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Iird of the 
versify of North Carolina 
hapel Hill 
Y 2 



20, 1970 



MBER 743 



THE SCHOOL OF 
SOCIAL WORK 

ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR THE SESSION 1970-1971 



50th anniversary year 

1920-1970 
school of social work 



RECORD OF THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA AT CHAPEL HILL 
Published by THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA PRESS 
Issued 14 times a year as follows: 2 numbers in January, 3 numbers in February, 3 
numbers in March, 3 numbers in April, 2 numbers in May, and 1 number in October. 
Second-Class Postage Paid at Chapel Hill, N. C. 27514 
Send all Undeliverable Copies and Change of Addresses 
to Director of Undergraduate Admissions, University of 
North Carolina, Chapel Hill, N. C. 27514 



THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 



(Six Component Institutions) 

WILLIAM CLYDE FRIDAY, B.S., LL.B., LL.D., President 

WILLIAM SMITH WELLS, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Vice President— Academic Affairs 
ARNOLD KIMSEY KING, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Vice-President— Institutional Studies 
CHARLES EDWIN BISHOP, M.S., Ph.D., Vice President— Research and Public 

Service Programs 
L FELIX JOYNER, A.B., Vice President— Finance 

ALEXANDER HURLBUTT SHEPARD, JR., M.A., Assistant Vice President and 
Treasurer 

JOSEPH SIBLEY DORTON, JR., B.S., Assistant Vice President and Assistant 
Treasurer 

GEORGE ELDRIDGE BAIR, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Director of Educational Television 
JAMES L. JENKINS, JR., A.B., Assistant to the President 

By the act of the General Assembly of 1931 the University of North Carolina 
at Chapel Hill, the North Carolina College for Women at Greensboro, and the 
North Carolina State College of Agriculture and Engineering at Raleigh were 
merged into The University of North Carolina. 

By the act of the General Assembly of 1963 effective July 1, 1963, The 
University of North Carolina comprised: The University of North Carolina at 
Chapel Hill, The University of North Carolina at Greensboro and North Carolina 
State of The University of North Carolina at Raleigh. 

By the act of the General Assembly of 1965 effective July 1, 1965, The 
University of North Carolina comprised: The University of North Carolina at 
Chapel Hill, The University of North Carolina at Greensboro, The University of 
North Carolina at Charlotte, and North Carolina State University at Raleigh. 

By the act of the General Assembly of 1969 effective July 1, 1969, The Uni- 
versity of North Carolina comprises: The University of North Carolina at Chapel 
Hill, The University of North Carolina at Asheville, The University of North 
Carolina at Charlotte, The University of North Carolina at Greensboro, The 
University of North Carolina at Wilmington, and North Carolina State University 
at Raleigh. 

Each institution has its own faculty and student body, and each is headed 
by a chancellor as its chief administrative officer. Unified general policy and 
appropriate allocation of function are effective by a single Board of Trustees 
and by the President with other administrative officers of The University. The 
general administration offices are located in Chapel Hill. 

Members of the Board of Trustees are elected by the Legislature, and the 
Governor of North Carolina is chairman ex officio. 

The chancellors of the component institutions are responsible to the 
President as the principal executive officer of The University of North Carolina. 



Record of the 

University of 
North Carolina 

at Chapel Hill 

SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK 

Announcements for 1970-1971 



JANUARY 20, 1970 



NUMBER 743 



1970 



S M 



JANUARY 
T W T F S 

1 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 

FEBRUARY 

5 M T W T F S 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 21 28 



MARCH 
S M T W T F S 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 31 



APRIL 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 
5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 

MAY 

S M T W T F S 

1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 

JUNE 

S M T W T F S 

1 2 3 4 5 6 
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 



JULY 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 29 30 31 

AUGUST 
S M T W T F S 

1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 
23 24 25 26 27 28 29 
30 31 

SEPTEMBER 
S M T W T F S 

1 2 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

27 28 29 30 



OCTOBER 
S M T W T F S 

1 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 

NOVEMBER 

5 M T W T F S 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 

DECEMBER 
S M T W T F S 

1 2 3 4 5 
6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 31 



1971 



JANUARY 
S M T W T F S 

1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 

FEBRUARY 
S M T W T F S 

1 2 3 4 5 6 
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 



MARCH 
S M T W T F S 

1 2 3 4 5 6 
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 31 



S M 



APRIL 
T W T F S 

1 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 



S M 



MAY 

T W T F S 



1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 
23 24 25 26 27 28 29 
30 31 



S M 



JUNE 
T W T F S 

1 2 3 4 5 
6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 



S M 



JULY 

T W T F S 

1 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 

25 26 27 28 29 30 31 



AUGUST 
S M T W T F S 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 31 



SEPTEMBER 
S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 
5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14.15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 



OCTOBER 
S M T W T F S 

1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 

NOVEMBER 
S M T W T F S 

1 2 3 4 5 6 
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 



DECEMBER 
S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 
5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ' 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 31 



UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 
1970-1971 



SUMMER SESSION, 1970 
First Term 

June 5, Friday 

June 6, Saturday 

June 27, Saturday 

July 10, Friday 

July 11, Saturday 

July 13-14, Monday-Tuesday 

Second Term 

July 16, Thursday 
July 17, Friday 
July 18, Saturday 
August 19, Wednesday 
I August 20, Thursday 

August 21-22, Friday-Saturday 

FALL SEMESTER, 1970 

September 11, Friday 
September 11, Friday noon 
September 12, Saturday, 8:30 A.M. 

September 14, Monday 
September 15-16, Tuesday-Wednesday 

September 17, Thursday, 8:00 A.M. 
October 12, Monday 
November 25, Wednesday, 1:00 P.M. 

| November 30, Monday, 8:00 A.M. 

December 18, Friday, 5:00 P.M. 
| January 4, 1971, Monday, 8:00 A.M. 

January 14, Thursday 
! January 15-17, Friday-Sunday 
! January 18, Monday 

January 27, Wednesday, 6:00 P.M. 



Registration. 

First day of classes. 

Regular classes in all departments. 

Last day of classes. 

Reading day. 

Final examinations 



Registration. 

First day of classes. 

Regular classes in all departments. 

Last day of classes. 

Reading day. 

Final examinations. 



Fall Semester opens. 
Residence halls open. 
Orientation and placement for all fresh- 
man and transfer students. 
Registration for freshmen only. 
Registration for upperclassmen. 
Preregistered students pick up 
schedules. 
Classes begin. 
University Day. 

Instruction ends for Thanksgiving 
recess. 

Instruction resumed. 

Instruction ends for Christmas recess. 

Instruction resumed. 

Last day of classes for Fall Semester. 

Reading days. 

Fall Semester final examinations begin. 
Fall Semester final examinations end 
and semester closes. 



SPRING SEMESTER, 1971 

January 27, Wednesday 
January 27, Wednesday, 1:00 P.M. 
January 28, Thursday, 9:00 A.M. 

January 29, Friday, 8:30-4:30 P.M. 
February 1, Monday 8:00 A.M. 
March 26, Friday, 6:00 P.M. 
April 5, Monday, 8:00 A.M. 
May 13, Thursday 
May 14-16, Friday-Sunday 
May 17, Monday, 8:30 A.M. 
May 26, Wednesday, 6:00 P.M. 
May 29-31, Saturday-Monday 



Spring Semester opens. 

Residence halls open. 

Orientation and placement of all new 

freshmen and transfer students. 

Registration. 

Classes begin. 

instruction ends for Spring recess. 
Instruction resumed. 
Last day of classes for Spring Semester. 
Reading days. 

Spring Semester examinations begin. 
Spring Semester examinations end. 
Commencement and Graduation. 



