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REVIEWS 

Compaq & Ogivar 
Portables 

Advanced Floppy Disk 
Drive Controllers 

Programmers' Text 
Editors 

Superbase 4 


286 vs 386SX 



PRODUCT FOCUS 



10 Large*Screen 
Monitors 


Do you really need an SX? 


Twin head 
Superset 



£2.00 U.K./A $6.50 AUSTRALIA 
Lit. 7,000 ITALY/$3.50 U,S.A, 
0360-5230 


Understanding 
High-Speed Caches 

PLUS 

PC-Write 3.0 
Turbo EMS 

International What’s New 

















9 


PLEASE CALL 800-426-5150. 



Laser Printers And More. 

The obvious companion for a high performance Dell 
system is a Dell laser or dot matrix printer. All printers 
come with 30-day money-back guarantee. And be sure 
to ask about our software offerings, which include most 
popular third-party applications as well as Dell Enhanced 
operating system software. 

Laser Printers. 

Laser System 150,15 pages per minute: $5,995. 

Laser System 80,8 pages per minute: $3,295. 

Laser System 60,6 pages per minute: $2,195. 

All Dell laser printers come with 1.5 MB RAM, fiill- 


It’s an 80286 system that’s as fast as most 
386 computers. But at less than half the 
price. Which means you get the best 
pricc/performance of any system. The 
System 220 runs at 20 MHz, with less 
than one wait state. It also features com¬ 
plete compatibility with Microsoft MS- 
DOS and MS OS/2, plus a remarkably 
small footprint. The System 220 is the 
ideal executive workstation. 

Standard Features: 

" 80286 microprocessor running at 20 MHz. 

• 1 MB of RAM* expandable to 16 MBf 
(8 MBf on system board). 

■ fagc mode interleaved memory architecture. 

• LIM 4.0 support for memory over 1MB. 

• Integrated diskette and VGA video controller 
on system board. 

• Socket for Intel 80287 math coprocessor. 

■ One 3.5" 1.44 MB diskette drive. 

■ Integrated high performance hard disk inter¬ 
face on system board. 

• Enhanced 101-key keyboard. 

-1 parallel and 2 serial ports integrated on 
system board. 

• 3 full-sized industry standard expansion slots 
available. 

Options: 

■ External 525" 12 MB diskette drive. 

• 3.5 * 1.44 MB diskette drive. 

• Intel 80287 math coprocessor. 

• I MB RAM upgrade kit. 

•*Lease for us low as $85/Month. 


A great value in a full-featured AT com¬ 
patible. An 80286 computer running at 
12.5 MHz, this computer is completely 
Microsoft MS-DOS and MS OS/2 com- 
patible.The System 200 offers high speed 
drive options, industry standard com¬ 
patible BIOS and on-site service. As 
Executive Computing said of this com¬ 
puter’s predecessor, “If faster processing 
speed and low cost are two key issues 
affecting your purchase decision, this 
machine might be the ideal choice for 
your office!’ 

Standard Features: 

■ 80286 microprocessor running at 12.5 MHz. 

• 640 KB of RAM expandable to 16 MBf (4.6 
MBf on system board). 

• Socket for Intel 80287 math coprocessor. 

• 525" 12 MB or 3J" 1.44 MB diskette drive. 

■ Dual diskette and hard disk drive controller. 

• Enhanced 101-key keyboard. 

■ 1 parallel and 2 serial pons. 

■ 200-watt power supply. 

• 6 industry standard expansion slots. 
Options: 

■ Intel 80287 math coprocessor. 

■ 512 KB RAM upgrade kit. 

•*Least for as low as $99/Month. 


♦Performance Enhancements 
(Systems 325,310 and 220): 


page 300 DPI graphics, and have 31 standard fonts (7 
resident and 24 down-loadable from diskette). Dell laser 
printers also provide Hewlett-Packard LaserJet, Epson/FX, 
IBM Proprinter and Diablo 630 emulations. 

Dot Matrix Printers. 

Printer System 800: $699.95. 

Our highest resolution text and graphics, 24-pin dot matrix 
printer. Draft quality at 200 cps. Letter quality at 66 cps. 
Parallel and serial interfaces. Wide carriage. 

Printer System 600: $499.95. 

9-pin dot matrix. Draft quality at 240 cps. Near-letter 
quality at 60 cps. Parallel interface. Wide carriage. 

Printer System 300: $ 199.95. 

9-pin dot matrix. Draft quality at 144 cps. Near-letter 
quality at 36 cps. Four standard fonts. Parallel interface. 
Narrow carriage. 

Operating System Software. 

Dell Enhanced Microsoft* MS-DOS® 3.3: $99.95 

Dell Enhanced Microsoft MS-DOS 4.0: $119.95 


640 KB is available for programs and data. The 
remaining 384 KB is reserved for use by the sys¬ 
tem to enhance performance. 

tUsing 1 MB SIMMs. Inquire as to availability. 


(Both MS-DOS versions with disk cache and other utilities) 
Dell Enhanced MS* OS/2 Standard Edition 1.0: $324.95 


System 220 

With Monitor 

Disk Drives 

VGA Mono 

VGA Color Plus 

One Diskette Dnve 

S2299 

$2,599 

40MB-29 ms 
Hard Disk 

$2,999 

$3299 

100MB-29 ms 
Hard Disk 

$3,799 

$4,099 


System 200 

With Monitor & Adapter 

Hard Disk Drives 

VGA Mono 

VGA Color Plus 

40 MB-28 ms 

$2,699 

$2,999 

90 MB-18 ms ESDI 

$3,499 

$3,799 

150 MB-18 ms ESDI 

$3,999 

$4299 

322 MB-18 ms ESDI 

$5,999 

$6299 


To Order, Please Call 

800 - 426-5150 

In Canada, Call 800-387-5752 


Corporation. °Scrvice in remote locations will incur additional travel charges. 
(DI988 DELL COMPUTER CORPORATION. 


AD CODE NO UEcT| 











































TO ALLAY YOUR SUSPICIONS 


Your Total Satisfaction 
Is Guaranteed. 

Dell offers a complete line of systems, peripherals and 
software. 

And whatever you choose, you must be absolutely, 
totally satisfied with it. If not, simply return it within the 
first 30 days for a money-back refund. No questions asked. 
We call this our Total Satisfaction Guarantee. 

Support Is 

A Free Phone Call Away. 

Also included in your system price is our toll-free support 



The New 25 MHz 
386 System 325. 


The Dell 20 MHz 
386 System 310. 



line. It’s open every business day from 7 AM to 7 PM (CT). 
Simply dial (800)624-9896. 

On-Site Service Is Included 
In Your System Price. 

For those rare problems that can’t be handled over the 
phone, we’ll send a service technician to your location 
by the next business day. At absolutely no charge to 
you? Because included in system price is a year’s worth of 
on-site service. 

One-Year Warranty. 

Dell offers a one-year limited warranty, which warrants 
each system we manufacture to be free of defects in 
materials and workmanship for one full year. During that 
period we will repair or replace any defective products 
returned to our factory. 

