- 





nentals, 1 Stacy. Pumps: 2 Murrays. Miscellane- 
ous items: 1 Hardwicke-Etter burner, various 
size fans, one double 30” Murray fan, two saw 


drums for 14’ Lummus bur machine, one rock 
and boll catcher, 5-70 Lummus change valve hop- 
pers, 1-72” Murray vacuum, 1-52” Murray Vacu- 
um, 4-72” Murray cleaning cylinder with bearings. 
Engines: One L3000 Le Roi, one 280 h.p. Le Roi, 
one MM Twin six 210 h.p., one MM 240 h.p., 6- 
cylinder. Electric motors: Sizes from 3 to 150 h.p., 
440 volt.—Bill Smith, Box 694, Phones 4-9626 and 
4-7847, Abilene, Texas. 


FOR SALE—1-24’ rotary lift, 1 double box Fair- 
banks seed scales,1-22’ truck scales, 1-14’ Wichita 
after-cleaner for bur machine of any make, 1-10’ 
Wichita bur machine, steel, 2-10’ steel Continental 
bur machines, 1-14’ steel Lummus bur machine, 
4 late model glass front roll dump Murray gin 
stands, 4-60 V-belt Mitchell machines, like new, 
supers, 4-60 big standard Mitchells, hot air intake, 
1-52” Stacy dropper, 2 Murray PX press, 1 Hard- 
wicke-Etter 6-cylinder air line cleaner, one 4- 
section Mitchell precleaner. These and many other 
pieces of machinery are ready for delivery.— 
Spencer’s Cotton Gin Sales & Service, 5 miles 
north Highway 81, Box 204, Georgetown, Texas. 


FOR SALE—Government type tower driers, auto- 
matic gas heaters, blow pies, a8 and fittings. We are 
prepared to deliver and install —— and any 
wily inery in conjunction with d uip- 

ervice Gin Co., P. O. Box 21, go 251, 
Ville Platte, Louisiana. 








FOR SALE—4-80 saw aii air blast gins, with 
6” mote conveyors, with 4 Gullett multiple hull 
extracting feeders and Murray steel belt distribu- 
tor; Murray lint flues; Murray 72” condensor; 
1 Lummus 10’ bur machine with 5-cylinder after 
cleaner; 1 Cen-Tennial all-steel double hopper 
seed scale; 2-40” fans; shafts, steel split pulleys, 
etc.—Brady Cotton Oil Company, Paul Klatt, sec- 
retary, Phone 2218, Brady, Texas. 





FOR SALE—All or any part of one pores late- 
model, all-steel 4-80 gin, consisting of 4-80 glass 
front Murray gins. 4-80 special standard V-drive 
Mitchells. 4-80 submerged lint flue. 4-80 Hard- 
wicke-Etter conveyor distributor. One 6-cylinder 
Hardwicke-Etter airline cleaner. One 16-shelf Hard- 
wicke-Etter tower drier, fan and burner. One 
5-cylinder Hardwicke-Etter V-drive blow-in No. 1 
cleaner. One Hardwicke-Etter 3-way bypass. One 
14’ Hardwicke-Etter bur machine. One 5-cylinder 
V-drive No. 2 cleaner. One Hardwicke-Etter side 
discharge condenser. One Cameron ballbearing 
tramper. One Hardwicke-Etter up-packing press. 
One set Hardwicke-Etter seed scales. Two retor 
lifts. One MM butane or natural gas engine. Faas 
on V-drive, al] transmissions, etc. This is an extra 
good, clean gin at a bargain.—Bill Smith, Box 
694, Phones 49626 and 47847, Abilene, Texas. 


JUNE 2, 1956 - 


FOR SALE—Several late model loose roll glass 
front 80-saw Murray gins and 80-saw Continental 
Model C gins with 30 fronts. Mitchell feeders in 
60” and 66”, standard and Super units. One 10’ 
Hardwicke-Etter steel bur machine. Steel clean- 
ers: One 48”, 6-cylinder Stacy, one 50”, 6-cylinder 
Continental and one 9-cylinder blow-in type, and 
one 9 and 10-cylinder 50” Hardwicke-Etters with 
V-drive. Steel separators: One 72” Continental 
revolving screen drum, 48” and 60” type M and 
48” type C Lummus. One 4-80 Lummus and 5-80 
Mitchell conveyor distributors. New Government 
type towers and drying equipment. Heaters: %4- 
million Mitchell, one- and two-million Continentals 
and one 1\4-million Murray. One 5-80 practically 
new double drum, down draft Cen-Tennial con- 
denser with lint slide, automatic self-cleaning 
mechanism and approximately 15 feet of exhaust 
pipe. Press Pumps: Two 4-plunger horizontal 
Beaumiers, three horizontal Murray triplex and 
cone vertical Continental triplex, all in excellent 
condition. Several practically new rams and cas- 
ings. New Phelps fans, open end V-belts and 
fasteners, V-sheaves, Seal-Skin and Beltraction 
belt dressing and a general line of new transmis- 
sion equipment. Hundreds of other miscellaneous 
items of machinery and supplies in Waco stock 
and available for prompt shipment. For your 
largest, oldest and most reliable source of used 
and reconditioned gin machinery, contact us. 
Qualified graduate engineer to assist you with any 
of your machinery problems at no obligation. Call 
us regarding any machinery or complete plants 
you have for sale or trade.—R. B. Strickland & 
Co., 13- . Hackberry St., Telephones: Day 2-8141, 
Night: 83-7929, Waco, Texas. 


FOR SALE—One 4-80 Murray gin, Super Chief 
Mitchell feeder, Mitchell heater with 24-shelf drier, 
Murray bur machine.—Box RX, c/o The Cotton 
ba and Oil Mill Press, P. O. Box 7985, Dallas, 
exas. 





FOR. SALE—7-13”, and 4-12” “two-way cotton 
valves, good shape, less than half new price.— 
Union Farmers Gin, Portageville, Mo. 





FOR ‘SALE—2- -80 Continental brush direct con- 
nected gins. 2-66 Super Mitchell extractor feeders 
flat belts. Used seed sterilizers.—Service Gin Co., 
P. O. Box 21, Phone 4251, Ville e Platte, Louisiana. 
FOR ~ SALE—Gin buildings, 30’, 86’ and 40’ 
widths. Any length. Built in sections, bolted in 
place.—Moorman Steel Co., Hutchins, Texas, or 
call CA5-2832. 

FOR SALE—One "“Hardwicke-Etter Type I all-steel 
cleaning system. Consists of 6-cylinder air line 
cleaner, 16-shelf tower drier, burner, fan and 
piping; one 5-cylinder V-drive No. 1 blow-in type 
cleaner, 3-way bypass, 14’ bur machine; one 5- 
cylinder V-drive No. 2 cleaner, all suction pipe, 
including suction. Price $8,500.—Bill Smith, Box 
694, Phones 49626 and 47847, Abilene, Texas. 

FOR SALE ‘OR TRADE—5-1949 model Hard- 
wicke-Etter extractor feeders in good condition.— 
Howard & Jones, Moody, Texas. 


FOR SALE—One all-steel down-packing Conti- 
nental press. One all-steel up-packing Hardwicke- 
Etter press.—Bill Smith, Box 694, Phones 4-9626 
and 4-7847, Abilene, Texas. 

















FOR SALE—4-80 gin well located, newly repaired, 
ready to go. Cotton looking fine. Recent rain. 
Price and terms reasonable. Write Owner, Box 
186, Kaufman, Texas. 





FOR SALE—4-66” Standard Mitchell feeders, V- 
belt drive, hot air receivers, repaired and painted. 
Good as new—A bargain.—P. O. Box 370, Kos- 
ciusko, Miss. 








FOR SALE—One all-steel Lummus 60” up-dis- 
charge condenser, one Lummus Super Jet lint 
cleaner, one Lummus Super Jet lint flue for 6-80. 
All in excellent condition. Will sell very cheap.— 
R. D. Southard Gin, Rt. 3, Box 32, Robstown, 
Texas. 


FOR SALE—Three Super Jet lint cleaners com- 
plete with lint flue, 50” condenser, and 15 h.p. 
suction motor. Excellent condition.—Box AA, c/o 
The Cotton Gin and Oil Mill Press, P. O. Box 
7985, Dallas, Texas. 








FOR SALE—Four 1949 model Gullett brush type 
gin stands. Good condition. Priced reasonable.— 
Box PT, c/o The Cotton Gin and Oil Mill Press, 
P. O. Box 7985, Dallas, Texas. 





FOR SALE—Four Mitchell Super Chief feeders, 
three years old. Good condition.—Hobbs Gin, New 
Deal, Texas. 





FOR SALE—One 10’ Lummus bur machine and 
cleaner, in fair condition, cheap.—Burton Farm- 
ers Gin Assn., Burton, Texas. 





FOR SALE 
condition. Price reasonable. — 
Saluda, S.C. 


8 Gullett 80-saw gins in excellent 
L. Hembel, 








FOR SALE—Five MEF Lummus feeders and gin 
— Gin, Rt. 1, Phone 3521, Idalou, 
‘exas. 








THE COTTON GIN AND OIL MILL PRESS 








FOR SALE—Gin building, any size. Seed houses 
and cotton houses. All-steel, ted section com- 
plete, erected on your foundation. Save as much 
- 20%. Call Moorman Steel, CA5-2832, Hutchins, 
exas. 





Equipment Wanted 


WANTED—Used double box, down-stroke, hy- 
draulic baling press, complete with pump, con- 
trols, etc. Will take immediate delivery.—Peabody 
Manufacturing Co., West Point, Georgia. 





WANTED— -Five F-3 Continental gin stands, “80 
saws.—Heckville Gin, Rt. 1, Phone 3521, Idalou, 
Texas. 





Personnel Ads 


WANTED— General manager for oil mill and 
gins. Bookkeeping knowledge essential. State ex- 
perience, age and references in application.— 
Box MW, c/o The Cotton Gin and Oil Mill Press, 
P. O. Box 7985, Dallas, Texas. 


POSITION WANTED—Gin manager r would like 
to re-locate in West Texas or New Mexico. 25 
years experience. Can install machinery and do 
own repair.—Box EMB, c/o The Cotton Gin and 
Oil Mill Press, P. O. Box 7985, Dallas, Texas. 








Power Units and Miscellaneous 


FOR SALE—New and rebuilt Minneapolis-Moline 
engines, from 35 h.p. to 220 h.p., call us day or 
night for parts and service.—Fort Worth Machin- 
ery Co., 913 E. Berry St., Fort Worth, Texas. 
FOR THE LARGEST STOCK of good, clean used 
gas or diesel engines in Texas, always see Stewart 
& Stevenson Services first. Contact your nearest 
branch. 





FOR SALE—6-cylinder Twin City, natural gas 
engine, 8” x 9”, in excellent condition, complete 
with cooling coils, sheaves, 10 D-330 belts.— 
Cooper Feed & Supply Co., Phone 58, Cooper, 
Texas. 

FOR SALE—Power Units: 51 h.p. Le Roi, $50; 
70 h.p. Le Roi, $850; p. Le Roi, $1350; 
180 hp.. International, : 160 h.p. G.M.C., 
$2750; Twin GMC 671-12103, 260 h.p., $6,000. 400 
h.p. Le Roi, $7500.—Wonder State Manufacturing 
Company, Paragould, Arkansas. 





