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CI HOME 
OMPUTINGi 
WEEKLY h 



Glittering 
prises 




Epyx games 
to move house 



CBS. 



Win Firebird's 

complete silver 

range for your 

micro 



Pititop II and !iii-,ii.,:,r .. Il . .these 
lilkl v.hu:h are inoM llkd-, l.i IitkI J 

volvcd in the industry, through ugrccd 

manufacturing and distribution liappucihinhcrcuere 

nif.ini.jii.ini. hut will no longer '" ■ 

market MAwHC under il> nun lahel 

or using the Ep>-: 

H>mei,CBS«ft> 
it involveithe whole of Europe. "Wc 
h»>t done « ry i*el I since December 
when »e stuneu hul Ihc parent 
company has decided to CUM the 
softwure houw KT.iviT.w-i through 
out Europe for - L — 
merited Brian. 
The imui v 




Enterprise 128— 
w^M-_. hands-on 
>,ee review p.12 

*' v ^ Graphics 
inversion chart' 
- pull out and 

eep part two 



Spectrum + 




F ,JI„»JAt»Mi>i«»rti»»°» 
. Et „I|„,„li«f»r.,«. .._,„, 






Video Pool 48K Spectrum £5.95 



A highly sophis.Eii.Mted si mutation of the game of pool 
guaranteed to tcs-t your skill ,W judgi'im-nl to the limit. The 
smooth flicker free movement of the balls, accurate 
calculation of the angles and speed make this the best version 
of pool available for the Spectrum. 



OCP is CHESS - THE TURK 

d,^,-.V tl llvS,i.M.UL..l'lV,l, 

launched. Probably the best 
chessgame for the Spectrum 
around. Outstanding features! 
includes Blil* chess. Demo 
mode. Replay, EdiWsel-up. List 
moves to screen .ind printer, 
line print the board, save move: 

board. There are six levels of 



Casino Royal 48K Spectrum £5.95 



Roulette and Pontoon are the classic games featured with all 
the atmosphere of the real thing with the Currah 
Microspeech facility. Roulette is for up to six players. FuL 
table layout with superb wheel action. Teaches you roulette 
■ind maybe will help you to win a fortune! 
Pontoon also known as Blackjack is just you and the bank 
Superb graphics, anJ a pot ni money is all you need to give 
hours of endless fascination. 


=~ ="' ~=- -= 


ic^V^ 


1 77a Packhorse Road, Gerrards Cru 

PIhbc send 10 me at once ai £5.95 e 
1 G»simiRov»lo Video Pool a CiwisTh 


ss, Bucks. Tel: 10753) 888866. 

ch inc. p&p. 
Turk o (tick box ) Chtquc/P. 0. 


1 *dd 






' Tit ho 


L 



Soapbox 

"Home computer; 



already a fundamental pan of 



evolve !o play ai 






leisure and working horn 

'"• could almost hold a 

competition with the question: 

Who, said that? It was Nick 

ssey, Commodore UK'sgen- 









Our current scrim on Micros 
n Society is only the lip of the 
cebcrg. an important lip 
perhaps, hut there is so much 



iriliirrruisn 






There is still a great deal ol 
work to be done in this area but 
lave the. feeling that ihc 
iiifactnrei' art waiting for 
increase in demand before 
they develop the goods. 

Home Computing Weekly is 
very interested in these 
developments and would like to 
hear from our readers. Send u» 
your ideas and suggestions as to 



CONTE NTS r^a*" 




(Iraham <iooch at Commodore show - 
Wallowing In the MUD 


pll 

11 


Peripheral - 






Bash convurilons potter — port (wo ... 


24 








Watford Slactronlci- Rom Manager 


31 




IBBC 


/ 


Character designer 


39 



lAMSTRAD 


/ 


Machine code the easy way 


33 




/SPECTRUM 


- / 


Tesfyourreflsiei 


18 


B.,i™i*,m.M..„i 


31 




/COMMODORE / 


Roll those dice 


16 




/REGULARS 


Competition 7 


News 810 


Software reviews 


14-17 


CfoitHWodiiiorfon 


*3 


letter* 


44 


Readers page* 


45-46 




Argus Speaalls I Publications Ltd. 
No. 1 Gulden Square. London WW 3AB 01-437 0626 



BASIC LIVING 



Jim Barker. Jon Wedge 




SILVER RANGE. . . Seeing 




THE HACKER Arcade/Strategy 
Terminal to modem, telephone net 



is believing £2.50 each 







BIRD STRIKE Arcade 


THE WILD BUNCH Strategy/Adventure 


Wing the planes and shoot 


he pigeons Accused of n 


urder. hunt the real killer 


FIREBIRD SILVER CATALOGUE 






COMMODORE«4 


SPECTRUM 16K/48K 










01 7 BOOTY 






01 a EXODUS 




041 SUBSUNK 


019 HEADACHE 

020 ZULU 
024 GOGO 
028 ESTHA 
032 SU8SUNK 
034 THE HELM 

.:.:■;?. CHICKIN CHASE 
041 CIRCUS CIRCUS 




003 BIRD STRIKE 
005 DUCK! 


012 THE WILD BUNCH 
014 MR. FREEZE 
016 BOOTY 
031 SUBSUNK 


023 THE HACKER 






037 HEUCHOPPER 






040DONT8UYTHISI 


027 BIRD STRIKE 


002 MICKEY THE BRICKY 


043 FAHRENHEIT 3000 


030 THE HACKER 







MAILORDER 

Please state name ol game (and machine] and numbers required. 
Enclose crossed cheque/PO made payable to FIREBIRD SOFTWARE 
All offers are subject to availability Orders are despatched promptly 
All prices inclusive of VAT and postage. 

MAIL ORDER: *FREEPOST FIREBIRD. 
WELLINGTON HOUSE, 



and his bombs 



I.. I JJ,IJ.LJ.LJ, l ). I JJ I LII I !U,. ! . l l! ! . l iyj | l .J„, 




raara 



The Very Latest 
Releases From Tynesoft 







All the above products are 

available by mail order, free 

of postage and packing from 

Tynesoft Computer Software. £ COMPUTERSOFTWARE \ 

Tynesoft Computer Software, Addison Industrial Estate, Blaydon, Tyne & Wear NE21 4ZE. Tel: (091) 414 4611 



o 



s 



I ^ 




There are games for a whole range of 
micros in our sofr'd silver competition 



There are prizes for 20 
readers [his week and 
[hey can include I he 
users of the six most popular 

I; you own a Spectrum, 
\ u ■:.(>. MHC.C64, ■ 
an Electron machine, men j 
ingcapson. 

To celebrate [he release of 
new range ol' Silver „ 
Firebird is offering 20 readers 

llu 1 jiaini'i 




Silver range arc priced al just 
£2.50 and this makes them ideal 
pocket money presents. 

The concept certainly caught 
on and the company's best 
seller "Booty" has now sold 
well over 100,000 copies, an 
event marked by the presenla- 



' fir: 



Hot 



Computing Weekly Gold 
Cassette award. Firebird has 
now sold around a quarter of a 



n this weeks 



think a little to wi 

prize. All the 

about silver and we hope [ti.it 

they have you searching the 

library of your reference books 

hi limt ihe answers. 






The Qu« 

1. What is the chemical symbol 
for the elemi 

2. What is the meaning of 
EPNS? 

3. Silver con be bought by 
weight but in what units is this 
weight measured? 

4. Which country is named after 

5. Which cowboy had 
called Silver? 

6. How many years have you 
been married if you celebrate 
your silver wedding? 

• Answer the questions and 

provided on the coupon. 

• Fill in your full name and 
address clearly. 

• Seal the coupon, on its ow: 
in an envelope and post it li 
Firebird Competition, Home 
Computing Weekly, "' 
Golden Square. London W1K 
3AB. 

• Make sure [hat your entry 
arrives by first post on Friday 
5th July, 1985. 

Special note 

If you own a home co 
and will be celebrating your 
silver wedding this vcar, please 
let us know at HCW. Wet ■ 
be able [o add lo your 
celebrations. 

,.|H1ll,.|M m| (,.■ 



1 
1 
1 

| Nome _ 


Flnblrd Stiver Competition 

Sntiy Coupon 


! Addr«, 









1 — 




1 A ni w.rs 

1 ' 


"-"' — 


1 J . . 


3 


4 


5 _ 



CO 



Spectrum Swap 

]f you've got a 48K Spectrum, 
in good working order, which 
you no longer warn Then Time- 
scape Adventure Holidays 
might be interested in laking it 

loliday company is look- 






: Sjvctn 



e III ill J ;!vs 



£100. They are real life role- 
playing adventures in which you 
' exciting lives of 





A view to success 



spirit of things 

and the mines of California. 

The James Bond theme, r i r L ■ j 
music from Duran Duran ai 

Domark's latest game, A View electronic speech a" 

to a Kill, was launched at the pany the game. 

Commodore show last week. It It is initially (o t 

is the first computer game to be on the C64. Spectrum and 1 

based on a James Bond moves Enterprise but versions are '- 

and is the follow-up to the pipeline for Amstrad a 

Domark's Eureka which IBM computers, 

achieved chart success last year. We apologise to Domarfc for 

Members of the press were describing the ga 

invited lo an exclusive preview adventure in HCW 115, i 

on 5 June. The climax of the fact an arcade game, 

event was intended to be a photograph in HCW 115 

helicopter landing by a lames actually of Eureka, however • 

Bond look-alike. Unfortunately this week's is definitely a Bond / 

the weather prevented this. snap, even though Roger Moore f 

The content of the game is isn't in it! 
based closely around the plot of 

the film and the aclion lakes Demode, 204 Worpfe 

place in Paris, San Francisco WtmbWon SW20 SPN 

'■ I *+• 




Stripping off 



If you're fed up of tearing the 
strips off the sides of your 
computer print oti:s. then the 
ACS Easystrip is what you 

ACS's Easystrip can be used 
on perforated or no n -perfora- 
ted paper. It has a cutter blade 
which clamps over the margin 
and a series of pegs hold the 
sprocket liiile securely. 

It's easy to operate and costs 
£9.95. 




to 8 HOME COMPUTING WEEKLY The ACS Kasyslrip — gels rid of those little perforations 




HOMI: COMPUTING W 



' Congo Bongo nets Arkh 

US honours Usi wi** ai:cc,ii " ii 

«j iivhvuii n»> Rogeti, Congo 

^Several ol" US Gold's game. Lee, Mig Alley Ace, Pole 

\h;i'..- 1-..L-I! tHMi,.iji._il In America 1'o.innii Jin] .-'..i .v>u. 
fin i tit- Sectron-S Gamea Design Hit award* saline outstund- 

i 1985 — otherwise ing achievement and attorrUiii! 

lo US Gold Ihes 

Ultima III was awarded ilic will all lie avail;-. ■ : 
I title of Computet Otmc 
I vefir and Best computer Action 

■<;.,„•,. v..:,,. n, BJue Max. US Gold, Unit .0, Th. 

Other US Gold game, which Inef fit, H«n»ag« «. Btnn.ng< 
ham 174"/ 



Software update 



Perhaps i 



! this 



The Secret of St I 

.! produced bv Sl Bride's 

School. Co Donegal, Ireland. It 
is a spin off from a very success- 
ful holiday idea which involves 
adults going to the school and 
reliving their school days! 

Superior So It ware has a new 

release called Rep I on and 

managing director. Richard 

I Hanson said: "We are 

convinced n 



o look o 



jr best game 
for it. 

For those who enjoy a more 
relaxing type of game, Kuma 
has released Bridge for the 
Amstrad. Major features of the 
1 game, claims Kuma, arc the 
high quality of play, excellent 
use of graphics, sound prompts 





BBC/Electron 


13. 95 




. Secret or St Brides 


Speelrum/C&i 


i:..«. 








£6,95 


St Brides School 






B.W 




1 MCT Basic 


CM 


£14.95 


Micro Competiem 
Trading Company 










i Amazon Warrior 


C64 


£7.95 




i Powerplan 


CM 


£44.94 


First Publishing 


Answer Back Spor 








Answer Back Quiz 


BBC 


flu. 45 


Kosmos 




*TMgetO HOME COMPUTING V. 




PROFESSIONAL KEYBOARD 

14 Kirs Spjit Sir - QWERTY Ejroul 



STANDAHD KEYBOARD 



GENERAL 

SUPEH STIK 



PCB EDEE CDNNEETDHS 
Limited Stacks Only!!! 




