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Full text of "Potential of BLM lands in western Fresno and eastern San Benito and Monterey counties, California, as critical habitats for the endangered San Joaquin kit fox, Vulpes macrotis mutica, and blunt-nosed leopard lizard, Crotaphytus silus"

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UC-11 


Energy Measurements Group 


st POTENTIAL OF BLM LANDS IN WESTERN FRESNO AND 
EASTERN SAN BENITO AND MONTEREY COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA, 
AS CRITICAL HABITATS FOR THE ENDANGERED 


SAN JOAQUIN KIT FOX, Vulpes macrotis mutica, 
AND BLUNT-NOSED LEOPARD LIZARD, Crotaphytus silus 


NOVEMBER 1981 


PREPARED FOR THE BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT ; 
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 





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DISCLAIMER 


This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the 
United States Government. Neither the United States nor the 

United States Department of Energy, nor any of their employees, 
makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal 
liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or 
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does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommen- 
dation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency 
thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do 

not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Govern- 
ment or any agency thereof. 


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Energy Measurements Group : Gal 


POTENTIAL OF BLM LANDS IN WESTERN FRESNO AND 
EASTERN SAN BENITO AND MONTEREY COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA, 
AS CRITICAL HABITATS FOR THE ENDANGERED 


SAN JOAQUIN KIT FOX, Vulpes macrotis mutica, 
AND BLUNT-NOSED LEOPARD LIZARD, Crotaphytus silus 


by 


eitomas he ONParrell 27Ph.D.; 
Patrick McCue, and Thomas Kato 


NOVEMBER 1981 


©. y 


Classification Officer 


This report is unclassified: 


ard 3ane © et 
PREPARED FOR THE BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, piv S gsdO cee 
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR BY BOOP cede ae 
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THROUGH INTERAGENCY AGREEMENT CA-010-IA1-11 WITH THE AES ag enn 
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, NEVADA OPERATIONS OFFICE BO nce 
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SANTA BARBARA OPERATIONS 


EG&G INC. 130 ROBIN HILL AO, GOLETA, CALIF. 99017 


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SUMMARY 


The major objectives of this project were to determine the presence and 
relative density of the San Joaquin kit fox and blunt-nosed leopard lizard on 
BLM lands in western Fresno and eastern San Benito and Monterey counties, 
California, and to determine the potential of these lands as critical habitat 
for these endangered species. A total of 6,220 acres in the Ciervo Hills and 
4,000 acres near Coalinga were surveyed for both San Joaquin kit fox and blunt- 
nosed leopard lizards; 810 acres in the Griswold Hills were surveyed for kit 
fox only; and 2,000 acres in the Tumey Hills were surveyed for blunt-nosed 
leopard lizards only. 


A total of 2,440 acres near San Ardo in the Salinas Valley was deleted 
from the survey afterpreliminary investigation indicated low potential as 
habitat for the kit fox because of rugged topography. Parcels in the Coalinga 
and San Ardo areas consisted of privately-owned surface with federally-owned 
subsurface mineral rights. Other parcels were vacant public lands. 


Eight line transects per mile were used to gather information on 1) kit 
toxedens, stats, tracks, and remains of their prey; 2) presence of blunt-nosed 
leopard lizards; 3) vegetation associations; 4) density of rodent burrows on 
lands surveyed for leopard lizards; 5) topography; 6) evidence of human 
activities; 7) presence of other wildlife species; and 8) any additional 
scientific data related to endangered species. Night spotlight surveys were 
conducted in the Ciervo Hills, Griswold Hills, and on lands adjacent to Coalinga 
and San Ardo to document presence of kit fox, their potential prey, and other 
yerteprates « 


BLM parcels were arranged into four land units: Ciervo Hills, Griswold 
Hills, Coalinga, and Tumey Hills. Field data gathered during surveys of the 
first three land units were evaluated using a numerical rating system. Scores 
were given to each land unit for presence of San Joaquin kit fox, evidence of 
breeding, abundance of prey (lagomorphs), space, suitability of topography, 
and impacts of grazing and oil developments. Final scores of the rating Ny 
were used to rank the suitability of each land unit as potential critical 
habitat for the San Joaquin kit fox. Potential of land units as critical 
“habitat for the blunt-nosed leopard lizard was evaluated using information on 
1) presence of the species, 2) perceived suitability of vegetation associations 
and physiography, and 3) compatibility of human activities in the area. 


Of BLM land surveyed in 1981, the Coalinga Land Unit had the highest 
potential as critical habitat for the San Joaquin kit fox, the Ciervo Hills 
Land Unit was ranked second, and parcels in the Griswold Hills received the 
lowest score given since inventories were initiated in 1979. Public lands in 
the Salinas Valley were too steep to serve as habitat for kit fox. 


Over 70% of the parcels had only fair to no potential as critical habitat 


for the blunt-nosed leopard lizard. BLM lands near Coalinga and those in the 
central plateau of the Tumey Hills visually appeared to have some potential as 


iii 


habitat for the species. Further rankings could not be assigned since only one 
blunt-nosed leopard lizard was observed during field surveys. Because of the 
insufficient number of observations, no attempt was made to relate presence of 
leopard lizards to vegetation associations, density of rodent burrows, propor- 
tion of open ground, topography, or human impacts such as grazing or petroleum 
developments. 


Twenty nine kit fox dens were found. The estimated relative density 
(number/1000 acres) of kit fox dens for all land units combined was 2.6, but 
no dens were found in the Griswold Hills. Multiple-hole dens had an average 
of 4,2 entrances. Dens were found at elevations between 206 and 859 m on 
sites having an average slope angle of 15.1°, and a majority faced the north- 
east quadrant. No evidence was gathered showing that kit fox den sites were 
selected because of the presence of particular plant species or associations. 


As in 1980 relative densities of black-tailed jackrabbits (43.8) and 


desert cottontails (19.3) were highest on the Coalinga Land Unit. Lagomorph 
densities on the other land units ranged between 2.4 and 3.7. 


iv 


a eel 


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 


We wish to acknowledge the contributions of Brenda Evans, Brad Hardenbrook, 
Rachel Horwitz, and Jeff Johnson who shared the rigorous field work and helped 
gather the data used in this report. ; 





Section 


ISD 


CONTENTS 


Tethhe 


CUMMARY © Ae WIE thence! » 
DECNONL DUE MEN Geta na himeMercrha UU PEER (a dour 


INTRODUCTION . 


rh Background 
ie Objectives 


Cures alsin coke Wencermeat lay: Pace he hte” Somes a0 hs 
feed GYOUnUEOULUGY Sie is yh ILE Ets 
Lge Night Spotlight fil bets POT gee eae er 
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26 Vegetation Survey .. 

cae Rodent Burrow Density . 


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OAM PAD EAR SUPE EC WU eel.) ore fos 
Griswoid Hillis: Land Unit) 3. 30. 
Tumey Hills Land Unit 


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CRITICAL HABITAT RATING SYSTEM AND RANKING .. . 


4.1 Nite Oseth a Cio S04.) eae te 

4.2? Ranking Potential of a ERohenl patcets as eee 
Habitat for San Joaquin Kit Fox and Blunt-Nosed — 
Leopard Lizards SG 

Characteristics of Kit rat pene 


AS 
4.4 Observations of Vertebrates 
DISCUSSION . 


eal Land Unit Rankings 

Sue Kit Fox Dens bate 

ee Blunt-Nosed Leopard Lizard bbservations 
5.4 Other Species Information . Ree athe 
RECOMMENDATIONS 


LITERATURE CITED . 


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CONTENTS (continued) 


Section Title Page 


APPENDIX A: DATA SUMMARY SHEETS FOR INDIVIDUAL PARCELS OF 
BLM LANDS SURVEYED FOR THEIR POTENTIAL AS 
CRETICAWTHAB LY AT Olgeice Lote rc) heme ies, ne, sone eee ee 


APPENDIX B: KIT FOX DEN ANALYSIS SHEETS OF SIGNIFICANT 
INFORMATION FOUND WITHIN EACH LAND UNIT... .. B-l 


APPENDIX C: VERTEBRATES OBSERVED DURING NIGHT SPOTLIGHT 
SURVEYS: OF (BLM: LANDS: IN P9810 3 ics te ete, oe eet 


APPENDIX D: NUMBER OF MAMMALS, REPTILES, AND BIRDS OBSERVED 


ON BLM LANDS SURVEYED AS POTENTIAL SAN wae 
KIT FOX -GRITTICAL HABVIAT CIN SEORdS | ec. ee hn hb! 


cle tek 


ILLUSTRATIONS 


Figure Title Page 
] Location of BLM lands in the Coalinga, Ciervo Hills, Griswold 


Hills, and Tumey Hills Land Units, and Salinas Valley that 
were assigned for survey in 1981 to determine their potential 
Peet reco neo tet TOT endangered SHGCLES Sk ee we a ed 8 


2 Parcels of BLM land in the Ciervo Hills Land Unit surveyed 
in 1981 to determine their potential as critical habitat for 
Sans oaguin’ kitefox and blunt-nosed leopard lizards ... 4.4. 10 


3 Parcels of BLM land in the Coalinga Land Unit surveyed in 
1981 to determine their potential as critical habitat for 
San Joaquin kit tox and blunt-nosed leopard lizards .... . 16 


4 Parcels of BLM land in the Griswold Hills Land Unit surveyed 
in 1981 to determine their potential as critical habitat for 
See Nir ae (eC AN SAG 65 5 ONIN Sault ehnk 5 pee ae ae aan NCA Sen ry ae Sara 21 


5 Parcels of BLM land in the Tumey Hills Land Unit surveyed in 


1981 to determine their potential as blunt-nosed leopard 
Te Peg Sel Rois (wale, Eee gM usher a ar a ORCS ecu ay ge ey ae a 26 


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Table 


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TABLES 


Title 


BLM lands in the Ciervo Hills Land Unit surveyed to determine 
their potential as critical habitat for San Joaquin kit fox 
and blunt-nosed leopard lizards .. 


Characteristics (Of yesgetation,ult tier, Vand. open space 
measured in the Ciervo Hillis Land Unit in 1981 , 


Dominant species observed along ground transects in the 
GLlervo Hillis siandaiini tne oo lee. 


BLM lands in the Coalinga Land Unit surveyed in 1981 to 
determine their potential as critical Nabitat for7san 
Joaquin kit fox and blunt-nosed leopard lizards . 


Characteristics of vegetation, litter, and ope, space 
measured in the Coalinga Land Unit in 1981 


Dominant plant species observed along ground transects in 
the Coalinga Land Unit in 1981 


BLM land in the Griswold Hills Land Unit surveyed in 1981 
to determine their potential as critical habitat ‘tor san 
Joaquin kit fox 


Characteristics of vegetativon, litter, and openrspece 
measured in the Griswold Hills Land Unit in 1981 


Dominant plant species observed along ground transects in 
the Griswold Hills Land Unit in 1981 


BLM: lands inothe Tumey Hills Mand’ Una surveyeo an 275) vo 
détermine their potential as critical*nabitat forenlunt— 
nosed Jéopard: Iagzards 


Characteristics of vegetation, litter, and open space 
measured in the. Tumey Hilisyhand Unetvin lock >. 


Dominant plant species observed along ground transects in 
the Tuméy Hills Land Unsteiny, 198d 


Synthesis of type, number, and relative densities of San 
Joaquin kit fox dens observed in 1981 


Page 


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20 


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Table 


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19 


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TABLES (continued) 


Titie 


Relative densities (numbers observed/1,000 acres) of black- 
tailed jackrabbits (Lepus caltforntcus) and desert cotton- 
tails (Sylvtlagus audubonitt) observed in 1981 


Total acreage, size of largest contiguous parcel, and number 
and average size of discontinuous parcels in each land unit 
surveyed in 1981 to determine their potential as critical 
habitat for kit fox 


Ratings of BLM land units as potential critical habitat for 
kit fox based on scores received in the "Other Habitat 
Pavamerers eC ar Coors Mi. ih tte 8), Ss %y 


Ratings of BLM land units surveyed in 1981 to determine their 
potential as critical habitat for San Joaquin kit fox 


Ranking of individual parcels of BLM lands surveyed in 1981 
to determine their potential as critical habitat for the San 
Joaquin kit fox 


Ranking of individual parcels of BLM lands surveyed in 1981 


to determine their potential as critical habitat for the 


blunt-nosed leopard lizard . 


Average number of entrances and elevational ranges of kit 
fox dens observed during surveys in 1981 


Proportion of San Joaquin kit fox dens tabulated as a 
function of slope angle 


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1. INTRODUCTION 


hee BACKGROUND 


On 28 December 1973, the Endangered Species Act (ESA) (Public Law 93-205) 
became law and superseded similar acts passed in 1966 and 1969. In Section 2(c) 
and Section 7(a) it was. declared that all Federal departments and agencies shall 
seek to conserve endangered species and threatened species listed pursuant to 
section 4iof the ESA. Section 7(a). further states that each federal agency 
shall insure that any action authorized, funded, or carried out by such agency 
does not jeopardize the continued existence of any endangered species or 
threatened species or result in the destruction or adverse modification of 
habitat of such species which is determined by the Secretary of the Interior 
fo Pe CE vErcal:, 


The San Joaquin kit fox, Vulpes macrotis mutica, and the blunt-nosed 
leopard lizard, Crotaphytus (=Gambelta) stlus, were once widely distributed in 
the semi-arid Central Valley of California (Grinnell, et al, 1937; Stebbins, 
1954). Both are now considered to be endangered and are on the Secretary of 
the Interior's List of Endangered and Threatened Species (Federal Register, 
41:43339-43358 and 41:47180-47198). They have been classified as "rare" and 
"endangered" respectively by the California Department of Fish and Game, and are 
included in the IUCN Red Book (1968ab) of rare and endangered species of the world. 


The most serious threat to their survival has been loss of habitat 
following conversion of native vegetation associations to agricultural, indus- 
trial, and urban developments (Brode, et al, 1978; Laughrin, 1970; Montanucci, 
1965; Morrell, 1972 and 1975; O'Farvell, 1981), Their present range: is limited 
to isolated parcels of remaining valley habitat in the southwestern San Joaquin 
Valley and the adjoining foothills. The latter habitat is being altered by 
increased petroleum activities and grazing pressure, 


Since the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is responsible for controlling 
permits for energy development and grazing on most public lands in the Central 
Valley, it. must ensure that the kit fox and blunt-nosed leopard lizard and 
their critical habitats are not negatively impacted by these activities. 
Information on present distribution of kit fox and blunt-nosed leopard lizard 
on public lands controlled by the BLM, and an appraisal of these parcels' 
potential value as critical habitat, are required before potential impacts of 
energy development and grazing can be adequately assessed. On 23 May 1977, 
President Carter directed the Secretary of the Interior to accelerate identi- 
fication of critical habitats of endangered species. Support for implementa- 
tion of this directive as it applies to the kit fox and leopard lizard was made 
available through funds allocated to the BLM. 


bye” = OBJECTIVES 
The major objectives of this project were to: 1) determine the presence 


and relative density of San Joaquin kit fox and blunt-nosed leopard lizards on 


ie 


approximately 12,000 acres of public land in western Fresno County and eastern 
San Benito and Monterey counties; 2) describe vegetation types, topography, 
associated vertebrates, rodent burrow densities, and present land-use patterns 
for BLM parcels inhabited by the endangered species; and 3) to evaluate the 


potential of surveyed lands as critical habitat for the kit fox and leopard 
Lizard: 


2. METHODS 


4a GROUND SURVEYS 


Ground surveys were conducted to gather data on presence and relative 
abundance of San Joaquin kit fox and blunt-nosed leopard lizards. Methods for 
the ground surveys were similar to those used in 1979 (O'Farrell, et al, 1980). 
Straight line transects were conducted at a density of eight per mile. Lands 
in the Tumey Hills, surveyed only for leopard lizards, had a transect density 
equivalent to sixteen line transects per mile. The number and length of 
Gransects were adjusted proportionately to parcel. size. In some sections, 
rugged topography forced observers to survey only ridge lines and washes. 


Trained personnel slowly walked (<l mph) the transects using a handheld 
compass to maintain a straight line. Data gathered during surveys included: 
1) date, time, temperature, and weather during transects; 2) presence of kit 
fox Signs (1.¢., den sites, scats, tracks, and prey remains); 3) presence of 
blunt-nosed leopard lizards; 4) topography; 5) evidence of human activity 
(impact); and 6) tallies (species and number) of all wildlife observed. 
Records were also kept of the dominant plant species present on all sections 
of BLM land surveyed, as well as changes in annual and perennial plant associa- 
tions along transect lines. Data were recorded in field notebooks, and later 
transcribed into permanent ledger books. 


Surveys for blunt-nosed leopard lizards were conducted only when the 
air temperature was between 20°C and 40°C. Air temperatures were recorded at 
the beginning, middle, and end of each transect. Air and soil temperatures 
were recorded at all locations where leopard lizards were sighted. Air 
temperatures were measured approximately 30 cm and 1 cm above the ground in 
the observer's shadow. Soil temperatures were measured with the thermometer 
bulb placed approximately 1 cm below the surface in the observer's shadow. 
Fast-reading mercury thermometers were used for all temperature measurements. 


Locations of all sightings of leopard lizards made during transects 
were plotted on 7.5-minute topographic maps. Color photographs were taken at 
the site of each observation. 


Each San Joaquin kit fox den site encountered during the transect was 
examined for the following characteristics: 1) activity (active versus 
inactive); 2) type (natal, multiple hole, single hole); 3) number and dimen- 
sions of entrances; 4) position on slope; 5) aspect; 6) slope angle of the 
den site; 7) elevation; and 8) presence or absence of fox tracks, scats, prey 
remains, matted vegetation, dirt berms, other mammals and owls, and human 
activities and/or disturbances. Detailed descriptions of vegetation in the 
immediate vicinity of each kit fox den were also noted including 1) species 
composition and relative density of dominant shrub cover, 2) species composi- 
tion and relative density of understory grasses and forbs, 3) presence of 
unusual or uncommon species, 4) general condition of the vegetation, and 
5) observations of vegetation disturbance due to either kit fox or human 
activity. 





Dens were positively identified as kit fox dens only when the investi- 
gator was satisfied that the size and shape of the den and associated signs 
(tracks, scats, and prey remains) were consistent with those of a kit fox den. 
The remainder were recorded as "unidentified," coyote (Cants latrans), or 
badger (Taxtdea taxus) dens. 


Den sites were plotted in, the fveld- on 7. 5-minute topographical maps. 
and were later placed on permanent topographical maps included with the master 
copy of the final report to the BLM. Den sites plotted on topographical maps 
were given code numbers so their locations could be easily cross-referenced 
with the field data in ledger books and den analysis information. Color trans- 
parencies were taken of den sites. 


CaP NIGHT SPOTLIGHT SURVEYS 


Night spotlight surveys were conducted on, or adjacent to, selected BLM 
land parcels <in. the’ Ciervo Hillis, Tumey Hills, Griswold Hills) saw Ardo,7and 
Coalinga areas to document the presence of kit fox, their potential prey, and 
other nocturnal vertebrates. Observations were made from a vehicle driven at 
10-15 mph with high beams on. One to two passengers used powerful spotlights 
to locate animals peripheral to the path of the vehicle. When eyeshines were 
detected, the vehicle was stopped and the identity of the animal determined. 
The driver recorded all data, including time and mileage of all kit fox obser- 
vations. Night surveys were preceded by daylight test-drives through the area 
to familiarize the crew with, the. terrain and route. 


