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Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2012 with funding from 
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http://archive.org/details/pickout1941 lowe 


1941 



PICKOUT 



PUBLISHED 


BY 


THE 


SENIOR CLASS 


THE 



PICKOUT 


VOLUME XXXVI 


OF LOWELL TEXTILE INSTITUTE 


Presenting ... 


Presenting the 1941 Pickout. . .Today 
it is yours. Yesterday it was ours — ours 
to sweat over, to sleep with and play 
with, to swear at and laugh at . . . ours to 
fashion into a thing of life. We have en- 
deavored to present through the medi- 
um of print and picture the accumula- 
tion of events and activities that com- 
prised life at Textile during the school 
year 1940-41. We have done our best, 
hoping that this book will live for you as 
a memento of those years. . . . 



... Containing 


In Part One — we extend our apprecia- 
tion for the guidance of our FACULTY 
. . . Part Two — we dedicate to those 
SENIORS with whom we have gone 
through Textile. .. Part Three— to 
those members of the lower CLASSES 
...Part Four — to the days given to 
the various school ACTIVITIES. . . 
Part Five — to the SOCIETIES which 
have provided for a good part of our 
social life . . . Part Six — to those who 
represent Textile in the field of SPORTS 
. . .and Part Seven — to a DIRECT- 
ORY which includes the names of all 
those now at school. 


TO THE MEMORY OF 


ARTHUR ANDREW ARCHIBALD STEWART 

Who for more than four decades was an integral part of Textile, this thirty- 
sixth edition of the Pickout is respectfully dedicated. None who knew him, 
could but respect him. His tasks were many; his successes were of equal num- 
ber. His extensive knowledge of finishing, his genuine interest in human prob- 
lems, and his fine inspiration as a man have won him an undying remem- 


brance in the hearts of all whom he met. 



1874 - I 94 ° 






FACULTY 





I 


SpRING shades into Summer as the seniors are visualizing their entry into 
active industrial life. To each the four years have passed very quickly and 
each one senses that the weeks remaining before Commencement will pass 
even more quickly because the time for completing the work will be fully 
taken. It is generally admitted that when one is actively engaged in his work 
the days and the hours pass almost unnoticed in the satisfaction of accomplished 
tasks. 

It is the wish of the president, faculty, and instructing staff that the many 
years following Commencement will be as happy and successful for the Class 
of 1941 as the past four years have been. 




t 


• • 




. Goodbye 9 Mr. Chips” 



EDGAR H. BARKER 


A LL of those who are or have been connected with Textile will mourn the 
1 *Tact that, when the bell for the opening of classes next September sounds, Pro- 
fessor Edgar H. Barker will no longer be with us in an active capacity. After 
over forty years at Textile, first as an instructor, and then as head of the Wool 
department, he will soon stand before a class for the last time, and bewilder 
them with rapid fire conversation and sparkling wit. 

Hardly need it be said to any of Professor Barker’s friends that he was born in 
Lawrence, Massachusetts, and that after attending the Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology, came to us in 1901. In those forty years, he has become an 
institution in himself. There are but few traditions at Textile, and Professor 
Barker is one of them. None who have ever known him will ever forget his fine 
sense of humor, his patient understanding, and his all-inclusive lectures in 
“textile testing” and “technology of wool manufacture.” 

Goodbye, Mr. Chips. We hate to see you go. 


THE 1941 


[12] 



Administration 


RUTH FOOTE, A.B., S.B. 

Registrar 

A.B., Boston University, 1910; S.B., Simmons College, 1913 
At Textile since 1923. 




WALTER BALLARD HOLT 
Bookkeeper , Bursar 


At Textile since 1906. 


FLORENCE MOORE LANCEY 
Librarian 

HELEN GRAY FLACK, S.B. 
Secretary 

MONA BLANCHE PALMER 
Clerk 

MIRIAM KAPLAN HOFFMAN, S.B. 
Clerk 


[13] 


P I C K O U T 



Department Heads 


LOUIS A. OLNEY, B.S., M.S., D.Sc. 

Professor in charge of Chemistry and Dyeing Departments 

Lehigh University, 1896. 

Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of 
Science; Directing Editor of the American Dyestuff Reporter; President 
of the Stirling Mills; Vice-president and Director of the United 
States Institute for Textile Research; Past President and Chairman 
of the Research Committee of the American Association of Textile 
Chemists and Colorists; Charter Member of the American Institute 
of Chemical Engineers; Past President and Councillor of the New 
England Section of the American Chemical Society; Associate Editor 
of the Abstract Journal of the American Chemical Society; Member of the 
Society of Chemical Industries, and Society of Dyers and Colorists. 

At Textile since i 8 gj. 




HERBERT J. BALL, B.S., B.C.S. 

Professor in charge of the Department of Textile Engineering and Accountancy 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1906; Northeastern Uni- 
versity of Professional Accountancy, 1916. 

Vice-President of the American Society for Testing Materials, and 
Chairman of Committee D-13 on textile materials; Member of the 
American Society of Mechanical Engineers; Member of the Textile 
Institute. 

At Textile since igo 6 . 


HERMAN H. BACHMANN 

Professor in charge of the Department of Textile Design and Power Weaving 

Textile School at Gera, R.J.L., Germany. 

Studied under Gustave Weise,' Gera, Germany. 

Parkhill Manufacturing Company, Fitchburg, Mass.; Boston But- 
ton Company, Boston, Mass.; Lorraine Manufacturing Company, 
Pawtucket, R. I.; Smith Webbing Company, Pawtucket, R. I.; 
Fitchburg Worsted Company, Fitchburg, Mass. 

At Textile since igio. 



[Hi 


THE 1941 





LESTER H. CUSHING, A.B., Ed.M. 

Professor in charge of the Department of Languages , History , Economics , and 

Physical Education 

Harvard University, 1911, 1925. 

Faculty Director of Athletics; and Secretary to the Faculty. 

At Textile since igu . 


GILBERT R. MERRILL, B.T.E. 

Professor in charge of the Department of Cotton Tarns 
Lowell Textile Institute, 1919. 

Member of the National Association of Cotton Manufacturers; 
Merrimac Manufacturing Company, and Hamilton Manufacturing 
Company; Special Expert to U.S. Tariff Commission; Secretary of 
Tau Epsilon Sigma. 

At Textile since igig- 




CORNELIUS L. GLEN 

Professor in charge of the Department of Finishing 

Dunnell Manufacturing Company, Pawtucket, R. I.; United 
States Finishing Company, Pawtucket, R. I.; O’Bannon Corpora- 
tion, West Barrington, R. I. 

At Textile since igi6 . 


[ 15] 


PICKOU T 




Faculty 


STEWART MacKAY 
Assistant Professor of Textile Design 
Lowell Textile Institute, 1907. 

At Textile since igo$. 


JOHN CHARLES LOWE, M.S. 
Assistant Professor of Textiles 
Lowell Textile Institute, (B.T.E.) 1934, 1940. 
At Textile since igu. 


JAMES HARRINGTON KENNEDY, JR., M.S. 
Assistant Professor of Textiles 
Lowell Textile Institute, (B.T.E.) 1937, 1940. 

At Textile since 1925* 


RUSSELL LEE BROWN, M.S. 
Assistant Professor of Textiles 
Lowell Textile Institute (B.T.E.) 1921, 1940. 

At Textile since 1929 . 




THE 1941 


[16] 





MARTIN JOHN HOELLRICH 

Assistant Professor of Weaving 

Textile School, Reichenbach, Germany, Lowell Textile Institute, 
1910. 

At Textile since 1916 . 




HAROLD CANNING CHAPIN, Ph.D. 
Assistant Professor of General Chemistry 
Harvard University, (A.B.) 1904, 1910. 

At Textile since 1920. 


ELMER EDWARD FICKETT, B.S. 
Assistant Professor of Analytical Chemistry 
Tufts College, 1908. 

At Textile since 1918. 



CHARLES LINCOLN HOWARTH, B.T.C. 
Assistant Professor of Dyeing 
Lowell Textile Institute, 1917. 

At Textile since 1921 . 


[17] 


P I C K O U T 






JOHN HENRY SKINKLE, B.S. 
Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1924. 

At Textile since 192J. 



HARRY CHAMBERLAIN BROWN, S.B. 
Assistant Professor of Physics and Mathematics 
Brown University, 1913. 

At Textile since 1919 . 



HORTON BROWN, B.S. 
Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering 
Tufts College, 1917. 

At Textile since 1930. 



JAMES GUTHRIE DOW, A.B. 
Assistant Professor of English 
Boston University, 1919. 

At Textile since 1919 . 



THE 1941 


[18] 




A. EDWIN WELLS, M.Ed. 

Assistant Professor in Mechanical Engineering 
Lowell Textile Institute, (B.T.E.) 1920; Boston University, 1937. 
At Textile since 1920. 


CHARLES FREDERICK EDLUND, Ed.M. 

Assistant Professor of Sales Engineering 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (S.B.) 1930; Harvard Uni 
versity, 1937. 

At Textile since 1930. 


ALBERT GREAVES SUGDEN 
Instructor in Weaving 
Lowell Textile Institute (Evening), 1912. 

At Textile since 1919 . 


ARTHUR JOSEPH WOODBURY 
Instructor in Cotton Tarns 
Lowell Textile Institute (Evening), 1924. 

At Textile since 1919 . 


[19] 





P ICKOUT 






RUSSELL METCALF FOX 
Instructor in Textile Design 
Lowell Textile Institute (Evening), 1922. 

At Textile since ig2i. 




CHARLES ARTHUR EVERETT, B.T.C. 
Instructor in Dyeing 
Lowell Textile Institute, 1919. 

At Textile since ig22. 


WILLIAM GEORGE CHACE, Ph.B. 
Instructor in Chemistry 
Brown University, 1926. 

At Textile since ig 26 . 


JOHN LESLIE MERRILL, B.T.E. 
Instructor in Weaving 
Lowell Textile Institute, 1927. 

At Textile since ig2j . 



T HE 19 41 


f20] 




FRANZ EVRON BAKER, B.T.E. 
Instructor in Knitting and Cotton Tarns 
Lowell Textile Institute, 1926. 

At Textile since 1929 . 




CHARLES HARRISON JACK 
Instructor in Machine Shop Practice 
Lowell Textile Institute (Evening), 1917. 

A t T ext He since 1911 . 


MILTON HINDLE, B.T.E. 
Instructor in Mechanical Drawing 
Lowell Textile Institute, 1925. 

At Textile since 1930. 



JOHN LAHIFF DOLAN, A.B. 
Instructor in Mathematics and Physics 
Boston College, 1929. 

At Textile since 1938 . 


[ 21 ] 


P I C K O U T 




CHARLES JOHN SCULLY, A.B. 
Instructor in Mathematics 

Villanova, 1930. 

At Textile since 1938. 



CHARLES LINCOLN DALEY, B.T.C. 
Instructor in Chemistry 
Lowell Textile Institute, 1934. 

At Textile since 1938 . 


PAUL CHARLES PANAGIOTAKOS, Ph.D. 
Instructor in Organic Chemistry 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (S.B.), 1935, 1938. 
At Textile since 1939 . 


CARL ARTHUR CARLSON, B.S. 
Instructor in Textile Engineering Department 
Tufts College, 1938. 

At Textile since 1938. 



[22] 


THE 1941 


VITTORIA ROSATTO, B.S. 
Instructor in Textile Design Department 
Massachusetts School of Art, 1931. 

At Textile since 1930. 




WALDO WARD YARNALL, B.S. 
Instructor in Physical Education 
University of Vermont, 1926. 

At Textile since 192J . 


WINFRED S. NOWELL, B.M.E. 
Instructor in Finishing Department 
Northeastern University, 1931. 

At Textile since 1940. 


ELMER PERCY TREVORS 

Assistant Instructor in Chemistry 

PAUL DAVID PETTERSON 

Assistant Instructor in Machine Shop 

ERNEST JAMES 

Assistant Instructor in Chemistry 

NEIL MANNING 

Assistant Instructor in Chemistry 

ROBERT DANA CARMICHAEL 

Assistant Instructor in Mechanical Drawing 

RALPH PEABODY WEBB 

Assistant Instructor in Cotton Tarns 


[23] 


PICKOU T 



In Memoriam 


WILLIAM GINIVAN 
i9 l8 - ! 94 0 




SENIORS 


Class of 1941 


W HEN the race is run, when a part of 
life is over, there is no more to do 
but to look back, in order that we may 
live again in our memories those occur- 
rences that were our lives at Textile. 

In our first year, all of us looked ahead 
to the time when we would be Seniors, 
that coveted goal which seemed to be in 
the dim, dark, future. How we envied 
those who were Seniors then, as they 
talked of theses, or commencement activi- 
ties, or how to plan the Pickout. How we 
regarded them as distinctly above us- 
as the near great. But now it is tomorrow, 
now we are they, and now we feel as they 
did not a bit different than when we or 
they were Freshmen. And yet our lives at 
Textile are over. Looking ahead four 
years seemed forever; looking back it was 
“only yesterday.” Time for us has gone 
quickly or slowly depending on the per- 
sonal traits or thoughts of each of us, sim- 
ply because time in a person’s mind is but 
relative to his thoughts of it, whether 
his thinking be conscious or subconscious. 

In our mind’s eye we see again, our 
orientation period as Freshmen. We re- 
member the mental examinations, the 
color blind test, and the physical examin- 
ation, in the course of which, we were 
weighed in for our four year fight. Then 
came the awful waiting for the dread 
Sophomores who would “get us” on 
Monday. When they did “get us” we 
remember running to the town hall with 
our pants legs rolled up, taking off our 
shoes, and using them to decorate the 
monument, while we were forced through 
various antics, during which the mayor 
poured water on the head of one of our 
speechmakers. 


How well we remember wondering 
what to do with ourselves over that first 
weekend in a new place where we knew 
no one. The result was an excellent op- 
portunity to become acquainted with one 
another. 

Soon after, we had the pleasure of 
beating the Sophomores on Field Day, 
in a very vigorous game which featured 
Okun’s vicious tackle and a loss of trousers 
to one of the Sophomore players. Where- 
with, twenty-one men grouped around 
while the gentleman put his “pants” 
back on. 

One fine moonlight night equipped 
with chalk, brushes, and red and black 
paint, we carefully marked and then 
painted an imposing “’41” in the shadow 
of the archway. The next morning we 
quivered in our boots when one professor 
said, “Someone will pay for this.” 

When our first five week marks came 
out back in October 1937, many a teacher 
was of the opinion that this class was the 
poorest in “this or that,” that he had 
ever seen. After four years however, we 
overhear much more “complimentary” 
remarks. Now when our scholastic ability 
is questioned, we are able to say that our 
record has been good, and back up our 
statement by “pointing with pride” to 
those class members who have made 
Tau Epsilon Sigma, the honorary society. 

Several activities have been repeated 
each year; so that as we look back the 
happenings of each year blend into one 
another in such a way that in the haze of 
time we lose the detail that enables us to 
separate each year into those activities 
which are distinctly its own. Thus, while 
several features of our Freshman Year 
stand out because of the natural strength 
of first impressions, much of this same 
clarity in remembrance is lost in the other 
years, although individual chronologicallv 
unplaceable happenings still remain to 
remind us of other pleasant times. 


THE 1941 


[ 26] 


Frederick Mason 


Abraham Grondin 


Charlotte Rich 


George McTeague 


Thus we reminisce, and as we do so, 
we remember that each year one of our 
greatest enjoyments was Upstream Day. 
Our mind, again pleasantly doing the 
usual trick scrambling up the order of 
events, causes this day to become not one 
to be remembered in four parts but rather 
as one enjoyable day — a few hours of 
which belongs to each of four years. We 
were introduced to Upstream Day as 
Freshmen, then it had to be sold to us, 
but after once going it was we ourselves 
who were selling it to the Freshmen who 
followed us. Upstream will always be 
one of our most pleasant memories of 
Textile. 

In our years here, those of us with his- 
trionic ability have done our best to make 
the presentation of the Textile Show each 
year as good as possible. As every show 
must have an audience, those of us who 
have not participated have given our 
support by our attendance each year. The 
show has always been for many the big 
social activity of the year to which we 
have been proud to bring our “favorite 
companions.” It was these activities 
which lightened our more serious moments 
and enabled us to take the hurdles in full 
stride- or at least to ride with the punches. 
Being a very honest class we will admit 
that we have always looked forward to 
vacations, and one of our first moves on 


returning from one vacation was to refer 
to the bulletin and to mark our calendar 
to indicate where the next vacation 
started. After June has come and gone, 
most of us will no longer bother to mark 
vacations for they will be too few. This 
June we are not looking forward to vaca- 
tion but to getting ourselves jobs — to 
continue toward the goal that began with 
enrollment at Textile in 1937. We have 
tried to do our part socially and have at- 
tempted to give Textile at least its share 
of school spirit and tradition. 

It is our hope that other classes will work 
internally within themselves, and external- 
ly with others in carrying on the work of 
developing at Textile a bit more of this 
spirit and cooperation. 

Any rereading of this, can not help but 
conjure in the individual reader’s mind 
those happenings which were peculiar to 
him and to him alone during his college 
days. Perhaps more than anything this is 
the most important because it is an indi- 
vidual rather than a collective outlook 
that is the determining factor in the at- 
taining of personal success. 

So have come and gone our lives here 
and now it is over, next year another class 
will do all the planning that we thought 
was ours alone and to us Textile will be 
these reflections that have in part been 
expressed here. 


[27] 


PICKOUT 


DONALD MILES ADIE 



AK 4 >; TES 

VI-W; Engineering Society; Interfraternity Council; Inter- 
fraternity Bowling; Class Football i, 2. 


GERARD ALEXANDER 

on 

VI-G; Engineering Society; Senior Executive Committee; 
Commencement Committee; Football 1, 2. 


BEN PITMAN BATCHELLER 

VI-W; Golf Team 2, 3, 4; Captain 2, Manager 3. 


THADDEUS BARDZIK 
AK 4 > 

IV; A.A.T.C.C.; Class Basketball 2, 3. 


THE 1941 


[ 28 j 




NEEDHAM BALLOU BROWN, JR. 

<j>iF 

VI-W; Engineering Society; Golf Team 2, 3, 4; Class Marshal. 


LIEUTENANT ROY G. BUCK 
VI; B.S. U.S. Naval Academy, 1933; A.A.T.C.C. 


JOHN DUNCAN CAMPBELL 

on 

II; Football 1, 2; Baseball 1, 2, 3; Interfraternity Council 3; 
Interfraternity Bowling 1,2; Commencement Committee. 


[29] 


PICKOU T 


ROBERT DANA CARMICHAEL 



on 

VI-G; Executive Committee; Assistant Instructor in Mechani- 
cal Drawing. 



CAPTAIN HARLAN C. COOPER 
VI; B.S. U.S. Naval Academy, 1931. 


GEORGES EDWARD CORDEAU 
AK4> 

IV; Football 1, 2, 3; Co-captain 4. 



L 30] 


T IIE 19 4 1 


RUDOLPH CARL DICK, JR. 
<t>*F 




EDWARD JOSEPH EPSTEIN 
AE; TEE 

IV; A.A.T.C.C.; Interfraternity Basketball 2, 3; Interfra- 
ternity Softball 2,3,4. 



SIDNEY WILFRED FACTOR 
IV; Rifle Team 2; Glee Club 2, 3. 


[3i] 


PICKOUT 


ROBERT WILLIAM FEAD 

cj>ip 

III; Golf Team i, 2, 3; Interfraternity Council 3. 


SAUNDER FINARD 
AE; TEH 

IV; Textile Players 1, 2, 3, President 4; A.A.T.C.C.; Athletic 
Association 4; Glee Club 2. 


STANLEY ARTHUR GARNETT 

on 

II; Pickout 3; Interfraternity Council, President 3; Text 1, 2; 
Class Football 1, 2; Commencement Committee; Senior Ex- 
ecutive Council. 


MATTHEW GASS 

IV; Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Basketball 1, 2, 3, Co-Captain 4; Ath- 
letic Association, President 4. 




THE 1941 


[32] 


STEPHEN ARISTOPHANES GATZIMOS 


IV; Rifle Club i. 


AK <S>; TKl 



BERNARD SAUL GREENBAUM 
IV; Class Basketball 2; Class Football 1, 2. 




ABRAHAM HECTOR GRONDIN 
AK 4 >; TE 2 

IV; Class Vice-President 2, 3, 4; President’s Cabinet 3, 4; 
Football 1, 2, 3, 4; A.A.T.C.C.; Interfraternity Bowling 2, 3, 
4; Interfraternity Basketball 1, 2, 3; Athletic Association 4. 


DONALD WILLIAM GUILFOYLE 
VI; Engineering Society; Senior Ring Committee. 


[ 33 1 


PICKOU T 


ARTHUR THEODORE HAMILTON 



on 

IV; Pickout 3; A.A.T.C.C.; Interfraternity Basketball 1, 2, 
3, 4; Interfraternity Bowling 2, 3; Interfraternity Baseball 3. 



GEORGE STEPHEN HIGGINBOTTOM 
AK<f> 

IV; Interfraternity Bowling 4; A.A.T.C.C.; Class Football 1; 
Glee Club 1 . 


NORMAN ALFRED INKPEN 
On; TES 

IV; Chairman Commencement Committee. 



ERNEST PETER JAMES 
TES 

IV; A.A.T.G.C.; Text, Associate Editor 3; Assistant Instructor 
in Quantitative Analysis. 



T HE 19 4 1 


[ 34 J 


JOSHUA DANIEL JAY 
VI-S; Pickout 3, 4; Football 1 ; Engineering Society. 



MAJOR CHARLES A. JONES 

VI; M.S. University of Wisconsin, 1927; B.S. Virginia Mili- 
tary Institute 1919. 





L 35 ] 


P 1 C K O U 1 


CHARLES STANLEY KOULAS 

AK<J> 

IV; A.A.T.C.C.; Football 3; Baseball Manager 3; Interfra- 
ternity Bowling 3, 4. 


JOSEPH JAMES LANE, II 

on 

VI-S; Engineering Society; Interfraternity Basketball 2, 3, 4; 
Commencement Committee; Interfraternity Bowling 2, 3; 
Interfraternity Baseball 3; Class Basketball 1. 


HAROLD LANDFIELD 
AE 

IV; In ter fraternity Bowling 3, 4. 


DOROTHY ELAINE LEWIS 
Phlame; TEL 

VI-D; Pickout 1, 2, 3, 4; Engineering Society; Commence 
ment Committee. 





T HE 19 41 


1 36 1 


LEO LINDEN 
AE; TE 2 

VI-G; Engineering Society; Interfraternity Basketball i, 2, 3, 4. 




JOSEPH JUSTIN McMAHON 
AK<f> 


LESTER ALLEN MACKTEZ 
AE 

II; Pickout 2, 3; Rifle Club 1; Text 1, 2, Editor 3; Football 
Assistant Manager 2, Manager 3; Basketball Assistant Man- 
ager 2, Manager 3; Textile Players 2, 3; Athletic Association 4. 


i 

i 



GEORGE DAVID McTEAGUE 

IV; Football 1, 2, 3, 4; A.A.T.C.C.; Program Committee 3, 
Chairman 4; Class Treasurer 4; Chairman Senior Ring Com- 
mittee; Commencement Committee; Student Council. 


\ 


[ 37 ] 


PICKOUT 



FRANCIS VINCENT MAHONEY JR. 
TEN 


IV; Baseball i, 3, 4. 



FREDERICK RUFUS MASON 
On; TEE 

VI-G; Class President 1, 3, 4; Engineering Society; Textile 
Cabinet 3, 4; Athletic Association 1, 3, 4; Coop 2, 3, Manager 
4- 


MAURICE MILBERG 

VI-S; Pickout 3; Engineering Society; Rifle Club 1. 



IRVING PAUL MINTZ 
AE; TEE 

Pickout 1, 2, 3, Editor 4; Text 1, 2, 3; Textile Players 3, 4; 
A.A.T.C.C.; Athletic Association 4. 



L 3« J 


T H E 19 4 1 


FRANCIS ARTHUR MURPHY 
AK<I>; TEIC 

IV; Class Vice-President i ; Golf Team 2, 3, 4. 





DAVID PERNICK 
TEY 

VI-G; Basketball 1, 2, 4, Captain 3; Executive Council 3; 
Engineering Society. 


[ 39 1 


PICKOU T 




MAURICE GORDON PHILLIPS 
TES 

VI-D; Pickout i, 3, Business Manager 4; Executive Council 
1 , 2 ; Engineering Society; Glee Club 1,3. 


WALTER WALLACE PLATT 


IV; A.A.T.C.C. 


