Skip to main content

Full text of "info - Issue 44 (1991-11)(.info Publications)(US)"

See other formats


EiTFEfl .info's liih AMJIVEfiSAfi/ GP/E;\WAy»»; 



OVER $V4!)l)& JjJ 

FPIZZ PfiJ^ESJ 

JjJOLJJDJjJG: 

j\DZO TOASiTErl 

DOT J * J.:DPriO 

rlAri&WArtZ ii 

SOrTWA^E 

(S3S pg. ^ 




DV. 19 



&ifom 







m 



■ . 





,_ 




■ : 
■ 












[^ 


pffKifcafr i4»[ 


IB 




fWr 




WK&k 


Hi 




Kg 


ydfi 







- -^ > 




,v*** 



CHS v^ifg 








' T ''"'» 



Alive and Killing! 

"Put simply, AMNIOS is the best 
shoot-'em-up that has been released 
for a long time". 

- Amiga Action - 93% 



Penetrate the living hell that is Amnios. 
Counter your comparatively diminutive 
ship against the merciless might of 
ten living, breathing planets in an 
audacious endeavour to rescue 
imprisoned members of your own 
persuasion. 

Pick up indigenous DNA and utilise it to 
fabricate enhanced weaponry to abet 
your pestilential quest. 

Aw, forget the Bull! Just get in 
there and save the World! 

Amiga Scrsen Shots 

PSYGNOSIS, 29 ST. MARY'S CT., BROOKLINE, MA 02146 
TEL: (61 7) 731 -3553 FAX: (61 7) 731 -8379 



Circle #1 1 5 on the Reader Service Card 



■ 




ijunmiruuiuii 







i 




■ hh MA 

" h 



if. 











fraUii pM« f U*i fa pv a Urptfi #t 3EB 




N<®K3S=±s=3"3l 






BARBARIAN II 

Necron's back in town and he wants revenge. Only you - in the guise 
of Hegor the Barbarian - have the courage, strength and stupidity to 
face the challenge: 

It's time once again to don your dented helmet, tie your sweaty 
breechcloth, sharpen your rusting sword and move your big feet in the 
direction of danger. 

Forests, caves, dungeons, castles and temples await your barbaric 
exploration, each is infested with deadly inhabitants and devious traps 
ready to terminate your lowbrow activities. 
Featuring 2,000 frames of sprite animation, 32 colours on-screen, 
parallax scrolling, 6 levels of continuous arcade/adventure action, over 
1 megabyte of fully-animated sprites, 50 divergent enemies, Magic & 
Health Potions to help you on your quest and a plethora of unique 
weapons to find and use. Barbarian II is: 

The ultimate in loincloth entertainment. 

Screen Shots from the Amiga version 

SEEING IS BELIEVING 



PSYGNOSIS 

29 Saint Mary's Court, 

Brookline, MA 02146 

Telephone: (617) 731-3553 

Fax: (617)731-8379 



Circle #102 on the Reader Service Card 



fiSKS 






Issue #44, November 1991 

About the COVGT: This issue marks .info's eighth birthday, which makes us one of the oldest 
computer magazines around, and the oldest surviving Amiga magazine. To celebrate, we're giving 
away over SI 2,000 worth of cool Amiga software and hardware, .info wishes to thank the many 
generous companies who donated products for our birthday bash. See page 34 for details. 
The cover illustration is a 1536 X 960 24-bit rendered with Newtek's Lightwave 3D. .info is produced 
and managed entirely with Amigas running off-the-shelf consumer software and peripherals, 

CONTENTS CONTENTS CONTENTS CONTENTS 




ProVish 



ions 





Graphics page 38 

Brad Schenck presents a RoundUp of the 
top Amiga native mode paint programs. 

♦ MultiMedia page 43 

Hon/ Laser's Rockin' and Boppin' to 
CD+G on CDTV. (With discography!) 

Audio page 46 

Bob Lindstrom examines the topic of how to add music to 
multimedia. 

m Video page 48 

OJ Sands ///puts himself in the picture with MicroSearch's 
impressive Chromakey. 



■■■■■■■ 



.info technical support 

54 UNIX: Is It For You? 

Daniel Barrett finishes his 
discussion with Part II: For the 
Programmer, 

58 Quarterback Tools 

David Martin reviews this 
Amiga utility program. 

60 Point / Counterpoint 

Nick Sullivan and Chris Zamara debate the relative virtues 
of the Workbench and CLI. 

62 Checking Out Programs 

Jim BuUerjield warns that Hallowe'en and Christmas may 
be the same thing. 






28 1 |i 






8' L'. -- 


3u*j 

[)«j4l«^Uff*>-M»f •— * tf+* f-*1. til" mttitt A ill u 1 
■ U Mr 'tttllh Hipt liltVa|ri|^M-| ftaditf iJi uj-i ftjir 1 


|-rSfa- ■--.--■ 




.,..., 








jfrr.ii.. . .- 








MP"^ 






«-"^^^^* i ^r 








■fei 





Columns 

20 Hardware 

Mo;r Kevelson packs an A 500 
with [CD's internal peripherals. 

23 Public Domain 

JeffLowenthal looks at programs 
from GEnic and CranWare. 

24 Tir Na Nog 

Brad Schenck explains the 
creative process. 

28 CyberPJay 

Tom reviews 4 new games, then 
twiddles his electronic thumbs. 

36 Productivity 

Jim Meyer backs up with 
Ami-Back and Flashback. 

52 DevCon Report 

Mark visits the Coors Brewery 
and the Amiga DevCon. 



DEPARTMENTS 


6 


.info Monitor 


8 


Mail 


10 


New Products 


18 


News & Views 


18 


.info Update 


19 


The Rumor Mill 


65 


Advertisers' Index 



.info NOVEMBER 1991 




Extended Forecast For San Francisco. 

Mostly Cloudy With 

A Slim Chance Of Survival. 














The outlook for the City by the Bay in the 21st Century is grim. A toxic cloud has billowed into town, 
smothering half the inhabitants. You're a hard-nosed cop called upon to soar through the cloud choked streets 
in your advanced XB500 hoverbike and defend the dwindling population. Especially now that the cloud 
provides a sinister smoke screen for the evil doings of a rabid pack of criminals, The Black Angels. Your mission 
is to net the ringleaders and solve the mystery of the cloud that kills. 

Receive each often daring assignments in the Briefing Room and strategically 
plant nets and robotic holding units throughout the city. Stoke your hoverbike with 
machine gun ammo, cannon rounds and a reserve fuel tank, then prepare to engage 
enemies in dogfights, seize robots and intercept enemy attacks. Interrogate 
captured suspects for key information. Exhilarating flight simulation lets you select 
flight or hover mode, forward and reverse thrust, refuel, radar detection, 
weaponry, multiple views and more. Navigate your way through an urban 
obstacle course of 240 authentically scaled San Francisco buildings and 
landmarks. To survive, you'll have to be skilled at piloting, combat, mapping 
strategies, and sleuthing. 

It's time now to don your foui weather gear and shield the citizens from 
the suffocating smog. See for yourself why the Killing 
Cloud will take your breath away. 

Available Fall 1991 for MS-DOS and Amiga. 

Circle #104 on the Reader Service Card 




»I990 Vcttor GiAphbt Ltd. 

199I Mlrosoft Ltd. Itie Kiting Cloud™ mi lm«gc Worts™ 
IK iMdwruiki of Mirronoft Ltd 
3 Rwi*n»4hd[t|#«retedP*lerurl<otKonamlCo..ltd 
PIWIfcKum.tr*. 1KB) 2I5-5I 1 1. Ml KSlKtoCTKd. 




KONAMI 



VVJIlilS ■■" 



.info Monitor 



Mark R, Brown 
Managing Editor 



Benn Dunnington 
Publisher 



CHANGING TIMES 

We've been quietly celebrating our eighth anniversary around the offices and 
doing a little reminiscing about what the world was like eight years ago. .info was called 
The Cyborg Gazelle, Interchanged to INFO-64. There have been a few changes since then, 
some significant, some not. Some relevant, some not. Then again, some things haven't 
changed at all. We thought we'd share some of our lunch-table observations with you. 



Then: 

Ronald Reagan was President and George 

Bush was Vice President. 

Leonid Brezhnev ruled the Soviet Union. 

The Amiga hadn't yet been born, and the 

Commodore 64 was about to become the 

first machine to bring real computing to 

the masses at an affordable price. 

The U. S. was in the depths of a recession, 

but things were starling to look up. 

Computers were single-tasking. 

64K was more memory than anyone could 
possibly use. 

No one could possibly want more than 1 6 
colors. 

Software came on cassette tapes and car- 
tridges. 

Multimedia meant a slide projector, a mi- 
crophone, and a long wooden pointer. 
Desktop Publishing meant a typewriter 
and a copy machine. 

Spreadsheet meant putting a cloth cover- 
ing on a bed. 

Marketing meant going to the grocery 
store to pick up a few things. 

Telemarketing meant selling telephones, 
something Ma Bell was fighting tooth and 
nail. 

Listening to music involved putting a 
vinyl record on a turntable and then scrap- 
ing it with a needle. 

Watching TV involved deciding whether 
to watch ABC, CBS, NBC, or PBS and 
then adjusting the antenna to get the best 
reception. 

Computer graphics meant a few semi- 
recognizable blobs on the screen. 



Wow; 

George Bush is President and Dan Quayle 

is Vice President. 

There is no Soviet Union. 

The Amiga is five years old. and IBM has 

brought boring computing to the masses al 

an exorbitant price. 

The U. S. is in the depths of a recession, 
but things are starting to look up. 
Computers are multitasking, except for 
IBM and Apple. 
64 gigabytes isn't enough memory. 

No one could possibly want more than 16 

million colors. 

Software comes on floppy disks and CDs. 

Multimedia means whatever you want it 
to mean. 

Desktop Publishing means a computer, 
page layout software, a laser printer, and a 
copy machine. 

Spreadsheet means playing what-if with 
the Federal Deficit. 

Marketing means having a hunch of num- 
ber-crunchers decide what you're going to 
buy at the grocery. 

Telemarketing means having a recording 
call while you're eating dinner and try to 
sell you plastic siding for your house. 
Listening to music involves putting a 
shiny plastic disc in your portable CD 
player and jogging through traffic. 
Watching TV involves deciding whether 
to watch TBS, TNT. HBO, ESPN, AMC, 
USA. CNN. or CNBC and then calling the 
cable company to complain about the 
fuzzy reception. 

Computer graphics means raytracing, dig- 
itizing, and image processing. 



.info Publications 



Publisher & Editor 

Benn Dunnington 

Managing Editor 

Mark R. Brown 

Senior Editor 

Tom Malcom 

Technical Editors 

Nick Sullivan 
Chris Zamara 

Contributing Editors 

Greg Conley 
Mort Kevelson 
Bob Lindstrom 

Harv Laser 
Jeff Lowenthal 

Jim Meyer 

Oran J. Sands III 

Brad Schenck 

Art & Production 

Megan Ward 
Tony Bodensteiner 

Data Manager 

Judith Kilbury-Cobb 

Advertising Director 

Anna Folkers 

Marketing Director 

Joy E. Schmelzer 



Advertising Sales 

Facsimile 

Subscriptions 



(319)338-3620 
(319)338-0897 
(319)338-0703 



COPYRIGHT© 1991 
BY .info PUBLICATIONS 
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 



.into (ISSN 089758681 is published monthly except bi-monthly in 
August-September by .mlo Publications. 705 Highway 1 West. Iowa 
City. IA 52246. US subscription rate is $26.00. one year; $17.50. two 
years; 565 00, three years. Canada f Mexico rates in US lunds are 
$34.00, one year; $63.50, two years; $89.00. three years, Foreign 
surface rate is $50.00 [US funds), one year. Second-class postage 
paid at Iowa City, [A and al additional mailing ollice. POSTMASTER; 
Send address changes to .info, 705 Highway One, Iowa City. IA 
52246. 

.info is an independent journal not connected with Commodore 
Business Machines. Inc. National and worldwide distribution by 
Kable News Co.. New York, NY. Entire contents copyright 1991 by 
.into Publications. Iowa City, IA. No part ol this publication may be 
printed Dr otherwise reproduced wilhoul written permission from the 
publisher, .inlo makes every elforl to assure Ihe accuracy ol articles, 
stories, and reviews published in this magazine, .info assumes no 
responsibility for damages cue to errors or omissions. 



.info NOVEMBER 1991 



Sullivan Bluth Presents 




JL 



\ 



i 





IBM VGA Sctoohs Shown 





"5> 



*^ 




-'.'.->"'■"' 



BORF'S BRCK 
WITH R V€NG€RNC€... 



Just when you thought €orth was safe from the evil 

Commander Borf, his little henchmen, The Goons, hove blasted 

Borf with the Infonto Roy Q second time returning him to his full age - 

and evil. Lead flee through battles with the goons and Borf's other allies until 

you encounter the evil Commander himself in the ultimate battle for the universe. 

Space Ace II: Borf's Revenge brings the classical animation style of Don Bluth to the 
computer format featuring over Five megabytes of full screen animation, digitized sound 
and new animations not included on the original Space flee laser disc. 

Available for IBM PC™ and Compatibles, Amiga™, Atari ST™ and Macintosh®. 

Hc.'irjySnii Incorporated 
30 Wertheim Court, Suite 2 
Richmond Hill, Ontario, Canada L4B 189 
" Tel: (416,731-4175 Fai: (416) 764-8867 

njiiiuinull, Llct fjiagf? Sparc Ace II Brjll'r. Rcveiajo'is a Ifjdmnaik 
tj/imi tjy Sulliwrr Blurll InTcraclpvc Media. Inc. -t^tffll Sullivan Blulh fnleraclrre Media, Inc.; used under licenso. 
hga Sutiivan bSulh Inleraelrw MpJa. Inc. Character Designs G1983 Don Builti; £>1<I89 an audio, visui&and 
coeteot - SuHm 9ulH inKratUvu Menu. Inc ALL RIGHTS RESERVED-. PingjimmuKj $1991 ttooVSoll 
it tncorpoHled. 

Airega. Alan sr and IBM are liadcrr — 



U 'if . lf'i . 1 . I . ' fl ! " ^ ,! 1 



Circle #106 on the Reader Service Card 



z 



READER 



*0 —mr . 



MAIL 



.info Mail Boxes 

Our U.S. Mail address is: 

.info Reader Mail, 
705 Highway 1 West 
Iowa City, IA 52246 

FAX us at 319-338-0897 

Send EMail to the editors at: 
COMPUSERVE 70215,1034 

PORTAL INFOMAG 

GEnie INFO.MAG 

BIX INFO.MAG 

InterNet infomag@cup.portal.com 

Please do not use our EMail addresses 
to inquire about subscription problems. 
Mail sub problems and address 
changes to the Subscription Depart- 
ment at the above U.S. Mail address. 

/^fter reading ihe article Is 
Amiga DTP a Real Alternative? in the 
Aug/Sept issue, I wanted lo respond from 
an Amiga point of view. I am not going to 
condemn the Mac or IBM, I just want a 
chance to say that the Amiga is a goad 
choice for DTP. 

The screen shots of FrameMaker and 
PageMaker 4.0 look great. Obviously, the 
reviewer spent some time to create (he doc- 
uments shown. Comparing these to the 
three Amiga "heavyweight" contenders, it 
looks like they did not survive the fight. 
Users of PageStream, ProPage, or Saxon 
would be embarrassed if their pages actu- 
ally looked like the samples shown. 

In my opinion, the Amiga lacks hardly 
anything except an expensive price tag. 
According to the article. Amiga DTP users 
lack fonts and polish. PageStream 2.1 
offers support for IBM Type I and Comput- 
graphic Intellifont format fonts, and Soft- 
Logik is coming out with a PostScript type- 
face library, including clip-art. 

The lack of interchangeable wordpro- 
cessing files is also a problem for most Mac 
and IBM users. Amiga DTP software does 
support a variety of picture formats. For 
example. PageStream supports ail of them 
except for HPGL and COM. Most people 
use The Art Department Professional to 
convert graphics into a format their DTP 
software supports. 

You want polish? Call up an Amiga man- 
ufacturer and ask for brochures, literature. 



copies of reviews, or even press releases. I 
can guarantee that all of them will send you 
colorful, professional brochures. They may 
have smaller budgets than their Mac and 
IBM counterparts, but who says you have 
to spend a lot of money to be professional? 
- Ellen Kazmaier, Soft-Logik Publishing 



I here is one desktop publishing 
program for the Amiga that will handle 
long documents well. The lists of tasks for 
which the Amiga falls 'miserably short" on 
page 28 of Daryell Sipper's article reads 
like a list of ihe features of AmigaTeX. Ami- 
gaTeX handles cross-references, tables of 
contents, lists of figures and illustrations, 
tables, paragraph numbering, segmented 
documents, illustration linking, scientific 
equations, page numbering options, global 
changes, and much more. Any custom 
extensions can be coded in the powerful 
macro language, providing support for cus- 
tom documents such as catalogs or 
databases. And this is only a partial list of 
features. On the other hand, AmigaTeX is 
not an interactive point-and-shoot program, 
and it is quite a bit more complex than any 
other Amiga publishing program. Not every 
user needs all of these features, and the 
simpler interface provided by other desktop 
publishing programs can be seductive. 
Nonetheless, for complicated documents 
AmigaTeX is an alternative that should be 
explored. 

If any of your readers are interested, I 
would be happy to mail them some litera- 
ture and a free demo disk if they write me 
at Radical Eye Software. Box 2081. Stan- 
ford, CA 94309. 

- Tomas Rokicki, Radical Eye Software 

The two letters above are only a sample of 
the mail we received about Daryell Sipper's 
article, and there were many more. We 
chose these two because they' re from peo- 
ple from companies producing Amiga DTP 
software and we thought they deserved a 
chance to reply. - Mark & Benn 



I have a XT Bridgeboard 
installed in my A2000. I'm looking to 
upgrade my Bridgeboard to a AT. I have 
noticed that various companies offer to 



upgrade a A1000/A500 to a A200O/A2500. 
Is there a company(ies) which offer the 
same upgrade to the Bridgeboards? If so. 
could you enlighten me? 

In closing, I applaud your magazine for 
the "NO BULL" reporting your staff pro- 
vides to its readers. The only request I have 
it that you take productivity software 
(wordprocessors, spreadsheets etc.) and do 
some comparisons and "NO BULL" report- 
ing on them. 

- Mo Morrison. CompuServe 

We have a regular Productivity column, but 
Jim has spent most of his space so far on 
DTP programs. We do. however, plan to do 
wordprocessing, database, and spreadsheet 
programs in the future. Stay tuned. We 
know of no Bridgeboard exchange pro- 
gram. You should, however, be able to sell 
Ihe XT board and apply the cash towards 
an AT board. I suggest your local BBS or 
user group newsletter. Good luck! 

- Mark & Benn 



I hate going into my favorite 
software store these days. The first thing I 
do is go to the IBM/PC shelves. I can usu- 
ally pick out a dozen programs I'd like to 
have. I then go to the Amiga section and 
see if these are available for my computer, 
90% of the time they're not. I'd like to see 
software companies even the score belween 
IBM/PC and the Amiga. Amiga is the better 
computer, so why not give it the better 
selections? Concerned, 

- Eric J. Boerner 
Free Mail. Operation Provide Comfort. 

As your return address indicates a military 
posting somewhere in the Middle East, we 
can only assume that the desert sun was too 
much for you. The Amiga may indeed he 
the better computer, but software develop- 
ers, unlike the military, don't have truck- 
loads of money shipped to them whenever 
they want. (A possible exception to this is 
Bill Gates at Microsoft.) They're in the 
business lo make money, and nearly all of 
that cash comes from IBM sales. If you 
really want help in the effort la have more 
IBM titles converted for your Amiga, write 
to the publishers. They do read their mail. 

- Mark & Benn 



8 .infO NOVEMBER 1W1 



AQUESTBEYOND BELIEF... AWORLD BEYOIXD IMAGIMTION I 





* 




v ,*• 



c* 






BOSU MIND CHALI 
game of strategy, phi/ 
and psychological agility 
Master the art of the 
Bosu or glue up 
alt hope of ■ M 

reaching your 
Crystaltion. 



A DARK UND 



ODR1D is a city rich in culture. A place of musk 
=n poetry, politics and religion. \ J 

] civilization thriving on wealth and & 

power. A CITY MADE OF BONE ... 
1 The journey through the skull or%5lMJ|r 
is a dangerous one, but succes 
"-jring <K»ti great power and pos 
in Orod rim society ... 
YOU ENTER THE WORLD OF THE 
CKVSTALLION. ,. 




TRICKS OF THE 

Using your trading 

rate the currency requl 

to pay the keepers, and to 

fortify yourself on the to — 

, journey throu 

* / the TSIMIT. But 

beware, compete 

too ruthlessly in the 

ti and you may 

yourself isolated 

when YOU ask for 

assistance. 




Overcome the ; 

eerfe darkness 

of the four VEILS of I 



the maze r 

valuable cr 

that will alio 

you to journey - 

onwards and rfs&in-^- 

the ranks ofOrodrim socleti 

To Order: 

See your local retailer 
or call 1-800-245-7744 

" HAW NODE RAY 
TRACED GKAFWCS. 
ORIGINAL STEREO 
SOUNDTRACK - 
includes non- 
repeating music 
generator. 

' DIGITIZED VISUAL 
AND SOUND ■■■'. 

EFFECTS. 




AVAILABLE ONLY ON 

AMIGA 



U.S. Gold Ltd., 550 Soulli Winchester Boulevard, Suite 200, S.in Jose, CA 9512K. Tel <40H» 241. M>07. 



NEW 




U C T S 



Skimming 

through the 

Grand Canyon 

with Natural 

Graphics' 

Scenery 

Animator 




FLY-BY 



B, 



'rest Caseboli. of Scene Gen- 
erator fame, has finished a new fractal 
landscape generation package called 
Scenery Animator. As the title implies, the 
primary function is to create animated 3D 
fly-throughs of both real and imaginary 
landscapes, though it can also be used to 
make single images. The software takes a 
key-frame approach to animation, letting 
you graphically plot out the course your 
fly-through is to take and letling you spec- 
ify the number of frames to generate. To 
save you some time, there's a preview 
mode so you can check your flight path for 
accuracy before you start rendering. 
Scenery < Animator will display its results in 
all Amiga resolutions, has direct support for 
DCTV. and will also produce 24-bit IFF 
files. The animations are in Aniiro formal 
and can also be saved off as individual 
frames. The package includes real-world 
digital elevation data for parts of the Grand 
Canyon. Yosemite, High Sierras, and Lake 
Tahoe. with more so be released in the 
future. There are two versions of Scenery 
Animator in the package, one for a stock 
68000 machine and another that requires a 
68020 or '030. a math coprocessor, and a 
minimum of 2 megs of RAM to run. 
Scenery Animator will accept files from 
Virtual Reality's VistaPm and MegageM's 
ScenePw. S99.95 from Natural Graphics. 
PO Box 1963. Rocklin. CA 95677. 
916-624-1436. RS #201. 



ASDG 

I here are a couple of new 
developments from ASDG. First, they're 
shipping an entirely new. ground-up rewrite 
of their software for the Sharp JX300. 
JX450. and JX600 color scanners. Profes- 
sional ScanLab II is a hardware/software 
combination that gives WYSIWYG control 
over the scanning process. Consisting of a 
GPIB board, connecting cable, and two 
software drivers, the package offers both 
stand-alone control of the Sharp scanners or 
control from within The Art Department 
Professional. The WYSIWYG control 
means that using the scanners for video and 
publishing is far easier than before; the 
scanned area can be specified in either pix- 
els or inches and. even better, the image 
aspect can be locked in to fit a particular 
space. If you've ever used a color scanner, 
you know the resulting files are enormous 
and it's very easy to run out of memory for 
the scan. ASDG has overcome this problem 
by allowing direct-to-di.sk scans. It's all 
2.0-compatible and the system (excluding 
the scanner itself) retails for S800. If you 
already have one of ASDG's GPIB boards, 
the software is available separately for 
$300, 

In a separate, but somewhat related 
development. ASDG is incorporating JPEG 
image compression into The Art Depart- 
ment Professional as a standard feature, 
Widely used on IBM and Macs, the file 
compression can achieve some astonishing 
results. For example, an overscan, 24-bit 



image can be compressed from about 
LIMB down to less than 30K without sig- 
nificant degradation of the image. And it 
only lakes about 35 seconds to do it on an 
A3000. The nifty part of this is that TAD- 
Pro can perform image processing on the 
compressed files as they're loaded. For 
more information, contact ASDG at 925 
Stewart Street. Madison. WI 53713. 608- 
273-6585. RS #204. 



DP IV 



W, 



e already previewed Deluxe 
Paint IV back in the June issue, but now 
we've gotten our hands on the release ver- 
sion. There have been a few changes from 
the alpha we told you about. The most 
notable had us doing backflips down the 
hall - you can now double-click a filename 
to load a picture! That has always been one 
of the biggest gripes about DPaim. and EA 
has listened! To summarize the major new 
features: HAM support, more types of fill 
options, a mix mode, completely reworked 
palette and range control (including the 
ability to save and load palettes and color 
sets independently of pictures), ordered 
dithering, brush morphing, a light table 
mode, translucency and color processing 
functions, and enough other stuff lo keep us 
glued to our computers for months. A point 
that needs to be made here is that nearly all 
of the functions and tools can be used in 
any mode, including HAM. though some 
work better in some modes than others. 
And DPaim IV is intelligent about whal 
tools can be used in what combinations, 
ghosting inappropriate selections. Switch- 
ing screen resolutions and number of colors 
is smooth and seamless. Overall, it looks 
like DPaim IV is still the definitive paint 
program not just for the Amiga, but for any 
computer. Price is SI 79. Owners of DPaim 
HI can upgrade for S67, and if you're still 
back on DPaint II. you can upgrade for 
$97. Electronic Arts, 1450 Fashion Island 
Blvd.. San Mateo, CA 94404. 4 15-57 1 - 
7171. RS #205. 

NEWGVP 

\3reat Valley Products has pro- 
duced a new 24-bii graphics board thai 



10 .info NOVEMBER 1W1 




Created and then 
abandoned by the 
Old Gods, Tessera is 
blighted by plague, and the 
vicious rule of the Archmage 
and his henchmen. A dying priest 
of the Kobbold Old Way bequeaths a 
sacred quest: to find and wake N'Gnir, 
an Old God rumoured to slumber in 
one of the farthest-flung of Tessera's 
eight kingdoms. Battle your way 
through 94 landscapes, fending off 
demons and bandits, befriending 
princes and hermits, winning 
knowledge and strength as you 
travel. Arm yourself with slings and 
crossbows, protect yourself with 
camouflage and 
dragonskin and find 
the Ring of 
Annihilation. 



c 




Dimensional 

playing action 

simulator 
combined with 

wn graphics 
1st person 

♦ Depth of an adventure with intuitive 
mouse control 

♦ 3 Dimensional sound effects 

♦ Wide variety oj weapons, armour and 
equipment to build up your character 

♦ Hundreds of independently controlled 
characters to fight or befriend 

♦ Game-save facility to continue 
your attest at a 
later date 

+ Ability to install 
on hard disk 



Available on: Commodore Amiga™' Atari ST, 
and IBM PC and Compatibles. 

Pack contains:- 
♦ Rebel Pamphlet & Poster. ♦ Comprehensive Playing Manual 



; Ci/cle-#i07 : on, the Reader Service CaVd •' 



^'^g! 



Diiiribuicd t>j RndrSoftloc.. 
3Q,WcflheJtn CL, State 2 ™ 

RktaFKind Hill, OdUtxi. Ciaidi. 
L-'B 1B9 , 



Screenshots taken from Commodore Amiga version. 

Under Licence from the Award Winning Oxford 

Digital Enterprises Team. Copyright 1991 



■•■.*/' 

i .: ■■■• 

'• : V- : 
./-*■» 



>f^f 



NEW 




U C T S 



Set up your own 
bulletin board 
with DLG BBS 




does much more than jusi display a 24-bil 
image onscreen. The Impart Vision 24 has 
a built-in frame buffer, flicker fixer, and 
digital keyer. along with genlocks lor both 
composite and analog RGB video. The 
board comes with a 2D paint program and a 
3D rendering package as well. The Impact 
Vision 24 is specifically designed for the 
A3000 and requires a small adapter board 
to plug into an A2000. Price is S2199.00. If 
you want to add sound and music to your 
video. GVP can help you oul there, too. 
The Digital Sound Studio (SI 25) plugs 
into your parallel port and, via a standard 
RCA cable, will let you digitize and edit 8- 
bit sound samples with an wide array of 
tools, including fade-in and -out. 600 Clark 
Avenue, King of Prussia, PA 19406. 215- 
337-8770. RS #206. 

DLG BBS 



We 



'e've heard some whining 
about there not being a decent, definitive 
Amiga-specific bulletin board system, but 
DLG Professional may put an end to it. 
The press release has seven columns of fea- 
tures, printed in tiny type, and that still 
doesn't cover it all. Among the more 
prominent: multiple lines limited only by 
the number of serial ports you have 
installed; up to 65000 users at 255 different 
levels; 9999 separate file areas and a like 
number of message areas: online help; 
ANSI support; and smart menus that only 
show options that are currently valid. The 
mail and file systems appear comparable to 



those of the big commercial systems. The 
file system even has an option to show the 
contents of Zip, Arc. Lharc, and Zoo files. 
The system supports FidoNet and 
UUCP/UseNet. And of course, it has multi- 
user realtime conferencing. There are all 
sorts of sysop conveniences to make living 
with your BBS easier. One more point that 
needs to be made about DLG Professional 
is that it is Amiga from the ground up and 
will run on any Amiga model, even a 5 1 2K 
500. Ofcour.se, you'll need a little more 
horsepower if you're planning to start your 
own version of CompuServe. The program 
itself is built around the AmigaDOS Shell, 
which means that standard CLl-based pro- 
grams can be used directly in your BBS 
setup. When you couple that with the full 
ARexx support, it makes an extremely 
powerful and expandable system. Cost of 
this powerhouse is SI 99 and it's from 
TelePro Technologies, 20- 1 524 Raytier 
Avenue, Saskatoon, SK Canada S7N 1 Y I . 
306-665-3811. RS #203. 

KEEPING UP 

r\her several years of not see- 
ing any Amiga PIMs (Personal Information 
Managers), those oh-so-handy computer 
Rolodexes and calendars that make life 
simpler, they've started popping up again. 
The latest is Secretary, a title that pretty 
much says it all. The program, which opens 
on a hi-res screen, includes a month-al-a- 
glance calendar and to-do list (unfortu- 
nately for those of us who are professional 



procrastinators, the list keeps moving for- 
ward automatically until the items are com- 
pleted or manually removed). There's also 
an address book that will accept up to five 
addresses and phone numbers for each per- 
son. Your book can be searched in several 
ways, and will do those searches based on 
partial strings. It will, of course, generate 
mailing labels and phone lists in either 
hardcopy or clipboard file format. S49.95 
from Expert Services, 59 1 2 Centennial Cir- 
cle, Florence, KY 41042. 606-371-9690. 
RS #207. 

DAT ARE XX 

^^ne of the more interesting 
new products we've heard about lately is 
the ARexxDB Records Manager from 
JMH Software of Minnesota. The program 
is essentially a database manager specifi- 
cally designed for ARexx. It will handle 
multiple open files, variable length records, 
unlimited indexes, record and file locking, 
and more functions than you can shake a 
hot address field at. It also uses dynamic 
RAM caching to make accessing your data 
as fast as possible. What makes this product 
unusual is that since it is ARexx-based, it 
can be customized and tailored to your own 
purposes using ARexx scripts and can also 
be accessed from any other program via 
ARexx. JMH also has a companion data- 
entry product in development. It's called - 
what else? - Windexx. Price for ARexxDB 
Records Manager is $ 1 25. 7200 Hemlock 
Lane, Maple Grove, MN 55369. 612-424- 
5464. RS #208. 

ENTHRONED 

\Jik of the first high-power 
UNIX programs we've seen ported to the 
Amiga 3000UX is Empress, a relational 
database manager with network and multi- 
user support. It has object-oriented capabil- 
ity and since it's distributed, each user can 
insert, delete, or otherwise alter records in 
multiple databases with location indepen- 
dence. It has ANSI standard SQL, an 
RDBMS kernel that can be called from C, a 
full-function report writer, and a 4GL appli- 
cations generator with XWindows support. 
The interesting thing to note, and one of the 



12 ,info NOVEMBER 1991 



DeluxePaint IV 

King of Paint and Animation 



There's a reason DeluxePaint has been ihe leading Paint and Animation program throughout the evolution of the Amiga. 
We've consistently overcome obstacles as large os pyramids to bring you the most intuitive, up-to-date graphics programs 
available. That's why our list of satisfied customers is as long as the Nile. So, large! about using those other programs with 
--'fphic interfaces and enter the next era of paint and animation with DeluxePaint IV. 




Superior LighlTable 
You'll be doing the 'Tut 
two-step" when you see 
how easy it is to create 
animations, How, see 
through your current 
frame to four additional 
frames — in color! 



Metaniorphosi 

i 



Instantly turn pyramids into 
skyscrapers 




'',.■ Easy Metnmorpho. 
ffi EJ Watch evolution unfold. 
ii " Instantly animate the shape 
"eID an d image of one brush 
into any other brush. 



DeluxePaint IV features: 

• Paint AND Animation in HAM using all 4D96 colors 

Improved gradients ere now smoother, more versatile and 
eosier to define 

• All new Color Mixer mokes creating end choosing colors a 



New Animation Control Pane! with VCR style interlace 
means no more searching through menus For the animation 
controls you need. Now, jusi paint and dick. 

Enhonced Stencils give you greater control over image 
processing and image manipulation 



Plus oil the Award-winning features you've come 
to expect from DeluxePaint: 

AnimPaint™ — Creating animations is as e«sy os pressing 
one key to record your point sliokes and another to ploy 
them back 

Instant 3-D perspective 

Direct Overscan support for video applications 

Split screen Magnification with voriable Zoom 

Animated brushes to simplify eel animation 

- Move Requestor lets you automatically animate brushes in 
Ml 3-D 

' Extensive keyboard equivalents help advanced users work 
more efficiently 



nformation 




our spe.. 
toll 800 
ANYTIME! 



And You Thought Tut was Ancient Art 




Amiga is o legaterid lunkmgtL of Cwmudort-Amigo, Inc. All Dttiti Irodemarlu hi 



Circle #112 on the Reader Servi 



NEW 




U C T S 



Visiting a 

Chinese 

restaurant and 

learning to 

pronounce 

things correctly 

with 
Audio Gallery 



reasons this is an important release for the 
Amiga version of UNIX, is that since 
Empress has the ability to store arbitrary 
sequences of data values of any length, 
which includes sound and graphic data, a 
natural for the Amiga. Prices (hold onto 
your wallets, folks!) start at S1400 for just 
the RDBMS up to $4200 for the full-boat 
version with 4GL. Empress Software, 6401 
Golden Triangle Drive, Greenbelt, MD 
20770. 301-220-1919. RS #209. 

REPEAT AFTER ME 

If you're contemplating a visit to 
Beijing or Xianggang (Hong Kong), you 
will most likely want to check out Audio 
Gallery, a computerized Chinese language 
tutor. The version we have is for Mandarin 
Chinese and it employs a common-sense, 
point-and-hear approach to learning a lan- 
guage. While it won't teach you grammar 
(the manual does include sections on 
putting together the words and phrases 
you'll learn), it will teach you the vocabu- 
lary and pronunciation in a particularly 
painless way. The main menu screen lets 
you choose from various topics, such as 
going to a restaurant, household objects, 
relatives and other people, locations in 
China, and so on. Once you enter a section, 
a scene comes up filled with numbered 
objects that you can click on to hear a pro- 
nunciation. This is where the Amiga really 
shines as a teacher; the voice you hear is 
digitized and the pronunciations are crystal 




clear. They're also repeatable, so you can 
hear it, say it, and repeal the process until 
you get it right. Being able to click on a 
particular object also makes it easy to learn 
what you're most interested in or what you 
most need to know. All in all, a very sensi- 
ble system for learning a language. Ver- 
sions of the Audio Gallery are also 
available for Spanish and German, with 
future editions to cover French, Italian, 
Russian, Korean, Japanese. English, and 
even Signing. Prices for European lan- 
guages are $89.95, while the Oriental lan- 
guages go for S 1 29,95. Fairbrothers, 5054 
S. 22nd Street, Arlington, VA 22206. 703- 
820-1954. RS #202 

NEW CAD 

If you use CAD software, you're 
certainly aware of X-CAD. The publisher. 
Applied Vector Technology, has now come 
out with three new X-CAD products, X- 
CAD 2000 (SI99) is designed for the 
beginning CAD user and automates the 
process of creating mechanical, architec- 
tural, engineering, and other types of draw- 
ings. The resulting designs can then be pro- 
jected or spun in 3D space and seen in 
orthographic, isometric, or perspective 
views. X-CAD 3000 ($599) is a much more 
sophisticated package which, besides the 
usual CAD functions, offers graphics tablet 
support, automatic hidden line removal, 
and 3D surfacing commands. Finally, X- 
CAD 3D ($499) is for those who already 



use X-CAD Designer and/or X-CAD Pro- 
fessional and need to add 3D modelling to 
their work. Point West, 1042 Uxbridge 
Road. Hayes, Middlesex. England UB4 
0RJ. 081-573-9694. RS #212. 

ANIMATING HAM-E 

If you've been wanting to do 
animation on your HAM-E video display, 
now you can. Holosoft Technologies has 
released Ham-E Workshop, a full-featured 
paint and animation program based on 
Holosoft 's Graphics Workshop and 
designed exclusively for use with Ham-E. 
In addition to all sorts of paint functions, 
such as color filtration, brushes that can be 
rippled, rolled, draped over images, and 
brush area masking, it supports two types 
of animation. Cell animation features 
variable movepaths, auto-animation, and an 
infinite number of frames that can be 
rotated, rolled, spun, and resized. The Page 
animation mode allows the user to create 
choreographed multi-brush animations and 
it also has the ability to change palettes on 
each page. $60. 1637 E. Valley Parkway, 
Suite 172, Escondido, CA 92027. 619-747- 
0663. RS #213. 

MAKING VIDEO 

* he Disc Company has a cou- 
ple of things to make life with your cam- 
corder and VCR a little easier and a lot 
more fun. Alterlmage Video FIX is a 
video titling package that supplies fonts, 
clipart, and functions for putting them on 
the screen, moving them around, and 
adding special effects. It also includes 
drawing tools for putting borders, boxes, 
and the like on top of your video. The com- 
pany also has a companion genlock, which 
is, of course, necessary for combining the 
video and computer graphics. This Alter- 
Image Genlock can be directly controlled 
by the titling software, making for a com- 
plete package. Price of the software is 
$199.95 and the genlock is $249.95. A bun- 
dled package with the software, genlock, 
and a training videotape is also available 
for $399.95. 1 1040 Santa Monica Blvd., 
Suite 300, Los Angeles, CA 90025. 213- 
478-6767. RS #214. 



