Skip to main content

Full text of "ABMAC bulletin"

See other formats


•H A 

A'BMAC 



PARTICIPATING IN 

affiliated with 







% 




VOL. VII, NoSo 1-2 



‘HUMANITY 





ictin 



UNITED CHINA RELIEF 

NATIONAL WAR FUND 



ABOVE ALL 1 



JANUARY-FFBRUARY 1945 



EMSTS DEFY ENEMY THREAT TO KWE I YANG 

KUNMING, CHINA - The staff of the 
Emergency Medical Service Training 
School remained at their posts while 
enemy troops threatened Kweiyang. At 
the order of the Kweichow Provincial 
Government, however, their families 
and students were evacuated. ABMAC 
has received the follovdng' letter 
from its Advisor, Lt. Gen„ Lim, tell- 
ing about these critical days. 




”1 left Chungking on 24 hours no- 
tice on December 12th and proceeded 
by truck with General Hsu Hsilin to 
Kweiyang. The truck was a commercial 
vehicle conscripted for the Amy and 
was in the last stages of decay. It 
took us five days to get to Kweiyang, 
a journey of 482 kilometers. Besides 
the driver there was a mechanic and a 
’human starter’, who did a very effi- 
cient job of cranking every time the motor 
stopped. On the last leg of the journey he 
served as a human carburetor; he sat on the 
right front mudguard and held a can of gas 
which he managed to drip into the carbure- 
tor 7 " fo r about'' fou r hours - the temperature 
was around zero.’ 



Surgical Unit from Medical Relief Corps 
Operates in Abandoned Temple 

Despite the dilapidated condition of most 
of the vehicles there were fewtrucks which 
did not move, or rather crawl. This then 
is the picture of the return of the Amy of 
. . jSqss cripte d T rucks which -h ad ruahod 
to the Tushan front. It was another Battle 
of the Marne, without the kid gloves and 
the glory. 



An Army of Conscripted Trucks 



"On the way down we passed hundreds of 
trucks of all descriptions, loaded to the 
top and beyond, and on top of crates, lug- 
gage, and all manner of goods were perched 
passengers shivering in the cold. These 
trucks were all coming north to Chungking; 
to hold their double and treble load of 
cargo and human freight; six-foot planks 
were inserted vertically along the sides 
of the truck body and roped precarionsly 
together so that the melee of matter and 
flesh w/ould not drop along the roadside. 



"We passed hundreds of soldiers on foot 
and were sorry indeed that the men had to 
march in such bitter weather. Strange to 
say, accompanying us were truck loads of 
horses and mules; verily, a horse is some- 
times more valuable than a man] The truck 
travelers looked a sorry sight but were 
not to be pitied, for they must have been 
very well off to have been able to afford 
truck travel. The poorer ones and students 
had to march. As we got nearer Kweiyang, 
the number of northbound trucks diminished 
(continued on page 8) . , 






Abmac Bulletin 



Issued by 

THE AMERICAN BUREAU FOR MEDICAL AID TO CHINA, 
1790 BROAO.AY, HEW TORK 19, n.Y. 

Participating in United China Relief 
Cooperating in National war Fund 



INC. 



MME. CHIANG KAI-SHEK 
Honorary Chairman 




HIS EXCELLENCY, DR. WEI TAO-MING 
HIS EXCELLENCY, OR. HU SHIH 
Honorary Presidents 



CONSUL-GENERAL TSUNE-CHI YU - Honorary Vice President 
OFFICERS 

DR. DONALD D. VAN SLYKE, PRESIDENT DR. MAURICE WILLIAM, 3RD VICE PRES-. 

LELAND REX ROBINSON, CHAIRMAN OF BOARD DONALD BROD IE. SECRETARY 
OR. CO TUI, 1ST VICE PRES. JOHN J. MARTIN, TREASURER 

DR. FKANK L. MELENEY. 2ND VICE PRES. WALTER U. PF IZENMAYER, ASST. TREAS. 



HERBERT L. DONALD, ASST. TREAS. 



HELEN KENNEDY STEVENS. EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR 



This Bulletin is issued bi-monthly for the benefit of our friends and contributors 
SUBSCRIPT I Oh, SI. 00 ver year 

editor TIT associate editor 

Charles w. ferguson _ nawv ruth, block 



LAND ROUTE TO CHINA OPENED 



ABMAC HOLDS WINTER BOARD MEETING 

Dr. Chiang Monlin, Chancellor of National 
Peking University, addressed the winter meet- 
ing of the ABMAC Board of Directors, held on 
February 6th. Dr. Chiang, who is President 
of the National Red Cross Society of China, 
described the work of that organization of 
which ABMAC is the American representative. 

Leland Rex Robinson presided, and reports 
were submitted by Chairmen of Standing Com- 
mittees. The audited statement for 1944 was 
presented. During that year $2,105,073 was 
transmitted to China, while $200,862 was ex- 
pended to purchase supplies here and ship 
them to China. 



The first convoy from India has arrived 
in China over the Ledo-Burma Road, breaking 
'trie three year Ianct bio create. ~ Flore tnan 
100 trucks, flying the Chinese and American 
flags, rolled into Kunming on February 4th. 
All the vehicles in this convoy will stay 
in China to alleviate the e’xtreme shortage 
of transport facilities. 

It would be a mistake to assume that a 
single land link with the outside world can 
solve China’s supply problem. The capacity 
of one mountain road is necessarily limited. 
It is doubtful whether heavy armaments can 
be transported over the new r highway. Not 
until ports are opened to our ships can the 
Chinese Army receive adequate equipment to 
launch a large-scale offensive. 

Nevertheless the road should do much to 
alleviate the situation in China. Already 
the War Transport Board is training 5,000 
drivers to man a constant stream of supply 
^Tnlcks . P r i o ri ty of ransporT will go" tcT" 

vital war equipment. However, this first 
convoy, in addition to ammunition, artil- 
lery pieces and jeeps, included ambulances. 
This gives ABMAC reason to hope that space 
will be reserved in future convoys for some 
of the medical supplies so urgently needed 
by the Chinese Army. 

Official Chinese health agencies, trans- 
mitting their requests for medical supplies 
and equipment to ABMAC, all expressed con- 
fidence that their needs could be met when 
the Ledo Road was opened. Plans have been 
made, therefore, to increase ABMAC shipments 
of such essential items as cannot conveni- 
ently be obtained through Lend-Lease. 



'C § 1 

ALLIED NATIONS FOR CHINA 

Mrs. Wadsworth Ramsay Smith of Vermont, 
raises money for China each New Year’s Day 
by selling chances on some treasured pos- 
' session. This year she raffled off six 
beautiful plates given to her grandmother 
long ago by a French diplomat. Mrs. Smith 
sent the proceeds to ABMAC , saying: 

"The day was awful (a real blizzard) but 
we had a pleasant afternoon. I enclose $30 
for medical relief. If the Chinese need 
help in 1946 we will draw for a lovely old 
Wedgewood pitcher. I have a bit of senti- 
ment about this - two years ago the Chinese 
mandarin coat; my ‘Tiffany soup-ladle from 
America last year; the plates from France 
this year, and a pitcher from England next 
year. Thus four allied nations will have 
given their bit for grand, suffering China." 

^ 1 

GOODWILL DINNER HONORS MARY CHU 

More than 100 friends of China assembled 
at the Port Arthur Restaurant in New York 
on January 10th to celebrate the seventh 
anniversary of the Chinese Goodwill Dinners. 
Joseph Vfei, one of the founders of ABMAC, 
was chairman. He paid tribute to the ini- 
tiative of Mrs. Mary Chu in starting these 
dinners in 1938 to raise funds for medical 
aid to the Chinese soldiers. These monthly 
dinners continue to attract large numbers 
of those who enjoy eating delicious Chinese 
food and hearing up-to-the-minute news of 
China. Dr. Cecilia Zung was the speaker at 
this anniversary celebration. 



mm 





THE KWE I YANG NURSING SCHOOL 
3y Carr i e Lu Lei 

KWE I YANG, CHINA - The Kveiyang Nursing 
School formally opened in September, 1942, 
when sponsorship came from ABMAC. Kv/eiyang 
Central Hospital was chosen as the practice 
hospital because of its competent medical 
personnel, high standing, and the facili- 
ties which it is able to offer the school. 

Nearly all of the staff hold concurrent 
positions in the hospital: the Principal 

acting as Superintendent, and the Dean a s 
Assistant Superintendent of Nurses. 

The Instructors and Business Mana- 
ger also hold concurrent positions 
in the hospital,, 

Our school has the use of two 
classrooms, a reading room and an 
office, formerly occupied by the 
Central Nursing School which had 
moved to Chungking in 1941. Dor- 
mitory space in the hospital was 
allotted to the first class of 18 
students. But when the class of 
1943 was admitted a temporary dor- 
mitory had to be erected on the 
hospital premises. This accommo- 
dates 30 students, 10 
to a room in double- 
decker beds. During 
the bitter cold winter 
months quite a few of 
the students "double- 
up" in their bunks be- 
cause they do not have 
sufficient bedding. 



There is no running 

water system. Water 
comes from the Nanming 
River which flows just 
past the hospital com- 
pound, and is carried 
in by servants. Each 
man carries two wooden 
buckets full of water 
hung from ropes, tied 
to a pole about five 
feet long. There are 
no washroom facilities 
in the dormitories so 
washing of faces and 



The 



Carrie Lu Lei and t 
Kweiyang Nu 



brushing of teeth must be done outside the 
dormitories „ The school and hospital are 
equipped with electricity, but the current 
is not strong which makes it difficult for 
our students who must study at night. 

Students must be single girls between 
the ages of 16 and 25, with good physique, 
sound health, high character, and possess- 
ing a certificate from a registered junior 
middle school. The course requires three 
years including a 10-week; probation period,. 
The curriculum conforms with regulations of 
the Ministry of Education. On graduating 
each student is subject to one-year's con- 
scription for government service, 
after which she is free to choose 
any hospital or institution. She 
receives her certificate on com- 
pleting t his y e a r ^ o f s e rvic e , 

Student's blue probation 
uniform is provided by the School 
and will be worn again when she 
is ready for public health field 
experience. As soon as she goes 
to the ward she is provided with 
two caps and three white uniforms 
with blue "Peter Pan" collar and 
cuffs. This variation from the 
traditional blue uniform with the 
white apron is made 
because ever since 
"Pearl Harbor" there 
has been a shortage 
of blue cloth. The v 
student buys her own 
shoes and stockings. 
It is now realized 
that we must permit 
her __to wea r s h oes_ o f 
any color as long as 
they are low-heeled. 
Many girls make their 
own shoes of left-over 
materials in place of 
leather with the soles 
of old cloth bound to- 
gether. Instead of 
stockings in summer, 
both for economy and 
comfort, she is per- 
mitted to wear socks 
as long as the color 
is not too loud. 
(continued on page 7) 



he IQ44 Graduates 
rsmg School 



of 



- 3 - 



OFFICERS WALK HUNDREDS OF MILES 
FOR ADVANCED MEDICAL TRAINING 

KUNHSIEN, CHINA - Advanced medical and 
surgical courses have started at the 3rd 
branch EMSTS at Kunshien in North Hopei, 
1132 graduates of preliminary emergency 
courses given by the school are eligible 
for this advanced training. These men 
constitute about 70% of all medical offi- 
cers in the war area. So eager are they 
for further medical knowledge that many 
of them have walked several hundred miles 
from their army posts to the school. 

The 1944 report of the school, recently 
received by ABMA.C, contains the following 
estimate of the ^lue to the army of the 
emergency medical training. 

"The kind of work the school has been 
doing is only gratifying as trainees go 
back to their original posts and do jobs 
that satisfy their military commanders. 
Word has been received unofficially from 
all sources that a great majority of them 
are doing much better work and are doing 
it much more enthusiastically and persis- 
tently than they ever did before." 

As ordered by the Army Medical Admin- 
istration, the school was amalgamated with 
the 1st Branch last fall. 




Sanitary Drill at 3 rd Branch EMSTS Teaches 
Trainees to Chlorinate Water 



FACTORY WORKERS DONATE BLOOD 
by Adet Lin 

KUNMING, CHINA - This month wo have been 
visiting many factories, electric works and 
machine shops in the vicinity of Kunming, 
At a telephone manufacturing factory out in 
the hills, department heads and workers com- 
peted to make the biggest donations. Blood 
donation was an amazing experience to th,em; 
the simplicity of the procedure astonished 
them and they came away, pleased and eager 
to give again. 

The factory seemed to be pall organized 
and efficiently run. It consists of sev- 
eral small one-story buildings scattered 
like farmhouses over two or three hillfe. 
There was a cooperative restaurant and a 
store, similar to a Post Exchange. Most 
of the factories we have visited are very 
much like this one, and the employees seem 
contented and healthier than any city shop- 
keeper. 

