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Instruction 

Manual 



If you’ve never played Infocom’s interac¬ 
tive fiction before, you should read this 
entire instruction manual. If you’re an ex¬ 
perienced Infocom game player, you may 
only want to read Section I: About The 
Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy. 


TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Section I: About The Hitchhiker’s 


Guide to the Galaxy 

Preface to the Story 3 

Hints 3 

Sample Transcript and Map 3 

About the Authors 7 

Section //. About Infocom’s 
Interactive Fiction 
An Overview: What Is 
Interactive Fiction? 7 

Starting and Stopping 8 


•Saving and restoring 
•Quiting and restarting 

Communicating with 


Infocom's Interactive Fiction 8 

•Basic sentences 

•Complex sentences 

•Talking to characters in the story 

Special Commands 10 

Tips for Novices 12 

Eleven useful pointers about 

interactive fiction 

Common Complaints 13 

We’re Never Satisfied 14 

If You Have Technical Problems 14 

Copyright and 

Warranty Information 14 

Quick Reference Guide 15 

The most important things to 
know about interactive fiction 


Instruction Manual 


SECTION I: ABOUT THE 
HITCHHIKER'S GUIDE TO 
THE GALAXY 
Preface to the Story 

Don’t Panic! 

Relax, because everything you need to 
know about playing The Hitchhiker's 
Guide to the Galaxy is contained in the 
pages of this manual. In this story, you will 
be Arthur Dent, a rather ordinary earth 
creature who gets swept up in a whirlwind 
of interstellar adventures almost beyond 
comprehension. As the story begins, 
bulldozers are waiting to reduce your 
house to rubble to make way for a motor¬ 
way bypass. While you attempt to deal 
with this problem, your rather strange 
friend Ford Prefect drops by to tell you that 
the Earth is about to be demolished to 
make way for an interstellar bypass! If you 
survive this double threat, you’ll embark 
on a series of intergalactic misadventures 
even funnier than your worst nightmares! 
And, because anything is possible in The 
Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy , you may 
soon not even be sure of your own 
identity! 

A special note for people who have read 
the book The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the 
Galaxy: Although the opening of the game 
is fairly similar to the book, the story . 
quickly diverges, with lots of new material 
and different twists. Although familiarity 
with the story may make a few of the early 
puzzles easier, if you rely too heavily on 
this previous knowledge you will certainly 
end up getting misled. 


Sample Transcript and Map 

This transcript is not from Hitchhiker’s, 
but it does show most of the things you can 
do in the story. It contains several simple 
puzzles and their solutions, and it will give 
you a good idea of how interactive fiction 
works. The player’s sentences appear in 
capital letters after each prompt (>). The 
map represents the terrain in the sample 
transcript. 



>GET OUT OF THE TAXI 
The door is locked. 

“Hey, that's four pounds thirty, old chap." 

>GIVE THE FIVE POUND NOTE TO THE 
DRIVER 
“Thanks, chum.” 

>UNLOCK THE DOOR 
The taxi door is now unlocked. 


Hints 

This version of The Hitchhiker's Guide 
to the Galaxy includes hints! If you ever 
get stuck, you can type HINT and press the 
RETURN (or ENTER) key. Then follow the 
instructions on your screen. Most of the 
hints are nudges in the right direction; the 
last hint in the sequence is usually a 
complete answer. 


>GET OUT OF THE TAXI 
Street Corner 

You are on a street corner on the outskirts 
of London. A signpost reveals that you are 
on the corner of Foominster and Frobbing- 
ton. The sidewalk continues north and east. 
Because of the heavy traffic here, crossing 
the street is out of the question. 


Instruction Manual 3 









>WHO AM I 

You are Chester Smith, an unemployed 
granola salesman. 

>WHAT IS THE OBJECT OF THE GAME? 
Well, the superficial object of the game is to 
get to the end of the story and achieve the 
maximum score. 

The real object of the game is to show a 
bunch of novices how interactive fiction 
works. 

>WALK NORTH 

Outside Blood Bank 

You are in the middle of the block on a 

street that runs north-south. Immediately to 

the east is the entrance to a massive 

granite (Footnote 9) building. Next to the 

entrance is a sign and a doorbell. 

>FOOTNOTE 9 

Well, concrete actually. We wanted a 
granite building for the story, but we 
couldn’t afford it. But the concrete IS 
covered with a plastic veneer that does 
LOOK a lot like granite. 

>READ THE SIGN 

“OUTSKIRTS OF LONDON BLOOD BANK: 
We pay 30 pounds for a pint of blood. 
Painless, takes only an hour. Ring doorbell 
for admittance.” 

>EAST 

The Blood Bank door is closed. 

>OPEN IT 
It's locked. 

>RING THE DOORBELL 
You already did that, didn’t you? 

>NO 

I think you’re wrong. I’m a computer, so I 
have a really terrific memory, and I’m 
almost positive you already rang the 
doorbell. Couldn’t you be mistaken? 

>NO 

Hmmm...well, I just looked back, and I 
guess you didn’t ring the doorbell after all. 
Do you still want to ring the doorbell? 


