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MUMMGA 



Blue Ribbo 



SunRize 




> Casio 



also in this issue... 



> Arrow 1500 

> Bodega Bay 

> ImageFinder 

> Professional Page 2.0 

includes .info tech support 
(at no extra charge!) 



#39 

A MAY 1991 

K U.S.A. $3.95 

Canada $4.50 

DISPLAY UNTIL JUNE 4 





Commodore Amiga, 
Commodore CDTV, 
Atari ST 
PC Compatibles 



Save the 



•"is-i 




W8 






BBS* 




'•3eh 



1 



^ 



.s^fj? w*i€ 



PSYGNOSIS 

29 Saint Mary's Court, 

Brookline, MA 021 46 

Telephone: (617) 731-3553 



Sag 



''.■-" :■'-'■ ■ 



BBS 



^HK££35n 



Circle #101 on the Reader Service Card 






■ 



■ 



ARMOUR-GEDDON 

Earth is being threatened by a powerful weapon whose beam is aimed at 
an Accentuation Satellite, in readiness to fry humankind. The whole planet 
is depending on you to keep it cool. 

Select and simultaneously control up to six diverse hi-tech vehicles in a 
race against time to seek and destroy enemy power lines; This may give 
you time to find and eventually knock out the Beam Weapon. 

Build up your arsenal by collecting enemy resources to help develop and 
create weapon systems for your vehicles to use. 

Featuring a sophisticated head-to-head serial link enabling 'being-there' 
realism between two players. 

Armour-Geddon: Strategy and simulation synthesized to perfection. 

Screen Shots from the Amiga Version 

SEEING IS BELIEVING 



Circle #145 on the Reader Service Card 



PSYGNOSIS 

29 Saint Mary's Court, 

Brookline, MA 02146 

Telephone: (617) 731-3553 

Fax:(617)731-8379 





22 MUSIC & SOUND: Peggy Herrington brings us up 
to date on a passel of new music products from 
Blue Ribbon SoundWorks, Dr. T's, and Casio, 
among others. 

30 VIDEO VICTORIOUS: JANE BARACSKAY: 

Sue Albert profiles the founder and guiding light of 
Kona-Kini Productions. 



26 VIDEO: OJ Sands catches up with recent 

hardware and software developments in the 
video marketplace. 

48 GRAPHICS: Brad Schenck opens up Imagine from 
Impulse and discovers a mature and powerful 3D 
animation system. 

50 PRODUCTIVITY: Jim Meyer reviews v2.0 of Gold 
Disk's powerful page-layout program Professional 
Page. 

54 HARDWARE: Mort Kevelson examines two 

expansion boxes for the A500: the Bodega Bay 
and the Arrow 1500. 

56 .info technical support: 

■r IMAGEFINDER: A Creative Sort of Program 

by Derek Grime 
*■ AN AMIGA WHAT'S WHAT - Do You Know Exec 

From AmigaDOS? - by Chris Zamara 
*• THE NARRATOR SPEAKS - Natural Sounding 

Speech From Your Amiga - by Chris Zamara 



.info Monitor 

8 Reader Mail 

1 New Products 

1 8 News & Views 

1 8 .info Update 

20 The Rumor Mill 

28 BRYCE! 

38 Cyberplay 

44 Public Domain 

69 Unclassifieds 

69 Advertiser Index 




.info strives to be 
a clear voice for 
Amiga users and a 



showcase for the 
talented people and 
exceptional prod- 
ucts of the Amiga 
computer commu 
nity. Everything in 
this magazine (except for some of the ads) 
is digitally created, edited, and color sepa- 
rated as complete pages on Amigas run- 
ning off-the-shelf software and peripherals, 
and output directly to film. 

Tilt 1st magazine produced entirely with personal computers. 




The Future Is Here 



▲ Paint, digitize and display lull color NTSC video graphics on any Amiga. 

▲ Capture a video frame in 10 seconds from any color video camera. (Also 
works with still video cameras, video disk and still frame capable VCR's.) 

l: Display and capture full color 24 bit high resolution images. 

Convert DCTV™ images to or from any IFF 
display format (including HAM and 24 bit). 

Paint, digitize and conversion software 
are all included. 



Works with ail popular 3D programs. 
L Animate in full NTSC color. 

$495 

* Min. 1 Meg. required 



♦ ♦- 



DCTV "(Digital Composite Television) is a revolutionary new video display and digitizing system for 
the Amiga. Using the Amiga's chip memory as its frame buffer memory, DCTV "creates a full color NTSC display 
with all the color and resolution of television. Sophisticated true color video paint, digitizing and image processing 
software are all combined into one easy to use package included with DCTV I" DCTV '"also works with all popular 
3D programs to create full color animations that can be played back in real time. 



DIGITAL 



Circle #107 on the Reader Service Card 



A T I O 

2865 Sunrise Boulevard Suite 103 Rarrcho Cordova CA 95742 Telephone 916/344-4825 FAX 916/635-0475 

©1990 Digital Creations. Amiga is a registered trademark of Commodore Business Machines. Patents applied far. 



.info Monitor 




Mark R, Brown 
Managing Editor 



Benn Dunnington 
Publisher 



THINGS WE'D LIKE TO SEE 

It's been quite a while since 
we've printed a "Things We'd Like to 
See" list, so here's one, in no particular 
order. If you're a PD programmer who's 
looking for a challenge, or a commercial 
publisher seeking inspiration, just pick 
one of these ideas and run with it! 

^ A virtual memory handler - This 
would allow the Amiga to treat storage 
devices (floppies and hard drives) 
almost like RAM, using them to cache 
data in and out of RAM buffers. This has 
two advantages: (1) It lets low-RAM 
machines emulate high-RAM machines, 
saving those on a budget the cost of 
upgrading, at the expense of some time 
and limitations, and (2) It lets any 
machine bypass the nine megabyte limit 
of the Amiga by simulating extra RAM 
space over and above the computer's 
addressing limits. 

^> A drive-independent file handler - 
This would allow files larger than 880K 
on floppies by linking files across disks. 
For example, you could store a two- 
megabyte data file as a single file bridg- 
ing three 880K disks. The last block of 
data on one disk would link to the first 
block of data on the next disk, prompting 
for its insertion when needed. 

^ Improved graphics hardware - We 
still want to see 8-bit graphics made the 
standard on the Amiga, with 24 bits 
optional. Tl-style hardware polygon 
draw, on-board compression chips, etc., 
would mean real improvements in 
graphics speed. And Jay Miner says the 
Amiga needs last Video RAM. 

^ An Amiga 500-based cartridge 
game machine - To compete with Nin- 
tendo, Sega, et. al. This should be an 
inexpensive one meg chip RAM 
machine with a cartridge slot and a cou- 
ple of controllers, expandable to CDTV 
or full Amiga 500 status with add-on 
hardware. We really think there's a 
niche for this machine. 

^ An updated PolyScope program - 
The original "Kaleidoscope" program 
included with the Amiga 1 000 was cool, 



and there's never been another quite 
like it, but it needs updated. We'd like to 
see more control, a save option, and 
whatever else you clever programmers 
can come up with. 

^ A laptop Amiga - Developers, did 
you know that Commodore will license 
the Amiga chips for OEM developent? 
As in a laptop Amiga? 

^ Nintendo-style games - 1 get so sick 
of hearing kids who have a perfectly 
good Amiga at home begging for a Nin- 
tendo just because all the other kids 
have one. (Too bad we can't get a bunch 
of child psychologists to testify before 
Congress that Nintendo ads are destroy- 
ing their little minds!) We need a collec- 
tion of cheap Nintendo-looking "knock- 
off" games to keep the kids happy when 
they're playing the Amiga. Maybe if they 
could play "Super Mazio Cousins" on 
their Amiga they would shut up. 

^ Real-world simulations - We've 
carped about this for years. Aren't you 
developers listening? We need physics, 
chemistry, engineering, and math (chaos 
& fractal) construction kits for people to 
play with. Let people fly spacecraft 
through the solar system and plot trajec- 
tories. Let 'em build buildings and see if 
they stand through an earthquake. Let 
'em mix chemicals and see what 
molecules result. Give us a way to play 
with the real world without getting our 
hands dirty! 

^ A worldwide information network - 
When are we going to see a reasonably- 
priced online reference link to all the 
world's information? A combination of 
newspaper, EMail, book & magazine lib- 
rary, and information link to business 
and government is badly needed now . 
Current online services are only a 
shadow of what computer users really 
need. 

Well, those ideas ought to stimulate 
some activity! What would you like to 
see? Write and let us know, and we'll 
pass your ideas along to the developers. 
Write to us at our Reader Mail 
addresses. 

- Mark & Benn 



.info Publications 



Publisher & Editor 

Benn Dunnington 

Managing Editor 

Mark R. Brown 

Senior Editor 

Tom Malcom 

Technical Editors 

Nick Sullivan 
Chris Zamara 

Contributing Editors 

Greg Conley 

Peggy Herrington 

Mort Kevelson 

Harv Laser 

Jeff Lowenthal 

Jim Meyer 

Don Romero 

Oran J. Sands III 

Brad Schenck 

Art & Production 

Megan Ward 
Kent A. Embree 

Data Manager 

Judith Kilbury-Cobb 

Marketing Director 

Joy E. Schmelzer 

Advertising Director 

Anna Folkers 



Advertising Sales 

Facsimile 

Subscriptions 



{319)338-3620 
(319)338-0897 
(319)338-0703 



COPYRIGHT© 1991 
BY .info PUBLICATIONS 
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 



.into (ISSN 0897586B) is published monthly except bimonthly in 
December-January by .inlo Publications, 705 Highway I West. Iowa 
City. IA 52246- US subscription rate is $2600. one year: $47.50, two 
years; $65.00, three years. Canada/Mexico rales in US Hinds are 
534 00. one year; $63,50. two years; $83.00. three years. Foreign 
surface rate is $50.00 {US tunds), one year. Second-class postage 
paio al Iowa City, IA and at additional mailing ottice. POSTMASTER: 
Send address changes to into. 705 Highway One, Iowa City, IA 
52246. 

.inlo is an independent iournai not connected with Commodore 
Business Machines, he. National and worldwide distribution by Kable 
News Co.. New York. NYi Entire contenls copyright 1990 by .info 
Publications, Iowa City, IA No part of this publication may be printed 
or otherwise reproduced wilhout written permission from the publisher, 
.info makes every effort to assure the accuracy of artictes, stories, and 
reviews published in this magazine, .info assumes no responsibility for 
damages due to errors or omissions. 



.info MAY 1991 



DARE YOU TAKE YOURS...? 




Inside the human body, a constant 
war rages between invading virus 
cells and the body's own defence 
mechanisms. Day after day the body 
repels the marauding bacteria until, 
once in a while a stronger, mutant 
viral strain penetrates the outer 
protective membranes and 
threatens to overwhelm the life- 
giving organs of your very being. 

Now, for the first time, you can fight 
your very own battle against the 
forces of biological destruction 
using your very own VAX1NE. 
Eliminate the invading virus cells 
before they can join together to form 
lethal viral strings that are capable 
of choking the life from your key 
body cells. Go on the attack with 
your own color coded anti-bodies, 
or use your DNA strands to strangle 
large clusters of alien invaders 
before they reach your brain and 
numb your senses forever. 

The invasion force is growing 
stronger- how long can you survive 
without VAXINE? 



Vaxine has an infinite number of 



increasingly difficult levels in 
which reflex, skill and strategy 
are the only resources which 



allow survival of the host. 

Over 100 colours on screen. 

Digitized sound. 

100% ray-traced graphics. 

Extra shooting stars bonus level. 



» l*.MII*Milll , ak\tJr : fitif*llJttl*mn'lt} ' J'/i'l 



(MS-DOS). 

256 colours (MS-DOS VGA 

version). 




I 



• ■B 



38^" 



MPP«*i & 




•' 






I 







IT'S GOT TO BE GOOD TO BE GOLD! 






Screen Shots art only injended lu be illustrative of 
the i;jffl» pUv mti i r.i the screen graphics which 
>-"". conviderabfy between different formate in 
quality and appearance and are subject to the 
computer* spcrfficil-oris. 



To Order: 

See your local retailer 

or call 1 -800-245-7744 



U.S. GOLD LTD. 

530 South 

Winchester 

Boulevard, 

Suite 200. 

San Jose 

CA 95128. 

Tel: (408) 246 6607, 




Screen shot from Amiga version 



Available on: 



1. ' I i .t Mj MMMfflff M 



LIMITED. All rights reserve 

by U.S. Cold Ltd., Units 13, Holford Way, Il.iif.iri5. 

Birmingham Bfi 7 AX, England, 

Copyright subsists on this program. Unauthorized copying 

lending or resale by any means strictly prohibited. 




Amiga & PC 



Circle #135 on the Reader Service Card 



3? 



READER 



<Xs 



MAIL 



.info Mail Boxes 

Our U.S. Mail address is: 

.info Reader Mail, 
705 Highway 1 West 
Iowa City, IA 52246 

FAX us at 319-338-0897 

Send EMail to the editors at: 
COMPUSERVE 70215,1034 

PLINK INFO MAG 

GEnie INFO.MAG 

BIX INFO.MAG 

Please do not use our EMail addresses 
to inquire about subscription problems. 
Mail sub problems and address changes 
to the Subscription Department at the 
above U.S. Mail address. 



B; 



► ack in 1985, I purchased 
an Apple lie. Then it seemed a logical 
choice, even though it didn't run all Ap- 
ple II software or any hardware. Well, 
it was a big disappointment. Now I'm 
looking to buy an Amiga, but I see 
some startling parallels between lie 
and the A3000. The Video Toaster 
won't fit in it, and some programs 
won't work with it. Should I buy it and 
risk another disaster, or stick with a 
more popular A2000? 

-Justin Phillips, Bellevue, WA 

Good question, and congratulations on your 
infinitely wise decision to switch to Amiga. 
The answer depends entirely on what you 
want to do witii the machine. If you're inter- 
ested in getting into Video Toaster work im- 
mediately, then go with the 2000. If you're 
not, then the 3000 is certainly the machine 
for the future. Commodore is very close to 
shipping the ROM version of the new 2.0 
operating system, and once developers get 
their hands on it. most of the incompatibili- 
ties between software, hardware, and 2.0 
will undoubtably disappear. NewTek tells ns 
that while they do have plans to do an 
A3000 version of the Toaster eventually, no 
date has been set. 

- Mark & Benn 



ations and HAM-E kom Black Belt Sys- 
tems? Both of these products look great 
but I am confused about the differences. 
- Nick Murray, CompuServe 

Oran Sands will be taking an in-depth look at 
both of these new video display systems in up- 
coming issues, so stay tuned.... (How's that 
for a sneaky way to keep you reading .info?) 
- Mark & Benn 



Ri 



Jsking the discovery that 
this letter is a blatant attempt to be pub- 
lished as the monthly ".info Is Great" let- 
ter, I just have to say that your maga- 
zine, at least every issue I've seen, is 
the best magazine published for any 
computer. I like the style, too. You man- 
age to be professional while still giving 
the impression of being real people and 
not robots in cubicles somewhere in an 
impersonal, air conditioned office. 

- Frank C. LeClair, Clatskanie, OR 

INTER-CUBICLE MEMO 

FROM: Publisher Model. Serialft 6S423P, 

Dunningion. Benn 
TO: Editor Model. Seriatff 73342E. 

Brown. Mark 
SUBJECT: ".info Is Great" letter 

1. Print attached epistle in May issue. 

2. Turn down air conditioning. Latest 
studies indicate staff robots operate 
025% more efficiently at precisely 62.8 
degrees Fahrenheit. 

3. Charade still working. Humanoid 
readers suspect nothing. 

4. Destroy tltis memo. 



I 



Wi 



.info be doing a compar- 
ison between DCTV from Digital Cre- 



would like to know where (if 
anywhere) I might be able to sell my 
used C64, monitor, and Okimate 10 
printer. I'd hate to just throw all these 
things out, even if I really haven't any 
use for them. (I want an Amiga!) You 
don't suppose Commodore needs any 
spare parts, do you? 

- David Chou, Sunnyside, NY 

Have we got a solution for you! All you 
have to do is put a remarkably inexpensive. 
very effective ad in the .info Unclassified 
section. (In case you missed it. that was a 
shameless plug.) We can offer a couple of 



other suggestions, too. First, someone in 
your local user group might take the stuff 
off your hands. Second, consider donating 
the system to a nursing home or the chil- 
dren's wing of a hospital. That makes it tax- 
deductible, and what you save from the 
IRS. you could put toward an Amiga. 

- Mark & Benn 



I 



find that not only the cover- 
age of .info but the very character of your 
magazine has changed very consid- 
erably since you dropped C64 coverage. 
It has become an Amiga expert's publica- 
tion, full of highly technical articles written 
in technical jargon and esoteric abbrevia- 
tions incomprehensible to novice Amiga 
users. What I liked about your magazine 
was that I understood most of Ihe con- 
tents; now I don't. A few articles for 
Amiga novices once in a while, and per- 
haps a department explaining technical 
jargon and abbreviations, giving origins, 
details, applications, and usage, would 
be greatly appreciated. 

- Alfred M. Hurter. Ottawa, ON 

Take a look at the .info technical section 
in this issue - Chris Zamara explains, in 
layman's terms, how the Amiga works. 
Since we're immersed in Amiga software 
and hardware 24 hours a day (one of the 
requirements for .info employees is learn- 
ing how not to sleep), we sometimes forget 
that not everyone has been around all this 
magical Amiga stuff since 1985 like we 
have. We'll try to do better for the novices 
out there, but it has to be a two-way street. 
There is a learning curve involved with all 
computers, and at least some of the jargon 
and abbreviations are things every 
computer user needs to know. If you think 
.info is incomprehensible, thumb through 
a couple of issues o/InfoWorld or Byte! 
We would recommend that every new 
Amiga user get a couple of books on 
AmigaDOS (like Abacus' AmigiiDOS 
Quick Reference) and browse through 
them. We've found, too, that most people 
pick up computer-speak by osmosis; after 
you've heard it long enough, you start to 
understand it from the context. 

- Mark & Benn 



8 .info MAY 1991 




CENTAUR 

SOFTWARE 



4451-B Redondo Beach Blvd., Lawndale, CA 90260 
Phone: 213-542-2226 - Fax: 213*542-9998 

Making Your Amiga 
More Amazing! 



ORLD ATLAS 

New Version 2.0! 



t^JEYTE bu BYT^ 

PnxJuced by BjCB-hy-Bya? Corporation, dtstributud txj 
Eentntr SbftvvarE. 




Mosl Americans can'l find Iraq, Vietnam. El Salvador or other countries on a globe! 
WORLD ATLAS to the rescue! Get detailed information on over 170 countries 
and all 50 states. Four disks full of maps and facts. 



Boing Optical Mouse 



Without question the 
highest quality, most 
accurate mouse for the 
Amiga. Solid, nigged, 
sturdy construction, super- 
smooth action and two- 
year warranty. Just plug it 
in and go. Also includes 
FREE D.U.D.E. (Directory 
Utility /DOS Enhancer) 
software. 



MindLink 



w 


*CWTWAKl £± 






^A 


Wu W 




TOWZKIVL 




|TiLtcoi«r-ncAiio^ 




1 BOrTKAHE FOR All 




1 Ajoiis co«pi.tebs 


'- 






"The Paint Program Jusl 
For Kids** just got better! 



A iit'w.n!iVI;!i'[) powerful 

modem package for \ our 
Amiga. Versatile features 
include X-Moriem. Y-Modem 
and Z-M»dtm pmlneols 
integrated scripting language, 
huill-in timer, and exclusive 
lexl -clicking feature. Just cJick 
on a xins-H.1 on the screen to 
transmit it 10 another computer. 
I'lilty Multitasking. 



*&& 






New Version 2.01 
Everybody loses My Paint. 
This htEhiy-ae claimed paint 
package was designed 
especially for children but n?3 




tun for uJlLjS^es. Includes ;in 
aniraaiedHChn interface, 
drawiag" tuois, special effecK 
nmht pic* palettes, th\i it i/td 
sound (-fleets ami more. \ 
rtallj niflj ctimputeri/ed 

with 2H paj-ts 
to color in. Also nvuilahie: 
Additional colnrint; hooks for 
My Paint: Alphabet 1'un and 
Miijc-lfx Characters. 



SCULPT-ANIMfflE 

4D— 



Miili\\tvrm 




41) Jr. 





Sculpt 3DXL 



- 



The SCULPT-ANIMATi; series of 3-D pmdu 
SCULF1-ANIMATE4D 

Still the most powerful modeler available on any computer, at uti) 

Design and render objects, then animate thcuv wilh professional 
Tri-View interlace. Powerful editing ((vols. Plioto-Reaiislic ray traei 
motion and motion hlur. Standard and 24-bJlimages and much n 

SCUI .IT-ANIMATE 4D Jr. 
Similar to SCULIT-ANIMATE4D hut vriihJQUl raj ll u lug 

SCULPT 3DXL 
For creating super realistic images but without animation. 



Pro-Net/Pro-Board 
Professional and Perso 








PRO M I PKOl KSKIONAL 
Schemntic I Jtymil Software. Theenmplete solution fur M'Ju-jiuIm 
Prnind only in packMj*esLfwtiu^mut!u mm 
automatic slcp .no I 1%-peal sigojnVoimcetor n;mue>. Win k-- in cniijundi.j • 
pnnitlc j solution that h cosl i-nwi.i%r. powerful and extremely wtsj bo use-. 

PRO-BOARD PK.OKJ --MiJWI 
Printed rinuii Board Artwirfc Cieneratian Program. Enjoytnepn 
wphHthaled W B layout package. Indudes Icaturei liki 
IHben vumpa k«Timiutwu%cft^urcsJiK5ud^adu^iiRviy'. nn the Ha ornn ;" : 
reference line* and more 

I'Ki-M'l andPRO-KOAHll PKKSM 
■■l'i,Tv. f ti;ii" I'crsiiKtt ttl tin' i'EK ial l,ri;n-i;i )Aith series nl ^inmatti ,.■ 
students* hobbyfefci and other who don't require Ihe efBaencieft and tap.;: 
versions. Call or write today for more (Mailed inntrmanon. 



PROFESSIONAL TE 



DpaintIII 



popular Amig i vid 

the most otil u 

Bniette and ! )Paint's ci«ator. i >an Siiva 



. 



Circle #121 on the Reader Service Card 



fN&'tivc compaiue 



NEW 




U C T S 



A still from 
Miramar's 
computer 
animation 
video, 
The Mind's Eye. 



VIDEO SPECTACULAR 

Always on the lookout for the 
visually stunning, we first heard about 
The Mind's Eye from Roy Tretheway at 
Premier Software and the producer, 
Miramar, was kind enough to provide us 
with a copy. After peeling our socks off 
the opposite wall, we watched this 40- 
minute computer animated video a few 
bazillion more times. Miramar has taken 
bits of previously released computer ani- 
mations (we recognized scenes from 
such animation pioneers as Apollo. Bell 
Labs, Digital Productions, Cranston/ 
Csuri, Pacific Data Images, Digital 
Effects, and Robert Abel & Associates), 
added some new ones, and set the 
whole thing to an original score, which is 
available by itself on CD. The result is a 
sort of computer Fantasia for the '90s, 
something you'll be watching over and 
over, as well as inviting the whole neigh- 
borhood in to see. None of the anima- 
tion was done on Amiga, but most 
everything you'll see in the tape can now 
be done with NewTek's Toaster and 
existing software. If you're looking for 
video and animation ideas. The Mind's 
Eye will certainly expand your horizons. 
Premier has the VHS tape available for 
$29.95, and Miramar will soon be 
releasing it on laserdisk. Miramar can be 
contacted at 200 Second Avenue West, 
Seattle, WA 981 1 9. 206-284-4700. Pre- 
mier is at PO Box 3782, Redwood City, 
CA 94064. 415-593-1207. 




ADPRO ADDITIONS 



A; 



. SDG has released three 
new add-ons for their Art Department 
Professional image processing software. 
The Professional Conversion Pack 
($90.00) provides input/output modules 
for Targa, TIFF, and Rendition format 
24-bit files, which are commonly used in 
high-end workstations. ASDG is also 
offering the Polaroid CI-3000 Digital 
Palette ($4495.00) and a driver for it. 
The device is a digital film recorder that 
guarantees accuracy to 24 bits; and it 
can make that claim since it operates at 
33 bits per pixel. It has an addressable 
image resolution of 2048 x 1638 pixels 
and includes camera backs for 35mm 
and Pack film, along with a Power Pro- 
cessor for developing 35mm instant film. 
Autofilm and 4x5 camera backs are 
available separately. The Polaroid CI- 
3000 Driver was specifically written to 
give complete control over the film 
recorder from within ADPro, which 
means that anything you can load into 
ADPro can be dumped to film in the CI- 
3000. ASDG, 925 Stewart Street,, Madi- 
son, Wl 53713. 608-273-6585. 

FINDING YOUR WAY 

tit Ikon Enterprises has pub- 
lished the second volume of their game 
hints, walkthrus, maps, and other good- 
ies to help you when you've been stuck 
in that same dungeon for six weeks and 



still don't have an inkling how to get out 
of it. The Revised Ultimate Hint Kit 
Volume II includes, among many other 
things, maps of Beast I & II, Eye of 
Horus, Pool of Radiance, Might & Magic, 
and Infestation; walkthrus of Colonel's 
Bequest, Drakkhen, Leisure Suit Larry 
III, Might & Magic II, Neuromancer. char- 
acter editors for Drakkhen, Champions 
of Krynn, Pirates, and Might & Magic II. 
There are also cheat patches (for unlim- 
ited lives or power) for Xenon, Infesta- 
tion, Killing Game Show, Captain Fizz, 
and more. $26.95. PO Box 4164, 
Wichita Falls, TX, 76310. 

ROCK OUT 



R< 



- octec Electronics has been 
manufacturing Amiga hardware for third 
parties for the past five years or so, and 
now Ihey've started marketing the stuff 
under their own name. They make sev- 
eral external floppy drives, including a 
5.25" (RF 542, $220) switchable 
between 360K and 880K, thus optimiz- 
ing it for Bridgeboard owners. They also 
make a super slim drive that's only 0.9" 
high (RF 332 C, $130) and a standard 
internal floppy drive (RFB 354 C, $120). 
Roctec's 51 2K RAM card, with clock, for 
the A500 is very tiny and has a switch 
that can be mounted outside the com- 
puter to turn it on and off. It retails for 
$79. More interesting is an external virus 
protection device. The RocKnight ($50) 
plugs into your external drive port and 
then an external drive is plugged into it. 
The little box has an LED readout of 
which track is currently being accessed, 
along with two red buttons. One button 
will prevent any writing to the floppy, 
while the other disables any writing to 
the bootblock. The box will even sound 
an alarm if something fishy (or virus-y) 
tries anything funny with your floppy. 
Roctec also offers a very sleek replace- 
ment mouse (RM-300C) for $50. And 
the company offers a low-cost ($300) 
genlock with fade and dissolve func- 
tions. The RocGen can be switched 
between internal and external power 
sources. 170 Knowles Drive. Suite 202. 
Los Gatos, CA 95030. 408-379-1713. 



10 .info MAY 1991 



MAGE PROCESSING'S COMMON 'GROUND 









#"Jlfe 




,o 



J-^ 








I 





^*p v 


^RIcTBh 




INCORPORATED 


BBBB! 






\f * I ^i i 


933 






---"" ■ -■; :'* \ j jf «t '■• . ' --".■ 



P^ CD 



Circle #108 on the Reader Service Card 



NEW 




U C T S 



□ Eutionl 



Auto-satire from 

HyperBook's 

romance novel 

generator 

demo. 



MINIM 



Waiting alone in the study, by the fiercely-staring portrait she so 
loathed, witS the scent of almond Hossoms mi frangipani wafting in 
from outside, the frightened girl thought once mora of former U.S. 
President Jimmy Carter, the 'hooded visitor* in her recurring dream. 
Tie was now, according to that television program, the hapless 
captive of mind-devouring space aliens. 

Then came a confused chorus of greetings from the courtyard, and 
she instinctively checked her fingernails. Tie was here! "I've 
thought of you every minute I've Been away, my Oriental pearlj" 
hi said gwietfy, ffexing his sweaty biceps, and she wondered if 
this would fee a good time to remind him about the boofts he 
had borrowed. 




HYPER TOME 

1 he hypermedia bandwagon 
is rolling along at full steam and every- 
one seems to be jumping on. The latest 
hyperproduct we've seen is Gold Disk's 
HyperBook. Written by .info technical 
support editors Chris Zamara and Nick 
Sullivan, it's the simplest to use applica- 
tions generator we've seen yet. The 
interface is very easy to navigate and 
provides control over page creation, 
text, buttons, lists, graphics, and about 
anything you could want for making a 
killer presentation or other application. 
Probably the best thing about it is that 
the system is all up front; you don't have 
to wade through layer upon layer of 
menus and requesters to get anything 
done. Virtually everything is accom- 
plished by point-and-click, and you can 
even run other applications from within 
HyperBook. For example, there are 
menu items for running your favorite 
wordprocessor and/or graphics program. 
The real heart of HyperBook is ARexx, 
with the support so well done that HB 
could very well become the standard 
front-end for ARexx. About the only 
things lacking in HyperBook are direct 
support for sound and music, but with 
ARexx it's a fairly simple matter to do it 
yourself. In fact, by creating your own 
ARexx functions HyperBook can be 
expanded to the limits of your imagina- 
tion. One of the best things about the 



package is the disk full of examples. 
Software usually takes itself far too seri- 
ously, but Chris and Nick have pulled 
out all the stops and devised examples 
that will have you rolling on the floor. 
Pictured is our favorite, a romance novel 
generator. It picks phrases at random 
from a list of classically loony cliches 
and plugs them into two paragraphs that 
will make you laugh out loud. Other 
examples include a comprehensive 
ARexx guide, an illustrated version of 
Lewis Carroll's Jabberwocky a very 
useful appointment book/calendar, a 
glossary of delightfully obscure words, 
and many others. $99.95 from Gold 
Disk, 5155 Spectrum Way, Unit 5, Mis- 
sissauga, ON Canada L4W 5A1. 416- 
602-4000. 

FONTS 

I here's a saying that you can 
never be too rich or too Ihin, to which we 
would add that you can never have 
enough fonts. Shereff Systems obvi- 
ously agrees and has released a collec- 
tion of new fonts to use with the Video 
Toaster's character generator. The nov- 
elty is lhat they don't have to be con- 
verted; they're written in the Toaster's 
font structure. There are 17 different 
styles, anti-aliased, of course, and they 
come in 26, 38, 50, and 66 scanline 
sizes. Continuing the peculiar new tradi- 
tion of naming computer things after 



kitchen devices and food products, 
Shereff calls the three disk collection 
Bread & Butter. If that still isn't enough 
characters for you, and you need some 
new ones for non-7basfef uses, Shereff 
has another three disk set, Video Fonts 
II, which consists of seventeen styles, 
each in four sizes. These fonts conform 
to the Amiga ColorText standard, are 
anti-aliased, and designed to go along 
with Shereffs Pro Video series charac- 
ter generator/titling software (though 
they'll work equally well for other pur- 
poses). 15075 SW Koll Parkway, Suite 
G, Beaverton, OR 970106. 503-626- 
2022. 

THE CORRECT TIME 

J\ Canadian company called 
Digital Processing Systems is shipping 
what they call their Personal TBC, a 
video timebase corrector on a card that 
fits into one of the PC slots in an A2000 
or A2500. Listing at $995, this is the first 
timebase corrector we've seen for under 
$1000. Designed to work with the 
Toaster, up to four of them can be 
installed in a single computer and it 
boasts full frame storage for infinite win- 
dow liming correction. It's compatible 
with any VCR, including Super-VHS and 
Hi-8. For more information, contact Digi- 
tal Processing Systems, Inc.. 55 Nugget 
Ave., Unit #10, Scarborough, ON, 
Canada M1S 3L1. 416-754-3323. 

RAM FOR EWE 



Gr 



treat Valley Products is ship- 
ping their new Series II RAM Expan- 
sion board for the A2000 series. It 
comes with two megs of auto-config 
memory installed, and it's easily 
expandable to eight megs via SIMM 
modules. The thing also supports the six 
meg configuration that provides the opti- 
mum memory for A2088/A2286 bridge- 
board users. Cost of the board is $249, 
which includes the two megs of factory- 
installed memory, with each additional 
two meg increment adding $200 to the 
price. GVP, 600 Clark Avenue, King of 
Prussia, PA 19406. 215-337-8770. 



12 .info MAY 1991 





(§&«©» m§m 



\vh 



T¥i 



If you do graphics, animation, games or video on your 
Amiga you need the Mega-Midget Racer 1 



„TM 



* 68030 accelerator 20, 25, 33MHZ same board. 

* Co-processor socket clocked for 20-50MHZ 68881/882 math chip. 

* 68000 is resocketed on board for complete compatibility. 

* Gives you more power than an A3000. 

* Optional Dram expansion ailows 1 -8MB of additional 32-bit ram. 

* Only 68030 accelerator that fits the A500/A1000/A2000. A1000 Call! 

* Creates a monster game machine for programs like Falcon™. 

* Cuts ray-tracing times 30X-60X for Sculpt™ or Turbo Silver™. 

* Speeds up frame rates, screen redraws, and overall performance. 

* Lowest price 68030 accelerator for any Amiga. 

If you need to add more memory to your system for running applications like the Video 
Toaster™, then add 32-bit memory the least expensive way with the Mega-Midget Racer. CSA 
offers the best price/performance answer for upgrading your Amiga A2000 with the capability 
to add 19 MB's of system memory. Why pay for an expensive solution when the Mega-Midget 
Racer gives you everything you need to expand your system without spending a fortune on 
the accelerator. Don't just add memory to your Amiga. Add 32-bit memory the least 
expensive way with the Mega-Midget Racer™ by CSA. 



A50O. A 1000. A2000 and Amiga are trademarks of Commodore Amiga Inc. 
MC-68O0O. 68030, 6888 1. and 68882 are irademarks of Motorola Inc. 
Mega-Midgei Racer is a trademark of Computer System Associates, Inc. 
Video Toaster is a trademark of NewTek. 




COMPUTER SYSTEM ASSOCIATES 

7564 Trade Street 
San Diego, C A 921 21 
(619)566-3911 



Circle #103 on the Reader Service Card. 