14 .infO NOVEMBER 1991 



NEW 




U C T S 



ARTWORK 

I hree new packages of art are 
available from INOVAlronks. The Inter- 
face Design Kit is a four-disk set of but- 
tons, icons, and such things as are used in 
Amiga applications. The most obvious use 
for these are in INOVAtronics' own CanDo 
authoring system. The images arc of every- 
thing from a mouse to music to clocks and 
and laserdisks. They come in both medium- 
and high-res and cost S59.95. The other 
two packages are both by Ryan Roberts, 
who is an animator at Warner Brothers. 
Lunar Construction Set (S24.95) provides 
clips of planets, spaceships, monsters, 
craters, and the like. Canvas (S34.95) is a 
collection of full-screen images and anima- 
tions in a fantasy vein. 8499 Greenville 
Ave., #209B. Dallas, TX 75231. 214-340- 
4991. RS #211. 

DELAYED FOR TOAST 

\J ne of the trickier aspects of 
using NewTek's Toasier is that when incor- 
porating it into a video system as an 
"upstream" device", the Amiga's signal 
must be delayed in order to synchronize 
with it. What this requires is either tweak- 
ing the timing of your genlock, in which 
case you'll have to reset it when you're 
using it as a switcher, or you can delay the 
signal. (Take a look at Oran Sands' expla- 
nation of this in his column last issue.) 
What all this is leading up to is \ha\ Allen 
Avionics has produced a little box that will 
delay the signal anywhere from 360 to 487 
nanoseconds, which is just the range 
needed to synchronize everything with the 
Toaster. It has toggle switches so you can 
set it to compensate for exactly the delay 
you need (it will vary a little depending on 
your cabling, etc.). Cost of the Video Delay 
Line is S275 and it's available from Allen 
Avionics, 224 East Second Street, Mineola, 
NY 1 150 1.: 516-248-8080. RS #2 15. 

LDENTITY 




A whole slew of 
icons can 
be found 

in the Interface 
Design Kit 



I. 



wDEN Videotronics is releasing 
two new timebase correctors that will also 
function as genlocks. The TBCard and 
TBCard PLUS are aimed, respectively, at 
low- to mid-range and mid- to hieh-end 



applications. The base model will take Y/C 
and composite signals and offers proc amp 
control and the system timing can be 
adjusted via a potentiometer. The PLUS 
model adds more inputs (component, 
RGB/Sync, and DOC) and provides output 
in Y/C, composite, and component. The 
high-end model has proc amp control and 
system timing that are accessible from an 
exterior box. I.DEN is also making an 
optional external box to house up to ten 
TBCard PLUS cards, which would allow 
multi-channel timebase correction. Price 
was unavailable at presstime. 9620 Chesa- 
peake Drive, Suite 204, San Diego, CA 
92123. 619-492-9239. RS #216. 

ON THE TBC FRONT 

r^ whole line of video time- 
base correctors and frame synchronizers is 
being produced by Showline Video. The 
array of models, features, and specs is truly 
mindboggling. The models break down into 
three basic categories. Speclrum SC series 
offers S-VHS, composite, and transcodes; 
models include the Spectrum 500SC 
(SI 295 - single channel, freezeframe/field 
& strobe) Spectrum 750SC (SI 895 - adds 
single channel, proc amp controls, and 
effects), and Spectrum 1000SC (S2695 - 
dual channel version). The Spectrum C 
series is less expensive and more 
consumer-oriented: these are composite 
only: the Spectrum 500C (S850, single- 
channel), Spectrum 900C (S1495 - the first 
dual-channel TBC and frame-synchronizer 



under SI 500, and squarely aimed at the 
Toasier market), and the Spectrum 1000C 
(a composite-only version of the I000SC). 
The QuadCode QC series is starting out 
with the Spectrum 850QC, which accepts 
input from NTSC composite, component 
Y/R-Y/B-Y, and Hi-8 and combines it with 
computer RGB. The specs on all of these 
are far too much to list here, but you can 
get more details from Showline at 120 Bea- 
con Street, Boston, MA 02116. 617-262- 
6844. RS #220. 

THIRD EDITIONS 

I he 3rd edition of the Official 
Commodore Doctrine on AmigaDOS is 
now available from Bantam Computer 
Books. Covering AmigaDOS through Ver- 
sion 2.04, the 447-page tome includes 
information on every command and func- 
tion of the operating system. It also has sec- 
tions on startup-sequences and other 
scripts, the difference between CLI and 
Shell, error codes and messages, file struc- 
tures, and all the other tidbits of informa- 
tion you're ever likely to need. If you're 
upgrading to 2.0. be sure to take a thumb- 
through of this book. Cover price for The 
AmigaDOS Manual, 3rd Edition, is 
S24.95. 666 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 
10103.212-554-9822. 

Addison-Wesley is currently shipping the 
Amiga ROM Kernel Reference Manual: 
Includes and Autodocs, Third Edition. 



.info NOVEMBER 1991 15 



NEW 




U C T S 



A wood parquet 

tile from 
MicroSearch's 

Materials 
Texture Library: 

Volume 2 




This is, of course, the definiiive reference 
for programmers. Us 1003 pages contain 
everything you could possibly want io 
know about the routines that make the 
Amiga do what it does under 2.0. It covers 
Libraries. Devices, and Resources, includes 
both C and Assembly include files, and is 
cross-referenced to help you wade through 
it all. Price is S38.95. Addison -Wesley, 
Jacob Way. Reading, MA 01867. 617-944- 
3700. RS #217. 

MAKING PROGRESS 

irogressive Peripherals has 
announced shipment of their 68040 Amiga 
accelerator. It comes in two models, the 
Progressive 040/2000 and Progressive 
040/3000, The 3000 model uses 32-bit 
memory and installs in the A3000's proces- 
sor slot. It has a "whisper-fan" on the board 
to keep things cool and is compatible with 
1 6 MHz, 25 MHz. and tower models of the 
A3000, operating at a synchronous 25 
MHz. It retails for SI 595. The version for 
the A2000 uses 16-bit memory, though the 
board itself can accept up to 32 megabytes 
of 32-bit memory'- It's compatible with both 
A and B revs of (he A2000 motherboard 
and is software switchable between 68000 
and 68040 modes (the A 31X10 model is 
switchable between '030 and '040 modes). 
The board can accept memory expansion in 
1 MB x 8 (80ns. 4 or 8 MB). 4MB x 8 
(80ns. 16 or 32MB configurations). Page 
Mode or Static Column SlfvlMs, and is 



available with 0. 4. 8, 16, or 32 megs 
installed. It operates at 28 MHz asyn- 
chronously. Retail for the A2000 accelera- 
tor is S 1995 with 4 MB of RAM. It should 
be noted that both boards require Amiga- 
DOS 2.0 in ROM. 464 Kalamath Street, 
Denver. CO 80204. 303-825-4144. RS 
#218. 

MORE TEXTURES 



M lc 



iicmSearch has released the 
second in their Materials Texture Library 
scries. Volume 2: Tiles is a 5-disk set con- 
taining 20 HAM images measuring 480 x 
480 pixels each. Obviously, the subject 
matter of these images is tiles of various 
patterns, including everything from marble 
to wood to what looks like vinyl. The 
images are specifically designed to use with 
such things as Turbo Silver, Imagine, and 
so on. The images are also designed to be 
easily manipulated into the sizes and num- 
ber of colors you require using The Art 
Department or other image processing soft- 
ware. Price is 549.95. 9896 Southwest 
Freeway. Houston, TX 77074. 71 3-988- 
2818. RS #210. 

EDU-WARE 

I hree recent edu-game titles 
have passed through the .info offices lately. 
Mr. Robot's Speak 'n Spell (ages 6 & up) 
has 204 levels of play with over 1000 pic- 
lures to expand a child's vocabulary and 



help with spelling. It uses crossword puz- 
zles and fill-in-the-blanks as a framework. 
(The best part, though, is that the package 
has a wiggle-picture on the cover - how 
long has it been since you've seen one of 
those!) S49.95 from Brain Technologies, 
PO Box 215147, Sacramento, C A 95821. 
800-272-4601. RS #222. 

Microlllusions is shipping Discovery 
2.0, a reworking of their lesson-based edu- 
cational game. The player tries to work 
through the many levels of a spaceship and 
must correctly answer questions in order to 
pass through doors. There are sets of ques- 
tions available on math, spelling, geogra- 
phy, history, science, social studies, trivia, 
and so on. The nice thing is that the lessons 
come on a separate disk and you can add 
your own or modify existing ones. Price for 
the basic program (with just math and 
spelling questions) is $39.95. A special 
Educational Pack with the other topics is 
available for S69.95. PO Box 3475, 
Granada Hills, CA 91394. RS #221. 

Free Spirit is converting their Barney 
Bear series in CDTV format. The latest 
we've seen is Barney Bear Goes Camp- 
ing, which is designed for ages 2-6. It fea- 
tures cute graphics, and aims to teach small 
kids about nature and the environment 
(can't start too young!). There are many 
activities to participate in along the way: a 
coloring book, matching games, connect- 
the-dots. mazes, and so on. S39.95. 58 
Noble Street, Kutzlown, PA 19530. 215- 
683-5609. RS #219. 

IR RODENT 

If you're tired of your mouse 
cord getting tangled up with everything on 
your desk, Alfa Data has a solution for you. 
They're shipping a new cordless, infra-red 
controlled mouse. It's a three-button model 
and comes in two pieces: one plugs into the 
computer and the other lives on your 
mousepad, The mouse itself can be 
recharged directly from the computer. 
Retail price for the CLM-MT is $99.95. 
602 North Country Fair Drive, Champaign. 
IL 61821. 217-356-1962. RS #223. 



16 .infO NOVEMBER 1991 



&D?raaaa wpQtffij maaaMQcm 



HJ 



AMIGA AMIGA AMIGA AMIGA AMIGA AMIGA AMIGA AMIGA AMIGA AMIGA AMIGA AMIGA AMIGA AMIGA AMIGA AMIGA AMIGA AMIGA 



ABACUS 

Amiga DOS Toolbox 24 

AssemPrc GO 

BeckerTeiti 90 

Data Rett £•■; f 43 

TeflPrp 4S 

ABACUS BOOKS 

3D Graphics Frsg In 3AS1C 

ArmgaDOS Quick Reference 10 

Best of Amiga Treks 3 Tips 24 

C for Bogtrews t . IB 
C lor Advanced Programmers ■ 26 

Desktop Video Book IE 

Amiga Beginners Book 1 4 

Am«94 Pnr*ters ir. Out Book 26 

An»ga Basic In Out Book- 19 

Amga Printers In Out Book 25 

Graprfccs iiOut Book - 2* 

Prog Guide Booh- 24 

Adv Prog Guide Booh - 24 

ArmgaD05 In Oil Book - 16 

Making Muse Book & Dsk 2S 

Companion Disk Avail 13 
ACADEMY SOFTWARE 

Typing Tutor 21 

ACCESS 

Crime Wav* 3i 

Heavy Mela' ... 30 

Mean Streets 30 

ACCOUDE 

Bar Games 27 

Elvira 36 

Elwa Hrffls 13 

Fasl Break 27 

Fourth 4 Irenes 1& 

Gc*J of the Aztecs 31 

Graphics Studio tO 

r-.n::.., l| 30 

Hove (force 31 

Ishido 33 

Jack Nicklaus Unwilled 36 

JNKkiaus Course 1. 2 or 3 ifi 

J hhekiaus Course 4 or 5 17 

Knights of Crvslaltoi 37 

Grand Pn* C*cs>t tS 

Gunboat 



• 11 



27 



Roto* 

Search lor me King 37 

Shoo! En> Up Construction 1 5 

Sim Control 30 

Strike Aces 30 

Tesi Dnve H 30 

Cji',-'im Cm ■.-;-.- 16 

European Challenge 16 

Super Cars 16 

MusaeCerj IS 

Vaaine 25 
World Class Soccer , , 25 

ACTTOHWAHE 

ActKinwnie Phasar Gun 39 

Capone 13 

Creature' ?* 

jwnc 

Phasar V3 20 

Phasar Va 54 

ARTWOfiX 

Bridge 6 2* 

Centerfold Squares 

LmkwOfC French 

Linkword German 

Linkword GeeJt 

Linkword Italian 

Unkwftd Soansnh 

Puzzle Mana 

Stnp Pokerll 

S Poker Data i<3 ea 15 

AS0G 

Cygngs Ed Pro 60 

BE7TCS0A SOFTWARE 

Damodes 27 

Dragon's Urr II . . . 42 

Wayne Grettky HocKey 30 

Hockey League Son 24 

BRTTAJ+H1CA 

Arohipi i |H 2b 

Desrgnusjurus 30 

Jigsaw 24 

BW0ERBUND 

Carmen USA 30 

Carmen Europe 30 

Carmen Tme 30 

CarmenWorW 30 

Prince ol Persia 24 

Katie's Farm 24 

McGee 24 

McGee aS !h« Fun Fair 25 

Piciionary 24 

SmCrty . 30 
&m Oly Graphics #1 D* #2 23 

Srti Cry Planners Boo* 15 

Sr/n Terrain. Ednor 1 5 

Woifpack 33 

Sim Cify Populus Bundle 43 

BYTE BY BYTE 

Sculpt 4DJr 105 



CADVISI0H INT. 




ELECTRONIC ARTS 




KARA GRAPHICS 




XCad Designer II 


90 


Impenum 


26 


Aramlonfsl. II or III 


30 


XCad 3D 


300 


Indi.irvtpoiis WO 


32 


headknesl 


48 


CAPC0M 




LOSI Patroi 


32 


Headknesll 


42 


Dynasty Wars 


- 3' 


King's Sou my 


33 


Suctfeads 


42 


CEHTAUfl 
BAD. . 


30 


Ua'.TS Beacon Typing 
Migni 4 Mage ll H*m 

Nightbmed: . . 


32 

13 

26 


KARHAS0FT 
Power Pineal". 


24 


DUDE 


30 


PGA Toui Gorf 


33 


KOfJ 




My Paint 

World Alias 


30 


Pit* N Prie 


27 


Bandil Kings Chma 


» 


. 36 


Popukjs 


32 


Genghis Khan 


34 


CENTRA! COAST 




Prweidrome 


IB 


Nphunngas Arrtbrlion 


,i, 


Disk 2 Disk 


30 


P(>»efmonger 


32 


Romance ol Ihc 3 Kingdoms 


42 


Oos2Dos 


33 


Proiectyle 


26 


K0KAUI 




Ouaner&ac* 


43 


Pro Tenrvs Tour |i 


33 


Back 10 the Future ll 


25 


Quarterback Toots 


54 


Ski of O* 


33 


Blades ot Steei 


15 


C1HEMAWARE 




Slarfkont 


32 


CaSilevania 


15 


Arcade Fever 


26 


StartUgh: Hants 


13 


Double Dnbbte 


IS 


Federation 


32 


Street Bod I . . 


18 


Nsscar Challenge 


31 


TV Spons Football 
Wings 

CCMMOOORE 
Amiga Logo 

Am-gavrsion 

CCtaWTE' BOC*S 


. 32 


Street Rod ll 


27 


Super Contra 


2B 


. 32 


Turbo Outrun . 


32 


Teenage Mutant Turtles 


27 


Unipucnables 


26 


Theme Park Mystery 


31 




Zany Gc-tl 


15 


LAKE FOftEST LOGIC 




Ei£CTB0«C ZOO 

Benin IMS 

Biack Gad 


24 

2* 


Disk Mechanic 
Macro Rami 

LATTCc 
Lattice C Development Conp 
LatBce C-Pkjs Plus 


54 

84 


AmgaDOS Reference Guile 
Beginners Guile Amiga 
Amga Programmers Guide 
inside Amiga Graphcs 


18 

ta 

16 
16 


Khalaan 

Legend a" F jeigf 1 .! 


25 
24 


215 

zso 


Legend ol Wiltam Ter 

Treasure Trap 
Vikng Child . . 


24 
17 
24 
24 


Lattice Te*t Utilities 


16 


Elementary Amiga Basic 


13 


UVE STUDIOS 




Advanced Amiga Basic 


. 16 


Futnje Classy; Collections 


30 


ML Programming Guide 


16 


Thufidersinke . . 


24 


KiG&a me Amiga 

Amiga Applications 

1st or 2nd Book ol Arraga 


13 
16 


Xphos 

ELECTHA 
Better Dead Than Ainm 


24 

13 


LDCASFILMS 

Pnrjy Jones Crusade Arcade 
Loom Hrrts 


12 


C0KSLH.THON 




EJIWE SIUUUTRXS 




Mamac 1 Htfi'.s 


■:- 


Cross Dos v4 


24 


Team Yankee 


37 


NtgrnShrf: 


.' 


DATA EAST 

Batman the Movie 
Chamber o( Sa Mutants 
Contmu.uim 


27 
30 
31 


EPVX 

Four m Four Racing 

EXPERT SERVICES 


13 


Secret ol Monkey island 
Then Finest Hour 
Zac McKratken Indy Graryiics 
Indy Giaphics Hmis 


38 
27 

13 


DfaJdrhen 


36 


Secretary 


31 


aIAGIC BYTES 




DrahXhiefl HnitS 


. 13 


FREEsmr 




OPmmanon 


21 


Full Metal Planet 

North* Scytn 
Rooocop II 

DAVIDSON 
Math Blast** Pkjs 


30 
36 
27 

a 

30 


ArmkrtDnveAJign 
Barney Seai-Camptng 
Barney Bear Farm 
Barney BeaiScfiooi 
Barney Bear-Space 
Dingori scape 


30 
21 
21 
21 
21 
10 


■UB 

Aflec C Oeweloper 
Aztec C Professiora! 
Aiiec C SL Debugger 

MASTERTR0NLC5 


IK 

130 
H 


DESKWHG MM 




Doctoi Ami 

FTL 


30 


CkM 
Conlhct 


£4 
16 


Byte & Back 


42 




Monopofy 


31 


Crossword Constructon 


24 


Dungeon MasW 1 or 11 


24 


Fbsk 


24 


Great Sales II 


24 


Dungeon Master 1 Hints 


12 


Scrabble 


24 


Heme Froni 


SO 


Dungeon Master II Hints 


13 


Double Dragon II 


24 


MrdCie East Wond Tour . . 


25 


GAMESTAR 




MagK MVP Baskerbai 


16 


Top Form 


54 


Championship Basketball 


13 


NY Warriors 


30 


DrGTTEK 




GQLDDtSK 




Overiwd 

ftKk Davis Soccer 


31 

30 


Dirxmars . . . 


24 


Comic Setter 


60 


Shark Attack Golf 


24 


HCe in Or* Miniature Go.1 
Hote in One Data #3 


24 


Cprr»cSettef Art Superhero* s 


21 


Sp*fl ol Encakbur 


31 


15 


ComcSefter Art Science Fc 


21 


Spon ol Kings 


16 


T&tghjn 


24 


ComcSetter An Funny Fug 


21 


Super 0*1 Road 


24 


DfSCOYHflY 




Desklop Budget 


42 


War In Middle Ear* 


30 


HyOOS 


13 


GotdSpelhll 


27 


Wr^ndenand 


37 


DISNEY 




Laser Scnpt 
Mov^ Sener 


27 
42 


HEDUGEMC 




Anamatiofl Studio 


106 


The Office 


180 


Beyond Dark Castle 


15 


Duck Tales . . . . 


27 


Pagesetter | 


78 


Ghoitbustefs 11 


24 


Dfl T SOFTWARE 




P-o'^ss-ona Draft 


120 


WCR0DEAL 




CapYE! DTP 

KCSLeveni </3.5 


195 


Ptolessicna Pagev? 


240 


HisoU Basic Pro 


96 


240 


IMPULSE 




MKH0ILHJSI0NS 




Tioe* Cut) 
KOH 


B5 
195 


Imagine 
Tiffbo Sirvw 


210 
67 


B^ack Jack Academy 
Dwcovery 2 


13 
25 


EAGLtTREt 




IHFOCOH 




Faerytaie Adven-urs 


n 


Distant Armies 


2? 


Bait lot ech 


20 


firepower 


13 


EUN DESIGNS 

Elan Perform!] r 


90 


Journey 
Musk: Studo 
Shogun 

IMHERPRISE 

ApprertJce 
Arkanod 1 
Bart* Squadron 
James Bond - Stearth 


20 
13 
15 


J* lions 
Lazer Squad 
MuwXJr 


15 
13 
90 


ELECTRON AHTS 






Romamic Entcunters 


IS 


6S8 Attack Sub ... 


32 


20 

to 

24 

30 


IMCROIEADGE 




G6SAitac* SubNnls 
Aquansui 
Bards Tale ll 
Sards. Tale III 
Bards 2 or 3 Hrffls 


12 
% 

16 
33 
10 


WWF Wrestrtng 
WWFOata *3 

HICROMASTER 


24 

TO 


Lost Dulcnnan s Mine- 


30 


Family Tnw v2 


■■■■ 


BAT 

Battle Command 

Blue Max 

Breach II 

Budokan 


. 32 
23 
33 

33 
26 


Gloouliis 

Persian Gu-f Inferno 

Plaugo 

Sword 0+ Sodon 

Tumcarl 


20 
24 
24 
1? 
24 


WCR0PR0SE 
3D Pool 
Classic Trilogy 
Dr Dooms Revenge 

Elite 


21 
37 
15 
34 


Centunan 


33 


BnEfiPUY 




Elite Hmi Book by Lerpy . 


7 


Chessmasier 2100 


32 


Battkeclttss 1 


30 


F-i5Str*eEagiell 


37 


Cnucfc Yeager aft ii 


27 


Bat-Jechess II 


3t 


Gunsftp . . - 


13 


Cradcdown .... 

Das Bom 

Delude Pim'-in 

Detune Music Construction 

Deluw Pnnl ll . . 

Empire 

F-i6Con*aTPik3l 

F-29 ReUkttCM 


IS 
33 
95 

63 
51 
32 
16 
32 


Checkmate . . 
Dragon Ware 
Dragon Wars Hints 
Future Wars 
James Bond Stealth 
Nemomancer 
Meuromancer Hints 


33 
30 
13 
30 
34 
27 
13 


Land, 5«, * Air 

Pirates 

Pro Soccer 

Megatraveller 

Ml Platoon 
Railroad Tycoon 
Red Storm Rising 
Savage 


36 

13 

27 

37 

. 36 

. 37 

13 


F A- 18 Merceptor 


15 


IHN0VATR0»#CS 




Silent Service 


IS 


Hlirnoon 


39 


Can Do 


* 


Universal Mi itary Stm II 


37 


Harpoon Banteset *2 or 3 


21 


Powei Wmdowa *2 5 


54 


We*d D-f a.Tis 


. 13 


Harpoon Sceneno Editor 
Hunt For Red Oct 


27 
20 


MMOVSrOW 




MICRO STYLE 




Immortal . - - . . 


32 


Sroadcas!. Trtier m2 


234 


Smiulcra 


. 30 



MICROSYSTEMS 

Excellence 120 

ScnbtJe' Planum 49 

The Works - Platinum 1'ft 

UIN0SCAPE 

Arcade Megabits v2 32 

Loop? 33 

NATURAL GRAPHICS 

Scene Generator 30 

HEW r*0fltZ0**S 

Design works 76 

Provmte 3 1 1 05 

OuckWme 45 

NEWTEK 

DtgiPam! 3. 60 

Digrview Go<! 1 36 

QMRKMD 

Paiadm DuesJOskl IB 

onoH 

Autoduel 24 

MoeOnrs 33 

Ogre 20 

Omega 30 

Dues! by Chan 2 W 3 . 25 

Times Of Lor* 24 

Ultima III 2? 

Ultima- LV 39 

Ultima V 37 

Wlndwalker ?4 

0901 

A-Talk 111 60 

Aooomaster in 60 

Fasl Eddw's Poor 22 

Sjp6 - ■ ' 61 

TunjoTein 61 

VideoScdpe 3D 120 

VideOliller % 

PAftSEC SOFTWARE 

Operation Spruance 30 

PfJJCAN SOFTWARE 

PeJtcan Press 61 

POLARWARe 

Afl Oogs Cokwing 20 

At (be Zoo 24 

Classic Board Games 20 

Dinosaurs Aio Forever 24 

MediBvel >"■'.."■■' 31 

Moonbase 31 

Numbers COuol 24 

Opposites Attract 24 

Operation Combat 30 
Sesame Street Cow De*j*e 25 

PRECISION 

SuperSaso Personal-ll 90 

Supefbase Fro v3 210 

Supeftjase Pro v4 325 

Supernlan 90 

PROGRESSIVE 

3D PrUlet&oPai 300 

AnimaTiofi Station 40 

Baud Banojt 30 

Dtskmasierr 1 1 43 

DR Term Pro 60 

Dunlap Utikbes 4fi 

Intra CAD 46 

Intra CAD Plus 90 

PlX-Male 42 

Utra Design 240 

PSYGH0SJS 

Anarchy 24 

Alomino 31 

Armbur Goddon 3< 

Awesome 36 

Baal 21 

Bfcxd Money 24 

Caplasn Fi.-; * s 

Carthage 27 

Cfcronoquest H 30 

Infestation . 24 

Kiikng Game Snow V 

Lemmings 31 

Matrix Marauders . 24 

Ctntus 36 

STiadow ol the Boast ll 3fi 

5pe tic end 24 

Swyi 21 
TnpiePack ..... 25 

RAW 

Woms at War 31 

REA0YSOFT 

A Ma* IP 1M 

64 Emulalor-II[5W200Q) i¥ 

t>agonsLBr , . 36 

Dragons Law-Time Warp 36 

SpaCeAce 36 

Wrath ol T* Demon 30 

SHEREFf SYSTEMS 

Pro Video Gold 150 



MM 




> 


AiO Tank Killer 


30 


i~ 


Black Cauldron 


?4 




Codertfme: iceman 


3n 




CcOename: Iceman Hints 


10 




Colonel s Bequest 


36 




Conguesi ol Camekjt 


36 


> 


GcHdRusli 


24 


| 


•ferps Quest 


■.it, 


8 

p 


Hoyk; s Book of Games 1 pr 2 


?1 


Kmg s Quest 4 


36 


Leisure Larry 2 or 3 


36 




Manhunter New York, 


30 


> 
2 


Maihunier Sian Francisco 


30 


Mined Up Mother Goose 


20 


Po*ceOuest2 


.% 


B 


Quest for Gtory II 


IT 


> 


Space Ouest 3 


36 




SteJLar 7 


23 


> 


SIR-TECH 




Wizardry 6 


37 


a 


Wizardry € Hints 


13 


SOFT BYTE 






Lotto Program 


24 




SOFT LOOK 






PageStream »r2 t 


■JO 


5 

> 


Owtkforms 


26 


SOFTWARE VTSI0HS 




Microfiche Hw Pkis . 


60 




SOFTWOOD 






Electronic Thesauraus 


30 


8 


Pen' Pal . 


flO 


Proper Gramma* 


61 




SPECTRUM H0L08YTE 






Faces- Tetns ill 


?4 


> 


Um 


30 


-c 


Falcon Missxms 1 


17 


fi 
> 


Falcon Missions ll 


20 


Solitare Ro/ale 


21 


Tetns 1 - 


PI 




Wetins-Tews » 


21 


> 


STRATEGIC S*MUUTK)NS 


£ 


BuchFtogers 


32 


8 


Charnpunsot Krynn 


32 


> 


Curse of the Ajure Bonds 


a* 




A/ure Bonds Hints 


13 




Dealh Knighls Krynn 


2t 




Death Knighl Hints 


13 


i 


Diagon Stnke 


32 




Dungeon Masl Asst vt 


13 




Eye o' Bonoldei 


39 




BenoWer Hrrts 


13 




Hi '.'/I' 


1f> 




Hiisfar Hint Boo* 


H 




Overrun . 


W 


> 


Poo* of Radiance 


x> 


Pool Hints 


13 


Renegade Loqion 


39 




Second Frons 


3? 


> 


Secret Silver Blades 


W 


Silver Blades H^ms 


13 


Storm Across Europe 


H 


Ll 


Typhoon of Steel 


38 


P 


Wargame ConstnicOQrt Set 


26 




STRATEfilC STU0IES 






Gold- ol H^e Amencas 


13 


E 


Warlords . . 


30 


8 

fri 


SUBLOGIC 




FixjhtSrmu'aio'-ll 


30 




SceneOisk7 9 or 1 1 Hawanar. 




W Europe or Japan Each 20 





..,■' 



3? 



SUNRIZE IND 
Pedect Sound 66 

SYBEX BOOKS 
Amig.a ProgramrTiOr s Guide 19 
Amiga Handbook Vol 1 or 2 19 

1BH8I 

RBI Two 3i 

UMSOH WORLD 

PnTTimaste* Pius 24 

An Gallery I & 2 Comfio ... 24 

Ail Gallery 3 20 

Fonts & Borders 21 

VEGA TECHNOLOGIES 

Amikrt Amiga 24 

YTRTUAL REAliTY 

Distant Suns 42 

Distant Sons Pro 61 

Vista 37 

VrataPro . 90 

Vista Data Disks - Appalachian.. 
Breckenndge.Calri I, Canyon Set 
I or 2. Mars. Rings Canyon 
Sequoia. West U S . Wyoming 
Yosetrrte Each 46 

WILLIAM S. KAWES 

APEXX 30 

WSHELL 30 

W0R0P£fifECT CORP 
Wordperfecl 165 

Wordpertect Library 70 



WE CARRY A COMPLETE LINE OF ACCESSORIES FOR YOUR COMPUTER — ASK FOR OUR FREE CATALOG 

AMIGA AMIGA AMIGA AMIGA AMIGA AMIGA AMIGA AMIGA AMIGA AMIGA AMIGA AMIGA AMIGA AMIGA AMIGA AMjGA_AMJGA_AMIGA_ 



SOITUIrM 




AMIGA 

COMMODORE 
AND IBM 

Please call or 

wnle for our 

FREE CUTALOG 

Oerseas cusorrcrs 

ptease remrl 3.00 

J.S funds 10 help 

defray shipping costs 



TOLL FREE LINE 

FOR USA & CANADA 

BOO-356-1179 

Monday - Frrday 6AM 5PM Pacihc Time 
N EW. S*UiHMy 7AM 3PM P«lic Timi 

IHTEHNATIONAL ORDERS 

206-695-1333 

Same Hojrs A* Above 

HOW ACCEPTING FAX ORDERS 

206-695-0059 

24-Hours A Day! 

TECHNICAL SUPPORT LINE 

206-695-9646 
Monday ■ Friday 9AM 5PM Pacific Tim* 



II You Prefer, You May Mail Your Order To: 

Software Support International 

2700 NE Andresen Road, Suite A-10, Vancouver, WA 98661 



METHODS OF PAYMENTS - We accept money Orders certitied checks. Visa M C 
and Discover Pievous customers ma*aJ»r«y &Y COD " cersonar check Alinwmes 
MUST be pa<l m US tunds 

SHIPPING AHD HANDUMG CHARGES ■ USA (46 SUHes). FPO APOJjH PWM- 
si^ns Please aod S4 CO per order US Sh.pp.ng is usually by UPS ground Fasl UPS 
2nd Day Air rs available lUS 46 suites only) 0y aooVig S3 00 per pound (1st lb i and 
5i 00 per adOitcna- pound <eacn software nem av^ag« ' * i Aaska S Hawaii 
Shpp^.susoailySyUPSSndDayA* P>ease add Si » p« ord^- C^iia f?"** 
Sfi DO (or the hna piece * 51.00 to* eech addrtonal pr«ce per shipment- Canadian 
H^oware Overweight orders 4 Foreign CourrEnes" SAH vanes bet order-pl#ase ca' 
or wnte 



COO CHARGES: - COD avartaftie to previous custpmere only m 
a'tSOUSslates PieisoacaS3 75inadditiwioyo«rS^Hch^oOS 

OTHER POLICIES • Washrigion State residonta musi add 7 &% to 
their order lor stair sales ra* Defective Horns aid replaced at no 
Lharge buimustl>ereluineoiousposlpa-dwilhn30daysolmvc«ce 
dale All m stock orders are processed wnth-n 21 hours US [48 
sister softwaie orders over S'OO will t* shipped 2nd Day M at no 
addmonal chayge above the normal Sa 00 5*H tee All pnc«. 
policies, and specrf ■cations are subject 10 change without naoce All 
sales are final unless autnorned by rriariagernenl 




We Accept 
VISA, M/C, 
& Discover 



\ Circle #136 on the Reader Service Card 



NEWS 




I E W S 



AGFA & COMMODORE 



We 



' e hear from AGFA that the 
final version of Workbench 2.0 includes 
three of AGFA'S Inlellifonts: Times, Tri- 
umvirate, and LetteiGothic. This scalable 
font technology is widely used throughout 
the industry. For example. Gold Disk's Pro- 
fessional Page uses scalable fonts, and 
Hewlett-Packard uses AGFA'S Intellifont 
technology as the scaler for their PCL 5 
language. Having Intellifonts incorporated 
as a part of the Amiga operating system is a 
big plus. It will also make for some very 
nice screen displays. 

RELEASE 2.04 

V^ommodore has announced 
shipment of the five-disk, final-release ver- 
sion of Version 2.04 of the Amiga Operat- 
ing System for the A3000. The disks sport 
new rainbow labels and contain version 
2.04 of Kickstart, Workbench, Extras, Ami- 
gaFonts, and the Install disk. Commodore 
doesn't charge for the upgrade and copies 
can be obtained by taking proof-of- 
purchase to your local dealer. Over 1000 



people participated in the beta test process 
for several years, so the hope is that this 
will be the most bug-free operating system 
Commodore has ever released. 

COMPATIBILITY 

I f you have Commodore's 
A2620 or A2630 accelerator installed in 
your Amiga and want to upgrade to the new 
2.04 ROMS, be sure to check the version 
number of the accelerator ROMs. The new 
Kickstart ROMs require Rev-06 of the 
accelerator ROMS. If you find yours are 
earlier, you can gel replacement pairs for 
S25 from Commodore. The part numbers 
are 390282-06 and 390283-06. 1200 Wil- 
son Drive, West Chester, PA 19380. 215- 
431-9100. 

CDTV TITLES 

I he latest list we have of cur- 
rently available and announced CDTV 
titles contains 65 entries. Among the more 
interesting ones (or at least more entertain- 
ing names) gleaned from the list: Family 
Circus Home Movie Workshop (Context, 



S79.95); A Bun for Barney (Multimedia 
Corp.. S49.95); Heather Hits Her First 

Home Run (Discis, S49.95); Moving Gives 
Me a Stomachache (Discis. S49.95 - and 
even sitting still sometimes makes us a lit- 
tle queasy); Scary Poems for Rotten Kids 
(Discis, S59.95); The Tale of Peter Rabbit 
(Discis, S59.95 - hopefully with the original 
Beatrix Potter illustrations); Defender of 
the down (CDTV Publishing, $39.95 - 
done by Jim Sachs); Xenon 2: Megablast 
(Mirrorsoft, $49.95 - arcade gaming at its 
best); Psycho Killer (On-Line, $49.95 and 
Tom's personal favorite title); The New 
Basics Electronic Cookbook (Xiphias, 
S59.95). Bear in mind that some of these 
have not yet been released, and may change 
their titles. 

NET NEWS 

\»/ompuServe has added a new 
forum to their already long list. The Crafts 
Forum offers online conferences for those 
involved in needlework, weaving, wood- 
working, knitting, crochet, and any other 
craft you can think up. The forum is being 



ADDRESS CHANGES 

J Zardoz Software is now at 12036 
Nevada City Highway, Suite 192, Grass 
Valley, CA 95945. 916-274-831 1 . 
</ Elan Designs has a new address: PO 
Box 3136, Half Moon Bay, CA 94019. 
The phone numbers are 415-726-5097 
voice, 415-726-5071 fax. 
/ Electronic Arts has undergone a 
minor move. They've been in two sepa- 
rate buildings and have now moved 
across the street to a place where they 
can all be together. The new address is 
1450 Fashion Island Blvd., San Mateo. 
CA 94404. The phone remains the same 
at 415-571-7171. 

VERSIONS & ADDITIONS 

S HelpDisk has added a version cover- 
ing Impulse's imagine to their Buddy 
System online help system series. Cost is 



$49.95. 6671 West Indiantown Rd., Suite 
56360, Jupiter, FL 33458. 407-694-1756. 
</ New Horizons' ProWrite is now at ver- 
sion 3.2. The biggest change is the addi- 
tion of direct PostScript support. The user 
interface has been reworked, and 
ProWrite can now read Professional Page 
text files. Registered owners of version 
3.0 can upgrade to 3.2 for S20, upgrading 
from 2.0 costs $60, and from 1 .0 (if there 
are any still out there) for $75. 

As if that weren't enough, New Hori- 
zons has also upgraded Flow, their out- 
line/idea processor to version 3.0. 
They've added ARexx support, saveable 
configurations, spellchecking, head- 
ers/footers, and, most important, auto- 
matic outline numbering. Upgrading from 
version 2.0 will cost you $20, from 1.0, 
$30. PO Box 43 1 67, Austin, TX 78745. 
512-328-6650. 

/" Scala, the titling/presentation package 
from Digital Vision via Great Valley Prod- 
ucts, has been upgraded to version 1.1. 



Among the new features are continuous 
credit scrolling, realtime antialiasing, 
ARexx support, and the ability to con- 
trol a Canon Xapshot digital still cam- 
era via the serial port. Scala 1.1 also 
has support for colorfonts and outline 
fonts. Contact GVP for upgrade infor- 
mation. 600 Clark Avenue, King of 
Prussia, PA 19406. 215-337-8770. 
/ Octree Software is shipping version 
2.1 of Caligari Broadcast, their 3D 
modeling program. They've enhanced 
the modelling features and added 
drivers for DCTV, HAM-E, Harlequin, 
and GVP's new Impact Vision 24 dis- 
play boards. An exact upgrade policy 
hadn't been set at presstime, though 
Octree tells us that the cost will be "less 
than $100." They're also working on a 
new consumer version of Caligari 
called Caligari 2 - look for details in 
New Products next issue. 311 W43rd 
Street, Suite 904, New York, NY 
10036.212-262-3116. 