SUMMER SESSION, 1971 

First Term 

June 7, Monday 
June 12, Saturday 
June 26, Saturday 
July 9, Friday 

July 12-13, Monday-Tuesday 



Registration. 

Regular classes in all departments. 
Regular classes in all departments. 
Last day of classes. 
Final examinations. 



Second Term 

July 15, Thursday 

July 16, Friday 

July 17, Saturday 

August 20, Friday 

August 23-24, Monday, Tuesday 



Registration. 

First day of classes. 

Regular classes in all departments. 

Last day of classes. 

Final examinations. 




CONTENTS 

CALENDAR / 5 
ADMINISTRATION / 8 
FACULTY / 9 

SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK / 12 
ADMISSION / 16 
SCHOLARSHIPS / 16 
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS / 18 
FEES AND EXPENSES / 19 
HOUSING / 21 

STUDENT HEALTH SERVICE / 21 
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION / 23 
ENROLLED STUDENTS / 29 



THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA AT CHAPEL HILL 



JOSEPH CARLYLE SITTERSON, Ph.D., Chancellor 

CLAIBORNE STRIBLING JONES, Ph.D., Assistant to the Chancellor 
CORNELIUS OLIVER CATHEY, Ph.D., Dean of Student Affairs 
JOSEPH COLIN EAGLES, JR., J.D., Vice Chancellor, Business and Finance 
JAMES REUBEN GASKIN, Ph.D., Registrar and Director of Institutional Research 
LYLE VINCENT JONES, Ph.D., Dean of the Graduate School and Vice Chancellor 
C. ARDEN MILLER, M.D., Vice Chancellor, Health Sciences 
JOHN CHARLES MORROW III, Ph.D., Provost 

CHARLES MILTON SHAFFER, B.S. Comm., Director of Developmental Affairs 

THE SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK 

C. WILSON ANDERSON, A.B., M.S.W., D.S.W., J.D., Dean 

ALAN KEITH-LUCAS, M.A. (Cantab.), M.Sc, Ph.D., Director of Extended Services 

ALBERT WARREN KING, M.S.W., Assistant to the Dean 

JANE CURTIS PARKER, M.S.W., Director of Admissions 

MARY EDNA PORTER, M.S.W., Director of Field Instruction 



Administration Board 12 

WILLIAM LEROY FLEMING, B.A., M.S., M.D., Professor of Preventive Medicine 
and Assistant Dean of the School of Medicine for Education and Research 
(1974) 

DONALD BALES HAYMAN, Ph.D., Professor of Public Law and Government and 
Assistant Director of the Institute of Government (1970) 

WILLIAM FRED MAYES, B.S., M.D., M.P.H., Dean of the School of Public Health 
(1974) 

JOHN ALBERT PARKER, M.Arch., M.C.P., Professor of Planning (1970) 

EUZELIA CAMOLENE SMART, M.S., Associate Professor of Clinical Social Work, 
Section of Allied Professional Education, School of Medicine (1970) 

HARVEY L. SMITH, Ph.D., Professor of Sociology in the Department of Sociology, 
Clinical Professor of Sociology in the Department of Psychiatry, Research 
Professor in the Institute for Research in Social Science, and Director of 
the Social Research Section of the Division of Health Affairs (1970) 

EARLE WALLACE, Ph.D., Professor of Political Science (1973) 



1. The Chancellor, the Provost, the Director of Admissions of the University, and the Dean of Student 
Affairs are ex officio members of the Administrative Board. 

2. Dates indicate expiration of terms. 



The School of Social Work 



9 



FACULTY 

C. WILSON ANDERSON, A.B., M.S.W., D.S.W., J.D., Dean and Professor of Social 
Work 

EUGENE D. ANDERSON, M.S.W., Lecturer and Field Instructor 
WILLIAM E. BAKEWELL, M.D., Associate Professor of Psychiatry 
BARBARA HENRY CLEAVELAND, M.S.W., Assistant Professor of Social Work 
ROBERT L. COATES, M.S.W., Lecturer in Social Work 
MORRIS H. COHEN, MA, M.Sc, Associate Professor of Social Work 
FRANCIS P. CONNOR, B.A., Training Specialist 
PHILIP WAYNE COOKE, M.S.W., D.S.W., Professor of Social Work 
PETER COUCHELL, M.S.W., Lecturer and Field Project Coordinator 
HOPE W. DAVIS, MA, Lecturer and Assistant to Director of Extended Services 
ANDREW W. DOBELSTEIN, M.S.W., Assistant Professor of Social Work 
ARTHUR E. FINK, M.S.W., Ph.D., Professor of Social Work and Research Associ- 
ate in The Institute for Research in Social Science 
GLADYS DELLINGER FRANKFORD, M.S.W., Lecturer and Field Instructor 
SAMUEL R. FUDGE, M.S.W., Lecturer in Social Work and Executive Director 
Group Child Care Consultant Services 
I MAEDA J. GALINSKY, M.S.W., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Social Work and 

Research Associate in The Institute for Research in Social Science 
1 PAULA LIPNICK GOLDSMID, MA, Lecturer in Social Work 
ELAINE L. GOOLSBY, M.S.W., Lecturer in Social Work and Assistant Professor 
of Clinical Social Work in Section of Allied Educational Programs and 
Department of Pediatrics 

, GERALDINE GOURLEY, M.S., Associate Professor of Maternal and Child Health 
and Social Work 

! WESTON HARE, MA, Lecturer and Training Specialist 
H. CARL HENLEY, JR., M.S.P.H., Lecturer in Social Work Research Methods 

| GERALD M. HOLDEN, M.S.W., Lecturer in Social Work 

I HANSEL H. HOLLINGSWORTH, M.S.W., Lecturer in Social Work 

I JANICE E. HOUGH, M.S.W., Assistant Professor of Social Work 

! GEORGIE P. HUGHES, M.S.W., Lecturer in Social Work 
ALBERT L. JOHNSON, MA, M.P.H., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Social Work 
and Assistant Professor of Public Health Administration 

j ALAN KEITH-LUCAS, MA (Cantab.), M.Sc, Ph.D., Alumni Distinguished Pro- 
fessor of Social Work and Director of Extended Services 

| ALBERT WARREN KING, M.S.W., Assistant Professor of Social Work and Assist- 
ant to the Dean 

(SHARON INEZ LANIER, M.S.W., Lecturer and Field Instructor 

j HORTENSE KING McCLINTON, M.S.W., Lecturer in Social Work 

| ALSI ROBINETTE McKINNON, MA, Assistant Professor of Social Work 

j CAROLYN LAW OTEY, M.S.W., Lecturer and Field Instructor 

i JANE CURTIS PARKER, M.S.W., Lecturer in Social Work and Director of Ad- 
missions 



10 



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 



CAROL R. PHELPS, M.S.W., Lecturer and Field Instructor 

SYLVIA K. POLGAR, MA, Lecturer in Social Welfare Policies and Services 

MARY EDNA PORTER, M.S.W., Assistant Professor of Social Work and Director 

of Field Instruction 
CLIFFORD W. SANFORD, M.A., Lecturer in Social Work 

EUZELIA C. SMART, M.S., Associate Professor, School of Social Work and 

School of Medicine and Hospital 
LILY PAN WANG, M.S.W., Lecturer and Field Instructor 

Part-Time Lecturers 

DAVID G. BLEVINS, M.S.W., Charlotte Area Fund, Charlotte, N. C. 
DOROTHY GAMBLE, M.S.W., Inter-Church Council for Social Services, Chapel 
Hill, N. C. 