NEW 




U C T S 



Design and print 

your own circuits 

with Centaur's 

Pro-Net and 

Pro- Board 

series. 



ON THE CIRCUIT 




c 



entaur Software is shipping 
four new schematic/printed circuit board 
design packages. Developed by Prolific, 
Inc., the four boxes are actually two ver- 
sions of a pair of complementary pro- 
grams. Pro-Net Personal ($179.95) and 
Pro-Board Personal ($179.95) provide 
a menu-driven system for creating circuit 
schematics, with such features as auto- 
matic device number/section assign- 
ment, variable template size (which fol- 
lows MIL-STD 860), a library of pre- 
drawn devices, bus bundles, grid snap, 
rubberbanding, DeMorgan equivalence, 
signal name stepping, and dynamic 
error checking. The Pro-Board package 
is the artwork generation half of the 
complete package and is billed as an 
intelligent, single line auto-router with 
high density capability. It also features 
automatic layering, which permits the 
user to route a pair of signal layers with- 
out specifying the active layer first. 
Other features include adding vias on 
the fly (as well as adding them to exist- 
ing traces with a query), automatic 
generation of power and ground planes, 
dynamic design rule checking, and 
library parts down to 0.001". The result 
of all your labor can be printed on dot 
matrix through Preferences for rough 
proofing, and the program directly sup- 
ports HPGL laser printers, plotters, and 
Gerber photo plotters. The second set of 



programs are Pro-Net Professional 
($499.95) and Pro-Board Professional 

($499.95). Besides the price, the pri- 
mary difference between the two ver- 
sions is that the Professional series 
includes post-processing capabilities, 
such as automatic generation of net 
lists, bills of materials, component maps, 
signal page references, and automatic 
error checking. Among other things, 
these advanced functions include the 
ability to check the component place- 
ment according the the net list, generate 
power and ground planes automatically 
per the net list, and automatic continuity 
checking. For more information, Centaur 
can be contacted at PO Box 4400, 
Redondo Beach, CA 90278. 213-542- 
2226. 

MEDIA SHOWOFF 



D, 



'ue to ship by the time this 
hits print. MediaShow (the preliminary 
title was ShowMaker) is Gold Disks 
entry into the multimedia wars. The pro- 
gram is billed as a multimedia 
sequencer, which by exploiting the 
Amiga's multitasking, can be loading 
one segment of an animation or presen- 
tation while another is playing. Media- 
Show has a built in video titler that can 
overlay text on top of whatever is play- 
ing on the screen and includes such 
effects as outlines, dropshadows. and 
multi-color extrusions. There are also 



built-in transitions, wipes, fades, and the 
like. It uses a timeline metaphor for con- 
trolling what happens when and it sup- 
ports files from most popular paint, ren- 
dering, sound, music, and animation 
packages. MediaShow will retail for 
$129.95. Gold Disk, 5155 Spectrum 
Way, Unit 5, Mississauga, ON Canada 
L4W5A1. 416-602-4000. 



CARDS 



We 



e are always looking for 
things to make life around an Amiga a 
little easier, and Vidia's reference cards 
fit the bill nicely. The latest they've pub- 
lished include the Guide to Profes- 
sional Page ($6.95), which is primarily a 
sample book of typefaces, rules, 
screens, symbols, pattern fills, and the 
like so you can see what something 
looks like before you go the trouble of 
putting it on your page. The Amiga Pro- 
grammer's Quick Reference Guide 
($6.95) is just that, with an emphasis on 
C and assembler code. Also available is 
a new version of the Amiga Graphics 
Reference Card ($2.95), which now 
includes information on the A3000 
modes, PAL, and 24-bit hardware. PO 
Box 1180, Manhattan Beach, CA 90266. 
213-379-7139. 

SOLUTION TO A GLARING 
PROBLEM 

(_, omputer Safety Products 
has introduced an aerosol spray-on 
plastic coating called Glare Shield that 
is applied directly to the screens of com- 
puter monitors and television sets. CSP 
claims that the spray dramatically 
reduces glare, reflection, and ultraviolet 
emissions. Annoying related problems 
such as eye strain, blurred vision, and 
fatigue are also reported to be greatly 
reduced. One three ounce can will pro- 
vide a permanent coating for three stan- 
dard monitors. Glare Shield contains no 
fluorocarbons. Now if they can only find 
a way to keep the dust from sticking to 
the monitor. Computer Safety Products, 
5440 S.W. Westgate Dr., Suite 250, 
Portland, OR 97221 . Tel 503-293-3081 . 



m 



14 ,infO MAY 1991 










WF 


P 



N 




^^^■1 



■*$*>*. 



SqqHq Mou^q 



Finally a fantastic mouse for only $49.95. The Beetle Mouse has a resolution of 320dpi and is 
economically designed to fit your hand. New light weight components make the Beetle Mouse 
ultra-light and fast with high quality switches that will last. Winner of the TIDEX 90' Award for 
innovative product design. Available for the Amiga and Atari computers. Includes MOUSE PAD! 

TALON TECHNOLOGY INC. 



243 N. Hwy 101 Ste. #11, Solana Beach, Ca. 92075 

TEL: (619) 792-651 1 FAX: (619) 792-9023 

Prices subject to change without notice. Shipping and handling are extra. *** Dealer Inquiries Welcome *** 

Circle #133 on the Reader Service Card 



NEW 




U C T S 



Screen made 
in about 30 

seconds 
with Scala, 

a new 

presentation 

package from 

GVP. 



LA SCALA 




Ir 



Imported and released in the 
US by Great Valley Products, Scala was 
actually developed in Norway. It is one 
of the easiest to use video titler/ presen- 
tation packages we've seen. It was 
shown at the Amiga '90 show in Cologne 
last year, as well as at the Commodore 
Christmas Show in London, and was 
knocking socks across the room at both. 
Scala comes on 8 disks, five of which 
contain some of the best backdrops and 
texlures we've seen, including fabric, 
several types of stone, grass, sky, and 
various patterns, all rendered in 16-cotor 
hi-res. It also includes a collection of 
fonts in various sizes and another col- 
lection of palettes, which can be loaded 
and applied to the backdrops with very 
good results. The transitions that are 
used to go from screen to screen are 
among the best we've seen and they're 
very fast. Most tilling programs have to 
render the transitions, but Scala per- 
forms them immediately and it's very 
easy 1o change from one to another if 
you decide you'd rather have a different 
one. These transitions are limited to the 
ones provided, but the selection is more 
than ample. Text can be entered directly 
(or imported) and automatically format- 
ted, and you can add dropshadows, out- 
lines, or make it 3D. The text layouts 
you design can be saved so you don't 
have to start from scratch each time. 



There is even provision for placing but- 
tons on the screens so the presentation 
can be controlled with mouseclicks, and 
you can also incorporate animations 
(ANIM format) into your presentation. 
The presentations you create can be 
saved as stand-alone files and there's a 
freely-distributable player included with 
the package. Before you rush out and 
buy Scala, though, you should be aware 
that it requires 1 MB of chip RAM and 
won't work without it. $395.00 from GVP. 
600 Clark Avenue, King of Prussia, PA 
19406.215-337-8770. 

SAXON 1.1 

1 here are so many new 
things in Saxon Publisher that we 
thought it deserved to be in New Prod- 
ucts. It appears to be a ground-up 
rewrite of the original page layout soft- 
ware. Among the more notable new fea- 
tures of Version 1 .1 are automatic 
hyphenation, the ability to view facing 
pages to see how the spread is going to 
look, variable tabs, two new kerning utili- 
ties (one internal for locally changing 
kerning pairs and another external one 
for global changes to the kerning table), 
new screen fonts, hot key coordinate 
support, and measurement in metric and 
picas/points. Automatic page numbering 
in either Arabic or Roman numerals is 
now possible, and attributes such as 
size, font, color, and so on can be set. 



Most of the rewrite, though, seems to 
have been concerned with color control. 
CMYK (cyan, magenta, yellow, and 
black) can be specified by percentage 
and there's a function to compensate for 
printer's ink impurity (believe il or not, 
the color of ink can vary considerably 
from batch to batch). In addition, the 
adjusted color can be viewed in an 
onscreen color preview, which Saxon 
Publisher accomplishes by running an 
internal color separation process and 
then displaying the chosen color. (You'll 
have to make sure your monitor is accu- 
rately adjusted.) Speaking of color sepa- 
ration, Saxon is using a new technology 
called APEX (Adaptive Photographic 
Extraction), which they claim gives 
results comparable to output from Mac- 
intosh page composition programs like 
Quark Express, PageMaker, and Ven- 
tura Publisher. If all this weren't enough, 
the company has also rewritten the 
manual and the program has been 
made compatible with AmigaDOS 2.0. 
Price of Saxon Publisher has been low- 
ered to $360.00 US and registered own- 
ers of the first version will be getting 1 .1 
for free. For more information, contact 
Saxon Industries, 14 Rockcress Gar- 
dens. Nepan, ON Canada K2G-5A8. 
613-228-8043. 

ONLY FROM THE MIND OF 
COMMODORE 



Wr 



hat rationale was behind 
Commodore spending the time to create 
Amiga Clips, Volume 1 : Sound 
Effects? We can only speculate. This 
collection of sampled sound effects is for 
use with AmigaVision, but equal or bet- 
ter samples can be found on nearly any 
online service, BBS. or PD collection. 
These are in standard 8SVX format and 
include samples of animals, bells, whis- 
tles, phones, weather, clocks, human 
voices, and so on. Price is $29.95. 1200 
Wilson Drive, West Chester, PA 19380. 
215-431-9100. 



16 .info MAY 1991 



LET'S FACE IT- MAIL ORDER HOUSES ARE NOT ALL THE SAME! 






AMIGA AMIGA AMIGA AMIGA AMIGA AMIGA AMIGA AMIGA AMIGA AMIGA AMIGA AMIGA AMIGA AMIGA AMIGA AMIGA AMIGA AMIGA 



% ABACUS 

* Amiga OOS Toolbox 24 
^ AssemPio 60 

BorterText 90 

rf Da: aRo! reive 43 

7t Te*tPro 43 
^ ABACUS BOOKS 

5 3D Graphics Prog l-n BASIC 17 
^ ArrugaDOS Quick Reference . 10 

C for Beginners - '6 
^ Clw Advanced Programmers - 26 

JS Desktop Video Book 16 

— Amiga f.1. tj inner $ Book 14 
X Amioa Printers In. Out Book 25 

< Amiga Basic In Out Book- .9 
Amiga Printers In Out Book 25 
Graphics In Out Book • 24 

< Prog Giode Book - 24 
O aov Prog Guide Boc* - 24 
5 Drives In Gut Book- 22 
^; AmigaDOSInOui Book- 56 

Making Music Beck a CJsk 25 

Companion Disk Avail 1 3 

< ACADEMY SOFTWARE 

_ Typng, Tutor .21 

2 ACCESS 

* Heavy Umi 30 
Leaderooard Dual Pak 21 

rf Mean Streets 30 

Ji World Class Leadertoarc) 20 

= Work! Class F'C #1 .15 
S ACCOLADE 

** Bar Games. 27 

Bubble Ghost . 10 

rf Elvtra 36 

L-i Elvira Hmts 13 

— Fas! Break 27 
£ Fourth & Inches 15 
*t Fourth & inches Team 10 

Graphics Studio 10 

Hardball II 30 

^f Harmony 27 

O Heal Wave ... 27 

3 ISJMdO ... 33 

< Jack Nicklaus Unlimited - 36 
Jack NicWaus Goit 30 
J Nicklaus Course 1 ,2 or 3 16 

< Grand Pn* C^ctat 18 
fj Mean tB 27 



2 
< 


Star Control 


30 


Stnke Aces 


M 




Test Drive 1 


15 


< 


Tea! Drive II 


30 


California, Challenge 


16 


European Challenge - 


16 


& 


Super Cars 


Mi 


< 


Muscle Cars 

ACT10NWARE 


ie 




Adionware Phasar Gun 


39 




Capone 


24 




Creature 


i>4 




Pnson 


24 




ANTIC 






Phasat va 


M 


< 


ARTW0RX 




O 


BrirJge&O 


24 


5 


Centerfold Squares 


20 




Ufskwo<d French 


IB 




Link word German 


IB 




Link word Greek 


IB 


< 


Linkwcrd Hater 


IB 


Q 


Unkword Spanish 


IB 


2 
< 


Puijto Mann 


ia 


Stnp Pc*er-ll 


24 


S Poker Data i-3«a. 


\b 




ASDG 




< 


Cygnus Ed Pro 


60 


O 


BAJDVILLE 




5 


Award Maker Data Sports 


IS 


< 


Award Maker Data Educatonal: 
BETrlESDA SOFTWARE 


16 




Damocles 


27 




Dragon s Lair n 


42 




Gridiron 


IB 


"3- 


Wayne Gf&uky Hockey 


W 


< 


Hockey League Sim 

BLUE RIBBON BAKERY 


24 


< 
O 

< 


Bars 4 Pipes 


180 


Who'Whai ^Vhe^■e'When' 


60 


BRTTANNICA 




Arehapeligos ... 


21 


Desigflasaurus 






Jigsaw . . . 




< 


SRODERBUNO 




a 


Carmen USA 


.-.. 


2 
< 


Carmen. Europe 


XI 


Carmen Trnw 


.-.. 


Carmen World 


X 






27 


< 


[.'inn Play Basketball 


■x 


Prince ol Persia 


24 



BR0DER9UND 

Srxifllepuck Gale 24 

Kant s Farm 24 

MeGee 24 

PCTjOnary ... 24 

Sim City 30 

Sim City Planners Bock 15 

Sim Terrain Editor 15 

Wings Of Fury . . 24 

WoKpack 33 

BYTE BY BYTE 

Sculpt JO Jr 1 05 

CADVISJON (NT 
XCad Designer II .90 

XCad Prolessonai 300 

CAPC0M 

Slnder II 37 
CENTAUR 

B.AD 30 

DUDE 30 

My Paint 30 

World Alias 36 

CENTRAL COAST 

Disk ZDrak 30 

Das, 2 Dos 33 

Ou irtwoack 42 

Quarterback Tools 54 

CINEMAWARE 

Arcade Fever .26 

Bratn Blaster 38 

Dofcndw of The Crown . 30 

DiagoHord ... 32 

Federalwr . 32 

rt Came Fiom rre Desert 32 

□esert I! Data Dts.k tS 

King of Chicago . .17 

Lotos qI The Rising Sun 32 
flockel RanoetThiee Stooges 32 

SOI 17 

Sinbad . . 17 

TV Spcms Basketball 32 

TV Sports Football 32 

Wings .... 32 

COMMODORE 

Amiga Logo . 66 

Amigavisjon BS 

COMPUTE! BOOKS 

ArrvqdDQS RefeierKe GuiOe IB 

Beginners Guide Amiga '6 

Amiga Programmers Gu«e 16 

Ins-de Amga G-rapntcS 16 

Elementary Amiga Basic 13 

Advanced Amiga Basic 16 

ML Programming Guide 16 

Kids & the Amiga 13 

Amiga App^caycTS 16 

1st or 2nd Book of Amiga 16 

C0NSULTR0H 

Cross Dos v4 24 

□ATA EAST 

Bad Dudes 13 

Batman-Arcade 0» Mowe 27 

Chamber ol Sa-MLrtants 30 

Drakkhen 36 

Orakkhen Hints . . 13 

Full Melai Plane! 30 

Monday Night Football 36 

Platoon .... 15 

North & South .27 

Robocop .13 

DATA MAX 

DataTa* 15 

□AV10S0N 

Math Btasiet Pius 30 

DESIGNING MINOS 

Byte i Back 42 

Crosstword ConstruCDOf 1 24 

Great States II 24 

Hon* Fronf . . . 60 

MkJdte East World Touf 25 

Top Form 54 

DIGITEK 

DmowOfS 24 

Hole in Oct-e Mtnatu't Go^r 24 

Hole in One Data #3 15 

Targhan . 24 

DISNEY 

AnamaKon SludiO .108 

Duck Tales 27 

DR. T SOFTWARE 

Copyist OTP . . .195 

KCS Level II v3 225 

Tiocr Cub 60 

EAGLE TREE 

Bulther 24 

Distant Armies 27 

ELAN DESIGNS 

Elan Porlcumer . 90 



ELECTRONIC ARTS 

60S Attack Sub 32 

68fl Ahack Sub Hmis 1 2 

Altered Beas.t 32 

Aquanaut 26 

Bards Tate I 16 

Bards Tale II . 16 

Bards I or II Hints 10 

BAT ... 32 

Block Out . 26 

Budokan . 26 

Chessmaster 21 00 32 

Cnbbage King Girt King 26 

Delude Pant-Til 95 
Deluto Music Construction 63 

Dduu 1 Pnrt It 51 

Deluxe Video III PnotoLab 95 

Ean weaker Baseball - 16 

Weaver Comm Disk 15 

Weaver m Stats 15 

Emptre 32 

F 16 Combat Pilot .16 

F-29 Retaiialor 32 

F A-16 Interceptor 15 

Flood 26 

Golden Axe 32 

Harpoon 38 

Hound ol the Snadow 16 

Hunt For Red Oct 20 

immortal 32 

Impfiujir . 26 

Ifldanapcfei 500 32 

Lost Paitoi 32 

Magic Fly 26 

Maws Eteacon Typing 32 

M>gtii A Magic M 36 

M=ght & Mage II Hrts 13 

Nighibreed 26 

■,,;!' •-..-.- 23 

Nuclear War 32 

Populus 32 

Powcrdfome 1 6 

Powe*mofiger 32 
F ,: . ■ ::, ■■> . 26 

Pro Tennis Tour 2S 

Puffys Saga 23 

Puule Storybook 26 
Rhyming Hotebook . 25 

Si arf tight 32 

Siartlight Hints 13 

Street Rod 26 

Tunnel 5 0* Annagedon 26 

TariM (>..-_- 3S 

Unreal 32 

Lntouchab«s 26 

Vegas Gambler 26 

Zany Gol1 15 

ELECTRONIC ZOO 

Berlin 1946 24 

Black Gaci 24 

Legend of Faercjnaii 24 

Leoendo* Wi*am Tell 24 
Spherical 

Tennis Cup . 24 

T mas ore Trap 24 

Viking Child 24 

Xiphos 24 

ETHOS 

Casino Fever 24 

Poker Scitart- 21 

FREE SPIRIT 

Amikit Dnve Align . . 30 

Barney Bear- Farm 2* 

Barney Beai-School 21 

Samey Bear- Space 2 1 

Oragomcape 10 

Ooctr> Ami 30 

FTl 

Dungeon Master I 24 

Durvjeo*" Master I Hints 12 

Dungeon Master i| 24 

GOLD DISK 

ComicSerter SQ 
ComicScner An Superneroes 21 
CorwcSf tier Art Soenee Fk 23 
CorrHcSener An Fuwiy Figures 21 

Desktop Budget 42 

Font Set I 21 

Gold Speii-M 27 

LaseiSCnpl 27 

'/.■, cSfiifi 42 

TheOHiot 1BC 

Pagesetiet II 76 

Proiessijriai Draw 120 

PtoiessonaJ Page 160 

IMPULSE 

Imagine . . 210 
Turbo &lver . . .60 

INF0C0H 
Arthur OueSI Fa ExcaKHT 20 

Banknech 20 

Jourrcy 20 

Shogun t5 

INNERPRISE 

Apptentce 20 



INNERPRISE 
Banio Sguadfcm 
Barnes Bond - Slt'.i !h 

Low Dutdiimr i Ml ■■ 

Globulus 

Persian Gulf Inferno 

Piauge 

Turrican .... 

INTERPLAY 
Battle Chess 
Checkmate 
Dragon Wats 
Dragon Wars Hints 
Future Wars 
Neuromancef 
Neu romancer Hints 

INN0VATR0KICS 
Can Do 
Power Windows v2 5 

INN0VISK0N 

Broadcast Titter v2 

KARA GRAPHICS 

AnnntOfits Ml or III 
Headlines I 

>■■-!' ' -I-- II 

SubHeads 

KARMASOFT 
Power PmcBll 

KOEl 

Bandil Kings Chinj 
Genghis Khan 
Nobunagas AmSitK>n 
Romance ol the 3 Kingdoms 

KOKAMI 
Back to (he Fuluce II 
Blades ol Steer 
Cast iu van a 
Double Dnbbie 
Super Cpntra 
Ttsonage Mutant Turtles 
LAKE FOREST LOGIC 

Dish Mechanic 
Macro Rami 

LATTICE 

Lattice C DeveOpmen! Camp 
Lattice C-Plus Plus 

LIVE STUDIOS 
Futrue Classic CoHectcns 
Thundeniirike 

LLICASFILWS 
Baniehawks 

indy JonesCfusade Arcade 
1ndy JoryjsCiusade Graphics 
Indy GraphKS Hints 
Loom 
Loom hrts 
Uamac Martsxin l 
Mamac I Hmts 
■. :■- -':- - 
Their Finest Hour 

MAGIC BYTES 
Domination 
Wall Streel 

MAN)! 
Aztec C Dev&opei 
Aztec C Professiorial 
Aitec C SL Debugge* 

MASTERTRONICS 
Clue 
Risk 

Scrabble 
Dbut-ie Dragon II 
Magic Johnson Basketball 
NY Wafnors 
R«:k Davis Soccer 
Shark Attack Golf 
Spirit ot Exca'ibur 
Super Oil Roafl 
2 War in Middle Eartn , 
MEDIAGENIC 

.BeycxvJ Dar*; Castle 
Ghostbusters H 
Rampage 

M1CR0DEAL 
[].■.[.!. .:■ 
Hisott Basic Pro 

MICROILLUSIONS 

BLack Jack Academy 
Faetyia'e Adventure 
Music X Jr 
Photon Pant v2 

MiCROLEAL'GE 

WWF Wtestling 

MICROMASTER 

Family Tree v2 

MICROPHOSE 
3DPoot 

C*» Doom s Revenge 
EMe 

Elite Him Book by leroy 
Land, Sea. S Air 



HfCROPROSE 

Pro Soccer 

Mtdwrnte- 
Ml PLatoon 
Red Slorm RjSing 
Siieni Service 
Stunt Track Racer 
Weird Dreams . 

MICRO STYLE 
Sim u lea 

MICRO SYSTEMS 

Analyze 
Excellence 
Organize 
Scribble' Plannum 
The Works - Plaimurrt 

MINDSCAF-E 
Arcade Megahits «2 
Balance of Power 1990 
Captive . . 
The Colony . 
Haney Davidson 

NATURAL GRAPHICS 

Scene Geneiator 

NEW HOfllZOKS 
ProwrteS I 
ChJlCk Wrrte 

NEWTEK 
DtgiPairt 3 
DtaMtM GoU 

OMNITRENO 

Paladin 

Paiadm Quest Disk i 

ORIGIN 
AutOduel 
Moebius 
Ogie 
Ontrgn 

Quasi lor Clues I 
dues! for Clues II 
Qj-.-il lor C"uL-i III 
Space Rogue 
Times Of Lore 
Llrunalll 

Ultrna-IV 

Ultima V . . 
Wmdwalkei 

OXXI 
A- Talk in 
Aud<omas!er III 
VidooScape 3D 
Videaliiler 

PARSEC SOFTWARE 

Operation Spruance 

POLARWARE 
At the Zoo 

Classic Board Games 
Dinosaurs Are Forever 
Numbers Count 
Oppcsrtas Attract 
Operaion Combat 

PRECISION 
Supeibase Personal i 
Superbase Personal -II 
Superba&e P(0 v3 
SuperpJan 

PROGRESSIVE 

3D FTotessfoftai . 
Animation StaKm 
Gaud Bandit 
Diskmasier vl 4 
DR Term Pro 
Duniap Lltf' ires 
Intro CAD 
Intro CAD Plus 
Micro Lawyer 
PDC-MaU 
JHra Desjgn 

PSYGNOSIS 
Anarchy . . 

Awesome . . 

Baal 

B^OOd Money 
Capia-n Fizz 
Carthage . . 

Chronoquesl 1 1 
Infpslalicm 
Kilting Game Show 
Matnv Marauders 
\ "; 

QHU 

Shadow of the Boast % 

Shadow of the Beast u 

Spenbound 

Stryx .... 

READYSOR 

A Mat II 
&4EmulaW-ll[5OO2O0O> 

[ir.i.j.-f-, Ll'- 

Dragons Lair-Time Wiirp 

Space Ace 

Wralh of the Demon 



SHEREFF SYSTEMS 

Ptn Video GoU '50 

SIERRA 

A-'O Tank Killer 3d 

Black Cauldron 24 

Codename Iceman 36 

Cedename: Iceman Hints 10 

Colonels Bequest 36 

Conquesl of Cameloi 36 

Gold Rush 24 

Hero s Dues! 36 

Hoyie s Book of Games 1 or 2 21 

King s Quest 4 36 

Leisure Surf Larry 2 36 

Letsute Surf Larry 3 36 

Manhunter New York 30 

Manhiunler San Francisco 30 

Mmod Up Mother Goose 20 

Police Quest 2 36 

Space Quest 3 36 

SOFT BYTE 

Lotto Program 24 

SOFT LOGIK 

PageStieam v2 i iBO 

SOFTWARE VISIONS 

Mcrofiche Filer Plus 60 

SOFTWOOD 

E t-ctionic Thesauraus 30 

Pen Pai 90 

SPECTRUM HOLOBYTE 

Faces-Terns III 24 

Falcon 30 
Falcon Missions I 

Falcon Missions II 20 

So-Mare Royale 21 

'..-, . i 21 

Welllns-Tetns II 21 

STRATEGIC SIMULATIONS 

Buck Rogers 32 

Champions ot Krynn 32 

Curse ol the Vure Bonds 32 
Azure Bonds Htnts 

Dtagon Strike 32 

Dungeon Mast Assl vl 20 

Hinsfar ... 15 

Hill5lar Hmi Book 8 

Overrun ... 3B 

Pool Ol Radiance 32 

Pool Hmts 13 

Second Front 32 

Siorni Across Europe 36 

Sword of Aragon 32 

Typhoon o' Steei 3B 

Waigame Construction Set 25 

STRATEGIC STUDIES 

Wailoids 30 

SUBiOGIC 

Flight Simulator-ll 30 

Scene&sk 7.9or1 \ 20 

Scenery Disk Hawaiian 20 
Scene Disk W Europe or Japan 20 

Jet 30 

SUNRIZE IND 

Perfect Sound 6B 

SYBEX BOOKS 

Amiga Programmer s Guide 19 

Amiga Handbook Vol ior2 19 

TAITO 

Amiga Action Pack 20 

TITUS 

F.iO PUfSUiT am 2? 

Firo & Farge! II 27 

ttohway PatrcJ ll 27 

WiW Street 27 

TOHr SEVER* 

Said Tale I Hinl Disk IS 

Kings Qufist 3 Hint Disk 15 

Leisuie Lairy I Hint Disk IS 

S^adowgale Hinl Disk IS 

Space Quest III Hinl Disk . - 15 

Zak McKracken Hinl DffiX 15 

UNISON WORLD 

Prmtmasler Pius 24 

Art Gallery I & 2 Combe 24 
An Gallery 3 .20 

Fonts & Borders Zt 

VEG* TECHNOLOGIES 

Amik4 Amiga 24 

VIRTUAL REALITY 

Dt&iam Suns 42 

Vrsla 60 

VisuPro . SO 

Vista Data - Mais .48 

Vista Data - Call' 1 4B 
WILLIAM S. H AWES 

AREXK 30 

WSHELL 3€ 

WORDPEflFECT CORP. 

Wddperiect 150 

WoidperteCt Lihrary 7B 



3 

a 
> 

> 

o 



p 
> 



> 
s 

S 



s 
B 
> 



s 



WE CARRY A COMPLETE LINE OF ACCESSORIES FOR YOUR COMPUTER - ASK FOR OUR FREE CATALOG 

AMIGA AMIGA AMIGA AMIGA AMIGA AMIGA AMIGA AMIGA AMIGA AMIGA AMIGA AMIGA AMIGA AMIGA AMIGA AMIGA AMIGA AMIGA 



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AND IBM 

Please call or 

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If You Prefer, You May Mail Your Order To: 

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METHODS OF PAYMENTS - We accept money orders, cetti'iect checks Viisa, MC. 
and Discover Previous customers may a'so pay by COD or personal check All monies 
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^Circle #13S on the Rt 



ader Service CardJ 



NEWS 




VIEWS 



JURY VERDICT 

I homas Rattigan, former 
President and CEO of Commodore, has 
won his nine million dollar lawsuit against 
his former employer. The breach of con- 
tract suit was filed just days after Ratligan 
was escorted off Commodore's property 
in April, 1987 by security guards, who 
were reportedly under direct orders trom 
Commodore's Chairman of the Board, 
Irving Gould. Rattigan had served in his 
position only for about a year of his five- 
year contract. As you may recall, he was 
credited with pulling Commodore back 
from the brink of bankruptcy, but clashed 
with Gould over his high profile, among 
other things. The final straw, according to 
industry insiders, was Rattigan's photo 
appearing on the cover of the now 



defunct Commodore magazine, which 
was published by Commodore. On 
February 14, a federal jury in New York 
found in favor of Rattigan. who at one 
time was the president of Pepsi Cola and 
is now CEO of G. Heileman Brewing in 
LaCross, Wl, makers of Old Style beer. 
Testifying at the trial were Gould and 
Alexander Haig, former Secretary of 
State and Commodore board member. 
Judge Michael Mukasey has yet to deter- 
mine the cash award in the case, and at 
presstime Commodore was trying to 
reach a settlement with Rattigan. 

SPA NOMINEES 



are Maxis' SimEarth (scheduled for 
Amiga this summer), Accolade's Jack 
Nicklaus' Unlimited Golf & Course 
Design and Star Control, Cinemaware's 
Wings, Disney's DuckTales. and Spec- 
trum Holobyte's Faces. We'll let you 
know how the voting turns out. 

CEE DEE OR NOT TO BE 



G 



Ar 



Lmong the candidates for the 
software awards at the Software Pub- 
lishers Association's Spring Symposium 



. D-based software develop- 
ment seems to a rough road to follow, at 
least financially. Cinemaware, the stan- 
dard-setting game publisher of such clas- 
sics as Defender of the Crown and // 
Came from the Desert, recently laid off a 
goodly portion of their staff. As of this writ- 
ing, and contrary to some flying rumors. 
Cinemaware has not filed bankruptcy. 
According to industry insiders, the main 



MISTEAK 

/ Readers point out that there were 
two disks with the number 343 listed 
in the April Public Domain column 
about MGHSoft. The Space Slide 
Show disk should have been #346. 
Jeff says I can blame him for this 
one, even though he sent me a cor- 
rection and I forgot to fix it. So I 
blame Jeff. 

NEW VERSIONS 

/ MegageM is shipping version 4.0 
of FractalPro, their Mandelbrot, 
Julia Set, and cube set HAM fractal 
exploration program. The most 
notable new features include the 
ability to pan in eight directions, cre- 
ate tweened sequences between two 
images, panning/zooming in four 
increments for smooth animations, 
and best of alt in our book, the abil- 
ity to save Digital Elevation Maps 
compatible with Virtual Reality Lab- 
oratories' VistaPro landscape genera- 
tor. What that means is that you can 



find an interesting spot in the Man- 
delbrot Set, save a DEM file, load it 
into VistaPro, and render it as if it 
were a real place. As far as we know, 
this is the only Mandelbrot generator 
that can save DEM files. MegageM, 
1903 Adria, Santa Maria, CA 93454. 
805-349-1104. 

/ CanDo is now at version 1.5, Ino- 
vatronics has made their hypermedia 
applications generator compatible 
with AmigaDOS 2,0. improved the 
ARexx support, added database func- 
tions and the ability to have multiple 
windows and multi-screen decks, and 
put in a new script editor. The ANIM 
control as been expanded to include 
cueing and showing ranges of frames, 
and the right mousebutton can now be 
used to launch scripts. Registered 
owners of CanDo can upgrade for 
$40. 8499 Greenville, Suite 209B. 
Dallas, TX 75231. 214-340-4991. 

/ Zardoz Software has fixed a minor 
problem with their Image Finder 
graphic indexing program and called it 
version 1.0B. The difficulty was a 
small one, having to do with running 



1M under 1.3 of AmigaDOS. For 
update info, contact the company at 
61 14 LaSallc Ave.. Suite 304, Oak- 
land. CA 946 1 1 . 4 15-339-6280. 

MOVES 

/ Taito, the game publisher best 
known for arcade shoot-em-ups that 
arc a more than a tittle heavy on vio- 
lence, has reorganized and moved its 
US operations to Chicago from 
Bothell, WA. The new address is 390 
Holbrook Drive. Wheeling, IL 
60090. The new phone number is 
708-520-9280. 

</ M.A.S.T. has a new address at 
1420 Kleppe Lane, Sparks, NV 
89431. 

AVAILABILITY 

/ Remember C Ltd.? Micro-Dyn, 
Inc. has picked up rights to all of C 
Ltd.'s product line and are producing 
Kronos and SCSI hard drive con- 
trollers. They're also offering ser- 
vice and upgrades. For more infor- 
mation, contact Micro-Dyn at 201 1 
S. Washington, Wichita, KS 67211 
316-265-2661. 



18 .info MAY 1991 



Draw Your Own Conclusions 




We think you'll find that 
Pro Vector is an indispensable 
tool for any Amiga 1 artist. 

ProVector is a fast, intutive object-oriented drawing 

program for all Commodore- Amiga models. ProVector is 

a true professional illustration tool which creates 

device-independent drawings, allowing output at the 

maximum resolution of your printer, plotter, film 

recorder, or other compatible device. 

ProVector offers a complete array of easy-to-use 

tools to provide a suprisingly natural feel to 

creating professional quality illustrations. 

In fact, the illustration to the left was created 

entirely in ProVector, then imported into 

Saxon Publisher"" to create this ad. 

ProVector allows you to master colorful 
*<0P illustrations, too. Our unique dithering 

system allows on-screen representations of 256 
colors from a pallette of 16 million, even in hi-res 
interlace mode! Color output takes advantage of 
both your printer's resolution and color capabilities, too! 

At last, you can reach beyond the boundaries of "jaggy" screen 
resolution to produce "Computer Art That Dosen't Look Like Computer 
Art" ... (unless you want it to!), with ProVector! 