For a lot of companies, leasing our systems is an even 
better idea because of the cash flow and tax advantages. 
And we guarantee fixed rates, so you know exactly how 
much to budget each month. We can even custom design 
a lease plan to fit the exact needs of your business. 

For the complete terms of our On-Site Service Con¬ 
tract, Satisfaction Guarantee, Warranty and leasing plans, 
write: Dell Computer Corporation, 9505 Arboretum Blvd., 
Austin, Texas 78759-7299. 


When you need the highest possible 
performance of any 386, this is the tech¬ 
nology of choice. Running at 25 MHz, 
the System 325 is faster than the Com¬ 
paq 386/25. Besides unequaled speed, it 
also offers Intel’s Advanced 82385 Cache 
Memory Controller and high perfor¬ 
mance disk drives. As a result, it gives 
you workstation-level performance for 
CAD/CAM and desktop publishing 
applications. It’s also especially effective 
as a network file server, and more than 
capable of handling the most complex 
spreadsheets and databases. 

Standard Features: 

• Intel 80386 microprocessor running at 25 MHz. 

• 1 MB of RAM* expandable to 16 MB using a 
dedicated high speed 32-bit memory slot 

•Advanced Intel 82385 Cache Memory 
Controller with 32 KB of high speed static 
RAM cache. 

• Page mode interleaved memory architecture. 

• VGA systems include a high performance 16- 
bit video adapter. 

■ Socket for 25 MHz Intel 80387 or 25 MHz 
WEITEK 3167 math coprocessor. 

• 5.25" 1.2 MB or 3.5" 1.44 MB diskette dnvt. 

• Dual diskette and hard disk drive controller. 

• Enhanced 101-key keyboard. 

• 1 parallel and 2 serial pons. 

• 200-watt power supply. 

• 8 industry standard expansion slots. 

Options: 

• 25 MHz Intel 80387 math coprocessor. 

• 1 MB or 4 MB memory upgrade lot 

• 2 MB or 8 MB memory expansion board kit. 
* m Leasefor as low as $245/Month. 


System 325 

With Monitor 8t Adapter 

Hard Disk Drives 

VGA Mono 

VGA Color Plus 

150 MB-18 ms ESDI 

S6.799 

S7.099 

322 MB-18 ms ESDI 

$8,799 

59,099 


The Dell System 325 is an FCC Class A device, 
intended for business use only. 


For business users who need a 386 sys¬ 
tem, this is the best combination of per¬ 
formance and value available. Running 
at 20 MHz, this 32-bit system is faster 
than the IBM PS/2' Model 70 and the 
Compaq 386/20e. Since it has the same 
high performance disk drives and Intel 
Advanced 82385 Cache Memory Con¬ 
troller as our System 325, it brings a new 
level of perf ormance to complex spread¬ 
sheets and databases. As you might expect, 
it runs windowed software at extremely 
high speed. It’s also well-suited for desk¬ 
top publishing applications, or as a net¬ 
work file server. 

Standard Features: 

• Intel 80386 microprocessor running at 20 MHz. 

• 1 MB of RAM* expandable to 16 MB using a 
dedicated high speed 32-bit memory slot. 

•Advanced Intel 82385 Cache Memoiy 
Controller with 32 KB of high speed static 
RAM cache. 

■ Page mode interleaved memory architecture. 

• VGA systems include a high performance 16- 
bit video adapter. 

• Socket for 20 MHz Intel 80387 or 20 MHz 
WEITEK 3167 math coprocessor. 

■ 5.25 " 1.2 MB or 3.5" 1.44 MB diskette drive. 

• Dual diskette and hard disk drive controller. 

• Enhanced 101-key keyboard. 

• 1 parallel and 2 serial ports. 

• 200-watt power supply. 

• 8 industry standard expansion slots. 

Options: 

• 20 MHz Intel 80387 math coprocessor. 

• 1 MB or 4 MB memory upgrade kit. 

• 2 MB or 8 MB memory expansion board kit. 
** Lease for as low as $140/Month. 


System 310 

With Monitor & Adapter 

Hard Disk Dnves 

VGA Mono 

VGA Color Plus 

40MB-28 ms 

S3.899 

$4,199 

90 MB-18 ms ESDI 

$4,699 

$4,999 

150 MB-18 ms ESDI 

$5,199 

$5,499 

322 MB-18 ms ESDI 

$7,199 

$7,499 


All prices and specifications arc subject to change without notice. Dell cannot be responsible for errors in typography or photography. ••Payments based on a 36-month open-end lease. 
In Cariada, configurations and prices will vary. Microsoft, MS and MS-DOS are registered trademarks owned by Microsoft Corp. Signifies trademarks of entities other than Dell Computer 






























Why you Should 

CONSIDER THE 
DELL 386 SYSTEMS, 

Despite Their 
Suspiciously low 
prices. 




















ur 386-based systems am priced about 35°/o 
less than comparable systems-like Compaq’s, 
Which may make you wonder if we’ve left some* 
thing important out Like high performance. 

Well we haven’t. 

In fact, these are among the fastest 386-based 
systems available. With more advanced features 
than you’d get in systems that list for up to 
$3000 more. 

Like Compaq’s. 

For instance* our 20 MHz System 310 offers 
you the best value available in any 386-based sys¬ 
tem. PC Magazine (6/14/88) describes it as “fast 
enough to bum the sand off a desert floor.” 

And If That Sounds Fast, 
Wait Till You See Our New 
25 MHz 386 -Based System. 

At 25 MHz, our new System 325 offers you the 
highest possible performance in a. 386. Like the 
System 310, it utilizes the very latest technology* 
including the Intel 82385 Cache Memory Con¬ 
troller, advanced 32-bit architecture and high per¬ 
formance drives. And of course, both systems are 
fully IBM PC compatible. (For more detailed 
specifications* see the inside pages.) 

But speed isn’t the only reason to buy from us. 
Or even the best reason. 

The First Personal 
Computer That’s Truly 
Personal. 

Dell configures systems to your own 
personal specifications. After an 


evaluation of your needs, we’ll help you select 
the features that are right for you. After your 
system unit is custom built, we’ll bum-in every¬ 
thing, add-in boards and all, to make sure the 
entire system works perfectly. 

Toll-Free Support And On-Site 
Service Included In The Price. 

Every Dell system includes the Dell System Ana¬ 
lyzer* a complete set of diagnostic tools. Which 
lets Dell’s expert technicians resolve problems 
right over the phone. This toll-free support serv¬ 
ice is available from 7 AM to 7 PM (CT) every 
business day, at no extra charge. 

And if your system requires hands-on service* 
a technician will be at your location the next 
business day. At absolutely no charge to you^ 
Because included in the price of your system is a 
full year of on-site service. 

But that’s not all. You also get our 30-day 
money-back guarantee. As well as our one-year 
limited warranty on parts and workmanship. 

And If You Still Think You Get 
What You Pay For, Consider This. 