One Sunday we finished our work at the 
telephone factory at 3:30 P. M. Then, with 
the wind blowing and the sun shining, we 
followed one of the donors three miles up 
a mountain path to visit a stone -carved, 
sleeping Buddha. Some of our unit had to 
pause to catch their breath; the weaker 
ones turned back, but the donor led us on 
swiftly with agile steps. 

"You shouldn’t walk so fast, we don’t 
want you to be tired out," we told him. 
"Are you sure you do not feel faint from 
loss of blood?" 

"No, I don't feel a thing," he repXiB^t,” 
rushing ahead. 

"You should go to bed early tonight, at 
any rate," we shouted after him. 

But that night as we climbed into our 
Red Cross Ambulance our mountain-climbing 
donor piled in with us, availing hhimself 
of the chance to ride into town. 



By 


now 


these 


trips come 


very 


easy 


to 


the mobile 


unit. 


It can 


set 


up 


wo rk 


in 


about 


10 


minutes 


and can 


take care of 


30 


donors 


in 


an hour 


0 











- 4 - 



EMSTS UNIT TRAINS TROOPS ON LEDO ROAD 
by Lt . Col . Ma Chu Chung 

CHUNGKING, CHINA - Twq Chinese divisions 
were flown from China to join the Northern 
Combat Area Command in April, 1944. Some 
regiments went into action at once; others 
were held in reserve and to®k the opportun- 
ity to get some training. An EMSTS unit 
was sent from Ramgarh to Ledo to give the 
courses for the medical personnel. This 
unit has been mainly responsible for the 
medical training of all troops in the Chi- 
nese Army in. India. 

All the trainees joined a training camp 
which was organized at Mile 20, Ledo Road. 
Within two months 23 medical officers, 65 
nursing soldiers , and 303 litter bearers- 
satisfactorily completed the training. 

In the course for medical officers em- 
phasis was laid on first aid, field san- 
itation, and medical tactics to acquaint 
them with conditions in this theater of 
operations. In the basic medical courses 
for nursing soldiers and litter bearers, 
the emphasis was on practical exercises. 
Litter bearers spent most of the time in 
the field, practicing first aid, applying 
field sanitation and littering patients 
across country and in the jungle for long 
distances. The whole class went on man- 
euvers every 'Sunday, while a three-day 
maneuver vas carried out before the con- 
clusion of each class. 

Students Learn To Live In Jungle 

Experience of field medical service in 
the Northern Burma Campaign in the past 
10 months was applied. The students were 
taught how to live in the jungle, how to 
set up a medical unit under present condi- 
tions, and how to function as a member of 
a team 0 Organizational equipment was re- 
duced to the bare necessities, capable of 
being transported by hand or by animal. 
Regimental aid posts were trained to move 
in and set up quickly. Field hospitals 
functioned a few hours after arrival, and 
shelters were built far personnel and the 
wounded or sick cases in aminimum of time. 
Security was also stressed to conserve the 
strength of the medical service. 




American personnel gave demonstrations 
and lectures of such specialized subjects 
as anti-malaria measures, identification 
and use of different gases, and medical 

diseases prevalent in this theater were 
given to medical officers, and bedside 
studies were carried out in an American 
evacuation hospital. Educational movies 
on general sanitation, personal hygiene, 
the louse and malaria were shown,, 






A clinic was set up in camp 0 Medical 
officers and nursing soldiers took turns 
in holding clinic, under the supervision 
of members of the EMSTS unit. This proved 
a very satisfactory method of training, 

Malar i a. Rate Drops 

The students were held responsible for 
constructing and maintaining sanitary in- 
stallations in camp. Strict anti-malaria 
discipline was enforced, and the incidence 
of that- disease dropped dramatically after 
three weeks in camp, — — 



In reviewing the work of our unit here 
and at Ramgarh, we felt that it' had been 
more successful in training soldiers than 
officers. The reason is that medical of- 
ficers cannot be thoroughly trained in so 
short a time. The soldiers were not given 
much theory but ware drilled repeatedly in 
basic medical subjects. They soon learned 
thoroughly the few requirements necessary 
to carry out their duties. Experience in 
the present campaign proved that the medi- 
cal soldier has carried out his mission in 
a most satisfactory manner. He _is the real 
unsung hero of the whole army.’ 



i 



-5- 



CHINESE ARMY CONSCRIPTS DOCTORS 










#/§^§ &4?/L.6* 
MUM f% 

v > * V,/ ^ /> * 



* K tg *fr? ^ir ^ > y ;t„ ^*r __ 

.<1 £.'^' 44 -£ 

?&&*& , u*i %*} •• 

f pl^/ 

&*&& 4 it &-/| 

-? 7 ^c - 4 ^ 

^'MM #| # # 

£j i*M.x& j&. - lj 4f #•/&. 

4 fyz&ik 4 4 *r *r ^ * ***■ 

'M$. ■£$% M-kr- 

AUtk 

>X1 . ^ 

fUi irj[ — 

l^^ 8 A 

u 

£*} §&— l£r$£^u 4 f, 
£44. iM&. 4$iyUH 

if *4 A % X H . 

Wffifc **-**'*' 



CHUNGKING, CHINA - The generalissimo has 
ordered the military conscription of final 
year medical students, all graduates of the 
past three years, 30-50% of China’s medical 
practitioners, and 10% of the doctors on 
the staff s of hospitals and medical schools. 

These medical officers will be trained 
by the EMSTS. A group of 250 began their 
training on November 27th in Chungking, to 
which an ETISTS unit had been sent. Subse- 
quent groups will attend the Central EMSTS 
in Kweiyang. 

The training program has been revamped 
to incorporate ideas obtained by Gen. Lim 
from the program of the U. S. Army Medical 
Corps. Equipment and supplies for the new 
Volunteer Army has been standardized to 
follow the U. S. Amy Catalogue, but with 
many fewer items. 

Several members of the EMSTS staff were 
awarded fellowships for six months of ad- 
vanced study in America. Although eager 
to refresh their technical knowledge, they 
have volunteered to forego this opportun- 
ity until the training of these medical 
officers has been completed. 

vC § * 

FIFTH BRANCH EMSTS REACHES SAFETY 

KWEIYANG, CHINA - After many narrow es- 
capes the staff of the 5th Branch EMSTS has 
reached Kweiyang, after walking most of the 
way from Kwengsi. The school was forced to 
evacuate Turg-an last July and start its 
work anew in Tushan. When that town was 
captured by the enemy it was feared that" 
the school’s personnel had been trapped. 

But Dr. Lin Chin-Cheng, the director, is 
an experienced field officer, and led his 
staff and current group of students safely 
through the enemy lines. They arrived in 
Kweiyang late in December, having lost all 
their teaching equipment and personal be- 
longings. In spite of their privations 
their morale is high and they ask only for 
a chance to carry on their work. They are 
tentatively assigned to train nursing sub- 
ordinates for the n ew Volunteer Amy at 
Hochiang, west of Chungking. 



- 6 - 



THE KWE I YANG NURSING SCHOOL 

(continued from page 3) 



NURSING COMMITTEE MEETS 



The student pays no tuition and her food 
is provided. Students whose homes are in 
Occupied China are practically without fin- 
ancial aid. For these the school provides 
work, such as assisting instructors to care 
for equipment in the demonstration class- 
room or acting as custodian of the small 
reading room. Stenciling and copying work 
is also given them so that they can earn 
some pocket money. 

Our total 1944 enrollment is 38 students: 

4 in the third year class, 20 in the second 
year and 14 in the first year. Two transfer 
students graduated in February, 1944, and 
are now serving in the hospital by govern- 
ment conscription. 

Despite wartime limitations the school 
manages to provide some recreation for its 
students. Since there is little open space 
in the hospital compound they go to a nearby 
race-course for gymnastics and take hiking 
trips to scenic spots near the city. They 
go by horsecart to a famous summer resort, 
19 kilometers away, where they enjoy swim- 
ming and boating. Every Wednesday evening 
the student glee club meets to sing such old 
American favorites as "Summer Winds Blow" 
and "'Whispering Hope", as well as Chinese 
war songs. Collaborating with the Hsiangya 
Songsters, they provide musical entertain- 
ment for the hospital and school at Christ- 
mas, New Year’s Day and on other occasions. 
At weekly assemblies students take turns in 
making oral reports on current events or on 
experiences of mutual interest. This tends 
to train them in public speaking, in the ex- 
pression of organized thought and in the 
presentation of ideas. 

Our first two and most difficult years 
have passed, and we have great hopes for 
the future. ABMAC has promised financial 
assistance for the year 1944-1945, and if 
our school proves itself worthwhile to the 
satisfaction of both our donors and of the 
public it serves, then future support will 
undoubtedly be continued. We shall do our 
best to win the approval of our benefactors 
so that our school can continue to do its 
part in building up a stronger nation by 
providing more nurses. 



Chairman Ruth ’Williams presided at the 
meeting of the ABMAC Nursing Committee on 
February 1st. Miss Marjorie Tooker, Super- 
intendent of Hsiangya Hospital, spoke of 
the cooperation between government agencies 
and missipn groups to promote nursing edu- 
cation. The greatest obstacle is the lack 
of teachers. The scarcity of nurses forces 
students to fill supervisory posts in hos- 
pitals during their senior year at school. 

A letter from Hui -yin Wang, Secretary of 
the Technical Committee on Nursing Educa- 
tion, told of the financial straits of the 
nursing schools and asked for assistance. 
The committee decided to try to induce some 
American schools to adopt Chinese schools 
..and act as "bi glisters" to them. - 1 

FACTS ABOUT BULLETIN CONTRIBUTORS 

Lt. Gen. Robert Lim must be one of the 
busiest men in all China. Recently appoint- 
ed Deputy Surgeon General, he 'is in charge 
of Technical Services and Liaison with the 
Allies. He is a nember of the Commission on 
Medical Education and has been asked to head 
the newly created Medical Research Institute. 
In the midst of his manifold official respon- 
sibilities, Gen. Lim somehow finds time to 
send ABMAC frequent and detailed reports on 
its China program. Carrie Lu Lei is princi- 
pal of Kweiyang Nursing School which had to 
evacuate the city during the critical days 
of December. Word has not been received of 
the present whereabouts of its staff and 
students. Lt. Col. Ma Chu Chung is Command- 
ing Officer of an EMSTS Medical Training 
Unit which served at Ramgarh and Ledo, 

r 1 , 

, American Bureau for Medical Aid to China 
| 1790 Broadway New York 19, N.Y. { 

i ! 

Participating in National War Fund 

| through United China Relief. 

! I enclose $1.00 for a year’s subscrip- } 

I tion to the ABMAC Bulletin. 

Name ■ 



Address 



- 7 - 



EMSTS DEFY ENEMY THREAT 

(continued from page 1 ) 



'sunyi on foot. The res^ 

^mained, set the hospital in order to re- 
ceive patients and took in troops for the 
night as they passed through on the way to 
the front. Invaluable equipment was packed 



and the numbers of walkers increased. 

"On the way \ve found the families of the 
EMSTS staff in a straw and bamboo compound, 
which was formerly used as a horse and mule 
cart station. Parts of the walls and roof 
were missing, and bedded down in stray; were 
masses of children and their mothers. In 
their effort to keep warm they were hugging 
wood or charcoal fires on the ground, obli- 
vious of the danger of fire with so much 
straw around. The kids seemed to take the 
affair as a picnic, but their mothers were 
in other mood. They had been glad enough 
of this poor haven when they first arrived, 
but as they learned that the' enemy had been 
forced to retreat to Kwangsi they thought 
k if rfVjho greater c o nf-ort^- Jt^jome 

K i ng Frost Aids Chinese 

"When our troops were able to stage a 
counterattack, the enemy fell back. Vfe had 
a grand ally in King Frost for the enemy 
were clothed in summer clothing and appar- 
ently were ill supplied. We were lucky to 
have staved off the invasion of Kweichow 
and averted the loss of the vital communi- 
cation center of Kweiyang. The Japs may 
again attack Kweichow during the next month 
or so, but every day that passes places us 
in a better position to resist until the 
day when we are ready to push them back. 

"Besides sending the families away when 
ordered to evacuate by the Provincial Gov- 
ernment, the ’EMSTS also sent the students 



and arranged in priority of evacuation, and 
what could not be moved was placed in the 
new buildings. After three days of anxiety 
the crisis passed, and the order to recall 
the students was sent out. 