• Extremely friendly user interface. 

• Flexible free hand drawing tool. 

• Easy to use Bezier Curve tools. 

• Flow text to any path. 

• Completely User Configurable. 

• Undo up to 255 steps, (limited only by 
available memory). 

• Create up to 256 separate layers that 
can be named, locked, hidden, edited 
and rearranged. 

• Multiple project windows with cut, 
copy & paste functions. 

• Create true hollow objects 
(transparent holes). 

• Editable Fill patterns. 

• Runs on any Commodore Amiga 
model with 1 meg. or more of RAM. 
(AmigaDOS 1 .3 and 2.0 compatible) 

Copyright 1990/1991, Taliesin, Inc. 

ProVector is a trademark of Talk-sin, Inc. Amiga is .1 registered trademark of Commodore- Amiga Inc.. PostScript is a registered 
trademark of Adobe Systems, Inc. ARcxx is a trademark of Wishful Thinking, Inc. Saxon Publisher is a registered trademark of Saxon 
Industries. PageStream is a registered trademark of Soft-Logik Corporation. HP-GL is a registered trademark of Hewlett-Packard, Inc. 



• Magnetize objects for precise 
alignment of joints. 

• Import ProVector drawings directly 
into Saxon Publisher'"' Li & 
PageStream"" 2.1 . 

• Export drawings for use with many 
other Amiga graphics and publishing 
programs in ProVector (IFF-DR2D), 
Encapsulated PostScript™ (EPS) or 
IFF-ILBM formats (includes ability to 
produce super bit maps). 

• Supports any Preferences printer. 

• Includes custom HP-GL m driver for 
plotters and other compatible devices. 

• Fully multi-tasking, ARexx 1 ™ 
compatible, includes several useful 
ARexx macros. 

• Complete on-line help. 



• 256 on-screen dithered colors, palette 
of 16 million. 

• Import any IFF-ILBM image for 
tracing, including HAM. 

• User definable Grid Size with 
Grid-Snap option. 

• Special effects include smoothing of 
straight-line objects into curved 
objects. 

• User selectable measurement system 
(Inches, Pica, Centimeters). 

• Extreme magnification for detail 
work. 

• Keyboard shortcuts for most 
operations. 

• Not copy protected, install on any 
hard drive. 



Taliesin, Inc. 

O. Box 1671 - Ft. Collins, CO 80522 

(303) 484-7321 



Circle #138 on the Reader Service Card 



NEWS 




VIEWS 



cause of their financial woes can be 
traced to Cinemaware's early, heavy 
involvement with interactive CD software 
development. Since Ihere are no CD-I or 
CDTV machines on the markel as yet, 
there's no financial return on what is a 
very expensive development burden. 

In other CD news, Sierra sent out a 
press release stating that they have 
indefinitely postponed a "multimedia 
hardware package." According to a 
spokesperson, the package was to 
have been a third party CD-ROM drive 
bundled with some of Sierra's games. 
However, the whole project has been 
put on hold because of the lack of 
industry standards. In other words, 
Sierra didn't want to put everything 
together only to have it become obso- 
lete the day after it shipped. They are, 
though, still developing for CD, as wit- 
nessed by their recent shipment of 
Mixed Up Mother Goose for the Fujitsu 
FM-Townes. 

It's interesting to note that the main 
hangup in the whole CD-based com- 
puter industry is the lack of hardware. 
There are any number of developers 
working on software and there are sev- 
eral titles ready to ship, but Com- 
modore did not ship their first CDTV 
unit for retail sale until March. Nor are 
there any CD-I machines on the mar- 
ket. If the hardware doesn't materialize 
soon in large quantities and at rea- 
sonable prices, there will undoubtably 
be serious financial problems through- 
out the industry. 

PRICE REDUCTIONS 

According to several dealers, 
the price of Amigas is about to come 
down dramatically. We've heard that a 
500C (the low-end consumer model) may 
come down as far as $399, street price. A 
2000 will reportedly sell for $999, with 
prices on other models similarly slashed. 
Amigas are reported to be going gang- 
busters Europe, where sales in some 
countries are reportedly up by as much 
as 52% during the latest quarter. It should 
be noted that as much as 30% to 50% of 
that growth is directly attributable to a 
weak US dollar, but even after subtracting 



thai percentage, those are some extraor- 
dinary sales figures. With Commodore's 
lowering prices as much as they are, let's 
hope sales pick up as much here in the 
US as they have in Europe. 

AMIGA PLUS "ACQUIRED" 

J\s we mongered in last 
month's Rumor Mill, Amiga Plus has, 
indeed, been "acquired" by AmigaWorld. 



If you subscribed to Amiga Plus, you'll 
now receive AmigaWorld; if you sub- 
scribed to bolh, you'll be getting even 
more issues of AmigaWorld. We're still 
not sure what happened to Amiga Sen- 
try's subscribers; Amiga Plus had an- 
nounced in their last issue that they'd be 
fulfilling Sentry subscriptions, but it is 
unclear whether that deal will be hon- 
ored by AmigaWorld. 



WE FlUMOFl MILL 

DISCLAIMER: The following are among the most entertaining 
rumors we've heard the past month. They are presented for your 

entertainment and amusement only. Please do not make any 

important decisions based on these rumors, as some will prove 

to be inaccurate or just plain false. 



O We understand that the cutbacks 
at Commodore have resulted in an 
overall 10% reduction in the work- 
force, with Customer Support cut by 
50%. Commodore Express, the war- 
ranty return service set up between 
Commodore and Federal Express. 
may lake over Customer Support by 
phone in the near future. 

3 Any new Amiga you purchase 
from now on should have the 2.0 
ROMs in it. If it doesn't, scream. 

O You'll see some changes in the 
June issue of AmigaWorld. We 

understand they're trimming their 
page size back to industry-standard. 
We've also heard that they may be 
dropping below 100 pages. 

Z> Copperman and fellow Apple 
alumni have long been concerned 
with Commodore's "gray market" 
problem - dealers selling Amigas at a 
huge discount to mail-order outfits, 
who then sell them super-cheap to the 
public without having to become 
authorized themselves. Now we hear 
that CBM is setting up a sort of "offi- 



cial gray market" themselves, estab- 
lishing "mega-dealers" who will act 
us authorized distributors to mail- 
order outfits and smaller retail stores. 
Since this effectively eliminates quo- 
tas, it should make the Amiga 
available in a lot more locations. 

D Commodore is on the rise on Wall 
Street. At presstime. Commodore 
stock had sold for as much as 18 3/8 
a share. Enough stock has been trad- 
ing that Commodore has made it into 
the "major mover' segment on cable 
TV's Financial News Network at 
least twice. FNN mentioned CDTV 
and good European sales as con- 
tributing factors, and predicted that 
Commodore might be regarded as 
one of the major up and coming com- 
puter manufacturers of the fust half 
of the 1990s! At least one analyst has 
predicted thai the stock may soon top 
$22 per share. CBM stock was selling 
for 4 1/2 just a few short months ago 
- did you buy when we told you to? 
(For those interested in tracking 
Commodore's stock price, their ticker 
symbol is CBU.) 



20 .info MAY 1991 




Written with SAS/C under AmigaDOS 2.0, Ami-Back is 



NOT JUST A PRETTY FACE! 




TM 



pjf Jim Cumin tidy ft* Jlwliju Pttziuju/ iuujpyjsf 



• Operates on any Amiga computer running AmigaDOS 2.0 or greater. 

• Elegant user interface for easy operation. 

• Allows multiple configurations for a wide variety of backup and restore options. 

• Backs up to floppies, high-density floppies*, harddrives, and SCSI tape drives. 

■ Performs complete, incremental (by date or archive bit), and selective backups. 

• Allows up to 100 file exclusion conditions during backup. 

■ Allows you to replace defective media without interrupting backups. 

• Performs complete or selective restores. 

■ Allows control of protections bits and file datestamps during restores. 

• Allows you to Write-Over, Skip-Over, or Rename files during restores. 

• Allows you to compare backed-up data to system data if data loss is suspected. 

• User-configurable scheduler, Ami-Sched, allows unattended backups. 

• Index files are saved after each backup. 

• Log file keeps track of background scheduler operations. 

• Background backups may be performed manually. 

• Technical support for registered users is provided by phone, support BBS. GEnie, or BIX. 

• Ami-Back is extremely fast. 

• Ami-Back is multitasking friendly. * ^T **? "If Y't En9ineering ' s 

. ,_ , . a .* HD floppy does NOT work with some versions 

• Ami-Back is not copy protected in any way. 0( Kickstart 2 . at this time. 



Ami-Back is a comprehensive hard drive backup utility with a number of powerful features that make it the most 
professional program of its type on the market. Ami-Back has been thoroughly tested with a large number of hardware 
configurations. Some of the tape drives tested include the WT-150 from Great Valley Products and the A3070 from 
Commodore Business Machines (both are QIC- 150 type drives). 



J 



_ 



moonUGHTEfl 
ior-Tcoqi!fc 
D£V7£Loprn£riT 



$79,95 

Suggested Price 



Send us the original disk from 
OR your present hard drive backup 
program, and upgrade for only 
$49.95 {limited time only). 



AmiComp 

oftware evelopment 

a division of AmiComp Multimedia Group. Inc. 
Dealer Inquiries Invited 



AmiComp Software Development • 2925 East Colonial Drive, Orlando, Florida 32803 • Voice: 407-895-3500 • Fax: 407-895-351 

AMI-BACK and AMI-SCHED are trademarks of Moonlighter Software Development 

and AmiComp Software Developmeni 

Amiga and AmigaDOS are trademarks of Commodore-Amiga, Inc. 



Circle #139 on the Reader Service Card 



Peggy Herrington 



Mreyyy nemiiyiun ^** 
usic & oound 

Join Peggy as she takes a brief look at a passel of exciting new Amiga music products. 



II is a tact thai Macintosh and even (gasp! ) Atari ST 
musicians have long had an edge on Amiga players 
when it comes to serious performance tools, but I'm 
convinced that's changing in a big way. As evi- 
dence, this month I bring you news of two majorly 
enhanced Amiga MIDI sequencers, some exciting 
CDTV music applications, two heavy-duty professional 
Amiga pro-quality sound cards, and a couple of wild 
new digital music makers from Casio. 
The good news for Amiga maestros this month is that 
al long last wc can finally work in standard notation 
when making music with MIDI-controlled synthesiz- 
ers. How long have we waited for this? Well, it's 
been six long years for me, but the best news is 
that noi one but two leading producers of Amiga 
MIDI sequencing software are releasing ver- 
sions that incorporate, among other fine fea- 
tures, scoring, editing, and printing capabili- 
ties using real traditional notation. And both 
of these programs are so good that, if you're 
serious about music, you're apt to 
have trouble deciding 
between them. 




STANDARD NOTATION AND MORE 

By the time you read this, Bars & Pipes (SI 99) 
from Blue Ribbon SoundWorks. the leading graphics- 
based MIDI sequencing program for the Amiga, will 
be available in a new. enhanced version called Bars & 
Pipes Professional which will retail for $379. Regis- 
tered B&P owners can upgrade to this Pro version for 
only $99, and I suspect they will be doing so in droves 
because it has so many solid new Features. I've been 
using a beta version of B&P Pro recently, and 
although not everything was fully functional (record- 
ing and editing of system exclusive messages, and dis- 
playing triplets in standard notation didn't work, for 
instance, but Blue Ribbon assures me they will in the 
final release version) and everything that they claimed 
would work performed flawlessly - including entering 
(although it's still easier to record via MIDI input), 
editing, and printing scores in standard music notation. 

In fact, you have four alternatives in Bars & Pipes 
Pro when it comes to editing scores: you can choose 
between the new notation display (which really is 
Spiff y), a piano roll display, an enhanced staff, or a 
numerical MIDI event list which has a new editing 
program. Any change you make using one method is 
automatically and instantly reflected by the others, of 
course, and you can use standard Amiga mouse and 
pull down menu features like insert, copy, cut, paste, 
and delete right along with Bars & Pipes special tools. 

The screen display in B&P Pro has changed, too, 
and for the better. Individual features like editing win- 
dows, transport, tracks, and tools displays are pre- 
sented in separate windows that can be moved, 
resized, and tucked away as icons when you don't 
need them. 

Other new musical features include MixMaestro, a 
graphical software mixer that lets you use sliders to 
mix MIDI tracks for volume, panning, control change 
parameters, and a new merge record mode. I also dis- 
covered some new tools in B&P Pro: The Groove 
Quantize tool lets you quantize based on preset 
rhythms or music clips, the Rhythm Pattern Generator 
(which I really like) helps create drum patterns, and 
(he new Tempo Tap tool picks up and stores the tempo 
as you tap a key on your synthesizer's keyboard. Neat 
stuff. 

Blue Ribbon offers several collections of accessory 
programs for Bars & Pipes (usable with both ver- 
sions), including a MultiMedia Kit for using B&P 



music with Amiga authoring and presentation soft- 
ware. They also have a MusicWare Collection of over 
250 professionally arranged and transcribed songs in 
B&P and MIDI file formats including material from 
the classics, pop. rock. jazz, and ethnic music, plus 
soundtracks, rhythm tracks, and standards. Bars & 
Pipes Pro even works with Dr.T's Phantom SMPTE 
lime code hardware. 

And speaking of Dr.T's Music Software, the latest 
release of his high-powered, utilitarian-looking Key- 
board Controlled Sequencer (KCS) VS.5 (S400) will 
also offer standard notation. You may already be 
familiar with the notation in KCS V3.5 because Dr.T's 
has incorporated notation displays and programming 
routines from his program Tiger Cub. including thai 
graphics-based sequencer's QtiickScore utility. (For 
more info on Tiger Cub and a comparative screen shot 
of QuickSeore notation, sec my column in .info #33, 
Oct. 1990.) 

THE DOCTOR STEPS OUT 

For a change of pace, Dr.T's is stepping out with a 
music program that doesn't focus on directly personal 
music composition. They're doing this with a snappy 
new AmigaVision application called Composer Quest. 
Designed for schools as well as individual use, Com- 
poser Quest is an elaborate musical game which 
teaches music history in two modes of operation: Play 
or Learn, and it also includes a randomly occurring 
Popular Music Trivia Game. 

Covering the various styles of music from 1600 to 
the present. Composer Quest divides music into four 
historical periods: Baroque, Classical. Romantic, and 
Modem. In Learn Vlode. it lets you explore these peri- 
ods by choosing from over 150 Amiga-played digi- 
tized stereo samples of great music as you read about 
the trend-setting composers who lived during these 
times, touching upon world history, the visual arts, and 




iBars&Pipe s P rofessional [Beta 1,6] a 1998 Blue Ribbon Soundfiorks {£ 




Bars & Pipes Professional, new from Blue Ribbon SoundWorks. 



The MixMaestro module from Bars & Pipes Professional. 



sociological change in the process. In Play Mode. 
Composer Quest is a race against time as you are pre- 
sented with a randomly selected digitized sample of 
well-known and, because of the high quality of the 
sound, readily recognizable music score (often in full 
orchestration), as you zoom off in your lime machine 
to track down the composer. Positive visual feedback 
and the Amiga's speech synthesizer reinforce your 
exploits. 

I've been waiting years for someone to develop a 
program like Composer Quest, primarily because I 
specialized in musicology in college, and realized 
when I first heard about the Amiga back in 1 984 - with 
its fantastic graphics and stereo sound capabilities - 
that it was custom-made for such an application. 
Dr.T's says Composer Quest will be available only on 
the Amiga for this very reason, and I think parents and 
teachers alike will welcome a product that teaches this 
worthwhile subject and delivers associated informa- 
tion in an enjoyable manner. Composer Quest is no 
lightweight. It was researched by accredited musicolo- 
gists (with PhDs and MAs from the likes of Harvard 
and MIT) and conforms to the stringent curriculum 
Standards of the California Visual and Performing Arts 
Framework. It not only includes information about and 
music by biggies like Bach, Beethoven, and Brahms as 
well as many other "classical" greats, it delves into 
20th century popular composer/performers like The 
Beatles, Elvis, The Rolling Stones. Jimi Hendrix. and 
Ray Charles. 

Composer Quest's retail price will be between SI 99 
and S249 (it is undecided as we go to press). It runs on 
any Amiga (including the A3000) that is equipped 
with two megabytes of RAM. a hard drive with 15 
megabytes of free space and. of course, the AmigaVi- 
sion authoring system from Commodore - with which 
you can alter and add to it if you wish. 



.info MAY 1991 23 




A screen from Dr.T's Composer Quest, an AmigaVision based educational 
program with versions for both the Amiga and CDTV. 



COMMODORE DYNAMIC TOTAL 
VISION 

Dr.T's is also making Composer Quest available on 
compact disc for Commodore's latesl baby, CDTV, on 
which proud owners will be able to hear those beauti- 
ful digitized sound samples reproduced in sparkling 
eight times oversampling. CDTV. of course, is the 
industry's first true multimedia appliance, and 
although it doesn't incorporate any new technology 
per se. 1 think il's a brilliant combination of current 
concepts cleverly cloaked for the average computer- 
hater. Put simply, CDTV is a CD player combined 
with an Amiga 500 with a lull megabyte of chip RAM, 
thus offering everything the Amiga can do with fabu- 
lously enhanced CD sounds and music, and the 
promise of full-motion video down the road a piece 
(which might be sooner than you think). It's not being 
billed as a personal computer, since CDTV is designed 
to look like a stereo component. You connect it to your 
home entertainment center (TV, amplifier and speak- 
ers) and relax on your couch while running it from 
across the room with a comparatively largish remote 
control. 

Although il's much, much more than "just" a com- 
puter-controlled CD player. CDTV plays standard 
audio CDs as well as those offering simplistic CD+G 
graphics, and of course, loads and runs Amiga pro- 
grams stored on 5" CDs. It also knows CD+MIDI for- 
mal and has built-in 5-pin DIN MIDI In and Out ports 
on the back of its slick black case. Once you connect it 
to your music synthcsizer(s) with long MIDI cables, 
it's ready to go for digital musicians - something many 
music developers find extremely promising. 

Graphic images are bad enough, but musical instru- 
ments and digitized samples require massive storage 
space, and while that has always been a problem for 
floppy disk-based products, it certainly won't be for 



Studio 1 6 is 

licensed from 
Vision Quest 
and supports 
multiple 
channel 16-bit 
audio. 



CDTV If fact, CDTV developers may have the oppo- 
site problem since a single compact disk holds about 
as much data as a staggering 700 Amiga floppy disks. 
That means CDTV developers will include things like 
audible instructions (how about spoken online help 
files?) for productivity programs, and audible histories 
for games, not to mention startlingly real-sounding 
background music and sound effects. 

Dr.T's isn't the only company producing CDTV 
music applications. I played with a gorgeous yet sim- 
ple-to-use CDTV program called Music Maker at (he 
official unveiling of CDTV in Las Vegas earlier this 
year. Didn't get the price, but Music Maker (available 
from CLOUDSCAN in England) incorporates won- 
derfully realistic CD-based music instrument sounds 
in a slick little environment that features beautiful 
images of traditional music instruments with a 
sequencer which records music as you enter it on the 
numeric keypad of CDTV 's remote control. I had a 
great time. Although no synthesizers were connected 
to it there, I believe Music Maker incorporates MIDI 
In/Out. too. And I'm aware of several CD-based music 
products out on other platforms, one for the Macintosh 
in particular which has the full score of Mozart's 
Magic Flute opera in MIDI data. That should be easy 
enough to port and would be substantially improved 
by replacing those dull Macintosh screens with color- 
ful Amiga animations. 

AUDIO FOR VIDEO POST 
PRODUCTION 

As I'm sure you're aware, the Amiga has made 
exciting inroads into the world of video production. 
Compared to other alternatives, it offers hands-down 
the best price/performance ratio of anything even 
remotely similar, and even has the best internally gen- 
erated sounds among all standard PCs these days. But 
when stacked against professional sound gear, the 
Amiga's 8-bit sounds are lacking. So if you're putting 
together a video production studio based around an 
Amiga (which I understand lots of people are) you're 
forced to start from scratch with some other system in 
order to create and synchronize post production music 
and sound effects. 

SunRize Industries, makers of PerfectSotmd ($99), 
the premiere Amiga 8-bit digitizing hardware on the 
market today, is about to ship two new products that 
will address this situation. Called Audio For Video 
Post Production Systems or, more specifically, Stu- 
dioll and Studiol6, these are hardware devices that 
provide analog to digital conversion (turning real 
world sounds to numbers) of anything you can get 
within hearing range of your Amiga. These cards are 
designed for use with A2000 and 3000 models, and 
modular software (sec the Studiol6 screenshot) is 
being developed for both. 

The idea behind these products is to record your 
entire sound track to hard disk along with SMPTE 
time code. Once digitized, you'll he able to edit these 
sounds, specifying SMPTE in and out points to syn- 
chronize them with your visuals. The final mixdown 
can be performed digitally, after which you then play 



24 .info MAY 1991 



back your track to video tape synced to time code. 

Sludh 1 2 will retail for around S500, and reportedly 
has a signal to noise ratio and frequency response bet- 
ter than most professional quality video tape recorders. 
Stiidioll samples at up to 44KH?. and includes a 12- 
bit sampler and player, onboard microprocessor, 
RAM, SMPTE In/Out. and linear phase low-pass fil- 
ters that can be adjusted under software control for a 
wide range of cut-off frequencies, 

SunRize's second, top-of-the-line card (which is 
licensed from Vision Quest) is called Studio! 6, It sup- 
ports multiple channel 16-bit sampling and playback, 
includes on-board RAM, digital low-pass filters, 
SMPTE plus MIDI In/Out, and incorporates the 
Motorola DSP chip - the one used by NeXT for their 
PC. According to SunRi/.e, the retail price for Stu- 
dio!6 will be between one and two thousand big ones, 
but it offers CD-quality sounds for professional video 
producers. 

NEW MUSIC GOODIES 

We all love musical toys, and Casio - the undisputed 
king of musical toy makers - introduced two cool ones 
at CES: A nifty new MIDI keyboard (model CT-680) 
with dramatically improved preset sounds, and one of 
the cleverest little non-MIDl toys I've ever seen - a 
keyboard especially equipped fordoing your own Rap 
music. 

Casio's CT-680 MIDI keyboard is their latest "top 
of the line" music synthesizer. It has 61 full-sized 
black-and-white piano type keys, is 12-note poly- 
phonic, and comes with 220 preset instruments with a 
really decent rhythm section. Built in are stereo delay, 
panning, a pilch wheel, and a four-position digital 
reverb that really cooks. At a suggested retail price of 
S499. that's hot. 

What can you do with it under MIDI control with 
your Amiga? You could have one of the coolest, most 
compact home music studios in town. When used with 
MIDI sequencing software (Blue Ribbon's original 
Bars & Pipes or Dr.T's Tiger Cub would be good 
starters) you could pre-record eight-part scores con- 
structed with both melodic and drum tracks (using the 
CT-680"s four multitimbral MIDI voices along with 
four Amiga-generated instruments) and still have eight 
CT-680 voices free to play along with on the keyboard 
live. True, those remaining voices would be set to a 
single instrument unless you split the CT-680's, key- 
board for multiple voices with the software, which you 
certainly could. I played with this keyboard at CES. 
and Casio will ship it this month. It runs on D batteries 
or AC power with their optional AD-5 adaptor, and 
I'm gonna get me one as soon as they're out. 

If you're interested in having one. too, do not take 
the kids shopping with you unless you're prepared to 
come away with the other new music goodie Casio 
says they'll ship in May. \hcir Rapman keyboard. Note 
that the Rapman is not MlDI-compatible and therefore 
cannot be controlled by a computer, but I wouldn't be 
a respectable 20th century music journalist if 1 didn't 
tell you about it 

Casio's Rapman sports 32 mid-size keys offering 




NainSotindfrack 
BIB 
doorjiell 
squeaky_door 
di'ippifls faucet 
f lust tei let 
phone ping 



II Ml II lil I J 

lU'UU'UL 



.■.v.v.".v.'.-..v.-.v.v.v.'.v .'.■.■.'.■.vav.w.w.-.'- - . w.v.v. 




88:88:88 :B8 HainSoundlrack Start recorded sound 



;efl;B5;l2 doorjell Let Me in! 

:8§: 12:38 squeakyjoop Need to oil these hinges 
t'H'M dpippina_faucet New scene 



Control screen for SunRize's Studio! 6 1 6-bit audio digitizer. 



three-note polyphony. It's little (which is indeed part 
of it's charm) and its innovative aspects more than 
make up for any deficiency in that department. The 
mosi unique things about it are a voice effector which 
alters your voice as you rap into its hand-held micro- 
phone, and a little round "scratch table" you play to 
simulate the record scratching sounds used in that 
genre's music. The Rapman comes with 30 different 
background rhythm patterns (rap, rock, and R&B) and 
25 preset instruments which include sound effects like 
a cur horn and emergency alarm. It also has three one- 
finger controlled percussion pads (with two live 
sounds each) for adding things like snare drum, cow- 
bell, and orchestra hits. Self-contained with a built-in 
speaker, it also has line output and headphone jacks, 
and runs on AA batteries or AC power, making it 
highly portable and great for parties. But the most 
astounding thing about the Rapman is that it retails for 
$99.95 - like I said, don't let the kids touch it or 
two-to-one vou'll own it. 



THAT'S A WRAP! 

Whether you're young or old, into rap or classical, 
the electronic music industry, especially the Amiga 
side of it these days, has products for just about every- 
body. I'll have more digital news for you next time. 

ADDRESSES 

Blue Ribbon SoundWorks. 1293 BriardaleNE, 

Atlanta. GA 30306. 404-377-1514 
Dr.T's Music Software, 100 Crescent Road, 

Needhum, MA 02194, 617-455-1454 
CLOUDSCAN (Music Sales), 10 West Street. 

Comberton, Cambridge ENGLAND CB3 7DS, 

0223-262455 
SunRize Industries. 270 E. Main St., Suite C. 

Los Gatos, CA 95032, 408-354-3488 
Casio, 570 Mt. Pleasant Avenue, Dover. NJ 07ROI . 

201-361-5400 jl, 



Don't take the 
kids shopping 
with you unless 
you're prepared 
to come away 
with a Rapman. 



.info MAY 1991 25 



"W 1 "T" Oran Sands 

Video 




Bread & Butter Fonts for the Video Toaster, from Shereff Systems. 



The most important video development of 
laic is that several VCR manufacturers 
are now building tape decks with com- 
puter compatible RS-232 serial ports. 
Any computer that can send data along a 
serial cable can now control all the 
motions and modes of a videocassclte deck. NEC's 
model is known as the PC-VCR and is primarily aimed at 
the multimedia and interactive markets. It can randomly 
access any portion of a tape using a built-in address gen- 
erator. This four-head S-VHS Hi-Fi stereo deck lists for 
$2100.00 and includes the capability to overlay frame- 
accurate limecode on pre-recorded videotapes. Available 
stK)ii from Seleclra is an RS-232 adapter/controller mod- 
ule ($2 1 .95) for the Panasonic NV-1960. It functions as a 
go-between for your VCR and computer. 



OJ brings 
us up to 
speed on 
what's 
happening 
in video. 



FONTS FOR ALL 

Toaster fans rejoice! You can now easily expand the 
fontset that you got with the Toaster Character Gener- 
ator program. Shereff Systems has announced their 
new Bread & Butter Fonts ($99.95) in typestyles and 
in sizes up to 64 lines tall. These fonts are conversions 
from the already popular font sets used in their Pro 
Video Gold and Post programs and feature the same 
anti-aliasing found in those programs. Included with 



the Bread & Butter Fonts is a new conversion program 
that converts standard Amiga fonts for use in the 
Toaster without cutting their si/.e in half. Shipping 
starts in February. And by the lime you read this they 
should also be delivering Cinnamon Toast Fonts 
(SN/A|. multi-color fonts for the Toaster CG program. 
Shereff System's fonts have also been convened to 
Amiga font standard and are available separately for 
use in Deluxe Faint and other programs. Unlike the 
usual Amiga fonts, these are ColorFonts lhal look like 
standard fonts but are specially anti-alias.ee! to give an 
apparent greater resolution than hi-res. The package 
includes six fonts in four sizes each. 

BLACK BURST BLUES 

Are you tired of wearing out your camcorder by 
turning it on and capping the lens just to use it to feed 
black to your genlock. Toaster, or other VCR? Need to 
send synchronous signals to several devices to genlock 
them together'.' Well, worry not. for Knox Video has 
made a tidy little solution to the problem. Their Mini- 
Burst box has three NTSC black hurst outputs, or one 
NTSC and one Y/C output. The connectors are BNC 
and the usual four-pin Y/C type. So stop aging that 
camera and do it the proper way! 

AMIGA 3000 AND GENLOCKS 

Many of you have heard lhal genlocks and Amiga 
3000s don't gel along too well. Although much of the 
problem was the physical size of the internal video 
slot, there was the additional problem of Commodore 
finally defining genlock standards several years after 
all those genlocks had already been designed. Many 
genlocks have since been modified, and for those of 
you wanting the best. Magni has a factory modifica- 
tion for their 4004 internal genlock. New units are 
shipped with the modification installed. The 4004 
Genlock is SI 995 .00 w/control box, $1695.00 w/o 
control box. Current owners can get their boards 
upgraded at the factory for S200. Now you can have 
true broadcast quality in the ultimate Amiga. 

TBCS AND YOUR CHECKBOOK 

NewTek's Video Toaster has created a new market... for 
timebase correctors! I'm being lltxxled with information 
from TBC manufacturers touting the latest in inexpensive 
(ami trust me, this is relative) TBCs and framestore syn- 
chronizers. These companies never had an inkling of how 
to create a demand for TBCs at what ihey consider the 
consumer level. Now the Toaster's done that for them. 



26 .info MAY 1991 



Prime image has formed a new computer products 
division Tor the purpose of selling its lower-priced TBC 
and framestore; distribution will be handled by Micro- 
Pace. Their Model 50 TBClFreezeframe unit is $2995; 
$3490 with S/VHS option. Without the framestore. the 
Model 25 TBCITimer goes for S1995; $2490 with 
S/VHS. prime Image's broadcast dealer network is also 
selling a high resolution RGB in/out TBC for high-end 
applications. JVC. meanwhile, isn't going to be caught 
with their pants down. They've just lowered their price 
on the JVC SA-T400U 525-line rramestore/TBC with 
freeze frame and Y/C compatibility. Look for dis- 
counted prices under $1900. Also making its debut is 
DPS's Personal TBC that fits into one of the PC- 
compatible expansion slots inside the Amiga. Not hav- 
ing to build a case or a power supply brings the cost 
down to $995. I. DEN has even begun advertising in 
Amiga magazines touting their new /VT-7 framestore/ 
TBC which retails for under $3500. Don't forget that 
when pricing a TBC vs. a framestore that the framestore 
will be a great deal more useful to you over the years. 

VIDEO TOOLS ON TAP 

I've always been one of Mike Berro's fans. He's a 
computer programmer who's a video professional as 
well, and his products have always shown it. His Pho- 
ton Transport Controller simply defined that niche of 
software. His public domain programs have been used 
by many sludios. Now he has rewritten his shareware 
program Video Tools On Tap for commercial release 
by Neriki, and it's worth more than a casual glance. 

VTOT ($79.95) is a program that happily runs in the 
foreground or background of any other tasks. With 
mouseclicks or hotkey combinations it can produce 
special test signal screens or perform certain functions. 
The screens available are SMPTE and EBU color bars 
(yes it's also configured for PAL!), black, grayscale, 
and Crosshatch (for aligning monitors). It also detects 
and fixes NTSC illegal colors. It allows automatic 
fade-outs and -ins with variable timing. Other features 
include test audio tones, screen centering by hotkeys. 
vertical and horizontal screen flips, auto anti-aliasing, 
negative colors, etc. - far too many to list here. Trust 
me, the hotkey-triggered color bars and screen center- 
ing features alone are enough to justify the purchase of 
VTOT. 

NEW TAPES 

Telegraphies International has added two tapes to their 
Amiga instructional videocassette series, at a very rea- 
sonable $49.95 each. The first is the most timely; Intro- 
duction and Switcher Operation is the first in a special 
series of tapes giving instruction on using NewTek's 
Toaster. As with all of their tapes, they cover the topic 
thoroughly using a great deal of on-screen demonstration 
of the techniques they describe. They also make a great 
point for using rwo Aniigas in a standard Toaster-sl\x6\o 
setup: the second Amiga is used downstream with a gen- 
lock in most of their instructional demonstrations. At the 
end of the tape is a self-produced music video showing 
all of the Toaster's effects. 

The second tape has nothing to do directly with 



Hotkeys: 



Black screen SMPTE Color Bars 

7 Full Color Bars Grey Scale 
Centering P Pattern 

vi Screen- standard F2 Screen- Overscan 
Single-plane Neg single-plane 

Anti-alias Blur inage 



ade Up 

rent Speed = ) 
V Vertical Flip Horizontal Flip 
Toggle Pointer Color Requester 

Move Display . Center Display 
Restore Save Prets 



,..e Interlace N Next Screen 
Execute Script New CLI or Shell 
About VTOT Change Parameters 



" EBU Color Bars 
Blue Color Bars 
1 Show s: VTOT, pic 

": : Edge-detect 
7 Negate pixels 
- Clean pixels 

Clear Display 
Negate Colors 
Custon Tool 
Save IFF 



Uindou Size 
I Audio Tone 
quit VTOT 



ASDG-RAjI 



harddrive 



Mike Berro's Video Tools on Tap, from Neriki. 



graphics or video. What it does cover is installing 
Amiga hard drives, and although it primarily covers 
SCSI drives, it does so thoroughly! Again using 
Amiga graphics to illustrate the topic, they totally de- 
mystify the operation and installation of the typical 
Amiga hard drive. Frankly, just watching any one of 
these tapes itself is an education in the proper use of 
Amiga graphics and correct instructional technique. 

ADDRESSES 

(DPS) Digital Processing Systems, 55 Nugget Ave., 

Unit #10, Scarborough, ON, Canada M IS 3L1 . 