When you buy or lease from Dell, you buy 
direcdy from our manufacturing facility in Austin, 
Texas. Which means we eliminate dealer markups, 
allowing us to give you a lot more 386 for less. 

This same principle is behind 
all the Dell systems. Review them 
in detail. Then call us at (800) 
426-5150 to order the system 
that’s right for you. 


DELL 

COMPUTER 

CORPORATION 


Circle 78 on Reader Service Card 


MARCH 1989 * B Y T E 1 













BYTE 

MARCH 1989 VOL. 14/NO. 3 


PRODUCTS IN PERSPECTIVE 


65 What’s New 

97 Short Takes 

CarrierNET, when Carrier 
Current Technologies' package 
works, it works well 
Turbo EMS, almosPmagic 
EMS emulation from Lantana 
PC-WriteS.O, 

Quicksoft r s now-serious product 
CCC Model 2406, Compu Com’s 
2400-bps modem for $95 
Picture Publisher # 

Astral *s image-editing package 


REVIEWS 

162 Product Focus: 
Upscale Monitors 

by Steve Apiki 
and Stanford Diehl 
When you're selecting 
a monitor, 
bigness 
actually 
adds utility 
to a system. 



COVER STORY 
Battle of the Chips 
page 274 

The 80286 vs. 80386, 
and an early look 
at two new 
SX-based machines. 


177 Laptop Dilemma 

by Jeff Holliman 
The Compaq SLT/286 and 
the Ogivar 286 offer different 
features for different needs, 

191 Advanced Floppy Disk 
Drive Controllers 

by Jeff Holtzman 

Installing the right disk controller 
lets you share information stored 
on incompatible disk formats. 

197 Extensible Text Editors 
for Programmers 

by Jon Udell 

BRIEF, EMACS, and Epsilon 
are powerful embedded languages 
that offer ultimate flexibility. 

209 A Virtual Toolkit 

for Windows and the Mac 

by Ray Va ldes 
XVT’s libraries guarantee 
Mac-to-PC and PCdo-MAC 
portability. 

221 Superbase 4 

by Nick Baran 
An intriguing database 
program, but does it promise 
more than it can deliver? 




EXPERT ADVICE 


109 


129 


135 


Computing at Chaos Manor: 
Chaos Manor Awards 

by Jerry Pournelie 
It was a very good year 
for computer users. 

Applications Plus: 

Trackball Madness 

by Ezra Shapiro 
A tale of woe that points out 
the short life span 
of some input devices. 

Down to Business: 

What Hath COMDEX 
Wrought? 

by Wayne Rash Jr . 

All that glitters in Las 
Vegas may be just another 
COMDEX fact. 


143 


149 


155 


Macinations: 

A Macintosh Retrospective 

by Don Crabb 
The Macintosh is five 
years old. How has it affected 
the world of computers? 

OS/2 Notebook: 

Not Quite COMDEX/2 Yet 

by Mark Mi nasi 
On the trail of the first 
OS/2 applications. 

COMl: 

The Protocol Pack 

by Brock N> Meeks 
In this look at XMODEM, 
file transfer protocols are put 
through their paces. 


2 BYTE* MARCH 1989 


COVER PHOTOGRAPHY: PAUL AVIS © 19S9 






























INTERNATIONAL SECTION 
begins after page 96 


IN DEPTH 


228 Introduction: 

Object-Oriented Programming 

231 What’s in an Object? 

by Dave Thomas 
Object-oriented programming 
allows you to build custom 
applications from existing 
ones easily. 

245 Learning the Language 

by Peter Wegner 
Object-oriented languages 
may well become the standard 
method for programming 
in the 1990s. 




255 Separation of Powers 

by Mahesh H. Dodani, Charles 
E. Hughes, and J. Michael 
Moshell 

The object-oriented paradigm 
shows great promise as the basis 
for achieving a mature user- 
interface technology. 

265 The Next Step 

by Tom Thompson 
Object-oriented programming 
simplifies software development 
with the NeXT computer’s 
NextStep. 

270 Object-Oriented Resources 

Languages, databases, 
and related products. 


Object-Oriented Programming/228 


FEATURES 


274 Cover Story 

Battle of the Chips 

by Frank Hayes 
The powerful 80386 
microprocessor and its 
stepchild, the 80386SX, 
take on the venerable 80286. 


HANDSON 

281 Under the Hood: 

Caching in on Memory Systems 

by Brett Glass 
How do designers make fast 
CPUs run with almost no wait 
states, in spite of slow memory? 

287 Some Assembly Required: 
Trees ’n Keys, Part 3 

by Rick Grehan 
In the final installment 
of this series, Rick discusses 
bringing the database together. 



DEPARTMENTS 


6 Editorial: OS/3 and Unix’s 
Last, Best Hope 
11 Microbytes 
24 Letters 
33 Chaos Manor Mail 
38 Ask BYTE 
51 Book Reviews 

335 Coming Up in BYTE 

READER SERVICE 

334 Editorial Index by Company 

336 Alphabetical Index to Advertisers 
338 Index to Advertisers 

by Product Category 
Inquiry Reply Cards: after 340 


BYTE (ISSN 0360-5280) is published monthly with an additional issue in 
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Form 3579. and fulfillment question* to BYTE Subscriptions, P O Bos 531. 
Hightstown. NJ 08520. Second-class postage paid at Peterborough. NH 
03458, and additional mailing offices Postage paid at Winnipeg, Manitoba 
Registration number 9321. Printed in the United States of America. 

Not responsible for lost manuscripts or photos Opinions expressed by the 
authors are not necessarily those of BYTE 
Copyright © 1989 by McGraw-Hill. Inc All rights reserved Trademark 
registered in the United Slates Patent and Trademark Office. 

Subscription questions or problems should be addressed to: 
BYTE Subscriber Service. P.O Bax 551. Hightstown. NJ 
08520 



PROGRAM LISTINGS 

From BIX: see 226 
From BYTEnet: 
call (617) 861-9764 
On disk or in print: 
see card after 320 


MARCH 1989 • B Y T E 3 
















BYTE 


EDITOR m CHIEF PUBU5HEH/GROUP VICE PRESIDENT 

Frederic S. Langa J - Burt lotara 


operations 

Glenn Hartwig Associate Managing Editor 


ADMINISTRATION 

Donna Nordtund, Publisher's Assistant 


REVIEWS (Hardware. Software, Product FoCUa) 

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Senior Technical Editor, Software, Richard Cretan Director, 
BYTE Lab, Stephen Apiki Jesting Editor. BYTE Lab, 
Stanford Diehl Testing Editor, BYTE Lab 

NEWS AND TECHNOLOGY (Mtorobytes, What’s New, Short Take*) 

Rich Mal loy Associate Managing Editor, D- Barker Senior 
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Editor, New Products , Andrew Reinhardt Associate News 
Editor 

Peterborough: Roger Adams Assodate News Editor, David 
Andrews Associate News Editor, Mart ha Hlck$ Associate 
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SENIOR TECHNICAL EDITORS 

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TECHNICAL EDITORS 

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CONTRIBUTING EDITORS 

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4 BYTE* MARCH L989 











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MARCH 1989 - BYTE 5 






















EDITORIAL ■ Fred Langa 



The next 90 days will 
be historic in the 
operating-system wars 


L ast month, I briefly examined 
the current fit between OS/2’s 
Presentation Manager and 
IBM Vs Systems Application Ar¬ 
chitecture—IBM’s grand scheme for top- 
to-bottom software uniformity. PM 
brings SAA to the desktop. 