B: 



1* my Cheque. Po*ml Ordnr I 



ELFXTHDNES :■" 



C16/piu, 


4 




Don't buy an 

C16 game t 

you see Tine 


>t.her 
ntil 
SLIP!! 


HHH 


f ■>. 


•■:■ ■ . 
■■■ ■ . 


^ 


<^ 




ATARI 

4O0/8O0/XL/130XE 


A 


IT 




KPH 


y 


¥Ky 






- ■ : 
.■■ ■ ■ -. ■ .. 



Q 




Cltve Gifford got his 
hands on the new 
Enterprise 128 and 
his fingers were 
very happy indeed! 

After suffering Ihe ignominy of 
being re- named constantly, the 
Enterprise (alias Flan, alias 
Elan, alias Samurai) eventually 
reached the shops- over a year 
lule: than planned. The first 
model, the bntei prise 64, 
despite its late arrival, did not 
look out of place in the highly 
competitive £200-1300 market. 
Now. with (he release of the 
new 128 machine, and the 
teduction in price of the 64, 
Enterprise Computers look set 

computing scene. 

The computer comes in some 
of the best packaging that I 
have seen; a well-made box 
housing the machine with all the 
leads, manuals, the power pack 
and the demonstration cassette 
underneath. Enterprise have in- 
cluded an excellent booklet, a 
'Setting Up Guide' which takes 
you through the process of 
getting the machine up and 
running. To seasoned cam- 
paigners in the computer field 
this is all a simple matter, but 
for the beginner, this booklet is 
ideal and, thankfully does not 
suffer from excessive jargon. 

My first impression of the 
machine was that it looked 
rather like a pancake, such was 
its flat design. It is supplied 
with all the leads that you'll 

the largest power pack that I've 
seen. Another difference from 
other computers is the double 



Before powering up, [ hi 
insert the BASIC cartrid) 
the port on the left-hand si 



( solid. Loading the 



of the screen. This tells you to 
turn the volume down until you 
obtain a green block instead. 
This is a good idea, but in 
practice is a little fiddly. Once I 
managed to get the correct 
level, 1 had no trouble loading 

The demonstration cassette is 
surprisingly good. It takes the 
form of a graphical journey 
through the Enterprise's circuit 
boards slopping off at the main 
chips where we are given a few 
brief textual details of their 
capabilities as well as a demon- 
stration. The sound chip demo 
was very poor but the graphics 
displays were quite breath- 
taking — obviously a lot of 
work had been put into them. 

The Enterprise appears to be 
well-built and for its size is 
light. The keyboard houses 68 
keys of a style similar to the 
Sinclair QL's, but of slightly 

as good as the keyboards on the 
BBC or Amstrad. This is an 
oversight of the computer's 



pro a- -;oi . 



e sports a built-ii 
nlly i 



feature of the Enterprise's hard- 
ware is the integral joystick. It 
feels quite solid and will stand 
up to some wear from arcade 
addicts but most people prefer a 
handheld model with a fire 
button. 1 can't help feeling that 
' an a gimmick 









) press ENTER, DEL c 

At the back of the machine is 
a plethora of interfaces and 
sockets. There is a non- 
standard Centronics printer 
port, 4 sockets for the cassette 
motor control and a T.V. and 
power socket, there are two 
control interfaces for other 
peripherals such as joyst ! cks, a 
monitor socket and a Serial 

other Enterprise 



the integral local network. 
The Enterprise has one ot 

64-way expansion 



interface, 



fu iiu 



t that will c 



Enterprise develop- 
ments. An obvious possibility is 
an extra memory module, as 
using the RAM bank switching 
method, the Z80 processor of 
the Enterprise can access up tr. 
3.9 Megabytes of user RAM. 

Using the computer through 
BASIC is most enjoyable. The 8 
function keys hold 16 of the 
most commonly-used com- 
mands and this makes program- 
ming just that fraction faster 



. The n 



fedc" 



Tli is window 



can be lifted up and the p; . 
taken out and replaced with the 
keywords applying to the func- 
tions that you have program- 
med. I expect many comp 
games and indeed seri 
software will use this featur 
The BASIC itself is far from 

standard).' Good old LEFTS, 
RIGHTS and MIDS have gone 
and are replaced with a system 
iif .nine slicing rather similar tc 
the ZX spectrum's — an un- 
necessary alteration in my 
opinion. AUTO, RENUMBER 
and DELETE are all included 
as are a number of n 
mands. It would be in 
to detail them all, so h 
few of the more interesting 

The Enterprise supports 
interrupts and windows. The 
commands. DEF, DEF END 
and CALL form the basis . " 
procedures whilst INFO pro- 
vides the user with the number 
of bytes free (s 
over 1I3K) and the first pro- 
gram line. IMAGE is - - 
sophisticated form of PRINT 
USING and there is a vast array 
of additional numeric 
array-based commands. 

There's nothing very- re 
able about the sound features of 
the Enterprise. There are 3 
channels offering 4 voices. The 
sound can be played through 
the computer's own speaker, 



1. (IIMI'I IIM, \vlil-KI ¥ IS June 1985 



SOUND L 



, RIGHT Y, 



values. Complex sound enve- 
lopes can be created and [here 
are commands to deal with 
flushing Ihe sound queue and 
shaping the sound. Sound buffs 
should have good fun with these 
facilities but the majority of 
i will benefit from these 
features only by using commer- 

_ ae command TAPE 
SOUND allows the pro- 
grammer to transfer music or 
speech from a cassette through 
the compuier and the machine's 
internal speaker. This feature 
when allied with Ihe motor- 
controlled cassetle recorder will 
allow the programmer to 

soundtracks and a whole host 
of other effects 

The graphics capabilities ate 
excellent but difficult for the 
new user to gei to grips wiih. It 
has 4 graphics modes with Ihe 
highesi resolution being 672 by 
512. There is a trade-off 
■een the resolution and the 
number of colours available in 
each mode. The highest resol 1 



offer 16 and 4 colours. 

The colours can be selected 
using the PALETTE command 



vhich a 



■ rag jest 



palette of coloui 
which the programmer can 
select the few that he or she 
needs. Eight of the colours can 
be accessed without using the 
complicated SET INK 
command. These colours; 
MAGENTA, BLUE, BLACK. 
WHITE, RED, CYAN. 
YELLOW, GREEN are used in 
the same way that PLOT or 
BORDER is. PLOT forms the 
main graphics display 
command being linked with 
ELLIPSE to draw circles and 
ovals of specified shape. PLOT 
PAINT provides a fill 
command which can be most 
■jsedil and can be linked up with 
■iMHkmni commands such as 
FORWARD, ANGLE and 
RIGHT to provide Turtle 

The Enterprise graphics arc 
Himething to savour. The wide 
tange of commands and their 
complexity will lead to many 
hours of experimentation but 
the results could be very im- 
pressive. The extra colours and 
memory produce effects and 
displays that will turn a proud 



A fascinating feature of this 
computer is its ability to 
support a local network of up to 
32 other Enterprises. 1 haven't 
unfortunately seen this feature 
running but can see Enterprise 
user groups linking up and 

version of the famous on-line 
adventure, Multi-User Dungeon 
or MUD. 

This machine has many 
integral features that you are 
used to seeing as optional extras 
on other computers, such as the 
word processor option. Enter- 
ing TYPE puts you into the 
Word Processing mode and this 
can even be done when the 
BASIC ROM cartridge is not in 
position in the ROM port. It is 
easy to use and its features are 
excellent. Justification, margin 
setting, word wrapping, tabula- 
tion and centring are all avail- 
able and for people who use 



more il'.m enough. 

The manual that comes with 
the machine is better than most 
It is nicely presented and pro- 
duced but not really suitable as 
a beginner's guide. There is de- 
finitely a need for a beginner's 
manual, though perhaps this is 
not a beginner's computet. 
Certainly, the machine will 
spawn a number of program- 
ming books, due to its wide 
range of commands and their 
non-standard features. 

There are certain features 



that 1 look out for in a 
computer that tells me n 
about ii. The quality of the 
error messages and how simj' 
and effective the program Ii 
editor is to use tell me about the 
computer's design and quality. 
The 128's line editot is superb. 
You simply move the curst 
the point on the screen (with the 
joystick) and make the change. 
On listing the program, you will 
see the change incorporated. Ii 



,! I! i 



progra 



OR DO/LOOP are staggered t, 
make the listing present at ioi 

Another feature that I liked 
was TIMES which ot 
value in hours, mi 
seconds acted as a digital clock. 
DATES works in a similar v " 
though it appears to be of li 
use unless you keep your ci 
putei switched on continuously. 

In conclusion, with it 
features and new commands, 
ihe Enterprise appears ti 
aimed at the second-time buyer 
whose interest is other I' 
games computing. Around the 
£250 price range it will prove 
be lough competition. Watch 
out Amstrad, Atari, Commo- 
dore and most of all, the MSX 

word processor, high resolutioi 
graphics and serial and parallel 
interfaces all built-in, it could 
become a very popular h 
compuier. After using ot 
few days, I hope it does 





eg 



o 

CO 



Sup erg ran 

"By Brian Howarlh and Mike 
Woodruff of Gremlin- fame" 



;-.m,ilk',i 
The pi. 



bell, > 



tedo h 



Gran, who is n ' ( exactly a spring 
chicken anymore, seems to 
come over all frail and fragile 
periodically, needing good 
doses of porridge to pep her up 



As an adventure for kids 
(which is how it describes 
itself). Supergran is quite good, 
uiili puzzles ilial should appeal 
to younger players, though they 
are unlikely 10 provide 



porridge than ii 



g fOI 



Unfortunately, Supergran is 
rather sloppy in places, and I 
found myself gelling no helpful 

commands as '"open door", 

program tells you (hat it doesn't 
know the word '"wear" despite 
the fact that it is specifically 
referred to in the instructions as 
a word that is understood. The 
program also tells you about 
various objects that you can 
see, only to later tell you that it 
doesn't know what they are. 
Pius, the authors don't seem to 
know how to use the full stop, 
which sets a poor example for 
the kitis die game is presumably 
aimed at. C.J. 

Price: £9.95 

Publisher; Tynesofl 



Estate, Blaydon upon Tync 



War a 

Exploding Fist 

Launching The Hobbit on Ihc 
Japanese market seems to have 
gone to Melbourne House's 
head with the release of this 
excellent Karate simulation. 

The game's graphics are 
extremely sophisticated and [he 
range of moves ensures a bailie 
which would do jusiice 10 any 
Bruce Lee movie. Aggressive 
kicks, punches, sweeps and 
defensive crouches and somcr- 



f the fire 



using 1 

position- 

the sparks to fly with a range of 
eighl kicks guaranteed 10 Floor 
your opponent ir used corrcclly. 
A perfectly executed move 
which makes contact with your 
opponent gains a full 'yin-yang' 
symbol, a move which " '" 



c! only ;\ 



1.: half 



a symbol. A numerical valt 
obtained also which takes into 
account the difficulty of the 
move. In the single player 
option two yin-yangs win the 
game, the two player game 
being the best of four limed 
bouts. 

In ihe single player game 
against ihc computer, you start 



takes over, 
you reach Tenth Dan but what 
happens next I cannot say. the 
hesi I managed was Second Dan 
after playing for iwo hours! 

The only gripes I have relate 
to the awful shouts emitted by 
the combatants and a niggling 
doubt as to Ihelasiing enjoyment 
of the game. At the moment 
I'm hooted and the sounds can 
be switched off if desired. E.D. 

Price: £9.95 

Publisher: Melbourne Hse 




international Tennis 



This is the latest in Com- 
modore's Internaiional Sports 
series and although it lacks the 
range of options availabli 

simplicity makes it suitable for 
the less ambitious gameslei 

This is a two player game and 
the opening screens give 
usual Commodore optioi 
select the colour of each 
player's outfit, level of play 
(one to four) and one or two 
player game. When .satisfied. 
the court is revealed giving a 
viewpoinl from the side in three 
dimensions. 

A joystick is essential 10 play 
this game and nine possible 
strokes are available. Play 
commences by pressing the fire 
button 10 serve the ball. To hi 
the serve the fire bution must b 
pressed again and the success 
of 1 he service depends on the 
position of the joystick and the 
height at which the bal' 
siruck. Fool faults are possible, 
as are nel calls and faults. 