4>'F 


JOSE LUIS PORTILLA 
VI-G; Engineering Society. 



[ 4° J 


THE 1941 


SALVATORE JOSEPH PULIAFICO 
AK 3 >; TEH 

IV; Executive Council 3, 4; A.A.T.C.C., Secretary 4; Inter- 
fraternity Bowling 1, 2, 3, 4; Interfraternity Softball 2, 3, 4. 


BERNARD RASHKIN 
TEH 

VI-G; Pickout 4; Text 1; Engineering Society. 




CHARLOTTE MERLINE RICH 
Phlame; TEH 

IV; Pickout i, 2, 3, 4; A.A.T.C.C.; Commencement Com- 
mittee; Class Secretary 2, 3, 4; Rifle Team 1, 2, 3, 4; Text 
1, 2, 3, 4; Student Council. 


ANGUS HENRY ROBERTS 

on 

IV; A.A.T.C.C.; Football 1,2; Basketball 1. 


[41 ] 


PICKOU T 



SIDNEY IRVING SALTSMAN 
AE; TEE 

IV; Interfraternity Council 3; A.A.T.C.C.; Basketball 2; 
Interfraternity Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Interfraternity Bowling 
1, 2, 3, 4; Interfraternity Softball 1, 2, 3, 4. 


HARRY GEORGE SCARMEAS 


AIv<J> 


IV; Basketball 1, 2. 


LATHROPE A. SCHIFFER 
AE 

VI-D; Engineering Society; A.A.T.C.C.; Interfraternity 
Basketball 2. 


HENRY ANTHONY SINSKI 
T l F 

VI-S; Football 2, 3, Captain 4; Executive Council 4; Engin- 
eering Society. 





THE 1941 


[ 42 ] 



PAUL JOHN SULLIVAN 
AK4> 

IV; Pickout 2, 3, 4; Class President 2; Interfraternity Council 
2; Executive Council 2. 




FRANK JOHN SZYMOSEK 
<S>W 


IV; A.A.T.C.C. 



JORDAN ALVIN TARTIKOFF 
VI-G; Engineering Society; Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4. 


[ 43 ] 


PICKOUT 


GEORGE ROBERT TURNER 



4>T 

IV; A.A.T.C.C.; Textile Players 4; Baseball 2; Commence- 
ment Committee; Glee Club 2, 3. 



JOSE VIA GARI 

VI-C; Engineering Society, Chairman 4. 



RALPH PEABODY WEBB 

on 

VI-G; Assistant Instructor in Cotton Yarns; Engineering 
Society. 



TIIE 19 4 1 


[ 44 ] 


CLARENCE BERNARD WEIL 
AE; TE 2 


IV; Textile Players 3, 4; Text 1, 2, 3; Public Speaking Club 1. 


IRVING J. WOLF 
AE 

VI-G; Pickout 1, 3; Engineering Society; Football 1; Inter- 
fraternity Basketball 1, 2, 3. 




ALICE MARJORIE WOODARD 
Phlame 

VI-D; Pickout 4; Text 1, 2; Engineering Society; Textile 
Quartet 1 ; Commencement Committee. 



RALPH JOHN ZELLWEGER 

VI-D; Interfraternity Council 3, 4; Engineering Society; 
Football 1, 2, 3; Basketball 1; Interfraternity Bowling 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Interfraternity Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Interfraternity Softball 
i,2, 3, 4. 


[ 45 ] 


PICKOUT 


Frosh-Soph Football 

W EDNESDAY, October 23, was the 
day scheduled for the traditional 
bout between the Freshmen and Sopho- 
mores to determine whether the Sophs 
should continue their “tyrannical” sway 
or whether the Frosh should be forever 
free of their “oppression.” The day 
dawned crisp and clear — a perfect foot- 
ball day. Throughout the morning, in the 
classes, in the corridors, in the lunch- 
room, and in fact everywhere around 
school, over-confident Sophomores could 
be heard discussing the probable outcome 
of the afternoon’s game with equally 
overconfident Freshmen. Players were 
excused from afternoon classes, and school 
was dismissed promptly at 2:15. 

At 2:30 sharp, the whistle blew and 
Silk kicked off for the Frosh. The all-im- 
portant contest was on. Sophomore Cap- 
tain Murray took the ball on his own 15- 
yard line, and was fiercely tackled by a 
horde of bloodthirsty Freshmen. After 
several line plays and an incomplete pass 
failed to gain, Allard punted. Payelian 
took the ball on the Frosh 30, and re- 
turned it to the 45. Two first downs and a 
15-yard penalty against the Sophomores 
for holding, brought the Freshmen to the 
Sophomore 24. It looked as though the 
Freshmen had begun to move. However, 
at this point an “inconsiderate” fumble 
halted the threat to the Sophomore goal. 
For the next 12 minutes, play see-sawed 
back and forth, mostly in Sophomore 
territory. Late in the second period, the 
Frosh again began to threaten. Starting 
on their own 24, they marched to the 
Soph 32, where an attempted aerial- 
Silk to Godet, backfired with Murray in- 
tercepting, and running the ball back to 
the Frosh 16, where he was finally hauled 
down from behind by Quinn and Dono- 
hoe. A five-yard penalty for offside, and a 
first down, brought the ball to the 5-yard 


line. At this point, the gun sounded the 
end of the first half, and the Sophomore 
threat was halted. 

After a well-earned and much needed 
rest, the second half began. Although 
they were outweighed man for man, the 
Freshman line opened up many holes for 
its hard driving backs, and knocked at the 
Sophomore door a good many times dur- 
ing the two latter periods of the game. In 
the third quarter, after an exchange of 
kicks and a 30-yard march, the Freshmen 
missed a splendid scoring chance, when a 
sleeper failed to click. In the fourth period, 
Silk faded back and threw a long and 
beautiful pass to Quinn in the end zone, 
which bobbled on his fingers for a seeming 
eternity and then fell harmlessly to the 
ground. Finally, with about two minutes 
of playing time remaining in the game, 
the Frosh right guard and tackle broke 
through to block a Sophomore punt, 
which was then recovered for the Fresh- 
men by Stromvall on the Sophomore 20- 
yard line. Several off tackle smashes with 
Donohoe and Abrahms carrying the 
ball, brought it to the Soph 4-yard stripe. 
After two unsuccessful attempts, to make 
a score, Abrahms took the ball on the 
third down and crashed over for the sole 
and winning touchdown of the game. The 
attempt to convert failed, and the final 
gun sounded almost immediately follow- 
ing this attempt, to give the game to the 
Freshmen, 6-0. 

The game was hard fought all of the 
way, with the extra poundage of the 
Sophomore team a decided advantage. 
Captain Murray and Allard played par- 
ticularly well for the Sophomores, as 
did A 1 Messer. The credit for the Fresh- 
man win goes to the hard driving of their 
line from tackle to tackle, and to the run- 
ning of Payelian and Abrahms. With 
this victory under their belts, the Frosh 
were then forever free of the oppression 
of their “overbearing” masters, the inevi- 
table Sophomores. 



CLASSES 



Class of 1942 

A S is almost traditional in a Textile 
Class, the class of 1942 returned to 
Textile in the fall of 1940 with their num- 
ber lessened, and in fact but a shadow of 
their former selves — in size, anyway. 

This was the year of P Chem, Woolen 
and Worsted Finishing, Worsted Lab, 
Heat, Electricity, Organic Chemistry, 
and many more equally awesome things 
that would have struck terror into the 
hearts of men who had not already been 
through two years of Textile. . . . 

And now it is June, — that year is past, 
and for the most part all of us are beyond 
what were the nightmares of September. 
The few exceptions to the “are beyond” 
are those exceptions who must inevi- 
tably prove the rule. As is equally inevi- 
table, our minds on these warm and sultry 
nights wander . . . wander to those days 
that are now behind us ... . 

It is again September, 1938. One hund- 


red gun shy Freshmen moved hesitatingly 
into the forbidding portals of Southwick 
Hall. The Sophs, our traditional enemies 
had not arrived, and the only thing to con- 
fuse and bewilder us were the intricacies 
of orientation. Descriptions of classes, 
activities, professors, pictures, examina- 
tions, placement tests, etc. etc The 

Sophs arrived all too soon. We were put 
through the rigors of hazing, and the ban- 
quet and smoker followed in rapid succes- 
sion. Then Field Day was upon us and in 
the contests, we demonstrated our might 
and our determination to stay on top. 
Fraternity bids were issued in late Octo- 
ber, and with them the smokers, dinners, 
dances, and parties which are So insep- 
arably linked with those days. 

The winter of ’38 and ’39 was a myriad 
of snows, cold, English, and Mechanism. 
Spring came with the respite that it af- 
fords before the final stretch. And then 
Upstream, the Textile Show, exams, and 
home again — no longer Freshmen, but 
now the orphans of college, the Sopho- 


Back Row: Noonan, Baer, Armstrong, Sanford, Hornung, Pettengill, Cryan, Smith, Mandikos 

Third Row: Wolf, Schiller, Moreau, Eichner, Roumas, Rawlinson, Murphy, Sandner, Harper 

Second Row: Magat, Boule, Hunter, Bulson, Rogoff, Caine, Wood, Webster, Oppenheiin. Hamer, McMahon 

Front Row: Kent, Miss Pratt, Lisien, Brook, Szopa, Allard, Shapiro, Staklinski 



THE 1941 


L 48 ] 



George Brook 

mores above the Freshman caste — but 
out of the ken of the Juniors and Seniors. 

With our return to school in September, 
our number had already dwindled 40%, 
and we were now seventy men and a girl. 
We set about our scheduled task of intro- 
ducing the Freshmen to Textile, and put- 
ting them through their paces. However, 
credit must be given where credit is due; 
the Frosh were well organized, and they 
were a determined opposition to the Soph- 
omore will. The keen rivalry that was 
being built up between the classes reached 
its peak with the Field Day Games, in 
which we showed our prowess in true ’42 
style. For the first time in a good many 
years, the Freshmen were prevented from 
painting their numerals in the vicinity 
of the school. Now the hosts, we enter- 
tained our “enemies” and the rest of the 
school as well, at a lavish banquet and 
smoker which was minus the fury of the 
elements that accompanied our banquet 
the year previous, in the form of a hurri- 
cane — which has escaped me until now. 

We have now but one year to go before 
we will attain the enviable position of 
those who are a year ahead of us — the 
Seniors; then we will have the dubious 
honor of spending hour and hour on end 
in laboratories, with options, thesis, and 
cuts, an integral part of our being. 

As is the lot of almost every third year 
man, we were not without the inevitable 


Ernest Allard 

woolen and worsted finishing, its routines, 
and inimitable “Doc” Glen; as third year 
engineers, we spent our every waking 
hour writing lab reports, and trying to 
solve the eternal Textile mystery of the 
French Comb; we listened with “awe” 
to the lectures of Prof. Cushing on the 
wonders of economics, and followed 
“Doc” Chapin in his relentless (and tradi- 
tional source of yearbook copy) pursuit of 
the H ion. The rantings of our beloved 
professor of Organic Chemistry, Dr. “P.C. 
P.” were not spared us — and followed us 
even unto the seclusion of what are tech- 
nically known as German lectures. As all 
Juniors before us, we cut Dye Lab with 
reckless abandon. Those of us who could 
fit — and even some who couldn’t — ex- 
plored the wonders of the boiler much 
to the chagrin of those who had to clean 
the towels on which were vented the rage 
of the explorers. 

Of course, there has been much more; 
it is, however, these things that stand out 
in our minds in June of 1941, and which 
will be as well remembered in June of 
1 961- 

Most of us will return next year — cer- 
tainly not all of us. In September, it will 
seem as an eternity until graduation in 
June we will look back as do all Seniors 
and wonder where the time, not only of 
the Senior year, but of our entire four 
years has gone. 


Stanley Szopa 


[ 49l 


P I C K O U T 


Class of 1943 

O NCE again, the echo of laughter and 
voices was heard beneath the arch- 
way of the Lowell Textile Institute. It 
was September 14, 1940 and once again 
the Class of ’43 was answering the call to 
the colors. It was just a year from the time 
when we as lowly Freshmen — 105 in 
number — first strode through these same 
gates ready to conquer whatever awaited 
us, armed with nothing but a prayer in 
our hearts and the determination to do 
our darndest. Well do we remember the 
mystification that was ours, as Miss 
Foote initiated us into what was to be a 
four-year nightmare of filling out hund- 
reds and hundreds of cards of varied hue 
and description. Next we remember the 
first words of wisdom, dropped from the 
lips of Professor James G. Dow, who was 
to pilot us through the bewildering chan- 
nels of orientation week. As do all Fresh- 
men, we met the heads of the various 


departments and learned “what torture” 
we might expect at their hands. We 
learned also of the extracurricular activi- 
ties which Textile had to offer. 

And now that year has passed. We are 
the Sophomores and they are the Fresh- 
men. We feel vastly superior— with good 
reason — and as do all Sophomore classes 
we let it be known that we were the lords 
and masters of the Freshmen. Whether or 
not we made known our power is a ques- 
tion which can easily be answered by any 
one or more Freshmen. Certain of us were 
a bit too energetic and one Sophomore had 
this indicated to him as he made a three- 
point landing on the top of the lockers— 
all of this, at the hands of some of the more 
rebellious Freshmen. Within the year we 
are glad to say that Larry Hallett has re- 
covered his dignity after that little episode 
down by the bridge. Why Sally? It was 
rather disappointing to see Skinny O’Don- 
nell without the characteristic energy 
that earned him renown as a Freshman. 


Back Row: Spanos, Clark, DeMallie, Griffin, Hollingsworth, Haggerty 

Fourth Row: Kelly, Goldberg, Brillant, Tyrie, Teichner, Hochschild, Coulman, Bullock, Brown 
Third Row: Foster, Hagerty, Roberts, McLean, Allard, Siegel, Kittay, Simon, Schlesinger 
Second Row: Harris, Donnelly, Garnett, Schwartzman, Harrison, Beuter, Petricek, McNellis, Mallon, 
Morel, Korb 

Front Row: Queeny, Miss Davis, Robinson, Miss Keirstead, Rowen, Miss O'Leary, Miss Fox, Murray 



T HE 19 4 1 


[50] 



John Cotton John Robinson 

I guess the most important change that 
has taken place in us in these past twelve 
months is our attitude towards marks. As 
Freshmen we used to worry about those 
inevitable yellow slips that came around 
every five weeks; now they come less often 
and we worry infinitely less about them. 
At a meeting early in the year John Cot- 
ton was elected president of the class. It 
was generally agreed that John was a 
good president, if he only had had a few 
meetings “to preside over.” The only 
trouble with his presidency was that he 
used to get lonesome at all class meetings. 

Both all-college dances received the 
full support of the Sophomore class. As 
you may well remember the first was held 
on December 18 at the Rex Auditorium 
and the second at Southwick Hall on 
March 7. The class of ’43 is well repre- 
sented in all forms of extracurricular 
activities. Herb Pesetzky is still, after two 
seasons on the varsity team, trying to 
figure out how it is possible for one man 
to play all the positions. Mat Kennedy, 
Claude Allard, Jim MacLean, George 
Hochschild, and Maurice Harrison are 
members of the Textile Players and were 
prominently concerned with the annual 
production, Petticoat Fever. 

As we come to the end of our Sopho- 
more year and thus to the half-way mark 
of our careers at Textile, it is altogether 
fitting that we pause for a backward 



Esther Davis Edward Rowen 

glance at what is now history and a for- 
ward glance into what the future may 
hold in store for us. As we look back we 
see that the past two years have gone 
much more quickly than we expected, and 
packed within those twenty-four months 
are happenings, events and occurrences 
which for many of us have formed the 
basic patterns of what may be “our lives 
when we have left Textile and college 
days are a thing of the past.” Certainly 
for most of us they have been years filled 
with memories of hopes and sorrows and 
joys and friendships. With the passing 
of June 1941, the curtain falls on another 
act of our lives. September will bring us 
back to our Junior year. Basically, to be 
sure, it will be a year filled with the 
courses, the events, and the happenings 
which are only too well associated with the 
Junior year at Textile. However, more 
than that, it will be the raising of still 
another curtain on still another act of our 
lives. What lies ahead of us in this act, 
what twists and what turns we can not 
here predict; we can only hope that it 
will be as fruitful as the past two years 
have been. We know that all of us will not 
return — that is a certainty — we do hope 
that those of us who do return will be able 
to join hands and in a fitting manner con- 
tinue to tread the path which has so been 
indelibly marked during the first two 
years of existence of the class of 1943. 


I 5i 1 


P I C K OUT 


Class of 1944 

I T was a memorable day when one hund- 
red and seventeen Freshmen registered 
for service at Textile on September 19, 
1940. This was the greatest mass registra- 
tion in the history of the school. Of course, 
the Sophomore Class wasn’t here yet so 
we had nothing to fear. We found out 
later that they weren’t as bad as the Seniors 
said. In fact, they were really nothing to 
fear. We were ushered through our orien- 
tation period under the careful guidance 
of Professor James G. Dow who explained 
all the “ins” and “outs” to us. During 
this period we heard from the professors 
of the various departments as to the books 
and materials which we would need to 
start our first year. We also got our tradi- 
tional Freshman outfits; red caps and 
black sweaters. 


Our first term started on September 24; 
nothing happened on that day but on the 
day following the “big bad” Sophomores 
finally arrived. It really was a discourag- 
ing sight to us Freshmen. There they 
were, bellowing and ordering the smaller 
of the Freshmen about. It looked as 
though they were afraid to pick on the 
bigger boys. The Freshman Rules came 
out that week, and the Inquisition began. 
Our general thought was, “Can’t the saps 
think of any harder ones?” We were 
ordered to refrain from talking to girls 
while in school, to use the back entrance, 
walk in single files in the halls, address the 
upper classmen as “Sir,” and also to 
learn and to recite the school song. 

During the first week, the fourth annual 
banquet was held in our honor. We were 
lavishly entertained by the upper class- 
men. It was truly a gala affair for us. 


Back Row: Quinn, Berkowitz, Kosowicz, Noyes, Klashman, Jay, Cherenson, Marcus, Kaplan, Strom- 
vall, Kopocinski, Haller, Leitch, Clogston, Barton, Ellis, Gottlieb, Donohoe 
Fourth Row: Murphy, Goldberg, Masse, Weinstein, Costello, Demenie, Rindge, Bell, Bent, Fine, Alperin, 
Helfgott, Hambleton, Richardson, Woitkowski, Abrahms 
Third Row: Spofford, Malcolm, Marinopoulas, Payelian, Fahey, Maguire, Bonte, Stohn, Hirn, Smoler, 
Rabinowitz, Saslowsky, Langlais, LaFrance, Nickerson, Fieldson, Mitchell 
Second Row: Leshowitz, Puliafico, Miss Haggerty, Miss CPLoughlin, Lasar, Godet, Baril, McKittrick, 
MacLean, Procter, Brilliant, Miss Nath, Miss MacDonald, Rudnick, Doo, Echavarria, Brassil 
Front Row: Kenin, Hogan, Avramov, Hallett, Healy, Hughes, Masachi, Silk, Weber, Merrill, Magown, 
Sharpe, Martin, Farren 



THE 1941 


r 52 ] 




Vernon McKittrick 


Phillip MacLean 


Richard Procter 



The second week held greater things in 
store for us. During that week, a sopho- 
more who shall remain unnamed, was 
forcefully “toned down” by a few mem- 
bers of the Freshman Class for insolent 
abuses. Some of us didn’t hear him so we 
thought it would be a good idea to let 
him “holler” from the top of the lockers. 
The Sophs quickly retaliated by making 
a group of us push one of their cars down 
Colonial Avenue. 

We proved our superiority over the 
Sophs by beating them in the annual 
Freshman and Sophomore Football game. 
In the thrilling last minutes of play, Ab- 
rahms our flashing back, smashed over 
for a touchdown to beat the Sophs six to 
nothing. 

On Nov. 27, we again proved our super- 
iority over the Sophs by beating them 
in the Freshman-Sophomore Basketball 
game. The score was 44-28. Isn’t there 
something somewhere about “He who 
laughs last, etc?” 

On Dec. 6, “Hell Week” started. Even 
if one wasn’t told about it he could read- 
ily see something amiss in the haggard 
faces of the “Pledgees.” To top it all, 
John Payelian, a Pledge at O Pi, fell asleep 
in Mech. Drawing. During that week, 
some of the frat members had to be calmed 
down by the police in Kearney Square. 

“And so with sadness in our hearts, we 


turn our prow southward and leave the 
Freshman year at Textile hoping that we 
may someday be able to return... (as 
Freshmen? — Ed.) 

In the short space that has been allotted 
to us, we have tried to record for ourselves, 
for you and for posterity, a few of those 
things which stand out in our minds as we 
sit over a typewriter some nine months 
after entering Textile. As Freshmen, per- 
haps we are a bit more impressionistic 
than the more sophisticated of our com- 
panions, the upperclassmen. Perhaps the 
things which we have recorded herein, are 
of less fundamental importance than 
some of the things that happened during 
the year 1940-41. Perhaps the more im- 
portant things to be considered are our 
classes, our teachers, and our progress 
toward the goal of being graduated from 
Textile four years — or rather three years 
hence. However, the things that we have 
included are those things which will not 
be recorded in the slips of paper that were 
issued every five weeks; they are not the 
things that occupy a prominent position 
in the copious notes that we took in our 
many lecture and laboratory courses. 
They are rather those things which we as 
members of the class of 1944 will always 
remember as having been equally as much 
a part of our first year at school whether 
it be now or twenty years from now. 


[53l 


PICKOUT 


Fourth Annual 
All School Banquet 

F OR the fourth time in four consecu- 
tive years, the entering Freshman class 
was entertained by the upperclasses and 
fraternities at the Annual Frosh banquet, 
held in Kitson Hall on September 25, 
1941, under the direction of Professor 
James G. Dow. 

The attendance surpassed in number 
that of any of the previous banquets. 
Throughout the course of the evening, 
the hall resounded with the cheers of 
237 students, hailing their favorite and 
current professors, as well as anything 
and everything that came to mind. 

Following an excellently catered din- 
ner, the program got under way with a 
speech of welcome by Professor Dow, 
who then turned the gathering over to 
Fred Mason, President of the Senior 
Class. At the request of the faculty and 
the seniors, a few minutes of silence were 
dedicated to the memory of the late Bill 
Ginivan of the Class of 1941. 

The singing of Alma Mater followed; 
after which, short speeches of welcome 
were given by George Brook, Junior Presi- 
dent, Ed Rowen, Sophomore Treasurer, 
Bob Fead, President of Phi Psi , Stan 
Garnett, President of Ornicron Pi , Sid 
Saltsman, President of Alpha Epsilon , 
and John Murphy, President of Delta 
Kappa Phi. 

President Eames addressed the gather- 
ing with a short talk in which he com- 
mented on the large audience present, 
as well as upon the large class entering 
Textile. As the President was speaking 
about the deplorable world conditions, 
and the necessity at this time of the 
“Textile Spirit,” a brief shortage of power 


caused the lights to go out, so that he was 
required to conclude his speech in the 
dark. This episode immediately carried 
all of the upperclassmen and instructors 
back to the occasion of the banquet two 
years previous, when the festivities had 
been interrupted by nothing less than the 
worst hurricane that New England had 
ever seen. 

With the return of current, Mason 
next introduced the Mistress of Ceremon- 
ies for the evening, Miss Ruth Tingley. 
Miss Tingley put the entire gathering in 
the right spirit with the singing of some 
old and new accordion favorites in which 
the entire audience joined her. Following 
her selections, Mr. George Gillett of- 
fered an act which featured, horns, bells, 
whistles, “toot toots,” and about every- 
thing that can make a noise — including 
several of Textile’s favorite instructors. 
Mr. Frank Mack was next on the bill, and 
his act, in blackface, included juggling, 
singing of some rather pointed, nonsensi- 
cal ditties and ventriloquism. The last 
feature on the program was Mora the 
Magician, who performed some new and 
utterly bewildering feats of legerdemain 
- which — as they were calculated to do 
mystified all present, and started several 
of his “stooges,” picked at random from 
the audience, talking to themselves. The 
feats of Mora concluded the evening’s 
entertainment, and sent everybody home 
in a happy frame of mind. 

Thus was concluded the fourth annual 
banquet to be held at Textile. Each pass- 
ing year shows an increase in the popular- 
ity of the banquet, and at the same time 
that the desire for affairs of this kind is 
growing at school. In that they bring 
together for one of the only times of the 
year all the social elements at Textile, 
they are exceedingly beneficial. There is 
no doubt but that as the years go on, Tex- 
tile will see bigger and bigger banquets, 
and even more affairs of a similar nature 
during the school year itself. 