>YES 

The bell rings. A minute later, a stooped 
man opens the door and beckons you to 
enter. 

>ENTER THE BLOOD BANK 
Waiting Room 

This is a dim room with exits to the east 
and west. A narrow, winding stair leads 
downward. The room is sparsely furnished 
with several uncomfortable-looking 
benches. There is no one waiting ahead of 
you. 

There is a bottle of smelling salts here. 

The stooped man slams the front door and 
bolts it. “Please..ave a seat. It will only be 
several...minutes.” He exits to the east. 

>SIT DOWN 

What do you want to sit down on? 

>THE BENCH 

You are now sitting on the bench. 

>ENJOY THE BENCH 

Easier said than done, considering how 

hard and uncomfortable the bench is. 

>TAKE THE BOTTLE OF SMELLING 
SALTS 

You can’t reach it from the bench. 

>STAND UP 

You are on your own feet again. 

>TAKE THE BOTTLE OF SMELLING 
SALTS 

Your load is too heavy. 

INVENTORY 
You have: 
a briefcase 
a suit 

It looks like the suit contains: 

a ten-pound note 
a grapefruit 

>OPEN THE BRIEFCASE 

Opening the briefcase reveals an array of 

granola samples. 


4 Instruction Manual 


>DROP THE GRAPEFRUIT THEN TAKE 
THE BOTTLE OF SMELLING SALTS 
| Dropped. 

Taken. 

>WAIT 

After all, what’s a waiting room for? Time 
passes... 

The stooped man enters, pushing a 
wheelbarrow full of bones. You’re no expert 
on the subject, but they sure don’t look like 
chicken bones. He spills the bones down 
| the winding stairway. 

>WEST 

1 The front door is closed. 

I >OPEN THE DOOR 

Which door do you mean, the front door or 
the laboratory door? 

>FRONT 
It’s bolted. 

>LOOK 
Waiting Room 

This is a dim room with exits to the east 
and west. A narrow, winding stair leads 
downward. The room is sparsely furnished 
with several uncomfortable-looking 
benches. There is no one waiting ahead of 
you. 

| There is a grapefruit here. 

The stooped man is here, pushing a 
| wheelbarrow. 

| >STOOPED MAN, OPEN THE FRONT 
j DOOR 

“Who are you calling stooped? I’ve got a 
name you know — Igor.” 

[ >IGOR, OPEN THE FRONT DOOR 
I Igor chuckles. “Don’t be nervous. It’s 
completely..ainless. There’s nothing to 
worry about.” 

>IGOR, WHAT ABOUT THE BONES? 

“Oh! Urn, they’re just...fake bones...we use 
for the...anatomy class on Wednesdays!” 


A gaunt man emerges from the doorway to 
the east. “Igor, bring in the next subject.” 

He exits. 

>BREAK DOWN THE STREET DOOR 
This results in a very sore shoulder. 

“If you'll just...step this way,” says Igor, 
producing a cattle prod. 

>DON'T WALK EAST 

You bravely hold your ground. Igor pokes 

you with the prod. You feel less brave. 

>WALK EAST 
Laboratory 

This is an even dimmer room filled with 
strange apparatus. A person-sized table 
fills the center of the room. 

The mad scientist is here, rubbing his 
hands. 

Igor enters behind you and locks the door. 

>DON'T PANIC 

You try your best. You fail. 

“The table..lease lie down...on the table,” 
says Igor, fondling the prod. 

>LIE DOWN ON THE TABLE 

You are now lying on the table. The mad 

scientist quickly shackles your wrists and 

ankles. 

>MAD SCIENTIST, LET ME GO 

“Who are you calling mad? They called me 

mad at Oxford also, but I’ll show them!” 

The mad scientist produces a hypodermic 
needle filled with a bubbling green fluid. He 
slowly inserts the needle into your arm. 
Everything becomes dark and fuzzy... 

>LOOK 

Everything is dark and fuzzy. 

>NORTH 

If you recall, you passed out a few moves 
ago. 


Instruction Manual 5 



>DIAGNOSE 

If you recall, you passed out a few moves 
ago. 

>LOOK AT ME 
Everything is dark and fuzzy. 

>WAIT 

Time passes... 

The fuzziness clears, and you find yourself 
in a strange new location. 

>LOOK 
West of House 

You are standing in an open field west of a 
white house, with a boarded front door. 
There is a small mailbox here. 

>OPEN THE MAILBOX 

Opening the small mailbox reveals a leaflet. 

INVENTORY 
You have: 
a briefcase 

It looks like the briefcase contains: 

an array of granola samples 
a suit 

It looks like the suit contains: 

a ten-pound note 
a bottle of smelling salts 

>SMELL THE SMELLING SALTS 
It smells just like the lid of a bottle of 
smelling salts. 

>OPEN THE BOTTLE 
Opened. 

>SMELL THE SMELLING SALTS 
The smell is overpowering. Your surround¬ 
ings blur and grow indistinct... 