When Ihe serve is returned 
you must dash over to intercept 
it, select a joystick position for 
the slroke you wish to play and 
press the fire button to make 

Scoring follows the 1 
lennis conventions and the 
match is the best of three set 

advantage over the opponent, 
then a liebreak takes place ur '' 
hi match is decided. 

The sound effect for 1 
shout of ihe crowd is awful. 



and the credits 

ir acknowledges 

E.D. 



ler: Commodore (UK) 



i: idmi'Mim; wh-Ki.y i; 




without 

produced it. Land of Havoc 
was such a game and my first 
impression was its sinking 
similarity with Cuthbert enters 
the Tombs of Doom. Hardly 
surprising that the producers of 
hoth programs is Microdea!. 

The background story tells a 
[ale of a land which has fallen 
under the destructive power of 
the Dark Lords. As the reptilian 
hero Sador you must free the 
land of their evil spell. 

Before the arrival of the evil 
lords the land was ruled by the 
High Vanish, a sorceror with 
skills equal to Merlin himself. 
In his wisdom the good wizard 
spread artifacts around the land 
and Sador must find them all in 
sequence to gain entry to the 
Lord's subterranean hideaway. 

This maze game hat a twist to 
il. The kit includes nine post- 
cards which each have a sector 
of land on it. Each time the 
game is played the cards must 
be placed in a different given 
order forming a general map 
which guides Sador' s move- 



Each area is inhabited 
different monsters which i 
be avoided or killed ant 
Sador gets nearer the : 



entering Ihe underworld 

<.Lli:-i«f[> must he found to 
each Dark Lord. 

becomes a pure maze game 
which can easily be mapped 
using the pause facility, but 
with a claimed 2000 screens this 
should take many hours of 
endeavour. 

If you like solving mazes, this 

one is worthy of investigating. 

E.D. 



Price: £6.95 
Publisher: Microdea 1 






The Chess Game 

If Lewis Carroll had wriilen a 
computer program then this 
would be it. All you have to do 
is move your pawn, a little hoy 
in a nightshirt, from square 
to square across the board. 
Sounds easy, but just try it. The 
chess pieces, board and crowd 

cross to safety in this nightmare 

The first screen reveals the 
stadium with a vicious looking 

Soon your first opponent, Ihe 
knight, arrives and battle 
commences. As you move from 
square to square their colour 
changes and the knight pursues 
following the eccentric path of 
its more normal existence. If it 
lands on the path you leave, the 
colour changes again and that 
square must be avoided for the 
rest of the game. 

The crossing must be attemp- 
ted five times in each direction. 
Total success means bonus 
points, failure is not always a 
cataslrophe because Ihe pawns 
who did make it go onto the 
next round. Even if only one 
pawn makes ihe grade, 
completion of a crossing at the 
next level brings a bonus. 

As you progress you meet the 
bishop, the rook, the king and 
the queen in excellent graphic 
action. 1 won't spoil the fun by 
giving away the secrets except in 
say look out for the board, it 
can turn very nasty and the 

I strongly recommend this 
game whether you understand 
chess or not. Just add quick 
thinking and fast reactions to 
get a recipe for i 



Price: £7.95 

Publisher: Micro Classic 




having reviewed Super Pipeline 
II for the Amstrad recently. 

The plol is more or less the 
same, with a tangle of pipes 
growing from the lop of the 
screen to barrels at ihe bottom. 
The idea is to fill Ihe barrels 
with water. Unfortunately, up a 
ladder at the side of the screen. 



II life !' 



put a bung 
in your pipe, thereby blocking 
it. Very painful! Your only 
weapon is your trusty spanner 
which can be thrown ai ihem if 
you're lucky. 

hard case lobster also crawls up 
your pipe. So one way and 
another you soon acquire a 
bung. Now you must colleci a 
workman to repair the damage, 
and protect him from the 
nasties, whilst still shoo ling 
them on the ladder. All very 
complex, and good fun. Success 

complies led pipe. 

Graphically, this exploits .ill 
that the Spectrum is capable of 
in 2-D, and the sprites move 
smoothly, conlrolled by a 
variety of joysticks. Enjoyable, 
[hough without the graphic 
excellence and humour of thc 
Amstrad implementation. 

There is an added bonus on 
ihe tape with an alien zapper. 
SOS. included too. Vou must 

surface avoiding Ihe aliens, 
collect the people, and return to 
ihe molhcr ship. A good game 
though the movement is very 
flickery in comparison to 
Pipeline. Fun and good value. 
D.M. 




Hooked 



Hi 



Comatose 



HOME COMPUTING Wl-lkl.v I- luire 1985 Page IS 



Video Pool 

er el al was veiy popula 




Now OCP adds pool to the 
library. Unlike its less 
sophisticated couins on Casino 
Royal, there's no help here in 
nsferring lo Microdrive. 
There's a turbo loader in the 
way. They do share the same 
warranty disclaimer which seeks 
to limit your legal rights. 

Given that there's no attempt 
lo provide the illustion of 3-D, 
the graphics are rather well 
done, particularly the intro 
screen and hi-score table. Well 
done James Huichby! Regret- 
tably, the pools balls are 
displayed in glorious black. 
Controls arc via Sinclair, 
Kemps ton or cursor joysticks, 
but are much less complete than 
Steve Davis' Snooker for 
ead of placing a 
; targe: ' " 



i, spin 



-,lhect 



id the cushiiui, and 
:uc hall flinmi sirnigtil I it it 
i strength determined by 
holding the fire button until the 

on a bar above. Three 

different games can be set up. 
—"—I is offered to 
alter the table to set up trick 

The controls need a lair hit i 



three frame game, and in the 
light of the complexity of the 
scoring system. I was glad my 

lire tin adequate im piemen - 
m, and certainly very 

ible, with sole and multiple 



Publisher: OCP 



Peter. Bucks S1.9 9QA 



Don't 



Casino Roy ale 






tything to do with James 
Bond. The spelling's different. 
Cunning huh? What you gel are 
two casino games. Roulette and 
Pontoon — Blackjack with a 
cloth cap. 

Roulette could be said to be 
you place your 



n the b 



d by fl- 



it)] your joystick. 
Several are catered for. Once 
the placing of bets is over, the 
game moves into the wheel 
phase. No attempt is made to 
simulate 3-D but movement is 
very smooth, with suitable 
sound effects. Currah Micro 
Speech is also featured, though 
I couldn't test this because 1 






The i 



till you quit, 
it ably rude message is 



printed. 

Pontoon is the old stick, twist 
or bust game. You must bet on 
the possibility of reaching a face 
value of 21 or neuter than the 
computet gets. Over 21 and 



Agai 



you' 

computer plays a mean game. 
The graphic standard of (his 
offering is best described as 
adequate, though it's pleasing 
to note the del ailed instructions 
for saving the whole thing to 
Microdnve, and ihe complete 
playing manual. 

Given the number of Summer 
Fairs, Fetes and PTA gatherings 
coming up in the next few 
weeks, 1 can see the humble 
Spectrum being pressed into 

punicrs from real money! 




Concentration 
The publishers of this [ape are 
keen you should know that the 
of flashy packaeine and 



hypeai 



part of their plan t 
Keep cost down. As a result all 
you gel is a plain library case, 
and a typewritten label, rather 
like the early days of ZXB1 
software. The game, however, 
is a different matter. I suspect 
BASIC, but 






i of t 



's possible to build up 



reofwl 






You 



poims by matching 
pairs, tuner solo, or against two 
levels of computer play, 
togelher with friends. As you 
might expect, Ihe Spectrum 
remembers what's where bm 
it's quite possible to beat it. At 
the end of the game, you have 

the same layout, or opt for a 

to play, and, yes, there is an 
improvement in your 
performance as the game 
progresses. 

The computer is slow in 
making its choices, and 
graphics are adequate without 
being arcade standard. It would 
appear, however, that in order 
to protect Ihe program, ihe 
error slack pointer has been 
poked to a new value, thus an 
inadvertanl press of the cursor 
keys, for example, results in Ihe 
proaram crashing. Enjovable. 
D.M. 

Price: £2.50 

Puhlisher: Lion Soflwan 



their football is the mor 
familiar, baseball being 
complex mystery. 



For my pari, I would h 
preferred grealer explanaiiot 
Ihe game on Ihe dreadful 



ii he 



Jan.- with i 
Designed 
powers of 
recall, it features a pack of 
cards placed face down. By 
vealing the 



including 



wilh .is aaitu 

of all allow p 
player game. The practice game 
pits you against legendary 
pitcher (bowler). Heat 
Huldoon. The computer 
formidable opponent in (he 
one- player game. 
If (he practice i 



, Ihe r 



, allow. 



each player to select their te 
and then (he game begins. 

There is a minimum of nin 
innings lo a game and (o wi 
against Ihe computer relies o: 
skills far beyond my puny 
efforts. 1 found the tin - ' 
the bat swing difficult lo 
and the 3D view made fielding 
difficult to judge. Perhaps 
greater familiarity with (he 
multiple joystick modes may 
have helped but somehow I 

Graphically, this game does 



teams. Where it does .cor, 
i lie complexity of ihe varia 
possible but is ihe B 
market ready for il? A lo 
the Top Ten games impliei 
maybe il is, but not for m 



Price: £10.9' 



4SZ 



\< 16 HOME COMl'I'l INti WF.EKI.V IS Jun 




Leonardo and 
Light Magic 

\ very simple program to write 
m [he Spectrum is an an utility: 
ine drawing, colours, UDG 
designing and so on. Loads or 
these appeared soon after its 
launch, and eventually Mel- 
Draw and Paintbox 
.■ established. Strange 
" hree years Liter, (in a 



nachint 



villi li 



products have appeared from 
well respected software houses. 

Both programs offer certain 
basic facilities: etch-a-sketch 
type drawing, circles, filling and 
magnify being the most 
obvious. But handling and 
details are very different. 

Leonardo offers more com- 
mands — in fact, a bewildering 
requires two 
keyboard layouts to show them 
all! Il comes with an equally 
rmfusing and sizeable manual. 
The programming is mostly 
BASIC, and the main fault is a 
deathly slow cursor speed. Line 
drawing is strangely complex, 
and the whole process takes 
ages. The program is generally 
user unfriendly, which is a 
shame, because il offers a tot of 
useful features: elipses, arcs, 
clever shading functions and a 
scroll feature. The problem is, 
with so many features, it takes 
five minutes to find the right 
key for the function you want. 

Leonardo offers no UDG 
designer as such. Instead UDGs 






t the 



fiddly. However, combined 
with Leonardo's excellent user 
programs, whole areas of screen 
•in be copied into a bank of up 
i 790 characters, so large 
irilcs can be created and used 
i games. The user program 

l canard a 

Priee: £7.95 

Publisher: Creative Sparks 

Address: Department MO. 296 
Far n bo rough Rd. Fa rn borough 
Hampshire GU 14 7NF 



by the user in his 
as he wishes - 
particularly good for advc.-i- 

style screens. 

1 igii! Magic is machine code, 
and the cursor glides effortlessly 
around at a user chosen speed 
The baffling number of keys ;:i 
Leonardo does not occur here, 
prevented by using various 
menus and modes. 

editor, which presents a blank 
screen for design. Pressing 
'enter' changes modes. Pen 
mode allows etch-a-sketch style 
drawing, plus a wonderful 
feature called 'band' which 
draws a line, moving quickly on 

the last sei point. The fact that 

slopes are easily set. 

Brush mode allows 20 sizes, 
and 10 types of brush, including 
an air brush simulator. Block 

from the screen and move them 
smoothly around. Text allows 
normal or double sized writing 
with case, and UDG mode is the 
same using characters from six 
selectable banks. Although 
many of these features are 
available in Leonardo, here 
they are much more user 
friendly. UDGs can be designed 
in a separate pan of the 
program which presents an 8x8 
grid, like good old 'Horizons', 



Light Magic is easy and fun 



proficient and useful — if you 
can plough through the manual. 
Certainly the user program is 
excellent, and it costs half as 
much. P.S. 

light Magic 

Price: £14.95 

Publisher: New Generation 

Address: FREEPOST. Bath 



Super Pipeline II 



I really liked 

Foreman Fred, charged with 

maintaining the pipeline which 

the screen to the bottom for Ihe 
purpose of Idling barrels. Not 
that it's a straight pipe! It twists 
and turns like a plumber's 
nightmare. In order not to get 
your hands dirty, you collect 
workers as they troll about the 
site, and when you do, they 



showers of tacks, the six-leggec 
Venusian pipe spider, and, in a 
crawl-on role, ihe Hard Case 
Lobster which can only be si 
from behind. All these mean 

must be repaired by leading c 
of your workers to ".Touch the 
marauding meanies and it's 
(shower?| curtains. Bui you can 
fight back with your laser, and 
use ihe workers as shields. Keep 
the pipe running, and you get 
promoted to an even more com- 
plicated tangle. 

