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BOSTON 

PUBLIC 

LIBRARY 





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in 2016 



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New England 

A Bibliography of Its History 



Bibliographies of New England Eiistory 

JOHN BORDEN ARMSTRONG (1926-1985) 

Boston University 
Series Editor 

1. Massachusetts: a Bibliography of Its History (1976) 

2. Maine: a Bibliography of Its History (1977) 

3. New Hampshire: a Bibliography of Its History (1979) 

4. Vermont: a Bibliograplty of Its History (1981) 

5. Rhode Island: a Bibliography of Its History (1983) 

6. Connecticut: a Bibliography of Its History (1986) 

7. New England: a Bibliography of Its History (1989) 

8. New England: Additions to the Six State Bibliographies (1989) 



New England 

A Bibliography of Its History 



Volume Seven of Bibliographies of New England History 



Prepared by the 




COMMITTEE FOR A NEW ENGLAND BIBLIOGRAPHY 

ROGER PARKS 

^ Senior Research Associate ^ 

Boston University 



With a Historiographic Essay 
by DAVID D. HALL and ALAN TAYLOR 
Boston University 



UNIVERSITY PRESS OF NEW ENGLAND 

Hanover and London 



University Press of New England 

Brandeis University 

Brown University 

Clark University 

University of Connecticut 

Dartmouth College 

University of New Hampshire 

University of Rhode Island 

Tufts University 

University of Vermont 



^ c . ■ 






BPLISO 

39999061767792 
Parks, Roger N. 

New Eiiyland : a 
bibliography of its histo 



All rights reserved. Except for brief quotation in critical articles or reviews, this book. 




Printed in the United States of America on permanent/durable acid-free paper. 



LIBRARY OF CONGRESS CATALOGING-IN-PUBLICATION DATA 

New England, a bibliography of its history / prepared by the Committee for a New 
England Bibliography ; edited by Roger Parks ; with a historiographic essay by 
David D. Hall and Alan Taylor. 

p. cm. — (Bibliographies of New England history ; v. 7) 

Includes bibliographical references. 

ISBN 0-87451-496-7 : $40.00 

1. New England — History — Bibliography — Union lists. 2. Catalogs, Union — 
United States. 1. Parks, Roger N. II. Hall, David D. III. Taylor, Alan, 

1955- . IV. Committee for a New England Bibliography. V. Series. 
Z1251.E1N452 1989 
[F4] 

016.974— dc20 



89-40231 

CIP 



This volume 

is dedicated with affection and respect 
to John Borden Armstrong 
whose leadership and dynamic perseverance 
made this series a reality. 



This volume has been made 
possible in part by a grant from 
the Research Materials Program of 
the National Endowment 
for the Humanities 



Sponsors 



A-Copy, Inc. 
Acorn Club of Connecticut 
American Antiquarian Society 
Amherst College Library 
Ella F. Anderson Trust 
Association for the Study of Connecticut History 
Association of Historical Societies of Neiv Hampshire 

Bangor Public Library 
Bates College 
Bay State Historical League 
Bennington Museum 
Boston Athenaeum 
Boston College 
Boston Public Library 
Boston University 
Bowdoin College 
Brown University Library 
William F. Bryant Foundation 
Helen P. Burns 
Colby College Library 
Colonial Society of Massachusetts 
Randolph P. Compton 
Friends of Connecticut College Library 
Connecticut Historical Society 
Connecticut Library Association 
Connecticut State Library 
fere R. Daniell 
Fred Harris Daniels Foundation, Inc. 

Dartmouth College Library 
Dexter Corporation Foundation 
Frederick P. Ehvert 



Mr. and Mrs. Philip H. English 
Essex Institute 
Faust and Louisa Fiore Memorial 
Green Mountain Power Corporation of Vermont 
Hartford Foundation for Public Giving 
Stuart Higley 
Historic Deerfield, Inc. 
Cecil Howard Charitable Trust 
Edward T. James 
Janet Wilson James 
David C. Libbey 
Maine Historical Society 
Maine Eibrary Association 
Maine State American Revolution 
Bicentennial Commission 
Maine State Archives 
Maine State Museum 
Massachusetts Historical Society 
Middlebury College 
Mount Holyoke College 
Mount Madison Volunteer Ski Patrol Trust 
Museum of American Textile History 
Museum of Our National Heritage 
National Life Insurance Company of Vermont 
National Society of the Colonial Dames of America 

in the State of Vermont 
New England Historic Genealogical Society 
New England Library Association 
Nezu Hampshire American Revolution 
Bicentennial Commission 
Neio Hampshire Charitable Fund 
New Hampshire Historical Society 
New Hampshire State Library 
Northeastern University 
Norwich University 



vii 



Sponsors (continued) 



Old Sturbridge Village 
John F. Page 
Mr. and Mrs. Hall ]. Peterson 
Phoenix Publishing 
Portland Public Library 
Providence College 
Providence Heritage Commission 
Providence Journal Company 
Providence Public Library 
Putnam Foundation 
Rhode Island Bicentennial Commission 
Rhode Island Committee for the Humanities 
Rhode Island Foundation 
Rhode Island Heritage Commission 
Rhode Island Historical Society 
Saint Anselm's College, Geisel Library 
Shelburne Museum 
The L. J. Skaggs and Mary C. Skaggs Foundation 

Arthur H. Smith 
Smith College 
Society of the Cincinnati of Connecticut 



Society of Colonial Wars in Connecticut 
Society of Colonial Wars in Massachusetts 

Ann F. Spencer 
Abbott and Dorothy H. Stevens Foundation 
Stoddard Charitable Trust 
Dale Stultz 
Torrington Historical Society 
Trinity College Library, Hartford, Conn. 

Tuttle Antiquarian Books, Inc. 

United Technologies 
University of Connecticut Foundation 
University of Maine 
University of Massachusetts 
University of New Hampshire 
University of Rhode Island Library 
University of Southern Maine Library 
University of Vermont Library 
UpCountry Magazine 
Vermont Bicentennial Commission 
Vermont Department of Libraries 
Vermont Historical Society 
Vermont National Bank 
Warren Brothers Company 
Wellesley College Library 
Wesleyan University 
Williams College 
H. W. Wilson Foundation 
Woodstock Foundation 
Mrs. Sidney Wright 
Yale University Library 
Yankee, Inc. 



viii 



Officers 




Committee for a New England Bibliography 



A. L. Morris 
West Kennebunk, Maine 


Chairman 


Albert T. Klyberg 
Rhode Island Historical Society 


First Vice Chairman 


Edward T. James 
Cambridge, Massachusetts 


Editorial Vice Chairman 


Christopher R Bickford 
Connecticut Historical Society 


Treasurer 


Margaret A. Whalen 
Augusta, Maine 


Clerk 


Samuel B. Hand 
University of Vermont 


Vice Chairman for Vermont 


Freeman W Meyer 
University of Connecticut 


Vice Chairman for Connecticut 


Elizabeth J. Miller 
Maine Historical Society 


Vice Chairman for Maine 


John F. Page 
Inherit New Hampshire 


Vice Chairman for New Hatnpshire 


Caroline Fuller Sloat 
Old Sturbridge Village 


Vice Chairman for Massachusetts 


Fay Zipkowitz 

Rhode Island Department of State Library Services 


Vice Chairman for Rhode Island 



IX 



1 




A. J* 

* 



I 



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I 



Contents 



Introduction 


xiii 


Map of New England (1795) 


li 


Essay: Reassessing the Local History of 




Serial Abbreviations 


liii 


New England 


xix 


Location Symbols 


Iv 


Preface 


xlix 





General and Chronological 1-886 



Bibliographies 1-24 


1 


Colonial Relations with Native Americans 




Collected Biography 25-87 


2 


and Other Europeans 458-508 


23 


General Histories 88-108 


5 


Colonial Wars 509-574 


26 


Archaeology (General and 




Other Aspects of Colonial History 575-713 


30 


Historical) 109-135 


6 


American Revolution through 




Other General Works 136-291 


8 


Civil War 714-839 


36 


Discovery and Exploration 292-315 


15 


Late 19th and 20th Centuries 840-886 


42 


Colonization and Expansion 316-457 


16 






Population and Ethnic 


: Groups 887-1229 




General 887-934 


45 


Franco-Americans 1111-1193 


55 


American Indians 935-1090 


47 


Other Ethnic Groups 1194-1229 


59 


Blacks/Slavery 1091-1110 


54 








Economic Life 


1230-1852 




General 1230-1262 


61 


Artisans and Labor 1550-1605 


75 


Land and Agriculture 1263-1333 


62 


Engineering and Technology 1606-1632 


78 


Fisheries and Whaling 1334-1372 


65 


Land Transportation 1633-1774 


79 


Money and Finance 1373-1401 


67 


Water Transportation 1775-1842 


85 


Business and Commerce 1402-1456 


69 


Other 1843-1852 


88 


Industry 1457-1549 


71 








Religion 1853-2426 




General 1853-1879 


89 


Revivals 2134-2163 


103 


Theology 1880-1945 


91 


Religious Life 2164-2195 


104 


Preaching 1946-1980 


94 


Puritan and Congregational 




Clergy and Other Religious 




History 2196-2320 


106 


Leaders 1981-2089 


96 


Other Religious Groups 2321-2426 


112 


Missions 2090-2133 


101 







XI 



Education 2427-2536 



General 2427-2449 


118 


Higher Education 2495-2529 


121 


Elementary and Secondary 2450-2494 


119 


Other 2530-2536 


123 




The Arts 2537-3069 




General 2537-2550 


124 


Antiques, Decorative Arts, and 




Architecture, Planning, and Historic 




Household Furnishings 2840-2965 


138 


Buildings 2551-2735 


125 


Gravestone Art 2966-3000 


143 


Painting, Sculpture, and 




Music and Dance 3001-3065 


144 


Graphic Arts 2736-2839 


133 


Theater 3066-3069 


147 


Literature, Language, and the Printed Word 3070-3558 




Literary History 3070-3183 


147 


Language and Speech 3462-3489 


165 


Specific Authors and Poets and 




Books, Libraries, and Reading 3490-3522 


166 


Their Works 3184-3350 


153 


Printing and Publishing 3523-3533 


168 


Intellectual History 3351-3432 


160 


Newspapers and Periodicals 3534-3558 


168 


Historians and Historiography 3433-3461 


164 






Other Aspects of Social and 


Cultural History 3559-4106 




General Social History 3559-3601 


170 


Medicine 3725-3763 


177 


Children 3602-3629 


172 


Organizations 3764-3776 


179 


Costume 3630-3635 


173 


Science and Weather 3777-3840 


180 


Courtship, Marriage, and 




Social Life and Customs 3841-3951 


183 


the Family 3636-3659 


174 


Social Reform 3952-3998 


187 


Crime and Punishment 3660-3672 


175 


Sports and Recreation 3999-4035 


189 


Diet and Cookery 3673-3683 


175 


Travels 4036-4069 


191 


Gardens and Gardening 3684-3695 


176 


Witchcraft 4070-4091 


193 


Folklore, Legends, and Humor 3696-3724 


176 


Women's History 4092-4106 


194 



Geographical Areas of New England 4107-4212 
Boundary Areas 4107-4134 195 Isles of Shoals (Maine and 

Rivers and River Valleys 4135-4173 197 New Hampshire) 4174-4192 198 

Other 4193-4212 199 



Index 



201 



Introduction 



T he Bibliographies of New England History 
series now consists of eight volumes, listing 
more than 60,000 titles on regional, state, 
and local history subjects. The first six volumes, 
published between 1976 and 1986, deal with the 
history of the six individual states: Massachu- 
setts, Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Rhode 
Island, and Connecticut. Volume 8, published si- 
multaneously with this one, lists additions and 
corrections to the state bibliographies and up- 
dates them through 1987, with additional entries 
for 1988 and early 1989. 

This volume contains entries that pertain to the 
history of the region and to more than one New 
England state. It also includes writings about the 
Northeastern United States in which New En- 
gland is prominently mentioned and works on 
certain subjects in the American past that are 
nearly synonymous with New England; Puritan 
history, for example; the early histories of Con- 
gregationalism, Unitarianism, and Christian Sci- 
ence; the early textile and whaling industries; and 
Eranco-American history. The cutoff date for com- 
prehensive coverage was December 31, 1987, but 
the listings also include more than 60 entries for 
1988 and early 1989 that have come to the editor's 
attention. 

New England regional history accounts for a 
relatively small portion of the writings listed in 
this series, but includes some of the earliest his- 
torical works in America, as well as a considerable 
number of recent writings. Indeed, more than 40 
per cent of the entries in this volume cite works 
produced during the 20 years since the Bibliog- 
raphies of New England History series was con- 
ceived. 

This bibliography, like Volume 8, lists doctoral 
dissertations on a comprehensive basis and some 



selected masters' theses — nearly 500 titles in all — 
in addition to published historical writings. Un- 
like the other seven volumes, which are organ- 
ized geographically, it groups entries under sub- 
ject headings. Most of the subjects dealt with here 
are also treated extensively in the state bibliog- 
raphies. Readers who are interested in a partic- 
ular topic in New England history, be it social, 
cultural, or political, will usually find a number 
of additional, relevant entries by consulting the 
indexes to the other volumes. 

With the exception of dissertations, which have 
come to be widely available as "on-demand" pub- 
lications, and masters' theses, which are usually 
unpublished, this bibliography lists primarily pub- 
lished historical writings: books, pamphlets, mag- 
azine and journal articles. With the exception of 
masters' theses and a few other items to be men- 
tioned below, this is also a comprehensive rather 
than selective bibliography. Within the editorial 
guidelines of the Committee for a New England 
Bibliography (CNEB), it includes all titles found 
in a systematic search of regional history collec- 
tions and numerous periodicals files. 

The various works cited here were written by 
academic scholars, professional writers, and am- 
ateur historians. Some of the subjects dealt with 
are of broad, current interest to students, schol- 
ars, or general readers; others are of more local 
concern or reflect the interests of earlier genera- 
tions of historians and their readers. Occasional 
foreign language publications, when found, have 
been listed. 

In bringing these materials together, we make 
no qualitative judgment. Our purpose is to iden- 
tify and make accessible the many scattered pub- 
lications and to suggest the kinds of information 
that can be gleaned from them through careful 



xiii 



use of the bibliography and its index of authors 
and subjects. Our listings provide uniform biblio- 
graphical data: name of author, full title of the 
work, place and date of publication, and pagina- 
tion. We provide a library location for each book 
and pamphlet entry and one for each dissertation 
and thesis found in a collection other than that of 
the university or college at which it was written. 

Editorial Guidelines 

Under the guidelines for the series, the writings 
listed here were produced as works of history or 
contain a significant historical dimension. To qualify 
as history, as distinct from contemporary chron- 
icle, they must have been written at least a year 
after the events they describe. They must also 
deal primarily with events that occurred in New 
England. 

Certain categories of materials, with exceptions 
to be described below, have been ruled out by our 
guidelines: almanacs, directories and guidebooks; 
government documents; historical articles pub- 
lished in newspapers; genealogies; maps and at- 
lases; works of fiction; juvenile literature; and, 
originally, biographies and autobiographies. 

"The exclusions, however," as former editor 
T. D. Seymour Bassett explained in his introduc- 
tion to the Vermont volume, "are not absolute. 
We try to go beyond the form and determine the 
substance." Thus, although we exclude straight, 
tabular genealogies, we do include family histo- 
ries. We also now include a substantial number 
of individual biographies and autobiographies 
that in our opinion contain significant materials 
about some aspect of New England history. Bio- 
graphical coverage in the series is concentrated 
primarily in the state volumes, especially volumes 
4 through 6 — Vermont, Rhode Island, and Con- 
necticut — and Volume 8, which expands and up- 
dates the six state bibliographies. In this volume, 
we deal only with individuals who are strongly 
identified with more than one New England state, 
such as Daniel Webster and Calvin Coolidge, Ly- 
man Beecher and Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. 

While our general policy is to be comprehensive 
within these defined limits, there are a few cate- 
gories in which we do not make a systematic 
search but nevertheless include items that have 
come to the attention of the editor. A notable ex- 
ample is that of newspaper articles. Although we 
do not search the many newspaper files that 



might contain an occasional historical article, we 
do list a certain number of such articles — espe- 
cially articles in a series — that have come to light 
in our library searches. 

Einally, we attempt in this volume and in the 
series to be comprehensive within specific limits 
in dealing with such subjects as literary and theo- 
logical history. We list, for example, works that 
trace the general outlines of New England literary 
history and describe important developments 
within that field; studies that pertain to the lit- 
erary treatment of some aspect of the region's his- 
tory; and biographies of a number of authors who 
are identified with more than one New England 
state. Similarly, in dealing with theological his- 
tory, we emphasize broad historical studies and 
biographies of important figures. We do not at- 
tempt to cover the voluminous analytical litera- 
ture that has been produced by scholars in these 
or analogous fields of study. 

Research Strategy and Procedures 

The editor began recording entries for this volume 
in Connecticut libraries while completing that 
state's bibliography in late 1984 and 1985. The 
work continued simultaneously with the compi- 
lation of Volume 8 from early 1986 through Jan- 
uary 1989. 

Many New England libraries collect New En- 
gland regional history, but few specialize in it. 
One that does is the research library at Old Stur- 
bridge Village in Sturbridge, Massachusetts, which 
collects titles that reflect the museum's emphasis 
on New England history in the late-eighteenth 
and early-nineteenth centuries. After completion 
of the Connecticut volume, the editor carefully 
searched the collection at Sturbridge and that of 
the American Antiquarian Society in Worcester, 
Massachusetts. The latter institution's strong hold- 
ings in state and regional history emphasize the 
period from early settlement to ca. 1820. 

The search continued in the Essex Institute in Sa- 
lem, Massachusetts, which also has strong hold- 
ings in early New England history. Erom there it 
extended to major libraries in and around Boston 
and state historical society, state and private uni- 
versity, and large, public library collections in the 
other New England states. 

This volume lists more than 1,700 book and 
pamphlet titles. Card catalogs and shelf lists were 
the primary tools used to identify these items. 



XIV 



Many New England titles are cataloged by librar- 
ies as regional subdivisions of main subject head- 
ings. The editor searched under "New England" 
and a long list of subjects in each collection. At 
Boston University, which recently has adopted 
electronic cataloging, he also searched every title 
containing "New England," "Northeast," "Puri- 
tan," and a number of other key words. Once 
identified from cataloging records, the books and 
pamphlets were examined and then cited. Most 
libraries granted stack privileges, and those that 
did not were uniformly cooperative in paging ma- 
terials. 

Periodicals 

Magazine and journal articles account for nearly 
half of the entries in this volume, some 1,900 
titles in all. A number of national, regional, and 
local serials have been searched systematically 
throughout the series. These periodicals, while by 
no means the only ones cited in the series, have 
formed the core of our serials coverage. We have 
updated and expanded the search of these core 
materials as part of the work on each bibliogra- 
phy. 

In compiling this volume, a number of recent 
articles were identified through the use of several 
current bibliographical publications: America: His- 
tory and Life, published in four parts each year by 
ABC-Clio; the American Historical Association's 
Writings on American History, published annually; 
and that organization's Recently Published Articles, 
which appears three times a year. Other compiled 
lists of recent articles, which appear regularly in 
such historical periodicals as the Journal of Amer- 
ican History and the Journal of the Early Republic, 
were also useful. A review of the early volumes 
of Writings on American History, which date back 
to 1902, was helpful in identifying some earlier 
articles, as was a search of the bibliographies of 
New England history published annually in the 
New England Quarterly from 1928 through 1966. 
Several specialized bibliographies, including one 
by David Starbuck on the historical archaeology 
of the Northeast,' and the thematic bibliographies 
published in recent issues of the annual Dublin 
Seminar Proceedings, were useful on specific sub- 
jects. 

Many of the periodicals cited in this volume are 
widely available; others are more difficult to find. 

’See entry 112 in this volume. 



Except for articles in a few local and ephemeral 
serials, nearly all of the periodical entries listed 
here were found in one or more of the following: 
New England state libraries and state historical 
societies; New England state and private univer- 
sity libraries; the Boston Public Library; and other 
research collections in the Boston, New Haven, 
and Worcester areas. 

A basic tool for identifying libraries that own 
sets of a particular periodical is the five-volume 
Union List of Serials in Libraries of the United States 
and Canada (3d ed., 1965). Also useful in our 
search were two consortium lists, available on mi- 
crofiche in member institutions, which list the pe- 
riodical holdings of universities and colleges in 
the Boston and Amherst-Northampton, Massa- 
chusetts, areas. A union list of serials in libraries 
in the Worcester, Massachusetts, area was also 
useful,^ as were OCLC records of periodical hold- 
ings in that national cataloging service's member 
libraries. Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) 
has hundreds of university, research and public 
libraries among its subscribers. 

Dissertations 

Most of the dissertations cited here were identi- 
fied by searching the following bibliographical 
publications of University Microfilms, which is lo- 
cated in Ann Arbor, Michigan: Comprehensive Dis- 
sertation Index (CDI), published in series for 1861- 
1972, 1973-1982, and annually since 1983; Disser- 
tation Abstracts International (DAI), which is pub- 
lished monthly; and American Doctoral Disserta- 
tions, an annual publication. These are usually 
available in universities that have strong graduate 
programs. The dissertation titles in CDI are grouped 
under thousands of key words, including place 
names and the names of individuals. The DAI 
listings are organized by discipline, and those in 
American Doctoral Dissertations by discipline and 
institution. We searched the latter two publica- 
tions under American Studies, Anthropology, Ar- 
chaeology, Architecture, Economics, Education, 
Fine Arts, History, Literature, Music, Political Sci- 
ence, Religion, and other disciplines in the hu- 
manities and social sciences. 

Some universities, including Harvard, have be- 
gun only in recent years to contribute complete 
information about dissertations to the University 

^Worcester Area Cooperating Libraries, Worcester Area Union 
List of Serials (Worcester, Mass., 1987), 2v. 



XV 



Microfilms program. We identified some impor- 
tant dissertations through our own search in the 
Harvard Archives. Other titles were found in the 
bibliographies of individual dissertations; in War- 
ren F. Kuehl's Dissertations in History (1965 and 
1972);^ and in an important bibliography of dis- 
sertations relating to early New England: Michael S. 
Montgomery's American Puritan Studies (1984), en- 
try 1 in this volume. 

The Montgomery bibliography describes in some 
detail a number of dissertations not abstracted in 
DAI. In this volume, we refer the reader wherever 
possible to DAI for the information contained in 
the abstract and, in many cases, an order number 
that can be used to purchase a photocopy or mi- 
crofilm copy of the dissertation. In instances 
where a dissertation is listed in Montgomery and 
not in DAI, we refer to Montgomery for further 
information. We also refer to the published — usu- 
ally revised— version of a dissertation when such 
is known to exist. 

We were able to examine the originals of dis- 
sertations in the archives of a number of New 
England universities. We also found photocopies 
of some titles in other library collections. In other 
cases, the citations and data listed here were 
gathered from DAI and the other University Mi- 
crofilms publications mentioned above, and from 
Montgomery, Kuehl, and OCLC cataloging re- 
cords. 

Theses 

In planning the scope of volumes 7 and 8, CNEB 
members voted to include, along with disserta- 
tions, a limited number of "recommended” mas- 
ters' theses. While recognizing that it would be 
impossible to compile a comprehensive listing 
within the time constraints of the project, the 
committee decided that the inclusion of some ti- 
tles would add to the value of the bibliography. 
Theses in some cases represent the best or only 
avaUable scholarship on a particular subject. A 
few theses are listed in this volume, and many 
more in Volume 8. 

Format and Citations 

This volume is organized by subjects. In setting 
up the specific categories, we borrowed from sev- 

^Warren F. Kuehl, Dissertations in History: an Index to Disser- 
tations Completed in History Departments of United States and Ca- 
nadian Universities (Lexington, Ky.; Univ. of Kentucky Pr., 
1965-1972), 2v. 



eral bibliographical models and tried to combine 
headings so as to emphasize the major contours 
of the region's historiography. Each title in the 
bibliography is cited only once, even if it relates 
to more than one subject. The index, which can 
be used to find additional entries for a particular 
heading, lists a great many subjects in addition to 
those under which the entries are organized. 

Under each subject, entries are arranged alpha- 
betically. Works by the same author are listed in 
alphabetical order by title, followed by any titles 
by that author and a collaborator. A dash at the 
beginning of an entry means that the work was 
written by the author of the preceding entry. Au- 
thors' names are listed as they appear on title 
pages or as determined from sources such as the 
National Union Catalog (NUC) and Library of Con- 
gress and OCLC cataloging. Thus, if the title page 
provides only a middle initial, and the middle 
name is later found in one of these other sources, 
we supply the middle name. 

Author and corporate-author entries have been 
preferred in most cases. Edited and compiled 
works, however, are given a title entry, unless it 
is clear from the text that a "compiler" should in 
fact be regarded as an author. Otherwise, the ed- 
itor's or compiler's name follows the title. 

Titles or imprints, when not shown on the title 
page or verso, appear in brackets. Where there is 
more than one edition, the most recent or best 
one is cited, and the date of the first edition, if 
known, appears in parentheses after the title. 
Pagination indicates the last numbered page; sub- 
stantial unnumbered pages are shown in brack- 
ets. 

In this volume and in Volume 8, we provide a 
library location for each book and pamphlet entry 
and for copies of dissertations and theses owned 
by libraries other than those of the universities 
and colleges where they were written. We cite 
wherever possible a major collection in New En- 
gland. Other collections cited, in order of prefer- 
ence, are: smaller libraries in New England; the 
Library of Congress; and, in a few cases where a 
work is known to exist but is not known to be in 
any of the above collections, another non-New 
England library. Standard library symbols are 
used. For a list of those cited in this volume, see 
Location Symbols. 

Prior to the publication of the Rhode Island vol- 
ume in 1983, we supplied locations only for books 
and pamphlets not listed in any of the various 



XVI 



editions of the NUC. That publication, however, 
is not readily accessible to some of our readers; it 
has become increasingly cumbersome to search; 
and it sometimes fails to list locations that most 
of our readers would find useful. We continue to 
check our book and pamphlet listings against the 
NUC's listings and provide a plus sign ( + ) to 
identify titles found there. Readers who wish to 
consult that source for other library locations may 
find the effort rewarding. 

We also have made use of OCLC cataloging re- 
cords in this volume to verify citations and help 
to identify library holdings. OCLC is used by a 
number of large libraries, and we have found it 
easier and more productive to use than recent edi- 
tions of the NUC. OCLC provides bibliographical 
information on a significant number of book and 
pamphlet titles cited in this volume, especially the 
more recent ones. In many cases, it also lists a 
sizable number of libraries that own a particular 
title. 

Index 

The index lists authors, editors, and compilers. It 
also provides access to scores of subjects in ad- 
dition to those under which the entries are 
grouped. Where the contents of a work are 
strongly oriented toward particular New England 
states, that information is noted in the index. 

Acknaivledgments 

A great many individuals and organizations as- 
sisted the editor. While it would be impossible to 
recognize all of them individually, special thanks 
should go to Connell Gallagher and David Ruell, 
who provided a number of titles pertaining in 
part to their states while assisting with the Ver- 
mont and New Hampshire sections of Volume 8. 
Thanks also to the library staffs of the following 
institutions: American Antiquarian Society, Bos- 
ton Athenaeum, Boston College, Boston Public 
Library, Boston University, Clark University, Con- 
necticut Historical Society, Connecticut State Li- 
brary, Dartmouth College, Essex Institute, Har- 
vard University, Maine Historical Society, Maine 
State Library, Massachusetts State Library, Mystic 
Seaport, New England Historic Genealogical So- 
ciety, New Hampshire Historical Society, New 
Hampshire State Library, New Haven Colony His- 
torical Society, Old Sturbridge Village, Rhode 



Island Historical Society, Vermont Historical So- 
ciety, Worcester (Mass.) Public Library, Yale Uni- 
versity, and the main campus libraries of the 
universities of Connecticut, Maine, Massachu- 
setts, and Vermont. 

Boston University's Academic Computing Cen- 
ter again provided valuable services. William Mar- 
shall, formerly of that facility's staff, continued to 
serve as programming consultant. Chris Kittle 
programmed the final copy and supervised its 
production. Computerization of the series began 
with the Rhode Island volume in 1983. 

Jennifer Phillips, a graduate student in Boston 
University's American and New England Studies 
Program, was the editor's graduate assistant dur- 
ing three semesters in 1986 and 1987 and also 
spent three summers working full-time for the 
project. She helped track down missing data, as- 
sisted with the serials search, checked book titles 
against NUC and OCLC listings, searched for re- 
cently published book titles in a number of Bos- 
ton-area libraries, and helped to proofread the 
entries and index. Michael Bedeau served as 
graduate assistant during three semesters in 1987 
and 1988. Barbara Nachtigall, an employee of Bos- 
ton University's Archaeology Department, as- 
sisted with final proofreading. She had worked as 
a research assistant in the preparation of the Con- 
necticut volume. 

Future Additions to the Series 

With the publication of volumes 7 and 8 in 1989, 
the CNEB has completed the task it set for itself 
in the early 1970s of compiling comprehensive 
bibliographies of the history of New England and 
each of the six New England states. In order to 
preserve and increase the value of the nearly two 
decades of scholarship that have gone into the 
series, the committee at this writing was pursuing 
plans to continue the updating process begun in 
Volume 8. As CNEB chairman A. L. Morris states 
in the preface to this work, we believe we will be 
able to publish a volume of further additions and 
corrections to the state and regional bibliogra- 
phies by 1994 or 1995. The present editor expects 
to continue the work on a part-time basis. Sugges- 
tions for additions and corrections may be sent to: 
Roger Parks, Nathanael Greene Papers, Rhode Is- 
land Historical Society, 110 Benevolent Street, 
Providence, RI 02906. 

April 1989 Roger Parks 



xvii 



Reassessing the Local History of New England 



I n the middle decades of the nineteenth century 
Americans awakened to their past. Through- 
out the nation, they turned back to remember 
and preserve. The power of this movement was 
felt deeply in New England. Here was founded 
the first state historical society; here, with few 
exceptions, every town became the subject of a 
local history. The consequences of this movement 
are apparent in the New England Bibliography 
series. What may be less apparent, though de- 
serving of reflection, is why the impulse to write 
local history emerged in the nineteenth century, 
and what has happened to it since. Ours is an 
essay about the unfolding of this special version 
of the past. 

We seek to place the rise of local history in per- 
spective. One way of doing so is to compare and 
contrast the work of nineteenth-century writers 
with that of their predecessors. The people we 
call Puritans were prolific in describing their con- 
quest of the wilderness. Two writers in the middle 
of the eighteenth century, Thomas Prince and 
Thomas Hutchinson, used with care the sources 
that were known to them. A group of writers who 
were energized by America's attainment of in- 
dependence told the story of each New England 
state. Nineteenth-century antiquarians depended 
on these predecessors. Yet as we will see, their 
work was also sharply different. Noting, as we 
shall, certain continuities, we will argue that 
nineteenth-century writers had a special under- 
standing of the past and therefore a distinctive 
concept of their task as antiquarians. 

Emerging strongly in the first half of the nine- 
teenth century, the impulse to write local history 
was sustained beyond the Civil War. Indeed the 
flow of publications reached its height as the cen- 
tury ended. But if we look more closely at these 



decades we see signs of change. The decline of 
local history was mirrored in a shifting relation- 
ship between writers and their audience. More 
crucially, by 1900 a new kind of local history was 
emerging from the research university. A fictional 
episode, a scene in John P. Marquand's satirical 
novel of Boston upper-class life. The Late George 
Apley (1937), suggests how the older style of local 
history fell from favor among cosmopolitans: Apley, 
a newly elected member of a literary society, 
reads a paper chronicling the history of a single 
plot of land in Boston — a paper we are to perceive 
as pointless and sterile.’ 

From this low point, local history would stage 
a remarkable recovery after 1960. Under the new 
name of "community studies," it has returned to 
the forefront of professional or academic history. 
This revival deserves close attention, both for 
what it has accomplished and for what it may sug- 
gest as future possibilities. The New England Bib- 
liography series embodies a great past, the nine- 
teenth-century movement we have spoken of, 
and owes its own existence to a reawakened in- 
terest in "community." How it will be used, and 
where it points us, are questions we hope to ad- 
dress.^ 



PART one: the rise and fall 

OF A GREAT TRADITION 

When William Whitmore contributed an essay on 
"American Genealogies" to the North American 

'John P Marquand, The Late George Apley (Boston, 1937), 
chap. 12. 

''Previous studies of the rise of history-writing in the nine- 
teenth century include David D. Van Tassel, Recording Amer- 
ica's Past (Chicago, 1960), and George Callcott, History in the 
United States, 1800-1860: Its Practice and Purpose (Baltimore, 
1970). 



XIX 



Review in 1856, his doing so signaled that the 
movement we have spoken of was well under 
way. Whitmore cited eighty-two published family 
histories and referred his readers to another ninety 
published in the pages of the New England Histor- 
ical and Genealogical Register.^ All of this activity 
was very recent. The Register was ten years old 
in 1856. Its parent society, founded in 1845, was 
the first of its kind in the country. Before 1820, no 
one in New England had paid any heed to ge- 
nealogy. Now it seemed essential. Much else was 
also happening in these decades. A notable ac- 
complishment, and one that remains unsurpassed, 
was the publishing of documents. In 1850 J. Ham- 
mond Trumbull initiated the fifteen-volume series 
The Public Records of Connecticut. Nathaniel Shur- 
tleff followed with the five-volume folio Records of 
the Governor and Company of the Massachusetts Bay 
in New England, and John Russell Bartlett with the 
ten-volume Records of the Colony of Rhode Island and 
Providence Plantations, in New England.'^ 

These grand projects were accompanied by 
many smaller triumphs. We cite a few at random. 
In the 1840s a group of like-minded citizens of 
Dorchester, Massachusetts, organized themselves 
as the Dorchester Antiquarian and Historical So- 
ciety and began to issue their Collections, reprint- 
ing two important seventeenth-century texts, one 
the Memoirs of Roger Clap, and publishing Richard 
Mather's journal of his voyage to New England. 
In 1845 certain citizens of Essex County, Massa- 
chusetts, were moved to establish the Essex In- 
stitute, the first organization in the United States 
to devote itself to the history of a county. It too 
issued Collections, and although the Dorchester 
Society ceased to publish after 1850, the Insti- 
tute's have appeared in an unbroken series since 
1860. A man of means in Hartford, George Brin- 
ley, was quietly assembling an extraordinary li- 
brary of rare New England imprints. No one was 
more active in these early years than John Farmer, 
a Massachusetts native who relocated to New 
Hampshire. To him is credited the first indepen- 
dently published local history, his brief history of 
Billerica, Massachusetts, which appeared in 1816.^ 

’[William H. Whitmore], "American Genealogies," North 
American Reviezv, 82 (Apr. 1856), 469-77. The rise of genealogy 
is traced in Robert Taylor and Ralph Crandall, Generations and 
Change (Macon, Ga., 1986). 

‘‘Similar series would publish the records of Plymouth, New 
Hampshire, and New Haven colonies. 

’Dorchester Antiquarian and Historical Society, Collections, 
3 vols., 1844-1850; Catalogue of the American Library of the late 
Mr. George Brinley, Part 1 (Hartford, Conn., 1878); John Farmer, 
An Historical Memoir of Billerica, in Massachusetts (Amherst, 
N.H., 1816). 



But let us turn away from "firsts" to sketch a 
general profile of production. Using, as our data, 
the separately published town histories listed in 
Jeremiah Colburn's pioneering Bibliography of the 
Eocal History of Massachusetts,^ we can trace the 
rapid development of the genre; five such books 
appeared in the 1820s, fourteen in the 1830s, sev- 
enteen in the 1840s, eleven in the 1850s, and thir- 
teen in the 1860s, for a total of sixty histories of 
as many Massachusetts towns. Using a quite dif- 
ferent body of data, the some four hundred works 
of New England local history in the Boston Uni- 
versity Library, we find that production reached 
its peak in the 1880s, though it remained strong 
for the next few decades.^ We may draw three 
conclusions from these different sets of figures. 
The first and most important is that local history 
arose suddenly about 1820 and made rapid prog- 
ress thereafter. A second is that, once launched, 
the enterprise was sustained throughout the cen- 
tury. A third is that decay — or more neutrally, a 
changing relationship between authors, publish- 
ers, and the local community — is increasingly ap- 
parent after 1880. The satire in The Late George 
Apley coincided with a distinct waning of the local 
history movement. 

It may be false romanticism to regard the pre- 
Civil War publications as more truly local and he- 
roic. What is certain is that, in those early de- 
cades, the impulse to remember and preserve was 
connected to a special sense of place and time. 
Something happened to direct the imagination of 
New Englanders to their past. The most cele- 
brated outcome of this process was a burst of po- 
etry and fiction that included Nathaniel Haw- 
thorne's The Scarlet Letter. Much less famous, 
though surely kin to novels like The Scarlet Letter, 
was the flood tide of local history. 

Nothing like this had happened in the eigh- 
teenth century. To be sure, the colonists and rev- 
olutionary generation had prepared the way in 
important respects. Across the decades and the 
centuries, a handful of visionary individuals had 
gathered up and preserved essential documents. 
Let us, then, acknowledge the two Mathers, In- 
crease and Cotton, who deserve recognition as 
the first persons in New England to collect doc- 
uments systematically. Another Boston minister, 

'’Jeremiah Colburn, Bibliography of the Local History of Mas- 
sachusetts (Boston, 1871). 

T owe this statistic to John Hermanson, who developed it 
as part of a research paper on the place of material culture in 
the local history tradition. 



XX 



Thomas Prince (1687-1758) was even more am- 
bitious in aspiring to amass "every Book, Pam- 
phlet, and Paper, both in Print and Manuscript," 
that might "have any Tendency to enlighten our 
History."® On the eve of the American Revolu- 
tion, two men shared a similar ambition. Thomas 
Hutchinson was a high-placed figure in Massa- 
chusetts politics and a descendant of the "Anti- 
nomian" Anne Hutchinson, expelled from the 
colony in 1638. The documents that he was able 
to collect and use in writing his History of the Col- 
ony of Massachusetts-Bay (1764) included the "Re- 
port" of his ancestor's "trial" before the Massa- 
chusetts General Court and depositions from the 
Salem witchcraft cases. Some of these texts he 
gathered up and published separately in A Col- 
lection of Original Papers. Ezra Stiles, a minister in 
Newport, Rhode Island, was equally active in col- 
lecting copies and originals of a host of texts — 
John Winthrop's journal history and Thomas She- 
pard's diary, to name but two examples — for a 
history of New England that he never wrote. 
Time (and rival collectors) were not kind to 
Prince's great collection, and a Stamp Act mob 
that sacked Governor Hutchinson's house threw 
his precious documents into Boston's muddy 
streets.’ 

As yet, however, no one was proposing to print 
merely local records. Nor did any of these collec- 
tor-historians wish to limit themselves to a single 
community. In comparing them to their succes- 
sors in the nineteenth century, we must keep in 
mind the audience for which they wrote and the 
role they saw as proper for historians. As in eigh- 
teenth-century England, so here in New England 
history bore the stamp of learned culture. Proper 
history was "philosophical" in undertaking to il- 
luminate broad principles of moral and civil so- 
ciety. Cosmopolitan in its ideal form, history 
appealed to the kinds of people who subscribed 
in the 1730s (that is, agreed in advance to buy 
copies) to Prince's Chronological History of New En- 
gland (1736); by and large, a provincial gentry of 
clergy, merchants, lawyers, and civil servants. 

"Clifford K. Shipton, Sibley's Harvard Graduates, vol. 5; Bio- 
graphical Sketches of Those Who Attended Harvard College in the 
Classes 1701-1712 (Boston, 1937), p. 342. 

’Ibid. Ezra Stiles's activities as collector and historian are 
described in Edmund S. Morgan, The Gentle Puritan: A Life of 
Ezra Stiles, 1727-1795 (New Haven, 1962). The fate of Thomas 
Hutchinson's manuscripts is described in Lawrence Shaw 
Mayo, ed.. The History of the Colony and Province of Massachu- 
setts-Bay, by Thomas Hutchinson (Cambridge, Mass., 1936), I, 
pp. xiv-xv. 



The book sold poorly outside this restricted clien- 
tele.'® 

Yet Prince could not imagine writing for a dif- 
ferent audience. Because he aspired to write 
something grander than mere local history, he be- 
gan with an account of the history of the world 
from the moment of Creation. As one of his bi- 
ographers has noted, he made "practically no use 
. . . of the unique mass of local materials which 
he had gathered."" At the very end of the eigh- 
teenth century, the early workings of the Massa- 
chusetts Historical Society reveal a similar reluc- 
tance to focus on the truly local. In 1791 the ten 
founders initially named their organization the 
"Historical Society," a name appropriate to an or- 
ganization that would encompass all of American 
history. Though "Massachusetts" was added to 
the name in 1794, when a charter was secured 
from the state, the Society did not restrict its Col- 
lections to Massachusetts material until well into 
the nineteenth century. 

Something had to change before local history 
as we find it in the middle of the nineteenth cen- 
tury became possible. But before we speak di- 
rectly of what changed, let us look more carefully 
at the narrative traditions (or literary models) that 
informed histories of New England written before 
1800. Three such models can be identified; topo- 
graphical description, the tradition of "annals," 
and providential history. 

Eighteenth-century English gentlemen liked to 
read and write "topographical descriptions." This 
mode of narration was so well established that by 
1818 the listings in William Upcott's Bibliographical 
Account of the Principal Works Relating to English 
Topography filled three large volumes. Beneath the 
rubric of "topography," Englishmen who often 
styled themselves "Antiquarians" wrote about 
everything from natural history and funeral mon- 
uments to architecture and church history. In 
doing so they wrote for others like themselves, 
persons of education and standing who had a 
taste for "curiosities" and "relics." This was not 
the same, however, as a taste for history. The 
difference is clear if we turn to the many brief 
"topographical descriptions" that members and 
correspondents of the Massachusetts Historical 
Society, imitating British precedents, published in 
the early volumes of the Society's Collections. The 

'"The subscribers to Prince's History are identified in Samuel 
Adams Drake, Some Memoirs of the Life and Writings of Rev. T. 
Prince (Boston, 1851). 

"Shipton, Sibley's Harvard Graduates, vol. 5, p. 355. 



XXI 



anonymous author of “Notes on Compton [Rhode 
Island]” followed the conventions of the form in 
describing, topic by topic, “boundaries,” “soil,” 
“windmills,” “natural history,” “roads,” “health,” 
“longevity,” and “ecclesiastical affairs.”’^ Thad- 
deus Mason Harris, the minister of Dorchester, 
introduced a swatch of history into his “Chro- 
nological and Topical Account” of that town. But 
much of what he thought of as history took the 
form of lists, with the church as center of atten- 
tion. The implied reader of these sketches was 
someone interested in knowing who had gone to 
Harvard from a town, and who had served as 
ministers. The present dominated, not the past.'^ 

Some of these descriptions were indebted to a 
second narrative tradition, that of annals. Prac- 
ticed in antiquity, reborn in the middle ages, and 
surviving to this day in publications like the World 
Almanac, the “chronicle” or “annals” represented 
the past as a sequence of events, all of them ar- 
ranged by date. The writers who fashioned his- 
tory in this form did not think of theirs as an easy 
task. They had to reconcile the sources they con- 
sulted and align the dating system that came in 
with Christianity with pagan or dynastic schemes. 
All this was important because, in the words of 
Thomas Prince, the end result was a pleasing or- 
der and precision: “It is the orderly succession of 
these transactions and events, as they fell pre- 
cisely out in time, too much neglected by our his- 
torians, that for some years past, I have taken the 
greatest pains to search and find. . . .“ And as he 
went on to say, dates were exact facts — facts that 
often were misstated by “historians” who pre- 
ferred to dress up their data with “artificial or- 
naments and descriptions to raise the imagination 
and affections of the reader.” What Prince had to 
offer was something lesser in one sense, though 
greater in another: “only facts in a chronological 
epitome.” Indeed he had so many facts — in part 
because, as we have noted, he began with crea- 
tion — that by the time he finally reached the 
founding of New England he had to stop in 1632!’'* 

Minister that he was. Prince also thought of 
history as manifesting the “providence” of God. 
In his preface he sounded an old theme in de- 

'^Massachusetts Historical Society, Collections, 1st Ser., 9 
(1804), 199-206. 

'^Thaddeus Mason Harris, "Chronological and Topograph- 
ical Account of Dorchester," ibid., 147-197. 

‘Hhomas Prince, A Chronological History of New-England, in 
the Form of Annals (1736; repr., Boston, 1826), pp. vii, xiii, xix- 

XX. 



daring that the “design” of his work would en- 
compass “the most remarkable Providences: such 
as appearances of comets and eclipses, earth- 
quakes, tempests, inundations, droughts . . . [and] 
memorable accidents and deliverances. . . 
Half a century before him, in the early 1680s, In- 
crease Mather had spoken similarly in An Essay 
for the Recording of Illustrious Providences. The cru- 
cial assumption behind these texts was that his- 
tory manifested the work of redemption: creation, 
the fall, and God's intervention to redeem the 
fallen. More especially, history was the record of 
supernatural interventions to protect the godly 
and to punish evil-doers. The task of the historian 
was to keep track of these interventions and, by 
doing so, maintain warnings or “memorials” that 
would help to keep a people godly. The earliest 
of the providential histories to be written in New 
England, William Bradford's Of Plymouth Planta- 
tion, celebrates the triumph of the “Pilgrims” over 
their enemies even as it also laments the decay of 
community.^* 

Fortunately for us the providential historians 
incorporated a great deal of information about 
politics, religion, the economy, and social behav- 
ior in and among the tales of “remarkables” or 
“wonders.” It may have been the influence of the 
topographical tradition that led Edward Johnson 
to include brief descriptions of each town in a 
book that is known by its running title: Wonder- 
Working Providence of Sions Saviour in New England 
(1654). John Winthrop, for many years the gov- 
ernor of Massachusetts, employed the format of 
“annals” (as did Johnson and Bradford) in de- 
scribing a broad sweep of events, though what 
interested him especially was the politics in which 
he was so much involved. Others were more in- 
terested in ecclesiastical affairs. The chief histo- 
rian of the New England churches was Cotton 
Mather. The Magnalia Christi Americana (“The 
wondrous works of Christ in America”), Mather's 
massive history of New England, described in de- 
tail the evolution of the “New England Way,” or 
Congregationalism, and provided short biogra- 
phies of many of the ministers. For Mather, the 
“church” was properly the focus of attention for 
two reasons: the very founding of New England 
arose from the ambition to create a purified or 

'=Ibid., pp. xiii-xiv. 

•'’Not published until the middle of the nineteenth century, 
yet read by some of his contemporaries: William Bradford, Of 
Plymouth Plantation (Modern Library edition. New York, 1981). 



XXll 



"primitive” church order; and in chronicling the 
progress of the church the historian was telling 
the most important story of them all, the work of 
redemption.’^ 

All three of these narrative traditions — the provi- 
dential, the "annals," and topographical descrip- 
tion — remained influential in the nineteenth cen- 
tury. The least influential of the three was provi- 
dential history. In the early eighteenth century 
the concept of an active God who interfered with 
nature to produce "special providences" fell into 
disfavor as scientists and philosophers articulated 
a world view in which general laws operated uni- 
formly throughout nature — laws that God sup- 
ported and indeed created, but also laws he left 
alone once the system was up and running. This 
new way of thinking helped make Prince's Chro- 
nological History a very different kind of book from 
the Magnalia: the reports of "wonders" that filled 
an entire section of that book were largely missing 
from Prince's narrative. A generation later, Tho- 
mas Hutchinson made no reference to providence 
at all, and the concept was conspicuously absent 
in the "revolutionary" histories written in the 
closing decades of the eighteenth century.’* Dis- 
placed from learned or elite culture, an age-old 
fascination with portents and prodigies survived 
within popular religion and popular culture. It 
survived as well in the "curiosities" and "Natural 
Wonders" that were described in many of the 
nineteenth-century local histories.’’ 

Another part of this tradition that survived well 
into the nineteenth century was a fascination 
with ecclesiastical history. The lives of ministers 
that filled the pages of the Magnalia Christi Amer- 
icana were replicated in the thousands of statistics 
compiled by John Farmer, and in chapters on 
church foundings and development that became 
a standard feature of town histories.^” Some of the 
older parishes or congregations in New England 
had records rich enough to merit separate publi- 

’^See in general Kenneth Murdock, Literature and Theology 
in Colonial New England (1949; Harper Torchbooks reprint. New 
York, 1963), and David D. Hall, Worlds of Wonder, Days of Judg- 
ment: Popular Religious Belief in Early New England (New York, 
1989), chap. 2. 

‘*Lester H. Cohen, The Revolutionary Histories: Contemporary 
Narratives of the American Revolution (Ithaca, N.Y., 1980), chaps. 
1 - 2 . 

‘^Cf. John Farmer and J. B. Moore, eds.. Collections, Histor- 
ical and Miscellaneous, and Monthly Literary Journal (Concord, 
N.H.), vol. 2 (1823). 

“John Farmer, An Ecclesiastical Register of New-Hampshire 
(Concord, N.H., 1821). 



cation, or to be described in an independent his- 
tory. This interest in the past was abetted by the 
conflict that erupted after 1820 among the de- 
scendants of the Puritans as some moved into 
Unitarianism. Daniel White, a Unitarian, resur- 
rected the early history of the Salem congrega- 
tion — the first to be organized in Puritan New 
England — in the hope of demonstrating that its 
founders did not impose a fixed creed on the 
members. White's New England Congregationalism 
In Its Origin And Purity: Illustrated By the Founda- 
tion and Early Records Of The First Church In Salem 
thus emerged out of partisan polemics.^’ Ortho- 
doxy had an early representative in Leonard Ba- 
con, minister of New Haven Center Church, and 
in writers who arose to defend the Mathers. But 
perhaps its greatest figure was Henry Martyn 
Dexter, a Congregationalist minister turned bib- 
liographer and book collector. The Dexter Collec- 
tion (Yale University Library) has nurtured many 
students of American Puritanism, and although 
the massive bibliography appended to Dexter's 
The Congregationalism of the Last Three Hundred 
Years has been superseded, it remains a resource. 
The finest of these works of church history — 
Perry Miller was not alone in thinking it "admir- 
able" — was Hamilton Hill's two-volume History of 
the Old South Church, which reprints all of the es- 
sential documents relating to the founding of that 
Boston church. 

The persistence of the narrative tradition of 
"annals" is immediately apparent to anyone who 
browses among nineteenth-century local histo- 
ries. Joseph Pelt, a minister at the time he wrote 
a history of his native town. The Annals of Salem, 
From Its First Settlement produced an extreme 
(that is to say, almost unreadable) version of the 
form. The main topics in Nathaniel Adams's An- 
nals of Portsmouth were public events, wars, and 
ecclesiastical affairs; of social history as we under- 

2‘The story of sectarian conflict and its impact on concep- 
tions of the New England past is narrated in Lawrence Buell, 
Neu’ England Literary Culture from Revolution through Renaissance 
(Cambridge, 1986), chap. 9. 

“Leonard Bacon, Thirteen Historical Discourses, on the Com- 
pletion of Txvo Hundred Years, from the Beginning of the First Church 
in New Haven (New Haven, 1839); Hamilton A. Hill, History of 
the Old South Church (2 vols.; Boston, 1890); the characteriza- 
tion of "admirable" was Williston Walker's in The Creeds and 
Platforms of Congregationalism (New York, 1893), p. 405; Perry 
Miller voiced his admiration in The New England Mind: From 
Colony to Province (Cambridge, Mass., 1953), p. 451. 

“Joseph B. Felt, The Annals of Salem, from its First Settlement 
(Salem, Mass., 1827). 



xxiii 



stand it there was almost nothing. A great many 
other books had "annals" in the title or used the 
form for want of any other. A late example that 
we cite more for reasons of filiopiety than for 
those of merit was George Drisko's Narrative of the 
Town of Machias (1904). 

The third of these traditions, topographical de- 
scription, became, like church history, a standard 
feature of the better local studies. By midcentury 
it was common for these books to open with a 
chapter on the natural landscape and then go on 
to speak of roads and other man-made features. 
A variation was to trace the shifting features of a 
town or city, as Annie Haven Thwing did for Bos- 
ton in The Crooked & Narrow Streets of the Town of 
Boston, 16S0-1822P 

To note the persistence of these narrative tra- 
ditions is important. Yet it leaves us short of ex- 
plaining what was special about local history in 
the nineteenth century. We have pointed out al- 
ready one feature of this movement, an explosion 
in the numbers of such books that were being 
published. Something else exploded that may 
serve as an important clue: the size of local his- 
tories. The descriptions published in the Collec- 
tions of the Massachusetts Historical Society be- 
fore 1820 ran to little more than ten or fifteen 
pages, and when Abiel Holmes published The 
History of Cambridge in 1803, it was all of 40 pages. 
John Farmer's Historical Memoir of Billerica (1816) 
encompassed a mere 36 pages. Histories of a state 
were substantial volumes, but not histories of a 
town or church. But a famous saying becomes 
relevant: "apres moi, le deluge!" The histories 
published in the 1820s ran, in general, to some 
three hundred pages, an astonishing shift in 
scale. So did many of their successors. When the 
Reverend Henry Hazen's History of Billerica was 
published in 1883, its five hundred pages repre- 
sented a twelvefold increase from the size of 
Farmer's work of 1816.^^ The difference between 
two successive editions of Frances Manwaring 
Caulkins's History of Norwich, Connecticut is an- 
other case in point. The original edition, which 
she published in 1845, ran to 359 pages. The sec- 
ond, revised, edition, which she issued in 1866, 

^'’Nathaniel Adams, Annals of Portsmouth (Portsmouth, N.H., 
1825); George Drisko, Narrative of the Town of Machias (Machias, 
Me., 1904). 

“Annie Haven Thwing, The Crooked & Narrow Streets of the 
Town of Boston, 1630-1822 (Boston, 1920). 

“Henry A. Hazen, History of Billerica, Massachusetts, with a 
Genealogical Register (Boston, 1883). 



swelled to 704 pages. By the 1880s, moreover, the 
antiquarian community was producing collabo- 
rative histories like the four-volume folio Memorial 
History of Boston.^'^ These illustrations serve to 
make a crucial point: after 1820 the scale and 
scope of local history changed dramatically. 

How can we explain this change? Without 
doubt, the single most important reason was a 
new sense of the relationship between the pre- 
sent and the past. But let us first consider a more 
limited or specific set of differences. 

Genealogy is a good place to begin, for the de- 
cision to include family histories added greatly to 
the bulk of local studies written after 1840. To 
return for a moment to firsts, it is worth observing 
that the first independently published genealogy 
appeared in 1819. John Farmer, the undoubted 
"father" of this field of research, began to publish 
his short-lived Genealogical Register in 1828. We 
have already mentioned the founding of the New 
England Historic Genealogical Society in 1845, 
and of its Register in 1847. Soon thereafter a Bos- 
ton antiquarian, James Savage, embarked on A 
Genealogical Dictionary of The First Settlers of New 
England. It was in the 1840s that historians of in- 
dividual towns began to include family histories; 
they appeared in Caulkins's History of Norwich 
and in Justin Winsor's History of The Town of Dux- 
bury (1849). 

Another reason for the leap in scale of local his- 
tory was a new attention to community records. 
It quickly became common to include substantial 
portions of the earliest of these records to survive: 
lists detailing the distribution of land grants, town 
meeting minutes, the minister's account of bap- 
tisms, deaths, and cases of church discipline. 

A third reason for the change in scale of local 
history was a new interest in Native Americans. 
To be sure, this interest was present in the Mag- 
nalia, which devotes an entire "Book" to retelling 
the "Wars of the Lord," from the settlers' slaugh- 
tering of the Pequots in 1637 to the prolonged 
struggle of King Philip's War and the border raids 
that resumed in 1689. It survived in another lit- 
erary form, the "captivity narratives" that print- 
ers turned into a form of popular culture. Yet by 
and large the details of these wars did not appeal 

^^Caulkins, History of Norwich, Connecticut: From Its Settle- 
ment in 1660, to January 1845 (Norwich, Conn., 1845) and His- 
tory of Norwich . . . to the Year 1866 ([Hartford], The Author, 
1866); Justin Winsor, ed.. The Memorial History of Boston (4 
vols.; Boston, 1880-81). 



XXIV 



to the more serious of our eighteenth-century his- 
torians. Then a shift of feeling occurred, a shift 
apparent as early as the 1820s in John Farmer's 
prescient Periodical Miscellany, which in the initial 
issue listed "Historical Sketches of Indian wars, 
battles and exploits; of the adventures and suf- 
ferings of the captives," as a main category of 
interest.^* Thereafter, lengthy chapters on King 
Philip's War and its bloody sequels in the eigh- 
teenth century became increasingly common, to 
reach something of a climax in George Sheldon's 
extraordinary History of Deerfield, Massachusetts 
(1895-96), where he spent one hundred pages re- 
counting the destruction of the town in 1704 and 
the fate of the captives.^’ 

Less certainly Sheldon, but for sure some of his 
contemporaries were responding to the example 
of Francis Parkman, a patrician who spent his life 
retelling the great struggle between France and 
Britain for control of the wilderness. Yet they may 
have owed as much, or more, to Walter Scott. 
Inventor of the historical novel, Scott focused in 
such novels as The Bride of Lamarnore on the con- 
tested border between England and Scotland. It 
is not far-fetched to suggest that Scott's theme of 
two great forces clashing to decide the fate of a 
nation — a theme that in his hands would energize 
a local version of the past — served to stimulate 
fresh interest in our border lands and the contest 
between whites and Indians. 

Yet in listing these three changes we still fall 
short of explaining the explosion in the scale and 
scope of local history. To do so we must take ac- 
count of a more elusive factor, a change in how 
the past itself was being perceived. The men and 
women who sought to reclaim the first centuries 
of New England history were moved to do so by 
a paradoxical relationship to the early centuries of 
New England history. On the one hand they felt 
a sense of distance from those times. Eor them 
the "Puritans" and "Pilgrims" were located in a 
past that was seen as "ancient." A telling adjec- 
tive, this word suggests a disruption between 
past and present: the old or the ancient is like a 
different epoch, a world unto itself.^® It may strike 

^''Preface, Periodical Miscellany. 

^George Sheldon, 1636 — Pocumtuck — 1886: A History of Deer- 
field, Massachusetts: The Times When and the People by Whom It 
was Settled, Unsettled and Resettled: With a Special Study of the 
Indian Wars (2 vols.; Deerfield, Mass., 1895-96). 

”E.g., in Royal R. Hinman, A Catalogue of the Names of the 
First Puritan Settlers of .. . Connecticut (Hartford, 1846), p. 9: 
“The book is now a curiosity of ancient days." 



US as curious that the very men and women so 
busy at describing the first settlers and the revo- 
lutionaries of 1776 — so busy, as it were, in filling 
up the past — felt cut off from the generations that 
preceded them. To us these writers seem like au- 
thentic witnesses to a past from which we are 
truly severed. Yet if we look sideways at the writ- 
ers and poets who in the same decades were writ- 
ing about the Pilgrims and the Puritans — writers 
such as Whittier, Longfellow, and Stowe, not to 
mention scores of others — the sense of distance, 
the struggle to re-imagine a lost world, become 
instantly apparent. We wish to insist that the ex- 
perience of the antiquarians was no different from 
the experience of these writers. Yet on the other 
hand, and again in keeping with some of the fic- 
tion writers, the antiquarian community felt a 
strong sense of kinship with what came before. 
Local history was premised on a concept of an- 
cestry, or of how the past was prologue to the 
present. Distance, but also closeness — this para- 
dox pervades and in some sense was the source 
of the great flowering of the genre. 

We do well to remember that this nineteenth- 
century effort to re-imagine a lost world gave us 
the Puritans not as they really were, but as a mix- 
ture of invention and fact interlaced with nine- 
teenth-century values. The literary historian Law- 
rence Buell, the most astute commentator on the 
historical imagination of New England writers, 
has proposed that this process involved an "emo- 
tional identification" with the past, but also an 
awareness of how "alien" to the nineteenth cen- 
tury the Puritans had become. "It reminds us," 
Buell writes, 

of the ever widening gap between our period's 
writers and the Puritans with whom or against 
whom they aligned themselves, whether or not 
they acknowledged that gap. It further suggests 
that the extremes of hostility and filiopietism that 
the Puritans provoked in their descendants were 
equally symptomatic of the historical distance be- 
tween the eras and of the necessity of bridging 
that distance through projective myth. . . . 

This awareness of distance and discontinuity lib- 
erated the imagination both of those who became 
antiquarians and of those who turned to poetry 
and fiction. It was the poignancy of distance that 
wrapped the past in mystery and "romance," and 
made it so intriguing to explore.^' 

3'Buell, New England Literary Culture, p. 194. 



XXV 



Armed with this suggestion, we may find a 
fresh significance in the prefaces in which local 
historians talked about the past and their motives 
for returning to it. Three recurring themes are 
especially revealing: the imperiled condition of 
local records, including oral lore; the pace of 
change, and the emigration to other parts of 
America by so many sons and daughters of a 
town. But perhaps the most interesting conse- 
quence of a felt distance from the past was a new 
appreciation of “customs." Each of these topics 
deserves consideration in turn. 

Here is the historian of New Britain, Connect- 
icut, commenting on the documentary evidence: 
“It has been the endeavor to preserve the memory 
of local events, traditions, and enterprise, and of 
notable persons; to glean from old records, from 
perishable manuscripts, crumbling monuments, 
and the memory of the aged, material which 
would soon be lost. . . Almost universally 
these nineteenth-century antiquarians present 
themselves as intervening at a crucial moment to 
rescue from neglect such records. We have to 
understand these statements both as fact — many 
records were indeed imperiled — and as a way of 
setting off the past from the present, of empha- 
sizing distance. They are like the “Customs 
House" introduction to The Scarlet Letter in which 
Hawthorne tells of finding a cache of old docu- 
ments in the attic of the Salem Customs House: 
at the outset, these statements tell us that we are 
about to enter a quite different world. 

The past and the present are set off from one 
another by the pace of change in the nineteenth 
century. The genealogies describe families that 
took root and flourished in a town, but that now 
are dying out. The very landscape is evolving 
with a speed that defies the imagination. Indeed 
the past is “crumbling" as death and emigration 
remove those who used to live here: “The original 
settlers of this street had all passed away. Some 
of the old families were represented by their de- 
scendants, but in many instances the old home- 
steads had passed into other hands, and new 
names were connected with these first farms of 
New Britain." So spoke the historian of New Brit- 
ain. And here is the historian of Norwich: “In this 
part of Norwich since 1835 the advance in the 
style of buildings, both public and private, has 

’^David N. Camp, History of New Britain (New Britain, 
Conn., 1889), p. 4. 



been surprisingly rapid, — almost like the changes 
of imagery in an enchanter's mirror. ... So great 
are the transformations, that absentees of fifteen 
or twenty years, on returning are embarrassed in 
endeavoring to trace out their former haunts."^^ 
Change seemed overwhelming in its pace and 
consequences. 

With remarkable unanimity the nineteenth- 
century antiquarians keep referring to a social 
fact, the exodus of people from New England. 
Many of the people Ellen Earned knew in her 
youth in Windham County, Connecticut, became 
movers — indeed, so many that she devoted a 
chapter in her county history to “The Army of 
Emigrants."^ An earlier generation had gone to 
the metropolis of New York or to upstate regions 
like the Genesee Valley, thereby prompting Rufus 
King's remark that the New York Constitutional 
Convention of 1821 contained more native sons 
of Connecticut than of New York itself. By the 
1840s the “wanderers," as they are labeled in a 
centennial address for the town of Middletown, 
Connecticut,^^ have scattered far across the coun- 
try. For those who stayed behind, their leaving 
became cause and symbol of the ever-widening 
distance between past and present. More sons 
and daughters now live elsewhere than in their 
old town. Should they be thought of carrying 
good New England values to the wider world, or 
as having betrayed their community? Is it possibly 
this migration that imperils the old records, since 
no one seems to care about the past? 

A sure sign of rupture from the past was a new 
curiosity about New England “customs" and 
“legends." Some of these customs had been noted 
by historians in the eighteenth century, though in 
general they regarded them as discredited and 
unfortunate “superstitions."^ But by the early de- 
cades of the nineteenth century a radically differ- 
ent way of perceiving these beliefs was beginning 
to emerge. Now they seemed to contain some- 
thing of value — something peculiarly “native," 
and also very “old." As the Enlightenment gave 
way to Romanticism, so did “superstitions" give 
way to the categories of “folklore" and “legend." 

^^Ibid., p. 69; Caulkins, History of Norwich (1866), p. 24. 

’^Ellen D. Lamed, History of Windham County, Connecticut (2 
vols.; Worcester, Mass., 1874-80), II, 586. 

35David D. Field, Centennial Address, with Historical Sketches 
of Cromwell, . . . Middletown and Its Parishes (Middletown, 
Conn., 1853), p. 20. 

^The Diary of William Bentley (4 vols.; Salem, Mass., 1905- 
14), III, 200. 



XXVI 



These categories suffuse the poetry and story-tell- 
ing of John Greenleaf Whittier. In the preface to 
his earliest book, Legends ofNeiv England, Whittier 
announced that "the New World" was not "de- 
ficient in the elements of poetry," as some had 
argued, but "full of Romance": "The great forest 
which our fathers penetrated — the red men — 
their struggle and their disappearance — . . . the 
tale of superstition, and the scenes of Witch- 
craft, — all these are rich materials for poetry." 
Whittier performed this alchemy in his own prose 
and poetry. Yet in doing so he reinscribed the 
distance between past and present; the old lore 
was "gone," and 

The roofless house, decayed, deserted. 

Its liihng tenants all departed. 

No longer rings with midnight revel 
Of witch, or ghost, or goblin evil. . . 

The same distance, the same recognition of a 
"world we have lost," informs the sympathetic 
descriptions of old customs that began to enter 
local histories — descriptions, say, of Sunday ser- 
vices, which, as one antiquarian remarked, would 
now seem so strange as to make us "smile . . . 
could these old times and customs be but once 
presented in reality."^^ 

Once again, however, distance seemed to lib- 
erate the antiquarian. In making the transition 
from regarding certain practices and beliefs as 
harmful "superstitions" to regarding them as 
quaint expressions of a bygone age, the local his- 
torian came into possession of a new body of ma- 
terial to preserve and retell. It was a transition 
Europeans were making early in the nineteenth 
century as they embarked on the search that Peter 
Burke has termed the "invention of the folk." The 
Brothers Grimm and Walter Scott were leaders in 
this movement, which, as Burke presents it, pro- 
jected onto the "folk" certain traits or qualities 
that seemed missing in the present. Behind the 
discovery of the folk lay, therefore, a heightened 
sense of change — and loss.'‘° 

To these four circumstances let us add a fifth. 
As historians of party ideology and party "myth" 

^’’Quoted in George Carey, "John Greenleaf Whittier and 
Folklore: The Search for a Traditional American Past," New 
York Folklore Quarterly, 27 (Mar. 1971), 114. 

^The Poetical Works of John Greenleaf Whittier (4 vols.; Boston, 
1892), I, 23 (from "New England Legends"). 

^’[Frederic Kidder and Augustus A. Gould], The History of 
New Ipswich IN.H.] (Boston, 1852), p. 156. 

■“Peter Burke, Popular Culture in Early Modern Europe (New 
York, 1978), chap. 2. 



have informed us, the Whigs in antebellum America 
were especially interested in the past. From their 
point of view the American who acknowledged 
the burden of the past — who felt himself respon- 
sible for sustaining what the founding fathers had 
begun and accomplished — would make a better 
citizen than someone lacking any sense of history. 
The great Whig orators such as Daniel Webster 
and Edward Everett wove a spell about the past 
that was meant to create bonds of "memory" that 
would curb a restless people.'" The same fear of 
unchecked freedom and unrestrained material- 
ism moved "sentimental" writers to affirm the 
significance of "home." The antiquarians, most of 
whom were Whigs, participated in both of these 
programs. As one local writer put it, to issue local 
history was to "encourage a love of home: by its 
attraction, they draw back the wanderer to his 
birth — and quiet in a measure that restless spirit 
of" change. 

The act of writing local history was therefore 
an act of restoring moral and social community, a 
restoration also taking place at the ritual moment 
when towns celebrated some great event. At 
these gatherings it was customary to announce 
that the audience "numbered . . . many of the 
sons of Union [Connecticut] now residing else- 
where."^^ Each town history embodied a literary 
parallel: everyone who read the book was once 
again enmeshed with the bonds of memory. 

Here is the place, however, to recall the other 
side of distance from the past, the concept of an- 
cestry. As Whigs, as antiquarians, as persons 
genuinely feeling a connection with what came 
before, local history writers could imagine — as 
Frances Caulkins did in the opening pages of her 
History of New London — the founders marveling at 
the progress of society: 

How his [John Winthrop, Jr.'s] heart would beat, 
could he now stand upon that spot in the garb of 
mortality, with earthly feelings still yearning in 
his bosom, and survey the fair town which he 
first began to hew out of the wilderness! . . . But 
where he then saw only a confused mass of sterile 
rocks and stunted trees, or swamps and thickets, 
relieved only by a few Indian smokes that rose 
from their depths, there are now wharves, and 

^■Cf. J. V. Matthews, '"Whig Ftistory': The New England 
Whigs and a Usable Past," New England Quarterly, 51 (June 
1978), 193-208. 

“Field, Centennial Address, p. 20. 

“Charles Hammond, The History of Union, Conn. (New Ha- 
ven, 1893), p. 25. 



XXVll 



spires, and fortresses; trains of cars gliding over 
iron tracks; hills furrowed with the cemeteries of 
the dead, and streets crowded with the mansions 
of the living.'” 

Linking past and present via faith in progress, 
and attempting to affirm the bonds of memory for 
those who lived elsewhere, nineteenth-century 
antiquarians infused local history with deepfelt 
cultural politics. 

They tell us this themselves. But in doing so 
they also confess their uncertainty. Will local his- 
tory really work this way, or is it too minute to 
matter? Is theirs a fruitless task, a lonely occu- 
pation that removes them from the present? 

The outcome of reflecting on such questions 
was a deep ambivalence about local history and 
the role of antiquarian. Let us listen once again 
to Frances Caulkins: 

The author can but hope that some few readers — 
aged and lonely people, or those among the stir- 
ring and ardent, who turn reverently toward the 
past, the youth perchance whose curiosity is ex- 
cited to know what has been done on this spot in 
older times, and the far off wanderer that cher- 
ishes Norwich as his own early home, or the seat 
of his ancestors — will experience in the perusal 
some portions of that satisfying interest which 
was felt in the preparation. 

This confession of uncertainty — "The author can 
but hope that some few readers" — was common 
among antiquarians. Whether rummaging in ne- 
glected records or "lift[ing] the veil from a past 
which has been almost forgotten,"” the tasks 
they undertook seemed to them at once of un- 
certain value and yet part of a much grander 
movement to shape the values of Americans. 

It is important that we hear the tone of uncer- 
tainty, for otherwise we run the risk of regarding 
local history as celebrating a romanticized New 
England. That celebration did occur in Fourth of 
July orations and Thanksgiving Day sermons. It 
occurred as well in a vast body of fiction and po- 
etry devoted to "old time" New England. In 
much of this fiction and poetry a formula pre- 
vailed — a formula apparent to reviewers for the 
North American Review and The Nation who com- 
ment critically on hearing once again of crabbed 
spinsters, stern, cold-hearted ministers, and vil- 

■”Frances Manwaring Caulkins, History of Neu' London, Con- 
necticut (New London, 1852), pp. 15-16. 

^’Caulkins, History of Norwich (1845), p. iv. 

“^Hazen, History of Billerica, p. iii. 



lage characters. But the sentimental spell that 
many of these writers — some of whom, like Jo- 
siah Holland, were close to the local history 
tradition — wove around the past was largely 
missing from the work of antiquarians. To their 
pages they admitted too much conflict, as in 
schisms within churches. Instead of dealing in 
grand themes and happy endings, local history 
writers committed themselves to a gritty real- 
ism.” It was the facts they wished to detail, and 
preferably the facts as manifested in old records. 

A good example of this passion for the facts and 
its literary consequence, a disheveled structure, 
is Miss Caulkins's History of Norwich. In the space 
of a few pages the reader moves rapidly through 
a series of sub-headed sections, their order almost 
random; "mill" is followed by "first births," 
"deaths," and "marriages," and then by "miscel- 
laneous details" in which we read of old houses, 
furniture, and foodways. Several pages of such 
information give way to "names" by which the 
land was known. Some of these, she tells us, are 
"obsolete." It is crucial that she list them: 

Connecticut Plains, — a tract within the 
bounds of the nine-miles-square, on what was 
then called the path to Connecticut, that is, the 
old road to Hartford. 

. . . New Roxbury, — New Woodstock. 

Nicholas Hill, — south of the Yantic, since 
called Nick's Hill. 

Little Faith Place, — south of Wawekus Hill. 

Thereafter a sudden rush of details fills the page.'*’’ 
This narrative strategy — in effect, an unchecked 
license to retail facts — is open to the obvious ob- 
jection that the writer cannot differentiate the sig- 
nificant from the insignificant. We may also 
complain that the facts are not arranged according 
to an argument. Admitting the justice of these 
questions, we must point out that they overlook 
the self-admitted purpose of the local historian. 
Miss Caulkins and her kind understood the role 
of "antiquarian" as involving, first and foremost, 
a responsibility to facts. Manifested in the nar- 
rative traditions of the annals and of topograph- 
ical history and sustained in the genre of the local 

^-’Nation, 8 (June 3, 1869), 437; 3 (Oct. 11, 1866), 288. 

Buell, New England Literary Culture, pp. 243-44. 
■’‘’Caulkins, History of Norwich (1866), pp. 72-81. 

^’’As Paul Boyer and Stephen Nissenbaum do of Charles 
Upham's Salem Witchcraft, on which nonetheless they depend 
for much of their data: Salem Possessed (Cambridge, Mass., 
1974), pp. x-xi. 



xxviii 



history, this concern for facts — the minutiae of 
dates and names — was coupled with a critique of 
legends and "tradition." Thus Miss Caulkins qui- 
etly dismissed certain local lore about the Indians. 
In the hands of the antiquarian, therefore, the de- 
tails which had been so arduously gathered func- 
tioned to correct our picture of the past. These 
facts were also being made available to others, 
notably "historians," to transform into a grander, 
more poetic story. Accepting for themselves the 
lesser role, nineteenth-century antiquarians went 
about the business of collecting all the details on 
which they could lay their hands. 

This role coincided with specific social and eco- 
nomic circumstances. It may be said in general 
that the scores of men and women who wrote 
local histories did so out of love for the subject, 
and not for the money. The products they created 
were not widely marketed as commodities. The 
proof of this statement lies in the indifference of 
major publishers in New York and Boston to the 
genre. A wholly different sociology of culture is 
contained in the statement at the foot of Miss 
Caulkins's title page: "Published by the Author." 
Such statements were common before 1870. The 
one qualification we must make (though it leaves 
the basic point unchanged) is that individual 
towns, often acting in response to an anniversary, 
commissioned and paid for a certain number of 
the histories. 

Certain aspects of biography point to the same 
sociology of culture. If these men and women had 
a literary reputation, it was merely local. Some of 
the men were college graduates, but in choosing 
to become an antiquarian or in taking up this av- 
ocation they removed themselves from the sphere 
of metropolitan culture. For them it was not a 
telling fact that they could trace their descent from 
the "first settlers." Ancestry was neutral in its 
implications until the final decades of the century. 

Accepting for themselves a sharply circum- 
scribed role, and acknowledging that few may 
care about their life work, the men and women 
who created local history were nonetheless an in- 
teresting and varied group of people. In becom- 
ing so preoccupied with local history, certain 

®'John Daggett, Sketch of the History of Attleborough (Dedham, 
Mass., 1834), p. 3; Lamed, History of Windham County, pp. v, 4. 

“Larned's History of Windham County, Connecticut was "Pub- 
lished by the Author," as was (to cite an example written by 
the author of this essay's great-great grandfather) A. P. Mar- 
vin's History of the Town of Winchendon (Winchendon, Mass., 
1868). 



writers were transformed into village characters: 
George Sheldon of Deerfield, for example. Some 
were ministers serving out their years in small- 
town New England. Charles Hammond moved 
from the pulpit to the schoolhouse, administering 
a series of academies. What was said of him in 
the posthumous History of Union, Conn . — "He be- 
came intensely interested in the stories of the 
early settlers of the place, and began while still a 
young man, to gather the information concerning 
the history of the town"” — was said of many 
men and women. Here is Edward E. Bourne, de- 
scribed by his son in the preface to another post- 
humously published history: 

. . . traveling from one part of the town to an- 
other, into adjacent places, and even into other 
States, wherever he could hear of an aged person 
whose memory might supply some fact or eluci- 
date a doubt; examining ancient records and doc- 
uments, feeling amply rewarded if a single fact 
was elicited, he has worked steadily on. . . . 
During his last hours, only the night before his 
death ... he called my attention to minutes of 
certain facts that had recently come to his knowl- 
edge. . . 

The archetypal hero of these early years was John 
Farmer, who had to resign from the ministry be- 
cause of ill health. Constrained always by the lim- 
its on his strength, never marrying, earning his 
living as an apothecary in Nashua, New Hamp- 
shire, Farmer turned out an astonishing quantity 
of publications even so.” 

And what of the women? Frances Caulkins, a 
native of eastern Connecticut who never married, 
was educated within her family and at one of the 
earliest female academies. She ran such a school 
herself for several years before moving to New 
York, where her activities included becoming an 
author of well-meaning pamphlets for the Amer- 
ican Tract Society. Ellen Earned, another native of 
eastern Connecticut, came out of a literary and 
politically progressive family; a brother taught lit- 
erature at Yale after serving briefly as a Congre- 
gationalist minister, and a half brother was a 

“Hammond, History of Union, Conn., preface, and p. 8. 

“Edward E. Bourne, jr., "Preface," to Edward E. Bourne, 
The History of Wells and Kennebunk (Portland, Maine, 1875), 
pp. iii-iv. Similar stories could be told of other local collectors 
(e.g., Sylvester Judd, Sherman Wolcott Adams), some of 
whom did not live to transform their materials into a narrative 
history. 

“"Memoir of John Parmer, M.A.," New England Historical 
and Genealogical Register, 1 (1847), 9-20. 



XXIX 



founder of the Free Soil Party in Connecticut. She 
too never married.^* To generalize is risky. Yet it 
may be said with assurance that these men and 
women did not constitute or have close relations 
to a "Brahmin" (and largely Unitarian and urban) 
elite. That elite included a few notable antiquari- 
ans, like James Savage. But for the most part the 
social history of the antiquarian community was 
a history of middle-class New Englanders respon- 
sive to and rooted in provincial culture. 

For grander personal histories, and grander 
themes about the New England past, we must 
look to such works (and their writers) as John 
Gorham Palfrey's multi-volume History of New En- 
gland, the first volume of which was published in 
1865. No compiler or mere annalist. Palfrey adopted 
the mode of narrative history. Eor his overriding 
theme he chose the emergence of liberty. As Law- 
rence Buell has observed. Palfrey could have 
sided with his fellow Unitarians in their conflict 
with the orthodox by describing the reign of the 
Puritans as a time of almost unrelieved spiritual 
and civil oppression — a "theocracy," in short. Ea- 
ger to legitimize their liberalism, these Unitarians 
were making much of the banishing of Roger Wil- 
liams, the witch-hunting at Salem in 1692, and 
the obscurantism of Cotton Mather. It was the 
Unitarian George Bancroft who popularized the 
argument that the Salem witch-hunt arose as an 
effort by the clergy to regain their authority. 
Many decades later, historians of New England 
are still dealing with the misapprehension of 
"theocracy" and an overbearing clergy that burned 
witches at the stake.®® But in the pages of Palfrey's 
History a different theme prevailed, a less partisan 
story of an ever- rising freedom. 

By the middle of the nineteenth century, there- 
fore, local history was being written in two quite 
different ways: in the main, as antiquarian detail, 
but in books like Palfrey's as grand narrative. Not 
until the very end of the century were both of 
these modes strongly challenged and their prem- 
ises denied. One challenge came from members 
of the Adams family, the quintessential insiders 
as outsiders of their time. In the 1890s two broth- 

*Henry P. Haven, “A Brief Sketch of the Life of the Au- 
thor," in Caulkins, History of Norwich, Connecticut (1874), pp. 
vi-xviii; "Lamed, Ellen Douglas," Appleton's Cyclopedia of 
American Biograplry, vol. 3. 

5^Palfrey, History of Neu^ England (Boston, 1865); Chadwick 
Hansen, Witchcraft at Salem (New York, 1969), pp. ix-x. 

“As retold by Vernon Louis Parrington and James Truslow 
Adams, among others. 



ers, Charles Francis Adams, Jr. and Brooks Adams, 
strongly denounced Palfrey for being an apologist 
who overlooked the fundamental errors of the 
"theocratic" Puritans.®^ 

In some sense this was a family quarrel without 
major consequences. More telling in the long run 
was the rise of "scientific" history within research 
universities. But before we describe this new way 
of writing local history let us sketch the broader 
scene. The movement we have often spoken of 
seemed to gain momentum in the final decades 
of the nineteenth century. More books were being 
published and more local societies were active 
than ever before. Some of the histories published 
in this period represent the genre at its best — for 
example, Thomas Waters's two-volume Ipswich in 
the Massachusetts Bay Colony.^ Yet all was not as 
prosperous as the data may suggest. New trends 
were emerging that, as they gained ground, un- 
dercut the enterprise of local history. Its apparent 
health was paradoxically a sign of impending col- 
lapse. 

One trend was for commercial publishers to 
sponsor local history. The Boston firm of James R. 
Osgood published several such histories in the 
1880s. A parallel event was the emergence of 
professional genealogists and antiquarians who, 
unlike any of their predecessors, wrote for pay or 
held posts as librarians and directors of historical 
societies. In collaboration with the Philadelphia 
firm of J. W. Lewis & Company, Duane Hamilton 
Hurd organized eleven county histories, some of 
them lavishly illustrated with "mug shots" of con- 
temporary worthies.®' This commercializing of 
the genre, though not in and of itself deplorable, 
signified the weakening of local sources of sup- 
port. 

The weakening of local history at its very source, 
the community, was hastened by the rise of "sci- 
entific" history and of its institutional sponsor, 
the research university. In 1876 the newly-founded 
Johns Hopkins University became the first Amer- 
ican university to limit itself to graduate instruc- 
tion leading to the Ph.D. degree. The main 
instrument of instruction was the "seminar," a 
structure imported from the German universities 

“Charles Francis Adams, Massachusetts: Its Historians and Its 
History; An Object Lesson (Boston, 1893); his younger brother 
Brooks Adams had launched this assault in The Emancipation 
of Massachusetts (Boston, 1887). 

“(Ipswich, Mass., 1905-17). 

‘■'E.g., History of Hillsborough County, New Hampshire (Phila- 
delphia, 1885). 



XXX 



at which several of the faculty had earned their 
advanced degrees. The man who undertook to 
organize instruction in American history, Herbert 
Baxter Adams, earned a Ph.D. at Heidelberg in 
1876. His family background — he was born in a 
small Massachusetts town, and his ancestry ex- 
tended back to the seventeenth century — quali- 
fied him to be an antiquarian. One of his early 
students, Charles McLean Andrews, was also a 
native of small-town New England (in this case, 
Connecticut) and enjoyed similar family roots. 
But when Adams wrote about the New England 
town, his “scientific” training led him in a new 
direction. It was crucial that the local be con- 
nected to more general structures — in Adams's 
case, the institutional evolution of “the town" 
from the Anglo-Saxon (or German) “tun." The 
evolution of institutions — alas, all too abstract — 
took the place of attention to unique, or nearly 
so, detail. Interestingly, Andrews rejected his 
mentor's vision of Germanic origins for the New 
England town. His Johns Hopkins thesis, a study 
of the founding and evolution of three Connecti- 
cut River towns, seems astonishingly modern — 
that is, free of Germanic, institutional history jar- 
gon — and yet clearly rooted in the antiquarian 
tradition.*^ But the blighting hand of institutional 
history seemed to prevail. Denounced from within 
by people like the Adamses, rejected from with- 
out by those with more pretensions, local history 
languished after 1900. As the curve of publica- 
tions dropped, as satire like The Late George Apley 
came upon the scene, it seemed certain that a 
great tradition had come to its end. 

David D. Hall 
Professor of History 
Boston University 



PART two: the advent and triumph 

OF THE COMMUNITY STUDY 

During the twentieth century academically-trained 
and academically-employed “social historians" 
took up the writing of local histories as “com- 
munity studies" and made them the staple genre 

“Herbert Baxter Adams, The Germanic Origin of New England 
Towns (Baltimore, 1882); Charles M. Andrews, The River Towns 
of Connecticut: A Study of Wethersfield, Hartford, and Windsor 
(Baltimore, 1889). 



of their trade. In describing this transition and 
contrasting the antiquarian and the social science 
modes of local history I mean to avoid the usual 
mythos of the invading academics: that their 
professionalism rescued local history from be- 
nighted, parochial amateurs. There has been no 
shortage of carelessly researched and poorly writ- 
ten antiquarian histories, but the same can be said 
of some of the succeeding community studies. My 
own research has taught me to respect the accom- 
plishments and continuing usefulness of the very 
best of the antiquarian works; and my own read- 
ing in the newer-style community studies has not 
convinced me that they have always improved on 
their predecessors. So, in the following pages, I 
will not glorify the rise of the new social historian 
by deriding the antiquarian. Nor will I concen- 
trate on the emergence or submergence of com- 
peting “arguments" with which academic review- 
ers and historiographers usually pigeonhole every 
study. Instead, I will treat the new community 
study as another form of historical literature, as 
the consequence of an agenda that differs from 
that of the antiquarians.^^ 

That agenda represents different answers to six 
interrelated questions. First, what role does the 
author take in relation to the people who once 
lived in a given place? Many antiquarians settled 
for being mere chroniclers who listed, in chro- 
nological sequence, the town's most conspicuous 
events or who described, in topical sequence, the 
town's preeminent institutions. But the best were 
narrators who organized their evidence into a 
richly descriptive and strictly linear story that be- 
gins with a Puritan (or, in northern New England, 
a Yankee settler) genesis and develops through 
the Indian and Revolutionary conflicts toward an 
apotheosis in the nineteenth century as an im- 
proved, progressive community, yet one that still 
reveres worthy traditions. In contrast, the social 
historian sees himself as a social scientist self- 
consciously posing theoretically-informed ques- 
tions to quantifiable data. The problem-solving 
social historian's encounter with difficult but po- 
tent sources moves to the very center of the nar- 
ration. 

The historian as modernist manifests his skill 
by fully exposing to his readers his methods of 

“For the disdain see John M, Murrin, "The Myths of Co- 
lonial Democracy and Royal Decline in Eighteenth-Century 
America: A Review Essay," Cithara, 5 (Nov. 1965), 53; Michael 
Zuckerman, Peaceable Kingdoms: New England Towns in the Eigh- 
teenth Century (New York, 1970), pp. 3-5. 



XXXI 



collecting data and reasoning with evidence. Dis- 
cussion of method and reasoning is no longer an 
adjunct, segregated in notes or an appendix, if 
included at all; instead such discussion dominates 
the text. Just as modernist architects cast aside 
every ornament in favor of exposing the skeletal 
frames of their buildings to the onlooker, the new 
social historians of the later twentieth century 
highlight the structure of their craft for the reader 
to see on every page. The narrative historian 
sought to sustain the illusion of presenting past 
people in past action without apparent intrusion 
from the off-stage scholar; the modernist seeks 
the newer illusion of presenting no illusion. Hav- 
ing become the text's central character, the new 
historian triumphs by persuading readers that he 
or she has wrung the best possible interpretation 
from difficult materials. 

Second, how does the author fit events together 
in order to explain them? For the best of the an- 
tiquarians, the meaning of an event emerged by 
arranging it in a chronological sequence. Every 
significant event led to the next and moved the 
community forward toward its destiny as part of 
the dramatic triumph in the nineteenth century 
of New England values, institutions, and pros- 
perity, an ascent that overcomes every challenge 
from the immoral representatives of social regres- 
sion: heathen Indians, French Catholics, tyran- 
nical Redcoats, selfish Tories, local loafers, and 
any geographic obstacles to economic develop- 
ment. In the narrative mode favored by the most 
skilled antiquarians, description and explanation 
and moralizing were inseparable. In contrast, for 
the social historian, understanding an event, a 
person, or an institution depends less on its place 
between antecedents and succedents, and more 
upon its systemic position or function within a 
community or a social order. 

Third, what sort of generalized knowledge does 
the scholar seek? The antiquarians sought affir- 
mation of their social order by reordering the past 
to provide reassuring "moral laws" that presum- 
ably dictated the inevitable triumph of the New 
England culture and society of the nineteenth 
century over its immoral and antiquated enemies. 

'^Harry B. Henderson III, Versions of the Past: The Historical 
Imagination in American Fiction (New York, 1974), pp. 3-15; 
David Levin, In Defense of Historical Literature: Essays on Amer- 
ican History, Autobiograplry, Drama, and Fiction (New York, 
1967), pp. i-33; James A. Henretta, “Social History as Lived 
and Written," American Historical Review, 84 (Dec. 1979), 1299. 



But the rise of social science in the late nineteenth 
and early twentieth century discredited the search 
for moral laws and dethroned history as the dom- 
inant form of social inquiry. The social historian 
sought renewed credibility and influence among 
the social scientists by joining their quest for test- 
able hypotheses about behavioral (rather than 
moral) regularities; by borrowing, testing, and re- 
fining the theoretical models developed by soci- 
ologists, anthropologists, or psychologists. Seek- 
ing a truce with the other social scientists on the 
basis of parity, the social historians concede that 
history will no longer find law but receive it from 
the other disciplines for testing. 

Fourth, what sources should the historian rely 
upon? The best antiquarians used virtually all of 
the sources later tapped by the social historians: 
traditions, probated wills and inventories, church 
records, land deeds, court cases, vital statistics, 
maps, prints, account books, and town meeting 
minutes. But where the antiquarian tended to use 
them to trace individuals, the social historian 
counts and sorts and cross-tabulates in search of 
aggregative statistics for entire populations or sub- 
groups within the town. The antiquarian attends 
to the town's special identity while the social his- 
torian usually treats the community as a micro- 
cosm of the region (if not the entire nation), as a 
laboratory for understanding a larger society. 

Fifth, what is the place of the community within 
New England and of New England within the na- 
tion? The emergence of the new social history of 
New England communities produced a paradox. 
Although the antiquarians had ostensibly pur- 
sued local identity, they described towns which 
were much more like one another than those de- 
picted by the various social historians, who had 
assumed that any one new England town could 
stand in for all of the others. The antiquarians 
wanted to fit their particular towns into shared 
regional traditions and to claim a place for them 
in New England's economic and cultural prog- 
ress. The social historian feels a concern for stak- 
ing a personal claim within the academic profes- 
sion by setting a particular town in a different 
light from those already studied. The antiquari- 
an's town was a special representative of the re- 
gion's collective achievements. The social histo- 
rian's town serves to correct all of those historians 
who had already written. It would seem that the 
antiquarians were more collegial, in the word's 
figurative sense, than their academic successors. 



xxxii 



Sixth, what sort of people should the scholar 
focus upon? Although attentive through geneal- 
ogy to middling folk, the antiquarians tended to 
focus their narrative on the town fathers and 
other conspicuous individuals at the center of 
public events and in the lead in town improve- 
ments. In contrast, the social historian has usually 
sought the ordinary, the common, the average 
man (less often, the woman) as defined by the 
statistical means of aggregated records. Until re- 
cently, most social historians took no interest in 
individuality. To better see the elusive common 
men, they put leading men out of view, presum- 
ing that the two sorts of townspeople lived in es- 
sentially different realms. 

The polarity between how antiquarians and so- 
cial historians answered those six questions has 
not remained constant over the course of the 
twentieth century. In the following discussion we 
will show how it widened over the decades as 
social historians appropriated and rearranged the 
genre of local history. The divergence peaked in 
the late 1960s and early 1970s. But during the last 
decade, as academic historians have tempered 
their enthusiasm for social science, that gap has 
begun to close in interesting ways. 

Vie Community Study Emerges 

The modernist social history of New England 
communities begins in 1938 with the publication 
of Carl Bridenbaugh's Cities in the Wilderness: The 
First Century of Urban Life in America, 1625-1742 
(New York, 1938), a study of the five largest co- 
lonial towns, two of them — Boston and New- 
port — in New England. On the advice of his 
graduate school mentor (Arthur M. Schlesinger, 
Sr., of Harvard), Bridenbaugh expropriated the 
realm of local history from the antiquarians. Like 
any pioneer, he justified his conquest by defining 
the terrain as essentially open and “free" (for the 
taking) because the natives had misused it; he 
dismissed the earlier town histories as "only too 
frequently works of filial piety, narrowly provin- 
cial and uncritical" (p. 483). More positively, he 
stressed the novelty and virtues of his own com- 
parative approach — of his five towns with one 
another and with their European counterparts. 
Neither his communities nor his region were iso- 
lates; he carefully and astutely situated them "in 
a world setting. ... as part of a great period of 
transition affecting all of western Europe" (p. vi). 



Bridenbaugh investigated a handful of locales, not 
to understand their specific identities but to help 
delineate a process of national and international 
significance: urbanization. In effect, he insisted 
that the potential of local history had been squan- 
dered by localists in pursuit of localism. 

To discern and present subtle social processes 
over a long period in five places, Bridenbaugh 
adopted a topical organization that modified nar- 
rative history's chronological linearity. He seg- 
mented his book into three chronological parts: 
1625-1690 ("The Planting of the Villages"), 1690- 
1720 ("The Awakening of Civic Consciousness"), 
and 1720-1742 ("The Towns Become Cities"). He 
then subdivided each of the four parts into four 
chapters: one devoted to the physical aspects of 
the town, a second to economic development, a 
third to urban problems, and a fourth to social 
life. "Thus the book may be read as a whole, or 
any one of the four topics followed through by 
itself," he advised, no doubt to the apoplexy of 
any surviving narrative historians (p. v). But within 
his modified framework Bridenbaugh retained 
the narrative historian's attentiveness to his read- 
ers. To encourage them "to live vicariously in the 
age under consideration," Bridenbaugh strove "to 
recreate the atmosphere of the period" with the 
great tricks of the narrative trade: the frequent use 
of quotes and detailed description of characters, 
places, and events (pp. vi-vii). 

The topics, organization, and comparative frame- 
work of Cities in the Wilderness were all innovative, 
but Bridenbaugh's research methods and sensi- 
bilities were more typical of his contemporary his- 
torians. As befits a work exploring a new field, 
he followed the path of least resistance to seek 
out the sources that were most abundant and 
most readily available. He relied on published 
collections of colonial laws and petitions, news- 
papers, politicians' letters, travelers' accounts, 
antiquarian compilations, prints and maps. Dis- 
trustful of quantifiable sources, Bridenbaugh rarely 
used statistics. His few numbers came directly 
from single sources, either historical or antiquar- 
ian, rather than from data files created by linking 
disparate records (as subsequent social historians 
would do). He included only three statistical ta- 
bles, and they merely presented rough approxi- 
mations of his towns' aggregate populations at 
different decades as drawn, not from his own re- 
search, but from the figures in Evarts B. Greene 
and Virginia D. Harrington, American Population 



xxxiii 



collecting data and reasoning with evidence. Dis- 
cussion of method and reasoning is no longer an 
adjunct, segregated in notes or an appendix, if 
included at all; instead such discussion dominates 
the text. Just as modernist architects cast aside 
every ornament in favor of exposing the skeletal 
frames of their buildings to the onlooker, the new 
social historians of the later twentieth century 
highlight the structure of their craft for the reader 
to see on every page. The narrative historian 
sought to sustain the illusion of presenting past 
people in past action without apparent intrusion 
from the off-stage scholar; the modernist seeks 
the newer illusion of presenting no illusion. Hav- 
ing become the text's central character, the new 
historian triumphs by persuading readers that he 
or she has wrung the best possible interpretation 
from difficult materials. 

Second, how does the author fit events together 
in order to explain them? For the best of the an- 
tiquarians, the meaning of an event emerged by 
arranging it in a chronological sequence. Every 
significant event led to the next and moved the 
community forward toward its destiny as part of 
the dramatic triumph in the nineteenth century 
of New England values, institutions, and pros- 
perity, an ascent that overcomes every challenge 
from the immoral representatives of social regres- 
sion: heathen Indians, French Catholics, tyran- 
nical Redcoats, selfish Tories, local loafers, and 
any geographic obstacles to economic develop- 
ment. In the narrative mode favored by the most 
skilled antiquarians, description and explanation 
and moralizing were inseparable. In contrast, for 
the social historian, understanding an event, a 
person, or an institution depends less on its place 
between antecedents and succedents, and more 
upon its systemic position or function within a 
community or a social order.^ 

Third, what sort of generalized knowledge does 
the scholar seek? The antiquarians sought affir- 
mation of their social order by reordering the past 
to provide reassuring "moral laws" that presum- 
ably dictated the inevitable triumph of the New 
England culture and society of the nineteenth 
century over its immoral and antiquated enemies. 

'^Harry B. Henderson III, Versions of the Past: The Historical 
Imagination in American Fiction (New York, 1974), pp. 3-15; 
David Levin, In Defense of Historical Literature: Essays on Amer- 
ican History, Autobiography, Drama, and Fiction (New York, 
1967), pp. 1-33; James A. Henretta, "Social History as Lived 
and Written," American Historical Review, 84 (Dec. 1979), 1299. 



But the rise of social science in the late nineteenth 
and early twentieth century discredited the search 
for moral laws and dethroned history as the dom- 
inant form of social inquiry. The social historian 
sought renewed credibility and influence among 
the social scientists by joining their quest for test- 
able hypotheses about behavioral (rather than 
moral) regularities; by borrowing, testing, and re- 
fining the theoretical models developed by soci- 
ologists, anthropologists, or psychologists. Seek- 
ing a truce with the other social scientists on the 
basis of parity, the social historians concede that 
history will no longer find law but receive it from 
the other disciplines for testing. 

Fourth, what sources should the historian rely 
upon? The best antiquarians used virtually all of 
the sources later tapped by the social historians: 
traditions, probated wills and inventories, church 
records, land deeds, court cases, vital statistics, 
maps, prints, account books, and town meeting 
minutes. But where the antiquarian tended to use 
them to trace individuals, the social historian 
counts and sorts and cross-tabulates in search of 
aggregative statistics for entire populations or sub- 
groups within the town. The antiquarian attends 
to the town's special identity while the social his- 
torian usually treats the community as a micro- 
cosm of the region (if not the entire nation), as a 
laboratory for understanding a larger society. 

Fifth, what is the place of the community within 
New England and of New England within the na- 
tion? The emergence of the new social history of 
New England communities produced a paradox. 
Although the antiquarians had ostensibly pur- 
sued local identity, they described towns which 
were much more like one another than those de- 
picted by the various social historians, who had 
assumed that any one new England town could 
stand in for all of the others. The antiquarians 
wanted to fit their particular towns into shared 
regional traditions and to claim a place for them 
in New England's economic and cultural prog- 
ress. The social historian feels a concern for stak- 
ing a personal claim within the academic profes- 
sion by setting a particular town in a different 
light from those already studied. The antiquari- 
an's town was a special representative of the re- 
gion's collective achievements. The social histo- 
rian's town serves to correct all of those historians 
who had already written. It would seem that the 
antiquarians were more collegial, in the word's 
figurative sense, than their academic successors. 



xxxii 



Sixth, what sort of people should the scholar 
focus upon? Although attentive through geneal- 
ogy to middling folk, the antiquarians tended to 
focus their narrative on the town fathers and 
other conspicuous individuals at the center of 
public events and in the lead in town improve- 
ments. In contrast, the social historian has usually 
sought the ordinary, the common, the average 
man (less often, the woman) as defined by the 
statistical means of aggregated records. Until re- 
cently, most social historians took no interest in 
individuality. To better see the elusive common 
men, they put leading men out of view, presum- 
ing that the two sorts of townspeople lived in es- 
sentially different realms. 

The polarity between how antiquarians and so- 
cial historians answered those six questions has 
not remained constant over the course of the 
twentieth century. In the following discussion we 
will show how it widened over the decades as 
social historians appropriated and rearranged the 
genre of local history. The divergence peaked in 
the late 1960s and early 1970s. But during the last 
decade, as academic historians have tempered 
their enthusiasm for social science, that gap has 
begun to close in interesting ways. 

The Community Study Emerges 

The modernist social history of New England 
communities begins in 1938 with the publication 
of Carl Bridenbaugh's Cities in the Wilderness: The 
First Century of Urban Life in America, 1625-1742 
(New York, 1938), a study of the five largest co- 
lonial towns, two of them — Boston and New- 
port — in New England. On the advice of his 
graduate school mentor (Arthur M. Schlesinger, 
Sr., of Harvard), Bridenbaugh expropriated the 
realm of local history from the antiquarians. Like 
any pioneer, he justified his conquest by defining 
the terrain as essentially open and “free" (for the 
taking) because the natives had misused it; he 
dismissed the earlier town histories as “only too 
frequently works of filial piety, narrowly provin- 
cial and uncritical" (p. 483). More positively, he 
stressed the novelty and virtues of his own com- 
parative approach — of his five towns with one 
another and with their European counterparts. 
Neither his communities nor his region were iso- 
lates; he carefully and astutely situated them “in 
a world setting. ... as part of a great period of 
transition affecting all of western Europe" (p. vi). 



Bridenbaugh investigated a handful of locales, not 
to understand their specific identities but to help 
delineate a process of national and international 
significance: urbanization. In effect, he insisted 
that the potential of local history had been squan- 
dered by localists in pursuit of localism. 

To discern and present subtle social processes 
over a long period in five places, Bridenbaugh 
adopted a topical organization that modified nar- 
rative history's chronological linearity. He seg- 
mented his book into three chronological parts: 
1625-1690 (“The Planting of the Villages"), 1690- 
1720 (“The Awakening of Civic Consciousness"), 
and 1720-1742 (“The Towns Become Cities"). He 
then subdivided each of the four parts into four 
chapters: one devoted to the physical aspects of 
the town, a second to economic development, a 
third to urban problems, and a fourth to social 
life. “Thus the book may be read as a whole, or 
any one of the four topics followed through by 
itself," he advised, no doubt to the apoplexy of 
any surviving narrative historians (p. v). But within 
his modified framework Bridenbaugh retained 
the narrative historian's attentiveness to his read- 
ers. To encourage them “to live vicariously in the 
age under consideration," Bridenbaugh strove “to 
recreate the atmosphere of the period" with the 
great tricks of the narrative trade: the frequent use 
of quotes and detailed description of characters, 
places, and events (pp. vi-vii). 

The topics, organization, and comparative frame- 
work of Cities in the Wilderness were all innovative, 
but Bridenbaugh's research methods and sensi- 
bilities were more typical of his contemporary his- 
torians. As befits a work exploring a new field, 
he followed the path of least resistance to seek 
out the sources that were most abundant and 
most readily available. He relied on published 
collections of colonial laws and petitions, news- 
papers, politicians' letters, travelers' accounts, 
antiquarian compilations, prints and maps. Dis- 
trustful of quantifiable sources, Bridenbaugh rarely 
used statistics. His few numbers came directly 
from single sources, either historical or antiquar- 
ian, rather than from data files created by linking 
disparate records (as subsequent social historians 
would do). He included only three statistical ta- 
bles, and they merely presented rough approxi- 
mations of his towns' aggregate populations at 
different decades as drawn, not from his own re- 
search, but from the figures in Evarts B. Greene 
and Virginia D. Harrington, American Population 



xxxiii 



the coin, what the petitioners were actually doing 
while airing their grievances, is revealed only in 
obscure town records” (p. 65). Moreover, by in- 
sisting that Kent was a "typical” New England 
hinterland town, he asserted that his findings de- 
molished the class-conflict interpretation for every 
rural community: "It would seem absurd, for ex- 
ample, to envision 300 Kent inhabitants enjoying 
bonanza conditions while to the north 300 fellow 
citizens chose to languish under proprietor tyr- 
anny in, say, Westminster, Massachusetts” (p. ix). 
According to Grant, things were not as they 
seemed in literary sources; so the social historian 
could and should rewrite the New England past 
by relying primarily on the patterns discerned by 
tabulating data from local records. He concluded 
his book with a clarion call for more town studies 
utilizing his research strategy. 

In Poverty and Progress: Social Mobility in a Nine- 
teenth Century City (Cambridge, Mass., 1964) Ste- 
phan Thernstrom, one of Oscar Handlin's grad- 
uate students, pursued a rhetorical and research 
strategy similar to Grant's. Thernstrom opened 
with the "legend,” rooted in literary accounts, 
that opportunity and social mobility for the com- 
mon man had characterized nineteenth-century 
America. "This has been the myth. How has it 
squared with social reality?” (p. 1). Literary sources 
had spun myths; but the manuscript returns of 
the federal census offered Thernstrom access to 
social reality. Thernstrom wanted to know "whether 
it was easy, difficult, or impossible for a laborer 
or a laborer's son to become a grocer, a foreman, 
or a farm owner in the United States a Century 
ago” (pp. 2-3). His subjects could hardly have 
differed more from the standard fare of American 
historiography, for he meant to rewrite history 
"from the bottom up” (p. 7). Instead of states- 
men, generals, millionaires, and novelists Thern- 
strom studied "the changing social position of 
unskilled manual laborers and their families. . . . 
These families stood at the very bottom of the 
social ladder by almost any criterion. Living at 
the margin of subsistence, they suffered from 
the classic disabilities of the depressed social 
group: unemployment, illiteracy, bad housing, 
poor diets” (p. 3). 

Given that such people left behind so few writ- 
ten documents, how was Thernstrom to study 
them? He followed Handlin's lead and turned to 
the original manuscript schedules of the United 
States Census for one small city: Newburyport, 



Massachusetts. Beginning in 1850, those sched- 
ules recorded occupation, place of birth, property 
holdings, and literacy, as well as name and age; 
this fuller information enabled Thernstrom "to fix 
the social position of the unskilled laboring fam- 
ilies of Newburyport at decade intervals, and to 
measure how much social mobility they experi- 
enced in the period 1850-1880” (p. 5). He sup- 
plemented the census returns with city directo- 
ries and tax assessments. He found that most of 
those who persisted for a decade or more enjoyed 
modest social mobility, accumulating houses and 
moving into some skilled trade; but less than a 
third of the laborers found in any given census 
reappeared ten years later in the next; two-thirds 
or more moved out of town and Thernstrom gave 
up on any effort to track them down. Because 
there was a correlation between persistence and 
success, Thernstrom's community study only 
captured the experiences of a fortunate few 
among the many laboring families who passed 
through Newburyport. He had used the com- 
munity study to plumb farther into the social 
depths than any previous historian, but he had 
still not found the bottom's "impoverished, float- 
ing lower class, large in number but so transient 
as to be formless and powerless” (p. 158). He con- 
fessed, "this is an interpretative essay based on 
fragmentary data, not a large-scale, definitive sta- 
tistical study” (p. 97n). Despite such caveats, 
Thernstrom was confident that his findings were 
vastly superior to the "sheer fantasy” manifest in 
the literary accounts by "nineteenth-century pro- 
pagandists” (pp. 161-63).^^ 

By asserting that preceding historians had mis- 
led themselves and their readers through their re- 
liance on literary sources. Grant and Thernstrom 
suggested abundant and promising opportunities 
for new historians to set the record straight. Every 
historical argument based on literary sources be- 
came an alluring target for the aspiring modern- 
ist. An aggressive new generation of social his- 
torians intended to use their reformation of the 
community study to conquer and transform the 
writing of American history. They waged polem- 
ical war on their scholarly ancestors and on the 
holdovers in political and intellectual history who 
failed to recognize the new hegemony. During the 

methodological problems with Thernstrom's work see 
Richard S. Alcorn and Peter R. Knights, "Most Uncommon 
Bostonians: A Critique of Stephan Thernstrom's The Other Bos- 
tonians,” Historical Methods Newsletter, 8 (June 1975), 98-114. 



XXXVl 



1960s and early 1970s, the new social historians 
tended to follow Grant's and Thernstrom's lead 
by opening their books and articles with some old 
literary-based interpretation targeted for deserved 
demolition, an unwanted anachronism in a bold 
new age. 

Tlw Big Three of 1970: 

In Search of the Ordinary 

The new age blossomed in 1970 with the publi- 
cation of three impressive books exploring the lo- 
cales of colonial New England: John P. Demos, A 
Little Commonwealth: Family Life in Plymouth Colony 
(New York, 1970); Philip J. Greven, Jr., Four Gen- 
erations: Population, Land, and Family in Colonial 
Andover, Massachusetts (Ithaca, N.Y., 1970); and 
Kenneth A. Lockridge, A Neiv England Tozvn: The 
First Hundred Years, Dedham, Massachusetts, 1636- 
1736 (New York, 1970). All three authors asserted 
the typicality of their town as all of early New 
England writ small. 

The clearest summation of their aspirations to 
reform the local history appears in John Demos's 
foreword to A Little Commonwealth. He expressed 
worry that by choosing for study the " 'Pilgrims' 
of fond and venerable legend" he increased his 
risk of being mistaken for an antiquarian (p. viii). 
Concerned "lest the title and subtitle of this book 
suggest merely one more exercise in antiquari- 
anism," Demos denied the sin and insisted that 
he used the local in pursuit of "a larger purpose": 
to derive "general answers, for a picture of the 
family rather than any single instance thereof" 
(p. viii). He investigated the Plymouth Colony 
not for parochial celebration, but as a "'case 
study' in early American family life — a study 
which through sustained work on materials from 
one community, produces questions, methods of 
approach, and even some substantive conclusions 
that will ultimately have a much wider applica- 
tion" (p. ix). He was the historian as social sci- 
entist; the records of a locality were his labora- 
tory; his mediation between systematic hypotheses 
and recondite but promising new data took cen- 
tral place in his narration; his findings were 
meant to influence the discourse of other social 
scientists with their own data. Greven and Lock- 
ridge conceived of their work in similar terms.*® 

'^Philip ]. Greven, Jr., Four Generations: Population, Land, and 
Family in Colonial Andover, Massachusetts (Ithaca, N.Y., 1970), 
pp. vii-ix, 1-18; Kenneth A. Lockridge, A New England Town: 
The First Hundred Years, Dedham, Massachusetts, 1636-1736 
(New York, 1970), pp. xi-xv. 



The Big Three of 1970 made three provocative 
promises about the potential of local history as 
social science. First, they insisted that it offered 
a more disciplined and focused way of examining 
and presenting evidence about the past. They had 
usurped and transformed the realm of local his- 
tory to obtain a base from which to challenge the 
predominant ways of researching and writing his- 
tory as practiced by most of their academic col- 
leagues. Again Demos is the most explicit. In his 
introduction (p. xi) he laments "the element of 
impressionistic presentation so common in his- 
torical writing — the tendency to offer a general 
statement followed (or preceded) by a small num- 
ber of illustrative 'examples'." To "introduce a 
greater degree of precision into a field which 
heretofore has been widely influenced by popular 
myth, and indeed by the most careless sort of 
guesswork," he offers two remedies. Whenever 
possible, he would count, seeking "quantitative 
measures" drawn from entire or representative 
populations; and he would follow (and expand 
upon) the lead of his graduate school mentor, Os- 
car Handlin, by applying the theoretical models 
of social scientists — especially the developmental 
psychology of Erik Erikson — to historical evi- 
dence. Demos did so partly to better understand 
the past but also, in part, to test and refine those 
models. Completing the journey to social science 
begun by Handlin, Demos utterly forsakes the au- 
thoritative narrative in favor of a research report 
that frankly admits its ultimate incompleteness 
and uncertainty. 

The second assertion of the three authors was 
to insist that their use of quantification and 
hypothesis produced evidence that was better 
because it was more comprehensive and less "eli- 
tist." They promised to democratize our knowl- 
edge of colonial America, finishing what Briden- 
baugh had begun but could not complete. The Big 
Three of 1970 not only accepted Charles Grant's 
stark dichotomy between literary and quantitative 
sources; they insisted that the distinction broke 
along class lines, with only the latter offering ac- 
cess to the experience of the great majority of co- 
lonial New Englanders. Demos asserted. 

Owing to the work of Perry Miller and a whole 
corps of his distinguished students, the religious 
faith and belief of the Puritan leaders is very well 
known indeed. But I am thinking rather of the 
followers, the ordinary citizens of these early New 
England towns. What they heard and read did 



xxxvii 



not necessarily coincide with what their ministers 
and magistrates said and wrote. Thus I contend 
that we have an excellent picture of Puritan wor- 
ship for the highest level of the culture (the ed- 
ucated, the powerful), but nothing comparable for 
the "average man." The problem in studying the 
latter group, of course, is that most of them were 
from the standpoint of history quite inarticulate 
(p. 12nl6). 

Consequently, it was only an apparent weakness 
for his study that so few literary sources ("which 
often bulk largest in historical research") sur- 
vived for the Plymouth Colony. Literary materi- 
als, he explained, were disproportionately pro- 
duced by and about "the most affluent and 
educated class of people (particularly given a so- 
ciety that was only partially literate); whereas I, 
lacking such evidence for Plymouth, have tried 
quite self-consciously to reach the life of the 'av- 
erage man' " (pp. x-xi). The lack of literary ma- 
terials was a blessing in disguise because neces- 
sity obliged Demos to discover and exploit the 
potential of three alternative sources he deemed 
more appropriate to his search for fhe common: 
surviving physical artifacts (houses, furniture, 
tools, utensils, and clothing); the wills and inven- 
tories of probate records; and the colony's court 
records. The community study promised to re- 
capture the Holy Grail of the social historian: the 
lost experience of ordinary people.*^ 

Third, the Big Three of 1970 suggested that 
their statistical attention to the long-neglected 
common people would construct a radically new 
understanding of societies in the past as holistic 
systems of slowly-changing "structures." Follow- 
ing the lead of the Annales and Cambridge schools 
of French and English historical demography, the 
three authors renounced American historians' 
preoccupation with public events and leaders' ac- 
tions as largely irrelevant to the lives of the com- 
mon people, who comprised the vast majority of 
any society. No events of trans-local significance 
receive more than passing reference in the three 
books. Bloody wars of conquest waged with the 
Indians made it possible for the invading whites 
to found Plymouth, Dedham, and Andover; the 
Indian counter-offensive in 1675 ("King Philip's 
War") devasfated or imperiled all three commu- 
nities; yet those wars receive bare mention in A 

“See also Greven, Four Generations, p. 3; and Rhys Isaac, 
"Order and Growth, Authority and Meaning in Colonial New 
England," American Historical Review, 76 (June 1971), 729. 



New England Town (pp. 59, 68, 97), A Little Com- 
monwealth (pp. 15-16, 175), and Four Generations 
(p. 65). "Whatever the reason, when the war was 
over a year later, life in the village resumed its 
old course," Greven writes of King Philip's War, 
conveying his sense that the rhythms of local life 
were virtually unaffected by the passing storms 
of politics and war (p. 65). Instead of the con- 
spicuous but fleeting event, the three authors 
sought the subtle but fundamental structure. 
They conceived of structures as demographic (the 
life-cycle patterns of births, marriages, and deaths 
as revealed by the shifting, or unshifting, statis- 
tical means among local populations over the gen- 
erations), as economic (the organization of pro- 
duction within households and the transmission 
of property across the generations through inher- 
itance^ and as cultural (the persistence of a tra- 
difional "mentalite" appropriate to small and 
intimate communities of peasants). The three au- 
thors suggested that isolated events are insignif- 
icant; events only become meaningful when ag- 
gregated into a series, to reveal deep structures 
beneath the chaotic surface of life. Moreover, it is 
ironic that the presumption of typicality for their 
towns led Greven and Lockridge, in particular, to 
depict communities in seeming isolation from 
every other locale and, by extension, from the 
wider world of commerce, politics, war, and re- 
ligion. They lost sight of Carl Bridenbaugh's in- 
sistence that the historian must define the local 
by describing its fit into the wider world. 

But the three promises proved easier to make 
than to keep. First, the paucity of data at critical 
points and the provisionality of their theoretical 
imports from the other social sciences often obliged 
the social historians to fall back on impressions 
derived from stray examples. In his foreword to 
A Little Commonwealth, immediately after his in- 
junctions for "a greater degree of precision," De- 
mos pled for the usefulness of informed specu- 
lation: "We must be ready to ponder what is likely 
to have happened — when more certain knowl- 
edge is laddng" (p. xiii). Throughout his subse- 
quent text, speculation proliferates in the wide- 
spread absence of conclusive data. Only one town 

™See also the discussion of social history in Gordon S. 
Wood, "Intellectual History and the Social Sciences," in John 
Higham and Paul K. Conkin, eds., Neie Directions in American 
Intellectual History (Baltimore, 1979), p. 36. For the isolating 
tendencies of the argument for typicality see John W. Adams, 
"Consensus, Community, and Exoticism," journal of Interdis- 
ciplinary History, 12 (Autumn 1981), 253-265. 



xxxviii 



census (for Bristol in 1689, on the geographic pe- 
riphery and at the temporal end of his study) and 
neither official vital statistics nor tax lists survive 
from the colony. He relies primarily on court and 
probate records but cannot specify how socially 
inclusive and comprehensive they were. His de- 
mographic "samples” are not truly representative 
(i.e., randomly drawn so that every member of 
the population at a given moment had an equal 
chance of inclusion), but are simply a group of 
those persons for whom the genealogical infor- 
mation is most complete. This does not inspire a 
reader's confidence that the "average person" has 
been found and described. Except when analyz- 
ing the Bristol census. Demos cannot deliver the 
quantitative precision he celebrated in his fore- 
word; and only a leap of faith, frequently made, 
can accept that town's census as a surrogate for 
every Plymouth Colony community throughout 
the century. Often he must write some variant of: 
"There is no way to measure its incidence in 
quantitative terms, but it happened, and hap- 
pened with some regularity" (p. 152). Most of his 
text consists of a series of hypotheses, each fol- 
lowed by a few examples drawn from wills or 
court cases, a technique virtually indistinguisha- 
ble from the "impressionistic presentation" he re- 
jects in his foreword. And when the court cases 
and wills cannot speak to a hypothesis. Demos 
repeatedly and unashamedly turns to Edmund S. 
Morgan's The Puritan Family, a study reliant upon 
literary sources, for needed confirmation. A scru- 
pulous and modest scholar. Demos recognizes 
the limitations in his data and qualifies almost all 
of his statements as "impressions," "sugges- 
tions," and "hypotheses." Time and again he 
warns, "All such statements are highly conjec- 
tural. . . . Still, with this strong word of warning, 
it seems worth proceeding somewhat further" 
(p. 134).^! 

The second promise also proved difficult to 
keep, for the community study as social science 
bore ironic consequences in the search for the 
past's common man. Conceived of as a social 
being, as a composite type, he was essentially 
stripped of individual initiative and confined within 
anonymizing structures. Social science's search 
for repetitive actions that form behavioral regu- 

^'For a more detailed discussion of the Bristol census see 
John Demos, “Families in Colonial Bristol, Rhode Island: An 
Exercise in Historical Demography," William and Mary Quar- 
terly, 3d ser., 25 (Jan. 1968), 40-57. 



larities entails a disinterest in individual action as 
random, irrelevant, and "anecdotal." According 
to this perspective, structures are the collective, 
accumulative consequence of so many decisions 
and actions that no one individual can be said to 
have more than the most minute influence over 
the unfolding of human affairs. The common peo- 
ple had an aggregate effect (mostly to immobilize 
change), but any one person was essentially 
trapped within reflexive patterns of inherited be- 
havior. Unwittingly, they held one another hos- 
tage. Moreover, by deemphasizing literary sources, 
the social historians denied themselves the ma- 
terials necessary to describe the appearance and 
personality of actual people (rather than the com- 
posite types defined by statistical analysis of 
quantitative evidence). 

Consequently, the three community studies of 
1970 generated quantitative evidence about the 
presence in official records of common people, 
but ignored them as individual personalities. It is 
striking that Demos's A Little Commonwealth, a 
work so indebted to current studies of individual 
psychology, deals so heavily in names and so 
lightly in characters. His pursuit of "the devel- 
opment of a typical settler" has the same effect 
as Handlin's preoccupation with "the Irish": merger 
of the actual individuals who lived in the Plym- 
outh Colony into one composite type. Two- 
hundred-sixty names appear sprinkled on the 
pages, but only as attachments to documents un- 
der consideration. The index reveals that in the 
196 pages of foreword and text only four persons 
from the seventeenth century appear on more 
than three pages (and never on more than two 
pages in succession). Of those four, only Andrew 
Ring (on 5 pages) could be considered an "aver- 
age man." Josiah Winslow (4) and William Brad- 
ford (17) were governors of the colony; John 
Robinson (11), who never came to live in Ply- 
mouth, had been the Pilgrims' minister in Ley- 
den, Holland. Ironically, Bradford and Robinson 
owe their prominence in the text to Demos's quo- 
tation from the literary sources they published. 
None of the named, not even Robinson or Brad- 
ford, receives a personality, for Demos attempts 
no reconstructions, through diverse sources, of 
any one person's life experience. 

Moreover, the Big Three of 1970 displayed an 
unwitting bias that slighted the female half of the 

^^Wood, “Intellectual History and the Social Sciences," 27- 
28; Henderson, Versions of the Past, 28-30. 



XXXIX 



population in the communities they studied. Since 
colonial laws subsumed unmarried daughters un- 
der the authority of their fathers, and wives under 
that of their husbands, few women (only the 
small minority who were widows) possessed the 
legal identity to appear in the court, probate, 
land, and town meeting records that supplied 
most of the social historians' data. Consequently, 
the flight away from the elitist bias of literary 
sources had an ironic consequence. Philip Greven 
is so preoccupied with the relationship of Puritan 
fathers and sons that he scarcely mentions any 
mothers or daughters. His index contains eleven 
entries for "father-son relationships" and sev- 
enty-three under "sons," but "mother," "daugh- 
ter," and "women" do not even appear. Because 
Lockridge also pays no particular attention to 
women's experience, the index for A New England 
Town also does not include any entry for "women." 
According to their indexes, Greven's text names 
214 men (88%) but only 25 women (12%); Lock- 
ridge's text names 69 men (97%) but only 2 
women (3%). Because Demos does attend to the 
marital relationship, his text contains a slightly 
higher proportion of women — 208 men (80%) and 
52 women (20%) — and his index includes an en- 
try for "women, status of." But it is revealing that 
in the last third of A Little Commonwealth, devoted 
to the life-cycle development of the "typical set- 
tler," that settler is almost invariably male in pro- 
noun and in social role. There is every reason to 
believe that the persistence is a function of the 
sources and of authorial oversight, rather than of 
any conscious determination to exclude women. 
Social history meant to study the lives of the hum- 
ble, but as of 1970, the community study had not 
been sufficiently refined to attend to the largest 
group of the powerless: women. Special efforts 
would be required to do so, special efforts which 
would revive attention to the personal in the com- 
munity studies of the 1970s and 1980s. 

The third promise, of a new structural history, 
was only partially realized. The Big Three and 
their emulators did achieve remarkable precision 
and uniformity in taking the measure of colonial 
New England's demographic structure: the birth 
rate, mean family size, age at first marriage, life 
expectancy, rates of migration. But economic and 

'The counts from each index refer only to names in the 
text, not to names which occur only in the forewords or in the 
notes, which feature the names of many contemporary his- 
torians, male and female. 



cultural structures proved harder to delineate, in 
part because there was, apparently, much varia- 
tion among the towns and, in part, because de- 
termining them was less purely quantitative and 
more subjective. The interpretive differences among 
the three were already significant: Demos stressed 
the almost immediately corrosive impact on fam- 
ily structures of American abundance and geo- 
graphic mobility; Greven dwelled on the endur- 
ing power, into the early eighteenth century, of 
Puritan patriarchs over their sons; Lockridge in- 
sisted on the similar ability of Dedham's settlers 
to establish and, for most of a century, to maintain 
"A Christian, Utopian, Closed, Corporate Com- 
munity" dedicated to peasant ideals of local 
homogeneity, consensus, and communal auton- 
omy. Thereafter, every new study published dur- 
ing the 1970s and 1980s cast new doubt on every 
previous scholar's claim to have described a town 
that could stand as a surrogate for the entire re- 
gion. The multiplication of interpretations of 
small towns within the same colony, during the 
same two centuries, called into question whether 
any one town can be said to have typified any- 
thing beyond its own borders. 

Post-1970: Explaining the Extraordinary 

By suggesting the rich potential of combining so- 
cial science hypotheses with local records, the 
community studies of 1970 encouraged a host of 
emulators during the 1970s and 1980s. The com- 
munity study became the predominant mode of 
researching and writing early American social 
history. But more recent work softens the sharp, 
polemical distinctions made in the community 
studies of the 1960s and of 1970 between the use- 
fulness of the quantitative and the literary source, 
and between the significance of the social struc- 
ture and the political event. More eclectic than the 
previous work, most of the newest community 
studies try to link textual and statistical sources 
in order to unite structural and particular analy- 
sis. The authors tend to rehabilitate the event, the 
personal, and the literary by interweaving them 
with quantitative delineation of the structural. 
Most of the new authors insisted that the previ- 

^■*For the proliferation of dissent about the economic culture 
of New Englanders see Zuckerman, Peacable Kingdoms; Stephen 
Innes, Labor in a New Land: Economy and Society in Seventeenth- 
Century Springfield (Princeton, N.J., 1983); and Christine Leigh 
Heyrman, Commerce and Culture: The Maritime Communities of 
Colonial Massachusetts, 1690-1750 (New York, 1984). 



xl 



ous studies had been too preoccupied with im- 
personal structures to attend to the qualitative 
aspects of "lived experience" and had failed to 
recreate vivid descriptions of the characters and 
struggles of ordinary people. Often the new work 
shifts inward to link a community study with a 
biography or a set of biographies, in an attempt 
to link the structural with the personal and with 
immediate events. 

After 1970, most of the new social historians 
modified their search for the ordinary by subor- 
dinating it to a pursuit of the extraordinary: the 
war fever, the witchhunt, the religious revival, 
the rebellion, the riot, and the strike. They could 
justify their new attention to events on two grounds. 
First, they pointed out that spectacular events 
generated reams of documents that, for a sus- 
tained moment, cast unusual light on the struc- 
tures of everyday life. Far from being irrelevant, 
dramatic events offered unusual opportunities to 
define structures, especially the cultural. Second, 
they insisted that events, especially those involv- 
ing conflict and large numbers, manifested strains 
in the social structures. Consequently, the social 
historian promised that community studies of 
quantifiable records would provide new and bet- 
ter explanations for great events.^® 

In one of the most important and provocative 
community studies of the 1970s, Salem Possessed: 
The Social Origins of Witchcraft (Cambridge, Mass., 
1974), Paul Boyer and Stephen Nissenbaum em- 
barked on a community study of Salem, Massa- 
chusetts, expressly to explain the witch trials of 
1692. By linking diverse local records, Boyer and 
Nissenbaum plotted and contrasted the respec- 
tive residences, statuses, biographies, and prop- 
erties of those accusing and those accused of 
witchcraft. Accusers tended to be people of di- 
minishing status and localist perspective who 
dwelled in the recesses of Salem Village (now 
Danvers); the accused tended to be the more pros- 
perous and cosmopolitan folk who lived nigh the 
expanding port of Salem Town. Therefore, Boyer 
and Nissenbaum concluded that the witchhunts 
broke along lines of tension established by the 
emergence of a split within Salem Village be- 
tween those clinging to the old communal ways 
and those who seemed to embrace a more com- 

^Taul Boyer and Stephen Nissenbaum, Salem Possessed: The 
Social Origins of Witchcraft (Cambridge, Mass., 1974), p. xii; 
John P. Demos, Entertaining Satan: Witchcraft and the Culture of 
Early New England (New York, 1982), p. vii. 



mercial and individualistic order associated with 
the Town. Flere was a new "social" explanation 
for the Salem witch trials, one made possible by 
the application of the techniques of community 
study.’’* 

Most of the newest community studies re- 
treated from the previous work's tendency to sep- 
arate the social from the political, to award the 
first to the common people and the second to the 
elite. Prone to accept the old notion of social his- 
tory as "history with the politics left out," the 
earlier community studies had attended to the so- 
cial while insisting that politics had already been 
overstudied. The separation implied, first, that 
the people were politically indifferent and impo- 
tent and, second, that the political activities of the 
elite were showy but not all that important. The 
newer works denied both implications by high- 
lighting the political ideals and behavior of the 
common people and by insisting upon the im- 
portant role of political power in shaping, main- 
taining, or undermining cultural and economic 
structures. The new work implied a reciprocal re- 
lationship between the political and the social. 
The goal remained to study the common people, 
but with new attention to their give and take with 
ruling elites.’’’ 

We can see this politicization of social history 
in Gary Nash's The Urban Crucible: Social Change, 
Political Consciousness, and the Origins of the Amer- 
ican Revolution (Cambridge, Mass., 1979). Nash's 
book recalled Bridenbaugh's by choosing three 
leading seaports (Boston, New York, and Phila- 
delphia) for comparative study, by attending to 
the place of those cities in trans-Atlantic com- 
merce and imperial politics, and by asserting that 
cities were at "the cutting edge of economic, so- 
cial, and political change" (p. vii). But Nash showed 
how much the community study had changed 
since Bridenbaugh's day by systematically exploit- 
ing quantifiable local records (especially tax lists 

^'’For a similar technique (from religious event through psy- 
chological stress to frustrated material interests) to explain the 
Great Awakening see J. M. Bumsted, "Religion, Finance, and 
Democracy in Massachusetts: The Town of Norton as a Case 
Study," Journal of American History, 57 (Mar. 1971), 817-831. 
Contrast this with his earlier, more literary approach to the 
subject in "Revivalism and Separatism in New England: The 
First Society of Norwich, Connecticut, as a Case Study," Wil- 
liam and Mary Quarterly, 3d ser., 24 (Oct. 1967), 588-612. The 
difference between the two essays manifests the influence of 
the Big Three of 1970. 

^For an example of the dismissal of politics see Demos, A 
Little Commonwealth, p. 9. 



xli 



and probate inventories) and by paying special 
attention to the behavior, circumstances, and ide- 
als of the cities' laboring classes, rather than to 
those of the merchant princes. Nash presented an 
antidote for "the hallowed generalizations made 
from the study of the select few upon which our 
understanding of history is primarily based" 
(p. ix). But Nash was careful not to exclude the 
elite from his analysis, for he sought to under- 
stand "the relationships among urban people 
who occupied different rungs of the social lad 
der" (p. x). He explained, "One part of this social 
organism cannot be understood in isolation from 
the others" (p. x). He found an association be- 
tween the growth of urban poverty (as indicated 
by his quantitative sources), the development of 
class consciousness among the laboring folk, and 
the urban riots that escalated the imperial crisis 
into a revolution. In Nash's new synthesis of so- 
cial and political history, leaders were not auton- 
omous innovators, but men obliged to respond to 
pressures initiated from below. 

The most vivid, eloquent, and personal account 
of the motives and consequences of the shift in- 
ward appears in the preface to Entertaining Satan: 
Witchcraft and the Culture of Early New England 
(New York, 1982) by John Demos. One of the Big 
Three of 1970 had begun to recant; 

My first outlines were organized around a series 
of interpretive questions, lifted more or less whole- 
sale from the social science literature. My notes 
from that early stage bristled with "analytical 
models" and "conceptual schemas," with "func- 
tions" and "costs," with "manifest" and "latent" 
tendencies. The outlines were clean and sym- 
metrical; the notes seemed expansive enough; 
hence the prospects looked generally bright. But 
before many words had been committed to paper, 
I knew that something was seriously wrong. 
Briefly stated: my study, if continued along the 
same track, would be long on concepts, but dis- 
tressingly short on human detail. The people were 
slipping through the scholarly cracks. Back to my 
research files. Days of confusion. Restless nights. 
Conversations with friends and colleagues. (I es- 
pecially remember one with a novelist of long ac- 
quaintance, which helped me to recognize how 
close are the imaginative worlds of history and 
fiction.) I began to write "stories" about witch- 

similar approach is evident in Gregory H, Nobles, Di- 
visions Throughout the Whole: Politics and Society in Hampshire 
County, Massachusetts, 1740-1775 (New York, 1983); and Isaac, 
“Order and Growth," pp. 735-736. 



craft — true stories of specific episodes for which 
my evidence was especially full. Stories of every- 
day experience in all its nettlesome particulars. 
Stories which put individual men and women 
(sometimes children) right at center-stage. Stories 
with beginnings, and middles, and ends (p. viii). 

This passage reads very much like one of the re- 
ligious conversion narratives that colonial New 
Englanders wrote and read in such bulk: a mis- 
guided sinner suddenly encounters the emptiness 
of his false doctrines, experiences painful unease, 
but ultimately achieves ecstatic release upon find- 
ing a new, more reassuring faith. 

As a result of that conversion. Entertaining Satan 
is a very different book from A Little Common- 
wealth. The differences between Demos's two 
books measure the post-1970 evolution of the 
New England community study. Above all. Enter- 
taining Satan is far richer in personal detail. In- 
stead of the disembodied names of A Little Com- 
monwealth, the pages of the newer book are rife 
with vivid descriptions of diverse people engaged 
in dramatic conflict. Demos benefited from the far 
more voluminous and detailed sources generated 
by the witchcraft controversies; the records gen- 
erated by the trials preserved far more informa- 
tion about humble people's ideas, language, be- 
havior, and appearance than had the wills and 
court cases he had used in A Little Commonwealth. 
Taking full advantage of witchcraft's sources. De- 
mos applied painstaking research and imagina- 
tive verve to stitch together, from diverse and 
often incomplete documents, the biographies of a 
score of ordinary folk caught up in extraordinary 
events. 

In Entertaining Satan documents have become 
invitations to reconstruct the lives once associated 
with them. Narrative "case studies" comprise the 
very core of his method and presentation, in- 
tended to "evoke as well as analyze" (p. ix). De- 
mos confesses, "Through witchcraft I have come 
to know scores of people who lived and died cen- 
turies ago. ... I think I would recognize them, 
and know just what to say to them, should I meet 
them in some otherworldly byway years hence" 
(p. ix). He could not have written that statement 
in A Little Commonwealth. Sixty-one persons ap- 
pear on at least five pages in Entertaining Satan, 
versus only three men in the earlier book. Indeed, 
in the newer book Demos devotes twenty or more 
pages to no fewer than eleven persons. The turn 
to the personal and the subject of witchcraft per- 



xlii 



mit Demos a fuller consideration of seventeenth- 
century women than had the structuralism of A 
Little Commonwealth. Where women comprised 
only a fifth of the names in the earlier text, they 
provide 37 percent (193 of 518) of the persons 
named in the newer book. More importantly, 
most of the people explored at length are women: 
eight of the eleven who appear on twenty or more 
pages. 