FOR SALE—One V-12 L3000, 400 h.p. Le Roi 
butane engine; one V-8, 280 h.p. Le Roi engine; 
two twin six MM, 210 h.p. butane engines; two 
6-cylinder MM 240 h.p. butane engines; several 
7%, 10, 20 and 30 h.p., 220-440 volt electric 
motors and starters.—Bill Smith, Box 694, Phones 
49626 and 47847, Abilene, Texas. 





FOR SALE—1-100 h.p. gin motor, 900 rpm, slip 
ring, with oil switch, grids and controller, re- 
built and in first class condition. Price $900 at 
our warehouse.—Durant Armature Works, 111 
South Second Avenue, Durant, Okla. 

FOR SALE—35 h.p. high pressure boiler, 150 lb. 
pressure test. Bargain.—W. D. Waddle, Route 1, 
Greenville, Texas. 











BB coiion Men Foam at Mouth 
Over Rubber Mattresses 


@ AT A MEETING of directors 
of the National Cotton Batting 


Institute in Atlanta, Georgia, 
the directors all appeared at the 
10 a.m. session weary, tired, and 
yawning. 

Comments such as, “I had to 
get up and take an aspirin”; “ 
tossed and turned all night”: a 
didn’t sleep a wink last night”; 
were heard on ail sides. The 
cause? The men had been 
forced to sleep on foam rubber 
mattresses—none_ slept well! 
And the hotel management 
heard the merits of cotton inner- 
spring mattresses from the 13 
Institute directors who attended 
the meeting. 











THE COTTON GIN AND OIL MILL PRESS 


Southwestern University 
Gives Degree to D. A. Lacy 


On May 28, the Southwestern Uni- 
versity of Georgetown, Texas, confer- 
red upon D. A. Lacy, Sr. of Dallas, 
Texas, the honorary degree of Doctor 
of Laws. 

D. A. Lacy is a layman in the Metho- 
dist Church and for many years he has 
given generously of his time and ma- 
terial possessions not only to the Meth- 


D. A. LACY 


odist Church, and its various institu- 
tions, but likewise to other institutions 
and agencies designed for help and ben- 
efit toward society irrespective of race, 
color or creed. 

Lacy became identified with the cot- 
tonseed products industry 47 years ago 
in Houston, Texas, the place of his 
birth. 

Lacy has always had his home in 
Texas—residing in Houston the first 
twenty-three years of his life, and the 
subsequent years in Dallas. 

He began work as a stenographer at 
Houston, June 11, 1909, for J. G. Leav- 
ell Company, a firm for many years 
prominent in the brokerage field, hand- 
ling cottonseed products, packing house 
products and provisions. 

Lacy at the age of fifteen was an 
employee of one of the larger railway 
systems at Houston as a stenographer, 
and in which work he remained until 
employed by J. G. Leavell Company. He 
continued his association with the Leav- 
ell Company for approximately ten 
years. He moved from Houston to Dal- 
las in 1913 to establish an office for 
the Leavell Company. 

In early January, 1918, the Leavell 
Company sent Lacy to San Francisco 
for a period of several months to pur- 
chase copra. At that time four cotton- 
seed oil mills in Texas had decided to 
try the crushing of copra. Those were 
the days of World War One when fats 
and proteins were much in demand, as 
usually happens during the years of 
warfare. 

In June. 1919. Lacy was invited by 
Sterne & Sons Company of Chicago to 
become associated with them as resident 
partner and manager of Sterne-Lacy 
Company, of Dallas—Lacy setting up 
the office in Dallas. 

In the summer of 1923, he took over 


+ JUNE 2, 1956 


the entire facilities and operations at 
Dallas of the Sterne-Lacy Company, 
and established his own company known 
for many years as D. A. Lacy Com- 


pany. 

In 1931 W. A. (Bill) Logan became 
an associate of D. A. Lacy Company, 
and within a very few months follow- 
ing the beginning of Lacy’s happy as- 
sociation with Bill Logan, the firm of 
Lacy-Logan Company came into exist- 
ence. 

At the present, the firm of Lacy- 
Logan Company, with offices at Dallas 
and Memphis, consists of D. A. Lacy, 
Sr., W. A. Logan, D. A. Lacy, Jr., Paul 
C. Lacy, and F. G. Nichol. 

Lacy-Logan Company of Memphis 
was established in 1950, and is in charge 
of O. H. Little who has been an asso- 
ciate of the firm for four years. Little 
was formerly of Texas. 

_Lacy-Logan Company, in the name of 
different partners, holds memberships 
in the Chicago Board of Trade, The 
New York Produce Exchange, the Mem- 
phis Merchants Exchange and the Dal- 
las Cotton Exchange. 


Taxes on Texas Farmers 
Rise for Ninth Year 


Taxes on Texas farm and ranch land 
in 1955 were 7.9 percent higher than 
in 1954 and at a new high average per 
acre, L. P. Gabbard, Texas A. & M. 
College, reports. 

; The average tax per acre for Texas 
in 1955 was 31.3 cents, up 2.3 cents 
per acre over the 29.0 cents in 1954. 

This was the ninth consecutive year 
of tax increase and the highest average 
tax per acre yet reached in Texas. 
While this substantial increase took 
place in taxes, prices of farm products 
declined. The price index of Texas farm 
commodities dropped from 265 in 1954 
to 259 in 1955. The tax-price ratio 
changed from 1.22 to 1.34, a relative 
increase in taxes of almost 10 percent. 
It took almost 10 percent more farm 
commodities to pay taxes in 1955 than 
in 1954. The relative tax burden has 
increased 74 percent during 1951-55. 

The average tax per acre increased 
19.6 percent in one part of the Rolling 
Plains Area; it declined 4.4 percent in 
the High Plains and the Trans-Pecos 
cattle grazing areas. These extreme va- 
riations in farm taxes among type-of- 
farming areas are caused mainly by 
differences in land values and local fi- 
nancial and economic conditions. 

No important changes occurred in the 
distribution of farm real estate taxes 
to the various types of governmental 
units. Farm taxes continue to be pre- 
dominantly local. 

The administration of the farm per- 
sonal property tax continues to show 
inequities among counties. Some coun- 
ties assess taxes on practically all prop- 
erty subject to tax; some limit the tax 
to livestock. while others ignore the 
personal property tax completely, Gab- 
bard added. 


@ HAROLD WILLIS WIED- 
MAN, Oroville, Calif., will start research 
on plant diseases of cotton and forage 
crops at New Mexico A. & M. on July 1 


@ GEORGE P. McCARTHY, 
formerly executive vice-president of Uni- 
versal Mills, Fort Worth, now is vice- 
president of Flour Mills of America. 


33 





@ Fats, Oils Brokers 
Elect Officers 


CECIL BAYS of Arcadia, Calif., was 
elected president of the National Fats 
and Oils Brokers’ Association at the 
annual meeting in Dallas during the 
National Cottonseed Products Associa- 
tion convention May 21-22. The fats and 
oils group was host at a reception for 
those attending the crushers’ meeting 
at the Statler Hilton Hotel. 

Bays succeeds George K. Dahlin of 
Chicago as head of the organization. 

F. Gordon Nichol of Dallas, who has 
been secretary-treasurer, was elected 
vice-president; and Gregory D. Huff- 
aker of New York was named secretary- 
treasurer. 

Members elected to the board of di- 
rectors were Dahlin, Bays, Nichol, Huff- 
aker, J. C. Laws and John Hinman. 


One of Plants Sold by 
Belton Bagging Co. 


Belton Bagging Co., manufacturers 
of jute bagging for covering cotton, in- 
terlinings and press cloth, announce the 
sale of one of their plants, located at 
North Belton, S.C., Williamston Road, 
to the Belton Yarn Mill. 

W. C. Brown, Jr., president of Belton 
Bagging Co., stated that their jute 
manufacturing operations have been 
transferred from this plant to Calcut- 
ta, India, and that no interruption in 
their deliveries of bagging throughout 
the Cotton Belt will occur. 


Brown also stated that their inter- 


lining and press cloth operations will 
continue as usual at Belton. 








Tristates Group Is 
Holding Meeting 


Several hundred representatives 
from oilseed processing mills and 
allied organizations will gather in 
Biloxi, Miss., June 6-7-8 for the 
thirty-first annual meeting of the 
Tristates Oil Mill Superintend- 
ents’ Association. The program 
for this meeting appeared in The 
Cotton Gin and Oil Mill Press on 
May 19. 

Officers of the Association in- 
clude E. E. Kressenberg, Mem- 
phis, president; O. M. Beckham, 
Osceola, Ark., vice-president; E. 
A. Gaulding, Jackson, Miss., vice- 
president; Roy Castillow, Little 
Rock, secretary - treasurer; and 
Mrs. Castillow, corresponding sec- 
retary. 











$1,000 Cotton Awards 
Awards of $1,000 in cash prizes are 
being offered in the Texas Plains 4-H 
Cotton Contest. District awards are 
given by Plains Cooperative Oil Mill, 
Lubbock, and additional awards are 
made by gins and others to winners in 
many of the counties participating. 


Gin Builds Third Unit 


Petersburg, Texas, Cooperative Gin 
Association 1s completing this summer 
its third gin plant. Ronald Weaver is 
manager and T. M. Ingram is the newly- 
elected president. 








@ Louisiana Decision 
Favors Mellorine 


A LOUISIANA court decision that 
swept aside restrictions blocking the 
manufacture and sale of frozen veg- 
etable fat desserts will help use of cot- 
tonseed oil. 

A. L. Story, chairman of the National 
Cotton Council’s domestic trade barriers 
committee, said “action by the Civil 
District Court for the Parish of Orleans 
in Louisiana overrules a series of legal 
maneuvers that were designed to keep 
nutritious and low-cost mellorine-type 
products off the market in an important 
cotton state and upholds a previous ac- 
tion by the State Board of Health, which 
authorized sales of mellorine in 1954.” 

J. H. Henry, Melrose, La., grower and 
ginner, said, “Opponents of mellorine 
have been able for several years to post- 
pone the effective date of sale for mel- 
lorine in Louisiana and to place a dis- 
criminatory ban on a tasty and nutri- 
tious food product which deserves to 
compete in the free market of the U.S. 
on its own merits. Now, however, tne 
public in Louisiana can make its own 
choice. Now competition will determine 
how much mellorine will be sold. Now 
competition will also decide how much 
mellorine fat will come from cottonseed. 
This is as it should be.” 


Frank D. Phillips, Jr., Wed 


A recent wedding of interest to mem- 
bers of the cotton oil industry was 
that of Nell Tunnell to Frank D. Phil- 
lips, Jr., at the home of the bride- 
groom’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank 
D. Phillips at Sherman, Texas. 









The New, Trouble-Free 


ZEIG UNIVERSAL 
TRAVELLING TELESCOPE 


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Ball Bearings 

® Rolls on Angle Iron Track 


® Travels Full Length with Light 
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Also, Complete Line of Gin, Oil Mill and Feed Mill Sheet Metal Products. 
The Home of the Famous and Talked-about 18 Gauge Elbows. 


ZEIG SHEET METAL WORKS 


P. O. Box 673 HEARNE, TEXAS Phone 504 


Write for 
Illustrated Bulletin 











THE COTTON GIN AND OIL MILL PRESS 


JUNE 2, 1956 - 






















e Sesame Grants Made 


+. 

To Texas Station 
SESAME RESEARCH will be 
by two grants-in-aid made _ to 
Experiment Station. 