Nurses Are Nonchalant 

"Two days later General Hsu and I arrived 
to find everything in order. At the hospi- 
tal the beds and bedding were laid out, the 
side tables and chairs were in place, and 
even badpans were decked out in trays in a 
handsome array. Some of the staff were ar- 
ranging the books in the library of the new 
Central Building, and the nurses with Miss 
Chow Mei-yu were putting the last touches 
to their new Nursing School Building as if 
getting ready for a normal Christmas. The 
nonchalance of these people was good to see, 
and the v/elcome that we received showed no 
trace of the arduous times through which 
the group had passed. 

"It was decided that the families should 
not return for at least two months, when it 
may be possible to judge the war situation 
with more certainty. The students were on 
the way back with their Corps officers, and 
classes will be resumed. No attempt will be 
made to remove equipment. If the enemy d*oes 
come again there is a good chance that they 
will not succeed in reaching Kweiyang, and 
there is little hope of transport anyway. 
The motto is 'Carry On'." 



Abmac Bulletin 

AMERICAN BUREAU FOR MEDICAL AID TO CHINA 
1790 Broadway - New York 19, N. Y. . 



VOL. VII, Nos. 1-2 Jan. - Feb. 1945 

TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

EMSTS Defy Enemy Threat 1 

Land Route to China Opened 2 

Kweiyang Nursing School 3 

Factory Workers Donate Blood 4 

EMSTS Unit Trains Troops on Ledo Road . . 5 

Chinese Column 6 

Chinese Army Conscripts Doctors... 6 



RETURN POSTAGE GUARANTEED 





Sec SM.P.tafi. 




US. POSTAGE 




PA 1 0 




Permit 13855 





l 

> 



1 



’ MASTER : 








VOL. VII. Nos. 3-4 





UNITED CHINA RELIEF 

NAT I ONAL MAR FUND 

MARCH-APRIL 1945 



A B M A C 



DIRECTOR FLIES TO CHINA 




KUNMING ... Dr. John 
Scudder reached Kunming 
March 11th. He flew to 
China at the request of 
Surgeon General Hsu Hsi- 
lin to straighten out 
technical difficulties 
which have hampered the 
Chinese Blood Bank in 
its work of preparing 
plasma for the Chinese 
Army. The bank’s staff 
was trained under his 
supervision in the New 
York Presbyterian Hos- 
pital’s blood bank. 

In his first report 
to ABMAC, Dr. Scudder 
stated: ” I approve of 

the location of the 
blood bank; there are 
some drawbacks, but I 
doubt that any other 
place will be as suit- 
able. The left wing of the ground floor is 
devoted to the activities of the bank and 
the preparation of plasma. One dehydration 
machine has been set up but has not been 
run because of fluctuation of the current. 
The Diesel engines have not been set up. 
This will have to be done, for I am con- 
vinced that shipments of plasma must be in 
the dried form. Another great difficulty is 
the water supply. The water tower can be 
filled by a hand pump, but three of these 
have broken down. Col. Armstrong, the U.S. 
Theater Surgeon, said he would arrange air 
priority for the electric pump which ABMAC 
is sending over. Meanwhile, I shall move 
heaven and earth to get the Diesels set up. 
My trip will have been worthwhile if the 



dehydration of plasma 
is started." 

All donor activity 
at the bank has been 
discontinued, pending 
reorganization. 

A letter from Gen. 
Lim, received April 7, 
says: "Dr. Scudder’ s 

sympathetic attitude 
is encouraging us all. 
He has taken the bank 
well in hand, and its 
members are tumbling 
over themselves with 
joy at having him in 
Kunming. The various 
improvements in the 
internal arrangements 
of the bank are now 
complete, except for 
the installation of 
the Diesel engines, 
but this is under way, and before Scudder 
leaves we expect the work of drying plasma 
will have been started. How I would like 
to have him with us for a longer period! 
The experience with Dr. Scudder encourages 
us to ask that still others will be able 
to come from ABMAC, bringing with them not 
only technical aid, but also the wonderful 
spirit of helpfulness with which ABMAC mem- 
bers are so innately imbued." 

Lady Mountbatten Visits Blood Bank 

Lady Louis Mountbatten, accompanied by 
Lt. Gen. Lim, recently inspected the bank 
and was favorably impressed by the layout 
and by the ABMAC -furnished equipment. 



Dr. John Scudder Bachrach 

Scientific Consultant to Surgeon General 



-1 





Abmac Bulletin 



Issued by 

THE AMERICAN BUREAU FOR MEDICAL AID TO CHINA, INC. 
1790 BROADWAY, NEW YORK 19, N.Y. 

Participating in United China Relief 
Cooperating in National War Fund 



MME. CHIANG KAI-SHEK 
Honorary Chairman 




HIS EXCELLENCY, DR. WEI TA0-MIN6 
HIS EXCELLENCY, DR. HU SHIH 
Honorary Presidents 



CONSUL-GENERAL TSUNE-CHI YU - Honorary Vice President 



OFFICERS 

DR. DONALDD. VAN SLYKE, PRESIDENT DR. MAURICE WILLIAM, 3RD VICE PRES-. 

LELAND REX ROBINSON, CHAIRMAN OF BOARD DONALD BROD IE, SECRETARY 
DR. CO TUI, 1ST VICE PRES. UOHN J. MARTIN, TREASURER 

DR. FRANK L. MELENEY, 2ND VICE PRES. WALTER J. PF I ZENMAYER, ASST. TREAS. 
HERBERT L. DONALD, ASST. TREAS. 



HELEN KENNEDY STEVENS. EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR 



This Bulletin is issued Pi-monthly for the benefit of our friends and contributors 
SUBSCRIPTIOH, fl.00 per year 



EDITOR' ASSOCIATE EDITOR 

CHARLES W. FERGUSON _ v *' RUTH BLOCK 



staff and junior assistants will have been 
trained to restart each medical school at 
its former site or in a new location to be 
assigned by the Ministry of Education. The 
aim will be to place at least one medical 
school in each province. 

7. Standard teaching equipment and a 
library to be provided for each school. 

8. Entire equipment of the army hospital 
in whi ch the school team works to be trans- 
ferred to the medical school for the estab- 
lishment of a teaching hospital. 



CHINA LOOKS AHEAD 

A five year plan has been proposed by 
China's medical leaders to meet the Army's 
present serious shortage of personnel and 
to prepare for the problems of the post-war 
period of reconstruction. After the cessa- 
tion of hostilities the state of emergency 
wfll not come to an abrupt end. Great num- 
bers of the population will be moving from 
west to east and will require medical care. 



This plan enables the maximum use to be 
made of Chinese medical resources for the 
Army during the final phases of the war, 
and ensures that the medical organizations 
of the Army (personnel, equipment and sup- 
plies) will be utilized to the fullest ex- 
tent, not only for the post-war period, 
but also as a basis for the eventual re- 
construction of the country. 

- Lt. Gen. Robert K. S. Lim 



To meet these several problems , the fol- 
lowing proposals have been made: 

1. The schools in each locality to co- 
operate to run combined courses so that 
teachers may be released for war service. 

2. Each school to endeavor to organize 
a team from its staff and graduates to work 
in one or more army hospitals. 

3. Civil hospitals may also take part 
in this scheme. 

4. The cooperation of medical schools 
and hospitals, and the service of their 
teams in army hospitals to continue for at 
least two years after the war. 

5. Army hospitals to operate under the 
supervision of UNRRA and the NHA during 
the post-war period to meet the needs of 
migrating and rehabilitated populations. 

6. Provide scholarships for postgradu- 
ate study abroad in subjects in which there 
is a lack of teachers. By the fifth year 
of the plan, sufficient numbers of senior 



ABMAC GIVES THANKS 

A study of our audited statement, which 
appears on page 5, reveals that during 1944 
ABMAC sent to China $ 2 ,105 ,073 . 11 in cash 
and $200,862.32 worth of medical supplies. 
On behalf of our beneficiaries in China we 
extend sincere appreciation to the National 
War Fund, for its successful fund raising 
campaign, and to United China Relief, for 
making available to ABMAC the money needed 
to carry on its program of medical aid to 
China. And to each and every contributor 
to the National War Fund go ABMAC ' s heart- 
felt thanks! 



The third edition of Dr. Szeming Sze's 
CHINA'S HEALTH PROBLEMS has appeared. The 
data has been brought up-to-date and new 
sections on the anti -tuberculosis , anti- 
venereal and anti-leprosy movements, on 
birth control and on nutrition have been 
added. This authoritative book is a must 
for anyone who wishes information on medi- 
cine and health in China. Send $1.00 to 
the Chinese Medical Association, P. 0. Box 
6096, Washington, D.C., for your copy. 



- 2 - 



NURSING SCHOOL USES ABMAC GRANT TO 
IMPROVE TEACHING FACILITIES 

-by Eva Liu Chen, Directress 

CHENGTU ... The Chengtu Jen Gi Nursing 
school was opened in 1914. There were 25 
classes with 222 students graduated. Most 
of these graduates are working in health 
institutions such as front and base hospi- 
tals, interior provincial health adminis- 
trations and county hospitals. 

Since we had fire on May 2, 1940 we have 
never had a decent building for dormitories 
and classrooms, so we have spent NC$5,000 
(of the ABMAC yearly grant of NC$60,000) to 
repair the school building and dormitories. 
Skeletons, models and posters were bought 
for NC$10,000 for anatomy, physiology, and 
bacteriology classes. 

Formerly, we did not 
have dietary laboratory 
and our students had no 
place to practice. So, 

NC$3,500 was spent for 
repairing a small room 
and a small stove was 
built. NC$8,000 was 
spent for furniture; 

$12,500 for utensils, 
balance and all kinds 
of enamel ware so that students 
can practice dietetics. 

Our conscripted nurses often 
write us that, when attending 
emergency cases in interior or 
rural hospitals, they feel very 
much handicapped for not having 
midwifery experience. Therefore 
we used the rest of the fund to 
furnish a prenatal clinic for poor patients. 
Now our graduating students are having mid- 
wifery practice under the direction of well 
trained midwives from the National Central 
Midwifery School. Each student had five 
chances to deliver a baby. 

One percent silver nitrate is dropped 
into the eyes of the newborn child. Mother 
and infant are taken care of by our public 
health nurses and students until the cord is 
off. They are asked to return to the post- 
natal clinic at fortieth day after delivery. 



We have maternity and well baby’s clinics 
weekly. 

The staff of the Chengtu Jen Gi Nursing 
School are very grateful to the people who 
contributed the fund of $60,000. They have 
spent it with great pains and did not spend 
a single cent without consideration. 

At present the school lacks bedrooms so 
the girls are using double deckers instead 
of single beds. In spite of this arrange- 
ment, the number of bedrooms is not enough 
for the number of students. There is also 
need for an Assembly Hall. Whenever the 
Student Government Association meets, or 
the teachers have to talk to the whole stu- 
dent body, they have to stand in the garden. 
If the weather does not permit , the meeting 
has to be postponed. 

( Editor's Note: Last fall the 
construction of an Assembly Hall 
was begun. ) 

Since January 1942, we started 
to recruit students in order to 
supply more nurses to our nation. 
Last spring we did lots of propa- 
ganda such as posting red adver- 
tisements at the gates of five 
high schools where the 

state examinations were 
held. More than 100 ap- 
plicants registered. We 
felt that the nursing 
profession is of such 
great importance to a 
patient’s life that we 
selected the students 
very strictly. Thirteen 
probationers were en- 
rolled; after the first 

ten weeks, nine were left in the new class. 
They are good students who practice vivid- 
ly in the wards; the patients enjoy their 
services a great deal. 

There were 12 students taking the state 

examination; only one failed one subject. 
The Ministry of War directed six girls of 
this class to proceed to the Wartime Health 
Training Institute at Kweiyang under Chow 
Mei-yu. Four others are waiting for orders 
from the National Health Administration and 
two are working in a base hospital. 



Dietary Laboratory 




H oio to Care for Patient's Mouth 



- 3 - 



/ 



A B M A C 



HIGHLIGHTS 



19 4 4 



IN THE FIELD 



BLOOD BANK 



opens in Kunming July 12th. Generals 
Tu and Ma first donors. Mobile unit col- 
lects blood from army camps and nearby col- 
leges. Plasma flown to Yunnan front. 



ARMY HOSPITAL 



at Kweiyang completed by special ABMAC 
grants. Hospital and EMSTS carry on work 
despite grave enemy threat to Kweiyang. 



EXPERIMENTS 



at Central Epidemic Prevention Bureau 
at Kunming yield small quantities of peni- 
cillin, effective in treating skin infec- 
tions. Spores and equipment furnished by 
ABMAC. 



PENICILLIN 



shipments from ABMAC reach China. Con- 
trol of. distribution to physicians follows 
system used in United States. 



6 PUBLIC HEALTH EXPERTS 



return from studies in America to key 
positions in China. ABMAC arranged trans- 
portation for Dr. Huang Sung, Dr. Philip 
Wang, Dr. Hung-Wen Wang, Dr. Tang Yun-teh, 
Miss Chi Chen and Miss Wen-Yuen Fong. 