18 .infO NOVEMBER 1991 



NEWS 




VIEWS 



run by Susan Lazear, one of the trailblazers 
in the area of computer-aided craft. Lazear 
is the guiding force behind Cochenillc 
Computer Knit Products, whose line 
includes, among other things, interfaces for 
connecting electronic knitting machines to 
personal computers, including the Amiga. 
Her expertise and Amiga-enthusiasm are 
lop-notch and her appearance on this new 
CompuServe Forum guarantees it will be 
worth looking in on. 

NEW UTOPIA 

I odd Rundgren is the current 
darling of the Amiga video community, 
being both a rock star and an Amiga afi- 
cionado. His latest video. Change Myself, 
was Toaster made, and now Rundgren has 
announced the formation of NUtopia, a 
computer/video production company. 
Among those involved: Ron Thornton, who 
worked on special effects for such films as 
Terminator II. Spaceballs, and Ghost- 
busters; John Sanborn, who was director of 
Alive from Off Center, a PBS series thai 
features short films and animations; Allen 
Hastings, author of LightWave, the Toaster 
rendering package Rundgren used in mak- 
ing Change Myself. 

VICE VERSA 

in the ordinary scheme of things, 
computer games are based on movies and 
TV shows, but in a reversal of the usual. 
Broderbund's Where in the World is Car- 
men Sandiego? has been made into a TV 
game show. A co-production of WQED in 
Pittsburg and WGBH in Boston, the show 
premiered nationwide on PBS on Septem- 
ber 30. Using live actors, animations, stu- 
dio participants, and a celebrity cameo here 
and there, the gameshow looks like it will 
be a success. The show is co-produced by 
Kate Taylor (Degrassi Junior High) and 
Jay Rayvid (Wonder Works) li's targeted at 
kids in the eight to 13 age group and we're 
in favor of anything that will help leach 
kids (and grown-ups. too) geography. 

SHOWS 

I he next European AmiEXPO 
shows will be held in Koln. Germany from 



October 31 -November 3 and in London 
November 14-17. Over 60,000 people 
attended the show in Koln last year, and the 
1991 show promises to be even bigger. 

The second annual CyberArts Interna- 
tional show is to be held November 15-17 
at the Pasadena Center in Pasadena. CA. 
Devoted to computer uses in the arts, enter- 
tainment, and education fields, the show 
will feature sessions with industry gurus. 
Among those scheduled to appear are Trip 
Hawkins (Electronic Arls), Rand Worrell 
(Mattel). Charlie Richmond (responsible 
for many of the effects in Siegfried & 
Roy's show at the Mirage in Las Vegas as 
well as Miss Saigon on Broadway). Carl 
Rosendahl (Pacific Data Images). Jaron 
Lanier (VPL Research, a company leading 
the way in virtual reality), B rendu Laurel 
(Telepresence), and Kirk Austin (Lucas- 



film). There will also be a session on 
NewTek's Toaster. The list of sessions, 
exhibits, and other cyber-activities goes on 
and on. The three-day cyber-extravaganza 
costs $450 and you can get registration 
information from CyberArts, 20085 
Stevens Creek Blvd., Cupertino. CA 
95014. 800-82-CYBER. 

ON THE AIR 

ZJome cable systems are show- 
ing Amiga Artists on the Air, a half-hour 
series showcasing the work and methods of 
Amiga artists. If your local cable system 
doesn't carry the program, you can get 
VHS tape copies for $15 each. For more 
information, contact Willow Mixed Media. 
PO Box 1 94. Lennox Ave.. Glenford. NY 
12433.914-657-2914. 



THE HUM Oft MILL 

DISCLAIMER: The following are among the most entertaining 
rumors we've heard the past month. They are presented for your 

entertainment and amusement only. Please do not make any 

important decisions based on these rumors, as some will prove 

to be inaccurate or just plain false. 



Z> Upgrade software from Commodore 
is letting developers get 15 frame per 
second 3/4 screen full-motion video out 
of CDTV. While that's not broadcast- 
quality, it is adequate for many applica- 
tions. No word yet on who'll be first to 
use it. 

O Commodore 'let go' 33 marketing 
people in mid-July, then 12 software 
engineers in August. Will the last one 
out please turn off the lights? 

Z> When Free Spirit's Sex Vixens from 

Space was first released last year, a 
shipment was seized by British customs 
officials as 'pornography.' until they 
could be convinced it was all just good, 
clean fun. Well. Free Spirit got a call 
from Canadian customs officials a few 



weeks ago -- but this time they were 
just playing the game and needed some 
hints! Free Spirirs tech support staff 
gladly provided the needed clues. 

Z> Nintendo and Sega have reportedly 
targeted Europe with millions of ad 
dollars for the Christmas season, Can 
they take the European games market 
away from Commodore? Without 
Europe, Commodore's sales would flat- 
line. We'll see. 

:> Who's buying CDTVs? According to 
the feedback we get, it's not "Joe Couch 
Potato,* the guy Commodore's market- 
ing plan is aimed at. It's - you guessed 
it - folks who already own Amigas. 
Who would'a thunk if? :) 



.info NOVEMBER 1991 19 



Hardware by Morton Kevelson 

Making the Most of Miniatures: 
ICD's Tiny Amiga Additions 




ver since the first 
foiir-bil microprocessor, small has been 
whal microcomputing is all about. The 
newest microprocessors contain more than 
a million transistors, and 64 megabit 
memory chips are already on the drawing 
boards. ICD is striving 10 make the word 
'small' lake on a new meaning for Amiga 
users. They have succeeded in squeezing 
into the space occupied by a single large- 
scale chip accessories that most developers 
place on a full-sized Amiga 2000 card. 

These reductions in scale without any 
loss of performance are made possible by 
the extensive use of surface mounted chips. 
These are standard chips in miniaturized 
packages whose mounting leads are sol- 
dered to the surface oflhe printed circuit 
board. (With conventional printed circuits, 
the chip leads are inserted into holes which 
have been drilled through the circuit 
board. ) To further reduce the size of their 
products. ICD mounts the chips on both 
sides of the board. Since these accessories 
usually install into the socket of a standard 
Amiga chip, ICD also squeezes most of the 
components into the space between the par- 
allel rows of mounting pins of die original 
chips! 

Miniaturizing on this scale requires 
greater precision than conventional con- 
struction techniques. As a result. ICD's 
products are somewhat more expensive 
than full-size products that perform similar 
functions. To help offset their higher prices, 
the ICD products have features which can- 
not be obtained with full-sized devices. 

With the exception of the AdRAM 
scries of RAM expansion boards, all (he 

devices thai I will look i-. month can be 

installed in an Amiga 500. an Amiga 1000. 
or an Amiga 2000. 

ADSPEED 

The concept behind AdSpeed is very 

simple: to make the Amiga run faster, sim- 
ply make its 6X000 microprocessor run 




faster. In practice, it takes a little more than 
speeding up the microprocessor to imple- 
ment this itlea. The 6X000 is just a small 
part of what makes up an Amiga. The 
Amiga's custom chips and the system's 
RAM are designed to run at a clock speed 
just a bit faster than seven million cycles 
per second. Simply speeding up the 6X000 
will leave the rest of the system behind. 

To install AdSpeed install it in place of 
the system's 68000 epu chip. Since 
AdSpeed comes with its own faster 68000. 
the original cpti chip should be stored in a 
secure place. AdSpeetfs length and width 
are only slightly larger than the 6X000 
itself, and its overall height is about three 
times that oflhe microprocessor. Four 
jumper pins are located at one end of the 
hoard, though only two of these are active - 
the second pair is for future options. If the 
active pins are connected. AdSpeed will 
power up at the Amiga's normal speed. If 
the pins are left open, it accelerates. 

The instruction manual suggests the 
connection of an optional switch lo the 
speed pins lo let you change processor 
speed in midstream. You will have to pro- 



Top view of 

AdSpeea 'with the 

68000 removed 

reveals the 32K 

static RAM cache. 

Bottom view 
shows additional 

components 

mounted between 

the socket pins. 



side your own switch and wire for this 
modification. The clock speed can also be 
changed by using a supplied utility program 
which can be run from the Workbench or 
CLI. ICD has found that some Amiga 
peripherals do not like to power up at the 
accelerated speed. The work-around is to 
set AdSpeed to power up at lite slow speed 
and then switch to the fast speed. You can 
put the AdSpeed program in your startup- 
sequence for this purpose. 

AdSpeed is built around a 6X000 
microprocessor running at a clock speed of 
about 14.3 megahertz, double the speed of 
your average Amiga. AdSpeed's actual per- 
formance increase is realized through the 
clever use of 32K of static RAM. This 
memory is equally divided between RAM 
cache and cache tags. 

The contents of chip RAM are invisi- 
ble to AdSpeed. Thus, the best performance 
gains will be realized with programs that 
run repetitive loops from fast RAM. Fortu- 
nately, most software falls into this cate- 
gory. To gel some idea of whal kind of per- 
formance improvement could be expected 
with AdSpeed. I ran up ASDG's Art 



20 .info NOVEMBER 1991 




HaWWare 



Department Professional. Loading a 
1024x768 color GIF image from a Xetec 
CD-ROM drive required 45 seconds at the 
seven MHz clock speed, and only 27 sec- 
onds al llie 14 MHz clock speed. Convert- 
ing the same image to a hi-res interlaced 16 
color screen display took 1 10 seconds al 
seven MHz and only 57 seconds at 14 
MHz. 

Since AdSpeed is simply an acceler- 
ated 68000. it cannot be used with a math 
coprocessor. Programs which require the 
presence of a math coprocessor will not 
find one with this accelerator. I also found 
that AMax II i die Macintosh emulator from 
ReadySoft) would not run with AdSpeed in 
the accelerated mode. The main advantage 
of using an accelerated 68000. as opposed 
to a 68020/6HH8I combination, is to ensure 
software compatibility with older programs 
that may not have been written with micro- 
processors other than the basic 68000 in 
mind. If you arc looking for a modest boost 
in performance at the minimum possible 
cost. AdSpeed will do the job. Based on the 
current street prices. AdSpeed can be 
bought for less than half the cost of the 
lowest priced 68020/68881 acceleraior on 
the market. 

FUCKER FREE VIDEO 

No, Flicker Free Video will not pro- 
vide you with free flickers to use with your 
video. To the contrary, it is a dc-interlacer 
which aims to remove the flicker which is 
an unavoidable result of NTSC composite 
video. Mere is a condensed version of the 
mandatory lecture on NTSC video that 
must accompany every de-interlacer review 
- if you think you already know all about 
the video display: just skip the next para- 
graph. 

The NTSC video flashes fresh images 
on the video display about 30 times per sec- 
ond. A complete image is called a frame. 
The images are scanned onto the screen in 
two parts, or fields, and fields appear at rate 
of about 60 per second. An NTSC frame is 
built up of 525 lines with 262 1/2 lines per 
field. The lines are progressively scanned 
from the top to the bottom of the screen. 
The two fields are interwoven so that the 
adjacent lines on the screen always belong 
to alternate fields. The glowing phosphors 
on the screen fade from view at such a high 
rate that each line disappears before the 
next one is scanned. End of lecture. We 
now return to our regularly scheduled 
review. 



Some simple low-cost or no-cost ways 
to reduce or eliminate flicker are dark sun 
glasses, reduced room lighting, turning 
down the contrast controls on the monitor, 
or low contrast screen colors. The best way 
to eliminate interlace flicker is to get rid of 
it entirely. This is just what a de-interlacer 
board such as Flicker Free Video docs. First 
it memorizes an NTSC field in its on board 
buffer. When the second field comes along, 
it sends out the first line from the first field 
followed by the first line of the second field 
and so on until the entire image has been 
displayed. The result is that the lines from 
both fields are displayed in order and inter- 
lace, with its accompanying flicker, is elim- 
inated. Of course, a normal monitor is not 
capable of accepting video at this acceler- 
ated rate, so you also need to buy a more 
expensive multi-sync monitor, 

Flicker Free Video is eqtiipped with a 
three megabit buffer which is just large 
enough for a single high-resolution field. 
To keep up with the doubled scan rate. 
Flicker Free Video replaces each line from 
the first field with the corresponding line 
from the next field as it displays the con- 
tents of its buffer. When the original dis- 
play is non-interlaced, the resulting display 
looks very smooth as all the interline gaps 
have been neatly filled in. With a rapidly- 
changed interlaced display, motion artifact- 
ing may occur. This happens when Flicker 
Free Video combines the fields from two 
successive images that have changed drasti- 
cally. Fortunately, these events do not occur 
very often. 

To install the unit you have to open the 
computer, locate and extract the Denise 
chip, insert the board into the recently 
vacated socket, and reinstall the Denise 
chip in the corresponding socket on the 
Flicker Free Video board. This leaves the 
video slot in the Amiga 2000 free for other 
applications. In the Amiga 2000. the Denise 
chip is located under the power supply. In 
the Amiga 500. Denise sits in the hack to 
the left. In the Amiga 1000 you will have to 
remove the 512 kilobyte Kickstart RAM 
daughterboard and perform some minor 
modifications to the circuit board. The 
modifications require the installation of 
some components and some soldering. ICD 
offers to do the Amiga 1000 installation for 
S40 plus shipping and handling. 

If you have the enhanced chip set 
installed in your computer, you also have to 
change a couple of FF\"s jumpers. You 
complete the installation by plugging a 
short lenath of nine-conductor flat ribbon 




Flicker Free Video has all its 

components mounted on the top 

surface. 

cable into a socket on the FFV board. For 
the Amiga 2000. the other end of the cable 
is fitted with a nine-pin "D" connector 
mounted on an expansion slot bracket. For 
the Amiga 500, the cable with the nine-pin 
socket hangs out the rear. A nine-pin to 15- 
pin adapter is provided for use with display 
monitors that use the 15-pin cable. 

Once installed. Flicker Free Video is 
completely transparent to the operation of 
the Amiga. You can continue using the 
original RGB port and Amiga monitor 
without the benefit of the de-interlaced dis- 
play. To complete the flicker-free side of 
the setup you will need either a VGA or a 
multisync monitor. The advantage of the 
multisync monitor is that it can be used 
with both the original interlaced display 
and the Flicker Free Video output. Just 
make sure that the monitor can synchronize 
with the 15 kilohertz Amiga scan rate as 
well as the 3 1 kilohertz Flicker Free Video 
scan rate. Since FfVdoes not have a 
bypass switch, you will also have to switch 
the monitor cable between its output socket 
and the Amiga's RGB connector. 

I tested Flicker Free Video on an NFC 
Multisync 3D high-resolution monitor. The 
results were superb. 

There are not too many options when 
it comes to de-interlacer boards for the 
Amiga. I cannot say how Flicker Free 
Video slacks up against the Commodore 
and Micro Way de-inierlacer boards. Flicker 
Free Video looks like a good choice for the 
A500 or A 1 000 computers or for the A2000 
if you want to free up the video slot for 
another device. 



.info NOVEMBER 1991 21 



M^A 



Hamware 




ICD's painless 

hard drive setup 

software. 



NOVIA20i 

Novia 20i is a 20 megabyte hard drive 
package made up of ICD's AdlDE host 
adapter and a 20 megabyte Conners 2 1/2 
(yes, TWO and a half) inch IDE hard drive. 
AdlDE is an IDE host adapter that is not 
much larger than the 68000 microprocessor. 
To install AdlDE. you open up the com- 
puler, remove the 68000 from its socket, 
plug AdlDE into the socket in its place and 
reinstall the 68000 in the corresponding 
socket on AdlDE. The IDE cable connects 
to a 44-pin header located along the edge of 
the circuit board. A pair of jumper pins lets 
you choose between floppy booting with 
Kickstart 1 .2 or autobooting from the hard 
drive with Kickstart 1.3. 

The 2 1/2 inch hard drive is mounted 
on a matching metal plale which is then 
mounted directly on the Amiga's mother- 
board using double sided tape and three 
nylon feet. A ground wire connection from 
the mounting plate to any nearby mounting 
screw completes the installation. The short 
length of flat ribbon cable is folded in a 
way that the hard drive ends up in a conve- 
nient location in the Amiga 500 where the 
tripod mounting can straddle several key 
components. Since the 2 1/2 inch hard drive 
was designed for use in laptop computers, 
there should be no problem powering it 
from the Amiga 500's original power sup- 
ply. However, I did notice that the area 
under and around the 6K0OO was a bit 
warmer with AdlDE installed. ICD claims 
that AdSpeed can be installed along with 
AdlDE nr\d the combination will work just 
fine. The problem with installing both 
AdSpeed and AdlDE in an Amiga 500 is 
that their combined height prevents the clo- 
sure of the computer's case. 

The hard drive setup software is the 



Complete Novia 20 
assembly. 

AdSpeed or 68000 
plugs into the 
socket strips. 



same program that ICD uses for all of its 
hard drive host adapters. The full-screen 
window makes the partitioning and format- 
ting of the hard drive as painless as possi- 
ble. Perfonnance of Novia 20i. based on 
DiskSpeed 3.1 is about average as com- 
pared to the other host adapters I have 
looked at. 

If you are determined to save desk 
space while cramming the maximum 
amount of power into an Amiga 500. then 
Novia 2(H is certainly worth considering. 
The 20 megabyte capacity is a bit small by 
today's standards, and you will pay a pre- 
mium for the compact packaging. Based on 
the current street prices of Amiga 500 hard 
drives, you should be able to buy a conven- 
tional add-on hard drive system with more 
than twice the capacity for about the same 
price as the Novia 20i. 



ADRAM 

Last, but not least, ICD's AdRAM 540 
with ihe AdRAM 560D daughterboard lets 
you install a battery-backed clock/calendar 
and up to six megabytes of RAM in the 
Amiga 500's belly slot. I took a close look 
at AdRAM. as well as a competing product, 
in issue #38. Since 1 have alreadv exceeded 




my allotted space for this issue. 1 will refer 
you to my earlier report for the details. 

Overall, ICD's products are marvels of 
miniaturization. If you are in the market for 
several power peripherals without the desk 
space on which to set them up, then ICD's 
product line is well worth considering. 



AdSpeed $349.95 

Flicker Free Video S499.95 

-k-kit-k 

Novia 20i $559.95 
-k-kik+ 

AdRAM 540 S 159.95 Unpopulated 

ICD, Inc. 

1220 Rock Street. Rockford. IL 61 101 
815-968-2228 



DiskSpeed 3. 


1 Test Results 


Device: Novia 20i 




Test Intensity: Med: Performance Stress: 


None 


26 Files Create, 40 Files Open/Close. 1 17 Files Scan, 34 Files Delete, 180 Seek/Read 


Buffer Size 512 


4K 32K 256K 


Bytes Create 66874 


1 54628 276168 308546 


Bytes Write 80817 


168933 358631 438620 


Bytes Read 72374 


167493 367216 414892 



22 info NOVEMBER 1991 



Public Domain by Jeff Lowenthal 

Programs to Read, Create, 
Analyze, and Dial 




iFJ.PopAj-t 



by PHLIP 



124 U§ |f*H]| 



sn"£ me:: close we pop thru jfET IIIIll [n] 



ublic domain and share- 
ware programs are available from many 
sources, including disk distributors and 
online services. Those reviewed this month 
were obtained from: 

Cranberry Software. PO Box 565. Carver 

MA 02355, 800-321-0815. 
GEnie Online Information Service, 
800-638-9636. 

VIEW-80 [GEnie #11795] 

Somelimes as you browse the files on the 
electronic services, you happen across a 
utility that does what ii does betier than 
anything else. View-80 is such a program. 
So it's an ASCII file reader - "big deal," 
you say. Well, this is a file reader with a 
difference. First of all, it's blazingly fast. 
Moving a slider at the bottom of the screen 
zips you through a text file faster than you 
can read it. It searches for strings, filters out 
ASCII garbage, and generally does every- 
thing a program of its type should. And this 
file reader can hold up to ten different files 
in as many buffers, allowing you to switch 
from one to another instantly. With the 
required library on your disk, it will also 
read Power-Packed text files. It prints too, 
including specified ranges. View-80 is 
shareware (SI 5). and worth it. An excellent 




effort from Federico Giannici of Palermo, 
Italy. 

POPART[CranWare#156] 

How shall we describe PnpArtl It is, I 
guess, an image creating/painting program 
with a sense of humor. With a few judicious 
choices, you can create vivid "op art" style 
graphics and then combine them into a 
page flipping animation. This thing is fun! 
Also on # 1 56: Pop Art Lite, a simitar pro- 
gram, and another to produce dropshadows 
for video titling fonts, along with the ven- 
erable ROT. which generates 3D objects 
and moves them over 24 frames to your 
specifications, producing short animations. 



Phone Plus 
address book 
and autodialer. 




Pop Art 

from 

Cranberry 

Software 



LUSCHER COLOR TEST [GEnie #11982] 
The validation of psychological tests has 
been a matter of great controversy. If they 
work, how well they work, and what they 
lell us are ongoing questions. The Luscher 
Color Test has been around for more than 
20 years, and seems deceptively simple on 
the surface. You arc presented with a 
palette of eight colors (originally on indi- 
vidual cards) and told to select them in the 
order of your "sympathy" for them. Then 
you are asked to do it again, and the results 
are presented on screen or directed to your 
printer. You may be shocked, as I was. at 
the apparent accuracy of this test. It draws 
conclusions about your state of mind based 
on your affinity for the various colors at 
any given time. There is a book available 
{The Luscher Color Test) which explains 
the concept, though I haven't seen it in 
years. If psychology interests you (I'll bet 
you own Mind Prober, right? I you will 
want to download this. PS: Kids, don't 
hang out your psychologist shingle without 
meeting the requirements of your state, ok? 

PH0NEPLUS [GEnie #11872] 

PhonePlus is a nice-looking phone num- 
ber/address database and dialer which also 
prints mailing labels. The interface is 
appealing, and 1 like the way the data is 
presented, much like a Rolodex(TM) card. 



.infO NOVEMBER 1991 23 



We get a chance in each issue to discuss what's new in graphics software; but in concentrating on 
the features in any one package we seldom see a real instance of how all these tools work together - 

and they must work together, since any one project is likely to require procedures that involve sev- 
eral different programs. Because of the early standardization of the IFF graphics format, we Amiga 

artists have always been able to combine the strengths of our tools, to the betterment of our work. 

Here's a case history of an image that passed through several different tools on its way to comple- 
tion. It involves both 3D and 2D graphics software and image processing as well. 




Tir Na Nog 



by Brad Schenck 



To the ancient Irish. Tir na Nog was 'The 
Land of Youih." It's an otherworld. another 
plane of exislence that's sometimes 
reachable from ours. Being an Irish legend, 
Tir na Nog has its share of fighting as well - 
ii was a variation on the earthly plane with a 
bit more magic than we have here. 

This 24-bil illustration was meant to catch some of the 
earihtike and yel unearthly spirit of that place. 

The background was rendered with Vista Pro (the geo- 



graphical and fractal landscape generator! in 24-bit color. I 
rendered two versions of the same scene in Vista: one with a 
daytime sky, the oihcr with a starry dark one. After saving 
these off lo disk I loaded them into lousier Paint's two 
screens and performed a 'Rub-Through' from one to the 
other. By using a highlighted fill. I rubbed a lot of blue into 
the night sky at the horizon, fading out to very little blue in 
the screen's comers. That gave me a nicely shaded twilight 
sky (see Figure I ). I saved the new version out and got to 
work with my 3D rendering tools. 



24 ,infO NOVEMBER 1991 



The sword and shield objects were created in Imagine even 
[hough I intended to render the image with Lightwave. Since 
3D objects are not saved in a standard tile format, it was nec- 
essary to convert the Imagine objects with Syndesis' Inter- 
change. Imagine and Lightwave are both recent products and 
aren't at this writing directly supported by Interchange, so 
this is a tricky process. An update to Interchange has been 
announced that will make the conversion much easier. 

In Lightwave 1 created the 'surfaces' used on the 
objects. I made use of one of Lightwave's algorithmic tex- 
tures (wood) and also its 'fractal noise' maps for both 
color and bump mapping. Bump mapping makes a 
smooth surface appear to be rough or pilled, or gives ii a 
simulated raised pattern. All of these features help the 
3D artist avoid pictures full of smooth shiny objects 
that all look like chrome, plastic, and glass. 

Once T had the objects and their surfaces the way I 
wanted them. 1 rendered the scene at 736x480 pixels in 
24-bit color. I used my touched-up Vista image as a 'Backdrop' in 
Lightwave, so that ii appeared as a background behind the objects in 
the scene. 

I then loaded the rendered image into Toaster Paittl for some 
retouching. Arriving at the perfect lighting for a 3D scene is as chal- 
lenging as building the objects; in the case of still images il can be 
faster to retouch a little (hail to experiment with the lighting until it's 
exactly right. So 1 made some adjustments to the shadows in the 
piece, after which it was ready for the next step. 



Figure 1: 

Here, two Vista Pro renderings have 

been combined into a single image 

that will become the background for 

the picture. 




I planned to add a decorative strip across the lower pan of the 
image. This uses a combination of Celtic and Art Nouveau elements. 
1 painted the border alone (Figure 2) in Deluxe Paint III, using just 16 
colors. This was more than adequate, sinee I would be 'mixing' this 
into the 24-bit image using a transparent effect; the 16 color image 
would modify the far more colorful picture il was to be compos- 
ited into. 

ASDG's Art Department Professional allows just 
this sort of compositing, and that's where 1 turned next. 
First I loaded in the 24-bit picture, already a veteran of 
Vista, Imagine, Toaster Paint and Lightwave, and then 
composited the 16 color border image into it with a 'Mix' 
value of seventy percent (see Figure 3), This wasn't 
strictly necessary; 1 planned to do some more "mixing' 
later in Toaster Paint, but I wanted to see roughly what 1 
was getting. The result. Figure 4. shows the Lightwave ren- 
dering with a border strip laid straight across it. This wasn't 
quite what 1 wanted, but I was nearly there. 

Figure 3: 

The Art Department Professional 's 

R, G, and B values are set at zero: 

this makes all blacks in the border 

picture completely transparent. 



Figure 2: 

A decorative border is designed in 
Deluxe Paint III in just 16 colors. 




.info NOVEMBER 1991 25 




Figure 4: 

At this stage, the backdrop has been 
used in a Lightwave 3D rendering, 

and the border design mixed into it. 

The picture just needs one more 

excursion into Toaster Paint. 



Once again I loaded the image into 
Toaster Paint, both the composited and the 
original versions (one an the spare screen). 
Again I used transparency (this time with- 
out a highlight effect) and the Rub Through 
painting mode. I worked on the original 
image's screen and rubbed through to the 
composited picture 'behind' the sword and 
shield, leaving them standing in front of the 
border. This created the layered effect I was 
after, as you see in the completed painting. 

There would have been several other 
ways to accomplish some of these same 
effects; this is simply a description of the 
steps I took this time, with the most appro- 
priate tools I had. While it probably sounds 
very involved and awkward, 1 can assure 
you that it wasn't; once you're familiar 



with a set of tools, it's second nature to go 
from one to another as you work, taking 
advantage of the strong points in each. 
If you want awkward, let me tell you 
about... oh, nevermind. Another lime. 

Addresses 

Vista Pro, $149.95 

Virtual Reality Laboratories. Inc. 

2341 Ganador Court 

San Luis Obispo, California 93401 

(805)545-8515 

Lightwave 3D and Toaster Paint, (bundled 
with the Video Toaster, S1595.00) 

NewTek, Inc. 

215 E. 8th Street 

Topeka, Kansas 66603 (800) 843-8934 



Imagine, S350.00 
Impulse, Inc. 

6870 Shingle Creek Parkway #112 
Minneapolis, Minnesota 55430 
(612)566-0221 

Deluxe Paint III, SI 49.00 

Electronic Arts 

1450 Fashion Island Boulevard 
San Mateo, California 94404 
(800) 245-4525 

Art Department Professional, S240.00 
ASDG, Inc. 
925 Stewart Street 
Madison. Wisconsin 53713 
(608) 273-6585 



There must be somebody who prints Amiga 
technical information for less than $59 a year. 

Of course there is. 

foff J shVUGA J UBEIiai 

r V P 



j J 







And our tech section is FREE. 
.info technical support 

This issue includes Unix, Quarterback Tools, and more starting on page 54 




26 .info NOVEMBER 1991 



Before you pchase a new 

word processing program ask 

for character references 




Outline Fonts: 

• Size fonts from 4 to 200 points 

• Leading (line spacing) from 4 to 200 points 

• Compress/Expand character widths 

• Underline, Double Underline, Strike-Thru 

• Small Caps/ All Caps 

• Superscript /Subscript 

Word Processing Features: 

• 1 1 6,000 word Spelling Detector and Corrector 

• 470,000 synonym Thesaurus with definitions 
1 Automatic hvphenation 

• Multiple columns (1-6) 

■ Search and Replace 
' Title page option 

• Header/Fooler option 

■ Left, right, center, and decimal tab stops 

• Left, right, center, and full paragraph ]uslification 

• Document statistics 

■ Copy /Paste ruler 

■ Insert dale, time, and page numbers 

• Custom page sizes 

User Interface Highlights: 

• Ruler displayed in inches, picas, or metric 

System Requirements: Amiga" with 1 megabyte RAM, 
and either a hard drive or 2 floppy drives. 



(and then ask the price!) 

Say goodbye to rough, jagged letters on a 
of your printouts. Until now, quality output 
was only possible from expensive desktop 
publishing programs or PostScript"' printers. 
Now any printer supported by 
Workbench™ printer drivers can be 
utilized to its fullest capabilities. Final 
Copy"' is the first and only word 
processor on the Amiga to offer high- 
quality outline fonts. And that's not 
all... Check out the rest of Final 
Copy's' 1 ' great features. Never 
before has a program like this 
been available. Check out the 
price. If you are interested 
in a quality word pro- 
cessor, you will riot find 
a better value than 
Final Copy"' 



Final Cow 

from ' v 

SoftWood 

© SoftWood, Inc. P.O. Box 501 78, Phoenix, AZ 85076 

1(800)247-8314 

Visa/Masferaird Accepted 



0NLY $ 99 95 



Circle #160 on the Reader Service Card 




■ Magnified and reduced page views 

■ User-defined preferences 

• ARexx port 

IFF Graphic Support: 

• Real-time text flow 

• Scale to any size 

• Cropping 

• Place anywhere on page 

• Depth arrange 

• Also supports HAM and Extra Halfbrile 

Final Printing: 

■ Print at full resolution of printer 

• 12 Bit-plane printing 

• No jagged edges 

■ Pictures print in their original colors 

Draft Printing: 

• Print at maximum speed of printer 

• Left, top, right, bottom, and first margins 

• Use printer's built-in fonts 

Printing Genera): 

• Use standard Amiga printer drivers 

• Print and edit documents simultaneously 

Workbench 1.3 and 2.0 compatible. 



CYBERPLAY by Tom Ma I com 

Computer Thumb Twiddling 
and Other Idle Pursuits 




earc taking a liulc 
lime off from the standard Cyberplay litis 
issue. Mark and 1 are longtime tans of soft- 
ware ephemera, those little bits of code that 
don't do anything productive, but are fasci- 
nating to play with. We've been meaning to 
do an article on them for several years and 
finally decided this was the lime to till you 
in on how to use them in the fine art of 
wasting time. We know this skimps a little 
on the game reviews for this issue, but (he 
good news is that the next issue is our 
annual Games issue. Stay tuned for our 
look back at the best of the year, what's hot 
and what's not in new games, and a look 
ahead at what's coming in entertainment 
software. 

WONDERLAND 

?<r *k ?'c ik ik 

Magnetic Scrolls/Virgin Games 

18061 Fitch Avenue, Irvine. CA 92714, 
714-833-8710 

It's been a long, long time since I've 
been as smitten with an adventure game as 
I am with Wonderland. Taking any famous 
literary work and translating il into an inter- 
active formal is a risky proposition, but 
Magnetic Scrolls has succeeded in a way 
that not only retains the nonsensical flavor 
of Alice in Wonderland, bill also revives 
and rejuvenates the text-adventure genre. 

Wonderland doesn't try to be Alice in 
Wonderland, taking instead (he approach of 
putting you in the role of Alice and leiling 
you explore the weird realm of the White 
Rabbit and the Queen of Hearts in your 
own way. It's all a dream, of course, jusl as 
in Lewis Carroll's classic novel, and the 
object of the game is to complete the 
dream. 

Most computer games these days don't 
seem to much care about literary quality . 
but Wonderland clearly does. The writing is 
sharp, clear, and true to the spiril of the 
original. It is also grammatically correct 
and spelled properly, something far too rare 




Visiting the 

caterpillar in 

Virgin Games' 

marvelous 

Wonderland. 



in computer games (and everywhere else, 
for that mailer) of the pasi couple of years. 
It is lilerale without being ponderous, liter- 
ary without being pompous. The game's 
wriiers have kept Carroll's world intaci 
without intruding on it. or, heaven forl'cnd. 
"enhancing" it. The graphics are stunning, 
and some have bils of animation. They 
retain much of the sly le of Ihe original Tcn- 
niel illustrations, but have the same respect 
for the original book as the text. In general, 
ihe characters aren't shown, leaving them 
intact in the player's imagination where 
they belong. There are bils of music here 
and there in (he game, though there are few 
sound effects. There's so much going on 
visually, though, that 1 didn't miss them. 

1 had a tough lime deciding to give Won- 
derland five stars. It most definitely doesn'l 
look like an Amiga game and in fact, looks 
like it's running on the IBM il was ported 
from, 1 suppose I've mellowed a liltle over 
the years: if something is good, it's good. It 
doesn't matter where it comes from. Won- 
derland uses a multiple window system: 
[here are separate windows for the text, 
graphics, map. inventory, compass, and so 
on. You can have any or all of the windows 
open, drag them around ihe screen, resize 



them, and generally tailor the display to suit 
your taste. The interface is so good that if 
you don't want lo do any typing, you don't 
have to. There are two sels of menus thai, 
when combined with ihe windows, mostly 
eliminate ihe need to use the keyboard. 

Wonderland is one of those rare works 
thai is far more lhan the sum of ils pans. It 
is suitable for adults and kids both. In fact, 
one of the first lliings 1 did after playing ihe 
game was dig out a copy of the book and 
reread il. What a great way to introduce this 
classic work to kids - lei them play the 
game and then read the book. They'll cer- 
tainly want lo. Wonderland is. pardon me. 
wonderful: I'll be playing il for years to 
come. 

BIG BUSINESS 



7l 7ir & 7ir ■ 



DigiTek 

1916 Twisting Lane, Wesley Chapel, FL 
33543,813-973-7733 

This is ihe first laugh-out-loud game I've 
played since New World's Nuclear War. In 
fact, it has much the same sense of lunatic 
humor [hat made Nuclear War such a suc- 
cess. Big Business is right on-larget with its 



Incredible 

ikikikik 7k 



Very Good 



Average 

JL JL JU. 

K K r\ 



Poor 



Drek 



7k 



28 .infO NOVEMBER 1991 




CY&eRWLAY 



jabs at every aspect of the business world. 
The game pits you against two other play- 
ers (human or computer) and you must out- 
wit litem in such things as sales, research & 
development, commodities trading, pricing, 
and other aspects of the greedy business of 
coming oul on lop. 

The game is entirely point and click, 
making the mechanics nearly transparent. 
The graphics are cartoonish, and even 
though they only use 16 colors, you'll 
never notice. There are innumerable weird 
little touches of animation thai add 
immensely to ihe game - be sure to click on 
everything on every screen. You'll be 
delighted with what you find. The sound 
effects are minimal, though, and I found 
myself wishing there had been more of 
them. 

Good as Big Business is, DigiTek has 
also included a second, separate bonus 
game in the box. Watistreet is a far more 
realistic game of stock trading and portfolio 
management. It isn't even close to Big 
Business in entertainment value, but its 
inclusion is a generous touch and it's cer- 
tainly worth looking at 

Big Business is an absolutely hilarious 
game. Invite a couple of friends over to 
play and you'll have a terrific time. Do it 
on a weekend, though. Your ribs will hurt 
too badly to go to work the next day. 

BILL ELLIOTT'S NASCAR 
CHALLENGE 

Konami 

900 Deerfield Parkway. Buffalo Grove, IL 

60089, 708-215-5100 
Similar to EA's Indianapolis 500, Bill 
Ellioll is set in the world of NASCAR rac- 




DigiTek's 
wickedly funny 
Big Bussiness. 



tng instead of Formula One. Developed by 
Distinctive Software (Test Drive and many 
other racing simulations), there really isn't 
much to set this game apart from others of 
the genre except Ihe Bill Elliolt name. 

The graphics are a combination of 
hitmans and \ eclor. and are handled with 
plenty of speed. I think the controls, like 
several other DSl-developed titles, are a lit- 
tle too touchy. The manual recommends 
using ihe keyboard instead of the joystick, 
and while I found that helpful. I don't like 
playing a racing game with the keyboard. I 
would much rather have some provision for 
calibrating ihe joystick response. 

You are given three racecars to choose 
from, and you can tune and tweak them to 
your heart's content. Several different race- 
ways are included, from Daylona to Tal- 
ladega, and you can race the whole season 
to become the NASCAR champ. 

If you're not a die-hard racing fan and 
you already have a car racing game on your 



NASCAR 

racing with 

Bill Elliot. 




shelf. I'd give Bill Elliott a miss, but if 
you're a fanatic where racetracks and fast 
cars are concerned, you'll certainly want to 
check this one out. It's not at all bad, it just 
isn't anything new. 

BATTLE CHESS II: 
CHINESE CHESS 

7?" 7s. 7< 

Interplay 

371 S. Susan, Santa Ana, CA 92704, 
714-549-2411 

I don't want to be disappointed in this 
game, but I just can't help it. The original 
Battle Chess is one of ihe two or three best 
things ever done on the Amiga. Benn and I 
couldn't wail to get the sequel booted up. 
but after about three minutes we both had 
the same reaction: "Why bother?" The 
problem isn't ihe execution, which is 
exceptional; it's the underlying concept. 
There's already been a Chinese chess game 
(published by Eagle Tree Software), and it 
proved that the Chinese version of the 
game isn't very interesting to Western audi- 
ences. 

Battle Chess II is just as skillfully pro- 
grammed as the original, and the anima- 
tions are extremely well done, but I just 
can't work up any interest in playing it. It 
works fine as an extended demo if you set 
both sides as computer players, but it all 
has a hollow feeling. Part of the reason the 
original Battle Chess was so successful was 
because the pieces were familiar and we 
knew the characters: that's not the case 
with Chinese Chess. The Western version 
of chess is deeply ingrained in our cultural 
imagery, and the unfamiliar layout and 



.info NOVEMBER 1991 29 





Animated 

Chinese 

Chess in 

Battle Chess II. 