ACTIVITIES 



The Pickout 


I T can hardly be said that the mid-March 
furor which marks the yearly con- 
ception of hundreds of yearbooks through- 
out the country was without its counter- 
part in the preparation of the 1941 Pick- 
out. It was from a host of cries — of “Send 
those groups to the engraver!” . . . “Who is 
that fellow on the end of the third line?” 
...“Paste up those candid pages!”... 
“Remember we’ve gotta be done by 
March 15th!” — and from a host of words, 
ideas, and pictures that a finished book 
was finally constructed. However, the 
responsibility of a yearbook extends far 
beyond the ultimate presentation of a 
dummy free from technical and typo- 
graphical errors. Its foremost purpose is to 
present the undergraduate body with a 
true portrait of the school year. This, we 
hope we have done. 

It has been our aim to improve the book 
by changing the cover, and by using an 
entirely new layout. We have deemed it 
more advisable to use individual faculty 
pictures rather than the groups of the past 
few years. We have tried to mold the 


Back Row: Hochschild, Macktez, Rashkin, Jay, Okiin, Garnett, Baer, Sullivan 
Front Row: Miss Lewis, Prof. Mackay, Phillips, Mintz, Miss Keirstead, Miss Woodard 



T HE 19 4 1 


[56] 





Irving Mintz 
Editor-in-Chief 


Maurice Phillips 
Business Manager 


Prof. Stewart Mackay 
Faculty Adviser 


candid pages into a form that told a run- 
ning story of the year, rather than leave 
them as a set of isolated pages merely 
jammed into the book, because candid 
pages are “the thing.” To facilitate the 
telling of our story, captions, headlines, 
and titles have been borrowed freely from 
the Text , the bulletin, and the Lowell Sun. 
We have tried to be fair in the editing of 
the articles. Frequently, fairness to the 
reader takes precedence over fairness to 
the author. In the main, the ability to 
write a decent article for the yearbook 
depends on whether the organization has 
anything of worth to say. However, come 
what may, space must be filled with what- 
ever is available. For this reason, too often 
is criticism leveled toward the worth of 
material included in a write-up. When- 
ever possible, we have tried to prevent 
this, preferring to rearrange our format 
from time to time to fit the availability of 
material on one or more organizations. 

Those who aided us in the preparation 
of the 1941 Pickout were: Bernard Rash- 
kin, Edith Keirstead, Charlotte Rich, 
Stanley Szopa, Sid Saslowsky, Paul Sulli- 
van, Bob Turner, Herb Goldberg, Stan 
Garnett, Lester Macktez, Daniel Jay, and 
George Hochschild. The photography 
was handled by Leonard Baer and George 
Armstrong. The art work on the divider 


pages and in other parts of the book is by 
Herb Pesetsky and Sid Saslowsky. 

The business staff was composed of Dot 
Lewis, Seymour Okun and Alice Woodard. 

We’d like to say that the Pickout in its 
thirty-sixth year was at its best. That 
wouldn’t be true. But it was as good as all 
of us working, writing, thinking, and hav- 
ing fun on the 1941 Pickout could make 
it. We give you then the school year 1940- 
41 ; we hope that you have enjoyed it, and 
will, in retrospect enjoy reliving it. 



[ 57 ] 


PICKOUT 





The Text 

\ 


D URING the school year 1940-41, the 
Text has endeavored to present to its 
readers a factual summary of all the news 
and activity which it, as a newspaper, 
considered of importance. It is a common 
misconception, and therefore the basis 
of much criticism, that a school newspaper 
should be able to present to its subscribers 
a galaxy in print of those events and hap- 
penings of momentary interest — that is, 
the so-called articles which possess “news- 
value.” Although this should be, and is 
the function of those college newspapers 
which are printed daily, it is a virtual im- 
possibility for a newspaper which is pub- 
lished bi-weekly to even try to exist on this 
plane. The daily class room happenings, 
the humorous events, and the reports of 
the daily happenings in certain school or- 
ganizations are not for consideration by 
a newspaper such as the Text; unless they 
are fundamental in nature, or worthy of 
commemoration — in short, worth reading 
and equally worthy of space, two weeks 
after they have transpired. 


Back Row: Hamer, Kopocinski, Hirn 

Front Row: Goldberg, Miss Keirstead, Macktez, Prof. Dow, Dick, Zenorini, Procter 



THE 1941 


[58] 




Lester A. Macktez 
Editor -in-Chief 

Editorially, during 1940-41, it has been 
the policy of the Text to comment only on 
those things which directly affected the 
student body at Textile as a whole and to 
maintain a “hands off” policy with regard 
to other matters. To acquaint the student 
body with the events of importance in 
other schools and universities throughout 
the country, the Text this year subscribed 
to a service which enabled if to present 
these facts in a concise, but readable form. 
To improve the appearance of the paper, 
a new heading in the form of a drawing 
of the school was employed, and this has 
met with favorable comment. 

The increasing activity of Textile Al- 
umni in the New England and New York 
areas, made necessary the development of 
an organ to serve their needs. Since this 
was — for the present anyway — an impos- 
sibility, the Text has devoted itself to 
that service, and in cooperation with 
Professor A. Edwin Wells made it a point 
to devote a portion of each issue to the 
end of keeping the alumni informed of 
all activity at Textile, and of keeping them 
in contact with each other. In particular, 
two issues deserve special mention. Both 
the issue devoted to the memory of the 
late Professor Arthur A. Stewart, and the 
later one devoted almost exclusively to the 
alumni banquet held in Boston on March 
1, 1941, were highlights of the year. 


Prof. James G. Dow 
Faculty Adviser 

Although much criticism has been 
heaped upon the editors and the staff as 
a whole with regard to this year’s paper, 
it has been a great effort to secure men 
for the staff who were willing to give of 
the time necessary to make the improve- 
ments which they desired. The Text in 
1940-41, was not a finished product of 
collegiate journalism. It can be materially 
improved. This improvement can only be 
accomplished through the united efforts 
of the staff, student body, and faculty. 



Rudolph C. Dick 

Business Manager 


[ 59 ] 


PICKOUT 




Textile Players 


W ITH the posting of the notice, “Try- 
outs for the Textile Players in Room 
343, on Wednesday afternoon, at 4:00 
P.M.”, the 1941 season of Textile’s dra- 
matic society was under way, and the 
preparations for the annual production on 
May 2, 1941, had begun. The first choice 
of the executive council was Boy Meets 
Girl , by Bella and Samuel Spewack, a 
light comedy about the foibles of Holly- 
wood. More than forty men turned out, 
and when after three hectic days of 
nervous readings, rereadings, and elimina- 
tions, the smoke of casting had died away, 
a cast had been picked. However, it was 
not destined that Boy Meets > Git l be 
given this year. Due to complications be- 
yond the control of the organization, it 
was necessary to abandon this play in 
favor of something more suitable. Again 
the haggling and argument were on, and 
the second choice of the executive council 
was Petticoat Fever , a “non-tropical” 
farce by Mark Reed; a play which was 
done with Dennis King on Broadway, 


Back Row: McLean, Harrison, Hochschild, Macktez 
Middle Row: Kennedy, Turner, MacLean, Cryan 
Front Row: Mintz, Finard, Prof. Fickett, Weil 



THE 1941 


[60] 


Saunder Finard 
President 


Maurice Harrison 
Business Manager 


Prof. E. E. Picket t 
Faculty Adviser 


and with Robert Montgomery in Holly- 
wood. 

In the part of Duncan Dinsmore, who 
has too long been exposed to the ravages of 
the Arctic — without benefit of female 
companionship, was Matt Kennedy. The 
role of Kimo, his faithful and monosyl- 
labic dolichocephalican Jeeves, was 
played by Irving Mintz. Claude Allard 
was cast as Sir James Fenton, an American 
version of an English globe-trotter; his 
fiancee Ethel Campion, was played by 
James McLean. The Reverend Arthur 
Shapman, who is not averse to a “spot” in 
his tea, was played by Saunder Finard. 
Clarence Weil was seen as Captain John 
Landry; Bob Turner as his mate Scotty; 
and Phil MacLean was cast as Clara Wilson , 
Dinsmore’s nymphomaniacal fiancee. The 
scene of the play is in the wilds of Labra- 
dor — one hundred miles from anywhere — 
and concerns the events which are inevi- 
table when a man who has not seen a 
beautiful woman for two years is suddenly 
confronted with two of the same. An Arcti- 
can hula-hula dance was done by two 
exponents of Alaskan terpsichore, George 
Hochschild and Larry Hallett. 

The annual controversy as to whether 
the girl’s parts should be taken by men 
or women was even more heated than 
usual, but when the debate was over, 


tradition had won, and some of the lighter 
voiced males were essaying the female 
parts. Much of the credit for the play’s 
success goes to Harlan Forrest Grant, 
who was coaching the players for the first 
time, after the untimely death of Charles 
J. Keyes, coach for the last eleven years. 
Mr. Grant was assisted on and off stage 
by Maurice Harrison, John Pinatel, and 
the other members of the stage and busi- 
ness staff. As usual, the entire production 
was under the supervision of Professor E. 
E. Fickett. 



[ 6 1 ] 


PICKOUT 




Back Row: Szymosek, Manning, Corcoran, Szopa, Hornung, Rawlinson, Higginbottom, Teichner, 
Bardzik, Tyrie, Grondin 

Middle Row: Wolf, Platt, Epstein, Mintz, Saltsman, Thomas, Sidebottom. Mandikos, Moreau, SchifTer, 
Lt. Buck 

Front Row: Schiffer, Hamilton, Hochschild, Finard, Turner, McTeague, Puliafico, James, Inkpen, 
Urlaub, Koulas, Skalkeas 


AATCC 

T HE student section of the American 
Association of Textile Chemists and 
Colorists located at Lowell Textile Insti- 
tute is one of the three student sections 
of this large organization located at the 
larger textile schools in the East. Its pur- 
pose is to bring its members in closer 
contact with the new developments which 
are constantly taking place in the textile 
industry, and to acquaint them with the 
practical problems and phases of the in- 
dustry such as cannot be thoroughly 
covered in the classroom lectures. This is 
accomplished through the medium of the 
American Dyestuff Reporter — the official jour- 
nal of the association, and by means of 
addresses by men in the textile industry. 

At a meeting early in the school year, 
George McTeague was elected chairman 
of the organization for the school year, 
and Salvatore Puliafico was elected secre- 
tary. Ernest James was put in charge of 


the membership committee, • and Robert 
Turner of the program committee. 

During 1940-41, the club with the most 
members since its inception, was fortunate 
in having at the same time one of the best 
programs in its history. On December 4, 
1940, the club was addressed by Mr. A. J. 
Gallagher, a Textile graduate, now con- 
nected with the Hillsboro Mills, on the 
subject of worsted stock, yarn, and slub 
dyeing. On January 15, 1941, Mr. Ray- 
mond Stevens of the Felters Co., gave a 
talk on the complete processing of felts. 
The value and interest of both talks was 
increased by illustration with samples, 
taken from various stages of the process- 
ings. On February 26, 1941, the entire 
organization was shown through the mills 
of the Merrimac Hat Co., and was here 
able to observe, the complete manufac- 
ture of a hat from the “bale to head.” 

The season’s program will be conclud- 
ed with several more talks and with at 
least one more trip to a nearby mill. 


[62] 


THE 1941 


Engineering Society 

A LL sophomores, juniors, and seniors 
who are taking the Engineering op- 
tion, are eligible for membership in the 
Textile Engineering Society. Although 
the group holds no formal meetings, from 
time to time it endeavors to bring speakers 
and illustrated lectures to the entire 
school. 

The original purpose of the society was 
to sponsor trips to those industrial plants 
and mills which are conveniently located 
with respect to school; to introduce the 
students through the medium of these 
trips to the commercial methods of pro- 
duction and manufacture. Within the 
past few years, the various departments 
of the Institute have found it more feasible 
to plan and conduct their own trips. 
Therefore the sole remaining function of 
importance is the presentation of the talks 
and illustrated lectures mentioned above. 


Although the society has not been ex- 
ceedingly active this year, it has tried 
many times during the course of the 
year to present the student body with at 
least one lecture every two weeks. Due to 
the many conflicting interests of the stu- 
dent body it has been a virtual impossi- 
bility to get satisfactory attendance at 
scheduled meetings, with the result that 
the committees in charge of elections and 
plans became disheartened and ceased 
what were seemingly fruitless efforts to 
improve the organization. 

The advantage of an organization such 
as the Textile Engineering Society in a 
school such as Textile is obvious. It is an 
important means of contact between stu- 
dent and industry. For this reason, it be- 
hooves every undergraduate engineer at 
Textile to do what little is required of him 
in furthering the scope and effectiveness 
of the Textile Engineering Society at 
Lowell Textile Institute. 


Back Row: Hagerty, Taylor, Roberts, Foisy, Oppenheim, Cryan, Batcheller, Brown, Sinski 
Fifth Row: Allen, Liang, Weiner, Korb, Lau, Kaplan, Pero, Kelly, Mason, Rashkin 
Fourth Row: Roberts, Okun, Harrison, Eichner, Shapiro, Schiffer, McKean, Hunter, Alexander, Adie 
Third Row: Staklinski, Garnett, Rogoff, Beuter, Pesetsky, Bulson, Smith, Siegel, Pernick, Donnelly, 
Foster 

Second Row: Mr. Hindle, Prof. Brown, Miss Keirstead, Via Gari, Miss Lewis, Mr. Carlson, Mr. Dolan, 
Mr. Scully 

Front Row: Glen, Wolf, Tartikoff, Phillips, Brooks, Guilfoyl 



[63] 


PICKOU T 



Back Row: Puliafico, Saltsman, Garnett, Grondin, Alexander 

Middle Row: McTeague, Patrick, Carmichael, Turner, Campbell, Skalkeas 

Front Row: Miss Rich, Brown, Sullivan, Inkpen, Mason, Miss Lewis 


Commencement 

Committee 

T HE primary purpose of the commence- 
ment committee is the organization 
and presentation to the graduating class 
of a program to be carried out and en- 
joyed during the last week of life at Tex- 
tile — in those few days which are set aside 
for the Seniors before commencement. In 
order to present the class with the best 
program possible, a committee is chosen 
which will as a whole, represent the com- 
posite interests of the class, and so will 
be able to decide upon a program of ac- 
tivities which as nearly as possible will 
satisfy all members of the class. With the 
largest class in the history of Textile about 
to be graduated, it was necessary to have 
a larger committee than had ever before 
been selected. In addition to the officers 
of the class of 1941, and the members of 
the executive council, the committee was 
filled out with representatives of the vari- 
ous fraternities and organizations, until 
its number was twenty. 


The committee under the supervision of 
Professor A. Edwin Wells, adviser to the 
Senior Class, met twice a week after school 
and seriously weighed and discussed all 
proposals that were offered in suggestion. 
After several weeks of argument and in- 
vestigation, the tentative program was 
presented to the class at a scheduled class 
meeting. Here again, its relative merits 
were weighed and discussed, and each 
event on the tentative program was put to 
a vote. Under the direction of Norman 
Inkpen, chairman of the committee, the 
final program was evolved, and presented 
to the individual members of the class for 
personal selection. With a general know- 
ledge of what would receive the most sup- 
port, various sub committees went about 
the arduous task of arranging the minor 
but important details. 

The final program as carried out, in- 
cluded the following activities; Baseball 
game, Pops concert, Class picnic, three- 
day trip to Maine, Alumni luncheon, 
Class Formal dance, and the Commence- 
ment on June tenth. 


THE 1941 


[64] 


Athletic Association 

T HE Athletic Association which is head- 
ed by Professor Lester H. Cushing, Ath- 
letic Director of the Institute, is a body 
whose duty it is to make all awards of 
letters and sweaters to the members of 
Textile’s various athletic teams. In so 
awarding the letters, sweaters, and gold 
footballs to the athletic teams by means of 
ballot, it is assured that all athletes re- 
ceive a fair representation. To make sure 
that the voting will represent a cross-sec- 
tion of the student will, and will not in 
any way be prejudiced or biased, the 
Council is made of the following men, in 
addition to Professor Cushing: the cap- 
tains of all athletic teams, the president of 
each class, the editor of the Pickout, and 
the President of the Lowell Textile 
Players. 

A second and equally important duty 


to the men of Textile is the planning and 
organizing of the traditional and annual 
Upstream Day, which was held as usual 
at Canobie Lake. 

At its first meeting of the year, the 
Council held an election of officers and 
elected Matthew Gass, co-captain of the 
1940-41 basketball team, as president, 
Lester Macktez and Walter Lisien, vice- 
presidents, Ernest Allard, secretary, 
and Professor Cushing as faculty trea- 
surer. The remaining members of the 
Council for the year were: Vernon Mc- 
Kittrick, Freshman president, John Cot- 
ton, Sophomore president, George Brooks, 
Junior president, and Fred Mason, Senior 
Class president; Hank Sinski, football 
captain, Vin Mahoney, baseball captain, 
Irving Mintz, editor of the Pickout, and 
Saunder Finard, president of the Textile 
Players. Many things of a nature bene- 
ficial to Textile can be accomplished, if 
this council continues to receive the whole- 
hearted support of every Textilite. 


Back Row: Mintz, McKittrick, Cotton, Mason, Foster 

Front Row: Allard, Prof. Cushing, Macktez, Gass, Lisien, Sinski, Finard 



[65] 


P 1 C K O U 1 



Back Row: Macktez, Murphy, Adie 

Front Row: Campbell, Mr. Baker, Garnett, Saltsman, Fead, Zellweger 


Interfratemity Council 

T HE Interfraternity Council was formed 
to perpetuate friendship among the 
various fraternities at Textile by promot- 
ing both sport and social events. The 
council is made up of the president and a 
delegate from each of the fraternities 
represented, and is under the faculty 
guidance of Professor F. E. Baker. The 
presidential office of the Council itself, is 
filled by rotation in each school year. For 
the year 1940-41, the Council was pre- 
sided over by Stan Garnett, Omicron Pi, 
and the other fraternities were repre- 
sented as follows: John Campbell, Omi- 
cron Pi; Robert Fead and Ralph Zell- 
weger, Phi Psi; Sidney Saltsman and Ed- 
ward Krintzman, Alpha Epsilon; and John 
Murphy and David Hamer, Delta Kappa 
Phi. 

With regard to rushing and pledging 
of Freshmen, the Council has endeavored 
to satisfy the desires of all fraternities by 
establishing a series of rules for rushing, 


and a code by which all the fraternities 
must abide. Due to an unfortunate ac- 
cident in Kearney Square during the initi- 
ation period, it was voted by the Council 
that a portion of the initiation, the so- 
called “Out Night” be discontinued, and 
something more suitable be substituted 
for it. Delta Kappa Phi and Phi Psi whose 
initiations came after this rule had been 
made, both revised their schedules, and 
did not find them wanting in any respect 
due to the omission of “Out Night.” 

The all-school banquet held at the 
beginning of the school year, and the 
interfraternity sports contests, held during 
the respective seasons of the year were 
under the direction of the Council. It is 
the further hope of the Council, that since 
it has succeeded so well in initiation and 
sports affairs; that in years to come it will 
be able to broaden its scope with respect 
to sponsoring more interfraternity social 
affairs. The attendances at the school 
dances and at the Tex Show, indicate 
that Textile could again sponsor Inter- 
fraternity formal dances. 


[ 66 ] 


THE 1941 


Textile Cabinet 

F OR many years there was at Textile 
the need of an organization to which 
all petitions and grievances of the under- 
graduates might be submitted for con- 
sideration and solution. It was for this 
purpose that the Textile Cabinet was form- 
ed. 

On October 27, 1939, Professor James 
G. Dow called a joint meeting of the 
president, the vice president, the secre- 
tary, and the treasurer of each class and 
organized the Cabinet. The membership 
consists of the four officers of each class 
together with all former officers who are 
still enrolled as undergraduates. Meetings 
are held each Wednesday during the 
college year at four o’clock in Room 310. 

The objectives of the Cabinet may be 
stated as follows: 

(1) a clearing house and a forum for 
the discussion of student opinion, criti- 
cisms and suggestions, and the presenting 
of petitions and recommendations to 


President Eames; (2) a permanent organ- 
ization for arranging social and other 
functions which will be operated on a 
college basis; (3) a class in parliamentary 
law in order that the officers may conduct 
their meetings in the proper manner; and 
(4) and organization for encouraging and 
promoting Textile Spirit. 

Although the Cabinet has been in opera- 
tion for only a little over a year, it has 
proved its worth many times. Through 
its efforts the following have been accom- 
plished : 

1. Class membership cards are now 
given as receipts for the payment of dues. 

2. Three All Textile Dances have been 
held with an average attendance of 200. 
The first two were at the Rex auditorium 
and the third at Southwick Hall. 

3. A constitution for class organization 
was written and submitted to each class 
for ratification. 

With co-operation from all Undergraduates , 
the Cabinet can accomplish much for the good 
of the Lowell Textile Institute. 


Back Row: Rowen, Allard, Sidebottom, Cotton, MacLean, McKittrick, Baril, Procter 
Front Row: Miss Davis, McTeague, Grondin, Prof. Dow, Brooks, Lisien, Szopa 



L 67 J 


P I C K O U T 






SOCIETIES 




Back Row: Misses Nath, O’Leary, Pratt, Fox, O’Laughlin, Lewis, MacDonald, Haggerty 
Front Row: Misses Foote, Keirstead, Woodard, Davis, Mrs. Olney 


Phlame 

Founded and Established at Textile , igjy 

P 

TN 1937, the girls at the Lowell Textile 
Institute, at the time numbering seven, 
united to form the first known textile 
sorority in the United States. Its primary 
purpose was not the mere formation of a 
successful girl’s club; it was rather the 
hope of the small band of coeds, that 
formed the nucleus of the Phlame, that 
their organization, like the flame from 
which it is named, would increase both 
in strength and in size and so be a guide 
for other sororities in other textile schools 
throughout the country. 

At the election, held in the latter half of 
the 1940 spring term the following officers 
were elected to carry on the work of this 



organization: Alice Woodard, President; 
Edith Keirstead, Vice-president; Esther 
Davis, Recording -Secretary; Louise 
O’Leary, corresponding secretary; and 
Dorothy E. Lewis, treasurer. 

The first social event of the year was 
an informal initiation held on October 
18, 1940 for the girls of the class of 1944. 
This was followed on October 20, by the 
formal initiation. The first roller skating 
party was held at the Crescent Arena on 
December 3, and in spite of the weather, 
it was well attended, and as usual a suc- 
cess. Prior to the Christmas recess, a 
party was held for the children of a local 
orphanage, at which Professor Charles 
Edlund acted as Santa Claus. 


[ 7o] 


THE 1941 


With cold weather prevailing, an ice 
skating party was sponsored on February 
3, 1941 at Lupien’s in Chelmsford. In 
spite of the fact that the ice was not as 
good as it might have been a large gather- 
ing was present and “a good time was 
had by all.” Doughnuts, hot dogs, and 
coffee, were served by the sorority; but it 
is “rumored” that certain other unmen- 
tionable condiments were present, strictly 
as cold prevention measures. A Lincoln’s 
Birthday party was given by Barbara Mc- 
Donald at her home, oddly enough, on 
the night of February 12, 1941. Doctor 
and Mrs. Olney were hosts at a party 


given at their home at 118 Riverside 
Street on the night of February 28, 1941. 
Edith Keirstead was hostess at another 
party given late in March. The first 
mother and daughter luncheon was given 
by the Phlame in mid-April, and was such 
a huge success that it will probably be- 
come a fixture on the social calendar and 
be repeated many times in years to come. 

At the conclusion of its fourth year, 
then, the Phlame found itself with eleven 
members, and with a yearly active pro- 
gram equal in scope and success to that 
carried out by many larger national sor- 
orities. 