EQUIPMENT 



for standardizing biologicals and sera 
reaches China. Laboratory set up under 
supervision of Lt. Col. Tripp, loaned to 
NHA by U. S. State Department. 



0 F 



ON THE HOME FRONT 



LT. GENERAL ROBERT LIM 1 



visits America and revitalizes work of 
ABMAC. Tours medical training centers of 
U.S. Armed Forces, adapts training methods 
for use of Chinese Amy. Acts as ABMAC* s 
Advisor concurrently with military duties. 



GENERAL SHANG CHEN 



addresses Fall Board Meeting* Head of 
Chinese Military Mission to United States 
thanks ABMAC for assistance in supplying 
medical needs of Chinese Amy. 



NEW MEMBERS 



strengthen Board of Directors. Elected 
in 1944 were: Ting-Wing Chu, Dr. A. Baird 

Hastings, Dr. Houghton Holliday, K. C. Lee, 
Dr. William Tillett, Dr. Harry van Dyke, 
Dr. Jerome Webster. 



NATIONAL COMMITTEE 



enlists cooperation of American medical 
schools to provide opportunities for ad- 
vanced studies to doctors from China. 



CLOSE RELATIONS 



with China maintained. Steady flow of 
cables, letters and reports from China’s 
health authorities. UNKRA fellows bring 
latest news of China’s medical problems. 



PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 



assists China Medical Board, China Aid 
Council, China Foundation, and American 
Friends Service Committee in making pur- 
chases and shipments of supplies to China. 



4 - 



AMERICAN BUREAU FOR MEDICAL AID TO CHINA, INC. 



Statement of Income and Expenditures 
Year Ended December 31, 1944 

INCOME 



Refund Medical Personnel Transportation 
Refund Traveling Expenses 
General Donations 
Designated Donations 
Donations in Kind 

Funds received from United China Relief, Inc. : 
Unappropriated 
Designated 
Functional 

Imprest Fund Reimbursed 
Special Penicillin 
Miscellaneous 
Add: 

Inventory, December 31, 1944: 

Merchandise Purchased 
Goods in Kind 



$ 4,074 .49 

1 , 000.00 

21.083.59 

15.232.60 
14,250.57 

2,261,723.04 

3,372.07 

3,197.56 

56,300.19 

13,992.00 

1,542.45 



8,298.41 

15,615.00 



TOTAL INCOME 



$2 , 419,681 o 97 



EXPENDITURE 



Remittances to China: 

Army Medical Administration 

Blood Bank Salaries 

Blood Bank Contingent Fund 

National Health Administration 

National Medical Colleges and Nursing Schools 

Chinese Red Cross 

ABMAC Chungking Office 

ABMAC China Committee 

Foreign Contributions for Army Medical Administration 
(through the Bureau) 

Medical Personnel: 

Fellowships 

Transportation to and from China and travel in U.S.A. 
Maintenance, equipment and incidental expenses of Fellows 
Expenses in connection with remittances to China 
(principally cable charges) 

Goods Purchased and Shipped to China 
Army nodical Administration 
National Health Administration 
National Medical Colleges 
Purchases and Shipments of Penicillin 
Microfilm Project 

Operating Expenses of National Headquarters 



681,038.18 
14,152.49 
5 , 652 o 32 
782 ,843 0 93 
224,068.09 
369,707.00 
7,616,50 

15.582.00 

4,412.60 

24,693.15 
5 , 718 . 45 
3,963.98 

854.00 

68.724.52 

76.154.52 
39,901.42 

13.992.00 
2, 089.86 

57,651.93 



H.G. Hutchinson , C.P.A. 



TOTAL EXPENDITURE 



$2,398,816. 94 



- 5 - 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY CULTIVATES 80 VARIETIES 
OF VEGETABLE DRUGS 

CHUNGKING... The drug plantation of the 
National School of Pharmacy yields about 80 
varieties of vegetable drugs for study pur- 
poses. A few such as digitalis, pyrethrum, 
stramonium, American wormseed, mentha ar- 
vensis and castor beans are cultivated on 
a larger scale for their active principles. 

.uack of chemicals, equipment and finan- 
cial support hampers the school in carrying 
on research. Some preliminary studies of 
crude drugs have been undertaken. Members 
of the faculty are now investigating the 
antiseptic properties of a red flower known 
as Chi King, the anti-malaria properties of 
a plant called dichroa febrifuga, and the 
possibilities of using Yu Ta Tsi in treat- 
ing dysentery. 

Students obtain practical experience in 
the pharmaceutical factory. More than 60 
varieties of drugs are manufactured on a 
small scale. A few for which there is a 
demand, are made in larger quantities, in- 
cluding ferric chloride, nitric acid, po- 
tassium permanganate and zinc sulphate. 

The director recently sent ABMAC this 
account of the history and future plans of 
the school. 

"The National School of Pha rmacy was es- 
tablished in Nanking in 1936. Less than a 
year later, we were forced to abandon our 
half-finished buildings and flee for safety 
to Hankow and then to Chungking. After go- 
ing through bhick and thin we built another 
campus on the summit of Koloshan at the 




Pharmacy Students Manufacture Tablets 




Botany Laboratory at School of Pharmacy 



city limits of Chungking. Koloshan means 
Happy Singsong Mountain. 

"We have 10 classes, 288 students and 
about 50 graduates yearly* Although small 
in comparison with an American college of 
pharmacy this is the largest one in China. 
We are just now ordered to take in three 
times as many new students this summer as 
we did last year, and will continue to in- 
crease until in four years we shall have 
about 800 students. What a task before us I 

"The US$8 ,000 gift which ABMAC generous- 
ly gave us has all been used for the pur- 
chase of chemicals and apparatus and has 
been a most valuable help. How we wish it 
could be continued I" 



EMSTS IMPROVISE TEACHING APPARATUS 

KUNHSIEN . . . Lack of proper equipment 
could not stop the 3rd Branch EMSTS from 
teaching physics. Since the school had no 
instruments of any kind; no prism, no tun- 
ing fork, no magnet and no reagents, it was 
necessary to improvise. 

A fiddle was the medium for demonstrat- 
ing the principles of sound. A bucket of 
water and a native balance illustrated the 
principle of Archimedes. The dilapidated 
trucks belonging to the school proved use- 
ful to the science classes. The physics 
instructor demonstrated the structure of 
the dry cell, while the chemistry class 
utilized the zinc and graphite. Fortunately 
a bottle of sulfuric acid had been brought 
from Kweiyang two years ago. 



- 6 - 



N H A SURGICAL UNITS SERVE CHINESE ARMY 



ABMAC WELCOMES NEW MEMBERS 



CHUNGKING (CNS) ... The National Health 
Administration sent six surgical units to 
the Yunnan Front. Each consisted of two 
doctors, three or four nurses and medical 
orderlies, drawn from the staffs of the 
Central Hospital and the Chungking Munici- 
pal Hospital. The following account of 
their work comes, via the Chinese News 
Service, from Dr. Yen Jen Hua, head of a 
unit operating in an Amy Field Hospital. 

"The hospital is located in an ancient 
temple. When we arrived, our forces were 
attacking Sungshan. The hospital was filled 
and we had to pitch more than 200 tents 
(supplied by the U.S. Army) to accommodate 
the wounded men. At that time, there were 
more than 2500 wounded officers and men, 
and we worked from morning until evening, 
often doing operations at night by the 
light of oil lamps. 

"We worked hard for four months. About 
80 percent of the wounded recovered fully, 
and they went back to the fighting lines 
organized as an honored division. 

"The wounded soldiers feel so grateful 
to those who have saved their lives or re- 
duced their sufferings that they often in- 
sist on giving presents to the hospital 
staff. The presents generally consist of 
war booty captured from the Japanese, in- 
cluding Japanese flags, bayonets, helmets, 
canned foods and rations which our soldiers 
have risked their lives to get as battle 
souvenirs . " 



TRY" THIS RECIPE 

TENHSIEN...A hospital here has found a 
substitute for adhesive plaster more satis- 
factory than the over-dated product that is 
obtainable in China. Here is the recipe: 

"Use one part of Kuang Tan, a brownish- 
red powder, mix with two parts of sesame or 
wood oil , heat until mixture becomes sticky. 
Spread this over a sheet of paper or cloth; 
p'i chih will do just as well. Cut it into 
strips when needed, and you have adhesive 
plaster a la native make." 



Two new Chinese members have joined the 
ABMAC staff this month. Mrs. Bliss Wang 
took over the post of China Program Secre- 
tary. A graduate of Shanghai University, 
she received an M. A. from Columbia Univers- 
ity in 1936. Mrs. Wang did volunteer work 
for the Bureau in its earliest days and re- 
cently has been teaching Chinese to American 
Naval Officers. Allen Lau will assist G.P. 
Waung in the Purchasing and Transportation 
Department, which handles a constantly in- 
creasing volume of supplies for China. Mr. 
Lau, a graduate of Lignan University, is 
working for his Ph.D. in Public Administra- 
tion at the University of Chicago. 



EMSTS TRAIN DOCTORS FOR VOLUNTEER ARMY 

CHUNGKING ... All newly graduated M.D.s 
have been conscripted for the Volunteer 
Army and will receive training in military 
medicine from the EMSTS . The first group of 
189 doctors completed a four weeks training 
course on December 31, 1944. Another course 
was slated to begin on January 15 and to 
last six weeks. 



SUPPLIES FOR THE BLOOD BANK 

To assist the blood bank to increase its 
production of plasma, ABMAC recently sent 
to China, via the Army Transport Command, 
additional supplies and equipment. Among 
the items sent were an electric water pump, 
a Seitz filter, 5,000 rubber stoppers, some 
donors’ bottles, 1,000 filter sheets, 100 
Army dispensary sets, 25 hemoglobin scales, 
and 4 cases of chemicals. 



American Bureau forMedical Aid to China 
1790 Broadway New York 19, N.Y. 

Participating in National War Fund 
through United China Relief. 

I enclose *1 .00 for a year’s subscrip- 
tion to the ABMAC Bulletin. 

Name 

Addre s s 



7 



NORTHWEST PREPARES TO STAMP OUT KALA-AZAR 

LANCHOW ... Kala-azar is a fatal tropi- 
cal disease, characterized by an irregular 
fever, enlargement of the spleen, hemorr- 
hages, dropsy and extreme emaciation. A 
preliminary investigation conducted by the 
National Northwest Institute of Health has 
shown it to be endemic in many parts of 
China’s Northwest Provinces. As part of a 
campaign to wipe it out, the Institute con- 
ducted two-week courses fitting doctors to 
diagnose and treat this disease. During the 
last four months of 1944, the course was 
completed by 27 doctors who are responsible 
for running 21 kala-azar clinics and three 
mobile units distributed throughout the 
Northwest. 

The Institute also offered special tech- 
nical courses in public health administra- 
tion, epidemiology, veterinary medicine, 
typhus, pathology, bacteriology and immuno- 
logy, nutrition, pharmacy and pharmacology, 
surgery and medicine, nursing, dentistry. 
A total of 89 students enrolled in these 
courses during 1944. With the sanitary in- 
spectors and junior pharmacists trained by 
the Institute, they represent a consider- 
able addition to the technical personnel 
available in this part of China. 

Cut off from her coastal regions by the 
war, China was forced to undertake the de- 
velopment of the interior provinces. The 
training program of the National Northwest 
Institute of Health is part of a 10-year 
plan for developing the natural resources 
and manpower of the Northwest, which con- 
stitutes about one-half of Free China. 



HAVE YOU RANSACKED YOUR CLOSET? 

Do you have a coat, a suit or a dress 
that you rarely wear? Has your young hope- 
ful outgrown last year’s overalls or shoes? 
Then make up a bundle of all the garments 
your family no longer uses and take it to 
the local receiving station for the United 
National Clothing Collection by April 30. 

To meet the urgent needs of distressed 
people throughout the world, 150,000,000 
pounds of substantial used clothing, for 
both winter and summer wear, must be se- 
cured. These garments will be shipped to 
war-devastated countries on the basis of 
the greatest immediate need and available 
shipping space. They will be distributed 
free to the needy without discrimination 
of any kind. The Far East will be included 
if conditions there permit distribution of 
clothing collected in this drive. 



STUDENTS MARCH AGAIN 

CHUNGKING . . . The provincial authorities 
ordered educational institutions to evacu- 
ate Kweiyang in December. The students of 
Hsiangya and Kweiyang Medical Schools and 
Kweiyang Nursing School took to the road 
and made their way to Chungking on foot. 
Medical schools and hospitals there are 
acting as "hosts" to the refugee institu- 
tions and classes have been resumed. But 
living accommodations are scarce, and the 
students are living in crowded, unhealthy 
quarters. Requests have been received for 
special ABMAC grants to help these schools 
through this emergency period. 



