Skip to main content

Full text of "Info Magazine Issue 22"

See other formats


($5.50 Canada) $3.95 




AMIGA 

COT^IMODOI 

COIVIPUTEPS 



;-JS:S^!i^ilJC^JW9JKfi flBKiii^'tdu.fbA* 



m AMMWEmAm issy 




"76956 






rw. -J-.- - -J 






^^fe 




'iKiiniAiiimiiii s s I I »i * I I 
mil Calvcn Street • Vim Nuys. CTA 91411 
»^ Tcchnicul Support (818) 785-0 il9 








.VL^ 



ExcluNivcly Distributed by 

lACTlVlSTONl 



Come trdvcl the path to a new realm of reality. 

Might and Magic''^' is w'aiting to take you away 
on a journey packed with challenging monsters 
and exciting quests. 

A fanuisy role-playing game featuring: 

U 200 Monsters 

D 94 Spells 

U 250 Magic Items 

D Flicker Free. 3-D indoor/outdoor graphic 
terrains to explore 
_ D Detailed combat system with quick fight 
r option. 

Let Might and Magic^' be your guide to a 
world of mazes, monsters, magic and mystery. 

Now available for Apple II series, Macintosh, 
ComiiKxlorc 64/128. and IBM/Tandy/Compatible. 

Hint/Map book also available. 

1 

Ask tor Might and Magic™' 

at your local dealer. 



IENTERTAI^IM[^;I ^O^T^ 



IBM h a irodcnuri iiT lnb;fiuti>iful HuhHiL>s^ MadlinCN. In.'. 
'IknJy Lsa luloEuri, liTunJy. Ilk-, 



] 






--.'•: jf'.sss-V 







#V«'^^ 




2 



i 



T 



DELIVERS ULTIMATE 
GRAPHICS POWER 



iyTtK* 



Bring the world into your Amiga with 
Digi-View, the 4096 color video 
digitizer In seconds you can capture 
any photograph or object your video 
camera can see in full color and with 
clarity never before available on a 
home computer. Digi-View's advanced 
features include: 

•Dithering routines give up to 
100,000 apparent colors on screen 
• NewTek's exclusive Enhanced 
Hold-and-Modify mode allows for 
exceptionally detailed images 
Digitize images in any number of 
colors from 2 to 4096 
'Print, animate, transmit, store, or 
manipulate images with available IFF 
compatible programs 
• Digitize in all Amiga resolution modes 
(320x200, 320x400, 640x200, 
640X400) ^mm^^t 

"Digi-View sets new standards for 
graphics hardware"-/nfolVofW 

Digi-View is available now at your local 

Amiga dealer or call: 

1-913-354-1146 or 1-800-843-8934 

,^. I ONLY $199.95 




Ail photos actual unretouched Digi-View pictures shot difeclly off the 1080 Amiga monitor. 






IS: 



Benn Dunnington 

Publisher, Editroid, Founder 

Mark R. Brown 

Senior Editroid, Tech Editroid 

Tom Malcom 

Assistant Editroid 

Megan Ward 

Art and Production Manager 

Judith Kilbury-Cobb 

Data Manager 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR 

Jim Oldfield, Jr. 
CONTRIBUTING EDITORS 

Don Romero 
Warren Block 
Karl T. Thurber, Jr. 



Advertising Sales 

Carol Brown 
(319) 338-3620 



Subscriptions # (319) 338-0703 
FAX #(319) 338-0897 



READER MAIL: 

INFO Reader Mail 

123 N. Linn St., Suite 2A 

Iowa City, lA 52245 



COPYRIGHT© 1988 BY 

INFO PUBLICATIONS, INC. 

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 

INFO is an indcpcndcnl joumyl not conneclcd wilh 
Commodnrc Business machines. INFO is publLslicd 
bi-montlily by INFO Publicalioas, Inc., 123 N. Linn 
St., Suite 2A, Iowa City, lA 52245. Subscription 
rate is S20.00 (U.S. Funds), one year. Foreign rale is 
S26.00 (U.S. Funds), one year. Emire contents 
copyright 1988 by INFO Publications. Inc. No part 
of this publication may be printed or otherwise 
reproduced witlioul written permission from the 
publisher. National and Worldwide distribution by 
Select Magazines, Inc. NY, NY. INFO makes every 
effort to a.ssure accuracy of articles, stories, and 
reviews published in this magazine. INFO assumes 
no responsibility for damages due to errors or 
omis.sions. Application to mail at .second-class 
postage is pending at Iowa City, lA and at additional 
mailing office. POSTMASTER: send address changes lo 
INFO Subs, 123 N. Una Suiic 2A, Iowa City, 1 A 52245 . 



Products used to create this 
issue of INFO include: 



PROFESSIONAL PAGE 




The 64 EHulitop 




'UP 



DICIBS!/IEW 






Sciilpt-3D 



SONY 

MONITORS 



KS DelLixePaint.il 



Super base 
Professional 

SUPER 
SNAPSHOT 



mm mmmm f—* —— "^ 

•LOG I ST I X« 




Butcher 




GRABBil 



^ Hitachi 



video cameras 




Li Rf&ct 




^^ 




mM^'m^^vll 



' W""'^l'> "** ^ y, _ ,||„| , 11^,.; „__||| ItrT fi 



PliotonPaint 



I PRINTERS: 
j QMS-PS810 
! HP LaserJet Plus 




csn 

TURBO 



Perfect 
Vision 



J 



2 Wm^Fm Scpt/Oci 1988 




NOW PLAYING AT A SOFTWARE DEALER NEAR YOU 

Available (or Amiga. CommcKlore 64, IBM PC, Apple llgs, and Alari ST which are trademarks respectively 
of Commodore-Amiga. Commodore Electronics. Ltd.. fnternational Business Machines, Apple Computer Inc.. and Atari Inc. 

Cinemaware Corporalion, 4165 Thousand Oaks Blvd., Westlake Village, CA 91362 




IFeatoufi 



^^ikikik 



22 INFO AT FIVE: A nostalgic look 

at tiic first five years of INFO. 
18 DIGITIZING MADE EASY: 

The "Digilizing Demon", Oran 
Sands, shares his secrets and sheds 
some light ("you need lots of it") 
on this elusive graphics technique. 

32 The MAC VS. the AMIGA: 

Bob Lindstrom puts the two 
powerhouses on the same track for 
a side by side evaluation. You may 
be surprised at his conclusions! 

26 CES Show Report: 

The biggest show on earth was a 
feast for gamers in Chicago! 



58 Back Issues 

90 Unclassifieds 

91 Advertiser Index 



C64 



51 The Write Stuff 

52 COMAL Power Driver 

53 Flexidraw 5.5 



C64/C1: 



54 Brown Boxes 

55 Super Graphix 
55 Symbol Master 



C120 ©nHy 



56 C 128 Developers' Kit 

57 Brainstorm 




AMIGA 



59 


Deluxe Help 


60 


Excellence 


61 


ARexx 


62 


WordPerfect Library 


63 


TxEd Plus 


63 


3-Demon 


64 


Color Commander 


64 


Micron Memory Board 


65 


Matfiamation 


65 


Graphics Studio 


66 


Flicker Fixer 


66 


Intellitype 


67 


3D Spex 



D(gpair{bm(eimte 



6 


Editors Page 


6 


Reader Mail 


10 


The Gallery 


46 


Midnite Gazette 


35 


Eye on Education 


36 


News & Views 


39 


Rumor Mill 


40 


New Products 


47 


Leemon at Large 


16 


Copy Corner 


44 


GeoSluff 


30 


Magazine Index 


48 


Best of Public Domain 


45 


User Group Forum 


67 


Real World 


72 


INFO Update 




This is our second consecutive cover 
entirely color-separated as well as 
composed with consumer publishing 
software (Pro Page) and a 300 dpi laser 
printer. The image was rendered by 
Sculpt-3D on an AlOOO with a CSA 
68020/881 Turbo, then enhanced with 
Digi-Paint, Photon Paint, and Deluxe 
Photo Lab. 



DIKlfFD Scpt/Oct 1988 



\ 



>m^}^ 



v.. 



^^^' 




NOW PLAYING AT A SOFTWARE DEALER NEAR YOU 

Available for Amiga. Commodore 64, IBM PC, Apple tigs, and Atari ST. which are Irademariss respectivefy 
0) Commodore-Amiga. Commodore Electronics. Ltd . Inlernational Business Mactiines, Apple Computer Inc.. and Atari Inc. 

Cinemaware Corporation, 4165 Thousand Oaks Blvd., Westlake Village, CA 91362 




page 



Qn a lot of ways, not much has changed in the 
five years that we've been producing INFO. 
We stili do everything on Commodore 
computers; Commodore is still the "underdog" 
computer company; and Reagan is still in the White 
House. 

On the other hand, the first issue of INFO was 
created entirely on a C64, but this one was done on an 
Amiga. We used to use an 8-pin dot-matrix printer; 
now it's a 300 dpi PostScript laser printer. We once 
used glue to assemble the pages, but now we use a 
desktop publishing package. 

The future holds even more technological 
innovations. Just around the corner, we'll have the 
capability to capture full-color video images in 
real-time. Someday soon, we'll probably acquire a 300 
dpi pagescanncr. And we may see 400, 600, or even 
1200 dot-per-inch laser printers at reasonable prices 
someday. 

But some things will never change. We'll always 
bring you the most complete and honest Commodore 
product information we can. We produce INFO 
because we like doing it; if we had to sit around using 
MS/ DOS computers all day, we'd just give it all up 
and get real jobs. We arc Commodore computer users, 
just like you. Our idea of a big evening is discovering a 
great new section of the Mandelbrot set, or racking up 
a new high score on Arkanoid, or finally hacking our 
way past the last monster into the King's Treasure 
Room. 

We know what it's like to get all enthused over some 
product that promises the moon, and then find out 
that it delivers nothing. Wc don't like that feeling any 
more than you do, and that's why some products 
don't rate very highly in INFO. 

We like to print opinions; including, sometimes, the 
opinions of people wo don't particularly agree with. 
We're big believers in freedom of the press, but we 
also believe strongly in the responsibilities of the 
press. If you don't agree sometimes with what wc say, 
that's fine. We're just glad that you care enough to 
form an opinion at all. 

INFO is sort of a grand experiment, to see if a feisty, 
independent, free-thinking magazine can survive in 
this age of publishing conglomerates and magazines 
that are launched only to sell advertising. And we're 
doing okay. Somehow, we think that says s<:>mething 
good about Commodore computing, our readers, and 
maybe even INFO itself. Thanks for a great five years. 



6 DKlPffl] Sept/Oct 1988 




Reader 
Mail 



INFO MAILBOXES 

Send comments, questions, and cash (large denomination bills on- 
ly, please) to: 

INFO Mail, PO Box 2300, Iowa City lA 52244 

Or send Electronic Mail (comments and questions only; please, 
NO subscription problems!) to our online mailboxes: 

CompuServe 70215,1034 

Quantum Link INFO Mag 

PeopleLink INFO Mag 

BIX inlomag 

Please do not use the EMail addresses to inquire about sub- 
scription problems. Mail all subscription inquiries to the PO Box ad- 
dress above, or call Judi at 319-338-0703. The Senior Editor han- 
dles all the EMail, and he can't do a darned thing about your sub- 
scription problems, It just unnecessarily upsets him to have to deal 
with subscription problems online. He has to turn it all over to Judi 
anyway, so you just as well talk to her in the first place. All he really 
likes to read are messages telling him how great a magazine INFO 
is. So be nice to fiim, and only send complimentary messages. It 
makes him easier to gel along with. 

Please don't call the INFO ofiices with general comments or 
questions, or send self-addressed stamped envelopes expecting a 
personal reply. We just don't have the staff to handle it. We wish 
we did. Right now we have two choices: put out a magazine, or an- 
swer all the mail and phone calls. We hope you'll settle for the 
magazine. -Thanks. 



U.S. Mail From: Greg While, Sauit Si. Marie, 
Ontario 

I have received your Summer issue. In regards to 
ihe National CHUMP section: you guys arc sick, 
SICK, SICK!!! You even made a joke in ihcrc about 
Elvis... Don't ever do that again! And the ariiclcs 
didn't contain any informalion to dispel the rumor 
that Mark and Benn are from outer space themselves. 
The only option open to me at ih is point is lo keep a 
close walch on you, and ihal forces me to take the 
following action: Please renew my subscription. 



Greg, there is absolutely no iruih to that rumor that we are 
space aliens. We do. however, luive brain-control devices in 
our heads that were planted by the space aliens tfiai run 
Commodore. By the way, pay no attention to the targe, disk- 
shaped object that seems to follow you wherever you go. It's 
jiLsl a weather balloon. 

-Mark & Benn 

. , , More Reader Mail on page 57 




IT'S TOTALLY O 



)m Prime Artihix 



A 5/4 inch slice of Down Undfef served hot to the world! 

Each disk is double sided and crammed with games, demos, grapEics 

utilities, business and education programs. oSa 



• Features of ISSUE ONE! 

ENTERTAINMENT 

• Forest Raiders — High Speed Danger* 

• Road Block — Action Strategy"' 

• Bert The Bug — Family Fun 

UTILITIES & TOOLS 

• Track & Sector Spreadsheet — DOS Utihty"'' 

• Screens to Basic — Captures Screen to Print Statements"' 

• Nice Lister — Format Printouts Control Codes* 

• Function Key — Gives C64, C128 F-Keys* 

EDUCATION 

• Typing Tutor — Learn to Touch Type 
(includes game) 

• 3D Plot — Create 3D Shapes Using Formula 

BUSINESS/HOME 

• Appointment Manager — Diary/Calenderf 

• Little Invoicer — Business Invoicingt 

GRAPHICS/MUSIC 

• Waltzing Matilda plus many programs 
from Europe!"' 

EDITORLAL 

• Care & Maintenance of your C64 

• Out and About Sydney plus many 
more programs! 



WIN A TRIP FOR 
TWO DOWN UNDER! 



/ 



/ 



We want to take vou there to welcome in / ^ 

the summer of 88/89. By sending in / ^^ i. 

this coupon you 

become eligible 

holiday tor two i 

Australia. Entries 

close Octob 

3L 




<^>v^v 



Full MachiuL- Code t Complied Bj^Ic 



WHAT'S A TAITO. ? 





That's a very good question. Taito (pronounced Tie-toe} is 
one of the oldest and biggest names in the arcade industry. We're 
the world's largest manufacturer and operator of arcade games. 
Taito's been in the business since 1953. 

And that's just the beginning. Taito practically started the 



videogame industry with 
our classic arcade hit, 

. , ARKANOiD: 33 screens of space-age excitement. Award winning 
Space Invaders!" And cDin-op/m. overt mmmsold in japan. -one of the test ever." 

— Electronic Game Player Magazine 

over the years, Taito has created more than 1,000 other great 
action games for arcade and home play. 

Taito has something equally exciting for you to slip into your 
home computer. Taito brings the same pioneering spirit, technical 

RENEGADE: This is th& one and only. Don't settle for imitations. 

Blistering, fast paced and r^ai Ufa streei-styie Karste action, ona of qua/fty dno excttemsnt that made US the arcdue leader to your 

the hottest games in Europe. 

Commodore, Amiga, IBM, Apple and Atari computers. Your computer won't be the same again. 

Taito is the arcade industry leader for a very good reason. We consistently make great video games 
that bring more action, thrills and value to the people who play our 
games. And literally millions of peo ple play our games in arcades 
and homes all over the world. 

Our strength comes from the massive development effort 
we put into creating the kind of games that satisfy the ever-growing 
arcade appetite and the research gathered from the more than if^,^ 




100,000 arcade machines Taito operates in Japan. (The money in 



. . . ^ X I- 1 It - t I •£ / ALCON: The ultimate in inler-planeiar/ combal Battle aliens wrlh 

the com boxes at the end of the day tells you quickly if you Ve got lasers, homing mlssHes. tmmbsandshieUs. fantastic vertical scmlUng 

future-world landscapes. 

TaitoSoftware Inc. 2G7 West Esplanade North Vancouver. BC. Canada V7M1A5. Tel: 604-984-3344. Sky Shark'" and Gladialor"' am tradsmartcs of Taito America. Inc Copyright ©1988 All rights 
Tallof Arkanoid,^" Renegade.^" Alcon.'" RastanJ** Bubble Bobble,'" Operation Wolf,'^ resejved. Amiga. Commodof^ Appl^ IBM and Atari are trademartts raspectivety of CommodofE- 



a good game or not.) And Taito is always working hard to develop 
the most exciting new video games that push the technology to 
its limits* We don't rest on our laurels. 

Because arcade games are the benchmark for home video 
games , Taito's leadership in the arcade industry means that when 
you buy Taito products you will be getting more home video thrills 
— more mesmerizing arcade quality graphics, spell-binding sound 
and above all, action.' 




RASTAN: One ot the bigges! coin-op hils ol 1987. Stunning graphics. 
Non-slop, mythical super hero action with multiple weapons, ene- 
mies and levels of play. 



That's why nobody but Taito can bring you more of what you're looking for in home computer video 
games. You don't get to be the biggest in the arcade business by making run of the mill video games. 

When you buy Taito games you're getting more than just 
fun. We bring you games that test your nerve, your skill and your 
strategy. Games that make you laugh and put you on the edge of 
your seat, games of adventure and excitement. Taito takes you on 
incredible mind voyages to places you've never been before— to 
brave new worlds of imagination and fantasy. And after all, isn't 
that what great video games are all about? 

And every action game we put our name on is more than 




BUBBLE BOBBLE: Laughpacked addictive action. Up to 100 levels 
of arcade quality play. One or 2 player action. The number one 
game in Europe for three months in a row. 



Just competitive confrontation. Taito games are all about the values of good triumphing over evil, of being 
the best you can be— games like Arkanoid/" Renegade"' Alcon'," Rastan" and Bubble Bobble:" And we 
have more arcade block-busters like O peration Wolf ,'" Sky Shark'" and Gladiator '" coming soon to soft- 
ware formats for play on your home computer. Taito's home-bound hit parade of video fun has Just begun. 

Who but the arcade leader could bring you so much? That's Taito! Aren't you glad you asked? 

Buy Taito products at leading computer stores everywhere. If no stores are near you, Visa/MasterCard 



holders can order direct from anywhere in the United States by calling 1-800-663-8067. \XA ITQ^^ 

Amtfla, Inc. Commodore Electirxics, Ltd.. Apple Compuier Inc. Intemationai Business Machines got the tecKnical end creative ability lo develop mind-blowing video games, write to Tatto, 
and Atari CwpofBlkxi. Advertisement by QuaJIv & Company Irex (Chicagoif *rt you think you've At!entioi*i: Product Devetopment. at Ihe above addresa 



THE GALLERY 




OMPO Sept/Oct 1988 



mMmmmmumiimmmtmm 



MAINFRAME 

iviicroillusions 
17408 Chalsworth St. 
Granada Hills CA 91344 



QO^O-gQ- rated 



ik-ikikik 



^a..j.»a.— .^.-.^^^^...-^^^.jlfjy),,,,.,).. 



Hats off to Peter Ward, designer/creator of tfiis lively and 
elatxirate 'space -capade"! Never mind tfie familiar 
save-the-world plot, just sit back and enjoy the dozens of 
colorful screens as you locate assorted weapons and 
equipment and cruise around the airborne, underground, 
undersea, and interior landscapes, gathering air, power, 
; fuel, and microcards in preparation for your assault on the 
evil mainframe computer, TriComplex III. Lots of options 
and details to discover and enjoy! -BD 



faitt 



^^i^~^^^I^^^^^^^^^^^^^^j^^^^^^^^^^ 



■tmtmmmmmMmitmm 



•''-"■'"'"•^'^'-'■•"-' 



OG^Q^tS- rated 



^^^ + 



miimuimimt'fifi^'^'^- 



STAR EMPIRE 

First Row 

900 E. 8th Ave, Ste. 800 
King of Prussia PA 19406 
21 5-337-1 500 ,.■:.',: , '.,.. 



There's a quiet charm to this space epic that kept me 
playing longer than i thought Iwouid. It has a nostalgic look 
to it, a combination of Asteroids-type vector graphics and a 
"Buck Rogers" feel. This space-trading game does involve 
some alien-blasting, but the action is definiieiy for those 
who like it paced, not "non-stop". 3 or 4 different sequences 
break up gameplay, and the playmap covers a good-sized 
starcluster. There's enough here that's different to keep 
you playing for quite awhile. -MB 



mEI&^, 



AiuUitiuuuuiaiudaUi^iutekaitaiUaiHdia^^ 



.^ — ■-^.-■^ .. ..^ 



nr 



Q[>90-B] - rated 



ilfillir -■J-tiffaiiiMiiiiiMiiii 



,lt^ 



AA^^ 



Zw.>:.^,,».-.«s.>j...^.^»....„....>..,-.V.^.^ 



CLUB BACKGAMMON 

Logical Design Works 

780 f^ontague Expwy. Ste. 403 

San Jose, CA 95131 .;••■■■;"-. 

Finally, a decent backgammon game for the 064! (Odesta 
promissed one way back in '83, and then went IBM on us 
before it was released.) This rendition is full- featured and 
easy to use, with pull down menus(!), color options, human 
or computer opponents (3 levels of computer skill), 
doubling cube, and game log (save game moves for later 
review). The manual is well done with a decent introduction 
to game play, strategy, and statistics of backgammon. A 
solid winner. -BD 



^■^•'" ''-"■■"• - 



liillllfiillii^"'"- -■"'■■ ■■-• ' 



b^ 



itiMMtamiiiiaatr 



ROAD RUNNER 

Mindscape 

3444 Dundee Road 

Northbrook, IL ■■ , 

61162(312)480-766r 



irifiniiiirmi'rfrniT 



OG^D^EO- rated 



AAA + 






i<f«.a..»,i^l.ti,«iigiM.iMi<.^3g 



-1, •-'■■■'•' 



A->i:^^%: i 



It was only a matter of time: Wamer Bros, ROAD RUNNER 
cartoon is now a computer game! A good job has been done 
capturing the frantic flavor of the Saturday morning favorite, 
and RR fans may now participate in the mayhem first hand. 
Try to avoid Wile E. Coyote thru numerous winding paths 
and obstacles, keeping one eye on the 'Seed f^^eter", and 
eating seed as necessary to keep RR's strength up. A! 
advanced levels, land mines and lemonade add to the 
confusion. Great cartoon music, awful colors! -BD 



^^^^^^^^^^^^_^^^lj^^,^glj^yy,^ly^jlj^^j^^^jyj^^j^l^yij2iriiM^;d£lijiU«itt^ 



^^.^JUl^^BjyU^^ijyi^ 



^ 



afrtmiiirii 



KARNOV 

Data East 
470 Needles Dr. 
San Jose, CA 951 12 
(40B)286-7074-.v.v,,. 



mmmaumtaiiamiiiiuiuiitiia^. 



ttiiiMdraaiaMW^ 



0[>9Q^[a- rated 



^^:^ + 



^umiat^tijiijtfi 



sautt 



!Y;i»>J-S'Vv' 



^*,h: 



This is a noble attempt at converting another coin-op title to 
8-bit computer format. The good news is that the graphics 
are really excellent, the sound is pretty good, and all the 
pieces are there. The bad news is that the action is very 
sluggish, and thus game play is difficult: like playing in 
slow-motion. If the speed doesn't bother you, there are lots 
of thorny challenges awaiting you, and plenty of treats for 
the eye (just don't make any plans for the evening!) One or 
two players. -BD 



/^.ii..^-,H,.-A'Ut'^.t.-i--4^^i.,,:r:..i^-t>..-^.^Jl>l^.^,:.,.,f>«.«~^^^^ 



'W, 



■^■'•'— ^"'^""'•^ 



i& 



,..., ■■ -„ ....;...,...::^.^j...^^.;,^a.^,JM^ 



Q[?9Q-a]- rated 



'F^Vlt'W 



'^d^^^^^j^^^^^^i^^^i^^^^i^r^^^t^ 






MANDROID 

Scorpion 

19 Harbor Drive 

Lake Hopatcong, NJ 07849 

(201)663-0202'->..'>.-,'-v/.>r 
.'?^';3':S^''*^^^; 

This game was not final at press time (and we didn't get 
any instructions), so we can't rate it yet, but 1 like what i see 
from the first batch of titles these folks have sent us. 
Several of the action titles use this narrow top-screen 
window which, as you can see, allows lor a surprising 
amount of detaii, and lightning- fast transitions from screen 
to screen. The small inset text window and control panel 
also work very well, and give these games a satisfyingly 
"busy" feeling. -BD 



.,.....^^^-»^..J. J.^. i^^„„.A.< _..... 



~.^.Liiit,a,:i,^iL<i--^'^.t-'ii',c»';iiiigr'1WiM'-''-''^''''~-*'''' 



QKKFm Sept/Oct 1988 11 



iiiiigiiiiiiiii^iiiiimiiM^iiiiiiu, 



EMERALD MINE 

Constellation Software 
1 7 St. Mary's Ct. 
Brookline MA 02146 : 
(617)731-8187 ■..,'';' 



0(>90^(ffi- rated 



^^^^ 



;™iiiiriiltfl'i"ri'"rni ""It I "fr' Mt''^'^^<'>^'-'««^'''^^ 



'^m!;i^^M-& 



t^..'->> 



Clearly an Amtgatized Boulder Dasrt, spin-off (if you 
know how to play BD, you already know tiow to play 
EM), Emerald Mm stands up well on its own. Ttie 
action is Amiga- fast, the graphics are Amiga hued, and 
the sounds are great. With over 100 levels, this baby 
shoutd keep you off the streets for a week or two. One 
especially nice enhancemenl is the ability for two 
players to piay simultaneously as a team, fvlade in West 
Germany 




ROCKFORD 

Electronic Arts 
1820 Gateway Dr. 
San Mateo, C A 94404 - 
(415)571-7171 .:.'..,■■•';' 



\ OG^Q-d- rated 



^^A^ 



^=^^^''''^^^^'^^^^=^^=^^=='^'^^^=^'*^^^^''^^^^ 



^'::&^^?: 



■ ^■•J--<\ 



A direct descendant of BOULDER DASH (bolh are from 
Fernando Herrera), ROCKFORD may be the ultimate 
incarnation of the genre. fHere the little spelunker (who 
variously takes the form of cowboy, spaceman, doctor, 
chef, and hunter) is cut loose in a fantastic and detailed 
80 -screen world of various mazes and arcade conundrums. 
Deveioped as a Coin-Op product, the home version on the 
64 has digitized sound effects, a professional feel, and lots 
ol play value. A nice game for any age group -BD^ 



: : :w;..;; .i^w ^^svit:^.^4^v v:^■..^v:.v;v.v^^J^>j:i::JL.iL.^:^^^A.>^..^ '—-. .^^ 



UJA^ritftaiaUtiMUttai«Hfitt&dUi 



^^ 



Km. 



!^-i-^y.-y^---^.:-i^:- ■ ■:■■. 



0&90^E]- rated 



i i^-k^ik-k 



aa.^feJBo^.aja«-<At:^.^j;j,^ 






CRAPS ACADEMY 

f^icroillusions 
17408 Chatsworth St. 
Granada Hills CA 91 344 -.:;•■•:" 
(818)360-3715 '.,'':; -^^^'^ 

SecwxJ in the 'Micro- Vice" series, CftAPS>^WD£My follows in 
the acdaimed footsteps of BLACKJACK ACADEMY wiltr the 
same depth, attention to detail, ease of use, arxJ staggering 
number of options. This world^;lass simulation marages up to 
four players, can simulate table rules at any casino in Vegas, 
Reno, or Atlantic City, and has pull -down tutorials available on 
riies, conduct, jargon, strategy, money management, and 
systems. Saoll option for those who insist on seeing the dee 
tumble across the full length o! the table. Superb! -BO 



I— 



VEGAS CRAPS 

Logical Design Works 
780 fvlontague Expwy. Ste. 403 
San Jose, CA 95131 
(408)435-1445 ..•,;■•...-:■■;.. 



;.^;.\-w.,:^.^ ■■:-^-.-<.;: i;.;^;^^^:^ 



OG^O-E]- rated 



; -A^^-k 



-?%3--:i.o^; 



f^ot as full-featured or broad in scope as CRAPS ACADEMY 
(table rules are fixed to match the most common in Vegas, 
and only one player is allowed), VEGAS CRAPS is 
nonetheless a fine simulation of the game, arxi the best 
currently available for the C64. The joystick is used for 
betting and rolling, the graphics are very well done, and 
on-screen help is inslantly available by clicking on "help" and 
then any item on the screen. Illegal bets are refused, with 
automatic prompting to help new players. -BD 



MtiiimaiiitiiiMMI^M^iiisiiMliiMiiii^'. 



iiiii^iiimmmaiLiiiimtiiiit&ia^timai^UuM^u^^ 



. .- .. ..v.. .- . .'„ ..■■., 



0&90-E]- rated 



^^A^ + 



^mammeluiib 



■'"i'''''i- IT' '-T [ iiniiTiin"iiifTn" 



INDOOR SPORTS 

Mindscape 

3444 Dundee Road 

Northbrook,IL 61162 .•:=•..:••■•■: 

:(312) 480-7667 -./^^^'Jj^. ...,,,., , ........ ^. ^,„ , 

You can't go wrong with this title ! Four recreational ': 
simulations are included on this one disk, and ifiey are'/' 
each top quality. Air-hockey (pictured), darts, bowling, '." 
and ping-pong provide a sure-fire, something for 
everybody package. Play against (he computer or 
another player. 1 especially like the phantom -effect as the 
air-hockey and ping-pong paddles move around with no 
visible means of support! Handicapping option for fair 
play against your betters. Super! -BD 



^~^^'-^■' 



^:^. ., 1.. ,;-. 1,:^::.^:,:^::,^^^,.^,:.^^^::^^^,,^:^^-,.^^^ t^-^. .,...^ ^. ^ ....^..^.^^..^^^..L.^.^:^..:.:.. ...:...... 




CLUBHOUSE SPORTS 

Mindscape 
3444 Dundee Road 
Northbrook, 1L61162 :^. 
(312)480-7667 ■.;,'t 



/ 



DC3Q-E]- rated 



I A^^A+ 



^'''^^'^^^^^^''■^■'^'''^^^'^^^ 



-•>»■ >T-,' ■ 



Wasting little time cashing in on a good thing, Mindscape 
has followed up their own hit, INDOOR SPORTS, wltli 
this delightful grab-bag of six assorted tavern and midway 
diversions (Foosball, Skeeball (pictured), Crazy Pool, 
Pinball, Billiards, and Shooting Gallery) -whew! Also one 
or two player, ski!! levels and conditions can be preset 
before each game, allowing players of different abilities or 
ages lo play on an even footing. Add this one to your 
permanent collection. -BD 



/.M^..,^'.,,^^A.^'.^^.^...v^^^>..^^.^...^.i.i^^i^-.^<^-^'^^^i-^^^ -^i^iiiii^^^ 



12 m[Fm Sept/Oct 1988 



THE GALLERY 



ens o7 TxtuE! ae 

^C O RE aO 8 2 S L I WES 2 

lev* 1 Mr 



W 9 




QMO^m Sept/Oct 1988 



ioiiiiiiiii^oiiiiiixiiii,^^ 



'"'''iTiliiMiil'iltliiiJilIf'^ 



OeaO-E] - rated 



•^tVtVt^ 



ffi^ 



'W^frirTriiltMMfriiTi'ttnHri'iii 



MISSION ELEVATOR 

Constellation Software 
17 St. Mary's Ct. 
BrooklineMA02l46i-. 
.i617) 731-8187';.'-;?^v,,.,,-.^, ,.,..,,..,,.,,,. ... ,,.,..^-.^.., , 

The creator of this title is obviously a stLfdent and admirer' 
of Ep/x's Impossible Mission. The look & fee! are totally-; 
different, but the structure is real close: elevators, clues & 
tools hidden in scenery objects, crack the code to save the 
day. Graphics, animation, and joystick response are all 
good. There are 64 floors to explore wiih assorted 
enemies, several gambling diversions along the way, and 
as many as five elevators on screen at once. Fun for age 4 
to adult. . -BD 



^.iMrfiii^^itiii:,^:;^^^^^ ::■ .'^:.:':.:..:^^ 



i' ^"r''n"'T''i ii rt i i i Ti'iir" fr i ii f ii r i ' i t 



WORDPLEX 

PAR Software 
PO Box 1309 
Vancouver WA 98666 
206 694 153^ 



0[^O-ffl]- rated 



^ 



-jL- -jL- -;L 

/v, r\ fK 



^Ijyj^QfiiGauuUHttiAjlttMlittltiitt^^ 



*l5 - 



Wordpiex is an unashamed clone of TVs "Wheel of 
Fortune . Little effort went into the graphics, and if could 
use some music and flash, but gameplay is fine. Up to six 
players can compete. Editable phrase lists open up 
Wordpiex lor use as an educational game, using 
vocabulary lists, Shakespeare quotes, Bible phrases, or 
what have you. An editor is included, and tfiere's one 
supplementary phrase disk available already. Wheel of 
Ui^isafiDtfflled in Wordpiex. -ME 




■ ■■...■■■^■.. ........ ^ J.^.-fJ-..^.TOJ.-..M;'.-y.:^-::..:i-:o:iv^^iy^^^y..M.s-::^.-r/.^-.|^^^^^^^ 



M 



^E] - rated 



7^ 7^ 7^ 7^ + 



'i:iiiiS^iiiii<iiiiii:'!ii:^^ 



::'<--J:f]^'^^:n:$i 



EMPIRE 

Interstel/EA 

1820 Gateway Dr. 

San Mateo CA 9440,4 ,■:=•..:•■•.•-■ 

415-571-7171' -■■i.:'>r;'t'^M:'M- -- 

Empire is the most entertaining 'world conquest" game I've 
ever played. It lets you battie 1 or 2 human or computer 
opponents for control of a planetary surface. The maps 
(designed by the computer or by you) are coSorfu! and 
informative, and there are mouse or keyboard equivalents 
for ail the pull-down menu options. You can even pass 
■ orders to your armies, navies, and fighters, which cuts 
down on repetitive input. They've thought of almost 
everything. But beware - Empire is extremely addiciive! 



^^ 



. *r-i^. ,.,- . '.'•wt^.....^..'^.-..~-....-^^:,:U^i^iMiJi^^ 



KARTING GRAND PRIX 

ANCO 

PO Box 292 

Burgetlstown, PA 15021 -.-■ ■• 

(800)992-9198 



0O90-E]- rated 



V 



I -kikik-k 



>. 'f-'- c, H- 



Tills English-made 6o-Kart simulation is a nice addition to 
the growing selection of racing & driving, software available. 
This is always a 3-car race, with the computer driving one 
car,, and one or two players competing simultaneously for 
the finish line. The complete circuit covers 8 different tracks 
with varying conditions. Players may select sprocket size 
and tire type before each race. A nice little package with 
convincing sampled engine and crash sounds. -BD 



ZaajaiiiiagJ^.a.aaiii^>:..;.ia...^agfflSi^^y^ 




ROADWARS 

I Electronic Arts 

1820 Gateway Dr. 

San Mateo, CA 94404 .■: '.. ■■ •■•'-' 

r.1415)571-7W':i/':s^^''^':)-V, ■- 
*-'h-r --^m^^l^:'--- 



iiiiiiidii::iiii6diii>iii;i.v:;.ii-^^^ 



IMQ^B]- rated 



/vKMA^fe^^taM^:^J:atfco.ic.^:j,^:;irfW;^K=ai^^ 






The package says this is a conversion of the Coin-Op hit, I 
haven't seen it in the arcades yet, but I can believe it is (or 
will be) a hit! This is one of EA's better 'affiliated" titles. 
One or two players roll along the digital roadway jockeying 
for position, avoiding, shooting, or colliding with assorted 
obstacles and enemies. When all the blue wall tiles are 
knocked out, the armed orbs drop into new, faster, and 
deadlier roadways. Play co-op or cut-throat with your; 
partner. Great music and sounds. FASTI -BDj^ 



^^^'*^^'^^^^°'^^'^^^**Miilfi'i Jri' BI'iiil'itilili'l'iftiiii'iMrii'ilfcil i^flfillil^ It 




^:1 



'jtitiiJMiiMiliiMiMMf^MtAiimiiiMMmiiMiiMitkd^ 



ny<,.i<./;Ai^^.A;.^;^:>..AAjjAwA»':':'^-rtitirjb'.t 



\}mm - rated 



mm 



> i I < - 



CRYSTAL HAMMER 

Constellation Software 

17 St. Mary's Ct. 

BrOokline MA 02146 

€17 731-8187 '.,',, ,-'', , ^ 

This Arkanoid clone features colorful 3D graphics killer tite 
.music, and keen sound effects. Ufiforiunately, things 
deteriorate when you start to play. The paddle imparts 
some strange, unpredictible "english" to the ball; I never did 
get the fee! of it. Worse, this import was designed for taller 
European PAL screens - your score is invisible below the 
. bottom line on a US monitor screen! Marginally playable 
and nice to look at, Crystal Hammer has all the polish but 
lacks some fundamentals. -MB 



>i 



UMfiatt* 



■itn^ii^iiiiSiii^iitiiilir'- — ■■ '^"i-''"^''-"-^"— ■^-"^aaaiamaa.iia 



Ss 



14 mUFm Sept/Oct 1988 



THE GALLERY 




DMFO Sept/Oct 1988 




iTOfiMaa 



Project D 

Project D vl.Oc 

$49.95 

Fuller Computer Systems 

PO Box 9222 

Mesa A2 85204-0430 

602-835-5018 



Project D by Benjamin Fuller is an 
Amiga disk utility that contains a smor- 
gasbord of disk utilities for Amiga users. 
As a new Amiga owner, I found it to be 
easy to use even without reading the in- 
structions. Everything is controlled via 
the integrated desktop environment, a 
pseudo- Workbench. In fact, all features 
are readily available at the click of a 
mouse button. Unlike some other 
producLs, no CLI commands are needed 
here! Let's take a look at the smorgas- 
bord's menu. 

FEATURES 

Project D runs on any Amiga system 
using Kickstart and Workbench vl.2. 1 
tested the program on an A500 with one 
megabyte of RAM and two 3.5" floppy 
drives. The program will support more 
floppy drives, and auto-configures to 
support the number of drives you have. 
Since it docs not support the RAM disk, 
I suggest a two drive system as the mini- 
mal requirement As usual, switching 
disks on a single drive system can be a 
real drag. 

The disk provided in the Project D 
package is bootable and the mouse is 
fully supported. Upon execution you are 
presented with Project £>'s own desktop 
environment, from which you can access 
all its features. These features include 
the Minitools, the Backuptool, the Omni- 
lool and the Editor tool. 

The Minitools, called memtool and 



by David Martin 

diskwipe, are accessible from anywhere 
within the Project D program package. 
The memtool keeps track of system 
memory usage by displaying chip, fast 
and total memory available. The 
diskwipe tool provides a means of quick- 
ly erasing a disk completely. I recom- 
mend caution when using this tool! Keep 
all your original disks write protected. 

The Backup- 
tool copies stan- 
dard AmigaDOS 
disks and copy 
protected disk- 
ettes, too. It fea- 
tures a parameter 
copier that con- 
tains over 100 pa- 
rameters for back- 
ing up protected 
disks. You even 

have the option of letting the program 
choose the parameter to use or you can 
select one to use yourself. 

The Omnitool allows Amiga users to 
copy foreign disk formats on the Amiga 
3.5" disk drives. FomiaLs supported in- 
clude; Atari ST, CP/M, MS/DOS, and 
Xenix disks in single or double sided 
modes. The manual suggests that owners 
of the Amiga Sidecar or Bridgeboard can 
use it to copy their diskettes. My only 
wish is that it supported the 1581 disk 
drive format and had the ability to trans- 
fer files between the different disk for- 
mats as ASCII data. 

Both the Backuptool and Omnitool 
support a multicopy mode that can best 
be exploited if you have at least 2 
megabytes of expansion RAM. Howev- 
er, the manual offers suggestions around 
this limitation. 

The Editortool is a disk sector editor 
for AmigaDos disks. The alitor ofTers 
two modes of operation: MFM or Ami- 
gaDOS tracks. MFM mode can be 



INFO Magazine does not promote or 
encourage software piracy. The pur- 
pose of this column Is to keep our 
readers informed so they can make 
archival backu ps of their legally ob- 
tained software, as allowed by U.S. 
copyright law. Anything else is theft! 
DON'T PIRATE! 
WHEN YOU STEAL SOFTWARE. 
WE ALL PAY THE PRICE! 




thought of as a "raw" disk data editor, 
since in diis mode you arc editing data as 
the disk drive sees it. This is similar to 
the OCR editors that arc available for the 
Commodore 64. AmigaDOS mode al- 
lows you to edit standard AmigaDOS 
sectors as you and the computer see 
them. 

The editor features a scrolling win- 
dow that contains 
^!=^^iS£gjg the disk data that 
you wish to edit; 
both the keyboard 
and the mouse 
are supported 
during the editing 
process. The user 
has the option of 
displaying data in 
numeric or ASCII 
daui (AmigaEXDS 
mode only). 

If you need to find certain data bytes 
in a disk sector, you can use the search 
function to find it Simply enter the hex 
word value and, viola!, the program 
scans the sector for the d;iui and places 
the cursor on it when found. 

CONCLUSIONS 

Overall the Project D package is a 
fine disk utility for the Amiga. It func- 
tions well, and disk copies were pretty 
fast. The user interface was wonderful 
since all of the program's features arc 
controlled by the mou.sc. The only things 
needing improvement arc the manual, 
and it would have been nice to see the 
addition of ASCII editing and searching 
in the Editortool. 

I'd also like to note that the version 
of Project D reviewed here docs not in- 
clude the Catalogtool. It has not been 
released yet, but it should be available 
by the time you read this. 



David Marfin is a recognized expert on Commodore disk drives, and is the 
author of a book on the I^SD drive and its operating system (available from 
Software Support Internafional). l-le is an undergraduate seeking a degree in 
computer science, and also works for B. Dalton Bookseller 



16 OMO"© Sept/Oct 1988 




■"BRYc:;e buys >=\n 



ART: Gregory Conley 
continuity: Mark R. Brown 




O C:- O 



I CRN TELL VOU'RE IN THE 
MRRKET FOR R BRRHD 

NEW MUeeMfuKi ^n , 

AG ^^2^ 




THE ST IS SELLING LIhiE HOTCRKES 
IN EUROPE! LOOK RT THE 
FRNTRSTIC GRRPHICS! 
LISTEN TO THRT INCREDIBLE SOUND. 



r^'* ^^p t^Tf ifffi iW^ ^^fc i^w J^m am 

444444AA ' 

9K M£ MC Me W He V£ ■ 

rf« i^fc ^n Jt^ rtW ^rt ^r« 






&fr mSlNT OIi_AA 




»»*! .=iiaiijaKjfiiHiqmi.b[jaa don't vou 

RERLI2E THE PUBLIC ISN'T EUVING 
THRT LINE -OR THE ST-RNV MORE? 
BRVCE WANTS TO BUV AN RMIGPl! 



RND it CRN DEUOTE IT'S FULL 
EFFORT TO RNV PROGRRM VOU 
RUN BECRUSE IT'S SINGLE-TASKING, 




SL- 




C'MON. KID... I'LL SHON 'VOU HOW 
TO DISPLRV THE SECRET 
INTUITION MESSAGES' 




m\Fm Sept/Oct 1988 



with 



\/f\ jNl oday you can simply hook up a 

I common video camera to your 
J-i Amiga and start rendering pictures 
sharpness and colors you could die for! One of the 
first programs released for the Amiga, Digi-View 
by NewTek, established itself as the program of 
choice for capturing images with your computer. It 
was quite a long time before any competitors even 
attempted to market similar products. 




by Oran Sands 



I was fascinated by Digi-View. 1 
found myself digitizing anything iliat'd 
hold still long enough. My early pics 
weren't much lo write home about, but 
after much practice, trial-and- error, and 
plain old dumb luck I started to figure 
out a few things. Listen closely, my 
children, for now I'll pass along what 
I've learned. 

WHAT ARE YOU DOING? 

Digitizing with Digi-View calls for 
an understanding of what it does iind 
how it docs it. If you can still find the 
manual, read it! And although I'll be 
talking specifically about using Digi- 
View, most all other digitizers work 
similarly, and will respond to the same 
techniques. 

Digi-View actually creates images 
with a 2.2 million color palette (7 bits 
per color), but since the Amiga can only 
display 4096 (or 32) of them, the soft- 
ware has to decide how to select which 
colors get used. Much of what we will 
do will help the software have an easier 
time of it. In fact, we must keep in mind 
that we arc stuck with our software and 
hardware and can't change diem. Given 
this, we must make sure that everything 
else we do will contribute to a better 
picture. The equipment you use may be 
different than mine but the techniques 
apply to all (see sidebar on selecting 
your equipment for digitizing). 



LET THERE BE LIGHT! 

How you set up your shot can deter- 
mine how good your results will be. 
How bright should the lights be? Where 
should the lights be? These ;ue ques- 
tions I'm asked all the time. First of all, 
I don't use the copy stand that many of 
you use. I find that it encourages bad 
lighting. The lighting must indeed be 
bright enough (more on that later), but 
if it's too close then you will gel un- 
even, hiir.sh lighting. By moving the 
lights back a distance and using brighter 
bulbs, the lighting evens out and is soft- 
er. Any steps you can take to soften the 
light by diffusing it will help. A white 
sheet hung in front of the light works 
well (if you can afford the light loss). 
Remember though, the first item of 
business is lo get enough light. I use a 
1000 watt light placed about 5 feet 
away from the subject. 

INDECENT EXPOSURE 

The exposure is important. The 
camera must be rock steady for all three 
exposures. Any movement will cause 
you to make three slightly different pic- 
tures. Combined, they'll make a bad im- 
age. It must also be as sharp as possible. 
The focus of each picture must be as 
good as you can make it. However, the 
lens you have probably isn't color cor- 
rected. This means that each exposure 
will be focused slightly differently de- 



pending on what color filter you're us- 
ing. You could rcfocus for each expo- 
sure but that would slightly change the 
magnification, making each picture a 
bit bigger or smaller than each other. 
Bummer! So a compromise is the an- 
swer. Set the focus while the green fil- 
ler is in place and the red and blue ex- 
posures will be adequately focused. 
Since you're working with a small f- 
slop (usually f/I6), the depth of field 
should cover the small distance neces- 
sary. The filter wheel itself should be 
flush up against the lens in order to 
minimize light leakage into the camera, 
especially when working with the copy 
stand setup. 

How do you figure out when the 
light level is bright enough? Well, let's 
let the program tell us! On the first 
menu you'll find a selection called HIS- 
TOGRAM. This is merely a graph of 
how bright your camera signal is and 
what it looked like after the program 
processed it. Ideally, your camera signal 
should closely resemble the processed 
signal. Exaggerate the difference by 
digitizing an image with only the room 
lights on. Then try again with your 
lights on. Move the lights closer or far- 
ther away (or dim them using a light 
dimmer). Watch the results. It is impor- 
tiuit that this be done using the red fil- 
ter; it is the least dense filter of the 
three. This will mean that the green and 
blue exposures will be about one stop 
underexposed, which is acceptable. If 
you use another filter for the tests, then 
red will come out over-exposed, .some- 
thing the program doesn't handle welt. 
Another way lo guess at the exposure is 
to check out the second pass of an ex- 
posure (from top to bottom). The more 
change you see, the more work you're 
making for the software. The key is to 
always let the software loaf while mak- 
ing the exposures. It will keep it from 
creating less-lhan-pcrfect pictures. -* 



mmm sept/oct i988 



NOT HOW, BUT WHAT.. 

Once you have the techniques down 
pal, you'll find that the choice of sub- 
ject will make an incredible impact on 
the quality of your image. I don't mean 
who the subject is (although the center- 
fold- of-ihe-month might certainly be 
more interesting than your dog) but 
what ihc subject is: photograph or live 
subject. The size of the subject is also a 
factor. 

I have found that pictures digitize 
belter than real things. Pointing the 
camera at a scene and trying to digitize 
it is just asking for it. In any scene, 
there is an infinite amount of detail and 
color shading. The software must work 
especially hard trying to figure out how 
to render that in only 4096 colors (or 32 
or even 16 if those are your chosen 
modes). Frankly, it's an almost impossi- 
ble task. Photographs are limited in 
their reproduction of detail and color, 
so your needs are less to begin with. 
This even alTccis what sort of pho- 
tographs you should use. 

What sort of pictures should you 
chose? Cars and female nudes, of 
course! (Uh, wait: that's a different arti- 
cle!) I've found thai pictures ranging in 
size from 4x6 to 11x14 inches seem to 
work best. Smaller than this, and you'll 
see thai the picture itself has too limited 
an amount of color and detail. Larger 
than this, and you run into the problem 
of dealing with too much color and de- 
tail again. And, other than size, there 
arc other concerns. Don't use pictures 
that arc themselves fuzzy or soft- 
focussed. They'll most likely digitize 
even fuzzier. Stay with pictures that 
have clear, sharp detail. These are the 
type of pictures that that everybody 
"ooohhhs" over! 

Try to pick photos wiih a limited 
range of colors. If a picture has a lot of 
flesh tones and also has a background 
that's blue, then ihc software will u-y to 
allocate some of the palette to both col- 
or ranges, which shortchanges both. 
The same goes for the contrast rtmge in 
a pic. Subtle shading requires numerous 
colors which you don't have. Your pic- 
ture will suffer as a result. Textured pa- 
per can also cause trouble, as it creates 
light and dark variations that the soft- 
ware will u-y to reproduce to the detri- 
ment of your final image. 

I've had lots of questions about digi- 
tizing slides. Excellent idea! Try plac- 
ing ihe slide on an even, soft light 



source (like a florcsceni bulb or light 
box) to trans-illuminate it. You may 
have problems getting the lens to focus 
close enough to the slide, however. Al- 
though you might try adjusting the me- 
chanical focus of the camera, I'd sug- 
gest either a macro lens or slide-making 
adaptor (see the section on equipment 
choices). 4" x 5" transparencies are 
simply wonderful to digitize from. 
However, you'll probably never see any 
in your lifetime unless you know a pro- 
fessional photographer. Negatives can 
also be used but all the conuols in the 
display menu will work in a "back- 
wards" manner. Frusuating, but certain- 
ly interesting! 

There's one thing that can help you 
"cheat" your way to a better image. The 
software almost always creates a 



"black" and a "white" as the first two 
colors. Knowing tJiis, you can mask off 
unwanted areas of your picture with 
black or white paper iuid reduce the 
number of colors the program needs to 
deal with! 

GET INVOLVED! 

Don't be afraid to clean up your im- 
age after digitizing it. You can remove 
unwanted sections of a digitized pic, 
leaving only the image portion you 
originally wanted. After doing that, 
draw a frame around it, title it, etc. Your 
picture will look a lot better for it. And 
this has an added benefit as well: the 
file size will be vastly reduced. It'll also 
"arc" compress more efficiently. If you 
upload your pictures to BBS systems, 
this will encourage others to download 



EQUIPMENT 



Your digitized picture can on- 
ly be OS good as the tech- 
niques and equipment you use. 
Choosing your equipment has 
generally been Ie1^ up to your 
dealer. Here ore some pointers 
in making your own choices. 

CAMERAS 

The single most important 
decision you'll make is what 
camera to use for digitizing. 
Nothing else matters a whit if 
your camera is the pits. How do 
you know what's good and 
what isn't? Look for these 
specs: Monochrome (block 
and white); Horizontal Resolu- 
tion 600 lines or better; 2:1 Inter- 
lace (not Random); Low light 
sensitivity 10 lux or 10 footcon- 
dles; ALC ratio of 100,000:1 (or 
close); Full range of contrast 
(there Is no spec for this). 

Use a monochrome camera. 
It'll be easy to find one match- 
ing these specs that will still be 
affordable. Home video cam- 
eras typically have a resolution 
of only 250 lines. Color cameras 
with acceptable resolution cost 
about $50001 Since the resolu- 
tion of the computer is about 
700 lines, your camera should 



meet or exceed that number 
Without 2:1 interlace your pic- 
tures will hove Jagged lines, The 
low light sensitivity is only impor- 
tant if you'll be digitizing with- 
out extra lighting. The ALC ratio 
gives you an idea of the range 
of lighting conditions the cam- 
era will operate under (Auto- 
matic Light Compensation). A 
good camera should be capa- 
ble of creating a picture that 
has very black areas at the 
same time as white areas. If the 
contrast range is not as wide as 
possible, then then picture will 
appear to lose detail. In fact, 
this is more important than the 
resolution specs. Think of plac- 
ing a white pixel between two 
black pixels, Viewed from a dis- 
tance, the transition from dark 
to light will appear to be sharp. 
If the outer pixels were gray, 
then the transition would not 
look as sharp. This effect occurs 
regardless of the camera's res- 
olution. Many of the cameras 
normally sold with Digi-View 
have a problem with contrast 
range. Newer cameras have 
recently appeared that cost 
about the same but work 
much better due to newer 
technology. My personal 



20 mUFm Sept/Oct 1988 



your files, because of ihcir relatively 
small size. 

If you find yourself needing a color 
that's not in the palette, then try using 
Butcher or Pixmate to merge a couple 
of colors together. This will often free 
up a color or two with little to no no- 
ticeable loss. In fact, if you know ahead 
of time that you'll need a color or two 
to use for something else, use the palet- 
te selector in Digi-Vicw to deselect a 
color or two. This will force Digi-View 
to create an image to your specifica- 
tions in the first place. Butcher, Pixmate 
and Deluxe PhotoLab will also allow 
you to modify and improve your image. 
Few photographers just snap a picture 
and leave it at that. Don't your pictures 
deserve a little extra effort? 



PRACTICE SELF-CONTROL 

The conuols for altering the picture 
are your last chance for changing the 
image before saving it to disk. While 
you can use other programs to alter the 
image later, you need to remember that 
these programs have only the saved pic- 
ture to use as data. While in the DIS- 
PLAY menu of Digi-View you are still 
using the exposure data to create the 
picture from the original RGB data 
each time you display. Only adjust one 
thing at a time ! Excuse my shouting, 
but I can't emphasize this enough! Do- 
ing otherwise will make for changes 
that you'll be hard prcs.scd to attribute 
to any particular control. And make 
small changes each lime, not large ones. 
Here are some hints to get you started: 



recommendation for a camera 
is the RCA TC701 h v»/hich retails 
for less than $3CXD, 

LENSES 

Most of the cameras you'll 
look at have cheap lenses. The 
glass is not color-corrected, 
which causes a focus shift with 
color changes, and the f/stop 
is fixed, causing you to rely on 
the camera's ability to adjust 
to the light. It also may not give 
you the magnification you de- 
sire. One solution is to buy a 
real photographic lens that will 
fit your camera. Most video 
cameras use what is called a 
"C" mount. Find yourself a Spira- 
tone photo catalog (check out 
the ads in a photo magazine). 
Look for lenses that use a 
mounting system called the T 
mount" system. It is really a sys- 
tem of adaptors. After finding 
the lens that strikes your fancy, 
check further into the catalog 
for the "T" mount adaptor to a 
"C" mount lens. These lenses 
are usually color-corrected, 
sharp, and hove adjustable 
f/stops: all good things. Several 
lenses are offered that have 
"macro" capability to enable 
very close focusing. If you wish 
to digitize slides, this catalog 
has several adaptors that will 



easily let you do just that (but 
don't get the ones that use a 
"flash" unit!). 