SORORS IN HONORARE 


Phyllis J. Baker 
Marion B. Calder 
Alda J. Cherr 
Anita M. Dori 
Louise Fox 
Helen G. Flack 
Miriam K. Hoffman 
Helen J. Jarek 


Eleen Keizer 
Florence M. Lancey 
Eileen M. O’Donoghue 
Mona B. Palmer 
Lucy Robbins 
Yittoria Rosatto 
June C. Turton 
Ruth Zenthbaucr 


SORORS IN COLLEGIO 


Esther Davis 
Barbara Fox 
Isabelle Haggerty 
Edith L. Keirstead 
Dorothy Lewis 


Louise O’Leary 
Helen O’Loughlin 
Barbara McDonald 
Virginia Nath 
Charlotte M. Rich 
Alice M. Woodard 


[7i ] 


P I C K O U T 



Hack Row: Schlesinger, Kittay, Weil, Goldberg, Simon, Weinstein 
Third Row: Mintz, Berkowitz, Smoler, Cherenson, Wolf, Klashman, Wolf 
Second Row: Rogoff, Baer, Finard, Rudnick, Landfield, Hochschild, Macktez 
Front Row: Shapiro, Schiffer, Krintzman, Saltsman, Epstein, Teichner 


Alpha Epsilon 

PI CHAPTER 

Established at Textile , 1Q41 
Founded at New York University , Kj2i 

AE 

O N Saturday, November 23, 1940, at 
the Parker House in Boston, the long 
rumored union between Sigma Omega 
Psi Fraternity and Alpha Epsilon Pi Fra- 
ternity became a reality with the signing 
of the agreement by leading members of 
both organizations. Under the terms of 
the agreement, Alpha Epsilon Pi was to 
induct all active chapters and alumni of 
the old SOP into its folds. The completion 
of this union made AE Pi one of the 
strongest National fraternities in New 
England, since in addition to its own 
chapters at Rhode Island State and Mass. 
State, it now has chapters at Tufts, B.U., 
Worcester Polytech, and Textile. How- 



ever, at a meeting of the National Inter- 
fraternity Council, held some weeks later 
with regard to this amalgamation, it was 
announced that AE Pi could not induct 
Eta Chapter at Textile without forfeiting 
its membership in the Council, since al- 
though Textile is accredited by the gov- 
ernment, it is not as yet fully accredited 
by the American Association of Universi- 
ties or by the New England Regional 
Association. Therefore, in February 1941, 
acting on the advice of Alpha Epsilon 
National, Eta Chapter of SOP, changed 
its name to Alpha Epsilon Fraternity, Pi 
Chapter, and became a pledge chapter 
to the national fraternity. Until such time 
as the chapter is fully inducted, all alumni 


T H E 19 4 1 


r 72 j 




may become members of the national. 

Twenty-three undergraduate members 
of Alpha Epsilon returned to school in 
September, with Sam Saltsman, Ed Krintz- 
man, Art Teichner, and Ed Epstein as 
officers for the forthcoming year. The 
rush season was started with a series of 
three affairs, to which all eligible Fresh- 
men were invited. A house party was the 
first event on the calendar, and it was 
extremely well attended. This was fol- 
lowed by an “old clothes” party on the 
week following. At the third party, some 
weeks later— to which men who had ac- 
cepted bids were invited pledge pins 
were handed out, and the serious business 
of pledging got under way. This was 
culminated in November, with the tra- 
ditional “Hell Week” and during the 
week of December 6th, the new men were 
inducted. To commemorate this event, 
a formal dinner dance was held at the 
Rex Penthouse on December io, 1940. 
Nearly forty undergraduate couples were 
present, and the “proverbial” good time 


was had by all. Social affairs were then 
suspended until the first week of the sec- 
ond term, when a Washington’s Birthday 
Dance was held appropriately enough on 
the night of February 22. On February 
27, AE Pi sponsored a smoker for all its 
New England Chapters at the Lenox 
House in Boston. An all New England 
basketball tournament and dance was 
held at Worcester Polytechnic Institute 
on March 15, with Worcester Chapter 
acting as host to the other New England 
Chapters which comprise the New Eng- 
land Regional Conclave of AE Pi. 

Alpha Epsilon won the interfraternity 
basketball contest at school by winning 
three consecutive games from the other 
fraternities represented. They also com- 
peted in the interfraternity bowling con- 
tests, but in spite of the spirit evidenced 
by the men, were not able to fare too well. 
The year was completed with several 
more house-parties, and with the fifth 
annual banquet in May, which as in 
years past was a highlight of the season. 


FRA TRES IN COLLEGIO 


1941 

Edward Epstein 
Saunder Finard 
Ralph Kaplan 
Harold Landfield 
Leo Linden 
Lester A. Macktez 
Irving P. Mintz 
Sidney I. Saltsman 
Lathrope A. Schiffer 
Clarence Weil 
Irving J. Wolf 

1942 

Leonard H. Baer 
David Rogoff 
Jeffrey Shapiro 
Irving P. Wolf 


1943 

Herbert Goldberg 
George Hochschild 
Morton Kittay 
Edward Krintzman 
Alex Miller 
Morton Schlesinger 
Richard Simon 
Arthur Teichner 

1944 

Joseph Berkowitz 
Allan Cherenson 
Melvin Goldberg 
Julian Klashman 
Maxwell Rudnick 
Irwin Smolcr 
Samuel Weinstein 


r 73 ] 


PICKOUT 



Back Row: Monroe, Weber, Hallett, Carmichael, Ellis, Griffen, Haseltine, Bell, Richardson, Payelian. 
Third Row: Sharpe, Webb, Nickerson, Merrill, MacLean. Procter, Mason, Malcolm, Hamilton, Lane, 
Patrick, McKittrick, Brown 

Second Row: Harris, Lodge, Garnett, Inkpen, Pero, Dolge, Bulson, Pinatel, Wilkinson, Johnson, Liang, 
Beuter, Barton 

Front Row: Clogston, Dr. Chapin, Mr. Holt, Prof. Brown, Alexander, Campbell, Garnett, Hunter, Me- 
Elhinney, Hughes, Healy, Mr. Chace, Fieldson 


O micron Pi 

Founded and established at Lowell 
Textile Institute in 1902 

on 

T HE 1940-41 season was started off with 
a bang by a Freshman Hayride party 
held for all undergrads and prospective 
freshmen on the night of October 1 7, 1940. 
It was the first rush affair of the season, 
and it was without reservation one of the 
best. The rush season which had thus so 
successfully started was finished off in 
December with the pledging and initia- 
tion of 19 men after the traditional week 
of “Hell.” The success of the initiation, 
and the “efficiency” of those in charge 
will be attested to by any of the nineteen 
men who went through it. Following the 
return from Christmas recess, and the in- 



evitable social lull during the equally 
inevitable exam week, the season was 
again started with a Monte Carlo Party 
held at the house on February 7, 1941, 
with John Johnson heading the committee 
in charge, and Doug McElhinney and 
Pete DeMallie his able assistants. Chaper- 
oned by Mr. and Mrs. George McTeague 
and Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Wilkinson, 
this party was definitely a case of “in- 
flation” that was enjoyed by all. A Pin 
Hop was held at home on the night of 
March 14, 1941, and it was here that the 
Star and the Crescent was in all its glory, 
thanks to the work of Doug McElhinney 
and Gerry Alexander. The pledge ban- 


[ 74 ] 


THE 1941 



quet in honor of all the newly inducted Informal Saturday night parties, 
men which was held in the weeks follow- All in all the 1940-41 season was one 
ing was another memorable event in the of the best in the history of the fraternity 
fraternity social season. Stan Garnett thanks to the cooperation of undergradu- 
acted as chairman and Arthur Hamilton ates and alumni working hand in hand 
was the toastmaster. with the officers for the year, Stan Gar- 

Thanks to the untiring efforts of Doug nett, Bob Hunter, Bob Haseltine, Vern 
McElhinney, the entire season was well Wilkinson, Dick Garnett, John Campbell, 
peppered with well planned Sports and Doug McElhinney, and Chandler Brown. 


FRA TRES IN FACUL TA TE 


Frederick S. Beattie, Ph.B.* 

Walter B. Holt 

Horton Brown, B.S. 

Percy B. Judd, B.S.* 

William G. Chace, Ph.B. 

Louis A. Olney, D.Sc. 

Harold C. Chapin, Ph.D. 

*Deceased 

Arthur A. Stewart* 

FRATRES IN COLLEGIO 

1941 

Richard H. Garnett 

Gerard Alexander 

Carl Harris 

John D. Campbell 

John Johnson 

Stanley A. Garnett 

John Lodge II 

Arthur Hamilton 

Bruno Petricek 

Joseph Lane II 

Frederick R. Mason 

Vernon Wilkinson 

Stephen Patrick 

1944 

Ralph Webb 

Douvlas Barton 

Norman Inkpen 

0 

Samuel Clogston 

Henry Pero 

Edward Chambers 

1942 

Robert Ellis 

Chandler Brown 

Arthur Fieldsend 

Douglas Bulson 

Lawrence Hallett 

Robert Haseltine 

Grant Healy 

Robert Hunter 

Robert Hughes 

Douglas McElhinney 

Philip MacLean 

John Pinatel 

Bruce Malcolm 

Stewart Shafter 

Vernon McKittrick 

Frank Whiting 

Livingston Munro 

John Payelian 

J 943 

George Richardson 

Ralph Beuter 

Richard Procter 

John Colburn 

Robert Sharpe 

Malcolm Coulman 

Albert Weber 

Peter DeMallie 

Howard Nickerson 

David Dolge 

Roger Griffin 

L 75 ] P I C K 0 U T 


P I C K O U T 



Back Row: Sandner, Morel, Brassil, Prof. Brown, Hambleton, Leitch, Szymosek, Mr. Baker 
Third Row: Sinski, Korb, Rawlinson, Kennedy, Meanv, Taylor, DeKalb, Stohn, Dubrule, Bevington, 
Brown 

Second Row: Echavarria, Bisko, Platt, Batcheller, Turner, Murphy, Zenorini, Bonte, Bent, Roberts, 
Blanchard, Dick 

Front Row: Prof. Wells, Prof. Bachmann, Zenorini. Rowen, Zellweger, Fead, G. Brook, J. Brook, Side- 
bottom, Mr. Hindle, Roberts, Prof. Dow 


Phi Psi 


Established, at Textile , 4904 
Founded at Philadelphia Textile School , igog 

A FTER a most enjoyable summer, the 
brothers of Phi Psi returned to open 
the school year with the annual Open 
House for the incoming students. The 
date selected was September 28, im- 
mediately following the first home foot- 
ball game of the year. Refreshments as 
served by “Al” the chef were thoroughly 
enjoyed by everyone, including the mem- 
bers of the football team to whom the new 
students were introduced. Since this was 
the first purely social event of the season 
for the Class of 1944, it proved to be in- 
valuable as a method of contacting upper- 
classmen, fellow classmen, and instructors. 
The annual initiation period “Hell 



Week” was carried out under the super- 
vision of Senior Warden John Brook, and 
hit a new high in hilarity and enjoyment. 
The accent was removed from the “haz- 
ing” aspect and emphasis was placed on 
giving the new men something that they 
would remember. Needless to say, the 
idea was a huge success. Due to an un- 
fortunate accident in Kearney Square 
on the evening previous to that scheduled 
for “Out Night,” this portion of the initia- 
tion had to be dispensed with, and a 
night of amusement at the house was 
substituted. Korb’s “fireman act,” Bent’s 
falsetto, Bisko’s “talkativeness,” and of 
course the banquet will be long remem- 
bered. 


THE 1941 


[ 76 ] 


On January n, 1941, the pledges be- 
came active members, when the third de- 
gree was bestowed upon them by the of- 
ficers of the Grand Council at the Mid- 
Winter Banquet of the Boston Alumni 
Chapter at the Myles Standish Hotel. 

The entire facilities of the Vesper 
Country Club were made available to 
Phi Psi on the night of May 3, when the 
annual Spring Formal was held by the 
fraternity. Following dinner, the new 
officers of the chapter were formally in- 
troduced. After this, dancing was enjoyed 
by all until closing time. A large group of 
alumni, as well as active members, 
thoroughly enjoyed the reunion, and 
heartily agreed that it was the best ever. 

During the weekend of May 16, 17, 18, 


Phi Psi held its 38th National Convention 
at Providence, R. I. The convention 
consisted of a smoker, luncheons, in- 
dustrial and historical trips, Grand Coun- 
cil elections and installation of officers, a 
banquet and entertainment, exhibits of 
the products of the alumni, and exhibits 
by the nine active chapters. The brothers 
who attended have many never-to-be- 
forgotten memories of a week end to be 
placed high among memorable events 
while at school. 

The officers for the year, Bob Fead, 
Ralph Zellweger, George and John 
Brook, Henry Zenorini, William Hayward, 
William Sidebottom, and Ed Rowen, are 
to be complimented for the success of 
Phi Psi during 1 940-4 1 . 


FRA TRES IN FACUL TA TE 

Hermann H. Bachmann Charles Edlund 

Franz Evron Baker Elmer E. Fickett 

Russell Brown Milton Hindle 

James G. Dow Charles H. Jack 

A. Edwin Wells 


FRATRES IN COLLEGIO 


1941 

Ben P. Batcheller 
Armand E. Blanchard 
Needham B. Brown, Jr. 
Rudolph C. Dick 
Louis J. Dubrule 
Robert W. Fead 
Henry Sinski 
Frank Szymosek 
Walter W. Platt 
G. Robert Turner 
Ralph Zellweger 

1942 

Lawrence E. Bevington 
John F. Brook 
George H. Brook 
John L. Meany 
Robert W. McCartney 
William E. Hayward 
Dustin Rawlinson 
Russell F. Roberts 


Charles R. Sandner 
Joseph Zenorini 

*943 

Stephen Bisko 
John DeKalb 
Gerard Morel 
Donald C. Roberts 
Edward J. Rowen, Jr. 
William W. Taylor 
Matthew Kennedy 
William J. Sidebottom 
Henry J. Zenorini 

1944 

Robert Bent 
Robert D. Brassill 
Andre Bonte 
Alejandro M. Echavarria 
Winston P. Hambleton 
Roland C. Korb 
John B. Leitch 
George C. Murphy 
William T. Stohn 


[77] 


P I C K O U T 



Back Row: Masse, Murphy, Allard, Murray, Allard, Marinopoulas. 

Third Row: Manning, Condon, McMahon, Cordeau, Silk, Wall, Maguire, Koscowicz, Godet 
Second Row: Grondin, McMahon, Koroskys, Gatzimos, Moreau, Skalkeas, Scarmeas, Sullivan, Koulas, 
Mandikos, Hogan 

Front Row: Valente, Mr. Daley, Puliafico, Adie, Murphy, Prof. Glen, Hamer, Puliafico, Noonan, Prof. 
Brown. 


Delta Kappa Phi 

Beta Chapter 

Established at Textile , igoj 
Founded at Philadelphia Textile School , iqo2 

4K* 

W ITH thirty active members return- 
ing to school in September, Delta 
Kappa Phi began its thirty-ninth year of 
activity at Lowell Textile Institute. The 
first activity of the year was the acquisi- 
tion of a council hall in the Howe Building 
in Kearney Square. About mid-Novem- 
ber, the bids were handed out to eligible 
members of the class of 1944, and were 
very favorably received. The men who 
accepted bids were put through the rigors 
of initiation, and were inducted about a 
month later. Due to unforeseen circum- 
stances, it was necessary to abandon the 
idea of having “Out Night” in Kearney 
Square, and the pledges were put through 



their routines at the beginning and during 
the intermission of one of the home basket- 
ball games in the gymnasium. This modi- 
fication in the initiation ritual met with 
popular approval, and in all probability 
will become a permanent part of the pro- 
gram in the years to come. 

The fraternity was well represented in 
both interfraternity basketball and bowl- 
ing; placing high in the basketball con- 
tests and winning the bowling tournament. 

In April of 1940, Delta Kappa Phi 
held its annual convention in Philadel- 
phia, with Alpha Chapter of the Phila- 
delphia Textile School acting as host. A 
successful business meeting was held at a 
local hotel, and various social affairs es- 


I 78] 


THE 1941 





pecially planned for the occasion, rounded 
out the activities. At the 1941 convention 
held in New Bedford, Delta Chapter was 
host, and presented to the other assembled 
chapters, a fine program of social activity. 

In the latter half of March, a banquet 
was held at the Hotel Manger in Boston. 
It was one of the most successful affairs 
of this kind ever held by the fraternity, 
and was attended by active members 
from all chapters as well as by a host of 
alumni. At this time, the pledges from all 


the chapters were given the third degree, 
and thus became full fledged members of 
Delta Kappa Phi. Full arrangements 
for the affair were made by Consul 
Murphy assisted by Dave Hamer and 
Abe Grondin, aided of course by the 
whole-hearted support of all chapter 
member. To John Murphy, Abe Grondin, 
Salvatore Puliafico, Ernest Allard, Dave 
Hamer, and James Wall, go the thanks of 
Beta Chapter for their work and effort in 
behalf of the fraternity during 1940-41. 


Harry C. Brown 
Charles Daley 
John Dolan 
Charles A. Everett 
Russell M. Fox 


FRA TRES IN FACUL TA TE 

Cornelius Glen 
Charles L. Howarth 
Stewart MacKay 
Gilbert R. Merrill 
Charles Scully 

John H. Skinkle 


FRATRES IN COLLEGIO 


1941 

Donald M. Adie 
John A. Condon 
George E. Cordeau 
Aristophanes Gatzimos 
Abraham H. Grondin 
Stanley C. Koulas 
Francis V. Mahoney, Jr. 
Francis A. Murphy 
Joseph M. McMahon 
Salvatore Puliafico 
Harry G. Scarmeas 
Basil Skalkeas 
Paul J. Sullivan 

1942 

Ernest H. Allard 
David O. Hamer 
Michael J. Koroskys 
Stillman D. McMahon 
Raymond Boule 
Arthur Moreau 
John A. Murphy 


Vasil J. Pappas 
James T. Wall 
Paul Noonan 
George Mandikos 

T 943 

John Sayers 
Claude Allard 
Thomas Gillick 
Thomas O’Donnell 
Martin Murray 
Louis Valente 

1944 

Earl Frappier 
Thomas Hogan 
John Godet 
Charles Puliafico 
Albert Massey 
John Maguire 
James Silk 
Julian Kosowicz 
Charles Marinopoulas 

[ 79 l 


P I C K O U T 



Back Row: Puliafico, Mahoney, Murphy, Urlaub, Weil, Gatzimos, Skalkeas 
Middle Row: Linden, Epstein, Finard, Saltsman, Mintz, James, Inkpen, Rashkin 
Front Row: Phillips, Miss Lewis, Prof. Merrill, Condon, Adie, Grondin, Mason, Per nick 


Tau Epsilon Sigma 

(Honorary) 

Founded and Established 
at Lowell Textile Institute, iQ2j 

TE2 

S INCE there was not in existence, at the 
time, an honor society for textile men, 
Lowell Textile Institute created its own 
honor society in 1927, namely Tau Epsilon 
Sigma. The key, which is the insignia of 
membership in this organization, is prized 
as the highest undergraduate award of 
merit obtainable. 

To become eligible for candidacy in 
the honor society, the student at the be- 
ginning of the first term of his senior year, 
must have been on the President’s List for 
four consecutive terms and his marks as a 
Freshman must also have been of equal 



calibre. Should the marks of the student 
during his first term be below the re- 
quired calibre, he may become a member 
of the society at the beginning of the sec- 
ond term of his fourth year, provided he 
has been on the President’s List for five 
consecutive terms, and has attained marks 
of equal calibre during the second half 
of his freshman year. Membership may 
also be obtained at the end of the fourth 
year, if the student can present evidence 
that his average for the entire course is 
equal to or better than that average neces- 
sary to make the President’s List, and 
that he has not failed in any subject. 


THE 194 1 


[80] 


FRATRES IN COLLEGIO 


Donald M. Adie 
John A. Condon 
Edward J. Epstein 
Saunder Finard 
Stephen A. Catzimos 
Abraham H. Crondin 
Norman A. Inkpen 
Ernest P. James 
Dorothy E. Lewis 
Leo Linden 

Francis V. Mahoney, Jr. 
Frederick R. Mason 
Irving P. Mintz 
Francis A. Murphy 
David Pernick 
Maurice G. Phillips 
Salvatore J. Puliafico 
Bernard Rashkin 
Charlotte M. Rich 
Sidney I. Saltsman 
Basil G. Skalkeas 
George S. Urlaub 
Clarence B. Weil 


FRATRES IN ALUMNI 
1940 

Merlen C. Bullock 
Arthur S. Davis 
Stanley Falk 
Louise Fox 
John A. Goodwin 
Robert B. Hull 
Arthur W. Lanner 
Edward J. F. Maslanka 
John S. McGilly 
Paul Roth 
Walter S. Thayer 
Malcolm R. Woodard 


1939 

Albert J. Beauregard 
A. P. Stuart Bone 
Vernon W. Colby 
H. Kendal Dick 
Theodore W. Fox 
John A. Goodwin 
Helen J. Jarek 
Samuel Levin 
Eileen M. O’Donoghue 
Herbert C. Olsen 
William B. Prescott 
William T. Reed 
Edward Spevack 
Henry E. Thomas 
Burton C. Winkler 


1938 

Herman T. Buckley 
Hugh F. Carroll 
Kenneth R. Fox 
Lorenzo M. Garcia 
Nelson F. Getchell 
Charles HoLem 


Hcrsey H. Howard 
Samuel G. Kaplan 
Warren T. Kelly 
Charles G. Kelakos 
Robert M. Kennedy 
Edward J . Klosowicz 
Richard G. H. Knight, Jr. 
Joseph H. Mahoney 
Earl E. Olsen 
John P. Ploubides 


J 937 

Louis L. Bassett 
Sidney M. Boordetsky 
William J. Daley 
Thomas N. Fisher 
Lee G. Johnston 
Gustave W. Kakenson 
Basil A. Natsios 
Francis X. Nerney 
Paul W. Regan 
Lucy W. Robbins 


1936 

James C. DeGruchy, Jr. 
George Georgacoulis 
Richard A. Hodgeman 
J. Raymond Kaiser 
James H. Kennedy, Jr. 
Allan J. McQuade 
Moushy Markarian 
Emilio G. Moreno, Jr. 
James R. Redmond 
James J. Rourke 
Kantilal H. Shah 
Bernard J. Tyler 
Preston S. Valentine 
Herbert A. Wormwood 


1935 

John F. Bogdon 
Ernest L. Dion 
Luis Echavarria 
Evan H. Fairbanks 
Edward Grossman 
Kenneth E. Leslie 
Chester M. Kopatch 
James H. Parechanian 
Joseph Shain 
Howard N. Stolzberg 
George R. Thompson 

1934 

Mitchell J. Bukala 
Parker Dunlap 
David J. Fox 
Francis C. Gillespie 
Robert T. Graham 
Robert C. Gregory 
Glen M. Kidder 
John C. Lowe 
Raymond S. Matthews 
Leon E. Moody 
Simon Shapiro 
Benjamin Thomas. Jr. 
Robert J. Thomas 
Robert C. Wilkie 

[81 ] 


! 933 

Joseph ]. Pizzuto 
Theodore Recker 
Gerald A. Robiliard 
Morris Lifland 


*932 

Herbert A. E. Bagshaw 
Arthur S. Bertrand 
Allan Campbell, Jr. 
Leo Glecklen 
Lome F. Howard 
Stanley S. Hockridge 
John J . McDonald 
Francis G. McDougal 
Herbert E. Meinelt 
Harold W. Russell 
Harry S. Sawyer 

i 93 i 

Alfred J. Carbone 
Stanley A. Hall 
Frank B. Hosmer 
Norman A. Johnson 
Eric A. Peterson 
Ric hard W. Rawlinson 
Yun-Cheng Wang 

193 ° 

Morris Barsky 
Richard S. Cleveland 
Arthur F. Gallagher 
Bliss M. Jones 
Samuel I. Kolsky 
Gerald F. McDonald 


1929 

Harry S. Buzzell 
James O. Ellis 
Walter F. Myers 
Kenneth E. Rice 
Bertil A. Ryberg 
Charles L. Shelton 

1928 

Clifford A. Farley 
Paul S. Fasig 
Stephen A. Ford 
Lawrence Gottschalk 
John V. Killheffer 
Raymond V. McKittrick 
G. Gordon Osborne 
Clifford W. Sampson 
Alvin B. Storey 
John C. West away 

1927 

Joseph B. Crowe* 

Claude C. Farwell* 

Jerome Franks 
Louis Goldenberg 
Berkley L. Hawthorne* 

Samuel Meeker 
Gilbert R. Merrill* 

*Graduated prior to 1927. 

V 1 C K O U T 


Upstream Day 

U PSTREAM DAY — two magic words 
which bring back memories of a 
glorious day “on the loose” at Textile. 
Upstream Day was last held on May 8, at 
Canobie Lake, and officially started at 
8:30 A.M. A strict vigil was maintained 
at the gate to see that no one wearing a 
tie passed within the “hallowed portals.” 
Within a few minutes, the busses came, 
were filled to overflowing, and were then 
on their way. As they passed up the high- 
ways toward New Hampshire, their occu- 
pants let it be emphatically known that 
this was “Textile’s Day.” 