FREDERICA C. HARRISON, M.S.W., Director, School Social Services, Durham 

Education Improvement Program, Durham, N. C. 
JOSEPH E. KLUG, M.S.W., Director of Student Programs, United Community 

Services, Charlotte, N. C. 
HAL R. LIEBERMAN, Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science, N. C. 

Central University, Durham, N. C. 
DERYL W. TORBERT, M.S.W., Consultant in Social Work, Mental Retardation 

Training Institute, Department of Psychology, University of North Carolina, 

Murdoch Center, Butner, N. C. 
STERLING H. WHITEN ER, M.S.W., Associate Professor of Sociology, Catawba 

College and Livingstone College, Salisbury, N. C. 
JAMES ALLEN WIGHT, M.S.W., Director, Craven County Department of Social 

Services, New Bern, N. C. 

Visiting Lecturers 

LESTER G. HOUSTON, M.S., Associate Clinical Professor, Department of Psy- 
chiatry, School of Medicine, Boston University 

ALVIN L. SCHORR, M.S.W., Professor of Social Policy and Director of Income 
Maintenance Project, Florence Heller School of Graduate Studies, Brandeis 
University, Waltham, Mass. 

Faculty of Group Child Care Consultant Services 

SAMUEL R. FUDGE, M.S.W., Executive Director 
ROBERT L. COATES, M.S.W., Field Consultant 
MARJORIE L. FARADAY, M.S.W., Field Consultant 
ALAN KEITH-LUCAS, Ph.D., Field Consultant 
CLIFFORD W. SANFORD, M.A., Field Consultant 

Faculty of the Community Action Training Center 

MORRIS H. COHEN, M.A., M.Sc, Director 
WESTON HARE, M.S.W, Training Specialist 



The School of Social Work 



F. PICKENS CONNOR, B.A., Training Specialist 
DOROTHY C. BERNHOLZ, BA, Research Assistant 

Staff 

LOIS S. DODSON, Administrative Secretary 

JANICE INGLE, Admissions Secretary 

SHARI P. CARRIER 

EVELYN P. EDWARDS 

VICKIE HULL 

DEBBIE KAUFMAN 

CYNTHIA PAINTER 

PAULINE J. SEAWELL 

PATSY G. TRUEHEART 

DIANE TYSON 

SALLY R. WALKER 



12 



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 



SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK 

The University of North Carolina, provided for in the state constitution in j 
1776 and chartered in 1789, laid the cornerstone of its first building in 1793 and 
opened its doors to students in 1795. It thereby became the first state university 
in the United States to admit students and send them out into the nation 
bearing a state university diploma. 

The Graduate School was established in 1903 and was reorganized in 1920. 
At that time the University was elected to membership in the Association of 
American Universities. 

The School of Public Welfare was established in conjunction with the 
Department of Sociology in 1920 and later became the Division of Social Work 
and Public Welfare in the Graduate School. Master's degrees were first awarded I 
in 1920. The Division was accredited by the Council on Social Work Education 
in 1929. The Division of Social Work and Public Welfare became the School of 
Social Work on September 1, 1950 and continues to be an accredited member 
of the Council on Social Work Education. 

At present the School awards the Master of Social Work degree and offers 
other special institutes. Plans are under way for a doctoral program. 

The current enrollment of the School is limited to 150 full-time students. 

Master of Social Work Program 

The School of Social Work is a professional school in the Graduate School 
of the University of North Carolina. Students are educated for a Master's degree 
in Social Work. The curriculum is designed to prepare students for responsible 
entry into the profession of social work. 

Instruction takes place on the campus at Chapel Hill and in the field con- 
currently. The curriculum covers four basic areas of study: Social Welfare 
Policy, Human Behavior and Social Environment, Research, and Methods of 
Social Work. Opportunities are offered for concentrations in selected areas of 
knowledge; services to individuals, families and small groups; services to 
larger groups, communities and institutional systems; and administration and 
planning in social welfare. The program requires study during two academic 
years. 

| 

Services to Individuals, Families and Small Groups: 

This concentration enables the student to acquire the knowledge base 
appropriate for the delivery of social work services to individuals, families and 
small groups. A range of helping models is analyzed in light of the contributions 
of the behavioral and social sciences and the values of society and the social 
work profession. Social work tasks and roles, settings and fields of service are 
examined in terms of their relevance to existing client systems and social 
problems. 

Building upon the School's core curriculum, emphasis is placed on the 
students acquiring a rationale for differential use of problem assessing, plan- 
ning, programming and evaluative approaches. Beyond concentration require- 
ments, students may select from University offerings courses directed toward 
acquiring knowledge and skills in specialized fields of service. 



The School of Social Work 13 

Services to Larger Groups, 
t! Communities and Institutional Systems: 

The concentration in community social work is directed to developing 
knowledge and skills necessary to practice social work in relation to com- 
i munity problems and needs and their resolution through societal programs 
I for change and improved delivery of social services. The instructional program 
| is methodologically based, geared to the utilization of a variety of techniques 
i and modes of practice in working with larger groups, communities and insti- 
j tutional systems. There are two major emphases in the concentration: 1) basic 
I or generic social work values, knowledge and practice skills involved in grass 
roots organizing, community development, social action, problem-solving and 
j planning, program design and implementation; and 2) particular knowledge and 
i expertise in respect to specific intervention through such change systems as 
j client groups, planning councils, community action programs, manpower serv- 
I ices, housing and urban development and others. 

In addition to selected core courses required by the School, the curriculum 
; consists of courses in community social work practice and elective choices 
| among other School or University course offerings consistent with the indi- 
vidual student's major professional interests. 



Administration and Planning in Social Welfare: 

The concentration in administration and planning in social welfare is con- 
! cerned with the study of human service organizations and their methods of 
I dealing with social problems. It is offered to those students whose interest 
| is in policy analysis, program planning and the administration or management 
of social welfare activities. The concentration will examine the varying eco- 
nomic, social, political and cultural forces which condition both the identifi- 
j cation of certain phenomena as a social problem and the choice of organized 
j social measures for dealing with it. Emphasis is placed on the theory and 
; behavior of complex organizations, administrative structures and practices, 
; informational processing and decision making, innovation and change and the 
i evaluation of organizational goal achievement. 

j While the concentration encourages individual educational planning in 
j line with career preferences, each student must complete the specified core 
I curriculum of the School. In addition the student elects additional courses 
| within a range of University offerings appropriate to administration and plan- 
ning. 

I Social Welfare Research 

I This unit represents more of a concentration of resources than a special- 
f ized area of graduate study. That is, it attempts to provide research oppor- 
tunities and services for social work practitioners, faculty members and gradu- 
ate students as the Institute for Research in Social Science serves the larger 
interests of social-behavioral scientists within the University. 
! Tne Primary resources of the unit consist of faculty representation from 
;each of the School's concentrated areas of graduate study, and open two-way 
'channels of communication with operating agencies through the School's field 
I instruction program. These mechanisms provide opportunities for the identifi- 



14 



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 



cation and formulation of problems relevant to social work practitioners in a 
variety of settings and from a variety of professional perspectives, and facili- 
tates the integration of practice and research. 

The unit offers the School's two required courses in research methodol- 
ogies, and collaborates with faculty members in other concentrations in the 
conduct of specialized research seminars applicable to particular settings or 
types of social work practice. In addition to these School-wide service func- 
tions, the unit offers a select few students with either considerable practical 
experience or a post-baccalaureate degree in one of the social-behavioral 
sciences opportunities for concentrated studies in social work research as a 
requisite for the School's contemplated doctoral program. 