FILTERS 

Although everyone curses 
the pieces of plastic that come 
with Digi-View, I've just com- 
pleted tests that show that they 
don't distort the Image as 
much as expected. If you wish 
truer color filtration, you could 
try regular photo filters from Ko- 
dak, Tiffen or Nikon. I've tried 
all three. Although the color 
might hove been a bit better, 
oil the filters reduced the im- 
age resolution by about 50 
lines. I found no appreciable 
difference in the sharpness of 
the pictures nor any distortion, 

LIGHTING 

Available light is nice and 
soft, but rarely bright enough 
to bring out details in the dark 
areas. Your camera has to 
work too hard to moke a pic- 
ture. Use extra lighting, but 
don't get it too harsh or too 
close. Lights with diff users work 
best. Florescents con provide 
a nice, even light but it takes a 
lot of them. The farther back 
you place a light the more 
wattage you need. Use a 
copy stand or a tripod to 
make sure that the camera is 
"rock" solid! Any wiggle will dis- 
tort the picture! O 



I've always found that Digi-View 
tends to create a picture that's a little 
too dark. Check out the darker areas of 
the pic. Do you sec ilie detail there or is 
it hidden? Raise the Brightness until it 
becomes visible. HAMs tend to repro- 
duce blues well, but if you'll use the 
same picture d:ita to make a 32 color 
picture you'll find that the blue has all 
but disappeared. I haven't the foggiest 
idea why this happens, but I often find 
myself tweaking the blue level up 
.somewhat. A little bit more Sharpness 
sometimes helps as well. Experiment 
like crazy but I think you'll find that 
conservative settings are usually the 
best. 

The real key to learning to use Digi- 
View is to minimize the amount of pro- 
cessing that the software has to do. But 
also remember that every picture won't 
turn out 10 be a "great" shot. Don't flog 
a dead horse. Either admit it won't get 
any better and save it, or delete it. With 
the proper choice of equipment, tech- 
nique and subject material you'll rarely 
go wrong. 

SAY CHEESE' 

Your granddad used a Kodak Brown- 
ie, your parents used an Insuimatic, and 
now you've got your Amiga. Your 
photo album might someday be fillctl 
witlt microfloppies! The family heir- 
loom may turn out to be a 40 meg hard 
drive. Even the least talented of us can 
now make wonderful images. Those 
more gifted will revel in the freedom 
the computer now gives them. One can 
only imagine what Leonardo DaVinci 
could've done if he'd had an Amiga: 
"..So I tell her 'Don't move while itsa 
scanning!' . And wfiadda slie do? She 
smiles just as the scan crosses her face! 
Now whadda I do with a picture of her 
with a half a smile? I tell you Mona 
Lisa II never work in this town again!" 



ABOUT THE 
AUTHOR: 

Oran Sands is 
the Eductional 
Media Special- 
ist for a Major 
Metropolitan 
Hospital in 
Indiana, which 
means he gels 
to play with lots of video equipment 
and get paid lor it. He is by ac- 
claimation the Amiga community's 
premiere digitizer of nudes, cars, 
nudes, motorcycles, and nudes. 




mwm Sept/Oct 1988 










Ij^^^M*^*^ J 












per «..:«,»wj*r~ -^^ 





j=j»^ 




is five years old. It 
hardly seems possible. 
We've produced 22 
issues in that time, starting out as a 
quasi-quarterly and ending up a 
rock-solid bimonthly. Over the years 
we've talked about a lot of fun things, 
and used a variety of equipment, 
software, and tricks to help us produce 
this feisty little mag we call INFO. We 
thought we'd take a few pages to share 
some of the high points of INFO's first 
five years with you. 



BEFORE THE BEGINNING 

Benn has laid out the early history of 
the Cyborg Gazzciie, the newsletter that 
preceded INFO, pretty solidly in his 
iwo-part History of INFO in issues #15 
and #16.(1 heartily recommend it to 
anyone thinking about starling his own 
magazine.) Anyone who owns an origi- 
nal Cyborg Gazzette has a real rare 
item--we'vc only got one copy of each 
ourselves.* 

The first Cyborg G;iz/.citc was little 
more than a compendium of magazine 
ads, photocopied with hand-scrawled 
comments from Benn. By issue #2, he 
had added U"ansfcr-leiier titles, and 
some of the text was dot-matrix printed 
using a C64, the Toil Text wordproccs- 
sor, and a modem-interfaced Texas in- 
struments Silent 700 printing terminal. 
Issue #3 of the Cyborg Gazzette began 
to approach what INFO was to be. It 
featured neatly-arranged columns of 
software listings in categories, with 



* But, I'm happy to say, for those of 
you interested in INFO history, we've 
made all three issues available on a sin- 
gle microfiche. If you'd like to see what 
INFO looked like before it was INFO, 
you can get the microfiche for $5.50 
from our Backissue Dept. (that's Judi). 
In fact, all of our backissues, even the 
ones thai are sold out in print editions, 
are available in microfiche. (Most li- 
braries have a microfiche reader, and 
you can make full-size paper photo- 
copies from the films.) See the back- 
issue ad elsewhere in this issue for 
availability of paper backissues. 



product "star-ratings"-a rciil Product 
RoundUp! WordPro 3+164 and a Gemi- 
ni- 10 printer were his tools. 

INFO 64 #1 

The cover of INFO 64 #1 (Fall 1983, 
S2.50) was produced using dry transfer 
lettering, grid 
paper, and col- 
or screen pho- 
tographs, all 
hand- 

assemblai witli 
scissors and 
glue. The IN- 
FO 64 logo and 
illustrations 
were done with 
Sorcerer's Ap- 
prentice and 
photographed 
off the 1701 
monitor screen 
using a Pentax 
35mm camera. 
On the contents 
page, Benn 
stated INFO'S policy of "using Com- 
modore products exclusively and exten- 
sively in our production and manage- 
ment", a policy we havn't strayed from 
since. The pages of this first issue were 
produced with WordPro and a Gemini- 
10. 

In the "Random Access" section we 
talked about die Executive 64, "coming 
soon" from Commodore; CBM renamed 
it the SX-64. Benn reviewed Calc Re- 
sult and Sorcerer's Apprentice, and Ar- 




by Fuller (who was that guy?) rated 
FlexiFile. The Gallery covered twelve 
C64 games in three pages; lop-rated at 
five stars was Jumpman from Automat- 
ed Simulations (later renamed Epyx). 
Also in the Gallery were Sierra On- 
Line's Frogger and UMI's Motor Mania 
(on cassette only). A 700-1- entry Product 
RoundUp filled out the rest of the 48 
pages. Since there were no databases up 
to compiling a RoundUp in 1983, it was 
put together and printed using WordPro. 

INFO 64 #2 

The cover of #2 (Winter 83/84) featured 
a colorful gridwork graphic produced 
with Koala Painter. The image of Benn 
on the contents page was the first C64- 
digitizcd image to appear in a national 
magazine. It was digitized using the Mi- 
cron Eye, a S295 CCD device from Mi- 
cron Technologies. 

There were now six pages of Gallery, 
arranged in the familiar 6-picture, 6- 
blurb format we still use. Donkey Kong 
and Q*Bert from AtariSoft (on car- 
tridge!) were top-rated at five stars. In 
"Product News" we said nice things 
about a new com- 



First published digitized photo 
on a Commodore 64: the 
'publisher as captured by the 
Micron Eye Camera. "I feel 
so... so... so LO-RE$r 



pany: Electronic 

Arts. We also 
made our first 
mention of the 
ill-fated "Apple 
Emulator" for the 
C64. There were 
reviews of 

Inkwell's Fle.x- 
idraw and Ultra- 
BASIC from Aba- 
cus Software. 
Benn ended up 
using short Ullra- 
BASIC programs 
to generate the 
headers and titles 
for much of issue 
#2. On page 22 is 
a very rare thing for INFO: a BASIC 
type-in program! This 54-line listing 
produced an arcade-style driving game 
called "Crash", written by Hans Grage. 
Issue #2 also debuted the famous INFO 
Ergcard reference cards; the first tlircc 
were for Gemini- 10 printer codes, BA- 
SIC 2.0, and WordPro 3+. The rest of 
this issue's 72 pages were consumed 
with the RoundUp, which now weighed 
in at over 1000 C64 products. 



DMFE) Sept/Oct 1988 23 



INFO AT FIVE 



continues 




INFO 64 #3 

Listed on the masihead as producLS used 
to produce INFO 64 #3 (Spring 1984, 
$2.95) were Paint Magic, Doodle!, 
WordPro 3+164, and the Star Delia-lO 
dol-malrix prinlcr. 

Pinball Consiruciion Set from EA 
got five stars in the Gallery, and in 
News & Views we reported the first ru- 
mors of the coming C128. Our CES re- 
port featured a look at the new Com- 
modore "264" (renamed the Plus/4 by 
CBM) and "V364" (never released) 
computers, and we ran a photo of the 
One Millionth Commodore 64. Despite 
our positive review of the SX-64, Com- 
modore never sold many of them; they 
arc a prizcti collector's item now. My 
own first review for INFO graces pages 
34 and 35: I gave 4+ stars to C64 Forth 
from Performance Micro Products. 
Bcnn rated C64 Superha.se a perfect 
five stars. Hans Gragc's lypc-in LOGO 
version of "Lunar Lander" has the dis- 
tinction of being the only type-in 
LOGO arcade game program ever to ap- 
pear in a Commodore magazine! Wc 
presented our first contest (with a prize 
of S64 cash moncyl) in this issue: "De- 
sign the C64+". Ergcards were included 
for Super base 64, Doodle!, and LOGO. 
The RoundUp rounded out ilic page- 
count to a fat 104 pages. 

INFO 64 #4 

So far, INFO 64 had been available only 
on newsstands. Our new subscription 
rate was S9 for 4 issues (one year). The 
RoundUp (well over 1000 entries) was 
produced using Superbase; we used Pa- 
perclip for everything else. This issue 
ran 112 pages, and included two 
Ergcards for Paperclip and one for Ea.sy 
Script. No cover date appeared on is- 
sues #4 through #7; Benn's brother 
Scott joined INFO 64 as Senior Editor 
for issues four and five. 

PASS from Parabola got five stars in 
the Gallery, News & Views has the first 



mention anywhere of the 
"Mac-VIC", or "Amiga". 
The rumor wc u^ackcd down 
had most of the details right 
(68000 cpu, 4-voice sound, 
4096 colors, etc.), except for 
the "80 columns on a stan- 
dard TV set" and the "built- 
in wordprocessing and 
spreadsheet". "Synful 

Sounds" was Peggy Herring- 
ton's first article for INFO 
64. On page 27 was an ex- 
amination of Flight Simula- 
tor I J from subLogic, along- 
side its compcliuon from 
MicroProsc, Solo Flight. Wc 
liked 'cm both. Our "Design 
the 64+" contest winner 
came up witti a machine 
both surprisingly like the fu- 
ture A500, and in many 
ways far beyond it! Wc an- 
nounced anotlicr contest in 
this issue, but (perhaps not 
surprisingly) wc got not one 
single entry for the "Elec- 
tronic Lava Lite Program" contest! 

INFO 64 #5 

All graphics for #5 were printed using 
our great new C, Iloh 8510 dot-matrix 
printer, and the text was .set using 
Brother's HR-35 daisywhecl printer. 
Nobody complained anymore about IN- 
FO 64 being hard to read! Benn was 
still using Paint Magic for tlie color 
cover art, and wc were now using Flex- 
idraw for article titles and headers. Is- 
sue Five looked great, except... we tried 
using a Kiron electronic video imaging 
system to lake color screcnshots direcdy 
from video output, and the Gallery pho- 
tos looked just plain gaudy! Wc had 
been getting much better results with a 
35mm camera, and that's what wc went 
back to on issue six. The masthead list- 
ed a new Associate Editor: Mark R. 
Brown. 

In News & Views, we celebrated INFO's 



(miUurssTr cm [ottedib:^ 



DESIGN THE 

64+ 




Wiliiiu 'gjijci^ 



' IJJ^ HU )KJ I 



Vi:i*im:HWW:j^ 



*l LC- fit ( tlWIta Wn » IH". 

=j tit. I m iii-ji'. ii iin;rn n i 



!!:Cj7} rlTl S.'i-^l i 



■ly-'nsr.iH vtiueat. 



r-iniHii n^wiTJ 



am lUTTH HTtiK ft 



t. a!sc-tM.itn* M 



■. **i? iroi M^ M 



The winning entry in INFO=64's 
first contest, "Design ttie 64+" 



survival of the "Great Computer Maga- 
zine Shakcout". Benn's dirce-page drub- 
bing of Commodore's Plus/4 (along 
with the "Dinosaur-Edscl-Pius/4" 
Doublc-Take) probably did more than 
anything before or since to cement IN- 
FO's reputation as the definitive source 
of honest Commodore product reviews. 
Just for balance, wc offered a Plus/4 as 
a contest prize! There were Ergcards for 
Flight Simulator II. F-15 Strike Eagle, 
and COITAL 0.14. Number Five ran 92 
pages, with a shorter RoundUp Update 
rather than a complete Product 
RoundUp. 

INFO 64 #6 

Rather than computer art, we used pho- 
tos of Commodore's two new comput- 
ers on the cover of #6: the CI 28, and 
the LCD laptop. The background grid 
was gone, replaced by a variable-shade 
paper. With #6, wc began running digi- 



24 M\Fm Sept/Oct 1988 





a 




G 



- another 

bright idea!) 




tizcd photos created using the C64 ver- 
sion of Compuiercyes from Digital Vi- 
sion. The masthead added Marty Amor- 
in as INFO 64's new Data Manager. 

Pitsiop II and Monty Plays Scrabble, 
both from Epyx, grabbed fivc-siar rat- 
ings in the Gallery. On the Editor's 
Page, Benn evaluated other computer 
magazines. His favorite? The Whole 
Earth Review. We were real excited 
about the CI 28 and the LCD portable 
(and still think the LCD would have 
been a hoi item). Wc also took some 
early potshots al the new ST, which 



Atari had shown at the 
same CES Show. Don 
Vande venter, who later 
founded Money Machine 
Magazine, conlribulcd 
"Home-Made Money", an 
article about making a 
profit with your Com- 
modore 64. I wrote a rare 
tutorial on C64 assembly 
language, and reviewed 
the C64 CP/M cartridge. 
We had another unwanted 
Plus/4, so we ran a "Win a 
Plus/4-Second Chance" 
contest. Ergcards were for 
the C. Iloh 8510, Com- 
puServe, and COM- 
PUTE! 's type-in wordpro- 
cessor, Speedscripl 3.0. 
The Round Up was omit- 
ted, to appear instead "pe- 
riodically". 

INFO 64 #7 

The cover of INFO 64 #7 was a mon- 
tage of color product photos surround- 
ing a colorful computer graphic created 
entirely with CBM character graphics 
on the C128's 80-column screen! 

Number Seven was overwhelmingly 
a "C128" issue; there was Benn's 
"hands-on" evaluation of the C128 (he 
loved it); our CES report featured the 
CI 28 prominently; and a multi-page 
CP/M .section provided a CP/M 3.0 tu- 
torial and a nine-page CP/M Product 
RoundUp! Even the Ergcards were 
strictly C128-spccific, with two cards 
for BASIC 7.0 and one for CP/M 3.0. 
Of course, no C128 software existed 
yet, so there were no C128 software re- 
views. Commodore's Sky Travel and 
Epyx's Chipwiis earned five-star ratings 
in the Gallery, and Benn wrote a glow- 
ing review of llic clever Gcrman- 
cnginccrexl Fischenechnik Robotics 
Lab. Our compiirison of seven disk 
copiers on page 30 was a landmLirk; tra- 
dition (and advertisers) generally dictat- 
ed that copier reviews were "hands off 
for computer magazines. Otlicr land- 
marks for issue #7 included the debut of 
Brian Redman's popular cartoons, our 
first rumor column, "the INFOrmer, by 
Buddy Hacker", and on page 47, the 
first-ever publishe<l photo of an Amiga 
scrccn--with a 3D cube caught in mid- 
spin! 




The first published photo of an 
AMIGA screen display! 



INFO #8 

Because of the debut of not one but two 
exciting new Commodore machines- 
ihe C128 and the Amiga-issue #8 
(Scpt-Oct 85, S3.60) was no longer 
called "INFO 64". We were now simply 
"INFO". The new logo was rendered 
with Flexldraw on the C64. Gracing the 
cover was the winning picture from IN- 
FO's graphics contest, a colorful rooster 
drawn with Animation Station. Also on 
the cover: a photo of Commodore's new 
Amiga computer. 

The masthead of #8 listed a new Se- 
nior Editor: Mark R, Brown, no longer 
just a free-lancer, but a salaried full- 
time employee. The Gallery this issue 
consisted of a single page full of Amiga 
press-release product photos. Benn's re- 
port on the gala Amiga unveiling in 
New York included loLs of pictures and 
plenty of "gee whiz". Without so much 
as a real Amiga in hand, wc cut loose 
with several pages of impressions, spec- 
ulations, and revelations about Com- 
modore's new toy. It was tempered with 
a page of "Amiga: Things We'd {Al- 
ready] Like to See". The centerfold fea- 
tured an overwhelming 2-pagc Reader 
Survey card, and the massive Product 
RoundUp section (C64, CI 28, and 
Amiga) ran the pagccount to 160 
pagcs-our biggest issue ever. 

INFO A T FI VF continues on page 68 



m\:Fm Sept/Oct 1988 25 



^£)A4/W « 



Consumer 

Electronics 

Show 

by Mark R. Brown 

The middle level of McCormick 
North at ihe Chicago Consumer Elec- 
tronics Show contained nothing but 
computers and videogames this year. 
No longer relegated to a few square feet 
hidden behind the telephone displays 
(as they were last year), the computer 
section looked healthy; leaner and 
mearier than in its heyday, but healthy, 
nonetheless. 

A quick survey of the show floor re- 
vealed that much of computerdom's vi- 
tality is due to the upsurge in the 
videogame market. Nearly a third of the 
floorspace was occupied by Nintendo's 
massive booth, and SEGA's booth 
brought the total up to over half. By the 
time I added in small third-party games 
companies and the purveyors of joy- 
sticks, it became apparent that comput- 
ers covered only about a third of the 
display floor. But several major players 
(Mcdiagcnics-formerly Activision, 
Psygnosis, Sierra On-line, Mjistertron- 
ic) occupied conference rooms in the 
lower level, and many others (Electron- 
ic Arts, Cinemaware, Berkeley Soft- 
works, subLogic) chose to operate out 
of suites in downtown Chicago hotels. 
And all were offering loads of new 
Commodore and Amiga games! 

EVENTS 

We assume that Chicago homc- 
towncr Mindscape's disco party was a 
big success this year-it always is, and 
tickets (a limited number, thanks to the 
Fire Marshal) are hard to come by. But 
after a long day on our feet at the show, 
we opted out. 

Megalithic software distributor 
Computer Software Services held 
their gala at the Shcdd Aquarium again. 
Though it was a hit last year (and this 
year, too, by all accounts), INFO 
staffers again took the low road, ending 




up at a quiet little Italian restaurant near 
O'Hare Airport. Joining us were INFO 
regulars Jim Oldfield and Bob Baker 
and their wives Debbie and Cathy, and 
the Senior Editor of Twilight Zone mag- 
azine, Tappan King. The food was 
great, the coversation stimulating, and 
the wine mellow. 

The great disappointment of this 
year 's CES social calendar (and the rea- 
son Benn stayed home) was the exclu- 
sion of Infocom's annual "Jazz Under 
the Dinosaur" party at the Field Muse- 
um of Natural History. This event has 
been the highlight of past CES shows, 
but Infocom boss Joel Bcrcz told us that 
they have, instead, scheduled a rollout 
parly for July in San Francisco. Let us 
hope that next year they reconsider, and 
reinstitute this marvelous CES tradition. 

THE ENEMY CAMP 

The first thing I saw when stepping 
off the escalators at CES was the medi- 
um-sized Atari booth, with its Jericho- 
high walls built of VCS 2600 game ma- 
chine boxes. Inside the booth were 
videogames galore-but no ST comput- 
ers! Playing to the overwhelming theme 
of CES, Tramiel and sons opted to 
leave the computers in Sunnyvale and 
just bring the videogames. Gathered 
groups of eager videogame dealers 
could occasionally be heard from that 
comer of the hall chanting 
"Atari!. ..Atari!" over the general din of 
the CES crowd. But, aside from Atari's 
booth itself, it was apparent that the 
majority of the videogame third-party 



support was going the way of Nin- 
tendo, with rival Sega, not Atari, a 
close second. Even Atari was getting in- 
to the act, with its recently-established 
Tengen division porting Atari classics 
like Pac-Man to the Nintendo system. 

EPYX 

Epyx's (415-366-0606) booth was a 
little bigger than Atari's. The high 
points? Dealers putting for prizes, and 
Amiga guru R.J. Mical prowling in an 
Olympics sweatshirt. And there are a 
ton of new game offerings coming this 
year from Epyx for C64 and Amiga 
gamesters. The Games-Summer Edi- 
tion, a simulation of eight events from 
the upcoming Seoul Summer Olympics, 
includes data for top competing 
athelclcs. The C64 version is due third 
quarter, Amiga, fourth. Street Sports 
Football is coming for both machines. 
Again, the C64 version comes out first. 
The Legend of Blacksilvcr is for the 
C64 only. Epyx simulates mountain 
climbing with Final Assault for C64 
and Amiga in the third quarter. Mind- 
Roil is a 3D mazerace for C64 only. 
Epyx will be doing a computerized ver- 
sion of the boardgame classic Battle- 
ship for both C64 and Amiga, complete 
with digitizctl sound effects. They will 
be importing seven of UlUsoft's titles 
from France; the first two will be Trials 
of Honor (adventure) and Ice Thrashers 
(arcade) for Amiga and C64. New U.S. 
Gold tides, also from Europe, are Tech- 
nocop (C64), Tower Toppler (C64 and 
Amiga), and Sports-A-Roni, a sports 



26 \m^m Sept/Oct 1988 



HOW DEPORT 



game parody for both computers. Epyx 
also introduced a C64 productivity tide; 
Home Video Producer for itie C64 pro- 
vides ten prc-built video tilling cinimai- 
cd sequences that you can "personalize" 
for use in home videos, and it gives you 
the tools to build your own sequences 
as well. 

MEDIAGENIC 

Mediagenic's (415-329-0500) cup 
runneth over. Their Activision division 

is releasing Rampage, a translation 




Advanced Dungeons and Dragons from SSI. 



from the Bally Midway arcade hit, for 

the C64 in October. Predator, based on 
the Schwarzenegger movie, is coming 
in September for the C64. Another C64- 
only title is a simulation of a naval mis- 
sile carrier; U.S.S. Ocean Ranger 
should be available by the lime you 
read this. Activision also announced 
that four C64 tides will be moving to 
their S14.95-priced Solid Gold series: 
Aliens. Leaiiier Goddesses of Phobos, 
GBA Cimmpionship Basketball, and 
Championship Baseball. The Games- 
tar line adds iwo new sports titles for 
the C64, with Main Event (boxing) and 
Pete Rose Pennant Fever. The former is 
available now; the latter will be 
released in November. Interplay has 
two new titles; Battle Chess is an ac- 
tion/ graphics/ strategy game for the 
Amiga, and Neuromancer is the long- 
awaited graphic adventure for the C64, 
based on the William Gibson book of 
the same name. The demo we saw (on 
an SX-64!) showed only the real-world 
Ciba City action segment, though ex- 
tensive "Cyber-Space" sequences are 
promised in the release version. Mi- 
crolllusions was promising Turbo (a 



new "one on one" modem title). Craps 
Academy, Music-X, and Tracers (arcade 
cops-and-robbers) for the Amiga; all 
should be available by now. We've al- 
ready received a copy of their re-rcleasc 
of the C64 classic Sky Travel planeiari- 
um-on-a-disk, and we're very glad to 
sec this gem made available again! Also 
out for the C64 is MainFrame, a "beat 
the evil computer" adventure. Microll- 
lusions promises 45 new tides in the 
next year! Among them will be Amiga 
and C64 versions of games based on 
Hanna-Barbera charac- 
ters The Flint stones, 
The Jetsons, Scooby- 
Doo, and Johnny Quest. 
Absolute Entertain- 
ment announced three 
new C64 lilies. F-18 
Hornet is an air combat 
simulator; Crossbow is 
a translation of the Ex- 
idy arcade coin-eater; 
and Space, Garry 
Kitchen's latest, is a 64- 
planet space u-avelogue. 
Lucasfilm is following 
up their C64 hil Maniac 
Mansion with a sequel; 
Zack McKracken and the Alien Mind- 
benders is a humor- packed Uikeoff on 
yellow tabloid journal- 
ism. The demo wc wit- 
nessed had us rolling on 
the floor! The Amiga 
version of Black Lamp 
from Rainbird features 
very entertaining car- 
toon-style animation; 
it's also available for the 
C64. Enlightenment is 
an arcade / adventure 
game that will be 
available for both ma- 
chines. Carrier Com- 
mand (Amiga now, C64 
4th quarter) is a new 
21st Century naval war- 
fare simulator. Rainbird 
also promises Star glider H for the 
Amiga and C64. The demo we wit- 
nessed on the Amiga showed the speed 
and 3D solid modeling wc were hoping 
for in the original Starglidcr. It looks 
hoi! Wargamcrs will be ecstatic to 
know that Rain bird's Universal Mili- 
tary Simulator will be available soon 
for ihc Amiga. The Amiga version in- 



cludes digitized sounds and speech. 

ELECTRONIC ARTS 

At their suite in the Hyatt-Regency 
hotel, Klectronic Arts (415-571-7171) 
announced a passcl of new lilies, all 
from their affiliated labels. Arcadia's 
Rockford is an underground arcade/ ad- 
venture for C64 and Amiga. Roadwars 
offers both machine formats in a space 
arcade scenario. Their most unique of- 
fering packs ihrce arcade titles- 
Sidewinder, Xenon, and Blasta Ball-in 
a single S49.99 package for the Amiga 
called The Awesome Arcade Action 
Pack. DataSoft's latest is Cosmic Re- 
lief, a save-ihe-world adventure spoof 
for C64 and Amiga. Also in the offing 
is Napoleon in Russia (C64 only). The 
Strategic Studies Group also has two 
new ones. Reach for the Stars (3rd Edi- 
tion) is a game of stellar empire- 
building for C64 or Amiga. Rommel 
Battles for North Africa is coming for 
C64 only. SSI is delivering the first in 
their licensed series oi Advanced Dun- 
geons and Dragons titles for the C64, 
Pool of Radiance. A second title, 
Heroes of the Lance, will be available 
for both Amiga ;u:d C64. Interstel's 
contribution to the EA mix consists of 
three Amiga programs. First Expedition 



23 tnetwa. 



- TtMi Gultmaas Book 
of Morld Racorda 



Mavis Beacon Teaches Typing. 



is a futuristic adventure; Empire is a 
Risk-Wkc game of world conquest; and 
Gone Fishin is a realistic simulation of 
bass fishin'. Empire is available now, 
and the other two will follow by Sum- 
mer's end. Interplay has designed 
Wasteland (Hot-Mean-Radioactive), 
an adventure set in a posl-nuclear 
world. It's for the C64. Four new 



mwm Sept/Oct 1988 27 



HOW DEPORT 



continued 



boardgame adaptations are coming out 
from Virgin Games under their Leisure 
Genius line. An Amiga version of 
Scrabble will be one of the first. C64 
versions of Monopoly, Scruples, and 
RISK are due out soon, with Amiga ver- 
sions of Monopoly and RISK delayed 
until early next year. Apparently an 
Amiga Scruples is not planned (docs 
this mean that Amiga owners arc un- 
Scrupleous?) Last but not least. Paragon 
Software plans the arcade Master Ninja, 
and Twilighi's Ransom, a graphic text ad- 
venture, for the C64. On the non-game 
front. The Software Toolworks offers 
Mavis Beacon Teaches Typing in both 
C64 and Amiga formats. Needless to say, 
EA's suite was big! 

MINDSCAPE 

New from Mind.scape 
(800-221-9884) is Harri- 
er Combat Simulator, in 
versions for C64 and 
Amiga. Road Runner is 
an improved version of 
the European C64 game 
based on the Warner 
Bros, cartoon character. I 
played it for a bit, and it 
had much of the "look and feel" of be- 
ing in a cartoon. There is no Amiga ver- 
sion planned. Also C64-only is Club- 
house Sports, a fun little collection that 
includes Billiards, Shooting Gallery, 
Foosbail (my favorite), and Skeeball. 
Captain Blood is planned for both ma- 
chines. It's a point-and-click space ac- 
tion/adventure. Also on hand was Mind- 
scapes 's new Powerplayers Joy slick. It 
features a pislol-grip with trigger fire- 
button, and a top- mounted .short- throw 
joystick. Mindscapc's inexpensive 
Thunder Mountain line is offering a 
whole list of new titles. In the $14.95 
price category are Summer Challenge. 
Nam, Fortress, Battalion Commander, 
GeopoUtique 1990, and Super Pac-Man 
for the C64. Sutruner Challenge is also 
available for Amiga. At the lower S9.95 
price are MusicWriter, Jr Pac-Man, and 
Pole Position, all for C64 only. 

TAITO 

In Taito's (604-984-6623) booth near 
the back of the hall, they were answer- 
ing the question "What's a TAITO?", 
By year's end, they plan on releasing no 
less than nine new Commodore 64 ti- 




The C64 version of 
Arkanoid. 



ties, with Amiga versions of seven of 
them. The two C64-only programs are 
Alcon, a spacc-baitic arcade game, and 
the long-awaited C64 version of 
Arkanoid. For both machines, Taiio will 
offer Gladiator (Roman combat). Sky 
Shark (\^Wil air battle), and one of my 
all-time personal arcade favorites, QIX. 
(I can't wait for that one on the Amiga!) 
They'll also have the arcade hit Bubble 
Bobble, Rastan, a kings-and-casilcs ad- 
venture, Renegade, a karate-and-kung- 
fu battlefest, and Operation Wolf, a ter- 
rorist strike-force arcade action epic. 

OTHERS 

There were, of course dozens of other 
companies, each intro- 
ducing one or more new 
games for the C64 or 
Amiga, Here's a quick 
rundown of some of the 
more interesting ones. 

Mastertronic (714- 
631-1CX)1) is bringing 
John Elway's Quarter- 
back to market. Devel- 
oped by Melbourne 
House, this title is a 
home computer version 
of the coin-op Quarterback game 
(which, ironically, eats quarters and 
never gives ^vf. of them back). This one 
is C64-only. Coming from them in 
September is War in Middle Earth, a 
panoramic graphic adventure that will 
be available in C64 and Amiga versions. 
We expect 15 or so new C64 games 
from Mastertronic in the 
next few months, along 
with a half dozen or more 
new Amiga titles. Watch 
for a C64 version of Bar- 
barian from Psygnosis 
via Mastertronic. Also 
from Psygnosis is a real 
good-looking space 

shoot-cm-up for the 
Amiga called Aquaven- 
lure that features 3D op- 
ponents composed of 
spheres, including one that looks like a 
walking "Juggler"] Another hot 
prospect from Mastertronic for the 
Amiga will be Teenage Mutant Ninja 
Turtles, based on the incredibly success- 
ful comic book of the same name, 
Konami (312-595-1443) is busy 



the C64. They'll offer Contra, 
Rush' n' Attack, Jackal, and Boot Camp. 
Amiga versions will follow late this 
year. 

Baudville (616-698-0888) is translat- 
ing a point-and-click graphic adventure 
from the Apple IIGS to the Amiga; it's 
called Dream Zone. 

Spectrum Holobyte (415-522-3584) 
will be shipping their graphic adventure 
Dondra: A New Beginning soon for the 
C64. The demo we saw on die Macin- 
tosh showed smooth cartoon-style char- 
acter animation. They will also have 
two new Amiga titles: Bermuda Project, 
in which you arc a reporter investigat- 
ing Bermuda Triangle disappearances, 
and Solitaire Royale, which offers 8 
versions of the classic cardgamc. 

Warlock will be coming this Fall for 
the Amiga and the C64 from Three Six- 
ty (408-879-9144). It's an undcrworid 
adventure. 

Eidersoft (800-992-9198) is porting 
several non-game titles to the Amiga 
from the Atari ST. Pro Sound Designer 
is a sound sampling h:u-dware/ software 
package (SI 29.95); Mortville Manor is 
a talking graphic adventure; Pro Sprite 
Designer (S29.95) lets you design 
sprites and save the code in BASIC, 
machine language, or C source; Tempus 
(S49.95) is their "GEM-based text edi- 
tor"; Flash-Bak ($79.96) backs up hard 
disks; and Pro Draw (S399) is a 
12"xl2" Summagraphics graphic tablet 
with mouse emulation software. 

Two new C64 titles will be debuting 
soon from Avalon Hill 
(800-638-9292). Com- 
bots is a tactical battle 
simulator using 

Japanese-style robots you 
design yourself, and Ml 
has you commanding a 
squadron of MI battle 
tanks in the Persian Gulf. 
Mancala is an ancient 
African "boardgiime" 
adapted to the C64 by 
California Dreams 

(408-435-1445). They'll make two oth- 
er new games available for both the C64 
and the Amiga; TrianGO, an 
interesting-looking u-iangular-grid adap- 
tation of the ancient Chinese game of 
GO, and Club Backgammon. 

Scorpion (201-663-0202) will have 
porting their Nintendo system games to five new C64 titles by Summer's end. 




Bubble 
from 



Bobble 
Taito 



v„ 



28 OMPm Sept/Oct 1988 



HOW DEPORT 



gHOWJ^ 



Alien Destruction Set, Mandroid, Mas- 
terpiece, Super Tanks, and Terror. Mas- 
terpiece is a paint program, and Terror 
is a graphic adventure; the rest arc ar- 
cade games. Scorpion will have a like 
number of new Amiga lilies, with Black 
Shadow, Foundation's Waste, Phantasm, 
Attack On London, and / Ludicrous. 

First Row (215-337-1500) has a 
couple of fun-loving new games in ihe 
queue for ihe C64 and Amiga. 77i£ Twi- 
light Zone offers a new iwist on the 
graphic adventure genre— literally. Be- 
sides mind-bending graphics, it offers a 
Zone-style "twist" ending. The Amiga 
version is due first, with a C64 version 
this Fall. A sequel is already planned. 
Jackie Gleason's The Uoneymooners 
puts you in the pants of the Greai One 
himsc!f"Or any of the other Honcy- 
mooncrs characters. It's due tliis Fall for 
the Amiga only. First Row had the Hon- 
ey m Doners TV show sel in iheir booth, 
and yours truly had a ball putting on 
Ralph Kramdcn's Raccoon Lodge hat 
and doing a (very bad, except for the 
physique) Jackie Glcason impression. 

New from Capcom (899-843-4632) 
are seven arcade actioners for the C64: 
Tiger Road, Stacker, Sarge, Black Tiger. 
Bionic Commando. 1943, and Street 
Fighter. The last ihrec will also be 
available on the Amiga. 

Accolade (408-985-1700) has five 
new C64-only titles. Jet Boy is the latest 
in their S14.95-pricc Avanuigc series. 
Fast Break features 3-on-3 basketball 
action-ihc demo had some nice action. 
Serve & Volley simulates tennis; Rack 
'Em features a 3D perspcclivc view of 
the game of pool. Last but nol least, 
T.K.O. (boxing) features almost disgust- 
ingly realistic graphics-whcn you hil 
your opponent, he bruises. 

Blue Lion Software (617-876-2500) 
offers the educational Ticket to Holly- 
wood, the latest in their excellent "Tick- 
et To..." travel series. It wraps an adven- 
ture game around a realislic portrayal of 
the terrain of Hollywood itself. This se- 
ries can provide a pleasant prelude to an 
actual visit, as I proved lo myself by 
playing Ticket to Washington prior to a 
recent visit lo Washington, D.C. (1 even 
look along the included map of the D.C. 
Metro system!) 

In the Cinemaware (805-495-6515) 
suite, ihcy were showing an actual, 
completed Rocket Ranger for the 




The Pregarne Show from TV Sports Football. 



Amiga. It looked fantastic! Well worth 
tlic wait. Two other grcal-looking new 
Cinemaware titles are in the queue for 
the Amiga. Lords of the Rising Sun is a 
wargame set in feudal Japan, but it re- 
places the usual hex-grid with fantastic 
graphics and inlcrspersed action se- 
quences. 7V Sports Football is a realis- 
tic football simulation, done television- 
slylc. That means a pregarne show, 
clo.sc-ups of the crowd, the coach, and 
the chcerlcadcrs-everylhing but the 
beer commercials! The graphics are, of 
course, superb. 

Malt Blair's Fantasy Football 
League for the C64 can be had with an 
optional book. FFL lets you create your 
"perfect" team and take them all the 
way to Ihe SuperBowl using real foot- 
ball-season player statistics. A database 
area has been established on Com- 
puServe to help you keep your team up- 
to-date. Fantasy Basketball. Hockey, 
and Baseball are planned over the next 
few months. The games arc from MBI 
Software (612-8904528). 

Titus (818-709-3693) is following up 
Crazy Cars with two new Amiga tides. 
Off Siwre Warrior is a sea action arcade 
game, while Fire and Forget puts you in 
the cockpit of tlie "Thunder Masler-the 
world's ultimate fighting machine!" 

Intracorp's (305-252-9040) Murder 
on the Atlantic is available for both 
Amiga and C64, and there's a half mil- 
lion dollar contest for solving die 
crimes! 

Sierra On-Line is releasing Kings 
Quest IV: The Perils of Ro sella for die 



Amiga. It features a new improved user 
interface. The same interface will be 
used in the sequel (yeah!) to the hilari- 
ous Leisure Suit Larry In the Land of 
the Lounge Lizards. In Leisure Suit Lar- 
ry H: Lookin' for Love in Several Wrong 
Places, Larry wins the lottery and heads 
off for a wild cruise on the "Lovers 
Boat". Sounds like more wacky fun for 
Larry Laffer! Also in the wings for the 
Amiga: Gold Rush, Manhunter: New 
York, Police Quest II, and Space Quest 
HI. 

On the hardware side, Wico 
(312-647-7500) has a new joystick 
called the Ergostick that is made of soft, 
spongy rubber, molded to fit the hand. Ii 
feels weird, but might be just die ticket 
for wringing a few more points out of 
your favorite videogame. 

OIL UP YOUR JOYSTICKS! 

And so, as the sun sets silendy in die 
West, we bid a fond "Aloha" to die 
Summer Consumer Electronics Show, 
land of enchantment. If nodiing else, 
CES proved lo me that the home 
videogame revival is not just smoke. 
Say what you will about home 
videogame machines-truth is, when 
diey do well, software manufacturers 
jump on the bandwagon and produce 
scads more games for personal comput- 
ers, too. Whether or not this upsurge in 
the videogames market will have more 
staying power than the original fad is 
anyone's guess, but for now we can all 
just lay back, oil up the ol' joystick, and 
enjoy the glut! 




OMPm Sept/Oct 1988 29 




INFO'S Guide to the Best From the Rest 



We generally focus this column on the 
mainstream computer magazines, but 
there are many other publications out 
there that are worth consideration. This 
time, we're going start off with a look 
at a few titles that are a little off the 
beaten track. 

BRITISH MAGS 

Noel Russell, one of our Australian 
readers, was kind enough to send us 
copies of liircc of the British computer 
magazines: Commodore User [£38/yr. 
for foreign. Priory Court, 30-32 Far- 
ringdon Lane, London ECIR 3AU], 
ACE [4 Queen St., Bath BAl lEJ], and 
ZZAP! 64 [PO Box 10, Ludlow, Shrop- 
shire SYS IDB]. They arc fairly simi- 
lar, unabashedly game magazines, and 
use a lot more color and illustrations 
than what we're used to seeing. Many 
of the games are ones we're just now 
seeing here in the States, and some 
haven't yet been imported. Some of the 
copies we received had cassettes and/or 
premiums taped to the covers. [The ad- 
dresses are all in England.] 

ELECTRONIC GAME PLAYER 

For hardcore video gamers, this is die 
magazine to read. Devoted mainly to 
the arcade and cartridge machines, 
there is some computer coverage as 
well. This is also the place to find out 
who's posting the highest scores both in 
the arcades and out. There are lots of 
reviews, features on both the history 
and future of arcade-type games, and 
interviews with industry people. 
There's also a regular column of game 
lips. [Sl4.95/yr. 13020 Pinon, Eli- 
wanda, CA 91739. 714-899-1238.] 

HIGH TECHNOLOGY BUSINESS 

HTB covers everything from supercom- 
puters to VCRs, and it's fascinating 
stuff for high-tech junkies like us. It's 
mostly in the regular features and 
columns that we pick up little tidbits of 
pertinent info. For example, the July is- 
sue talks about diskless PCs, the grow- 
ing number of buyouts by the big de- 



fense contractors of smaller elecU'onics 
companies, and the latest in supercon- 
ductor dcvclopmenls, among other 
things. A couple of the most useful fea- 
tures are a digest of normally extremely 
expensive industry newsletters, and 
monthly charts of which companies are 
doing what to (and with) other compa- 
nies and how much money they're mak- 
ing doing it. [214 Lewis Wharf, Boston 
MA 02110. 617-723-6611] 

SCIENCE NEWS 

This weekly is about the only magazine 
that comes through our doors that Mark 
and I fight over. It's our main source of 
news on the superconductor front, as 
well as what's going on in basic com- 
puter research. There's a very interest- 
ing feature in the June 18 edition on 
what's being done to establish a nation- 
wide computer network. The project is 
likened to the building of the interstate 
highway system. [321 W. Center St., 
Marion OH 43305] 

VERBUM 

If you have a penchant for computer art, 
this is the magazine for you. It's the on- 
ly mag we've seen that addresses the is- 
sues of Art in the computer world. 
While it shows a heavy Mac bias, it 
does occasionally talk about tlie Amiga 
and even the C64. Issue 2.1 shows a 
couple of color C64 screens by Judge 
Schonfcld and his son Justin. It appears 
that the publishers are fascinated with 
the Amiga, but just don't know enough 
about it yet. Perhaps a few letters and 
art disks would enlighten them. [PO 
Box 15439, San Diego CA 921 15] 

VIDEOFAX 

We had the weirdest sense of dcja vu 
when this magazine covering high-end 
video was brought to our attention, and 
then it hit us: it has the same altitude 
INFO does. It's absolutely fanatical 
about its subject, and doesn't care who 
it offends with its honest reviews. There 
is no advertising and the cover price is a 
sleep S6.95, but if you're a world-class 



couch potato and need information 
about the latest in VCRs, Uuscrdisk 
players, and what they're used for, then 
this is the magazine for you. [PO Box 
481248, Los Angeles, CA 90048-9743] 



V! 



M>y! 



Comments made in the Art Gallery sec- 
tion of the July issue of Ahoy! are sure 
10 offend our Canadian neighbors. 
Ahoy! will be dropping its COMAL 
column as of the Sept. issue. The Au- 
gust Amiga User, as several other mags 
have done this time of year, hits hard on 
Amiga video. Mort the K looks at video 
digitizers and frame grabbers. Ahoy! 
has also announced its intention to pub- 
lish S AU issues a year. Contact Ahoy! 
for further details. 






Vol. 3 No. 5 features a hardware buy- 
er's guide that's full of specs and very 
complete. There's an intriguing article 
by Udo Pemisz about creating an inter- 
active startup-sequence. Reviews con- 
centrate mainly on assemblers, both 
commercial and PD. The July issue 
(yes, they've finally started dating the 
issues) spotlights video again, with lots 
of color shots. 




The July issue features a report on printers. 
Unfortunately, the sample printouLs they 
published look really bad. Whether ihcy 
were getting bad output or just bad repro- 
duction is impossible to tell. Sheldon 
Lcemon's handiwork is splattered all over 
the issue, with features on the Amiga work- 
station and the new devices in Workbench 
1.3. We love the photo of ihe AW staff in 
their beach gear. 



30 OK][F[D) Sept/Oct 1988 



AMIGA SENTRY"^ 

The July issue reviews (favorably) excel- 
lence! and WordPerfect Library, and in- 
cludes their Comdex report. 



BVTE 



The main problem with computer chauvin- 
ism is that it so severely narrows one's view 
of the world. The July issue theme is multi- 
tasking, but the Amiga is mentioned only in 
passing. Buried deep in the section is the 
quote "...ihe Amiga is at least partially re- 
sponsible for the rush to bring multitasking 
to other PCs." 

CMnmodone 



M 



G 



If you're about to lake the plunge into 
Amiga video, don't miss Matthew Leeds' 
article in the June issue. The results of Com- 
modore's graphics conlcst arc prominently 
displayed in a stunning 8 -page spread. John 
lovinc's coltimn in the July issue details 
building a tachistoscopc. (I had to look it 
up. It means a device for flashing a word or 
phrase for a fraction of a second, especially 
for speed -reading.) In the same issue there's 
a piece by Mark Jordan on writing programs 
for publication. He says "Benn Durmington, 
editor of INFO, kind of cheated. He just out 
and out started a magazine to assure that 
he'd get published." Just as wc suspected. 

COMPUTE! 5 G4ZE7/E 

The July issue features hard drives and the 
August issue looks at MIDI and includes a 
buyer's guide that looks fairly complete. 
The remainder of both issues is about as ex- 
citing as a big bowl of porridge. 

COMPUTER PLAY 

This is a new magazine; it debuted at Sum- 
mer CES, where wc arc told they brought 
30,000 copies lo hand out. It's billed as 'The 
Complete Guide lo Computer Games', and 
covers games for all computers. The review- 
ers are mostly familiar names; but Bob 
Lindstrom tells us that they listed him as 
Associate Editor without his permission, 
and he won't be writing for them again. 
We'll wait and see with this title. 



COMPUTE! 

Dull and lifeless as we usually find Com- 
pute!, do not, repeat, do not miss Arlan Lev- 
itan's Levitations column starting on the last 
page of the July issue. He had us rolling in 
the aisles with his wonderful solution lo the 
whole Apple/Microsoft brouhaha (it in- 
volves the WWF), as well as his conversion 
chart for "payback" items purchased by 
vengeful computer spouses. (For example, 
buying a game entitles Ehc spouse to a new 
pair of shoes.) His COMDEX report in the 
Augusl issue is equally hilarious. Someone 
apparently put a burr under Orson Scott 
Card's I/O port before he wrote his Game- 
play colunm. He latmches into a diatribe 
against game programmers for not being 
fair. (Did someone pass a law making life 
fair?) Also in the August issue, Compute! 
mentions Commodore's Colt XT clone, and 
even shows a picture. Either they printed the 
photo backwards, or Commodore has decid- 
ed that the disk drives and the keypad 
should go on the left. There's also an inter- 
view with head Commodroid Max Toy. 



Computer Shopper, since the buyout by Ziff 
Davis, has ceased publication of their PC 
Clones title. Direct competition with other 
Ziff Davis titles is given as a reason. The 
June and July issues of CS continue the se- 
ries on database managers, covering Aba- 
cus' DalaRetrieve and Precision's Superbase 
Professional in depth. 



RUN 



In the June issue. Run states that yes, they 
are going to continue lo be exclusively 8-bit 
and yes, the geoWatch column is back after 
being omitted during Run's format change. 
The type-ins include a forms generator and a 
couple of adventure-type games. The July 
issue looks at graphics and prints some of 
the best-but don't get excited over the Artist 
64 program some of the artists mention. It 
isn't available in the U.S. -we checked. 



HOME OFFICE COMPUTING 

This is the third name change in almost as 

many issues, from "Family Computing" to 
"Family & Home Office Computing" to 
"Home Office Computing". Using the same 
logic, you could change "Soldier of For- 
tune" magazine to "Wliccl & Soldier of For- 
tune", and then lo "Wheel of Fortune". We 
think some subscribers will be upset. Shay 
Addams, in the miniscule space allowed for 
his Commodore-specific column, says he's 
heard rumors of "internal or design 
changes" to prolong the C64's life. 

DISK MAGAZINES 

Dan Gutman takes a dim, if fun, view of the 
weather and the amount of discussion about 
it in his review o[ Accu-Weaiher Forecaster 
in V2 #1 of Uptime. Why Uptime would 
publish a review of a PC product in the 
Commodore version of their disk mag, 
though, is beyond us. In the same issue, 
Bruce Jaeger has a few unkind things to say 
about Manx's C compiler, the mostpertineni 
of which is the condescending documenta- 
tion, something we Commophiles see en- 
tirely too much of. V2 #2 conlains Mini- 
Golf, a miniature golf game ihat has a very 
good player interface. The game has a bug 
or two, like letting ihc ball escape the 
boundaries of the hole, but il plays ex- 
iremely well. [PO Box 299. Newport RI 
02840] 

Loadstar #48 marks the magazine's 4th an- 
niversary. Congrats! The issue conlains a 
well-done menu-driven DOS utility called 
Pop DOS wriitcn by Nick Peck. [PO Box 
30008, Shreveporl LA 71130] 
On the Amiga front, AMnews has gone bel- 
ly-up, owing money to lots of the people, 
but, fortunately, leaving behind only a few 
hundred unfulfilled subscribers. 
On a more cheerful note, Jumpdisk keeps 
on Cruckin', doing a great job. The June is- 
sue contains 'Perspectives' a strange pro- 
gram that displays impossible structures a la 
M. C. Escher. It shows jusl the bare outline, 
the areas of which can be color-filled by the 
user. There's a maddening maze game called 
'Pipeworks' that I've spent far too much 
time trying to solve. The screen is a jumble 
of plumbing-variety pipes that the player 
must guide a small disk through. They say 
it's possible, bul I'm not sure I believe them. 
[1493 Ml. View Ave, Chico CA 95926] 



miFM Sept/Oct 1988 31 



Amiga vs. Macintosh 



Mm nails 
twim mfmt 

with my 

tmmmmm 

you mm with 



*%** 



i^t 



W^^m,, 



with it?'' 



The opinions in this article are 
those of the author, and do not 
necessarily represent the opin- 
ions of INFO Magazine. We 
asl<ed Bob for a fair and impar- 
tial article based on his daily use 
of both a Mac and an Amiga, 
and that's what he gave us. 

-Mark & Benn 



When computer worshippers 
gaihcr for an irreverent ses- 
sion of hardware bashing, 
they seem guided by an unspoken and 
fallacious assumption: All computers are 
created equal, A well-designed computer 
will excel no matter what the task- 
games, art, spreadsheet, word process- 
ing, or file management. Wrong, silicon 
breath. Like any other work (or play) 
tool, micros are no more equal than 
hammers and knives. IBM PC-compat- 
ibles arc great litUc office tools; but have 
you ever uicd to play music on one? 

THE MENAGERIE 
In my home office, I'm sur- 
rounded by .seven different mi- 
cros representing all the major brands 
of personal computer. Some days I'll 
fire up the Atari ST; on other occasions 
the Apple IIGS gels a workout. A new 
shipment of review software almost al- 
ways means a jolt of AC current for the 
Commodore 128. When letter-quality 
printing is required, I turn to my PC- 
compatible Compaq and its daisy- 
wheel printer. And I keep an Atari 8-bit 
around for auld lang syne. 

But two of my computers invariably 
are turned on every clay, all day: tlie 
Apple Macintosh Plus and the Com- 
modore Amiga.* Each has of special 
strengths, each has its glaring weak- 
nesses. Between the two, I have a com- 
puting powerhouse of business acumen 
and creative muscle. But like any other 
pair of computers, the Mac and Amiga 
are not created equal. INFO's 16/32-bit 
computer comparison chart in the 
Nov/Dec 1987 issue gave an excellent 
and objective run-down on the compar- 
ative features of the Amiga 500/2000 
and Macintosh Plus/11. What follows is 
a far more subjective comparison based 
on the experiences of this Mac/Amiga 
user. It will probably infuriate Mac and 
Amiga users alike--an opportunity no 
writer can resist. 



* Unlike some less competent multi-machine 
software reviewers, Bob has resisted the 
temptation to name his computers, -Editor 



by Bob Lindstrom 



DESIGN DIFFERENCES 
The Mac and Amiga hardware 
and system software designs 
are suriking reflections of their creators 
and the conditions surrounding their 
births. The Macintosh is the brainchild 
of the Apple engineering staff, driven 
largely by the cheerleading of Apple 
Computer co-founder Steve Jobs. His 
vision was to create a one-piece com- 
puting appliance, primarily for the of- 
fice, that stressed compatibility over ex- 
pandability. This was a direct response 
to a condition in the Apple 11 world in 
which numerous third-party options and 
modifications created a hardware Tower 
of Babel. Any software developer had 
to support a chaotic range of add-on de- 
vices to ensure that his product would 
be useful to the largest segment of the 
Apple II community. The non- 
expandable Macintosh guaranteed that 
all Mac users had a common hardware 
configuration. Furthermore, the empha- 
sis on the Imagewritcr printer made it 
the Mac standard and established a di- 
rect and reliable relationship between 
the Mac's high-resolution, monochrome 
video display and the printed page. On 
top of this, Apple imitated and adapted 
the mousc/mcnu/icon Desktop interface 
developed at Xerox's Palo Alto Re- 
search Center (PARC). The result was 
the notoriously underpowered 128K 
RAM Macintosh with a single 400K 
disk drive and no expandability beyond 
an external disk drive. To add injury to 
insult, the menu/icon interface was fi- 
nal. There was no alternative way to 
control the system. Even mouse haters 
were locked into the Macintosh Find- 
er *s desktop. 

The Amiga initially was intended to 
become the ultimate game machine 
and, therefore, placed emphasis on 
high-quality sound and color graphics. 
Jay Miner, who supervised the engi- 
neering team, contributed a lesson he 
learned while designing the Atari 800: 
Provide custom chips to speed opera- 
tion and establish a unique machine 
identity. In the Atari 800, however. 
Miner also learned that his over- 
developed graphics routines could ham- 



32 m^m Sept/Oct 1988 



siring a creative programmer. The 
Amiga's chips were designed to permit 
a wide variety of sound and graphic al- 
ternatives. The Amiga team learned also 
from Apple's Macintosh mistiikcs. The 
Amiga 1000 easily could be expanded 
to 512K RAM (and more with the sin- 
gle cxpan.sion port); il had a double- 
sided, 880K disk drive; and it offered 
both a Mac-like desktop and a PC-like 
Command Line Interface (CLI). 

In the years since the Mac's introduc- 
tion, Apple has washed its dirty laundry 
in public, gradually reworking and re- 
designing its way toward the 
mature Macintosh Plus and the 
Macintosh SE. 

The press remained inexpli- 
cably permissive toward Ap- 
ple's stumbling and applaudctl 
generously each time that Ap- 
ple got one step closer to Mac 
reality. But the press and pub- 
lic alike put on their army 
boots and instantly started 
jumping on the shortcomings 
of the Amiga 1000, followed 
by swift tarantellas on the 
Amiga 500 and 2000. Some of 
the complaints were deserved, 
some misleading. In any case, 
like the Mac Plus/SE, the 
Amiga 500/2000 now repre- 
sents a mature version of the 
Amiga's vision of computing 
speed and graphic/sound supe- 
riority. 

Tl HE WORKPLACE 
Though Apple hard- 
ware is invariably 
under-engineered and underpowered, 
the Mac system software is among the 
most elegant and useful in the industry. 
The Macintosh Finder user interface 
truly achieves its goals: easy to learn 
and efficient to use. Fire up the Mac and 
you feci like you're behind the wheel of 
a Mercedes. Wherever your task, the 
Macintosh Finder is there as a helpful 
partner. Icons are automatically created 
when files are added to disk. Disk direc- 
tories arc quick and easy to summon. 
When a new floppy disk is placed in a 
Mac, the computer asks if you want it 
formatted single or double-sided. The 
system is rich with thoughtful details. 

By comparison, you may feel like 
getting out and jump-starling the Amiga 
Workbench. Though it can be produc- 



tive, Workbench lacks the cxu-as that 
abound in the Mac. Put a blank in the 
Amiga and it just tells you the disk is 
BAD:. Thanks loads. Amy. Throughout 
the Amiga Workbench the user is re- 
minded of ii5 limitations. The Amiga's 
mouse/ icon/ menu interface offers nei- 
ther the help nor the feci of productivity 
achieved in the Mac desktop. 

Through its Command Line Inter- 
face, however, ihc flexible Amiga per- 
mits detailed operations far beyond the 
scope of the Mac Desktop, Though CLI 
is confusing to the beginner, its numer- 




The Commodore Amiga 2000. 

ous commands - expandable via the 
Amiga's disk-based operating system - 
arc a playground for the experienced 
user. For the casual to moderate user 
more interested in productivity than mi- 
cro hijinx, the Mac Finder probably is 
the superior choice. However, for the 
frequent computer user who wants to 
turbocharge his working environment, 
the Amiga provides high-level potential 
not available in the Mac. 