>, < 1 aiF- 






r # %: ' y 



2fa£ 







tisfc 



■u 




05 






I III I M^V_r~ 




pieces of ihe Chinese game don't have the 
same impact. Seeing a piece turn into a 
dragon and flame another piece doesn't 
have the same effect as seeing a rook from 
the original game turn into a monster and 
devour the queen. Benn and I discussed it 
at length and agreed that we would much 
rather have seen Interplay release a new 
animation disk for the original instead of 
changing the game itself. How about a 
comedy set, with Mae West the queen and 
W.C. Fields as the king? Now that would 
have piqued our interest. 

Baule Chess II is a fine game in itself, 
and I would have been bowled over if I 
hadn't seen the original. As it is, it's one of 
those unfortunate ideas that probably 
seemed wonderful at the time, but just 
didn't work when it was put into practice. 

COMPUTER 
THUMB-TWIDDLING 

The fine art of doing nothing is a tradi- 
tion that goes back to the days when man's 
ancestors developed opposable thumbs and 
found that they could be satisfyingly 
rotated around one another to no good pur- 
pose. Time-wasting was born. We've come 
a considerable distance since then, but the 
art of fiddling around has come even fur- 
ther. Now we have computers to take the 
burden off our thumbs; we have software 
that's much more entertaining to play with 
than any digits, pedal or carpal. What I'm 
talking about here aren't games, but soft- 
ware of another sort altogether: programs 
that are utterly useless for anything but 
wasting a chunk of time, and preferably 
time that should have been used doing 



something productive. They're things to 
relax with, ephemera, sort of like computer- 
age worry beads. 

Most of the programs used in computer 
thumb-twiddling produce eye-candy, fleet- 
ing patterns and images thai serve no pur- 
pose but are interesting to look at. The first, 
and still one of the greatest, of these is Dan 
Silva's Polyscope, which Commodore 
shipped with the Amiga 1000. It produces 
kaliedoscopic patterns on the screen and 
illustrates another point about this 
ephemeral type of software: its often hyp- 
notic qualities. Ideally, thumb-twiddling 
software should require a minimum of 
interaction; it's best when you can sit back 
in your chair (or better. lie down) and veg 
out in front of the screen. Of course, not all 
software achieves this level of oblivion, nor 
should it. There are degrees of interaction 
and satisfaction. 

Thumb-twiddling software doesn't nec- 
essarily have to be written for that purpose 



alone: anything will serve, including pro- 
ductivity titles. Commercial or public 
domain, it doesn't matter as long as the 
goal of squandering a few minutes or a few 
hours is achieved. Deluxe Paint is one of 
the best time-wasters ever and probably the 
best Amiga entertainment title ever written. 
Megan plays with ProPage, which isn't 
everyone's idea of a good time, but illus- 
trates the principle that thumb-twiddling is 
a very personal thing. 

There are a few established traditions in 
using this type of software. First, never, 
ever save anything. I don't care how pretty 
the result of your labor is. If you save a file 
from something, you're doing something 
productive. Stop it right now! Second, and 
most important, you don't have to know 
how to use the software to waste time with 
it. Many of the titles in the list are mathe- 
matically oriented, but don't let that throw 
you. You don't have to know a single thing 
about math to waste time with them. Just 
look for examples included with the pro- 
grams and alter them slightly to get the 
hang of how things work. If the program 
has alterable default settings, fiddle with 
them. Read the documentation only as a 
last resort. After all, we're not interested in 
learning anything, we only care about frit- 
tering our lives away. Finally, if you get 
bored with one thing, move on to another. 
Build yourself a library of these things so 
you'll have some variety in your time- 
wasting. 

The numbers after the PD lilies indicate 
which Fish disk they can be found on. 
Nearly all are also available on BBSs and 
online services as well. Some of the titles 
are so ancient we can't remember where 
they came from. Look around online and 
you'll find them. (Yet another good way to 




A fleeting 

pattern from 

Sizzlers 

(FF#90). 



30 .info NOVEMBER 1991 




CYBf$FLAY 



waste some time!) The best way to ferret 
them out these programs is to search 
through Aquarium (the Fred Fish index pro- 
gram), or do a keyword search on the 
online services. Keywords to use include 
graphics, music, demo, fractal, mandelbroi, 
julia, and so on. 

LINES 

There are any number of line-generating 
programs, including SuperLiues (FF#243), 
Hypna (FF#297). Klide (FF#26S). Spliner. 
Kaleidoscope. Mackie (FF#305). Sizzlers 
(FF#90), and many more. They use lines, 
boxes, and other shapes, including some 
spectacular spline-based ones, to create pat- 
terns on the screen. Most will change them- 
selves, morphing through a series of differ- 
ent patterns as they swim across the screen. 
The best are SuperLiues. which is the 
definitive of the Lines-type programs, and 
Spliner (written by Torn Rokicki, this is a 
new version of Mackie). There are also a 
couple of screen-blankers that will not only 
blank your screen, but your mind, too. Pyro 
(FF#199) is the best and explodes little 
multicolored skyrockets on your screen at a 
slow, majestic pace. There are also several 
variations on Stars (FF#1 18) and Star- 
Blanker (FF#308), which display moving 
starfields to watch if you're feeling other- 
worldly. 

SOLIDS 

This category includes Polyscope, 
released to the public domain by Electronic 
Arts and available on BIX (polyscope, Izh). 
As mentioned above, this early classic by 
Dan Silva will make patterns to keep you 
hypnotized for hours. It has never been 
updated and should be. Strangely, it runs 
under Kickstart 1.0 to 1.2, won't under 1.3 
(unless FixHunked), and will again under 
2.0. Also take a look at such treasures as 
Worm (FF#218), Mondrian, Circles 
(FF#304) Blobs (FF#15), Tunnel (FF#174), 
HAMmmm2 (FF#239), Dance (FF#126). 
and variations on several of them. They 
operate for the most pan like their line- 
based counterparts, but with the addition of 
solid shapes. 

SOME ASSEMBLY REQUIRED 

While the following programs require 
some interaction to produce the unproduc- 
tive effect we're looking for. they're well 
worth lolling back in your chair and wast- 
ing some time with. Be sure to have every- 




An exotic 
fractal from 

Ronnie 
Johansson's 

Fractals. 



thing you need for the next few hours 
within amis' reach. 

Deluxe Paint is the champion here. Do 
some experimenting with the symmetry 
function, color cycling, and the move 
requester. I've wasted months fiddling with 
these. While it's not strictly in the spirit of 
time-wasting to save the results of any of 
your electronic doodling, you can put 
together slideshows of these screens and 
keep yourself vegged out for a few hours. 
(See the MindUght, below.) If you're idling 
away a few hours with a paint program, 
don't forget that you can waste even more 
time by running the results through image 
processing software such as Butcher (Eagle 
Tree Software), Pixmate (Progressive 
Peripherals), or The An Department 
(ASDG). After that, you can fiddle with the 
colors using Doug's Color Commander 
(Seven Seas). 

This brings us to another matter. You can 
waste incredible amounts of time waiting 
for screens to render. Always keep in mind, 
though, that it is strictly forbidden to get up 
from your chair (recliner preferred) to do 
anything besides make a trip to the kitchen 
for refreshments. Correct time-wasting eti- 
quette requires watching every moment of 
the rendering. 

Some of the possibilities for this type of 
inactivity include rendering packages like 
Sculpt, Turbo Silver. RealSD, Imagine, and 
so on. By the way, remember to turn off 
any accelerators you might have installed 
so the screens don't render too fast. The 
biggest portion of this class of software is 
mathematical and includes all the fractal 
programs. There are scores, if not hundreds, 
some for exploring Mandclbrol-type num- 



ber sets, some for generating fractal land- 
scapes, and still others for rendering purely 
mathematical formulas. There are also 
many purely unique entries. When you dive 
into (perhaps sink into would be a better 
phrase) them, don't limit yourself to just 
the mainstream packages like MathVision 
and VistaPro. Some of the more obscure 
titles have odd functions and capabilities 
that can eat up weeks of your time, I'll list 
a few of the best and most unusual here 
along with a brief description: 
MathVision (Seven Seas Software) - The 
ultimate mathematical fooling-around 
toy. Don't let a lack of mathematical 
knowledge put you off. Just load in a for- 
mula, change a number or two, and space 
out while the screen renders. 

FracGen - basic fractal shape generator 
written by Doug Houck of Seven Seas 

Anything by Terry Gintz - These include 
such PD titles as PolySys (FF#389). 
ZPIot (FF#389). FractalLab (FF#391). 
Plot (FF#389). CPlot (FF#392), and oth- 
ers. They offer different types of fractal 
and mathematical renderings that pro- 
duce a variety of interesting patterns and 
images. The interfaces arc fairly uniform, 
so after you figure out how to use one. 
the others are easy to learn. 

VistaPro (Virtual Reality Laboratories) - 
Generates landscapes based on real- 
world data or on fractal seed numbers. 
The screens take a satisfy ingly long time 
to render. 

Roses (Fish #345) - Generates sine roses 
(sort of like string-art). 

Scene Animator (Natural Graphics) - This 
new landscape generating software from 



infO NOVEMBER 1991 31 




CYB^EVWLAY 



Making 
molecules with 
Chemesthetics. 




Breit Caseboll (Scene Generator, 
FF# 1 55 ) is a complete reworking and 
includes some terrific animation tools 
you can spend months with. 

Anything from MegageM - HAMundei. 
ScapeMakcr, FrtictalPro 

Genesis (Microillusions) - Similar to 
VistaPm and Scene Animator, it has even 
more functions and menu options to fid- 
dle with. 

Fractals (FF #37 1 ) - Written by Sweden's 
Ronnie Johansson, this fractal generator 
has, in addition to the standard Mandel- 
brot and Julia sets, several more exotic 
types. 

IceFrac (FF #.103) - This one grows fractal 
icicles up from the bottom of your 
screen. 

Cloud f FF #21 6) - Makes fractal cloud- 
scapes that will save you having to go 
outside and look up at the sky. 

ifs (FF#32I ) - an Iterated Function System 
viewer which has considerable Flexibil- 
ity. 

Another branch of mathematical soft- 
ware is concerned w-ith Life as simulated 
electronically, cellular automata, and chaos. 
(Mark says he'll get around to writing 
about these someday.) 

ADDING SOUND 

So far, I've only talked about graphics, 
but sound and music software also have 
fine potential lor some serious wasted 
hours. For pure sound fiddling (pun 
intended), try The Other Guys' E-'Z FM 
Synthesizer, It's an easy-to-use sound and 



instrument generator that will not only 
entertain you, but also drive your family 
and neighbors to distraction. For hours. 
Sound digitizers and editors can also eat up 
a few hours. Make sure to try all the weird 
effects, too. From there, if you don't mind a 
slight stigma of productivity, you can use 
the instruments in EA's Deluxe Music Con- 
struction Set. Be careful here, though, not 
to actually produce any finished music. Just 
noodling around is the best way. Other 
music packages also offer of entertainment 
value, particularly MED (FF#476). While 
MED isn't pretty to look at. it is compli- 
cated enough that you can sit down to start 
making some music (or noise, in my case) 
and look up from the screen only to find 
that six hours have passed. 

There is a hybrid category of time- 
wasting software that incorporates both 
graphics and sound. The ultimate is Visual 
Aural Animation's Mindlight 7, This hard- 
ware/software combination takes an incom- 
ing audio signal and generates patterns on 
the screen thai are driven by the audio. This 
is the one thing I have wasted more lime 
with than anything else, it's (he ultimate 
video wallpaper. Unfortunately, the Mind- 
lii-lit is no longer being produced, but 
Geodesic Publications is working on a new 
version called LightShaw. Another title in 
this category is from Hoiograinophone 
(available from Centaur Software). Pixound 
will lake any ll-T screen, analyze the RGB 
values, and play them as music. It will 
work with both internal Amiga sound and 
MIDI. Hypcrchard. another of Holographo- 
phone's titles is also a good timewaster. It's 
basically a riff processor that lets you gen- 
erate random or user-designed riffs, put 



them together, and play them in a variety of 
ways: computer-composed music. SeeHear 
( FF#335) goes the opposite direction of 
Pixound. generating colorful spectographs 
of sound samples. 

MISCELLANY 

There are many programs of this sort 
which fall into no category at all. For 
example, take a look at Chemesthetics 
(FF#427). which renders pictures of 
molecules based on the atoms you specify. 
Tes.s lets you design tiles and put them 
together in various patterns. Another whole 
class of time-wasting software arc Euro- 
pean demos. You can find them on all the 
online services, and though most are very 
large files, they will dazzle you with music 
and graphics. 

Idle pursuits are their own reward. 
There's something about playing with soft- 
ware for its own sake that seems to get the 
creative juices flowing. Time-wasting isn't 
such a bad thing at all. Give some of these 
eyecatchcrs a spin and you'll see what 1 
mean. 

SOURCES 

Electronic Arts, 1450 Fashion Island 
Blvd.. San Mateo. CA 94404. 415- 
571-7171 

Seven Seas Software. 35 Cape George 
Wye. Port Townsend. WA 98368, 206- 
385-1956 

Virtual Realities Laboratory, 2341 
Ganador Court. San Luis Obispo. CA 
93401.805-545-8515 

Centaur Software. 14040 Tahiti Way. 
Suite 528. Marina Del Ray, CA 90292. 
213-542-2226 

Geodesic Publications, PO Box 956068. 

Duluth, GA 30136, 404-822-0566 
Eagle Tree Software. PO Box 164. 

Hopewell. VA 23860, 804-452-0623 
Progressive Peripherals, 464 Kalamath 

Street. Denver. CO 80204. 303-825-4144 

ASDG, 925 Stewart Street. Madison. WI 
52713.608-273-6585 

The Other Guys. 55 N. Main St.. Suite 
30 ID. Logan. UT 84321. 801-753-7620 

Natural Graphics, PO Box 1963. Rocklin. 
CA 95677, 9 16-624- 1436 

MegageM, 1903 Adria. Santa Maria, CA 
93454.805-349-1104 



32 .infO NOVEMBER 1W1 




KONAMI 
GREflfHin 

A Publishing Partnership 



A routine biological survey mission into the Orion 
Galaxy became a space nightmare.The biological specimen 
locks snapped open the instant the fie it's 20 ships time- 
warped into the eye of the exploding Wolf- Raert nova. 
The lab's bizarre cargo of 20 alien crec tures emptied within 
minutes, taking control. A desperate S )S was sent out, 
just as fuel and navigation systems fa tered. 

The ships drifted along for a decade in hopeless 
orbit when the SOS finally reached Earth. Most of the 
human crew had years ago opted for cryogenic freeze. 
Others still alive, suffer from radiation poisoning. 

You must repair and return the shins to earth using 
what you find aboard.,.. 
6 programmable robots, 
weapons, pass keys, 
maps and chemical 
coolant. Your only 
obstacles are the mad 
trew, the new crew, J 
and time. You are 
Spacewrecked. 



Spatewrecked " 14 Billion Light Years from Earth is a trademark al Konami Inc. Konami is a registered 
trademark of Konami Co., ltd. Gremlin " is a registered trademark of Gremlin Graphics Software 
Limited. % 1991 Konami Inc. 1991 Gremlin Graphics Software Limited. All right! reserved. Konami 
'70S, 215-5111. 



SSfSf! G ',,°, phi " !_?E - Available Fall 1991 for 

iRiilpd. All rtghls reicrkirfd. Konnmi 

MS-DOS & Amiga. Supports Ad Lib & 
Roland "Sound Boards. 
Circle #103 on the Reader Service Card 




1st PRIZE 

($7,000 VALUE) 



Abacus 



Accolade 

AlohaFonts 

ASDG 

Blue Ribbon 

Broderbund 

Central Coast 

Commodore 

Devware 
Dr. T's Music 
Electronic Arts 

Gold Disk 



GVP 
ICD 

Interplay 
intraCorp 

Jumpdisk 

Kara Graphics 
Maxis 

MicroSearch 
New Horizons 
NewTek 
Progressive 
Peripherals 

Psygnosis 

ReadySoft 



Right Answers 
SoftWood 



Vidia 

Virtual Reality 



Amiga Graphics Inside & Out 

3D Graphic Programming in BASIC 

C for Advanced Programmers 

Elvira 

Ishido 

eclips 1 & 2 

Art Department Professional 

Bars & Pipes 

Typhoon Thompson 

Quarterback 

Quarterback Tools 

2.0 ROM Chip Key Chain 

Rare Amiga 'Boing' Logo Plates 

Top 25 Devware PD Picks 

KCS 3.5 

Deluxe Paint IV 

HyperBook 

Professional Draw 2.0 

Professional Page 2.0 

Scala 

AdSpeed 

Battle Chess II 

Big Deal 

Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventure 

1 Yr Subscription to Jumpdisk 

PowerPacker Professional 

Kara Fonts - Toaster Fonts 1 & 2 

SimCity 

SimCity Graphics Sets 1&2 

Material Textures Library vol. II 

ProWrite 

Video Toaster 

DiskMaster II 

IntroCADD 

PIXmate 

Amnios 

Lemmings 

Dragon's Lair I & II 

Space Ace 

Team Yankee 

The Director Version 2 

Clip Art: Animals / People 

Clip Art: Classic / Collectors 

Electric Thesaurus 

Proper Grammar 

Maverick V3 for the Amiga 

SupraModem 2400ZI Plus 

Brigade Commander 

MRBackup Professional 

RXTools 

Teachers Toolkit 

Workbench Management System 

Amiga Graphics Reference Card 

Vista Pro 




-^ 




2nd PRIZE haM*£4 

($3,600 VALUE) 



Abacus 



Accolade 
ASDG 

Blue Ribbon 
Broderbund 

Commodore 
Devware 



Amiga Machine Language 

Amiga Printers Inside & Out 

Making Music on the Amiga 

Hoverforce 

Art Department Professional 

Bars & Pipes 

Where In Time is Carmen 

Sandiego? 

Rare Amiga 'Boing' Logo Plates 

Top 25 Devware PD Picks 



Digital Creations DCTV 

Dr. T's Music Copyist Pro/DTP 

Electronic Arts Deluxe Paint IV 



MicroSearch 
New Horizons 
Psygnosis 

ReadySoft 



SoftLogik 



Gold Disk ShowMaker 

Interplay Lord of the Rings 

IntraCorp Big Deal 

Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventure 
Kara Graphics Kara Fonts - Headlines 
MicroSearch ChromaKey 
New Horizons DesignWorks 
Psygnosis Amnios 

Lemmings 
ReadySoft Dragon's Lair I & II 

Space Ace 

Team Yankee 
SoftLogik PageStream 

PageStream Fonts & Forms 
SSII Maverick V3 for the Amiga 

Vidia Amiga Graphics Reference Card 

Virtual Reality Distant Suns 4.0 



34 .infO NOVEMBER 1991 



.info turns EIGHT this month! 

And to show our thanks for your 

support, we're giving away these 

fabulous prizes worth over $12,000! 



AMIGA 




Giveaway rules: No purchase necessary, 2 ways to enter: 1) Subscribing or renewing a subscription to .info using the specially marked 
subscription card included in this issue (by the giveaway deadline) will automatically enter participant in the giveaway, 2) Send a 3X5 card 
with your name, address, and phone number to ".info 8th Anniversary Giveaway / 705 Hwy. 1 West / Iowa City, IA 52246." All entries must 
be received no later than November 15, 1991 to be eligible. Winners will be drawn at random. The odds of winning will depend on the 
number of entries received. Taxes and duties on all prizes are the sole responsibility of the winner. Prizes are not transferable, nor are 
they redeemable for cash value. All federal, state, and local laws apply. Void where prohibited by law. Employees of .info Publications and 
their families are not eligible to enter, .info is not responsible for lost, misdirected, or late mail. Prizes listed have been donated by the 
manufacturers and distributors listed. Distribution of specific prizes listed is subject to delivery to .info by participating manufacturers and 
distributors. No compensation shall be made to winners lor any products not available by 30 days after the contest deadline due to failure 
of third parties to deliver same to .info in a timely manner or through any other cause not reasonably in .info's control, 



_ . _ 


^^^^^^■■i 




KMIIw 




I DELUXE 




3 kslfflW' 

1 If* *= ML m 


--- 


■ r f^^y 


: 


1 


I j^.V \^\ v 








1 3rd PRIZE 

| ($2,200 VALUE) 


j§4^ 


rA 


Abacus AmigaDOS Inside & Out 

AmigaDOS Quick Reference Guide 
Best Amiga Tricks & Tips 

Accolade Gunboat 

Activa Reai3D 

ASDG, Inc Art Department Professional 

Broderbuhd Wings of Fury 

Commodore Rare Amiga 'Boing' Logo Piates 

Devware Top 25 Devware PD Picks 

Dr. T's Music Phantom 

Electronic Arts Deluxe Paint IV 

Gold Disk PageSetter II 

New Horizons Flow 

Psygnosis Amnios 

Lemmings 

Saxon Saxon Publisher 1.2 

Saxon Script Professional 

Vidia Amiga Graphics Reference Card 




Abacus 



Accolade 
ASDG 

Broderbund 
Commodore 
Devware 
Dr. T's Music 
Electronic Arts 
Gold Disk 
Vidia 



prize ssiam£4 

VALUE) 



Amiga C for Beginners 

Amiga for Beginners 

AmigaBASIC Inside & Out 

Star Control 

Art Department Professional 

Wolfpack 

Rare Amiga 'Bo ng' Logo Piates 

Top 25 Devware PD Picks 

X-OR 

Deluxe Paint IV 

TransWrite 

Amiga Graphics Reference Card 




25 Runners ■■ Up 

each receive a Vidia Amiga Graphics Reference 
.into pocket-protector, and f i box of Dweebs® 



.info NOVEMBER 1991 35 




Productivty by Jim Meyer 

Archive Your Disks: 

Two Backup Programs 




, here ;ire two primary 
axioms in the computer world. One of lhem 
is: Stuff expands to fill available spaee. If 
you have a Ooppy-based system, that axiom 
means that you can either risk being 
drowned in a sea of disks, or you can buy a 
hard disk drive. Once you have a hard 
drive, however, you run into Murphy's 
Law: Whatever can go wrong will, when 
you least expect it. Hard drives are a Mur- 
phy disaster watting to happen: large 
amounts of data concentrated in one area - 
especially if it's vital data - seems to 
increase the odds of having someone (rip 
over the power cord. If you absolutely, pos- 
itively have to have the data, something ter- 
rible will happen. 

I can't emphasize this enough: BACK 
UP YOUR DATA! Regular backups will 
add years to your life. If you're worried 
that you'll spend those extra years backing 
up your drives, let me put your mind at 
ease. The programs I tested for this column 
-Ami-Back and FlashBack - were fast, con- 
venient, and reliable. 

COMMON GROUND 

Before I introduce the players. I'd like to 
mention the operations both have in com- 
mon. Both will do full backups, archival 
backups (only files which have been added 
or changed since the last backup), and 
selective backups and restores. Both will 
backup lo floppy disks. SCSI tape, and bard 



Ami-Back 
$79.95 

Moonlighter Software 
Development, Inc. 

3208-C East Colonial Drive Suite 204 

Orlando, Florida 32803 

(407) 628-3005 



Ani-Bjick Schedule Configuration 



TM 



Konths Per Year 



Days Per tenth 



[JInJFeb[iii7pijr 
|Kay f Jun | Jul |A«s 

|Sep|Oct|Nov|Cec 



nr^jiiijiiij 



Hours Pet 1 Day 



JJ 

22[23j24 
Z9]3Sj31 



15j28)2l| 



[Tjj_2JJ_ 
18|19|2B|21 



P; Configuration 1 | 

Active I 



IdMs/am-bask.confisrt 



*»« ' 



Default Settings! 



drives, and both feature a verify option. 
And both perform "fast-disk" floppy back- 
ups. In this mode, AmigaDOS is bypassed 
and data is written to the disks on a track- 
by-track basis. Both programs log their 
results, including errors, to an ASCII file. 
And. lastly, both programs sport the spiff;' 
3D look that heralds the coming of Work- 
bench 2.0, 

Ami-Back 

Ami-Buck, from Moonlighter Software 
Development, comes in two flavors: Ami- 
BaekI3, lor Workbench 1.3, mdAmi- 
Backlti. for Workbench 2.0. These com- 
ments apply to the 1.3 version. When you 
first boot Ami-Back, you'll be greeted by 
three gadgets: Backup. Restore, and Quit. 
Additional options are available from the 
menu. Ami-Buck gets its defaults from con- 
figuration files. If you always back up the 
same partition and always use the same 
options, you can just click on Backup or 
Resiore and go. If you need to change the 
defaults, the menu options will summon the 
appropriate panel. 

One of the Backup options enables you 
to perform an Image backup. In this mode, 
the entire contents of a partition are copied, 
byle-by-bytc. to the backup medium. If you 
have a non-AmigaDOS partition such as 
AMax, this option simplifies backups for 



Days P«* Week 




Minutes Per Hour 



JJJJ9J15 
2y25_3BJ_35J 
4j|45j_58j^j 



The Ami-Back 

schedule 

configuration 

panel. 



you. Ami-Back allows you to define exclu- 
sion filters. If, for example, you don't want 
to backup any files with an '.Izh' suffix, 
just add '*,lzh' to the exclusion filter list. In 
addition to the normal incremental backup 
mode, Ami-Back allows you to backup files 
added after a certain date. In Selective 
backup mode, you can choose to include or 
exclude the files you select. Ami-Back also 
gives you the option to perform an Amiga- 
DOS backup. This saves the backed-up 
data as one large AmigaDOS file. 

Backing up to (loppy disks is a smooth 
operation with Ami-Back. Disk insertion 
and removal is automatically sensed, so if 
you have more than one drive you can 
always slay one step ahead of the operation. 
Ami-Back allows you to backup in either 
fast disk mode or in AmigaDOS mode. A 
handy timer shows you not only elapsed 
lime, but an estimate of the time remaining. 
If you're backing up to something other 
than floppies, you'll know if you have time 
lo gel I hat snack. 

When it's lime to restore your backed-up 
files, Ami-Back gives you a Compare Infor- 
mation option to save you from restoring 
duplicate files. There are five comparison 
ileitis: Filename, data, time and dale, pro- 
tection biis, and comment. If you'd like to 
keep duplicate files without writing over 
the original. Ami-Back includes an opiion 
to rename duplicate files. 



36 .info NOVEMBER 1991 




Prodncfivty 



CHECK THE SCHEDULE 

One of the more interesting options 
available with Ami-Back is the ability to 
schedule backups. You can define as many 
as ten different backup schemes, each with 
its own backup schedule. If. for example, 
your DH I : partition gets a lot of activity, 
while DHO: is fairly dormant, you can have 
Ami'Sched (a companion program to Ami- 
Back) back up the data in DH I : once a day. 
while backing up DHO: only once a month. 
Ami-Sched lets you set the hours of the day. 
the days of the week and month, and the 
amount of time each hour thai it will 
backup your data. If you have the appropri- 
ate device - streaming tape or Syquest. for 
example - Ami-Sched looks like a painless 
way 10 insure your data. 

FlashBack 

The opening screen for FlashBack from 
Advanced Storage Systems presents you 
with the primary options: Backup (or 
restore) Image or File, and Load or Save 
Configuration. There's also a handy Help 
button. Once you've selected the backup 
method, you'll be taken to the Options 
panel, where you specify the source (where 
the data's coming from) and the destina- 
tion. Any mounted device can be specified 
as the destination, including a file in RAM: 
(although not RAM: itself). The Options 
panel lets you select a full or archive 
backup, as well as whether existing files 
will be overwritten, and whether the 
archive bits will be set or ignored. 

Once you've set your options, FlashBack 
reads the source device, builds a catalog, 
and displays a new screen. If you've 
selected File backup mode, the directories 
and subdirectories from the source device 
wilt be displayed in a visible tree, in one of 
two file windows. The other window dis- 
plays the files in a selected directory. This 
screen allows you io select files to be 
excluded from the backup, and gives you 
access to the Backup Files Select panel. 
This panel lets you define certain parame- 
ters that will determine which files are 
backed up. The Date gadgets let you spec- 
ify a start and end date; files created before 
or after these dates arc not backed up. You 
can also use wildcards to define what kinds 
of files are included. If you entered '*.lzh' 
as one of the patterns, all files with the suf- 
fix of Mzh' would be selected for backup. 

Backing up to floppy is as painless with 
FlashBack as it is with Ami-Back. Thanks 




— 



tesr.W. 



Backup Files Select 






: *M. 



r*M 



Exclude Files 

Hiddtn ; No_ 

Hot Mi : Yes 



: &m 

«l — 

n\ 



X 



Je:'»lt : 



■jRcel 



97 — Af 
U —A 
62 -~A 
91 *H 
■A 

a -?? 
% -n 

95 -PA 

18 —A 

19 —t 
91 —A 

18 




TOT 



ielect 



ptions 



Selecting file 
patterns in 
FlashBack, 



to the automatic disk insertion/removal 
detection, you can slay one floppy ahead of 
the process. Restoring the data is quick and 
easy, too. The Restore panel lets you deter- 
mine whether directories will be created, 
whether archive bits will be set, and 
whether you'll get a warning when a file is 
about to be overwritten. The Copy Files 
option enables you to restore only files that 
exist on the destination drive, in case you 
don't want deleted files to reappear. Like 
the Backup operation. Restore (once the 
catalog is generated) brings up a display of 
the directories and subdirectories to be 
restored. The options are (he same here as 
they are for backup - you can manually 
exclude directories and/or files from the 
restoration process. 

In the course of testing FlashBack. I was 
able lo investigate its error-handling capa- 
bilities. I purposely used ancient, much- 
used floppies for the backup, and I was 
rewarded (?) with a few unreadable files. 
FlashBack gave me the option to retry the 
read (which failed, of course) and then 
allowed me to abort the restoration. I was 
able to complete the restoration by exclud- 
ing the faulty files and re-starling the 
restore process. Don't try this at home, 
though - if you're going to back up lo flop- 
pies, invest in a fresh batch. 

WHAT'S IN A TAPE? 

LET ME COUNT THE WOES 

Ami-Back supports SCSI tape drives two 
ways. The first way is through SCSI-direct 
commands. If your tape drive understands 
these commands, you don't need a tape 
handler. My drive, of course, doesn't. After 



consulting with the program's author. I 
managed to convince my unit - a 3M 40- 
meg drive - to talk to Ami-Back through 
BTN. a public domain tape handler. Flash- 
Back requires the services of a tape handler. 
So far, it doesn't work with BTN. but I've 
contacted the programmer and hope to have 
belter news to report next month. 

HOW DO THE BACKUPS 
STACK UP? 

Both Ami-Back and FlashBack are qual- 
ity programs. They're easy to use, and they 
gel the job done quickly, with a minimum 
of fuss. Although I gave both of I hem the 
same rating, Ami-Back had a few advan- 
tages over FlashBack. The automatic 
scheduling utility is one. although you can 
set up a script to run FlashBack automati- 
cally. Another advantage is the more flexi- 
ble approach to devices like tape drives. 
Note thai each program has a few features 
thai the other doesn't. That might make the 
difference in your decision. You won't go 
wrone with either one. thouah. 



FlashBack 
$79.00 

Advanced Storage Systems 

1 4540 East Be twood Parkway 

Dallas, Texas 75244 

(214)702-9191 



.infO NOVEMBER 1 991 37 




ions 





Graphics. . 


. 38 


A RoundUp of Amiga Paint Programs, 


MultiMedia 


.43 


CDTV plays and displays CD+G disks. 


Audio 


.46 


How to add music to your productions. 


Video ..... 


.48 


Do your own TV forecast with Choma Key. 




IIIIIITIIIIII 

Join Brad as he 

presents a 

RoundUp of the 

top Amiga paint 

programs. 

IIIIIIAIIIIII 



'A PHia 



~\ Jk W hile the availability of 24-bit composite 
I g\ ■ g video and other advanced display devices is 
\g \M the most exciting of the recent developments 
V V in Amiga graphics, the standard Amiga 
graphics modes have certainly not gone away. If you're 
new to the Amiga, it's most likely that you're working 
with these stock graphic displays. Long-time users may 
also be waiting out the inrush of new display enhancers 
to the market before deciding which 
of them is best for their particular use. 

This month, we'll be taking a look 
at paint software that's available for 
the Amiga's standard display modes, 
with a comparison of the programs' 
features. Keep in mind that any com- 
parison is certain to overlook the finer 
points of each product. As always, you 
should, if possible, evaluate a program 
at your local dealer, discuss your 
choice with other users, and read spe- 
cific reviews if they're available. 
Lastly, remember that reviewers like 
me are just human beings like every- 
one else, and our conclusions may be based on personal 
prejudices, not objective fact. 

ADVANTAGES 

If you are just beginning to work with paint software, 
you'll find that computer graphics automatically offer 
many advantages over traditional media. The simple 
presence of an 'Undo' feature may be the most empower- 
ing thing you'll notice at first. 'Undo' and the ability to 



by Brad Schenck 



save multiple versions of a project to disk free the artist 
to experiment widely with techniques. 1 know from my 
own experience that my skills improved far more rapidly 
once I had that freedom to experiment without ruining 
the work in progress. 

The fact that the images are made using a computer 
gives you abilities very similar to a writer working with 
wordprocessing software - or an accountant, for that mat- 
ter, working with a spreadsheet. It's a simple matter to 
copy one area of an image and place it elsewhere. Take 
this a step further and you can use that 'brush' to paint an 
entirely new shape, shrink or expand it, or import it into 
a different program to modify it in untold ways. 

None of these features replaces the artist or his artistic 
vision. It's true thai they may be used to quickly produce 
a rough version of a good effect, which is laziness; but 
it's also true that these features can and should be used to 
simplify the artist's work, letting the computer do tedious 
and repetitive tasks that would tax a human's patience. 
As I pointed out before, that is exactly what wordpro- 
cessing software does for a writer. 

BASICS 

The Amiga's standard display modes are first identi- 
fied by their resolution, or dimensions in pixels (the tiny 
dots of color that make up an image). Low resolution 
screens are 320 pixels wide; high resolution screens are 
640 pixels wide. Either resolution may be interlaced, 
with a screen height of 400 pixels, or non-interlaced, 200 
pixels high. In addition, a screen may be overscanncd. 
This means that it extends beyond the normal screen bor- 
ders, filling the entire monitor. Overscan sizes vary, but a 



38 .info NOVEMBER 1991 




Deluxe Paint III, the definitive Amiga paint program 
from Electronic Arts. 



Deluxe Paint IV, with many new features including HAM 
mode, will be available by the time you read this. 



common one for high resolution interlaced screens is 
736x480 pixels. 

In the 'normal' screen modes, a low resolution screen 
may have up to 32 colors out of a palette of 4096. A high 
resolution screen can have up to 16 colors out of 4096. 
Colors are mixed by adjusting the amount of Red, Green, 
and Blue that define (hem - these RGB values represent 
the primary colors in computer graphics, which is a bit of 
a shock at first to artists accustomed to mixing red. blue, 
and yellow. 

Low resolution screens can also use two additional 
graphic modes: extra halfbright and HAM (Hold-and- 
Modify). 

Halfbright images stilt offer 32 'mixable' colors, but 
add 32 additional colors that are exactly half the bright- 
ness of the hues in the first 32. These limited extra colors 
are especially useful in shading effects. Keep in mind 
when you work in halfbright that those darker shades 
will tend toward grey, and make the first 32 colors rela- 
tively bright. 

In HAM mode you can use any number of the 4096 
possible colors in a single image. Before you decide to 
work only in HAM, you should be aware that it has tech- 
nical side effects that cause some combinations of color 
to 'fringe' to the right of the area you're painting. For 
this reason it's often practical to do the layout for a HAM 
image in fewer colors, and then import the layout to a 
HAM paint program for the more painterly work. While 
the sheer number of colors available in HAM is very 
attractive, you may find that it's not appropriate for many 
applications, particularly those involving text displays or 
in which you need smaller pixels for a smoother appear- 
ance. Working in HAM is often more frustrating than the 
'normal' modes because of its unique limitations. 

Antialiasing is a technique in which diagonal or 



curved lines are smoothed to remove the jagged stairstep 
effect that results from drawing with rectangular pixels. 
Intermediate colors are applied to the jagged edges to 
smooth the transition between one color and another. The 
smaller your pixels are (as in high resolution), the less 
noticeable these 'jaggies' are. 



DELUXE PAINT 

Deluxe Paini has been with us for almost as long as 
there have been Amigas to run it on. At the time of writ- 
ing the most recent version is DPaint 111. though DPtiim 
IV (previewed in .info #40) will be 
available by the time you read this. 

DPaint's user interface has the elu- 
sive quality of transparency that is an 
ideal for software. The mechanics of 
the program almost never interfere 
with its use, and it rewards experi- 
enced users with shortcuts and 
advanced features. DPaint III added 
powerful animation features. The only 
thing most users missed at that point 
in the program's evolution was HAM 
painting, which is coming in DPaint 
IV. 

While other products listed have brush warping abili- 
ties that allow the artist to simulate perspective effects, 
DPaint is alone in offering a true perspective drawing 
mode in which a movable vanishing point constrains per- 
spective effects in a realistic way. On the whole, 
DPaint\ powerful array of features have made it a 
favorite among artists. If the support for HAM mode is 
as well designed and implemented as one expects from 
DPaint, the new version may set a new standard. 



mil mil 

DPa/n "s powerful 

array of features 

have made it a 

favorite among 

artists. 






.infO NOVEMBER 1991 39 




by Brad Schenck 




Deluxe Photolab Paint, until Deluxe Paint A/the only 
paint program to handle both standard and HAM. 



Spectracolor, an update of the HAM paint program 
Photon Paint from Aegis/OXXI. 



IIIIIITIIIIII 

Animation 
features are a 
major point in 

Spectracolor's 
favor. 

iiiiii mi 



DELUXE PHOTOLAB PAINT 

Although it hasn't been updated since its introduction 
in 1988, this suite of programs - now bundled together 
with Deluxe Video III - has a good deal to oiler. Until the 
advent of DPciitt! IV. Photolah remained the only paint 
software that works in every standard Amiga graphics 
mode. 

The Photolab package includes Paint, Posters, and 
Colors, which respectively are painting, printing, and 

image processing programs. Photolah 
Paint doesn't offer any animation fea- 
tures, but its painting tools are quite 
useful. Like a few of the other listed 
products, it features not only "Undo.' 
but 'Redo' - a function that repeals the 
last action, allowing the artist to alter 
some paint settings and try again, or 
overlay the area last worked on. That's 
a very useful feature. A unique pair of 
functions is Photolab's 'Save From* 
and 'Load Ai.' These allow the artist 
to clip a rectangular part of an image 
and load it to a precise location in 
another, and has great potential when working with ani- 
mation frames. 