All of this frantic action is 
accompanied by rather tasteful 
music, perhaps a spring quartet 
playing (watering-can) Handel, 
and the pipe-work is drawn in 
clever shades which give the 
impression of depth. The 

flickery which is disappointing, 
are very amusing. In fact. 

down to the C5 and lecherous 

A demo-modc is provided. 
are keyboard, joystick a 
multiple life options. I would 
have flipped had the movement 
been up to Sorcery standards, 
even so, I'm swamped! D.M. 



Some time ago 1 laboriously 
typed in a BASIC listing fot a 
tuixinu game whir 1 - — 









could only I 
left or right hooks but could 
move all around the ring. 

reminds mc of this game ex 
that the view is from a ringside 
seal and the opponents can only 
move left and right a 

Admittedly the graphics are 

■.jlii; :s cd. in many w 

prefer my H^SICgame 

The opening screen a! 
you to choose a game against 
[he computer or a two-player 
game. The siam.na of the 
boxers may be set and. ii 
one-player game [he movements 
of youi opponeni can b 

Above ihis sclecnoi 
ihe name of [he game 
in a horizon I al plane, i 
out of Ihe TV screen, 
touch which is unfortunately 
not supported by the rest of the 

At the end of each rmiru 
bell sounds and a suitable ni 
floats across the screen. The top 
of the screen indicates the st " " 
of each 



i by r 



s of 



extending from right 
and left towards a KO logo in 
the cemre of ihe screen. When 
one of the player's chevrons 
reach Ihe logo, their boxer hits 

the deck and Ihe game is 

After three preliminary 
bouts, you gel a crack 
Luropcan diimiysinmh 
-ik\;->i'.:i !im. :«.;:■ 
Chai 



contained o 






rs Alligata 
I Orange St. Sheffield 



I: COMPUTING tt 



00 



ul 

LU 




Robert S/mfhe's 
game has you 
testing the 
speed of your 
reactions. 
Its addictive t 



23(1-1411 » 
300-350 



Please now: All the Spectrum 
listings in HCW are printed to a 
special formal. All user defined 
characters are printed as capital 
letters but with an underline. In 
order to type them into your 
computer you need to place the 
machine in GRAPHIC mode 
and then press the capital letter 
indicated. If you follow these 
instructions to the letter the 
graphic characters will be 
shown on screen when you run 



Pmieta homi- c-nwi'ij-nNc; wii.kiy is j un ci985 



instead value for money packs are 
to be sold in ihe future. 

Nick also gave details of [he 
Commodore 128 which will be 
launched in September, He 
claimed that it would provide an 



gap 



the 



e sixth International Commo- 
ns Computer show got off to a 
at start on Friday 7th June 
after being opened by Nike Clark 
and Maggie Defreitas, two 



professional computet", saying: 

"While it is a sophisticated games 

also a powerful 

There acre no price details 
iuailahle except that it will be 
considerably 
liie 1 nmmiidorc 54. 

Paul Welch, marketing and 
consumer sales manager, made 
it quite clear that the current 
range of products was not going 
to be neglected in favour of the 
new breed "waiting in the 




industry in some ways. Whilst 
there were a good number of 
companies showing off their 

few new launches. Music Sales 
was busy for the whole weekend 
demonstrating its Sound - 
Sampler which was the "Hit of ' 
the Show" as far as I'm 
concerned. 

Mike Mahoney of Alligata 
commented that there was just 
the right mix of stands for the 
number of 




HOME COMPUTING Wfii-KI.Y IX. Ii 




HOME COMPUTING WEEKLY IS June 1985 




David I.sycock of British Telecom New Information Services 

MUD 2, the interactive adventure game 
which will be available over the phone, 
t is to be launched In September. 
Marie Curry spoke to David Laycock of 
8T's information service about the new 
prefect 




f Century 
wliors Richard 
Trubshaw. 



fanatics will 

ailable to them, 

Telecom New 

Services and Muse 

[UD 2 at the PCW 

Simon Dally 
MUD 




MUD stands for Mull i- User 
Dungeon and the original 
version of the game has been 
running on the Essex University 
main frame computer for the 
past four years. Early this year 
it became available to Compu- 
nei users and now adventurers 
ir the country will be able 
their hand at MUD 2, a 
much larger version of the 



iginal, MUD 2 will have 
bout 1000 loca ' 
opposed to the 400 ol 



The name of the game speaks 
for itself. The concept is ver 
simple — although there hai 
inevitably been a few problen 
in putting the idea into practice. 
It is hoped that, when MUD 2 is 
first launched it 
to cope with up to 50 players 
simultaneously and this figun 
will be improved upon as sooi 
as possible. The 50 players wil 
enter the land and attempt tc 
get through all the obstacles 
itually become a Grand 



Wis 



J that players n 



E COMPUTING WEEKLY IS June 1985 Punt 21 



or hinder their colleagues in 
their progress through the land. 

David Laycock or British 
Telecom's New Information 
Services is confident that the 
nev. idea will prove extremely 
popular with computer users. 
He said: "There is a vas! 
computing market out there 
and people are becoming bla;i 
about the existing type of 
games. Players arc now looking 
for something very different 
and original and MUD is 
certainly that." 

To play MUD you will need 
to buy the MUD starter pack 
which will cost around £20. The 

number and password, a book- 
let explaining the game to give 
you feel of the world of MUD 
and a colour map showing part 
of the land. The first few hour. 
on MUD are included in the 
pack and after that you will 
have to buy credits which will 
give you one hour's play for £2, 
although (here will be discount- 
for players who buy their 
credits in bulk. 




Richard Banlc 



MUD 2 will initially be based 
on a London Vax system and 
players will be able to access the 
game with a modem. Baud rate 
will be 300/300 and 1200/75 
and the game will run in off 
peak telephone hours between 
6pm and Sam. 

"At this stage everything is 
still being finalised", explained 
Mr Layock, "but the eventual 
goal will not be a pot of gold. 
The players will aim lo become 

grand wizard and lo do this 



i.f the aulhnrsof MUD 



nasty depending on his whim. 
"We will have to limit the 
powers of the wizards to some 
extent otherwise things could 
gel out of hand," he commen- 

could pick up a dragon and put 
it at the entrance of the game so 
that everyone rrying to come in 
would die instantaneously, 
of thing we need 



become more and m 
ful." A wizard will 

cast spells lo i r b l"l 1 1 ■>■ n f l ■ 
players and he can be r, 









1 fro 



ve really v 
estrictions on players ,u ail." 
Ate Hiding to Mr Laycock i 
till be advisable for players tl 






: obstacle 
which cannot be overcome by 
one player alone, although 
we're not revealing what t' ' 

Another added complicati 
for players is the presence of 
computer generated beings o 
mobiles. Mr Laycock was ver 
enthusiastic about these. "W 
will be giving the mobiles 
artificial intelligence and it wil 
be very difficult for players tc 
ascertain whether the beings 
they meet are mobiles o 

Asked about the New Infor- 
mation Service's future plans, 
Mr Laycock said: "MUD 2 will, 
of course, be added t 
di-s doped, it is by no m 
■italic same. We ar< 
looking at ideas for 
projects in the future. We may 
move away from the traditional 
dungeon style of adventure and 
perhaps do a space explor 
game. There are many possi- 
bility " 



WIN AN 

ENTERPRISE 64 

MICRO! 




^^— ai^fc— — MtAA 


PC'! 


i^f ^x? 





The Enterprise 64 is one of the very latest 
micros to appear on the home market. It 
combines many features not found together 
in one small package. For example; stereo 
sound, 256 colours, built in joystick, 
wordprocessor, 64k memory — expandable 
to 4000k! 

The language is standard BASIC, as is the 
interfacing circuits to printers and even local 
area networking. We like the Enterprise so 
much that we are giving you the chance to 
win one FREE in our easy lo enter 
competition in our next issue. 

This together with; Audio Analyser, 
Syndrum, CPC RS232 Interface, plus 
features galore makes buying Digital & 
Micro Electronics your number one choice. 



On Sale Friday 19th July! 



COMPUTING WEEKI.1 




Richard Seeley has been looking closely 

at Softllfe's EPROM programmer. Read 

on to find out what he thinks 



Sofrtlfe EPROM 
Programmer 

One of [he most flexible and 









of it 



machine of youi 

simply fining extra sideways 

ROM chips. 

Using (his sytem the machine 
can become a powerful word 
processor terminal, a machine 
code monitor or even a business 
machine running CP/M. 

Someone has to write and 
then produce ihe sideways 
ROMs on which this fktibiliiv 
is based. An EPROM program- 
mer is the machine that lakes 
the programs and "blows" 
them into the chips which you 
plug in. 

I had an earlier version of this 






pm n r annuel a 
criticism ihcn v 

very slow. This 

proved version wilh superfast 
programming. Another differ- 
ence is lhai a larger range of 
chip types can be programmed 

If design quality is related to 
simplicity ihen Ihis unit is one 
of Ihe best around. There is 
only one cable, plugging inlo 
the BBC user port, and no 
switches or other items to spoil 
[he plain while case. It is very 
difficult to make any type of 
mistake, as I have been known 
to do on other programmers. 

The software is supplied on 
an EPROM (2764) and is read 
from this device using a shon 
program contained in the 



manual. You arc advised to 
make a number of back-up 
copies of ihe program and 1 can 
echo thai advice — if you lose 
the program you're left with a 
elegam while box of no use 
whatsoever! 

When you "RUN the pro- 
gram a menu appears from 
which you select the type of 
EPROM you wish to program. 
The basic types covered are 
2764 and 27128 but within each 
type you can also select from 
those needing the normal 
21-voh. programming voltage 
and the advanced type which 
needs only 12.5 volts. 

From this menu you move to 
the actual programming menu. 
This has the options shown in 
Table 1, Most are self- 
explanatory. Note [hat in the 
main the programmer expects 
to have a file as input. This is a 
slightly misleading concept 
though because the file is read 
from disc or cassette into RAM 
before programming begins. 
Checksum enables you to see ir 
a series of EPROMs have all 
been programmed with Ihe 



■ ■ : 



EPROM using 

the BBC's 'ROM format. This 
is very similar to the cassette 
filing system and is a way of 
keeping programs in your 
machine permanently . All you 
have to do is type "ROM and 
then LOAD, CHAIN or 'RUN 
them as normal. It is an excel- 



lent store for frequently used 
utilities and this programmer 
makes writing this type of ROM 
simplicity itself. 

During programming itself 
you can assess ihe progress of 
the system by the number of 
stars which are output between 
the letters S, for start, and F for 
finished. This is a sensible id 
and gets over the problem 
programming software which 
claims to be fast but then prints 

milliseconds and thereby slows 
itself down! 

In all a well-designed product 
which has a high specification 
and yet is simple lo use. The big 
let-down is ihe price. I cf " 
rcullv accept that it needs tc 
so high. The maierial cost is 
too great and I have a feeling 
that the biggest pan of the pric" 
charged is probably due t 
advertising. If Ihis machil 




Table I 

Softlife pi 
Plrogram Eprom Irani a Hie 
W)rite Eprom lo a File 
VJerify Eprom against : 
T)esi Eprom is Blank 
Ohccksum Eprom 
Select Eprom Type 
R)om Format 
M>os Call (•) 



HOME COMPUTING WEEKLY it 











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"^ M C O 






it° 


si 






si s s i* 


i 


II 


II 


1 






E a i 


a x"5 


- £ 


* ■. 


S u n 


can. gift 


,J; 


,. <- 




-' 









Ui 

to 
O 





Trust to luck in K Henderson's dice game 



This program is a version of the 
dice game Yahizee for the Com- 
modore 64, following the rules 
of (he original game. 