That’s nice, you might say, but so 
what? Yes, it will be good to be able to 
share data transparently among all man¬ 
ner of True Blue machines. And yes, it 
will be a,pius to be able to sit down at al¬ 
most any IBM box and find a familiar- 
looking interface staring back at you. 

But the Macintosh is already more or 
less uniform within its own family and 
has been for some time. And the chaos of 
Unix is rapidly boiling down to a few 
major and reasonably similar choices. 
For example, X Windows is the underly¬ 
ing structure for AT&T/Sun’s Open 
Look, the Open Software Foundation’s 
OSF/Motif, Sony’s NWS interface, and 
others. Apple has even announced X 
Windows forA/UX. 

Thus, an asset such as a standardized 
GUI (graphical user interface)—while 
welcome and necessary—won’t, by it¬ 
self, give OS/2 any particular edge. 

The edge—if there is to be one—will 
have to come from planned enhance¬ 
ments to OS/2. At a recent two-day brief¬ 
ing staged by IBM and Microsoft, Steve 
Ballmer of Microsoft offered some 
glimpses into the future: 

* OS/2 will be made faster (“although 
people are surprised at how quick OS/2 
already is/’ Ballmer said). It will also be 
made smaller. “You can run a functional 
OS/2 with 1. 6 megabytes if you forgo the 
compatibility box or with about 4 mega- 


OS/3 AND UNDCS 

Last, Best Hope 


bytes full-blown; and that compares well 
with other powerful operating systems,” 
he said. 

* The FAT (file-allocation table) file sys¬ 
tem will get an overhaul. “It can stand a 
scrub-up,” Ballmer admitted, “We’ll 
improve performance in file access and 
in smart caching to produce a superfast, 
supercompedtive file system using the 
fastest techniques known to man.” He’s 
not one for understatement. 

* The eight-dot-three filename restric¬ 
tion will finally be lifted, allowing addi¬ 
tional attributes for items like subject, 
author, and file revision dates. 

* OS/2 will support larger disk volumes 
and provide standardized access to dif¬ 
ferent media, including WORM (write 
once, read many times) drives. 

* OS/2 LAN Manager enhancements 
will include services to enable you to 
browse a network’s users, resources, and 
so forth, which can be important on very 
large systems; additional security ser¬ 
vices; additional program-to-program 
communications support; improvements 
in transport efficiency; and “full coordi¬ 
nation” with the planned file system en¬ 
hancements mentioned earlier. 

* And most significantly, within the 
next few months, we’ll see the first tool¬ 
kits for OS/3, or OS/386, or whatever the 
80386-specific version of OS/2 will be 
called. This is the version we’ve all been 
waiting for—the version that will finally 
deliver on the full promise of OS/2. It 
will, of course, support a true flat ad¬ 
dress space; it will demand-page {in 4K- 
byte blocks); and it will offer “full 
binary compatibility with all OS/2 appli¬ 
cations—all OS/2 applications will run 
unchanged,” Ballmer said, although 
they’ll run faster. 

Best of all from a user’s perspective, 
this new version of OS/2 will at last sup¬ 
port multiple concurrent DOS sessions, 
which will make the transition from 
DOS to OS/3 fairly painless and avoid 
the hassles and limitations of OS/2’s cur¬ 
rent compatibility box. 


As for DOS extensions, watch for 
many of the enhancements listed above 
for OS/2 to show up in future versions of 
DOS. Many of them are already available 
from third parties anyway: Norton’s File 
Info lets you work around the eight-dot- 
three filename limits (albeit clumsily). 
Many vendors offer add-on support for 
disk volumes larger than 32 megabytes. 
And there are numerous solid multi¬ 
taskers available that work just fine with 
vanilla DOS. 

PM intentionally bears a strong family 
resemblance to DOS-based Microsoft 
Windows. Over time, the available DOS 
interfaces and PM will become even 
closer, partly to move DOS at least a lit¬ 
tle within the SAA fold, and partly for 
pure marketing reasons. “People can 
safely stick their toes in the GUI waters 
with Windows and migrate to OS/2 PM 
when their favorite applications show up 
there,” Ballmer explains. 

All this makes DOS attractive in the 
short term, and Microsoft apparently 
concedes the point: Ballmer restated 
what BYTE’s COMDEX polls have been 
telling us for some time—that it will be at 
least 1991 before OS/2 will be able to 
pass DOS. 

But Unix is also an attractive alterna¬ 
tive. After years of ineffectual internal 
wrangling, the Unix community is fi¬ 
nally getting its act together. Within the 
next few months, Unix will take its last, 
best shots at becoming a “mainstream” 
operating system outside of the academic 
and scientific venues. There will be a 
great deal of activity: Very soon, OSF 
will release its Motif user interface, fol¬ 
lowed by preliminary versions of OSF/1 
(its proprietary version of Unix); Next- 
Step will leave beta testing and ship ver¬ 
sion 1.0; AT&T will release its response 
to OSF; and more. 

Things are about to get very, very 
interesting. 

—Fred Langa 
Editor in Chief 
(BIXname flanga”) 


6 BYTE • MARCH 1989 






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Installed in minutes, the Renegade 386 M motherboard turns any 
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lightning fast with both old software AND new OS/2 releases. 


| s this you? 

You would like to have extraordinary computing 
As peed and power. You want number crunching ability. You 
need complex CAD capabilities. Or graphics. Or multi-tasking, 

And you haven’t got it. (And you don’t want to spend a 
fortune to replace good equipment with the newest standard.) 

Weep no more. You can turn your present system into 
the latest, high-performance system that will equal or exceed 
the best of the new computers. 

Renegade 386. 

A new heart and brain for your computer. 

Renegade Technologies offers designers, engineers, 
architects, and computer-dependent businesses a simple and 
reliable alternative to obsolescence. Or the unreasonable 
expense of a new system. 

Simply replace the “motherboard’’ of your present sys¬ 
tem with a Renegade 386™ motherboard. 

It takes a screwdriver and less than 20 minutes. And 
costs but, $1695. 

That’s thousands qf dollars less than a new IBM System/2 
Model 80. 

But it gives you more than just the latest industry stan¬ 
dard. You can run your old software on it. Probably anything 
you now use on your XT or AT. Big Blue can’t do that. 

You can use your present 16-bit peripherals. (If you’ve 
looked at PC “add-on" cards, you already know your old equip¬ 
ment would be useless.) 