Field Instruction 

Field Instruction provides a student with experience and practice oppor- 
tunities in human services which cut across social agency, department and 
service boundaries. The field learning environment permits each student to 
practice social work skills and to gain a comprehensive understanding of a 
field of social work service or a social problem. Through observation, practice, 
special assignments and seminars opportunities are utilized to enable students 
to have some direct engagement with the continuum of a given field of service 
or a selected social problem. A diversification of experience enables students 
to learn about agencies, departments, service boundaries and service networks. 

Student, according to their interest, background, and concentration, will 
participate in the selection of learning areas which provide them with oppor- 
tunities to further their understanding of program development, planning, 
analysis and implementation. 

Emphasis is placed upon knowledge and skill in working with client 
systems, social welfare systems, community systems, and human services 
systems. Students have the opportunity to participate in both direct and in- 
direct service delivery. 

Field Instruction settings include: family and children services, school 
social services, medical social services, in-patient and out-patient mental 
health services, correctional social services, social planning agencies, com- 
munity action programs, community development and neighborhood organi- 
zation programs, manpower development program, and housing programs. 

Work-Study Programs 

The School also maintains work-study units on the campus of the Uni- 
versity at Charlotte and at Fayetteville State College, in which the first year 
of the master's degree program may be taken in the course of two successive 
academic years. Students in these units attend classes one day a week for 
four successive semesters. In the second semester of the program, students 
are in field placements four days a week and are therefore, for this semester, 
full-time students. Admission to these units is granted on the same basis as 
admission to the School's full-time resident program at Chapel Hill, except 
that the applicant must be currently employed in a social work agency which 
will allow him released time for the unit's program. 



The School of Social Work 



15 



Group Child Care Consulting Services 

The School of Social Work provides, in cooperation with the Southeastern 
Child Care Association, a service offering consultation, research studies and 
in-service training to approximately seventy child care institutions and agencies 
in more than sixteen states. The service, founded in 1956, is by request or on 
a continuing membership basis. Small agencies in North Carolina are assisted 
by the Duke Endowment to obtain the service at a fraction of its cost. 

The Consultant Services, in addition to its visits to its members offers 
each year at the University, and elsewhere, conferences for child-care workers 
executives and other staff of child care institutions ('The Chapel Hill Work- 
shops," founded in 1945). 

The Community Action Training Center 

The Community Action Training Center conducts training and research 
activities related to the development and implementation of local community 
action programs that deal with social problems and community needs The 
Center provides comprehensive assessments of the training needs in such 
programs, develops curriculum materials and training approaches for working 
with community action programs and indigenous community groups, and offers 
direct training services. 

At the present time a grant from the Office of Economic Opportunity pro- 
vides for a program of training board members, administrative and supervisory 
staff, field workers and target area residents in community action agencies 
serving seven North Carolina counties. 

The School of Social Work's community action training activities were 
initiated in 1966 with establishment of the Community Action Training Unit 
These activities were in 1969 extended to provide broader services to North 
Carolina communities with the transfer to the School of Social Work of the 
community action training responsibilities formerly carried out in the Univer- 
sity by the University Extension Division. 



16 



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 



ADMISSION 

Steps Prior to Admission 

1. Applicants who wish to be considered for admission should request the 
required application blanks from the Director of Admissions. All applicants 
are required to pay a $10.00 non-deductible, non-refundable application fee. 
Because of the increasing number of applicants, it is best to submit appli- 
cations by January for the Fall Semester. The School's two-year master of 
social work program begins only in the Fall Semester. 
The Admissions Committee of the School of Social Work reviews each 
application and recommends admission to the Graduate School of the 
University which makes the final decision on admissions. The admissions 
process takes from six weeks to two months depending on the receipt of 
application material. 

Admission Requirements 

1. A bachelor's degree from an accredited college or university. 

2. Undergraduate courses must have included at least eighteen semester hours 
in anthropology, economics, sociology, political science or psychology. It is 
recommended that there be a distribution of courses in two or more of 
these fields. The student deficient in these requirements may be required 
to take courses outside the School to be eligible for admission to candi- 
dacy for a degree. 

3. A grade point average of 3.0. Occasionally exceptions are made below 3.0, 
but not lower than 2.5. 

4. Academic and work references. 

5. The Admissions Committee considers the applicant's potential for the social 
work profession which includes concern for people, a disciplined capacity 
for relationship and commitment to the values and objectives of the social 
work profession. 

6. Score on the Miller Analogies Test prior to admission if the grade point 
average is below 3.0. The Graduate School requires that the test be taken 
during the first semester if not taken before admission. The score should 
be sent to the Director of Admissions. 

7. A personal interview may be required. 

8. Competency in speaking and writing English and ability to present material 
in an orderly, clear and logical way. A special English class is offered for 
students if necessary to meet this requirement. 

Admission with Advanced Standing 

Applicants who have completed satisfactorily the first year at an accredited 
School of Social Work and who meet the admission requirements of this 
School may be accepted to complete their M.S.W. when there is room in the 
second-year class. The second year must be in residence in Chapel Hill. 

Scholarships— Stipends— Loans 

Scholarships 

Applicants who need full or part scholarships or loans should note this 
in the supplementary application statement. After admission to the School the 



The School of Social Work 



17 



Scholarship Committee will make every effort to plan with the applicant for 
necessary financial assistance. 

A variety of scholarships and other financial sources are available. 

Federal Scholarships 

Under the provisions of the National Mental Health Act, a limited number 
of trameeships are available for the training of students in psychiatric social 
work, corrections, and school social work. 

While there is no work commitment to a specific agency after graduation 
there is a moral commitment to work in the area of the specific scholarship' 
At least one year of field placement will be in a psychiatric, school social 
work, or corrections setting. 

The Babcock Foundation has provided two scholarships for 1970-71 students 
from minority groups. They are administered by the School. 

Several social agencies award scholarships to social work students which 
carry a commitment to work a year after graduation for each year the scholar- 
ship was received. A list of North Carolina agencies which have scholarships 
will be sent upon request. 

The National Urban League has a scholarship program for students inter- 
ested in community social work. Application should be made by writing the 
Urban League, 55 East 52nd Street, New York, N. Y. 10022. 

The Council on Social Work Education, 345 East 46th Street, New York N Y 
10017, publishes yearly "'Student Financial Aid for Master's Program in 'Grad- 
uate Schools of Social Work in the U.S.A. and Canada." The cost is $1.50. 

Loan Funds 

The North Carolina Rural Rehabilitation Corporation of Raleigh North 
Carolina, has set apart $25,000 as a loan fund for social work students Money 
may be borrowed at 4 per cent interest and may be repaid on easy terms as 
sixty monthly installments beginning one year after the student finishes his 
period of study. Repayments are applied first to accrued interest and then to 
principal. Collateral security or two responsible endorsers are required Appli- 
cations should be made through the School of Social Work or direct to the 
Corporation office in Raleigh. 

The Emanuel Sternberger Educational Fund has resources available on a 
non-interest bearing loan basis for citizens or residents of the state of North 
Carolina. Inquiry may be made directly to Mr. Sidney J. Stern, Jr., Emanuel 
Sternberger Educational Fund, Greensboro, North Carolina. 

In addition to these special loan funds, the general loan funds, announced 
in the University catalogue, are open to graduate students. Applications, ap- 
proved by the Dean of the School of Social Work, should be made to the Office 
of the Director of Student Aid. 

Annie Kizer Bost Award in the Public Social Services 

Each year an award will be made to a graduating student in the School 
of Social Work in memory of Mrs. Annie Kizer Bost. Mrs. Bost was Commissioner 
of Public Welfare in North Carolina from 1930 to 1944. The award is made to 
a North Carolina resident who intends to work in the broad field of public 
welfare in the state. 



18 



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 



DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 

The two-year graduate professional social work training program leads to 
the degree of Master of Social Work. 