416-754-3323 
I.DEN Videotronics. 9620 Chesapeake Bay, 

San Diego, CA 92123, 800-874-1DEN 
JVC. 41 Slater Dr., Elmwood Park, NJ 07407, 

201-794-3900 
Knox Video. 8547 Grovemont Circle. Gaithersburg, 

MD 30877, 301-840-5805 
Magni, 9500 SW Gemini Dr. Beaverton, OR 97005, 

503-626-8400 
NEC Professional Systems, Div, (Al Woodman), 

1255 Michael Dr., Wood Dale. IL 60191. 

800-562-5200xNEC 
Neriki, PO Box 712 Victoria Station. Montreal. QU. 

Canada H32 2V8, 5 14-483-2080 
Panasonic. One Panasonic Way. Secaucus, NJ 07094, 

201-348-7000 
Prime Image. 1995 Las Plumas, San Jose, CA 95133. 

408-867-6519 
Selectra (Richard Comfort). PO Box 5497, 

Walnut Creek, CA 94596, 4 1 5-46 1 -5438 
Shereff Systems. 1507 SW Koll Pkwy.. Suite G, 

Beaverton, OR 97006. 503-626-2022 
Telegraphies International. 605 Dock St., 

Wilmington, NC 28401, 919-642-6295 



Don't forget 
that when 
pricing a TBC 
versus a 
framestore 
the framestore 
will be a great 
deal more 
useful to you 
over the years. 



.info MAY 1991 27 




ART & CONTINUITY: GREGORY CONLEY 



7 




ACME AMIGAWARE PRESENTS 

till 1 ti -Mill 

r 



iSfMSg? 







^ 



NO 



cfe$ 





BRVCE f 
you ready for 
driving less 



r 9 1 

on? ^J 



Gregory Conlcy can be contacted by writing: Gregory Conley. I7.i2(l Laverne Avenue. Cleveland. O 




28 .info MAY 1991 




Im&Oi 



m 






The smallest hard drive and interface in the world is now available 

for your Amiga 500 computer! This rugged little sweetheart mounts 

completely inside your computer allowing 20 megabytes of high 

speed storage that takes absolutely no desk space. The advanced 

features include autobooting from FastFileSystem partitions, high 

speed caching, auto-configuring, and A-Max II support. Novia 20i comes with complete instructions 

and all the hardware necessary for a simple, clean, no-solder installation. Available today at Amiga 

dealers everywhere. 

Novio is o trademark of ICD, Incorporated. Amiga is a registered trademark of Commodore-Amiga, Inc. A-Max II is a Irademark of ReadySoft. 



ICD 



ICD. Incorporated 1220 Rock Street Rockford. IL 61 101 

USA 
(815) 968-2228 Phone (815) 968-6888 FAX 

Circle #144 on the Reader Service Card 



Video Victorious 



by Sue Albert 




Jane Baracs 




vner of Kona-Kini Productions. 

I was eight years ago in pastoral Brunswick Hills, 
Ohio, thatjaife Baracskay - satisfied housewife, 
mother of two growing sons, and a busy conimu- 
Hty volunteer - look the first tentative steps in an 
mi\ ssey thai spiraled her all the way to the Amiga 
and an unexpected new career. Alone in her 
kitchen one day. she was struck by a disquieting 
thought: "Soon these kidsaren'l going to need my 
undivided attention. Then what am I going to do? No 
one is going to want me baking brownies and blowing 
up balloons every day tor [he rest of my life!" Jane 
characteristically took action. With the support and 
encourageinentof her husband Don. she enrolled in a 
class at the community college. "1 was so afraid I 
would fail that I toTd no one. Even my parents found 
put by accident." 

E-ENTRY WOMAN 

Petite, demure, and soft-spoken" describes the out- 
Rd Jane Baracskay, but her experiences reveal an 
strength and a determination so fierce thai it 
ow her lo work only at her highest level, what- 
challenge. "I just won't let anything go until 1 
" And "do it" she did. Four years after enter- 
she graduated with honors and a BA with 
:>mputers from nearby Baldwin-Wallace 
the same year her oldest son graduated from 
sol. "I'm proud of what 1 did. No one can lake 




that away from me. They can lake my money, ihey can 
take everylhing else, but they can't take my piece of 
paper. I feel if I could do that, I can do anything." 

TRY IT! YOU'LL LIKE IT! 

Discovering her skill with computers was a surprise. 
"I never would have become involved with computers 
if it hadn't been for anoihcr woman. One of my 
instructors saw that I had a knack and she literally 
pushed me into it. She kept at me, even talking me 
into teaching computers at a summer camp for kids." 
Jane didn't like working with mainframes, and though 
she conquered programming il seemed lo her "just too 
isolating". Working with people and the direcincss of 
the personal compuler was more comfortable. After 
graduation, she laught wordprocessing on ihe IBM at 
ihe community college and eventually started her own 
business as a computer consultant, selling up computer 
systems and training personnel for local businesses. 

VISUAL AID 

Jane loved Ihe work, but constant late-night calls 
from bewildered neophytes became trying. She 
thought that a simple videoiape covering elementary 
procedures and providing quick solutions lo the most 
common errors might be the answer. "Customers could 
just run the sape for review when they got stuck." Her 
first estimate for a video rocked her. "The company 
wanted $37,000 for a twelve-minute tutorial. Other 
companies charged by the minule starling at $1500 
and going up lo $3500." Abashed, but undaunted, 
Jane's new-found confidence surfaced. "I thought. 
'Hey! Maybe I can make my own." and I began lo 
research what was available and affordable." 

Not surprisingly, lhal search led directly to the 
Amiga. She and Don drove to the 1988 AmiExpo in 
Chicago. When she saw what was possible using the 
affordable Amiga, she decided not lo stop wiih just 
producing a tutorial for her own use. Having worked 
with local businesses. Jane realized there was a ready 
market for reasonably priced business presentations 
and training videos. In late 1988 a metamorphosis 
began. Jane's home office turned into a video produc- 
tion sludio with the purchase of an Amiga 2000. soft- 
ware, and an industrial Panasonic PV 330 camera. 
Kona-Kini Enterprises was bom and Jane iried her 
first free-flight as a video producer. 

HAWAII IN OHIO? 

Both Jane and Don love ihe Hawaiian Islands and 
combined ihe Hawaiian equivalents of their names for 
the business name, using a stylized pineapple for the 



30 .info MAY 1991 



Kona-Kini logo. Don also works out of their home 
when he isn't traveling as u sales and marketing con- 
sultant. He freely assists Jane in filming, editing, and 
whatever, whenever more then two hands are needed. 

Taping their first few videos, they learned hard, but 
fast. "We ran around and shot everything. That was a 
nightmare because then we had loo much editing to 
do. At first we didn't use a scene slate (clapboard), so 
there were times I couldn't remember which was the 
particular segment 1 wanted to use. At that time we 
had to reserve space in advance at a hourly rate to use 
a Vidi Craft editor at an editing house for the final 
edits. It was essential to be efficient to keep the costs 
down." 

"We also made .some mistakes in choosing software 
and hardware. It was difficult then to get solid advice. 
I was disappointed that some Amiga software just 
wasn't up to professional level. With our first genlock 
1 let myself get talked into buying a less capable unit 
by a dealer whose intentions were good, but who was 
actually learning right along with us. Now I look at 
everything, very, very carefully." 

MEETING MRS. CAMERA 

Jane personally controls every step in the produc- 
tion process. She interviews the clients to get a thor- 
ough idea of what they want and then writes the script. 
She goes over the script with each client for input and 
final changes before making cue cards. On the day of 
the "shoot," she and Don take the camera, tripod, and 
lights to the site. Jane explains how the camera works 
to remove any mystery and to help put the participants 
at ease. 

"I sit down with them and we do a couple of read- 
throughs and work out how they want the cue cards 
held. We do a lot of joking and laughing. 1 try to erase 
any negative images like the tyrannical Hollywood 
director with jodhpurs and riding crop. I want it to be 
an enjoyable experience and it usually goes very 
well." 

THE RIGHT STUFF 

At home after the taping, Jane generates the titles on 
the Amiga using Pro Video Post, TV Text Pro, and 
Kara Fonts. For special effects, fancy 3D titling, and 
animations, she uses Deluxe Paint III, Animation Stu- 
dio, and Page Render 3D. (Jane curses the user inter- 
face in Page Render 3D but praises the superb results.) 

When she has completed the rough edit, she shows 
the client the tape for last minute changes before com- 
pleting the editing. Now all editing is done in-house 
(literally) on their three Panasonic AG 1960 editing 
decks and a Future Video EDL-IOOO hooked up to an 
IBM. They also put a WJMX 1 2 special effects gener- 
ator to good use. "It's a mad tangle of wires, but all 
our equipment is linked and works together seam- 
lessly." 

Don did all the voice overs during the first year. 
Now they employ two professionals to do voice and 
occasional on-camera narration. Together they bravely 
tried to create their own background music. "We 
bought Sonix and we tried, we tried hard, but we just 




Still from a "Nuts and Bolts" animation done for a client. 



couldn't make good music. It was terrible: really bad. 
We finally just bought professionally created music 
from QCCS Productions. Recently we discovered a 
wonderful 24-track professional recording studio. Har- 
vest Productions, right down the road. They record our 
sound tracks and have supplied custom and original 
music for us." 



WISHES GRANTED 

In its first year, Kona-Kini produced six commercial 
videos. One of the first was a fund solicitation tape 
made for a local private school. "They wanted a tape 
to show to corporations and alumni, but they didn't 
want any direct requests for money." Jane planned 
shots of all the positive aspects of the school, profiles 
of four successful alumni, and segments showing what 
the current students are contributing to the community. 
Within those shots were things that the school needed 
to carry on and improve their work. The school was 
not only delighted with the resulting twelve minute 
tape, they received a SIU.(KX) grain at its first viewing. 

Another early success was a presentation Weated for 
a local builder. The video showed his construction 
methods inside-out. from the ground up, and gave 
potential home buyers a close look at details of the 
materials and construction methods usually invisible 
within walls. Tapes were played for customers at each 
model home on portable VCRs. This satisfied cus- 
tomer has returned to Kona-Kini after each new con- 
struction project. 

Kona-Kini productions is getting evermore profes- 
sional and complex, and is going further afield. They 
have done shoots in Detroit, Florida, and New Jersey. 
Kona-Kini's latest triumph was a motivational video 
for the Akron/Canton branch of Merrill Lynch. "We 
were given eight days 'take it or leave it' to do the 
whole thing. We worked day and night. We created an 
animated opening with a "Top Gun" style aerial theme 



We just 
couldn't make 
good music, 
jit was terrible; 
really bad. 




.info MAY 1991 31 





so the 2000 
now has 
nine megs 



A self-promotional slide, typical of Kona-Kini's production work. 



integrated into varied shots of the .sales staff. The 
recording studio composed original music in just two 
days that fit the action perfectly. I delivered the film 
right off the editor and finished setting up at 4:10 for 
the presentation at 4: 15. They were bowled over! They 
couldn't believe the quality, or the speed, or that it had 
been produced completely with an Amiga." 

MOVING TARGET 
UsTfcaied a short four-minute promotional 
tape enhanced with animations and special effects that 
she takes along with a portable VCR to interviews 
with potential clients. This video "sells" both Kona- 

ini and the video media for point of sale presenta- 
tions; 

Kona-Kini is participating in several local small 
business organizations. The Small Business News and 
C.O.S.E. (Council of Smaller Enterprises), sponsored 
he Cleveland Growth Association, both run bi- 
hly business shows. "We rent a table and run our 
videos. We have had many profitable leads from these 
shows because other small business people can see 
exactly what we do. Many other leads now come by 
word-of-moulh. and it's because people find our 
graphics work so unique. 

Kona-Kini is also producing short video resumes. 
"We get both private clients and referrals from agen- 
cies. Usually we create an introduction with soft music 
and the client's name fading into a live interview of 
them stating their goals and qualifications. Then we 
use the genlock on half mode to present a listing of 
their credentials rolling over an appropriate back- 
ground symbol for their vocational field that is created 
with Deluxe Paint III." 

Kona-Kini turned a profit in its first year. Jane 
pumped those earnings right back into equipment 
upgrades and continues to devote a large share to mak- 
ing Kona-Kini a completely professional quality oper- 





ation. "Some of our animations run over 1000 frames, 
so the 2000 now has nine megs. Last year we 
upgraded to the broadcast quality Supcrgen 2000S. 
That was a great investment." While admitting to 
"heart palpitations" when she sees the Toaster soft- 
ware and effects. Jane is bucking the hoopla with a 
cautious, long look at the Toaster performance and 
peripheral requirements, in comparison to non-Amiga 
"one piece - one supplier" equipment. "I'm still on the 
fence," she says. 

A great deal of Kona-Kini's success can be 
attributed to the energy, determination, and just plain 
thoughtfulness Jane puts into every detail of the 
endeavor, right down to matching paperclips to the 
stationery. As a parting gift to her clients, she presents 
them with a sweatshirt hearing their own company's 
logo in full color. She captures the logos with Perfect 
Vision in HAM mode and has local Amigaphile Paul 
Gold of AC Color Labs transfer the images from 
Amiga disk to sweatshirt. 

SONS OF KONA-KINI 

Kona-Kini is a family affair. Jane's oldest son is a 
skilled Amiga animator. Now engulfed in his last 
months of medical school, he spent part of his summer 
vacations designing animated fonts for their produc- 
tions. Kona-Kini markets a tape he created that con- 
tains an intricate animated segment of a bride and 
groom emerging from a wedding album and waltzing 
around the cake. Called "The Bridal Dance" it is to be 
used as a lead-in to amateur or professional wedding 
videos. His graphics have appeared in Amiga periodi- 
cals. Her younger son is in his first year of college 
majoring in communications. "J think he is going to be 
very helpful." 

CLOSING SHOTS 

Jane's ambitious plans are to keep Kona-Kini prices 
competitive and begin producing a tape a month. 
"Now that I am familiar with the all the software and 
equipment, I can breeze right though a job. I hope to 
retain full control so we can maintain our high stan- 
dards, but I know that if we keep growing, the 
demands may become impossible. It's something I 
think about." Jane's familiarity with the business com- 
munity has been a definite asset in procuring and 
understanding the needs of clients and her MS/DOS 
training has given her a confident "leg-up" with the 
technical side of the Amiga. 

It was a surprise to find that Jane has had no art 
training at all, and never used a computer creatively 
until she got the Amiga. "I even had trouble with stick 
figures in school, but the Amiga's paint packages and 
Perfect Vision jus! brought out my creative juices. 
Now 1 find I enjoy really looking at what the camera is 
going to pick up, and producing unique effects. I want 
my work to be something special, and I love to see the 
customer's eyes light up when they sec the results." 



Kona-Kini Enterprises, 3696 Puritan Drive, 
Brunswick Hills, OH 44212, (216) 225-2457 



32 .info MAY 1991 



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Incredible Very Good Average Awful Drek 




Simple, elegant, and perfectly playable, Vaxine 
is one of the first of U.S. Gold's games to be 
imported from Europe. The look of the game 
is reminiscent of Accolade's Game of Har- 
mony, but the dim is entirely different. It's a sort of 
perspective- wew Defender descendant that puts you 
inside a human body where you battle against invading 
and multiplying viruses. 

I suppose some sort of scenario is a necessary evil, 
but just forget about this one and play Vaxine as one 
of the best abstract arcade games in years. The play 
consists of racing around the field shooting al the 
viruses, which are represented by colored spheres and 
can only be destroyed by hitting them with like- 
colored balls (the graphics are simple, but very well 
done). There are all sorts of variables and options to 
make the play challenging and thoroughly absorbing. 
Movement is last and fluid in all directions, though it 
will take considciable practice to get the hang of aim- 
ing and shooting. 

If you like abstract concept games, this is one of the 
very best. Vaxtne's infinite levels will keep you infi- 
nitely entertained. - Tom Malcom 




VAXINE 

U.S. Gold / Accolade, 550 South Winchester 
San Jose, CA 95 128, 408-985-1 700 



Blvd. 




NIGHT BREED 

Ocean / KA. 1 820 Gateway Drive 
San Mateo. CA 44404. 415-571-7171 



7V * 



Based on Clive Barker's book and the movie 
of the same name, this is one of the lamest 
excuses for an adventure (interactive movie, 
as the publisher calls it) I've seen in ages. It 
hasn't crashed, which is the only reason it has a iwo- 
star rating instead of one, but I wouldn't boot it up 
again unless someone held a gun to my head. 

The biggest problem is that it's capricious; 1 don't 
mind trial and error in a game, but I at least want to be 
able to save my position before I try something that's 
going to kill me off without warning or possibility of 
escape. Night Breed doesn't even have a save function. 
The music is pretty good, but the graphics, which 
often have an amateurish look, and animation are 
strictly low-end common denominator. For example, 
the idiotic first sequence has you driving a car around 
an overhead view map by clicking on intersections. 
The car is then moved, without even being turned to 
face the direction it's moving, to the intersection. 

Ocean seems to publish extremely good original 
games or incredibly bad licensed games. Night Breed, 
unfortunately, is one of the bad ones. 

- Tom Malcom 



36 info MAY 1991 




If you haven't played tlie i'ree five-level 
demo version of Lemmings, go get it right 
now. If you have played it. run right 
down to your local game dealer and buy 
this release version, ll has something like 120 
levels divided into four difficulty levels, ranging 
from pure, simple fun to one step from impossi- 
ble. Something for everyone. 

If you somehow missed all mention of Lem- 
mings (not an easy feat unless you've been hid- 
ing in a cave somewhere in Outer Mongolia), 
the idea of the game is to save as many lem- 
mings as possible by giving them certain 
attributes, like making them bridge builders, 
diggers, etc. Everything is mouse controlled, 
making the mechanics of play simple enough 
even for small kids. The graphics are high Psyg- 
nosis quality, the music wonderful, and the 
sound effects perfect. 

I've heard the point made about Lemmings 
that its genius lies in thai its ideas have all been 
around since computer games began, but that by 
putting them together in new ways, a new type 
of game was invented. Lemmings has universal 
appeal. - Tom Malcom 





ftlKWMK 



3 




LEMMINGS 

Psygnosis. 29 Saint Mary's Court 
Brookline. MA 02146, 617-731-3553 




B.A.T. 

UBISoft / EA. 1 820 Gateway Drive 
San Mateo, CA 94404, 415-571-7 1 7 1 



***^A 



I first saw this futuristic adventure when 1 
visited UBISoft in Paris and now that 
I've had the chance to play it, I'm 
impressed. B.A.T. out-cybcrpunks Newo- 
mancer. The look of the game is what sells it; 
it's dark, richly detailed, and populated with 
enough strange characters to fill a hundred 
seedy bars in Chiba City or, in this case. Ter- 
rapolis, where a rogue scientist and a small-time 
crook are about to blow up the planet. You have 
to track them down. Cyberpunk as a science fic- 
tion genre has been around for about ten years 
now. but B.A.T. is the first computer game I've 
seen that really captures how I think it should 
look. The artwork is somber-hued, and filled 
with little gratuitous animations (things like lit- 
tle robots iloating past in the air) that don't add 
anything to the game, but add enormously to its 
texture. The game uses multiple windows to 
tine graphic effect and the play system uses a 
smart pointer that automatically changes 
according to the the purpose that's needed: con- 
versation, movement, and the like. B.A.T. is 
atmosphere incarnate. Designer Lance Mason 
deserves some applause. - Tom Malcom 



.info MAY 1991 39 




From what I've seen of Castles, it's 
shaping up to be the Sim City for 
1991. The game is an elaborate, 
ground-up simulation of a medieval 
castle, including everything from designing 
your own castle to lighting with the church. 
The description in the product sheet says it 
best and it's too funny not to quote here: 

"As lord or lady of the realm you'll be able 
to make life and death decisions over your 
fiefdom. Burden overtaxed peasants with 
tyrannical demands. Then, defend your castles 
in bloody battles against the angry, overtaxed 
peasants! Cheat workers of their hard-earned 
wages. Engage in brutal treachery and make 
scores of enemies, then sit in a cold damp cas- 
tle and wonder why no one likes you. All the 
neat things that went into making the medieval 
ages a swell lime..." 

Castles is, of course, much more than that, 
with stunning graphics and wonderfully detailed 
gameplay (I'm especially fond of the treachery 
angle). The screen you see here is taken from 
the IBM VGA version, but the Amiga one 
should look just as good. -Tom Malcom 



flHl 


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CASTLES 

Interplay Productions. 3710 S. Susan, Suite 10 
Santa Ana, CA 92704, 7 1 4-545-900 1 



Preview 




DRAGON WARS 

Interplay Productions. 3710 S. Susan, Suite 10 
Santa Ana, CA 92704. 7 14-545-900 1 



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The manual talks about how Dragon 
Wats is "as much a story as a game" 
and that may be true, though I still 
don't understand why I'm frequently 
told to read paragraphs of that story in the back 
pages. Computers handle text pretty well these 
days. As stories go. Dragon Wars doesn't have 
anything you haven't seen in a hundred other 
fantasy games. 

The biggest problem with Dragon Wars is 
that it's years out of date (in fact, the C64 ver- 
sion was released a couple of years ago), and it 
shows badly. Adventuring has come a consid- 
erable distance since the days of Dragon Wars' 
crude graphics (and even cruder animation) 
and the ancient and outmoded Bard's Tale key- 
board-intensive interface. Witness Dungeon 
Master and Ohittts. The music is about the 
only thing up to modern-day standards. 

Fans of hit-points and hit-and-miss battles will 
probably like Dragon Wars, but I think its pri- 
mary interest is historical. On that count. Dragon 
Wars is successful, but I doubt we'll be seeing 
many more games like it. Time marches on. and 
it left Dragon Wars behind. - Tom Malcom 



40 .info MAY 1991 




AIR STRIKE USA 



ikik-kik 



Spotlight / Cinemaware / EA, [820 Gateway Drive 
San Mateo, CA 94404. 415-571-7171 



Nc 



low this is my idea of a flight simulator. I can get in it, 
fly it, shoot down enemies, blow up ground installations, 
and I can do it without having to memorize twelve bazil- 
lion keyboard commands. Air Strike USA is a combination 
Oight simulator and arcade game, just the thing to boot up 
after you've been watching the Allied air forces blow hell 
out of the Iraqis on TV. Air Strike USA is easily learned, a 
kick to play, and strategically deep enough that you won't 
get bored with it after ten minutes. Good graphics, good 
play, good stuff. 

-TM 



THE UNTOUCHABLES 

Ocean / EA, 1820 Gateway Drive 

San Mateo, CA 94404, 415-57 1-7171 



?<" ~i< ~?< 



V iolence, violence, violence, bloodshed, and some more 
violence pretty much sums up The Untouchables. Of 
course, the TV series that the movie and game are based on 
was much criticized for the same thing, so I won't harp on 
it any more. What I will harp on is that the game is ho- 
hum. Eliot Ness and the guys have been put in a standard 
sidescrolling shoot 'em up with nothing to set it apart from 
a dozen others. The graphics are considerably better than 
most, but I found moving around very sluggish. Only for 
fans of the genre or the movie. 

-TM 



THE LOST PATROL 

Ocean / EA, 1820 Gateway Drive 
San Mateo, CA 94404, 4 1 5-57 1-7171 



~k~kiz 



l don't think I've ever carped about a game being all 
graphics and no play before. The Lost Patrol has some ter- 
rific images, but what it doesn't have is a playable game. 
The graphics include digitized, nicely touched up pictures 
from the Viet Nam War and even some small-window film 
animations. The object is to move the seven survivors of a 
chopper crash to safety through miles of hostile territory. 
Unfortunately, the process gets boring very quickly: there 
just isn't much to make you want to keep playing. Well 
worth a look for the graphics, but not much else, 

-TM 




,infO MAY 1991 41 





■# 4fi "$& 4K 4K ^ 



(AHtack 
COreet you opponents 
(T)a Ik to thett 
(H)i thdraw at once 




BLACK GOLD ikiziz 

LEGEND OF FAERGHAIL ?V ?V ?V 

XIPHOS ?^?V?V+ 

Rainbow Arts / Electronic Zoo, 343 1 -A Benson Avenue 
Baltimore, MD 21227, 301-646-5031 

J. recently received a package ol" games from the Electronic 
Zoo and was almost aquiver with anticipation. They were all 
imports from Rainbow Arts, the European company that pub- 
lished Spherical, one of my all-time favorite arcade puzzle 
games. (In fact, the box also contained the US release version 
of Spherical, and it's still high up on my five-star list.) Unfor- 
tunately, the remaining games in the package, while having 
considerable entertainment potential, have some serious prob- 
lems. Most of the troubles I've had are directly related to inac- 
curate translation from German to English and poor quality 
control - I've found a bug or two and several design gaffes. 

Black Gold is the worst offender. I dearly love the game, 
but it eventually crashed or hung up at some time or 
another every time 1 played it for any length of time. It's a 
cutthroat oil industry trading game that has much the same 
addictive, compulsive greed that makes Monopoly so much 
fun. Starting out with $5,000,000, you buy a concession, 
drill a well, watch out for saboteurs, try to scuttle your 
three computer or human opponents, and generally behave 
like J. R. Ewing. The play would be terrific if it weren't for 
several needless, inane arcade-type episodes. I still play 
Black Gold, but I'd really like to see a revised version. 

The Legend of Faerghail has the potential to be one of the 
better entries in the hit-points and dragons category, and in 
fact has some of the best dungeon graphics this side of Dun- 
geon Master. The main problem here is that the translation 
from German is frequently awkward and sometimes down- 
right wrong. It's also rather unclear just what you're sup- 
posed to be doing and where you're supposed to go. I sup- 
pose a good part of the game is tlguring out what's going on, 
but 1 think the manual should have been much more helpful. 

Xiphos is an arcade/trading/wargame and the best of the lot. 
The animation and displays are nicely done and there's plenty 
of action to be found while you fly your spaceship around a 
collapsing intergalaclic civilization. Xiphos plays well, with 
belter than average vector graphics, and I like the way it 
moves, but the trading portions of the game are a little shallow. 
Still, it's worth some of your time if you like space operas. 

Despite the problems I've had with them. I'm still delighted 
that the Electronic Zoo is importing Rainbow Arts' games; no 
matter how frustrated I get with them, they're always enter- 
taining and that's still what it's all about. - Tom Malcom 



42 .info MAY 1991 



No PC Graphics Here 

As everybody knows, many Amiga games aren't really Amiga games at all. They're PC 
games in disguise, But now Accolade introduces three awesome games that definitely are 
"Made in Amiga." That means enhanced 32-color Amiga graphics. Great Amiga sounds. 
Hot Amiga music. And dazzling Amiga animation. If you're looking for 100% pure Amiga 
adventure. Accolade has three graphic examples. 



"Riotously entertaining. ' 
— The Denver Post 



"Elvira rules!" 
— Questbusters 



Graphically stunning. 
— Omni 




The look and fee! of a Graphic Adventure 
with the depth of an FRP. Totally icon driven. 
Over 100 hours of frighteningly realistic 
gameplay. Help Elvira solve 1he terrible secret 
of her 800-location castle. 



As the skinny but heroic Les Monley. your task 
is to find the greatest, most elusive enter- 
tainer of all time, win a million dollars -- and 
the affection of your boss's secretary who 
doesn't know you exist. 



One minute you're watching TV, the next 
you're sucked into a parallel universe of 
gorgeous artwork and clever animation. 
Your quest? Save this remarkable world 
from destruction. 



To order visit your retailer or call: 

1 -800-245-7744 

For hints on all of the games, call 
900-9°0-HINT using a touch tone phone. 



Etora mags t. 1 IW0/1WI Queen "fi' Product^yu Elvira qr^a Matres ■;■ fwj [jou 
Ore Tf» iioaerTarks af Queen "5" Productnns The phone cnarpjo for pre- 
(Bccrded Mntiand Ips s BK fat the Brit rrtntfe. 60= foi «K*i COional rmrhjte 



r 



'How About a FREE Demo?' 



~l 



Fill out this coupon, and mail it to Accolade, c/o Penny Parker, 550 S. 
Winchester Blvd. #200, San Jose, CA 95128. We'll show you what Amiga 
graphics and sounds should be. 



NAME 



ADDRESS 



STATE 



ZIP 



PHONE NUMBER 

How many games have you purchased for your Amiga computer? 

Note: Demo is, available tor the Amiga only. 



L. 



J 



Circle #148 on the Reader Service Card 



P U B L I 




O M A I N 



SYSINF0YU8 MRITTEM B¥ NIC HILSOH 

fi»0 IS FREELY DISTRIBUTABLE 



NIC WILSON SOFTWARE PHONE (076) 358539 
I38d SOUTH ST. TOOKMHBA QLD 4350 AUSTRAL I 



| SYSTEM SOFTWARE INSTALLED 

KICKSTART VERSION 33.1M 

HORKBENCB VERSION 

EXEC LIBRARY !:'•', 

INTUITION LIBRARY 

GRAPHICS LIBRARY 

DOS LIBRARY FAST RAH 



| SPEED COMPARISONS 

A50Q STANDARD - 

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LEFT BUTTON TO EXIT 
RIGHT BUTTON TO RUH B031K 



AMERICAN PEOPLE/LINK 

The Amiga Zone and Amiga Zone PRO are American Peo- 
ple/Link's popular Amiga support areas. Each file is listed below 
with its library file number and is tagged either "AZ" or "AZPRO" 
to indicate in which Zone you'll find it. For information on getting 
your own People/Link account, call 800-524-0100 (voice) or 
800-826-8855 (modem). 

SYS1NF0.LZH [#3020/AZPRO] 

This is version 1.98 of Australian Nic Wilson's excellent Amiga 
system identifier and performance analyzer. Run Syslnfo (shown) 
and its well-organized and attractive screen opens. In a couple of 
seconds, the program scrutinizes your hardware and shows you 
your Amiga's configuration, including a speed comparison with 
other Amiga seiups. Great for showing off or settling arguments 
with friends or roving gangs of Atari owners. 





PROSTEP.LZH [#301 3/ AZPRO] 

I don't know about you but I'm no programmer. And yet I want to 
be able lo use different programs' ARexx capabilities to do wonderful 
things with as little effort as possible. Hey. isn't that what a computer 
is for? Bob Hosch's ProStep (shown) is a bound CanDo deck created 
to help batch-process files through ASDG's Art Department Profes- 
sional using ARexx commands. Although ProSwp's interface looks 
like alien spaceship hardware, it's easy to lean) to use it to shuffle a 
series of IFF files into and out of ADPro, performing any kind of 
image processing on them. The freely distributable DeckBrowser (or 
CanDo itself). ADPro. ARexx. and a hard drive are required. 

AMIDOCK.LZH [#26268/AZ] 

Since the early days of freely distributable Amiga software, devel- 
opers have been trying to improve on the WorkBench concept. 
Here's another innovative approach. If you're seen or played with a 
NeXT computer you're familiar with its concept of a "dock" of icons 
from which you can run various programs without having to open 
windows or drawers to find them. Gary Knight's AmiDock (shown) 
brings this concept to the Amiga, and gives you a vertical or horizon- 
tal expandable row of icon buttons from which to click-launch your 
favorite programs. If you want more buttons or different ones you'll 
have to design your own in a paint program, but AmiDock. comes 
with a gooil supply and a handy grid pattern for making more. 

HANDSHAKE22C.LZH [#26598/AZ] 

This is the long-awaited new version of Eric Haberfellner's 
exquisite VT52/1O0/102/220 terminal emulator. New to version 
2.20c is an ARexx port to give HandShake extended macro capa- 
bility, recognition of C tinman or WShelt on your system, and its 
ability to use external protocol libraries. I can't yet recommend 
HandShake for People/Link use since it still doesn't incorporate 
our fast WXmodem file transfer protocol, but if and when a 
WXmodem XPR library appears that problem should be solved. 
Still, if you need a terminal emulator that does what HandShake 
does you won't find anything helter. - Harv Laser [CBM*HARV| 



44 .infO MAY 1991 



P U B L I 




O M A I N 



GEnie 

GEnic is General Electric's commercial online information ser- 
vice. GEnie's *Siarship Amiga* software library has over 10.0(10 
files available for downloading. For information on signing up for 
GEnic. call 800-638-9636. 

BOMBSQUAD.LZH [#10124] 

Addictive and slightly misnamed. Bombsqttad ( shown I by 
George A. Rucker will have you searching for as many as 1 08 ran- 
domly hidden bombs. Double-clicking each tile on the playfield 
either ends the game (boom! ) or reveals the number of bombs bor- 
dering on (he selected square. Quick replay more or less counter- 
balances the frustration of only having one guy in your "squad," 
since the game requires a lot of luck as well as keen logic to win. 

ASTROLOGY.LZH [#10139] 

For those who don't find the moniker "astrological utility" to be 
an oxymoron, here is a demo version (shareware $25) of 'Astrology 
(shown) by Phil Moore. The program charts and interprets any- 
one's horoscope. The demo version will do the charting - in color 
and hi-res, no less. Paying the shareware fee gets the interpretation 
disks. Despite the warning in the instructions. Astrology seems to 
run okay with a tad less than 400K of available chip RAM. 

LW-TEAPOT.LZH [#10185] 

Now that NewTek's Video Toaster and several other 24-bit 
graphic boards are available, 24-bit graphic files are starting to 
show up on GEnie. For those whose hardware budget is on the 
Spartan side. Teapot (shown) is a HAM version of a 3D rendering 
completed with the Toaster's Lightwave 3D software. X- 
WING.LZH [#10255] and LW-MARBLECAN.LZH |#10186] 
arc two more nice Lightwave to HAM conversions. 

CHKBKACCNTNT0.9.LZH [#9953] 

While Jeffery Almasol's Checkbook Accountant \i).9 may not be a 
full-function checkbook register replacement yet, this 'pre-release" 
version is very useful and easy to use as a balance reconciliation utility 
when you get your monthly statements. There is even a simple budget 
function thai can give you a good idea where the money went. 

SPACEWAR.LZH [#10078] 

Spacewar by Jeff Peikau and Brian Fendrau is an Amiga adaptation 
of one of the first hacker games from the early days of mainframe 
computers. Here the starship Enterprise and a Klingon bird of prey 
duke i: out in a universe dominated by a (variably) high gravity sun 
and a mad planet. Two players are required, but fear not - Spacewar 
has modem support so competition can be just a phone call away. 