Lake Canobie received us in all its 
splendor. Although the baseball fields 
were in rather “indelicate” shape, a 
quick working over with shovel and hoe, 
put them in shape for the forthcoming 
contests. The Freshmen lost their ball 
game to the Sophomores by a score of 
4-1. The Seniors then beat the Juniors 
6-3, but lost to the Sophs in the elimina- 
tion game, 3-0. However, the Juniors did 
get some revenge by beating their su- 
periors in softball, 13-9, while the Sophs 
eked out a 13-12 victory over the Frosli. 

In the meantime, the various other of- 
ferings of Canobie Lake had not been 
neglected. Mr. Dolan spent an eventful 
morning challenging all comers to pitch 
“hoss-shoes” against him and his partner, 
— unfortunate lad. The cling of the shoes 
did not however drown out the shouts from 
other parts of the field, or the soulful pleas 
of those who were trying to convince the 
keepers of the boats that it was an ideal 
day for canoeing, and other “water- 
sports.” Although their pleas were in 
vain, ’tis rumored that one student took 
an unscheduled plunge from the dock, 
and spent the rest of the day dodging the 
minions of the law. The loud argument 
on the main ball field indicated that the 


instructors and the Seniors were getting 
ready for their traditional bout. Unable 
to decide between softball and hardball, 
they compromised by playing three in- 
nings of each. The battery of the athletic 
department enforced by men from other 
departments proved to be too strong a com- 
bine for the future alumni, and the game 
went to the instructors, 3-1. None who 
saw the game will ever forget the valiant 
effort of the “heavyweight of the math 
department” to reach first base after a 
mighty clout, only to arrive in time to 
hear the umpire shout “Yerrrout!” In 
the second part of the game, the Seniors 
retaliated with a lot of ball blasting to 
win, 6-0. 

And now it was noon; the fragrant odor 
of roasted turkey floated from the dining 
hall up to the playing field, and in less 
time than it takes to say the proverbial 
“Jack Robinson” — or better, “Paul C. 
Panagiotakos,” the field was deserted, 
and the tables filled to capacity. The food 
disappeared as fast as it was heaped upon 
the plates. The looks of distress on the 
faces attested to the worth of the meal. 

After lunch, the grass, the bowling 
alleys, the skating rink, and the inevitable 
penny arcade, each attracted a share of 
customers. The cribbage fans were as 
usual, entirely oblivious to the noise 
around them, and huddled without res- 
pite around their boards and pegs. Sev- 
eral “minor sports” were also tried out, — - 
touch football, one-o-cat, and one in 
particular by the old trolley car. . .What- 
ever do you mean, sir? The roller coaster 
had started and it climbed to “soaring 
heights,” much to the combined delight 
and nausea of those who chose to ride it. 

After a tasty and hasty buffet supper, 
the crowd again took to the busses, and 
set out toward Lowell. Throats were sore 
from singing and yelling, backs were 
sore from sunburn, and Mason was 
“sore” because he was as usual unable to 
retain his pants — or is it trousers? 



SPOR TS 



Back Row: Abrahms, Gass, Masachi, Woitkowski, Noyes, Murray, O’Donnell, Wall, McTeague, Costello 
Middle Row: Coach Yarnall, Macktez, Grondin, Cordeau, Sinski, Whiting, Broderick, Mr. Scully, Prof. 
Cushing 

Front Row: Rowen, Malcolm, Kaplan, Queeny, Johnson, Murphy 


Football 

I N preparation for one of her biggest 
schedules in years, Textile began the 
1940 season, with a practice call in mid- 
September. During the first two weeks, 
prospects looked bright, with the return 
of seven lettermen, and a host of promis- 
ing Freshmen material. It was generally 
believed that these new men would supply 
the key to a winning combination for 
1940, in spite of the heavy schedule. Walt 
Weirioski, Jack Noyes, Steve Woitkowski, 
Art Coughlin, Phil Dean, Tom Broderick, 
aided by veterans, Mickey Gass, Hank 
Sinski, Joe Tomasuria, and George Mc- 
Teague, looked as though they would be 
ready for anything that anyone might 
have to offer. 

Pre-season practice was brought to a 
close, and Coach Rusty Yarnall pro- 
nounced his charges ready for the opener 
with Hyannis Teachers on September 28. 


The game was played on a warm day — a 
day far more suitable for a good baseball 
game. The heat slowed down the pace of 
the game; but the game was not without 
its lively moments, and a large opening 
day crowd saw Textile win 12-0. It was 
truly a Pyrrhic victory, because in an 
attempt to score via a running play, 
Weirioski was hard-hit, and suffered a 
broken ankle, causing him to be lost to 
the team for the remainder of the season. 
Had he not been so seriously injured, the 
outcome of the season might have been 
entirely different. In the same game, 
Kal Kaplan received a broken nose, and 
he too was forced out of play for almost 
the remainder of the entire season. 

On the night of October 2, Textile 
went up to Manchester, to engage the 
“mighty” St. Anslem team. Although 
Textile put up a hard fight, they were no 
match for the O’Donnell men, and were 
trounced by a score of 38-7. Rhode 
Island, whom we had not played for a 


[ 84 ] 


THE 1941 


good many years, appeared next on the 
schedule. The Rhode Island boys showed 
a good bit of the same stuff that had kept 
them in the game with Brown the week 
before. However, in spite of their ack- 
nowledged superiority, Textile held them 
scoreless for twenty-five minutes. In the 
second half, it was Rhode Island all the 
way, and the final score was 48-0. In 
this game, another veteran was lost, when 
George McTeague suffered a broken 
ankle. 

A home game with Panzer was next on 
the schedule — October 19. It was a nip 
and tuck affair most of the way, but the 
Panzer aerial attack accounted for a final 
margin of 12 points in an 18-6 score. Our 
lone touchdown was scored on a pass by 
Woitkowski to Sinski. The injury jinx 
was still rearing as both Coughlin and 
Noyes were hurt in the encounter. Dis- 
playing the Notre Dame system of attack, 
American International came to town on 
October 26, and smothered Textile with 
powerful running plays by a score of 26-0. 
This game too was not without its mishap 
since Frank Whiting received a hip injury 
that slowed him up for the rest of the 
season. 

Textile began its Western “invasion,” 
during the first week in November, and 
traveled first down to Philadelphia to 
play Drexel Tech. To top off the injury 
jinx that was apparently anchored to the 
team, Coach Rusty Yarnall showed up 
on the day set for departure, with a 
couple of torn ligaments in his ankle, and 
a pair of crutches to boot. The game was 
played on Drexel field, in a sea of mud. 
Although we had three distinct oppor- 
tunities to score, it seemed as though the 
punch necessary to push over a score was 
lacking. Drexel capitalized on a break, 
and pushed over a score and a safety to 
make the Philly headline read— -“Drex 
Chex Tex.” 

The game with Arnold on the following 
week was a see-saw affair which ended up 


in a 7-7 tie. Arnold scored first on a pass; 
and Textile finally tied in a similar man- 
ner. It looked as though Textile would be 
able to break the tie more than once, but 
again it was also apparent that the neces- 
sary punch to do so was lacking. 

With the not too savory record of 1 vic- 
tory, 1 tie, and 5 defeats, Textile set out 
for Bethlehem to do battle with a new- 
comer to the Textile schedule — Lehigh 
University. Although Textile was re- 
solved to put everything it had into this 
last game of the season, that everything 
was not enough. The Lehigh line and 
backfield which had tasted of victory 
only once before in the 1940 season, went 
at us with a vengeance, and opened up 
holes in our line, large enough for the 
proverbial “Mack Truck” to go through. 
The score showed only too well that we 
had been entirely outplayed; to wit — 40-7. 
In passing, it might be mentioned that 
the sole Textile score was made on a play 
which surprised everyone, including the 
Textile board of strategy. Diminutive 
John Johnson had the honor of scoring the 
last touchdown of the 1940 campaign on 
this play, which defies being described by 
mere words of commendable and high 
praise. 

It can hardly be said that the 1940 cam- 
paign was a successful one. Had it not 
been for the fact that we were dogged by 
injuries, the outcome might have been 
different. However, the season was not 
without its personal victories. Hank Sinski 
was named to the second team of the As- 
sociated Press Little College All New 
England team. Joe Tomasuria received 
honorable mention on the same team. 
Mickey Gass turned in the best perform- 
ance of his career at Textile, playing 60 
minutes of every game. In spite of the 
evident bad luck of the team with regard 
to injuries, mention must be made of the 
fine work of Rusty Yarnall and Charles 
Scully in the face of overwhelming odds 
and a skeleton team. 


[85] 


P I C K O U T 



Basketball 

I N spite of any prejudice that may exist, 
it cannot be said that Textile’s 1940-41 
basketball was a successful one. Success in 
sport is mainly figured on the number of 
games won as against the number of 
games lost, and since we only won seven 
out a a total of twenty-two played, we 
cannot say that we emerged successfully 
as a whole. 

Potentially, the team was a strong one, 
and one which should have — to all minds 
—done better than it did. With the first 
call of the season, six of last year’s eight 
lettermen reported, and the new men ex- 
hibited a good bit of the “stuff” needed 
to win games. We had our high scorers in 
Pesetsky, Lisien, and Pernick, and since 
most of the boys had been playing together 
for two or more years, they seemed to know 
pretty well each other’s capabilities and 
potentialities. However, games are not won 
on theoretical calculations. 

Our first game was with Rhode Island 


State — and to put it bluntly, it was a 
nightmare; a nightmare which we lost 
83-37. ^ ma y be that this game took a 
lot of the necessary confidence out of the 
boys, because they lost the next one — an 
easy one -to M.I.T., at Cambridge, 41- 
33. In their first home appearance, Tex- 
tile bombarded New Bedford Textile to 
win, 48-31. In this game, the team showed 
every indication of snapping out of the 
doldrums, and going on to win a few 
games. In this contest, they really played. 

The team performances in the next few 
games seemed to conform almost to a 
mathematical formula. The first ten min- 
utes of play, saw “all out” basketball, but 
then there would be an apparent slacken- 
ing of the pace, and the remainder of the 
game would be played on a plane dis- 
tinctly inferior to that on which it had 
started. When they were playing as a 
team, the boys invariably clicked, and the 
score board showed it. . .when they were 
playing as — well, the record, in part, shows 
that too. 

It is not feasible to recount the story of 
the entire schedule in detail, but it cannot 
be denied that the season did have its 
highlights. Probably the most interesting 
part of the season was the New York trip. 
Prior to that trip, the team traveled up to 
Maine to beat Gorham Normal in a game 
that was a “thriller.” The score at the 
half was 21-21, after about 20 minutes 
of exciting and fierce play. During the 
final period, the ball and the score see- 
sawed back and forth, without a dead 
moment, until with about a minute to go, 
Textile dropped two baskets to win, 44-40. 

On February 12, the long awaited New 
York trip began, with the first game to be 
played at Springfield against A.I.C. The 
first half was a repetition of the Gorham 
game. In the second half, Textile started 
to click with Pesetsky sparking the attack, 
and we went out to win 54-48. This was in 
itself encouraging, because it was the first 
game that Textile had won on a New 


THE 1941 


L 86 ] 



York trip in three years. The following 
night, Textile met the University of New- 
ark in a return game. Again, the first half 
was close, with Textile leading by one 
point at the gun. Dave Pernick led the 
scoring in the second half and the final 
score was 35-33. The win streak was at 
three, and things were looking up. 

The third game of the trip was a match 
with Wagner at Staten Island, and again 
the first half of the game was a repetition 
of the past three games. The awaited 
second half “blitzkrieg” never happened, 
however, and Wagner eked out a 29-27 
victory in the last minute of play. A Tex- 
tile high point occurred the minute 
previous to that when substituted Fresh- 
man Hal Leshowitz, in his initial ap- 
pearance on the floor, sunk a long shot 
from center court to tie up the game at 
27 all. Seemingly inspired to do the same, 
a Wagner man dropped a similar long 
one through the hoop as the clock was 
ticking out, to give his team the win. 

It was a pretty tired team that met Hof- 


stra at Hempstead on the following night. 
For the better part of the game, the Hemp- 
stead boys had things pretty much their 
own way, and won 35-21. The next six 
games at Lowell saw some very good 
teams gracing our courts. Five of the six 
games were Textile losses, but the “as- 
sembled multitudes” saw some superior 
basketball played by Holy Cross, St. 
Anselms, and the famed Panzer team. 
In true theatrical style, the season was 
concluded with a decisive win, 58-42, 
over Assumption on the night of March 8. 

Again, although the season in itself was 
not successful, congratulations are in 
order for Herb Pesetsky, who finished the 
season with 263 points to his credit — plac- 
ing him fifth among New England high 
scorers. A word of praise is due to Walt 
Staklinski for his fight and spirit in every 
game in which he played, as well as to the 
other members of the squad, Mickey 
Gass, Walt Lisien, Dave Pernick, Bert 
Coffin, and Jimmy Silk who were gener- 
ally “in there” trying to put Textile on top. 


Back Row: Coach Yarnall, Leshowitz, Simon, Cryan, Fahey, Macktez 
Fror.t Row: Silk, Pernick, Pesetsky, Gass, Lisien, Staklinski, Coffin, Clark 



[87] 


P I C K O U T 





Back Row: Rowen, Haggerty, Kaplan, Leshowitz, Allard, Lasar, Fahey, Noyes 

Front Row: Coach Yarnall, TartikofF, Haller, Staklinski, Campbell, Malcolm, Rudnick, Valente 


Baseball 

W ITH the basketball season a thing of 
the past, and with the first smell of 
spring in the air, Coach “Rusty” Yarnall 
posted his first call for baseball recruits 
late in March of 1940. About eighty per- 
cent of the 1939 veteran letter men turned 
out, and prospects for the forthcoming 
season appeared to be exceedingly favor- 
able. As is his custom, “Rusty” first 
worked out with the eligible batteries in 
the gymnasium, while the playing field 
thawed out from under the snows of a 
hard winter. Reporting for active duty 
were two outstanding pitchers of the previ- 
ous year; Captain Art Proulx, and Roy 
Johnson. In addition to these men, 
“Rusty” had several good freshmen pros- 
pects, these being Louis Valente, Tom 
Gillick, and Jim McNellis. 

Since the men seemed to work well to- 
gether and since the schedule was not too 


heavy, it appeared as though Textile in 
1940 would have a better than average 
season on the diamond. The final out- 
come of the 1940 season was not as good 
as it might have been, but since the entire 
story of the season is not told in records 
alone, it was satisfactory on the whole to 
both the team and the coaching staff. Of 
the seventeen games played, six were won, 
ten lost, and one was tied. As is evident 
from the scores, many of the games that 
were lost were pitcher’s battles in the true 
sense of the word, since they were games 
that were lost only by one run in a hard 
last inning of play, or by a seemingly 
harmless error early in the game. 

The season opened at Medford with 
Textile playing Tufts College on April the 
tenth. Since it was Textile’s opening 
game and the third game on Tufts’ sched- 
ule, it is not altogether surprising that Tex- 
tile did lose. The score, thanks to the hard 
hitting bats of the Tufts’ men, was 12-2. 
Textile next met Arnold on April six- 


THE 194 1 


[ 88 ] 


teenth at home. Again it was not Textile’s 
day and they lost, 12-7, in a game which 
featured some heavy hitting by both 
teams. Rhode Island State was next on 
the schedule and they too handed us a 
12-1 defeat. Smarting from the defeat at 
the hands of these three teams, Textile 
went to work on New Bedford Textile the 
following week, and beat them, 15-3. In 
the succeeding few weeks, we met As- 
sumption, American International Col- 
lege, New Bedford and Arnold again, but 
managed to win only one of these games. 
However, three of them were pitching 
duels and were “anybody’s game” until 
the last man was called out. On May 15, 
we met Trinity and lost another mound 
duel, 4-3. Several days later, we played 
Assumption again, this time on their home 
field and repeated our first exhibition 
against them winning, 9-5. In succession 
then, we lost a single game to Massachu- 
setts State, and a double header to Con- 
necticut State. The New Hampshire game 
which was next on the schedule was a 3-3 
tie, and had to be called because of dark- 
ness. On June 1, Providence College came 
to Lowell, and in a one-sided slug fest, 
“eked-out” a 12-1 victory. The final 
game of the season was played during 
commencement week on June 8th against 
the Alumni. The undergrads led all the 
way and wound up the contest with an 
1 1 -4 victory which wrote finis to the 1 940 
chapter of baseball at Lowell Textile 
Institute. 


T HE 1941 season opened with the re- 
port of veterans and new men in the 
gymnasium the day after the last basket- 
ball game had been played. The season 
before the Yarnall men was a hard one, 
and one for which there would, of neces- 
sity, need to be a lot of practice, shifting, 
and sifting of men and positions. Among 
those letter men reporting at the first 


few practices, were Mahoney, veteran 
first baseman— and last year’s surprise 
slugger, Staklinski, Tartikoff, Campbell, 
Lisien, and Valente.The class of 1944 was 
represented by Woitkowski, Noyes, Haller, 
Malcolm, Silk, Massachi, Sharfer, Bent, 
Ellis, and Lasar. Last year’s Freshman 
sensation, Lou Valente is counted on to 
handle the brunt of the mound duty in the 
games to be played. The schedule which 
began with a game with Brown Univer- 
sity at Providence on April 16, was fol- 
lowed with seven home games, and nine 
other matches played on foreign soil. The 
complete schedule was as follows: April 17, 
Rhode Island State at Kingston; April 23, 
Arnold College at New Haven; April 26, 
Massachusetts State at Amherst; April 30, 
Providence College at Providence; May 3, 
Becker at Lowell, in the first scheduled 
home game; May 7, New Bedford Textile 
at Lowell; May 10, Trinity College at 
Hartford; May 13, American Interna- 
tional College at Lowell; May 16, New 
Bedford Textile at New Bedford; May 17, 
Arnold College at Lowell; May 22, Hyan- 
nis Teachers at Lowell; May 24, Assump- 
tion College at Worcester; May 26, New 
Hampshire University at Durham; May 
31, Springfield College at Lowell; June 
4, Keene Teachers at Keene; and June 7, 
the traditional Alumni vs. Varsity game 
at Lowell, to wind up the season. 

The 1941 team has about seven letter- 
men, and a good supply of Freshman 
talent, and if this combination of men 
performs as well as the early season re- 
cords indicate that they should, Textile 
should end up the season on the black side 
of the ledger. To attain this goal it is ex- 
tremely important that the team, what- 
ever may be their early season record 
while on the road, receive the whole- 
hearted support and attendance at home 
games of the entire Textile student body, 
since it is generally conceded that it is a 
virtual impossibility to play “bang up” 
ball to empty stands. 


[89] 


1'ICKOUT 


Rifle Team 

T HROUGH all the clanging which is 
heard at Textile, the noise which is 
perhaps the most impressive, and seem- 
ingly the most foreign, is that one which 
ricochets through the building every 
day at noon and at four o’clock. To 
Textile men, it means but one thing. 
The Rifle Club is at it again. They have 
been “at it” for the last ten years, and at 
no time have they been content to rest on 
their laurels, but have constantly tried to 
improve both team and equipment. They 
began ten years ago, with nine members, 
a borrowed rifle, and a pygmy range 
located behind the grandstand in the 
gymnasium. The first year saw them en- 
gaging in only two matches, and having 
the use of their range, only when the gym 
was not in use. During the next year, a 
second gun was added to the collection, 
and the range moved into the auditorium, 
where it could be staked at standard 
length. The club now possessed two bullet 


catchers, and had twenty-one members. 
In this year, the first of the all school 
tournaments, which have since become a 
popular annual activity, was held. In 
this year, the club also became affiliated 
with the National Rifle Association. When 
the club was five years old, the range was 
moved to the old hand loom room where 
it still is, and in the year following, a 
Winchester ’52 and a full size backstop 
were given to the club. Today (in addition 
to sponsoring the all-school shoot) the 
club participates in a series of matches 
with other New England Colleges. The 
season starts around Christmas and runs 
through Spring recess. The credit for the 
success of the club is due to the coopera- 
tion of the members in attempting to im- 
prove their scores and also to the efforts of 
the faculty advisers, Mr. Chace and Pro- 
fessor Skinkle to improve the club. 

Their record this year in matches with 
the Lowell Marksmen’s Club, the Uni- 
versity of New Hampshire, the Merrimack 
Valley Rifle Club, and the Billerica Car 
Shops includes five wins and three losses. 


Back Row: Hagerty, Angell, Berkowitz, Mr. Chace, Marcus, Harper, Mandikos 
Front Row: Schiller, Wall, Echavarria, Eichner, Moreau 



L90 J 


THE 194 1 



Brown, Batcheller, Fead, Murphy, Roberts, DeMallie, Bullock 


Golf Team 

“ T) ACK in 1939,” a group of students at 
JLJ Textile who were interested in golf 
decided that it was only fair that Lowell 
Textile Institute be officially represented 
by a golf team in the form of a minor 
sport as well as by the football, basket- 
ball, and baseball teams in the other 
major sports. As a result of this decision, 
three worthy “divot diggers,” who are 
incidentally still with us, set out to ac- 
complish what was termed by many to 
be the impossible. The three aforemen- 
tioned men were: “Pete” Murphy, Ben 
Batcheller, and Bob Fead. Undaunted by 
the fact that they were not officially rec- 
ognized, they set out to prove their worth 
to the scoffers at school. This they did, by 
going out and playing several matches, 
in their first year as a team, and win- 
ning all easily with the exception of the 
one played with Andover Academy. 

Last year, the same team, with their 
number augmented from the Freshman 


Class, again completed their schedule 
with distinction. 

Playing their home games on the long, 
tricky Vesper Country Club course, against 
such opposition as New Bedford Textile, 
Andover Academy, and Worcester Acad- 
emy, the team was able to emerge with 
two wins, two losses, and one tie. 

This year’s prospects look equally good, 
with co-captains “Pete” Murphy and 
Ben Batcheller leading such veteran 
“divot diggers” as Bob Fead, Pete De- 
Mallie, Ralph Bullock, Russ Roberts, and 
Needham Brown; and with the Freshman 
Class supplying recruits in the form of 
Rick Procter and Bob Hughes. 

It might be said that due to the in- 
creased interest in golf at the Institute, two 
local clubs have made special arrange- 
ments for Textile students. It is sincerely 
hoped that those students who are inter- 
ested, will take advantage of these offers, 
with the result that in a few years we will 
see golf as an important interscholastic 
and interfraternity competition. 


[ 9 1 ] 


P I C K O U T 



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RAH and HANK — A Modern Textile Fable 


Reprinted by Permission from a Recent Issue of 
COTTON ( Serving the Textile Industries ), 
Atlanta, Georgia 


Several months ago the article printed 
below was brought to our attention. 
We rather think that it presents a fun- 
damental truth in a very convincing 
manner, and in so doing tells a story 
that every graduate of Lowell Textile 
Institute should read and profit by. 
For this reason, we believe that it is 
well worthy of inclusion in the year- 
book of the Senior Class. 

The Editor 

A ND it came to pass that in those days 
. there arose in the land a great queen, 
full of wisdom, whose name was Alma Mater, 
whose son was Rah, meaning Hopeful, 
Happy, The Confidence of Youth. 

And Rah was as one and Rah was as many, 
and Alma Mater, the kind mother, said unto 
her son, “Go now into the land that is mine 
and join there the forces that work, and see 
that you grow in wisdom and in strength 
that in the days that are to come you may 
rule in the land.” And she gave him a paper 
bearing witness that he was her son and shut 
the gates of the house upon him so that Rah 
wandered off down the road viewing the 
land that was to be his. 

So it came to pass that Rah, son of Alma, 
stood before Boss, General of the Hosts, and 
spake, saying, “Lo, I am Rah, son of the wise 
queen, bearing a paper saying thus and so, 
and I am come to help you in your labor and 
show you how it should be done.” And Boss, 
saying, “I care not for the paper so that you 
prove yourself,” sent for Hank, Captain of 
the Carders. 

And Hank, viewing him this way and that, 
spat with disgust and spake, saying, “Behold, 
here’s another one. Forty times have I re- 
ceived into my company Rah, son of the 
queen called wise, and forty times forty times 
hath Rah quit before the water got hot. Why, 
therefore, do you still send for me? Is there 
not a soft snap here in your tent for him to 
answer the ’phone, saying, ‘Yes’ or ‘Nay,’ or 


to flirt with Stenog, Pounder of the Keys? 
What is there in this one?” 