For the degree of Master of Social Work a minimum of forty-eight semester 
hours is required. 

Formal application for admission to candidacy for an advanced degree is 
required. This is generally made during the second year of study. Approval of 
the application is dependent on the previous work of the student as shown by 
his undergraduate record; the score on the Miller Analogies Test; the record 
made in the Graduate School prior to the time when the application is filed; 
the certification, by the School of Social Work, that the student is qualified to 
continue advanced work with a program of work prepared in satisfaction of the 
requirements for the degree; and the removal of any special conditions imposed 
by the School of Social Work or by the Administrative Board of the Graduate 
School. 

The student is expected to obtain a grade of P or better in all of his 
courses. A grade of F, or a grade of L in three courses, or in nine hours of 
courses will terminate the student's progress toward the degree or toward 
completion of the year of training. A student who is admitted provisionally by 
the Graduate School may have more stringent conditions placed on his con- 
tinuing in school. 

Only work announced as open for graduate credit in this bulletin or the 
bulletin of the Summer Session may be counted toward higher degrees. 

Work taken more than five years before the date at which the master's 
degree is expected may not be used to count for credit toward that degree, 
except that this rule may be waived in regard to courses closely related to 
social work practice when the candidate has been actively engaged in social 
work involving the application of such courses. 

On the recommendation of the faculty of the School of Social Work the 
requirement of a reading knowledge of a foreign language may be waived in 
the case of a candidate for the degree of Master of Social Work. 

Notice is called to the regulation of the Graduate School that work taken 
while the student is enrolled as a "special student" may not be credited later 
as a part of the fulfillment of the requirements for a graduate degree. 

Research and Professional Productivity 

The course and field work instruction culminating in the Master of Social 
Work degree provides training and experience in social work research and also 
in productive professional writing. These requirements, specifically stated, 
are: 

(a) Successful completion of a social work research project and the sub- 
mission, either individually or as a member of the research group, of 
a written report demonstrating acceptable research method and pre- 
sentation (Social Work 253 and 254). 

and 

(b) Successful completion of a substantial study, professional in content 
and in its manner of presentation, in which the student examines some 
problem or area of practice in which he has been engaged and sup- 
ports his findings with evidence from his own learning, experience, and 



The School of Social Work 



19 



practice (Social Work 341). Completed studies are bound and catalogued 
in the University Library as Studies in Social Work Process upon ap- 
proval by the instructor, the Dean of the School of Social Work, and 
the Dean of the Graduate School. 



Examinations 

Candidates for the master's degree are required to pass all examinations 
in courses at the end of each semester of residence with the grade specified 
under the general regulations given above. In addition, a written examination 
on the field of the major is set by the student's advisory committee and must 
be taken no earlier than the first month of the last semester of residence. 

In the School of Social Work this takes the form of a comprehensive 
examination given in April or May of the second year. 

Examinations in course and the final written examination must satisfy the 
committee which has charge of them that the candidate possesses such knowl- 
edge of the theory of social work as may reasonably be expected, that he can 
draw upon his knowledge with promptness and accuracy, and that his thinking 
is not limited to the separate units represented by his courses. 

The recommendation of the faculty of the School of Social Work will be 
reported to the Dean of the Graduate School at least one week before the end 
of the last semester of residence. If the candidate's record is satisfactory, and 
if he has complied with all the requirements for the degree, the Dean' will 
report the student to the University faculty for approval and recommendation 
to the Board of Trustees. 



FEES AND EXPENSES 

The University reserves the right to make, with the approval of the proper 
authorities, changes in tuition and any other fees at any time. 

For in-state students the University fees for an academic year, including 
the $75.00 field work fee, are approximately $470. For out-of-state students 
these fees, including the $75.00 field work fee, amount to approximately $1200. 
Residence Status for Tuition Payment 

1. General: The tuition charge for legal residents of North Carolina is less 
than for nonresidents. To qualify for in-state tuition, a legal resident must 
have maintained his domicilei in North Carolina for at least the six months 
next preceding the date of first enrollment or re-enrollment in an institution 
of higher education in this State. 

2. Minors: The legal residence of a person under twenty-one years of age at 
the time of his first enrollment in an institution of higher education in 
this State is that of his parents, surviving parent, or legal guardian. In 
cases where parents are divorced or legally separated, the legal residence 
of the father will control unless custody of the minor has been awarded 
by court order to the mother or to a legal guardian other than a parent 
No claim of residence in North Carolina based upon residence of a guardian 

_ _ l ^_ North Carolina wil1 be considered if either parent is living unless the 

L thf- P° mici ) e is synonymous with legal residence. A person's domicile is his permanent dwellina olace It 
I re ur S An'aSLT 1 ? V" d —tood to reside with the intention of remain*!! ! there indefi i e y 

t red note ^TSJS^JL kSS"^ ^ * ^ so \ who5e domicle '* In North Carolina is regis- 
of Persons reside t in K Carol na * ° ther np0rt5 ' "** C ° mP ' ieS W ' th ° ther obli9ations 



20 



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 



action of the court appointing the guardian antedates the student's first 
enrollment in a North Carolina institution of higher education by at least 
twelve months. 

A minor student whose parents move their legal residence from North 
Carolina to a location outside the State shall be considered to be a non- 
resident after six months from the date of removal from the State. 

For the purpose of determining residence requirements under these 
rules, a person will be considered a minor until he has reached his twenty- 
first birthday. Married minors, however, are entitled to establish and main- 
tain their residence in the same manner as adults. Attendance at an insti- 
tuition of higher education as a student cannot be counted as fulfilling 
the six-month domicile requirement. 

3. Adults: A person twenty-one years of age or older is eligible for in-state 
tuition if he has maintained continuous domicile in North Carolina for 
the six months next preceding the date of enrollment or re-enrollment, 
exclusive of any time spent in attendance at any institution of higher 
education. An in-state student reaching the age of twenty-one is not 
required to reestablish residence provided that he maintains his domicile 
in North Carolina. 

4. Married Students: The legal residence of a wife follows that of her hus- 
band, except that a woman currently enrolled as an in-state student in an 
institution of higher education may continue as a resident even though 
she marries a nonresident. If the husband is a nonresident and separation 
or divorce occurs, the woman may qualify for in-state tuition after estab- 
lishing her domicile in North Carolina for at least six months under the 
same conditions as she could if she were single. 

5. Military Personnel: No person shall be presumed to have gained or lost 
in-state residence status in North Carolina while serving in the Armed 
Forces. However, a member of the Armed Forces may obtain in-state resi- 
dence status for himself, his spouse, or his children after maintaining his 
domicile in North Carolina for at least the six months next preceding his 
or their enrollment or re-enrollment in an institution of higher education 
in this State. 

6. Aliens: Aliens lawfully admitted to the United States for permanent resi- 
dence may establish North Carolina residence in the same manner as any 
other nonresident. 

7. Property and Taxes: Ownership of property in or payment of taxes to the 
State of North Carolina apart from legal residence will not qualify one for 
the in-state tuition rate. 

8. Change of Status:2 The residence status of any student is determined as 
of the time of his first enrollment in an institution of higher education in 
North Carolina and may not thereafter be changed except: (a) in the case 
of a nonresident student at the time of his first enrollment who, or if a 
minor his parents, has subsequently maintained a legal residence in North 
Carolina for at least six months, and (b) in the case of a resident who has 

2. To qualify for in-state tuition, a legal resident must have maintained his domicile in North Carolina 
for at least six months next preceding the date of fi st enrollment or re-enrollment in an institution of 
higher education in the State. Attendance at an institution of higher education as a student cannot be 
counted as fulfilling the six-month domicile requirement. A person twenty-one years of age or older is eligible 
for in-state tuition if he has maintained continuous d micile in North Carolna for the six months next pre- 
ceding the date of enroilment or re-enrollment, exclusive of any time spent in attendance at any institution 
of higher education. 