COMIX01I.ZIP [#10133] 

Comic collectors will get a leg up with Lort Stitch's Comix Caper 
database. It will search all text fields for specified strings, be they user 
comment Ileitis or the essential title, publisher, condition, etc. Supports 
both a "Have" and a "Want" list. - Don Romero 



Botib Squad Sari) Count : 48 iBlidt 


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.info MAY 1991 45 



P U B L I 




O M A I N 



Rp 1 1 n a 

Pel -!■[■:. !.v I h. n'.-i- 






DISK COLLECTIONS 

BARBARA'S CHOICE 

There are many companies distributing Amiga PD/Shareware 
disks and much duplication of the programs offered. What sets a 
company apart is the quality of iis service - catalog, selection, sup- 
port, and guarantee. On all counts. Barbara's Choice Software is 
excellent. Their catalog, which includes disks formerly sold by 
California Shareware, includes detailed listings which rale program 
quality and experience needed for use. The "Gelling Started" sec- 
lion should be required reading for all new Amiga owners; il tells 
all you need to know lo get these programs running. In addition lo 
the usual PD favorites, Barbara's Choice has a very extensive col- 
lection of clip art. much of it produced by in-house artists. They 
can be used as is, or modified to meel your needs. Most arc quite 
good, and CLIP ART PAKS [# 9144-48J assemble the best. 

ANATOMY CLIP ART [9261] 

The eye (shown) is but one of dozens of body parts and systems, 
plus a few scary-looking surgical inslruments, included on this 
clip-art disk. I also like COLOR CLIPART [9245J. which 
includes an entertaining "Humorous" subdirectory. Manipulating 
these images in DPaint is easily done. 

ASTRONOMY [9235] 

Buffs and teachers will love this disk of BASIC astronomy pro- 
grams. From satellite orbit demonstrations (shown) to facts about 
Uranus, photons, and Saturn, this is a gold mine of information. 
The series is self-running, perfect for unattended display purposes 
like science fairs. 

FAIRY TALE TRAKS [9246] 

Great idea! This disk contains line drawings illustrating popular 
fairy tales and nursery rhymes. Produced especially for Barbara's 
Choice, they provide your child with an electronic coloring book, 
The advantages are obvious - mistakes can be corrected as often as 
necessary, and they can experiment with many different colors. Or 
you could print the outlines for use as a normal coloring book. 
Some text is included, and with programs like DPaim kids could 
even change the stories to their taste. 

DINOSAUR TRAKS [9207] 

This is another electronic coloring book, and features giant... 
well, you know (look at the picture). Simple facts about the 
dinosaurs are included in each picture. Kids seem to love 
dinosaurs, so this is a natural for home or school use. By the way. 
how do you like my coloring? 

HOW TO ORDER 

Each disk is S 3.99. Shipping/Handling $3.00 per order (HI, AK, 
Canada S5.00. International SI 1. 00). Barbara's Choice Software, 
38438 20th Street East. Palmdalc CA 93550, 805-267- 1 172. VISA 
and MasterCard accepted. 

-Jeff Lowenthal 



46 .info MAY 1991 




Business • Home • Games • Graphics • Music * MultiMedia • Programming • Sounds • Utilities • Clip Art 
Thousands of Titles 

Same-Day Shipping/Next-Day and 
Second-Day Air Available on Request 




CranWare 



NO MINIMUM 
NEVER A SURCHARGE 
COD & Checks Welcome 



The Best and Most Complete Amiga Public Domain Library Available at the Lowest Price 
Only *4 each — and for every 3 you buy — take one FREE ! 



Hundreds of subjects. All titles in stock. Only the best professional quality disks are 
used. All disks are fully labeled for easy indexing and come with complete documenta- 
tion — many with source. Dedicated support team and phone line. Personal checks are 
welcome and we ship upon receipt so you receive your order as soon as possible. Free 
catalog sent with all orders. User groups and dealer inquiries encouraged. 
GAMES 



D W20-CARD GAMES: CONCENTRATION: A classic 1-or 2rjlayer game. 
VIOEOPOKER-Bet, draw, hold, or (old. lust like the machines in Vegas. 
rHIHTY-ONE. THIRTEENS. HON'ANA, KLONDIKE. CARD-O-RAMA 
(source inc.). Also on this disk CASDHAKER-design your o*n cards Id 
use in your program 

D #0!!-BATTLEFORCE: Take control of a tyrohundred-foot robol armed 
with lasers and missiles as you blast and maneuver ynur way thru this 
nonstop action strategy game. Ga me is over 600k and takes up Iheone 
disk 

D«022-BOARO GAMES: This disk is full with classic board games foi 
multiple or single players. MONOPOLY. REVERSI, OTHELLO II, CLUE 
BACKGAMMON If. and CHESS. 

D#023-GAME HINTS: This is an extended Dungeon Master game hint 
disk with more nraps and hints. Spells, item locations, nddle answers, 
more. Beast II walk-thru (ram start to finish. Also included ate the 
Ultimate Hint lists 1 £ 2 with hundreds ol cheats and hack doors tor all 
your lavonte games. No adventurer should be without this one. 

L-l#025-ARCAOE 2: Some ol video gaming' s best-known and classic 
games are contained on this disk. A MOEBA -a space i nvsders clone. 
SUPERB REAKOUT.ASIESOIDS. 3-D BREAKOUT, and many more. 

D W26-ADVENTURE: ZERK and HACKLITE-Iwo well-done Ultima clones 
with different plots. 

BACKUP UTILITIES 

□ «45-eACKU P: KCOPY III and Aia-Copes what the others mn\ Gets 
rid ol annoying code wheel protection and pth-er protection schemes. 
Plenty of parameters included 

ANIMATIONS 

HH f*052-AN IMATIONS: ANTI CBS-Sfie and lead what made this author so 
perturbed at the famed network. CPUSTANDOFF- animation at it's best 
as the Amiga getsthe best of the Apple. MACHI NE-a maze ol inter-linking 
gears and mechanisms 

□ 3053-AN I MATI ON S: CA R-j-tf in on the pke mtt Allen Hastings classic 
animation ot the speeding sports car and the runaway unicyde. a must 
see, HBHILL-an excellent animation uyng the Amigas "'Eitra Halfbirte 
Mode" with muse in the background, Interesting pictures also included, 

D P054-ANIUATIQHS: AHIGAWVE-another excellent animation by Allen 
Hastings. BOIHGTHROWS-this classic took 325 hours of run time to 
generate. DARK -am nation demo with source. 

□ p055-ANIP*ATIDN$: ASTEROID FIELO-a large (670K) animation by 
Michael Powell of a spaceship racing thru an asteroid held being chased 
by unseen foes with several near misses Seen from a movie-theater view, 

□ #Q57-ANIMATIDNS:JUGGtER^ho could forget EncGraham'sstunning 
3-D ray trace animation that has shown olf theAmigas abilities lor so long 
This is a true cfassic and a must-have tor any collection. BUT "Brain Layer 
Inspection Transfer"- an interesting look into human mind enhancement. 
Also includes a couple of excellent pics. 

D sfl$8-ANI MATIONS: BQING-witfi selectable speed. NOT BOING AGAIN- 
take a humorous look at what happens when the computer gets too much 
"Bang." DRIVE -Hmnm... this car looks familiar. 

DtO59-ANIHATl0NS: TOO MUCH 3-D-don'l miss Ihisescellerl animation 



of a spaceship that flies straight out of the monitor and plays havoc in the 
room, only to return from where rt came. Also on this disk BILLIARDS. 
3SPACE, and a couple of good cycle pics. 

D rteo -ANI HATIONS; KAHNAKAS-a fascinating animated 3-D Ray Trace 
with stunning detail so precrse that you can see the reflections off the 
reflections This one is a masterpiece and has helped to sell many of the 
Amiga computers on store demos. GHOSTPOOL-a well done animation of 
an unseen pool shark RADIO II— an excellent animation with clarity so 
good it looks better than the real thug (3-D Ray Trace). 

D#06i-ANIHATIONS: 3 great animations ROCKER. SPIRAL TOWER, 
HEADANIM. and 3 great pictures BUGEYE. AMERICA, and MISCHIEF 

GRAPHICS 

□ #0G2-PICTURES: Disk 1 of the Nagel collection. Pictures 101 to 121 of 
beautiful: women, plus Nagel Tiger. Viewer included. 

n#064-ARCHITECFUHE: Several pictures ol castles, museums, dream 

houses, etc., arranged in a slide show presentation. 
D tfO&5-FAHTA$T: Black knights, dragons, wizards, elves, and lots more all 

arranged in a point and ciick or slideshow formal 

D #06&-COVERGIRLS: 18 beautiful faces of models from around the world 
Disk 1 of the series. 

O #Q70-RAYTRACES: Several excellent 3-D Ray Trace pictures all presented 
in a slideshow or point-anddick format Adefinite plus to your collection. 

LJ #072-COMBAT JETS: A collection ot the world's best fighters and bombers 
being used today. 

I— I ftSO-CARS: Parens, Lotus. Lamborghini, Ferrari, and fourteen other eiotic 

sports cars are all here in stunning high-res pictures. 
Dwai-CARTOOHS: All your favorite Saturday morning and newspaper 

cartoon characters are presented in a long-running slideshow. 
L_l ftSS-FRACTALS 1: This disk is packed with entries from around the world. 
LJ #88-S.PACE; Some excellent shots of our solar system, moon landings. 

shuttle flights, and unmanned probes. Great for multimedia applications. 
D 089-SCIFI: Star Wars and Star Trek tarts-tors drsk is packed with your 

favorites. Pont -and -click 

UTILITIES 

D »00 1 -VI R LIS PROTECTION: Prelect your hies with these Virus Utilities 
BERSERKER. VIRUSX M.0}. VCHECK GUARDIAN. XENOZf.P plus 
many more. 

□ #002-PRINTER DRIVERS: This disk contains many useful utilities for 
your printing needs PflTDHVGEN-generale your own custom drivers tor 
any printer. PRINTSTUDIO-pnnt hard copies of any type of IFF file (HAM. 
Eitra haifbright. Overscan] Print it all or just the parts you want LABEL- 
PRI HT-reads your disks and printout labels for them Also catalogs and 
allows custom editing. Much more, 

□ frO03-C0HPR£SSORS: 1G lies compressors, to include LHArc [vl 20). 
ARC (v2.3). LHWarp (vl.4), PKAZIP. ZOO [v2.tj). These will compress your 
files up to 50% and aie indispensable for the Telecommunlcalor or Hard 
Orrve owner, 

□ #OM-liMX EDITORS: ED and STEVlE-twn full featured UNIX edrtors. 
plus AMIGASPELL-spellingcheeker with nodisk access. 100% assembly 
language 

D rW73-VIEWERS: SH0WWII 2 -a great picture presenter that incorporates 



Best Bets 

□ KB400-BIBLE: 8 disk set ollhe King James version of the Holy 
Bible. Every chapter, every verse ol Ihe Old and New Testament. 
Specially puced at only $16.95. (no free disk offer on lira seJectronJ. 

Q iflj'S-STARTREK: The new Tobias version from Germany. Com- 
mercial quality and highly addictive. 2 disk set pneed at 1, 

D#232-Helpers: CREOITBOOK-Keep track of all yoor charge 
accounts. Generates a letter lo report lost or stolen cards. DIETAIO - 
Slay trim with Ihis diet helper. AREACODE-No more fumbling thru Ihe 
phone book. MAPHAKCR-C-enerates graphic representations of the 
earth's surface. FtOADROUTE-Shows Ihe best routes lo lake, miles. 
time, and major cities. BIORHTTHH, HACKS-vanous icons, and much 
more. 

□ #2B8-CLIGHT: An eitremely easy 3D RayTracing generator that 
is bolh powerful and fieiible. Don't spend your $$ on anything else 
until you have tried this one. 



several different wipes and effects, fade-in. dissolve, magnify, etc.. su. 
ports scripts and text Also includes a smaller version. HAMOI F~now it is a 
snap to view IBM GIF type pictures using one simple command. MULTI- 
VIEW shows IFF, Alan, and Mac pictures wren an easy-lo-use graphic 
interface. Converts icons into IFFs. Also on this disk SHOWANIM (v5.3) 
IfFMIRRORS.SUPERVIEW and more 

TELECOMMUNICATIONS 

DftOlI-Telecomraunicalions: NCOHM (vl 91 one of Ihe best terminal 
packages available lor Ihe Amiga. Has all the leatures of commercial 
programs plus more. Full ANSI/VT 100 emulation. Phonebook. Auloredial. 
NTCS/PAL support for normal or interlaced screens. Hotkeys, online dock 
Counter, supports scripts, XYZ protocols, Auto-logon, script generated 
BBS, split screen, many eirtras. Disk also includes AKERMIT 

I— ] #014-BBS's: Set up your own Builebn Board Service with these well- 
written programs. TAG, SOf TSPAN. LI NKBBS. and PROBBS. A great way 
to add to your file collection. 

HOME & BUSINESS APPLICATIONS 

D#3L2-FINANCES:BANKN-keeptrack of bank account with this handy 
program. SUPEBMORT-a morlgageand loan calculator. FUNDS-helps 
you keep track of the stock market. QBASE-keep track ol triends and 
others. IRA -an investment calculator. VC-spreadsheet program. 

LJ rr330-ANAlYTICALC: Alu I feature numerical analysis and spreadsheet 
program. Uses memoiy lor instant access to data Drive any cell Irom 
macro. Has built-in matnxalgebraand much mere List too long lo print 
This is a top-notch program and puts many similar commercial pro- 
grams to sha me, (This is a 2-disk set tor the price ol 1.) 

PROGRAMMING 

D#2t>0-C00ES: Several code generators to help assist you in your 
programs— DOREVISION -creates revision headers similar to ttie ones 
al Ihe top of every Amiga C header file. HENUBUfLDER-automaticaiSy 
builds menus, EGAD-a gadget editor BLX-lor making requesters 

D WOB-PASCAL-a complete 2-disk set ol everything yo u need to pro- 
gram In PASCAL Assemblers, subset corn pliers, etc. Also includes P2C 
i Pascal loC translator. 

MUSICS SOUNDS 

D HOTS-INSTRUMENTS: Over B50K ol DMCS instrument lilts. 

□ HOW-CLASSIC ROCK: DMCS scores of the class cs-Stairway to Heav- 
en. Smoke on Ihe Water, Riders on Ihe Storm, also some modern rock 
tunes. Over 35 scores in all 

D M05-SOUHDS: Sounds Irom 2001. Lost in Space, Star Wars. 



USA and CANADA Toll Free 1-800-321-0815 7 DAYS A WEEK 



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Join our club and receive over 1 Meg of 
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no extra charge. Only $39.95 per year. 



To order, check boxes for the disks you want and send this order form with your name, 
address, and phone number along with a check or money order to: 

Cranberry Software Distributors, P.O. Box 565, Carver, MA 02355. 
Shipping and handling add $2.50 for orders under 10 (excluding free disks). Canadian 
orders add $.50 per disk (U.S. Funds]. Blank disk orders add $3.50 per 100 or fraction. 
Call for international rates. As a service to you personal checks are not held 3nd we ship 
on receipt. Massachusetts residents add 5% sales tax. 



ProDupe 3.5 Disks 

High-Quality Certified 
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.49 each any quantity 




Circle #146 on the Reader Service Card 




Brad Schenck 



on -i • 

raphics 




These two images are large HAM versions of a couple of 24-bit 
Imagine renderings from Brad's animation "Off the Record"... 



Imagine is Impulse's successor to Turbo Silver. 
After close to a year of new development. Impulse 
has come up with an entirely new environment for 
creating raytraced or solid modeled animations; 
most of what we liked about Silver is slill there, 
but the whole approach to designing scenes and 
motion lias been created from scratch. The result is a 
large, complex program whose intuitive interface makes 
it fairly simple to get started even without an under- 
standing of all the program's features. The modules in 
Imagine each have very similar interfaces and functions 
within their specialty, and are consistent. 

Imagine is so large that even after completing one 
long animation and many smaller projects with it I have 
to admit that there are a lot of things I simply haven 't 
tried yet. 1 will be working with the program more in 
the coming months and hope to share some of my expe- 
riences with you all. In the meantime. I want to present 
this introduction to the program with some observations. 



Brad takes a 
sneak peek 
at the latest 
3D imaging 
program for 
the Amiga: 
Impulse's 
Imagine. 



PROGRAM MODULES 

All of Imagine's editors use a four-window screen 
that shows the usual three views plus a perspective 
view. Any of these views can be made full-screen, and 
the perspective view can be displayed as wireframe, 
'solid' wireframe, or shaded. 

In the object editing areas, all or any of the points. 



faces, or edges of objects can be modified; objects 
may be scaled, moved, or rotated using the mouse, or 
by entering numerical values. A variable sized grid can 
be turned on or off. Mouse control includes several 
selection modes; clicking, using a 'drag box", or draw- 
ing a freehand 'lasso.' 

The interface is consistent throughout the program mod- 
ules and is quite intuitive. Function keys may be assigned 
to any function available through the editor's menus, 

FORMS EDITOR 

The Forms Editor allows the user to create unusual, 
irregular forms very' easily by editing representative 
slices of an object in the available views. This editor is 
unique in my experience and hard to describe; it's well 
suited to modelling organic, flowing shapes that would 
be next to impossible to make any other way. Should 
an object become too complex (involving an unrea- 
sonable number of points) it can be recalculated using 
fewer points. Several varieties of 'symmetry' between 
views make the creation of symmetrical sections easy. 

DETAIL EDITOR 

This editor allows the user to create objects from 
scratch by creating the points and faces desired, and 
also has built-in primitives like surfaces, spheres, cones, 
and so on. It incorporates the following features: 

Editable objects, groups, points, edges, and faces (sel- 
ected points can be 'hidden' to make the display clearer). 
'Ground' objects, as in Silver, exlend in an infinite hori- 
zontal plane. Pointless spheres are available as primitives. 

Hierarchical grouping of objects: groups may consist 
of any combination of other groups or objects and can 
be moved, scaled, or rotated together or individually. 

Extrusions include straight, lathing (two types), and 
extrusions on paths. Objects may be scaled or rotated 
in any dimension during an extrusion, and the far end 
of an object can be made to mirror the original end (in 
depth). Linked to extrusion is Imagine's ability to con- 
form an object to a sphere or cylinder; the user can 
choose what size the imaginary sphere or cylinder is in 
relation to an object, and 'bend' that object to match. 

IFF images may be converted to flat 3D objects 
within the Detail Editor, but are not automatically 
'filled' with faces. 

Volumetric Textures: up to four per object. Nine arc 
included with Imagine (bricks, checks, wood, grid, 
angular, linear, radial, dots, and disturbed). 

Image mapping capability includes up to four IFF 
maps per object, using color, reflection, filler (trans- 
parency), or altitude (bump) mapping. 



48 .info MAY 1991 



Boolean Operations: one object may be 'sliced' with 
another. This means thai a user can build shapes and 
'subtract' those shapes from objects, much like carv- 
ing or stamping an object with a die, or cutting it as 
with a mill or planer. This makes complicated relief 
patterns simple but also means that holes (of any 
shape) can be drilled through objects. 

Duplicate points are eliminated with the 'Merge' func- 
tion (which apparently didn't make it into the manual). 
This is especially useful after 'Slicing' a set of objects. 

In addition io the volumetric textures and image 
maps, surfaces can have variable color, reflectivity, 
'filter' or transparency, color of specular highlights, 
faceted or phong shading, dithering, hardness, rough- 
ness, shininess, and refraction. Objects can be forced 
to an unshaded color zero for genlocking, and object 
attributes can be saved and loaded. 

Magnetism, with very flexible controls, can make a 
single dragged point 'carry' nearby points with it. The 
tutorials amply demonstrate how useful this can be in 
creating landscapes, but it has many uses in creating 
characters and other objects as well. 

CYCLE EDITOR 

This module allows you to import objects created in 
the other editors and link them together as characters. 
By designing keyframes of motion, it's a relatively 
simple matter to create a walk cycle or other cyclic 
motion which can then be imported into the Stage 
(animation) editor and repeated at will. It's also possi- 
ble to morph between cycles, meaning that one cycle 
can be animated while transforming into another one. 

With a few exceptions, this editor has ail the same 
hot-key commands and similar functions to the other edi- 
tors, so that going from one module to another is natural. 

STAGE EDITOR 

This module has two parts. The first, which resem- 
bles the other editors, is a four-view graphical repre- 
sentation of any frame in an animation. The second is 
more symbolic; called the 'Action' screen, this is a 
kind of chart for all the objects in the animation, light 
sources, transformations (morphs), animated cycles (in 
forward or reverse, beginning with any frame of the 
cycle) and camera motion. The position, alignment 
and size of any scene clement can be 'tweened' auto- 
matically by using the corresponding bars in the 
Action chart, and the motion of one 'Actor' on the 
Action chart can be "Hinged" on another object. 

Just about any object or Global characteristic can be 
morphed. Shape, color, any or all of the textures and 
image maps (color, reflectance, filter and altitude 
maps), cycling motions, and so on are all transformable. 
In addition, the Action screen offers control of F/X, or 
Special Effect Modules (these, like Textures, can be 
added to as more become available). Partly morphed 
objects can be captured and saved from the Stage Editor. 

The three F/X provided with Imagine 1.0 are Explode. 
Ripple, and Grow. All of these alter an object's geometry, 
not just its appearance as the Textures do. and so their 
effects can be viewed in the stage editor either frame by 
frame, or in an animation preview. 

Objects and cycles can be animated as they follow a 




...They were rendered in about twenty minutes each on a 
25 mhz 68030 system, using Scanline mode. 



motion path of any shape. Motion paths are made up 
ol a scries of axes rather than points, so it's possible to 
rotate them to define path direction. 

Global characteristics can also be defined. Separate 
colors can be specified for the Zenith, Horizon and 
'Negative Zenith' or Nadir of the sky. as well as Ambi- 
ent light. A Global Brush will, in non-raytracing modes, 
become a reflectance map that affects the appearance of 
any reflective objects in a scene. 



THE PROJECT EDITOR 

This module controls rendering. Imagine offers wire- 
frame, color wireframe, quick shading, scanline render- 
ing, and full raytraced images. Images can be of any 
size up to SI 92 by 8192 pixels in any Amiga display 
mode or in 24-bit color, and will directly display on 
Impulse's Firecracker 24-bit display board. File formats 
for images include Impulse's 12 and 24-bit format and 
IFF format, including 24-bit. Animations can be created 
in the Impulse format or in IFF ANIM format. 

AH Project Editor choices can be entered directly into 
a Rendering Subproject requester, or can be defined as 
'Presets' to choose from in Imagine'*, xonfig file; this is 
a simple text file that can be edited with a text or word- 
processor. This .config file, unfortunately, contains the 
only control over anti-aliasing and recursion. 

As you can see, even a terse description of the pro- 
gram's capabilities can strain the seams of my column. 
I'll be coming back to Imagine in these pages soon: 
this introduction will, 1 hope, give you an idea of what 
the program offers. This software is a major develop- 
ment for Amiga artists. While version 1 .0 has a couple 
of unpolished edges, it's an amazing program. Weigh- 
ing in as it does at one tenth the price of some recent 
competition on Mac and MS/DOS systems, it's no less 
a heavyweight in the rendering arena. 



Imagine vl.O 
$350.00 
Impulse 
6870 Shingle 
Creek Parkway 
#112 

Minneapolis, 
MN 55430 
612-566-0221 



.info MAY 1991 49 



Jim Meyer 



Productivity 




DTP Wars Heating 



Till Color 



o 

CM 

1) 

bi) 

Oh 



Grey 68'/. 

Grey 7K 

Grey 73* 

Grey 87* 

!■- '" ii I ■ 

Red 

Hliite 
Yellow 



OK 



Things are gett 

teieased 5aii)j 

bumped ftfo 

lowed qmckl; _ 

Gold Disk, «Ao had announced that pio/es- 

is^ia.' Jfc« Ji 1 (PFagel Mould 93 on hit the 

inaiket Well, aftet a few false starts, PFage 

2.0 appeared in my mailbox 

PPage comes on three floppy disks, and is ac- 
companied by a 257-page manual and an in- 
stnictionaludeotape The videotape basically 
follows the totoial in Use manual taking the 
user through the basic steps of document cre- 

,i.,r :A'"'-i:"-ri^ ^i I'^UbiilMim- 



| Falgtte | | Cancel 



M-featured All o f the standard edit 
op? rations are present, along w.tb a i 
would eipect to find m a word pro ce! 
Most unlets will appreciate the teal- 
checker. One of the more interesting 
is the Translation Table. Thisfeatuif 
you to set up a able from wlijch text 
substitutions can be made Le'.'s say 
yourself typing "Desktop Pubhsbing 
o\«f indover again You can create 

y™!jli*,™»1shla „.lnrl, „n,ll^ Viw 3 




Professional Page v2,0 from Gold Disk; the main layout screen. 



Professional Page 2.0 comes on lliree 
floppy disks, and is accompanied by a 
267-page manual and an instructional 
videotape. The videoiape is slick and 
well-organized, and takes [he user 
through [he basic steps of document cre- 
ation. Setting up Professional Page is easy, but (here is 
one catch - if you don't boot from the Professional 
Page disk, you must make three assigns that enable 
Professional Page lo find its fonts and utilities. Forget 
this step, and you'll find that the text in the menus, 
requesters, and gadgets runs off the left-hand side. 
Hard disk installation is accomplished through the 
HDinstall script. 

Professional Page employs the familiar metaphor of 
a blank screen (ari board, if you will) flanked by a col- 
umn of gadgels on the right. Noihing exists until you 
create a page. You can choose from six predefined 
page sizes, or specify one of your own. The New Page 
Format requester allows you lo set margins, number of 
pages, automatic column linking, number of columns, 
and gutter (space between columns) size. A PostScript 
Output Specs gadget brings up an additional requester. 
This one lets you position, scale, roiate, or acid crop 
marks to a page, and gives you a "no eject" option. 
With this option in force, you can overlay pages. Once 



Jim boots up 
version 2.0 
of the 
grandaddy 
of Amiga 
desktop 
publishing 
programs. 



you've gotten your pages set up, it's time lo put some- 
thing on them. What do you put on the page? Why, 
boxes, of course. 

SAY IT WITH BOXES 

Professional Page is a box-oriented program. As the 
manual says, "Once you fully understand boxes, you 
have grasped the main concept of Professional Page." 
Thankfully, there's not too much to understand. Boxes 
are mini-environments, with adjustable size, trans- 
parency, permeability, internal margins, color, and bor- 
ders. The elements of a document - text and graphics - 
live within those boxes, and are "pasted" onto the page. 

Once a box is defined, you can fill it with text or 
graphics. Professional Page will import any IFF 
graphic. Encapsulated PostScript (EPSF) graphics, and 
structured drawings in ,-\<"„'/.v Draw Pins or Professional 
Draw format. After a graphic lias been imported, it can 
be cropped or scaled to size. If you need to create your 
own graphics. Professional Page provides you with a 
set of structured drawing tools. The lools allow you to 
draw straight lines, bezier curves, rectangles, ellipses. 
polygons, ami freehand curves. Because these are struc- 
tured graphics, you can resize them with no distortion. 
Professional Page also provides a variety of line 
weights, colors, and fill patterns. 

THE ARTICLE EDITOR 

One of the more significant aspects to Professional 
Page 2.0, and something dear to the heart of this 
columnist, is the Article Editor. While all DTP pro- 
grams will lei you enter lexl directly inlo a document, 
il's almost always a slow and ledious proposition. 
WYSIWYG Formatting gets in the way, and you soon 
feel as if you're operating in slow motion. Gold Disk 
has chosen an alternate route. The Article Editor - 
which is based on Gold Disk's wordprocessor. Tran- 
sWrite - gives you all the advantages of a separate text 
editor (and more) while allowing you to integrate the 
two steps of text ediiing and document creation. You 
can invoke the Article Editor with two keystrokes, cre- 
ale or import your texl. and flow that text into your 
document with two more keystrokes. 

The Article Editor is surprisingly full-featured. All 
of the standard ediiing operations are present, along 
with a few one would expect lo find in a wordproces- 
sor. Most writers will appreciate the real-lime spell 
checker. One of the more interesting features is (he 
Translation Table. This feature allows you to set up a 
table from which texi substitutions can be made. Let"s 



50 .info MAY 1991 



say you find yourself typing "Desktop Publishing Pro- 
gram" over and over again. You can create a transla- 
tion table, which would have a substitution ("DPP" = 
"Desktop Publishing Package") which the Article 
Reader can summon with a single command. You can 
make translation tables as long as you wish, and you 
may create as many tables as you need. 

I decided to live dangerously for (he purposes of 
this column. Every word is being created in the Article 
Editor and automatically imported into my Profes- 
sional Page document. I am finding this to be one of 
easiest methods for creating text and getting it into the 
document. I also like having the resident spellchecker, 
word counter, and FOG (readability) index. There are 
other options, of course. Professional Page will import 
text from WordPerfect. Scribble!, TextCraft, Textcrafi 
Plus, and generic files, as well as TransWrite files cre- 
ated with the Article Editor. 

FABULOUS FONTS 

Text is one part of the puzzle. Fonts arc another. 
Professional Page uses bitmap. PostScript, and Com- 
pugraphic fonts. You'll get the best on-screen repre- 
sentation, as well as non-PostScript output, from one 
of the Compugraphic "outline" fonts. Two - Times and 
Triumvirate - are supplied. Because Compugraphic 
fonts are created on-screen from data stored on disk, 
there is a delay the first time a character is used. As a 
character is created, however, it is saved in a cache. 
Subsequent calls to cached characters will be consid- 
erably faster. If you have the storage space, there's a 
CacheEdit program which will create your cache in 
advance. In addition to Compugraphic fonts. Profes- 
sional Page supports the standard array of PostScript 
fonts, as well as bitmap fonts. Bitmap fonts, however, 
can only be used with non-PostScript printers. 

I was pleased to see that Professional Page, when 
using outline fonts, rendered text noticeably faster 
than the competition. Should you use a PostScript or 
bitmap font, text is rendered extremely fast. The on- 
screen representation will suffer, though. One unfortu- 
nate habit thai Professional Page has in common with 
its competitors is its propensity to re-draw the entire 
screen every lime something changes. Thankfully, 
Professional Page does this faster than anyone else. 

A GAME OF TAG 

The differences between desktop publishing pro- 
grams become more apparent when you get down to 
the business of stylizing the appearance of your docu- 
ment. An attractive document is much more than text 
in a box. There are attributes to consider - spacing 
between letters (tracking), spacing between lines 
(leading, pronounced "ied-ing"), spaces between par- 
ticular letters (kerning), first line indent in paragraphs, 
and more. Professional Page lets you set these 
attributes through Style and Paragraph tags, by menu 
item, or by imbedding a formatting code in the text. 
The three methods offer you all the flexibility you'd 
need. If you use more than a lew text styles, the fastest 
method for text formatting is the use of imbedded 
codes. That's the way it's done at most newspapers, 



Project Edit Connantls Mm Styles Ciu>soi> 



Set options a-F2 ■ [r]hj] 

Tilings are setting hotter in tljSet colons a-F3 m ^\, first, 



.Professional Page has, long bef " Pt ™ - * ' iU |the heavyweights 

iSw sa Ei \l l t m ' w !M te ( Jo 'i single lines ; ' 
SShK.r et!tl ° ni ^P-te lines 

|LL THIS ^ A TAPE, 100, ^S* $ 

PPage cones on three floppy &vJw& ' !:;i "*w .4.7 
and an instructional videotape.! • „,,„;„„ 
and takes the user through tfo' lm spacin * 
t PPase is easy, but there's one -gotcha!" if you don't boot fron the 
rim fljsk, you mist tuke three assigns that enable PPage to find its fonts 
and utilities, Forget this step, and you'll find that the text in the 
Menus, requesters, and gadgets runs off the left-hand side, Hard disk 
installation is acconphshed through the HDInstall script.il 



tiamial 
ganized, 
i, Setting 
oot fron the 



id side, Hard disk 

cript.H 



9125 / U 



The Article Editor, which bears more than a passing 
resemblance to TransWrite, 



where lens or hundreds of pages are laid out each day. 
Tags are the next fastest method, and can be faster than 
imbedded codes if you have several pre-defined lags 
available. For small blocks of text, all of (he options are 
available via menu or keyboard shortcut. One interest- 
ing twist: you can change the tracking or baseline of 
highlighted text by holding down the cursor keys. 

MOSTLY GOOD NEWS 

All in all, Professional Page 2.0 has many advan- 
tages and few deficiencies. Among lhe advantages: it's 
fairly responsive, and the integrated Article Editor 
makes document preparation more of a one-step oper- 
ation. It does an excellent job of handling imported 
graphics, and the support for Compugraphic fonts 
allows folks without PostScript printers to gel the best 
print possible. Professional Page supports a full range 
of output options: PostScripl and color PostScript, 
Preferences-supported primers, and color separations. 

There were a few deficiencies. I'd like to see sup- 
port Tor irregular shapes, as well as irregular text 
runaround. I'd also like to see improved low-memory 
handling. Although Professional Page will sometimes 
warn you when chip memory runs low. I experienced 
two lockups without warning. Nole thai my rating 
applies for machines with one meg of chip memory. 
Folks with only 5 1 2K of chip RAM are likely to have 
an unexpected surprise from lime to time. 

The love hate relationship continues. The speed increase 
ot PostScript output has been offset by the frequency of 
unneeded screen refreshes. Cheers for the new easy-to-use 
palette are matched by hisses at the cumbersome para- 
graph control. For every "Gee Whiz" feature it seems they've 
added an "Oh No" bug. Yet, all in alt, Professional Page 2.0 
has the flexibility and control we need to create this maga- 
zine. - Megan Ward, .info Art & Production Manager 



Professional 
Page 2.0 

$395.00 
Gold Disk 
5155 Spectrum 
Way, Unit #5 
Mississauga, 
Ontario, Canada 
L4W 5A1 
416-602-4653 



.info MAY 1991 51 




#2 INFO 64, Winter 1983/84 

Guide to C64 products. Koala pad. Flexidraw. Ul- 
traBASIC-64, Home Accountant vs. C.P.A. 

#3 INFO 64, Spring 1984 
Product Round-up: I0O0 product listings forC64, 
Superbase 64, Commodore LOGO. C64 Forth. 
Model Diet. Computer Mechanic. 

#6 INFO 64 Spring 1985 
Color Gallery! C64 hard drives. Intro to Assembly 
Language. COMAL 2.01, The Print Shop. Whith- 
er C/PM. 

#10 INFO May/June 1986 
Monitor Roundup! Cf>4 wordprocessors. Multi- 
plan lor C64/C128, Amiga BASIC, Tips & hints. 