The program is beginning to show its age. but still 
holds up very well. It doesn't offer as much in the non- 
HAM modes as DPaint does, but it does do all the 
graphic modes and is credible enough as an all-in-one 
paint package. It deals well with superbitmap images 
(that is, images much larger than a displayed screen, 
although when working on an overscan picture the entire 
image is not visible at once - the artist has to scroll 
around to work on the edges. 



SPECTRACOLOR 

Those of you who've been using Amiga software for a 
while will recognize Spectracolor as an improved ver- 
sion of Microillusions' Photon Paint 2. Photon Paint was 
one of the earlier HAM-only painl programs, and 
included some basic features for working with com- 
pressed AN1M files. Now Spectracolor builds on those 
capabilities with new paint and animation functions (for 
a full review, see .info #43 1. 

Spectracolor still works only in Hokl-and-Modify 
mode, and most of its painting tools arc designed to take 
full advantage of that. It offers minute control of painting 
both for foreground and background color, and has sev- 
eral unique tools (like pantograph) that none of the other 
products include. Its stencils are limited to a single filled 
shape, unfortunately, but keep in mind that the other 
HAM-only programs don't offer stencils at all (except 
the new DPaint IV). There are some other nuances that 
don't show in our comparison chart: for example, Spec- 
tracolor will accept and preserve unusual screen shapes 
for ANIM files, like ietterboxed' animations, which may 
be overscanncd horizontally but are less than a screen 
tall. 

While animation features are somewhat outside the 
scope of a paint software comparison, these are a major 
point in Spectracolor's favor. Its paint features are also 
quite good and it's a program well worth looking into if a 
HAM-only painl program will suit your needs. 

DIGIPAINT 111 

Despite aggressive marketing that compares this pro- 
gram to DPaint. DigiPaint 111 is a relatively simple paint 
system for working only in Hold-and-Modify mode. 
DipiPaint's original incarnation was the first HAM paint 



40 .info NOVEMBER 1991 

























AMIGA PAINT PROGRAM COMPARISON CHART 

T 














^ 

/ 
# 








Company 


Electronic Arts 


Electronic Arts 


Oxxi/Aegis 




Electronic Arts 


NewTek 


Holosoft Technologies 






Rating 


-kikik~ki< 


PREVIEW 


-kikik+ 


~kikik~k 


***+ 


NOT RATED 






Price 


$149.00 


$179.00 


$149.95 




$149.00 


S99.9J 




$100,00 












Low Res.<32 


Yes 


Yes 


No 




Yes 


No 




Yes 






High Res/1 6 


Yes 


Yes 


No 




Yes 


No 




Yes 






Halfbright 


Yes 


Yes 


No 




Yes 


No 




Yes 






HAM 


No 


Yes 


Yes 




Yes 


Yes 




No 






Interlace 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 




Yes 


Yes 




Yes 






Overscan 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 




No! Displayed 


Not Displayed 


Yes 






Image Size 


To Memory Limit 


To Memory Limit 


To Overscan Only 


To Memory Limit 


To 1024 by 1000 


To 1024 by 1024 












Perspective 


Yes 


Yes 


No 




No 


No 




No 






2 1/2 D Brush 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 




No 


No 




Yes 






Brushes 


1 


Multiple 


1 




1 


2 




Multiple 






Brush Painting 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 




Yes 


No 




Yes 






Pattern Fill 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 




Yes 


Yes 




Yes 






Brush Warping 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 




Yes 


Yes 




Yes 






Stencil 


By Color 


By Color or Area 


By Area 




No 


No 




By Area 






Anti alias 


Yes 


Yes 


No 




Yes 


Yes 




Yes 






Gradient 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 




Yes 


Yes 




Yes 






Rub-Through 


No 


No 


No 




No 


Yes 




No 






Shadow 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 




No 


No 




Yes 






Transparency 


No 


Yes 


Yes 




Yes 


Yes 




No 






Blur/Smooth 


Yes 


Yes 


No 




No 


Yes 




No 






Redo 


No 


No 


Yes 




Yes 


Yes 




No 












Color Cycling 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 




No 


No 




Yes 






Animation 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 




No 


No 




Yes 






ANIM Files 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 




No 


No 




Ves 






ANIM Brushes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 




No 


No 




Yes 












Fonts 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 




Yes 


Yes 




Yes 






Colorfonts 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 




No 


No 




No 






Printing 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 




Yes 


Yes 




Yes 






AREXX 


No 


No 


No 




No 


Yes 




No 






Other Software 


ANIM Player 


ANIM Player 


None 




Image Processing; 
'Poster' printing 


Image Processing 


Animation player 
(non-ANIM) 






Addresses 

Electronic Arts 

1450 Fashion Island Blvd. 

San Maieo. CA 94403 

415-571-7171 


Oxxi 

PO Box 90309 

Long Beach, CA 90809 

213-427-1227 


NewTek 

215 East 8th St. 

Topeka, KS 66603 

800-843-8934 




Holosoft Technologies 
1637 E.Valley Parkway, 
Suite 172 

Escondido. CA 92027 
619-747-0663 





.infO NOVEMBER 1901 41 



'Gra phics 



by Brad Schenck 




NewTek's DigiPainf HI HAM paint program with menus 
by Jim Sachs. 



Graphics Workshop from HoloSoft Technologies. 



iiiiii iiiiii 

The single most 

exciting feature in 

DigiPaint is its 

ARexx port 

IIIIIIAIIIIII 



program, which underwent quite a lot of changes in the 
update to version III. It has a reasonable array of painting 
tools (with the remarkable exception of a straight line I 
and good control over graduated transparency in its fill 
modes. Color gradients are a bit less sophisticated, but 
again, quite usable. 

Like Photolab and Spectracolor, DigiPaint has a 
'Redo" feature that is invaluable. Also like Photolab, 

overscanned images can be edited, but 
not while viewing them in full over- 
scan - the artist must scroll the image 
to see the edges of the picture. While 
the artist can pick up and stamp 
brushes on the image, it's not possible 
to paint freely wiih a brush as one can 
in most paint software. 

The single most exciting feature in 
DigiPaint is its ARexx port, which 
none of the other programs offer. This 
makes a wide variety of applications 
possible, since other programs can 
assume full control over DigiPainv, that partly over- 
comes its lack of ANIM support, since third-party prod- 
ucts (or user-written programs) can add animation fea- 
tures through ARexx. That may be of little immediate 
benefit to the artist, but it's a strong advantage for the 
program in the long run. 

GRAPHICS WORKSHOP 

This non-HAM package is basically the reverse of the 
others listed, since it's essentially an animation program 
with an array of paint features. While the program sup- 
ports the compressed ANIM file format, it stresses its 
own realtime brush animation features, in the same vein 
as Gold Disk's Moviesetter. 



Strong points are a very useful antialiasing tool and 
(due to its brush animation functions) good control over 
the placement and manipulation of multiple brushes. 

The reason Graphics Workshop is not rated in our 
chart as the others are is not a limitation of the program, 
but of the reviewer. I simply haven't worked with it 
enough to rate it fairly. 

Based on a little experience with it and its selection of 
features. I do recommend that artists take a closer look at 
the program, which is now at version 1 . 1 to correct a few 
problems in the original release. 

ABOUT THE COMPARISON CHART 

In a chart like this, oversimplification is a real threat. 
As you look over the lists of features, bear in mind that the 
programs approach problems in different ways: often it's 
possible to get an effect by using one or more tools, so that 
things which aren't directly supported are still possible. 

If your main needs are for video and animation, you 
should place special emphasis on color and animation fea- 
tures. If your work is going to print or to slides, resolution 
may be more important to you and you should look for 
tools (hat allow you to work on superbitmap images. 

The difference between 'Perspective' and '2 1/2 D 
Brush' is the presence of a constraining vanishing point 
for true perspective drawing. A '2 1/2 D Brush' may be 
rotated on three axes to simulate a 3D effect. This is what 
most software offers as 'perspective' but I've had to sep- 
arate the two for reasons of clarity. 'Other Software' lists 
bonus programs included with the product which 
enhance its capabilities. 

Note: the images used in this article are shown for 
illustrative purposes; they were not necessarily cre- 
ated with the software shown, 



42 .info NOVEMBER 1991 



ipl 




f MUL TIMEDL 



n the back of CDTV's fancy sales package 
you'll see a box that reads: "It's a CD 
Player Too! Plays all standard audio CDs 
in stereo (8x oversampling) and a growing 
library of CD+Graphics (CD+G) discs from major 
artists." 

As an .info reader, you already know CDTV can play 
regular music CDs. controlled using a slick graphical 
interface designed by Jim Sachs and Leo Schwab. But 
you might not know about CD+G. In fact, even though 
you may have never seen any CD+G graphics, there's a 
chance you might already own one or more of these discs 
without even knowing it. The ability to play and display 
CD+G discs is one of the most intriguing and least 
talked-about aspects of CDTV. 

Way back in the dark ages (1983) JVC developed and 
released the CD+G data specs. CDs with graphical infor- 
mation encoded alongside music, per the CD/CD+G 
standard, had to be 100% compatible with all non-CD+G 
CD players or decks. It's been part of, and one of the 
best-kept secrets about CD technology ever since. This 
probably has more to do with the lack of CD+G capable 
players and decks than anything else. Another self- 
fulfilling prophecy: few decks, few CD+G discs. The 
advent of CDTV could well spell a renaissance in 
CD+G. 

The CD+G format is a screen of 288x192 pixels made 
up of 12x6 pixel "blocks." Sixteen colors out of a palette 
of 4096 (or 16 shades of gray) can be displayed at once. 
On first blush, this might sound like a fairly crude reso- 
lution, but don't pre-judge before you see what it can do 
when talented artists are driving it. The graphics can be 
slow-scrolled, faded in or out, dissolved onto the screen 
in various wipes and patterns (including wiping multiple 
regions of the screen with different patterns simultane- 
ously) and color-cycled. 

CD+G discs cost the same as regular CDs. and the 
graphics on them in no way limit the amount of music 



by Harv Laser 





CDTV's '+G' and '+MIDI' icon. 



+G graphic from Jirnl Hendrix's "Smash Hits. 

they can hold, nor the music's audio quality. If you're 
CD shopping, I'd suggest you pick up a few. Even if you 
don't own a CDTV yet. you'll be all set when you or 
your friends take the plunge. 

PLAYING CD+G 

To play a CD+G disc on CDTV. you simply insert the 
disc into a caddy, shove it into the player, and. when the 
CDTV audio interface appears, move the cursor to the 
lower right hand icon - the one that 
has a television set and a piano key- 
board on it. (This same button also 
launches CD+MIDI discs, but that's 
a whole 'nuther story). When you 
click that icon, the player screen 
vanishes and is replaced with some 
pictograms of CDTV's front panel 
buttons (play, stop, etc.). 

Unfortunately, you lose ail the 
nifty disc-controlling features of the 
pretty player interface to get to 
CD+G graphics, but you can still 
use your remote or the buttons on 
the CDTV itself to navigate the 
disc's tracks. The deck's front panel 
blue LED display will show you 
which track you're watching/listening to. but its clock 
stays on the current time of day. If you pause during play 
the graphics tend to break up or vanish, but reappear 
when play mode is engaged again. 

So what kind of graphics will you find on CD+G 
discs? These pages have some samples I captured with a 
DCTV and a Time Base Corrector (to freeze the graph- 
ics) from the discs I own, which are commented in the 



llllll + IIKIII 

Harv flips over 
CD+G (CD audio 
disks with 
graphics), 
playable 
on CDTV. 

111111*111111 



.infO NOVEMBER 1991 43 



by Harv Laser 




A still from "The Planets", conducted by Zubin Mehta. 



From Little Feat's CD+G disk "Representing the Mambo. 1 



lists below. These sialic images really 
don't do justice to the swirling, constantly 
evolving montages you'll find on CD+G 
discs. Some of them are incredible Multi- 
Media experiences. Many discs have song 
lyrics, some in multiple languages. 

FINDING CD+G 

Digging up information about CD+G 
(nevermind finding the discs themselves!) 
became an exercise in frustration. There's 
no list of current discs packed with CDTV. 



Most record store personnel 1 dealt with 
locally were woefully ignorant about the 
CD+G titles available (there are close to 
50 discs now), even in their own shops. In 
visiting half a dozen local record stores, 
ranging from Mom'n'Pop holes-in-thc- 
wall to huge chains (Tower, The Where- 
house. Music+), not one clerk, or manager 
for that matter, knew what I was talking 
about when I asked for CD+G discs. My 
shopping turned into a scavenger hunt - 



sands of "long boxes" looking for a special 
yellow CD+G sticker affixed to a scant 
few titles. 

Further, none of the stores had a CD+G 
capable player deck of any kind. Here's a 
golden opportunity for Commodore's sales 
folk to get their act in gear and get CDTVs 
into these stores, wired up to their audio 
and video systems. They'll draw customers 
like moths to a flame. Unlike bookstore 
clerks who usually seem willing to hike all 
over their store to help a customer find 



Here's the most complete list of CD+G discs I could 
paste together from various sources: 

Alphaville "Breathtaking Blue" Atlantic 81943 

Laura Branigan "Laura Branigan" Atlantic 82086 

Ella Fitzgerald "Ella/Things Ain't What They Used to Be" Sire 

26023 
Flamin' Groovies "Groovies* Greatest Grooves" Sire 25948 
Fleetwood Mac "Behind the Mask" Warner Bros 261 1 1 
Emmyfou Harris "Pieces of ihe Sky" Reprise 2284 
Jimi Hendrix "Smash Hits" Reprise 2276 

This digitally remastered collection of songs has wildly 
psychedelic graphics, like a Fillmore poster come to life. 
Mandalas, lots of digitized and colorized thematic pictures, 
and shots of Jimi. Various fades and scrolling are used. Col- 
ors pulse to the beat in many songs. No lyrics. An absolute 
MUST for Hendrix fans. 
Information Society "Information Society" Tommy Boy 25691 
Chris Isaak "Silvertone" Warner Bros, 25156 
Little Feat "Hoy, Hoy" Warner Bros. 3538 



Little Feat "Representing the Mambo" Wanier Bros 26163 
Graphically, the best pop/rock CD+G I've seen so far. 
Each song is represented by excellent scrolling thematic 
graphics. Considering the limited color palette of CD+G and 
its low resolution, this one is quite an achievement. English 
lyrics display with the graphics for many of the songs. 

Van Dyke Parks "Tokyo Rose" Warner Bros 25968 

Gram Parsons "GP/Grievous Angel" Wamer Bros 26108 

Bonnie Rain "Green Light" Warner Bros. 3630 

Bonnie Raitt "Nine Lives" Warner Bros 25486 

Lou Reed "New York" Sire 25819 

A title screen, some digitized scenes, and then lyrics for 
each song take over the screen. CD+G is capable of 1 5 
"channels" of language information and this disc has multi- 
language lyric graphics in English, German, Spanish. French 
and etc. available at screen bottom. Some interest- 
ing/depressing New York graphics in some of the songs. The 
whole album is pretty depressing, but hey, that's Lou Reed. 
You won't hear this one on the radio. 

Various Artists "Woody Guthrie Tribute" Wamer Bros 26036 



44 .info NOVEMBER 1991 



something, mosi record store clerks actu- 
ally take offense at a customer knowing 
about something they don't. Perhaps things 
are better in your neck of the woods than 
they are in mine. 

CD+G discs will usually be found co- 
mingled with regular discs in the regular 
bins. Warner Brothers Records, and its 
house labels, and Warner New Media are 
the main purveyors of CD+G discs, in fact, 
they dominate this still-small realm. The 
older Warner Brothers discs are quickly 
identified by a bright yellow CD+G sticker 
on the outside of the standard long box, 
but not always on the front of the box. The 
new series of WNM discs come in 
redesigned long boxes with the CD+G info 
printed right on it. and on the disc itself. 

Besides CDTV, machines which can han- 
dle CD+G graphics include (but are not 
necessarily limited to) high-end consumer 
decks such as the JVC XLG-512NBK, and 
CD-ROM based game machines such as the 
NECTurboGrafx-16 unit with CD-ROM 
and Sega Genesis CD-ROM game unit. 

Warner New Media 

3500 Olive Avenue 
Burbank.CA 91505 
818-955-9999 




The jewel boxes of 
these two CD+G 
discs only hint at 

the images inside. 



Johann Sebastian Bach "St. Matthew Passion" WNM (Warner 

New Media) 15010 
Ludwig Van Beethoven "String Quartet NO. 14" WNM 1501 1 
Ludwig Van Beethoven "Symphony No. 7" WNM 15008 
Beethoven/Liszt "Symphony No. 9" WNM 1 5009 
Anton Bruckner "Symphony No. 9" WNM 15004 
Gustav Hoist "The Planets" WNM 15001 

Whew! I thought Little Feat's album was good - this one 
is unbelievable. With Warner New Media's second genera- 
tion" CD+G graphics, this is an absolute sonic and visual 
masterpiece. It goes miles beyond other CD+G discs I've 
seen. Beautiful, mind-boggling, often spine-tingling 
scrolling "collages" interpret each of the "planet" move- 
ments beautifully. This is a full digital (DDD) recording too. 
A must have. 
Gustav Mahler "Symphony No. 5" WNM 15007 
Felix Mendelssohn "Symphony No. 3" WNM 15003 
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart "Abduction from the Seraglio" 

WNM 15006 
Henry Purcell "Dido and Aeneas" WNM 15005 



The following CD+G titles were made in very limited 
quantities and may be difficult to locate: 

Anita Baker "Rapture" 

Crosby. Stills & Nash "Live it Up" 

Frozen Ghost "A Nice Place to Visit" 

Honeymoon Suite "Racing after Midnight 

Simply Red "Picture Book" 

Phoebe Snow "Something Real" 

Donna Summer "Another Place and Time" 

Talking Heads "Naked" 

10,000 Maniacs "Blind Man's Zoo" 

I also found one non Warner's label CD+G disc: 

The Home Video Album RCA Victor 60354-2-RC 

This disc contains some atmospheric music from motion 
pictures (Studio Fanfares, Overtures, Intermissions, etc.) plus 
a few dozen somewhat hokey graphics screens, the intent 
being to spice up homemade video tape footage by running 
the video-out of your CD+G player into your tape deck. This 
disc is usually found in stores' "Sound Effects" bins. 



,infO NOVEMBER 1991 45 




AUDIO 



by Bob Lindstrom 



. AnigaVision Authoring Ssisten 
p|Iiitoi'iaLl:E)(anplfs/Hultitiej[i| 

Hilli Vanilli Sequence 
P Vapid Guys pic 
.jiPl "He Can't Sing" tune 
#j 32 see of SioHon 
|| Bad LipSync Blues 
^ Bogus Ani nation 



it a n ia if 

'1 iff Screen Sound Speak Husii :. 



IHIHusic; 



eh 

Icon Nam Bad LipSjinc Blues 



Strut and Stutter Polka valuations 





lllllltllllll 

Bob Lindstrom 

looks at 

multimedia 

programs and 

tries to get a 

sound in 

edgewise. 

Illlll#llllll 



AmigaVision's music requester. 

ny boob with 520,000 worth of audio equip- 
ment, a degree in sound engineering, and ten 
years of audio post-production experience 
can go into the studio and sync up a tightly 
conceived and recorded soundtrack for a multimedia pre- 
sentation. It lakes real fortitude, determination, and per- 
haps a bit of brain damage to tackle the same task with 
no money, modest talents, a cheap parallel port sound 
sampler, a couple pieces of used MIDI gear, and an 
Amiga. But it can be done. 

Unfortunately, every musician 
knows that we tend to be the last ones 
to get the great tools. If the rest of the 
world was excavating with a steam 
shovel, we'd still be scraping the bot- 
tom of the Panama Canal with a nail 
file and spade. 

Unless you accidentally grabbed 
this magazine on the newsstand while 
reaching for Industrial Gasscx Maga- 
zine, chances arc good (hat you 
already know the Amiga is the best 
hardware choice for multimedia 
development. But even the computer 
that fired the first shot in that revolu- 
tion lacks a clear-cut solution for com- 
bining first-rate images with first-rale sounds and lunes. 
[With the possible exception of Gold Disk's ShowMaker - 
see O.l's review in next issue's Video column. -Ed.j 

The newer, more powerful programs only achieve 
multimedia max-otit when combined with other applica- 
tions, a slightly costly proposition. The older products 
lend 10 be more self-contained, more widely used, and 
less expensive; but because they are older, they are 



inclined to be less comprehensive in their sound support. 
Still, all you need is someihing that works. So, here's a 
brief, biased whistlestop tour through four venerable and 
not-so-vencrable software tools to combine images, ani- 
mation, and sound. They're all relatively affordable, as 
opposed to state-of-the-art, and sport somewhat different 
feature sets. Maybe one has the right stuff for your pro- 
ject. 

AMIGAVISION 

Slap Commodore's imprimatur on it and you have an 
Amiga standard. The world is now full of Amiga owners 
who know (he names and capitals of all the United 
Slates, can whistle a Bach iwo-pan invention, and 
haven't a clue on how to do any thing but load the prefab 
demos in AmigaVision. 

Even so, you shouldn't eyeball the demos and then 
avoid the learning curve. The AmigaVision Authoring 
System boasts a logical icon-based interface (in many 
ways superior to the overrated HyperCard on the Macin- 
tosh) and an easily understood object-oriented strucsure 
that effectively can combine separate pieces of Amiga 
artistry into polished interactive presentations. 

Musically, though, AmigaVision is somewhat limited 
by its reliance on the SMUS (Simple Music) file formal. 
Music composed for AmigaVision presentations must be 
generated in a SMUS-oriemed program such as Soni.x or 
Deluxe Music or composed as a four-track MIDI file and 
then converted to the SMUS format. 

The limits are more severe for MIDI musicians. Only 
four MIDI tracks are allowed, each with only one voice. 
So. while you can send MIDI data out of AmigaVision, it 
hardly exploits the capabilities of a good synth. One 
might almost wonder if they hamstrung the MIDI sup- 
port to make the Amiga sound better. 

DELUXE VIDEO III 

Like AmigaVision, Deluxe Video III from Electronic 
Arts (EA) is an authoring environment for generating 
interactive presentations. Though each program has Lis 
fans, DVideo provides more built-in animation and pre- 
sentation tools at the cost of a more complex interface. 
AmigaVision is more effective as the multimedia "glue" 
between the outputs of disparate applications. 

Yet, both products have similar sound support. Like 
AmigaVision, DVideo III supports only the SMUS file 
format, but links lo MIDI devices in a somewhat more 
sophisticated way. 

DVideo III accepts multiple MIDI channels and pro- 
gram change information embedded in a SMUS file. In 
short, it supports the level of MIDI implementation seen 
in EA's Deluxe Music, making (his the logical compan- 
ion product if you intend to make much use of MIDI 
within DVideo III. 



46 .infO NOVEMBER 1991 



Support for digital samples, either as musical instru- 
ments or sound effects, is .similar to AmigaVMon. It 
works. It sounds. It syncs. 

The non-musical choice between AmigaVtsion mid 
DVideo 111 is one of interface (slightly easier in AmigaVt- 
sion). brush animation routines (superior in DVideo III). 
and the number of built-in effects and features you 
require {DVideo is conceived to be more self-contained 
overall than AmigaVtsion). 

For the musician, it's veiy much .1 toss-up for internal 
Amiga sampled sounds. But DVideo HI offers better 
MIDI support. 

AREXX 

Some of the more knowledgeable among you may be 
muttering. "ARexx, ARexx," by now. You're dismayed 
because I seem to be overlooking the power that this 
interprocess communication language adds to both Ami- 
gaVtsion and DVideo III. 

While a sequencer such as Blue Ribbon Soundworks' 
Bars & Pipes can be controlled through an ARexx port, 
the limited bandwidth of that port makes it inappropriate 
for the passing of MIDI information. You can, however, 
add stand-alone MIDI support to authoring programs that 
otherwise support only SMUS files and gimpy MIDI. 

Still, the need to leant ARexx commands, for a musi- 
cian who is probably already up to his guitar pick in 
MIDI jargon, renders this option somewhat less than 
attractive, in my opinion. 

NOISY CARTOONS 

If you don't give a dissonance for multimedia interac- 
tivity and just want to put cartoons on screen with sound 
effects and some music. 1 have a pair of suggestions from 
left field. 

Disney Software's The Animation Studio is primarily 
for creating character animations. Just don't overlook the 
fact that its Exposure Sheet module permits you to com- 
bine SMUS files, digital instruments, sound effects and 
ANIM files into polished and. more to the point, lightly 
synchronized presentations. It has a thorough set of inter- 
nal voice commands, including control over tempo and 
volume and instruments; but no MIDI. 

Even more specialized is ANIMATION: Soundtrack 
from Hash Enterprises. This utility specifically targets 
the task of recording and editing digital samples, then 
syncing them up with ANIM files. If you're trying to lip 
sync dialogue with on-screen images (not a musical task, 
but, face it guys, we generally end up doing sound 
effects, too), this is the most complete tool I know. 

Samples are recorded within the program, then timed 
out down to the individual frame per second (with set- 
tings for all the film and video rates from 24 fps to 30 fps 
dropframe). The numbers within the program allow the 




Samples may be synchronized with ANiM files in Soundtrack. 

sound technician to create very precise timing sheets for 
the animator. 

With animation complete, the sound techni- 
cian/musician returns to Soundtrack with a range of 
options that permit him to align sound and image down 
to individual phonemes, a must for precise lip syncing. 

The limit here is a musical one. Unless you're pre- 
pared to digitally sample huge music files. Soundtrack is 
best used for integration of sampled 
sound effects and dialogue. If you 
need to add a musical soundtrack as 
well, you're back to the studio, the 
engineering degree and the decade of 
experience. 

Or you could just whip out that 
stereo Walkman and do the best you 
can. 



lllllltllllll 



Addresses 



AmigaVtsion. S 1 49.95 

Commodore. 1200 Wilson Drive, 

West Chester PA 19380,215- 

431-9100 
DeluxeVideo III. SI 49.95 

Electronic Arts, 1450 Fashion Island Blvd.. San 

Mateo CA 94404, 4 1 5-57 1-7171 
The Animation Studio. SI 79.00 

Walt Disney Software. 3900 W. Alameda Avenue 

23rd Floor, Burbank CA 91505. 8 18-567-5360 
Soundtrack, $119.95 

Hash Enterprises, 2800 E. Evergreen Boulevard, 

Vancouver WA 9K66 1 . 206-256-8567 



There's hot artistic 

weaponry for 

artists and writers; 

but cold comfort 

for a musician on 

a budget. 



IIIIIMHIII 



.info NOVEMBER 1991 47 



f VIDEO 



by Orctn J. Sands, 




ChromaKey with tape, cable, and blue chromakey cloth. 



1/1/ 



IIIIIIBIIIIII 

OJ tests the 

ChromaKey 

from 

MicroSearch. 

IIIIIIBIIIIII 



e video professionals like to think of our- 
elves as being in the imagination business: 
You imagine ii. and we'll produce it. (Or ai 
east we'll make you think we did!) And one 
of the more powerful tools we use is the chroma keyer. 
Its magic can place weathermen in front of weather maps 
and float an astronaut over the planet Earth. It's all 
smoke and mirrors, perhaps, but the 'virtual reality' peo- 
ple have little on us when it comes to creating impossible 
or improbable scenes. 

WHAT IT IS 

The chromakey process is really very simple. The 
chroma keying unit looks for the color blue in your 

video image and removes it. replac- 
ing it with video from a second 
source. Don't confuse chroma keying 
with luminance keying where the 
determining factor for replacing the 
video is the video's brightness level. 
Although in theory any color can be 
used, in practice blue is the more pre- 
dominant because it's so far removed 
from skin tones (Lime green is a 
close runner-up). This process was 
originally only usable with three-lube 
color cameras with RGB outputs. 
Today, composite color outputs are 
usable because methods of cleanly decoding the signal 
back into the RGB component signals has become pos- 
sible. The price is still high, though - often several 
thousand dollars. 



FOR THE AMIGA 

Of course, lime marches onward and electronic 
devices get better and cheaper. So 1 suppose I really 
shouldn't be surprised thai a chroma keyer for the Amiga 
is not only available, but inexpensive. MicroSearch, a 
company best known for its Color Spinier box for video 
digitizers, is shipping the world's first desktop video 
chroma keyer. named appropriately enough. ChromaKey, 
The surprise is thai it's much belter than I had hoped. For 
$395. 1 didn't expect much, but this little box works well 
enough to be used for typical garage-video and local 
cable productions. With careful usage, the industrial and 
educational market could even put it to use. 

The ChromaKey isn't quite a 'normal 1 chroma keyer. 
though. It strips the blue out of your firsi video source, 
but the second video source must be the Amiga. Of 
course that's hardly a limitation. Connecting between 
your Amiga and an external genlock, the ChromaKey 
intercepts the necessary signals to process ihe video. The 
ChromaKey does the color detection while the genlock is 
used to do (he keying portion of the chroma key process 
- a very nice implementation that cuts the cost. 

INSTALLATION 

The ChromaKey installs easily. Simply follow the 
manual's diagrams and you'll be hooked up in less than a 
minute. The ChromaKey has its own power supply, so it 
won't load clown your Amiga. That makes it safe for 
A500 owners. Rummaging around in the box will find 
several other interesting items. MicroSearch figured you 
might need a ready source of blue backgrounds, so they 
included a large piece of blue cloth. They also figured 
you'd need some computer graphics to use as back- 
ground graphics, so there's a disk of those as well. And 
finally, there's a ChromaKey tape demo that may have 
you scratching your head wondering "how'd they do 
that?" (Read the manual and find out!) 

The manual included with the ChromaKey is clear and 
concise, with plenty of illustrations for the criminally 
klutzy. It addresses all the controls, adjustments, and 
techniques you'll need to know to produce good chroma 
key images. You'll even find an appendix that lists 
sources of chroma key blue cloth and paint. 

The controls on the ChromaKey are simple and few. 
There is a large slider for adjusting the key level, and a 
toggle switch for selecting regular genlock operation or 
chroma key mode. Another toggle inverts the keying 
effects. The connections are also few in number: one 
BNC for the video input, one for the output, a power 
connector, and a special connector for the cable that 
hooks up between the Amiga and your genlock. (Take 
note: the ChromaKey does not work with internal gen- 
locks or on Video Toaster-equipped machines, though 
MicroSearch is working on new versions that will.) 



48 .info NOVEMBER 1991 




"MotoOran" - OJ has always wanted to ride Jim Sachs' 
motorcycle! 



The author points out important results of the latest 
satellite pics. 



USING THE CHROMAKEY 

Using the ChmmaKey can be a little tricky. That's not 
due to any problem with the CkromaKey; it's a problem 
with every chroma keycr. The blue component of a color 
video signal is inherently noisy, which makes keyed 
edges ragged or 'fringy' This can be reduced by careful 
lighting and color balance of both the lights and the cam- 
era. A great deal of caution must be used to properly set 
up a scene for chroma keying. I must admit that the 
ChmmaKey .seems to be a little less touchy than some 
more expensive units I've used, though. 

There are several steps to setting up a chroma key 
scene. First, make sure you have a blue background; 
preferably all the same color blue - same tint, same 
brightness. If using a cloth, try to remove wrinkles or 
sags. Light it evenly and brightly. Put your subject in 
front of the background and light it separately. Be very 
sure that the subject doesn't cast a shadow on the back- 
ground. That creates a darker blue than the rest of the 
background and might make a noisy key. Angle the light- 
ing so the shadows fall short of the background. Remem- 
ber that blue clothing will also key out. so stay away 
from that color unless that's the effect you're looking for. 
Make sure your Amiga-produced background graphics 
cover the screen from edge to edge, or you may ruin the 
illusion you're trying to create. After all these things arc 
in place, you need to adjust the ChmmaKey itself. 

TWEAKING THE CHROMAKEY 

The most obvious adjustment to make is the key level. 
Moving the .slider will take you from all video to all 
graphics. Somewhere in between you'll find the blue dis- 
appearing and the graphics showing through. Careful 
adjustment will produce an image with very little fring- 



ing around the edges. If this point isn't easily achievable, 
then your lighting is probably the culprit. Examination of 
the subject's image will show a leading or lagging 
shadow or outline. This can be reduced by opening up 
the ChmmaKey and changing the Delay adjustment. This 
correction is necessary as no two brands of genlock have 
the same amount of key delay. Charts and diagrams are 
included to make this easy, with suggested settings for 
the more popular genlocks. A Hue adjustment is also 
possible to make sure the ChmmaKey 
is keying on the same hue of blue that 
you are using. With these tweaks com- 
pleted, you should now have the 
imaginary image you were trying to 
complete. 

I expect to see some really interest- 
ing videos put together with a Chro- 
ma/Ci'y-eu,uipped Amiga. Remember 
the old tv show The Invisible Man? 
(Okay, so I'm showing my age!) My 
favorite scene was where he'd unwrap 
the bandages from his head and there 
would be nothing there! He merely 
had his head in a blue cloth bag. Blue 
gloves under his white ones created 
the same illusion for his hands. Godz- 
illa stomping over Tokyo is another 
possibility with your ChmmaKey. Let your imagination 
run wild! I predict thai this will quickly become the one 
of the more entertaining and useful video devices you'll 
own. Reality is virtually just around the corner with the 
CkromaKey, 

NOTE: The screenshots were done using DCTV to digi- 
tize a videotape of the ChromaKey's output. 



IIIIIIHIIIIII 

ChromaKey 

k-kkk 

$395,00 

MicroSearch 

9896 S.W. Freeway 

Houston, TX 77074 

(713) 988-2819 

IIIIIIHIIIIII 



.infO NOVEMBER 1991 49 



MNm 



nw7 



hi J AMIGA J USERS' 



JJJ 



$5.50 EACH! 

$6.50 Outside the USA. 



BACK 
ISSUES 



DW 



#2 INFO 64, Winter 1983/84 
Guide lo C64 producis. Koala pad. Flexidraw, Ul- 
traBASIC-64, Home Accountant vs. C.P.A. 

#3 INFO 64, Spring 1984 
Product Round-up: 1000 product listings lor CM. 
Superbase 64. Commodore LOGO. C64 Forth. 
Model Diet. Computer Mechanic. 

#6 INFO 64 Spring 1985 
Color Gallery! C64 hard drives. Intro to Assembly 
Language. COMAL 2.0 1 . The Print Shop. Whith- 
er C/PM. 

#10 INFO May/June 1986 
Monitor Roundup! Cfi4 wordproccssors. Multi- 
plan for C64/C 1 28, Amiga BASIC. Tips & hints. 

#11 INFO Aug/Sept 1986 
Product Roundup issue: over 1500 hardware and 
software listings for C64. CI 28 and Amiga. 

#12 INFO Nov/Dec 1986 
Graphics report: Cf)4/12S and Amiga painting, 
CAD. drafting, video animation, tools and utili- 
ties. Idea-processors. 8 bit business software. 

#13 INFO Jan/Feb 1987 
Games issue: C64/C128 and Amiga games. 8-Bit 
business and application software (part 1 1, 
Telecommunication networking, Amiga Music. 

#14 INFO Spring/Summer 1987 
Product Roundup issue: over 2000 hardware and 
software listings for C64. C 1 28 and Amiga. First 
look at the A500 & A2000 systems. 

#15 INFO July/Aug 1987 
1st Annual C.H.U.M.P. Magazine! Commodore & 
Amiga Survival Guide, Anne Westfall interview, 
TDI Modula 2, Supra Hard Drive. 

#17 INFO Nov/Dec 1987 
ANNUAL GAMES ISSUE! GEOS Update. 16/32 
bit comparison. CI28 ROM upgrades. B.E.S.T. 
Accounting. Word Writer 3, DIGA! 

#18 INFO Jan/Feb 1988 
Desktop Publishing & wordproccssors (pan I}. 
Virus diagnosed. Geos Update. C64 Power Car- 
tridges. CI 28 Supeipak II. 

#19 INFO Mar/Apr 1988 
Desktop Publishing & wordproccssors (part 2). 
Leo Schwab interview. GEOS Update. ICT hard 
drive. Digital SuperPak2. Thoughtform. 



#20 INFO May/Jun 1988 

Desktop Video: Tillers, genlocks, converters. C64 
slide show programs, GeoSluff. AmigaDos 1. 2 
Bugs. Joel I lagen tutorial. 

#22 INFO Sep/Oct 1988 
Digitizing. Mac VS. Amiga. GeoSluff. Over 50 re- 
views for C64. C 1 28. and Amiga computers, IN- 
FOmania Game Tips! BRYCK debut! 

#23 INFO Nov/Dec 1988 
ANNUAL GAMES ISSUE!! INFO Mania Game 
Tips. New Products, News & Views. 

#24 INFO Jan/Feb 1989 
Amiga 3D Graphics Round Up. Reichart Von 
Wolfsheild interview, GeoSluff. SuperBase Pro, 
Spectrascan, Sky Travel. 

#25 INFO Mar/Apr 1989 
Amiga Animation Round Up. Rodney Chang in- 
terview. C128 T.H.I.S.. GeoCalc 1 28. Dr. Term 
Pro. AC/BASIC. Microfiche Filer Plus. 

#26 INFO May/June 1989 
Paint Program Round Up. Loren Lovhaug inter- 
view. Removable Mass Storage, 158 1 Toolkit, Mi- 
croLawycr, WillMaker. Pen Pal 

#27 INFO Jul/Aug 1989 
3rd Annual C.H.U.M.P. Magazine! Dale Luck in- 
terview. Sound & Music. Fractals. GeoProgram- 
mer. Silentwriler LC890, Transcript. 

#28 INFO Sept/O ct 1989 
Video Bool Camp! High-End Amiga Expansion. 
Gail Wellington interview, 3D options. Home 
Town, Viking I. A-Mux. Ami-Virus. V.I.P. 

#29 INFO Nov/Dec 1989 
Annual Games Issue! Chris Crawford interview. 
SFX Sound Expander. The Write StulT 128, 
Toshiba ExpressWriter 301. RawCopy, Mac-2-Dos, 

#30 INFO Jan/Feb 1990 
Amiga DeskTop Publishing Tools, LOGO, A590 
Hard Drive. Dual Serial Board. Abacus Books. 
Twin Cities 1 28 book. 

#31 INFO July 1990 
Amiga 3000. AmigaVision, AmigaDOS 2.0. 
RJ. Mical interview. Ray-Tracing. TV*Texl Pro. 
CanDo. CrossDOS, FractalPro, ScanLab 100. 

#32 .info September 1990 
First issue of monthly All-Amiga .info'. Turbo Sil- 
ver, Laurence Gartel interview. Page Stream J. 8. 
Power PC Board, introducing CDTV. all new .info 
Technical Support section by Sullivan and Zamara. 