Laboratory 

Sitting on the table are: 
some bones 

Sitting on your workbench is: 
a hypodermic needle 
a book 

>IGOR, REMOVE THE BONES 
“Yes, master.” Igor clears the table. 
“There's another subject waiting outside.” 


>IGOR, BRING IN THE NEXT SUBJECT 
“Yes, master.” 

>WHO AM I 

You are Baron von Edelstein, the “Mad 
Professor of Oxford.” 

>EXAMINE THE HYPODERMIC NEEDLE 
It is filled with a bubbling green fluid, your 
identity transfer serum. 

>READ THE BOOK 
(taking the book first) 

The book is entitled “Who's Who in 
Interactive Fiction Sample Transcripts.” It 
would take hours and hours to read the 
whole thing; perhaps you'd like to consult 
the book about a specific individual? 

>CONSULT THE BOOK ABOUT ME 
The entry about Baron von Edelstein reads, 
“A minor and poorly developed character in 
the Hitchhiker’s sample transcript." 

Igor prods the subject into the room and 
onto the table. 

>INJECT THE SUBJECT WITH THE 
SERUM 

You’re not holding the hypodermic needle. 

>TAKE THE HYPODERMIC NEEDLE 
Taken. 

>INJECT THE SUBJECT WITH THE 
SERUM 

The subject, who you forgot to shackle to 
the table, pushes you away. In the ensuing 
struggle, you accidentally inject yourself 
with the serum. Lights whirl around your 
head. Especially red, yellow, and green 
lights. The lights slow down and finally stop 
whirling, and you realize that... 

Your taxi is stopped at a traffic light. It's 
been an hour since your last fare. Sud¬ 
denly, someone pulls open the door and 
slides into the back seat. “Corner of 
Frobbington and Foominster, please.” 


6 Instruction Manual 



About the Authors 

Douglas Adams graduated from Cam¬ 
bridge in 1974, where he was an active 
member of the Footlights Club, which 
launched the careers of many of Britain’s 
great comics. He has collaborated on 
several projects with Monty Python’s 
Graham Chapman, and has worked as a 
writer and script editor for the TV series 
Dr. Who. The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the 
Galaxy began as a radio serial, and its 
popularity soon propelled it into four 
books, a television series, two records and 
a stage show. Given Adams's fondness for 
Infocom’s computerized fiction, and 
Infocom's soft spot for the Hitchhiker’s 
saga, it was only a matter of time before 
the two teamed up to produce an interac¬ 
tive version. Adams second work of 
interactive fiction was Bureaucracy. He is 
listed first (thanks to alphabetical order) in 
Britain's Who’s Who Among Zany 
Comedy Science Fiction Authors, where 
his entry reads “Mostly harmless.” 

Steve Meretzky was bom in mid-1957, 
frightening the Soviet Union into the early 
launching of its Sputnik satellite. 

Meretzky’s gestalt was shaped by a 
number of painful childhood experiences, 
including growing up in Yonkers and 
rooting for the New York Mets. His first 
contact with interactive fiction came while 
he was a student at MIT. (We use "stu¬ 
dent” in the most general sense.) Meretzky 
now lives near Boston. He and his wife 
Betty are expecting to increase the size of 
their family by approximately 50% 
sometime in early 1988. Meretzky is 
irresponsibly responsible for the following 
other Infocom titles: Planetfall, Sorcerer. 
A Mind Forever Voyaging, Leather 
Goddesses ofPhohos, and Stationfall. 


SECTION II: 

ABOUT INFOCOM’S 
INTERACTIVE FICTION 


An Overview: What Is 
Interactive Fiction? 

Interactive fiction is a story in which you 
are the main character. Your own thinking 
and imagination determine the actions of 
that character and guide the story from 
start to finish. 

Each work of interactive fiction, such as 
Hitchhiker's, presents you with a series of 
locations, items, characters, and events. 

You can interact with these in a variety of 
ways. 

To move from place to place, type the 
direction you want to go. When you find 
yourself in a new location, it’s a good idea 
to become familiar with your surroundings 
by exploring the nearby rooms and reading 
each description carefully. (You may 
notice that Hitchhiker's occasionally refers 
to a location as a “room," even if you are 
outdoors.) As you explore the galaxy, it is 
helpful to make a map of the geography. 

An important element of interactive 
fiction is puzzle-solving. You should think 
of a locked door or a ferocious beast not as 
a permanent obstacle, but merely as a 
puzzle to be tackled. Solving puzzles will 
frequently involve bringing a certain item 
with you, and then using it in the proper 
way. 

In Hitchhiker's, time passes only in 
response to your input. You might imagine 
a clock that ticks once for each sentence 
you type, and the story progresses only at 
each tick. Nothing happens until you type a 
sentence and press the RETURN (or 
ENTER) key, so you can plan your turns as 
slowly and carefully as you want. 

To measure your progress, Hitchhiker's 
keeps track of your score. You may get 
points for solving puzzles, performing 
certain actions, or visiting certain loca¬ 
tions. Keeping track of what actions result 
in an increase in your score will help you 
learn what the goal of the story is. 