#11 INFO Aug/Sept 1986 
Product Roundup issue: over 150(1 hardware and 
software listings lor CM. CI 28 and Amiga. 

#12 INFO Nov/Dec 1986 
Graphics report: C64/128 and Amiga painting. 
CAD. drafting, video animation, tools and utili- 
ties. Idea-processors. 8 bit business software. 

#13 INFO Jan/Feb 1987 

Games issue: C64/CI28 ami Amiga games. 8-Bit 
business and application software (pari I). 
Telecommunication networking, Amiga Music. 

#14 INFO Spring/Summer 1987 
Product Roundup issue: over 2()(K) hardware and 
software listings ForC64, CI28 and Amiga. First 
look at the A500 & A2000 systems. 

#15 INFO July/Aug 1987 
1st Annual C.H.U.M.P. Magazine! Commodore & 
Amiga Survival Guide. Anne Westfall interview. 
TDI Modula 2. Supra Hard Drive. 

#16 INFO Sept/Oct 1987 
Graphics Renaissance! GEOS Update. CI2S BA- 
SIC compilers, Miefolmll. Fonlmaster. Amiga 
500. Sidecar. Genlock. Multi-tasking. 

#17 INFO Nov/Dec 1987 
ANNUAL GAMES ISSUE! GEOS Update, 16/32 
hit comparison, CI28 ROM upgrades, B.E.S.T. 
Accounting. Word Writer 3, DIGA! 



fo* J AMIGA rlUoERS! 







BACK 
■ SSUES 



$5.50 EACH! 

$6.50 Outside the USA. 



#18 INFO Jan/Feb 1988 

Desktop Publishing & wordprocessors (pan I), 
Virus diagnosed. Geos Update, C64 Power Car- 
tridges. CI 28 Superpak II. 

" #19 INFO Mar/Apr 1988 
Desktop Publishing & wordprocessors (part 2l, 
Leo Schwab interview, GEOS Update. 1CT hard 
drive. Digital SuperPak2, Thoughtform. 

#20 INFO May /J un 1988 
Desktop Video: Titlers. genlocks, converters, C64 
slide show programs. GcoSluff. AmigaDos 1. 2 
Bugs. Joel I lagcit tutorial. 

#21 INFO Jul/Aug 1988 
Second Annual C.H.U.M.P. Magazine! Jay Miner 
interview, Easing The Upgrade Path, GeoStuff, 
Virus prevention. Over 40 8 & 16 bit reviews. 

#22 INFO Sep/Oct 1988 
Digitizing. Mac VS. Amiga, GeoStuff. Over 50 re- 
views for C64. CI 28, and Amiga computers, IN- 
FOmania Game Tips! BRYCE debut! 

#23 INFO Nov/Dec 1988 
ANNUAL GAMES ISSUE!! INFO Mania Game 
Tips, New Products. News & Views, 

#24 INFO Jan/Feb 1989 
Amiga 3D Graphics Round Up. Rcichart Von 
Wolfsheild interview, GeoStuff, SuperBase Pro, 
Spectrascan, Sky Travel. 

#25 INFO Mar/Apr 1989 
Amiga Animation Round lip, Rodney Chang in- 
terview, CI28 T.H.I.S., GcoCalc 128. Dr. Term 
Pro. AC/BASIC. Microfiche Filer Plus. 

#26 INFO May/June 1989 
Paint Program Round Up. Loren Lovhaug inter- 
view'. Removable Mass Storage. 1: 58 1 Toolkit. Mi- 
croLuwyer. WillMakcr, Pen Pal. 

#27 INFO Jul/Aug 1989 
3rd Annual C.H.U.M.P. Magazine! Dale Luck in- 
terview. Sound & Music. Fractals. GeoProgram- 
mer, Silentwriter 1.C890. Transcript. 

#28 INFO Sept/Oct 1989 
Video Bool Camp! High-End Amiga Expansion, 
Gail Wellington interview, 3D options. Home 
Town. Viking I. A-Max. Anti-Virus. VI. P. 

#29 INFO Nov/Dec 1989 
Annual Games Issue! Chris Crawford interview, 
SFX Sound Expander. The Write Stuff 128, 
Toshiba ExpressWriter 30I. RawCopy, Mac-2-Dos. 

#30 INFO Jan/Feb 1990 
Amiga DeskTop Publishing Tools. LOGO. A5V0 
Hard Drive, Dual Serial Board, Abacus Books, 
Twin Cities 128 book. 

#31 INFO July 1990 
Amiga 3000. Amiga Vision, AmiguDOS 2.0, 
R.J. Mica] interview, Ray-Tracing, TV*Text Pro. 
CanDo. CrossDOS. FraclatPro. ScanLab 1 00. 



#32 .into September 1 990 
First issue of monthly All-Amiga .info'. Turbo Sil- 
ver brush mapping. Laurence Cartel interview. 
Page Stream 1.8. Power PC Board, introducing 
CDTV, all new .info Technical Support section by 
Sullivan and Zamara. 

#33 .info October 1990 
Fractal Frontiers. Inside Amiga Vision, Peggy Her- 
rington's new Music & Sound column. Pro Video 
Post. The An Department. Archivers. 

#34 .info November 1990 
The Video Toaster Cometh! George Chrislensen 
interview. ProWrite 3.0. Synlhia II. Saxon Pub- 
lisher, Pro Draw 2.0, Hard Disk Management, 
Forms in Flight. 

#35 .info Dec 90/Jan 91 
Annual Games Issue! The year's lop 25 games, 
Exclusive - Amiga Unix, Balllelcch Center. Elan 
Performer. GVP Impact Series II SCSI RAM Con- 
troller. 

#36 .info February 1991 
Image Wrapping. The Amiga in Europe. Victor 
Osaka interview. World's first Video Toaster 
Show, Retulcmian. A-Max II. 

#37 .info March 1991 
Ellison I lorne profile. Video Toaster part 2. 
MLNIX 1 .5, Pagestream 2.0. Power PC Board. 
Animation Studio, AudioMasler III & E-Z FM. 

#38 .info April 1991 
Amiga Networks, Draw4D, Auto- Script. J. Hop- 
kins profile. Video Toaster part 3, WOC. CES. 
UNIX shows, MacroPainl. Bin Bellv RAM. 



Use the tear-out 

order card or charge 

by phone with your 

VISA 
or 

MASTER CARD 
(319)338-0703 



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Rip into the 

AMIGA 
magazine 



with more 



V3BM3! 







Morton A. Kevelson 



W-i on 

ardware 




Inside the Bodega Bay. Four slot expansion connector to the left. 
The 200 watt power supply is behind the dual 5 1/2" drive bay to the right. 



According to my Webster's, a 'bodega' 
is a wine cellar or a place where wine 
is sold or stored, and a bay is, among 
many other things, a compartment. 
Since California Access has adopted 
a West Coast theme for all of its 
other Amiga products. I have the feeling that I must be 
missing something, j 'For Moil's edification and yours, 
'Bodega Bay is an actual geographical location north 
of Sun Francisco, -ed.j 

For our purposes. Bodega Bay is an expansion box 
for the Amiga 500. When integrated with the A500, 
the system's footprint is 22" wide by 23.5" deep. The 
overall depth of the system includes the Amiga 500 's 
keyboard. The seven-inch height of the system is just 
about right for a video monitor. 

Mating or "docking" the Amiga 500 with Bodega 
Bay is simply a matter of sliding the computer under 
the Bay until the the expansion bus is fully inserted 
into its matching connector. When done, only the 
Amiga's keyboard remains exposed. The only other 
electrical connection consists of a short jumper cable 
from the back of the Bay to the Amiga 500 's power 
connector. The Amiga 500*s power supply is no longer 
needed as the computer's electrical energy require- 
ments will be supplied from the Bay. 

Forced ventilation of the Amiga is provided by 
Bodega Bay's internal fan, which is part of its built-in 



.info's 
Hardware 
Doctor 
dissects two 
expansion 
boxes for 
the A500. 



200 watt power supply, The power supply's external 
cables are fitted with power connectors for up to five 
hard drives and one 3.5" floppy drive. 

Once the system has been assembled, access to the 
I/O ports on the back of the computer is severely 
restricted since the Bay overhangs the back of the 
A500 by several inches. If the computer's external 
cables are properly routed, the Amiga 500 can be slid 
out from under the Bay whenever you need to access a 
back panel connector. Just remember to disconnect the 
power adapter cable from the back of the Bay. 

To open the Bay and gain access to its internal 
expansion slots, you simply remove four screws from 
the back panel and slide off the top cover. On the left 
side of the Bay are four A2000 style expansion slots. 
Since the expansion cards slide in from the right, there 
is a large open space inside the Bay which remains 
unoccupied to provide the needed clearance. Three of 
the slots are combination A2000-PC/AT Bridge slots, 
which will accommodate a Bridgeboard and two PC 
cards. The interface between the Amiga 500 's expan- 
sion slot and the Bay is electronically buffered. The 
buffering of the output lines insures that there will be 
adequate capacity to drive the expansion cards. 

The cards are installed component side down, which 
forestalls the use of a hard drive in a hard card configu- 
ration. This should not be a problem as the right side of 
the Bay has enough space for two half-height 5.25" inch 
drives and one 3.5" inch drive. The 5.25" drive bays, 
which are located behind u pair of removable plastic 
inserts, can be used for floppies or removable media 
drives. Optional adapter plates are required when 
installing 3.5" drives in these bays. The 3.5" drive bay 
is a vertically oriented nook along the left side of the 
case with barely enough room for a half-height hard 
drive. The space in the front of this nook contains a pair 
of LEDs, one of which indicates that the power is on. 
The second LED has a pair of wires and a connector 
and it is used to indicate hard drive activity. 

I tried out the Bodega Bay with a Micron Technol- 
ogy two megabyte expansion board, a Xetec FastCard 
Plus with four megabytes installed and a 512K A501. 
The resulting seven megabyte RAM, 40 megabyte 
hard drive system performed flawlessly. I also 
swapped the A501 with one of Pulsar's Power PC 
Boards without any problems. 

ARROW 1500 

Arrow 1500 is an expansion box which accepts 
A2000-type cards; all of the working parts of an 
Amiga 500 are taken out and installed in the box. Its 



54 .info MAY 1991 



footprint is about 22 inches wide by 15 inches deep, to 
which another seven inches should be added to account 
for the depth of the external keyboard. Its five-inch 
height is just about right for a video monitor. When fully 
assembled, the Arrow 1500 resembles an oversized 
Amiga 1000 with two internal 3.5" floppy drives and 
what looks like a separate Amiga 2000 keyboard with a 
built-in power light and a floppy drive activity light. 

Assembling the Arrow 1500 is not for the fumble- 
fingered nor the faint of heart. The poorly translated 
manual, although well illustrated, was little more than a 
guide for someone who already had some idea of what 
had to be done. I spent about three hours carefully set- 
ting up the system. Now that I have had the practice, I 
could probably do it again in about one hour. 

To start with, you will have to completely gut your 
Amiga 500. The floppy disk drive has to be extracted 
and the main circuit board has to be removed and 
stripped of its metal shielding. The keyboard is removed 
and installed in a separate case. A coiled cord adaptor 
cable connects the keyboard assembly to the back of the 
Arrow 1500. Like the Amiga 1 000, the keyboard can be 
stored in an alcove underneath the main console. 

The Arrow 1500's expansion chassis consists of 
four A2000-PC/AT Bridge slots which are perma- 
nently attached to the side of the power supply. Power 
is supplied to the Amiga 500 motherboard via its own 
expansion slot. The power supply has only one addi- 
tional power connector for a single hard drive or a 
5.25" floppy drive. 

The expansion slots face to the left of the enclosure 
and the boards are slid in from outside the case with 
their component sides facing up. Although the Arrow 
1500 has a total of four expansion slots, only three of 
these have matching openings in the back panel. In the 
assembled system, all of the Amiga's original back 
panel connectors can be easily accessed from the rear 
of the Arrow 1500, 

The original Amiga 500 floppy disk drive is 
mounted on the drive bracket and connected with a 
length ribbon cable and a power supply adapter cable 
which are included with the package. You may 
encounter some problems installing the drive as Com- 
modore has used a number of suppliers. The disk drive 
bracket can accommodate as many as two 3.5" flop- 
pies and two 3.5" hard drives, or one 5.25" hard drive. 

The Arrow 1500 is supplied with a plastic faceplate 
that has been set up for two floppy drives. Installing this 
faceplate and lining it up with the drive is a trial and 
error procedure. You have to gel it just right or disks 
may jam in the drive. In some cases, the plastic eject 
button on the disk drive will have to be tiled down to 
obtain a proper fit. Since the Arrow 1500's faceplate is 
designed for 3.5" floppies, the 5.25" drive that comes 
with the Bridgeboard will have to be externally 
mounted. Pre'spect offers an optional enclosure for this 
purpose. The Bridgeboard will also have to be modified 
to accommodate an external drive as the boot device. 

Since the Amiga 500 does not support a second 
internal disk drive, an adapter cable is needed for this 
purpose. Pre'spect included a third party adapter in the 
package which looked like a 23-pin gender changer 




Inside view of the Arrow 1500 with the flip top up and the 

faceplate down. Expansion slots are to the left, power supply is 

down the center, and the drive plate is to the right. 



with a flat ribbon cable attached to an external circuit 
board. Instructions were not included with this device 
and neither Pre'spect nor I have actually tried it out. 
Of course, additional floppy drives can always be con- 
nected to the external drive port. 

Once I had the system up and running, I loaded it up 
with the same complement of boards as above with the 
exception of Pulsar's Power PC Board. The system 
would not boot with (he Micron memory board 
installed. The four megabyte RAM portion on the 
Xelec FaslCard Plus worked line; however, the hard 
drive interface portion would not function. 



CONCLUSIONS 

Neither of these systems provides the complete ver- 
satility of an Amiga 2000. What is missing arc the 86- 
pin microprocessor slot and the internal video slot. 
The prime consideration when selecting these expan- 
sion boxes would be the intent to add a Bridgeboard or 
the utilization of existing A2000-style expansion 
cards. Check with the manufacturer of the expansion 
box to make sure thai the cards you want to use will 
work with the system. 

Of these two boxes. Bodega Bay looks like the sys- 
tem to choose. It costs less, it is easier to set up, it will 
not violate Commodore's one year warranty and it 
offers more flexible drive arrangements. Although the 
Arrow 1500 has been sold in Germany for two years, ii 
does not seem to be ready for (he North American 
market Its lack of FCC certification could hamper its 
distribution. Its high cost, complex installation, and 
the violation of the Commodore warranty are draw- 
backs which are difficult to overcome. 

ADDRESSES 

California Access. 1 30A Knowles Drive, Los Gatos, 

CA 95030, 408-378-0340 
Pre'spect Technics Inc., PO Box 670. Station 'H'. 

Montreal, Quebec Canada H3G 2M6, 514-954-1483 



Bodega Bay 

$429.95 

California 

Access 

Arrow 7500 



$650.00 
Pre'spect 
Technics Inc. 



.info MAY 1991 55 



:^\&\#»&\&& 



IMAGEFINDER: 
A Creative Sort Of Program 

by Derek Grime 



In this issue, .its 
editor Chris Zamara 
fills you in on what's 
what in the Amiga 
operating system; 
he also reveals the 
inner workings of the 
Amiga's Narrator 
device, and includes 
a speech program in 
AmigaBASIC; and 
Derek Grime takes a 
look at ImageFinder, 
a database for your 
IFF images. 




omputers and artists don't mix. 
Like oil and water, the two may 

seem to co-exist but on close 
inspection you'll find that the 
separation is actually quite telling. Random- 
ness is the domain of the artist. Creative 
people rarely think in a coldly logical fash- 
ion. In fact, it's been argued that a scailergun 
approach to problem solving is the seed 
from which all creativity grows. Computers, 
on the other hand, never have a moment's 
doubt about what direction they're heading 
in. Problems are analyzed and dissected with 
digital precision. 

Despite these differences, many artists 
have found that computers can be a powerful 
creative tool. The Amiga is a good example 
of the type of computer favoured by the artist. 
The Amiga makes few demands on the user. 
It's non-threatening. You don't have to leam a 
lot of cryptic commands. Its ease of use 
leaves the IBM family far behind. Yet. unlike 
the Mac, the tools are there if you really want 
to dig into the internals of the hardware. 

Software developers are always striving 
to make their products as easy to use as pos- 
sible. The less a program feels like part of a 
machine, the better the artist can interface 
with it. On the Amiga we have the creative 
power needed to create great artwork. Still. 
there are some tools that have been 
unavailable until now. 

For most artists, organization is a real 
weakness. It's easy to create hundreds of 
illustrations: it's not so easy to remember 
where they all are. Most art jobs generate 
dozens of pictures. The client may only pur- 
chase a few finished pieces but all the 
roughs, sketches, and false starts are saved 
along the way. When the time comes for you 
to present your work for approval, how do 
you find the finished picture? 

A good solution is ImageFinder, a power- 
ful art database program newly released by 
Zardoz Software. Unlike other databases and 



ImageFinder 

$65.00 

Zardoz Software 

6114 LaSalle Ave, Suite 304 
Oakland, California 94611 
(415)339-6280 

disk catalogcrs, ImageFinder is made to han- 
dle only picture files. It's easy to use and after 
a simple start-up procedure it will run quietly 
in the background until you need it. Once in 
operation, you will never have to frantically 
dig through your disks for images again. 

Mere's what it does. When you power up 
your Amiga. ImageFinder runs itself from the 
startup-sequence. Until needed, it operates as 
a background process, monitoring all pro- 
grams and disk activity. When you want 
information on a picture, a hot-key combina- 
tion will open an ImageFinder screen. On the 
screen will be small thumbnail versions of all 
the pictures in the database. These thumbnails 
can be shuffled through w-ith the cursor keys 
until you find the picture you need. 

Decisions, Decisions... 

Before you run ImageFinder for the first 
time you have to set some parameters. There 
is a staggering selection of available options, 
making ImageFinder one of the most con- 
figurable pieces of software I have ever 
seen. Before the database is actually pre- 
pared you have to tell ImageFinder where to 
look for images. A series of Workbench v2- 
style requesters enable you to walk through 
the file system, choosing volumes and draw- 
ers that you want to scan. Once you have the 
scan list prepared, you can move on to the 
format of thumbnail pictures that you prefer. 

Thumbnails At Your Fingertips 

The thumbnail is really the heart of 
ImageFinder. Thumbnails resemble small 



56 .info MAY 1991 



Use QUARTERBACK 

to save your Data. 

Use QUARTERBACK TOOLS 

to save your A** ! 



Have you ever deleted the wrong file (or 
worse yet, ALL your files) with a slip of 
the finger? 

Have you seen this awful message: "Error 
validating DHO"? 

Then you need QUARTERBACK TOOLS, 

the fastest and easiest my to recover 
your lost files on any AmigaDOS volume. 

QUARTERBACK TOOLS also optimizes the 
speed and reliability of your Amiga hard 
disks and floppy disks by: 

• Repositioning your files to optimum 
locations on the disk, eliminating file 
fragmentation, and consolidating disk 
free space. 

• Searching the entire disk for errors 
and marking bad areas "out of 
service." 

• Curing validation problems; finding 
and fixing corrupted directories. 




QUARTERBACK 
TOOLS runs on any 
Amiga using either 
the old or new filing 
systems, and runs 
with new and old 
Workbench 
versions. 

QUARTERBACK TOOLS now this is 

nodonkey! 

And to close the barn door before the 
horse escapes, use QUARTERBACK the 
fastest and easiest hard disk backup 
program for the Amiga. 

Other useful products from Central 
Coast Software: 

Mac-2-Dos for transferring Macintosh 
files to and from the Amiga. 

Dos-2-Dos for transferring MS-DOS/ 
Atari files to and from the Amiga. 




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* (303) 526-1 030 • Fax (303) 526-0520 *ST 

Dealer Inquiries Welcome m ^^ m 



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Figure 1: 
Diddling 
with the 
settings. 



TtuppFiiKici' 6 1991 7-jfrtnT Snftmnc. Tiifi. 

IH iHisrfinte Browser - 'i him laatu nits 



IiuseFindev - Inise Confiffui'ation 



JColor 
jGra? Scale 
T Black/White IV 



an 
active of Hi ftp 





Jit Colors 
f 8 Colors 



brushes thai arc really miniature versions of 
full-size IFF pictures. Thumbnails can be pre- 
sented many different ways. Each picture is 
scanned and image processed to give the best 
results with the reduced image. The image 
processing is fairly fast and the thumbnails are 
•smoothed out' as the)' are resized to retain as 
much detail as possible. If speed is more 
important, thumbnails can be scanned line by 
tine with no smoothing; this is faster but the 
image quality is noticeably rougher. Some 
careful thought should go into what format 
best suits your work. You can choose whether 
the processing will convert the originals down 
to eight or sixteen colors. Sixteen will give bel- 
ter results, but of course will use more memory 
and take longer to calculate. (See ihe Image 
Configuration requester in Figure I.) 

If you choose color, each thumbnail uses 
its own palette. This ensures that each 
thumbnail is very faithful to the image it 
represents. The downside of color thumb- 
nails is thai many different palettes will 
share one sixtccn-color screen. The selected 
thumbnail will look great, but others may be 
difficult to decipher if their palettes differ 
greatly. Using a gray scale solves the prob- 
lem. All thumbnails will share the same six- 
teen or eight-color palette, ensuring that they 
are legible at all times. Gray scales also will 
print very well on most dot matrix printers if 
you want a hardcopy of your database. You 
can scan gray scales using different algo- 
rithms, adjust the size of thumbnails, choose 
which ANIM frames to display and more. 
Having this sort of control puts ImageFinder 
way ahead of other catalog programs. 

Scanning 

After configuration, ImageFinder goes to 



work scanning through your disks. 
ImageFinder recognizes all forms of IFF 
pictures including HAM, ANIMs and ANI- 
Mbrushes. Scans can take some time: most 
images are done in less than a minute, but 
the odd scan can take considerably longer. 
On one disk that contained some 640x480, 
24-bit IFF pictures, each color scan took 
over one hour. And this was on a 68030- 
equipped Amiga! To be fair, this is a worst- 
case scenario, and you can cancel the current 
scan at any time if you just can't wait. 

Once a database file has been prepared, 
the scanning never has to be repeated. As 
databases get older you can choose an auto- 
matic update feature. It prompts you for 
disks, reads them and adds or deletes new 
thumbnails as necessary. 

Like all ImageFinder modules, the Scan- 
ner does its work silently in the background. 
It's good to see a program that makes good 
use of multitasking in this manner. (This is 
one to show to your friends who use single- 



tasking computers; Amiga owners can walk 
and chew gum at the same lime.) 

Just Browsing... 

Once the Scanner has finished its job it's 
time to have some fun. The thumbnail 
viewer is called the Browser. Pressing the 
Alt-left cursor combination will bring the 
Browser to the front at any time. The 
Browser can display hundreds of thumbnails 
that you can scroll through using the mouse 
or keyboard. At the top of the Browser is a 
text window called the Parameter area that 
shows additional information about the cur- 
rently selected thumbnail (see Figure 2). You 
can see its name, drawer, resolution, size, 
comment, color paleite and date of creation. 
If you want to view the original, just press 
(he spacebar and il will be displayed with 
your favorite IFF viewer. 

The sort options are almost limitless. As 
well as soriing by the expected alphabetical, 
date, and drawer fields, you can use an 
advanced pattern matching language to 
really home in on the picture you warn, [f 
you had to see all the pictures you did for 
'Acme Widgets' in the past three months 
that were over 20K in size and did not con- 
tain the word 'Rhubarb' in the title, you are 
in luck. In fact, you could search by color, 
density, or brightness if you desire. 

Finally, the Browser can do a little multi- 
tasking magic. Let's say you are hard at 
work in your paint program of choice and 
you need a certain brush to spruce things up. 
At this point most of us fruitlessly gronk 
through the most likely disks and more often 
than not end up redrawing what we are after. 
With ImageFinder, life becomes a lot easier. 
Bring up the "Load Picture' requester and 
summon the Browser. A quick perusal will 



InaseFinte $ 1991 Zardoz Software, Inc. irj 

iQUJIiHseFtnder Brouser - 1 Active Index File - it iitases active of 42 toft G 



elarmlk.head 



IHorkixMs/aninbrtuh 



m 

IB2 



5 



|Iue Oct 22 23:55:88 2B38 
I 15262 




Browsing 

through 

IFF files with 

ImageFinder. 



58 .info MAY 1991 



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Public Domain Library 

We are the Olfical Public Domain Library of Antic Amiga Plus, we have been the Offical PD library 
or Amiga World. Find out why these magazines choose us! Each of our disks are jam packed with onlv 
the best programs. The first two letters on each disk indicate the orientation of the disk: DD# 
intermediate to advanced - often contains source, WB# general interest ■ most programs can be jun from 
he workbench, and FD# games and entertainment. Order our disk based catalog and receive a coupon 
for a comphmentry volume with your next purchase. We always use only SONY disks' 



WB12: Disk Utilities #1- This greal disk is loaded 
with wonderful utilities tor everymmg including making 
disk labels, disk cataloging, disk optimizing, disk and 
file recovery, archiving and organizing, and all sorts of 
file and directory manipulation. Incudes SID, grealty 
reduces CU use. * 



New Disks 

FO50: Submarine Game Sealartce, one and a half years in tha 

making, this is an ou Islanding submarine Tactical 1 game 

CoT-meical QuaMy, r-rghly recommended 

FD51: Games - DesartStorm a fast action arcade game 

Amigalraion a well rjane concentration game, Chuie a parachute 

jumping game, Ruminc a dungeon adventure game similar to 

wanderer, and Sofcx a solilary card game 

FD52: Classics Games PetersOuesi a w&il ccne Mano brothers 

type ol game. Jymbc a two player rmssiia Com-Tiand cfone. and 

Vs'ank a tank carnmandei game 

WB80:Graphies - Raytracing programs generate absolutely 

BHJBtafl reaist.c loo- rg plana, rockets, bjiidings.. . and surreal 



images often consistng oi highly polish spheres and objects 3-D 
Master is the mosi powerful EASY-TO-USE ol its kind we have 
seen to date Trvis ^ easily better and more tun featured, than 
simftBrcDmmiKCi.ii programs costing m the hundreds of dollars 
WBB1: Great Applications DataEasy a very easy to use. 
database program Dm t 'el the easy of use foal you this is a very 
full teatured database program including full prmler control lor 
address labels and mail merge acoi>catrons. Al$& includes TypeTut 
a good iyo<r>g Tutor, RL.C a tull featured label printer. Banner, a 
muln-font Danner maMer. and Budget a home accounting in a 
program. H^hfy recommended. 

WB82:Anfrn»Uons - Four lull length, well done 'movie' style 
ammations Including. Coyote, JuggleMI, GhostPool. and 
Mechann Two disK set, counts as Dnei 

DD76:Adv»nced Utilities This dis* cortams two of the most 
powerful utilities on the Amiga, Dmowse and Machlll. These 
program are whal js referred to generrtalty as mouse enhancers 
Features include popping up a ch, screen blanker*, mouse 
accelerator defmabe keyboard macros, a raj hot and function key 
definitions. Demo play backs, and much much more. Contains 
many more e»Q&lerfl programs- 

Othef Great. Disk* - 

FDS: Tacilcal Games ■ BullRun a Civil war battle game. Metro 

you play the itfe of a aty planner Build wisely and your system will 

be a success, but poor planning will lead to disaster and financial 

ruin Very very habil forming 

FD6; GAMES! ■ This disk is chock full ol games including 

Checkers, Clue, Go*d - A new si-de :re pieces puzzie, Jeopard - An 

enhanced version of Risk, Ru$hHour - Surprisingly addicting, anc 

SpaceWar Best described as a cross between Combat-Tanks anc 

as ter oi d s , 

FD7: PACMAN - This disk contains several pacman type games 

including: PacMan87. MaiMan and ZOnfat 

F09: Uorla This has great graphic controls, murtjple speNs, 

similar to Larn and Hack. Play time several weeks! 

FOlO: HackLite A dungeon adventure game Considered a 

must-have classic Ths is ihe second release of this game on the 

Amiga Gieal Amiga graphic interface Play time several weeks' 

FDl 2A.FD1 2B: Star TfDk, The Game This is by far the best Sta- 

Trek game ever wnnen tor any computer. R features mouse control. 

good graphics, digitized sound elects and great gameplay Counts 

as 2 disks Req 1Mb and two drives (or hd). 

FD13: Board Games - contains multilayer Monopoly, Dominoes, 

Paranoids, and others. 

FDl4: Dungeon Master Hints and Arcade Games ■ DM maps, 

spells, item location, and hints and more, also on ihis disk, Hbail ■ 

an arkanoid.'breakout type game. Trix - a Cr* type clone. 

FD16- Strategy Games - includes Diplomacy and Empcos. both 

great conquer and rule mulliplayer games similar m concept to 

Simcjry and Populace, Also includes blackbox, hearts, and others 

FDl?: Educational Games ■ This disk incudes several games, tor 

the younger members including geography, math, science, and 

word games, also includes Wheel at Fortune. 

FTJ20: Tactical Cannes ■ MechForoe(3 72): A game that simulates 

combat between two or more giant, robot-like machines Simple 

words cani begin to give you the feel of piloting a 30 - 40 foot tal, 

fire breathing earth shaking colossus that obeys your every whim 

FD29: Shool'em up's - WWII - you re the pilot of a WWII plane 

Bying through enemy territory, you've }ust been spotted good luck 

on you mission, SpKilier - try and penetrate enemy lines with this 

game, and Retailor ■ anottier great game. 

FD3J;Flight Simulator include an instrument tt.gh! simulator lor 

aDClO 

FD33: Arcade Games - Ffreddy a mano brothers type ol game, 

Gerbils a target practice game, PtpeUna a German interpretation 

of Pipe Dreams. Tron a light cycles version, and wetroids a 

wonderful version of asteroids with a hiianous twist 

FD3Ta & b:Tactical GBmes • Empire [2 £w) This great game 

comes h<ghly recommended. Now with a full-featured graphic front 

end. 

FD3S:Games ■ Crbbage Master ■ A great cnbbage game and tutor. 

Spades - a well done card came. Chinese Checkers - A compute' 

version ol this c assic. Puzz ■ a slide piece puzzle game aid 

construction set. 

FD39a & bcTObtH Star Trek ■ This is a new. completely diflereni 

version of Star irek than that found on FDt2 This one was 

created by tha German author Tobias. Now with English 

instructions. Very Excellent!!' Counts as two disks Requires 512k 

memory, a 500. 2000 or Pal, FD40;Arc*de - MiddleEast - a timely 

arcade game of death and destruction set in Iraq, 



BackToTnsFutureli - a very playabie demo version ol ihis soon to be 
-teased Commi rc a O i game, Crty • a mtsale command done. 
FD42:Games - Incudes SpaceWar3 - a remake ot this original Amiga 
classic. Tnppin - a fascinating board game of intrigue, strategy and 
DUjyer manipulation Domiruon - an engrossing strategy game of galactic 
war and conquest. Frog a trogger type done, and Mines ■ a very 
challenging Strategy board game 

F044: Gam* ■ Mechtigh.t is an out of ;his world roie-playmg adventure 
comparable to hack and moria The setting, interplanetary colonies and 
space slations In your quest to explore the world lake time out to 
liberate bad g jys o - [haft most valuable possesions engage m a mortal 
combat or two against robots and alien lite forms, dick, up a new amioa 
9000. Most of all, don I forget to stay alive., 

FD49:Chaos Cheats ■ This disk contains an everything you warned to 
know about cheat set for Chaos Strikes Back, including hfl maps spells 
orj-ec: location super characters and more 

Wf34;TeiecommumnicaIlon - This disk contains several excellent pd 
communication programs designed to get you on Ime quickly and easily 
Access ( 1 .42) A very nice ANSI term program based on Ccmm v\ 34' 
but with the addition of transfer protocols Comm [1.34) - Last version 
Of one of tne best pubic domain communications programs ever made on 
the Amiga. Handshake (2 i2a] Handshake is a Full lealured 
vT52. tOQ 102220 

WB5 - Fonts #1- Several fonts (35) for the Amiga, also included are five 
PweStrsarn fonts.and ShowFont - a font d splay program. 
WB7; Cup Art Ths dsk i$ loaded with black and white clip art Art 
includes, trees, watches, tools, US and Slate maps, and more 
WBiOtVlrui Killers The latest arid best VirusX|4 0), Kvf£ i) and 
ZeroVrrusfl .3) 

WB13: Printer Drivers and Generator - over 70 diHerent drivers, and if 
these don't do il. wlh PrtDrvGen you can make your own. 



WB14: Video- on :fiis disk are several utilities for the video enthusiast 
We have included multiple slates, video titling. Bars and Tone, Gray 
ScaEe, Screen fades and swipes. Interlace toggles- and SMPTE 
Cakajiators .Also on thss disk is a tull featured video cataloging program 



WBiS: Business Ths dsk contains a spreadsheet, a database, a 
pioject time management program arid financial analysis [stocks). 
WBtE: Business - This disk contains an inventory manager, a loan 
analysis program, a great calendar scheduiar. a rolodex program, and 
pennywise a good "Cash Book' accounting tor home or office 
WBlB: Word'Texl Processors This disk contains lha best editors 
includes. TestPlus (v2 2e) a full featured word processor. Dme(v1 .35) a 
great programmers editor with strong macro features. Te*EO[v2,e) an 
enhanced Emacs type editor, and a spell checker, 
WB20: General Interest - OiskSahr VI .42 a disk recovery program for all 
Amiga tile systems. FixOisk VI .0 another file recovery program with 
features DiskSaiv doesn't have. 3DLooki gives a 3D appearance to your 
WorkBench. Clean Vr 01 a program to defragment memory. Tracer - 
trace any part of an image. 

WB23: Graphics «ncl Plotllna ■ Plot !20b} a three dimensional 
mathematical function plotter Can pfoi any user defined function. 
BezSuri2 - produce awesome pictures of objects one could turn on a 
lathe Can also map iH imagB files onto any surface that it can draw Now 
compatible with most 30 packages, aid VScreen ■ makes a virtual 
screen anywhere, great for DTP . 