The program is in BASIC 
with a short machine code 

a key is pressed. 



Voriabitt 




X i mm tier of players 
























\Sn.l> ~iora lineiiilis 








IIT(1) score values 









dore machines would i 
changes for screen size 
20-90 and IS0OO-1S6O) a 



'IPOKE53280,: 




0B PRINTSPCs" 13V "aniTCV K. HENDERSON" 

10 FOR2-lTO1000INEXTZ:PR[NTSPCC10>'\n 

20 GETZ*i IFZ*<>"Y"flNDZ«< > "N'THENISB 

SB IF7*=-N , 'THEN!S0 

a© 13OSUB5B0 

50 POKE53580, i0iPOKe5358l ,31 INPUT ,, k J« 
PLAYERS "<X 

SB IFX<1THEN150 

70 DIMft*fl3,X>,fl<13,«),UT<X>,LT<K),CI' 

75 GOSUB1000iPOKE53280,5iPOKE53581, li 

80 FORWITOISIFGRV-ITOX 

90 C-BiO=01GfJTO351B 

300 E-1 IGOSUB1500 



INSTRUCTIONS ' 



HOME COMPUTING WEEKLY 




1 ARE ACCUMULATED ON"! 



ORE"!GOSUB5510 
328 G=0:GOSUB3^10iGOTO4000 
333 NEXTV,_W 
1 GOTOS000 

499 REM ***INSTRUCTIONS*** 

500 POKE53291 ,1£1PRINTCHR*(!4> 
510 0-1 1GOSUB75B0 

r,, W 1*11* !' IS R Gftl»E OF CHANCE IN WHICH 

"' THE THROW OF FIVE DICE." 

""WTACH PLATER HAS 13 TURNS IN A GAME AND ASCGRE MUST BE MARKED ON 
■" EACH TURN. *ERO IS MARKED IF NO VALID SCORE IS' MADE." 

""SB.-P TO THREE THROWS, OF ONE OR MORE DICE, MAY BE MADE IN 

"EACH TURN-1GOSUB5S50 
600 GOSUB7500 

'"« UINTS ARE AWARDED AS FOLLOWS:- flB-OR EACH TURN SCORED 

"THE ,PPER [ABLE, THE SCORE IS THE TOTflL VALUE OF DICE "t 

•"SHOWING THE NUMBER SCORED . gB" 

"-OR TURNS SCORED PS 3 OR 4 OF A KIND OR AS ' -HANCE ' , THE SCORE 
'" THE TOTAL VALUE OF ALL FIVE DICE." 

"W*NY COMBINATION OF NUMBERS MAY BE SCORED PS '-HANI 



560 PRII 
590 PRIr 



680 PRII 





IF A K 


IND + 


2 OF 


A 


KIND 


1 


TO 4, 


F T,l 




3 


TO B 


c 


TO S 


OR S 


TO 6 






5 


OF Pi 


<1ND) 


1GOSUB5550 



,FPER I ABLE SCORE" 



□SUBSEQUENT I* II ♦ IS" 

.NO DISPLAY THE DPME RESULT ' 
END OF EACH GAME. * 



lit ||* ! ■,,■'50 "I PR 

500 

MJIONUS "DINTS! "1PRIN- 

EXCEEDS 65- 

■-OR SECOND AND", ,"100 POINTS 

■ I HE -OMPUTER WILL ADD THE ! 
950 PRINT'ANO THE MATCH RUNNING TOTALS AT THE END 
960 PRINT" * MATCH CONSISTS OF SIX GAMES." 

965 PR1NT"MB«M»1<_L - *OUND r"N>" 

>#*■■»!- " - *-■■■:■:■ fFF>" 
170 GOSUB5550'PRINTCHR*C 142> i RETURN 
139 REM ***IN1T1ALIZE VARIABLES & STRINGS*** 
000 FORV=0TOH:A*( 1 ,V>-"A ONES ■":A*(B,V)-"B TWOS 

010 A*f4,V>-"D FOURS ■"IA*C3,V>"*E FIVES ■"IA*C6. 
020 AS<7,Vi=-G 3 OF A KIND H" ■ AI(S,V ) = "H 4 OF A KIND H" 
030 A*<9,V>»'I FULL H0U5E S" ' »*( 10 , V ) = " J LOW RUN ■ " 

040 ASCII, V1--K HIGH RUN ■"!fl*<lE,V>-»L YAHTZEE! ■'. 

050 AS(13,V>-'M CHANCE ■":FORB-lTO13!A(B,Vl=0:NEXTBiUT<V>=0:LT<V)-0 

055 M(V>=0 ' 

070 YD*="Ml«r'OUR DICE:a ,, "RS="a":P.GS="B=!NOTHER GP.ME 7 'Y/N> " [RETURN 
499 REM ***PRINT DICE SHAPES*** 



>*F sixes 



"C THREES ■■ 



-II-! 






MDMl: COMPUTING WEEKLY 18 Jun 



1999 REM ***DI5PLRV S 



]=H+54272 



2040 
2850 
2060 



1-1THENG05UBS 
)-2THEWG0?UedP7ri 
i =3THENGOSUB2070 
) -4THENGOSUBH070 
>=3THENGOSUB2070 



2080 POKEH 

50 PDKEH 
10 PDKEH 
20 POKEH 
30 POKEH 



250B 
2510 
2520 
2530 

2999 



,81 "POKE 

8UPOKEI 

39,81 -POKE 

POKE I , 9 

Bl I POKE I 
,8H POKE 



i RETURN 

IGOSUB2130 

IGOSUBS100 

1GOSUB2090 

IGOSUB20B0 

1GGSUB2080 



-41 ,9iRETURN 
1 ,91RETURN 
+39,9iRETURN 
RETURN 
-39,9IRETURN 
1,9 i RETURN 
+41 ,9"RETURN 



SS" l RETURN 



RETURN 

GOSUBH130SRETURN 

GGSUB2 1101 G0SU82 1 30 : RETURN 

GOSUBS 1 00 1 GOSUB2J 1 1 GOSUB2 1 30 1 RETURN 

GO3UB20901GOSUBE1 18: GOSUBE 1EB1 GOSUB2 1301RET 



FZ*' , 'N"THEN2540 
■THENX<F>-I 
G0T02510 




3880 
3690 
3700 
37 10 
3720 
3730 

3750 ( 
3760 < 
3770 I 
3760 



IFCITHEN3730 
PRINTgPCf II 
GETZ*i IFZ* 
IFC=0THENC: 
IFG=0THEN3770 



"asm PRE6S a ■ 

P-THEN37 10 
GOTG200 



PRESS SPRCEB" 



HOME COMPUTING WEEKLY IB Junf 198} 



4020 
4030 
4040 

4060 
4070 
4080 



IFO-1THEN4000 

RETURN 

REM ***CHECK SCORE L 

FORB=1T0i3: 1FYS-MIDI 

NEXTB 

Y*-LEFTSIi=t* 
YS-LEFT3KS* 
Y*=LEFT*(!ftS 
FY*"LEFT*<ftI 
-LEFT*(fl* 
FYS=t_EFT*<ftS 
FY**LEFT*<ftS 
FY**L,EFT*<fl* 
FY*-UEFTS(flS 

FYI-LEFTS<fl* 
FYt^LEFTIifl* 
FY*-LEFT*(fl* 



) THENB -131 GOTO3500 



THENGOSUB4500: 
THENGOSUB4520 i ft* ' 
THENGOSUB45401A*' 
THENGOSUB45G0 I AS' 
THENG0SUB458B! f\*< 
THENGOSUB4G001 A*. 
TMENGOSUB4620I 
THENGOSUB4G70 1 AS I 
■HENGOSUB4710I 
THENGOSUB4750 1 AS ' 
THENG0SUB48EO:fl*i 
THENGO5UB4B501B*' 
THENA.< !3,V>=;-;:i)i 



4500 
1510 
4520 
4530 



REM 
FORF- 

FORF = 
NEXTF 

! NEXTF 

1 NEXTF 



tr.nnF' :~E SCOPE -■ 



T05! IFX 


F> 


RETURN 




TOS: 1FX 


F> 


RETURN 




T051 1FK 


F> 


RETURN 




T05i IFX 




RETURN 




TOS ! I FX 




RETURN 




TOS I I FX 


F) 



=1THENA< 1 
-2THENA<2 
=3THENflf3 



-5THENA(5 
-6THENFK6 



4630 
4640 
4B50 

4670 

4690 
4700 
4710 
4720 
4730 

4750 
4760 
4770 



IFIS<l>«IS<2)ANDISd '-IS 

IFIS<21-IS(3JflNDiSCS)-IS 

IFIS<3>«IS<4)flNDIS<3>-IS 

RETURN 

GOSUB3000 

IFIS( 11-IS(2>ANDIS( I )=IS 

IFIS(2>=IS(3>AN0IS<2>-IS 

RETURN 



IFISC1>=I5<2>AND!E 

IFIS<1>-IS<2>AN0IS 

RETURN 

6OSUB3000 

IFIS<1)-IS<2 

IFISC1>-IS<2 

IFIS< 1 >-IS(2 

IFIS( I )-IS<3 



IF 



ANDIS(2)»ISC3> 
fiN0IS<2)->SC3) 
BNDIS<2>-1S<4) 



3>THENft<; 
4>THEN*<- 
5 > THENAR 



>-ISlRETURN 



■]SC41THENAiB,V 



IFtNDIS<3>-IS 

lftNDIS<4>=IS 
lftNDIS(4J»IS 
li=lND]S(4>-IS 





M THENB < 


e 


V 


-36 


RETURN 


<S) 


MTHENflt 





V 


■ 30 


RETURN 


<s> 


HTHENFK 


B 


V 


-30 


RETURN 


<3) 


MTHENFK 


e 


V 


-30 


RETURN 


<5) 


♦ 1 THENfl ( 


e 


V 


-36 





4860 
5499 
3300 
5510 
5520 
5530 



IF1S<1 >=IS(2)*1AN0IS(2>=I5C3 

RETURN 

1FK(1)-K(2)«N0X( D=X(3>ftNDX< 

RETURN 

REM ••♦'SPfiCE 1 TO CONTINUE**! 

FORZ - 1 TO 1 000 1 NEXTZ 



lftN0IS<3>-IS<- 



PR IN 



)TMENft<12,V>-50 



:ESS SPfiCE I 



HOME COMPUTING WEEKLY If 



5550 FORZ=1TO1000!NEXTZ 

5570 GETZS: EFZ«< >" "THEN5570 

5580 RETURN 

5999 REM ***SCORES/ENO OF SAME* 

6000 FORV=lTOXI !FUT<V)>62THENUT 
SB 10 IFJfV5-0THENJ<V)-l 



P0?0 


Q<V>-UT(V 


+LT 


V) + ( 


Ji<V)- 


) 


6030 


B=l tFORV- 


TOX 




>STR* 


B 


684 e 


M<vi»a<v> 


B-B 


1 " NEXTV 




S050 


K-0 










G0GB 


FORV-MTOX 


1FM 


V-l) 


-MCV) 


H 


6070 


y*-o«<v-i 


IU- 


<V-1 






eeisn 


Q*<v-n-o*(V) 


M<V- 


>=M<V 





ilTHENG050 




FLAYER"' 



ISCOREH 



6210 
6E20 
6230' 



FORV=0TDX-1 
IFX< 10THENPRINT 

GOgUB5500:GG5UB6500iPOKE532B0,8:POKE53E81 , IE 

PRINT"im-,flG* 

6ETZSI 1FZ**"Y"THENPRINT"LJ'1G0T0I73 

]FZS="N"THENPOKE53E80. 14 1POKE53S81 , 6 1 PR INT "LU" ' END 

GOTO6E10 

REM ***ENO GAME/MATCH TOTALS*** 

INOTHER MATCH 1 

IFL>6THENL=I:FORV*!TOX!QTa 

FORy-iToxiaT<V)'QT<v)+ci<v> i 

AI-"H" IFX>7THENAS=" " 
B=0:FORV=0TOX!Afl*<V)-"U"*STR*fE 
H ! NEXTV 




I GOSUB55001 RETURN 

I REM ***CHECK FOR YAHTZEEI*** 

<<E>ANDX<1)-X<3>ANDX<1 > *>■ 
I RETURN 

i "mi vnHTZEE i a"u<v>-jcv)' 