H 



ARDWARE HEARTINESS 

You can learn a lot about the 
relative computing prowess of 
a computer by slaying within its desk- 
top interface. The Mac/Amiga inter- 
faces arc no exception. Like all Apple 
computers, the Macintosh shuns co- 



processors. Graphics, sound, calcula- 
tions - everything is handled by the Mo- 
torola 68000 of the Mac Plus, the Mac 
SE's 68010 processor or the Mac II's 
68020. In the Finder, Apple has em- 
ployed a few software graphic shortcuts 
to disguise the Mac's processing liabili- 
ties. For instance, when you move an 
icon, you move only an oiitlinc of the 
icon. The Amiga moves the entire icon 
image. On the other hand, window re- 
drawing takes place at comparable 
speeds on both systems (which seems to 
be more a flaw in the Amiga's system 
programming than an indica- 
tion of comparitivc system 
speed.) Some things can't be 
disguised, though. Bit-mapped 
text displays arc slower on ihe 
Mac than the Amiga. A Macin- 
tosh user usually waits some- 
what longer for a screen re- 
fresh than an Amiga user. The 
68010 in the Mac SE improves 
matters but il is not until you 
reach the heady computing 
(and financial) heights of the 
Mac II that the polish of Ap- 
ple's Finder interface finds the 
speed it genuinely deserves. 

The Amiga hardware is 
faster and more powerful. Un- 
fortunately, the often clumsy 
system programming and disk 
layout of the Amiga tends to 
eat up its edge in computing 
speed. Call up a directory on 
both the Mac and the Amiga 
and you'll wonder what's 
wrong with the Amiga. What is 
wrong is a patchwork operat- 
ing sysicm-blccding hunks of system 
and DOS code gathered from both sides 
of the Atlantic and stitchctl together. 
The Amiga OS remains to be optimized 
for truly satisfactory performance 
(though Commodore is making head- 
way with Workbench 1.3 and 1.4). On 
the plus side, the Amiga's operating sys- 
tem offers built-in support for such 
things as RAMdisks and virtual disks 
that are only available as shareware or 
public domain utilities on the Mac. 

Which brings us to multi-tasking. 
The Macintosh's new Multi-Finder of- 
fers a form of mulli-lasking within the 
constraints of Mac hardware perfor- 
mance. And, of course, concurrent 



0[N][F(D] Sept/Oct 1988 



Amiga vs. Macintosh 



continued 



program operation has been available 
on ihe Mac for years via the Switcher 
program which allows the user to alter- 
nate between several programs. 

The Amiga still stands alone in mi- 
crocomputer multi-tasking. Said simply, 
it remains the only affordable personal 
computer with ihc hardware design, the 
computing strength and the system soft- 
ware to effectively support multi- 
tasking. And those who argue 
that multi-tasking is unneces- 
sary filigree don't know what 
they're talking about. Once 
you've used the Amiga's multi- 
tasking, it's difficult to use 
computers without it. Period. 

An arcii where the Amiga 
straggles pathetically behind is 
in printer handling. Slow and 
awkward, the Amiga's past re- 
lationship with printers should 
be an embarrassment to Com- 
modore. The Workbench 1.3 
drivers address this problem. 
Still, the Mac and Imagcwriter 
I or II effortlessly produce hard 
copy at a speed and quality lliat 
shames the Amiga. 

In the area of hardware 
expandability, the Mac and 
Amiga rate side by side. Ex- 
pansion RAM, hard disk and 
other add-ons are equally 
available for both machines, despite 
the Mac's and the ASOO's semi-closed 
architecture. 

THE BOTTOM LINE 
Desktop Publishing? Buy a Mac. 
Home office? Buy a Mac, 
Database management? Buy a Mac. 
Fact is, with a two- to three-year head- 
start and a grudging acceptance even Ln 
the PC-dominated business community, 
the Mac stiinds head and shoulders 
above the Amiga in capable, impressive 
and polished business software. For in- 
stance, there simply is no Amiga 
spreadsheet that can compete with Mi- 
crosoft's Excel. Business purchasers 
who pass over the Mac in favor of an 
Amiga arc probably making the wrong 
decision. Unless their business involves 
graphic-intensive output, video applica- 
tions or design work, that is. 

If you need color imagery, Amiga is 
ihe affordable choice. While it is true 



that the Macintosh II can do stunning 
things, the first thing it does is stun your 
pockctbook. On many levels, the unex- 
pandcd Amiga 2000 can match the 
graphic functions of the Macintosh II at 
about one-third the hardware cost. In 
price-performance, Amiga is way out in 
front. For creativity - music and art ap- 
plications - the Mac walks strong but I 
frankly prefer the Amiga. 




The Apple Macintosh II. 

The Mac has been embraced by pro- 
fessional musicians as the best comput- 
er for controlling MIDI (Musical Instru- 
ment Digital Interface) instruments. 
Still, the Amiga's musical future sounds 
promising, with Dr. T's KCS (Keyboard 
Controlled Sequencer) now available 
and several terrific MIDI products on 
the horizon. And multi-tasking is a boon 
in MIDI applications: edit patches and 
change your sonics while you play your 
sequence. Fabulous, 

Visually, graphic artists won't find 
anything quite as impressive or af- 
fordable on the Mac as the Amiga's 
DeJuxePaint II from Electronic Arts, 
The Mac 11 is quickly closing in on the 
Amiga's graphic superiority, but at a 
premium price. 

In the Public Domain software arena, 
I judge the score about even. The older 
Macintosh boasts a larger volume of 
freeware and shareware; but there arc 
PD/Shareware products on the Amiga 



that arc among the most outstanding 
programming achievements to be seen 

anywhere. 

WHO TAKES THE MONEY 
Finally, there's more to the 
bottom line than the comput- 
er job at hand. The last consideration is 
whether you prefer to buy a computer 
from Apple or from Commodore. Apple 
is solid and accepted. Despite 
all its size and manufacturing 
force, Commodore remains an 
enigma in the industry, its for- 
tunes swinging as wildly as a 
crazed pendulum. The conser- 
vative computer user with an 
immediate business need 
should take the safe solution 
and buy a Macintosh Plus or 
SE. If graphics arc significant 
and price is no object, the 
Macintosh II has impressive, 
but as yet unrealized potential. 
The fortunes of the Amiga 
look much better now than 
they did six months ago and, 
without question, the Amiga is 
the most capable home/- 
consumcr computer available 
as well as the price- 
performance leader in sound 
and graphic vertical markets. 
And until the Mac II can step 
forward with more capable software and 
display hardware, the Amiga has no 
peer in the growing field of desktop 
video. Computer users with a bit of the 
pioneer spirit might want to rush out 
and buy an Amiga. The ride so far has 
been invigorating. The road ahead looks 
positively dizzying. 



ABOUT THE 
AUTHOR: 

Bob Lindstrom 
is an inter- 
nationally- 
acclaimed 
writer in both 
the Apple and 
Commodore 

arenas. He was recently voted 
Reviewer of the Year by the 
Software Publishers Association. 




34 miFm Sept/Oct 1988 



EYE ON EDUCATION 



by Dr. Elizabeth Kaspar 





In Ihe last issue, I wrote 
about the need for today's 
children to learn keyboard- 
ing (typing) no later than the ele- 
mentary' school years, because 
the use and number of school 
microcomputers is increasing so 
rapidly. There are now, in fact, 
more than two million micro- 
computers in our schools, a 
25% increase over last year; this 
trend is expected to continue. In 
response to that column, I heard 
from many parents and teachers 
asking what keyboarding pro- 
grams are the best. 

There are dozens on the mar- 
ket, falling into two categories: 
those that focus primarily on a 
disk-based program, and those 
that base instruction on a text- 
book. Programs on a disk- 
Keyboard Cadet by Mindscape, 
for exampie--are often highly 
motivating, with an arcade game 
motif. Their emphasis is on 
speed; disaster strikes if a word 
is not typed quickly enough. 

Most of these programs, how- 
ever, have two flaws, Even the 
advanced lessons include only 
short phrases. Thus, students 
get no practice on long sen- 
tences, much less paragraphs. 
Such practice is a necessity if 
the skill is going to reach mas- 
tery level. A second problem is 
that disk-based programs can- 



grade class in which each child 
had dots on his nails lo match 
those on the keys. This seemed 
a successful technique for em- 
phasizing the importance of cor- 
rect fingering.) Because the text 
is for younger children, its 
lessons are not as advanced as 
others. Order it from Barron's 
Educational Series, Inc., 250 
Wireless Blvd., Hauppage, N.Y. 
11788, $6.95. 



not emphasize correct fingering, 
so students often sacrifice fin- 
gering for speed. They don't 
achieve good long-term results. 

Keyboard Cadet has an inge- 
nious method to counter this 

problem somewhat. Periodically ^ ^ ,,. 

a spaceship appears, and the ($7.95 plus $1.50 postage. SeU- 

student has only a few seconds 



For children fifth grade level 
and above, a good book is Key- 
hoarding For Kids: Teach Your 
Child In Ten Easy, Fun Lessons 



to type in the home key row (AS- 
DF and JKL:). thereby receiving 
bonus points. This feat can be 
accomplished only if the fingers 
were already correctly placed. 

n spite of their flaws, disk- 
based programs are useful, 
especially for beginners, be- 
cause they make drill and prac- 
tice fun. But after a certain skill 
level is reached, they need to be 
supplemented by lessons that 
Include typing whole pages. 
Most text-oriented courses fill 
that need. 



I 



Counsel Press, Inc., 1303 N. 
Norlhgate Way, Seattle. WA.. 
98133). For still older children 
and adults, Keyboarding Skills: 
All Grades by Diana Hanbury 
King is excellent. I have seen 
this text used successfully both 
in a classroom setting and for 
home instruction. It Is $6.00 
from Educators Publishing Ser- 
vice, Inc.. 75 Moullon St.. Cam- 
bridge, MA. 

hese are just a few of the 
disks and books 

available, and more come 
on the market each month. Chil- 



T 



dren need encouragement to 
For fourth and fifth graders, I jearn to type and to use a word- 
recommend Kids Can Type. Too. processor. (Even children as 
It comes with adhesive-backed young as the third grade can 
textured dots for the home keys, use a wordprocessor such as 
and the drawings in the text are Bank Street Writer by Sunburst.) 
color -coded to match. I only The advantages, both in lime 
wish they had included colored saved and quality of output, wUl 
dots to put on the fingernails! (I contribute to thetr school suc- 
have actually seen a fourth cess. 

Dr. Elizabeth Kaspar is professor of Educational Psyciiology in ihe College of 
Education at Western Illinois University. She has also been a teacher of 
upper elementary grades, and still comes down from her ivory tower 
regularly to worl< with real teachers and children. 



CKlFmi Sept/Oct 1988 35 



NEWS AND 

COMMODORE NEWS 




Commodore has hired Ihc fonncr 
President of Franklin Computer, Joel 
Shusicrman, as the new Vice President 
of Markcling. He will be responsible for 
Ihc markcling of all of Commaiore's 
producLs in the U.S. It's loo early to tell 
what effect his hiring will have on mar- 
keting policies, though he docs have to 
answer to Max Toy and Irving Gould 
above him. We ccrliiinly wish him luck 
in his new position, and remind him that 
our phone number is in the front of the 
magazine if he wants any advice. 

We hear that widi Shusterman aboard, 
Rich Mclntyre will become more of a 
dealer and distributor liiison and less of 
a policy-maker. 

While we're on the subject of person- 



nel, folks we talk to say that Ken Wcbcr, 
who replaced Frank Leonardi, is doing a 
"wonderful job". 

Commodore slock has been strong in 
recent weeks, topping at SI2 a share. 
We wish we'd bought at undcr-S5! Vol- 
ume is also high; it hi i a one-year peak 
near the end of June. CBM's earnings 
are up, and that's driving trading. 

The Imagine Music Group, a leading 
computer inusic disU'ibutor, has signed 
with Commodore to disu-ibute Amiga 
500s into the music market. The agree- 
ment will gel the A500 into almost 1000 
new stores. 

If you bought a 1541 recently, you 
got GEOS, too. Now CBM is bundling 
it with ilic 1541 as well as the 64C. O 



NEW AMIGA PRICES 

Commodore has announced new 
prices for the A500, A2000, and PC 
clones, effective July 1. Industry 
shortages and price hikes on DRAf^Jl 
chips are the cause. The A500 now 
sells for $799, an increase of $100, 
and the A2000 retails for $2199, 
$200 more than the previous price. 
List prices of the C64 and CI 28. 
which use static, not dynamic, 
RAM, are unaffected. 

CBM is also running distribution 
deals that should result in some 
lower street prices for the C64 -- 
bundled in a system, suggested re- 
tail may be as low as $149. The 
deal is said to be fueled by a desire 
to compete more closely with Nin- 
tendo's home videogame system.© 



EIGHT-BIT NEWS 

by Loren Lovhaug 

•J* Commodore has sold 10 million 8-bil computers. 
There are now eight million C64s and two million 
CI 28s in the world. 

♦ One of tlie early prototypes of BASIC 7.0 for the 
CI 28 had 80-column equivalents of ihe 40-column 
graphics commands. 

♦ A C128 with 64K video RAM is now capable of 
displaying interlace monochrome screen resolutions 
of up to 756 X 600 pixels, far beyond the current 704 
X 480 maximum resolution of overscan video on the 
Amiga! Color displays of up to 640 x 480 with 128 
colors are also possible. The current issue of Twin 
Cities 128 contains all the software secrets involved. 

♦ Software Support International is marketing a sol- 
derless 64K video RAM upgrade board for the 
C128. It simply plugs into the 8563 video controller 
socket inside your C128. It's S34.95. 2700 NE An- 
derson Road, Vancouver WA 98661, Suite D13, 206- 
695-1393. 

♦ C128 gamesters have been screaming for the 
past three years for a true honest-to-goodness 
shoot-em up type arcade game to appear on the vi- 
brant 80-column RGBI screen. 128 Invaders by 
Darrcll Spice Jr. fits the bill nicely. With sprite-like 
animation and great sound effects, this tried and 
true theme comes off beautifully on the big screen. 
It's available from most sources of public domain 
software. (40 disk blocks) O 




"VIRUS WARNING" 



TO SAreCUARD AGAINST 

INFECTING THIS DISK, 

YOU MUST POWEROFF YOUR COMPUTER 

BEFORE LOADING THIS SOFTWARE 



VIRUS ALERTS 

Some companies are including virus alert information in their 
software packages, like the one pictured here from Constella- 
tion Software. We think it's a good idea. 



FORESIGHT 
INSTITUTE 

If you are fascinated by 
events on the tlireshold of 
technology, you might want 
to write to K. Eric Drcxlcr's 
Foresight Institute and ask to 
be put on llic mailing list for 
their newsletter, tlic Fore- 
sight Update. They keep 
labs on such things as "wet" 
memories, nanocngineering, 
and such. PO Box 61058, 
Palo Alto CA 94306. You 
might want to enclose a 



small conu-ibution, as they are 
a non-profit organization. 
And pick up his fascinating 
book, The Engines of Crea- 
tion, for a real mental ride! O 



FASTER 68030 

Motorola has release<.l a 
new, improved version of its 
68030 processor chip that 
runs at 33 MHz. This miikes 
it the fastest 32'bit computer 
chip on the market 100- 
quantity pricing on the new 
chip is 5697 each. O 



56 miFm Sept/Oct 1988 



NEWg AMD VIEWS 



P. D. ON DISK 

TPUG is making the programs in IN- 
FO'S Public Domain column available 
on disk. Each disk (C64, C128, or 
Amiga) will be $10.00, (Ontario resi- 
dents add 8% sales tax) plus $3.00 
postage and handling. Disks for issues 
#20 and #21 are available now. 
TPUG/INFO PD Disks, 5300 Yonge St., 
Toronto Ontario Canada M2N 5R2, 



COMPUTER SHOWS 



On August 2-4, ilic ACM Siggraph 
computer graphics show will be held in 
Atlanta GA. The Seybold Desktop Pub- 
lishing ConFerencc will convene from 
September 15-17 in Santa Clara CA. 
Commodore is currently planning to 
have a booth at Siggraph, but wc have 
no word on their pliins for Seybold. 



TRUTH AND FICTION DEPARTMENT 




The real world really is stranger than fiction. No sooner tiad we gone to 
press with last issue's National CHUMP tabloid newspaper parody, than 
the real tabloid pictured here appeared in the local supermarkets. 
Sharp-eyed readers will identify the "Computer That Talks To The Dead" 
as an Amiga 1000! 



Commodore will be exhibiting at the 
first World of Commodore Show to be 
held in the U.S., and in a big way: their 
booth will cover 3000 sq. ft. In fact, 
they arc co-.sponsors of the show, to be 
held the weekend of November 3-6 in 
Philadelphia's Civic Center. It is the 
first U.S. effort by the Hunter Group, 
which has been staging highly success- 
ful Commodore-onty shows in Toronto 
for six years; ihcy plan four regional 
U.S. shows next year, with Com- 
modore's official backing and presence. 
The Canadian edition of the World of 
Commodore Show will take place De- 
cember 1-4 ill tlic Toronto International 
Centre. Call 416-595-5906 for more IN- 
FO on either show. 

That megalithic industry business 
show, Fall COMDEX, is happening 
November 14-18 in Las Vegas; call 617- 
449-6600 for details. 

The Winter Consumer Electronics 
Show will mke place January 7-10 at 
the Las Vegas Convention Center. Re- 
member: CES is for dealers only! You 
can call 202-457-8700 for more infor- 
mation, O 



% 



INFOMANIA GAME TIPS 



Amiga: Robert X. Cringely re- 
ported a fun trick in InfoWorld: 
You can boot up EA's Infiltra- 
tor, taxi your plane dovyn U.S. 
101, turn right at Highway 92. 
pull up to the EA headquor- 
ters, and blow it away! Much 
nnore fun than just taxiing 
across the Golden Gate 
Bridge in Jef! 

Amiga: Ronald Yong of 
Dothan, AL, reports that in Mi- 
crolllusions' Faery Tate, there's 
a trick that will let you accu- 
mulate all the treasure you 
want. Just go near the trea- 
sure item, press the space bar, 



and keep pressing T'. You'll 
receive an infinite supply of 
that treasure! 

C64: You can start out Activi- 
sion's Gtiostbusfers with a 
bunch of money if you use 
the trick supplied by Robert 
W. Benjamin of Wysox, PA. 
When you ore asked for your 
name at the start of the 
game, just type 'OV\/EN'. 
When it asks if you have an 
account, type 'YES', and 
when asked for your account 
number, type 'LIST'. You'll be 
sent to the car selection 
screen with $720,000. 



If you've discovered t)idden 
"secret tricks' /n your favorite 
game, share tt)em wifti other 
INFO readers! We're not inter- 
ested in "strategy tips", but 
true bugs or "back doors" that 
work to your advantage, or 
let you do something weird 
and wonderful. If we print 
your tip, we'll include your 
name and send you a world- 
famous INFOManiac Kit! Don't 
forget to fell us which ma- 
chine the tip is for! Send to: IN- 
FO Mania. PO Box 2300. Iowa 
City I A 52244. 

O 



DMFm Sept/Oct 1988 37 



NEWS AND VIEWS . . . co,„i,„,ed 



SMALL! UNCROWDED! FRIENDLY! 



by Sue Albert 

The Ainiga/Commodorc Show con- 
vened ihc weekend of May 14 & 15 in 
Santa Clara, Califomia. This small, iin- 
crowded show gave inc ample opporlu- 
niiy lo mccl Lhe "just plain folks" be- 
hind the suits. Here's what was news in 
Sania Clara: 

Put away those polaroid sunglasses, 
desktop publishers! CBM's Dale Ltick 
says the high-resolution grey screen 
monitor is due to ship by cnd-of-yc;ir. 
The A2024 will run on all Amigas and 
have a maximum resolution of 
1 008x800 at 60HZ in the U.S. and 
1008x1024 at 50HZ in Europe. Price? 
Still anyone's guess. 

Wendy Peterson promises ihc Zorro- 
stylc LIVE! 2000 will be shipping be- 
fore AmiExpo in Chicago. Between 
S300/S400 list will gci you two BNC 
slcrco connectors as video ends and 



software key controls for wipes. Cades, 
dissolves, and cuts, with mirroring in 
hardware. 

Bob Maludzinski of Mindwarc Inter- 
national dcmocd diz/ying 3D objecLs 
whirling and spinning al different 
speeds witii Pa^cfliiiper Plus FIX, a full 
screen IFF image and special effects 
program. Due by the lime you read this. 

Spake Randy Spenser from Infinity 
Software: "A Shakespeare Li upgrade 
will soon be shipped free lo ail regis- 
tered purckiscrs of 1.0". John Collins, 
the new owner of InterActivc Soft- 
works, displayed the Calligraphcr 
VI. 05 upgrade, with correct PAL screen 
aiuibulcs luid a new FoniMover utility. 
Sharing the bcxith was a tic-d)cii Lion 
Kuniz, dressed lo match his wildly col- 
orful Lion Fonts. In another part of the 
jungle, equally colorful "Uncle D" 
flashed bis dirce Aloiui Font disks and 



PA GE CENSUREE SUR ORDRE DE COMMODORE FRANCE 

!'RKM!i^:R JOUKN.AL FK.ANC.U.S IJEUI1-: A l/ORUIN/ViKUK .A 




On the international front, A-News, 
the first independent Amiga magazine 
in France, had a hard time getting off 
the ground, tJianks to official opposi- 
tion from Commodore France. Com- 
modore was already supporting Com- 
modore Review, a magazine that cov- 
ers all Commodore products, and re- 
fused permission for ibe new maga- 
zine to be distributed under its 
planned lillc, AmigaNcws. Further, 
Commodore is not delivering press 
releases or review prcxlucls lo the 
new magazine, and told the publisher, 
Bruce Lcpper, that A-Ncws cannot 
use Commodore's tradctnarks 
"Amiga", "Kickslart", or "Work- 
Bench" on the cover. As the firsi issue 



of the magazine had already been 
primed, a delay ensued while the cov- 
er was reprinted with those words 
blanked out. The publisher also added 
the taglinc "Page censored by order of 
Commodore France". Lepper says 
"This is all very silly. Our mag is 
bringing much-needed information to 
French-language users of ibe Amiga, 
and Commodore France arc kicking 
us all around ihc shop instead of 
thanking us. Wc want this lo end as 
soon as possible. We jusl hope dial 
sooner or later someone in CBM will 
realize what's going on." Like INFO, 
A-News is independent, feisty, and en- 
tirely Amiga-prfxluccd using Profes- 
sional Page and a PostScript printer. O 



Con-Soiind-l'ralion, a totally mousc- 
coniTollcd children's disk for joyful ed- 
ucation. 

Always completely surrounded were 
the friendly guys al Digital Creations 
wiih Uicir Supergen professional gcn- 
l(x;k. Likcwi.sc snuggled with Maxiplan 
fans, the Oxxi people announced A-Talk 
III, a "soonest" upgrade to the A-'lalk 
Plus communications program. 

1 missed the demo, but was 
"whelmed" by the beautiful larue color 
posters produced by Phololab from 
Electronic Arts. New Horizons (with 
Prowriie wordproccssor) was icmpting 
the eyes with color graphics, making me 
glad I went Amiga! Couldn't wrestle a 
joystick away from ihc ovcr-30ish 
"kids" at Accolade's Ixioib, but BidMc 
Ghost looks a charmer, while their 71*.?; 
Drive simulation was just a bit loo real- 
istic for this cautious Califomia driver. 

Small, 111 avy, 11^ Amigi / Qiniixiku-, 
Show was a nice weekend "computing 
break" from the daily grind. O 

VIRUSES ARE 
BIG BUSINESS 

A plclliora of new companies are 
springing into cxistancc to fighl the 
growing danger of computer disease in 
the business workplace. New companies 
offer everything from security training 
to "anti-viral" programs. Though some 
industry pundits predict a shakcout of 
all lhe new firms entering the field, it is 
obvious that the new business of "virus 
security" is with us to slay. O 

C128 PUBLIC 
DOMAIN LIST 

Brad Burcan is in tlic process of com- 
piling a definitive book listing and re- 
viewing C128-specific public domain, 
freeware, and shareware programs. If 
you've written programs that you think 
should be listed, or if you're inicrcslcd 
in purchasing the book when it's done 
later diis year, contact Blynd Dog Pub- 
lishing, 9410 E. 18lh Terrace, Indepen- 
dence MO r>4052. O 



38 \m:Fm Sept/Oct 1988 



NEWS ANB VIEWS 




th]i 

w iiiji | Bia 

HILL 



DISCLAIMER: The following are 
among the most entertaining 
rumors we've heard the past 
couple of months. They are 
presented for your entertainment 
and amusement only. Please do 
not base any important 
decisions on these rumors, as 
many will prove to be inaccurate 
or just plain false. 



>- Sieve Jobs and NeXT, Inc., may be 
making a bid to buy computer graphics 
giant PIXAR. 

> \Vc hear consistent rumors lliat peo- 
ple who have complained loudly and 
sent back their copy of the enraging 
Outrageous Pages to EA have rcccivai 
a nice letter and a copy of ifie cxcellcnl 
Paperclip PulAisher in exchange. 

>- Now thai QuantumLink has .spawned 
AppleLink, a similar network for Big 
Blue owners may be in the offing--look 
for ii by llic end of the year. 

>- Apparently the folks at Data Pacific 
have given up on producing ihcir Magic 
Sac Macintosh emulator for the Amiga. 
The problem? Fatal differences in the 
way the two machines divide memory 
space. The best they could get working 
was an almost useless 256K Mac. 

>- We hear Sharp is gcldng together 
with ASDG to rclca.sc an Amiga version 
of their excellent 300 dpi pagescanncr. 

>- Not one, not two, but three different 
groups thai we've heard about iu"c 
working furiously to produce an Amiga 



"HyperCard" clone by Christmas. All are 
basing dicir product on ARcxx. 

>- [f for some strange reason you'd like 
to see an Apple II emulator for die 
Amiga, write to Computer Applications 
Inc., 12813 Lindley Drive, Raleigh NC 
27614. They have done Apple If emula- 
tors for the Mac, PC, and ST, and are 
apparently considering an Amiga ver- 
sion. 

>* We got to wondering the other day 
whatever happened to Enable Write for 
the Amiga? It was promised at the 
Amiga unveiling 'way back when. The 
Software Group says they delivered 
Write to Commodore, but for some rea- 
son it was never released. 

>- "8-bil backlash" has resulted in the 
announcement of at least one Com- 
modore show that will not allow Amiga 
exhibitors. 

>► We hear rumblings from some com- 
puter dcidcrs that a major purveyor of 
Yuppie computers has intimated lliat it 
will pull its products from their shelves 
if they sign up to carry the Amiga. 

>- There's talk that the shortage of one 

meg DRAMs is coming to an end, and 
at Iciist one vendor (Texas Instruments) 
has cut their price by 30% already. Still 
no end to die shortage of 256K units, 
though. 

>- Videogame giant SEGA develops 
their videogames on an Amiga! 

>- Dale Luck's XWindows for the 
Amiga is in limited alpha testing, and 
should be "early beta" by die time this 
issue hits tlic newsstands. 

>■ We hear ! I agar the Horrible and the 
Pink Panther will turn up in Com- 
modore videogames soon, 

>► A Major Amiga Games Programmer 
is about to break away and form his 
own software company. 

>- Jackie Gleason's The Honcymooners 
for die Amiga may be picked up for a 
coin-op arcade game, 

>- Watch for two new "Test Flight" 
videos at Amiga dealers soon. 

>^ Apparently, it's been ages since die 
royalty checks have gone out from one 
major Amiga software company. 



>- We hear a commercial version of the 
excellent public domain raytracing pro- 
gram DBW Render is on its way to 
market. It'll be called QTrace. 

>■ Seems there really js a 64D-you 
know, the C64 widi a built-in 3.5" 
drive? The prototype had the drive on 
the right, the function keys moved to 
the left side, and a switch for old ROMs 
or new, fast, burst-mode ROMs. The 
story goes that CBM ran it past some 
third-party software developers, who 
flat out refused to even think about pro- 
ducing software in die new 3.5" format, 
so Commodore killed it. 

5* You-Know-Who has a new profes- 
sional Amiga digitizer in the works. For 
under S4(X), it'll grab real-time full- 
color video and audio from any video 
source. And it doesn't make toast! O 



™dim( 



WE'D 



Ti 



O A SID music translator for the 
Amiga. Surely the Amiga is ca- 
pable of simulating the SID chip 
on the C64, and there's a bazil- 
lion great C64 SIDPlayer songs 
out there in the public domain! 

@ How about a 3D modeling pro- 
gram that uses a better algo- 
rithm than simple shading, but a 
faster algorithm than ray- 
tracing? The computer graphics 
pros out there must have some 
tricks of intermediate complex- 
ity for graphically simulating 
the real world. I mean, all we 
want really is ray -traced quality 
with real-time, full-view anima- 
tion! 

© Molecular modeling; a physics 
construcdon set; nuclear reac- 
tion simulations; computer sys- 
tems emulation; a robotics de- 
sign lab; structural, hydraulic, 
and electrical engineering build- 
ing sets-why isn't anybody do- 
ing these things? Does every- 
body just want to sit around 
blasting aliens for the rest of 
their lives? O 



DMFE] Sept/Oct 1988 39 




ISCILI^ 



SOFT 'N SQUEEZABLE 

Wico has built a joystick and put it in a 
soft, pliable case. It's molded to fit your 
hand, with the stick on the top, and the 
fircbutton in the index finger groove on 
the bottom. The Ergostick retails for 
S26.20. 6400 W. Gross Point Rd., Niles, 
IL 60648. 312-647-7500. 

SWITCHING CABLES 

Mouse Master plugs into both your 
joystick/mouse ports, providing you 
with three ports instead of two (one for 
port 1 and two for port 0). Thus, you 
can have two joysticks and a mouse 
connected at the same lime. It's S39.95 
from Practical Solutions, 1930 E. Grant 
Rd., Tucson, AZ 85719. 

PRINTER PROVENDER 

Wc stumbled across Pro-Tech at 
Comdex and were impressed by their 
wide variety of high-quality, specialized 
papers and transparency films designed 
for the current generation of printers. 
The transparency film is especially 
noteworthy, since each sheet is attached 
to a carrier sheet, making it easy to feed 
through a laser printer. They even have 
the special paper/film for the HP Paint- 
jet. Pro-Tech / James River Corp., Lud- 
low, MA 01056. 800-521-5035. 

HACKERWARE 

The ZR2 chip from ALX Digital has 
dimmers, a 64 channel controller, 4 
variabic-spccd chasers and zoncrs, three 
modes of operation (auto, sync, and 
manual), and much more, all packaged 
in one 40-pin chip. It can also be con- 
nected in series if you need even more 
output lines. But what's it for, you ask? 
Well, it could be used for controlling 
light shows, or electric motors, or what- 
ever else your imagination can come up 
with. It requires +5 volts, a 4Mhz crys- 
tal, and some electronics experience. 
Cost is S3 5. 12265 S. Dixie Hwy., Suite 
922, Miami, FL 33156. 




JOY OF FREEDOM 

Though it's not billed as such, the folks 
at Camerica have designed a joystick 
that works great for left-handed people. 
(It's not bad for right-handers, cither.) 
And it's cordless! The Freedom Stick 
(S69.95) operates on infra-red, just like 
your TV remote. There's a unit that 
plugs into your joystick ports, (both of 
them if you want to play a two-player 
game) and the actual joystick unit, 
which sits on suction cups, has buttons, 
switches, and even LEDs to make it fun 
to watch. 230 Fifth Ave., New York, 
NY 10001. 

TEENY FONTS 

If you've ever u-ied printing a spread- 
sheet on an HP Laserjet, you've already 
discovered that none of the fonts are 
small enough to allow much on a page, 
Jetfonts from Jetware plug right in and 
give you ([;)roviding you send the prop- 
er escape codes to access them - as is 
usually the case with such generic prod- 
ucts, the supplied drivers and installa- 
tion routines arc only for the IBM/PC) 
up to 30 characters per inch, and the 
fonts arc specially designed to be legi- 
ble at the tiny size. The 1 23 (as in Lotus 
123) cartridge is aimed for spreadsheet 
printing, and contains both landscape 
and portrait fonts. Retail is a sleep S325 
each. Computer Peripherals Inc., 667 
Rancho Concjo Blvd., Newbury Park, 
CA 91320. 805-499-5751. 

CHOCO-DISK 

Those chocoholics among you (and you 
know who you are) will be glad to 



know that you can now obtain choco- 
late disks. It probably wouldn't be a 
very good idea to put one in your drive, 
but they'll fit nicely in your facial slot. 
Creative Software Unlimiied markets 
the disks in 5 1/4" ($11.25 in a reusable 
disk case) and 3 1/2" sizes, as well as 
chocolate keyboards and other system 
configurations. PO Box 8011, Cedar 
Rapids, lA 52408. 3)9-396-4549. 



BLOODLINES 

Lineages is a gcncology program that 
will help you keep track of where you 
came from. It could also be used for 
anything [hat requires keeping track of 
pedigrees. It will generate both standard 
and compressed pedigree charts, index- 
es can be made in a variety of ways, 
and it will even make an address list of 
your living relatives for you. The pack- 
age comes in three versions: Siiirtcr 
(S29), Standard (S49), and Advanced 
(S99). From Quinscpt, PO Box 216, 
Lexington, MA 02173. 617-641-2930. 

OF SOUND MIND 

We're in favor of anything that will de- 
prive the lawyer-weasels of ill-gotten 
gain, and have found just the thing in 
WillMaker (S39.95). The software will 
write a will for you based on the an- 
swers you give to questions it asks. The 
wills thus produced are legal in every 
state but Louisiana and the District of 
Columbia (the lawycr-weascIs' intcr- 
galactic headquarters). The program 
comes with a 200 page manual, just to 
make sure you know what you're do- 
ing, and is from Nolo Press, a well- 
known publisher of legal self-help 
books. It would probably be worth your 
while to write for information. They 
sent us a copy of their tabloid newslet- 
ter/ catalog along with the software and 
it's fun residing; there's even a column 
of lawyer jokes. Nolo Press, 950 Parker 
St., Berkeley, C A 94710. 415-549-1976. 



40 DMIFm Sept/Oct 1988 




I'D LIKE TO THANK. 



TlTLE 



Award Maker Plus will al- 
low you to design and print 
certificates, awards, coupons, 
and the like on your C64. It 
lets the user pick a border, 
which can be printed in color 
or black & while, and the 
award. Samples and gold 
seals are included, along with 
an order form for pinfeed 
parchment paper. $39.95 
from Baudville, 5380 52nd 
St. SE, Grand Rapids, MI 49508. 616 
698-0888. 




DATE 



BORDER 



Award Maker from Baudvilk. 



MONEY MAHERS 

Pyxis Software has released version 2. 1 
of their Investment Simulation Pro- 
gram. It's a specialized spreadsheet 
program that will calculate your fi- 
nances seven ways from Sunday. It 
comes with a 51 page manual and isn't 
copy-protected. S36. PO Box 18016, 
Colorado Springs, CO 80935. 719-596- 
6465. 

GEOS WORDPROCESSOR 

Spinnaker has released a GEOS -based 
wordproccssor, Betterworking Word 
Publisher. It claims to handle text entry 
five times faster than other GEOS 
wordprocessors and comes with a 
100,000 word spellchcckcr. It will al- 
low up to nine fonts and six lypcstylcs 
on the same page, and while il isn't 
WYSIWYG, it docs have a preview op- 
tion. Price is S39.95. One Kendall 
Square, Cambridge, MA 02139. 617- 
494-1200. 

BETTING ON IT 

Advanced Racing Systems will handi- 
cap races for you based on statistics you 
input. Price ranges from S64.95 lo 
S74.95, depending on the animal. Ver- 
sions (on disk or cassette) arc available 
for Thoroughbred, Harness, Greyhound, 
and Quartcrhorse races. From Software 
Exchange, 2681 Peterboro Rd., PO Box 
5382, W. Bloomfield, Ml 48033. 313- 
626-7208. 



GEOS FONTS 

If you need fonts to spice up your 
GEOS applications, TF Graphix is mar- 
keting four disks of them. Price is 36.95 
per disk, with each disk containing 
about 16 fonts. Tlic samples look quite 
good and there are some styles we 
haven't seen before. 326 Clothier 
Spring Rd., Malvern, PA 19355-9657. 

MOVING FINGERS 

If your typing skills are something less 
than exemplary, perhaps Mavis Beacon 
can help. The Software Toolworka has 
released the C64 version of their typing 
tutor. Mavis Beacon Teaches Typing. 
The program is menu driven, and cus- 
tomizes itself to the individual using it. 
There's even a metronome onscreen lo 
help with your typing rhythm. Dis- 
tributed by Electronic Arts, retail price 
is $39.95. (We asked, and no, Mavis 
Beacon isn't a real person; she's a spiri- 
tual sister lo Betty Crocker and Aunt 
Jemima.) One Toolworks Plaza, 13557 
Ventura Blvd., Sherman Oaks, CA 
91423. 818-907-6789. 

BIBLE STUDY 

Proclaim Software is marketing a num- 
ber of Bible study programs: Bible 
Study Guide, Children's Bible Quiz, 
New Testament Chapter Summary, 
and Translations (which displays llic 
same same verse from different transla- 
tions for comparison). S5 each or 4 on 
one disk for S15. PO Box 12192, Nor- 
folk, VA 23502. 



TC1 28 DIGEST 

Voyager Mindtools, publisher of Twin 
Cities 128 sent us a copy of their new 
book, Twin Cities Compendium #1. 
It's a compilation of the best articles 
from Uic first 18 issues of the magazine, 
many of which arc no longer available 
as backissucs. Cover price is S16.95. 
PO Box 4625, St. Paul, MN 55104. 

BOOTING... 

If you'd like to have your CI 28 auto- 
boot your programs, Superboot will do 
il for you. It will write autoboot sectors, 
permitting custom screen colors and 
messages. S 14.95 from JT Program 
Software, 100 N. BcreUinia St., Sic. 
210, Honolulu. HI 96817. 808-521- 
6420. 



Mm<Qh 



FONTCY FANTS 

The National Type Foundry has 
released Vol. #1: Fancy, a collection of 
42 fancy monochrome Amiga fonts in a 
multitude of point sizes from 7 to 94, 
Some fonts arc available in only one 
size, but 16 of them arc supplied in 2, 4, 
5, or even 6 different point sizes. Many 
arc u^anslations of Macintosh fonts, but 
there are some original designs here, 
loo, and all have been "twiddled" lo 
look dicir best on the Amiga. They arc 
even organized to fit the DehixePaint 
font file menu. The collection is S74.95. 
PO Box 1 3431 , Torrance CA 90503. 

FONTMANIA 

Always being on the lookout for new 
font collections, we snagged this one at 
Comdex. Lion's Fonts (389.95) con- 
sists of four disks full of fonis, sized up 
to 160-point, and one of the disks is all 
colorfonts, in an assortment of 4 and 8 
colors. The collection comes from Inter- 
Aciive Softworks, publishers of Calligra- 
pher. 2521 So. Vista Way, Suite 254, 
Carlsbad, CA 92008. 619-434-5327. 



DM[P(o) Sept/Oct 1988 41 






contauied 



FONTING AROUND 

If you need fonts for video titling, Kara 
Fonts (S79.95) will provide them. 
These are all hi-rcs and in color. They 
have the interesting option of being 
able 10 accept different surface textures, 
such as marble, mirror, wood, brick, 
etc. The 3-disk package also comes 
witJi instructions on using the fonts 
with various graphics programs. 1Mb 
of RAM is required. From Kara Com- 
puier Grapliics, 6355 Green Valley Cir- 
cle, Suite 317, Culver City, CA 90230. 

CASTING A SPELL 

Realtime spcllchccking is just coming 
into its own on the Amiga. The latest 
entry is Zing! Spell from Meridian 
Software. It features options to check 
your typing after every word, line, para- 
graph, or after you finish your docu- 
ment. It allows custom dictionaries, in 
addition lo its own 95,000 words, 
which can be accessed if you want to 
look up a word as you type. It also sup- 
ports ARexx. 9361 W. Brittany Ave., 
Littleton, CO 80123. 303-979-4140. 

LOOK IT UP 

Stan S. Spcnce has put together two 
noteworthy indexes: one of the seven 
major Amiga magazines {INFO includ- 
ed), and the other of over 2200 public 
domain titles. Magdex and Pubdex use 
an authorized demo version of Soft- 
wood File IISG, and the disks also sup- 
ply an ASCII text file if you want to im- 
port it into another database. The di.sks 
also have custom boot sectors, which 
play music and change screen colors as 
they boot. If the music or colors should 
fail, you'll know there's a virus 
present-a novel solution. Price is a 
mere S5.00 each. 5147 So. 37th St., 
Lincoln, NE 68516. 402-423-3856. 

TAKING IT APART 

OTG Software has come out with the 
DSM l.Od (S67.50), which is a disas- 
sembler for the Amiga. It will disassem- 
ble any executable code that doesn't use 
overlays. It uses Wack-rcadabic symbol 
information. 200 W. 7th St., Suite 618, 
Ft. Worth, TX 76102. 312-816-3474. 







v.. 


















;:-;;;-^->-: ::■:■:■ 


m^p;-: 






:-■■-"-:■":;■■■:■:■■: 


1-: ■:■:.> ■ 






, r.\'JZ , 


-- 


^M 




:"? 












■^t: TTT— ,;^:;^^ 


.^H.^^^;:,-^ 




Tj— — — 1^ 


^^^^^r^r,^ 


:-7^r. 


- -' ■ 


— "";r-r=^ 


■■aC^!?!:vr: 


M^ 


■■•"t'C-, 




.^4^1^™^;.^!-^ 








■^^^»/.v: 


■:-^:: ■ :;-:-'H- 





t. ■ /f\''.:--f- 1,3^: 










Great grayscale! 
Preferences output on the left, FinePrint on the right. 



TRUE GRAY 

Designlab sent us samples of the print 
output from their FinePrint progriun. 
The samples shown were done on a 24- 
pin Ep.son printer with a resolution of 
120x90 dots. 9-pin printers arc also 
supported, with similarly spcclaclular 
results. It works by printing one pass, 
then spacing up only one line of dols to 
print the next pass, thus building up 
layers of ink for U'uc gray-scale print- 
ing. It also has built-in scaling and av- 
eraging routines. The kicker is tliat you 
must use worn out printer ribbons! PO 
Box 419, Owego NY 13827. 607-687- 
5740. 

NAVIGATOR 

FTD PILOT is the Amiga version of 
the PILOT programming language. It's 
designed to be as compatible as possi- 
ble with Apple and IBM versions. It 
supports all Amiga graphics modes, in- 
cluding overscan, HAM, and halfbrite. 
This implementation is aimed at video 
presentation, specifically Level 111 in- 
teractive video, in which output from a 
laser vidcodisk is combined with graph- 
ics and/or interaction from the Amiga. 
Price for version 1.0 is S39.95, and a 
higher-priced version 1.3, compatible 
with Workbench 1.3, has been an- 
nounced for Fall '88. From Flight 
Training Devices, PO Box 91723, An- 
chorage, AK 99509- 1 723. 907-276-67 19. 



C++ 

Lai lice has released C++, a pre- 
processor for C source code, for the 
Amiga. It's an object-oriented superset 
of C and has a driver to permit translat- 
ing, compiling, and linking in a single 
step, It requires 1.5Mb and two floppy 
drives. Rcuiil is S500.00. 2500 S. High- 
land Ave., Lombard, IL 60148. 
312-916-1600. 

DAS BOOK 

Aixicus has published two more in their 
series of Gennan-import Data Becker 
books. Amiga Machine Language and 
Amiga Tricks & Tips. Each has a cov- 
er price of S19.95. 5370 52nd St., 
Grand Rapids, MI 49508. 616-698-0330. 

PD SOURCE 

We're always looking for sources of 
public domain softwiu-c and found an- 
otlier one with Software Excitement. 
The catiilog they sent lists 154 disks. 
Cost per disk is S4-S6, depending on 
quantity. PO Box 5069, Ccnu-al Point, 
OR 97502. 503-772-6827. 

VACCINE 

If you're worried about viral infection 
of your disks. Discovery Software, pub- 
lishers of Marauder II, arc releasing 
V.I.P., a disk innoculation program. 
Price is 349.95. 163 Conduit St., 
Annapolis, MD 21401. 301-268-9877. 



42 mwm Sept/Oct 1988 




TUNE IT UP 

The Disk Mechanic is a collection of 

utilities for doing disk repair, tuning up 
disk performance, restoring deleted 
files, backing up hard disks, and more. 
It supports the 1.3 fasi-filc system. 
$89.95 from Lake Forest Logic, 
28101E Ballard Rd., Lake Forest, IL 
60045. 312-816-6666. 

CLI HELP 

If you spend too much time thumbing 
through the AmigaDOS manual looking 
for correct CLI command syntax, a 
booklet from The Computer Club Com- 
pany could be just the thing. It's only 8 
pages, but it provides a compact, com- 
plete list of commimds. S3.95. 4131 
Meadow Hill Lane, Fairfax, VA 22033- 
3113.703-968-7588. 

BACKDROPS 

Video Visions is publishing a .series of 
disks to ase with the various Amiga video 
litlers and animation packages. Some of 
the areas covered arc TV-News, back- 
drops, digitized faces & animals, and 
even some scripts for animation. All the 
images arc in 384x480 overscan fomiai. 
Two disks arc available, S24.95 aich. 
Castom art is also available. Charles Von- 
cr Designs, 61 Clewlcy Rd., Ntelford, 
MA 021 55. 617-396-8354. 

BACK TO BASICS 

GFA-BASIC, which has sold over 
50,000 copies for the Atari ST, is now 
available on the Amiga, GFA-BASIC 
3.0 comes with an inicUigeni editor, and 
the code is compatible between the 
Amiga and Atari versions. S99.95 from 
Michiron, 576 S. Telegraph, Fonliac, 
MI 48053. 313-334-5700. 

ENVISION THIS 

Elan Design has released a software 
special-effects generator for use wiih A- 
Squarcd's Live! video digitizer. Invi- 
sion (SI 29) works in realtime, letting 
the user change color, combine the 
video with stills from a paint program, 
and otherwise manipulate images. Live! 
is required. PO Box 31725, San Fran- 
cisco, CA 94131. 



PHOTOS DELUXE 

Electronic Arts sent along the lat- 
est in their Deluxe series. Deluxe 
PhotoLab. It's an integrated 
graphics tool that supports all 
Amiga graphics modes, including 
HAM and halfbrite. It also has an 
image processing module, and a 
poster maker dial will print 
posters up to 10' X 10'. It lists for 
S149. 1820 Gateway Dr., San 
Mateo, CA 94404. 415-571- 
7171. 

HI-YO, AND AWAY 

The latest module for Syndesis' Inter- 
Change, a utility for converting objects 
between the various 3D modeling pro- 
grams, is for Turbo Silver. It also in- 
cludes the PointReducc utility for low- 
ering the number of duplicate edge 
points in objects. InicrChangc ($49.95) 
is required to use the Turbo Silver mod- 
ule (S 19.95). 20 West St, Wilmington, 
MA 01887. 508-657-5585. 

BACK IT UP 

HardnKast is a hard disk backup utility 
from CompulerWorLs. It takes 20 min- 
utes to back up 10Mb, works from 
icons, and can back up an entire drive 
or just selected directories. It keeps a 
catalog of the files backed up, will tell 
you how many disks you'll need, and 
uses speech to tell you when you need 
to swap disks. It docs use a proprietary 
floppy format tliat can only be read 
back out Willi llardnFast. S49.95. 6641 
Scoll St., Hollywood, FL 33024. 

ANY PALM TREES? 

One of the problems with sampled 
sound is that if ii's in a format you can't 
read, you can'i use it. The guys at New 
Wave Software, publishers of Dynamic 
Studio, have come up with a .solution. 
Sound Oasis will read and U'anslate 
files from Mirage sampling keylxiards 
using tlie Amiga's disk drive. You can 
then save the samples in IFF format to 
use in other Amiga music programs. 
Huge libraries of Mirage sampled 
sounds arc available. PO Box 438, St. 
Clair Shores, Ml 48080. 313-771-4465. 




Deluxe PhotoLab in zoom mode. 



X-CAD 

The 256-laycr CAD package from Tau- 
ruS'Impex, marketed in the US by Ilai- 
lex Resources, X-CAD Designer, is 
now available. It uses a command struc- 
ture built on 'a verb-noun arrangement 
which is followed by modifiers'. It 
comes wiUi a 350-page manual, and 
sports such drawing tools as parallel, 
fillet, tangent, extend, crosshatching, 
etc. Text can be placed anywhere at any 
angle and at any slant. S599. 208 Car- 
roflton Park, Suite 1207, Carrol lion. TX 
75006. 214-241-8030. 

DISK DISCIPLINE 

Disk Master (S49.95)is a likely candi- 
date for anyone in need of a file man- 
agement utility. It's compatible wiOi 
ASDG's FACC 11, will let the user de- 
fine up to 12 physical or logical de- 
vices, supports boih ARC and ZOO, 
and has customizable menus. From Pro- 
gressive Peripherals. 464 Kalamalh St., 
Denver, CO 80204. 303-825-4144. 

REAL WORLD CONNECTION 

Far loo little scientific and other real- 
world applications are being done witli 
ihe Amiga, one reason being that there 
hasn't been any way to connect ihc real 
world to it. ASDG has remedied the sit- 
uation with their Twin-X I/O board. It 
conforms lo llic IEEE 959 (iSBX) stan- 
dard, which niciins ihat it's rciidy to use 
widi huntlrcds of data-acquisition and 
process-control modules already 
available. S329, 925 Sicwart St., Madi- 
son, WI 53713. 608-273-6585. 

o 



mVFm Sept/Oct 1988 43 



his is a really tough call, folks. Some will love piy offered om of scir defense, onceihc 



TBeckerBASIC for its flexibility, wealth of 
commands, and the fact that it's the only 
high-level GEOS programming language available. 
Others will hate BeckerBASIC for its idiosyncratic 
vocabulary, overly modular structure, and poorly 
organized manual 



Becker Basic 

S49.95 

Abacus Software 

5370 52nd St. SE 

Grand Rapids, MI 49508 

616-698-0330 



keywords arc renamed, they arc refer- 
enced in the manual by number using 
the COMNAM and COMNUM com- 
mands. 

Speaking of the manual, it is a stiff 
paperback rather than ringbound, which 
i.s especially annoying because of the 
constant need to refer to it. It is not par- 
And some, like myself, will have licularly wcll organized, through it ef- 
fectively has three indexes. There are 
no tutorials, no quick reference listings 
which group related commands togeth- 
er or show command syntax, and few 
progranmiiiig examples. 

While BeckerBASIC programs can 
give all the appearances of teing GEOS 
applications (as the demo programs am- 



difficulty figuring out just what to think, at all. 



BONANZA 

There are many nice to excellent fea- 
tures within BeckerBASIC: a good array 
of programming aids (I miss FIND and 
CHANGE); structured programming 
extensions (ELSE, WHILE, DO, 
CASE, ENDIF, etc.) including .several 
POP commands for neatly exiting 
loops; full DOS support, including 
GEOS disk file formats; numerous 
memory management and data transfer 
functions; extensive keyboard, function 
key, and cursor movcmcni support; 
ASCII conversion functions; and nu- 
merous sprite, sound and GEOS hi-rcs 
graphic commands. 

There arc also some groaners. 
BeckerBASIC has three modules: ^v-^'- 
leni I is the editing module. System 2 is 
the testing module and Sysicm 3 is the 
runtime program to be distributed wiili 
the final program. With die 64K 
[Ticmory limit, it's ;m acceptable way to 
make room for BcckerBASlC's 273 new 
commands and functions and the GEOS 
Kemal, and slill end up with a re- 
spectable amount of user programming 
.space (about 16K). 



But within BeckerBASIC, the dat:i 
structures for a program's (Iroji-down 
menus, dialog boxes, sprites, and 
screens are saved as separate disk files, 
so diat a relatively simple program can 
easily wind up consisting of half a 
dozen disk files or more, not counting 
the runtime module. Simple file copy- 
ing becomes a chore, and ?F1LE NOT 
FOUND is as popular here as an Ami- 
gaDOS guru. 

And about tlio.sc 273 commands- 
over forty are simple ON or OFF tog- 
gles. There iu'c also ten versions of 
SAVE, ten cursor (CR...) commands 
(not including PRINT AT, TAB, etc), 
eight LOADS, eight GETs, six OPENs, 
and so on down the line. A little elo- 
quence and a few more parameters 
could easily have eliminated around 
100 commands and functions. 

The original BeckerBASIC keyword 
mnemonics lake a little getting u.scd to. 
It sometimes seems [hat the author 
searched through all tlic different vo- 
cabularies of Commodore and Amiga 
BASICS to be sure NOT to standardize 
anything. Ironically, there is not a WIN- 
DOW, MENU, ICON or MOUSE com- 
mand in the bunch. 

Of course, if you don't like ttie 
BeckerBASIC keywords, you can re- 
name each and every one of them to 
suit yourself! It's uniciue. It's inieresi- 
ing. But I still haven't decided if it's a 
consimimate stroke of genius or is sim- 



ply show), BeckerBASIC is slill by na- 
ture an extension of BASIC 2.0, with 
many of its shortcomings int;icl. It's 
easy to import old BASIC programs, 
but tliey probably won't run without 
some modification. Memory allocation 
is very different, and the ASCII situa- 
tion can be problematic, as the jirogram 
ADDRSAMPLE inadvertently demon- 
strates. 

RECOMMENDATIONS 

One thing I can say neiirly for cer- 
tain: don't go out and buy this package 
because you think you should have it, 
or might need it sometime, or your 
friends all have it. I can almost guaran- 
tee it will wind up collecting dust in a 
week. Besides, you don't need Becker- 
BASIC to run BeckerBASIC programs: 
you only need the freely distributable 
runtime program System 3. 

"Casual" and BeckerBASIC don't go 
logctltcr becau.se tlie initial learning 
curve is pretty demanding. You should 
first be certiiin tliat you really want to 
program under GEOS. That, after all, is 
what it's for And in the right hands, it 
has all the potential to get diat job done 
admirably. 



Don Romero loves movies, the color orange, anything by Beethoven or Led 
Zep, and his Amiga. Turn-offs include Madonna, overcooked beef, and tak- 
ing himself seriously. His love sign is Taurus. 



J 



44 OMPrn Sept/Oct 1988 




YOUR IDENTITY 



What keeps your user 

group together? Do the 

people in the group feel 

like they belong? 

Of course your group has a name; 
but you need more. You need a mascot! 
(Look at the spirit at a high school or 
college football game-many schools 
build a whole image on an exciting 
mascot.) OK, maybe a mascot is going 

Ca bit too far. But at least come 
^ up with a logo, one that is in- 
^ stantly recognizable, like the 
C= that Commodore uses. 
Once you have a nice group logo, 
you can use it in many ways. Of course, 
you will want it on the cover or banner 
of your newsletter. Also put it at the top 
of posters or notices that you post in 
your community. 

THE BEST PART 

Remember, I mentioned that your 
members need to feel like Ihey belong? 
Customized T-Shirts are one way that a 
person can feel part of a group. Just 
look at all the customized T-Shirts you 
see in the summer (and the customized 
sweatshirts in die fall!) You see shirts 
like Save The Whales and / Survived 
The Rampage. Usually these shirts arc 
mass produced by silk screening. This 
makes it hard for your group, since you 
usually need to meet a minimum order, 
pay in advance, and know what 
sizes, colors, and styles to order. Well, 
as you may have guessed, there is an 
easier way! 