Instruction Manual 7 




Starting and Stopping 

Starting the story: To load Hitchhiker's, 
follow the instructions on the Reference 
Card in your package. 

Following the copyright notice and the 
release number of the story, you will see a 
message which begins the story. Then the 
prompt (>) will appear, indicating that 
Hitchhiker's is waiting for your first input. 

Here are a few inputs for you to try at 
the first several prompts. After typing each 
input, don’t forget to press the RETURN 
(or ENTER) key: 

>TURN ON THE LIGHT 
>LOOK UNDER THE BED 
INVENTORY 
>LOOK AT THE GOWN 

You should now have a feel for interacting 
with the story. You decide what to do next. 

Saving and restoring: It will probably 
take you many days to complete 
Hitchhiker's. Using the SAVE feature, you 
can continue at a later time without having 
to start over from the beginning, just as 
you can place a bookmark in a book you 
are reading. SAVE puts a “snapshot” of 
your place in the story onto another disk. 
You may want to save your place before 
(or after) trying something dangerous or 
tricky. That way, you can go back to that 
position later, even if you have gotten lost 
or “killed” since then. 

To save your place in the story, type 
SAVE at the prompt (>), and then press the 
RETURN (or ENTER) key. Then follow the 
instructions for saving and restoring on 
your Reference Card. Some systems 
require a blank disk, initialized and 
formatted, for saves. Using a disk with 
data on it (not counting other Hitchhiker’s 
saves) may result in the loss of that data, 
depending on your system. 

You can restore a saved position any 
time you want. To do so, type RESTORE 
at the prompt (>), press the RETURN (or 
ENTER) key. Then follow the instructions 
on your Reference Card. You can then 
continue the story from the point where 
you used the SAVE command. You can 
type LOOK for a description of where you 
are. 


Quitting and restarting: If you want to 
start over from the beginning, type 
RESTART and press the RETURN (or 
ENTER) key. (This is usually faster than 
re-booting.) Just to make sure. 

Hitchhiker's will ask if you really want to 
start over. If you do, type Y or YES and 
press the RETURN (or ENTER) key. 

If you want to stop entirely, type QUIT 
and press the RETURN (or ENTER) key. 
Once again. Hitchhiker’s will ask if this is 
really what you want to do. 

Remember when you RESTART or 
QUIT: if you want to be able to return to 
your current position, you must first do a 
SAVE. 

Communicating with Infocom’s 
Interactive Fiction 

In Hitchhiker’s, you type your sentence in 
plain English each time you see the prompt 
(>). Hitchhiker's usually acts as if your 
sentence begins “I want to...,” although 
you shouldn’t actually type those words. 
You can use words like THE if you want, 
and you can use capital letters if you want; 
Hitchhiker's doesn’t care either way. 

When you have finished typing a 
sentence, press the RETURN (or ENTER) 
key. Hitchhiker's will respond, telling you 
whether your request is possible at this 
point in the story, and what happened as a 
result. 

Hitchhiker's recognizes your words by 
their first six letters, and all subsequent 
letters are ignored. Therefore, BULLDOg, 
BULLDOgs, BULLDOzer, and BULLDOck- 
pokingham (a small town in Dockpoking- 
hamshire) would all be treated as the same 
word by Hitchhiker’s. 

To move around, just type the desired 
direction: NORTH, SOUTH, EAST, WEST, 
NORTHEAST, NORTHWEST, SOUTH¬ 
EAST, and SOUTHWEST. You can 
abbreviate these to N, S, E, W, NE, NW, 

SE, and SW, respectively. You can use UP 
(or U) and DOWN (or D). IN and OUT will 
also work in certain places. On board a 
ship, you’ll want to use the directions 
PORT (or P), STARBOARD (or SB), FORE 
(or F), and AFT. 


8 Instruction Manual 


Hitchhiker's understands many different 
kinds of-sentences. Here are several 
examples. (Note that some of these objects 
do not actually appear in Hitchhiker’s.) 

>WALK NORTH 

>DOWN 

>NE 

>GO AFT 
>U 

>TAKE BOX 

>PICK UP THE CARDBOARD BOX 
>DROP IT 

>PUSH THE BUTTON 
>OPEN THE AIRLOCK DOOR 
>EXAMINE THE PRESSURE SUIT 
>LOOK BEHIND RHODODENDRON 
BUSH 

>LOOK UNDER THE TABLE 
>LOOK INSIDE THE REACTOR CAVITY 
>SHOOT THE BEAST WITH PEA 
SHOOTER 

>ATTACK THE BUREAUCRAT WITH THE 
COURT ORDER 

You can use multiple objects with 
certain verbs if you separate them by the 
word AND or by a comma. Some ex¬ 
amples: 

>TAKE PENCIL, PAPER, STAMP 
>DROP THE MAP, THE FORK, AND THE 
THERMO-NUCLEAR WEAPON 
>PUT THE FRYING PAN AND THE EGG 
IN THE CUPBOARD 

The word ALL refers to every visible 
object except those inside something else. 
If there were an apple on the ground and 
an orange inside a cabinet, TAKE ALL 
would take the apple but not the orange. 