The School of Social Work 21 

abandoned his legal residence in North Carolina for a minimum period of 
six months. In either case, the appropriate tuition rate will become effec- 
tive at the beginning of the term following the six-month period. 
i| 9. Responsibility of Student: Any student or prospective student in doubt 
concerning his residence status must bear the responsibility for securing 
a ruling by stating his case in writing to the admissions officer. The stu- 
dent who, due to subsequent events, becomes eligible for a change in 
classification, whether from out-of-state to in-state or the reverse, has the 
responsibility of immediately informing the Office of Admissions of this 
circumstance in writing. Failure to give complete and correct information 
regarding residence constitutes grounds for disciplinary action. 
10. Appeals of Rulings of Admission Officers: Any student or prospective stu- 
dent may appeal the ruling of the admissions officer in writing to the 
Chancellor of the institution. The Chancellor may use any officer or com- 
mittee which he deems appropriate in review of the appeal. Appeal of the 
Chancellor's ruling may be made to the President of the University; such 
appeals to be filed with the Chancellor and forwarded by him to the 
President. 

Housing 

The University provides limited housing for unmarried students in resi- 
| dence halls, several of which are reserved for graduate students. The cost per 
i academic year is $339-$607. Laundry and linen services are available at reason- 
able rates. Further information about housing may be found in the Graduate 
j School Catalog. The University operates several cafeterias, in which the average 
ij cost of three meals a day has been estimated at $60 to $70 per month, 
j The University has several hundred apartments available for married stu- 
| dents, consisting of one bedroom and two bedroom units. Rent is approximately 
|$82 to $110.00 per month, while rent in the older prefabricated units is con- 
siderably lower. It is a general policy of the University to grant priority to 
j married graduate students. Early application to the Director of Housing is 
i strongly recommended. 

I Apart from University housing, there are privately operated residence halls 
in University Square. These buildings have a cafeteria dining commons, and 
the fee charged includes room and board. Arrangements for these accommo- 
dations should be made directly with the Granville Towers Business Office 

j University Square, Chapel Hill, N. C. 27514. 



Student Health Service 

In order to provide proper medical attention for the student, the University 
jemploys nine full-time physicians, two part-time physicians, two half-time 
'psychiatrists, one part-time consulting psychologist, and one half-time marriage 
| counselor, who provide general medical care and psychiatric counseling. It 
| maintains a well-appointed infirmary with sixty-five beds. Modern diagnostic 
facilities include an x-ray unit, under the direction of a full-time technician, 
jand a clinical laboratory, under the direction of two full-time technicians. The 
j infirmary is under the immediate supervision of the Director of Student Health 
jService and is provided with seventeen full-time experienced nurses who are 
directed by a nursing supervisor. At the discretion of the attending physician, 



22 



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 



a student may be admitted to the wards, and for such service as may be 
rendered by the staff no charges are made. However, certain highly specialized 
services (major surgery, consultations, certain types of x-ray and laboratory 
procedures) not available at the infirmary are rendered by N. C. Memorial 
Hospital at standard charges. In addition, a charge is made for inpatient meals 
and for other than routine drugs and dressings provided on either an inpatient 
or outpatient basis. Charges are also made for routine procedures not directly 
related to the health of a student— such as pre-employment physical exami- 
nations, and the like— and for services rendered between regular sessions when 
the student is not actually enrolled in the University. 

Firearms and Other Weapons Prohibited 

The possession of bowie knives, dirks, daggers, loaded canes, sword canes, 
machetes, pistols, rifles, repeating rifles, shotguns, pump guns, or other fire- 
arms or explosives upon any University campus or in any University owned or 
operated facility, unless explicitly permitted by the appropriate Chancellor or 
his designated representative in writing, is forbidden. Violation of this pro- 
hibition constitutes grounds for suspension from the University." 



The School of Social Work 



23 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Courses listed from departments other than Social Work and occasionally a 
course not listed, may be elected for credit with the approval of the student's 
special committee or of the Dean. 

Subject to restrictions of the Graduate School (see Graduate Catalogue) 
with the approval of the head of the major department and of the Dean, stu- 
dents in other departments of the University may elect courses in the School 
of Social Work. Such students will be given credit as a part of their program 
approved by the major department, not in the School of Social Work. This rule 
will not prevent the transfer of credit in accord with the regulations of the 
University if the student later registers with the School. 

The listing of a course in the catalogue does not obligate the University to 
give the course in any particular year. 

205 The Creative Process 3 Hours 

Open to students who have begun their second year's work toward a degree 
in social work. This seminar will help the student examine and find his 
own creative process through class discussion, papers, and reading. Ma- 
terial for the seminar is drawn not only from the student's experience but 
also from fiction, poetry, the plastic arts, biography, and other authentic 
accounts of the creative process. 

209 Individuation and Socialization in Human Growth 4 Hours 

This course offers the student an opportunity to acquire the knowledge 
and understanding of human growth essential for social work practice. 
Attention will center upon the individual in his biological, social, and 
psychological dimensions; his way of making use of relationships; and the 
significance of interaction with the family, the small group, the commun- 
ity and the culture. Individuation and socialization over the entire life 
span will be studied. 

210 Social Casework I 2 Hours 

Introduction to the practice of casework and preparation for field instruc- 
tion (220). Casework is seen as a process of helping people on an indi- 
vidual basis through concrete services of personal counseling within the 
framework of a social agency. The course consists of group discussion of 
recorded casework material and casework principles, and individual con- 
sultation with the instructor. 

211 Social Casework II 2 Hours 

Prerequisite, Social Work 210. As this course follows the student's first 
field instruction practice, his experiences in field and class will contribute 
to an evaluation and organization of his understanding of basic social 
casework principles. 

212 Social Casework III 2 Hours 

Prerequisite, second-year standing. A discussion course in social casework 
applicable to students before their block field instruction placement. The 
study will be related to the generic social casework approach, although 
members of the class will subsequently be placed in a variety of settings, 
such as family casework, public assistance, child welfare, psychiatric 



24 



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 



social work, school social work, medical settings, and other advanced 
practice areas. 

213 Social Casework IV 2 Hours 

Prerequisite, second-year standing. In this course, the nature of the help- 
ing process of casework will be explored in depth through class discussion 
of professional literature, case material, and student presentation of cases 
from their own work in the various agencies of field placement. Attention 
will also be given to aspects of the historical growth of casework. 

214 Principles of Casework for Employed Workers 3 Hours 

A course offered in Extension only to workers currently carrying cases. An 
exploration of simple casework concepts taught largely from case situa- 
tions in the student's own caseload. Readings, papers, and class dis- 
cussion. 

220 Social Work Practice I 6 Hours 

Prerequisite, graduate standing. Students are placed under supervision in 
social work agencies or other practice situations approved by the School. 
Classroom and practice learning is correlated through conferences with 
the field adviser and written assignments reflecting practice activities and 
observation reflecting all components of the curriculum. Spring and Fall 
semesters. Special fee, $75.00. 

221 Social Work Practice II 6 Hours 

Prerequisite, second-year standing. Second-year social work practice (see 
SW 220 above), providing more specialized practice learning primarily in 
the student's chosen major method but similarly reflecting all components 
of the curriculum. Spring and Fall semesters. Special fee, $75.00. 

222 Social Work Practice III 6 Hours 

Prerequisite, Master's degree in Social Work. A practicum in social work 
for advanced (post-Master's) students, approved by the Committee on Con- 
tinuing Education. The practicum is flexibly conceived and may be con- 
centrated or extended in time. 