The grants, according to Director 
R. D. Lewis, were made by the Texas 
Sesame Seed Growers of Paris, Texas, 
through Executive Vice-President Rob- 
ert L. Parker and the Frito Co. of Dal- 
las through President C. E. Doolin. The 
grants are for $500 and $1,000 respec- 
tively and the research studies which 
they will support are being conducted 
in the department of agronomy under 
the supervision of Dr. Murray L. Kin- 
man. 

The grant from the seed growers will 
be used for work on developing sesame 
varieties suited to the whole seed spe- 
cialty trade, namely, baking and con- 
fection. Here the emphasis is placed on 
seed quality and flavor. Presently the 
types being produced in Texas for these 
uses have a tan seed coat and bitter 
flavor. Both of these are undesirable 
from the whcle seed trade standpoint. 
The grant funds will be a big aid, says 
Kinman, in evaluating and increasing 
desirable varieties with sweet flavored, 
white seed. 

The Frito grant was used to purchase 
special equipment, a high clearance, self- 
propelled sprayer. This equipment will 
be used primarily in preharvest desic- 
cation experiments. Present recom- 
mendation for harvesting non-shatter- 
ing (Rio) sesame is to cut and wind- 
row at the time of maturity and after 
the plants have dried to complete the 
harvest with a combine equipped with 


helped 
Texas 


a pickup attachment. If preharvest des- 
iccation can be made practical and eco- 
nomical, it will be possible to combine 
the standing plant and thus make har- 
vesting more convenient, says Kinman. 

This same equipment will also be used 
for inoculating breeding plots with dif- 
ferent diseases in the search for dis- 
ease resistant varieties. 

These two grants, says Kinman, are 
evidence of the interest being shown in 
the sesame breeding program of the 
Station, which has been aided for a 
number of years by National Cotton- 
seed Products Association. 


Oil Chemists Announce 
Short Course Plans 


Details of the program for the Amer- 
ican Oil Chemists’ Society 1956 Short 
Course on Unit Processes in the Fatty 
Oil, Soap and Detergent Industries have 
been announced. It will be held July 
16-20 at Purdue University. 

The Society also has announced an 
Aug. 1 deadline for entries in the $500 
Fatty Acid Producers’ Award compe- 
tition. 

Sept. 24-26 are dates for the Society’s 
fall meeting at the Sherman Hotel in 
Chicago. 


W. R. Flippin Honored 


W. R. Flippin, Buckeye division man- 
ager, was one of the past presidents 
honored at the thirtieth anniversary ob- 
servance of the Memphis Agricultural 
Club on May 28. 


e Steelmaking Shows 
Gains in South 


STEELMAKING capacity in the South 
has increased 70 percent in the past 10 
years, Robert S. Lynch, president, At- 
lantic Steel Co., told the American Iron 
and Steel Institute May 24 in New York. 

Some steel companies in the South, 
Lynch noted, have increased capacity 
by about 200 percent in just one decade, 
and three producers were not even in 
operation 10 years ago. 

“It is no accident,” he continued, 
“that the number of steel producers 
has been growing—and that the smaller 
companies in many instances have been 
expanding far more rapidly than the 
major corporations.” 

Responsible management today knows 
the difference between fair competition 
and destructive competition. Big com- 
panies seek expansion for the whole 
economy as well as for themselves. He 
pointed out that they encouraged the 
growth of smaller enterprise both in- 
side and outside the industry. 


Ginning Research Summary 


Ginning research at Chickasha, Okla., 
is summarized in a recent publication, 
available from Oklahoma A. & M. Col- 
lege, Stillwater, Technical Bulletin No. 
T-59 is titled “Ginning Research at 
Chickasha, 1951-55.” The author is 
James A. Luscombe, formerly at Chick- 
asha but now in charge of the new 
USDA Cotton Ginning Laboratory at 
Clemson, S.C. 





Color folder on request. 


Galveston Late 


THE COTTON GIN AND OIL MILL PRESS 


Here’s that desert Isle you’ve 
dreamed about, with swaying palms, 
pounding surf, and 32 miles of 
beach. All the atmosphere of the 
south seas plus the comfort of mod- 
ern resort hotels, every recreational 
facility and Texas’ brightest night 
important, too, rates are 


life . 
extremely reasonable at 


Completely Air Conditioned 


-+.@ symphony of Surf, Sand and Sun 


* JUNE 2, 1956 


hotel GALVEZ 
a 
hotel BUCCANEER 


on the beach, Galveston, Texas 


Television @ Radio © Swimming Pool 


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HOTEL ADMIRAL SEMMES 
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© Four Changes Made 
In Swift Officers 


FOUR major changes in Swift & 
Co.’s_ officer ranks have been an- 
nounced by President Porter M. Jarvis. 
They involve election of two new vice- 
presidents, transfer of responsibilities 
of another, and the retirement of George 
J. Stewart, vice-president and director, 
because of ill health. 

Stewart is retiring on pension after 
nearly 45 years of service, 25 of them 
as an officer. A native Chicagoan, 
Stewart started his Swift career as an 
office boy on Oct. 3, 1911. Twenty years 
later he was elected a vice-president— 
one of the youngest in the company’s 
history. In January, 1950, he was elected 
a director. 

New and broader responsibilities have 
been assigned to Vice-President Harold 
E. Wilson, who has been the officer in 
charge of sales for the last four years. 
He will become associated with O. E. 
Jones, executive vice-president who is 
charge of future sales planning, adver- 
tising, merchandising, and consumer 
packaged frozen foods. 

F. J. Townley, general sales mana- 
ger, was elected’ vice-president, in 
charge of all general sales departments 
of Swift and associated plants. 

J. B. Miller, district sales manager at 
Atlanta, was elected vice-president. In 
his new post he will direct refinery, 
vegetable oil buying, margarine and 
storage operations. He takes over the 
responsibilities of Stewart. 

The two new Swift vice-presidents 
have had experience in various sales 
divisions. 

Townley started with Swift as a stu- 
dent salesman in Birmingham in 1924. 
Since then he has held various sales 
positions, in Nashville, Montgomery, 
Houston, Kansas City and Chicago. In 
1951 he was named assistant general 
sales manager, was placed in charge of 
branch house sales in 1952 and was 
named general sales manager in 1953. 

Miller joined Swift 28 years ago as a 
clerk in Fort Worth. After several 
years in the margarine and refinery 
divisions, Miller was transferred to 
sales units in Texas, serving as manager 
at Beaumont and later at Houston. In 
1952 he became district sales manager 
at Fort Worth and late in 1953 was 
named assistant general sales manager. 
Since last January, Miller has served 
as district sales manager in the At- 
lanta territory. 

Vice-President Wilson has a 36-year 
record with Swift, starting as a clerk 
in the Chicago accounting department. 
Later he was transferred to sales. He 
subsequently managed the company’s 
sales unit at Springfield, Ill., was dis- 
trict manager for sales units with head- 
quarters at Syracuse, N.Y., and also 
manager of the New York district ter- 
ritory. He was elected vice-president in 
charge of sales in 1952. 


Russians Studying Cotton 


Two Russians, N. I. Milokhov and 
S. S. Kanash, visited Lubbock and the 
South Plains area of Texas during the 
last week of May to study cotton pro- 
duction and processing. They visited 
gin machinery manufacturing plants, 
gins and oil mills as well as cotton 
farms and research centers. They also 
are studying cotton in Arizona, Mis- 
sissippi and North Carolina on their 
tour. 


36 





New Book 


RELATIONS IN INDUSTRIAL 
SOUTHEAST DISCUSSED 


Dr. Glen Gilman, Georgia Institute of 
Technology, is the author of a detailed 
study, of special interest to members of 
the textile industry, titled “Human Re- 
lations in the Industrial Southeast.” 





Prepared under the sponsorship of the 
Textile Education Foundation, Inc., the 
book was published by the University of 
North Carolina Press. 


g@M. O. WATKINS became 
Florida Extension Service director on 
June 1, succeeding H. G. CLAYTON, 
retired. 








Editorial 


A GOOD EXAMPLE—AND 
A CHALLENGE 


ATIONAL DAIRY MONTH in June follows closely on the heels 

of National Cotton Week in May. Both observances pay trib- 

utes to fine products, commodities that contribute much to the 

nation. Both cotton and dairy products deserve all of the attention 

that can be concentrated on their merits and their problems. Both 

ought to have far more research, advertising and promotion than 
they are gettirg. 

Cotton men are interested in the progress of the dairy industry 
for many reasons. Its products are basic to healthful diets for the 
nation. Its producers make up one of the largest and most im- 
portant segments of agriculture. Dairy cattle offer cottonseed feed 
products an important market, and dairymen benefit from the wide 
availability of these feed products. And, of course, there is the 
factor of the competition between butter and margarine for the 
consumer’s favor. 

The dairy industry recently has embarked upon a widespread 
program of promotion of all of its products, a program long over- 
due. This is far more extensive than the observance of National 
Dairy Month. It includes a year-round advertising and promotional 
campaign—featuring such attention-getters as Disneyland and the 
Lone Ranger on TV, Bob Hope on radio, full page ads in news- 
papers and other publicity material. During June, Disneyland is 
expected to reach 50 million people each week and the Lone Ranger 
25 million—to say nothing of the audience reached by newspapers, 
magazines and other media. And, these are not mere statistics: 
Disneyland definitely reaches our own three boys, each week, no 
matter what program the parents may prefer to watch! 

Cotton people will do well to think about the following fact. 
The National Cotton Council does not have millions to spend on 
nationwide advertising programs nor does it ask the industry to 
put up the millions needed for such a program. Instead, it takes a 
few dollars and multiplies them many times by getting others to 
invest in cotton promotion. For example, the downtown merchants 
of a single city—Dallas—spent as much money promoting National 
Cotton Week this year as the Council had available to spend 
throughout the nation in behalf of Cotton Week. It’s a marvel and 
a tribute to a very able, dedicated staff that the National Cotton 
Council can do so much with so little. 

Dollar for dollar, no one gets more for the money than the 
cotton industry is getting for its investment in National Cotton 
Week and other work of the National Cotton Council. The trouble 
is that too often it’s a case of penny for dollar—only a penny avail- 
able to spend for cotton to match a dollar spent to promote its 
competitors. And, a penny just won’t do the job—no matter how 
hard Rhea Blake, Ed Lipscomb or the others in the Council and in 
the industry work. 

Right now, each cotton product is being asked to provide a few 
more pennies for cotton in its fight for survival. We think that 
National Dairy Month, and every other month, is a good time for 
cotton people to ponder carefully the need for doing more—the 
vital necessity for investing in their own future by supporting the 
National Cotton Council. 