This idea came from Mike Precise, 
editor of the Peek & Poke newslcller. It 
is a make-your-own T-Shiri, sweatshirt, 
or whatever, project: yes, it's an "Iron- 
On". A couple of years ago, Mike had 
an Iron-On page in his newslet- 
ter... featuring his newsletter logo of 
course! Reccndy Mike agreed to share 
his secret with User Group Update. 
Here is his scoop: 




OcaMModore ^ 

Peek & Poke, PO Box 611, 
Westbrook, Maine 04092; 

"You need a special ink, and a co- 
operative primer. The type of ink wc use 
is sold by the Van Son Holland Ink 
Corp. of America (Van Son for short), 
92 Union Street. Mineola, NY 11501. 
Although the Heat Transfer ink is un- 
usual and expensive, the Van Son brand 
is widely available through printer .sup- 
ply houses. We pay about $35 for a one 
pound can (ie. VS246 Yellow #7600). 
The ink is thinner than normal offset 
printing ink, but with minor adjustmen- 
ts, it can be used by any competent 
printer in any offset printing press to 
produce Iron-On pages. " 
"Look under Printer Supplies in the Yel- 
low Pages to locate and nail down a lo- 
cal price for this ink. Ask for 'Van Son 
and don't expect it to be in .stock. It will 
be a special order, so expect to pay in 
advance. Before purchasing the ink, tell 
your printer what you have in mind, and 
tliat you have already located the special 
ink. Be prepared to reverse the imase 
that you want printed, and include some 
simple instructions for the end user." 

Finally, Mike makes this generous 
offer: If this process has you confused, 
contact: Mike Precise, Peck & Poke, 
PO Box 611, Westbrook, Maine 04092; 
phone: (207) 854-4579. A member of 
their Graphics Group is an excellent 



printer, and should be able to accom- 
modate those who cannot get these 
printed locally. 

Here is how your reader applies the 
iron-on: Put a piece of newspaper under 
the T-Shirt on an ironing board. Then 
put the iron-on page face down on top 
of the shirt. Put another sheet of news- 
paper on top of that. Iron with the 
hottest setting; don't rub. Just press 
down on each section...longer than 
seems necessary. 

GET THE VOTE 

John Kroul and Earl Jones of Wash- 
ington Area Commodore Users Group 
(WAC) recendy used an Amiga spread- 
sheet called Analyze! 2.0 to tally the 
number of votes for each candidate by 
precinct. Analyze macros cut the work- 
ioad down immensely. The work was 
done and results printed just 30 minutes 
after the polls closed. They are now 
looking forward to the November elec- 
tion. This might be a great project for 
your group to try in your area. Here is 



WAO 



WAC, PO Box 684, 
Springfield, VA 22150 

what they said about it in the Com- 
modore Ciu"S0r: "It might be fun to link 
them [Amigas] all to a net by using 
Amiga multi-tasking to run ANALYZE! 
along with a telecommunications pack- 
age. We cotdd share results with each 
other and with interested viewers such 
as local candidate headquarters and 
television stations." 

If your User Group has a newslsller, I'd like to 
read it. Please add me lo your mailing list: 
Len Lindsay 
PO Box 6055 
Madison, Wl 53716-0055 



Len Lindsay is one of the true pioneers of Commodore computing. He is ihe 
editor and publisher of Comal Today, and he lives and works In Wisconsin. 



DMIFfQ] Sept/Oct 1988 45 



MidniU Softzoan Qazette 



CASHING IN ON TECHNOLOGY 
PART V: IT'S A SMALL WORLD 




By James Oldfield, Jr. 

Why, you may a.sk, would yoii want 
10 sell your prixiucLs ouisidc iJic USA? 
There iirc miiny gocxl reasons: wider 
markets provide you with the potential 
lo increase your revenues (sell more 
products = make more money); you can 
achieve worldwide recognition: it helps 
the trade dellcit (iJiough on a small 
scale); and, what the heck, it's a kick to 
have your sofiwarc running on foreign 
soil. (You just hope the person using it 
over there paid for il!) But how ilo you 
gel there I'rom here? By planning ahead 
a bit in (lie development stages of your 
product, you can avert many of the 
headaches and hciiruichcs that >'ou could 
run into later. The old adage 'better laic 
than never' dcysn't hold hcrc--you have 
to think ahead! 

PRODUCT ADAPTATION 

A great way to expand your pro- 
gram's potential is by u-anslating (he text 
inio foreign languages. The most lucra- 
tive arc French (which includes a 
healthy chunk of the Canadian market!), 
German, and Spanish. I've found thai 
foreign language deparuiicnls in many 
colleges and universities arc a gtxxi 
place to sc^'k translators. There arc [)ro- 
fcssional organizations which specialize 
in this, but their fees arc specialized as 
well. Translate both the on-scrccn ie,\t 
and tlic documcnt:ition. Once your pro- 
gram has tlic language [xurier broken, 
the odds of selling it outside America arc 
greatly enhanced. 

Besides the language barriers, you 
might also want to think about iftc cltinic 
and cultural differences ovcrsciis. Games 
slanting towards violence may not be re- 
ceived well in certain countries. Then, 
loo, a la.x program designed for Ameri- 
cans will have a tough time in France. 

Don't forget to keep uibs on which 
computers arc sold where. Comnuxlorc 
has a broad worldwide m;irkct. but dif- 
ferent models arc popular in different 
counuics. For example, knowing Uiat the 
Pius/4 is tlic official educational comput- 
er of Hungary might deter you from 



The opinions expressed in this 
column are those of the author, 
and do not necessarily reflect 
those of INFO Publications, Inc., 
our staff, our lawyers, or any 
other living hutnan tDeing. 



translating your Amiga educational pro- 
gram into Hungarian! 

The video display is also importiint. 
You'll need to understand the differences 
between PAL and NTSC video suin- 
dards; you will need a special version of 
your program for counu-ics on the PAL 
siandtird. Copy protection (if an;0 must 
be experimented with to insure global 
comiiatibility among machinery. 

MARKETING DISTRIBUTION 

Where arc you going to find people 
who iirc acquainted with foreign mar- 
kets? Besides computer trade journals 
(which arc not sold on the newssuinds), 
you can atieiul national and intcmaiional 
trade shows tliat attract foreign buyers 
and sellers. The Consumer Elecu-onics 
Show, Comdex, PCW, and the Hanover 
Fairc arc among these. Foreign maga- 
zines and journals arc also a gocxl jiUicc 
to kxak. Most of the hirger book stores 
and chains carr>' magazines from Eng- 
land and Gennany (u-anslated into En- 
glish). L(X)k at ihe ads to st-e what is sell- 
ing and who's doing iJic selling. It'll give 
ycHi a good feci for what is alreadv' pre- 
sent in the foreign market and what isn't. 

There is one important factor that a 
lot of people ovcrkx)k when deciding a 
marketing plan overseas, and thai is how 
the channels of disuibuiion arc done. In 
England, it's simikir lo America's three- 
tier system (manufacturer, distributor, 
dealer). But in GcrmLuiy, for example, 
software companies sell directly lo 
dealers more than to distributors. (It 
must be .siiid, though, that this approach 
is changing and evolving.) 



SIGNING THE CONTRACTS 

As I mentioned a few issues ago, you 
can ncgoliatc witJi a dealer or disu^ibutor, 
or even another software company. 
Many sell computer products oversais, 
and have already done the leg work to 
establish tlic communication channels 
needed. If you decide not to do it alone, 
my advice is lo not sign any exclusive 
distribution contract witli a company tlial 
you know little, if anything, about Be- 
fore you sign to one distributor or .sales 
agent, be sure you've first .shown die 
contract to your attorney. Also, tliscuss it 
witli someone who has already been sell- 
ing tiirough thai particular company. 
Anyone you work with should be able to 
sujiply you with references to other com- 
panies they have been doing business 
witli. Ask tliose references if tlicy'vc 
been fairly u-caicd. It never hurts to ask. 

There arc two sides to exclusive 
agreements. An exclusive contract allows 
[he distribution company to .sell your 
prcxluct into the markets tliat they deal in 
exclusively. This could lead your product 
to market areas that you wouldn't nor- 
mally lx> able to peneu-ate. This is impor- 
tant if you have a vcr\- sjx'cillc applica- 
tion-it may mean that you have to go in- 
to the vertical market arena. On the llip- 
sidc, it's possible for a distributor to have 
too narrow a marketing plan, which 
could limit tlic number of s;ilcs for your 
prcxluct. Spend some time tJiinking about 
your siiecific needs before you sign on 
the lx)itom line. 

1 hojK diis series has given you a bit of 
an insight to iJie personal computer mar- 
ketplace. If I'n'c helped one [vrson, diat's 
one more software product tliat helps to 
sup]X)ri my favorite brand of computer: 
ComiiKxlore! 

Thanks to all who have helped: 
Clark, Janet, Pete, Jim and Bob. 

Jim Oldfield Jr. 



James Oldfield Jr. v/as ihe editor and publisher of the legendary Midnife 
Software Gazette. He is now tvlarketing Director of Abacus Software. He can 
be reached on QLink as midnife, or by mail of RR2. Box 34 1 , Tascolo IL 61953. 



46 m\!Fm Sept/Oct 1988 



r 




LEEMON - AT LARGE 



A TALE OF TWO COMPANIES 



/; was the best of times, ii wiv; the 
worst of times." The opening line 
from A Tale of Two Cities may nol 
make much sense, but il just about sums 
up how my feelings for the Amiga ihcsc 
days. There arc so many reasons for both 
optimism and pessimism about the fate 
of the Amiga (and, by extension. 
Commodore) thai I can't decide whether 
to celebrate, or sell my Amiga. 

In many ways, tJic Amiga is in the best 
shape it's ever been in. The ambiguous 
A 1000 has been replaced by two com- 
puters, ctich witti a distinct identity. The 
Amiga 500 has been positioned as ihc 
successor to the Commodore 64, a low- 
cost home computer that can work like 
an IBM and play like a Nintendo. Tiic 
Amiga 2(X)0 is tlic first CommcKiore 
computer since tlic business PET dial 
doesn't look out of place in the office. 
Commodore has been working to up- 
grade the Amiga hardware, to make il 
even more competitive. They've an- 
nounced development of auto-booting 
hard drives, a 68020 accelerator card, a 
chip set that provides a 400 line non- 
interlaced display, and a high-res 
(l(X)0x80()) mon(x;hromc monitor. 
They're even working on iranspuler 
technology to bring real mainframe pow- 
er to the Amiga, They're updating the 
system software, with work on versions 
1.3 iind 1.4 going on simultaneously. 

CkxxI software is available in all of the 
basic business categories, and ihc suc- 
cess of WordPerfect may lure more big 
names into the Amiga market. There's 
been an explosion of new games, as soft- 
ware dcvclo[Krs have tliscovcrcd diat the 
Amiga's hiirdwarc makes it easy lo cre- 
ate games that kx^k every bit as good as 
those in the tircadcs. And whole new 
software categories have arisen around 
the Amiga's unique graphics capabilities. 
While dierc's no 3D animation software 
to speiik of on the PC or Macintosh, 
there arc al lea.st five such programs for 
the Amiga, with two or three more in de- 
velopment. There arc a dozen or more 
pnxiucLs being sold for desktop video pro- 
duction, more dian ihc number of worti- 
proccssors available for ilie machine. 



Commodore's management finally 
seems to undcrsUind thai ihe Amiga has 
some natural vertical market niches like 
video production and presenialion graph- 
ics, and is targeting iliese markeLs. 
They're attending broadcast and comput- 
er graphics u-adc shows. They're basing 
their education market slralcgy around 
interactive video instruction. They're do- 
ing a lilUe advertising again, aiid will be 
doing more as Chrisuiias approaches. As 
a result, sales of ttie Amiga may reach 
one million worldwide this year, a figure 
which could provide die critical mass 
needed to assure its success. 

Ail of tliesc encouraging signs, 
however, may nol mean a thing 
in the face of the IBM juggcr- 
naul. When the Amiga was inuaiuccd in 
1985, iLs technology was clearly superior 
lo that of IBM. Since ihcn, its lead has 
been steadily eroding, as IBM "invcnicd" 
3.5 inch floppies, analog RGB monitors, 
and mulli-tiisking. In the last three years, 
the PC's proces.sor has gone froin a 4 
Mhz S-bii 8088, to a 32-bit 80386 run- 
ning at 25Mh/.. It's display has gone 
from 4-color CCA lo 256-color VGA. 
Someday scxin, OS/2 will finally arrive 
wiilT a real mulii-tasking windowing en- 
vironment. 

While IBM has been running hard, 
Commodore hasn't left iJic starting gale. 
It look the company two years just to re- 
package the old 10(K) technology into the 
2(X)0 and 5(K). Now tlicy seem lo Ix- 
smiled in development of stop-gap mea- 
sures like the 68020 accelerator board 
and higher-resolution displays. If a com- 
pimy llie size of CSA could protlucc a 
68020 card for the Amiga in 1986, why 
can'l a company the size of Commodore 
produce one by 1988? The answer ap- 
pears to be thai in cutting back expenses, 
Commodore has trimmed away most of 
its research and engineering suiff. The 
motto "The few, the proud, the remaining" 
seen on some board prototypes is no joke. 
Things arc hardly better on Uic soft- 



by Sheldon Leemon 



This column reflects the views of 
Sheldon Leemon, and is the result 
o1 whatever environmental, social, 
and genetic influences have 
shaped and molded his develop- 
ment. We don't necessarily agree 
with anything he says, though if it's 
abrasive, insightful, and fun, we 
probably do. 



ware side. Commodore siaffcrs were 
saying that version 1.3 was "substantially 
done" last October, and ycl ii stiil ha.sn't 
been released as of this writing. Arc we 
really supposed to believe ihal version 
1.4 will be ready "tx;fore the end of ihc 
year'".' The iruth is, ihc Amiga operating 
system is a big ;uid complex beast, with 
very few people lending il. Since the ctir- 
ly days at Amiga, it's basically been "one 
man, one module". There's one person in 
charge of Intuition, one in chiu'gc of 
graphics software, one for Ihc printer de- 
vice, one for the fasl Hie system, etc. 
Nowadays, most of these people aren't 
even Commodore employees, but arc in- 
dependent conuiictors, hired on for six 
montlis at a lime. Witlioui more software 
engineers, operating system improve- 
ments will continue to develop at a 
snail's pace. 

Ironically, just as tire Amiga seems to 
be gaining sales momentum, it is 
losing momentum as a technology 
leiidcr. If tlic company wants sales to 
keep improving, tlicy must increase the 
research and development clTori. Instead 
of lutzing around wilh 80286 Bridge- 
boards and 1.3, llicy should he working 
on a 68020-bascd 5(X) and a 68030-bascd 
Amiga 30(XI, both wiQi full 32-bit buses 
and higher-resolution displays. Most im- 
portantly. Commodore must conccninitc 
on getting new prtxiuct-s out prompUy. 
"Next year" is jusi not good enough. This 
year, the Amiga 500 is competing against 
an SIKX) Temdy 80286 computer. Next 
year, il may be competing against inuch 
[iiorc [TOwerful SIO(K) hi-rcs color 80386 
niacliines. 



Sheldon Leemon is one of the pioneers of microcomputer journalism. His 
bool<s include Mapping flie C64 and COMPUTE i's AmigaDos Reference 
Guide. He lives and works in Michigan. 



\. 



DMO-m Sept/Oct 1988 47 





lil^^''^^^^ 




QUANTUMLINK by Saul Cohen 



macto54-1525.sc)a and macto64-epsn.sda 
location: ml c64 software library/ graphics/ 
graptiic utilities/ printer conversion pgms 
2/28/88 27 blocks 
from: siamak (auttior: Siamak Ansari) 
suggested art files: nerdcomixl, nerdcom- 
ic2, nerdcomicS, cliparll, geishagirl 



Now you can view Macintosh grapfi- 
ics on your C64. Download tlic appro- 
prialc version of ihc program, tlicn 
download one of the Maciniosh graph- 
ics listed above. Load and run ihc cor- 
rect macto64 program. (If you don't 
have a compatible printer, cither pro- 
gram will work for viewing). It will self 
dissolve into a master program and a 
documentation file. Run the master pro- 
gram, and enter one of the graphic file- 



Macintosh graphics into GeoPaint for- 
mat. Download nuiconvert 2.3 to a gcos 
workdisk. Enter the geos environment 
and use the public domain convert pro- 
gram to translate it into working form. 
In the process, the name will be 
changed to macaiiack. Click its icon, 
select a filename, and in a few minutes 
you will have a translated GeoPaint 
graphic. 

dingbat.arc 

location: ess/ geos arenas/ user applications 

2/14/88 23 blocks 

Irom: J Hastings (author: J. Hastings) 




Macto64 displays a Macintosh graphic. 



names. Once loaded, you can view, 
move left, right, up, down, and rcsavc 
the picture as a Doodle! file. Of you 
have an 80 dpi printer, you can print the 
entire picture in compressed mode. 
Otherwise, you can print out the picture 
in pieces. 

maconvert 2.3 

location: ess/ geos arena/ software library/ 

user applications 

1/12/88 18 blocks 

from: red storm (author: Joe Buckley) 



dinghai.arc is a marvelous font for 
use in your GcoWrite and GeoPubiish 
documents. The author has used a font 
editor lo create exciting graph- 
ics instead of letters. With the 
dingbat font, you can highlight 
your articles with scrolls, eyes, 
stars and more. 

Download this file to a geos 
workdisk, then load and run the 
public domain arc230 utility. 
Translate ihc resulting two files 
using the convert program. One 
becomes the font file, while the 
other is a GeoWrite example. 
Print the example file so you 
will know which graphic goes 
with which key. 

arc-sda v4.6.sda 

location: ess/ c-64 software/ telecommunica- 
tions/ telecom utilities 

2/14/88 149 blocks 

from: bmark (author: B. Mark Rhodes) 



arc is a utility which links and com- 
presses several program files together. It 
saves uploading and downloading 



times. But the process needs lo be re- 
versed with arc once the program has 
been downloaded. An sda is a self- 
dissolving archive-a file composed of 
compacted programs that will load and 
run and unpack itself automalically. 
arc-sda converts arc files lo more con- 
venient sda files. 

pink 

location: ess/ c-64 software/ arcade/ other 

6/26/86 90 blocks 

from: johnm67 (author: Klatt) 



In this marvelous adaptation of an 
old game, you are first presented with a 
picture of ihc Pink Panther. The pro- 
gram then jumbles up the face into 15 
parts and an empty space. Your job is to 
move the parts back to tlicir original po- 
sition. Great for kids. This game is ad- 
dicting! 



c-128 bootmaker 

location: ess/ c-128 software/ applications/ 

other disk utHities 

12/31/87 34 blocks 

from: man/inmS (author: marvinmG) 



One nice feature of the CI 28 is its 
ability to load a designated program 
when you first power up. Now you can 
make your own programs autoboot too! 
Load and run C-128 bootmaker, and se- 
lect your program from a directory list- 
ing. In a few seconds, a boot sector will 
be written. Then simply rcss the reset 
button and watch your program boot. 



You can get information about signing 

up for ttiese network services by calling: 

QUAflTUMLINK; 

703-883-0788 

AMERICAN PEOPLELINK: 

312-670-2666 



With maconvert 2.3 you can translate 



Saul Cohen (INFO SC on QLink] is on eighth grade science and 
computer teacher in Montgomery County. Pennsylvania. 



v^ 



48 DMiFE) Sept/Oct 1988 




PEOPLELINK 64 and 128 by Robert Umfer 



PEOPLELINK 64 
SID NOTES 

Richmond, VA was ihe site of the 
1988 SID Fest from May 6-8. Many of 
the well-known names in SID composi- 
tion were present to give demonstra- 
tions, to offer helpful hints, and to 
release new songs. For several months 
in advance, SID composers were asked 
to write songs which would be released 
to the public during the Fest, The result 
of this, the SIDFEST '88 ALBUM, is 
now in section 6 of ihc Commodore 
Club in 6 separate files. Three of these 
files are for those with 
stereo capability (#8237, 
#8240, #8241); the re- 
maining three (#8236, 
#8238, #8239) are mono 
SID songs. Commodore 
Club members who con- 
tributed to the album are 
iLs music chairman Joe 
Grau (JABBA HUTT), 
Syl, Nick Z, Utah Blaine, 
Kermit Woodall, Bob- 
byE, Sir Jon, Whole 
Note, and Bob Umfer. 

Continuing with the SID theme, 
COMPUTE! has released a demonsua- 
tion program for playing enhanced SID 
songs (those whose names begin with a 
"I" in section 6). It's file #7979 and it's 
40 blocks long. If you wish to avoid 
COMPUTEl's advertisement screens 
each time you run this program, then 
download Joe Grau's BOOT.PROMO 
(#8057). It's only 4 blocks long. 

If your SID library has gotten out of 
hand, then Jerry Roth (Dr. J) has written 
just what you need. SID ORGANIZ- 
ER (#8062) will read up to 2500 SID 
files (including .WDS, .STR, .PIC) 
from your various disks and save the in- 
formation to disk, as well as print it out 
to your printer. There is even room for 
pertinent comments about each song. 

B.L. Copeland has uploaded an cx- 
Lraordin;iry SID utility to section 6. It's 
called SIDLISTER V2,l. and it's file 
#7949 (23 blocks long). Mr. Copland's 
program will read regular and enhanced 
sids and print the coding either to your 
screen or printer. It will even align the 
coding by measure, mjiking it much 
easier to read from paper. This is an ex- 



tremely well -written program, and 
comes in handy when you want to see 
the combinations of codes that others 
have used to create their sounds. 

John Turner has written SID 
TUNER Vl.O (#8060)-an excellent 
new SID utility. This program will load 
and play a .MUS file (plus a .STR file if 
your computer is stereo-capable), al- 
lowing you to adjust the voice settings 
and other commands as you listen! 
There is also an option to print out the 
current settings. The self-dissolving arc 
file has the program iuid player module, 
good documentation (accessible from 




within the program or printable with a 
SEQ file printer), and even a stereo SID 
for you to practice with. The file is 73 
blocks long. 

Finally, for a good laugh and a su- 
perb lesson in SID composition, down- 
load one of the most magnificent SID 
creations ever written. It's file #8118 
and it's called WAKEMOZART.MUS 
(14 blocks long). Who else but Syl 
could have transcribed a Mozart duct 
for rubber band and water glass to a 
SID file? 

JABBA HUTT is currently taking 
care of over 1300 SID files in section 6. 
There arc plenty of each kind to suit ev- 
eryone's taste in music. Type /QSC 
ALL and open your buffer to get a 
quick download of all available titles. 
Maybe the above utilities will convince 
you to write your first SID. Be sure to 
upload it here when you do. Remember, 
uploading is free. 



PEOPLELINK 128 

DM9.1 

Section 12 #5927 



Bob Osscntjuk has written a not-to- 
bc-without disk manager for the C128 
in cither 40 or 80 columns. Among 
many other commands, this file will al- 
phabetize your directory, insert com- 
ments about programs, insert file sepa- 
rators which use no disk blocks (see be- 
low), change your disk ID or name, or 
alter your directory in any order you 
wish. The standard DOS commands are 
also included in this BASIC file of 39 
disk blocks. 

UNIQUEST.SDA 

Section 1 #7945 



For those of you into adventure 
games, make sure you download this 
file. Your friend the last Unicom has 
been kidnapped. Your mission is to find 
him and rescue him. The game includes 
seven different cities, an array of dun- 
geons, monsters, weapons, etc. There 
are four levels of difficulty from easy to 
hard. There are on-screen instructions. 
This 150-block self-dissolving arc fde 
dissolves into 29 files. The game is disk 
operated. 

CSLIDE SHOW 128 
Section 10 #8044 



D.A. Hook has written a program 
which will permit you to show your 
Koalas and Doodles (whether normal or 
compressed) as an uninterrupted slide 
show on the 128 in 40-column mode. 
After you have finished downloading it, 
go to section 7, where over 350 files are 
available to show with this program. 
The file is in a self-dissolving arc for- 
mat to solve the Xmodem padding 
problem. It's 19 disk blocks long. 



Robert Umfer (CBM''BOB, Commodore Club Sysop on PLink) is a 
high school French and Spanish teacher. 



DMPE] Sept/Oct 1988 49 



'^^ 



PEOPLELINK AMIGA by Harv Laser 



FRACGEN.ARC 
Sections #12,070 
Author: Doug Houck 
54,016 bytes (executable only) 

There arc many Fracial and Mandel- 
brot pallern-gcncrators in the Zone li- 
brary. This is one of [he best. Written by 
Doug Houck (who also authored the 
commercial titles DOUG'S MATH 
AQUARIUM and DOUG'S COLOR 
COMMANDER reviewctl elsewhere in 
this issue), FracGen's arc file includes 
a lot of pre-built fractal designs which 
can be generated in a flash. You can 
modify these designs in many ways or 
create your own from scratch. The "na- 
ture" designs such as Cauliflower and 
Evergreen arc especially pretty. Frac- 
Gcn is a great piece of eye candy that's 
very fast and very easy to use. 

0RB1T3D.ARC 

Section 10 #12,058 

Author: R. Home 

146,048 bytes (executable only) 

This is an interesting arcade game. 
You arc in orbil about a black hole with 
your mother ship. While trying lo avoid 
being sucked down into the void, you 
shoot marauding asteroids and dock 
witli the motliership to refuel. The goal 
is to suiy in orbit as long as possible. 
Nice color with digitized sound effects. 
An interesting play mode features the 
old red/blue .3-d effect. (3-d glasses arc 
required for that mode - check your 
comic books or your local 7-1 1 store if 
you don't have the glasses.) This is the 
first true freely distributable 3-D game 
I've seen since i-D Breakout. 

PEEL. ARC 

Section 5, #12,079 

Author: Andy Lochbuam (ANDY L) 

12032 bytes (executable only) 

Peel is a program which uikcs a 
320x200 (low resolution) IFF picture 
and peels llic image off the screen while 
showing the back side of image, like 
(ape being pulled off glass. This peeling 
stiirts in ihc lower left comer and leaves 



the background 

(Color 0) behind, 
which makes it nice 
for genlock dis- 
solves. The peel 
rates vary from 25 
seconds to 1/10 sec- 
onds 10 peel, but a 
36 second precalcu- 
lation (with the pic- 
ture displayed) is 
required before 

each peel. It's a 
flashy effect and I 
expect it to show up 
in commercial animation 
sooner or later. 




software 



MUSEUM.ARC 

Section 5 #11,650 

Artist: Steve Hollasch 

85,376 bytes (ILBM picture with 

data files for DBW_Rendei) 



Museum isn't a program or an ani- 
mation, it's "just" a sialic picture.. .but 
what a picture! Museum look over three 
and a half weeks of Amiga computer 
time to raytrace after the data was creat- 
ed with a modified version of 
DBW_Render. This room is filled with 
delicious textures and lighting cffccls- 
so many that it's almost overwhelming. 
The small reprodLiciion above docs not 
do it justice. If you love Amiga graph- 
ics, don't miss Museum. This picture 
deserves a place in the "Ray Trace Hall 
of Fame". 

TYPEWRITER. ARC 
Section 9 #11,281 
Author: John D. Gerlach, Jr 
14,336 bytes (executable only) 



*^**# 



Typewriter allows easy use of your 
printer as a typewriter. It's perfect for 
desks that aren't large enough to hold: 
I) an Amiga; 2) a printer; and, 3) a 
typewriter. It is envisioned for use with 
cnvclo[KS, forms, ;ind oilier non- 
standard printing uses. A typewriter 



'meter' is displayed for easy placement 

of characters. Standard Amiga printer 
fonts and styles arc available by menu. 
For typewriter purists, actions of the 
backspace key, and shifted comma and 
period keys may be toggled. Great for 
those times when you don't need a full- 
powered word processor or text editor. 



VSCREEN.ZOO 

Section 11 #12,097 

Author: David Cervone 

54,016 bytes (executable only; 

source code available separately) 



•A-^A* 



vScreen is a virtual screen handler 
written by David P. Cervone o( Journal 
fame. vScreen gives you an automati- 
cally scrolling Workbench screen that is 
larger than your monitor display, up to 
about 1000 X 1000 pixels! It's terrific to 
move the mouse to the right or bottom 
edge of the screen and watch it scroll lo 
give you more room. Many programs 
will automalically adjust to the new 
screen size, imd there are utilities in- 
cluded lo coax the reluctant ones. You 
can drag CLl windows down or even 
off the visible screen and have more 
room. Its like working at a bigger desk. 
vScrcen foreshadows what will come 
"officially" from Commodore only with 
vl.4 of Workbench; it helps make the 
Workbench a better place to work and 
play. 



Harv Laser (CBM'HARV) is the Senior Chairman/Sysop of Plink's 
AmigaZone Club. 



50 m\Fm Sept/Oct 1988 



The Wriic Stuff S 19.95 
(S24.95 for talking version) 
Busy Bee Software 
PO Box 4655 

SanUi BcU-biira CA 93 140-4655 
il 805-736-8184 




by Kari T. Thurber Jr. 

The Wriie Stuff is a collcclion of 
wordprocessing and utility programs 
that includes a very complete word pro- 
cessor (BB Writer), a talking counier- 
part {BB Talker), and a printer cus- 
loniizcr. Three freeware utilities 
arc included: BB File Reader, BB 
Menu Maker, and BB Manual 
Maker. Promised arc a CI 28 ver- 
sion, spelling checker, and the- 
saurus. 

The package is designed to 
serve beginners who require an 
casy-to-usc word handler, as well 
as more advanced users who de- 
mand a full plate of productivity 
features. Accordingly, I'he Write 
Stuff offers two mocics of opera- 
lion: menu and command-driven. 

Documentation consists of a 60-pagc 
rcrcrcncc manual, a 12-page mini- 
manual, and a C64 keyboard overlay. 
The reference manual has bolli a de- 
tailed table of conlcnls and an index, .so 
finding things is easy. 

FEATURES 

Despite its low price and plain-Jane 
packaging, The Write Stuff is far from 
suippcd-down. Il features a full com- 
plcmcni of advanced features, including 
flexible search and rcjilacc, mail merge, 
complete text manipulation, soft hy- 
phenation, one-pass columnar printing, 
columnar son, file append and merge, 
justification, hciulers and footers, and 
much more. It also supports multiple 
and dual drives, and multiple printing 
Icalures. The program holds 22K of text 
and has a 9K buffer. 

The Write Stiiff can save documents 
as .sequential or program files, set up 
macros, encrypt and decrypt text, siorc 



two documents in memory simultane- 
ously, and switch between the standiu-d 
QWERTY and the more efficient Dvo- 
rak keyboard. There's about 86K of on- 
disk documentation which includes 60 
help files, three in-mcmory help 
screens, and 26 sample files and tutori- 
als. 

Other advanced features include 80- 
column text preview; 1764 RAM ex- 
pander support; a 21 -function calcula- 
tor; a file u-anslator Uiat accommodates 
15 wordproccssor formaus; kcyclick 
sound toggle; anti numerous customiza- 
tion options. SulTicc it to say, if you can 
think ofit, 'I'lw Write Stuff m\\ probably 
do il. 



FLASH!!! A new version of The 
Write Stuff is available that 
works with the Quick Brown Box 
battery-backed RAM cartridge. It 
lets you load and run TWS in 
seconds from the Brown Box, 
and also saves text as vou type 
into Box RAM. What a concept! 
[See INFO'S Quick Brown Box 
review elsewhere in this issue.] 

-Mark 



iLJ 



Busy Bee Sottvare PresenTs 



t^iSU* 



~^^j:^ 



''k 






_C i.. 









'mB^.^"^. 



BB Writer , 



BB FrinlPrTi 



BB File Reader 



BB Manual Maker 



s^*^m^- 



^ 



■■l'-:i- 



SPEECH 

The talking version {BB Talker) in- 
cludes S.A.M., the Software Automatic 
Moulh, m early C64 software speech 
synthesizer. BB 'I'alkcr recites any por- 
tion of your icxi, and can even an- 
nounce each letter and command as it is 
typed. It comes equipped with several 
familiiir nursery rhymes and songs that 
can be loaded into the wordpr(x;essor 
and played back. S.A.M.''a nine voices 
sound mechanical and "computery," but 
understandable. The possibilities are 
there for realistic "talking text" for the 
visually impaired and preschoolers. 

IMPRESSIONS 

The Write Stuff is an unusual prod- 
uct. My initial impression was tliat 



S.A.M. was a silly add-on. But this in- 
novation does a credible job. I know of 
at least one blind ircrson who is able to 
exchange leuers with others using The 
Write Sniff. 

As a wordproccssor. The 
Write Stuff holds its own with 
ilie best-selling, slickly pack- 
aged C64 producls-and at a 
nnich lower price. Don't be 
f(X)led by the package, which 
still has the "look and feci" of a 
uscrwarc or shareware product 
going commercial. Its only real 
shortcoming is dial it presently 
lacks a spelling checker and the- 
saurus. 

While The Write Stuff works 
fine righl oul of llic bag, programmers 
can have endless fun customizing and 
enhancing it. I wouldn't be surprised to 
sec an after-market grow up around The 
Write Stuff like that around Compute! 
magazine's wordproccssor, Speedscripl. 
And, thanks lo an early discount offer 
by Busy Bee to user groups, plenty of 
involved C64 users already own a copy 
of 'The Write Stuff. 

SUMMING UP 

If you're searching for a poslformat- 
ting wordproccssor tliat's equally at 
home among children and power users. 
The Write Stuff may be "ihc right stuff 
for you. It's an impressive product, one 
that's healthy competition for Paper- 
Clip 111, Fleet System 4, and others in 
their class. 



Kari Thurber is a 22-year Air Force veteran, and he's been a columnist tor 
CQ Magazine for 8 years. Karl's a member of his local users group, the 
Montgomery Area Commodore Komputer Society (MACKS). 



DK](F(D] Sept/Oct 1988 51 



Comal Power Driver 




Comal Power Driver 

S31.95 

Comal Users Group 

550 1 Groveland Terrace 

Madison, WI 53716 

608-222-4432 

JIL, 



F3 



by Don Romero 

COMAL is significantly faster than 
BASIC, is struciured like Pascal, has a 
full compliment of LOGO commands, 
includes powerful editing functions, is 
widely popular in Europe, has a nation- 
al COMAL Users Group, numerous 
books, and PD programs, and-besl of 
all-is free! 

So why hasn't COMAL caught on? 
Three things: For one, the CO- 
MAL O.M interpreter is a huge 
program which lakes forever to 
load, and it leaves only 8K of 
memory for programs. For an- 
other, the typical Commodore 
64 user prefers BASIC because 
it's 'there'. Finally, COMAL 
programs are not 'stand alone' 
-they only run under CO- 
MAL. 

Power Driver won't make 
the programming world free 
for COMAL, but it does offer 
partial solutions to several 
problems. The package in- 
cludes Power Driver il.self, a revised 
version of COMAL 0.14, and a CO- 
MAL compiler program for creating 
standalone COMAL 0.14 or Power 
Driver programs. {COMAL 2.0 car- 
tridge owners note: tlic compiler is not 
compatible with v2.0 programs!) There 
is a tutorial disk, sample subroutines 
and programs, and a slimmish manual 
in a nice COMAL ring binder. Also in- 
cluded arc previously released COMAL 
utility disks and books Three (function 
and procedure libraries) and Nine (utili- 
ties) of the "Amazing Adventures of 
Captain Comal". The Power Driver/ 
compiler disk is not copy protected; but 
it is definitely iiot intended for public 
domain distribution. 



POWER DRIVER 

Power Driver itself is an enhanced 
version of COMAL 0.14, with almost 
16K of user programming space (15,324 
bytes), cind several new commands port- 
ed down from COMAL v2.0, including 
GETS, INKEYS, INPUT AT, STRS, 
VAL, DIR, PRINT AT, TIME, FREE, 
BYE, three logical bitwise operators, and 
ctirsor positioning commands. Power 
Driver also addresses the old up- 
per/lowercase problem, and is compati- 
ble with version 2.0 in that regard. 

COMAL COMPILER 

The manual slates that "the purpose 
of a compiler is to turn a program into 
a standalone file that may be run inde- 
pendent of any programming lan- 
guage." At this, the COMAL compiler 



mi 



SCREEN 
STOP 



QUIT 



F5 



SEE 



VIOUS 5 
EXAMPL 



TfEOr 



PENDOUN 

AFTER THIS COMMAND. WHEM YOU MOVE THE 
TURTLE IT MILL 1>RAH AS IT MOVES. 




PENDOUN 



NO PARAMETERS 



succeeds admirably. Note that compiled 
versions of poorly written COMAL 
programs (particularly tho.sc lacking 
graceful exits and/or which fail to 
disable the RUN/STOP key) typically 
lock up the computer. 

Compilers usually optimize a 
program's speed, too. The COMAL 
compiler offers no speed increase, but 
then COMAL is already significantly 
faster than BASIC. 

Finally, compilers usually opti- 
mize the size of the runtime package 
and reduce the size of the program be- 
ing compiled. The COMAL compiler is 
seriously problematic in this regard. 

Using ihe compiler is simple. 
It's loaded from BASIC, and prompts 
the user to insert a disk with program to 



be compiled. It then reads the disk di- 
rectory and offers the user a choice. 
Once that's made, the compiler reads 
the file and checks the program; then it 
prompts for the disk that the program is 
to be compiled to, and the new file 
name. Finally, it saves the COMAL 
runtime package (about 20K or 82 
blocks in size) to disk and lacks the 
compiled COMAL program on the end 
of that. 

The problem is that each and every 
compiled program includes the full run- 
time package, wreaking havoc on load- 
ing times and di.sk space. A simple 
2.5K, 10 block COMAL utility com- 
piles to a 23K, 92 block monstrosity. 
An UK, 45 block COMAL program 
compiled to 127 blocks-virlually the 
same size as COMAL itself! Just six 
compilefi COMAL programs could ab- 
sorb 492 blocks, or over 120K 
of disk space in runtime pack- 
age duplication alone. (By 
comparison, the average BA- 
SIC 7.0 compiler adds a run- 
time library that is only half as 
long-about 40 blocks.) 

A COMAL compiler may 
be ihc most requested addition 
by COMAL users, but this one 
needs some options. An option 
for a "load once" runtime 
package, separate from the 
compiled programs, would 
rate at least one star better. A 
'smarter' compiler (possibly 
one which turns structured COMAL in- 
to pure machine language) would 
probably make this a five-star product. 

CONCLUSIONS 

Users of COMAL 0.14 should con- 
sider this package primarily for the ad- 
vanced features of Power Driver, and 
for the ability to compile COMAL pro- 
grams into suind-alone applications, 
which makes it easier to share pro- 
grams with non-COMALitcs. They will 
probably be too large for realistic BBS 
uploading and downloading, however. 
And compiled programs take up way 
too much disk space to be practical for 
mass conversion; you'll be better off 
keeping most of your library as exe- 
cutable COMAL files. O 



52 m\Fm Sept/Oct 1988 



Flexidraw 5.5 




HHJiHF^lH^lKMi(S^ 



Flexidraw 5.5 

S34.95 

Inkwell Systems 
5710 Ruffin Road 
San Diego C A 92123 
619-268-8792 



By Paul A. Hughes 

Flexidraw Version 2.1 was first intro- 
duced in the Winter 1983/84 Issue #2 of 
INFO=64 magazine. Flexidraw 5.5, the 
latest version of this high-resolution 
drawing program, now enables Com- 
modore 64 users to create professional 
quality computer graphics 
using the data entry device 
of their choice. Anyone can 
use Flexidraw to produce 
artwork ranging from simple 
freehand sketches to detailed 
technical drawings quickly 
and easily. 

Version 5.5 has added the 
ability to use other input de- 
vices besides the lightpen for 
which it was originally de- 
signed. It now supports the 
Commodore 1351 mouse. 
Koala pad, and joystick, as 
well as Inkwell's 170-C 
touch tip and 184-C two button light 
pens. The original Flexidraw package 
contained the software and 170-C light 
pen and cost SI 50. Now the software 
can be purchased for under one-fourdi 
the price and be used with any input de- 
vice. 

FEATURES 

Flexidraw features a dynamic on- 
screen menu with full audio/video feed- 
back. One can freehand draw, create au- 
tomatic geometric shapes, and add text 
to a drawing. It has excellent support 
for custom character fonts. There is a 
"split-screen" feature which allows you 
to do more detailed work between two 
screens linked cither horizontally or 
vertically. A Pen Paiclie program is in- 
cluded on the disk so that you can paint 
pictures using 16 high resolution colors. 
One can also print on a number of black 



and white or color printers and plotters 
using a variety of interfaces. 

INPUT OPTIONS 

The joystick as a drawing tool is 
masochisdc; it should only be used for 
maze or arcade games where up/down 
left/right and diagonal movements are 
required. 

The Koala pad is a natural drawing 
device, but it is a bit jittery. Drawing 
with the pad is like scratching on a 
teflon frying pan. And the Koala pad is 
not available for Commodore comput- 
ers any more. 

The light pen is the most natural de- 
vice with which to draw; like a pen with 
paper. But your arm can get tired hold- 




ing the pen up to the screen while 
reaching over your computer. It is a lit- 
tle like having a siring attached to your 
wrist like a puppet. One also has to 
watch out for static which could cause 
stray lines to occur. The single button 
light pen-the 170-C anodized alu- 
minum barrelled one— is heavy, but the 
touch lip gives a nice tactile feel. The 
two button light pcn-184-C U-i-lobular 
plastic one- takes a while to get used to. 
It is lightweight and has very touchy 
buttons [see review in INFO #20}. With 
either light pen, one has to watch out 
for the cord. 

The Commodore 1351 mouse is a 
true proportional mouse with 360 de- 
gree control. It is very accurate; you 



can create smooth curves with this 
mouse. With a mouse, the user can sit 
back and relax and watch the screen 
without being right in front of it. Draw- 
ing with a mouse is like drawing with a 
bar of soap and scrubbing a surface, 
and using one could cramp your hand if 
used for a prolonged period of time. 
Moving a mouse around lakes up a 
good amount of desk space, and the 
cord often gets tangled. But once you 
get used to it, the mouse can be very 
easy lo use. 

The mouse and two button light pen 
are ideal for Flexidraw, because one but- 
ton is for pointing and selecting menu 
options and the odier is used for setting 
origin points. The touch tip light pen. 
Koala pad, and joystick have 
to use the back arrow key on 
the keyboard. 

And you can use more 
than one input device with 
Flexidraw at the the same 
time. By pressing the C= 
SHIFT and L, M, P, and J 
keys, one can switch be- 
tween the light pen, mouse. 
Koala pad and joystick. 

CONCLUSION 

Flexidraw is a very good 
high-resolution drawing pro- 
gram. It has many standard 
features found in most drawing pro- 
grams, and a few unique ones. Because 
so many input devices are now support- 
ed, anyone should be able to pick one 
he likes. The light pen and mouse are 
recommended for freehand sketching. 

Inkwell Systems had a logo designed 
by Wayne Schmidt for slickers on ver- 
sion 5.0 boxes and T-Shirts; it was a 
mouse holding a light pen standing be- 
hind a universal "no" symbol (a circle 
with a slash through it). The slogan 
said: "!i's Not Natural To Draw With a 
Mouse!" I guess Inkwell has decided lo 
now let the users decide whether they 
prefer the light pen or mousc-or the 
Koala pad or joystick, for that matter. 



Paul Hughes is SYSOP PH in QuantumUnk's Graphics Forum. He and his twin 
brother Peter are respected Commodore graphic artists on both the C64 
and the Amiga. 



DM[F(D] Sept/Oct 1988 53 



rOO:i)0^(IMMH)^?ll®=i 



Quick Brown Boxes 
S69, S99,S129 
Brown Boxes, Inc. 
26 Concord Road 
Bedford, MA 01730 
617-275-0090 



by Tim Sickbert 

A long lime ago (it seems), auto-start 
cartridges were very popular. Now 
Brown Boxes has revived them with us- 
cr-progr;immable, battery-backed, auto- 
start cartridges, packaged with utilities 
that will also dlow you lo 
use them as RAMdisks. 

THE HARDWARE 

Quick Brown Boxes are 
standard-size cartridges with 
a sliding C64/CI28 mode 
switch, a push-button reset 
switch, and 64K, 32K, or 
16K of RAM. The reset 
switch restarts the computer 
and leaves RAM intact on a 
C64; on a CI 28, it performs 
a standard reset. Inside the 
box is a custom pc board, 3 
ICs, a couple of CMOS RAM chips, a 
few miscellaneous componenLs, and a 
battery. No miracles in this black, cr. 
Brown Boj:-just clean design. 

The RAM is configured into 16K 
byte banks which can be mapped into 
memory at address S8000. On ttic C64, 
BASIC must be mapped out lo see the 
full 16K; on the CI28, external applica- 
tion ROM must be banked in and the 
clock set SLOW. The ctulridgc u.ses 
SDEOO as the control port, leaving 
SDFOO available for Commodore's 
RAM expansion units. Thus, the two 
are theoretically compatible, given an 
expansion board lo plug boih cartridges 
in at the same time. 

THE SOFTWARE 

With the Brown Boxes come four 
utilities: the C64 and C128 Managers, 
the QBB Loader, and a checksum pro- 
gram. Jim Bullerfield's venerable and 



enduring C64 Superman and a couple of 
other progriuns arc also included. 

The manager programs conurol ini- 
tialization, loading and deleting pro- 
grams, and saving the entire conienLs to 
disk. This lets you set up and store 
many different box setups to disk. They 
can be restored using the QBB Loader. 

The Brown Boxes can be initialized 
several different ways, but must be ini- 
tialized specifically for C64 or C128 
use; if you switch modes, you must 
reinitialize the Box (at least if you are 
using the Manager). 

If you want to load programs from 
computer memory into the box without 
the manager, you can initialize the box 



There is now a version of The 
Write SfL/ffwordprocessorforthe 
064 that keeps both program 
and data in the Quick Brown 
Box. This makes for instant pro- 
gram operation, power-down re- 
covery, and easy transportability 
from machine to machine. See 
Karl Thurber's review elsewhere 
in this issue. -Mark 




to act as a RAMdisk. Set up lliis way, 
the cartridge supplies a wedge for load- 
ing, saving, and deleting programs from 
the cartridge. On 32K and 64K boxes, 
16k can be set aside as unnamed pro- 
gram storage where single keystrokes 
can save and load a program. 

Four kcysu-okcs quickly load a pro- 
gram from the box into computer 
memory. Any single program can also 
be a.ssigncd to auiostitrt each time the 
computer is turnai on, iuid programs 
can be linked. 

PROGRAMMING THE BOX 

While the manager utilities provide 
easy access to the box, llic real potential 
is l^or custom applications. Think of it 
as a programmable cartridge without 



ihc EPROMs; every time the computer 
is turned on, the program runs automat- 
ically-and data can be saved to the car- 
tridge as well! A couple of POKEs is all 
it takes lo control the car- 
tridge and lo flip between its 
banks. Once mapped into 
ihe computer's address 
space, you can treat the box- 
es as normal RAM. 

EVALUATION 

The Brown Boxes arc 
good, .solid, well-designed 
hardware; I can find no Haw 
there or in the C64 Manager. 
The CI28 Manager, though, 
has some rough edges. The 
wedge grabs the BASIC er- 
ror vector (S03(X)) and routes it through 
ihc RS232 buffer (SOCOO). This causes 
problems: if you try lo enter FAST 
mode without reselling ihe vector, you 
go to the ML monitor and can't get out; 
also, running a terminal program or a 
utility tliat uses RAM at SOCOO effec- 
tively kills the manager. 

If you want to make a custom car- 
tridge but don't want to burn EPROMs, 
look no further—the Brown Boxes arc 
perfect. And as a RAMdisk, the box is 
fine, but the software manager and the 
wedge are likely to gel in the way of 
many programs, especially commercial 
ones, making it more of a nuisance lo 
use than you might hope. All in all, an 
excellent product. 



Tim Sickbert. who was the editor of the legendary Midnite Software Gazette, 
now writes manuals for Computer Teaching Corp. of Champaign, IL. 



54 OIKiaFEl Sept/Oct 1988 



r 



Supergraphix Gold 



64/128 



Supergraphix Gold 



r ^ 



SI 19.95 

Xelcc 

2804 Arnold Road 

Salina, KS 67401 

913-827-0685 



by Don Romero 

Supergraphix Gold is the latest Xelcc 
graphic printer interface. It offers twice 
as many online fonts (8), twice as many 
user mode settings (8) and twice the 
buffer RAM (32k) of its predeces- 
sor,. .and even has two reset buttons! 
Printer support has been expanded to 
include the Star NB-24 and Panasonic 
KX-r}524 24-pin printers. 

The hardware has been improved all 
around. SG Gold is in a mcud case witli 



a Centronics printer connector on 

an 18" cable, and comes with a sep- 
arate plug-in power supply. There 
are two sets of DIP switches for 
font, printer, and mode selection. 

The manual is greatly improved 
in virtually all aspects, but the pro- 
grams on the dcmo/uliliiy disk arc 
still relatively unimpressive. And 
the downloadable font selection 
does not include all of Xetcc's 
fonts, though some of them arc new. 

New tools include: expanded BASIC 
listing modes, double height font print- 
ing, and a simple "banner" command. 
And the SupcrGraphix Gold can down- 
load data from disk very quickly-very 
nice. 

SG Gold has expanded graphic dump 
capabilities, with about 64 combinations 
of height, width, and darkness. Howev- 
er, only hi-res bitmap files arc supix)rt- 
ed, excluding popular Doodle, Koala, 




Print Shop, and Newsroom formats. 
There is also a limited method for mix- 
ing text and graphics. 

Someday, a dol-mau-ix printer inter- 
face with an unbciilablc array of func- 
tions may become tlie poor hacker's an- 
swer to the laser printer; but technology 
isn't quite up to that sUige yet. If you 
need the best, Supergraphix Gold is the 
state-of-llic-art in printer interfaces, and 
I recommend it highly. O 



Symbol Master v2.0 




Symbol Master v2.0 849.95 
Schncdler Systems 
25 Eastwood Rd, 
PO Box 5964 
AshevilleNC28813 
(704) 274-4646 



by David Martin 

Symbol Master is a multi-pass sym- 
bolic 6502/6510/8502 assembly lan- 
guage disassembler for the C64 and 
CI 28. If you are not familiar with 
symbolic disassemblers, you may not 
realize the benefits of using one. The 
traditional method of studying ma- 
chine language consisted of examining 
"source" code produced by a machine 
language monitor (MLM). With an 
MLM's disassembly feature, you could 
produce assembly code listings of a 
program on paper, and then you could 



analyze the program by hand. 

Assuming that your extensive analy- 
sis of the program is over, you'd proba- 
bly Wtint to make changes in the pro- 
gram, right? If you do, then be prepared 
to take out the monitor and key in all 
the program source code. You won't 
necessarily like that piu^t, since typing 
in 16k of hex code or assembler data is 
not fun! A good symbolic disassembler 
like Symbol Master, can help you to 
avoid all that hard work and let the 
computer do the messy parLs quickly 
and efficiently. 

Symbol Master produces a source 
code listing of a program in minutes 
rather than hours. It generates symbols 
for all program entry points, subrou- 
tines, branches, daui liiblcs, etc. You 
can specify labels for the addresses 
used, or Symbol Master will generate 
its own coded symbols automatically, 
based on its knowledge of the 
C64/C128 memory maps. 

Source code listings can be directed 
to the printer or disk. Disk files can be 



modified using your favorite assem- 
bler's editor. Currently Symbol Master 
will create source code that is compati- 
ble with these assemblers: CBM, Devel- 
op 64, LADS. Merlin. MAE, PAL, and 
Panther. 

Symbol Master also has brains be- 
hind the brawn. It will effcclivcly han- 
dle "bil-.skips", which occur when pro- 
grams use the hit insu-uction to skip the 
next one or two bytes. Symbol Master 
will also handle disassembly of undocu- 
mented opcodes and opcodes com- 
patable with 65C02 cpus (in, for in- 
stance, MSD disk drives). 

Symbol Master Is a very impressive 
package with few shortcomings. In fact, 
the power of this program has far sur- 
passed my initial ex(x;clations. 1 highly 
recommend Symbol Master to anyone 
wiiJi even a minor interest in assembly 
language programming. This utility is a 
great tool to have in your program li- 
brary for programming, software analy- 
sis, or just plain hacking iiround. O 



DMiFm Sept/Oct 1988 55 



C128 Developers Package 

S50.00 

Commodore Business Machines 

1200 Wilson Dr. 

West Chcsicr PA 19380 

215^36^4200 



by Robert W. Baker 

If you are doing serious machine lan- 
guage developmcnl for 8-bit Com- 
modore systems, then you will defi- 
nitely want a copy of the oilicitiJ Com- 
modore in-house CI2S Developers 
Package. It's tlic most complete devel- 
opment package currently 
available at any price, and in- 
cludes a wide assortment of 
extra information and tools 
beyond the expected editor 
and assembler. As the name 
implies, this is a complete de- 
veloper's package. 

MAJOR EQUIPMENT 

The C12S Developers 
Package includes two double 
sided (flippy) diskettes and an 
extensive manual. Although 
designed to be used on any 
Commodore 128 system, it 
works best with an 80 column 
display and more than one disk drive. A 
printer is, however, almost a necessity. 
Though the editor, assembler, and loader 
run only on the C128, many of the l(K)ls 
and utilities can also be used on a C64. 

The EDI28 Editor is a full screen 
editor for the C128 that operates like 
the ZTDV editor from Digitiil Equipment 
Corp. !t supporus botli standiu^d ASCII 
and the Commodore PETASCII charac- 
ter sets. There are online help screens, 
and it has all the high-powered editing 
features you could want. It's also very 
simple to use; everything is controlled 
by tlic function keys and the numeric 
keypad. 

The HCD65 Macro Assembler is a 
powerful and full-featured macro as- 
sembler for the 65xx family of mitro- 
proccssors. It uses the standard MOS 



Technology insu^uction mnemonics and 
addressing syntax. It supporLs condi- 
tionals (to 10 levels deep), local labels, 
cross-references, plus a large assorunent 
of directives. 

The assembler accepts sequential text 
files from disk, and generates three out- 
put files: an object file, a listing file, 
and ;ui error file. Each of these files has 
a specific channel associated with it that 
can be defined along with other parame- 
ters in a BASIC shell suirtup program. 
File and project sizes are generally lim- 
ited only by available disk space. 

The Object file Loader is simple but 
fast; it reads standard MOS-HEX object 
files created by the assembler into com- 
puter memory. From there it's a simple 




matter to save the object code to disk as 
an executable binary file using the 
CI28 ROM monitor. The loader resides 
in bank zero from hex address SI 300 to 
S17FF, so you'll have to do a litde relo- 
cating to load files that normally use 
that area. 

ADDITIONAL TOOLS 

In the collection of tools, you'll find 
Commodore's SPRED sprite editor, the 
CURED character editor, and the SID- 
MON SID chip sound editor. All of 
these tools run only in C64 mode. 

The developer's package also in- 
cludes source code for three different 



fast load routines for die C64, and for 
three helpful routines for expansion 
RAM support in the C64 and C128. 
Plus you'll find commented source 
code of 1351 mouse drivers for the C64 
and C128, and 1571 and 1581 burst 
load routines for the C128. 

DOCUMENTATION 

The detailed manual is over 250 
pages in length and provides complete 
descriptions of every feature of the 
package. It also provides a detailed list- 
ing of ROM differences in the C128, 
the 1571 disk drive, and the SX64 
portiibic system. The last chapter con- 
tains information on the BASIC 7.0 
floating point math package convcn- 

tions, aridimetic routine 

calling conventions, and 
more. I don't think I've 
.seen this type of infor- 
mation presented any- 
where since the Ciirly 
PET systems. This is one 
of die most complete de- 
velopment packages I've 
seen for any system, and 
includes more than 
enough information for 
the serious programmer. 
The package assumes 
that you know machine 
language programming 
and the 65xx micropro- 
cessors. It does not cover the basics of 
assembly language programming such 
as programming style or techniques. 

CONCLUSION 

This is an excellent package for de- 
velopers and experienced programmers. 
Everything is well documented, easy to 
use, and flexible enough to accomplish 
almost any desired project. The added 
system information and sample source 
files are very helpful additions. All in 
all, you won't want to be without this 
package if you intend to do any serious 
programming for the CI 28. 



Robert Baker runs the popular New Products Forum on QuantumLink, and is 
a regular columnist for Commodore Magazine. You can reach him on QLink 
as RBaker. 



56 DMPD] Sept/Oct 1988 



BrainSlorm 2.0 

S22.00 

Country Road Soflwarc 

70284 C.R. 143 

Ligonier IN 46767 

219-894-7278 

■Ji-. 



by Robert Umfer 

BrainSlorm is an idea-grouping pro- 
gram. You're asked to slari typing in 
ideas-don'i worry aboul sentences- 
one by one until your brain stops pro- 
ducing Ihcm, or until you reach 100 or 
them, whichever occurs first. After a sc- 
ries of comparisons, they are grouped in 
a quasi-outlinc form. Another menu 
now allows you to edit and eventually 
print these ideas. 