I PPKE53281 , 15iPOKE53£80,lSiGOSUB8500 

i0,5iPOKES3E81 , 1EIRETURN 
I REM ***IN5TRUCTrONS PAGE TITLES*** 
I PRINT";J1"J 1FORS-ITO40IPR1NT" * " ; tNEXTB 
1 PRINT" ^/fl.H^r^ -T- » II ♦ ! ■ 



5>THEN70£0 



HOMI- tBMPUTINfi WF.FKI.Y li 



80 IB 

8030 
8040 
8090 
8060 

8080 
8098 
8108 

8180 



8 160 
8170 

8580 



8550 
8560 
8S7B 



PRINT"B"l IF0RB-IT0481PRINT , '*'I INEKTBIG=i 

REM *** 1 BEeP 1 ROUTINE*** 

□ ATA 120, 173. 28, 3, 14 1,46,3,173 

0ATA21,3, 1 4 1,47, 3, 169, S3, 14 1 

OATA20,3, 168, 192, 141 ,2 t ,3, 162 

0ATA24, 168, 0,157,0,315,202,208 

DATA250, 169,3, 14 ! ,5,212, 169,0 

DATA 1 4 1,6, 2 12; 163, 13, 14 1,24, 2 12 

DATA 169,0, 14 1 ,52,3,88,96,163 

DATA 187. 201 ,4,240,7,201,5,240 

DATA1 1,76-84, 182, 168,255, 14 1 ,5S 

DATA3, 108,46,3, 169,0,141 ,52 

OATA3,10B,4B,3,!73,52,3,20 1 

OATA255,240,3, 108,46,3, 165 , 197 

OATA20 1 ,64,208,8, 162,32, 142,4 

□ATA2 12, 108, 46, 3, 14 1,1, 2 12, 169 

DATA33,14 1,4,212,109,46,3,255 

FORI-0TO119!READA 

P0KEI*48152,AINEXTI 

RETURN 

P0KE54296, 15 tP0K£S4277,9iP0KE54 278,0 

P0KE54284 , 9 I POKE54285 , 

FORI=1TOI50 

P0KE54273 , I I P0KE54273 ,1 + 1 

POKE54280, ISt-I JPOKE54280, 152-1 

PDKE54276,33!P0KE54283,33 

P0KE54276,32iPOKE54283,32 

NEXTl: RETURN 




m**& ■' 



KOBE icqpe 



TIM ESCAPE 
1 Berridge Road Ea.t, 
Sherwood RJac, 
Nottingham NG6 7LX 
Tel: 0602 026377 



ADVENTURE HOLIDAYS 

Peering through the coarse bracken we view the only bridge across the river, Alas, how do 
we deal with that encampment of fearsome creatures souatting & snarling their curses to 
unknown ears! A fight breaks out, giving our warriors an opportunity to charge forward! 
Too late, the creatures rally themselves for the ensuing awesome fight, but being over- 
whelmed they flee in confusion— the bridge is ours! Time for something to eat. 
This may have been an episode in any tabletop role-playing game in the safety of your own 
home. Imagine the personal glory of defeating those fearsome creatures during your real 
time role-playing experience under the personal guidance of our professional team here 

at TIMESCAPE. 

AN ACTION PACKED WEEK OF ROLE-PLAYING ACTIVITIES WHERE YOU AS YOUR 

CHARACTER WILL VISIT DIFFERENT ERAS IN AN ATTEMPT TO DEFEAT THE 

TWISTED DWARF. 

This unique holiday experience will comprise such activities as:- 

MedievaJ Adventure- Bar Room Brawls 

Gothic Horror Adventure— Pyramids of Power 

Futuristic Adventure— Outing to an Historic Location 

Monstering-Extra Adventures 

H un ter — T heatric al Figh ting Tec h n i q u es 

Banquet— and much, much more 

For a FREE copy of our brochure, please send a large SAE to 

TIMESCAPE 1 Berridge Road But, Sherwood Rue, Nottingham NC6 7I.X 

Telephone 0602 626377 



HOMECOMPUTIN*.. WL-L.KI V IS June I9S5 Puge 31 



< 



5£ 



David Ellis leads 
you gently through 
the jungle of 
machine code In 
the second part of 
our series 



I looked al a simple piMyrani 
thai stored the value in the 
accumulalor lo a memory 
location — in this case ihe 
screen. The operation is iden- 
tical to the BASIC POKE 
command. If the variable 'a* 

and 255, then POKE &C000,a 
would achieve the same result as 
the machine code program. 






little r 



: than 



a lo rificd calculator! 

In CPC464 BASIC, there are 
various methods of branching 
and looping. GOTO is probably 
the most widely used and 
controversial of these, and there 
is also GOSUB, FOR.. .NEXT, 
and WHILE.. .WEND. When 
using machine code the choice is 
limited in effect to using GOTO 
and GOSUB although a 
FORTH ASSEMBLER has the 
of the 






meaning 'jump' 



t IR c 






■a the tv 
nly ji -i 
+ 127 i. 






-I2S) whereas a JP can jump 
to 65535 bytes in either diiec 
lion. For reasons that will be 
explained later, a JR is alwav> 
preferable to a JP. A few 
'special' Z80 jump instructions 
are also provided, such as 
DJNZ and l.DIR which will be 

The equivalent of the BASIC 
GOSUB in machine code is 
CALL. The end of the machine 
code subroutine is signalled by 

can see this operation is 

virtually the same as in BASIC. 

Taking the 












sure that you will all agree that 
Ihe following BASIC program 




Now study the machine code 
assembly language program 
listed below:- 




n the accumulator t 



equal ?ero Mien a jump is i 
io HERE. As B is sel to B 
jump "ill lake place 80 t 
When B doe* equal zero 
the program will com inn 
Ironi its presc'in position. 

All that needs doing now 
look up the various opcodes. 



and to calculi 
placement . 



: the ji 



accumulator with 255, equ 
lent to setting the variable / 
255 in line 10 of Ihe BASIC 
program. The second 
lion loads the register B with the 
value of 80, again equivalent to 
line 20 of the BASIC program. 
The third instruction loads the 
H I register pair with the screen 
addrcscs of ScOOO, the same as 
in line 30. H and L are two Z80 
registers that can be used cith< 
singly (as in S bh registers), t 
combined together to form a 1 
bit register pair, as used here. 
16 bit register pair can hoi 
values ftom )276S to 65535. 
Although f 
as single tegisters they are 
normally used as a pair, and 
usually foe holding addre; 
The H register hold the I 
pan of the address (*256), 
Ok I registei holds the low pan 
of the a, ' 

The t 
ilH-valu, 

by HL. The brackets around 
HL signify that it is the address 
where the value will be stored, 
and not the HL register itself. 
This can be compared direcily 
to the POKE instruction of 
BASIC. INC is a machine code 
instruction that adds a value of 
I to the register thin is specified 
- in this case HL. DJNZ 
performs exactly the same 
functions as those shown in line 
60 of the BASIC program. The 
B register is first decremented 
by 1 . I f the B register does not 



filiating. This is a lot easier 
some people would have you 
believe! For a backward jump 
as in this case, simply cour "" 



will take us back lo HERE. 
Subtract your answer from 256 
and this will give the cc 
displacement — in this 
256 - 4 = 252. The final Ust of 
machine code number 
therefore: — 



with the RET placed at the end. 
Enter these numbers in a 
DATA line and RUN the 
BASIC loader program Isee last 
article). When you CALL the 
machine code program you will 
see a complete line drawn across 
the screen. Try the BASIC 
program listing in this article 
which does the same thing, and 
see just how much quicker the 
machine code version is. 

A better idea or ihe differ- 
ence in speed will be gained by 
changing the program so that 
the whole of the screen is filled. 
The following program will 
accomplish this.: 



PlKC.12 HOMI-. UlMI'l 




gram — another Z80 register, 
D, is used to hold the value thai 

locations. As we need to till 
e than 255 locations the C 
egister is used in conjunction 
vith B to give the register pair 
JC. B will hold the value of 64. 
ind C the value of zero, giving 
is 64 • 256 + which is 16384, 



shown. DECBC 

from the value in BC, and the 
i are used 
lo check if the value of BC is 
zero. The accumulati 
with the value of B and then a 
logical OR is performed 
between A and C. If the result 
of this is not zero (NZ> then a 
ejump(JR) is taken back 
to HERE otherwise the pro- 
gram will return to BASIC. 

Enter ihe machine code num- 
bers given on Ihe right of the 
program into DATA state- 
ments, and [hen try CALLing 
the program. Compare the 
speed that the screen is Tilled up 
with the BASIC program :- 



gram will only use up 
Remember that the program 
that you use to load in f 
machine code program does l . . 
count — once the machine code 
program has been poked 
memory, the BASIC prograrr 
no longer needed. Remember 



nally for this week, try th 
following shon BASIC lim 
which makes use of the machin. 
code program jusi shown. Try i 
with all three MODES and 
think thai you will be suitably 
impressed by Ihe speed i- 




Unitsoft || 



HOME COMPUTING Wi-iiKLY IS Inn 




< 



O 

U 



y^ 






CHve Cifford helps 
you to understand 
sound on your 
Dragon and Oric, 
and looks at two 
Spectrum sound 
packages 

Lei's consider how two 
machine. The Dragon 11 
and [he Oric, make 
music. Though both arc getting 
a little long in the tooth, they 
have considerable follow ings 
and both can make effective 
music and sound effects. 

The Dragon is the simplest of 
the two with just single-channel 
sound. This can be program- 
med by one of two commands; 
SOUND and PLAY. SOUND is 
followed by two values, the first 
is the pitch and the second is [he 
duration of the note. Both 
values can be any number 
hi'iuccii I and 255. 

In contrast, PLAY must be 
followed by a string containing 
letters from A to G {i.e. normal 
musical notation). In addition, 
the string requires other para- 
meters such as note length, 
octave (between ! and 5) and 
pause between notes. For 
example. PLAY "05PI40CP24 
0DP24OE" will play the r — 
three notes of the highest i 
wild ;iv<rvihii:i jiLiiisi- l>i: 
each sound. SOUND is 
useful for effects while PLAY is 
particularly good for 
-implc nines. Program 
e vam|ik- (■I'each at work 
The Oric has three 






Briefly, the three command;, art 
PLAY, SOUND and MUSIC. 
PLAY creates a sound envelope 
or shape which is actually 
played by either SOUND n 
MUSIC, As with the Dragon 1 
SOUND command, the Oric' 



sound 



if the s 
I be used for ct 



effects while MUSIC, 
name suggests, i 
creating your o\ 

Ml'SIC command rcquin 






ic-making. Computer! 
can take a sample of sound; 
anything from an explosion 






king! 






number (between 1 and 3); the 
octave number (between and 
6); the actual note (between 1 
and II with 1 equal to C, 2 to C 
sharp and so on) and volume 

The duration of each note is 
controlled by the Oric's pause 
command. WAIT, with the 
number following equal to the 
pause length in milliseconds. 
Always end the note with the 
command PLAY 0,0,0,0 which 
effectively switches the sound 
off. Program 2 is a very well- 
known tune given the Oric 



The Spectrum has many good 
points but few would admit to 
its sound being one of them. 
Yet the extraordinary inventive- 
ness that some programmers 
have employed has resulted in a 
number of pieces of software, 
all designed to improve the 
Spectrum's meagre sound out- 
put. 'Spectrum Sound Effects', 
from MFM Data Services, is 
one such title. The program 
offers a large number (50, in 
fact) of pre-programmed sound 
effects plus the facility to create 
your own effects using the 
machine code routine provided. 



The f 



II will a 






graph of each sound showing in 
envelope shape and has ' 
keyboard feature allowing y 



< play ( 



y of t 



varying pilches. 

The program's peripheral 
features and instructions are 
excellent but the actual sound 
effects leave a lol to be desired. 
The effects are the core of the 
program but 1 find it hard I 
believe the manual's descriplk 
of many of the sounds. With 
this in mind, 1 couldn't recom- 
mend this program knowing 



different t< 

i sure that most vicuplc h 

ird examples of sol 

npling in action. Da 

Bowie is one artist that has u 

this effect. 