#33 .info October 1990 

Fractal Frontiers. Inside AmigaVision. Peggy Efcr- 
rington's new Music & Sound column. Pro Video 
Post. The Art Department. Archivers. 



#34 .info November 1990 
The Video Toaster Cometh! George Christensen 
interview. ProWritc 3,0, Synlhia li. Saxon Pub- 
lisher. Pro Draw 2.0. Hard Disk Management. 

#35 .info Dec 90/Jan 91 
Annual Games Issue! The year's top 25 games. 
Exclusive - Amiga Unix. Balllelcch Center. Elan 
Performer. GVP Impact II SCSI RAM Controller. 

#36 .info February 1991 
Image Wrapping. The Amiga in Europe. Victor 
Osaka interview, World's first Video Toaster 
Show. Rendcrman, A -Max II. 

#37 .info March 1991 
Ellison Home profile. Video Toaster part 2. 
MINIX 1.5. Pagcslream 2.0. Power PC Board, 
Animation Studio. AudtoMaster III & E-Z FM. 

#38, info April 1991 
Amiga Networks. Dra\v4D, Auto-Script, J. Hop- 
kins profile. Video Toaster purl 3. WOC, CES. 
UNIX shows. MacroPainl. Big Belly RAM. 

#39 .info May 1991 
Special Music & Sound issue! New Producis from 
Casio.Dr. T's. and Blue Ribbon. Plus Imagine. Ar- 
row 1 500. Bodega Bay, and Professional Page 2.0. 

#40 ./VrtoJune1991 
DPaim IV! CDTV. Hyperbook. Xetec CD-ROM, 
Amiga UNIX, AmigaDOS Scripts, TransWrile, 
RAM facts, and Amiga World Expo NY. 

#41 .info July 1991 
DCTV. Proper Grammar. PageStream 2. 1 . Image 
Processing. Trumpcard 500, Supra Drive 500XP. 
Q30Q0 Film Recorder. Art Depl. Professional. 



Use the tear-out 
order card or charge 
by phone with your 

VISA 

or 

MASTERCARD 
(319)338-0703 




MSKSA 



© 



u 

□ 



r^ 



mm 







Rip into the 

AMIGA 
magazine 

with more 




#42 

AUG SEPT 1991 

U.S.A. S3.95 



Canadi 
DISPLAY UNTI 



PLUS: Inside CDTV * ADPro for 
Publishing * 10 New Games * 
Networking (part 2) * Micro-Math 
AmigaDos Scripts * and More! 





I he 1991 Amiga Developers 
Conference was held the 

I first week in September at the 
Denver Marriott City Center, just 
a few blocks from the U.S. Mint. 

I I was there. So were 265 other 
attendees from six countries. 

Commodore handed out over 800 pages 
of documentation and four disks of sample 
code to attendees. There were about four 
dozen formal sessions, concentrating on 
new hardware under development (lop- 
secret stuff!), CDTV. international market- 
ing, 2.0, and other topics. The whole works 
was kicked off with a barbeque Tuesday 
night, and a speech by CATS head Jeff 
Scherb early Wednesday morning. I really 
liked the barbeque. 

We were told that the A3000 Power Up 
program had been very successful - so suc- 
cessful that it caused a temporary shortage 
of 3000s. We were also told that 3000s are 
substantially outselling the A2000. Video 
and presentation markets are the emphasis 
of present Commodore ad campaigns, and 
the Amiga has about 70% of the video com- 
puter market. Commodore is now targeting 
the corporate training and kiosk markets 
with both Amiga and CDTV. 

Commodore announced the release of 
the Workbench 2.0 Enhancer Kits with 2.0 
ROM, disks, and manual. Il will be 
available by the lime you read this. Rev 2.0 
ROMs will also be 'phased in' to new units. 

Commodore will bundle Grolier's New 



Rocky Mountain High 

THE 1991 

AMIGA DEVELOPERS 

CONFERENCE 



by Mark R. Brown 



Electronic Encyclopedia and Psy gnosis' 
Lemmings with new CDTV units for the 
Christmas season. CDTV sessions demoed 
Commodore's CDXL straight-off-the-CD 
data technology, which is capable of dis- 
playing 1/4 screen. 12 frame- per-sccond 
video with stereo audio in real-time. That 
may not sound like much, but it's more 
than CD-I can deliver, and CDXL demos 
much better than it sounds. With the right 
software, il should really help sell CDTV. 
Commodore spokespeople said they are 
'keenly aware' of the suggestions of the 
public and press for improvements and 
additions to CDTV, and there was much 
talk of a "CDTV Family' of products. The 
keyboard, mouse, and disk drive for CDTV 
will be coming 'after the first of the year.' 
and the new IR trackball should be 
available by the time you read this. There 
will be an intensive advertising 'test cam- 
paign* in the San Francisco Bay area for 
Christmas, with CDTV slated to be in 10- 
15 major urban markets by the holidays. If 
you can't find CDTV in your area, call 800- 
662-6442 for dealer information. Mail 
order CDTV software is available by call- 
ing Commodore at 800-468-CDTV. CDTV 
units are also available by mail order 
through Hammacher-Schlcmmer and Mont- 
gomery Ward. 

85% of Commodore Amiga sales are 
overseas, and many sessions concentrated 
on 'localization' of products Tor the interna- 
tional market. CBM is helping developers 
find translators for software and manuals 
and has created a new "locale. library' which 
will considerably speed up the software 
translation process. They are also assisting 
developers in their efforts lo link up with 
European distributors. 

But did Commodore announce any hot 
new products, you ask? There are. as usual, 
many top-secret new machines, boards, and 
chips under development behind the doors 
of the Commodore Engineering Depart- 
ment, and some prototypes were shown and 
discussed at DevCon. We can't talk about 



them here, since we signed a non- 
disclosure agreement. But the folks we 
talked to assured us that Commodore is 
always working on the next generation of 
machines, and they are keenly aware of the 
need to compete against other computers 
with enhanced capabilities, such as 256 
color VGA-type displays. 24-bit graphics, 
and 16-bit CD-quality stereo audio. 

Commodore is doing really, really well 
in Europe. They turned a profit this fiscal 
year, and posted over a billion dollars in 
sales for the first time since the C64 days. 
Unfortunately. U.S. sales don't seem to be 
following along. Though Commodore has 
some good plans for the video, education, 
and presentation specialty markets, don't 
expect to see a big general-purpose market- 
ing and advertising push in the U.S. 

With CDXL. CDTV is a CD-I killer. It 
will sell CDTVs when consumers see soft- 
ware that takes advantage of it. There are 
now 50 CDTV titles available, with 50 
more by Christinas, and 100 more in first 
quarter 1992. Remember, software drives 
hardware sales. 

Workbench 2.0 is out. and looks great. It 
should do a lot to improve the Amiga's pro- 
fessional image. 

Impressive new hardware is underdevel- 
opment. The CBM engineering department 
is again in the process of proving them- 
selves the top wizards in the computer 
industry. 

In the meantime, we all own the best 
computers available on the third planet 
from the sun. Let's put "em to good use. 



For Subscribers Only! For more 
DevCon News That Just Wouldn't Fit, 
see this issue's WrapUp! In the Wrap: 
Fun Things We Did in Denver; 1991 
Developers' Choice Awards; New 3rd 
Party Products Announced. 



52 .info NOVEMBER 1991 




Credit Card Orders Only, Call Toll-Free 1-800-45-POWER (215) 922-0050 Fax: (215) 922-0116 



pcmr coriPUTino products 



POWER MOUSE 
PC880 POWER DRIVE 
8LKZ AMIGA ■ AS00/200O 
DUAL DRIVE 
POWER SCANNER 
A500 INTERNAL DI3IVE 
A20OD INTERNAL DRIVE 
51JK RAM CLOCK CARD 
512K RAM WITHOUT CLOCK 
PRO SOUND AMIGA 



S 36 00 

S 99.00 

S 34R5 

S 199 00 

S 259 00 

$ 7995 

S 79 95 

59 95 

49 9S 

d9 95 



PC880B POWER DRIVE - NEW 

HIGH SPEC 88QK ELOPPV DRIVE 

BLITZ HARDWARE COPIER BUILT-IN 

[SWITCHABLEJ 

POWER COMPUTING ANTICUCK FEATURE 

VIRUS BLOCKER BUIU-IN 

(SWI1CHABIEI 



1.5 MB EXPANSION BOARD 

PIUGS EASILY INTO VOUR AS00 
KICKSTART 13 AND ABOVE 
SIMPLE INTERNAL. FITTING 
FULLY COMPATIBLE WITH FATTER 
AGNUS AND 



ATonce 

PC/AT EMULATOR 
A500 $ 239.00 

A2000 ADAPTOR $ 79.00 



Supra 



500 XP HARD DRIVE KITS 
EXP. to B MB 

20MB w'2 MB $445 011 

52 MS - w2 MB 5560 0'J 

105 MB w.2 MB $735 0fi 

SUPRA RAM 500 $ 49 00 

SUPRA RAM 500 R» 1 MB (EXP TO ! $129 00 

SUPRA RAM 500 Pit 2 MB li» 10 (J S 189 00 

SUPRA RAM 2000 

OK S10B0I 

2 MB S CALi 

' MB S CALi 

6 MB S CALI 

6 MB S CAL, 

SUPRA MODEMS 

2400 BAUD EXTERNAL S 97 01 

2400 Zl INTERNAL |A2000| S 11501 

2400 MNP |2-5) S 145011 

2400 PLUS |MNP V42 Bis) S 165 00 

2400 Zi PIUS |MNP ■ V 42 Bis) S15S0H 

0600 PLUS |V 32. MNP ■ V 42 Bis) 5 540 00 

SUPRA WORD SYNC [A2000) 5 99 00 

SUPRA DRIVE 3 5' EXTERNAL S 9900 



$149.00 ,MBCH ™ $189,00 



EXPANSIO N 

BASEBOARD MEMORY EXPANSIONS FOR A500 



OK 
512K 

1 MB 

2 MB 

3 MB 

4 MB 



S 95.00 
$118.00 
$ 135.00 
$ 174.00 
S 220.00 
S24Q.00 



DATA FLYER 

A-500 i 129 00 

A- 2000 $ 79 00 




UPGRADE/REPLACEMENT CHIPS 



MTrgACTfVt VIMO SnTtfcH 



TRUMP CARD 500 
TRUMP CARD 2000 
TRUMP CARD 500 PRO 
TRUMP CARD 2000 PRO 
GRAND SLAM 500 
GRAND SLAM 2000 
META 4 

PRINTERFACE AUXILIARY 
PRINTER PORT 



S 179 00 
S 10900 
S 228.00 
S 169 00 
S 276 00 
5225 00 
S 12900 

S 78 00 



PROGWxnve 

g€RIPH€RF)L/- 
/oftujpirT 



KICKSTART 1.3 ROM 

KICKSTART 2 ROM 

8372A FATTER AGNUS 1MB 

8372B FATTER AGNUS 2MB 

8362 DENISE 

B372 SUPER DENISE 

8364 PAULA 

5719 GARY 

3520 CIA 

1 M8 x 4/80NS SC ZIP (A3000) 

I X 1/8DNS 

:?56 x 4/80NS 

:>56 x 1/80NS 

1 J B 80NS SIMM 

4 x 8 80NS SIMM 

FATTER AGNUS CHIP PULLER 



27 00 
CALL 
85.00 
CALL 
26.00 
CALL 
26.00 
12 95 
1500 
30.00 
5.50 
5 50 
2 00 
4500 
5 198 00 
S 6 50 



r-RAMEGRABBER 542900 

FRAMEGRABBER 256 S499 00 

MINIGEN S1B9 00 

BAUD BANDIT MNPS 2400 BD MODEM S139D0 



HARD DRIVES 



DKB Software 

MEGACHIP 2000 S229 00 

GST J Ml r> CWPOAM 'OP M «C<» JU I'J "WE A33TJC 

Mf BACHIP 2000 w J Ml Fatrtl Acjnui S 325 00 

Leu 55 00 FOR IHE 1 MB CHIP 

MULTI CTAST II $ 79 00 

FOfl ASMSttM SW1CH MTWEEN KlOCSTAfiT 5d AO 1 3 BOM 

SJCUBiKEY S 109 00 

W0OC 3000 SECURITY CONTROL 

KWIK ITABTII $ 8900 

WTM1 BOCSHB1 !IW<] ROMS * Ml AIMO 

SWICHUIE WTH THE GITOm 

IATT. DISK S 225 00 

A2000J00U 

INSIDER II 

mt 521800 'ms$248O0 i5ms5278LXI 




ROCTEC 



35- ultw aw ax imam nam drive s moo 

525' J60720 K EXT DRIVE 51 SO 00 

MOUSE S 3JO0 

3£NlOC< A5EB200E SWOO 



SERIES II ACCELERATORS 

with SCSI Conlfollers 

GVP A-2000 COMBO. 22 MHZ 2 MB S 679 01 

GVP A 2000 COMBO 33 MHZ 4 MB51599CK 

IDE CONTROLLER 
GVP 3050 50 MHZ-4 MB S2349 00 



Quantum 



105 MB - LPS 



<SF Seagate 

51 157N - 149MB-2BMS 
ST 27JN - 1-60MB-28MS 
ST 1096 N B0MB-20MS 
ST 296 N 30MB-28MS 

SyQuest 



44 MB REMOVABLE 
44 MB w CARTRIDGE 
CARTRIDGE 



S235 00 
S385 00 

S71000 



$325 00 
$275 00 
S325 0O 
S2B5 00 



S400 00 
S475 00 
S 75 00 



AE-DATA LINK 2000 [KT| S 13SO0 

AE-DATA LINK 2000 WMNP5 - FAX [INI] SIJ900 
AE-DAIA LINK EXPRE5S W MNP-5 • FAX |EXT | 5 215 00 
AE-HIGH DENSITY (LOPPY DPTVE S 189 00 



[<|UMANA* 

3 5" EXTERNAL DRIVE 

$99.00 



A<5 SCSI 2000 S12900 

AO SCSI 2080 S 169 00 

*d SCSI 20B0 2 MB $26? 00 

*0 5CSS 2010* MBS WOO 

Ad SCSI 2080 4 M8 516900 

Ad SCSI 2090 ! MB 556900 

Ad SAM 540 
Ad RAM 540 1 MB 
AO RAM 540 2 MS 
Ad RAM 540 3 MS 
Ad RAM 540 i MB 



ICD 



5 104 00 
S 142 00 
S 180 00 
521600 
S 256 00 



A3 RAM 560 D S 1 75 00 



Ad RAM 20S0 
AO RAM 2080 2 MB 
Ad RAM 20BO 4 MB 
Ad RAM 2080 6 MB 
Ad RAM 2080 8 MB 

Ad SPEED 

FLICKER FREE VIDEO 

NOVIA 20I (A50OI 

NOVIA 40i [A500) 

NOVIA 60i [A50D] 

PRIMA 52. (A500) 

PRIMA 105i (A500) 

AD IDE 40 [3 5 HDKitJ 

AD IDE -44 [2 5 HDKMI 



S 11700 
S 149 00 
S 261 00 
5 333 00 
S 405 00 
S 210 00 
S 299 00 
S 479 00 
S 649 00 
5 879 00 
5 459 00 
$639 00 
S 109 00 
$119 00 



GVP A-SO0 MO 8 ■ 0.-40 
GVP A-500 HO 8 ■ 0<52 
GVP A-500 KD 8 ■ 0.M05 



5559 00 
5599 00 
$84900 



AMIGA EXTRAS 



GVP 82 MEMORY EXPANSION FOR A-2000 
2 MB S199 00 

4 MB S CALL 

6 MB 5 CALL 

9 MB 5 CALL 



GVP Secies II 
GVP Series II 



KC.A-2000 

HC 8-0 A-2000 



S159 00 
519600 



MICRO R&D 

Dl -. C „„ T 150 Worn power lupptv Toi A500. 

Bib C(J(JI 2M)W ana 2MW ovcMoolol ' 88 00 

PRINTER BUFFER S 120.00 

JOYSTICK/MOUSE SWITCH S 28.00 

MW-73B'A500 POWER SUPPLY 5 108 00 

[LIFETIME WARRANTY! 

MOUSE [LIFETIME WARRANTY] S 55.00 



AM1RACK TRACKBALL 

BODEGA BAY 

BODEGA BAY WITH MALIBU 

BEETLE MOUSE 

BOING OPTICAL MOUSE 

CUTTING EDGE MAC DRIVE 3 5' 

CHROMAKEY 

DPS PERSONAL TBC 

DAKOTA SKETCHMASTER 12x12 

DAKOTA SKETCHMASTER 12.16 

FLICKER FIXER 

FLICKER FIXER DEB 2000 

FIRECRACKER 2400-2MB 

ICD SHUFFLE BOARD 

MAGNI SYSTEMS 

MIGRAPH HAND SCANNER 

PANASONIC 16MM LENS WITH IRIS 

PANASONIC 16MM LENS YV-O IRIS 

PANASONIC WVI410 CAMERA WITH CAJLf 

REJUVENATOR 1000 WITH AGNUS 

SHARP COLOR SCANNERS 

SCANLOCK 

VIDEO MASTER 



64 95 

CALL 

CALL 

45 00 

99 00 

199 00 

5 31900 

S 84900 

5 379 00 

5 55900 

5 239 00 



94 O0 
CALL 
CALL 
CALL 

299 00 
69.00 
29 00 

209 00 
CALL 
CALL 

B49 00 
S 1079 00 



on 



MEGAM1DGET RACER 
25 MHZ (A50O-2O00) S 599 DC 

33 MHZ (A500-2000) S 679 00 

MEGAMIDGET ECONOMY 

25 MHZ IA5OO-2000) S499O0 

33 MHZ [A5002000) S 599 00 

MATH COPROCESSOR 25MHZ-3JMHZ S CALL 
MEGA MIDGET RACER MEMORY 5 CALL 



NewTek 

$1399.00 



DIGITAL 

R E A T I O H S 



DCTV j 3*9.00 

5UPERGEN 2000S GENLOCK S134900 
SUPERGEN GENLOCK $ 599 00 



FAST TRACK A500 1000 
FAST TRACK Q52 - A500 1000 
FAST TRAK Q105 ASOO'1000 
FAST RAM SA5 A500 1000 
FAST RAM SA10 A50010QO 
FAST RAM 2 M8 A500 1000 
FAST RAM 4 MB A500 1000 
FAST CARD PLUS A2000 
FAST CARD PLUS 052 A2000 
FASI CARD PLUS Q105 A2000 
MINI f AST CARD - A2000 
CD-ROM650EEXTERNAL 



S 220 00 
S CALL 
5 CALL 

S 7500 
5 85 00 
S CALL 
S CALL 
S 145 00 
S CALL 
S CALL 
5 75.00 
Si;:9Q0 



goldenIMAGE° 

GOLDEN IMAGE A500; 1000-2000 MOUSE % J8 

GOLDEN IMAGE OPTICAL MOUSE % 4V 

GOLDEN IMAGE HAND SCANNE R S 239 

MA5TER3-A1 - 500)1000.2000 5 79 

MASTER 3 A1D - 500 1000 2000 S 95 



ORDERING INFORMATION POWER COMPUTING USA 21 South 5th Street Suite 900 Philadelphia. PA 1 91 06 

We pay ail ircight chaiges wiihin [ho continental US UPS Gfouna Service For fast delivery send cashier's cnech o» money aider Personal 

and Company checks alow \a business days 10 clear COD charges are 4 00 Insurance add 2"t lo total amouni PA restdenis please add 

6% sales tax 

AK HI FPO. APO. PuDrto Rico and Canadian orders please add B c c sfnppmt) Minimum SfiOO AH olher forttflfl otdeis add i5*s shipping 

Minimum Si 5 00 AH orders shipped oulsrde the continental USA a/e shipped first class insured An Mail II loreign charges exceeo itie minimum 

amouni. you will be charged the additional amount All goods are new and delude factory warranty We do not guarantee compalitnlity and 

vcsion numbers - due to our low prices all sales aie final 

All defective returns must have return autJ W llMrt iO n number To ooiain an R A * Call 215-9220050 Delective returns not accepted without 

R A # PRICES AND AVAILABILITY ai"0 subiect to change without notice Shipping, handling and insurance charges are not refundable Not 

responsi&Je lor typog/aphic errors All trademarks acknowledged 



NO 
CREDIT CARD 
SURCHARGE 

VISA - MC 

AMEX 

DINERS CLUB 



FREE 

DELIVERY 

UPS Grouno 

Service - USA 

only 



WE SPECIAL 
ORDER 

AnyH»WUresMSo(l- 
*ar* Products f OR 
iUIGt COMPUTERS 

50S bepwt t&*j.^d wtn [ 



Circle #173 on the Reader Service Card 



:■■■«■■■■■■■«! 



■■■■■■■ 

•info technical support 



■■■■i 



CONTENTS 

page 54 
UNIX: Is It For You? 

Daniel Barrett finishes 
his discussion with Part 
II: For The Programmer. 

page 58 

Quarterback Tools 

David Martin reviews 
this indispensible Amiga 
utility program. 

page 60 

Point/ Counterpoint 

Nick Sullivan and Chris 
Zamara debate the 
relative virtues of the 
Workbench and the CLI. 

page 62 

Checking Out 

Programs 

Jim Butterfield warns 
that Hallowe'en and 
Christmas may 
sometimes be the same 
thing. 






UNIX: Is It For You? 

Part II: For The 
Programmer 

by Daniel Barrett 

In Part I, we discussed some 
differences between Ihe UNIX 
and Amiga operating systems 
that affect all users. We now discuss 
issues relevant to programmers and 
power-users: sophisticated UNIX use, 
programming, and systems administra- 
tion. 



The UNIX Power User 

UNIX has lots of opportunities for 
users who like to get the most out of 
their computers. Most UNIX programs, 
including the shell user interface, are 
highly configurable. Some of them even 
let you define the behavior of every sin- 
gle keystroke and mouseclick {or you 
can accept the defaults). 

Once you have mastered various 
UNIX programs, the power doesn't stop 
there. The UNIX shell lets you build 
sophisticated 'pipelines' that send data 
from one program into another. As an 
example, let's find out the most com- 
mon first name of all the users on a 
UNIX machine. In a single command, 
you can get a list of all user names 
from the file "/etc/passwd," extract the 
first names, sort them, count adjacent 
identical names, sort the resulting num- 
bers, and then find the largest: 

Command: cut -d: -f5 

/etc/passwd \ 

cut -d' ' -fl \ 

| sort \ 

| ur.iq -c \ 

| sort -nr \ 

| head -1 

Response: 12 John 

(The backslashes X mean "continued 
on the next line"; I used them to 
emphasize the different components of 
the command.) The command proba- 
bly looks cryptic to you now, but this 
kind of operation quickly becomes sec- 
ond-nature as you use UNIX. Because 
ail of the above programs (cut, sort, 
uniq, head) come standard with UNIX, 
you can expect the command to work 
on almost anybody's UNIX machine. 

How does one become a UNIX 
power user? Mainly by exploring the 
system directories and becoming famil- 
iar with many programs. In my experi- 
ence, if you spend time learning a new 
UNIX utility, you gain the time back 
(and more) in your first week of use. 

Program Development 

The most popular UNIX programming 
language is C. In fact, UNIX itself is 
written almost entirely in C. (Some 



assembly required.) Many people con- 
sider UNIX to be one of the most versa- 
tile and productive programming envi- 
ronments available, for several rea- 
sons. First, it has many programmer's 
tools. Second, it does not allow individ- 
ual programs to crash the machine. 
Third, the source code for many UNIX 
utilities is generally available. 

All commercial Amiga C compilers 
come with a utility called make which 
helps the programmer keep track of 
large programs. Would you like to 
guess where make originated? It was 
written for UNIX by Stu Feldman of Bell 
Laboratories. UNIX provides a veritable 
arsenal of programmers tools. There's 
lex and yacc to help you write compli- 
cated input routines, sees and res for 
maintaining multiple versions of pro- 
grams, tintto spot-check your C code 
for common errors, ctags for jumping 
quickly between functions in your text 
editor, ctrace for tracing program exe- 
cution, pro/ for identifying the slowest 
parts of your code, various debuggers, 
and much more. Combine these tools 
with a powerful shell and a multitasking 
operating system, and you have one 
serious programming environment. 
(Some of these tools have been ported 
to the Amiga and are available on Fish 
Disks.) 

Virtually Speaking. . . 

UNIX has three important features for 
programmers that AmigaDOS does not: 
memory protection, virtual memory, and 
resource tracking. These features come 
at a price, however: UNIX has much 
more overhead than does the Amiga 
kernel, and therefore runs more slowly. 

Memory protection prevents one pro- 
gram from affecting the memory owned 
by another program. On the Amiga, this 
is not true: programs are free to scrib- 
ble all over each other's memory. This 
is why individual programs are capable 
of crashing the computer (the famous 
guru meditation). When a UNIX pro- 
gram crashes, it doesn't bring down the 
whole machine; instead, UNIX takes a 
'photograph' of the program's memory, 
stores it in a file, and then terminates 
the program. This file, called a 'core 
dump,' may now be examined with a 



54 .infO NOVEMBER 1991 










technical support 




debugger to determine the cause of the 
crash. 

Virtual memory allows a program to 
access more RAM (Random-Access 
Memory) than actually exists on the 
machine. This is done by causing a 
section of your hard disk to act as if it 
were RAM. The operating system 
moves running programs between the 
hard disk and true RAM as needed. 

Resource tracking means that the 
programmer doesn't have to free all the 
resources that he allocates. When a 
program exits, all of its allocated 
memory, files, devices, and so on, are 
deallocated automatically. This means 
that the operating system can kill a run- 
ning program and be sure that every- 
thing gets cleaned up properly. On the 
Amiga, this is not the case: programs 
are required to keep track of their own 
allocated resources and explicitly de- 
allocate them. There is no completely 
reliable way to make the operating sys- 
tem kill a running program, although 
some clever programs such as xoper 
make a good attempt. 

According to rumors floating around 
the Amiga community, the Amiga oper- 
ating system may one day incorporate 
memory protection, virtual memory, 
and/or resource tracking. However, the 
addition of some of these features 
would cause serious incompatibility 
with many existing programs, and some 
people do not want to sacrifice the CPU 




Color 

XWindows 

running 

under UNLX 

VSr4. 



cycles that these features will require. 
Let's hope that Commodore comes up 
with a solution that makes most users 
and developers happy. 

Systems Programming 

Like AmigaDOS, UNIX provides pro- 
grammers with hundreds of system 
functions and structures for manipulat- 
ing UNIX-specific information. For 
example, if you want to learn the user- 
name of the owner of a file, you can call 
statQ to find the user ID number of the 
owner, pass that value to getpwuidf) to 
look up the user's name, and then print 
the answer. (See listing.) 



/* Given a filename as argv[l], print the name of the owner 


. */ 


#include <stdio.h> 




#include <sys/types.h> 




#include <sys/stat.h> 




#include <pwd . h> 




roain(int argc, char *argv[]) 
< 

struct stat info; /* A buffer for file information. 




*/ 


struct passwd *pw; /* Pointer to to user information. 


*/ 


if (argc != 2) 




fprintf (stderr, "Osage: %s filename", argv[0]); 




else if (stat (argv[l] , Sinfo) < 0) 




fprintf (stderr, "File %s does not exist.", argv[l]>; 




else if ( (pw = getpwuid(info. st_uid) ) = NULL) 




fprintf (stderr, "I can't find the owner's name!"); 




else 




printf("The owner of file %s is named %s.", 





A major programming advantage of 
UNIX is that the operating system itself 
may be modified conveniently: some or 
all of its source code comes supplied 
with the UNIX distribution. Recompiling 
the kernel (the low-level part of UNIX) 
requires just a few commands. The 
catch is that the kernel source code 
itself can be difficult to understand. 

Systems Administration 

Remember when you first started 
using an Amiga? Although you could do 
some fun things right away, it probably 
took you a while to set up the Amiga 
just the way you like it: modifying the 
Startup-Sequence and the MountList 
files, setting up your printer with Prefer- 
ences, changing the screen cofors and 
fonts, installing commercial and public 
domain software packages, organizing 
files on the hard drive, making a search 
path, and so on. A similar process must 
be done on almost any other computer 
before you feel completely comfortable 
using it. 

Under UNIX, this process of 'systems 
administration' is much more complex 
than under the Amiga operating sys- 
tem, for several reasons. First of all, 
there is no consistent method for tailor- 
ing a UNIX machine. For example, 
printer setup is done totally differently 
from network management or electronic 
mail configuration. There's no equiva- 
lent of Preferences on UNIX. (Some 
companies have tried to make such 
programs, like IBM's smit program for 
AIX UNIX, but these have, interestingly 
enough, been accused of being 



.info NOVEMBER 1991 55 



Public Domain Library 



Guarantee 

We believe so strongly in our product that we offer a full lifetime, 
complete satisfaction guarantee. No questions asked. 



We have been the official Public Domain Library of all of the best Amiga magazines. Find out why 
these magazines choose us! Each of our disks are jam packed with only the best programs. The first 
two letters on each disk indicate the orientation of the disk; DD# intermediate to advanced - often 
contains source, WB# general interest - most programs can be run from ihe workbench, and FD# 
games and entertainment. Order our disk based catalog and receive a coupon for a complimentary 
volume with your next purchase. We have always used only SONY blank disks! 



FD39a & b: Star Trek, The New Generation - 

This is a, completed different version of Star Trek 
than that found on FD12. This one was created by 
the German author Tobias. Now with English 
instructions. Very Excellent!!! Counts as two disks. 

New Disks 

FD66: GameTease2 - Contains playable demos of ChuckRock 

and Torvak 

FD65; GameTeasel • Contains playable demos of Atomino 

and Turrican II 

FD64: Games - Wizzy's Quest • a 'great' 50 level game with 

great graphics. Cubus • a 3-dimensional Tetris type game 

(rotate and move in 3 dimensions). Husker Du - Colors and 

pattern rather than shape in this Tetris-esque game; 5 screens 

and 3 levels of difficulty. Requires Fat Agnus ( 1 Meg of Chip) 

FOGS: Quizzsho'; an interactive multimedia quiz game snow 

program that tests your knowledge of Dpaintlll. The questions 

can be changed so you may quiz on whatever topic you'd like. 

FD62: PomPom Gunner. An extremely smooth and well done 

World War II gunner simulation. Requires 1 meg chip memory. 

FD61 : Games Solitaire; great graphics, plays two versions. 

Klide; an interesting piece of eye candy. Extreme Violence: 2 

player kill or bekilled game. YATC; A Tetris clone with Anitical 

Intelligence. Genesis; cmate realistic 3d fractal worlds. 

FD60: Games In Nebula, race over a 3d world lo destroy 

enemy installations. Interferon; a great Dr. Mario clone. 

Enigma; is it a gameor a puzzle? 

WB97: Molecule3D ■ An Interactive 3d solid modeling program 

for molecules; creates stunning 3D pictures of molecules. Disk 

also includes a mailing list manager. 

WB96: Dupers - Contains Xcopylll 4 Nib which will backup 

copy-protected programs. FreeCopy removes copy protection 

from several programs, and SuperDuper will crank-out fast 

AmigaDOS copies. 

WS95: Checkbook Accountant 2.0 This program is delinitBly 

commercial grade; we've seen many checkbook programs and 

this is absolutely Ihe best. Full budgeting, transaction recording 

and report generation. 

WB93: Workbench Extras #2 This disk contains the utilities 

that Commodore should have shipped with the Amiga; 

VirusX4.0, Snap. FixDisk (recover corrupt/deleted files), Disk 

Optimizer (floppy S hard), Machlll (screen blanker, hotkey. 

mouse accel.. macro, clock utility). GOMF (a gurubusterjand 

PrintStudio. 

DD80: VFont System ■ A font rendering system that extends 

Ihe Amiga so that it will be able to use vectorized outline fonts. 

Fast rendering, rotating, and sizing. Use in your own programs! 

Other Great Disks! 
FD5: Tactical Games - BullRun - a Civil war battle game, 
Metro you play the role ol a city planner. Build wisely and your 
system will be a success, but poor planning will lead lo disaster 
and financial ruin. Very very habit forming, 
FD6: GAMES! - This disk is chock full of games including; 
Checkers. Clue. Gold - A new slide the pieces puzzle, Jeopard ■ 
An enhanced version of Risk, RushHour ■ Surprisingly 
addicting, and SpaceWar - Best described as a cross between 
Combat-Tanks and asteroids. 

FD7: PACMAN - This disk contains several pacman type 
games including: PacManS?, MazMan and Zonix. 
FD9: Moria -. This has great graphic controls, multiple spells, 
similar to Lam and Hack. Play lime several weeks! 
FD10: HackLile ■ Adungeon adventure game. Considered a 
must-have classic This is the second release of this game on 
the Amiga. Great graphic interlace. Play time several weeks! 
FD11: Las Vegas and Card Games ■ Las Vegas Craps - The 
best Las Vegas Craps simulation every written for any 
computer. Contains extensive HELP features, Also Thirty- 
One. VirJeoPoker and more. 

FD12A,FD12B: Star Trek, The Game - This is by lar the best 
Star Trek game ever written for any computer. !t features 
mouse control, good graphics, digitized sound effects and great 
gameplay. Counts as 2 disks. Req, 1Mb and two drives (or hd), 
FD13: Board Games - contains multiplayer Monopoly. 
Dominoes, Paranoids, and others. 

FD14; Dungeon Master Hints and Arcade Games - DM 
maps, spells, item location, and hints and more, also on this 
disk, Hball - an arkanoid/breakout type game, Trix - a Qix type 
clone. 

FD17: Educational Games - This disk includes several games 
lor the younger members including geography, math, science, 
and word games, also includes Wheel of FortunB. 
FO20: Tactical Games - MechForce(3.72); A game that 
simulates combat between two or more giant, robot-like 
machines. Simple words can't begin to give you the feel of 
piloting a 30 - 40 fool tall, fire breathing, earth shaking colossus 
that obeys your every whim. 

FD26 : Arcade Games - Marbleslide, this is a truly commercial 
quality game. Similar to a Lucas game named PipeDreams. 



excellent payability and entertainment. Mutants . a small 

version ol Ihe arcade game of the same name, also 

SuperBreakout a pong/arkanaids type game. 

FD27: Arcade Games - This disk is loaded with some great 

games. Includes, Raceorama a great racing car game with ten 

different courses, MiniBlast a helicopter gunship type clone. 

Shark in the same class as Iroger. and SBreakout the original 

breakout with more. 

FD29: Shoot'em up's - WWII - you're the pilot ot a WWII plane 

Hying through enemy territory, you've just been spotted, good 

luck on you mission. SpKiller - try and penetrate enemy lines 

with Ihis game, and Retalrator - another great game. 

FD31 : Games! - Air Trallic Control - a good ATC simulation 

game, Black Jack Lab - a full featured set of card games, 

ChessTel - play chess with your friend in distant and remote 

places with this game and a modem, labyrnth ■ a well done text 

adventure game (like an infocom game), and MouseTrap - a 3d 

maze game. 

FD32:Fllght Simulator ■ Includes an instrument High! simulator 

for aOClO. 

FD33: Arcade Games - Flreddy a mario brothers type of 

game. Gerbils a target practice game, PipeLme a German 

interpretation of Pipe Dreams. Tron a light cycles version, and 

wetroids a wonderful version of asteroids with a hilarious twist. 

FD35 Omega (v 1.3) - A new outstanding dungeon and 

outdoors adventure game in a similar vein as hack, rouge, and 



the Amiga. Handshake (2.12a) Handshake is a Full featured 

VT52/1 00/1 02/220 

WB5 - Fonts #1- Several fonts (35) tor the Amiga, also 

included are five PageSlream fonts.and ShowFonl - a font 

display program. 

WB6: video Fonts #2 - ShowFont(4,0) This program allows 

you to quickly and painlessly view all 256 characters in a 

typical font. Large AmigaOos system lonts (many up to 

septs) 

WB7: Clip Art ■ This disk is loaded with black and white clip 
art. An includes, trees. watchBS, tools, US and State maps, 
and more. 

WB9:lcons - Truly a multitude at various types and kinds. 
Also includes IconMiester. IconLab. and others great utilities 
to help generate icons. 

WB10:Virus Killers - The latest and best VirusX(4.0). 
Kv(21).and ZeroVirus(1.3). 

WB11 : Business - Clerk(4.Q), finally a lull featured business 
accounting PD program tor the small to medium company. 
Includes receivables, payables, end of month and uch more. 
WB12: Disk Utilities - This great disk is loaded with 
wonderful utilities lor everything inducing making disk labels 
disk cataloging, disk optimizing, disk and tile recovery archive 
and organizing, and all sorts of file manipulation. A must have 1 
WB13: Printer Drivers and Generator - over 70 different 
drivers, and if these don't do it, with PrtDrvGen you can make 
your own. 



WB14: Video- on this disk are several utilities lor the video 
enthusiast. We have included multiple slates, video titling. 
Bars and Tone, Gray Scale. Screen lades and swipes. 
Interlace toggles, and SMPTE Calculators .Also on this disk is 
a lull leatured video cataloging program. 



WB15: Business - This disk contains a spreadsheet, a 

database, a project/time management program and linancial 

analysis (stocks). 

WB16: Business - This disk contains an inventory manager. 

a loan analysis program, a great calendar/scheduler, a 

rolodex program, and pennywise a good "Cash Book" 

accounting for home or office. 

WB18: Word'TeH Processors ■ This disk contains the best 

editors, Includes.TextPlus (v2 2e) a lull featured word 

processor, Dme(v1.3S) a great programmers editor with 

strong macro leatures,TexED(v2.8) an enhanced Emacs type 

editor, and a spell checker. 

WB20 General Interest - DiskSalv V1 .42 a disk recovery 




$5.95 ea 

1-9 Disks 



$4.95* ea 

10-24Disks 



$3.95* ea 

25+ Disks 



moria. This version is considerably faster and better that all 
previous versions. Play lime several weeks or months. 
FD37a & b:Tactlcal Games Empire (2.2w) This great game 
comes highly recommended. With a full-graphic front end. 
FD33:Gemes ■ Cribbage Master - A great cribbage game and 
tutor. Spades - a well done card came, ChineseCheckers - A 
computer version ot this classic, Puzz - a slide piece puzzle 
game and construction set. 

FD44: Game - Mechfight is an out of this world role-playing 
adventure comparable to hack and moria. The setting, 
interplanetary colonies and space stations. In your quest to 
explore the world, take time out to liberate bad guys of their 
most valuable possessions, engage in a mortal combat or two 
against robots and alien life lorms. pick up a new amiga 9000 
Most ol all. don't forget to stay alive... 
F049:Chaos Cheats - This disk contains an everything you 
wanted to know about cheat set tor Chaos Strikes Back, 
including lull maps, spells, objecl locations, super characters 
and more. 