Yet, in Entertaining Satan Demos's conversion to 
narrative is still not complete. He concludes his 
conversion narrative, "Throughout this passage I 
saw — I felt — the historian's old dilemma: history 
as art versus history as science. If the barricades 
should ever go up, I know now which way I'll 
jump. But better by far not to have to choose. At 
any rate, this book declines to choose. Science is 
not renounced, only scaled down" (p. viii). Ac- 
cordingly, the book is an extraordinary, experi- 
mental medley of rhetorical styles and theoretical 
perspectives. It is divided into four sections, each 
characterized by a different scholarly discourse 
with evidence: biography, psychology, sociology, 
and history. This segregation produced "four 
viewpoints overlooking a single field of past ex- 
perience." Each part is further subdivided into 
three chapters: two which explicate particular 
case studies of people in place, time, and action, 
followed by a third, more synthetic chapter, in 
which. Demos confesses, are vestiges of his orig- 
inal social science design for the book (pp. viii- 
ix). Within the case-study chapters. Demos's au- 
thorial voice alternates. Sometimes he is the au- 
thoritative narrator presenting an unambiguous 
story. More often, he remains the questioning and 
uncertain social scientist sharing interesting but 
inconclusive confrontations with difficult data. 
For the reader. Entertaining Satan is a fascinating 
but frustrating example of the New England com- 
munity study in transition. Demos concedes, "There 
is overlap, to be sure, and some redundancy" 
(p. 15). But, he insists, "To see all this from dif- 
ferent sides is to move at least some way toward 
full and final comprehension." There is a note of 
resignation here that the book was not yet the 
integrated, coherent narrative that Demos seemed 

^My counts from the index exclude those names mentioned 
only in the notes. The three men are William Morse (22), Hugh 
Parsons (23), and Samuel Willard (38); the eight women are 
Sarah Bridgman (20), Rachel Clinton (27), Eunice Cole (38), 
Elizabeth Garlick (31), Katherine Harrison (27), Elizabeth 
Knapp (40), Elizabeth Morse (40), and Mary Parsons of 
Northampton (23). 



to want to write but did not yet know how to 
sustain. His forthcoming study of Eunice Wil- 
liams promises to be that sort of book, completing 
John Demos's journey toward the synthesis of so- 
cial history with narrative exposition. 

Such a synthesis can be found in The Minutemen 
and Their World (New York, 1976) by Robert A. 
Gross. Although dedicated to explaining New 
England's mobilization for revolutionary war in 
1775, Minutemen is a social history because Gross 
sets the fighting at Concord "in the context of the 
townspeople's ordinary lives, before and after 
April 19, 1775" (p. vii). It is a "new social history" 
because Gross enlists a computer and applies sta- 
tistical methods to the usual array of local records 
to "reveal the life of a whole community in sur- 
prisingly intimate detail" and "to tell the story of 
ordinary men and women who have left behind 
few of the diaries and letters on which historians 
have long relied" (p. viii). Social science guided 
his research but narrative techniques framed his 
presentation. "Social history," he writes, "like 
any other branch of history, should be accessible 
to as wide an audience as possible, for it deals 
with everyday, fundamental experiences of hu- 
man life — with work and play, with growing up 
and raising families, with growing old and facing 
death" (p. viii). Gross sought to make social his- 
tory readily comprehensible by making past ex- 
periences visceral and tangible. 

In 1970 Michael Zuckerman had promised that 
his study of New England towns would correct 
the antiquarian image of eighteenth-century folk 
as "caricatures of stolid virtue"; he would show 
them "fornicating out back in the barn." But such 
lusty folk are nowhere to be found (I looked dil- 
igently) in a study devoted to town petitions. At 
last Zuckerman's promised characters appeared, 
six years later, as Lucy Barnes and Joseph Hosmer 
in Minutemen, a book by one of his former stu- 
dents, Robert Gross. She was the teenage daugh- 
ter of a wealthy farmer; he a penurious young 
cabinetmaker. Her father refused to countenance 
their plans for marriage. But the couple forced the 
issue: Lucy became pregnant and father Barnes 
grudgingly consented to the match. "Lucy's case 
was not unique. . . . [IJn the twenty years before 
the Revolution, more than one out of every three 
firstborn children had been conceived out of wed- 
lock. In the process, the young people subverted 
their parents' authority" (p. 100). Here is the pi- 
vot in Gross's telling of the couple's story: the 



xliii 



turn from particular people to the general point 
about Concord which they represent. This turn 
reverses the actual course of Gross's work. First, 
his research in Concord's vital statistics found a 
pattern of increased premarital pregnancy asso- 
ciated in time with the press of a growing popu- 
lation on the town's supply of farmland; shrink- 
ing family landholdings meant that fathers had 
less to pass on to their heirs, less leverage to con- 
trol the behavior of their adolescent offspring; 
then Gross encoded his findings into the narra- 
tive of a personal story. Lucy Barnes and Joseph 
Hosmer lead the willing reader to the general 
point; the social scientist can turn to Gross's notes 
to find the statistics and the methodological rea- 
soning to sustain the interpretation. Those notes 
demonstrate that Gross's research and quantita- 
tive analysis are as thorough, if not more so, than 
those of the Big Three of 1970. He enjoys more 
surviving sources than Demos; attends to more 
types of evidence than Greven; and uses what he 
finds more carefully than Lockridge. More im- 
portantly, Gross regards social science as only the 
first half of his dual challenge. Not satisfied with 
the research-report model of exposition, he takes 
a second step by translating his findings into his- 
torical literature. Throughout the book. Gross 
presents capsule biographies which build toward 
general points (rather than exemplifying such 
points already made). The historian is no longer 
the narration's central character. 

In Good Wives: Image and Reality in the Lives of 
Women in Northern New England, 1650-1750 (New 
York, 1982), Laurel Thatcher Ulrich presents an- 
other example of how social history can evoke, as 
well as analyze, through "an extended descrip- 
tion constructed from a series of vignettes" (p. xiii). 
The book extends outward to consider the lives 
of women in several northern New England com- 
munities (especially Ipswich, Haverhill, and Salem, 
Massachusetts), but it is primarily devoted to 
demonstrating how the inward turn can em- 
power social historians to recover the lives of ordi- 
nary women — those common people unwittingly 
slighted by pure structuralism. On the other 
hand, unlike so many of the other new studies. 
Good Wives does not revolve around an extraor- 
dinary event; neither witch trial nor revolution 
organizes Ulrich's presentation. Instead, she prom- 
ises readers "much about housekeeping, child- 

“’Zuckerman, Peaceable Kingdoms, pp. 3-4. 



bearing, and ordinary churchgoing, about small 
conflicts experienced by forgotten women, and 
about little triumphs that history has not re- 
corded" (p. xiii). She works a middle ground of 
quotidian incidents set between the anonymity of 
structures and the flash of great events. 

Contrary to social science history, Ulrich's in- 
tended narration dictates her research (or, more 
accurately, determines which research is pre- 
sented to the reader). Intent on presenting "a pa- 
rade of exemplary lives" meant "to entertain and 
to instruct the reader," she plunges into the local 
records to obtain the materials she needs to re- 
create a series of capsule biographies (p. xiv). In 
contrast to the social historians of 1970, who ag- 
gregated court cases and probate inventories to 
create types, Ulrich prefers a microscopic analysis 
which nurses, from the same sources, every pos- 
sible descriptive detail about the lives of particular 
women and the small places they dwelled in. In 
part, her pursuit of "lost detail" harkens back to 
the very best of the antiquarians; she insists that 
renewing our personal confrontation as readers 
with the people of the past can be a worthy goal 
in and of itself. Indeed, she suggests that we can- 
not accurately comprehend structures or great 
events until we understand the particular expec- 
tations of the people within those structures and 
events. But the detail ultimately serves a broader 
purpose; she accumulates it to reveal general 
trends among the women of her place in time: 
"the magnification of motherhood, the idealiza- 
tion of conjugal love, and the elevation of female 
religiosity" (p. 240). 

Most recently, the trend toward the personal 
has been carried to an extreme where only the 
shell of the community study remains. The recent 
social historians of the personal seek the ordinary 
person who produced extraordinary documents. 
In The Way of Duty: A Woman and Her Family in 
Revolutionary America (New York, 1984), Joy Day 
Buel and Richard Buel, Jr., claim to have found 
such an ideal subject in Mary Fish of Connecticut. 
There is no doubt about the riches in the letters 
and reminiscences produced by Mary Fish and 
her relatives and which survive in unusual bulk, 
a cache unprecedented for an eighteenth-century 
New England woman, with the exception of Abi- 
gail Adams. But, as the wife of a president, 
Adams is not the proper subject of a social his- 
torian; in the Buels' words, she is too "notable" 
and "exceptional" (p. xii). They allege that Mary 



xliv 



Fish is different; she “illuminates the lives of 
countless ordinary people who passed through 
an extraordinary period of American history” 
(p. xiv). Given the imperatives of recent scholarly 
fashion, this is an understandable claim, but, in 
light of Mary Fish's actual class position, it is mis- 
leading. What does the word “ordinary" mean if 
it can apply to a woman whose father, Joseph 
Fish, was a Harvard-educated Congregational 
minister; whose first husband, John Noyes, was 
another Congregational reverend and the son of 
one of Connecticut's wealthiest and most famous 
divines; whose second husband. Gold Silliman, 
was a Yale graduate, a wealthy lawyer, the state's 
attorney, a state legislator, and a brigadier general 
of militia; whose third husband. Dr. John Dick- 
inson, was a wealthy judge and physician; and 
one of whose sons, Benjamin Silliman, became 
“the most influential scientist in America during 
the early nineteenth-century" (p. xiii)? In an era 
when a liberal education was a rare badge of the 
very highest social status, her father, three hus- 
bands, and five sons all graduated from college. 
For her part, Mary Fish studied during the early 
1750s at the Newport school of the renowned 
Sarah Osborn, the closest thing to a collegiate ed- 
ucation then available to New England women, 
and another mark of unusually high status. As an 
adult, Mary Fish lived in fine mansions, enter- 
tained the most powerful and renowned men in 
Connecticut, and benefited from the labor of 
seven slaves. None of this makes her unworthy 
of study, for her documents richly evoke her mi- 
lieu; but it is a milieu of the learned and com- 
fortable elite, not of the “ordinary." Her circum- 
stances were far closer to Abigail Adams's than 
to those of the vast majority of New England 
women who were the wives of common farmers 
and artisans. 

A second problem is that the Duels are so cap- 
tivated by their rich literary sources that they 
rarely see any need to venture beyond them into 
the local records. Their book is essentially a syn- 
thesis of family papers and, almost invariably, 
they accept Mary Fish's perspective on events at 
face value. Consequently, the Buels can deliver on 
only the first half of their promise to illuminate 
“the persistent patterns and daily routines of 
family and community life" (p. xiv). There is 
much on the family but almost nothing on com- 
munity because of a disinterest in the deeds, pro- 
bate, tax, and town meeting records which had 



become the foundation of New England social his- 
tory. As a militia general during the Revolution, 
Gold Silliman was a figure of considerable contro- 
versy: unpopular with his enlisted men, charged 
repeatedly with military incompetence, and ulti- 
mately found by the state comptroller to be £1800 
in arrears as a consequence of his careless han- 
dling of, and accounting for, public monies. The 
deserters who belabored Silliman's reputation 
and carried their complaints to the Connecticut 
assembly are never identified, never analyzed. 
Consequently, readers are left to see Silliman 
solely as his wife did: as the impeccable husband 
and gentleman unfairly maligned and abused by 
shadowy ingrates. The Buels' quick dismissal of 
every complaint against Silliman would inspire 
more confidence if it derived from sources beyond 
the family cocoon, but in the chapter (fifth) de- 
voted to Silliman's checkered military career, all 
of the 101 citations refer exclusively to family let- 
ters and reminiscences. Again the Buels seem 
empowered by the fashion for the personal to dis- 
pense altogether with the structural; this has un- 
fortunate consequences. They present an elo- 
quent, humane, fascinating, and useful book; but 
it would have been a better book had it been more 
of a community study. 

Conclusion 

A return to the six fundamental questions ad- 
dressed by New England local histories indicates 
that the inward turn has narrowed the once 
yawning gap between the social historian and the 
narrative antiquarians. Eirst, the return to the 
personal has induced many social historians to 
withdraw behind a screen of literary technique, 
leaving central place in the narrative to vivid char- 
acters making a linear story. This variety of social 
historian confines self-conscious social science — 
the posing of explicit and theoretically-informed 
questions — to notes or appendices. Second, chro- 
nological narration has returned, albeit not to cel- 
ebrate the advent of the social order of the 
nineteenth-century town. Third, the inward turn 
withdraws from the social science search for be- 
havioral regularities and retreats into the specific, 
the local, the literary, and the biographical. Fourth, 
the social historians of the personal share the an- 
tiquarians' disinterest in the aggregative statisti- 
cal analysis of local records; both groups prefer to 
illustrate, rather than to prove. Fifth, both the an- 



xlv 



tiquarian and the newest social historians start 
from the presumption of atypicality but derive 
places that are evocations of the New England 
whole. The latest work follows the lead of the an- 
thropologist Clifford Geertz to reject the notion 
of typical places altogether and instead to seek 
"the world" as perceived through the prism of 
one person or one dramatic episode. Paradoxi- 
cally, every place and event is unique but reveals 
the "symbolic systems" of an entire culture. Only 
on the sixth question does there remain an im- 
portant distinction between the two approaches: 
the newest social historian seeks out the common 
folk while the antiquarian preferred the leading 
citizens. Indeed, such is the power of their dif- 
ferent imperatives that some of the newest prac- 
titioners feel compelled to downplay the status of 
their subjects, in stark contrast to the antiquarians 
who felt so defensive about dwelling on humble 
individuals that they tended to inflate their stand- 
ing and accomplishments.®' 

Afterword 

Whither the New England community study in 
the 1990s? What sort of approaches to local his- 
tory will prove most productive? We hope that 
future works will seek the balance between the 
personal and the structural and between the nar- 
rative and the analytical evident in Robert A. 
Gross's The Minutemen and their World and Laurel 
Thatcher Ulrich's Good Wives. We also favor new 
community studies which will offer more explicit 
comparisons. Three sorts seem especially prom- 
ising; comparisons between settler towns and the 
Indian communities they displaced; between the 
locale and the world beyond; and between how 
the two genders apprehended and affected their 
locale. 

Implicit comparisons create problems. For ex- 
ample, when Kenneth Lockridge described the 
Puritan settlers of seventeenth-century Massa- 
chusetts as anti-commercial "peasants" he must 
have meant, in comparison to nineteenth- and 
twentieth-century Americans. But, by leaving the 

"'Clifford Geertz, The Interpretation of Cultures: Selected Essays 
(New York, 1973), pp. 5, 22, 28, 412-435; Lawrence Stone, 
“The Revival of Narrative; Reflections on a New Old History," 
Past and Present #85 (Nov. 1979), 3-24. Another recent New 
England local history devoted to Geertz's style of "thick de- 
scription" is David Piichard Kasserman, The Fall River Outrage: 
Life, Murder, and justice in Early Industrial Neio England (Phila- 
delphia, 1986). 



comparison inexplicit, Lockridge asserts a sweep- 
ing statement that can be, and has been, contra- 
dicted by the manifold evidence that the Puritan 
settlers eagerly bought and sold and accumulated 
property. When Stephen Innes retorted that the 
Puritan settlers were aggressive and materialistic 
individualists he implicitly meant; compared to 
the ideal type postulated by Lockridge. Far more 
satisfying is the explicitly comparative framework 
used by William Cronon in Changes in the Land: 
Indians, Colonists and the Ecology of New England 
(New York, 1983). He devotes equal attention to 
the differing and evolving economic and environ- 
mental cultures of New England's aboriginal and 
invading peoples during the seventeenth century. 
This enables Cronon to reach a judicious under- 
standing: 

When seventeenth-century New England towns 
are compared with those of the nineteenth cen- 
tury, with their commercial agriculture, wage 
workers, and urban industrialism, the transition 
between the two may well seem to be that from 
a subsistence to a capitalist society. . . . And yet 
when colonial towns are compared not with their 
industrial successors but with their Indian pre- 
decessors, they begin to look more like market 
societies, the seeds of whose capitalist future 
were already present (pp. 75-76). 

The Web of Progress: Private Values and Public 
Styles in Boston and Charleston, 1828-1843 (New 
York, 1985), by William H. Pease and Jane H. 
Pease, suggests the rich possibilities of studying 
a New England community side-by-side with a 
contemporary but external place. The compara- 
tive element gives persuasive precision to their 
statements. It is one thing to study Boston in iso- 
lation and assert that the work ethic was funda- 
mental to the city; it is quite another to show the 
importance of that work ethic to Boston by con- 
trasting it to the different development of a city 
where it was deemphasized among the white 
population. 

Explicit comparisons between men's and wom- 
en's experiences and attitudes in particular com- 
munities are equally important and promising. 
Ulrich is about to publish Martha Ballard's Book: 
Midwifery in a Kennebec River Town (New York, 
1990): part biography of a midwife, part com- 
munity study of Hallowell, Maine in the genera- 
tion after the Revolution, and part exposition of 
Ballard's manuscript diary. Ulrich offers a beau- 



xlvi 



tiful analogy of community life with a woven fa- 
bric: 

Where white thread crossed white thread, the 
squares would be uncolored, where blue crossed 
blue the squares would be a deep indigo, where 
white crossed blue or blue crossed white the re- 
sult would be a lighter, mixed tone, the whole 
forming the familiar pattern of plain woven 
"check” even today. Think of the white threads, 
the opaque but luminous white, as women's ac- 
tivities, the blue as men's, then imagine the re- 
sulting social web. 

In late eighteenth-century Hallowell some strands 
of social life were distinctly male (for example, 
town governance), others reserved for women 
(such as keeping and tending the hearths), but 



the interweave made the culture whole. Conse- 
quently, the astute student of locale will neither 
study men in isolation from women nor assume 
that one gender alone built and sustained com- 
munities. Instead, he or she will comparatively 
and equally attend to both the distinctions be- 
tween male and female "worlds" and to their in- 
terdependence.*^ 

Alan Taylor 
Assistant Professor of History 
Boston University 

*2por another model for this type of work (which also com- 
pares a settler community with its aboriginal predecessor) see 
John Mack Faragher, Sugar Creek: Life on the Illinois Prairie (New 
Haven, 1986). 



xlvii 




\ 



\ 



! 




Preface 



I n his preface to Connecticut: A Bibliography of its 
History, the late John Borden Armstrong stated, 
"with the publication of this sixth and final 
state volume, the Bibliographies of New En- 
gland History series reaches an important mile- 
stone." The publication of the Connecticut vol- 
ume in 1986, some eighteen years after the series 
was first conceived, was indeed significant. It was 
a point at which those who had labored so long 
to bring the project to fruition saw at last a glim- 
mer of light at the end of what had been a very 
long tunnel. 

At this writing, with the two final volumes in 
the last stages of pre-publication detail and the 
fulfillment of our mandate to publish a complete 
and comprehensive series assured, the word 
milestone seems inadequate to mark the current 
occasion. A more powerful expression is needed 
to reflect the state of mind of committee mem- 
bership in contemplating the successful conclu- 
sion of a project which has taken over twenty 
years to complete and has been under the con- 
tinuing direction of an organization comprising 
over 100 volunteers. In retrospect, it seems re- 
markable that this did not become a classic ex- 
ample of the old corporate adage that a camel is 
really a horse designed by committee. 

It would be redundant for me to restate the his- 
tory of this remarkable project or to comment in 
any detail on the scope of its importance to the 
historiography of New England. John Armstrong, 
chairman and series editor from 1969 until his un- 
timely death in December 1985, delineated the 
project's history in each volume as it appeared, 
and his preface in the Connecticut volume is sin- 
gularly complete through that period. An even 
more detailed description of the evolution of the 
project through 1980 was presented by him at the 



annual meeting of the Vermont Historical Society 
in August of that year and subsequently pub- 
lished in the January-Eebruary 1981 issue of Ver- 
mont History Neios. I would commend both to the 
reader who is interested in the history and meth- 
odology of this series. As for its importance, the 
reader may best draw his own conclusions after 
reading the historiographic essay of David Hall 
and Alan Taylor together with Roger Parks' com- 
ments in his introduction to this volume. 

It is interesting that one lapse of historical 
memory has persisted in all the printed records 
of the project's beginnings. It has been popularly 
believed (and recorded) that the first gathering of 
those who considered the desirability and feasi- 
bility of publishing a bibliography of New En- 
gland history was at Old Sturbridge Village in 
May of 1969. That gathering, at which the project 
was formally launched, was in fact preceded in 
the fall of 1968 by a meeting in Worcester, Mass., 
called by Marcus McCorison of the American 
Antiquarian Society at the request of Lawrence 
Wikander, then president of the New England 
Library Association. The group was small, the 
consensus was positive, and formalization fol- 
lowed in the succeeding year. It is interesting also 
that these two organizations have continued to be 
principal supporters of the project within the 
Commonwealth over the years. 

Repetition of history aside, a brief summary of 
the major factors which have made this project 
work seems very much in order. In terms of fund- 
ing, it is quite dear that the project would never 
have gotten off the ground without initial support 
from the libraries and historical and academic in- 
stitutions of New England. It is equally dear that 
it would have foundered economically at many 
points along the way without strong continuing 



xlix 



support from the National Endowment for the 
Humanities and the generosity of many institu- 
tions and individuals within New England in con- 
tributing matching funds over the years. 

John Armstrong's perseverance provided much 
needed drive and leadership through 1985, and 
over and over again disparate segments of an ex- 
traordinarily large and unwieldy committee struc- 
ture proved capable of resolving editorial and 
administrative problems alike as they arose. Our 
editors — we have had but three since 1972 — all 
brought highly individual personal and profes- 
sional characteristics to the project, yet have been 
unfailingly responsive to the committee's desires, 
have shown a remarkable capacity for self-direc- 
tion, and have produced an editorial product of 
substantial uniformity and excellence. 

Since 1986, Boston University's role in admin- 
istering NEH grants in support of the program, 
the contribution of its Academic Computing Cen- 
ter, and the support of university staff within the 
Office of Special Programs and the American and 
New England Studies Program have been of enor- 
mous help. The logic and strength of this rela- 
tionship was well demonstrated in early 1986 by 
the ease and competence with which Richard 
Candee was able to assume the responsibilities of 
principal investigator of the project, responsibili- 
ties previously carried out by the chairman and 
series editor. 

A final factor in any venture such as this must 
of necessity be a publisher, and history has it that 
in the early 1970s the committee's search to find 
one which would agree to its established criteria 
for the series met with disappointments. Despite 
this, in late 1974 a satisfactory contract was signed 
with G. K. Hall & Co. of Boston who published 
the first four volumes of the series over the suc- 
ceeding period of nearly eight years. In 1983 this 
contract was terminated and a new agreement 
signed with the University Press of New England, 
primarily to ensure that all volumes would be 
kept in print until the completion of the series — 
a promise which has been faithfully kept. More- 
over, UPNE has exhibited a refreshing interest in 



and sensitivity to the future needs and opportu- 
nities which might be served by the committee. 

And what of this future? Over the past several 
years there has been an increasing amount of dis- 
cussion within the committee addressed essen- 
tially to two questions. Eirst, is there a feasible 
way in which the series can be brought up to date 
periodically to avoid its obsolescence, and sec- 
ond, can the structure of the organization be ef- 
fectively used to carry other major projects for- 
ward once the present series is complete? In this 
context it should be emphasized that at the end 
of a twenty-year grueling regimen the member- 
ship, and I am sure all the membership, have 
thought happily of that magic day when the com- 
mittee could say the job was done and self- 
destruct. Nonetheless, serious and productive 
consideration of both these questions has gone 
forward. 

Without going into detail, it now seems assured 
that a practical means of researching and publish- 
ing update volumes at four- or five-year intervals 
can be developed and funded and will definitely 
go forward. In addition to forestalling rapid ob- 
solescence of twenty years of work it is quite pos- 
sible that the modus operand! contemplated will 
contribute to the improvement and standardiza- 
tion of the process of gathering bibliographic data 
within all the New England states. As for the 
broader question of involvement with a new and 
major project the issue is in doubt, but the mem- 
bership is agreed that come what may the struc- 
ture per se should not be dissolved prematurely. 

It will be for others to judge the true value of 
what has been accomplished. At the very least, 
however, it seems reasonable to take some degree 
of pride in having completed what we believe to 
be the first comprehensive historical bibliography 
of a major region of our country ever undertaken, 
in creating what has proven to be a research tool 
of enormous value to scholar and layman alike, 
and in ensuring that it will remain a viable re- 
source in the years to come. 

West Kennebunk, Maine A. L. Morris 

April 9, 1989 Chamnan 




Reproduced by the kind permission of the American Antiquarian Society, Worcester, Mass. 









1 

\ 







¥ 







Serial Abbreviations 



Only those titles for which abbreviations are used in this 
volume are listed. This is not a complete list of serials searched or cited. 



AASP 

CEAIA 

DAI 

DubSemPr 

EIHC 

JSH 

MHSC 

MHSP 

NEG 

NEM 

NEQ 

NEHGR 

NE-StLVGSPr 

OTNE 

S'liner 



WMQ 



American Antiquarian Society. Proceedings 
Early American Industries Association. Chronicle 
Dissertation Abstracts International 

Dublin Seminar for New England Folklife. Annual Proceedings 

Essex Institute. Historical Collections 

Journal of Social History 

Massachusetts Historical Society. Collections 

Massachusetts Historical Society. Proceedings 

New-England Galaxy 

New England Monthly ' 4/^ ^ C>£^ 

New England Quarterly 

New England Historical and Genealogical Register 
Neiv England-St. Lawrence Valley Geographical Society. 

Proceedings 
Old-time Neio England 

New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad Historical and Technical 
Association. Shoreliner 
William and Mary Quarterly 



liii 











I 



i 





Location Symbols 





+ Listings in the National Union Catalog for books and 
pamphlets marked with this symbol may include additional library locations. 


Ct 

CtB 

CtGro 

CtH 

CtHi 

CtHT 

CtMy 

CtNh 

CtNhHi 

CtStf 

CtTmp 

CtU 

CtWeth 

CtWhar 

CtWillE 

CtY 

DLC 

DNLM 

M 

MAC 

MB 

MBAt 

MBNEH 

MBou 

MBU 

MBU-S 

MChB 

Me 

MeAu 

MeC 

MeHi 

MeL 

MELB 

MeP 

MeU 

MFr 

MH 


Connecticut State Library, Hartford 
Bridgeport [Conn.] Public Library 
Groton [Conn.] Public Library 
Hartford [Conn.] Public Library 
Connecticut Historical Society, Hartford 
Trinity College, Hartford, Conn. 

G. W. Blunt White Library, Mystic Seaport, Mystic, Conn. 

New Haven [Conn.] Free Public Library 

Neiv Haven Colony Historical Society, Neiv Haven, Conn. 

Stafford Library Association, Stafford Springs, Conn. 

Thompson [Conn.] Public Library 

University of Connecticut, Storrs 

Wethersfield [Conn.] Public Library 

West Hartford [Conn.] Public Library 

Eastern Connecticut State University, Willirnantic 

Yale University, New Haven, Conn. 

Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. 

National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, Md. 

Massachusetts State Library, Boston 
Amherst College, Amherst, Mass. 

Boston Public Library 
Boston Athenaeum 

New England Historic Genealogical Society, Boston 
Jonathan Bourne Public Library, Bourne, Mass. 

Boston University 

Boston University. Stone Science Library 
Boston College, Chestnut Hill, Mass. 

Maine State Library, Augusta 
Auburn [Me.] Public Library 
Colby College, Waterville, Me. 

Maine Historical Society, Portland 
Lewiston [Me.] Public Library 
Bates College, Lewiston, Me. 

Portland [Me.] Public Library 
University of Maine, Orono 
Pall River [Mass.] Public Library 
Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass. 



Iv 



MHi 

MLowU 

MNb 

MNF 

MNS 

MPl 

MS 

MSaE 

MStuO 

MU 

MUB 

MW 

MWA 

MWAC 

MWalB 

MWC 

MWelC 

MWstR 

MWiW 

N 

NBronSL 

Nh 

NhD 

NhHi 

NhKeS 

NhM 

NhNc 

NhNh 

NhPoA 

NhPl 

NhU 

PnWC 

RHi 

RPB 

RU 

RWe 

RWoU 

TM 

VtBF 

VtHi 

VtU 

WHi 



Massachusetts Historical Society, Boston 
University of Lowell, Lowell, Mass. 

New Bedford [Mass.] Public Library 
Forbes Library, Northampton, Mass. 

Smith College, Northampton, Mass. 

Plymouth [Mass.] Public Library 
Springfield [Mass.] Public Library 
Essex Institute, Salem, Mass. 

Old Sturbridge Village Research Library, Sturbridge, Mass. 

University of Massachusetts, Amherst 

University of Massachusetts, Boston 

Worcester {Mass.] Public Library 

American Antiquarian Society, Worcester, Mass. 

Assumption College, Worcester, Mass. 

Brandeis University, Waltham, Mass. 

Clark University, Worcester, Mass. 

Wellesley College, Wellesley, Mass. 

Regis College, Weston, Mass. 

Williams College, Williamstown, Mass. 

New York State Library, Albany 
Sarah Lawrence College, Bronxville, N. Y. 

New Hanifishire State Library, Concord 
Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H. 

New Hampshire Historical Society, Concord 
Keene State College, Keene, N.H. 

Manchester [N.H.] City Library 
North Conway [N.H.] Public Library 
Nash-Gordon Library, Neiv Hampton, N.H. 

Portsmouth Athenaeum, Portsmouth, N.H. 

Plymouth State College, Plymouth, N.H. 

University of New Hampshire, Durham 
Westminster College, Wilmington, Pa. 

Rhode Island Historical Society, Providence 
Brown University, Providence, R.l. 

University of Rhode Island, Kingston 
Westerly [R.L] Public Library 

Union Saint-]ean Baptiste, Mallet Library, Woonsocket, R.L 
Memphis and Shelby County Public Library, Memphis, Term. 
Rockingham Free Public Library, Bellows Falls, Vt. 

Vermont Historical Society, Montpelier 
University of Vermont, Burlmgton 
Wisconsin Historical Society, Madison 



Ivi 



New England 

A Bibliography of Its History 



I 






General and Chronological 



BmUOGRAPHIES 



1 AMERICAN Puritan studies: an annotated 
bibliography of dissertations, 1882-1981. Michael S. 
Montgomery, comp. Westport, Conn.; Greenwood Pr., 
1984. xii, 419p. MB. + 

2 ARMSTRONG, JOHN BORDEN. "The 
Bibliographies of New England History: half-way 
home." Vermont History News, 32 (Jan. -Feb. 1981), 5- 
9. 

Includes historical information about the 
Bibliographies of New England History project. 

3 BIBLIOGRAPHY of lists of New England 
soldiers. Mary Ellen Baker, comp. Boston: New 
England Historic Genealogical Society, 1911. 56p. 
MBNEH. + 

4 "BIBLIOGRAPHY of the historical 
publications of the New England states." Colonial 
Society of Massachusetts, Publications, 3 (Apr. 1895), 
94-139. 

Appleton Prentice Clark Griffin, comp. 

5 BOSTON PUBUC LIBRARY. New England: a 
selected list of works in the Public Library of the 
City of Boston. Boston: The Trustees, 1920. 38p. 
MB.-i- 

6 "CHECKLIST of Maine, New Hampshire and 

Vermont almanacs." AASP, n.s. 38 (Apr. 1928), 63-163. 



8 "EARLY New England court records: a 
bibliography of published materials." American 
Journal of Legal History, 1 (Apr. 1957), 119-147. 

William Jeffrey, Jr., comp. 

9 GAY, FREDERICK LEWIS. A rough list of a 
collection of transcripts relating to the history of 
New England, 1630-1776, in possession of Frederick 
Lewis Gay. Brookline, Mass.: Priv. Print., 1913. 

273p. MWA. -H 

10 GENEALOGICAL research in New England. 

Ralph J. Crandall, ed. Baltimore: Genealogical 
Publishing, 1984. 190p. MB. + 

11 LEACH, DOUGLAS EDWARD. "Early town 
records of New England as historical sources." 

American Archivist, 25 (Apr. 1962), 173-181. 

12 "A LIST of New England bibliographies." 

NEQ, 44 (June 1971), 278-300. 

T. D. Seymour Bassett, comp. 

13 NEW England. Elfricda B. McCauley, ed. 

Chicago: American Library Association, 1985. ix, 
194p. MB. -H 

Bibliography. 

14 "NEW England community studies since 

1960: a bibliography." NEHGR, 138 (July 1984), 186- 
202; (Oct. 1984), 290-308. 

Ronald Dale Karr, comp. 



+ Listings in the National Union Catalog for books and pamphlets marked 
with this symbol may include additional library locations. 



1 



New England; A Bibliography of iLs History 



15 BIBLIOGRAPHIES 



15 NEW England diaries, 1602-1800: a 
descriptive catalogue of diaries, orderly books and 
sea journals. Harriet Merrifield Forbes, comp. 
[Topsfield, Mass.]: Priv. Print, 1923. viii, 439p. 
MWA. -r 

1 6 NEW ENGLAND LIBRARY ASSCQATION. 
BIBLIOGRAPHY COMMITTEE. A genealogist’s 
handbook for New England research, n.p., 1980. 129p. 
MBNEH. + 

17 "NEW England map bibliography." DubSemPr 
(1980), 117-125. 

18 RICARD, LAURA BRODERICK. "New England 
Puritan studies in the 1970's." Fides et Historia, 15 
(Spring-Summer 1983), 6-27. 

See also entry 1 . 

19 "SELECT itinerancy bibliography." 

DubSemPr (1984), 244-253. 

Artists, entertainers, clergy, etc. 

20 "A SELECTED guide to the manuscript court 

records of colonial New England." American Journal of 
Legal History, 11 (1967), 107-126. 

David H. Flaherty, comp. 

21 TUTTLE, JUUUS HERBERT. "Early 

manuscript maps of New England." Colonial Society of 
Massachusetts, Proceedings, 17 (Mar. 1913), 111-115. 

22 UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK, 

ALBANY. State Library bulletin: bibliographies No. 2- 
4. July 1897. Reading lists on colonial New England, 
travel in North America, history of the 17th century. 
Albany, N.Y., 1897. 92p. MStuO. -h 

New England reading list compiled by Minnie Cornwell 
Wilson. 

23 WINSOR, JUSTIN. "The earliest printed 

sources of New England history, 1602-1629. MHSP, 2 
ser. 9 (Nov. 1894), 181-192. 

Also published separately. 

24 WRIGHT, NORMAN EDGAR. Genealogy in 
America: Massachusetts, Cormecticut, and Maine. 
Volume 1. Salt Lake City, Utah: Deseret Book, 1968. 

X, 299p. MWA. -H 

Includes historical sketches. 

SEE "Bibliographies" in Index for additional listings. 



COLLECTED BIOGRAPHY 



25 AGGER, LEE. Women of New England. 

Volume I. Portland, Me.: Gannett Books, 1986. 178, 
[12]p. MeHi. 

26 AMERICAN HISTORICAL COMPANY, INC. Men of 
New England. Winfield Scott Downs, ed. N.Y., 1941- 
1954. 6v. MWA. -t- 

27 AMERICAN HISTORICAL SOCIETY, INC. New 
England families, genealogical and memorial: a record 
of the achievements of her people in the making of 
commonwealths and the founding of a nation. William 
Richard Cutter, ed. N.Y., 1916. 6v. MWA. -t- 

Other eds. 

28 BANKS, CHARLES EDWARD. Topographical 
dictionary of 2885 English emigrants to New England, 
1620-1650. Philadelphia, 1937. 295p. NhHi. + 

29 BARKER, SHIRLEY. Builders of New 

England. N.Y.: Dodd, Mead, 1965. 238p. MB. + 

30 BIOGRAPHICAL encyclopaedia of Connecticut 
and Rhode Island of the nineteenth century. N.Y.: 
Metropolitan Publishing and Engraving, 1881. iv, 
376p. MB. -I- 

31 BOSTON HERALD (newspaper). Commercial 

and financial New England illustrated. Boston, 1906. 
vi, 426p. MH. -I- 

32 BOULEY, CHARLES HENRY. Biographical 
sketches of the pioneer settlers of New England and 
their descendants in Worcester, Massachusetts. Barre, 
Mass.: Barre Publishers, 1964. xi, 643p. MB. -i- 

33 BRADFORD, ALDEN. Biographical notices of 

distinguished men in New England: statesmen, 
patriots, physicians, lawyers, clergymen, and 
mechanics. Boston: S. G. Simpkins, 1842. 464p. 
MWA.-h 

34 BRADFORD, GAMALIEL. Portraits of 

American women. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1919. x, 
276p. Ct. + 

Biographical sketches of Abigail Adams, Sarah Alden 
Ripley, Mary Lyon, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Margaret 
Fuller, Louisa May Alcott, Frances Elizabeth Willard, 
and Emily Dickinson. 



2 



General and Chronological 



COLLECTED BIOGRAPHY 52 



35 BRIDGEPORT [CONN.] PUBUSHING COMPANY. 

Along the Housalonic lines: an illustrated review of 
the natural scenery, manufacturing industries and 
mercantile life of business centers along the 
Housatonic Railroad and the valley of the Housatonic 
River; with portraits and sketches of leading men in 
business, public and professional life throughout this 
famous belt of country. Bridgeport, Conn., 1892. 

121, [3]p. CtB. + 

36 CHAUNCY, CHARLES. "A sketch of eminent 
men in New England, in a letter written to Dr. 

Stiles." MHSC, 10 (1809), 154-170. 

Written 1768. 

37 CLARK, MARY. Biographical sketches of 
the fathers of New England: intended to acquaint 
youth with the lives, characters and suffering of 
those who founded our civil and religious 
institutions. Concord, N.H.: Marsh, Capen and Lyon, 

1836. 180p. CtY. + 

38 CORNELL, WILLIAM MASON. Recollections of 
"ye olden time," with biographical sketches of eminent 
clergymen, statesmen, merchants. ..etc., in 
Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New 
Hampshire, and Pennsylvania. Boston: Lee and 
Shepherd, 1878. viii, 436p. Ct. -t- 

39 DRAKE, SAMUEL GARDNER. Result of some 
researches among the British archives for information 
relative to the founders of New England: made in the 
years 1858, 1859 and 1860. Originally collected for 
and published in the New England Historical and 
Genealogical Register, and now corrected and enlarged. 

Boston: Office of the New Eng. Hist, and Gen. 

Register 1860. 143p. MSaE. + 

Other eds. 

40 EASTERN HISTORICAL PUBUSHING COMPANY. 

Prominent and progressive men of New England. Boston, 
n.d. 224p. NhHi. + 

41 ELIOT, JOHN (1754-1813). A biographical 

dictionary, containing a brief account of the first 50 

settlers, and other eminent characters among the 
magistrates, ministers, literary and worthy men in New- 
England. Salem, Mass.; Cushing and Appleton, 1809. 

viii. Slip. Ct. + 

51 

42 EMMERTON, JAMES ARTHUR, and HENRY F. 

WATERS. Gleanings from English records about New 
England families. From Hist. Coll., Essex Inst. 

Volume XVII, No. 1. Salem, Mass.: Salem Pr., 1880. 52 

147p. MSaE. -i- 



43 FARMER, JOHN. A genealogical register of 
the first settlers of New England: containing an 
alphabetical list of the govemours...to which are 
added various genealogical and biographical notes, 
collected from ancient records, manuscripts, and 
printed works. Reprinted with additions and 
corrections by Samuel G. Drake. (1829) Baltimore: 
Genealogical Publishing, 1964. 355p. NhHi. -i- 

44 FLAGG, ERNEST. Genealogical notes on the 
founding of New England. My ancestors' part in that 
undertaking. Hartford, Conn.: Case, Lockwood & 
Brainard, 1926. 440p. Ct. + 

45 GAMMELL, WILUAM, and JACOB BAILEY MOORE. 
Makers of American history: Roger Williams, by 
William Gammell; Colonial governors of New England, by 
Jacob Bailey Moore. N.Y.: University Society, 1904. 
356p. DLC. -I- 

See also entry 60. 

46 GOLDMAN, MAUREEN. "American women and 
the Puritan heritage: Anne Hutchinson to Harriet 
Beecher Stowe." Ph.D. dissertation, Boston Univ., 

1975. ix, 169p. 

A study of the lives of a number of New England 
women. Abstracted in DAI, 36, No. 3 A (1975), 1503. 

47 GOWING, CHARLES DARROW. Yankee family. 

[Boston: Gowing, 1980.] v, 125p. MBNEH. -t- 

Gowing and Darrow families. 

48 HUBBARD, CLAUDE. "English and American 
Puritan biographies in the seventeenth century." 

Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of Chicago, 1978. 291p. 

Described in American Puritan Studies, Michael S. 
Montgomery, comp. (1984), 298. 

49 HUNTINGTON, ELLSWORTH, and MARTHA 
RAGSDALE. After three centuries; a typical New 
England family. Baltimore: Williams & Wilkins, 1935. 
viii, 274p. MWA. -t- 

Huntington family. 

KEYES, FRANCES PARKINSON. Pioneering 
people in northern New England: a series of early 
sketches. Washington, D.C.: Judd & Detweiller, 1937. 
47p. MWA. -H 

LEWIS HISTORICAL PUBUSHING COMPANY. New 
England families, genealogical and memorial. N.Y., 

1913. 4v. MSaE. + 

UVES of the chief fathers of New 
England. Boston: Massachusetts Sabbath School 
Society, 1846-1870. 6v. CtY. + 



3 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



53 COLLECTEDBIOGRAPHY 



53 LOWRY. GERTRUDE S. The wheel of truth: 

an ancestral saga. Hicksville, N.Y.: Exposition Pr., 
1977. xiv, 418p. MH. + 

Stoddard family in New England. 

54 McGovern, JAMES R. Yankee family. New 
Orleans: Polyanthos, 1975. iv, 191p. MWA. + 

Poor and Pierce families. 

55 MAD and magnificent Yankees: a New 
England portrait gallery. Clarissa M. Silitch, ed. 

Dublin, N.H.: Yankee, Inc., 1973. 319p. MB. + 

Selections from Yankee Magazine. 

56 MARSON, PHILIP. Yankee voices. 

Cambridge, Mass.: Schenkman Publishing, 1967. 173p. 
MHi. + 

57 MAYO, LAWRENCE SHAW. The Winthrop family 
in America. Boston: Massachusetts Historical 
Society, 1948. 507p. MBU. + 

58 MEN of Boston and New England. [Boston]: 

The Boston American, 1913. 186p. Ct. + 

59 MERCANTILE PUBUSHING COMPANY. Uading 
business men of Westerly, Stonington, and vicinity; 
embracing Mystic River, Mystic Bridge, Noank and 
Ashaway. Boston, 1889. 78p. CtY. + 

Westerly, R.I., and Stonington, Conn. 

60 MOORE. JACOB BAILEY. "Sketch of the 
governors and chief magistrates of New England from 
1620-1820." American Quarterly Register, 13 (Feb. 
1841), 269-279; (May 1841), 441-447; 14 (Aug. 1841), 
15-26; (Nov. 1841). 152-162; (Feb. 1842), 285-295; 15 
(Aug. 1842), 19-30; (Nov. 1842), 162-167; (Feb. 1843), 
298-306. 

See also entry 45. 

61 NEW England aviators, 1914-1918: their 
portraits and their records. Caroline Ticknor, ed. 

Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1919-1920. 2v. Ct. -i- 

62 NEW ENGLAND HISTORIC GENEALOGICAL 
SOCIETY, BOSTON. Memorial biographies of the New 
England Historic Genealogical Society. Boston, 1880- 
1908. 9v. MWA. -H 

Biographies of deceased members of the society. 

63 NOYES. SYBIL, CHARLES THORNTON LIBBY, and 
WALTER GOODWIN DAVIS. Genealogical dictionary of 
Maine and New Hampshire. Portland, Me.: Southworth- 
Anthoensen Pr., 1928-1939. 795p. MWA. + 



64 PARKER, HERBERT. Courts and lawyers of 
New England. N.Y.: American Historical Society, 

1931. 4v. MStuO. -t- 

See also this author's article of same title in 
Americana, 25 (Jan. 1931), 62-82. 

65 POPE, CHARLES HENRY. The pioneers of 

Maine and New Hampshire, 1623 to 1660: a descriptive 
list, drawn from records of the colonies, towns, 
churches, courts and other contemporary sources. 

Boston: C. H. Pope, 1908. xi, 252p. MWA. + 

66 POTTER, GAIL M. Stories behind the 

stones. South Brunswick, N.J.: A. S. Barnes, 1969. 
244p. MSaE. -K 
Biographies and epitaphs. 

67 PURITAN personal writings: 

autobiographies and other writings. N.Y.: AMS Pr., 
1983. 236p. MBU. + 

68 RANDALL, KATHARINE M. ODELL. Forget not 
your heritage: Henry Harrison Randall (1870-1961): 
memoirs of his life and times; my ancestors in the 
China trade: Captain Jonathan H. Lovett (1804-1882), 
Captain Amos Lefavour, Jr., 1799-1859; Captain Charles 
H. Odell (1829-1897). North Conway, N.H.: Reporter 
Pr.. 1971. [25]p. NhNc. 

Randall was proprietor of the Hotel Randall in North 
Conway, N.H.; the captains were from Beverly, Mass. 

69 RUGOFF, MILTON. The Beechers: an 
American family in the nineteenth century. N.Y.: 

Harper and Row, 1981. xvii, 653p. MWA. -i- 

See also entries 76, 2168, and 2173. 

70 SAVAGE, JAMES. A genealogical dictionary 

of the first settlers of New England, showing three 
generations of those who came before May, 1692, on the 
basis of Farmer's Register. (1860-1862) Baltimore: 
Genealogical Publishing, 1965. 4v. NhHi. -i- 
See also entry 43. 

71 SmPTON, CUFFORD KENYON. New England 

hfe in the 18th century: representative biographies 
from Sibley's Harvard graduates. Cambridge, Mass.: 
Belknap Pr. of Harvard Univ. Pr., 1963. xxvii, 626p. 
MSaE. -I- 

See also next entry. 



4 



General and Chronological 



GENERAL HISTORIES 89 



72 SHIPTON, CUFFORD KENYON. "Part I. New 
England in social transition, 1680-1740: an 
historical introduction to Volume Four of Sibley's 
Harvard graduates. Part II, Biographical sketches of 
Harvard's graduates of the classes of 1690-1790 
(alumni Harvardienses)." Ph.D. dissertation. Harvard 
Univ., 1933. 156, 394p. 

Described in American Puritan Studies, Michael S. 
Montgomery, comp. (1984), 41. Shipton edited volumes 
4-16 of the Sibley series (entry 6698 in the 
Massachusetts volume). See also preceding entry. 

73 "SKETCHES of alumni at the different 

colleges in New England." NEHGR, 1 (Jan. 1847), 77- 
91. 

74 SKETCHES of representative women of New 
England. Julia Ward Howe, ed. Boston: New England 
Historical Publishing, 1904. 499p. Ct. + 

75 SPONHOLTZ, CARL L. Founders of New 
England. Salem, Mass., 1942-1953. 4v. MWA. -t- 

76 STOWE. LYMAN BEECHER. Saints, sinners 

and Beechers. Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill, 1934. 

450p. MStuO. + 

See also entries 69, 2168, and 2173. 

77 TALCOTT, S. V. Genealogical notes of New 

York and New England families. Albany, N.Y.: Weed, 
Parsons, 1883. xii, 747p. NhHi. -i- 

78 THAYER, ELISHA. Family memorial: 
genealogy of fourteen families of the early settlers 
of New England. Hingham, Mass.: J. Farmer, 1835. 

176, 96p. NhHi. -i- 

79 TITCOMB, SARAH ELIZABETH. Early New 
England people: some account of the Ellis, Pemberton, 
Willard, Titcomb, Sewall, and Longfellow and allied 
families. Boston: W. B. Clarke & Carruth, 1882. 

288p. MSaE. -t- 

80 VAN SLYCK, J. D. New England 
manufacturers and manufactories, in two volumes. 

Three hundred and fifty of the leading manufacturers 

of New England represented, and its pages embellished 
by. ..steel portraits and views of works.... Boston: 

Van Slyck, 1879. 2v. MStuO. -t- 

8 1 WALKER, WILUSTON. Ten New England 
leaders. N.Y.: Silver, Burdett, 1901. v, 471p. Ct. 

+ 

Ministers (17th to 19th centuries). 



82 WEIS, FREDERICK LEWIS. Ancestral roots 

of sixty colonists who came to New England between 
1623 and 1650; the lineage of Alfred the Great, 
Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, 
and some of their descendants. Lancaster, Mass., 

1950. 160p. MBNEH. -t- 

83 WHITEHILL, WALTER MUIR. Analecta 
biographica: a handful of New England portraits. 
Brattleboro, Vt.: Stephen Greene Pr., 1969. xi, 

243p. MSaE. -H 

84 WHITTEMORE, HENRY. Our New England 
ancestors and their descendants, 1620-1900: 
historical, genealogical, biographical. N.Y.: N.E. 
Ancestral Publishing, 1900. 48p. NhHi. -t- 

85 WHO's who in New England: a biographical 
dictionary of leading men and women of the states of 
Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode 
Island, and Connecticut. Chicago: A. N. Marquis, 

1909. 1141p. Ct. + 

Another ed., 1916. 

86 WINSHIP, GEORGE PARKER. An odd lot of 
New England Puritan personalities; with some 
observations on the Bay Psalm book. Portland, Me.: 
Southworth-Anthoensen Pr., 1942. 24p. MWA. + 

87 WORCESTER COUNTY LAW LIBRARY, WORCESTER, 
MASS. Memorials in Maine, Massachusetts, New 
Hampshire, Rhode Island and Vermont state reports. 
Worcester, Mass.: Commonwealth Pr., 1913. 8p. Ct. + 

Biographical sketches of lawyers. 

SEE "Biography, collected" in Index for additional 
listings. 



GENERAL HISTORIES 

88 ADAMS, HANNAH. An abridgement of the 

History of New-England, for the use of young persons. 
Boston: B. & J. Homans, 1805. iv, 185p. MSaE. + 
See also next entry. 

89 . A summary history of New-England, from the 

earliest settlement at Plymouth, to the acceptance of 
the federal constitution. Comprehending a general 
sketch of the American war. Dedham, Mass.: Printed 
for the Author, 1799. 513p. MSaE. + 



5 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



90 GENERAL HISTORIES 



90 BARBER, JOHN WARNER. The history and 
antiquities of New England, New York, New Jersey, and 
Pennsylvania. Embracing the following subjects, viz; 
discoveries and settlements— Indian history— Indian, 
French and Revolutionary wars— religious history- 
biographical sketches— anecdotes, traditions, 
remarkable and unaccountable occurrances— with a 
great variety of curious and interesting relics of 
antiquity.... Hartford, Conn.: A. S. Stillman, 1844. 
viii, 624p. MWA. + 

Other eds. 

91 . New England scenes: or, a selection of 

important and interesting events which have taken 
place since the first settlement of New England: 
principally of a religious nature. New Haven, Conn.: 

L. H. Young, 1833. viii, 106p. MWA. + 

92 BRADFORD, ALDEN. New England chronology: 
from the discovery of the country, by Cabot, in 1497, 

to 1800. Boston: S. G. Simpkins, 1843. 202p. MBAt. 
+ 

Republished in Historical New England, 1 (1900). 

93 CADY, ANNIE COLE. A history of New 

England, in words of one syllable. Chicago: Belford, 
Clarke. 1888. 208p. DLC. + 

94 COOLIDGE, AUSTIN JACOBS, and J.B. 

MANSFIELD. A history and description of New England, 
general and local. Boston: A. J. Coolidge, 1859. 
xxvii, 1023p. MWA. + 

95 ELUOTT, CHARLES WYLLYS. The New England 
history, from the discovery of the continent by the 
Northmen, A.D. 986, to the period when the colonies 
declared their independence, A.D. 1776. N.Y.: 

Charles Scribner, 1857. 2v. MWA. + 

96 HATCH, ROY WINTHROP, and DAVID LINCOLN 
HATCH. The story of New England. Boston; Allyn and 
Bacon, 1938. iii, 138p. NhD. + 

97 [HAWKS, FRANCIS LISTER.] The history of 
New England, illustrated by tales, sketches, 
anecdotes, & adventures.... By Lambert Lilly 
[pseud.]. Boston: William Hyde, 1831. 184p. Ct. + 

98 A HISTORY of New England: containing 
historical and descriptive sketches of the counties, 
cities and principal towns of the six New England 
states. Rodney Holland Howard and Henry E. Crocker, 
eds. (1879) Boston: Crocker, 1880. 2v. MSaE. + 

99 LIBRARY of New England history. Boston: 

J. K. Wiggin, 1865-1867. 4v. CtY. 



100 McCLINTOCK, MARSHALL. The story of New 
England. N.Y.: Harper and Brothers, 1941. 39p. 
NhD. + 

101 MAUDUTT, ISRAEL. A short view of the 

history of the New England colonies, with respect to 
their charters and constitutions.... 4th ed. London: 
Printed for J. Wilkie, 1776. 71, [6, 29]p. CtY. -i- 

1 02 MORSE, JEDIDIAH, and EUJAH PARISH. A 
compendious history of New England, exhibiting an 
interesting view of the first settlers of that 
country, their character, their sufferings, and their 
ultimate prosperity. Collected and arranged from 
authentic sources of information. London; William 
Burton, 1808. vi, 207p. MWA. -i- 

Other eds. 

103 NEW England armals: history and 

genealogy. Laird C. Towle, ed. Bowie, Md.: Heritage 
Books, 1980. Var. p. MSaE. + 

Reprints of articles and books. 

104 THE NEW England states: their 
constitutional, judicial, educational, commercial, 
professional and industrial history. William Thomas 
Davis, ed. Boston: D. H. Hurd, 1897. 4v. MWA. -i- 

105 PALFREY, JOHN GORHAM. History of New 
England.... Boston: Little, Brown, 1858-1890. 5v. 
MWA.-(- 

Titles of the individual volumes vary. 

106 QUACKENBOS, GEORGE PA YN. Special history 

of the New England states. N.Y.; D. Appleton, 1879. 
383p. DLC. + 

107 STEARNS, MONROE. The story of New 

England. N.Y.: Random House, 1967. 179p. MH. -t- 

108 WAGENKNECHT, EDWARD CHARLES. A pictorial 
history of New England. N.Y.: Crown Publishers, 
1976. X, 342p. MB. -i- 

SEE "New England-histories" in Index for additional 
listings. 



ARCHAEOLOGY (GENERAL AND HISTORICAL) 

109 BAKER, VERNON G. "A comment on contract 

archeology on New England historic sites." Man in the 
Northeast, No. 18 (Fall 1979), 59-63. 



6 



General and Chronological 



ARCHAEOLC« Y (GENERAL AND HISTORICAL) 1 32 



110 BEAUDRY, MARY C. "Archaeology and the 
historical household." Man in the Northeast, No. 28 
(Fall 1984), 27-38. 

1 1 1 "BIBLIOGRAPHY of New England archeology." 
DubSemPr (1977), 148-159. 

112 "A BIBLIOGRAPHY of Northeast historical 
archaeology." Northeast Historical Archaeology, 15 
(1986), 19-99. 

David R. Starbuck, comp. 

113 "A BIBLIOGRAPHY of the contact period in 
southern New England." Archaeological Society of 
Connecticut, Bulletin, 45 (1982), 65-74. 

114 BROWN, MARLEY R. in. "A survey of 
historical archeology in New England." DubSemPr 
(1977), 4-15. 

115 BYERS, DOUGLAS S. "Thoughts on New 
England archaeology." Archaeological Society of 
Coimecticut, Bulletin, No. 6 (Mar. 1938), 19-21. 

116 CERAMIC analysis in the Northeast: 
contributions to methodology and culture history. 

James B. Petersen, ed. Rindge, N.H.: Franklin Pierce 
College, Dept, of Anthropology, 1985. iii, 159p. 
NhHi. -t- 

1 17 CONSERVATION archaeology in the 
Northeast: toward a research orientation. Arthur E. 
Spiess, ed. Cambridge, Mass.: Peabody Museum of 
Archaeology and Ethnology, 1978. iv, 122p. MBU. + 

118 DEETZ, JAMES J. F. In small things 
forgotten: the archaeology of early American life. 
Garden City, N.Y.: Anchor Pr., 1977. 184p. MStuO. + 

Primarily New England. 

119 DEMPSEY, CLAIRE W. "Digging up history: 
unearthed ceramics as tools to study New England's 
past." Bay State History, 10 (Summer 1984), 2-7. 

120 FARRELL, ROBERT T., and FAITH HARRINGTON. 

"The Shoals Nautical Archaeology Project (SNAP), Isles 
of Shoals, Maine/New Hampshire." Journal of Nautical 
Archaeology and Underwater Exploration, 16 (Nov. 
1987), 277-282. 

See also entry 125. 

121 FEDER, KENNETH L. "The archaeology of 
trade, migration and diffusion: how can you really 
tell?" Archaeological Society of Connecticut, 

Bulletin, No. 44 (1981), 51-58. 

Pertaining to New England’s "alleged megalithic 
structures." 



122 FOUNDATIONS of Northeast archaeology. 

Dean R. Snow, ed. N.Y.: Academic Pr., 1981. 266p. 
MBU.-i- 

See also entry 133. 

123 FRANCO, BARBARA, and SUSAN J. MONTGOMERY. 
"Unearthing New England's past: the ceramic 
evidence." Archaeology, 37 (May-June 1984), 54-57. 

124 GRADIE, ROBERT R. in. "Irish 

immigration to 18th century New England and the stone 
chamber controversy." Archaeological Society of 
Connecticut, Bulletin, No. 44 (1981), 30-39. 

"The evidence seems sufficient to conclude that the 
Irish were responsible or at least contributed to the 
stone chamber building tradition in New England." 

125 HARRINGTON, FAITH. "Archaeology at the 

Isles of Shoals." Context, 6 (Spring 1988), 13-16. 

See also entry 120. 

126 HOORNBEEK, BILLEE. "Archaeology in the 
White and Green mountains." Appalachia, 43 (Dec. 
1981), 32-39. 

Sites in Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont. 

127 HUEY, PAUL R. "The beginnings of modem 
historical archaeology in the Northeast and the 
origins of the Conference on Northeast Historical 
Archaeology." Northeast Historical Archaeology, 15 
(1986), 2-15. 

128 PA YNTER, ROBERT. "Social dynamics and 

New England archaeology." Man in the Northeast, No. 
27 (Spring 1984), 1-11. 

1 29 ROCKMAN, DIANA DIZIGER A, and NAN A. 
ROTHSCHILD. "City tavern, country tavern: an 
analysis of four colonial sites." Historical 
Archaeology, 18, No. 2 (1984), 112-121. 

Includes sites in Wellfleet, Mass., and 
Pemaquid, Me. 

130 RUBERTONE, PATRICIA E. "Historical 
landscapes: archaeology of place and space." Man in 
the Northeast, No. 31 (Spring 1986), 123-138. 

131 SAl rl A, DEAN J. "The archaeology of 
households: alternative approaches." Man in the 
Northeast, No. 28 (Fall 1984), 1-8. 

1 32 SCOTTISH RITE MASONIC MUSEUM OF OUR 
NATIONAL HERITAGE, LEXINGTON, MASS. 
Unearthing New England's past: the ceramic evidence, 
n.p., 1984. 112p. MB. -t- 

Historical archaeology. 



7 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



133 ARCHAEOLOGY (GENERAL AND HISTORICAL) 



133 SNOW, DEAN R. The archaeology of New 
England. N.Y.: Academic Pr., 1980. xiv, 379p. MB. 

+ 

See also entry 122. 

134 WALDBAUER, RICHARD C. "House not a home: 
hill farm clustered communities." Man in the 
Northeast, No. 31 (Spring 1986), 139-150. 

"A sample of 130 farm sites in the White Mountains 
of New Hampshire and Maine" (19th century). 

135 WILVER, WALTER T. "Whither the 

beehives?" New Hampshire Archeologist, No. 20 (1978- 
1979), 62-69. 

Concerning stone beehives found in New England. 

SEE "Archaeology" in Index for additional listings. 



OTHER GENERAL WORKS 

136 [ABBOTT, JACOB.] New England, and her 
institutions. By one of her sons. Boston: John 
Allen, 1835. 4, xi, 271p. MWA. -t- 

137 ADAMS, HERBERT BAXTER. The Germanic 
origins of New England towns: read before the Harvard 
Historical Society, May 9, 1881. Baltimore: Johns 
Hopkins Univ., 1882. 57p. MSaE. -i- 

138 . "Tithingmen." AASP, n.s. 1 (1882), 398-420. 

139 ANDERSON, LETTY. "Hard choices: 

supplying water to New England towns." Journal of 
Interdisciplinary History, 15 (Autumn 1984), 211-234. 

19th century. 

140 ARNOLD, NASON H. Little known historical 
spots in New England, n.p.: Otis Carl Williams, 

1929. 24p. MStuO. -h 

141 BACON, EDWIN MUNROE. Historic 
pilgrimages in New England: among landmarks of 
Pilgrim and Puritan days and of the provincial and 
Revolutionary periods. N.Y.: Silver, Burdett, 1898. 
xiv, 475p. MWA. -t- 

142 . Literary pilgrimages in New England to the 

homes of famous authors of American literature and 
among their haunts and the scenes of their writings. 
N.Y.: Silver, Burdett, 1902. 532p. MBU. + 



143 BALDWIN, SIMEON EBEN. New England's 
leadership in American history: address. ..at the 
108th annual dinner of the New England Society in the 
City of New York, December 22, 1913. n.p., n.d. lOp. 
MWA.h- 

144 BARBER, LAURENCE LUTHER, JR. 

"Modifications of town government in New England." 
Ph.D. dissertation. Harvard Univ., 1941. 279p. 

Described in American Puritan Studies, Michael S. 
Montgomery, comp. (1984), 61. 

145 BATES, FRANK G. "Village government in 

New England." American Political Science Review, 6 
(Aug. 1912), 367-385. 

146 BAXTER, JAMES PHINNEY. "New England." 
Genealogical (^arterly Magazine, 4 (July 1903), 89- 
110 . 

147 . New England: an address delivered before the 

Old Planters Society, at Salem, Massachusetts, April 
7, 1903. n.p., [1903]. 22p. MWA. -t- 

148 BEALS, CARLETON. Our Yankee heritage: 

New England's contribution to American civilization. 
N.Y.: D. McKay, 1955. 311p. MStuO. -i- 

149 BELL, JOHN J. "Annual address on New 

England towns." New Hampshire Historical Society, 
Proceedings, 2 (1890), 182-197. 

150 BELL, MARGARET. Women of the wilderness. 

N.Y.: E. P. Dutton, 1938. 384p. Ct. + 

Frontier and pioneer life in New England. 

151 BENNETT, JOHN E. "New England in 
California." NEM, n.s. 17 (Feb. 1898), 688-708. 

Influences on settlement and growth. 

152 BENTON, JOSIAH HENRY. Warning out in New 
England, 1656-1817. Boston: W. B. Clarke, 1911. 
131p. MWA. + 

The practice of warning out individuals and families 
who had not achieved a legal residence in a particular 
town. 

153 BLANCHARD, FESSENDEN SEAVER. Ghost towns 
of New England: their ups and downs. N.Y.: Dodd, 
Mead, 1960. xiv, 205p. MBU. + 

154 BLAWIE, JAMES LOUIS. "Fundamental 
concepts in considering home rule for New England 
towns and cities." Ph.D. dissertation, Boston Univ., 
1959. 591p. 

Includes historical information. Abstracted in DAI, 

20, No. 7 (1960), 2819. 



8 



155 

156 

157 

158 

159 

160 

161 

162 

163 

164 

165 

166 



General and Chronological 



OTHER GENERAL WORKS 178 



BLAWIE, JAMES LOUIS, and MARILYN BLAWIE. 

"Town vs. state: interposition and secession in New 
England." Journal of ^blic Law, 5 (Spring 1956), 90- 
109. 

17th-20th centuries. 

BONGARTZ, ROY. New England records. 

Brattleboro, Vt.: Stephen Greene Pr., 1978. viii, 

184p. VtU. -h 
Curiosities. 

BORGEAUD, CHARLES. The rise of modem 
democracy in old and New England. London: S. 
Sonnenschein, 1894. xvi, 168p. MH. + 

BRIDGMAN, HOWARD ALLEN. New England in 
the life of the world: a record of adventure and 
achievement. Boston: Pilgrim Pr., 1920. xiii, 395p. 
MWA.H- 

BRION, DENIS J. "The common law of 
waterpower in New England." Vermont Law Review, 5 
(Spring 1980), 201-249. 

BRODEUR, DAVID DALLIN. "Evolution of the 
New England town common, 1630-1966." Professional 
Geographer, 19 (Nov. 1967), 313-318. 

. "Geographic consequences of the location of 

some New England town commons and greens." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Clark Univ., 1963. viii, 207p. M. 
Abstracted in DAI, 24, No. 7 (1964), 2862. 

BROOKS, CAROL FLORA. "The early history 
of the anti-contraceptive laws in Massachusetts and 
Connecticut." American Quarterly, 17 (Spring 1966), 3- 
23. 

BURNAP, JACOB. Sermon, preached at 
Merrimac, December 22, 1820, being two centuries from 
the first settlement of New-England. Amherst, N.H.: 
Manuar, 1821. 24p. NhHi. + 

CAHILL, ROBERT ELLIS. Finding New 
England's shipwrecks and treasures. (1984) Peabody, 
Mass.: Chandler-Smith Publishing House, 1987. 5 Ip. 
RHi. -H 

. New England's ghostly haunts. Peabody, Mass.: 

Chandler-Smith Publishing House, 1983. 48p. 

CtWhar. + 

CARPENTER, FREDERIC I. "The genteel 
tradition: a re-interpretation." NEQ, 15 (Sept. 

1942), 427-443. 



167 CARRUTH, WILUAM H. "New England in 
Kansas." NEM, n.s. 16 (Mar. 1897), 3-21. 

Before and after the Civil War. 

168 CENDELLA, ROBERT. "A lesson in civics." 

American Heritage, 12 (Dec. 1960), 42-43, 100-102. 

New England town meeting. 

169 CERNY, JAMES W. "The pattern of Indian- 

derived town names in New England." NE-StLVGSPr, 3-4 
[1975], 21-26. 

170 CHAKERIAN, CHARLES GAR ABED. 'The 
development of state care of dependents and defectives 
in New England." Ph.D. dissertation, Yale Univ., 

1934. ix, 536p. 

Described in American Puritan Studies, Michael S. 
Montgomery, comp. (1984), 43. 

171 CHANNING, EDWARD. A few remarks on the 

origin of New-England towns. Cambridge, Mass., 1892. 
24p. ClY.+ 

172 CHAPIN, HOWARD MILLAR. Dogs in early New 
England. Providence, R.I.: Pr. of E. A. Johnson, 

1920. lip. MStuO. -I- 

173 CHASE, E. SHERMAN. "New England's 
contribution to the water-works profession." New 
England Water Works Association, Journal, 72 (June 
1958), 88-97. 

174 CHOATE, RUFUS. The romance of New 

England history. The importance of illustrating New 
England history by a series of romances like the 
Waverly novels. An address delivered at Salem, 1833. 
[Boston: Directors of the Old South Work, 1900.) 

24p. MSaE. + 

175 CLARKE, HELEN ARCHIBALD. Hawthorne's 
country. N.Y.: Baker and Taylor, 1910. 348p. 

NhD.-i- 

176 . Longfellow's country. N.Y.: Baker and 

Taylor, 1909. 252p. MW A. + 

177 . The poets' New England. N.Y.: Baker & 

Taylor, 1911. 356p. NhD. -t- 

178 CLIFFORD, HAROLD B. Exploring New 
England. Chicago: Follett Publishing, 1961. 224p. 
RHi. -I- 



9 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



1 79 OTHER GENERAL WORKS 



179 CLOUGH, WILSON OBER. Dutch uncles and 

New England cousins: historical sketches of New York 
and New England during three hundred fifty years as 
illustrated by some of America’s earliest families. 

New Orleans: Polyanthos, 1977. 196p. MBNEH. + 

1 80 COLE. JOHN R.. and MITCHELL TYLER 
MULHOLLAND. Historic and prehistoric patterns of 
water use in the Connecticut River Valley: 
implications for water resources planning. Amherst, 
Mass.: Water Resources Research Center, Univ. of 
Massachusetts, 1983. vii, 144p. MBU-S. 

181 CUSHING, JOHN D. "Fire societies." NEG, 

4 (Summer 1962), 10-19. 

182 . "Town commons of New England, 1640-1840." 

OTNE, 51 (Winter 1961), 86-94. 

183 . "A well-regulated militia." NEG, 5 (Summer 

1963), 26-36. 

184 DEEDY, JOHN. Literary places: a guided 
pilgrimage. New York and New England. Kansas City, 
Mo.: Sheed, Andrews and McMeel, 1978. 289p. MW. + 

1 85 DODGE, LAWRENCE G.. and AUCE COLE DODGE. 

New England paths, from candle to countdown. 
Newburyport, Mass.: Newburyport Pr., 1964. 126p. 
MSaE. -H 

186 . Puritan paths from Naumkeag to Piscataqua: an 

excursion from Rum Comer to Trundle Bed Lane. 
Newburyport, Mass.: Newburyport Pr., 1963. xvii, 
219p. MSaE. + 

187 [DODGE. NATHANIEL SHATSWELL.] Sketches 

of New England, or memories of the country. By John 
Carver, Esquire [pseud.], justice of the peace and 
quorum. N.Y.: E. French, 1842. vi, 286p. MWA. -i- 

1 88 DOUGLAS-UTHGOW, ROBERT ALEXANDER. 

Dictionary of American-Indian place and proper names 
in New England. Salem, Mass., 1909. 400p. MSaE. + 

189 DRAKE, SAMUEL ADAMS. Nooks and comers 

of the New England coast. N.Y.: Harper & Brothers, 
1875. 459p. MWA. + 

Other eds. 

1 90 DUVAL, ANDRE, and MASON WADE, (^ebec- 
Boston: celebrating New England-Nouvelle France, 350 
years of partnership in shaping North America. 

Boston: Delegation du Quebec en Nouvelle-Angleterre, 
1980. 120p. MB. -t- 



191 EASTMAN, RALPH M. Some famous privateers 

of New England. [Boston]: Priv. Print., 1928. vii, 

87p. MWA. -t- 

1 92 ELWELL, EDWARD HENRY. "Origin of 
democratic institutions in New England: read before 
the Maine Historical Society, May 4, 1893." Maine 
Historical Society, Collections and Proceedings, 2 
ser. 7 (1896), 337-361. 

193 THE ENCYCLOPEDIA of New England. Robert 
O’Brien, ed. N.Y.: Facts on File, 1985. ix, 613p. 

MB. 

194 FAIRBANKS, CHARLES WARREN. The 
indebtedness of the West to New England: address. ..at 
the two hundred and fiftieth anniversary of the 
founding of Lancaster, Mass., June 30, 1903. 

Indianapolis: Pr. of Levey Bro’s, 1903. 18p. MB. -i- 

Old Northwest. 

195 FERGUSON, HENRY. Essays in American 
history. (1894) Port Washington, N.Y.: Kennikat 
Pr., 1969. 221p. MWA. -e 

Essays on the following subjects in New England 
history: (fakers, witchcraft. Sir Edmund Andros, and 
Loyalists. 

196 FERLING, JOHN E. "The New England 

soldier: a study in changing perceptions." American 
(^arterly, 33 (Spring 1981), 26-45. 

Colonial and Revolutionary wars. 

197 FESSENDEN, F. G. "Some phases of our New 
England institutions." Pocumtuck Valley Memorial 
Association, History and Proceedings, 3 (1901), 285- 
295. 

198 FIGHTING fire: the great fires of 

history, including the conflagrations in Chicago, 

Boston, Portland, New York, etc. Hartford, Corm.: 

Dustin, Gilman, 1873. 716p. CtHT. -t- 

199 FLEMING, RONALD LEE, and LAURI A. 

HALDERMAN. On common ground: caring for shared land 
from town common to urban park. Harvard, Mass.: 

Harvard Common Pr., 1982. xviii, 171p. M. + 

200 FORBES, ALLAN. France and New England. 

[Boston], 1925-1929. 3v. MWA. -i- 



10 



General and Chronological 



201 [FORBES, ALLAN.] Towns of New England 

and old England, Ireland and Scotland. ..connecting 
links between cities and towns of New England and 
those of the same name in England, Ireland and 
Scotland; containing narratives, descriptions, and 
many views, some done from old prints; also much 
matter pertaining to the founders and settlers of New 
England and to their memorials on both sides of the 
Atlantic; printed to commemorate the tercentenary of 
the landing of the Pilgrims. Boston: State Street 
Trust, 1920-1921. 2v. MWA. -i- 

202 FOWLER. WILUAM CHAUNCEY. Local law in 
Massachusetts and Connecticut, historically 
considered; and the historical status of the Negro, in 
Connecticut; also, a speech delivered in the senate of 
Connecticut, June 22, 1864. n.p., 1875. 171p. 
CtNhHi. + 

Reprinted 1971. 

203 FRAZIER, DONALD H. "New England: the 
cradle of the nation." Congregational Vermont, 58 
(Oct. 1946), 5-9. 

204 FREUND, PAUL A. "The New England seat on 
the Supreme Court." MHSP 87 (1975), 32-44. 

"The most distinctively regional seat was that 
founded by William Cushing. From 1789 to 1962, with 
one notable exception, it was held by an appointee 
from New England, the First Circuit." 

205 GEMMING, ELIZABETH. Getting to know New 
England. N.Y.: Coward-McCann, 1970. 69p. MB. + 

206 GOULD, JOHN. New England town meeting: 
safeguard of democracy. Brattleboro, Vt.: Stephen 
Greene Pr., 1940. 60p. MSaE. -t- 

207 GREEN, ARNOLD. New England's gift to the 
nation— the township: an oration... delivered July 
5, 1875. Providence [R.I.]: Angell, Burlingame, 

1875. 56p. Ct. -I- 

208 GREENE, AELLA. Reminiscent sketches. 

[Florence, Mass.: Pr. of the Bryant Print], 1902. 

208p. Ct. -H 

209 GREENE, JACOB LYMAN. The New England 
town: its spirit and meaning, with some reference to 
modem social and economic questions: an address 
delivered at Waterford, Maine, September 3d, 1897, at 
the 100th anniversary of the incorporation of the 
town. Hartford, Conn.: Case, Lockwood & Brainard, 
1897. 32p. Me. -H 



OTHER GENERAL WORKS 221 



HALL, BARBARA. "New England town 

meeting." Early American Life, 14 (Apr. 1983), 11-12, 

79-80. 

HARDING, J. W. "The civilizations 
bordering respectively upon the St. Lawrence and the 
Connecticut rivers." Pocumtuck Valley Memorial 
Association, History and Proceedings, 2 (1898), 191- 
205. 

HARMON, JOHN E. "New England as a 

vernacular culture region." NE-StLVGSPr, 14 [1985], 

37-45. 

HART, ALBERT BUSHNELL. 'The 

westernization of New England." Ohio Archaeological 

and Historical Quarterly, 17 (July 1908), 259-274. 

Western U.S. influences on New England in language, 
education, and politics. 

HARVEY, LASHLEY GREY. The "walled" towns 
of New England. Boston: Boston Univ. Pr., 1964. 

28p. MB. -H 
Local govenunent. 

HAWTHORNE, HILDEGARDE. Old seaport towns 
of New England. N.Y.: Dodd, Mead, 1916. viii, 312p. 
MWA.+ 

HENDERSON, HELEN W. A loiterer in New 
England. N.Y.: George H. Doron, 1919. 445p. MWA. + 
Includes historical sketches. 

HILL, JAMES N. "Some Yankees enlarged." 

NEM, n.s. 47 (Sept. 1912), 80-91. 

New Englanders and the settlement and early 
development of Iowa. 

HINES, TERENCE M. The revenue stamps of 
New Hampshire and Vermont. [Lincoln, Neb.: State 
Revenue Society, 1971.] [12]p. VtU. 

HIRAIDE, NOBUMICHI. "The New England 
town and the begirming of American capitalist 
democracy." American Journal of Economics and 
Sociology, 20 (Oct. 1961), 523-534. 

HISTORIC towns of New England. Lyman 

Pierson Powell, ed. N.Y.: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1898. 

xxi, 599p. MWA. -i- 

Includes historical sketches of a number of cities 
and towns. 

JOHN HANCOCK MUTUAL UFE INSURANCE 
COMPANY, BOSTON. New England: with special referenct 
to the 300th anniversary of the landing of the 
Pilgrims. 1620-1920. Boston, 1920. [30]p. MWA. + 



210 

211 

212 

213 

214 

215 

216 

217 

218 

219 

220 

221 



11 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



222 OTHER GENERAL WORKS 



222 JOHNSON, CLIFTON. Highways and byways of 
New England, including the states of Massachusetts, 

New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Connecticut, Vermont, and 
Maine. N.Y.: Macmillan, 1921. 284p. MSaE. + 

223 . New England: a human interest geographical 

reader. N.Y.: Macmillan, 1917. ix, 371p. Ct. + 

224 . New England and its neighbors. N.Y.: 

Macmillan, 1902. xv, 335p. MSaE. + 

225 . The New England country. Boston: Lee and 

Shepard, 1893. x, 121p. MW A. + 

226 JOHNSON, LANE J. "The spatial uniformity 
of central place distribution in New England." 

Economic Geography, 47 (Apr. 1971), 156-170. 

227 JONES, LEONARD AUGUSTUS, and CONRAD RENO. 
Memoirs of the judiciary and the bar of New England 
for the nineteenth century, with a history of the 
judicial system of New England...; the century's 
record of the lives of distinguished members of the 
legal profession.... Boston: Century Memorial 
Publishing, 1900. 3v. RHi. -i- 

228 KENT, LOUISE ANDREWS. Village greens of 

New England. N.Y.: M. Barrows, 1948. 280p. MPB. + 

229 KLEBANER, BENJAMIN J. "Pauper auctions: 
the 'New England method' of public poor relief." 

EIHC, 91 (July 1955), 195-210. 

230 KOCH, STUART G. Water resources plaiming 

in New England. Hanover, N.H.: Univ. Pr. of New 
England, 1980. 185p. MBU. -i- 

231 LAB AREE, BENJAMIN WOODS. "New England 
town meeting." American Archivist, 25 (Apr. 1962), 
165-172. 

232 LARSON, ROBERT NELSON. "The governor's 
council in New England." Ph.D. dissertation, Boston 
Univ., 1960. V, 248p. 

In Maine, Massachusetts, and New Hampshire colonial 
and state governments. Abstracted in DAI, 21, No. 4 
(1960), 947. 

233 LAUER, PAUL ERASMUS. Church and state in 

New England. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins Univ., 1892. 
106p. MSaE. -t- 

Published Ph.D. dissertation (Johns Hopkins Univ.). 

234 LEIGHLY, JOHN. "New England town names 
derived from personal names." Names, 18 (1970), 155- 
174. 



235 LOOKING back: images of New England, 

1860-1930. Susan Mahnke, ed. Dublin, N.H.: Yankee 
Publishing, 1982. 160p. MW. -t- 

236 'THE LOWELL explosion and other New 

England disasters." NEM, n.s. 29 (Sept. 1903), 3-15. 

237 LUNT, GEORGE. Three eras of New England, 
and other addresses, with papers critical and 
biographical. Boston, 1857. 264p. MSaE. -i- 

238 McCarthy, joe. New England: 

Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, 
Rhode Island, Vermont. N.Y.: Time, Inc., 1967. 

192p. MB. -h 

239 MacGILL, CAROLINE E. "The New England 

type: a study in psychological sociology." NEM, n.s. 
40 (Aug. 1909), 667-675. 

240 McKENNEY, LEWIS TIMOTHY. The New England 
people: builders of America. Boston: Meador 
Publishing, 1942. 191p. MWA. -i- 

241 McLAUGHUN, ANDREW CUNNINGHAM. The 
foundations of American constitutionalism. N.Y.: New 
York Univ. Pr., 1932. vii, 176p. Ct. + 

New England's influence. 

242 MANN, WILUAM JUSTIN. Little walks on 
enchanted ground. Brattleboro, Vt.: Stephen Daye 
Pr., 1935. 277p. MH. -h 

Historic houses and literary landmarks. 

243 MARSH, GEORGE PERKINS. The Goths in New- 
England: a discourse delivered at the anniversary of 

the Philomathesian Society of Middlebury College, Aug. 
15, 1843. Middlebury [Vt.]: Printed by J. Cobb, 

1843. 39p. VtU. + 

Traces New England values to the "Gothic" period in 
Europe. 

244 MASTER BREWERS ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA. 
Convention of the U.S. Brewmasters' Association, held 
September 1901, Boston, Mass. N.Y.: Cherouny 
Printing & Publishing, 1901. 96p. RHi. + 

Includes historical sketches of New England and 
Boston. 

245 MERYMAN, RICHARD. "Walter Muir 
Whitehill: the irascible iconoclast." Yankee, 42 
(Sept. 1978), 104-109. 

Pronouncements on New England institutions and 
characteristics. 



12 



General and Chronological 



OTHER GENERAL WORKS 266 



246 MIDDLEBROOK, LOUIS FRANK. Seak of 
maritime New England. Salem, Mass.: Essex Institute, 
1926. 43p. Ct. + 

Reprinted from EIHC, 62 (Apr. 1926), 91-112; (Oct. 
1926), 353-363; (July 1926), 209-224. 

247 MOOK, H. TELFER. "Training day in New 
England." NEQ, 11 (Dec. 1938), 675-697. 

Militia training. 

248 MORRISON, LEONARD W. "Paupers for rent." 

Yankee, 4 (May 1938), 28-29. 

Public welfare in rural areas. 

249 MOULTON, AUGUSTUS FREEDOM. "Church and 
state in New England." Maine Historical Society, 
Collections, 3 ser. 1 (1904), 221-251. 

See also this author's article of same title in NEM, 
n.s. 27 (1902-1903), 96-111. 

250 MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN INDIAN. HEYE 
FOUNDATION. Indian place names of New England. John 
C. Huden, comp. N.Y., 1962. xiv, 408p. MeU. + 

251 THE NEW England Galaxy: the best of 20 

years from Old Sturbridge Village. Roger Parks, ed. 
Chester, Conn.: Globe Pequot Pr., 1980. 192p. 

MStuO. -I- 

Articles on New England history, selected from New- 
England Galaxy, the periodical edited by Catherine 
Feimelly and published by Old Sturbridge Village from 
1960-1979. 

252 NEW ENGLAND SOaETY IN THE CITY OF NEW 
YORK. The New England Society orations: addresses, 
sermons and poems delivered before the New England 
Society in the City of New York, 1820-1885. Cephas 
Brainerd and Eveline Warner Brainerd, eds. N.Y.: 

Century, 1901. 2v. MW A. -i- 

Includes historical addresses. 

253 'THE NEW England town hall." Maine 
Townsman, 14 (Oct. 1952), 11, 16. 

254 NEW England: what it is and what it is 

to be. George French, ed. Boston: Boston Chamber of 
Commerce, 191 1. 43 Ip. MWA. -i- 

255 OLD COLONY TRUST COMPANY, BOSTON. New 
England, old and new: a brief review of some 
historical and industrial incidents in the Puritan 
'New English Canaan,' still the land of promise. 

(1920) Boston, 1957. 61p. MWA. -h 

256 PACKARD, EDWARD H. New England essays: 
the challenge of an individualist. Boston: Four 
Seas, 1929. 191p. MWA. -i- 



257 PARKER, JOEL. The origin, organization, 

and influence of the towns of New England: a paper 
read before the Massachusetts Historical Society, 
December 14, 1865. Cambridge [Mass.]: Pr. of John 
Wilson and Son, 1867. 54p. MWA. + 

Also published in MHSP, 9 (1866-1867), 14-65; and in 
New Hampshire Provincial and State Papers, 25 (1895), 
749-787. 

258 PAULUN, CHARLES OSCAR. "New England 
secretaries of the Navy." NEM, n.s. 37 (Feb. 1908), 
651-668. 

259 PERRY, ARTHUR LATHAM. Miscellanies. 
Williamstown, Mass.: Published by the Author, 1902. 
xii, 189p. MWA. + 

Essays on New England history. 

260 PIERSON, GEORGE WILSON. "The obstinate 
concept of New England: a study in denudation." NEQ, 

28 (Mar. 1955), 3-7. 

Discussion of changing historical definitions of New 
England as a region. 

26 1 POOR, JOHN ALFRED. The first 
international railway and the colonization of New 
England. Life and writings of John Alfred Poor. 

Laura Elizabeth Poor, ed. N.Y.: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 
1892. 400p. Ct. + 

Historical essays. Title refers to St. Lawrence and 
Atlantic Railway and to beginnings of the Popham 
Colony in Maine. There is also an essay on the 
northeastern boundary. 

262 POWELL, E. P. "New Englanders in New 
York." NEM, n.s. 28 (July 1903), 585-593. 

263 REDGRAVE, WILLIAM J. All of New England. 
Greenlawn, N.Y.: Harlan Publications, 1956. 88p. 
NhD.-i- 

264 ROBERTS, KENNETH LEWIS. Know New 
England: eighty cities and towns, with illustrations 
of prominent landmarks and historical anecdotes. 

[Boston: Boston Herald Transcript, 1950.] 161p. 

CtY. + 

265 ROBINSON, WILUAM F. Abandoned New 
England: its hidden ruins and where to find them. 

Boston: New York Graphic Society, 1976. xi, 21 Ip. 
MB. + 

266 . Coastal New England: its life and past. 

Boston: New York Graphic Society, 1983. 244p. MB. + 



13 



267 

267 

268 

269 

270 

271 

272 

273 

274 

275 

276 

277 

278 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



OTHER GENERAL WORKS 



ROBINSON, WILUAM F. Mountain New 
England: its life and past. Boston: Little, Brown, 
1988. 206p. MB. + 

RUTMAN, DARRETT BRUCE. "New England as 
idea and society revisited." WMQ, 3 ser. 41 (Jan. 

1984), 56-61. 

SANDLER, MARTIN W. This was New England: 
images of a vanished past. Boston: Little, Brown, 
1977. 222p. Ct. 

SEW ALL, J. B. "The New England town- 

house." Granite Monthly, 7 (Sept.-Oct. 1884), 284- 

290. 

Use of meeting houses for town meetings (17lh and 
18th centuries). 

SHEFFIELD, W. P. The soldiers and 
sailors of New England: address delivered at the 
annual reception of the New England Society in the 
City of Brooklyn, Thursday evening, February 4, 1886. 
n.p., 1886. 18p. Ct. -i- 

SHERWOOD, HERBERT FRANCIS. Historic 
places of New England. N.Y.: Rand McNally, [192_?]. 
60p. Ct. -I- 

SLEEPER, MYRON O. "Indian place names in 

New England." Massachusetts Archaeological Society, 

Bulletin, 10 (1948-1949), 89-93. 

SMITH, CHARLES E. "Destiny comes to New 
England." Century, 117 (Feb. 1929), 436-445. 

Changing New England characteristics in response to 
social change. 

SNYDER. DOROTHY EASTMAN. 'The passenger 
pigeon in New England." OTNE, 45 (Winter 1955), 61- 
72. 

STEVENS, BENJAMIN F. "Odds and ends of 
New England history." Magazine of New England 
History, 3 (1893), 38-44. 

STOWE. LYMAN BEECHER. New England, the 
leaven of the nation. [N.Y., 1935.] Unp. DLC. -i- 

TAYLER, J. LIONEL. New England and new 
America and other writings of the late J. Lionel 
Tayler.... F. H. Hayward, ed. London: Williams and 
Norgate, 1933. viii, 335p. CtY. -i- 
"New Englandism" and American values. 



279 TENNEY, C. J. New-England distinguished: 

a discourse preached in Wethersfield [Corm.j, Nov. 29, 
1827, being the day of annual Thanksgiving; with an 
appendix. Wethersfield, Conn.: A. Francis, 1828. 

16p. MW A. + 

280 THORNTON. JOHN WINGATE. The historical 
relation of New England to the English commonwealth. 
Boston: Pr. of Alfred Mudge & Son, 1874. 105p. 
MSaE. -I- 

281 TREE, CHRISTINA. How New England 

happened: a guide to New England through its history. 
Boston: Little, Brown, 1976. x, 269p. MB. -t- 

282 USHER, ELLIS BAKER. "New England in 
Wisconsin." NEM, n.s. 22 (June 1900), 446-461. 

283 VARTANIAN. PERSHING. 'The Puritan as a 
symbol in American thought: a study of the New 
England societies, 1820-1920." Ph.D. dissertation, 
Univ. of Michigan, 1971. vi, 323p. MWalB. 

Societies of transplanted New Englanders. 

Abstracted in DAI, 32, No. 7 A (1972), 3939. 

284 VERRILL, ALPHEUS HYATT. Along New 
England shores. N.Y.: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1936. 
xxi, 298p. MWA. -i- 

285 WAKEHELD, ALBERT J. 'Water! Water! 

Water!" Yankee, 7 (Aug. 1941), 22-23, 35. 

Old-time fire companies. 

286 WEEDEN, WILUAM BABCOCK. "(Quality the 
prevailing element in representation." AASP, n.s. 9 
(Oct. 1894), 339-369. 

New England. 

287 WHITEHILL, WALTER MUIR. "The union of 

New England and Virginia." Virginia Quarterly Review, 
40 (Autumn 1964), 516-530. 

Ties between the two (18th and 19th centuries). 

288 WHITING. EDWARD ELWELL. Changing New 
England. N.Y.: Century, 1929. x, 275p. MWA. -i- 

289 WILSON, RUFUS ROCKWELL. New England in 
letters. N.Y.: A. Wessels, 1904. xi, 384p. MWA. -t- 

"... Scenes and places associated with the men and 
women who have helped to make our literature. ..one of 
our most precious heritages." 

290 WRIGHT, JOHN K. "New England." 

Geographical Review, 19 (July 1929), 479-494. 



14 



General and Chronological 



DISCOVERY AND EXPLORATION 309 



291 ZUCKERMAN, MICHAEL WOLODIN. Peaceable 
kingdoms: New England towns in the eighteenth 
century. N.Y.; W. W. Norton, 1970. ix, 329, vi p. 
MWA.+ 

See also this author's Ph.D. dissertation (Harvard 
University, 1967): 'The Massachusetts town in the 
eighteenth century". 



DISCOVERY AND EXPLORATION 

292 ASKOWITH, HYMAN. "Early explorations of 

the New England coast." NEM, n.s. 28 (Mar. 1903), 19- 
32. 

293 BAXTER, JAMES PHINNEY. "The av ant 

couriers of colonization." Maine Historical Society, 
Collections, 3 ser. 2 (1906), 1-20. 

294 BOLTON, CHARLES KNOWLES. Terra nova: 

the northeast coast of America before 1602; armals of 
Vinland, Markland, Estotiland, Drogeo, Baccalaos and 
Norumbega. Boston: F. W. Faxon, 1935. xiii, 194p. 
MSaE. -H 

295 BRERETON, JOHN. Discoverie of the north 

part of Virginia. (1602) n.p.: Readex Microprint, 

1966. 48p. MWA. -t- 

"...The first English description of New England and 
reports the fu^st attempt at its settlement." 

296 [COUNCIL FOR NEW ENGLAND.] Abriefe 
relation of the discovery and plantation of New 
England: and of svndry accidents therein ocevrring, 
from the yeere of Our Lord M.DC.VII. to the present 
M.D.C.XXn. Together with the state thereof as now it 
standeth, the generall forme of gouemment intended; 
and the diusion of the whole territorie into counties, 
baronies, &c. (1622) Boston, 1890. [42]p. MSaE. -t- 

297 DIAMOND, SIGMUND. "Nurumbega: New 

England Xanadu." American Neptune, 11 (Apr. 1951), 95- 
107. 

Mythical city of the exploration and early- 
settlement eras. 

298 THE ENGLISH New England voyages, 1602- 
1608. David B. (Juirm and Alison M. Quirm, eds. 

London: Hakluyt Society, 1983. xxiv, 580p. MWA. + 

299 FALNES, OSCAR J. "New England interest 

in Scandinavian culture and the Norsemen." NEQ, 10 
(June 1937), 211-242. 

During the 19th century. See also entries 306 and 
308. 



300 FORERUNNERS and competitors of the 

Pilgrims and Puritans; or narratives of voyages made 
by persons other than the Pilgrims and Puritans of the 
Bay Colony to the shores of New England during the 
first quarter of the seventeenth century, 1601-1625. 
With special reference to the labors of Captain John 
Smith in behalf of the settlement of New England. 
Charles Herbert Levermore, ed. Brooklyn, N.Y.: [New 
England Society in the City of Brooklyn], 1912. 2v. 
MWA. 

301 GOODWIN, V/ILUAM BROWNELL. The ruins of 
Great Ireland in New England. Boston: Meador 
Publishing, 1946. 424p. MWA. + 

302 HOWE, HENRY FORBUSH. Prologue to New 
England. N.Y.: Farrar & Rinehart, 1943. xi, 324p. 
MBU.-i- 

Discoveries and events preceding the Pilgrim and 
Puritan migrations. 

303 JOSSELYN, JOHN. New-England's rarities, 
discovered in birds, beasts, fishes, serpents, and 
plants of that country. (1672) Boston: William 
Veazie, 1865. 169p. MWA. -t- 

Includes historical introduction by Edward 
Tuckerman. 

304 LEVETT, CHRISTOPHER. A voyage into New 
England begun in 1623, and ended in 1624.... London: 
William lones, 1628. [61]p. CtY. -i- 

Also published in MHSC, 3 ser. 8 (1843), 159-190. 

305 McMANIS, DOUGLAS R. European impressions 

of the New England coast, 1497-1620. Chicago: Univ. 
of Chicago, Dept, of Geography, 1972. vii, 147p. 
MWA.+ 

306 NITKIN, NATHANIEL. "Viking New England." 

NEG, 17 (Spring 1976), 40-45. 

See also entries 299 and 308. 

307 OnS, VIRGINIA LADD. "The explorers and 
the natives." NEG, [18] (Fall 1976), 50-56. 

308 PERRY, CLAY. "Captive Vikings in 

America." American Swedish Monthly, 47 (Jan. 1953), 
12-13, 19. 

See also next entry and entries 299 and 306. 

309 POIRIER, DAVID ARTHUR. "Norse evidence 

in the Northeast: illusion or history? A review of 
the archaeological evidence." Archaeological Society 
of Cormecticut, Bulletin, No. 44 (1981), 41-50. 

See also preceding entry. 



15 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



3 1 0 DISCOVERY AND EXPLORATION 



310 ROTHOVIUS, ANDREW E. 'The Celt-Iberian 
culture of New England, 1st millennium B.C." NEAR A 
Journal, 10 (1975-1976), 2-4. 

311 SAILORS' narratives of voyages along the 

New England coast, 1524-1624. George Parker Winship, 
ed. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1905. 292p. MWA. + 

312 SALWEN, BERT. "The reliability of Andre 
Thevett's New England material." Elhnohistory, 10 
(Spring 1963), 183-185. 

In his description of the geography and Indians of 
the region, published in 1575. 

313 SMITH, JOHN (1580-1631). A description 

of New-England: or the observations and discoueries 
of Captain lohn Smith (admirall of that country) in 
the north of America, in the yeare of our Lord 1614: 
with the successe of sixe ships, that went the next 
yeare 1615; and the accidents befell him among the 
French men of warre: with the proofe of the present 
benefit this country affords: whither this present 
yeare, 1616, eight voluntary ships are gone to make 
further tryal. (1616) Boston: William Veazie, 1865. 
vii, 89p. MWA. + 

314 . The generall historie of Virginia, New England 

& the Summer Isles; together with The true travels, 
adventures and observations and A sea grammar. 

Glasgow: J. MacLehose and Sons, 1907. 2v. CtY. + 

315 WINSOR, JUSTIN. "The Cabot 
controversies." MHSP, 31 (1896-1897), 156-169. 



COLONIZATION AND EXPANSION 

316 ADAIR, JOHN. Founding fathers: the 

Puritans in England and America. London: J. M. Dent, 
1982. xii, 302p. Cu + 

317 ADAMS, JAMES TRUSLOW. The founding of 
New England. Boston: Atlantic Monthly Pr., 1921. 
xi, 482p. MWA. + 

318 ALBERTSON, DEAN. "Puritan liquor in the 
planting of New England." NEQ, 23 (Dec. 1950), 477- 
490. 

319 AMERICANUS [pseud.]. "Puritanism in East 

Devon and the New England emigrants, 1625-30." Devon 
& Cornwall Notes & Queries [U.K.], 18 (Apr. 1934), 86- 
90. 



320 ANDERSON, VIRGINIA DeJOHN. "Migrants and 
motives: religion and the settlement of New England, 
1630-1640." NEQ, 58 (Sept. 1985), 339-383. 

321 . "To pass beyond the seas: the great migration 

and the settlement of New England, 1630-1670." Ph.D. 
dissertation. Harvard Univ., 1984. v, 478p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 45, No. 12A (1985), 3727. 

322 ANDREWS, MATTHEW PAGE. The soul of a 
nation: the founding of Virginia and the projection 

of New England. N.Y.: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1943. 
xiv, 378p. MBU. -h 

323 AYRES, HARR AL. The Great Trail of New 
England: the Connecticut Path, great trail of the 
southern New England pioneers... the associated 
paths. ..related historical collections of the Indians 
and their country, and of the empire-building years of 
the pioneers. Boston: Meador Publishing, 1940. 

444p. MWA. -I- 

324 . "Historic journeys of pioneer years: southern 

New England trails and activities." Massachusetts 
Archaeological Society, Bulletin, 6 (1944-1945), 1-10. 

325 BALDWIN, ERNEST H. "The promoter's part 

in the colonization of New England." Americana, 7 
(Aug. 1912), 724-736. 

326 BANKS, CHARLES EDWARD. "Religious 
'persecution' as a factor in the emigration to New 
England, 1630-1640." MHSP, 63 (1930), 136-151. 

327 . "The topographical sources of English 

emigration to the New England colonies." New York 
Genealogical and Biographical Record, 61 (Jan. 1930), 
3-6. 

328 BARTON, BONNIE. The comparability of 
geographic methodologies: a study of New England 
settlement. Ann Arbor, Mich.: Dept, of Geography, 
Univ. of Michigan, 1977. xxiii, 161p. NhD. + 

329 . "New England settlement: an inquiry into the 

comparability of geographic methodoligies." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Univ. of Michigan, 1972. vi, 214p. MU. 

Abstracted in DAI, 34, No. 4B (1973), 1578. 

330 BASSETT, SARA WARE. New England bom. 

N.Y.: Doubleday, 1938. 277p. MBAt. -t- 

33 1 BAXTER, JAMES PHINNEY. The great seal of 

the Council for New England. Cambridge, Mass.: Pr. 
of John Wilson & Son., 1884. 20p. MSaE. -t- 

See also entry 369. 



16 



General and Chronological 



COLONIZATION AND EXPANSION 350 



332 BAXTER. JAMES PHINNEY. A New England 
pantheon, to commemorate the principles and 
achievements of the pioneers whose ideals were the 
seed of free government. Portland, Me.: Stephen 
Berry, 1917. 8p. CtY. + 

333 . "A New England temple of honor." NEHGR, 74 

(Apr. 1920), 121-124. 

Proposed memorial to the founders of New England. 
See also preceding entry. 

334 "BEGINNINGS of New England." Americana, 

13 (July 1919), 215-243. 

335 BENEDICT, ERASTUS CORNEUUS. The 
beginning of America: a discourse delivered before 
the New-York Historical Society on its fifty-ninth 
anniversary, Tuesday, November 17, 1863. N.Y.: 
Printed by J. F. Trow, 1864. 64p. Ct. -t- 

336 BENNETT,GRANVILLEG. "Forefathers’ 

day." New England Society in the City of New York, 
130th Armual Report (1935), 25-32. 

Concerning the character and ideals of the early New 
England colonists. 

337 BICKNELL, THOMAS WILLIAMS. 'The family 
immigration to New England." Bay State Monthly, 1 
(1884), 20-24. 

338 BOLTON, CHARLES KNOWLES. The real 
founders of New England: stories of their life along 
the coast, 1602-1628. Boston: F. W. Faxon, 1929. 
xiv, 192p. MWA. -t- 

Reprinted 1974. 

339 BOLTON, EDITH STANWOOD. Immigrants to 
New England, 1700-1775. Salem, Mass.: Essex 
Institute, 1931. 235p. MSaE. -i- 

Reprinted from EIHC, 63-65 (1927-1929). Another 
ed., 1973. 

340 BOULIND, RICHARD. "William Hack and the 
Description of New England." Colonial Society of 
Massachusetts, Publications, 59 (1982), 61-144. 

Painted manuscript map (17th-century), belonging to 
the Pilgrim Society, Plymouth, Mass. 

341 BRIDENBAUGH, CARL. "Right New-England 

men; or, the adaptable Puritans." MHSP, 88 (1976), 3- 
18. 

How the first "settlers changed as they adapted 
themselves to living in New England." 



342 BROWN, R. D., and J. YOUINGS. "Devonians 

and New England settlement before 1650." Devonshire 
[U.K.] Association for the Advancement of Science, 
Literature, and Art, Rejaort and Transactions, 95 
(1963), 219-243. 

343 BURGESS, WALTER H. "The making of New 
England." Plymouth Institution and Devon and Cornwall 
Natural History Society [U.K.], Annual Report and 
Transactions, 15 (1916), 382-390. 

Colonization. 

344 BYINGTON, EZRA HOYT. The Puritan as a 
colonist and reformer. Boston: Little, Brown, 1899. 
xxvi, 375p. MStuO. -t- 

345 . The Puritan in England and New England. 4th 

ed. with a chapter on witchcraft in New England. 

Boston: Little, Brown, 1900. xliii, 457p. CtHi. -t- 

Other eds. 

346 CAMMISA, ALFRED. "A comparison of 
settlement pattens and general land use between the 
native Americans and the English settlers in southern 
New England in the seventeenth century." 

Massachusetts Archaeological Society, Bulletin, 45 
(Oct. 1984), 66-77. 

347 CAMPBELL, COLIN. "Deportations from 

Scotland in 1685." NEHGR, 114 (Apr. 1960), 150-151. 
To New England. 

348 CANUP, JOHN LESLIE. "American nature, 

English culture: enviroiunental thought and the 
emergence of a provincial mentality in colonial New 
England, 1620-1730." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of 
North Carolina, 1986. xix, 655p. 

"The rhetoric that early New England writers devised 
to deal with perceived environmental obstacles to 
cultural transplantation." Abstracted in DAI, 48, No. 

2A (1987), 465. 

349 CARLTON, WILLIAM R. "Overland to 
Connecticut in 1645: a travel diary of John Winthrop, 
Jr." NEQ, 13 (Sept. 1940), 494-510. 

350 CARSON, GERALD. "Dukes don't emigrate." 

NEG, 7 (Winter 1966), 3-11. 

Concerning the first Puritan settlers. 



17 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



351 COLONIZATION AND EXPANSION 



351 CHAMPION. JUDAH. A brief view of the 
distresses, hardships and dangers our ancestors 
encounter'd, in settling New-England— the privileges 
we enjoy, and our obligations thence arising with 
moral reflections thereupon. In two sermons, 
delivered at Litchfield, on the general fast, April 

18, 1770. Hartford, Conn.: Printed by Green & 

Watson, 1770. 44p. Ct. + 

352 CHESTER. JOSEPH LEMUEL. Influence of the 
county of Essex on the settlement and family history 
of New England. London: J. Henry & J. Parker, 1863. 
5p. DLC. + 

353 CHURCH, JOHN HUBBARD. The first 

settlement of New England: a sermon, delivered in the 
South Parish in Andover, April 5, 1810; being the 
armual fast in Massachusetts. Sutton [Mass.]: Sewall 
Goodridge, 1810. 24p. NhD. + 

354 CLARK, CHARLES EDWIN. The eastern 
frontier: the settlement of northern New England, 
1610-1763. (1970) Hanover, N.H.: Univ. Pr. of New 
England, 1983. xxviii, 436p. M. -t- 

See also next entry. 

355 . "The eastern parts: northern New England, 

1690-1760." Ph.D. dissertation. Brown Univ., 1966. 
viii, 418p. CtY. 

Abstracted in DAI, 27, No. 11 A (1967), 3806. See 
also preceding entry. 

356 . "The second New England: life beyond the 

Merrimack, 1690-1760." Historical New Hampshire, 20 
(Winter 1965), 3-22. 

"The men who settled the region northeast of the 
Merrimack differed from the Pilgrims and Puritans in 
place of origin, motives for settlement, religion, 
politics, temperament, and way of life." 

357 COCKRAN, DAVID HUDSON in. "The New 
England colonists' English image, 1550-1714." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Univ. of California, Berkeley, 1970. 

214p. MWalB. 

Abstracted in DAI, 30, No. 7A (1970), 3463. 

358 CODDINGTON, JOHN. "Migrations and 
settlements in colonial New England." Mayflower 
Quarterly, 46 (Feb. 1980), 12-13. 

359 CRANDALL, RALPH JAMES. "New England's 
second great migration: the first three generations 

of setUement, 1630-1700." NEHGR, 129 (Oct. 1975), 
347-360. 



360 CRANE, ELLERY BICKNELL. "Beginnings of 

New England." Worcester [Mass.] Society of Antiquity, 
Collections, 19 (1903), 263-285. 

361 CRESS Y, DAVID. Coming over: migration 

and communication between England and New England in 
the seventeenth century. N.Y.: Cambridge Univ. Pr., 
1987. xiv, 324p. Ct. + 

362 . "Puritans at sea: the seventeenth-century 

voyage to New England." Mystic Seaport, Log, 36 (Fall 
1984), 87-94. 

363 . "The vast and furious ocean: the passage to 

Puritan New England." NEQ, 52 (Dec. 1984), 511-532. 

364 CRONON, WILLIAM. Changes in the land: 

Indians, colonists, and the ecology of New England. 
N.Y.: HiU and Wang, 1983. x, 241p. MWA. -i- 

365 CROSS, GEORGE I. "The New England 
migration." Worcester [Mass.] Historical Society, 
Publications, 28 (Jan. 1938), 85-89. 

17th century. 

366 CROUSE, NELLIS M. "Causes of the Great 
Migration, 1630-1640." NEQ, 5 (Jan. 1932), 3-36. 

367 DAVIS, JOHN. "Character of the fathers 

of New England." Collections Historical and 
Miscellaneous and Monthly Literary Journal, 2 (1823), 
74-76. 

368 DE COSTA, BENJAMIN FRANKLIN. WiUiam 
Blackstone in his relation to Massachusetts and Rhode 
Island. N.Y.: M. H. Mallory, 1880. 24p. MWA. -t- 

One of the earliest European residents of both. 

369 DEANE, CHARLES. "Communication 
respecting the 'Council for New England.'" MHSP, 9 
(Mar. 1867), 469-470. 

Seal of the council, incorporated 1620. See also 
entry 331. 

370 DELBANCO, ANDREW. "Looking homeward, 
going home: the lure of England for the founders of 
New England." NEQ, 59 (Sept. 1986), 358-367. 

37 1 DEXTER, FRANKLIN BOWDITCH. The influence 

of the English universities in the development of New 
England. Cambridge [Mass.]: University Pr., 1880. 

17p. MWA. + 



18 



General and Chronological 



372 DEXTER, SAMUEL. Our fathers God, the 

hope of posterity: some serious thoughts on the 
foundation, rise and growth of the settlements in New 
England with a view to the edification of the present, 
and the instruction and admission of future 
generations. A discourse delivered at Dedham, on the 
day of publick thanksgiving, Nov. 23, 1738. Upon the 
conclusion of the first century, since a church of 
Christ was gathered in that place. Boston: Reprinted 
by Thomas Fleet, Jun., 1796. 5 Ip. MBU. + 

373 DRAKE, SAMUEL ADAMS. The making of New 
England, 1580-1643. N.Y.: Charles Scribner's Sons, 
1886. X, 251p. MWA. + 

374 DUNN, RICHARD SLATOR. "John Winthrop, 

John Winthrop, Jr., and the pattern of colonial 
dependency in New England, 1630-1676." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Princeton Univ., 1955. ix, 480p. M. 

Abstracted in DAI, 16, No. 3 (1956), 522. See also 
next entry. 

375 . Puritans and Yankees: the Winthrop dynasty of 

New England, 1630-1717. (1962) N.Y.: W. W. Norton, 
1971. vii, 376p. Ct. + 

See also preceding entry. 

376 EAST, ROBERT A. "Puritanism and new 
settlement." NEQ, 17 (June 1944), 255-264. 

17th-century expansion of the New England frontier. 

377 FOSTER, JOHN E. Primitive New England: 
an address delivered before the Milford, N.H., 

Historical Society in 1898. Ithaca, N.Y.: West Hill 
Pr., 1902. 34p. MWA. 

378 FOXCROFT, THOMAS. Observations 
historical and practical on the rise and primitive 
state of New-England. With a special reference to the 
old or first gather’d church in Boston. A sermon 
preach'd to the said congregation, Aug. 23. 1730. 

Being the last Sabbath of the first century since its 
settlement. Boston: S. Kneeland and T. Green, 1730. 
46p. Ct. -I- 

379 FRENCH, ALLEN. Charles I and the Puritan 
upheaval: a study of the causes of the Great 
Migration. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1955. 436p. 

Ct. 

380 GORGES, FERDINANDO. A briefe narration 

of the originall undertakings of the advancement of 
plantations into the parts of America. Especially, 
shewing the beginning, progress and continuation of 
that of New England. London: E. Brudenell, 1658. 

67p. MWA. + 

Also published in MHSC, 3 ser. 6 (1837), 45-93. 



COLONIZATION AND EXPANSION 391 



381 HALEY, JOHN WILLIAMS. "William 
Blackstone, the 'first settler' of Boston and Rhode 
Island." OTNE, 49 (Summer 1958), 8-10. 

382 HALLER, WILLIAM. The Puritan frontier: 
town-planting in New England colonial development, 
1630-1660. N.Y.: Columbia Univ. Pr., 1951. 119p. 
MWA.+ 

Published Ph.D. dissertation (Columbia Univ., 1951). 
Reprinted 1968. 

383 HALLETT, LEAMAN F. "Indian trails and 
their importance to the early colonists." 

Massachusetts Archaeological Society, Bulletin, 17 
(Apr. 1956), 41-46. 

384 HAVEN, SAMUEL FOSTER. History of grants 
under the great Council for New England: a lecture of 
a course by members of the Massachusetts Historical 
Society, delivered before the Lowell Institute, Jan. 

15, 1869. Boston: Pr. of John Wilson and Son, 1869. 
36p. MWA. -i- 

385 HEIMERT, ALAN. "Puritanism, the 

wilderness, and the frontier." NEQ, 26 (Sept. 1953), 
361-382. 

386 HIGGINSON, FRANCIS. New-Englands 
plantation, with the sea journal and other writings, 
by Rev. Francis Higginson.... (1630) Salem, Mass.: 
Essex Book and Print Club, 1908. 132p. MWA. -i- 

Other eds. 

387 HOAR, GEORGE FRISBIE. The obligations of 

New England to the county of Kent. Worcester, Mass.: 
C. Hamilton, 1885. 30p. VtHi. -i- 
England. 

388 HOMANS, GEORGE C. "The Puritans and the 
clothing industry in England." NEQ, 13 (Sept. 1940), 
519-529. 

389 HORTON, JOHN T. 'Two bishops and the 

holy brood: a fresh look at a familiar fact." NEQ, 

40 (Sept. 1967), 339-363. 

English dioceses of Norwich and Lincoln and their 
relationship to the Great Migration. 

390 HUBBARD, WILLIAM. A general history of 

New England, from the discovery to MDCLXXX. (1815) 
2d ed. Boston: Charles C. Little and James Brown, 
1848. vi, 768p. Ct. -i- 

Written ca. 1680. Other eds. See also entry 542. 

391 HUMPHREY, FRANCES A. How New England was 
made. Boston: D. Lothrop, 1890. 267p. VtHi. -t- 



19 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



392 COLONIZATION AND EXPANSION 



392 


[HUNT, ELMER M.] "King James and the 

Council of New England." Historical New Hampshire, 4 

(Apr. 1948), 1-6. 


402 


LOCKRIDGE, KENNETH A. "Land, population, 
and the evolution of New England society." Past and 
Present, No. 39 (Apr. 1968), 62-80. 


393 


JAMES, BARTLETT BURLEIGH. The 

colonization of New England. Philadelphia: G. Barrie 

& Sons, 1904. xxii, 425p. CtY. -i- 


403 


MARTIN, JOHN FREDERICK. 

"Entrepreneurship and the founding of New England 
towns: the seventeenth century." Ph.D. dissertation. 
Harvard Univ., 1985. 968p. 


394 


JEWELL, ERASTUS P. "The beginnings of 

New England." Granite Monthly, 50 (Jan.-Mar. 1918), 




Abstracted in DAI, 46, No. 7A (1985), 2053. 




47-58. 

Living conditions (17th century). 


404 


MATHER, COTTON. Magnalia Christi 
Americana. Books I and II. Kenneth B. Murdock, ed. 
Cambridge, Mass.: Belknap Pr. of Harvard Univ. Pr., 


395 


JOHNSON, EDWARD. Wonder-working 
providence of Sions saviour in New England. (1654) 
Andover [Mass.]: Warren F. Draper, 1867. xliv, 265p. 
MWA.-1- 




1977. viii, 500p. MBU. -t- 
Mather's ecclesiastical history of New England, 
first published in 1702. 




Includes historical introduction by William 
Frederick Poole. Other eds. See also entry 3438. 


405 


[MATHER, INCREASE.] A brief relation of 

the state of New England, from the beginning of that 

plantation to this present year, 1689. In a letter to 


396 


JOSSELYN, JOHN. [An account of two 

voyages to New-England, made during the years 1638, 

1663.] John Joselyn, colonial traveler: a critical 




a person of quality. (1689) Washington, D.C., 1846. 
17p. Ct. -t- 


397 


edition of Two voyages to New-England. Paul J. 
Lindholdt, ed. Hanover, N.H.: Univ. Pr. of New 
England, 1988. xxxviii, 221p. MBU. + 

See also entry 401. 

KEAY, FRED E. "The animals which our 


406 


. Essav for the recording of illustrious 
providences; wherein an account is given of many 
remarkable & very memorable events, which have 
happened in this last age; especially in New-England. 
Boston, 1684. 372p. Ct. + 




fathers found in New England." NEM, n.s. 24 (July 
1901), 535-545. 


407 


. Remarkable providences, illustrative of the 
earlier days of American colonisation. (1684) 
London: J. R. Smith, 1856. xix, 262p. MSaE. + 


398 


KING, HAROLD RCXjER. "The settlement of 
the upper Connecticut River Valley to 1675." Ph.D. 




New England. 


399 


dissertation, Vanderbilt Univ., 1965. iv, 306p. 
Abstracted in DAI, 26, No. 4 (1965), 2164. 

LEACH, DOUGLAS EDWARD. The northern 


408 


MATTHEWS, ALBERT. "University alumni 
founders of New England." Colonial Society of 
Massachusetts, Publications, 25 (1922-1924), 14-23. 




colonial frontier, 1607-1763. N.Y.: Holt, Rinehart 
and Winston, 1966. xvii, 266p. MBU. -i- 


409 


MAVERICK, SAMUEL. A briefe discription 
of New England and the severall townes therein, 
together with the present government thereof. John 


400 


LECHFORD, THOMAS. Plain dealing; or News 
from New England.... A short review of New-Englands 
present government, both ecclesiastical and civil, 
compared with the anciently-received and established 




Ward Dean, ed. [Boston: Pr. of D. Clapp & Son], 
1885. 28p. MWA. -1- 
Written ca. 1660. 




government of England.... J. Hammond Trumbull, ed. 
Boston: J. K. Wiggin, 1867. xl, 21 Ip. Ct. -t- 
First published in 1642. 


410 


MORGAN, EDMUND SEARS. "Provisions for 
the Great Migration." NEQ, 12 (Mar. 1939), 98-99. 

About an English broadside (1630), which set forth 
an "official estimate of the expense which settling in 


401 


LINDHOLDT, PAUL JEFFREY. "A critical 
edition of John Josselyn's 1674 'Account of two 




New England entailed for the individual colonist." 




voyages to New-England."’ Ph.D. dissertation, 
Pennsylvania State Univ., 1985. 4(X)p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 46, No. 9A (1985), 2693. See 
also entry 396. 


411 


MORTON, RICHARD K. "The settlement and 

growth of New England." Education, 51 (Oct. 1930), 7 

79. 



20 



General and Chronological 



COLONIZATION AND EXPANSION 430 



412 NEAL, DANIEL. The history of New- 

England: containing an impartial account of the civil 
and ecclesiastical affairs of the country, to the year 
of our Lord, 1700. To which is added, the present 
state of New-England. With a new and accurate map of 
the country. And an appendix containing their present 
charter, their ecclesiastical discipline, and their 
municipal laws.... London: Printed for J. Clark, 

1720. 2v. MWA. + 

413 NEUWIRTH, STEVEN DOUGLAS. "The images of 
place: Puritans, Indians, and the religious 
significance of the New England frontier." American 
Art Journal, 18, No. 2 (1986), 43-53. 

414 NEW Englands first fruits; in respect, 

fiist of the conversion of some, conviction of divers, 
preparation of sundry of the Indians. 2. Of the 
progress of learning, in the college at Cambridge in 
Massachusetts Bay. With divers other speciall matters 
concerning that countrey.... (1643) N.Y.: Reprinted 
for Joseph Sabin, 1865. 47p. MWA. + 

415 NEWTON, ARTHUR PERCIVAL. Colonising 
activities of the English Puritans. New Haven, Conn., 
1914. 244p. CtHi. 

416 PETTENGILL, SAMUEL BARRETT. The Yankee 
pioneers: a saga of courage. Rutland, Vt.: Charles 
E. Tuttle, 1971. 175p. VtHi. -t- 

417 PORTER, NOAH (1781-1866). A discourse on 
the settlement of New-England. Delivered in 
Farmington [Corm.], on Friday evening, December 22, 

1820. Hartford, Conn.: Printed by P. B. Gleason, 

1821. 20p. Ct. -I- 

418 POTEET, JAMES MARK. "A homecoming: the 
Bulkeley family in New England." NEQ, 47 (Mar. 1974), 
30-50. 

"For three generations they sought to understand 
what it meant to be a colonist in a strange land; out 
of this painful process there slowly emerged a self- 
image of New England." 

419 PRATT, PHINEAS. A declaration of the 

affairs of the English people that first inhabited New 
England. Richard Frothingham, Jr., ed. Boston: T. 

R. Marvin and Son, 1858. 20p. MSaE. + 

420 PRESTON, RICHARD ARTHUR. "Fishing and 
plantation: New England in the Parliament of 1621." 
American Historical Review, 45 (Oct. 1939), 29-43. 



421 PRINCE, THOMAS. A chronological history 
of New England, in the form of annals: being a 
summary and exact account of the most material 
transactions and occurrences relating to this country, 
in the order of time wherein they happened, from the 
discovery of Capt. Gosnold, in 1602, to the arrival of 
Governor Belcher, in 1730. With an introduction 
containing a brief epitome of the most considerable 
transactions and events abroad. From the creation.... 
(1736) [Boston]: Cummings, Hilliard, 1826. xxi, 

439p. MWA. -t- 

Other eds. 

422 RIPLEY, CHARLES. An oration, on the 
colonization of New England, delivered December 21, 
1838, before the Pilgrim Society of Louisville. 
Louisville, Ky.: Prentice & Weissinger, 1839. 44p. 
MWA.-t- 

423 ROBBINS, THOMAS. An historical view of 

the first planters of New-England. Hartford, Conn.: 

Peter S. Gleason, 1815. x, 300p. MSaE. -t- 

424 ROBERTSON, WILUAM. History of America, 
books IX and X: containing the history of Virginia to 
the year 1688; and of New England to the year 1652.... 
Walpole, N.H.: Printed for Thomas and Thomas by David 
Carlisle, 1800. 192p. NhHi. -i- 

425 SACHS E, WILLIAM L. "The migration of New 
Englanders to England, 1640-1660." American 
Historical Review, 53 (Jan. 1948), 251-278. 

426 SANBORN, FRANKUN BENJAMIN. "Maj. Brian 
Pendleton in New Hampshire and Maine." Granite 
Monthly, 34 (1903), 119-135. 

427 SARGENT, JEAN A. Valentine Hill: 

sparkplug of early New England. Laurel, Md.: The 
Author, 1981. vi, 146p. MU. -+- 
Of Boston and Exeter, N.H. (17th century). 

428 SCOFIELD, EDNA. "The origin of 
settlement patterns in rural New England." 

Geographical Review, 28 (Oct. 1938), 652-663. 

429 SHIPTON, CUFFORD KENYON. "Immigration 

to New England, 1680-1740." Journal of Political 
Economy, 44 (Apr. 1936), 225-239. 

430 . 'The New England frontier." NEQ, 10 (Mar. 

1937), 25-36. 

Colonial era. 



21 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



431 COLONIZATION AND EXPANSION 



431 


SHUMWAY, FLOYD MALLORY. 'The 
constitutionality of the settlement of New England." 
New Haven Colony Historical Society, Journal, 30 (Fall 
1983), 3-13. 


439 


TERRY, RODERICK. "The early relations 
between the colonies of New Plymouth and Rhode 
Island." Newport Historical Society Bulletin, 34 
(Oct. 1920), 1-28. 


432 


SMITH, JOHN (1580-1631). Advertisements 
for the unexperienced planters of New England, or any 
where. Or, the path way to experience to erect a 
plantation. With the yearely proceedings of this 


440 


TOTTEN, NORMAN. "The first European 
colonists in New England." Epigraphic Society, 
Occasional Publications, 3 (Aug. 1975), 1-5. 




country in fishing and planting, since the yeare 1614 
to the years 1630, and their present state.... (1631) 
Boston: William Veazie, 1865. viii, 72p. MWA. -i- 


441 


A TRUE relation concerning the estate of 
New England, as it was presented to His Matie. (From 
three copies of a manuscript written about 1634, found 
in the British Museum, and transcribed by Henry F. 


433 


. New Enelands trials. Declarine the successe 
of 80 ships employed thither these eight yeares; and 
the benefit of that countrey by sea and land. With 




Waters. With notes by Charles E. Banks, M.D.) 
[Boston: Pr. of D. Clapp & Son], 1886. 16p. MWA. -i- 




the present estate of that happie plantation, begun 
but by 60 weake mean in the year 1620. And how to 
build a fleete of good shippes to make a little nauie 
royall. (1622) Cambridge [Mass.]: H. O. Houghton, 
n.d. [26]p. MWA. + 


442 

443 


TYACK, NORMAN C. P. "The humbler 
Puritans of East Anglia and the New England movement: 
evidence from the court records of the 1630s." NEHGR, 
138 (Apr. 1984), 79-106. 

. "Migration from East Anglia to New England 


434 


SPRING, GARDINER. A tribute to New- 
England: a sermon, delivered before the New-England 
Society of the City and State of New-York, on the 22d 
of December 1820. Being the second centennial 
celebration of the landing of the Pilgrims at 




before 1666." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of London 
[U.K.], 1951. ix, ii, 581, cxix, xx, xi p. MNS. 

Described in American Puritan Studies, Michael S. 
Montgomery, comp. (1984), 84. 




Plymouth. N.Y.: L. & F. Lockwood, 1821. 44p. 
MWA.-i- 


444 


UNDERHILL, JOHN. Nevves from America, 

or, a new and experimental! discoverie of New England; 

containing a trve relation of their war-like 


435 


STOWELL, W. H., and D. WILSON. History 
of the Puritan and Pilgrim fathers. N.Y.: 
Worthington, 1888. 508p. CtHi. + 




proceedings these two yeares last past, with a figure 
of the Indian fort, or palizado. Also a discovery of 
these places, that as yet have very few or no 
inhabitants which would yeeld speciall accommodation 


436 


STRAUB, CARL BENTON. "Providential 
ecology: Puritan envisagement of their wilderness 
environment." Ph.D. dissertation. Harvard Univ., 




to such as will plant there.... (1638) n.p.: 

Underhill Society of America, 1902. 44p. MWA. -f- 




1971. V, 353p. 

Described in American Puritan Studies, Michael S. 
Montgomery, comp. (1984), 219. 


445 


WHITE, JOHN (1575-1648). The planting of 
colonies in New England. (1630) Boston, 1905. 20p. 
Ct. -1- 


437 


STRONG, FRANK. "A forgotten danger to 
the New England colonies." American Historical 
Association, Annual Report (1898), 74-94. 

"Removals and attempted removals of New England 
people to other countries between 1635 and 1660." See 


446 


WIDGER, THURLOW STANLEY. The birth of 
New England: the true story of its discovery and 
settlement. [Framingham Centre, Mass.]: Thurlow S. 
Widger, 1959. 82p. MSaE. -i- 


438 


also this author's article of same title in NEM, n.s. 
20 (Apr. 1899), 184-189. 

[TALVI, THERESE A. L. von J. ROBINSON.] 


447 


WILLIAMS, SELMA R. Kings, commoners & 
colonists: Puritan politics in old & New England, 
1603-1660. N.Y.: Atheneum, 1974. 266p. MB. + 




Talvi's history of the colonization of America. 

William Hazlitt, ed. London: T. C. Newby, 1851. 2v. 
MWA.-t- 

New England colonies. 


448 


WINSLOW, EDWARD. "A brief narration of 

the true grounds or cause of the first planting of New 

England." OTNE, 11 (Jan. 1921), 99-105. 

Includes introduction by Howard M. Chapin. See also 
next entry. 



22 



Genera] and Chronological 



COLONIAL RELATIONS 466 



449 WINSLOW, EDWARD. "Good news from New 
England, with an exact relation of the first planting 
of that countrey, a description of the profits 
accruing by the worke, together with a briefe but true 
discovery of their order both in church and common- 
wealth, and maintenance allowed the painfull labourers 
in that vineyard of the Lord, with the names of the 
severall towns and who be preachers to them." MHSC, 4 
ser. 1 (1852), 195-218. 

First published in 1625. 

450 WINTHROP papers. Boston: Massachusetts 
Historical Society, 1929-1947. 5v. MWA. + 

451 WINTHROP, JOHN, SR. (1588-1649). The 
history of New England from 1630 to 1649. (1649) 

N.Y.: Amo Pr., 1972. xi, 424, 429p. MH. -(- 

James Savage, ed. 

452 . Winthrop's Conclusions for the plantation in 

New England. Boston, 1894. 12p. MSaE. -t- 

453 WOOD, JOSEPH SUTHERLAND. "The origin of 
the New England village." Ph.D. dissertation, 

Pennsylvania State Univ., 1978. xii, 341p. 461 

Abstracted in DAI, 39, No. 8 A (1979), 5008. 

454 . "Village and community in early colonial New 

England." Journal of Historical Geography, 8 (Oct. 

1982), 333-346. 

See also preceding entry and entry 839. 462 

455 WOOD, WILLIAM. New England's prospect. 

Alden T. Vaughan, ed. (1634) Amherst, Mass.; Univ. 
of Massachusetts Pr., 1977. x, 132p. MWA. -i- 463 

456 YENTSCH, ANNE ELIZABETH. "Expressions of 
cultural diversity and social reality in seventeenth- 
century New England." Ph.D. dissertation. Brown 
Univ., 1980. 239p. MWalB. 

Study of several communities in Massachusetts and 
Maine to "determine if the customs and values the 464 

English people brought with them were an important 
element in their adaptation to New England." 

Abstracted in DAI, 41, No. 12A (1981), 5152. 

465 

457 ZABIEREK, HENRY CARL. "Puritans and 
Americans: an inquiry into the nature of English 
settlement in New England." D.A. dissertation, 

Camegie-Mellon Univ., 1971. 436p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 32, No. 8A (1972), 4547. 466 



COLONIAL RELATIONS WITH NATIVE AMERICANS 
AND OTHER EUROPEANS 



458 BAXTER, JAMES PHINNEY. The pioneers of 

New France in New England, with contemporary letters 
and documents. Albany, N.Y.; Joel Munsell's Sons, 
1894. 450p. MWA. -t- 
Reprinted 1980. 

459 BUFFINTON, ARTHUR HOWLAND. "The policy 

of the northern English colonies towards the French to 
the Peace of Utrecht." Ph.D. dissertation. Harvard 
Univ., 1925. 466p. 

Described in American Puritan Studies, Michael S. 
Montgomery, comp. (1984), 29. 

460 BURTON, WILUAM JOHN. "Hellish fiends 
and brutish men: Amerindian-Euroamerican interaction 
in southern New England; an interdisciplinary 
analysis, 1600-1750." Ph.D. dissertation, Kent State 
Univ., 1976. iv, 385p. Ct. 

Abstracted in DAI, 37, No. IIA (1977), 7246. 

COHEN, RONALD DENNIS. "Colonial 
leviathan; New England foreign affairs in the 
seventeenth century." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of 
Minnesota, 1967. vii, 496p. Ct. 

Abstracted in DAI, 28, No. 12A (1968), 4984. 

. "New England and New France, 1632-1651: 

external relations and internal disagreements among 
the Puritans." EIHC, 108 (July 1972), 252-271. 

CROSBY, ALFRED W. "God. ..would destroy 
them, and give their country to another people." 
American Heritage, 29 (Dec. 1978), 38-43. 

Belief that the mysterious diseases that nearly 
wiped out the Indian population of New England were 
the work of the Christian God. 

DAY, GOREX3N M. "English-Indian contacts 
in New England." Ethnohistory, 9 (Winter 1962), 24- 
40. 

DEXTER, FRANKLIN BOWDITCH. "Early 
relations between New Netherland and New England." 
New Haven Colony Historical Society, Papers, 3 (1882), 
443-469. 

DREUILLETTE, GABRIEL. "Journal of an 
embassy from Canada to the United Colonies of New 
England, in 1650." New- York Historical Society, 
Collections, 2 ser. 3 (1857), 303-328. 

John Gilmary Shea, ed. See also entry 471. 



23 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



467 COLONIAL RELATIONS 



467 EISINGER, CHESTER E. "The Puritans’ 
justification for taking the land." EIHC, 84 (Apr. 

1948), 131-143. 

468 FISKE, JOHN. New France and New England. 

Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1902. xxii, 377p. MBU. + 
Other eds. 

469 FORBES, ALLAN. Some Indian events of New 
England; a collection of interesting incidents in the 
lives of the early settlers of this country and the 
Indians, with reproduction of rare prints. Boston: 
Printed for the State Street Trust, 1934-1941. 2v. 
MWA.-t- 

2d volume entitled. Other Indian events of New 
England.... 

470 HALLE 11 , LEAMAN F. "The colonial 
invasion of hereditary lands.” Massachusetts 
Archaeological Society, Bulletin, 20 (1958-1959), 34- 
37. 

Land titles. 

471 HONDEN, BENEDICT M., JR. "Gabriel 
Dreuillette, S.J.-diplomat." American Catholic 
Historical Society of Philadelphia, Records, 68 (Mar.- 
June 1957), 51-58. 

See also entry 466. 

472 "INDIAN-European contact in southern New 
England: a selected bibliography." Archaeological 
Society of Coimecticut, Bulletin, No. 45 (1982), 65- 
74. 

Mary G. Soulsby, comp. 

473 ISHAM, EDWARD SWIFT. Frontenac and MUes 
Standish in the Northwest: a paf>er read before the 
New-York Historical Society. ..Dec. 4, 1888. N.Y.: 
Printed for the Society, 1889. 39p. Ct. -t- 

New France and New England contrasted. 

474 JENNINGS, FRANCIS. The invasion of 
America: Indians, colonialism, and the cant of 
conquest. Chapel Hill, N.C.: Univ. of North Carolina 
Pr., 1975. xvii, 369p. MWA. -t- 

Primarily a New England study. 

475 JOHNSON, RICHARD RIGBY. "The search for 

a usable Indian: an aspect of the defense of colonial 
New England." Journal of American History, 64 (Dec. 
1977), 623-651. 

"Colonists were able to exploit divisions among the 
Indians. ..[in] an intricate mosaic of diplomacy, 
accommodation, and manipulation." 



476 KAWASHIMA, YASUHIDE. "Forced conformity: 

Puritan criminal justice and Indians." Kansas Law 
Review, 25 (1977), 361-373. 

477 KOEHLER, LYLE. "Red-white px)wer 
relations and justice in the courts of seventeenth- 
century New England." American Indian Culture and 
Research Journal, 3, No. 4 (1979), 1-31. 

478 KUPPERMAN, KAREN ORDAHL. Settling with 
the Indians: the meeting of English and Indian 
cultures in America, 1580-1640. Totowa, N.J.: Rowman 
and Littlefield, 1980. x, 224p. MWA. + 

New England and Virginia. 

479 LEWIS, GUY LORAN. "Daniel Gookin, 
superintendent of and historian of the New England 
Indians: a historiographical study." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Univ. of Illinois, 1973. ix, 240p. 

MWA. 

17th century. Abstracted in DAI, 34, No. 9A (1974), 
5876. See also entry 992. 

480 LLOYD, PETER. "The emergence of a racial 
prejudice towards the Indians in seventeenth-century 
New England: some notes on an explanation.” Ph.D. 
dissertation, Ohio State Univ., 1975. 229p. M. 

Abstracted in DAI, 36, No. 6A (1975), 3930. 

48 1 LaFANTASIE, GLENN W., and PAUL R. 

CAMPBELL. "Covenants of grace, covenants of wrath: 
Niantic-Puritan relations in New England.” Rhode 
Island History, 37 (Feb. 1978), 15-23. 

482 McCORISON, MARCUS ALLEN. "Colonial 
defense of the upjjer Connecticut Valley." Vermont 
History, 30 (Jan. 1962), 50-62. 