The author, Mark Jordan, has made 
his program very user-friendly, so that 



using his very wcU-wriiicn 32-page 
manual is almost unnecessary. Help 
menus appear by pressing the most logi- 
cal keys. Mr. Jordan has worked very 
long and hard on perfecting his pro- 
gram, but who would benefit from it? 
As a high school teacher 1 can avow 
thai tlic average teenager could certainly 
use this program for his English or So- 
cial Studies class. The person who has 
no trouble arranging his thoughts (and 
notes) would have less use for it, unless 
he just enjoys using his computer. 

Brainpower, llie other program in 
the package, is a wordprocessor. It is 
complete; it docs just aboul everything 
that the bcllcr-known wordprocessors 
do. My main complainl is that it docs 
not make use of the RAM Expansion 
Units for the 128, something that Mr. 
Jordan should consider for future up- 
dates. Brainpower has plenty of help 
menus available at the touch of a key. 
This is a fine wordprocessor for somc- 




Reader 
jtlaif 



continued from page 6 



QuanlumLink Mail From: The 
Duff 

I really like your magazine a lot, 
but it seems ihat you are going 
inorc and more Amiga, I think 
that's great, but I would still like to 
see more for the C64 and the C128. 
Is everybody going to just give up 
on the C64 & C128, and go full 
force with the Amiga? Did I make 
a mistake by buying a computer 
that everybody is going to turn 
their backs on? I'd really appreci- 
ate some feedback on this! I would 
just like to know what is going to 
happen to C64 & C128 support. 
Thanks, Michael Duff 



We get a lot of mail from readers who 
arc concerned about the future of the 



one starting out with his 128 who docs 
not yet own one. The price is certainly 
right ($22 for boOi programs, including 
posliigc and hiuidling). 

Mark Jordan's effort on both pro- 
grams is to be comiTicndcd. He is a tal- 
ented programmer who understands llic 
128 completely. I hope that we will sec 
even more of his programs 
appci.u'iiig on tlic market. 
These two programs will * 
appeal lo botli tlic novice 
and advanced computer 
user as well. 





'because you never really know when a good 
idea is going to t^appen. ' 



C64 and CI 28. We won't feed you a line 
like the 01 her Commodore magazines 
about how "aciive and vital" the CBM 
8-bit marketplace is- truth is. the C64 & 
CI28 market is slowing down. Wc are 
receiving less new C64IC128 software 
every month. Games are still very 
strong, but it's obvious that most of the 
major software houses have cut way 
back on producing; new non-game lilies 
for the S-bit Commodore market. (But 
the same thing is also happening to the 
8-bit Apple market.) Many of ihem are 
making the transition to MS/DOS, the 
Amiga, or the Macintosh. GEOS is still 
a very active area, and wc still sec oc- 
casional new noteworthy titles like EA's 
Paperclip Publisher But software com- 
panies go where the profits are. Com- 
modore is still selling C64s and CJ28s 
like crazy, but rumor has it that Com- 
modore's marketing peple arc projecting 
an "Amiga-only" 1989 Christmas sea- 
son (that's next year, gang), and from 
what we're observing, they may he 
right. Don't gel us wrong-CBM 8-bil 
machines are great, and we promise to 



pass along every bit of C64 and C12S 
news and information thai wc can get 
our hands on. But it's slowing down, 
folks, and that's a fad. 

-Mark & Benn 



QuanlumLink Mail From: Lou 
Sander 

1 just heard ihai my name has 
appeared in your magazine. It was 
pointed out to mc that you spelled 
it "Sanders", which it is not . Like 
some politicians, I don't care what 
you say aboul me, but just be sure 
to spell my name right l Regards, 
Louis F. Sander 



Tom (who was responsible for that par- 
ticidar mistake) has been punished by 
having lo watch us all cat a Godiva 
Chocolate Tone in front of him. Sorry, 
Louis! 

-Murk & Renn 

More Reader Mail on page 73 



mwm Sept/Oci 1988 57 



BmK Disy 



(Q)E/s\©C={] 



umcu. 





mmi 



5 Kini^'''*'*^ 




lllw 


^flS 


^^/s^hH 


^^^^^^^■kJ 


' tHftSwdBw 


^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^1 


fT:-^^^^HIH 


r f ^^^B^^^H 


I'^^^H^^H 


|L 9^^^H 


^^^^^HH 


P'f^^^^^^n 




MHnl^Hfl 


i 


WW 


T^^^^*^5^p^p^^ ' 1 




BACK ISSUES ARE $5.50 EACH 



USE THE TEAR OUT ORDER CARD or 
CHARGE BY PHONE WITH YOUR VISA or MASTERCARD (319) 338-0703 



Deluxe Help 



by Mark Smith 

It is a proven fact that learning by 
experinientation is far more effec- 
tive than hearing about someone 
else's experience. With that idea as a 
catalyst, the Amiga has bred a concept 
so innovative thai it may change the 
way Amiga software is written. 

RGB Video Creations has devel- 
oped a system thai they call the Deluxe 
Instructor Interface. This forms the 
kemal of the Deluxe Help series, 
which has been produced for Deluxe 
Paint 11. Digi-Painl. CalUgrapher, 
and, most recently. Photon Paint. Sim- 
ply put, the Deluxe Instructor is an on- 
line interactive tutorial which coexists 
with a host program to guide the user 
on a slep-by-sicp tutorial on the fea- 
tures of thai program. 

Not many people can resist the urge 
to tear the wrapper off their newly- 
purchased program and dive right into 
it with careless abandon. Secretly, you 
are hoping that you never have to pick 
up the manual. Nevertheless, when you 
hit a snag you are eventually going to 
have to read it. The Deluxe Help tutori- 
als satiate your desire to play while giv- 
ing you the detailed information thai is 
generally provided only by a manual. 

Each of the Deluxe Help tutorials 
works basically the same. The Deluxe 
Paint II tutorial will run in a 512k sys- 
tem, though the others require at least 
one meg of RAM; all need two drives. 
(Remember, you are running two very 
heavy-duty programs!) Once the 
Deluxe Help disk has loaded all of its 
modules, it will ask you for the host 
disk; i.e. Digi-Painl, Deluxe Pain! If, 
CalUgrapher, or Photon Paint. Then ihc 
lesson begins. The Deluxe Instructor 
displays an array of menus which ad- 
dress almost every feature of the host 
program. Choosing a lesson from the 
menu is all that is needed to gel started. 
Every lesson begins with an informa- 
tive text description that gives a little 
insight into what the selected feature is 
and what it will do for you. Following 
the text, you arc placed into the host 
program (we'll use Digi-Paint as an ex- 




Coli 



^ 



SIEHCIL QTECIS 



A STEBClt is created by lockinj the the cokrs that Hake up an iHatfe, Alloain 

Sob to te ail* to (aint armuid the inase uithout paintins on it. 
the options for usinj SIEHCIL are: 

HAXE: Calls up the SIENCIl REOUESnF atlnsim von to select the tolors 
jioa would like to define a rusk (SIEHCIL), protectinj .mi at" ff"" 
being painted on. Vou can chanffe th( colors that iiake up a STHKIl 
it anv tine since the shape rather than the wlw infortiation of the , 



sa«a STENCILS in ne* pictures. Once you hauB decided i*at coitrs you 

want to protect, se ect HAKE to create a MorkJM SIEHCIL, Once this 
has heen done, ihe etter "S'.' Hill appear in the nenuhar to tell you 
that the SIENilL WM is acti«*, Seleetjnj INVgl in the SIEHCIL 
REQUISUR Hill reverse the settings of the SIENCE, 

RDIAKE: Hhen i SIENCE is active, an» colors you add onto the Picture »e 
— tSfacela-iMvance Pase3—ttetw'n^.t!.einDe tmtJ— EESC:?Wtl — B [ 



ample) for the lesson. What is so clever 
about these tutorials Is that they not on- 
ly explain the details of the host pro- 
gram, but actually show you as well! 
It's an almost eerie experience at first, 
to see the mouse pointer glide across the 
Digi-Paint work surface by itself as it 
acts out the lesson for you. One almost 
expects the mouse itself to start moving 
around on the desktop! 

Assisting the mouse pointer is the 
Mouse Talker module, which is 
available if you have enough memory. 
The Mouse Talker indicates, in the fa- 
miliar Amiga voice, what mouse actions 
are being performed. The Mouse Talker 
doesn't have much of a vocabulary. 
"Right hulton" ."Left button", "drag", 
and "release" is about all it says. This 
enhancement allows the user with no 
knowledge of mouse protocol to know 
what mou.se button is being pushed and 
how it is being used. 

When the lesson is completed, tlie 
Deluxe Help menus are pushed to the 
front, ready for another lesson selection. 
If you're inclined to practice what you 
have just learned, just push Deluxe Help 
to the back, and practice, practice, prac- 
tice. It is truly a wonderful use of the 
multi-tasking environment. 

At ihe start and finish of a lesson, the 



Deluxe Instructor always sets itself up 
for the next lesson. This "setting up" in- 
volves removing the traces of the lesson 
so the next session can start on a clean 
slate. At times, when you interact with 
the host program this may mess up the 
lesson to follow. This can easily be 
avoided by reluming the host program 
to the boolup slate. 

It is hard lo hide my excitement for 
this series of tutorials. RGB has put out 
four quality tutorials, with no end in 
sight. Future plans include Deluxe Help 
for AtnigaDos, Pagesetter, and City 
Desk 2.0. It is also rumored Ihal Pro- 
gressive Peripherals & Software will 
market an interactive tutorial written by 
RGB for Superhase Professional. 
Down the road, I see Deluxe Help as a 
concept that could be adopted by all 
software developers as standard operat- 
ing procedure. The interactive tutorial's 
day has come! 

DELUXE HELP 

RGB Video Creations 

3944 Florida Blvd. 

Ste.102 

Palm Beach Gardens 

PL 33410 

407-622-0138 



Mark Srrrith is a member of the AMUSE users group, and lives in New Jersey 
with his Amiga. 



^ 



OM[F[D) Sept/Oct 1988 59 



excellence! S299.00 

Micro-Syslems Software Inc. 
12798 W.Forcsl Hill Blvd. 
Suite 201A 

West Palm Beach. FL 33414 
(407) 790-0772 



By Bob Lindstrom 

If ihc verbal/visual model of 
MacWrite means wordprocessing qual- 
ity to you, then excellence! is the ulti- 
mate in word- and image- 
juggling power for the 
Amiga. If, like this irascible 
writer, you believe writing is 
a verbal activity and graph- 
ics are for artists (and desk- 
top publishers), then you 
may maintain a healthy 
skepticism toward this 
Scribble! sequel from MSS. 

Whatever your personal 
writing prejudices, excel- 
lence! clearly is the best 
WYSIWYG (What You Sec 
Is What You Get) wordpro- 
cesser currently available 
for the Amiga. Its facility for 
blending text (up to 120 different fonts, 
if you have lots of memory) and IFF 
color graphics in a single document is 
unmatched. And, unlike the less- 
capable TextCrafi and its WYSIWYG 
colleagues, excellence! includes bonus- 
es that you don't expect in a graphic- 
oriented word processor, such as a 
90,000 word spelling checker, a 70,000 
word thesaurus, and a grammar checker, 

excellence! is truly a full-featured 
wordproccssor. In addition to all the ex- 
pected cul/paste/copy functions, it 
boasts a variety of text-formatting op- 
tions, multiple columns (up to four), su- 
per- and sub-scripting, mail merge, hy- 
phenation, math calculation, footnotes, 
and headers. Overall, these features are 
comparable to other word processors in 
utility and efficiency. 

The program is not copy protected, 
and although it will work on 512K 
RAM Amigas, one megabyte of RAM 
is recommended lo access features such 



as the eight-color hi-res mode. 

The program works best with a 
mouse and menu system in the best tra- 
ditions of the "user-friendly" Amiga in- 
terface. Keyboard command substitutes 
for mouse use occasionally are confus- 
ing. For example. Print is <Right 
Amiga>-T while Style Plain is <Righi 
Amiga>-P. Fortunately, keyboard substi- 
tutes often follow the MacWrite stan- 
dards, and a macro capability is provided 
to customize keystroke commands. 

Despite the claim that excellence! is a 
taie WYSIWYG processor, it allows on- 
ly two, four or eight colors onscreen. As 
a result, the program automatically altere 



HE KlUa IIHIE IS R HDUa PET 



htroiijctiaii 



lilhefi [ first begat the | 

research for this paper, I had '- 
i mst MiaiSt t'm locating 
the Eiiaterials needed. One does 

not singly jorraj to the local l| 

exotic fish store and purchase M 




the colors in your imported graphics. 
Color and proportion alterations are 
rudimentary and often unsatisfactory. 
Plan on preparing clip art specifically for 
use in excellence! It is not a substitute 
for a good desktop publishing program. 

The spcllcheckcr can scan completed 
documents or, if you have sufficient 
RAM, it will patrol for typos while you 
write . The thesaurus supplies both syn- 
onyms and antonyms on request. These 
tools ofKralc efficiently (particularly when 
run from a RAMdisk) though I prefer the 
utility and display clarity of the spell- 
checker and thesaurus in WordPerfect. 

The atypical tool here is excellence!' s 
grammar checking option. It calculates 
word and sentence count, average word 
and sentence length, and then bar-graphs 
the values compared to a Hemingway 
short story and Lincoln's Gettysburg Ad- 
dress. The grammar checker also deter- 
mines readability grade level and preposi- 
tion frequency, and suggests changes in 



writing style. The rule-of-thumb style 
conclusions arc likely to impress week- 
end authors with their common sense. 
Pros will be aggravated by their didacti- 
cism. 

A special requester offers an opportu- 
nity to customize your document (and 
override Preferences settings) when the 
time comes to commit those golden 
words and graphics to paper, excellence! 
includes PostScript support for laser 
printers. The Workbench 1.3 printer 
drivers also are supported and provided 
on one of the two excellence! disks. 

While the documentation is sizeable 
at over 300 pages, tabbed dividers, logi- 
cal organization, and a help- 
ful index make it genuinely 
useful whether you want to 
peruse it step by step or just 
spot-check random features. 
I confess that excellence! 
is not my kind of wordpro- 
ccssor. When you work with 
words, you want to be work- 
ing with words, not with 
mice, menus or graphics. 
For that reason, I will re- 
main faithful to the more 
flexible verbal-only format- 
ting options (and preferable 
spell/thesaurus tools) of 
WordPerfect. 
Still, I honestly can recommend ex- 
cellence! for Amiga-owning authors 
who need to combine words and pic- 
tures, who have outgrown some of the 
other available products, or just want 
high-quality software for their occa- 
sional wordprocessing needs. For them, 
excellence! is an obvious and affordable 
choice. g 



ippparent that 



A NOTE FROM THE EDITOR: 

I would have been a little harder 
on excellence! than Bob was. I 
thought the screen was slow (it's 
quite easy to type ahead of it), and 
the printed fonts can still be jaggy, 
even with the Preferences 1.3 
drivers, unless you have a PostScript 
printer I think there is too much em- 
phasis on the WYSIWYG look, and 
too little on speedy and efficient text 
editing. MSS would have been better 
off promoting excellence! as 'a great 
color wordprocessor" and not a 
'IVbrofPerfecf Killer". -Mark 



60 OMPE) Sept/Oct 1988 



ARexx 



rflC3(P(iMS(sMi®Tl 






^MIGA 



ARexx 

S49.95 

William S. Hawes 

P.O. Box 308 

MaynardMA01754 



/» Add the suppi 
check = addllol 



optigns FULAI 3( 
optiins PR4MPI '? 
echo = 1 



by Warren Block 

ARexx i.s a simple, interpreted BA- 
SlC-like programming language. But 
it's also a batch command language, a 
script language (like those 
found in terminal programs), a 
string processing utility, a 
floating-point malh evaluator, 
and a way to integrate com- 
pletely separate applications 
programs. 

Actually, lliis Amiga version 
of the mainframe REXX macro 
language is difficult to pin 
down. As a programming lan- 
guage, il has some surprising 
features, like "typclcss" data- 
no distinction is made between 
strings and numbers. But what 
makes ARexx outstanding is its 
ability to conlrol and intercliangc data 
between applications programs. Imag- 
ine a programmable "software inter- 
face" that can connect any number of 
programs simultaneously. You could 
use a spreadsheet to calculate a set of 
points, then U'ansfer il through ARexx to 
a 3-D object editor, make changes, and 
transfer tlic object back to the spread- 
sheet as a set of points. 

FEATURES 

Programming in ARexx is simple and 
intuitive. Variables can be defined "on 
the fly," as in BASIC. ConsLinl values 
can be string literals or decimal, hex, or 
binary numbers, and a complete set of 
bit functions even makes working in bi- 
nary practical. 

Since ARexx programs arc interpret- 
ed, there is no lime-consuming com- 
pile/link phase of developmeni. Interac- 
tive debugging is enhanced by the abil- 
ity lo trace program execution, with op- 
tions to display such information as 
program labels encountered, intermedi- 



ate iind final variable values, and com- 
mands sent to a host program. 

Control structures include ordinary 
consu-ucts like "do-unlil" and "do- 
whilc" looping. However, different 
types of loops can be combined into sin- 
gle structures, like "do i=l to 5 until 
q=12 while 7=1." Programming com- 
plex loops has never been this easy. 

There arc many, many string func- 
tions. Word-based parsing routines are 
provided, in addition to the more ordi- 
nary character-based ones. Writing text 
processors or text manipulation pro- 
grams is incredibly simple with ARexx. 



T>Eal ■:l!cul■t■)^,^■i»:l; 



/» Cikulitor prosriN' intfrprets the jrauneat strifts 
* Authors: Hirvin Heinstein i Uilly Lanseudd 
»/ 

SIWAL m ESSOR 
Slow, ON FiNTAX 



opt libraries »/ 

UPPOI 

latM 
check : addlibCr*! 



rex)QUPPort.niirary',9,-36,8) 

check : addlibt're x)(nath[ih.iihrirv',9.-38i8> 



tMB 



do i t 1 
pull e<iuati«n 

equalloc - index _ 

sayloc : indextequallori,"SA'i'') 
select 



3 = 3 

1 3*4*7 

3 t 4 » 7 = 31 

? (2<4-1.3)»(23/76) 

(2M-1.2W23/76) : 1,45263156 



3E][!l 



equjTion, 



-r 



iihen equation : "QllII" then exit 



Shjired function libraries can extend 
the language in an infinite number of 
ways. A support library of Amiga- 
specific utility functions is provided, 
but a library could contain routines to 
deal with graphics, sound, or more 
mundane data-processing liisks. 

DOCUMENTATION 

The "ARexx User's Reference Manu- 
al" is 155 pages (including a fairly 
comprehensive index) of small but 
readable type. As a reference manual, it 
is quite successful. However, the tutori- 
al sections are limited, especially when 
they attempt to explain sending com- 
mands and data lo applications pro- 
grams, ARexx itself doesn't include any 
applicaiions programs, so the lack of in- 
formaiion is undersuindablc; still, even 
specific examples ihat wouldn't work 
withoul a particular application pro- 



gram would be helpful. 

Overall, (he documentation provided 
is readable and thorough, although 
more examples arc needed. (The manu- 
al recommends M, F. Cowlishaw's "The 
REXX Language: A Practical Approach 
to Programming" for furtJicr infomia- 
tion.) 

FLAWS 

Since it is a programming language, 
ARexx does lake some time to Icam. 
However, it is one of the simplest lan- 
guages I've ever experienced, and be- 
ginners and pros alike seem to find it 
easy lo lake. 
I031 i^aCill ARexx's biggest flaw is sim- 
ply that only a few applica- 
tions programs have ihc capa- 
bility of communicating with 
il-so far. However, as devel- 
opers begin to appreciate the 
power that ARexx adds lo their 
applications, more and more 
will add ARexx communica- 
tion ports. As of Ihis writing, 
the group of programs thai are 
already 4y?(?xr-compatiblc in- 
cludes ihc TxEd Plu.<; text edi- 
tor, the AmgaTeX typesetting 
system, and the CAPE 68K as- 
sembler. Microfiche Filer and several 
other programs will include ARexx sup- 
port shortly, and Commodore is even 
looking at the language. 

CONCLUSIONS 

ARexx is well worth having just as a 
powerful and simple programming lan- 
guage. Combining this power with the 
ability to link applications programs 
and to simplify information transfer re- 
sults in a simple too! thai has almost 
unlimited potential. 

My initial .skepticism aboul ARexx 
gradually lumed into respcx;l, then mu- 
tated into hundreds of ideas. Like good 
software should, ARexx got my imagi- 
nation going. Even belter, it allowed me 
lo turn lliosc ideas into realily. ARexx is 
one of the best values in Amiga soft- 






ware in a long time. 



INFO Confribufing Editor Warren Block is a 
Soufti Dakota near the foot of Mf. Rushmore. 



free-lance writer who lives in 



Wm^m Sept/Oct 1988 61 



WordPerfect Library 
SI 29.00 

WordPerfect Corp. 
1555 N. Technology Way 
Orem.UT 84057 
801-225-5000 



□ UP Calendar 1,8 



Scpteriier im 

Sun Hon Tut Ued Iliu Fri Sat 



:ja|^.:|D||E]| Afi>t.ifitn^n1:s 



mm 




HonJay, Septeiilier 5, 1988 lfl:e9ai 1 

ll;eeaii|rubins jala 
TMfii Volleyball 
6:8flpn Grin-i-panawiHi the 

Shrokes, Houards, and 

Osinjs 



!□! To-to 



by Tom Malcom 

I'm one of those self-infuriating peo- 
ple who has every intention of gelling 
organized one of these decades, but 
somehow I just never get around to it. 
Even if I do manage to get slarlcd, I 
don't keep with it. But I think WordPer- 
feci Library is going to cure my "Disor- 
ganization Syndrome". 

The Library is a collection of six 
suind-alonc utilities. There is a File 
Manager, Program Editor, Notebook. 
Calculator, Calendar, and Alarm. 
Granted, there arc public domain incar- 
nations of all of these, but WordPerfect 
has put them all harmoniously together 
in one place, in very slick, very profes- 
sional versions. 

The depth of the package requires a 
manual an inch and a half thick. Exam- 
ples, illustrations, and prcci.sc instruc- 
tions abound. It is indexed and divided 
into logical sections. 

The Calculator has three different 
modes: scientific, business, and pro- 
grammer. I'd been looking around for a 
useable programmer's calculator for 
quite a while, and this is the first one 
I've found thai 1 can use with ease. 
The same goes for the other two 
modes. 1 still prefer a plain old four- 
banger beside the computer to just add 
numbers on, but for many functions, 
the Library's are better and just as 
handy. I haven't found any way to 
transfer the contents of the calculator to 
a document, or even to dump iLs output 
to the printer. These are shortcomings 
WordPerfect nec<ls to fix. 

The Program Editor is a actually a 
slrippcd-down, lean and mean version 
of WordPerfect. It's what ihe AmigaBa- 
sic editor should have been; [he auto- 
indent function is perfect for C. It will 



lal Hew 



Monday, Septenlier 5, 1988 18:89an 



feiKMMi? to pack: 

bottle openw 
asipwin 
toilet paper 



Monday, Septe»)bef 5, 198B 18:B9a 



If 1 aet fi'esh uatei> 

G 2 start fire 

[♦ 3 apply iiDsquito repellent 

H i nAe coffee 

5 take tua aspirin 

6 cravl back into tent 



The 

four 

|Q}P j Calendar 
° windows. 



also print blocks of code or text. It will 
also permit direct hex editing, a boon if 
you need only to change a byte or two 
in a file and know exactly which ones. 

One of the major annoyances of 
WordPerfect is that it lacks a sort func- 
tion. The Library's Notebook lakes sort- 
ing a step further and makes it into a 
miniature database. It is sophisticated 
enough to use for far more than a phone 
book. Template screens that attach to 
the entries in your list are easy to design 
and the whole thing is flexible enough 
to handle any smallish filing project that 
you don't want to fire up a full-bore 
datiibase manager for. 

The File Manager isn't anything we 
haven't seen before in utilities like CLl- 
Maie and DirUlil, though it's taken to the 
point of overkill. There are even buttons 
to click for directories of logical devices. 

The Calendar is the most elaborate 
I've seen yet. It pops up four windows: 
one with the calendar, another with an 
appointment book, a Uiird with a "To- 
Do" list, and the fourth with a memo 
pad. Each can be called up scpitratcly, 
and each window also displays the cur- 
rent date and time in a box at its top. 
You can do such organizational things 
(which 1 promi.sc I'm going to get to to- 
morrow, really) as print out your "To- 
Do" list for the week, or make sure you 
don't forget Auntie Em's birthday. (1 did 
have a replicabic encounter with the 
Guru when I tried to run \hQ, Alarm from 
within the calendar.) The speed of the 
calendar is amazing. Clicking on a date 



brings up any notes or appointments for 
[hat date instantaneously. 

Being the sort who, as a child, liked 
to pull the wings off bugs (the mark, I 
su.spect, of becoming a software re- 
viewer later in life), 1 decided to put the 
Library to the Full Test. On a single- 
megabyte AlOOO, I managed to have 
WordPerfect, the File Manager, Calcu- 
lator, Program Editor, Calendar, Alarm, 
and Notebook all running at the same 
time, and was able to close one to load 
the remaining utility. Things slowed 
down to an unacceptable crawl, but it 
did all work. However, don't expect to 
be able to run the utilities simultane- 
ously on a 512K machine if you 
have WordPerfect ah-eady running. 

WordPerfect Library has a lot going 
for it- WordPerfect Corp's leg- 
endary customer support, for one. 
The strongest point is that all these 
utilities are in one place, with excel- 
lent documentation, and make for a 
complete desk management system. It 
could use a few bug and oversight fix- 
es, and I'd love to see ARexx hooks 
built into both the utilities and Word- 
Perfect itself. Some truly formidable 
applications could be constructed. If 
you have WordPerfect and you need 
some efficienl, businesslike help in 
getting your life organized, then you 
should add the Library to your collec- 
tion. Who knows? Maybe I'll get orga- 
nized enough to .save enough time to 
gel organized. This time for surel 



62 OM(F(m Sept/Oct 1988 



TxEd Plus 




HHJS«lHMs}^?MlHi 



TxEd Plus 
S79.95 

Microsmilhs Inc. 
P.O. Box 561 
Cambridge MA 02140 
(617)354-1224 



by Warren Block 

The original TxEd is an extremely 
popular text editor. Microsmiths' new 
version, TxEd Plus, builds on the sim- 
plicity and speed of TxEd, and adds the 
power of programmable menus, key- 
board macros, and an ARexx interface 
port. 

TxEd Plus requires two files to oper- 
ate: the program itself and arp.library, 
for a total of 37K of disk space. To op- 
erate with ARcxx, it must also be oper- 
ating when TxEd Plus is executed. 



Those familiar with the 
standard AmigaDos ED editor 
will find TxEd Plus easy to 
learn, but more .sophisticated 
and simpler to use. TxEd Plus 
is so small tlial it can replace 
ED altogether. Keyboard 
macros and new menu 
selections can be added to 
customize it for special 
applications. 

The documentation covers 
TxEd Plus, BliizDisk [see the review in 
INFO #21], FunKeys, FastFonts, and 
instructions for the ARP commands; all 
of these utilities and programs are in- 
cluded on the distribution disk. Fifty 
pages of small type describe using TxEd 
Plus, reconfiguring the keyboard and 
menus, and using it with ARexx. 

TxEd Plia is potentially very ix)wer- 
ful-and that's the catch. To get it to do 
something really advanced, you use 
ARexx, which means you'll need to have 




ARexx available. Fortunately, ARexx is 
easy to learn and inexpensive to acquire. 
TxEd Plus is small, fast, and rccon- 
figurable. The included utilities 
BliizDisk and FastFonis arc worth at 
least half the purchase price. The docu- 
mentation is acceptable, if not ouLstand- 
ing. Finally, Microsmiths offers a 30- 
day money-back guarantee if "/( does 
not perforin as you expected." As a pro- 
gramming and general- purpose text edi- 
tor, TxEd Plus sets the standard, O 



3-Demon 




HMMlHMsM^®^ 



3-Demon 

S99.95 

Mimelics Corporation 

P.O.Box 1560 
Cupertino, CA 95015 
(408)741-0117 




by Harv Laser 

3-D animation and ray facing soft- 
ware is starting to come out of the wood- 
work. This is good-it gives Amiga 
artisLs more tools to choose from, and as 
the number of titles grows so does the 
hot compctidon for the customers' dol- 
lars. Each new program has features 
missing from older software. Here's 
Mimctics entry into the field, and it has a 
lot of things going for it. 

3-Dcmon is not an animation or ray 
tracing program; radier, it's an edi- 



tor/convenor for objects used in 
other programs. S-Demon reads 
in Sculpt 3D and VideoScape 
objects (so far, the two most 
popuUu" formats) onto a gadget- 
packed screen. There you can 
use dozens of different tools for 
creating, viewing and modify- 
ing Uiem. Objects can then be 
saved back to disk in formats 
suitable for Sculpt, VideoScape, 
Silver, Forms in Flight, and in 
3 'Demon's own format. 

Slick features include a variable- 
strcngdi magnet you touch to an object; 
you can then mush it around like Play- 
Doh, stretching and pulling it in different 
directions. Add points and polygons; 
move, delete, color, copy and clone 
them; the possible combinations are 
practically infinite. 

1 have two complaints: the first is 5- 
Demon's password protection. You'll be 
reaching for die manual every time you 




run the program-but at least you can 
make backup copies. The other is speed: 
on my stock 68000 Amiga with 2.5 megs 
of RAM, 1 grew very weary of looking 
at 3-Demon'?, little "weight lifter wait 
pointer" when manipulating large com- 
plex objects. A 68020/68881 speedup 
board would help build his muscles (and 
your 3D objects) a lot faster! If you're 
creating animations or doing ray-tracing, 
give 3-Dcmon a road test It's a powerful 
addition to your graphics arsenal. O 



m\Fm Sept/Oct 1988 63 



Color Commander 



is 



AMIGA 



DOUG'S COLOR 

COMMANDER S29.95 

Seven Seas Software 

P.O. Box 4 1 1 

Porl Townscnd, WA 98368 

(206)385-1956 




By Harv Laser 

Doug's Color Commander falls into 
a group of programs 1 call the "Gee! 
I've always wanted something like iJiis" 
category. These arc ihc practical utili- 
ties that Amiga owners can embrace 
like IBMers relish Sidekick. DCC is 
"neat". It's merely the most llcxible and 
sophisticated Amiga scrccn/color/palcttc 
controller I've ever .seen. 

Like a lot of powerful programs, on 
ihc surface DCC looks very simple. 
"Oh! another palette requester, I've 



seen those in the public domain." 
Right, Bucko, but you've never 
seen one that'll do this much. It adds 
all the color controls and mastery 
you wish Amiga Preferences had. 

DCC loads in and sits on your 
Workbench menu bar, awiiiting ac- 
tivation. Meanwhile, you run your 
other software - paint programs, an- 
imation, word processors, termi- 
nals, whatever. If those programs 
only have some wimpy conU'ol over 
their screen colors (or maybe none at 
all), DCC to the rescue. 

DCC knows abtjul all llic screens 
currently active on your Amiga. Click 
its activator and you've got a symphcjny 
of gadgets for color and palette control. 
DCC will plop itself onto the other pro- 
gram's screen or slide up on its own 
movable custom screen, your choice. 
Now you have authority over Rcd- 
Grccn-Blue values. Hue, Value, Satura- 
tion, Contrast, or everything at once. 



reatLu^es 



AXA: ml Cf ^ Hue V.^1 '%At 



I i ' I : ' ' ' '••I'' ' T ■ T ■ ■ r^ TTT 



I iJiiii I i I itr; 



sifi- Copy mi] BHBEBlEa 



j| D!TT? I nTTT«?l I kCW3 I n 



>Caloi« Bars 

Pick Ai>ea 
"-"Ranse 
'-'-Rotate 



I . tl ip 

NUHepic FsedbacK 



Grab a palette from one picture, screen, 
or progrLun iuid map it onto another. 
Store your favorite palettes as files and 
recall them any time. Cuslomi/.c your 
Workbench like never before. 

It's handy, it's solid, it's satisfying, 
and the manual (which is sized so you 
can store it with your 3.5" disks) has 
terrific tutorials to quickly acclimate 
you to OCC's power. The disk also in- 
cludes Doug's incredible public domain 
FracGen program. DCC is a winner. O 



Micron Memory Board 




HC!Qfle^lM^{Rl^^p(i®^i 



Micron Memory Board 
S595-S770 
Micron Technology 
2805 E. Columbia 
Boise ID 83706 
208-386-3800 



by Tom Malcom 

It's a little difficult to find a lot to .say 
about something I Uike for granted. Mi- 
cron memory boards arc the perfect ad- 
dition for your Amiga: they're easy to 
insudl, you don't have to worry about 
reconfiguring your system, and best of 
all, once you have it hooked up, you 
can just forget it's there. That's my idea 
of what additional memory should be: 
unobtrusive. 

Micron Technology is no newcomer 
to the memory board market; they've 
been making expansion boards for PCs 



for years. And dicy make their 
own chips, an important con- 
sideration in these days of 
DRAM scarcity. While the 
boards arc a bit pricey, they arc 
readily available and we haven't 
heard of any problems with them, 

A secondary consideration is 
that if you eventually intend to 
upgrade to an A2000, the board 
will still be compatible. The 
models for ilic AKXX) and A500 
consist of a chassis v.'idi an exter- 
nal power supply and im on/off switch. 
When you get your A2000, all you have 
to do is open the chassis, pull out die 
board, and plug it into an cmjny slot. 
The whole operation took nie about five 
minutes. Actually, it was so easy I 
thought I'd done something wrong, but 
the boiird has performed faultlessly ever 
since. 

Admittedly, the A50() model takes 
some getting used to, since it plugs into 
the left side of the computer and sticks 
up like a wall, making for a little claus- 




trophobia. However, since it comes 
with iLs own power supply, there's no 
need to worry about overloading the 
ASOO's wimpy one. 

Prices range from S595 for the I- 
mcg A2000 (without chassis), to S770 
for tlie 2-meg AIOOO model witli dual 
slot chassis and pass-thru. 

If you're in the market for additional 
memory and don't mind paying a little 
more for a quality product, you just 
can't go wrong with Micron boards: 
you gel what you pay for. O 



J 



64 mwm Sept/Oct 1988 



Math-Amation 




Math-Amalion S79.95 
Progressive Peripherals and 
Software, Inc. 
464 Kalamalh Slrcci 
Denver, CO 80204 
(303) 825-4144 



by Bob Lindstrom 

Math-Amation delivers much more 
than the promised "4 years of College 
Math on a Single Disk". It's an entire 
university math department tucked into 
your Amiga. 

Whether calculating algebraic poly- 
nomials, generating 3D bar graphs, do- 
ing simple unit conversions, or manipu- 
lating mathematical matrices, Math- 
Amation is the Schwiirzcncggcr of com- 
puterized calculators. 

In addition to scientific and matrix 



calculators, the program in- 
cludes modules for geometric, 
algebraic, and statistical prob- 
lem solving. 

Although the math concepts 
arc complex, mouse/keyboard 
operation is simple. Values arc 
traded easily between modules. 
Extensive memory storage lo- 
cations permit you to save and 
trace through strings of values. 
Screens, graplis, or chtirts can 
be saved to disk as IFF graphics for en- 
hancement in Amiga art programs. 

The program disk includes many ex- 
amples, and one pulldown menu has en- 
tries for future expansion modules. 

Witli generous amounts of genius and 
ingenuity, the Maih-Anmtion user can 
customize and save program modules 
for the specialized task at hand. The 
nexihihiy of the program promises lim- 
itless power. But that power will go un- 
realized by most of us, due to a 103- 




page manual that assumes math exper- 
tise and remains vague on many pro- 
gram functions. It encourages trial and 
crror-with the emphasis on error. More 
get-acquainted tutorials arc needed. 

Screen refreshes can also grow slug- 
gish when multi-tasking several mod- 
ules. Actual calculations, though, are 
remarkably swift. 

Maih-Amalion is an exu-aordinary 
program that cries for more hand- 
holding cnhanccmenis. O 



The Graphics Studio 




The Graphics Studio 

S49.95 

Accolade 

20813 Stevens Creek Blvd. 

Cupertino CA 95014 

408-296-8400 



by Don Romero 

The Graphics Studio is Music Studio 
for the eyes. It requires an Amiga with 
512K or more of memory, and supports 
both 320x200 lo-rcs and 640x200 hi-rcs 
standard (non-HAM) modes; the 
workspace in both modes is a "full 
page" (400 scan lines high and scrolled, 
not interlaced). A sceond clip screen is 
200 lines high. 

The Graphics Studio comes on a sin- 
gle disk, and is "key disk" copy protect- 
ed. The manual is nicely put together. 



and is spiral bound for case of use; 
it lacks an index. 

This program is easy to use, wilfi /^' 
everything conU'olled using the 
mou.sc in combination with tradi- 
tional Amiga and unique 'Studio' 
droptlown iind stackup icon menus 
(which harken back to tliis pro- 
gram's Apple IIGS origins). All of 
the essential painting tools (free- 
hand, line, box, fill, zoom, undo, etc) 
and most of liie now-standard Amiga 
paint features {brush, color cycling, ro- 
tate n degrees, palette, and so on) arc al- 
so here, occasionally in disguise. The 
airbrush adaptation, for ex;imple, is 
unique and interesting. And there iue 
some new goodies, like shadow, concen- 
tric shapes and outline fdled shape. 

On the noi-so-good side, some of the 
functions arc simply bush league. The 
nearly featureless zoom mode is awk- 
wiu-d to use, and the color controls for 
editing the palette arc almost painful. 




The corners on the rounded box aren't. 
The algorithms for circle and oval func- 
tions produce pretty crude images at the 
smaller diameters. And the only way to 
break out of some functions is to select 
another function. 

The Graphics Studio is something of 
an odd man out in a realm dominated 
by Deluxe Paint U and HAM mode pro- 
grams like Photon Paint. But it's an 
easy-to-use package, and might satisfy 
the less demanding artistes out there. 

O 



DM[Fini Sept/Oct 1988 65 



flickerFixer 



AMIGA 



rWKHPaMSfiMaSNi 



flickerFixer 

S595.00 
MicroWay Inc. 
PO Box 79 
Kingston MA 02364 
617-746-7341 



by Oran Sands 

If you curse the Amiga's dreaded hi- 
res "flicker", you've no doubt wished for 
a more stable, less tiring display. Wish no 
more, for MicroWaLy's flickerFixer is here 
and it works. This is not another dark 
piece of plastic with which to cover your 
screen. It's an electronics product, de- 
signed for use only with the A2000. It 
plugs into the video slot and, using the 
digiuil information available there, stores 
both fields of video (odd and even lines), 
combines them in its own memory, and 



displays them in conect order in l/60ih of 
a second. Since the entire screen is now 
refreshed twice as often as normal, the 
display no longer flickers. This doubles 
the hori/.onlal scan rale from 15.75 KHz 
to 31,5 KHz. Your normal monitor won't 
work with \hc flickerFixer; you'll need a 
special monitor capable of operating at the 
faster rate (witli Analog RGB inputs). The 
NEC MuliiSync. is one such popuUir moni- 
tor, selling for about S500. 

The flickerFixer comes with a small 
manual with clear, simple instructions for 
installation. A separate sheet shows the 
proper pinouts for making your own mon- 
itor cables. Setup is done by tweaking a 
polcniiomcter witli a tool (included) while 
viewing a test screen. The disk included 
with \hQ, flickerFixer has the lest screen, 
sample hi-rcs CAD pictures ;ind tlic 
Morerows public domain program. 

The di.splay is cri.sp and easy to read. 
There is aksolutely no llickcr. The only 
drawback is that the screen display is an 




undcrscanncd picture; the entire picture is 

visible. This, however, allows you lo use 
the Morerows program to create a 704 x 
470 pixel Workbench, allowing for a larg- 
er, nicker-free information display. 

It is also possible to connect your stan- 
dard Amiga monitor as usual while using 
iho, flicker Fixer with the multi-sync moni- 
tor. Operauon of \hQ flickerFixer with a 
genlock is not possible though. 

Tho. flickerFixer is an excellent product 
delivering a high quality, stable display. If 
not for the need for a new and expensive 
monitor, I'd buy one tomorrow. O 



Just Your Type? 




INTELLITYPE 

S49.95 Inlellisoft Systems/ 

Electronic Arts 

2755 Cainpus Drive 
San Mateo CA, 94403 
(415) 571-7171 



by Sue Albert 

My inU"oduction to typing was from 
an unforgettable 9th grade teacher who 
taught by intimidation and humiliation. 
Painfully shy and uncoordinated, I re- 
ceived my first "D" grade while having 
the touch system indelibly etched on my 
brain. My recent switching between the 
C64 and new Amiga's softer "touch" and 
altered keyboard triggered an alarming 
increase in typos, and resurrected the 
shadowy ghost of my ogre instructor. To 
the rescue came the Al -enhanced Intelli- 



type typing tutorial, which sets up a 
30 or 60 day program of personal- 
ized QWERTY keyboard lessons, 
with drills customized to specific 
needs. It analyzes your every error, 
and at session's end shows chiuis of 
speed and accuracy levels contrasted 
to your goals. 

It i.s patient and friendly, but firm. 
A unique feature of Intclliiype is a 
continuing .saga which cleverly 
weaves repeats of needed drills into the 
text of a sudsy, romantic, space/spy 
thriller. By compressing several lessons 
(something the program noticed, by the 
way: "You seem lo he in a rush"), I man- 
aged lo increase my typing speed from 
27 to 35 WPM in three days. 

The program includes many 'Tree" 
practice drills for polishing up problem 




areas or increasing speed, including a 
clever finger placcmcnl animation for 
beginners. The helpful manual illustrates 
finger positions and thoroughly explains 
all aspects of the program and tutorials. 
intclliiype hiis the unmisuikabic stamp of 
a labor of love by its author Moses Ma. 
It seems to have forever banished the 
lingering ghost of my "Instructor Past". 



San-Francisco based Sue Albert (aka SUZART on QLink) is an artist, poet, and 
recently-upgraded C64-to-Am!ga Commodore computer user. 



66 m[Fm Sept/Oct 1988 



Coming At You! 




X-Specs3D S 124.95 
Haitcx Resources 
208 Carroll ion Park, 
Suilc 1207 
CarrolUon TX 75006 
214-241-8030 



TiiiTTi— I 



by Tom Molcom 

I don'l care how silly ihey make mc 
look, I'm going to wear them anyway. 
These goggles from Haitcx Resources 
arc a far cry from the red/blue 3D glass- 
es of the Fifties (not that 1 remember 
the Fifties personally, of course). These 
goggles give full-color 3D via an elec- 
tronic LCD shutter. The shutters open 
and close sixty times a second, in exact 
sync with the scan rate of the monitor. 
So, by flipping between two slightly 



different images, you get 
extremely effective 3D. 

The goggles connect 
via an interface box to 
the joystick port. They 
look just like die 3D 
glasses used with some 
Nintendo games and 
with Toshiba's new 3D 
TV, and operate on the 
same principle. The 
software Hailcx gave 
me at CES is still in "al- 
pha tesung", and it's ob- 
vious that a lot of kinks need to be 
worked out. It's also apparent that die 
system is workable and clo.sc enough to 
reality to gel excited over. 

A prototype space shoot-em-up 
game, Space Spuds, on die demo disk 
promises to rcvolulionizc the way 
Amiga iircadc games are done. The 3D 
is so real you'll find your.^clf ducking as 



objects fly toward you. 
The glasses are so ef- 
fective that even if you 
move up to 20 degrees 
side- to- side, or up to 
eight feet away, llic illu- 
sion is still perfectly 
maintained. 

Haitex is hoping to 
have everything put to- 
gether by AmiExpo in 
late July. The package 
will retail for S 124.95 
and will include the 
goggles and a demo disk containing 
static 3D screens and the finished ver- 
sion of Space Spuds. The driver is 
stand-alone, so users can create their 
own 3D displays (including ray- 
tracings), games, and animations. We 
expect to sec lots more applications us- 
ing the goggles in the coming months. 

O 



Ij 


9m 


^ 


^- 


■ ^ 


f\ 




Most big shopping-mall "chain" 
bookstores offer a pretty generic selec- 
tion. You can find the latest best-seller, 
and dicrc are plenty of romance novels, 
but where do you go for a little some- 
thing out of the ordinary? If you are 
lucky enough to live in a big city, you 
probably have your pick of specialty 
bookstores. The rest of us have a 
rougher time of it. 

But if you live in or near a college 
town, drop into the college bookstore. 
They aren't restricted to just college 
students, and they don't carry just text- 
books. Many have fantastic science fic- 
tion book sections (diat's where we buy 
our cyberpunk). There are usually art 



L WORLD 



books galore, just ripe for digitizing. 
And the science and math shelves over- 
flow with interesting stuff (spotted on a 
recent trip: Ben Bova's Welcome to 
MoonBasc). 

If you arc a programmer and you're 
stuck for new ideas, a quick glance 
down the math and computer graphics 
sections should leave you with enough 
ideas to keep you busy for years! My 
mind is buzzing since reading Rudy 
Ruckcr's Mind Tools-ihe Five Levels of 
Mathematical Reality. Check out Mart- 
in Gardner's math games books, too. 
Some of the computer graphics books 
delve into dieorics that would make 
perfect applications for the Amiga. And 
a college bookstore is the only place 
you're likely to ever sec a copy of 
Benoii .Mandelbrot's The Fractal Ge- 
ometry of Nature without having to spe- 
cial order it. 

Don'l ovcrl(X)k the bookstore's hii- 



2S6 I^" 64 



512 




Rudy Rucker reveals how to count to 
1023 on your fingers'-in binary! 

mor section; there are some really off- 
the-wall books in a college bookstore 
that will never sec the light of day in a 
chain bookstore. 

You might want lo check out the 
magazine rack, loo. There arc usually a 
bunch of magazines you've never heard 
of, including many extremely well-done 
little pocuy and an magazines, as well 
as foreign titles and underground film, 
music, and video mags. 

Don't be afraid it) explore; diumb 
through a jol of hcx)ks while you're 
there. Allocate a himch of lime, and 
lake lots of money. It'll he worth il. 



OMOPQD Scpt/Oct 19KS 67 



INFO AT FIVE continued from page 25 



INFO #9 



On the cover of Number Nine, we com- 
p:ired scrc^ins from Pinhall Construc- 
tion Set on the C64 and the Amiga. The 
Amiga version was taken from ihc Elec- 
tronic Arts shdeshow included with ear- 
ly Amiga 1000s. (Unfortunately, EA 
never got around to producing PCS for 
the Amiga.) On the cover for the first 
time was the declaration, "The first (and 
still the only) personal computer maga- 
zine produced entirely with personal 
computers!" 

The Gallery was back, with Hardball 
from Accolade rating four-plus stars. 
Another first for INFO: there were no 
five-star games! The Amiga Gallery 
page was composed of screens from 
EA's slidcshow of promised products. 
Our 8-page analysis of the Amiga ver- 
sus the Atari ST was a meticulous com- 
parison constructed from weeks of us- 
ing both machines sidc-by-side. (Wc lat- 
er sent ihc ST back.) In News & View.s 
we printed the keywords for Amiga Mi- 
crosoft BASIC ('t^oming .soon"), and 
had a page listing the Amiga software 
being promised by third parties. On the 
8-bit front, we publi.shcd an extensive 
evaluation of all the software available 
for the CI 28, and wc printed the first- 



m w^ 



h 



/i&aarJ"'**^ 



THERE'S ONLY ONE WORD 

FOR THESE prices: 

RIP -OFF. 



IftwoJuDnn ik [cmiwicrE c! psnoiur amfO!, $199. 




Our tongue in cheek ATARI ad 



ever program to 
enable a C64 to ac- 
cess both sides of a 
1571 disk. Ergcards 
this time were for 
Infocom adventures. 
Ultima If!, and 
Commodore DOS. 

INFO 

#10 

The logo on INFO 
#10 (May-June 86) 
was rendered by 
Benn on tlic Amiga, 
using the original 
Deluxe Paint from 
EA, and the result 
was beautiful: all 
shiny gold. The cov- 
er illustration was 
the famous Amiga fioaling "Castle" pic- 
lure done by Greg Johnson. Inside, 
there were lo^ of changes; we had ac- 
quired a Hewlett-Packard LaserJet Plus 
laser printer. All the headers were being 
done with DPainl and dumped to iJic 
laser at 150 doLs per inch. The icxl was 
also being set with the LaserJet, but wc 
had no way to do it using the Amiga. In- 
stead, we used CI 28 Viza- 
write, which did support the 
HP LaserJet. INFO had never 
looked so good! New on the 
masthciid: Peggy Hcrringion, 
now Associate Editor. 

Wc finally had some real 
Amiga games to review in 
the Gallery; .surprisingly, 
none of them got five stars 
(though Arctic Fox from EA 
came close at A+). Firebird's 
Elite, however, grabbed an 
easy five-star rating on the 
8-bil side. A look at nine 
monitors for C64, CI 28, and 
Amiga even included the 
Atari ST's color monitor! 
Our Copy Corner column 
made its debut in this issue, 
and Peggy Herring ton's 
Sound Advice column had 
one of the first in-depth looks 
at the Amiga'.s music abili- 
ties. Rounding out the issue 
were Ergcards for Elite, Viia- 
write, and AmigaDOS. 




Our favorite Brian Redman cartoon' 



INFO #11 

Issue Eleven (Aug/Sept 86, S3.95) was 
our first Product RoundUp since #8, and 
the 1500+ product listings ran it to 118 
pages. It would have been much falter, 
but the LascrJct+ (and a special Super- 
base 128 output program) let us use a 
small 8 point font with /.ero spacing! 
Section headers were done with DPaint. 
The cover was a giant red swirl created 
by Benn using DPainCs symmetry and 
dithered fill features. Wc also had a 
shiny new Digi-View digitizer from 
NcwTek. Carol Brown was added to the 
masthead as our full-time ad salesperson. 
The Rumor Mill said that tlic A2000 
would ship within 10 weeks, with the 
A3000 following by Spring of '87. In 
News & Views, we reported that a C64 
Emulator was in the works for the 
Amiga, and the C128 Programmer's 
Reference Guide was finally available. 
Just for a change, on the Editor's Page 
wc discussed the things that Com- 
modore had done right ! Benn also 
proudly noted that the Wall Street Jour- 
nal had asked for INFO's input for an 
article on the lack of honesty in most 
magazine software reviews. Peggy's 
COMDEX rcfxjri provided a precursor)' 
examination of the Amiga Sidecar, and 
Reader Mail contained a letter of praise 
from Joe Spano of TV's Hill Street 
Blues'. 



m^m Sept/Oct 1988 



INFO #12 



INFO #13 



INFO #14 



The Nov/Dcc 1986 INFO focused on 
graphics; on Lhc cover were pix of four 
Amiga graphics programs, cut and as- 
sembled into a giant Commodore logo 
which was outlined using Aegis Draw 
Plus and a Roland plotter; these tools 
were added lo the list on INFO's mast- 
head page. Also on the masthead for the 
first time was INFO's new Data Manag- 
er, Tom Malcom. 

There was no Gallery in #12. Instead, 
we used the color pages to talk about 
graphics programs; Benn even told how 
lo digitize in 3D with Di^i-View'. The 
Rumor Mill reported that Lotus was 
about to release 1-2-3 for the Amiga, 
and Ashion Tate had dBase III almost 
ready. In News & Views, wc greeted the 
new Apple IIGS with a resounding 
"thumbs down". Wc also mentioned the 
hilarious C.H.U.M.P. computer maga- 
zine parody produced by Don Romero 
for the Western Indiana Commodore 
Users Group. On the review front, wc 
rated GEOS at four stars. On the other 
hand, we finally got to review the Spar- 
lan Apple II emulator from Mimic Sys- 
tems—it rated a surprisingly high two 
and a half stiirs. On page 59 we ex- 
plained why Lottery programs don'l 
work, and included a type-in program to 
prove it. Ergcards were for Partner 128, 
Commodore screen and PETSCII codes, 
and Deluxe Paint 11. 



A giant scrcenshot of Microillusions' 
Defender of the Crown for the Amiga 
graced the cover of this Games Issue 
(Jan/Fcb B7). The INFO logo was not 
gold this lime, bui silver on blue, lo 
complement the colors in the DOC 
screen. 

Wc reviewed 42 games in this issue! 
Five-star games for the C64 were Gun- 
ship from MicroProsc, and Activision's 
Portal and Alter Ego. Two Amiga titles 
copped five stars: Chcssmaster 2000 
from Software Toolworks, and subLog- 
ic's Flight Simulator I!. On the Editor's 
Page, we took the networks to task for 
inadequately compensating ihcir sysops. 
In News & Views we reported that 
Broderbund had won their "look and 
feel" suit against Uni.son World over 
their Print Shop work-alike Print Mas- 
ter. Paperclip 11 was new for the C128, 
CBM had just announced the 1764 and 
7557, and D0S-2-D0S was the latest 
thing for the Amiga. R.J. Mical's 
tongue-in-cheek rendition of how tlie 
Amiga was created was a real INFO 
landmark. Because there was no one to 
write it, Copy Comer made its last ap- 
pearance for a while; and ihe Rumor 
Mill contained the first rumblings about 
the A500 and A2()(XI. Instead of 
Ergcards, #13 featured an original INFO 
boardgame: INFOMania!. 



This massive Product RoundUp issue 
(Spring/Summer 1987) listed 2000-h 
products, and took 160 pages to do it! 
The "hot" colors of tlic Mandelbrot pat- 
tern on the cover were a real eye- 
catcher. Megan Ward joined us as Pro- 
duction Manager, and much of the 
"New Look" inside INFO was due to 
her creative skills. 

In the Rumor Mill, wc made our first 
mention of the "Walrus" hi-res graphics 
program for the C128-it was later mar- 
keted as BASIC 8. Due to the massive 
size of the RoundUp, tlic Gallery occu- 
pied only one page, but it was enough 
space for two Amiga programs to gather 
in five stars: MandFXP Enhanced from 
CygusSoft (used to create the cover art), 
and Mindscapc's Deja Vii. Our main 
feature slory exposed (in words and pic- 
lures) the inner workings of Com- 
modore's new Ami gas, the A2000 and 
A500. Though Commodore had given 
other mags "exclusives" on the A2000 
story, wc managed to gather togcilier as 
much information on our own as others 
had gotten with Commodore's assis- 
tance. And our A500 report had the Tirst 
photos and dcuiiled descriptions of this 
new, low-priced Amiga to be published 
anywhere. On page 80, INFO printed an 
"exclusive" of our own: a picture of lhc 
Tramiels of Atari, enhanced via the 
Amiga, that answered a lot of questions! 





TRAMIELS PLAY HARDBALL" 



So read the caption accompanying this widely- 
distributed P.R, photo of Sam, Jack, & Leonard 
coincident with their vapor-release of a PC 
clone and "Mega"-ST at the Winter Consumer 
Electronics Show in Las Vegas, NV. 



"LET'S PLAY WHIFFLE-BALL" 

Same photo after processing with proprietary 
Amiga-driven image enhancement software 
developed at INFO Labs, in Iowa City, lA. 
This newly-perfected technique allows normally 
invisible detail and information to be greatly 
amplified, resulting in images which often yield 
startling new insight into the subject matter. 