JUNE 2, 1956 - 








THE COTTON GIN AND OIL MILL PREsSs 














Texas Ginners Start 
District Meetings 


District meetings of Texas Cot- 


ton Ginners’ Association are get- 
ting under way. Ed H. Bush, Dal- 


Memory of Ward Delaney 
Honored by Foundation 


A bronze tablet, in memory of Ward 
Delaney, first executive director of the 
Oscar Johnston Foundation, was viewed 
by National Cotton Council directors 
May 25 at the Foundation building in 


USDA Has Export Program 
For Cotton Textiles 


Cotton textiles, yarns and spinnable 
cotton waste made from U.S. cotton will 
get export help, USDA has announced. 
The export program for raw cotton will 
be extended to include these cotton prod- 














ieee te eee eae a The building is Council head- yets and details of the plan being de- 
shail ailiniec Mee sina, Ue aamabaeeend aa ers. palaces veloped will be announced before Aug. 1, 
2 s é visit to the building followed a when the program starts. 
June 5, Districts 13-14, noon luncheon of the Council’s board of direc- 
lunch at Little Creek Motel, Harl- tors, at which Mrs. Margaret Delaney, ¢ Japanese Imports — Commerce Secre- 
ingen. Charlottesville, Va., widow of the late tary Sinclair Weeks said that this act 
June 6, Districts 11-12, noon executive director, was honor guest. would greatly increase U.S. textile ex- 





ports. He also announced that the Japan- 
ese have restated their plans to place 
voluntary limits on textile exports to the 
U.S. in 1956 and “to adopt a similar 
measure in a 


A. L. Durand, Hobart, Okla., chairman 
of the Board of Trustees of the Founda- 
tion, paid tribute to Delaney’s achieve- 
ment in making the Foundation a fact 
as well as a name. 


lunch at White Plaza Hotel, Cor- 
pus Christi. 

June 27, District 10, noon lunch 
at Richmond Country Club, Rich- 
mond. 








1957. 


















® India Will Crush 


More Cottonseed 


INTEREST in crushing cottonseed is 
increasing in India, where the crop has 
grown for 5,000 years but relatively 
little of the seed has been processed, 
according to C. R. Das of New Delhi, 
manager of the Delhi Cloth Mills Chem- 
ical Works. 

Das recently has been visited oil mills 
and other firms in the U.S. and was in- 
terviewed while at Producers Cotton Oil 
Co. in Fresno. He said that higher liv- 
ing standards are increasing demand 
for fats and that India will increase its 
cotton production. 







SPEED UP UNLOADING WITH A 
BOARDMAN 










Wilson & Co. Moves 

Wilson & Co. general offices in Chi- 
cago have moved to Prudential Plaza 
Building. The new telephone number is 
Whitehall 4-4600. 






















Unloading is the special job of this 
cone-shaped Superblast Fan. Its air 






flow pulls in cotton and seed—slides 






the material off the perforated cone- 
shaped screen—picks the cotton and 







seed up again at the outlet, where it’s 






on its way. The blades never strike 






the material—eliminating roping, seed 
cracking and fire hazards. The Board- 
man Superblast Unloading Fan will 
work faster and more economical for 
YOU. See it today! 


4 BOARDMAN co. 


OKLAHOMA CITY 


1401 S.W. 11TH 


BRANCH OFFICE: TULSA, OKLAHOMA 









Bob Mays Recovering 


J. R. MAYS, Memphis, president, Bar- 
row-Agee Laboratories, is recovering 
from a lengthy illness, but will have to 
remain at home, 1564 Harbert, for some 
time before resuming normal activity 
in the chemical and oilseed fields. His 
friends throughout these industries will 
join the staff of The Press in best wishes 
for his continued recovery. 





Makers of 
CONVEYING FANS, 
CONVEYOR BOXES 

AND COVERS. 



















THE COTTON GIN AND OIL MILL PREss + JUNE 2, 1956 37 








NCPA Meeting 
(Continued from Page 11) 


ical sketch of the new president accom- 
panies this article. 

Association members. presented a 
handsome gift to Retiring President 
and Mrs. E. H. Lawton as an expression 
of their appreciation for his leadership 
during the past season. A silver service 
was presented at the convention, in ad- 
dition to an Oriental rug sent directly 
to their home. 

The following directors who had been 
nominated by the states were elected, 
to serve along with the new president, 


retiring president, and four directors 
at large: 
J. S. Long, Cuilman, Ala. 


James A. Yost, Litchfield Park, Ariz. 

James Hicky, Forrest City, Ark. 

W. B. Coberly, Jr., Los Angeles, Calif. 

E. G. McKenzie, Jr., Macon, Ga. 

J. E. Byram, Jr., Alexandria, La. 

J. B. Perry, Jr., Grenada, Miss. 

A. K. Shaifer, Clarksdale, Miss. 

W. T. Melvin, Rocky Mount, N.C. 

A. L. Durand, Chickasha, Okla. 

R. M. Hughes, Greer, S.C. 

Frank B. Caldwell, Sr., Jackson, Tenn. 

Roy B. Davis, Lubbock, Texas 

Joe Flaig, Dallas, Texas. 

W. L. Goble, Sr., Waco, Texas. 

S. J. Vaughan, Jr., Hillsboro, Texas. 

Directors at large, elected on the rec- 
ommendation of the board of directors, 
are: C. T. Prindeville, Chicago; E. A. 
Geoghegan, New Orleans; W. H. Knapp, 


Cincinnati; and Dupuy Bateman, Jr., 
Houston. 

Association directors for 1955-56 held 
a meeting on the Monday morning pre- 
ceding formal opening of the convention, 
and the 1956-57 board of directors met 
at lunch after the convention adjourned. 


and re-appointed the Association staff. 
Other Activities 


The entertainment features, arranged 
by local committees in cooperation with 
Association officials, were enjoyed by 
one of the largest crowds of recent 
years. The first event on the entertain- 
ment program was the Sunday evening 
reception. 

The ladies’ luncheon was held at noon 
Monday and featured a fashion presen- 
tation by Neiman-Marcus, world fam- 
ous store. 

The annual handicap golf tournament 
was held Monday afternoon at Brook 
Hollow Country Club. 

National Fats and Oils Brokers’ As- 
sociation was host Monday evening at 
a reception for all convention regis- 
trants. 

The thirty-eighth annual reunion of 
the Old Guard, industry organization, 
was held Monday evening at the Dallas 
Club. 

Elected to membership in the honor- 
ary organization of oil mill leaders were 
Hal Harris, Greenville, Miss.; J. W. 


Simmons, Jr., Dallas; and W. R. Flip- 
pin, Memphis. R. Haughton, Dallas, was 
elected an honorary member. 

Old Guard officers, all re-elected, are: 





New NCPA Head Active 
In Many Industry and 
Civic Programs 


m HARRY S. BAKER, Fresno, the 
1956-57 president of National Cot- 
tonseed Products Association, is a 
native of Tennessee who moved to 
California with his family as a boy 
and settled in the Imperial Valley. 
While a student at Oregon State 
College, Baker returned to the San 
Joaquin Valley each fall quarter to 
work in the office of a cotton gin 
and to buy and sell cotton. 

While in college, he met his wife, 
then Tina Amick of Grants Pass, 
Ore., a member of the class of 1927, 
as Baker was, and they were mar- 
ried on April 2, 1927. They have two 
children, Jane (Mrs. Fred W. Wiley) 
and a son, David Franklin. 

After working in the graduate 
manager’s office at Oregon State 


Commerce; 


and industry programs. 





College until the summer of 1928, Baker returned to California as manager 
of some of the ginning operations of San Joaquin Cotton Oil Co. When 
Producers’ Cotton Oil Co. was organized in 1930, Baker became associated 
with the firm as manager of one of the gins, at Helm. In 1933, he became 
field manager for the firm, in charge of all production loans and farming 
operations; in 1935, he was elected to the board of directors; and in De- 
cember, 1937, he was unanimously elected president of the company. 
Baker also is president and a director of a number of other associated oil 
milling, ginning and cotton firms; and president and director of Producers 
Cotton Oil Agricultural Foundation, which seeks to conduct and aid the 
development and dissemination of agricultural information. His many ac- 
tivities include serving as a director of the National Cotton Council, mem- 
ber of USDA’s cotton and cottonseed advisory committee; member, New 
York Cotton Exchange advisory committee; director, California Manufac- 
turers’ Association; past president, Fresno City and County Chamber of 
member of the Rotary Club; 
College Agricultural Foundation; and leadership in numerous other civic 





vice-chairman, Fresno State 











JUNE 2, 1956 > 





W. D. LOWE, Jackson, Miss., was hon- 
ored for his leadership in the cottonseed 
crushing industry by election as an hon- 
orary member of National Cottonseed 
Products Association at the annual meet- 
ing in Dallas. He was president of NCPA 
in 1950-51 and has served on many 
committees. 


Tom Law, Atlanta, president; Jas. R. 
Gill, Paris, Texas, vice-president; R. M. 
Hughes, Greer, S.C., historian; and C. 
E. Garner, Memphis, secretary-treasur- 
er. 

The final social events, Tuesday even- 
ing, were a reception followed by the 
annual dinner and dance. 

Committees for the 1956 
were: 

General Arrangements — Joe Flaig, 
chairman, Simmons Cotton Oil Mills, 
Dallas; L. W. Althauser, The Procter 
& Gamble Co., Dallas; Bruce Coleman, 
The Englander Co., Dallas; Jas. R. 
Gill, Southland Cotton Oil Co., Paris, 
Texas; Richard Haughton, Jr., The Cot- 
ton Gin & Oil Mill Press, Dallas; and 
— Tobian, Louis Tobian & Co., Dal- 
as. 

Golf—Carr Robinson, chairman, Rob- 
inson-Adams Co., Dallas; Tom UH. 
Hughston, Strader-Hughston Co., Dal- 
las; a . Kutner, Merrill Lynch, 
Pierce, Fenner & Beane, Dallas; W. A. 
Logan, Lacy-Logan Co., Dallas; A. 
Chad Ogden Chase Bag Co., Kansas 
City, Mo.; and W. B. Vaughan, Kim- 
bell-Norris Mills, Ft. Worth. 


To Meet in Washington 


convention 


Plans for holding the next annual 
convention of the Association in Wash- 
ington, D.C., were announced at the 
conclusion of the Dallas convention. 
The 1957 meeting will be on May 20-21 
at the Shoreham Hotel. 


New Bulletin 


BAUER DOUBLE-DISC ATTRITION 
MILLS ARE DESCRIBED 


Bauer double disc attrition mills are 
the subject of a new Bulletin A-5-A 
available from The Bauer Bros. Co., 
1701 Sheridan Avenue, Springfield, 
Ohio, or The Cotton Gin and Oil Mill 
Press, P.O. Box 7985, Dallas 26. Plates 
designed for specific functions are il- 
lustrated and described in the publica- 
tion. 


THE COTTON GIN AND OIL MILL PRESS 








From our Washington Bureau 
(Continued from Page 14) 


hower to take some things he didn’t want. 
Chief among those were provisions for 
a more aggressive cotton export pro- 
gram, a permissive two-price plan for 
rice and some increase in non-corn feed 
grain prices. 

The cotton export provision in the 
bill finally sent to the White House 
poses some difficult problems of admin- 
istrative interpretation. For several days 
the USDA legal experts have been work- 
ing on an interpretation that would sat- 
isfy both the cotton industry and the 
Administration. 

The language of the conference re- 
port on the farm bill appears to give 
Benson considerable discretion in the 
acceptance or rejection of bids on cot- 
ton for export. What it does, however, 
is knock the props out from under 
Benson’s announced intention not to 
lower export prices below 27.5 cents 
per pound, basis 7/8-inch middling. 

That section of the bill directs the 
CCC to use its existing powers and au- 
thorities to encourage the exportation 
of cotton by offering to make it avail- 
able at prices based on sales under the 
so-called million-bale program  an- 
nounced last year, and “even lower if 
necessary,” in order to be competitive 
with foreign countries exporting cotton 
in substantial quantities. 

That, on the face of it, appears to di- 
rect the Secretary to offer cotton at 
25.5 cents per pound, and to go still 
lower if necessary. The one word— 
“based”—may indicate, however, that 
the figure is not necessarily exact. 