483 McCULLY, BRUCE T. "The New England- 

Acadia fishing dispute and the Nicholson mission of 
August, 1687." EIHC, 96 (Oct. 1960), 277-290. 

484 McFARLANE, RONALD OLIVER. "Indian 
relations in New England, 1620-1760: a study of a 
regulated frontier." Ph.D. dissertation. Harvard 
Univ., 1933. xv, 694p. 

Described in American Puritan Studies, Michael S. 
Montgomery, comp. (1984), 40. 

485 MALONE, PATRICK MITCHELL. "Indian and 
English military systems in New England in the 
seventeenth century." Ph.D. dissertation. Brown 
Univ., 1971. vi, 337p. MWalB. 

Abstracted in DAI, 32, No. 9A (1972), 5155. 



24 



486 

487 

488 

489 

490 

491 

492 

493 

494 

495 

496 



General and Chronological 



COLONIAL RELATIONS 508 



MARCUS. RICHARD HENRY. "The Connecticut 
Valley: a problem in intercolonial defense." 

Military Affairs, 33 (Apr. 1969), 230-241. 

MORRISON. KENNETH M. The embatUed 
Northeast: the elusive ideal of alliance in Abnaki- 
Euramerican relations. Berkeley, Calif.: Univ. of 
California Pr., 1984. x, 256. MB. -i- 
See also next entry. 

. "The People of the Dawn: the Abnaki and their 

relations with New England and New France, 1600-1726." 
Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of Maine, 1975. 493p. 

MeHi. 

Abstracted in DAI, 36, No. lOA (1976), 6854. See 
also preceding entry. 

MOYNIHAN, RUTH BARNES. "The patent and 
the Indians: the problem of jurisdiction in 
seventeenth-century New England." American Indian 
Culture and Research Journal, 2, No. 1 (1977), 8-18. 

PEARCE. ROY HARVEY. 'The ’mines of 
mankind': the Indian and the Puritan mind." Journal 
of the History of Ideas, 13 (Apr. 1952), 200-217. 

PURITANS, Indians, and manifest destiny. 

Charles M. Segal and David C. Stineback, eds. N.Y.: 
Putnam, 1977. 249p. Ct. -i- 

SAINSBURY, JOHN A. "Miantonomo's death 

and New England politics, 1630-1645." Rhode Island 

History. 30 (Nov. 1971). 111-123. 

SALISBURY. NEAL EMERSON. "Conquest of 
the 'savage': Puritans, Puritan missionaries, and 
Indians, 1620-1680." Ph.D. dissertation, UCLA, 1972. 
ix, 298p. MWalB. 

Abstracted in DAI, 32, No. 12A (1972), 6905. See 
also next entry. 

. Manitou and providence: Indians, Europ>eans, 

and the making of New England, 1500-1643. N.Y.: 
Oxford Univ. Pr., 1982. xii, 316p. M. -t- 
See also preceding entry. 

. "Social relationships on a moving frontier: 

natives and settlers in southern New England, 1638- 
1675." Man in the Northeast, No. 33 (Spring 1987), 89- 
99. 

SEARS, LOUIS MARTIN. "The Puritan and 

his Indian ward." American Journal of Sociology, 22 

(July 1916), 80-93. 



497 THE SECOND part of the tragedy of 
Amboyna: or, A tme relation of a most bloody, 
treacherous and cmel design of the Dutch in New 
Netherland in America, for the total mining and 
murthering of the English colonies in New England. 
(1653) N.Y., 1915. 7p. CtY. + 

498 SIMMONS. WILLIAM SCRANTON. "Cultural 
bias in the New England Puritans' perception of 
Indians." WMQ, 3 ser. 38 (Jan. 1981), 56-72. 

499 . "The earliest prints and paintings of New 

England Indians." Rhode Island History, 41 (Aug. 

1982), 73-85. 

500 SPRINGER. JAMES WARREN. "American 
Indians and the law of real property in colonial New 
England." American Journal of Legal History, 30 (Jan. 
1986), 25-58. 

501 STINEBACK, DAVID C. "The status of 
Puritan-Indian scholarship." NEQ, 51 (Mar. 1978), 80- 
90. 

502 THOMAS, G. E. "Puritans, Indians, and 

the concept of race." NEQ, 48 (Mar. 1975), 3-27. 

503 VAUGHAN, ALDEN TRUE. New England 
frontier: Puritans and Indians, 1620-1675. (1965) 

Rev. ed. N.Y.: Norton, 1979. Iviii, 430p. MWA. + 

See also next entry. 

504 . "New England Puritans and the American Indian, 

1620-1675." Ph.D. dissertation, Columbia Univ., 1964. 
ix, 476p. RHi. 

Abstracted in DAI, 28, No. 2A (1968), 608. See also 
preceding entry. 

505 , and DANIEL K. RICHTER. "Crossing the cultural 

divide: Indians and New Englanders, 1605-1763." 

A ASP, 90 (Apr. 1980), 23-99. 

506 WASSERMAN, MAURICE MARC. "The American 
Indian as seen by the seventeenth-century 
chroniclers." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of 
Pennsylvania, 1954. 483p. MeLB. 

Primarily New England. Abstracted in DAI, 14, No. 5 
(1954), 823. 

507 WEAVER, EMILY P. "What Acadia owed to 

New England." NEM, n.s. 30 (June 1904), 423-434. 

508 WHIPPLE, CHANDLER. The Indian and the white 
man in Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Stockbridge, 
Mass.: Berkshire Traveller Pr., [1974?]. 144p. M. -t- 

SEE "French" and "Indians, American" in Index for 
additional listing. 



25 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



509 COLONIAL WARS 



COLONIAL WARS 



509 ABBOTT. JOHN STEVENS CABOT. History of 
King Philip, sovereign chief of the Wampanoags. 
Including the early history of the settlers of New 
England. N.Y.: Harper & Brothers, 1857. viii, 41 Op. 
Ct. + 

510 ADAMS, AMOS. A concise historical view 
of the difficulties, hardships, and perils which 
attended the planting and progressive improvements of 
New-England. With a particular account of its long 
and destructive wars.... Boston, 1770. 68p. MBU. + 

511 ADAMS, ELIZABETH L. "The wars of New 
England." More Books, 15 (Mar. 1940), 87-101. 

See also Samuel Penhallow, The history of the wars 
of New-England (entry 559). 

5 1 2 ANDERSON. FRED WAYNE. "Why did colonial 
New Englanders make bad soldiers? Contractual 
principles and military conduct during the Seven 
Years' War." WMQ, 3 ser. 38 (July 1981), 393-417. 

513 BAKER. CHARLOTTE ALICE. "More New 
England captives." Pocumtuck Valley Memorial 
Association, History and Proceedings, 5 (1905-1911), 
173-198. 

Indian captivities. See also next entry. 

514 . True stories of New England captives carried 

to Canada during the old French and Indians wars. 
[Greenfield, Mass.; Pr. of E. A. Hall], 1897. 407p. 

MB. -H 

515 BARBEAU, MARIUS. "Indian captivities." 

American Philosophical Society, Proceedings, 94 (Dec. 
1950), 522-548. 

516 BODGE, GEORGE MADISON. Soldiers in King 
Philip's War: being a critical account of that war, 
with a concise history of the Indian wars of New 
England from 1620-1677, official lists of the soldiers 
of Massachusetts Colony serving in Philip's War, and 
sketches of the principal officers, copies of ancient 
documents and records relating to the war, also lists 
of the Nanagansett grantees to the United Colonies, 
Massachusetts, Plymouth, and Connecticut, with an 
appendix. Leominster, Mass.: Printed for the Author, 
1896. xiii, 502p. MWA. -t 

Reprinted 1976. 



517 BONFANTI, LEO. The Indian war of 1675- 

1677: Massachusetts, Maine, and New Hampshire. 
Wakefield, Mass.: Pride Publications, 1976. 46p. 

CiB. -t- 

King Philip's War. Cover title. 

518 BUFFINTON, ARTHUR HOWLAND. "The Puritan 
view of war." Colonial Society of Massachusetts, 
Publications, 28 (1930-1933), 67-86. 

519 BURKE, CHARLES T. Puritans at bay: the 

war against King Philip and the squaw sachems in New 
England, 1675-1676. N.Y.: Exposition Pr., 1967. 
261p. MWA. -H 

520 CALLOWAY, COLLIN G. "An uncertain 

destiny: Indian captivities on the upper Connecticut 
River." Journal of American Studies, 17 (Aug. 1983), 
189-210. 

521 CAVERLY, ROBERT BOODEY. Heroism of 
Hannah Dustin, together with the Indian wars of New 
England. Boston: Russell, 1874. 407p. MHi. -i- 

522 . History of the Indian wars of New England, 

with Eliot the apostle fifty years in the midst of 
them. Vols. I and II. (1874) Boston: James H. 

Earle. 1882. 396, 98p. MWA. -t- 

523 CHARD, DONALD F. "The impact of French 
privateering on New England, 1689-1713." American 
Neptune, 35 (July 1975), 153-165. 

524 CHILD, LYDIA MARIA FRANCIS. The first 
settlers of New-England; or, conquest of the Pequods, 
Narragansetts and Pokanokets; as related by a mother 
to her children, and designed for the instructions of 
youth. By a lady of Massachusetts. Boston: Munroe 
and Francis, [1822]. vi, 282p. CtY. -t- 

525 CHURCH. BENJAMIN. Diary of King Philip’s 

War, 1675-1676. Alan Simpson and Mary McEldowncy 
Simpson, eds. Chester, Conn.: Pequot Pr., 1975. 
xxi, 226p. MWA. + 

This item is the 6th ed. of Church’s history of King 
Philip's War, first published in 1716. Includes 
historical introduction. 

526 COLEMAN, EMMA LEWIS. New England 
captives carried to Canada between 1677 and 1760, 
during the French and Indians wars. Portland, Me.: 
Southworth Pr., 1925. 2v. Ct. + 



26 



General and Chronological 



COLONIAL WARS 540 



527 COLEMAN, EMMA LEWIS. "The story of some 
New England girls who were captured by Indians and 
taken to Canada." OTNE, 21 (Apr. 1931), 23-30; 22 
(Jan. 1932), 121-135. 

17th and 18th centuries. 

528 COLMAN, B. "Some memoirs for the 
continuation of the history of the troubles of the New 
England colonies from the barbarous and perfidious 
Indians, instigated by the more savage and inhuman 
French of Canada and Nova Scotia, 1726." MHSC, 6 
(1799), 108-118. 

529 DRAKE, SAMUEL ADAMS. The border wars of 

New England, commonly called King William's and Queen 
Anne's wars. N.Y.: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1897. 
xiii, 305p. MWA. + 

530 DRAKE, SAMUEL GARDNER. A particular 

history of the five years French and Indian war in New 
England and parts adjacent, 1744-1749; called Governor 
Shirley's War. Albany, N.Y.: Joel Munsell, 1870. 

312p. MChB. -I- 

531 EASTON, JOHN. A nanative of the causes 

which led to Philip's Indian War, of 1675 and 1676, by 
John Easton, of Rhode Island. With other documents 
concerning this event in the office of the secretary 
of state of New York. Prepared from the originals, 
with an introduction and notes, by Franklin B. Hough. 
N.Y.: J. Munsell, 1858. xxiii, 207p. MWA. -(- 
Easton's account was written in 1675. 

532 ECKSTROM, FANNIE HARDY. "Who was 
Paugus?" NEQ, 12 (June 1939), 203-226. 

Indian warrior, killed at Fryeburg, Me. (1725). 

533 ELUS, GEORGE WILLIAM, and JOHN E. 

MORRIS. King Philip's War: based on the archives and 
records of Massachusetts, Plymouth, Rhode Island and 
Connecticut, and contemporary letters and accounts. 

With biographical and topographical notes. N.Y.: 
Grafton Pr., 1906. xiii, 326p. MWA. + 

534 FREEMAN, FREDERICK. Civilization and 
barbarism, illustrated by especial reference to 
Metacomet and the extinction of his race. Cambridge, 
Mass.: Printed for the Author, 1878. 186p. Ct. + 

King Philip's War. 

535 GOLDSMITH, B. H. 'Tragedies of the 

Indian Wars in New England." Americana, 31 (July 
1937), 425-460. 



536 [GOOKIN, DANIEL.] "An historical account 

of the doings and sufferings of the Christian Indians 
in New England, in the years 1675, 1676, 1677. 
Impartially drawn by one well acquainted with that 
affair, and presented unto the Right Honourable the 
Corporation residing in London, appointed by the 
king's most excellent majesty for promoting the gospel 
in America." American Antiquarian Society, 
Archaeologia Americana, Transactions and Collections, 
2 (1836), 423-534. 

During King Philip's War. 

537 HANSON, ELIZABETH. God's mercy 
surmounting man's cruelty. Exemplified in the 
captivity and redemption of Elizabeth Hanson, wife of 
John Hanson, of Knoxmarsh at Kecheachy, in Dover 
township, who was taken captive with her children and 
maid-servant, by the Indians in New-England, in the 
year 1724. In which are inserted, sundry remarkable 
preservations, providences and marks of the care and 
kindness of Providence over her and her children, 
worthy to be remembered. The substance of which was 
taken from her own mouth, and now published for 
general service. 3d ed. Philadelphia: Re-printed 

and Sold by E. Russell, 1780. 32p. MWA. -i- 
Other eds. 

538 HARRIS, WILLIAM. A Rhode Islander 

reports on King Philip's War: the second William 
Harris letter of August, 1676. Douglas Edward Leach, 
ed. Providence, R.I.: Rhode Island Historical 
Society, 1963. v, 95p. MWA. + 

539 HASTINGS, SUSANNAH WILLARD JOHNSON. A 
narrative of the captivity of Mrs. Johnson, containing 
an account of her sufferings during four years with 

the Indians and French. Together with an appendix, 
containing the sermons preached at her funeral, and 
that of her mother, with sundry other interesting 
articles. 4th ed. Lowell [Mass.]: D. Bixby, 1834. 

150p. MB. -I- 

Captured at Charlestown, N.H. (1754). 

540 HIRSCH, ADAM J. "The collision of 

military cultures in seventeenth-century New England. " 
Journal of American History, 74 (Mar. 1988), 1187- 
1212. 



27 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



541 COLONIAL WARS 



541 HOYT, EPAPHRAS. Antiquarian researches: 
comprising a history of the Indian wars in the country 
bordering Connecticut River and parts adjacent, and 
other interesting events, from the first landing of 
the Pilgrims, to the conquest of Canada by the 
English, in 1760; with notices of Indian depredations 
in the neighboring country: and of the first planting 
and progress of settlements in New England, New York 
and Canada. Greenfield, Mass.: A. Phelps, 1824. 

xii, 312p. MSaE. + 

542 HUBBARD, WILLIAM. The history of the 

Indian wars in New England from the first settlement 
to the termination of the war with King Philip, in 
1677. From the original work.... (1677) Roxbury, 
Mass.: Printed for W. Eliot Woodward, 1865. 2v. 
MWA.+ 

Other eds. See also entries 390 and 554. 

543 HUTCHINSON, THOMAS. King Philip's War 

and witchcraft in New England. N.Y.: E. Maynard, 
[1890]. 63p. Nh. + 

Extracted from Hutchinson's The history of the 
colony and province of Massachusetts-Bay (entry 913 in 
the Massachusetts volume). 

544 LACHANCE, HENRY. 'The most dangerous war 

in New England's history." Yankee, 40 (Sept. 1976), 
84-91, 145. 

King Philip's War. 

545 LEACH, DOUGLAS EDWARD. 'The causes and 
effects of King Philip's War." Ph.D. dissertation. 
Harvard Univ., 1950. iii, 529p. 

See also next entry. 

546 . Flintlock and tomahawk: New England in King 

Philip's War. N.Y.: Macmillan, 1958. x, 304p. MWA. 
+ 

See also preceding entry. 

547 . "The question of French involvement in King 

Philip's War." Colonial Society of Massachusetts, 
Publications, 38 (Dec. 1951), 414-421. 

548 MARKHAM, RICHARD. A narrative history of 
King Philip's War and the Indian troubles of New 
England. N.Y.: Dodd, Mead, 1883. 336p. MWA. + 



549 MATHER, INCREASE. A brief history of the 

war with the Indians in New-England. From June 24. 
1675. (when the first Englishmen was murdered by the 
Indians) to August. 12. 1676. when Philip, alias 
Metacomet, the principal author and beginner of the 
war, was slain. Wherein the grounds, begiiming, and 
progress of the war is summarily expressed. Together 
with a serious exhortation to the inhabitants of that 
land. London, 1676. 51, 8p. Ct. + 

550 . Early history of New England: being a 

relation of hostile passages between the Indians and 
European voyagers and first settlers; and a full 
narrative of hostilities, to the close of the war with 
the Pequots, in the year 1637; also a detailed account 
of the origin of the war with King Philip. (1677) 
Albany, N.Y.; J. Munsell, 1864. xxxviii, 309p. 

Ct. -H 

551 . A relation of the troubles which have happened 

in New-England, by reasons of the Indians there. From 
the year 1614 to the year 1675. Wherein the frequent 
conspiracyes of the Indians to cutt off the English, 
and the wonderfull providence of God, in disappointing 
their devices, is declared. Together with an 
historical discourse concerning the prevalency of 
prayer; shewing that New Englands late deliverance 
from the rage of the heathen is an eminent answer of 
prayer. Boston: John Foster, 1677. 76p. CtY. + 

552 , and COTTON MATHER. The history of King 

Philip's War, by the Rev. Increase Mather, D.D. Also, 
a history of the same war, by the Rev. Cotton Mather, 
D.D. To which are added an introduction and notes, by 
Samuel G. Drake. Boston: Printed for the Editor, 

1862. xxxiii, 281p. DLC. -t- 

See also entry 549. 

553 NARRATIVES of the Indian wars, 1675-1699. 

Charles Heruy Lincoln, ed. N.Y.: C. Scribner's Sons, 
1913. xii, 316p. Ct. -t- 

New England. 

554 NELSEN, ANNE KUSENER. "King Philip's War 

and the Hubbard-Mather rivalry." WMQ, 3 ser. 27 (Oct. 
1970), 615-629. 

William Hubbard and Increase Mather as historians of 
the conflict. See also entry 542. 



28 



General and Chronological 



COLONIAL WARS 571 



555 NEWS from New-England: being a true and 

last account of the present bloody wars carried on 
betwixt the infidels, natives, and the English 
Christians, and converted Indians of New-England, 
declaring the many dreadful battles fought betwixt 
them; as also the many towns and villages burnt by the 
merciless heathens. And also the true number of all 
Christians slain since the beginning of the war, as it 
was sent over by a factor of New-England to a merchant 
of London. (1676) Boston: Reprinted for Samuel G. 
Drake, 1850. 20p. MW A. + 

556 NILES, S. "A summary historical 

narrative of the wars in New England with the French 
and Indians in the several parts of the country." 

MHSC, 3 ser. 6 (1837), 154-279; 4 ser. 5 (1861), 309- 
589. 

557 "NOTES on the Indian wars in New 

England." NEHGR, 112 (Jan. 1858), 1-16; (Apr. 1858), 
161-167. 

558 THE OLD Indian chronicle: being a 
collection of exceeding rare tracts, written and 
published in the time of King Philip's War, by persons 
residing in the country; to which are now added an 
introduction and notes. Samuel Gardner Drake, ed. 
Boston: Samuel A. Drake, 1867. ix, 333p. Ct. + 

559 PENHALLOW, SAMUEL. The history of the 

wars of New-England with the eastern Indians; or, a 
narrative of their continued perfidy and cruelty, from 
the 10th of August, 1703, to the peace renewed 13th of 
July, 1713. And from the 25th of July, 1722, to their 
submission 15th December, 1725, which was ratified 
August 5th, 1726. (1726) Cincinnati, Ohio: Re- 
printed for Wm. Dodge, 1859. 129p. MWA. -t- 
The 1726 ed. also was reprinted in 1973. 

560 PRATT, EDWARD M. "The causes of King 

Philip's War." Middleborough [Mass.] Antiquarian, 16 
(Feb. 1975), 2-4. 

561 THE PRESENT state of New-England with 
respect to the Indian War. Wherein is an account of 
the true reason thereof (as far as can be judged by 
men). Together with most of the remarkable passages 
that have happened from the 20th of June, till the 
10th of November, 1675. Faithfully composed by a 
merchant of Boston and communicated to his friend in 
London. (1675) Boston: Josiah Drake, 1833. iv, 

69p. MWA. -h 

King Philip's War. 



562 PURITANS among the Indians: accounts of 

captivity and redemption, 1676-1724. Alden T. Vauglian 
and Edward W. Clark, eds. Cambridge, Mass.: Belknap 
Pr. of Harvard Univ. Pr., 1981. x, 275p. MB. + 

563 RANLET, PHILIP. "Another look at the 

causes of King Philip's War." NEQ, 61 (Mar. 1988), 79- 

100 . 

564 RAWLYK, GEORGE A. "New England and 
Louisbourg, 1744-1745." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of 
Rochester, 1966. 348p. MB. 

Abstracted in DAI, 27, No. lA (1966), 169. 

565 RUTMAN, DARRETT BRUCE. "A militant New 
World, 1607-1640: America's first generation: its 
martial spirit, its tradition of arms, its military 
organization, its wars." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of 
Virginia, 1959. ix, 824p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 20, No. 4 (1959), 1346. 

566 SANDERS, DANIEL CLARKE. History of the 
Indian wars with the first settlers of the United 
States, particularly in New England. Montpelier, Vt.: 
Wright and Sibley, 1812. 319p. NhHi. + 

567 SO dreadfull a judgment: Puritan 

responses to King Philip's War, 1676-1677. Richard 
Slotkin and James K. Folsom, eds. Middletown, Conn.: 
Wesleyan Univ. Pr., 1978. 490p. MB. -i- 

568 STECKER, CAROLINE CHRISTINE. "King 
Philip's War: an Old South lecture." NEM, n.s. 3 
(Dec. 1890), 519-528. 

569 STROCK, DANIEL, JR. Pictorial history of 
King Philip's War: comprising a full and minute 
account of all the massacres, battles, conflagrations, 
and other thrilling incidents of that tragic passage 

in American history. With an introduction, containing 
an account of the Indian tribes, their manners and 
customs. Boston: Horace Wentworth, 1851. 448p. 
MWA.-h 

570 SYLVESTER, HERBERT MILTON. Indian wars 

of New England. Boston: W. B. Clarke, 1910. 3v. 
MWA. -H 

571 WASHBURN, WILCOMB E. "Governor Berkeley 
and King Philip's War." NEQ, 30 (Sept. 1957), 363- 
377. 

Governor William Berkeley of Virginia. 



29 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



572 COLONIAL WARS 



572 WHITE, HENRY. Indian battles: with 
incidents in the early history of New England. 
Containing. ..narratives of battles, captivities, 
ambuscades, assaults, massacres, and depredations of 
the Indians. The habits, customs, and traits of 
character peculiar to the Indian race. The life and 
exploits of Capt. Myles Standish. The history of King 
Philip's War, and personal and historical incidents of 
the Revolutionary War. N.Y.: D. W. Evans, 1859. iv, 
428p. MWA. + 

Published in earlier eds. under the title. The early 
history of New England.... 

573 WINTHROP,JOHN, SR. (1588-1649). A 
declaration of former passages and proceedings betwixt 
the English and the Narrowgansets, with their 
confederates, wherein the grounds and iustice of the 
ensuing warre are opened and cleared.... (1645) 
[Boston, 1936.1 7p. Ct. + 

574 WORRALL, ARTHUR JOHN. "PersecuUon, 
politics, and war: Roger Williams, Quakers, and King 
Philip's War." Quaker History, 66 (Autumn 1977), 73- 
86 . 



OTHER ASPECTS OF COLONIAL HISTORY 

575 ADAMS, CHARLES FRANCIS, JR. (1835-1915). 

Sir Christopher Gardiner, knight: an historical 
monograph. Cambridge, Mass.: John Wilson and Son, 
1883. 36p. MeU. -I- 

17th century. Reprinted from MHSP, 20. 

576 ADAMS, ELIZABETH L. "The uprising in New 
England." More Books, 19 (Feb. 1944), 43-48. 

Overthrow of Sir Edmund Andros and the Dominion of 
New England. 

577 ADAMS, JAMES TRUSLOW. Revolutionary New 
England, 1691-1776. Boston: Atlantic Monthly Pr., 
1923. xiv, 469p. MWA. -t- 

578 . "The unexplored region in New England 

history." American Historical Review, 28 (July 1923), 
673-681. 

The years from 1716-1765. 

579 ADAMS, JOHN QUINCY. The New England 
confederacy of MDCXLIII: a discourse delivered before 
the Massachusetts Historical Society, at Boston, on 
the 29th of May, 1843; in celebration of the second 
centennial anniversary of that event. Boston: 

Charles C. Little and James Brown, 1843. 47p. MWA. -t- 



580 ADAMS, RANDOLPH G. "William Hubbard's 

map of New England." MHSP, 2 ser. 4 (1887-1889), 13- 

21 . 

1677. See also enu-ies 622 and 633. 

58 1 AKAGI, ROY HIDEMICHI. The town 
proprietors of the New England colonies: a study of 
their development, organization, activities and 
controversies, 1620-1770. Philadelphia: Pr. of the 
Univ. of Pennsylvania, 1924. xiii, 348p. MWA. -t- 

Published Ph.D. dissertation (Univ. of Pennsylvania, 
1923). Reprinted 1963. 

582 ALLEN, ROWLAND HUSSEY. The New-England 
tragedies in prose. I. The coming of the Quakers, 
n. The witchcraft delusion. Boston: Nichols and 
Noyes, 1869. 156p. MSaE. -t- 

583 ANDREWS, CHARLES McLEAN. Pilgrims and 
Puritans. Part I: The fathers of New England. Part 

II: Colonial folkways. New Haven, Corm.: Yale Univ. 
Pr., 1919. vii, 210, iii, 255p. CtY. + 

584 APPLETON, MARGUERITE. "The agents of the 
New England colonies in the Revolutionary period." 
NEQ, 6 (June 1933), 371-387. 

585 BACON, LEONARD WOOLSEY. "Four lost 
legacies of the early New England civil polity." New 
London County [Conn.] Historical Society, Records and 
Papers, 3, Part 1 (1906), 127-140. 

586 BAIRD, EDWARD G. "New Deal laws in 
colonial days." Connecticut Bar Journal, 9 (July 
1935), 187-201. 

587 BALDWIN, ERNEST H. "New England colonial 
liquor legislation." NEM, n.s. 20 (July 1899), 567- 
579. 

588 BARNES, VIOLA FLORENCE. The Dominion of 
New England: a study in British colonial policy. New 
Haven, Conn.: Yale Univ. Pr., 1923. viii, 303p. 

MWA. -I- 

Reprinted 1960. See also next entry. 

589 . "The Dominion of New England: a study in 

British colonial policy." Ph.D. dissertation, Yale 
Univ., 1919. 350p. 

See also preceding entry. 

590 BEALE, JOSEPH H. "The origin of the New 
England town." Cambridge [Mass.] Historical Society, 
Publications, 25 (1939), 61-64. 



30 



General and Chronological 



OTHER ASPECTS OF COLONIAL HISTORY 612 



591 BERGSTROM, E. ALEXANDER. "English game 
laws and colonial food shortages." NEQ, 12 (Dec. 

1939), 681-690. 

592 BLOOM, JEANNE GOULD. "Sir Edmund Andros: 
a study in seventeenth -century colonial 
administration." Ph.D. dissertation, Yale Univ., 

1962. xvii, 333p. MB. 

Abstracted in DAI, 30, No. 6A (1969), 2455. 

593 BREEN, TIMOTHY HALL. The character of a 
good ruler: a study of Puritan ideas in New England, 
1630-1730. New Haven, Coim.: Yale Univ. Pr., 1970. 
301p. MWA. + 

See also next entry. 

594 . "The character of a good ruler: a study of 

Puritan political ideas in New England, 1630-1730." 
Ph.D. dissertation, Yale Univ., 1968. viii, 41 2p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 29, No. HA (1969), 3941. See 
also preceding entry. 

595 BREMER, FRANCIS JOHN. 'The English 

context of New England's seventeenth-century history." 
NEQ, 60 (June 1987), 323-335. 

596 . "Puritan crisis: New England and the English 

civil wars, 1630-1670." Ph.D. dissertation, Columbia 
Univ., 1972. 389p. M. 

Abstracted in DAI, 36, No. 5A (1975), 3032. 

597 . The Puritan experiment: New England society 

from Bradford to Edwards. N.Y.: St. Martin's Pr., 

1976. XV, 255p. MB. -i- 

598 BRIDENBAUGH, CARL. Cities in revolt: 

urban life in America, 1743-1776. N.Y.: Knopf, 1955. 
xiii, 433p. MB. -i- 
See also next entry. 

599 . Cities in the wilderness: the first century 

of urban life in America, 1625-1742. N.Y.: Ronald 
Pr., 1938. xiv, 500p. MWA. -i- 

Five communities, including Boston and Newport. See 
also preceding entry and entry 601. 

600 . "The New England town: a way of life." AASP, 

56 (Apr. 1947), 19-48. 

Social organization in colonial New England. 

601 . "The rise of the colonial towns, 1625-1742." 

Ph.D. dissertation. Harvard Univ., 1936. x, 936p. 

See also entry 599. 



602 BRIEF review of the rise and progress, 

services and sufferings, of New England, especially 
the Province of Massachuset's-Bay. London: Printed 
for J. Buckland, 1774. 32p. MWA. -i- 

603 BRODHEAD, JOHN ROMEYN. The government of 

Sir Edmund Andros over New England in 1688 and 1689. 
Read before the New York Historical Society, on 
Tuesday evening, 4th December, 1866. Morrisania, 
N.Y.: [Bradstreet Pr.], 1867. 40p. Ct. -t- 

604 BROWN, B. KATHERINE. "A note on the 
Puritan concept of aristocracy." Mississippi Valley 
Historical Review, 41 (June 1954), 105-112. 

605 BURNS, JAMES JOSEPH. The colonial agents 

of New England. Washington, D.C.: Catholic Univ. of 
America, 1935. v, 156p. MWA. -t- 
Published Ph.D. dissertation. 

606 BURNS, JOHN FRANCIS. Controversies 
between royal governors and their assemblies in the 
northern American colonies. Boston: Wright & Potter, 
1923. 447p. MBU. -i- 

Published Ph.D. dissertation (Catholic Univ. of 
America, 1923). Reprinted 1969. 

607 BYFIELD, NATHANAEL. An account of the 

late revolution in New-England; together with the 
declaration of the gentlemen, merchants, and 
inhabitants of Boston, and the country adjacent. 

April 18, 1689. (1689) N.Y.: Reprinted for Joseph 
Sabin, 1865. 26p. MWA. -i- 

608 CAMPBELL, TONY. "New light on the 
Jansson-Visscher maps of New England." Map 
Collector's Circle, 24 (1965), 3-46. 

Mid- 17th century. 

609 CARDEN, MARK ALLEN. "The conununal ideal 
in Puritan New England, 1630-1700." Fides et 
Historia, 17 (Fall-Winter 1984), 244-250. 

610 . "God's church and a godly government: a 

historiography of church-state relations in Puritan 
New England." Fides et Historia, 19 (Feb. 1987), 51- 
65. 

611 CARLTON, WILLIAM R. "New England masts 
and the king's navy." NEQ, 12 (Jan. 1939), 4-18. 

612 CLARK, JOHN E. "Beyond the frontier: an 
environmental approach to the early history of 
northern New England." Maine Historical Society 
Newsletter, 11 (1971-1972), 4-21. 



31 



613 

613 

614 

615 

616 

617 

618 

619 

620 

621 

622 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



OTHER ASPECTS OF COLONIAL HISTORY 



COLEGROVE, KENNETH. New England town 
mandates. Reprinted from the Publications of the 
Colonial Society of Massachusetts, Vol. XXL 
Cambridge [Mass.]: John Wilson and Son, 1920. [39]p. 
MH. + 

COLONIAL SOCIETY OF MASSACHUSETTS. 
Seventeenth-century New England. David D. Hall and 
David Grayson Allen, eds. Boston, 1984. xx, 340p. 
MB. -t- 

Collection of papers dealing with social history and 
colonial mentality. 

A CONCISE historical account of all the 
British colonies in North-America, comprehending their 
rise, progress, and modem state; particularly of the 
Massachusetts-Bay, (the seat of the present civil 
war,) together with the other provinces of New- 
England. To which is annexed an accurate descriptive 
table of the several countries.... London: Printed 
for J. Bew, 1775. iv, 196p. MB. + 

COOK, EDWARD MARKS, JR. The fathers of 
the towns: leadership and community structure in 
eighteenth-century New England. Baltimore: Johns 
Hopkins Univ. Pr., 1976. xvii, 273p. MWA. + 

See also next entry. 

. 'The fathers of the towns: leadership and 

community structure in eighteenth century New 
England." Ph.D. dissertation, Johns Hopkins Univ., 
1972. 221p. 

See also preceding entry. 

. "Local leadership and the typology of New 

England towns, 1700-1785." Political Science 
Quarterly, 36 (Dec. 1971), 586-608. 

DANIEL, RICHARD. The present state of 
New England (circa 1675) now first printed from the 
original manuscript. N.Y.: J. O. Wright, 1899. 15p. 
MSaE. 

DANIELS, BRUCE COLIN. "Contrasting 
colony-town relations in the founding of Connecticut 
and Rhode Island prior to the charters of 1662 and 
1663." Connecticut Historical Society Bulletin, 38 
(Apr. 1973), 60-64. 

DAWES, NORMAN H. 'Titles as symbols of 
prestige in seventeenth-century New England." WMQ, 3 
ser. 6 (Jan. 1949), 69-83. 



623 DOUGLAS, JAMES. New England and New 
France: contrasts and parallels in colonial history. 

N.Y.: G. P. Pumam's Sons, 1913. x, 560p. MWA. + 

624 DUMMER, JEREMIAH. A defence of the New- 
England charters. London: W. Wilkins, 1721. 80p. 
MWA.+ 

Other eds. 

625 "EARLY 'freemen' in New England." NEHGR, 

3 (Jan. 1849), 41-45. 

626 EVANS, CHARLES. "Oaths of allegiance in 

colonial New England." AASP, n.s. 31 (Oct. 1921), 377 
438. 

627 EVERETT, ALBERT. Early franchise rights 

in Massachusetts and other New England colonies. 
Homell, N.Y.: Wilson's Associated Printers, 1936. 

6p. MB. + 

628 FERGUSON, WILLIAM W. "The development of 
home-made govenunents in New England." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Indiana Univ., 1938. iii, 207p. 

Described in American Puritan Studies, Michael S. 
Montgomery, comp. (1984), 56. 

629 FTSKE, JOHN. The begiimings of New 

England; or, the Puritan theocracy in its relations to 
civil and religious liberty.... (1889) Boston: 

Houghton Mifflin, 1899. xvii, 296p. MWA. + 

630 FOX, DIXON RYAN. Yankees and Yorkers. 

N.Y.: Oxford Univ. Pr., 1940. x, 237p. Ct. -i- 

631 FRIEDELBAUM, STANLEY HERMAN. "Bellomont: 
imperial administrator-during the seventeenth 
century." Ph.D. dissertation, Columbia Univ., 1955. 

222p. 

Richard Coote (1636-1701), Earl of Bellomont, who 
served as governor of Massachusetts, New Hampshire, 
and New York from 1698-1701. Abstracted in DAI, 15, 
No. 8 (1955), 1379. 

632 THE GLORIOUS Revolution in America: 
documents on the colonial crisis of 1689. Michael G. 
Hall, Lawrence H. Leder, and Michael G. Kammen, eds. 
Chapel Hill, N.C.: Univ. of North Carolina Pr., 1964. 
XV, 216p. Ct. + 

New England, New York, and Maryland. 



DEANE, CHARLES. Remarks on Hubbard's map 
of New England. Cambridge [Mass.]: John Wilson and 
Son, 1888. 12p. N. + 

See also entries 580 and 633. 



32 



General and Chronological 



633 GREEN, SAMUEL ABBOTT. Hubbard's map of 
New England, engraved probably by John Foster, the 
first printer of Boston. Remarks made before the 
Massachusetts Historical Society, November 8, 1888. 
Cambridge [Mass.]: John Wilson and Son, 1888. lOp. 
MWA.+ 

See also entries 580 and 622. 

634 GREENE, JACK P. "Autonomy and stability: 

New England and the British colonial experience in 
early modem America." JSH, 7 (Winter 1974), 171-194. 

635 GUEGEN, JOHN A., JR. "Political order 

and religious liberty: a Puritan controversy." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Univ. of Chicago, 1970. xvi, 339p. 

Described in American Puritan Studies, Michael S. 
Montgomery, comp. (1984), 197-198. 

636 HAFFENDEN, PHILIP S. New England in the 
English nation, 1689-1713. Oxford [U.K.j: Clarendon 
Pr., 1974. xiii, 326p. MWA. -i- 

637 HALE, EDWARD EVERETT. Puritan politics 

in England and New England: a lecture of a course by 
members of the Massachusetts Historical Society, 
delivered before the Lowell Institute, Feb. 12, 1869. 
Boston: Pr. of John Wilson and Son, 1869. 22p. 
MWA.-I- 

638 HANNA, ARCHIBALD, JR. "New England 
military institutions, 1693-1750." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Yale Univ., 1951. 316p. 

Described in American Puritan Studies, Michael S. 
Montgomery, comp. (1984), 83. 

639 HERTZ, KARL HERBERT. "Bible commonwealth 
and holy experiment: a study of the relation between 
theology and politics in the Puritan and Quaker 
colonies." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of Chicago, 

1948. vi, 367p. 

Described in American Puritan Studies, Michael S. 
Montgomery, comp. (1984), 75. 

640 HOLMAN, RICHARD B. "John Foster’s 

woodcut map of New England." Printing & Graphic Arts, 
8 (Sept. 1960), 53-92. 

64 1 HORTON, EDWARD AUGUSTUS . The culmination 
of the Puritan theocracy. Boston: J. S. Lockwood, 

1900. 32p. MB. + 

642 JOHNSON, RICHARD RIGBY. Adjustment to 
empire: the New England colonies, 1675-1715. New 
Brunswick, N.J.: Rutgers Univ. Pr., 1981. xx, 470p. 
MWA.-I- 

See also next entry. 



OTHER ASPECTS OF COLONIAL HISTORY 653 



643 . "Adjustment to empire: war. New England, and 

British colonial policy in the late seventeenth 
century." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of California, 
Berkeley, 1972. 

See also preceding entry. 

644 . "The humble address of the republicans of New- 

England: a reassessment." NEQ, 51 (June 1978), 241- 
249. 

1691. 

645 KEEGAN, D. W. "Colonial ideals of New 

England." Society of Colonial Wars, New York (State), 
Addresses & Year Book (1906-1907), 50-101. 

646 KOCHER, HELEN J. "Sidelights on the 

Puritans and Pilgrims." DAR Magazine, 113 (May 1979), 
489-493, 521. 

647 ROLLING, HAROLD. "The New England 
Confederation of 1643: its origin, nature, and 
foreign relations, 1643-1652." Ph.D. dissertation, 

Univ. of Chicago, 1957. v, 296p. Ct. 

Described in American Puritan Smdies, Michael S. 
Montgomery, comp. (1984), 107-108. 

648 La FLEUR, MARY ANN. "Seventeenth century 

New England and New France in comparative perspective: 
Notre Dame des Anges— a case study." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Univ. of New Hampshire, 1987. 306p. 
Abstracted in DAI, 48, No. 10 (Apr. 1988), 2712. 

649 LABAREE, LEONARD WOODS. 'The royal 
governors of New England." Colonial Society of 
Massachusetts, Publications, 32 (Apr. 1937), 120-131. 

650 LEWIS, THEODORE BURNHAM, JR. "A 
revolutionary tradition, 1689-1774: ‘there was a 
revolution here as well as in England.'" NEQ, 46 
(Sept. 1973), 424-438. 

651 . "Royal government in New Hampshire and the 

revocation of the charter of the Massachusetts Bay 
Colony, 1679-1683." Historical New Hampshire, 25 
(Winter 1970), 3-45. 

652 UCHTHENTHAL, JACK. "Eschatology and the 
political life: an analysis of seventeenth-century 
origins in Puritan New England." Ph.D. dissertation. 

New School for Social Research, 1970. 245p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 31, No. lOA (1971), 5481. 

653 UNDSLEY, CHARLES E. "The English 

regicides in America." Magazine of History, 44, Extra 
No. 175 (1931), 151-172. 

Reprint of an address delivered in 1893. See also 
entry 678. 



33 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



654 OnrHER ASPECTS OF COLONIAL HISTORY 



654 LUCAS. PAUL ROBERT. Valley of discord; 

church and society along the Connecticut River, 1636- 
1725. Hanover, N.H.: Univ. Pr. of New England, 1976. 
xiv, 275p. MWA. -I- 
See also next entry. 

655 . "Valley of discord: the struggle for power in 

the Puritan churches of the Connecticut Valley, 1636- 
1720." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of Minnesota, 1970. 
xiv, 358p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 31, No. 5A (1970), 2314. See 
also preceding entry. 

656 MacLEAR, ANNE BUSH. Early New England 
towns: a comparative study of their development. 

N.Y.; Columbia Univ. Pr., 1908. 183p. Ct. + 

Published Ph.D. dissertation (Columbia Univ., 1908). 

657 McMANlS, DOUGLAS R. Colonial New 

England: a historical geography. N.Y.: Oxford Univ. 
Pr., 1975. ix, 159p. MB. + 

658 MALONE, JOSEPH J. "The British naval 

stores and forests policy in New England." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Univ. of London [U.K.], 1956. 

See also next entry. 

659 . Pine trees and politics: the naval stores and 

forest policy in colonial New England, 1691-1775. 
Seattle, Wash.: Univ. of Washington Pr., 1964. xi, 
219p. MWA. -I- 

See also preceding entry. 

660 MARSTON, PHILIP MASON. 'The origins of 
the towns and township system of New England." 
Sandwich [N.H.] Historical Society, Annual Excursion, 
33 (Aug. 1952), 3-22. 

661 MATHER, INCREASE. A narrative of the 
miseries of New-England by reason of an arbitrary 
government erected there. [London, 1688.] 8p. 

MWA. + 

662 MILLER, GUY HOWARD. "Rebellion in Zion: 

the overthrow of the Dominion of New England." The 
Historian, 30 (May 1968), 439-459. 

663 MORRISON, MALCOLM FLEMING. The 
political relations between the English dissenters and 
the New England colonies, 1700-1750." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Univ. of Southampton [U.K.], 1977. ii, 
467p. 

Described in American Puritan Studies, Michael S. 
Montgomery, comp. (1984), 290. 



664 MOSSE, GEORGE L. "Puritanism and reason 

of state in old and New England." WMQ, 3 ser. 9 (Jan. 
1952), 67-80. 

665 MUTH, PHILIP ARTHUR. "The Ashursts: 

friends of New England." Ph.D. dissertation, Boston 
Univ., 1967. vi, 343p. NhKeS. 

English family, who "performed valuable services in 
support of the New England colonies in the late 
seventeelh and early eighteenth centuries." 

Abstracted in DAI, 28, No. 6A (1967), 2160. 

666 NEILL, EDWARD DUFFIELD. "A contribution 

to the early history of New England." Macalester 
College, Dept, of History, Literature, and Political 
Science, Contributions, 1 ser. (1890), 199-209. 

667 NORTH, GARY KILGORE. "The concept of 
property in Puritan New England, 1630-1720." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Univ. of California, Riverside, 1972. 
xiii, 466p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 34, No. lOA (19774), 6571. 

668 O'BRIEN, MICHAEL JOSEPH. "Chapter of 

Irish charity in Thanksgiving history." American 
Irish Historical Society, Journal, 18 (1919), 163-168. 

Relief ship sent to the aid of New England colonists 
by the city of Dublin (1676). 

669 OTOOLE, JAMES M. "New England reactions 

to the English Civil Wars." NEHGR, 129 (Jan. 1975), 3 
17; (July 1975), 238-249. 

670 PARKES, HENRY B. "New England in the 
seventeen-thirties." NEQ, 3 (July 1930), 397-419. 

671 PECK, WALLACE. The story of the 

Puritans: a go-as-you-please history (part fact, part 
fiction) from the first leeway voyage of the Mayflower 
down to the close of the doughnut dynasty. St. 
Johnsbury [Vt.]: C. T. Walter, 1889. 90p. CtY. + 

672 PENROSE, CHARLES. New England in the 
year of grace 1766— and Sir Francis Bernard, his 
outlook on trade and navigation. A Newcomen address, 
1940. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton Univ. Pr., 1940. 

28p. MH. + 

673 PRESTON, RICHARD ARTHUR. "The colonial 
schemes of Sir Ferdinando Gorges." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Yale Univ., 1934. 

Described in American Puritan Studies, Michael S. 
Montgomery, comp. (1984), 51-52. 



34 



General and Qironological 



OTHER ASPECTS OF COLONIAL HISTORY 692 



674 PURITAN New England: essays on religion, 
society, and culture. Alden T. Vaughan and Francis J. 
Bremer, eds. N.Y.: St. Martin's Pr., 1977. vii, 

395p. M. + 

675 REALE, PAUL J. "The New England 
regicides." American History Illustrated, 2 (July 
1967), 33-38. 

676 RICKETSON, WILUAM FRED, JR. "A Puritan 
approach to Manifest Destiny: studies from artillery 
election sermons." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of 
Georgia, 1965. vi, 151p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 26, No. 11 (1966), 6662. 

677 RILEY, FRANKLIN LAFAYETTE. Colonial 
origins of New England senates. Baltimore: John 
Hopkins Pr., 1896. 76p. MStuO. + 

Published Ph.D. dissertation, Johns Hopkins Univ. 
(1896). 

678 ROBBINS, CHANDLER. The regicides 
sheltered in New England: a lecture of a course by 
members of the Massachusetts Historical Society, 
delivered before the Lowell Institute, Feb. 5, 1869. 
Boston: Pr. of John Wilson and Son, 1869. 36p. MW A. 
+ 

Several judges of King Charles I, who reputedly 
found safety in New England following the Restoration. 

679 ROGERS, SARA BULKLEY. 'The rise of civil 
government and federation in early New England." 

Ph.D. dissertation, Yale Univ., 1894. 

Described in American Puritan Studies, Michael S. 
Montgomery, comp. (1984), 7. 

680 SANBORN, EDWIN DAVID. "Union of New 
Hampshire with Massachusetts.” Granite Monthly, 1 
(June 1877), 33-35. 

1641. 

681 SAVAGE, JAMES. "Gleanings from New 

England history." MHSC, 3 ser. 8 (1843), 243-348; 10 
(1849), 127-146; 4 ser. 1 (1852), 91-101. 

682 SCHWARZ, PHILIP J. The jarring 

interests: New York's boundary makers, 1664-1776. 
Albany, N.Y.: State Univ. of New York Pr., 1979. 
xvi, 343p. MBU. -t 

Includes boundaries with the New England colonies 
and states. 

683 SEVENTEENTH-century constitutions and New 
England political documents. Sumner Chilton Powell, 
ed. Baltimore: Powell Associates, 1973. 17p. M. + 

Connecticut, Massachusetts, and Rhode Island. 



684 SHARP, MORRISON. "Leadership and 

democracy in the early New England system of defense." 
American Historical Review, 50 (Jan. 1945), 244-260. 
See also next entry. 

685 . 'The New England trainbands in the seventeenth 

century." Ph.D. dissertation. Harvard Univ., 1938. 

31 5p. 

Militia. Described in American Puritan Studies, 

Michael S. Montgomery, comp. (1984), 58. 

686 SHIPTON, CLIFFORD KENYON. "The shaping 

of Revolutionary New England, 1680-1740." Political 
Science Quarterly, 50 (Dec. 1935), 584-597. 

687 SOCIETY OF COLONIAL WARS. RHODE ISLAND. 

A letter from the Council of the Colony of 
Massachusetts Bay to the Council of the Colony of 
Cormecticut. Written April 7, 1676, by Edward Rawson, 
the secretary.... Providence, R.I.: Standard 

Printing, 1921. 15p. MWA. -i- 
Conceming the death of Governor John Winthrop, Jr., 
Rhode Island land, and King Philip's War. 

688 STILES, EZRA. A history of three of the 

judges of King Charles I. Major-general Whalley, Major- 
general Goffe, and Colonel Dixwell: who, at the 
Restoration, 1660, fled to America; and were secreted 
and concealed, in Massachusetts and Connecticut, for 
near thirty years.... Hartford, Conn.: Elisha 
Babcock, 1794. 357p. CtHi. + 

The regicides. 

689 STOUT, HARRY S. H. "The morphology of 
remigration: New England university men and their 
return to England, 1640-1660." Journal of American 
Studies [U.K.], 10 (Aug. 1976), 151-172. 

690 . "Remigration and revival: two case studies in 

the social and intellectual history of New England, 
1630-1745." Ph.D. dissertation, Kent State Univ., 

1974. 426p. 

"The remigration of New England university men to 
England between 1640 and 1660; and Old and New Light 
clergy at the time of the Great Awakening." 

Abstracted in DAI, 35, No. 9A (1975), 6081. 

691 . "University men in New England, 1620-1660: a 

demographic analysis." Journal of Interdisciplinary 
History, 4 (Winter 1974), 379-400. 

692 THAYER, OMAN G., JR. "The colonial 
soldier." Medford [Mass.] Historical Register, 42 
(Sept.-Dec. 1939), 55-59. 



35 



693 

693 

694 

695 

696 

697 

698 

699 

700 

701 

702 

703 



New England: A Bibliography of iLs History 



OTHER ASPECTS OF COLONIAL HISTORY 



THOMPSON, GRACE AGNES. "March in New 
England history." NEM, n.s. 46 (Mar. 1912), 49-50. 

The month's significance in the region's early 
history (17th century). 

THOMPSON, ROGER. "'Holy watchfulness' 
and commercial conformism: the functions of 
defamation in early New England communities." NEQ, 56 
(Dec. 1983), 504-522. 

Study of the social functions of "legal actions 
involving verbal abuse." 

TOPPAN, ROBERT N. "Andros records." 

AASP, n.s. 13 (Apr. 1900), 463-499. 

TUTTLE, JULIUS HERBERT. "Land warrants 

issued under Andros, 1687-1688." Colonial Society of 

Massachusetts, Publications, 21 (Apr. 1919), 292-361. 

UNITED COLONIES OF NEW ENGLAND. 
COMMISSIONERS. Acts of the commissioners of the 
United Colonies of New England. Boston; W. Whitle, 
1859. 2v. Ct. + 

. Extracts from the records of the United 

Colonies of New England. Comprising such portions of 
the records as are not published in the second volume 
of Hazard's State paprers. From the original 
manuscript in the secretary's office, at Hartford. 

Hartford, Conn.: Pr. of Case, Lockwood, 1859. 46p. 
MWA. -H 

USHER, JOHN. "John Usher's report on the 
northern colonies in 1698." WMQ, 3 ser. 7 (Jan. 

1950), 95-106. 

Margaret Kinard, ed. 

VON KIENBUSCH, CARLO. "A footnote on 

New England's colonial halberds." American Military 

Institute Journal, 4 (1940), 121-124. 

Polearms. 



704 WELLES, LEMUEL AIKEN. The history of the 
regicides in New England. N.Y.: Grafton Pr., 1927. 
139p. MWA. -(- 

See also this author's The regicides in Connecticut 
(entry 1831 in the Connecticut volume). 

705 WENTWORTH, JOHN. "John Wentworth's 
description of the American colonies in 1765." 
Historical New Hampshire, 27 (Fall 1972), 141-166. 

Derek H. Watson, ed. 

706 WHITCOMB, LINCOLN. Brief .sketches of the 

early history of New England & other historical notes. 
Charlestown, N.H., 1886. 32p. Ct. -i- 

707 WHITTLESEY, JOHN J. Law of the seashore, 
tidewaters and great ponds in Massachusetts and Maine 
under the colony ordinance of 1641-1647. Cambridge, 
Mass.: Murray Print, 1932. xliv, 90p, M. + 

708 WINSTON, ALEXANDER. "The hunt for the 
regicides." American Heritage, 16 (Dec. 1964), 26-29, 
90-93. 

709 WISNER, ELIZABETH. "The Puritan 
background of the New England poor laws." Social 
Service Review, 19 (Sept. 1945), 381-390. 

710 WOODWARD, PATRICK HENRY. "The true story 
of the regicides." Connecticut Magazine, 9, No. 3 
(1905), 539-548. 

711 WORCESTER, ALFRED. The origin of the New 
England townmeeting. Waltham, Mass.: A. T. Ball, 
[1925]. 29p. MWA. -I- 

712 YOUNG, RAY. "Charles the Second's 
manhunt." NEG, 14 (Summer 1972), 39-44. 

For the regicides. In addition to the titles cited 
here, see listings on this subject in the Connecticut 
volume. 



WARD, HARRY M. The United Colonies of 
New England, 1643-90. N.Y.; Vantage Pr., 1961. 

434p. MWA. -t- 

WARDEN, GERARD BRYCE. "Law reform in 
England and New England, 1620 to 1660." WMQ, 3 ser. 
35 (Oct. 1978), 668-690. 

WEEDEN, WILUAM BABCOCK. Three 
commonwealths: Massachusetts, Connecticut and Rhode 
Island; their early development. Worcester, Mass.: 

Pr. of C. H. Hamilton, 1903. 37p. MWA. -t- 
Reprinted from AASP, n.s. 15 (Oct. 1902), 130-164. 



713 ZAKAI, AVIHU. "Theocracy in New England: 

the nature and meaning of the holy experiment in the 
wilderness." Journal of Religious History, 14 (Dec. 
1986), 133-151. 



AMERICAN REVOLUTION THROUGH Q VIL WAR 

714 ADAMS, JAMES TRUSLOW. New England in the 

republic, 1776-1850. Boston: Little, Brown, 1926. 
xiv, 438p. MWA. + 

Reprinted 1960. 



36 



General and Chronological 



AMERICAN REVOLUTION THROUGH aVTL WAR 736 



715 ADAMS. SAMUEL HOPKINS. The godlike 
Daniel. N.Y.: Sears Publishing, 1930. xi, 426p. 
MWA.+ 

Daniel Webster (lived 1782-1852). 

716 APPLETON, JOHN. North for union: John 
Appleton's journal of a tour to New England made by 
President Polk in June and July 1847. Wayne Cutler, 
ed. Nashville, Tenn.: Vanderbilt Univ. Pr., 1986. 
xxix, 135p. MB. + 

717 ARCHER. RICHARD LEE. "New England 
Federalism and the Hartford Convention." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, 

1968. 274p. 

1814. See also entry 775. 

718 BACON, CORINNE. "New England 
sectionalism." NEM, n.s. 12 (Apr. 1895), 241-254. 

War of 1812 era. 

719 BAKER, ANDREW H. "The selling of the 
president, 1840." Old Sturbridge Village, Rural 
Visitor, 20 (Summer 1980), 17-19. 

That year's election campaign in New England. 

720 BALDWIN, ALICE MARY. "The influence of 
the New England clergy upon the constitutional 
doctrine of the American Revolution." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Univ. of Chicago, 1926. 1923p. 

See also next entry. 

721 . The New England clergy and the American 

Revolution. (1928) N.Y.: F. Ungar, 1958. xiii, 

222p. MWA. -H 

See also preceding entry. 

722 BALDWIN, ERNEST H. "When New England was 
rebellious." NEM, n.s. 21 (Dec. 1899), 470-475. 

The John Henry affair (1809). 

723 BARBER, JAMES and FREDERICK VOSS. The 
godlike Black Dan: a selection of portraits from life 

in commemoration of the two hundredth aimiversary of 
the birth of Daniel Webster. Washington: Smithsonian 
Institution Pr., 1982. 48p. MStuO. -i- 

724 BARTLETT, IRVING H. "Daniel Webster as a 
symbolic hero." NEQ, 45 (Dec. 1972), 484-507. 

See also next entry. 

725 . Daniel Webster. N.Y.: W. W. Norton, 1978. 

xii, 333p. MWA. -i- 



726 BASSETT, JOHN SPENCER. "Notes on 

Jackson's visit to New England, June 1833." MHSP, 56 
(1923), 244-260. 

President Andrew Jackson. This article also was 
published in Temiessee Historical Magazine, 8 (July 
1924), 119-131. See also entry 763. 

727 BATES, ELIZABETH BALUSTER. "The New 
England governors in the Civil War." NEM, n.s. 20 
(Apr. 1899), 131-147. 

728 BAXTER, MAURICE. "One and inseparable: 

Daniel Webster and the Union. Cambridge, Mass.: 
Belknap Pr of Harvard Univ. Pr., 1984. vii, 646p. 
MWA.-i- 

729 BENNETT, RANDALL H. "New England's last 
Indian raid." NEG, 20 (Summer 1978), 45-54. 

In northern New Hampshire and western Maine (1781). 

730 BENSON, ALLAN LOUIS. Daniel Webster. 

N.Y.: Cosmopolitan Book Corp., 1929. viii, 402p. 
MWA.-i- 

731 BOTTORFF, WILLIAM K. "Mr. Jefferson 

tours New England." NEG, 20 (Summer 1979), 3-7. 

732 BRACE, RICHARD MUNTHE. 'Talleyrand in 
New England: reality and legend." NEQ, 16 (Sept. 
1943), 397-406. 

1790s. 

733 BRICELAND, ALAN VANCE. "The Philadelphia 
Aurora, the New England Illuminati, and the election 
of 1800." Pennsylvania Magazine of History and 
Biography, 100 (Jan. 1976), 3-36. 

734 BROWN, CHARLES RAYMOND. The northern 
confederacy according to the plans of the "Essex 
Junto," 1796-1814. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton Univ. 
Pr., 1915. 123p. MWA. -i- 

Published Ph.D. dissertation. 

735 BULLARD, FREDERIC LAURISTON. "Lincoln's 
'conquest' of New England." Abraham Lincoln 
(Quarterly, 2 (June 1942), 49-79. 

See tilso entry 750. 

736 CAHILL, ROBERT ELLIS. New England's 
naughty navy. Peabody, Mass.: Chandler-Smith 
Publishing, 1987. 60p. RHi. + 

American Revolution. 



37 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



737 AMERICAN REVOLUTION THROUGH CIVIL WAR 



737 CHAMBERLAIN. MELLEN. John Adams, the 
statesman of the American Revolution, and other essays 
and addresses, historical and literary. Boston: 

Houghton Mifflin, 1899. vi, 476p. MWA. + 

Mostly on New England subjects. 

738 CLARK UNIVERSITY. WORCESTER. MASS. 

AMERICAN STUDIES PROGRAM. New England 
1820-1860: a sampler. Prepared for students in the 
American Studies cluster course, English 240/History 
240, by the Clark University American Studies Program 
and Old Sturbridge Village. Worcester, Mass., 

[1979?]. 354p. MWA. 

Selected readings and documents. 

739 CLARK, WILLIAM BELL. George Washington's 
navy: being an account of His Excellency's fleet in 
New England waters. Baton Rouge, La.: Louisiana 
State Univ. Pr., 1960. xi, 275p. MChB. + 

740 COOLIDGE, JUUAN L. "Washington in New 
England." Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, 
49 (Apr. 1941), 125-140. 

George Washington. See also entries 801 and 827. 

741 CRESS. LAWRENCE DELBERT. "'Cool and 
serious reflection': Federalist attitudes toward war 
in 1812." Journal of the Early Republic, 7 (Summer 
1987), 123-145. 

Primarily a New England study. 

742 CURRENT, RICHARD NELSON. Daniel Webster 
and the rise of American conservativism. Boston: 

Little, Brown, 1955. 215p. CtU. -t- 

743 CURTIS, GEORGE TICKNOR. Life of Daniel 
Webster. N.Y.: D. Appleton, 1870. 2v. MWA. + 

744 DAVIDSON, PHIUP GRANT. "Revolutionary 
propaganda in New England, New York and Pennsylvania, 
1763-1776." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of Chicago, 

1929. 269p. 

745 DAVIS. WILUAM A., and CAROLINE FULLER 
SLOAT. "Good sense and integrity." Old Sturbridge 
Visitor, 26 (Winter 1986), 7-9. 

Lawyers in New England. See also entry 753. 

746 "DEBTS and finances of the states of the 

Union: Maine and Massachusetts." Merchant's Magazine 
and Commercial Review, 17 (1847), 577-587. 

747 EXXTUMENTS relating to New-England 
Federalism, 1800-1815. Hemy Adams, ed. Boston, 

1877. xi. 437p. MSaE. -i- 



748 DOUGLASS. EUSHA P. "Fisher Ames: 
spokesman for New England Federalism." American 
Philosophical Society, Proceedings, 103 (Oct. 1959), 
693-715. 

749 EAST, ROBERT A. "Economic development 

and New England Federalism, 1803-1814." NEQ, 10 
(Sept. 1937), 430-446. 

750 EGGLESTON. PERCY COE. Lincoln in New 
England. N.Y.: Stewart, Warren, 1922. 36p. CtNhHi. 
+ 

Abraham Lincoln. See also entry 735. 

751 FECHTER, CLAY M. "Sectionalism of New 
England Federalists in an early test of American 
nationalism, 1800-1805." Rocky Mountain Social 
Science Journal, 2 (Mar. 1965), 95-105. 

752 FEES, PAUL R. "New England's image of 

the Old Northwest and its incorporation of western 
cultural symbols, 1783-1820." Ph.D. dissertation. 
Brown Univ., 1982. iv, 253p. NhD. 

Abstracted in DAI, 43, No. IIA (1982), 3636. 

753 FENNELLY, CATHERINE M. The country 

lawyer in New England, 1790-1840. Sturbridge, Mass.: 
Old Sturbridge Village, 1968. 48p. MStuO. -i- 
See also entry 745. 

754 nSH. CARL RUSSELL. "The relation of New 
England to the Ohio Valley." Ohio Archaeological and 
Historical Quarterly, 22 (Jan. 1913), 119-125. 

755 nSHER, SYDNEY GEORGE. The true Daniel 
Webster. Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott, 1911. 
xviii, 516p. MWA. 4 - 

756 FLEMING, THOMAS J. "The Loyalists- 
Americans who lost the war." Yankee, 40 (Apr. 1976), 
96, 98-101, 122, 124-126. 

New England. 

757 FUESS, CLAUDE MOORE. Daniel Webster. 

Boston: Little, Brown, 1930. 2v. MWA. + 

758 GOLDENBERG, JOSEPH A. "The Royal Navy's 
blockade in New England waters, 1812-1815." 
International History Review, 6 (Aug. 1984), 424-439. 

759 GOLDSCHMIDT, ELI. "Northeastern 
businessmen and the secession crisis." Ph.D. 
dissertation. New York Univ., 1972. 347p. Ct. 

Abstracted in DAI, 33, No. IIA (1973), 6271. 



38 



General and Chronological 



AMERICAN REVOLUTION THROUGH QVIL WAR 780 



760 GOODMAN, PAUL. "The social basis of New 
England politics in Jacksonian America." Journal of 
the Early Republic, 6 (Spring 1986), 23-58. 

761 . Towards a Christian republic: Antimasonry and 

the great transition in New England, 1826-1836. N.Y.: 
Oxford Univ. Pr., 1988. x, 328p. MBU. -t- 

762 GRANT, PHILIP ALOYSIUS. 'The election of 
1834-35 in New England: a judgement of Jacksonian 
democracy." Ph.D. dissertation, Georgetown Univ., 
1960. 109p. 

763 GREEN, FLETCHER M. "On tour with 

President Jackson." NEQ, 36 (June 1963), 209-228. 
1833. See also entry 726. 

764 GREENOUGH, CHESTER NOYES. "New England 
almanacs, 1766-1775, and the American Revolution." 
AASP, n.s. 45 (Oct. 1935), 288-316. 

765 GRISBROOK, EDWARD O. "A scion of New 
England." NEM, n.s. 27 (Dec. 1902), 477-486. 

Emigration of New England Loyalists to the Eastern 
Townships of Quebec. 

766 HART, SIDNEY. "The American sense of 

mission, 1783-1810: Puritan historical myths in post- 
Revolutionary New England." Ph.D. dissertation, Clark 
Univ., 1973. ix, 427p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 34, No. 4 A (1973), 1824. 

767 HARVEY, PETER. Reminiscences and 

anecdotes of Daniel Webster. Boston: Little, Brown, 
1877. X, 480p. MW A. -i- 

768 HASKINS, ROSWELL WILSON. New England and 
the West. Buffalo, N.Y.: A. W. Wilgus, 1843. 36p. 
NhD.-t- 

I.e., the Old Northwest. 

769 HATCH, NATHAN ORR. "The origins of civil 
millennialism in America: New England clergymen, war 
with France, and the Revolution." WMQ, 3 ser. 31 
(July 1974), 407-430. 

See also following entries. 

770 . 'The sacred cause of liberty: political 

religion in New England from the first to the second 
Great Awakening." Ph.D. dissertation, Washington 
Univ., 1974. xvii, 203p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 35, No. 9 A (1975), 6059. See 
also next entry. 



771 . The sacred cause of liberty: republican 

thought and the milleimium in revolutionary New 
England. New Haven, Conn.: Yale Univ. Pr., 1977. 
xii, 197p. MBU. + 

See also preceding entry. 

772 HA YCOX, STEPHEN WALTER. "Jeremy Belknap 
and early American nationalism: a study in the 
political and theological foundations of American 
liberty." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of Oregon, 1971. 

V, 259p. MWalB. 

Abstracted in DAI, 36, No. 3 A (1971), 1441. 

773 HEIMBEINDER, MURRAY E. "Northern men 
with Southern principles: a study of the doughfaces 

of New York and New England." Ph.D. dissertation. New 
York Univ., 1971. iii, 290p. MH. 

1835-1861. Abstracted in DAI, 33, No. 3A (1972), 
1109. 

774 HESLIN, JAMES J. "The New England Loyal 
Publication Society: an aspect of the molding of 
public opinion during the Civil War." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Boston Univ., 1952. 314p. 

775 HICKEY, DONALD R. "New England's defense 
problem and the genesis of the Hartford Convention." 
NEQ, 50 (Dec. 1977), 587-604. 

See also entry 717. 

776 JOHANNSEN, ROBERT W. "Stephen A. 

Douglas' New England campaign, 1860." NEQ, 35 (June 
1962), 162-186. 

777 [JOHNSON, NOAH.] Journals of two cruises 

aboard the American privateer Yankee, by A Wanderer. 
N.Y.: Macmillan, 1967. xxxii, 156p. MW A. -t- 
War of 1812. 

778 JOHNSON, REINHARD OSCAR. "The Liberty 
Party in New England, 1840-1848: the forgotten 
abolitionists." Ph.D. dissertation, Syracuse Univ., 
1976. 482p. NhKeS. 

Abstracted in DAI, 38, No. 5 (1977), 2998-2999. 

779 JONES, WILUAM CLOUGH. "The New England 
Transcendentalists and the Mexican War." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Univ. of Minnesota, 1970. 120p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 32, No. lA (1971), 360. 

780 LANCASTER, BRUCE. "The Riedesels view 
the Yankees." OTNE, 42 (Winter 1952), 78-80. 

German prisoners in the American Revolution. 



39 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



78 1 AMERICAN REVOLUTION THROUGH CIVIL WAR 



781 LAND, MARY. '"Bluff Ben’ Wade's New 

England background." NEQ, 27 (Dec. 1954), 484-509. 
The Civil War era senator and radical 
reconslructionist from Ohio. 

782 LANMAN, CHARLES. The {private life of 

Daniel Webster. N.Y.: Harper & Brothers, 1852. vi, 
205p. MWA. -I- 

783 LEDBETTER, BILL S. "Charles Sumner: 
political activist for the New England 
Transcendentalists." The Historian, 44 (May 1982), 
347-363. 

784 LEVER, ANN BUTLER. "Vox populi, vox dei: 

New England and the French Revolution, 1787-1801." 
Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of North Carolina, 1972. 

329p. MWalB. 

Abstracted in DAI, 33, No. 4 A (1972), 1651. 

785 LODGE, HENRY CABOT (1850-1924). Daniel 
Webster. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1884. vi, 372p. 
MWA. -H 

786 McMASTER, JOHN BACH. Daniel Webster. 

N.Y.: Century, 1902. xi, 343p. MWA. -h 

787 MaePEEK, GERTRUDE A. "New England in 

1776." DAR Magazine, 110 (July 1976), 759-765, 928. 

788 MAGUIRE, JAMES HENRY. "A critical 

edition of Edward Parry's journal, March 28, 1775 to 
August 23, 1777." Ph.D. dissertation, Indiana Univ., 
1971. Ixxi, 333p. MWA. 

British mast agent, arrested during the American 
Revolution in Georgetown, Me. He was confined in 
Sturbridge, Mass., and repatriated from Portsmouth, 

N.H. 

789 MELDER, KEITH E. The village and the 

nation. Roger N. Parks, ed. Sturbridge, Mass.: Old 
Sturbridge Village, 1976. 77p. MStuO. h- 
Symbols and celebrations of American nationalism in 
New England communities (early-19th century). 

790 MOODY, ROBERT EARLE. "Samuel Ely: 
forerunner of Shays." NEQ, 5 (Jan. 1932), 105-134. 

Post-Revolutionary "rebel in three states": 
Massachusetts, Vermont, and Maine. 

791 MORGARWILLIAM JAMES. Captains to the 
northward: New England captains in the Continental 
Navy. Barre, Mass.: Bane Gazette, 1959. 260p. 

MSaE. -H 

See also next entry. 



792 . "The New England captains in the Continental 

Navy." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of Southern 
California, 1958. 

See also preceding entry. 

793 MORISON, SAMUEL ELIOT. "Nova Albion and 
New England." Oregon Historical Quarterly, 28 (Mar. 
1927), 1-17. 

New England and the early history of the Oregon 
country. 

794 . "The property of Hanison Gray, Loyalist." 

Colonial Society of Massachusetts, Publications, 14 
(1911-1913), 320-350. 

In Massachusetts and New Hampshire. 

795 MORRIS, RICHARD B. "Legalism versus 
revolutionary doctrine in New England." NEQ, 4 (Apr. 
1931), 195-215. 

796 MORSE, SIDNEY GILBERT. "The fleet." 

American Neptune, 5 (Apr. 1945), 177-193. 

Privateers operating out of New England ports during 
the American Revolution. See also next entry. 

797 . "New England privateering in the American 

Revolution." Ph.D. dissertation. Harvard Univ., 1941. 
598p. 

798 . "The Yankee privateersmen of 1776." Yankee, 

17 (Mar. 1944), 71-86. 

799 NANCE, JOSEPH M. "The attitude of New 

England toward westward expansion, 1800-1850." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Univ. of Texas, 1941. 203p. 

800 NAPIER, HENRY EDWARD. New England 
blockaded in 1814: the journal of Henry Edward 
Napier, lieutenant of H. M. S. Nymphe. Walter Muir 
Whitehill, ed. Salem, Mass.: Peabody Museum, 1939. 
xxi, 88p. MBU. + 

War of 1812. 

801 NEAGLE, MARJORIE SPILLER. 'The New 

England journey (as told in George Washington’s 1789 
diary)." NEG, 13 (Fall 1971), 12-19. 

See also entries 740 and 827. 

802 NEWMYER, R. KENT. "Harvard Law School, 

New England legal culture, and the antebellum origins 
of American jurisprudence." Journal of American 
History, 74 (Dec. 1987), 814-835. 



40 



General and Chronological 



803 ’"NOTES on settling America'; Albert 

Gallatin, New England, and the American Revolution." 
NEQ, 58 (Sept. 1985), 442-453. 

The future secretary of the treasury's critical 
comments about New England, where he lived briefly 
following his anival from Geneva in 1780. Edwin G. 
Burrows, ed. 

804 O'CONNOR, THOMAS HENRY. The lords of the 
loom; the cotton Whigs and the coming of the Civil 
War. N.Y.; Charles Scribner's Sons, 1968. ix, 214p. 
MBU.-t- 

805 OVERTON, ALBERT G. Plunderers from 
across the Sound; documented narratives of 
Revolutionary War incidents not previously known to 
historians involving inhabitants of Long Island, 
Connecticut and Nantucket in the illicit trade and 
raids across the Sound. Florissant, Mo.; Micro- 
Records Publishing, 1980. 70p. CtNhHi. -i- 

806 PARISH, PETER J. "Daniel Webster, New 
England, and the West." Journal of American History, 
54 (Dec. 1967), 524-549. 

Attitudes towards the American West. 

807 POWER, RICHARD LYLE. "A crusade to 

extend Yankee culture, 1820-1865." NEQ, 13 (Dec. 
1940), 638-653. 

808 PRENTISS, HARVEY PUTNAM. 'Timothy 
Pickering as the leader of New England Federalism, 
1795-1815." Ph.D. dissertation, Northwestern Univ., 
1932. 118p. MH. 

See also next entry. 

809 . Timothy Pickering as the leader of New England 

Federalism, 1800-1815. N.Y.; DaCapo Pr., 1972. 

118p. MSaE. -t- 

810 "THE REVOLUTION remembered." American 
Heritage, 31 (Apr.-May 1980), 49-64. 

Narratives and recollections of "ordinary" people of 
the time. John C. Dann, ed. 

811 "REVOLUTIONARY War records; being 

records of committees appointed by the several New 
England states, which met in Providence, R.I., 
December 25, 1776; in New Haven, Conn., January 15, 
1778; and in Boston, Mass., August 3, 1780." New 
Hampshire Historical Society Collections, 9 (1889), 
245-303. 

8 1 2 ROBINSON, WILU AM ALEXANDER. 

Jeffersonian democracy in New England. New Haven, 
Conn.; Yale Univ. Pr., 1916. vi, 190p. MWA. -i- 

See also next entry. 



AMERICAN REVOLUTION THROUGH aVIL WAR 825 



. "Jeffersonian democracy in New England." 

Ph.D. dissertation, Yale Univ., 1913. 190p. 

See also preceding entry. 

. "Party organization and campaign methods in 

New England in the Jeffersonian era." Washington 
Univ. Studies, 3 (1916), 183-204. 

SANBORN, EDWIN DAVID. "New Hampshire men 
at Bunker Hill and Bermington." Granite Monthly, 1 
(Sept. 1877), 209-211; (Oct. 1877), 241-244. 

SCHUTZ, JOHN A. "Those who became 

Tories; town loyalty and revolution in New England." 

NEHGR, 129 (Apr. 1975), 94-105. 

SIEBERT, WILBUR H. "Loyalist troops of 
New England." NEQ, 4 (Jan. 1931), 108-147. 

SLOAT, CAROLINE FULLER. ’"Liberty within 
the people's reach." Old Sturbridge Visitor, 25 
(Spring 1985), 7-9. 

Town meetings (early-19th century). 

SMITH, GEORGE WINSTON. "Broadsides for 
freedom!; Civil War propaganda in New England." NEQ, 
21 (Sept. 1948), 291-312. 

SMITH, PHILIP SAMUEL FOSTER. "Captain 
Samuel Tucker (1747-1833), Continental Navy. EIHC, 
112 (July 1976), 155-268. 

Includes his early years in Marblehead, Mass., and 
his later life in Bristol, Me. 

STEVENS, J. HAROLD. "The influence of 

New England in Michigan." Michigan History Magazine 

19 (Autumn 1935), 321-353. 

STEVENSON, ARCHIBALD E. New England in 
Washington's day. New Canaan, Conn.; John E. Hersam 
1929. 102p. Ct. + 

STUART, REGINALD C. "'For the Lord is a 
man of warr'; the colonial New England view of war 
and the American Revolution." Journal of Church and 
State, 23 (Autumn 1981), 519-532. 

TAYLOR, GEORGE ROGERS. "The agricultural 
towns of southern New England, 1790-1830." New 
England Social Studies Bulletin, 13 (Dec. 1955), 8-9, 

16. 

THARP, LOUISE HALL. "New England under 
observation." NEG, 6 (Fall 1964), 3-9. 

Foreign visitors (Revolutionary era). 



813 

814 

815 

816 

817 

818 

819 

820 

821 

822 

823 

824 

825 



41 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



826 AMERICAN REVOLUTION THROUGH CIVIL WAR 



826 THEY preached liberty: an anthology of 

timely quotations from New England ministers of the 
American Revolution on the subject of liberty, its 
source, nature, obligations, types and blessing. 

Franklin P. Cole, ed. Indianapolis: Liberty Pr., 

[1977], 176p. M. + 

827 THOMPSON, WINFIELD M. "When Washington 
toured New England, 1789." Magazine of History, 23 
(Sept.-Oct. 1916), 116-125; (Nov.-Dee. 1916), 201-208; 
24 (Jan.-Feb. 1917), 35-41; (Mar.-Apr. 1917), 153-161; 
(May-June 1917), 221-228; 25 (July 1917), 15-23; (Aug. 
1917), 64-73; (Sept.-Oct. 1917), 88-95. 

George Washington. See also entries 740 and 801. 

828 TURNER, FREDERICK JACKSON. "Greater New 
England in the middle of the nineteenth century." 

AASP, n.s. 29 (Oct. 1919), 222-241. 

829 . New England, 1830-1850. Cambridge, Mass.: 

Harvard Univ. Pr., 1931. [46]p. Ct. -i- 

Reprinted from Huntington Library Bulletin, No. 1 
(May 1931), 153-198. 

830 VARG, PAUL A. New England and foreign 
relations, 1789-1850. Hanover, N.H.: Univ. Pr. of 
New England, 1983. ix, 260p. MWA. -i- 

83 1 VOLKOMER, WALTER E. 'Timothy Dwight and 

New England Federalism." Connecticut Review, 2 (Apr. 
1970), 72-82. 

832 WEBER, DONALD. Rhetoric and history in 
Revolutionary New England. N.Y.: Oxford Univ. Pr., 
1988. xil, 207p. MB. -t- 

833 WEBSTER, DANIEL. The letters of Daniel 

Webster, from documents owned principally by the New 
Hampshire Historical Society. C. H. Van Tyne, ed. 

N.Y.: McClure, Phillips, 1902. xxii, 769p. MWA. 

834 . The papers of Daniel Webster: correspondence. 

Charles M. Wiltse, ed. Hanover, N.H.: Univ. Pr. of 
New England, 1974-1986. 7v. MWA. -i- 

835 . The papers of Daniel Webster: legal papers. 

Alfred S. Konefsky and Andrew J. King, eds. Hanover, 
N.H.: Univ. Pr. of New England, 1982-1983. 2v. MWA. 

-I- 

Vol. I: New Hampshire practice; Vol. II: Boston 
practice. See also related series of Webster's 
diplomatic papers, Kenneth E. Shewmaker, ed. (1983-). 

836 . The private correspondence of Daniel Webster. 

Fletcher Webster, ed. (1857) Boston: Little, Brown, 
1875. 2v. MWA. + 



837 . The works of Daniel Webster. Boston: Charles 

C. Little and James Brown, 1851. 6v. MWA. -i- 

Other eds. 

838 WELLS, FREDERIC PALMER. "The ranger 

service of the Coos country in the Revolutionary War." 
Vermont Antiquarian, 3 (1904-1905), 153-160. 

New Hampshire and Vermont. 

839 WOOD, JOSEPH SUTHERLAND. "Elaboration of 

a settlement system: the New England village in the 
Federal period." Journal of Historical Geography, 10 
(Oct. 1984), 331-356. 

See also entry 454. 



LATE 19TH AND 20TH CENTURIES 

840 ANDERSON, WILLIAM PINKNEY, JR. 

"Intersecting cultures in mass society: national, 
regional, and local hegemony in Southern and New 
England cities, 1950-1980." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. 
of Connecticut, 1985. 216p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 46, No. 6 A (1985), 1740. 

841 ARCHER, J. CLARK. "Federal spending in 

New England: 1952-1977." NE-StLVGSPr, 8 [1979], 1- 

10 . 

842 BARTLETT, ALBERT L. "The transformation 

of New England." Forum, 7 (Aug. 1889), 634-644. 

843 BLOCKER, R. "Mr. Roosevelt's Civilian 
Conservation Corps." Yankee, 41 (Aug. 1977), 66-71, 
130, 133. 

In New England. 

844 BUENKER, JOHN D. "The politics of 
resistance: the rural-based Yankee Republican 
machines of Connecticut and Rhode Island." NEQ, 47 
(June 1974), 212-237. 

"From the Gilded Age to the New Deal...." 

845 CALVIN Coolidge and his family: an 
aimotated bibliography. Clifford A. Pease, comp. 
Plymouth, Vt.: Calvin Coolidge Memorial Foundation, 
1987. 48p. VtHi. -H 

846 CALVIN COOLIDGE MEMORIAL FOUNDATION, 
PLYMOUTH, VT. The real Calvin Coolidge.... Plymouth, 
Vt., 1983-. VtU. -I- 

Five volumes to date. 

847 CAMPBELL, COUN DEARBORN. A comparative 
study of the fiscal systems of New Hampshire and 
Vermont, 1940-1974. n.p., 1976. 44p. NhD. -i- 



42 



General and Chronological 



848 CENTER, JUDITH ANN. "Reform's labours 

lost: two eras of party change in Connecticut and 
Massachusetts." Ph.D. dissertation, Yale Univ., 1981. 
iv, 259p. CtHi. 

Abstracted in DAI, 43, No. 7 A (1983), 2436. 

849 CLAVEL, PIERRE. The progressive city: 

plamiing and participation, 1969-1984. New Brunswick, 
N.J.: Rutgers Univ. Pr., 1986. 262p. VtU. + 

Includes studies of Burlington, Vt. (1981-1984), and 
Hartford, Coim. (1969-1979). 

850 COOLIDGE, CALVIN. The autobiography of 
Calvin Coolidge. N.Y.: Cosmopolitan Book, 1929. 
246p. VtU. -t- 

851 . Your son, Calvin Coolidge: a selection of 

letters from Calvin Coolidge to his father. Edward 
Connery Lathem, ed. Montpelier, Vt.: Vermont 
Historical Society, 1968. xi, 243p. MWA. -i- 

852 CURRIER, AMOS N. "The decline of rural 

New England." Popular Science Monthly, 38 (Jan. 

1891), 384-389. 

853 DeMOTT, JOHN B. Yankee postal inspector. 

Old Town, Me.: Howland's Fhinting, 1982. 177p. MeU. 

-I- 

Author was first New England regional director of 
the Post Office Department. 

854 FOSTER, CHARLES H. W. Experiments in 
bioregionalism: the New England River Basin story. 
Hanover, N.H.: Univ. Pr. of New England, 1984. xvi, 
231p. MB. -I- 

New England River Basin Commission. 

855 FUESS, CLAUDE MOORE. Calvin Coolidge: 

the man from Vermont. Boston: Little, Brown, 1940. 
xii, 522p. VtU. + 

And Massachusetts. 

856 GILFOND, DUFF. The rise of Saint Calvin: 

many sidelights on the career of Mr. Coolidge. N.Y.: 
Vanguard Pr., 1932. ix, 294p. VtU. + 

857 GREEN, HORACE. The life of Calvin 
Coolidge. N.Y.: Duffield, 1924. 263p. VtU. + 

858 HADLEY, CHARLES D., and SUSAN E. HOWELL. 
"Partisan conversion in the Northeast: analysis of 
split ticket voting, 1952-1976." American Political 
Quarterly, 7 (July 1979), 259-282. 

859 HEARDEN, PATRICK J. "New England's 

reaction to the New South." South Atlantic Quarterly, 

75 (Summer 1976), 371-388. 



LATE 19TH AND 20TH CENTURIES 871 



HOAR, JAY S. New England's last Civil 

War veterans. Arlington, Tex.: Seacliff Pr., 1976. 

ix, 195p. MWA. + 

HOLBROOK, STEWART HALL. "There she 
stands." NEQ, 23 (Mar. 1950), 3-18. 

Concerning the alleged decline of New England (since 
ca. 1850). See also entry 875. 

JONES, HOWARD MUMFORD. "The unity of New 
England culture." MHSP, 79 (1967), 74-88. 

Post-Civil War. 

LEUCHTENBURG, WILLIAM EDWARD. Flood 
control politics: the Connecticut River Valley 
problem, 1927-1950. Cambridge, Mass., 1953. 339p. 
MB. -(- 

See also next entry. 

. "Flood control politics: the Connecticut 

River Valley, 1927-1950." Ph.D. dissertation, 

Columbia Univ., 1953. 325p. 

See also preceding entry. 

LOCKARD, WALTER DUANE. "National 

politics in New England." New England Social Studies 

Bulletin, 10 (Oct. 1952), 24-31. 

National elections (1932-1948). 

. New England state politics. Princeton, N.J.: 

Princeton Univ. Pr., 1959. xi, 348p. MBU. -i- 

LYNCH, JACQUELINE T. "What they did at 

camp." Chickuppy & Friends Magazine, 6 (Oct. 1986), 7- 

9, 12-17. 

Civilian Conservation Corps camps in New England. 

McCOY, DONALD R. Calvin Coolidge: the 
quiet president. N.Y.: Macmillan, 1967. viii, 472p. 

MB. -t 

Reprinted 1988. 

MARSTON, FRANK A., PERCY A. SHAW, and 
EDWIN T. McDowell. "Water works operating expenses 
under post-war conditions." New England Water Works 
Association, Journal, 64 (June 1950), 119-137. 

MEET Calvin Coolidge: the man behind the 
myth. Edward Connery Lathem, ed. Brattleboro, Vt.: 
Stephen Greene Pr., 1960. 223p. VtU. -i- 

MOORE, JOHN HAMMOND. "Hitler's Afrika 
Korps-in New England." Yankee, 40 (June 1976), 82- 
88, 116. 

World War II prisoner of war camps. 



860 

861 

862 

863 

864 

865 

866 

867 

868 

869 

870 

871 



43 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



872 LATE 19TH AND 20TH CENTURIES 



872 NEW ENGLAND-NEW YORK INTER-AGENCY 
COMMITTEE. Land and water resources of the New 
England-New York region. Washington, D.C.: 
Government Printing Office, 1957. xxxiv, 429p. 
MBU.-t- 

Includes historical information. 

873 NEW England political parties. Josephine 

F. Milbum and William Doyle, eds. Cambridge, Mass.; 
Schenkman Publishing, 1983. x, 272p. MH. + 

Essays on recent political history. See also next 
entry. 

874 NEW England politics. Josephine F. 

Milbum and Victoria Schuck, eds. Cambridge, Mass.: 
Schenkman Publishing, 1981. xvii, 315p. VtU. 

See also preceding entry. 

875 O'BRIEN, ROBERT LINCOLN. "The decay of 

New England." New England Society of Cleveland and 
the Western Reserve (1929), 47-55. 

See also entry 861. 

876 PEIRCE, NEAL R. The New England states: 
people, politics, and power in the six New England 
states. N.Y.: Norton, 1976. 447p. MB. + 

877 PIDGEON, DANIEL. Old-world questions and 
New-world answers. London: Kegan Paul, Tranch, 
viii, 369p. MWA. + 

An Englishman's observations of society and 
industry in New England, New York, and Canada. 

878 RANKIN, R. S. "Developments in equipment 

for water works in New England." New England Water 
Works Association, Journal, 72 (June 1958), 315- 
322. 



879 ROBERTS, KENNETH LEWIS. Concentrated New 
England; a sketch of Calvin Coolidge. Indianapolis: 
Bobbs-Merrill, [1924]. 57p. VtU. -i- 

880 ROGERS, CAMERON. The legend of Calvin 
Coolidge. Garden City, N.Y.; Doubleday, Doran, 
179p. VtU. -t- 

881 ROSS, ISHBEL. Grace Coolidge and her 

era: the story of a president's wife. N.Y.: Dodd, 
Mead, 1962. 370p. VtU. -t- 

Reprinted 1988. 

882 SUGDEN, JANE, and NORMAN KOTKER. New 
England past: photographs, 1880-1915. N.Y.; H. N. 
Abrams, 1981. 258p. Ct. -t- 

883 WHEELER, WALTER HEBER, JR. New England 
Council: its beginnings, its work and its future 
(1925-1952). N.Y.: Newcomen Society in North 
America, 1952. 32p. MWA. + 

884 WHITE, JOHN KENNETH. The fractured 
electorate; political parties and social change in 
southern New England. Hanover, N.H.: Univ. Pr of 
New England, 1983. xvi, 159p. MB. -t- 

See also next entry. 

885 . "The fractured electorate: social change and 

the political parties in southern New England." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Univ. of Connecticut, 1980. 475p. 

20th century. Abstracted in DAI, 41, No. 8 (1981), 
3710. See also preceding entry. 

886 WHITE, WILLIAM ALLEN. A Puritan in 
Babylon: the story of Calvin Coolidge. N.Y.; 
Macmillan, 1938. xvi, 460p. VtU. -i- 



44 



Population and Ethnic Groups 



GENERAL 



887 ADAMS, JOHN W„ and AUCE BEE KASAKOFF. 
"Migration and the family in colonial New England: 
the view from genealogies." Journal of Family 
History, 9 (Spring 1984), 24-43. 

888 . "Wealth and migration in Massachusetts and 

Maine: 1771-1798." Journal of Economic History, 45 
(June 1985), 363-368. 

889 ALLEN, NATHAN. Changes in New England 
population. Lowell, Mass.: Stone House, 1877. 16p. 
Ct. + 

890 BIDWELL, PERCY WELLS. Population growth 

in southern New England, 1810-1860. [Boston, 1917.] 
[27]p. MBAt. + 

Reprinted from American Statistical Association, 
Quarterly Publications (Dec. 1917), 813-839. 

891 BLOUIN, FRANCIS XAVIER, JR. The Boston 
region, 1810-1850: a study of urbanization. Ann 
Arbor, Mich.: UMI Research, 1979. xiii, 229p. 

MStuO. -I- 

Region under study includes all of Massachusetts as 
far west as the eastern boundary of the Connecticut 
River watershed in Worcester County, plus Rockingham 
County, N.H. See also next entry. 



892 . "The Boston region, 1810-1850: a study of 

urbanization on a regional scale." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Univ. of Minnesota, 1978. 315p. M. 

Abstracted in DAI, 39, No. 2A (1979), 1054. See 
also preceding entry. 

893 BREWER, DANIEL CHAUNCEY. The conquest of 
New England by the immigrant. N.Y.: G. P. Putnam's 
Sons, 1926. vi, 369p. MWA. + 

894 DANIELS, BRUCE COLIN. "Bridgeport’s a 

long way from Boston: population growth in New 
England's secondary cities, 1790-1980." Cormecticut 
History, No. 26 (Nov. 1985), 133-144. 

New England's six secondary cities-Bridgeport, 
Hartford, New Haven, Providence, Springfield, and 
Worcester— "have always suffered from being too 
close to Boston, to New York City, and to one 
another." 

895 . "The colonial background of New England's 

secondary urban centers." Historical Journal of 
Massachusetts, 14 (Jan. 1986), 11-24. 

Includes the six cities mentioned in note to 
previous entry, plus Manchester, N.H. 

896 FLORIN, JOHN WILUAM. Death in New 
England: regional variations in mortality. Chapel 
Hill, N.C.: Univ. of North Carolina, Dept, of 
Geography, 1971. viii, 172p. MWA. -t- 



-I- Listings in the National Union Catalog for books and pamphlets marked 
with this symbol may include additional library locations. 



45 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



897 GENERAL 



897 FLORIN. JOHN WILLIAM. "Death in New 
England: an analysis in time and space." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Pennsylvania State Univ., 1971. 239p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 32, No. 9B (1972), 5243. 

898 GLASS, ROBERT LOUIS. Mortality of New 

England dentists, 1921-1960. Washington, D.C.: U.S. 
Dept, of Health, Education and Welfare, Public Health 
Service, Division of Radiological Health, 1966. viii, 
70p. NhD. + 

899 HALE. EDWARD EVERETT. "New England and 
emigration." Chautauquan, 12 (Feb. 1891), 630-635. 

9(X} HANSEN, MARCUS. "The second colonization 
of New England." NEQ, 2 (Oct. 1929), 539-560. 
1815-1914. 

901 HARMON, JOHN E. "The regional structure 

of megalopolis and the situation of southern New 
England cities." NE-StLVGSPr, 13 [1984], 80-89. 

902 HIDDEN minorities: the persistence of 
ethnicity in American life. Joan H. Rollins, ed. 
Washington, D.C.: Univ. Pr. of America, 1981. x, 
258p. MNb. -H 

Mainly a study of southern New England. 

903 HIGGS, ROBERT. "Colonial New England 
demography: a sampling approach." WMQ, 3 ser. 27 
(Apr. 1970), 282-294. 

904 HOGAN. WILLIAM VINCENT. "Demographic 
aspects of a maturing economy: New England, 1850- 
1900." Ph.D. dissertation, Cornell Univ., 1976. 

296p. MLowU. 

Abstracted in DAI, 37, No. lA (1976), 496. 

905 HOLBROOK. STEWART HALL. The Yankee 
exodus: an account of migration from New England. 
N.Y.: Macmillan, 1950. xii, 398p. MWA. -t- 

906 JACOBUS, DONALD LINES. "Age of girls at 
marriage in colonial New England." American 
Genealogist, 27 (Apr. 1951), 116-118. 

907 LEWIS, GEORGE K. "Population change in 
northern New England." Association of American 
Geographers, Annals, 62 (June 1972), 307-322. 

908 "MIGRATION at marriage in colonial New 
England." Mayflower Quarterly, 46 (Feb. 1980), 6-8. 

909 MUSSEY, JUNE BARROWS. "Yankee chills. 

Ohio fever." NEQ, 22 (Dec. 1949), 435-451. 

Cold summer of 1816 and westward migration from New 
England. See also next entry. 



, and SYLVESTER L. VIGILANTE. "Eighteen-hundrec 

and froze-to-death: the cold summer of 1816 and 
westward migration from New England." New York Public 
Library, Bulletin, 52 (Sept. 1948), 454-457. 

See also preceding entry. 

O'BRIEN, ROBERT LINCOLN. "The census and 
New England." MHSP, 63 (1930), 71-78. 

O'KEEFE, DORIS. "Patterns of marriage 

migration in colonial New England." NE-StLVGSPr, 6 

[1977], 7-10. 

PENNSYLVANIA. STATE UNIVERSITY. 

NORTHEAST REGIONAL CENTER FOR RURAL 
DEVELOPMENT. The structure and impact of population 
redistribution in New England. Thomas E. Steahr and 
A. E. Luloff, eds. University Park, Pa., 1985. 197p. 

RHi. -h 

Includes historical essays. 

POWELL, E. P. "The romance of 

pioneering." NEM, n.s. 21 (Nov. 1899), 342-352. 

PRESSEY, EDWARD P. "The rise of the tide 

of life to New England hilltops." NEM, n.s. 22 (Aug. 

1900), 695-711. 

Settlement patterns. 

RAND, BENJAMIN. "New England settlements 
in Acadia." American Historical Association, Aimual 
Report (1890), 41-42. 

18th century. 

ROSENBERRY, LOIS CARTER KIMBALL MATHEWS. 

The expansion of New England: the spread of New 
England settlement and institutions to the Mississippi 
River, 1620-1865. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1909. 
xiv, 303p. MWA. -t- 
See also next entry. 

. "Study of the spread of New England settlement 

and institutions, 1620-1865." Ph.D. dissertation, 

Radcliffe College, 1906. [228]p. 

See also preceding entry. 

SCHNELL, GEORGE A., and MARK S. 

MONMONIER. "Stability and interrelationships of 
demographic variables in the Northeast, 1960-1974." 
NE-StLVGSPr, 6 [1977], 72-74. 

SMITH, DANIEL SCOTT. "The demographic 

history of colonial New England." Journal of Economic 

History, 32 (Mar. 1972), 165-183. 



910 

911 

912 

913 

914 

915 

916 

917 

918 

919 

920 



46 



Population and Ethnic Groups 



AMERICAN INDIANS 940 



921 SOLOMON, BARBARA MILLER. Ancestors and 932 

immigrants: a changing New England tradition. 

Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard Univ. Pr., 1956. ix, 276p. 

MWA.+ 

See also next entry. 

933 

922 . "The intellectual background of the 

immigration restriction movement in New England." 

NEQ, 25 (Mar. 1952), 47-59. 

Late- 19th century. 

934 

923 . "New England pride and prejudice: a study in 

the origins of immigration restriction." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Radcliffe College, 1953. 

See also preceding entry. 

924 SPENGLER, JOSEPH JOHN. The fecundity of 
native and foreigh-bom women in New England. 

Washington, D.C.: Brookings Institution, 1930. 63p. 

NhD.-t- 

925 . "Has the native population of New England been 

dying out?" Quarterly Journal of Economics, 44 (Aug. 

1930), 639-662. 

I.e., Yankees. 

926 STOCKWELL, EDWARD GRANT. "Socio-economic 
mortality differentials in Hartford, Connecticut, and 
Providence, Rhode Island, 1949-1951: a methodological 
critique." Ph.D. dissertation. Brown Univ., 1960. 

285p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 23, No. 5 (1962), 1823. 

927 TUCKER, RUFUS STICKNEY. 'The expansion 
of New England." NEHGR, 76 (Oct. 1922), 301-305. 

Population movements out of the region. 

928 U.S. OFHCE OF REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT 
PLANNING. New England: a social and economic 
characteristics profile, 1940-1985. Joel Frisch and 
Margaret Olsen, comps. Washington, D.C., 1967. 9, 

[53]p. MBU. 

929 VINOVSKIS, MARIS A. "The 1789 life table 
of Edward Wiggles worth." Journal of Economic History, 

31 (Sept. 1971), 570-590. 

Analysis of the populations of Massachusetts, New 
Hampshire, and Maine, by a Harvard professor. 

930 WEST, NIELS. "Coastal demographic 
changes in the Northeast between 1970 and 1980." NE- 
StLVGSPr, 12 [1983], 9-14. 

931 WILLIAMSON, JEFFREY G. "Antebellum 
urbanization in the American Northeast." Journal of 
Economic History, 25 (Dec. 1965), 592-608. 

See also next entry. 



, and JOSEPH A. SWANSON. "The growth of cities 

in the American Northeast, 1820-1870." Explorations 
in Entrepreneurial History, 2 ser. 4, Supplement 
(1966), 3-101. 

WILSON, HAROLD RSHER. "Population 

trends in north-western New England, 1790-1930." NEQ, 

7 (June 1934), 278-306. 

See also next entry. 

. "Population trends in northern New England, 

1790-1930." Geographical Review, 24 (Apr. 1934), 272- 
277. 

See also preceding entry. 

SEE "Population" and "Immigration and emigration" in 
Index for additional listings. 



AMERICAN INDIANS 

935 APES, WILLIAM. The experiences of five 
Christian Indians of the Pequod tribe. Boston: J. B. 
Dow, 1833. 60p. MSaE. + 

936 ARMBRUSTER, EUGENE L. The Indians of New 
England and New Netherland. N.Y.: Printed by G. 
Quattlander, 1918. lip. Me. -i- 

937 BARBER, RUSSELL J. "Shell middens and 

New England archaeology." Context, 3 (Winter 1984), 
1- 3. 

938 [BARRATT, JOSEPH.] The Indian of New- 
England, and the north-eastern provinces: a sketch of 
the life of an Indian hunter, ancient traditions 
relating to the Etchemin tribe, their modes of life, 
fishing, hunting, &c.; with vocabularies in the Indian 
and English, giving the names of the animals, birds, 
and fish.... Middletown, Conn.: C. H. Pelton, 1851. 
24p. MSaE. -t- 

939 BENNETT, MERRILL KELLEY. 'The food 
economy of the New England Indians, 1605-1675." 
Journal of Political Economy, 63 (Oct. 1955), 369-397. 

940 BLODGETT, HAROLD. Samson Occom. 

Hanover, N.H.: Dartmouth College Pr., 1935. 230p. 
MU.-^ 

Indian preacher and leader from Connecticut (lived 
1723-1792), who raised funds that were used to found 
Dartmouth College. See also entries 1014 and 1028. 



47 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



94 1 AMERICAN INDIANS 



941 BOISSEVAIN, ETHEL. "Whatever became of 

the New England Indians shipped to Bermuda to be sold 
as slaves?" Man in the Northeast, No. 21 (Spring 
1981). 103-114. 

942 BONE ANTI, LEO. Biographies and legends 

of the New England Indians. Wakefield, Mass.: Pride 
Publications, 1970-1974. 4v. MWA. -i- 

943 BORNS. HAROLD W., JR. "Possible paleo- 
Indian migration routes in northeastern North 
America." Maine Archaeological Society, Bulletin, 1 1 
(Spring 1971). 33-39. 

See also next entry. 

944 . "Possible paleo-Indian migration routes in the 

Northeast: a geological approach." Massachusetts 
Archaeological Society, Bulletin, 34 (Oct. 1972-Jan. 
1973), 13-15. 

See also preceding entry. 

945 BRADLEY, JAMES W. "Native exchange and 
Europ>ean trade: cross-cultural dynamics in the 
sixteenth century." Man in the Northeast, No. 33 
(Spring 1987), 31-46. 

Study of the Onondaga Iroquois of New York and the 
Pokanoket Indians of southern New England. 

946 BRADLEY, WILL T. "Medical practices of 

the New England aborigines." Kennebec Proprietor, 3 
(Spring 1986), 16-20. 

947 BRATTON, TIMOTHY L. "The identity of the 

New England Indian epidemic of 1616-19." Bulletin of 
the History of Medicine, 62 (Fall 1988), 351-383. 

948 BRODEUR, PAUL. Restitution: the land 

claims of the Mashpee, Passamaquoddy, and Penobscot 
Indians of New England. Boston: Northeastern Univ. 
Pr., 1985. ix. 148p. MB. -t 

949 BURTON, ALMA HOLMAN. The story of the 
Indians of New England. N.Y.: Silver, Burdett, 1896. 
273p. NhD. + 

950 BUTLER, EVA L. "Algonkian culture and 

use of maize in southern New England." Archaeological 
Society of Connecticut, Bulletin, No. 22 (Dec. 1948), 
3-39. 

951 . "Notes on Indian ethnology and history." 

Archaeological Society of Connecticut, Bulletin, 27 
(Dec. 1953), 35-47. 

In southern New England. 



952 . "Sweat-houses in the southern New England 

area." Massachusetts Archaeological Society, 

Bulletin, 7 (1945-1946), 11-15. 

Medical cure. 

953 and WENDELLS. HADL(X:K. "Dogs of the 

Northeastern woodland Indians." Massachusetts 
Archaeological Society, Bulletin, 10 (1948-1949), 17- 
35. 

954 CADUTO, MICHAEL J. "Abenaki myths: 

living legends of the People of the Dawn." Vermont 
Life, 41 (Winter 1986), 37-40. 

955 CALIGERO, BARBARA ANDERSON. "Rock art of 
New England." Archaeological Society of Connecticut, 
Bulletin, No. 46 (1983), 1-13. 

956 CAVE, ALFRED A. "The Pequot invasion of 
southern New England: a reassessment of the 
evidence." NEQ, 62 (Mar. 1989), 27-44. 

957 CECI, LYNN. "Fish fertilizer: a native 

North American practice?" Science, 188 (Apr. 4, 

1975), 26-30. 

958 . "Watchers of the Pleiades: ethnoastronomy and 

native cultivators in northeastern North America." 
Ethnohistory, 25 (Fall 1978), 301-317. 

959 COGLEY, RICHARD WILLIAM. "John Eliot and 

the origins of the American Indians." Early American 
Literature, 21 (Winter 1986-1987), 210-225. 

960 COLEE, PHILLIP SAUVE. "The Housatonic- 
Stockbridge Indians: 1734-1760." Ph.D. dissertation. 
State Univ. of New York, Albany, 1977. 208p. MWiW. 

Abstracted in DAI, 38, No. 3A (1977), 1498. 

961 CONNOLE, DENNIS A. "Land occupied by the 
Nipmuck Indians of central New England, 1600-1700." 
Massachusetts Archaeological Society, Bulletin, 38 
(Oct. 1976) 14-20. 

962 COOK, SHERBURNE F. The Indian population 

of New England in the seventeenth century. Berkeley, 
Calif.: Univ. of California Pr., 1976. vii, 91p. 

MBU.-t- 

963 . "Interracial warfare and population decline 

among the New England Indians." Ethnohistory, 20 
(Winter 1973), 1-24. 

964 . "The significance of disease in the extinction 

of the New England Indian." Human Biology, 45 (Sept. 
1973), 485-508. 



48 



965 

966 

967 

968 

969 

970 

971 

972 

973 

974 

975 



Population and Ethnic Groups 



AMERICAN INDIANS 988 



DAY, GOREXDN M. "Henry Tufts as a source 

on the eighteenth century Abenakis." Ethnohistory, 21 

(Summer 1974), 189-197. 

Tufts' autobiography (he died in 1831) as a source 
of information about a group of Abenakis living in 
northwestern New England and southern Quebec. 

DEWAR, ROBERT E. "Discovering settlement 
systems of the past in New England site 
distributions." Man in the Northeast, No. 31 (Spring 
1986), 77-88. 

Indian settlement. 

DINCAUZE, DENA FERRAN, and JUDITH W. 

MEYER. Prehistoric resources of east-central New 
England: a preliminary predictive study. Washington, 
D.C.: National Park Service, 1977. vii, 55p. NhD. -i- 

DKON, ROLAND BURRAGE. 'The early 
migrations of the Indians of New England and the 
maritime provinces." AASP, n.s. 24 (Apr. 1914), 65- 
76. 

EARLY and middle archaic cultures in the 
Northeast. David R. Starbuck and Charles E. Bolian, 
eds. Rindge, N.H.: Franklin Pierce College, Dept, of 
Anthropology, 1980. vi, 137p. NhHi. -i- 

FAGAN, LISA A. "A vegetational and 
cultural sequence for southern New England, 15,000 BP 
to 7,000 BP." Man in the Northeast, Nos. 15-16 
(Spring-Fall 1978), 70-92. 

FEDER, KENNETH L. "Metal tools for stone 
age New Englanders: trade and warfare in southern New 
England." Man in the Northeast, No. 27 (Spring 1984), 
51-65. 

. "Site survey in southern New England: toward 

a settlement model." Man in the Northeast, No. 22 
(Fall 1981), 31-35. 

Prehistoric settlement. 

FETCHKO, PETER, JOHN GRIMES, and WILUAM 
PHIPPEN. Stone age New England: 10,(XX) years of 
history. Salem, Mass.: Peabody Museum, [1976?]. 

30p. MBAt. -I- 

FOWLER, WILLIAM SMITH. "Abodes of four 
aboriginal periods." Massachusetts Archaeological 
Society, Bulletin, 34 (Apr.-July 1973), 15-22. 

. "Agricultural tools and techniques of the 

Northeast." Massachusetts Archaeological Society, 
Bulletin, 15 (Apr. 1954), 41-51. 



976 . "Bone implements: how they were used." 

Massachusetts Archaeological Society, Bulletin, 33 
(Oct. 1971-Jan. 1972), 12-19. 

977 . "Ceramics of the 'early' period." 

Massachusetts Archaeological Society, Bulletin, 13 
(Apr. 1952), 29-32. 

Central New England. 

978 . "Comparative study of hoe and spade blades." 

Massachusetts Archaeological Society, Bulletin, 35 
(Oct. 1973-Jan. 1974), 1-9. 

979 . "The diagnostic stone bowl industry." 

Massachusetts Archaeological Society, Bulletin, 36 
(Apr.-July 1975), 1-10. 

980 . "Eating practices in aboriginal New England." 

Massachusetts Archaeological Society, Bulletin, 36 
(Apr.-July 1975), 21-27. 

981 . "Figured art: its presence in stone age New 

England." Massachusetts Archaeological Society, 
Bulletin, 35 (Oct. 1973-Jan. 1974), 20-24. 

982 . "Metal cutouts of the Northeast." 

Massachusetts Archaeological Society, Bulletin, 34 
(Apr.-July 1973), 24-30. 

983 . "Pottery types of central New England." 

Massachusetts Archaeological Society, Bulletin, 12 
(Apr. 1951), 38-40. 

984 . "Projectile imports: how to recognize them." 

Massachusetts Archaeological Society, Bulletin, 34 
(Oct. 1972-Jan. 1973), 16-24. 

From outside New England. 

985 . "Stone-age methods of woodworking in the 

Connecticut Valley." Archaeological Society of 
Connecticut, Bulletin, No. 20 (Dec. 1946), 1-32. 

986 . "A study of projectile points." Massachusetts 

Archaeological Society, Bulletin, 35 (Apr.-July 1974), 
1 - 8 . 

987 . Ten thousand years in America. N.Y.: Vantage 

Pr., 1957. 160p. Ct. -h 

Indians in New England. 

988 . "Tomahawks of central New England." 

Massachusetts Archaeological Society, Bulletin, 12 
(Apr. 1951), 29-39. 



49 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



989 AMERICAN INDIANS 



989 FOWLER. WILLIAM SMITH. "Water 
transportation in the Northeast." Narragansett 
Archaeological Society of Rhode Island, Report (June 
1984). 4-9. 

990 FRANKUN PIERCE COLLEGE, RINDGE. N.H. 
DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY. Essays in 
Northeastern anthropology, in memory of Marian E. 
White. William E. Englebrecht and Donald K. Grayson, 
eds. Rindge, N.H., 1978. vi, 183p. VtU. + 

991 G AH AN, LAWRENCE K. "The Nipmucks and 
their territory." Massachusetts Archaeological 
Society, Bulletin, 2 (July 1941), 2-6. 

992 GOOKJN, DANIEL. The Historical 

collections of the Indians in New England: of their 
several nations, numbers, customs, manners, religion 
and government, before the English planted there. 
(1792) Jeffrey H. Fiske, ed. n.p.: Towtaid, 1970. 

XV, 140p. MWA. -I- 
Written ca. 1674. 

993 GOOKJN, WARNER FOOTE. "Metsoo'onk 
(Experience Mayhew's word for victuals)." 
Massachusetts Archaeological Society, Bulletin, 12 
(July 1951), 58-60. 

Indian cookery. 

994 HALLETT, LEAMAN F. "Cultural traits of 

the southern New England Indians: a summary of 
material derived from historical sources." 

Massachusetts Archaeological Society, Bulletin, 15 
(July 1954), 59-64. 

995 . "Indian games." Massachusetts Archaeological 

Society, Bulletin, 16 (Jan. 1955), 25-28. 

996 . "Medicine and pharmacy of the New England 

Indians." Massachusetts Archaeological Society, 
Bulletin. 17 (Apr. 1956), 46-49. 

997 HAM ELL, GEORGE R. "Mythical realities 

and European contact in the Northeast during the 
sixteenth and seventeenth centuries." Man in the 
Northeast, No. 33 (Spring 1987), 63-87. 

998 HERMAN, MARY W. "Wampum as a money in 
northeastern North America." Ethnohistory, 3 (Winter 
1956), 21-33. 

999 HOFFMAN. CURTISS R. "Plow zones and 
predictability: sesquinary context in New England 
prehistoric sites." North American Archaeologist, 3, 
No. 4 (1982), 287-309. 



1000 . "Radiocarbon and reality: the fifth 

millennium B.P. in southern New England." Man in the 
Northeast. No. 26 (Fall 1983), 33-53. 

1001 HOORNBEEK, BILLEE. "An investigation 
into the cause or causes of the epidemic which 
decimated the Indian population of New England, 1616- 
1619." New Hampshire Archeologist, No. 19 (1976- 
1977), 35-46. 

1002 HOWE, HENRY FORBUSH. "The sources of New 
England Indian history prior to 1620." Massachusetts 
Archaeological Society, Bulletin, 3 (1941-1942), 19- 
24. 

1003 HOWES. WILLIAM J. "Aboriginal New 
England pottery." Massachusetts Archaeological 
Society, Bulletin, 15 (Jan. 1954), 23-36; (July 1954), 
81-86; 16 (Oct. 1954), 9-19; 17 (Jan. 1956), 30-40; 

(Apr. 1956), 52-58. 

1004 THE INDIANS of New England: a critical 
bibliography. Neal E. Salisbury, comp. Bloomington, 
Ind.: Indiana Univ. Pr., 1982. xviii, 109p. MBU. -i- 

See also next entry. 

1005 THE INDIANS of the Northeast: a critical 
bibliography. Elisabeth Tooker, comp. Bloomington, 
Ind.: Indiana Univ. Pr., 1978. xi, 77p. MeHi. + 

See also preceding entry. 

1006 JOHNSON, STEVEN F. New England Indians, 
n.p., 1980. IlOp. MBNEH. + 

1007 KELLEY, MARC A., T. GAIL BARRETT, and 
SANDRA D. SAUNDERS. "Diet, dental disease, and 
transition in Northeastern Native Americans." Man in 
the Northeast, No. 33 (1987), 113-125. 

1008 KENYON. VICTORIA BUNKER. "A new approach 
to the analysis of New England prehistoric pottery." 

Man in the Northeast, No. 18 (Fall 1979), 81-84. 

1009 . "Prehistoric archeology in the Merrimack River 

Valley." Man in the Northeast, No. 25 (Spring 1983), 

1-5. 

1010 . "River valleys and human interaction: a 

critical evaluation of middle woodlands ceramics in 
the Merrimack River Valley." Ph.D. dissertation, 

Boston Univ., 1983. 263p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 44, No. 5A (1983), 1501. 

1011 , and PATRICIA F. DOWELL. "Environmental settin. 

of Merrimack River Valley prehistoric sites." Man in 

the Northeast, No. 25 (Spring 1983), 7-23. 



50 



Population and Ethnic Groups 



AMERICAN INDIANS 1031 



1012 


KNIGHT, MARIAN VERA. The craniometry of 

the southern New England Indians. New Haven, Coim.: 

Yale Univ. Pr., 1915. 36p. MBU. + 


1022 


MOOREHEAD, WARREN KING. The Merrimack 
archaeological survey: a preliminary paper; with 
supporting notes by Benjamin L. Smith on the Concord 
Valley. Salem, Mass.: Peabody Museum, 1931. 79p. 


1013 


LANE, E. N. Indians of early New 

England: their character and customs. Notes and 




MBU.-i- 




bibliography. Springfield, Mass.: City Library 
Association, n.d. [4]p. MSaE. + 


1023 


. 'The truth about New England Indians." 
Yankee, 3 (June 1937), 11-12. 


1014 


LOVE, WILLIAM DeLOSS, JR. Samson Occom 
and the Christian Indians of New England. Boston: 
Pilgrim Pr., 1899. xiii, 379p. MSaE. + 

See also entries 940 and 1028. 


1024 


MORRISON, ALVIN HAMBLEN. "Dawnland 
decisions: seventeenth-century Wabanaki leaders and 
their response to the differential contact stimuli in 
the overlap area of New France and New England." 
Ph.D. dissertation. State Univ. of New York, Buffalo, 


1015 


LUEDTKE, BARBARA E. "Flexible tools for 
constructing the past." Man in the Northeast, No. 31 
(Spring 1986), 89-98. 




1974. V, 163p. MeU. 

Abstracted in DAI, 35, No. lOA (1975), 6291. 




Archaeology of Indians sites. 


1025 


MULHOLLAND, MITCHELL TYLER. "Patterns of 
change in prehistoric southern New England: a 


1016 


McBRIDE, KEVIN ALLEN, and NICHOLAS F. 
BELLANTONI. "The utility of ethnohistoric models for 
understanding late woodland-contact change in southern 
New England." Archaeological Society of Connecticut, 




regional approach." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of 
Massachusetts, 1984. 644p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 45, No. lOA (1985), 3156. 


1017 


Bulletin, No. 45 (1982), 51-64. 

McQUAID, KIM. "William Apes, Pequot: an 


1026 


"NEW England Indians." Historical New 
England, 1 (May 1900), 1-2. 




Indian reformer in the Jackson era." NEQ, 50 (Dec. 
1977), 605-625. 

New England reformer, one of a group of little-known 
"crusaders for human dignity in a period when the 
future of the Indian within American society seemed 


1027 


NICHOLAS, GEORGE PETER B. "Prehistoric 
utilization of crystal quartz in northern New 
England." New Hampshire Archeologist, 22, No. 1 
(1981), 49-64. 




nonexistent." 


1028 


NILES, NATHANIEL. Samson Occom: the 
Mohegan Indian teacher, preacher, and poet, with a 


1018 


MALONE, PATRICK MITCHELL. "Changing 
military technology among the Indians of southern New 
England, 1600-1677." American CJuarterly, 25 (Mar. 
1973), 48-63. 




short sketch of his life. [Madison, N.J., 1888.] 8p. 
NhD.+ 

See also entries 940 and 1014. 




See also entry 485. 


1029 


NORTHEAST. Bruce G. Trigger, ed. 

Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institution, 1978. 


1019 


MASSACHUSETTS. UNIVERSITY, AMHERST. 
DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY. Ecological 
anthropology of the middle Connecticut River Valley. 
Robert Paynter, ed. Amherst, Mass., 1979. iv. 




xvi, 924p. Ct. -t- 

Volume 15 of the Handbook of North American Indians 
series. 




161p. M. 


1030 


OTIS, LEO D. "The stones of Stone Age 

New England." Massachusetts Archaeological Society, 


1020 


MESERVE, WALTER T. "English works of 
seventeenth-century Indians." American Quarterly, 8 
(Fall 1956), 264-276. 




Bulletin, 11 (Jan. 1950), 45-47. 
Types of stone used by the Indians. 




New England. 


1031 


PAGOULATOS, PETER. 'Terminal archaic 
settlement and subsistence in the Cormecticut River 


1021 


MOELLER, ROGER W. Guide to the Indian 
artifacts of the Northeast. Blaine, Wash.: Hancock 
House Publishers, 1984. 3 Ip. MeU. + 




Valley." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of Connecticut, 
1986. 335p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 47, No. 9 A (1987), 3464. 



51 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



1032 

1032 

1033 

1034 

1035 

1036 

1037 

1038 

1039 

1040 

1041 



AMERICAN INDIANS 



PARKER. JOHNSON. "Changing 
paleoecological relationships during the late 
pleistocene and holocene in New England." 
Archaeological Society of Connecticut, Bulletin, No. 

50 (1987), 1-16. 

PEIRCE. EBENEZER WEAVER. Indian history, 
biography and genealogy: pertaining to the good 
sachem Massasoit of the Wampanoag tribe, and his 
descendants. North Abington, Mass.: Z. G. Mitchell, 
1878. xiii, 261p. MSaE. -i- 

PERKINS, GEORGE M. Archaeology of New 
England. Reprinted from Prehistoric Implements (W. 

K. Moorehead), pages 86-125. Saranac Lake, N.Y., 
1900. [43]p. MWA. + 

"A PRELIMINARY bibliography of the 

archaeology of New England Indians." Massachusetts 

Archaeological Society, Bulletin, 3 (1941-1942), 3-10. 



PRICE, CHESTER B. "Peace monuments of 
the Indians." New Hampshire Archeologist, No. 6 
(1956), 9-10. 1045 

QUARTZ technology in prehistoric New 
England. Russell J. Barber, ed. Cambridge, Mass.: 

Institute for Conservation Archaeology, Peabody 1046 

Museum, Harvard Univ., 1981. 141p. MUB. + 

RAINEY, FROELICH G. "A compilation of 

historical data contributing to the ethnography of 1047 

Connecticut and southern New England Indians." 

Archaeological Society of Connecticut, Bulletin, No. 3 
(Apr. 1936), 1-89. 1048 

RITCHIE, WILUAM AUGUSTUS. 'The paleo- 
Indian in the Northeast." Massachusetts 

Archaeological Society, Bulletin, 19 (Jan. 1958), 21- 1049 

22 . 

. Traces of early man in the Northeast. Albany, 

N.Y.: Univ. of the State of New York, 1957. 91p. 1050 

MU. -H 



ROBINSON, BARBARA. Native American 
sourcebook: a teacher's resource on New England 
native people. Concord, Mass.: Concord Museum, 1988. 1051 

xi, 222p. NhHi. -t- 



1042 ROBINSON, BRIAN S. Parti: the Nelson 

Island and Seabrook Marsh sites; late archaic marine 
oriented people on the central New England coast. 

Part II: ceramic analysis in the Northeast; 
contributions to methodology and culture history. 

James B. Petersen, ed. Rindge, N.H.: Dept, of 
Anthropology, Franklin Pierce College, 1985. vii, 

107, iii, 159p. MeHi. + 

The two sites are in Rowley, Mass., and Seabrook, 
N.H. 

1043 ROBINSON, PAUL A. "Beyond site 
prediction: interpreting and evaluating prehistoric 
data in southern New England." Man in the Northeast, 
No. 22 (Fall 1981), 147-158. 

1044 ROND A, JAMES P., and JEANNE RONDA. "The 
death of John Sassamon: an exploration in writing New 
England Indian history." American Indian (Quarterly, 1 
(Summer 1974), 91-102. 

Mysterious death of a Christian Indian at the time 
of King Philip's War (1675). 

RUSSELL, HOWARD S. Indian New England 
before the Mayflower. Hanover, N.H.: Univ. Pr. of 
New England, 1980. 296p. MSaE. + 

. "New England Indian agriculture." 

Massachusetts Archaeological Society, Bulletin, 22 
(1960-1961), 58-61. 

RUSSELL, NERISSA. "Foods of the New 
England Indians." Artifacts, 4 (June 1976), 3-4, 10. 

SARGENT, HOWARD R. "Prehistory in the 
upper Connecticut Valley." New Hampshire 
Archeologist, No. 16 (Nov. 1971), [16-17]. 

SAVILLE, MARSHALL HOWARD. Archaeological 
specimens from New England. N.Y.: Museum of the 
American Indian, Heye Foundation, 1919. lOp. NhD. -i- 

SHELDON, GEORGE. "The Pocumtuck 
confederacy." Connecticut Valley Historical Society, 
Papers and Proceedings, 2 (June 2, 1890), 78-99. 
Pocumtuck Indians. 

SILLIMAN, HORACE F. "Further notes on 
the copper breastplates of New England Indians." 
NEARA Newsletter, 5 (1970), 14-17. 



1052 SIMMONS, WILLIAM SCRANTON. "Southern New 

England shamanism: an ethnographic reconstruction." 
Papers of the Seventh Algonquian Conference (1976), 
217-256. 



52 



Population and Ethnic Groups 



AMERICAN INDIANS 1074 



1053 SIMMONS, WILLIAM SCRANTON. Spirit of the 
New England tribes: Indian history and folklore, 1620- 
1984. Hanover, N.H.: Univ. Pr. of New England, 1986. 

336p. MB. + 

1054 SNOW, DEAN R. "The ethnohistory of the 
eastern Abenaki." Ethnohistory, 23 (Summer 1976), 291- 
306. 

1055 SPECK, FRANK GOULDS MITH. 'The eastern 

Algonkian Wabanaki confederacy." American 
Anthropologist, n.s. 17 (July-Sept. 1915), 492-508. 1066 

1056 SPIESS, ARTHUR E. "Arctic garbage and 

New England paleo-Indians: the single occupation 
option." Archaeology of Eastern North America, 12 
(Fall 1984), 280-285. 

1067 

1057 , and BRUCE D. SPIESS. "New England pandemic of 

1616-1622: cause and archaeological implication." 

Man in the Northeast, No. 34 (Fall 1987), 71-83. 

1058 SPRINGFIELD [MASS.] MUSEUM OF SQENCE. 

The Connecticut Valley Indian: an introduction to 
their archaeology and history. New series, Vol. 1, 

No. 1. William R. Young, ed. Springfield, Mass., 

1969. 121p. MU. -H 

1059 STOCKLEY, BERNARD H. "Archaeology and 
history." Historic Nantucket, 12 (Oct. 1964), 13-19. 

Concerning the pre-history of southern New England. 

1060 STRATEGIES for survival: American 
Indians in the eastern U.S. Frank W. Porter, ed. 

N.Y.: Greenwood Pr., 1986. xvi, 232p. VtHi. + 

1061 STRAUSS, ALAN EDWARD. "Narragansett 
Basin argillite: lithology, chronology, and 
prehistoric tool manufacture." North American 
Archaeologist, 10, No. 1 (1989), 25-37. 

"...The use of one low-grade raw material. ..by 
prehistoric peoples in southeastern New England." 

1062 . "Nature's transformations and other pitfalls: 

toward a better understanding of post-occupational 
changes in archaeological site morphology in the 
Northeast." Massachusetts Archaeological Society, 

Bulletin, 39 (Oct. 1978), 47-64; 42 (Apr. 1981), 2-11; 

46 (Apr. 1985), 2-11; (Oct. 1985), 65-72. 

1063 . 'Toward an understanding of the manufacture 

and function of large argillite bifaces in New 
England." Man in the Northeast, No. 32 (Fall 1986), 

109-121. 



1064 THOMAS, PETER ALLEN. "Contrastive 

subsistence strategies and land use as factors for 
understanding Indian-white relations in New England." 
Ethnohistory, 23 (Winter 1977), 1-18. 

Connecticut River Valley. 

1065 . "Discerning some spatial characteristics of 

small, short-term, single occupation sites: 
implications for New England archaeology." Man in the 
Northeast, No. 31 (Spring 1986), 99-121. 

. "In the maelstrom of change: the Indian trade 

and cultural process in the middle Connecticut River 
Valley, 1635-1665." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of 
Massachusetts, 1979. xiv, 552p. CtHi. 

Abstracted in DAI, 40, No. 4A (1979), 2141. 

. "Jesuit rings: evidence of French-Indian 

contact in the Connecticut River Valley." Historical 
Archaeology, 7 (1973), 54-57. 

Rings found in three-comer area of Massachusetts, 

New Hampshire, and Vermont. 

1068 . "Middle Cormecticut Valley Indian house types: 

a cautionary note." Man in the Northeast, No. 1 (Mar. 
1971), 48-50. 

1069 THORBAHN, PETER F. "Socioeconomic 
complexity in prehistoric hunter-gatherer land use 
systems." Man in the Northeast, No. 28 (Fall 1984), 
11-25. 

1070 . "Where are the late woodland villages in 

southern New England?" Massachusetts Archaeological 
Society, Bulletin, 49 (Oct. 1988), 46-57. 

1071 TRAVERS, MILTON A. The last of the great 
Wampanoag Indian sachems: a factual story of the last 
days of King Philip's War, 1676. Boston: Christopher 
Publishing House, 1963. 93p. MWA. -t- 

1072 . The Wampanoag Indian federation of the 

Algonquin nation: Indian neighbors of the Pilgrims. 
New Bedford, Mass.: Reynolds-DeWalt, 1957. 245p. 
MSaE. -t- 

Massachusetts and Rhode Island. 

1073 TRUMBULL, JAMES HAMMOND. Origin and 

early progress of Indian missions in New England, with 
a list of books on the Indian language, printed at 
Cambridge and Boston, 1653-1721. Worcester, Mass., 
1874. 50p. MSaE. -t- 

1074 TURNB AUGH, WILLIAM A., and THOMAS H. 

KIEFFER. "Chemical variation in selected soapstone 
quarries of southern New England." Man in the 
Northeast, No. 18 (Fall 1979), 32-47. 



53 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



1075 AMERICAN INDIANS 



1 075 TURNB AUGH, WILUAM A., and WILUAM 
SCRANTON SIMMONS. "An Indian peace medal from King 
Philip's War, 1676." Man in the Northeast, No. 22 
(Fall 1981), 159-163. 

1076 UPHAM, GEORGE BAXTER. "The Indian trail 
along the Connecticut River." Granite Monthly, 51 
(Sept. 1919), 424-430. 

1077 WALLACE, ANTHONY F. C. "Political 
organization and land tenure among the Northeastern 
Indians, 1600-1830." Southwestern Journal of 
Anthropology, 13 (Winter 1957), 301-321. 

1078 WARNER, ROBERT AUSTIN. "The Indians of 
southern New England to 1725: a study in culture 
contact." Ph.D. dissertation, Yale Univ., 1935. xii, 

366p. 

Described in American Puritan Studies, Michael S. 
Montgomery, comp. (1984), 49. 

1079 WATERS, JOSEPH H. "Animal remains from 
some New England woodland sites." Archaeological 
Society of Connecticut, Bulletin, No. 33 (Jan. 1965), 

5-11. 

1080 . "Some animals used as food by successive 

cultural groups in New England." Archaeological 
Society of Connecticut, Bulletin, No. 31 (Dec. 1962), 
33-45. 

1081 WEEKS, ALVIN G. Massasoitof the 
Wampanoags: with a brief commentary on Indian 
character and sketches of other great chiefs, tribes 
and nations; also a chapter on Samoset, Squanto and 
Hobamock, three early friends of the Plymouth 
colonists. Norwood, Mass.: Plimpton Pr., 1919. xi, 

270p. MBU. 

Reprinted 1987. 

1082 WEINSTEIN, LAURIE LEE. "The dynamics of 
seventeenth century Wampanoag land relations: the 
ethnohistorical evidence for locational change.” 
Massachusetts Archaeological Society, Bulletin, 46 
(Apr. 1985), 19-35. 

1083 . "Seventeenth centtiry southern New England 

Indian agriculture." Massachusetts Archaeological 
Society, Bulletin, 47 (Oct. 1986), 59-68. 

1084 . "Survival strategies: the seventeenth-century 

Wampanoag and the European legal system." Man in the 
Northeast, No. 26 (Fall 1983), 81-86. 

1085 WILBUR, C. KEITH. The New England 
Indians. Chester, Conn.: Pequot Pr., 1978. 103p. 

MBU. -i- 



1086 WILLIAMSON, WILUAM DURKEE. "Indian 

tribes in New England." MHSC, 3 ser. 9 (1846), 92- 

100 . 

1087 WILLOUGHBY, CHARLES CLARK. Antiquities 

of the New England Indians, with notes on the ancient 
cultures of the adjacent territory. Cambridge, Mass.: 
Peabody Museum of American Archaeology and Ethnology, 
Harvard Univ., 1935. 314p. Ct. + 

1088 WYMAN, JEFFRIES. An account of some of 

the hjoekkerunoeddings, or shell heaps, in Maine and 
Massachusetts. Salem, Mass.: Essex Institute, 1867. 

26p. MSaE. + 

1089 YESNER, DAVID R. "The structure and 

function of prehistoric households in northern New 
England." Man in the Northeast, No. 28 (Fall 1984), 
51-72. 

1090 YOUNGS, JOHN WILUAM THEODORE, JR. 'The 
Indian saints of early New England." Early American 
Literature, 16 (Winter 1981-1982), 241-256. 

SEE "Indians, American" in Index for additional 
listings. 



BLACKS/SLAVERY 

1091 BROWN, CHARLES SUMNER. "The genesis of 
the Negro lawyer in New England." Negro History 
Bulletin, 22 (Apr. 1959), 147-152; (May 1959), 171- 
177. 

1092 BROWN, RICHARD DAVID. '"Not only extreme 
poverty, but the worst kind of orphanage': Lemuel 
Haynes and the boundaries of racial tolerance on the 
Yankee frontier, 1770-1820." NEQ, 1 (Dec. 1988), 502- 
518. 

See also entry 2041. 

1093 BUECHLER, JOHN LEWIS. "Brace, Bran, and 
St. Albans." NEG, 20 (Fall 1978), 35-41. 

Concerning a biographical account of Boyrereau 
Brinch, one-time Cormecticut slave. Revolutionary 
soldier, and Vermont freeman, published in St. Albans, 
Vt. (1810). 

1094 CHILD, FRANK SAMUEL. "Slavery in New 
England." Fairfield [Conn.] Historical Society, 

Annual Report (1916), 3-11. 



54 



1095 

1096 

1097 

1098 

1099 

1100 

1101 

1102 

1103 

1104 

1105 

1106 



Population and Ethnic Groups 



FRANCO-AMERICANS 1116 



GREENE. LORENZO JOHNSTON. The Negro in 
colonial New England, 1620-1776. N.Y.: Columbia 
Univ. Pr., 1942. 404p. MStuO. -i- 
Published Ph.D. dissertation (Columbia Univ., 1942). 
Reprinted 1968. 

JORDAN, WINTHROP D. "The influence of 
the West Indies on the origins of New England 
slavery." WMQ, 3 ser. 18 (Apr. 1961), 243-250. 

MACKINLAY, PETER W. "The New England 
Puritan attitude toward black slavery." OTNE, 63 
(Jan.-Mar. 1973). 81-88. 

McManus, EEXjAR J. Black bondage in the 
North. Syracuse, N.Y.: Syracuse Univ. Pr., 1973. 
xiii, 236p. MWA. + 

MILLER, KELLY. "The Negro in New 
England." Harvard Graduates' Magazine, 34 (June 
1926), 538-549. 



1107 RICHTER, DANIEL K. '"It is God who has 

caused them to be servants': Cotton Mather and Afro- 
American slavery in New England." Bulletin of the 
Congregational Library, 30 (Spring-Summer 1979), 4-13 

1108 ROSENTHAL, BERNARD. "Puritan conscience 

and New England slavery." NEQ, 46 (Mar. 1973), 62-81. 

1109 WADE, MELVIN. "'Shining in borrowed 
plumage': affirmation of community in the black 
coronation festivals of New England (c. 1750-c. 

1850)." Western Folklore, 40 (July 1981), 211-231. 

1110 WHITE, ARTHUR O. "Prince Saunders: an 
instance of social mobility among antebellum New 
England blacks." Journal of Negro History, 60 (Oct. 
1975), 526-535. 

Bom 1775. 

SEE "Blacks" in index for additional listings. 



O'DEA, MICHAEL. "The Negro governors." 

American History Illustrated, 15 (July 1980), 23-25, 
48. 

Colonial custom. 

PARKS, ROGER N. Early New England and 
the Negro. Sturbridge, Mass.: Old Sturbridge 
Village, 1969. 25p. MStuO. -t- 

PIERSEN, WILUAM DILLON. "Afro-American 
culture in eighteenth-century New England: a 
comparative examination." Ph.D. dissertation, Indiana 
Univ., 1975. xix, 337p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 36, No. 8A (1976), 5474. See 
also next entry. 

. Black Yankees: the development of an Afro- 

American subculture in eighteetnth-century New 
England. Amherst, Mass.: Univ. of Massachusetts Pr., 
1988. xii, 237p. RHi. -i- 
See also preceding entry. 

PORTER, DOROTHY B. "Family records: a 

major resource for documenting the black experience in 

New England." OTNE, 63 (Winter 1973), 69-72. 



FRANCO-AMERICANS 

nil ANCTIL, PIERRE. "Bibliographies 

commenyee sur les Franco-Americains de la Nouvelle- 
Angleterre." Cahiers de Geographies du Quebec 
[Canada], 23 (Apr. 1979), 179-181. 

Bibliography of New England Franco-Americans. See 
also next entry. 

1112 . A Franco-American bibliography: New England. 