DMlFm Sept/Oct 1988 69 



DVFOATFrra; continues 



INFO #15 

There were a lot of changes with IN- 
FO M15 (July/Aug 87). First, we were 
picked up for worldwide distribulion by 
Select Magazines, so IlSfFO appeared in 
more newsstands than ever before. Sub- 
scribers received their first copy of the 
JNFO WrapUp, extra pages of INFO for 
subscribers only. This issue contained 
the first installment of Benn's History of 
INFO, as well as his infamous review of 
the Commodore suspenders. The Edito- 
rial Page expanded into a multi-page 
expose of how Compute! Publications 
had misU"eated and ignored the True 
Founder of Compute! Magazine, Len 
Lindsay. The legendary Midnile Soft- 
ware Gazelle became a part of INFO 
with issue #15, and consequently so did 
Associate Editor Jim Oldfield. His first 
column was a two-part history of that 
historic Commodore publication. IN- 
FO's Survival Guide was a definitive 
guide to buying a Commodore comput- 
er; Mindy Skckon's first interview for 
INFO focused on Anne Weslfall. There 
were three Ergcards for Amiga BASIC, 
and INFO offered an A500 as a contest 
prize. Last, but ccruiinly not Iciisi, the 
centersprcad contained an eight-page 
C.H.U.M.P. computer magazine parody 
by Don Romero. Bcnn still considers 
this our best issue ever. 



INFO #16 



the Chicken Coop Era 




Issue Sixteen (Scpt/Oct 
87) declared a "Graphics Re- 
naissance" for the Amiga; on 
the cover were graphics 
from Doug's Math Aquari- 
um, Sculpt 3D, and Digi- 
Paint. Also covered inside 
were XCAD and EF/X. This 
issue saw the debut of our 
popular Real World column; 
we talked about Neuro- 
mancer. Rocky & Bullwinkle, 
Max Headroom, and where 
to get good Italian beef sand- 
wiches in Chicago. Tom Ral- 
tigan had just been kicked 
out as head of Commodore, 
and we ran photos of Irving Gould's 
hand-picked replacements. Rich Mcln- 
lyrc and Al Duncan from Commodore 
Canada. Don Romero's "non-column" 
GEOS Update ran its first installment 
(it's still going!), and Tom wrote his 
first "full review", of Fonimasier. We 
thought Warren Block's "Public Domain 
Programming Aids" in this issue was 
such a good idea, it inspired us to 
launch INFO's Public Domain column. 
In the review arena, we rated the A500 
at four-plus stars, but the Amiga Gen- 
lock only rated 3+. The Sidecar got a 
pitiful two-star rating. We launched the 
INFO Update column in #16, to clear 
up errors in articles, report company ad- 
dress changes, and keep readers up-to- 
date on the latest software versions. 
There were two Ergcards for BASIC 8, 
and one "split" card covered both 
Fairlight and Sentry. 




The Chicken-Coop in Iowa City; 

Secret International HQ during issues #4- 




INFO #17 



The Commodore and Amiga chess- 
pieces on [he cover of #17 (Nov/Dec 
87) were rendered using Sculpt 3D, The 
giant Games Gallery featured 39 re- 
views, and previews of 3 new games; 
C64 Diablo, and Dark Castle and Land 
of Legends for ihe Amiga. Not one 
game merited a five-star rating, though 
Deep Space (Amiga/ Psygncsis) and In- 
to the Eagle's Nest (C64/ Mindscape) 
came close with 4+. Jim Oldfield took a 
noslitlgic look at Star Trek gaines, and 
"The First— The Best" examined some 
of the best games of all time. Mindy 
Skclton's interview with NcwTck's Paul 
Montgomery opened a lot of eyes, and 
many readers noted Paul's resemblance 
to Nicola Tesla in the Real World col- 
umn on ihc opposite page. Our compari- 
son of 32-bil computers showed the 
Amiga to be the best deal (of 
course), and in New Products 
we were die first to print (and 
comment on) the new "curved 
Amiga" logo. Our popular 
Public Dom;un column, with 
ratings of the best PD software, 
debuted in this issue. News & 
Views reported Uiat Atari had 
bought the chain of Federated 
Stores, one of the major Amiga 
ouUcts, and the Rumor Mill 
mentioned lliat CBM was de- 
veloping a "Really Fat Agnus" 
chip. This issue featured our 
last INFO Ergcards: one for 
GFL Championship Football, 
and two for WordPerfect. 



70 DMIFIQ] Sept/Oct 1988 



INFO #18 



Number Eighteen (Jan/Fcb 88) marked 
the dcbul of desktop publishing in the 
pages of INFO, The cover, contents 
page, Editor's Page, and unclassified 
ads were all produced using Ciiy Desk 
and the HP LascrJct+. We'd also added 
Butcher to our graphics toolbox. Tom 
was listed now as Assistant Editor, 

Chuck Yeager's Advanced Flight 
Trainer (C64/ EA) pulled in a five-star 
rating in the Gallery. We led off this is- 
sue with the industry's first in-dcplh re- 
port on die Amiga virus. It turned into a 
four-part scries by the time wc were 
done, and Commodore asked our per- 
mission to reprint the entire series to 
hand out to developers at the 1988 
Amiga Developers Conference. The hot 
news in News & Views was CBM's hir- 
ing of Ma,x Toy to fill the top job at 
Commodore. Jim Oldficld started his 
series on "Cashing in on Technology" in 
this issue; Peggy Hcrrington filed a re- 
port from the first AmlExpo in New 
York; and Lcn Lindsay's column focus- 
ing on Commodore Users Groups de- 
buted. We previewed GeoPublish, the 
first desktop publishing package for the 
C64, Bob Lindstrom reviewed two 
Amiga desktop pubHshing packages, 
and wc previewed three that were still 
"coming soon". 



drive was in the works at Commodore; 
News & Views told of Activision ab- 
sorbing Firebird. Mindy's interview 
with Leo Schwab provided some insight 
into the inner workings of a hacker's 
mind; and we rounded out the issue 
with reviews of the products we'd used 
to make our format change. 



INFO #19 



The March/April 1988 issue focused 
on Games. The cover was a Sculpt 3D 
rendering of a giant "Pyradoks" from 
Discovery's Arkanoid for the Amiga. 
This issue jumped us into the era of full 
desktop publishing, thanks to Profes- 
sional Page from Gold Disk, a 
PostScript laser printer from QMS, and 
lots of blood, sweat, and tears from 
Megan. With only minor modifications, 
it's the setup wc still use. 

We printed a secret "back door" for 
Arkanoid in this issue, and subscribers 
got even more "INFOMania Game 
Tips" in the WrapUp. Arkanoid picked 
up an easy five sliirs in the Gallery, as 
did MicroProse's Stealth Fighter for the 
C64. Also in Uic Gallery: a preview of 
Cinemaware's Three Stooges for the 
Amiga. Wc listed 26 Cyberpunk science 
fiction books in this issue's Real World 
column. The Rumor Mill reported that a 
new C64 model with a built-in 3.5" 



INFO #20 



The May/June 88 INFO (the "White Is- 
sue") focused on Desktop Video; the 
cover graphics were Sculpt 3D render- 
ings of spiraling red, green, and blue ar- 
rows. Inside, we were using Perfect Vi- 
sion to capture some video images thai 
moved loo fast for DigiView. On die 
mastlicad, Judith Kilbury-Cobb was our 
new Data Manager. 

Our editorial on lies that were slill 
circulating about ihc Amiga was ex- 
tremely popular. Jet from subLogic and 
Digilek's Amegas were this issue's lop- 
ralcd games at five stars. We scooped 
everyone with our story of C. Ltd.'s 
coming SCSI network (complete with 
laser printer and page scanner) for tlie 
Amiga. Video features abounded, with 
Oran Sands telling how video pros use 
Amigas, Harv Laser reporting colorfully 
on Amiga video titling programs, and 
Joel Hagen revealing the secrets behind 
his award-winning Amiga video "RGB". 
In News & Views, wc were the first to 
report on the new features of version 
1.3 of the Amiga operating system. 
Bcnn's visit to NewTek provided some 
entertaining anecdotes; Sheldon Lecmon 
joined INFO as a regular columnist "at 
large"; Copy Comer returned with 
David Mi\riin at the helm; and, at 
prcsstime, we just barely squeezed in 
the story of CBM's new A2500 models 
and a third-party laptop Amiga! 



INFO #21 



The July/Aug 1988 issue featured die 
first national magazine cover to be pro- 
duced entirely on consumer equipment. 
We used the new color separation mod- 
ule form Professional Page and our 
QMS 3(X) dpi laser printer. The subject 
matter was a mechanical seahorse ren- 
dered for INFO by renowned Amiga 
arust Louis Johnson. This was the sec- 
ond issue delivered to subscribers pro- 
tected in a poly bag. 



PROFESSIONAL PAGE 
W: 



■ (>w rssio ton nwkr, Ti. *;; 

ib* »i«k c« kr ^w^f inlM»M) n 









Sts 100127 



Five-star rated in the Gallery were 
Ebonsiar (Amiga/ Microlllusions) and 
FIA-18 Interceptor (Amiga/ EA). We 
scooped everyone with a picture of 
Commodore's new Transputer board for 
the Amiga. We also told of Tandy's new 
technological breakthrough in computer 
storage: the THOR erasable CD. 
Mindy's controversial interview with 
Jay Miner brought us lots of mail, and 
Dr. Elizabeth Kaspar's "Eye on Educa- 
tion" column raised some questions 
about Commodore computing in the 
schools. Greg Conley's winning entry in 
the INFO Cartoon Contest was a 
scream; so was Sue Albert's review of 
EA's incredibly bad DP program for the 
C64, Outrageous Pages. Mort Kevclson 
did his first piece for INTO, a feature on 
"Easing the Upgrade Path" from the 
C64 to the Amiga, Rounding out #21 
was our six-page "NaUonal CHUMP" 
computer magazine parody.. .in the form 
of a supermarket tabloid! 

SELF INDULGENCE 

Well, maybe it has been a bit self- 
indulgent.. .but we enjoyed taking this 
trip down Memory Lane. It's good 
someumcs to take a long look back and 
see where you've been, so you can plan 
more carefully where you're going! 
We're thankful to all of you who have 
been paying your hard-earned cash to 
read INFO these first five years. 
Whether you have every issue since IN- 
FO 64 #1, or you're holding your first 
copy in your hands right now, we're 
glad to have you on board. We hope to 
see you back next issue. 

-Bcnn, Mark, Carol, Tom, 
Megan, and Judi O 



OMFO Sept/Oct 1988 71 



r 




iy][pi£j^ 




ALERT ALERT ALERT 

In the CHUMP humor section in 
issue #21, we inadvertently printed 
a real 800 number in the phony 
CON-PUTER NOVELTIES ad. 
Unfortunately, a few of you have 
actually called that number. 
Please...DONT CALL!! Believe 
me, they don't have any computer 
novelties for sale. We regret any 
inconvenience this error has 
caused. 

THANK YOU! 



ALLEGED ERRORS 

The subscription cards that were 
bound into INFO #21 incorrccUy listed 
our subscription prices. INFO's real 
subscription prices are S20.00 for 6 is- 
sues. S37.00 for 12, and S50.00 for 18 
(and S26/6, S49/12, and S68/18 outside 
the U.S.). We regret tlie mistake, and 
apologize for any inconvenience ii may 
have caused. 

Mark added a tagline to Warren 
Block's comparison of FACC II and 
Bliizdisk last issue which erroneously 
stated that Commodore had included 
Microsmith's Bliizdisk and Fasifonts 
on Workbench vl.3. Faslfonts'-^mcXud- 
ed, but not Blitzdisk. On that same sub- 
ject, Microsmiths is no longer market- 
ing Bliizdisk separately; it is included 
with TxEd Plus, which, for S79.95, puts 
TxEd Plus, FiisiFonts, FunKeys, ARP, 
and a demo version of Bill Hawes' 
AREXX all on the same disk. 

In the games box of the New Produc- 
ts section of #21, the line containing the 
name Digitek was somehow twilighi- 
zoned, shoving two listings together, 
Cyber-Complex, Skyblaster, Final Mis- 
sion, Spinworld, New York Subway, and 
Monslerhall arc coming from Digitek, 
not from Digitiil Dreams. 

There was some finger slippage on 
the address we printed for Creative Mi- 
cro Designs in the #21 Update. It 



should be PO Box 789, Wilbraham MA 
01095. Their real phone number is 413- 
589-7624, 

Somewhere between INFO and ihc 
printer, gremlins stole the ratings box 
from the Micro Detective review in #2 1 . 
Bob Baker rated il at four stars. 

In #18, wc printed an incorrect ad- 
dress for Floor Covering Systems. 
Their address is PO Box 418399, Sacra- 
mento CA 95841. 916-344-5175. 



MOVES, ETC. 



While wc haven't moved since last 
August, ihc Postal weasels have seen fit 
to change our zipcodc here at the INFO 
intcrgalactic headquarters. It is now 
52245, up by 5 from our previous 
52240; the zipcode for our PO box re- 
mains 52244, 

Peoplelink has new phone numbers: 
312-670-2666 / 800-524-0100 for voice, 
and 312-822-9712 / 800-826-8855 mo- 
dem. 

Other new numbers and/or addresses: 
RGB Video Creations: 407-622- 

1038. 
Accolade: 550 S. Winchester Blvd., 

Suite 200, San Jose, CA 95128. 

408-985-1700. Customer service: 408- 

296-8400. 

Oxxi: 1339 E. 28th St., Long Beach, 

CA 90806. 213-427-1227. 

NEW VERSIONS 

Tiic following is a list of the latest 
software updates we know about. Ver- 
sion numbers are listed, but there are 
just too many of them to describe the 
enhancements. Contact the companies 
for full details if you're in need of an 
upgrade. 

Amiga: 

City Desk 2.0; MicroSearch 

Express Paint 2.2, Stellar Conflict II, 
WordPlex 2.0; Professional Automation 
Research (P.A.R.) 

Digi-View3.0; NewTek 

Shakespeare 1 .1; Infinity 



GoldSpell II; Gold Disk 

AOBASIC 1 .3; ^\)S,Qil 

Dynamic Studio 1.21; New Wave 

VideoScape 3D 2.0, Video Tiller I.I; 
Aegis 

Pascal 2.0; Metacomco 

MaxiPlan 1.9, Nimbus 1.3; A-Talk III; 
Oxxi 

The Investor's Advantage 2.0; Soflwiire 
Advantiigc 

IntroCAD 2.0; Progressive Peripherals 

PowerWindows 2.0; Inovatronics 

CalUgrapher 1.05; Inter Active Soft- 
works 

ARexx 1.06; William S. Hawes 

C128: 
T.H.I.S. 2.0; Micro Aided Designs 

C64: 

GEOS 2.0; Berkeley Soflworks 

CH..CH..CH..CHANGES 

R & DL Productions has dropped 
the name AProCAD for its graphics 
tablet package. All incamaiions now go 
by the name AFroDraw. 

The Disc Company has formed an 
alliance with Oxxi and Software Vi- 
sions to put together the Critic's Choice 
Productivity Bundle. It consists of the 
KindWords wordprocessor, Maxiplan 
spreadsheet, and Microfiche Filer 
database manager and retails for S249. 

New Horizons is releasing an ad- 
junct lo its ProWrite wordprocessor. For 
S49.95, ProScript will convert docu- 
ments from ProWriie lo a PostScript 
format for laser printing. 

The LOGO programming language 
for the C64, which was dropped by 
Commodore, is available from the origi- 
nal authors. Terrapin Inc., 376 Wash- 
ington St., Maiden MA 02148. 

LRA Enterprises offers the FAST! 
C64-to-Amiga file transfer cable men- 
tioned in Mort Kevelson's article on 
upgrading last issue. It retails for 
S14.95ppd. 



72 m\Fm Sept/Oct 1988 




Continued from page 57 



U.S. Mail From: 

Wayne Turner, Glendalc CA 

As an owner of Commodore 
stock and a seven-year survivor of 
the brokerage business, I must 
point out an important clarification 
of the information you gave on 
page 15 of issue #21. Although 
Commodore has eamed Sl.37 per 
share in the first nine months of its 
fiscal year ending March 31, this is 
not a dividend payment to share- 
holders. No dividends have been 
paid since the company's founding, 
though as a shareholder I hope one 
day they will. 



Thanks, Wayne. We don't own stock in 
Commodore, so we weren't aware of 
how the system works. ! hope one day 
your investment in Convnodore will pay 

off! 

-Mark & Benn 



U.S. Mail From: 

Paul Vaughan, San Jose CA 

I was going to send along a note 
saying what a great mag you are- 
best there is, and all that stuff-but 
you already know that. So then I 
thought I might just share how 
much I really enjoy and appreciate 
your clean and honest reporting- 
but then I would just be bragging 
about my own good taste. So, in- 
stead, I am settling on the only true 
and meaningful statement of my 
opinion of your magazine- 
enclosed find a check and resub- 
scription form. Thanks for all the 
good reading. 



What a wonderful way to show appreci- 
ation—cold, hard, CASH! We kinda 
hope your idea catches on, Paul. 
Thanks for providing us with this issue's 
obligatory "INFO is Great" letter 

-Mark & Benn 



CompuServe Mail From: 
Dave Voelker [75166,401] 

Yours is the fourth review I've 
read of PapcrClip III that fails to 
point out the many ways in which 
the program is a step backward 
from its predecessor, PaperClip 11. 
Here are the flaws not mentioned 
in Karl Thurber's rubber-stamp re- 
view: it no longer autoboots; the 
computation of page size has been 
changed, and older files now print 
too many lines or crash with a pag- 
ing error; the number of printer 
files has been cut from well over 
100 to around 30; printer files cre- 
ated for previous PClip versions 
are incompatible with PClip III; 
the spellchecker dictionary is still 
only 38,000 words, and PClip III 
won't read the considerable num- 
ber of new words I had already 
added to my PClip II dictionary 
disk; the spellchecker still doesn't 
recognize words with conditional 
hyphens as whole words; its speed 
is still slow; functions that used to 
be memory resident are now in 
overlays that must be fetched from 
disk for each use; etc. I wrote Elec- 
tronic Arts about my disappoint- 
ment with PaperClip III, and they 
never replied. Why should they, 
when the Commodore magazines 
think a review is simply a list of 
features uncritically regurgitated 
from their product literature? I had 
hoped for better from INFO. If it's 
not too late to get the word out, I'd 
like to send a warning to PaperClip 
II owners considering upgrading to 
PaperClip III: stick with what 
you've got. PaperClip has finally 
been improved too much. 



it on its own merits. Perhaps we should 
have asked Karl to check compatibility 
with earlier versions--we might have 
discovered some of the problem areas 
you point out. But most of what you are 
so angry about will affect upgraders on- 
ly. We agree: upgraders .should be 
warned of the possible upgrade prob- 
lems. Consider them warned. However, 
we still believe Paperclip III is one of 
the finest 8-bit wordprocessors around, 
and we don't see anything in your argu- 
ments that should dissuade a new user 
from considering it. 

-Mark & Benn 



We were unaware of any incompatibili- 
ties when we did the review. Thanks for 
bringing them to our attention. But, 
frankly, we're a little torqued off by 
your browbeating— we don't ever just 
"regurgitate" reviews from product liter- 
ature. We run the software and evaluate 



QLink Mail From: WiIliamL2 

In Albany, GA (a so-called stan- 
dard metropolitan area, according 
to the U.S. GOVT), the local U- 
brary system has had no Com- 
modore magazines. After a great 
deal of thought, we of the local us- 
er group selected the best all- 
around Commodore INFOrmation 
publication to give to the library, in 
order to both boost Commodore 
systems and to provide a service to 
the community. Needless to say, we 
chose your publication. 



We're honored. And we think it's a great 
way to support both your local commu- 
nity and INFO. Thanks. 

-Mark & Benn 



CompuServe Mail From: 
David Sieben [76625,622] 

I have been an avid reader of 
your magazine for the last two 
years, and the list of useful and en- 
tertaining articles that you have 
provided is quite long. However, 
your interview with Jay Miner was 
a disservice to the Amiga commu- 
nity. The PS/2, ST, and Mac II have 
many shortcomings. The Amiga is 
still out in front of the crowd. 



Jay's point was not that the Mac or PS- 
2 are superior machines, but thai they 
have grabbed a lion's share of the mar- 
ketplace. His argument is that it's a 
share of the market that Amiga can't 
take away from them. And we feel that 
the "Father of the Amiga" is entitled to 
a forum in which he can state his opin- 
ions, unfettered by censorship. 

-Mark & Benn 



miFm Sept/Oct 1988 73 



(Q) Creative 

AQ^X Orders only: 800-872-8882 


Computers 

(outside CA) 213-370-2009 (inside CA) 
CA 90260 Moii-Sat 8AM-6PM PST FAX: (213) 214-0932 


L i 44jJ KCUOnuO rlCtlLIl oiVQ. 


L^uvvjiuai^^ 




r^\ /o 




Special Aegis Promotion: 


(j^Vr 




Buy any ihree Aegis products iuid gcL Pons of Call free! 


V_^ V 1 

Great Va ey Products 




Or: Buy Ports of Call and get a Ports of Call T-shirt free 

(while supplies last). 


Impact SCSI Controller and memory board, 1 meg or 2 




megs space 




Soiiix S4y.98 Digu! -Telecommunicaiions 549,98 


Will auteboott with 1 .3 - Hard drives available up 


to 80 


Draw - CAD 549,95 Audionmsicr $37,48 


meg capacity- Call for prices. 




Viduoscapo 3-D 5124.98 Animutor + Images S87.48 


GVP Hard Cards available. Please call. 




Videotillcr S99.95 


Quantum 84 MB 12 ms 3,5" hard disk: $995!! 


Impact -lousiness Grupliics S62.46 New Ac'j^is products: 


Shock mounted, 64KB cashe (for 12ms speed), SCSI 
interface. Compatible with IMPACT or A2090 boards. 


Ara/.ok's Tomb S3 1.25 Lights, Cimicra, Action! 
Ports of Call S29.71 Modeller 3-D 






aENC.H."Ju!K LIBRARYS 
BENCK.MASK MODULA-2 
DErCiD ZCRK 


64.97 

129,97 

33.76 


DELUXE PRODUCTIO.WS I 39. 95 
DELUXE VIDEO 1.2 S9.95 
DEHONSTHATOS, THE 21.85 


FLIGHT SLi^ULATOR 11 37,46 




SO 


Fl 


rwA 




p 


FLIP FLOP 9.75 
FLIP3IDE 37.48 






BIG PICTURE OKI.'SATE 
BLACK CAULDRON 


18.95 
28.83 


DES CARTES 22.71 
DESKTOP ARTIST 18.73 


ELO'rf 6? 32 


: 


-DEUON 71 . 95 


FONTS AND BORDERS 22.12 


64 EHUIATOR 2, THE 4 9.95 


BLACK JACK ACADEMY 


29.93 


DESTROYER 25.26 


FOOTBALL FACTS 42.97 


A-TALK PLUS 51 .98 


BLITZKRIEG AT ARDENNES 


34,41 


DETONATOR 2 5,9V 


FL^TMAN 21.95 


AAARGBt 23.95 


BLOCKBUSTER 


32.47 


DEVELOPERS TOOLKIT 36.22 


FOitMS IN FLIGHT 44,93 


AC BASIC-COMPILER FOR AMI 134.0 6 


30MB BUSTER 


21,95 


DIABLO 23.36 


FORTRESS UNDERGROUND 13.23 


AC FORTRAN 19 9.00 


30HH0KED TIME-TEXT ADVNTR 


30.90 


DIGA-TELECOH PACKAGE 49,96 


FOUR IN ONE 18,68 


ACCOUMTA-tT, THE 1S6.89 


BREACH 


25.95 


OIGI PIX 12 22.71 


FRACTION ACTION 31,23 


ADBUM 51.98 


BREACH SCENARIO DISK 


16.2! 


DIGI-DROID 69.95 


FROST BYTE 19.46 


ADVENTUSE C0K5TRCTI0N SET 14.40 


BRIDGE 4.0 -CARD GAME 


20.55 


DIGI-PAINT 41.22 


GALACTIC INVASION 16.22 


ADVENTURES OF SIHEAD 32.4 6 


BRIDGE 5.0 


24.10 


DIGI-VIEH 3.0 143.72 


GALAXY FIGHT 16.23 


AEGIS A.>IIKATOR 87.48 


BRUSH -(iOKKS 


20.59 


DIGI-VIEK 3.0 UP'JSADE 11.95 


GALILEO 2.0 49.95 


A£G1S ART PAK*1-CL:P AST 24.98 


BRUSH KORKS 2 


19.9b 


DIRECTOR, THE 45.47 


GA».'YHED 21.95 


AEGIS DRAW 49.95 


BUMPER STICKER MAKER 


37,45 


DISCOVERY EXPANSION DISKS 12.97 


GARRISON 29.19 


AEGIS IMAGES-PAINT 24.98 


BUREAUCRACY 


27.47 


DISCOVERY CAME DISK 25.00 


GARRISON 11 35.71 


AESOP'S FABLES 31.23 


BUTCHER 2.0 


23.13 


DISCRETE MJiTilEMATICS 36.22 


GEE BEE AIB RALLY 29.95 


AIRT SYMBOLIC LANGUAGE 4 4.95 


BUTTON AND BADGE MAKER 


3».9a 


DISK MECHANIC, THE J»,SO 


GEOMETRIC LIBRARY 11,88 


ALGEBRA I 32.46 


C-ZAk 


126,75 


DISK PRO PLUS 18.75 


GETTYSBURG 38,95 


ALGEBRA II 3 6. 13 


C.A.P.E. eSK ASSEMBLER 


sa,47 


DISK TO DISK 34.34 


GIZ.MOZ 2.0 39,95 


ALIE.1 FIRES 24. 9B 


CALCUU'S 


36, 13 


DISK WICK 32.46 


CUOyS. RAJIGER 13,23 


ALL ABOUT AMERICA 31.47 


CALLICRAPUER 


79.40 


DISKHASTER 37.40 


GOLD DISK FONT SET *1 21,65 


ALOHA FONTS 12.96 


CA.'-.BRIDGE LISP 


124,95 


DOCTOR TER.-^ PROFESSIONAL 74.06 


GOLD SPELL 2 6.10 


ALOHA FONTS 2 12.96 


CAPITALIZATION SERIES 


19,46 


DOMINOES 16.95 


COLD SPELL II 29.95 


ALOHA FONTS 3 12.96 


CASOUE 


25.96 


DONALD DUCK'S PLAYGROUND 18.00 


GOLDEN PATH 2 9.21 


ALTERNATE BEALITI 27,06 


CASINO FEVER 


25, S6 


DOS TO DOS 37.82 


GOLDEN PYRAMID IGAMEEHOW) 24 . U3 


AKEGAS 22.72 


CB THEE PLUS 


64.95 


DOUG'S HATH AQUARIUM 58.46 


GOLDRUNNER 24.98 


AMIGA DOS EXPRESS 20.60 


CELEBRITY COOKBOOK, THE 


22.71 


DPAINT AHTIUTIL. DISK ll 21.60 


IXmr 22.72 


AMIGA i(A.=IATE 24. 9( 


CESTERFOLD SQUARES 


19.95 


DR. FRUIT 19.46 


GR,\aaiT 20.59 


ANALYTIC AST-CMAPHieS 37.4 6 


CHALLENGER 


9.75 


DR. T'S CAGED ARTIST EDITORS CALL 


GRAND SLAM TENNIS 31.25 


ANALYZE 2.0-SPllEADSHEET 93.73 


CHA.MPICNSHIP SPORTS CA.MES 


27.46 


DR. T'S BACH SOSGbOOit 19.95 


GRAPHICS STUDIO, T.HE 38.96 


ANIMAL KINGDO.H 31.23 


CHESSMASTEH 2000 


32.40 


DR. T'S DRUMS 19.95 


GREAT STATES 24.99 


ANIMATESD 99.95 


CHESS.MATE 


20.60 


DR. T'S KCS 161.98 


GREAT STATES !1 2 5.96 


ANIMATION EFFECTS 32.4 6 


CHICKEN LITTLE 


19.48 


DR. T'S DB, KEYS 19.95 


GRID START 16.22 


ANIMATION STAND 32.4 6 


CITY DEFENSE 


14.95 


DR,XEK 34.34 


GRID, THE 34.34 


AJJIHATOH FLIPPER 24. 9B 


CITY DESK 


93.75 


DRAW PLUS (AEGISI 162.48 


aRIDIRON-FOOTOALL CAME 9. 95 


ANIMATOR JR. 49.38 


CITY DESK ART COMPANION 


IS. 47 


DRUM STUDIO 32.47 


GUILD OF THIEVES 30.90 


AWIMATOR'S APPRENTICE 194. 3* 


CLI MATE 


24.98 


DimAMIC DRUMS 49.98 


HACKER II 27.4 6 


ARAZOK'S TOMB 31.2S 


CLIP AST SERIES 1-6 


12.95 


DUNAMIC STUDIO 1.2 142.96 


ilAlCALC 30. SO 


AKCADE ACTION PACK 34.95 


COMICS ON DISK 


12.96 


DYNA.'di: WORD 124.38 


iiALLEY PROJECT 30.90 


ABCTiC FOX 1 ,2 26.40 


COMPUTER BASEBALL 


27.47 


DYNAMIC-CAD 340.32 


HARDBALL iS.li 


ARENA 12.96 


CRAZY CARS 


25.94 


EARL HEAVER BASEBALL 34.9 5 


HARRIER CDWaAT SIMULATOR 32.95 


AKEXX 32.9S 


CRIMSON CROWN 


12.97 


EASY LOANS 25.00 


HARRIER MISSION 16.21 


ARKAKOID 35.72 


CROSSWORD CREATOR 


34.34 


EBON STAR 25.96 


HEAD COACH 32.4 7 


ART COMPANION 19.95 


CRYSTAL HAH.MEH 


12.96 


EMERALD MINES 13.97 


HEX 24. 9S 


ART GALLEHV FANTASY 23.36 


CUBEKASTER 


22.71 


EMPIRE 34.32 


HITCHIKEHS GUIDE 20.59 


ART GALLERY I 18.73 


CUSTC-iS SCREENS 


43.73 


ENCHANTER 20.59 


HOLLYWOOD HIJINX 27,47 


AiiT GALLEKY II 18.73 


DARK CASTLE 


25.95 


EUROPEA.S- SCENERY DISK 17.95 


HOLLYWOOD POKER 25,96 


AST OF CHESS, THE 22.95 


DATA RETRIEVE 


49.95 


EXCELLENCE! 195.00 


HO,",! BUILDERS CAC 129,96 


ART PASTS t2 21. SO 


DEATH S-rtORD 


16.35 


EXPLORER, THE 36.22 


HO? i COOL JA22 21.60 


ASHA'E FONTS 5 8.95 


DECIMAL DU.SGEON 


31.23 


EXPRESS PAINT G2.5D 


HOT LICSS 27,59 


ASSEMPRO 59.97 


DEEP SPACE 


17,95 


EXTEND 25.96 


HUliT FOR RED OCTOBER 27,46 


AUDIO M/.STEH 37. 4S 


DEFCON 5 


25.95 


FACC 11 21,65 


IMPACT-BUSINESS GRAPHICS 62,46 


AZTEC 68/A.v,-D 224.25 


DEFENDER OF THE CROWN 


34.34 


FAERY TALE ADVENTURE 31,23 


INDOOR SPORTS 31 ,22 


AZTEC C PROFESSIONAL 175.46 


DEJA VU 


34.34 


FAERY TALE GUIDEBOOK 7,76 


INOVATOOLS I 51,96 


a.E.S.T. BUSINESS MGMT. 355.50 


DELUXE HELP CALLIGRAPHER 


22.71 


FERRARI FOS.MULA ONE 33,57 


INSANITY FIGHT 25,96 


BALANCE OF POWER 34.34 


DELUXE HELP FOR DICIPAINT 


21.84 


FEUD 12,96 


INSTANT MUSIC 1,2 33,00 


BALLYHOO 27.47 


DELUXE HELP FOR DPAINT II 


21.84 


FINAL TRIP 19.46 


i:.;ellitype 35.1? 


BARBARIAN 2i.77 


DELUXE HELP FOR PHOTON PAINT 21.84 


FI.VANCIAL COOKBOOK 14.40 


INTERCEPTOR 37.95 


BARD'S TALE 36.00 


DELUXE .MAPS 


16,22 


FINANCIAL TIME MACHINE 31.16 


INTERCHANGE 29.22 


BARD'S TALE CLUE BOOK 10.77 


DELUXE MUSIC 


69,95 


FIREPOWER 1S.6U 


JNVERCHANOE CONVERSION 16,95 


BARD'S TALE II 41.96 


DELUXE PAINT 11 


89.95 


FIRST LETTERS i WORDS 33,00 


INrERCHAHGE OUJECTS *1 16,95 


BASIC GHAM-IEH SERIES 19.46 


DELUXE PHOTO LAB 


99.95 


FIRST SHAPES 33.00 


INTO THE EAGLE'S NEST 26,56 


BBS-PC 62.32 


DELUXE PRINT r ART DISK 


72,00 


FLEET CHECK 25,96 


INTROCAD 4 9,95 


BECKER TEXT 99.95 


DELUXE PRINT ART DISK (2 


21 ,[ia 


FLIGHT PATH 737 I 6 . 2 I 


1,':VE3TCK'S ADVANTAGE 64.97 



We carry over 800 products. Call for unlisted items. 



Ak^U^lUld 



IT'S Of4L¥ ROCK t ROLL 21.60 

J FORTH 68.74 

JET il.iS 

JET SET FONT SET 32.50 

JEWELS OF DARKNESS 19.95 

JINXTEB 25.95 

KA.".PFaBOPPE 41.22 

KAJUl FOHXS • 54.95 

KAilATE KID II 25.91 

KARATE KING 15.56 

KABTINE GRAND PRIX 16.22 

KEK TO C 22.72 

KErUOARD CADET 27.47 

KICKWORK 19.46 

KIDTALK 31.95 

KINDERAHA 31.23 

KINDWOBDS 62. SO 

KING OF CHICAGO 3<.34 

KING'S QUEST I, II. Ill 32.95 

KNIGHT OSC 30.90 

KWIK SPEAK 2a. 01 

LAND OF LEG£(IDS CALL 

UiRRIE 12.96 

LATTICE C 4.0 162. 41 

LATTICE C fROFFESIONAL 212.41 

LftEERSCRIPT 2B.10 

LEADER BOARD TORNA DISK 14. CO 

LEADER BCARD-COLF CAKE 27.00 

LEASNING THE ALPHABET 19. <6 

LEATHER GQDESSES OF PilOEOS 27.47 

LEATHERNECK 2 5.96 

LEISURE SUIT LARRY 26.^0 

LEXCHECK 2 6.85 

LIBYANS IN SPACE 19.97 

LIHKWORD LANGUAGE SERIES 20.55 

LIST (GIHPLEI 63.70 
iJOK'S AMIGA ART STVOIO 38. S7 

LISP 1.3-aY HETACC'ICO 137.47 

LITTLE DRAGON 12.96 

LITTLE BED HEN 19.49 

LOGIC WORKS 62.4 7 

LOTTERY- MAGIC 19.21 

LPD FILER-DBASE 81.23 

LPD PLANNER-SPREADSHEET 81.23 

LPD WRITER-HP 8 1.23 

LURKING HORROR 25.96 

HAD LIBS 12.48 

MAGICAL MYTHS 32.47 

MAGICIAN'S DUNGEON 21.84 

MARAUDER II 27.47 

MARBLE MADNESS 33.00 

MASTER TYPE 27.4 7 

MATCH IT J5.71 

MATH MAGICIAN 27.49 

MATH TALK 31 .25 

HATH TALK FRACTIONS 24.95 

HATH WIZARD 31 .23 

.MATH -A.'IAT I OS 64.95 

HAVIS BEACON TYPING 30.89 

HAJilPIAN 500 93.13 

KAXIPLAS PLUS 124.4 

MEAN IB COURSE DISK 14.96 

MEAN 18 GOLF 28.77 

METACOHCO ASSEMBLER 68.72 

HETACOMCO PASCAL 68.72 

HETAC0.1C0 SHELL 48.10 

METACO.'.ICO TOOLKIT 34.34 

METASCOPE DEBUGGER 59.95 

MICROFICHE FILER 69.95 

HICROLAMYER 37.47 

HINDWALKER 34.34 

HIND FOREVER 27.47 

MIND LIGHT 7 153.95 

MISSION ELEVATOR 34.95 

HOEBIUS 39.95 

MONEY MENTOR 5 9.98 

MOONHIST 27.47 

MOUSETRAP 12,96 

MULTl-FORTH 59.95 

."lULTI-PREFS 19.45 
MUSIC MOUSE ■ 51.35 

MUSIC STUDENT 37.48 

MUSIC STUDIO, THE 34.35 

NANCY-SPELLING CHECKER 34.35 

NEWSLETTER KONTS COLOR 19.50 

NI.MHUS 1; RECORD KEEPER 93. »0 

NINJA .'SISSIQK 13.00 



OBLITSRATOR 

OGKE 

OMEGA FILE 

ONE -ON -ONE 

ONLINE 2.0 

OO-TOPOS 

ORCA/llZE 

OUTLINE 

PAGE FLIPPER 

PAGESETTER 

PALADIN 

PAWN, THE 

PEOPLE METER 

PERFECT SCORE 

PERSECUTORS 

PHANTASIE 

P.HANTASIE 3 

PHASAR-FIS' L HSKT 

PHOTON PAINT 

PHOTOSYNTHESIS 

PINBALL I.Q. 

PINK PANTHER 

PIXKATE 

PLANET PROBE 

PLUTOS 

portal-adventase game 
ports of call 
pckeh pack 
pomerk:.s"coxs 2.0 
pre calculus 
printkaster plus 
pr is.". plus 
pro midi studio 
pro video cgi 

PRO VIDEO FONT SET fl 

PRO VIDEO FONT SET *2 

PRO VIDEO PLtS 

PBObABILITY THEORY 

PROFESSIONAL PAUE 

PROJECT D 

PR0.''.1SE:SPELLING CHECKER 

P.ROKRITE 2.0 

PUBLISHER PLUS 

PUNCTUATION SERIES 

PUPPY LOVE 

Q-BALL 

QUARTERBACK-HARD DISK BACKUP 

Q'JISTSTTES 

QUIZ .»iASTEH 

QUIZAK 

R.Rt AESOP'S FABLES 

BEAD i SHY,".E 

READ-A-RA.-'Jl 

REASONiATST WRITERS W.B 

RETURN TO ATLANTIS 

ROAD TO .MOSCOW 

ROABWAR 200 

RCADWAR EUROPA 

ROADWARS 

ROCKFORD 

ROGUE -ADVENTURE CAKE 

ROLOBASE PLUS 

ROMANTIC ENCOUNTERS 

SAF-T-NET HD BACKUP 

SANTA PARAVIA ( FIU.'^ACCIO 

EA.RCON III 

SCENERY DISK fll EAST CCA 

SCENERY DISK tl EAST COAS 

SCRIBBLE 

SCULPT-3D 

SDI !CLNA''AKARg SERIES 

SEASONS AND HOLIDAYS 

SEVEN CITIES OF GOLD 

SHADOWGATE 

SHAKESPEARE 

SHANGHAI-STRATEGY GA.ME 

SHERLOCK 

SILENT SERVICE 

SILICON DREA.MS 

SINBAD 1 FALCON 

SKYFOH 1.2 

SLAYGON 

S.'^OOTH TALKER 

SOFTKOOD FILE SG 

SOFTWOOD LE3GER VI. 2 

SONIX (AEGISI 

SOUNDLAD MIRAGE 



25 


99 


32 


46 


54 


99 


14 


40 


43 


56 


19 


Ai 


SZ 


32 


31 


25 


31 


23 


93 


72 


25 


96 


30 


90 


46 


70 


54 


97 


13 


23 


27 


47 


24 


95 


62 


48 


e4. 


9S 


97 


95 


19 


46 


28 


56 


45 


4 7 


19 


46 


19 


46 


34 


3S 


29 


71 


22 


95 


(2 


46 


36 


33 


31 


2 3 


45 


43 


130 


38 


144 


00 


72 


00 


72 


DO 


181 


95 


3G 


22 


2i7 


50 


31 


23 


3 4 


36 


76 


10 


124 


96 


19 


46 


18 


66 


2! 


41 


45 


47 


30 


SO 


49 


98 


23 


10 


19 


48 


31 


23 


31 


.23 


271 


56 


34 


.32 


29 


.97 


27 


.47 


29 


.21 


23 


.95 


23 


.95 


27 


.46 


58 


.46 


25 


.95 


32 


.46 


19 


.46 


35 


.75 


16 


.72 


16 


.71 


62 


.32 


09 


.95 



34.34 
21.60 
14.40 
31.23 

146.25 
27.46 
27.00 
25.95 
19.95 
34.34 
14.95 
25.96 
33.95 
78.21 
62.4 8 
49.98 

209.95 



sou.>:dscape utilities 1 

SOURCE level DEUUGGEi? 

SPACE BATTLE 

SPACE FLIGHT 

SPACE MATii 

SPACE PORT 

SPACE RANGER 

SPACEQUEST 

SPELLBOUND 

SPELLER BEE 

STAR GLIDER 

STARFLEET I 

ATION FALL 
STELLAR CONFLICT 
STOCK M-ARKET-THE CAV.E 
STRIP POKER 

RIP POKER DATA DISKS 
STUCIO FONTS VI (COLOR) 
STUCrO MAGIC 
SUB BATTLE 

SUPER HUEV-CO?TEH GA.ME 
SUPERliASE 

SUPERBASE PROfSSSlOSAL 
SURGEON, THE 

SYMPHONY SONGS (EACH VOL| 
SYSTHIA 
SYSTE-'iS HO.SITOR 

L GALLERY 
TALES FKO.'< ARA3IA.S NIGHTS 
TALKER-TALKING WP 
TALKING COLORING BOOK 
TASS TLME5 1.1 TONETOWN 
TELEGAKES 
TELEKARS 

TEMPLE OF APSHAI 
TERSOHPODS 
TEST DRIVE 
TEXrCRAFT FLUS 
TEXrPHO 
THAI BOXING 
THEXDER 
THREE LITTLE PIGS 

HREE STOOGES 
THUNDER BOY 
TIiME BANDITS 
TOOL CADDY 

TRANSCONTINENTAL RAIL.^iOAD 
TRlCON'J.'iETRY 
TRINITY 
TRUE BASIC 
Ta.=lBO 

TVRBO SILVER 
TV 5;;:;w 

TV TEXr 

TXED PLUS 

TYPING TUTOR WORD INVADER 

ULTI.MA III 

ULTRA DOS 

UNCLE D CON SOUND TRATION 

UNINVITED 

VADEH 

VA.".? IRE'S EMPIRE 

VIDEO EFFECTS 3D 

VIDEO VEGAS 

VIDEOSCAPE 3D 

VIDEOTITLER 

VIP PROFESSIO.MAL 

VIZA'/iRITE 

VOCABULARY IMPROVEMENT 

VYPER 

H SHELL 

WBEXTRAS 

WESTERN C,'i.''.ES 

'NIKUOSi PRINT II 

WINNIE THE POOH 

WINTER CHALLENGE 

WINTER GA.".ES 

KISHHSIHGER 

■n'OHD MASTER 

WOUD PERFECT 

WORD PCRFECT LIBRARY 

WORKS . T'JiE 

KCRLD CA.XES 

KRITE •>;• FILE 

X'CAD 

ZING 

ZI.NG KEYS 



35 


71 


57. 


16 


16 


96 


19. 


46 


29. 


95 


27. 


36 


13 


DO 


33 


DD 


25 


96 


31 


25 


30 


90 


36 


3D 


27 


4 7 


25 


95 


16 


2! 


27 


46 


12 


97 


19 


50 


64 


95 


32 


95 


23 


36 


93 


73 


195 


00 


31 


23 


15 


95 


59 


95 


28 


95 


9 


95 


31 


95 


ii 


10 


14 


13 


27 


46 


23 


9 = 


24 


97 


27 


46 


25 


7 7 


34 


95 


64 


93 


49 


95 


14 


26 


23 


95 


X9 


48 


35 


95 


22 


71 


22 


09 


32 


4 6 


25 


96 


36 


22 


27 


47 


68 


72 


CALL 1 


i2i 


95 


65 


Jl 


62 


32 


51 


»S 


22 


73 


26 


57 


37 


95 


25 


97 


34 


34 


19 


46 


29 


.21 


129 


.96 


24 


.10 


124 


.98 


99 


.95 


103 


.10 


93 


.75 


19 


.95 


21 


,95 


31 


.16 


24 


.95 


31 


.95 


22 


.75 


16 
9 


.5D 
.95 



Z 1 .N ^■ 



PELL 



zoom 

ZCRK TRILOGY 
ZU."./i .tON.S VOL 



5 7.95 

21.95 

48. 10 
21.85 



HAS 



27. 4G 
lD.il 
29.95 

219,00 

84.50 

124.9V 
2 7 . ', C 
59. 9i 

399,00 
49.48 
31.25 



15' CA.'iEaA CABLE 12.97 

ALEGSA WITH OX 166.95 

ALPS AL'J300 COLOR 24PIN 599.00 

AMIGA 2052 2 U£C RAM 399.00 

(V.IGA LIVE! 2 7 0.00 

A.>f!SEN GENLOCK 149.95 

ASDG a .MEG BOARDS W/QK 399.00 

AVATEX 24 00 BAUD MODEM 2 2 9.18 

BYTE BOX CK-RAH OPTIONAL 249.00 

C LTD 33 MB AlOOO HD 799.00 

C LTD SO UEG HD 899.00 

C LID 512K UNPOPULATED 49.95 

C LTD SCSI CNTULK AlOOO 219.95 

CA-S80 FLOPPY DRIVE 219.00 

CLEANING KIT ISKALL) 8.95 

CPS 500-POXER SUPPLY A50D 74.97 

EASYL TABLETS (ALL A.V:lGAS) 369,00 

ECE MIDI 500/ 2000 48.71 

ESCORT 2 UNPOPULATED 249.00 

ESCORT 500 UNPOPULATED iJ9.00 

EXP-1000 IM A500 479.95 

EXF-1000 IH UNPOPULATED 219.95 
FLICKER FIXER (HARDWARE) 499.00 

:^:^A^ iaUND-AUDIO£AM?LES 142.23 

LI-^ACT SCSI/;k RfM 541.20 

l.x.pACT SCS1/512K RAM 429.95 

KWICK START 149.47 

MICRON 2 MEG FOR A2000 499.00 

MICRON 2 KEG FOR A5 00 CALL 

MIDI GOLD 64.20 

MINISCHIBE 20HB 3.5" FAST 329.00 

.MINISCHIBE 80S1S SCSI 4 OH 615.00 

NEC COLOR P6 621,20 

NEC P2200 PRINTER 399.00 

OKIMATE 20 'W/PLUG N PRINT 199.00 

OVERDRIVE HD CONTROLLER 199.95 

PANASONIC WV1410 CAMERA 224.96 

PANASONIC WV15 00 CA.X.ERA 319.95 

FER-'-ECT SOUND 67.4 7 

PERFECT VISION 163.95 

PROaRIVE 219.00 

PRODRIVi 2000 14 9.0 

QUANTUM PROiBIVE SOS 1199.00 

SCRIBE-CARD 30 FOR 20860 420.00 

SPIRIT U MB FOR AlOOO 249.00 

SPIRIT D Ma FOR A500 249.00 

STAR NB24-10 545.96 

STAR NXIOOO PH!N'.'£a 199.00 

STAR SXIOOO FIAINBOX 249.95 

STARBOARD 2 PRODUCTS CALL 

SUBSYSTEM 500 199.95 

SUPERGEN 699.00 

SUPRA 2400 MODEM 152,49 

SUPRA DRIVE 20 KEG AlOOO £99. OC 

SUPHA DRIVE 20 MEG ASDO 699. OC 

SUPIIA DRIVE 30 MEG AIDOO 859.00 

SUPRA DRIVE 30 KEG ASOO 859. CO 

VI 200'J BF 79.95 

XEROX 4020 INK JET COLOR 1140.00 




Yes, we carry accessories! Everything 
from blank disks lo joysticks to Amiga 
dust covers to printer accessories 10 
copy stands to computer cables to RGB 
encodofs to power strips to modems, & 
much more! Unfortunately, tftsre's too 
mucfi to list here, so please caW us for 
anything and everything you need for 
your Amiga ttiat isn't listed here. 
THANK YOU! 



Creative Computers is both a mail order company with a siore's support and ihree store 

showrooms with mail order prices. If possible, drop by astore and you will be Ama2ed! 

Store front addresses: 

310 Wilshire Blvd. Santa Monica, CA 90A0^ 

Tues, -Sat. 11-7 p.m.. Sun. 11-5 p.m. phone: (213)394-7779 

4153 Redondo Beach Blvd., Lawndale, CA 90260 

Mon-Sat. 11-7 p.m. phone: (213) 542-2292 

21 12 E. Thompson Dr., Ventura, CA 93001 

Tues ■ Sat 1 1-7 p.m.. Sun. 12-5 p.m. phone: (805) 652-0325 



MINIMUM OflOfB: $20 

SHIPPING INFO: 1 % suichaiga lor Visa and MastaiCa/d: call loi sh.ppli!g falss. 

INTERNATIONAL PHONE i MAIL OROEffS ACCEPTED 

RETURN FOUCY: Delecilve marchandisu under wajranly will be (apairad oi leplaced. Raiurnod 

pfod'jcl tnusl be in original package. Wtjdo not oiler an/ reJund on duluctive producis Dt id! producls 

lha\ do no\ pydoim sauslaclorily. Wa maku no guaranltjos lor producl parlormanco. 

CONDITIONS: Croativa Computers reservos Iho right lo lin;il ihs sale of any lems lo local in-peison 

pick-up only. Pnctis scbj£;ci to change wilfioul nolico. 

WE ALSO RUN A 24 Hr. BBS: Call (213) 39-1 -5938 with jour modom. 

SCHOOL AND LARGE COMPANYPURCHASE ORDERS ACCEPTED. 



Visit one of our stores soon!! 



75 



Pioneer Computing Proudly Introduces 

. . ; Series II HARD DRIVES . . . 

HARD CARD 

'For AMIGA 2000. 

• 100% Amiga Compatible including WorkBench 1.3, 
Fast-file System and Auto Boot when available. 

• Pre-Formated and Tested 

• Complete ready to use. 

• Does no: require a floppy drive slot 

• Auto Park. 

• PHC33 3 3 megabyte, 28ms Hard Card 

• PHC48 48megabyte, 28ms Hard Card 

Jr vlJN X Myyj\ (not shown) 
'For AMIGA 500 

• 100% Amiga Compatible including WorkBench 1.3, 
Fast- file System and Auto Boot when available. 

• Pre-Formated and Tested. 

• Complete one piece SCSI controller. Hard Drive and 
fan cooled power supply that plugs on the Amiga 500 
expansion Port 

• Bus Pass Thru. 

• Auto Park. 

• PPB33 33megabyte. 28ms unit. 

• PPB 48 48megabyte, 28ms uniL 




^599. 95 
m9. 95 



PHC33 
PPB 33 



PHC48 
PPB 48 



PIONEER COMPUTING 

2469 East 7000 South #200 - Salt Uke Ciiy, Utah 841 21 

Tech Support and Questions - (801) 942-1 174 

ORDER DESK - 1-800-999-3013 



mi 
oasis 




The internal sound capabtlities of the Amiga are better than 
that of any other personal computer. These capabilities mean 
nothing though, without quality digital sounds, which up till 
now have been scarce. Sound Oasis gives Amiga owners 
access to a large library of studio-tested digital samples, by 
using the Amiga's built in disk drive to read disks made for 
the Mirage Digital Sampling Keyboard. Sounds can then be 
played from a MIDI keyboard, the computer keyboard, or 

saved as an IFF standard file. Mirage is a trademark of Ensoniq Inc. 

Transform your Amiga into a professional-quality drum 
machine with this software package. Easier to use than 
hardware-based drum machines because everything is 
displayed graphically on screen. Enter drum patterns quickly 
and easily in real time with visual feedback and editing. Create 
realistic drum tracks with any of the 100 drum and percussion 
samples that are included or use your own unique IFF one- 
shot samples. Dynamic Drums also has full MIDI 
implementation and even becomes velocity sensitive when 
triggered from a MIDI keyboard. 

A powerful MIDI sequencer that takes full advantage of the 
Amiga's sound, graphics, and sophisticated user-interface. 
Dynamic Studio is perfect for professional applications due 
to its sophisticated editing capabilities and SMPTE support. 
It is also ideal for home studios, because in addition to 
sequencing MIDI instruments, Dynamic Studio has a built-in 
drum machine, and the ability lo playback instruments 
translated with Sound Oasis. 



I — iwjnm8r 



P.O. Box 438 SI. Ciair Shores. Mi 48080 (313) 771-4465 




Don't fumble around with your Amiga files. Let QUARTERBACK manage your valuable 
data. The Quarterback sneal< scores every time! 

QUARTERBACK is a FASTHarti Disk to Floppy Backup Utility for the Commodore Amiga, featuring: • Fast bacl<up 

- 20IV1B in less Itian 40 minutes • LIses two floppy drives for backup with automatic switching • Builds, sorts, and 

displays catalog of files and subdirectories • Provides Full/Subdirectory/lndividual file backup/restore • Includes 

or excludes files by name (with wild cards), file date, or archive bit • Calculates the number of floppies you'll need 

before you start • Handles tiles of unlimited length, unlimited subdirectories and unlimited files per subdirectory 

• Automatically formats diskettes with no delay as it writes • Sequentially numbers and date/time stamps backup 

diskettes • Checks the sequence number and date/time stamp of each diskette before restoring files from it 

Detects bad disks during backup or restore • Restores original date/time stamp, file notes, and protection bits 

on both files and subdirectories • Runs from Workbench or CLI • Produces backup/restore report to disk or 

printer • Beeps for floppy change • Accepts CLI parameters and batch command files • Convenient/user 

friendly error recovery • Multi-tasking • No copy protection • Works with all AmigaDOS compatible hard 

disk drives. 

You'll have fewer "time-outs" with QUARTERBACK managing your file backups. 

Put Quarterback on your team for only S69.95 pltisSS.OO for shipping and handling, ca residems add 6% sales lax 




Convert C64/C128 Files to the Amiga 



DISK-2-DISK makes it easy and convenient to transfer 
C64/C123 files to and from the Amiga! DISK-2-DISK programs 
the Amiga model 1020 external 5.25' disk drive to read and write 
1541/4040 and 157ID/1571 disk formats including 1541 "flippies ". 
• Converts Commodore/PET ASCII to AmigaDOS standard ASCII 
and vice versa • Transfers word processing text files (such as 
Paperclip, SpeedScript and Pocket Writer) to and from the 
Amiga for use with popular Amiga word processors • Includes 3 
public domain programs for converting C64 Koala. PrmtShop 
and Doodle files to IFF format • Finds and flags dialect differences 
between Commodore Basic and Amiga Basic files * Provides 
VALIDATE BAM and CHECK DISK utilities (VALIDATE BAM 
verifies the directory structure of the 1 541/1 571 diskette; CHECK 
DISK reads every block ol a 1 541/1 571 diskette to detect diskette 
errors). 

DISK-2-DISK recfuires the Amiga mode! W20 525 disk dme. 

Only $49.95 

plus 83.00 shipping and handling 

Ct-e5-denisadti6'i ssSs tat 





Read/Write MS-DOS and 
Atari ST Disl(S on your Amiga 

DDS-2-D0S Transfers MS-DOS and Atari ST Files To and 
From AmigaDOS! 

• Supports single and double sided 5.25 as well as 3.5 720KB 
MS-DOS diskettes • Reads/Writes 3.5' Atari ST diskettes (GEM 
format) * Converts ASCII file line-ending characters and provides 
Wordstar compatibility • Supports full directory path names, 
with wild cards in the file names • Allows selection of MS-DOS 
and AmigaDOS subdirectoryand displays sorted directory listing 

• Formats 3.5 and 5.25' MS-DOS diskettes • Provides duplicate 
file name detection v/ith query/replace options • Provides TYPE 
and DELETE commands • Permits renaming of files where file 
name restrictions occur • Remains resident to permit AmigaDOS 
disk swapping. 

Only $55.00 
plus £3.00 shipping and handling 

CA residenis add 6':i! sales tax 



;CSI 



Central Coast Software 

268 Bowie Drive, Los Osos. CA 93402 -Teleplione (805) 528-4906- FAX (805) 528-3138 

Deaier Inquires Welcomo 



77 



HARD DISK DRJVE 

PRICE-PERFORMANCE yBRMAK-THRU 

The Phoenix PHD-22 or PHD-48 is the Hard Disk Drive System at the price you can afford — with the qimlity you demand! 
Add its convenient size, fast access time, and one year warranty, and you have the perfect choice for your Amiga 500 or 1000. 