The conference explained that “this 
provision directs that such quantities 
of cotton be offered and sold as will re- 
establish and maintain the fair histor- 
ical share of the world market for U.S. 
cotton, the quantity to be determined by 
the Secretary of Agriculture. 

“It is hoped,” the conference report 
reads, “that the Secretary can regain 
the historical American share (esti- 
mated at five million bales) of the 
world market without unnecessarily 
lowering the level of world prices for 


cotton, and it is not intended that he 
shall be required to drastically reduce 
the price of cotton far below the level 
of prices received at the sale announced 
Aug. 12, 1955. 

“On the other hand it is intended 
that he shall have ample authority to 
reduce prices to whatever level he finds 
necessary to accomplish this result.” 

Benson has sold a little over a quarter 
of a million bales at 27.5 cents. There 
are reports that the State Department 
had promised some exporting nations 
that we would not cut the price farther. 

Congress said, in effect, we mean to 
go after our share of the world cotton 
market and we’ll meet the price of all 
comers. The law is clear: Benson must 
accept bids that will result in the sale 
of approximately five million bales in 
the 12 months beginning Aug. 1. 


e Countries Agree 


On Yarn Terms 


MEETING at Southport, England, 20 
nations have agreed on a universal sys- 
tem for expressing yarn count. 

The word “Tex” which indicates the 
yarn weight in grams per 1,000 meters, 
should be used exclusively by their 
technologists, the countries agreed. The 
group stated that this system would 
displace the multiplicity of yarn num- 
bering systems now used in each coun- 
try. 

This action was supported by repre- 
sentatives of International Wool Tex- 
tile Organization, International Linen 
and Hemp Confederation and B.I.S.F.A. 
(International Bureau for Standardiz- 
ing Synthetic Fibers). 

Seventeeen U.S. delegates attending 
the meeting have been nominated by 
various organizations to represent the 
American Standards Association, U.S. 
member of the 37-country organization, 
at the meetings of ISO Technical Com- 
mittee 38 on Textiles, held May 11-18. 

Members of the delegation include 
T.L.W. Bailey, Jr.. USDA; Dr. Earl E. 
Berkley, Anderson, Clayton & Co., 
Houston; George S. Buck, Jr. National 
Cotton Council; Louis A. Fiori, USDA; 


Gin Sponsors Cotton Maid Winner 


THE WINNER of the Dona Ana County (New Mexico) Maid of Cotton Contest on 
May 18, Argie Hoskins, is shown here. On her left is Mitchell Landers, executive 


vice-president, Supima Association of 


America. 


Presenting her with a gift is 


Marshall O. Thompson, manager of Mesilla Co-op Gin, which sponsored her in the 
contest. She will compete in the state finals at the New Mexico Cotton Ginners’ 
Association convention at Ruidoso, June 21-22. 


THE COTTON GIN AND OIL MILL PRESS 


+ JUNE 2, 1956 


Otto Goedecke, Otto Goedecke Corp., 
Hallettsville, Texas; Joel F. Hembree, 
University of Texas; Dr. Kenneth 
Hertel, University of Tennessee; Charles 
E. Hilton, American Standards Associa- 
tion, New York; Professor William A. 
Newell, North Carolina State College, 
Raleigh; Edward T. Pickard, Kent, 
Conn.; Dr. Arthur G. Scroggie, E. I. 
du Pont de Nemours and Co., Inc., Wil- 
mington, Del.; A. L. Vandergriff, Lum- 
mus Cotton Gin Co., Columbus, Ga.; 
Benjamin L. Whittier, North Carolina 
State College, Raleigh; William L. 
Wilt, The Sheffield Corp., Dayton, 
Ohio; Dr. John W. Wright, USDA, Lt. 
Col. Carl L. Whitney, Department of 
the Army, Quartermaster Research and 
Development Command, Natick, Mass. 


New Cotton Standards 
Approved at Meeting 


Delegates to the Eleventh Universal 
Cotton Standards Conference in Wash- 
ington, May 21-23, approved 1,712 boxes 
of universal cotton standards. They will 
be the basis for international trade in 
American upland cotton for the next 
three years. In accordance with the Cot- 
ton Standards Act, they must be used 
as the official standards in this coun- 
try for all transactions based on de- 
scription. 

In addition to approving the boxes 
for the physical standards for white and 
tinged cotton, the conference recom- 
mended that descriptive standards for 
Strict Good Middling be promulgated. 
The Conference agreed that the new 
grade standards boxes will be valid for 
12 months instead of 18, effective im- 
mediately. The group also decided not 
to promulgate physical standards for 
spotted cotton at this time. 

USDA will continue to prepare field 
trial boxes for the grades of Strict 
Middling, Middling, Strict Low Middling, 
and Low Middling for spotted cotton. 
These will be available for distribution 
as during the past three years. 


Cotton Exchanges Studying 
Foreign Growth Contract 


New York Cotton Exchange and New 
Orleans Cotton Exchange have announc- 
ed the formation of special committees 
to study the adoption of a contract which 
will permit the delivery of cotton other 
than that grown in the U.S. 

For more than 85 years, the two 
exchanges have only permitted delivery 
on contract of cotton grown in the U.S. 
Now, because of U.S. policies, the ex- 
changes are studying the new policy in 
an effort to “re-establish their useful- 
ness to the world cotton trade as a 
place where all segments may buy and 
sell freely without the hampering in- 
fluence of artificial support levels and 
other governmental policies.” 


DDT or Toxaphene Will 


Control Cutworms 


Cutworms are bothering cotton in 
some California fields, and V. E. Bur- 
ton, farm advisor at Bakersfield, says 
that ground applications of DDT or 
Toxaphene have been most effective 
against this pest. He recommends DDT 
at the rate of 1.5 pounds of spray or 
2.0 pounds of dust for ground applica- 
tion. Toxaphene rates should be 3.0 to 
3.5 pounds. 


39 













e@ More Butter and Less 


Margarine Bought 


HOUSEWIVES continue to report to 
USDA that they are buying more but- 
ter and less margarine than a year 
ago. (For other margarine information, 
see the report elsewhere in this issue 
of the meeting of the margarine man- 
ufacturers’ organization.) 

In March, 1956, women surveyed re- 
ported buying seven percent more but- 
ter than a year earlier, but five percent 


less margarine. March was the sixth 
consecutive month of decline in mar- 
garine buying, after 12 consecutive 


months in which margarine purchases 
had been larger than in the correspond- 
ing month a year earlier. 


e Margarine — Margarine purchases for 
household use during March 1956 were 
estimated at 94 million pounds, about 
five million pounds less than March 
1955. Slightly less than 60 percent of 
all families reported buying margarine 
during March 1956 as compared with 
almost 62 percent in March 1955. Those 
families buying margarine bought less 
frequently during March 1956 than a 
year earlier, but they were buying larg- 
er average amounts per purchase. 

For the year April, 1955-March, 1956, 
household purchases of margarine were 
about two percent larger but average 
prices were six percent lower than in 
the corresponding period a year earlier. 
The market for margarine, as indicated 
by the percentage of all families buy- 
ing, showed virtually no change from 
the April 1954-March 1955 period to 


the April 1955-March 1956 period. Dur- 
ing April 1955-March 1956, the fre- 
quency of purchase per buying family 
fell off almost eight percent from the 
preceding 12-month period, but families 
buying margarine reported an increase 
of about five percent in the average 
size of purchase. 

Household purchases of margarine 
declined about five million pounds from 
February to March 1956. In 1954 and 
1955 the purchase movement was also 
downward from February to March by 
three and four million pounds, respec- 
tively. 


e Butter — Total purchases of butter 
for household use during March, 1956 
were reported at just over 68 million 
pounds compared with 64 million pounds 
for March 1955. About 47 percent of all 
families made a butter purchase during 
March 1956 compared with 45 percent a 
year earlier. Both the frequency of pur- 
chase and the average size of purchase 


were somewhat higher than a _ year 
earlier. 
Butter purchases by householders 


during the year ending March 31, 1956, 
were about five percent larger than in 
the corresponding period of 1954-55. 
Butter prices to consumers were about 
the same during both periods. In addi- 
tion, the percentage of all families buy- 
ing butter during April 1955-March 
1956 was up about four percent over a 
year earlier, and the average size of 
purchase per buying family was up 
fractionally. However, the frequency of 
purchase per buying family fell off 
about five percent. 





. Non-slip 

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No cut bands 
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Oe ON 


B/D BALE TIE BUCKLES 
have been proven and accepted interna- 
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3050 East Slauson Ave., Huntington Park, Calif. 
75 Market Street, Oakland, Calif. 









JUNE 2, 1956 > 





hee SR ra emeesee ss 


iO 





Cooperative Mill, Gins 


Sponsor Conferences 


Four or more director-manager con- 
ferences for cooperative organizations 
will be held this year in Texas under 
sponsorship of Texas Federation of Co- 
operatives, Houston Bank for Coopera- 
tives and Texas Extension Service. 

Meetings definitely scheduled are July 
10 at Mid-West Cooperative Oil Mill, 
Hamlin; July 11, Ralls Inn at Ralls; 
July 12, Cochran County Activities 
Building, Morton; and July 13, O’Donnell 
Grade School, O’Donnell. 

The Hamlin meeting will be sponsored 
by Mid-West Cooperative Oil Mill and 
chairman for the meeting will be man- 
ager R. L. McClung. 

Sponsors for the Ralls conference are 
Ralls Cooperative Gin Company, Loren- 
zo Cooperative Gin Ass’n., Crosbyton 
Farmers Cooperative Gin, and Owens 
Cooperative Gin Company. C. R. (Doc) 
Cooper, manager of the Ralls gin, will 
be the chairman. 

Morton Cooperative Gin, Maple Coop- 
erative Gin, and Enochs Farmers Coop- 
erative Ass’n. will sponsor the Morton 
meeting with J. R. Kuykendall, manager 
of the Morton gin, as chairman. 

Cooperatives sponsoring the O’Donnell 
meeting are O’Donnell Farmers Coopera- 
tive Gin Ass’n., Wells Farmers Gin, 
Tahoka Cooperative Ass’n. No. 1, and 
Lamesa Cooperative Gin. Chairman of 
the O’Donnell conference will be Weldon 
Martin, manager of the O’Donnell gin. 


Storage Loan Program Is 
Extended Until 1957 


Extension of farm storage facility 
and farm storage equipment loan pro- 
grams for another year (through June 
30, 1957) has been announced by USDA. 

Any farm owner-operator, share ten- 
ant, share landlord, or producer part- 
nership is eligible to participate in the 
programs. Application for a loan may 
be made at the county Agricultural 
Stabilization and Conservation Commit- 
tee (ASC) office. The loan may be 
made either directly through the county 
office or through a local bank. Loans 
may be obtained on storage for wheat, 
corn, oats, rye, barley, soybeans, grain 
sorghums, dry edible beans, rice, pea- 
nuts, cottonseed, flaxseed, and winter 
cover crop seeds. 


Golden Anniversary Plans 
Made by Meat Institute 


American Meat Institute will hold its 
Golden Anniversary Convention Sept. 
28-Oct. 2 at the Palmer House in Chi- 
cago. The organization represents 85 
percent of the commercial meat packing 
business of the U.S. 