Cae DATA SUMMARIES 


Section summary sheets were prepared to provide the BLM with a brief 
analysis of each parcel surveyed (Appendix A). Information was included on the 
legal description of the section, date surveyed, field crew, a Drieft description 
of the general topography, habitat and disturbances, the number of lagomorphs 
(Lepus and Sylvilagus) observed, and any evidence of kit fox and leopard lizards 
that was observed. Comments were also made on the potential of the section as 
critical habitat for kit fox and leopard lizards, and on points Of Significant 
biological interest, 


Information on physical characteristics of each kit fox den was recorded 
on den analysis sheets, which are summarized in Appendix B. 


2.4 LAND UNITS 


Four major land units were described by combining adjacent, ecologically 
similar BLM parcels. The units were based on proximity of parcels, topographical 
and vegetational similarities, and existing land-use patterns. Combining data 
from the numerous sections into land units made it easier to formulate kit fox 
and leopard lizard critical habitat recommendations. 


Zon RATING SYSTEM 


A numerical rating system (O'Farrell, et al, 1980) was used (Section 3.5) 
to make recommendations on the potential of surveyed lands as San Joaquin kit 


RAL 


fox critical habitat. The rating system is based on the Fish and Wildlife 
Service puidelines, ror-the delineation of ",.. vital needs relevant in 
Gcrermining Critica) Napitay for a given species "...," including: 

oY territorial “behavior 


1. Space for normal growth, movements, 


2. Nutritional requirements, such as food, water, and minerals 


Gj 


sites for breeding, reproduction, or rearing offspring 


Cover or shelter 


. Other biological, physical, or behavioral requirements ania: 
Reqveter 40; 78 (22 April 1975]) 


Interpretations of these guidelines were adapted to reflect significant 
aspects of the ecology of the San Joaquin kit fox ‘that could be observed and 
qugtitied, if notequantitiedy during field surveys... Five rating categories 
paralleling the FWS guidelines were proposed: Presence of Species, Breeding 
piles, Frey Base, opace, and Uther Habitat Parameters, Numerical ‘values were 
established reflecting conditions between the most (3) and least (0) optimal 
states in each category. Land units were then assigned values, determined by 
field data and observations, for each category. 


Presence of Species was considered essential in determining the potential 
Oba Land unit as kit fox’ critical habitat. “ The most unequivocal evidence ‘of 
kit fox observable during daytime transect-type surveys was the presence of dens. 
For comparative purposes a relative density index (number of dens per 1000 acres) 
was calculated for each land unit. . 


The second category, Breeding Sites, provided an important assessment of 
the reproductive success of kit fox on each land unit. Relative density (number/ 
1000 acres) of natal dens was the criterion used to assign numerical values with- 
in ‘this category. 


Presence of an adequate Prey Base was the third factor used to rank the 
potential of land units as critical habitat. Assuming that San Joaquin kit fox 
prey heavily on lagomorphs (Egoscue, 1962; Knapp, 1978; O'Farrell and Gilbertson, 
1979), especially during the breeding season, we determined the relative densities 
(number/1000 acres) of jackrabbits and cottontails in each land unit. Density 
indices were used to assign numerical values within this category. 


Space to support and protect a breeding population is essential to an 
endangered species. Large contiguous parcels of relatively undisturbed land 
under federal jurisdiction were considered to be optimal. Relatively small, 
widely scattered parcels of federal land were judged to be marginally important 
Asa potential. Gfitical habitat. 


A fifth category, Other Habitat Parameters, was created to rank potential 


importance of three factors thought to influence kit fox populations: impacts 
of grazing, effects of oil developments, and influence of topography. Quantifi- 


able criteria for ranking the possible significance of these factors were not 


available; therefore, they were evaluated 
specialists who had conducted comparative 


Heavy grazing by Cattle and ‘sheep, 
a negative effect on the herbivorous prey 


ee 


using subjective judgements of fox 
field studies for two years. 


especially in combination, may have 
of kit fox, although results of studies 


testing this hypothesis have not been published. Increasing intensities of 
petroleum developments also have increasingly negative impacts on populations 
of San Joaquin kit fox (O'Farrell, et al, 1980). Rugged topography is not 
suitable habitat for the species. (Morrell 2O/2) O'Parrell, .et.al, 1980), 


Numerical values were assigned for each land unit under the three Other 
Habitat category subheadings. Values were summed and land units were ranked 
according to their total score under this category, so that land units with 
the highest and lowest scores received values of 3 and 0, respectively, while 
land units with intermediate scores received intermediate values. 


After ratings were assigned in five categories for each land unit, a 
cumulative score for each unit was summed. These total scores were used as a 
comparative index to evaluate land units as potential San Joaquin kit fox 
critical habitat with respect to each other and, ultimately, with other BLM 
lands. surveyed jin 1979 /(O"'Farvel ly ecw. font, 


aS, VEGETATION SURVEY 


‘Vegetation was sampled on parcels of BLM land selected as representative 
of the habitat in each land unit. Data were gathered using line intercept and 
belt transect techniques. . Species composition, density, and ‘canopy, Coverage 
of shrubs were estimated using four belt transects established at random 
within surveyed sections. Each belt was 50 m long and 3 m wide. Transect 
width was defined by a 3-m lath held at midpoint over the transect centerline. 
Observers worked in pairs to count and record all shrubs, including seedlings, 
whose canopies were at least 50% inside the belt. Canopy cover for each shrub 
species was determined by measuring the length of the transect centerline 
intercepted by shrubs. 


Line intercepts, 25-m long, were located alonp belt transect Lines, (Vata 
on species composition and frequency of occurence of forbs, grasses, bare ground, 
and litter were gathered from. 100 points alonp each line. Any species touching 
the tape at each sample point was recorded. Litter was defined as matted annual 
vegetation or material from the 1980 growing season. Frequency of occurrence was 
determined by tallying the number of points each species was touching. 


Dominant species of vascular plants observed during vegetation surveys 
and transects for endangered species were collected. Voucher specimens will be 
maintained in the EG&G herbarium. 


todd RODENT BURROW DENSITY 


Densities of rodent burrows were estimated using the belt transects 
established to sample the perennial vegetation. The total number of rodent 
burrows in two size classes, <4 cm and >4 cm, was tallied in each belt transect. 
Observers counted only burrows that were at least 10 cm deep to assure that 
shallow digs were not included in the sample. 


mee 


ore RESULTS 


Field surveys were conducted between 1 June and 15 July 1981. A total 
of 10,220 acres in the Ciervo Hills and Coalinga area were surveyed for both 
San Joaquin kit fox and blunt-nosed leopard lizards, 810 acres in the Griswold 
Hills were surveyed for kit fox only, and 2,000 acres in the Tumey Hills were 
surveyed for blunt-nosed leopard lizards only (Figure 1). Seven parcels 
totalling 1,840 acres were not surveyed because access was difficult, the land 
was presently under cultivation, or the parcel had low potential as endangered 
species critical habitat. The 2,440 acres of BLM land, Sections 31 and 32, 
TS or, pane Sections 74, > yy Oy eames, 1D) 20550 geands O2jeii225, RIE, near 
San Ardo in the Salinas Valley were not surveyed. Preliminary ground investiga- 
tions and a night spotlight survey indicated that they had little potential as 
habitat for kit fox, primarily because they were so rugged. 


Surveys conducted for presence and relative abundance of blunt-nosed 
leopard lizards were completed by 19 June 1981; 4,080 acres were surveyed by 
standard techniques, and 7,880 acres were surveyed by ridge-wash techniques. 
An additional 340 acres of rolling hills in the Tumey Hills were surveyed 
intensively with transects spaced at 100-m intervals. All surveys were 
conducted within the optimal temperature range for lizard activity. 







CIERVO 


~ PXUILLS 
: GS 
\. GRISWOLD + 
\ HILLS 
SS | TO FRESNO 
im ie 68km 
% erie, Sh mx wet 
%, PAS ‘ 
a9 \_S ‘ COALINGA ref, 
& 
XK, \ COALINGA ig a 
I XN / 
\ Xp 
\_ Sy 
SAN nae DD peice / 
\~O 70 
S-\ |Z AVENAL 
\< 
\ 
| , 
papain les MONTEREY Oui aa enemies aS 
SAN LUIS OBISPO CO. 
N 
MILES 
0 10 20 
0 16 32 
KILOMETERS 
Figure 1. 


Location of BLM lands in the Coalinga, Ciervo Hills, Griswold Hills, 
and Tumey Hills Land Units, and Salinas Valley that were assigned 


for survey in 1981 to determine their potential as critical habitat 
for endangered species. 


ce | CIERVO HILLS LAND UNIT 


aki Description 


The Ciervo Hills Land Unit, totalling 7,020 acres, was composed of a 
checkerboard of 16 federal land parcels, interspersed with private land holdings, 
in the central Ciervo Hills-Monocline Ridge region, Fresno County (Table 1, 
Figure 2). It was bounded on the north and east by the San Joaquin Valley, on 
the west by the Fresno/San Benito county line, and on the south by Cantua Creek. 


Numerous steep drainages dissected the land unit into a series of ridges, 
washes, and high plateaus. Elevation ranged between 960 m and 2960 m. 


Intensive grazing by sheep was the predominant disturbance observed. A 
series of well-maintained dirt roads were dispersed throughout the land unit, 
but access was restricted by a series of locked gates. 


eh a 2 Vegetation 


The dominant plant association observed in the Ciervo Hills was Upper 
Sonoran Grassland (Twisselman, 1967). Grasses observed in the heavily grazed 
(>60% of annual biomass removed) parcels included Bromus rubens, Bromus mollis, 
Festuca megalura, and Hordeum sp. Bromus mollts was more frequently tallied 
(17%) in this land unit than in any other (Table 2). Common forbs throughout 
the land unit included Lepidium sp., Eremocarpus settgerus, Erodium cteutartum, 
Ertogonum gractlltmum, and Ertogonum tnflatum (Tables 2 and 3). 


Shrub cover was limited primarily to drainage bottoms, infrequent patches 
of exposed hillsides, and peaks of ridges and hills. Gutterrezta bracteata, 


Table 1. BLM lands in the Ciervo Hills Land Unit 
surveyed to determine their potential as 
critical habitat for San Joaquin kit fox 
and blunt-nosed leopard lizards. 


Survey Method/ ; . , Area 
Gladte tet Township/Range Section Pots 


Ridge/Wash 
















22,26,28,30 


Oa eee 
Tei T4234 


18 


Monocline Ridge 





Ciervo Mountain 





Lillis Ranch 


Deleted 
Ciervo Mountain 


Lillis Ranch 


*Mt. Diablo Meridian 










KAMM AVE. 


DERRICK AVE 









LRA AAAAAPS 
KKK KKK) 
rirrererarerere: 


\N ¢ STs “ 
? 
NN RIDGE/WASH SURVEY 3 RANCH yay eo 
was 
aS 


DELETED 





mee NIGHT SPOTLIGHT SURVEY ROUTE 
SCALE IN KILOMETERS 


0 0.5 1 2 3 4 


Figure 2. Parcels of BLM land in the Ciervo Hills Land Unit surveyed in 1981 


to determine their potential as critical habitat for San Joaquin 
kit fox and blunt-nosed leopard lizards. Section centers are 
numbered. 


ae 


Table 2. Characteristics of vegetation, litter, and open space measured in the 
Ciervo Hills Land Unit in 1981. Density, frequency, and canopy cover- 
age are presented for shrubs; frequency of occurrence is tabulated 


for grasses, forbs, open space, and litter. 


Species 


SHRUBS 
Atriplex polyearpa 


Density (N/ha) 
Frequency (%) 
Canopy Coverage (%) 


Atriplex spintfera 


Density (N/ha) 
Frequency (%) 
Canopy Coverage (%) 


Gutterrezta sp. 


Density (N/ha) 
Frequency (%) 
Canopy Coverage (%) 


Haplopappus lineartfoltus 


Density (N/ha) 
Frequency (%) 
Canopy Coverage (%) 


Ephedra caltforntca 


Density (N/ha) 
Frequency (%) 
Canopy Coverage (%) 


GRASSES AND FORBS 


Bromus rubens 

Bromus mollis 

Bromus tectorum 
Disttchlts sptcata 
Festuca megalura 
Festuca reflexa 
Festuca sp. 

Hordeum sp. 

Sehtsmus arabicus 
Oryzopsts hymenotdes 
Erodium etcutartum 
Erodtum sp. 
Eremocarpus settgerus 
Leptdtdium nitidum 
Leptdidium sp. 
Plagtobothrys sp. 
Ertastrum sp. 
Eriastrum plurtflorum 
Centaurea sp. 
Unknown Shrubs 

Open Space 

Litter 


Section 


150 +150 
22 


28552241 
50 
Orc ona 


3083 +2698 
50 
0 


+0.8 
5.0) 2b,0 


2p). Osa : ; 62.0 +16.0 
ZOI00 SLA, NE WO e057) 


ane 


280) 3 
+6..5 











SOOT LIS2 
50 
OC. 250e0725 


Side 
282 











687 +554 
40 





Table 3. Dominant species observed along ground transects in the 
Ciervo Hills Land Unit in 1981 


TIOS, RISE Tiss; RRSE T17S, R14E 


ie. 

















GRASSES 


Poaceae 






Avena sp. 
Bromus dtandrus 
Poa seabretla 
Stipa leptda 
Sttpa sp. 


FORBS 
























Asteraceae 


Ambrosta acanthtearpa 
Ambrosta sp. 
Chrysothamnus: sp. 
Hemtzonta kellogtt 
Stephanomerta sp. 


Boraginaceae 
Amstnekta sp. 


Brassicaceae 







Brasstca sp. 
Stsymbrtum ortentale 
Streptanthus sp. 


Chenopodiaceae 
Salsola sp. 
Euphorbiaceae 


Euphorbta ocellata 
Euphorbta sp. 
Sttillingta lineartfolta 


Fabaceae 






Astragalus sp. 
Lupinus btecolor 
Lupinus subvexus 
Luptnus sp. 


Hydrophyllaceae 
_ Phacelta sp. 
Lamiaceae 


Marrubium vulgare 
Salvta sp. 
Trtchostema ovatum 
Trichostema sp. 


Nyctaginaceae 


Abronta pogonantha 


Table 3, Dominant species observed along ground transects in the 
Ciervo Hills Land Unit in 1981 (continued) 


OS ear RSE ES ales Sey RAE 


















FORBS (continued) 





Onagraceae 


Camtssonta caltforntca 
Camtssonta boothtt 
Camissonta sp. 
Oenothera hookert 











Papaveraceae 


Eschscholtata mtnuttflora 






Plantaginaceae 






Plantago sp. 








Polemoniaceae 





Langlotsta schottit 


Polygonaceae 






Chortzanthe perfoltata 
Ertogonum gractle 
Ertogonum gractllimun 
Ertogonum tnflatum 
Ertogonum virtdescens 
Holltsterta lanata 
Rumex hymenosepalus 














Solanaceae 






Datura sp. 
Nieottana bigelovtt 






Typhaceae 






Typha domtngensts 
Typha sp. 







SHRUBS 






Asteraceae 










Acamptapappus schaerocephalus 
Artemesta caltforntca 
Ertophyllum conferttflorum 
Gutterrezta bracteata 
Haplopappus sp. 







Chenopodiaceae 






8 
Vv 
v¥ 
Vv 
V 


Atriplex lenttformtis 






Polygonaceae 






Eriogonum fasetculatum 







Solanaceae 


Ntcottana glauca 





Ss 


Haplopappus lineartfolius, Atrtplex polycarpa, and Ephedra caltforntca were 

the most commonly observed shrub species. The greatest densities of Hap lopappus 
lineartfolius were measured in this land unit. Most slopes and rolling plateau 
areas were devoid of shrub cover. The area was burned in June, 1979. 


More open space (28%) and less litter (13%) were characteristic of ground 
cover in the Ciervo Hills. 


Zed bra Surveys 


A total of 6,220 acres of BLM land in the Ciervo Hills Land Unit was 
surveyed using ridge/wash techniques (Table 1). Two parcels totalling 480 acres 
were deleted from the survey because of access difficulties. A 320-acre parcel 
was deleted because the topography was considered too rugged for frequent use 
by kit fox and blunt-nosed leopard lizards. 


Fourteen dens were found on BLM land in the Ciervo Hills including: one 
active natal den, seven active multiple-hole dens, three inactive multiple-hole 
dens, two active single-hole dens, and one inactive single-hole den. Eight kit 
fox dens were noted on private land adjacent to BLM parcels; these included: 
one active natal den, four active multiple-hole dens, and three inactive multiple- 
hole dens. 


Two night spotlight surveys totalling 23.1 miles were conducted within and 
adjacent to the Ciervo Hills (Figure 2). Nine kit fox, 13 black-tailed jackrabbit 
(Lepus californicus), 64 desert cottontails (Sylvtlagus audubonit), two bobcats 
(Lynx rufus), one coyote, and eight other species of vertebrates were observed 
(Appendix C). 


Lagomorph observations during ground surveys were limited to nine black- 
tailed jackrabbits and six desert cottontails. 


No blunt-nosed leopard lizards were sighted; however, six desert spiny 
lizards (Sceloporus magtster), 76 side-blotched lizards (Uta stansburtana), six 
coast horned lizards (Phrynosoma coronatum), and three western whiptails 
(Cnemtdophorus tigris) were observed (Appendix D). 


3.1.4 Rodent Burrows 


The average number of rodent burrows measured in the Ciervo Hills was 
287 +74 per hectare; the range was between 84 and 501 per hectare. Variability 
was great and there were no significant differences between average densities 
of size classes. Therefore, data were lumped in this and subsequent analyses 
of burrow densities. 


te 


a COALINGA LAND UNIT 


ee ea Description 


The Coalinga Land Unit consisted of 4,920 acres of BLM land in 12 parcels 
(Table 4, Figure 3). Topography varied from gently rolling hills in the East 
Coalinga Extension Oil Field to steep hills dissected by numerous drainages in 
the North Dome-Kettleman Hills region. Elevation ranged between 530 m and 
Pi25 i: 


Oil developments and related activities were the primary form of distur- 
bance. Heavy grazing by sheep was observed in the Kettleman Hills. Three 
-parcels (Sections 4 and 10, T20S, RISE; and Section 8, T20S, R16E) were not 
surveyed because they were being cultivated. 


i ee aes Vegetation 


Dense, ungrazed stands of Bromus dtandrus, Bromus rubens, and Festuca 
megalura dominated BLM parcels in the East Coalinga Extension Oil Field 
(Tables 5 and 6). Bromus rubens achieved its highest frequency of occurrence 
(31%) here. Vegetation in the Pleasant Valley Oil Field and Guijarral Hills 
consisted of heavily grazed Bromus rubens, Festuca megalura, and Erodium 
eteutartum, intermixed with young Salsola kalt and Astragalus. A heavily 
grazed Upper Sonoran Grassland association (Twisselman, 1967), consisting 
primarily of Bromus rubens and Festuca megalura, was noted throughout the 
North Dome-Kettleman Hills region. A dense shrub cover of Atriplex polyearpa 
and Gutterrezta bracteata occurred in most drainage bottoms and in localized 
patches on ridges and hillsides. 