Abmac Bulletin 

AMERICAN BUREAU FOR MEDICAL AID TO CHINA 
1790 Broadway - New York 19, N.Y. , 

VOL. VII, Nos. 3-4 March-April 1945 

TABLE OF CONTENTS 

page 

ABMAC Director Flies to China... 1 

China Looks Ahead 2 

Nursing School Uses ABMAC Grant 3 

Highlights of 1944 4 

Statement of Income and Expenditures ... 5 

School of Pharmacy 6 

NHA Surgical Units Serve Army 7 

RETURN POSTAGE GUARANTEED 

POSTMASTER : If addressee has removed and new address is 

known, notify sender on Porn 35U7, postage 
for which is guaranteed. 





Sec S62.P.I&S. 
US. POSTAGE 

PA I 0 

Permit 13855 





VOL VII, Nos. 



A 

ABMAC 



PARTICIPATING IN 

affiliated with 




5-6 



HUMANITY 





UNITED CHINA RELIEF 

NATIONAL WAR FUND 

ABOVE ALL” 




. MAY- JUNE 1945 



GENERALISSIMO ASKS CONTINUED ASMARA ID 

NEW YORK .. Greetings from General- 
issimo Chiang Kai-shek were delivered 
to ABMAC by Dr. John Scudder who re- 
turned on May 6th after a two months 
stay in China. At an interview held 
April 17th, China’s leader expressed 
appreciation for all ABMAC has done 
for China, part icularly in establish- 
ing the Blood Bank at Kunming. The 
Generalissimo voiced the hope that 
ABMAC would continue to help China 
provide better medical care for her 
sick and wounded soldiers. 

Dr. Scudder was successful in his 
mission of ironing out technical dif- 
ficulties that had been obstructing 
the work of the Blood Bank. He in- 
stalled a safer system of collecting 
blood and made changes in the method 
of preparing the bleeding bottles. 

The U. S. Army assigned an expert to 
repair and set up the Diesel engines so now 
the dehydrators can be used to dry plasma. 
When Dr. Scudder left China the Blood Bank 
was operating at full capacity. 

China Mourns President Roosevelt 

In Chungking Dr. Scudder attended the 
memorial services for President Roosevelt, 
at which about 5,000 persons were present. 
The Generalissimo entered and, bowing three 
times, placed a wreath before a picture of 
our late President. 

Dr. Scudder conferred with Chinese health 
officials in Kunming, Chungking and Kweiyang. 
He visited many of the institutions which 
MAC subsidizes, including the EMSTS, Army 
rsing School, National Health Administra- 
tion, National Inst itute of Health, several 
medical colleges and army hospitals. 



Janes Yen, Mass Education Leader, Bids Farewell 
to Nurses Leaving for China 

NURSES ANSWER CALL TO COLORS 

KUNMING .. Two nurses, commissioned as 
officers in the Chinese Army, arrived here 
on the i r- way to act ive duty. They are Major 
Elsie Chung Lyon and Capt. Margaret Tchou. 
Major Lyon has been assigned to the staff 
of the Army Nursing School, and Captain 
Tchou will work in the Chinese Blood Bank 
at Kunming or in a newly established bank 
at Kweiyang. Their homeward flight was ar- 
ranged by ABMAC at the request of China’s 
Surgeon General. 

Major Lyon was the first western trained 
Chinese nurse. She received her training at 
Guy’s Hospital in London, returning to China 
in 1910 as Superintendent of Nurses at the 
Imperial Je i -yang Women ' s Hospital in Tient- 
sin. Nursing was such a new profession in 
(continued on page 8 





1 - 




Abmac Bulletin 



Issued by 

THE AMERICAN BUREAU FOR MEDICAL AID TO CHINA, INC 
1790 BROADWAY, NEW YORK 19, N.Y. 

Participating in United China Relief 
Cooperating in National War Fund 



MME. CHIANS KAI-SHEK 
Honorary Chairman 




HIS EXCELLENCY, DR. WEI TA0-MIN6 
HIS EXCELLENCY, DR. HU SHIH 
Honorary Presidents 



CONSUL-GENERAL TSUNE-CHI YU - Honorary Vice President 



OFFICERS 



DR. DONALD D. VAN SLYKE, PRESIDENT 
LELAND REX ROBINSON, CHAIRMAN OF BOARD 
DR. CO TUI, 1ST VICE PRES. 

DR. FRANK L. MELENEY, 2ND VICE PRES. 

HERBERT L. DONA 



DR. MAURICE WILLIAM, 3RD VICE PRES; 
DONALD BRODIE, SECRETARY 
JOHN d. MARTIN, TREASURER 
WALTER J. PF I ZENMAYER, ASST. TREAS. 

, ASST. TREAS. 



HELEN KENNEDY STEVENS. EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR 



This Bulletin is issued bi-monthly for the benefit of our friends and contributors 
SUBSCRIPT IOH, $ 1.00 per year 



ED I TOR 

CHARLES W. FERGUSON 






ASSOCIATE EDITOR 
RUTH BLOCK 



CHINA HAILS V-E DAY 

Although much of her population and the 
richest, most highly industrialized parts 
of her country are still in the hands of 
the enemy, China shared the joy of all the 
United Nations on V-E Day. For China re- 
alized that the war in Europe and the war 
in Asia were in truth parts of the same 
battle against tyranny and aggression, and 
that the success of her allies in defeat- 
ing Germany means that final victory is in 
s ight . 

For many years China’s desperate appeals 
for weapons with which to combat the highly 
mechanized Japanese forces have met with 
the reply, "First we must defeat Germany; 
you’ll have to wait." 

China has waited with what patience she 
could muster. She has undergone all the 
terrors of invasion, blockade, inflation 
and famine. She was forced, for lack of 
military supplies, to fight a defensive war. 
She has been subjected to unjust criticism 
from armchair strategists who could not 
understand why her soldiers did not push 
the Japanese back with their bare hands. 

Now after eight heartbreaking years of 
defeat, China looks forward confidently to 
driving the last invader from her soil. In 
Burma the Chinese troops proved that with 
modern equipment they are f irst-class fight- 
ing men. V-E Day means that the flow of 
supplies and equipment will turn westward, 
and China at long last will be able to 
take the offensive. 

In the near future great battles will be 



fought on the soil of China. Battles mean 
large numbers of wounded men who will need 
medical and nursing care. As China pre- 
pares for the final offensive, ABMAC is 
ready to send ever-increasing assistanc 
to the Chinese Army in the way of medica 
supplies, trained personnel and the latest 
scientific developments. 



LIM NAMED SURGEON GENERAL OF CHINESE ARMY 

Lt. Gen. Robert K. S. Lim has been ap- 
pointed by the Generalissimo as Surgeon 
General and Director of the Army Medical 
Administration of China. This news reached 
ABMAC in the following cable from Gen. Lim. 

"AM NOW APPOINTED SURGEON GENERAL AND 
CHARGED WITH REORGANIZATION ARMY MEDICAL 
ADMINISTRATION TO FACILITATE MAXIMUM COOP- 
ERATION WITH ALLIES AND CONTRIBUTE ALL OUT 
EFFORT FINAL STAGES OF WAR." 

The choice of Gen. Lim for this important 
post is a f ortunate one as his experience in 
practical military medicine is as extensive 
as his scientific learning. It was Gen. Lim 
who organized the Medical Relief Corps of 
the Chinese Red Cross, as well as the Emer- 
gency Medical Training Schools. The respect 
accorded him by medical leaders both in 
China and in the west will help him to pro- 
mote the cooperation between China and her 
Allies which is essential for bringing the 
war against Japan to a victorious end. 

ABMAC Pledges Support to Gen. Lim 

The Executive Committee took the follow- 
ing action at its meeting on May 8th. 

WHEREAS, Lt. Gen. Robert K. S. Lim has 
been honored by appointment t o the post of 
Director General of the Chinese Army .Med- 
ical Administration, and 

WHEREAS, in this high office he will be 
directly responsible for the medical care 
and health of the Chinese soldiers, be it 

RESOLVED: that the Directors of the 
American Bureau for Medical Aid to China 
express to General Lim tneir confidence iM 
his success and pledge to him their con" 
tinued and sustained cooperation in carry- 
ing out his important work. 



- 2 - 






Field Medical Service ? raining Drills 



CHINA PREPARES FOR THE OFFENSIVE 

KUNMIHG . . Reorganization is the 
order of the day as ChUna looks for- 
ward to the coming counteroffensive. 
The Army is being reduced to three 
and a half million effectives. A 
Combat Force of 500,000 well trained 
men has been formed, the rest of the 
troops to be held for defensive and 
replacement purposes. Every effort 
will be made to step up the striking 
power of this new Combat Force. 

The old Chinese supply and trans- 
port organizations have been super- 
seded by a Service of Supplies. The 
U.S. and Chinese SOS are both under 
the command of General Cheves. Many 
American officers and men have been 
assigned to the Chinese SOS, with 
Lt. Gen. Lim being appointed Surgeon. 
This is the first joint Chinese- 
American organization analagous to 
the Anglo-American Command in the 
West. The SOS, as an Allied unit, 
can facilitate the improvement of 
army hospitals by providing tents, 
beds, furnishings and other supplies. 



EMSTS Changes Name and Set-Up 

The Army’s system of medical edu- 
cation is also being reorganized to 
reduce the number of units while in- 
creasing their efficiency. The EMSTS 
and its five branch schools have com- 
bined to form the Army Medical Field 
Service Schools, known as the AMFSS. 
The function of the school will be 
to give medical field service train- 
ing to various types of personnel 
required by the medical units of the 
Army. Training will be provided at 
the school in Kweiyang and at Army 
Training Centers and special Army 
Hospitals to which Training Units 
will be sent. 

The staff of the AMFSS is cooper- 
ating with doctors of the U.S. Army 
to conduct a special course for the 
medical of ficers from various Chinese 
divisions. The course consists of 96 
hours of lectures and demonstrations. 
(continued on page 6) 



- 3 - 



'kj'- 4 *-‘1 ^4 

•i 4- 1 1 >t # * #j i 

f -* ■ 'i'iJi * f -?- - * 




m # 

#■ « ft s 



IKS i 









-f, 2 Jfc 

tu¥fr- l 

'-f ^ %-> W: A$~ 

dL # f " *•£' 15- 



ft I f 3 $■ -i, # a- jj u 

* is 3l ll *’" f £ * 



4r^ ^ 



/' 



m ^ 

z- /tx /£_ -a: ^ 

■£fs if | < *,t as 

*i tltiAf " 






4— f 

ft 








xyQ. i Tjn 

4 « * t 

ftW/./_ 7 ^ 



ftH£ /it Tr 

* /& 6 

fib* . 





WAR MINISTER INVITES DR. CO TUI TO CHINA 






NEW YORK .. At the invitation of China’ 
Minister of War Dr. Co Tui, ABMAC ’ s Vi 
Pres ident, will go to China on a two-fold 
mission. He will set up plants for manu- 
facturing non-pyrogenic intravenous fluids 
and will introduce the latest methods of 
treating malnutrition. 

Pyrogens are bacterial products present 
in substances in which bacteria grow. When 
present in fluids used for intravenous in- 
jections they cause severe chills, accom- 
panied by severe and occasionally fatal 
results. In 1954 Dr. Co Tui discovered 
that pyrogens could be filtered out ot 
fluids; his method is universally used by 
pharmaceutical houses in this country. 

The need for pyrogen-free saline and 
glucose for transfusions is acute in China. 
Dr. Co Tui has prepared a blueprint for a 
stationery manufacturing plant at Kunming, 
and a copy has gone to Surgeon General Lim 
so that construction can be started. It 
is also planned to establish a pilot plant 
in Kweiyang, with mobile manufacturing 
units to be developed later. The necessary 
equipment has been ordered, and Dr. Co Tui 
is training Mrs. Bo Ching Boey, a labora- 
tory technician, to accompany him as his 
technical assistant. 



What Is A Hydrolysate? 

Dr. Co Tui will also introduce protein 
hydrolysates into China. These are predi- 
gested proteins which can be absorbed by 
persons too near death from starvation, 
sickness, wounds or shock to digest other 
foods. Dr. Co Tui’s pioneer experiments 
show that hydrolysates produce striking 
gains in weight and accelerate recovery in 
cases of malnutrition. Peptic ulcers heal 
rapidly when treated with hydrolysates. 

To undertake a scientific study and in- 
vestigate the possibilities of making the 
hydrolysates from soybeans, Dr. Co Tui 
hopes to take with him a group of trained 
personnel. Since malnutrition and peptic 
ulcers are widespread in China such studij^ 
will be important in establishing the 
of this new treatment. 