WB2S: Educational ■ On this dtsk are two programs that cart generate 
maps of differing types. World Data Base uses the CIA's data base to 
generate delated maps of any entered user global coordinates Also 
Paradox a great demonstration ol Albert Einstein General Theory of 
Reiativity_ 

WB26: Disk Utilities *2 ■ MrBackup. ^wickBackup two well done 
utilities to help with harddisk and floppy dis* backups. FileMast a binary 
! ;ie ed lor, Labefprmter ■ Disk label printer with very powerful leatures 
W327: Nag*l 26 Patrick Nagetpictures of beautiful women. 
WBM; Graphics and Sound' This disk has several different Mandelbrot 
type programs lor generating stunning graphics Includes. 
MandeiMountains - a realistic terrain generator, Fracgen - generated 
recursive fracials tiom user input. Mandelbroi and Tmandel - two last 
mandeibrot generators, aj$0 Mostra - the best IFF display program to 
date, will display ALL IFF's including Dynamic HAM, and Sound ■ a great 
IFF sound player, will play anything Try this disk, you'll Fove ill 
WB33:Cireuil Beard Design - several terrific routines for the electronic 
enthusiast. Including PCBtooi - a circuit board design tool. LogicLab ■ 
circuit logic teste - , and Mead ( i 26} a well done new release o' this PD 
CAD program, now cc-mes with predrawn common circuit components for 
insertion into schematics. 

WB36: Graphics On this disk are several programs lo create stunning 
graphical images including. MPath - creates swulmg galaiy images. 



Roses - oroduce an unlimited number of variations of images that a 
symmetrically similar to a rose. SimGen - display those spectacular 
images as pan of your workbenck screen, and RayShade a very good 
ravtraong progra.n. create your own beautiful 3d graphics. 
WB3£: Plotting and Graphics ■ Piouy is the most powerful full featu red 
plotting package. Used by many co;ieges and universities. A welcome 
addition to our library' Highly recommended Plans - a incredibly well 
done Computer Aided Drafting program very f u;l featured Tesseiator ■ 
a program that helps generates iantastic looking, recursive M C Ecsher 
tyoe pictures 

WB39: Music - Intuitracker is an German offer oi an exoyisilely well 
Cone program that allows you to play music on your Amiga wrtft CD like 
controls. Lets you strip out music from your lavonte games or others 
and include them m your music library 

WB40; Music - *CD on a disk*. 90 ftiinuies ol modem music on this wefl 
presented collection 

WB41 : Music - MED an mciedibly we" done, full featured music editor 
Create you' own stunn-ng music directly on your the Amiga Similar to 
SounoTracker but better very powerful, easy to use program 
WB43:Business - This dsk. contains AnalyhCale ■ proba&ly the most 
powerful spreadsheet program on the Amiga. A full featured soreaflsheet 
witn many features electee in a commercial pacxaae 
WB53:Graphics- The disk contains C-ligftt - The easiest to use 
raytracmg we have seen to date, This one started out life as a full 
leatured commercial product similaf to Sculpl3d Raytracmg programs 
can generate stunning, reaiisticaily shaded ob;eC.s, Also, sMovie - a full 
featured video teil letter similar to ProVideo', BrcarJcas: T-tler Great 
video scrolling, wipt-s, special effects, and more.,, 
WB54:Prlntlng This disk conla rs several routines to help with the 
chore ol pnntmg. Includes Gothtc - Finally a Banner printer lor the PDF 
PrmiStudio a well implemented aii-purposo printer-utility with a very 
comfortable graphic interface and many advanced features, Lila ■ with 
ease, pr.n; ASCII Res io a PostScript prrnter. and many more 
WB55:Appiica1lon XCopyltl - a M ieatured disk copier, make backups 
of write protected d^<5 PoacRcute •■ f'nd the quickest route from one 
ary to another, h-ghway description .ncfuded. Diary a diary program PAe 
Dougy Howard M.D". Cal ■ a calendar program, Magman ■ a database 
tailored to mamtam recoids on articles and publications 
WB7I :C64 Emulation The AfjJ Package is a complete, very powerful! 
Commodore 64 emulator, 

DD47: Pascal ■ This disk contains everything needed to program in 
as S! '"tfudes. ^GS^ (1.2) 68000 assembler, Bimk linking software 
anc PCQ { ; 0) a modest Pascal sub-sel compiler 
DD49: C Compiler- contains zc{- 0t) fully KSH. «c(i .0) from end 
ASSM i a M a e m bfcir , Bimk hnker, 

DD51 : Circuit Analysis - Aspice (2.3) A full featured program tor electric 
circuit analysis. 

DD5Z: Scientific Incfudes Elements - art incredibly w&JI cone periodic 
table program with source, Scientific plotting ■ over 600k of Lattice C 
sou'ee routines that can be mciudec m your own p'ograms. 
DD54: Compression - This disk is loaded wi|h ALL ol the best file 
compression programs and ads tci the Amiga. Many ol the programs 
can be used b^ the new user includes Art(2 3j, LhaicTi 0] 
Lhwarp(l 03). Pkand.0). PowerPacker(2 3a] a must have by all 
Zip(i.O), WarplB.04). and Zoo[2,0) Also IFFcrunch an excellent 
corr-a-ession for IFF files 

DD55; ARP - Oi this disk you will tind the complete ArpRe:3 release 
including the ful: user decs, the 'i.i 1 De'/etope's guide, and Conman (1 4) 
AHP is the official AmigaDOS Resource Project' fARP] release: 3 ARP 
makes many improvements to AmigaDOS and makes your system 
easier to use from the CLI 

DD57: Advanced Utilities Msh ■ like Cross-dos cooies files to and 
from MS-DOS. Pai-NTSC conven any pal program to NTSC and vice 
versa, Also several utilities that improve your startup- sequence plus 25 
more programs 

DD62: Basic and Xseheme ■ Cursor a full featured Amiga Basrc 
compiler, sbasic ar\^ ftaxt - severaE wonderful routines to help In basic 
orogramers and Xseheme - an mte-pieted object o'iemed language 
DD65 C Tutorials - Several well done tutorials on how to program the 
Amiga. Includes tutorials and working examples on Device Orrvers. IFF 
reads and writes, Sound implementation. Arcade game design and 
implementation, Double Buffering, and others A must have for Amiga 
Programmers. 

DDTliC compiler - This disk contains Dee, Matthew Dillons lull 
featured, powerful C compeer and environment system 






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find the image you are after. A double-click 
on it makes the Browser disappear, and you 
are back in the paint program with the file- 
name magically typed into the load 
requester. Neat! This is how all Amiga soft- 
ware should work. 

There are also a host of other important 
features to recommend this package: full 
ARexx support, user configurable menus, 
and an auto-update feature that removes files 
from the Browser automatically when they 
are deleted from a disk. Not to mention that 
necessity which is unfortunately something 
of a rare feature, a well-written manual. 

There is not much that one can find to 
complain about with ImageFinder. The low 
points are few: The packaging is dog-ugly, 
like so many other Amiga products. Devel- 
opers should note that (hough commercial 
artists can be expensive, we are the ones 



buying your software and cheesy boxes are a 
real turn-off. Some thumbnail scans can be 
slow. The databases are quite large: a floppy 
can contain about a thousand thumbnails. 
The Browser sometimes will reconfigure 
itself to just four colors even though there is 
plenty of memory available. ImageFinder 
multitasks well but occasionally will thrust 
itself to the front as if it wants some atten- 
tion. Perhaps it's just getting lonely... 

Here's the bottom line. If you produce art- 
work on the Amiga, you can benefit from 
ImageFinder. Not only is it a kick to see 
hundreds of tiny pictures that you created, 
it's also a serious productivity tool. This 
software can get an artist organized, and that 
is no small accomplishment. ImageFinder is 
going to help you get the job done faster, 
and isn't that what it's all about? 

-k 



AN AMIGA WHAT'S WHAT 

Do You Know Exec From AmigaDOS? 

Learn and Impress Your Friends! 

by Chris Zamara 



You can always tell an Amiga 
Guru from a regular user. After a 
particularly spectacular system 
crash, a Guru will say something 
like, "The Copper list got trashed." while the 
typical user will say something much closer 
to English, like. "The screen went funny and 
then the little red light started blinking." The 
ability to use strange- sou tiding gibberish 
instead of perfectly understandable language 
has always set the Gurus and Wizards apart 
from the rest of the world, and it's their way 
of communicating with one another, just as 
ants rub antennae and exchange smelly sub- 
stances. All fields have their jargon, and the 
world of the Amiga is no exception. You 
may have heard terms like Workbench. Intu- 
ition, the Blitter. and AmigaDOS dozens of 
limes while reading this magazine, but what 
exactly do these things refer to in the 
Amiga? What portion of the operating sys- 
tem are you dealing with when you reply to 
a Disk full requester, type into a shell, resize 
a window, double-click an icon? For the 
answer to these questions, and many more, 
read on... 



Workbench 

Workbench is the first thing that many 
Amiga users see. and a familiar 'home base" 
that most people deal with for everyday 
operations. Workbench lets you run pro- 
grams, copy files, and manage your disks. 
As far as the operating system is concerned. 
Workbench is a special kind of application 
program. It is built into the operating system 
but functions much as a paint program or 
wordproccssor does: it is an interface 
between you and the underlying operating 
system and hardware. Workbench doesn't 
actually create the windows or menus you 
sec. or do all the work involved with main- 
taining the display. Like other programs, it 
calls on other parts of the operating system 
to do that. 

Intuition 

Chances are you've heard this word 
before. Intuition is. very basically, the 
Amiga's graphical user interface (GUI). It 
manages all user input to windows, and pro- 
vides such facilities as gadgets, menus, and 
requesters. Gadgets can be buttons that you 



click on. boxes that you can type text into, 
or sliding knobs that you can use for posi- 
tioning and adjusting. Almost all application 
programs use Intuition's facilities to com- 
municate with the user. 

While Intuition manages the display that 
you see. it does not actually get its hands 
dirty with things such as drawing on the 
screen, or redrawing overlapping windows 
when one of them is moved. These tasks are 
relegated to two other parts of the system, 
the Graphics library, and the Layers 
library, respectively. When you have many 
overlapping windows on the Workbench 
screen and drag one of them, it can some- 
times take a moment to refresh the display: 
this is the Layers library hard at work, and 
not specifically Intuition (although Intuition 
may be redrawing window borders, gadgets 
and the like). The Graphics library is respon- 
sible for putting pixels on the screen. It can 
draw lines, fill in areas, and move blocks 
around on the screen, all with the aid of the 
Blitter chip. 

AmigaDOS 

Here's another commonly used term, but 
there is sometimes some confusion about 
what it refers to. Some people use the term 
AmigaDOS to mean the entire operating 

system, just as PC/DOS or MS/DOS on 
other architectures encompasses the entire 
system. This usage is understandable for 
those coming from other platforms, but in 
strict Amiga-speak (as defined in the ROM 
Kernel manuals) it is incorrect. Unfortu- 
nately, the entire operating system doesn't 
really have a name, other than 'The Amiga 
Operating System.' and 'AmigaDOS' refers 
to thai part of the system that specifically 
relates to filing system devices such as disk 
drives: opening files, reading, writing, load- 
ing programs, etc. Since it is responsible for 
loading and managing programs in the sys- 
tem. AmigaDOS is actually slightly more 
pervasive than that, but it's generally safe to 
assume that anything to do with reading and 
writing from disk is an AmigaDOS job. 
When a requester pops up telling you that a 
disk has a read error, the wrile protect lab is 
on. or a disk is full, it is AmigaDOS that is 
iltiing the complaining, but Intuition that is 
putting up the requester. 

AmigaDOS is a flexible and solid system. 
but it has a bit of a bad reputation among 
software developers, mostly because of the 
non-standard way it does its job. As far as 
the various components of the operating sys- 



60 .info MAY 1991 



IS OUR GALAXY PREPARED FOR THE 

SEXOLYMPICS? 



Its time for the Sex Olympics to begin 
again. However, this year the infamous 
Dr. Dildo has entered the competition as 
part of his devious plot to control the 
Universe. If he can 
keep his batteries 
fully charged, he has 
an excellent chance 
of accomplishing his 
goal. Thinking quick- 
ly, Headquarters 
called upon Captain 
Brad Stallion, wooer 
of women, and eradi- 
cator of evil to represent the Earth in this 
inter-galactic frolic. And of course, Brad 
Stallion never goes anywhere without his 
legendaiy space ship, the "Big Thruster". 

Have you completed your training for 
this important challenge? Are you pre- 
pared to become Captain Brad Stallion 
and go head-to-head with Dr. Dildo? Can 




you find and solve the puzzle of seducing 
nine different women before your oppo- 
nent? Can you solve the mystery of the 
CDG weapon? Can you find Dr. Dildo's 
spare batteries before 
he does? Will you be 
able to control yourself 
in the hall of drones? 
These questions can 
only truly be be 
answered by playing 
Sea: Olympics. 

Sex Olympics com- 
bines sexual, tongue-in-cheek humor, 
adult (R-rated) graphics, unusual sound 
effects and an icon-driven point-and-click 
interface to create a game that's a little 
different than your usual fare. To keep 
the game interesting there are three 
different levels of play, and the locations 
of clues and objects change each time 
you play. 



Why not compete in the Sea: Olympics, 
where a little metal medallion isn't your 
only reward. 

Suggested retail price $39.95. Available 
at dealer's everywhere. Both Amiga and 
Atari ST versions are available. 

If you can't locate a copy of Sear Olympics 
at your local dealer, you can order one by 
calling: 

1-800438-5757 



I 







Software 




Free Spirit Software 
58 Noble Street 

Kutztown, PA 19530 
(215)683-5609 



Circle #141 on the Reader Service Card 





Work 
bench 



tern go, AmigaDOS is the odd one out since 
it was originally developed in BCPL instead 
of the C language, and just has its own 
unique outlook on life. This is mostly a 
problem for programmers and not for end 
users, and AmigaDOS has been cleaned up 
in Version 2 to keep everyone happy. 

Exec 

Exec has been referred 10 as the heart of 
the Amiga's operating system, and that is an 
apt analogy. Exec is working constantly, 
switching tasks many times a second in order 
to keep the multitasking Amiga running all 
those programs at the same time. Exec man- 
ages very basic duties like handling lists of 
data structures and running programs. It also 
takes care of 'messages' and 'ports' used for 
communication between simultaneously run- 
ning tasks, and provides a standard form of 
internal I/O management called the software 
'device.' Exec is written in very efficient 
assembler code and is the reason that multi- 
tasking works as well as it does in the 
Amiga, The same people who say bad things 
about AmigaDOS will generally voice noth- 
ing but respect for Exec, so make sure you 
don't make any disparaging remarks about 
Exec in front of an Amiga Guru. 

The Blitter and the Copper 

These are both special pieces of hardware. 
the computer chips that make the Amiga 
unique in its graphics capabilities. These 
chips both deal with graphics, but in totally 
different ways. 

Perhaps the best-known single component 
of the Amiga is the Blitter. The Blitter is just 
a specialized memory-mover, and makes 
animation and other high-speed graphics 



operations possible. 
Since the pixels on 
the screen are repre- 
sented by bits in 
memory, fast screen 
updating requires the 
ability to modify and 
copy large amounts 
of memory very 
quickly, The Blitter 
allows this, and is 
designed to move 
rectangular regions 
of display memory 
from one place to 
another, performing 
logical operations on 
the data at the same 
time. When you drag a window from one 
place to another and release it, it is redrawn 
almost instantly thanks to the Blitter's abil- 
ity to 'blit' the entire rectangular region at 
once, instead of the pixels being laboriously 
copied by software. Anything that involves 
redrawing on the screen usually involves the 
Blitter. including text display. 

The Copper is an entirely different animal: 
it doesn't deal with the actual bits in memory 
that represent pixels on the screen, but with 
the video display hardware itself. The Copper 
is what allows you to have the display sliced 
up into more than one 'Screen' at a time, 
switching graphics modes and color palettes 
from one line to the next. The Copper gets its 
nickname because it is actually a co- 
processor, it follows its own limited set of 
machine language instructions much the same 
way as the main CPU. The 'program' exe- 
cuted by the Copper is called the Copper list, 
and when you switch to a new screen or drag 
a screen up or down, new Copper lists are 
built on the fly to change the graphics modes 
accordingly. The instructions in the Copper 
list can control exactly what happens to the 
graphics modes, display memory location, 
and color palette at any given position on the 
display. The Copper can also be used when 
programs need to use more colors than would 
be ordinarily available in a given graphics 
mode: the new 'Sliced HAM' and 'Dynamic 
HiRes' graphics modes achieve their magic 
through the use of the Copper. 

The distinction between Blitter and Cop- 
per operations is generally this: when some- 
thing is drawn onto the screen, the Blitter is 
usually involved; when something happens 
instantly, like a color change or a new screen 
popping up, it's the Copper. 



Libraries 

Libraries on the Amiga are sets of func- 
tions (general purpose subroutines) that can 
be used by several programs running at the 
same time. These 'shared libraries' can be in 
ROM, or can be loaded from disk when 
required. Only one copy of a shared library 
exists in memory at a time, and disk-based 
libraries can be unloaded from memory 
when they're not being used and the 
memory is required by something else. 
Some of the most fundamental libraries - 
Intuition, Graphics, and Layers - have 
already been discussed. These are all in 
ROM and are always present in the system. 
Another ROM-based library that is always 
available is the DOS library, which pro- 
vides access to the AmigaDOS functions for 
disk file access. Other libraries of interest 
are the Diskfont library, used to load and 
manage disk-based fonts; the Translator 
library, used to translate written text into 
phoneme codes for the Narrator device to 
convert to speech: the Icon library, for 
reading and writing icon files; and several 
math libraries that provide floating point 
math operations and support a math copro- 
cessor chip. In addition. Version 2 of the 
operating system provides libraries to deal 
with IFF files, ARexx, and other new stuff. 

Devices 

The confusing name 'device' in the 
Amiga refers to an Exec-managed software 
entity that provides a standard interface for a 
variety of different resources in the system. 
It is possible for an application to bypass 
these software devices and use the hardware 
directly, but this can foul up multitasking 
when several applications try to use the 
same hardware at the same time (two music 
programs playing at the same time, for 
example). Let's look at a few of the more 
important devices. 

The Console device is used to handle key- 
board input and screen output of text. While 
programs often render text directly using calls 
to the Graphics library, the console device is 
used in shells and other programs that are pri- 
marily text- based. The console device can be 
used for all user input, instead of using Intu- 
ition's standard user input messages. When 
you use the special 'escape sequences' to 
change the color or style of text, it is the con- 
sole device that is interpreting these codes 
and making the changes in the display. The 
most obvious use of the console device is in 
the CLI and Shell programs. 



62 .info MAY 1991 



A 



The Clipboard device is an underused 
pari of ihc Amiga that is designed to ease the 
flow of data from one application to another. 
In theory, applications like spreadsheets, 
wordprocessors. paint programs, and Desk- 
top publishing packages would all have 
'copy to clipboard' and 'paste from clip- 
board" menu items. You could then move a 
picture from the paint program to the page in 
the DTP program, for example. You could 
copy a range of cells from a spreadsheet into 
a document in the wordprocessor. In prac- 
tice, the clipboard was poorly documented 
in the original set of developer's manuals, so 
ii was never supported much, and people 
learned to live without it. The idea behind 
the clipboard is to support standard data for- 
mats and access the data in a standard way 
so that you can cut and paste anything - pic- 
tures, text, music - from one application to 
another. Many programs do support the clip- 
board, but it is by no means universal. 

There are two separate devices that deal 
with producing stereo sound. The Narrator 
device is the software that makes the Arnica 



pronounce speech. (See the Narrator article 
in this issue for details about what it does 
and how to use it.) The Audio device is used 
to access the Amiga's audio hardware to 
produce music and sound effects. 

The Printer device is responsible for con- 
verting the generic Amiga printer codes into 
the codes for the specific printer that is con- 
nected. It loads the printer driver from the 
'devs/printers' directory to do the job. The 
data is actually sent to the printer using the 
Serial device or Parallel device, which con- 
trol communication out the serial and paral- 
lel ports on the back of the computer. 

The Trackdisk device deals with the 
floppy disk drive at a very low level. It is 
used by AmigaDOS, and rarely needs to be 
accessed by an application, except specialized 
programs that need to read and write nonstan- 
dard disk formats. Since AmigaDOS deals 
with the drive hardware through the Track- 
disk device, new hardware can be supported 
by just changing the the Trackdisk software, 
which shouldn't affect AmigaDOS at all. 

Other devices of importance are the Input 



device, which Intuition and the Console 
device use to get input from the keyboard, 
mouse, and joystick. The Input device, in 
turn, communicates with the Keyboard and 
Gameport devices, which deal directly with 
their assigned hardware. The Tinier device 
can be used by any program that needs pre- 
cise timing of events, as well as by Exec and 
other parts of the system. 

Coping with it all 

The software and hardware systems men- 
tioned above are just a few of the more com- 
monly known parts of the Amiga. With so 
many interconnected systems, is it possible to 
really know your way around the whole sys- 
tem? Fortunately, you don't have to know any 
of these details in order to use the machine; 
devices, libraries, and the rest are things for 
software developers and Gums to worry about. 
But with a general understanding of what's 
what, perhaps you'll be able to make some 
sense out of the jargon and start bridging the 
gap between Guru and regular mortal. 




— ■ 



■O #\ 






High quality RGB output for your Amiga 

These images are completely unretouched photos taken from a stock 1084s RGB monitor. 

They are pure RGB, not smeary composite. No other graphics expansion device offers so 
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• 18'24 bit "pure" modes 

• 256'5 12 color register modes 

• RGB pass through 

• Screen overlay' underlay 

• Screens pull up/down & 
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■ Works with DigiView™ 

• Completely bli tier- compatible 

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• PAL & NTSC compatible 

• Uses only RGB port 

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• RGB and HSV spreads 

■ Extensive ARexx™ support 

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THE NARRATOR SPEAKS 

Natural-sounding Speech From Your Amiga 
by Chris Zamara 



Speech in the Amiga is accom- 
plished by two separate software 
systems: the Translator and the 
Narrator. The Translator converts 
English text into strings (groups of charac- 
ters) of 'phonemes' that tell the Narrator 
exactly what to say. Converting English text 
to phonemes is a tricky business, and the 
Translator doesn't always get the sounds 
right. Even so, the Narrator can usually be 
coaxed into producing reasonably intelligi- 
ble speech, if given the right phoneme 
strings. How to construct these phoneme 
strings is the topic of this article. 

Getting to the Narrator 

The Narrator exists in the Amiga as a soft- 
ware 'device,' and there is no built-in soft- 
ware to access the device directly. The Say 
command and the SPEAK: device, discussed 
in last month's article, always work through 
the Translator software, and can't be used to 
send phonemes directly to the Narrator. 

Programmers can use the Narrator directly 
from C or assembler programs by accessing 
the Narrator device as outlined in the official 
ROM Kernel Manual (the RKM). A much 
simpler way 10 access the Narrator is from 
AmigaBASIC: you can use it in your own 
AmigaBASIC programs, but even non- 
programmers can use it simply by using the 
AmigaBASIC SAY command directly. (Ami- 



gaBASIC can be found on the "Extras' disk 
on system software releases 1.1 to 1.3; Ami- 
gaBASIC is not distributed with the new Ver- 
sion 2. AmigaBASIC will not work on sys- 
tems with a 68020 or 68030 processor. ) 

To use the Narrator lo apply your 
about-to-be-acquired knowledge of 
phoneme strings, just do the following: 

• Run AmigaBASIC (double-click its icon 
from Workbench) 

• Close the LIST window 

• Type the following into the BASIC win- 
dow: SAY "/HEHLOW" 

You've just told the Narrator to say "Hello" 
using a phoneme string (the characters 
between the quotes). Only certain codes are 
acceptable in this string, and if you type 
something that the Narrator does not accept 
as a valid phoneme. AmigaBASIC will 
respond to your command with an "Illegal 
function call" error message. Now about 
Ihose funny phoneme codes... 

Writing Phonetically 

The information in this article regarding 
Narrator phoneme strings comes mostly 
from two sources: the RKM ("Libraries and 
Devices" volume) chapter on the Narrator, 
and experimentation. The section in the 
RKM called "How to Write Phonetically for 
Narrator" is less technical than other parts of 
the manual and is recommended for further 



leading on the subject, if you can get your 
hands on the volume. 

Spoken sounds have been identified and 
encoded into a standard alphabet called the 
IPA (International Phonetic Alphabet). Most 
dictionaries will show this alphabet and the 
sounds each symbol represents, to allow for 
phonetic spelling that indicates how a word 
sounds. A version of this alphabet was later 
developed using ordinary letters that can be 
typed on a standard keyboard. This is called 
the Arpabet (it was developed by the 
Advanced Research Projects Agency - 
ARPA), and it is an extended version of this 
that is used in Narrator phoneme strings. In 
other words, what you learn about phoneme 
strings in this article isn't specific lo the 
Amiga, but can be applied to any Arpabet- 
slandard speech system. 

The Narrator works with entire sentences, 
adjusting the intonation of each word to give 
a natural contour lo the sentence. To create a 
phoneme string for a sentence, you have to 
break down each word into its individual 
phonemes, and use the special one or two- 
character code that corresponds to that 
phoneme. A phoneme is an individual sound, 
like the t in talk. If you say a word oul loud, 
you should be able to determine each individ- 
ual phoneme. Talk, for example, has three: the 
initial t sound, the middle vowel sound, and 
the final k sound. Although the word is spell 
with an a! to indicate the vowel sound, you'll 
see in ihe table that the phoneme code we 
warn is actually AO. From the table, you can 
construct the phonetic spelling for the entire 
word: TAOK. Since English spelling is 
largely non-phonetic, the phonetic spellings 
will rarely coincide with Ihe written ones. 
When constructing phoneme strings, forget 
completely about how a word is spelled, and 
concentrate on how it sounds. 



Figure 1. 

The simple 

AmigaBASIC 

'Coffee Machine' 

program in action. 



Cursor left/right to select 
Cursor up/down (a adjust 
REIURN to speak the uord 
Close uindou or Stop to quit 



Stress: 3 



Speed: **** 

Pitch: *** 

Phoned* string: KAA3FIY. 



Types of Phonemes 

As you can see in the table, the phonemes 
are broken inio several categories. The mosl 
obvious of lhesc are the vowel and conso- 
nant sounds, which are generally easy lo dis- 
tinguish in a word. The diphthongs arc also 
vowel sounds, but consist of two distinct 
sounds put together. For example, [he 'EY' 
diphthong as in made starts off sounding like 
EH as in bet. but ends up sounding like IY 
as in beet. The fact that these combination 
vowel sounds are actually diphthongs is not 
really of much concern lo you when con- 
structing phoneme strings, unless you're ihe 
type of person who's terribly concerned over 



64 .info MAY 1991 




such things. Simply by saying the word out 
loud and comparing the vowel sound with 
the sound made in the sample words in the 
table, you should have no trouble deciding 
which vowel or diphthong to use. Conso- 
nants are even easier, and in many cases use 
the obvious letter to represent the sound. 

The AX and IX phoneme codes are spe- 
cial cases, and represent 'a' and T vowel 
sounds that are abbreviated and almost left 
out in normal pronunciation. The sound that 
the a makes in the word balloon, for exam- 
ple, is barely noticeable. Substituting from 
the phoneme table, we get the string 
"BAXLUWN" for the word "balloon". 

The Narrator also has some special codes 
thai aren't strictly phonemes. There are 
some abbreviations for using the AX and IX 
phonemes with some common consonants: 
AXL can be replaced by simply UL, for 
example. Other codes are more specialized: 
Q is used to create a 'glottal stop', a brief 
break between sounds. Normally, the Narra- 
tor puts in glottal stops where required, but 
in some cases you may have to put them in 



Table of Narrator Phoneme Codes 

(From the Amiga Rom Kerne! Reference Manual: Libraries and Devices) 



CONSONANTS 


R 


red 


L 


yellow 


W 


away 


Y 


yellow 


M 


men 


N 


men 


NX 


sing 


SH 


rush 


S 


sail 


TH 


thin 


F 


fed 


ZH 


pleasure 


2 


has 


DH 


then 


V 


very 


J 


judge 


CH 


check 


/C 


foch 


/H 


hole 



Pput 

Bbut 

Ttoy 

D dog 

G guest 

K Commodore 

VOWELS 

IY beet 
IH bit 
EH bet 
AE bat 
AA hot 
AH under 
AO talk 
UH look 
ER bird 
OH border 
AX about 
IX solid 



DIPTHONGS 

EY made 
AY hide 
OY boil 
AW power 
OWlow 
UW crew 

SPECIAL CODES 

DX pity (tongue flap) 
Q kitt_en (glottal stop) 
QX (pause - silent vowel) 
RX car (posivocalic R) 
LX cail (postvocalic L) 

CONTRACTIONS 

UL=AXL UN=AXN 
IL=IXL IN=IXN 

UM=AXM 
IM= IXM 



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' "The Coffee Machine'' 



A Narrator experiment 



' open window and display instructions 

WINDOW 2, "The Coffee Machine", (10, 30) - (300, 155) , 30 

PRINT " Cursor left/right to select" 

PRINT " Cursor up/down to adjust" 

PRINT " RETURN to speak the word" 

PRINT " Close window or Stop to quit" 



'phonemes for 1st syllable, "CO...." 
'phonemes for 2nd syllable, "..FFEE" 
'stress on 1st syllable, to 9 
'stress on 2nd syllable, to 9 
'0=period, l=question mark, 2=nothing 
' speech speed 
' speech pitch 
'which of above settings to change 



syllS="KAA" 
syl2S="F:Y" 
stress (0)=3 
stress (1)=0 
stress (2)=0 
stress (3) =3 
stress (4) =2 
select=0 
punctS=".? . ? . ? ." 

' main loop - do until window closed or program stopped 

WHILE WINDOW (7) 

' build phoneme string based on current stress and punctuation 

slS="": IF stress (0) THEN slS=MID$ (STRS (stress (0) ), 2) 'stress syl 1 

s2S="": IF stress(l) THEN s2S=HID$ (STRS (stress (1 )), 2) 'stress syl 2 

phonemeS = syll$+slS+syl2S+s2S+MIDS (punctS, stress (2) +1, 1 ) 

CALL showdisplay (select, phonemeS) 'update display 

IF init = THEN SAY phonemeS: Init=l 'initial utterance 

k$="": WHILE kS = "" AND WINDOW(7): kS=INKEY$: WEND 'wait for key 

IF kS = CHRS(13) THEN 'say it when RETURN is pressed 
sparm% (2)=stress (3) *36+40 'speech speed 
sparm% (0)=stress (4) *25+65 'speech pitch 
sparm%<4)=22200: sparm% (5) =64 : sparra%(6)=10 
SAY phonemeS, sparm% 
END IF 

' adjust parameters and values using cursor keys 

IF kS = CHR5(31I THEN select=select-l : IF select < THEN select-0 

IF kS = CHRS(30) THEN select=select+l : IF select > 4 THEN select=4 

IF kS = CHRS(28> THEN stress (select ) =stress (select) +1 

IF kS = CHRS(29) THEN stress (select ) =stress (select ) -1 

IF stress (select) > 9 THEN stress (select ) =9 

IF stress (select) < THEN stress (select) =0 

WEND 

WINDOW 1 

' Simple display subroutine to show current values 

SUB showdisplay (select, phonS) STATIC 

SHARED stress (), punctS 

LOCATE 7,1 

PRINT " CO... FFEE " ;MIDS (punctS , stress (2 ) +1 , 1 ) 

PRINT: PRINT " Stress: "; STR$ (stress (0) ); SPC (7) ; STRS (stress (1 1 ) 

IF select < 3 THEN PRINT SPACES (select * 9 + 9);" 

PRINT SPACES (40): PRINT 
FOR i = 3 TO 4 

i THEN PRINT " Speed: ";: ELSE PRINT " Pitch: "; 

PRINT LEFTS ("**********", stress <i)+I) ; LEFTS (" ", 9-Stress (i) ) ; 

IF i = select THEN PRINT SPACES (7 ); "< " : ELSE PRINT SPACES (13) 

NEXT i 

LOCATE 15,3: PRINT "Phoneme string: ", -phon$; SPACES ( 10) ; 
:-: SUB 



yourself. A slighi pause can be inserted 
between any phonemes by using the QX 
code; longer pauses may be created by using 
more than one QX. All of these special 
codes are listed in the table. 

Stress Marks 

In order to produce natural-sounding 
speech with the Narrator, it is not enough to 
just choose the correct phonemes for each 
word. You must also place the appropriate 
stress marks after the correct vowel sounds. 
In speech, stress indicates ihe emphasis on a 
certain syllable. Dictionaries usually show 
which syllable or syllables are stressed in a 
word, but you can tell just by saying the 
word to yourself. The word Am-i-ga, for 
example, has ihe emphasis on the second syl- 
lable; key-board has the emphasis on the firs!. 

Siress marks are indicated in phoneme 
strings by a single-digit number after a vowel 
(or diphthong) phoneme, exceptions being the 
special AX and IX sounds discussed earlier. 
The location of (he stress mark in the word is 
determined by ihe the word itself; (he empha- 
sis must be placed on the correct syllable or 
syllables for that word, as it is normally pro- 
nounced. The number you choose for the 
stress mark determines how strong the 
emphasis is, and this is used lo emphasize a 
word in a sentence over others. Adjusting the 
value of stress marks of individual words 
allows you to 'fine-tune' a sentence and give 
it a more natural contour. 

Let's see how careful adjustment of stress 
marks can improve Ihe Amiga's speech. 
Take the simple sentence. "It is very cold 
outside today." When you use the Say pro- 
gram on the Workbench disk to speak this 
sentence, it sounds very unnatural, not at all 
the way a person would emphasize the 
words in the sentence. If you use the 
TRANSLATES function in AmigaBASIC to 
translate this sentence, you will see that it is 
convened into ihe following string: 

1HT 1HZ VEH I RIY KOH4LD 

AWTSAY3D TUWDEY3. 
As you can see, strong emphasis is placed 
on the words 'cold' (siress 4), 'outside*, and 
'today' (stress 3), which results in ihe unnat- 
ural sound of the sentence. In actual speech, 
a person would more likely place a greater 
emphasis on ihe word 'very', and less on the 
others. Note lhai in this particular sentence, 
the Translator seems to have chosen the 
phoneme codes themselves correctly - this is 
not always the case. All we have lo do to 
improve the sound is fiddle with the stress 



66 .info MAY 1991 



marks a bit. The following modification puts 
things more in line with the way a person 
would really say the sentence: 

IHT IH2 VEH4RIY KOH3LD 

AWTSAYD TUWDEY. 
Try giving that string to the AmigaBASIC 
SAY command, and listen to the difference. 