>TAKE ALL 
>TAKE ALL STAMPS 
>TAKE ALL THE STAMPS EXCEPT THE 
RED STAMP 

>TAKE ALL FROM THE DESK 
>GIVE ALL BUT THE PENCIL TO THE 
ROBOT 

>DROP ALL EXCEPT THE PEA 
SHOOTER 


You can include several sentences on 
one input line if you separate them by the 
word THEN or by a period. (Note that each 
sentence will still count as a turn.) You 
don’t need a period at the end of the input 
line. For example, you could type all of the 
following at once, before pressing the 
RETURN (or ENTER) key: 

>EAST.TAKE THE GUN THEN PUT THE 
BULLET IN IT.SHOOT GERTRUDE 

If Hitchhiker’s doesn't understand one of 
the sentences in your input line, or if 
something unusual happens, it will ignore 
the rest of your input line (see “Common 
Complaints” on page 13). 

There are only three kinds of questions 
that Hitchhiker's understands: WHAT, 
WHERE, and WHO. Here are examples 
that you can try in the story: 

>WHAT IS ADVANCED TEA 
SUBSTITUTE? 

>WHERE IS THE TOWEL? 

>WHO IS ZAPHOD BEEBLEBROX? 

You will meet other people and creatures 
in Hitchhiker's. You can “talk” to some of 
these beings by typing their name, then a 
comma, then whatever you want to say to 
them. Here are some examples: 

>BARTENDER, GIVE ME A DRINK 
>FORD, OPEN THE SATCHEL 
>CAPTAIN, WHAT ABOUT THE METEOR 
HOLE? 

>FRED, TAKE THE TOWEL THEN 
FOLLOW ME 

>MARVIN, KILL THE ALIEN.ENTER THE 
CLOSET 

Notice that in the last two examples, you 
are giving a person more than one com¬ 
mand on the same input line. 

You can use quotes to answer a question, 
say something “out loud,” or type some¬ 
thing on a keyboard. For example: 

>SAY “HELLO" 

>ANSWER "MY NAME IS ZEKE” 

>TYPE “LOGOUT” 


Instruction Manual 9 


Hitchhiker's tries to guess what you 
really mean when you don’t give enough 
information. For example, if you say that 
you want to do something, but not what 
you want to do it to or with. Hitchhiker s 
will sometimes decide that there is only 
one possible object that you could mean. 
When it does so, it will tell you. For 
example: 

>SHOOT THE DOGGIE 
(with the ray gun) 

The cute little doggie is incinerated. 


>GIVE THE TOWEL 
(to the hitchhiker) 

The hitchhiker naturally already has a 
towel, but thanks you politely for your offer. 

If your sentence is ambiguous, 
Hitchhiker's will ask what you really 
mean. You can answer most of these 
questions briefly by supplying the missing 
information, rather than typing the entire 
input again. You can do this only at the 
very next prompt. Some examples: 

>CUT THE BREAD 

What do you want to cut the bread with? 
>THE KNIFE 

The bread is stale to the point of being 
petrified. 

or 

>KILL THE FLY WITH THE AXE 
Which axe do you mean, the teensy axe or 
the atomic-powered supersonic planet- 
smashing axe? 

>TEENSY 
The fly expires. 

Hitchhiker’s uses many words in its 
descriptions that it will not recognize in 
your sentences. For example, you might 
read, "Disgusting gobs of yellow goo ooze 
out of the monster’s elbows.” However, if 
Hitchhiker’s doesn’t recognize the words 
GOO or ELBOWS in your input, you can 


assume that they are not important to your 
completion of the story, except to provide 
you with a more vivid description of where 
you are or what is going on. Hitchhiker’s 
recognizes over 800 words, nearly all that 
you are likely to use in your sentences. If 
Hitchhiker's doesn’t know a word you 
used, or any of its common synonyms, you 
are almost certainly trying something that 
is not important in continuing your 
adventure. 

Special Commands 

There are a number of one-word com¬ 
mands which you can type instead of a 
sentence. You can use them over and over 
as needed. Some count as a turn, others do 
not. Type the command after the prompt 
(>) and press the RETURN (or ENTER) 
key. 

AGAIN— Hitchhiker's will usually respond 
as if you had repeated your previous 
sentence. Among the cases where AGAIN 
will not work is if you were just talking to 
another character. You can abbreviate 
AGAIN to G. 

BRIEF— This tells Hitchhiker’s to give 
you the full description of a location only 
the first time you enter it. On subsequent 
visits. Hitchhiker's will tell you only the 
name of the location and the objects 
present. This is how Hitchhiker's will 
normally act, unless you tell it otherwise 
using the VERBOSE or SUPERBRIEF 
commands. 

DIAGNOSE— Hitchhiker's will give you a 
medical report of your physical condition. 
This is particularly useful if you have just 
survived a dangerous part of the story. 

FOOTNOTE— Occasionally the text in 
Hitchhiker’s will mention the existence of 
a footnote. To read the footnote, simply 
type FOOTNOTE followed by the appro¬ 
priate footnote number (for example, 
FOOTNOTE 2). This will not count as a 
turn. 