(continued on page 5) 



- 4 - 



ABMAC HELPS CHINA IMPROVE ARMY HOSPITALS 

NEW YORK .. From additional funds made 
Available by United China Relief, ABMAC 
has sent to China CN$68,000.00 for the 
improvement of army hospitals. The need 
for such financial help was expressed in 
a letter received from Surgeon General 
Lim. 

"In the past, hospitals have depended 
upon local housing in temples, schools or 
warehouses, and were often too far removed 
from the troops they were assigned to sup- 
port. They could not readily be moved un- 
til housing in or near the new situation 
could be found; this delay was bad enough 
in the defense situations of the past but 
will be intolerable if our troops are able 
to advance with any speed in the future. 

"With the march of in- 
flation building repairs 
have had to be virtually 
suspended. For the same 
reason beds made locally 
of wooden planks have 
been out of the reach of 
hospitals that moved to 
new localities. Many es- 
sential requirements of 
a hospital, such as bed- 
ding and bedpans, have 
not been replenished for 
three years. Most of the 
army hospitals are miser- 
able structures not comparable with any- 
thing you can think of except a shake-down 
in the Bowery; medical care and especially 
nursing care, is a herculean task under 
these conditions. 

Tents To Replace Local Housing 

"To do away with the need for local 
housing and for building repairs we have 
asked for tents, which will also make for 
ready mobility. We have secured only a quar- 
ter of the tents we need, but we will keep 
asking for more, like Oliver Twist! 

"To obviate the need for pure has ing beds 
at a price for which you could buy a second- 
-hand motor car before the war, we asked for 
rcamp cots for one-third of the hospital cap- 
acity and litter canvas for the remaining 



two thirds. We have requested the issue of 
new bedding, linen, bedpans, utensils, 
soap and extra fuel for washing, laundry 
and sterilization. 

"I know that we are asking the Govern- 
ment for a tremendous increase of expendi- 
ture all of a sudden, and that some of our 
requests must be met by importation from 
abroad. I know that Ledo Road and Hump 
tonnage will be limited, but I hope that 
all concerned will stretch several points 
so that at least the combat forces will be 
adequately supported. You will now under- 
stand our requests to ABMAC and UCR fo-r 
large support for the improvement of army 
hospitals . " 

The need of improving China’s army hos- 
pitals was stressed by Dr. Scudder who saw 

many hostels where the 
soldiers returning from 
the front obtained food 
and shelter but no real 
medical attention. Some 
of the hostels have no 
doctors or nurses, only 
orderlies to take care of 
the wards. 

In striking c entrast 
was the Chinese Base Hos- 
pital which Dr. Scudder 
visited. It was clean 
and well organized with a 
small, but well - chosen 
stock of drugs. The operating room was al- 
so small but adequate withagood selection 
of instruments kept in good condition. The 
competent surgeon was a PUMC graduate. This 
is the type of hospital which General Lim 
hopes to develop to provide up-to-date 
medical care for China’s Army. 



WAR MINISTER INVITES DR. CO TUI TO CHINA 

(continued from page U) 

Hydrolysates have been sent to Holland, 
and they may prove of the utmost importance 
in treating the liberated populations of 
Europe. Science writers predict that in 
the next 10 years hydrolysates will become 
as much a commonplace of our daily talk as 
vitamins have been recently, but with more 
j ust if icat ion. 





- 5 - 



DR. ADELE COHN CONDUCTS T. B. CLINIC 

CHUNGKING . . Dr. Adele Cohn, who was 
sent to China by ABMAC in 1941, is now in 
charge of the tuberculosis clinic that the 
Chinese Red Cross conducts in this city. 
During the first three months of 1945 she 
examined 1006 new patients and 689 old 
patients. As the clinic was without elec- 
tricity more than half the time since 
January, many patients could not be fluoro- 
scoped. Dr. Cohn reports an incidence rate 
of 58 per cent for patients examined 
during the last half of 1944. After con- 
ducting the clinic alone for many months 
Dr. Cohn has an assistant whom she has 
trained to help administer pneumothorax. 

In addition to her regular clinic work 
Dr. Cohn fluoroscopes all students wishing 
to come to this country for further study. 
Her certificate that a student is free of 
T. B. is required before he can obtain a 
visa for the United States. 

The work of the clinic is hampered by 
lack of X-Ray film and a full-sized screen 
for the fluoroscope. The U. S. Navy Sick 
Bay has cooperated by furnishing such ma- 
terials as syringes and stains. 

Dr. Cohn sends patients who need opera- 
tions to Dr. Y. K. Wu with very successful 
results. Dr. Wu is the thoracic surgeon 
who studied in this country and whose re- 
turn to Kwe iyang Central Hospital in 1943 
was arranged by ABMAC. 



N.Y.U.. STUDENTS AND ABMAC 

NEW YORK . . New York University Chinese 
Students Club held its annual spring danc^ 
on April 7th at London Terrace. Among the 
250 guests were members of the armed forces 
of the United States and China, as well as 
students from N.Y.U. , Columbia, Hunter, and 
City College. Admission charges and raffle 
tickets netted $293.64 which the club has 
donated to ABMAC. To the officers, Wei 
Hsien King, Mary Young, Cheng Chia Chiu, 
Emy Lee Chan, Lillian Chung, and Pao Ching 
Sunn, and to all the members of this club 
ABMAC extends its sincere thanks. 



INFLATION HITS TRAINING SCHOOLS 

KWEIYANG . . The cost of living here has 
risen from four to ten times since the end 
of last year. This has caused great hard- 
ship to the students and teaching staff of 
the AMFSS. Their diet, consisting largely 
of government issued rice, contains enough 
bulk to allay hunger but is deficient in 
nutritive value. The past winter was ex- 
traordinarily cold and neither classrooms 
nor dormitories were heated. Most of the 
students and teachers have sold their spare 
clothing to raise extra money, and the gar- 
ments they have left are ’’tattered and t era”. 



CHINA PREPARES FOR THE OFFENSIVE 

(continued from, page 3) 



with 




two hours of review daily. Emphasis 
is placed on minor surgery and medi- 
cal aid, including nursing and ward 
management, and on problems encoun- 
tered on the actual field of opera- 
tions. Trainees also receive brief 
instruction in anatomy, sanitation, 
and selected medical subjects. 

The Army Medical College and its 
branches have been reorganized with 
the college remaining at Anshun. A 
Northwest Army Medical College will 
be located at Sian, and a Southwest 
Army Medical College at Kunming. In 
these colleges regular courses in 
medicine, dentistry, nurs ing and phar- 
macology will be given. Graduated! 
will undergo medical field service 
training at the AMFSS or in one of 
the Army Training Centers. 



Dr. cohn takes Case History of Tubercular 
Mother and Child 



- 6 - 



HERE THE TWAIN SHALL MEET 



RED CELLS AID ANEMIC OFFICIAL 



KWEIYANG . . East and West meet on the 
ommon ground of humanity and science at 
he teaching hospital of China’s Army Med- 
ical Field Service School. Here a U. S. 
Field Hospital has pitched its tents, and 
American and Chinese doctors work side by 
side, sharing resources and experiences. 
A few months ago the Japs were expected ip 
this very spot. Now U. S. Army trucks, 
jeeps and weapons carriers run in and out, 
bringing all the paraphernalia of medicine 
at war. Here the United Nations is no mere 
figure of speech, but a reality to be seen, 
heard and felt. 

The hospital is a simple affair whose 
windows are covered with paper. The furni- 
ture consists of beds with rope "springs”, 
modest bedside tables and stools. The 



KUNMING .. Red blood cells, discarded 
in the preparation of plasma, are used by 
the Chinese Blood Bank to combat anemia. 
Dr. Yi, director of the bank, wrote ABMAC 
of his concern when an important Chinese 
official asked for a transfusion. 

"If any reaction resulted from giving a 
transfusion to such a well known man (the 
rate of reactioh is around 14 per cent) 
rumor might spread and ruin the reputation 
of the blood bank. So I warned him and 
advised him to reconsider. 

"That night several prominent military 
officers advised him not to have a trans- 
fusion.* He did not sleep all night, try- 
ing to decide what to do. Finally he did 
decide to have the transfusion. 





floor of local slate slabs is hard to keep 
clean and the bedding is not as white as it 
might be due to lack of soap and hot water. 
But competent doctors, hardworking nurses, 
and GIs vie with each other in caring for 
the wounded and sick. 

The Americans and Chinese each have an 
operating room, their surgeons alternating 
in operations. The Americans run the den- 
tal clinic, the medical supply room and an 
additional X-Ray set. The Chinese attend 
to most of the medical cases, provide the 
nursing staff and perform the bacteriolog- 
ical and serological examinations.. Since 
the Americans provided fuel for the gener- 
tor this hospital is one of the few places 
n China that has electricity throughout 
most hours of the day and night. 



"I picked out a bottle containing about 
lOOcc of the latest red cells and checked 
the cross-matching twice. Then I prepared 
lOOcc of pyrogen-free saline which was im- 
mediately autoclaved. By suspending such 
a small number of cells in a small amount 
of saline, transfusion reaction is less 
liable to occur. 

"Early that morning I did a pyrogen test 
for the saline on a rabbit; the result was 
negative. I am happy to say that nothing 
happened also to the official. The next 
day his doctor found his hemoglobin up to 
90 percent and the red cell count 4,100,000. 
The patient was very happy and told all 
his visitors that he never had such results 
from injections of liver extracts." 



i American Bureau for Medical Aid to China j 
i 1790 Broadway New York 19, N.Y. | 

i 

Participating in National War Fund 

through United China Relief. i 

i 

! I enclose $ 1.00 for a year’s subscrip- 
tion to the ABMAC Bulletin. 

! i 

i 

i Name j 

i 

i 

Address » 

J 4 




7 - 



MY KINGDOM FOR A HORSE 



NURSES ANSWER CALL TO COLORS 

(continued from page 1) 



CHUNGKING . . Surgeon General Lim writes 
that shortage of transportation makes it 
difficult to carry out the duties of his 
office. It is almost impossible to obtain 
transport to enable him and his subordin- 
ates to go into the field and inspect the 
medical insta>]lat ions . The cars owned by 
the Army Medical Administration are now so 
worn out that the shortest trip constitutes 
a hazard and the cars usually break down en 
route. General Lim says that he can well 
understand the emotion that inspired the 
cry, ”My kingdom for a horse! ” 



MEDICAL SCHOOLS SPONSOR ARMY HOSPITALS 

CHUNGKING .. The Hsiangya and Shanghai 
National Medical Schools have agreed to 
sponsor army hospitals. This is in line 
with the Five Year Plan for medical educa- 
tion, which was described in the March- 
April issue of the Bulletin. Hsiangya 
will run a hospital in Yuaning, while 
Shanghai will be in charge of a hospital 
in another section of Hunan Province. The 
colleges will supply the necessary doctors 
and nurses, and the administrative person- 
nel and soldiers will come f r an the Army. 
That v part of each school’s staff which is 
assigned to the army hospitals will count 
toward the quota which the school would be 
called upon to provide under conscription. 
The Five Year Plan aims at improving the 
medical service of the army and at the same 
time enable the medical school to carry 
on during the difficult years of war and 
reconstruction. 

Abmac Bulletin 

AMERICAN BUREAU FOR MEDICAL AID TO CHINA 

1790 Broadway - New York |9, M. Y. . 



VOL. VII, Nos. 5-6 May- June 1945 

TABLE OF CONTENTS 

page 



Generalissimo Asks ABMAC Aid 1 

Nurses Answer Call to Colors 1 

Lim Named Surgeon General 2 

China Prepares for Offensive 3 

War Minister Invites Dr. Co Tui 4 

ABMAC Helps Improve Army Hospitals.... 5 

Dr. Cohn Conducts T.B. Clinic 6 

Here the Twain Shall Meet 7 



RETURN POSTAGE GUARANTEED 

POSTMASTER: If addressee has removed and new address is 
known, notify sender on Form 35U7, postage 
for which is guaranteed. 



her country that she had to coin a Chinese 
word for ’’nurse”. As there were no nursing 
textbooks in Chinese she translated one 
from English. This was printed at the ex- 
pense of a grateful patient, Yuan Shih-kai, 
China’s first president. Major Lyon was one 
of the founders of the Nurses* Association 
of China, which has done so much to raise 
professional standards. 

As the wife of an American Mrs. Lyon has 
made her home in this country since 1923. 
Her two sons are in our armed forces and 
she, herself, volunteered for the U. S. 
Nursing Corps but was rej ected as over-age . 