But with Renegade 386™ you’ll have to find some other 
excuse to throw away your current modem, network card, 



EGA or disk controller 
cards, 

The Renegade 386™ 
board comes with an iron¬ 
clad (me year limited 
warranty. It uses genuine 
U.S. made Intel 386 chips 
and is designed and manu¬ 
factured in the U.S.A. 
by Hauppauge Computer 
Works. Hauppauge is a 
mgjor developer of software 


Multi task with Lotus 1-2-3 and 
other applications running side-by- 
side on the Microsoft Windows! 386 
desktop. 

support for Microsoft and IBM products, and is producer of 
the highly respected Hauppauge 8087 or 80287 highspeed 
math coprocessors. Over 50,000 have been .sold. 

Major computer magazine reviews in the last year have 
hailed our Ilauppauge-made board as a major breakthrough 
in a high speed, high power, high performance upgrade 
product. 


Not an a«elerator card. Not a "turbo" gimmick. 
Renegade 386™ gives you a full-featured 
new computer. 

Thanks to Renegade’s 80386 microprocessor your com¬ 
puter will now boast a 32-bit data path —and a clock speed of 
16 MHz with zero wait state access. Up to 8 expansion slots 
are provided depending on your computer configuration. 

Your “new” computer also will now have 1 Megabyte 
of 100ns RAM. This is not a naked board. And it also includes 
a 32-bit high-speed RAM expansion slot which you can popu¬ 
late with up to 15 Mbytes of system memory. 


8 BYTE * MARCH 1989 




















In practical terms that simply means that programs like 
Lotus 1-2-3 or new products like Foxbase 386, and almost any¬ 
thing else, will runfaster than anything you tuwe ever seen 
Which is a minor problem for some folks who are playing 
computer games on company time. Renegade 386™ may run 
them at speeds far too fast for human reactions. 

The world is not perfect. 

Otherwise Renegade 
386™ is perfectly com¬ 
patible with products 
like AutoCAD, Aldus 
PageMaker, Microsoft Win¬ 
dows, Ventura Publisher, 
the Novell Network and siz- 
zlers like Paradox 386. We 
haven’t yet found a popular 
program we can’t run 
with it. 


Faster, easier presen tation, graphics 
with newest software releases 


Power hungry? Equip Renegade 386™ with 
even more RAM—without speed loss. 


Add up to 15 Mbytes of system memory with Renegade™ 
expansion modules that plug right into your Renegade 386™ 
32-bit expansion slot. And run with no toss of speed 
—something no IBM or Compaq model can match. 

There’s a lot of confusion in computer claims, but the 
feet is that with zero wait state, our 16 MHz is effectively the 
same as those highly touted machines running at 20 MHz 
with one wait state. 

So plug in Renegade™ expansion modules in 2-and 
4-Megabyte increments and run Windows 386 applications at 
the speed God intended. 


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graphics, make massive and instant spreadsheet recal¬ 
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Wring it out—on anything your software is up to. 

But don’t, stop there. Challenge your best com¬ 
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After 30 days, if it isn’t for yon, for any reason, 
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MARCH 1989 - BYTE 9 















































Creative License 


you've ever tried to combine 
windows, menus, forms, and text 
entry to create an effective user 
interface, you know how challenging 
it can be. 

Perhaps you've turned to a third- 
party library for help. Only to run into 
restrictions, limitations, and dead ends. 
So you had to compromise your design. 
Or modify the library source code. Or 
start over. 

Which is precisely why we designed 
Vermont Views™, the new generation 
of Windows for Data®, the best-selling 
C library for user interfaces* 

Vermont Views offers unbridled, un¬ 
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The Human Interface Of 
Your Dreams 

Vermont Views offers an unparal¬ 
leled set of interface building blocks that 
you can combine in unlimited ways: 

■ Menus can be created in any style 
you choose, made scrollable vertically 
and horizontally, and nested to any level, 
features include n-th character selection, 
checkmarks, and unavailable items. 

1 Data entry forms can be bigger 
than their display windows, have scroll¬ 
able regions for the entry of variable lines 
of items, lists of choices for data entry, 
context sensitive help, and special 
decimal, date, time, and toggle fields. 

1 A mini word processor can be at¬ 
tached to a field window in a form or 


used as a pop-up note taker. 

You're In Charge 

Because you can write and attach 
functions to the beginning and end of 
menus, forms, fields, and to keys, you're 
always in control. 

Use these control functions to call up 
subsidiary forms and menus, change 
field values and the active field, exit or 
abort a form, do almost any task you can 
imagine. 

Ail interactive capabilities of Ver¬ 
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change or disable key assignments - even 
add to the functions provided for menus, 
forms, text entry, and windows* 

One For All 

Vermont Views is available for DOS, 
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\fermont Views provides internation¬ 
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Novice Or Expert 

Despite its depth and flexibility, Ver¬ 
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contained section of the manual, so you 
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To help you become an expert in no 
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10 BYTE * MARCH 1989 














Microbytes 


Staff-written highlights of developments in technology and the microcomputer industry, 
compiled from Microbytes Daily and BYTEweek reports 


Tl’s Prototype Transistor Takes a Quantum Leap 


L aptop supercomputers 
that run off flashlight 
batteries may be the stuff of 
science fiction, but Texas In¬ 
struments has developed an 
experimental transistor that 
may very well make such 
advanced electronic devices 
possible within a decade. 

At the company’s Dallas re¬ 
search center, physicists 
have built the world’s first 
quantum-effect transistor, a 
device that operates on a fun¬ 
damentally different prin¬ 
ciple than the transistors that 
currently make up our elec¬ 
tronic world. Quantum-effect 
devices potentially will fit 
100 times as many functions 
in the same space as, and 
consume far less power than, 
today’s ICs. 

At dimensions less than 
0.02 micron, principles 
known as quantum mechan¬ 
ical effects dominate the be¬ 
havior of matter. The quan¬ 
tum transistor—called the 
bipolar resonant tunneling 
transistor—is the first semi¬ 
conductor to directly con¬ 
trol a quantum well, an al¬ 
most unimaginably thin 
layer that allows only elec¬ 
trons with certain energy 
levels to pass through. 

Quantum transistors have 
active regions that are about 
100 times smaller than the 
corresponding areas on a 
contemporary IC. These re¬ 
gions range between 10 and 
20 nanometers in size, 
which is about 10,000 times 
smaller than a human hair. 


F rom operating systems 
to interfaces to file for¬ 
mats, the microcomputer 
industry is uniquely confus¬ 
ing. Industry executives say 


And future generations of the 
devices will be even 
smaller. At these micro¬ 
scopic dimensions, elec¬ 
trons act more like waves 
than particles. They occupy 
discrete energy levels, known 
as bands, and resonate 
when they’re confined to a 
region that’s the size of 
their wavelength. These 
properties let quantum tran¬ 
sistors switch at speeds thou¬ 
sands of times faster than 
today’s conventional devices. 

Transistors are made up 
of three parts: Current flows 
between an emitter and a 
collector, controlled by a 
base. In standard transis¬ 
tors, the current flow is con¬ 
trolled by varying the volt¬ 
age that’s applied to the base. 
The base controls physical 
barriers of semiconducting 
material called P-N junc¬ 
tions and depletion layers. 