From this example, you have learned a 
useful technique for convening sentences 
into phoneme strings: use the Amiga's Trans- 
lator as a starting point, and refine the output 
until you get the most natural pronunciation. 

Punctuation 

As you can see in the table, some punctua- 
tion symbols are also recognized by the Narra- 
tor in phoneme strings. The simplest of these is 
a period or question mark at the end of a sen- 
tence. The period results in a final drop in 
pitch, giving the sound of a statement, while 
the question mark causes a rise in pitch at the 
end of a sentence in the manner of a question. 
The Narrator documentation says that a period 
is assumed if it is left out, but experimentation 
shows a definite difference in the sound of a 





' ^J**k' 



* * * -B. 



low high low high 

"CO.,," "...FFEE" 



, SLOW FRST 



Figure 2. 

A crude 

representation of 

the real 'Coffee 

Machine,' give or 

take a few 

controls. 

The phoneme 

indicators on the 

circuit board light 

up as that part of 

the circuit is 

activated and the 

phoneme is 

spoken. 



phoneme string ending in a period, and one 
without. Leaving off the period leaves the end 
of the sentence 'hanging,' as if the speaker is 
about to say something else. 

Commas and dashes are generally used in 
phoneme strings as they would appear in the 
written sentence. A comma creates a rising 



pitch followed by a slight pause, and a dash is 
similar but does not cause the pitch to rise as 
much. The documentation recommends using 
dashes to divide phrases and commas to divide 
clauses. Parentheses are more interesting: the 
documentation states that they are used to 
adjust the intonation of a sentence when it 



STATEMENT OF OWNERSHIP, 
MANAGEMENT AND CIRCULATION 

1. Title of the Publication: .info. 1A. Publication no. 039 75 868. 2, 
Dale of filing: Nov. 6, 1990. 3. Frequency of issue: Monthly 
except combined issue Dec/Jan. 3A. No. of issues published 
annually: 11. 3B. Annual subscription price: $26.00. 4. Complete 
mailing address of known office of publication: 705 Highway 1 
West, Iowa City, Johnson County, IA 52246. 5. Complete mailing 
address of the headquarters or general business offices of the 
publishers: 705 Highway 1 West, Iowa City, Johnson County, IA 
52246. 6. Full names and complete mailing addresses of pub- 
lisher, editor, and managing editor: Publisher, Benn Dunnington, 
705 Highway 1 West, Iowa City, Johnson County, IA 52246; Edi- 
tor, Benn Dunnington, 705 Highway 1 West, Iowa City, Johnson 
County, IA 52246; Managing Editor, Mark Brown, 705 Highway 1 
West. Iowa City, Johnson County, IA 52246. 7. Owner: Benn Dun- 
nington, 705 Highway 1 West, Iowa City, Johnson County, IA 
52246. 8. Known bondholders, mortgagees, and other security 
holders owning or holding 1 percent or more of total amount of 
bonds, mortgages or other securities: None. 9, for completion by 
nonprofit organizations authorized to mail at special rates: Not 
applicable. 10. Extent and nature of circulation: (X) Average no. 
of copies each issue during preceding 12 months; (Y) Actual no. 
of copies of single issue published nearest to the filing date; A. 
Total no. of copies: (X) 99,167 (Y) 95,000. B. Paid circulation: 1. 
Sales through dealers and carriers, street vendors and counter 
sales: (X) 35,287 (Y) 28,495. 2. Mail subscription: (X) 7,311 (Y) 
7,655. C. Total paid circulation: (X) 42,598 (Y) 36,150. D. Free 
distribution by mail, carrier or other means, samples, complimen- 
tary, and other free copies: (X) 548 (Y) 600. E. Total distribution: 
(X) 43,147 (Y) 36,750. F. Copies not distributed: 1. Office use, left 
over, unaccounted, spoiled after printing: (X) 4,162 (Y) 3,392. 2. 
Return from news agents: (X}51,858 (Y)54,858. G. Total: (X) 
99,167 (Y) 95,000. 



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contains noun phrases of two or more content 
words. Il gives as examples of such phrases 'a 
giant yachi'. and "a big basket of fruit and 
nuts'. In practice, the parentheses don't seem 
to have a noticeable effect. The interesting part 
is that the Translator converts parentheses in 
the text into commas, almost as if it doesn't 
trust the Narrator to handle Ihein properly. 
Could parentheses be a Narrator feature that 
just didn't work out quite right? In the new 
Version 2 Narrator, parentheses have a 
noticeable effect, but don't seem to help the 
sentence sound more natural. 

"The Coffee Machine" 

Once you know the concept of phoneme 
strings and have the table in front of you. the 
best way to produce good sounding speech is 
through experimentation. Getting the right 
phonemes is usually the easy part, but jug- 
gling the stress marks among all the words in 
a sentence can involve a lot of trial and error. 
In light of that, you may be surprised to learn 
that the AmigaBASIC program listed here 
will do very little to help you with [his pro- 



cess. It does lei you experiment with the 
effects of different stress marks and punctua- 
tion however, and can be enjoyable to fool 
with for a minute or an afternoon. 

The Coffee Machine is inspired by an 
exhibit that I encountered years ago at the 
Ontario Science Center in Toronto. This 
exhibit featured a large circuit board under a 
transparent panel, covered with plenty of 
good old-fashioned analog components: 
resistors, capacitors, transistors, coils. The 
board was divided into four sections, each 
with a large square light on it that would flash 
when that section of the circuit was activated. 
A speaker connected to the circuit board 
would repeat the same word over and over 
again, electronically generated by the compo- 
nents in front of your eyes. As the lights 
Hashed sequentially, they would spell out the 
word... C... O... FF... EE... as the voice 
repeated "Coffee!" endlessly from the speaker. 

Now. this in itself might get boring after a 
short while, but the panel contained a really 
exciting feature: large metal knobs, just made 
for twiddling. Each knob controlled a differ- 



ent aspect of the speech: the first knob con- 
trolled the pitch anil emphasis of the first syl- 
lable in the word, then came the one for the 
second syllable. Next to these was the knob 
that controlled the final inflection, adjusting 
all the way from a strong 'Coffee!' (falling 
inflection) to a very inquisitive •Coffee?" (ris- 
ing inflection). Still another knob controlled 
the speed of the pronunciation. By simply 
twiddling the knobs, you could get all kinds 
of strange accents and pronunciations of the 
same word out of the machine, even though 
the actual phonemes used remained constant. 
But wait - save your money on plane tick- 
ets to Toronto. The AmigaBASIC program 
listed here is a computerized version of the 
'Coffee Machine." stripped to its bare mini- 
mum. To keep the program short so that it can 
be listed here and you won't be intimidated 
from entering it. the user interface is not 
exceedingly pretty or clever, but it does work. 
You "twiddle the knobs' by adjusting values 
with the cursor keys, and get it to speak by 
pressing RETURN. * 



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shipping and handling 



PREMIER 
lijgOFTWARE 

► User friendly 

► Readyto rv. 

► Icon h. is*_'[] 

AMIGA 



9) Dungeon 
Master II Help 

HEiusnvaps for DM2. 
Single disk $6.00 Dealer & User Group inquiries invited. 



Send $3.00 for our disk based 
catalog nf over 125 available disks. 




6) VideoFonts 

Over 2(1 video fonis 
B/W anil Color 

2 disk set $1 O.IK) 



r-i 



8) Video and 
Graphics Tools 

6 disk set $25.00 



TXBJ 



BE MTEB 
OFTWABE 

AMIGA 

public rowm mo 



10) Fred Fish 
Catalog! 

Sintle disk $6.00 



RELAX! 

USE THE 



XI 



Fax your ad to Anna Folkers at 

(319)338-0897 

Note: All faxed unclassifieds 
must be accompanied by full 
name, street address, phone, 
AND your Visa or Mastercard 
number and expiration date. 

No unclassified ads will be 
billed out. 



Circle #142 on the Reader Service Card 



.info UNCLASSIFIEDS 



DATA ACQUISITION for all AMIGAS 

Affordable. Expandable. Multitasking. Mea- 
sure TEMPERATURE. LIGHT, etc. Brochure 
available. Boon Technologies, P.O. Box 
15052, Richmond, VA 23227. 

LOW COST AMIGA CHIPS & UPGRADES 

34 diagnostics, tutorial tapes, interfaces, 
Megachip 2000 (utilize new A3000 2MB 
Agnus in your A2000 and get 2MB of chip 
RAM) $339.00 (less substantial rebate). 
New 150 watt Amiga 500 repairable P/S at 
$99.00. Rejuvenator upgrade $479.00 



(MC/Visa). Send for new spring catalog. 
THE GRAPEVINE GROUP, 3 Chestnut 
Street, Suffern, NY 10901. (914) 357-2424 
or (800) 292 7445. FAX (914) 357-6243. 

WANTED: Older Commodore LED digital 
watch with BRIGHT RED light-emitting 
diode display, for nostalgic aging Managing 
Editor who can no longer read a black-and- 
grey LCD watch display. Phone Mark at the 
.info editorial offices, 319-338-0070, or 
write 705 Hwy. One West, Iowa City, IA 
52246. 





Advertisers' Index 








Reader 


Advertiser 


Page 




Service # 








148 


Accolade 


43 




139 


AmiComp 


21 




108 


ASDG, Inc 


11 




147 


Black Belt Systems 


63 




121 


Centaur Software 


9 




123 


Central Coast Software 


57 




103 


Computer System Associates 


13 




146 


Cranberry Software 


47 




122 


Creative Computers 


33-37 




140 


Devware 


59 




107 


Digital Creations 


5 




— 


Fuller Computer Systems 


71 




141 


Free Spirit Software 


61 




144 


ICD 


29 




— 


.info Back Issues 


52 




— 


.info Subscriptions 


53 




143 


Jumpdisk 


69 




— 


Montgomery Grant 


70 




130 


Newtek 


72 




142 


Premier 


68 




101 


Psygnosis 


2 




145 


Psygnosis 


3 




136 


Software Support International 


17 




114 


Software Support International 


65 




— 


Split Image 


67 




138 


Taliesin 


19 




133 


Talon Technologies 


15 




135 


U.S. Gold 


7 













SWIMSUIT SHOW Beach ladies slideshow. 
Disks: 3-525, 10-S35. Free catalog: Data 
Foundations. 100D. Box 9324. Akron, OH 
44305. 

USED MIDI/SOUND GEAR WANTED: Is 

your basement cluttered with old cables, 
black boxes, effects, etc. that no one seems 
to understand or know what to do with? 
Especially needed - Vocoders 8 Amiga MIDI 
interfaces. THEREFORE PRODUCTIONS. 
408 BJaysville Ln. #1, Iowa City, IA 52245. 



.info UNCLASSIFIEDS 

$3.00 per word 

Send along with check or 

money order to: 

.info Unclassifieds 

705 Hwy 1 West 
iowa City, IA 52246 

Ads received with payment by 
April 22nd will appear in issue 
#41 (on sale June 11, 1991). 
Ads received with payment by 
May 27th will appear in issue 
#42 (on sale July 16th). 



JUMPDISK 

$1.00 
Offer! 




We can't 
make it any 
easier for you 
to sample 
JUMPDISK 
Original Disk 
Magazine for 
the Amiga: 

You send us one dollar. 
We send you JUMPDISK. 

You'll get 10 programs, plus an abundance 
of material ranging from tutorials to music, 
all on one tightly edited disk. 

We've published JUMPDISK every month 
since August 1986. Every issue features 
premiere programs, news, tips, how-tos. 
JUMPDISK is only for the AMIGA, 

Send that dollar (or a Canadian loonie) to: 

JUMPDISK 

1493 Mt. View Ave. 
Chico.CA 95926 U.S.A. 



Questions? Call us al 
(916)343-7658. 

The line print: Only one 
per person or address. 



Circle #143 on the Reader Service Card 

.info MAY 1991 69 



1 800 759-6565 



FOR ORDERS AND 

INFORMATION SN 
USA & CANADA CALL 



Order Hours: t,\<ml\ivti, f )am-7m/fii, 9om-6:30pm/aOSEDSat/S»n,»:30-6(ET) 



[SPECIAL! VIDEO PACKAGE 

■PANASONIC 1 410 CAMERA • 16mm LENS with VARIABLE IRIS 

•COPYSTAND with LIGHTS ■ DIGIVIEW GOLD 4.0 



*359l 




■Sa (718)6920790 



OR 
WRITE TO: 



MONTGOMERY GRANT: MAIL ORDER DEPT. 

P.O. BOX 58 BROOKLYN, NY, 1 1230 

FAX #7186923372 /TELEX 422132 MCRANT 



1967, 



RETAIL OUTLET PENN STATION, MAIN CONCOURSE 

(Beneath Madison Sq. Garden) NYC, 10001 
Store Hrs: MON-WED, 9-7 / THURS, 3-8 / FRI, 9-6:00 / SAT-CLOSED / SUN, 9:30-7 



AMIGA 




Supra 



po^iemls VIDEO TOASTER 

1429 

TIME BASE CORRECTORS (TBC) A VAILABL E 
TO AS TER TUTORIAL VIDEO CASSETTE A VAILABL E 



A-501 RAM EXPANSION $119 

A-2Q8aDX7BRJQGEBOARD $449 

A-22S6DATBRIIDGEBOARD $649 

MPS1270INK-JETPRINTER $299 

16B0MODEMW/CABLE S69 



28 MHz. 68030 Accelerator tor A-2000 S649 

2BMHZ, 68030, 66882 S779 

GVP3001Ki1(2eMHz)w/6ea30,2MB, 68882 $1239 

3001 Kil(28MHz.)w/68030, 4MB, 68882.$1379 
GVP3033Kil(33MHz.)w/68030,4MB,68e82....$1579 

GVP 3050 Kit (50 MHz) W/68030, 4 MB, 68882 $2399 

ABOVEKITSW/OUAHTUM40MB ADDtm 

ABOVE mS W/QUANTUM 80MB ADD $600 

ABOVE KITS w/MAXTOR 210MB ADD S970 

GVP A-500 HD 8-tO/42MB 3599 

A-500 HD 8+0/52MB QUANTUM $669 

A-500 HD 6+0/1 05MB QUANTUM $899 

RICOH50 MB Removable w/Carl ridge $799 



SUPRA BOOXP HARD DRIVES 

512K, 20MB S469 2MB.20MB SS29 

512K, 40MB S549 2MB. 40MB S599 

512K, 52MB $599 2MB.52MB $699 

512K, 105MB $829 2MB, 105MB $679 

2MB TH RU 8MB VERSIONS AVAJ LABL E 

SUPRA RAM BOORX CALC 

S12K EXPANDABLE TO 8MB~^—~^ 

SUPRA MODEM 2400 SUPRA 2400 PLUS.S1 95 

EXTERNAL SUPRA 

W/CABLE $115 24O0I PLUS $175 

SUPRA 2400 Zl SUPRA 2400 Zl 

INTERNAL MODEM.S125 PLUS $179 

SUPRA2400MNP....S175 SUPRA9600 

SUPRA2400IMNP...S139 PLUS $619 

SUPRA3.5-EXTERNALDRIVE $98 



SUPRA RAM 2000 

OK. $129 4MB $299 8MB $459 

2MB $219 6MB $379 

SUPRA RAM 500 51 2K Expansion lor A-500 $59 , 



JVVIIG/^500 

AMIGA 500 BUILT-IN 3.5" DISK DRIVE • MOUSE /I 
SYSTEM SOFTWARE • SOFTWARE BUNDLE (a U |X Jl 71 

$250 Value) ■ RF MODULATOR I U If 

AMIGA 500P. CALL 

AMIGA BOO RGB COLOR PACKAGE „_^_ 

•AMIGA500-BUILT-IN3.5-DISKDRIVE- MOUSE A IHOIlEllilSeEcS 
RGBCQLORV.ONITOR-SYSTEMSOFTWARE- dlT VII" 
(a $250 Value) LJOU 



SOFTWARE BUNDLE 
•RF MODULATOR 



Ui 



li'iKHilHDi'ilJilllMH^H 



I AJRDRIVE INTERNAL DRIVE tor A-2000 $89 

AMIGA 1000 MEMORIES, PARTS 

& ACCESSORIES AVAILABLE 

AMIGA 2000 POWER SUPPLY $169 

AMIGA 3000 32BHMemory AVAILABLE 

AMIGA APPETIZER SOFTWARE (Word Process 

Music, Palm, Game. Tutorial Program) S39 

AMIGAREPLACEMENT PARTS AVAILABLE 

AMI GAVISION SOFTWARE $65 

AMIGAI.3ROMIB850) $39 

AMIGA1MBFATTEHAGNUSCHIP(8372A) $114 

I AM1GA2MBSUPERAGNUSCHIP(8372B) $99 

A-MAXEMULATORII S139 

APPLIED ENGINEERING 

1.52MB HJ-DENSITY DRIVE $199 

APPLIED ENGINEERING PonrerSupplylorA-5C0.... $87 

ATonce PC/AT EMULATOR 3299 



■ BAUDBANDIT2400EXTERNALMODEM $99 

BAUD BANDIT 2400 MNP LEVELS $139 



BASEBOARD 



2MB Daughter 
Board Available 



Memory Expansion for A-500 (uses A-501 Exp Stot) 

OK $99 1MB _.$149 3MB $269 

512K. S129 2MB $199 4MB S329 



CALIFORNIA ACCESSCA-B803 5" Dish Drive $95 



BODEGA BAY 

By CALIFORNIA ACCESS 



CALL 




2000 



1MB EXPANDABLE TO 9MB -BUILT-IN 3.5 1 
DISK DRIVE • SYSTEM SOFTWARE 
MOUSE 

AMIGA 2000HD....$1399 AMIGA 2500/30.... $2999 
A-1950MULTISCANMONITOR. $539 



S 1 




TW'G/v^bo" 



£&. ALL MODELS AVAILABLE 
; Starting as low as 



s 2179 



JIIJifiilM^lHH^ili^; 



GENLOCKS 



AMIGEN $99 MINIGEN $195 

SUPERGEN $629 

SUPERGEN2000S $1339 

VIDTECHSCANLOCK $759 

VIDTECHVIDEOMASTER CALL 



ICD AD-RAM 2080 

Memory Ex pan son for A-2000 

OK....S125 4MB...S339 
2MB...S229 6MB....$419 
8MB $529 



ICD AD RAM 54C 

WwnwyEipanacn 

tor A-500 
expandable to4ME 

OK $105 



ICD ADSPEED Excellent (14.3MHz.). $225 

ICD FLICKER FREE VIDEO. $323 



INSIDER II Memory for A-1000 

OK Expandable to 1.5MB 
512K $229 1MB $259 1.5MB $ 



LATTICE C5.1 $219 

MASTER 3A-13.5-DISK DRIVE $65 

MASTER 3A-10 $119 

MASTER 5A-1 525 DISK DRIVE $199 

MEGA-MIDGET RACER (25 MHz.) $649 

MEGA-MIDGET RACER 33 MHz. $759 



MICROBOTICS Memory UpgradeslorA-2000 

Bup OK $129 Bupw/SMB $399 

Bup W/2MB S219 Supw/SMB $479 

8upw/4MB $319 



AMIGA 500 & AMIGA 2000 
COMPATIBLf HARD DRIVE PKGS. 

MIX'nMATCHTHESESCSICOtfTRCLLERSAHARO\ 
DRIVES TO FTT THE RIGHT PACKAGE FOR YOU! 
SCSI CONTROLLERS 

SUPRA WOADSYfJC (A-2000).,...,. $129 

GVPSERIESIIHCA-2000.. $159 

GVPSERIESIIHCa-O A-2000 $215 

TRUMPCARD 2000 (Exp. 10 4MB) $149 

TRUMPCARD 2000 PROTExp.lo 4MB) $229 

TRUMP CARD A-500 (Exp. to 4MB) $229 

TRUMP CARD A-500 PRO (Exp, 10 4MB) $279 

XETEC FASTTRAK A-500/ A- 1 000 (Exp.lo 4MB). .5299 

AdSCSI20BOA-2000(Exp.to8MB) $179 

ArJSC SI 2000 $129 

HARD DRIVES 

SEAGATE ST-138N-1 (30MB) $249 

SEAGATE ST-157N-1 49MB) $269 

SEAGATE ST-177N (60MB) $369 

SEAGATE ST-277N -1 (60MB, 5 25") S309 

SEAGATE ST-296N (80MB) $349 

SEAGATE ST-1096N (80MB, 3.5') $389 

QUANTUM40MB.. $269 

QUANTUM 52M8 (LOW PROFILE) $309 

QUANTUM80MB $419 

QUANTUM 105MB $449 

QUANTUM 105MB (LOW PROFILE) $489 

QUANTUM 120MB $539 

QUANTUM 170MB $779 

QUANTUM 210MB $859 



Turn Yout Amiga into a 
Video Production System 



•Genlock • Video Titling J//H1 

Software • Video Fonts t. m W%3 

Video Animation Packages stamngasiowas 

•Genlock* Animation Sollware SOOQ 

•Animation Fcits £00 

Our trainee consultants are ready to customize the 
perfect desktop Video Computer System lor you! 



PRINTERS 

STAR CITIZEN 

NX-1001... $159.95 GSX-140 $284.95 

NX-1020R $199.95 200GX $169.95 

NX-2420 $309.95 ColorOpllon Kits CALL 

NX-2420 R $349.95 PANASONIC 

EPSON KXP-1180 S159.95 

LX-810 $189.95 KXP-1191 $244.95 

FX-650 $329.95 KXP-1124 $279.95 

LQ-510 $279 95 KXP-1624 $349 95 

HEWLETT PACKARD 

DESKJET500 $529 PAINTJET $929 

LASERJET IIP LASER JET I II 

wToner. $899 w/Totw $1599 

PAINTJET XL $1849 



COLOR SPLITTER $119 

CUTTING EDGE MAC COMPATIBLE DRIVE 

FORA-MAX $169 

DIGITALCREATIONSDCTVDC-10 $389 

DIGIVIEWGOLDv.4.0 $124 

FIRECRACKER 24 (2MB) $1279 

GOLDEN IMAGE 

HANDSCANNERw/MIGRAPH TOUCH-UP $259 

OPTO-MECH MOUSE $35 

OPTICAL MOUSE $59 



PANASONIC 1410W/LENS $199 

PANASONIC WV1500X $319 I 



PROGRESSIVEPER1PHERALS 

EXP-1000 1MB UPGRADE FOR A-500 $109 

MEGA-20002MBUPGRADE FOR A-2000 $139 

DOUBLE TALK (A2000. A3000 NETWORKING, 
AMIGA 10 MAC COMPATIBLE) $419 



FOR CUSTOMER SERVICE CALL: (718) 692-1148 

CUSTOMER SERVICE HOURS: MON-THURS Sam-Spm/FRI 9ara-4pm/SUN 10am lp 



FLICKER FIXER. ., 

FLICKER FIXER DEB 2000., 

FHAMEGHABBER 

FRAMEGRA3BER 256 . 



..$269 

.$99 
..$519 
.$569 



REJUVENATOR 1000 S419 

SHARP JX 100 COLOR SCANNER 

W/SOFTWARE& CABLES $719 

SHARP JX 300 SI 689 

WORDPERFECT (AMIGA) S155 

XETECCDROM 



NO SURCHARGE FOR CREDIT CARD ORDERS 

WE INVITE CORPORATE AND EDUCATIONAL CUSTOMERS. DISCOUNTS 
FOR QUANTITY ORDERS. RUSH SERVICE AVAILA1LE. 

CUSTOMER TOLL FREE TECHNICAL SUPPORT 

Sfl 1 ' 1 ^ .1- e ~ k - B i nk 95S£ h Money Orders, Approved P.O.s, Visa. Mastercard, Amcx, Optima, Diners 



C3X-650E EXTERNAL $689 

CDX-6501 INTERNAL S5B9 



MONITORS 



NEC MULTISYNC HID.... $629 SEIKO1440MULTISYNC $559 

SONY 1304 MULTISYNC $699 



ceriineacnccks must wait 2-4 weeks for clearance. I 
notice. Mot responsible for typographic errors. Return ol defective rmi 
returnauiriorizatipnnumberorreiurnswill not be accepted. Shipping ft HandlinaaddrViona^Socomi 

■ secalUorshippIng rates. APO FPO 



niUMM!,i!l<rMrWMti?MV. 



FREE Product Info From oDfu® ! 

To receive free information from participating advertisers in this issue: 

Circle the reader service numbers on the card below assigned to advertisers which interest you. 

Fill in your name and address where indicated and mail. Please attach the proper postage to the card. 



Fill out this card carefully. You may check more than one answer 
to the questions at right. PLEASE PRINT. 



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( ) 

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102 107 112 117 122 

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226 231 235 241 246 

227 232 237 242 247 

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230 235 240 245 250 



R VI C E 



A Which type of Amiga do yoj own? 

1 3 Amiga 500 4 3 Amiga 2500 

2 CI Amiga 1000 5 3 Amiga 3000 

3 □ Amiga 2000 6 3 None 

E Which of the following software 
products are you likely to purchase 
within the next year? 

7 "1 Desktop PuWishing 

8 P Wordprocessing 

9 n Video 

10 3 Graphics/Animation 

11 3 Sound/Music 

12 "1 Productivity 

13 "I UNIX 

14 D Entertainment 

15 □ Educational 

C. Which of the following hardware products are 
you likely to purchase within the 
next year 1 

16 O Mass Storage 19 P Video Hardware 

17 O Accelerators 20 3 Monitors 



D. What applications are your 
primary interests? 

22 □ Desktop Publishing 

23 3 Wordprocessing 

24 3 Video 

25 n Graphics/Animation 

26 D Sound/Music 

27 "I Productivity 

2B 3 On-line Services 

29 3 UNIX 

30 3 Entertainment 

31 3 Educational 

E How did you receive this 
copy of .info? 

32 3 Subscription 

33 3 Newsstand 

34 3 Borrowed 

35 O Library, etc. 



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May #39 card remains valid until June 30, 1991. 



Mk 



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WHEN YOU WANT MORE 
THAN EMPTY PB 




"I consider Project D to be akin to a well equipped luxury automobile; it gives a 
smooth ride and lots of easy to use operations." - AmigaWorld 

"Project D is certainly one of the most sophisticated, yet easy to use, disk utility 
packages available for the Amiga" - Amiga Sentry 

'The user interface is wonderful..." .info Rated: 4+- stars - .info Magazine 



Introducing the most complete disk utility system ever 
created for the Amiga. Project D includes a powerful 
Amiga disk copier, a special format copier, a software 
indexing utility and a disk editor. Project D also 
represents over three years of continuous support and 
enhancements. 

BackupTool gives you the power to protect your 
software investment by making backup copies of your 
Amiga floppy disks. It will copy both non-protected and 
protected disks, deprotecting most of your favorite 
copy-protected software with ease. It supports up to four 
disk drives and lets you copy to multiple drives at the 
same time. 

OmniTool allows you to duplicate disks that you 
may have for other computers. It is able to copy most 
protection schemes used by other computers and will 
even copy software that cannot be duplicated on the host 
machine! The OmniTool is able to duplicate the Atari 
ST, MS-DOS. CP/M and Xenix disk formats. It will also 
allow you to quickly duplicate most music synthesizer 
disk formats including Ensoniq and Roland. 

EditorTool will give the expert user complete 
control over AmigaDOS floppy disks and hard drives. 
You can examine and edit disks at the sector level in 
HEX and ASCII. Features include data and bitmap 
block checksumming as well as boot block 
checksumming. You can search through the edit buffer 
for vims text, hidden passwords, messages and hex 
values. You can also edit MFM data on floppy disks. 



Now Shipping Project D Version 2.0 
AmigaDOS Release 2 Compatible 



CatalogTool will help you organize and index your 
software library. It can automatically read filenames 
from any AmigaDOS file system (DFO: HDO: etc.) or 
you can enter filenames manually. You can then quickly 
separate and sort your filenames into different categories. 

Updating Project D is simple and inexpensive. We 
will notify you of new parameters eveiy three months, 
and you can order updates as often as you like, for as low 
as $10. Project D is not copy protected in any way and 
is completely compatible with the Amiga's multi-tasking 
operating system. 

You get all this for $59.95 and that includes shipping 
and handling! So call now and order your copy of the 
best Amiga disk utility system, today! 



Project D: BackupTool Copyright 1 937-9B Fuller Conputer Systens, Inc. 



Project D: BackupTout Ue 



31*3 lUU l.'A 

;ijiu "JidKslitfa.mii'iu 1 /' Ifersliui ^. : 1 
Usiuy Piur-ikaiar Fits itiwiiy Jil-Jil 



BES1N 



BACKUP CONTROL SELECTOR 

CHOOSE BACKUP NODE: 
(• Standard RmgaDOS 
JAnigaDOS Multicopy 
JAutoHAGK Paranettr 
JHanual Paranettr 



J VERIFY 
J INDEXSTHC 
jd AUDIO BEEP_ 

DRIVE CONFIGURATION SELECTOR 

source; <• ore: J JDF2: Ji 

TAA5ET; JDFB: J I 1 Nil J 




TRACK POSITION SELECTOR 
STRRT AT CYL:88 HEAD: 9 HERD 
P <* Both 

S TOP AT CYL: 79 HEHDM J Read 8 
I rj J Head 1 



DISK BACKUP ERROR LIST 






hjl -^ [J? \-J_ jjaninjjaj uiiJ Jli-iiiiii] by iteii Fullai- 

Project D: 

The Disk Copier...Plus! 

AVAILABLE AT FINE AMIGA 
DEALERS EVERYWHERE 



...PROJECT D DEUVERS. 



Fuller Computer Systems, Inc. Post Office Box 9222 Mesa, Arizona 85214 Orders: (800) 874-DISK Tech Support: (602) 497-6070 FAX: (602)497-6071 
Amiga is a registered trademark of Commodore-Amiga, Inc. Dealer Inquiries Invited Project D is a trademark of Fuller Computer Systems. Inc. 




Just The Pacts: 

What Makes Digi-Paint 3 
the Ultimate Paint Program? 



"Why is Digi-Paint 3 better 
thanDeluxePaintlH™?" 

Digi-Paint 3 works in the Amiga's 
powerful Hold And Modify (HAM) 
mode, which allows you lo paint 
using all 4096 colors simulta- 
neously. By comparison, Deluxe 
Paint HI (by Electronic Arts) oper- 
ates in less sophisticated modes, 
restricting you to a maximum of 
only 64 colors. Advanced features 
available in Digi-Paint 3 -including 
Colorizing, Variable Transparency, Shad- 
ing, Lighten, Darken and Range Painting - 
are simply not possible in Deluxe Paint III due to 
its 64 color limitation. AMIGAWORLD warns, "Competitors may 
want to head back to the drawing board, because Digi-Paint 3 is 
hard to beat!" 

"What makes Digi-Paint 3 better than 
other HAM paint programs?" 

Digi-Paint 3 is the only Amiga paint program written in 100% 
assembly language. Although challenging to program (taking up to 
10 times longer than other computer languages), it's the only way 
to achieve the incredible speed found in Digi-Paint 3. AMIGAWORLD 
calls it "the fastest HAM paint program yet" and AMIGA SENTRY 
estimates it's, "6-10 times faster" than the nearest contender. 

Other advanced features found only in Digi-Paint 3 include: anti- 
aliased texture mapping, anti-aliased fonts, ARexx support, 1024 x 
1024 super bitmaps with auto-scrolling and dithering to 30 bits per 
pixel (over a billion colors internally, giving you tens of thousands of 
apparent colors). COMPUTER SHOPPER magazine reports "Digi-Paint 
3 is without a doubt the most advanced HAM paint program to date!" 



"Finding the best paint 
program for your Amiga can 
be confusing, but once you 
have the facts it's simple, " 



Laura Longfellow 
Sales Manager 
NewTek Inc. 





"But is Digi-Paint 3 easy to use?" 

I've learned that no matter how powerful a program is, if it's 
not friendly it's not worth my time. We designed Digi-Paint 3 with all 
users in mind- from the beginner just starting out with computers, 
to the "power user" who demands the most advanced features 
possible. The spiral-bound manual contains a step-by-step Guided 
Tour, 1 1 hands-on tutorials, a color coded reference card, and 
almost one hundred example photos. 

Digi-Paint 3's intuitive user interface was created by Digi-View 
designer (and NewTek Founder) Tim Jenison and renowned Amiga 
artist Jim Sachs. It features innovative "Dashboard" controls which 
AMIGAWORLD regards as "a joy to use" and "very easy to learn and 
understand". INFO MAGAZINE says the new interface "looks great 
and works logically". 

"What is the Transfer 24 program 
included with Digi-Paint 3?" 

Transfer 24 is a separate program 
disk included in the Digi-Paint 3 package, 
allowing you to alter any picture's bright- 
ness, color saturation, contrast, hue and 
sharpness, almost as easily as adjusting 
the controls on your television set. Transfer 
24 also lets you modify the size, palette, 
and resolution of any picture. These 
powerful features, known as "Image Pro- 
cessing", give you incredible control over 
your final artwork. You can also save your 
image in any of the Amiga's 24 resolution 
modes (up to 768x480) making it com- 
patible with all Amiga graphics software. 
AX MAGAZINE notes that "Transfer 24 
gives you even more options xs to the final 
appearance of your work". AMIGAWORLD 
declares, "Transfer 24 is great for making 
overall changes." 

"What technical support does NeWTek offer?" 

Digi-Paint 3 has one other thing you won't find in any ordinary paint program: 
a toll-free help line. If you should have any questions while using Digi-Paint 3, 
you're not on your own. Call NewTek's technical support team at 1-800-736-7617 
Monday through Friday, 8 am -7 pm Central Time. 




Oigi-Paint 3, Digi-View, and Transfer 24 are trademarks of NewTek Inc. 

DeluxePamt III is a trademark of Electronic Arts. 

All brand and product names are trademarks of their respective holders. 



Digi-Paint 3 is available now at your 
local Amiga dealer or call 
1-800-843-8934 or 1-913-354-1146. 



NewTek 

INCORPORATED 



Circle #130 on the Reader Service Card