Table 4. BLM lands in the Coalinga Land Unit 
surveyed in 1981 to determine their 
potential as critical habitat for 
San Joaquin kit fox and blunt-nosed 
leopard lizards. 


Survey Method/ m Area 
ee rrave ite Township/Range Section (este a) 


Standard Ground 


















10 
Gree 20.8 


34 
18,20, 30 


Coalinga 












Guijarral Hills 


Avenal 





Deleted 


4,10 
8 


18 


Coalinga 











Avenal 


*Mt. Diablo Meridian 


~ 


"eoee Vi 
ony: Ce 
roee Was 











PALMER eee AVE ‘< OY AR AVE 
au WZ. J BEAST 
me a COALINGA 


AA 


§/) EXTENSION 
OY OIL FIELD 
OL; 


a 











: 20 \54 
| KEE 
: G 
i hilt 
4 Lg 
u a 
34 
JAYNE AVE 
, > 
COALINGA < 
Lu 
< 
a 
od 
< 
N 
Y STANDARD GROUND SURVEY 
A, 
% KXXXXY 
RXXs) DELETED FROM SURVEY 
rtatate 
mm = NIGHT SPOTLIGHT SURVEY ROUTE 2 A 
SCALE IN KILOMETERS (33) OO 
i hem 
00545) 2) A ceh4 XPS 


Figure 3. Parcels of BLM land in the Coalinga Land Unit surveyed in 1981 to 
determine their potential as critical habitat for San Joaquin kit 
fox and blunt-nosed leopard lizards. Section centers are 
numbered. 


S162 


Table 5, Characteristics of vegetation, litter, and open space measured in the 
Coalinga Land Unit in 1981. Density, frequency, and canopy coverage 
are presented for shrubs; frequency of occurrence is tabulated for 
grasses, forbs, open space, and litter. 


Species 
mane fs 


SHRUBS 
Atrtplex polycarpa 


Density (N/ha) 
Frequency (%) 
Canopy Cover (%) 


Gutterrezta sp. 


Density (N/ha) 660 +600 500 £500 
Frequency (%) 25 25 
Canopy Cover (%) : pts | 


Gutterrezta bracteata 
Density (N/ha) 
Frequency (%) 
Canopy Cover (%) 

GRASSES AND FORBS 

Avena barbata 

Bromus rubens 

Bromus dtandrus 

Festuca megalura 

Hordeum sp. 

Sehtsmus arabtcus 

Schtsmus sp. 

Erodtum eteutartum 

Erodtum sp. 

Eremocarpus settgerus 

Euphorbia sp. 

Salsola kalt 

Hemtzonta sp. 

Trtchostema sp. 

Plagtobothrys sp. 

Astragalus sp. 

Unknown Forb 

Open Space 

Litter 





Sains 


Table 6. 


in the Coalinga Land Unit in 1981 










T20S, R16E ~ T21S, RI7E 
PUES CIED ES 


























GRASSES 


Poaceae 





Avena sp. 
Bromus tectorum 
Festuca reflexa 
Oryzopsts hymenotdes 


FORBS 


Asteraceae 





Ambrosta dumosa 
Ambrosta sp. 
Stephanomerta pauctflora 
Stephanomerta sp. 


Boraginaceae 
Amstnkta sp. 
Chenopodiaceae 
Saleola sp. 
Cucurbitaceae 


Cucurbita palmata 





Euphorbiaceae 
Euphorbta ocellata 
Fabaceae 


Astragalus douglastt 






















Lamiaceae 


Marrubtum vulgare 





Polygonaceae 
Ertogonum sp. 
Solanaceae 


Datura sp. 





Typhaceae 
Typha sp. 


SHRUBS/SUB-TREES 





Chenopodiaceae 
Atriplex lenttformis 
Solanaceae 


Ntcottana glauca 
Nicottana sp. 


Tamaricaceae 


Tamarix sp. 


Sige 


Dominant plant species observed along ground transects 


There was less open space (13%) in the ground cover of the Coalinga 
Land Unit compared with other BLM parcels measured in 1981 (Table 5). 


oe Surveys 


A total of 4,000 acres of BLM land was surveyed and 920 acres was 
deleted (Table 4). Evidence of kit fox was noted in five of the nine BLM 
sections surveyed. Fifteen kit fox dens were observed, including three 
active single-hole dens, eight inactive multiple-hole dens, one active 
single-hole den, one inactive single-hole den, and two dens were found in 
man-made structures. One kit fox was sighted during ground surveys in 
Section 20,.T215,.R1L7E. 


A night spotlight survey was conducted through the East Coalinga 0il 
Field. Species observed included 51 black-tailed jackrabbits, 24 desert 
cottontails, and five coyotes. 


A total of 175 black-tailed jackrabbits and 77 desert cottontails were 
noted during transect surveys. 


One blunt-nosed leopard lizard was observed in Section 18, T21S, RI7E. 
Air temperature at the time of the sighting (1345) was 34.0°C. This was within 
the range of temperatures that included all sightings of blunt-nosed leopard 
lizards reported in Kern County in 1980 (O'Farrell and Kato, 1980). The soil 
temperature was greater than 50°C. The lizard was basking in partial shade 
under an Atriplex polycarpa on an old concrete well pad foundation. 


3.2.4 Rodent Burrows 
Average density of rodent burrows was 375 +144 per hectare. No burrows 


were observed in Section 18, T20S, R16E. The greatest density was 1,184 per 
hectare in Section: 30,/)T21S, RPE: 


mS Wawa 


ane GRISWOLD HILLS LAND UNIT 


Se ak Description 


The Griswold Hills Land Unit, totalling 930 acres, consisted of one main 
parcel of 680 acres, and five small scattered parcels averaging 50 acres 
(Table 7, Figure 4). It was located at the eastern end of Vallecitos Valley 
near the junction of New Idria Road and Silver Creek drainage. Steep south- 
facing slopes, and ridges ending in rolling hills were the predominant topogra- 
phic features. Elevation ranged between between 488 m and 720 m. 


Moderate (30%-60% of annual biomass removed) to heavy grazing by cattle 
was the only major disturbance observed. 


Se Vegetation 


Parcels of BLM land along the foothills of the Griswold Hills contained 
a composite of Upper Sonoran Grassland and Upper Sonoran Subshrub assocations 
(Twisselman, 1967). Parcels having low relief were dominated by a heavily 
grazed Bromus mollis, Bromus rubens, Festuca megalura, and Hordewn sp., grass- 
land. Vegetation associations in areas of high relief at greater elevations 
contained the above grasses plus a mixture of at least 13 species of woody 
plants including Ertogonum faseteulatum, Gutterrezta bracteata, Yueca whtipplet, 
Ephedra caltforntea, Ertogonum fasctculatum, and Juntperus caltforntea (Table 8 
and 9). This was the only land unit that did not have Atriplex polycarpa in the 
shrub cover. Festuca megalura had its highest frequency of occurrence here. 


Table 7. BLM land’ in the Griswold Hills Land 
Unit surveyed in 1981 to determine 
their: potential’ as.critical Nabatat 
for San Joaquin kit fox. 


Survey Method/ 2 G : Area 
Ducdeaneie fownship/Range* | Section Pee 


Standard Ground 
1 290 
eee 
6 520 
2 120 
18 













fdr 


Ridge/Wash 


ldrie 








Deleted 






Idria 


*Mt. Diablo Meridian 


2506 


Figure 4. 





ee 4 
ei ye ( 
So ~ } 
bie: \ i 
Moons 
~~AOAD 
XN Sean 
Ns 
‘N 
SS 
x 
Os a 
UNS 
88% 
US oO 
OO 
\ 
Dr. 
a 
XN 
an 
AN 
O 
TO PANOCHE 6 ‘ 
7 MILES c i 
petetd et GRISWOLD HILLS cc oN 
Pi ed 1b vu 
~<%M% es ® 
“4 Z or \~ 
Xo, @ @ ZZ @2# 
N ‘\“ oe 1 of = \ 
P Ry NS OGATE | 
G STANDARD a i 
/\ GROUND SURVEY ~*~ 7 : 
RIDGE/WASH I ASHURST 
N SURVEY <e, RANCH 
7> Klis 
5 
L 
% 
m= = == NIGHT SPOTLIGHT SURVEY gy 


SCALE IN KILOMETERS: 


SOtLSSEL Seer al Kemenes Sanaa! 
0.) Ae Cee NEW IDRIA 


Parcels of BLM land in the Griswold Hills Land Unit surveyed in 1981 


to determine their potential as critical habitat for San Joaquin kit 
fox. Section centers are numbered. 


ae. 


Table 8. Characteristics of vegetation, litter, and open space measured in the 
Griswold Hills Land Unit in 1981, Density, frequency, and canopy 
coverage are presented for shrubs; frequency of occurrence is tabulated 
for grasses, forbs, open space, and litter. 































Species 
[eal ae oie Tad 
SHRUBS 


Gutterrezta sp. 
Density (N/ha) 3383 +2486 | 217 +217 1800 +1300 


Frequency (%) 50 25 38 
Canopy Cover (%) Ret) aeihan! 13252058 





Haplopappus linearifoltus 


Density (N/ha) . 317 £220 ifsstey eal es} 

Frequency (%) 50 25 

Canopy Cover (%) 0.7 +0.4 Oe SreO) 2 
Ephedra caltforntca 

Density (N/ha) 17 £17 134 461 wl 750237 

Frequency (%) 25 75 62 

Canopy Cover (%) 0 0.4 0,2 30,2 


Ertogonum fasctculatun 


Density (N/ha) iy secu 467 +281 492 +273 

Frequency (%) 25 50 38 

Canopy Cover (%) Ng 221k 2 0.6 +0.6 
Yueca whtpplet 

Density (N/ha) 1867 +1195 933 +656 

Frequency (%) 50 25 

Canopy (%) Sy ang Blok sei AS 


GRASSES AND FORBS 

































Avena barbata O52 se 

Bromus cartnatus AO £3.00 ee 1S 
Bromus rubens Po Se aad ballin Pallalsy set [Please S257) 
Bromus mollts 9,0,.¢674°| 74.5 2.23.4 
Bromus diandrus 2.5 SL aie mae 
Bromus sp. 0.5 +0.5 LS eles LNG)» ae(Oste: 
Festuca megalura 61.2 +3.4 Bao 442201 735.4 21100 
Festuca reflexa Oe Stl 5 se. se) 
Festuca sp. Doh S0o4 || SW al 
Hordeum sp. 0.2 20.25) <0.1 
Erodtum sp. yas) ae late! Bie2e 510 59 ee 26 
Euphorbia sp. 5202022 1) <003 
Plagtobothrys sp. 0.8 +0.8 
Ertastrum sp. O52) 20 scr ae 
Camissonta sp. 0,520.5 (P0c2aetOrZ 
Ertogonum gractlltmumn See 20,5 | 1.0 2057 
Ertogonum sp. Po Ske) 0.8: 220.5 
Unknown Forb Ose 20, 2,) 204 

Open Space G. Opt2eSaieeie cot God Phi 25.2 
Litter 18. 5922.5 T6658 523215 |ely On eel. 9 





Bio 


Table 9. Dominant plant species observed along ground transects 
in the Griswold Hills Land Unit in 1981. 


GRASSES 
Cyperaceae 
Carex sp. 
Poaceae 
Poa scabrella 
Polypogon sp. 
Sehtsmus sp. 
FORBS 
Chenopodiaceae 
Salsola sp. 
Euphorbiaceae 
Eremocarpus setigerus 
Geraniaceae 
Erodtum eteutartum 
Lamiaceae 
Salvta carduacea 
Polygonaceae 
Ertogonum tnflatum 
Typhaceae 
Typha sp. 


SHRUBS 
Asteraceae 


Eastwoodia elegans 
Gutterrezta bracteata 
Haplopappus acradentus 
Haplopappus sp. 


Chenopodiaceae 

Atriplex polyearpa 
Cupressaceae 

Juntperus caltforntca 
Polygonaceae 

Ertogonum sp. 
Salicaceae 


Populus fremontit 
Saltx sp. 


Tamaricaceae 


Tamartx sp. 


ota 





T17S, RIE T17S, R12E 


Section 


Section 


le an Surveys 


A total of 810 acres of BLM land was surveyed: 290 acres by standard 
ground techniques and 520 acres by modified ridge/wash techniques (Table 7). 
Three parcels, totalling 120 acres, were not surveyed because of their small 
size (40 acres) and inaccessibility. No evidence of kit fox was observed 
during ground surveys. No kit fox were sighted during a night spotlight 
survey along New Idria Road (Appendix C). 


Only two black-tailed jackrabbits and one desert cottontail were 
observed, 


Pio les 


3.4 TUMEY HILLS LAND UNIT 


Sek Description 


The Tumey Hills Land Unit was composed of three parcels, totalling 
2,000.acres* (Table 10, Figure 5). ° The largest parcel, 1,460 acres, contained 
steep west-facing drainages emptying into Silver Creek and Panoche Creek. A 
200-acre parcel was located in rolling hills and ridges on the western boundary 
of Silver Creek drainage. The last parcel contained 340 acres of low-relief 
public land within the central plateau of the Tumey Hills. Elevation ranged 
between 183 m and 410 m. 


Cattle grazing was the primary disturbance observed. 


ovake Vegetation 


Vegetation was dominated by an Upper Sonoran Grassland association 
(Twisselman, 1967). Steep slopes had a ground cover of Bromus mollts, Bromus 
rubens , Hordeumsp., and Festuca megalura, and a shrub cover of EFastwoodta 
elegans, Atriplex polycarpa, Gutierrezta bracteata, and Haplopappus sp. 
(Tables 11 and 12). Vegetation in the rolling central plateau was primarily 
heavily grazed Bromus rubens, Erodium sp., and Festuca megalura, with a 
scattered shrub cover of Atriplex polycarpa. Frequency of occurrence of 
litter was greatest (24%) in this land unit. 


3.4.3 Ground Surveys 


Ridge/wash surveys were conducted on 1,600 acres of rugged terrain 
bordering Silver Creek and Panoche Creek (Table 10). Intensive ground surveys 
(16 transects per mile) were conducted on 340 acres in the central plateau 
region (Table 10). 


Table 10. BLM lands in the Tumey Hills Land Unit 
surveyed in 1981 to determine their 
potential as critical habitat for 
blunt-nosed leopard lizards. 


Survey Method/ : s Area 
S 
Duaduanele Township/Range ection ope 


Intensive Ground 









T15S, R12E riche 





Tumey Hills 





Ridge/Wash 
Tumey Hills 












T15S, R12E Nicaea ite Ler 


39 6392 935 






*Mt. Diablo Meridian 


Hoes 






PANOCHE HILLS 


MANNING 






TUMEY HILLS 





V/7 
yy INTENSIVE GROUND SURVEY 


J 
N RIDGE/WASH SURVEY 
SS 


wea NIGHT SPOTLIGHT SURVEY 
SCALE IN KILOMETERS 
00.5 1 2 3 4 
Figure 5. Parcels of BLM land in the Tumey Hills Land Unit surveyed in 1981 


to determine their potential as blunt-nosed leopard lizard critical 
habitat. Section centers are numbered. 


226. 


Table 11. Characteristics of vegetation, litter, and open space measured in the 
Tumey Hills Land Unit in 1981. Density, frequency, and canopy coverage 
are presented for shrubs; frequency of occurrence is tabulated for 
grasses, forbs, open space, and litter. 


Section 


Species 


SHRUBS 
Atrtplex polycarpa 


Density (N/ha) 
Frequency (%) 
Canopy Cover (%) 


Atrtplex spintfera 


Density (N/ha) 
Frequency (%) 
Canopy Cover (%) 


Gutterrezta sp. 


Density (N/ha) 
Frequency (%) 50 
Canopy Cover (%) 


Haplopappus lineartfoltus 
Density (N/ha) 
Frequency (%) 
Canopy Cover (%) 

GRASSES AND FORBS 

Bromus rubens 

Bromus mollts 

Bromus tectorum 

Festuca megalura 

Hordeum glaucun 

Hordeum sp. 

Erodtum eteutartum 


Erodtum sp. 


ka O00; Ga ot 00. “ON  .00 


Leptdium nittdum 


SS) 


Euphorbta ocellata 


e 
— 


Euphorbta sp. 
Plagtobothrys 
Ertogonum gractllimum 
Unknown 


Open Space 


Ww co fb KF | 


Litter 





Sia 


Table 12. Dominant plant species observed along ground transects 
in the Tumey Hills Land Unit in 1981. 


T15S, R12E 


Species Section 


BVESEIEJEIED 







GRASSES 


Poaceae 















Avena sp. 
Bromus diandrus 
Disttchlis sptcata 
Oryzopsts hymenotdes 
Sehtsmus arabicus 
Schismus sp. 
Sttpa spectosa 


FORBS 


Asteraceae 










Hemtzonta kellogtt 
Stephanomerta pauctflora 
Stephanomerta 


Boraginaceae 
Amstinkta sp. 


Brassicaceae 






























Leptdium sp. 
Stsymbrium iris 
Stsymbrtum sp. 
Chenopodiaceae 


Salsola kalt 
Salsola sp. 


Euphorbiaceae 

Eremocarpus setigerus 
Papveraceae 

Eschscholata minuttflora 
Onagraceae 


Camissonta boothit 
Clarkta purpurea 


Polygonaceae 


Eriogonum nudum 

Eriogonum viridescens 
Ertogonum sp. 
SHRUBS 


Asteraceae 






Eastwoodia elegans 
Gutterrezta bracteata 
Haplopappus acradentius 
Haplopappus sp. 


Chenopodiaceae 

Atriplex lentiformis 
Polygonaceae 
Eriogonum fasctculatum 
Solanaceae 


Nicotiana glauca 


2384 





No blunt-nosed leopard lizards were sighted. Although surveys were 
conducted within the optimal temperature range for lizard activity, only nine 
side-blotched lizards were observed, 


3.4.4 Rodent Burrows 


- Average density of rodent burrows was 317 +110 per hectare. Highest 
densities, 500 +240 per hectare, were in Section 21, T15S, R12E. No rodent 
burrows were observed in Section 32, T15S, R12E. 


say Va 





4. CRITICAL HABITAT RATING SYSTEM AND RANKING 


4.1 KIT FOX RATINGS 


4.1.1 Presence of Species 


A total of 29 kit fox dens was found for an overall relative density of 
2.6 per 1,000 acres (Table 13). Fourteen kit fox dens were observed in the 
Ciervo Hills Land Unit (relative density 2.3/1,000 acres), and 15 were noted 
in the Coalinga Land Unit (relative density 3.8/1,000 acres). No dens were 
observed in the Griswold Hills Land Unit. 


The Coalinga Land Unit received a score of 3, the Ciervo Hills Land Unit 


a score of 2, and the Griswold Hills Land Unit a minimum score of 0. 


Table 13. Synthesis of type, number (N), and relative densities (RD) 
of San Joaquin kit fox dens observed in 1981. 