• 100% compatible with aJl Amiga software including Version 1,3 Workbiench when available 

• Complete Controller System including SCSI Card and Internal Power Supply 

• Pre-formatted and packaged with Demo and Public Domain Software 

• For Amiga A500 and AlOOO Computers 

• Very small size; 2.6 " high by 4.4 " wide bv 10 " long 

• Seven Device Expansion allowed bv SCSI 

• Benchmark test results available upon request 
•3W" Hard Disk Drive 

• PHD-32 - 22 Megabytes 

• PHD-48 - 48 Megabytes 

• Common SCSI Command Set 

• 86- Pin Pass-Thnj available 

• On/Off Switch and Protected Primary 

• Average access time of 28 ms 

• One Year Limited Warranty on pans and labor 

PHD-22 S624.95 
PHD-48 ^849.95 

\Vc acccpi VISA and MasterCard 

PHOENIX 

ELECTRONICS, INC. 

P.O. Box 156, 31J Coun St., Cl^ Center, KS 67432 l913l 632-2159 



S. C. Express 




LOW PRICES, 

FAST, FRIENDLY 

SERVICE 



ALL SOFTWARE 30% OFF RETAIL I 

ALL TITLES AVAILABLE 

CHECK WITH US BEFORE YOU BUY I 

NEW TITLES ARRIVING DAILY 

ASK FOR OUR FREE CATALOG 

WE APPRECIATE YOUR BUSINESS ! 



r^ 



10 a.m. - H) p.m. (al[) • Momlay - Saturday 
1-5 p.m. (c-di) • Sunday 



P. O. Box 3736 
Joplin,MO 64«(J3-3736 



VVc jiitpl ViNU, .\1asicri'uril. immey onlL-is, C4shicr\ chetk. uiiJ personal thcctis. (Allow 3 wctks for pcrsoiul tlictks lu 
tiL-.ir). All dcliilivc Mtliwaw will be ccplaicd tviih same priHlutl. Ii must be rL-lumtJ in orijiiiul natkjyc, uintcnls 
uMiiplilf, wiihiti 311 days Iciitn purth;i>c. All iclums muM have KA tt. I'ricc-i tdku a 2'b cash distuunl, adJ 2% fiir Visa or 
Vlavlffoid. Ctl-.Iu tiirils iiul tturgi-d unlil order is ihippal Wu do mil suaranlec iK-rftiniuiitu <ir uunpalaliilily. Any 
divpulc muNl bj handled with inannlailiifrtv. I'riees subjctl It* thaiite wiihoul nmitc. MO rciidcnls add 6.3'i',J> sales lax 
-SS.SI) sltipping Hi handliiiB per Mittivare order. S7.l)(» shipping & handling per ilan uii hardware orders. 



78 



INTRODUCING. 



ProJeeJ W 



Fuller Computer 





An 

Evolution 

in Disk 

Utilities 

for Amiga'" 

Personal 
Computers! 



F 

E 
A 
T 
U 
R 
I 

N 
G 



An easy to use, friendly and iniuiuvc user interface. 

A powerful and fast disk backup lool that lets you make backups of 

your copy-protected Amiga software. 

A disk editing lool that Ids you edit raw- MFM tracks, AmigaDOS 

sectors and AmigaDOS files (automaiically calculating new 

checksums). 

A iiisk cmaloging tool that lets you mainiain lists of your pLTs«naI. 

public domain and commercial ^ofiuare. 

A unique backap tool for duplicating other disk formats including 

MS-DOS,, PC-DOS and Atari ST. 

An easy lo read, informative user manual is included. 

I his product i-* nol capy^protccted in .iin way. 



NOW SHIPPING! 

$49.95 . 

Includes shipping and handling! 
Arizona residents add 6-5^'} sales lax. 



TO ORDER 

Send chfck i>r money order to: 

Fuller Computer Systems. Inc. 

E'.O. Box 9222 

Mesa, An/ona 85214-0430 

OrCAI.I.|602)8.'^5-50lS 



Amiga is a trademarJ.. of fommixjinc- Amiga. Iik- 



[)c;i]cr Inquincv Imiicil 



XAD 

You can WIN over $1,000 


of AMIGA s 


oftware! 


Solve Murder by Byte! today. 


Supra 2400 Mode 


m $139 


Digi-View 


129 


Professional Pag 


e 239 


Word Perfect 


199 


WP Libraries 


75 


ALPS Color Printer 56 9 


Walter MIDI 


55 


Gauntlet 


35 


P.O.W. 


27 


Lights, Camera, A 


ction 4 9 


Call for details & FREE Catalog! 
(404)548-8452 
XAD Corp. 

2351 College Station Rd. 
Suite 477 

Athens, GA 30505 \'\f[Jr^ A 
BBS: (404)543-8131 x\lVi i vT-Tl 



WHEN WINNING 
IS EMERYTHING 




WHEN 
YOUR 
USINESS IS 
W THE LINE, YOU CAN'T 
AFFORD TO COME IN SECOND 



Big contracts usually mean big deadlines, and if 
it can't cross tiie finisii line in time, someone 
else will. When winning the race means 
everything, it's time to put on your racing gloves 
and call CSA. 

CSA's exclusive FastPac'" System for the Amiga 
2000'" is the only winning team to feature the 
latest version of Kickstart'" in EPROM running at 
14MHz on CSA's 32 bit bus. With the Amiga's 
operating system running at top speed on CSA's 
32 bit static RAIVl board in combination with 
CSA's CPU accelerator board, you'll never want to 
drive in the slow lane again. 

No other system can give you lightning fast Disk 
I/O and screen updates without CSA's unique 
FastPac Technology. And while other accelerator 
boards are still struggling with the 68020, CSA is 
already one step ahead with the new 68030 and 
25 MHz 68882. 

CSA's FastPac System is completely compatible 
with all Commodore hardware and standard 
Amiga software, and comes with a free pair of 
CSA racing gloves. 

When winning the race means everything, don't 
settle for second best, call CSA today. 

The Performance Experts! 




COMPUTER 

SYSTEM 

ASSOCIATES 

INC. 



7564 Trade Street, San Diego, CA 92121 
(619) 566-3911 Telex: 333693 
FAX: (619) 566-0581 

Trademarks: 

flrniga, Kickstart Are Tradesiarks of CoTmodore Eusiriess Machines, Inc. 



Software Excitement's 
Public Domain Library 

TOP 40 

The BEST Amrga Dlsks!!t 



I Quantity Prices i 

I kpO or 5>D or q)4 I 



Buy 1-4 



Buy 5-14 



Buy 15 + 



FREE Same-Day Shipping! 

Disks work with all Amiga Systems, are 
easy to use, and include Instructions! 

Your Satisfaction Guaranteed! 



BUSINESS 

#37 Business Pnagnims- Inctuded are an addiess book. 

3n aniorljz^tjon piogram, a talking mail manager, and a 

labpl priniei 

«1 15 Word Pfoce^BOf— Lot5 ot features 

"116 Spreadahset-VC. a powerful spreadsheet 

#117 DBase-Good lor business c^ home use 

*135 Quickbpse-Tliis is a mail manager DBase 

Persmpll-A HBase for kpppinq trnck nl people 

UTILITIESrAPPLICATIONS 

*47 Printer Drivers-Epson LO 800, NEC P6. Slar SG- 

10, Geniini 10 X, and C Itoh B5I0 

#90 Modern Matfneasl-Teiminals (Sta:Tftrm, ATerm. Ker- 

trnt) and arcJiive utiiiijps 

#105 Utliitiea— An icon maker, disltcatatoguer. FKeylem 

plate maker, and PopCli2-A new cli at Ihe push of a 

#114 Aulo Printer Driver GenerFtor- An Amiga DOS key- 
board shoricul program, too' 

#126 ShowPrlnt-Make'j vigwing picture iiies easy 
FuficKey-a function kfv ndtior 
#129 DPalnt Tutor and Hmd Disk Backup 
^130 JOBS —A mpro pHoctivp systemf'user interface Aiso 
Floppy Dr?ue Speedup! 

*133 Amiga DOS Hciper-This makiBS using CLI so much 
easier! Works from ils own menu 
#134 Applicntions-Labei maker/pnnter, grocery list 



ma^er, and AMiGa7et- a star viewing program 
need? this' Makes 
1o delect and (Eliminate iho known viruses 



#14D Virus Klllerl — Everyone need? this' Makes it easy 
I and (*iiminale ihe known viruses 

GRAPHICS/SOUND/VIDEO 

^1 Norman Rockwell— "i? beautiful digitiz&d paintings 

in a self-runnind siideshow 

^SDPSIIde 1-PulyourDPainlor ather IFF pTCture dies 

into a seir-runniog slideshow 

#ie Future Sound Demo -Several samples o( digitized 

sound Is it livP or is it your Amiga"^ 

«t77 Instruments-Turn yout keyboard into 25 ditlerenl 

musical inslrumenist fry them all' 

#61 Flying Eagle Demo ^ See an eagle Uy across yiiur 

SCfPen EjicbUdmI animation 

#94 DIglVlew Demo-See several great examples and 

the drqitizing process in stages 

#10B Juggfer Demo "See ihs famous ray tracing anima 

lion Shew this one lo your iriends' 

#113 mCAD-A luli-Ieatured CAD package 

#120 WorkBench Picture-View these great IFF and 

HAM pfclures by "clicking" their icons 

#132 Videomaker— Packed withseveraf utHtiiesfui dcch 

lop video enthinTsiasts 

#136 Graphics -BorderSei useful lo you Jl you are 

involved in desktop publishing or video 

GAMES 

#23 Monopoly— Enjoy great graphics and sound whKe 

playing three lough cotripuier opponents 

#27 Amoeba Invaders-A better Space Invaders' 

#38 Card Gflmes-Cra/y Eights and Hi Low Card. 

Several arcade games make tnis a fun disk 

#113 IRON- Just tike Ihe popular arcade game! 

«I1B Space Games- Missile Command, Asteroids game. 

and 3D Tnclops -great graphics' 

#121 Bachgammon- Play against the computer 

#122 Solltatre—Two styles witti color screens 

#123 Cribbege— Its you against Ihe computer! 

#124 M*lestone-Afniga f^ies Bournes game 

#125 3-D Olheflo-Great graphics and play! 

#127 Wheel of Fortune — A great computer version for 

multiple pfayers, It even talks! 

*I31 PacMan 67— Great sound and graphics Adds new 

elements to PacMan, Saves Top 10 

#137 VeoBS Fun-Play Blackjack or the Slots 

#139 Bufl Run-Gi-eal Civrl War strategy board game with 

mpressive graphics and sound 



FREE catalog with order or request 



MAIL OFiDERS-PI?ase uie 5epara!e shpel and include 
phonrt number Enclose chPcH or i( charging yourordBr. 
include lull account numbef. eitpiraiion. and signature 

No, ol Disl^s X price/disk S =S 



Shipping (Frefl us -Cu^ada add ?5c pai d'lii,- S_ 
FoiP'qn ftrtd sot pel d,si,> 
UPS 2nd Day Air (US cnly-add S-:^) S_ 

TOTAL ENCLOSED S_ 



SOFTWARE EXCITEIWENT! 

"Service with Excellence" 

P.O. Box 3073 
-Central PoinI, OR 97502 , ^^^ 
(503) 772-6827 ^^ 

■ ■■iB^^^BiBii aTaa i 

80 



JUMPDISK: $5 

The Original 
Disk IVIagazine 
for the Amiga 

Try our new SAMPLER. It costs $5. 
That's all. If you don't like It, we'll buy II 
back. We're that confident. 

You'll gel original material: 

— A talking slideshow program 

— A text/picture reader 

— Utilities, games, articles, art 

— Our shameless emotional pitch 



Order: 

JUMPDISK SAMPLER 
1493 ML View Ave. 
Chico, CA 95926 



JUMPDISK has been published everir month 
since August 1986. Without fall. We ship 
orders day received. 

Questions? Call us at (916) 343-7658 
Dealers, get In touch. JUMPDISK sells! 

Aadi*a ine. 




Subscribe 
to 




319-338-0703 




PILOT 



Programmed • Aythonng Language 

Inquiry 

Learning ' '^'^p'^' "''' st^phics 

Or 

• Supports Laser Video 
Teaching disc and Touch-Panels 



$39.95 



OSOERS: 
Fiigtit Training Devices 
3t2 E, Imperial Ave.. 
Dept. A 
El Ssgundo. CA 90S45 



INFORMATION; 
FTD-AK 

P.O. Box 91723 
Anchorage. A K 99509 



8W321.9139 213*0-9772 BIX: llagrone 



HOW TO GET 

THE MOST 

OUT OF YOUR 

GRAPHICS 

AND 

WORD PROCESSING 

SOFTWARE 



You're enjoying writing and drawing 
on your Amiga, but you're wondering 
how to organize your woric and 
play. What more can you do? 
There's one superb way to activate, 
energize, utilize, massage and 
manipulate your te.xt, lists, and pic- 
tures - Microfiche Filer, the world's 
only visual daiaba.se. Only available 
on Amiga, Microfiche Filer lets you 
file, reclassify, recall, modify, sort, 
and select your work. Instantly. 
Microfiche Filer is the most power- 
ful database for personal use on the 
market today. This is software with 
limitless possibilities in a user 
friendly package that's truly 
exciting to use. 

" the fastest, easiest, most 

advanced database program I have 
ever seen... King of Databases!'^ 

- Commodore Magazine 

"....an extremely well-written, well- 
debugged, and well documented 
program ' ' 

- Amazing Computing 

''Best New Idea" - Editors' Choice 
A ward 

- Amiga World 

At '99 Microfiche Filer is superior 
to other databases costing much 
more. It includes several ready-to- 
use databa.ses such as a public 
domain software catalog, 
commodities listings, and an 
address book at no extra charge. No 
software will be more fun to use or 
will offer the satisfaction of this 
product. Visit your nearest Amiga 
dealer and ask for a demonstration. 
You'll be stunned by what your 
Amiga can do that no other 
personal computer can. 

Microfiche Filer from Software 
Visions. Call 800-527-7014. 
In Massachusetts 508-875-1238. 



Nothing 

but 
the best. 



memorg 
Location 



396 Washington Street 
Wellesley,MA 02181 

(617)237-6846 



C TxEd PLWli 

The Text Editor for the Amiga7 
Plus a whole lot more. 

"D 1 Z -^ r7T^-i gIt ^^^^ cache, speeds up floppy and 
JDii LZ J_/lblV Yxavd disk reads up to 20007^. 

X* StStX* OntS Speeds up text display. 

jP XiriiVG VS Hotkey window manipulatoi:. 

A T3 "p) Latest versions of the AmigaDOS 

x~i.X\X^ Replacement Programs. 

A "D T7'"V"V Demo version of the AREXX, the 
XjLXVXLi.Z\_Z\. macj-Q processor used by TxEd Plus, 
that is changing the way people think about computing. 



Complete package: 
$79.95 




MC + Visa 

Mass Ki's .irfd.^'! 



Microsmiths, Inc 

PO Box fiei. CambridKe MA U2M0 
(6171 354-122'! BIX: chealh CIS: 7421fi.21 17 

Ainij;;! asid Aiiii^aDO-S ivrt- lr,i(lt"iinirk> ijf Cnniinodorc .\ini^'a, Iiic 



5 



DeluxeHelp Is Available For L 

Photon Paint L 



DeluxePalnt 



$34.95' 




$34-95* 



S44.95* 



"...It looks like DeluxeHelp may end up an industry standard 
for online help, much like IFF is the standard for graphics..." 

- INFO Magazine, March/April '88, p45 - 



"...live demonstrations, with interactive practice, can 
greatly speed up the learning cuive...Our experience 
with DeluxeHelp tends to confirm that theory..." 
- Computer Shopper Magazine, January 1988, p318 ■ 



Coming Soon For: 




RGB VIDEO CREATIONS 

3944 Florida Blvd^ Suite 102 
Palm Beach Gardens, Florida 33410 
407-622-0X38 AmlgaLInk BBS: 407-622-7049 
* Add $3 US Shipping ($6 FOREIGN Shipping) 

FL Residents Add 6% slate tax 



AProDraw 



The Artisfs Dream. 

Featuring high resolution 
Summagraphics tablets 
with two button stylus 
for the Amiga. 

12 X 12 - .$549 
9x6 - - S449 
Optiona 
cursor -, $50 



Dealer inciuiries 
are invited. 




R & DL Productions 
11-24 46th Ave. 
LLC. NY 11101 
(718) 392-400 



comfng^oon . . . 

DON'T MISS Tf^SOON TO BE FAMOUS 




INFO ANKUAU^IAMES ISSUE 




: . . on sale October 1 7th at a newsstand near you! 



HIGHER PERFORMANCE...AND CHEAPER TO BOOT! 



FData-1 angle 3.5" External Drive $1 49.95 

FData-20 Oual 3.5" Extemal Drive w/Power Supp^ $299.95 



' Fully 1010 Compatible 

' Ultra Compact 

' Acoustically Quiet 

' Amiga" Color Coo'dinated 



■ Daisy Chainable 
' Extra Long CaWe 
' High Perlormance 
' Suoer Low Price 



Disk 

Performance 

Software 



► 



ASDG FAC il 

Hlcrosmlths, Inc. TxEd+ 
Fuller Computer Pro-ect 
Progressive Peripherals 



S29 

S55 

■D" - S39 

Directory Master S39 



Central Coast Software Quarterback S55 

Central Coast Software D0S-2-D0S $39 

Discovery Software fdarauder II S27 

Sony 3,5" DSDD (Box ol 10) S19 



yfix 



LEXIBLE 



.eDa 



ATA 

Systems, inc. 



POLICY: Shipping and handling extra. Personal and company checks require 3 weeks to clear. For faster deNvery, use you: credit card 
or send cashier's check Of bank money order. Credit cards are not charged until we shrp. All prices are USA. prices and are subject 
to change, and all rtems are subject to ava^labtliiy. Those prices reflect a 5% ca^h discount For all credit card purchases there will be 
an addilianal 5% charge. Detective sottwaie wi!l be replaced with the same iiem only. All sates are Imal and leiurneO shipments are 
subject to a res^tocking tee. 



1 0503 FOREST U\NE ' SUITE 148 
FAX: 214-669-0021 



' DALLAS. TX 75243 



214-669-3999 



Amiga* is a registered tracorEark of CommociOfe-Arriga. 



^s 



"1 




fwo-and-a-half years of hard worl 
27 infonnation-packed issues. 



with that type of experience under its belt, Amazing Com- 
puting™ Is your key to using the Ajniga. The Amiga packs 
Uic power of dazzling video, sizzling sound, business pro- 
ductivity, and mitch more. AC has got tlic unbiased re- 
views, hardware projects, and programming examples you 
need to grab that power. Don't let your Amiga off easy any- 
more. Put it to work with Amazing Computing'''". 



49% 0£f Newsstand Price 

«bscribe now to Amazing Computing'''" and you get all 
tlia. hottest, most useful Amiga information at half the 
everyday cost. $24 puts Amiga Information: in your n 
box ev'&Q' month for one year, along with discoury* on 
public dohi^in software and easy access to bacMssues 



il- 



I I Yes, I want lo put my Amiga to work. Pleaie start my one-year 
subscription to Amazing Computing immediately. Enclosed is my check 
for S24 (S36 Canada & Mexico; S44 overseas). 
NAME 



ADDRESS. 
CITY 



_ZIP_ 



Sand chsch or Monay Ordw 
(no W\lnQ Of cr*dlt cajdi) to: 
PIM PubllcatEDni, fnc 
P.O. Box dfiS 
FaJiftlvw.MA O2722-O0» 



All ruBa lie one year only Foreign and US mai iai6i stvatlabl^ upon request- fHessC' aiictw 6 Co fi weeks fa delivefy. 

L«»— •••■^ — —— — — — — -. — -..___»_________„„^_______ J 

82 



CLIP ART ! 

For AMIGA' 

Over 100 high resolution 
images on each disk. 




Disk 1 : 
Disk 2 
Disk 3 
Disk 4 
Disk 5 
Disk 6 



Compuier, Office, Music, School, Travel, Trans. 
Busine.ss. Sports. Animals, Party, Religious 
Food, Borders, Medicine, Old West, Newsletter 
Hands, Seasons, Pirates, Tools, Personal, America 
Theater, Corners, Zoo, Menu, Outdoor 
Adman's Special: Computer Products 



$19.95 

per disk 



(Add $2.50 P&H per order) 



Magnetic Images Co. 
P.O. Box 17422, Phoenix, AZ 85011 

(602) 265-7849 
Dealer inquiries welcome. 



4 MEGS FOR YOUR AMIGA! 




■w Cooflgurable as low as 1/2 meg, up lo 4 full megs on a single card! 

V UscsstandardD]PDRAMchips(256kx4 or Imcgxl). 

» Cuslora conlrollcr eliminate* refresh conieiilioti and wait stales. 

i» Conforms to Amiga aulo-config protocol. 

■* Can he used on the A500 wilh our ^idapicr box. 

i/ Includes board diagncatic test and rwoverahle RAM disk software. 

As every new Amiga owTier qviickly disftivtrrs. memory is Ihe key lo unleashing the full 
power of their machine. Consequently, tncmory is usually first on every Amiga owner's 
shopping list So. what is itie best path for upgrading;? For the A2(X)(), a 2 meg bnartJ w too 
quickly maxed oui, and an 8 meg btxird populaitxi with its m inimvim con figuration of 2 
mcj*s COSTS tiHj much. The Digiironics RC-I Ramc^^rJ si^lves ihese prtiMcm? by proviJin^ 
the flexibility lo allow you lo slarl out jnexpctisively. while maintaining the expandability 
you need for future growth. 



Call or write us for more details, including 
information on our do-it-yourself kits. Dealer 
inquiries invited. 



Di 



igiironics 



RC4 aisemblcd t Icslet] ... S22.'j (Ok RAM) 

• Amiga and An^al><K are tradt^marks of Commodore-Amiga Inc. 



P.O. Box 2M Villanovii, PA IWULS 
(215)459-449.1 



Now For The Amiga! 




r.;**- 



Are you tired of fumbling under or behind 
your computer lo swap your mouse and joy- 
stick cables'? Are your cable and computer 
connectors worn out from al! the plugging and 
unplugging? Then Mouse Master is a mu.st 
for vou! 



k 



ProctiCQl 

Solution/. 



^39.95* 



I930 E Grant Rd.. 
Tuc/on, AZ 65719 

•Retail price does not 602 ' 864 - 9612 

include sliipping & handling. 



Flicker Mastertm 

Master the interlace flicker of your 
$17.95 Amiga tm $17.95 

Flicker Master is a specially designed filter that 
attaches easily to the face of your monitor 

Greatly reduces interlace flicker 

Improves contrast in all resofuSions 

Helps reduce eye-strain 

10 1/2 in. X13 1/2 in. {26.7 cm X 34.3 cm) size 

is designed to fit the following monitors, 

Amiga 1080, 2002, and 1084/ sony KV 1311 

Magnavox RGB 80 / NEC Multisync and others, 

check size 

Flicker Master is a great companion to your Graphics,. 

Video, Cad, and Desktop Pubiistilng, Software, 

such as 

Digi-Paint, Deluxe Paint II, Express Paint, 

Photon Paint, Pixmate, Butcher 2.0, Aegis Video Titler, 

ZumaTVText and TV Show, Sculpt 3D, Animate 3D, 

Videoscape 3D, Pro Video CGI, X-Cad, Intro Cad, 

PageSetter, and Professional Page 

TS.R. Hutchinson Go. 110 W. Arrowdale 

Houston, Texas 77037-3801 (713) - 448 - 6143 

The above named products are Iradennarks of 

their respective companies 



Tired of uioiting? 

Give your disks Q ^^^^^^^^ 

lune-up 

Only $89.95 with The mshMechonlc 

The Disk MecKanic is a comprehensive collection of flmigo DOS utilities 
for every opplicotion. The Disk Medionic can recover files that have 
been deleted, salvage files from corrupted disks, and repair damaged 
files. The Disk Mechanic includes o 6\sV. optimizing program that con 
increase your hard or floppy disk access speed up to 400% by reorgan- 
izing the disk's data. The Disk IMeehonic also includes o hard disk 
back-up program and a full featured disk block editor for the advanced 
user. Version 2.0 of The Disk Mechanic includes full support for the soon 
to be released Amiga Fast Filing System and o neui high speed hard 

disk back-up utility. 
The Disk Mechonic 
requires on Rmigo 
ujithatleost512Kof 
memory and Amiga 
DOS version T.2 or 
higher. Coll us or ask 
your deoler about it 
todayl 
Lake Forest Logic Inc. 

261016 Sollord Rood 

loke Forest. IL 60045 

(312)816-6666 




Dealer irwiuirw* iwctccpna 
AmrQ* It I itK(KcTia,rk si 
ComtTLi>lot«' Business Micnin«i. I 



83 



Jiffy DOS 



Ultra-Fast Disk Operating System for the 
Commodore C-64, SX-64, & C-128 

Features...? See how we've got the competition beat! 









OigiDOS 


1541 
Fiashl 


Dolphin 
DOS 


Features 


JiffyDOS 


RaplDOS 


leaves Cartridge and 
User Porls open 


YES 


NO 


NO 


NO 


NO 


WoAswith modems and 
oommuncaions Kjftware 


YES 


NO 


NO 


NO 


NO 


Requires aiiditlonal cabling 
be(weer)(30!rpu<er & <tnve(s) 


NOI 


YES 


YES 


YES 


YES 


AvaHaWolon 541-11,1571. 
15ei.FSD-1»2,MSD-1»2 


VES 


MO 


NO 


NO 


NO 


Can be Installed on disslmitai 
drVes (I.e. 1541/1571/1561) 


YES 


NO 


KG 


NO 


NO 


Simple HO M IriBtaHatiOfl - no 
add it ionfli hardware 


YES 


NO 


KO 


NO 


NO 


Allow? proper rsplacemanl 
ot Interference Shielding 


YES 


NO 


? 


7 


? 



< Pnfofma ill di«)t operition* - LOAD, SAVE, S£0, REL, & USfl access ■ up lo 1 5« laaler 
■Built-in DOS Wedge plu* 14 KMitional convrwrxis »nd convenience features 
.F(!f :CM, MC, SX-M, C12a, CiaaD, 1541, 1541C, 1541-11, 1571, 1581, FS0U2, MS0li2 
' JlffyDOS/1 28 tpeed* up all drlvei and all disk operatiana In baSl 64 and 128 mode* 
■ FUI uaer aupport and Honev-Bacli Hardwafe;Software ComnatitJIitY Guarantw 

C.e4/SX-64 versions $49.95; C-128 version $59.95; Additional drive ROM's $24.95 

Please add $4.25 shipping/handling per ordsf . VISA/MC, COD, Money Order accepted 

Call or Wf iie for mora inlormalion. Dealer, Oisttibutof , & tjsers' Group prtdng available 

Ptsaae spedty computer »nd drivt when ordering 

Creative IVlicr o Des ig ns. Inc. 



P.O. Box 789, Wilbrahim, MA 01095 
219 Moody SL, Ludlow, MA 01056 



Ptwne: (413)589-7624 
FAX: (413) 589 -(M13 



S545H555S«5»SB»mKH^w^ 



■■■ ■:■ >>:: iiSSW>* '<i9,^£Srj-i-Mi-M&yjjr,Vj'yyyy/^'i 






$2.9^ ^° - 







EAST COAST 

615-478-5760 




AMIGA SOFTWARE 



Advanced Dungeon b Dr»(|ans: 



Hhms oI Ihe Lance 


s n 




i 32 


Questrw II . 


» 37 


Pagesenet Font Set « t 


♦ 22 


Sliioli: Graot-s Tral 




Capone 


• 29 


In Tlie West 


t 34 


Deaiure 


• 29 


tmpire . , 


* 37 


HlaSH Gui . . ..... 


,,•37 


FIA 18 IntHceptOf 


% 37 


Iijrrtswi II 


.,• 37 




$ 29 


J.I 


.,* 37 


BanTs Talc II 


» ts 


Hocliel Rangvt 


• 37 


Defexe PtWQ ijJi 


Sll» 


Vafnpre's Empee 


* 32 


Otkiii Pml II 


} to 


Tlno* Stooges 


S 37 


tjfe b Deilh 


S JJ 


EKrilence 


S229 


Space Quest II 


S J7 


Paln&i 


S 29 


WwU Tow GdH 


S29 


Romantic Encounters 


S 29 


Uatic Macheu 


S3) 


Cen1i>ft[3kl Scpwe^ 


! 22 


DduiB Pbm II 


S 95 


Jtfiiler 


S7S 


Mj« Beacoi Teaches Tnmg 


S 37 


ftlletnile ReA; 


...132 


Gamtlel 


S 37 


Ehonslai 


179 


Supasln Ice Hoctey 


$ 37 


DUHeialoi 


...129 


ZlKnil 


S 22 


PomtlCai 


• 37 




5 29 


Disli 2 DisJi 


...•X 
...•33 


tlkmlH 


S 22 


DosZDos 


Maaodei 2 


S 29 


Blilriireig 


i X 


(*IDfe£Sional Paje 


iZ95 


Kind Wnib 


% m 



(Uais* 


S 23 


PiMtm Paint 


S 60 


D«!P 


..,.« 55 


MoetHiS 


.. S 44 


Sonii 


....! a 


Gn tjni 


i 52 


SciitJilB wISfnHI 


> 7< 


Faetv Tale Jyventute 


S 37 


Fke Power 


t IB 


Dil^Pant 


.. • 44 


DiDiView 


.., tto 


Breach 


. t 23 


Balisiai 


S 21 


Ptiantssie III 


S 29 


Fighl Smilator II . . 


. S 3S 


axi Z^rk 


) 32 


Print MaslH Plus 


!37 


Alt GaleiY t. 2 or 3 


u t 22 


Mo Dud 


137 


Deli:on5 


S 29 


Lmt of Legends 


S 37 


PO-W- 


S 29 



C64/ 



Advanced Dtmgecn b Dragons: 

HefKS ot Ihe Lance 

Pool ol Radiance 

l>D55bow 

Award Maker Pftn 

AH 

Bard's Tale III 

Road Runner 

Roadwvs 

Mage Midnes2 

ImpDSSdite Mission 2 

Jfmxxa 

Blockbustei 

Sinhad 

Patton Vi. F 

Wasteland . 

Contra 

Three Stooges. 

Battle Dreidi 

Ghjbal CommjnCer 

Red Slornq Rising 

Aliens Fires 

4x4 Off Road Racing 

f^afmen San Oiege Europe 



$22 
$29 
•22 
•29 
.•12 
•32 
•IS 
•22 
Sl» 
429 
«2S 
522 
S2S 
•22 
•29 
•22 
•27 
•IB 
S22 
S23 
S22 
•27 



DUST COVERS 

Amiga 2000 wlKiyboaid •15.00 Vic 20iI34 Compinei . $ 7.00 

Amiga 1 DUO Ijiniputer. •9.00 C 123 Computet S 7.m 

Amiga 500 Cmpiitef • 9.00 C l2aD wi'Keyliosil •15.1X1 

Amiga Keylioaid % ISB CtZSO Keftxsd • l.DO 

tSldOidi Olive i im IMIDsli Drive • 7.(n 

1020 Chsli Oiiae • 7.00 1571 Wst Drive • 7.00 



Contmadare 1525 . 
Commoloie l52Gi'MPS 
t^ommodoiE MPS SOt 
ComnalaE MPS 903 
Cimmaoit MPS 1201 
Star Getnim IBIach) 



RIBBONS 



S7.5a Star NXJNPtNL 10 la. $3.00 

B02 $7.50 Panasonic 10a0ii9lu92i S;.95 

•7.50 Dliimale 10120 (Blacli] •4.3E 

•7.110 Dhmale 10.70 (Ciilal i6.00 

•7.110 Star lOOOIIOOCC lOadil •6.00 

•2.50 Star IMVIOOaC Ranliow »9.0I1 



C128 SOFTWARE 




Miadei on the Atlantic 


CALL 


Becker Basic 


$37 1 


Hunt foi Red Ocloliei 


S29 


Man Beaton Itaches lypng $29 1 


Power al Sea 


S22 


Fast Hack 'Em 64 or 128 CALL 1 


GeneiaJ Accounting 




1541 1571 Disk Ai^menl $22 I 


Systems S4J126 


CALl 


Le^ar^r of the Antot3ils 


$22 


Big Blue Reader 94112! 


835 


Stiihe Fle^t 


$22 


Waipspccd 


$37 


Platoon 


S22 


Paferctp III 


S37 


Find CalKtge III 


S4i 


Instant Music 


S22 


Sagon 1 


$14 


Papicip PiMoher 


537 


Fbghl Stmolalor II 


•39 


Monopol, 


S22 


Heiidraw 5.5 


S2b 


Scruples 


•29 


Ptoiect Stealth Fighter 


•29 


Test Drives 


•22 


Term Pa(w Wnte* 


•29 


Edielon 


•32 


Merijn 64128 


•29 


Diui Yeaget-s A.F.S, 


•29 


Bolt's Pio Term 64128 


CALL 


Ihait Watrin 


•14 


Fleet System 2 . 


•44 


Ullimi V 


CALl 


Reel System « . 


•57 


Might E) Magic 


•29 


CaHtDoiia Games 


•29 


G.E.0 S. 64 or 123 


CALL 


Hard Ban 


•22 


GeoWme WorliiliDp 64 


X 12KALL 


Defender ot the Down 


•25 


Pml Shnp 


•32 


AatoDud 


•36 


P.S. Griphc Uniary 




Partner 64 H 129 


CALL 


1.2 or 3 


ea. $19 


Leader Buad Golf 






•25 


Tuple Pack 


SI4 




ETC. 




Ergo Stiek Joystick 


•19,95 


Mouse Mastei 


•35 95 


Epvi 500XJ Joystick 


•IS-OO 


C 54 Powet Scpply 


• 29m 


Vc 1351 Moot 




C 128 Power Suptdy 
Anuga 500 Power Supply 




Mouse Mai 


t 7.50 


$79 00 


Mouse House 


• 4.95 


Super Graphic Inlerlace 


S55,95 


Mouse HOMO 


• 4.50 


Super Giaphio Ji Inieriace 


•35,95 



OrH^ I- I "ia.m.--Hp.m iwonday-lhursday Customer Service 

n oSl^^oToo^ ^..c4 ,„ 10 a-""--? Pm- F"day & Ohio Residents 

1-800-282-0333 |o\>c*^^j1 ^" ®'"- *** ^ P™- Saturday 1-513-879-9699 

11 S. Wright Avenue, Fairborn. OH 45324 

I f2n!t'!:.'*t°'*".~,'''!?ti'"1',!i^" •*' Ti^'" '^ •'•'P<*'« *•• ""^ •" coo«n«tirt U,S, PtoM. Ktd *3 order. und« IGO. HARDWARE and all onlan r~" ' 



*i awvlca Gharga. Ohio raiidwtl* add t% i 



^ . .^ -add«6, Chargacwdontonadd 



PANIEO BY AN AUTHORHAT10H NUMBER. FOR YOUR PROTECTION WFE CHECK FOR CREDIT CARD FRAUD 



84 



I^Check THEIR Ad then E' CHECK OUR PRICE! 



Compalible 
3 5 O'SkDnves S-l gQ 
WyPass Thru From ' ^^^^ 
H.HT . PHOENIX • MASTER 3A 






OVER 2000 SOFTWARE TITLES • IN STOCK! 




UNPOPULATED 

• INSIDER M80 

• Micron 2 Mg. ■ ■ ■ =Call 




• PROGEN New Low Price I 

• Amiga 51 2K.2/6/8 Meg . . . Call 



Starboard 



Mention This Coupon and Gel 

eC Off Ifie 
O Compelilions Price 

on aov Software Idle iS25 Mm Purchi 

CALL FOR DETAILS 





AMIGA 




Dala Belrieve 


MB 


Deluke Produirtens 


$122 


Dynamic Studw 


Call 


(VC/Bjsic 


$117 


Ferrari Formula 1 . . 


$32 


Paieilin 


s<;4 


CaooriG 


S2A 


GOMF2 


$24 


Majriplan Plus 


$120 


Port of Call 


S2< 


PrO'VifleoCGI 


$120 


CLI'Male 


$24 




1120 


C - Regular 


$147 


IntmCaP 


$iB 


FACCII 


S21 
S95 




$260 




$180 


Azlec C ■ Devel 


$195 


8arbarian 


$24 


Sculp) 


565 


kiiK C ■ Prot 


$130 


Oblileraior 


$24 


DOS 2 DOS 
3 Slooges 


S33 


Source level Debug r 


$49 




$24 




$30 




$32 


S42 




$60 


Morula 11 - Devel 


$90 


Arkanoid 


S30 


e»cellence' 


$180 


Hoduia 11 - Reg 


$60 




S24 


The Works 


S120 


Word Perlecl 


$200 


Zoom 


Call 


3 Demon 


S65 


fA/1Blnlerceplor 


$32 


Critics Cfwice 


S150 


Suoersiar Ice h<Kkey 


$30 


Bards Tale II 


$33 


Aw!Some Arcade Pk 


S12 


Dyrrarmc Drums 


54 B 


Sub Baltle 


$24 




COMMODORE 




Plaioo 




S20 95 


Geopublish 


$41 95 


Pbaniasle 1,2.3 e3cti23 95 


Paper Clip Publtslier 


S3195 


Geoprogramr^er 


$29 95 


Panzer Strike 


23 95 




1995 


Deskpack Plus 


$29 95 


Pocket Filer /Han ner 2 


Call 


3aia s Tjle II 


S2595 


Fonlpack Plus 


41795 


SuperPack2|1281 


S59.95 


Cncssmasler 2000 


S2595 


GEDS Tricks and Tips 


SB 95 


Pocket Wriler II 


!29«5 


Marble Madness 


S1995 


Cadpak 128 


$35 95 


Mrcro L BaseCaii 


2395 


Criuck yeager 
Paper Clip III 


$2295 


Cadpak ti 


$23 95 


Dala Disk 


.1195 


S31 95 


Super C Compiler 64/123 


$35 95 


Ultima IV 


35.95 


Clue Books 


scan 


Gun ship 


$20 95 


Into Comics 


5C3II 


BarCs Tale III 


S23 95 


Carmen SanD.ego (World! 


$20 95 


Super Snapsrwp 11 


>49 95 


Waslelar^ 


S25 95 


Prinl snoo comp 


$20 95 


Final Carl (11 


,54 95 




S20 95 


^lighl Srm 11 


$3195 


Warp Speed 


J29.95 


Super Siar Hockey 


S20 95 


Woidwriler 3 


529 95 


3 Slooges 


13095 


Clubhouse Sports 


SI 7 95 


Font Masler II 64 


529 95 


MHiroiawyer 


544 9b 


Wheel ot Fotiune 


S895 


Four and Four Racing 


Call 


C128Ca™n 


$^B 


GE0S12B 


541 95 


Fast Load 


S23 95 


Sriotgun II 

KJ 5.6 7 


512 


G£OS 




S35 95 


LA Crackdown 


Can 


$16 




APROTEK ^ 

MINIMODEM *7995l 



Hayes Compatible 




DIGIVIEW CAMERA 
PANASONIC Si 
1410 



AMIGA 




I 


20 MEG 


FROM 


S49995 


PHOENIX • 


SUPRA 


• C-LTD 1 



WE WANT VOUR BUSINESSI 

d j'j ,1 PAID 'lv'>;.'?lrom jn^ crimpelilor nllrrS 
"trisajne and *e *ili cred'! you 



jC ON ANY 



NEW ORDER 
By in» Way— 'Ae Forgive Vou--lS25 Min Purchi 
CALL FOR DETAILS 



Panasonic 

Industrial Company 



Laser SCall 

10801-11 ...$160* 
10911-11 ,..$190* 

10921 $300* 

15921 $380* 

15241 $520* 

■W/2 ribbon Purchase 



ii£@iir 

A% ■ c F a n 1 c B 


NX1000 Rainbow 

S220 
Laser $Call 




NX1000 170* 




NX15 300* 


4^ / jL 


NB2410 380* 


^^H^te^r 


NR14 420* 


-^^ 


Powertype LO.. . . 200* 

NX1000G 170* 

■w/2 Ribbon Purchase 





HARDWARE 




• 


Digiview 3,0 . 


.$129.9! 


) 


• 1764 RAM 


.S1 19.95 


• 1351 Mouse 


. . $34.95 


• AB Switch 


$30 


• Marauder II 


S24 


• Time Saver 


S60 


• 64 Power Supply. . . . 


. . $27,95 


• Amiga Hart Dr Cont. 


., SCall 


■ Okimate 20 


.$190 


w/plug & prim 




. MW 350 (2K) 


.... SCall 


• Disk Case (3'A).... 


48 


• Disk Heaci CInr . . 


S6 


• )Cetec Junior 


. . . S34.95 


• Epyx Joystick , . . 


$15 




Most Cables 


S15 



Mouse Pad S6 

Super Snapshot II $49.95 

Hatd Cards SCall 

Digiview Stand S55 

Disk Notcher $4.95 

256K DRAMS SCall 

3.5 Internal Ot J130 




3y2DS/DDGE.NERicM.30 



ORDERS 
ONLY 



800-433-7756 

IN MICH. 313-427-7713 
FAX: 313-427-7766 

Monday Ihrij Fiiday - 10 AM lo 10 P M 
Saluiday- 10 AM 106 PM (ESTl 

CUSTOMER SERVICE 31 3-427-0267 

MF 10-6 



SCHOOL P.O.'s ACCEPTED 

We Check For Char ge Ca rd_Fr aud 

aWB^iB 

MICROCOMPUTER SERVICES 




No Surcnaine lor MCVlSAlDlSCOVEH All Sales Are Final Sorrf no *ilk in Iraftic 

All reliirns musi nave RA « Mercnandise lound delecl ive *i!l be repai red » replaced We do not oiler 
r-hjnds lor delei:tive pioOuclS or toi prtMucls tnal do not oerlorm satislaclo'il/ We make no 
■uaraniefs i« product peitimance Any money 5aek guarantee must be banaiefl direciiy with ire 
marsulactuiei Call Ipi 5liiKi.ng $ handling into Prkres suDiecl to cnange wjtrittjt notice 
12B64 FARMINGION f.OAD LIVONIA. Ml 4B150 We cannot guarantee compsti&lit; 



TEVEX Computer Software 1-800-456-1162 



iiKissiisiisiismmmmMMmbaaassassssstsxa^^ 



mmtmiimimmyoximm,i>m3x ,immmmmm axmi 




SSI 



B-24 

Battlecruiser 
Eternal Dagger 
Gettysburg 
Kampfgruppe 
Panzer Strike 
Phantasie III 
President Elect 
Ouestron II 
Realms Darkness 
Roadwar 2000 
Roadwar Europa 
Shard of Spring 
Shiloti 

Sons of Liberty 
Wargame Constr, 
War South Pacific 
Wizard's Crown 



Lists 
£35 
$60 
S40 
$60 
$60 
345 
S40 
S25 
$40 
£40 
£40 
|40 
|40 
|40 
S35 
$30 
$60 
$40 



Our$ 

$24 
S41 
$28 
$41 
S41 
531 
S28 
S18 
S28 
S28 
S28 
S28 
$28 
S23 
S24 
S21 
$41 
S23 



j[ [ACCO^D^^k I ELEC.ARTS j \ EDUCATIONAL j 





Lists 


OwS 


Apollo 18 


1130 


S21 


Card Sharks 


!130 


S21 


4th & Inches 


i;30 


$21 


Hardball 


S30 


S21 


Plasmatron 


S15 


S1Z 


Power at Sea 


S30 


S21 


SpyvsSpyl&ll 


;;i5 


S12 


Test Drive 


1130 


S21 


The Train 


;;30 


S21 



ACTIVISION 



1 



Aliens 
Last Ninia 
Maniac Mansion 
Star Rank Boxing 



Lets 
S3S 
S35 
$35 
$30 



Ou'S 
S24 
$24 
S24 
$22 



Adv Constr, Set 
Bard's Tale lor II 

Chuck Yeager 
Dragon's Lair 
Hunt Red October 
Legacy -Ancients 
Lords - Conquest 
Marble Madness 
Monopoly 
Pegasus ' 
ROM.- 



m 



MICROPROSE~^ I INFOCOM 



1 



HOC, 

Skate or Die 
Seven Cities 
Skyfox II 
Strike Fleet 
Wasteland 




Airborne Rar^ger 
F-15 
Gunship 
Pirates 
Silent Service 
Stealth Fighter 



LstS 


Ojf$ 


S35 


S24 


S35 


S24 


$35 


$24 


$40 


S28 


$35 


S24 


S40 


S28 





Lists 


Our$ 


Beyond Zork- 128k 


S45 


S31 


Border Zone 


$35 


S24 


Lurking Horror 
NordSBert 


$35 


S24 


$35 


$24 


Sherlock 


$35 


$24 



ORIGIN SYS. 



EPYX 



Auto Duel 
Ogre 
Uftima I 
Ultima III 
Ultima IV 



AMIGA 



~Efa 



LislS 
$50 
$30 
$40 
$50 
$60 



] 



Carmen - U.S. 
Carmen - World 
Early Games 
Easy as ABC 
Fraction Factory 
Kindercomp 
Magic Spells 
Math Blaster 
Piece of Cake Math 
Reader Rabbit 
Rocky's Boots 
Speed Reader 11 
Spell It 

SB Spellgrabber 
StickybearABC 
SB Math II 
SB Numbers 
SB Opposites 
SB Reading 
Word Attack 



OurS 

$34 
S21 
S28 
S34 
S41 



List i Our $ 

$40 S28 

$35 S24 

S35 S24 

$40 $28 

$30 S21 

$21 S15 

$40 S28 

$50 $34 

$35 S24 

$40 $23 

$35 $24 

$50 $34 

$50 $34 

£30 S21 

£30 S21 

$30 S21 

£30 S21 

£30 S21 

$30 $21 

$50 S34 



PRODUCTIVITY j 



Jl 



California Games 
Death Sword 
Destroyer 
4k4 Off Road 
Irnoos. MisTi 
Movie Monster 
Spy vs Spy III 
Street Sports Soccer 

Tiwgmsi 

World Games 



Lists 
$40 
$20 
$40 
$40 
$40 
$20 
$25 
$40 
£40 
$40 



Ours 

$28 
$15 
$28 

$29 
$29 
$15 
S18 
$28 
$28 
$28 



SSG 



J R< 



LSIS 

Battles Civil War I $40 

Battles Civil War Ij $40 

Battles Normandy $40 

Carriers at War $50 

Europe Ablaze $50 

Halls Montezuma $40 

Reach - Stars $45 

Rommel N. Africa $40 

Russia $40 



S28 
S28 
S28 
$34 
S34 
S28 
S31 
S23 
S28 



Alien Fires 
Alternate Realitrv 
Breach 
Death Sword 
Defender- Crown 
Empire 

FA 16 Interceptor 
Ferrari Formula 1 
Gettysburq 
Hunt-Red October 
King of Chicago 
" ^aladin 
ortsof Call 
Return to Atlantis 
Roadwar Europa 

Sinbad 
Starlleet I 
Three Stooges 
Tost Drive 
Weaver Baseball 
World Tour Golf 
Zoom 



AR- Dungeon 
Choplifter-Magic 

Defender -Urown 

Echelon 

Full Count Baseball 

Gauntlet 

High Seas 

JinKster 

Might & Magic 

ML Baseball 

ML Wrestling 

NBA 

President is Missing 

RoadJUmnor 

Sinbad 

Starlloot I 

Stc-allh Mission 

Jhres_S!s23££ 

Under Ftre 

Up Pe.nscDpe 

Wizardry I 

WC Leader Board 

Wooden Ships 



Lists 


Ours 


$40 


S28 


$15 


$12 


$15 


S12 


$35 


$24 


$45 


S31 


$40 


$30 


$35 


S24 


$50 


$34 


$35 


S25 


$40 


S28 


$40 


S28 


$30 


S21 


$40 


$28 


$25 


$19 


$35 


S24 


S35 


S24 


$^0 


S28 


S50 


S34 


$35 


$24 


$35 


$24 


$30 


$21 


$40 


$28 


$40 


S28 


$3b 


S24 



Certificate Maker 

GEOS-64 

GEOS-128 

Geos Desk Pack I 

GeoCalc 

GeoDex 

GeoFile 

GeoProgrammer 

GeoPublish 

GeoSpell 

GeoWrite Wkshop 

Newsroom 

Paperclip III 

Print Shop 

Print Shop Comp, 

Toy Shop 



Lists OarS 

$40 S28 

£60 $41 

S70 S47 

$35 $24 

$50 $34 

$40 $28 

$50 $34 

$70 $47 

$70 $47 

$30 $21 

$50 $34 

$50 $34 

£50 $34 

£45 $31 

S35 $24 

$30 $21 



ACCESSORIES | 

Sony DSDD 5.25 S9 

Tevox DSDD w.library case S8 

Sony DSDD 3,5 S20 

3-M DSDD 3,5 S22 

Cleaning Kit 5. 25 S6 

Cleaning Kit 3.5 $6 

EPYX 500 Joystick $15 

Mouse Pad S6 

Safe Strip 6 Surgo P'oleciof S22 

Storage Case 60 5,25 S9 

Storage Case 40 3,5 39 

Universal Printer Stand S22 

Universal System Stand S20 




Same Day 
Shipping 

Just call before 3:30 and 
we 'II ship your order today 
by UPS. Your package is 
only days away with Tevex. 



CALL TOLL-FREE 1-800-456-1162 



FREE CATALOG WITH YOUR FIRST ORDE R 

Open 9-8 Mon. - Fri. 10-5 Sat. 
Retail Store open same hours. 

Gmrgia rcsiiioiL'i call 404-934.5a^9, When ordering by mail scaid monty order. Ijicliidc plionc number. 

Snil'I'ING: Add S3.00 for shipping jnd handling charge. Georgia nisidiaiis add A% sales lax, Slupping for 

Canadian orders is 5% of order, wiih a S4.00 miiumum . U. S. Mail, APO & FPO orders add 5% of order. 

with a S4.00 minimum. Shipping for all oilier foreign orders is 15% of order. *iih a SIO.OO mimmum. All sales are fin^l. 

New Titles are underlined 

86 



COMING SOON \ 

Battles of Napoleon 

Covert Action 

Dive Bomber 

The Games - Summer Ed. 

Heroes of the Lance 

Pool of Radiance 

Red Storm Rising 

S.D.I. 

Sporting News Baseball 

Ultima V 

TEVEX 

4205 First .Ave, Suite 100 

Tucker (Atkinta), CA 30084 

404-934-505D 



CHIP LEVEL DESIGNS PRESENTS 




HE SUPER-FAST PARALLEL DISK OPERATING SYSTEM 
FOR THE COMMODORE 64 AND 1541 DISK DRIVE! 



• All disk access is handled at super-fast parallel 
speed! (LOAD, SAVE, directory, SEQ & REL 
files, scratcfi, validate, format). 

•Designed to support multiple drive systems. 

•Parallel Centronics printer support with file 
spooling capability. 



•f^any useful, timesaving features (DOS 
Wedge, screen dump, resident monitor). 

• No loss of compatibility. 

•Far too many features to list in this ad . . 
perhaps in this magazinel 
(Call or write to get all the details!) 



. and 



. , . and If you want the ultimate, get RapiDOS Professional! 

• Gives even faster disk access! •Provides 40 track extension (749 blocks free!) 

• Uses 8k RAM track buffering and hardware 'Adds 20 new disk commands (i.e., lock files, 
GCR conversion! change disk name). 

Here's what people are saying about RapiDOS: 

Mike J. Henry (Basement Boys Software) - "It's amazing how incredibly fast it is, I'm impressed!" 

Mitch S. (Eaglesoft Inc.) - 'Very fast, very reliable, and very compatible. I love it!" 

J.F. Jones (ADP) - "Superbases' speed is increased greatly, and it's now a dream to use!" 



Function 


Normal DOS 


RapiDOS 


RapiDOS Pro 


Your System 


Load 202 blocks 


128 sec. 


15 sec. 


3 sec. 




Save 202 blocks 


196 sec. 


98 sec. 


8 sec. 




Format 35 tracks 


90 sec. 


24 sec. 


18 sec. 





Compare these speeds with your current system and see why RapiDOS puts the C-64 into a different league! 

RapiDOS requires a socketed kernal ROM U4, and is available in versions for the 64, 64C, 128 in 64 mode, and 

1541 & 1541C (pleasG specify when ordering). RapiDOS is easily upgradable lo the Professional Version. 

RapiDOS Professional drive controller is (c) '87 mts data GbR, the creators of the best European parallel systems. 

At these affordable prices no C<64 owner should be without RapiDOS! 

RapiDOS $49.95 RapiDOS Professional $99.95 



MASS DUPLICATOR 1541 

• For the C64/128 with a single 
1541 disk drive. 

•15 second, 4 pass backup for 

standard disks! 
•25 second full GCR Super Nibbler, 

the most powerful yet! 
•9 second disk format! 
•Fast loader! 

• Quick installation. $32.95 
•Can be upgraded to RapiDOS 

MASS DUPLICATOR MSD 

•A must for any MSD SD-2 owner. 
•15 second standard disk backup! 

• 18 second full GCR Quick Nibbler! 

• 9 second disk format! $25.95 

MSD AUTO COPY ROM 

• Adds new Fast Backup 
commands! 

• Turns the MSD SD-2 into a 
dedicated copying drive 

(no computer needed). $29.95 



C-64 BURST- ROM 

•Gives the 64 'Burst Mode' when 

used with a 1571 or 1581 

disk drive! 
•Loads 100 blocks in 6 seconds 

on a 1 571 , 4 seconds on a 1 581 ! 
•Fast directory, SEQ, and REL 

file access! 
•Built in DOS wedge! 
•Simple installation. 

(Kernal ROM U4 must 

be socketed) $39.95 

C-128 BURST- ROM 

•Lets the 128 run at 'Burst' speed 

when in 64 mode! 
•Provides the same features as 

the C-64 Burst-ROM! ^ _ __ 



STILL TO COME 

• 1571 Mass Duplicator! 

(1581 Utility Pack! 

«1571/1581 RapiDOS Professional! 



TURBO 64 

•Speed-up cartridge for the C-64, 
just plug it in! 

•Adjust the clock rate from 100 khz 
(1/10 normal) to 4 mhz (4x normal)! 

•Uses 8/16 bit 65816 microproc- 
essor (same as the Apple ][gs... 
but twice as fast)! 

• Spread sheets, BASIC, flight 
sjms, graphics, and now GEOS... 
all are accelerated! ^^-^ „_ 

$199.95 



WWM^ 



CHIP LEVEL DESIGNS 

^^^ Cash. Check. g^^_ 

^^^p Money Order. V/SA 

^^ M.C- or Visa ^^" 

S3. 00 shipping on all orders 

C.OD.s add S3. 00 

P.O. BOX 603 
ASTORIA, on 97103-0603 

(503)861-1622 

Dealer. Distribulor. & Group Pricing Available 



87 



YOU CX« HAVE IT ALL 

THE CONVENIENCE OF A CARTBIDGEI 

THE FLEXIBILITY OF A DISKI 

THE QUICK BROWN BOX stores up to 30 of 
your favorite programs - Basic & Ml, Games 
& Utilities, Word Processors & Terminals - 
READY TO RUN AT THE TOUCH OF A KEY 
- HUNDREDS OF TIMES FASTER THAN 
DISK - Modify tfie contents instantly. Replace 
obsolete programs, rut your cartridge. Use as 
a permanent RAM DISK, a protected wortt 
area, an autoboot utility. 0-64 or C-128 mode. 
Loader Utilities induded. Price: 16K $69 32K 
$99 64K $129 (Plus $3 S/H; MA res add 5%) 
Brown Boxes, Inc, 26 Concord Road, Bedford, 
MA 01730 _^ _ (617)275-0090 




THE QUICK BROWN BOX 
BATTERY BACKED RAM 



Commodore Built It... 

WE_Support It! 