Bedford, N.H.: National Materials Development Center, 
1979. ix, 137p. MW. -t- 

See also preceding entry. 

1113 . "From Quebec to New England." Ovo Magazine, 

12, No. 46 (1982), 4-5. 

French immigration. 

1114 . L'identite de I'immigrant Quebecois en 

Nouvelle-Angleterre: le Rapport Wright de 1882." 
Recherches Sociographiques [Canada], 22 (Sept.-Dee. 
1981), 331-360. 

Identity of Quebec immigrants in New England: the 
Wright Report (1882). 



QUINLAN, MAURICE J. "George Knox, a 
black soldier in the American Revolution." Dartmouth 
College Library Bulletin, n.s. 20 (Apr. 1980), 54-62. 
Of New Hampshire and Vermont. 

REIDY, JOSEPH P. "'Negro election day' & 
black community life in New England, 1750-1860." 
Marxist Perspectives, 1 (Fall 1978), 102-117. 



1115 ARNELL, WILLIAM. "The French population 

in New England." Geography, 34 (1949), 96-101. 

1116 ASSUMPTION COLLEGE, WORCESTER, MASS. 
FRENCH INSTITUTE. SECOND ANNUAL 
CONFERENCE (1981). L'Emigrant Quebecois vers les 
Etats-Unis: 1850-1920. Quebec: Le Conseil de la 
vie francaise en Amerique, 1982. 122p. MeAu. -i- 



55 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



1117 FRANCO AMERICANS 



1117 


ASSUMPTION COLLEGE. WORCESTER. MASS. 

FRENCH INSTITUTE. THIRD ANNUAL 
CONFERENCE (1982). The LitUe Canadas of New England. 
Claire Quintal, ed. Worcester. Mass.. 1983. x. 119p. 
MBU.+ 


1128 


COMITE d’ORIENTATION FRANCO-AMERICAINE. 
Centennaire franco-americaine. 1849-1949: programme 
souvenir. Worcester. Mass.: Le Travailleur. 1949. 
Unp. MeL. -t- 




Franco-American enclaves. 


1129 


CONFERENCE ON THE FRENCH IN NEW ENGLAND. 
ACADIA. AND QUEBEC. The French in New England. 


1118 


AUGER. ROLAND. "Les Notres en Nouvelle- 
Angleterre." Le Canado-Americain. 6 (Jan. -Mar. 
1970). 4-8. 

Concerning the Franco-American communities in 




Acadia, and Quebec. Edward O. Schriver. ed. Orono. 
Me.: Univ. of Maine. New England-Atlantic Provinces- 
CJuebec Center. [1974?]. 142p. MBU. + 




Manchester. N.H.. and Woonsocket. R.I. 


1130 


CONGRESS OF THE FRANCO-AMERICANS OF NEW 
ENGLAND. The 20th century Franco-American: le Franco- 


1119 


BENOIT. JOSAPHAT. Catechisme 

d'histoire franco-americaine. Manchester. N.H.: 

Societe Historique franco-americaine. 1939. 58p. 




Americain au 20e siecle. Bedford, N.H.: Le Comite 
de Vie Franco- Americaine. 1976. 69. 73p. MeL. 




DLC.+ 


1131 


D' ANDREA. VANEETA-MARIE. "The women of 
survivance: a case study of ethnic persistence among 


1120 


BENDER. PROSPER. "The French Canadian in 
New England." NEM. 6 (July 1892). 569-577. 




the members of Franco-American women's groups in New 
England. 1950-present." Ph.D. dissertation. Univ. of 
Connecticut. 1986. 266p. 


1121 


. "A New France in New England." Magazine of 
American History. 20 (Nov. 1988). 387-394. 




Abstracted in DAI. 47. No. 9 A (1987). 3571-3572. 




Franco-Canadian immigration. 


1132 


DAVIDSON. JOHN. "The growth of the 

French Canadian race in America." American Academy of 


1122 


BOWDOIN COLLEGE. BRUNSWICK. ME. FRANCO- 
AMERICAN INS 111 UTE. Les conferences de I'lnstitut 
Franco-Americain de Bowdoin College. ..sous la 




Political and Social Sciences. Annals. 8 (Sept. 1896). 
213-235. 




direction de Gerard J. Brault. Brunswick. Me.. 1961. 
2v. MeU. -1- 


1133 


DeGOESBRIAND. LOUIS BISHOP. Les 
Canadiens des Etats-Unis. Leon XIII. Aux eve6ques 
d'Amerique relativement aux immigres italiens. 


1123 


BRAULT. GERARD JOSEPH. Essais de 
philologie franco-americaine. Worcester. Mass.: 




[Burligton. Vt.. 1889.] 20p. VtU. -t- 




Assumption College. 1958. 124p. MW AC. 


1134 


DENNIS. HEBERT KNIGHT. "The French 
Canadians: a study in group traits, with special 


1124 


. The French-Canadian heritage in New England. 
Hanover. N.H.: Univ. Pr. of New England. 1986. xiii. 
282p. NhHi. -i- 




reference to the French Canadians of New England." 
Ph.D. dissertation. Harvard Univ.. 1918. 225p. 
Late- 19th century. 


1125 


. "New England French culture." French Review. 
45 (Mar. 1972). 831-837. 


1135 


DEXTER. ROBERT CLOUTMAN. 'The Habitant 
transplanted: a study of the French Canadian in New 
England." Ph.D. dissertation. Clark Univ.. 1923. 


1126 


CHASSE. PAUL P. "The other Yankee: the 
Franco-American." Revue de Louisiane. 6 (1977). 157- 




331p. 




162. 


1136 


DOTY. C. STEWART. "Going to the States: 
testimony from the Franco-American life history 


1127 


CHEVALIER. FLORENCE MARIE. 'The role of 
French national societies in the sociocultural 
evolution of the Franco-Americans of New England from 
1860 to the present: an analytical macro-sociological 
case study in ethnic integration based on current 




narratives in the Federal Writers Project. 1938-1939." 
Contemporary French Civilization. 7 (Spring 1983). 275- 
292. 

See also entry 1 140. 




social system models." Ph.D. dissertation. Catholic 
Univ. of America. 1972. 386p. MW. 

Abstracted in DAI. 33. No. lOA (1973). 5833. 


1137 


DUCHARME. JACQUES. Shadows of the trees: 
the story of French Canadians in New England. N.Y.: 
Harper and Brothers. 1943. iv. 258p. RHi. -i- 



56 



Population and Ethnic Groups 



FRANCO- AMERICANS 1159 



1138 DUMAINE, PAUL R. "New England's Franco- 
Americans: an annotated bibliography." M.A. thesis, 
Rhode Island College, 1974. 

1139 "EMIGRATION; the Franco-American 

experience." New Hampshire Alumnus, 56 (Sept. 1980), 
8 - 11 . 

The making of a movie on the subject. 

1140 THE FIRST Franco- Americans: New England 

life histories from the Federal Writers' Project, 1929- 
1938. C. Stewart Doty, ed. Orono, Me.: Univ. of 
Maine Pr., 1985. 163p. NhHi. + 

1141 FOISY, J. ALBERT. The Sentinellist 

agitation in New England, 1925-1928. Providence, 

R.I.: Providence Visitor Pr., 1930. vi, 234p. RHi. 

-I- 

French-nationalist movement within the Roman 
Catholic Church in Rhode Island and elsewhere in New 
England. 

1142 FOLEY, ALLEN RICHARD. "From French 
Canadian to Franco-American: a study of the 
immigration of the French Canadian into New England, 
1650-1935." Ph.D. dissertation. Harvard Univ., 1939. 
686p. VtHi. 

1143 FORGET, ULYSSE. Les Franco-Americains 
et le 'melting pot'; et, Onomastique franco- 
amcricaine. [Fall River, Mass., 1949.] 52p. DLC. -(- 

1144 A FRANCO- American overview. Renaud S. 

Albert, comp. Cambridge, Mass.: National Assessment 
and Dissemination Center for Bilingual/Bicultural 
Education, 1979-. 6v. MB. -i- 

1145 "FRANCO- Americans in New England; a 

select bibliography of secondary sources." Le Canado- 
Amcricain, 3 (July-Sept. 1977), 18-20. 

Richard S. Sorrell, ed. 

1146 LES FRANCOS de la Nouvelle-Angleterre: 
anthologie franco-americaine, XIXe et XXe siecle. 
Francois Roche, ed. Paris, 1981. 212p. MW. -i- 

1 1 47 FREEMAN, STANLEY L, JR., and RAYMOND J. 
PELLETIER. Manual du professeur pour introduire les 
etudes franco-americaines; initiating Franco- 
American studies: a handbook for teachers. Orono, 

Me.: Canadian/Franco-American Studies Project, Univ. 
of Maine, 1981. 284p. MeU. -i- 



1148 GATINEAU, FELIX. Historique des 
conventions generales des Canadiens-Francais aux 
Etats-Unis, 1865-1901. Woonsocket, R.I.: L'Union 
Saint-Jean-Baptiste d'Amerique, 1927. 5(X)p. MNb. -i- 

Primarily held in New England localities. 

1 149 GOULET, ALEXANDRE. Une Nouvelle -France 

en Nouvelle-Angleterre. Paris: E. Duchemin, 1934. 
iii, 558p. DLC. + 

Published Ph.D. dissertation (Univ. of Paris, 1934). 

1150 GUY, DAN. "New England Franco- Americans: 
vive la difference?" Yankee, 40 (July 1976), 68-73, 
118-128. 

1151 HAM, EDWARD BILLINGS. "French national 
societies in New England." NEQ, 12 (June 1939), 315- 
332. 

1152 . "French patterns in Quebec and New England." 

NEQ, 18 (Dec. 1945), 435-447. 

1153 HAM ON, EDOUARD. Les Canadiens-Francais 
de la Nouvelle-Angleterre. Quebec: N. S. Hardy, 

1891. XV, 483p. NhD. -t- 

1 1 54 HENDRICKSON, DYKE. Quiet presence: 
dramatic, first-person accounts: the true stories of 
Franco- Americans in New England. Portland, Me.: G. 
Garmett, 1980. ix, 266p. MSaE. + 

1155 HYDE SCHOOL, BATH, ME. FRANCO-AMERICAN 
STUDIES CLASS. Immigrants from the north: Franco- 
Americans recall the settlement of their Canadian 
families in the mill towns of New England. James W. 
Searles, Kent Morse, and Stephen Hinchman, eds. Bath, 
Me., 1982. xi, 63p. MeU. -i- 

1156 KALIJARVI, THORSTEN V. "French Canadians 

in the United States." American Academy of Political 
and Social Sciences, Annals, 223 (Sept. 1942), 132- 
137. 

1157 KEMPERS, ANNE. Franco-American studies: 

a research guide. Orono, Me.: Canadian/ Franco- 
American Studies Project, Univ. of Maine, 1980. 55p. 
NhPl. -H 

1158 LAVOIE, YOLANDE. L'Emigration des 
Canadiens aux Etats-Unis de 1840 a 1930. Quebec: 
Editeur Officiel du (Quebec, 1979. ix, 57p. MB. 

1159 [LEVESQUE, LEO ALBERT.] Silhouettes 
Franco-Americaines by Rosaire Dion-Levesque 
[pseud.]. Manchester, N.H.; Association Canado- 
Americaine, 1957. vi, 933p. NhD. + 

Biographies. 



57 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



1160 

1160 

1161 

1162 

1163 

1164 

1165 

1166 

1167 

1168 

1169 

1170 



FRANCO- AMERICANS 



[LEMOINE, ADELARD.] L'evolution de la 

race francaise en Amerique. Vermont, New-Hampshire, 

Connecticut, Rhode -Island. Tome 1. Montreal: 

Librairie Beauchemin Limitee, 1921. x, 277p. MWA. + 

LOWER, A. R. M. "New France in New 
England." NEQ, 2 (Apr. 1929), 278-295. 

Franco- American immigration to New England (1860- 
1920). 

LaPLANTE, EVE. "The rise of the 

unmeltable Francos." New England Monthly, 4 (May 

1987), 22-25, 28-29. 

MacDONALD, WILUAM. "The French 
Canadians in New England." (^arterly Journal of 
Economics, 12 (Apr. 1898), 245-279. 

MAGNAN, DENIS MICHEL ARISTIDES. Histoire 
de la race francaise aux Etats-Unis. (1912) 2d ed. 

Paris: C. Amat, 1913. xvi, 386p. VtU. -i- 

MAINE. UNIVERSITY, ORONO. CANADIAN- 
AMERICAN CENTER. The French in New England, Acadia 
and Quebec: proceedings of a conference. ..at the 
Univeristy of Maine, Orono, May 1 and 2, 1972. Edward 
O. Schriver, ed. Orono, Me., [1974?]. 142p. MeU. -i- 

MAUR AULT, OLIVIER. The French of Canada 
and New England: a Newcomen address in Vermont. 

N.Y.: Newcomen Society in North America, 1950. 25p. 
M. -H 

NELSON, HENRY LOOMIS. "French Canadians 
in New England." Harper's New Monthly Magazine, 87 
(July 1893), 180-187. 

ORBAN, EDMOND. "Fin d’un nationalisme: 
le cas recent des Franco-Americains de la Nouvelle- 
Angleterre." Canadian Review of Studies in 
Nationalism, 4 (Fall 1976), 91-99. 

End of nationalism: the recent case of the New 
England Franco-Americans. 

PAQUET, GILLES. "L'emigration des 
Canadiens-Francais vers la Nouvelle-Angleterre, 1870- 
1910: prises de vue quantitatives." Recherches 
Sociographiques [Canada], 5 (Sept.-Dee. 1964), 319- 
370. 

PELOQUIN-FARE, LOUISE. L'identite 
culturelle: les Franco-Americains de la Nouvelle- 
Angleterre. Paris: Didier, 1983. 159p. RPB. -t- 



1171 PERREAULT, ROBERT B. One piece of the 

great American mosaic: the Franco-Americans of New 
England. Manchester, N.H.: L' Association Canado- 
Americaine, 1976. 43p. NhHi. -i- 

1 172 PODEA, IRIS SAUNDERS. "Quebec to little 
Canada': the coming of French Canadians to New 
England in the nineteenth century." NEQ, 23 (Sept. 
1950), 365-380. 

1173 QUEBEC (PROVINCE). LEGISLATURE. 
LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY. Les Canadiens- 
Francais aux Etats-Unis.... Quebec, 1883. 34p. 
NhD.-t- 

1174 RAMIREZ, BRUNO, and JEAN LAM ARRE. "Du 
Quebec vers les Etats-Unis: I'etude des lieux 
d'origine." Revue d'Histoire de I'Amerique Francaise 
[Canada], 38 (1985), 409-422. 

Places of origin of French-Canadian migrants to the 
U.S. (mainly to New England). 

1175 ROBERT, ADOLPHE. "Lettre ouverte 

touchant I'etablissement des Clubs Richelieu en 
Nouvelle-Angleterre." Le Canado-Americain, 3 (Aug.- 
Sept. 1963), 29-33. 

1176 . Memorial des actes de I'Association Canado- 

Americaine. Manchester, N.H.: Avenir National, 

1946. 485p. MChB. -t- 

1177 . Souvenirs et portraits. Manchester, N.H.: 

Association Canado-Americaine, 1965. 289p. NhD. -i- 

Franco- Americans in New England. 

1178 ROBY, YVES. "Les Canadiens-Francaise des 
Etats-Unis (1860-1900): devoyes ou missionaries." 
Revue d'histoire de I'Amerique Francaise [Canada], 41 
(Summer 1987), 3-22. 

1179 . "Quebec in the United States: a 

historiographical survey." Maine Historical Society 
(^arterly, 26 (Winter 1987), 126-159. 

1180 RUMILLY, ROBERT. Histoire des Franco- 
Americains. Montreal: L'Union Saint-Jean-Baptiste 
d'Amerique, 1958. 552p. VtU. -t- 

1181 SIM ANO, IRENE M. Les Franco-Americains 

de la Nouvelle-Angleterre: un catalogue de materiaux 
disponibles dans certaines biblioth^ues de I'etat 
du Maine. Orono, Me.: Canadian-American Center, 
Univ. of Maine, 1971. vi, 15p. MeU. + 

1182 SMYTH, EGBERT C. "The French-Canadians 

in New England." AASP, n.s. 7 (Oct. 1891), 316-336. 



58 



Population and Ethnic Groups 



OTHER ETHNIC GROUPS 1203 



1 1 83 SOCIETE HISTORIQUE FRANCO-AMERICAINE. 

Les quarante ans de la Societe Historique Franco- 
Americaine. J. Ubalde Paquin, Arthur L. Eno, Antoine 
Clement, J. T. Benoit, and Adrien Verrette, eds. 
Manchester, N.H.: Pr. of I'Avenir National, 1940. 
878p. MChB. 

1184 SORRELL, RICHARD SHERMAN. "Franco- 
Americans in New England." Journal of Ethnic Studies, 
5 (Spring 1977), 90-94. 

1185 . 'The survivance of French Canadians in New 

England (1865-1930): history, geography and 
demography as destiny." Ethnic and Racial Studies 
[U.K.], 41 (Jan. 1981), 91-109. 

1 1 86 VEDDER, R. K., AND and L. E. CALLAWAY. 
"Settlement patterns of Canadian emigrants to the 
United States, 1850-1960." Canadian Journal of 
Economics, 3 (Aug. 1970), 476-486. 

Primarily French-Canadians. 

1187 VERRETTE, ADRIEN. "La survivance en 
Nouvelle-Angleterre et en Nouvelle-Ecosse." Vie 
Francaise, 4 (Nov. 1949), 157-181; (May 1959), 452- 
463. 

French parishes in New England and Nova Scotia. 

1188 VIALTE, AUGUSTE. "Les Franco-Americains 

de Nouvelle-Angleterre." Renaissance, 2-3 (1944- 
1945), 322-335. 

1189 VICERO, RALPH DOMINIC. "Immigration of 
French Canadians to New England, 1840-1900: a 
geographical analysis." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of 
Wisconsin, 1968. xiii, 449p. NhD. 

Abstracted in DAI, 29, No. 12B (1968), 4707. 

1190 WADE, MASON. "The French parish and 
'survivance' in nineteenth century New England." 
Catholic Historical Review, 36 (July 1950), 163-189. 

"Preservation of religion, language, and customs." 

1191 WILFRID, R. F. "Le Franco-Americain 

n'est pas un etranger aux Etats-Unis." Bulletin de 
la Societe Historique Franco- Americaine (1951), 31- 
53. 

1192 WILSON, BRUNO. L'evolulion de la race 
francaise en Amerique. Tome I: Vermont, New 
Hampshire, Connecticut, Rhode Island. Montreal: 
Librairie Beauchemin, 1921. Unp. VtU. -t- 



1 1 93 WRIGHT, CARROLL DAVIDSON. The Canadian 

French in New England. Boston: Rand, Avery, 1882. 
92p. CtY. + 

From the 13th aimual repxjrt of the Massachusetts 
Bureau of Statistics of Labor. 

SEE "Franco -Americans" in Index for additional 
listings. 



OTHER ETHNIC GROUPS 

1 194 AMARAL, PAT. They ploughed the seas: 

profiles of Azorean master mariners. St. Petersburg, 
Fla.: Valkerie Pr., 1978. xix, 171p. MNb. -t- 

1195 BEAN, WILLIAM GLEASON. "Puritan versus 
Celt, 1850-1860." NEQ, 7 (Mar. 1934), 70-89. 

Hostility toward Irish immigration. 

1196 CARVALHO, EDUARIX) de. Os Portugueses na 
Nova Ingleterra. Rio-De-Janeiro, 1931. xvi, 358p. 
MNb. -t 

1 1 97 DANIELS, ABRAHAM GETZEL. History of the 

Jews of Boston and New England.. .with biographies of 
noted men. Boston: Jewish Chronicle Publishing, 
1892. [124]p. MB. + 

1 198 "EARLY Irish settlers in Maine and New 
Hampshire." Sprague's Journal of Maine History, 10 
(1922), 29-31. 

1 199 FAY, BERNARD. "Une colonie rhenane en 
Nouvelle-Angleterre au XVIIIe siecle." Franco- 
American Review, 1 (Winter 1937), 276-283. 

Immigration to New England from the Rhine Valley 
(mid-18th century). 

1200 FUCHS, LAWRENCE H. 'The Jews of New 
England: anything special?" Rhode Island Jewish 
Historical Notes, 9 (Nov. 1984), 155-160. 

1201 GURAK, DOUGLAS T, and MARY M. KRTTZ. 
"Hispanic immigration to the Northeast in the 1970s." 
Migration Today, 13, No. 2 (1985), 6-12. 

1202 HALL, EDWARD H. "The Irish pioneers of 
the Connecticut Valley." Connecticut Valley 
Historical Society, Papers and Proceedings, 2 (Jan. 

29, 1902), 175-213. 

1635-1735. 



1203 HANSON, EDWARD W. "The non-English New 
Englanders." NEHGR, 139 (Jan. 1985), 3-20. 



59 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



1 204 OTHER ETHNIC GROUPS 



1204 HARVEY, GEORGE. Irish immigrants to 

colonial New England, n.p., 1981. 359p. MBNEH. + 

1205 HILL, DOUGLAS ARTHUR. The English to New 
England. N.Y.: C. N. Potter, 1975. 119p. MB. + 

Emigration from Great Britain. 

1206 HILL, JAMES LANDON. Yankees. Boston: 

Richard G. Badger, 1923. 301p. MWA. + 

1207 HUHNER,LEON. 'The Jews of New England 
(other than Rhode Island) prior to 1800." American 
Jewish Historical Society, Publications, No. 11 
(1903), 75-99. 

Reprinted 1973. 

1208 IVES, JOEL S. "The foreigner in NewEngland." 

Connecticut Magazine, 9, No. 2 (1905), 244- 
256. 

1209 JACOBUS, DONALD LINES. "Irish in New 

England before 1700." NEHGR, 90 (Apr. 1936), 165-167. 

1210 LANG, HENRY R. "The Portuguese element 

in New England." Journal of American Folklore, 5 
(Jan.-Mar. 1892), 9-18. 

1211 MARCUS, JACOB RADER. Early American 
Jewry. Philadelphia: Jewish Publication Society of 
America, 1951-1953. 2v. MBU. + 

Vol. 1: The Jews of New York, New England, and 
Canada, 1649-1794. 

1212 MONIZ, RfTA. "The Portuguese of New 

Bedford, Massachusetts, and Providence, Rhode Island: 
a comparative micro-analysis of political attitudes 
and behavior." Ph.D. dissertation. Brown Univ., 1979. 
578p. M. 

Abstracted in DAI, 40, No. IIA (1980), 5991. 

1213 NEW ENGLAND FINNISH AMERICAN BICENTENNIAL 
COMMITTEE. The Finnish imprint: a New England 
experience. Liisa A. Liedes, ed. New York Mills, 

Minn.: Porta Printers, 1982. xviii, 581p. MW. -t- 

1214 NEW ENGLAND HISTORIC GENEALOGICAL 
SOCIETY, BOSTON. The Irish in New England. Boston, 
1985. iv, 44p. RHi. -t- 

1215 O'BRIEN, MICHAEL JOSEPH. "Early Irish 
schoolmasters in New England." Catholic Historical 
Review, 3 (Apr. 1917), 52-71. 

1216 . "Irish mariners in New England." American 
Irish Historical Society, Journal, 17 (1918), 149-190. 

17th-19th centuries. 



1217 . Pioneer Irish in New England. N.Y.: P. J. 

Kennedy & Sons, 1937. xiv, 325p. MWA. + 

1218 O'CONNOR, THOMAS HENRY. "The Irish in 
New England." NEHGR, 139 (July 1985), 187-195. 

1219 O'DWYER, GEORGE FRANCIS. "Irish names in 
New England records." American Irish Historical 
Society, Journal, 19 (1920), 89-91. 

1220 PERRY, ARTHUR LATHAM. Scotch-Irish in 
New England. Boston: J. S. Cushing, 1891. 55p. 

MH.-t- 

1221 RISCH, ERNA. "Joseph Crellius: 

immigrant broker." NEQ, 12 (June 1939), 241-267. 

Promoter of German immigration to New England (mid- 
18lh century). 

1222 ROTHOVIUS, ANDREW E. "The 1 7th century 

Irish in New England." NEARA Newsletter, 8 (1973- 

1974), 42-44. 

1223 SCHELL, RUTH. "Swamp Yankee." American 
Speech, 38 (1963), 121-123. 

History of the term, defmed as "a rural New England 
dweller who abides today as a steadfast rustic and who 
is of Yankee stock that has endured. ..since the 
colonial days." 

1224 SIMMONS, DONALD C. "Anti-Italian- 

American riddles in New England." Journal of American 
Folklore, 79 (July-Sept. 1966), 475-478. 

1225 TAFT, DONALD R. Two Portuguese 

communities in New England. N.Y., 1923. 359p. MBU, 

-t- 

Fall River, Mass., and Portsmouth, R.I. Published 
Ph.D. dissertation, Columbia Univ. Reprinted 1969. 

1226 TUPPER, GEORGE WILLIAM. Foreign-bom 
neighbors. Boston: Taylor Pr., 1914. 176p. MSaE. -i- 

1227 TURNOCK, MARIA J. I have heard of 
America: Swedish community life in New England. 
Kingston, R.I.: Dovecourt Books, 1975. 52p. CtY. -i- 

1228 USSACH, STEVEN SAMUEL. "The New England 
Portuguese: a plural society within a plural 
society." Plural Societies [Netherlands], 6, No. 2 
(1975), 47-57. 

1229 WILLIAMS, JERRY. And yet they come: 

Portuguese immigration from the Azores to the United 
States. Staten Island, N.Y.: Center for Migration 
Studies, 1982. xvii, 150p. MBU. -i- 

Primarily Massachusetts and Rhode Island. 



60 



Economic Life 



GENERAL 



1230 ANDERSON, TERRY LEE. "Economic growth in 
colonial New England: 'statistical renaissance.'" 

Journal of Economic History, 39 (Mar. 1979), 243-257. 

1231 . The economic growth of seventeenth century New 
England: a measurement of regional income. N.Y.: 

Amo Pr., 1975. viii, 160p. MU. -i- 

See also next entry. 

1232 . "The economic growth of seventeenth century 

New England: a measurement of regional income." 

Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of Washington, 1972. 173p. 
Ct. 

Abstracted in DAI, 33, No. 5A (1972), 1956. See 
also preceding entry. 

1233 . "Wealth estimates for New England colonies, 

1650-1709." Explorations in Economic History, 12 
(Apr. 1975), 151-176. 

1234 BIDWELL, PERCY WELLS. "Rural economy in 
New England at the beginning of the nineteenth 
cenmry." Connecticut Academy of Arts and Sciences, 
Transactions, 20 (1916), 241-399. 

Also published separately. See also next entry and 
entry 1271. 

1235 . "Rural economy in New England at the beginning 

of the nineteenth century." Ph.D. dissertation, Yale 
Univ., 1915. 



1237 BOYDSTON, JEANNE. "Home and work: the 
industrialization of housework in the Northeastern 
United States from the colonial period to the Civil 
War." Ph.D. dissertation, Yale Univ., 1984. 284p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 46, No. 3A (1985), 775. 

1238 DAME, LAWRENCE R. New England comes 

back. N.Y.: Random House, 1940. xi, 319p. MWA. + 

1239 DANIELS, BRUCE COLIN. "Long range trends 
of wealth distribution in eighteenth century New 
England." Explorations in Economic History, 1 1 
(Winter 1973-1974), 123-135. 

1240 DAY, CLIVE. "Capitalistic and 

socialistic tendencies in the Puritan colonies." 

American Historical Association, Annual Report (1920), 
223-235. 

1241 EISENMENGER, ROBERT WALTZ. The dynamics 
of growth in New England's economy, 1870-1964. 
Middletown, Conn.: Wesleyan Univ. Pr., 1967. xv, 
201p. Ct. -H 

See also next entry. 

1242 . "The dynamics of economic growth in New 

England, 1870-1960." Ph.D. dissertation. Harvard 
Univ., 1964. xiv, 31 Ip. 

See also preceding entry. 

1243 FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF BOSTON. New 
England trends. Boston, 1939. 38p. NhD. -t- 



+ Listings in the National Union Catalog for books and pamphlets marked 
with this symbol may include additional library locations. 



61 



New England: A Bibliography of iLs History 



1244 GENERAL 



1244 FOLBRE, NANCY RUSSELL. "Patriarchy and 
capitalism in New England, 1620-1900." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Univ. of Massachusetts, 1979. xi, 207p. 
Ct. 

Abstracted in DAI, 40, No. 3A (1979), 1621. See 
also next entry. 

1245 . "Patriarchy in colonial New England." Review 

of Radical Political Economics, 12 (Summer 1980), 4- 
13. 

See also preceding entry. 

1246 GUILTINAN, MOLLY. Gross state product: 

New England, 1980-1983. Boston: Research Dept., 
Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, [1985?]. 25p. MBU. -i- 

1247 HARRIS, SEYMOUR EDWIN. The economics of 
New England: case study of an older area. Cambridge, 
Mass.: Harvard Univ. Pr., 1952. xvii, 317p. Ct. -i- 

1248 HARRISON, BENNETT. Rationalization, 
restructuring, and industrial reorganization in older 
regions: the economic transformation of New England 
since World War II. Cambridge, Mass.: Joint Center 
for Urban Studies, Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology and Harvard Univ., 1982. 13 Ip. M. + 

1249 HARTLAND, PENELOPE C. Balance of 
interregional payments of New England. Providence, 
R.I.: Brown Univ., 1950. vii, 125p. MW A. + 

Ca. 1930s. 

1250 HOY, JOHN C, and MELVIN HERBERT 
BERNSTEIN. Business and academia: parmers in New 
England's economic revival. Hanover, N.H.: Univ. Pr. 
of New England, 1981. xii, 160p. MB. -i- 

1251 HUTCHINSON, WILUAM K. "Import 
substitution, structural change, and regional economic 
growth in the United States: the Northeast, 1870- 
1910." Journal of Economic History, 45 (June 1985), 
319-325. 

1252 JONES, AUCE HANSON. "Wealth estimates 

for the New England colonies about 1770." Journal of 
Economic History, 32 (Mar. 1972), 98-127. 

1253 KOZLOWSKI, PAUL JOSEPH. "Changes in 
structure and in cyclical economic activity in New 
England urban areas during the post-World War II 
period." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of Connecticut, 

1976. 223p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 36, No. lOA (1976), 6808. 



1 254 MAIN, GLORIA LUND, and JACKSON TURNER 
MAIN. "Economic growth and the standard of living in 
southern New England, 1640-1774." Journal of Economic 
History, 48 (Mar. 1988), 27-46. 

1255 NEW England prospects: critical choices 

in a time of change. Carl H. Reidel, ed. Hanover, 

N.H.: Univ. Pr. of New England, 1982. xii, 206p. M. 

+ 

Includes historical information. 

1256 NEW England's prospect: 1933. John K. 

Wright, ed. N.Y.: American Geographical Society, 

1933. ix, 502p. NhD. + 

1257 NIEMI, ALBERT WILLIAM, JR. "New England: 
gross state product and productivity, 1948-65." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Univ. of Connecticut, 1969. 606p. Ct. 

Abstracted in DAI, 30, No. 7A (1970), 2707. 

1258 SCOTT, KENNETH. "Price control in New 

England during the Revolution." NEQ, 19 (Dec. 1946), 
453-473. 

1259 SOMWARU, AGAPI LAMBRINl. "The effects of 
industrialization on the farm and nonfarm income 
distributions in New England." Ph.D. dissertation, 

Univ. of Connecticut, 1981. 196p. 

1950-1974. Abstracted in DAI, 42, No. lOA (1982), 
4529. 

1260 STEWART, JOAN PHELPS. "Urban wage 
differentials in New England, 1951-1963." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Boston Univ., 1969. 155p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 30, No 5A (1969), 1701. 

1261 THOMAS, ROBERT PAUL, and TERRY LEE 
ANDERSON. "White population, labor force and 
extensive growth of the New England economy in the 
seventeenth century." Journal of Economic History, 33 
(Sept. 1973), 634-667. 

1262 WEEDEN, 'WILUAM BABCOCK. Economic and 
social history of New England, 1620-1789. Boston: 
Houghton Mifflin, 1890. 2v. MWA. + 

Other eds. 



LAND AND AGRICULTURE 

1263 ABBOTT, COLLAMER M. "The farmer's year." 
NEG, 20 (Winter 1979), 20-27. 

Based on New Hampshire and Vermont diaries. 

1264 ALLEN, RUTH HOWARD. "The making of cider 
in New England." OTNE, 47 (Fall 1956), 41-48. 



62 



Economic Life 



LAND AND AGRICULTURE 1289 



1 265 ATACK, JEREMY, and FRED BATEMAN. 

"Marketable farm surpluses; Northeastern and 
Midwestern United States, 1859 and 1860." Social 
Science History, 8 (Fall 1984), 371-393. 

1266 AYRES. PHIUP W. "Is New England's 

wealth in danger? Our vanishing forests.” NEM, n.s. 
38 (Mar. 1908), 35-48; (Apr. 1908). 145-160; (May 
1908), 291-308; (June 1908), 435-449. 

1267 BAKER, ANDREW H. "Improving every hour 
of the sun." Old Sturbridge Visitor, 27 (Summer 
1987), 4-6. 

Haying on New England farms (early- 19th century). 

1268 BAZELEY, W. A. L. "State forests in New 
England." Journal of Forestry, 24 (May 1926), 559- 
561. 

Includes historical information. 

1 269 BEATTIE, MOLUE, CHARLES THOMPSON, and 
LYNN LEVINE. "A New England forest history." 
Appalachia, 44 (Winter 1983-1984), 114-131. 

1270 "BIBLIOGRAPHY of farm diaries and account 
books." DubSemPr (1986), 170-187. 

Northeastern U.S. See also entry 1316. 

1271 BIDWELL, PERCY WELLS. "The agricultural 
revolution in New England." American Historical 
Review. 26 (July 1921), 638-702. 

See also entry 1234. 

1272 B RIDENB AUG H, CARL. "Yankee use and abuse 

of the forest in the building of New England." MHSP, 
89 (1977), 3-35. 

1273 BROWN, NELSON C. "The king's arrow 

pine." American Forests, 58 (July 1952), 22-23, 40. 

1274 CARROLL, CHARLES FRANCIS. "The forest 
civilization of New England: timber, trade and 
society in the age of wood, 1600-1688." Ph.D. 
dissertation. Brown Univ., 1970. xiv, 645p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 31, No. 12A (1971), 6509. See 
also next entry. 

1275 . The timber economy of Puritan New England. 

Providence, R.I.: Brown Univ. Pr., 1973. xiii, 221p. 
MStuO. -t- 

See also preceding entry. 

1 276 EGLESTON, MELVILLE. The land system of 

the New England colonies. Baltimore: N. Murray, 
publication agent, Johns Hopkins Univ., 1886. 56p. 
MSaE.-h 



1277 ELIOT, JARED. Essays upon field 

husbandry in New England, and other papers, 1748-1762 
Harry J. Carman and Rexford G. Tugwell, eds. N.Y.: 
Columbia Univ. Pr., 1934. Ivi, 261p. MStuO. -i- 

1278 FISHER, RICHARD T. "Pine plantations and 

New England forestry." Journal of Forestry, 26 (Oct. 
1928), 790-793. 

1279 FORREST, ANN D. "Mulberry madness." 

Yankee, 7 (Dec. 1941), 17-18, 38. 

Silk production in New England (19th century). 

1280 GROVER, CARL WILFORD. "The withdrawal of 
resources from Coimecticut Valley agriculture, 1900- 
1965." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of Pennsylvania, 

1969. 224p. CtHi. 

Abstracted in DAI, 30, No. 6A (1969), 2234. 

1281 HARPER, ROLAND M. "Changes in the forest 
area of New England in three centuries." Journal of 
Forestry, 16 (Apr. 1918), 442-452. 

1282 HAWES, AUSTIN F. "New England forests in 
retrospect." Journal of Forestry, 21 (Mar. 1923), 209- 
224. 

1283 HAYWARD, SUE. "'Fruits in abundance.'" 

Old Sturbridge Village, Rural Visitor, 19 (Fall 1979), 
18-20. 

New England harvests, as seen in early- 19th-century 
diaries. 

1284 HERR, CLARENCE S. The development of 
industrial forestry in the Northeast. Seattle, Wash.: 
Univ. of Washington, College of Forestry, 1959. 50p. 
TM.-h 

1285 HIGBEE, EDWARD C. "The three earths of 

New England." Geographical Review, 42 (July 1952), 
424-438. 

"Indian," "colonial," and "modem." 

1286 "HISTORY of the timber supply in the New 
England states." Lumber (June 24, 1918), 12-13. 

1287 HOLBROOK, STEWART HALL. "Log drive." 

Vermont Life, 13 (Spring 1959), 50-55. 

On the Cormecticut River (ca. 1903). 

1288 . Yankee loggers: a recollection of woodsmen, 

cooks, and river drivers. N.Y.: International Paper 
Co., 1961. 124p. NhHi. -i- 

1289 IRLAND, LLOYD C. Wildlands and woodlots; 

the story of New England's forests. Hanover, N.H.; 

Univ. Pr. of New England, 1982. xiii, 217p. MB. + 



63 



1290 

1290 

1291 

1292 

1293 

1294 

1295 

1296 

1297 

1298 

1299 

1300 



New England; A Bibliography of Its History 



LAND AND AGRICULTURE 



KNIGHT, R. J. B. "New England forests 1301 

and British seapower: Albion revised." American 
Neptune, 46 (Fall 1986), 221-229. 

Historian Robert G. Albion. See also entry 1403. 

KRANTZ, EARL BEACH. "Light horses and 1302 

their place in New England." Morgan Horse, 10 (Feb. 

1950), 9, 27-28. 

20th century. 



MEREDITH, MARY ANN. "The dairymaid's 
challenge." Old Sturbridge Visitor, 26 (Summer 1986), 
8 - 10 . 

Butter and cheesemaking (1830s). 

MONMONIER, MARK S. "Land quality and 
agricultural change in the Northeast." NE- 
StLVGSPr, 9 [1980], 24-28. 

1954-1974. 



LEAVITT, ROBERT GREENLEAF. The forest 
trees of New England. Jamaica Plain, Mass.: Arnold 
Arboretum of Harvard Univ., 1932. 179p. MWA. -(- 
Includes historical information. 



1303 MORRIS, DOUGLAS E. Agricultural land use 

changes in the Northeast, 1949-1974. Durham, N.H.: 
New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station, Univ. 
of New Hampshire, 1977. iii, 32p. NhD. + 



LINCOLN, PROCTOR. "New England's lumber 
business." Southern Lumberman, 193 (Dec. 15, 1956), 
169-172. 

18th-20th centuries. 

LOFTIS, ANNE, and PAUL S. TAYLOR. 'The 
legacy of the nineteenth-century New England farmer." 
NEQ, 54 (June 1981), 243-254. 



1304 OAKES, ELINOR F. "A ticklish business: 

dairying in New England and Pennsylvania, 1750-1812.' 
Pennsylvania History, 47 (July 1980), 195-212. 

1305 PARKS, ROGER N. "Comments on change in 
agriculture." Agricultural History, 46 (Jan. 1972), 
173-180. 

New England (1790-1840). 



LOKKE, CARL L. "A French appreciation of 
New England timber." NEQ, 8 (Sept. 1935), 409-411. 
1787. 



1306 PHILLIPS, DEANE. Horse raising in 

colonial New England. Ithaca, N.Y.: New York 
Agricultural Experiment Station, 1922. [57]p. MWA. + 



MANNING, SAMUEL F. New England masts and 
the king's broad arrow. Kennebunk, Me.: Thomas 
Murphy, [1979]. iv, 52p. MeHi. -i- 



1307 PICARD, DENNIS. "Fresh pressings." Old 
Sturbridge Visitor, 25 (Fall 1985), 4-6. 
Cider mills (early-19th century). 



MANYON, PAUL GLEN. A reassessment of New 
England agriculture in the last thirty years of the 
nineteenth century. N.Y.: Amo Pr., 1978. xi, 308p. 

M. -H 

MARQUIS, RALPH W. "Forest research in 

the Northeast." Southern Lumberman, 193 (Dec. 15, 

1956), 193-194. 

Since ca. 1876. 

MARTI, DONALD BENEDICT. "Agrarian 
thought and agricultural progress: the endeavor for 
agricultural improvement in New England and New York, 
1815-1840." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of Wisconsin, 
1966. ix, 440p. VtHi. 

Abstracted in DAI, 28, No. 3A (1967), 1033. See 
also next entry. 

. To improve the soil and the mind: 

agricultural societies, journals, and schools in the 
Northeastern states, 1791-1865. Ann Arbor, Mich.: 
University Microfilms International, 1979. 309p. 
MStuO. -t- 

New England and New York. See also preceding entry. 



1308 PIKE, ROBERT EVERDING. Tall trees, tough 
men. N.Y.: W. W. Norton, 1967. 288p. NhD. + 

Logging in northern New England. 

1309 RECORDS, RALPH H. "Land as a basis for 
economic and social discontent in Maine and 
Massachusetts to 1776." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of 
Chicago, 1936. x, 379p. 

Described in American Puritan Studies, Michael S. 
Montgomery, comp. (1984), 52. 

1310 'THE RISE and decline of the sheep 

industry in northern New England." Agricultural 
History, 9 (Jan. 1935), 12-40. 

1311 RUSSELL, HOWARD S. "Allium capa: onions 
through three hundred years." NEG, 18 (Winter 1977), 
12 - 21 . 

In New England. 

1312 . A long, deep furrow: three centuries of 

farming in New England. Hanover, N.H.: Univ. Pr. of 
New England, 1976. 672p. MStuO. -t- 



64 



Economic Life 



FISHERIES AND WHALING 1334 



1313 RUSSELL, JASON ALMUS. "Cordwood for 
locomotives." OTNE, 39 (Jan. 1949), 79-80. 

1314 . "Gathering sawdust." CEAIA, 3 (Mar. 1950), 

201, 204. 

For use on New England farms (ca. 1900). 

1315 SACHS, WILLIAM S. "Agricultural 
conditions in the northern colonies before the 
Revolution." Journal of Economic History, 13 (Summer 
1953), 274-290. 

1316 "SELECTED bibliography of New England 
farm studies." DubSemPr (1986), 154-169. 

Ross W. Beales, Jr., comp. See also entry 1270. 

1317 SHERMAN, REXFORD BOOTH. "Daniel Webster, 
gentleman farmer." Agricultural History, 53 (Apr. 
1979), 475-487. 

In Franklin, N.H.; Marshfield, Mass.; and Peru, 111. 

1318 SIMMONS, FRED C. "956 years of lumbering 

in the Northeast." Southern Lumberman, 193 (Dec. 15, 
1956), 227-229. 

1319 SLOAT, CAROLINE FULLER. "An abundance of 
apples." Old Sturbridge Village, Rural Visitor, 20 
(Fall 1980), 4-6. 

New England varieties (Etu-ly-19th century). 

1320 SMITH, DAVID CLAYTON, JR. "Climate 
fluctuation and agricultural change in southern and 
central New England, 1765-1880." Maine Historical 
Society Quarterly, 21 (Spring 1982), 179-200. 

Co-authors: William R. Baron, Anne E. Bridges, 
Harold W. Bams, Jr., and Janet K. TeBrake. 

1321 SOCIETY OF AMERICAN FORESTERS. NEW 
ENGLAND SECTION. A half century of forestry, 1920- 
1970. Robert I. Ashman, ed. Littleton, N.H.: 

Courier Print, 1970. 56p. VtU. -t- 

1322 SPINNEY, FRANK OAKMAN. "Well surrounded 
and divided." NEG, 3 (Spring 1962), 46-49. 

Fences in New England rural life. 

1323 STILGOE, JOHN R. "A New England coastal 
wilderness." DubSemPr (1980), 89-105. 

"New Englanders classified the [coastal] zone as 
wilderness, if they classified it at all, and they 
knew that order and man trespassed as utter aliens in 
that wilderness of rocks, marsh, and moving sand." 

See also this author's article of same title in 
Geographical Review, 71 (Jan. 1981), 33-50. 



1324 . "White pines." New England Monthly, 6 (Jan. 

1989), 49-50. 

In the 19th-century reforestation of New England. 

1325 . "The wildering of rural New England, 1850- 

1950." NE-StLVGSPr, 10 [1981], 1-6. 

Reactions to, and results of, farm abandonment. 

1326 SWEETSER, MARY CHISHOLM. "Wool 
gathering." NEG, 8 (Spring 1967), 53-58. 

Sheep raising in New England. 

1327 TAYLOR, PAUL S., and ANNE LOFTIS. "The 

legacy of the nineteenth-century New England farmer." 
NEQ, 54 (Mar. 1981), 243-254. 

1328 TERCENTENARY of New England agriculture: 
dedicated to the courage, vision, devotion, of nine 
generations of Yankee farmers and farm wives who 
conquered the wilderness and built our present-day 
agriculture. Gleim C. Sevey, ed. Springfield, Mass.: 
Phelps Publishing, 1930. 82p. MWA. + 

1329 TRIPPENSEE, REUBEN EDWIN. "The 
development and use of state forests in New England in 
relation to wildlife." Journal of Forestry, 35 (Apr. 
1937), 403-408. 

1330 VAN RAVENSWAAY, CHARLES. "Sugaring 
time." NEG, 4 (Spring 1963), 48-52. 

1331 WALCOTT, ROBERT R. "Husbandry in 

colonial New England." NEQ, 9 (June 1936), 233-252. 

1332 WALKER, JOSEPH BURBEEN. "The progress of 
New England agriculture during the last thirty years." 
New Englander, 47 (Oct. 1887), 233-245. 

1333 WILSON, HAROLD FISHER. 'The rise and 
decline of the sheep industry in northern New 
England." Agricultural History, 9 (Jan. 1935), 12-40. 

SEE "Agriculture" and "Forests and forestry" in Index 
for additional listings. 



HSHERIES AND WHALING 

1334 ACHESON, JAMES M. "Government regulation 

and exploitive capacity: the case of the New England 
groundfishery." Human Organization, 43 (Winter 1984), 
319-329. 

Since 1977. 



65 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



1335 nSHERIES AND WHALING 



1335 ACKERMAN. EDWARD AUGUSTUS. New England's 
fishing industry. Chicago: Univ. of Chicago Pr., 

1941. xix, 303p. M. + 

1336 ASHLEY. CUFFORD WARREN. The Yankee 
whaler. (1926) Garden City. N.Y.: Halcyon House. 

1942. xxviii. 156p. Me. + 

Autobiographical account. 

1337 BOERI. DAVID, and JAMES GIBSON. 'Tell it 
good-bye. kiddo": the decline of the New England 
offshore fishery. Camden. Me.: Int. Marine. 1976. 
154p. MBU. 

1338 CHASE. MARY ELLEN. The fishing Beets of 

New England. Boston: Houghton MifBin. 1961. 180p. 
CtMy. + 

1339 DEWAR. MARGARET. Industry in trouble: 

the federal goverrunent and the New England fisheries. 
Philadelphia: Temple Univ. Pr.. 1983. xiv. 252p. 
MBU. -I- 

Since World War II. 

1340 DODGE. STANLEY D. "The geography of the 
codfishing industry in colonial New England." 
Philadelphia Geographic Society. Bulletin. 25 (1927). 
43-50. 

1341 DOERINGER. PETER B.. PHILIP I. MOSS, and 
DAVID G. TERKLA. The New England fishing economy: 
jobs, income, and kinship. Amherst. Mass.: Univ. of 
Massachusetts Pr.. 1986. 176p. MB. -i- 

1970s and early 1980s. 

1342 DOW. GEORGE FRANCIS. Whale ships and 
whaling: a pictorial history of whaling during three 
centuries, with an account of the whale fishery in 
colonial New England. Salem. Mass.: Marine 
Historical Society. 1925. xi. 446p. MSaE. + 

1343 DULLES. FOSTER RHEA. Lowered boats: a 
chronicle of American whaling. N.Y.: Harcourt. 

Brace. 1933. x. 292p. VtU. -t- 

1344 FARR. JAMES. "A slow boat to nowhere: 

the multi-racial crews of the American whaling 
industry." Journal of Negro History. 68 (Spring 
1983). 159-170. 

1345 FEDERAL WRITERS' PROJECT. MASSACHUSETTS. 
Whaling masters. New Bedford. Mass.: Old Dartmouth 
Historical Society. 1938. 314p. M. + 



1346 THE FISH and fisheries of colonial North 
America: a documentary history of the fishery 
resources of the United States and Canada. Part II: 
the New England states. John C. Pearson, ed. 

Springfield. Va.: Reproduced by National Technical 
Information Services. [1972?]. [501 jp. CtMy. -t- 

1 347 GORDON. MYRON, and PHILIP MASON MARSTON. 
"Early fishing along the Merrimack." New England 
Naturalist. No. 8 (Sept. 1940). 1-10. 

1348 HARRINGTON. FAITH. "Sea tenure in 

seventeenth century New England: native Americans and 
Englishmen in the sphere of marine resources. 1600- 
1630." Ph.D. dissertation. Univ. of California. 
Berkeley. 1985. v. 211p. NhHi. 

Abstracted in DAI. 46. No. 12A (1985). 3764. 

1349 HART. FRANQS RUSSELL. "The New England 
whale-fisheries." Colonial Society of Massachusetts. 
Publications. 26 (Mar. 1924). 65-79. 

1350 HOHMAN. ELMO PAUL. The American 
whaleman: a study of life and labor in the whaling 
industry. N.Y.: Longmans. Green. 1928. ix. 355p. 
MBU.-i- 

1351 HOWARD. LAWRENCE C. "A note on New 
England whaling and Africa before 1860." Negro 
History Bulletin. 22 (Oct. 1958). 13-16. 

Black whalemen. 

1352 JENSEN. ALBERT C. The cod. N.Y.: 

Crowell. 1972. 182p. CtY. -t- 

Cod fisheries. 

1353 KOCHISS. JOHN M. Oystering from New York 

to Boston. Middletown. Conn.: Wesleyan Univ. Pr.. 
1974. 25 Ip. MW A. + 

1354 LYTLE. THOMAS G. Harpoons and other 
whalecraft. New Bedford. Mass.: Old Dartmouth 
Historical Society. 1984. xii. 256p. MNb. -t- 

1355 McFarland. RAYMOND. A history of New 
England fisheries; with maps. N.Y.: D. Appleton. 

1911. 457p. MWA. -H 

Published Ph.D. dissertation. Univ. of Permsylvania. 
(1911). 

1356 PEABODY MUSEUM. SALEM. MASS. The New 
England fisheries: a treasure greater than gold. 

Salem. Mass.. 1984. xii. 52p. MB. -i- 



66 



1357 

1358 

1359 

1360 

1361 

1362 

1363 

1364 

1365 

1366 

1367 



Economic Life 



MONEY AND FINANCE 1377 



PIERCE, WESLEY GEORGE. Goin' fishin': 

the story of the deep-sea fishermen of New England. 

Salem, Mass.: Marine Research Society, 1934. xiii, 

323p. CtMy. + 

RICH, GEORGE. "The New England 
fisheries." NEM, n.s. 10 (Apr. 1894), 229-247. 

ROGERSON, WILLIAM T., JR. "New England 
fishermen-imperilled species." U.S. Naval 
Institute Proceedings, 99 (Dec. 1973), 44-49. 

SPEARS, JOHN RANDOLPH. The story of the 
New England whalers. N.Y.: Macmillan, 1910. ix, 

418p. ClMy. + 

SPRAGUE, STUART SEELY. "The whaling 

ports: a study of ninety years of rivalry, 1784- 

1875." American Neptune, 33 (Apr. 1973), 120-121, 124- 

130. 

STACKPOLE, EDOUARD A. The sea-hunters: 

the New England whalemen during two centuries, 1635- 

1835. Philadelphia: Lippincott, [1953]. 510p. 

MStuO. + 

. Whales and destiny: the rivalry between 

America, France, and Britain for control of the 
southern whale fishery, 1785-1825. Amherst, Mass.: 
Univ. of Massachusetts Pr., 1972. xii, 427p. MBU. -i- 

STACKPOLE, RENNY A. American whaling in 
Hudson Bay, 1861-1919. Mystic, Conn.: Munson 
Institute of American Maritime History, 1969. 67p. 

CtMy. -I- 

STARBUCK, ALEXANDER. History of the 
American whale fishery from its earliest inception to 
the year 1876. (1878) N.Y.: Argosy-Antiquarian, 

1964. 2v. MStuO. 

STATE STREET TRUST COMPANY, BOSTON. 

Whale fishery of New England: an account, with 
illustrations and some interesting and amusing 
anecdotes, of the rise and fall of an industry which 
has made New England famous throughout the world. 
Boston: Perry Walton, 1915. 63p. MBU. -t- 
Reprinted 1968. 

STOKESBURY, JAMES L. "Saga of the Yankee 
whalers." American History Illustrated, 9 (July 
1974), 4-10, 43-50. 



1368 STOLTE, LAWRENCE. The forgotten salmon 
of the Merrimack. U.S. Dept, of the Interior, 

Northeast Region, 1981. xxii, 214p. NhHi. -i- 

Salmon fishery, focusing on 19th-century attempts to 
restore the fish to the Merrimack River system. 

1369 SWEET, GORDON. "The northern oyster 
industry." New England Social Studies Bulletin, 8 
(Mar. 1951), 27-31. 

New England and New York. 

1370 THOMPSON, WINHELD M. "The passing of 

the New England fisherman." NEM, n.s. 13 (Feb. 1896), 
675-686. 

1371 TOWER, WALTER SHELEXJN. A history of die 
American whale fishery. Philadelphia: Published for 
the Univ. [of Pennsylvania], 1907. x, 145p. MU. -f- 

1372 WHITE, DONALD JOSEPH. The New England 
fishing industry: a study in price and wage setting. 
Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard Univ. Pr., 1954. xvii, 

205p. MB. -H 

SEE "Fisheries" and "Whaling" in Index for additional 
listings. 



MONEY AND FINANCE 

1373 AMERICAN NUMISMATIC SOCIETY. The state 
coinages of New England.... N.Y., 1920. 76p. 

MWiW. -I- 

1374 ANDREWS, CHARLES McLEAN. "Current lawful 
money of New England." American Historical Review, 24 
(Oct. 1918), 73-77. 

Colonial. 

1375 DAVIS, ANDREW McFarland. "Andros's 
proclamation money." AASP, n.s. 13 (Apr. 1900), 500- 
508. 

1376 DAVIS, LANCE EDWIN. "The New England 
textile mills and the capital markets: a study of 
industrial borrowing, 1840-1860." Journal of Economic 
History, 20 (Mar. 1960), 1-30. 

See also entry 1397. 

1377 . "Stock ownership in the early New England 

textile industry." Business History Review, 32 
(Summer 1958), 204-222. 



67 



New England: A Bibliography of iLs History 



1378 MONEY AND HNANCE 



1378 DUNHAM, CONSTANCE R„ and DENISE M. 

JARVINEN. Bank holding companies in New England: a 
decade of change. [Boston]: Federal Reserve Bank of 
Boston, 1985. vi, 179p. NhD. + 

1379 FEDERAL RESERVE BANK OF BOSTON. Changing 
commercial bank structure in New England: 1975-1976. 
Boston, 1978. 293p. NhD. + 

See also entry 1401. 

1380 . A history of investment banking in New 

England. (1965) Boston, 1973. 150p. MB. -t- 

1381 FENSTERMAKER, J. VAN, JOHN E. HLER, and 
ROBERT STANLEY. "Money statistics of New England, 
1785-1837." Journal of Economic History, 44 (June 
1984), 441-453. 

1382 GWYN, JULIAN. "Money lending in New 
England: the case of Admiral Sir Peter Warren and his 
heirs, 1739-1805." NEQ, 44 (Mar. 1971), 117-134. 

Ca. 1746. 

1383 HORVTTZ, PAUL MICHAEL. Concentration and 
competition in New England banking. [Boston], 1958. 
190p. NhD. -I- 

1945-1957. Published Ph.D. dissertation, 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology. See also this 
author's article of same title in Journal of Finance, 

14 (Dec. 1959), 567-568. 

1384 KONKER, ELIZABETH A. Money in colonial 
New England. [Boston]: Federal Reserve Bank of 
Boston, [1974]. 38p. MWA. + 

1385 LAMOREAUX, NAOMI R. "Banks, kinship, and 
economic development: the New England case." Journal 
of Economic History, 46 (Sept. 1986), 647-667. 

1386 . "The structure of early banks in southeastern 

New England." Business and Economic History, 2 ser. 

13 (1984), 171-183. 

1387 LUQUER, LEA S. "The U.S. commemorative 

half dollars relating to New England." OTNE, 40 (Oct. 
1949), 159-162. 

1388 McKAY, GEORGE LESLIE. Early American 
currency: some notes on the development of paper 
money in the New England colonies. N.Y.: The 
Typophiles, 1944. xxiv, 85p. NhD. + 

1389 McLEOD, FRANK FENWICK. "The history of 

fiat money and currency inflation in New England from 
1620 to 1789." American Academy of Political and 
Social Science, Annals, 12 (Sept. 1898), 229-249. 



1390 OGG, FREDERIC AUSTIN. "Coins and coinage 

in the New England colonies." NEM, n.s. 28 (Aug. 
1903), 739-751. 

1391 . "Indian money in the New England colonies." 

NEM, n.s. 27 (Feb. 1903), 749-760. 

1392 . "Paper money in the New England colonies." 

NEM, n.s. 29 (Feb. 1904), 772-782. 

1393 SAYRES, WILLIAM G. "A Puritan standard 

of value: the role of wampum money." Kennebec 
Proprietor, 3 (Fall 1986), 26-28. 

1394 SCOTT, WILLIAM A. "New England's own 
half dollars." Yankee, 36 (Feb. 1972), 72-77. 

17th-century coinages. 

1395 TURNER, WILLIAM WILUS. 'Trends in the 
resources, liabilities and net worth of Rhode Island 
and Massachusetts banks, 1891-1933." Ph.D. 
dissertation. Brown Univ., 1936. 

1396 VAN FENSTERMAKER, J., JOHN E. FILER, and 
ROBERT STANLEY. "Money statistics of New England, 
1785-1837." Journal of Economic History, 44 (June 
1984), 441-453. 

1397 VATTER, BARBARA. "Industrial borrowing 

by the New England textile mills, 1830-1860: a 
comment." Journal of Economic History, 21 (June 
1961), 216-221. 

See also entry 1376. 

1398 WEEDEN, WILLIAM BABCOCK. Indian money as 
a factor in New England civilization. Baltimore: 

Johns Hopkins Univ., 1884. 51p. MSaE. -i- 

Reprinted 1973. 

1399 WISMER, DAVID CASSEL. Obsolete bank 

notes of New England. Boston: Quarterman, 1972. 

31 Ip. MU. + 

1400 WOOTEN, SIMEON FRANQS, JR. "The 
international strategies of three New England banks 
for the period 1970 to 1979." Ph.D. dissertation, 

Univ. of Virginia, 1983. 425p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 45, No. 5A (1984), 1460. 

1401 YOKAS, STEVE. Changing commercial baitk 
structure in New England, 1976-1979. Boston: Federal 
Reserve Bank of Boston, 1981. v, 219p. MBU. -i- 

See also entry 1379 



68 



Economic Life 



BUSINESS AND COMMERCE 1424 



BUSINESS AND COMMERCE 

1402 ABRAMS, RICHARD M. "Brandeis and the New 
Haven-Boston & Maine merger battle revisited." 
Business History Review, 36 (Winter 1962), 408-430. 

1907-1909. 

1403 ALBION, ROBERT GREENH ALGH, WILUAM AVERY 
BAKER, and BENJAMIN WOODS LABAREE. New 
England and the sea. Middletown, Corm.: Wesleyan 
Univ. Pr., 1972. xiv, 299p. MWA. + 

1404 ARNOLD, ALLAN A. "Merchants in the 
forecastle: the private ventures of New England 
mariners." American Neptune, 41 (July 1981), 165-187. 

1405 BABCOCK, H. L. 'The beaver as a factor 

in the development of New England." Americana, 11 
(Apr. 1916), 181-196. 

1406 BAILYN, BERNARD. "Kinship and trade in 
seventeenth century New England." Explorations in 
Entrepreneurial History, 6 (May 1954), 197-205. 

1407 . "The New England merchants in the seventeenth 

century: a study in the history of American society." 
Ph.D. dissertation. Harvard Univ., 1953. vi, 497p. 

See also next entry. 

1408 . The New England merchants in the seventeenth 

century. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard Univ. Pr., 1955. 
viii, 249p. MWA. -i- 

See also preceding entry. 

1409 BERNARDI, JOHN LAWRENCE, JR. "A century 

and a quarter of milk contracting in New England: the 
Hood Company, 1846-1970." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. 
of Pennsylvania, 1971. xii, 160p. NhKeS. 

Abstracted in DAI, 32, No. 8A (1972), 4222. 

1410 BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY. Shoptalk: papers 

on historical business and commercial records of New 
England. James Lawton, ed. Boston, 1975. 52p. 

MB. -H 

1411 BROOKS, GEORGE E., JR. Yankee traders, 
old coasters & African middlemen: a history of 
American legitimate trade with West Africa in the 
nineteenth century. Boston: Boston Univ. Pr., 1970. 
xiv, 370p. MWA. -t- 

See also entry 1436. 



1412 BUFFINTON, ARTHUR HOWLAND. "New England 
and the western fur trade, 1629-1675." Colonial 
Society of Massachusetts, Publications, 18 (Jan. 

1916), 160-192. 

1413 BURPEE, CHARLES WINSLOW. "Fire insurance 

in New England." NEM, n.s. 19 (Sept. 1898), 101-119. 

1414 CARSON, GERALD. Country stores in early 
New England. Sturbridge, Mass.: Old Sturbridge 
Village, 1955. 15p. MStuO. -t- 

1415 COWLEY, MALCOLM. "Some Yankee slavers." 

NEG, 4 (Fall 1962), 28-34. 

1416 DODGE, ERNEST STANLEY. New England and 

the South Seas. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard Univ. Pr., 
1965. XV, 216p. MSaE. -i- 

1417 DOLAN, J. R. The Yankee px;ddlcrs of 

early America. N.Y.: Clarkson N. Potter, 1964. 

270p. MWA. -H 

1418 DONNAN, ELIZABETH. "TTic New England 
slave trade after the Revolution." NEQ, 2 (Apr. 

1930), 251-278. 

1419 DORSEY, RHODA MARY. "The resumption of 
Anglo-American trade in New England, 1783-1794." 
Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of Minnesota, 1956. 409p. 
M. 

Abstracted in DAI, 16, No. 10 (1956), 1891. 

1420 DOW, GEORGE FRANCIS. "Shipping and trade 

in early New England." MHSP, 64 (1932), 185-201. 

1421 DUNBABIN, THOMAS. "Australia and New 
England." American Neptune, 15 (Apr. 1955), 153-154 

1422 FLINT, RICHARD W. "Entrepreneurial and 
cultural aspects of the early-nincteenth-century 

circus and menagerie business." DubSemPr (1984), 131- 
149. 

1423 GEMMING, ELIZABETH. Blow ye winds 
westerly: the seaports & sailing ships of old New 
England. N.Y.: Thomas Y. Crowell, 1971. viii, 183p. 
MSiuO. -I- 

1424 GOEBEL, DOROTHY BURNE. "Tlie 'New Engkind 
trade' and the French West Indies, 1763-1774: A study 
in trade policies." WMQ, 3 scr. 20 (July 1963), 331- 
372. 



69 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



1425 BUSINESS AND COMMERCE 



1425 GRAVES, EBENEZER. "Journal of a peddling 
trip kept by Ebenezer Graves of Ashfield, 

Massachusetts: memorandum for the year 1853, 
commencing March 21st." OTNE, 56 (Winter 1966), 81- 
90; (Spring 1966), 108-116. 

In Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Maine. 

1426 HALL, ARTHUR N. "The old wholesale 

peddler and his teams." NEM, n.s. 22 (Aug. 1900), 690- 
694. 

1427 HALL, FRANKLIN P. 'The New England 

business cycle." New England Social Studies Bulletin, 

10 (May 1953), 18-22. 

1428 "JINGLE-jangling through the 
countryside." Yankee, 37 (May 1973), 156-164. 

Yankee peddlers. Ian Nichols, ed. 

1429 KESSLER, WILLIAM C. "Incorporation in 
New England: a statistical study, 1800-1875." 

Journal of Economic History, 8 (May 1948), 43-62. 

Business incorporation. 

1430 KLINE, PRISCILLA C. "New light on the 
Yankee peddler." NEQ, 12 (Mar. 1939), 80-98. 

1431 LEAVITT, JOHN F. "The New England 
coastwise trade." Connecticut Antiquarian, 22 (June 
1970), 4-8. 

1432 MANNING, CHARLES, and MERRILL MOORE. 

"Sassafras and syphilis." NEQ, 9 (Sept. 1936), 473- 
475. 

Sassafras, believed to be a cure for syphilis, was a 
"prime commodity" in early- 17th-century New England. 

1433 MASSON, ROBERT LOUIS. A case study of 
balloting regulation: the Boston and Maine 
recapitalizes, 1948-1953. Boston: Division of 
Research, Graduate School of Business Administration, 
Harvard Univ., 1956. xvi, 373p. MB. + 

1434 MOLONEY, FRANQS XAVIER. The fur trade 

in New England, 1620-1676. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard 
Univ. Pr., 1931. 150p. MWA. + 

Reprinted 1967. 

1435 NETTELS, CURTIS P. "England's trade with 

New England and New York, 1685-1720." Colonial 
Society of Massachusetts, Publications, 28 (1934), 322- 
350. 



1436 NEW England merchants in Africa; a 

history through documents, 1802 to 1865. Norman R. 
Bennett and George E. Brooks, Jr., eds. Boston: 

Boston Univ. Pr., 1965. xxxiv, 575p. MWA. + 

See also entry 1411. 

1437 OSLEEB. JEFFREY P., and SAMUEL J. RATICK. 

"The impact of coal conversions on the ports of New 
England." Economic Geography, 59 (Jan. 1983), 35-51 

1438 PENN, THEODORE Z. "Who's minding the 
store?" Old Sturbridge Village, Rural Visitor, 21 
(Winter 1981-1982), 8-9. 

Early- 19th-century management skills. 

1439 POWERS, HENRY M. C. H. Sprague & Son 
Company: a New England colossus. N.Y.: Newcomen 
Society of the U.S., 1985. 24p. NhPoA. + 

Coal, oil, etc. 

1440 PUTNAM, HENRY H. "Life insurance in New 
England." NEM, n.s. 28 (Apr. 1903), 188-211. 

1441 ROBERTS, WILLIAM IREDELL 11. "The fur 
trade of New England in the seventeenth century." 

Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of Pennsylvania, 1958. 
liii, 237p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 19, No. 1 (1958), 126. 

1442 SACHS, WILLIAM S. 'The business outlook 
in the northern colonies, 1759-1775." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Columbia Univ., 1957. 332p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 17 (1957), 1690-1691. See also 
Sachs and Ari Hoogenboom, The enterprising 
colonials... (1965). 

1443 SALTONSTALL, WILLIAM G. Ports of 
Piscataqua: soundings in the maritime history of the 
Portsmouth, N.H., customs district. Cambridge, Mass.: 
Harvard Univ. Pr., 1941. 244p. MWA. -t- 

In Maine and New Hampshire. 

1444 SMITH, ISAAC TOWNSEND. The early 
maritime life of New England: address before the 
Union League Club of New York, April 12, 1900. N.Y., 
1900. 68p. MSaE. -t- 

1445 SMITH, LINCOLN. "The regulation of some 

N.E. holding companies." Land Economics, 25 (Aug. 
1949), 289-303. 

1446 SWAN, MABEL MUNSON. "Coastwise cargoes 

of venture furniture." Antiques, 55 (Mar. 1949), 278- 
280. 

18th century. 



70 



Economic Life 



INDUSTRY 1467 



1447 TAUSSIG, CHARELS WILLIAM. Rum, romance & 
rebellion. N.Y.: Minton Balch, 1928. xiii, 289p. 
MBU. + 

Infuence of rum on New England's commerce and 
colonial life. 

1448 TYACK, NORMAN C. P. "English exports to 
New England, 1632-1640: some records in the port 
books." NEHGR, 135 (July 1981), 213-238. 

1449 VOYAGES and commercial enterprises of the 

sons of New England. N.Y.: Leavitt & Allen, 1858. 
407p. MSaE. + 

1450 WEAVER, GLENN. "Jonathan Trumbull and 

the Nantucket trade." Historic Nantucket, 7 (Jan. 

1960), 20-27. 

The Cormecticut merchant and Revolutionary -era 
governor. 

1451 . "The New England country store of the 

eighteenth century." NEG, 5 (Fall 1963), 14-22. 

1452 WEEDEN, WILLIAM BABCOCK. "The early 
African slave-trade in New England." AASP, n.s. 5 
(Oct. 1887), 107-128. 

1453 WHITE, CHARLES BRYANT. 'New England 
merchants and missionaries in coastal nineteenth- 
century Portuguese East Africa." Ph.D. dissertation, 
Boston Univ., 1974. 318p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 35, No. 3A (1974), 1608. 

1454 WINGATE, J. D. P. "Railroad 

consolidation and the public weal in New England." 
NEM, n.s. 35 (Oct. 1906), 130-134. 

1455 WOLKOMIR, RICHARD. "By the atamal, 

Yankee Jonathan!" Smithsonian, 5 (July 1974), 40-44. 
Development of the myth of the Yankee peddler. 

1456 WOOSTER, HARVEY ALDEN. "A forgotten 
factor in American industrial history." American 
Economic Review, 16 (Mar. 1926), 14-27. 

"The village general store" in New England (early- 
19th century). 



INDUSTRY 

1457 AMERICAN WOOLEN COMPANY, BOSTON. A 

sketch of the mills of the American Woolen Company. 
Boston, 1901. 144p. NhD. + 



1458 ANDERSON, DONALD NORTON. The decline of 

the woolen and worsted industry in New England, 1947- 
1958: a regional economic study." Ph.D. 
dissertation. New York Univ., 1971. ii, 299p. NhKeS. 
Abstracted in DAI, 32, No. 3A (1971), 1428. 

1459 BAGNALL, WILUAM R. The textile 
industries of the United States: including sketches 
and notices of cotton, woolen, silk and linen 
manufactures in the colonial period. Cambridge, 

Mass.: Riverside Pr., 1893. xxii, 660p. MStuO. -i- 

Mostly sketches of New England companies. Reprinted 
1971. 

1460 BAKER, WILLIAM H. "Early mills and 
factories of New England." Cormecticut Circle, 9 
(Feb. 1946), 23-24. 

1461 BATCHELDER, SAMUEL. Introduction and 

early progress of the cotton manufacture in the United 
States. Boston: Little, Brown, 1863. iv, 108p. 

MStuO. + 

Strong New England emphasis. 

1462 BLACKALL, FREDERICK STEELE, JR. 

Invention and industry— cradled in New England! 

N.Y.: American Branch of the Newcomen Society, 1946. 
32p. M. -I- 

1463 BROWN, EPHRAIM. "Glass-making in the 
Merrimack Basin: three glass manufactories." Old 
Residents' Historical Association of Lowell [Mass.], 
Contributions, 2 (Jan. 1882), 180-200. 

In New Hampshire and Massachusetts. 

1464 BURGY, JACOB HERBERT. The New England 
cotton textile industry: a study in industrial 
geography. Baltimore: Waverly Pr., 1932. vii, 246p. 
MStuO. + 

See also next entry. 

1465 . "The New England cotton textile industry: a 

study in industrial geography." Ph.D. dissertation, 

Clark Univ., 1930. 

See also preceding entry. 

1466 CAHILL, CHARLES T. "The evolution of the 
modem shoe factory." NEM, n.s. 51 (Sept. 1914), 46- 
50. 

In New England. 

1467 CAMERON, EDWARD HUGH. Samuel Slater, 

father of American manufactures. Freeport, Me.: Bond 
Wheelwright, 1960. 206p. MStuO. -i- 



71 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



1468 INDUSTRY 



1468 CANDEE, RICHARD McALPIN. "Merchant and 
millwright: the water powered sawmills of the 
Piscataqua." OTNE, 60 (Apr.-June 1970), 131-149. 

1469 CLARK, GREGORY. "Why isn't the whole 
world developed? Lessons from the cotton mills." 
Journal of Economic History, 47 (Jan. 1987), 141-173. 

Comparison of worker output in New England mills 
with productivity in other countries (ca. 1910). 

1470 CLARK, HAZEL BAKER. "Our colonial comb 
industry." OTNE, 41 (Fall 1950), 4145. 

1471 COLLAZm CHARLES J., JR. 

"Groundbreaking developments of the New England 
footwear industry." CEAIA, 37 (Sept. 1984), 43-44, 

46. 

Early mechanization. 

1 472 CONFERENCE OF NEW ENGLAND GOVERNORS. 
COMMITTEE ON THE NEW ENGLAND TEXTILE 
INDUSTRY. Report on the New England textile industry. 
Cambridge, Mass., 1953. xi, 317p. DLC. + 

Includes historical information. 

1473 DALZELL, ROBERT F., JR. Enterprising 

elite: the Boston Associates and the world they made. 
Cambridge: Harvard Univ. Pr., 1987. xviii, 298p. 
MWA.-I- 

Francis Cabot Lowell, his associates, and the early 
New England textile industry. 

1474 DECKER, FRANK A., JR. The Pike saga: 

one more river to cross. A history of the textile and 
chemical industry in southern New England, n.p., 

1976. ii, 302, [18], 6p. CtTmp. 

1475 DEVINO, WILUAM STANLEY, ARNOLD H. 
RAPHAELSON, and JAMES A. STORER. A study 
of textile mill closings in selected New England 
communities. Orono, Me.: Univ. of Maine Pr., 1966. 
viii, 160p. MB. -t- 

1476 DEYRUP, FELIQA JOHNSON. Arms makers of 
the Cormecticut Valley: a regional study of the 
economic development of the small arms industry, 1798- 
1870." Northampton, Mass.: Smith College, Dept, of 
History, 1948. 290p. MNF. + 

Reprinted 1970. 

1477 DUNWELL, STEVE. The run of the mill: a 
pictorial narrative of the expansion, dominion, 
decline and enduring impact of the New England textile 
industry. Boston: David R. Godine, 1978. xi, 299p. 
MStuO. + 



1478 EDWARDS, DAVID F. "Saco-Lowell Shops, 

1813-1950: a saga of New England enterprise." Cotton 
History Review, 2 (Oct. 1961), 187-199. 

Machinery. 

1479 . "Saco-Lowell," 1813-1950: a saga of New 

England enterprise. N.Y.: Newcomen Society in North 
America, 1950. 32p. M. 

1480 ELDEN, ALFRED. 'Tide-mills in New 
England." OTNE, 25 (Apr. 1935), 117-127. 

17th- 19th centuries. 

1481 ENGLUND, JOHN. "A new sawmill for the 

old millstream." Old Sturbridge Visitor, 22 (Fall 
1982), 4-5. 

Sawmills in the rural economy of early New England. 

1482 ESTALL, ROBERT C. "The electronic 
products industry of New England." Economic 
Geography, 39 (July 1963), 189-216. 

1483 . New England: a study in industrial 

adjustment. N.Y.: Praeger, 1966. xv, 296p. MB. -i- 

1484 FARNSWORTH, FRANK ALBERT. "Some aspects 
of the development of the electric utility industry in 
New England, 1924-1949." Ph.D. dissertation. Harvard 
Univ., 1952. 275p. 

1485 FULLER, NED. "Ned Fuller's story of 
barrel making." CEAIA, 4 (Jan. 1951), 4-5. 

1850s. 

1486 GALENSON, ALICE CAROL. The migration of 

the cotton textile industry from New England to the 
South, 1880-1930. N.Y.: Garland Publishing, 1985. 
206p. MBU. -H 
See also next entry. 

1487 . 'The migration of the cotton textile industry 

from New England to the South: 1880-1930." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Cornell Univ., 1975. 245p. MWalB. 

Abstracted in DAI, 36, No. 6A (1975), 3900. See 
also preceding entry. 

1488 GIBB, GEORGE SWEET. The Saco-Lowell 

shops: textile machinery building in New England, 
1813-1949. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard Univ. Pr., 
1950. xxxvi, 835p. MWA. + 

See also next entry. 

1489 . "The Saco-Lowell shops: textile machinery 

building in New England, 1813-1949." Ph.D. 
dissertation. Harvard Univ., 1955. 105p. 

See also preceding entry. 



72 



1490 

1491 

1492 

1493 

1494 

1495 

1496 

1497 

1498 

1499 

1500 

1501 

1502 



Economic Life 



INDUSTRY 1513 



GOOLD, WILLIAM. "Early papermills of New- 1503 

England." NEHGR, 29 (Apr. 1875), 158-165. 

GREENE, SUSAN. "The Kimballs of New 

England: a family that helped keep the wheels of 

America turning for three centuries." Carriage 

Journal, 19 (Summer 1981), 39-42; (Autumn 1981), 85- 1504 

88 . 

Carriage makers in Portland, Me., New Haven, Corui., 
and Chicago, 111. 

GWYN, JULIAN. "Shipbuilding for the 1505 

Royal Navy in colonial New England." American 
Neptune, 48 (Winter 1988), 22-30. 

HALL, ELTON W. "Sailcloth for American 
vessels." American Neptune, 31 (Apr. 1971), 130-145. 1506 

Production in New England. 

HAMILTON, EDWARD PIERCE. "The New 
England village mill." OTNE, 42 (Fall 1951), 29-38. 

. The village mill in early New England. 1507 

Sturbridge, Mass.: Old Sturbridge Village, 1964. 

22p. MStuO. + 

HARMON, JOHN E. "A time series analysis 

of manufacturing employment decline in New England 1508 

cities." NE-StLVGSPr, 6 [1977], 69-72. 

HOROWITZ, DANIEL. "Genteel observers: 

New England economic writers and industrialization." 

NEQ, 48 (Mar. 1975), 65-83. 

1509 

HOWARD, STANLEY EDWIN. The movement of 
wages in the cotton manufacturing industry of New 
England since 1860. Boston: National Council of 
American Cotton Manufacturers, 1920. 99p. NhD. + 

HUBBARD, E. K. The industrial evolution 1510 

of New England, n.p., [1924?]. lip. Ct. -t- 

INGRAHAM, PAUL. "New England's car- 
making history." Yankee, 35 (May 1971), 132-133. 1511 

Automobiles. 

KEIR, ROBERT MALCOLM. "Some influences 
of the sea upon the industries of New England." 

Geographical Review, 5 (May 1918), 399-404. 1512 

KELLEHER, TOM. "Essential services." 

Old Sturbridge Visitor, 27 (Winter 1987-1988), 7-9. 1513 

Mills in the rural economy (early- 19th century). 



LAYER, ROBERT GEORGE. Earnings of cotton 
mill operatives, 1825-1914. Cambridge, Mass.: 
Committee on Research in Economic History, 1955. ix, 
71p. MBU. 

In New England. See also next entry. 

. "Wages, earnings, and output in four textile 

companies in New England, 1825-1860." Ph.D. 
dissertation. Harvard Univ., 1952. vii, 521p. 

See also preceding entry. 

LEBLANC, ROBERT GEORGE. Location of 
manufacturing in New England in the 19th century. 
[Hanover, N.H.], 1969. 173p. MStuO. -i- 
See also next entry. 

. "The location of manufacturing in New England 

in the nineteenth century." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. 
of Minnesota, 1967. 290p. Ct. 

Abstracted in DAI, 29, No. lOB (1969), 3784. See 
also preceding centry. 

UNCOLN, JONATHAN T. "The cotton textile 
machine industry." Harvard Business Review, 1 1 (Oct. 
1932), 88-96. 

New England (19th and early-20th centuries). 

LOWELL [MASS.] CONFERENCE ON INDUSTRIAL 
HISTORY. Essays from the Lowell Conference on 
Industrial History, 1980 and 1981. Robert Weible, 
Oliver Ford, and Paul Marion, eds. Lowell, Mass., 

1981. 172p. MWA. -h 

LOZIER, JOHN WILLIAM. "Rural textile 
mill communities and the transition to industrialism 
in America, 1800-1840." Working Papers from the 
Regional Economic History Research Center, 4 (1981), 
78-96. 

McDONAUGH, JOHN P. "Differential growth 
in New England cotton textile cities." NE- 
StLVGSPr, 6 [1977], 35-38. 

McGOULDRICK, PAUL F. New England 
textiles in the nineteenth century: profits and 
investment. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard Univ. Pr., 
1968. xviii, 307p. MWA. -i- 

"MANUFACTURES in New England, 1704-1850." 
OTNE, 13 (Oct. 1922), 78-83. 

MERRITT, ARTHUR C. "Textile industries 
of western New England." Western New England, 3 
(1913), 368-381. 



73 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



1514 INDUSTRY 



1514 NETTELS, CURTIS P. "The menace of 

colonial manufacturing." NEQ, 4 (Apr. 1931), 230-269. 

British discouragement of manufacturing in New 
England. 

1515 THE NEW England mill village, 1790-1860. 

Gary Kulik, Roger Parks, and Theodore Z. Penn, eds. 
Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Pr., 1982. xxxv, 520p. MWA. -i- 
Selected documents and readings. 

1516 NIEMI, ALBERT WILUAM, JR. 'The 
development of industrial structure in southern New 
England." Journal of Economic History, 30 (Sept. 

1970), 657-666. 

1517 O'CONNOR, THOMAS HENRY. "New England 

mill magnates and the South." Textile History Review, 

5 (Apr. 1964), 44-65. 

19th century. 

1518 OXFORD-PRINT, BOSTON. New England 
industries: brief historical sketches concerning 
twenty-five leading industries in New England. 

Boston, 1911. [94]p. Ct. + 

1519 "PAPER and pulp- -and New England." 

Maine Townsman, 16 (Apr. 1954), 4-5, 17-18. 

1520 PATTON, JEANNIE ALANE. "An investigation 

of the bleaching of cotton textiles in Massachusetts 
and Rhode Island, 1800-1850." Ph.D. dissertation, 

Purdue Univ., 1977. 239p. RHi. 

Abstracted in DAI, 38, No. lOB (1979), 4753. 

1521 PHENIS, ALBERT. Yankee thrift: the 
story of New England's marvelous industrial 
development, how "clear grit," ingenuity and ceaseless 
activity have transformed a semi-barren comer of the 
country into one of the most prosperous regions of the 
globe. An inspiration for other sections, especially 
the South. Baltimore: Manufacturers' Record 
Publishing, 1905. lOOp. Ct. -t- 

1522 PORRITT, EDWARD. "The cotton mill towns 

of New England." Co-operative Wholesale Society, 
Limited, England and Scodand, Annual (1900), 195-222. 

1523 RICH, GEORGE. "The cotton industry in 

New England." NEM, n.s. 3 (Oct. 1890), 167-191. 

1524 SANTORO, CARMEL A. "New manufacturers' 
experiences in New England." New England Social 
Studies Bulletin, 13 (May 1956), 13-19. 

Since 1945. 



1525 SCULLY, CHARLES J. "The wool industry in 
New England." Review of Social Economy, 9 (Sept. 
1951), 137-145. 

1526 SMITH, GILMAN P. The rise of the 

carriage industry in New England, n.p., n.d. 22p. 

NhHi. 

1 527 SOKOLOFF, KENNETH LEE. 

"Industrialization and the growth of the manufacturing 
sector in the Northeast, 1820-1850." Ph.D. 
dissertation. Harvard Univ., 1982. iv, 304p. MStuO. 
Abstracted in DAI, 43, No. 9A (1983), 3073. 

1528 SOLTOW, JAMES H. "Origins of small 

business metal fabricators and machinery makers in New 
England, 1890-1957." American Philosophical Society, 
Transactions, n.s. 55, Part 10 (Dec. 1965), 6-58. 

1529 SPALDING, ROBERT VARNUM. "The Boston 
mercantile community and the promotion of the textile 
industry in New England, 1813-1860." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Yale Univ., 1963. v, 253p. MStuO. 

Abstracted in DAI, 30, No. 3 A (1969), 1097. 

1530 STATE STREET TRUST COMPANY, BOSTON. 

Other industries of New England: their origin, 
development and accomplishments, illustrated by many 
old and interesting views. Boston, 1924. vi, 59p. 
MWA.-t- 

See also next entry. 

1531 . Some industries of New England: their origin, 

development, and accomplishments; illustrated by many 
old and interesting views. Boston, 1923. vi, 70p. 
MWA.+ 

See also preceding entry. 

1532 STEARNS, BERTHA MONICA. "Early factory 
managers in New England." Journal of Economic and 
Business History, 2 (Aug. 1930), 685-705. 

1533 SZEPESI, EUGENE. "Migrating cotton 

mills." Virginia Quarterly Review, 4 (July 1928), 321- 
336. 

1534 TABER, MARTHA VAN HOESEN. A history of 
the cutlery industry in the Cormecticut Valley. 
Northampton, Mass.: Smith College, Dept, of History, 
1955. vi, 138p. MChB. -h 

1535 TUCKER, BARBARA MAY. "The merchant, the 
manufacturer, and the factory manager: the case of 
Samuel Slater." Business History Review, 55 (Autumn 
1981), 297-313. 



74 



Economic Life 



ARTISANS AND LABOR 1554 



1536 TUCKER, BARBARA MAY. "Samuel Slater & 

Sons: the emergence of an American factory system, 
1790-1860." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of California, 
Davis, 1974. 254p. RHi. 

Abstracted in DAI, 35, No. lOA (1975), 6648. See 
also next entry. 

1537 . Samuel Slater and the origins of the American 

textile industry, 1790-1860. Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell 
Univ. Pr., 1984. 268p. MWA. 

See also preceding entry. 

1538 TUSTTN, E. R., JR. "The story of salt in 

New England." EIHC, 85 (July 1949), 259-271. 

1616-1894. 

1539 VAN SLYCK, J. D. Representatives of New 
England manufacturers.... The First in a series of 
choice publications, with sub-classifications into 
manufacturers, commerce, literature, etc.; to consist 
of full biographical sketches and portraits of the 
most eminent men in each department.... Boston: Van 
Slyck, 1879. 2v. MH. -t- 

1540 WAILES, REX. "Notes on some windmills in 
New England." OTNE, 21 (Jan. 1931), 99-128. 

1541 WALLACE, WILLIAM H. "Merrimack Valley 
manufacturing: past and present." Economic 
Geography, 37 (Oct. 1961), 283-308. 

1 542 WARE, CAROLINE FARRAR. The early New 
England cotton manufacture: a case study in 
industrial begiimings. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 
1931. 349p. MWA. 

Reprinted 1966. 

1543 . "The effect of the American Embargo, 1807- 

1809, on the New England cotton industry." American 
Journal of Economics, 40 (Aug. 1926), 672-688. 

1544 WELLES, ARNOLD. "Father of our factory 

system." American Heritage, 9 (Apr. 1958), 34-39, 90- 
92. 

Samuel Slater. 

1545 WELLS, RALPH GENT. Trends in New England 
industries: a statistical study based on the U.S. 

Census of Manufacturers, 1919-1929-1931; a report 
submitted to the Industrial Committee of the New 
England Council. Boston: Boston Univ., College of 
Business Administration, Bureau of Business Research, 
1935. 46p. MBU. -i- 



1546 WHITE, GEORGE SAVAGE. Memoir of Samuel 
Slater, the father of American manufactures; connected 
with a history of the rise and progress of the cotton 
manufacture in England and America, with remarks on 
the moral influence of manufactories in the United 
States. Philadelphia, 1836. 448p. MStuO. -i- 

1547 WHITTEMORE, EDWIN C. "Ship building in 
early New England." CEAIA, 8 (Jan. 1955), 4-7, 9. 

1548 ZEVIN, ROBERT BROOKE. The growth of 
manufacturing in early nineteenth century New England. 
N.Y.: Amo Pr., 1975. 16, 71, 21p. MWA. + 

See also next entry and this author's article of 
same title in Journal of Economic History, 25 (Dec. 
1965), 680-682. 

1549 . "The growth of manufacturing in early 

nineteenth century New England." Ph.D. dissertation. 
Harvard Univ., 1981. 

See also preceding entry. 

SEE "Industry" in Index for additional listings. 



ARTISANS AND LABOR 

1550 ALDRICH, MARK. "Determinants of 

mortality among New England cotton mill workers during 
the Progressive Era." Journal of Economic History, 42 
(Dec. 1982), 847-863. 

1551 ARNOLD, DEXTER PHIUP. " A row of 

bricks': worker activism in the Merrimack Valley 
textile industry, 1912-1922." Ph.D. dissertation, 

Univ. of Wisconsin, 1985. 915p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 46, No. 2A (1985), 504. 

1552 BLEWETT, MARY H. Men, women, and work: 
class, gender, and protest in the New England shoe 
industry, 1780-1910. Urbana, 111.: Univ. of Illinois 
Pr., 1988. xxii, 444p. MBU. + 

1553 . "Work, gender and the artisan tradition in New 

England shoemaking, 1780-1860." JSH, 17 (Winter 
1983), 221-248. 

See also preceding entry. 

1554 BONFIELD, LYNN A. "The production of 

cloth, clothing and quilts in 19th century New England 
homes." American Quilt Study Group, Uncoverings 
(1981), 77-96. 



75 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



1555 

1555 

1556 

1557 

1558 

1559 

1560 

1561 

1562 

1563 

1564 



ARTISANS AND LABOR 



BUHLER, KATHRYN C. "Master and 
apprentice: some relationships in New England 
silversmithing." Antiques, 68 (Nov. 1955), 456-459. 
17th century. 

COHEN, ISAAC. "American management and 
British labor: Lancashire immigrant spinners in 
industrial New England." Comparative Studies in 
Social History, 27 (Oct. 1985), 608-650, 

CUTLER, URIEL WALDO. 'Tools, trades and 
an honest living in early New England." Worcester 
[Mass.] Historical Society, Publications, n.s. 1 (Apr. 
1935), 479-486. 

DALE, CHRISTOPHER DAMON. "From household 
laborers to millhands: a study of women in the 
transition to industrial capitalism in antebellum New 
England." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of Kentucky, 

1984. 258p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 45, No. 9A (1985), 2995. 

DUBLIN, THOMAS LOUIS. "A personal 
perspective of the ten hour movement in New England." 
Labor History, 24 (Summer 1983), 398-403. 

. "Women’s work and the family economy: 

textiles and palm leaf hatmaking in New England, 1830- 
1850." Tocqueville Review, 5 (1983), 297-316. 

EARLY, FRANCES HORN. "A reappraisal of 
the New England labour-reform movement of the 1840’s: 
the Lowell Female Labour Reform Association and the 
New England Workingmen's Association." Histoire 
sociale/Social History [Canada], 13 (May 1980), 33-54. 

FACTORY girls: a collection of writings 
on life and struggles in the New England factories of 
the 1840's. By the factory girls themselves, and the 
story in their own words, of the first trade unions of 
women workers in the United States. Philip S. Foner, 
ed. Urbana, 111.: Univ. of Illinois Pr., 1977. 
xxvii, 360p. MStuO. + 

FALER, PAUL GUSTAF, THOMAS LOUIS DUBLIN, 
and HM O'BRIAN. The New England working class: a 
bibliographic history. Boston: Radical Historians 
Caucus, 1972. 24p. RHi. 

FARM to factory: women's letters, 1830- 
1860. Thomas Dublin, ed. N.Y.: Columbia Univ. Pr., 
1981. X, 191p. MW A. -(- 
New England mill workers. 



1565 FELDBLUM, MARY ALICE. "The formation of 
the first factory labor force in the New England 
cotton textile industry, 1800-1848." Ph.D. 
dissertation. New School for Social Research, 1977. 
iii, 344p. MStuO. 

Abstracted in DAI, 38, No. 7A (1978), 4300. 

1566 FISKE, A. K. "Old time factory life in 

New England." NEM, n.s. 18 (Apr. 1898), 249-256. 

1567 GERSUNY, CARL. "’A devil in petticoats' 

and just cause: patterns of punishment in two New 
England textile factories." Business History Review, 

50 (Summer 1976), 131-152. 

Lowell, Mass. (1830) and Woonsocket, R.I. (1972). 
"...The differences in the patterns of punishment are 
more apparent than real." 

1568 . "New England mill casualties: 1890-1910." 

NEQ, 52 (Dec. 1979), 467-482. 

1569 GREEN, CONSTANCE W. McLAUGHLIN. The role 
of women as production workers in war plants in the 
Connecticut Valley. Northampton, Mass.: Smith 
College, 1946. 84p. MNF. -t- 

World War H. 

1570 GRIFFITH, ROY. Skilled labor: the 

Puritan heritage. Cambridge, Mass.: Perry-Estabrook 
Pr., 1924. 14p. MH. -h 

1571 THE HOLLING WORTH letters: technical 

change in the textile industry, 1826-1837. Thomas W. 
Leavitt, ed. Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Pr., 1969. 
xxvii, 120p. MWA. -i- 

Family of British textile workers in small mills in 
Massachusetts, Connecticut, and New York State. 

1572 JOHNSON, PAUL E. "The modernization of 

Mayo Greenleaf Patch: land, family, and marginality 
in New England, 1677-1818." NEQ, 55 (Dec. 1982), 488 
516. 

Patch and his wife Abigail "were among the first New 
Englanders to abandon farming and take up factory 
labor. They did so because rural society had no room 
for them, and their history is a tale of progressive 
exclusion from an agrarian world governed by family, 
kinship, and inherited lands." Family eventually 
relocated from Essex County, Mass., to the cotton 
mills of Pawtucket, R.I. 

1573 KORNBLITH, GARY J. "From artisans to 
businessmen: master mechanics of New Englarid, 1789- 
1850." Ph.D. dissertation, Princeton Univ., 1983. 
xvi, 582p. MWA. 

Study of "the members of mechanics' associations" in 
Providence, Boston, and Salem. 



76 



1574 

1575 

1576 

1577 

1578 

1579 

1580 

1581 

1582 

1583 

1584 



Economic Life 



ARTISANS AND LABOR 1596 



LASSER, CAROL S. "The domestic balance 
of power: relations between mistress and maid in 
nineteenth-century New England." Labor History, 28 
(Winter 1987), 298-306. 

See also next entry. 

. "Mistress, maid and market: the 

transformation of domestic service in New England, 
1790-1870." Ph.D. dissertation. Harvard Univ., 1982. 
vi, 335p. MStuO. 

Abstracted in DAI, 43, No. 2 (1982), 527. 

LENK, WALTER E. "The engineers' strike 
of February, 1877." B&M Bulletin, 11 (Summer 1982), 
12-16. 

On the Boston and Maine Railroad. 

LENT, HENRY B. Men at work in New 
England. N.Y.: Pumam, 1956. 130p. NhM. -t- 

MYERS, CHARLES ANDREWS, and W. RUPERT 
MacLAURIN. The movement of factory workers: a study 
of a New England industrial community, 1937-1939 and 
1942. N.Y.: J. Wiley & Sons, [1943]. 11 Ip. MBU. + 

THE NEW England working class and the new 
labor history. Herbert Gutman and Donald Bell, eds. 
Chicago: Univ. of Illinois Pr., 1987. xvi, 296p. 

MBU. -H 

NICKLESS, PAMELA J. "Changing labor 
productivity and the utilization of native women 
workers in the American cotton textile industry, 1825- 
1860.” Ph.D. dissertation, Purdue Univ., 1976. 21 Ip. 
Abstracted in DAI, 37, No. lOA (1977), 6654. 

. "A new look at productivity in the New England 

cotton textile industry, 1830-1860." Journal of 
Economic History, 39 (Dec. 1979), 889-910. 

See also preceding entry. 

NISONOFF, LAURIE. "Bread and roses: the 
proletarianisation of women workers in New England 
textile mills, 1827-1848." Historical Journal of 
Massachusetts, 9 (Jan. 1981), 3-14. 

NORTON, NANCY P. "Labor in the early New 
England carpet industry." Business Historical 
Society, Bulletin, 26 (Mar. 1952), 19-26. 

RAMIREZ, BRUNO. "French Canadian 
immigrants in the New England cotton industry: a 
socioeconomic profile." Labour, 11 (Spring 1983), 125- 
142. 



1585 RIVARD, PAUL E. The home manufacture of 

cloth, 1790-1840: an exhibit developed by the Slater 
Mill Historic Site through a grant from the National 
Endowment for the Humanities. Pawtucket, R.I.: 
Slater Mill Historic Site, 1974. Unp. MStuO. -t- 

1 586 ROBINSON, HARRIET JANE HANSON. Early 
factory labor in New England. Boston: Wright & 
Potter Printing, 1889. 26p. MB. -i- 

1587 ROUILLARD, JACQUES. Ah les Etats! Les 
travailleurs canadiens-francais dans I'industrie 
textile de la Nouvelle-Angleterre d'apr^ la 
temoignage des demiers migrants. Montreal: Boreal 
Express, 1985. 155p. MLowU. -t- 

1588 RUSSELL, JASON ALMUS. "Forgotten home 
industries." Yankee, 5 (Oct. 1939), 18-21, 36. 

1589 SAYWARD, ELLIOT M„ and WILLIAM M. 
STREETER. "Planemaking in the valley of the 
Connecticut River and the hills of western 
Massachusetts." CEAIA, 28 (July 1975), 21-29. 

Hand tools. 

1590 SIPSON, MARK. "Shoe shop demonstrates 
largest 19th century New England industry." Old 
Sturbridge Village, Rural Visitor, 17 (Fall 1977), 4- 
5. 

Includes historical information. 

1591 SLO AT, CAROLINE FULLER. "Leisure time 
becomes paid time." Old Sturbridge Visitor, 28 (Fall 
1988), 7-9. 

Straw hat braiding (1820s and 1830s). 

1592 STEWART, PETER. "Paternalism in a New 
England mill village." Textile History Review, 4 
(Apr. 1963), 59-65. 

19th century. 

1593 THARP, LOUISE HALL. "Bonnet girls." 

NEG, 1 (Winter 1960), 3-10. 

Straw hat braiding (19th century). 

1594 THOMPSON, AGNES L. "New England mill 
girls." NEG, 16 (Fall 1974), 43-49. 

1595 'TRADES and occupations in 18th century 

New England." OTNE, 18 (July 1927), 35-40; (Oct. 
1927), 89-94. 

Gleanings from Boston newspapers. 

1596 TUCKER, BARBARA MAY. "The family and 
industrial discipline in ante-bellum New England." 
Labor History, 21 (Winter 1979-1980), 55-74. 



77 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



1 597 ARTISANS AND LABOR 



1597 

1598 


WATKINS, LURA WOODSIDE. "Shoemaking and 
the small town." OTNE, 51 (Spring 1961), 104-114. 

WATKINS, MALCOLM. "Notes on the New 


1608 


BOTTS, A. K. "New England water power: 

facts and traditions." Journal of Geography, 34 (Oct. 

1935), 278-285. 




England blacksmith." Antiques, 51 (Mar. 1947), 180- 
182. 


1609 


BRAYLEY, ARTHUR WELLINGTON. History of 
the granite industry of New England. Boston: 
Published by Authority of the National Association of 


1599 


WHITE, FRANK G. "Tin shop pulls up 

stakes." Old Sturbridge Visitor, 26 (Spring 1986), 4- 




Granite Industries of the U.S., 1913. 2v. Ct. + 




5. 

Concerning the trade as it was practiced in early- 
19th-century New England. 


1610 


FELLER, IRWIN. "The diffusion and 
location of technological change in the American 
cotton-textile industry, 1890-1970." Technology and 
Culture, 15 (Oct. 1974), 569-593. 


1600 


WING, ANNE. "The Nicholson family- 

joiners and tool makers." CEAIA, 36 (June 1983), 41- 

43. 




Focus is on the "inability of New England firms to 
compete with the newer cotton mills of the South." 




1611 


. "The Draper loom in New England textiles. 1894 


1601 


WOOSTER, HARVEY ALDEN. "Manufacturer and 
artisan, 1790-1840." Journal of Political Economy, 34 
(Feb. 1926), 61-77. 

New England. 


1612 


1914: a study of diffusion of an innovation." 

Journal of Economic History, 26 (Sept. 1966), 320-347. 
See also Ibid., 28 (Dec. 1968), 628-630. 

FULLER, EDMUND. Tinkers and genius: the 


1602 


. "The rise of a wage-earning class in New 
England, 1790-1860, as related to the evolution of the 
factory system." Ph.D. dissertation, Yale Univ., 




story of the Yankee inventors. N.Y.: Hastings House, 
1955. xii, 308p. MWA. -i- 




1916. 


1613 


GOODWIN, KATHERINE R., and CHARLES E. 
DURYEA. Captain Samuel Morey of Orford, N.H., and 


1603 


ZEA, PHILIP. "Clockmaking and society at 
the river and the bay: Jedidiah and Jabez Baldwin, 
1790-1820." DubSemPr (1981), 43-72. 

Of Hanover, N.H., and Boston and Salem, Mass., 
respectively. 


1614 


Fairlee, Vermont: the Edison of his day. White River 
Junction, Vt.: Vermonter Pr., [1931?]. 31p. NhHi. 

Inventor of an early steamboat and internal 
combustion engine. 

GORDON, ROBERT B. "Cost and use of 


1604 


ZONDERMAN, DAVID AARON. "Aspirations and 
anxieties: New England workers and the mechanzied 
factory system, 1815-1850." Ph.D. dissertation, Yale 
Univ., 1986. 592p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 48, No. 12A (1988), 3141-3142. 


1615 


waterpower during industrialization in New England and 
Great Britain: a geological interpretation." 

Economic History Review [U.K.], 36 (May 1983), 240- 
259. 

. "Hydrological science and the development of 


1605 


ZWELLING, SHOMER S. Working in rural New 
England, 1790-1840. Sturbridge, Mass.: Old 
Sturbridge Village, 1977. 40p. MStuO. + 

See "Labor and laboring classes" in Index for 




waterpower for manufacturing." Technology and 
Science, 26 (Apr. 1985), 204-235. 

At Collinsville and Whitneyville, Conn., and 
Springfield, Mass. (19th century). 




additional listings. 


1616 


JENISON, PAUL B. "The availability of 

lime and masonry construction in New England: 1630- 

1733." OTNE, 67 (Summer-Fall 1976), 21-26. 


ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY 


1617 


JEREMY, DAVID J. "Irmovation in American 
textile technology during the early 19th century." 


1606 


ABBOTT, COLLAMER M. "New England's 
mining relics." NEG, 7 (Winter 1966), 12-18. 




Technology and Culture, 15 (Jan. 1973), 40-76. 
New England. 


1607 


ALLEN, RICHARD SANDERS. "Overshadowed by 
the Hoosac." Trains, 17 (Jan. 1957), 16-20. 
Railroad tunnels in New England and New York. 


1618 


UNCOLN, JONATHAN T. "Beginnings of the 
machine age in New England: documents relating to the 
introduction of the p>ower loom." Business Historical 
Society, Bulletin, 7 (Oct. 1933), 6-13. 



78 



Economic Life 



LAND TRANSPORTATION 1638 



1619 LINCOLN, SAMUEL BICKNELL. Lockwood 
Greene: the history of an engineering business, 1832- 
1958. Brattleboro, Vt.: Stephen Greene Pr., 1960. 

861p. MB. + 

Founded in Providence, R.I., and later moved to 
other New England locations. 

1 620 MITCHELL, ELLIOTT. "Granites of New 
England." NEM, n.s. 43 (Sept. 1910), 84-93. 

1621 MITCHELL, RICHARD M. "George Whitney: 
maker of steamboats." Steamboat Bill of Facts, 5 
(Sept. 1948), 51-53. 

Of Hartford and Boston (bom 1862). 

1622 PARKM AN, AUBREY. Army Engineers in New 
England: the military and civil works of the Corps of 
Engineers in New England, 1775-1975. Waltham, Mass.: 
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 1978. xii, 319p. 

MeHi. + 

1623 PENN, THEODORE Z. "Powerful 
waterwheels." Old Sturbridge Visitor, 23 (Summer 
1983), 17-19. 

Types commonly used during the early- 19th century. 

1624 RICH, GEORGE. "The granite industry in 

New England." NEM, n.s. 5 (Feb. 1892), 742-763. 

1625 SANDBERG, LARS G. "The Draper loom in 
New England textiles: a comment." Journal of 
Economic History, 28 (Dec. 1968), 624-627. 

1626 SANDE, THEODORE ANTON. 'TheNaUonal 

Park Service and the history of technology: the New 
England Textile Mill Survey." Technology and Culture, 
14 (July 1973), 404-414. 

1627 TREBILCOCK, BOB. "50 amazing things that 

made a difference." Yankee, 49 (Sept. 1985), 130-133, 
190-193. 

Important New England inventions (17th century to 
the present). 

1628 UHL, WILLIAM FRANK. Charles Main, 1856- 

1943: one of America's best! N.Y.: Newcomen Society 
in North America, 1951. 24p. MB. -i- 
Consulting engineer and designer of hydroelectric 
plants in New England. 

1629 WHITTEMORE, LAURENCE FREDERICK. Yankee 
ingenuity! Then and now. N.Y.: Newcomen Society of 
England, American Branch, 1947. 28p. M. + 



1 630 WORRELL JOHN, ED M ARKUNAS, and GUNNAR 
SPETS. "Seeing sawing for what it is-or was." Old 
Sturbridge Visitor, 24 (Summer 1984), 4-7. 

Sawmill technology (early- 19th century). 

1631 WORRELL JOHN, and THEODORE Z. PENN. "Of 
ice and men." Old Sturbridge Visitor, 23 (Fall 1983), 
6-7. 

Concerning rural millponds and dams (early- 19th 
century). 

1632 YANKEE BOOKS. The inventive Yankee: 

from rockets to roller skates, 200 years of Yankee 
inventors & inventions. Dublin, N.H., 1989. 223p. 
CtB. -t- 



LAND TRANSPORTATION 

1633 ALBERT, DAVE, and GEORGE F. MELVIN. New 
England diesels. Omaha, Neb.: George R. Cockle, 
1975. 232p. RHi. -t- 

Locomotives. 

1634 ALLEN, C. F. H. "The Atlantic locomotive 

in New England." Railway and Locomotive Historical 
Society Bulletin, 116 (Apr. 1967), 50-55. 

Type of engine popular at the beginning of the 20ih 
century. 

1635 ANDREWS, HENRY N. "Rolling the roads." 

OTNE, 38 (Oct. 1947), 63-66. 

Horse-drawn snow rollers (late-19th and early-20ih 
centuries). 

1636 ARMSTRONG, DONALD. "The notorious 

Boston, Hartford and Erie Railroad." My Country, 18 
(Winter 1983-1984), 31-35. 

1637 BAEHR, GEORGE BERNARD, JR. "The attempt 

at a transportation empire in New England: the New 
York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad, 1872-1913." 
Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of Notre Dame, 1969. 586p. 
MB. 

Abstracted in DAI, 30, No. IIA (1970), 4902. 

1638 BAKER, GEORGE PIERCE, JR. The formation 
of the New England railroad systems: a study of 
railroad combination in the nineteenth century. 

(1937) N.Y.: Greenwood Pr., 1968. xxxi, 283p. 
MStuO. -t- 

See also next entry. 



79 



1639 

1639 

1640 

1641 

1642 

1643 

1644 

1645 

1646 

1647 

1648 

1649 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



LAND TRANSPORTATION 



BAKER. GEORGE PIERCE. JR. "Railroad 1650 

combination in New England before 1900." Ph.D. 
dissertation. Harvard Univ.. 1934. xxv. 321p. 

See also preceding entry. 

. "Some episodes in New England railroad 1651 

consolidation." Business Historical Society. 

Bulletin. 10 (Feb. 1936). 58-65. 

BARDWELL. JOHN D. A diary of the 

Portsmouth. Kittery and York Electric Railroad: a 1652 

chronology of events based on newspaper accounts, 
editorials, news notes and letters to the editors from 
January 8. 1897 to November 12. 1897. Portsmouth. 

N.H.: Portsmouth Marine Society. 1986. xh. 84p. 1653 

NhPoA. -t- 
Street railroad. 

BISHOP. CHARLES W. "The automobiles of 

New England." Antique Automobile. 15 (Mar. 1951). 27- 1654 

30; (June 1951). 81-82. 87. 

BIXBY. ARTHUR M.. SR. 'The New Haven 
Mountains." S'liner. 9 (Spring 1978). 4-17. 1655 

Steam locomotives on the New York. New Haven and 
Hartford Railroad. 



BRADLEE. FRANQS BOARDMAN CROWNINSHIELD. 
The Boston and Maine Railroad: a history of the main 
road, with its tributary lines. Salem. Mass.: Essex 
Institute. 1921. 84p. MBU. -t- 

. The Eastern Railroad: a historical account of 

early railroading in eastern New England. Salem. 

Mass.: Essex Institute. 1922. iv. 122p. MStuO. + 
Reprinted 1972. 

. "Recollections of Charles B. George of 

Haverhill, an old-time conductor on the Boston and 
Maine Railroad." EIHC, 68 (Oct. 1932). 289-298. 

BROWN. CHARLES A. "The Charles River 
Line." S’liner. 13. No. 3 (1982). 25-39. 

Between Newton. Mass., and Woonsocket and 
Harrisville. R.I. 

. "Fairbanks -Morse Consolidation diesel 

locomotives." S'liner. 9 (Spring 1978). 12-22. 

On the New Haven Railroad. 

. "Fairbanks-Morse on the New Haven." S'liner. 

18. No. 2 (1987). 23-30. 

Locomotives. 



. "The New Haven Pacifies." S'liner. 10 (Winter 1656 

1979). 8-21. 

Steam locomotives. 

1657 

. "The New Haven's G-4A tenwheelers: some 

personal experiences." Railroad History. No. 144 

(Spring 1981). 77-84. 1658 

BIXLER. HERBERT E. "The New Haven in its 

golden age." S'liner. 13. No. 2 (1982). 8-15; No. 3 

(1982). 8-15. 1659 

BOSTON AND MAINE RAILROAD HISTORICAL 

SOCIETY. Moguls, mountains, and memories: a gallery 1660 

of New England railroading north and west of Boston. 

Boston. 1979. v. 126p. VtHi. -i- 

'THE BOSTON and Mt. Desert Limited." 

Railway & Locomotive Historical Society. Bulletin. 82 1661 

(Apr. 1951). 72-73. 

1888. 

BOSTON. MASS. CITY COUNCIL. The 

railroad jubilee: an account of the celebration 1 662 

commemorative of the opening of railroad communication 
between Boston and Canada. September 17th. 18th. and 
19th. 1851. Boston: J. E. Eastbum. 1852. 288p. 

MWA.-H 

Includes historical and statistical information 
about other New England railroads. 



. "New Haven EF-4: electric freight locomotives 

No. 300-310." S'liner. 11. No. 3 (1980). 18-30. 

. "The New Haven Railroad: mother of main line 

electrification." S'liner. 14. No. 1 (1983). 26-29. 

. 'Those 'Little Shoreliners': the Mack F.C.D. 

Rail Bus." S'liner. 12. No. 1 (1981). 10-22. 
Self-propelled passenger cars. 

. 'Trolley express and freight in southern New 

England." S'liner. 18. No. 3 (1987). 32-39. 

BUFFUM. J. HOWARD. JR. "Hoot, toot, & 
whistle." Vermont Life, 7 (Autumn 1952), 50-54. 

Hoosac Tunnel and Wilmington Railroad (Massachusetts 
and Vermont). See also entry 1662. 

BYRON, CARL R. "The B&MRRHS at ten 
years-a look back." B&M Bulletin, 11 (Fall 1981), 

6-7. 

Boston and Maine Railroad Historical Society. 

CARMAN, BERNARD R. Hoot, toot & whistle: 

the story of the Hoosac Tunnel & Wilmington Railroad. 

Brattleboro, Vt.: Stephen Greene Pr., 1963. 43p. 

MB. -I- 

Massachusetts and Vermont. See also entry 1660. 



80 



Economic Life 



LAND TRANSPORTATION 1687 



1663 CARSON, GERALD. "The motor buggy: its 

New England years." NEG, 12 (Summer 1970), 3-13. 

1664 CASWELL, CHARLES EDWARDS. Boston, 

Concord & Montreal: story of the building and early 
days of this road. Warren, N.H.: News Pr., 1919. 

148p. NhD. -I- 

Railroad. 

1665 CLAPP, DAVID. "Snow removal on the New 
Haven." S'liner, 10 (Winter 1979), 22-35. 

1666 CORNWALL, L. PETER. "Railroads chartered 

to serve New England." New England States Limited, 2 
(Winter 1978-1979), 29-31; 3 (Summer 1979), 40-41; 5 
(Mar. 1983), 26-27. 

1667 . "When foreign steam power rode the B&M rails." 

B&M Bulletin, 13 (Mar. 1985), 25-29. 

Locomotives belonging to other lines. 

1668 . "Where the trains went." B&M Bulletin, 14 

(Apr. 1986), 6-21. 

"One day's assignments out of the new Boston Engine 
Terminal in 1934." 

1669 COWEN, RODNEY P. "Life on the west end." 

B&M Bulletin, 12 (Summer 1983), 25-30; 13 (Fall 1983), 
22-31; (Winter 1983-1984), 12-14. 

Recollections of work on the Boston and Maine 
Railroad. 

1670 CRANE, ELLERY BICKNELL. "Origin and use 

of post roads in New England." Worcester [Mass.] 

Society of Antiquity, Proceedings, 20 (1904), 148-190. 

1671 CROUCH, H. BENTLEY. "The 'phantom' 
division: Worcester, Nashua and Portland." B&M 
Bulletin, 8 (Summer 1979), 4-25. 

1672 . "Cornfield meets and other debacles." B&M 

Bulletin, 9 (Fall 1979), 17-26. 

Wrecks on the Worcester, Nashua and Portland 
Railroad. 

1673 , and HARRY A. FRYE. "Worcester, Nashua & 

Portland, Part 3: all those branches." B&M Bulletin, 

9 (Winter 1979-1980), 20-31. 

1674 CROUSE, CHUCK. "B&M 6000: a new era in 
New England railroading." B&M Bulletin, 13 (June 
1985), 9-13. 

Streamlined diesel locomotive (1930s). 

1675 . "More Budds than anyone else." B&M Bulletin, 

15 (Oct. 1986), 5-16, 20-35. 

Budd cars on the Boston and Maine Railroad. 



1676 CUMMINGS, OSMOND RICHARD. "Massachusetts 
Northeastern Street Railway, 1913-1930." 
Transportation, 2 (Jan. 1948), 1-16. 

In Massachusetts and New Hampshire. 

1677 . "The trolley parlor cars of New England." 

Transportation Bulletin, No. 58 (May-June 1959), 1-16. 

1678 . Trolleys to Hampton Beach: Massachusetts 

Northeastern St. Ry. Vol. 3: Amesbury division. 
Manchester, N.H.: New England Electric Railway 
Historical Society, 1966. 54p. NhHi. 

1679 . Trolleys to York Beach: the Portsmouth, Dover 

& York Street Railway, n.p., [1964?]. 52p. NhHi. -i- 

New Hampshire and Maine. 

1680 CURTIN, TOM. "The Berkshire line." 

S'liner, 10, No. 3 (1979), 6-23. 

Housatonic Railroad. 

1681 DARR, RICHARD K. A history of the Nashua 

and Lowell Railroad Corporation, 1835-1880. N.Y.: 
Amo Pr., 1976. xiii, 389p. MWA. -i- 
See also next entry. 

1682 . "A history of the Nashua and Lowell Railroad 

Corporation, 1835-1880." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of 
Nebraska, 1956. xiii, 389p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 17 (1957), 260. See also 
preceding entry. 

1683 DOLE, RICHARD F. "The continuing saga of 

a hard luck line-Portland and Rochester Railroad 
Co." B&M Bulletin, 12 (Spring 1983), 4-17. 

Maine and New Hampshire. 

1684 . "The Flying Yankee." Railroad History, No. 

148 (Spring 1983), 68-75. 

Train from Boston to New Brunswick, Canada (1880s). 

1685 DRUMMOND, WAYNE. "Era of stripes." 

S'liner, 18, No. 1 (1987), 18-23. 

On New Haven Railroad locomotives. 

1686 . "The New Haven Railroad and the birth of the 

NHRTHTA." S'liner, 18, No. 4 (1987), 15-17. 

New Haven Railroad Historical & Technical 
Association (1962). 

1687 . "Strangers on the New Haven." S'liner, 18, 

No. 3 (1987), 16-19. 

"...Even in the days of steam power, off-line 
locomotives were seen on the [railroad]." 



81 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



1688 LAND TRANSPORTATION 



1688 FARNHAM, ELMER E. The quickest route: 

the history of the Norwich & Worcester Railroad. 

Chester, Corm.: Pequot Pr., 1973. xi, 210p. MWA. + 
Connecticut and Massachusetts. 

1689 nSHER, CHARLES EBEN. A little story of 

the Boston and Providence Railroad Company. Boston, 
1917. 16p. MB. + 

1690 . 'The locomotives of the Boston & Maine 

Railroad." Railway and Locomotive Historical Society 
BulleUn, 26 (Oct. 1931), 18-24; 34 (May 1934), 52-63; 
35 (Oct. 1934), 62-76; 37 (May 1935), 41-56; 38 (Oct. 

1935) , 40-49; 40 (May 1936), 62-71. 

1691 . "Locomotives of the New Haven R.R." Railway 

and Locomotive Historical Society Bulletin, 41 (Nov. 

1936) , 29-37; 43 (Apr. 1937), 60-68; 44 (Oct. 1937), 
64-69; 46 (Apr. 1938), 37-50; 47 (Sept. 1938), 79-89. 

1692 . "The New Haven's 'combines' and baggage cars." 

Railway and Locomotive Historical Society Bulletin, 

104 (Apr. 1961), 60-63. 

1693 . "The New Haven's wooden coaches." Railway and 

Locomotive Historical Society Bulletin, 103 (Oct. 

1960), 57-60. 

1694 . "The parlor and sleeping cars of the New 

Haven." Railway and Locomotive Historical Society 
Bulletin, 105 (Oct. 1961), 64-68. 

1695 . "The steam locomotives of the New Haven R.R." 

Railway and Locomotive Historical Society Bulletin, 

100 (Apr. 1959), 67-81. 

1696 . 'Through car service from New England." 

Railway and Locomotive Historical Society Bulletin, 87 
(Oct. 1952), 47-58. 

Boston & Albany Railroad (late- 19th and early -20th 
centuries). 

1697 . "The twin-headlighters." Railway and 

Locomotive Historical Society Bulletin, 110 (Apr. 

1964), 39-42. 

Trains in southern New England (late-19th century). 

1698 FISHER, RALPH E. Vanishing markers; 

memories of Boston and Maine railroading, 1946-1952. 
Brattleboro, Vt.; Stephen Greene Pr., 1976. 128p. 

VtHi. 

1699 FLETCHER, WILLIAM J. "Snowplowing on the 
WN&P." B&M Bulletin, 11 (Winter 1981-1982), 26-31. 

Worcester, Nashua and Portland Railroad (ca. 1920). 



1700 . "Tracking the ghost of the W.N.&P. 

(Worcester, Nashua & Portland)." B&M Bulletin, 9 
(Winter 1979-1980), 32-33. 

1701 FRYE, HARRY A. "Bridges." B&M Bulletin, 

11 (Spring 1982), 7-11. 

Railroad bridges. 

1702 . Minuteman steam: Boston & Maine steam 

locomotives, 1911-1958. Littleton, Mass.: Boston and 
Maine Railroad Historical Society, 1982. ix, 164p. 
NhHi. -h 

1703 . "New England articulateds." New England 

States Limited, 3, No. 3 [1980], 14-21. 

Locomotives. 

1704 FULLER, ROBERT PAUL. New England 
railroads; past, present, and future. Portland, Me.: 

New England Transportation Research, 1977. viii, 95p. 
MeHi. -I- 

1705 GIBBONS, GAIL. From path to highway: 

the story of the Boston Post Road. N.Y.: Thomas Y. 
Crowell, 1986. 32p. MB. -(- 

1 706 GOODWIN, DANA D., and H. ARNOLD WILDER. 

"Not on the timecard." B&M Bulletin, 10 (Fall 1980), 
12-31. 

Special trains on the Boston and Maine. 

1 707 GOODWIN, JOHN A. "Early promotion for 
railroad construction." B&M Bulletin, 11 (Spring 
1982), 15-16. 

1708 "A GREAT railroad and how it grew." 

S'liner, 9 (Fall 1978), 27-32. 

New York, New Haven and Hartford. 

1709 HAGOPIAN, ROBERT M. J. 'Two days in 

January, 1978." B&M Bulletin, 10 (Winter 1980-1981), 
24-29. 

Conditions on the Boston and Maine Railroad between 
Boston and Providence, following the first of two 
major blizzards that winter. 

1710 HARLOW, ALVIN F. Steel ways of New 
England. N.Y.; Creative Age Pr., 1946. 461p. 

MWA.-i- 

1711 HARVEY, FRANK. "The jets-the story of 

the New Haven EP-5's." S'liner, 8 (Fall 1977), 6-25. 
Diesel locomotives. 



82 



Economic Life 



LAND TRANSPORTATION 1735 



1712 HASTINGS, PHILIP R. Grand Trunk 

heritage: steam in New England. John Krause and Ed 
Crist, eds. N.Y.: Railroad Heritage Pr., 1978. 48p. 

VtU.+ 

1713 HEALY, KENT T. "Development of 
transportation in New England." Connecticut Society 
of Civil Engineers, Annual Report (1934), 95-120. 

Railroads. 

1714 HILL, HOWARD G. "The Yankee Clipj)CT." 

Railway and Locomotive Historical Society Bulletin, 

119 (Oct. 1968), 72-74. 

Account of a trip between Boston and New York City 
on the train (1935). 

1715 HOISINGTON, RICHARD A. "This train does 
not stop at Nutt's Pond: a history of the B&M's 
Manchester & Lawrence branch." New England States 
Limited, 1 (Spring 1978), 15-33. 

1716 , and E. ROBERT HORNSBY. "The Amesbury and 

Merrimac branches: and never the trains shall meet." 

B&M Bulletin, 10 (Spring 1981), 18-25; (Summer 1981), 
7-15. 

Branch railroads in the Massachusetts-New Hampshire 
border area. 

1717 HOLBROOK, STEWART HALL. The old post 
road: the story of the Boston Post Road. N.Y.: 
McGraw-Hill, 1962. 273p. MW A. -t- 

1718 HOLMES, OLIVER W. "Levi Pease, the 

father of New England stagecoaching." Journal of 
Economic and Business History, 3 (Feb. 1931), 241-269. 

1719 . "Stagecoach travel and some aspects of the 

staging business in New England, 1800-1850." MHSP, 85 
(1973), 36-57. 

1720 HOLT, JEFF. The Grand Trunk in New 

England. Toronto: Railfare Enterprises, 1986. 176p. 
MeHi. -I- 
Railroad. 

1721 JACOBS, WARREN. "Dates of some of the 
principal events in the history of 100 years of the 
railroad in New England, 1826-1926." Railway and 
Locomotive Historical Society Bulletin, 17 (Oct. 

1928), 15-28. 

1722 . "The story of the New England." Railway and 

Locomotive Historical Society Bulletin, 1 (1921), 13- 
18. 

New York and New England Railroad (1846-1898). 



1723 JENKINS, STEPHEN. The old Boston Post 

Road. N.Y.: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1913. xxiv, 453p. 
MWA.-h 

1724 KARR, RONALD DALE. Rail abandonments in 

New England, 1845-1981. Chicago: R. D. Karr, 1983. 
iv, 12p. M. + 

1725 KENNEDY, CHARLES J. "The Eastern 

Railroad Company, 1855-1884." Business History 
Review, 31 (Summer 1957), 179-208. 

Between Boston and Portland. See also next entry. 

1726 . "The Eastern Rail-road Company to 1855." 

Business History Review, 31 (Spring 1957), 92-123. 

See also preceding entry. 

1727 . "The influence of government regulation on the 

management decisions of forty-five New England 
railroads, 1830-1900." Railway and Locomotive 
Historical Society Bulletin, 105 (Oct. 1961), 6-22. 

1728 KIRKLAND, EDWARD CHASE. Men, dues, and 
transportation: a study in New England history, 1820- 
1900. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard Univ. Pr., 1948. 

2v. MWA. + 

Reprinted 1968. 

1729 KISTLER, THELMA W. The rise of railroads 

in the Connecticut River Valley. Northampton, Mass.: 
Smith College, Dept, of History, 1938. 289p. MWA. + 

1730 KRAUSE, JOHN. Trains of northern New 
England. N.Y.: Quadrant Pr., 1977. 96p. VtU. -i- 

1731 KRUSCHWrrZ, DAVID MARTIN. 

"Rationalization of the New England railroad system, 

1920-1977." Ph.D. dissertation, Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology, 1978. 229p. NhD. 

1732 KYPER, FRANK. "The narrow gauge 

railroads of New England, excluding the Maine and 
Massachusetts two-footers." Railroad Enthusiast, 5 
(Winter-Spring 1968), 14-17. 

1733 LARCOM, PAUL S. "A history of the Boston- 

Maine and Central Vermont airways." B&M Bulletin, 8 
(Fall 1978), 7-17. 

Railroads. 

1734 LAWRENCE, ALVIN A. "New Haven K Class 
Moguls." S'liner, 11, No. 1 (1980), 7-19. 

Steam locomotives. 

1 735 UNDH AL MARTIN LEROY. The New England 
railroads. Boston: New England Economic Research 
Foundation, 1965. 169p. NhD. + 



83 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



1736 

1736 

1737 

1738 

1739 

1740 

1741 

1742 

1743 

1744 

1745 

1746 

1747 



LAND TRANSPORTATION 



LINK, STEVE. "Introducing The Comet.'" 

S’liner, 13. No. 1 (1982), 9-31. 

Streamlined passenger train, put into operation 
between Boston and Providence in 1935. 

LYNCH. PETER. "Signalling on the 
Shoreline." S'liner, 14, No. 2 (1983), 22-33. 

The railroad route between New Haven and Providence. 

McCUTCHEON, ROBERT C. "50 years on the 
B&M." B&M Bulletin. 10 (Fall 1980), 5-9. 

MACEY, BARRY A. "Charles Sanger Mellen: 
architect of transportation monopoly." Historical New 
Hampshire, 26 (Winter 1971), 3-29. 

Role of Mellen (1851-1927) in the consolidation of 
New England railroads. 

MAY, HARRY S. "Old Boston and Providence 
Railroad coach." OTNE, 27 (July 1936), 34-35. 

MORGAN, DAVID P. "Diesels and covered 
bridges." Trains, 9 (Jan. 1949), 16-24. 

Boston 2 ind Maine Railroad. 

NEAL, ROBERT MILLER. High green and the 
bark peelers; the story of engineman Henry A. 

Beaulieu and his Boston and Maine Railroad. N.Y.: 
Duell, Sloan and Pearce, 1950. 275p. MU. + 

Worker on the railroad from 1902-1948. 

NORTHERN rails; a complete guide to the 
railroads of Maine-New Hampshire- Vermont. Ron 
Johnson, ed. South Portland, Me.; 470 Railroad Club, 
1978. 32p. MeU. -i- 

"AN OLD engineer remembers." B&M 
Bulletin, 8 (Spring 1979), 29-32. 

Benjamin F. Flanders, a long-time employee of the 
Boston and Maine Railroad. 

PARKS, ROGER N. "All the facilities for 
discomfort." NEG, 9 (Winter 1968), 25-32. 

Roads and travel in early New England. 

. Roads and travel in New England, 1790-1840. 

Sturbridge, Mass.; Old Sturbridge Village, 1967. 

28p. MStuO. + 

See also next entry. 

. 'The roads of New England, 1790-1840." Ph.D. 

dissertation, Michigan State Univ., 1966. v, 271p. 
NhD. 

Abstracted in DAI, 27, No. 8A (1967), 2484. 



1748 PATTON, KEN. "The 400’s; the New 

Haven's ALCO FA fleet." S'liner, 14, No. 3 (1983), 15- 
19, 22-33; No. 4 (1983), 20-36. 

Diesel locomotives. 

1 749 PAVLUCIK, ANDREW J. The New Haven 
Railroad; a fond look back. New Haven, Conn.; 
Pershing Pr., 1978. 112p. CtNhHi . -h 

1750 PERRY, BEN. "The New Haven DL-109's." 

S'liner, 8 (Summer 1977), 6-13. 

Diesel locomotives. 

1 75 1 BEDFORD, PH YLUS H. "The very elegant 
Ghost Train." NEG, 14 (Spring 1973), 39-44. 

Between Boston and New York City (1890s). 

1752 RICE, DOUGLAS M. Log and lumber 

railroads of New England. (1961) 3d ed. Portland, 

Me.; 470 Railroad Club, 1982. 21p. MeU. + 

1753 RICE, FREDERICK, JR. "Urbanizing rural 

New England." NEM, n.s. 33 (Jan. 1906), 528-541. 
The influence of street railroads. 

1754 ROSENBAUM, JOEL. "Route of the Cape 

Codders and Neptuners." S'liner, 17, No. 2 (1986), 16- 
27. 

Passenger rail service between New York City and 
Cape Cod. 

1755 SMITH, DWIGHT ALMAR, JR. Northern rails; 
a complete guide to the railroads of Maine-New 
Hampshire-Vermont. n.p., [1967?]. 26p. NhD. -i- 

1756 SPINNEY, FRANK OAKMAN. "Chaise 
revolution." NEG, 3 (Winter 1962), 47-49. 

The horse-drawn pleasure vehicle (19th century). 

1757 STANFORD, R. PATRICK. Lines of the New 

York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad Co. Robert J. 
Ryer, ed. n.p., 1976. 50p. CtNhHi. -i- 
In New England and New York. 

1758 STUART, INGUS. "The New York and New 
Haven, the Hartford and New Haven, and the western 
Massachusetts railroads." Railway and Locomotive 
Historical Society Bulletin, 12 (1926), 43-51. 

1759 SWANBERG, J. W. 'The New Haven EP-2's; 

from top passenger engine to death by proxy in forty 
years." S'liner, 9 (Summer 1978), 14-26. 

1760 TAYLOR, PHILIP ELBERT. "The turnpike era 

in New England." Ph.D. dissertation, Yale Univ., 

1934. vii, 368p. VtU. 



84 



Economic Life 



WATER TRANSPORTATION 1 782 



1761 TOBEY, RAYMOND E. "The Green Mountain 
Flyer." B&M Bulletin. 11 (Summer 1982), 24-34. 

Passenger train. 

1762 . "Tracks along the Coimecticut." B&M Bulletin, 

14 (July 1986), 6-25. 

Railroad history. 

1763 TURNER. GREGG M. "New England's famed 
white train." New England States Limited, 3, No. 3 
[1980], 22-31. 

The New England Limited, which ran between New York 
City and Boston (late-19th century). 

1764 VALENTINE. DONALD B., JR. "Riding the 
Northern." New England States Limited, 4 (Sept. 

1982), 13-18. 

Passenger train between Concord, N.H., and White 
River Junction, Vt. (1940s). 

1765 WARDELL, W. EMORY. From horse trails to 
steel rails. Rockport, Me.: Falmouth Publishing 
House, 1955. 96p. VtU. -i- 

Rail transportation in New England (1823-1900). 

1766 WEBBER. CARROLL. "Braking on the old 

W.N. & P." B&M Bulletin, 10 (Summer 1981), 30-35. 
Worcester, Nashua and Portland Railroad. 

1767 WELLER. JOHN L. The New Haven Railroad: 

its rise and fall. N.Y.: Hastings House, 1969. vh, 

248p. MB. + 

1768 WILLIAMS. LLOYD R. 'The Great Trail." 

Cormecticut Circle, 8 (Dec. 1945), 3-4; 9 (Jan. 1946), 
4-5; (Feb. 1946), 4-5. 

Indian and pioneer path connecting the Boston and 
Hartford areas. 

1769 WITHINGTON, SIDNEY. "Pioneer experience 

in electric traction and the New Haven Railroad." 

Railway and Locomotive Historical Society Bulletin, 26 
(Oct. 1931), 25-32. 

Late-19th century. 

1770 "WOOD-bumers to diesels." New Hampshire 
Profiles, 1 (Dec. 1951), 35-37, 58. 

Boston and Maine Railroad. 

1771 WOOD, FREDERICK J. "New England toll 
bridges." Stone & Webster Journal, 21 (Sept. 1917), 
163-179. 

1772 . The turnpikes of New England and evolution of 

the same through England, Virginia, and Maryland. 
Boston: Marshall Jones, 1919. 461p. MStuO. + 



1773 WOOD, JOHN G. The stage coach period in 

New England. Exeter, N.H.: News-Letter Pr., 1934. 

23p. MB. -H 

1774 WOODRUFF, GEORGE M. "A brief history of 
the New York & New England R.R." Railway and 
Locomotive Historical Society Bulletin, 22 (May 1930), 
53-58. 



WATER TRANSPORTATION 

1775 AN ACCOUNT of the Farmington Canal 

Company; of the Hampshire and Hampden Canal Company; 
and of the New Haven and Northampton, till the 
suspension of its canals in 1847. New Haven, Conn., 

1850. 24p. CtY. + 

In Connecticut and Massachusetts. 

1776 ADAMS, JOHN PHILLIPS . The Piscataqua 

River gundalow. Durham, N.H., [1982]. 43p. NhPoA. + 
See also entry 1841. 

1777 ALLEN, JAY. "Morsiana." Steamboat Bill 
of Facts, 7 (Mar. -June 1950), 1-4, 27, 51-52. 

Steamboat, operating between Boston and Maine (1904- 
1931). 

1778 AYLMER, KEVIN J. "Sidewheelers on the 

Sound." Yankee, 34 (July 1970), 88, 93-97, 102-110. 
Long Island Sound. 

1779 BAKER, ROBERT H. "The Sakonnet River 
boat." American Neptune, 16 (Jan. 1956), 61-62. 

1780 BAKER, WILLIAM AVERY. "Notes on a 

shallop." American Neptune, 17 (Apr. 1957), 105-113. 

Type of boat used in New England coastal waters as 
early as 1607. 

1781 BARNS, EVERETT. History of Pawcatuck 
River steamboats, written for the Westerly [R.I.] 

Historical Society. Also embracing a record of the 
building of sailing vessels along the banks of our 
rivers, as prepared by the late Herbert A. Babcock in 
1896. Westerly, R.I.: Utter, 1932. 54p. CtMy. -t- 

The river forms part of the boundary between 
Connecticut and Rhode Island. 