TI researchers say the 
breakthrough that made the 
quantum-effect transistor 
possible was the discovery of 
a means to directly control 
the tunneling current by 
modulating the voltage po¬ 
tential inside a quantum 
well, which is the device’s 
base. The modulation takes 
place by putting a charge 
into the energy well at an 
energy level that’s just 
below the energy level where 
the actual current “tun¬ 
nels” across the base from 
the emitter to the collector. 

The speed at which the 
current travels between the 


things should straighten out 
in the next year or so. But 
one much-publicized issue du 
jour isn’t confusing at all, 
say some industry leaders. 


emitter and collector- 
known as transit speed—is 
several orders of magnitude 
faster in a quantum transistor 
than in today’s conventional 
devices, TI researchers say. 
The TI scientists estimate 
that the transit speed is in 
quadrillionths of a second. 

The quantum transistor, 
which is only a laboratory 
prototype now, was fabri¬ 
cated using a combination of 
gallium arsenide, alumi¬ 
num gallium arsenide, and 
indium gallium arsenide. 

Practical applications for 
the quantum transistor are at 
least 10 years away. And 
before the transistor can be 
commercially feasible, 
techniques will have to be de¬ 
veloped to manufacture and 
interconnect the tiny struc¬ 
tures reliably in production 
quantities. Moreover, TI sci¬ 
entists admit that quantum 
transistors will require the 
development of “whole new 
circuit architectures.” But 
they predict that once the 
problems are solved, the cost 
of quantum transistors will 
quickly compete with that of 
conventional devices. 

Meanwhile, TI is touting 
quantum transistors as the 
next generation of solid- 
state devices. George Heil- 
meier, the company’s chief 
technical officer, says that 
“comparing quantum effect 
devices with today’s semi¬ 
conductors is like compar¬ 
ing semiconductors with vac¬ 
uum tubes.” 


and that’s personal com¬ 
puter bus architectures. 

Micro Channel or the 
EISA (for extended industry 
continued 


NANOBYTES 


• Expenditures for re¬ 
search and development 
in the U.S. will reach 
$129 billion this year, 
according to a report 
from Battelle (Columbus, 
OH). That’s an increase 
of 3.4 percent, or about 
$4 billion, over what 

the National Science 
Foundation says was 
spent on R&D in 1988. 
Battel le’s forecast says 
American industry will 
fund most of that re¬ 
search, to the tune of 
$92 billion. The remain¬ 
ing spare change will 
come from academic in¬ 
stitutions, nonprofit 
organizations, and the 
federal government. 

• Texas Instruments 
and Hitachi have agreed 
to work together to de¬ 
velop a new series of 16- 
megabit DRAM cir¬ 
cuits. The American and 
Japanese chip giants say 
they’ll jointly design 
technology that both 
can use. As part of the 
deal, each company will 
have access to the other’s 
DRAM technology “as 

it relates to 16-megabit 
development," a TI 
spokesperson said. While 
some Japanese compa¬ 
nies are currently sam¬ 
pling 4-megabit memory 
chips, Fujitsu recently 
publicly detailed its de¬ 
sign for 64-megabit 
DRAMs. 

• Bill Gates put it 
down as ho-hum, but 
what do other industry 
captains say about the 
NeXT computer? 

Apple’s John Sculley said 
that if anyone can pull 
off a start-up company 

continued 


Don’t Worry About the Bus, Some Say 


MARCH 1989 -BYTE 11 












MICROBYTES 


NANOBYTES 


successfully, it’s Steve 
Jobs. But Sculley said it 
will be at least a few 
years before NeXT be¬ 
comes a competitive 
threat. “The key will be 
software. Many of the 
technical features [of the 
hardware] are not new 
to the industry.” Regard¬ 
ing Jobs’s prediction 
that the Macintosh will 
start to decline in the 
1990s, Sculley said, “I 
have a lot of respect for 
Steve, but his track 
record on predicting the 
Macintosh is not as good 
as his track record on 
creating new products. 
The Macintosh will 
only get better.” 

“We’ll compare it to 
Sun’s mid-1989 product 
and we’ll compare 
apples to apples,” said 
Scott McNealy of Sun 
Microsystems. Sun is ex¬ 
pected to announce, any 
day, week, or month 
now, a “desktop work¬ 
station” that, if you lis¬ 
ten to rumors, will be 
so good that it will take 
people away from the 
Mac II, the Personal 
VAX, souped-up PCs, 
and other systems aimed 
at number- and image¬ 
intensive applications. 

“The only thing I see 
in NeXT that’s really 
unique is the operating 
system. The hardware 
features may appear on 
other machines before 
NeXT is even on the 
market,” said Steve Dow 
of Calera Recognition 
Systems. 

Reese Jones of Far- 
allon, which develops 
Macintosh products, 
said he thinks program¬ 
mers will like the NeXT 
cube. He cited the 
Display PostScript im¬ 
aging model as a very at¬ 
tractive feature. Go’s 
Jerry Kaplan said he 
thinks NeXT’s “great- 
continued 


standard architecture) bus? 
It’s not so confusing after 
all, said industry heavy¬ 
weights at the recent PC Out¬ 
look conference in San 
Francisco. Tandy Corp.’s 
John Roach dismissed all 
the “vapor talk” in the 
micromedia about the “bus 
wars.” “Users don’t need to 
worry about the bus, any¬ 


way, yet we continue to de¬ 
bate and debate and de¬ 
bate,” he said. 

Roach suggested that 
companies should “do more 
strategizing within rather 
than in full view of our cus¬ 
tomers.” Microsoft chair¬ 
man Bill Gates agreed that 
the bus architecture has no 
effect on software compati¬ 


bility and is therefore not 
very important to users. Rod 
Canion of Compaq, figured 
to be the ringleader behind 
EISA, agreed with that, but 
he put in a plug for 32-bit bus 
architectures, which he said 
will be more important in the 
1990s, when mainframe/ 
personal computer connec¬ 
tivity becomes widespread. 


“Chasing After Change”: Life Gets Harder 
for Software Developers 


D espite mostly glowing 
predictions of comput¬ 
ing in the next decade, in¬ 
dustry executives at the re¬ 
cent PC Outlook conference 
agreed that the lag in soft¬ 
ware development will get 
worse. Developers at the con¬ 
ference talked about the 
overwhelming complexity of 
designing new software ap¬ 
plications for today’s market. 

The problem is keeping 
up with the competing hard¬ 
ware and operating system 
platforms as well as design¬ 
ing for graphical interfaces. 
Jerry Kaplan, CEO of Go 
Corp. and a former execu¬ 
tive at Lotus, pointed out that 
Lotus 1-2-3 version 3 is 
actually six different prod¬ 
ucts because of the different 
operating systems it will run 
under (including DOS, 

OS/2, and Unix). Kaplan 


said that small software 
companies are faced with tre¬ 
mendous financial risks if 
they pick the wrong environ¬ 
ment for their application. 