10 Instruction Manual 



HINT — If you have difficulty while 
playing the story, and you can’t figure out 
what to do, just type HINT. Then follow the 
directions at the top of your screen to read 
the hint of your choice. 

INVENTORY— Hitchhiker’s will list what 
you are carrying. You can abbreviate 
INVENTORY to I. 

LOOK — This tells Hitchhiker’s to describe 
your location in full detail. You can 
abbreviate LOOK to L. 

QUIT — This lets you stop. If you want to 
save your position before quitting, follow 
the instructions in the “Starting and 
Stopping” section on page 8. You can 
abbreviate QUIT to Q. 

RESTART — This stops the story and starts 
over from the beginning. 

RESTORE — This restores a position made 
using the SAVE command. See “Starting 
and Stopping" on page 8 for more details. 

SAVE — This makes a “snapshot” of your 
current position onto your storage disk. 

You can return to a saved position in the 
future using the RESTORE command. See 
“Starting and Stopping” on page 8 for 
more details. 

SCORE — Hitchhiker's will show your 
current score and the number of turns you 
have taken. 

SCRIPT — This command tells your printer 
to begin making a transcript of the story as 
you venture onwards. A transcript may aid 
your memory but is not necessary. It will 
work only on certain computers; read your 
Reference Card for details. 


SUPERBRIEF— This commands 
Hitchhiker’s to display only the name of a 
place you have entered, even if you have 
never been there before. In this mode. 
Hitchhiker's will not even mention which 
objects are present. Of course, you can 
always get a description of your location, 
and the items there, by typing LOOK. In 
SUPERBRIEF mode, the blank line 
between turns will be eliminated. This 
mode is meant for players who are already 
very familiar with the geography. Also see 
VERBOSE and BRIEF. 

UNSCRIPT— This commands your printer 
to stop making a transcript. 

VERBOSE— This tells Hitchhiker's that 
you want a complete description of each 
location, and the objects in it, every time 
you enter a location, even if you’ve been 
there before. Also see BRIEF and SUPER¬ 
BRIEF. 

VERSION— Hitchhiker's responds by 
showing you the release number and the 
serial number of your copy of the story. 
Please include this information if you ever 
report a “bug” in the story. 

WAIT — This will cause time in the story to 
pass. Normally, between turns, nothing 
happens in the story. You could leave your 
computer, take a nap, and return to the 
story to find that nothing has changed. You 
can use WAIT to make time pass in the 
story without doing anything. For example, 
if you encounter an alien being, you could 
WAIT to see what it will do. Or, if you are 
in a moving vehicle, you could WAIT to 
see where it will go. You can abbreviate 
WAIT to Z. 


Instruction Manual 11 


Tips for Novices 

1. You may want to draw a map showing 
each location and the directions connecting 
it to adjoining locations. When you find 
yourself in a new location, make a note of 
any interesting objects there. (See the 
small sample map that goes along with the 
sample transcript on page 3.) There are 10 
possible directions (NORTH, SOUTH, 
EAST, WEST, NORTHEAST, NORTH¬ 
WEST, SOUTHEAST, SOUTHWEST, UP, 
and DOWN) plus IN and OUT. Drawing a 
map isn’t essential in Hitchhiker’s, but 
you might find it useful. 

2. EXAMINE all objects you come across in 
the story. 

3. If you find an object that you think you 
can use, TAKE IT. Some objects will help 
you solve some of the puzzles. 

4. Save your place often. That way, if you 
mess up or get “killed,” you won’t have to ' 
start over from the beginning. See page 8 
for instructions. 

5. Read the story carefully! There are often 
clues in the descriptions of locations and 
objects. 

6. Try everything you can think of - even 
strange or dangerous actions may provide 
clues, and might prove to be fun! You can 
always save your position first if you want. 
Here’s a silly example: 

>GIVE THE TARNISHED COIN TO THE 
USHER 

The usher looks unimpressed, and begins 
leading you toward the last row of the 
theatre. 

You’ve just learned there is something 
(such as the crisp bill) which might 
convince the usher to give you a front row 
seat... perhaps even a front row seat next 
to Queen Isameera and her dreadfully 
expensive and easy-to-steal diamond- 
studded tiara. 


7. Unlike other “adventure games” you 
may have played, there are many possible 
routes to the end of Hitchhiker's. If you 
get stuck on one puzzle, move on to 
another. Some puzzles have more than one 
solution; other puzzles don’t need to be 
solved at all. Sometimes you will have to 
solve one puzzle in order to obtain the 
item(s) or information you need to solve 
another puzzle. 

8. You may find it helpful to go through 
Hitchhiker’s with another person. Different 
people may find different puzzles easy and 
can often complement each other. 

9. If you really have difficulty, you can 
type HINT. The screen will then show you 
a list of questions to which you can get 
answers. (Simply follow the directions at 
the top of your screen to see the hint of 
your choice.) You don’t need to use the 
hints to enjoy the story, but it will make 
solving the puzzles easier. 