And Boss answered, “Who knoweth? But 
take him and find whether he be filled with 
sawdust or guts and report again to me.” 
So Hank took him and clad his legs in dirty 
overalls and filled his pockets with tools and 
his face with grease and made of him a pri- 
vate in the rear rank of his company and 
spake briskly to him, saying, “Do this,” and 
“Do that, and see that you do it quickly and 
well for your own good and the glory of 
Alma the wise queen who is your mother.” 
And Rah did as he was told. 

And after many days Rah stood again be- 
fore Boss, General of the Hosts, saying, “Be- 
hold, I am Rah, son of Alma Mater.” And 
Boss answered, “So thou sayest.” 

And Rah, in the heat of his youth, spake 
boldly, saying, “Is it not enough that I am 
the son of a queen, but that I am put in the 
rear rank of your host to fetch and carry for 
the least of them like a beggar from the 
streets? I, who was reared in a queen’s house? 
Behold, now, I have come to help you, but 
of what service am I in a pair of dirty over- 
alls? Many days now have I seen Hank, Cap- 
tain of the Carders and others of your Host 
and they are boneheads, all. Put them now 
under me that I might show them how to go. 
Otherwise, I join another Host.” Then Boss 
answered, saying, “That’s what they all say. 
Go see Hank, I’m busy.” 

And Rah spake to Hank, saying, “Here’s 
where I quit. For many days now have I 
labored strongly and well, but to what end? 
Squills, Dispenser of Drugs, has offered me 
the post of Chemist of the Soda Fount, and 
I go that my legs abide not in greasy over- 
alls, nor my face in dirt. Think you that I 
shall stay here and be the least of your com- 
pany at the beck and call of a crew of jar- 
heads? Not I. Not Rah, son of a queen, who 
should be your leader, but am appointed 
your slave.” 


THE 1941 


[ 98 ] 


Then Hank said, “Wherein are you better 
than the other jarheads?” And Rah waxed 
wroth, saying, “Wherefore think you I abode 
in the house of the queen? Verily, I know 
many things you never heard of, such as 
split infinitives and parsing and the binominal 
theorem and the pons asinorum. Atoms and 
molecules were my playthings and the abso- 
lute zero I carried in my pocket when I dwelt 
in my mother’s house, not to speak of other 
things too numerous to mention. No hand than 
mine more swift with the racquet, no foot 



“/ am Rah, Son of the Queen" . . . 


more sure in the kick for goal, no in-shoot 
more deadly. No voice could more sweetly 
sing, and once I won a prize for declamation. 
Yet I am here. I, Rah.” 

And Hank spat, saying, “Know you Draft 
and Twist?” 

“Oh, aye,” answered Rah, “and Tension 
also and the laying in of Threads in the Reed 
and the Dyeing of sundry Colors and divers 
other things. These also I learned in my 
mother’s house. Wherefore then should I be 
your slave?” 

And Hank said, “What else do you know?” 
and Rah answered, saying, “What else is 
there to know?” and Hank said, “Stick 
around.” 

And the first day there came before them 
Grump, the Discontent, who spake harshly 
unto them, cursing with a loud voice and 
saying, “Damn this job and you,” and Hank 
spake softly, saying, “What is your counsel, 
Rah, son of the Queen?” And Rah said, 
“Thus would I fire him. Behold, so great 
would the detonation be that it would be 
heard even to the Gates of Gotham,” and 
Hank answered, “Stick around.” Then did 


Hank, Captain of the Carders, take Grump, 
the Discontent, and listen to his words and 
reason with him and arrange his trouble so 
that Grump departed not, but abode with 
them and became Pep, the Willing, and 
learned under Hank, the Captain, and in 
time himself became Hank, Captain of the 
Carders. 

And the second day Hank said unto Rah, 
"Behold now, Rah, the work runneth light. 
What is your counsel?” And Rah answered, 
“Heavy upon it.” But Hank heavied not but 
answered, saying, “Stick around.” 

And the third day Hank said unto Rah, 
“Behold now, Rah, the work runneth heavy. 
What is your counsel?” And Rah answered, 
“lighten it”; but Hank lightened not, but 
answered, saying, “Stick around.” 

And yet again the fourth day did Hank say 
unto Rah, “Behold now, Rah, the work run- 
neth neither light nor heavy, but right on the 
dot. What is now your counsel?” And Rah 
answered, “By the beard I hope to grow, 
there is more to it than appeareth.” 

And the fifth day Hank said unto Rah, 
“Behold now, Rah, Super, Captain of the 
Captains, was here desiring that we should 
put more frames on 3.00-hank. What is your 
counsel?” And Rah answered, “Thus would 
I do. I would take some frames from the 
2.00-hank for the purpose.” And Hank said, 
“But tliou knowest that we cannot now keep 
up with the 2.00-hank. How then are we to 
take from that which we have not?” And 
Rah said, “I give it up. Behold my mind is as 
water which runneth hither and yon, and my 
tongue as a bell that is broken. You can 
search me.” And Hank answered, saying, 
“Hearken now to my words. It is written that 
Doubt is the father of Achievement, and Ig- 
norance the father of Knowledge, but not 
always. There remaineth the hand maiden, 
Ambition. Have you see her around here?” 
And Rah pondered these words. 

Then Hank spake further, saying, “Behold 
now, Rah, we are boneheads and jarheads 
as thou sayest and no man shall say that we 
know it not, but do we not each according 
to the best that is in us? We are as plants cast 
into rock soil to grow as best we may. The 
winds that have blown upon us have bent us, 
the poorness of the soil has stunted us, yet we 


[ 99 ] 


PICKOUT 


bear the best fruits that we can. How, then, 
are you? Behold, you are as a nursery plant, 
carefully seeded and tended with care and 
skill until such time as you are well grown, 
so that when the time comes for you to take 
your place with us in the rocky soil of the 
hillside you shall grow to be a giant among 
us, branching out well on all sides, the bearer 
of fine fruits. 

“Yet thou comest before me saying, ‘Now 
shall I go to Squills and be his Chemist,’ 
which means that you shall return to the 
nursery and never reach your full growth, 
but be a seedling all your life, the bearer of 
no fruits at all, for, believe it or not, it is only 
in the hard and rocky that you will grow 
from now on. Shall your mother, the wise 
queen, point to you with scorn saying, “Be- 
hold, he is no longer my son?’” 

And Rah cried out, saying, “But why am I 
your slave?” and Hank answered, “You are 
no man’s slave but your own. He who would 
command must first learn to obey. You are 
not working for me, nor Super, nor yet for 
Boss, General of the Host, but only with us 
that we may direct your work to your own 
advantage. You work only for Rah, son of a 
queen, who, it seems to me, is about to lose 
her son to become the twin brother of Pride 
and Sloth, which is Futility. Stay with us, 
Rah. Stay and work and learn and when the 
winds of experience have broadened your 
limbs and the hard and rocky soil of ad- 
versity has given you of its strength and you 
are well grown and full branched, then will 
we willingly follow you and serve you well. 
But, behold now, a little while ago you spake 
against Grump and would have had him 
fired, yet wherein are you different from him? 
What then shall I do with you?” 

And Rah said, “By the name of Heck, 
thou speakest truly. Gimme them wrenches.” 

So Rah dragged on his overalls and went 
back to work and abode there many days, 
and Hank, Captain of the Carders, said unto 
him, “Rah, behold I shall make you Wrench, 
Changer of the Gears,” and Rah pondered, 
saying, “You reckon I can run it?” And 
Hank answered, “Yea, by my help you shall 
run it.” Then, again, he said unto him, “I 
shall make you second under me, Keeper of 
the Help.” And Rah pondered deeply, saying, 

THE 1941 


“You reckon I can run it?” and Hank an- 
swered, “Yea, by my help.” 

Then came Super, Captain of the Captains, 
saying, “Behold now, Rah, thou hast done 
better than we thought. Twist, Captain of 
the Spinners, has gone to join another host, 
and you shall stand in his place and be cap- 
tain.” And Rah answered, “Lo, Super, I 
am yet young. Let a better man be cap- 
tain.” And Hank waxed wroth and swore, 
saying, “Where is the young squirt that was 
going to be the head of the whole works? Get 
out of here. By my troth, had I known I was 
trying to raise a doodle instead of something 
with a backbone I would have run you off 
long ago. Take then thy hat and coat and 
beat it quickly ere I slay thee.” So Super led 
him up stairs and there he gave him two 
swift kicks, saying, “See now thou doest this 
well for your own good lest worse befall 
thee,” and Rah became Captain of the Spin- 
ners and ruled wisely and in time himself 
became Super, Captain of the Captains. 

And after many days he that was Rah 
stood again before Boss, General of the Host. 
And Boss said, “Rah, son of the queen, be- 
hold how the strength hast gone from mine 
hands and the light from mine eyes and I am 
become an old man. Sit now in my tent and 
judge in my place that I might end my days 
in peace.” And Rah answered, “Not so.” 

And Boss sorrowed at his words and spake, 
saying, “Wherefore now do you fail me in my 
hour of need?” And Rah said, “Behold the 
burden which I already bear is too great for 
my years. Had it not been for you and Super 
and Hank and the others, how should I have 
borne it? Yet you would make it greater. 
How then shall I bear this also? Let an older 
man lead us, Boss, a stronger man and an 
abler, and loyally will I follow him.” And it 
so happened that at that time came Hank, 
Captain of the Carders, and stood within 
the door of the tent glaring with a baleful eye 
and saying, “Ahem!” in a loud and danger- 
ous voice and inquiring if there be anyone 
present with enough good hide on him to 
make a cone belt, so that Rah’s heart failed 
him and his legs became as wax and he cried 
quickly, “Yea, yea, that will I do as thou 
sayest to the best that is in me.” 

So he abode in the tent of Boss and be- 


[ ioo ] 


came himself General of the Host and ruled 
wisely and well. And as the years went on 
and his fame spread in the land that was the 
queen’s there came before him Prex, Ruler of 
the Queen’s House, and of the sons that 
dwelt therein, saying, “Lo, the time has now 
come that many of the queen’s sons must go 
out to join the forces that work, even as thou 
didst many years ago. Come then and speak 
to them the language of wisdom.” And Boss 
went with his mind full of words, but when 
he stood before them and looked into their 
faces who were his brothers as he had been 



“Gimme them wrenches ” . .. 


so long ago his tongue failed him and he 
spake not, but came away. 

And when he had returned to his Host 
there came Hank and he said, ‘‘Hank, old 
friend, I have made a fool of myself. Behold, 
I went to speak to Rah, the many sons of the 
wise queen, and had naught to say. And 
since I have come away it seems to me that 
I could not speak because I am no longer 
their brother Rah, the son of the queen 
called wise, but have become the son of 
others.” 

And Hank asked, saying, “Whose son, 
then, are you?” And Boss answered, “I am 


your son, Hank, and Super’s, and the son of 
Boss who was General before me and of 
others who have worked here through the 
years and helped to make me what I am. Yet 
when I came here I thought to meet with 
nothing but jealousy and hatred because I 
was the son of a queen. But instead of pulling 
me down you have all helped me to grow un- 
til I have become as you said that I would, a 
giant among you. Why did you do it, Hank?” 

And Hank answered, “Behold, I have 
enough things blamed on me without this. 
We have done nothing, for you are now the 
sons ol your own deeds, not ours. As you 
were your own slave when you came here, 
so have you now become your own master, 
fit to be the master of others. See now that 
you do this well as an example to others. 
But whatever has been done, you have done 
it, not I nor Super, nor he that was Boss.” 

And Rah said, “It may be that you speak 
truly.” 

So Hank returned to his own tent and 
spake with himself, saying, “Of course we all 
made him. He was a fine boy when he forgot 
about this queen’s house stuff and we were 
glad to help him. But let him take to himself 
all the credit that he may, so that he lose not 
confidence in himself. But if he get over 
proud I will take him down a peg or two as of 
old. Yet I and Super and he that was Boss, 
we know who made him what he is.” 

And his eyes became dim at the thought 
of the years that were gone and his hands 
trembled and he spake again, saying, “Drat 
me if I don’t believe I’m getting old. If the 
Boss remembers all I have done for him may- 
be he’ll let me keep this job some longer. In 
the shelter of the mighty oak the weak and 
scrubby tree weathers the storm, but all the 
same I hope there don’t no more of them rah- 
rah boys come around here. I don’t feel 
strong enough to train up any more of ’em.” 


[ioi] 


PICKOUT 


Help Wanted 


DEDICATED TO THE CLASS OF 1941 


A large mill commanding 

Position of standing 

Requires a general man 

Someone who’s admitted 

To practice and fitted 

For very diversified plan. 

Must understand dyeing 

And selling and buying 

And linen as well as silk. 

Be familiar with rayon 

And Vinyon and Nylon, 

And fibers of similar ilk. 

Must form corporations, 

And hold consultations 

Assuming a dignified mien. 

Should read all provisions, 

And textile decisions 

Wherever the same may be seen. 

Should be able to cope 

With our microscope, 

Be well grounded in physics and math 
Understand cloth analysis, 

As well as catalysis 

And of all kinds of ‘scopes’ plot the patl 

Must have a sound basis 

In all kinds of cases 

Should never be idle or slow. 

Must manifest learning 

In all things concerning, 

The matters referred to below: 

Must understand blending, 

Economical spending 

And twists both single and ply. 

To condition a room, 

Or find the lay of the loom 

Should be as easy as pie. 

Mill’s hand restrictions 

And also evictions 

Testing and spinning too. 

Wool manufacture 

Cotton contracture 

Designing both old and new. 

Must be acquainted with printing 

And all sorts of tinting, 

Distinguish a comb from a card. 

Be familiar with grinding, 

And all sorts 6f winding 

With weaving, plain and Jacquard. 


Above are essentials 

The best of credentials 

Required —and handsome physique 

Make prompt application 

Will pay compensation 

Of seventeen dollars a week. 


Adapted from Law Journal 



DIRECTORY 


Class of 1941 


Adie, Donald Miles 

26 Otis St., Lowell, Mass. 

Alexander, Gerard 

1 12 Quentin St., Kew Gardens, N. Y. 

Bardzik, Thaddeus 

iog Arlington St., Dracut, Mass. 

Batch eller, Ben Pitman 

1 61 Lowell St., Andover, Mass. 
Blanchard, Arm and Eugene 

161 Sayles St., Southbridge, Mass. 

Bloch, Seymour S. 

132 Armory St., Brookline, Mass. 

Brown, Needham Ballou, Jr. 

20 Johnson Rd., Andover, Mass. 

Buck, Roy Garvin 

3601 Woodruff Ave., Oakland. Cal. 

Campbell, John Duncan 

41 Marine Rd., South Boston, Mass. 

Carmichael, Robert Dana 

Box 43, RED No. 1, Lowell, Mass. 

Condon, John Andrew, Jr. 

Corthcll Rd., North Billerica, Mass. 

Cooper, Harlan Cyril 
Clayton, Ind. 

Dick, Rudolph Carl, Jr. 

37 Stanley Rd., Swampscott, Mass. 

Dubrule, Louis Joseph 

596 Haverhill Rd., Lawrence, Mass. 

Epstein, Edward Joseph 
872 S. 16th St., Newark, N. J. 

Factor, Sidney Wilfred 

49 Pleasant St., Haverhill, Mass. 

Fead, Robert William 

1713 Tenth Ave., Port Huron, Mich. 

Finard, Saunder 

46 Lancaster Ave., Revere, Mass. 
Garnett, Stanley Arthur 

1406 Narragansett Blvd., Edgewood, R. 1 . 
Gass, Matthew 

201 Hildreth St., Lowell, Mass. 

Gatzimos, Stephen A. 

172 Adams St., Lowell, Mass. 

Greenbaum, Bernard Saul 

31 Observatory Ave., Haverhill, Mass. 
Grondin, Abraham Hector 
1 1 1 Alma St., Lowell, Mass. 

Gijilfoyle, Donald William 

180 Gallatin St., Providence, R. I. 

Haas, Alexander Robert 

550 Willoughby Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Hamilton, Arthur Theodore 
Pittsfield, Maine 

Higginbottom, George Stephen 

46 Otis St., Lowell, Mass. 

Ink pen, Norman Alfred 

40 Oxford Ave., Ward Hill, Mass. 

James, Ernest Peter 

47 High St., Haverhill, Mass. 

Jay, Joshua Daniel 

668 Lenox Rd., Brooklyn, N. Y. 


Kahn, Seymour James 

1 16 Princeton Blvd., Lowell, Mass. 
Kaplan, Ralph Reuben 
43 Hawthorne St., Lowell, Mass. 
Koroskys, Michael Joseph 

175 Abbot St., North Andover, Mass. 
Koulas, Stanley Charles 

254 Pine Hill Rd., Chelmsford, Mass. 
Landfield, Harold 

15A Bowdoin Ave., Dorchester, Mass. 
Lane, Joseph James 

24 Prospect St., Millbury, Mass. 

Lewis, Dorothy Elaine 

8 Woodbine St., Chelmsford, Mass. 
Linden, Leo 

36 Garland St., Chelsea, Mass. 
Macktez, Lester Allen 

76 Summer St., W'oonsocket, R. I. 
McTeague, George David 
298 Riverside St., Lowell, Mass. 
Mahoney, Francis Vincent Jr. 

Twombly Ave., North Billerica, Mass. 
Manning, Neil Joseph 

1 18 Mt. Washington St., Lowell, Mass. 
Mason, Frederick Rufus 
Glendale, R. I. 

Milberg, Maurice 

1734 5^th St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Mintz, Irving Paul 

308 Gregory Ave., Passaic, N. J. 
Murphy, Francis Arthur 
318 Clyde St., Brookline, Mass. 

Okun, Seymour 

1080 Oceanview Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Patrick, Stephen Edmund, Jr. 

Riverside Drive, Augusta, Maine 
Pernick, David 

140 Kensington St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Pero, Henry Leland 
RFD No. 1, West Wellington, Conn. 
Phillips, Maurice Gordon 
Box 358, Southbridge, Mass. 

Platt, Walter Wallace 

9 Kenwood Place, Lawrence, Mass. 
Portilla, Jose Luis 

Zacatecas No. 39, Mexico, D.F. 
Puliafico, Salvatore Joseph 
P.O. Box 94, Bar re, Mass. 

Rashkin, Bernard 

1215 Ave. I, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Rich, Charlotte Merline 
2 Freeman St., Haverhill, Mass. 

Roberts, Angus Henry 
35 Wiggin St., Lowell, Mass. 

Saltsman, Sidney Irving 

89 Washington St., Lowell, Mass. 

Scarmeas, Harry 

21 Hancock Ave., Lowell, Mass. 
Schiffer, Lathrope A. 

175 Sherman Ave., New York, N. Y. 
Sinski, Henry Anthony 

81 Union Ave., Gardner, Mass. 

Skalkeas, Basil George 
53 Avon St., Lowell, Mass. 


THE 194 1 


L !04] 


Sullivan, Paul John 

33 S. Walker St., Lowell, Mass. 

Szymosek, Frank John 

13 Thorndike Rd., North Andover, Mass. 
Tartikoff, Jordan Alvin 
1552 48 St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Turner, George Robert 

457 Mt. Prospect Ave., Newark, N. J. 

Urlaub, George Samuel 
209-46 1 10 Ave., Bellaire, L. I. 

Via Gari, Jose 

Avenida de la Paz 44, Villa Obregon, Mexico, 
D.F. 

Webb, Ralph Peabody 
450 Broadway Rd., Draeut, Mass. 

Weil, Clarence Bernard 

1235 Grand Concourse, New York, N. Y. 

Wolf, Irving Jacob 

6 Altamount Ct., Morristown, N. J. 

Woodard, Alice Marjorie 
26 High St., Chelmsford, Mass. 

Zellweger, Ralph John 

Cliff Manor, Arcadian Way, Palisade, N. J. 


Class of 1942 

Allard, Ernest Herbert 
78 Hanks St., Lowell, Mass. 

Angell, Charles Francis 

108 Ward St., Chestnut Hill, Mass. 

Armstrong, George Gordon, Jr. 

24 Adams St., Littleton, Mass. 

Baer, Leonard Herman 

3920 Avenue D, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Boule, Raymond George 

66 Mt. Hope St.,. Lowell, Mass. 

Brook, John Frederick 
Simcoe, Ontario, Canada 

Bulson, Douglas Whitney 
557 Mercer St., Albany, N. Y. 

Caine, Philip Daniel 

89 Paffer St., Lowell, Mass. 

Coffin, William Burton 
120 Green St., Melrose, Mass. 

Corcoran, Leonard Robert 
77 Leonard Ave., Bradford, Mass. 

Cordeau, Georges Edward 

1014 Lake view Ave., Lowell, Mass. 

Cryan, Thomas Francis 
59 Temple St., Lowell, Mass. 

Eichner, Albert David 

730 Ft. Washington Ave., New York City, N. Y. 

Hamer, David Orville, Jr. 

1 1 Kelby St., Draeut, Mass. 

Harper, Cyril Newcomb 
44 Nahant St., Wakefield, Mass. 

Hornung, Sanford Lee 

146 E. 2nd St., Corning, N. Y. 

Hunter, Robert Arnold 
10 Green St., Newbury, Mass. 


Kent, George 

41 Deepdale Drive, Great Neck, N. Y. 
Lisien, Walter 
85 Whipple St., Lowell, Mass. 
McCartney, Robert Wallace 
16 Sidney St., Lowell, Mass. 

McMahon, Joseph Justin 
7 Belmont St., Lowell, Mass. 

Mandikos, George John 

ioi High St., Haverhill, Mass. 

Moreau, Arthur Joseph 
45 West St., Lowell, Mass. 

Murphy, John Anthony 

123 Andrews St., Lowell, Mass. 

Noonan, Paul Francis 
45 By St., Lowell, Mass. 

Oppenheim, Morton Lewis 
81 Sanray St., Lawrence, Mass. 

Pappas, Vasil James 

230 Draeut St., Draeut, Mass. 

Pinatel, John Andre 
386 East 32nd St., Paterson, N. J. 

Pratt, Caroline Elizabeth 
1 19 Fairmount St., Lowell, Mass. 
Rawlinson, Dustin 
Hampstead, N. H. 

Roberts, Russell Frederick 
Kendall Rd., Tyngsboro, Mass. 

Rogoff, David 

25 West Selden St., Mattapan, Mass. 
Roumas, Zeron Anthony 
3 Emmett St., Peabody, Mass. 

Sandner, Charles Rodney 

103 East Pleasant St., Lawrence, Mass. 
Sanford, George Morse, Jr. 

19 Garnet St., Malden, Mass. 

Schiffer, Clifford Elias 

3245 Corlear Ave., New York City, N. Y. 
Schiller, W 7 illiam 

130 Longwood Ave., Brookline, Mass. 
Shaffer, Stuart Frf:deric 
373 Beacon St., Lowell, Mass. 

Shapiro, Jeffrf;y Jay 

1 454-4861 St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Smith, Francis Dunham 

7 High St., Dover-Foxcroft, Maine 
Staklinski, Walter Albert 

8 Oak St., Rockville, Conn. 

Szopa, Stanley 

39 Beacon St., Lowell, Mass. 

Thomas, Donald Henry 

19 Adams St., Medford, Mass. 

Wolf, Irving Paul 

728 Troy Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 


Class of 1943 

Albert, Theodore William 
1 1 Clinton Ave., Newport, R. 1 . 


[ 105 ] 


PICKOUT 


Allard, Claude Henry 
78 Hanks St., Lowell, Mass. 

Allen, Craig 

45 Thornbury Rd., Scarsdale, N. Y. 

Barry, Gerard George 

539 Chelmsford St., Lowell, Mass. 

Beuter, Ralph Julius 

8421 106th St., Richmond Hill, N. Y. 

Bevington, Lawrence Elliot 

46 Tower Hill St., Lawrence, Mass. 

Bisko, Stephen John 

Perryville Rd., Webster, Mass. 

Bloom, Joseph 

126 Westbourne Terr., Brookline, Mass. 

Brook, George Henry 
Simcoe, Ontario, Canada 

Brown, Chandler Russell 

8 Cowell St., Marblehead, Mass. 

Bullock, Ralph Lewis 

18 Hill St., Lexington, Mass. 

Clark, George Carlyle 

16 Hawthorne St., Methuen, Mass. 

Colburn, John Allen 

1412 Bridge St., Dracut, Mass. 

Cotton, John Page, Jr. 

21 Fairmount Rd., Brookline, Mass. 

Coulman, Malcolm Prescott 
7 Hood St., Saugus, Mass. 