New Peruvian Cotton 


Pima BB is the designation of a new, 
high-yielding cotton variety which has 
been developed in Peru, according to 
the Pan-American Union. Yields are 
said to be as much as three times those 
of established Peruvian varieties. 


Cotton Is Rotary Topic 
Ronald Tucker, National Cotton 
Council field representative, spoke at 
the May 24 meeting of the Rotary Club 
at Blytheville, Ark. 


THE COTTON GIN AND OIL MILL PRESS 


























Started Out As Farmer 





Mayor of Ralls Stumbled 
Into Ginning Industry 


@ BILL SMITH has made a fine record in West Texas as a ginner, 


L. SMITH, a leading West Texas 
e ginner in Ralls, has had a unique 
start in the ginning business. As he 
puts it, he stumbled into the business. 
He is known around Ralls as Mayor 
Smith, having been elected to office 
April 3 this year; and is quite well 
known over the state as a leader in the 
Lions Club. He was the first president 
of the Ralls Lions Club, 1953, and be- 
came zone chairman of District 2-Tl in 
1955. He is at present deputy district 
governor. 

Born in 1901 near Anson, in Jones 
County, Bill remained a farmer until 
1928 when he took a job of bookkeeping 
at the Texas Farm Bureau Gin in 
Lorenzo (eight miles west of Ralls). 
His good work resulted in his being of- 
fered the job as manager of the gin in 
1929. He remained manager until 1932. 
In 1933 he moved to Ralls and managed 
two gins for the organization until 
1935. In a deal with partners, he 
bought and sold another gin that he 
managed in Ralls; and then he set- 
tled as manager in 1951 of his own gin 
at Ralls. 

Bill is a square shooter and knows 
the business from A to Z. He has ultra- 
modern equipment and does a good job 
for his customers. 

This probably accounts for his present 
office of president of the Plains Gin- 
ners’ Association. He has done legisla- 
tive research on the pink bollworm 
committee and is an active member of 
the National Cotton Council. Bill was 
recently elected as Crosby County di- 
rector to the Plains Cotton Growers, 
Inc., a 23-county organization created 
to promote South Plains cotton. 

Having to do a lot of community and 
civic work doesn’t keep Bill from being 
an active member of the First Baptist 
Church in Ralls. He was called upon to 


W. L. SMITH 


THE COTTON GIN AND OIL MILL PRESS 


community leader and worker in many other programs. 





help others in the church work on a 
new $200,000 building that is now 
near completion. He and his wife attend 
church, and often on Sunday expect a 
visit from their son Jean D. Smith, or 
his daughter Patsy (Mrs. James Moore). 
Jean owns two gins at Cone, eight miles 
north of Ralls. 

Mayor Smith is a quiet man, who sel- 
dom expresses his opinion at a gather- 
ing—but he is also a man that thinks! 
He gets things done. 


e V. C. Marshall Wins 


Texas Farm Award 


V. C. MARSHALL, soil conservation 
leader, received the Hoblitzelle Award 
of $5,000 and a gold medal on May 23 
at the Texas Research Foundation field 
day at Renner. The 1956 award is for 
the advancement of Texas rural life. 

Marshall was selected by a state com- 
mittee from among many nominees as 
the Texan who made the most notable 
contribution during the past three years 
as a professional agricultural worker. 
He is executive director of the State 
Soil Conservation Board. 

The award is alternated every third 
year among agricultural scientists, prac- 
ticing farmers and ranchmen and pro- 
fessional workers in agriculture. 

The presentation was the climax of a 
tour and barbecue of Texas Research 
Foundation and ceremonies in which 
speakers included Karl Hoblitzelle, donor 
of the award; Mayor R. L. Thornton of 
Dallas; J. B. Thomas, president, Texas 
Electric Service, Fort Worth; and Judge 
Sarah T. Hughes, Dallas. 

Marshall has devoted his life to agri- 
cultural betterment. He gave his own 
school district its first bus, a modified 
Model T truck. He helped to write and 
secure legislation to provide rural school 
transportation. He led the program that 
resulted in vocational agriculture in 
Texas. 

Starting in the 1930, he travelled 
thousands of miles in behalf of the soil 
conservation program, led in the work to 
pass state legislation for conservation 
districts and became a member of the 
first State Soil Conservation Board. He 
later was executive secretary until last 
Jan. 1. 


Meeting Has Cotton Theme 


“Sell More To Produce More Cotton” 
was the theme of the May 31 meeting 
of Arkansas Agricultural Council at 
Forrest City. Speakers included Carl- 
ton Power, National Cotton Council; 
Sadler Love, American Cotton Manu- 
facturers’ Institute; and Representative 
Jamie L. Whitten of Mississippi. 


@ NANCY GENEROSE, a 
daughter, is the newest member of the 
family of D. L. ELMORE, cashier for 
Southern Cotton Oil Co., Darlington, S S.C. 


* JUNE 2, 1956 


















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41 








e Cotton Maid Starts 
Trip to Europe 


MAID OF COTTON Pat Cowden of 
Raleigh, N.C., will be Europe-bound 
June 5 as the American cotton indus- 


try’s fashion and good will ambassador 
to five nations. 

Pat will be the first of King Cotton’s 
18 Maids to visit Spain. Other nations 
on her tour are England, France, Bel- 
gium, and Germany. 

The North Carolina beauty goes first 
to England. Accompanying her will be 
two Cotton Council representatives, An- 
nette Reid, tour manager, and Margot 
Herzog, fashion director. 

On June 7 she will be featured in a 
fashion show at London under auspices 
of the Cotton Board of England. It will 
be staged at the national trade fair 
sponsored by the British Board of 
Trade. 

On June 8, the Maid will be presented 
in fashion showings featuring British 
cottons at the Color, Style, and Design 
Center of the Manchester Cotton Board. 

A return to London for sightseeing 
is scheduled June 9, and the next day 
Maid Pat will leave London for Barce- 
lona, Spain. A reception is planned for 
her at the Barcelona airport, and that 
evening Pat and her party will attend 
a bullfight. 

On June 11, a morning conference is 


scheduled at which members of the 
Spanish cotton textile industry and 
press representatives will meet the 


Maid; in the afternoon a reception will 
be held; and that evening Pat will par- 
ticipate in a cotton fashion show. 


France is next on the Maid of Cotton 
itinerary, with Pat scheduled to arrive 
in Paris June 13. The next day she 
will open the French Cotton Syndicate 
exhibit showing promotion and market 
research work by the National Cotton 
Council in the U.S. and the Syndicate 
in France. This event will mark the of- 


ficial opening of the joint promotion 
activities in France. 
On June 15, the visiting American 


Maid will serve as official hostess at a 
charity benefit to be staged under aus- 
pices of the French Cotton Syndicate. 
The following two days will be spent 
visiting French couturier houses. 

The Maid will go from Paris to Brus- 
sels, Belgium. She will also go to Liege 
for a fashion show and to Antwerp for 
a fashion show. 

At Ghent, June 22, Maid Pat offi- 
cially will open the new Belgian cotton 
organization, Institut National Du 
Coton. The ceremony will be followed 
by a cotton industry reception at Ghent 
University. On the same day, the Maid 
will return to Brussels for a cotton 
fashion show. 

Germany is the last European coun- 
try to be visited by the 1956 Maid of 
Cotton, and she will leave Brussels for 
Hamburg June 23. She will make fash- 
ion appearances there and in Berlin, 
Dusseldorf, Essen, Frankfurt, Karl- 
sruhe, Stuttgart, and Munich. The last 
official activities of the Maid in Europe 
will take place on July 6. 

The Maid’s tour is sponsored by the 
National Cotton Council, the Memphis 


Cotton Carnival, and the Cotton Ex- 
changes of Memphis, New York, and 


New Orleans. 


Pian Each Step in Machine 
Picking, Mullins Urges 


To save labor over hand-picking and 
get a grade of cotton comparable to 
hand-harvested, cotton farmers should 
plan each step in cotton production from 
land preparation to the last cultivation, 
says J. Mullins, specialist for Ten- 
nessee Extension Service, Jackson. 

He points out that a field arrange- 
ment with the longest rows, saves time 
with all machine operations. If the field 
has terraces and ditches they should be 
so widened that machinery works over 


and around them with ease; turning 
space at the end of the rows is im- 
portant. 


In the land preparation process, dispose 
completely of all old stalks, and remove 
from the field all stumps and other ob- 
structions. A good seed bed is, of course, 
important in getting a good stand. Se- 
lection of a variety that a machine 
picks well should not be overlooked. 
Planting with row spacing suitable for 
machine picking is easy to overlook. Be 
sure that the planter’s and _ picker’s 
widths are about the same. 

The stand of cotton, and spacing of 
the cotton along the row, will affect 
efficiency of the picker. 


“Push-Button” Ginning 


Automatic operations of the J. G. 
Boswell Co. gins at Coolidge and Green 
Rock, Ariz., are the subject of an article 


in a recent issue of Arizona Farmer- 
Ranchman, titled ‘“Push-Button Gin- 
ning.” 





How Statifier 
Cuts Costs... 









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For Details Today! 


“Magic Wand” Moisture Control 


The gentle mist of “wet water” now has the most 
dependable control yet devised. Two steel rods (Magic 
Wands) protruding up through the bottom of the lint 
slide are connected to two sensitive-but-rugged micro 
switches under the slide. When the batt of cotton 
depresses the “wands” the mist starts. The Moyst wet- 
ting agent insures quick, uniform penetration . . . costs 
less than 2¢ a bale and wet water only adds about 8 
Ibs. to a 500 Ib. bale. Breaks in the batt, releasing 
either “Magic Wand” or both, instantly stop the mist 
and prevent wetting the lint slide 

Available in 4 Automatically 


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CABLE - KEMGAS 


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2518 ERSKINE STREET 


POrter 2-2894 P. O. Box 5007 


Experienced Ginners Know... 


... the advantages of moisture in bal- 
ing cotton. It makes pressing simpler. 
It enables the press crew to keep up 
with the production of the largest gin. 
It reduces sponginess so that losses 
from broken ties are practically elim- 
inated. Press repairs are kept at a 
minimum. It turns dry, harsh-feeling 
samples into smooth ones that have a 
slightly longer staple. 







Lubbock, Texas 








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Makes cleaner, stronger bales 


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JUNE 2, 1956 


THE COTTON GIN AND OIL MILL PRESS 























TAKES 
ROUGH HANDLING 


Stands up well under 
rough handling... pro- 
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LOOKS 
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EXTRA 
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Cotton is subject to less 
weather damage than 
that covered with closely 
woven cloth. 


(A 








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43 





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In NCPA Convention Talk 








Need for Better Cottonseed 
Meal Quality Emphasized 


@ INDUSTRY wants to use more in formula feeds, authority says, 
but cotton oil mills must assure high nutritional value and uni- 
formity of their product to meet soybean competition. 


ORE COTTONSEED MEAL prob- 

ably will be used in formula feeds 
in the future, but cotton oil mills will 
have to do a better job of assuring uni- 
formity and high quality of their prod- 
uct, Dr. R. M. Bethke, Ralston Purina 
Co., said in his address at the National 
Cottonseed Products Association conven- 
tion in Dallas. The convention is reported 
elsewhere in this issue, and the following 
summary of Dr. Bethke’s talk is pub- 
lished in more detail because of its im- 
portance to the industry. 

The Ralston Purina nutritional author- 
ity estimated that about one-third of all 
cottonseed meal now produced is used in 
formula feeds; and said that the manu- 
facturer wants the same thing in all 
protein supplements “high nutritional 
value and uniformity from both a phys- 
ical and a nutritional standpoint.” 