10. Read the sample transcript on page 3 to 
get a feel for how Infocom’s interactive 
fiction works. 

11. You can word a command in many 
different ways. For example, if you wanted 
to take a blue jacket, you could type in any 
of the following: 

>GETJACKET 

>TAKE THE JACKET 

>PICK UP THE BLUE JACKET 

If you type in a command that Hitchhiker’s 
doesn’t understand, try rephrasing the 
command or using synonyms. If 
Hitchhiker’s still doesn’t understand your 
command, you are almost certainly trying 
something that is not important in continu¬ 
ing your adventure. 


12 Instruction Manual 



Common Complaints 

Hitchhiker’s will complain if you type a 
sentence that confuses it completely. 
Hitchhiker's will then ignore the rest of the 
input line. (Unusual events, such as being 
attacked, may also cause Hitchhiker’s to 
ignore the rest of the sentences you typed, 
since the event may have changed your 
situation drastically.) Some of Hitchhiker’s 
complaints: 

I don’t know the word “ _ The 

word you typed is not in the story’s 
vocabulary. Sometimes using a synonym 
or rephrasing will help. If not, Hitchhiker's 
probably doesn’t know the idea you were 
trying to get across and it isn't necessary to 
complete the story. 

You used the word " in a way 

that I don’t understand. Hitchhiker’s 
knows the word you typed, but couldn’t 
use it in that sense. Usually this is because 
Hitchhiker's knows the word as a different 
part of speech. For example, if you typed 
PRESS THE LOWER BUTTON, you are 
using LOWER as an adjective, but 
Hitchhiker's might know LOWER only as 
a verb, as in LOWER THE BOOM. 

There was no verb in that sentence! 

Unless you are answering a question, each 
sentence must have a verb (or a command) 
in it somewhere. 

There seems to be a noun missing in 
that sentence! This usually means that 
your sentence was incomplete, such as 
EAT THE BLUE. 

There were too many nouns in that 
sentence. An example is PUT THE SOUP 
IN THE BOWL WITH THE LADLE, which 
has three noun “phrases,” one more than 
Hitchhiker's can digest in a single action. 

I beg your pardon? You pressed the 
RETURN (or ENTER) key without typing 
anything. 

It’s too dark to see! In the story, there was 
not enough light to perform your action. 


Be specific: what object do you want to 

“_”? You used HIM, HER or IT, 

but Hitchhiker’s isn’t sure what person or 
object you meant. 

You can’t see any “_” here! The 

item you referred to was not visible. It may 
be somewhere else, inside a closed 
container, and so on. 

The other object(s) that you mentioned 
isn’t (aren’t) here. You referred to two or 
more items in the same sentence, and at 
least one of them wasn’t visible to you in 
your present location. 

You can’t go that way. There was no 
passage or exit in the direction you tried to 
move. 

You can't use multiple (in)direct objects 

with “_You can refer to several 

items at the same time only with certain 
verbs. Among the more useful of these 
verbs are TAKE, DROP, and PUT. This 
restriction also applies to the use of ALL, as 
in DROP ALL. For example, ATTACK will 
not work with multiple objects; you 
couldn’t say ATTACK ALL or ATTACK 
THE BEAST AND THE ROBOT. 

That sentence isn’t one I recognize. The 

sentence you typed may have been 
gibberish, such as GIVE COMPUTER 
WITH SWORD. Or, you may have typed a 
reasonable sentence but used a syntax that 
Hitchhiker’s does not recognize, such as 
SMELL UNDER THE ROCK. Try rephras¬ 
ing the sentence. 


Instruction Manual 13 







We’re Never Satisfied 

Here at Infocom, we take great pride in the 
quality of our stories. Even after they’re 
“out the door,” we’re constantly improv¬ 
ing, honing and perfecting. 

Your input is important. No matter how 
much testing we do, it seems that some 
bugs never crawl into view until thousands 
of you begin doing all those wild and crazy 
things to the story. If you find a bug, or if 
you think a certain puzzle was too hard or 
too easy, or if you have some other 
suggestion, or if you’d just like to tell us 
your opinion of the story, drop us a note! 
We love every excuse to stop working, and 
a letter from you is just such an excuse! 
Write to: 

Infocom, Inc. 

125 CambridgePark Drive 
Cambridge, MA 02140 
Attn: Marvin 

If You Have Technical Problems 

You can call the Infocom Technical 
Support Team to report bugs and technical 
problems, but not for hints to solve 
puzzles, at (617) 576-3190. If your disk 
develops a problem within ninety (90) days 
after purchase, we will replace it at no 
charge. Otherwise, there is a replacement 
fee of $5.00 (U.S. funds). If you call to 
report a bug, please provide your release 
number, which you can find by typing 
VERSION. Please return your warranty/ 
registration card if you’d like to be on our 
mailing list and receive our newsletter. 


Copyright and 
Warranty Information 

Limited Warranty 

This software product and the attached instructional materials 
are sold “AS IS,” without warranty as to their performance. 
The entire risk as to the quality and performance of the 
computer software program is assumed by the user. 