TWIN CITIES 128 

North America's ONLY 

C-128-exclusive publication 

$25.00 FOR 12 ISSUES 

$12.50 FOR 6 ISSUES 

$2.50 PER SINGLE ISSUE 

NOW AVAILABLE! 

Twin Cities 128 Compendium 

Book#1 (ISSUES 1-18) 

$16.95 ppd. $17.95 Can. 

TWIN CITIES 128 P.O. Box 4625 
Saint Paul, MN 55104 



COMMODORE 
ALIGNMENT TOOL 



|$34.95l 



n iTirniim 

C3 



ra 



QCJ 



* Software 

* Alignment Device 

* Manual 

ftequirestwoSV Batteries Alignment Tool 

Alignyour1541 disk drive with the 
same accuracy as using a Scope! 



Track Counter for 1541 

LED Readout -Software $59.95 
Instalation Guide Included 




north (707) 
comput'=e°rr 826-0121 

791 Eighth St. Areata CA 95521 



BIG BLUE READER 128/64 

COMMODORE <=> IBM PC 
File Transfer Utility 

Big Blue Header 128 64 is ideal for ihose ^ho use 
iBr/ PC compa!ib)e MS-DOS compuiers ai work 
and have Jhe CDmmodcre 1 28 or Qd. a! home 
The Big Blue Reader 128/64 is not an IBM PC 
omulaiDr, bjt rather il is a quick and easy Id use lile 
trarsler program designed to Iransler. word 
processing, texl and ASCII liles between Iwo 
eniiiely dilferent disk lormats. Commodore and ISM 
MS-'DGS Both aSB anO Co-J appi'caUons are on 
the same disk an6 regutre etther a t571 or 158t 
dtsk drive (franslers J60K-360K 5.25 met) & 720K 
3 5 'nch MS-DOS disk) 

Big Blue Header 128 also suppons C-128 CP/M 
hies. 1 7).> FIAM L'xp, iO and 80 column mofleS. 
Big Blue Reader 64 now I57t and 1581 compaiibie 

BIG BLUE READER 1 28/64 S44.95 

Order by check, mortey order, or COD, 

No credit card o«ders please Foreign ordefs adO S-^ 

BBR 1 2864 available as an upgrade 10 Current 

users lor S18 plus original dish. 

Free shipping and handling. 




To order-Call or write: 
SOGWAP Software 

15 Bclliiuint RoLid; Dec;ttiir. IN -4fi7.i3 
l*h i:!!^! 724-3900 



Subscribe 
to 





now 

with 

plastic 



VISA 



319-338-0703 



en I WALL 



SOLID PRODUCTS 



SOLID SUPPOHT 



OUR PRODUCTS: We carry a com plete line 
of software products and accessories for your 
Commodore 64 and 128 and Amiga computers. 

OUR PRICING: Our prices are very competi- 
tive and are normally discounted 20% to 35%. 
some even more 

OUR PROMISE: Quite simply we promise 
your salisfaction. Witti our no-nonsense low 
prices, our lull satisfaction guarantee and our 
dedication to seivice. we feel that you canrxit get a 
better deal anywhere else! 

Write or call for your free catalog today: 

P.O. BOX 129 

56 NOBLE STREET 

KUTZTOWN, PA 19530 

TOLL FREE 24 HRS. 

1-800-638-5757 



154111571 

DkiVc ALiONivlENT 

"- - . excellent, elliaent program thai can help you 
save both nroney arjd downfrme. " 

Compute.' 's Gazette 
Dec. 1987 
1541/1371 Drive Alignment reports the 
alignment condition of the disk drive as you 
pefforin adjustments. On screen help is 
available while ttie program Is mnning. 
Includes features for speed adjustment and 
stop adjustment. Complete instruction 
manual on aligning both 1541 and 1571 
drives. Even Includes instructions on how to 
load alignment program when nothing else 
will load! Works on the C64, SX64, CI 28 in 
either 64 or 126 mode* Autoboots to all 
modes. Second drive fully supported. Pro- 
gram disk, calibration disk and instruction 
manual only $34.95! 



■ SuperSI UlihtiesisacompJeleulilities 

^^ _^ \ oackage for the Commodore i58i 

^^ I 1 Dis)\ DriveancC12acom[)ulei Copv 

^^ -*- / wftoJe disks Of individjal fiSes from 

1541 or 1571 partiltons Sackup 

IMI disks. Contains 1561 Disk 

Editoi. Drive Monilor. HAM Writer. CPIM Ulililiesand more 

lOf only S39.9S. 



'M lH^ 



ULTRA DOS UTILITIES 
MODULE I 

High Speed Hard Drive or dual floppy drive 
backup utility for the Amiga 5(X), 1000 or 
2000. 51 2K Amiga required. Compatible 
with any hard drive that follows convenlional 
AmigaDOS protocol. Backup those valu- 
able files on your Hard Disk the easy way for 
only S59.95! 



If your can't find our products at your local 

dealer, you can order direct by calling: 

1-800-552-6777 

or write to us at: 
FREE SPIRIT SOFTWARE, INC. 

905 W. Hillgrove, Suite 6 
La Grange, IL 60525 





^mmm 



INFO Magazine is entirely produced and managed with 
Commodore & AMIGA computers, third-party peripherals 
& software, and simple "lay" cquiptmcnt (standard 35mm 
cameras, ect.) 

We use no Macintoshes, no typesetting service, no in- 
dustrial cquiptment, (or mirrors!) We do our wordprocess- 
ing, illustrating, accounting, mailing labels, data manage- 
ment: EVERYTHING with this stuff! In short- everything 
you sec in these pages you could do yourself at home wiili 
easily found products aviiilable to the average consumer at a 
relatively modest cost. We arc committed lo this approach 
for several reasons; 1) it's cheap, 2) lum-around limes from 
news to print are incredibly short, 3) we feci thai using these 
producUi everyday in "real-life" is the best basis for reviews 
and comparisons, 4) it's a blast! 

INFO began in 1983 and was originally produced quar- 
terly (sort of) by one person working out of a spare bedroom 
with one C64, a dot matrix printer, one disk drive, crude 
software, and absolutely no publishing experience (sec Is- 
sues #15 & #16 for the complete lurid history). INFO is 
now produced bi-monthly by a core group of 6 regular all- 
purpose computer nerds out of a renovated brewery in beau- 
tiful Iowa City, Iowa. 

Our mission is lo keep making a living doing what we 
love best (computing) by giving you hard-hiiiing reviews 
you can U"usi, laic-breaking news, infomialivc and fresh arti- 
cles, and a healthy dose of satire and humor. We don't pub- 
lish type-in program ihat waste your time and money, we 
don't wear suits, we don't take any guff from advertisers, 
and we don't take American Express! 



What the Ratings Mean: 



Superl Sels Ihe Standard. , 
Tops in its Class! 

Excellent! Has Extra Fea- 
tures and Good Feel! 

Average. Standard Fea- 
tufes, no Bugs, no Extras. 

Lacks Fealutes, or is Hard 
to Use, or has Bugs. 

Bulk this disk. 



DEALERS: 

If you would like to carry INFO 
vour store, contact 
Select Magazines for details. 

(21 2) 696-7353 



in 



fGENL 



yO DAY WARRANTY 

on Rcfurbi.shcti 

rCENUlNE C0Mi\40D0RE 64^ 

f Power Supply 

^ Power Suppb $19^5 

''Return old 64 supply $3.CX) 

Your Cost $16.95 
S&H $3.50 

'ReiLTred 64 supplies musi be genuine Commodore'" Brar^d. 



Sick Disk Drive? 

Use Physical Exam to adjust alignment, speed & stop position. 

15^1 Physical Exam Sample sc:een 

Illustrated manual 
supplies complete 
instructions to 
guide you in 
making necessary 
adjustments that 
are indicated by the 
test diskette. No 
special scopes or ..»"o»i<.. ,-.««.......-,., o.j.-i 

tools needed. Used 

by many repair shops and individuals to maintain disk 

drives. Easy to use. 

.4v;ul;iblt for tiiese ComnuKlore Disk Drives 1541, 1571, 
8(150. S25(l. 4040, SFD 1001. S39.95 each 




^ 



Cardinal Software, 14840 Build America Dr., 
Woodbridge, VA 22191 Info: (703) 491-6494 



^ders: 800 762-5645 




The SID chip just met 



GODZILLA! 

Forget about cute little bleeps and squonks, we're talking 9-voice Yamaha 
FM music synthesizer with optional real 5-otlave piano lieytioard and a 
coiTiposer & voice editor progi^m that Ifeelhoven would have tradeJ ihe 
Fiftli fori 

If you're talt<ing music on the C64/C128 you're talking 

SFX SOUND EXPANDER, 

9 independently programmable voices and MIDI capability. 

And if that's not enough there's our SFX SOUND SAMPLER complete 
with microphone and software, also MIDI capable. 

For the real lowdown fill oul the coupon and drop it in tlw mail, or just 
give us a TOLL-FREE call at C800) 447-3'l3'l (in California call 
805 925 6682). 



FEARN & MUSIC 

519 W.Taylor «1 14 
Santa Maria 
CA 93454 





INFO UNCLASSIFIEDS 

$2 per Word. 

Send with check or M.O. to: 
INFO UNCLASSIFIEDS 
123 N. Linn, Suite 2A 
Iowa City, lA 52245 
Ads received with payment by 

August 23, 1988 will appear in 

Issue #23 (on sale October 18). 



SUPRA 2400bps, S134.95. VIDEO- 
SCAPE 3D-V2, $106.95. Call Wild Wares, 
2pm to 9pm at 805-682-8330 for a free 
catalog or additional information. 

€64 HINT DISK, The Bard's Talc, The 
Pawn, Might & Magic, Guild of Thieves 
and Leather Goddesses. All on the same 
disk for S10.50. Elkon Enterprises, 2914 
Pennsylvania, Wichita Falls, TX 76309. 

VIDEO VIStONS, Art Disk series for 
Amiga Desktop Video programs. Video- 
tape Demo (S15), Demo Disk ($5), Vol- 
ume One or Two (S24.95 each) 2 disks 
per volume. CV Designs, 61 Clewey 
Road, Medford. MA02155. 

ANIMATIONS, Digiti/.ed Pictures, 
Graphics; \ buy and sell. Write Jack Mor- 
row, 7421 mV 5lh Terrace, Oklahoma 
Cicy, OK 73127, 

TRANSFORMER TALK (Amiga) 

Subscription SIO.OO. Box 7969. Tyler. TX 

75711. 

COLORFUL VIDEO TITLE MAK 
ER for Commodore 64 Print Shop (tm) 
users. INFO #20 review: "...simple to use 
and gels results". RUN article: "...a win- 
ner". S14,95. MicroAds, 145 Norman 
Drive, Palatine, IL 60067. 

COMMODORE / AMIGA CHIPS. 

Low prices two/more: 6510- S10.95, 
6526- Si 1.50, 901 ROMS Scries- S10.95. 
PLA/82S100- S13.95, 6581- S12.85, 
Amiga chips and low price RAM expan- 
sion Module....COMMODORE REPAIR. 
Low prices, (eg. C64- S54.95 complete). 
Largest authorized Service Center in the 
country ... C64 power supply, (H.D.), 
S27.95 plus UPS ... Send for complete 
catalog of chips, parts and accessories ... 
VISA/MC ... Kasara Micro, Inc., 37 Mur- 
ray Hill Drive, Spring Vallcv. NY 10977, 
1-800-248-2983 (nationwide") or 914-356- 
3131. 

WANTED: WORDPROCESSING 

PROGRAM for the VIC -20. Call collect 
201-385-6379 Sat-Sun 9am to 7pm, 



PLUS 4/VIC20/C64/C128 OWNERS- 
Workbook: How To Control Any Printer 
From Anv Compuler. SI 6.95. Large selec- 
tion of software, books, and hardware 
available. Send S2 for catalog. McWARE 
(I), PO Box 2784. Fairfax, VA 22031. 

AMIGA ART DISKS featuring 
Aclion-Oricnlcd, 3D, detailed drawings of 
shutdcs, satellites, astronauts and back- 
grounds. DPainl(tm) 32 color, IFF LoRez, 
no repeats. Space Project with 83 draw- 
ings, S19.95. Space Project II, 92 draw- 
ings. S19.95, Space Piojccl for Deluxe 
Video (combination of above in DV-8 col- 
or) S34.95. F-SYSTEMS, 1500 NobSe St., 
Longwood, FL 32750. All three 359.95. 

PRINT SHOP (tm) GRAPHICS and 

otlicr public Domain C64 and CI28 soft- 
ware: $3.00/disk. Introductory offer: Buy 
10 Get 4 FREE. FREE Catalog, Visa/MC. 
BRE Software, 6210 N. First St., Suite 
130, Fresno, CA 93710. (800) 622-7942. 
In CA (209) 432-2159. 

GEOS USERS: Outstanding full-page 
MacPa!nt(lm) files converted to GEO- 
paint(tm). Two disks per volume. Volume 
1. general subjects. Volume 2, female art. 
S8.95/sei. Rainbow Software, 20224 S. 
Sprague Rd., Oregon City, OR 97045. 

FREE CATALOG. OUR NEW CATA- 
LOG IS OUT! Over 15,000 public do- 
main, freeware, and shareware programs. 
Write to: Midwest Public Domain, P.O. 
Box 5048. Terre Haute, IN 47805. 

1520 PLO'ITER PROGRAMS. 

Mandelbrot Set, Misc/Util. GDL, Fractals, 
and 3-D Plot. Write for our flyer. Com- 
piled and/or source code available. The 
Plotting Shed, 1315 N. 13lJi St., Boise, ID 
83702-3529. 

FREE SAMPLE AMI-FORUM 
newsletter! Exchange ideas, original soft- 
ware, cam royalties. Low prices on huge 
software library. Gladstone, 7744 Picker- 
ing Ave., Dept 14, Whitiier, CA 90602. 

C64 1701 MONITOR, 1541 drive, 
Pan.-Lsonic printer w/interface, etc. David, 
713-474-4919. S550OBO. 



2 MEG RAM EXPANSION. AlOOO 
and A500; Meg Kh S148.00. Ex- 
pandable to 8 Megs! Assembly available. 
AlOOO Essential Clock kit, S25.00. Dealer 
inquiries invited. BEAR Products, 600 
University Avenue, San Jose, CA 95110. 
408/279-1959. 

1670 STAND-ALONE Interface. 

Run the 1670 on your Amiga or PC. 
S44,95, LRA RS232 Interface for 64/128. 
S19.95, C Modem Stand-Power, C= mo- 
dem power supply. S27.95. Shipping in- 
cluded. Add 52.50 for COD. 90 day guar- 
antee, 30 day money back. For info write 
or call LRA Enterprises, 35615 Ave. D., 
Yucaipa, CA 92399. 714-797-6867. 

THE HOTTEST European PD Games! 
8-10 quality games on a DS disk for the 
C64 at only S5! Send SASE to: The Game 
Shop, PO Box 491. Now York, NY 11375. 

AMIGA HIGH-PERFORMANCE 

SOFTWARE at low prices. Free Catalog. 
Demo Disk only S4.95 (refundable). 
Gladstone, 7744 Pickering Ave,, Dept. 12, 
Whitiier, CA 90602. 

FULL-FEATURED C64 LOTTO, 

Entertaining - music, sprites, windows - 
only S29.95. Demo Disk only $4.95 (re- 
fundable), FREE information/catalog. 
Gladstone, 7744 Pickering Ave., Dept 13. 
Whitiier. CA 90602. 

FREE TRIAL: LIST MASTER. We're 
sure this Idea Processor. List Keeper and 
Omlinor will help you think, plan, orga- 
nize & compose. But if you don't agree, 
just return it! Send no money, pay S29.95 
after 10 days (USA only). BONUS: 
MENU MASTER (list: S25) FREE even 
if you don't buy! Put lists, catalogs, even 
manuals on disk in a way that's easy for 
anyone to retrieve & peruse. XYTEC 
TRIAL, 1924 Divisadcro, San Francisco, 
CA 94115 (4I5)-563-0660. 

FLOOR COVERING ESTIMATING 

Floor Essence; a program for estimating 
carpet, linoleum and tile. Will figure any 
room dimension and display with pinpoint 
accuracy the amount of material to use in 
each room, including tlic fill-piece area. 
Complete with job-costing and separate 
conversion program. Ideal for installers, 
contractors, dealers, estimators, planners 
and insurance eslimating, etc. S79.95. PO 
Box 418399, Sacramento, CA 95841- 
8399.916-344-5175. 



CONFUSED BY YOUR SUBCRIPTION LABEL? 

Tlie numbers on your subscription label mean: 

11. 12. 23. #22 

11 - Your subcription started with issue #11. 

12 - Your subscription length is 12 issues (2 years). 

23 - Your last issue issue will be #23 

#22 - The current issue number is #22 

When the last two numbers match, or there is an arrow with the word 'last", 

you are holding the last issue of your subcription. 



miFm Sept/Oct 1988 




Excellence,™ 

for the Commodore 

Product Family 

Look for the name that 
spells Quality, 

Affordability, 
and Reliability. 



U. Kemal - a 20 or 40 
Megabyte Hard Drive which sup- 
ports CPM. 

Super Graphix GOLD - the ultimate primer interface including a 32K buf- 
fer, 4 built-in fonts, a utility disk with 27 fonts and more. 
Super Graphix - an enhanced printer interface including NLQ, an 8K buffer, 
reset button, a utility disk with 27 fonts and more. 
Super Graphix jr - an economical printer interface with NLQ. 
FontMaster II - a powerful wordprocessor for the C64 with 30 fonts ready 
to use, 65 commands, font creator and more. 

FontMaster 128 - a super wordprocessor for the 128 including 56 fonts ready 
to use, a 102,00 word spell checker and much more. 
All Hardware is FCC Certifed All Interfaces include a Lifetime Warranty 

— C64 and 128 aie reg.TM of Commodore Business Machines, [nc. 

M^E,^= = 2804 Arnold Rd. Salina, KS. 67401 (913) 827-0685 




GET MORE 
PLEASURE 
FROM THE 
BIBLE WITH 

LANDMARK 

The Compulcr Reference Bible 

Here's what LANDMARK will enable you lo do: 

• SEARCH TllROUGI mm BIBLE— Find 
Phrases, words or stnicnccs. 

• DEVELOP TOPICAL nLES— Copy from The 
Bible Lcxl end search results ihcn add your o^^'n 
commenls and notes. 

• COMPILE YOUR PERSONAL DELE— Out- 
line t£jtts in color. Add Notes and commenls. 
Create your own supplcmcnury Study files. 

*^ CREATE FILES— Then convert them for use 
with wordpixjcessois like Paperclip and GEOS. 

• MAKE SUPPLEMENTARY STUDY F1LES- 
and develop translation variations. 

SUGGESTED RETAIL $164.95 

ASK ABOUT OUR 

FALL '88 SPECIAL! 

vl.2 for C64 or v2.0 for C128/1571 

CALL OR WRITE TODAY FOR A 
FREE BROCHURE, WHICH SHOWS 
HOW VALUABLE LANDMARK CAN 

BE IN YOUR BIBLE STUDY 

P.A.V.Y. Software P.O. Box 1584 

Ballwin, MO 63022 (314) 527-4505 

ASK POR rr AT YOUR LOCAl. SOPTWARE DEAUIR; 



KINDERGARTEN 
SOFTWARE 



KINDER KONCEPTS 

30 ACTION-PACKED PROGRAMS 
FOR PRE-SCHOOL TO 
REMEDIAL SECOND GRADE 

Glowing Reviews from Special Education 

Software Review, Software Reports and 

Electronic Learning. 

FOR APPLE II FAMILY, PET AND 
COMMODORE 64/128 

30 PROGRAM SET S99.00 

15 READING PROGRAMS .S55. 00 

15 MATH PROGRAMS. . . . S55.00 

Please Add S2.00 For Shipping 



FREE TRIAL IN YOUR SCHOOL 
FOR 30 DAYS 



CALL TODAY! 

TOLL FREE 1-800-422-0095 

MICHIGAN AND AFTER 5:00 P.M. 
(313) 477-0897 

VISA/MASTERCARD 

MIDWEST SOFTWARE 

Box 214, Farmington, Ml 48332 




84 Abby's Software 
88 Briwall 

88 Brown Boxes 

89 Cardinal Software 

77 Central Coast Software 

87 Chip Level Designs 
3 Cinemaware 

5 Cinemaware 

74 Creative Computers 

75 Creative Computers 

84 Creative Micro Designs 

79 Computer Systems Assoc. 
83 Digitronics, Inc. 

89 Fearn and Music 

82 Flexible Data Systems 

80 Flight Training Devices 

79 Fuller Computer Systems 
58 liNj?0 Back Issues 

. 7 Jonathan Jager, Intl. 

83 Lake Forest Logic 

80 Jumpdisk 

82 Magnetic Images 

85 Micro Computer Services 

81 the Memory Location 
C4 Mtcroillusions 

81 Microsmiths, Inc. 
91 Midwest Software 

76 New Wave Software 
C2 New World Computing 
PI NewTek 

88 North Coast Computers 

91 PAVY Software 

78 Phoenix Electronics 

82 PIM Publications 
76 Pioneer Computing 

83 Practical Solutions 
81 R & DL Productions 

84 Redmond Cable 

81 RGB Video Creations 

78 S.C. Express 

80 Software Excitement 

92 Software Support Int'l 
C3 Software Support Int'l 
80 Software Visions 

88 SOGWAP Software 
83 T.S.R. Hutchinson 

8 Taito America 

9 Taito America 

86 Tevex 

88 Twin Cities 128 

79 XADCorp. 
91 Xetec 



91 



S(!)[?^\2?aaa scj[?[?Q[ii^ aa^s[aG]a^[i(T)C]a[L 



CONVENIEIMCE-FAST SERVICE-RELIABILITY-SUPPORT 



AbacusIS Software "^BfwJertwndSoftuBfe- 



1J9 Iniemali ibx*) 
'2B TntAs & T^reihofl*] 
•571 InferrjS (DOOkl 

Baste Cwnpitf &* 

Base Cofipde* I3fl 

Becker Basic ky G«M 

C«3Pilk64 

CaO Pik !38 

Ch*t PaK 64 , . , 

Chart Pah IJS . 

CoM6< 

Cobol 1?6 

CPMfor ^tw?C12B<ljookl 

Supet C ComfMiei 64 

Stjpef C Canpef 12a 

Supef Pascal &t 

Supef Pascal l?B 

Geos In&rie & Oyt Book 

(jeos Inside t Oul Disk 

Geos Tncks A Tips 6ook 

Geos Tiki^s i Tfis Disk 



lbJ6 

13 36 

2457 
36 97 
33 97 
24 97 
36 97 
24 97 
24 97 
24 97 
36 97 
13 36 
36 97 
36 97 
36 97 
3697 
15 36 
11 76 
13 20 
11 76 



I ACCESS 



LB * Tcwn i EiK t 12 97 

Mach 5 21 9? 

Mac^i2a 3Q37 

Ttfltfi Ffwiw 24 97 

WvV] Cla» LeK9«t Boa^d 2' 97 

W C LB Fan Casi%^ 2 \2 9' 

W C Lfi FaniG«jrs*^s 3 I? 57 



BuWeGhost 

C^dSharVs . 
FanBreah 
F«jnh & lnch« 

Plasnulrcn 
Power at ^a 
Hac*-e*n 
Sene& Votov 
Test Dfwe 
The Tfain 



16 97 
18 9T 
18 97 

cm 

10 97 
IB 97 
1697 
9 97 
18 97 
CM 
Cai 
16,97 
18 97 



ACTIONSOFT 



Thuodof Crwppf r 
Up Ppnscopc 



A i^-TIV1^3l ON 



■^^■JT^_RT^]^.^^!EN^' 



AJiens 

Faeiy Tal«& 
fire Poww 
Goe 8«fr A>r FUtv 
la&l Hm^ 
Marwc UaJTSion 

Rampage 

RORUdtie Emarters 
SkyTrjn^! 



24 97 
2197 
3097 
15 37 
TBJ7 
2197 

21 sr 

24 47 
10 97 
2197 
24 97 
3097 



■~r yw-T-r -r— V 

Sortworks 



OesiL P» I Fool. Pah I Gewtei 
Desk Rah Plus 
fort Pack Plus 
Geos 64 
G«ft 12S 

GEOSBASIC 

Geocat Si ....... 

Geocat i?8 . 

Geotiio64 

GwMc t?B 

Geopfogiammei &* 

Geoproqiammei 128 

GeowtiiSh6J 

Geospell 

GeiMwnter s W(N^s^x>p &4 

Geownter s Wortshop 123 



31 97 

i&9r 

16 97 
36 97 
J2 97 

Cjii 

3097 
4297 
30 97 
12 97 
42 97 
A2 97 
3097 
16 97 
30 97 
«97 



BOX OFFICE 



S100.000 Pyap«d 

Mi 

High Flolters 



995 
9« 



^BratertJUftdSofhuare" 



Arcade Game Cors; Se: 
Bark Streec Win(« 
Bar*, Stip?! Fier 
Bv^ SbMI kUiff 
Barii Sbnel Spe>^ 
Carmen Sandta^ Eiropn 
Carmen SarKkecjo USA 
Carmen Sanj^igo Woiid 
Cauldron 1. i 2 



-8 97 
30 97 
16 97 
1597 
IS 97 
2-I97 
24 97 
^197 



Magnetron 


lb.9/ 


PnnlShcp 


27.97 


Pmi Shop CompafnoT 


2197 


PSGri^fwsDrst' 


1597 


P S Giap^iO D.51 2 


15 97 


P S Graphcs D-sk 3 


1597 


P S Ho«a^ Gfiphcs 




CXj«1 lor CKie5 [book) 


19 97 


Sot>wt>fce Challenge 


12 97 




CAP COM' 





Ghosts 4 Gotjifns 

Ha! Tncfc 

Mirn^ 

SkIb Aims, - . . . 

tW2 



1097 

18 9? 
18 97 
18 97 



CINEMAWARE 



tWencte< 01 the Oown 


2197 


K^igotCNci^ 


2197 


SOI 


2197 


Siiit>ad 


2197 


RoOi«R*i^ 


2197 


Three Stooges 


2197 


Wafp Spe«J (Carl 


30 97 



Bfeatttru 
Corrvnanrto 
llian WarrKV^ 
Karate Oiamp 

Kamow 

Kong Fu Uas!er 
Platoofi 
Speed Buggy 
VicloryBoad 



19 97 
12 97 
16 97 
12 97 
18 97 
IS 97 
1297 
18 97 
^S97 
16.97 



DATASOn 



/^'lernaieHeairTvChrv 


19 36 


City Hint Book 


712 


Alternate! fleaiily Durigeon 


25 48 


Dungeon Hinl Book 


712 


Bailie Qiotdi 


16 30 


Global COfnmandsr 


1936 


Hunr Foi Bed Ocl^ftee 


25 4S 


Rut>con AiiiafK:*: 


13 24 


Tobfuk 


193? 


VicJeo Tflie Cofrpar*on 2 


13 24 


VOeo Title Shop - Come '■ 


19 36 



[>ctiDnafv DrsK 
Dtgia) Supefp^ 2 
Pockei Filer 2 
Pocket Pianrwr 2 
Pi(X*«Wnw2 



9 97 
60.97 
36.97 
3637 
3697 



EltCTRnNlC APTS- 

Alwn Fees 19 36 

Anir^eaa 25 48 

A/CK fox 21 4£ 

Baidi Tale I 25 ^ 

BaFd s Tale I Kmi 9 1 E 

Bards Tale II 2Sd8 

Bard's Tale U HmlA 9 IE 

Baid'5 Take III 25 46 

gartfs Tale m Hmts 9 i€ 

Chessmiasler 20f» 25 4a 

Chuck Vesger 5 AFS 22 42 

Dan Oaie 13 24 

OeJIa Palrol 1324 

Demon Siahei ;9 3e 

EaiUi Ortm &aliofi 1 SM 

fnsiam Muse 1 9.36 

Legacy of rhe Anoems i9 3fi 

MaflW) Madness 19 3i6 

Masip Mffija 19 36 

Mav^s Beacon Typmg ?5 46 

Monopoly 1936 

Paperclip 3 3i 60 

PapefO* Pubtenef 3i 3C 

Peqasus 19.36 

Ho*JWare 1936 

FlocWord 19.56 

Scrafctjie 21 <C 

Soypptes 25*fi 

SkJteorDw 1936 

SkytoiM 19 36 

Strike Fleel 193€ 

Twikghis Rart^om 22 *1 

TwihgTAs Ransom Hviti 7 12 

Wasietand 25 46 

Wasdanti HfTtB 9 16 



ArcfiC Arties 

Bati^estHp 

Calitorrwa Gafnes 

Champ Wrestlir^ 

Crflate A Ca^end* 

OeathSiHvt] 

Destrcryei 

Fajl Lead Citudge 

rinal Assault 

4X4 Racing 

The Games Sumrrwi EOrticn 

The Ganws Wirtw EOhon 

Graphic Scrapbook 1 . 

Graphic Scpapbook 2 

Giaphic Scrapbooh 3 

Home Vidcc PrKiLtCT 

ImposyblC MiSSOn II 

L A Crackdowt 

Welioaoss 

MindRol 

Sp«aertMI 

Spooinq News Baseball 

Sports A Roni 

Sireei Cai 

Stteei Sports Baseball 

SUeel Spors Bashettiali 

Siree: Spans Swxei 

Sub Same arrvjiator 

Summef Games H 

TDH«r Tappiet 

Wrser Games 

Www Gamtrs 



p-tfeeetitd 



Advanced Airrstuoo 

Gamer Command 

EiAe 

EWf Him Bcoh iLeror) 

Gu*d of Tfnews 

Jtfttie* 

Star Gliaw 

The SefTtry 

Traser 



1597 

Caf 

24 97 

14 97 
1697 

15 9T 
24 9f 
24 97 
24 J? 
24 97 

Call 
24 97 
15.97 
IS. 97 
1597 
30 97 
24.97 
24. 9 r 
1337 
24.97 
t7.16 
24.97 
15.97 
12.37 
24.97 
24.97 
24 97 
24 97 
13.92 
24 97 
1297 
24 97 



24 97 
Can 
1197 
5T7 
2497 
2*97 
2197 
24 97 
24 97 
24 97 



£jimsa0^ 



Champ B.i:&(?Cul< 
Champ Baskeitwii 
GFL FooiDaif 
Siar Rar>k Bdtit^ II 



INKWELL 



Fleiidraw & S 
FhJiriafll 

Gtac^ncs iwegfalo' 2 
LiqM Pen (1840 
Grapnics Gai!ei\ 1 
Gfatfucs Ga'*fv 7 



T6 97 
2197 
2197 
18 97 
16 97 



24 06 
20 76 
20 76 
40 57 
20 75 
20 74 



KRACKER JAX 



EMe V4 7 
Geotpuslefs V4 

Hacker s IfWrtv Kri 



695 
14 » 
995 

139^ 



y^K^iO PROSE 



Airtwrne Ftangef 

Fi5 StnkA Ea^ 

GuntHp 

Ptiaies . 

Project Sieaftti FigWer 

Red Slomi RtS40(] 

Silenl S<yrvKe 



720 

Bad SiiFTl aiannei 

Block Buster 

Bop k Wresiie infutraior 2 

Captaifi Blood 

Ciutmoose Spons 

Cipsswcd Magic 

Defenrtei ol t^p C'own 

Deja Vu 

Eagles W^sl InliHrator 1 

Ga-jrrlle; 

Manwf CoTtiat Simuaior 

Indoor SporTs 

indy Jones Teir»p*e tji Doom 

MiSl SoCCCf 

Papeito^ 

Roaa Runner 

SupefSu* Ice Hockey 

SuperSiai Soccer 



2197 
2197 
2197 
24 97 
24 97 
2*97 
2197 



?\ Q7 
1897 
18 97 

Cafi 
2197 
2197 
30 97 
21 97 
21 97 

Cal< 
21 97 
18 97 
18 97 
2197 
2197 
2197 
2197 
2197 
2197 
2197 
IB 97 



ORIGIN 

Autoduef _..._, ... 33.36 

kloebus 26ja 

Ogte 2040 

mtma 1 26.86 

Utwna 3 2686 

UlWiM 4 39 B4 

UI1ima5 39 64 



PROFESSIONAL 

rrofessjcriaj Sofrw%aje Inc 

Fleet F^ 64 128 24 97 

Fleet System 2 - * 36 g/ 

fswi System 4 .49 97 



ElemaJ Dagger 3497 

Gemstone He3lle^■ . 18.97 

Gemsione Wamof 9 97 

Heroes oT It* LarxM 19 36 

Phartajwl . 24 97 

PtwntMll .2*97 

Ptwntasw lU 24 97 

Pool of Rackanoe . . 2$ 4a 

Ouesi/ofi, I . . , 24 97 

Ouesuorvll 24 97 

Reaims o( Darkness 24.97 

Rmgi of ZiBffi 24 97 

Shard t»f Spnng , 24.97 

War^ame ConstrucJvon Set 18 97 

Wuards&own 24 9? 



SHARE! )AIA 



ConcefiTr3lK?n 995 

Family Feoct . _ . , . 995 

H»gh Rofler? _ _ . 9.95 

Jeopardy 9 95 

Jeopard Jr 9 95 

Wheel Of Foni.jne 9 95 

Wheel ol Fonune 2 995 

Card Sharks . 9 95 



SOLUTIONS UNLIMITED 



BilsDoatd Makcf 
Gtatu Ltnk 
Icon Faciofv 
Phfflo Finish 

SawiFX 



24 97 
12.97 
24 97 

18.97 



SPRINGBOARD 



Certrfcaie Makp^ L*r i 

Newsroom Ckpari i 
Newstoom Cl(iart 2' 
Newvoom Chftarr 3 
PSG<ar*»c Expander 



2fiBe 
20 40 
33 36 
20 40 
2«B8 

2354 



UDQIC 



Fbghi Simuialor It 
Fh^m Sim Scerwry i 
Flignt Sun Sc^rvry 2 
Fliqtii S>m Scerwf> 3 
Fligrit S<m Scer>efv 4 
Flight Swn Scenery 5 
Flighi Sim Scenery 6 . 
Flighl Sim Scenery 7 
Flight Sim Scenery 11.. . 
Fl^t Swn Scenery 14 
Flighl S>ni Scenery Japan 
Flight S*rn Scenify SanFfan 
Jet2 
SleaHh Mission 



Data Manager 2 
DaiaUv^ager 1^ 
DeshlCV Pufahshef 
EiKlronc ChecMXKA 
GencfalLfid^ 
kwwtofv Management 
FarBv<&4 



33 57 
14 16 
1*16 
14 16 
14.16 
14 16 
14 16 
1746 
17.46 
tT46 
1716 
17 46 
27 36 
33 96 



33.36 
33 3G 
17 16 
33 36 
39 84 
1393 
33 36 
33 36 
33 36 



3WTEUlC3i!|iS 



Par7^t2B 


39 84 


PayroE Managemer-! 


33 36 


SwittcatSidMiays &4 


17 16 


SwrftcatS-)ewjysi28 


33 36 


Sylvia Poner F P 54 


33 36 


SyStiapDriei FP 126 


46 32 


Word Wnlft 3 


13 36 


nord Wriief 128 


. . . 3336 



\m 



UMSCN WCniD iNCfT«>OP*tC 



Art Gallery 1 
Art Gallery 2 
ArtGalleryl Amer Hisl 
An Gallery 3 
Pnnmastei Plus . , 



15 97 
1597 

Call 
15 97 
2197 



MISCELLANEOUS 



An Wont Bfidge 5.0 

Assem&iv lor Kids {hook) 

AvaKm Hill MBA Baskelbali 

Base 6 

Begirri^ S Guile BasC fi 

Big Bioe Reader i2SCP-M 

Bot s Tenn Pro 64 

Bets Term Pro 126 

Easy Work«ng Triple Pak 

B W Business Form ShOC 

B W Geos Word PuWiEfter 

CDA Graphic Trar^tormei's 

Ckjb BaOi^^ammon 

CSM Drve Abgn Krt 

CSW Ppotecttxi Marua: i 

CSM ProwcDon Marvdi tl 

Dafk CasPe f3 60l 

Doodk- 

Fleir«ei2fl 

Fort Master 2 

FontMBter 126 

(>eneolr^ Family Tree 6^ 

Geneoiogv Famiy Tree I2fi 

Geos Companion ' 

Hes Mon64 {carti 

IHT CAD 3D 

KoiiamiConifa 

Kortarm RushN AtlKk 

Konarrn Yie Ar Kung Fu 2 

Merlin A-iwmblpr 64 

Merlin Assembler 1?a 

Micralawyei 

Mic;olca(;oe WWF Wroslling 

P^l Whrtehead Ctiess 

SamsC-64PrDq Base RH Guide 

Soteync Pers riewsJener 

SinpPoke! 

Poker Data Disk 1 

Poker Daia Disk 2 

Pc^fif Daia Dtsk 3 

Star Empire 

SupertMse 64 

SupedMH 128 

&u^3«)baS« the Book 

Super Sunday 

Super scflpT 64 

Superscript i26 

-at) BcotsAd- t28 G** Snd 

'as Bocks C&l Trout-e SiwT 

Tad 6oo*(s CW Senout Prog 

Vampires Empwe 

Wttartirv Sir Tech - 



2197 

11 76 
24 97 

29 ?5 

19 95 
27 97 
3097 
3697 
12.97 
24 97 
24 97 

21 97 

20 40 
3012 

22 55 
26 15 
?i 97 
24 97 

30 97 
30 97 
36 97 
36 97 
3697 
18 97 

9.95 
3tJ97 
16 97 
18 97 
1897 
30 97 
42 97 
36 97 
24.95 
?1 97 
15 36 
36 97 
IB 97 
12.97 

12 97 
12 97 
1597 
48 97 
48 97 
12 48 

23 «4 
M97 
42 97 
12« 
•32t> 



ACCESSORIES 

1541 71 Serial Cdbt 

^541 71 PD«*ttCaWe 

AntiStatc Toucfl Sinp 

C-128 (tee Morwor Cabte 

C-&4 Color Morflor Cord 

C-64 RepaKai3<e Power Supply 

RS-232 Inlerlace 

MW 350 Pfifflft Inlcriacp 

Aprijspand 64 

Aprospand Eiftendtr C^tblr- 

AfKOiek 1200 Baud Minimoriwn 

Commodwe i35t Mouse 

Mouse Mat 

1541 Dust Cover 

1571 Dust Cover 

C-&4 Dust Covtrr 

CWC Dus! Cover 

C-12B Dust Cover 

ftsh htwcher-Souarr Cut 

5 25 ' Disk Dnve Ckeaner 

SS-Di&k Dnve Cleanor 

lOCrl Disk Sioragt- 

M Cm Drik Sioragt- 

100 cm Disk swage «*Loc* 

90 Cnt 3 5 ' Disk Sior w Lock 

3 SDisX L^)ets-25 art 

b 25- Disk 13WS-96 cnt 

3 5" DSODDiskefts 

5 25' DSDO Diske^K-Biack 

S 25' DSDO Dtskefles-IO colors 

Wnte PiotectE- 1 00 cnl BJac* 

Tyypk Sioev^■Hlg^ OuaMy 

Skk Suk-JoyslKk 

Quck Snoi II JOySICk 

Tk 2 jkjyStiCk 

Taca-Joyshck 

Soncom Icon Troler 

Surge ProfeCor Po*e( Pad 



4 95 
4 35 
8 95 
595 
495 
39 95 

36 95 
49 95 
27 95 
15 95 
79 95 

37 95 
8 95 
6.95 
6^5 
6.95 
6 95 

8 95 

4 95 

5 95 

6 95 
195 
B95 

12 96 

9 95 
1 00 

too 

129 

39 

79 

^00 

ea 09 

695 

795 

10 95 

1195 

1795 

39 95 



MANY OTHER C-64/128 TITLES AVAILABLE — CALL FOR PRICES! 



SUBSCRIPTIONS 



n NEW n RENEWAL 
n 6 ISSUES $20 

(S26 OUTSIDE USA) 

□ 12 ISSUES $37 

C$49 OUTSIDE USA) 

n 18 ISSUES $50 

($68 OUTSIDE USA) 



BACK ISSUES 

$5.50 EACH (SfiJO outade USA) 
ORCLE THE ONES YOU WANT 

I 2 3 6 9 10 

II 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 



SUBSCRIPTFON S_ 
BACK ISSUES $_ 



Card # or payment MUST 
accompany order. We do not bill. 



TO I'AL $ 




U.S. funds only! Credit card, check, or money order only. Make payable to: INFO 
NAME 



ADDRESS 



CITY/STATE/ZIP. 



I'll use my VISA 
card # 



Mastercard 



With your paid subscription or runcwal 
to INFO Magazine. While supplies last. 



NOW ORDER BY 
PHONE! r 

with VISA or MASTERCARD 
CALL (319)338-0703 



_expirati<)n date_ 



signature_ 



BUSINESS REPLY MAIL 

FIRST CLASS PERMIT NO 171 IOWA CITY. lA. 



POSTAGE WILL BE PAID BY ADDRESSEE 

INFO MAGAZINE 

P.O. BOX 2300 

IOWA CITY, lA 52244-9941 



NO POSTAGE 

NECESSARY 

IF MAILED 

IN THE 

UNITED STATES 





I.I.Im.I.ImI.I.ImI.ImIIiI.iI.Iu.ImIm.I 



'ATTENTION C-128 OWNERS 

Now that Commodore has released ihe C- 128D with &4K ot video RAM, 
we should be seein^g 128 programs address Ihis tariastic new tealuie 
soon. 

BASIC B already has the capability ol usmt] all 64K ol video RA^^. II you 
own Ihe C-12fi m stock condition, you own all 16K ol /ideo RAM that 
Commodore' lell was necessary Using Basic S format and the lull 64K 
of wtdeo RAM provides you with the ability to scroll Ihrough video mem- 
ory as well as enhanced coIoj resoluuon. 

Up unlil now. to upgrade Ihe C-l 28 lo B4K of video RAM you would have 
lo lirst search out Ihe componerls, then find a competent repair outlet 
to desolder and install the pans What a hassle! 
SOLUTION — We have devetoped a module tfial simply plugs jn to Ihe 
mother board ol yojr C- 12B No jplallered solder =■ No heat damage 
— Ho hassle. 

This package includes lull easy lo follow msiaHaiiori irsiructiong. a lesi 
program to validate proper installation and Ihe plug-m upgrade module. 

ONLY $34.95 



AMIGA 



AMIGA AMIGA AMIGA 



AMIGA SOFTWARE 

4x4 OH Road Racing 24.97 

Arkanoids 16.97 

Awesom Arcade Pak 30.97 

Barbarian 24,97 

Bard's Tale 30.97 

Bubble Ghost 24.97 

California Games 24.97 

Captain Blood 30.97 

Deluxe Pairjt II 79.97 

Digipaint 36.97 

Digiview 134.97 

Dive BoiTiber 24.97 

Earl Weaver Baseball 30.97 

Faery Tale 30.97 

Fire Power 15.97 

Flight Simulator II 33.97 

Flight Sim Scenery #7 17.97 

Flight Sim Scenery #11 , , . . . 17.97 

FA 18 Interceptor 30,97 

Heros Of the Lance 25.97 

Kindwords 60.97 

Land of Legends 30.97 

Leaderboard Golf 27.97 

Leadertxiard F/C #1 13.97 

Maxtplan 500 109,95 

Microfiche Filer 60.97 

Money Mentor 59.97 

Obhleralof 24.97 

Paladin 24.97 

Phantasie 26.97 

Phantasie III 26.97 

Printmasler Plus 30.97 

Pnntmasler Art Gallery #1 ... 21.97 

Pnntmaster Art Gallery #2 , , , , 21.97 

Pnntmaster Art Gallery #3 .... 18.97 

Printmaster Fonts Borders .... 21.97 

Road Wars 21.97 

Rocket Ranger 30.97 

Rockford 21.97 

Sculpt 3D 66.97 

Sfiadowgate 30.97 

Strip Poker 24.97 

Strip Poker Data Disk #4 .... 13.97 

Strip Poker Data Disk #5 .... 13.97 

Test Drive 27.97 

The Director 42.97 

Three Stooges 30.97 

Time Bandit 24.97 

Turbo 15.97 

Uninvited 30.97 

Vampires Empire 21.97 

Zoom 18.97 



AMIGA AMIGA AMIGA AMIGA 






Pro|ecl Phoenm We assembled a team ol Ihe hottest arctiival programmefs m Ihe mduslry and gave them the 
challenge ol their carreers create a prolessional ulilily system that would set the lone for the luttire of Commodore 
personal computing - a system tor the next decade and beyond. 

Hundreds ol expert-hours later, that team delivered lo us a utility package ol sobering power and scope A package 
that could turn an average hacker into a superstar A package created at the very boundary behmeen what is and is not 
possible. A package called Renegade 

Renegade lakes the very best ideas from the past and re-creates them, combining state ot the art techniques with a 
conceptual grasp ot ihe luture ot computing The result is dynamic ■ classic ulilities are transformed mto muscular 
components ol a system designed for speed, power, and Hexibiiity 

Here aie Some of the Features Built Into The RENEGADE! 



Single Or Dual Ultra Fast File Copier 
Capable ol Arctiiving RapidLok Protection 
ScrolUng M/L Monitor with Drive Mon 
Error Scanner with Unique Sector Editor 
Byte Pattern Scanner: High Speed Searchies 
Upgradable Sub Menu: hJew tools in the works 
Major RENEGADE upgrades only S9.95 each 
Technical support available: of course 



■*■ Single or Dual High Speed Data Copier * 

* Single Of Dual Stale of the Art Nibbler * 

* Directory Editor: Organize your Disks * 

* GCR Editor For the Experrenced Hacker * 

* Geos' Modual: PARAMETERS and TOOLS * 

* 200 Parnns: For those tough to backup disks * 

* New Parameter updates only S9-95 each + 
■A- CompatablewithC-64-12awith 1541. 7t Drives * 

Renegade comes witti over 250 parameters, and additional parameters are avail^e every 2 months' Also. Renegade program 
updates are available to regislered owners 3 limes a year to ensure that Renegade w-ll always be a step ahead of anything else 
on the market' 

Mow nothing can stop you Irom taking TOTAL conirol ol youi software ! Renegade gives you Ihe most advanced tools on Ihe 
maiKet tor one remaikably low price And. unlike some companies that datm to sell utilities unlimited in power, Renegade is 
produced by a company mat knows T!ial ihe ci;s)omer is cur rr>osl va'uaWe assei 

Renegade: Next generation software - tor !he next generation hacker. 
ATTENTI0N:REG1STEREDRENEGADE0WNERS! Ortlu CO/I OK 

Parameter Module *2 is now available. Only S9.95 RENEGADE \yiliy ^OHmViJ 



GRAPHIC LABEL WIZARD 

You #na b* deii^ied wtn r^s iiei*ie anC powefiui 'oa ViiTM, a I 
h30u01, the Graphic Latiei Wnaid is tfie ixnte^i lahei pragram aiourd r 

* pniTtagraiplitcafrfiiptoBlinesirttexlonastandardmaiiirgiatel' 

* High Res dspiay aitows loM and prsmew ot up lo kwr giaphes' 

* Savecraaiedlabetsondsk^iaierrewu.modihcatcnandpnntjrg' 

* Pnrric3t*ogsctfyftifPrtrnmasteforPTintshopcCTTip3*3biegraph»^ I 

* Wofks. wth Epson concaiitxe. and Coaimodoce t52S. 801. go3| 

A Pr^teflir^nysty^yourpnntefsuppOfW Halic.8oa.EipanCted' 

* Pro-am (fck >nclude$ eicitmg r»n ^aphjcs^ 

* FREEBOhUS ltl0NEWg^dp^^C5CIea1rtt7ySott•lafeSo*utlO^s' 
A SUPER C-frt LhlTy trom the peop* who twoughl you SupeiCas' 

ONLY $24.95 



SYSRES '" ENHANCED 

'^* besi — we rntjn the Besi Basic ertnancemeni sysEen-' l« the C'fr* 

t Adds met 2S maiot OTnmands co Bas'C 

t Eilended Super DOS-Wedge * ScroiinglhiuBa^ | 

* Renumbef , Trace, Searcn, and maoy oihef features 
t 1S4T 71 lasl kjadef inqiiried 

♦ ML r^KT-no* 'rom Basic * TransJeraWe to 1 56i | 

ONLY $39.95 



SuperCat 

ttiMt of s^aichu^ BnUfS^ty tnicugh you( asks lo hnd the orte titfe 
VOU IS irflefeslecl <i'' FmSIiaied hy (la^dkTg ptdgrarns thai run OuT O' 
memory c* sSorage space every time vour disfc itjrafy grows'' 
Then new a. tfie uve !o wr/es in SjjKrCa:, the rrHSt sophisiicatHJ 
4isli calalogmg sysi^nn^ av^jiable xoasy lot your Commo()or@ C-&i^ 

* Calaloq i^ to 640 (teXs 35x3 jOOO Mies per disk* 

* Accepts (3ts*5 WITH dw><ca:e ID s 

* Reacts htkn 'ram the dseaory a'. im (ksks ic be cataloged 

* AHowscuslom Kjfling ollflle&betngcaialogefl' 

+ Pnnls aiargevaneiy of repofl^.ewencieales labels tcycujidisits'' 

* Operaies wrtth cTte Of two twi I57i dis« tSwes' 
FindoutiwtiyA/iov'UagazneintheFeti i&e7i$sue.gavehghpraises 

to this powerful- uli!i!y SyperC^:- ACLASSiC" 



Only $24,95 



mmmmmm 



c-128 CANNON 

THE TOTAL COPV UTILITIES PACKAGE 
CREATED JUST FOB C-128 OWNERS! 

* TheN*b^ef■Pwefful'WMVswI*stnq^eofoual15n i57i*ives' 

* FaslCopiet Fortackiftgupdaiadistscn'orusewihKrackerJaji' 

* FileCopef Fue !ran$;ers Deiwser 1E41 iBSl 1571 drives' 

« i581FaslCopte! Cop'M'iomoneJ 5"d'5*:o5:'TD^'tier-'iOi2(tives' 

* MFMCtip*r CopyLir*pfoteciiKllBM(xCPMfOfTrats^)ni57idrve' 

* Track 4 Sector Edrtpr 'Ml i571 andcven 1561 compaiatjie' 

* E;to* Scanner Fyi; feahied ftra scanner witti onscreen AspJayi 

* D«i$irf5£aiv>w Ai-ovtscrcckrocartefeddensiiestrackbytiadi' 

* Dffectory Ed'or Re^gafnie ITW tkector*5 or your 5 2S' daiis' 

* KrackerJaji 100 o' our richest most popuiai paramelersi 

* SPECIAL BONUSEIiie V3 tot backi^^ ol Pocket JSenesFREE! 
Voui Comnictoe 129 cJeierv« the best, so why noi gei the tMst' 



ONLY $34.95 



Introducing the 1541 RAMBOard 
Copy protection's "worst nightmare" 

Th« dream has b«w ttiere tor years ngw. an ineipwsm piece ol tBri)*are tiat, 
utien adJetJ n youi sysim. wouk) alijs (cu lo backup imosi neri single piece 
0' sc!Twa;e ever refeased fix ttie £Ai 

Software Support has jusl made the dream a realrty! 

We le pratjd to mvoduce he W RAMBOaid. i small cam Hal can saaiy be 
rstaiied <i!o jwjr 1 H I 1 541 C is* *m in 5 minutes lising jisl a saev(*ivc( Willi 
ihs powertjl card » place, backup nassles ate a frq d tte pasl! Wnkii^ wBi 
special sottirae. ine RAMBOaiil wii tactup spiinsie iliai otte intes can'i evai 
saaicn W surface ol Ami as new ptotedion saiemes ame, well neaie new 
paiametefs lo keep youf RAMBOaJd cpefatffig befiind enemy lines 

HAWBCwd also cones twrxHeil wth a lajlcoow M can archve an un(«oieaa] 

(Jala flisk in utrief 50 seconcs^ 

Tf« concepB betw) "card" syslems iie pubbc (Wian So v*ty sfiouM you tave 
Id pay $44 95 or mwe IH somecne elscs -caid"' SoSwaie Suffon will sell you 
the iiai*raie' '« iust S26 95'" So il you ilait have an urtimieil mco™. don I 
•wiy Josl (Kite ywi new FUlMBOaril Hon SotTwaie Suppon •- tne company BMl s 

declaied wai o*i Ngh pwss 

RAMBOard - Our Price: $26.95 

other companies "card" boards: S44.95 or more. 

■Th£ 1541 RAMBOafC requres sorfwaie '.0 cperate Ths sclT»*we can be either 
RjyyBOard paiameiefs, soffi lo be fount) on an Retiecade pfogram disk, or any 
cl Ihe othei "card" soMwaie already on the mari\et 



KRACKER KAX REVEALED I & II 

Oir knowledge of protediDn schetnes hias made us tamus. Sow tnJ cut tKw «£ 
dowtiS wedo best, OurbotSts are youJ ley to REAL Irowfedge OT>^ERSONLV 
GIVE SURFACE INFO - We<}ig deep, nvoh deeper, Le! us show you ttte re Sfid 
outs o! todays copc fOtHKn These books are a nmjsi br all senous Conirsodore 

REVEALED BOOK I »f Resei Bpnon $23.50 

REVEALED BOOK 11 wuh Hesmn Canndge $23.50 

REVEALED BOOK III COMING THIS FALLil 



FLASH! Kracker Jax 

Earns a 5 Star Rating 

In INFO'S May-June '88 Issue 

Xrackw Jax rs ttie pc*eiljl parameter Cased copyrig sysrem ■tfiat rias taken itie 

CBUfilry by stofmi What IS o paranwier^ Us a ciKiofn program iriat T^lan yax 

1541 or 1571 disk dnve ;d strp All ccpy p'OtKIon from your enpefisrve software^ 

leaving you wth UNPROTECTED, TOTALLV BflOKEN &ACK\JPS Hat en even 

tK copied wth a ample fast ajp«f ' 

We cteciaie Kracfcer Jai to be Che b^ sysiem of te knd on cne maricel today' A 

txWd ciairTi^ Maybe 

B(jt don 1 talte our Mfd tor rt-ii you want the REAL story ofi how good KndtBf 

J« fi just ask one ol our cuslomef s Don t worry You woo I bave arry problem 

Sr^tntrOTK 



Vols 1-2-3-4 
VolsS-£-7 St 



Only S9.95 ea. 
I Only $19.95 ea. 



SOFTIURRE 




INTERNATIONAL 



Oa^fig IS ^jiTipit We accept ft«y>ey MOera, ceiijttM awcks. pefsorai chews (ot pievious Sotrware Suppon 
cusEomeisl VISA, MC Dacovw. ar»d COD OriJ$rs shipped to LI S A . F P . A P . Canada, or Metim. ptease 
add S3 00 pet ixd« 'ty ihtpptng ai^ harvfing COO avaiiiW !o U S ojsJomers onry aOd S2 ?S adidHoral per 
order f&e^gr cuslomefs rmst ca ! y wn«e (or eiacl srtpp^ ch^ge? Deteclw Liems are fepiaced al re chyge 
IF anc oTTf IF yovj caii 'or z Return Au:fTOfizatcin l*jnber Al< rfi sBrt oroers are processed wiThn 2^ hows U S 
Shipfur^ IS Oy UPS gtouna in rrtmi cases FAST ?nd DAV AIR avaiiatte: 366 Si M pef pound addiionai itJ S 4fl 
slat« onfy) U^.S softwa-e ordera over lOO doHafS mn tie shipped 2rN3 Day Air al our regular S3 00 S H cfiatge 
Washington resKtents p«ase add 7 5'. addtiona' !i> Saes Taj> AH pnces subi«! lo char^ 



Program Submissions Inwiled 
Need more irrlo^ Call or writa lor our Ireo catalog 



WiM VOUI orUKr lo Sottwdre Suppoil Irit 

2700 NE Anaiesen RoiiQ / Vancouver WA 98661 



After ho 
12061 69S.964« 7 days a week. 
Technical support available. Call 
1206) GH 9646, Sam.Spm Paclllc time. 



DEALERS — WE HAVE THE SUPPORT YOU'RE LOOKING FOR!