Den Type 


Multiple-Hole Single-Hole 
Land Unit 


| Active Inactive | Inactive PACtive’ Inactive 


pete = eT 





Ciervo Hills 
Coalinga 


Griswold Hills 


TOTALS 





“Dens in man-made structures 
TNumber per 1,000 acres 


aa Breeding Sites 


One active natal kit fox den was observed in the Ciervo Hills Land Unit, 
for a relative density of 0.2 per 1,000 acres (Table 13). No natal dens were 
noted in either the Coalinga or Griswold Hills land units. 


The Ciervo Hills Land Unit received a score of 1 in this rating category; 
Coalinga and Griswold Hills received scores of 0. 


Eis lis 





rs oka Prey Base 


The highest relative density of lagomorphs (63.0 lagomorphs/1,000 acres), 
was observed: in the Coalinga Land Unit; consequently, it received a score of 
3 (Table 14). Low relative densities of lagomorphs were observed in the Ciervo 
Hills and Griswold Hills land units: 2.4/1,000 acres and 3.7/1,000 acres, 
respectively. Both land units were assigned scores of 0. 


Table 14, Relative densities (numbers observed/1,000 acres) 
of black-tailed jackrabbits (Lepus caltforntcus) 
and desert cottontails (Sylvilagus audubonit) 
observed ani 9si 


Crervo Hrits 


Coalinga 
Griswold Hills 


Average Densities 





Are Dek Space 


The largest contiguous parcel of BLM land was 680 acres in the Griswold 
Hills (Table 15). Although Ciervo Hills was the largest land unit in total 
acreage (7,420 acres), it consisted of a checkerboard of 15 parcels interspersed 
with private land. Because of the scattered nature and small sizes of BLM 
parcels, the land units were assigned minimum scores of 0. 


Table 15. Total acreage, size of largest (contiguous parcel, 
and number and average size of discontinuous 
parcels in each land unit |surveyediin 1961.{to 
determine their potential as critical habitat 
fore hart. aes 


Discontinuous 
Largest Parcels 
Area Contiguous 


(acres) Area Average 
(acres) Number Area 
(acres) 


Land Unit 


Ciervo Hills 


Coalinga 


Griswold Hills 





Bes 


4.1.5 Other Habitat Parameters 


Grazing — Heavy grazing pressure was observed throughout the Ciervo Hills 
and Griswold Hills land units, and they were assigned scores of 0 (Table 16). 
Grazing pressure within the Coalinga Land Unit ranged from light in the East 
Coalinga Extension Oil Field to heavy in the Pleasant Valley Oil Field. It was 
given a score of 1. 


Table 16. Ratings of BLM land units as potential critical 
habitat for kit, fox based on scores received in 
the "Other Habitat Parameters" category. 


Cumulative | Overall 


Land Unit 011 | topography Gala ee Store? 





Crervo Hills 
Coalinga | 
Griswold Hills 


"Grazifigz Heavy =O, Moderate =1, Light’=2, None =3 
tDevelopment : Extensive =0, Moderate =1, ,Light’=2, None =3 
*Unsuitable Topography =0, Suitable Topography ate 
#Cumulative Score: 0-2 20%. S-dys hao 2 247-8 = 


Oil Development — Levels of oil field impacts were assessed using 
DuUuttsheevde:initions of *intensity, (O'Farrell, yet’ al, 1980). Sinte there were 
no petroleum developments in the Ciervo Hills and Griswold Hills, those land 
ulits received scores: of.35, (Table 16). Because oi] development in the Coalinga 
Land Unit varied from light in the Pleasant Valley Oil Field to heavy in the 
North Dome of the Kettleman Hills, this unit was assigned an overall score of l. 


Topography — The three land units appeared to have topography suitable 
for kit fox habitat, and received scores of 2 (Table 16). 


4.1.6 Other Habitat Parameters — Cumulative Scores 


Scores assigned under Grazing, Oil Development, and Topography were summed 


to obtain a cumulative score for each land unit (Table 16). Overall scores under 
the Other Habitat Parameters category were assigned to each land unit according 
rostne relative: scalesproeposed in’ 1979 \(O"* Farrell, et al; 1980)..°<-The Ciervo 
Hills and Griswold Hills Land Units received cumulative scores of 5, and were 
assigned overall scores of 2. The cumulative score for the Coalinga Land Unit 
was 4; the overall score was l. 


Avo  ranaly score 


Scores received by each land unit for the five rating system categories 
were summed, and the land units were ranked according to these totals. Coalinga’ 


265 








had the highest total score, and was ranked first of the land units surveyed in 
1981 (Table 17).  Ciervo Hills and Griswold’ Hills had total scores of 5 andi ay 
respectively, and were ranked second and third. 


Table 17. Ratings of BLM land units surveyed in 1981 
. to determine their potential as critical 
habitat for San Joaquin kit fox. 


Other 
Habitat Total | Rank 
Parameters 


Presence Breeding 
of Species Sites 


Land Unit 


Coalinga 
Ciervo/Hildis 


Griswold Hills 





4.2 RANKING POTENTIAL OF INDIVIDUAL PARCELS 
AS CRITICAL HABITAT FOR SAN JOAQUIN KIT 
FOX AND BLUNT-NOSED LEOPARD LIZARDS 


Assessing the potential of BLM lands as critical habitat for endangered 
species using parcels lumped into land units has been successful in the past 
(O'Farrell, et al, 1980; O'Farrell and McCue, 1981). However, the potential 
of individual parcels or sections is sometimes masked by the overall score of 
the land unit, which might be greater or less than that of its components. To 
avoid possible loss of specific information that might be critical to land 
managers, the potential of each section of BLM land as critical habitat was 
also tabulated. 


Each parcel was subjectively assigned to one of five levels ranging 
between excellent to no potential as endangered species habitat. Each level 
was defined using a combination of qualitative and quantitative characteristics. 


Level 1, excellent habitat, included sections having large numbers of 
endangered species, large areas of suitable habitat, few human disturbances 
or incompatible land uses, and protection from habitat alterations. 


Level 2, very good habitat, included sections having moderate populations 
of endangered species, large areas of suitable habitat, compatible land uses, 
and protection of the parcel from incompatible uses is in effect or possible. 


Level 3, good habitat, included sections where either occasional evidence 
of endangered species was found or the parcel was adjacent to areas of similar 
habitat on which observations have been made, and the parcels have fairly large 
areas of suitable habitat, and compatible land uses, 


Level 4, fair or low potential, included sections on which there were no 


observations of endangered species, acreage was limited, and suitable habitat 
gave way to rugged relief and more intensive human uses. 


ae 


EE 





Level 5, no potential, included sections on which there were no observa- 
tions of endangered species, areas of suitable habitat were small or nonexistent, 
most of the terrain was rugged, and the parcel was disturbed by intensive human 
uses; 


Except for data on actual observations of species or evidence of presence, 
i.e., den sites, the ranking was based on the collective, subjective judgements 
of the field personnel. Although suitable insights into what might be adequate 
endangered species habitat have been developed, the rankings are speculative and 
should be used for comparative purposes only. Readers are cautioned against 
making important land management decisions based merely on rankings presented 
here. 


eek San Joaquin Kit Fox 


None of the parcels were judged to be excellent habitat for San Joaquin 
kit fox, and only three parcels were assigned to Level 2 (Table 18). Eighty 


Table 18. Ranking of individual parcels of BLM lands surveyed in 1981 to deter- 
mine their potential as critical habitat for the San Joaquin kit fox. 


Level / 
Potential 


Section | Township/Range* Quadrangle 


1) Excellent 


RISE Ciervo Mountain 
2) Very Good R1I3E Ciervo Mountain 
RITE Avenal 


RISE Monocline Ridge 

R17E Avenal 

RIESE Coalinga 
stood R16E Coalinga 

R16E Coalinga 

R16E Coalinga 

R16E Coalinga 

R16E Guijarral Hills 


RISE Monocline Ridge 


RISE Ciervo Mountain 
RITE Avenal 

RSG Monocline Ridge 
REOE Monocline Ridge 
RLS Ciervo Mountain 
RISE Ciervo Mountain 
RI14E Lillis Ranch 
R12E ldria 

RIZE Idria 

R12E Idria 

R12E Idria 


RISE Ciervo Mountain Range 
RISE Ciervo Mountain Range 





“Mt. Diablo Meridian 


S15 5= 


percent of the lands were considered to have either fair or good potential as 
kit fox habitat, since there was limited evidence of the presence of the species 
on them, and many parcels were small in size and scattered throughout private 
land holdings. Two parcels in the Ciervo Hills Land Unit had no observable 
potential as kit fox habitat because of their rugged terrain. 


4.2.2; Blunt=Nosed Leopard Lizard 


None of the BLM lands were considered to be excellent or very good 
habitat for blunt-nosed leopard lizards, since moderate to high densities of 
the species were not observed on many of the parcels in 1981 (Table 19). Blunt- 
nosed leopard lizards were observed on or near three of the parcels assigned to 


Table 19, Ranking of individual parcels of BLM lands surveyed 
InNlI8 hate determine thelr potent ialeastcritical 
habitat for the blunt-nosed leopard lizard. 


~Level/ 
Potential 


Section | Township/Range Quadrangle 


1) Excellent 
2) Very Good 


Rive Avenal 

RIZE Avenal 

Rise Coalinga 

R16E Coalinga 

R16E Coalinga 

R16E Coalinga 

R16E Coalinga 

RI6E Guijarral llillis 


Risk Avena] 

RUE Tumey Hides 
RiZE Tumey Hills 
RISE Ciervo liountain 
RISE Ciervo Mountain 
RUSE Ciervo Mountain 
R13E | Monocline Ridge 
RISE Ciervo Mountain 
R13E | Monocline Ridge 
RI4E Lid bis. Ranch 
KLE Tumey. Hills 
RAE Tumey Hills 


RISE Monocline Ridge 
RISE | Monocline Ridge 
RISE Ciervo Mountain 
ESS Ciervo Mountain 
RISE Ciervo Mountain 
RAZE Tumey Ilills 

R1I2E Tumey llilis 


RI 2E Tumey Ilills 





Bi Hes 


Level 3: one was observed in 1981, and six were observed in 1980 (Chesemore, 
1981) on Section 18, T21S, RI7E. Additional observations were made on lands 
eujecene ta ocction 20° T215, RI7E, and Section 10, T20S, RISE, in 1980 
(Chesemore, 1981). However, over 70% of the BLM lands were considered to have 
only fair to no potential as critical habitat for leopard lizards. 


ANS CHARACTERISTICS OF KIT FOX DENS 


Data combined for all land units indicated that multiple-hole dens had 
from 2 to 10 entrances and an overall average of 4.2 (Table 20). Multiple- 
hole dens in the Coalinga Land Unit had a significantly greater number of 
entrances than those found in the Ciervo Hills. The one natal den observed 
in 1981 had three entrances. 


Table 20. Average number of entrances and elevational ranges of 
kit fox dens observed during surveys in 1981. 


N ; : 
Sets Seale Den Elevation (mn) Land Unit 
Land Unit z Elevation 


Ciervo, Hillis PLO SV GROy sb 72 GLAS 427-839 293-903 


Coalinga | Ug (1 jeletos. 6a tb. 2b bor 206528401 Loe 345 
Griswold Hills —_ ae 488-720 


Total 3 pay el ee 206-839 


Range 





Kit fox dens were found at elevations between 206 and 839 m (Table 20). 
In the Ciervo Hills, dens were found at an average elevation of 673 m, and on 
lands around Coalinga dens were found at an average elevation of 239 m. Average 
elevations corresponded to elevational ranges surveyed in the respective land units. 


Kit fox dens were found on sites having an average slope angle of 15.1°; 
90% were found on slopes of less than 25° (Table 21). Multiple-hole dens were 
found on slopes averaging 15.6°, an angle that was not significantly different 
from that observed for single-hole dens (17.0°). 


Ninety percent of all kit fox dens were found on slopes of hills; few 
were found on the limited flat land surveyed. The proportion of dens found at 
various positions on slopes, regardless of elevation or slope angle, was: upper 
Slope, 18%; mid-slope, 43%; lower slope, 29%; and flats, 11%. 


Analysis of information on aspect, the compass directions faced by dens, 
again revealed that dens were not facing quadrants in equal proportions. Orien- 
tation of dens was: 0-89°, 56%; 90-179°, 10%; 180-269°, 14%; and 270-359°, 21%. 
A majority of kit fox dens faced the northeast quadrant. 


ee 








Table 21. Proportion of San Joaquin kit fox dens tabulated as 
a function of slope angle (°). 


Slope Angle | Dens Found 
tC) (%) 





4.4 OBSERVATIONS OF VERTEBRATES 


Six species of mammals, eight species of reptiles, and 35 species of 
birds were observed (Appendix D). Ten additional species of mammals were 
observed during night spotlight surveys (Appendix C). 


Sixteen San Joaquin kit fox were observed: one during ground surveys 
near Avenal, three along Panoche Road, San Benito County, three during night 
spotlight surveys along Panoche Road, and nine in the Ciervo Hills (Appendix D). 


Sixteen coyotes were observed in the Coalinga Land Unit. Four natal 
dens of coyotes were located on sections of BLM land west of Coalinga. 


San Joaquin antelope ground squirrels, Ammospermophtlus nelsont, were 
observed in the Ciervo Hills (5), Tumey Hills (5), and Coalinga (2) land units. 
This species has been listed as "rare" by the State of California. 


Side-blotched lizards were by far the most numerous (105 sightings) of 
ally repeiie Species. 


California Quail, Lophortyx californtcus, Chukar, Alectornis chukar, 
Mourning Dove, Zenaida macroura, Horned Lark, Eremophtla lapestrts, and Western 
Meadowlark, Sturnella neglecta, were the most numerous birds observed in 1981. 
Eleven Prairie Falcons, Falco mextcanus, were observed in the Ciervo Hills. 


weet: 


94 DISCUSSTON 


Did, LAND UNIT RANKINGS 


The Coalinga Land Unit received the highest ranking of land units surveyed 
to determine their potential as critical habitat for theiSan Joaquin kit fox. 
This ranking was determined largely by the number of kit fox dens observed and 
the high relative densities of lagomorph prey seen. Although different parcels 
were surveyed in 1981, the overall score was almost identical with that assigned 
Soliowing surveys: im, 1980 (O'Farrell, and McCue, 1981). Surprisingly, most of 
the kit fox dens were observed in the North Dome, Kettleman Hills, which has 
been heavily disturbed by intensive petroleum developments and chronic grazing. 


dhe small size and scattered nature of the’ BLM parcels in this land unit 
may not be conducive to management as critical habitat. Quality of individual 
parcels as possible kit fox habitat also varied widely. However, evidence of 
kit fox was sufficient to justify consideration of most parcels of the Coalinga 
Land Unit as potential critical habitat. 


The large number of coyotes observed in the Coalinga Land Unit may have 
an adverse affect on kit fox populations. Coyotes are known to kill kit fox 
(O'Farrell and Gilbertson, 1979; Knapp, 1978). However, previous studies 
(Egoscue, 1962) have also shown that coyotes and kit fox coexist if there are 
differences in preferred habitats and denning areas, as well as an adequate 
Drev base. 10r both: canids’, 


Areas of low relief in the Ciervo Hills Land Unit were being used for 
den sites by kit fox, but dens were not found in steep terrain. More rugged 
areas near dens were probably being used as hunting areas by kit fox. Data 
gathered during surveys of the nearby Tumey and Panoche Hills also indicated 
limited use of areas of high releif for kit fox den sites (O'Farrell and McCue, 
1981). The only active natal den found in 1981 was observed in the Ciervo 
Hills. Kit fox dens were also observed on private lands adjacent to parcels of 
BLM land on which no evidence of kit fox was found. The largest number of kit 
fox observed during night spotlight surveys were seen in the Ciervo Hills Land 
Unit. Due to the numerous observations of kit fox and their dens, the Ciervo 
Hills Land Unit was ranked second in the rating system to evaluate potential 
critical habitat. 





Relative densities of lagomorphs were lowest on this land unit, which 
suggests that the fox must be using an alternate food source, such as rodents. 
However, the low numbers of jackrabbits and cottontails may negatively influence 
the population size and distribution of kit fox in the Ciervo Hills. 


The ranking of this land unit was further depressed by the scattered 
nature of the BLM parcels. As mentioned, public lands interspersed with private 
parcels may be difficult to manage for endangered species. This is especially 
true in the Ciervo Hills, where much of the public land consists of high relief 
that 1s not’ conducive’ to’ kit fox denning habits. 


whos 





BLM lands in the Griswold Hills Land Unit were small, scattered, and 
lacked evidence that they were being used by kit fox. Potential lagomorph prey 
populations were also depressed. As a result, this land unit received the low- 
est ranking. Its total score was also the lowest received by any BLM lands that 
have been surveyed since 1979 (O'Farrell, et al, 1980; O'Farrell and McCue, 1981)9 


De KIT FOX DENS 


Data on physical characteristics of kit fox dens located in 1981 show 
trends similar to those noted in previous surveys (O'Farrell, et al 19304 
O'Farrell and McCue, 1981). Multiple-hole dens had an average of 4,2 entrances, 
a value intermediate to averages of 4.7 and 3.5 found in 1979 and 1980, 
respectively. 


Average elevations of kit fox den sites corresponded to the elevational 
ranges surveyed in land units. Based on three years of observations, the only 
generalized relationship seems to be that San Joaquin kit fox dens have not been 
found at elevations below 200 m or above 900 m. 


Although a greater percentage of kit fox dens were found on slopes of 
hills in 1981 as compared with data from 1979 and 1980, the average slope angle 
where dens were found was less than in previous years. Unlike previous years, 
no kit fox dens were found in flat terrain, although limited low relief parcels 
were surveyed in the Coalinga and Griswold Hills land units. 


For the third consecutive year, field data indicated that a majority of 
dens faced the northeast quadrant. BLM lands assigned for survey along the 
western boundary of the San Joaquin Valley were generally located in hilly 
terrain oriented towards the east. However, the presence of east-facing slopes 
does not adequately explain the high proportion of dens facing northeast compared 
with southeast, and we are still unable to suggest why this is true. 


As in previous years, no evidence was gathered in 1981 showing that kit 
fox den sites were selected because of the presence, density, or growth form of 
specific vegetation associations. 


Two kit fox dens in the Kettleman Hills were found in steel pipes. Like- 
wise, two coyote dens in the East Coalinga Extension Oil Field were also found 
in steel pipes, and 3 to 4 coyotes were observed in one of these "unique" dens. 
A third coyote den was found dug into the embankment surrounding a sump. Sand- 
stone bedrock close to the surface may limit the number of available den sites 
in both areas. 


In the past, kit fox dens have been found in culverts (Egoscue, 1956; 
O'Farrell and Gilbertson, 1979) and steel pipes (Jensen, 1972; Knapp, 1978; 
O'Farrell and Gilbertson, 1979). The species appears to be able to adapt to 
some types of human disturbances, such as petroleum field activities, by taking 
advantage of man-made structures for den sites. 


oo BLUNT-NOSED LEOPARD LIZARD OBSERVATIONS 


The lack of observations of blunt-nosed leopard lizards on BLM lands 
greatly limits a discussion of the potential of these parcels as critical habitat 


Sage 








for the species. However, most BLM lands near Coalinga appeared visually to 
have good potential as habitat for leopard lizards, and the single observation 
of the species was made on one of the parcels. Other lands assigned to Level 3 
received their relative ratings because they were relatively large, had low 
topographic relief, and some were proximate to locations where leopard lizards 
Nad=been seen in’ the past. 