1782 BODFISH, JOSHUA P. "Reminiscences of New 
England clipp>er ships." NEM, n.s. 10 (May 1894), 371- 
386. 



85 



1783 

1783 

1784 

1785 

1786 

1787 

1788 

1789 

1790 

1791 

1792 

1793 

1794 

1795 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



WATER TRANSPORTATION 



BRADLEE, FRANQS BOARDMAN CROWNINSHIELD. 
"Some accounts of steam navigation in New England." 
EIHC, 60 (Jan. 1919), 1-32; (Apr. 1919), 113-128; 

(July 1919), 177-208; (Oct. 1919), 257-272. 

This item also was published separately (1920). 

BRIEFLEY, KENNETH. "Canaries in the 
staterooms: a brief history of the Fall River Line." 

New Bedford Magazine, 5, No. 4 (1985), 24-28. 

BROWN, ALEXANDER CROSBY. "The 'elegant' 
steamboat Commonwealth." American Neptune, 8 (July 
1948), 246-254. 

BURNHAM, COLLINS G. "Early traffic on 

the Connecticut River." NEM, n.s. 23 (Oct. 1900), 131- 

149. 

CABOT, DAVID. "The New England double 
enders." American Neptune, 12 (Apr. 1952), 123-141. 
Type of boat. 

CAMPOSEO, JAMES MARK. "The history of 
the canal system between New Haven and Northampton." 
Historical Journal of Western Massachusetts, 6 (Fall 
1977), 37-53. 

CHENEY, R. K. "Startled Fawn: speed 

queen of the Merrimack." Steamboat Bill of Facts, 7 

(Sept. 1950), 63-65. 

Steamboat (1879-1896). 

COLLINS, JOSEPH WILUAM. "Evolution of 

the American fishing schooner." NEM, n.s. 18 (May 

1898), 336-349. 

In New England. 

COOMBS, ZELOTES WOOD. 'The Blackstone 
Canal." Worcester [Mass.] Historical Society, 
Publications, n.s. 1 (Apr. 1935), 458-470. 

In Massachusetts and Rhode Island. 

COVELL, WILUAM KING. "The Commonwealth: 
a fiftieth anniversary celebration." Steamboat Bill 
of Facts, 15 (June 1958), 27-52. 

Steamboat belonging to the Fall River Line. 

CRAM, W. BARTLETT. Picture history of 
New England passenger vessels. Hampden Highlands, 
Me.: Bumteoat, 1980. x, 414p. MW. -i- 
Steam boats. 

DICKSON, BRENTON H. "The Blackstone 
Canal." NEG, 13 (Summer 1971), 3-13. 

. "Comparison of the Blackstone and Middlesex 

canals." OTNE, 58 (Apr.-June 1968), 89-98. 



1796 DOW, GEORGE FRANCIS. "The sailing ships 
of New England." OTNE, 13 (Oct. 1922), 51-63. 

1 797 DUNB AUGH, EDWIN L. The era of the Joy 

Line: a saga of steamboating on Long Island Sound. 
Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Pr., 1982. xxv, 363p. 

M. + 

1798 EVERETT, KATHERINE. "One of the most 
romantic vocations in the world will soon pass into 
oblivion." New England's Coastal Journal (July 1986), 
17-19. 

Lighthouse keeping. 

1799 EWEN, WILUAM H. "Steamboats to New 

England." Mystic Seaport, Log, 22 (Summer 1970), 34- 
45. 

Fall River Line. 

1800 'THE FIRST steamboat Rose Standish, 1863- 
1900, Boston, Hingham, and Passamaquoddy Bay." 
Steamboat Bill, 29 (Fall 1972), 132-133. 

1801 GARDNER, JOHN. "The New England wherry." 

Mystic Seaport, Log, 22 (Winter 1970), 141-144. 

Early type of fishing boat. 

1802 GODDARD, ROBERT H. I., JR. "Notes on 

some New England three-masters." American Neptune, 5 
(July 1945), 286-295. 

Schooners. 

1803 HAYES, LYMAN SIMPSON. "The navigation of 
the Connecticut River: address before the Vermont 
Historical Society in the hall of the House of 
Representatives, January 16, 1917. Vermont Historical 
Society, Proceedings (1915-1916), 49-86. 

1804 JACOBUS, MELANCTHONW. "Fine forests for 

the navy." American Neptune, 18 (Oct. 1958), 315-316. 

Concerning proposed canals in New Hampshire and 
Vermont (1820s). 

1805 JENSEN, OLIVIER. "The old Fall River 
Line." American Heritage, 6 (Dec. 1954), 6-15. 

1806 JOHNSON, ARTHUR L. "Historic night line 
revived." Steamboat Bill, 29 (Spring 1972), 16-19. 

Steamships between Boston, Maine, and Nova Scotia. 

1807 LaFRANCIS, EDITH HULL. "The lady boats." 

NEG, 10 (Fall 1968), 47-50. 

Early steamboats. 

1808 LOVE, WILLIAM DeLOSS, JR. 'The 

navigation of the Connecticut River." A ASP, n.s. 15 
(Apr. 1903), 385-441. 



86 



Economic Life 



WATER TRANSPORTATION 1 834 



1809 Me ADAM, ROGER WILLIAMS. Commonwealth: 
giantess of the Sound. N.Y.: Stephen Daye Pr., 1959. 
193p. CtY. + 

Fall River Line steamboat (1907-1938). 

1810 . Floating palaces: New England to New York on 

the old Fall River Line. Providence, R.I.: Mowbray, 

1972. 207p. MB. -t- 

1811 . The old Fall River Line: being a chronicle of 

the world-renowned steamship line with tales of 
romantic events and personages during its ninety years 
of daily service and accounts of the last voyages of 
the famous Sound steamers. (1937) Rev. ed. N.Y.: 
Stephen Daye Pr., 1955. 288p. MFr. + 

1812 . Priscilla of Fall River. N.Y.: Stephen Daye 

Pr., 1947. 224, [16]p. MWA. -t- 

Fall River Line steamboat. 

1813 . Salts of the Sound: an informal history of 

steamboat days and the famous skippers who sailed Long 
Island Sound. Rev. ed. N.Y.: Stephen Daye Pr., 

1957. 240p. MWA. -I- 

1814 . "The story that was": a pictorial history of 

the world famed Fall River Line. Fall River, Mass.: 

Fall River Area Chamber of Commerce, 1967. [27]p. 
MNb. 

1815 McELROY, JOHN WILLIAM. "Seafaring in 

early New England." NEQ, 8 (Sept. 1935), 331-364. 

1816 McLain, GUY A., JR. "Steam power on the 
Connecticut." Historical Journal of Massachusetts, 14 
(June 1986), 135-145. 

1817 'THE MERRIMACK as a maritime way." 

Granite State Magazine, 3 (May 1907), 215-221. 

1818 MILKOFSKY, BRENDA. "Three centuries of 
Connecticut River shipping." Sea History, 36 (Summer 
1985), 12-16. 

1819 MORGAN, CHARLES S. "New England coasting 
schooners." American Neptune, 23 (Jan. 1963), 5-21. 

1820 ORDW AY, WALLACE B. "The Merrimac River 
gundalow and gundalowmen." American Neptune, 10 (Oct. 
1950), 249-263. 

1 821 PARKER, WILLIAM JAMES LEWIS. The great 

coal schooners of New England, 1870-1909. Mystic, 
Conn.: Marine Historical Association, 1948. 135p. 
CtMy. -I- 



1822 PRESSEY, PARK. "Old New England canals." 

OTNE, 46 (Spring 1956), 96-99. 

1 823 QUINN, WILLIAM P. Shipwrecks around 

Maine: a collection of photographs and stories from 
the 1880's and 1890's of marine disasters along the 
coasts of Maine and New Hampshire. Orleans, Mass.: 
Lower Cape Publishing, 1983. ix, 182p. MeU. -t- 

1 824 ROBINSON, JOHN, and GEORGE FRANQS DOW. 

The sailing ships of New England, 1607-1907. Salem, 
Mass.: Marine Research Society, 1922-1928. 3v. 
CtMy. + 

1825 SCOTT, WALTER E. "Working on the J. T. 

Morse." Steamboat Bill, 17 (Summer 1960), 36-37. 

Steamboat between Boston and Maine (ca. 1904). 

1826 SILVA, ELAINE A. "Beacons afloat." 

Salem: a Seacoast Journal (1982), 56-62. 

New England lightships. 

1827 SMITH, HELENA. "The story of a New 

England canal." NEM, n.s. 25 (Feb. 1902), 707-711. 
Between Northampton, Mass., and New Haven, Conn. 

1828 SNOW, EDWARD ROWE. Adventures, 

blizzards, and coastal calamities. N.Y.: Dodd, Mead, 
1978. 275p. M. -h 

1829 . Great storms and famous shipwrecks of the New 

England coast. Boston: Yankee publishing, 1943. 
338p. MSaE. -I- 

1830 . New England sea tragedies. N.Y.; Dodd, Mead, 

1960. 310p. MSaE. + 

1831 . Pirates, shipwrecks and historic chronicles. 

N.Y.: Dodd, Mead, 1981. x, 229p. M. -i- 

1832 STRILLCHUK, JANE. "On the Fall River 

Line: interview with Ray Connors.” Spinner: People 
and Culture in Southeastern Massachusetts, 4 (1988), 
162-171. 

1833 SULLIVAN, TIM. "Is this the Bermuda 

triangle, northern style?" Salem: a Coastal Journal 
(1982), 27-31. 

Recent disapperances of vessels and sailors off the 
New England coast. 

1834 TAYLOR, WILUAM LEONHARD. "A productive 
monopoly: the effect of railroad control on the New 
England coastal steamship lines, 1870-1916." Ph.D. 
dissertation. Brown Univ., 1968. 399p. CtHi. 

Abstracted in DAI, 30, No. lA (1969), 261. See also 
next entry. 



87 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



1835 

1835 

1836 

1837 

1838 

1839 

1840 

1841 

1842 

OTHER 

1843 



WATER TRANSPORTATION 



TAYLOR. WILLIAM LEONHARD. A productive 
monopoly: the effect of railroad control on 
England coastal steamship lines, 1870-1916. 
Providence, R.I.: Brown Univ. Pr., 1970. xvi, 323 p. 
M. -H 

See also preceding entry. 

UPHAM, GEORGE BAXTER. 'The Connecticut 
River: a great highway." Granite Monthly, 51 (June 
1919), 301-305. 

. "Early navigation on the Connecticut." 

Granite Monthly, 51 (Aug. 1919), 362-368. 

WATERMAN, WILLIAM RANDALL. 'The 
Connecticut River Valley Steamboat Company." 
Vermont History, 25 (Apr. 1957), 83-102. 

WEBSTER, C. B., COMPANY. Old sailing 
ships of New England. Boston: Charles E. Lauriat, 

1927. 151p. CtMy. -i- 

. Old ships of New England. Boston, 1923 

125p. CtMy. -I- 
See also preceding entry. 

WINSLOW, RICHARD ELUOTT m. The 
Piscataqua gundalow: workhorse for a tidal basin 
empire. Portsmouth, N.H.: Portsmouth Marine Society, 
1983. 164p. NhHi. -t- 

Cargo carrier in the Piscataqua River system of 
Maine and New Hampshire. See also entry 1776. 

WOODS, AMY. "Shipwrecks along the New 
England coasts." NEM, n.s. 31 (Nov. 1904), 

251-260. 



COOLIDGE, JOHN. "Low-cost housing: the 
New England tradition." NEQ, 14 (Mar. 1941), 
6-24. 



1844 GARDNER, GEORGE EDDY. "First in New 
England skies!" Twentieth anniversary Northeast 
Airlines, 1933-1953. N.Y.: Newcomen Society in 
North America, 1953. 24p. NhHi. -t- 

1845 HATCH, FRANCIS W. "Packet and 'steam 
cars' to Boston: a sentimental journey in the 
1840's." American Neptune, 26 (Oct. 1966), 262-271. 

1 846 INDEPENDENT TELELPHONE PIONEER 
ASSOQATION. NEW ENGLAND CHAPTER. 
Independent telephony in New England: a history, 
1876-1976. Eleanor Haskin, ed. Waitsfield, Vt., 

1976. 364p. VtU. -t- 

1847 LEWIS, EDWARD A. The Blackstone Valley 

line: the story of the Blackstone Canal Company and 
the Providence and Worcester Railroad. [Seckonk, 
Mass.: The Baggage Car, 1973.] 80p. MWA. -i- 

1 848 MUDGE, ROBERT W. Adventures of a 
yellowbird: the biography of an airline. Boston: 
Branden Pr., 1969. 374p. RU. + 

Northeast Airlines. 

1 849 NEW ENGLAND TELEPHONE AND TELEGR AI^H 
COMPANY. New England telephone history. Boston, 
1966. 116p. NhKeS. -h 

1850 TAYLOR, ALAN SHAW. "The early republic's 
supernatural economy: treasure seeking in the 
American Northeast, 1780-1830." American Quarterly, 
38 (Spring 1986), 6-34. 

1851 WILLIAMS, HARVEY L. "Yankee aviation: 
factors not everyone knows." Yankee, 6 (Mar. 

1940), 22, 30, 37. 

1852 YANKEE PUBLISHING. Yankees under steam: 

an anthology of the best stories on the world of steam 
published in Yankee Magazine since 1935. Austin N. 
Stevens, ed. Dublin, N.H., 1970. 253p. NhM. 



88 



Religion 



GENERAL 



1853 BACKUS, ISAAC. Church history of New 

England, from 1620 to 1804. Containing a view of the 
principles and practice, declensions and revivals, 
oppression and hberty of the churches, and a 
chronological table.... Philadelphia: Baptist Tract 
Depository, 1839. 250p. MWA. + 

Other eds. See also next entry. 

1854 . Isaac Backus on church, state, and Calvinism, 

1754-1789. William G. McLoughlin, ed. Cambridge, 
Mass.: Belknap Pr. of Harvard Univ. Pr., 1968. 523p. 
MWA.-h 

See also entry 2374. 

1855 BAINTON, ROLAND HERBERT. Christian unity 
and religion in New England. Boston: Beacon Pr., 
1964. 294p. MBU. -t- 

1856 BATCHELDER, AUSTIN I. "Ancient church 

lore of New England." Granite Monthly, 12 (Nov. -Dec. 
1889), 295-300. 

1857 BROWN, JERRY WAYNE. The rise of Biblical 
criticism in America, 1800-1870: the New England 
scholars. Middletown, Conn.: Wesleyan Univ. Pr., 
1969. vi, 212p. MStuO. -t- 



1858 [BURGESS, GEORGE.] Pages from the 
ecclesiastical history of New England, during the 
century between 1740 and 1840. Boston: James B. Dow, 
1847. 126p. MWA. + 

1859 DAILEY, BARBARA RITTER. "Root and 
branch: New England's religious radicals and their 
transatlantic community, 1600-1660." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Boston Univ., 1984. 362p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 48, No. 8A (1988), 2148. 

1860 EARLEY, LAWRENCE STEPHEN. "Endangered 
irmocent, arrogant queen: images of New England in 
controversies over religious persecution, 1630-1730." 
Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of North Carolina, 1975. 

ix, 297p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 36, No. lOA (1976), 6893. 

1861 FELT, JOSEPH BARLOW. The ecclesiastical 
history of New England: comprising not only 
religious, but also moral, and other relations. 

Boston: Congregational Library Association, 1855- 
1862. 2v. MWA. -t- 

1862 FORD, DAVID BARNES. New England's 
struggles for religious liberty. Philadelphia: 

American Baptist Publication Society, 1896. 279p. 

Ct. + 



+ Listings in the National Union Catalog for books and pamphlets marked 
with this symbol may include additional library locations. 



89 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



1863 GENERAL 



1863 HOOKER. RICHARD JAMES. "The Mayhew 
controversy." Church History, 5 (1936), 239-255. 

Anti-Anglican agitation among New England 
Congregationalists, led by the Rev. Jonathan Mayhew 
(1760s). 

1864 McLOUGHLIN, WILUAM GERALD. "Barrington 
Congregationalists vs. Swansea Baptists, 1711." Rhode 
Island History, 32 (Feb. 1973), 19-21. 

A case in which Baptists apparently "were 
persecuting Puritans." Present-day Barrington, R.I., 
was then a part of Swansea, Mass. 

1865 MARINI, STEPHEN ANTHONY. "New England 
folk religions, 1770-1815: the sectarian impulse in 
revolutionary society." Ph.D. dissertation. Harvard 
Univ., 1976. vi, 514p. 

See also next entry. 

1866 . Radical sects of revolutionary New England. 

Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard Univ. Pr., 1982. 213p. 
MWA.-h 

Includes Freewill Baptists, Shakers, and 
Universalists. 

1867 NOLL, MARK ALLAN. "Church membership and 
the American Revolution: an aspect of religion and 
society in New England from the revival to the War of 
Independence." Ph.D. dissertation, Vanderbilt Univ., 
1975. iv, 379p. CtY. 

Abstracted in DAI, 36, No. 4A (1975), 2278. 

1868 NORDBECK, ELIZABETH CURRIER. "The New 
England diaspora: a study of the religious culture of 
Maine and New Hampshire, 1613-1763." Ph.D. 
dissertation. Harvard Univ., 1978. xiii, 409p. 

Described in American Puritan Studies, Michael S. 
Montgomery, comp. (1984), 302-303. 

1869 PARKES, HENRY B. "John Cotton and Roger 
Williams debate toleration." NEQ, 4 (Oct. 1931), 735- 
756. 

See also next entry. 

1870 POLISHOOK IRWIN H. Roger Williams, John 
Cotton and religious freedom: a controversy in old 
and New England. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice- 
Hall, 1967. vi, 122p. MWA. + 

1871 THE RELIGIOUS history of New England: 

King's Chapel lectures.... Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard 
Univ. Pr., 1917. v, 356p. MWA. + 

Sketches of the history of various religious groups 
in the region. 



1872 ROWE, HENRY KALLOCH. "Rise and 
development of religion in New England." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Boston Univ., 1905. ix, 161p. 

Described in American Puritan Studies, Michael S. 
Montgomery, comp. (1984), 13. 

1873 A SHORT history of late ecclesiastical 

oppressions in New-England and Vermont. By a citizen. 
In which is exhibited a statement of the violation of 
religious liberties, which are ratified by the 
constitution of the United States. Richmond [Va.]: 
James Lyon, 1799. 19p. MH. -t- 

1874 SLADE, WILLIAM ADAMS. 'Two champions of 
religious liberty in New England: Obadiah Holmes and 
John Myles." NEM, n.s. 17 (Nov. 1897), 342-346. 

17th century. 

1875 SMITH, CHARD POWERS. Yankees and God. 

N.Y.: Hermitage House, 1954. 528p. MStuO. -i- 

1600s-1950s. 

1876 SQUIRES, J. DUANE. The influence of the 

Bible in New England history: an address given at the 
155th anniversary of the New Hampshire Bible Society, 
held in Concord, New Hampshire, March 6, 1967. n.p., 
[1967?]. 12p. MWA. + 

1877 SWEET, DOUGLAS HARDY. "One glorious 

temple of God: eighteenth-century accommodation to 
changing reality in New England." Studies in 
Eighteenth-Century Culture, 11 (1982), 311-320. 

"The entrenchment of Congregationalism in New 
England and the sectarian rivalries that arose with 
such gusto during and after the Great Awakening and 
the bitter denunciations so frequently couched in 
pulpit oratory...." 

1878 UNDERHILL, EDWARD BEAN. Struggles and 
triumphs of religious liberty: an historical survey 
of controversies pertaining to the rights of 
conscience, from the English reformation to the 
settlement of New England. N.Y.: Lewis Colby, 1851. 
vi, 242p. RHi. + 

1879 VAN NESS, THOMAS. The religion of New 
England. Boston: Beacon Pr., 1926. xi, 205p. 
MWA.-t- 



90 



Religion 



THEOLOGY 1897 



THEOLOGY 

1 880 ALLEN. JOSEPH HENRY. Our liberal 
movement in theology; chiefly as shown in 
recollections of the history of Unitarianism in New 
England. (1892) N.Y.: Amo Pr.. 1972. iv. 220p. 
MStuO. + 

1881 BEEBE. DAVID LEWIS. "The seals of the 
covenant: the doctrine and place of the sacraments 
and censures in the New England Puritan theology 
underlying the Cambridge Platform of 1648." Th.D. 
dissertation. Pacific School of Religion. 1966. x. 

323p. CtY. 

Abstracted in DAI. 27. No. 4A (1966). 1100. 

1882 BERCOVITCH. SACVAN. "Typology in Puritan 
New England: the Williams-Cotton controversy 
reassessed." American Quarterly. 19 (Summer 1967). 
166-191. 

1883 BIRDS ALL. RICHARD DAVENPORT. "Ezra 
Stiles versus the New Divinity men." American 
Quarterly. 17 (Summer 1965). 248-258. 

1884 BO ARDMAN. GEORGE NYE. A history of New 
England theology. N.Y.: A. D. F. Randolph. 1899. 

314p. MBU. -t- 

1885 BREITENBACH. WILLIAM. "The consistent 
Calvinism of the New Divinity movement." WMQ. 3 ser. 
41 (Apr. 1984). 241-264. 

Late-18th century. See also next entry. 

1886 . "Unregenerate doings: selflessness and 

selfishness in New Divinity theology." American 
Quarterly. 34 (Winter 1982). 479-502. 

See also preceding entry. 

1887 BUSH. SARGENT. JR. '"Revising what we 

have done amisse': John Cotton and John Wheelwright. 
1640." WMQ. 3 ser. 45 (Oct. 1988). 733-750. 

Antinomian controversy. Wheelwright was living in 
exile in New Hampshire at the time. 

1888 CHABLE. EUGENE ROBERTS. "A study of the 
interpretation of the New Testament in New England 
Unitarianism." Ph.D. dissertation. Columbia Univ.. 
1955. iv. 375p. 

Ca. 1811-1865. Abstracted in DAI, 16, No. 2 (1956), 
392-393. 



1 889 CONFORTI. JOSEPH ANTHONY. "The rise of 

the New Divinity in western New England, 1740-1800." 
Historical Journal of Western Massachusetts, 8 (Jan. 

1980). 37-47. 

1890 . "Samuel Hopkins and the New Divinity movement, 

1740-1820: a study in the transformation of Puritan 
theology and the New England social order." Ph.D. 
dissertation. Brown Univ., 1965. 356p. MB. 

Congregational pastor in Great Barrington, Mass., 
and Newport, R.I. Abstracted in DAI, 37, No. lA 
(1976), 542. See also next entry. 

1891 . Samuel Hopkins and the New Divinity movement: 

Calvinism, the Congregational ministry, and reform in 
New England between the great awakenings. Grand 
Rapids, Mich.: Christian Univ. Pr., 1981. viii, 

241p. MWA. -I- 
See also preceding entry. 

1892 . "Samuel Hopkins and the New Divinity: 

theology, ethics and social reform in eighteenth- 
century New England." WMQ, 3 ser. 34 (Oct. 1977), 572- 
589. 

1893 CONSTANTIN,CHARLES JOSEPH. "The New 
Divinity men." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of 
California, Berkeley, 1972. 

1894 DAVIDSON. JAMES WEST. "Eschatology in 

New England: 1700-1763." Ph.D. dissertation, Yale 
Univ., 1973. iv. 285p. MH. 

Abstracted in DAI, 34, No. 11 A (1974), 7146. See 
also next entry. 

1895 . The logic of millennial thought: eighteenth- 

century New England. New Haven, Conn.: Yale Univ. 

Pr., 1977. xii, 308p. MStuO. -t- 

See also preceding entry. 

1896 DAVIS, THOMAS M. "The tradition of 
Puritan typology." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of 
Missouri, 1968. 412p. CtU. 

'Traditional method of relating the Old and New 
Testaments" in the writings of Puritans in Great 
Britain and New England. Abstracted in DAI, 29, No. 

9A (1969), 3094. 

1897 De JONG, PETER YMEN. The covenant idea 

in New England theology, 1620-1847. Grand Rapids, 
Mich.: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing, 1945. 264p. MH. 

+ 

See also next entry. 



91 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



1898 

1898 

1899 

1900 

1901 

1902 

1903 

1904 

1905 

1906 

1907 

1908 



THEOLOGY 



De JONG. PETER YMEN. "The covenant idea 
in New England theology, 1620-1847." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Hartford Seminary Foundation, 1942. ix, 
513p. 

See also preceding entry. 

EMERSON, EVERETT H. "Calvin and covenant 
theology." Church History, 25 (June 1956), 136-144. 

In New England. 

EUSDEN, JOHN DYKSTRA. "Natural law and 
covenant theology in New England, 1720-1760." Natural 
Law Forum, 5 (1960), 1-30. 

FOSTER, FRANK HUGH. A genetic history of 
the New England theology. Chicago: Univ. of Chicago 
Pr., 1907. XV. 568p. MWA. -t- 
17th to 19th centuries. See also next entry. 

. The modem movement in American theology: 

sketches of American Protestant thought from the Civil 
War to the World War. N.Y.: Fleming H. Revell, 1939. 
219p. NhD. -I- 

Continuation of preceding entry. 

GILSDORF, ALETHA JOY BOURNE. 'The 
Puritan apocalypse: New England eschatology in the 
seventeenth century." Ph.D. dissertation, Yale Univ., 
1965. 238p. MWalB. 

"The science of the four last things: death, 
judgement, heaven, and hell." Abstracted in DAI, 26, 

No. 4 (1965), 2160. 

GOODWIN, GERALD J. "The myth of 
'Arminian-Calvinism' in eighteenth century New 
England." NEQ, 41 (June 1968), 213-237. 

GORDON, GEORGE ANGIER. Humanism in New 
England theology. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1920. 
viii, 105p. MBU. -i- 

GRAEBNER, NORMAN BROOKS. "Protestants 
and dissenters: an examination of the seventeenth- 
century Eatonist and New England antinomian 
controversies in Reformation perspective." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Duke Univ., 1984. 268p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 46, No. 6A (1985), 1656. 

HARTOUNIAN, JOSEPH H. Piety versus 
moralism: the passing of the New England theology. 
N.Y.: H. Holt, 1932. 329p. CtY. + 

See also next entry. 

. "Piety versus moralism: the passing of the 

New England theology." Ph.D. dissertation, Columbia 
Univ., 1932. 329p. 

See also preceding entry. 



1 909 HOUFIELD, ELMER BROOKS. The covenant 
sealed: the development of Puritan sacramental 
theology in old and New England, 1570-1720. New 
Haven, Corm.: Yale Univ. Pr., 1974. xi, 248p. Ct. -i- 

See also next entry. 

1910 . 'The covenant sealed: the development of 

Puritan sacramental theology in old and New England, 
1570-1720." Ph.D. dissertation, Yale Univ., 1970. x, 
437p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 31, No. 12A (1971), 6702. See 
also preceding entry. 

1911 . "The renaissance of sacramental piety in 

colonial New England." WMQ, 3 ser. 29 (Jan. 1972), 33- 
48. 

1912 "INCREASE Mather's 'New Jerusalem': 
millennialism in late seventeenth-century New 
England." AASP, 87 (Oct. 1977), 343-408. 

Mason I. Lowance, Jr., and David Waters, eds. 

1913 JONES, GERALD HARVEY. "A comparison of 

the theology of George A. Gordon and the New England 
theology." Ph.D. dissertation, Boston Univ., 1942. 
384p. MBU. 

1914 JONES, JAMES WILLIAM m. "The 

beginnings of American theology: John Cotton, Thomas 
Hooker, Thomas Shepard, and Peter Bulkeley." Ph.D. 
dissertation. Brown Univ., 1970. vi, 346p. MWalB. 

Abstracted in DAI, 31, No. 12A (1971), 6703. See 
also entry 2241. 

1915 KNAPP, HUGH HEATH. "Samuel Hopkins and 
the New Divinity." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of 
Wisconsin, 1971. 294p. MWalB. 

Abstracted in DAI, 32, No. 6A (1971), 3211. See 
also entry 1890. 

1916 LANG, AMY SCHRAGER. "Antinomianism and 
the 'Americanization' of doctrine." NEQ, 54 (June 
1981), 225-242. 

1917 LEWIS, MARY JANE. "A sweet sacrifice: 

civil war in New England." Ph.D. dissertation. State 
Univ. of New York, Binghamton, 1986. 407p. 

Antinomian controversy. Abstracted in DAI, 47, No. 

2A (1986), 530. 

1918 LONG, GARY DALE. "The doctrine of 

original sin in New England theology: from Jonathan 
Edwards to Edwards Amasa Park." Ph.D. dissertation, 
Dallas Theological Seminary, 1972. 332p. 



92 



Religion 



THEOLOGY 1939 



1919 MacLEAR, JAMES FULTON. "New England and 
the fifth monarchy: the quest for the millennium in 
early American Protestantism." WMQ, 3 ser. 32 (Apr. 
1975), 223-260. 

Puritan view of apocalyptic history. 

1920 MALEFYT, CALVIN STERUNG DeWAAL. 'The 
changing concept of pneumatology in New England 
Trinitarianism." Ph.D. dissertation. Harvard Univ., 
1966. 297p. 

17th and 18th centuries. Described in American 
Puritan Studies, Michael S. Montgomery, comp. (1984), 
155. 

1921 MARTIN, DENNIS D. "Schools of the 
prophets: shepherds and scholars in New England 
Puritanism." Historical Reflections, 5 (Summer 1978), 
41-80. 

Assessment of Puritan theology in the context of the 
medieval church. 

1922 MILLER, RAYMOND CLINTON. "Jonathan 

Edwards and his influence upon some of the New England 
theologians." Ph.D. dissertation. Temple Univ., 1945. 
486p. 

1923 MOONEY, MICHAEL EUGENE. "Millenialism 
and antichrist in New England, 1630-1760." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Syracuse Univ., 1982. 429p. M. 

Abstracted in DAI, 43, No. 7A (1983), 2420. 

1924 MORGANS, JOHN IVOR. "The naUonal and 
international aspects of Puritan eschatology, 1640- 
1660." Ph.D. dissertation, Hartford Seminary 
Foundation, 1970. 35 Ip. 

Abstracted in DAI, 31, No. 11 A (1971), 6149. 

1925 MURPHY, SUSAN. "In remembrance of me: 
sacramental theology and practice of colonial New 
England." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of Washington, 
1978. 271p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 39, No. 5 A (1978), 2942. 

1926 MURRAY, IAIN HANNISH. Antinomianism: 

New England's first controversy. Edinburgh [U.K.]: 
Banner of Truth Trust, 1978. 75p. PnWC. -i- 

1927 PACKARD, A. APPLETON. "The paralysis of 
'inability.'" Religion in Life, 28 (Winter 1959), 104- 
110 . 

In Congregational theology (17th-19th centuries). 

1928 PARKER, DAVID LOWELL. "The application 
of humiliation: Ramist logic and the rise of 
preparationism in New England." Ph.D. dissertation, 
Univ. of Pennsylvania, 1972. xix, 278p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 33, No. 4A (1972), 1825. 



1929 PEACOCK, JOHN. "Liberty and discipline 

in covenant theology." Canadian Review of American 
Studies, 15 (Spring 1984), 1-16. 

1930 PIERCE, HOWARD FRANKLIN. "Thesis on 
Jonathan Edwards and his relation to New England 
theology." Ph.D. dissertation. Temple Univ., 1912. 
33p. 

1931 POND, ENOCH. Sketches of the theological 

history of New England. Boston: Congregational Pub. 
Society, 1880. 102p. CtY. + 

1932 ROSENMEIER, JESPER. "New England's 
perfection: the image of Adam and the image of Chrisi 
in the antinomian crisis, 1634 to 1638." WMQ, 3 ser. 
27 (July 1970), 435-459. 

1933 SIGNETT, ROLAND DALE. "The image of 

Christ and symbolism of atonement among the Puritan 
clergy: theology, personality, and the social order, 
1600-1745." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of Washington, 
1974. iii, 218p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 35, No. 8A (1975), 5267. 

1934 SMITH, ALECK LEWIS. "Changing 
conceptions of God in colonial New England." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Univ. of Iowa, 1953. iii, 286p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 13, No. 6 (1953), 383. 

1935 SOMERVILLE, C. J. "Conversion versus the 
early Puritan covenant of grace." Journal of 
Presbyterian History, 44 (Sept. 1966), 178-197. 

1936 STEPHENS, BRUCE M. God's last metaphor: 

the doctrine of the Trinity in New England theology. 
Chico, Calif.: Scholars Pr., 1981. viii, 92p. 

MBU.-t- 

1937 STOEVER, WILUAM KENNETH BRISTOW. "The 
covenant of works in Puritan theology: the antinomian 
crisis in New England." Ph.D. dissertation. Brown 
Univ., 1970. viii, 268p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 32, No. lA (1971), 530. 

1938 . "Nature, grace and John Cotton: the 

theological dimension in the New England antinomian 
controversy." Church History, 44 (Mar. 1975), 22-33. 

1939 TAYLOR, THOMAS TEMPLETON. "The spirit of 
the Awakening: the pneumatology of New England's 
Great Awakening in historical and theological 
context." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of Illinois, 

1988. 447p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 49, No. 8A (1989), 2369. 



93 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



1940 THEOLOGY 



1940 VAN HALSEMA, DICK L. "Samuel Hopkins: 

New England Calvinist." Th.D. dissertation. Union 
Theological Seminary in the City of New York, 1956. 
386p. 

1941 VINTON, JOHN ADAMS. "The antinomian 
controversy of 1637." Congregational Quarterly, 15 
(1873), 263-285, 393-426, 542-573. 

1942 WASHBURN, OWEN REDINGTON. John Calvin in 
New England, 1620-1947. North MontjDelier, Vt.: 
Driftwood Pr., 1948. 11 Ip. MH. -i- 

1943 WHITTEMORE, ROBERT CLIFTON. The 
transformation of the New England theology. N.Y.: P. 
Lang, 1987. x, 437p. MBU. + 

18th and 19th centuries. 

1944 WIDENHOUSE, ERNEST CORNEUUS. "The 
doctrine of the atonement in the New England theology 
from Jonathan Edwards to Horace Bushnell." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Hartford Seminary Foundation, 1931. 

286p. 

1945 WILCOX, WILUAM GEORGE. "New England 
covenant theology: its English precursors and early 
American exponents." Ph.D. dissertation, Duke Univ., 
1959. 372p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 20, No. 10 (1960), 4195. 

SEE "Theology" in Index for additional listings. 



PREACHING 

1946 BENTON, ROBERT MILTON. 'The American 
Puritan sermon before 1700." Ph.D. dissertation, 
Univ. of Colorado, 1967. xiii, 290p. CtU. 

Abstracted in DAI, 29, No. 2A (1968), 559. 

1947 BERCOVITCH, SACVAN. The American 
jeremiad. Madison, Wis.: Univ. of Wisconsin Pr., 
1978. 239p. MBU. -t- 

1948 BOSCO, RONALD ANGELO. "Lectures at the 
pillory: the early American execution sermon." 
American Quarterly, 30 (Summer 1978), 156-176. 

Primarily New England. See also entries 1950 and 
1969. 



1949 BOSWELL, PARLEY ANN. "'Unspeakable rich 
mercy': text and audience in three Puritan sermons: 

John Cotton's The covenant of God's free grace'; 

Thomas Hooker's The Christian's two chiefe lessons'; 
and Thomas Shepard's The saint's jewel.'" Ph.D. 
dissertation, Loyola Univ., Chicago, 1987. 215p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 48, No. 5 A (1987), 1241. 

1950 COHEN, DANIEL A. "In defense of the 

gallows: justifications of capital punishment in New 
England execution sermons, 1674-1825." American 
(^arterly, 40 (June 1988), 147-164. 

See also entries 1948 and 1969. 

1951 COUNTS, MARTHA LOUISE. "The political 

views of the eighteenth century New England clergy as 
expressed in their election sermons." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Columbia Univ., 1956. ix, 282p. M. 
Abstracted in DAI, 16, No. 7 (1956), 1245. 

1952 DAILEY, BARBARA RITTER. "The itinerant 
preacher and the social network in seventeenth-century 
New England." DubSemPr (1984), 37-48. 

1953 DALTON, JOHN VASMAR. "Ministers, 

metaphors, and the New England wilderness, 1650-1700." 
Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of New Hampshire, 1981. 
vii, 219p. MWalB. 

Abstracted in DAI, 42, No. 12A (1982), 5219. 

1954 DELLA VECCHIA, PHYLLIS ANN. "Rhetoric, 
religion, politics: a study of the sermons of Lyman 
Beecher." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of Pennsylvania, 
1973. 223p. CtHi. 

Abstracted in DAI, 34, No. 4A (1973), 1794. 

1955 ELUOTT, EMORY BERNARD, JR. "The 
development of the Puritan funeral sermon and elegy: 
1660-1750." Early American Literature, 2 (Fall 1980), 
151-164. 

See also entry 1958. 

1956 . "Generations in crisis: the imaginative power 

of Puritan writing, 1660-1700." Ph.D. dissertation, 

Univ. of Illinois, 1972. iv, 253p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 33, No. lOA (1972), 5675. See 
also next entry. 

1957 . Power and the pulpit in Puritan New England. 

Princeton, N.J.: Princeton Univ. Pr., 1975. xi, 

240p. MStuO. -I- 

See also preceding entry. 



94 



Religion 



PREACHING 1978 



1958 ENBEBRETSEN, TERRY ODELL. "Pillars of 
the house: Puritan funeral sermons through the 
'Magnalia Christi Americana.’" Ph.D. dissertation, 
Washington State Univ., 1982. 293p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 43, No. 2A (1982), 440. See also 
entry 1955. 

1959 ERKLAUER,WILUAM HENRY, JR. The 
dynamic forms of Puritan discourse: the rhetorical 
practices of six New England Puritans." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Univ. of Massachusetts, 1983. 328p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 43, No. 12A (1983), 2910. 

1960 HARRIS, BILLY LAYDON. 'The New England 

fast sermon, 1639-1763." Ph.D. dissertation, Florida 
State Univ., 1968. iii, 202p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 29, No. 5 A (1968), 1612. 

1961 JOHNSON, LOUIS RICHARD. "American 
preaching in the seventeenth century." Th.D. 
dissertation. Northern Baptist Theological Seminary, 
1958. ix, 217p. 

Primarily New England. Described in American 
Puritan Studies, Michael S. Montgomery, comp. (1984), 
110 - 111 . 

1962 JONES, PHYLUS MARIAN. "Biblical 
rhetoric and the pulpit literature of early New 
England." Early American Literature, 11 (Winter 1976- 
1977), 245-258. 

Sermons of the first generation of Puritan 
ministers. 

1963 . "A literary study of the sermons of the first- 

generation preachers of New England." Ph.D. 
dissertation. Harvard Univ., 1973. 257p. 

Described in American Puritan Studies, Michael S. 
Montgomery, comp. (1984), 241. 

1964 . "Puritan's progress: the story of the soul's 

salvation in the early New England sermons." Early 
American Literature, 15 (Spring 1980), 14-28. 

1965 LEVY, BABETTE MAY. Preaching in the 

first half century of New England history. Hartford, 
Conn.: American Society of Church History, 1945. 
vii, 215p. MSaE. + 

See also next entry. 

1966 . "Preaching in the first half century of New 

England history." Ph.D. dissertation, Columbia Univ., 
1943. 

See also preceding entry. 

1967 MARTIN, HOWARD H. "Puritan preachers on 
preaching: notes on American colonial rhetoric." 
Quarterly Journal of Speech, 50 (Oct. 1964), 285-292. 



1968 MASSON, MARGARET W. "The typology of the 
female as a model for the regenerate: Puritan 
preaching, 1690-1730." Signs, 2 (Winter 1976), 304- 
315. 

1969 MINNICK, WAYNE. "The New England 

execution sermon, 1639-1800." Speech Monographs, 35 
(1968), 77-89. 

See also entries 1948 and 1950. 

1970 MIXON, HAROLD DEAN. 'The artillery 
sermon in New England, 1672-1774." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Florida State Univ., 1964. iii, 224p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 25, No. 12 (1965), 7420. 

1971 REID, RONALD F. Prophecy in New England 
victory sermons, ca. 1760: a study in American 
concepts of historic mission. Waco, Tex.: Baylor 
Univ., [1979]. 27p. MWA. -i- 

1972 RUMSEY, PETER LOCKWOOD. "Acts of God: 

the rhetoric of providence in New England, 1620-1730." 
Ph.D. dissertation, Columbia Univ., 1984. 319p. 

Preaching. Abstracted in DAI, 45, No. 3 A (1984), 

846. 

1973 SALVATION in New England: selections 

from the sermons of the first preachers. Phyllis M. 

Jones and Nicholas R. Jones, eds. Austin, Tex.: 

Univ. of Texas Pr., 1977. xiii, 198p. MBU. -t- 

1974 STOUT, HARRY S. B. The New England 

soul: preaching and religious culture in colonial New 
England. N.Y.: Oxford Univ. Pr., 1986. xii, 398p. 
MWA.-h 

1975 TOULOUSE, TERES A. The art of 

prophesying: New England sermons and the shaping of 
belief. Athens, Ga.: Univ. of Georgia Pr., 1987. 
xii, 21 Ip. NhD. -t 

1976 TREFZ, EDWARD KENNETH. "Satan as the 
prince of evil: the preaching of New England 
Puritans." Boston Public Library Quarterly, 8 (Jan. 

1956), 3-22; (Apr. 1956), 71-84; (July 1956), 148-159. 

See also next entry. 

1977 . "A study of Satan, with particular emphasis 

upon his role in the preaching of certain New England 
Puritans." Th.D. dissertation. Union Theological 
Seminary in the City of New York, 1953. [350]p. 

Described in American Puritan Studies, Michael S. 
Montgomery, comp. (1984), 91. 

1978 ULRICH, LAUREL THATCHER. "Vertuous women 
found: New England ministerial literature, 1668- 
1735." American Quarterly, 28 (Spring 1976), 20-40. 



95 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



1979 PREACHING 



1979 VAN HOF, CHARLES LEE. ’The theory of 
sermon rhetoric in Puritan New England: its origins 
and expression." Ph.D. dissertation, Loyola Univ. of 
Chicago, 1979. v, 495p. MeU. 

Abstracted in DAI, 40, No. 6 A (1979), 3304. 

1980 WILLIAMS, DAVID ROSS. "Wilderness lost: 

New England in the jaws of an angry God." Ph.D. 
dissertation. Brown Univ., 1982. 415p. M. 

The metaphor of the wilderness and conversion in 
Puritanism, the Great Awakening, and 
Transcendentalism. Abstracted in DAI, 43, No. lA 
(1983), 3638. 

SEE "Preaching" in Index for additional listings. 



CLERGY AND OTHER REUGIOUS LEADERS 

1981 ANDERSON, RICHARD L. Joseph Smith’s New 
England heritage. Salt Lake City, Utah: Deseret 
Book, 1971. xix, 230p. MBU. + 

The Mormon prophet. 

1982 BABCOCK, C. MERTON. "The Puritan 
minister." NEG, 17 (Spring 1976), 3-8. 

1983 BACKUS, ISAAC. The diary of Isaac 

Backus. William G. McLoughlin, ed. Providence 
[R.I.]: Brown Univ. Pr., 1979. 3v. MWA. -t- 
The early Baptist leader (lived 1724-1806). Diary 
covers the years from 1741-1806. 

1984 BACON, BENJAMIN WISNER. Theodore 
Thornton Munger, New England minister. New Haven, 
Conn.: Yale Univ. Pr., 1913. xxiii, 409p. MAC. + 

Congregational minister (lived 1838-1910), who 
served churches in Massachusetts and Connecticut. 

1985 BAILYN, BERNARD. "Religion and 
revolution: three biographical studies." 

Perspectives in American History, 4 (1970), 85-169. 

Andrew Eliot and Jonathan Mayhew of Boston; Stephen 
Johnson of Lyme, Conn. 

1986 BALLOU, MATURIN M. Biography of Rev. 

Hosea Ballou. Boston: Abel Tompkins, 1852. viii, 
404p. MWA. -I- 

Early Universalist leader (lived 1771-1852). 

1987 BATES, ERNEST SUTHERLAND, and JOHN V. 

DlTl EMORE. Mary Baker Eddy: the truth and the 
tradition. N.Y.: Alfred A. Knopf, 1932. xviii, 476, 
xxxiv p. MWA. -I- 

Founder of Christian Science (lived 1829-1910). 



1988 BEASLEY, NORMAN. Mary Baker Eddy. N.Y.: 

Duell, Sloan and Pierce, 1963. vi, 371p. NhKeS. -t- 

1989 BEAUEXDIN, LIONEL. Mantle of blue: a 

half century of Marist apostate; history of the Boston 
province. Society of Mary, United States of America. 
[Boston]: Marist Fathers of Boston, 1974. 380p. MB. 

Order of French Catholic priests (in Maine, 
Massachusetts, and Rhode Island). 

1990 BEECHER, LYMAN. The autobiography of 
Lyman Beecher. Barbara M. Cross, ed. Cambridge, 
Mass.: Belknap Pr. of Harvard Univ. Pr., 1961. 2v. 
MStuO. -(- 

The noted Congregational minister (lived 1775-1863). 

1991 BILLINGTON, LOUIS. '"Female laborers in 

the church': women preachers in the northeastern 
United States, 1790-1840." Journal of American 
Studies [U.K.], 19 (Dec. 1985), 369-394. 

1992 BREMER, FRANCIS JOHN. "Increase Mather’s 
friends: the trans-Atlantic Congregational network of 
the seventeenth century." AASP, 94 (Apr. 1984), 59- 
96. 

1993 BRISBANE, ARTHUR. Mary Baker G. Eddy. 

Boston: Bell Publishing, 1908. 62p. MBU. + 

1994 BROWN, RICHARD DAVID. "Spreading the 

word: rural clergymen and the communications network 
of 18th century New England." MHSP, 94 (1982), 1-14. 

1995 BUSS, DIETRICH. "The millennial vision 

as motive for religious benevolence and reform: 

Timothy Dwight and the New England evangelicals 
reconsidered." Fides et Historia, 16 (Fall-Winter 
1983), 18-34. 

1996 BUTTERFIELD, LYMAN HENRY. "Elder John 
Leland, Jeffersonian itinerant." AASP, 62 (Oct. 

1952), 155-242. 

Baptist evangelist (lived 1754-1841). 

1997 CASSARA, ERNEST. Hosea Ballou and the 
rise of American religious liberalism. Boston: 
Universalist Historical Society, 1958. 24p. MWA. -i- 

1998 . Hosea Ballou: the challenge to orthodoxy. 

Boston: Universalist Historical Society, 1961. x, 

226p. MWA. 

Reprinted 1982. 

1999 "CHARACTER of the first ministers of New 
England." Spirit of the Pilgrims, 2 (Sept. 1829), 516- 
517. 



96 



Religion 



2000 CHILD, FRANK SAMUEL. The colonial parson 
of New England: a picture. N.Y.: Baker & Taylor, 
1896. 226p. MWA. + 

Reprinted 1974. 

2001 COLBY, JOHN. The life experience and 
travels of John Colby, preacher of the Gospel. 

Portland, Me., and Andover, N.H., 1815-1819. 2v. 
NhHi. + 

Colby (lived 1787-1817), a Freewill Baptist 
minister, preached in all of the New England states 
except Connecticut. 

2002 CONFORTI, JOSEPH ANTHONY. "Antebellum 
evangelicals and the cultural revival of Jonathan 
Edwards." Journal of Presbyterian History, 64 (Winter 
1986), 227-241. 

Connecticut Valley area (1730s and 1740s). 

2003 DAKIN, EDWIN FRANDEN. Mrs. Eddy: the 
biography of a virginal mind. N.Y.: Charles 
Scribner's Sons, 1929. x, 553p. MWA. + 

Mary Baker Eddy. 

2004 DAVENPORT, JOHN GAYLORD. "Moses Stuart - 
the man who unfettered religious life in America." 
Coimecticut Magazine, 11, No. 1 (1907), 111-122. 

Theologian (lived 1780-1852), of New Haven, Conn., 
and the Andover [Mass.] Theological Seminary. 

2005 DAY, RICHARD ELLSWORTH. Flagellant on 
horseback: the life story of David Brainerd. 
Philadelphia: Judson Pr., 1950. 253p. Me. -t- 

Congregational minister and missionary to the 
Indians (lived 1718-1747). See also next entry. 

2006 EDWARDS, JONATHAN. The life of David 
Brainerd. Norman Pettit, ed. New Haven, Conn.: Yale 
Univ. Pr., 1985. x, 620p. MB. -h 

Biographical account, first published in 1749. This 
is Volume 7 in a series of Edwards's works. See also 
Petit's article on Brainerd, his expulsion from Yale, 
and his relationship to Edwards in NEQ, 59 (Mar. 

1986), 28-50; and preceding entry. 

2007 ELSBREE, OUVER WENDELL. "Samuel Hopkins 

and his doctrine of benevolence." NEQ, 8 (Dec. 1935), 
534-550. 

2008 FENTZ, EDWARD W. "Elijah Kellogg, 1813- 
1901." Yankee, 5 (Dec. 1939), 14, 30-31. 

See also entries 2038 and 2067. 

2009 FERGUSON, JOHN. Memoir of the life and 
character of the late Samuel Hopkins. Boston: L. W. 
Kimball, 1830. viii, 196p. RU. + 



CLERGY AND OTHER REUGIOUS LEADERS 2020 



2010 FRASER, JAMES W. Pedagogue for God's 
kingdom: Lyman Beecher and the Great Awakening. 
Lanham, Md.: Univ. Pr. of America, 1985. vi, 523p. 
CtHi. + 

201 1 FULLER, RICHARD FREDERICK. Chaplain 
Fuller: being a life sketch of a New England 
clergyman and army chaplain. Boston: Walker, Wise, 
1864. vi, 342p. MBU. + 

Arthur Buckminster Fuller (lived 1822-1862), 

Unitarian minister in Manchester, N.H., and Boston. 

2012 GAMBRELL, MARY LATIMER. Ministerial 
training in eighteenth century New England. N.Y.: 
Columbia Univ. Pr., 1937. 169p. MStuO. -t- 

See also next entry. 

2013 . "Ministerial training in eighteenth-century 

New England." Ph.D. dissertation, Columbia Univ., 

1938. 171p. MBU. 

See also preceding entry. 

2014 GRENZ, STANLEY. "Isaac Backus and 

religious liberty." Foundations, 22 (Oct.-Dec. 1979), 
352-360. 

See also next entry. 

2015 . Isaac Backus-Puritan and Baptist: his 

place in history, his thought, and their implications 
for modem Baptist theology. Macon, Ga.: Mercer 
Univ. Pr., 1983. 346p. MWA. + 

2016 GUERNSEY, A. H. "Lyman Beecher." 

Harper's, 30 (May 1868), 697-710. 

2017 HALL, DAVID DRISKO. The faithful 

shepherd: a history of the New England ministry in 
the seventeenth century. Chapel Hill, N.C.: Univ. of 
North Carolina Pr., 1972. xvi, 301p. MWA. -t- 
See also next entry. 

2018 . 'The faithful shepherd: the Puritan minister 

in old and New England, 1570-1600." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Yale Univ., 1964. 278p. 

See also preceding entry. 

2019 HARLAN, DAVID CRAIG. "New England 
Congregationalism and ministerial professionalism in 
the eighteenth century." Bulletin of the 
Congregational Library, 34 (Winter 1983), 4-18; 
(Spring-Summer 1983), 4-17. 

2020 HEARD, JOHN, JR. John Wheelwright, 1592- 

1679. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1930. 137p. MWA. -i- 
Puritan minister in Massachusetts, New Hampshire, 
and Maine. 



97 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



2021 

2021 

2022 



2023 

2024 

2025 

2026 

2027 

2028 

2029 

2030 



CLERGY AND OTHER REUGIOUS LEADERS 



HENRY. STUART CLARK. Unvanquished 
Puritan: a portrait of Lyman Beecher. Grand Rapids, 
Mich.: W. B. Eerdmans, 1973. 299p. Ct. + 

HOPKINS, SAMUEL. Sketches of the life of 
the late Rev. Samuel Hopkins, D.D., pastor of the 
First Congregational Church in Newport, written by 
himself; interspersed with marginal notes extracted 
from his diary;.... Stephen West, ed. Hartford, 

Conn.: Hudson and Goodwin, 1805. xxii, 240p. CtHi. 
+ 

The Congregational theologian (lived 1721-1803) 
served churches in Great Barrington, Mass., and 
Newport during a long ministerial career. 

HOVEY, ALVAH. A memoir of the life and 

times of the Rev. Isaac Backus, A.M. Boston: Gould 

and Lincoln, 1859. xvi, 369p. MStuO. -t- 

HUSE, RAYMOND HOWARD. The autobiography 
of a plain preacher. Boston: Meador Publishing, 

1949. 121p. DLC. -t- 

Methodist minister (bom 1880), in New Hampshire, 
Vermont, and New York. 

HUTCHINSON, WILUAM R. The 
Transcendentalist ministers: church reform in the New 
England renaissance. New Haven, Conn.: Yale Uni v. 
Pr., 1959. xvii, 240p. MStuO. -i- 
See also next entry. 

. "The Transcendentalists as church reformers." 

Ph.D. dissertation, Yale Univ., 1956. 298p. 

See also preceding entry. 

JACOBSON, ALF EDGAR. "The Congregational 
clergy in eighteenth-century New England." Ph.D. 
dissertation. Harvard Univ., 1963. iii, 538p. 

Described in American Puritan Studies, Michael S. 
Montgomery, comp. (1984), 132-133. 

JOHNSTON, JULIA MICHAEL. Mary Baker 
Eddy: her mission and triumph. Boston: Christian 
Science Publishing Society, 1946. 183p. MBU. h- 

LAPOMARDA, VINCENT ANTHONY. The Jesuit 
heritage in New England. Worcester, Mass.: Jesuits 
of Holy Cross College, 1977. x, 321p. MW. -i- 

LARKIN, JACK. "Meet the new minister and 
his family: what do you think of them?" Old 
Sturbridge Village, Rural Visitor, 15 (Summer 1975), 5- 
6, 14. 

The clergy in rural New England (early- 19th 
century). 



203 1 LEE, ELIZA BUCKMINSTER. Memoirs of Rev. 

Joseph Buckminster, D.D., and of his son. Rev. Joseph 
Stevens Buckminster. Boston: Wm. Crosby and H. P. 
Nichols, 1849. x, 486p. MStuO. -t- 

Former was a Congregational minister in Portsmouth, 
N.H.; latter was a Unitarian minister in Boston. 

2032 LORD, MYRA BELLE HORNE. Mary Baker Eddy: 

a concise story of her life and work. Boston: Davis 
& Bond, 1918. 62p. MB. + 

2033 LOVEJOY, DAVID SHERMAN. "Samuel Hopkins: 
religion, slavery, and the Revolution." NEQ, 40 (June 
1967), 227-243. 

2034 McLOUGHUN, WILLIAM GERALD. Isaac Backus 
and the American pietistic tradition. Boston: 

Little, Brown, 1967. xii, 25 2p. MStuO. -i- 

2035 MAMPOTENG, CHARLES. "The New England 
Anglican clergy in the American Revolution." 
Historical Magazine of the Protestant Episcopal 
Church, 9 (Dec. 1940), 267-304. 

2036 MILMINE, GEORGINE. The life of Mary 

Baker G. Eddy and the history of Christian Science. 
(1909) Grand Rapids, Mich.: Baker Book House, 1971 
xxxiv, 495p. MStuO. + 

2037 MINKEMA, KENNETH PIETER. 'The Edwardses: 
a ministerial family in eighteenth-century New 
England." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of Cormecticut, 
1988. 690p. 

Jonathan, Jonathan, Jr., and Timothy. Abstracted in 
DAI, 49, No. IIA (1989), 3484. 

2038 MITCHELL, WILMOT BROOKINGS. Elijah 
Kellogg: the man and his work. Boston: Lee and 
Shepard, 1903. xiv, 424p. MeU. -t- 

Kellogg (lived 1813-1901) was a Congregational 
minister and author in Harpswell, Me., and Boston. 

2039 MOE, WILLIAM C. H. Seeing it through: 

an autobiography of Rev. William C. H. Moe, D.D. 2d 
ed. n.p., [I960?]. 124p. CtStf. -t- 
Served Congregational churches in Vermont, 
Massachusetts and Connecticut. 

2040 MORSE, JAMES KING. Jedidiah Morse: a 
champion of New England orthodoxy. N.Y.: Columbia 
Univ. Pr., 1939. ix, 179p. NhD. + 

Published Ph.D. dissertation (Columbia Univ.). See 
also entry 2046. 



98 



Religion 



CLERGY AND OTHER REUGIOUS LEADERS 2064 



2041 NEWMAN, RICHARD. Lemuel Haynes: a bio- 
bibliography. N.Y.: Lambeth Pr., 1984. 138p. MB. + 

Early black Congregational minister (Massachusetts 
and Vermont). 

2042 PEEL. ROBERT. Mary Baker Eddy.... N.Y.: 

Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1966-1977. 3v. MBU. + 

2043 PHELPS. VERGIL VIVIAN. "The pastor and 

teacher in New England." Harvard Theological Review, 
4 (July 1911), 388-399. 

See also next entry. 

2044 . 'The pastor and teacher, with special 

reference to the pastor and teacher in the New England 
churches." Ph.D. dissertation, Yale Univ., 1910. 

123p. 

Described in American Puritan Studies, Michael S. 
Montgomery, comp. (1984), 18. 

2045 PHILLIPS, JOSEPH WILSON. "Jedidiah 
Morse: an intellectual biography." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Univ. of California, Berkeley, 1978. 

338p. MH. 

Congregational minister and author (lived 1761- 
1826). Abstracted in DAI. 39, No. 9A (1979), 5682. 
See also next entry. 

2046 . Jedidiah Morse and New England 

Congregationalism. New Brunswick, N.J.: Rutgers 
Univ. Pr., 1983. x. 290p. MWA. -t- 

See also preceding entry and entry 2040. 

2047 POWELL, LYMAN PIERSON. Mary Baker Eddy: 
a life size portrait. N.Y.: Macmillan, 1930. xii, 

364p. MWA. 

2048 QUINT, ALONZO H. "The origin of 
ministerial associations in New England." 
Congregational C^arterly, 2 (Apr. 1860), 203-209. 

2049 RICARD, LAURA BRODERICK. "The 

evangelical New Light clergy of northern New England, 
1741-1755: a typology." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of 
New Hampshire, 1985. x, 375p. MeU. 

Abstracted in DAI, 47, No. 2A (1986), 638. 

2050 . "The northern New England 'New Light' clergy 

and 'declension' reconsidered." Historical New 
Hampshire, 42 (Summer 1987), 125-149. 

See also preceding entry. 

2051 RIEGLER, GORDON ARTHUR. Socialization of 
the New England clergy, 18(X) to 1860. Greenfield, 
Ohio: Greenfield Printing and Publishing, 1945. 

187p. MSaE. -i- 



2052 ROBBINS, THOMAS. Diary of Thomas 
Robbins, D.D. Increase N. Tarbox, ed. Boston: 

Beacon Pr., 1886-1887. 2v. MWA. -i- 

Massachusetts and Connecticut clergyman. Diary 
covers the years 1796-1854. 

2053 ROMAINE, LAWRENCE BOND. "Isaac Backus: 

New England minister, historian and Yankee trader, 

1724 to 1806." OTNE, 42 (Spring 1952), 88-92. 

2054 SAFFORD, OSCAR F. Hosea Ballou: a 
marvellous life-story. Boston: Universalist 
Publishing House, 1889. iv, 290p. MWA. -t- 

2055 SCHMOTTER, JAMES W. "The irony of 
clerical professionalism: New England's 
Congregational ministers and the Great Awakening." 
American Quarterly, 31 (Summer 1979), 148-168. 

2056 . "Ministerial careers in eighteenth-century New 

England: the social context, 1700-1760." JSH, 9 
(Winter 1975), 249-267. 

2057 . "Provincial professionalism: the New England 

ministry, 1692-1745." Ph.D. dissertation, 
Northwestern Univ., 1973. 362p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 34, No. 9 A (1974), 5884. 

2058 SCOTT, DONALD M. From office to 
profession: the New England ministry, 1750-1850. 
Philadelphia: Univ. of Pennsylvania Pr., 1978. xv, 
199p. MStuO. + 

2059 SELEMENT, GEORGE JOSEPH. Keepers of the 
vineyard: the Puritan ministry and collective culture 
in colonial New England. Lanham, Md.: Univ. Pr. of 
America, 1984. vi, 122p. MWA. + 

2060 . "Publication and the Puritan minister." WMQ, 

3 ser. 37 (Apr. 1980), 219-241. 

2061 SHERMAN, DAVID. Sketches of New England 
divines. N.Y.: Carlton and Porter, 1860. 443p. 

MSaE. + 

2062 SILBERGER, JULIUS, JR. "Mary Baker 

Eddy." American Heritage, 32 (Dec. 1980), 56-64. 

See also next entry. 

2063 . Mary Baker Eddy: an interpretive biography of 

the founder of Christian Science. Boston: Little, 
Brown, 1980. x, 274p. MWA. -i- 

2064 SMAUS, JEWEL SPANGLER. Mary Baker Eddy: 
the golden days. Boston: Christian Science 
Publishing Society, 1966. 193p. MBU. + 



99 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



2065 CL£RG Y AND OTHER REUGIOUS liADERS 



2065 SMITH, CHARLES C. "Financial 
embarrassments of the New England ministers in the 
last century." AASP, n.s. 7 (Oct. 1890), 129-135. 

2066 SPOONER, ELLA BROWN. Clark and Tabitha 
Brown: the first part of their adventures and those 

of their three children in New England, Washington and 
Maryland. N.Y.: Exposition Pr., 1957. 132p. MStuO. 

-I- 

Clark Brown, a New England Congregational minister, 
created controversy during his pastorate in Brimfield, 
Mass. (1797-1803). 

2067 STORER, CLEMENT ALLYN ALDEN. "Elijah 
Kellogg: 19th century New England orthodox preacher.' 
Ph.D. dissertation, Michigan State Univ., 1969. 237p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 31, No. 3A (1970), 1212. 

2068 SWIFT, DAVID E. "Samuel Hopkins: 

Calvinist social concern in eighteenth century New 
England." Journal of Presbyterian History, 47 (Mar. 
1969), 31-54. 

2069 TARBOX, INCREASE N. "Jonathan Edwards as 

a man; and the ministers of the last century." New 
Englander, 43 (Sept. 1884), 615-631. 

2070 TEAHAN, JOHN F. "Warren Felt Evans and 

the mental healing: romantic idealism and practical 
mysticism in nineteenth-century America." Church 
History, 48 (Mar. 1979), 63-80. 

Methodist minister and later a Swedenborgian lay 
reader in Massachusetts and Rhode Island. 

2071 THOMPSON, JAMES EARL, JR. "A perilous 
experiment: New England clergymen and American 
destiny, 1796-1826." Ph.D. dissertation, Princeton 
Univ., 1966. xi, 330p. VtU. 

2072 THURSTON, CHARLES RAWSON. "Bishop 
Berkeley in New England." NEM, n.s. 21 (Sept. 1899), 
65-82. 

George Berkeley. 

2073 TURNBULL, G. H. "John Dury's 
correspondence with the clergy of New England about 
ecclesiastical pjeace." Colonial Society of 
Massachusetts, Publications, 38 (1947-1951), 18-21. 

1659. 

2074 VAN deWETERING, MAXINE SCHORR. 'The New 
England clergy and the development of scientific 
professionalism." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of 
Washington, 1970. xii, 223p. 

1720's-1750's. Abstracted in DAI, 31, No. lOA 
(1971), 5342. 



2075 WADE, MASON. "Odyssey of a Loyalist 

rector." Vermont History, 48 (Spring 1980), 96-113. 

The Rev. Ranna Cossitt, Anglican missionary in New 
Hampshire and Vermont. 

2076 WALKER, WILUSTON. The influence of the 
Mathers in New England religious development, n.p.: 
Knickerbocker Pr., 1893. [25]p. Ct. -t- 

2077 WATERHOUSE, RICHARD. "Reluctant 
emigrants: the English background of the first 
generation of the New England Puritan clergy." 

Historical Magazine of the Protestant Episcopal 
Church, 44 (Dec. 1975), 270-277. 

2078 WEBSTER, HOMER J. "The colonial parson." 

NEM, n.s. 27 (Oct. 1902), 167-176. 

2079 WEIS, FREDERICK LEWIS. The colonial 
clergy and the colonial churches of New England. 
Lancaster, Mass.: Society of the Descendants of the 
Colonial Clergy (1620-1776), 1936. 280p. MWA. -t- 

Reprinted 1977. 

2080 WHTTTEMORE, THOMAS. Life of Rev. Hosea 
Ballou; with accounts of his writings, and 
biographical sketches of his seniors and 
contemporaries in the Universalist ministry. Boston: 
James M. Usher, 1854-1855. 4v. MWA. + 

2081 WILBUR, SIBYL. The life of Mary Baker 

Eddy. N.Y.: Concord Publishing, 1908. xvi, 384p. 
MWA.-i- 
Other eds. 

2082 WISBEY, HERBERT A., JR. "A Yankee 
prophetess." NEG, 3 (Winter 1962), 3-11. 

Jemima Wilkinson (lived 1752-1819), the Universal 
Friend. 

2083 WOOD, RAYMOND LEE. "Lyman Beecher, 1775- 
1863: a biographical study." Ph.D. dissertation, 

Yale Univ., 1961 . v, 347p. CtHi. 

Abstracted in DAI, 27, No. 3A (1966), 822. 

2084 WOODBRIDGE, GEORGE. "Samuel Seabury, 

first American bishop." Newport History, 56 (Spring 
1983), 68-79. 

Episcopal bishop of Connecticut (from 1785-1796) and 
Rhode Island (from 1790-1796). 

2085 WOODMAN, CYRUS. The memoir and journals 
of Rev. Paul Coffin, D.D. Portland, Me.: B. 

Thurston, 1855. 181p. NhD. -i- 

Congregational minister in Buxton, Me. (lived 1738- 
1821). Includes accounts of a number of missionary 
tours in New England. 



100 



Religion 



MISSIONS 2104 



2086 YACOVONE, DONALD. "Samuel Joseph May, 
antebellum religion and reform: dilemmas of the 
liberal persuasion." Ph.D. dissertation, Claremont 
Graduate School, 1984. 579p. 

Unitarian minister and social reformer. Abstracted 
in DAI, 45, No. 6A (1984), 1848. 

2087 YOUNG, DAN. Autobiography of Dan Young, 

a New England preacher of the olden time. W. P. 
Strickland, ed. N.Y.: Carlton & Porter, 1860. 380p. 
NhD.+ 

Methodist (bom 1783). 

2088 YOUNGS, JOHN WILUAM THEODORE, JR. God’s 
messengers: religious leadership in colonial New 
England, 1700-1750. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins Univ. 
Pr., 1976. xi, 176p. MStuO. -i- 

See also next entry. 

2089 . "God’s messengers: religious leadership in 

colonial New England, 1700-1750." Ph.D. dissertation, 
Univ. of California, Berkeley, 1970. vii, 504p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 31, No. 12A (1971), 6535. See 
also preceding entry. 

SEE "Clergy" in index for additional listings. 



MISSIONS 

2090 ADAMS, NEHEMIAH. The life of John Eliot; 

with an account of the early missionary efforts among 
the Indians of New England. Boston: Massachusetts 
Sabbath School Society, 1847. 324p. MStuO. -i- 
Eliot lived 1604-1690. 

2091 ANDREW, JOHN ALFRED in. Rebuilding the 
Christian commonwealth: New England 
Congregationalists and foreign missions, 1800-1830. 
Lexington, Ky.: Univ. of Kentucky Pr., 1976. 232p. 
MBNEH. + 

See also next entry. 

2092 . "Rebuilding the Christian commonwealth: New 

England Congregationalists and foreign missions, 1800- 
1830." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of Texas, 1973. 

431p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 34, No. 5 A (1973), 2502. See 
also preceding entry. 

2093 BARTLETT, IRVING H. "The Puritans as 
missionaries." Boston Public Library Quarterly, 2 
(Apr. 1950), 99-118. 



2094 BEALS, CARLETON. John Eliot, the man who 

loved the Indians (July 31, 1604-May 20, 1690). N.Y.: 

J. Messner, 1957. 192p. MSaE. -t- 

2095 CAMERON, KENNETH WALTER. Letter-book of 
the Rev. Henry Caner, S.P.G., missionary in colonial 
Coimecticut and Massachusetts until the Revolution. A 
review of his correspondence from 1728 through 1778. 
Hartford, Conn.: Transcendental Books, 1972. 224p. 
MBU.-t- 

Anglican. 

2096 CHAMBERLAIN, GEORGE WALTER. "A New 
England crusade." NEM, n.s. 36 (Apr. 1907), 195-207. 

American Agricultural Mission to Syria and Palestine 
Emigration Association (mid- 19th century). 

2097 COGLEY, RICHARD WILUAM. ”The 
millenarianism of John Eliot, ’apostle’ to the 
Indians." Ph.D. dissertation, Princeton Univ., 1983. 

188p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 43, No. 12A (1983), 7-12. 

2098 CRAM, JACOB. Journal of a missionary 

tour in 1808 through the new settlements of northern 
New Hampshire and Vermont, from the original 
manuscript of Rev. Jacob Cram, A.M. Rochester, N.Y.: 
Genessee Pr., 1909. 37p. NhD. + 

2099 ELIOT, JOHN (1604-1690). "Account of 

Indian churches in New England, 1673." MHSC, 10 
(1809), 124-129. 

2100 . A brief narrative of the progress of the 

gospel among the Indians of New England. 1670. 

Boston: John K. Wiggin & Wm. Parsons Lunt, 1868. 

36p. MW A. + 

2101 . "The glorious progress of the gospel amongst 

the Indians in New England." MHSC, 3 ser. 4 (1834), 
69-94. 

First published in 1649. 

2102 . "A late and further manifestation of the 

progress of the gospel amongst the Indians in New- 
England." MHSC, 3 ser. 4 (1834), 261-287. 

First published in 1655. 

2103 , and THOMAS MAYHEW, JR. ’Tears of repentance; 

or, a further narrative of the progress of the gospel 
amongst the Indians in New England." MHSC, 3 Ser. 4 
(1834), 197-260. 

First published in 1653. 

2104 ELSBREE, OUVER WENDELL. ’The rise of 

the missionary spirit in New England, 1790-1815." 

NEQ, 1 (July 1928), 295-322. 



101 



2105 

2105 

2106 

2107 

2108 

2109 

2110 

2111 

2112 

2113 

2114 

2115 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



MISSIONS 



FINDLEY, J. W. "Eliza A. Gardner, mother 
of the A.M.E. Zion Missionary Society, A.M.E. Zion 
Church." A.M.E. Zion Quarterly Review, 66 (Winter 
1955), 36-38. 

19th century. 

GUGGISBERG, HANS R. "Die Indianerbible 
des John Eliot in einer Easier Gelehrtenbibliothek des 
n.Jahrhunderts." Easier Zeitschrift fUr Geschichte 
und Arbeiterbewegung, 82 (1982), 195-204. 

MARLING, FREDERICK FARNHAM. "A biography 
of John Eliot, 1604-1690." Ph.D. dissertation, Boston 
Univ., 1965. iv, 281p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 26, No. 5 (1965), 2709. 



2116 MASS ACHUSETTS HISTORICAL SOaETY, BOSTON. 
'Tracts relating to the attempts to convert to 
Christianity the Indins of New England." MHSC, 3 ser. 
4 (1834), 1-287. 

2117 NEWCOMBE, ALFRED W. "The organization 

and procedure of the S.P.G., with special reference to 
New England." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of Michigan, 
1934. 245p. 

Described in American Puritan Studies, Michael S. 
Montgomery, comp. (1984), 44. See also entry 2113. 

2118 ORTEGA y MEDINA, JUAN ANTONIO. "An 
analysis of the missionary methods of the Puritans." 
Americas, 14 (Oct. 1957), 125-134. 



HUTCHINSON, WILUAM R. "New England's 
further errand: millennial belief and the beginnings 
of foreign missions." MHSP, 94 (1982), 49-64. 

Early- 19th century. 

JENNINGS, FRANCIS. "Goals and functions 
of the Puritan missions to the Indians." 

Ethnohistory, 18 (Summer 1971), 197-212. 

KELLAWAY, WILLIAM. "The collection for 
the Indians of New England, 1649-1660." John Rylands 
Library, Manchester [U.K.], Bulletin, 39 (Mar. 1957), 
444-462. 

Society for the Propagation of the Gospel 
(Anglican). 

. The New England Company, 1649-1776: 

missionary society to the American Indians. N.Y.: 
Barnes & Noble, 1961. 303p. MSaE. -t- 
Reprinted 1975. 

KING, IRVING HENRY. "The S.P.G. and the 

Great Awakening in New England." Connecticut Review, 

9 (Nov. 1975), 62-74. 

See also next entry. 



2119 OTIS, VIRGINIA LADD. "John Eliot, 

missionary to the Indians." NEG, 17 (Fall 1975), 25- 
31. 

2120 PRINCE SOCIETY. The New England Company 

of 1649 and John Eliot. Boston, 1920. Ixxxiv, 219p. 
CtY. -H 

Corporation for the Promoting and Propagating of the 
Gospel of Jesus Christ in New England. 

2121 ROND A, JAMES P. "'We are well as we 

are': an Indian critique of sevententh-century 
Christian missions." WMQ, 3 ser. 34 (Jan. 1977), 66- 
82. 

2122 RUSSELL, FRANCIS. "Apostle to the 

Indians." American Heritage, 8 (Dec. 1957), 5-9, 117- 
119. 

John Eliot. 

2123 SEBOLT, ALBERTA P. "'Few things around 

me which look like home.'" Old Sturbridge Visitor, 23 
(Spring 1983), 7-9. 

Foreign missions movement in New England (early-19th 
century). 



. "The S.P.G. in New England, 1701-1784." Ph.D. 2124 

dissertation, Univ. of Maine, 1968. 324p. NhKeS. 

Society for the Propagation of the Gospel. 

Abstracted in DAI, 29, No. 6A (1968), 1835. See also 

entry 2117. 2125 

LANDRY, THOMAS M. Mission catholique et 
francaise en Nouvelle-Angleterre. Quebec: Editions 
Ferland, 1962. MeU. •+• 

2126 

McELROY, PAUL SIMPSON. "John Eliot: the 
apostle to the Indians." Danvers [Mass.] Historical 
Society, Historical Collections, 34 (1946), 41-49. 



SEHR, TIMOTHY JEROME. "John Eliot, 
millennialist and missionary." The Historian, 46 
(Feb. 1984), 187-203. 

SHEPARD, THOMAS. "The clear sun-shine of 
the gospel breaking forth upwn the Indians in New 
England." MHSC, 3 ser. 4 (1834), 25-67. 

First published in 1648. 

. 'The day-breaking if not the sun-rising of the 

gospell, with the Indians in New-England." MHSC, 3 
ser. 4 (1834), 1-23. 

First published in 1647. 



102 



Religion 



2127 SMITH, BRADFORD. Yankees in paradise; 

the New England impact on Hawaii. Philadelphia: 
Lippincott, 1956. 376p. MBU. + 

Missions (19th century). 

2128 STARKEY. MARION LENA. "Haytstack 
mission." NEG, 8 (Spring 1967), 37-45. 

The foreign missions movement in New England (early- 
19th century). 

2129 TANIS, NORMAN EARL. "Education in John 
Eliot's Indian utopias, 1645-1675." History of 
Education Quarterly, 10 (Fall 1970), 308-323. 

2130 WEIS, FREDERICK LEWIS. "The New England 
Company of 1649 and its missionary enterprises." 
Colonial Society of Massachusetts, Transactions, 38 
(1959), 134-218. 

2131 WHITHELD, HENRY. "The light appearing 
more and more towards the perfect day; or, a farther 
discovery of the present state of the Indians in New 
England concerning the progresse of the gospel amongst 
them." MHSC, 3 ser. 4 (1834), 100-147. 

First published in 1651. 

2132 . "Strength out of weakness; or, a glorious 

manifestation of the further progresse of the gospel 
among the Indians in New-England." MHSC, 3 ser. 4 
(1834), 149-196. 

First published in 1652. 

2133 WINSLOW. OLA EUZABETH. John Eliot: 

"apostle to the Indians." Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 
1968. 225p. MWA. -t- 

SEE "Missions" in Index for additional listings. 



REVIVALS 

2134 [BALDWIN, THOMAS.] Brief account of the 

late revivals of religion in a number of towns in the 
New-England states, and also in Nova-Scotia. 
Extracted chiefly from letters written by several 
gentlemen of unquestionable veracity. Boston: 
Manning & Loring, 1799. 24p. CtHi. -t- 

2135 BEALES, ROSS WORN, JR. "Harvard and Yale 
in the Great Awakening." Historical Journal of 
Massachusetts, 14 (Jan. 1986), 1-10. 

The 18th-century revival. 

2136 BILLINGS, T. H. "The Great Awakening." 

EIHC, 65 (Jan. 1929), 89-104. 



REVIVALS 2147 



2137 BIRDSALL, RICHARD DAVENPORT. 'The Second 
Great Awakening and the New England social order." 
Church History, 39 (Sept. 1970), 345-364. 

19th century. 

2138 COTT, NANCY FALIK. "Young women in the 
Second Great Awakening in New England." Feminist 
Studies. 3 (Fall 1975), 15-29. 

2139 EASTON, BARBARA LESUE. "Women, 
religion, and the family: revivalism as an indicator 
of social change in early New England." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Univ. of California, Berkeley, 1975. 

232p. 

2140 G AUST AD. EDWIN SCOTT. The Great 

Awakening in New England. N.Y.: Harper, 1957. 173p. 
MStuO. + 

2141 . "Society and the Great Awakening in New 

England." WMQ, 3 ser. 11 (Oct. 1954), 566-577. 

2142 . "The theological effects of the Great 

Awakening in New England." Mississippi Valley 
Historical Review, 40 (Mar. 1954), 681-706. 

2143 GOEN, CLARENCE CURTIS. Revivalism and 
separatism in New England, 1740-1800. Strict 
Congregationalists and Separate Baptists in the Great 
Awakening. (1962) [Hamden, Conn.]; Archon Books, 
1969. xii, 370p. Ct. -i- 

See also next entry. 

2144 . "Revivalism and separatism in New England, 

1740-1800: Strict Congregationalists and Separate 
Baptists in the Great Awakening." Ph.D. dissertation, 
Yale Univ., 1960. 

See also preceding entry. 

2145 THE GREAT Awakening: documents on the 

revival of religion, 1740-1745. Richard L. Bushman, 
ed. N.Y.: Atheneum, 1970. xiv, 174p. MWA. + 
Primarily New England documents. 

2146 GREENE, EV ARTS BOUTELL. "A Puritan 

counter -reformation." AASP, n.s. 42 (Apr. 1932), 17- 
46. 

Evangelical revival in New England (early- 19th 
century). 

2147 GUELZO, ALLEN C. "George Whitefield 

comes to New England." NEG, 20 (Summer 1978), 12-21. 
The evangelist's several visits, from 1740-1770. 



103 



2148 

2148 

2149 

2150 

2151 

2152 

2153 

2154 

2155 

2156 

2157 

2158 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



REVIVALS 



HARLAN, DAVID CRAIG. The clergy and the 
Great Awakening in New England. Ann Arbor, Mich.: 
UMI Research Pr., 1980. 172p. MStuO. + 

See also next entry. 

. "The clergv and the Great Awakening in New 
England." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of California, 
Irvine, 1979. 248p. MWA. 


2159 


TYLER, BENNET. New England revivals, as 
they existed at the close of the eighteenth, and the 
beginning of the nineteenth centuries. Compiled 
principally from narratives first published in the 
Connecticut Evangelical Magazine. Boston: 
Massachusetts Sabbath School Society, 1846. xvi, 
328p. RHi. -h 


Abstracted in DAI, 39, No. 12A (1979), 7469. See 
also preceding entry. 

NORDBECK, ELIZABETH CURRIER. "Almost 
awakened: the great revival in New Hampshire and 


2160 


WARCH, RICHARD. "The shepherd's tent: 
education and enthusiasm in the Great Awakening." 
American Quarterly, 30 (Summer 1978), 177-198. 
Mainly about New England. 


Maine, 1727-1748." Historical New Hampshire, 35 
(Spring 1980), 23-58. 

O'BRIEN, SUSAN. "A transatlantic 


2161 


WHITE, EUGENE EDMOND. "Decline of the 

Great Awakening in New England, 1741 to 1746." NEQ, 

24 (Mar. 1951), 35-52. 


community of saints: the Great Awakening and the 
first evangelical network, 1735-1755." American 
Historical Review, 91 (Oct. 1986), 811-832. 


2162 


. "George Whitefield and the paper war in New 
England." Quarterly Journal of Speech, 39 (Feb. 
1953), 61-68. 


PARKES, HENRY B. "New England and the 
Great Awakening: a study in the theory and practice 
of New England Calvinism." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. 
of Michigan, 1929. 351p. 

PIKE, SAMUEL W. "A study of New England 
revivals." American Journal of Sociology, 15 (Nov. 


2163 


. "The protasis of the Great Awakening in New 
England." Speech Monographs, 21 (Mar. 1954), 10-20. 

SEE "Revivals" in Index for additional listings. 


1909), 361-378. 

Beginning with the Second Great Awakening. 

SIMMONS, WILUAM SCRANTON. 'The Great 
Awakening and Indian conversion in southern New 
England." Papers of the Tenth Algonquian Conference 
(1979), 25-36. 


REUGIOUS LIFE 

2164 ADAMS, CHARLES FRANCIS, JR. (1835-1915). 

Some phases of sexual morality and church discipline 
in colonial New England. Cambridge, Mass.: John 
Wilson and Son, 1891. 43p. MWA. + 

Reprinted from MHSP, 6 (June 1891), 477-516. 


THE STATE of religion in New-England 
since the Reverend Mr. George Whitefield's arrival 
there, in a letter from a gentleman in New-England to 
his friend in Glasgow. Glasgow: R. Foulis, 1742. 
44p. MBNEH. -t- 

STENERSON, DOUGLAS C. "An Anglican 


2165 


BOYD, RICHARD BRUCE. "Three generations 
of Puritan spiritual autobiography: problems of self- 
definition in a time of declension." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Univ. of California, San Diego, 1985. 
189p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 46, No. 3A (1985), 701. 


critique of the early phase of the Great Awakening in 
New England: a letter by Timothy Cutler." WMQ, 3 
ser. 30 (July 1973), 475-488. 

STOUT, HARRY S. II. "The Great Awakening 


2166 


BRODIN, PIERRE. Quelques aspects de la 
vie religieuse en Nouvelle-Angleterre au dix-septieme 
si^le. Saint-Amand [France]: Imprimerie C. A. 
Bedu, 1935. 59p. CtY. -h 


in New England reconsidered: the New England clergy 
as a case study." JSH, 8 (Fall 1974), 21-47. 

TRACY, JOSEPH. The Great Awakening: a 
history of the revival of religion in the time of 
Edwards and Whitefield. Boston: Tappan and Dennett, 
1842. xviii, 433p. MWA. + 

Mainly about New England. 


2167 


BROWN, GEORGE EDWARD. "Catechists and 
catechisms of early New England." D.R.E. 
dissertation, Boston Univ., 1934. [900]p. 

Described in American Puritan Studies, Michael S. 
Montgomery, comp. (1984), 43. 



KM 



Religion 



RELIGIOUS LIFE 2189 



2168 CASKEY. MARIE CARPENTER. Chariot of 

fire; religion and the Beecher family. New Haven, 
Conn.: Yale Univ. Pr., 1978. xv, 442p. MWA. + 

See also next entry and entries 69, 76, and 2173. 

2169 . "Faith and theology in the Beecher family, 

1775-1907." Ph.D. dissertation, Yale Univ., 1974. 
532p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 36, No. lA (1975), 458. See also 
preceding entry. 

2170 COHEN, CHARLES LORD. God’s caress: the 
psychology of Puritan religious experience. N.Y.: 
Oxford Univ. Pr., 1986. xiv, 310p. Ct. + 

2171 DUNN, MARY MAPLES. "Saints and sisters: 
Congregational and Quaker women in the early colonial 
period." American Quarterly, 30 (Winter 1978), 582- 
601. 

New England and Pennsylvania. 

2172 EAMES, WILBERFORCE. "Early New England 
catechisms." AASP, n.s. 12 (Oct. 1897), 76-182. 

2173 GOODELL, JOHN. "The triumph of moralism 

in New England piety: a study of Lyman Beecher, 

Harriet Beecher Stowe, and Edward Beecher." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Pennsylvania State Univ., 1976. vi, 

483p. CtHi. 

Abstracted in DAI, 37, No. 7A (1976), 4431. See 
also entries 69, 76, and 2168. 

2174 GRANT, LEONARD T. "Puritan catechizing." 

Journal of Presbyterian History, 46 (June 1968), 107- 
127. 

2175 GRIMES, MARY COCHRAN. "Saving grace 

among Puritans and Quakers: a study of 17th and 18th 
century conversion experiences." CJuaker History, 72 
(Spring 1983), 3-25. 

2176 HALL, DAVID DRISKO. 'Toward a history of 
popular religion in early New England." WMQ, 3 ser. 

41 (Jan. 1984), 49-55. 

2177 . Worlds of wonder, days of judgment: popular 

religious belief in early New England. N.Y.: Knopf, 
1989. 316p. MBU. -h 

2178 HAMBRICK-STOWE, CHARLES EDWIN. The 
practice of piety: Puritan devotional disciplines in 
seventeenth-century New England. Chapel Hill, N.C.: 
Univ. of North Carolina Pr., 1982. xvi, 298p. MWA. + 

See also next entry. 



2179 . "The practice of piety: Puritan devotional 

disciplines in seventeenth-century New England." 

Ph.D. dissertation, Boston Univ., 1980. ix, 538p. 

Ct. 

Abstracted in DAI, 40, No. 12A (1980), 6332. See 
also preceding entry. 

2180 HUDSON, ROY FRED. "Conviction in 

colonial New England." Municipal Univ. of Wichita, 
Bulletin, 30 (Oct. 1955), 3-15. 

2181 LAZEROW, JAMA. "Religion and the New 
England mill girl: a new perspective on an old 
theme." NEQ, 60 (Sept. 1987), 429-453. 

2182 MILLER, PERRY GILBERT EDDY. "Declension 

in a Bible commonwealth." AASP, 51 (Apr. 1941), 37- 
94. 

Religious life. 

2183 . "’Preparation for salvation’ in seventeenth 

century New England." Journal of the History of 
Ideas, 4 (June 1943), 253-386. 

2184 MONSELL, MARGARET ELIZABETH. ’The 
’newborn bard of the Holy Ghost’: spiritual 
perfectionism in New England." Ph.D. dissertation, 
Boston Univ., 1988. 192p. 

19th century. Abstracted in DAI, 48, No. 8A (1988), 
2086. 

2185 MORRIS, MRS. E. L. "Religious life in 

New England a century ago." Cormecticut Magazine, 9, 
No. 1 (1905), 87-91. 

2186 MURPHEY, MURRAY G. "The psychodynamics 
of Puritan conversion." American Quarterly, 31 
(Summer 1979), 135-147. 

2187 PETTIT, NORMAN. The heart prepared: 

grace and conversion in Puritan spiritual life. New 
Haven, Conn.: Yale Univ. Pr., 1966. ix, 252p. MWA. 
+ 

See also next entry. 

2188 . "The image of the heart in early Puritanism: 

the emergence in England and America of the concept of 
preparation for grace." Ph.D. dissertation, Yale 
Univ., 1963. 268p. 

See also preceding entry. 

2189 POPE, ROBERT GARDNER. "New England 

versus the New England mind: the myth of declension." 
JSH, 3 (Winter 1969), 95-108. 

Myth of the decline of religion in the region. 



105 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



2190 REUGIOUSLIFE 



2190 POTTER. ROBERT ATKINSON. "Church, 
converts, and children: implications for Christian 
education in the doctrine of the church held by 
seventeenth-century New England Puritans as 
particularly exemplified in John Norton’s The answer." 
Ed.R.D. dissertation, Hartford Seminary Foundation, 
1968. ix, 234p. 

Abstracted in DAI. 30, No. 2A (1969), 800. 

2191 RABINOWITZ, RICHARD ISAAC. "Soul, 
character, and personality: the transformation of 
personal religious experience in New England, 1790- 
1860." Ph.D. dissertation. Harvard Univ., 1977. v, 
498p. MStuO. 

2192 REES, ROBERT A. "Seeds of the 
Enlightenment: public testimony in the New England 
churches, 1630-1750." Early American Literature, 3 
(Spring 1968), 22-29. 

2193 SELEMENT, GEORGE JOSEPH. "The means to 
grace: a study of conversion in early New England." 
Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of New Hampshire, 1974. 

401p. MH. 

Abstracted in DAI, 38, No. 2A (1977), 981. 

2194 WALETT, FRANQS GUSTAF. "Shadrack 

Ireland and the 'immortals' of New England." Colonial 
Society of Massachusetts, Publications, 59 (1982), 541- 
550. 

Example of religious fanaticism in the region during 
the era following the Great Awakening. 

2 1 95 WARREN. EDWARD AUSTIN. New England 
saints. Ann Arbor, Mich.: Univ. of Michigan Pr., 

1956. 192p. MWA. -I- 

SEE "Religious life" in Index for additional listings. 



PURITAN AND CONGREGATIONAL HISTORY 

2196 ANDERSON. JOSEPH. The New England 
Puritans: their principles and aims; an address at a 
meeting of the Cormecticut Society of the Order of the 
Foimders and Patriots of America, September 18, 1899. 
[New Haven, Coim.: Tuttle, Morehouse, and Taylor, 
1900.] 27p. CtHi. + 

2 1 97 ATKINS. G AIUS GLENN, and FREDERICK L. 

FAGLEY. History of American Congregationalism. 
Boston: Pilgrim Pr., 1942. ix, 432p. MWA. + 

Primarily New England. 



2198 BACON. LEONARD (1802-1881). The genesis 
of the New England churches. N.Y.: Harper & 

Brothers, 1874. xiv, 485p. MWA. -i- 

2199 BACON, MARY SCHELL HOKE. Old New England 
churches and their children, by Dolores Bacon 
[pseud.].... N.Y.: Doubleday, Page, 1906. xxxiv, 

442p. MWA. + 

2200 BERCOVITCH, SACVAN. The Puritan origins 

of the American self. New Haven, Corm.: Yale Univ. 

Pr., 1975. X, 250p. Ct. -i- 

2201 BERNHARD. VIRGINIA PURINGTON. ’"Essays 

to do good': a Puritan gospel of wealth, 1690-1740." 
Ph.D. dissertation. Rice Univ., 1971. ii, 161p. 

MWalB. 

Cotton Mather. Abstracted in DAI, 32, No. 4A 
(1971), 2010. 

2202 BLAKE, SILAS LEROY. The Separates; or. 

Strict Congregationalists of New England. Boston: 
Pilgrim Pr., 1902. 21 Ip. MWA. -i- 

2203 CALVERTON, V. F. "The Puritan myth." 

Scribner's, 89 (Mar. 1931), 251-257. 

2204 CAMPBELL, DOUGLAS. The Puritan in 
Holland, England, and America: an introduction to 
American history. 4th ed. N.Y.: Harper & Brothers, 
1893. 2v. CtHi. 

2205 CHATHELD, DONALD F. "The 
Congregationalism of New England and its repercussions 
in England and Scotland, 1641-1662." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Univ. of Edinburgh [U.K.], 1964. vii, 
347p. 

Described in American Puritan Studies, Michael S. 
Montgomery, comp. (1984), 138. 

2206 CHAUNCY, CHARLES. Seasonable thoughts on 
the state of religion in New-England; a treatise in 
five parts.... With a preface giving an account of 
the antinomians, familists and libertines, who 
infected these churches above an hundred years ago.... 
Boston: Printed by Rogers and Fowle for Samuel Eliot, 
1743. XXX, 18, 424p. MBU. -i- 

2207 CLAP, THOMAS. A brief history and 
vindication of the doctrines received and established 

in the churches of New-England, with a specimen of the 
new scheme of religion beginning to prevail. 2d ed. 
Boston: S. Kneeland, 1757. 40p. CtY. -t- 



106 



Religion 



PURITAN AND CONGREGATIONAL HISTORY 2228 



2208 COFFMAN. RALPH JOHN. "Gardens in the 
wilderness: Stuart Puritan reforms and the diversity 
of New England Puritanism, 1604-1650." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Harvard Univ., 1976. viii, 346p. 

Described in American Puritan Studies, Michael S. 
Montgomery, comp. (1984), 275. 

2209 CONGREGATIONAL CHURCHES IN CONNECTICUT. 
GENERAL ASSOCIATION. The ancient platforms of the 
Congregational churches of New England; with a digest 
of rules and usages in Connecticut, and an appendix 
containing notices of Congregational bodies in other 
states. Middletown, Conn.: E. Hunt, 1843. x, 351p. 
Ct. + 

2210 THECONGREGATIONAUSTS: a collection of 
source materials. William Warren Sweet, ed. N.Y.; 
Cooper Square Publishers, 1964. xi, 435p. VtHi. + 

2211 COOLEDGE, A. H. "Scripture reading in 

the worship of the New England churches." NEM, n.s. 
19 (Feb. 1899), 677-687. 

2212 COTTON, JOHN. John Cotton on the 

churches of New England. Larzer Ziff, ed. Cambridge, 
Mass.: Harvard Univ. Pr., 1968. 401p. MWA. + 
Collection of writings by the early Puritan leader 
(lived 1584-1652). Includes historical introduction. 

2213 DAWSON, JAN CARLETTA. "Changing concepts 
of Puritanism in America, 1830-1910." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Univ. of Washington, 1976. 365p. MH. 

Abstracted in DAI, 37, No. 5A (1976), 3125. See 
also next entry. 

2214 . The unusable past: America's Puritan 

tradition, 1830 to 1930. Chico, Calif.: Scholars 
Pr., 1984. viii, 155p. MBU. -h 

See also preceding entry. 

2215 DELB ANCO, ANDREW. The Puritan ordeal. 

Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard Univ. Pr., 1989. ix, 306p. 
MB At. 

22 1 6 DEXTER, HENRY M ARTYN. The 
Congregationalism of the last three hundred years, as 
seen in its literature: with special reference to 
certain recondite, neglected, or disputed passages. 

In twelve lectures delivered on the Southworth 
Foundation in the Theological Seminary in Andover, 
Mass., 1876-1879. With a bibliographical appendix. 
N.Y.; Harper & Brothers, 1880. xxxviii, 716, 326p. 
VtHi. 

2217 . A glance at the ecclesiastical councils of New 

England. Boston, 1867. 68p. CtY. -i- 



2218 DEXTER, MORTON. "Congregationalism in 
America." NEM, n.s. 21 (Sept. 1899), 97-117. 

New England influences. 

2219 DORENKAMP, JOHNH. "The New England 
Puritans and the name of God." AASP, 80 (Apr. 1970), 
67-70. 

Puritan translations of the Psalms. 

2220 DUNNING, ALBERT E. Congregationalists in 
America: a popular history of their origin, belief, 
polity, growth and work. N.Y.: J. A. Hill, 1894. 
xxxii, 552p. MStuO. + 

Primarily New England. 

2221 EMERSON, EVERETT H. Puritanism in 

America, 1620-1750. Boston: Twayne Publishers, 1977 
180p. Ct. + 

2222 ENO, JOEL N. "Who were the Puritans." 

Connecticut Magazine, 9, No. 1 (1905), 49-53. 

2223 HELD, THOMAS POWER. Puritanism and 

Puritans in New England: a discourse delivered in New 
London, Conn., on the annual day of fasting, April 
3rd, 1863. New London, Conn.: Starr & Famham, 1863. 
30p. MWA. -t- 

2224 FINLAYSON, MICHAEL GEORGE. "Independency 
in old and New England, 1630-1660: an 
historiographical and historical study." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Univ. of Toronto [Canada], 1968. 

Divisions in Puritanism. Abstracted in DAI, 33, No. 
lA (1972), 250. 

2225 . "Puritanism and Puritans: labels or libels?" 

Canadian Journal of American History, 8 (Dec. 1973), 
201-223. 

Historiographical essay. 

2226 FOSTER, STEPHEN. "New England and the 
challenge of heresy, 1630 to 1660: the Puritan crisis 
in transatlantic perspective." WMQ, 3 ser. 38 (Oct. 
1981), 624-660. 

2227 FRENCH, JONATHAN. Historical notices of 

the Piscataqua Association. Boston: Charles C. P. 
Moody, 1850. 24p. MWA. + 

Congregational association in Maine, Massachusetts, 
and New Hampshire. See also entry 2288. 

2228 FRIEDERICI, GEORG. Das puritanische Neu- 
England, ein beitrag zur entwick-lungsgeschichte der 
nordamerikanischen union. Halle a. Saale: M. 

Niemeyer, 1924. 104p. CtY. -i- 



107 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



2229 PURITAN AND CONGREGATIONAL HISTORY 



2229 GREGORY, JAMES. Puritanism in the Old 

World and in the new: from its inception in the reign 
of Elizabeth to the establishment of the Puritan 
theocracy in New England. N.Y.: Fleming H. Revell, 
1896. X. 406p. MH. + 

2230 GURA, PHILIP F. A glimpse of Sion’s 

glory: Puritan radicalism in seventeenth-century New 
England, 1620-1660. Middletown, Conn.: Wesleyan 
Univ. Pr., 1984. xv, 398p. MWA. + 

2231 HALL, DAVID DRISKO. "On common ground: 

the coherence of American Puritan studies." WMQ, 3 
ser. 44 (Apr. 1987), 193-229. 

2232 HALL, EDWARD H. "The origin of 
Congregationalism." Colonial Society of 
Massachusetts, Transactions, 8 (1902-1904), 326-333. 

2233 . "Relations between the First Church of 

Hartford and the First Church in Cambridge." Colonial 
Society of Massachusetts, Publications, 13 (Mar. 

1911), 273-277. 

17th century. 

2234 HALL, EDWIN. The Puritans and their 
principles. 2d ed. N.Y.: Baker and Scribner, 1846. 
440p. CtHi. -I- 

2235 HALL, MICHAEL GARIBALDL and WILUAM L. 
JOYCE. "The Half-way Covenant of 1662: some new 
evidence." AASP, 87 (Apr. 1977), 97-110. 

2236 HALTUNEN, KAREN. "Cotton Mather and the 
meaning of suffering in the Magnalia Christi 
Americana." Journal of American Studies, 12 (Dec. 
1978), 311-329. 

See also entry 404. 

2237 HAMBRICK-STOWE, CHARLES EDWIN. 

"Spiritual dynamics of Puritan worship." DubSemPr 
(1979), 112-123. 

2238 [HARLOW, ELLA ELIZA.] The church of our 
forefathers. Worcester, Mass., 1909. 3 Ip. MStuO. -i- 

Congregational churches in New England. 

2239 HAWES, JOEL. A tribute to the memory of 

the Pilgrims, and a vindication of the Congregational 
churches of New England. Hartford, Corm.: Cooke, 
1830. vi, 226p. MStuO. -i- 

2240 HOOKER, THOMAS. The way of the churches 

of New England: the preface of [his] Survey of the 
summe of church discipline. Boston, 1894. 16p. 
MSaE.-i- 



2241 JONES, JAMES WILLIAM III. The shattered 
synthesis: New England Puritanism before the Great 
Awakening. New Haven, Conn.: Yale Univ. Pr., 1973. 
xi, 207p. MWA. -t- 

Biographical sketches of leading 17th- and 18th- 
century clergymen. See also entry 1914. 

2242 KIBBEY, ANN. The interpretation of 

material shapes in Puritanism: a study of rhetoric, 
prejudice, and violence. N.Y.: Cambridge Univ. Pr., 
1986. xi, 203p. MB. -h 

2243 . "Mutations of the supernatural: witchcraft, 

remarkable providences, and the power of Puritan men." 
American (^arterly, 34 (Summer 1982), 107-124. 

2244 KOBRIN, DAVID. "The expansion of the 

visible church in New England: 1629-1650." Church 
History, 36 (June 1967), 189-209. 

2245 McGIFFERT, MICHAEL. "American Puritan 
studies in the 1960's." WMQ, 3 ser. 61 (Oct. 1970), 
31-40. 

2246 MATHER, INCREASE. A vindication of New- 
England, from the vile aspersions cast upon that 
country by a late address of a faction there, who 
denominate themselves the church of England in Boston, 
n.p., [1690?]. 27p. DLC. 

Other eds. 

2247 MICHAELSEN, ROBERT S. "Changes in the 
Puritan concept of calling or vocation." NEQ, 26 
(Sept. 1953), 315-336. 

2248 MILLER, GLENN THOMAS. "The rise of 
evangelical Calvinism: a study in Jonathan Edwards 
and the Puritan tradition." Ph.D. dissertation, Union 
Theological Seminary in the City of New York, 1971. 
552p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 32, No. 3A (1971), 1614. 

2249 MILLER, PERRY GILBERT EDDY. 'The Half- 
Way Covenant." NEQ, 6 (Oct. 1933), 676-715. 

2250 . "The marrow of Puritan divinity." Colonial 

Society of Massachusetts, Publications, 32 (1936), 247- 
300. 

2251 . 'The Puritan theory of the sacraments in 

seventeenth century New England." Catholic Historical 
Review, 22 (Jan. 1937), 409-425. 



108 



2252 

2253 

2254 

2255 

2256 

2257 

2258 

2259 

2260 

2261 

2262 

2263 

2264 



Religion 



PURITAN AND CONGREGATIONAL HISTORY 2276 



MITCHELL, JOHN. A guide to the 
principles and practice of the Congregational churches 
of New England; with a brief history of the 
denomination. Northampton [Mass.]: J. H. Butler, 
1838. 300p. MStuO. + 

MOLLON, CHARLES. "The conflict of ideas 
in colonial New England: being an anthology 
illustrative of orthodox Congregationalism and liberal 
tendencies from the first settlement in the 
Massachusetts Bay Colony to the close of the colonial 
period." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of Paris [France], 
1929. ii, 70p. CtY. 

MOORE, EDWARD C. "Some aspects of our 
Puritan inheritance." Harvard Theological Review, 23 
(July 1930), 181-212. 

MORGAN, EDMUND SEARS. "New England 
Puritanism: another approach." WMQ, 3 ser. 18 (Apr. 
1961), 236-242. 

. "The Puritan's marriage with God." South 

Atlantic Quarterly, 48 (Jan. 1949), 107-112. 



2265 PEW, WILLIAM A. "The spirit of 
Puritanism." EIHC, 67 (Apr. 1931), 137-144. 

2266 POPE, ROBERT GARDNER. The Half-way 
Covenant: church membership in Puritan New England. 
Princeton, N.J.: Princeton Univ. Pr., 1969. xi, 

321p. MWA. -h 

See also next entry. 

2267 . "The Half-way Covenant: church membership in 

the holy commonwealth, 1648-1690." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Yale Univ., 1967. x, 285p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 28, No. lOA (1968), 4101. 

2268 PORTER, NOAH (1811-1892). The New 

England meeting house. New Haven, Conn.: Yale Univ. 
Pr. for Connecticut Tercentenary Commission, 1933. 
34p. MWA. + 

First published as an article in the New Englander 
(May 1883). 

2269 PUNCHARD, GEORGE. History of 
Congregationalism. Salem, Mass.: John P. Jewett, 
1841. 388p. MSaE. -h 



. Visible saints: the history of a Puritan 

idea. N.Y.: New York Univ. Pr., 1963. ix, 159p. 

MB. -I- 

MORISON, SAMUEL ELIOT. "Those 

misunderstood Puritans." Forum, 85 (Mar. 1931), 142- 

147. 

MURDOCK, KENNETH BALLARD. 'The Puritans 
and the New Testament." Colonial Society of 
Massachusetts, Publications, 25 (1922-1924), 239-243. 

THE NEW England Puritans. Sydney V. 

James, ed. N.Y.: Harper & Row, 1968. vi, 169p. 

MBU. -t- 

'THE NEW England way." Congregational 
Vermont, 58 (Jan. 1947), 9-40. 

See also next entry. 

'THE NEW England way." Maine Christian 
Pilgrim, 143 (Jan. 1947), 8-19. 

See also preceding entry. 

PARK, CHARLES EDWARDS. "Excommunication 
in colonial churches." Colonial Society of 
Massachusetts, Publications, 12 (1911), 321-332. 

PEASE, JANE HANNA. "On interpreting 
Puritan history: Williston Walker and the limitations 
of the nineteenth-century view." NEQ, 42 (June 1969), 
232-252. 



2270 THE PURITAN tradition in America, 1620- 

1730. Alden T. Vaughan, ed. Columbia, S.C.: Univ. 
of South Carolina Pr., 1972. 348p. Ct. + 

2271 PURITANISM in early America. George M. 

Waller, ed. Boston: Heath, 1950. x, 115p. Ct. -i- 

2272 THE PURITANS in America: a narrative 
anthology. Alan Heimert and Andrew Delbanco, eds. 
Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard Univ. Pr., 1985. xviii, 
438p. MB. -h 

2273 ROBINSON, LEWIS MILTON. "A history of 

the Half-way Covenant." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of 
Illinois, 1963. iv, 327p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 25, No. 1 (1964), 440. 

2274 ROLPH, REBECCA SEWARD. "Emmanuel 

College, Cambridge, and the Puritan movements of old 
and New England." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of 
Southern California, 1979. 394p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 40, No. 4 A (1972), 2202. 

2275 ROWLEY, WILLIAM E. "The Puritans' tragic 
vision." Yankee, 17 (Sept. 1944), 394-417. 

2276 RUTMAN, DARRETT BRUCE. American 
Puritanism: faith and practice. Philadelphia: J. B. 
Lippincott, 1970. xii, 139p. MStuO. -i- 



109 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



2211 PURITAN AND CONGREGATIONAL HISTORY 



2277 RUTMAN, DARRETT BRUCE. "God's bridge 
falling down: 'another approach' to New England 
Puritanism assayed." WMQ, 3 ser. 19 (July 1962), 408- 
421. 

2278 SAUNDERSON, HENRY HALLAM. Puritan 
principles and American ideals. Boston: Pilgrim Pr., 
1930. xi, 255p. MStuO. + 

2279 SCHIMMELPFENG, HANS. 'The conception of 
church in earliest American Congregationalism, from 
1620-1650." Ph.D. dissertation, Hartford Seminary 
Foundation, 1928. ii, 160p. 

Described in American Puritan Studies, Michael S. 
Montgomery, comp. (1984), 34. 

2280 SCHNEIDER, HERBERT WALLACE. The Puritan 
mind. N.Y.: H. Holt, 1930. 301p. Ct. -i- 

Another ed., 1958. 

2281 SCHULZ, LOUIS. "Social applications of 

the gospel in Congregational churches." S.T.D. 
dissertation. Temple Univ., 1942. ix, 164p. 

Described in American Puritan Studies, Michael S. 
Montgomery, comp. (1984), 66. 

2282 SHIELS, RICHARD DOUGLAS. "The 
feminization of American Congregationalism, 1730- 
1835." American (Quarterly, 33 (Spring 1981), 46-62. 

Coimecticut and Massachusetts. 

2283 SHIPTON, CLIFFORD KENYON. "The New 
England clergy of the 'glacial age.'" Colonial 
Society of Massachusetts, Publications, 32 (Dec. 

1933), 24-54. 

2284 SIMPSON, ALAN. Puritanism in old and New 
England. Chicago: Univ. of Chicago Pr., 1972. vii, 
126p. MStuO. -I- 

2285 SINNOTT, EDMUND WARE. Meetinghouse* 
church in early New England. N.Y.: McGraw-Hill, 

1963. 243p. MWA. 

2286 SMITH, ASA DOIXJE. The Puritan character: 

an address delivered before the New England Society of 
the City of Montreal, December 23, 1857. Montreal: 
Published by the Society, 1858. 36p. DLC. -t- 

2287 SOLBERG, WINTON U. Redeem the time: the 
Puritan Sabbath in early America. Cambridge, Mass.: 
Harvard Univ. Pr., 1977. xii, 406p. MStuO. + 



2288 SPALDING, GEORGE BURLEY. Historical 
discourse delivered on the one hundredth anniversary 
of the Piscataqua Association of ministers, at the 
North Church, Portsmouth, N.H., October 26, 

1881. . .with reminiscences and remarks.... Dover, 

N.H.: Morning Star Job Printing Office, 1881. 83p. 
MBNEH.-t- 

See also entry 2227. 

2289 STARKEY, MARION LENA. The Congregational 
way: the role of the Pilgrims and their heirs in 
shaping America. Garden City, N.Y.: Doubleday, 1966. 
xiii, 342p. MStuO. + 

Primarily a New England study. 

2290 STEARNS, RAYMOND PHINEAS, and DAVID 
HOLMES BRAWNER. "New England church 'relations' and 
continuity in early Congregational history." AASP, 75 
(Apr. 1965), 13-45. 

Conversion experiences. 

2291 STEPHENSON, GEORGE M. The Puritan 
heritage. N.Y.: Macmillan, 1952. 282p. MStuO. -i- 

In American religious life. 

2292 STOUT, HARRY S. II. Puritanism 

considered as a profane movement. Chicago: Newberry 
Library, [1977?]. 25p. NBronSL. -h 

2293 STUDIES in New England Puritanism. 

Winfried Herget, ed. N.Y.: P. Lang, 1983. 235p. 

MBU.-t- 

2294 TENSIONS in American Puritanism. Richard 
Reinitz, comp. N.Y.: Wiley, 1970. xiii, 192p. 

MBU.-k 

2295 THOMAS, ALLEN C. "Puritans and Pilgrims 

as persecutors." Friends Historical Society, Journal 
[U.K.], 13, No. 1 (1916), 37-39. 

2296 TIPSON, BAIRD. "Invisible saints: the 
'judgement of charity' in the early New England 
churches." Church History, 44 (Dec. 1975), 460-471. 

2297 UHDEN, HERMANN FERDINAND. The New 
England theocracy: a history of the 
Congregationalists in New England to the revivals of 

1740.. .. Boston: Gould and Lincoln, 1859. xiv, 

303p. MWA. -H 

Translated from 2d German ed. 

2298 VAN TIL, L. JOHN. Liberty of conscience: 

the history of a Puritan idea. Nutley, N.J.: Craig 
Pr., 1972. vi, 192p. MH. -t- 
In England and New England. See also next entry. 



110 



Religion 



PURITAN AND CONGREGATIONAL HISTORY 2317 



2299 VAN TIL, L. JOHN. "Liberty of 

conscience: the history of a Puritan idea." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Michigan State Univ., 1971. iv, 246p. 
MWalB. 

Abstracted in DAI, 32, No. 6 A (1971), 3232. See 
also preceding entry. 

2300 WALKER, GEORGE LEON. Some aspects of the 
religious life of New England, with special reference 
to the Congregationalists. Lectures delivered on the 
Carew Foundation before the Hartford Theological 
Seminary in 1896. N.Y.: Silver, Burden, 1897. 

208p. MWA. + 

2301 WALKER, WILUSTON. The creeds and 

platforms of Congregationalism. (1893) Philadelphia: 
Pilgrim Pr., 1960. xvi, 604p. MBU. + 

2302 . A history of the Congregational churches in 

the United States. N.Y.: Christian Literature, 1894. 
xiii, 45 Ip. MH. + 

2303 . "Why did not Massachusetts have a Saybrook 

Platform?" Yale Review, 1 (May 1892), 67-86. 

2304 WALSH, JAMES PATRICK. "Holy time and 
sacred space in Puritan New England." American 
Quarterly, 32 (Spring 1980), 79-95. 

2305 WALZER, MICHAEL. "Puritanism as a 
revolutionary ideology." History and Theory, 3, No. 1 
(1962), 59-90. 

2306 WATKINS, HAROLD KEITH. "The 
ecclesiastical contributions of Increase Mather to 
late seventeenth- and early eighteenth-century Puritan 
thought." Th.D. dissertation. Pacific School of 
Religion, 1964. iv, 425p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 25, No. 6 (1964), 3721. 

2307 [WELD, THOMAS.] A brief narration of the 
practices of the churches in New-England. Written in 
private to one that desired information therein; by an 
inhabitant there, a friend to truth and peace: 
published according to order. (1645) London, 1651. 
18p. ClY.+ 

1645 ed. reprinted 1875. 

2308 WELLS, FREDERIC PALMER. A chapter in the 
ecclesiastical history of Haverhill, N.H., and 
Newbury, Vt. Woodsville, N.H.: News Print, 1906. 
13p. VtU. -H 

Congregational. 



2309 WENDELL, BARRETT. "Some neglected 
characteristics of the New England Puritans." 

American Historical Association, Annual Report (1891), 
245-253. 

2310 WHITE, JOHN (1677-1760). New England's 
lamentations under these three heads: the decay of 
the power of godliness; the danger of arminian 
principles; the declining state of our church-order, 
government and disciplines. With the means of these 
declensions, and the methods of our recovery.... 

Boston: Printed and Sold by T. Fleet, 1734. Var. p. 

Ct. + 

23 1 1 WILLSON, LAWRENCE. "The gods of New 
England." Pacific Spectator, 9 (Winter 1955), MI- 
MS. 

Puritan and Congregational history. 

2312 WINSLOW, OLA ELIZABETH. Meetinghouse 

hill, 1630-1783. N.Y.: Macmillan, 1952. 344p. MWA 
+ 

New England church history. 

2313 WINTHROP, JOHN, SR. (1588-1649). A short 
history of the rise, reign, and ruin of the 
antinomians, familists, and libertines that infected 
the churches of New-England, and how they were 
confuted by the assembly of ministers there; as also 
of the magistrates proceedings against them. Together 
with God's strange remarkable judgements from heaven 
upon some of the chief fomenters of those opinions; 
and the lamentable death of Mrs. Hutchinson.... 

London; Printed for Tho. Parkhurst, 1692. 64p. 

MBU.-t- 

2314 WISE, JOHN. A vindication of the 

government of New-England churches.... (1717) Perry 
Miller, ed. Gainesville, Fla.: Scholars' Facsimilies 
& Reprints, 1958. xvii, 105p. MH. -i- 

2315 WORCESTER, SAMUEL MELANCHTON. New 
England's glory and crown: a discourse delivered at 
Plymouth, Mass., Dec. 22, 1848. 2d ed. Boston: T. 

R. Marvin, 1849. 56p. MBNEH. -i- 

2316 WORTHLEY, HAROLD FIELD. "The colonial 
diaconate: an example of the allocation and exercise 
of authority in the particular churches of New 
England." Unitarian Historical Society, Proceedings, 

12, No. 2 (1959), 27-52. 

2317 YOUNG, EDWARD JAMES. The early religious 
customs of New England: an address at the two 
hundredth aimiversary of the building of the meeting- 
house in Hingham, Mass. August 8, 1881. Cambridge 
[Mass.]: J. Wilson and Son, 1882. 17p. MWA. + 



111 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



23 1 8 PURITAN AND CONGREGATIONAL HISTORY 



2318 YOUNG, RALPH F. "Good news from New 
England: the influence of the New England way of 
church polity on old England, 1635-1660." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Michigan State Univ., 1971. iv, 196p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 32, No. 6 A (1971), 3236. 

2319 ZIFF, LARZER. Puritanism in America: 

new culture in a new world. N.Y.: Viking Pr., 1973. 
xiv, 338p. Ct. + 

2320 ZIMMERMAN, PHILIP DOUGLAS. "The Lord’s 
supper in early New England: the setting and the 
service." DubSemPr (1979), 124-134. 

SEE "Churches, Congregational" and "Puritans" in Index 
for additional listings. 



OTHER REUGIOUS GROUPS 

2321 ALPHONSE, ALFORD WESLEY. "The impact of 
the ethnic minority local church strategy on the 
Southern New England Conference: an evaluation, 1981 
to 1985." D. Min. dissertation, Boston Univ., 1987. 

V, 119, 25p. 

United Methodist Church. 

2322 AN AMERICAN reformation: a documentary 

history of Unitarian Christianity. Sydney E. Ahlstrom 
and Jonathan S. Carey, eds. Middletown, Conn.: 
Wesleyan Univ. Pr., 1985. 493p. MB. -t- 

2323 ANDERSON, PHILIP JAMES. "Presbyterianism 

and the gathered churches in old and New England, 1640- 
1662: the struggle for church govermnent in theory 
and practice." D.Phil. dissertation, Univ. of Oxford 
[U.K.], 1979. 6, vii, 324p. 

Described in American Puritan Studies, Michael S. 
Montgomery, comp. (1984), 307. 

2324 ANDREWS, EDWARD DEMING. 'The Shakers in 
New England." NEG, 2 (Summer 1960), 3-10. 

2325 ANGLICAN apologetic in colonial New 
England: rare tracts defending the polity, theology, 
and liturgy of the Church of England before and during 
the Revolution. Kenneth Walter Cameron, ed. 

Hartford, Conn.: Transcendental Books, 1984. 250p. 
Ct. -H 

2326 AUGUSTANA EVANGEUCAL LUTHERAN CHURCH. 
NEW ENGLAND CONFERENCE. 50 years in New 
England: a history of the New England Conference, 
1912-1962. Luther E. Lindberg, ed. n.p., [1962?]. 
xvii, 314p. MBU. -i- 



2327 BACKUS, ISAAC. A history of New-England, 
with particular reference to the denomination of 
Christians called Baptists. Collected from the most 
authentic records and writings, both ancient and 
modem. (1777) Newton, Mass.: Backus Historical 
Society, 1871. 2v. MWA. + 

Reprinted 1969. Other eds. 

2328 BAKER, GEORGE CLAUDE, JR. An 

introduction to the history of New England Methodism, 
1789-1839. Durham, N.C.: Duke Univ. Pr., 1941. 
145p. MWA. 

Reprinted 1969. 

2329 BAXTER, NORMAN ALLEN. "History of the 
Freewill Baptists: a study in New England 
separatism." Ph.D. dissertation. Harvard Univ., 1954. 
iii, 283p. 

See also next entry. 

2330 . History of the Freewill Baptists: a study in 

New England separatism. Rochester, N.Y.: American 
Baptist Historical Society, 1957. xii, 212p. MStuO. 

-I- 

See also preceding entry. 

2331 BEASLEY, NORMAN. The cross and the 

crown: the history of Christian Science. London: G. 
Allen & Unwin, 1953. 502p. MBU. -i- 

2332 BISHOP, GEORGE. New-England judged, by 
the spirit of the Lord. In two parts. First, 
containing a brief relation of the sufferings of the 
people call'd (Quakers in New-England, from the time of 
their first arrival there, in the year 1656, to the 

year 1660.... In answer to the declaration of their 
persecutors apologizing for the same MDCLIX. Second 
part, being a farther relation of the cruel and bloody 
sufferings of the people call'd Quakers in New- 
England, continued from anno 1660 to anno 1665. 
Begiiuiing with the sufferings of William Leddra, whom 
they put to death.... London: T. Sowle, 1703. 498, 
212p. Ct. -(- 

2333 BLAIKIE, ALEXANDER. History of 
Presbyterianism in New England: its introduction, 
growth, decay, revival and present mission. Boston: 
Alexander Moore, 1881. 2v. MW. -i- 

2334 BOSTON, WALTER M., JR. "A study of 
Presbyterianism in colonial New England." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Michigan State Univ., 1972. viii, 232p. 
Ct. 

Abstracted in DAI, 33, No. IIA (1973), 6265. 



112 



2335 

2336 

2337 

2338 

2339 

2340 

2341 

2342 

2343 

2344 

2345 

2346 



Religion 



OTHER REUGIOUS GROUPS 2356 



BRASSARD, GERARD. The Roman Catholic 
Church in the United States of America: armorial of 
the American hierarchy. Volume II. The New England 
states: the ecclesiastical provinces of Boston and 
Hartford. Worcester, Mass.: Stobbs Pr., 1956. xii, 

149p. DEC. + 

The Congregational theologican (lived 1721-1803) 
served churches in Great Barrington, Mass., and 
Newport during a long ministerial career. 

BREWER, PRISCILLA JOAN. "Emerson, Lane, 
and the Shakers: a case study of converging 
ideologies." NEQ, 55 (June 1982), 254-275. 

Ralph Waldo Emerson and Charles Lane. 

. Shaker communities. Shaker lives. Hanover, 

N.H.: Univ. Pr. of New England, 1986. 288p. MB. -t- 
In New England and eastern New York. 

BRUSH, JOHN W. "Writing histories of 
three New England churches." Baptist History and 
Heritage, 2 (Jan. 1967), 41-45. 

BURRAGE, HENRY S. History of the 
Baptists in New England. Philadelphia: American 
Baptist Publication Society, 1894. 317p. VtHi. -t- 

CADBURY, HENRY JOEL. "From separation to 
union among New England Friends." American Friend 
(Sept. 13, 1945), 85-88. 

CAMERON, KENNETH WALTER. Colonial 
Anglicanism in New England: a guide. Hartford, 

Conn.: Transcendental Books, 1984. 47, 80, 89p. 

Ct. + 

CHESTNUT, PAUL IVAR. "The Universalist 
movement in America, 1770-1803." Ph.D. dissertation, 

Duke Univ., 1973. ix, 275p. MH. 

In New England, New York, and Pennsylvania. 

Abstracted in DAI, 34, No. 12A (1974), 7672. 

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE PUBUSHING SOCIETY. A 
century of Christian Science healing. Boston, 1966. 2355 

X, 256p. MBU. + 

CONNOLLY, DONALD F. X. "A chronology of 
New England Catholicism before the Mayflower landing." 
American Catholic Historical Society of Philadelphia, 2356 
Records, 70 (Mar. 1959), 3-17; (Dec. 1959), 88-108. 

COOKE, GEORGE WILLIS. "Unitarianism in 
America." NEM, n.s. 22 (May 19(X)), 317-337. 

CRAWFORD, GEORGE ARTEMAS. Centennial of 
New England Methodism. Boston: Crawford Brothers, 

1891. 562p. MB. -h 



CROCKER, ZEBULON. The catastrophe of the 
Presbyterian church, in 1837, including a full view of 
the recent controversies in New England. New Haven, 
Conn.: B. & W. Noyes, 1838. xii, 300p. Ct. + 

CROTEAU, FERNAND. The establishment of 
Catholic churches in New England. Manchester, N.H.: 
Croteau, 1977. [35]p. Ct. + 

DAVIS, DAVID BRION. "The New England 

origins of Mormonism." NEQ, 26 (June 1953), 147-168. 

De GOESBRIAND, LOUIS BISHOP. Catholic 
memories of Vermont and New Hampshire; with sketches 
of the lives of Rev. Wm. Henry Hoyt and Fanny Allen, 
also with accounts heretofore unpublished of the lives 
of Rev. Daniel Barber, Rev. Horace Barber, S.J., and 
Jerush Barber, named in religion Sister Mary Augustin; 
also with many of their letters. Burlington, Vt.: 

Pr. of R. E. Styles, 1886. 166p. NhHi. + 

DeNORMANDIE, J. "Some early religious 
matters at the Piscataqua." MHSP 2 ser. 16 (May 
1902), 175-181. 

Anglican. 

ELIOT, FREDERICK MAY. "Tensions in 
Unitarianism a hundred years ago." Unitarian 
Historical Society, Proceedings, 8, No. 1 (1947), 1- 
16. 

ETHOS of Anglicanism in colonial New 
England and New York: gleanings from the S.P.G. 
abstracts (1704-1785) concerning the Church of England 
in the northern plantations and nearby areas. Kenneth 
Walter Cameron, comp. Hartford: Transcendental 
Books, 1981. 202, [6]p. Ct. -i- 

FTTTON, JAMES. Sketches of the 

establishment of the church in New England. Boston: 

Patrick Donahoe, 1872. 340p. MWA. + 

Roman Catholic. 

FREEMAN, CHARLES. "Historical sketch of 
Presbyterianism in the State of Maine, with some 
account of Presbyterianism in New England." New 
Hampshire Repository, 1 (1845-1846), 253-263. 

GADT, JEANETTE CARTER. 'Women and 
Protestant culture: the Quaker dissent from 
Puritanism." Ph.D. dissertation, UCLA, 1974. x, 

336p. MWalB. 

Abstracted in DAI, 35, No. 5A (1974), 1591. 



2347 

2348 

2349 

2350 

2351 

2352 

2353 

2354 



113 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



2357 

2357 

2358 

2359 

2360 

2361 

2362 

2363 

2364 

2365 

2366 

2367 



OTHER REUGIOUS GROUPS 



GOODWIN, DANIEL. "Founding of the church 
in New England, outside Connecticut." Church 
Historical Society, Proceedings, Part 2 (1916), 88- 
111 . 

Episcopal. 

GOTTSCHALK, STEPHEN. The emergence of 
Christian Science in American religious life. 

Berkeley, Calif.: Univ. of California Pr., 1973. 
xxix, 305p. MBU. + 

HANKINS, JEAN F. "A different kind of 

Loyalist: the Sandemanians of New England during the 

Revolutionary War." NEQ, 60 (June 1987), 223-249. 

HISTORY of the Catholic Church in the New 
England states. Boston: Hurd & Everts, 1899. 2v. 
MChB. -I- 

Authors: William Byrne, William A. Leahy, James H. 
O’Donnell, John E. Finen, J. J. McCoy, A. Dowling, 
Edmund J. A. Young, and John S. Michaud. 

HUCH, RONALD K. "James Gillespie Bimey 
and the New England Friends." Kentucky Historical 
Society, Register, 67 (Oct. 1969), 350-359. 

HUMPHREY, DAVID C. "Anglican 
’infiltration’ of eighteenth century Harvard and 
Yale." Historical Magazine of the Protestant 
Episcopal Church, 43 (Sept. 1974), 247-251. 

JOHNSEN, THOMAS CHRISTOPHER. "Christian 
Science and the Puritan tradition." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Johns Hopkins Univ., 1983. 373p. 
Abstracted in DAI, 44, No. 4A (1983), 1179. 

JOHNSON, CLIFTON. "The passing of the 
Shakers." OTNE, 25 (July 1934), 3-19; (Oct. 1934), 50- 
66 . 

JONES, MARY HOXIE. The standard of the 
Lord lifted up: a history of Friends in New England 
from 1656-1700. n.p., 1961. 161p. MWA. -t- 

KANTROW, ALAN MITCHELL. "Anglican 
custom, American consciousness." NEQ, 51 (Sept. 

1979), 307-325. 

Contributions of New England Anglicanism to American 
consciousness. See also next entry. 

. "Jacob’s ladder: Anglican traditionalism in 

the New England mind." Ph.D. dissertation. Harvard 
Univ., 1979. vi, 288p. 

See also preceding entry. 



2368 KNIGHT, RICHARD. History of the General 

or Six Principle Baptists, in Europe and America: in 
two parts. Providence, R.I.: Smith and Parmenter, 

1827. 367p. MStuO. + 

The early American churches were primarily in New 
England. 

2369 "LETTERS on the introduction and progress 

of Unitarianism in New England." Spirit of the 
Pilgrims, 2 (Feb. 1829), 65-70; (Mar. 1829), 121-128; 
(Apr. 1829), 177-185; (June 1829), 289-298; (Sept. 
1829), 469-480; 3 (Mar. 1830), 113-125; (Aug. 1830), 
393-404; (Oct. 1830), 503-511; 4 (Feb. 1831), 61-67. 

2370 LOETSCHER, FREDERICK W. "Presbyterianism 
in colonial New England." Presbyterian Historical 
Society, Journal, 11 (June-Sept. 1921), 73-83; (Sept.- 
Dee. 1921), 97-118. 

See also next entry. 

2371 McCLURKIN, PAUL THEODORE. 

"Presbyterianism in colonial New England." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Hartford Seminary Foundation, 1939. ix, 
297p. 

Described in American Puritan Studies, Michael S. 
Montgomery, comp. (1984), 58-59. 

2372 . "Presbyterianism in New England 

Congregationalism." Presbyterian Historical Society, 
Journal, 31 (Dec. 1953), 242-246; 32 (June 1954), 109- 
114. 

See also preceding entry. 

2373 McLOUGHUN, WILLIAM GERALD. ’The first 
Calvinistic Baptist association in New England, 1754?- 
1767." Church History, 36 (Dec. 1967), 410-418. 

Six Principle Calvinistic Baptist Association, in 
southern New England. 

2374 . New England dissent, 1630-1833: the Baptists 

and the separation of church and state. Cambridge, 
Mass.: Harvard Univ. Pr., 1971. 2v. MStuO. -t- 

See also entry 1854. 

2375 McNamara, Robert F. ’Tmsteeism in the 
Atlantic states." Catholic Historical Review, 30 
(July 1944), 135-154. 

2376 MANSFIELD, JOHN H. "New England dissent, 
1630-1833: the Baptists and the separation of church 
and state." American Journal of Legal History, 17 
(Apr. 1973), 185-201. 

See also entry 2374. 



114 



Religion 



OTHER RELIGIOUS GROUPS 2394 



2377 MARSHALL, FRANK W„ JR. "The church on 
the border; Colebrook, N.H., Canaan, Vt., and 
Hereford, P.Q." New Hampshire Churchman, 2 (Dec. 

1949), 13, 15. 

Episcopal. 

2378 MARSHALL, MARY. A portraiture of 
Shakerism, exhibiting a general view of their 
character and conduct, from the first appearance of 
Arm Lee in New-England, down to the present time.... 
Concord, N.H., 1822. 446p. NhD. + 

2379 MEKEEL, ARTHUR J. "Free Quaker movement 

in New England during the American Revolution." 

Friends' Historical Association, Bulletin, 27 (Autumn 
1938), 72-82. 

2380 MEMORIALS of deceased Friends: of New 

England Yearly Meeting. Published by the Meeting for 
Sufferings, 1841. Providence, R.I.; Knowles & Vose, 
1841. viii, 96p. RHi. + 

2381 MILLER, RUSSELL E. The larger hope: the 

first century of the Universalist Church in America, 
1770-1870. Boston: Unitarian Universalist 
Association, 1979. xxvii, 1009p. MStuO. -i- 
Strong New England emphasis. 

2382 MONROSS, WILUAM WILSON. "Alexander 
Viets Griswold and the Eastern Diocese." Historical 
Magazine of the Protestant Episcopal Church, 4 (Mar. 
1935), 13-25. 

The Episcopal diocese, established in 1810, 
consisted of churches in Massachusetts, New Hampshire, 
Rhode Island, and Vermont. 

2383 MORGAN, JOHN H. "The Baptist-Shaker 
encounter in New England: a study in religious 
confrontation in eighteenth-century America." Shaker 
Quarterly, 12 (1972), 83-94, 152-163; 13 (1973), 27- 
32. 

2384 MORI ARTY, G. ANDREWS. The New England 
Huguenots. Reprinted from the Proceedings of the 
Huguenot Society of London, Vol. XUI, No. 6. London: 
Printed by Spottswoode, Ballantyne, 1929. 5p. RHi. -i- 

2385 MUDGE, JAMES. History of the New England 
Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 1796- 
1910. Boston; Published by the Conference, 1910. 

481p. MW A. -t- 

2386 NEW England Methodism: the story of the 

New England Convention of Methodist Men, held in 
Tremont Temple, Boston, Mass., November 11-13, 1914. 
E. C. E. Dorion, ed. N.Y.: Methodist Book Concern, 
1915. 158p. MBU. -(- 



2387 NEW England (^akerism illustrated, or 

facts relative to the expulsion of Adam Anthony from 
the Society of Friends. North Providence, R.I., 1843. 
71p. MWA. + 

2388 NEW-England's faction discovered; or, a 

brief and true account of their persecution of the 
Church of England. Being an answer to a pamphlet 
entitled News from New England &c. London: Printed 
for J. Hindmarsh, 1690. 19p. DLC. -i- 

See also entry 555. 

2389 NORMENT, OWEN L., JR. "Chauncy, Gordon, 

and Ferre: sovereign love and universal salvation in 
the New England tradition." Harvard Theological 
Review, 72 (July-Oct. 1979), 285-304. 

Charles Chauncy, George A. Gordon, Nals Ferre, and 
Universalism in the late- 18th and early- 19th 
centuries. 

2390 [NORTON, HUMPHREY.] New-England's 
ensigne: it being the account of cruelty, the 
professors pride, and the article of their faith; 
signified in characters written in blood, wickedly 
begun, barbarously continued, and inhumanly 
finished. ..by the present power of darkness possest in 
the priests and rulers in New-England, with the Dutch 
also inhabiting the same land.... This being an 
account of the sufferings sustained by us in New- 
England (with the Dutch) the most part of it in these 
two last years, 1657, 1658. With a letter to lohn 
Indicot, and lohn Norton, governor, and chief priest 
of Boston, and another to the town of Boston. Also, 
the several late conditions of a friend upon Road- 
Iland.... Written at sea, by us whom the wicked in 
scorn calls Quakers, in the second month of the yeer 
1659. This being a confirmation of so much as Francis 
Howgill published in his book titled. The Popish 
inquisition newly erected in New-England. London: 
Printed by T. L. for G. Calvert, 1659. 120p. CtY. + 

2391 "ORIGINAL Shaker communities in New 
England." NEM, n.s. 22 (May 1900), 303-309. 

2392 PAINTER, BORDON W., JR. "The vestry in 
colonial New England." Historical Magazine of the 
Protestant Episcopal Church, 44 (Dec. 1975), 381-408. 

2393 PEEL, ROBERT. Christian Science; its 
encounter with American culture. N.Y.: Holt, 

Rinehart and Winston, 1958. xiv, 239p. MBU. + 

2394 PERCY, DAVID ORAN. "The Anglican 
interest in early eighteenth-century New England: a 
political analysis." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of 
Nebraska, 1973. 238p. M. 

Abstracted in DAI, 34, No. 12A (1974), 7687. 



115 



2395 

2395 

2396 

2397 

2398 

2399 

2400 

2401 

2402 

2403 

2404 

2405 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



OTHER REUGIOUS GROUPS 



PETTTNGILL, CHARLES I. Quakerism in the 
Piscataqua: a historical address delivered before the 
Piscataqua Pioneers at Exeter, New Hampshire, August 
7, 1945. n.p., [1945?]. 31p. NhHi. + 

POPE, EARL A. New England Calvinism and 
the disruption of the Presbyterian Church. N.Y.: 
Garland, 1987. ii, 488p. MBU. + 

REEVES, THOMAS C. "John Checkley and the 
emergence of the Episcopal Church in New England." 
Historical Magazine of the Protestant Episcopal 
Church, 34 (Dec. 1965), 349-360. 