The problem is largely 
caused by hardware vendors 
“chasing after annual 
change” to differentiate 
themselves, thus making it 
hard for software developers 
to keep up, says Adele 
Goldberg of Pa re Place Sys¬ 
tems. Goldberg also blamed 
the lack of software tools for 
allowing one application to 
work on multiple platforms. 

Software developers face 
a tough challenge. But as 
Reese Jones of Farallon 
Computing put it, “There 
will be no more home-run 
products. We can’t do that 
anymore.” The trick is to 
work on small pieces incre¬ 
mentally. Developers need 


to continue working in small 
teams. Throwing lots of 
people at a project doesn’t 
work. And companies will 
have to hope they chose the 
right environment for their 
product, he said. 

Software companies have 
learned from the famous de¬ 
lays at Lotus and Ashton¬ 
Tate. Companies will be 
more cautious about pre- 
announcing upcoming prod¬ 
ucts and providing time¬ 
tables for their availability, 
and they will, in general, 
be more tight-lipped about 
their plans. This may be 
tough for the press covering 
these subjects, but it cer¬ 
tainly will help software 
companies avoid the embar¬ 
rassment that Lotus and Ash¬ 
tonTate have had to face 
because of products missing 
announced shipping dates. 


Kodak Packs 4 Million Pixels onto Image Sensor Chip 


C apping a five-year de¬ 
velopment effort in elec¬ 
tronic imaging, Eastman 
Kodak has announced a 4- 
million-pixel image sensor 
chip that could have long¬ 
term implications for both 
commercial and consumer 
applications. Officially 
dubbed the KAF-4200 Full- 
Frame Imager, the chip is 
similar in design to charge- 
coupled device (CCD) sen¬ 
sors used in such applications 
as TV cameras. But there’s 
a very large resolution 
difference. 


A typical CCD chip in a 
consumer-type video camera 
has a resolution of 510 by 
389 pixels, while the Kodak 
chip has a resolution of 
2048 by 2048 pixels. This re¬ 
sults in “near-photograph¬ 
ic” quality, and it’s all 
packed onto a package 
that’s just 19 millimeters 
square. 

But the KAF-4200 isn’t 
designed for full-motion 
video. Using a pair of 20- 
MHz output channels, it’s ca¬ 
pable of delivering only 10 
frames per second, well 


below the 30 frames per 
second required for full 
motion. 

Potential applications for 
the chip are numerous, in¬ 
cluding ultrahigh-resolution 
scanners and ultrahigh-qual- 
ity electronic still cameras. 
Consumer applications, how¬ 
ever, are many years away, 
largely because of the KAF- 
4200’s price. Although 
Kodak hasn’t announced a 
price yet, a similar chip 
with 1.7 million pixels sells 
for $25,000 for perfect 

continued 


12 BYTE* MARCH 1989 












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hypertext electronic manual that can make you 
instantly more productive, even if you don't know 
the first thing about programming QB Advisor 
actually lets you experiment by cutting and past¬ 
ing useful sample programs right into your pro¬ 
gramming window. Only Microsoft has it Only 
Microsoft could. And it’s just one of the things you’ll 
learn about new Microsoft® QuickBASIC version 45 
for IBM® PCs and compatibles. 

Another is the step-by-step tutorial that actu¬ 
ally takes you through every stage of programming 
by working you through a complete program. 

And QB Express—the interactive way to 
learn all about your programming environment in 
a matter of minutes—not hours. 

Microsoft QuickBASIC also comes with 
Easy Menus that let you develop programs with 


Microeoft-Quicfcll^SIC 


a minimum number of menu choices. Context- 
sensitive Help for immediate help with error 
messages and variables by simply punching a key 
or clicking a mouse. And a built- 
in debugger that lets you see 
exactly what your program is 
doing as its doing it 

Best of all, Microsoft; Quick¬ 
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Microsoft QuickBASIC version 45. If program¬ 
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Making it all make sense: 


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and the Microsoft logo are registered trademarks and Making it all make sense is a trademark of Microsoft Corporation. IBM is a registered trademark of International Business Machines Corporation. 


MARCH 1989 - BYTE 13 






MICROBYTES 


NANOBYTES 


est innovation was the 
deal with IBM,” Kaplan 
also said that NeXT may 
have an uphill battle 
trying to capture users 
who don't care about 
programming as well as 
scientists who don’t care 
about high-level interface 
tools. 

“Steve is king of ease 
of use,” said Adele Gold¬ 
berg of ParcPlace Sys¬ 
tems, adding that the 
main feature of the 
NextStep operating envi¬ 
ronment is “putting 
control on the desktop. ” 

* Vendors like Aldus, 
AshtonTate, and Inter¬ 
leaf have been working 
with DEC windows for 
several months now, say 
DEC officials. DEC win¬ 
dows is “quite porta¬ 
ble,^ said DECwindows 
team leader Scott 
McGregor. DECwindows 
applications will be 
ported to the OS/2 envi¬ 
ronment once his team 
knows what users want, 
McGregor said. 

* Prentice-Hall {Engle¬ 
wood Cliffs, NJ) is fin¬ 
ishing up publication of 
two 10-voiume series of 
AT&T documentation 
to go with version 3,2 of 
Unix System V. One 

set covers plain Unix; the 
other, Unix for 80386- 
based systems. 

* Computer software 
and computer systems 
were two of the “worst 
performing industry 
groups” during 1988, 
according to a report re¬ 
leased by Standard & 
Poor’s. Collective finan¬ 
cial performance of 
software companies fell 
13 percent last year (2 
percent better than gold 
mining), while compa¬ 
nies involved in computer 
systems declined by 3.6 
percent, S&P analysts 
said. On the happy side 
of that scale, with gains 

continued 


chips, with the price going as 
low as $1000 for chips with 
defective pixels, A Kodak 
spokesperson said the price 
for the KAF-4200 is “likely” 
to be somewhere in the 
$50,000 to $100,000 range. 
That will limit its initial ap¬ 
plications primarily to the 
military and to sophisti¬ 
cated applications, such as 
medical imaging. 

Dr, Michael McCreary, 
manager of product develop¬ 
ment for Kodak’s Micro¬ 


electronics Division, told 
Mkrobytes Daily that one 
of the reasons the chip will 
be so expensive is that the 
yield of perfect chips during 
the manufacturing process 
is extremely low. In addition 
to the problems of produc¬ 
ing a chip with 4,194,304 
perfect individual micro¬ 
scopic diodes on a 19-mm 
square, the fabrication pro¬ 
cess has to be held to close 
tolerances to eliminate 
what’s called “dark cur¬ 


rent,” spurious noise in the 
semiconductor substrate that 
causes bright speckles in 
the image. 

Kodak had planned to 
start shipping samples of the 
chip in January, with full- 
fledged production scheduled 
by the middle of this year, 
the company said. 

For further information, 
contact Eastman Kodak, Mi¬ 
croelectronics Technology 
Division, Rochester, NY 
14650,(716) 477-7053. 