In the category of uniformity, Doctor 
Bethke continued, “We consider texture, 
color, dustiness, freedom from foreign 
material and chemical analysis as im- 
portant. While some of these have noth- 
ing to do with the nutritional worth of 
the finished product, they nevertheless 
are factors that can influence the ap- 
pearance of the feed.” 

Two different textures are preferred, 
depending upon how the meal will be 
used, he said. Coarser texture is better, 
for example, in dairy feeds, whereas a 
finely ground meal would be preferred 
for feeds that are pelleted or dusted with 
cottonseed meal. 

Uniformity of color and freedom from 
dark, discolored material are important 
He said that it is obvious that manufac- 
turers want the meal to be non-dusty 
and free from such foreign material as 
excessive hulls, coarse hulls and lint 
balls. 


e Must Meet Guarantee — The feed au- 
thority emphasized the importance of 
uniformity of analysis in cottonseed 
meal and of meeting the guarantee. 

“Too often,” Doctor Bethke comment- 
ed, “we purchase meals that are out of 
line analytically. For example, out of 
100 shipments the first few months of 
this year, 26 percent fell below the sup- 
posed guaranteed analysis of 41 percent 
protein ... The protein analysis in these 
samples varied from 35 to 46 percent— 
an over-all spread of 11 percent. Would 
you consider this a good job on the part 
of suppliers or processors ? 

“We also know from experience that 
not ail processors do an equally good 
job. Witness our experience with two 
different suppliers. In the case of Sup- 
plier A, 57 percent of the samples were 
under the 41 percent protein guarantee 
on which they were purchased. The meals 
from this supplier ranged from 34 to 50 
percent in protein. In contrast, Supplier 
B had meals which were much more 
uniform, a maximum range of six percent 
—from 39 to 45 percent. And only eight 


JUNE 2, 1956 - 








R. M. BETHKE 


out of 1,000 samples from Supplier B 
failed to meet the protein guarantee by 
a small percent. Which of these suppliers 
would you patronize if you were in the 
formula feed business?” 


Doctor Bethke warned the cottonseed 








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THE COTTON GIN AND OIL MILL PRESS 














processors that their chief competitors, entered the employ of Continental Gin sentative until his recent appointment. 
soybean processors, are doing a fine job Co. of Birmingham, representing their The grain, milling, feed and process- 
and added, “some (cottonseed) proces- industrial division. After 11 years of ing industries will be served by Cox 
sors will have to do a better job if they service he left to assume the duties of in his travels selling Hammond Screw 
want the feed manufacturer’s business.” sales representative of Hewitt-Robins, Conveying Systems, Screw-Lifts, Kew- 

He encouraged the crushers by saying Inc., manufacturers of vibrating equip- anee Hydraulic Truck Dumpers, Truck 
that the feed industry would like to use ment. He also represented Screw Con- Lifts, Flexible Spouts, Bucket Elevators 
more cottonseed meal, especially in its yeyor Corp. as manufacturers’ repre- and allied material handling equipment. 
poultry and swine feeds. To assure this 
greater demand, he said that the cotton- 
seed industry needs to do the following 
things: 


1. Make available meals sufficiently 
low in free-gossypol to eliminate the 
dangers of toxicity in swine and poul- 
try 


2. Eliminate the factor which causes 
discoloration of eggs. 
3. Improve the over-all protein qual- FOR GINS AND OIL MILLS 
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production procedures. 

4. Make available high-protein, low- 
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5. Do a better job of supplying uni- 
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Electric Motor Repair 










“The progress already made by your New Motors: 
industry is impressive,” he concluded. ° ° 
“Your Association is not only looking Allis-Chalmers and Rewinding 
ahead but is actually doing something Cent 
about the future. It is well that your entury DAYTON BELTS 
Association has seen fit to set up a A. O. Smith 
cottonseed research committee and spon- Baldor LUMMUS GIN REPAIR PARTS 





sor basic research on various phases of 
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greater use in formula feeds—especial- 
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Cox Joins Southern Sales LUBBOCK, TEXAS 














Staff of Screw Conveyor 


Bringing with him experience in 
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where he remained until 1944. He then ES A, ee I 











THE COTTON GIN AND OIL MILL PRESS + JUNE 2, 1956 45 





© Pfeiffenberger Will 
Head Plains Group 


GEORGE PFEIFFENBERGER will be- 
come executive vice-president of Plains 
Cotton Growers about July 1, W. O. 
Fortenberry, Lubbock, Texas, president 
of the West Texas cotton organization, 
has announced. 

He will manage an organization dedi- 
cated to the promotion and protection of 
cotton producer interests in West Texas. 
Charter members of the group—which 
includes producers and other individuals 
and businesses having a stake in West 
Texas cotton—are now drawn from a 
23-county area surrounding Lubbock. 
Additional counties may be brought in 
later. 

Pfeiffenberger will be concerned with 
activities aimed at solving cotton pro- 
duction problems in this area, at improv- 
ing and stabilizing fiber and seed qual- 
ity, at improving merchandising and 





promotion of short-staple consumption, 
and at analysis of government policies 
affecting Plains cotton. 

He comes to the Plains Growers from 
the National Cotton Council. For the 
past two years he has led the Council’s 
research program aimed at developing an 
improved bale package. Another major 
project was improvement of methods and 
standards for laboratory fiber testing, 
and wider application of such tests in 
large-scale merchandising and manufac- 
turing of cotton. In addition, Pfeiffen- 
berger worked on Council projects to 
develop automatic controls for gins, and 
to study the possibility of using mechan- 
ical pickers and modern gins for extra- 
long staple cotton. 

Prior to joining the Council, Pfeiffen- 
berger was research director and tech- 
nical mill consultant for Otto Goedecke 
Co., Hallettsville, Texas. The company is 
noted for pioneering work in using pre- 
cise laboratory measurements of fiber 
properties as a basis for large-scale cot- 





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JUNE 2, 


\ 








1956 * THE COTTON GIN AND OIL MILL PRESS 
















































































































































GEORGE PFEIFFENBERGER 


ton merchandising—and for its special- 
ized services to cotton manufacturers on 
their raw material problems. 

From 1944 to 1952, Pfeiffenberger 
was in Lubbock as spinning research 
director for the Chicopee Manufacturing 
Corp. Under his direction, the fiber lab- 
oratory and pilot plant at Texas Tech 
analyzed the use-value of all types of 
cotton, measuring variations in quality 
caused by area and season of growth, 
by differences in ginning practices, and 
by producing cotton under irrigation or 
under rain-grown conditions. Tests also 
were run to determine how various 
qualities of cotton could be scientifically 
blended to achieve desirable qualities in 
cotton yarns and fabrics. Information 
of this kind formed the basis for advis- 
ing Chicopee’s management on how to 
improve cotton buying practices and 
mill operations. 

Before joining Chicopee, Pfeiffenber- 
ger had been with USDA since 1930. 

A native of Ohio, Pfeiffenberger is a 
member of The Fiber Society, the Amer- 
ican Society for Quality Control, the 
American Association for the Advance- 
ment of Science, the American Society 
for Testing Materials, and the Texas 
Academy of Science. 

He studied chemical and textile engi- 
neering at the University of Dayton and 
at Texas A. & M. College. 

He and Mrs. Pfeiffenberger, along 
with 16-year-old son Will and 19-year- 
old daughter Ann, will make their home 
in Lubbock. 


Cooperative Short Course 
Planned in New Mexico 


A short course for directors and man- 
agers of New Mexico cooperatives is 
scheduled for June 6-7-8 on the New 
Mexico A. & M. College campus. Speak- 
ers will include Otis Weaver, USDA, 
Washington; Gilbert Terpening, Bank 
for Cooperatives, Wichita, Kans.; and 
Ken Stern, American Institute of Co- 
operation, Washington. 


Co-op Modernizes Gins 


Farmers Cooperative Society at Post, 
Texas, is modernizing its ~ at Close 
City and Graham Chapel. J. W. McMa- 
hon is manager and L. G. Thuett, Sr., 
president. 








an to find” 


Sure, the ginner is a “hard man to find” 

especially during the off-season. Yet this is the 
time of year when you most need to get the gin- 
ner’s attention . . . because right now he’s planning 
improvements for the coming season and deciding 
what supplies he will need to keep his plant humming 
at top speed when the new crop starts to move. 


Advertisers who use The Cotton Gin and Oil Mill Press 
know the ginner is easy to find, at amy time. The PRESS 

is an old and trusted friend that can get you an audience 
with the ginner whenever you want it. It has been bringing 
advertisers and ginners together for fifty-seven years. 


Now, while the ginner is planning his operations, make sure 

he has an opportunity to consider your products or services. There is no 
better . . . or more effective way .. . to do this than through the 
advertising columns of The Cotton Gin and Oil Mill Press. 


\ 


| \ 


the cotton gin and oil m ” p re 
mS 


3116 commerce st | Ale 
This is our fift}rsixt 


L 














12 | 13 | 14/ 15 | 16] 17 | 18 


10471) —«_I- ee ee 


e June 3-6 — International Oil Mill Su- 
perintendents’ Association annual con- 
vention. Plaza Hotel, San Antonio, Texas. 
H. E. Wilson, P. O. Box 1180, Wharton, 
Texas, secretary-treasurer. 


e June 4-5 — North Carolina Cottonseed 
Crushers’ Association and South Caro- 
lina Cotton Seed Crushers’ Association 
joint annual convention. Ocean Forest 

















Hotel, Myrtle Beach, S.C. Mrs. M. U. 
Hogue, 612 Lawyers Building, Raleigh, 
secretary-treasurer, North Carolina As- 
sociation; Mrs. Durrett L. Williams, 609 
Palmetto Building, Columbia, secretary- 
treasurer, South Carolina Association. 


e June 6-8 — Tristates Oil Mill Superin- 
tendents’ Association annual convention. 
Biloxi, Miss. For information, write Roy 
Castiliow, 20 Lenon Drive, Little Rock, 
Ark., secretary-treasurer. 


e June 10-12—Texas Cottonseed Crush- 
ers’ Association annual convention. Stat- 
ler Hilton Hotel, Dallas. Jack Whetstone, 
624 Wilson Building, Dallas, secretary- 
treasurer. 






































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WALLER BALE GAGE 


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e For gins and oil mills 

e No more big bales 

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e Keeps compresses happy 


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EVERY NEED of Cotton Gins and 
Oil Mills, we offer you the most 
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Call us for ACTION! 


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& SUPPLY CO., INC. 