Davis, Esther Alice 

252 Middlesex St., Lowell, Mass. 
de Basterrechea, Juan 

Lamparilla No. 1, Havana, Cuba 
DeKalb, John Ernest 

19 Evergreen St., Chelmsford, Mass. 
DeMallie, Peter 

275 Gibson St., Lowell, Mass. 

Dolge, David Bigelow 

4 Oak St., Hazardville, Conn. 

Donnelly, Eliot Manning 

3 Northhampton Rd., Amsterdam, N. Y. 
Foisy, Robert William 

55 Florence Rd., Lowell, Mass. 

Foster, Clarence Everett 

9 Gregg St., Dracut, Mass. 

Fox, Barbara Elizabeth 

170 Marsh Hill Rd., Dracut, Mass. 
Fuller, Samuel Lloyd 

R-2 Lowell Box 99, Lowell, Mass. 
Garnett, Richard Herbert 

1406 Narragansett Blvd., Edge wood, R. I. 
Gillick, Thomas John 

47 S. Walker St., Lowell, Mass. 

Glen, Cornelius Leonard 

RFD No. 1, Lowell, Mass. 

Goldberg, Herbert Arthur 
37 Supple Rd., Dorchester, Mass. 

Griffin, Roger Castle, Jr. 

9 Washburn Ave., Needham, Mass. 

Gross, Stanley Frederick 

750 Harold Rd., Wood mere, N. Y. 
Hagerty, Francis William 
6 Lincoln St., Lexington, Mass. 
Haggerty, William Thomas 
28 Winsor St., Lowell, Mass. 


Harris, Carl Webster 

30 Tremont St., Penacook, N. H. 
Harrison, Maurice William 
18 Bellevue St., Lowell, Mass. 
Haseltine, Robert Clifton 

30 Eastland Terr., Haverhill, Mass. 
Hayward, William Edwin 
1 Nor well Rd., Dedham, Mass. 
Hochschild, Reiner George 

18 Spring St., Shelton, Conn. 
Hollingsworth, Clifford Earl 

12 Springpark Ave., Dracut, Mass. 
Howard, Philip John 

1 01 Union St., North Andover, Mass. 
Johnson, John Thomas 

35 Barasford Ave., Lowell, Mass. 
Keirstlad, Edith Louise 

34 Chauncy Ave., Lowell, Mass. 
Kelly, Allan William 
41 E St., Lowell, Mass. 

Kennedy, Matthew Anthony 

19 Dracut St., Lowell, Mass. 

Kittay. Morton Victor 

415 E. 86th St., New York, N. Y. 

Korb, Roland Carl 

142 East St., Methuen, Mass. 
Krintzman, Edward 

19 S. Lenox St., Worcester, Mass. 

Lau, Ching Sut 

74-A Mott St., New York, N. Y. 

Liang, Leland Sung 

22 Kennedy Rd., Hong Kong, China 
Lygimenos, Peter Charles 

3 Fitz Rd., Peabody, Mass. 
McElhinney, Douglas Hamilton 

16 Redman Ter., Caldwell, N. J. 
McLean, James Arthur 

30 Greenfield St., Lowell, Mass. 

McMahon, Stillman Dillon 
7 Belmont St., Lowell, Mass. 

McNellis, James Stanislaus 
74 Foster St., Lowell, Mass. 

Mallon, John Francis 

79 Sunset Ave., Lawrence, Mass. 

Meany, John Lawless 

99 Blossom St., Leominster, Mass. 

Messer, Albert Sidney 

1 03-24- 1 03rd St., Ozone Park, N. Y. 
Miller, Alex Michael 

1 91 Hall Ave., Perth Amboy, N. J. 
Morel, Gerard Charles 

4 Iceland Rd., Andover, Mass. 
Morton, Jackson Wentworth 

603 Country Way, Egypt, Mass. 
Muncy, Martin Patrick 

30 Cosgrove St., Lowell, Mass. 
Newell, William Andrews 
3 Williams St., Holyoke, Mass. 
O’Leary, Louise Margaret 

36 Pleasant St., Dracut, Mass. 

Pesetsky, Herbert 

2160 Anthony Ave., New York, N. Y. 
Peterson, Richard Edward 
Monument St., Concord, Mass. 


THE 1941 


L 106 ] 


Petricek, Bruno 

60 Clifton Ave., Clifton, N. J. 
Pettengill, Warren Martin 
i 66 Friendly Rd., Cranston, R. I. 
Queeney, John Hart 

28 Hazel Ave., Scituate, Mass. 

Quinn, Thomas Gregory, Jr. 

3 Rhodora St., Lowell, Mass. 

Rand, Woodbury Holmes 

23 Regent Circle, Brookline, Mass. 
Roberts, Donald Chester 
Kendall Rd., Tyngsboro, Mass. 
Robinson, John Bailey 
Oxford, Maine 
Rowen, Edward Joseph 

10 Graham Terr., West Roxbury, Mass. 
Ryan, Joseph Michael 

Lionsmouth Rd., Amesbury, Mass. 
Sayers, John Timothy, Jr. 

236 Princeton Blvd., Lowell, Mass. 
ScHLESINGER, MORTON 

328 W. 86th St., New York, N. Y. 

SCHWARTZMAN, MoSES 

Garciadiego 709, Mexico City, Mexico 

SlDEBOTTOM, WlLLIAM JAMES 

490 Brook Rd., Milton, Mass. 

Siegel, Harold 

5017-17 Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

SlLBERSTEIN, ROBERT HERBERT 

1 73 Riverside Dr., New York, N. Y. 
Simon, Richard Bernard 

140 W. 79th St., New York, N. Y. 
Spanos, George Peter 

14 West Bowers St., Lowell, Mass. 

Sullivan, Paul Henry 

329 Washington St., Lowell, Mass. 

Taylor, William Warren 

79 Dalton Rd., Chelmsford, Mass. 
Teichner, Arthur Charles 
7641 Yates Ave., Chicago, 111 . 

Towne, Allen Newman 

17 Maple Ave., North Andover, Mass. 
Tyrie, Wallace Rolley 

83 Leonard Ave., Haverhill, Mass. 
Valente, Louis Joseph 

2 Elm St., South Barre, Mass. 
Walwood, John Thomas 

144 A. St., Lowell, Mass. 

Wall, John Thomas 

157 Pleasant St., Lowell, Mass. 
Webster, Frederick Leonard 
1.67 D St., Lowell, Mass. 

Whiting, Frank Edward 

17 Maple Ave., Andover, Mass. 
Wielicka, Edward Dominick 
71 Arlington St. Lawrence Mass. 
Wilkinson, Vernon Lee 

Lebanon Hill, Southbridge, Mass. 
Winer, Allen 

1 15 Salem St., Medford, Mass. 
Zenorini, Henry John 

717 Palmer Ave., Teaneck, N. J. 
Zenorini, Joseph Aiden, Jr. 

514 1 6th St., Union City, N. J. 


Class of 1944 

Abrahms, Alan Bernard 

180 Williams St., Pittsfield, Mass. 

Alperin, George 

98 South Pleasant St., Bradford, Mass. 

Avramov, Rudi Marco 

306 W 93 St., New York City, N. Y. 

Baril, Wilfred Dolphir 

24 Olive Ave., Lawrence, Mass. 

Barton, Douglas Robert 
Center Place, Stow, Mass. 

Berko witz, Joseph Howard 

26 Beechwood Terr., Yonkers, N. Y. 

Bell, Walter George 

1 10 Melrose Ave., Hamilton Ontario, Can. 

Bent, Robert Mace, Jr. 

76 Vassar St., Worcester, Mass. 

Bonte, Andre Roger 

351 Winter St., Woonsocket, R. I. 

Brassil, Robert Daniel 
404 Wentworth Ave., Lowell, Mass. 

Brilliant, Ira Francis 

1620 Ocean Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Broderick, Thomas William 
36 Merriam St., Pittsfield, Mass. 

Chambers, Edward Francis 
Upper Gore, Webster, Mass. 

Cherenson, Alan Harold 

71 Canton St., Lowell, Mass. 

Clogston, Samuel Leighton 

152 Wentworth Ave., Lowell, Mass. 

Costello, Thomas David, Jr. 

57 Pleasant St., Woburn, Mass. 

Coughlin, Arthur Robert 

17 Cambridge PI., Lowell, Mass. 

Dean, Philip Semist 

80 Warren St., West Medford, Mass. 

Deminie William Frederick 
9 Boie Ave., Amesbury, Mass. 

Donohoe, William James 
46 Birch St., Lowell, Mass. 

Doo, Nee-Bing 

216 Wagner Rd., Shanghai, China 

Echavarria, Alyandro Mauricio 

Hijos de Pablo Echavarria, Medellin, Colombia , 
S.A. 

Ellis, Robert Warren 

Salem Rd., North Billerica, Mass. 

Fahey, John James 

5 Goodell St., Salem, Mass. 

Farren, Roger Patrick 

21 Hale Ave., Medford, Mass. 

Fieldsend, Arthur Tull 

89 Washington St., Hudson, Mass. 

Fine, Theodore 

387 Harvard St., Brookline, Mass. 

Frank, Arthur Joseph 

72 Montview Ave., Lowell, Mass. 

Frappier, Earl Francis 

18 Arthur Ave., Dracut, Mass. 

Ganezer, Max 
46 Bishop St., Waterbury, Conn. 


[ 107 ] 


pickout 


Godet, John Russell 

71 Agawam St., Lowell, Mass. 

Goldberg. Melvin David 

264 Winchester St., Brookline, Mass. 
Goldstein, Leon 

105 Bayview Ave., Port Washington, N. Y. 
Gottlieb, Edwin Meyer 

1531 East 2 St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Haggerty, Isabel Francis 

127 Fort Hill Ave., Lowell, Mass. 

Haller, Robert Walter 

71 Basswood St., Lawrence, Mass. 
Hallett, John Lawrence, Jr. 

98 Wannalancit St., Loweli, Mass. 
Hambleton, Winston Porter 
43 Raymond St., Nashua, N. H. 

Healy, Grant Samuel 

R.F.D. No. 1, Box 123, Webster, Mass. 
Helfgott, Stanley Lee 

I Plaza St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Hirn, John Edward 

4 Wind Rd., East Hartford, Conn. 

Hogan, Thomas Patrick 
25 A St., Lowell, Mass. 

Hughes, Robert Edward 

105 Pollack Ave., Pittsfield, Mass. 

Jay, Milton Jerry 

670 Lenox Rd., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Kaplan, Kalman 

71 Chatham Rd., Everett, Mass. 

Kenin, Philip 

2326 E 21 St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Kl ashman, Julian Bernard 
3 Austin Park, Cambridge, Mass. 
Kopycinski, Joseph Valentine 
242 Branch St., Lowell, Mass. 

Kosowicz, Julien Frank 
15 Leverett St., Lowell, Mass. 

La France, Henry Joseph 
Frost Rd., Tyngsboro, Mass. 

Langlais, George Oliver 
10 Robert PI., Lowell, Mass. 

Lasar, Lionel 

872 E 8 St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Leitch, John Badger 

I I Johnson Rd., Andover, Mass. 
Leshowitz, Harold 

933 50th St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Macdonald, Barbara Turner 
310 Wilson Ave., Rumford, R. I. 
McKittrick, Vernon Russell 
19 Hawthorne St., Lowell, Mass. 
MacLean, Philip Eugene 

52 Norfolk Ave., Swampscott, Mass. 
Magown, Robert Malcolm 
1 13 Summer St., Medford, Mass. 

Maguire, John Paul 
31 Prospect St., Lowell, Mass. 

Malcom, Bruce Brundage 
30 Taylor St., Pittsfield, Mass. 

Marcus, Martin Bernard 
953 Morton St., Mattapan, Mass. 
Marinopoulos, Charles 
2 34 Adams St., Lowell, Mass. 

Martin, Paul Joseph 
34 Sycamore St., Lowell, Mass. 


Masaschi, Joseph Bernard 

17 Rocky Nook Terr., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
Massey, Albert Joseph 

12 Carolyn St., Lowell, Mass. 

Merrill, John Walcott 
Main St., Tewksbury, Mass. 

Mitchell, Alvin Emery 

155 Cowesett Rd., Warwick, R. I. 

Munro, Livingston 

8 Lowell Rd., Watertown, Mass. 

Murphy, George Campbell 

30 Cunard Rd., Buffalo, N. Y. 

Nath, Virginia Louise 

2020 Middlesex St., Lowell, Mass. 
Nickerson, Howard Leslie, Jr- 

244 Chelmsford St., Chelmsford, Mass. 
Noyes, John Howard 

52 Main St., Andover, Mass. 

O'Donnell, Thomas Francis, Jr- 
71 Canton St., Lowell, Mass. 

O’Loughlin, Helen Mary 
25 Robins St., Lowell, Mass. 

Payelian, John 

94 Maple St., Lowell, Mass. 

Pincus, Stuart 

1525 Flatbush Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Procter, Richard 

187 Hovey St., Lowell, Mass. 

PULIAFICO, CARMELO ROSARIO 
P. O. Box 94, Barre Plains, Mass. 

Quinn, John Kieran 

1 18 Wentworth Ave., Lowell, Mass. 
Rabinowitz, Irving Manny 

2244 Creston Ave., New York City, N. Y. 
Rauser, Erwin Frank, Jr. 

2309 E. Kensington Blvd., Milwaukee, Wis. 
Richardson, George Francis 
7 Fairmont St., Lowell, Mass. 

Rindge, Samuel Everett 

31 Durham Rd., Longmeadow, Mass. 
Rudnick, Maxwell 

329 Winthrop Ave., New Haven, Conn. 
Sandner, Wallace 

103 E. Pleasant St., Lawrence, Mass. 
Sarver, Gerald Delano 

51 Nesmith St., Lawrence, Mass. 

Saslowsky, Sidney 

737 E. 10 St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Sharpe, Robert MacQueen, Jr. 

29 The Green, Woodstock, Vt. 

Silk, James Francis 

69 Lamb St., Lowell, Mass. 

Smoler, Irwin Charles 

910 Grand Concourse, New York, N. Y. 
Spofford, Ray Milton 

991 Main St., Haverhill, Mass. 

Stohn, William Thomas 

91 So. Main St., Middleboro, Mass. 
Stromvall, Ernest Malcom 
19 Sheldon St., Lowell, Mass. 

Towey, Frank Henry 

409 Fligh St., Lawrence, Mass. 

Weber, Alfred Julius 

226 Piaget Ave., Clifton, N. J. 

Weinstein, Samuel 

154 E 40 St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Woitkoiski, Stephen Anthony 
223 Wahconah St., Pittsfield, Mass. 


A OVER TISEMENTS 


Index to Advertisers 


cal 


Abbot Worsted Co. . 

Albany Felt Co. . 

Ambassador Cleaners 
American Cyanamid & Chem 

Corp 

American Dyestuff Reporter 
American Dyewood Co. 

American Viscose Corp. 

Andover Press 
Henry K. Barnes Co. 

Edward H. Best & Co., Inc 
The Bon Marche 
Calco Chemical . 

Norman Chapleau, Photographer 

Ciba Co., Inc 

Curtis & Marble Machine Co. 
Davis & Furber Machine Co. 
Davison Publishing Co. . 

The Derby Company 
Doe & Ingalls, Inc. . 

Dupont 

Emery & Conant Co., Inc. 

Geigy Company Inc. 

General Dyestuff Corp. 

David Gessner Co. 

Gilet Carbonizing Co., Inc 
G. S. Harwood & Son . 

Hart Products Corp. 

James Hunter Machine Co 
Lanatex Chemical Co. 

W. T. Lane & Bros., Inc. 

Laurel Soap Mfg. Co., Inc. 

John D. Lewis, Inc. 

Lowell Iron & Steel Co. 

Lowell Shuttle Co. 

Lowell Textile Associates, Inc 
Lowell Top Dyeing & Print Works 
Lowell Textile Institute . 


140 

136 

141 

1 16 
122 

137 

1 13 

1 18 

r 37 

138 

141 

"9 

1 14 

121 

*37 

127 

138 

! 34 

140 

1 12 

135 
!25 
120 
129 
131 
I 26 

133 

n 5 

138 

136 

I2 5 

*39 

141 

140 

134 

J 39 

1 1 1 


Zinsser & Company, 


Mass. Mohair Plush Co. 

Frank G. W. McKittrick Co. 
Middlesex Paper Tube Co. . 
National Aniline & Chemical C 
National Rayon Dyeing Co. 
National Ring Traveler Co. 
New England Bobbin & Shuttle 
New System Laundry 
Nyanza Color & Chemical Co. 
Packard Mills, Inc. 

Pawtucket Taxi Co. 

Pequot Mills . 

Rex Grille 
A. G. Pollard Co. 

Prescott & Co., Reg’d 
Proctor & Schwartz, Inc 
Riggs & Lombard, Inc. 

Rhode Island Warp Stop Equip 

Co 

Rodney Hunt Machine Co. 
Rohm & Haas Co., Inc. 

Sandoz Chemical Works, Inc. 

C. G. Sargent’s Sons Corp 
Scott & Williams, Inc. 

Sonoco Products Co. 
Southbridge Finishing Co. 
Southwell Wool Combing Co 
Standard Brands, Inc. 
Stowe-Woodward, Inc. . 

Textile Lunch 
U.S. Ring Traveler Co. 

Victor Ring Traveler Co 
Village Riding Academy 
Wallerstein Co., Inc. 
Watson-Park Co. 

M. G. Wight & Co. 

Jacques Wolf & Co. . 

Wyandotte Worsted Co. 

Inc. . . . 1 17 


Co 


\ 


140 

131 

138 
o., Inc. 127 

! 39 

133 

z 34 

141 

L35 

132 

141 
132 
141 
141 

! 37 
1 3i 
122 


me 




133 
139 
130 
124 
1 29 
128 

123 
128 

135 

1 39 

1 24 

140 

136 

139 

141 

140 
132 
136 
1 26 

*34 


LOWELL TEXTILE INSTITUTE 



LOUIS PASTEUR HALL— LOWELL TEXTILE INSTITUTE 
Four-year degree courses in 

Chemistry and Textile Coloring 
Textile Engineering 


Degrees of B. T. C. (Bachelor of Textile Chemistry) and B. T. E. (Bachelor of 
Textile Engineering) offered for completion of prescribed four-year courses. 


Three-year diploma courses in 

Cotton Manufacturing, Wool Manufacturing, Textile Designing 

Scientific and practical training in all processes of textile manufacture including all 
commercial fibres. Certified graduates of High Schools and Academies admitted 
without examination. 


For catalogue address 

CHARLES H. EAMES, S. B., President 

LOWELL, MASSACHUSETTS 




THE MIRHCLE OF 


zMJKCUS HOOK 



T hirty years ago, on December 19,1910, 
a group of engineers and scientists gath- 
ered in a new, unusual plant at M arcus Hook, 
Pa. This was to be the first commercial pro- 
duction of a man-made textile fiber in the U. S. 

Finally, someone gave a signal. Machinery 
sprang to life. And from the equipment there 
began to issue slender filaments which were 
led through a chemical Solution, then col- 
lected in the form of yarn. 

A new American textile industry was born! 
The progress of America's rayon industry 
in the thirty years that have passed since that 
first successful production in the Marcus 
Hook Plant of American Viscose Corpora- 
tion is now history. Rayon has marched 
steadily ahead as it has made possible new, 
more beautiful and more durable fabrics. To- 
day, it employs 49,000 American men and 


women, and annually produces more than 300 
million pounds of yarn. An outstanding ex- 
ample of American achievement. 

From the first, American Viscose Corpora- 
tion has figured prominently in every major 
development. It pioneered many vital ad- 
vances for cost reduction, price reduction, 
and quality improvement. It established the 
Crown Quality Control Plan to assure con- 
sumers the quality they want in rayon mer- 
chandise. It instituted the “Textile Unit/’ a 
full-sized textile research plant, in order to 
better serve the industry. 

American Viscose Corporation is proud of 
its 30-year record of achievement. And now, 
embarking on its fourth decade, it pledges 
continuance of the progressive policies which 
have stimulated the growth of the American 
rayon industry. 


Lustre Fibres , Ltd., 350 Fifth Avenue, New York, SELLING AGENTS for 


AMERICAN VISCOSE CORPORATION 

SALES OFFICES: NEW YORK, N. Y. t CHARLOTTE, N. C., PROVIDENCE, R. I., PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

World* s Largest Producer of Rayon Yarn 


PLANTS IN ... . MARCUS HOOK, PA. 
PARKERSBURG, W.VA. - Nil RO. W. VA. 



ROANOKE. VA. • LEW1STOWN. PA. 
M EADV1LLE, PA. - FRONT ROYAL. VA. 


BEST WISHES 


To the Class of ’41 


Norman Chapleau 


Photographer to the Pickout 


STUDIO OF 

A. G. POLLARD CO. 

LOWELL MASS. 


w 


COMPLIMENTS 


JAMES HUNTER 1 
COMPANY 

AACHNE 

NORTH ADAMS, 

MASS. 


• Wet Finishing 


• Preparation 


• Rag, Stock and Cloth Carbonizing 

• Garnett 


• Mattress and Batting Machinery 

• All Types of Textile Dryers 


Chemical Specialties 

and 

Chemicals 

\ 

\ 

tf-osi the *1 entile 9itdUi&tsuf, 

SULFONATED OILS 
SOFTENERS 
PENETRANTS 
SIZING COMPOUNDS 
*DECERESOL Wetting Agents 

American Cyanamid & Chemical Corporation 

New England District Office: 

89 Broad Street, Boston, Massachusetts 

*Reg. U.S. Pat. Office 


ZINSSER & COMPANY, live. 

Manufacturing Chemists 

Established 1897 

HASTINGS-ON -HUDSON, N. Y. 


Manufacturers of 

ANILINE 

ALIZARINE 

CHROME and 

ACETATE DYESTUFFS 

— also — 

FINE ORGANIC PIGMENTS 
TANNIC ACID and CHEMICALS 


We offer the services of our Technical Staff and fully 
equipped Laboratories for the solution of any 
Dyestuff or Chemical problems. 


IN THE FIVE HUNDREDTH ANNIVERSARY OF THE INVEN- 
TION OF PRINTING FROM MOVABLE TYPES (JOHANN GU- 
TENBERG, MAINZ GERMANY 1440), THE FOUR HUNDREDTH 
ANNIVERSARY OF THE INTRODUCTION OF THE FIRST PRESS 
TO AMERICA (MEXICO CITY 1539), THE THREE HUNDREDTH 
ANNIVERSARY OF THE FIRST BOOK PRINTED IN COLONIAL 
AMERICA (CAMBRIDGE 1640), THE TWO HUNDRED AND FIF- 
TIETH YEAR SINCE THE FIRST PAPER MILL IN THIS COUNTRY 
(GERMANTOWN 1690) AND SINCE THE FIRST NEWSPAPER 
(PUBLICK OCCURRENCES, BOSTON 1690), THE HUNDREDTH 
YEAR AFTER THE INVENTION OF THE CAMERA (DAGUERRE 
1839), THE SIXTIETH FOLLOWING THE DEVELOPMENT OF 
PHOTO-ENGRAVING, AND THE FIFTIETH AFTER THE PER- 
FECTION OF THE MONOTYPE CASTING MACHINE 

This Book was Printed in M.ay 1941 

BY THE 

ANDOVER PRESS IN ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 


ESTABLISHED 1798 


INCORPORATED 1887 


30,000,000 POUNDS OF 



Boston • Philadelphia • Providence • New York • Charlotte • Chicago 


S INCE 1915, Calco has grown from a standing 
start to become one of the country’s largest 
producers of dyestuffs, intermediates and related 
chemicals. In terms of size, our growth may be 
measured by our yearly consumption of the raw 
materials from which Calco dyes are made. Sulphur, 
for instance, is but one of many of these raw ma- 
terials. We now use 30,000,000 pounds of it a year. 

This progress takes on special significance as we 
pass our twenty-fifth anniversary. It is typical of 
the impressive development we have shared with 
the country’s Chemical Industry as a whole. And 
we are proud that Calco products contribute so sub- 
stantially to the nation’s self-sufficiency of vital 
materials — not only on the score of quantity, but 
on the basis of quality as well. 


CALCO CHEMICAL DIVISION 


AMERICAN CYANAMID COMPANY 


Bound Brook, New Jersey 




DYESTUFFS FOR 
ALL TEXTILE PURPOSES 

Scouring, wetting and penetrating agents, 
dyeing auxiliaries, softeners, water 
repellents and moth proofing agents. 



GENERAL DYESTUFF CORPORATION 

435 HUDSON STREET, NEW YORK 

Boston, Mass. Providence, R. I. Philadelphia, Pa. 

Chicago, III. Charlotte, N. C. San Francisco, Cal. 


★ 


Congratulations 

Seniors! 