Steep-sloped parcels bordering Silver Creek and Panoche Creek in the 
Tumey Hills Land Unit were considered to be poor habitat for blunt-nosed leopard 
lizards. Major washes within these parcels and the central plateau of the Tumey 
Hills were potentially fair habitat for the species, although none were observed. 
Even a doubling of effort, 16 transects per mile, in the central plateau failed 
tovyaecld a Single observation of a leopard Lizard. 


Having observed only one leopard lizard in 1981, we did not attempt to 
correlate presence of the species with environmental parameters, such as vegeta- 
tion types or density, topography, density of rodent burrows, or proximity to 
human disturbances like grazing or petroleum developments. 


The single observation was made when the soil temperature exceeded 50°C. 
Previous studies had used 46°C (O'Farrell and Kato, 1980) or 50°C (Tollestrup, 
1976) as soil temperatures beyond which leopard lizard surveys should not be 
conducted. Recent studies have indicated, however, that leopard lizard activity 
is more highly correlated with air rather than ground temperatures (Mullen, 1980; 
O'Farrell and Kato, 1980), and a significant number of observations are made when 
soil temperatures exceed 50°C. 


5.4 OTHER SPECIES INFORMATION 


A fascinating series of disjunct sand dune communities were found on 
several of the higher peaks of Monocline Ridge, western Fresno County. Sand 
dunes were located on tops of peaks and rarely extended down the slopes. Vege- 
tation included an overstory of Ephedra caltforntca, and a ground cover of 
Oryzopsts hymenotdes, Sttpa spectosa, Ertastrum plurtflorum, Camissonta 
californica, Gutterrezta sp., Oenothera hookert, Ambrosta sp., Rumex hymenosepalus, 
Haplopappus lineartfoltus, Marrubtum vulgare, and Chorizanthe perfoliata. 


Numerous small mammal burrows were observed, and Dtpodomys heermannt, 
Dtpodomys nttratotdes, and Onychomys torridus were live-trapped during an 
abbreviated sampling schedule. Sceloporus magtster, Phrynosoma coronatum, and 
Uta stansburtana were also captured near the dunes. 


Because of their unusual nature, these dune areas warrant further field 
investigations to describe the flora and fauna endemic to the sandy ridges. 


Eleven Prairie Falcons were observed in the Ciervo Hills. The sightings 
probably represented two to three pairs rather than 11 individuals. The relatively 
high number of sightings in such a short duration may indicate that the Ciervo Hills 
are providing above-average habitat for the falcon. 


A red fox, Vulpes vulpes, was observed during a night spotlight survey east 
of San Ardo. This may represent a new species record for Monterey County. 


wa 





a] 


4 











6. RECOMMENDATIONS 


Some parcels of BLM land in the Coalinga and Ciervo Hills Land Units 
(page 35, Table 18, levels 2 and 3) have potential as critical habitat 
for the San Joaquin kit fox and should be considered for that designation. 


A limited amount of BLM land in the Coalinga Land Unit (page 36, Table 19, 
level 3) has potential as critical habitat for the blunt-nosed leopard 
lizard, and should be considered for that designation. 


Some consideration should be given to designating the low relief parcels 
and major drainages within the Ciervo Hills, and the central plateau of 
the Tumey Hills as critical habitat for the blunt-nosed leopard lizard, 
although the’ potential of these parcels is less than that’ of public lands 
near Coalinga. 


Public land in the Griswold Hills and in the Salinas Valley near San Ardo 
should not be designated as critical habitat for the San Joaquin kit fox. 


Grazing, predator trapping and poisoning campaigns, spraying of insecticides 
to control curly top beet virus, and petroleum developments may adversely 
affect populations of San Joaquin kit fox, blunt-nosed leopard lizards, and 
terri critical habitats. The BLM should support studies to assess the 
Significance of the impacts and develop practical endangered species 
management plans. 


Land exchanges or acquisitions should be considered to consolidate holdings 
of public lands in areas with potential critical habitat for endangered 


species. 


Field studies to describe the ecological significance of sand dune commu- 
nities on ridgetops in the Ciervo Hills should be initiated as soon as 


possible. 


CASS 














LITERATURE CITED 


Brode, J.M., D.P. Christenson, J. Lindell, T. Charmley, R.C. Long, P. Schempf, 
S. Montgomery, D. Johnson, and J. Boggs. 1980. Recovery Plan Blunt-Nosed 
Leopard Itzard, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Portland, Oregon. 


Chesemore, D.L. 1981. Blunt-nosed leopard lizard inventory. Final Report, 
Contract YA-553-CT0O-51, U.S. Bureau of Land Management, Bakersfield District, 
California. 


eeoscuc, "HJ. 1956. 'Preliminary studies’ of the: kit fox in Utah. Mammal. , 
She OLS I's 


Egoscue, H.J. 1962. Ecology and life history of the kit fox in Toole County, 
Utah... Bcology, 43:481-497. 


Grinnell, J., J.S. Dixon, and J.M. Linsdale. 1937. Fur-Bearing Mammals of 
Caltfornta, Vol. 2. University of California Press, Berkeley, Calatoinia. 


IUCN. 1968a. Red Data Book, Vol. 1. Mammalia. Morges, Suisse. 
IUCN. 1968b. Red Data Book, Vol. 3. Amphtbia and Reptilia. Morges, Suisse. 


Jensen, C.C. 1972. San Joaquin kit fox distribution. U.S. Fish and Wildlife 
Service Report, Sacramento, California. 


KnappyD.k.* 197s. Ertects of agricultural. development: in Kern County, 
California, on the San Joaquin kit fox in 1977. Final Report, Project E-1-l, 
Job V-1.21, Non-Game Wildlife Investigations, California Department of Fish 
and Game, Sacramento, California. 


Laughrin, L. 1970. San Joaquin kit fox. Its distribution and abundance. 
Administrative Report No. 70-2, P-R Project W-54-R, California Department of 
Fish and Game, Sacramento, California. 


Montanucci, R. 1965. Observations on the San Joaquin leopard lizard, 
Crotaphytus wisltzentt stlus Stejneger. Herpetologtca, 21:270-283. 


Morrelt,«S. 1972. bife history of the San Joaquin’ kit fox. -Caitfornia: Fish 
and Game, 58:162-174. 


Morrell vo, 197/5.+) 2a JOaguin Kit fox distribution ‘and abundance in 1975. 
Administrative Report No. 75-3, P-R Project W-54-R-7-1, California Department 
of Fish and Game, Sacramento. 


Mullen, R.K. 1981. Elk Hills endangered species program, environmental assess- 


ment of the blunt-nosed leopard lizard, Crotaphytus stlus, Phase 2, 1980. USDOE 
Topical Report EGG 1183-2417, Santa Barbara Operations, Santa Barbara, California. 


oas. 


O'Farrell, T.P. 1981. Recovery Plan, San Joaquin kit fox, Vulpes macrotis 
muttea. Draft Report, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Sacramento, California. 


O'Farrell, T.P. and L. Gilbertson. 1979. Ecological life hlstory of the 
desert kit fox in the Mojave Desert of Southern California. Final Report, 
U.S. Bureau of Land Management, Desert Plan Staff, Riverside, California. 


O'Farrell, T.P. and T. Kato. 1980. Relationship between abundance of blunt- 
nosed leopard lizards, Crotaphytus stlus, and intensity of petroleum field 
development in Kern County, California, 1980. Final Report. USDOE Topical 
Report EG&G 1183-2413, Santa Barbara Operations, Santa Barbara, California. 


O'Farrell; TP, °T. Kato, Po McCuel: and -M.L, Saulsy (1950. ,.Inventory sot leon 
Joaquin kit fox on BLM lands in southern and southwestern San Joaquin Valley. 
Final Report. USDOE Topical Report EG&G 1183-2400, Santa Barbara Operations, 
Santa Barbara, California. 


O'Farrell, T.P. and P. McCue. 1981. Inventory of San Joaquin kit fox on BLM 
lands in the western San Joaquin Valley. Final Report. USDOE Topical Report 
EG&G 1183-2416, Santa Barbara Operations, Santa Barbara, California. 


Stebbins, R.C. 1954. Amphibians and Reptiles of Western Worth America. 
McGraw-Hill Book Company, Inc., New York City, New York, 528 pp. 


Tollestrup, K. 1976. <A standardized method of obtaining an index of densities 
of blunt-nosed leopard lizards, Crotaphytus stlus. Final Report, Contract 
14-16-0001-5793RF, U.S. Department of the Interior, Fish and Wildlife Service. 


Twisselman, E.C. 1967. A flora of Kern County, California. Wasmann d. Biot... 
2575-3599. 


LAG = 














APPENDIX A: DATA SUMMARY SHEETS FOR INDIVIDUAL PARCELS 
OF BLM LANDS SURVEYED FOR THEIR POTENTIAL AS 
CRITICAL HABITAT 


At the end of each survey, data gathered by the field crew was collated 
and then synthesized to provide a concise summary of all important information 
gathered for each individual land parcel. Because data from individual par- 
cels might be overlooked or lost when combined with data from other parcels 
into land unit summaries, they are provided here. The information on individ- 
ual parcels is arranged by land unit. 


Location — The quadrangle title of the USGS 7.5 minute topographic map 
is provided, along with township/range, and section coordinates. The land unit 
assigned to each section for this report is given. 


Date, Acreage, and Time of Survey — The date the surveys were performed, 


the total area surveyed within the section, and the time the surveys. began and 
ended (24 hour clock) are given. 


Field Crew — The names of field crew members allow cross-referencing 
with field data books. 


Temperature — Air temperatures (°C) recorded at beginning and end of 
surveys. Temperatures 1 cm above the soil were not recorded during survey for 
kit fox only (NA); 


Topography — Descriptions of drainage patterns, relief, and other topo- 
graphic features that might affect kit fox are provided. 


Habitat — Information on vegetation associations, and species of flora 
observed, were included in this category. Significant human disturbances were 
also described here. 


Prey Base — The numbers of black-tailed jackrabbits (Lepus) and desert 
cottontails (Sylvrlagus) observed were tallied in this category to provide an 
index to prey base. 





Evidence of Kit Fox — The total number of each type of den observed by 
the field crew is given. Den types include: active natal, active multiple 
hole, inactive multiple hole, active single hole, inactive single hole, and 
active unique. The category also provides the number of kit fox scats observed 
in the’ land parcel: 


Evidence of Blunt-Nosed Leopard Lizards — The number of Crotaphy tus 


stlus observed is recorded. Each sighting is accompanied by information on 
the sex of the lizard and the air and soil temperatures taken at the spot the 
lizard was observed. 


Estimated Length of Transect — Total length of transects was estimated 
for parcels surveyed by ridge/wash techniques. 


Conclusion — A preliminary evaluation of the significance of this land 
parcel as kit fox and blunt-nosed leopard lizard critical habitat is given, 
and important observations that did not apply to above categories are included. 


Area Suitable for Endangered Species Inhabitation — Estimates of total 
area in BLM parcel suitable for inhabitation by San Joaquin kit. fox (SIKF) wand 
blunt-nosed leopard lizard (BNLL). 











QUADRANGLE: Ciervo Mountain TOWNSHIP/RANGE: AAT oe RISE 
SECTION SLU LAND UNIT: Ciervo Hills 
DATE OF SURVEY: 4 June 1981 ACREAGE: 640 
TIME-OF SURVEY: Begin — 0847 End — 1114 

FIELD CREW: Hardenbrook, Horwitz, Kato, Johnson 


TEMPERATURE (30 cm): Begin — 26.2°C End — 28.6°C 
(1 cm): 26<28°C 296°C 


TOPOGRAPHY: Long, gently sloping hill in center of section, called Pepper- 
grass Flat; bordered on north and south by steep east-running 
drainages. 


HABITAT: Festuca megalura, Bromus rubens, Leptdium sp., Oryzopsts, and Sttpa 
sp., with sparse Atriplex polycarpa and Gutterrezta in drainages. 


PREY BASE: None observed 


PVIUENCE OF KIT FOX: ‘Dens: Active natal — 1 
Active multiple hole — 2 


EVIDENCE OF BLUNT-NOSED LEOPARD LIZARD: None observed 
ESTIMATED LENGTH OF TRANSECT: 14.0 km 


CONCLUSION: Very good kit fox habitat. Four kit fox observed during night 
spotlight survey rear western boundary of BLM parcel. Flat 
central area and major drainages are good potential blunt-nosed 
leopard lizard habitat. 


AREA SUITABLE FOR ENDANGERED SPECIES INHABITATION: SJKF — 480 acres 
BNLL — 480 acres 


QUADRANGLE: Ciervo Mountain TOWNSHIP/RANGE: T17S, RI3E 
SECTIONS <2.12 anes UNIT: Ciervo: Hitths 
DATE OF SURVEY: 4 June 1981 ACREAGE: 480 
TIME OF SURVEY: Begin — 1244 End — 1403 


FIELD CREW: Johnson, Kato 


TEMPERATURE (30 cm): Begin — 33.6°C End —31.0°C 
(lacy: . BA. 5.-C $5,0°C 


TOPOGRAPHY: Dominated by major northwest-southeast ridge through center of 
section, . 


HABITAT: Bromus rubens, Erodium, Oryzopsts, with scattered Ambrosta. Shrub 
cover primarily of Ephedra, Haplopappus, and Ertogonum fasetculatum. 


PREY BASE: Lepus — 1 

EVIDENCE OF KIT FOX: None observed 

EVIDENCE OF BLUNT-NOSED LEOPARD LIZARD: None observed 
ESTIMATED LENGTH OF TRANSECT: 7.9 km 

CONCLUSION: No potential as habitat for kit fox or blunt-nosed leopard lizard. 


AREA SUITABLE FOR ENDANGERED SPECIES INHABITATION: SJKF — 160 acres 
BNLL — 100 acres 











QUADRANGLE: Ciervo Mountain TOWNSHIP/RANGE: T17S, R13E 
BEG ION s+ a4 LAND UNIT: Ciervo Hills 
DATE OF SURVEY: 4 June 1981 ACREAGE: 640 
TIME OF SURVEY: Begin — 1446 End — 1619 

FIELD CREW: Johnson, Horwitz, Hardenbrook, Kato 


TEMPERATURE (30 cm): Begin — 34.6°C End — 36.5°C 
flip cmy: BG ce G ESS 


TOPOGRAPHY: Dissected by numerous south-running drainages emptying into 
Arroyo Hondo. 


HABITAT: Bromus rubens, Bromus mollis, Erodium, Leptdtum, with a cover of 
Atrtplex spintfera, Gutterrezta, and Haplopappus. 


PR bao: -lepuse— 
Sylvtlagus — 2 


EVIDENCE OF KIT FOX: None observed 
EVIDENCE OF BLUNT-NOSED LEOPARD LIZARD: None observed 
ESTIMATED LENGTH OF TRANSECT: 10.2 km 


CONCLUSION: Fair kit fox habitat. Steep drainages in the eastern half 
marginal. Flat areas and major drainage in southern part of 
section fair potential blunt-nosed leopard lizard habitat. 


AREA SUITABLE FOR ENDANGERED SPECIES INHABITATION: SJKF — 400 acres 
BNLL — 320 acres 


QUADRANGLE: Ciervo Mountain | TOWNSHIP/RANGE: T17S, R13E 
SECTION? ¥r2Z LAND UNIT: Ciervo Hills 
DATE OF SURVEY: 8 June 1981 ACREAGE: 580 
TIME OF SURVEY: Begin — 1420 End — 1648 

FIELD CREW: Kato, Hardenbrook, Horwitz, Johnson 


TEMPERATURE (30 cm): Begin — 32.0°C End 2436.;0°C 
GL remy S5.5°C 58.55 °6 


TOPOGRAPHY: Steep, rugged slopes draining into Arroyo Hondo. 


HABITAT: Bromus mollts, Bromus rubens, Bromus dtandrus, and Hordewn, with a 
diverse shrub cover of Atriplex polycarpa, Haplopappus , Ertogonum 
fasctculatium, and Yueca whtpplet. 


PREY BASE: Sylvtlagus — 3 

EVIDENCE OF KIT FOX: None observed 

EVIDENCE OF BLUNT-NOSED LEOPARD LIZARD: None observed 
ESTIMATED LENGTH OF TRANSECT: 10.0 km 


CONCLUSION: No potential as kit fox or blunt-nosed leopard lizard habitat due 
to rugged topography. Major drainage system has fair potential 
as suitable lizard habitat. 


AREA SUITABLE FOR ENDANGERED SPECIES INHABITATION: SJKF — 250 acres 
BNLL — 100 acres 


A-6 











QUADRANGLE: Ciervo Mountain TOWNSHIP/RANGE: T17S, R13E 
SECTION: 24 LAND UNIT: Ciervo Hills 
PAI Or SURVEY; +9 June 1981 ACREAGE: 360 
TIME OF SURVEY: -Begin — 0920 End — 1118 

FIELD CREW: Kato, Horwitz, Hardenbrook, Johnson 


TEMPERATURE (30 cm): Begin — 23.0°C End’ 927 97°C 
(ive): BSE SEC SIN8=C 


TOPOGRAPHY: Steep slopes and drainages oriented northward. 


HABITAT: Heavily grazed former burn area. Annuals consist primarily of Bromus 
mollts, Hordeum, Festuca megalura, and Erodtum. Sparse localized 
shrub cover of Gutterrezta, Haplopappus, and Atrtplex sp. 


PREY BASE: None observed 

EVIDENCE OF KIT) FOX: Den — Inactive single — 1 
EVIDENCE OF BLUNT-NOSED LEOPARD LIZARD: None observed 
ESTIMATED LENGTH OF TRANSECT: 10.2 km 


CONCLUSION: Fair kit fox habitat. Private land to the east appears to be 
good kit fox habitat. No potential as blunt-nosed leopard lizard 
habitat. 


AREA SUITABLE FOR ENDANGERED SPECIES INHABITATION: SJKF — 280 acres 
BNLL — 100 acres 





QUADRANGLE: Ciervo Mountain TOWNSHIP/RANGE: T16S, R13E 
SECTIONS nia2 LAND UNIT: Ciervo Hills 
DATE OF SURVEY: 18. June 1981 ACREAGE: 640 
TIME OF SURVEY: Begin. ~— 1110 End — 1157 

FIELD CREW: Johnson, Hardenbrook, Horwitz, McCue 


TEMPERATURE (30 cm): Begin — 28.0°C End: —/31..0°C 
(FY .cmyh: 30.0°C 35..0°C 


TOPOGRAPHY: Rolling hills, oriented northeast; becomes steeper in the southern 
portion. 


HABITAT: Heavily grazed Bromus mollts, Bromus rubens, Festuca megalura, and 
Erodium sp., sparse cover of Haplopappus. 


PREY BASE: None observed 


EVIDENCE OF KIT FOX: Dens — Active multiple — 5 
Active single — 2 


EVIDENCE OF BLUNT-NOSED LEOPARD LIZARD: None observed 
ESTIMATED LENGTH OF TRANSECT: 7.9 km 


CONCLUSION: Very good kit fox habitat. Two kit fox observed on night spot- 
light survey. Three multiple-hole dens observed in privately 
owned section west of BLM parcel. Fair potential as blunt-nosed 
leopard lizard habitat. 