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JUNE 2, 1956 ° 








e June 16-19—Alabama-Florida Cotton- 
seed Products Association and Georgia 
Cottonseed Crushers’ Association joint 
annual convention. Lookout Mountain 
Hotel, Lookout Mountain, Tenn. J. E. 
Moses, 318 Grand Theatre Bldg, Atlanta, 
secretary of Georgia Association; C. M. 
Scales, 322 Professional Bldg., Mont- 
gomery, Ala., executive secretary, Ala- 
bama-Florida Association. 


e June 20-22 — Mississippi Cottonseed 
Crushers’ Association annual convention. 
Buena Vista Hotel, Biloxi, Miss. Gordon 
W. Marks, P. O. Box 1757, Jackson, Miss., 
secretary. 


e June 21-22—New Mexico Cotton Gin- 
ners’ Association annual convention. Nav- 
ajo Lodge, Ruidoso. For information 
write Winston Lovelace, secretary-treas- 
urer, Pecos Valley Cotton Oil Co., Lov- 
ing, N.M. 


e June 25-26-27 — Oil Mill Operators’ 
Short Course. Texas A. & M. College, 
College Station. Sponsored by College, 
Texas Cottonseed Crushers’ Association 
and International Oil Mill Superintend- 
ents’ Association. For information write 
Dr. J. D. Lindsay, Texas A. & M. College. 


e Aug. 13-15—Joint conventions, Amer- 
ican Soybean Association and National 
Soybean Processors’ Association, Univer- 
sity of Illinois, Urbana, Ill. R. G. 
Houghtlin, president, National Soybean 
Processors’ Association, 3818 Board of 
Trade Building, Chicago 4; Geo. M. 
Strayer, executive vice-president, Amer- 
ican Soybean Association, Hudson, Iowa. 


e Aug. 22-23-24—Tenth Beltwide Cotton 
Mechanization Conference. Biltmore Ho- 
tel, Atlanta, Ga. For information, write 
National Cotton Council, P. O. Box 9905, 
Memphis 12, Tenn. 


e Sept. 23-26 — American Oil Chemists’ 
Society fall meeting. Sherman Hotel, 
Chicago. For information, write Society 
headquarters, 35 East Wacker Drive, 
Chicago. 


e Dec. 13-14 — Second annual Cotton 
Production Conference. Tutwiler Hotel, 
Birmingham, Ala. For information, write 
National Cotton Council, P. O. Box 9905, 
Memphis, Tenn. 


1957 


e Jan. 28-29 — National Cotton Council 
of America annual meeting. Jefferson 
Hotel, St. Louis. For information, write 
Wm. Rhea Blake, executive vice-presi- 
dent, P. O. Box 9905, Memphis, Tenn. 


e March 5-6—Western Cotton Produc- 
tion Conference. Hotel Westward Ho, 
Phoenix, Ariz. Sponsored by Southwest 
Five-State Cotton Growers’ Association 
and National Cotton Council. 


e April 1-3 — Texas Cotton Ginners’ 
Association Convention, State Fair of 
Texas grounds, Dallas. Ed H. Bush, ex- 
ecutive vice-president, 3724 Race Street, 
Dallas. For information regarding ex- 
hibit space, write R. Haughton, presi- 
dent, Gin Machinery & Supply Associ- 
ation, P. O. Box 7985, Dallas 26. 


e May 20-21—National Cottonseed Prod- 
ucts Association annual _ convention. 
Shoreham Hotel, Washington, D.C. John 
F. Moloney, 19 South Cleveland Street, 
Memphis, secretary-treasurer. 


e June 5-7 — Tristates Oil Mill Super- 
intendents’ Association annual conven- 
tion. Memphis, Tenn. 






THE COTTON GIN AND OIL MILL PRRss 












Oklahoma Research Foundation 
(Continued from Page 7) 


other funds go into the cash fund from 
which the Foundation draws its oper- 
ating expenses. 

The Foundation’s policies are deter- 
mined by its officers and a board of di- 
rectors, all of whom serve without ex- 
pense to the Foundation. “No one work- 
ing with the Foundation draws a sal- 
ary. All of the directors’ and officers’ 
time and expenses are contributed in 
interest of cotton in the state,” Lucas 
explains. All of the officers of the 
Foundation, and all but three of the 
directors, now serving are the same as 
started at the Foundation’s origin in 
1948. 

Officers of the Foundation are Lucas, 
president; Noble Bennett of Oklahoma 
City, vice-president; and J. D. Flem- 
ing of Oklahoma City, secretary-treas- 
urer. Directors of the Foundation in- 
clude Bennett of the Oklahoma Cooper- 
ative Association; G. N. Irish of Mus- 
kogee, representing ginners; H. A. 
Sparkman of Anadarko, representing 
cotton compresses of Oklahoma; E. E. 
Huff of Chickasha representing Okla- 
homa cotton producers; Dent Smith of 
Frederick representing cotton mer- 
chants; and Lucas of the cottonseed 
crushers. 


Albert L. Long, Dallas, 


Honored by Bankers 


Albert L. Long, vice-president of the 
Republic National Bank in Dallas and 
widely known in the cotton industry, 
has been elected vice-president of the 
Bankers’ Association for Foreign Trade. 

Long had much experience in cotton 
financing at Memphis and joined Re- 
public in 1947. He is now vice-president 
in charge of the bank’s foreign and 
commodity operations. 

For several years, Long has been a 
member of the advisory committee to the 
Department of Agriculture on the cot- 
ton loan program. He is chairman of 
the insurance committee of the Texas 
Cotton Association, and is a member of 
the Statewide Cotton Committee. 

The BAFT is a professional associa- 
tion for bankers whose specialty lies in 
the field of foreign banking and inter- 
national trade transactions. 


Plains Cooperative Mill 
Adding Refinery Unit 


A new refining unit is being added 
to the facilities of Plains Cooperative 
Oil Mill at Lubbock. Estimated to cost 
$150,000, the unit will produce once-re- 
fined oil. 

“This is a move to help broaden the 
market for our oil,” explained Wilmer 
Smith, mill president. “More people are 
in the market for once-refined oil than 
for the crude product, so we are increas- 
ing the number of our potential custom- 
ers,” he pointed out. 

“The fact that our oil can be stored 
for long periods of time will also give 
us a sales advantage.” 


Gin Gets New Equipment 


Grassland, Texas, Cooperative Gin is 
rebuilding its power plant and modern- 
izing its equipment. Odis Tew is man- 
ager. 


THE COTTON GIN AND OIL MILL PREss 

















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The Duplex Mill & Manufacturing Co. 114 W. Washington St., Ocala, Fla. 
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MODERN STEEL STORAGE 


All-Steel Self-Filling Non-Combustible 
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~ = 


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JUNE 2, 1956 49 














2 National Favorites! 


Wesson Oil 


America’s choice for salads . . 
Stir-N-Roll pastry, biscuits, 
Chiffon cakes, frying and 
popcorn. 





Snowadrift 


No other shortening at any 






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THE Ginest TELESCOPE EVER BUILT! 







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Bronze Oil-Lite Bear- 
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"Largest exclusive manufacturer of gin saws in America” 


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JUNE 2, 1956 













laugh it of f 


A man was in court, charged with 
having cut another man to pieces. The 
defendant on being asked by the judge 
to give his side of the story, said: 

“Your Honor, I did not cut him to 
pieces. I only stuck my knife in him 
once, then walked around him.” 

eee 

Two spinsters sat on a porch knit- 
ting when a hen came tearing around 
the corner, with a rooster not too far 
behind. Around and around they 
whirled, Finally, the hen, still doing 
well over the speed limit, ran into the 
path of a passing car. Observed one of 
the female spectators, “See, she’d rath- 
er die!” 

eee 

The stinger of a bee is about one- 
thirty-second of an inch long. The other 
foot and a half is imagination. 

ee e@ 

“What is the difference between a 
girl and a traffic cop?” 

“When a cop says ‘stop,’ he means it.” 

eee 

“I’m sorry, sir,” said the telephone 
operator, “but that number has been 
taken out.” 

“Oh, is that so?” came the man’s voice 
indignantly. “Well, can you give me any 
information as to just who has taken her 
out?” 

eee 

Girl: “I’ll never go out with a ven- 
triloquist again.” 

Mother: “Why not, dear?” 

Girl: “Last night he sat me on his 
knee and you should have heard the 
things he made me say.” 


eee 
On the outdoor bulletin board of his 
church a sensational minister announced 
this sermon subject: “Do you know what 
hell is?” Just below was printed, “Come 
hear our choir.” 
eee 
“What’s that crawling on the wall?” 
“A ladybug.” 
“Gad, what eyesight!” 
eee 
World’s most glaringly prominent ob- 
ject: A blonde’s hair on the coat lapel 
of a dark suit observed by a brunette 
wife, 
eee 
Daughter — Daddy, I heard Auntie 
say that women have cleaner minds 
than men. 
Daddy—tThat’s probably because they 
change them more often. 





& & e 
Sooner or later the bride that uses 
face powder to get her man finds that it 
takes baking powder to keep him. 
eee 
A man is never so weak as when a 
pretty girl is telling him how strong 
he is. 


eee 
Patient: “Five dollars is an awful lot 
of money for pulling a tooth — two 


seconds’ work.” 
Dentist: “Well, If you wish, I can pull 
it very slowly.” 
eee 
A sense of humor is what makes 
you laugh at something that happens 
to somebody else which would make you 
angry if it happened to you. 
eee 
Salesman: “You make a small deposit, 
then you pay no more for six months.” 
Lady at the door: “Who told you about 
us?” 


THE COTTON GIN AND OIL MILL PRESS 
















1956 MOss 


LINT CLEANERS 









NEW 
WRAPPED 
WIRE SAW 










Again, Moss-Gordin is first to bring you the latest improvement in lint clean- 
ing efficiency. After two years of exhaustive field tests, Moss-Gordin 
developed the WRAPPED WIRE SAW for use in all 1956 Moss Lint 


write Cleaners. 


This new saw, with its scientifically designed tooth, is accurately balanced 
for for improved performance. Moss Lint Cleaners comb as they clean as they 
bloom ... providing uniform staple length, improving color and raising 


details cotton a full grade or more. 


If you are interested in increasing volume and making more profit we recom- 
mend a Moss Lint Cleaner for your gin, whatever size or type. A Moss Lint 
now Cleaner, with its advanced features and outstanding results, will keep you 
ahead of competition. 










Sewitce after the sale is standard equipment. 





3116 Main Street 
Dallas, Texas 
Third Street & Ave. O 
ET) -) 1-14 ou a-t) 


LINT CLEANER CO. | 13225 00 2000 


| Memphis, Tennessee 














The HARDWICKE-ETTER 
AUTOMATIC SUCTION CONTROL 


SIN FILLS—Suction “OFT 


Easy Installation... Fully Tested 
As An Overflow Pen 


or 





Separate Unit 

BIN EMPTIES—Suction “ON” 

Ginner selects constant rate 

of steady feed .. . automatic- 

ally maintained .. . to give ex- 

traction, cleaning, drying and 

ginning equipment proper 

supply of cotton for most ef- 
ficient operation. 


RATE OF FEED CONTROI 
HYDRAULIC VARIABLE SPEED UNIT 





No Slugging Or Starving AIR PICK-UP TO CLEANER 


HARDWIChE-ETTER COMPANY 


Manufacturers of Complete Cotton Ginning Systems SHERMAN, TEXAS 





























D.D.D. TRAMPER 


Precision x Strength « Superiority 


This new improved Heavy Duty Tramper is 
extra heavy steel and alloy iron construction, 
precision machined at all wear surfaces, 
making the strongest, heaviest and most 
precision-built Tramper developed for the 
Ginning Industry, weighing approximately 
7800 lbs. 


De 
dati TL) 


“ ; — 
ae Se a) Mee ie 
=~ ‘ Leie, 





Gear Set has continuous Load Rating of 35 
horsepower and intermittent Load Rating of 
70 horsepower. More than Three times the 
strength necessary for Load requirements. 


An extra duty Tramper for users who want 
the best. 


For further information, write for Bulletin No. 68. 


THE MURRAY COMPANY or TEXAS, 


DALLAS ° ATLANTA * MEMPHIS ’ FRESNO