FD50: Submarine Game - Sealance, one and a half years in 
the making, this is an outstanding submarine tactical game. 
Commercial quality, highly recommended, 
FD52: Classics Games - PetersQuest a well done Mario 
brothers type of game. Jymoc a two player missile command 
clone, and Vstank a tank commander game. 
F053: Great Arcade - On this disk is a wonderful 
implementation ot the ever popular classic arcade game 
Defender. Also contain Air Race a WWII flying ace arcade 
game, and Psycoblast new creation idea game. 
FD56: Arcade - includes SpaceWar, HueyRaid a well done 
helicopter arcade game, and PowerPong a great expanded 
pong game. 

FD57: Arcade Games includes 2 true commercial quality 
games. MegaBall is the successor to Ball; features 5 full 
musical scores, multiple levels and addicting gameplay. 
Gravity Attack is a psychadellic trip through several different 
worlds-each distinctly diflerent. 

FD58: GAMES! Includes Steinschlag; a great Tetris clone 
from Germany with music. SCombat: simulate battle between 
up to 40 players 8. monstBrs Imperium Romanum: Battle up 
to 4 players for control of the Mediterranean in this Risk- 
esque game. 

FD59: Game Potpourri Xenon III is an almost exact clone of 
the commercial game ol the same name.. .a great shootemup- 
Crossword will take lists of words & automatically generate 
crossword puzzles for any Epson compalable printer. 
WB4:Teleeommumnleaiion - This disk contains several 
excellent pd communication programs designed to get you on 
line quickly and easily, Access (1 .42) - A very nice ANSI term 
program based an Comm vl.34. but with the addition ol 
transfer protocols. Comm ( 1 .34) - Last version of one of the 
best public domain communications programs ever made on 



* Anli-Virus Free on all orders with 
15 or more disks! 

program for all Amiga file systems, FixDisk V1 another file 
recovery program with features DiskSalv doesn't have, 
3DLookl gives a 3D appearance to your WorkBench, Clean 
VI. 01 a program to de-fragment memory. Tracer - trace any 
part of an image. 

WB22: Fonts #3 ■ Several more great lonts. These, like the 
other tonl disks work great with Opaint and WYSIWYG word 
processors. 

WB23: Graphics and Plotting - Plot (20b) a three 
dimensional mathematical function plotter. Can plot any user 
defined function, BezSurf2 - produce awesome pictures of 
Objects one could turn on a lathe. Can aso map iff image files 
onto any surface that it can draw. Now compatible with most 
3D packages, and VScreen - makes a virtual screen 
anywhere, great lor DTP . 

WB25:Edu'cational - On this disk are two programs that can 
generate maps of differing types, Worlc Data Base uses the 
CIA's data base to generate detailed maps of any entered 
user global coordinates. Also Paradox a great demonstration 
of Albert Einstein General Theory ol Relativity, 
WB26: Disk Utilities #2 ■ MrBackup, KwickBackup ■ two well 
done utilities to help with harddisk and floppy disk backups. 
FileMast - a binary file editor, Labelprinter ■ Disk label printer 
with very powerful features. 

WB27: Magel - 26 Patrick Nagel pictures ot beautilu! women 
WB29: Graphics and Sound - This disk has several different 
Mandelbrot type programs for generating stunning graphics. 
Includes. MandelMountains - a realistic terrain generator. 
Fracgen - generated recursive fractals from user input. 
Mandelbrot and Tmandel - two fast mandelbrot generators, 
also Mostra - the best IFF display program to date, will 
display ALL IFF's including Dynamic HAM, and Sound - a 
great IFF sound player, will play anything Try this disk! 
WB33:Clrcuit Board Design - several terrific routines for the 
electronic enthusiast, Including PCBtool - a circuit board 
design tool, LogicLab - circuit logic tester, and Mead (1.26) a 
well done new release of this PD CAD program, now comes 
with predrawn common circuit components for insertion into 
schematics. 

WB34: Utilities - Several well done utilities, some will require 
moderate knowledge of a CLI or Shell for setup. Chatter Box - 
ths one wili play any user defined sound after any event (ie. 
disk insert, mouse click, disk removal...), . Artm - The Amiga 
real time monitor, gives you lull control of the Amiga OS. very 
powerful program, Helper - help program lo make learning the 
CLI easier, and more! 

WB35: 3d Graphics - This disk contains several neat 
programs lo use with your 3d modeling/raytracing programs 
SdFonts - Full vector font set for use with 3d programs, 
FontMaker - make 3d fonts from any system font, 
Make3DShape - create 3d shapes from any image, 
DumptolFF - create 3d animations preserves pallet, and 



i"/Ri" ■■ "rf ,-, i - . in ij^j display midi inlo, file sequence player, and a lew scores 

ffiidfcS5SfokSRjS rW3d ' a de ™ p,09ram 0( a w &3:Di s k Utilities #3 - Several highly recommended 

wK»X S,S^ ! , programs to aid in removing duplicate Tiles from your hard 

«t, nLSS 2" ^ ^ ^ several programs lo create drive, performing file backups, Binary ediling, fast formatting, 

S^i=?J 9 ^ ap Ca i lma9es ,nci " d,n B. MPalh - creates swtrling file recovery, disk track recovery, and forced DISK 

galaxy images, Roses - produce an unlimited number of VALIDATION of corrupt disks 

Stan™ 32 'V 9 ?* lhat a 5 V mm ,eirically similar to a rose, WB66:lcons #2- Lot's of neat icons. Also, several wonderful 

^thln^ = P y ' os 5 n pe c?^ lar ima9es as part af 1° w P ro 9 r a™ l^ai 10 let you create your own icons, modify and 

workbenck scr B en, and RayShade - a very good raytracing manipulate icons and info structures, 

£ rO ?5Si^ ea riS ! ' 0u '.,° wn , be ?. uti,ul3d 9 ra P hlcmodel5wilhtni5 WB6U:Music Utilities several good utilities lor Ihe Amioa 

PhS JSS?« f h ducatlona J ' Educational games and puzzles music enthusiast. IncludBS. Noisetracker - a great musrc 

WB3B P o^nnS?r? a hy -h pe ' l,n Si 3nd b0 °^ A96S 6 ' 1 5 crealion P r °9' am ' SoniKSMOD - converts sonix to mod files 

h^ii t«if,™JI nS,? Gra P hlcs :, p,0 }y IS lhe ™ s l Powerful which then can be used by noisetracker. soundtraker, and 

full leatured plotting package. Used by many colleges and MED. SpeakerSim ■ a speaker desmn tool demo 

^Sr^St A " elcone ad J d ' , , Ion to our library! Highly Wondersound is an additive harmonic instrument design tool 

recommended. Plans - a incredibly weN done Computer Aided with a separate envelope design window and 16 relative 

Dralting program, very full featured. Tesselator ■ a program harmonic strength and phase anqTe controls 

hat helps generates fantastic looking, recursive M.C. Ecsher WBS9: Music - This disk has over 90 minutes of classical and 

woirir ilf.tl- , . „ modern electronic music for you Amiga. 

WB39 Music- Intuiiracker is a German offering of an WB70: Desk Top Pud -Alcp ■ transfer Macintosh screen fonts 

v^.rlmL S ,h°rn P rL° Sram hal a "? w , s you '° ^ ™ sicon Mac or IBM lor ™' AFM melrlc ,ilss . «■ A™9a screen fonts 
pur Amiga with CD like controls. Lets you strip out music and PPage metric files. With this program open door to the 
from your favorite games or others and include them in your libraries of Adobe and PostScript type" Calendar ■ month 

Wfun Ei, rn „„ „ Hie- » , , ■ tem P laIes in p S form. Post • a full leatured post script lite 

WB4u. Music - CD on a disk', 90 minutes of modern music display and print ut litv 

onjhis well presented collection. WB71:C64 Emulation • The A64 Package is a complete, very 



WB41: Music ■ MED an incredibly well done, full featured powerfuVcom'midoreW emulator 

ZTJ r °t 'f a 'f V c Ur °ht st " nnln 9 ™ sic c«raclly on your VVB75: Music - over 100 instruments files (.inst) and sample 
lhe Amiga. Similar to SoundTracker but better. Very powerful sound files (.ss) lor your music programs 
WR^°RH«i P ^° 9 ' a, V h l ■ . , ,„ WB76: *PP'ications - This disk comains Slichery . a often 

WB«.Buslness This disk contains AnalytiCalc - probably requested knitting design program. Lotto ■ a rather complete 
he most powerful spreadsheet program on the Amiga. A full lottery tracking and prediction utility. SSS ■ this screen capture 
leatured spreadsheet with many lea lures expected in a program can grab almost any screen including games, Today - 
commercial package. Requires 1 .2 MB of memory! a personal calender. Tarot - fortune teller, and Grammar . 

WB46,clip Art - HighRes clip art with lhe following motifs • grammar checker 

embellishments (borders, dodads ,...), people, and WB78: AV - On this disk are two Amiga Vision programs 
w£!£ rii'i? *,. u-kh , . u , „ (bubbler, sync) written by Lou Wallace, chief technical editor ot 

WB4B. ctrp Art ■ HighRes clip art with the following motifs • Amiga World. These programs are marvelous examples of 
Holidays, music, medical, and misc. how too s with AV 

WB49abc;Animatieri Sampler . On this three disk sampler WB79: Home & Business Accounting - Includes Ckbacct ■ 
set (counts as two disks) are some of the best animations lhat the most complete checkbook accounting program going. 

LCDCalc - this well done calculator has a very large display 
and operates Irom the keyboard or mouse. Mileage master - 
monitor your automobile mileage with this mileage log. 
Grammar • a grammar checker, and Worldtime • lind out what 
time it is in up to 50 global cities. 

WBB1 : Great Applications - DataEasy a very easy to use. 
database program. Don't let the ease of use fool you. this is a 
very lull featured database program including full printer 
control for address labels and mail merge applications. Also 
includes, TypeTut a good typing tutor, RLC a full leatured label 
printer. Banner, a multi-font banner maker, and Budget a home 
accounting in a program. Highly recommended. 
WB82:Animatlons - Four full length, well done "movie" style 
animations. Including. Coyote. Jugglerll, GhostPool, and 
Mechanix. Two disk set, counts as one! 
WB83: Computer Art - this disk has some of the best Amiga 
generated computer art that we have collected in the past 5 
years. 

WB85: Graphics - Contains several programs lor 
manipulating 24 Bil color images (ham-e) and a rather nice Iff 
Image processing package. 

WB86; Amiga Vision - Confains Ihe Centurion Press. An 
Amiga newspaper by Lou Wallace. 

WBSSabc: The Complete Bible - A three disk set. with the 
entire text of the New Testament and Old Testament. Great 
search utilities. 

WB90: Rippers, Strippers and Beats - For the Amiga music 
enthusiast, this disk contains many programs designed strip 
music from your favorite games and programs. Music can then 
be played with your favorite Pd Music program. Also contains 
Drums, a very nice drum machine. This disk can require 
moderale knowledge ot the CLI. 

DD45: AREXX PROGRAMS - This disk contains several 
useful arexx programs and examples. PopCLW - The latest ol 
a must have utility. 

DD47: Pascal - This disk contains everything needed to 
program in Pascal. Includes, A68k (1.2) 6B000 assembler. 
Blink linking software and PCQ (1.0) a modes! Pascal sub-set 
compiler. 

DD49: C Compiler - contains zc(l.01) fully KAR, zcc(l.O) 
Iront end. A68k(1.2) assembler, Blink linker. 
DD5Q: ARexx #2 - a must have set ot tutorials on ARexx and 
several useful examples and utilities for ARexx development. 



SONY 

Blank Disks 

DSDD 

10 for $ 8.90 (.89 cents ea) 

25 for $18.90 (.76 cents ea) 

50 for $34.90 (.70 cents ea) 

100 for $68.00 (.68 cents ea) 

No shipping cnaige on USA blank disk crdais, Canada 
and Mexico add 5. 1 5 each. Other foreign add S 50 ea. 



have been created over the lasl three years. Several 
examples of "Movie" type animations some with spectacular 
raytraced reality (coolroby. watch, spigot and egg). Also 
several european style or "Demo' animation with incredible 
graphics and outstanding electronic music (akrilight, 
copersine. doc, dps201Q, impact, and logodemo). These truly 
show off the creative edge of an Amiga! 
WB50: Animation - Seven of the best european style 
animations or "Demos", including ■ scientific 451. subway (a 
U.S. entrant, also our favorite), sunnde. thrstdemo, might, 
waves, and woow. 

WB53:Graphics - Raytracing programs generate absolutely 
stunning realistic looking planes, rockets, buildings..., and 
surreal images often consisting of highly polished spheres and 
objects. C-Light is the most powerful EASY-TO-USE of it's 
kind we have seen to date. This is easily belter, and more full 
featured, than similar commercial programs costing in the 
hundreds ol dollars. Also, sMovie - a full featured video text 
tiller similar to ProVideo. Broadcast Tiller, Great video 
scrolling, wipes, special effects, and more... 
WB54:Prlnting - This disk contains several routines to help 
with the chore of printing, includes Gothic - Finally a Banner 
printer lor the PD! PrintStudio a well implemented all-purpose 
printer-utility with a very comfortable graphic interface and 
many advanced features, Lila - with ease, print ASCII files to a 
PostScript printer, and many more. 

WB55:Application - XCopylll - a full featured disk copier, 
make backups ot write protected disks, Road Route - find the 
quickest route from one city to another, highway description 
included. Diary - a diary program like "Dougy Howard M.D*. 
Cal - a calendar program, Maqman - a database tailored to 
maintain records on articles and publications. 
WB57:Anlmatlon • This disk has several "Demo" style 
animations. Including. Blitter. Lolly. Sun5, vertigo, vortex, and 
xenmorph. 

WB59:Business - contains a great, very full featured stock 
market technical analysis and tracking program, also an 
appointment calendar, and more. 

WB61 .Intermediate Utilities ■ Includes programs to help to 
drasticaly decrease flicker in interlace and hi-res modes 
(antiflick). an Atari-st emulator, an eprom programmer, turn 
your amiga into an eight channel digital data analyzer or 
ocilloscope. and more. 

WBG2:Midi Utilities - Several useful midi utilities including, 
programs to transfer to and from several music programs to 
midi. a midi sysex handler, a midi recorder with timebase, 




Anti-Virus 
Now Only $19.95 

•friStii* , INFO Sep 89 
•••• , Amiga Resource Oct89 

Anti-Virusfcl is not Public Domain 



r" 



Please send me the following: 

Enter disk id (Ex. DD17, FD5, WB3) 



DD51 : Circuit Analysis ■ Aspice (2 .3 ) A full lealured program 

for electric circuit analysis. 

DD52: Scientific • Includes Elements - an incredibly well 

done periodic table program with source, Scientific plotting - 

over 600k ol Lattice C source routines that can be included in 

your own programs. 

DD54: Compression This disk is loaded with ALL of the best 

file compression programs and aids for the Amiga. Many of the 

programs can be used by the new user. Includes Arc(2 3) 

Lharc(I.O), Lhwarp(1.03). Pkax(I.O), PowerPacker(2.3a) a 

must have by all, Zip(t.O), Warp(2.04). and Zoo(2.0). Also 

IFFcruncn an excellent compression for IFF files. 

DD55: ARP ■ On this disk you will lind Ihe complete ArpHel3.0 

release including lhe lull user docs, the full Developers guide 

ARP is the official AmigaDOS Resource Project (ARP) release 

1.3. ARP makes many improvements to AmigaDOS and 

makes your system easier to use from the CLI. 

DD57: Advanced Utilities - Msh - like Cross etos. copies files 

to and from MS-DOS. Pal-NTSC - convert any pal program to 

NTSC and vice versa. Also several utilities lhat improve your 

startup-sequence, plus 25 more programs. 

DD62: Basic and Xscheme - Cursor - a full featured Amiga 

Basic compiler, sbasic and ftext - several wonderful routines to 

help in basic programers, and Xscheme - an interpreted object 

oriented language. 

DD64 Amiga Programmers Manual - The fully 

comprehensive Amiga programming manual with source code 

examples and easy to understand tutorials! 

DD65 C Tutorials - Several well done tutorials on how to 

program the Amiga. Includes tutorials and working examples 

on Device drivers, IFF reads and writes. Sound 

implementation. Arcade game design and implementation. 

Double Buttering, and others. A must have lor Amiga 

Programmers. 

DD66 Programming ToolBox - Many programs lo help in 

your development efforts (most lor C some for basic) Includes 

programs to generate requesters, an incredible spritemaker 

toolbox, to greatly aid compiling, convert DPaint brushes to C 

structures, a great library manager, and many more wonderful 

time savers! 

DDG9:Advanced Utilities - SerNel and ParNet - Connect two 

Amiga's and share resources, MemMonitor - Similar to WFrag 

but greatly improved, Selector - put menus on your workbench 

screen, and more. 

DD71:C compiler - This disk contains Dice, Matthew Dillon's 

full featured, powerful C compiter and environment system. 

DD72:VT Emulators - Contains three powerful, full leatured vt 

emulators, with many advanced features including kermit, 

xmodem and tektronix protocols, VaxTerm, VLT and more 

DD77: Fortran - Contains a full featured FORTRAN77 

environmental development system. Also contains EzAsm a 

strongly macro dependent 68000 assembler. 

DD70: Menus & System Enhancements - Several neat 

programs lo aid in launching programs from special icons 

(Next computer style), adding WorkBench menus and more. 

Also contains many useful programs to determine operation 

system configuration, memory usage, load and many other 

mportant utilizations. 

DD79abcd: Amhga C Tutorial - This is the most 

comprehensive C language. Amiga orientated set of tutorials 

available, includes full working examples, source code and an 

incredible set of lessons. Included are full discussions and 

examples of every topic on Amiga programming. Four disk 

set. counts as three. 



IS 

Total disks 



$ each $_ 

Disked based catalog (add $2.50) $_ 
Anti-Virus {add $19.95) $_ 

Sony Blank Disks# $_ 

CA residents add 8.25% sales tax $ 
Foreign Shipping $_ 



Payment Enclosed 

Please charge my 

Visa 

Master charge 



Handling $2.00 
Total Due $ 



Account#_ 
Signature_ 

Name 

Address_ 
City_ 



_Exp_ 



_ST Zip_ 



Following day shipping in most 
cases. No shipping charges within 
USA. Canada add $.25 each. 
Foreign add S.50 per disk for air 
mail delivery. Payment in US 
funds. A minimum of S20.0Q 
required on credit card orders. 



Phone ( ) 

DevWare, 12528 Kirkham Court, Suite 11 -IN1 1 , Poway, CA 92064 
Orders Only Please! 800 879-0759 Support 619 679-2825 Fax 619 679-2887 



Circle #140 on the Reader Service Card 



■SSBS55S 







technical support 



'un-UNIX-like' by members of the UNIX 
community.) 

What is the reason for this inconsis- 
tency? Realize that UNIX was written 
by hundreds of different people over a 
20-year period. Although many of the 
individual programs were carefully 
crafted in advance, the overall frame- 
work was not. UNIX was originally writ- 
ten by programmers and for program- 
mers. 

Another reason that UNIX adminis- 
tration is more difficult than the Amiga's 
is that there simply are more things to 
administrate! You have multiple printers 
being used by many machines simulta- 
neously, network connection and data 
routing, electronic mail, automatic 
lookup of other computer addresses 
('name service'), adding and removing 
users, automatic startup of programs at 
regular intervals, system accounting 
and usage statistics, security tools, and 
more. And don't forget that these ser- 
vices may be used by many users at 
once, adding to the complication. 

Don't let this difficulty discourage you 
from using UNIX! If you are a rea- 
sonably intelligent person with pro- 
gramming experience who likes to learn 
about computers, then UNIX systems 
administration is within your abilities. If 
you encounter problems that you do 
not know how to solve, don't panic. 
UNIX has been around long enough 
that many problems have already been 
solved by someone else. If you have 
access to USENET or other electronic 
news services, you will find thousands 
of people willing to help you. 

Do I Need UNIX? 

Serious programmers should defi- 
nitely check out UNIX. With its large 
selection of languages, tools, and 
shells, UNIX can be a great develop- 
ment environment. Amiga power users 
may also find UNIX to be useful and 
fun, especially if they like to explore 
and tailor the computer environment to 
its fullest. 

Suggested Reading 

Assuming that you already know C, 
here are some good UNIX program- 
ming books. Using C On The UNIX 
System by David A. Curry (O'Reilly & 
Associates, Inc., 1989) is an excellent 



HftlH MENU 
Value selected: SOOT 

Display vol we statistics. 

Go to Vol une Reorganization Menu. 

Restore deleted/lost files and drawers. 

Go to Volune Repair ttenu. 

Foriat vol we. 

Unfomat wlwe. 

Select a different wlwe. 



guide containing many example pro- 
grams. This book is one in a series of 
'Nutshell Handbooks' that are enjoyed 
and recommended by many UNIX pro- 
grammers. After this introduction, check 
out Advanced UNIX Programming by 
Marc J. Rochkind (Prentice-Hall, 1985) 
for more in-depth information. Low-level 
operating system information may be 
found in The Design Of The UNIX 
Operating System by Maurice Bach 
(Prentice-Hall, 1986). To learn more 
about systems administration, see 
UNIX System Administration by David 
Fiedler and Bruce Hunter (Hayden 
Book Company, 1986). ■ 



About the Author 

Daniel Barrett is a long-time 
Amiga user and UNIX systems 
administrator. 

His Internet EMail address is: 
barrett@cs.umass.edu 



Quarterback Tools 

by David Martin 

If you were to ask my brother 
Andrew about Ihe kind ol soft- 
ware that I buy he'd probably 
respond with a sour face and spit out 
the word "Utilities!" I must confess that 
this is very true. Much to my brother's 
disappointment, I tend to purchase utili- 
ties more than anything else. This 
doesn't mean that I'm not any fun - 1 do 



QuarterBack 

Tools 

main menu 

screen 



have some favorite games (i.e. Lem- 
mings, Pocoman), but I'm always look- 
ing for something to make my comput- 
ing life safer and easier. 

As a programmer, the protection of 
my data is very important to me. That's 
why I back up my hard disk on a regu- 
lar basis. But even though backing up 
software is important, there have been 
times when I needed more than just a 
good backup to save a file or program. 
That's where a product like Quarter- 
back Tools [QBT) comes in. Just hav- 
ing it around makes me feel a little bit 
safer. Imagine accidentally deleting the 
newest version of the source file for a 
program you're writing, or getting the 
dreaded "Read/Write Error" requester. 
What would you do? Panic? No, you 
would use QSTto save the day! 



■I 



Vroooom! 



One of OBTs major attractions is its 
ability to reorganize a disk so that data 
access is faster. This is done by rewrit- 
ing the files so that they are not frag- 
mented. Fragmented files have their 
data blocks spread all over a disk, but 
once they are reorganized they appear 
as one long list of contiguous blocks. 
This speeds up data access by reduc- 
ing head movement. 

Using OBTs reorganizer is easy. 
Firsl you select the type of reorganiza- 
tion you wish to perform: Workbench or 
CLI. The Workbench version optimizes 
access to icon files, while the CLI ver- 
sion treats all files equally. Before start- 
ing the reorganization, QBTsuggests 
that you back up the disk you wish to 



58 .info NOVEMBER 1991 






.info technical support 




reorganize, just in case there's a power 
failure or other disaster halfway 
through. 

The actual reorganization process 
begins after an integrity check of the 
disk, which is provided as a means of 
making sure the media being written to 
is valid. Failure to check the media can 
result in disaster during the reorganiza- 
tion. By doing this test, GSTcan lock 
out bad blocks and prevent them from 
being used. 

After the integrity check, OSfbegins 
reorganization. This process can take a 
considerable amount of time, depend- 
ing on the size of your disk. 

File Restoration 

OST also offers features that let you 
recover lost or deleted files and directo- 
ries. This "undeletion" feature saves 
your keister in those situations when 
you've misused a wildcard or accidently 
deleted that all-important source file 
you worked so hard to perfect. Unfortu- 
nately, recovery of deleted AmigaDOS 



Quarterback Tools V1 .3d 

***;*;+ 

$89.95 

Central Coast Software/ 

New Horizons 

206 Wild Basin Road, Suite 109 

Austin, TX 78746, 512-328-6650 



files under the Original File System is 
not 100% reliable due to the way Ami- 
gaDOS (V1 .2 and V1 .3) works. Some 
loss of data may occur, with one or 
more files being unrecoverable. Over- 
all. GSTworks well when undeleting, 
though it works better with FFS files. 

Disk Repair 

QBTcan also be used to repair dam- 
aged AmigaDOS disks. Using this util- 
ity, you can recover many lost and 
damaged files or directories that may 
be corrupted due to bad characters in a 
file name, illegal date/time stamps, 



bitmap errors, checksum errors, etc. 
You can even have QBT mark 
unreadable disk blocks as "out of ser- 
vice," preventing them from being used 
to store data later. 

The repair process is quite extensive, 
but not even QBTcan save every piece 
of data on a disk. Once again, 100% 
reliability cannot be expected because 
of the nature of the media. The manual 
fully explains the limitations of the pro- 
gram, but overall it does a fine job of 
repairing most problems that occur. 

Disk Formatting 

QBTs disk formatting feature lets 
you format disks in a safe manner, 
according to the manual. How is this 
accomplished? QBTdoes not actually 
format the disk - it only modifies the 
disk's root and bitmap blocks. After 
doing so, AmigaDOS now thinks the 
disk contains no data. (Actually it does 
contain one small file called 'QBT.FMT' 
which contains the old root and bitmap 
block information. Using the data in this 




MAVERICK for the AMIGA 

Five Years Of Experience On A Single Disk 

When wd started makrng Commodore backup oroducls we started making history 
Our Mavcnck Iof Ihe Commodore has become Ihe single mosl successful archival 
utility system ewer created lor the C64 02B eomputess We pioneered ^novations 
tfta! made Maverick ihe ONLY og«cal choice for the serious user 
Hisiory is repealing itself 

Our new Maverick for the Amiga is a ground breaking product' II t& unlike anything 
you've ever seen fof the Amiga before You use it withoul fumbling for pull-down 
menus or searching through overlapping windows The Maverick Amiga screen is a 
clean, modern control panel designed to allow you to intuitively operate the system 
as if it were a physical piece of hi-iech equipmeni 
Options abound. These include leaiures Me 

* Hypercooy High speed, effortless, ettor free data duplication 

+ Parameters Our own custom routines backed by 5 years of experience 

* OverRide A new tool that makes a program useable on a nard drive by 
COMPLETELY de protecting ft! 

* Inspector Our MFM track editor featuring whole lr*ck or data block modification 
capability macros far automation and best ol ail ■ Backup Buddy compatrnle' 

+ Backup Buddy support to allow easy reliable backups of some of the Ihoughest 
to duplicate lilies on ihe market 

* Over 100 new parameters keep you up to dale wiin today s sofiware releases 
There s more For a minimal tee registered Maverick owners can upgrade their 
system to the newest version, including new parameters every 90 days! Maverick 
Amiga was actually designed with Mure expansion capabilities built right in And 
experienced users can even create and store their own custom copiers accessible 
right from the mainconlro 1 panel, just as if they were buiil into Maverick from the factory' 
When you're ready to spend your hard earned money for an Amiga backup utility 
keep this In mind: There are lots ol copiers on tne market, but there's only one 
complete archival ulility system — Maverick 

MAVERICK AMIGA V3 

SQQ95 
ONLY 09 + »H 
Available from your local dealer or contact us directly: 




A MAN'S BEST FRIEND 

IS HIS DOG 

AN AMIGA'S 

BEST FRIEND IS THE 

'BACKUP BUDDY™' 

Ready to add another drive to your system? We've got some 
good news for you: tor nearly the same price as an ordinary 
drive, you can buy the brand new Maverick Amiga Backup 
Buddy drive' 

The Backup Buddy drive Isold ONLY to registered Maverick 
Amiga owners) is a superb Golden Image drive that weve 
worked our special magic on. Weve added our own custom 
engineered speed control circuitry to create a unique new tool 
Used alone, the Backup Buddy is as fast, reliable, and compat- 
ible as any other Amiga external disk drive. But. used with the 
Maverick Amiga, the Backup Buddy becomes the newest 
weapon tn the Archival Utility System arsenal, easily letting you 
backup titles that could NEVER be reliably duplicate before now 1 
The Backup Buddy is another demonstration of our commit- 
ment to the Maverick tradition Always be the best 

THE Backup Buddy' BISK BRIVE 

ONLY l*tiJ+s&H 
Available Only From Software Support International 
to registered Maverick Amiga owners. 



SOFTWARE SUPPORT INTERNATIONAL 

2700 N.E. ANDRESEN ROAD • SUITE A-10 ■ VANCOUVER, WASHINGTON 98661 

Write or call us for more information or our current 
catalog listing 1000's of items for your computer 



1-800-356-1179 



Circle #114 on the Reader Service Card 






info technical suppo 



EBHMtMrMBHKHKBHMHiM 



file, 067" can perform an 'unformat.') 

The whole idea here is that QBT 
never completely formats the disk. It 
performs a high-level formal similar to 
AmigaDOS's 'quick' format option. The 
lack of a low-level format bothers me, 
since without one a disk can continue 
to accumulate errors that would other- 
wise be taken care of. This does not 
mean that QBT does not support a full 
format: it does, but only when a disk is 
invalid. 

I personally do not think that it is wise 
to substitute QBTs format as a replace- 
ment for the AmigaDOS format com- 
mand. Instead, keep both at hand and 
ready-to-use as their purpose suits you. 
The special formatting methods used 
by OSTare the only features of the 
package that I will not be using myself. 

ARexx Support 

Like most powerful Amiga programs 
of the past year, QBT offers an exten- 
sive ARexx port that allows you to fully 
automate its execution. This means you 
can schedule reorganizations after 
backups, etc. There is no end 1o the 
uses you can think up for this feature. 
ARexx support is definitely a welcome 
addition. 

Conclusion 

As I mentioned at the beginning of 
this review, the protection oi data on my 
disks is very important to me. Quarter- 
back Tools gives me some measure of 
safety, and a great deal of piece of 
mind. So my brother is out of luck 
again, since I'm off to the store to buy 
my own copy of Quarterback Tools. I 
can just see his face now; "Blech!" ■ 



Point/CounterPoint 

Workbench vs. CL1 

by Nick Sullivan and 
Chris Zamara 

Normally in this section, we 
would present a technical topic 
in the form of a standard arti- 
cle. Some topics, however, are best 
explored in a dialogue of opposing 
viewpoints. While the authors for the 
most part enjoy an agreeable, collabo- 



rative working relationship, there are a 
few bones of contention that serve to 
make life a little more interesting. Here 
we thrash out one of these. 

Long before the mouse and icons of 
the GUI (Graphical User Interface), 
computer users typed commands at 
consoles and saw text printed out or 
displayed on a screen. MS/DOS is an 
example of a command-based user 
interface, while the Macintosh uses a 
GUI. On the Amiga, we have both: the 
CLI/Shell for commands, and the Work- 
bench for point-and-click. Which is bet- 
ter? Is the GUI really a step forward, or 
just a gimmick? A friendly debate may 
be a good way to explore some of the 
arguments on both sides... 

Nick: Sure, Workbench and its icons 
can be helpful, to beginners - just as 
children learn to read with the aid of a 
picture-book. But once you know a bit 
about the computer and the filing sys- 
tem, it's only through the command 
interface that you can realize their full 
potential. 

Chris: Just because something is easy 
to learn doesn't mean it's useful only for 
beginners. Maybe you can do more 
from the CLI, but for 95% of what you 
do, the Workbench is easier, faster, and 
more intuitive. 

Nick: Intuitive? That's a word I hear a 
lot. Who says that pictures are more 
intuitive than words, once you've mas- 
tered the concepts? I don't find any- 
thing un-intuitive about typing a com- 
mand or a command-line option, thank 
you very much. As for easier and faster, 
baloney! Given a well-written set of 
shell aliases, I'll match your mouse 
clicks with my command lines any day 
of the week. 

Chris: Well, I don't know about you, but 
it seems to me that dropping an icon 
into a drawer to move a file is a just 
wee bit more intuitive than using a 'Re- 
name' command and typing the same 
file name twice. And a fair bit quicker, 
too, especially for long filenames. This 
is just one example, of course, and I 
can supply several more if you have 
the time. 

Nick: Come on, Chris, a symbol is a 



symbol whether it's text or graphics. 
And while you're fumbling around with 
both the mouse and the keyboard, I'll 
be done in half the time, even if I do 
have a few extra characters to type. 
You'll still be struggling to rename that 
file, while I'm down sunbathing in Rio! 

Chris: Just the place to go if you insist 
on burying your head in the sand! But 
seriously, who needs two different input 
methods? I plop a disk in the machine, 
and I instantly see what it's called with- 
out typing 'Info' or whatever command 
you need these days. A simple click 
shows me what's there, and the pro- 
gram I need is up and running in sec- 
onds. No 'Dir' or 'List' to see what's on 
the disk and what the files are called. 
And I can always tell programs from 
data by the look of the icons! 

Nick: You mean 'tools' from 'projects'... 

Chris: I was translating for your benefit. 

Nick: Well, I agree with you. Sur- 
prised? In the circumstances you 
describe, the Workbench may have 
certain advantages. But - and this is a 
big 'but' - those circumstances aren't 
typical operations for me. Normally, 
when I want to run a program, I type its 
name - 1 don't have to go looking for it. 
The kind of browsing you're talking 
about is a special case, and even for 
that there are several utilities that give 
me functionality comparable to the 
Workbench - if not quite as appealing to 
the eye. 

Chris: You can talk all you like about 
specific programs that you can run from 
the CLI, but from an overall perspec- 
tive, life in the Workbench is just more 
pleasant. Tasks seem easier and more 
efficient, and I prefer to work that way 
even if a speedy typist could keep up to 
me using a flurry of CLI commands. 

Nick: Let's face it, Chris: the Work- 
bench is only useful if the only thing 
you do is run application programs. The 
serious computerist - and I'm talking 
about hobbyists here, too. not just pro- 
fessionals - needs the flexibility you 
only get with a command line. Want an 
example? How about pattern match- 
ing? How about searching your 



60 info NOVEMBER 1991 



.info technical support 






documents directory for that particular 
fragment of text? It all goes back to 
what I said in the first place - if you're a 
novice, the Workbench may be all you 
need. Otherwise, uh-uh. 

Chris: I didn't say you should never 
use the CLI. But if you don't take 
advantage of the Workbench, and sim- 
ply stick to typing commands, you're 
missing out on a whole lot of what 
makes the Amiga great. If you want an 
MS/DOS machine, why don't you buy 
one? The fact that we can use either 
type of interface - or both - is what 
gives us the best of the Macintosh and 
the PC. And if command-based com- 
puting is superior to the GUI, why is the 
world turning away from it? Can you 
say, "Windows?" 

Nick: I thought we were talking about 
using computers, not selling them. Just 
because IBM and Microsoft can see the 
profit potential behind the "GUI" buzz- 
word, doesn't persuade me it's a better 
way of doing things. Besides, I like the 



Amiga for the real advances it repre- 
sents - the multitasking, the custom 
chips. The Workbench is just window- 
dressing (or should I say, "Windows"- 
dressing), as far as I'm concerned! 

Chris: Sneer if you must, but marketing 
only works if it appeals to what people 
want. Look whal happened to the IBM 
PCjr - it doesn't matter what IBM sells if 
it's no good. Let's face it - the GUI is 
the way of the future, and so is Work- 
bench on the Amiga. 

Nick: Okay, I'll tell you the truth: I do 
use the Workbench from time to time, 
and I'm glad - really - that Commodore 
realized the importance of a GUI for the 
Amiga. I'll even grant you that some 
users might never 'graduate' to the CLI 
or the Shell - and never realize that 
they've missed anything. But I still 
maintain that if you want 1o exploit the 
full power of the Amiga, the CLI is the 
only way to go. 

Chris: Well, to tell you the truth. I don't 



use the Workbench exclusively myself. 
When I'm programming, for example, I 
use the Shell. And there are some 
things it lets me do that would be 
impractical or even impossible from the 
Workbench. But that's more a reflection 
of the limitations of current software 
than of the Workbench perse. Macin- 
tosh users get along quite well without 
a CLI - without a command interface - 
because software has evolved in that 
environment. On the other hand. I 
wouldn't give up the CLI on my Amiga 
for a whole diskful of icons! 

Nick: I guess only time will tell whether 
Workbench really is the wave of the 
future. We'll have to get together in 
twenty years or so and discuss this 
again! ■ 



About the Authors 

Nick Sullivan and Chris Zamara 
are the editors of .info technical 
support. They were once the edi- 
tors of the Amiga Transactor. 




Simply the best SCSI hard drive 

controller for the money 

...maybe better. 

Faster than GVP under contention, AMAXII and Syquest 

compatible, mouse button game switch, optional plug-on 

8 megabyte RAM card, "Auto-Install" format software. 



DataFlyer 2000 
DataFlyer 500 
DataFlyer RAM 



S99.95 
$189.95 
$119.95* 



EXPANSION 



510 656-2890 



ExpansionSystems 44862 Osgood Rd. Fremont California 94539 U.S.A. Fax 510 656-31 52 Datallyer 500, 
DataFlyer RAM are trademarks of Expansion Systems B1991 Expansion Systems. 'DataFlyer RAM price 

is without memory. This ad is small but so are our prices. 



C\rr\e> HMC\ nn thp Rearipr Sprvicp Card 






* 



nfo technical support 




V4 of Steve 
Tibbetfs 

VirusX 

doesn't like 

Workbench 

2.0. 




Checking Out 
Programs 

When Hallowe'en is the 
same as Christmas 

by Jim Butterfield 

User group librarians and bulletin 
board system (BBS) operators 
have a common problem. They 
get a lot of programs, and it's hard to 
tell the good ones from the bad. 

Users get most programs from their 
user group, or by means of downloads 
from BBS services. A librarian or BBS 
operator works hard to gather this 
material. Is most of the feedback from 
grateful users? Nope. Most often, it will 
be cries of protest if a 'bad' program 
should happen to find its way into the 
collection. 

What makes a bad program - and 
how can you spot such a beast before 
it goes into distribution? On another 
level: can one person find a program 
quite acceptable, while another does 
not? Is the question of 'bad' and 'good' 
programs often just an exercise in cod- 
ing snobbery? 

I'm not sure I have answers to these 
questions, but I'll be putting forth some 
ideas in the paragraphs that follow. 