AREA SUITABLE FOR ENDANGERED SPECIES INHABITATION: SJKF — 640 acres 
BNLL — 600 acres 


es 








QUADRANGLE: Ciervo Mountain TOWNSHIP/RANGE: T16S, R13E 
SECTION: 34 LAND UNIT: Ciervo Hills 
DATE OF SURVEY: 18 June 1981 ACREAGE: 480 
TIME OF SURVEY: Begin — 0917 Bridw— thd 2 

FIELD CREW: Johnson, Horwitz, Hardenbrook, McCue 


TEMPERATURE (30 cm): Begin — 27.5°C Ende=9297557C 
(lcm): 2oes)-C 2n0.C 


TOPOGRAPHY: Long north-running ridges and drainages. 


HABITAT: Heavily grazed Bromus mollis, Festuca megalura, and Erodium sp., 
Trichostema ovatum and Haplopappus sp. scattered. 


PREY BASE: Lepus — 1 

EVIDENCE OF KIT FOX: None observed 

EVIDENCE OF BLUNT-NOSED LEOPARD LIZARD: None observed 
ESTIMATED LENGTH OF TRANSECT: 9.4 km 


CONCLUSION: Fair kit fox habitat. No positive sign was observed, however. 
Fair potential as blunt-nosed leopard lizard habitat, especially 
flatter areas and gentle slopes. 


AREA SUITABLE FOR ENDANGERED SPECIES INHABITATION: SJKF — 400 acres’ 
BNLL — 320 acres 








QUADRANGLE: Lillis Ranch TOWNSHIP/RANGE: T17S, R14E 
rs of Wg OC) ee Uc: LAND UNIT: Ciervo Hills 
DATE OF SURVEY: 9 June 196d ACREAGE? -320 
TIME OF: SURVEY! >= BEGIN at 156 End =-"1545 

FIELD CREW: Kato, Hardenbrook, Johnson, Horwitz 


TEMPERATURE (30 cm): Begin — 29.0°C Enda oo Ob 
(1 cm): Blip ook: 557.0 4 


TOPOGRAPHY: BLM land is comprised primarily of rugged slopes drained by 
Arroyo Hondo. 


HABITAT: Annuals consist of Hordeum, Schismus, Bromus mollis, Festuca megalura, 
with Atriplex lentiformits, Eritogonum inflatum, and Trtchostema ovatum 
present. 


PREY: BASE... “Bepue. 

EVIDENCE OF KIT FOX: None observed 

EVIDENCE OF BLUNT-NOSED LEOPARD LIZARD: None observed 
ESTIMATED LENGTH OF TRANSECT: 5.9 km 


CONCLUSION: Fair kit fox habitat. Flat areas and major drainage fair potential 
as blunt-nosed leopard lizard habitat. 


AREA SUITABLE FOR ENDANGERED SPECIES INHABITATION: SJKF — 160 acres 
BNLL — 160 acres 





‘ 
Z 
i 
‘ 
i 
+ 











QUADRANGLE: Monocline Ridge TOWNSHIP/RANGE: A163, “RIGE 
SEUIALONES 4 22 LAND UNIT: Ciervo Hills 
DATE OF SURVEY: 3 June 1981 ACREAGE: 400 
TIME OF SURVEY: Begin — 0900 End — 1127 

FIELD CREW: Kato, Johnson, Hardenbrook 


TEMPERATURE (30 cm): Begin — 24.8°C End — 29.0°C 
Clee): 26.5°6 B12 °C 


TOPOGRAPHY: Contains two major peaks of Monocline Ridge, bisected by deep 
ravines. 


HABITAT: Sparse: annual cover of Eroditum Bromus rubens, Schitsmus, and 
Marrubtum. Shrubs include Ephedra, Gutterrezia, and Ertogonum 
faseteulatum, 


PREY BASE: Sylvtlague — 1 
EVIDENCE OF KIT FOX: Den — Inactive multiple — 1 
EVIDENCE OF BLUNT-NOSED LEOPARD LIZARD: None observed 


ESTIMATED LENGTH OF TRANSECT: 9.4 km 





CONCLUSION: Fair kit fox habitat. Steep slopes throughout parcel are marginal 
kit fox habitat. No potential as blunt-nosed leopard lizard 
habitat; large drainage and flat ridges appear most suitable, 


AREA SUITABLE FOR ENDANGERED SPECIES INHABITATION: SJKF — 280 acres 
BNLL — 140 acres 





QUADRANGLE: Monocline Ridge ; TOWNSHIP/RANGE: T16S, R13E 
SEOTTON con 26 LAND UNIT: Ciervo Hills 
DATE OF SURVEY: 5 June 1981] ACREAGE: 400 
TIME OF SURVEY: Begin — 1436 End — 1652 

FIELD CREW: Kato, Johnson, Hardenbrook 


TEMPERATURE (30 cm): Begin — 31.0°C End = 50 10°C 
(1 cm): Boe ce ea pe © 


TOPOGRAPHY: Steep ridges and drainages oriented northeast. 


HABITAT: Annual cover consist of Bromus rubens, Schismus arabicus, and Erodium. 
Sparse shrub cover of Ephedra and Gutterreztia. 


PREY BASE: None observed 

EVIDENCE OF KIT FOX: None observed 

EVIDENCE OF BLUNT-NOSED LEOPARD LIZARD: None observed 
ESTIMATED LENGTH OF TRANSECT: 6.4 km 


CONCLUSION: Fair kit fox habitat. Two multiple-hole dens observed on private 
land within 0.25 km of BLM land. No potential as blunt-nosed 
leopard lizard habitat. 


AREA SUITABLE FOR ENDANGERED SPECIES INHABITATION: SJKF — 300 acres 
BNLL — 160 acres 


A-12 











QUADRANGLE: Monocline Ridge TOWSNHIP/RANGE: T16S, R13E 


SRL LON? * 20 LAND UNIT: Ciervo Hills 


DATE OF SURVEY: 7 July 1981 ACREAGE: 640 


pari OUPRTSURVEY: Begin — 0750 End — 0906 


FIELD CREW: Evans, Hardenbrook, Johnson, McCue 


TEMPERATURE (30 cm): Begin — 19.5°C Ende. 2520-0 


TOPOGRAPHY: Deeply dissected east-facing slope. 


HABITAT: Heavily grazed Bromus mollis, Festuca megalura, and Erodium sp., with 
sparse Atriplex polycarpa and Haplopappus sp. cover. Ertogonum 
fasetculatum and Gutterrezta bracteata were observed on south-facing 
slopes. 


PREY BASE: None observed 


EVIDENCE OF KIT FOX: None observed 


EVIDENCE OF BLUNT-NOSED LEOPARD LIZARD: None observed 


ESTIMATED LENGTH OF TRANSECT: 15.2 km 


CONCLUSION: Fair kit fox habitat. One kit fox observed during night spotlight 
survey along western boundary of section. Fair potential blunt- 
nosed leopard lizard habitat. Flatter areas and major drainages 
appear most suitable. 


AREA SUITABLE FOR ENDANGERED SPECIES INHABITATION: SJKF — 500 acres 
BNLL — 260 acres 








QUADRANGLE: Monocline Ridge TOWNSHIP/RANGE: T16S, R13E 
SEC LLIUN? 71 0U LAND UNIT: Ciervo Hills 
DATE OF SURVEY: 7 Juiy 1931 ACREAGE: 640 
TIME, OP SURVEY 14 Deca nea End 1214 


FIELD CREW: Evans, Hardenbrook, Johnson, McCue 


TEMPERATURE (30 cm): Begin — 26.5°C End — 28.0°C 


TOPOGRAPHY: "Relatively" gentle slopes in the northeast and south central 
portions bisected by two deep offshoots of Tumey Gulch. 


HABITAT: Festuca megalura and Bromus mollis grassland with scattered 
Haplopappus sp. and Gutterreata bracteata. 


PREY BASE:. “bepus — 1 

EVIDENCE OF KIT FOX: Den — Inactive multiple — 2 
EVIDENCE OF BLUNT-NOSED LEOPARD LIZARD: None observed 
ESTIMATED LENGTH OF TRANSECT: 7.0 km 


CONCLUSION: Good kit fox habitat, especially gradual slopes and plateaus. 
Fair potential blunt-nosed leopard lizard habitat excluding 
steep slopes. 


AREA SUITABLE FOR ENDANGERED SPECIES INHABITATION: SJKF — 480 acres 
BNLL — 480 acres 











QUADRANGLE: Avenal TOWNSHIP/RANGE: T21S, RI17E 
SECTION: 1S LAND UNIT: Coalinga 
DATE OF SURVEY: 10 June 1981 ACREAGE: 400 
TIME OF SURVEY: Begin — 1331 Endo 1505 

FIELD CREW: Hardenbrook, Horwitz, Johnson | 


TEMPERATURE (30 cm): Begin — 31.0°C End "36 25°C 
(1 cm): ys ed 38 ,0°C 


TOPOGRAPHY: Rolling foothills of the Kettleman Hills emptying out onto 
"The Washboard."' 


HABITAT: Annuals consist of Bromus rubens, Festuca megalura, Plagtobothrys, 
Salsola, and Erodtum; shrubs consist of Atriplex polyearpa and 
Gutterrezta in drainages. 


PREY BASE: Lepus — 41 
Sylvtlagus — 5 





EVIDENCE OF KIT FOX: Den — Inactive multiple — 1 


EVIDENCE OF BLUNT-NOSED LEOPARD LIZARD: Number of observations — 1] 
Sex — unknown 
Temperature at observation — 
1 cm below surface — >50.0°C 
1. cm above surface —, 39.4°C 
30 cm above surface — 34.0°C 


ESTIMATED LENGTH OF TRANSECT: NA 


CONCLUSION: Good kit fox habitat. Good blunt-nosed leopard lizard habitat. 
' One lizard sighted on an abandoned well pad. 


AREA SUITABLE FOR ENDANGERED SPECIES INHABITATION: SJKF — 400 acres 
BNLL — 400 acres 





QUADRANGLE: Avenal : TOWNSHIP/RANGE: T21S, R17E 
SEGTIONE, «20 LAND UNIT: Coalinga 
DATE. OP, SURVEY: 10 June 1981 ACREAGE: 640 
TIME OF SURVEY: » Begin — 0749 End — 1134 

FIELD CREW: Kato, Hardenbrook, Horwitz, Johnson 


TEMPERATURE (30 cm): Begin — 20.6°C End — 29.5°C 
{J eny7 ts Baa 35..0°C 


TOPOGRAPHY: Heavily dissected hills, generally oriented north. 


HABITAT: Grasses consist of Bromus rubens and Festuca megalura; forbs consist 
of Erodium, Salsola, Eremocarpus, Astragalus, and Typha; and shrubs 
consist of Gutterrezia and Atriplex polycarpa. 


PREY BASE? Lepye 772 
Sylvtlagus — 56 


EVIDENCE. OF KIT FOX: Dens — Active multiple — 3 Scats. = 2 
Inactive multiple — 4 
Active single — 1 
Inactive single — 1 
Active unique. = 2 


EVIDENCE OF BLUNT-NOSED LEOPARD LIZARD: None observed 
ESTIMATED LENGTH OF TRANSECT: NA 


CONCLUSION: Very good kit fox habitat. Two observations of kit fox utilizing 
man-made structures as "dens" were made. One kit fox was seen 
during ground surveys. Potentially good blunt-nosed leopard 
lizard habitat. 


AREA SUITABLE FOR ENDANGERED SPECIES INHABITATION: SJKF — 640 acres 
BNLL — 640 acres 








QUADRANGLE: Avenal TOWNSHIP/RANGE: T21S, RI17E 
eBCERION: ~30 LAND UNIT: Coalinga 
DATE OF OSURVEY: 11 June 198] ACREAGE: 640 
TIME OF SURVEY: Begin — 0831 Bde O54 

FIELD CREW: Kato, Horwitz, Johnson, Hardenbrook 


TEMPERATURE (30 cm): Begin — 23.5°C End — 30.5°C 
Civen)2 ER aply 35°0°C 


TOPOGRAPHY: Numerous dissected washes, oriented west from central portion of 
North Dome, Kettleman Hills. 


HABITAT: Heavy oil development and grazing. Sparse annual cover of Bromus 
rubens, Festuca megalura, and Erodium, with sparse shrub cover of 
Atriplex polycarpa and Gutterreszta. 


PREY BASE: Lepus — 23 
Sylvtlagus — 20 


EVIDENCE OF KIT FOX: Den — None observed Scats — 1 
EVIDENCE OF BLUNT-NOSED LEOPARD LIZARD: None observed 
ESTIMATED LENGTH OF TRANSECT: NA 


CONCLUSION: Fair kit fox habitat. Potentially fair blunt-nosed leopard lizard 
habitat; major drainages are potentially good habitat. 


AREA SUITABLE FOR ENDANGERED SPECIES INHABITATION: SJKF — 640 acres 
BNLL — 640 acres 





mall 


QUADRANGLE: Coalinga TOWNSHIP/RANGE: T20S, R16E 
SECTION: 6 LAND UNIT: Coalinga 
DATE OF SURVEY: 16 June 1981 ACREAGE: 480 ; 


TIME OF SURVEY: Begin. — 0909 End = 1126 
FIELD CREW: Johnson, Hordenbrook, Horwitz, McCue 


TEMPERATURE (30 cm): Begin — 30 S476 End =. 36.5°€ 
(lem): 30.550 44.6°C 


TOPOGRAPHY: Rolling hills, interspersed with sumps and ponds. 


HABITAT: Dense Bromus rubens, Bromus dtandrus, Festuca megalura, Festuca 
reflexa, with Astragalus, Salsola kalt, and Tritchostema abundant. 
Shrub cover limited to large patches of Gutterresta bracteata. 


PREY BASE: Lepus — 1 
eyLuLlaguea — 2 


EVIDENCE OF KIT FOX: None observed 
EVIDENCE OF BLUNT-NOSED LEOPARD LIZARD: None observed 
ESTIMATED LENGTH OF TRANSECT: NA 


CONCLUSION: Potentially good kit fox habitat. However, few small mammal burrow 
systems were observed and several coyotes (6) were noted. Sand- 
stone bedrock was close to the surface. Good potential as blunt- 
nosed leopard lizard habitat. 


AREA SUITABLE FOR ENDANGERED SPECIES INHABITATION: SJKF — 480 acres 9 
BNLL — 480 acres 


8 8 











QUADRANGLE: Coalinga TOWNSHIP/RANGE: T20S, R16E 


SECTION: 8 LAND UNIT: Coalinga 


DATE OF SURVEY: 17 June 1981 ACREAGE: 320 


TIME OF SURVEY: Begin — 0647 End’ 0816 


FIELD CREW: Johnson, Horwitz 


TEMPERATURE (30 cm): Begin — 23.0°C End — 27.5°C 
(1 cm): er. c 28°.0°C 


TOPOGRAPHY: Rolling hills, tending toward northeast and San Joaquin Valley. 


HABITAT: Festuea megalura, Bromus rubens, Hordeum, and Frodtum grassland, 
with Salsola kalt present. 


PREY BASE: Lepus — 3 
Sylvtlagus — 4 


EVIDENCE OF KIT FOX: None observed 


EVIDENCE OF BLUNT-NOSED LEOPARD LIZARD: None observed 


ESTIMATED LENGTH OF TRANSECT: NA 


CONCLUSION: Potentially good kit fox and blunt-nosed leopard lizard habitat. 
Eastern half of section has been cultivated. 


AREA SUITABLE FOR ENDANGERED SPECIES INHABITATION: SJKF — 320 acres 
BNLL — 320 acres 





QUADRANGLE: Coalinga TOWNSHIP/RANGE: T20S, RISE 
SECTION: «10 LAND UNIT: Coalinga 
DATE ‘OFsSURVEY: 11 June 198) ACREAGE: 160 
TIME OF SURVEY: Begin — 1430 End — 1556 

FIELD CREW: Johnson, Horwitz 


TEMPERATURE (30 cm): Begin — 34.0°C Endi— 24.0°C 
(1 cm): 565, 0 36 .0°C 


TOPOGRAPHY: Southwest facing slope ending on the flat land of Pleasant Valley. 
HABITAT: Bromus rubens, Festuca megalura, Hordeum, and Salsola kalt. 
PREY BASE: Lepus = 2 

EVIDENCE OF KIT FOX: Den — Inactive multiple — 3 Scaterais 
EVIDENCE OF BLUNT-NOSED LEOPARD LIZARD: None observed 

ESTIMATED LENGTH OF TRANSECT: NA 


CONCLUSION: Good kit fox habitat (NE % section). Potentially good blunt- 
nosed leopard lizard habitat also in the NE % section. Southwest 


1 section has been cultivated. 


AREA SUITABLE FOR ENDANGERED SPECIES INHABITATION: SJKF — 160 acres 
: BNLL — 160 acres 


A-20 











QUADRANGLE: Coalinga TOWNSHIP/RANGE: T20S, R16E 
SECTION: 18 | LAND UNIT: Coalinga 
DAI EMVUESSURVEY: 16 June. 198] ACREAGE: 640 
TIME OF SURVEY: Begin — 1500 End — 1704 

FIELD CREW: Johnson, Hardenbrook, Horwitz, McCue 


TEMPERATURE (30 cm): Begin — 37.0°C End —-38.0°C 
(1 cm): ACIS AG ALDOTE 


TOPOGRAPHY: Gently sloping terrain extending from large hill in center of 
section. 


HABITAT: Bromus dtandrus, Bromus rubens, Erodtum, and Avena grassland, with 
Ambrosta, Salsola kalt, Gutterrezia, and Amstnekta locally abundant. 


PREY BASE: Lepus — 35 
Sylvtlagus — 5 


EVIDENCE OF KIT FOX: Den — None observed Scats — 1] 
EVIDENCE OF BLUNT-NOSED LEOPARD LIZARD: None observed 
ESTIMATED LENGTH OF TRANSECT: NA 


CONCLUSION: Potentially good kit fox habitat. However, three coyote natal 
dens were observed, two of which were in man-made structures. 
A general lack of small manual burrows was noted in this section. 
Good potential as blunt-nosed leopard lizard habitat. 


AREA SUITABLE FOR ENDANGERED SPECIES INHABITATION: SJKE — 640 acres 
BNLL — 640 acres 


A-21 





QUADRANGLE: Coalinga : TOWNSHIP/RANGE: T20S, R16E 
SECTION 2 220 LAND UNIT: Coalinga 
DATE OF “GURVEY:. “17. Junes19s1 ACREAGE: 480 
TIME (OF SURVEY: *Begin w=707 25 End ~ 1045 

FIELD CREW: Hardenbrook, McCue, Johnson, Horwitz 


TEMPERATURE (30 cm): Begin — 20.7°C End @s 132 65°C 
(1 cm): 22-259 SAVecC 


TOPOGRAPHY: Gentle west-to-east slope. 


HABITAT: Heavily grazed Bromus and Festuca megalura grassland, with young 
Salsola kalt abundant. 