Such features have only bi 
vailable on large and very 
expensive machines si ' " 
Fairlight Synthesiser costing 
many thousands of pounds 
until Datel Electronics recently 
introduced a sampler for the 
Spectrum costing £50.00. The 
unit plugs into the expansion 
port and comes complete with a 
small microphone and a cassette 
of software. This software 
of four separate 
j effects, keyboard, 
sequencer and games program. 
Let's deal with each in turn. 

The effects program allows 
you to record a sound and then 
play it back with a different 
pitch or tempo, play the sc 
backwards, play it with ech 
with several other effects. The 
second program allows you 
play your sampled sound bai 
using the Spectrum as a ro 
time, 10 octave keyboard. This 
feature would have been e> ' 
tail if il weren't for 
Spectrum's tacky keyboard. 
The third program alio 
10 use your Spectrun 
sequencer, composing a 
up to 1000 noies of different 
durations and ihen playing ii 



particularly valuable feature of 
this program is its casy-to-us 
editor allowing changes lo t 
made to the note's pitch t 

The final program is an excel- 



lent u 






• CiflC 



sampler effects w 
programs. Dalel call it a Game 
Speak program and this i 
obviously a main area c 
potential use. 

The instructions supplied arc 
clear but not comprehensive 



P»ge M HOME COMPUTING WEEKLY IS Jl 



enough in certain areas, foi 
example how do you connec 
IlK unit up 10 an external ampli 
fication source. The aciua 



certainly bctte 












human voice 


generally don' 










Despite this, the excelle: 


software and 








considering, t 




first whether 





mud] practical use for such a 
device, 

A final plea. If any of you 
have hints or lips involved with 
sound or music on your micro 
or if you just wish to comment 
on the 'Music And The Micro' 
column so far, then please write 
to me, via Home Computing 
Weekly. We are particularly 
interested in hearing from 
anyone who uses a home 




10 FDR N=l TO 76: IF N=19 OR N=37 THEN RE 

STORE 

20 IF N=27 OR N=55 THEN FDR D=l TD 20:RE 

AD DN:NEXT DN 

30 READ A.B:IF A>12 THEN C=C+1:A=A-12 

40 IF A<1 THEN U=C-l:ft=A-<2*A> 

50 HUSIC 1,O,A,0:MUSIC 2, C+l , A, 0:MUSIC 



60 PLAY 7 

0,0.6,0 
70 DATA B,15,9, 15. H 
2S.-10, I5,1B.45 
80 DATA 6.15.8,15.9. 
0,25,5,15.9,25,6,70 
90 DATA 3.15,1,15,-12. 
a.B, 15,9,15,3, 13, B, S3 

100 DATA 6, 15. B, 15.9,15, 10.15,6, 15, B. 
10,25,6,15,3,25 
110 DATA 10, 15,6, 15, B, 15, 10,25,6, 15. B. 25 
120 DATA 10,15,6, 15.B, 15, 10, 25, 5, 15,5,25 



20000tWAIT B-2:NEXT N:PLAY 
15, IB, 25, -10, 15, IB, 
5,10,15,6,15,3,15, 1 
5,15,15,6,15,10,; 



10 PLAY "T2L6CDGGAAGP6FFEEDDC" 
20 PLAY "P6GGFFEEDP6GGFFEED" 
T0 PLAY "P6CCGGAAGP6FFEEDDC 1 



i^MCT 
BASIC 

FOB THE COMMODORE 64 COMPUTER 
INCLUDES MANUAL - DEMO PROGRAM 

HAS OVER 125 COMMANDS AND IS 
LANGUAGE COMPATIBLE WITH BASIC 3.5 

Commands included: 



£10,, 

Including p&p& VAT 



Telephone: (0603) 633005 



CASSETTE VERSION 
DISK VERSION AVAILABLE 
JUNE 1985 at £14.95 

enquiries welcome 

Please direct enquiries/orders to: 

MICRO COMPONENT TRADING COMPANY 

Group House 
Fishers Land 
Norwich 
Norfolk 



BYTE 



HOMIi COMPUTING WEEKLY It 



Rom Manager 

for BBC Micro Paged ROMs 




Richard Seeley gives the thumbs up to 
Watford electronics' Rom Manager 



Rom Manager 

If you use a number of sideways 
ROMS in your BBC then 
sooner or later you're going to 
get a number of commands 
which ate duplicated on more 
than one ROM. 

Hiis might not seem too gieat 

you find your commands going 
to the wrong utility program 
and having effects you weren't 
expecting, it can become very 
annoying. 

Take a simple command such 
as 'EDITOR. This has no effect 
on the standard B11C machine 

accept and respond to this 
command. One allows me to 
edit discs, one allows me to 
have full screen editing and 
another gives me a search and 
replace feature. It is most frus- 
trating to find yourself con- 
stantly dropping into the wrong 

In order to avoid this you can 
constantly keep swapping the 
ROMs, in order to change their 
priority, or you can buy this 
chip. 

Watford is a company 
known for its ability to provide 
solutions for problems even 
before you understand th( 
problem and need the solution. 
This is another example and the 
ROM allows you to control 
completely the action of a 
other ROMs you use. 

Figure 1 shows the command 
list. Certain of these com 

and esoteric. '-(.HrtKSUM, 
•FUNCTION and -EXPLAIN- 
FX are such commands. The 
lirst is used so rarely as to b 
pointless and the others at 
likely to be provided dsewher 
if you have a need to buy ROM 



The 



of 



making 

certain that the command you 
want goes to the ROM you 
specify. -DIRECT (and its twin 
•VECTOR) makes this 
possible. If you arc using a 
certain ROM a great deal then 
•DEFAULT is the simplest way 
tocontrolthesystem. 'NAMES 
gives a read out of all the ROMs 
inside the machine. 

-INCLUDE, -REMOVE and 
•RAM are rather strange in- 
clusions. They allow you to add 
a RAM based routine to the list 
of ROMs and call it as if it were 
a ROM itself. The idea is that 
' debug a piece 



ill it,mv: 






EPROM from main memory. 
It could be useful but if you're 
writing this type of code the 
likelihood is that you already 
have sideways RAM in the 
memory space from &8000 tc 
&BFFF anyway. 

The information commands 
are very useful indeed. 
•NAMES is the one that I usi 
most frequently because I 
prefer to specify the ROMs by 
number rather than by name. 
•STATUS gives full informa- 
tion about a ROM including 
details of whether it is switched 
off or not (by the use of 
•START and -STOP). 

•EXAMINE and i 
•MODIFY, allow viei 
change of the contents of ROM 
and RAM u ' 
ASCII dump 






hex and 

Is simple, and very 
to use. TAB toggle ' 
fields and cursor 
around the display, 
all I have just one major 
sm of the program and 



3rd Electronics 
ROM MANAGER 1.10 
niECkSUM <rom) 
DEFAULT (command) 
DIRECT (rom> <command> 
EXAMINE <rom> 

EXPLAINFX(< number>) 

FILE <command> 

FUNCTION ( <key number) ) 

INCLUDE <start addr> 

MODIFY (<start addr> ) 

NAMES 

RAM (command) 

REMOVE 

SPECIFY (rom) 

START (<rom>( 

STATUS <rom> 

STOP <rom> 

VALUES 

VECTOR <rom) (command; 



*sil! 


5} BBC 
% Micro 


IB 



soft BREAK. I would I 
thought it possible to main 
the status of the system through 
a soft BREAK but this isn't the 
case. If you press break then all 
the ROMs are powered again 
and you are back to square ot 
Apart from that one nigi 
there is a great deal to be said 
for this system and I can see 
being of great value to tf. 
growing number of BBC usei 
with enough ROMs to cau; 
clashes of command. R-l 

Price: £23.30 

Publisher: Watford Electronic 

Address: 250 High St, Watford, 
WD1 2AN 



Page 36 HOMI COMl'l'IIMi YvIIKLY 18 June l< 



*8 



< 

5 



Let Diana Smith — assisted by husband 

Colin — take you through the minefield 

of machine code programming on your 

Spectrum 



Ts 



« first ii 



introduce you lo simple 
Spectrum machine cade pro- 
gramming. It assumes that you 
are familiar with simple BASIC 
programming techniques such 
as FOR-NEXT loops. IF state- 
ments etc, which are explained 
manual. 



Oar i 






r ning by doing and 
examples to sho* how machine 
code routines can be developed 
to replace their BASIC 
equivalent! 









I of it 






machine code subroutines 
to speed up slow sections of 
BASIC and eventually, per- 
haps, put a number of your 
machine code routines together 
to produce a complete program 

Machine code is normally 
written in assembly language. If 
you have PEEKed into the 
Spectrum's ROM (Read Only 
Memory), you will have noticed 
! of whole 



numbers between 
These are the machine code 

meaningful on their own, ; 



If you turn to Appendix A of 
your Sped rum manual, you will 
see a list of the — 



language. ZSO is the name of 
the CPU — Central Processing 



201. isn't it! You ca 
assembler program o 
which allows you tc 



into the Sped 

for you. These . 
other useful faciliti 
allowing editing of the 
mnemonics. To start with, 
however, you should be able to 
convert your short routines by 
hand, referring to Appendix A 
of the Spectrum manual. 

Note that most Assembler 
program listings use upper case 
letters, whereas Appendix A of 
the manual uses lower case. 
This is just another way of 
writing the same thing. 
OK! Let's try an example. 
Type in Listing I, which is a 
simple machine code loader 
program. Save 
You ci 






exampli 

simply manes it easier tc 

machine code into mem 

We will start our pi 
ming by looking at how 
characters on the screen 

Add the DATA 
Listing 2 to the loader program 
and RUN the program. The 
loader will finish with the error 
report OUT OF DATA when it 
has POKEd in all your 



numbers. Run the code by 
keying RAND USR 30000. My 
name should appear in the top 
left hand corner of the screen. 
The Assembler listing in Fig 1 






: left i 



: the 



. addresses 
the code (the numbers on the 
right) are POKEd. In the 



character for you eg. "D" - 
68. 

The first 5 bytes use the 
CALL instruction — equivalent 
to GOSUB in Basic - to call a 
ROM routine at address 5633. 
Preceded by LD A, 2 this 
routine prepares the 
to print something 



Below that are the bytes in 
the DATA statement on line 
2010, which are in groups of LD 
A.n .RST 16. LD A,n means 
Load the A register with the 
number n, equivalent to LET A 
+ number in Basic, but remem- 
ber that n must be a whole 
number between and 255. 
RST stands for ReStarT and 
calls another ROM routine (at 
address 16) which prints any 
character, whose code is in the 
A register, at the next print 
position. 

The last byte, 201, is the RET 

and take us back to Basic. 
Whenever you use this tech- 
nique, you must sandwich your 
LD A,n, RST 16 instructions 
between the code of lines 2000 
and 2020 or it won't work! 

If you run the code once 
more with RAND USR 3O000 
ENTER, my name will be 
printed again, immediately to 
the right of the previous 



HOME COMPUTING WEEKLY IE June 1985 Pugt 37 



By changing Ihe Dal a state- 
lent on line 2010, you can now 
tint anything you like! 

fcelinc confidem? Then let's 
c a little mote adventurous . . 



(l)Load the loade 


program 






(2) define a graphic 




by adding lines 1 




in Listing 3. 




(3)Fig. 2 gives an 




listing of the ne 


piece of 










byte numbers shown in the 


right hand colu 





saving this on tape, just in 
case you make a mistake. 

(4) RUN the Loader program 

(5) run the code with RAND 
USR 30000 ENTER. 

This program makes use of a 
ROM routine, starting at 
address 8252, which prints a 
string of characters using the 
RST 16 instructions. The 
assembler uses labels lo cal- 
culate addresses for you. LI is 
the address of the first byte to 
be printed. Its address is loaded 
into (he DE register pair by the 
LD DE, LI instructions. LD 
BC.24 loads the number of 
bytes to be printed into the BC 
register pair and we are ready to 
Listing 1 



call the ROM routine. This 
saves you having lo repeatedly 
code up LD A,n, RST 16. by 
auiomalically moving Ihrough 
lilt lisi of characters ([he define 
byte. DEFB numbers), loading 
them into the A register and 
executing RST 16 until priming 

As you can see, the LD 
A,n,RST 16 sequence can be 

change the colours, etc and 
print graphic characters, li 
doesn't mailer which method 

Check the DEFB values 
against the codes and 
ponding characters in Appendi 
A of the manual. The codi 



PRINT AT 11,11; 
PAPER 0; INK 7;"["; INK 2; 
FLASH 1:"H"; FLASH 0; 
INK 7; •' HCW " (H is the 
graphic H character). 