Types of 'BAD' Programs 

A Virus program: Such a program 
secretly makes copies of itself to 
other disks; you may not know it's 
there. There are many types of virus, 
some relatively harmless and some 



very nasty indeed. There's even one 
that says that its purpose is to keep 
other viruses away. Regardless, a 
virus is an unplanned activity within 
your Amiga: you don't want it there, 
and you don't want it to spread fur- 
ther. 

A Trojan/Bomb program: A cousin to 
the virus. This kind of program 
doesn't propagate itself. It seems 
useful; then, one day (Friday the 
13th, for example) it strikes out with a 
completely unexpected action. Per- 
haps it just says BOO! Then again, 
perhaps it wipes all programs from 
your disk. 

Commercial theft: A commercial pro- 
gram, perhaps with its protection 
scheme and copyright statement 
removed, possibly with some fea- 
tures changed. You can end up in 
court if you handle these; nobody 
wants that kind of hassle. 

Enemy of multitasking: A program 
that won't co-exist with other pro- 
grams within the Amiga. Maybe it 
grabs the whole screen and won't let 
go; maybe it wrecks other programs 
by using their memory; maybe it 
insists on a specific drive, say dfO:, 
even when some other program is 
trying to use it. Use one of these, and 
you're throwing away one of the most 
attractive features of the Amiga. 

Litterbug program: Most often, this 
kind of program asks the Amiga for 
memory, and then never gives it 



back. Every time you run it, your 
computer has less memory - until you 
reboot. There are other types of 
resource grabs: a badly written pro- 
gram could seal off various parts of 
your computer's I/O, such as the 
audio channel, the serial port, or your 
printer. And I hate programs that start 
to play music, but won't stop. 

Doesn't work right; If your distance- 
calculating program tells you that 
New York to Dallas is five miles, you 
have good reason to doubt the cor- 
rectness of the program or its data 
files. There's little point in having a 
mortgage program that calculates 
incorrect amounts, a word processor 
that sometimes loses part of your 
document, or a chess game that 
makes illegal moves. It's a program- 
ming witticism that Hallowe'en is the 
same as Christmas, since OCT 31 = 
DEC 25 (if you're not familiar with 
octal numbering, ask a technical 
friend). But you don't really want a 
calendar program that mixes up the 
two dates. 

Not Good Coding Practice: people 
argue about this one. If a program 
works correctly, can those on the 
upper cloud levels fairly argue that 
it's unacceptable because it doesn't 
follow good coding rules? They often 
can, on the Amiga. A program has to 
do more than work correctly: it must 
also live harmoniously with other pro- 
grams... and if it's well constructed, it 
will probably pass happily through 
upgrades such as DOS 2.0 and 
those beyond. 



I get nervous When 

Perhaps I'm paranoid about pro- 
grams of uncertain origin, but it seems 
to me you can't be too careful. Here are 
some items I've seen lately. Some of 
them are, well, okay... but they still ring 
warning bells. 

A coding fragment received from the 
Middle East created a program pause 
by fiddling with the hardware timer (up 
in the $BFE.. area of memory). Wrong! 
DOS function DelayQ would do the job 
just as well, and would allow other 
tasks to run during the pause time. In 
addition: You don't play with the hard- 
ware without first making application to 



62 .infO NOVEMBER 1991 




*tafo technical support 



cia.resource; by doing so, you avoid 
collision with other programs trying to 
do the same thing. 

A screen-blanker program usually 
works at a high priority. Such a program 
tells the timer to wake it up after a set 
delay, and also awakes occasionally to 
sniff the input stream for activity. But a 
recent blanker program reverses the 
process; this one works at a very low 
priority and runs all the time unless a 
higher priority task interrupts it. Well... 
possible, but you must realize that only 
one task can pull that trick: once you've 
grabbed all the Amiga's remaining time, 
lower priority tasks will never see day- 
light. Not too serious, and the author 
does document this. But this particular 
program features another gimmick: tim- 
ing and input are detected by looking 
directly at the hardware chips. As 
already mentioned, that's not too good 
a practice. A lone program can get 
away with this kind of thing... but the 
multitasking Amiga may get unhappy 
with many tasks roaming around the 
hardware area. 



Lately, I've started to see programs 
that contain unreadable sections. They 
may be encrypted to prevent anyone 
from looking at them; or they may sim- 
ply be compacted to save disk space. 
But they make me nervous; any pro- 
gram that seems to contain secrets 
might possibly contain surprises. 

How to spot them 

There are many facilities available to 
the knowledgeable librarian. Even more 
are in the hands of registered Com- 
modore developers. Some are men- 
tioned below. 

I'll talk about some less technical 
considerations in a moment. But first, 
the mechanics. 

Virus programs: Many virus programs 
reside in the disk : bootblock' and 
propagate to other disks by writing a 
copy of themselves into their boot- 
block sectors. The classic bootblock 
virus checker is VirusX, by Steve Tib- 
bett; it's re-issued periodically, so 



look for a recent version. VirusX usu- 
ally comes with a program names KV 
to detect the 'IRQ' style virus, which 
propagates without using the disk 
bootblock. 

The New Orleans Commodore Com- 
puter Klub (NOCK) issues a disk 
called 'InNockulation,' which is full of 
anti-virus material. Write NOCK for 
information on the current version at: 
3701 Division St., Suite 140, 
Metairie, LA 70002. 
There are other programs to detect 
or remove viruses from your Amiga. 
I've heard good reports about a new 
compilation of programs, the 'Speedy 
Gonzales Superkillers' disk. 

Trojan/Bomb programs: These are 
difficult to spot. Source code supplied 
with the program can be of great help 
in assuring you that there are no sur- 
prises lying in wait for you. Techni- 
cally adept users can investigate the 
inner workings of a program using 
debug packages or disassemblers 
such as Resource. 




It's easy to get more information on products 
written about and advertised in .info. Most 
advertisements and new product listings 
have a special coded reader service number 
to help you get brocures, flyers and other 
literature about the products you like in .info. 

Fill out the reader service 

card you'll find in this 



issue of .info. 



Circle the numbers coded 
for those products you want 
more information about. 

Just drop it in the mail. Most 
companies send information 
right away. 




AMIGA 

■IL'.W.Iriihdl.Ha.i. 



THE GRAPEVINE CROUP, INC. 



2El3 

Fatter Agnus (8372A)...., see below 

M62Den.se $24.95 

8364 Paula $24.95 

Super Densse (new) 8373 '69.95 

571 9 Gary chip. 12.95 

8520A ClAchip 14.95 

1 3 ROM Kickstart 24,95 

A500 Keyboard Call 

AT Bndceboard (relutb.) 536.00 



COMPARE OUR PRICES 

■ i. ' w 



A500 Producls 

AdRAM 5401 Meg S131.S5 

Each add. Meg ol RAM 35.00 

A2000 Products 

AdRAM 2080 OK 114.50 

Each add. 2 Megs ol RAM 70.00 

AdSCSI 2000 127.50 

AdSCSI20800K 177,95 

Each add. Meg ol RAM 44.00 

AdSpeed 203,95 

Flicker Free Video 274.C0 



AMIGA 

■ M 

512K(A501J RAM .Mod 549.50 

1x4;80 SC Zip for A3000 24,95 

IxVIOONS 4.95 

256i4/120 all ICO. GVP. etc....4.95 

1*8. 80 SIMM 43,95 

HP Laser Memory ted 

1 Meg... 97,50 

2 Megs 137.95 

4 Megs 199.95 

Insider II BD for A-000 265.50 



SAMS Computertacts Call 

Dr. Ami (software) 29,35 

AMI Alignment System., 28.50 

Low costiremanu.prinlheads ...Call 



Enhanced Chip Sel 

Super Den ise 8373 

with productivity mode. etc. Ar 

absolute must with 2.0 

69.95 



HOT AMIGA UPGRADES 



A500 45 watt (dvyduty) power 
supply 67.50 

FlickerFixw 229.95 

Printer Port Adapter (runs any 

CBM primer to PC) 34.95 

KB Talker-use any PC keyrjd.53.95 



1802 Color Monitor Special ■ Refurbished by Commodore. Includes 90 day warranty and cables Looks 

real mint, Excellent for Video Toaster as a broadcast or preview monitor Si 19.00 

MegACbp 2000 ■ Upgrade your A20OO to 2MB ol chip RAM, Includes A3000 2 MB Agnus chip... 5329 95 

less substantial rebate, MegACHip 2000 now available for your A500. FREE Rockwell chip 

puller and diagnostic Agnus diskette program with either. 

Fatter Agnus (8372A) I MB w'Rockwell chip puller (a necessity) and instructions S69.95 

Mufelart (/- NEW ROM switch tot 3 ROMs for A500<2000 Keyboard Controlled S77.77 

Switch Activated Version S37.95 

1SO Walt "Big Foot'ASOO Universal Switching Power Supply with Ian, An absolute must for Ihose adding 

on more memory ,..., , S63.95 

Emergency Amiga Startup Kil • Sold to government PXs and now available to all. Kit has all major 

chips, parts, schematic, intstruclions and diagnostic software programs. Agnus, etc {even/thing 

needed to get it started) ,599.50 

Rejuvenator AI0CO- Upgrade board with everything, including diagnostc software package 

(S30 value). 1.3 ROM. Meg Bf RAM S488.00 

Diagnostic Trouble-shooting Software (STU). a ternfie diagnostc package 8. absolute musl 

(all Amigas) by Custom Services, Inc , ., .,..,„.. S29.95 

Amiga Diagnostician - Diagnose up lo 28 common problems, comes with software and booklet. Save 

lots of money by locating faulty chips yourself S14.95 



SEND FOR OUR FREE 36 PAGE CATALCG 



3 Chestnut Street ■ Suflern, NY 10901 

Order line only 1 -800-292-7445 
Customer Service (91 41357-2424 Fax (914)357-6243 
Prices subject to change Add UPS charges lo above Hours: 9-6 EST M-F 



We ship worldwide 



Circle #177 on the Reader Service Card 



■Jvfc w5rv " 



HK 



technical support 



Commercial thefts: A memory scan 
(the crude way is type hex) will often 
turn up information on the commer- 
cial source, even if the copyright 
screen and protection systems have 
been removed. 

Enemies of multitasking: Some pro- 
grams make it obvious: they take 
over the machine. For others, it's 
best to have somebody with a techni- 
cal background examine the pro- 
gram. 

Litterbug programs: To test for 
memory gobblers: open a CLI win- 
dow, run the program, type AVAIL, 
run the program again and type 
AVAIL again. Provided you don't do 
anything silly like changing the size 
of your CLI window, you should get 
the same memory each time. Note 
that this isn't true if you type AVAIL al 
the start: the first run of program may 
bring in libraries or other items that 
will legitimately stay in memory after 
the run. (They will be kicked out if 
you become short of space). 

Don't work right: Check out the most 
obvious things, such as if the pro- 
gram loads and saves data correctly. 
If there are calculations, check them 
by hand or against reference data, if 
possible. If your astronomy program 
says the sun will rise today at 5:10 
am, get up early, or stay awake, and 
check it out. 

Not Good Coding Practice: Some- 
body has to look at the coding. Then 
you must decide how to classify any 
reported difficulty. Is it trivial, so that 
you can ignore it or add a small note 
to the distribution? Moderate, so that 
it should be released with cautionary 
notes? 

Know Your Source 

There are practical checks that are 
often more useful than technical con- 
siderations. If you know that the pro- 
gram was written by a trustworthy per- 
son - or a person that you know you 
can get back to in case of problems - 
you can feel relatively safe. If the pro- 
gram is readable - in Basic, or accom- 
panied by source code - you can be 



Program Sources 

VirusX: Updated periodically, and 
a new version is said to be immi- 
nent. Check for the most recent 
version on recent AmigaLibDisk 
('Fish'} releases. 

XOper. Again, the most direct 
source is AmigaLibDisk. My cur- 
rent version is XOper12. 

Resource: There's more than one 
version, depending on the model 
of Amiga you have. Write: The 
Puzzle Factory, PO Box 986 
Veneta, OR 97487. Phone: (503) 
935-3709. 



reassured. And if the program came 
through a trustworthy pipeline, it can 
likely be trusted. 

Sadly, there have been virus pro- 
grams carrying fake author identities; 
be sure the program is really from the 
claimed author. A phone number or 
address is reassuring; it generally 
means that the author will take respon- 
sibility for what's in the program. 

Major distribution networks: National 
BBS download or disk libraries such 
as the 'Fish' disks are fairly secure. 
Even if a problem slips through, it will 
be spotted and reported quickly. 

Source included: Even Steve Tibbett's 
VirusX comes with the 'source pro- 
gram,' to help guard against fake ver- 
sions. You may read such a source 
file and assemble it yourself to con- 
firm that it indeed does what it claims 
to do. BBS/librarians would find 
source code reassuring, even if not 
intended for distribution. 

Technical Resources 

There are many programs that will 
help the technical type snoop a pro- 
gram s performance. Some are 
included as part of the disk collections 
mentioned above. Here are some oth- 
ers that I've found useful. 

XOper. This is a rich program for peer- 
ing into the inner workings of your 
Amiga. There's a whole labyrinth of 



mechanisms in there, ticking along 
like clockwork; if you're looking for 
the cuckoo, pay special attention to 
Tasks. Some programs spin off extra 
tasks that have an independent life of 
their own. Sometimes that's good. 
But if a program stops, yet leaves 
some part of itself running in the sys- 
tem, you should know why. 

Debug programs: Many debug pro- 
grams allow you to load a program 
into memory without starting it up. 
You may then inspect memory for 
unpleasant messages or curious 
code. If part of the program is 
encrypted, it's even possible to put a 
breakpoint into the program, and 
allow it to run Ihe decryption rou- 
tines... but no more. 

Resource: this commercial program by 
Glen McDiarmid will perform a disas- 
sembly of most programs with little 
effort on your part. You don't need to 
read the code, although sometimes 
that's interesting, too. Just look for 
peculiar messages and encrypted 
sections. With a little more effort, you 
can identify the system calls made by 
the program. So, for example, if you 
see a music program hitting hard- 
ware addresses or invoking Track- 
disk... look out! It may be marching to 
the beat of a different drummer. 

Commodore Developer Debug Tools: 

Commodore supplies registered 
developers with a whole set of 
debugging and testing tools. Many of 
them call for the use of an extra 
9600-baud terminal, and some must 
be run on an Amiga that's fitted with 
an MMU (Memory-Management Unit) 
chip or 68030 processor. But they 
are very good at spotting a program 
that's breaking the rules. 



Last Thought 

If you plan to look at a program that 
you suspect of possible problems, 
there are a few precautions you can 
take. The programs that 1 look at most 
closely are those that involve them- 
selves with disk operations: copying, 
file reorganization, protection system 
defeat, and similar items. 

If you have a hard disk system, take 
it out (logically, not physically) when 



64 .info OCTOBER 1991 




.info technical support 



you're doing such tests. Hard disks 
don't have write protect tabs; if a bad 
program wants to do damage there, it 
can really make a mess. The way to 
take out your hard disk: boot your 
Amiga from a Workbench floppy in dfO: 
and your hard disk won't be mounted 
for this session. Start by installing a 
resident virus checker into your system. 
Something like VirusX wi\\ run in the 
background, and will check all disks 
that are subsequently inserted. 

Any floppy disks of your own that you 
insert in the test system should be 
copies, not originals. Keep the write 
protect on, unless you're testing a pro- 
gram that is intended to write to a disk. 
In the latter case, check the changed 
floppy very carefully, comparing its con- 
tents and size to that of the original. 

And when you're finished: turn the 
power switch off. Don't use the three- 
key reboot (Ctrl, Left-Amiga, Right- 
Amiga) unless you're sure the system 
is safe. ■ 



Commodore Development Tools 

Request an application for the Commodore-Amiga development programs by 
writing: CATS-lnformation, 1200 West Wilson Drive, West Chester, PA 19380- 
4231 . Include a self-addressed, stamped, 9" x 1 2" envelope. 

Commodore's Test Programs for Developers. 

memung and mungwall - watches memory, especially for illegal calls to 
FreeMem. It also watches to check that a program does not write outside the 
memory area that it has requested. 

iotorture - watches IO requests. 

Enforcer - uses the MMU; reports any attempts made by a program to access 
"illegal" memory. 

memoration (William S. Hawes) - fakes a low memory situation and observes 
program behavior. 

There are many other programs: flush and wack, for example. The above are 
recently introduced powerful test tools. 



Advertisers' Index 



Reader 
Service # 



Advertiser 



Page 



143 


Consultron 


65 


140 


Devware 56, 57 


112 


Electronic Arts 


13 


110 


Expansion Systems 


61 


177 


Grapevine Group. The 


63 


104 


Konami 


5 


103 


Konami 


33 


169 


Montgomery Grant 


66 


130 


NewTek 


68 


173 


Power Computing 


53 


102 


Psygnosis 


3 


115 


Psygnosis 


2 


170 


RCS Management 


67 


106 


ReadySoft, Inc 


7 


107 


ReadySoft, Inc 


11 


136 


Software Support International 


17 


114 


Software Support International 


59 


160 


Softwood, Inc 


27 


165 


U.S. Gold 


9 









Do you feel like the 
BridgeboarcT and the Amiga" 

are worlds apart? 

Mmwm 



'CoXoXQ 



The 



Ambassador 



has been appointed to establish efficient lines of communication. 

The Ambassador improves file transfer capability for both the Bridge- 
board and the Amiga in a transparent fashion. 

The Ambassador is l(K)'7r software. No additional hardware to buy or 
install. 



From the Hridgeboard: 

• Directly access the Amiga- 
connected floppy drives as MS- 
DOS drives from within most 
MS-DOS programs. 

• Receive up to a 1 00 limes speed 
increase when using our version 
of the PC virtual hard drive parti- 
tions. 



From the Amiga: 

■ Access MS-DOS formatted me- 
dia using the same features as 
our five star rated product Cross- 
DOS". 

• Access Bridgeboard created vir- 
tual hard drive partitions (such as 
MakeABandJLink files}. 



Suggested List; 



$79 



95 



CrossDOS owner upgrades available. 

If you need to read and write MS-DOS" disks but do not have a Bridge- 
board, consider CrossDOS 1 ". It allows the Amiga to directly read a~nd 
write 36QK. 720K and 1.44M MS-DOS s disks. 



CrossDOS r 

is only: 
$3922 




consul™ 



11 283 Parkview 
Pltfmotjlh Ml -13170 



TecnnicluSLjppori 
(3131459-7271 



Wp 5 1 ■t^sartd Saaerart rf aa-rcojy t.-*?, n. Mflpa eM sjnMffliftcjC t i -Vuen rJrigi. n 



i ngsartc noo-an rt lAct^cf, re 



Circle #143 on the Reader Service Card 






■ 



FOR ORDERS AND 



INFORMATION IN 1 -Slflf1-TRQ-ISRC E 1 

USA & CANADA CALL I OUU / UO DUUU 

Order Hours: Mtwi-Thws, 9«iti-7pm/rri, 9om-5pm/ClOSED Sot /OPEN Sun, 9:30-e(ET) 



AMIGA 500 EXPANSION KIT 

' SUPRARAM500512KRAMEXPANSlONwimCLOCK, 
CALENDAR and MASTER 3A-1 EXTERNAL DRIVE 





INFO 
1IS1 



.SSSu (718)965-9066 

MONTGOMERY GRANT: MAIL ORDER DEPT. 
33 34th ST., DEFT. A, BROOKLYN, N.Y. 11 232 
FAX #7188658889 / TEIEX 422132 MGRANT 



OR 
WRITE TO: 



retail OUTLET PENN STATION, MAIM CONCOURSE 

(Beneath Madison Sq. Garden) NYC, 10801 
Store Hrs: M0N-THURS, 8:30-7 / FRI, 8:30 5 / SAT CLOSED / OPEN SUN, 9:30-7 



A-1950 
MULTISCAN 1 
: MONITOR I 

'509 



AMIQ 



2000 



VIDEO TOASTER 

CALL FOR OUR LOW, LOW PRICE 



NEWTEK VIDEO TOASTER 80X ALL 
IN ONE VIDEO PRODUCTION SYSTEM 



CAU 



PERSONAL TBC $729 

MANY THER TIME BASE CORRECTORS 

(TBC) AVAILABLE 
TOASTER TUTORIAL VIDEO CASSETTE 



L 



1MB EXPANDABLE TO 9MB BUILT-IN 3.5' 
DISK DRIVE SYSTEM SOFTWARE 

MOUSE 

AMIGA 2000HD....S 1499 AMIGA 2500/50.... $2749 
AMIGA 2500/100. $3229 



1199 



^DdlG^"^oo 






ALLMODELS AVAILABLE 
Starting as low as 



s 2299 



$19.95 



TVMTQ 



500 



'469 



AMIGA 500P. „ CALL 

AMIGA PERIPHERALS 

A-2088DXTBRIDGE6OARD $449 

A-2286DATBRIIDGEBOARD $599 

A-2630/4 ACCELE RATOR 

KIT (25MHz, 68030,4MB, 68882) $1499 

A-1680 MODEM w/CABLE $69 



1084 RGB 

COLOR 
MONITOR 

s 279 




WJJM^hMHIilliJ.ilNIMI^I^ilill^lnma 



A-MAX EMULATOR II $129 

AMIGA 3000 32 HI Memory. AVAILABLE 

AMIGAVISION SOFTWARE 569 

AMIGA 1.3 ROM (8850) $49 

AMIGA 1 MB FATTER AGNUS CHI P(8372A) $99 

APPLIED ENGINE ERINO 
1.52 MB HI-DENSITY DRIVE. $199 



ATonee PC/AT EMULATOR S2« 

A-Z000 ADAPTOR IN STOCK 



BASEBOARD 



2MB Daughter 
Board Available 



Memory Expansion (or A-500 (usesA-501 Exp Slot) 

OK $99 1MB.. $135 3MB -S229 

512K $119 2MB $175 4MB $259 



BOMAC TOWER A-2000 $239 

BROADCAST TITLER II $216 

BODEGA BAY 



By CALIFORNIA ACCESS 




EXPANSION CONSOLE 

TumyourA-500lnl0 8 

A-2000 Compatible NOW AVAILABLE 



CALL 



CHINON INTERNAL DRIVE lor A-2000 $79 

COLOR SPLITTER $105 

DAKOTA SKETCHMASTER 12x12 $369 

DAKOTA SKETCHMASTER 12x18 $569 

DIOITAL CREATIONS DCTV $369 

OIGIVIEW GOLD V. 4.0 $114 

EXCELLENCE2.0 $105 

EXPANSION SYSTEMS 

Heavy Duty Power Supply for A-500 S79 

FUCKER FIXER... - $229 

FLICKER RXER PAL $269 

FUCKER FIXER GENLOCK OPTION $39 

FLICKERFIXERDEB2000 $69 

FRAMEGRABBER $419 

FRAMEGRABBER 256 $499 



GENLOCKS 
MINIGEN 


$184 


SUPERGEN 


$599 


SUPERGEN 2000S 

VIDTECH SCANLOCK 


$1339 
$759 


VIDTECH VIDEOMASTER 


$1049 




HANDSCANNER 

W/MIGRAPH TOUCH-UP 

OPTO-MECH MOUSE 

OPTICAL MOUSE 


$239 

$35 

S49 


HAME 


$295 



HAME/PLUS $379 

ICD ■ 

1CDADIDE... $89 

ICDNOVIA2H 

20MBINTERNAL DRIVE for A-500 $479 

ICD ADSPEED Excellerator (1 4.3MHi.| $205 

ICDFUCKERFREEVIDEO $279 

NEWPRIMA52I $429 

NEW PRIMA 105I $599 



AMIGA 500 6 AMIGA 2000 
COMPATIBLE BARD DRIVE PKGS. 

mX'nMATCHTHESESCSICONTRQLLERSlHAnD 
DRIVES TO FIT THE RIQHT PACKAGE FOR YOU! 

A-500 SCSI CONTROLLERS 

DATAFLYER500 $125 

RAPID ACCESS TURBO A-500 $229 

TRUMPCAR0 500 , $159 

TRUMPCARDS00PRO $229 

XETEC FASTT RACK A-500 $219 

A-10QO SCSI CONTROLLERS 
XETEC FASTTHACK A-1000 $299 

A-2000 SCSI CONTROLLERS 

ADSCSI2080 $159 

CAMAUBUBOARD2000 $109 

DATAFLYER200Q $85 

GVPSERIESIIHCA-2000 $149 

GVP SERIES II HCB/0 A-2000 $195 

RAPlDACCESSTURBOA-2000 S229 

SUPRA WORDSYNC $99 

TRUMPCARD2000 $99 

TRUMPCARD2000PRO $135 

HARD DRIVES 

SEAGATE ST-157N-1 (49MB) $215 

SEAGATE ST-1096.M (80MB, 3.5") $325 

QUANTUM 52MB (LOW PROFILE) $235 

QUANTUM 105MB (LOW PROFILE) $379 

QUANTUM 170MB $619 

QUANTUM 210MB 5699 

NEW 



GVPRAM8/2A-2O00 

(2MB EXP, to 8MB) $175 

NEWSERIES II 




A-2000 22MHMMB exp. 10 13 MB/66882. .CALL FOR 

A-2000 33MHz/4MBexp. to 16MB/68862..LOW PRICE 

CALLFORLOW, LOWPRtCES 

SCSI HARD DRIVE PACKAGES AVAILABLE 



GVP 3050 Kit (50 MHz) 

w/68030, 4MB exp. 10 32MB, 688B2 $2159 

QVPMS0 KIT w. QUANTUM 40M3.. ADD 1300 

QVP3050 KIT WWANTUM SOWS. ADO t500 

QVP3050KlTwmXTOR210HB. „„.ADD«W 

GVPA-500HD8+0/52Q $554 

A-500 HD 8+0/105Q $804 

RICOH SOMBRemoreblew/Ca (Wage $759 



VIDEO PACKAGE 

• PANASONIC PV-I4ID VIDEO CAMERA COMPLETE w 16mm I 
LENS ■ COPVSTAHDw LIGHTS ■ DIGIVIEW COLO 4.0 

iv FIXED LENS $309 WVARIABLELENS...S339 



INSIDER II Internal Memory for A-1000 

OKExpandaPfef0).5Ma 
512K. $219 1MB $249 15MB.~..$279 



COMMODORE 
CD-TV 




PRINTERS 

PANASONIC 

KXP-1180 $159.95 

KXP-1123 $234.95 

KXP-1124! S299.95 

KXP-1624 $359.95 

KXP-1654 $589.95 

STAR 

NX-1001 $149.95 

NX-1020R 5189.95 

— NX-2420 5279.00 

IMAGINE,... $1B9NX-2420R 5299.00 

LATTICE C5.1 $189 CANON 

UvSjWWO $ |jg BUBBLEJET BJ30O...S499 BUBBLEJETBJ330..5679 

MASTER3A-13,5"DISKDRIVE ".. '. $79 HEWLETT PACK ARD 

MEGA-MIDGET ECONOMY (25MHz) $489 DESKJET 500 $499 

MEGA-MIDGET ECONOMY (33MHz) $559 LASERJETIIPwToner ..$899 

MEGA-MIDGET RACER (25 MHz.)... $599 ^ERJL^I^w/Toner $1099 

MEGA-M1DGETRACER 33MHz $679 COMMODORE MPS1270INK-JET $139 



Supra 



SOOXP HARE DRIVE KITS 

512K.20MB $349 512K, 80MB $559 

512K, 52MB $475 512K.105MB $655 

2MB.20MB $459 2MB, 80MB $639 

2MB.52MB $499 2MB, 105MB $715 

2MB, 52MB 2MB, 105MB 

|1 MBx4) „.$555 (1 MBX4) $725 

2MB THRU 9MB VERSIONS AVAILABLE 



CITIZEN 

GSX-140 $275.95 

GSX-145 

WldeCarraige $385.95 

200GX. $159.95 

Color Option jjlts CALL 



SUPRA RAM BOORX ,j 28 tflBB 

5 UK [XPAHDABU TO 3MS-PA5S THRU BUS 



SUPRA2400 SUPRA24O0 PLUS 

EXTERNAL MODEM W/MNP5, V.42, bls.$1 65 

W/CABLE $99 SUPRA 2400 Zl 

SUPRA2400ZI PLUS $159 

INTERNAL MODEM.51 14 SUPRA9600 

SUPRA 2400 MNP. ...$145 PLUS $549 

SUPRA3.5" EXTERN AL DRIVE $98 

SUPRA RAM 2000 

OK. $105 4MB $235 8MB....$369 

2MB $169 6MB $299 

SUPRA RAM 500 51 2K 8A7 
Expansion for A-500 H/ 



MEGA-MIDGET RACER (80MHz) $849 

PAGESTREAM2.1 $164 

PANASONIC 141 0CAMERA. $179 

PROFESSIONALPAGE2.0 $215 

PROVIOEOGOLD $129 

PRO VIDEO POST $139 

PROWRITE3.1 $89 

SCALA $257 

SCULPT ANIMATE4D $289 

SHARP JX 100 COLOR SCANNER 

W/SOFTWARE& CABLES $645 

TURBOSILVER3.0 $58 

WORDPERFECT (AMIGA) $155 

XETEC CD ROMCDX-E50E EXTERNAL $649 



>»«>■■■■■«*»«« NEC MULTISYNC HID 5589 

MONITUnS NEC MULTISYNC IIIDS $609 

SONY1304MULTISYNC $649 



SEIKO1440 $509 

SEIK01445 $579 

SEIK0 1450 $629 



FOR CUSTOMER SERVICE or ORDER STATUS CAU: (718) 965-9285 

CUSTOMER SERVICE HOURS: MON-THURS 9am-Spm/FRI 9am-4pm/SUN 10am-4pm 



NO SURCHARGE FOR CREDIT CARD ORDERS 

WE INVITE CORPORATE ANO EDUCATIONAL CUSTOMERS. DISCOUNTS 
FOR QUANTITY ORDERS. RUSH. 2nd DAY & NEXT DAY AIR SERVICE AVAILABLE. 

CUSTOMER TOLL FREE TECHNICAL SUPPORT 

Certified check, Bank Chech Money Orde is, Approved P.O.s Visa, Maslercaid, Amen, Oplima, Diners 
Club, Carle-Blanche, COD'S & Wire Transfers accepted. Please call belore submitting P.O.s. Non- 
cerlilied checks must wait 2-4 weeks for clearance. Prices and availability subject to change without 
nance. Nat responsible tor typographic errors. Return ot detective merchandise must have prtor 
return authorization number or returns will not be accepted. Shipping & Handling additional. Second 
" "tent Day Air available at eitra cost. Canadian orders please call lor shipping rales. ftPO FPO 
... please add l0%shipping & handling - min, S1 5 (Over $l200-8°o. Over S30D0b°i). All A PO FPO 
ordersare sh ipped first eta ss priority a ir. Oversized shipments may bo levied a surcharge. All orders 
can be shipped air express. Call for details. We check for credit card Ihell. OCA #800233. Amiga is a 
registered trademark ol Commodore Amiga, Inc. 



Circle #169 on the Reader Service Card 



r=^l 



FREE Product Info From MM) ! 



To receive free information from participating advertisers in this issue: 

Circle the reader service numbers on the card belowof the advertisers which interest you. 

Fill in your name and address where indicated. 

Attach the proper postage and drop it in the mail. 



READER SERVICE CARD #44 is valid until January 31, 1992. ONE 



Fill out this card carefully. You may check more than one answer 
to the questions at right. PLEASE PRINT. 



Mr. 



Name 



Company 



Title 



Address 



City/State/Zip 

( ) 

Phone 



101 106 111 116 12! 

102 107 112 117 122 

103 108 113 118 123 

104 109 114 119 124 

105 110 115 120 125 



Ms. 



Fax 



151 156 161 166 171 

152 157 162 167 172 

153 158 163 168 173 

154 159 164 169 174 

155 160 165 170 175 



A. Which type of Amiga do you own? i 

1 n Amiga 500 4 □ Amiga 2500 

2 1 Amiga 1000 Sfl Amiga 3000 

3 "1 Amiga 2000 6 3 None 

B. Which of the following software 
products are you likely to purchase 
within the next year? 

7 D Desktop Publishing 

8 "I Wofdpfocessing 

9 □ Video 

10 n Graphics/Animation 

11 n Sound/Music 

12 n Productivity I 

13 D UNIX 

14 fl Entertainment 

15 n Educational 

C. Which ot the following hardware products are 
you likely to purchase within the next year? 

16 □ Mass Storage 19 3 Video Hardware 

17 D Accelerators 20 3 Monitors 

18 Printers 21 "I Other 



201 206 211 216 221 

202 207 212 217 222 

203 208 213 218 223 

204 209 214 219 224 

205 210 215 220 225 



251 256 261 266 271 

252 257 262 267 272 

253 258 263 268 273 

254 259 264 269 274 

255 260 265 270 275 



What applications are your 
primary interests? 

22 O Desktop Publishing 

23 3 Wordprocessing 

24 n Video 

25 n Graphics/Animation 

26 O Sound/Music 

27 3 Productivity 

23 "I On-line Services 

29 3 UNIX 

30 3 Entertainment 

31 n Educational 

How Ctd you receive this 
copy of .into? 

32 O Subscription 

33 1 Newsstand 

34 3 Borrowed 

35 3 Library, etc. 



301 306 311 316 321 

302 307 312 317 322 

303 308 313 318 323 

304 309 314 319 324 

305 310 315 320 325 



< 



126 131 136 141 146 

127 132 137 142 147 

128 133 138 143 148 

129 134 139 144 149 

130 135 14D 145 150 



176 181 186 191 196 

177 162 187 192 197 

178 183 188 193 198 

179 184 189 194 199 

180 185 190 195 200 



226 231 236 241 246 

227 232 237 242 247 

228 233 238 243 248 

229 234 239 244 249 

230 235 240 245 250 



276 281 286 291 296 

277 282 287 292 297 

278 283 288 293 298 

279 284 289 294 299 

280 285 290 295 300 



326 331 336 341 346 

327 332 337 342 347 

328 333 338 343 348 

329 334 339 344 349 

330 335 340 345 360 



□ U 




SU^SCilJPTIOilS 



P 



11 Iss. 
lYear 

only 

$2600 



J 22 Iss. 

2 Years 

only 

$47?" 



you save 



'$ 



you save 

4if£<§r 



4J 



® 



33 Iss. 

3 Years 

only 

$5500 



CnnadaMexica add $8 00 per year 
Foreign: add $24.00 per year 



Card # or payment MUST 
accompany order. We do not bill. 



BACK ISSUES 

$5.50 EACH ($6.50 outside USA) 
CIRCLE THE ISSUES YOU WOULD LIKE: 

II nu ill e il? ij| 

nasBxsss 

32 33 34 35 
36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 
44 

(note: issues #10-31 cover Amiga & C64. 
issues #32 on are Amiga-only.) 



SUBSCRIPTION $_ 
BACK ISSUES $_ 



TOTAL $ 



U.S. funds only! Credil card, check, or money order only. Make payable to: .info 

NAME 

ADDRESS 



CITY/STATE/ZIP 

□ NEW LI RKNKWA! (Alli.di your .info mailing label) 

VISA _ Mastercard expiration date 

Signature: Card # 




ORDER NO W 

PHONE! 

with 



VISA' 



^i^:-: 



VISA or MASTERCARD 



LiiiimTixm 





DUU UU 



Reader Service Management Department 

PO Box 5195 

Pittsfield, MA 01203-5195 



NO POSTAGE 

NECESSARY 

IF MAILED 

IN THE 

UNITED STATES 



BUSINESS REPLY MAIL 

FIRST CLASS PERMIT NO 171 IOWA CITY, IA. 



POSTAGE WILL BE PAID BY ADDRESSEE 

.info Subscriptions 
705 Highway 1 West 
Iowa City, I A 52246 -4221 

USA 




I,I.I...| i ImI.I,ImI,LII i |„I.L.I..I...IIII...I 



DIBUIIEW 



C D L D 







' ';••: ,. •*?&** , 



NOW WORKS WITH 
THE AMIGA 3000 



$99.95 



in 


^ 


ERFORMER 


2.0 



^ 




■**| 


CQ33 




ULMLj 


FOR 






NOW AVAILABLE 
EXCLUSIVELY FROM 
NEWTEK. 



FROM THE CREATORS OF THE VIDEO TOASTER 

THE AMIGA MULTI-MEDIA 

TASK FORCE 



The Best Digitizer 
Keeps Getting Better 

Digi-View Gold is the most award winning, best 
selling, most used Amiga hardware product 
of all time. Simply locus your camera on 
any object or picture and in seconds Digi-View 
Gold turns il into Amiga graphics thai glow with 
vibrant colors and stunning clarity. Only the new 
Digi-View 4.0 offers Dynamic HiRes (4096 colors 
in high resolution), advanced image processing, 
and powerful graphics tools never before avail- 
able. Images can be modified and enhanced with 
Digi-Paint 3 and easily displayed with Elan 
Performer. AmigaWorld Magazine says. "Digi-View 
is the best value in Amiga digitizers and delivers 
the best images. " 



The Most 

Successful HAM Paint 

Program Ot All Time 

NewTek pioneered 4096 color painting on the 
Amiga. With Digi-Paint 3 we enter the next 
generation of advanced HAM painting. Powerful 
features such as Rub-Thru. Colorize.Variable 
Transparency, and Warping put Digi-Paint 3 in a 
class by itself. Don't be fooled by HAM newcom- 
ers, only Digi-Paint 3 has the speed, ease-of-use, 
high-quality HAM display, and direct Digi-View 
interface that make it the best paint program for 
your Amiga. In a head-to-head paint showdown 
AmigaWorld found a clear winner: "If you are 
really serious about owning only one paint 
programme would have to 
recommend Digi-Paint 3. " 



The Hottest 
Presentation Graphics 
Tool Ever For The Amiga 

Before Elan Design joined the NewTek Video 
Toaster design team they created Elan Performer 
2.0. Now available exclusively from NewTek. 
Performer brings high-end presentation power 
to the Amiga. Performer is the power tool 
Digi-View and Digi-Paint users have been waiting 
for. Now you can easily combine your images in 
presentations that spring to life with animation 
and excitement. Whether you're doing presenta- 
tions, video, multi-media or animation. Per- 
former will make your graphics the star of the 
show. AmigaWorld says. "Elan Performer is a 
flawless performer. ' 



\ 




Digi-View Gold, Digi-Paint 3, Dynamic HiRes and Video Toaster 
are trademarks of NewTek Inc. Dynamic HiRes requires 2 megs 
of RAM. Amiga is a trademark of Commodore-Amiga. Inc. 
Ban Performer is a trademark of Elan Design. 

Circle #130 on the Reader Service Card 



Digi-View Gold, Digi-Paint 3, and Elan 
Performer are available now at your local 
Amiga dealer or call 1-800-843-8934 
or 913-354-1146. 

NewTek 

INCORPORATED