PREY BASES: lepus = 6 
Sylvi_lagus — 4 


EVIDENCE OF KIT FOX: None observed 

EVIDENCE OF BLUNT-NOSED LEOPARD LIZARD: None observed 

ESTIMATED LENGTH OF TRANSECT: NA 

CONCLUSION: Potentially good kit fox and blunt-nosed leopard lizard habitat. 


AREA SUITABLE FOR ENDANGERED SPECIES INHABITATION: SJKF — 480 acres 
BNLL — 480 acres 








QUADRANGLE: Guijarral Hills TOWNSHIP/RANGE: T20S, RI16E 
SECTION: 34 LAND UNIT: Coalinga 
DATE OF SURVEY: 17 June 1981 ACREAGE: 320 
TIME OF SURVEY: Begin — 0954 End. — 1057 

FIELD CREW: Peri airool McCue 


TEMPERATURE (30 cm): Begin — 29.0°C Ends eae C 
Cl cm): 2928.6 is Nese 


TOPOGRAPHY: Rolling hills oriented toward the southeast. 


HABITAT: Heavily grazed Bromus rubens and Erodium Astragalus and Salsola kal¢ 
were observed to be abundant. 


PKEY BASE:  Lepus — 1 

EVIDENCE OF KIT FOX: None observed 

EVIDENCE OF BLUNT-NOSED LEOPARD LIZARD: None observed 

ESTIMATED LENGTH OF TRANSECT: NA 

CONCLUSION: Potentially good kit fox and blunt-nosed leopard lizard habitat. 


AREA SUITABLE FOR ENDANGERED SPECIES INHABITATION: SJKF — 320 acres 
BNLL — 320 acres 


A-23 


QUADRANGLE: Idria : TOWNSHIP/RANGE: T17S, R12E 
SECTIONS 2 LAND UNIT: Griswold Hills 
DATE OF SURVEY: 6 July 1981 ACREAGE: 160 
TIME OF SURVEY:, Begin — 1445 End = 1525 

FIELD CREW: Evans, Hardenbrook, Johnson, McCue 


TEMPERATURE (30 cm): Begin — 35.0°C End — 34.5°C 


TOPOGRAPHY: Deeply dissected south-facing foothills of the Griswold Hills. 
Flattens out onto plateau above Vallecitos Valley. 


HABITAT: Moderately to heavily grazed Festuca megalura, Bromus rubens, and 
Bromus mollis in flat areas. Vegetation in hills include Ertogonum 
faseteulatum, Gutterrezta sp., Yucca whtppleyt, and Ephedra caltforntea. 


PREY BASE: None observed 
EVIDENCE OF KIT FOX: None observed 


EVIDENCE OF BLUNT-NOSED LEOPARD LIZARD: None observed 


ESTIMATED LENGTH OF TRANSECT: NA 


CONCLUSION: Flat to rolling hills at the base of the Griswold Hills appears to 
be fair kit fox habitat, but no sign was observed. 


AREA SUITABLE FOR ENDANGERED SPECIES INHABITATION: SJKF — 120 acres 
BNLL — Not surveyed 











A DONELE. Idria TOWNSHIP/RANGE: T17S, RIZE 
SEGrLON... 5 LAND UNIT: Griswold Hills 
DATE OF SURVEY: 6 July 1981 ACREAGE: 40 
TIME OF SURVEY: Beoin. ~ 1222 End. 1247 

FIELD CREW: Johnson 


TEMPERATURE (30 cm): Begin — NA End — NA 


TOPOGRAPHY: Gradual east-facing slope, emptying into Silver Creek Valley. 


HABITAT: Bromus mollts, Hordeum sp., Festuca megalura, and Erodtumn sp. 
Shrubs include Haplopappus and Atriplex polycarpa. 


PREY BASE: None observed 
EVIDENCE OF KIT FOX: None observed 


EVIDENCE OF BLUNT-NOSED LEOPARD LIZARD: None observed 


ESTIMATED LENGTH OF TRANSECT: NA 
COM UD LOUNs!* Pairvkit<fox ‘habitat. 


AREA SUITABLE FOR ENDANGERED SPECIES INHABITATION: SJKF — 40 acres 
BNLL — Not surveyed 


QUADRANGLE: Idria TOWNSHIP/RANGE: T17S, R12E 
SECTION: (6 LAND UNIT: Griswold Hills 
DATE OF SURVEY: 6 July 1981 ACREAGE: 520 
TIME “OF SURVEY? "Begin = Ts End — 1257 

FIELD CREW: Evans, Hardenbrook, McCue 


TEMPERATURE (30 cm): Begin — 33.0°C End — 38.0°C 
(1 cm): NA NA 


TOPOGRAPHY: Very steep, deeply dissected ridges and washes draining south- 
east into Silver Creek. 


HABITAT: Bromus spp. and Festuca megalura with scattered Juniperus in rolling 
southern portions. 


PREY BASE? Lepus 2 
Sylvtlagus — 1 


EVIDENCE OF KIT FOX: None observed 


EVIDENCE OF BLUNT-NOSED LEOPARD LIZARD: None observed 


ESTIMATED LENGTH OF TRANSECT: NA 


CONCLUSION: Poor kit fox habitat in the rugged northern half of the parcel; 
fair kit fox habitat in southern half. 


AREA SUITABLE FOR ENDANGERED SPECIES INHABITATION: SJKF — 260 acres 
BNLL — Not surveyed 


A-26 











QUADRANGLE: Idria TOWNSHIP/RANGE: T17S, R12E 
SEL nN: Wy ; LAND UNIT: Griswold Hills 
DATE OF SURVEY; 6 July 1981 : ACREAGE: 90 
TIME OF SURVEY: Begin — 1059 End — 1146 

FIELD CREW: Johnson 


TEMPERATURE (30 cm): Begin — 33.5°C End — NA 


TOPOGRAPHY: Rolling, east-facing hills. 

HABITAT: Primarily a grazed Bromus/Hordeum grassland. 
PREY BASE: None observed 

EVIDENCE OF KIT FOX: None observed 


EVIDENCE OF BLUNT-NOSED LEOPARD LIZARD: None observed 


ESTIMATED LENGTH OF TRANSECT: NA 
CONCLUSION: Potentially fair kit fox habitat. 


AREA SUITABLE FOR ENDANGERED SPECIES INHABITATION: SJKF — 90 acres 
BNLL — Not surveyed 


QUADRANGLE: Tumey Hills TOWNSHIP/RANGE: T15S, R12E 
SECTION: 15 LAND UNIT: Tumey Hills | 
DATE OF SURVEY: 2 June 1981 ACREAGE: 60 


TIME OF SURVEY: Begin — 1619 End — 1645 
FIELD CREW: Hardenbrook 


TEMPERATURE (30 cm): Begin — 28.2°C End = °31°.0°C 
(lem): 29 .0°C 32.0°C 


TOPOGRAPHY: Steep ridge in southeast corner of BLM parcel, major drainage 
runs north through center of section. 


HABITAT: Annuals consist of Festuca megalura, Bromus mollis, Bromus rubens, 
and Hordewn; sparse shrub cover of Atriplex sptnifera, Gutterrezta, 
and Haplopappus. 


PREY BASE: Not surveyed 

EVIDENCE OF KIT FOX: Not surveyed’ for kit fox 
EVIDENCE OF BLUNT-NOSED LEOPARD LIZARD: None observed 
ESTIMATED LENGTH OF TRANSECT: 1.0 km 


- CONCLUSION: The flat part of this section is potentially fair blunt-nosed 
leopard lizard habitat. 


AREA SUITABLE FOR ENDANGERED SPECIES INHABITATION: SJKF — Not surveyed 
BNLL — 30 acres 


A-28 


} 








QUADRANGLE: Tumey Hills TOWNSHIP/RANGE: TSG AHI 
SECTION: ..21 LAND UNIT: Tumey Hills 
DATE OF SURVEY: 2 June 1981 ACREAGE: 480 
TIME OF SURVEY: Begin — 0950 End — 1511 

FIELD CREW: Hardenbrook, Horwitz 


TEMPERATURE (30 cm): Begin — 28.2°C End: .29.,0-G 
(1 cm): 29,056 S055) C 


TOPOGRAPHY: Steep northwest facing slope along western boundary of parcel; 
deep drainage in southwest; ridge in each central portion. 


HABITAT: Bromus rubens, Bromus mollis, Festuca megalura, with shrub cover 
of Atriplex spintfera and Haplopappus. 


PREY BASE: Not surveyed 

EVIDENCE OF KIT FOX: Not surveyed for kit fox 

EVIDENCE OF BLUNT-NOSED LEOPARD LIZARD: None observed 
ESTIMATED pene OF. TRANSECT: 7.6 km 

CONCLUSION: No potential as blunt-nosed leopard lizard habitat. 


AREA SUITABLE FOR ENDANGERED SPECIES INHABITATION: SJKF — Not surveyed 
BNLL — 40 acres 


QUADRANGLE: Tumey Hills TOWNSHIP/RANGE: T15S, R12E 
SECTION SohZ2 LAND UNIT: Tumey Hills 
DATE OF SURVEY: 2 June 1981 ACREAGE: 260 
TIME OF SURVEY: Begin — 1540 End — 1619 

FIELD CREW: Hardenbrook 


TEMPERATURE (30 cm): Begin — 30.0°C End — 31.0°C 
(1 em): St,2 ¢ 32.0.C 


TOPOGRAPHY: Moderate to steep-sloped hills. 


HABITAT: Average annual cover of Festuca megalura, Bromus rubens, Bromus 
dtandrus, Erodium sp., Plagtobothrys sp., and Bromus mollts. 
Sparse shrub cover of Atriplex lenttformis, Ertogonum tnflatum, 
and Ertogonum gractlltmum present. 


PREY BASE: Not surveyed 

EVIDENCE OF KIT FOX: Not surveyed for kit fox 
EVIDENCE OF BLUNT-NOSED LEOPARD LIZARD: None observed 
ESTIMATED LENGTH OF TRANSECT: 1.4 km 


CONCLUSION: No potential as blunt-nosed leopard lizard habitat. The major 
drainage appears most suitable. 


AREA SUITABLE FOR ENDANGERED SPECIES INHABITATION: SJKF — Not surveyed 
BNLL — 40 acres 


A-30 








QUADRANGLE: Tumey Hills TOWNSHIP/RANGE: T15S, R12E 
SECTION: 28 LAND UNIT: Tumey Hills 
DATE OF SURVEY: 2 June 1981; 17 June 1981 ACREAGE: 360 
TIME OF SURVEY: Begin — 1344; 1422 mndk=\ 144525 7540 

FIELD CREW: Johnson, Hardenbrook, Horwitz, McCue 


TEMPERATURE (30 cm): Begin — 29.0°C End — 37.0°C 
CLecny: 9 esa bAma2.0-C 


TOPOGRAPHY: Rolling hills on plateau in east portion of section. Steep west- 
wart flowing drainages and ridges along western border, 


HABITAT: Heavily grazed Bromus rubens, Erodium sp., and Festuca megalura; 
scattered shrub cover of Atriplex polycarpa. 


PREY BASE: Not surveyed 

EVIDENCE OF KIT FOX: Not surveyed for kit fox 
EVIDENCE OF BLUNT-NOSED LEOPARD LIZARD: None observed 
ESTIMATED LENGTH OF TRANSECT: 6.5 km 


CONCLUSION: The steep-sloped western areas have no potential as blunt-nosed 
leopard lizard habitat. The central plateau is potentially fair 
blunt-nosed leopard lizard habitat. Three multiple entrance kit 
fox dens not observed in 1980 were noted. 


AREA SUITABLE FOR ENDANGERED SPECIES INHABITATION: SJKF — Not surveyed 
BNLL — 200 acres 


QUADRANGLE: Tumey Hills ; TOWNSHIP/RANGE: T15S, R12S 
SECTION: . #29 LAND UNIT: Tumey Hills 
DATE. OF SURVEY: “2° June 7i96! ACREAGE: 320 


TIME OF SURVEY: Begin’ "0953 End — 1250 
FIELD CREW: Kato, Johnson, Horwitz 


TEMPERATURE (30 cm): Begin a 29 o0G End — 32.5°C 
(1 em}: 285°C B3.8°C 


TOPOGRAPHY: Steep west-flowing drainages along eastern border, East-flowing 
washes and rolling hills along western border. Section is bisected 
by privately-owned Silver Creek Valley. 


HABITAT: Grasses consist of Hordeum, Bromus sp., and Festuca megalura; 
Eastwoodia, Gutterrezta, and Atriplex spinifera on ridges. 


PREY BASE: Not surveyed 

EVIDENCE OF KIT FOX: Not surveyed for kit fox 

EVIDENCE OF BLUNT-NOSED LEOPARD LIZARD: None observed 
ESTIMATED LENGTH OF TRANSECT: 13.0 km 

CONCLUSION: No potential as blunt-nosed leopard lizard habitat. 


AREA SUITABLE FOR ENDANGERED SPECIES INHABITATION: SJKF — Not surveyed 
BNLL — 75 acres 


A-32 








QUADRANGLE: Tumey Hills TOWNSHIP/RANGE: T15S, R12E 


SECTION? ~ 32 LAND UNIT: Tumey Hills 


DATE OF SURVEY: 1 June 1981; 2 June 1981 ACREAGE: 240 


TIME OF SURVEY: Begin — 1447; 0926 Eng te 1625 noo 7 


FIELD CREW: Hardenbrook, Horwitz, Johnson, Kato 


TEMPERATURE (30 cm): Begin — 26.5°C End — 34.2°C 
(1 em): 545°C 360°C 


_TOPOGRAPHY: BLM land dominated by northwest-flowing drainages, emptying into 
Silver Creek. 


HABITAT: Annual cover consist of Bromus rubens, Bromus mollis, Hordeum, and 
Salsola. Shrub cover consist of Atriplex polyearpa, Atriplex 
spintfera, and Atriplex lenttformis. 


PREY BASE: Not surveyed 


EVIDENCE OF KIT FOX: Not surveyed for kit fox 


EVIDENCE OF BLUNT-NOSED LEOPARD LIZARD: None observed 


ESTIMATED LENGTH OF TRANSECT: 20.0 km 


CONCLUSION: Potentially fair blunt-nosed leopard lizard habitat, especially 
in large drainages. 


AREA SUITABLE FOR ENDANGERED SPECIES INHABITATION: SJKF — Not surveyed 
BNLL — 100 acres 


A-33 


QUADRANGLE: Tumey Hills ‘ TOWNSHIP/RANGE: T15S, R12E 


SECT IONGH, 3.5 LAND UNIT: Tumey Hills 


DATE OF SURVEY: 19 June 1981 ACREAGE: 120 


TIME OF SURVEY: Begin — 0950 End — 1050 


FIELD CREW: Johnson, Hardenbrook, Horwitz, McCue 


TEMPERATURE (30 cm): Begin — 30.5°C End — 33.3°C 
(1 cm): 5300°C. 39 .0°C 


TOPOGRAPHY: Rolling hills generally running eastward on central plateau. 
Steep west-flowing drainage in western Section 33. 


HABITAT: Heavily grazed Festuca megalura, Bromus rubens, Bromus mollis, Frodium, 
Atriplex polycarpa, and Haplopappus scattered in drainages. 


PREY BASE: Not surveyed 


EVIDENCE OF KIT FOX: Not surveyed for kit fox. 


EVIDENCE OF BLUNT-NOSED LEOPARD LIZARD: None observed 


ESTIMATED LENGTH OF TRANSECT: NA 


CONCLUSION: Western half has no potential as blunt-nosed leopard lizard 
habitat. Eastern portion of section consists of rolling hills 
and has fair potential as blunt-nosed leopard lizard habitat. 


AREA SUITABLE FOR ENDANGERED SPECIES INHABITATION: SJKF — Not surveyed 
BNLL — 120 acres 


A-34 








APPENDIX B: KIT FOX DEN ANALYSIS SHEETS OF 
SIGNIFICANT INFORMATION FOUND WITHIN EACH LAND UNIT 


Den Code Number — Each den received an individual code number to facili- 
tate cross-referencing with field notebooks and map references. The code con- 
Sists of the section number, followed by the transect line number, and den 
number, Transect lines were number 1 through 8 from west to east or north to 
south, depending on how the transects were arranged within a land parcel. The 
den number was the cumulative number of dens found to that point on a specific 
transect. 


Category — Dens were classified using the following abbreviations. 
AN — active natal den, AM — active multiple-hole den, AS — active single-hole 
den, IM — inactive multiple-hole den, IS — inactive single-hole den, and 
UN — active unique den, Active dens had positive evidence of use by fox in 
1981; inactive dens did not. Natal dens had multiple holes, matted vegetation, 
and prey remains. Unique dens were in man-made structures. 


Number of Holes — The number of holes for each den was counted. 


Slope Position — Position of dens on slopes was noted as follows: 
U — upper slope, M — mid-slope, L — lower slope, and F — found in the flats 
away from a slope. 


Aspect — The compass direction (in degrees) faced by the den was 
determined. 


Slope Angle — Slope angles (in degrees) where dens were found were 
measured with a clinometer. 


Elevation — Presented here in both English and metric units. 


Vegetation Dominants — The dominant ground cover and shrubs associated 
with individual den sites were noted using the following species key: 
Assp — Astragalus sp., Atpo — Atrtplex polycarpa, Brmo — Bromus mollis, 
Brru — Bromus rubens, Brte — Bromus tectorum, Epca — Ephedra caltfornica, 
Erci — Erodiwn ctecutartum, Erfa — Ertogonum fasciculatum, Erin — Ertogonum 
inflatum, Erse — Eremocarpus settgerus, Feme — Festuca megalura, Gubr — 
Gutterrezta bracteata, Hasp — Haplopappus sp., Hesp — Hemizonia.sp., Hosp — 
Hordeum sp., Lesp — Leptdium sp., Masp — Marrubium sp., Saka — Salsola kalt, 
Scar — Sehtsmus arabtcus, and Trov — Trichostema ovatum. 


Animal Sign — Where observed’at a den, the following types of informa- 
tion were noted with a plus (+): fox scats, fox tracks, prey remains, vegeta- 
tion matted by fox (particularly pups), presence of owls (slices, pellet prey), 
other mammals (observed, tracks, scats), and dirt berms due to animal digging. 
The following abbreviations were used in the other animals category: BA — 
badger, BO — burrowing owl, and UR — unidentified rodent. 


Human Activities — The types and degrees of human activities proximate 
to the den sit were summarized. The following abbreviations indicate human 
activities: BN — burn, DR — dirt road, FLD — field, GR — grazing, HWY — highway, 
ORS orchards, PL°=— pipelines er LFD plowed field, PWR — powerlines, RD — road, 
SMP — sump, TNK — tank, UD — undisturbed, WL eta and WP — well pad. 


Den analysis sheets in this Appendix are presented for individual land 
units. Within land units the den analyses are arranged by section, transect 
number, and den order within individual transects. 