We welcome you as fellow workers in one of 
the nation’s leading industries . . . the textile 
industry. It is our sincere wish that your par- 
ticipation in the advancement of this great 
textile industry during the coming years 
may bring you success and happiness. We be- 
lieve that the timeliness of your Commence- 
ment will bring you bigger and better ap- 
pointments than you 


ever anticipated. 

★ 

Better Grades 
of Dyestuffs for 
All Purposes 

★ 



★ 



OF FINISHING EQUIPMENT 


Cloth Washers 
Rope Soapers 
Soaping Machines 
Piece Dye Kettles 



Yarn Steamers 
Top Dyeing Machines 
Stock Dyeing Machines 
Crushers 


Carbonizing Ranges 
Fulling Mills 


DERBY DRY CLEANER 

Cleans with NON-INFLAMMABLE agent, 
removing tar, chalk, paint and oil (used 
again). Reduces hurling time, redyes, sec- 
onds; saves soap, alkali, steam: often 
eliminates scouring. 


Cloth Tenter Dryers 
Progressive Jig 



RIGGSand 8 !! LOMBARD 


m 


INCORPORATED 


Foot of Suffolk Street • • ♦ Lowell. Mass . 


Official Publication 
of the proceedings 



American Association 
Textile Chemists & Colorists 


•l 


L. A. OLNEY, D.Sc. 
Directing Editor J 


AMERICAN 
DYESTUFF REPORTER 


Published every other Monday 
by the 


HOWES PUBLISHING COMPANY 

440 Fourth Avenue - - New York City 


NORM AN A. JOHNSON 
Managing Editor 


MYRON DREW REESER 
Advertising Manager 




<»U)€¥S 


CONES * TUBES 
SPOOLS • CORES 


LARGEST MANUFACTURERS 

of PAPER CARRIERS 


FOR THE TEXTILE INDUSTRY 


Sonoco Products Company 


HARTSVILLE 
S. C. 


BRANTFORD 

ONT 


MYSTIC 

CONN. 




3518133 


H) PAPER CARRIERS H 




Compliments of 

Sandoz Chemical Works 

INCORPORATED 

\ 


STOWE -WOODWARD, Inc. 

CRY S L E R Sectional Rolls and Rubber Covered Rolls 
for every Textile Requirement 

NEWTON UPPER FALLS, MASSACHUSETTS 

New York Office - Woolworth Building 


M* n v : 


?ij|$ r " 



LAUREL SOAP MFG. CO. ,INC. 


¥m. H. Bertoiet’s 


Sts., Philadelphia, Pa. 


Known for over 30 years tar quality and efficiency, Laurel Brand 
Soaps, Oils and Finishes are keyed to the needs of the textile in- 
dustry by continuous laboratory and mill research. Consult us on 
your textile problems — be they bleaching, scouring, foiling, 
soaking, degumming, lubricating, dyeing or finishing. 

Warehouses: 

Paterson, N. J. Chattanooga, Tenn. Charlotte, Pi. C. 







Sstablishrd 176 a 


TWELVE YEARS before the signing of the Declaration of Inde- 
pendence of the United States of America, the Geigy Organization 
came into existence. 

Thus, 1941, finds the Geigy Organization one hundred and seventy - 
seven years old : 

With that in mind and the fact the organization has shown a conserva- 
tive and steady growth, it is only reasonable to deduct that Geigy 
occupies a distinct position in the field of dyestuffs and extracts. 


GEIGY COMPANY Inc. — New York 

89-91 BARCLAY STREET 

Sole Selling Agents in U . S. and Canada for J. R. GEIGY S. A., Basle 

BOSTON PORTLAND, ORE. PHILADELPHIA CINCINNATI 

PROVIDENCE JTORONTO ^CHARLOTTE, N. C. 

In Great Britain — THE GEIGY COLOUR CO., LTD., National Bldgs., Parsonage, Manchester 



SPECIALIZED 


SUPERCLEAR* 

Scientific printing gum 

LUPOMIN* 

Cation active finish 



CHEMICALS 


WETSIT CONC.* 
Rapid wetting agent 

LUPOSEC* 

Improved waterproof 


HYDROSULFITES — FINISHES — SOFTENERS — SULPHONATED OILS 
SIZES -IMPORTED GUMS — Ask for samples and prices 

Jacques Wolf St Co. 


Manufacturing Chemists and importers 
PASSAIC. N.J. 


*Reg. U.S. Trade Mark 


GEO. S. HARWOOD & SON 

TEXTILE FEEDING MACHINERY 


Specialists in the manufacture of automatic feeds to suit 
your particular requirements. 


50 LAGRANGE STREET 


WORCESTER, MASS. 


DAVIS & FURBER MACHINE CO. 

NORTH ANDOVER, MASS. 



3-Cylinder Set of Woolen Cards with Center-Draw 
Intermediate Feed and Tape Condenser 


Card Clothing, Carding Machines for Woolen, Worsted, 
Mohair, Asbestos. Cotton Waste, Rayon Staple Fiber. Flax 
Waste, Jute Waste, Silk Waste, Shoddy and all Wool Substi- 
tutes. 

Garnett Breasts, Broad Brand Intermediate Feeds, Tape 
Condensers, Double and Triple Apron Rubbs. 

Ring Spinning Frames for all Stocks Spun on the Woolen 
System. 



Ring Spinning Frame for All Materials Spun 
on the Woolen System 


Standard High Speed Mules, and High Speed Large Package 
Mules for All Stocks Spun on the Woolen System. 

# Full Line of Nappers for Cotton, Wool and Rayon Staple 
Fiber Goods, Woven or Knitted, Single Acting and Double 
Acting; Napper Clothing. 

Full Line of Wool and Rayon Staple Fiber Openers, Dusters, 
Pickers, Shredders, Twisters, Bobbin Winders, Spoolers, 
Dressers, and B earners. 

Leather Rubb Aprons; Tapes for Tape Condensers. 

Garnett Wire and Re-Clothing Garnett Breasts, Garnett 
Machines, Feed Ends and All Card Rolls and Cylinders. 


▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼ DAVIS & FURBER ▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼ 



In National Textile Service Laboratories chemists and colorists antic- 
ipate and prevent dye house troubles by subjecting fabrics to tests far 
more rigorous than conditions encountered in actual use. These men, 
all with years of practical dye house experience, will welcome your 
dyeing or finishing problems with a warmth of intelligent interest as 
genuine as their technical skill. 

Attached to each principal National sales offi ce is a National Textile 
Service Laboratory having an unequalled accumulation of test work 
and technical data. We invite you to use this nearby technical service. 

NATIONAL ANILINE & CHEMICAL CO., INC 

40 RECTOR STREET NEW YORK, N, Y, 

BOSTON PHILADELPHIA GREENSBORO CHATTANOOGA 

PROVIDENCE SAN FRANCISCO ATLANTA PORTLAND, ORE. 

CHICAGO CHARLOTTE NEW ORLEANS TORONTO 

BRANCHES AND DISTRIBUTORS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD 



KEEP IN MIND 

THE S & W RECORD OF PROGRESS 


Through the introduction of new and better 
knitting methods . . improvements in knitting 
devices . . . and the development of entirely 
new machines Scott & Williams has been con- 
tributing to progress in the knitting industry 
for more than three quarters of a century. Keep 
(his long record of achievement in mind. The 

ESTABLISHED 1865 


experience gained by S & W over these years 
is a constant source of benefit to students and 
veterans alike throughout the knitting world. 
It is one of the reasons why S & W Knitting 
Machines and S & W service have attained such 
a high standing among mills that strive to give 
their customers the fullest value in knitting. 



SCOTT & WILLIAMS 

INCORPORATED 

40 WORTH STREET, NEW YORK, N. Y 

“THIS IS THE SCOTT & WILLIAMS MACHINE AGE’ 


Compliments of 

SOUTHBRIDGE FINISHING 

COMPANY 

PRINTERS 

FAST COLOR PRINTS 

on 

FINE COTTON GOODS 



STOCK DRYER 


ACIDIFYING MACHINES 
AUTOMATIC FEEDERS 
BACKWASHERS 
BACKWASH DRYERS 
BAGGING MACHINES 
CLOTH DRYERS 
CONVEYING SYSTEMS 
CRUSHROLL MAC HINES 
DUSTING MACHINES 
BALL WINDING MACHINES 
BURR PICKERS 
CARBONIZING DRYERS 
CARBONIZING DUSTERS 
OPENING MACHINES 


COTTON STOCK DRYERS 
PRESS ROLL MACHINES 
CONVEYING APRONS 
WOOL DRYING MACHINES 
MIXING PICKERS 


PACKAGE DRYERS 
WOOL WASHING MACHINES 
YARN CONDITIONING 
MACHINES 

YARN SCOURING MACHINES 


C. G. SARGENT’S SONS CORP. 

GRANITEVILLE, MASS. 


Gessner 

Improved Cloth Finishing Machinery 

Nappers, Presses, Decating Machines, Gigs, 
Decating Aprons, Vacuum Extractors, Scutchers, 
Shrinking Plants, Hydrolizers, Brushes, Spot 
Proofing Machines. 


DAVID GESSNER CO. • WORCESTER, MASS. 



CHEMICALS 

FOR EVERY 
TEXTILE APPLICATION 


T vkouon Sodium hydrosulfite for vat dye- RHoilite Resins — Urea formaldehyde 

J r illy ami stripping resins for crush resist- 

ant finishes 


Formopon — 


Sodium formaldehyde sulfox - 
ylate for vat printing and 


stripping 


RHoteX Resins Synthetic gums for siz- 

ing , thickening and 
weighting 


RHoplex Resins 


Acrylate 

permanent 


resins for 
finishing 


XritOIlS Agents for wetting , scouring and 

softening yarns and fabrics 





GILET CARBONIZING CO., INC. 

Lowell, Mass. 

COMMISSION SORTING 
SCOURING, CARBONIZING, DEPAINTING 
WOOLS AND NOILS 

Also Commission Sorting, Scouring, Carbonizing, Carding and Garnett ing of 
Worsted Thread Wastes and Clips. Cutting to length of Tops, Laps, etc. 

Blending, Pickering. 

Phones: Lowell 5445 and 5446 


EST. 1922 — INC. 1935 


FRANK G. W. McKITTRICK CO. 


OTHER DIVISIONS 
C. S. Dodge Co., Est. 1883 
Rag or Shoddy Picker Mfrs. 


^ROLL COVERING 


John A. Thomson Co. 
Est. 1901 

Mill Hardware and Supplies 




REPAIR SHOPS 
Mill Brushes 

Worsted Top Roll Covering 
Faller and Circle Repairing- 
Belting — New and Rebuilt 


Ala chi lie Shop 

USED WOOLEN AND WORSTED MACHINERY 


60 FLETCHER ST. 


LOWELL, MASS. 


Time and Money Savers . . . 

the famous line of 

PROCTOR DRYING AND TEXTILE MACHINERY 

Dryers — Garnetts — Cards — Feeders and Preparatory 
Machinery for Woolens, Worsteds, Cotton, Rayon, etc. 

PROCTOR & SCHWARTZ, INC., Philadelphia 



l/UcdA&n - pa/iJz Gfutvnantf, 

261 FRANKLIN STREET 

BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 


The most popular sheets and cases 
in America — because they wear so long. 

PEQUOT MILLS 

SALEM, MASS. 


PACKARD MILLS, Inc. 

Woolen Manufacturers 



WEBSTER, MASS. 


K-A ELECTRICAL WARP STOPS 

INCLUDED IN 

THREE RECENT MODERNIZATIONS 


M' 


f i 

Lxji 


o 


ci 


Since last Textile Show — 200 Mills have installed K-A — of these 110 have 

extended K-A Equipment. 

RHODE ISLAND WARP STOP EQUIPMENT COMPANY 

Frank Quance Wm. D. Whittaker 

P. O. Box 1543 PAWTUCKET, R. I. P. O. Box 2063 

Paterson, N. J. Atlanta, Ga. 


Compliments of 

THE HART PRODUCTS CORPORATION 

1440 BROADWAY • NEW YORK CITY 

Manufacturing Chemists 


The OLDEST and LARGEST Manufacturer of RING 
SPINNING and TWISTER TRAVELERS IN AMERICA 


American Hicks Wilson U. S. Standard 


Wentworth Double Duty, 

Wentworth Gravity and Gravity Express 

National Ring Traveler Co, 

Philip C. Wentworth, Treasurer 

PAWTUCKET, R. I. PROVIDENCE, R. I. 

354 PINE ST. P. O. Box 1565 



New England Bobbin 



& Shuttle Co. 


COMPLIMENTS OF 

NASHUA, NEW HAMPSHIRE 



1 


WYANDOTTE 



WORSTED 

Makers of 


COMPANY 

PRECISION BOBBINS 



AUTOMATIC LOOM 


WATERVILLE, ME. 

WARP AND TWISTER 

i r 


j 

1 





A STORE OF DISTINCTION 

Compliments of 


Where your needs are met 
with a SMILE 

THE 


The “COOP” 

DERBY COMPANY 


• 

SPECIALS!! 



American Wool Handbook 



American Rayon Handbook 



Handbook of Chemistry and Physics 



Lange’s Handbook of Chemistry 



and Others 

15 UNION ST. 


• 

LAWRENCE, MASS. 


LOWELL TEXTILE ASSOCIATES, INC. 



College Book Store 



NYANZA 


1 

EMERY & CONANT 

ANILINE COLORS 


COMPANY, Inc. 

DYESTUFFS 

CHEMICALS 


FINISHING MATERIALS 


Inquiries about Technical Problems Invited 



FACTORIES: 



Chemical Manufacturing Co., Ashland, Mass. 



The New Brunswick Chemical Co. 



Newark, N. J. 



NYANZA COLOR & CHEMICAL CO. 






Main Office: 


Co,,y «io ^ t0 

215 WATER STREET * NEW YORK CITY 


WOOL MERCHANTS 

BRANCHES: 


New England Office: Ashland, Mass. 

519 West Randolph St., Chicago, 111. 

635 Drexel Bid., Philadelphia, Pa. 


▼ 

911 North 6th Ave., Knoxville, Tenn. 

115 So. West 4th Ave., Portland Ore. 

304 E. Morehead St., Charlotte, N. C. 


267 SUMMER ST. - BOSTON 


Southwell Wool Combing Co. 

COMMISSION WOOL COMBERS 

NOBLE COMBS FRENCH COMBS 

North Chelmsford, Massachusetts 

Phone Lowell 6311 


^ m 

1 

“A TRAVELER FOR EVERY FIBRE” 

Universal Standard 

1 | g 


Ring Travelers 

LANE BASKETS 


for SPINNING for TWISTING 

• 

For every Textile Mill. 


PERFECT SATISFACTION 

Not only as above but also on Casters, 


• 

\ 

or perforated for steaming. 


s 

Manufactured Exclusively by 

Equally at home with 


U. S. Ring Traveler Co. 

Cotton - Wool - Silk - Synthetics 

| M a rt ufn ct u red for £5 years by 


Providence, R. I. 

Greenville, S. C. 

W. T. LANE & BROS., Inc. 


AMOS M. BOWEN, President and Treasurer 

Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 

l 

i 


• 


M.G. Wight &Co. 


For 

TOP PRODUCTION 

PRINTING 


Specify 

RULING 


BINDING 


Albany Machine Cloths 

m 

i 


ALBANY FELT COMPANY 

Distributors EDISON Brand 


Albany, N. Y. 

MAZDA LAMPS 


Machine cloths and felts for every 



Textile Use. 

• 


BLANKETS CLOTHS JACKETS 



Sanforizing Lapping Slasher Roll 

67 MIDDLE STREET 


Palmer Roller Quetsch Roll 

LOWELL, MASS. 

i 

1 

Printing Clearer Rubbing 

Slasher 

1 


Curtis * Marble 

CLOTH FINISHING MACHINERY 

for 

Cottons Woolens Plushes 

Rayons Worsteds Corduroys 

Silks Knit Goods Carpets 

Wool Burring, Mixing and Picking 

MANUFACTURERS SINCE 1831 

Curtis & Marble Machine Co. 

72 Cambridge Street, Near Webster Square 
WORCESTER, MASS. 

BRANCH OFFICES: 

New York/ Philadelphia, Pa./ Greenville, S. C. 

AMERICAN 

DYEWOOn COMPANY 

Serving 

THE TEXTILE TRADE 

for 143 years 

• 

FRENCH PASTE 

FOR ONE-BATH 

LOGWOOD BLACK ON WOOL 

• 

W ri te for Particulars 

22 EAST 40th STREET 

NEW YORK CITY 



GREETINGS 


Henry K. Barnes 



Company 

PRESCOTT 





8 IRVING STREET 

AND 


SALEM, MASS. 

COMPANY 


w 

REGISTERED 


▼ 

Manufacturers' Agents for 


TEXTILE BELTING 

Dyes & Chemicals 


APRONS 



STRAPPING 

MONTREAL - CANADA 


ACCESSORIES 



REG U.S. PAT OFF. 


KNOXALL FABRICS 

Clearer Cloth Roller Cloth 

Slasher Cloth Finishing Fabrics 

Filter Cloths, Pure Wool 
Filter Cloths, Cotton, CamePs Hair 
Linen and Silk 

Mechanical Felts, Cotton and Wool 
Endless Woolen Blankets and Felts 

EDWARD H. BEST & CO., Inc. 

BOSTON, MASS. 


The 76 th Year Blue Book 


will be ready July 1941 



Office Edition, $7,50; Handy Edition, $5.00; 
Salesman’s, $4,00, Full description on request. 

DAVISON PUBLISHING COMPANY 

Standard Textile Publications Since 1866 

Executive and Sales Offices, RIDGEWOOD, N. J. 


MIDDLESEX PAPER TUBE COMPANY 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

PAPER TUBES • CLOTH ROLLS • PAPER CORES 

SPIRAL AND PARALLEL 


Mailing Tubes and Cases, Paper Cans, Boxes, Ribbon Blocks, Paper Spools 

Factories: TRENTON, N. J., LOWELL, MASS., AUGUSTA, ME. 

Main Office: LOWELL, MASS. 

NEW YORK OFFICE - - 342 MADISON AVE. 


LANATEX CHEMICAL COMPANY 

49 Westminster Street Providence, R. I. 


Speck Dyes 

Specializing in Speck Dyes for Fabrics 
Containing Rayon Decorations and Rayon Mixtures 


ALWAYS A QUALITY 
PERFORMER! 

Diastafor has an outstanding reputation 
for quality performance in sizing, desizing, 
dyeing and bleaching. Always uniform in 
action, Diastafor is the choice of the textile 
manufacturing industry. 

For full particulars , write to 

FLEISCHMANN’S 

DIASTAFOR 

DIASTAFOR DEPARTMENT 
STANDARD BRANDS INCORPORATED 

595 MADISON AVE. NEW YORK, N. Y. 


W Repetition # 

Builds Reputation 

We repeat the quality and specifications of 
the first Victor Travelers you buy from us in 
filling every additional order you send us 
thereafter. 

This reputation for uniformity is the result 
of carefully organized manufacturing and test- 
ing facilities. 

Tell us your traveler troubles. . . . 

VICTOR RING TRAVELER COMPANY 

20 Mai hewson Si reel Providence, R. I. 

P. O. Box 1318 

1733 Inverness Ave., N. E. 173 W. Franklin Ave. 

Atlanta, Ga. Gastonia, N. C. 

j Tel. Vernon 2330 Tel. 247 




Lowell Top Dyeing 


Compliments of .. . 

and 



Print Works 


fjatkmal (lamn \ 



.bifeuuj, QmipaHn 

Lowell, Massachusetts 


NEWARK, NEW JERSEY 




JOHN D. LEWIS 


Compliments of .. . 

Incorporated 


RODNEY HUNT 

MACHINE COMPANY 

Textile Chemicals 





OISANGE, MASS. 

Synthetic Resins 


• 

Specialists in 

PROVIDENCE, R. I. 


WET FINISHING 

MANSFIELD, MASS. 

1 

I.... ... ..... ... 


MACHINERY 


RAPIDASE 


FOR DESIZING COTTON, RAYON AND MIXED GOODS 

WALLERSTEIN COMPANY, INC. - NEW YORK, N. Y. 


MASSACHUSETTS 
MOHAIR PLUSH COMPANY 



56 Garden St. 
Everett Station 


oston,Mass. 


Established 1857 Cable Address, “IBIDEM LOWELL” Incorporated 1900 

ABBOT WORSTED COMPANY, Graniteville, Massachusetts 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Worsted — Mohair YARNS Camel Hair 

For Plushes, Carpets, Men’s Wear, Dress Goods and Knit Fabrics 

Selling Agents: Davis, Young and Anderson, Boston and Philadelphia 


COMPLIMENTS OF 

LOWELL SHUTTLE COMPANY 

LOWELL - - MASS. 


PETE’S 

TEXTILE LUNCH 

“ WHERE TEXTILE MEN EAT IN SPITE OF THE FOOD ” 
734 MOODY ST. LOWELL, MASS. 


Compliments of 

A. G. POLLARD COMPANY 

Lowell’s Oldest Department Store 


Compliments of 

Lowell Iron & Steel Company 

Lowell, Mass. 


★ ★ ★ / 

The BON MARCHE 

Department Store 
LOWELL, MASS. Phone 6361 


REX GRILLE 

Where old and new friends meet 

Good Food and Floor Show 


Ambassador Cleaners 

May we serve you in the future 
as we have in the past. 

3-HOUR SERVICE WHEN DESIRED 

PHONE 2-3661 


New System Laundry 

A. A. PARENT & SON 

285 THORNDIKE STREET, LOWELL 
PHONE 2-0991 


Village Riding 

Academy 

EDDIE GAUDETTE, Prop. 

Instruction 

Riding 

1677 MIDDLESEX ST. 

PHONE 2-2621 


PAWTUCKET 
TAXI COMPANY 

760 Moody Street 

Phone 6891 


A cknowledgments 


\ A TE are particularly indebted to Mr. Johnson and 
^ ’ Mr. Cole of the Andover Press; to Mr. Carter of 
Donovan and Sullivan; and Mr. Chapleau, of the Chap- 
leau Studios; for their willingness to give freely of their 
time and experience in the ironing out of the many 
technical difficulties that were inevitably encountered. 
It goes without saying that we wish to thank Professor 
MacKay for his consideration in humoring our many 
whims, and for his aid in keeping us within the borders 
of financial practicability. To our staff, we are indebted 
for their aid in the preparation of the material, as well 
as for their numerous helpful suggestions. Credit is due 
Miss Rosatto for her willingness to help us with drawings, 
sketches, and general artistic design. To Miss Foote, our 
thanks for the time and effort which she so cheerfully 
gave. Last, we cannot forget our advertisers, without 
whom this book would have been an impossibility. 


Index 


AATCC 

62 

Acknowledgments 

142 

Administration 

12 

Advertisements 

J 

I OQ 

All-School Banquet ........ 

j 

54 

Alpha Epsilon .......... 

72 

Athletic Association ........ 

65 

Baseball 

88 

Basketball .......... 

86 

Candids 

92 

Commencement Committee ...... 

64 

Contents ........... 

7 

Dedication 

8 

Delta Kappa Phi 

. . . . 78 

Department Heads 

14 

Directory 

103 

Engineering Society 

... 63 

Faculty 

. . 16 

Football 

. . . . 84 

Foreword 

6 

Freshman Class History 

52 

Frosh-Soph Football 

. . . . 46 

Golf Team 

9 1 

Good-bye Mr. Chips 

12 

Help Wanted .......... 

102 

Interfraternity Council ........ 

66 

Junior Class History 

. . . . 48 

Omicron Pi . . . 

74 

Phi Psi 

. . . . 76 

Phlame 

70 

Pickout 

56 

President’s Message 

1 1 

Rah and Hank 

• • • 98 

Rifle Team 

90 

Senior Class History 

26 

Seniors 

28 

Sophomore Class History 

50 

Tau Epsilon Sigma 

80 

Text 

58 

Textile Cabinet 

. . . . 67 

Textile Players 

60 

Typographical Error 

144 

Upstream Day ......... 

82 


Typographic Error 


Oh, the typographic error is a slippery thing and sly 
You can hunt till you are dizzy, but it somehow will get by, 
Till the forms are off the presses — it is strange how still it keep 
It shrinks down into a corner and it never stirs or peeps. 

That typographic error too small for human eyes 
Till the ink is on the paper when it grows to mountain size, 
And the Editor stares in horror and tears his hair and groans, 
The copyreader drops his head upon his hands and moans. 
The remainder of the volume may be as clean as clean can be 
But that typographic error is the only thing you see.