Captain Tchou, who came to America in 
1938, graduated fromNewton Hospital School 
of Nursing and received a B.S. at Teachers 
College. An ABMAC fellowship enabled her to 
study blood bank techniques at Presbyterian 
Hospital in New York so that she can serve 
in a blood bank in China. Capt. Tchou is 
particularly interested in nursing educat ion 
and, after the war, hopes to join the teach- 
ing staff of the Lanchow School of Nurs ing. 



ANATOMY SLIDES VALUABLE TO AMFSS LIBRARY 

KWEIYANG . . A set of kodochrome slides 
of microscopic human anatomy, prepared by 
Dr. Aura E. Severinghaus and sent to the 
Army Medical Field Service Training School 
by ABMAC, has been called the most valuable 
asset of the AMFSS library. This is one of 
the best medical libraries in China. 




•M A 

A'BMAC 



PARTICIPATING IN 

AFFILIATED with 








VOL. VI I, Nos. 7-8 



HUMANITY 





tktii 



UNITED CHINA RELIEF 

NATIONAL WAR FUND 



ABOVE ALL 



§9 



JULY-AUGUST 1945 




Wounded Chinese Soldiers Are Carried by ABMAC Ambulance to 
Plane Which Will Fly Them to a Base Hospital 

(Photo by U.S. Army Signal Corps) 



CHINESE RELIEF SOCIETIES PLEDGE AID TO ARMY 



Nearly a quarter of a million dollars 
will be spent by Chinese Relief Societies 
in this country to equip mobile medical 
units for the Chinese Army. The generous 
response of these societies to their coun- 
try’s needs was stimulated by the follow- 
ing cable from Surgeon General Lim. 

t •* 

"AMA GREATLY APPRECIATES- YOJR EFFORTS 
ON BEHALF WOUNDED ET SICK SOLDIERS. THREE 
YEARS BLOCKADE HAVE RESULTED SERIOUS SHORT- 
AGES IN ARMY MEDICAL SERVICE. U.S. GIVING 
IMPORTANT MEDICAL ASSISTANCE BUT YOUR HELP 
STILL NECESSARY IF MORE COMPLETE SUPPORT 



IS TO BE PROVIDED." 



New York’s Chinese Relief Society has 
already raised $50,000; pledges have been 
made by relief societies in these cities. 



Chicago 

Los Angeles 

San Francisco 

Oakland 

Sacramento 

Stockton 

Seattle 

(continued 



$52,000 

52.000 
52, 000 

15. 000 

15, 000 

15, 000 

7,500 

on Page 8) 



- 1 - 






Abmac Bulletin 

THE AMERICAN BUREAU FOR MEDICAL AID TO CHINA, INC. 

1790 BORADWAY, NEW YORK 19, N.Y. 

Participating in United China Relief 
Cooperating in National War Fund 



MME. CHIANS KAI-SHEK 
Honorary Chairman 



k 



HIS EXCELLENCY, DR. WEI TA0-MIN6 
HIS EXCELLENCY, DR. HU SHIH 
Honorary Preai dents 

CONSUL-GENERAL TSUNE-CH I YU - Honorary Vice President 
OFFICERS 

OR. DONALD D. VAN SLYKE, PRESIDENT DR. MAURICE WILLIAM, 3RD VICE PRES. 

LELAND REX ROBINSON, CHAIRMAN OF BOARD MRS. UULIAN CHASE, SECRETARY 

DR. CO TUI, 1ST VICE PRES. JOHN U. MARTIN, TREASURER 

DR. FRANK L. MELENEY, 2ND VICE PRES. WALTER d. PF IZENMAYER, ASST. TREAS. 
HERBERT L. DONALD, ASST. TREAS. 

HELEN KENNEDY STEVENS, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR' 

This Bulletin is Issued bi-monthly for the benefit of our friends and contributors 
SUBSCRIPT I OH, fl. 00 per year 



EDITOR 

CHARLES W. FERGUSON 



ASSOCIATE EDITOR 
RUTH BLOCK 



RUMORS PROVE FALSE 

Rumors have frequently been circulated 
by people wishing to discredit the Govern- 
ment of China. One of the most persistent 
is the charge that supplies, contributed 
by the American people for relief, are be- 
ing hoarded for some sinister purpose. 
Such baseless accusations can only lead to 
serious misunderstandings between Americans 
and Chinese. 

ABMAC microfilms have been the subject 
of numerous rumors. It was alleged that 
the EMSTS kept all the films for their own 
use. Then the NHA was accused of receiving 
the films and failing to distribute them. 
Next came the charge that cases of micro- 
film had been carelessly ’’lost” in godowns 
near Kunming. All these charges have been 
proven false, and the microfilms, after 
some unavoidable delays, have reached the 
institutions for which they were intended. 

The true situation is summed up in a 
recent letter from Lt. Col. John Tripp, an 
American officer attached to the NHA. 



tain the good will of the Chinese people. 
They have pride; they have problems. I 
sincerely hope that we can help them with- 
out raising disagreeable issues based on 
incomplete information. Our continued 
whispering campaigns are a disgrace. 



ABMAC DIRECTORS HOLD ANNUAL MEETING 

One of the speakers at ABMAC’ s Annual 
Meeting on June 19 was Dr. Shen-yen Cheri, 
who gave medical aid to Capt. Ted Lawson 
and his crew when their bomber crashed in 
Occupied China after the raid on Tokio in 
1942. The young doctor, who recently ar- 
rived in the U.S. to study surgery as the 
guest of the American Government, said: 

’’The doctors in China must work very 
hard to try to take care of the large num- 
ber of people sick or wounded as a result 
of the war. The help which has been sent 
by the American Bureau for Medical Aid to 
China during this crisis has been of the 
greatest value. Every person in China who 
has been helped by American medicines is 
grateful for this expression of encourage- 
ment. ” 

Dr. Grant Endorses ABMAC Policy 

Dr. John B. Grant, recently returned 
from India and China, attributed much of 
China’s medical progress to the assistance 
of ABMAC. He endorsed our policy of work- 
ing with existing medical organizations in 
China. Dr. Grant, former Director of the 
All-India Hygiene Institute, has rendered 
invaluable aid to ABMAC in getting its per- 
sonnel and supplies from India to China. 



’’Transportation of any kind of supplies 
is very difficult and terrifically expen- 
sive. The activities of the American Red 
Cross and ABMAC have been of greatest im- 
portance in maintaining some sort of supply 
system for the various medical services in 
China. Everyone admits this. The failures 
have been few compared with the successes, 
and all the failures can be traced either 
to lack of transportation or to inadequate 
budgets. Most of the time and money today 
is spent trying to get the essentials of 
life and keeping staff together. 

”It is to our national interest to main- 



Other speakers were Dr. John Scudder, 
wno reported on his trip to China, Dr. J. 
Heng Liu, Dr. Donald D. Van Slyke, and the 
Chairmen of Standing Committees. 

Off Ice rs El ected 

Mrs. Julian Chase was named Secretary; 
all other officers were reelected for the 
coming year. Three new Directors, chosen 
at the meeting, are Arthur Corwin of Socony 
Vacuum Oil Company; Herbert Donald of the 
Chase National Bank; Dr. Magnus Gregersen, 
Professor of Physiology at Columbia Univer- 
sity College of Physicians and Surgeons. 



- 2 - 



AMERICAN CLUBWOMEN AID CHINA’S NURSES 

\ 

NEW YORK .. A gift of $19, OOO to China’s 
Army Nursing School boosts the total amount 
contributed by the National Federation of 
Business and Professional Women’s Clubs in 
the past year to $36, 500. In recognition of 
her leadership in this project, Federation 
President Margaret Hickey received a cer- 
tificate of membership in the China Relief 
Legion from United China Relief. 

Col. Chow Mei-yu, Dean of the Army Nurs- 
ing School, asksABMAC to convey the s incere 
appreciation of its staff and students to 
each member of the Federation. She writes: 



they still need some money to buy articles 
of daily necessity. One pair of ordinary 
cotton stockings costs at least $1,500 in 
Chinese currency. We realize that our stu- 
dents are not the only ones who are in need. 
All- the students in China are more or less 
under the same fate, and the constant fi- 
nancial worry affects their study. Part of 
the loan fund will be used to engage gar- 
deners to cultivate vegetables and raise 
pigs. By so doing the capital may increase 
and both students and staff may have bet- 
ter nutrition. 

’’Scholarships will be given to students 
and to promising junior staff. 




’’Last year we moved in our new- 
ly built dormitories. Due to the 
limited fund for construction, we 
have mud floors and no ceilings. 
During winter, since fuel is so 
expensive that nobody can afford 
to have a room heated, the damp 
cold is unbearable. In summer, 
when it rains the floor gets very 
damp and actually becomes muddy. 
A simple bamboo mat ceiling and a 
slate floor will help a lot. 



’’During the hard times which all nations 
are facing now such a grant will be most 

valuable to us materially and spiritually. 
We shall be most careful in handling this 
sum, and it is our hope that every cent of 
it will be wisely spent so as to justify 
the aims and expectations of the generous 
» donors. 

’’The money will be allocated as follows: 

Students’ Loan Fund 5% 

Scholarships 5% 

Teaching Facilities 40% 

Improvement of Living Quarters 50% 

* N 

’’Although our school provides students 
with the necessary stationeries and books, 



Dr. Scudder Visits Army Hospital atKweiyang 



’’If any money is left over it 
will be used to buy some cotton 
quilts to be loaned to the needy 
students during winter.” 



’’Watches and clocks are very expensive 
here, but they are absolutely necessary for 
nurses. We wish to buy three strong and 
reliable clocks and place one in the main 
classroom, one in the students’ dormitory, 
and one in the staff's dormitory. 



Students Need Uniforms 



’’At present the students wear military 
uniforms, men and women alike. The regular 
nursing uniform, besides bearing profession- 
al dignity, actually helps in carrying out 
duties. If our students are provided with 
some uniform cloth and shoes the students 
will be encouraged and the patients will be 
impressed. Due respect to the nursing pro- 
fession will thus be commanded. The cur- 
. rent price for a pair of service 
shoes is about NC$10,000 and a 
foot of cloth costs between one 
and two thousand dollars. 



- 3 - 




PROFILE 



FILMS AND PROJECTORS REACH CHINA 



Among his scientific and academic honors 
Dr. Aura E. Severinghaus values none more 
highly than the Medal 
of Honored Merit from 
the Republic of China. 

He received this award 
in recognition of his 
services t o Chinese 
medical education, as 
Chairman of the ABMAC 
Committee on Microfilm 
and Medical Libraries. 

From 1920 through 
1 9 2 6 he ’was head of 
the Biology Depart- 
ment andd Dean of the 
pre-Medical School at 
Peiping Onion Medical ^ MraE - Stvertnghaus 

College. Rejoining the faculty of Columbia 
University in 1927, he is now Associate Pro- 
fessor of Anatomy and the Associate Dean of 
the College of Physicians and Surgeons. He 
has done intensive research in the minute 
structure, function and inter-relationship 
of the glands of internal secretion in man, 
publishing numerous papers and books. He 
was one of five investigators chosen by the 
Singer-Polignac Foundation to represent the 
U.S. and Canada at an international sympo- 
sium on hormones-, held in Phris in 1937. 

' \ 

During his last sabbatical year he made 
a notable contribution t-o Chinese medical 
education. He devised and built a special 
apparatus to photograph microscopic sec- 
tions of human anatomy in color. Assisted 
by Dr. W. M. Copenhaver, he made more than 
5000 kodachrome slides which now enable the 
Army Medical Field Service School to give 
complete courses in the minute structure of 
human tissues. In consultation with other 
American medical leaders, he select's the 
textbooks and journals which ABMAC micro- 
films and sends to China. 

Dr. Severinghaus was an enthusiast ic big 
game hunter in China. Whenever possible he 
combined a wild boar or big horn sheep hunt 
with his trips to -the interior. Golf is a 
much less strenuous pres'ent day sport. We 
hear that after studying the recent encour- 
aging' report on ABMAC’ s microfilms, which 
appears in the next column, Dr. Severinghaus 
cut ten strokes from his score. 



CHUNGKING .. The Microfilm Distribution 
Center recently received 9ll reels of micro- 
filmed medical literature and 20 pro j ec tors 
from ABMAC. They have been distributed among 
the following institution^: 

Army Medical College 
Army Medical Field Service School 
Chinese Red Cross Medical Relief Corps. 
National Central Medical College 
National Epidemic Prevention Bureau 
National Institute of Health 
National Kweiyang Medical College 
National Shanghai Medical College 
Northwest Institute of Health 
West China Union University 

With ABMAC’ s financial assistance the 
Microfilm Center puts out a monthly publi- 
cation called ’’Current Medical Selections 
frcm Microfilms Donated by ABMAC.” It con- 
sists of 120 pages of reproductions of or- 
iginal articles, reviews, abstracts and 
news, and 500 copies are distributed free 
of charge to public medical and health in- 
stitutions. An additional 300 copies are 
sold to private subscribers. In this way 
current medical literature is made avail- 
able to large numbers of Chinese doctors, 
medical professors and students. 