Lived 1680-1722. 

RILEY, ARTHUR JOSEPH. "Catholicism and 
the New England mind." Colonial Society of 
Massachusetts, Publications, 34 (Dec. 1940), 389-399. 
I.e., anti-Catholicism. 

. Catholicism in New England to 1788. 

Washington, D.C.: Catholic Univ. of America, 1936. 
ix, 479p. MWA. -(- 

Published Ph.D. dissertation (Catholic Univ. of 
America, 1936). 

ROBINSON, DAVID. The Unitarians and the 
Universalists. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Pr., 1985. 
xiii, 368p. MB. + 

Includes strong New England content. 

SANFIUPPO, MARY HELENA. "The New 
England Transcendentalists' opinions of the Catholic 
Church." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of Notre Dame, 
1972. 339p. MH. 

Abstracted in DAI, 33, No. 4 A (1972), 1660. 



2406 STARBUCK, DAVID R. "The Shaker concept 

of household." Man in the Northeast, No. 28 (Fall 
1984), 73-86. 

2407 STEINER, BRUCE E. "New England 
Anglicanism: a genteel faith?" WMQ, 3 ser. 27 (Jan. 
1970), 122-135. 

2408 STEWART, ISAAC DALTON. The history of 
the Freewill Baptists for half a century, with an 
introductory chapter. Volume I: from the year 1780 
to 1830. Dover [N.H.j: Freewill Baptists Print. 
Establishment, 1862. xii, 479p. MeU. -t- 

Primarily New England. 

2409 STILLMAN, KARL G. Seventh Day Baptists 

in New England, 1671-1971. n.p.: [New England 
Seventh Day Baptist Churches and the Seventh Day 
Baptist Historical Society, 1971]. [14]p. CtMy. + 

2410 A STREAM of light: a sesquicentennial 

history of American Unitarianism. Conrad Wright, ed. 
Boston: Unitarian Universalist Association, 1975. 
vii, 178p. MStuO. ■+■ 

2411 TALBOT, MICAH J. The making of the New 
England Southern Conference: a sermon delivered at 
the 61st session of the conference at New London, 
Conn., April 15, 1905. In commemoration of sixty 
years membership in that body, n.p., n.d. 14p. RHi. 

-I- 

Methodist. 

24 1 2 TRINTERUD, LEONARD J. "The New England 
contribution to colonial American Presbyterianism." 
Church History, 17 (Mar. 1948), 32-43. 



SMITH, CUFFORD PEABODY. Historical 2413 

sketches, from the life of Mary Baker Eddy and the 
history of Christian Science. Boston: Christian 
Science Publishing Society, 1941. ix, 268p. MBU. -i- 

2414 

SOUVENIR history of the East District, 

New England Conference.... William Albert Thurston, 
ed. Boston: Pr. of Lounsbery, Nichols & Worth, 1896. 

222p. MBU. 2415 
Methodist. 

SOUVENIR history of the New England 

Southern Conference.... Rennetts C. Miller, ed. 2416 

Nantasket, Mass.: Reimetts C. Miller, 1897. 3v. 

MBU. -H 
Methodist. 



. "Presbyterianism in colonial New England." 

Presbyterian Historical Society, Journal, 27 (Mar. 

1949), 1-20. 

UNIVERSALISM in America: a documentary 
history. Ernest Cassara, ed. Boston: Beacon Pr., 

1971. xi, 290p. MStuO. -i- 

WALKER, WILLISTON. "The Sandemanians of 

New England." American Historical Association, Annual 

Report (1901), 133-161. 

WILBUR, EARL MORSE. Our Unitarian 
heritage: an introduction to the history of the 
Unitarian movement. Boston: Beacon Pr., 1925. xiii, 
495p. MStuO. + 



SPINI, GIORGIO. "On Yankees and Seventh- 
Day Adventists." Storia Nordamericana [Italy], 1 
(1984), 141-145. 



116 



Religion 



OTHER RELIGIOUS GROUPS 2426 



2417 WILLAUER, G. J.. JR. "First publishers 

of truth in New England; a composite list, 1656- 
1775." Quaker History, 65 (Spring 1976), 35-44. 
"Public Friends" who ministered in New England. 

2418 . "New England Friends record the visits of 

ministers." Quaker History, 63 (Autumn 1973), 

118. 

2419 WOOD, JEROME H., JR. "For truth and 
reputation: the New England Friends' dispute with 
Isaac Backus." NEQ, 50 (Sept. 1976), 458-483. 

2420 WOODARD, CLIFFORD A. "Recent growth of 
Christian Science in New England." NEM, n.s. 51 
(Sept. 1914), 57-66. 

2421 WORRALL, ARTHUR JOHN. "The impact of the 
Discipline: Ireland, New England and New York." 
Quaker History, 68 (Autumn 1979), 83-91. 

Late- 18th-century reforms in Quakerism. 

2422 . "New England Quakerism, 1656-1830." Ph.D. 

dissertation, Indiana Univ., 1969. x, 234p. RHi. 

Abstracted in DAI, 30, No. 5A (1969), 1972. See 
also next entry. 



2423 . Quakers in the colonial Northeast. Hanover, 

N.H.: Univ. Pr. of New England, 1980. x, 238 p. 
MStuO. + 

New England and New York. See also preceding entry 

2424 WRIGHT, CONRAD. The beginnings of 
Unitarianism in America. Boston: Starr King Pr., 
1955. 305p. MStuO. -h 

2425 . The liberal Christians; essays on American 

Unitarian history. Boston: Beacon Pr., 1970. 147p. 
MStuO. -t- 

Another ed., 1980. 

2426 ZION RESEARCH FOUNDATION. The history of 
the Christian Science movement, by contemporary 
authors, written for and edited at the request of Mary 
Beecher Longyear. Brookline, Mass., 1926. 2v. 
MBU. -I- 

SEE "Churches" and specific types of churches 
for additional listings. 



117 



Education 



GENERAL 



2427 AMON, MARIE CELINE. "Influence of 
political philosophy on education in seventeenth- 
century New England." Ph.D. dissertation, St. Louis 
Univ., 1955. iv, 364p. 

Described in American Puritan Studies, Michael S. 
Montgomery, comp. (1984), 95. 

2428 AXTELL, JAMES. The school upon a hill: 
education and society in colonial New England. New 
Haven, Corm.: Yale Univ. Pr., 1974. xxi, 298p. 
MWA. -I- 

2429 BUTLER, VERA MINNIE. Education as 

revealed by New England newspapers prior to 1850. 
[Philadelphia: Majestic Pr.], 1935. ix, 503p. MWA. 

-t- 

Published Ed.D. dissertation (Temple Univ., 1935). 

2430 CASSIDY, IVAN. "The Calvinist tradition 

in education in France, Scotland and New England 
during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries." 

Ph.D. dissertation. Queens Univ. of Belfast [U.K.], 
1966. 340p. 

Described in American Puritan Studies, Michael S. 
Montgomery, comp. (1984), 152. 



2431 CRAWFORD, JOHN OLIVER. "The impact of 
Puritanism on education." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. 
of Colorado, 1956. 172p. 

In England and New England. Abstracted in DAI, 17, 
No. 10 (1957), 2259. 

2432 DAVIS, LEROY ALTON. "A comparative 
investigation of certain similarities of educational 
concern between New England Puritanism and the 
proposals for national systems of education in the 
eighteenth century." Ph.D. dissertation, Ohio Univ., 
1973. X, 331p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 34, No. 5 A (1973), 2350. 

2433 DENENBERG, DENNIS. "The missing link: 

New England's influence on early national educational 
policies." NEQ, 52 (June 1979), 219-233. 

2434 DOWNS, ROBERT BINGHAM. Henry Barnard. 
Boston: Twayne Publishers, 1977. 138p. RHi. -i- 

Educational reformer (lived 1811-1900). 

2435 FRENCH, FRANCIS ORMOND. Exeter and 
Harvard eighty years ago: journals and letters of F. 

O. French. Amos Tuck French, ed. Chester, N.H.: 
Priv. Print., 1932. 174p. VtU. + 



+ Listings in the National Union Catalog for books and pamphlets marked 
with this symbol may include additional library locations. 



118 



Education 



ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY 2453 



2436 GOODMAN, DAVID MICHAEL. "The American 
Institute of Instruction and the contours of 
educational association and reform in New England, 
1830-1918." Ph.D. dissertation, Clark Univ., 1972. 
276p. 

"One of the earliest educational associational 
reforms of Horace Mann." Abstracted in DAI, 33, No. 

6A (1972), 2859. 

2437 HEDDON, BEATRIC C. "Early New England 
education." Early American Life, 3 (Jan. -Feb. 1972), 
30-33. 

2438 HENRY Barnard: American educator. 

Vincent P. Larmie, ed. N.Y.: Teachers College Pr., 

1974. X, 158p. MWA. -i- 

2439 HINER,N. RAY. "The cry of Sodom 

enquired into: educational analysis in seventeenth- 
century New England." History of Education Quarterly, 
13 (Spring 1973), 3-22. 

2440 JENKINS, RALPH C. "Henry Barnard, 
progressive educator of teachers." Ph.D. 
dissertation, New York Univ., 1937. 

2441 KLAIN, ZORA. Educational activities of 

New England (Quakers: a source book. Philadelphia: 
Westbrook Publishing, 1928. xiii, 228p. MWA. -h 

2442 LOmCH, KENNETH VERNE. New England 
transplanted: a study of the development of 
educational and other cultural agencies in the 
Connecticut Western Reserve in their educational and 
philosophical setting. Dallas, Tex.: Royal Pub., 

1964. 314p. MChB. -h 

In Ohio. 

2443 MATTINGLY, PAUL HAVEY. "Educational 
revivals in ante-bellum New England." History of 
Education Quarterly, 11 (Spring 1971), 39-71. 

"During the 1840s and 1850s the transformation of 
school keepers into a professional corps of educators 
hinged more on the efficiency of contemporary 
revivalist strategies than on any conception of 
scholarship or systematic pedagogy." 

2444 . "Professional strategies and New England 

educators, 1825-1860." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of 
Wisconsin, 1968. 283p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 29, No. 12A (1969), 4434. 

2445 MIDDLEKAUFF, ROBERT LAWRENCE. "A 
persistent tradition: the classical curriculum in 
eighteenth-century New England." WMQ, 3 ser. 18 (Jan. 
1961), 54-67. 



2446 MORRIS, RICHARD K. "Parnassus on wheels: 

a biographical sketch of Henry Barnard, 1811-1900." 
Trinity College Library Gazette, No. 2 (Feb. 1955), 3- 
11 . 

2447 NEW ENGLAND ASSOCIATION OF SCHOOLS AND 
COLLEGES. The first hundred years, 1885-1985: New 
England Association of Schools and Colleges. Patricia 
A. Moore, ed. Winchester, Mass.: New England 
Association of Schools and Colleges, 1986. x, 235p. 
MH.+ 

2448 PIONEERS of women's education in the 

United States: Emma Willard, Catharine Beecher, Mary 
Lyon. Willystine Goodsell, ed. N.Y.: McGraw-Hill, 
1931. viii, 311p. CtY. -H 

2449 PRESTON, JO ANNE. "Feminization of an 
occupation: teaching becomes women's work in 
nineteenth-century New England." Ph.D. dissertation, 
Brandeis Univ., 1982. 155p. Ct. 

Abstracted in DAI, 43, No. 6A (1982), 21 15. 



ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY 

2450 BALAZS, JANIE SACKS. "The demise of open 
education: a case study of the public elementary 
schools in a suburban New England town." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Univ. of Connecticut, 1986. 344p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 47, No. 5A (1986), 1600-1601. 

2451 BALLOU, RICHARD BOYD. "The grammar 
schools in seventeenth-century colonial America: a 
study of the grammar schools in New England, New 
Amsterdam, New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and 
Maryland; with special reference to the ideas which 
led to their establishment and influenced their early 
history." Ed.D. dissertation. Harvard Univ., 1940. 
viii, 433p. 

Described in American Puritan Studies, Michael S. 
Montgomery, comp. (1984), 59. 

2452 BARNARD, HENRY. Biographical sketch of 
Ezekiel Cheever; with notes on the free schools and 
early school-books of New England. [Hartford, Conn., 
1856.] 32p. MSaE. 

Lived 1614-1708. 

2453 BICKNELL, THOMAS WILLIAMS. "Early 
education in New England: free common schools." 
Magazine of New England History, 2 (July 1892), 149- 
164. 



119 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



2454 

2454 

2455 

2456 

2457 

2458 

2459 

2460 

2461 

2462 

2463 

2464 



ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY 



BROWN. MARY ELIZABETH ADAMS, and HELEN 
GILMAN BROWN. The story of John Adams, a New Eng- 
land schoolmaster. By M.E.B. and H.G.B. N.Y.: Charles 
Scribner's Sons. 1900. 275p. CtNhHi. + 

Longtime principal of Phillips Academy. Andover. 

Mass., who previously served at several private 
schools in Connecticut (lived 1772-1863). 

[BURTON. WARREN.] The district school as 
it was. By one who went to it. (1833) Rev. ed. 

Boston: Phillips. Sampson. 1850. x. 206p. MStuO. + 2467 

In New England. Other eds. 

BUSH. GEORGE GARY. The first common 
schools of New England." New Englander. 44 (Mar. 

1885). 214-226; (May 1885). 330-343. 2468 

'THE DAME school." OTNE. 25 (Jan. 1935). 

103-106. 



FENNELLY. CATHERINE M. Town schooling in 
early New England. 1790-1840. Sturbridge. Mass.: Old 
Sturbridge Village. 1962. 40p. MStuO. + 

FUESS. CLAUDE MOORE. "The development of 

the New England academies." Yankee. 4 (May 1938). 22- 2470 

25. 45; (June 1938). 23-24. 29; (July 1938). 23. 29. 

31; (Aug. 1938). 632-638. 

. "The old New England academy." NEG. 2 (Summer 

1960). 11-19. 

GALE. ANNA D. "Glimpses of Margaret 
Fuller: the Green Street School and Florence." NEQ. 

29 (Mar. 1956). 87-98. 

Providence. R.I.. and Florence. Mass. (1838-1839). 

Edward A. Hoyt and Loriman S. Brigham, eds. 

GRIZZELL. EMIT DUNCAN. Origin and 
development of the high school in New England before 
1865. Philadelphia. 1929. xv. 428p. MW A. -i- 2473 

See also next entry. 

. "Origin and development of the high school in 

New England before 1865." Ph.D. dissertation. Univ. 2474 
of Permsylvania. 1922. MAC. 

See also preceding entry. 

2475 

HAMMOND. CHARLES. New England academies 
and classical schools, with sketches of Phillips 
Academy. Andover. Lawrence Academy. Groton, and Monson 
Academy. From the twenty-ninth annual report of the 
Massachusetts Board of Education. Boston: Wright & 

Potter. 1877. 64p. MB. -t- 

2477 



HILL. AMELIA LEAVITT. "A glimpse at 
colonial schools." NEM. n.s. 18 (June 1898). 446-451. 
New England. 

JACKSON. SIDNEY LOUIS. America's 
struggle for free schools: social tension and 
education in New England and New York. 1827-42. 

(1941) N.Y.: Russell & Russell. 1965. viii. 276p. 
MStuO. -t- 

JERNEGAN. MARCUS WILSON. "Compulsory 
education in the American colonies." School Review. 

26 (Dec. 1968). 731-749. 

New England. 

JOHNSON. CLIFTON. The country school in 
New England. N.Y.: D. Appleton. 1893. vi. 102p. 

MStuO. -I- 

KIDGER. HORACE. "The New England History 
Teachers' Association." New England Social Studies 
Bulletin. 4 (Nov. 1946). [3-4]. 

See also this author's article of same title in 
ibid.. 7 (Dec. 1949). [3-5]. 

LITTLE. WILLIAM J. "Education of New 

England apprentices during the colonial period. 1600- 

1789." CEAIA. 33 (Sept. 1980). 47-50. [57]. 

2471 LITTLEFIELD. GEORGE EMERY. Early schools 
and school-books of New England. Boston: Club of Odd 
Volumes. 1904. viii. 354p. MWA. -t- 

McLEOD. JOHN PORTER B. "The New England 
boarding school: an analysis of its historical 
development and contemporary uncertainty of purpose." 
Ed.D. dissertation. Univ. of Massachusetts. 1973. 

192p. 

Abstracted in DAI. 34. No. lOA (1974). 6315. 

MARR. HARRIET WEBSTER. "Amusements and 
athletics in the old New England academies." OTNE. 44 
(Winter 1954). 84-91. 

. "Debating societies in the old New England 

academies." OTNE. 43 (Fall 1952). 48-53. 

. "Early diplomas awarded in New England 

academies." OTNE. 47 (Winter 1957). 78-83. 

2476 . "An exhibition at an old New England acaden 

OTNE. 41 (Winter 1951). 65-73. 

Typical public ceremony (ca. 1800). 

. "Financing the old New England academies." 

EIHC. 90 (Jan. 1954). 1-16. 



2465 



2466 



2469 



2472 



120 



Education 



HIGHER EDUCATION 2499 



2478 MARK, HARRIET WEBSTER. "Grants of land 

to academies in Massachusetts and Maine." EIHC, 88 
(Jan. 1952), 28-47. 

2479 . The old New England academies founded before 

1826. N.Y.: Comet Pr. Books, 1959. Slip. MWA. -i- 

2480 . "Punishment in the old New England academies." 

EIHC, 90 (Oct. 1954), 350-360. 

Corporal punishment. 

2481 . 'They sought an education." OTNE, 44 (Fall 

1953), 47-54. 

Student accounts of school expenses at various 
boarding schools (19th century). 

2482 MENT, DAVID MARTIN. "Racial segregation 

in the public schools of New England and New York, 
1840-1940." Ph.D. dissertation, Columbia Univ., 1975. 
314p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 36, No. 5A (1975), 2684. 

2483 MIDDLEKAUFF, ROBERT LAWRENCE. "Ancients 
and axioms; a history of secondary education in 
eighteenth-century New England." Ph.D. dissertation, 
Yale Univ., 1961. viii, 218p. MSaE. 

See also next entry. 

2484 . Ancients and axioms: secondary education in 

eighteenth-century New England. New Haven, Conn.: 
Yale Univ. Pr., 1963. 218p. MStuO. -i- 

See also preceding entry. 

2485 . "Masters and scholars in eighteenth-century 

New England." NEG, 3 (Spring 1962), 37-42. 

2486 PARKER, FRANKLIN. "Ezekiel Cheever: New 
England colonial teacher." Peabody Journal of 
Education, 37 (May 1960), 355-360. 

Connecticut and Massachusetts (17th and early-18th 
centuries). 

2487 PERRIN, JOHN WILLIAM. The history of 
compulsory education in New England. Meadville, Pa., 
1896. 71p. MWelC. 

Published Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of Chicago, 

(1895). 

2488 SAMMONS, MARK J. "'Without a word of 
explanation': district schools of early nineteenth- 
century New England." DubSemPr (1985), 78-90. 

2489 and SANDRA GIBSON-QUIGLEY. "Adding it 

up in the district school." Old Sturbridge Visitor, 25 
(Winter 1985-1986), 17-19. 

Rural schooling (early- 19th century). 



2490 SARGENT, WALTER. "The passing of the old 

red schoolhouse." NEM, n.s. 23 (Dec. 1900), 422-429. 

2491 SHIPTON, CLIFFORD KENYON. "Secondary 
education in the New England colonies." NEQ, 7 (Dec. 
1934), 646-661. 

2492 SMALL, WALTER HERBERT. Early New England 
schools. (1914) N.Y.: Amo Pr., 1969. ix, 401p. 
MWA. + 

2493 SPEARE, ELIZABETH GEORGE. "Old-time 
schoolmasters and scholars." NEG, 1 (Spring 1960), 6- 
15. 

2494 WALL, MARGARET ELEANOR ROSSON. 

"Puritanism in education; an analysis of the 
transition from religiosity to secular morality in 
primary reading materials, 1620-1775." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Washington Univ., 1979. iv, 358p. MeU 

England and New England. Abstracted in DAI, 40, No. 
7A (1980), 3831. 

SEE "Education" and "Schools" in Index for additional 
listings. 



HIGHER EDUCATION 

2495 ALLMENDINGER, DAVID F., JR. "The dangers 

of ante-bellum student life." JSH, 7 (Fall 1973), 75- 
85. 

Student disorder in New England colleges (1760- 
1860). 

2496 . "New England students and the revolution in 

higher education, 1800-1900." History of Education 
Quarterly, 11 (Winter 1971), 381-389. 

2497 . Paupers and scholars: the transformation of 

student life in nineteenth century New England. N.Y.: 
St. Martin's Pr., 1975. 160p. MStuO. + 

Antebellum college life. 

2498 DEXTER, FRANKLIN BOWDITCH. "On some 
social distinctions at Harvard and Yale, before the 
Revolution." AASP, n.s. 9 (1894), 34-59. 

Also published separately. 

2499 DUFFY, JOHN JOSEPH. "From Hanover to 
Burlington: James Marsh's search for unity." Vermont 
History, 38 (Winter 1970), 27-48. 



121 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



2500 

2500 

2501 

2502 

2503 

2504 

2505 

2506 

2507 

2508 



HIGHER EDUCATION 



ESCHENBACHER, HERMAN FRANQS. 

"Discipline, furniture, and piety: the foundations of 
higher education in New England in the ante-bellum 
period." New England Social Studies Bulletin, 22 
(Fall 1964), 11-15. 

FINK, JEROME SANFORD. "The purposes of 
the American colonial colleges." Ed.D. dissertation, 
Stanford Univ., 1958. 224p. 

Described in American Puritan Studies, Michael S. 
Montgomery, comp. (1984), 109-110. 

FINN, RICHARD PAUL. "An historical 
analysis of the contributions of Samuel Read Hall to 
nineteenth century teacher education." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Boston College, 1970. 265p. VtU. 

Ca. 1820s- 1830s. Abstracted in DAI, 31, No. 6 A 
(1970), 2714. 

FOUR American universities: Harvard, 

Yale, Princeton, Columbia. N.Y.: Harper & Brothers, 
1895. viii, 202p. CtY. + 

HARVEY, SAMUEL C. "The education of 

Nathan Smith." Yale Journal of Biology and Medicine, 

1 (May 1929), 259-268. 

Smith (lived 1762-1829), a Cornish, N.H., physician, 
was educated at Harvard and abroad. He later taught 
medicine at Yale. 

HERBST, JURGEN. "The first three 
American Colleges: schools of the Reformation." 
Perspectives in American History, 8 (1974), 7-52. 
Harvard, Yale, and William and Mary. 

HOWE, MARK ANTONY De WOLFE. Classic 
shades: five leaders of learning and their colleges. 
Boston: Little, Brown, 1928. 199p. MBU. -i- 
Four of the five were New England educators: 

Timothy Dwight (1752-1817) of Yale, Mary Lyons of 
Mount Holyoke, Mark Hopkins of Williams College, and 
Charles William Eliot of Harvard. 

KIRKPATRICK, J. E. ’The British college 

in the American colonies." School and Society, 17 

(Apr. 28, 1923), 449-454. 

Includes Harvard, Yale, Brown, and Dartmouth. 

LOCKARD, E. KIDD. "The influence of New 
England in denominational colleges in the Northwest, 
1830-1860." Ohio State Archaeological and Historical 
Quarterly, 53 (Jan. -Mar. 1944), 1-13. 



2509 McGOWN, RUSSELL MILLER. "The 
Congregational way in higher education." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Yale Univ., 1942. v, 796p. 

Described in American Puritan Studies, Michael S. 
Montgomery, comp. (1984), 65. 

2510 MOLLON, CHARLES. Les colleges et les 
progres du liberalisme en Nouvelle-Angleterre 
(periode coloniale). Paris: J. Vrin, 1929. xvi, 

251p. NhD. H- 

2511 MOORE, KATHRYN McDaniel. 'The war with 
the tutors: student-faculty conflict at Harvard and 
Yale, 1745-1771." History of Education Quarterly, 18 
(Summer 1978), 115-127. 

2512 MY Harvard, my Yale. Diana Dubois, ed. 

N.Y.: Random House, 1982. xi, 289p. MBU. -i- 

Recollections of college life by a number of well 
known graduates. 

25 1 3 PATTON, CORNEUUS HOWARD, and WALTER 
TAYLOR FIELD. Eight o'clock chapel: a study of New 
England college life in the Eighties. Boston: 

Houghton Mifflin, 1927. xiii, 344p. MChB. -t- 

1880s. 

2514 PAULI, KENNETH WOODS. "Evidence of 

popular support for the land-grant college act of 1862 
as revealed in selected speeches in New England, 1850- 
1860." Ph.D. dissertation, Stanford Univ., 1959. 
232p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 20, No. 11 (1960), 4460-4461. 

2515 PETERSON, GEORGE E. The New England 

college in the age of the university. Amherst, Mass.: 
Amherst College Pr., 1964. viii, 260p. MBU. -i- 

2516 SHEEHAN, PATRICK MICHAEL. "Harvard 

alumni in colonial America: demographic, theological 
and political perspectives." Ph.D. dissertation. Case 
Western Reserve Univ., 1972. ix, 227p. MeU. 
Abstracted in DAI, 32, No. 12A (1972), 6792. 

2517 SHIPTON, CLIFFORD KENYON. "Ye mystery of 
ye ages solved; or, how placing worked at colonial 
Harvard & Yale." Harvard Alumni Bulletin, 57 (Dec. 

11, 1954), 258-259, 262-263. 

2518 SIMPSON, LOWELL. "The development and 
scope of undergraduate literary society libraries at 
Columbia, Dartmouth, Princeton, and Yale, 1783-1830. 
Journal of Library History, 12 (Summer 1977), 209-221 



122 



Education 



OTHER 2536 



2519 SMITH, WILLARD WALLACE. The relations 

of college and state in colonial New England." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Columbia Univ., 1950. 175p. 

Including Harvard and Yale. Described in American 
Puritan Studies, Michael S. Montgomery, comp. (1984), 
81. 

2520 STOECKEL, ALETHIA LUCILLE. "Politics and 
administration in the American colonial colleges." 

Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of Illinois, 1958. iv, 

172p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 19, No. 10 (1959), 2595. 

2521 STORY, RONALD DELL. "Harvard students, 

the Boston elite, and the New England preparatory 
system, 1800-1870." History of Education Quarterly, 

15 (Fall 1975), 281-298. 

See also this author's The forging of an 
aristocracy: Harvard and the Boston upper class, 1800- 
1870 (1980). 

2522 SYNNOTT, MARCIA GRAHAM. "The admission 
and assimilation of minority students at Harvard, 

Yale, and Princeton, 19(X)-1950." History of Education 
Quarterly, 19 (Fall 1979), 285-304. 

See also next entry. 

2523 . The half-opened door: discrimination and 

admissions at Harvard, Yale, and Princeton, 1900-1970. 
Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Pr., 1979. xxi, 310p. M. 
+ 

See also next entry. 

2524 . "A social history of admissions policies at 

Harvard, Yale, and Princeton, 19(X)-1930." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Univ. of Massachusetts, 1974. xv, 776p. 
CtY. 

Abstracted in DAI, 35, No. 5 A (1974), 2920. 

2525 WELLS, KATE GANNETT. "Some facts about 

state aid to higher education in New England." NEM, 
n.s. 2 (June 1890), 469-474. 

2526 WHITEHEAD, JOHN SIMMS. The separation of 
college and state: Columbia, Dartmouth, Harvard, and 
Yale, 1776-1876. New Haven, Conn.: Yale Univ. Pr., 
1973. X, 262p. MWA. -h 

See also next entry. 

2527 . "The separation of college and state: the 

transformation of Columbia, Dartmouth, Harvard, and 
Yale from quasi-public to private institutions, 1776- 
1876." Ph.D. dissertation, Yale Univ., 1971. 310p. 
MB. 

Abstracted in DAI, 32, No. 12A (1972), 6914. See 
also preceding entry. 



2528 WILLIAMS, STANLEY T. "Yale College and 
Middlebury College." Yale Alumni Weekly, 29 (June 4, 
1920), 855-856. 

The former's influences on the latter. 

2529 WILSON, J. WALTER. "The Wilson halls at 
Brown and Dartmouth: the story of a legacy." Books 
at Brown, 23 (1969), 169-179. 

SEE "Education-higher" and "Universities and 
colleges" in Index for additional listings. 



OTHER 

2530 JACKSON, SIDNEY LOUIS. "Some ancestors 

of the 'extension course.'" NEQ, 14 (Sept. 1941), 505- 
518. 

Begiimings of adult education in 19th-century New 
England. 

2531 MONAGHAN, E. JENNIFER. "Literacy 
instruction and gender in colonial New England." 
American Quarterly, 40 (Mar. 1988), 18-41. 

2532 SCOTT, EX3NALD M. "'For the purpose of 
mutual improvement.'" Old Sturbridge Visitor, 27 
(Spring 1987), 4-6. 

Lyceum movement in New England. 

2533 . "Itinerant lecturers and lecturing in New 

England, 1800-1850." DubSemPr (1984), 65-75. 

2534 SEYBOLT, ROBERT FRANCIS. Apprenticeship 

& apprenticeship education in colonial New England and 
New York. N.Y.: Teachers College, Columbia Univ., 
1917. 121p. MStuO. -t- 

Published Ph.D. dissertation (Columbia Univ., 1916). 

2535 TORTORA-BRIGMAN, ELAINE ANNA. "A study 

of the teacher center movement in New England and New 
York City, 1980." Ph.D. dissertation, Boston College, 
1982. 152p. 

Includes historical sketch of the teacher center 
movement since the mid-1960s. Abstracted in DAI, 44, 
No. lA (1983), 38-39. 

2536 WOODWARD, CHARLES JEPTHA HILL. Textile 
education among the Puritans: read before the 
Bostonian Society, Council Chamber, Old State House, 
April 18, 1911. Boston, 1911. 30p. MStuO. -i- 



123 



The Arts 



GENERAL 



2537 BENES, PETER. Two towns: Concord & 

Wethersfield; a comparative exhibition of regional 
culture, 1635-1850. Volume I: catalogue of the 
exhibition. Concord, Mass.: Concord Antiquarian 
Society, 1982. xvi, 176p. MStuO. -i- 

Concord, Mass., and Wethersfield, Conn. 

2538 BOOTH, EARL WALTER. "New England 

quartet: E. A. Robinson, Robert Frost, Charles Ives 
and Carl Ruggles." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of Utah, 

1974. viii, 203p. VtU. 

Abstracted in DAI, 35, No. 3A (1974), 1648. 

2539 CONRON, JOHN. "Contemplative landscajjes: 

New England, 1870-1960." NE-StLVGSPr, 7 [1978], 3-15. 

2540 DOW, GEORGE FRANCIS. The arts & crafts 

in New England, 1704-1775: gleanings from Boston 
newspapers relating to painting, engraving, 
silversmiths, pewterers, cloclcmakers, furniture, 
pottery, old houses, costume, trades and occupations, 

&c.... Topsfield, Mass.: Wayside Pr., 1927. xxxii, 

362p. MWA. -I- 

2541 FAIRBANKS, JONATHAN L., and ROBERT 

FRANCIS TRENT. "New England begins: the seventeenth 
century. An exhibition at the Museum of Fine Arts, 

Boston, May 5-August 22, 1982." Antiques, 121 (May 
1982), 1126-1128. 



2543 GETLEIN, FRANK G. "The flowering of New 
England culture was off to an early start." 

Smithsonian, 13 (June 1982), 106-113. 

Article occasioned by the "New England begins" 
exhibition at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. See 
also entry 2545. 

2544 JOHNSTON, PHILLIP. Art in 17th century 

New England: visitor's guide to the exhibition. May 
11-November 13, 1977. n.p., 1977. 73p. CtHi. -i- 

2545 MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS, BOSTON. New England 
begins: the seventeenth century. Boston, 1982. 3v. 
MWA. -t- 

2546 PILGRIMS and pioneers: New England women 
in the arts. Alicia Faxon and Sylvia Moore, eds. 

N.Y.: Midmarch Arts Pr., 1987. viii, 160p. MBU. -i- 

2547 ST. GEORGE, ROBERT BLAIR. "A retreat 
from the wilderness: pattern in the domestic 
environments of southeastern New England, 1630-1730." 
Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of Pennsylvania, 1982. 

xxiii, 502p. MStuO. 

2548 . The wrought covenant: source material for the 

study of craftsmen and community in southeastern New 
England, 1620-1700. Brockton, Mass.: Brockton Art 
Center, 1979. 132p. MStuO. + 



Listings in the National Union Catalog for books and pamphlets marked 
with this symbol may include additional library locations. 



124 



The Arts 



2549 "SELECTED regional studies bibliography." 
DubSemPr (1981), 132-142. 

Includes New England architecture and decorative 
arts. 

2550 WADSWORTH ATHENEUM, HARTFORD, CONN. The 
great river; art & society of the Connecticut Valley, 
1635-1820. Hartford, Conn., 1985. xvii, 524p. 
MStuO. + 



ARCHITECTURE, PLANNING, AND HISTORIC BUILDINGS 

2551 ABBOTT, KATHARINE MIXER. Old paths and 
legends of New England: saunterings over historic 
roads, with glimpses of picturesque fields and old 
homesteads in Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and New 
Hampshire. N.Y.: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1904. xvii, 
484p. MWA. -t- 

2552 . Old paths and legends of the New England 

border; Connecticut, Deerfield, Berkshire. N.Y.: G. 

P. Putnam’s Sons, 1907. xiv, 408p. MWA. -t- 

2553 ALDERMAN, CUFFORD LINDSEY. "Old New 
England taverns." Early American Life, 8 (Oct. 1977), 
44-47. 

2554 ALEXANDER, EDWARD P. "Sixty years of 
historic preservation: the Society for the 
Preservation of New England Antiquities." OTNE, 61 
(July-Sept. 1970), 14-19. 

2555 ALLEN, RICHARD SANDERS. "The Connecticut 
River bridges." Covered Bridge Topics, 6 (Mar. 1948), 
6-7; (June 1948), 4-5; (Sept. 1948), 4-7; (Dec. 1948), 
6-7. 

2556 . Covered bridges of the Northeast: the 

complete story in words and pictures. Brattleboro, 

Vt.: Stephen Greene Pr., 1957. 121p. MChB. -i- 

2557 . "Forty Cormecticut crossings." Vermont Life, 

14 (Summer 1960), 28-29. 

Connecticut River bridges. 

2558 . "Roofs over rivers." American Heritage, 10 

(June 1959), 30-37, 82-84. 

Covered bridges. 

2559 ANDRES, GLENN M. "Lavius Fillmore and 

the Federal style meeting house." DubSemPr (1979), 30- 
42. 

Connecticut and Vermont architect (lived 1767-1846). 
See also entry 2726. 



ARCHITECTURE, PLANNING, AND HISTORIC BUILDING.' 



2560 ANDREWS, WAYNE. Architecture in New 
England; a photographic history. Brattleboro, Vt.: 
Stephen Greene Pr., 1973. vi, 202p. MWA. -t- 

2561 APPLETON, WILLIAM SUMNER. "Destruction 
and preservation of old buildings in New England." 

Art and Archaeology, 8 (May-June 1919), 131-184. 

2562 . "Two famous covered bridges." OTNE, 12 (Jan. 

1922), 121-126. 

At Manchester, N.H., and Springfield, Mass. 

2563 BAHR, BETSY W. "New England mill 
engineering: rationalization and reform in textile 
mill design, 1790-1920." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of 
Delaware, 1987. 322p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 49, No. 4A (1988), 929. 

2564 BAKER, NORMAN B. Early houses of New 
England. Rutland, Vt.: C. E. Tuttle, 1967. 144p. 

MStuO. -I- 

2565 BARTLETT, STUART. "Garrison houses along 

the New England frontier." Pencil Points, 14 (1933), 
253-268. 

2566 "BEACONS of safety: a sample of New 

England light station types." Mystic Seaport, Log, 35 
(Spring 1983), 22-27. 

2567 BEAUREGARD, MARK W. R.R. stations of New 
England today, Vol. I. Flanders, N.J.; Railroad 
Avenue Enterprises, 1979. 72p. DLC. -i- 

2568 BELLOWS, ROBERT P. "Country meeting 

houses along the Massachusetts-New Hampshire line." 
White Pine Series of Architectural Monographs, 11, No. 

5 (1925), 1-23. 

2569 BENES, PETER. "Sky colors and scattered 
clouds: the decorative and architectural painting of 
New England meeting houses, 1738-1834." DubSemPr 
(1979), 51-69. 

2570 . "The Templeton 'run' and the Pomfret 

'cluster': patterns of diffusion in rural New England 
meetinghouse architecture, 1647-1822." OTNE, 68 (Jan.- 
June 1978), 1-21. 

Templeton, Mass., and Pomfret, Conn. 

2571 . "Twin-porch versus single-porch stairwells: 

two examples of cluster diffusion in rural 
meetinghouse architecture." OTNE, 69 (Winter-Spring 
1979), 44-68. 



125 



New England; A Bibliography of Us History 



2572 ARCHTTECrURE, PLANNING. AND HISTORIC BUILDINGS 



2572 BENES, PETER, and PHILIP DOUGLAS 
ZIMMERMAN. New England meeting house and church: a 
loan exhibition at the Currier Galley of Art, 

Manchester, New Hampshire. Boston: Boston Univ., 
1979. xi, 177p. MStuO. + 

2573 "BIBLIOGRAPHY of New England meeting 
houses and churches." DubSemPr (1979), 135-143. 

2574 BRUCE. CURT, and JILL GROSSMAN. 

Revelations of New England architecture: people and 
their buildings. N.Y.: Grossman Publishers, 1975. 

179p. MStuO. + 

2575 CAMPBELL, ROBERT. "Making properties pay 
their way." Historic Preservation, 34 (Jan. -Feb. 

1982), 26-31. 

Properties belonging to the Society for the 
Preservation of New England Antiquities. Includes 
historical sketch. 

2576 CANDEE, RICHARD McALPIN. "Wooden 
buildings in early Maine and New Hampshire: a 
technological and cultural history, 1620-1720." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Univ. of Pennsylvania, 1976. Iviii, 

396p. MB. 

Abstracted in DAI, 37, No. 4A (1976), 2267. 

2577 CHAMBERLAIN. NATHAN HENRY. A paper on 
New-England architecture. Read before the New-England 
Historic Genealogical Society, September 4, 1858. 
Boston: Crosby, Nichols, 1858. 30p. MWA. -i- 

2578 CLOUES, RICHARD ROSS. "Where art is 
combined with nature: village improvement in 
nineteenth-century New England." Ph.D. dissertation, 
Cornell Univ., 1987. 1226p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 48. No. 7A (1988), 1870. 

2579 COLONIAL architecture in New England: 

from material originally published as the White Pine 
Series of Architectural Monographs.... Robert G. 

Miner, ed. [N.Y.]: Amo Pr., 1977. 223p. M. + 

See also entries 2605, 2666, and 2710. 

2580 CORNER. JAMES M., and E. E. SODERHOLTZ. 

Examples of domestic colonial architecture in New 
England. Boston: Boston Architectural Club, 1891. 

3p. MAC. -I- 

2581 CREESE, WALTER L. "Round houses of New 
England." OTNE, 43 (Apr. -June 1953), 85-90. 

Domestic architecture (1829-1929). 

2582 CUMMINGS. ABBOTT LOWELL. Architecture in 
early New England. (1958) Sturbridge, Mass.: Old 
Sturbridge Village, 1974. 38p. MStuO. + 



2583 . "Eighteenth-century New England garden design: 

the pictorial evidence." 18th Century Life, 8 (Jan. 
1983), 130-135. 

2584 . "An investigation of the sources, stylistic 

evolution and influence of Asher Benjamin's builder’s 
guides." Ph.D. dissertation, Ohio State Univ., 1951. 
242p. 

2585 . "Meeting and dwelling house: 

interrelationships in early New England." DubSemPr 
(1979), 4-17. 

2586 . "The past decade." OTNE, 61 (July-Sept. 

1970), 20-25. 

Society for the Preservation of New England 
Antiquities. 

2587 . 'The study houses." Antiques, 129 (Mar. 

1986), 612-617. 

Ten New England houses belonging to the Society for 
the Preservation of New England Antiquities. 

2588 DEAN, ELDON L. "Early college and 
educational buildings in New England." White Pine 
Series of Architectural Monographs, 20, No. 6 (1934), 
177-192. 

2589 DEMARS, STANFORD E. "Changing housing 
patterns in New England shore resorts." NE- 
StLVGSPr, 6 [1977], 31-34. 

2590 . "The seaside resort in New England: evolution 

of a settlement form." NE-StLVGSPr, 10 
[1981], 28-30. 

2591 DERBY, RICHARD BAKER. An architectural 
monograph on houses of the Connecticut River Valley. 
St. Paul, Minn.: White Pine Bureau, 1916. 16p. 

MUB.-i- 

2592 DesJARDINS, MAURICE. "The enigma of the 

two towers." New Bedford Magazine, 4, No. 1 (1984), 
14-16. 

The Newport Tower in Rhode Island and the Old Powder 
House in Lakeville, Mass. 

2593 DEXTER, HENRY MARTYN. Meeting houses 
considered historically and suggestively. Boston: J. 

E. Tilton, 1859. 29p. MNS. -i- 

2594 DOMOSH, MONA, and MARTYN J. BOWDEN. 
"Meetinghouse and townhouse in New England." NE- 
StLVGSPr, 7 [1978], 24-30. 



126 



2595 

2596 

2597 

2598 

2599 

2600 

2601 

2602 

2603 

2604 

2605 

2606 

2607 



The Arts 



ARCHITECTURE. PLANNING. AND HISTORIC BUILDING! 



DONNELL. ROBERT P.. and ROBERT J. FRENCH. 

"The reuse of old forts on the harbor islands of 
Boston and Portland." NE-StLVGSPr. 16 (1987). 89-97. 

DONNELLY. MARIAN CARD. "Materials in 
early New England." OTNE. 61 (Apr. -June 1971). 87-94. 
Building materials. 

. "New England meeting houses in the seventeenth 

century." OTNE. 47 (Spring 1957). 85-97. 

. "New England meeting houses in the 17th 

century." Ph.D. dissertation. Yale Univ.. 1956. 

See also next entry. 



2608 GARNER. JOHN STURDY. The model company 
town: urban design through private enterprise in 
nineteenth-century New England. Amherst. Mass.: 

Univ. of Massachusetts Pr.. 1985. xiv. 288p. MWA. + 

Hopedale and Ludlow. Mass.; Peacedale. R.I.; South 
Manchester. Coim.; and Fairbanks Village. Vt. See 
also this author's study of Hopedale (Ph.D. 
dissertation. Boston Univ.. 1974). 

2609 GARVIN. JAMES LEO. "Academic 

architecture and the building trades in the Piscataqua 
region of New Hampshire and Maine. 1715-1815." Ph.D 
dissertation. Boston Univ.. 1983. xxv. 550p. MB. 

Abstracted in DAI. 44. No. 5A (1983). 1227. 



. The New England meeting houses of the 

seventeenth century. Middletown. Conn.: Wesleyan 
Univ. Pr.. 1968. x. 165p. MWA. + 

See also preceding entry. 



2610 . "Bradbury Johnson: builder-architect." M.A. 

thesis. Univ. of Delaware. 1969. xxi. 276p. NhHi. 

Johnson (lived 1766-1820) worked in Exeter. N.H.. 
and Saco. Me. 



. "New England pyramids. 1651-1705." Society of 2611 

Architectural Historians. Journal. 19 (May 1960). 76- 
77. 

Meetinghouse steeples. 

. "Seventeenth-century meeting house turrets." 

OTNE. 65 (Summer-Fall 1974). 10-11. 2612 

DOW. GEORGE FRANQS. "The houses of the 
Brst settlers in New England." Antiques. 18 (Aug. 

1930). 127-129. 



. "Mail-order house plans and American Victorian 

architecture." Winterthur Portfolio. 16 (Winter 
1981). 309-334. 

Emphasizes the work of New England architects and 
houses built in New England. 

GILMORE. ANDREA M. "Dating architectural 
moulding profiles: a study of eighteenth and 
nineteenth century moulding plane profiles in New 
England." APT Bulletin. 10. No. 2 (1978). 90-117. 
Architectural exterior decoration. 



DRAKE. SAMUEL ADAMS. Our colonial homes. 
Boston: Lee and Shepard. 1893. 211p. NhHi. + 

DRUMMOND. ANDREW LAND ALE. "Evolution of 
the New England meeting house." Royal Institute of 
British Architects Journal. 353 (June 1946). 337-342. 

EARLY homes of New England: from 
material originally published in the White Pine Series 
of Architectural Monographs.... Robert G. Miner, ed. 
[N.Y.]: Amo Pr.. 1977. 223p. MSaE. 

See also entries 2579. 2666. and 2710. 

ELDER. CHARLES BROWN. 'The old New 

England meeting-house." Worcester [Mass.] Society of 

Antiquity. Proceedings. 24 (1909). 74-90. 



2613 GOLDBERG. HAYDEN. "The architecture of 
Charles Bulfinch on historical blue Staffordshire." 
Antiques. 128 (Dec. 1985). 1198-1205. 

2614 [GOODELL. ABNER CHENEY.] Essay on the 
ancient architecture of New England, to be read before 
the Old Planters' Society, in Boston. Wednesday. March 
23. 1904. n.p.. n.d. 29p. MSaE. + 

2615 GREGORY. ELIZABETH. "Covered bridges." 

Quaboag Plantation. 6 (Spring 1988). 34-40. 42-45. 

2616 GRIFFIN. GILLETT G. "In respect to a New 
England farmhouse." New Haven Colony Historical 
Society. Journal. 32 (Spring 1986). 15-21. 

Preservation. 



"EXISTING New England taverns and inns 

built during the Revolutionary War period." Yankee. 

39 (Apr. 1975). 24-25. 



2617 HAGELSTEIN. ISABELLA. A primer on New 
England's colonial architecture. (1975) 3d ed. 
Lexington. Mass.: Primer Pr.. 1983. 31p. M. -i- 



127 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



26 1 8 ARCHTTECTURE, PLANNING. AND HISTORIC BUILDINGS 



2618 HAMILTON, HARLAN. Lights and legends: a 
historical guide to lighthouses of Long Island Sound, 
Fishers Island Sound and Block Island Sound. 

Stamford, Corm.: Wescott Cove Publishing, 1987. Unp. 
CtNhHi. + 

2619 HARRIS, JOHN. Treasures of New England: 
special Boston Globe section for nation's 
bicentermial. [Boston]: Globe Newspap>er, 1976. 79p. 
RHi. + 

Architectural. 

2620 HASKELL, ARTHUR C. "Early interior 
doorways of New England." Pencil Points, 13 (Oct. 

1932), 230-244. 

2621 HAYES, MARIAN. "Life and architecture in 

the Coimecticut Valley." Ph.D. dissertation. Harvard 
Univ., 1944. 223p. 

2622 HIPKISS, EDWIN JAMES. An architectural 
monograph: interior woodwork in New England during 
the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries; containing, 
also, measured drawings from the George F. Lindsay 
collection. N.Y.: R. F. Whitehead, 1925. 18p. 

MB At. + 

2623 HISTORIC AMERICAN BUILDINGS SURVEY. The 
New England textile mill survey. Washington, D.C., 
1971. ix, 176p. MStuO. + 

See also next entry. 

2624 HISTORIC AMERICAN ENGINEERING RECORD. 

New England: an inventory of historic engineering and 
industrial sites. T. Allan Comp, director. 

Washington, D.C., 1974. 87p. MWA. -t- 

See also preceding entry. 

2625 HOROWITZ, HELEN LEFKOWITZ. Alma mater: 
design and experience in the women's colleges from the 
nineteenth-century begiimings to the 1930's. N.Y.: 
Knopf, 1984. xxii, 354p. MB. -i- 

Architectural history of a number of colleges, 
including Bennington, Mount Holyoke, Smith, Radcliffe, 
and Wellesley. 

2626 HOUSEMAN, ROBERT W. "Early New England 
homes with 20th century owners." American Home, 68 
(Mar. 1963), 26-31. 

2627 HOWE, MARK ANTONY DeWOLFE. "Dwellers in 
old dwellings: George Berkeley at Whitehall and 
Adamses at Quincy." MHSP, 70 (1957), 21-32. 

2628 . Who lived here? A baker's dozen of historic 

New England houses and their occupants. Boston: 

Little, Brown, 1952. 139p. MStuO. -i- 



2629 HOWELLS, JOHN MEAD. The architectural 
heritage of the Merrimack: early houses and gardens: 
Newburyport, Newbury, Amesbury, Georgetown, Old Town, 
Haverhill, Massachusetts; Concord, New Hampshire.... 
N.Y.: Architectural Book Publishing, 1941. xxiii, 

299p. MStuO. 

2630 . The architectural heritage of the Piscataqua: 

houses and gardens of the Portsmouth district of Maine 
and New Hampshire. N.Y.: Architectural Book 
Publishing, 1937. xxvi, 217p. MStuO. + 

2631 HUBKA, THOMAS C. Big house, little 

house, back house, bam: the connected farm buildings 
of New England. Hanover, N.H.: Univ. Pr. of New 
England, 1984. xiii, 225p. MWA. + 

2632 . "The connected farm buildings of northern New 

England." Historical New Hampshire, 32 (Fall 1977), 
87-115. 

See also preceding entry. 

2633 HUNTER, ETHEL AMBLER. "The ten-footers 

of New England." NEG, 5 (Winter 1964), 41-46. 
Shoemakers' shops. 

2634 INDUSTRIAL architecture in the Quinebaug 

and Blackstone valleys: a tour co-sponsored by the 
Society for Industrial Archeology and the Society of 
Architectural Historians, Boston chapter. Richard M. 
Candee, comp, n.p., 1972. [10]p. MStuO. + 

2635 JACOB, EVA. New architecture in New 

England.... Lincoln, Mass.: DeCordova Museum, 1974. 
142p. NhD. 

2636 JAKEMAN, ADELBERT M. "Covered bridges 
today." OTNE, 28 (Jan. 1938), 109-113. 

2637 . Old covered bridges: the story of covered 

bridges in general; with a description of the 
remaining bridges in Massachusetts and Connecticut. 
Brattleboro, Vt.: Stephen Daye Pr., 1935. 107p. 

MB. -t- 

2638 KAPLAN, DONALD, and ALAN BELUNK. 

Classic diners of the Northeast. (1980) Boston: 

Faber and Faber, [1986]. 160p. MB. -i- 

2639 KAPPEL, PHILIP. New England gallery. 

Boston: Little, Brown, 1966. xvi, 349p. MSaE. -i- 
Historic houses. 

2640 KAY, JANE HOLTZ, and PAULINE CHASE- 
HARRELL. Preserving New England: Connecticut, Rhode 
Island, Massachusetts, Vermont, New Hampshire, Maine. 
N.Y.: Pantheon Books, 1986. x, 214p. MB. -i- 



128 



The Arts 



ARCHITECTURE. PLANNING, AND HISTORIC BUILDING: 



2641 KINGSBURY, FEUCIA DOUGHTY. "First 
impressions of some Society houses." OTNE, 40 (July 
1949), 108-117. 

Society for the Preservation of New England 
Antiquities. See also next entry. 

2642 . 'The pattern of New England settlement as 

exemplified by the properties of the Society; together 
with a comparison of ancient and modem routes of 
travel." OTNE. 40 (Apr. 1950), 201-226. 

See also preceding entry. 

2643 KNIFFEN, FRED. "The American covered 

bridge." Geographical Review, 4 (Jan. 1951), 114-123. 

Its development in and diffusion outside of New 
England. 

2644 LATHROP, ELISE. Old New England 
churches. Rutland, Vt.: Tuttle Publishing, 1938. 

171p. MWA. -I- 

2645 LEWIS, EDWARD A. New England country 
depots. Seekonk, Mass.: The Baggage Car, 1973. 

160p. NhHi. + 

Railroad depots. 

2646 LINDGREN, JAMES MICHAEL. 'The gospel of 
preservation in Virginia and New England: historic 
preservation and the regeneration of traditionalism." 
Ph.D. dissertation. College of William and Mary, 1984. 
452p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 45, No. 9 A (1985), 2974. 

2647 UTTLE. ARTHUR. Early New England 

interiors: sketches in Salem, Marblehead, Portsmouth 
and Kittery. Boston: A. Williams, 1878. 45p. 

VtU.-t- 

2648 LITTLE, BERTRAM K. "Retrospect: fifty 

years of historic preservation." Antiques, 77 (May 
1960), 466-468. 

By the Society for the Preservation of New England 
Antiquities. 

2649 UTTLE, NINA FLETCHER. "On dating New 
England houses." Antiques, 48 (Mar. 1945), 155-157; 
(Apr. 1945), 228-231; (May 1945), 273-276; (June 
1945), 334-336. 

2650 UVINGSTON, 'WILLIAM FARRAND. "The homes 
and haunts of Israel Putnam." NEM, n.s. 17 (Oct. 

1897), 193-212. 

In Massachusetts and Connecticut. 



265 1 McARDLE, ALMA DeC., and DEIRDRE BARTLETT 
McARDLE. Carptenter gothic: nineteenth-century 
ornamented houses of New England. N.Y.: Whitney 
Library of Design, 1978. 159p. MSaE. + 

2652 MALLARY, PETER T. Houses of New England. 

N.Y.: Thames and Hudson, 1984. 208p. MBU. + 

2653 . New England churches and meeting houses, 1680- 

1830. N.Y.: Vendome Pr., 1985. 208p. MBU. -t- 

2654 MARLOWE, GEORGE FRANCIS. Churches of old 
New England: their architecture and their architects, 
their pastors and their people. N.Y.: Macmillan, 

1947. xii, 222p. MWA. + 

2655 MARR, HARRIET WEBSTER. "The four-square 
school." Antiques, 65 (June 1954), 475-477. 

The architecture of early New England academies. 

2656 MATCHAK, STEPHEN. "Folk houses of the 
Northeast." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of North 
Carolina, 1982. viii, 242p. MStuO. 

Abstracted in DAI, 43, No. 8 A (1982), 2790. 

2657 MAZMANIAN, ARTHUR B. The stmeture of 
praise: a design study, architecture for religion in 
New England from the 17th century to the present. 

Boston: Beacon Pr., 1970. 151p. MStuO. + 

2658 MEADER, ROBERT F. W. "Colonial church 
architecture in New England." Susquehanna Univ. 

Studies, 4 (Mar. 1949), 63-82. 

2659 MEEKS, CARROLL L. V. "Some early depot 
drawings." Society of Architectural Historians, 

Journal, 8 (Jan. -June 1949), 33-42. 

2660 MILLER, AMELIA F. Connecticut River 

Valley doorways: an eighteenth-century flowering. 
[Boston]: Boston Univ. for Dublin Seminar for New 
England Folklife, 1983. 148p. MBNEH. + 

See also this author's article of same title in 
DubSemPr (1981), 60-72. 

2661 MIXER, KNOWLTON. Old houses of New 

England. N.Y.: Macmillan, 1927. xx, 346p. MWA. + 

2662 MONKHOUSE, CHRISTOPHER P. "Parris' 
perusal." OTNE, 58 (Fall 1967), 51-59. 

Architect Alexander Parris (lived 1780-1852) and his 
collection of architectural books. 



129 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



2663 

2663 

2664 

2665 

2666 

2667 

2668 

2669 

2670 

2671 

2672 

2673 



ARCHTTECTURE, PLANNING, AND HISTORIC BUILDINGS 



MORGAN, WILLIAM. The almighty wall: the 
architecture of Henry Vaughan. N.Y.: Architectural 
History Foundation, 1983. xi, 210p. M. + 
Boston-based architect (lived 1845-1917), whose work 
included a number of buildings in Massachusetts and 
southern New Hampshire. 

MURCHISON, KENNETH M. "The spired 
meeting houses of old New England." Arts and 
Decoration, 48 (Mar. 1938), 8-12. 

MUTRUX, ROBERT. Great New England 
churches: 65 houses of worship that changed our 
lives. Chester, Conn.: Globe Pequot Pr., 1982. 
xvii, 262p. MSaE. + 

NEW England by the sea: from material 
originally published as the White Pine Series of 
Architectural Monographs.... Lisa C. Mullins, ed. 
[Harrisburg, Pa.]: National Historical Society, 1987. 
248p. M. -t- 

See also entries 2579, 2605, and 2710. 

NEWTON, EARLE W. "New England taverns." 

American Heritage, 4 (Summer 1953), 24-29. 

18th century. 

NOBLE, ALLEN G., and GAYLE A. SEYMOUR. 
"Distribution of bam types in Northeastern United 
States." Geographical Review, 72 (Apr. 1982), 155- 
170. 

NORTHEND, MARY HARROD. Historic homes of 
New England. Boston: Little, Brown, 1914. xvi, 

274p. MWA. 

. "Noted inns of New England." NEM, n.s. 30 

(Mar. 1904), 68-75. 

. We visit old inns. Boston: Small, Maynard, 

1925. xii, 176p. NhD. -i- 

NORTON, ALLA REBECCA SOPER. The old 
houses. Boston: Bruce Humphries, 1936. 47p. CtY. -t- 
New England. 

OAKLEY, IMOGEN BRASHEAR. Six historic 
homesteads. Philadelphia: Univ. of Pennsylvania Pr., 
1935. vii, 191p. MWA. + 

Includes three in New England: Moffatt-Ladd House, 
Quincy Mansion, and Webb House. 



2674 OLD colonial brick homes of New England, 

edited and published with the purpose of furthering a 
wider knowledge of the beautiful forms of domestic 
architecture developed during the time of colonies and 
the early days of the republic. Albert J. MacDonald, 
ed. Boston: Rogers and Manson, 1917. 55p. NhD. + 

2675 OLIVER, RICHARD. Bertram Grosvenor 
Goodhue. Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Pr., 1983. xii, 
297p. xii, 297p. MBU. -t- 

Architect (lived 1869-1924). 

2676 OVERBY, OSMUND R. "Ammi B. Young: an 
architectural sketch." Antiques, 81 (May 1962), 530- 
533. 

Architect (lived 1798-1874) in New Hampshire and 
Vermont. 

2677 . "Ammi B. Young in the Connecticut Valley." 

Society of Architectural Historians, Journal, 19 (Oct. 
1960), 119-123. 

2678 PARKER, W. PRENTISS. "Some old houses I 
have met." Nantucket Historical Association 
Proceedings, 27 (1921), 47-50. 

In New England. 

2679 PERKINS, ELIZABETH. "Legends of York and 
Portsmouth houses." Garden Club Bulletin, 7 ser. 
(1939), 37-41. 

Maine and New Hampshire. 

2680 PERRIN, NOEL, and KENNETH BREISCH. Mills 

and factories of New England. N.Y.: Harry N. Abrams, 
1988. 108p. MBU. -t- 

2681 PLACE, CHARLES A. "From meeting house to 
church in New England." OTNE, 13 (Oct. 1922), 69-77; 
(Jan. 1923), 111-123; (Apr. 1923), 149-164; 14 (July 
1923), 3-20. 

Architectural. 

2682 PORTSMOUTH [N.H.] FIRST NATIONAL BANK. 

Old colonial doorways of New England. Boston, 1912. 
Unp. NhHi. -h 

2683 POWELL, ANNE ELIZABETH. The New England 
colonial. N.Y.: Bantam Books, 1988. 248p. MBU. -i- 

2684 POWELL, WILLIAMS ERE Y. "Covered 
bridges." OTNE, 29 (Oct. 1938), 62-69. 

2685 PRENTICE, THOMAS MORGAN. "Historic 
taverns in New England." Cormecticut Magazine, 7 
(Feb.-Mar. 1903), 459-472. 



130 



The Arts 



2686 

2687 

2688 

2689 

2690 

2691 

2692 

2693 

2694 

2695 

2696 

2697 



PURINTON, RANDOLPH. "Hipped roof with a 2698 

turret: the square meetinghouses of 17th century New 
England." New Haven Colony Historical Society, 

Journal, 33 (Fall 1986), 15-26. 

QUINAN, JOHN FRANCIS, JR. "Asher 2699 

Benjamin and Charles Bulfmch: an examination of 
Baroque forms in Federal style architecture." 

DubSemPr (1979), 18-29. 

ROBERTSON, EDWIN BILL, and DORIS 

ROBERTSON. Covered bridges in the Saco Valley in 2700 

Maine and New Hampshire. Westbrook, Me.: Robertson 
Books, 1984. 84p. MeU. + 

ROBINSON, ALBERT GARDNER. Old New 
England doorways. N.Y.: Scribner's, 1919. 21, 

[66]p. MStuO. -I- 

2701 

. Old New England houses. N.Y.: Charles 

Scribner's Sons, 1920. viii, 29, [73]p. MWA. -t- 

ROLANDO, VICTOR R. A survey of the stone 

blast furnaces of New England and eastern New York. 2702 

n.p.: Published by the Author, 1977. iv, 87p. VtU. 

ROOS, FRANK J., JR. "Reflections of New 
England's architecture in Ohio." OTNE, 28 (Oct. 

1937), 41-48. 2703 

RUELL, DAVID L. "The 'round' 
meetinghouses of New Hampshire and Vermont." 

Historical New Hampshire, 36 (Summer-Fall 1981), 171- 
194. 2704 

SAMMONS, MARK J. "The stylish stamp of 
the Greek Revival." Old Sturbridge Visitor, 23 
(Winter 1983-1984), 18-20. 

As represented in New England buildings at Old 2705 

Sturbridge Village. 

SCHULLER, STANLEY. Old New England 

homes. Exton, Pa.: Schiffer Publishing, 1984. 224p. 

MWalB. + 

2706 

SKELTON, EDWARD OLIVER. The story of New 

England, illustrated: being a narrative of the 

principal events from the arrival of the Pilgrims in 

1620 and of the Puritans in 1624 to the present time. 2707 

Boston: E. O. Skelton, 1910. 140p. MWA. -t- 

SMTTH, CHARLES LYMAN. "New England 

churches of architectural and historical interest." 2708 

American Architect, 23 (Mar. 1923), 261-266. 



ARCHITECTURE, PLANNING, AND HISTORIC BUILDING: 

SMITH, PATRICIA ANNE. "New England 
meeting houses and churches." Society of 
Architectural Historians, Journal, 7 (July-Dcc. 1948), 
29-30. 

SNOW, EDWARD ROWE. Famous New England 
lighthouses. Boston: Yankee Publishing, 1945. 457p. 
MWA.+ 

Another ed., entitled The lighthouses of New 
England, was published in 1973. 

SOUTHEASTERN MASSACHUSETTS UNIVERSITY, 
NORTH DARTMOUTH. GALLERY. Russell 
Warren in the coastal towns of southeastern New 
England, February 22 to March 11, 1982. [New Bedford, 
Mass.: Reynolds-DeWalt, 1982?) 15p. MNb. 

Architect (lived 1783-1860). 

SPIRIT of New England. Lisa C. Mullins, 

ed. [Harrisburg, Pa.]: National Historical Society, 

1988. 224p. CtHT. + 

Georgian architecture. 

STRAWBERY BANKE, INC., PORTSMOUTH, N.H. 
Architecture near the Piscataqua: 

Portsmouth, New Hampshire, to York, Maine. 

Portsmouth, N.H., 1964. 52p. MStuO. -t- 

TOLLES, BRYANT FRANKLIN, JR. "College 
architecture in New England before 1860 in printed and 
sketched views." Antiques, 103 (Mar. 1973), 502-509. 

See also next entry. 

. "College architecture in northern New England 

before 1860: a social and cultural history." Ph D. 
dissertation, Boston Univ., 1970. xxii, 430p. NhD. 
Abstracted in DAI, 31, No. 5A (1970), 2326. 

. "Early medical school architecture in northern 

New England: a study of buildings at Burlington, 
Woodstock and Castleon in Vermont, Hanover in New 
Hampshire, and Brunswick in Maine." Vermont History, 

42 (Fall 1974), 257-277. 

. "Textile mill architecture in east central New 

England: an analysis of pre-Civil War design." ElllC, 

107 (July 1971), 223-253. 

TRAVIS, HAROLD G. "Law office buildings 
of early New England." Weston [Mass.] Historical 
Society Bulletin, 9 (Oct. 1972), 3-10. 

'THE TRIPLE-decker and old pieces of junk 
like that." Yankee, 37 (Apr. 1973), 70-75. 

Urban house type. 



131 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



2709 ARCHTTECTURE, PLANNING, AND HISTORIC BUILDINGS 



2709 TUCCI, DOUGLASS SHAND. "First 
impressions on the rediscovery of two New England 
galleries by Ralph Adams Cram." Currier Gallery of 
Art Bulletin (Fall 1979), 2-16. 

The architect’s design of the Japanese Court at the 
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, and an unused design 
prepared for the Currier Gallery of Art, Manchester, 

N.H. 

27 1 0 VILLAGE architecture of early New 

England: from material originally published as the 
White Pine Series of Architectural Monographs.... 

Lisa C. Mullins, ed. Pittstown, N.J.: Main Street 
Pr., 1987. 238p. M. -t- 

See also entries 2579, 2605, and 2666. 

2711 VOGEL, ROBERT M. "The New England 
Textile Mill Survey." Historical Archaeology, 1 
(1967), 34-36. 

2712 WAGEMANN, CLARA E. Covered bridges of 
New England. Rutland, Vt.: Tuttle 1931. 158p. 

MStuO. + 

Another ed., 1952. 

27 1 3 WALKER, C. ERNEST. Covered bridge 

ramblings in New England. Contoocook, N.H., 1959. 

1 14p. NhD. -I- 

2714 . "The covered railroad bridges of New England." 

Covered Bridge Topics, 12 (Fall 1954), 7-8. 

2715 WARREN, WILLIAM LAMSON. "William Sprats 
and his civil and ecclesiastical architecture in New 
England." OTNE, 44 (Spring 1954), 103-114. 

In Connecticut and Vermont. See also the 
Connecticut volume in this series for additional 
articles about Sprats by this author. 

27 1 6 WHITEFIELD, EDWIN. The homes of our 
forefathers: being a selection of the oldest and most 
interesting buildings, historical houses, and noted 
places in Rhode Island and Connecticut. From original 
drawings made on the spot. Boston: Whitefield and 
Crocker, 1882. Unp. MStuO. + 

21 n . The homes of our forefathers: being a 

selection of the oldest and most interesting 

historical houses in Maine, New Hampshire and Vermont. 

Reading, Mass.: E. Whitefield, 1886. Unp. MBU. -i- 

2718 WIGHT, CHARLES ALBERT. Some old time 

meeting houses of the Connecticut Valley. Chicopee 
Falls, Mass.: Rich Print, 1911. 144p. MWA. + 



2719 WILLARD, A. R. "The New England meeting- 
house and the Wren church." NEM, n.s. 1 (Jan. 1890), 
496-515. 

2720 WILLOUGHBY, MALCOLM F. Lighthouses of 
New England. Boston: T. O. Metcalf, 1929. 253p. 
MWA. -H 

2721 WILSON, RICHARD GARY. "The early work of 
Charles F. McKim: country house commissions." 
Winterthur Portfolio, 14 (Autumn 1979), 235-267. 

The noted architect (late-19ih century). 

2722 WODEHOUSE, LAWRENCE. "Ammi Burnham 
Young, 1798-1874." Society of Architectural 
Historians, Journal, 25 (Dec. 1966), 268-280. 

2723 . "Ammi Young's architecture in northern New 

England." Vermont History, 36 (Spring 1968), 53-60. 

2724 . "Architectural projects in the Greek Revival 

style by Ammi B. Young." OTNE, 60 (Winter 1970), 73- 
85. 

2725 . "The architecture of Lavius Fillmore.” 

Antiques, 104 (Dec. 1973), 1080-1095. 

Fillmore (lived 1767-1846), a native of Norwich, 

Coim., moved to Middlebury, Vt., ca. 1796. See also 
next entry. 

2726 . "Churches in Connecticut and Vermont by Lavius 

Fillmore." Vermont History, 37 (Autumn 1969), 239- 
246. 

In East Haddam and Norwich, Conn.; Bennington and 
Middlebury, Vt. See also preceding entry and entry 
2559. 

2727 WORTH, HENRY BARNARD. The development of 

the New England dwelling house. ..read before the Lynn 
Historical Society, March 10, 1910. From Vo. XIV of 
the Register of the society. Lynn, Mass.: F. S. 

Whitten, 1911. 24p. CtY. -(- 

2728 YANKEE PUBLISHING. At home in New 
England. Dublin, N.H., 1986. 64p. CtHi. + 

2729 'THE YANKEE saltbox: simple and 

austere." Yankee, 37 (June 1973), 136-139, 180-183. 
House type. 

2730 YOUNG, RAY. "The ubiquitous mill house." 

NEG, 19 (Jan. 1977), 28-36. 

New England mill workers' housing. 

273 1 ZAITZEVSK Y, CYNTHIA. The architecture of 
William Ralph Emerson, 1833-1917. Cambridge, Mass., 
1969. lOOp. MBU. -t- 



132 



The Arts 



2732 ZELINSKY. WILBUR. "The New England 
connecting bam." Geographical Review, 58 (Oct. 
1958), 540-553. 

2733 ZIEGLER, PHILIP C. Storehouses of time: 

historic bams of the Northeast. Camden, Me.: Down 
East Books, 1985. 131p. MStuO. + 

2734 ZIMILES, MARTHA, and MURRAY ZIMILES. 

Early American mills. N.Y.: C. N. Potter, 1973. 
xii, 290p. MWA. -t- 

Mainly New England. 

2735 ZOOK, NICHOLAS. Houses of New England 

op>en to the public. Barre, Mass.: Barre Publishers, 
1968. 126p. MStuO. -t- 

SEE "Architecture," "Historic buildings," and 
"Historic preservation" in Index for additional 
listings. 



PAINTING. SCULPTURE, AND GRAPHIC ARTS 

2736 ABBY AIDRICH ROCKEFELLER FOLK ART 
COLLECTION. WILLIAMSBURG. VA. Erastus 
Salusbury Field, 1805-1900: a special exhibition 
devoted to his life and work, January 20 to March 17, 
1963. [Williamsburg, Va., 1963?] Unp. MStuo. + 

New England artist. 

2737 ALLEN, EDWARD B. "Some old New England 
frescoes." OTNE, 25 (Jan. 1935), 79-84. 

19th-century wall paintings. 

2738 AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF MUSEUMS. NEW 
ENGLAND BRANCH. ART SECTION. Art in New 
England: the arts and crafts of New England and a 
survey of the tastes of its people. Cambridge, Mass.: 
Harvard Univ. Pr., [1939?]. Var. p. MStuO. -i- 

2739 BAYLEY, FRANK W. Five colonial artists 

of New England. Boston: Priv. Published, 1929. vi, 
448p. MBU. 

Joseph Badger, Joseph Blackburn, John Singleton 
Copley, Robert Feke, and John Smibert. 

2740 BEAM, PHILIP CONWAY. "Winslow Homer's 
father." NEQ, 20 (Mar. 1947), 51-74. 

Charles Savage Homer, Sr., of Boston and Prout's 
Neck, Me. 

2741 BELKNAP, W. PHOENIX. "The identity of 

Robert Feke." Art Bulletin, 29 (Sept. 1947). 201-207. 
Portrait painter (lived ca. 1705-ca. 1750). 



PAINTING. SCULPTURE, AND GRAPHIC ARTS 2751 



2742 BISHOP, ROBERT CHARLES. "The Borden 
limner and his contemporaries." Ph.D. dissertation, 

Univ. of Michigan, 1975. vii, 323p. NhKeS. 

Portrait painter John S. Blunt (lived 1798-1835), of 
Portsmouth, N.H., and Boston. Abstracted in DAI, 36, 

No. lOA (1976), 6346. 

2743 . "John Blunt: the man, the artist, and his 

times." The Clarion (Spring 1980), 20-40. 

See also preceding entry. 

2744 BLACK, MARY. Erastus Salisbury Field: 

1805-19(X). Museum of Fine Arts, Springfield, 
Massachusetts, Febmary 5-April 1, 1984; National 
Museum of American Art and National Portrait Gallery, 
Washington, D.C., June 10-September 4, 1984; Museum of 
American Folk Art and the Metropolitan Museum of Art, 
New York, New York, November-December 1984; Marion 
Koogler McNay Art Institute, San Antonio, Texas, 
January-February 1985. Springfield, Mass.: Museum of 
Fine Arts, 1984. 115p. MStuO. + 

2745 . "Two painters: itinerants in New York and New 

England." DubSemPr (1984), 226-243. 

Ammi Phillips and Erastus Salisbury Field. 

2746 BOLTON, THEODORE. "New England portrait 
painters in miniature." OTNE, 12 (Jan. 1922), 131- 
134. 

2747 BOWDITCH, HAROLD. "Early water-color 
paintings of New England coats of arms." Colonial 
Society of Massachusetts, Publications, 35 (1951), 172- 
210 . 

2748 BROCKTON [MASS.] ART MUSEUM. FULLER 
MEMORIAL. Selections: three centuries of New England 
art from New England museums, 18th, 19lh, and 20ih 
century. Brockton, Mass., [1969?]. [49]p. MSaE. -t- 

2749 BUMGARDNER, GEORGIA BRADY. "The early 
career of Ethan Allen Greenwood." DubSemPr (1984), 
212-225. 

Itinerant painter (early-19th century). 

2750 CANDEE, RICHARD McALPIN. "The early New 
England textile village in art." Antiques, 98 (Dec. 

1970), 910-915. 

2751 CANTOR, JAY E. The landscape of change: 

views of rural New England, 1790-1865: February 9 to 
May 16, 1976, Old Sturbridge Village, Sturbridge, 

Masstts. Sturbridge, Mass.: Old Sturbridge Village, 

1976. [16]p. MStuO. 

See also this author's articles on same subject in 
Antiques, 109 (Apr. 1976), 772-783; and Art in 
America, 64 (Jan. -Feb. 1976), 51-54. 



133 



2752 

2752 

2753 

2754 

2755 

2756 

2757 

2758 

2759 

2760 

2761 

2762 

2763 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



PAINTING. SCULPTURE. AND GRAPHIC ARTS 



CANTOR. JAY E.. and ANDREW H. BAKER. 2764 

"Views of rural New England. 1790-1865: selected from 
The landscape of change.'" DubSemPr (1986). 126-147. 

See also preceding entry. 2765 

COBURN. F.W. "New England 

impressionists in the Redman collection." NEM. n.s. 

43 (Jan. 1911). 437-446. 

Harry Newton Redman, of Boston. 2766 

COLBY COLLEGE, WATER VILLE, ME. ART 
MUSEUM. Portraits of New England places: twenty- 
fifth anniversary exhibition, July 18-September 30, 

1984. Waterville, Me., 1984. 57p. MeHi. 2767 

CRAVEN, WAYNE. "Winckworth Allan Gay, 

Boston painter of the White Mountains, Paris, the 

Nile, and Mount Fujiyama." Antiques, 120 (Nov. 1981), 2768 

1222-1232. 

Lived 1821-1910. 

2769 

CRESSON, MARGARET FRENCH. Journey into 
fame. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard Univ. Pr., 1947. 

XV, 316p. MWA. -I- 

Sculptor Daniel Chester French (lived 1850-1931). 2770 

CURTIS, JOHN OBED. "Portraits at Old 
Sturbridge Village." Antiques, 116 (Oct. 1979), 880- 
889. 2771 

New England portraits. 

. "Some contemporary views of the New England 

militia." Military Collector and Historian, 30 (Fall 
1978), 100-108. 2772 

Early- 19th century. See also entry 3632. 

DE LORME, ELEANOR PEARSON. "Gilbert 

Stuart: portrait of an artist." Winterthur 2773 

Portfolio, 14 (Winter 1979), 339-360. 

Lived 1755-1828. 

DODS, AGNES M. "Connecticut Valley 

painters." Antiques, 46 (Oct. 1944), 207-209. 2774 

. "Erastus Salisbury Field (1805-1900): a New 

England folk artist." OTNE, 33 (Oct. 1942), 27-32. 2775 

DOWNES, WILLIAM HOWE. The life and works 

of Winslow Homer. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1911. 2776 

xxvii, 306p. MWA. + 

Lived 1836-1910. 

DRESSER, LOUISA. "New England painting 

from 1700 to 1775." American Collector, 12 (Mar. 2777 

1943), 6-7, 19. 



. "Some New England portraits, 1700-1775." 

Antiques, 43 (Mar. 1943), 126-128. 

DRISCOLL, JOHN PAUL, and JOHN K. HOW AT. 

John Frederick Kensett: an American master. N.Y.: 

W. W. Norton, 1985. 208p. CtHi. 

Landscajje painter (lived 1816-1872). 

FEDERAL ART PROJECTS IN NEW ENGLAND. 

Federal art in New England, 1933-1937. ..with a history 
of the arts projects in New England by Richard C. 
Morrison.... n.p., [1937?]. 64p. MWA. + 

FLEXNER, JAMES THOMAS. "New England 
painting, 1700-1725." Antiques, 51 (Feb. 1947), 109- 
111 . 

. The world of Winslow Homer, 1836-1910. N.Y. 

Time, Inc., 1966. 190p. MeU. -i- 

FOOTE, HENRY WILDER. Robert Feke: 

colonial portrait painter. Cambridge: Harvard Univ. 

Pr., 1930. xix, 223p. MWA. -t- 

FORBES, HARRIETTE MERRIHELD. "Early 
portrait sculpture in New England." OTNE, 29 (Apr. 
1929), 159-172. 

FOURATT, MARY EILEEN. "Ruth Henshaw 

Bascom, itinerant portraitist." DubSemPr (1984), 190- 

211 . 

During the period from 1828-1846. 

GARDNER, ALBERT TEN EYCK. Winslow Homer, 
American artist: his world and his work. N.Y.: 

Clarkson N. Potter, 1961. 262p. MeU. -t- 

GETLEIN, FRANK G. "A fantasy world from 
a stem-faced Yankee painter." Smithsonian, 15 (Aug. 
1984), 60-69. 

Erastus Salisbury Field. 

GOODRICH, LLOYD. Winslow Homer. N.Y.: 
Macmillan, 1944. viii, 241, 63p. MWA. -i- 

GOULD, JEAN. Winslow Homer: a portrait. 

N.Y.: Dodd, Mead, 1962. x, 305p. MWA. -t- 

HALL, ELTON W. "R. Swain Gifford." 

American Art Review, 1 (May-June 1974), 51-67. 

Painter of New England landscapes and seascapes 
(lived 1840-1905). 

HARTLEY, MARSDEN. "The six greatest New 
England painters." Yankee, 3 (Aug. 1937), 14-16. 



134 



The Arts 



2778 

2779 

2780 

2781 

2782 

2783 

2784 

2785 

2786 

2787 

2788 



PAINTING, SCULPTURE, AND GRAPHIC ARTS 2800 



HARVARD UNIVERSITY. WILLIAM HAYES FOGG 
ART MUSEUM. Art in New England; New England 
genre.... Cambridge, Mass.: Printed at the Harvard 
Univ. Pr., 1939. 88, [23]p. MWA. + 

HAVERSTOCK, MARY SAYRE. "A halcyon 
summer that lingered on and on— in painting." 

Smithsonian, 3 (July 1972), 32-39. 

Concerning the work of some American impressionists 
in New England. 

HEARD, PARTICIA L. With faithfulness and 
quite dignity: Albert Gallatin Hoit, 1809-1856. 

Concord, N.H.: New Hampshire Historical Society, 

[1985]. 32p. NhHi. -i- 
Painter. 

HILL, JOYCE. "New England itinerant 
portraitists." DubSemPr (1984), 150-171. 

HOLZER, HAROLD. "Daniel Chester French, 
an American sculptor." American Art and Antiques, 2 
(Sept.-Oct. 1979), 94-100. 

JORDAN, CHARLES J. "A New England trip: 
tracking down WPA murals." Yankee, 41 (Jan. 1977), 

122-130. 

In New England post offices, dating from the 1930s. 

Includes historical information. 

KNOX, KATHARINE McCOOK. "A note on 
Michele Felice Come." Antiques, 57 (June 1950), 450- 
451. 

Painter, in Salem, Boston, and Newport (from 1799- 
ca. 1830). 2797 

KORNHAUSER, ELIZABETH MANKIN. "Ralph 
Earl as an itinerant artist: patterns of patronage." 

DubSemPr (1984), 172-189. 

Lived 1751-1801. 

2798 

. "Regional landscapes in Cormecticut River 

Valley portraits, 1790-1810." Antiques, 128 (Nov. 

1985), 1012-1019. 

KRISTIANSEN, ROLF H., and JOHN J. LEAHY, 

JR. Rediscovering some New England artists, 1875- 2799 

1900: biographies and memorabilia of some little 
known and forgotten master New England painters. 

Dedham, Mass.; Gardner-O'Brien Associates, 1987. 2800 

316p. MB. + 

LA BUDDE, KENNETH JAMES. "The rural 

earth: sylvan bliss." American Quarterly, 10 (Summer 

1958), 142-153. 

Thomas Cole as painter of New England and New York 
landscapes (1820s-1840s). 



2789 UPMAN, JEAN HERTZBERG. "The rediscovery 

of Rufus Porter." Antiques, 119 (Jan. 1981), 204-211. 

Artist and inventor (lived 1792-1884). See also 
following entries. 

2790 . Rufus Porter rediscovered: artist, inventor, 

journalist, 1792-1884. N.Y.: Clarkson N. Potter, 

1980. 197p. MStuO. -h 

2791 . Rufus Porter: Yankee pioneer. N.Y.: 

Clarkson N. Potter, 1968. ix, 202p. MStuO. + 

2792 . "Rufus Porter, Yankee wall painter." Art in 

America, 38 (Oct. 1950), 135-200. 

See also preceding entries. 

2793 LITTLE, NINA FLETCHER. Country art in 

New England, 1790-1840. (1960) Sturbridge, Mass.: 

Old Sturbridge Village, 1965. 40p. MStuO. + 

2794 . "J. S. Blunt: New England landscape painter." 

Antiques, 54 (Sept. 1948), 172-174. 

1820s and 1830s. 

2795 . "John Brewster, Jr., 1766-1854." Antiques, 78 

(Nov. 1960), 462-463. 

See also next entry. 

2796 . "John Brewster, Jr., 1766-1854: deaf-mute 

portrait painter of Connecticut and Maine." 

Connecticut Historical Society Bulletin, 25 (Oct. 

1960), 97-129. 

See also preceding entry. 

. New England on land & sea: an exhibition from 

the collection of Bertram K. and Nina Fletcher Little, 

June 9-September 7, 1970, Peabody Museum, Salem, 
Massachusetts. [Salem, Mass.]: Peabody Museum, 1970. 
24, [8]p. RPB. -H 

. Paintings by New England provincial artists, 

1775-1800. Boston: Museum of Fine Arts, 1976. 173p. 
CtHi. + 

See also this author's article of same title in 
Antiques, 110 (Nov. 1976), 994-1005. 

. "Provincial portraits for country cousins." 

American Heritage, 1 (Summer 1950), 46-49. 

. "William M. Pryor, traveling artist, and his 

in-laws, the painting Hamblens." Antiques, 53 (Jan. 
1948), 44-48. 

19th century. 



135 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



2801 

2801 

2802 

2803 

2804 

2805 

2806 

2807 

2808 

2809 

2810 



PAINTING. SCULPTURE, AND GRAPHIC ARTS 



McGrath, Robert L. "ideality and 

actuality: the landscape of northern New England." 

DubSemPr (1980), 106-116. 

"...Artists rather than farmers and entrepreneurs 
gave ultimate deFmition to the vital qualities of the 
landscape and articulated that perception for 
succeeding generations." 

. "Pompeii and New England: the archaeology of 

early American murals." OTNE, 61 (Oct. -Dec. 1970), 31- 
40. 

McLANATHAN, RICHARD. Gilbert Stuart. 

N.Y.: Harry N. Abrams, 1986. 159p. RHi. + 

MANKIN, ELIZABETH R. "Zedediah Belknap." 

Antiques, 110 (Nov. 1976), 1056-1066. 

Itinerant painter (lived 1781-1858). 

MAYTHAM, THOMAS N. ’Two faces of New 
England portrait painting: Erastus Field and Henry 
Darby. Museum of Fine Arts [Boston], Bulletin, 61 
(1963), 31-42. 

MILLER, FREDERICK DeWOLFE. Christopher 
Pearse Cranch and his caricatures of New England 
Transcendentalism. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard Univ. 
Pr., 1951. xi, 81p. MBU. -i- 
Cartoons (ca. 1835). 

MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS, BOSTON. New England 
miniature, 1750 to 1850. Barbara Neville Parker, 
comp. Boston: T. O. Metcalf, 1957. Var. p. MStuO. 

+ 

Miniature painting. 

NEAL, AVON, and ANN PARKER. Early 

American stone sculpture found in the burying grounds 

of New England. N.Y.: Sweetwater Editions, 1981. 

114p. MStuO. -(- 

THE NEW England image: nineteenth- 
century landscapes from the college collection. 

Margaret Moody Stier, ed. Hanover, N.H.: Trustees of 
Dartmouth College, 1982. 63p. NhD. + 

NEW HAMPSHIRE HISTORICAL SOCIETY, 

CONCORD. Full of facts and sentiment: the art of 
Franklin H. Shapleigh. Concord, N.H., 1982. 64p. 
MWA.-H 

Painter of the New England landscape (bom 1842). 



2811 O’BRIEN, DONALD C. "Elkanah Tisdale: 
designer, engraver and miniature painter." 

Connecticut Historical Society, Bulletin, 49 (Spring 
1984), 83-96. 

A native of Lebanon, Coim., Tisdale (lived 1768- 
1835) was "active in New York, Boston and Hartford for 
over forty years." 

2812 THE PAINTINGS and journal of Joseph 

Whiting Stock. Juliette Tomlinson, ed. Middletown, 
Conn.: Wesleyan Univ. Pr., 1976. xv, 180p. MStuO. -i- 
Portrait painter (lived 1815-1855). See also entry 
2829. 

2813 PARKER, BARBARA NEVILLE. "New England 
miniatures." Antiques, 74 (Sept. 1958), 237-240. 

Miniature painting. See also entry 2807. 

2814 . "Paintings of old and New England." Antiques, 

47 (Apr. 1945), 214-216. 

2815 PASSOW, JON. Boston and Five Islands: 

forty years behind the lens of Charles Tinkham; a 
retrospective. Camden, Me.: Down East Books, 1981. 
xi, 153p. MB. -I- 

Boston photographer, who summered in Five Islands, 
Me., from 1938-1966. 

2816 PATTERSON, J. DANIEL. "God's 
determinations: the occasion, the audience, and 
Taylor's hope for New England." Early American 
Literature, 22 (Spring 1987), 63-81. 

Poem by Edward Taylor (1662). 

2817 PELADEAU, MARIUS B. Chansonetta: the 

life and photographs of Chansonetta Stanley Emmons, 
1858-1937. Waldoboro, Me.: Maine Antiques Digest, 
1977. 96p. MeU. -t- 

Longtime resident of Newton, Mass., who spent 
summers in her hometown, Kingfield, Me. 

2818 PEABODY MUSEUM, SALEM, MASS. Michele 
Felice Come, 1752-1846, versatile Neapolitan painter 
of Salem, Boston & Newport. Salem, Mass., 1972. 44p. 
MSaE.+ 

2819 RHODE ISLAND SCHOOL OF DESIGN, 

PROVIDENCE. MUSEUM OF ART. The 
catalogue of old and New England: an exhibition of 
American painting of colonial and early republican 
days, together with English painting of the same time. 
Offered in cooperation with the Rhode Island War 
Finance Committee of the United States Treasury 
Department.. .from January 19th through Febmary 18, 
1945. Providence, R.I., [1945?]. 62, [20]p. MWA. -i- 



136 



The Arts 



2820 



2821 



2822 



2823 



2824 



2825 



2826 



2827 



2828 



PAINTING. SCULPTURE, AND GRAPHIC ARTS 2838 



RICHMAN, MICHAEL. "Daniel Chester French 
and Henry Bacon: public sculpture in collaboration, 
1897-1908." American Art Journal, 12 (Summer 1980), 
46-64. 

ROBINSON. FRANK T. Living New England 
artists: biographical sketches, reproductions of 
original drawings and paintings by each artist. 

Boston: S. E. Cassino, 1888. 200p. MSaE. + 

Reprinted 1977. 

ROBINSON, WILLIAM F. A certain slant of 
light: the first hundred years of New England 
photography. Boston: New York Graphic Society, 1980. 
243p. MB. -I- 

ROMAINE, LAWRENCE BOND. "John James 
Audubon, salesman." Massachusetts Audubon Society, 
Bulletin. 35 (Oct. 1951), 278-282. 

His efforts (early 1840s) to obtain subscriptions in 
New England for his work. 

SAVAGE. GAIL, NORBERT H. SAVAGE, and 

ESTHER SPARKS. Three New England watercolor painters. 

[Chicago]: Art Institute of Chicago, 1974. 72p. 

MStuO. + 

J. Evans, J. A. Davis, and Joseph H. Davis: 19th- 
century painters with Maine and New Hampshire 
associations. 

SCHLOSS, CHRISTINE SKEELES. The 
Beardsley limner and some contemporaries: post- 
revolutionary portraiture in New England, 1785-1805. 
Williamsburg, Va.: Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, 
1972. 47p. MStuO. -h 

See also this author's article on same subject in 
Antiques, 103 (Mar. 1973), 533-538; and additional 
listings about the Beardsley limner in the Connecticut 
volume. 

SEARS, CLARA ENDICOTT. Some American 
primitives: a study of New England faces and folk 
portraits. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1941. xviii, 

29 Ip. MStuO. + 

SHEPARD, PAUL, JR. "Paintings of the New 
England landscape: a scientist looks at their 
geomorphology." College Art Journal, 17 (Fall 1957), 
30-42. 

SKERRETT, JOSEPH T.. JR. "Edward M. 

Bannister, Afro-American painter (1828-1901)." Negro 
History Bulletin, 41 (May-June 1978), 829. 

Worked in Boston and Providence. 



2829 SMITH COLLEGE, NORTHAMPTON, MASS. MUSEUM 
OF ART. Joseph Whiting Stock, 1815-1855: February 4- 
March 20, 1977, Smith College Museum of Art, 
Northampton, Massachusetts. Northampton, Mass., 1977 
62p. MStuO. + 

Portrait painter. See also entry 2812. 

2830 SPEAR, ARTHUR, JR. Arthur Spear, 1879- 

1959. Warren, Me.: Warren Historical Society, 1981. 
vii, 40p. MBU. + 

Painter, with ties to Boston and Maine. 

2831 SPINNEY, FRANK OAKMAN. "Joseph H. Davis, 
left hand painter." Wakefield-Brookfield [N.H.] 

Historical Society, Meeting in Print, 3 (Winter 1949), 
[3-5]. 

See also entry 2824. 

2832 STEIN, ROGER B. Seascape and the 

American imagination. N.Y.: C. N. Potter, 1975. 
xii, 144p. CtMy. + 

See also this author's article of same title in 
Early American Literature, 7 (Spring 1972), 17-37. 

2833 TATHAM, DAVID. "Winslow Homer and the 

New England poets." AASP, 89 (Oct. 1979), 241-260. 
Homer as a book illustrator. 

2834 WARREN, WILLIAM LAMSON. "Richard 
Brunton-itinerant craftsman." Art in America, 39 
(Apr. 1951), 80-94. 

Engraver and counterfeiter (late- 18th and early- 19th 
centuries). 

2835 WILLIAMS COLLEGE, WILUAMSTOWN, MASS. 
MUSEUM. The New England eye: master American 
paintings from New England school, college, and 
university collections. An exhibition (Williams 
College— September 11 through November 6, 1983). 
Williamstown, Mass., 1983. 63p. MBAt. -i- 

2836 WOLFE, ALICE WALKER. "Another 

Ellsworth." Spinning Wheel, 14 (Nov. 1958), 14, 16. 

Itinerant painter James Sanford Ellsworth (lived 
1802-1874?). 

2837 WOODBURY, DAVID O. "Charles H. Woodbury: 

Yankee with a paint brush." NEG, 5 (Spring 1964), 19- 
28. 

New England landscape painter (bom 1864). 

2838 WORCESTER [MASS.] ART MUSEUM. Art in New 
England: early New England printmakers. An 
exhibition held in collaboration with the American 
Antiquarian Society, July 1939-January 1940. 

Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard Univ. Pr., [1939?]. 77, 

[14]p. MStuO. + 



137 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



2839 PAINTING. SCULPTURE, AND GRAPHIC ARTS 



2839 WORCESTER [MASS.] ART MUSEUM. XYHih 
century painting in New England: a catalogue of an 
exhibition held at the Worcester Art Museum in 
collaboration with the American Antiquarian Society, 
July and August, 1934. Louisa Dresser, ed. 

Worcester, Mass.: The Trustees, 1935. 187p. 

MStuO. + 

SEE "Art and artists" in Index for additional 
listings. 

ANTIQUES. HOUSEHOLD FURNISHINGS. AND 
DECORATIVE ARTS 

2840 ACKERMAN, PHYLUS. "Wallpaper from New 
England houses." Antiques, 69 (May 1956), 440-443. 

2841 ADAMS, JOHN PHILLIPS. Bottle collecting 

in New England. Somerswonh, N.H.: New Hampshire 
Publishing, 1969. 120p. MLowU. -t- 

2842 AVERY, AMOS GEER. New England clocks at 
Old Sturbridge Village: the J. Cheney Wells 
collection. (1955) 2d ed. Sturbridge, Mass.: Old 
Sturbridge Village, 1966. [46]p. MStuo. -t- 

2843 BAKER, MURIEL L. "Some New England 
crewelwork bed furniture." NEG, 6 (Summer 1964), 29- 
36. 

2844 BARR. LOCKWOOD ANDERSON. 'The forerunner 

of the Willard banjo." Antiques, 75 (Mar. 1959), 282- 
285. 

New England clockmaking (late- 18th and early- 19th 
centuries). 

2845 "BASKETMAKING in New England during the 

19th century." Middleborough [Mass.] Antiquarian, 8 
(Apr. 1906), 6-7. 

2846 BATES. VIRGINIA T., and BEVERLY 
CHAMBERLAIN. Antique bottle finds in New England. 
Peterborough, N.H.: Noone House, 1968. 80p. VtU. -i- 

2847 BENES, PETER. "Decorated family records 
from coastal Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and 
Connecticut." DubSemPr (1985), 91-147. 

2848 . New England prospect: a loan exhibition of 

maps at the Currier Gallery of Art, Manchester, New 
Hampshire. [Boston]: Boston Univ., 1980. xx, 124p. 
MWA. 



2849 BOGDONOFF, NANCY DICK. Handwoven 
textiles of early New England: the legacy of a rural 
people, 1640-1880. Harrisburg, Pa.: Slackpole, 1975 
192p. MStuO. + 

2850 BREWER, PRISCILLA JOAN. "Home fires: 
cultural responses to the introduction of the 
cookstove, 1815-1900." Ph.D. dissertation. Brown 
Univ., 1987. 239p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 48, No. 4A (1987), 963. 

2851 BROWN, MICHAEL K. "Scalloped-top 

furniture of the Connecticut River Valley." Antiques, 
117 (May 1980). 1092-1099. 

2852 BURROWS. FREDRIKA ALEXANDER. The Yankee 
scrimshanders. Taunton, Mass.: W. S. Sullwold, 1973 
79p. CtMy. -I- 

2853 CAVALLO, ADLOPH S. 'TIew England crewel 
embroideries." Connecticut Historical Society 
Bulletin, 24 (Apr. 1959). 33-43. 

2854 CHAPIN. HOWARD MILLAR. "Colonial 
military flags." NEQ, 4 (July 1931), 448-459. 

2855 . "The early use of flags in New England.” 

OTNE, 21 (Oct. 1930), 60-73. 

2856 . "Notes on colonial flags." OTNE, 24 (Jan. 

1934), 135-141. 

2857 CHILDS, DAVID B. "The evolution of the 
Sheraton chest in New England." Hobbies, 64 (Aug. 
1959), 58-60. 

Early-19th century. 

2858 CHINNERY, VICTOR. Oak furniture: the 
British tradition; a history of early furniture in the 
British Isles and New England. (1979) Woodbridge, 
Suffolk [U.K.]: Antiques Collectors' Club, 1986. 

618p. MBU. 

2859 CLARK, EDIE. "The man who looked back 

and saw the future." Yankee, 50 (Sept. 1986), 108- 
113, 172-181. 

Wallace Nutting, collector, photographer, and author 
of New Englandiana. See also entry 2872. 

2860 CLARK, F. C. "Candlelight in colonial 
times." NEM, n.s. 1 (Jan. 1890), 516-518. 

2861 CLARKE. HERMANN FREDERICK. 'The craft of 
silversmith in early New England." NEQ, 12 (Mar. 
1939), 68-79. 



138 



The Arts 



ANTIQUES, HOUSEHOLD FURNISHINGS, AND DECORATIVE ARTS 2885 



2862 CONNECTICUT VALLEY HISTORICAL MUSEUM, 
SPRINGFIELD, MASS. Pewter of the Connecticut Valley. 
The Connecticut Valley Historical Museum, May 2nd 
through May 31st, 1948. Springfield, Massachusetts, 
n.p., [1948?]. [8]p. MStuO. + 

2863 COOK, JANE L. "Along the Connecticut 

coast & up the Connecticut Valley." Old Sturbridge 
Visitor, 27 (Fall 1987), 7-9. 

New England furniture in the Old Sturbridge Village 
collection. 

2864 COONS, MARTHA, and KATHERINE KOOB. Linen- 
making in New England, 1640-1860: all sorts of good 
sufficient cloth. North Andover, Mass.: Merrimack 
Valley Textile Museum, 1980. 121p. MWA. -i- 

2865 "COSTUME and fabrics in eighteenth- 

century New England." OTNE, 19 (Apr. 1929), 187-190. 

2866 CUMMINGS, ABBOTT LOWELL. "Notes on 
furnishing the seventeenth-century house." OTNE, 46 
(Winter 1956), 57-67. 

2867 . Rural household inventories: establishing the 

names, uses, and furnishings of rooms in the colonial 
New England home, 1675-1775. Boston: Society for the 
Preservation of New England Antiquities, 1964. xl, 

306p. MStuO. 

2868 CURRIER, CHARLES. "John Osgood, 
clockmaker of the Merrimack and Connecticut River 
Valley." Antiques Journal, 15 (Jan. 1960), 15-17, 36. 

Lived 1770-1840 in North Andover and Haverhill, 

Mass.; Haverhill, N.H. 

2869 DELPH, SHIRLEY, and JOHN DELPH. New 
England decoys. Exton, Pa.: Schiffer Publishing, 

[1981]. 159p. MW. -I- 

2870 DODGE. ERNEST STANLEY. "Captain 

collectors: the influence of New England shipping on 
the study of Polynesian material culture." EIHC, 81 
(Jan. 1945), 27-34. 

2871 DOMESTIC pottery of the northeastern 

United States, 1625-1850. Sarah Peabody Tumbaugh, 
ed. Orlando, Fla.: Academic Pr., 1985. xxi, 319p. 
MStuO. -I- 

Includes essays on New England potters and 
potteries. 

2872 DULANEY, WILUAM L. "Wallace Nutting: 
collector and entrepreneur." Winterthur Portfolio, 

No. 13 (1979), 47-60. 

See also entry 2859. 



2873 EATON, ALLEN HENDERSHOTT. HandicTafts of 
New England. N.Y.: Harper, 1949. xxi, 374p. 

MStuO. -I- 

2874 ENDICOTT, ROBERT RANTOUL. "Cherry was 

the mahogany of New England." American Collector, 5 
(Mar. 1936), 4-5, 12. 

2875 "EVIDENCES of daily life in New England, 

1790-1810." OTNE. 56 (July-Sept. 1965), 14-24. 

2876 FALES, MARTHA GANDY. 'Two early New 
England dummy boards." Antiques, 120 (Dec. 1981), 
1422-1423. 

"...Painted figures. ..that were cut life size from 
wooden boards, shaped according to the outline of the 
figure, and painted to resemble servants, soldiers, or 
children and other members of the family." Examples 
are from Massachusetts and New Hampshire. 

2877 FENNELL Y. CATHERINE M. Textiles in New 
England, 1790-1840. Sturbridge, Mass.: Old 
Sturbridge Village, 1961. 40p. MStuO. -i- 

2878 FLYNT, HENRY NEEDHAM, and MARTHA GANDY 
FALES. The Heritage Foundation collection of silver; 
with biographical sketches of New England 
silversmiths, 1625-1825. Deerfield, Mass.: Heritage 
Foundation, 1968. xiv, 391p. MStuO. -t- 

2879 FORBES. EDWIN nSHER. "New England 
trademarks." OTNE, 31 (Apr. 1941), 83-87. 

2880 FRENCH, REGINALD. "English delftware in 
New England." Connecticut League of Historical 
Societies, Bulletin, 8 (Summer 1956), 8-10. 

2881 GARVAN, ANTHONY N.B. "The New England 
porringer: an index of custom." Smithsonian 
Insitution, Annual Report (1958), 543-552. 

2882 GOULD. MARY EARLE. "Early New England 
woodenware." Antiques, 31 (Feb. 1937), 68-72. 

2883 . "On the hearths of the first settlers." OTNE, 

41 (Jan. 1951), 61-64. 

Fireplace utensils in early New England. 

2884 GREEN. CHARLES. "Old New England 
porcelain." OTNE, 22 (Jan. 1932), 114-120. 

2885 GREENLAW, BARRY A. New England furniture 
at Williamsburg. Williamsburg, Va.: Colonial 
Williamsburg Foundation, 1974. viii, 195p. MWA. -i- 



139 



2886 

2886 

2887 

2888 

2889 

2890 

2891 

2892 

2893 

2894 

2895 

2896 

2897 

2898 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



ANTIQUES, HOUSEHOLD FURNISHINGS, AND DECORATIVE ARTS 



HARGRAVE, CATHERINE PERRY. "The playing 
cards of Puritan New England." OTNE, 18 (Apr. 1928), 

167-181. 

Puritan era and later. 

HARLOW, HENRY J. "Decorated New England 
furniture." Antiques, 116 (Oct. 1979), 860-871. 

. "Signed and labeled New England furniture." 

Antiques, 116 (Oct. 1979), 872-879. 

HEBARD, HELEN BRIGHAM. Early lighting in 
New England, 1620-1861. Rutland, Vt.: C. E. Tuttle, 

1964. 88p. MStuO. + 

HEDLUND, CATHERINE A. A primer of New 
England crewel embroidery. (1963) Sturbridge, Mass.: 2903 

Old Sturbridge Village, 1971. 72p. MStuO. -t- 

HOSLEY, WILUAM N., JR., and PHILIP ZEA. 2904 

"Decorated board chests of the Connecticut River 
Valley." Antiques, 119 (May 1981), 1146-1151. 



KRUEGER, GLEE F. New England samplers to 
1840. Sturbridge, Mass.: Old Sturbridge Village, 

1978. XV, 227p. MStuO. -t- 

LEE, RUTH WEBB. "Blown molded glass of 
New England." American Collector, 10 (Apr. 1941), 9, 
20 . 

LINDSAY, MERRILL. The New England gun: 

the first two hundred years. New Haven, Conn.: New 

Haven Colony Historical Society, 1976. 190p. MWA. + 

LITTLE, NINA FLETCHER. "Coach, sign and 
fancy painting." OTNE, 45 (Spring 1955), 83-87. 

In New England. 

. "English engravings as sources of New England 

decoration." OTNE, 54 (Spring 1964), 96-105. 

. Floor coverings in New England before 1850. 

Sturbridge, Mass.: Old Sturbridge Village, 1967. 

82p. MStuO. -(- 



2899 



2900 



2901 



2902 



HOWE, FLORENCE T. "Some early New 

England church pewter." Antiques, 22 (Sept. 1932), 92- 

94. 

HYNSON, GARRET, and SUSAN H. NASH. 

"Design in Yankee butter molds." Antiques, 41 (Feb. 
1942), 131-133. 

JACKSON, EDWIN. "New England stoves." 

OTNE, 26 (Oct. 1935), 55-64. 

For heating (pre-1800). 



2905 . "Lighting in colonial records." OTNE, 42 

(Spring 1952), 96-101. 

2906 . Little by Little: six decades of collecting 

American decorative arts. N.Y.: E. P. Dutton, 1984. 
xiv, 292p. MB. -(- 

Nina Fletcher Little and Bertram K. Little 
collection. 

2907 . "Livery cupboards in New England." Antiques, 

84 (Dec. 1963), 710-713. 



JOBE, BROCK W., and MYRNA KAYE. New 
England furniture: the colonial era; selections from 
the Society for the Preservation of New England 
Antiquities. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1984. xiii, 
494p. MWA. 

KERN, ARTHUR B., and SYBIL B. KERN. 

"Almira Edson, painter of family registers." 
Antiques, 122 (Sept. 1982), 558-561. 

Lived 1803-1886. 

KETTELL, RUSSELL HAWES. The pine 
furniture of early New England. N.Y.: Doubleday, 
Doran, 1929. xiii, 618p. MStuO. + 

KIRK, JOHN T. "The traditions of English 
painted furniture. Part I: the experiences in 
colonial New England." Antiques, 117 (May 1980), 
1078-1083. 



2908 . "Old New England guide boards." NEG, 9 

(Winter 1968), 10-15. 

Road signs. 

2909 LORD, PRISQLLA SAWYER, and DANIEL J. 

FOLEY. The folk arts and crafts of New England. 
Updated ed. Radnor, Pa.: Chilton Book, 1975. ix, 
287p. MStuO. + 

2910 LYNES, WILSON. "Slat-back chairs of New 
England and the Middle Atlantic states." Antiques, 25 
(Mar. 1934), 104-107. 

2911 LYON, IRVING WHITALL. The colonial 
furniture of New England: a study of the domestic 
furniture in use in the seventeenth and eighteenth 
centuries. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1925. xii, 

285p. MStuO. + 

2912 MaeSWIGGAN, AMELIA ELIZABETH. "Early 

desks made in New England." Antiques Journal, 10 (May 
1955), 24-25. 



140 



2913 

2914 

2915 

2916 

2917 

2918 

2919 

2920 

2921 

2922 

2923 

2924 

2925 



The Arts 



ANTIQUES, HOUSEHOLD FURNISHINGS. AND DECORATIVE ARTS 2938 



MARTIN, LAUREL KOCH. "Candles take 2926 

over." Old Sturbridge Visitor, 24 (Winter 1984-1985), 

8-9. 

Their use in early- 19th-century New England. 

2927 

MER AS, PHYLLIS. A Yankee way with wood. 

Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1975. 255p. NhD. -t- 
Carving. 

2928 

MERRILL. MADELINE OSBORNE. "The Osborns 

and their redware: from South Danvers, Massachusetts, 

to Loudon, New Hampshire." OTNE, 56 (Fall 1965), 49- 

58. 2929 

MITCHELL, EDWIN VALENTINE. The romance 
of New England antiques. N.Y.: A. A. Wynn, 1950. 

265p. MStuO. -t- 

MITCHELL, GRACE B. "Evolution of the New 2930 

England hearth." Connecticut Circle, 10 (Jan. 1947), 

26-27, 31; (Feb. 1947), 18-19. 

NEEDHAM, A. C. "Random notes on funeral 

rings, compiled from various sources." OTNE, 39 (Apr. 2931 

1949), 93-97. 



NICOLL, JESSICA. "A legacy recognized." 

Old Sturbridge Visitor, 28 (Spring 1988), 4-6. 

Artifacts reflective of women's work in the early- 
19th century. 2932 

NORTON, C. A. QUINCY. "The lights and 

lamps of early New England." Connecticut Magazine, 7 

(Feb.-Mar. 1903), 501-513; 8. No. 1 (1903), 95-100. 2933 

NYLANDER, JANE C. "Candlelight." Early 

American Life, 16 (Apr. 1985), 58-59, 76-77. 2934 

. "Some print sources of New England schoolgirl 

art." Antiques, 110 (Aug. 1976), 292-301. 2935 

. 'Toward comfort and uniformity in New England 

meeting houses, 1750-1850." DubSemPr (1979), 86-100. 
Interior decoration and furnishings. 2936 



NYLANDER, RICHARD C., ELIZABETH REDMOND, 
and PENNY J. SANDER. Wallpaper in New England: 
selections from the Society for the Preservation of 
New England Antiquities. Boston: Society for the 2937 

Preservation of New England Antiquities, 1986. ix, 

283p. MStuO. 

ORMSBEE, THOMAS H. "New England produced 

its own type of small sideboards." American 2938 

Collector, 5 (July 1936), 7, 18. 

Cabinetmaking. 



PANKIEWICZ, PHIUP R. New England 
cutlery. [Gilman, Conn.: Holytree Publications, 

1986.] 256p. RHi. -h 

PEIRCE, DONALD C., and HOPE ALSWANG. 

American interiors: New England and the South. N.Y.: 
Universe Books, 1983. 64p. CtNhHi. -t- 

PETERSON, HAROLD LESLIE. "Firearms of 

the Pilgrims and Puritans." American Arms Collector, 

1 (July 1957), 66-72. 

POLLAK, EMIL, and MARTYL POLLAK. "A 

study of planes made by Francis and John Nicholson and 

Cesar Chelor." CEAIA, 38 (June 1985), 25-27. 

Hand tools, made in Rehoboth and Wrentham, Mass., 
and Cumberland, R.I. 

POTWINE, ELIZABETH B. "John Potwine: 
silversmith of Massachusetts and Connecticut." 

Antiques, 28 (Sept. 1935), 106-109. 

18th century. 

PRESTON, CAROLINE D. "A rebus from 
Fanny." EIHC, 118 (July 1982), 186-188. 

1835 letter belonging to the Essex Institute, Salem, 
Mass., in which "pictures of objects and symbols [are] 
substituted for words." 

PRINCE, DANIEL. "Scrimshaw: art of the 

Yankee whaler." Art & Antiques, 4 (May-June 1981), 

108-113. 

RAYMOND, PERCY E. "Some New England 
|3ewter." OTNE, 42 (Fall 1951), 48-53. 

REAVELEY, MABEL E. Weathervane secrets. 

Dublin, N.H.: W. L. Bauhan, 1984. 71p. MB. -h 

RUMFORD, BEATRIX T. "How pictures were 

used in New England houses, 1825-1850." Antiques, 106 

(Nov. 1974), 827-835. 

SAMMONS, MARK J., and CAROLINE FULLER 
SLOAT. "New light in the meetinghouse." Old 
Sturbridge Visitor, 27 (Winter 1987-1988), 4-6. 

Use of chandeliers (1830s). 

SAUNDERS, RICHARD H. "Collecting 
American decorative arts in New England...." 

Antiques, 109 (May 1976), 996-1002; 110 (Oct. 1976), 
754-763. 

SCOTT, KENNETH. "Gideon Casey, Rhode 
Island silversmith and counterfeiter." Rhode Island 
History, 12 (Apr. 1953), 50-54. 

Also in Cormecticut and New York (18th century). 



141 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



2939 ANTIQUES, HOUSEHOLD FURNISHINGS, AND DECORATIVE ARTS 



2939 SMITH, MRS. CHETWOOD. "Lawn animals." 

OTNE, 39 (Apr. 1949), 89-92. 

2940 SOCIETYFORTHEPRESERVATIONOFNEW 
ENGLAND ANTIQUITIES, BOSTON. Elegant 
accomplishments: furnishings from New England homes, 
1660-1860. Permy J. Sander, ed. Boston, 1982. 115p. 
MStuO. + 

2941 . New England furniture: essays in memory of 

Benno M. Forman. Boston, 1987. xvii, 354p. MU. -t- 

2942 SPINNEY, FRANK OAKMAN. "Country 
furniture." Antiques, 64 (Aug. 1953), 114-117. 

New England (ca. 1800). 

2943 STARR, GEORGE ROSS, JR. "Old New England 
decoys." OTNE, 43 (Fall 1952), 42-47. 

2944 STEARNS, MARTHA GENNUNG. "New England's 
needlework origins." NEG, 3 (Spring 1962), 23-29. 

2945 STILLMAN, KARL G. "Deacon William 
Stillman: clockmaker of Westerly, R.I., and 
Burlington, Conn., 1786-1809." Timepieces Quarterly, 

1 (Feb. 1949), 94-95. 

2946 STOW, CHARLES MESSER. "Northern New 
England furniture." The Antiquarian, 10 (May 1928), 
33-37, 76. 

2947 TERRACE, USA COOK. "English and New 
England embroidery." Museum of Fine Arts [Boston], 
Bulletin, 62 (1964), 65-80. 

2948 TOOKER, DOROTHY. "Candles for luck." 

OTNE, 39 (Oct. 1948), 46-47. 

Bayberry candles. 

2949 TRENT, ROBERT FRANQS. "New England 
furniture: joinery and turning before 17(X)." Art & 
Antiques, 6 (July-Aug. 1982), 72-79. 

2950 . "Style, technology, and the craftsman: 

assessing regionalism in seventeenth-century New 
England joinery.” DubSemPr (1981), 10-28. 

2951 VON SUCK, MARJORIE. 'Tracing New England 
wall and furniture stencils historically." Decorator, 

7 (Summer 1953), 7-9. 

2952 WARD, BARBARA McLEAN. "'In a feasting 
posture': communion vessels and community values in 
seventeenth- and eighteenth-century New England." 
Winterthur Portfolio, 23 (Spring 1988), 1-24. 



2953 WATKINS, LURAWOODSIDE. Early New 
England potters and their wares. (1950) Hamden, 

Conn.: Archon Books, 1968. x, 291p. MStuO. + 

2954 . Early New England pottery. Sturbridge, Mass.: 

Old Sturbridge Village, 1959. 22p. MStuO. h- 

See also preceding entry. 

2955 . "Early New England redware potters." CEAIA, 3 

(Apr. 1945), 21, 30, 33, 36. 

2956 . "New England pottery in the Smithsonian 

Institution." Antiques, 72 (Sept. 1957), 232-236. 

2957 , and EVAN W. LONG. "Old-time foot stoves." 

Antiques, 35 (Mar. 1939), 132-134. 

2958 WATTS, HENRY F. R. "Tower clocks: a 

survey of many interesting New England specimens made 
before 1850." National Association of Watch and Clock 
Collectors, Bulletin, 4 (Apr. 1950), 94-102. 

2959 WHIPPLE, J. RAYNER. "Old New England 
weather vanes." OTNE, 31 (Oct. 1940), 44-56. 

2960 WHITE, FRANK G. "Reflections on a tin 
kitchen." CEAIA, 36 (Sept. 1983), 45-48, 61. 

Historical sketch of the making and use of reflector 
ovens in New England (late- 18th and early- 19th 
centuries). 

2961 . "Stoves in nineteenth-century New England." 

Antiques, 116 (Sept. 1979), 592-599. 

2962 WILCOX, ROBERT H. 'The New England 
underhammer rifle." American Arms Collector, 2 (July 
1958), 72-73. 

2963 WILSON, KENNETH M. Glass in New England. 

(1959) Sturbridge, Mass.: Old Sturbridge Village, 

1969. 45p. MStuO. + 

See also next entry. 

2964 . New England glass and glassmaking. N.Y.: 

Crowell, 1972. 401p. MStuO. -t- 

2965 WINTON, ANDREW L., and KATE G. WINTON. 

"Early whitewood furniture." OTNE, 19 (July 1927), 18- 
27. 

Late-17th and 18th centuries. 



142 



The Arts 



GRAVESTONE ART 

2966 BENES, PETER. "The caricature hypothesis 
re-examined: the animated skull as a Puritan folk 
image." DubSemPr (1976), 57-67. 

2967 . "Lt. John Hartshorn: gravestone maker of 

Haverhill and Norwich." EIHC, 109 (Apr. 1973), 152- 
164. 

Massachusetts and Connecticut. 

2968 . "The Rockingham carvings: folk ecclesiology 

in the upper Cormecticut River Valley, 1786-1812." 
NEHGR, 132 (Apr. 1978), 97-114. 

Gravestone carvings in southeastern Vermont and 
southwestern New Hampshire. 

2969 BERGENGREN, CHARLES. "Folk art on 
gravestones: the glorious contrast." Markers, 2 
(1983), 171-185. 

New England. 

2970 "BIBLIOGRAPHY of gravestone studies." 

DubSemPr (1976), 137-141; (1978), 149-158. 

2971 BYERS, LAURA. Till death do us part': 

design sources of eighteenth century New England 
tombstones. New Haven, Corm.; Yale Univ. Art 
Gallery, 1978. 22p. CtY. -t- 

2972 CHASE, THEODORE, and LAUREL K. GABEL. 

"John Gaud: Boston and Cormecticut gravestone carver, 
1693-1750." Cormecticut Historical Society Bulletin, 
50 (Spring 1985), 77-104. 

2973 FORBES, HARRIETTE MERRIHELD. 

Gravestones of early New England and the men who made 
them, 1653-1800. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1927. 
141p. MWA. + 

Reprinted 1967. 

2974 . "Symbolic cemetery gates in New England." 

OTNE, 24 (Oct. 1933), 46-58. 

2975 FOSTER, STEPHEN C. "From significant 
incompetence to insigificant competence." DubSemPr 
(1976), 33-40. 

New England gravestone carving. 

2976 GARDNER, ALBERT TEN EYCK. Yankee 
stonecutters: the first American school of sculpture, 
1800-1850. N.Y.: Columbia Univ. Pr., 1945. 84p. 
MStuO. -t- 



GRAVESTONE ART 2989 



2977 GILLON, EDMUND VINCENT, JR. Early New 
England gravestone rubbings. N.Y.: Dover 
Publications, 1966. xxvi, 195p. MStuO. -i- 

2978 GORMAN, FREDERICK, and MICHAEL DiBLASI. 
"Nonchronological sources of variation in the 
seriation of gravestone motifs in the Northeast and 
Southeast colonies." DubSemPr (1976), 69-87. 

2979 GROSSMAN, LLOYD. "Heraldic design on New 
England gravestones." OTNE, 64 (Oct. -Dec. 1973), 55- 
60. 

2980 HALL, DAVID DRISKO. "The gravestone 

image as a Puritan cultural code." DubSemPr (1976), 
23-32. 

2981 KELLY, SUE, and ANNE WILLIAMS. '"And the 
men who made them': the signed gravestones of New 
England." Markers, 2 (1983), 1-103. 

2982 KRIM, ARTHUR J. "Diffusion of garden 
cemeteries in New England." NE-StLVGSPr, 13 (1983), 
38-44. 

Following the development of Mount Auburn Cemetery 
in Cambridge, Mass. (1831). 

2983 KULL, ANDREW. New England cemeteries: a 
collector's guide. Brattleboro, Vt.: Stephen Greene 
Pr., 1975. xvii, 253p. MSaE. + 

2984 LUDWIG, ALLAN I. "Carved stone-markers 

in New England: 1650-1815." Ph.D. dissertation, Yale 
Univ., 1964. 

See also entry 2986. 

2985 . "Eros and agape: classical and early 

Christian survivals in New England stonecarving." 
DubSemPr (1976), 41-56. 

2986 . Graven images: New England stonecarving and 

its symbols, 1650-1815. Middletown, Conn.: Wesleyan 
Univ. Pr., 1966. xxxi, 482p. MStuO. -t- 

See also entry 2984. 

2987 . "Stone carving in New England graveyards." 

Antiques, 86 (July 1964), 87-91. 

See also next entry. 

2988 . "Stonecarving in New England." New Haven 

Colony Historical Society, Journal, 12 (Mar. 1963), 8- 
13. 

See also preceding entry. 

2989 LUDWIG, JANTNE LOWELL. "New England's 
carvers: the forgotten artists of early America." 

NEG, 3 (Winter 1963), 29-35. 



143 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



2990 GRAVESTONE ART 



2990 MANN, THOMAS CLIFFORD, and JANET GREENE. 

Over their dead bodies: Yankee epitaphs & history. 
Brattleboro, Vt.: Stephen Greene Pr., 1962. 103p. 

VtU. + 

2991 MINER, GEORGE L. 'Types of early New 
England gravestones." Rhode Island Historical 
Society, Collections, 12 (Apr. 1919), 34-45. 

2992 PIKE, ROBERT EVERDING. Granite laughter 
and marble tears: epitaphs of old New England. 
Brattleboro, Vt.: Stephen Day Pr., 1938. 80p. 

MWA.+ 

2993 SANDROF, IVAN. '"As I am now so you must 
be.'" American Heritage, 11 (Feb. 1960), 39-43. 

New England Gravestones. 

2994 SMITH, JAMES M. "Puritanism: self-image 
formation through gravestone form, style, and 
symbols." DAR Magazine, 114 (Apr. 1980), 470-485. 

2995 TASHJIAN, DICKRAN, and ANN TASHJIAN. 

Memorials for children of change: the art of early 
New England stonecarving. Middletown, Conn.: 
Wesleyan Univ. Pr., 1974. xv, 309p. Ct. -t- 

2996 TAYLOR, ERICH A. O'D. "The slate 

gravestones of New England." OTNE, 15 (Oct. 1924), 58- 
67. 

2997 WATTERS, DAVID HARPER. "Withbodilie 
eyes": eschatological themes in Puritan literature 
and gravestone art. Arm Arbor, Mich.: UMI Research 
Pr., 1981. xii, 255p. MWA. -h 

See also next entry. 

2998 . "'With bodilie eyes': eschatological themes 

in the literature and funerary art of early New 
England." Ph.D. dissertation. Brown Univ., 1979. iv, 
338p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 40, No. IIA (1980), 5869. See 
also preceding entry. 

2999 WILLIAMS, MELVIN GILBERT. The last word: 
the lure and lore of early New England graveyards. 

Boston: Oldstone Enterprises, 1973. 39p. MWA. -i- 

3000 WILLSHIRE, BETTY. "Scottish gravestones 

and the New England winged skull." Markers, 2 (1983), 
105-114. 



MUSIC AND DANCE 

3001 ARMSTRONG, MAURICE WHITMAN. "Henry 
Alline: 1748-1784." Hymn, 7 (July 1956), 73-78. 

Itinerant Methodist minister and composer of hymns. 

3002 BANDEL, BETTY. Sing the Lord's song in a 
strange land: the life of Justin Morgan. Rutherford, 
N.J.: Fairleigh Dickinson Univ. Pr., 1981. 263p. 

VtU. -H 

Morgan was a composer, as well as the owner of the 
original Morgan horse. 

3003 BARRY, PHILLIPS. "Springfield Mountain: 
materials for a critical study." Folk-song Society of 
the Northeast, Bulletin, No. 7 (1934), 4-5; No. 8 
(1934), 3-6; No. 9 (1935), 9-10; No. 10 (1935), 6-8; 
No. 11 (1936), 13-15; No. 12 (1937), 6-8. 

Ballad. See also entry 3059. 

3004 BECKER, LAURA L. "Ministers vs. laymen: 

the singing controversy in Puritan New England, 1720- 
1740." NEQ, 55 (Mar. 1982), 79-96. 

3005 BEVERIDGE, LOWELL P. "Music in New 
England from John Cotton to Colton Mather (1640- 
1726)." Historical Magazine of the Protestant 
Episcopal Church, 48 (June 1979), 145-165. 

3006 BONYUN, BILL. The story of New England 
through its ballads and songs. [Brookhaven, N.Y., 
1959.] 14p. MWA. 

3007 BRAYLEY, ARTHUR WELLINGTON. "The First 

organ in America." NEM, n.s. 27 (Oct. 1902), 212-219. 

18th-century organ, owned successively by Anglican 
and Episcopal churches in Boston, Newburyport, Mass., 
and Portsmouth, N.H. 

3008 BRINK, CAROL RYRIE. Harps in the wind: 

the singing Hutchinsons. (1947) N.Y.: Da Capo Pr., 
1980. V, 312p. Me. + 

19th century. See also entry 3036. 

3009 BROOKS, HENRY MASON. Oldcn-iimc music: 

a compilation from newspapers and books. Boston: 
Ticknor, 1888. xiii, 283p. MSaE. -i- 

3010 BUECHNER, ALAN CLARK. The New England 
harmony: a collection of early American choral 
music.... Sturbridge, Mass.: Old Sturbridge Village, 
1964. 32p. MSaE. -i- 



144 



The Arts 



MUSIC AND DANCE 3037 



3011 BUECHNER, ALAN CLARK. "Yankee singing 
schools and the golden age of choral music in New 
England, 1760-1800." Ed.D. dissertation. Harvard 
Univ., 1960. xxiii, 402, [5]p. MStuO. 

3012 COOKE, MYM. "Itinerant Yankee singing 

masters in the eighteenth century." DubSemPr (1984), 
16-36. 

Primarily from Connecticut and Massachusetts. 

3013 COVEY, CYCLONE. "Puritanism and music in 
colonial America." WMQ, 3 ser. 8 (July 1951), 378- 
388. 

3014 DANIEL, RALPH T. The anthem in New 

England before 1800. Evanston, 111.: Northwestern 
Univ. Pr., 1966. xvi, 282p. MWA. -i- 
See also next entry. 

3015 . "The anthem in New England before 1800." 

Ph.D. dissertation. Harvard Univ., 1955. 930p. 

See also preceding entry. 

3016 EU ASON, ROBERT ERWIN. Graves & Company, 
musical instrument makers. Dearborn, Mich.: 

Greenfield Village, 1975. 20p. NhHi. + 

In Winchester, N.H. (1830-1850), and Boston (1851- 
1877). 

3017 nSHER, WILLIAM ARMS. YeoldeNew- 
England psalm-tunes, 1620-1820: with historical 
sketch, biographical notes, and hints on performance. 
Boston: Oliver Diston, 1930. xvi, 56p. MBU. -t- 

3018 FTTZ, ADELINE FRANCES. "Music of our 
forefathers." NEM, n.s. 37 (Feb. 1908), 669-678. 

3019 FLANDERS, HELEN H ARTNESS. Ancient 
ballads, traditionally sung in New England. 

Philadelphia: Univ. of Pennsylvania Pr., 1960. 4v. 
MWA. H- 

3020 . "Ancient themes and characteristics found in 

certain New England folksongs." Journal of American 
Folklore, 77 (Jan.-Mar. 1964), 32-38. 

3021 . "Ballads in an Irish family." NEG, 7 (Fall 

1965), 3-11. 

3022 . "Folk songs traditional in New England." NEG, 

2 (Fall 1960), 3-12. 

3023 . "In the 1800s." NEG, 4 (Spring 1963), 3-12. 

New England songs. 

3024 . "One thing leads to another in collecting 

ballads." NEG, 10 (Summer 1968), 19-24. 



3025 . "Songs alive from Revolutionary times." 

American Heritage, 2 (Winter 1951), 48-49, 62-64. 

3026 , and MARGUERITE OLNEY. Ballads migrant in New 

England. N.Y.: Farrar, Straus and Young, 1953. xiv, 

248p. RPB. 

3027 FLEXNER, BEATRICE HUDSON. "The music of 

the Puritans." American Heritage, 8 (Dec. 1956), 64- 
67, 117-119. 

1620-1794. 

3028 FRANK, STUART M. "Ballads and songs of 

the whale-hunters, 1825-1895, from manuscripts in the 
Kendall Whaling Museum." Ph.D. dissertation. Brown 
Univ., 1985. xli, 1185p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 46, No. 7A (1985), 1983. 

3029 GOODELL, ABNER CHENEY, JR. "Progress of 
sacred music in New England." Essex Institute, 
Proceedings, 5 (1868), 168-190. 

3030 HALE. EDWARD EVERETT. New England 
history in ballads. Boston: Little, Brown, 1903. 

XV, 182p. MBU. + 

3031 HARRIS, T. W. "The New England ballad." 

NEHGR, 9 (July 1855), 206-207. 

Ballad satirizing Puritan manners and customs. 

3032 HITCHCOCK, WILEY. "William Billings and 

the Yankee tunesmiths." Hi-Fi Stereo Review, 16 (Feb. 
1966), 54-65. 

Composer (lived 1746-1800). 

3033 HOOD, GEORGE. A history of music in New 
England: with biographical sketches of reformers and 
psalmists. Boston: Wilkins, Carter, 1846. vii, 

252p. MWA. -H 

3034 IRWIN, JOYCE. "The theology of 'regular 
singing.'" NEQ, 51 (June 1978), 176-192. 

1720s. 

3035 JOHNSON. H. EARLE. "Early New England 
periodicals devoted to music." Musical Quarterly, 26 
(Apr. 1940), 153-161. 

3036 JORDAN, PHILIP D. Singin' Yankees. 

Minneapolis: Univ. of Minnesota Pr., 1946. xi, 305p. 
MBU.-k 

Hutchinson family and New England abolitionism. See 
also entry 3008. 

3037 . "Songs of long ago." Yankee, 6 (Oct. 1940), 

21 - 22 . 



145 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



3038 MUSIC AND DANCE 



3038 KELLER. KATE VAN WINKLE. "John 
Griffiths, eighteenth-century itinerant dancing 
master." DubSemPr (1984), 90-1 1 1. 

3039 KOUWENHOVEN, JOHN A. "Some unfamiliar 

aspects of singing in New England, 1620-1810." NEQ, 6 
(Sept. 1933), 567-588. 

3040 LAHEE, HENRY C. "A century of choral 

singing in New England." NEM, n.s. 26 (Mar. 1902), 
102-117. 

3041 . "Organs and organ building in New England." 

NEM. n.s. 17 (Dec. 1897), 485-505. 

3042 LAMBERT, BARBARA. "The musical 
Puritans." OTNE, 62 (Jan.-Mar. 1972), 66-75. 

3043 LARKIN, JACK. "In harmony." Old 
Sturbridge Visitor, 25 (Summer 1985), 8-10. 

Music in rural New England life (early-19lh 
century). 

3044 LEMAY, JOSEPH A. LEO. "New England's 
annoyances": America’s first folk song. Newark, 

Del.: Univ. of Delaware Pr., 1985. 163p. Ct. -t- 

17th and 18th centuries. 

3045 LINDSAY, BRYAN EUGENE. "The English glee 

in New England, 1815-1845." M.A. thesis, George 
Peabody College for Teachers, Vanderbilt Univ.,, 1966. 
vi, 397p. MStuO. 

3046 LINSCOTT, ELOISE HUBBARD. Folk songs of 
old New England. (1939) Hamden, Conn.: Archon 
Books, 1962. xxiii, 344p. NhD. -t- 

3047 McDaniel, STANLEY ROBERT. "Church song 
and the cultivated tradition in New England and New 
York." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of Southern 
California, 1983. 

Abstracted in DAI, 44, No. 5 A (1983), 1237. 

3048 MacDOUGALL, HAMILTON CRAWFORD. Early New 
England psalmody: an historical appreciation. 
Brattleboro, Vt.: Stephen Daye Pr., 1940. 179p. 

NhD.+ 

3049 MUSIC and dance in the New England 

states, including Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, 
Massachusetts, Rhode Island & Connecticut. Sigmund 
Spaeth, ed.-in-chief. N.Y.: Bureau of Musical 
Research, 1953. 347p. MSaE. -i- 



3050 MUSIC in American society, 1776-1976: 

from Puritan hymn to synthesizer. George McCue, ed. 
New Brunswick, N.J.: Transaction Books, 1977. 20 Ip. 
MBU.-i- 

3051 "ORGAN building in New England." New 
England Magazine, 6 (1834), 205-215. 

3052 OSTERHOUT, PAUL RAGATZ. "Note reading 
and regular singing in eighteenth-century New 
England." American Music, 4 (Summer 1986), 125-144, 

3053 OWEN, BARBARA. The organ in New England: 
an account of its use and manufacture to the end of 
the nineteenth century. Raleigh [N.C.]: Sunbury Pr., 
1979. XX, 629p. MW A. + 

3054 RIDER, DANIEL EDGAR. "The musical 
thought and activities of the New England 
Transcendentalists." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of 
Minnesota, 1964. xvi, 324p. MBU. 

Abstracted in DAI, 26, No. 9 (1966), 5476. 

3055 SCHOLES, PERCY ALFRED. The Puritans and 
music in England and New England: a contribution to 
the cultural history of two nations. (1934) N.Y.: 

Russell & Russell, 1962. xxii, 428p. MStuO. -t- 

3056 . "The truth about the New England Puritans and 

music." EIHC, 69 (Jan. 1933), 1-17. 

3057 SHEPARD, MARTHA DANA. "Forty years of 
musical life in New England." NEM, n.s. 21 (Oct. 

1899), 131-143. 

3058 STEEL, DAVID WARREN. "Stephen Jenks 
(1772-1856): American composer and tunebook 
compiler." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of Michigan, 

1982. 487p. MBU. 

Abstracted in DAI, 43, No. lOA (1983), 3151. 

3059 SWIDERSKI, RICHARD M. '"Springfield 
Mountain' in valley and bay." DubSemPr (1981), 87- 
100 . 

19th-century ballad, traceable to a 1761 tragedy in 
Wilbraham, Mass. See also entry 3003. 

3060 THOMPSON, JAMES WILUAM. "Music and 
musical activities in New England, 1800-1838." Ph.D. 
dissertation, George Peabody College for Teachers, 
Vanderbilt Univ., 1962. xi, 673p. MBU. 

Abstracted in DAI, 23, No. 9 (1963), 3409. 

3061 VANDEN HONERT, PETER. "A pedagogical 

study of New England folk music." Ph.D. dissertation, 
Univ. of Missouri, Kansas City, 1985. 207p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 46, No. 5A (1985), 1126. 



146 



Literature, Language, and the Printed Word 



LITERARY HISTORY 3073 



3062 WINSLOW. OLA ELIZABETH. "Victory in the 
'singing seats.'" NEC, 3 (Spring 1962), 3-14 

18th-century reform in meeting-house singin 

3063 WINTHROP, ROBERT CHARLES. Music in New 
England. Boston, 1908. 20p. MSaE. -t- 

3064 WIRLING, EUOT I. "Pipe organs of New 
England." OTNE, 45 (Fall 1954), 3748. 

3065 WORST, JOHN WILUAM. "New England 
psalmody, 1760-1810: analysis of an American 
Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of Michigan, 1974. 
543p. MBU. 

Abstracted in DAI, 35, No. 7A (1975), 4605. 



THEATER 

3066 ANDERSON, MARCIA J. "Devils and divines: 
the New England Puritan in American drama." 
dissertation, Brandeis Univ., 1968. 422p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 29, No. 8A (1969), 2665. 

3067 DORSON, RICHARD MERCER. "The Yankee on 
the stage— a folk hero of American drama.” N 
(Sept. 1940), 467493. 

3068 GAFFORD, LUCILE. 'Transcendentalist 
attitudes toward drama and the theatre." NEQ 
(Sept. 1940), 442-466. 

3069 MORGAN, EDMUND SEARS. "Puritan hostility 
to the theatre." American Philosophical Soci 
Proceedings, 110 (Oct. 1966), 340-347. 