( ^However, lo the original purchaser of a disk prepared by 

recorded to be free from defects in materials and faulty 
workmanship under normal use and service for a period of 
ninety (90) days from the date of purchase. If during this 
period a defect on the medium should occur, the medium may 
be returned to Infocom, Inc. or to an authorized Infocom, Inc. 
dealer, and Infocom, Inc. will replace the medium without 

a defect is expressly limited to replacement of the medium as 
provided above. 

THE ABOVE WARRANTIES FOR GOODS ARE IN 
LIEU OF ALL WARRANTIES. EXPRESS, IMPLIED, OR 
STATUTORY, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, 
ANY IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY 
AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND OF 
ANY OTHER WARRANTY OBLIGATION ON THE 
PART OF INFOCOM, INC. IN NO EVENT SHALL 
INFOCOM, INC. OR ANYONE ELSE WHO HAS BEEN 
INVOLVED IN THE CREATION AND PRODUCTION OF 
THIS COMPUTER SOFTWARE PROGRAM BE LIABLE 
FOR INDIRECT, SPECIAL, OR CONSEQUENTIAL 
DAMAGES, SUCH AS, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, LOSS OF 
ANTICIPATED PROFITS OR BENEFITS RESULTING 
FROM THE USE OF THIS PROGRAM, OR ARISING OUT 
OF ANY BREACH OF THIS WARRANTY. SOME 
STATES IX) NOT ALLOW THE EXCLUSION OR LI MI 
TATION OF INCIDENTAL OR CONSEQUENTIAL 
DAMAGES, SO THE ABOVE LIMITATION MAY NOT 
APPLY TO YOU. 

N.B. After the warranty period, a defective Infocom disk 
order for $5.00 U.S. currency for replacement. 

Copyright 

The enclosed software product is copyrighted and all 
rights are reserved by Infocom, Inc. It is published 
exclusively by Infocom, Inc. The distribution and sale of this 
product are intended for the use of the original purchaser only 
and for use only on the computer system specified. Lawful 
users of this program are hereby licensed only to read the 
program from its medium into memory of a computer solely 
for the purpose of executing the program. Copying (except 
for one backup copy on those systems that provide for it—see 
Reference Card), duplicating, selling, or otherwise 

are copyrighted and all rights reserved by Infocom. Inc. 

These documents may not, in whole or in part, be copied, 

electronic medium or machine-readable form without prior 

Willful violations of the Copyright Law of the United 
States can result in civil damages of up to $50,000 in addition 
to actual damages, plus criminal penalties of up to one year 
imprisonment and/or $10,000 fine. 

The Hitc hhiker s Guide to the Galaxy is a trademark of 
Douglas Adams. Planetfall, Sorcerer, A Mind Forever 
Voyaging, Leather Goddesses ofPhohos, Bureaucracy and 
Stationfall are trademarks of Infocom, Inc. 

(c) 1987 Infocom, Inc. Printed in U.S.A. 


14 Instruction Manual 




Quick Reference Guide 

1 . To start the story (“boot up”), see the 
separate Reference Card in your 
Hitchhiker's package. 

2. When you see the prompt (>) on your 
screen, Hitchhiker’s is waiting for your 
input. There are four kinds of sentences or 
commands that Hitchhiker’s understands: 

A. Direction commands: To move from 
place to place, just type the direction you 
want to go: N (or NORTH), E, S, W, NE, 
SE, NW, SW, U (or UP), D, IN, OUT, P (or 
PORT), SB, F, or AFT. 

B. Actions: Just type whatever you want to 
do. Some examples: READ THE BOOK or 
OPEN THE DOOR or LOOK THROUGH 
THE WINDOW. Once you’re familiar with 
simple commands, you’ll want to use more 
complex ones as described in “Communi¬ 
cating with Infocom’s Interactive Fiction” 
on page 8. 

C. Commands given to people: To talk to 
characters in the story, type their name, 
then a comma, then what you want to say 
to them. For example: MARVIN, GIVE ME 
THE AXE or OLD MAN, GO NORTH. 

D. Special one-word commands: Some 
one-word commands, such as INVENTORY 
or DIAGNOSE, give you specific informa¬ 
tion or affect your output. A list of these 
appears in the "Special Commands” 
section on page 10. 

3. Important! After typing your sentence or 
command, you must press the RETURN (or 
ENTER) key before Hitchhiker's will 
respond. 

4. On most computers, your screen will 
have a special line called the "status line." 

It tells you the name of your current 
location, your score, and the number of 
turns you have taken. 


5. You can pick up and carry many of the 
items you’ll find in the story. For example, 
if you type TAKE THE NECKLACE, you 
will be carrying it. Type INVENTORY to 
see a list of the items you are carrying. 

6. When you want to stop, save your place 
for later, or start over, read the “Starting 
and Stopping” section on page 8. 

7. If you have trouble, refer to the specific 
section of this manual for more detailed 
instructions. 


Instruction Manual 15 



INFOCOM 
Proof of Purchase 
HHGG 


G-IS4-03A