CHINA IMPROVES ARMY RATIONS 

CHUNGKING . . The new ration scheme of 
the Chinese Army aims to provide soldiers 
with a daily diet of about 3600-3700 cal- 
ories. It will include rice, salt, leafy 
and - root vegetables, soybeans, peanuts, 
vegetable oil, meat when available, and 
multiple vitamin capsules. The vitamins 
must be imported from the United States, 
but most of the foodstuffs can be secured 
in China. Plans are being made to explore 
the possibilities of using local methods 
of preserving food. 

\ 

In the past the Chinese Army has only 
issued rice and salt. Soldiers received 
cash allowances to purchase supplementary 
articles of food. The new ration scheme 
affords an opportunity to modernize the 
Quartermaster Service by substituting the 
principle of "issues in kind" for the in- 
adequate cash allowances. 




- 4 - 




BLOOD BANK WORK IS WELL DONE 



KUNMING . . From a captain in the 
U.S. Army comes high praise for the 
Chinese Blood Bank. He writes: 

’’One of the many handicaps that 
this ardent group is up against is* 
that there is no running water in 
the building. There is a well out- 
side, but the water is too hard for 
cleaning purposes so they have to 
use a small stream. Knowing how im- 
portant spotless cleanliness is in 
this type of work you can imagine 
what hardships they are up against . 




% 



’’Bistilled water is another prob- 
lem. They need more than 20 gal- 
lons a day, whereas they can only 
get five out of their distiller. The rest 
they must haul from the cotton factory some 
distance away, at a carrying post (to the 
coolies) of approximately CN$1, 000 a day. 



Dr. Helena Wong Draws Blood From Lt. Gen. Lu Tso 
As Maj . Gen. Cheves, a Former Donor, Looks On 



give from three to six infusions of blood 
cells every day to poor people who suffer 
from anemia. 



’’Most of the laundry has to be ’done at 
home’, for it costs about CN$700 per sheet 
at the local cleaning establishments which 
return them looking yellow. Gauze and other 
things that would be thrown away in the 
States after the first using are washed and 
used over again. 



”1 may not have used all the proper med- 
ical terms, but this should give you some 
idea of what the Blood Bank is doing here 
to fulfill its generous and humane assign- 
ment. I know the whole staff personally, 
and they are a splendid group. I know that 
their work is often tedious to the extreme, 
but it’s work well done and deserves all 
the credit that’s given — and more. v 



’’Still another handicap and time waster 
is the lack of an ambulance. Frequently 
they take trips by train into the country- 
side to draw blood from the Chinese Army 
volunteers in the field. On the last trip 
Dr. Wong, three nurses and two soldier at- 
tendants stayed in the army camps three 
nights and were on the road two days. The 
blood is shipped back to the blood bank by 
plane, but the staff must return by what- 
ever transportation is available, including 
army trucks and jeeps. 

. ■» 

’’One day the mobile unit met a G. I. who 
had been on the boat with them coming from 
America. He was interested in their work 
and said they could take two bottles of blood 
from him (the bottles they use contain only 
350 c.c.). The same day, 50 other American 
soldiers followed him to donate a bottle of 
blood apiece. 

% 

’’Mrs. Jean Chum Liu says that, in addi- 
tion to their other work, they generally 



NURSES IMPROVE BLOOD BANK TECHNIQUE 

KUNMING . . Chinese Blood Bank nurses have 
improved their methods of packing supplies 
for the mobile unit. Bleeding sets are put 
in four boxes, each holding 72 sets. Jars 
of gauze, applicators, tourniquets, bottle 
clamps, needles and syringes are packed se- 
curely in a minimum of space, with extra 
bags of gauze filling in the cracks. Bulky 
equipment goes in, large tin cans, later used 
to hold donors’ bottles during bleeding so 
the donors cannot see the blood. 

Each bottle (about 200 daily) has to be 
rinsed five times before soaping, five times 
after soaping, five times before rinsing in 
sulphuric acid and then five times with dis- 
tilled water. Hundreds of feet of rubber 
tubing must be washed, piece by piece, and 

boiled in distilled water. No wonder Mrs. 

/ 

Jean Chum Liu writes that sometimes she 
could scream because there is no water. 



- 5 - 





NHA REQUESTS ABMAC AID FOR 1945-1946 



CHUNGKING.. The chief responsibility of 
the National Health Administration in the 
year 1945-1946 will be to direct all public 
health activities to support the war effort 
and rehabilitation services. The extent of 
this task will strain the resources of the 
NHA. ABMAC’ s financial assistance to the 
following proj ects will help the NHA to ful- 
fill its wartime responsibilities. 

Training Public Health Personnel 

All new graduates of medical and nursing 
schools are conscripted by the army. Unless 
effective measures are takentto train more 
public health personnel it will be impossible 
to carry out health programs in the free and 
liberated areas. The training courses will 
aim to increase the quantity and quality of 
public health workers. The main part of the 
work will take place in Chungking, with ad- 
ditional training centers to be established 
in newly liberated areas. 

Epidemics Must be Controlled 

Control of epidemic diseases is of partic- 
ular importance to the war effort. Since 
effective control depends upon intelligent 
application of anti-epidemic measures, it is 
necessary to undertake epidemiological in- 
vestigations. Demonstrations of malaria 
control have been carried on successfully. 
Studies of typhus and cholera control have 
begun, and anti-epidemic measures will be 
based upon their results. In 1945-1946 em- 
phasis will be placed on the control of ty- 
phus, relapsing fever, cholera and plague. 

Field Demonstrations 

These projects, initiated by ABMAC, have 
been functioning for the past three years. 
They include maternity and child health cen- 
ters, the Shatze Urban Health Center, the 
Pishan Rural Health Demonstration Center, 
industrial health service and health educa- 
tion. These services will be expanded to 
provide a teaching field for the training 
program. Posters and pamphlets, illustrat- 
ing rules of health and hygiene, will be 
prepared for army use. Cooperating with 
the National Resources Commission the in- 
dustrial health service will be extended to 
the most important war industries. 




Experimenting in NHA Laboratory 



State Dental Health Program 

The Dental Health Board is functioning 

actively. Enrollment at West China Union 
College of Dentistry and at the Dental Col- 
lege of National Central Medical College 
has practically doubled. The amount of pre- 
ventive dentistry practised at the Dental 
Health Center in Shapingpa has increased 
considerably in 1945, and dental services 
have been installed in the Central Hospitals 
of Chungking, Kweiyang and the Northwest. 

State Nursing Program 

Three new nurs ing schools established by 
the Nursing Association of China are now pro- 
viding a high standard of training. The NAC 
performed effective service in aiding nurses 
during the evacuation of Kweilin and Kweiyang 
in 1944. This organization deserves finan- 
cial support to enable it to continue its 
important work of sustaining the morale of 
graduate nurses during the hard times caused 
by war and inflation. 

Manufacture of Intravenous Fluids 

With the help of Lt. Col. John Tripp, the 
National Institute of Health has produced py- 
rogen free intravenous fluids with locally 
improvised equipment. Samples, sent to the 
local hospitals for testing, have proved sat- 
isfactory. The NIH is also training and or- 
ganizing four mob ile units to produce intra- 
venous fluids for the army. To meet military 
and civilian needs the service must be ex- 
panded in the coming year. Dr. Co Tui is 
expected to be in Chungking to supervise the 
large scale production of pyrogen free intra- 
venous fluids. 



- 6 - 







SOROPTIMISTS NAME NEW CHAIRMAN 

NEW YORK . . Mrs. Felicitas Keel has been 
appointed Chairman of the Committee on Chi- 
nese Contacts of the American Federation of 
Soroptimists Clubs. She replaces Madaline 
Murphy, who has gone overseas as a Recrea- 
tion Director of the American Red Cross. 

For their services to China, Soroptimist 
President Lois Sandall and Miss Murphy re- 
ceived certificates of membership in the 
China Relief Legion from United China Re- 
lief. The Soroptimists have made generous 
contributions to the Lanchow Nursing School. 
In addition to financial support they plan 
to send nursing books, which are urgently 
needed by the school. 

SCIENTISTS SEEK MALARIA SPECIFIC 

CHUNGKING .. Research scientists of the 
National Health Administration have been 
investigating Chang Shan for the past three 
years. This native herb is commonly found 
in the provinces where malaria is prevalent. 
Experiments have already indicated that the 
herb has definite anti-malaria properties, 
but further investigation is necessary be- 
fore it can safely be used on patients. At 
present the extreme scarcity of quinine and 
atabrine in China makes it impossible for 
many malaria sufferers, both military and 
civilian, to secure any specific treatment. 

Treatment of Shock 

' Since the supply of plasma and other in- 
fusion fluids is not sufficient to meet the 
needs of tne Chinese Army, shock remains a 
serious problem. NHA scientists are inves- 
tigating the possibility of treating shock 
with simple chemicals given by mouth. 



— 1 

American Bureau for Medical Aid to China * 
1790 Broadway New York 19,. N.Y. J 

Participating in National War Fund i 

through United China Relief. I 

I enclose $ 1. 00 for a year’s subscrip- 1 
tion- to the ABMAC Bulletin. 1 



Name 

Address 



- 7 - 



ON THE MOVE 

J. Heng Liu, ABMAC Director is now in 
London attending an UNKRA Conference. He 
is accompanied by Cheng Pao-nan, former 
ABMAC representative in China. 



CHINESE RELIEF SOCIETIES PLEDGE AID 

(continued from page i) 

The success of this project is due in 
large measure to the efforts of the fol- 
lowing leaders of Chinese communities. 



Joseph Wei, ABMAC Transportation Mana- 
ger, has left for India to speed delivery 
of our supplies from India into China. 

Col . Chow Mei-yu, Head of the Army Nurs- 
ing School at Kweiyang, is in England to 
attend a conference, at the invitation of 
Lady Mountbatten. ABMAC hopes that Col. 
Chow, one of China’s outstanding women, may 
be able to visit the United States. 



Chicago 

/ 

Los Angeles 



New York 



Oakland 



James Moy 
Chin Kun-lo 

i 

Chu Sau-yan 
Dr. T. B. Chew 

Chu Ting-wing 
Lau Yan-chao 

Lew Gan-sheng 



C. T. Loo, Chairman of ABMAC ’s Chinese 
Advisory Committee, is in Paris. 

Capt. Adet Lin of the Chinese Blood Bank 
has gone to Chungking as temporary secretary 
to Surgeon General Lim. The assignment of 
a group of American medical experts to as- 
sist in reorganizing the Army Medical Admin- 
istration has greatly increased the need for 
English speaking secretaries. 

Dr. Stanley Chiu has arrived in India en 
route to China where he will fill the post 
of surgeon at the Chungking Army Hospital. 
ABMAC arranged his transportation and pur- 
chased surgical instruments and anesthesia 
equipment for him to take to China. He has 
received thorough training in surgery and 
anesthesia at the Mayo Clinic, the Onondaga 
Sanatorium, the New England Deaconess Hos- 
pital and the Massachusetts General Hospi- 
tal. Dr'. Chiu joins the Chinese Army with 
the rank of colonel. 



Sacramento Bill Fong 

San Francisco B. S. Fong 

Chan Tok-chau 

Seattle K. K. Lew 

Stockton Wong Sai-gin 

The trucks and equipment needed to en- 
able the mobile medical units to operate 
close to the front lines will be purchased 
by ABMAC. This is not the first time that 
it has acted as a central purchasing agent 
for Chinese organizations in America. Be- 
tween 1938 and 1941 more than 100 trucks 
were donated to the Chinese Army by Chinese 
patriotic societies, through ABMAC." They 
were fitted with ambulance bodies and were 
used to transport both wounded soldiers and 
medical supplies. Many were demolished in 
battle or lost in Burma, but some are still 
in operation. 



Abmac Bulletin 

AMERICAN BUREAU FOR MEDICAL AID TO CHINA 
1790 Broadway - New York 19, M.Y. . 

VOL. VII, Nos. 7-8 July-August 1945 

TABLE OF CONTENTS 

page 



Chinese Relief Societies Pledge Aid .. 1 

Rumors Prove False £ 

ABMAC Directors Hold Annual Meeting .. 2 

Clubwomen Aid China ! s Nurses 3 

Profile . .. 4 

Films and Projectors Reach China ..... 4 

Blood Bank Work is Well Done 5 

NHA Requests ABMAC Aid 6 

Chinese Column 7 



RETURN POSTAGE GUARANTEED 



POSTMASTER: If addressee has removed and new address is 
known, notify sender on Form 35U7, postage 
for which is guaranteed.