Literature, Language, and the Printed Word 



LITERARY HISTORY 

3070 AMERICAN literature: the New England 
heritage. James Nagel and Richard Astro, eds. N.Y.: 
Garland, 1981. viii, 204p. MBU. -t- 

3071 THE AMERICAN Puritans: their prose and 
poetry. Perry Miller, ed. Garden City, N.Y.: 
Doubleday Anchor Books, 1956. 346p. MSaE. -i- 



3072 THE AMERICAN renaissance in New England. 

Joel Myerson, ed. Detroit: Gale Research, 1978. 
224p. Ct. -I- 

Literary. 

3073 ANTHOLOGY of the New England poets from 
colonial times to the present day, with biographical 
and critical commentaries. Louis Untermeyer, ed. 
N.Y.: Random House, 1948. xx, 636p. MChB. -i- 



-(- Listings in the National Union Catalog for books and pamphlets marked 
with this symbol may include additional library locations. 



147 



3074 

3074 

3075 

3076 

3077 

3078 

3079 

3080 

3081 

3082 

3083 

3084 

3085 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



LITERARY HISTORY 



BACON, MARTHA. Puritan promenade. 

Boston; Houghton Mifflin, 1964. 160p. MChB. + 
Biographical sketches of some New England women of 
letters (late-18th and early-19th centuries). 

BALDWIN, LEWIS MORSE II. "Moses and 
marmerism: an aesthetic for the poetry of colonial 
New England." Ph.D. dissertation, Syracuse Univ., 

1973. 150p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 35, No. 2A (1974), 1035. 

BLEJWAS, STANISLAUS A. "Puritans and 
Poles: the New England literary image of the Polish 
peasant immigrant." Polish American Studies, 42 
(Autumn 1985), 46-88. 

BOYNTON, PERCY H. 'The novel of Puritan 
decay, from Mrs. Stowe to John Marquand." NEQ, 13 
(Dec. 1940), 626-637. 

BROOKS, CHARLES BURNELL. "Puritanism in 
New England fiction, 1820-1870." Ph.D. dissertation, 
Princeton Univ., 1943. iv, 237p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 12, No. 3 (1952), 296-297. 

BROOKS, HENRY MASON. Literary 
curiosities. Boston: Ticknor, 1886. x, 127p. 

MSaE.-i- 

BROOKS, VAN WYCK. The flowering of New 
England, 1815-1865. N.Y.: E. P. Dutton, 1936. 550p. 
MWA. 

Literary. See also next entry. 

. New England Indian summer, 1865-1915. N.Y.: 

E. P. Dutton, 1940. 557p. MWA. -i- 
See also preceding entry. 

BROWN, RUTH ELIZABETH. "A French 
interpreter of New England's literature, 1846-1865." 
NEQ, 13 (June 1940), 305-321. 

Emile Montegut. 

BUELL, LAWRENCE. Literary 

Transcendentalism: style and vision in the American 
renaissance. Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell Univ. Pr., 1973. 
viii, 336p. MBU. + 

. New England literary culture from revolution 

through renaissance. N.Y.: Cambridge Univ. Pr., 

1986. xii, 513p. MWA. -t- 

BUSHMAN, RICHARD LYMAN. "Caricature and 
satire in old and New England before the American 
Revolution." MHSP, 88 (1976), 19-34. 



3086 CALDWELL, PATRICIA LEE. "A literary 

study of Puritan testimonies of religious experience 
from the 1630s to the 1660s, including a critical 
edition of Thomas Shepard's manuscript. The 
confessions of diverse propounded to be received and 
were entertayned as members,' from the First Church, 
Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1637-1645." Ph.D. 
dissertation. Harvard Univ., 1978. iv, 554p. 

See also next entry. 

3087 . The Puritan conversion narrative: the 

beginnings of American expression. N.Y.: Cambridge 
Univ. Pr., 1983. x, 210p. Ct. -i- 

In England and New England. See also preceding 
entry. 

3088 CARLETON, PHILLIPS D. "The Indian 

captivity." American Literature, 15 (July 1943), 169- 
180. 

3089 CARROLL, RICHARD SUTCUFFE. "Studies in 
the background and practice of prose style in New 
England, 1640-1750." Ph.D. dissertation. Harvard 
Univ., 1951. 396p. 

Described in American Puritan Studies, Michael S. 
Montgomery, comp. (1984), 81-82. 

3090 CAUGHER, RICHARD EDWARD. "The concept of 
the Puritan in American literary criticism, 1890- 
1932." Ph.D. dissertation, Northwestern Univ., 1964. 
ii, 238p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 25, No. 11 (1965), 6618. 

3091 CHARTIER, RICHARD GERARD. "King Philip's 
War in representative American literary works of the 
period 1820-1860." Ed.D. dissertation. Ball State 
Univ., 1970. 187p. 

Abstracted in DAJ, 31, No. lOA (1971), 5354. 

3092 CHASSE, PAUL P. Anthologie de la 

poesie franco-americaine de la Nouvelle-Angleterre. 
[Providence, R.I.]: Rhode Island Bicentermial 
Commission, 1976. viii, 285, [8]p. MU. + 

3093 . "How elitist were Franco-American authors in 

New England?" Contemporary French Civilization, 3 
(Fall 1978), 111-130. 

3094 . "Les poetes franco-americains de la Nouvelle- 

Angleterre, 1875-1925." Ph.D. dissertation, Laval 
University [Canada], 1968. 1, 472p. MU. 

3095 CHRISTY, ARTHUR. "Orientalism in New 
England." American Literature, 1 (Jan. 1930), 372- 
392. 



148 



Literature, Language, and the Printed Word 



LITERARY HISTORY 3116 



3096 CLARK, EDWARD. Black writers in New 

England: a bibliography, with biographical notes, of 
books by and about Afro-American writers associated 
with New England in the collection of Afro-American 
literature, Suffolk University, Museum of Afro- 
American History, Boston African American National 
Historic Site. Boston: U.S. Dept, of the Interior, 
National Park Service, 1985. xvi, 76p. MBU. -t- 

3097 COYNE, MARY REEAN. "New England 
regionalism in the context of historical change." 

Ph.D. dissertation. Case Western Reserve Univ., 1970. 
vi, 173p. NhKeS. 

Literature. Abstracted in DAI, 31, No. 7A (1971), 
3498. 

3098 DALY, ROBERT. God's altar: the world 

and the flesh in Puritan poetry. Berkeley, Calif.: 

Univ. of California Pr., 1978. ix, 253p. MWA. + 

3099 DENNIS, ALBERT WOODBURY. 'The writing 
habit in New England." Massachusetts Magazine, 9 
(Oct. 1916), 205-210. 

3100 DONOVAN, JOSEPHINE. New England local 
color literature: a woman's tradition. N.Y.: F. 

Ungar, 1983. ix, 158p. Ct. -i- 

3101 EAKIN, PAUL JOHN. The New England girl: 
cultural ideas in Hawthorne, Stowe, Howells and James. 
Athens, Ga.: Univ. of Georgia Pr., 1976. 252p. 

MB. 

3102 EVANS, EVAN ALFRED, JR. "Literary 
references in New England diaries and other personal 
records, 1700-1730." Ph.D. dissertation. Harvard 
Univ., 1940. 260p. 

Described in American Puritan Studies, Michael S. 
Montgomery, comp. (1984), 60. 

3103 FTTZGIBBONS, KATHLEEN CONNERY. "A 
history of the evolution of the didactic literature 
for Puritan children in America from 1656-1856." 

Ed.D. dissertation, Univ. of Massachusetts, 1987. vi, 
96p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 48, No. 9A (1988), 2337. 

3104 GILMORE, MICHAEL TIMO. "The middle way: 
Puritanism and ideology in American literature." 

Ph.D. dissertation. Harvard Univ., 1974. 567p. MBU. 

See also next entry. 

3105 . The middle way: Puritanism and ideology in 

American romantic fiction. New Brunswick, N.J.: 
Rutgers Univ. Pr., 1977. x, 220p. MBU. + 

See also preceding entry. 



3106 GLADSKY, THOMAS S. "The immigrant on the 
land: Polish farmers and New England novelists." 

NEQ, 61 (Sept. 1988), 429-438. 

3107 GRAHAM, MARGARET ANN BAKER. "Realism in 
New England local color." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. 
of North Carolina, 1982. 217p. 

19th-century writers. Abstracted in DAI, 43, No. 5A 
(1982), 1543. 

3108 GUMMERE, RICHARD M. "The classical 
element in early New England almanacs." Harvard 
Library Bulletin, 9 (Spring 1955), 181-196. 

3109 GURA, PHILIP F. The wisdom of words: 
language, theology, and literature in the New England 
renaissance. Middletown, Conn.: Wesleyan Univ. Pr., 
1981. X, 203p. MBU. -h 

3110 HAIMS, LYNN MARIA. "The American Puritan 
aesthetic: iconography in seventeenth-century poetry 
and tombstone art." Ph.D. dissertation. New York 
Univ., 1981. 209p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 42, No. 2 A (1981), 702. 

3111 HANSCOM, ELIZABETH DEERING. The heart of 
the Puritan: selections from letters and journals. 

N.Y.: Macmillan, 1917. xiii, 281p. CtHi. -i- 

3112 HARKNESS, DAVID JAMES. Literary New 
England: a manual for schools and clubs. [Knoxville, 
Term.]: Univ. of Teimessee, 1956. vi, 58p. MChB. -i- 

3113 HENSON, ROBERT ESTON. "Content and form 

in the Puritan funeral elegy." American Literature, 

22 (Mar. 1960), 11-27. 

See also next entry. 

3114 . "Sorry after a godly manner: a study of the 

Puritan funeral elegy in New England, 1625-1722." 

Ph.D. dissertation, UCLA, 1957. vii, 314p. 

Described in American Puritan Studies, Michael S. 
Montgomery, comp. (1984), 106-107. 

3115 HIBLER, DAVID JOSEPH. "Sexual rhetoric 

in seventeenth-century American literature." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Univ. of Notre Dame, 1970. iv, 18 Ip. 

New England. Abstracted in DAI, 31, No. 8A (1971), 
4121. 

3116 A HISTORY of the New England Poetry Club, 

1915-1931. John Wheelwright, ed. Boston, 1932. 51p, 
MBU.-i- 



149 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



3117 

3117 

3118 

3119 

3120 

3121 

3122 

3123 

3124 

3125 

3126 

3127 



LITERARY HISTORY 



HOLSTUN, JAMES. A rational millennium: 3128 

Puritan utopias of seventeenth-century England and 
America. N.Y.: Oxford Univ. Pr., 1987. x, 371p. 

MBU. -I- 

Literary history. Includes John Eliot's writings 
about his missions to the Indians. 

HORNSTEIN, JACQUELINE. "Literary history 3129 

of New England women writers, 1630-1800." Ph.D. 
dissertation, New York Univ., 1979. 4, iii, 615p. 

NhKeS. 

Abstracted in DAI, 39, No. 12A (1979), 7347. 

ISRAEL, CALVIN. "American Puritan 3130 

literary theory: 1620-1660." Ph.D. dissertation, 

Univ. of California, Davis, 1970. ix, 253p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 31, No. 12A (1971), 6553. 

3131 

JACKSON, FRANK MALCOLM. "An application 
of the principles of Aristotelian rhetoric to certain 
early New England prose." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. 
of Texas, 1967. v, 192p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 28, No. 5A (1967), 1788. 

3132 

JANTZ, HAROLD S. "The first century of 

New England verse." AASP, 53 (Oct. 1943), 219-508. 

. "Unrecorded verse broadsides of seventeenth- 

century New England." Bibliographical Society of 3133 

America, Papers, 39 (First Quarter, 1945), 1-19. 

KAZIN, ALFRED. "Fiction and New 

England." New Hampshire Alumnus, 38 (Mar. 1962), [17- 

24]. 

3134 

LANG, AMY SCHRAGER. Prophetic woman: 

Anne Hutchinson and the problem of dissent in the 
literature of New England. Berkeley, Calif.: Univ. 
of California Pr., 1987. xii, 237p. Ct. -t- 

LEVERENZ, DAVID. The language of Puritan 3135 

feeling: an exploration in literature, psychology, 
and social history. New Brunswick, N.J.: Rutgers 
Univ. Pr., 1980. xi, 346p. MB. + 

3136 

THE LITERARY humor of the urban 

Northeast, 1830-1890. David E. Sloane, ed. Baton 

Rouge, La.: Louisiana State Univ. Pr., 1983. xii, 

319p. CtHi. -I- 

LOCKYER, TIMOTHY JOHN. "Religion and 3137 

good literature: Puritan devotional poetry." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Pennsylvania State Univ., 1977. 280p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 38, No. 12A (1978), 7334. 

3138 



LOWANCE, MASON IRA, JR. "Images and 
shadows of doing things: Puritan typology in New 
England from 1660-1750." Ph.D. dissertation, Emory 
Univ., 1967. iii, 242p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 28, No. lOA (1968), 4255. See 
also next entry. 

. The language of Canaan: metaphor and symbol 

in New England from the Puritans to the 
Transcendentalists. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard Univ. 

Pr., 1980. X, 335p. MStuO. -h 
See also preceding entry. 

LUTWACK, LEONARD. "The New England 
hierarchy." NEQ, 28 (June 1955), 164-185. 

Literary history (19th century). 

LYCETTE, RONALD LEE. "Diminishing 
circumstances: feminine responses in fiction to New 
England decline." Ph.D. dissertation, Purdue Univ., 

1970. ix, 279p. NhKeS. 

Abstracted in DAI, 31, No. 4A (1970), 1764. 

McCartney, lisa MARY. "Form and voice in 
selected American Puritan spiritual autobiographies." 

Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of Notre Dame, 1982. 169p. 
Abstracted in DAI, 43, NO. 6A (1982), 1973. 

McELROY, JOHN HARMON. "Images of the 
seventeenth -century Puritan in American novels, 1823- 
1860." Ph.D. dissertation, Duke Univ., 1966. ix, 

187p. MBU. 

Abstracted in DAI, 27, No. 11 A (1967), 3845. 

MacIVER, KENNETH A., and WILLIAM O. 

THOMSON. Echoes of old New England. Cape Neddick, 
Me.: Nor'East Heritage Publications, 1982. lOOp. 

NhD. + 

Legends and folklore. 

MILLER, PERRY GILBERT EDDY, and THOMAS 
HERBERT JOHNSON. The Puritans. N.Y.: American Book 
Co., 1938. xvi, 846p. MSaE. -t- 

MILLS, BARRISS. "Attitudes of some 19th- 
century American writers toward Puritanism." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Univ. of Wisconsin, 1942. 485p. 

Described in American Puritan Studies, Michael S. 
Montgomery, comp. (1984), 65. 

MURDOCK, KENNETH BALLARD. Literature and 
theology in colonial New England. Cambridge, Mass.: 
Harvard Univ. Pr., 1949. 235p. MStuO. + 

NEW England discovery: a personal view. 

Nancy Hale, ed. N.Y.: Coward-McCann, 1963. xxiv, 

549p. NhD. -I- 



150 



Literature, Language, and the Printed Word 



LITERARY HISTORY 3160 



3139 NICKELS, CAMERON C. "Federalist mock 
pastorals: the ideology of early New England humor." 
Early American Literature, 17 (Fall 1982), 139-151. 

3140 ORIANS, GEORGE HARRISON. "New England 
witchcraft in fiction." American Literature, 2 (Mar. 
1930), 54-71. 

3141 PEARCE, ROY HARVEY. "The significance of 
the captivity narrative." American Literature, 19 
(Mar. 1947), 1-20. 

3142 PENNELL, MEUSSA McFarland. ”'A language 
of the heart': spiritual realism and the fiction of 

New England." Ph.D. dissertation. Brown Univ., 1984. 
301p. 

19th century. Abstracted in DAI, 45, No. 7A (1985), 
2104. 

3143 PERLUCK, HERBERT A. "Puritan expression 

and the decline of piety." Ph.D. dissertation. Brown 
Univ., 1955. iv, 233p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 15, No. 8 (1955), 1389. 

3144 PIERCY, JOSEPHINE K. "The 'character' in 

the literature of early New England." NEQ, 12 (Sept. 
1939), 470-476. 

3145 PURITAN influences in American 

literature. Emory Elliott, ed. Urbana, 111.: Univ. 
of Illinois Pr., 1979. xxi, 212p. MBU. -i- 

3146 PURITAN poets and poetics: seventeenth- 

century American poetry in theory and practice. Peter 
White, ed. University Park, Pa.: Pennsylvania State 
Univ. Pr., 1985. xvii, 343p. MWA. -i- 

3147 QUINN, ARTHUR HOBSON. "Pilgrim and 
Puritan in literature." Scribner's, 26 (May 1920), 
571-581. 

About the writings of Pilgrims and Puritans. 

3 1 48 ROBINSON, WILUAM HENRY. Black New 
England letters: the uses of writing in black New 
England. Boston: Trustees of the Public Library of 
the City of Boston, 1977. ix, 146p. MBU. -i- 

3149 ROTH, GEORGE L. "New England satire on 
religion, 1790-1820." NEQ, 28 (June 1955), 246-254. 



3150 SANBORN, FRANKLIN BENJAMIN. Literary 
studies and criticism: evaluations of the writers of 
the American renaissance— with fresh approaches to 
Transcendentalism, literary influences, New-England 
cultural patterns, and the creative experience. 

Keimeth Walter Cameron, ed. Hartford, Conn.: 
Transcendental Books, 1980. 367p. NhD. -i- 

See also entries 3300 and 3410. 

3151 SANTERRE, RICHARD ROBERT. Anthologiede 
la litterature franco-americaine de la Nouvelle- 
Angleterre. Renaud S. Albert, ed. [Bedford, N.H.: 
National Materials Development Center for French, 1980 
1981.] 9v. MU. -(- 

3152 . "Le remain franco-americain en Nouvelle- 

Angleterre, 1878-1943." Ph.D. dissertation, Boston 
College, 1974. 358p. 

Franco-American novel in New England. Abstracted in 
DAI, 35, No. 6A (1974), 3768. 

3153 SCOTT, SARAH MOORE. "A thematic study of 
the writings of Puritan women from the time of the 
original settlers to 1770." Ph.D. dissertation. 

Southern Illinois Univ., 1981. v, 232p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 42, No. 5A (1981), 2133. 

3154 SEARL, STANFORD JAY, JR. "The symbolic 
imagination of American Puritanism." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Syracuse Univ., 1970. iii, 205p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 32, No. lA (1971), 399. 

3155 SELLERS, MONTGOMERY P. "New England in 
colonial literature." NEM, n.s. 28 (Mar. 1903), 100- 
107. 

3156 SHIELDS, DAVID S. "Exploratory 

narratives and the development of the New England 
passage journal." EIHC, 120 (Jan. 1984), 38-57. 

17th century. 

3157 . "The religious sublime and the New England 

poets of the 1720s." Early American Literature, 19 
(Winter 1984-1985), 231-248. 

3158 SIMPSON, LEWIS P. The man of letters in 
New England and the South. Baton Rouge, La.: 

Louisiana State Univ. Pr., 1973. 255p. MBU. -t- 

3 1 59 SPENCELEY, KENNETH JAMES. "The rhetoric 

of decay in New England writing, 1665-1730." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Univ. of Illinois, 1967. 191p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 27, No. IIA (1967), 3851. 

3160 SPINGARN, LAWRENCE P. "The Yankee in 

early American fiction." NEQ, 31 (Dec. 1958), 484- 
495. 



151 



3161 

3161 

3162 

3163 

3164 

3165 

3166 

3167 

3168 

3169 

3170 

3171 

3172 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



LITERARY HISTORY 



ST AVELY, KEITH W. F. Puritan legacies: 3173 

Paradise lost and the New England tradition. Ithaca, 

N.Y.: Cornell Univ. Pr., 1987. xiv, 294p. MB. + 

STEWART, RANDALL. "Puritan literature 3174 

and the flowering of New England." WMQ, 3 ser. 3 
(July 1946), 319-342. 

. "Regional characteristics in the literature of 3175 

New England." College English, 3 (Nov. 1941), 129- 
143. 

SULUVAN, PAUL WILSON. New England men 3 1 76 

of letters. N.Y.: Macmillan, 1972. x, 256p. 

MStuO. -I- 

3177 

TARBOX, INCREASE N. "New England poetry 
of the seventeenth century." New Englander, 39 (Mar. 

1880), 174-197. 

THERRIAULT, MARIE-CARMEL. La 
litterature francaise de Nouvelle-Angleterre. 

Montreal: Chez Fides, 1946. 324p. MU. + 3178 

TOWNER, LAWRENCE WILUAM. 'True 
confessions and dying warnings in colonial New 
England." Colonial Society of Massachusetts, 3179 

Publications, 59 (1982), 523-539. 

Published confessions of condemned criminals; 
execution sermons. 

TRACTS against New England. N.Y.: AMS 
Pr., 1985. 468p. MBU. -h 

Published between 1646 and 1854. 3180 

A TREASURY of New England folklore: 
stories, ballads, and traditions. Benjamin Albert 
Botkin, ed. N.Y.: Crown Publishers, 1947. xxvi, 

934p. MWA. -t- 

3181 

VAIL, ROBERT WILLIAM GLENROIE. "Certain 

Indian captives of New England." MHSP, 68 (1952), 113- 

131. 

Literary history. 

VITELLI, JAMES ROBERT. 'The resurrection 

of the Puritan: a study of an American literary 

symbol." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of Pennsylvania, 3182 

1955. liii, 521p. 

In 20th-century American literature. Abstracted in 
DAI, 15, No. 5 (1955), 832. 

WALKER, KENNETH R. "April in New 3183 

England: the blossoming of literature in 1841." New 
England Social Studies Bulletin, 15 (May 1958), 3-9. 



WELSH, CHARLES. "The early history of 
children's books in New England." NEM, n.s. 20 (Apr. 
1899), 147-160. 

WESTBROOK, PERRY D. Acres of Bint: 

writers of rural New England, 1870-1900. Washington, 

D.C.: Scarecrow Pr., 1951. vii, 199p. MBU. + 

. The New England town in fact and fiction. 

Rutherford, N.J.: Fairleigh Dickinson Univ. Pr., 

1982. 286p. MWA. -h 

WEYGANDT, ANN M. "New England colonial 
diaries." Delaware Notes, 21 (1948), 37-58. 

WHARTON, DONALD P. "Providence and the 
colonial American sea-deliverance tradition." EIHC, 

119 (Jan. 1983), 42-48. 

"For the Puritan audiences of colonial America, the 
sea-deliverance provided a way of ordering human 
exp>erience, of making sense out of it." 

WHITE, TRENTWELL MASON, and PAUL WILLIAM 
LEHMAN. Writers of colonial New England. Boston: 
Palmer, 1929. 176p. MWA. -i- 

WIDDICOMBE, RICHARD TOBY. "Continuity 
and change: the influence of Transcendentalism in 
nineteenth-century American literature." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Univ. of California, Irvine, 1984. 

438p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 45, No. 9A (1985), 2879. 

WILUAMS, PETER WILLIAM. "A mirror for 
Unitarians: Catholicism and culture in nineteenth 
century New England literature." Ph.D. dissertation, 

Yale Univ., 1970. 287p. MH. 

Abstracted in DAI, 32, No. lA (1971), 374. 

WRIGHT, THOMAS GODDARD. "Aspects of 
culture in New England during the first century of 
colonization, with special reference to literary 
culture and the production of literature." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Yale Univ., 1917. 444p. 

Described in American Puritan Studies, Michael S. 
Montgomery, comp. (1984), 23-24. See also next entry. 

. Literary culture in early New England, 1620- 

1730. [Mabel Hyde Kingsbury Wright, ed.] New Haven, 
Conn.: Yale Univ. Pr., 1920. 322p. MWA. -t- 
See also preceding entry. 

THE WRITING women of New England, 1630- 

1900: an anthology. Arlen Gilman Runzler Westbrook 

and Perry D. Westbrook, eds. Metuchen, N.J.: 

Scarecrow Pr., 1982. vii, 273p. MBU. -t- 

SEE "Literary history" in Index for additional 
entry. 



152 



Literature, Language, and the Printed Word 



SPEanC AUTHORS AND POETS 3205 



SPECIFIC AUTHORS AND POETS AND THEIR WORKS 

3 1 84 AARON, DANIEL. "The legacy of Henry 
Wadsworth Longfellow." Maine Historical Society 
Quarterly, 27 (Spring 1988), 42-66. 

Lived 1807-1882. 

3185 ABBOTT, MORETON. '"Along shore days.'" 

NEC, 13 (Fall 1971), 20-25. 

Author Sarah Ome Jewett (lived 1849-1909). 

3186 ADAMS, JOHN R. Harriet Beecher Stowe. 

N.Y.: Twayne Publishers, 1963. 172p. MWA. -t- 

Lived 1811-1896. See also next entry. 

3187 . "The literary achievements of Harriet Beecher 

Stowe." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of Southern 
California, 1940. 

See also preceding entry. 

3188 AKERS, CHARLES. "Personal glimpses of 
our New England poets, from an artist's 
autobiography." NEM, n.s. 17 (Dec. 1897), 446-456. 

3189 ARVIN, NEWTON. Longfellow; his life and 

work. Boston: Atlantic-Little, Brown, 1963. 338p. 
MBU. -t- 

3190 AUSTIN, GEORGE L. Henry Wadsworth 
Longfellow: his life, his works, his friendships. 

Boston: Lee & Shepard, 1883. x, 419p. MChB. -t- 

3191 AVERILL, ESTHER C. "Alice Morse Earle: 

a writer who popularized old New England." OTNE, 37 
(Jan. 1947), 73-78. 

3192 BELL MICHAEL DA Vnr. Hawthorne and the 
historical romance of New England. Princeton, N.J.: 
Princeton Univ. Pr., 1971. xii, 253p. MBU. -i- 

3193 . "Hawthorne and the romantic treatment of 

Puritanism: seventeenth-century New England in 
American fiction, 1820-1850." Ph.D. dissertation. 
Harvard Univ., 1969. iii, 41 2p. 

See also next entry. 

3194 BLUMENTHAL ANNA S. "The New England 
oblique style: the poetry of Ralph Waldo Emerson, 

Emily Dickinson, and Edwin Arlington Robinson." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Washington Univ., 1986. 273p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 47. No. 8A (1987), 3036. 



3 1 95 BOYNTON, PERCY H. 'Two New England 
regionalists." College English, 1 (Jan. 1940), 291- 
299. 

May Ellen Chase and Dorothy Canfield Fisher. 

3 1 96 BRAND. ALICE GLARDEN. "Mary Wilkins 
Freeman: misanthropy as propaganda." NEQ, 50 (Mar. 
1977), 83-100. 

"Freeman's characters are the New England peasantry. 
They are the leftovers of society— the spinsters, 
widows and widowers, bachelors and elderly— living 
civilized but neglected lives." 

3197 BRIGGS, PETER M. "Timothy Dwight 
'composes' a landscape for New England." American 
Quarterly, 40 (Sept. 1988), 359-377. 

3198 BRYAN, GEORGE B. "Royall Tyler and The 
contrast." Vermont (Aug. 1987), 17-19. 

3199 BUCHANAN, LEWIS E. "A conservative view 
of the frontier." State College of Washington, 

Research Studies, 25 (Mar. 1957), 49-56. 

Timothy Dwight's comments on the New England and New 
York frontiers. 

3200 BURSTEIN, FRANCES BROWNELL. "The picture 

of New England Puritanism presented in the fiction of 
Henry James." Ph.D. dissertation, Boston Univ., 1964. 
iii, 578p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 25, No. 5 (1964), 2977. 

3201 BUSH. SARGENT. JR. "The relevance of 
Puritanism to major themes in Hawthorne's fiction." 

Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of Iowa, 1967. xv, 266p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 28, No. 7A (1968), 2677. 

Biographical studies of Hawthorne are listed in 
Volume 8. 

3202 CARPENTER. FREDERIC I. "Puritans 
preferred blondes: the heroines of Melville and 
Hawthorne." NEQ, 9 (June 1936), 253-280. 

3203 CARSON, ADA LOU, and HERBERT L. CARSON. 

Royall Tyler. Boston: Twayne Publishers, 1979. 

172p. VtU. -r 

The playwright and judge (lived 1757-1826). 

3204 CARY, RICHARD. "Sarah Ome Jewett and 

the rich tradition." Colby Library Quarterly, 4 (Nov. 

1957), 205-217. 

Her descriptions of New England characters. 

3205 . Sarah Ome Jewett. N.Y.: Twayne Publishers, 

1962. 175p. MeU. -(- 



153 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



3206 

3206 

3207 

3208 

3209 

3210 

3211 

3212 

3213 

3214 

3215 

3216 



SPECIHC AUTHORS AND POETS 



CLARK. GREGORY DALLAN. 'Timothy Dwight's 
Travels in New England and New York' and the rhetoric 
of Fhiritan public discourse." Ph.D. dissertation, 
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 1985. 274p. Ct. 
Abstracted in DAI, 46, No. lOA (1986), 3032. 

CLARK. JAMES WILLIAM, JR. "Washington 
Irving and New England witchlore." New York Folklore 
Quarterly, 29 (Dec. 1973), 304-313. 

COFFIN, ROBERT P. TRISTRAM. New poetry 
of New England: Frost and Robinson. Baltimore: 

Johns Hopkins Univ. Pr., 1938. xvi, 148p. MBU. -t- 

COLACURCIO, MICHAEL JOSEPH. JR. 'The 
progress of piety: Hawthorne's critique of the 
Puritan spirit." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of 
Illinois, 1963. v, 31 Op. 

Abstracted in DAI, 24, No. 12 (1964), 5405. 

CONNORS, DONALD FRANCIS. "Enchanted 
wilderness: a commentary on Thomas Morton's New 
English Canaan." Ph.D. dissertation, Columbia Univ., 
1961. 193p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 22, No. 2 (1961), 562. See also 
next entry. 

. Thomas Morton. N.Y.: Twayne Publishers, 

1969. 172p. MWA. -n 

Author of New English Canaan (published 1637). See 
also preceding entry. 

CONRON, JOHN. "'Bright American rivers': 
the luminist landscapes of Thoreau's A week on the 
Concord and Menimack rivers." American Quarterly, 32 
(Summer 1980), 144-166. 

CROWLEY. JOHN W. "John Cheever and the 
ancient light of New England." NEQ, 56 (June 1983), 
267-275. 

The 20th-century author. 

CROZIER, ALICE C. The novels of Harriet 
Beecher Stowe. N.Y.: Oxford Univ. Pr., 1969. x, 

235p. MChB. -(- 

DANIEL, CLAY. "The scarlet letter: 

Hawthorne, Freud, and the Transcendentalists." 

American Transcendental Quarterly, No. 61 (Oct. 1986), 
23-36. 

DAWSON. EDWARD BARKER. "Nathaniel 
Hawthorne's knowledge and use of New England history." 
Ph.D. dissertation, Vanderbilt Univ., 1937. iii, 

305p. 

Described in American Puritan Studies, Michael S. 
Montgomery, comp. (1984), 54. 



3217 DONAHUE, MARIE. "Celia Thaxter's island 
world." Down East, 23 (Aug. 1976), 72-75, 98-99. 

Isles of Shoals. 

3218 DONOVAN. JOSEPHINE. Sarah Ome Jewett. 

N.Y.: Ungar, [1980]. x, 165p. Me. -i- 

3219 DOUBLEDAY, NEAL F. "Hawthorne's 

criticism of New England life." College English, 2 
(Apr. 1941), 639-653. 

3220 ELIOT, SAMUEL A. "Jeremy Belknap." 

MHSP, 66 (1942), 96-106. 

3221 ELLSWORTH. MARY ELLEN. 'Two New England 
writers: Harriet Beecher Stowe and Mary Wilkins 
Freeman." Ph.D. dissertation, Columbia Univ., 1981. 
iv, 222p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 42, No. 6A (1981), 2674. 

3222 FLEMMING, LARAINE. "Women of more than 
local color." Ph.D. dissertation. State Univ. of New 
York, Buffalo, 1983. 260p. MWstR. 

Mary Wilkins Freeman and Saran Ome Jewett. 
Abstracted in DAI, 44, No. lOA (1984), 3064. 

3223 FOSTER, CHARLES HOWELL. The rungless 
ladder: Harriet Beecher Stowe and New England 
Puritanism. Durham, N.C.: Duke Univ. Pr., 1954. 
xviii, 278p. MWA. -i- 

3224 FRANQS, LESLEY LEE. "A decade of 

'stirring times': Robert Frost and Amy Lowell." NEQ, 
59 (Dec. 1986), 508-522. 

3225 FRENCH, WARREN G. J. D. Salinger. 

(1963) Rev. ed. Boston: Twayne Publishers, 1976. 
191p. MBU. -H 
The 20th-century author. 

3226 FROST, JOHN ELDRIDGE. "Sarah Ome 

Jewett." Ph.D. dissertation. New York Univ., 1953. 
345p. 

3227 GARRISON, THEODORE ROOSEVELT. "John 
Greenleaf Whittier: pioneer regionalist and 
folklorist." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of Wisconsin, 
1960. 536p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 21, No. 3 (1960), 621-622. 
Biographical studies of Whittier are listed in 
Volume 8. 

3228 GEROULD, KATHERINE F. "Call it holy 
ground." Atlantic Monthly, 163 (Jan. 1939), 74-82. 

Hawthorne on the New England spirit. 



154 



3229 

3230 

3231 

3232 

3233 

3234 

3235 

3236 

3237 

3238 

3239 



Literature, Language, and the Printed Word 



SPEanC AUTHORS AND POETS 3250 



GERSON, NOEL BERTRAM. Harriet Beecher 
Stowe: a biography. N.Y.: Praeger Publishers, 1976. 
218p. MeU. + 

GILBERTSON, CATHERINE. Harriet Beecher 

Stowe. N.Y.: D. Appleton-Century, 1937. xii, 330p. 

MWA.+ 

GOERING, WYNN M. "To obey, rebelling: 
the Quaker dilemma in Moby Dick." NEQ, 54 (Dec. 
1981), 519-538. 

GOLD. SYLVIANE. "Eugene O'Neill lived 

here." Boston Globe Magazine (Oct. 16, 1988), 22, 57- 

63. 

GOODRICH, SAMUEL GRISWOLD. Recollections 
of a lifetime, or men and things I have seen; in a 
series of familiar letters to a friend, historical, 
biographical, anecdotal, and descriptive. N.Y., 1857. 
2v. MStuO. -I- 

Includes his early years in Ridgefield, Conn., and 
his literary career in Boston. Goodrich lived 1793- 
1860. See also entry 3297. 

GORMAN, HERBERT S. A Victorian American: 

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. N.Y.: Doran, 1926. xv, 
363p. MH. 

GOWEN, JAMES ANTHONY. "Some Puritan 
characteristics of the poetry of Edwin Arlington 
Robinson." Ph.D. dissertation, Stanford Univ., 1968. 
iii, 213p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 29, No. 5A (1968), 1538. 

GRAYSON, ROBERT CALVIN. "History and the 
imaginary in Hawthorne's early tales and sketches." 
Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of Missouri, 1981. 305p. 
Abstracted in DAI, 43, No. lA (1982), 168. 

GRIFFITHS, THOMAS MORGAN. "'Montpelier' 
and 'Seven Gables': Knox's estate and Hawthorne's 
novel." NEQ, 16 (Sept. 1943), 432-443. 

GROSS, ROBERT ALAN. "Lonesome in eden: 
Dickinson, Thoreau and the problem of community in 
nineteenth-century New England." Canadian Review of 
American Studies, 14 (Spring 1983), 1-17. 

HARDING, WALTER ROY. 'Thoreau and 

Timothy Dwight." Boston Public Library Quarterly, 10 

(Apr. 1958), 109-115. 

Thoreau's use of Dwight's Travels in his writings. 



3240 HATHAWAY, RICHARD D. Sylvester Judd's 

New England. University Park [Pa.]: Pennsylvania 
State Univ. Pr., 1981. 362p. MWA. + 

Unitarian minister and author (lived 1813-1853). 
Biographical studies of Judd are listed in Volume 8. 

3241 HAWTHORNE, NATHANIEL. The American 
notebooks by Nathaniel Hawthorne, based upon tlie 
original manuscripts in the Pierpont Morgan Library. 
Randall Stewart, ed. New Haven, Conn.: Yale Univ. 

Pr., 1932. xcvi, 350p. MStuO. + 

Another ed. of the notebooks, edited by Claude M. 
Simpson, was published in 1972. 

3242 HAYWARD, LAURENCE. "An early writer of 

New England travels." NEM, n.s. 23 (Nov. 1900), 256- 
262. 

Timothy Dwight. 

3243 HEDRICK, JOAN D. "'Peaceable fruits': 

the ministry of Harriet Beecher Stowe." American 
Quarterly, 40 (Sept. 1988), 307-332. 

3244 HEIMER, JACKSON W. The lesson of New 
England: Henry James and his native region. Muncic, 
Ind.: Ball State Univ., 1967. x, 26p. MBU. + 

Lived 1843-1916. 

3245 HIGGINSON, THOMAS WENTWORTH. Henry 
Wadsworth Longfellow. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 
1902. vi, 326p. MeU. -t 

3246 HIRSH, EDWARD L. Henry Wadsworth 
Longfellow. Minneapolis: Univ. of Minnesota Pr., 
1964. 48p. MeU. + 

3247 HOVET, THEODORE R. "Christian 
revolution: Harriet Beecher Stowe's response to 
slavery and the Civil War." NEQ, 47 (Dec. 1974), 535- 
549. 

3248 HUGUENIN, CHARLES A. 'The truth about 

the schooner Hesperus." New York Folklore, 16 (Spring 
1960), 48-53. 

Maine ship, sunk in Boston Harbor during a gale and 
memorialized in a poem by Longfellow. 

3249 HUMPHREY, EDNA H. "Husband to Harriet." 

NEG, 17 (Spring 1976), 9-14. 

The Rev. Calvin Ellis Stowe (1802-1886). 

3250 JEWETT, SARAH ORNE. "'Yours ever 
lovingly': Sarah Ome Jewett to John Greenleaf 
Whittier." EIHC, 107 (Oct. 1971), 412-450. 

Richard Cary, ed. 



155 



3251 

3251 

3252 

3253 

3254 

3255 

3256 

3257 

3258 

3259 

3260 

3261 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



SPECmC AUTHORS AND POETS 



JOHNSON. CARL LEONARD. Professor 
Longfellow of Harvard. Eugene, Ore.: Univ. of 
Oregon, 1944. xii, 112p. MeU. + 

JOHNSON. THOMAS E.. JR. "American- 
Puritan poetic voices; essays on Anne Bradstreet, 
Edward Taylor, Roger Williams, and Philip Pain." 

Ph.D. dissertation, Ohio Univ., 1968. 164p. 
Abstracted in DAI, 29, No. 9A (1969), 3141. 

JOHNSTON, JOHANNA. Runaway to heaven: 
the story of Harriet Beecher Stowe. Garden City, 

N.Y.: Doubleday, 1963. 490p. MeU. -i- 

JONES, HERBERT GRANVILLE. The amazing 
Mr. Longfellow: little known facts about a well-known 
poet. Pen sketches by the author. Portland, Me.: 
Longfellow Pr., 1967. 133p. MeU. + 

KEMP, JOHN CROCKER. Robert Frost and New 
England: the poet as regionalist. Princeton. N.J.: 
Princeton Univ. Pr., 1979. xiii, 273p. Ct. + 

See also next entry. 



3262 LAWTON. WILLIAM CRANSTON. The New 
England poets; a study of Emerson, Hawthorne, 
Longfellow, Whittier, Lowell, Holmes. (1898) 
Freeport, N.Y.: Books for Libraries, 1972. xvi, 

265p. MB. + 

3263 LEACH, NANCY R. "New England in the 

stories of Edith Wharton." NEQ, 30 (Mar. 1957), 90- 
98. 

3264 LEVIN, DAVID. The province of piety: 

moral history in Hawthorne's early tales. Cambridge, 
Mass.: Harvard Univ. Pr., 1984. x, 670p. MH. + 

3265 LEVY, BABETTE MAY. "Mutations in New 
England local color." NEQ, 19 (Sept. 1946), 338-358. 

Writings of Harriet Beecher Stowe, Rose Terry Cooke, 
Sarah Ome Jewett, and Mary E. Wilkins Freeman. 

3266 LIFE and letters of Harriet Beecher 

Stowe. Aimie A. Fields, ed. Boston: Houghton 
Mifflin, 1897. 406p. MStuO. -t- 
1811-1896. 



. "Robert Frost reconsidered: the poet as 

regionalist." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of 
Pennsylvania, 1975. 323p. 

See also preceding entry. 

KENNEDY, WILUAM SLOANE. Henry W. 

Longfellow: biography, anecdotes, letters, criticism. 
Cambridge, Mass.: Moses King, 1882. 368p. MeU. -i- 

KIMBALL, GAYLE. "Harriet Beecher Stowe's 
revision of New England theology." Journal of 
Presbyterian History, 58 (Spring 1980), 64-81. 

KIRKH AM, E. BRUCE. The building of Uncle 
Tom's cabin. Knoxville, Tenn.: Univ. of Tennessee 
Pr., 1977. X, 264p. MWA. -i- 

KNOBBS, CATHERINE. "Seeing New 
Englandly: scene and character in the novels of 
Harriet Beecher Stowe." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of 
Notre Dame, 1978. iv, 192p. MStuO. 



3267 LIFE of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, with 
extracts from his journals and correspondence. Samuel 
Longfellow, ed. 2d ed. Boston: Ticknor, 1886. 2v. 
MeU. -H 

3268 LONGFELLOW, SAMUEL. Final memorials of 

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. Boston; Ticknor, 1887 
447p. MH. + 

3269 LUNEX^UIST, JAMES. J. D. Salinger. N.Y.: 

F. Ungar, 1979. ix, 194p. MBU. -i- 

3270 McCRAY, FLORINE THAYER. The life-work of 
the author of Uncle Tom's cabin. N.Y.: Funk & 
Wagnalls, 1889. vii, 440p. MeU. -i- 

Harriet Beecher Stowe. 

3271 McCullough, DAVID. "The unexpected Mrs. 

Stowe." American Heritage, 24 (Aug. 1973), 4-9, 76- 
80. 

Harriet Beecher Stowe. 



LANG, HANS-JOACHIM, and FRITZ 
FLEISCHMANN. "'All this beauty, all this grace': 
Longfellow's The building of the ship' and Alexander 
Slidell Mackenzie's 'Ship.'" NEQ, 54 (Mar. 1981), 104- 
118. 

Background of poem by Longfellow, published in 1849. 



3272 McGUIRE, MARY AGNES. "Sarah Ome 

Jewett." Ph.D. dissertation, Columbia Univ., 1964. 
251p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 25, No. 12 (1965), 7275. 

3273 McPherson, HUGO. "Hawthorne's mythology: 
a mirror for Puritans." Univ. of Toronto Quarterly 
[Canada], 28 (Apr. 1959), 267-278. 



156 



Literature, Language, and the Printed Word 



SPEanC AUTHORS AND POETS 3295 



3274 MATTIESSEN, FRANCIS OTTO. Sarah Ome 
Jewett. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1929. 160p. 
MeU. + 

3275 MILLER, ELEANOR AILEEN. 'The Christian 
philosophy in the New England novels of Harriet 
Beecher Stowe." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of Nevada, 
Reno, 1970. 199p. 

Abstracted in DAJ, 32, No. lA (1971), 445. 

3276 MILLER, JAMES EDWIN. J. D. Salinger. 

Minneapolis: Univ. of Minnesota Pr., 1965. 48p. 
MBU. + 

3277 MILLS, BARRISS. "Hawthorne and 
Puritanism." NEQ, 21 (Mar. 1948), 78-102. 

3278 MOSS, WILLIAM M. '"So many promising 
youths': Emerson's disappointing discoveries of New 
England poet-seers." NEQ, 49 (Mar. 1976), 46-64. 

3279 MOTT, WESLEY THEODORE. "Emerson and 
Thoreau as heirs to the tradition of New England 
Puritanism." Ph.D. dissertation, Boston Univ., 1975. 
viii, 243p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 36, No. 12A (1976), 7916. 

3280 MULDER, WILLIAM. "Seeing 'New 

Englandly': planes of perception in Emily Dickinson 
and Robert Frost." NEQ, 52 (Dec. 1979), 550-559. 

3281 MULLIN, JOAN A. "The transformation: 

the Puritan past and language in Hawthorne's novels." 
Ph.D. dissertation, Loyola Univ. of Chicago, 1987. 
257p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 49, No. 2A (1988), 255. 

3282 NAGEL GWEN L. "This prim comer of 

land where she was queen': Sarah Ome Jewett's New 
England gardens." Colby Library Quarterly, 22 (Mar. 
1986), 43-62. 

Imagery of New England gardens in Jewett's v^itings. 

3283 NEWBERRY, FREDERICK. "A red-hot A and a 
lusting divine: sources for The scarlet letter." 

NEQ, 60 (June 1987), 256-264. 

Possible sources for Hawthorne's novel: the 
branding of Mary Batchellor for adultery in York, Me. 
(1651) and the previous dismissal of her clergyman- 
husband from the church in Hampton, N.H., for 
attempted adultery. 

3284 [NEWDICK, ROBERT S.] Newdick's season of 
Frost; an interrupted biography of Robert Frost. 
William A. Sutton, ed. Albany, N.Y.: State Univ. of 
New York Pr., 1976. 454p. MBU. + 



3285 O'DONNELL, W. G. "Robert Frost and New 
England: a revaluation." Yale Review, 37 (Summer 
1948), 698-712. 

3286 ORIANS, GEORGE HARRISON. "Hawthorne and 
Puritan punishment." College English, 13 (May 1952), 
424-432. 

3287 PERRIN, PORTER GALE. The life and works 

of Thomas Green Fessenden, 1771-1837. Orono, Me.: 
Printed at the Univ. Pr., 1925. 206p. MStuO. -t- 
Poet and journalist. 

3288 PINCUS, ROBERT L. "Pictures of New 
England's apocalypse: Benjamin Tompson's 
transformation of the British advice-to-a-painter 
poem." Early American Literature, 19 (Winter 1984- 
1985), 268-278. 

In "New-Englands crisis" (1676). 

3289 PRITCHARD, WILLIAM H. Robert Frost: a 
literary life reconsidered. N.Y.: Oxford Univ. Pr., 

1984. xix, 286p. MB. + 

3290 QUATERMAIN, PETER ALLAN. "Nathaniel 
Hawthorne and Puritanism: a study of Puritan 
influences on nineteenth-century literature." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Univ. of Nottingham [U.K.], 1959. 396p. 

Described in American Puritan Studies, Michael S. 
Montgomery, comp. (1984), 115-116. 

3291 RAGAN, JAMES FRANCIS. "Hawthorne's bulky 
Puritans." Modem Language Association, Publications, 
75 (Sept. 1960), 420-423. 

3292 RALEIGH, JOHN HENRY. "O'Neill's Long 
day's journey into night and New England Irish 
Catholicism." Partisan Review, 26 (Fall 1959), 573- 
592. 

3293 ROBERTSON, ERIC SUTHERLAND. Life of 

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. London: W. Scott, 1887. 
177, xii p. MeU. + 

3294 ROBERTSON, MARQA LOUISE. "Stowe, 

Jewett, and Cather: the development of a fiction of 
place." Ph.D. dissertation, Washington Univ., 1987. 
367p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 49, No. 5A (1988), 1144. 

3295 ROOD, KAREN LANE. "Robert Frost before 
England: the making of a modem poet, 1890-1912. " 
Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of South Carolina, 1979. 
iv, 400p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 40, No. 3A (1979), 1473. 



157 



New England; A Bibliography of Its History 



3296 

3296 

3297 

3298 

3299 

3300 

3301 

3302 

3303 

3304 

3305 



SPECmC AUTHORS AND POETS 



ROSE. ALAN HENRY. "’Such depths of sad 
initiation': Edith Wharton and New England." NEQ, 50 
(Sept. 1977), 423-439. 

ROSELLE, DANIEL. Samuel Griswold 
Goodrich, creator of Peter Parley: a study of his 
life and work. Albany, N.Y.: State Univ. of New York 
Pr., 1968. 181p. MStuO. -i- 
See also entry 3233. 

ROTELLA, GUY L. Three contemporary poets 
of New England: William Meredith, Philip Booth, and 
Peter Davison. Boston: Twayne Publishers, 1983. 
210p. MBU. -I- 

RYSKAMP, CHARLES. "The New England 
sources of The scarlet letter." American Literature, 

31 (Nov. 1959). 257-272. 

SANBORN. FRANKLIN BENJAMIN. 

Transcendental and literary New England: Emerson, 
Thoreau, Alcott, Bryant, Whittier, Lowell, Longfellow, 
and others. Kenneth Walter Cameron, ed. Hartford, 
Conn.: Transcendental Books, 1975. iii, 470p. MBU. 

-I- 

See also next entry and entries 3150 and 3410. 

. Transcendental writers and heroes: papers 

chiefly on Emerson, Thoreau, literary friends, and 
contemporaries, with regional and critical 
backgrounds. Kenneth Walter Cameron, ed. Hartford, 
Coim.: Transcendental Books, 1978. 417p. NhD. -i- 
See also preceding entry. 

SANDS. ALYCE ENID. "John Saffm: 
seventeenth-century American citizen and poet." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Pennsylvania State Univ., 1965. iii, 
272p. 

Of Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Abstracted in 
DAI, 26. No. 11 (1965), 6724. 

SCHAEDLER, LOUIS C. "Whittier's attitude 
toward colonial Puritanism." NEQ, 21 (Sept. 1948), 
350-367. 

SCHWARTZ. JOSEPH. "Three aspects of 
Hawthorne's Puritanism." NEQ, 36 (June 1963), 192- 
208. 

SCOTT. JOHN ANTHONY. Woman against 
slavery: the story of Harriet Beecher Stowe. N.Y.: 
Crowell, 1978. xiii, 169p. MeU. + 



3306 SEARS, JOHN F. 'Timothy Dwight and the 
American landscape: the composing eye in Dwight's 
Travels in New England and New York." Early American 
Literature, 11 (Winter 1976-1977), 311-321. 

Dwight's Travels was first published in 1821-1822. 

See also entry 4043. 

3307 SHEA, DANIEL B. "'Our professed old 
adversary': Thomas Morton and the naming of New 
England." Early American Literature. 23, No. 1 
(1988), 52-69. 

3308 SHERMAN, SARAH WAY. "American 
Persephone: Sarah Ome Jewett in context.” Ph.D. 
dissertation. Brown Univ., 1983. vi, 707p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 44, No. 7A (1984), 2150. See 
also next entry. 

3309 . Sarah Ome Jewett; an American Persephone. 

Hanover, N.H.; Univ. Pr. of New England, 1989. 384p. 
DLC.+ 

See also preceding entry. 

3310 SHUMAKER. CONRAD. "’A daughter of the 
Puritans': history in Hawthorne's The marble faun." 
NEQ. 57 (Mar. 1984), 65-83. 

3311 . "Fathers and daughters: Nathaniel Hawthorne 

and Henry James on the patterns of New England 
history." Ph.D. dissertation, UCLA, 1982. 222p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 43, No. 6A (1982), 1975. 

3312 SMITH, ISADORE. "The Prospect and the 
Rarities." NEG, 10 (Winter 1969), 43-53. 

William Wood's and John Josselyn's 17th-century 
writings about New England. 

3313 SPOFFORD, HARRIET ELIZABETH PRESCOTT. A 
little book of friends. Boston: Little, Brown, 1916. 
184p. MB. -I- 

Includes sketches of a number of New England women 
writers. 

3314 STEARNS, FRANK PRESTON. Sketches from 
Concord and Appledore. Concord thirty years ago: 
Nathaniel Hawthorne; Louisa M. Alcott; Ralph Waldo 
Emerson; Matthew Arnold; David A. Wasson; Wendell 
Phillips. Appledore and its visitors: John Greenleaf 
Whittier. N.Y.: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1895. xii, 

276p. DLC. -I- 

Appledore is one of the Isles of Shoals. 

3315 STOWE, CHARLES EDWARD. Life of Harriet 
Beecher Stowe, compiled from her letters and journals. 
Boston; Houghton Mifflin, 1889. xii, 53op. MWA. + 



158 



3316 

3317 

3318 

3319 

3320 

3321 

3322 

3323 

3324 

3325 

3326 

3327 

3328 



Literature, Language, and the Printed Word 



SPEanC AUTHORS AND POETS 3339 



STOWE, CHARLES EDWARD, and LYMAN BEECHER 
STOWE. Harriet Beecher Stowe: the story of her life. 
Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1911. vi, 313p. MHi. + 

STOWE. HARRIET BEECHER. The papers of 
Harriet Beecher Stowe. Margaret Granville Mair, comp. 
Hartford, Conn.: Stowe-Day Foundation, 1977. 74p. 
MWA.+ 

STUBBS, JOHN C. "Hawthorne's The scarlet 
letter: the theory of the romance and the use of the 
New England situation." Publication of the Modem 
Language Association of America, 83 (Oct. 1968), 1439- 
1447. 

STUBBS. M. WILMA. "Celia Laighton 
Thaxter, 1835-1894." NEQ, 8 (Dec. 1935). 518-533. 
The poet and author. 



3329 TOTH, SUSAN ERICKSON ALLEN. "Defiant 
light: a positive view of Mary Wilkins Freeman." 

NEQ. 46 (Mar. 1973), 82-93. 

'"Our most truthful recorder in fiction of New 
England village life,' a life drawing to an isolated 
and improverished conclusion by the 1880's and 
1890's." 

3330 . "More than local color: a reappraisal of Rose 

Terry Cooke, Mary Wilkins Freeman, and Alice Brown." 
Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of Minnesota, 1969. ii, 

344p. NhKeS. 

Abstracted in DAI, 30, No. 4A (1969), 1577. 

3331 TRAUTMANN, FREDERICK. "Harriet Beecher 
Stowe's public readings in New England." NEQ, 47 
(June 1974). 279-289. 

1872. 



SWEENEY. GERARD M. "Henry James and the 3332 

'New England conscience'— once again." NEQ, 54 
(Mar. 1981), 255-264. 



TANSELLE, GEORGE THOMAS. Roy all Tyler. 

Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard Univ. Pr., 1967. xvi, 

281p. CtU. 3333 

TAYLOR. JOHN GOLDEN. "Hawthorne's 
transmutations of Puritanism." Ph.D. dissertation, 

Univ. of Utah, 1958. vi, 284p. 3334 

Abstracted in DAI, 19. No. 10 (1959), 2605. 

THARP. MARGARET FARRAND. Sarah Ome 
Jewett. Mirmeapolis: Univ. of Minnesota Pr., 1966. 

48p. MeU. -H 3335 

THAXTER, ROSAMOND. Sandpiper: the life 

of Celia Thaxter. Sanbomville, N.H.: Wake-Brook 

House, 1962. 351, [7]p. MWA. -t- 3336 

THOMPSON, LAWRANCE. Robert Frost.... 

N.Y.: Holt, Rinehart, and Winston, 1966-1976. 3v. 

VtU. H- 3337 

Co-author of 3d volume: R. H. Winnick. 

. Young Longfellow (1807-1843). N.Y.: 

Macmillan, 1938. xxiv, 443p. MWA. + 3338 



THOREAU, HENRY DAVID. Thoreau in the 
mountains: writings. William Howgarth, ed. N.Y.: 

Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 1982. 394p. MB. + 

THORNDIKE. JOSEPH J., JR. "Thoreau's 3339 

vacation." American Heritage, 34 (June-July 1983), 94- 

101 . 

On the Merrimack River (1839). 



TURNER, ELDON RAY. "Peasants and 
parsons: readers and the intellectual location of 
John Wise's Churches quarrel espoused." Early 
American Literature, 18 (Fall 1983), 146-170. 

1713. 

TUTTLETON, JAMES W. "The New England 
character in Cooper's social novels." New York Public 
Library, Bulletin, 70 (May 1966), 305-317. 

UNDERWOOD. FRANQS HENRY. The life of 
Heruy Wadsworth Longfellow, with critical and 
descriptive sketches of his writings. Boston: B. B. 
Russell, 1882. 355p. MeU. + 

VALLIER, JANE E. Poet on demand: the 

life, letters and works of Celia Thaxter. [Camden, 

Me.]: Down East Books, [1982]. xviii, 267p. MeU. -i- 

. "The role of Celia Thaxter in American 

literary history: an overview." Colby Library 
Quarterly, 17 (Dec. 1981), 238-255. 

WAGENKNECHT, EDWARD CHARLES. Harriet 
Beecher Stowe: the known and the unknown. N.Y.: 
Oxford Univ. Pr., 1965. 267p. MBU. 

. Longfellow: a full-length portrait. N.Y.: 

Longmans, Green, 1955. xiii, 370p. M. -i- 
Another ed. (1965) was published under the title: 
Heruy Wadsworth Longfellow: portrait of an American 
humanist. 

WAGGONER. HYATT H. "A Hawthorne 
discovery: the lost notebook, 1835-1841." NEQ, 49 
(Dec. 1976). 618-626. 



159 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



3340 SPECmC AUTHORS AND POETS 



3340 WAGNER. FREDERICK. "Eighly-six letters 
(1814-1882) of A. Bronson Alcott." Studies in the 
American Renaissance (1979), 239-308; (1980), 183-228. 

3341 WESTBROOK, PERRY D. "Celia Thaxter." 

Down East, 4 (June 1958), 37-38. 

3342 WHITE, HILDA. Truth is my country: 

portraits of eight New England authors. Garden City, 

N.Y.: Doubleday, 1971. 289p. MH. + 

Nathaniel Hawthorne, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry 
David Thoreau, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Emily Dickinson, 
Edwin Arlington Robinson, Edna St. Vincent Millay, and 
Robert Frost. 

3343 WHITE, PAULA KOPACZ. "Hawthorne's use of 
the Puritan theory of history." Ph.D. dissertation, 
Columbia Univ., 1975. 371p. 

Abstracted in DAI. 38, No. 7A (1978), 4144. 

3344 . "Puritan theories of history in Hawthorne's 

fiction." Canadian Review of American Studies, 9 
(Fall 1978), 135-153. 

3345 WILUAMS, CECIL BROWN. Henry Wadsworth 
Longfellow. N.Y.: Twayne Publishers, 1964. 221p. 

MeU. + 

3346 WILLIAMS, MARY. "The pastoral in New 
England local color: Celia Thaxter, Sarah Ome 
Jewett, Alice Brown." Ph.D. dissertation, Stanford 
Univ., 1971. vi, 315p. NhKeS. 

Abstracted in DAI, 32, No. 12A (1972), 6947. 

3347 WILLSON. LAWRENCE. "Thoreau and New 
England's weather." Weatherwise, 12 (June 1959), 118- 
124. 

3348 WILSON, FORREST. Crusader in crinoline: 

the life of Harriet Beecher Stowe. Philadelphia: J. 

B. Lippincott, 1941. 706p. MWA. 

3349 ZANIELLO, THOMAS A. "Chips from 
Hawthorne's workshop: the icon and cultural studies." 
DubSemPr (1976), 68-78. 

Comparison of gravestone and literary art. 

3350 ZIETLOW, PAUL. "The meaning of Tilbury 

town: Robinson as a regional poet." NEQ, 40 (June 
1967), 188-211. 



INTELiECTU AL HISTORY 

335 1 ALB ANESE, CATHERINE L. Corre.sponding 

motion: Transcendental religion and the new American. 
Philadelphia: Temple Univ. Pr., 1977. xxiii, 210p. 
MBU.-h 

3352 ALEXIS, GERHARD T. "Perry Miller and the 

New England mind." Christian Scholar, 38 (June 1955), 
148-154. 

3353 APPLEBY, JOYCE. "History as art: 

another view." American Quarterly, 34 (Spring 1982), 
25-30. 

Perry Miller's The New England mind. See also 
entries 3398 and 3399. 

3354 BENNETT, FORDYCE RICHARD. "Bronson 
Alcott and free religion." Studies in the American 
Renaissance (1981), 403-421. 

3355 BIRDSALL, RICHARD DAVENPORT. "Climate 

and conscience in New England." NEG, 8 (Spring 1967), 
9-15. 

3356 BISCHOFF, VOLKER. "The 'New England 
conscience,' Thomas Gold Appleton, and Mrs. Vivian." 
NEQ, 53 (June 1980), 222-225. 

Brief historiographical essay. 

3357 BOLLER, PAUL F. American 
Transcendentalism, 1830-1860: an intellectual 
inquiry. N.Y.: Putnam, 1974. xxiii, 227p. MBU. -i- 

3358 BOZEMAN, THEODORE DWIGHT. "The Puritans' 

'errand into the wilderness' reconsidered." NEQ, 59 
(June 1986), 231-251. 

See also entry 3393. 

3359 BRYAN, GEORGE COCHRANE. "Concepts of 
leadership in American political thought: the Puritan 
period." Ph.D. dissertation. Harvard Univ., 1950. 
vii, 260p. 

Described in American Puritan Studies, Michael S. 
Montgomery, comp. (1984), 79. 

3360 BUTTS, FRANQS T. 'The myth of Perry 

Miller." American Historical Review, 87 (June 1982), 
665-694. 



SEE "Authors" and "Poets and poetry" in Index for 

additional listings. 3361 CARROLL, PETER NEIL. Puritanism and the 

wilderness: the intellectual significance of the New 
England frontier, 1629-1700. N.Y.: Columbia Univ. 
Pr., 1969. xi, 243p. Ct. -t- 
See also next entry. 



160 



Literature, Language, and the Printed Word 



INTELLECTUAL HISTORY 3382 



3362 CARROLL, PETER NEIL. "Puritanism and the 
wilderness: the intellectual significance of the New 
England frontier, 1629-1700." Ph.D. dissertation, 
Northwestern Univ., 1968. 243p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 29, No. 7A (1969), 2172. See 
also preceding entry. 

3363 COOKE, GEORGE WILLIS. Memorabilia of the 
Transcendentalists in New England. Hartford, Conn.: 
Transcendental Books, 1973. 122p. MH. -t- 

3364 [DALL, CAROLINE H.] Transcendentalism in 
New England: a lecture delivered before the Society 
for Philosophical Enquiry, Washington, D.C., May 7, 
1895. Boston: Sold by Roberts Brothers, 1897. 38p. 
MWA.-H 

3365 DEISS, JOSEPH JAY. "Men, women, and 
Margaret Fuller." American Heritage, 23 (Aug. 1972), 
42-47, 94-97. 

3366 ELLIS, CHARLES MAYO. An essay on 
Transcendentalism. (1842) Westport, Conn.: 
Greenwood Pr., 1970. xv, 104p. MBU. -i- 

3367 EMERSON, EVERETT H. "Perry Miller and 
the Puritans: a literary scholar's assessment." 

History Teacher [Long Beach], 14 (Aug. 1981), 459-467. 

3368 ERICKSON, JOHN H. "Emerson and the 
Transcendentalists: their attitudes towards 
Puritanism." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of Chicago, 

1973. ii, 235p. 

Described in American Puritan Studies, Michael S. 
Montgomery, comp. (1984), 239. 

3369 RERING, NORMAN S. "Will and intellect 

in the New England mind." WMQ, 3 ser. 29 (Oct. 1972), 
515-558. 

3370 FROTHINGHAM, OCTAVIUS BROOKS (1822-1895). 
Transcendentalism in New England: a history. (1876) 
N.Y.: Harper, 1959. xxix, 386p. CtY. + 

Introduction to 1959 ed. by Sydney E. Ahlstrom. 

3371 GILMORE, WILLIAM JAMES. "Orestes 
Brownson and New England religious culture, 1803- 
1827." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of Virginia, 1971. 
503p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 36, No. 7A (1976), 4670. 

3372 GODDARD, HAROLD CLARKE. Studies in New 
England Transcendentalism. N.Y.: Columbia Univ. Pr., 
1908. X, 218p. MWA. -h 

Published Ph.D. dissertation (Columbia Univ.). 



3373 GOHDES, CLARENCE LOUIS FRANK. "Aspects 
of idealism in early New England." Philosophical 
Review, 39 (Nov. 1930), 537-555. 

3374 . The periodicals of American Transcendentalism. 

Durham, N.C.: Duke Univ. Pr., 1931. vii, 264p. 

NhD. 

3375 GREENWOOD, DOUGLAS McCreary. "James 
Marsh and the Transcendental temper." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Univ. of North Carolina, 1979. iii, 

200p. MB. 

President of the Univ. of Vermont from 1826-1833 and 
later a member of the faculty at Andover Theological 
Seminary. Abstracted in DAI, 40, No. 5 A (1979), 2680. 

3376 GRUSIN, RICHARD ARTHUR. "Interpretation 
and the institution of the self in New England 
Transcendentalism." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of 
California, Berkeley, 1983. 286p. 

Transcendentalist critique of the role of religious 
institutions. Abstracted in DAI, 44, No. 8 A (1984), 
2472. 

3377 HALL, DAVID DRISKO. "A reader's guide to 

The New England mind: the seventeenth century." 
American Quarterly, 34 (Spring 1982), 31-35. 

I.e., Perry Miller's seminal study. See also entry 
3399. 

3378 HARRIS, P. M. G. "Of two minds, falsely 
sundered: faith and reason, duality and complexity, 

'art' and science in Perry Miller and in Puritan New 
England." American Quarterly, 34 (Spring 1982), 36- 
42. 

See also entries 3398 and 3399. 

3379 HARTNEY, EDWIN A. "The clerical 
contribution to the Revolutionary mind in New 
England." Ph.D. dissertation. Drew Univ., 1935. 

3380 HOLLINGER, DAVID A. "Perry Miller and 
philosophical history." History and Theory, 7, No. 2 
(1968), 189-202. 

3381 HOLLIS, C. CARROLL. "Brownson on native 
New England." NEQ, 40 (June 1967), 212-226. 

Orestes Brownson was "as fully aware as Hawthorne or 
Emerson of the shaping influence of colonial 
Puritanism on New England traditions." 

3382 HOOPES, JAMES. "Art as history: Perry 

Miller's New England mind." American Quarterly, 34 
(Spring 1982), 3-24. 

See also entries 3398 and 3399. 



161 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



3383 DSTTELLECrUALHISTORY 



3383 JANTZ, HAROLD S. "German thought and 
literature in New England, 1620-1820." Journal of 
English and German Philology, 41 (Jan. 1942), 1-45. 

3384 JESKE, JEFFREY MICHAEL. "The origins and 
development of the Puritan idea of nature." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Kent State Univ., 1978. iii, 264p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 39, No. 9 A (1979), 5513. 

3385 KOSTER, DONALD NELSON. Transcendentalism 

in America. Boston: Twayne Publishers, 1975. 126p. 
MB. -(- 

3386 KUKLICK, BRUCE. Churchmen and 
philosophers: from Jonathan Edwards to John Dewey. 
New Haven, Conn.: Yale Univ. Pr., 1985. xx, 31 Ip. 
MBU.+ 

New England. 

3387 LE, VAN-DIEM. "Puritan idealism and the 
Transcendental movement." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. 
of Miimesota, 1960. 205p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 21, No. 7 (1961), 1929. 

3388 LEIGHTON, WALTER LEATHERBEE. French 
philosophers and New-England Transcendentalism. 
Charlottesville, Va.: Univ. of Virginia Press, 1908. 
105p. MBU. + 

Published Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of Virginia 
(1908). 

3389 LUBELL, ALBERT J. "George Santayana and 

the New England mind." South Atlantic Quarterly, 57 
(Summer 1958), 295-310. 

3390 LYSTRA, KAREN ANNE. "Perry Miller and 
American Puritan studies: a case study in scholarly 
community." Ph.D. dissertation. Case Western Reserve 
Univ., 1973. xiv, 413p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 34, No. 11 A (1974), 7135. 

339 1 McLennan, wiluam cordon lawson. 

"Transcendentalism, 1832-1862." Ph.D. dissertation, 
Univ. of Toronto [Canada], 1973. 

3392 MARSDEN, GEORGE M. "Perry Miller’s 
rehabilitation of the Puritans: a critique." Church 
History, 39 (Mar. 1970), 91-105. 

3393 MILLER, PERRY GILBERT EDDY. Errand into 

the wilderness: an address. Williamsburg, Va., 1952. 
35p. MWA. 

Refers to Samuel Danforlh’s 17th-century work, A 
brief recognition of New-Englands errand into the 
wilderness. See also Miller's article of similar 
title in WMQ, 3 ser. 10 (Jan. 1953), 3-32. 



3394 . "Individualism and the New England tradition." 

Journal of Liberal Religion, 4 (Summer 1942), 3-21. 

3395 . "Jonathan Edwards to Emerson." NEQ, 13 (Dec. 

1940), 589-617. 

Mysticism in New England thought. 

3396 . Nature's nation. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard 

Univ. Pr., 1967. xvi, 298p. MWA. -i- 

Primarily essays on New England intellectual and 
literary history (17th to 19th centuries). 

3397 . "The New England conscience." American 

Scholar, 28 (Winter 1958), 49-58. 

3398 . The New England mind: from colony to 

province. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard Univ. Pr., 1953. 
xi, 513p. MWA. + 

See also next entry. 

3399 . The New England mind: the seventeenth 

century. N.Y.: Macmillan, 1939. xi, 528p. MWA. -t- 

See also preceding entry. 

3400 THE MINOR and later Transcendentalists, a 
symposium. Edwin Gittleman, ed. Hartford: Conn.: 
Transcendental Books, 1969. 72p. CtY. -i- 

3401 MORISON, SAMUEL EUOT. The intellectual 

life of colonial New England. (1936) 2d ed. N.Y.: 

New York Univ. Pr., 1956. 288p. MWA. + 

Originally published under the title: The Puritan 
pronaos. 

3402 MUNROE, JAMES PHINNEY. The New England 
conscience; with typical examples. Boston: R. G. 
Badger, 1915. 219p. MBU. -i- 

3403 MYERSON, JOEL. "Frederic Henry Hedge and 

the failure of Transcendentalism." Harvard Library 
Bulletin, 23 (Oct. 1975), 396-410. 

3404 MYRES, WILLIAM VENTING. "The private and 
political thought of Ezra Stiles, 1760-1795." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Univ. of Dallas, 1973. xi, 369p. MB. 

Abstracted in DAI, 35, No. 2A (1974), 1185. 

3405 NEUWIRTH, STEVEN DOUGLAS. "The imagined 
savage: the American Indian and the New England mind, 
1620-1675." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of Washington, 
1982. 261p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 43, No. 9 A (1983), 2994. 



162 



Literature, Language, and the Printed Word 



INTELLECTUAL HISTORY 3428 



3406 PARETSKY, SARA N. "Words, works, and 

ways of knowing: the breakdown of moral philosophy in 
New England before the Civil War." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Univ. of Chicago, 1977. 

Abstracted in DAI, 38, No. 12A (1978), 7516. 

3407 POCHMANN, HENRY AUGUST. New England 
Transcendentalism and St. Louis Hegelianism: phases 
in the history of American idealism. Philadelphia: 

Carl Schurz Memorial Foundation, 1948. 144p. CtY. + 

Reprinted 1970. 

3408 PORTER. LAWRENCE CHARLES. "New England 
Transcendentalism: a self-portrait." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Univ. of Michigan, 1964. vi, 249p. 

CtY. 

3409 ROBINSON. DAVID. "The legacy of 
Charming: culture as a religious category in New 
England thought." Harvard Theological Review, 74 
(Apr. 1981), 221-239. 

3410 SANBORN, FRANKLIN BENJAMIN. Parameters 

of American romanticism and Transcendentalism: a 
chronological ordering of Sanborn's 700 recently 
gathered literary papers (critical, historical, and 
biographical), with a locating index. Kenneth Walter 
Cameron, ed. Hartford, Corm.: Transcendental Books, 
1981. 35p. NhD. -t- 

See also next entry and entry 3150 and 3300. 

3411 . The transcendental eye: historical papers 

pertaining to New England and other points on a great 
circle. Kenneth Walter Cameron, ed. Hartford: 
Transcendental Books, 1980. 251p. MU. + 

See also preceding entry. 

3412 . Transcendental youth and age: chapters in 

biography and autobiography. Keimeth Walter Cameron, 
ed. Hartford, Conn.: Transcendental Books, 1981. 

210p. NhD. -I- 

3413 SCHMELTEKOPF, DONALD D. "Puritan thought 
and the formation of the early American political 
tradition, 1630-1787." Ph.D. dissertation. Drew 
Univ., 1975. 338p. 

Abstracted in DAJ, 36, No. 5 A (1975), 2924. 

3414 SEYMOUR, J. A. "The development of New 
England thought." S.T.D. dissertation. Temple Univ., 
1912. 37p. 

Described in American Puritan Studies, Michael S. 
Montgomery, comp. (1984), 19-20. 

3415 SIMPSON, LEWIS P. "Emerson and the myth 

of New England intellectual lapse." Emerson Society 
C^arterly, 10, No. 1 (1958), 28-31. 



3416 SNYDER, K. ALAN. "Foundations of 

liberty: the Christian republicanism of Timotliy 
Dwight and Jedidiah Morse." NEQ, 56 (Sept. 1983), 382 
397. 

3417 SPINI, GIORGIO. "Plato and the 

'Puritanism' of the Puritans." Storia Nordamericana 
[Italy], 1 (1984), 130-139. 

3418 STAUFFER, VERNON. New England and the 
Bavarian Illuminati. N.Y.: Columbia Univ. Pr., 1918. 
374p. Ct. -H 

Published Ph.D. dissertation (Columbia Univ., 1918). 

3419 STEARNS, RAYMOND PHINEAS. "Assessing the 
New England mind." Church History, 10 (Sept. 1941), 
246-262. 

3420 SULLIVAN, JONATHAN GRAY. "Perry Miller's 

The New England mind: from colony to province: an 
historiographical study." Ph.D. dissertation, Emory 
Univ., 1974. vi, 252p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 35, No. 11 A (1975), 7209. See 
also entry 3398. 

3421 THOMPSON, CAMERON. "John Locke and New 
England Transcendentalism." NEQ, 35 (Dec. 1962), 435- 
457. 

3422 TRANSCENDENTALISM and its legacy. Myron 
Simon and Thornton H. Parsons, eds. Ann Arbor, Mich.: 
Univ. of Michigan Pr., 1966. viii, 228p. MBU. 

3423 THE TRANSCENDENT ALIST revolt. George F. 

Whicher, ed. Lexington, Mass.: D. C. Heath, 1968. 
ix, 109p. MBU. -H 

3424 THE TRANSCENDENT ALISTS: a review of 
research and criticism. Joel Myerson, ed. N.Y.: 

Modem Language Association of America, 1984. xix, 
534p. NhD. + 

3425 THE TRANSCENDENTAUSTS: an anthology. 

Perry Miller, ed. Cambridge: Harvard Univ. Pr., 

1950. xvii, 521p. MStuO. + 

Includes historical introduction. 

3426 WALL, ANNIE. "Early Transcendentalism in 
New England." NEM, 5 (1886-1887), 162-170. 

3427 WALLS, LOUIS. 'The New England 

conscience: a study in moral perception." American 
Journal of Sociology, 19 (July 1913), 48-60. 

3428 WARREN, EDWARD AUSTIN. The New England 
conscience. Arm Arbor, Mich.: Univ. of Michigan Pr., 
1966. ix, 23 Ip. MSaE. -i- 



163 



1 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



\ 



34 29 INTELLECTU AL HISTORY 



3429 WELLER. RENEE. "The minor 
Transcendentalists and German philosophy." NEQ, 15 
(Dec. 1942), 652-680. 

3430 WISE, GENE. "Implicit irony in recent 

American historiography: Perry Miller's New England 
mind." Journal of the History of Ideas, 29 (Oct.-Dec. 
1968), 579-600. 

3431 WOHL, HAROLD B. "Charles Chauncy and the 
Age of Enlightenment in New England." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Univ. of Iowa, 1956. 216p. 

The 18th-century Boston clergyman. Abstracted in 
DAI. 16. No. 10 (1956), 1895. 

3432 ZOLLA, ELEMIRE. Le origini del 
trascendentalismo. Rome: Edizioni di Storia e 
Letteratura, 1963. 28 Ip. CtY. -t- 

SEE "Intellectual life" in Index for additional 
listings. 



HISTORIANS AND HISTORIOGRAPHY 

3433 BELL. SUSAN CHERRY. "History and 
artistry in Cotton Mather's Magnalia Christi 
Americana." Ph.D. dissertation. State Univ. of New 
York, Binghamton, 1981. 298p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 42, No. 2A (1981), 701. See also 
entry 404. 

3434 BERCOVITCH, SACVAN. "New England epic: 

a literary study of Cotton Mather's Magnalia Christi 
Americana." Ph.D. dissertation, Claremont Graduate 
School, 1965. iii, 416p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 28, No. lOA (1968), 4117. See 
also entry 404. 

3435 BRUNKOW, ROBERT. "An analysis of Cotton 
Mather's understanding of the relationship of the 
supernatural to man as seen in history." Historical 
Magazine of the Protestant Episcopal Church, 42 (Sept. 
1973). 319-329. 

I.e., as seen in his writings about the early 
history of New England. 

3436 BUCHANAN, JOHN GEORGE. "Puritan 

philosophy of history from Restoration to Revolution." 
EIHC, 104 (Oct. 1968), 329-348. 

3437 BUSH, MARY T. "Representative nineteenth- 
century New England historians view Manifest Destiny." 
Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of Ottawa [Canada], 1977. 



3438 GALLAGHER, EDWARD JOSEPH. "A critical < 

study of Edward Johnson's Wonder-working providence of t 
Sions saviour in New England." Ph.D. dissertation, 

Univ. of Notre Dame, 1970. 222p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 31, No. 9 A (1971), 4712. See 
also entry 395. 

3439 GAY, PETER. A loss of mastery: Puritan 
historians in colonial America. Berkeley, Calif.: 

Univ. of California Pr., 1966. viii, 164p. MB. + 

3440 GRIBBfN, WILLIAM. "A mirror to New 

England: the Compendius history of Jedidiah Morse and 
Elijah Parish." NEQ, 45 (Sept. 1972), 340-354. 

See also entry 102. 

3441 HOWARD, ALAN BLAIR. "The web in the 

loom: an introduction to the Puritan histories of New 
England." Ph.D. dissertation, Stanford Univ., 1968. 
xii, 422p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 29, No. 7A (1969), 2214. 

3442 KILMAN, JOHN C. "A joiner looks at 
colonial New England: Edward Johnson's Special 
providences." Southern Folklore Quarterly, 45 (1981), 
135-144. 

See also entry 395. 

3443 KIRSCH, GEORGE BENSON. Jeremy Belknap: 

a biography. N.Y.: Amo Pr., 1982. v, 226p. MBU. + 
Belknap (lived 1744-1798), Congregational clergyman 
and historian, served churches in New Hampshire and 
Massachusetts and founded the Massachusetts Historical 
Society. See also next entry. 

3444 . "Jeremy Belknap: a biography." Ph.D. 

dissertation, Columbia Univ., 1972. iii, 366p. MWA. 

Abstracted in DAI, 33, No. 5A (1972), 2289. See 
also preceding entry. 

3445 . "Jeremy Belknap and the problem of blacks and 

Indians in early America." Historical New Hampshire, 

34 (Fall-Winter 1979), 202-222. 

3446 . "Jeremy Belknap: man of letters in the young 

republic." NEQ, 54 (Mar. 1981), 33-53. 

See also preceding entries. 

3447 McCANDLISH, GEORGE EDWARD. "Annotations 
for a new edition with a definitive text of Cotton 
Mather's 'Magnalia Christi Americana' (1702), Books I 
and II." Ph.D. dissertation. Harvard Univ., 1963. 

204p. I 

Described in American Puritan Studies, Michael S. j 

Montgomery, comp. (1984), 134. See also entry 404. j 



164 



Literature, Language, and the Printed Word 



LANGUAGE AND SPEECH 3468 



3448 MacLEAR, JAMES FULTON. "The heart of 
New England rent': the mystical element in early 
Puritan history." Mississippi Valley Historical 
Review, 42 (Mar. 1956), 621-652. 

3449 [MARCON, JANE BELKNAP.] Life of Jeremy 
Belknap, D.D., the historian of New Hampshire. With 
selections from his corresfXDndence and other writings. 
Collected and arranged by his grand-daughter. N.Y.: 
Harper and Brothers, 1847. 253p. MStuO. -t- 

3450 MATTHEWS, J. V. "'Whig history’": the 

New England Whigs and a usable past." NEQ, 51 (June 
1978), 193-208. 

Whig Party. 

3451 MURDOCK, KENNETH BALLARD. "Clio in the 
wilderness: history and biography in Puritan New 
England." Church History, 24 (Sept. 1955), 221-238. 

3452 PERRY, DENNIS R. "Autobiographical 
structures in seventeenth-century Puritan histories." 
Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of Wisconsin, 1986. 245p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 47, No. 6A (1986), 2161. 

3453 RUSHING. STANLEY BALLARD. "The recovery 
of New England Puritanism: a historiographical 
investigation." Th.D. dissertation. New Orleans 
Baptist Theological Seminary, 1971. vi, 165p. 

Described in American Puritan Studies, Michael S. 
Montgomery, comp. (1984), 218. 

3454 SCOBEY, DAVID M. "Revising the errand: 

New England's ways and the Puritan sense of the past." 
WMQ, 3 ser. 41 (Jan. 1984), 3-31. 

3455 TICHL CECEUA LOUISE HALBERT. The art 

of the Lords remembrancers: a study of New England 
Puritan histories." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of 
California, Davis, 1968. vi, 210p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 29, No. 7A (1969), 2211. 

3456 . "The Puritan historians and their New 

Jerusalem." Early American Literature, 6 (Fall 1971), 
143-155. 

See also preceding entry. 

3457 TREFZ, EDWARD KENNETH. "The Puritans’ 

view of history." Boston Public Library Quarterly, 9 
(July 1957), 115-136. 

3458 TUCKER, EDWARD BRUCE. "The founders 
remembered: the Anglicization of the Puritan 
tradition in New England, 1690-1760." Ph.D. 
dissertation. Brown Univ., 1979. viii, 234p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 40, No. IIA (1980), 5983. 



3459 . "The reinterpretation of Puritan history in 

provincial New England." NEQ, 54 (Dec. 1981), 481- 
498. 

3460 . "The reinvention of New England, 1691-1770. 

NEQ, 59 (Sept. 1986), 315-340. 

"Whatever else New England was, it was a story, a 
creation of mind that each generation of ministers 
retold in order to connect New Englanders to a central 
purpose that transcended their own time and place." 

3461 WEST, ELLIOTT. "Thomas Prince and New 
England history." Journal of Church and State, 16 
(Autumn 1974), 435-451. 

18th century. See also entry 421. 

SEE "Historians and historiography" in Index for 
additional listings. 



LANGUAGE AND SPEECH 

3462 ABBOTT, ORVILLE LAWRENCE. "A study of 

verb form and verb uses in certain American writings 
of the seventeenth century." Ph.D. dissertation, 
Michigan State College, 1954. 233p. 

New England. Abstracted in DAI, 14, No. 2 (1954), 
361. 

3463 . "Verbal endings in seventeenth-century 

English." American Speech, 33 (Oct. 1958), 184-194. 

New England. 

3464 BATCHELDER, SAMUEL F. "Some sea terms in 
land speech." NEQ, 2 (Oct. 1929), 625-653. 

3465 BLACKBURN, RUTH M. "Representation of 
New England rustic dialects in the plays of Eugene 
O'Neill." Ph.D. dissertation. New York Univ., 1967. 

221p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 28, No. IIA (1968), 4616. 

3466 BRAGDON, KATHLEEN JOAN. "'Emphaticall 
speech and great action': an analysis of seventeenth- 
century native speech events described in early 
sources." Man in the Northeast, No. 33 (Spring 1987), 
101 - 112 . 

3467 BRAULT, GERARD JOSEPH. "New England 
vocabulary." French Review, 35 (Dec. 1961), 163-175 

3468 CADIEUX, LOUIS EDOUARD. L'Enseignement 
du francais dan les centres canadiens-francais de la 
Nouvelle-Angleterre. Quebec, 1912. 14p. RWoU. + 

French language in New England. 



165 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



3469 

3469 

3470 

3471 

3472 

3473 

3474 

3475 

3476 

3477 

3478 

3479 

3480 



LANGUAGE AND SPEECH 



CHOATE. ISAAC BASSETT. 'The New England 3481 

dialect." NEM, 6 (1887-1888), 583-594. 

COLE, ARTHUR HARRISON. The charming 

idioms of New England: an essay upon their 3482 

significance, together with a compilation of those 

current in the region around 1900-1910. [Worcester, 

Mass.: Davis Pr., I960.] 52p. MWA. -t- 
Reprinted from AASP, 70 (Apr. 1960), 21-68. 



MILLER, MARY R. "Bilingualism in 
northern New England." American Dialect Society, 52 
(Nov. 1969), 1-23. 

PELOQUIN-FARE, LOUISE. "Images of 
French language and culture outside France: a survey 
of a Franco-American population in New England." 
D.M.L. dissertation, Middlebury College, 1985. 468p. 
Abstracted in DAI, 47, No. lA (1986), 167. 

3483 PENZL, HERBERT. "Relics with broad A' 

in New England speech." American Speech, 13 (Feb. 
1938), 45-49. 

3484 POOL, DAVID de SOLA. Hebrew learning 
among the Puritans of New England prior to 1700. 
n.p., [1911?]. 83p. CtHi. + 

3485 POTTER, DAVID. "Some aspects of speaking 
in the town meetings of colonial New England." 

Southern Speech Journal, 22 (Spring 1957), 157-163. 

3486 ROWE, HERSHEL DALE. "New England terms 
for bull: some aspects of barnyard bowdlerism." 
American Speech, 32 (May 1957), 110-116. 

3487 TJOSSEM, HERBERT K. "New England 
pronunciation before 1700." Ph.D. dissertation, Yale 
Univ., 1955. 247p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 28, No. 7A (1968), 2669. 

3488 TYLER, CLARICE E. ’Topographical terms 

in the seventeenth-century records of Connecticut and 
Rhode Island." NEQ, 2 (July 1929), 382-401. 

3489 WOLFE, JULIA W. "Some New England 
neologisms." American Speech, 5 (Dec. 1929), 134-135 

SEE "Language and languages" in Index for additional 
listings. 



BOOKS, LIBRARIES, AND READING 



. 'The social significance of New England 

idiomatic phrases." AASP, 70 (Apr. 1960), 21-68. 

DARBELNET, JEAN-LOUIS. "Etude 
sociolinguistique des contacts entre Tanglais et le 
francais au Canada et en Nouvelle-Angleterre." Modem 
Language Association, Bulletin Annuel, French VIll 
(Dec. 1970), 11-20. 

DOWNER, JAMES W. "Features of New 
England rustic pronunciation in James Russell Lowell's 
Bigelow papers." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of 
Michigan, 1958. 368p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 19, No. 6 (1958), 1373. 

ENGLAND, GEORGE ALLAN. "Rural locutions 
of Maine and northern New Hampshire." Dialect Notes, 

4, Part 2 (1914), 67-83. 

HUDSON, ROY FRED. "Rhetorical invention 
in colonial New England." Speech Monographs, 25 (Aug. 
1958), 215-221. 

. "The theory of communication of colonial New 

England preachers, 1620-1670." Ph.D. dissertation, 
Cornell Univ., 1954. vi, 248p. 

See also next entry. 

. "The theory of communication of colonial New 

England preachers, 1620-1670." Speech Monographs, 21 
(Aug. 1954), 172. 

See also preceding entry. 

JOHNSON, FALK S. "New England phonetic 
transcriptions before 1850: Ezekiel Rich and Henry 
Martyn Parkhurst." DubSemPr (1983), 77-87. 

KLOSS, HEINZ. "Les droits linguistiques 
des Franco-Americains aux Etats-Unis. Quebec: 

Presses de TUniversite Laval, 1970. 80p. MBU. + 

Legal status of the French language in New England 
and Louisiana. 

MATTHEWS, 'WILLIAM. "Early New England 
words." American Speech, 15 (Oct. 1940), 225-231. 



3490 ALBEE, JOHN. "Dudley Leavitt’s New 
Hampshire almanac, with some observations of New 
England almanacs." NEM, n.s. 17 (Jan. 1898), 545-555. 

3491 CRESS Y, DAVID. "Books as totems in 
seventeenth-century England and New England." Journal 
of Library History, 21 (Winter 1986), 92-106. 

3492 DEXTER, FRANKLIN BOWDITCH. "Early 
private libraries in New England." AASP, n.s. 28 
(Apr. 1907X 135-147. 

Also published separately. 



166 



Literature, Language, and the Printed Word 



BOOKS, UBRARIES, AND READING 3516 



3493 DITZ30N. SIDNEY HERBERT. Arsenals of a 
democratic culture: a social history of the American 
public library movement in New England and the middle 
states from 1850 to 1900. Chicago: American Library 
Association, 1947. x, 263p. MChB. + 

3494 FLORIDA. UNIVERSITY. The Parkman Dexter 
Howe Library, Part I. Sidney Ives, ed. Gainesville, 

Ra., 1983. 79p. MH. + 

Boston businessman’s collection of books by New 
England authors, now owned by the university. 

3495 GILMORE, WILLIAM JAMES. Reading becomes 
a necessity of life: material and cultural life in 
rural New England, 1780-1835. Knoxville, Term.: 

Univ. of Tennessee Pr., 1989. MWC. + 

Pagination not available. 

3496 HERRICK, C. A. "The early New 
Englanders: what did they read?" The Library, 9 
(1918), 1-17. 

3497 "HISTORY of school books in New England." 

New Hampshire Repository, 1 (1845-1846), 286-287; 2 
(1846-1847), 81-82. 

3498 JOHNSON, CLIFTON. "The New England 
primer." NEM, n.s. 28 (May 1903), 323-333. 

3499 LIVERMORE, GEORGE. The origin, history 
and character of the New England primer. Being a 
series of articles contributed to "The Cambridge 
Chronicle." N.Y.: C. F. Hearunan, 1915. 94p. 

NhD.-t- 

3500 LOCKRIDGE, KENNETH A. Literacy in 
colonial New England: an enquiry into the social 
context of literacy in the early modem West. N.Y.: 
Norton, 1974. xii, 164p. MWA. -i- 

3501 LOVELY, N. W. "Notes on New England 
almanacs." NEQ, 8 (June 1935), 264-277. 

3502 McCauley, ELFRIEDA B. ’The New England 

mill girls: feminine influence in the development of 
public libraries in New England, 1820-1860." D.L.S. 
dissertation, Columbia Univ., 1971. 365p. NhKeS. 

3503 . "Some early women librarians in New England." 

Wilson Library Bulletin, 51 (Apr. 1977), 648-655. 

3504 McMullen, HAYNES. "Prevalence of 
libraries in the Northeastern United States before 
1876." Journal of Library History, 22 (Summer 1987), 
312-337. 



3505 MARBLE, ANNIE RUSSELL. "Early New 

England almanacs." NEM, n.s. 19 (Jan. 1899), 548-557 

3506 MOULTON, PRISCILLA. ’’ A reHection of old 
New England." Wilson Library Bulletin, 50 (Oct. 

1975), 146-148. 

Collection of children’s literature at Essex 
Institute, Salem, Mass. 

3507 THE NEW-England primer: a history of its 

origin and development; with a reprint of the unique 
copy of the earliest known edition and many fac- 
similie illustrations and reproductions. Paul 
Leicester Ford, ed. N.Y.: Dodd, Mead, 1897. xi, 

354p. MSaE. -H 

3508 "THE NEW England primer." NEHGR, 3 (July 
1849), 209-211. 

3509 PERRY, AMOS. "New England almanacs." 

Narragansett Historical Register, 4 (1885-1886), 27- 
39. 

3510 "A PIONEER American booktrade 
bibliographer-Simeon Ide." Publishers’ Weekly, 67 
(Jan. 14, 1905), 37-39. 

Lived 1794-1889. 

3511 SEIGEL, JULES PAUL. "Puritan light 
reading." NEQ, 37 (June 1964), 185-199. 

3512 SESSIONS, RUTH HUNTINGTON. "A lady’s 
reading eighty years ago." NEM, n.s. 21 (Oct. 1899), 
145-153. 

3513 SHERA, JESSE HAUK. Foundations of the 
public library: the origins of the public library 
movement in New England, 1629-1855. Hamden, Conn. 
Shoe String Pr., 1949. xv, 308p. MStuO. + 

Reprinted 1965. See also next entry. 

3514 . "Foundations of the public library: the 

origins of the library movement in New England, 1629- 
1855." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of Chicago, 1944. 
341p. 

See also preceding entry. 

3515 SHIPTON, CUFFORD KENYON. "Literary 
leaven in provincial New England." NEQ, 9 (June 
1936), 203-217. 

Book collecting. 

3516 STODDARD, ROGER E. "The use of mourning 
wrappers in New England, with a note on mourning 
papers in English books at Harvard." Harvard Library 
Bulletin, 30 (Jan. 1982), 96-98. 

Used with published funeral sermons. 



167 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



35 1 7 BOOKS, LIBRARIES. AND READING 

3517 TTTTJS, ANSON. "The days of the New 

England primer." Magazine of New England History, 3 
(1893), 31-37. 

3518 WATTERS, DAVID HARPER. "1 spake as a 
child': authority, metaphor and the New-England 
primer." Early American Literature, 20 (Winter 1985- 
1986), 193-213. 

3519 WHITE, ELIZABETH PEARSON. 'The New 

England primer." Mayflower Quarterly, 46 (May 1980), 
61-69. 

3520 WOLF, EDWIN II. "Some books of early New 
England provenance in the 1823 library of Allegheny 
College." AASP, 73 (Apr. 1963), 1344. 

3521 WRIGHT, THOMAS GODDARD. "Colonial book 
peddlers." Nation, 106 (Jan. 3, 1918), 14-15. 

3522 ZIYAD, DAWUD, and GEORGE R. JOHNSON. 

"Amos Fortune and the early American library 
movement." Negro History Bulletin, 42 (July-Sept. 
1979), 77. 

18th century. 



PRINTING AND PUBUSHING 

3523 COBB, NATHAN. "The rural book world." 

Boston Sunday Globe, New England (Jan. 9, 1977), 8-9, 
12. 14, 26-27. 

Biographical sketches of some contemporary book 
publishers in northern New England. 

3524 COLLIER. THOMAS S. "Early printing in 

New England." New London County [Conn.] Historical 
Society, Records and Papers, Part III, Volume I 
(1891), 37-43. 

3525 DOW, GEORGE FRANCIS. 'Trade cards." 

OTNE, 26 (Apr. 1936), 115-135; (July 1936), 10-22. 

3526 GREEN, SAMUEL ABBOTT. "Early history of 
printing in New England." MHSP, 31 (1896-1897), 240- 
253. 

3527 HAWKINS. RUSH C. "The Daye Press." 

Literary Collector, 7 (Mar. 1904), 136-139. 

Early printing in Massachusetts and Connecticut. 

3528 HOY, JOAN McELROY. "The publication and 
distribution of books among New England Quakers, 1775- 
1836." Ph.D. dissertation, Boston Univ., 1989. viii, 
358p. RHi. 



3529 JOHN CARTER BROWN LIBRARY. PROVIDENCE, R.I. 
New England printers and the American 
Revolution: an exhibition opened at the annual 
meeting of the associates of the John Carter Brown 
Library, May 2, 1975. Providence, R.I., 1975. 35p. 

RHi. -I- 

3530 KIESSEL, WILLIAM C. 'The Green family: 

a dynasty of printers." NEHGR, 104 (Apr. 1950), 81- 
93. 

3531 UNSCOTT, ROBERT NEWTON. 'The 

subscription book agent at Houghton Mifflin Company." 
NEG, 12 (Fall 1970), 36-39. 

Traveling salesman. 

3532 MOORE, JOHN WEEKS. Moore's historical, 
biographical, and miscellaneous gatherings, in the 
form of disconnected notes relative to printers, 
printing, publishing, and editing of books, 
newspapers, magazines and other literary productions, 
such as the early publications of New England, the 
United States, and the world, from the discovery of 
the art, or from 1420 to 1886, with many brief notices 
of authors, publishers, editors, printers, and 
inventors. Concord, N.H.: Printed by the Republican 
Pr. Association, 1886. 604p. MH. -i- 

3533 SILVER, ROLLO GABRIEL. "Financing the 
publication of early New England sermons." Studies in 
Bibliography, 11 (1958), 162-178. 

17th and 18th centuries. 



NEWSPAPERS AND PERIODICALS 

3534 ASSUMPTION COLLEGE, WORCESTER, MASS. 

FRENCH INSTITUTE. FOURTH ANNUAL 
CONFERENCE (1983). Le joumalisme de langue francaise 
aux Etats-Unis. Quebec [Canada]: Le Conseil de la 

vie francaise en Amerique, 1984. 162p. MeAu. -i- 

3535 BEUSLE, ALEXANDRE. Histoiredela 

presse franco-americaine: comprenant I'historique de 
I'emigration des Canadiens-Francaise aux Etats-Unis, 
leur development et leurs progrcs. Cet ouvrage 
content aussi historique des joumaux publics depuis 
1838 jusqua'a nos jours, les biographies des 
joumalistes, defunts et vivants, et un supplement 
sur les Joumaux publics des Francais a New- York, cn 
Louisiane et ailleurs. Worcester, Mass.: "L'Opinion 
Publique," 1911. 434p. MB. -t- 



168 



Literature, Language, and the Printed Word 



NEWSPAPERS AND PERIODICALS 3555 



3536 BISHOP. GEORGE W„ JR. "New England 
journalist: highlights in the newspaper career of 
Charles H. Dow." Business History Review, 34 (Spring 
1960), 77-93. 

Creator of the Dow- lone average (bom 1851). 

3537 BROWN. HERBERT ROSS. The New England 
(^arterly: an editor's reminiscences, n.p.: Printed 
for the Colonial Society of Massachusetts by the 
Athoensen Pr., 1980. [10]p. MB At. -t- 

3538 BUTLER. RANDALL RICHARDSON n. "New 
England journalism and the questions of slavery, the 
South, and abolitionism, 1820-1861." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Brigham Young Univ., 1979. v, 210p. 
CtHi. 

Abstracted in DAI, 41, No. 2A (1980), 769. 

3539 CLARK. C. E. FRAZER, JR. "Origins of the 
American renaissance: a front-page story." Studies 
in the American Renaissance (1977), 155-164. 

"Role of the American [primarily New England] press 
in the promotion and spread of America's native 
literature." 

3540 COOKE, GEORGE WILUS. "The first "New 
England Magazine,' and its editor." NEM, n.s. 16 
(Mar. 1897). 103-117. 

Joseph Tinker Buckingham edited the periodical, 
which was published between 1831 and 1835. See also 
entry 3543. 

3541 FINLEY, RUTH E. The lady of Godey's: 

Sarah Josepha Hale. Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott, 
1931. 318p. MWA. -I- 
See also entry 3553. 

3542 GARLAND, JOSEPH. "Medical journalism in 

New England, 1788-1924." Boston Medical and Surgical 
Journal, 190 (1924), 865-879. 

3543 HALL, HOLMAN S. "The first New England 
Magazine." NEM, n.s. 33 (Jan. 1906), 520-525. 

See also entry 3540. 

3544 HAM, EDWARD BILLINGS. "Journalism and 

the French survival in New England." NEQ, 11 (Mar. 
1938), 89-107. 

3545 HANNA, WILLIAM FRANCIS. "Abraham Lincoln 
and the New England press." Ph.D. dissertation, 

Boston College, 1980. 228p. MB. 

Abstracted in DAI, 41, No. 6A (1980), 2736. 



3546 HENDEE, J. KIRBY. "Newspaper coverage in 
New England of the illness and death of Pope Leo 
Xin." American Catholic Historical Society of 
Philadelphia, Records, 68 (Sept.-Dee. 1957), 71-95. 

1903. 

3547 HUMPHREY, CAROL SUE. "This popular 
engine': an institutional study of New England 
newspapers, 1775-1789." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of 
North Carolina, 1985. 297p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 46, No. 12A (1986), 3843. 

3548 JACKSON, ELIZABETH. "Reaction against 
Puritanism in American periodicals of the eighteenth 
century." Ph.D. dissertation, Radcliffe College, 

1916. 257p. 

Described in American Puritan Studies, Michael S. 
Montgomery, comp. (1984), 21. 

3549 LORD, MYRA BELLE HORNE. History of the 

New England Woman's Press Association, 1885-1931. 
Newton, Mass.: Graphic Pr., 1932. 4p. MBU. + 

3550 LUCEY, WILLIAM LEO. "Catholic journalism 

in New England, 1885-1900." New England Social 
Studies Bulletin, 10 (May 1953), 9-17. 

3551 MAGRUDER, CHARLES. "The White Pine 
monograph series." Society of Architectural 
Historians, Journal, 22 (Mar. 1963), 39-41. 

Architectural monographs, with strong New England 
content. 

3552 PERREAULT, ROBERT B. La presse franco- 
americaine et la politique: I'oeuvre de Charles- 
Roger Daoust. Bedford, N.H.: National Materials 
Development Center for French, 1981. ix, 102p. Nhlli 
+ 

Franco-American journalist. 

3553 ROGERS, SHERBROOKE. Sara Josepha Hale: 

a New England pioneer, 1788-1879. Grantham, N.H.: 
Tompson & Rutter, 1985. 135p. MStuO. -i- 
Editor of American Ladies Magazine and Godey's 
Ladies Book. See also entry 3541. 

3554 STEARNS, BERTHA MONICA. "Early New 
England magazines for ladies." NEQ, 2 (July 1929), 
420-457. 

See also entry 3556. 

3555 . "John Greenleaf Whittier, editor." NEQ, 13 

(June 1940), 280-304. 



169 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



3556 NEWSPAPERS AND PERIODICALS 



3556 STEARNS. BERTHA MONICA. "New England 
magazines for ladies, 1830-60." NEQ, 3 (Oct. 1930), 
627-656. 

See also entry 3554. 

3557 TETRAULT, MAXIMIUENNE. Leroledela 
presse dans revolution du people franco-amcricaine 
de la Nouvelle Angleterre; avec une liste 
chronologique des joumaux publics dans les etats de 
rillinois, Michigan, Minnesota, New-York et de la 
Nouvelle Angleterre. Marseille [France]: Imprimerie 
Ferran, 1935. 143p. MWA. + 



I 

\ 

t 

Other Aspects of Social and Cultural History ■ 

) 

i 

! 

t 

3562 CANUP, JOHN LESLIE. "The cry of Sodom ' 

enquired into': bestiality and the wilderness of 
human nature in seventeenth-century New England." * 

AASP, 98 (Apr. 1988), 113-134. j 

3563 DAWES, NORMAN H. "Social classes in , 

seventeenth-century New England." Ph.D. dissertation. 
Harvard Univ., 1946. xviii, 503p. 

Described in American Puritan Studies, Michael S. 
Montgomery, comp. (1984), 71. | 

I 



GENERAL SOCIAL HISTORY 

3559 BOYETT, GENE W. "Aging in seventeenth- 

century New England." NEHGR, 134 (July 1980), 181- 
193. 

3560 BROOKE, JOHN L. "Enterrement, baptdme 

et communite in Nouvelle- Angleterre (1730-1790)." 
Annales: Economies, Societies, Civilisations, 42 
(May-June 1987), 653-686. 

3561 BUERLE, DAVID ELMORE. "Some measures of 
Boston and New York City social influence on their 
common hinterland." Ph.D. dissertation, Clark Univ., 
1965. 239p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 26, No. 4 (1965), 2128-2129. 



t 

3558 WELTMAN, JANIE GORDON. Our first fifty j 

years: the New England Woman's Press Associa 
1885-1935. Malden, Mass.: Maplewood Pr., 1936. 4p. 
MBU.-i- 



+ Listings in the National Union Catalog for books and pamphlets marked 
with this symbol may include additional library locations. 



170 



Other Aspects of Social and Cultural History 



3564 DETHLEFSEN, EDWIN STEWART. "Life and 
death in colonial New England." Ph.D. dissertation. 
Harvard Univ., 1972. v, 202p. 

Described in American Puritan Studies, Michael S. 
Montgomery, comp. (1984), 226-227. 

3565 DUNN, RICHARD SLATOR. "The social 

history of early New England." American Quarterly, 24 
(Dec. 1972), 661-679. 

3566 FLAHERTY, DAVID HARRIS. Privacy in 
colonial New England. Charlottesville, Va.: Univ. 

Pr. of Virginia, 1972. xii, 287p. MWA. + 

See also next entry. 

3567 . "Privacy in colonial New England, 1630-1776." 

Ph.D. dissertation, Columbia Univ., 1967. 441p. CtU. 

Abstracted in DAI, 28, No. 5A (1967), 1760. See 
also preceding entry. 

3568 FOSTER, STEPHEN. "The Puritan social 

ethic: class and calling in the first hundred years 
of settlement in New England." Ph.D. dissertation, 

Yale Univ., 1966. xiv, 415p. MWalB. 

Abstracted in DAI, 27, No. 8A (1967), 2475. See 
also next entry. 

3569 . Their solitary way: the Puritan social ethic 

in the first century of the settlement of New England. 
New Haven, Conn.: Yale Univ. Pr., 1971. xxii, 214p. 
MWA.-H 

See also preceding entry. 

3570 GEDDES, GORDON ELDON. Welcome joy: 

death in Puritan New England. Arm Arbor, Mich.: UMI 
Research Pr., 1981. 262p. MWA. -t- 
See also next entry. 

3571 . "Welcome joy: death in Puritan New England, 

1638-1730." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of California, 
Riverside, 1976. viii, 372p. M. 

Abstracted in DAI, 37, No. 12A (1977), 7919. See 
also preceding entry. 

3572 GORLIER, CLAUDIO. L'universo domestico: 
studi sulla cultura e la societa della Nuova 
Inghilterra nel secolo XIX. Rome: Edizioni di Storia 
e Letteratura, 1962. 29 Ip. CtY. -t- 

3573 HATCH, DAVID UNCOLN, and MARY AUCE 
HATCH. Under the elms, yesterday and today: a study 
of changes in structure in a rural New England 
community since 1900. [Syracuse, N.Y.]: Syracuse 
Univ., 1949. 185p. New England. + 

Unnamed town. 



GENERAL SOaAL HISTORY 3585 



3574 HEYRMAN, CHRISTINE LEIGH. "The fashion 
among more superior people: charity and social change 
in provincial New England, 1700-1740." American 
C^arterly, 34 (Summer 1982), 107-124. 

See also next entry. 

3575 . "A model of Christian charity: the rich and 

the poor in New England, 1630-1730." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Yale Univ., 1977. v, 280p. M. 

Abstracted in DAI, 38, No. 6A (1977), 3681. 

3576 KORNBLITH, GARY J. "Self-made men: the 
development of middling-class consciousness in New 
England." Massachusetts Review, 26 (Summer-Autumn 
1985), 461-474. 

3577 LARKIN, JACK. The reshaping of everyday 

life, 1790-1840. N.Y.: Harper & Row, 1988. xv, 

304p. MStuO. -I- 
New England. 

3578 . "The view from New England: notes on everyday 

life in rural America to 1850." American Quarterly, 

34, No. 3 (1982), 244-261. 

3579 LEITES, EDMUND. The Puritan conscience 

and modem sexuality. New Haven, Conn.: Yale Univ. 
Pr., 1986. xi, 196p. MBU. + 

3580 LENN, THEODORE I. "Social stratification 

in southern New England." New England Social Studies 
Bulletin, 11 (May 1954), 14-22. 

3581 LEON, WARREN. "If you’ve seen one small 
town, have you seen them all?" Old Sturbridge 
Village, Rural Visitor, 20 (Spring 1980), 16-19. 

Changes in rural life in New England (late- 19th and 
early-20th centuries). 

3582 MANN, HENRY. Features of society in old 

and New England. Providence, R.I.: S. S. Rider, 

1885. viii, 103p. VtHi. -i- 

3583 MORGAN, EDMUND SEARS. "Masters and 

servants in early New England." More Books, 17 (Sept. 
1942), 311-326. 

3584 NAGLACK, JAMES J. "Death in colonial New 
England." Historical Journal of Western 
Massachusetts, 4 (Fall 1975), 21-33. 

3585 OAKS, ROBERT F. "Things fearful to 

name': sodomy and buggery in seventeenth-century New 
England." JSH, 12 (Winter 1978), 268-281. 



171 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



3586 GENERAL SOCIAL HISTORY 



3586 PARKES, HENRY B. "Morals and law 
enforcement in colonial New England." NEQ, 5 (July 
1932), 431-452. 

3587 . "Sexual morals and the Great Awakening." NEQ, 

3 (Jan. 1930), 133-135. 

3588 PEARSON. HAYDN SANBORN. The New England 
year. N.Y.: W. W. Norton, 1966. 255p. M. -h 

Country life. 

3589 PERLEY, SIDNEY. "Early memorials of the 
dead." EIHC, 18 (Apr.-June 1881), 156-160. 

In New England. 

3590 RUGGLES, HENRY STODDARD. Colonial gentry 
of New England as recorded by Harvard and Yale 
universities. Wakefield, Mass., [1920?]. 8p. MSaE. 

-I- 

See also this author's article of similar title in 
OTNE, 12 (Oct. 1912), 78-79. 

3591 SANBORN. EDWIN WEBSTER. Social changes 

in New England in the past fifty years. Boston: G. 

H. Ellis, 1901. 23p. NhD. -i- 
Reprinted from American Social Science Association, 
Report (1900). 

3592 ST ANNARD, DAVID EDWARD. "Death and dying 

in Puritan New England." American Historical Review, 
78 (Dec. 1973), 1305-1330. 

3593 . The Puritan way of death: a study in 

religion, culture, and social change. N.Y.: Oxford 
Univ. Pr., 1977. xii, 236p. Ct. + 

See also next entry. 

3594 . 'The Puritan way of death: a study in 

religion, culture, and social change." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Yale Univ., 1975. 315p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 36, No. 6A (1975), 3941. See 
also preceding entry. 

3595 TOWNER, LAWRENCE WILLIAM. "'A fondness 
for freedom': servant protest in Puritan society." 

WMQ, 3 ser. 19 (Apr. 1962), 201-219. 

3596 VERDUIN, KATHLEEN. "'Our cursed 
natures': sexuality and the Puritan conscience." 

NEQ. 56 (June 1983). 220-237. 

3597 WEBSTER. CLARENCE MERTOUN. Town meeting 
country. N.Y.: Duell, Sloan & Pearce, 1945. ix, 

246p. MStuO. -I- 

Reprinted 1970. 



3598 WELLS. MICHAEL VERNON. "Sex and the law 

in colonial New England." Ph.D. dissertation, Ohio 
State Univ., 1974. iv, 202p. MAC. 

Abstracted in DAI, 35, No. 8A (1975), 5269. 

3599 WILSON, HAROLD RSHER. The hill country 

of northern New England: its social and economic 
history, 1790-1930. N.Y.: Columbia Univ. Pr., 1936. 
xiv, 455p. MW A. + 

See also next entry. 

3600 . "A study in the social history of rural 

northern New England, 1830-1930." Ph.D. dissertation. 
Harvard Univ., 1933. 582p. 

See also preceding entry. 

3601 WRIGHT, CONRAD EDICK. "Christian 
compassion and corporate beneficence: the 
institutionalization of charity in New England, 1720- 
1810." Ph.D. dissertation. Brown Univ., 1980. iv, 

41 6p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 41, No. 12A (1981), 5225. 



CHILDREN 

3602 ALBEE, JOHN. Confessions of boyhood. 

Boston: R. G. Badger, 1910. 267p. NhU. -i- 

Author grew up in Bellingham and Worcester, Mass.; 
Norwich, Conn. 

3603 BEALES, ROSS WORN, JR. "Cares for the 

rising generation: youth and religion in colonial New 
England." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of California, 
Davis, 1971. xii, 246p. MWalB. 

Abstracted in DAI, 32, No. 9A (1971), 5139. 

3604 . "In search of the historical child: miniature 

adulthood and youth in colonial New England." 
American Quarterly, 27 (Oct. 1975), 379-398. 

3605 BERNHEIM, MARC. Growing up in old New 
England. N.Y.: Crowell-Collier Pr., 1971. lx, lOOp. 
MStuO. + 

3606 CARDWELL, PATRICIA BROWN. "Death and the 
child: an historical analysis of selected Puritan 
works of children's literature with implications for 
modem education." Ph.D. dissertation. Catholic Univ. 
of America, 1982. 425p. MB. 

Abstracted in DAI, 43, No. 4A (1982), 1067. 

3607 CLAY, GEORGE R. "Children of the young 
republic." American Heritage, 11 (Apr. 1960), 46-53. 

Theories of child-rearing. 



172 



Other Aspects of Social and Cultural History 



COSTUME 3630 



3608 EARLE. ALICE MORSE. Child life in 

colonial days. N.Y.: Macmillan, 1899. xxi, 418p. 
MWA.+ 

3609 FLEMING. SANFORD. Children & Puritanism: 
the place of children in the life and thought of the 

New England churches, 1620-1847. New Haven, Conn.: 
Yale Univ. Pr., 1933. xii, 236p. MWA. -t- 
See also next entry. 

3610 . "Children in the life and thought of the New 

England churches, 1620-1847." Ph.D. dissertation, 

Yale Univ., 1929. 

See also preceding entry. 

3611 FRANKEL, GUSTI WIESENFELD. "Between 

parent and child in colonial New England: an analysis 
of the religious child-oriented literature and 
selected children's works." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. 
of Minnesota, 1976. ii, 275p. MWA. 

Abstracted in DAI, 38, No. 31 (1977), 1572. 

3612 GEMMING, ELIZABETH. Huckleberry Hill: 
child life in old New England. N.Y.: Thomas Y. 

Crowell, 1968. 147p. MWA. -t- 

3613 HITCHCOCK, ALFRED MARSHALL. A New 
England boyhood. [Rahway, N.J.]: Priv. Print., 1934. 
153p. CtY. -H 

3614 HOFFERT, SYLVIA D. '"A very peculiar 
sorrow’: attitudes toward infant death in the urban 
Northeast, 1800-1860." American Quarterly, 39 (Winter 
1987), 601-616. 

3615 HOWLAND, RUTH. "Essence of a New England 
childhood." NEG, 2 (Winter 1961), 30-32. 

3616 JOHNSON, CLIFTON. The farmer's boy. 

N.Y.: T. Y. Crowell, 1907. x, 164p. NhD. + 

3617 LARKIN, JACK. "A question for young 

people: what if you'd been alive in the 1830s?" Old 
Sturbridge Village, Rural Visitor, 21 (Summer 1981), 
16-19. 

Child life in rural New England. 

3618 LAURENCE, ANYA. "A New England boyhood." 

NEG, 16 (Winter 1975), 28-33. 

That of the Rev. Henry Ward Beecher (bom 1813). 

3619 RONDA, BRUCE A. "Genesis and genealogy: 

Bronson Alcott's changing views of the child." NEHGR, 
135 (Oct. 1981), 259-273. 



3620 "SELECTED bibliography on children and 

families in New England." DubSemPr (1985), 148-157. 
Ross W. Beales, Jr., comp. 

3621 SLATER, PETER GREGG. Children in the New 
England mind: in death and in life. Hamden, Conn.: 
Archon Books, 1977. 248p. MWA. -t- 

See also entry 3623. 

3622 . "'From the cradle to the coffin': parental 

bereavement and the shadow of infant damnation in 
Puritan society." Psychohistory Review, 6 (Fall- 
Winter 1977-1978), 4-24. 

3623 . "Views of children and of child rearing during 

the early national period: a study in the New England 
intellect." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of California, 

1970. xi, 323p. MWilW. 

Abstracted in DAI, 31, No. 12A (1971), 6532. See 
also entry 3621. 

3624 SPEARE, ELIZABETH GEORGE. Child life in 
New England, 1790-1840. Sturbridge, Mass.: Old 
Sturbridge Village, 1961. 28p. MStuO. + 

3625 STANNARD, DAVID EDWARD. "Death and the 
Puritan child." American Quarterly, 26 (Dec. 1974), 
456-476. 

3626 SUTTON, JOHN R. "Stubborn children: law 
and the socialization of deviance in the Puritan 
colonies." Family Law Quarterly, 15 (Spring 1981), 31- 
64. 

3627 WAGNER, HANS-PETER. "A note on Puritans 
and children in early colonial New England." 
Amerikastudien [Federal Republic of Germany], 25, No. 

1 (1980), 47-62. 

3628 WEIS, ROBERT K. "To please and instruct 

the children.'" EIHC, 123 (Apr. 1987), 117-149. 

Toys, games, etc. 

3629 WORTLEY, GEORGE FRANCIS. "The status of 
the child in New England Congregationalism from 
Jonathan Edwards to Horace Bushnell." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Hartford Seminary Foundation, 1927. 
265p. 

SEE "Children" in Index for additional listings. 



COSTUME 

3630 'THE ADVENT of continental fashions in 

early colonial times." OTNE, 36 (July 1945), 21-22. 



173 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



3631 COSTUME 



363 1 CHILDREN’S MUSEUM, HARTFORD, CONN. New 
England costumes, 1635-1820. Hartford, [1935?]. 22p. 
ClH.+ 

3632 CURTIS, JOHN OBED, and WILUAM H. 

GUTHMAN. New England militia uniforms and 
accoutrements: a pictorial survey. Sturbridge, 

Mass.: Old Sturbridge Village, 1971. 102p. MStuO. + 

See also entry 2758. 

3633 FENNELLY, CATHERINE M. The garb of 

country New Englanders, 1790-1840. Sturbridge, Mass.: 
Old Sturbridge Village, 1966. 77p. MStuO. + 

3634 NYLANDER, JANE C. "Clothing a New 

England family, 1800-1840." Early American Life, 11 
(Dec. 1980), 48-52. 

3635 . "Clothing for the little stranger, 1740-1850." 

DubSemPr (1985), 64-77. 

SEE "Courtship," "Family history," and "Marriage" in 
Index for additional listings. 



COURTSHIP, MARRIAGE, AND THE FAMILY 

3636 CHEVIGNARD, BERNARD. "Les voyageurs 
Europeens et la pratique du ’bondelage' (bundling) en 
Nouvelle-Angleterre a la fm du XVnie siecle." 

L'Amerique et I'Europe: realites et 
representations [France], 2 (1986), 75-87. 

3637 COURTWRIGHT, DAVID T. "New England 

families in historical perspective." DubSemPr (1985), 
11-23. 

3638 CRESSY, DAVID. "The seasonality of 
marriage in old and New England." Journal of 
Interdisciplinary History, 16 (Summer 1985), 1-21. 

3639 DODGE, DANIEL KILHAM. "Puritan names." 

NEQ, 1 (Oct. 1928), 467-475. 

3640 DOTEN, DANA. The art of bundling: being 

an inquiry into the nature & origins of that curious 
but universal folk-custom, with an exposition of the 
rise & fall of bundling in the eastern part of No. 

America. [Weston, Vt.]: Countryman Pr., 1938. x, 
190p. VtU. -H 
I.e., New England. 

3641 DUMAS, DAVID W. "The naming of children 

in New England, 1780-1850." NEHGR, 132 (July 1978), 
196-210. 



3642 HILLYER, LAURIE. "Bundling-an old New 
England custom." Yankee, 2 (Feb. 1936), 8-9. 

3643 JACOBUS, DONALD LINES. "Early New 

England nomenclature." NEHGR, 77 (Jan. 1923), 10-16. 
Puritan naming practices. 

3644 KTORIDES, IRENE. "Marriage customs in 

colonial New England." Historical Journal of Western 
Massachusetts, 2 (Fall 1973), 5-21. 

3645 KUHN, ANNE L. The mother's role in 

childhood education: New England concepts, 1830-1860. 
New Haven, Conn.: Yale Univ. Pr., 1947. x, 224p. 
MBU.-h 

3646 LAWRENCE, HENRY WELLS. "Puritan 
scandals— courtship, marriage and divorce three 
centuries ago." Yankee, 3 (Dec. 1937), 7-9, 29. 

3647 LOVEJOY, DAVID SHERMAN. "Shun thy father 
and all that: the enthusiasts' threat to the family." 

NEQ, 60 (Mar. 1987), 71-85. 

Primarily as seen in the writings of Emerson and 
Hawthorne. 

3648 McCAEN, DIANA ROSS. "Bundling: the not- 
always-innocent pleasures of early American 
courtship." Early American Life, 19 (Oct. 1988), 19- 
20, 72-73. 

New England. 

3649 MORAN, GERALD FRANCIS, and MARIS A. 
VINOVSKIS. "The Puritan family and religion: a 
critical reappraisal." WMQ, 3 ser. 39 (Jan. 1982), 29- 
63. 

3650 MORGAN, EDMUND SEARS. "The Puritan 
family and the social order." More Books, 18 (Jan. 

1943), 9-21. 

3651 . The Puritan family: essays on religion and 

domestic relations in seventeenth-century New England. 
(1944) 2d ed. Boston: Trustees of the Public 
Library, 1956. 118p. MSaE. -i- 

See also next entry 3655. 

3652 . "Puritan love and marriage." More Books, 17 

(Feb. 1942), 43-62. 

3653 . "Puritan tribalism." More Books, 18 (May 

1943), 203-219. 

3654 . "The Puritans and sex." NEQ, 15 (Dec. 1942), 

591-607. 



174 



Other Aspects of Social and Cultural History 



DIET AND C(X)KERY 3675 



3655 MORGAN, EDMUND SEARS. "Religion and the 
family in seventeenth-century New England." Ph.D. 
dissertation. Harvard Univ., 1942. 323p. 

See also entry 3651. 

3656 . "Responsibilities of a Puritan parent: I. 

Social security." More Books, 17 (Mar. 1942), 87-103. 

3657 . "Responsibilities of a Puritan parent: II. 

The education of a saint." More Books, 17 (Apr. 

1942), 141-159. 

3658 POWELL, CHILTON L. "Marriage in early 
New England." NEQ, 1 (July 1928), 323-334. 

3659 STILES, HENRY REED. Bundling: its 

origin, progress and decline in America. (1871) 
Harrisburg, Pa.: Priv. Print, by the Aurand Pr., 

1928. viii, 97p. MStuO. -t- 
Mainly New England. 



CRIME AND PUNISHMENT 

3660 BROOKS, HENRY MASON. Some strange and 
curious punishments. Boston: Ticknor, 1886. 90p. 
MSaE. -t- 

3661 DEMPELWOLFF, RICHARD. Famous old New 
England murders and some that are infamous. 

Brattleboro, Vt.: Stephen Daye Pr., 1942. 293, [9]p. 
MWA.+ 

3662 DOW, GEORGE FRANCIS. "The trial and 
execution of pirates two centuries ago in New 
England." OTNE, 14 (Oct. 1923), 73-84. 

3663 and JOHN HENRY EDMONDS. The pirates of the 

New England coast, 1670-1730. Salem, Mass.: Marine 
Research Society, 1923. xxii, 394p. MWA. + 

Reprinted 1968. 

3664 HOFFER, PETER, and N. E. H. HULL. 

Murdering mothers: infanticide in England and New 
England, 1558-1803. N.Y.: New York Univ. Pr., 1981. 
xxii, 21 Ip. MWA. -i- 

3665 LEE, VERA. "Crime among the 

Puritans.. .and the penalties therefor." Harvard 
Magazine, 88 (July-Aug. 1986), 48A-48H. 



3666 McCAIN, JIM. A brief account of the 

wicked doings of Dixie Bull, reportedly the first 
pirate in New England waters: containing accounts 
from contemporary sources, with a copy of the first 
map ever cut in New England. Brooklyn, N.Y.: Court 
Printers, 1980. v, 40p. MeHi. 

3667 "OF course, no two criminals' minds think 
alike." Yankee, 50 (Sept. 1986), 142-147. 

New England crime and criminals. 

3668 PEARSON, EDMUND. Murder at Smutty Nose 
and other murders. (1927) Garden City, N.Y.: 

Dolphin Books, 1965. viii, 269p. NhPoA. + 

Includes several famous New England murders. 

3669 PRINCE, WALTER FRANKLIN. "Three studies 

in the history of crime and punishment in the colonial 
period." Ph.D. dissertation, Yale Univ., 1899. 97, 

106, 72p. 

In Connecticut, New Haven, and Massachusetts Bay 
colonies. Described in American Puritan Studies, 

Michael S. Montgomery, comp. (1984), 10-11. 

3670 SLOTKIN, RICHARD. "Narratives of Negro 

crime in New England, 1675-1800." American Quarterly, 
25 (Mar. 1973), 3-31. 

3671 STEVENS, JAY. "Confessions of a 

professional black sheep." Yankee, 50 (Sept. 1986), 
136-141, 194-199. 

Thief Heruy Tufts, Jr., who published his memoirs in 
1807. 

3672 WILLIAMS, DANIEL E. '"Behold a tragick 

scene strangely changed into a theater of mercy': llic 
structure and significance of criminal conversion 
narratives in early New England." American Quarterly, 

38 (Winter 1986), 827-847. 

SEE "Crime and criminals" in Index for additional 
listings. 



DIET AND COOKERY 

3673 BROWN, SANBORN C. Wines and beers of old 

New England: a how-to-do-it history. Hanover, N.H.: 
Univ. Pr. of New England, 1978. xxx, 157p. MWA. + 

3674 CHANCE, LUCY. "New England lobster." 

Early American Life, 16 (Aug. 1985), 33-35. 

3675 "FOODWAYS bibliography." DubSemPr 
(1982), 130-139. 



175 



New England; A Bibliography of Its History 



3676 DIET AND COOKERY 



3676 KIRKLAND. EDWARD CHASE. ’"Scientific 

eating': New Englanders prepare and promote a reform, 
1873-1907." MHSP, 86 (1974), 28-52. 

3677 McCABE, CAROL. "New England chowder." 

Early American Life, 11 (Aug. 1980), 10-19. 

Historical sketch. 

3678 . "A ration of rum." Early American Life, 17 

(Feb. 1986), 33-34. 

Drinking in colonial New England. 

3679 McMahon, SARAH FRANCIS. '"A comfortable 
subsistence': a history of diet in New England, 1630- 
1850." Ph.D. dissertation, Brandeis Univ., 1981. v, 
351p. MStuO. 

Abstracted in DAI, 42, No. 12A (1982), 5222. 

3680 . "A comfortable subsistence: the changing 

composition of diet in rural New England, 1620-1840.' 
WMQ, 3 ser. 42 (Jan. 1985), 26-65. 

See also preceding entry. 

3681 . "Provisions laid up for the family: towards a 

history of diet in New England, 1650-1850." 

Historical Methods, 14 (Winter 1978), 4-21. 

3682 STEARNS, ELINOR. "A kitchen of 1825 in a 
thriving New England town." OTNE, 13 (Jan. 1923), 
125-130. 

3683 WHITEHILL, JANE REVERE. Food, drink, and 
recipes of early New England. Sturbridge, Mass.: Old 
Sturbridge Village, 1963. 44p. MStuO. + 



3688 HUSSEY, JANE STRICKLAND. "Seventeenth 
century herbs." Mayflower Quarterly, 43 (Feb. 1977), 
5-9. 

Grown in New England. 

3689 LANGDON, CAROLYN S. "New England’s 
garden heritage." NEG, 4 (Summer 1962), 38-45. 

3690 . "New England gardening how-to's, 1760-1851 

NEG, 9 (Fall 1967), 26-34. 

3691 LEIGHTON, ANN. Early English gardens in 
New England: "for meate or medicine." London: 
Cassell, 1970. xviii, 441p. MStuO. -t- 

3692 . "A pleasing savour of sweet instruction." 

NEG, 8 (Fall 1966), 32-45. 

Herbals read by 17th-century New Englanders. 

3693 [SHURCUFF, ARTHUR ASAHEL.] "Some old 
New England flower gardens." NEM, n.s. 21 (Dec. 
1899), 422-426. 

3694 SLOAT, CAROLINE FULLER. "Minding one's 
peas and carrots: seed catalogs of the 1800s." Old 
Sturbridge Village, Rural Visitor, 19 (Spring 1979), 

4- 6. 

3695 SMITH, ISADORE. "Of Puritans and pinks." 

NEG, 6 (Summer 1964), 21-28. 

Puritans and their flower gardens. 



FOLKLORE, LEGENDS, AND HUMOR 



GARDENS AND GARDENING 



3696 



3684 BENNINGTON [VT.] GARDEN CLUB. "New 

England settlers used their plants." Garden Club of 3697 

America, Bulletin, 40 (Sept. 1952), 43-49. 



3685 FAVRETTI, RUDY J. Early New England 

gardens, 1620-1840. (1962) Sturbridge, Mass.: Old 3698 
Sturbridge Village, 1974. 52p. MStuO. -i- 

3686 . New England colonial gardens. Stonington, 

Conn.: Pequot Pr., 1964. 32p. MWA. -i- 3699 



3687 . "The ornamentation of New England towns, 1750- 

1850." Journal of Garden History [U.K.], 2 (Oct. -Dec. 3700 

1982), 325-342. 



BISBEE, ERNEST EMERSON. The New England 
scrap book of stories and legends of old New England. 
Lancaster, N.H.: Bisbee Pr., 1947. [64]p. MH. + 

BLACKINGTON, ALTON HALL. More Yankee 
yams. N.Y.: Dodd, Mead, 1956. 245p. MSaE. -t- 
See also next entry. 

. Yankee yams. N.Y.: Dodd, Mead, 1954. 243p 

MSaE. -t- 

See also preceding entry. 

BOLTE, MARY. Haunted New England. 

Riverside, Conn.: Chatham Pr., 1972. 128p. MeU. + 

BROWNE, GEORGE WALDO. Real legends of 

New England. Chicago: Albert Whitman, 1930. 264p. 

MWA. -H 

See also this author's Legends of New England 
(1925). 



176 



3701 

3702 

3703 

3704 

3705 

3706 

3707 

3708 

3709 

3710 

3711 

3712 

3713 



Other Aspects of Social and Cultural History 



MEDICINE. PHARMACY. AND PSYCHOLOGY 3726 



CHILDS. RALPH de S. "Phantom ships of 
the northeast coast of North America." New York 
Folklore Quarterly. 5 (Summer 1949). 146-165. 
1711-1948. 

CRANDALL. ARTHUR GEORGE. New England 
joke lore: the tonic of Yankee humor. Philadelphia: 

F. A. Davis. 1922. 293p. VtHi. -t- 

CRANE. JONAS R. Fighting Yankees and 

other yams. Freeport, Me.: Bond Wheelwright. 1967. 

181p. MB. + 

CURRIER. JOHN M. "Folk-lore of the 
Coimecticut Valley." Granite State Magazine. 4 (Oct. 
1907). 151-159. 

New Hampshire and Vermont. 

DORSON. RICHARD MERCER. Jonathan draws 
the long bow. Cambridge. Mass.: Harvard Univ. Pr.. 
1946. viii. 274p. CtNhHi. -t- 
New England folklore. See also this author's 
article of same title in NEQ. 16 (June 1943). 244-278; 
and next entry. 

. "New England popular tales and legends." 

Ph.D. dissertation. Harvard Univ.. 1943. xi. 774p. 

See also preceding entry. 

DRAKE. SAMUEL ADAMS. A book of New 
England legends and folk lore in prose and poetry. 
Boston: Roberts Brothers. 1884. 461p. MSaE. + 

FANTASTIC folklore and fact: New England 

tales of land and sea. Edward Rowe Snow. comp. N. Y.: 

Dodd. Mead. 1968. x, 270p. CtY. -h 



3714 SNOW. EDWARD ROWE. Legends of the New 
England coast. N.Y.: Dodd. Mead. 1957. 268p. Ct. -i- 

3715 . Mysterious tales of the New England coast. 

N.Y.: Dodd. Mead. 1961. 310p. MSaE. + 

3716 . Tales of terror and tragedy. N.Y.: Dodd. 

Mead. 1979. x. 250p. M. + 

31 n . True tales and curious legends: dramatic 

stories from the Yankee past. N.Y.: Dodd. Mead, 

1969. xiii, 273p. CtY. -h 

3718 SPOFFORD, HARRIET ELIZABETH PRESCOTT. 
New-England legends. Boston: J. R. Osgood, 1871. 
40p. MeU. -I- 

3719 TAFT, LEWIS A. Profile of old New 

England: Yankee legends, tales, and folklore. N.Y.: 
Dodd, Mead, 1965. xiii, 271p. NhPoA. + 

3720 TALES of old New England. Frank Oppel, 

comp. Secaucus, N.J.: Castle, 1986. 474p. MS. + 

3721 TALES of the New England coast. Frank 

Oppel, comp. Secaucus, N.J.: Castle, 1985. 472p. 
CtNhHi. + 

3722 WHITTIER. JOHN GREENLEAF. Legends of New 
England. (1831) Gainesville, Fla.: Scholar's 
Facsimiles & Reprints, 1965. xiv, 142p. MBU. + 

3723 . The supematuralism of New England. (1847) 

Norman [Okla.]: Univ. of Oklahoma Pr., 1969. v, 
133p. MWA. -H 

1969 edition edited by Edward Wagenknecht. 



GOLDEN tales of New England. May 

Lambertson Becker, ed. (1931) N.Y.: Bonanza Books, 

1985. vi, 378p. MB. -t- 

HAYWOOD, CHARLES FRY. Minutemen and 
mariners: true tales of New England. Rev. ed. N.Y.: 
Dodd. Mead. 1967. 277p. MSaE. + 

MYSTERIOUS New England. Austin N. 

Stevens, ed. Dublin, N.H.: Yankee, 1971. 319p. MW. 

-t- 

Curiosa. 

SAGENDORPH, ROBB. "New England weather 
yams." New Hampshire Alumnus, 30 (Oct. 1953), 14-15. 

SMITH, CHARD POWERS. "Plain humor: New 
England style." NEQ, 43 (Sept. 1970), 465-472. 



3724 YANKEE PUBUSHING. Mysteries, marvels & 

nightmares: more than 40 exciting stories from the 
pages of Yankee Magazine. Dublin, N.H., 1987. 304p 
MS. -(- 



MEDICINE. PHARMACY. AND PSYCHOLOGY 

3725 ALPER, THELMA M. G. "Psychology in New 
England: a retrospective look-a woman's point of 
view." Journal of the History of the Behavioral 
Sciences, 16 (July 1980), 220-224. 

3726 ANDERSON, RICHARD F. "Cancer mortality 

and risk factors in eastern New England, 1950-1969." 
NE-StLVGSPr, 12 [1983], 97-107. 