CIeTvo Millis Lana Unit 


}30-8-1 | 30-8-2. 32-7-1 | 32-7-2 | 32-7-3 | 32-7-4 | 32-7-5 | 32-7-6 | 32-1-1 





10-5-1 









Township/Range R13E RISE R13E RLSE R13E RISE R13E R13E “RISE Ri SE R13E 
fame emi te fe (s [+ (ef? > ds |e fe 
a 


1400 
427 


(ft) 
(m) 


Elevation 


2240 2240 2380 2380 2340 2360 2320 2340 2750 
683 683 720 726 714 720 708 714 839 


Feme ETCi Feme EFCL Brru 
Brru Brru Brru Feme 
Brmo Feme ECT Brru 
EGCL Saka 








Vegetation Dominants 

















Animal Sign: 


ROxesCcats 
Fox Tracks 


Prey Remains 


Matted Vegetation 


Other Animals 


Dirt Berms 


w 
> 





fc 
oe) + 


+ 
G GR 






+ 
o 
6 
Human Activities a = 


Seeeeo 
Bees 
GR GR GR 
DR DR DR 


wo 
Pub 
Be 





GR 
DR 


v-4d 


Ciervo Hills Land Unit (continued) 


Den Code Number 10-6-1 | 10-6-2 | 24-6-1 



















Township/Range 


R13E RISE R13E 
: 
7 
Poe os meee 
O57 634 561 
Brmo 


Ercl 
Erin 








Elevation 





Vegetation Dominants 







Animal Sign: 







Fox Scats 






Fox. Tracks 






Prey Remains 


Matted Vegetation 






Other Animals 











Dirt Berms 







Human Activities 





S-4 


Coalinga Land Unit 


Den Code Number 10-7-1 |10-8-1 ]|10-8-2 18-8-1 | 20-1-1 | 20-2-1 | 20-2-2 | 20-2-3 20-2-4} 20-4-1 | 20-4-2 


T20S T20S F205 T2258 T2138 F2is T2iS T2585 T2ls T21S 1215 
RISE RISE RISE Rive R17E RI7E R17E RI7E Rive REE REE 
















Township/Range 


ce 


ttt, 925 930 825 675 tres lifes AS TLS P20 825 810 
Poe 284 252 206 221 er 218 218 2a. Zoe 247 


Brru Feme Feme Brru 
Feme Brru Brru Feme 
Erse 


Rieaeeeee eS 





I 
7 
M L 
1 56 4 


M IS IM 
i ey 
M 
54 1 4 
Z ] 19 


IM IM 
2 4 







Elevation 













Brru Brru Feme 
: ; Erci* Erse Brru 
Vegetation Dominants Galea Bee Rey 





Animal Sign: 






FOX soaGa ts 
Fox Tracks 
Prey Remains 


Matted Vegetation 


Other Animals 


= 
25) 


+ 


Dirt Berms 





Human Activities 


e 


se 
bes 
ce 
ri 
a0 
= 
w< 
Uy 
panes 
Td 
eo 
N 
= 
2: 
=, 
ve) 
Oo 
ne 





oa 


Den Code Number. 





Township/Range 


Animal Sign: 


Fox Scats 

Fox Tracks 

Prey Remains 
Matted Vegetation 
Other Animals 


Dirt Berms 


Human Activities 


Coalinga Land Unit (continued) 


RUE R17E RIVE R17E 
: 
i 
; 














Private land adjacent to BLM land 


29-1-1 | 29-1-2 | 31-1-1 31-1-2] 31-1-3 | 35-2-1 | 35-3-1 



















Den Code Number 


Township/Range 









eae ere 
R13E RI3E RISE R13E R13E R13E R13E R13E 

: 

Danae 

pe nsicon fv fe Jn 

Em 

cg : 

: 


2640 ZOU 2660 1860 
805 833 811 567 


2 2 

M L 
290 106 
23 rw 


Pie 
mame 
Pa [1 
Eee 


2600 
Los 


Feme 
Brmo 
ee 


+ 
+ 









Brru Erci 
Erci Brmo 
Feme 





Animal Sign: 
Fox Scats 
Fox Tracks 
Prey Remains Mi 
Matted Vegetation 


Other Animals 


Dirt Berms 


Human Activities 


& 
UD 





8-4 


New dens on BLM land previously surveyed 


28-2-1 | 28-6-1 | 28-5-1 
I 





Den Code Number 
























Township/Range ee 
Cre 
ower ovmes ff? fe 
Siow Fosiein [fw fe 
fence ares [we foo [vo | 
Supe one eros] se fe | s 

epee fe be 

366 366 366 308 


Elevation 
(m) 
Brru Brmo Brru 
Feme Feme Feme 
Brru Ener 
Brmo 


ce 
rs 
Es 


2 
1 


Vegetation Dominants 





Animal Sign: | 
Fox Scats + - “i 
Fox Tracks + ES ee | eg EE 
a 
Matted Vegetation Be Soa FS ea ee ee 
Sg 
a 

Human Activities 2 

PWR 





APPENDIX C: VERTEBRATES OBSERVED DURING 
NIGHT SPOTLIGHT SURVEYS OF BLM LANDS IN 1981 


Information is presented both in a table summarizing vertebrates ob- 
served on six spotlight surveys, and in individual night survey sheets prepared 
following each survey. The night survey sheets include information on date, 
route, personnel conducting survey, start and finish time, mileage, speed, 
weather conditions, and total observations. 


Vertebrates observed during night spotlight surveys of potential 
kit fox habitat in the Ciervo Hills, Panoche Valley, Vallecitos 
Valley, Lynch Canyon, and Coalinga area in 1981 


Survey Locations 


Species Total 
ee a ee 
Svig 


San Joaquin kit fox 
Black-tailed jackrabbit 
Desert cottontail 
Coyote 

Red fox 

Bobcat 

Striped skunk 
Raccoon 

Housecat 

Boar 

Mule deer 

Kangaroo rat 

Pocket mouse 

Deer mouse 

Barn Owl 

Burrowing Owl 
Short-Eared Owl 
Mourning Dove 
Western Meadowlark 
Unidentified bats 
Unidentified rodents 
Unidentified canids 
Unidentified owls 
Unidentified bird 
Unidentified eyeshine 
Gopher snake 





A — Panoche Road, 18.6 miles 

B — Ciervo Hills, from Hudson Avenue, 14.0 miles 

C — North Coalinga (Palmer Avenue, Calveras Avenue), 12.9 miles 
D — Cantua Creek, 9.1. miles 

Eo— San Ardo (Lynch Canyon); 7.2 miles 

PF — New ldria Road, 7:9 miles 


C-1 


DATE: 1 Jane. 1981 


ROUTE: Panoche Road 


PERSONNEL: Kato, Hardenbrook, Johnson 


TIME: Starting — 2030 Finishing — 2310 Total — 2 hours 40 minutes 


MILEAGE: Starting — 332.7 Finishing — 351.3 Total — 18.6 miles 


SPEED: 10-15 mph 


WEATHER: Temperature — 26°C 
Cloud Cover — High, Overcast 
Wind — Gusty from NW 
Moon — New Moon 


Species Total 
Jackrabbits iv 
Cottontails 18 
Kangaroo rat 1 
Kit fox 3 
Coyote 1 
Striped skunk 1 
Barn Own 1 
Mourning Dove 1 
Unidentified bats 2 

Unidentified rodents 2 
Unidentified canid 1 


DATE: -4-Junetigsi 


ROUTE: Ciervo Hills — Hudson Avenue to Peppergrass Flat 


PERSONNEL: Kato, Hardenbrook, Johnson, Florence 


TIME: -Starting — +2052 Fineshangs312555 Total — 3 hours 3 minutes 


MILEAGE; ‘Starting — 711.3 Finishing -)725 93 Total — 14.0 miles 


SPEED: 10-15 mph 


WEATHER: Temperature — 30.5°C 
Cloud Cover — None 
Wind — None 
Moon — None, two nights after new moon 


Species Total 
Jackrabbits 5 
Cottontails 14 
Kangaroo rats 47 
Deer mouse 1 
Kit fox 9 
Western Meadowlark 1 
Unidentified eyeshine 6 
Gopher snake 1 
Burrowing Owls 2 


DATE: 16 June 1981 


ROUTE: North Coalinga — Palmer Avenue to Calveras Avenue 


PERSONNEL: McCue, Johnson 


TIME: Starting — 2109 Finishing — 2255 Total — 1 hour 56 minutes 


MILEAGE: Starting — 77.3 Finishing — 92.7 Total — 12,9 miles 


SPEED: 10-15 mph 


WEATHER: Temperature — 31°C 
Cloud Cover — Slight 
Wind — Light from NE 
Moon — Full 


Species Total 
Jackrabbits 51 
Cottontails 24 


Kangaroo rat 

Pocket mouse 
Unidentified eyeshine 
Coyotes 

Unknown canid 


Re ON Re 


c-4 


DATE: 17 June 1981 


ROUTE: Cantua Creek 


PERSONNEL: McCue, Hardenbrook, Korvalin 


TIME: Starting — 2110 Finishing — 2230 Total — 1 hour 20 minutes 


MILEAGE: Starting — 97.6 Finishing — 106.7 Total — 9.1 miles 


SPEED: 10-15 mph 


WEATHER: Temperature — NA 
Cloud Cover — None 
Wind — Light from North 
Moon — Full 


Species Total 


Jackrabbits 
Cottontails 
Kangaroo rats 
Bobcats 

Coyote 

House cat 

Barn Owls 
Short-Eared Owls 
Unidentified owls 
Unknown 


Sa 


MPNN BKK YH WOC 


DATE: 22. June. 1981 

ROUTE: San Ardo — Lynch Canyon 

PERSONNEL: McCue 

TIME: Starting — 2130 Finishing — 2300 Total — 1 hour 30 minutes 
MILEAGE: Starting — 75.2 Finishing — 82.4 Total — 9.0 miles 
SPEED: 10-15 mph 


WEATHER: Temperature — NA 
Cloud Cover — None 
Wind — Light 
Moon — None, two nights before last quarter 


Species Total 
Jackrabbit 1 
Cottontail ] 
Kangaroo rats 8 
Striped skunks 2 
Red fox t 
Raccoon 1 
Boars 13 
Bobcats 2 
Mule deer i 


DATE: - -¢ July 1981 


ROUTE: New Idria Road 


PERSONNEL: McCue, Evans, Hardenbrook, Johnson 


TIME: Starting — 2119 Finishing — 2155 Total — 38 minutes 


MILEAGE: Starting — 733.9 Finishing —-°741,1 Total — ¥,2° miles 


SPEED: 10-15 mph 


WEATHER: Temperature — 20.2°C 
Cloud Cover — None 
Wind — Light from East 
Moon — Half, one night before first quarter 


Species Total 
Jackrabbits 3 
Cottontails 10 
Raccoons Z 
Mule deer ih 
Unidentified owl 1 
Unidentified bird il 
Unidentified eyeshine 3 






—* 


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APPENDIX D: NUMBER OF MAMMALS, REPTILES, AND 
BIRDS OBSERVED ON BLM LANDS SURVEYED AS 
POTENTIAL SAN JOAQUIN KIT FOX CRITICAL HABITAT IN 1981 


Information is presented in two tables. The first includes tallies of 
all vertebrates observed during ground surveys of four BLM land units. The 
second table is a complete annotated listing of direct observations of kit fox 
made during the study. 


Vertebrate tallies 


Se arr aad Unit 
Species Gree Ee. Griswold | Tumey Total 
Hidehhe ce enue a Here Hii 


Lepus caltfornicus 
Black-tailed jackrabbit 





MAMMALS 


Sylvtlagus audubontt 
Desert cottontail 


Spermophtlus beecheyt 
California ground squirrel 


Ammospermophtlus nelsontr 
San Joaquin antelope 
ground squirrel 


Vulpes macrotts muttca 
San Joaquin kit fox 


Cants latrans 
Coyote 


REPTILES 


Crotaphytus stlus 
Blunt-nosed leopard lizard 


Seeloporus magtster 
Desert spiny lizard 


Uta stansburtana 
Side-blotched lizard 


Phrynosoma coronatum 
Coast horned lizard 





Vertebrate tallies (continued) 


UR ee cand Cue eae Unit 
pl hee Ciervo Griswold Tumey ska: 
Coalinga 
Hills 


REPTILES (continued) 


Cnemtdophorus ttgrts 
Western whiptail 


Artzona elegans 
Glossy snake 


Tanttlla plantceps 
Western blackheaded snake 


Crotalus vtrtdus 
Western rattlesnake 


| BIRDS 


Anas platyrhynchos 
Mallard 


Anas acuta 
Pintail 
Cathartes aura 
Turkey Vulture 


Elanus leucurus 
White-Tailed Kite 


Buteo jamatcensts 
Red-Tailed Hawk 


Aqutla chrysaetos 
Golden Eagle 


Circus cyaneus 
Marsh Hawk 


Faleo mextcanus 
Prairie Falcon 


Falco sparvertus 
American Kestrel 


Lophortyx caltforntcus 
California Quail 


Alectorts chukar 
Chukar 


Charadrius voctferus 
Kilideer 


Recurvtrostra amertcana 
American Avocet 





——_ 


Vertebrate tallies (continued) 






Land Unit 










Species Total 





Ciervo Griswold | Tumey 









BIRDS (continued) 


Htmantopus mexicanus 
Black-Necked Stilt 











Zenatda macroura 
Mourning Dove 


Tyto alba 
Barn Owl 







Athene cuntecularia 
Burrowing Owl 








Tyrannus verttcalus 
Western Kingbird 






Sayornts saya 
Say's Phoebe 







Pica ptea 
Black-Billed Magpie 







Eremophtla alpestris 
Horned Lark 






Petroeheltdon pyrrhonota 
Cliff Swallow 


Corvus corax 
Common Raven 

















Parus rufescens 
Chestnut-Backed Chickadee 






Chamaea fasctata 
Wrentit 






Salptnetes obsoletus 
Rock Wren 





Mimus polyglottos 
Mockingbird 







Lantus ludovtetanus 
Loggerhead Shrike 








Sturnus vulgarts 
Starling 






Sturnella neglecta 
Western Meadowlark 






Euphagus cyanocephatlus 
Brewer's Blackbird 







Vertebrate tallies (continued) 


eee ans ame eee Unit 
S , 
eho fi Ciervo ets os Griswold | Tumey aio. 
Hills g Hills | Hills 


BIRDS (continued) 


Carpodacus mextcanus 
House Finch 


Chondestes grammacus 
Lark Sparrow 
Amphtsptza bellt 
Sage Sparrow 


Zonotrtchia leucophrys 
White-Crowned Sparrow 





Direct observations of San Joaquin kit fox 
made during the 1981 inventory of BLM lands 


Location 


Night spotlight survey observations along Panoche Road, 
San Benito County, California: 2 observed at natal den 
2.5 miles west of Fresno/San Benito County line; one 

observed 3.4 miles west of county line. 










01 June 1981 












Night spotlight observations in the Ciervo Hills. Mile- 
ages from first gate at Lower Hudson Avenue: 6.2, 7.4 
(2),.9.6:(2), 12.5) (3), and 12.9) eb totalor miierira: 
fox was observed. 


04 June 1981 





10 June 1981 | Kit fox observed during ground transects, 1030 hours, 
NW/NW Section 20 (T21S, R17E), 5 miles north of Avenal, 


California; entered 8 inch pipe in berm of oil sump. 





07 July 1981 | Kit fox observed near Panoche Road, NE/SW Section 27 
(T15S, R11E) San Benito County, California; entered 


culvert under road, 2020 hours. 









Two kit fox (one pup) at entrance to culvert under 
Panoche Road, NW Section 35 (T15S, R11E) San Benito 
County, California, 0700 hours. 





Pe Juiy wor 






D-4 


DISTRIBUTION 


U.S. Department of Energy, 
Office of Environment, 


Washington, Dale 


Woo USbUTT Sr. 


USDOE, Office of Naval Petroleum 
and Oil Shale Reserves, 


Washington, D.C. 


G.R. Gilmore 
D. Silawsky 


USDOE, Naval Petroleum Reserves 
in California, 


Tupman, California 
S. Helton 
J. Lagler 


USDOE, Nevada Operations Office, 
Las Vegas, Nevada 


BW Church 

P.B. Dunaway 

W. Howard 

gama MuMpnrey:, eT. 
J.A. Koch 

D.A. Nowack 

J. Newlin 


USDOE, San Francisco Operations 
Office, Oakland, California 


R. Brechbill 


USDOE, Technical Information 


Office, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 
UC-11 Category (233) 


U.S. Department of the Interior, 
Bureau of Land Management, 
Bakersfield, California 


B. Bowen 
M. Ferguson 


USDI, BLM, Hollister, California 


S. Florence 
DF, Johnson 


USDI, BLM, Riverside, California 


KiHesBerry 
L. Foreman 


USDI, BLM, Sacramento, California 


J.R. Boggs 
R.R. Olendorff 
T. Rado 

R. Taylor 


USDI, BLM, Washington, D.C. 
J. Crawford 


USDI, Bureau of Reclamation, 


Sacramento, California 
GC. Lone 


USDI, Fish and Wildlife Service, 
Kern NWR, Delano, California 


M. Phillips 


USDI, FWS,.Port land, Oregon 


R.K. Martinson 


USDI, FWS, Sacramento, California 


C. Benz 
R.G. Swanson 
R. Thompson 


USDI, FWS, Washington, D.C. 
Gy Remegad) teri, 


D. James 
J. Spinks 


USDI, FWS, Endangered Species 
Technical Bulletin, 


Washington, D.C. 


C. Senecal 


U.S. Department of the Navy, 
Western Division, 
San Bruno, California 


M.C. Stroud 
P.S. Worthing 


State of California, Department 
of Fish and Game, 
Fresno, California 


D. Christenson 
Ey (Smith 


State of California, Department 
of Fish and Game, 
Rancho Cordova, California 


J.M. Brode 


State of California, Department 
of Fish and Game, 
Sacramento, California 


J.R. Gustafson 


Office of Federal: Inspector ; 


San Francisco, California 


R.T. Russell 


The Nature Conservency, 
California Natural Diversity 


Data Base, Sacramento, California 


Bee Csuty 


Naval Petroleum Reserve #1, 
Williams Brothers Engineering 


Company, Tupman, California 
R.L. Norland 


California 


Santa Barbara Museum of Natural 


History, Santa Barbara, California 
P.We Coliyns 


California Polytechnic State 
University, San Luis Obispo, 


A. Roest 


California State University, 


Bakersfield, California 


D. Hinds 


Clovis, California 


J.C. Lorenzana 


San Francsico, California 


S. Morrell 


Santa Barbara, California 


R. Mullen 


Las Vegas, Nevada 
P. Medica 


Grantsville, Utah 
H..J, Eeoscue 


EG&G, Santa Barbara Operations 
H.M. Borella 
Bei Gor tins 
B. Evans ; 
J.W. Gehring 
D.B. Hardenbrook 
R. Horwitz 
Ta, Katov{S) 

P. McCue (5) 

J.S. McManus 

DL. Mitchell 

PGs Muick 

T.P. O'Farrell (10) 
M.L. Sauls 

Library 
Publications (2) 


Sa 


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2, Pines 
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Form 1279~3 
(June 1984) BORROWER’S CARD 








‘es 


OL. 8&4 .032 «.2 
O'Farrell, Thomas Pp, 
Potential of BLM lands in 
western Fresrim and eastern 


BORROWER OFFICE 


(Continued on reverse) 








DATE 
RETURNED 





DATE 
LOANED 





USDI — BLM 








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