232 Community Social Work I 2 Hours 

This course serves to acquaint the student with community work as a 
social work method and to familiarize him with major current develop- 
ments in practice. A variety of concepts of community and its functioning 
are reviewed, the major principles on which community work is based are 
examined, and the knowledge and skills required to participate effectively 
as a professional in community planning and problem-solving are identi- 
fied. 

233 Community Social Work II 2 Hours 

Designed to deepen understanding of concepts and techniques of com- 
munity work. Stresses participation of community residents in problem- 
solving and decision-making. Emphasis is put on the practitioner's use of 
structure and relationships, as tools in helping groups and organizations 
resolve community problems. Types of organization for planning, coordi- 
nation, service, and community action are studied. 



The School of Social Work 25 

234 Community Social Work III 2 H(Jurs 

Prerequisite, second-year standing. The focus of this course is on practice 
skills at the local community and neighborhood level of organization and 
on the development of indigenous leadership for community problem- 
solving. It is based on an analysis of major social interaction processes 
and confrontations, such as cooperation, conflict, consensus, and their 
functions in community life. Strategies for planned social change arising 
out of these processes are evaluated. 

235 Community Social Work IV 2 Hours 

Prerequisite, second-year standing. This course examines policy and plan- 
ning issues as they affect efforts to solve community problems It directs 
itself to a professional role in inter-agency planning and coordination 
administration of different types of community programs, and work with 
decision-making bodies and community power orders. 
245 Beginning Casework Supervision 3 Hours 

Prerequisite, completion of one year in a school of social work and present 
employment in a supervisory capacity in social work. Basic problems and 
principles in relation to the supervisory process in social casework will 
be studied by using current material provided by the instructor and the 
class members. The course will be especially geared to the needs of the 
new supervisor and to the supervisor of new workers. 

252 Social Work Research Methods I 2 Hours 

This course provides an orientation to the knowledge base and research 
methods of various behavioral social sciences which underlie social work 
practice. Through selected readings, lectures presented by various social 
scientists, and seminar sessions, students are exposed to a variety of 
human behavior at various levels of complexity. 

253 Social Work Research Methods II 2 Hours 
This course offers an opportunity for the student to apply selected social 
science concepts, theories, and research methodologies to a social work 
problem of interest to him. Through identification of a problem area 
formulation of a researchable question, and development of a research 
protocol the student is taken through all of the steps in the research 
process except data collection. 

254 Social Work Research Methods III 2 Hours 

Prerequisite, second-year standing. This course provides an opportunity 
to critically review the student's own efforts to carry through the research 
design developed in S.W. 253, and those conducted by other students as 
well as by more experienced social researchers working on related prob- 
ems. Deepens capacity to initiate and conduct research related to prac- 
tice and to critically evaluate and apply the results of scientific investi- 
gations. 

255 Seminar in Social Research 2 Hours 

Prerequisite, second-year standing. This class will be conducted as a 
aboratory course in which a select few students will be assigned prob- 
lems relevant to faculty research projects in various stages of develop- 
ment. These projects will predominantly reflect service agencies' request 
tor assistance. 



26 



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 



260 Social Welfare Policy I 2 Hours 

Prerequisite, graduate standing. The theory and practice of social welfare 
decision-making at the national, state, and local level. Readings, class 
reports, and discussion. 

261 Social Welfare Policy II 2 Hours 

Prerequisite, graduate standing. This course examines programs for eco- 
nomic security, including national employment policies, fiscal policies, 
and income maintenance programs. Emphasis is placed on the problem 
identification and formulation phase of policy making. Criteria are devel- 
oped by which the student learns to analyze policies and programs with 
respect to effectiveness and efficiency. Income maintenance programs in 
other nations are examined. 

262 Social Welfare Policy III 2 Hours 

Prerequisite, second-year standing. This course examines the various sys- 
tems into which social services are organized and by which they are 
delivered. Using the criteria developed for income security programs in 
SW 261, students will analyze the organization of social services with 
special reference to problems in the delivery of the services to varying 
population groups. Economic, social, professional, and racial barriers to 
service delivery will be examined as will the problems related to effective 
planning of service systems. 

263 Seminar on Social Welfare in Urban Planning 2 Hours 

Prerequisite, second-year standing. This course examines the role of the 
social services and the role of social workers in the context of urban 
planning efforts. Selected urban phenomena are examined and planning: 
concepts discussed. Several social planning models embodying alternate 
roles for social welfare and social work are presented and examined. The 
student is given the opportunity to identify a problem area and to study 
it in depth in relation to planning concepts. 

264 History and Philosophy of the Helping Process 2 Hours 

Prerequisite, second-year standing. The course traces the development of 
helping method from its Greek, Hebrew, and Latin roots to the moderr 
day, with special attention to the effects of culture, philosophy and 
theology on helping theory. The process is related to similar and different 
processes in administration, art, literature, religion, and the practice o1 
other professions. Class discussion, reading, and a term paper. 

268 Social Work and the Law 2 Hour 

(Note: This course is required of all NIMH-Corrections stipend recipients. 
Seminar on law as a resource in social work practice, with emphasis oi 
areas where the two professions frequently meet, i.e., public welfarej 
juvenile court, family law, adoptions, etc. Examines attitudes of law an< 
social work toward each other, development and complexity of law, bash 
constitutional principles as applied to socio-legal institutions, the advei 
sary process as a method of seeking truth, role of courts and the attorney 
similarities and differences in the two professions. 

269 Social Work Administration 2 Hour 
Problems and principles in the administration of a social agency, taugl 1 
on the case method. Readings, class reports, and discussion. 



The School of Social Work 27 

270 Social Group Work I 2 Hours 

Introduction to the theory and practice of the social group work method 
This course is designed to help the student gain an overview of the con- 
cepts and processes involved in helping individuals in and through pur- 
posefully planned group experiences. Class discussion of reading assign- 
ments and social group work methods are supplemented with role plavine 
exercises. a 

1 Social Group Work II 2 Hours 

Prerequisite, graduate standing. This course is designed to enhance the 
development of practice skills in social group work for students who plan 
a concentration in social group work in their second year and students 
who plan to choose social group work as their second practice method 
Particular attention is paid to diagnosis, group composition and formation 
and group structure and processes from the perspective of three models 
of social group work. Theoretical material is drawn from the literature of 
social group work and social psychology. 

Social Group Work III 2 Hours 

Prerequisite, second-year standing. This course for students concentrating 
in Social Group Work as one of their practice methods extends the major 
themes of Social Work 271 especially defining group progresses and goals 
composing and structuring groups, extra-group means of influence and 
programming, in light of organizational variables and setting differentials 
The major themes for the course are drawn from social systems theories. 
Social Group Work IV 2 H 

Prerequisite, second-year standing and specialization in social group work 
Selected current issues, theoretical problems and research are examined 
in this seminar as they relate to and affect social work practice In addi- 
tion social group work theory and practice is examined in the spectrum 
of diverse methods of helping people in and through groups. 

Psychopathology of Human Behavior 2 Hours 

Prerequisite, second-year standing. Lectures and clinical demonstrations 
on the dynamics of development and of normal behavior, with emphasis 
on unconscious motivations and mechanisms. For practical purposes 
differentiation is made between essentially normal responses and those 
significant in psychoneuroses, psychopathic personality and psychoses 
but similarities will also be noted. The course will include such reference 
to treatment methods. Collateral reading will also be assigned. 

90 Principles and Problems of Agency Child Care 3 Hours 

An examination of process, structure, and principles involved in caring for 
children away from their own homes, or where separation from home is in 
question. Foster family, group and part-time care, placement for adoption 
counseling and protective services. Readings, papers, and class discussion! 