177 



New England; A Bibliography of Its History 



3727 MEDICINE, PHARMACY, AND PSYCHOLOGY 



3727 ANDERSON, RICHARD F. "Investigating 
cancer mortality in eastern New England." NE- 
StLVGSPr, 11 [1982], 130-139. 

See also preceding entry. 

3728 BALDWIN, OWEN. "An old New England 
medicine chest." American Forestry, 49 (Jan. 1943), 
15-17. 

3729 BARKER, CREIGHTON. "Daniel Webster and 

the hay-fever." Yale Journal of Biology and Medicine, 

9 (May 1937), 393-402. 

3730 BEINRELD, MALCOLM SYDNEY. 'The early 
New England doctor: an adaptation to a provincial 
environment." Yale Journal of Biology and Medicine, 
15 (Oct. 1942), 99-132; (Dec. 1942), 271-288. 

3731 BLAIS, GERARD D., JR., and GEORGE E. 

OSBORNE. "The chondrus industry in New England." 
Pharmacy History, 16, No. 1 (1974), 3-10. 

Irish moss. 

3732 BONNEY, SHERMAN GRANT. Calvin Fairbanks 
Bonney, Harriott Cheney Bonney: a tribute. Concord, 
N.H.: Rumford Pr., 1938. xvi, 320p. NhNh. -i- 

Calvin F. Bonney (lived 1817-1886) was a physician 
in Cornish, Me., and Manchester, N.H. 

3733 BOYLSTON, ZABDIEL. An historical account 

of the small-pox inoculated in New England, upon all 
sorts of persons, whites, blacks, and all ages and 
constitutions. With some account of the nature of the 
infection in the natural and inoculated way, and their 
different effects on human bodies. London: Printed 
for S. Chandler, 1726. vi, 53p. DNLM. -t- 

3734 BRACKETT, ARTHUR S. "A note on 
inoculation for small-pox in colonial New England." 
Connecticut State Medical Journal, 16 (July 1952), 540- 
543. 

3735 BROWN, FRANCIS HENRY. "The practice of 
medicine in New England before the year 1700." 
Bostonian Society, Publications, 8 (1911), 93-120. 

3736 BROWN, MADELAINE R. "The inheritance of 
progressive muscular atrophy as a dominant trait in 
two New England families.” New England Journal of 
Medicine, 262 (June 23, 1960), 1280-1282. 

Farr family of Vermont and Wetherbee family of 
Massachusetts (since 1872). 

3737 CARVALHO, JOSEPH m. "Rural medical 
practice in early nineteenth century New England." 
Historical Journal of Western Massachusetts, 4 (Spring 
1975), 1-15. 



3738 CAULHELD, ERNEST. "Dr. John Walton, 

Yale 1720." Yale Journal of Biology and Medicine, 9 
(Mar. 1937), 287-304. 

Connecticut and Rhode Island physician, clergyman, 
lawyer, and politician. 

3739 . "A history of the terrible epidemic, vulgarly 

called throat distemper, as it occurred in His 

Majesty's New England colonies between 1735 and 1740.' 
Yale Journal of Biology and Medicine, 11 (Jan. 1939), 
219-272; (Mar. 1939), 277-335. 

Also published separately. 

3740 . "The pursuit of a pestilence." AASP, 60 (Apr. 

1950), 21-52. 

Influenza epidemics in early New England. 

3741 . "Some common diseases of colonial children." 

Colonial Society of Massachusetts, Publications, 35 
(Apr. 1942), 4-65. 

3742 COBB, CAROLUS M. "Some medical practice 
among the New England Indians and early settlers." 
Boston Medical and Surgical Journal, 177 (July 26, 

1917), 97-105. 

3743 DAME, LAWRENCE R. "Ophthamologists: 

their general and special contributions." New England 
Journal of Medicine, 262 (May 5, 1960), 918-920. 

In New England. 

3744 EATON, LEONARD KIMBALL. "Hospital 
development in New England, 1790-1833: a study in 
social and cultural history." Ph.D. dissertation. 

Harvard Univ., 1951. 350p. 

See also next entry. 

3745 . New England hospitals, 1790-1833. Arm Arbor, 

Mich.: Univ. of Michigan Pr., 1957. xii, 282p. MWA. 

+ 

See also preceding entry. 

3746 ESTES, J. WORTH. "Medical skills in 

colonial New England." NEHGR, 134 (Oct. 1980), 259- 
275. 

3747 FERRIS, H. B. "The peregrinating Dr. 

William Tully, A.M., M.D." Yale Journal of Biology 
and Medicine, 5 (Oct. 1932), 2-37. 

New England physician and teacher of medicine (lived 
1785-1859). 

3748 HASMANN, ETHEL B., and JANE E. HAYNES. 

"New England and the medicine men and witch doctors." 
NEG, 8 (Spring 1967), 46-52. 

Medicinal herbs. 



178 



3749 

3750 

3751 

3752 

3753 

3754 

3755 

3756 

3757 

3758 

3759 

3760 



Other Aspects of Social and Cultural History 



ORGANIZATIONS 3770 



HOADLY, CHARLES JEREMY. "Some early post- 
mortems in New England." Connecticut Medical Society, 
Proceedings (1892), 207-217. 

KLEINERT, MARGARET NOYES. "Medical women 
in New England: history of the New England Women's 
Medical Society." American Women's Medical 
Association, Journal, 11 (Feb. 1956), 63-64, 67. 

Since 1878. 

LEIGHTON, ANN. "'Meate and medicine' in 

early New England." History Today, 18 (May 1968), 398- 

405. 

UPMAN, ARTHUR G., and GEORGE E. OSBORNE. 
"Medicine and pharmacy aboard New England whaleships.' 
Pharmacy History, 11, No. 4 (1969), 119-131. 

McKUSICK, VICTOR A. "Hemophilia in early 
New England: a follow-up of four kindreds in which 
hemophilia occurred in the pre-Revolutionary period." 
Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied 
Sciences, 17 (July 1962), 342-365. 

MEDICINE in the New World: New Spain, 

New France, and New England. Ronald L. Numbers, ed. 
Knoxville, Term.: Univ. of Tennessee Pr., 1987. 

175p. Ct. -H 

MORSE, JEDIDIAH, and EUJAH PARISH. 'The 
throat distemper, 1735-1802." Coimecticut State 
Medical Journal, 20 (May 1956), 384-385. 

Arthur S. Brackett, ed. 



3761 STOOKEY, BYRON. "A medical society for 
the Massachusetts, New York and Connecticut 
physicians, 1779-1790." Cormecticut Medicine, 30 
(Mar. 1966), 189-192. 

3762 TYMESON, MILDRED McCLARY. "The family 
dentist." NEG, 7 (Spring 1966), 3-11. 

19th century. 

3763 WATTE, FREDERICK CLAYTON. "Grave robbing 
in New England." Medical Library Association, 
Bulletin, 33 (July 1945), 272-294. 

SEE "Medicine" in Index for additional listings. 



ORGANIZATIONS 

3764 aVTTANINTERNATIONAL. NEWENGLAND 
DISTRICT. Historical accounts of the Civitan clubs of 
the New England district. Fiftieth aimiversary 
publication. Melvin T. Bishop, ed. n.p., 1970. 64p. 
CtWeth. 

3765 DAVIES, WALLACE EVANS. "The Society of 

the Cincinnati in New England, 1783-1800." WMQ, 3 
ser. 5 (Jan. 1948), 3-25. 

3766 EASTMAN, BILL, and MARGARET EASTMAN. 

"New England's first fat men's club." Yankee, 42 
(Sept. 1978), 100-103, 226, 229-230, 233-234, 237. 

New England Fat Men's Club (early-20th century). 



PARKER, GAIL THAIN. Mind cure in New 
England: from the Civil War to World War I. Hanover, 
N.H.: Univ. Pr. of New England, 1973. xi, 197p. 
MBU.+ 

PSYCHOANALYSIS, psychotherapy and the New 
England medical scene, 1894-1944. George E. Gifford, 
ed. N.Y.: Science History Publications, 1978. 438p. 
MBU. -(- 

RIZNIK, BARNES. Medicine in New England, 
1790-1840. Sturbridge, Mass.: Old Sturbridge 
Village, 1965. 24p. MStuO. -h 

. "The professional lives of early nineteenth- 

century New England doctors." Journal of the History 
of Medicine and Allied Sciences, 19 (Jan. 1964), 1-16. 

ROGERS, NAOMI. "'Screen the baby, swat 
the fly': polio in the Northeastern United States, 

1916." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of Pennsylvania, 
1986. 206p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 47, No. 12A (1987), 4496. 



3767 FREEMASONS. MASSACHUSETTS AND RHODE 
ISLAND. KNIGHTS TEMPLARS. GRAND 
COMMANDERY. Grand commandery of Knights Templars, 
Massachusetts and Rhode Island, 1805-1905. 

Celebration of centennial anniversary, in Boston, May 
24, 1905. [Central Falls, R.I.: Pr. of E. L. Freeman 

& Sons, 1905.] X, 293p. MU. -t- 

3768 . The grand encampment of Knights Templar, and 

appendant orders of Massachusetts and Rhode Island. 

Its history: edicts; past and present grand officers; 

and organizations of its subordinates. Boston: 

Printed by John Wilson and Son, 1864. 143p. WHi. + 

3769 GARDNER, CHARLES M. "New England and the 
Grange." Yankee, 7 (Nov. 1941), 48-50. 

3770 MEEKS, HAROLD A. "The New England-St. 

Lawrence Valley Geographical Society: a short 
history." NE-StLVGSPr, 5 [1977], 73-78. 



179 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



3771 ORGANIZATIONS 



3771 NEW ENGLAND CONFERENCE OF STATE 
FEDERATIONS OF WOMEN’S CLUBS. HLslory, 
sixty-one years, 1909-1970; organized 1909: New 
England Conference of State Federations of Women's 
Clubs. (Naugatuck, Conn.]: The Conference, 1971. 

94p. RHi. 

3772 SHERMAN, REXFORD BOOTH. "The Grange in 
Maine and New Hampshire, 1870-1940." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Boston Univ., 1973. xii, 402p. NhKeS. 

Abstracted in DAI, 33, No. 12A (1973), 6852. 

3773 SOROPTIMISTINTERNA'nONAL. NEW ENGLAND 
REGION. History, 1938-1976. n.p., 1976. [98]p. 
CtGro. -t- 

Includes historical sketches of local clubs. 

3774 SPRAGUE, JULIA A. History of the New 

England Women's Club from 1868 to 1893. Boston: Lee 
and Shepard, 1894. 99p. RHi. -i- 

3775 WHITE, MARTHA E. O. "The work of women's 

clubs in New England." NEM, n.s. 28 (June 1903), 447- 
463. 

3776 WILSON, BUDD. "The Council for Northeast 
Historical Archaeology: the early years." Northeast 
Historical Archaeology, 15 (1986), 16-18. 



SCIENCE AND WEATHER 

3777 ALLEN, EVERETT S. A wind to shake the 
world: the story of the 1938 hurricane. Boston: 

Little, Brown, 1976. xii, 370p. MSaE. + 

New England and New York. 

3778 ANDERSON, PETER. "The hurricane of '38." 

Boston Globe Magazine (Sept. 18, 1988), 26, 72-81. 

3779 ANDREWS, WILU AM D. "The literature of 

the 1727 New England earthquake." Early American 
Literature, 7 (Winter 1973), 281-294. 

3780 BARON, WILLIAM R. "Eighteenth-century 

New England climate variation and its suggested impact 
on society." Maine Historical Society Quarterly, 21 
(Spring 1982), 201-218. 

3781 . 'Tempests, freshets and mackerel skies: 

climatological data from diaries using content 
analysis." Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of Maine, 1980. 
649p. MStuO. 

Abstracted in DAI, 41, No. 9A (1981), 4139. 



3782 BEFFEL, JOHN N. "Dark day in New 

England." American Mercury, 56 (Apr. 1943), 481-485. 
May 19, 1780. 

3783 BENSON, KEITH R. "Laboratories on the 

New England shore: the 'somewhat different direction' 
of American marine biology." NEQ, 61 (Mar. 1988), 55- 
78. 

3784 BENTON, ROBERT MILTON. "The John 
Winthrops and developing scientific thought in New 
England." Early American Literature, 7 (Winter 1973), 
272-280. 

3785 BRASCH, FREDERICK E. "An earthquake in 
New England during the colonial period (1755)." 
Seismological Society of America, Bulletin, 6 (Mar. 

1916), 26-42. 

3786 BRIGHAM, WILLIAM T. "Volcanic 
manifestations in New England: being an enumeration 
of the principal earthquakes from 1638 to 1869." 

Boston Society of Natural History, Memoirs, 2 (1871), 
1-28. 

3787 BROOKS, CHARLES FRANKLIN. "Hurricanes 
into New England: meteorology of the storm of 
September 21, 1938." Smithsonian Institution, Annual 
Report (1939), 241-251. 

3788 . "New England snowfall." Geographical Review, 

3 (1917), 222-240. 

3789 , and CONRAD CHAPMAN. "The New England hurric 

of September 1944." Smithsonian Institution, Annual 
Report (1945), 235-246. 

3790 CABLE, MARY. The blizzard of '88. N.Y.: 

Atheneum, 1988. ix, 197p. MBU. -i- 

New England and Northeast (1888). See also next 
entry. 

3791 CAPLOVICH, JUDD. Blizzard! The great 

storm of '88. Wayne W. Westbrook, ed. Vernon, Conn.: 
VeRo Publishing, 1987. xiv, 242p. CtHi. -i- 
See also preceding entry. 

3792 CmCKERING, HOWELL D., JR. "Edward 
Hitchcock's mountain mania." NEG, 19 (Spring 1978), 3- 
12. 

Geologist (lived 1793-1864), whose "detailed surveys 
are still valuable to geologists today." 

3793 CHURCH, P. E. "A geographical study of 

New England temperatures." Geographical Review, 26 
(Apr. 1936), 283-292. 



180 



Other Aspects of Social and Cultural History 



SCIENCE AND WEATHER 3816 



3794 CLARK. CHARLES EDWIN. "Science, reason, 
and an angry God; the literature of an earthquake." 

NEQ. 38 (Sept. 1965). 340-362. 

1755. 

3795 CONOVER, JOHN H. "Are New England 

winters getting milder?" Weatherwise, 4 (Feb. 1951), 
5-9. 

3796 DONNELLY, MARIAN CARD. "Astronomical 
observatories in New England." OTNE, 50 (Winter 
1960), 72-80. 

3797 EMERY, JOSIAH. "Earthquakes from 1638 to 
1883, in the New England states and in the British 
possessions north of the United States and east of the 
Rocky Mountains." Granite Monthly, 7 (Oct. 1883), 31; 
(Nov. 1883). 57-60; (Mar. 1884), 128; (May 1884), 151; 
(June 1884), 188-190. 

3798 FOB ES, CHARLES B. "Extremes of ice 

clearing dates calculated from new data of Maine and 
New Hampshire lakes." Archiv fiir Meteorologie, 
Geophysik, und Bioklimatologie, Series B, Band I, Heft 
2 (1948), 138-148. 

3799 FRANCIS, JAMES B. "Great freshets in 
Menimack River." Old Residents' Historical 
Association of Lowell [Mass.], Contributions, 3 
(1887), 252-257. 

3800 GOODALE, GEORGE LINCOLN. "New England 
plants seen by the earliest colonists." Colonial 
Society of Massachusetts, Publications, 3 (1895-1897), 
183-194. 

3801 GREEN, SAMUEL ABBOTT. Remarks on the 
early appearance of the northern lights in New 
England. Cambridge [Mass.]: John Wilson and Son, 
1885. 7p. MWA. + 

18th century. Reprinted from MHSP, 2 ser. 2 (1885- 
1886), 102-106. 

3802 HORNBERGER, THEODORE R. "American 
Puritanism and the rise of the scientific mind: a 
study of science and American literature in the 
seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Univ. of Michigan, 1934. vi, 659p. 

Described in American Puritan Studies, Michael S. 
Montgomery, comp. (1984), 43-44. 

3803 . "Puritanism and science: the relationship 

revealed in the writings of John Cotton." NEQ, 10 
(Sept. 1937). 503-515. 



3804 HOUSTON, JOURDAN. "When the great 
earthquake struck New England." American Heritage, 31 
(Aug. -Sept. 1980), 102-107. 

1755. 

3805 HOYT. JOSEPH BDCBY. "The cold summer of 

1816." Association of American Geographers, Annals, 
48 (June 1958), 118-131. 

3806 HUMPHREY. JAMES ELLIS. "Botany and 

botanists in New England." NEM, n.s. 14 (Mar. 1896), 
27-44. 

3807 HURRICANE in southern New England: an 
analysis of the great storm of 1938. Bernard L. 

Gordon, ed. Watch Hill, R.I.: Book & Tackle Shop, 
1976. 61p. RHi. + 

3808 JOHNSTONE, EDA. "The black Friday of 
1780." NEG, 11 (Summer 1969), 9-14. 

May 19,1780: the "dark day" in New England. 

3809 KILGOUR, FREDERICK G. "The rise of 
scientific activity in colonial New England." Yale 
Journal of Biology and Medicine, 22 (Dec. 1949), 123- 
138. 

3810 KINCHELOE, ISABEL. "Nature and the New 

England Puritan." Americana, 31 (Oct. 1937), 569-578. 

3811 KONTE, SANDRA HANSEN. "New England's 
darkest day." American History Illustrated, 20 (Dec. 
1985), 18-19. 

May 19, 1780. 

3812 KUBRIN, DAVID CHARLES. "Providence and 
the mechanical philosophy: the creation and 
dissolution of the world in Newtownian thought; a 
study of the relations of science and religion in 
seventeenth-century New England." Ph.D. dissertation, 
Cornell Univ., 1968. xii, 387p. CtY. 

Abstracted in DAI, 29, No. 6A (1968), 1835. 

3813 LOCKWOOD, ROSE ANN. "The scientific 
revolution in seventeenth-century New England." NEQ, 
53 (Mar. 1980), 76-95. 

3814 LOEWENB ERG, BERT JAMES. "The controversy 
over evolution in New England, 1859-1873." NEQ, 8 
(June 1935), 232-257. 

3815 LOUGEE, R. J. "Six historic floods." 

New Hampshire Highways, 6 (May 1928), [3-4]. 

3816 LUDLUM, DAVID McWlLUAMS. The Country 
Journal New England weather book. Boston: Houghton 
Mifflin, 1976. xi, 147p. MWA. + 



181 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



3817 

3817 

3818 

3819 

3820 

3821 

3822 

3823 

3824 

3825 

3826 



SCIENCE AND WEATHER 



MATHER, COTTON. "Account of a great 
storm. 1723." MHSC, 2 (1793), 11-12. 

MINSINGER, WILLIAM ELLIOTT. The 1938 
hurricane: an historical and pictorial summary. East 
Milton, Mass.: Blue Hill Observatory, 1988. viii, 
128p. NhHi. + 

Includes a bibliography of "Booklets and newspaper 
supplements on the hurricane," which were published 
shortly after the event. 

NATTI, THEODORE. 'The thirty-eight 
hurricane." Forest Notes, 138 (Fall 1979), 2-5. 

1938. 

NEWELL, LYMAN CHURCHILL, and TENNEY L 
DAVIS. Notable New England chemists. Boston: 
Division of History of Chemistry, American Chemical 
Society, 1928. 16p. MBU. -i- 

NORRIS, CURTIS B. "Rockbound, but not so 
stable: some infamous New England rumblings." NEC, 
14 (Spring 1973), 28-38. 

Earthquakes. 

PAGUUC A, SALVATORE. "Our winter 

storms." New England Naturalist, No. 13 (Dec. 1941), 

17-19, 21. 

PERLEY, SIDNEY. Historic storms of New 
England: its gales, hurricanes, tornadoes, showers 
with thunder and lightning, great snow storms, rains, 
freshets, floods, droughts, cold winters, hot summers, 
avalanches, earthquakes, dark days, comets, aurora- 
borealis, phenomena in the heavens, wrecks along the 
coast; with incidents and anecdotes, amusing and 
pathetic. Salem, Mass.: Salem Publishing and 
Printing, 1891. x, 341p. MWA. -t- 

PERRY, CLAY. New England's buried 

treasure. N.Y.: Stephen Daye Pr., 1946. 348p. MWA. 

-t- 

Caves. See also next entry. 

. Underground New England. Brattleboro [Vt.]: 

Stephen Daye Pr., 1939. 247p. MWA. + 

Caves. See also preceding entry. 

PULLI, JAY J. "Earthquakes of New 

England and adjacent areas." Appalachia, 44 (June 

1982), 24-43. 



3827 REA, MARY- ALICE F. "The early 

introduction of economic plants into New England." 
Economic Botany, 29 (Oct.-Dec. 1975), 333-356. 

"What, when, where, why, how, and by whom were 
nonindigenous plants first brought to the territory 
now called New England?" 

3828 ROBBINS, WILLIAM JACOB. "French 
botanists and the flora of the northeastern United 
States— J. G. Milbert and Elias Durand." American 
Philosophical Society, Proceedings, 101 (Aug. 1957), 
362-368. 

19th century. 

3829 ROTHSCHILD, ROBERT F. "Colonial 
astronomers in search of the longitude of New 
England." Maine Historical Society Quarterly, 11 
(Spring 1983), 175-204. 

3830 SHUTE, MICHAEL NATHANIEL. "Earthquakes 

and early American imagination: decline and renewal 
in eighteenth-century Puritan culture." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Univ. of California, Berkeley, 1977. 

255p. M. 

Abstracted in DAI, 38, No. 8A (1978), 5010. 

383 1 SIMMONS, GENE. Our New England 
earthquakes. Boston: Boston Edison, [1977?]. 18p. 
MB. -t- 

3832 SLADE, DANIEL DENISON. The evolution of 
horticulture in New England. N.Y.: G. P. Putnam's 
Sons, 1895. 180p. MWA. -h 

3833 STOMMEL, HENRY, and ELIZABETH STOMMEL. 
Volcano weather: the story of 1816, the year without 
a summer. Newport, R.I.: Seven Seas Pr., 1983. xii, 
177p. MBU. -h 

3834 STRONG, SAMUEL MEREDITH. The great 
blizzard of 1888. Brooklyn, N.Y., 1938. xi, 99p. 

NhD. -I- 

3835 STRUIK, DIRK JAN. Yankee science in the 
making. Boston: Little, Brown, 1948. xiii, 430p. 
MWA. -(- 

Republished in 1957 as Origins of American science. 

3836 THOMSON, BETTY FLANDERS. The changing 

face of New England. N.Y.: Macmillan, 1958. 188p. 
MStuO. -I- 

Natural history. Reprinted 1977. 

3837 THOMSON, M. T.,W.B. GANNON, M.P. 

THOMAS, and G. S. HAYES. Historical floods in New 
England. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing 
Office, 1964. iv. 105p. VtU. -n 



182 



Other Aspects of Social and Cultural History 



SOCIAL UFE AND CUSTOMS 3860 



3838 VAN deWETERING, MAXINE SCHORR. 

"Moralizing in Puritan natural science: 
mysteriousness in earthquake sermons." Journal of the 
History of Ideas, 43 (July-Sept. 1982), 417-438. 

3839 WILKINSON, RONALD STERNE. New England's 

last alchemists. Cambridge, Eng.: W. Heffer & Sons, 
[1962?]. [lljp. CtHi. -H 

Reprinted from Abix, the Journal of the Society for 
the Study of Alchemy and Early Chemistry, 10 (Oct. 
1962), 128-138. 

3840 WYUE, EVAN McLEOD. "The blizzard of 

'88: how bad was it really?" Yankee, 42 (Mar. 1978), 
86-91, 168, 171. 

SEE "Science," specific scientific disciplines, and 
"Weather" in Index for additional listings. 



SOQAL UFE AND CUSTOMS 

3841 AHEARN, MARIE L. "Health restoring 
resorts on the New England coast." Nineteenth 
Century, 8, Nos. 1-2 (1982), 39-48. 

3842 APPELBAUM, DIANA KARTER. Thanksgiving: 
an American holiday, an American history. N.Y.: 

Facts on File Publications, 1984. ix, 305p. MB. -t- 

New England origins of the holiday. 

3843 AYER, SARAH NEWMAN CONNELL. Diary of 
Sarah Connell Ayer. Andover and Newburyport, 
Massachusetts; Concord and Bow, N.H.; Portland and 
Eastport, Maine. Portland, Me.: Lefavor-Tower, 1910. 
404p. MU. + 

Lived 1791-1835. 

3844 BACKUS, M. E. "Gala days in old New 

England." Connecticut Magazine, 10, No. 3 (1906), 484- 
485. 

Militia training days. 

3845 BARRETT, RICHMOND. Good old summer days. 

Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1952. xiii, 338p. MH. -i- 

Study of several resorts, including Bar Harbor and 
Newport. 



3848 BROOKS, HENRY MASON. Curiosities of the 
old lottery. Boston: Ticknor, 1886. vi, 73p. 

MSaE. -t- 

3849 . The days of the spinning-wheel in New England, 

Boston: Ticknor, 1886. vii, 99p. MWA. + 

3850 . New-England Sunday. Boston: Ticknor, 1886. 

viii, 65p. MWA. + 

3851 . Quaint and curious advertisements. Boston: 

Ticknor, 1886. viii, 153p. MSaE. -i- 

3852 BROWN, ABRAM ENGLISH. "The ups and downs 
of Christmas in New England." NEM, n.s. 29 (Dec. 
1903), 479-484. 

3853 BROWN, ALICE. Meadow-grass: tales of 

New England life. N.Y.: Grosset and Dunlap, 1895. 
315p. RHi. -I- 

3854 BULLARD, FREDERIC LAURISTON. Historic 
summer haunts from Newport to Portland. Boston: 

Little, Brown, 1912. xii, 329p. MWA. -t- 

3855 BURKE, JAMES, JR., and WILLIAM B. COLTIN. 

Quaint old New England: new slant on the old days in 
New England. Hartford, Conn.: Triton Syndicate, 

1936. 94p. MSaE. + 

3856 CAMPBELL, MARY MASON. The New England 
butt'ry shelf almanac: being a collation of 
observations on New England people, birds, flowers, 
herbs, weather, customs, and cookery of today and 
yesterday. N.Y.: World, [1970]. 302p. MB. -i- 

3857 CHAPMAN, EDWARD M. New England village 
life. Cambridge, Mass.: Priv. Print, at the 
Riverside Pr., 1937. 232p. MStuO. -t- 

3858 CHASE, HEMAN. More than land: stories 

of New England country life and surveying. Dublin, 
N.H.: W. L. Bauhan, 1975. xiii, 159p. NhHi. -h 
In New Hampshire and Vermont. 

3859 CLAFLIN, MARY BUCKUN DAVENPORT. 

Brampton sketches: old-time New England life. N.Y.: 
Thomas Y. Crowell, 1890. 158p. RHi. -t- 



3846 BLISS, WILLIAM ROOT. Side glimpses from 3860 CLEVELAND, HORACE WILLIAM SHALER. Social 

the colonial meeting-house. Boston: Houghton life and literature fifty years ago. Boston: Cupples 

Mifflin, 1894. 256p. MStuO. -i- and Hurd, 1888. 96p. MH. -i- 

Reprinted 1970. 

3847 BORMANN, PAULINE C. "Were the Puritans 
'puritanical'?" DAR Magazine, 112 (May 1978), 435- 
438, 567. 



183 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



3861 SOaALUFE AND CUSTOMS 



3861 'THE CODE of honor in colonial and 
revolutionary times with special reference to New 
England." Colonial Society of Massachusetts, 
Publications, 26 (Feb. 1926), 367-388. 

Duelling. 

3862 COLE, ARTHUR CHARLES. "The Puritan and 
fair Terpsichore." Mississippi Valley Historical 
Review, 29 (June 1942), 3-34. 

Changing attitudes toward dancing and other social 
pleasures during the 19th century in New England. 

3863 CRANE, BATHSHEBA H. MORSE. Life, 

letters, and wayside gleanings, for the folks at home. 
Boston: J. H. Earle, 1880. 480p. Ct. + 

The author was a minister's wife, who lived in 
several different New England communities. 

3864 CRAWFORD, MARY CAROLINE. Little journeys 

in old New England. Boston: L. C. Page, 1902. viii, 
390p. MWA. -I- 
Historical sketches. 

3865 . Little pilgrimages among old New England irms. 

Being an account of little journeys to various quaint 
inns and hostelries of colonial New England. Boston: 

L. C. Page, 1907. xiii, 381p. MWA. -i- 

3866 . The romance of old New England churches. 

Boston: L. C. Page, 1903. x, 379p. MWA. + 

3867 . The romance of old New England rooftrees. 

Boston: L. C. Page, 1903. 390p. MH. + 

3868 . Social life in old New England. Boston: 

Little, Brown, 1915. xiii, 515p. MWA. -i- 

3869 . "Summer vacation colonies. Here and there in 

New England with Boston's pleasure seekers— Thomas 
Wentworth Higginson." New England Home Magazine, 
12 (July 8, 1900), 51-61. 

3870 DOW, GEORGE FRANCIS. Domestic life in 

New England in the seventeenth century: a discourse. 
Topsfield, Mass.: Printed for the Author at the 
Perkins Pr., 1925. 48p. MWA. + 

Reprinted 1972. 

3871 EARLE, ALICE MORSE. Customs and fashions 

in old New England. N.Y.: Scribner's, 1893. 387p. 
MWA. -H 

3872 . Home life in colonial days. N.Y.: Macmillan, 

1898. xvi, 470p. MSaE. + 



3873 . The Sabbath in Puritan New England. N.Y.: 

Charles Scribner's Sons, 1891. viii, 335p. MStuO. + 

Reprinted 1968. 

3874 EARLY, ELEANOR. A New England sampler. 

Boston: Waverly House, 1940. xii, 372p. MB. + 

Social life and customs; biography. 

3875 ESTABROOK, HAROLD KELSEY. "New England, 
1631-1848." OTNE, 39 (Jan. 1949), 70-75. 

Based on author's family records. 

3876 EVANS, WALKER. "Summer north of Boston." 

Fortune, 40 (Aug. 1949), 74-79. 

Resort hotels in northern New England. 

3877 FELT, JOSEPH BARLOW. The customs of New- 
England. Boston: T. R. Marvin, 1853. 208p. MWA. -t- 

3878 FENNELLY, CATHERINE M. Life in an old 

New England country village. N.Y.: T. Y. Crowell, 
1969. viii, 21 Ip. MWA. -i- 
New England country life as exemplified by Old 
Sturbridge Village, the re-created, early -19th -century 
community in Sturbridge, Mass. 

3879 . New England character and characters as seen 

by contemporaries. (1956) Sturbridge, Mass.: Old 
Sturbridge Village, 1965. 45p. MStuO. -(- 

3880 . The New England village scene: 1800. 

Sturbridge, Mass.: Old Sturbridge Village, 1955. 

15p. MStuO. -I- 

3881 FIELD, EDWARD. The colonial tavern: a 
glimpse of New England town life in the seventeenth 
and eighteenth centuries. Providence, R.I.: Preston 
and Rounds, 1897. viii, 296p. MStuO. -i- 

3882 FOLEY, DANIEL J. "Old World Christmas in 

New England." Boston, 56 (Dec. 1964), 21, 61, 63-64. 

3883 HALE, JUDSON D. Inside New England. 

N.Y.: Harper & Row, 1982. xii, 257p. M. -t- 

3884 HAWKES, CLARENCE. Idyls of old New 

England. Northampton, Mass.: Picturesque Publishing, 
1897. 154p. Ct. -t- 

3885 HELFRICH, G. W. "Christmas through the 

years with Henry." Down East, 32 (Dec. 1985), 41, 59- 
61. 

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow and the development of 
Christmas in 19th-century New England. 

3886 HOLTON, EDITH AUSTIN. Yankees were like 

this. N.Y.: Harper & Brothers, 1944. 268p. MU. + 



184 



Olhcr Aspects of Social and Cultural History 



SOQAL UFE AND CUSTOMS 3911 



3887 HOOPER, JOHN S. Hooper's pasture from 

Maine to Vermont. Shelburne, Vt.: New England Pr., 
1982. 197p. VtU. + 

Rural life. 

3888 HUBBARD, CHARLES DANIEL. An old New 
England village: the people, the ways, the atmosphere 
of the old days. Freeport, Me.: Bond Wheelwright, 

1947. 107p. MWA. + 

3889 HUMPHREY, ZEPHINE. A book of New 

England. N.Y.: Howell, Soskin, 1947. 292p. MChB. + 

3890 HUNTINGTON, ARRIA SARGENT. Under a 
colonial roof-tree: fireside chronicles of early New 
England. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1891. 133p. 

MH. -I- 

3891 KITTREDGE, GEORGE LYMAN. The old farmer 

and his almanack: being some observations on life and 
manners in New England a hundred years ago; suggested 
by reading the earlier numbers of Mr. Robert B. 

Thomas's Farmer's almanack, together with extracts, 
curious, instructive, and entertaining, as well as a 
variety of miscellaneous matter. Boston: W. Ware, 

1904. xiv, 403p. CtY. -(- 

3892 LARKIN, JACK. "Dirty & slovenly to a 
degree." Old Sturbridge Visitor, 28 (Winter 1988- 
1989), 4-6. 

See also following entries. 

3893 . "Gathering places." Old Sturbridge Village, 

Rural Visitor, 21 (Winter 1981-1982), 4-6. 

Social life (early- 19th century). 

3894 . "Reels, contra dances and the occasional 

waltz." Old Sturbridge Visitor, 27 (Spring 1987), 8- 
9. 

Dancing in the social life of rural New England 
(early- 19th century). 

3895 . "Remembering the Sabbath." Old Sturbridge 

Village, Rural Visitor, 20 (Winter 1980-1981), 4-6. 

Rural New England (early-19th century). 

3896 . "Winter was different in 1830." Old 

Sturbridge Village, Rural Visitor, 18 (Winter 1978), 4- 

6 . 

Social life. 

3897 , and CAROLINE FULLER SLOAT. "Thanksgiving: 

thegreat festival of New England." Old Sturbridge 
Visitor, 27 (Fall 1987), 4-6. 



3898 LAWRENCE, HENRY WELLS. The not-quite 
Puritans: some genial follies and pjeculiar frailties 
of our revered New England ancestors. Boston: 

Little, Brown, 1928. x, 228p. MSaE. -t- 

3899 LAWRENCE, ROBERT MEANS. New England 
colonial life. Cambridge, Mass.: Cosmos Pr., 1927. 
276p. MWA. + 

3900 LOEB, ROBERT H., JR. New England 

village: everyday life in 1810. Garden City, N.Y.: 
Doubleday, 1976. 98p. MStuO. 

3901 LOVE, WILLIAM DeLOSS, JR. The fast and 
thanksgiving days of New England. Boston: Houghton 
Mifflin, 1895. vii, 607p. MWA. -i- 

3902 LOWE, MAY. 'Thanksgiving Day." NEM, 
n.s. 31 (Nov. 1904), 302-308. 

Historical sketch. 

3903 LYFORD, KATHERINE VAN ETTEN. 'The 

victory of the Christmas keepers." Yankee, 28 (Dec. 
1964), 78-79, 102-105. 

In New England (19th century). 

3904 MARLOWE, GEORGE FRANCIS. Byroads of old 
New England: some tales of less-known persons and 
places along the way. N.Y.: Exposition Pr., 1954. 
153p. MWA. -H 

3905 MARNELL, WILLIAM HENRY. Vacation 
yesterdays of New England. N.Y.: Seabury Pr., 1975. 
177p. RHi. -H 

3906 MATHIEU, JOE. The olden days. N.Y.: 

Random House, 1979. 32p. NhM. + 

3907 MILNER, FLORENCE CUSHMAN. "New England 
memories." NEG, 11 (Fall 1969), 37-45. 

Author was bom in 1850 and wrote her autobiography 
ca. 1950. Mary Maud Oliver, ed. 

3908 MITCHELL, EDWIN VALENTINE. It's an old 

New England custom. N.Y.: Vanguard Pr., 1946. 277p. 
MWA.-t- 

3909 . Yankee folk. N.Y.: Vanguard Pr., 1948. 

278p. Ct. -I- 

3910 MORONG, THOMAS. Puritan life and 

manners: address, Ipswich, Mass., at the memorial 
services on Forefathers' Day, Dec. 21, 1870. Boston, 
1871. 44p. MSaE. -h 



3911 MUSSEY, JUNE BARROWS. Old New England. 
N.Y.: A. A. Wyn, 1946. 127p. MBU. + 



185 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



3912 SOQAL UFE AND CUSTOMS 



3912 


NELSON. FLORENCE AGNES. Lest we forget: 
sketches of rural New England in the 19th century, 
with incomparable pen and ink drawings from Charles D. 
Hubbard's An old New England village. Portland, Me.: 


3924 


RAWSON, MARION NICHOLL. When anUques 
were young: a story of early American social customs. 
N.Y.: E. P. Dutton. 1931. x, 271p. NhD. -t 


3913 


Falmouth Publishing House, 1949. 207p. Me. + 
See also entry 3888. 

NYLANDER, JANE C. "Keeping warm: coping 


3925 


RICH. LOUISE DICKINSON. "A litUe 
leaven." NEG, 1 (Fall 1959). 2-12. 
Yankee characteristics. 


3914 


with winter in early 19th-century New England." Early 
American Life, 11 (Oct. 1980), 46-49. 

. "Summer housekeeping in early 19th century New 


3926 


SEAVER, HENRY LATIMER. "Hair and 
holiness." MHSP, 68 (1952), 3-20. 

Puritan attitudes toward long hair and wigs for men. 




England." Early American Life, 1 1 (Apr. 1980), 32-35, 
56-57. 


3927 


SHERMAN. STEVE. Basic Yankee. N.Y.: 
Arco Pub., 1984. x, 256p. NhD. + 


3915 


. "Thanksgiving in New England: a cornucopia of 
memories, traditions and food." Old Sturbridge 
Village, Rural Visitor, 21 (Fall 1981), 4-6. 


3928 


SHURCUFF, ARTHUR ASAHEL. A man walks 
the earth: near and far in New England. Boston: Old 
Comer Book Store, 1951. 132p. MBU. -i- 


3916 


OLD New England traits. George Lunt, ed. 
N.Y.: Hurd, 1873. v. 244p. MWA. -t- 


3929 


. New England college men walking and talking 
the armals of a society of saunterers in the late 
horse and carriage days of 1905-1906. Boston: Old 


3917 


OLIVER, SANDRA L. "The festive board: 
recipes for a nineteenth-century Thanksgiving." 




Comer Book Store, 1948. 204p. NhD. -i- 




Mystic Seaport, Log, 36 (Fall 1984), 95-97. 


3930 


SLATER, GEORGE A. The hills of home: 

American life pictured in New England in the last half 


3918 


PAINE, PHILBROOK. "Only the horses kept 
warm." Yankee, 45 (Dec. 1981), 94-95, 98. 
Sleigh rides. 


3931 


of the nineteenth century. N.Y.: W. E. Rudge, 1931. 
28p. MBU. -(- 

SLOAT, CAROLINE FULLER. "Visiting and 


3919 


PARKER. DONALD F. A Parker family: 

rural life in the late 1800's; an account of farm and 

family life taken from old diaries where the 




other social enjoyments.” Old Sturbridge Visitor, 29 
(Spring 1989), 7-9. 




raconteurs speak for themselves. [Littleton, N.H.], 
1974. 9 Ip. Nh. -t- 
In New Hampshire and Vermont. 


3932 


SMITH, S. J. Recollections of a busy 
life: embracing a description of New England, its 
hills, river valleys, climate and soil. Its people, 
customs, superstitions, schools, religion and 


3920 

3921 


PARKS, ROGER N. "New England Christmas." 

Old Sturbridge Village, Rural Visitor, 11 (Spring 
1971), 5, 10. 

Evidence that the holiday was not widely celebrated 
in New England until after the mid-19th century. 

PEASE, ARTHUR STANLEY. Sequestered vales 




intelligences of childhood, boyhood; the struggles of 
youth. Western life. Border scenes. Indians and 
prairie life of a half century ago, etc., etc. 

Berlin, N.H.: Berlin Publishing, [1894?]. 108p. 
MStuO. + 

Smith (bom 1822), grew up in Mexico, Me. 




of life. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard Univ. Pr., 1946. 
129p. NhNc. -t- 

Autobiographical. Includes accounts of experiences 
in a number of New England localities. 


3933 


SOUTHWICK, JEANIE LEA. "A Brief account 
of marmers and customs in the New England colonies 
before the Revolution." Worcester [Mass.] Society of 
Antiquity, Collections, 18 (1902), 50-64. 


3922 


POLLEY, GEORGE GIBSON. "Call them 
strange." Yankee, 43 (Sept. 1985), 157-163. 
New England eccentrics. 


3934 


SPENCER, IVOR DEBENHAM. "Christmas, the 
upstart." NEQ, 8 (Dec. 1935), 498-517. 

In New England. 


3923 


PRIME. WILUAM COWPER. Along New England 
roads. N.Y.: Harper & Brothers, 1892. 200p. 
MSaE. -H 


3935 


SPRACKLING, HELEN. Customs on the table 

top: how New England housewives set out their tables. 

Sturbridge, Mass.: Old Sturbridge Village, 1958. 

22p. MStuO. + 



186 



Other Aspects of Social and Cultural History 



SOCIAL REFORM 3958 



3936 STILES, PERCY GOLDTHWATT. Wayfaring in 
New England. Concord, N.H.: Rumford Pr., 1920. 

140p. MH. + 

3937 SYLVESTER, HERBERT MILTON. Homestead 
highways. Boston: Ticknor, 1888. 302p. NhD. + 

3938 TACHAU, FLORA. Early New England 
colonial life, n.p.: Industrial Arts Cooperative 
Service, [1944?]. [47]p. MPl. 

3939 TARBOX, INCREASE N. "Our New England 
Thanksgiving, historically considered." New 
Englander, 38 (Mar. 1879), 240-252. 

3940 THOMSON, WILUAM O., and KENNETH A. 

MacIVER. An old New England farm. Cape Neddick, Me.: 
Nor'East Heritage Publications, 1983. 64p. MeP. + 

19th-century farm life, based on an 1861 diary. 

3941 TITUS, ANSON. "Social life in early New 
England." NEM, 4 (1886), 63-68. 

3942 VARRELL, WILLIAM M. Summer-by-the-sea: 
the golden era of Victorian beach resorts. 

Portsmouth, N.H.: Strawbery Banke Print Shop, 1972. 
152p. NhHi. -h 

In Maine, Massachusetts, and New Hampshire. 

3943 WE were New England: Yankee life by 

those who lived it. June Barrows Mussey, ed. N.Y.: 
Stackpole Sons, 1937. 41 Ip. MWA. -i- 

3944 WEBSTER, CLARENCE MERTOUN. Puritans at 
home. N.Y.: Harcourt, Brace, 1936. 230p. CtY. + 

3945 WEEDEN, WILUAM BABCOCK. "Glimpses of 

life in New England two centuries ago." NEM, n.s. 14 
(May 1896), 277-281. 

3946 WIGGIN, KATE DOUGLAS SMITH. A 
Thanksgiving retrospect: or, simplicity of life in 
old New England. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1928. 

37p. MB. H- 

3947 [WRIFFORD, ANSON.] Traits of character, 
pursuits, manners, customs of habits, manifested by 
the inhabitants of the north-eastern states, in their 
common pursuits of life. By Uncle Daniel. Portland, 

Me., 1837. 68p. CtY. -H 

3948 WRIGHT, HARRY ANDREW. "Those human 
Puritans." A ASP, 50 (Apr. 1941), 80-90. 



3949 YANKEES all! New England personified 

from the Berkshire Traveller collection. Richard V. 
Happel, ed. Stockbridge, Mass.: Berkshire Traveller 
Pr., 1970. 95p. CtY. + 

3950 YANKEES remember: how it used to be. 

Clarissa M. Silitch, ed. Dublin, N.H.: Yankee, 1976. 
175p. CtY. -H 

3951 YOUNG, JOANNE. Christmas in New England. 

N.Y.: Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1972. 63p. CtH. -i- 

SEE "Social life and customs" in Index for additional 
listings. 



SOCIAL REFORM 

3952 ALBERTSON, FRANK, ANNETTA HTNZMAN, and 
NANCY VONBURG. "Seven utopias of mid-nineteenth- 
century New England." OTNE, 62 (Oct.-Dec. 1971), 47- 
52; (Jan.-Mar. 1972), 80-84. 

3953 ANDREWS, HORACE, JR. "Kansas crusade: 

Eli Thayer and the New England Emigrant Aid Company." 
NEQ, 35 (Dec. 1962), 497-514. 

3954 BACON, LEONARD WOOLSEY. Anti-slavery 
before Garrison: an address before the Connecticut 
Society of the Founders and Patriots of America, New 
Haven, September 19, 1902. Being a contribution 
toward the hitherto unwritten life of the true William 
Lloyd Garrison. New Haven, Corm.: Pr. of Tuttle, 
Morehouse & Taylor, 1903. 37p. MBU. -i- 

3955 BACON. MARGARET HOPE. I speak for my 
slave sister: the life of Abby Kelley Foster. N.Y.: 
Thomas Y. Crowell, 1974. viii, 235p. MWA. -i- 

Lived 1810-1887. 

3956 BARRY, LOUISE. "The Emigrant Aid Company 
parties of 1854." Kansas Historical Quarterly, 12 
(May 1943), 115-155. 

See also next entry. 

3957 . "The New England Emigrant Aid Company parties 

of 1855." Kansas Historical Quarterly, 12 (Aug. 

1943), 227-268. 

See also preceding entry. 

3958 BERNARD, JOEL. "Authority, autonomy, and 
radical commitment: Stephen and Abby Kelley Foster." 
AASP, 90 (Oct. 1980), 347-386. 

Abolitionists. 



187 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



3959 SOQAL REFORM 



3959 BORCHARDT, BEATRICE E. "Arnold Buffum: 
buoyant abolitionist." NEG, 7 (Summer 1965), 23-30. 

3960 BRENNAN, SISTER THOMAS CATHERINE. 

"Thomas Wentworth Higginson: reformer and man of 
letters." Ph.D. dissertation, Michigan State Univ., 

1959. 305p. 

Lived 1823-1911. Abstracted in DAI, 20, No. 1 
(1959), 296. 

3961 BURKETT, NANCY H. Abby Kelley Foster and 
Stephen S. Foster. Worcester, Mass.: Worcester 
Bicentennial Commission, 1976. 40p. MW A. + 

3962 CARSON, GERALD. Rum and reform in old 
New England. Sturbridge, Mass.: Old Sturbridge 
Village, 1966. 19p. MStuO. + 

See also this author's article of same title in NEG, 

6 (Winter 1965), 3-14. 

3963 CURTI, MERLE E. The learned blacksmith: 
the letters and journals of Elihu Burritt. N.Y.: 
Wilson-Erickson, 1937. ix, 241p. MWA. -i- 

Social reformer (lived 1810-1879), noted for his 
role in the peace movement. 

3964 . "Non-resistance in New England." NEQ, 2 (Jan. 

1929), 34-57. 

3965 EDELSTEIN, TILDEN G. Strange enthusiasm: 

a life of Thomas Wentworth Higginson. New Haven, 

Conn.: Yale Univ. Pr., 1968. ix, 425p. MWA. + 
Clergyman, reformer, soldier, and author (lived 1823- 
1911). 

3966 nLLER, LOUIS. "Parker Pillsbury: an 
anti-slavery apostle." NEQ, 19 (Sept. 1946), 315-337. 

See also entry 3982. 

3967 FUESS, CLAUDE MOORE. "Daniel Webster and 
the abolitionists." MHSP, 64 (1932), 28-42. 

3968 HARDEN, JUUA W. "Judge Sewall and 

antislavery sentiment in colonial New England." Negro 
History Bulletin, 6 (Mar. 1943), 125, 143. 

3969 JOHNSON, SAMUEL A. The battle cry of 

freedom: the New England Emigrant Aid Company in the 
Kansas Crusade. Lawrence, Kans.: Univ. of Kansas 
Pr., 1954. 357p. MSaE. -h 

3970 . "The genesis of the New England Emigrant Aid 

Company." NEQ, 3 (Jan. 1930), 95-122. 

3971 . "The New England Emigrant Aid Company." Ph.D. 

dissertation, Univ. of Wisconsin, 1935. 

See also preceding entry. 



3972 LADER, LAWRENCE. The bold Brahmins: New 
England’s war against slavery, 1831-1863. N.Y.: E. 

P. Dutton, 1961. 318p. MStuO. + 

3973 LANGSDORF, EDGAR. "S. C. Pomeroy and the 

New England Emigrant Aid Company, 1854-1858." Kansas 
Historical Quarterly, 7 (Aug. 1938), 227-245; (Nov. 

1938), 379-398. 

3974 LEDBETTER, PATSY S., and BILLS. 

LEDBETTER. "The agitator and the intellectuals: 

William Lloyd Garrison and the New England 
Transcendentalists." Mid-America, 62 (Apr.-July 
1980), 173-183. 

3975 MAY, SAMUEL JOSEPH. Memoir of Samuel 

Joseph May. Boston: Roberts Brothers, 1873. 297p. 
MWA. -H 

Unitarian minister and reformer (lived 1797-1871). 

3976 MEAD, EDWIN D. 'Two great New England 

peace workers." NEM, n.s. 51 (Sept. 1914), 107-116. 
Edwin Giim and Samuel B. Capen. 

3977 MEYER, HOWARD N. Colonel of the black 
regiment: the life of Thomas Wentworth Higginson. 

N.Y.: W. W. Norton, 1967. xix, 346p. MWA. + 

3978 MOODY, ROBERT EARLE. "The first year of 

the Emigrant Aid Company." NEQ, 4 (Jan. 1931), 148- 
155. 

1854. 

3979 NEW ENGLAND EMIGRANT AID COMPANY. 

History of the New-England Emigrant Aid Company; with 
a report on its future operations. Boston: Pr. of J. 

Wilson and Son, 1862. 33p. MBU. + 

3980 NORTHEND, CHARLES. Elihu Burritt: a 
memorial volume containing a sketch of his life and 
labors, with selections from his writings and 
lectures, and extracts from his private journals in 
Europe and America. London: Sampson, Low, Marston, 
Searle, & Rivington, 1880. 479p. MWA. + 

3981 PEASE, JANE HANNA. "The freshness of 
fanaticism: Abby Kelley Foster: an essay in reform." 

Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of Rochester, 1969. x, 

276p. MWA. 

3982 PILLSBURY, PARKER. Acts of the 
antislavery apostles. Concord, N.H., 1883. 503p. 

MStuO. -I- 

Personal recollections of abolitionists and the 

antislavery movement (mostly in New England). 



188 



Other Aspects of Social and Cultural History 



SPORTS AND RECREATION 4003 



3983 RIEGEL, ROBERT E. "Abby Kelley." NEC. 6 
(Spring 1965), 21-26. 

The abolitionist. 

3984 ROSE, ANNE C. Transcendentalism as a 

social movement, 1830-1850. New Haven, Conn.: Yale 
Univ. Pr., 1981. xii, 269p. MStuO. -i- 
See also next entry. 

3985 . "Transcendentalism as a social movement, 1830- 

1850." Ph.D. dissertation, Yale Univ., 1980. 403p. 

MH. 

Abstracted in DAI, 40, No. IIA (1980), 5981. See 
also preceding entry. 

3986 SENIOR, ROBERT CHOLERTON. "New England 
Congregationalism and the antislavery movement, 1830- 
1860." Ph.D. dissertation, Yale Univ., 1954. 443p. 
NhKeS. 

Abstracted in DAI, 28, No. 2A (1967), 606. 

3987 TALBOT, GEORGE FOSTER. 'Temperance and 
the drink question in old time." Maine Historical 
Society, Collections, 2 ser. 6 (1895), 357-392. 

3988 THAYER, ELI. "New England Emigrant Aid 
Company and its influence through the Kansas contest 
upon national history." Worcester [Mass.] Society of 
Antiquity, Collections, 7 (1887), 17-60. 

3989 THOMPSON, JAMES EARU JR. "Lyman 
Beecher's long road to conservative abolitionism." 
Church History, 42 (Mar. 1973), 89-109. 

3990 TOLIS, PETER. Elihu Burritt: crusader 

for brotherhood. Hamden, Conn.: Archon Books, 1968. 
ix, 309p. MW A. + 

3991 TUTTLETON, JAMES W. Thomas Wentworth 
Higginson. Boston: Twayne Publishers, 1978. 172p. 
MWA.+ 

3992 THE UNDERGROUND railroad in New England. 

Richard R. Kuhns and John Sabino, eds. [Boston?]: 
American Revolution Bicentennial Administration, 
Region 1, [1976?]. 20p. MWA. + 

3993 WATNER, CARL. Those 'impossible 
citizens': civil resistants in 19th century New 
England." Journal of Libertarian Studies, 3 (Summer 
1979), 173-190. 

3994 WEIR, WILLIAM R. "When perfectionism was 
in flower." Connecticut, 37 (Nov. 1974), 33-36. 

19th-century communal utopias. 



3995 WELLS, ANNA MARY. Dear preceptor: the 

life and times of Thomas Wentworth Higginson. Boston: 
Houghton Mifflin, 1963. ix, 363p. MWA. + 

3996 WILUAMSON, DOUGLAS JAMES. "The rise of 

the New England Methodist temperance movement, 1823 
1836." Methodist History, 21 (Oct. 1982), 3-28. 

3997 WYMAN, TILLIE B. CHACE. "Reminiscences 

of two abolitionists." NEM, n.s. 27 (Jan. 1903), 536- 
550. 

Stephen S. Foster and Abby Kelley Foster. 

3998 ZORN, ROMAN J. "The New England Anti- 
slavery Society: pioneer abolitionist organization." 
Journal of Negro History, 42 (July 1957), 157-176. 

1830s. 

SEE "Social reform" In Index for additional listings. 



SPORTS AND RECREATION 

3999 ADLER, ALLEN. New England & thereabouts - 

a ski tracing. Barton, Vt.: NETCO Pr., 1985. 138p. 
VtHi. + 

Skiing in New England before 1950. 

4000 ALLEN, E. JOHN B. "The making of a 

skier: Fred H. Harris, 1904-1911." Vermont History, 
53 (Winter 1985), 5-16. 

Harris, of Brattleboro, Vt., founded the Dartmouth 
and Brattleboro outing clubs and "profoundly 
influenced the development of skiing as a spxtrt in New 
England." 

4001 . "Skiing: a hundred miles of hell." Magnetic 

North, 4 (Winter 1986), 37, 40. 

Two-man, cross-country race from Portland, Me., to 
Berlin, N.H. (1926). 

4002 . "Values and sport: the development of New 

England skiing, 1870-1940." Oral History Review, 13 
(1985), 55-76. 

4003 BAGG, LYMAN HOTCHKISS. Yale and Harvard 

boat racing. New Haven, Corm.: Tuttle, Morehouse & 
Taylor, 1871. 46p. CtY. + 

Most of the recent writings on this subject are 
listed in the Cormecticut volume, under New London. 



189 



4004 

4004 

4005 

4006 

4007 

4008 

4009 

4010 

4011 

4012 

4013 

4014 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



SPORTS AND RECREATION 



BEAL, J. HOLLAND. The mountains, the 

main and members of our tribe. North Conway, N.H.: 

Reporter Pr., 1969. vi, 145p. NhNc. 

Autobiographical account of growing up in 
Massachusetts, sailing along the New England coast, 
and recreation in New Hampshire. 

BERGIN, THOMAS G. The Game: theHarvard- 
Yale football rivalry, 1875-1983. New Haven, Cotm.: 
Yale Univ. Pr., 1984. xii, 367p. MB. + 

. 'To the Game: happy birthday." Harvard 

Magazine, 86 (Nov. -Dec. 1983), 29-35. 

See also preceding entry. 

BLANCHARD, THERESA W. "New England 
influence on figure skating." Yankee, 2 (Dec. 1936), 
41-42. 

BLANDIN, AMOS N. "It was a Dartmouth 

jinx all the time." Dartmouth Alumni Magazine, 53 

(Nov. 1960), 22-29. 

Dartmouth-Yale football rivalry. 

BLOOD, CHARLES W. The A.M.C. trail 
crew, 1919-1964." Appalachia, 30 (June 1964), 88-95. 
Appalachian Mountain Club. 

CHIPMAN, WILLIAM J. "Before the ivy 
sprouted: an interesting history of the old American 
Intercollegiate Football Association once dominated by 
Yale and Princeton." [Yale-Princeton football 
program, Nov. 15, 1941], 13, 33, 37, 41. 

Other members of the league, which was in existence 
from 1876-1893, were Harvard, Wesleyan, Columbia, and 
Pennsylvania. 

COFFIN, EDMUND. "How the Yale-Harvard 

rowing races began." Yale Alumni Weekly, 38 (Feb. 15, 

1929), 599. 

See also entry 4003. 

GORDON, BEVERLY S. "Marion Davis and the 
Wapack Trail." New Hampshire Profiles, 36 (Nov. 

1987), 62-63, 65. 

Hiking trail in Massachusetts and New Hampshire, 
opened during the 1920s. 

GREENELEAF, FLORENCE E. The game of 
candlepin bowling. Westfield, Mass.: F. & E. 

Greenleaf, 1981. xii, 240, [133]p. MeU. -t- 

HARRIS, MICHAEL. "Heartbreak and 
happiness— the Yale-Dartmouth series." Dartmouth 
Official Program, Yale Game (Oct. 30, 1971), 52-56. 

Program includes additional historical information 
about the football series. 



4015 HODGSON, GREGOR. "New England shark 
strikes: only four, but that's enough." Yankee, 39 
(Nov. 1975), 130-133, 166-171. 

Recorded attacks by sharks. 

4016 JENKS, PAUL R. 'Twenty -five years of the 
A.M.C. trail crew." Appalachia, 9 (Dec. 1943), 441- 
452. 

Appalachian Mountain Club. 

4017 KENYON, JIM. "On the road to Cambridge: 

the Harvard game." Dartmouth Alumni Magazine, 78 
(Oct. 1985), 52-53. 

The football rivalry. 

4018 LESSNER, ERWIN CHRISTIAN. "Ancestor of 

the rally." Truce's Automobile Yearbook, 7 (1958), 16- 
17, 68-72. 

Twelve-day tour from New York City to Bretton Woods, 
N.H., and return (1905). 

4019 MAHONEY, JACK. The golf history of New 
England. Wellesley, Mass.: New England Golf, 1973. 
175p. MHi. -H 

4020 NORTHEND, MARY HARROD. "Country and hunt 
clubs of New England." NEM, n.s. 38 (Aug. 1908), 666- 
677. 

4021 PARK, ROBERTA J. "The attitudes of 
leading New England Transcendentalists toward 
healthful exercise, active recreations and proper care 
of the body, 1830-1860." Journal of Sport History, 3 
(Spring 1977), 34-50. 

4022 PERRY, PHILLIP M. "Banfield's harvest." 

NEG, 17 (Fall 1975), 19-24. 

Hiker Walter Banfield and the Metacomet-Monadnock 
Trail (opened during the 1940s). 

4023 PUTNAM, GRANVILLE B. "The introduction 

of gymnastics in New England." NEM, n.s. 3 (Sept. 
1890), 110-113. 

4024 RYAN, FRANK. "The fiftieth game: 

Harvard and Yale reach a football landmark." Harvard 
A. A. News, 6 (Nov. 21, 1931), 9, 75, 96. 

Historical sketch of the football series, included 
in the program for the 1931 game. 

4025 SACK, ALLEN L. "The commercialization 

and rationalization of intercollegiate football: a 
comparative analysis of the development of football at 
Yale and Harvard in the latter nineteenth century." 

Ph.D. dissertation, Pennsylvania State Univ., 1974. 
197p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 36, No. 3A (1975), 1375. 



190 



Other Aspects of Social and Cultural History 



TRAVELS 4045 



4026 SANDLER, MARTIN W. As New Englanders 
played. Chester, Conn.: Globe Pequot Pr., 1979. 

96p. Ct. + 

4027 SMITH, RONALD A. "A failure of elitism: 

the Harvard-Yale dual league plan of the 1890s." NEQ, 
61 (June 1988), 201-213. 

Intercollegiate athletics. 

4028 STRUNA, NANCY LYNN. "Puritans and sport: 
the irretrievable tide of change." Journal of Sport 
History, 3 (Spring 1977), 1-21. 

1630-1730. 

4029 VARA, JON. "Why candlepins became 
celebrities." Yankee, 51 (Feb. 1987), 86-91, 126, 
128. 

Candlepin bowling in New England. 

4030 WAGNER, HANS-PETER. "Puritan attitudes 
towards physical recreation in 17th century New 
England." Journal of Sport History, 3 (Summer 1976), 
139-151. 

4031 . "Puritan attitudes towards recreation in 

seventeenth-century New England: with particular 
consideration of physical recreation." Dr. Phil, 
dissertation, Univ. des Saarlandes [Federal Republic 
of Germany], 1978. 267p. 

Described in American Puritan Studies, Michael S. 
Montgomery, comp. (1984), 305-306. See also next 
entry. 

4032 . Puritan attitudes towards recreation in 

seventeenth-century New England: with particular 
consideration of physical recreation. Frankfurt am 
Main [Federal Republic of Germany]: Verlag Peter 
Lang, 1982. 267p. MBU. -i- 

See also preceding entry. 

4033 "WE'VE certainly left our mark on the 

world of sports." Yankee, 50 (Sept 1986), 130-135. 

Personalities and inventions on the New England 
sports scene. 

4034 WOODMAN, FRANCIS CALL. [Reminiscences.] 
Harvard Alumni Bulletin, 52 (Oct. 8-Oct. 22, 1960), 
50, 98, 100. 

Harvard-Yale football (1886-1888). 

4035 WRIGHT, EDGAR F. "Biking-camping across 

New England, 1903." Appalachia, 41 (June 1976), 94- 

100. 

Author's recollections. 



TRAVELS 

4036 BAILEY, JACOB. [Excerpts from a diary.] 

Harvard Alumni Bulletin, 58 (Jan. 1956), 294-295, 

315. 

Record of a Harvard student's travels between 
Cambridge and Connecticut (1754). 

4037 BASTIAN, MAURICE. Journal d'un lour en 
Nouvelle-Angleterre. Vevey [France]: Sauberlin & 
Pfeiffer, 1978. 8 Ip. RHi. -t- 

1951. 

4038 BENES, PETER. "Itinerant entertainers in 

New England and New York, 1687-1830." DubSemPr 
(1984), 112-130. 

4039 BOOTH, ALAN R. "Francis Silsbee's August 
odyssey, 1831." EIHC, 100 (Jan. 1964), 59-69. 

Extracts from his journal during a tour of New 
England following his graduation from Harvard. 

4040 BOTTORFF, WILUAM K. "The New England 

village and Timothy Dwight." NEG, 16 (Fall 1974), 11- 
18. 

The Yale president's observations of New England 
communities during his travels around the region. See 
also entry 4043. 

4041 CURRIER, FREDERICK A. "Stage coach days 

and stage coach ways." Fitchburg [Mass.] Historical 
Society, Proceedings, 2 (1894-1897), 126-192. 

4042 DARR, RICHARD K. "Traveler's troubles." 

New Hampshire Profiles, 8 (Apr. 1959), 32-33. 

On a railroad trip from Lawrence, Mass., to 
Portsmouth, N.H. (1846). 

4043 DWIGHT, TIMOTHY (1752-1817). Travels in 

New England and New York. Barbara Miller Solomon, ed 
(1821-1822) Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard Univ. Pr., 
1969. 4v. MStuO. + 

Includes historical information about many 
localities that the Yale president visited during his 
travels. 

4044 EARLE, ALICE MORSE. Stage-coach and 
tavern days. N.Y.: Macmillan, 1900. xvi, 449p. 
MStuO. -t- 

4045 EBY, CECIL D., JR. "The 'old Virginia 
gentleman' in New England." Virginia Magazine of 
History and Biography, 70 (Jan. 1962), 92-101. 

George W. Bagby's 1880 tour of New England, as 
reported to the Baltimore Sun. 



191 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



4046 TRAVELS 



4046 EDDY, NELLIE TIRZA. Along thy banks, 

fair river. Boston; Alex C. Morrill, 1894. [29]p. 

RPB. + 

Historical notes and description of a carriage ride 
from Brattleboro, Vt., to Vernon, Vt., Northfield, 

Mass., Hinsdale, N.H., and return. 

4047 "EXTRACTS from the journal of a Shaker 
journey, 1856." NEG, 4 (Summer 1962), 20-28. 

Robert G. Newman, ed. 

4048 FEIKS, MADELEINE. "New England amazon; 

the life and times of Sara Knight; traveller, business 
woman, teacher of Benjamin Franklin." NEG, 10 (Spring 
1969), 16-22. 

See also entry 4057. 

4049 FORBES, ALLAN. Taverns and stagecoaches 

of New England; anecdotes and tales recalling the 
days of stagecoach travel and the ancient hostelries 
where the strangers tarried. R. M. Eastman, ed. 

Boston; State Street Trust, 1953-1954. 2v. MWA. -i- 

4050 FRANCIS, JOHN. "In search of Cahoone; 

the 1790 diary of John Francis." OTNE, 59 (Fall 
1969), 55-71. 

Business journey from Providence to Boston, 
Winchester, N.H., and the area of Brattleboro, Vt. 

Glenn B. Skillin, ed. 

4051 GRANT, H. ROGER. "We're off to Center 
Sandwich!" A. B. Stickney's 1909 automobile trip to 
New Hampshire." Historical New Hampshire, 41 (Spring- 
Summer 1986), 45-57. 

From New York City and return. 

4052 GREER, LOIS GOODWIN. "Stage coach and 
tavern days in northern New England." Granite 
Monthly, 56 (Jan. 1924), 13-16. 

4053 HILL, AMEUA LEAVITT. 'Travel in early 

New England." NEM, n.s. 17 (Sept. 1897), 82-88. 

4054 HOLBROOK, CHANDLER. "A business trip 

seventy years ago." NEM, n.s. 20 (Mar. 1899), 23-32. 
From Chandler's journal. Herbert Elmer Mills, ed. 

4055 HOWE, FRANCES S. 14,000 miles, a 

carriage, and two women. [Fitchburg, Mass.; Sentinel 
Printing], 1906. 287p. NhD. -i- 
Travels in New England, New York, and Canada. 

4056 JORDAN, FRANKLIN INGALLS. "The coaster." 

Down East, 4 (Aug. 1957), 32-35, 53-54, 56. 

Sailing trip from Boston to Maine (1890). 



4057 KNIGHT, SARAH KEMBLE. The journal of 
Madam Knight; with an introductory note by George 
Parker Winship. N.Y.; P. Smith, 1935. xiv, 72p. 
MBU.-t- 

Account of a 1704 overland journey from Boston to 
New York. Other eds. 

4058 LEFCOWrrZ, ALLAN B., and BARBARA F. 

LEFCOWrrZ. "James Bryce's first visit to America; 
the New England sections of his 1870 journal and 
related correspondence." NEQ, 50 (June 1977), 314- 
331. 

The British author of The American commonwealth 
visited Boston and the White Mountains. 

4059 MARLOWE, GEORGE FRANQS. Coaching roads 
of old New England; their inns and taverns and their 
stories. N.Y.; Macmillan, 1945. xvi, 200p. MWA. + 

4060 . The old bay paths; their villages and byways 

and their stories. N.Y.; Hastings House, 1942. 

126p. MWA. + 

4061 MEDIEROS, PATRICIA. "Sarah Kemble 
Knight." NEG, 18 (Winter 1977), 30-36. 

4062 MITCHELL, EDWIN VALENTINE. The horse & 

buggy age in New England. N.Y.; Coward-McCaim, 1937, 
viii, 232p. MWA. -t- 

4063 POWELL, MARY G. "A Scotchman's journey 

in New England in 1771." NEM, n.s. 12 (May 1895), 343- 
352. 

William Gregory. 

4064 ROGERS, C. TALBOT. "Peleg Chandler." 

OTNE, 56 (Fall 1965), 45-48. 

Journey from New Gloucester, Me., to Halifax, Mass. 
(1790). 

4065 SCHUBERT, LELAND. "A boy's journal of a 

trip into New England in 1838." EIHC, 86 (Apr. 1950), 
97-105. 

George Long Duyckinck, of New York City. 

4066 SILLIMAN, BENJAMIN. Remarks, made on a 

short tour between Hartford and Quebec in the autumn 
of 1819. (1820) 2d ed. New Haven, Corm.; S. 

Converse, 1824. 443p. VtU. + 

4067 SLADE, DANIEL DENISON. Twelve days in 

the saddle; a journey on horseback in New England 
during the autumn of 1883. By Medicus [pseud.] 

Boston; Little, Brown, 1884. 73p. NhD. -t- 



192 



Other Aspects of Social and Cultural History 



WITCHCRAFT 4088 



4068 STILES, EZRA. Extracts from the 
itineraries and other miscellanies of Ezra Stiles, 

D.D., LL.D., 1755-1794; with a selection from his 
correspondence. Franklin Bowditch Dexter, ed. New 
Haven, Coim.: Yale Univ. Pr., 1916. 620p. MStuO. -i- 

4069 WEBER, CARL J. "New England through 

French eyes fifty years ago." NEQ, 20 (Sept. 1947), 
385-396. 

Thcrese Blanc-Bentzon. 

SEE "Travels" in Index for additional listings. 



WITCHCRAFT 

4070 BURR, GEORGE LINCOLN. New England’s 

place in the history of witchcraft. (1911) Freeport, 

N.Y.: Books for Libraries Pr., 1971. 35p. CtY. -i- 
Also published in AASP, n.s. 21 (Oct. 1911), 185- 
217. 

4071 CAHILL, ROBERT ELUS. New England's 

witches and wizards, n.p.: Chandler-Smith Publishing 
House, 1983. 48p. CtWillE. + 

4072 DANFORTH, FLORENCE GARRISON. New England 
witchcraft. N.Y.: Pageant Pr., 1965. 54p. MSaE. + 

4073 DEMOS, JOHN PUTNAM. "Entertaining 

Satan." American Heritage, 29 (Aug. -Sept. 1978), 14- 
23. 

See also next entry. 

4074 . Entertaining Satan: witchcraft and the 

culture of early New England. N.Y.: Oxford Univ. 

Pr., 1982. xiv, 543p. MStuO. -t- 

4075 . "Underlying themes in the witchcraft of 

seventeenth-century New England." American Historical 
Review, 75 (June 1970), 1311-1326. 

4076 DRAKE, FREDERICK C. "Witchcraft in the 
American colonies, 1647-1662." American Quarterly, 20 
(Winter 1968), 694-725. 

Mainly New England. 

4077 DRAKE, SAMUEL GARDNER. Annals of 
witchcraft in New England, and elsewhere in the United 
States, from their first settlement.... Boston: W. 

E. Woodward, 1869. liii, 306p. NhHi. -t- 



4078 . The witchcraft delusion in New England: its 

rise, progress tmd termination, as exhibited by Dr. 
Cotton Mather, in The wonders of the invisible world; 
and by Mr. Robert Calef, in his More wonders of the 
invisible world.... Roxbury, Mass.: Printed for W. 

E. Woodward, 1866. 3v. CtY. + 

4079 EVANS, FREDERICK WILUAM. New England 
witchcraft and spiritualism. [Mount Lebanon, N.Y., 
1890?] 8p. CtY. -I- 

4080 HALL, DAVID DRISKO. "Witchcraft and the 

limits of interpretation." NEQ, 58 (June 1985), 253- 
281. 

408 1 KARLS EN, CAROL FRANCES. The devil in the 
shape of a woman: the witch in colonial New England. 
N.Y.: W. W. Norton, 1987. xvii, 360p. MB. -n 

See also next entry. 

4082 . "The devil in the shape of a woman: the witch 

in seventeenth-century New England." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Yale Univ., 1980. xvi, 412p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 41, Nol llA (1981), 4812. See 
also preceding entry. 

4083 KITTREDGE, GEORGE LYMAN. "Notes on 
witchcraft." AASP, n.s. 18 (Apr. 1907), 148-212. 

4084 . Witchcraft in old and New England. Cambridge, 

Mass.: Harvard Univ. Pr., 1929. 641p. MWA. + 

Reprinted 1956. 

4085 MATHER, COTTON. Strange phenomena of New 
England: in the seventeenth century: including the 
"Salem witchcraft, 1692." From the writings of "the 
Rev. Cotton Mather, D.D." Henry Jones, comp. New- 
York: Piercy and Reed, 1846. iv, 54p. DLC. h- 

4086 NEWHALL, JAMES ROBINSON. A lecture on 

the occult sciences, embracing some account of the New 
England witchcraft, with an attempt to exhibit the 
philosophy of spectre seeing, disease charming, &c. 
Salem [Mass.]: G. W. & E. Crafts, 1845. 36p. MWA. -t- 

4087 OWEN, DENNIS EDWARD. "Satan’s fiery 

darts: explorations in the experience and concept of 
the demonic in seventeenth-century New England." 
Ph.D. dissertation, Princeton Univ,, 1974. vi, 316p. 
Abstracted in DAI, 35, No. 9A (1975), 6233. 

4088 TODD, MABEL LOOMIS. "Witchcraft in New 
England." Connecticut Valley Historical Society, 

Papers and Proceedings, 4 (Jan. 12, 1906), 165-184. 

17th century. 



193 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



4089 WITCHCRAFT 



4089 WINSOR. JUSTIN. The literature of 
witchcraft in New England. Worcester, Mass.: 
Hamilton, 1896. 25p. CtY. + 

Reprinted from AASP, 10 (Oct. 1895), 351-373. 

4090 WITCHCRAFT delusion in New England: its 

rise, progress, and termination, as exhibited by Dr. 
Cotton Mather, in The wonders of the invisible world; 
and by Mr. Robert Calef, in his More wonders of the 
invisible world. Roxbury, Mass.: W. Elliott 
Woodward, 1866. 3v. NhHi. -i- 

4091 "WITCHCRAFT in colonial Connecticut and 
Massachusetts: an armotated bibliography." Bulletin 
of Bibliography, 33 (Feb. -Mar. 1976), 61-72. 

Steven H. Keeney, comp. 

SEE "Witchcraft" in Index for additional listings. 



WOMEN'S HISTORY 

4092 BOYDSTON, JEANNE, MARY KELLEY, and ANNE 
MARGOLIS. The limits of sisterhood: the Beecher 
sisters on women's rights and woman's sphere. Chapel 
Hill, N.C.: Univ. of North Carolina Pr., 1988. xxiv, 
369p. MWA. -I- 

4093 COBBLEDICK, MELVILLE ROBERT. "The status 
of women in Puritan New England, 1630-1660: a 
demographic study." Ph.D. dissertation, Yale Univ., 
1936. 333p. MBU. 

Abstracted in DAI, 31, No. 11 A (1971), 6173. 

4094 COTT, NANCY FAUK. The bonds of 
womanhood: 'woman's sphere' in New England, 1780- 
1835. New Haven, Conn.: Yale Univ. Pr., 197. xii, 
225p. MWA. -H 

See also next entry. 

4095 . "In the bonds of womanhood: perspectives on 

female experience and consciousness in New England 
1780-1830." Ph.D. dissertation, Brandeis Univ., 1974. 
380p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 35, No. 6A (1974), 3628. See 
also preceding entry. 

4096 DOUGLAS, JAMES. The status of women in 

New England and New France. Kingston, Ont., 1912. 
16p. MWA. -H 



4097 EASTON, BARBARA LESLIE. 

"Industrialization and femininity: a case study of 
nineteenth century New England." Social Problems, 
(Apr. 1976), 389-401. 

Feminity defined as domesticity (19th century). 

4098 GINZBERG, LORI D. "Women and the work of 
benevolence: morality and politics in the 
Northeastern United States, 1820-1885." Ph.D 
dissertation, Yale Univ., 1985. 390p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 46, No. IIA (1986), 3468 

4099 GORDON, BEVERLY S. "Playing at being 
powerless: New England ladies' fairs, 1830-1930." 
Massachusetts Review, 27 (Spring 1986), 144-160. 

4100 KOEHLER, LYLE. A search for power: the 
"weaker sex" in seventeenth-century New England. 
Urbana, 111.: Univ. of Illinois Pr., 1980. viii, 

561p. CtHi. -I- 

4101 LARKIN, JACK, and CAROLINE FULLER SLOAT. 

"The family circle and beyond." Old Sturbridge 
Visitor, 23 (Spring 1983), 4-6. 

Women's changing roles (early-19th century). 

4102 MALMSHEIMER, LONNA MYERS. "Daughters of 
Zion: New England roots of American feminism." 

50 (Sept. 1977), 484-504. 

4103 . "New England funeral sermons and changing 

attitudes toward woman, 1672-1792." Ph.D. 
dissertation, Univ. of Minnesota, 1973. 213p. 

Abstracted in DAI, 34, No. 7A (1974), 4161. 

4104 ULRICH, LAUREL THATCHER. "'A friendly 
neighbor': social dimensions of daily work in 
northern colonial New England." Feminist Studies, 6 
(Summer 1980), 392-405. 

4105 . "Good wives: a study in role definition in 

northern New England, 1650-1750." Ph.D. dissertation, 
Univ. of New Hampshire, 1980. 548p. MB. 

Abstracted in DAI, 41, No. 6A (1980), 2741. See 
also next entry. 

4106 . Good wives: image and reality in the lives of 

women in northern New England, 1650-1750. N.Y.: 
Alfred A. Knopf, 1982. xv, 296p. NhKeS. + 

See also preceding entry. 

SEE "Women" in Index for additional listings. 



194 



Geographical Areas of New England 



BOUNDARY AREAS 



4107 BALDWIN. SIMEON EBEN. "The secession of 
Springfield from Connecticut." Colonial Society of 
Massachusetts, Publications, 12 (1908-1909), 55-82. 

See also entry 4132. 

4108 BLISS, LEONARD, JR. The history of 

Rehoboth, Bristol County, Massachusetts: comprising a 
history of the present towns of Rehoboth, Seekonk, and 
Pawtucket, from their settlement to the present time; 
together with sketches of Attleborough, Cumberland, 
and a part of Sawnsey and Barrington, to the time that 
they were severally separated from the original town. 
Boston: Otis, Broaders, 1836. v, 294p. RHi. + 
Massachusetts and Rhode Island. 

4109 BOSTON UNIVERSITY. COMMUNITY SOaOLOGY 
TRAINING PROGRAM. Westerly, R.I.--Pawcatuck, Conn.: 
a hyphenated community. A community social profile. 
Boston, 1978. 254p. RWe. 

Includes historical sketch. 

4110 "BOUNDARY line." Granite Monthly, 10 
(Sept.-Oct. 1887), 309-313. 

Between Massachusetts and New Hampshire. 



41 1 1 ERHARDT, JOHN G. The history of 

Rehoboth, Seekonk, East Providence, Pawtucket & 
Barrington. Volume I. Seekonk, Mass.: J. G. Erhardi, 
1982. 237p. RHi. -h 

Massachusetts and Rhode Island. See also next 
entry. 

4112 . Rehoboth, Plymouth Colony, 1645-1692. 

Volume II: a history of Rehoboth, Seekonk, Swansea, 
Attleboro & No. Attleboro, Mass.; East Providence, 
Barrington, & Pawtucket, R.I. Seekonk, Mass.: J. G. 
Erhardt, 1983. 529p. RHi. + 

See also preceding entry. 

4113 FOX, CHARLES JAMES. History of the old 
township of Dunstable, including Nashua, Nashville, 
Hollis, Hudson, Litchfield, and Merrimac, N.H.; 
Dunstable and Tyngsborough, Mass. (1846) Bowie, Md. 
Heritage Books, 1983. xiv, 293p. MBNEH. -t- 

4114 GREEN, SAMUEL ABBOTT. The bound;iry line 
between Massachusetts and New Hampshire, from the 
Merrimack River to the Connecticut. A paper read 
before the Old Residents' Historical Association of 
Lowell, on December 21, 1893, the twenty-fifth 
anniversary of the formation of the society. Lowell, 
Mass.: Lowell Courier Publishing, 1893. 30p. MWA. -t- 



-t- Listings in the National Union Catalog for books and pamphlets marked 
with this symbol may include additional library locations. 



195 



New England: A Bibliography of iLs History 



4115 BOUNDARY AREAS 



4115 GREEN, SAMUEL ABBOTT. The northern 
boundary of Massachusetts in its relation to New 
Hampshire: a part of the council's report made to the 
American Antiquarian Society, at Worcester, on October 
21, 1890. Worcester, Mass.: Pr. of C. Hamilton, 

1891. 24p. MWA. + 

Also published in AASP, n.s. 7 (Oct. 1890), 11-32. 

4116 . "The Pawtucket Falls as a factor in 

determining so much of the northern boundary of 
Massachusetts." Old Residents' Historical Association 
of Lowell [Mass.], Contributions, 5 (1894), 309-336. 

4117 . Remarks on the names of Townsend Harbor, 

Massachusetts, and of Mason Harbor and Dunstable 
Harbor, New Hampshire. Cambridge, Mass., [1896?]. 

3p. MWA. -H 

4127 

4118 "GROTON Plantation." Granite Monthly, 9 
(Sept. 1886), 272-274. 

Boundary question between Massachusetts and New 
Hampshire (17th and 18th centuries). 4128 

4119 HANNA, WILLARD A. The Berkshire- 
Litchfield legacy: Litchfield, Ancram, Salisbury, 

Stockbridge, Lenox. Rutland, Vt.: Charles E. Tuttle, 

1984. 122p. MW. -h 4129 

4120 HAZEN, RICHARD. The boundary line of New 
Hampshire and Massachusetts. Journal of Richard 

Hazen, surveyor, 1741. Henry A. Hazen, ed. [Boston, 4130 
1879.] [ll]p. Nh. -I- 

Reprinted from NEHGR, 33 (1979), 323-332. 

4121 HISTORICAL sketch of Fall River, Mass., 4131 

with notices of Freetown and Tiverton: three 

discourses, Jan. 24, 1841. Fall River, Mass., 1841. 

64p. MWA. 

Massachusetts and Rhode Island. 

4 1 22 NEW HAMPSHIRE. COMMISSIONERS ON THE 
BOUNDARY BETWEEN MASSACHUSETTS AND NEW 4132 
HAMPSHIRE. Final report of the commissioners 

appointed to ascertain and establish the true 
jurisdictional line between Massachusetts and New 
Hampshire to the New England legislature, 1901. 

Manchester, N.H.: J. B. Clarke, 1902. 32p. VtU. 4133 

4123 NEW HAMPSHIRE. STATE LIBRARY, CONCORD. 

The State of Vermont vs. the State of New Hampshire, 
boundary dispute, 1912-1937, in the Supreme Court of 

the United States: a bibliography of primary sources. 4134 
Concord, N.H., 1970. 6p. VtU. -t- 



4124 "NEW Hampshire's southern border." 

Congregational Record and New Hampshire Journal, 1 
(1895-1896), 351-352. 

With Massachusetts. 

4125 PALMER, HENRY ROBINSON. "Fisher's 

Island: a former bit of New England." NEM, n.s. 28 
(July 1903), 567-584. 

Fisher's Island, N.Y. 

4126 POWERS, GRANT. Historical sketches of 
the discovery, settlement, and progress of events in 
the Coos country and vicinity, principally included 
between the years 1754 and 1785. Haverhill, N.H.: J. 

F. C. Hayes, 1841. vi, 240p. MWA. -t- 

In northern New Hampshire and Vermont. 

ROMANO, JOSEPH E. 'The great boundary 
dispute." Magnetic North, 4 (Summer 1986), 8-13. 
Between New Hampshire and Vermont. 

SANFORD, GREGORY. "Hands across the 
water." Vermont History News, 34 (May-June 1983), 42- 
43. 

New Hampshire-Vermont boundary dispute. 

SARGENT, GEORGE H. "Where is New 
Hampshire?" Magazine of History, 21 (1915), 212-216. 
New Hampshire-Vermont boundary disputes. 

SMITH, JONATHAN. "The Massachusetts and 
New Hampshire boundary line controversy, 1690-1740." 
Granite Monthly, 42 (Feb. 1910), 69-75. 

SOUTHEASTERN MASSACHUSETTS UNIVERSITY, 
NORTH DARTMOUTH. DEPARTMENT OF 
CONTINUING EDUCATION. Gosnold's hope: a 
story of southeastern New England. North Dartmouth, 
Mass., 1976. 95p. MBou. -i- 
Historical essays. 

"SPRINGFIELD'S secession from 

Connecticut." Western New England, 1 (1910-1911), 159 
160. 

See also entry 4107. 

UPHAM, GEORGE BAXTER. "Sir William Phips 
and early townships of western New Hampshire and 
eastern Vermont." Vermont Historical Society, 
Proceedings, n.s. 2 (Sept. 1931), 129-141. 

'THE VERMONT-Massachusetts boundary." 

Vermont History, 30 (Jan. 1962), 63-65. 

Glenn B. Skillin, ed. 



SEE "Boundaries" in Index for additional listings. 



196 



Geographical Areas of New England 



RIVERS AND RIVER VALLEYS 4156 



RIVERS AND RIVER VALLEYS 

4135 ALLIS, MARGUERITE. Connecticut River. 

N.Y.: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1939. xiii, 310p. Ct. + 

4136 BACON, EDWIN MUNROE. The Connecticut 
River and the valley of the Connecticut: three 
hundred and fifty miles from mountains to sea. 

Historical and descriptive. N.Y.: G. P. Putnam's 
Sons, 1906. XX, 487p. MWA. + 

4137 BELLOWS FALLS [VT.] TIMES (newspaper). 

Souvenir edition of the Bellows Falls Times: devoted 
to towns of Walpole and Westminster: historical, 
industrial, biographical (July 1, 1899). 36p. VtBF. 

Connecticut River Valley (New Hampshire and 
Vermont). 

4138 BEVERLY, ELAINE M. Bridge over the 
Piscataqua. [Kittery, Me., 1974.] 65p. Me. + 

Between Kittery, Me., and Portsmouth, N.H. 

4139 BLAISDELL, KATHARINE. Over the river and 
through the years. Littleton, N.H.: Courier 
Printing, 1979-1984. 6v. MWA. + 

Collected articles on New Hampshire and Vermont 
history. 

4140 BROWNE, GEORGE WALDO. The river of 

broken waters: the Merrimack; the romance, tradition, 
history, folklore, scenery, people, literature and 
industry of "the busiest river in the world." 

Manchester, N.H.: Standard Book, 1918. 34p. MWA. + 
See also this author's series of articles of similar 
title in Granite State Magazine, 1 (Jan. 1906), 5-12; 

(Feb. 1906), 65-78; (Mar. 1906), 133-140; (Apr. 1906). 
157-165; (May 1906), 193-199; (June 1906), 271-279. 

4141 CLARK, EDIE. "Voices of the Valley." 

Yankee, 49 (Sept. 1985), 118-127, 202-208; (Oct. 

1985), 102-109, 156-167; (Nov. 1985), 132-141, 156- 
165; (Dec. 1985), 70-79, 152, 154-161; 50 (Jan. 1986), 
92-101, 138-150. 

Cormecticut River Valley. 

4142 DAVIS, REBECCA I. Gleanings from 

Merrimac Valley. Portland, Me.: Hoyt, Fogg & Donham, 
1881-1886. 2v. MWA. -r 

4143 DELANEY. EDMUND T. The Connecticut 

River: New England's historic waterway. Chester, 

Conn.: Globe Pequot Pr., 1983. 182p. MB. -t- 



4144 DROWNED valley: the Piscataque River 

Basin. John P. Adams, comp. Hanover, N.H.: Univ. 
Pr. of New England, 1976. xix, 274p. MBU. + 

4145 GRANT. ELLSWORTH STRONG. "The main 

stream of New England." American Heritage, 18 (Apr. 
1967), 46-58, 100-105. 

Connecticut River. 

4146 HARD, WALTER R. The Cormecticut. N.Y.: 

Rinehart, 1947. x, 310p. Me. -t- 

4147 HAYES, LYMAN SIMPSON. The Connecticut 

River Valley in southern Vermont and New Hampshire: 
historical sketches. Rutland, Vt.: Tuttle, 1929. 

358p. MS. 

4148 HILL, EVAN. The Connecticut River. 

Middletown, Corm.: Wesleyan Univ. Pr., 1972. 142p. 
NhD. -H 

4149 HOLDEN, RAYMOND P. The Merrimack. N.Y.: 
Rinehart, 1958. 306p. MWA. -t- 

4150 HOOPER, MARION. Life along the 
Cormecticut River. Brattleboro, Vt.: Stephen Daye 
Pr.. 1939. 120p. MU. -h 

4151 JONES, PAGE HELEN. Evolution of a 

valley: the Androscoggin story. Canaan, N.H.: 
Phoenix Publishing, 1975. vii, 176p. NhHi. -t- 
In Maine and New Hampshire. 

4152 JONES, W. S. Colonial backgrounds of the 
Piscataqua region. N.Y.: Newcomen Society of 
England, American Branch, 1944. 24p. M. -t- 

4153 LEWIS, THOMAS REED, JR. "Changing 
environmental perception of the Cormecticut River 
Valley, 1635-1835." NE-StLVGSPr, 15 [1985], 26-36. 

4154 MEADER, J. W. The Merrimack River: its 
source and its tributaries. Embracing a history of 
manufactures, and of the towns along its course; their 
geography, topography, and products, with a 
description of the magnificent natural scenery about 
its upper waters. (1869) Boston: B. B. Russell, 

1872. viii, 307p. MWA. -h 

4155 NAMUTH, HANS. "The Housatonic." 

Horizon, 2 (May 1960), 10-29. 

In Massachusetts and Connecticut. 

4156 NILES, GRACE GREYLOCK. The Hoosac 
Valley: its legends and its history. N.Y.: G. P. 
Putnam's Sons, 1912. xxv, 584p. MWA. -i- 

In Vermont and Massachusetts. 



197 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



4 1 57 RIVERS AND RIVER VALLEYS 



4157 PIKE, ROBERT EVERDING. Drama on the 4169 

Connecticut. Eatontown, N.J.: H-H Pr., 1975. 200p. 

MWA.+ 

"...Places, people and events along the upper 
Connecticut River, from the headwaters to the 4170 

Massachusetts line." 

4158 PINNETTE, RICHARD E. Norihwoods echoes: 
a collection of true stories and accounts of the North 
Country. Colebrook, N.H.: Liebl Printing, 1986. 

280p. NhHi. + 

Androscoggin Valley of Maine and New Hampshire. 

4159 ROBERTS, GEORGE SIMON. Historic towns of 
the Cormecticut River Valley. Schenectady, N.Y.: 

Robson & Adee, 1906. vii, 494p. MWA. + 

4160 SMITH,CHARD POWERS. The Housatonic: 

Puritan river. N.Y.: Rinehart, 1946. 532p. MBU. + 

4161 SNELSON, CHARLOTTE. "The Nissitissit." 

New Hampshire Echoes, 2 (July-Aug. 1971), 9-11. 

River, flowing through Brookline and Hollis, N.H.; 

Pepperell, Mass. 

4162 U.S. NATIONAL PARK SERVICE. Blackstone 
River corridor study: conservation options draft. 

Washington, D.C., 1985. 27, [12]p. MWA. -4- 

In Massachusetts and Rhode Island. 

4 1 63 VALLEY NEWS (newspaper), WEST LEBANON, N.H. 

Two hundred years of the Upper Valley: 
bicentennial ed. (1961). 88p. NhD. + 

4164 VERRILL, ALPHEUS HYATT. The heart of old 
New England. N.Y.: Dodd, Mead, 1936. xx, 298p. Ct. 

-I- 

Connecticut River Valley. 

4165 WACKERBARTH, DORIS H. The guardians: 
pioneering in the Connecticut Valley. Winchester, 

Conn.: Country Squire, 1980. viii, 278p. MBNEH. -i- 

4 1 66 WALKER, ALICE MOREHOUSE. Early days in 
the Cormecticut Valley. Amherst, Mass., 1901. 51p. 

CtY. + 

4167 WHITTLESEY, CHARLES W. Crossing and re- 
crossing the Connecticut River: a description of the 
river from its mouth to its source, with a history of 
its ferries and bridges. New Haven, Corm.: Tuttle, 

Morehouse & Taylor, 1938. 143p. MBU. -t- 

4168 WIGHT, DENMAN BARTLETT. Androscoggin 
River Valley: gateway to the White Mountains. 

Rutland, Vt.: Charles E. Tuttle, 1967. 561p. MWA. -i- 4177 

In Maine and New Hampshire. 



. The Wild River wilderness. Littleton, N.H.: 

Courier Printing, 1971. 158p. MWA. + 

In Maine and New Hampshire. 

WIKOFF, JEROLD. "Jerold Wikoff 
historically." Valley News [Lebanon, N.H.] (July 21, 
1981-Aug. 31, 1982; Sept. 28, 1982-Jan. 4, 1983; Feb. 
15-Apr. 19, 1983). 

Series of weekly newspaper articles, dealing with 
the history of the Cormecticut River Valley area near 
Lebanon. 

4171 . The upper valley: an illustrated tour along 

the Cormecticut River before the twentieth century. 
Chelsea, Vt.: Chelsea Green Publishing, 1985. 192p. 
MB. -I- 

In New Hampshire and Vermont. 

4172 WILSON, GRANVILLE PAYSON. Pioneers of 

the Magalloway from 1820 to 1904. Old Orchard, Me., 
1918. 64p. MWA. -h 
In Maine and New Hampshire. 

4173 WRIGHT, HARRY ANDREW. "Some vagaries in 
Connecticut Valley Indian place-names." NEQ, 12 
(Sept. 1939), 535-544. 

SEE specific rivers and river valleys in Index for 
additional listings. 



ISLES OF SHOALS (MAINE AND NEW HAMPSHIRE) 

4174 BIGELOW, E. VICTOR. Brief history of the 
Isles of Shoals off Portsmouth, New Hampshire. 

Lowell, Mass.: Congregational Summer Conference, Star 
Island, 1923. 72p. NhHi. -i- 

4175 BREWSTER, LEWIS W. Historical souvenir 

of the Isles of Shoals, prepared for the New Hampshire 
Weekly Publisher Association on the occasion of their 
visit to Star Island in 1905. (1905) Rev. cd. 

Portsmouth, N.H.: Pr. of Arthur G. Brewster, 1910. 

34p. MeU. -I- 

4176 CORNISH, LOUIS C. The story of the Isles 

of Shoals: an address first delivered on Star Island, 

July 15, 1916, upon the occasion of the twentieth 
anniversary of the Unitarian summer meetings, and 
repeated on the thirtieth armiversary in 1926; 
rewritten and delivered on the fortieth anniversary, 

July 26, 1936. Boston: Beacon Pr., n.d. 47p. 

NhHi. -t- 

"A DESCRIPTION and historical account of 
the Isles of Shoals." MHSC, 7 (1801), 242-261. 



198 



Geographical Areas of New England 



4178 

4179 

4180 

4181 

4182 

4183 

4184 

4185 

4186 

4187 

4188 

4189 



OTHER 4198 



GAGE. WILLIAM LEONARD. The Isles of 
Shoals in summer time. Hartford, Conn.: Case, 
Lockwood & Brainard, 1875. 24p. NhHi. + 

Includes historical sketch. 

THE ISLES of Shoals from the beginning, 
n.p., n.d. 16p. NhHi. + 

JENNESS, JOHN SCRIBNER. The Isles of 
Shoals: an historical sketch. 2d ed. N.Y.: Hurd 
and Houghton, 1875. 214p. NhHi. + 

Reprinted 1975. 

LAIGHTON, CEDRIC. Letters to Celia: 
written during the years 1860-1875 to Celia Laighton 
Thaxter by her brother Cedric Laighton. Frederick T. 
McGill, ed. Boston: Star Island Foundation, 1972. 

XV, 167p. NhPoA. + 

Isles of Shoals. 

LAIGHTON, OSCAR. Ninety years at the 
Isles of Shoals. Andover, Mass., 1929. v, 167p. 
NhPoA. + 

MONTEGU, M. TZL. Ancient and modem 
Isles of Shoals: from their first discovery to the 
present time. Boston: G. Alex Emery, 1872. 36p. 
NhHi. 

MOORE. AUBERTINE WOODWARD. 'The story of 
the Isles of Shoals." NEM, n.s. 18 (July 1898), 519- 
536. 

NEW HAMPSHIRE. UNIVERSITY. DURHAM. ART 
GALLERIES. A stem and lonely scene: a visual 
history of the Isles of Shoals; University Art 
Galleries, University of New Hampshire. Durham, N.H., 
1978. 143p. NhHi. + 

PAGE, ESTELLE JANE. 'Neighbors: New 
Hampshire and Maine— the Isles of Shoals." New York 
Folklore Quarterly, 8 (Summer 1952), 143-152. 

PENROSE, CHARLES. "They live on a rock 
in the sea!" The Isles of Shoals in colonial days. 

N.Y.: Newcomen Society in North America, 1957. 48p. 
MeU. 

RANDALL, PETER E. All creation and the 

Isles of Shoals. Camden, Me.: Down East Books, 1980. 

71p. MeU. -I- 

RUTLEDGE, LYMAN V. The Isles of Shoals 
in lore and legend. Barre, Mass.: Barre Publishers, 

1965. xii, 210p. MWA. -i- 



4190 . Ten miles out: guide book to the Isles of 

Shoals, Portsmouth, New Hampshire. (1949) 4th ed. 
Boston: Isles of Shoals Unitarian Association, 1964. 
vii. 85. [13]p. NhHi. + 

Includes historical sketch. 

4191 THAXTER, CELIA LAIGHTON. Among the Isles 

of Shoals. (1873) Bowie, Md.: Heritage Books, 1978. 
188p. NhPoA. -t- 

4192 TUTTLE, CHARLES W. "The Isles of Shoals 

in the year 1653." NEHGR, 25 (Apr. 1871), 162-164. 

SEE "Isles of Shoals" in Index for additional 
listings. 



OTHER 

4193 BANKS, CHARLES EDWARD. "Martha's 

Vineyard and the Province of Maine." Maine Historical 
Society, Collections, 2 ser. 9 (1898), 123-127. 

4194 BIGELOW, JACOB. An old account of Mt. 

Washington. A word upon its insect life. A word on 
Mt. Katahdin. Bar Harbor, Me.: Wild Gardens of 
Acadia, [1918?]. 33p. DLC. -t- 

4195 BLANCHARD, FESSENDEN SEA VER. Block 
Island to Nantucket: Narragansett and Buzzard bays. 
Block Island, Vineyard and Nantucket sounds. 
Princeton, N.J.: D. Van Nostrand, 1961. xiv, 253p. 
MWA.-h 

Includes historical sketches. 

4196 CLAYTON. BARBARA, and KATHLEEN WHITLEY. 
Exploring coastal New England, Gloucester to 
Kennebunkport. N.Y.: Dodd, Mead, 1979. xi, 276p. 
MB. + 

Includes historical information. 

4197 THE FRIENDLY mountains: Green, White, 
and Adirondacks. Roderick Peattie, ed. N.Y.: 

Vanguard Pr., 1942. xii, 341p. MWA. + 

4198 GATHERED sketches from the early history 

of New Hampshire and Vermont: containing vivid and 
interesting account of a great variety of the 
adventures of our forefathers, and of other incidents 
of olden time. Original and selected. Francis Chase, 
ed. Claremont, N.H.: Tracy, Kenney, 1856. 21 5p. 
MWA.-h 



199 



New England: A Bibliography of Its History 



4199 OTHER 



4199 GILMORE, ROBERT CREIGHTON. "Connecticut 
and the foundation of Vermont." Ph.D. disser 
Yale Univ., 1953. 145p. Ct. 

Abstracted in DAI, 30, No. 4A (1969), 1496. 

4200 HAMMOND, OTIS GRANT. "The Mason tide 
and its relations to New Hampshire and Massac 
AASP, n.s. 26 (Oct. 1916), 245-263. 

4201 HILL, RALPH NADING. Yankee kingdom: 
Vermont and New Hampshire. (1960) Updated e 
Woodstock, Vt.: Countryman Pr., 1984. 338p. 

4202 JILLSON, CLARK. Address on New Hampshire 
and Vermont: their unions, secessions and 
dissensions. Worcester, Mass., 1882. 40p. 

4203 KING, ALLEN L. "Hitchcock's relief maps 

of New Hampshire and Vermont.” Dartmouth Col 
Library Bulletin, 25 (Apr. 1985), 101-104. 

Charles H. Hitchcock (1870s). 

4204 LIND, GENEVIEVE R. "Nineteenth-century 
cadastral maps of New Hampshire and Vermont." 
Dartmouth College Library Bulletin, n.s. 9(1 
1969), 20-28. 

4205 MORROW, RISING LAKE. Connecticut 
influences in western Massachusetts and Vermo 
Haven, Corm.: Yale Univ. Pr. for Connecticut 
Tercentenary Commission, 1936. 22p. Ct. -i- 

4206 MORSE,' ALLEN. "Coimecticut and Vermont 
town names." Vermont History, 12 (Oct. 1954) 
278. 



4207 ROSSITER, WILLIAM SIDNEY. 'Three 
sentinels of the north." Atlantic Monthly, 1 
1923), 87-97. 

Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont. 

4208 SHEA, PETER. "A new and accurate map of 
Philip's Grant." Vermont History, 53 (Winter 
36-42. 

1796 Indian grant to 3,000 square miles in 
New Hampshire, Vermont, and Canada. 

4209 SHERMAN, ANDREW M. "Historic New England 
towns revisited, or back on my native heath." 
Americana, 8 (Jan. 1913), 29-56; (Feb. 1913), 
(Mar. 1913), 227-254; (Apr. 1913), 321-342. 

4210 TWINEM, LEONARD. "Salisbury-birthplace 
of Vermont." Lure of the Litchfield Hills, 4 
1932), 3-4, 20-27. 

Salisbury, Corm., and the early history of 

4211 WOODROW, ARTHUR D. Metallak, the last of 
the Cooashaukees; with the life of David Robb 
story of Molly Ockett, the adventures of Lieu 
and the killing of the last moose. Rumford, 
Rumford Publishing, 1928. 103p. NhHi. 

Maine and New Hampshire. 

4212 WYATT, SOPHIA HAYES. Autobiography of a 
landlady of the old school. Boston: [Wright 
Hasty], 1854. iv, 284p. MWA. -t- 

Rocollections of Dover, N.H., and other pla 
New England. 



200 



Index 



This index includes authors, editors, and compilers, as well as subjects and places. The references are to entry numbers, not pages. 
Library of Congress subject headings have usually been preferred. If there is a bibliography for a particular subject, it is listed first 
and is separated from other entry numbers by a semicolon. We provide vital dates and other data to distinguish persons with 
identical names. General works of regional history are listed under "New England-histories." 

We alphabetize word by word rather than letter by letter (New England before Newberry). Corporate authors divided by a period 
(such as New Hampshire. State Library) precede names of institutions not so divided (such as New Hampshire Historical Society). 

Users of this work will find additional listings for many subjects in other volumes of the Bibliographies of New England History. 
These include the six state bibliographies (Volumes 1-6 in the series) and Volume 8, which updates the state bibliographies 
through 1987, with additional listings for 1988 and early 1989. 



Aaron, Daniel, 3184 
Abbott, Collamer M., 1263, 1606 
Abbott, Jacob, 136 
Abbott, John Stevens Cabot, 509 
Abbott, Katharine Mixer, 2551-2552 
Abbott, Moreton, 3185 
Abbott, Orville Lawrence, 3462-3463 
Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Folk Art Collection, 
Williamsburg, Va., 2736 

Abenaki Indians, 487-488, 954, 965, 1024, 1054- 
1055 

Abolitionists, see Antislavery 

Abrams, Richard M., 1402 

Academies, see Private schools 

Acadia (Colony), 483, 507, 916, 1129, 1165 

Acadians, 458 

Accidents (see also Disasters), 1568, 1672, 3716 

Acheson, James M., 1334 

Ackerman, Edward Augustus, 1335 

Ackerman, Phyllis, 2840 

Adair, John, 316 

Adams, Abigail Smith, 34 

Adams, Amos, 510 

Adams, Charles Francis, Jr. (1835-1915), 575, 
2164 



Adams, Elizabeth L., 511, 576 

Adams, George Jones, 2096 

Adams, Haimah, 88-89 

Adams, Henry, 747 

Adams, Herbert Baxter, 137-138 

Adams, James Truslow, 317, 577-578, 714 

Adams, John (1735-1826), 737 

Adams, John (1772-1863), 2454 

Adams, John Phillips, 1776, 2841, 4144 

Adams, John Quincy, 579 

Adams, John R., 3186-3187 

Adams, John W., 887-888 

Adams, Nehemiah, 2090 

Adams, Randolph G., 580 

Adams, Samuel Hopkins, 715 

Adams family, 2627 

Adirondack Mountains (New York), 4197 
Adler, Allen, 3999 
Advertising, 3851 

Africa, 1453— trade with, 1411, 1436, 1452 
Afro-Americans, see Blacks 
Aged, 3196, 3559 
Agger, Lee, 25 

Agricultural education, 1299-1300 



201 



Index 



Agricultural reform, 1299-1300 
Agricultural societies, 1299-1300 
Agriculture (see also Farm life; Farms and 
farming; Livestock), 1316; 824, 950, 957-958, 
975, 1045-1046, 1083, 1234-1236, 1259, 1265, 
1271, 1277, 1280, 1294, 1297, 1299-1300, 1302- 
1306, 1310-1312, 1314-1315, 1320, 1325-1328, 
1331-1333, 2096, 2547, 2631-2632, 3599-3600, 
3679-3680, 3769, 3772 
Abeam, Marie L., 3841 
Ahlstrom, Sydney E., 2322, 3370 
Akagi, Roy Hidemichi, 581 
Akers, Charles, 3188 
Albanese, Catherine L., 3351 
Albee, John, 3490, 3602 
Albert, Dave, 1633 
Albert, Renaud S ., 1 1 44, 3151 
Albertson, Dean, 318 
Albertson, Frank, 3952 
Albion, Robert Greenhalgh, 1290, 1403 
Alchemy, 3839 

Alcott, Amos Bronson, 3340, 3354, 3619 
Alcott, Louisa May, 34, 3314 
Alderman, Clifford Lindsey, 2553 
Aldrich, Mark, 1550 
Alexander, Edward P., 2554 
Alexis, Gerhard T., 3352 
Algonkian Indians, 950 
Alienation, 3238 

Allegheny College, Meadville, Pa., 3520 

Allen, C. F. H., 1634 

Allen, David Grayson, 614 

Allen, E. John B„ 4000-4002 

Allen, Edward B., 2737 

Allen, Everett S., 3777 

Allen, Fanny, 2350 

Allen, Jay, 1777 

Allen, Joseph Henry, 1880 

Allen, Nathan, 889 

Allen, Richard Sanders, 1607, 2555-2558 
Allen, Rowland Hussey, 582 
Allen, Ruth Howard, 1264 
Allis, Marguerite, 4135 
Allmendinger, David F., Jr., 2495-2497 
Almanacs, 6; 764, 3108, 3490, 3501, 3505, 3509, 
3891 

Almy and Brown, Providence, R.I., 1535 
Alper, Thelma M. G., 3725 
Alphonse, Alford Wesley, 2321 
Alswang, Hope, 2927 
Amaral, Pat, 1194 

American Association of Museums. New England 
Branch. Art Section, 2738 
American Board of Commissioners for Foreign 
Missions, 2091-2092 
American Historical Company, Inc., 26 
American Historical Society, Inc., 27 
American Institute of Instruction, 2436 
American Intercollegiate Football Association, 

4010 



American Ladies Magazine, 3553 

American Numismatic Society, 1373 

American Revolution, see Revolution, American 

American Woolen Company, Boston, 1457 

Americanus [pseud.], 319 

Ames, Fisher, 748 

Amesbury, Mass., 1678, 2629 

Amesbury Branch Railroad (Massachusetts), 1716 

Amherst, Mass., 3238, 3280 

Amherst College, Amherst, Mass., 3792 

Amon, Marie Celine, 2427 

Amusements, 2473, 3628 

Anatomy— study and teaching, 3763 

Ancram, N.Y., 4119 

Anctil, Pierre, 1111-1114 

Anderson, Donald Norton, 1458 

Anderson, Fred Wayne, 512 

Anderson, Joseph, 2196 

Anderson, Letty, 139 

Anderson, Marcia J., 3066 

Anderson, Peter, 3778 

Anderson, Philip James, 2323 

Anderson, Richard F., 3726-3727 

Anderson, Richard L., 1981 

Anderson, Terry Lee, 1230-1233, 1261 

Anderson, Virginia DeJohn, 320-321 

Anderson, William Pinkney, Jr., 840 

Andover, Mass., 2004, 2454, 2464, 3843 

Andover Theological Seminary, Andover, Mass., 

2004, 3375 

Andres, Glenn M., 2559 
Andrew, John Alfred IB, 2091-2092 
Andrews, Charles McLean, 583, 1374 
Andrews, Edward Deming, 2324 
Andrews, Henry N., 1635 
Andrews, Horace, Jr., 3953 
Andrews, Matthew Page, 322 
Andrews, Wayne, 2560 
Andrews, William D., 3779 

Andros, Edmund, 195, 576, 592, 603, 695-696, 1375 
Androscoggin River Valley (Maine and New 
Hampshire), 4151, 4158, 4168 
Anecdotes and facetiae, 3708, 3717, 3719, 3883 
Anglicans, see Churches, Episcopal 
Animals (see also Dogs; Livestock), 397 
Anthony, Adam, 2387 
Anthropology, 990 
Anti-Catholicism, see Nativism 
Antimasonic Party, 761 

Antinomianism, 1887, 1906, 1916-1917, 1926, 1932, 
1937-1938, 1941, 2020, 2184, 2206, 2313, 3124 
Antiques (see also Art and artists; Collectors 
and collecting; Furniture; specific arts and 
crafts), 2916, 2937 

Antislavery (see also Blacks; Slave trade; 

Slavery), 167, 778, 781, 1108, 2007, 2033, 

2058, 2068, 2086, 3008, 3036, 3247, 3253, 

3305, 3348, 3538, 3555, 3953-3961, 3965-3970, 
3972-3975, 3977-3978, 3981-3983, 3986, 3988- 
3989, 3992, 3995, 3997-3998 



202 



Index 



Antoine, Clement, 1183 
Apes, William, 935, 1017 
Appalachian Mountain Club, 4009, 4016 
Appalachian Trail, 4009 
Appelbaum, Diana Karter, 3842 
Appleby, Joyce, 3353 
Appledore Island, Kittery, Me., 3314 
Apples, 1319 
Appleton, John, 716 
Appleton, Marguerite, 584 
Appleton, Thomas Gold, 3356 
Appleton, William Sumner, 2561-2562 
Apprenticeship, 1555, 2470, 2534 
Archaeology, 111-113, 1035; 109-135, 969, 985, 
987, 1007, 1057-1058, 1079-1080, 1087- 
historical, 109-112, 114, 118-119, 121, 124, 
126-127, 129-132, 134, 309, 1067, 1630, 2406, 
2711, 2871, 3776— prehistoric, 117, 133, 937, 
966-967, 970, 972-974, 976, 978-980, 982-984, 
986, 988, 990, 999-1000, 1002-1003, 1008-1009, 
1011-1012, 1015, 1021-1022, 1025, 1027, 1031- 
1032, 1034, 1036-1037, 1039-1040, 1042-1043, 
1048-1049, 1056, 1059, 1061-1063, 1065, 1069- 
1070, 1074, 1088 

Archdiocese of Boston, see Boston, Archdiocese of 
(Roman Catholic) 

Archer, J. Clark, 841 
Archer, Richard Lee, 717 
Architects and architecture (see also 
Architecture, domestic; Church architecture; 

Historic buildings), 2549; 1626, 2559-2561, 

2563, 2565-2566, 2574, 2576-2577, 2582, 2584, 
2588, 2590, 2592, 2594, 2598, 2604, 2608-2614, 
2619, 2625, 2629, 2634-2635, 2638, 2654-2655, 
2657-2659, 2662-2663, 2666, 2675-2677, 2680- 
2681, 2686-2687, 2692, 2694, 2700-2706, 2709- 
2710, 2715, 2719, 2721-2726, 2731, 2738, 2820, 
3551 

Architectural books, 2584 
Architecture, domestic (see also Historic 
houses), 2565, 2576, 2579-2582, 2584-2585, 

2587, 2589, 2591, 2602, 2605, 2609, 2611, 2616- 
2617, 2620-2622, 2629-2632, 2635, 2641, 2647, 
2649, 2651-2652, 2656, 2660-2661, 2666, 2668- 
2669, 2672, 2674, 2682-2683, 2689-2690, 2694- 
2695, 2701, 2708, 2710, 2716-2717, 2721, 2727, 
2729-2730, 2732-2733, 2927, 3682 
Architecture, Federal, 2559, 2687 
Architecture, Georgian, 2701 
Architecture, Gothic Revival, 265 1 
Architecture, Greek Revival, 2694, 2724 
Architecture, Victorian, 2611 
Archives (see also Public records), 695, 1 104, 

1410 

Aristocracy, 604 
Armbruster, Eugene L., 936 
Arminianism, 1904, 2310 
Armstrong, Donald, 1636 
Armstrong, John Borden, 2 
Armstrong, Maurice Whitman, 3(X)1 



Amell, W illiam, 1115 
Arnold, Allan A., 1404 
Arnold, Dexter Philip, 1551 
Arnold, Matthew, 3314 
Arnold, Nason H., 140 

Art, decorative (see also Interior decoration), 

2549; 789, 2550, 2569, 2612, 2660, 2689, 2840, 
2847, 2853, 2876, 2887, 2890, 2893, 2898-2900, 
2903, 2919, 2922-2924, 2927, 2931, 2937, 2939, 
2944, 2947, 2951, 2961, 2974 
Art and artists (see also Art schools; Landscape 
painters and landscape paintings; Portrait 
painters and portrait paintings), 2970; 19, 

246, 499, 882, 955, 981, 2540, 2542-2546, 

2550, 2703, 2736-2740, 2743-2748, 2753, 2756, 
2758-2763, 2766-2768, 2770, 2772-2779, 2783- 
2784, 2787, 2789-2793, 2798, 2802-2803, 2806- 
2808, 2811, 2813-2815, 2817, 2819-2824, 2828, 
2830, 2832-2836, 2838, 2852, 2859, 2873, 2896, 
2903, 2906, 2909, 2932, 2935, 2966, 2968-2969, 
2971, 2975-2977, 2979-2981, 2984-2989, 2991, 
2995-2998, 3000, 3085, 3110, 3349, 3912, 4015, 
4185 

Art schools, 2542 

Articles of Confederation, 790 

Artillery sermons, 676, 1970 

Artisans (see also specific crafts and trades), 

33, 1468, 1553, 1573, 1595, 1601-1602, 2470, 
2534, 2540, 2547-2548, 2609, 2879, 3576 
Arvin, Newton, 3189 
Ashby, Mass., 2771 
Ashfield, Mass., 1425 
Ashley, Clifford Warren, 1336 
Ashman, Robert I., 1321 
Ashurst family, 665 
Askowith, Hyman, 292 
Association Canado-Americaine, 1176 
Assumption College, Worcester, Mass. French 
Institute. Fourth Annual Conference (1983), 

3534 

Assumption College, Worcester, Mass. French 
Institute. Second Annual Conference (1981), 

1116 

Assumption College, Worcester, Mass. French 
Institute. Third Armual Conference (1982), 

1117 

Astro, Richard, 3070 

Astronomy, 958, 3796, 3801, 3813, 3829 

Atack, Jeremy, 1265 

Athletics, see Sports; specific sports 

Atkins, Gaius Glerm, 2197 

Attleboro, Mass., 4108, 4112 

Attorneys, see Lawyers 

Audubon, John James, 2823 

Auger, Roland, 1118 

Augustana Evangelical Lutheran Church. New 
England Conference, 2326 
Aurora borealis, 3801 
Austin, George L., 3190 
Australia, 1421 



203 



Index 



Authors (see also Literary history and criticism; 
Poets and poetry), 3317; 41, 46, 69, 76, 142, 

175, 184, 242, 289, 772, 959, 1497, 1959, 

2008, 2038, 2045-2046, 2060, 2067, 2168, 2173, 
2336, 2859, 2872, 3071-3072, 3074, 3077, 3079- 
3081, 3084, 3089, 3093, 3096-3097, 3100-3101, 
3107, 3109, 3112, 3117-3118, 3130, 3147-3148, 
3153, 3158, 3164, 3174-3175, 3178, 3183, 3185- 
3187, 3191-3193, 3195-3207, 3209-3223, 3225- 
3226, 3228-3233, 3236-3244, 3247, 3249-3250. 
3253, 3258-3260, 3262-3266, 3269-3279, 3281- 
3283, 3286, 3290-3292, 3294, 3296-3297, 3299- 
3301, 3304-3324, 3327-3333, 3335-3337, 3339- 
3344, 3346-3349, 3353, 3356, 3365, 3371, 3377- 
3378, 3382, 3396, 3400, 3411-3412, 3415, 3434, 
3438, 3442-3446, 3449, 3494, 3532, 3553, 3647, 
3671, 3690. 3692. 3722, 3738, 3960, 3965, 

3977, 3984, 3991, 3995, 4043, 4058, 4061, 
4092.4181 

Automobiles. 1500, 1642, 1663, 4018, 4051 

Averill, Esther C., 3191 

Avery, Amos Geer, 2842 

Aviation (see also Aircraft industry), 61, 1844, 

1848, 1851 
Axtell, James, 2428 
Ayer, Sarah Newman Connell, 3843 
Aylmer, Kevin J., 1778 
Ayres, Harral, 323-324 
Ayres, Philip W., 1266 
Azoreans, 902, 1194 

Babcock, C. Merton, 1982 
Babcock, H. L., 1405 

Backus, Isaac, 1853-1854, 1983, 2014-2015, 2023, 
2034, 2053,2327, 2419 
Backus, M. E., 3844 
Bacon, Benjamin Wisner, 1984 
Bacon, Coriime, 718 

Bacon, IDolores, see Bacon, Mary Schell Hoke 

Bacon, Edwin Munroe, 141-142, 4136 

Bacon, Henry, 2820 

Bacon. Leonard (1802-1881), 2198 

Bacon, Leonard Woolsey, 585, 3954 

Bacon, Margaret Hope, 3955 

Bacon, Martha, 3074 

Bacon, Mary Schell Hoke, 2199 

Badger, Joseph, 2739 

Baehr, George Bernard, Jr., 1637 

Bagby, George W„ 4045 

Bagg, Lyman Hotchkiss, 4003 

Bagnall, William R., 1459 

Bahr, Betsy W„ 2563 

Bailey, Jacob, 4036 

Bailyn, Bernard, 1406-1408, 1985 

Bainton, Roland Herbert, 1855 

Baird, Edward G., 586 

Baker, Andrew H.. 719, 1267, 2752 

Baker, Charlotte Alice, 513-514 

Baker, George Claude, Jr., 2328 

Baker, George Pierce. Jr., 1638-1640 



Baker, Mary Ellen, 3 
Baker, Muriel L., 2843 
Baker, Norman B., 2564 
Baker, Robert H., 1779 
Baker, Vernon G., 109 
Baker, William Avery, 1403, 1780 
Baker, William H., 1460 
Balazs, Janie Sacks, 2450 
Baldwin, Alice Mary, 720-721 
Baldwin, Ernest H., 325, 587, 722 
Baldwin, Jabez, 1603 
Baldwin, Jedidiah, 1603 
Baldwin, Lewis Morse II, 3075 
Baldwin, Owen, 3728 
Baldwin, Simeon Eben, 143, 4107 
Baldwin, Thomas, 2134 
Ballads, 3019, 3026, 3030-3031, 3046 
Ballou, Hosea (1771-1852). 1986, 1997-1998. 2054, 
2080 

Ballou, Maturin M., 1986 
Ballou, Richard Boyd, 2451 
Bandel, Betty, 3002 
Banfield, Walter, 4022 
Bangor, Me., 3403 
Bank notes, see Money 

Banks, Charles Edward, 28, 326-327, 441, 4193 
Banks and banking, 31, 1249, 1378-1380, 1383, 
1385-1386, 1395, 1397, 1399-1401 
Bannister, Edward M., 2828 
Baptists, see Churches, Baptist 
Bar Harbor, Me., 3845 
Barbeau, Marius, 515 
Barber, Daniel, 2350 
Barber, Horace, 2350 
Barber, James, 723 
Barber, Jerusha, 2350 
Barber, John Warner, 90-91 
Barber, Laurence Luther, Jr., 144 
Barber, Russell J., 937, 1037 
Bardwell, John D., 1641 
Barker, Creighton, 3729 
Barker, Shirley, 29 

Barnard, Henry, 2434, 2438, 2440, 2446, 2452 

Barnes, Viola Florence, 588-589 

Bams, Everett, 1781 

Bams. Harold W., Jr.. 1320 

Bams, 2631-2632, 2668, 2732-2733 

Barnstable County, Mass., 1754 

Baron, William R., 1320, 3780-3781 

Barr, Lockwood Anderson, 2844 

Barratt, Joseph, 938 

Barrett, Richmond. 3845 

Barrett, T. Gail, 1007 

Barrington, R.I., 1864, 4108, 4111-4112 

Barry, Louise, 3956-3957 

Barry, Phillips, 3003 

Bartlett, Albert L., 842 

Bartlett, Irving H.. 724-725, 2093 

Bartlett, Stuart, 2565 

Barton, Boiuiie, 328-329 



204 



Index 



Bascom, Ruth Henshaw, 2771 
Baskets, 2845 
Bassett, John Spencer, 726 
Bassett, Sara Ware, 330 
Bassett, Thomas Day Seymour, 12 
Bastian, Maurice, 4037 
Batchelder, Austin I., 1856 
Batchelder, Samuel, 1461 
Batchelder, Samuel F., 3464 
Batchelders Grant, Me., 4169 
Batchellor, Mary, 3283 
Batchellor, Stephen, 3283 
Bateman, Fred, 1265 
Bates, Elizabeth Ballister, 727 
Bates, Ernest Sutherland, 1987 
Bates, Frank G., 145 
Bates, Virginia T., 2846 

Baxter, James Phinney, 146-147, 293, 331-333, 458 

Baxter, Maurice, 728 

Baxter, Norman Allen, 2329-2330 

Bay Path, 4060 

"Bay Psalm book," 86 

Bayley, Frank W., 2739 

Bazeley, W. A. L., 1268 

Beal, J. Holland, 4004 

Beale, Joseph H., 590 

Beales, Ross Worn, Jr., 1316, 2135, 3603-3604, 
3620 

Beals, Carleton, 148, 2094 
Beam, Philip Conway, 2740 
Bean, William Gleason, 1195 
Bean's Purchase, N.H., 4169 
Beardsley limner (artist), 2825 
Beasley, Norman, 1988, 2331 
Beattie, Mollie, 1269 
Beaudoin, Lionel, 1989 
Beaudry, Mary C., 110 
Beaulieu, Henry A., 1742 
Beauregard, Mark W., 2567 
Becker, Laura L., 3(X)4 
Becker, Mary Lambertson, 3709 
Beebe, David Lewis, 1881 
Beecher, Catharine Esther, 2448, 4092 
Beecher, Edward, 2173 
Beecher, Henry Ward, 3618 
Beecher, Lyman, 1954, 1990, 2010, 2016, 2021, 
2083,2169,2173, 3989 

Beecher family, 69, 76, 2168-2169, 2173, 3266, 
3618, 4092 
Beehives, 135 
Beer, 3673 

Beffel, John N., 3782 

Beinfield, Malcolm Sydney, 3730 

Belisle, Alexandre, 3535 

Belknap, Jeremy, 772, 3220, 3443-3446, 3449 

Belknap, W. Phoenix, 2741 

Belknap, Zedediah, 2804 

Bell, Donald, 1579 

Bell, John J., 149 

Bell, Margaret, 150 



Bell, Michael Davitt, 3192-3193 
Bell, Susan Cherry, 3433 
Bellantoni, Nicholas F., 1016 
Bellingham, Mass., 3602 
Bellink, Alan, 2638 
Bellomont, Earl of, see Coote, Richard 
Bellows, Robert P., 2568 
Bellows Falls [Vt.] Times (newspaper), 4137 
Bender, Prosper, 1120-1121 
Benedict, Erastus Cornelius, 335 
Benes, Peter, 2537, 2569-2572, 2847-2848, 2966- 
2968, 4038 

Benjamin, Asher, 2584, 2687 

Bennett, Fordyce Richard, 3354 

Bennett, Granville G., 336 

Bennett, John E., 151 

Beiuiett, Merrill Kelley, 939 

Bennett, Norman R., 1436 

Bennett, Randall H., 729 

Bennington, Vt., 2726— Battle of (1777), 815 

Bennington [Vt.] Garden Club, 3684 

Bennington College, Bennington, Vt., 2625 

Benoit, J. T., 1183 

Benoit, Josaphat, 1119 

Benson, Allan Louis, 730 

Benson, Keith R., 3783 

Benton, Josiah Henry, 152 

Benton, Robert Milton, 1946, 3784 

Bercovitch, Sacvan, 1882, 1947, 2200, 3434 

Bergengren, Charles, 2969 

Bergin, Thomas G., 4005-4006 

Bergstrom, E. Alexander, 591 

Berkeley, George, 2072, 2627 

Berkeley, William, 571 

Berkshire County, Mass., 1680, 2552, 4119 

Berlin, N.H., 4001 

Bermuda, 314, 941 

Bernard, Francis, 672 

Bernard, Joel, 3958 

Bernard!, John Lawrence, Jr., 1409 

Bernhard, Virginia Purington, 2201 

Bemheim, Marc, 3605 

Bernstein, Melvin Herbert, 1250 

Bethel, Me., 729, 4211 

Beveridge, Lowell P., 3005 

Beverly, Elaine M., 4138 

Beverly, Mass., 68 

Bible, 1876, 2106, 2211, 2259-criticism, 1857, 
1895-1896, 2219 

Bibliographies, 1-24, 111-113, 250, 472, 501, 
845, 858, 1004-1005, 1013, 1073, 1111-1112, 
1138, 1145, 1179, 1270, 1316, 1410, 1563, 
2041, 2549, 2573, 2970, 3096, 3122, 3317, 
3453, 3494, 3510, 3620, 3675, 3779, 3818, 
4089, 4091, 4123 

Bibliographies of New England History series, 2 
Bicknell, Thomas Williams, 337, 2453 
Bicycling, see Cycling 
Bidwell, Percy Wells, 890, 1234-1235, 1271 
Bigelow, E. Victor, 4174 



205 



Index 



Bigelow, Jacob, 4194 
"Bigelow papers," 3473 
Bilingualism, 3481 
Billings, T.H.,2136 
Billings, William, 3032 
Billington, Louis, 1991 

Biography, collected, 25-87, 148, 150, 158, 227, 
240, 256, 258, 338, 418, 423, 562, 826, 860, 

935, 942, 1033, 1091, 1140, 1154, 1159, 1194, 
1197, 1206, 1539, 1985, 2031, 2037, 2061, 2079- 
2080, 2165, 2168-2169, 2195, 2241, 2283, 2380, 
2512, 2739, 2787, 2821, 2878, 3017, 3033, 3072- 
3074, 3096, 3132, 3135, 3164, 3174, 3178, 

3298, 3300, 3313, 3342, 3402, 3412, 3451-3452, 
3523, 3532, 3535, 3759, 3820, 3874, 3927, 

3943, 3949, 3984,4137,4170 
Biology, 854, 3783 
Birds, 275 

Birdsall, Richard Davenport, 1883, 2137, 3355 

Bimey, James Gillespie, 2361 

Birth control, 162 

Bisbee, Ernest Emerson, 3696 

Bischoff, Volker, 3356 

Bishop, Charles W., 1642 

Bishop, George, 2332 

Bishop, George W., Jr., 3536 

Bishop, Melvin T., 3764 

Bishop, Robert Charles, 2742-2743 

Bishops, 2072, 2084, 2335, 2627 

Bixby, Arthur M., Sr., 1643-1645 

Bixler, Herbert E., 1646 

Black, John Donald, 1236 

Black, Mary, 2744-2745 

Blackall, Frederick Steele, Jr., 1462 

Blackburn, Joseph, 2739 

Blackburn, Ruth M., 3465 

Blackington, Alton Hall, 3697-3698 

Blacks (see also Antislavery; Slave trade; 

Slavery), 202, 1091-1110, 1344, 1351, 1452, 

2105, 2482, 2828, 3074, 3096, 3148, 3445, 

3522, 3670, 3733 

Blacksmiths and blacksmithing, 1598 
Blackstone, William, 368, 381 
Blackstone Canal (Massachusetts and Rhode 
Island), 1791, 1794-1795, 1847 
Blackstone River Valley (Massachusetts and Rhode 
Island), 1847, 2634,4162 
Blaikie, Alexander, 2333 
Blais, Gerard D., Jr., 3731 
Blaisdell, Katharine, 4139 
Blake, Silas Leroy, 2202 
Blanc-Bentzon, Therese, 4069 
Blanchard, Fessenden Seaver, 153, 4195 
Blanchard, Theresa W., 4007 
Blandin, Amos N., 4(X)8 
Blawie, James Louis, 154-155 
Blawie, Marilyn, 155 
Bleaching, 1520 
Blejwas, Stanislaus A., 3076 
Blewett, Mary H., 1552-1553 



Bliss, Leonard, Jr., 4108 
Bliss, William Root, 3846 
Blizzards, 1709, 1828, 3790-3791, 3823, 3834, 
3840 

Block Island, see New Shoreham, R.I. 

Block Island Sound, 2618 
Blocker, R., 843 
Blodgett, Harold, 940 
Blood, Charles W., 4009 
Bloom, Jeanne Gould, 592 
Blouin, Francis Xavier, Jr., 891-892 
Blumenthal, Arma S., 3194 
Blunt, John S., 2742-2743, 2794 
Boarding schools, see Private schools 
Boardman, George Nye, 1884 
Boats and boating (see also Rowing), 1776, 1779- 
1780, 1787, 1801, 1820, 1841, 4004 
Bodfish, Joshua P., 1782 
Bodge, George Madison, 516 
Body snatchers, 3763 
Boeri, David, 1337 
Bogdonoff, Nancy Dick, 2849 
Boissevain, Ethel, 941 
Bolian, Charles E., 969 
Boiler, Paul F., 3357 
Bolte, M ary, 3699 
Bolton, Charles Knowles, 294, 338 
Bolton, Edith Stanwood, 339 
Bolton, Theodore, 2746 
Bonfanti, Leo, 517, 942 
Bonfield, Lynn A., 1554 
Bongartz, Roy, 156 
Bonney, Calvin Fairbanks, 3732 
Bonney, Harriott Cheney, 3732 
Bonney, Sherman Grant, 3732 
Bonyun, Bill, 3006 

Book collecting, 2662, 3182, 3492, 3494, 3506, 
3515, 3520 

Booksellers and bookselling, 3510, 3521, 3528, 
3531 

Booth, Alan R., 4039 
Booth, Earl Walter, 2538 
Booth, Philip, 3298 
Borchardt, Beatrice E., 3959 
Borden limner (artist), 2742 
Borgeaud, Charles, 157 
Bormarm, Pauline C., 3847 
Boms, Harold W., Jr., 943-944 
Bosco, Ronald Angelo, 1948 
Boston, Walter M., Jr., 2334 
Boston, Mass., 58, 69, 76, 190, 198, 244-245, 374- 
375, 378, 381, 427, 582, 598-599, 601, 607, 

811, 815, 835, 891-892, 1197, 1353, 1382, 

1529, 1573, 1595, 1603, 1649, 1709, 1714, 1725- 

1726, 1736, 1751, 1763, 1777, 1800, 1806, 

1825, 1845, 1863, 1912, 1938, 1949, 1954, 

1985, 1987, 1989-1990, 1992, 2003, 2008, 2010- 
2011, 2016, 2021, 2031, 2036, 2038, 2045-2047, 
2063, 2067, 2076, 2081, 2083, 2105, 2201, 

2212, 2236, 2246, 2283, 2306, 2486, 2521, 



206 



Index 



2595, 2648, 2662-2663, 2687, 2709, 2721, 2740, 
2742-2743, 2753, 2755-2756, 2769, 2782, 2784, 
2803, 2810-2811, 2815, 2818, 2828, 2830, 2972, 
3007, 3009, 3016, 3032, 3158, 3233, 3248, 

3297, 3371, 3403, 3416, 3431, 3443-3444, 3446- 
3447, 3449, 3494, 3522, 3531, 3541, 3553, 

3618, 3784, 3803, 3899, 3960, 3965, 3972, 

3974, 3989, 3998, 4050, 4056, 4058, 4078 
Boston, Mass. City Council, 1649 
Boston and Albany Railroad, 1 696 
Boston and Maine Railroad, 1402, 1433, 1576, 

1650, 1652, 1661, 1667-1669, 1671, 1674-1675, 
1690, 1698, 1701-1702, 1706, 1709, 1715-1716, 
1733, 1738, 1741-1742, 1744, 1761, 1770 
Boston and Maine Railroad Historical Society, 

1647, 1661 

Boston and Mount Desert Limited (train), 1648 
Boston and Providence Railroad, 1689, 1740 
Boston, Archdiocese of (Roman Catholic), 2335 
Boston Associates, 1473 
Boston, Concord and Montreal Railroad, 1664 
Boston Engine Terminal, 1668 
Boston, Hartford and Erie Railroad, 1636 
Boston Herald (newspaper), 3 1 
Boston Post Road, 1705, 1717, 1723 
Boston Public Library, 5, 1410 
Boston University. Community Sociology Training 
Program, 4109 
Boswell, Parley Ann, 1949 
Botany, 303, 3800, 3806, 3827-3828 
Botkin, Benjamin Albert, 3169 
Bottles, 2841, 2846 
Bottorff, William K., 731, 4040 
Botts, A. K., 1608 
Bouley, Charles Heiuy, 32 
Boulind, Richard, 340 

Boundaries, 261, 630, 682, 2568, 4107, 4110, 4114- 
4116, 4118, 4120, 4122-4124, 4127-4130, 4132- 
4134 

Bow, N.H., 3843 
Bowden, Martyn J., 2594 
Bowditch, Harold, 2747 

Bowdoin College, Brunswick, Me. Franco-American 
Institute, 1122 
Bowling, 4013, 4029 
Boyd, Richard Bruce, 2165 
Boydston, Jeanne, 1237, 4092 
Boyett, Gene W., 3559 
Boylston, Zabdiel, 3733 
Boynton, Percy H., 3077,