You can also use this 
technique to print TOKENS, 
but I'll leave you to try thai for 
yourself. 

In the next article we will 
explain whal registers and 
addresses are and ho» they can 
be used and ihe machine code 
equivalent of Ihe BASIC FOR/ 
NEXT loop. 























































































8 


POKE 











3000 
3001 



COLL 5633 



CRLL 5633 



CALL 8252 





DEFB 


2S 






































































































































-»e03s 








Page 3! HOME COMPUTING W 



Q 

LU 

Q 

I 

oc 

U4 
00 



00 
Uj 

U 



Sb/ngo Sug/ura 
continues his series 
with the procedure 
for editing 

This week, we go on to 
the procedure v.hkh 
controls the editing, 
amongst other less important 

First, procedure "prompt" 
prints the options available to 
the user: edi[ , save the charac- 
ters (which, incidentally, saves 
characters in a BASIC format 






i of 



memory), restart option which 
allows you to clear all the user 
defined characlers and last but 
not least, the quit option. 
Having printed these options, 
Ihe program waits until one of 
the options is selected. The 
option is held in AS. 

The next procedure "edit" is 
probably the most important 
procedure in the whole 
program. This actually handles 
edit mode. 



ie 500, a 






just below the enlarged editing 
grid and then you are asked to 
input the ASCII code of the 
character you would like to 
edit. This is not done by a 
simple INPUT statement. 
Instead, I have written a 



*s you to specify the 
length of the input 
string and the characters 
allowed in the input string. This 
may seem like a waste of 
memory but 1 feel that the 
INPUT routine is very messy, 
especially when clever clogs 
typein"6&*#)JF]' + ="on 
being asked to 



l will 



notice a CALL 
I'm afraid I had to resort to 
machine code for much of this 
program becase even BBC 
BASIC is too slow when 
fiddling with numbers at bit 
level. Don't worry, you don't 
actually need to understand 
how Ihe machine code loutines 
work as long as you know what 
they do. So line ; " ■ calls a 
machine code routine which 
reserves the current definition 



41 ODEFPROCpr ompt 
420PR0Cwindow 
430PRINT' '" 1) Edit 
440PRINT" "Enter cht 
450REPEAT A*=BET* 




choose to edit. In this way, if 
you decide that you've made a 
mess of the character you're 
editing or if you decide ihat you 









at all, you may quit the editing 
mode and get Ihe old definition 
back. Did you understand that? 
No, neither did 1. 

Let me try to make it clearer 
with an example. Say you 
choose io edit character 217. 
The program reserves the 
current definition of character 
255 in a safe pan of memory, 
then copies the definition of 227 
to 255. From now on. you will 
be editing character 255 and 227 
will be left well alone. Now, 
when you've finished editing, 
ihe new definition of 255 will be 
transferred to 227 and the old 
definition of 255 (which has 



saved ii 






memory) will he transferred 
back to 255. 

However, if you decide that 
you don't want to change 
character 227 or you clt 



definiti 



ihe 



it by 



of 227 has 
toucned, all thai needs to be 
done is to restore the old 
definition of 255 and all is well. 
This may not be the neatest way 
of doing filings but it works and 
it turned out to be vety easy to 
program (the whole program in 
fact took less than a day to 

I int.' 5 JO initialises Ihe cursor 



The REPEAT-UNTIL loop 
from 540 to 650 contains the 
main loop. In line 550, the 



then Ihe current pixel is filled in 
bv calling PROCedure "fill" 
but if it's TAB (A = 9), then the 
current pixel is erased by calling 
PROCedure "erase". In 580 
and 590, if the cursor k 



SHIFT, the cursor position is 
updated to the appropriate 
position. In lines 600 and 620, 
the cursor position is updated 
according to which cursor key is 



that there is 
re and that is 
because I have used Boolean 
algebra. I'm afraid that I don't 
have room to describe this 

basically, it relies on the fact 
that when a condition is met, 
the computer generates -1, ot 
otherwise a zero is generated. In 
line 620 to 640, the function 
keys are checked and if one of 
them is pressed, the appropriate 
facility is called. In line 650, a 
check is made to see whether 
the RETURN key has been 
pressed. If it has, the loop is 
exited. Otherwise you go back 
to line 540. 

In line 660, the little window 
below the grid is cleared and ihe 
old definition of 255 is restored 
as 1 explained. In line 670, you 
are asked (o enter the ASCII 
code of the character you would 
like to assign the new definition 
10. At this stage, you may 
choose lo ignore the new 
definition by simply pressing 

anything. If a number is 
entered, the new definition is 
assigned to Ihe appropriate 
character in line 690. In line 
700, the text window is restored 
and the character set at the 



That's it for this week. You 
may like to read up on Boolean 
logic if you like. More 
procedures will be revealed next 



HOMI- ( OMPL'TING WEEKLY IK Jt.n 



460UNTILINSTR("1234 n ,A*K>0 --*^^V 


470VDUASCA* .26 ^*0^'" 


4B0ENDPR0C ^'1^"" K 


490DEFPRGCedit ?P"''" ^^ M 


500PR0Cwindow \ „^rf^^O V 


510?char=VAL(FNinput ("Enter code ",4B,57,3!> \ #^B^^^ _M 


520CALLreserve \ ^^^^^-^9^^^ 


53OX7.=0sY7.=0 \\ ^ 


540REPEAT r"{ ^^^^^ 


550PRINTTftB(X*/.+ l,Y7.+2> : U ) *Z *"" 


560A*=GET _ 


570rF A=32 PROC-fill ELSE IF A=9 PRaCerase 


5B0IF A=155 X7.=0 ELSE IF A=156 XX=7 


590 IF A=158 Y7.=0 ELSE IF" A«=I37 Y7.=7 


600XX=X7.+ (A"=139 AND X'/>0> -<A=I40 AND X - /.<7) 


610Y7.=Y"/.+ (A=142 AND YX>01-(A-14J AND Y"/.<7) 


620IF A=127 PROCclear ELSE IF A=128 PROCinvert 


630IF A=129 CALLrot_left ELSE IF A=I30 CALLrot„right 


640IF A=131 CALLupturn ELSE IF A=132 CALLmirrnr 


650UNTILA=13 


660PR0Cwindaw:CALLrestore 


670CX=VAL(FNinput ("Enter cede ",4B,57,3>> 


680IF C7.=0 ENDPRQC 


690VDU23,C7.,?char ,char?l , char 72, char ?3, char 74, char ?5, char 76, char ?7 


700VDU26: PROCset 


710ENBPR0C 








Programs are always supplied on 


Use this mm inlay card for your program 








cassette and are accompanied by full 
details of the program variables, how 
the program works and any hints on 


Nine 








AMRB 




conversion you can offer. Please type 












these details double spaced. Listings 










are helpful but not essential. What is 
vital is that the programs should be 












completely error free, so please 










double check. 

Always use a coupon firmly fixed to 
the back of your envelope, and fully 
complete and enclose the cassette 


















s kWImO 










inlay card. 










We are particularly interested in 






n ' 




programs with less than 100 actual 


I 


Pi' 




lines of BASIC. All submissions are 


E 


Itfl 




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t ; 


ES 




Send your 

programs to 

HCW! 




Compta .hi, coupon .nd s.ioki, r, rmi y on .no bac* or you, «*«. 






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London WIR 1DD (1 Dl 
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HCW needs you 

Have you ever looked at (he articles and programs in 
HCW and thought you could have written that? 

Why not try? We welcome MLhmis.jons from readers 
and are always interested in your ideas and 
suggestions. 

Submissions tend to fall into one of three 
categories... 

Programs are always supplied on cassette and are 
accompanied by full details ot the pioiiram variables. 
Please type these details double-spaced. Listings are 
helpful, but not essential. What is vital is that the 
programs should be completely error free, so please 
double check. 

Articles on certain aspects of using home computers 
should be no longer than I000 words. Try to keep to 
the style you see in HCW and include programming 
examples where they will help the reader understand 
the subject. We will convert your sketched ill list rat ions 
into final artwork. 

We also use short tips, articles and brief 
programming routines. Any discoveries you have 
made about your machine might be of interest to other 

All contributions are acknowledged and those 
accepted for publication are paid for at competitive 
rates. The copyright in such work will pass to Argus 
Specialist Publications Ltd. Keep a copy or your work 
and include a telephone number and an SAE. Please 
label everything clearly with your name and the 
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All contributions should be sent to: 

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icceptable. write to us at the address below. 

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PREFERRED CLASSIFICATION 




LETTERS PAGE 



•fri 



w * 



We are pleased to announce the first 

winner In our Ashkeron! competition. 

Read on and learn how you too can 

win £25 



monthly compel ilion to find the 
best players of Mirrorsoft's new 
game Ashkeron! This week we 
can announce Ihe fit si winner 
but there arc plenty more prizes 
for you to win. 

The prize or £25 each month 
will be given to the person who 



following months then the prize 
will still be awarded to the 
previous high scorer. This 



Home Computing 

Weekly /Ashkeron! 

Competition Winner 

June 1985 

Our first winner is: 

Simon Tucker, of Hook in 
Surrey. Simon is only 11 years 
old. but is a real fanatic about 
strategy-type games and has 
had his Spectrum for three 
years. He attends Hook Middle 
School, attd when he's not 
hooked up to his Spectrum he 
enjoys belonging lo the boy 
scouts, going fishing, and 
working on the design and 
layout of model railways. He 
dived into Ashkeron! with 
enthusiasm, and his family lost 
the use of its television for a 
considerable length of rime! 
However, he did finally finish it 
and believes Ashkeron! is great 
fun and quite a challenge to the 
strategist. Simon has asked that 
Mirrorsofi donate his £25 prize 
money to charity, so the money 



in the Brussels football 



The clue for this 
month Is: 



falls. Some areas of the castle 
are permanently lit, but before 
too long you will wander ir 
an area which has only natural 
light, and there isn't much of 
that in the hours of darkness! 
Finding a candle shouldn't 
prove too much of a problem t< 
an avid explorer, and even 
lighting it should be fairly easy 
as a source of natural flame is 
not too far away. This is not. 
unfortunately, the complete 
answer lo the problem because, 
as you may have already found, 
it doesn't always stay alight! 
What is really required is s 
method of lighting it wherever 
vou are and whenever you need 
Examining something found 
' of the castle 



Here's your visual ch 




READERS PAGE 



HOMI UJMl'l.MlNC WI-FKI V IS tun 



Readers' ht-score table 




Hope you enjoy ii — ir you 
have reviews of your favourite 
games, send [hem to us al 
Readers' Page. Each one p 



flock man 
The object is to recover the 180 
pieces of an amulet broket . 
by the forces of hell. Opposing " 



contains eight pans of 
amulet, and a pattern of rocks, 
plus some skulls. To get t' 
parts of the amulet you mi 
dig around the cave, like in C 
Dug. Once all the pans are | 
recovered you have the chance 
to go through one of the ej 
The rocks fall down when you 
dig around them and somet;' 
landslides can be caused for 
your advantage. 

Graphically the game is good. 
All the characters are double- 
heighted and superbly anim. 
ed. The minions look like ct 
cartoon characters. Music plays 
and the sound effects could be 
irritating. Your figure look.- like 
Kojak. 

The ability to define keys is 
good feature, as most VI 
games controls arc hard 1 
master. You can use the keys 
you feel are the most comfort- i 
able. The game is a hybrid 
between Boulder Dash and 

My personal best is around 
120 pieces and 1 have discovered 
about 15 caves. Each cat 
different so new lories mu 
i. You can kill your ene 
pushing or i'[iinint i 
slides. When Ihey're hit I 
rock a nice piece of anim: 

rns them into rocks. 

\ tr> plavalile and addici 

Price: £1.99 

■: Mastertronic 



EADERS PAGE 





TRADE ENQUIRIES: ANIROG SOFTWARE LTD UNIT 10 VICTORIA INDUSTRIAL PARK VICTORIA ROAD 



KENT (0322)92513/8 




Trouble In Store for Herbert 



Spectrum 48K £9-95 
Commodore 64 £9.95 
AmstradCPC 464 £9.95 




44 The Broadway, Bracknell, Berks. 0344 427317