Principles of Child Welfare for Employed Workers 3 Hours 

A course offered in Extension only to workers in public and private child 
welfare agencies. Basically the same content as 290 (above) with special 
reference to services carried by students in the class. Readings, papers, 
and class discussion. 



28 



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 



301 Human Values and Social Problems 2 Hours 

Prerequisite, SW 209. A consideration of the nature of human values, per- 
sonal and professional, as a factor in shaping human behavior and in the 
definition and selection of approaches toward the resolution of social 
problems. 

310 Seminars in Advanced Social Casework 6 Hours 

311 A course designed for third-year students of casework to increase their 
knowledge and understanding of the helping process of casework. To be 
accompanied by supervised field instruction in casework. 

314 Advanced Casework for Practitioners 3 Hours 

In this seminar, the class will consider with the instructor, casework prob- 
lems encountered in the student's practice in agency, issues raised about 
the solution to these problems, and possible resolution in the helping 
process of casework. Open to practicing caseworkers with the Master ol 
Social Work degree. 

330 Research Seminars in Community Organization 6 Hours 

331 

341 Seminar: Studies in Social Work Process 2 Hour! 

Successful completion of a substantial study, professional in content anc 
in its manner of presentation, in which the student examines some prob 
lem or area of practice in which he has been engaged and supports hi<; 
findings with evidence from his own learning, experience, and practice; 

345 Seminar in Casework Supervision 3 Hour; 

Prerequisite, master's degree in Social Work. A course designed for super 
visors who are practicing supervision in their agencies, to learn the teach: 
ing of casework skill to the beginning or less experienced worker througl 
the supervisory relationship within the social agency. 

362 Research Seminars in Public Welfare 6 Hour 

363 

367 Research Seminars in Social Work Administration 9 Hour 

368 

369 

400 General Registration Hour 



The School of Social Work 



UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 
SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK 



Second-Year Students 
Student 

Adams, Mrs. Mary Alice 
Agnew, Rufus 
Appleby, George A. 
Avera, Mrs. Jean E. 
Baker, Melvin B. 
Bardolph, Miss Virginia Ann 
I Beamon, Miss Dorothy 
I Bibb, Mrs. Jeane R. 
I Black, Mrs. Mary Ann 
I Bridwell, Mrs. Catherine 
I Brown, Mrs. Anne G. 
j Burnette, Everette R. 
I Cage, Lt. Lee E., Jr. 
I Cannon, Miss Linda 
I Cathcart, Miss Narvair C. 
( Chesnut, Mrs. Glenina 
I Crumpler, Sara 
j Deal, Mrs. Virginia S. 
I Dowdy, Mrs. Janice 
I Elmore, Mrs. Billie 
i Feagans, Helen 
if Flinn, Mrs. Katherine 
i Folger, Mrs. Louise 
if Foss, Mrs. Sarah 

Freitag, Miss Judith A. 
j Fulk, Mrs. Judith 

Gerrish, Richard B. 
\ Gibson, Jesse 

Glennon, Robert B. 
iGoss, Darrell W. 
\ Hall, Adrianna Rose 
j Hargrove, Miss Catherine 
; Harrison, Miss Gail 
| Haskett, George T. 
i Hendrix, Wanzo F. 

Hill, Robert W. 

Hines, Erthel 
jJacobson, Teresa 
'Jones, Jill V. 

Kirkpatrick, Mrs. Pam 

Knopf, Ronald R. 

Mabe, Raymond S. 

Mann, Mrs. Patricia 



State of Residence 

North Carolina 
North Carolina 
Connecticut 
Kentucky 
North Carolina 
North Carolina 
North Carolina 
North Carolina 
South Carolina 
Washington 
California 
South Carolina 
Maryland 
South Carolina 
North Carolina 
North Carolina 
North Carolina 
North Carolina 
Virginia 
North Carolina 
Virginia 
North Carolina 
North Carolina 
North Carolina 
Minnesota 
Maryland 
North Carolina 
North Carolina 
Connecticut 
Oklahoma 
North Carolina 
North Carolina 
North Carolina 
Virginia 
North Carolina 
North Carolina 
North Carolina 
North Carolina 
Virginia 
North Carolina 
North Carolina 
North Carolina 
North Carolina 



30 



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 



Student 

Marsden, Mrs. Anne 
McAllister, Miss Joan 
McKeagney, Robert B., Jr. 
Mingua, Sandra 
Moore, Robert H. 
Nunn, Linda Kay 
O'Connor, Roderick B. 
Onn, Mrs. David 
Patelos, Mary D. 
Phillips, Mary Ellen 
Rausch, Mrs. Jean 
Redding, Donna Jo 
Reed, Miss Dianne 
Sage, Mrs. Caroline 
Schell, Miss Joan 
Schonfeld, Ivan 
Segar, Robert Alan 
Sin, Miss Yuen-Bing 
Smith, Mrs. Frances 
Stiegler, Mrs. Phyllis H. 
Styron, Miss Gaye 
Temple, Betsy 
Thomas, Patrick 
Tietz, Miss Virginia Ann 
Ulmer, Miss Margaret 
Wassenich, Mrs. Linda 
Waters, Mrs. Martha 
Wicker, Harry Lee 
Wilkerson, Frank CHI 
Woods, Mrs. Louise 
Wray, Mrs. Jinger J. 



State of Residence 

North Carolina 
North Carolina 
Maine 
Kentucky 
North Carolina 
North Carolina 
North Carolina 
North Carolina 
North Carolina 
North Carolina 
Massachusetts 
North Carolina 
North Carolina 
North Carolina 
North Carolina 
Pennsylvania 
Pennsylvania 
China 

North Carolina 
Maine 

North Carolina 
Virginia 
North Carolina 
North Carolina 
Kentucky 
Texas 

North Carolina 
North Carolina 
New Jersey 
North Carolina 
Arkansas 



Place of Residence 

North Carolina 
North Carolina 
New York 
North Carolina 
Virginia 
North Carolina 
Michigan 
North Carolina 
Florida 

North Carolina 

North Carolina 

North Carolina 

Florida 

New York 

Texas 

New York 

North Carolina 

Washington, D. C. 

Florida 

Pennsylvania 

Minnesota 

North Carolina 

South Carolina 

North Carolina 

Indiana 
North Carolina 
Pennsylvania 
Pennsylvania 
North Carolina 
North Carolina 
North Carolina 
Maryland 
Pennsylvania 
North Carolina 
North Carolina 
Florida 

North Carolina 
North Carolina 
North Carolina 
North Carolina 
Maryland 
North Carolina 
Georgia 
North Carolina 
North Carolina 
North Carolina 
Virginia 
North Carolina 



32 



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 



Student 


Place of Residence 


Pope, Mrs. Elizabeth H. 


North Carolina 


Rapport, Miss Erica 


New York 


Read, Mrs. Virginia C. 


North Carolina 


Setzer, Miss Donna 


North Carolina 


Shook, Miss Lois 


North Carolina 


Simmons, Mr. Larry 


North Carolina 


Small. Miss Sandra 


North Carolina 


Taylor, Miss Ava 


Alabama 


Todd, Miss Mary Ann 


North Carolina 


Turlington, Mrs. Helen N. 


North Carolina 


Turner, Walter Rupert 


North Carolina 


Wagoner, Mrs. Sandra F. 


North Carolina 


Walker, Miss Elaine 


North Carolina 


Wasson, John M., Jr. 


North Carolina 


Weinkam, Thomas V. 


North Carolina 


Wells, William S. 


North Carolina 


West, Miss Sandra 


North Carolina