Novell to Offer Tool for Distributed Processing 


N ovell plans to soon of¬ 
fer a software tool that 
will help programmers de¬ 
velop applications that fea¬ 
ture distributed processing. 
The new NetWare RPC (for 
remote procedure call) is a 
C preprocessor and a set of 
network-specific library 
files designed for various 
network protocols. Net¬ 
Ware RPC is actually a 
Novell version of a product 
developed and already being 
sold by Netwise (Boulder, 
CO). NetWare RPC is sched¬ 
uled to be available in the 
first quarter of 1990 for both 
DOS and OS/2. 

In designing a distrib¬ 
uted-processing or client/ 
server application, a pro¬ 
grammer will divide the ap¬ 
plication so that part of it 
will run on a user’s work¬ 
station (the client side) and 
part on a central file server. 
With Netware RPC, the 


programmer will not have to 
be concerned with any of 
the comm u n ic at ion s-or iented 
code that is needed by each 
particular type of network 
operating system. Forex- 
ample, the programmer 
could use a single set of net¬ 
work functions and compile 
an application to run on a 
NETBIOS-compatible net¬ 
work, Later, the program¬ 
mer could recompile the pro¬ 
gram with a different 
library file to have the appli¬ 
cation run on a network that 
uses OS/2’s Named Pipes 
protocol or the Sockets pro¬ 
tocol used in Berkeley Unix, 
In addition to these library 
files, Netwise will also have 
library files for the TCP/IP 
protocol used in Unix and the 
SPX protocol used by 
Novell, A library file for 
IBM’s APPC protocol used 
in its System Network Archi¬ 
tecture is scheduled to be 


available next year. 

Initially, Novell will of¬ 
fer only the SPX library file. 
Developers, however, will 
be able to obtain the other 
network protocol files di¬ 
rectly from Netwise, Also, 
Netwise’s own version of 
the product, called RPC 
Tool, is available for sev¬ 
eral environments, including 
DOS, OS/2, Unix, and 
DEC VMS. The DOS version 
starts at $1250; the OS/2 
version, $1750. When the 
Novell version of the prod¬ 
uct becomes available 
(planned for the first quar¬ 
ter of 1989), the DOS version 
will sell for $950; the OS/2 
version will sell for $1750, 

For further information, 
contact Novell, 122 East 
1700 St., P.O, Box 5900, 
Provo, UT 84601, (800) 453- 
1267, or Netwise, 4745 
Walnut St., Boulder, CO 
80301,(303)442-8280. 


Different Drum Uses Computer, Radio Waves 


magine playing a 
Beethoven sonata with a 
pair of drumsticks. The lo¬ 
cation and force of the drum¬ 
stick as it strikes the drum 
determines the tempo and the 
shape of the notes played in 
the sonata. Or, if you can 
write music, imagine com¬ 
posing a piece for an orches¬ 
tra and then adding expres¬ 
sion and tempo with a pair of 


drumsticks. That’s what 
Max Mathews’s Radio Drum 
is all about. 

Mathews, a former Bell 
Labs scientist specializing in 
acoustics, retired last year 
to join Stanford’s Center for 
Computer Research in 
Music and Acoustics 
(CCRMA, pronounced 
“karma”). Actually, the 
Radio Drum was invented 


by R, A, Boie, Mathews’s 
former colleague at AT&T. 
But it is based on a concept 
developed by Mathews, 
who hopes it will become a 
commercial product. 

The drum is a sheet of 
metal, approximately 18 
inches square, covering an 
array of radio sensors. In re¬ 
sponse to how the player 

continued 


14 BYTE * MARCH 1989 











Yiull never know 
how quick it is until 
you open it up and see 
what it can do. 



All the horsepower in the world 
is useless until you can get at it. 

Introducing new Microsoft' 

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easiest way to master all the power 
and glory of C. Frankly nobody but 
Microsoft packs this many exclu¬ 
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For starters, theres QC Advisor 
—a new hypertext electronic man¬ 
ual that teaches, helps and guides 
you on screen. It even lets you cut 
and paste sample programs, so you 
can learn C the easy way 

By example. 

And “C For Yourself” our detailed book 
of C fundamentals that’ll give you more 
in-depth programming lessons. You’ll find 
one in every box. 

With Microsoft QuickC, you can ease 
into C with Easy Menus to help you write 
your first C programs, then advance to Full 
Menus to access the hill-throttle potential 
of C. You’ll be up to speed in no time. 

And speaking of speed, QuickC has 
enough muscle for incremental compiling 
and linking at an incredible 25,000 lines per 
minute—so it’ll make short work of any de¬ 
velopment you have in mind. 


And speaking of development, its in-line 
assembler lets you write assembly code 
within your C code for more efficient pro¬ 
grams. Plus ifs the only integrated debug¬ 
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and your in-line assembler. Talk about 
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For all the details, call us at (800) 541- 
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Get it And break a few speed limits. 

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trademarks and Making it all make sense is a trade mark of Microsoft Corporation. 


MARCH 1989 -BYTE 15 







MICROBYTES 


NANOBYTES 


in performance, were 
textiles, retail food 
chains, shoes, tobacco, 
and manufactured 
housing. 

• Apple II designer/ 
industry icon/electronics 
whiz-guy Steve Wozniak 
sat in as disc jockey for 
the morning drive-time 
slot at a San Jose, Cali¬ 
fornia, radio station re¬ 
cently, apparently to 
good reviews. Woz, who 
also cofounded Apple 
Computer, produced two 
rock festivals, and re¬ 
cently coauthored what 
may be the worst collec¬ 
tion of computer jokes 
ever published, hosted 
the morning spot on 
KSJO, an FM rock sta¬ 
tion. It was a one-day- 
only gig; the usual disc 
continued 


positions and strikes the 
drumsticks, these sensors 
send signals to a D/A data 
acquisition board in the 
computer. The computer 
stores these signals in mem¬ 
ory and uses them to modify 
the frequencies and dura¬ 
tion of the notes played in a 
score of music, which is 
also stored in the computer. 
The resulting signals are 
sent via a MIDI interface 
card to an electronic music 
synthesizer for playback. 
Mathews’s original drufn 
used strain gauges to deter¬ 
mine the deflection of the 
drum membrane after each 
strike of the drumstick. The 
radio-wave model, developed 
by Boie at AT&T, allows 
more precise modulation of 
the sound. 

The Radio Drum per¬ 
forms the role of a conductor 
of a symphony. Mathews 
calls the software that inter¬ 
prets the signals from the 


Radio Drum the conductor 
program. The drum allows 
the performer to modify the 
tempo and tone of the lines 
of the composition stored in 
memory. The scores for any 
number of instruments can 
be stored, so the Radio 
Drum can conduct an entire 
orchestra. Tempo is con¬ 
trolled by the frequency with 
which you strike the drum. 
Each strike of the drum rep¬ 
resents a beat in the musical 
score. Using the conductor 
program, you can add the 
beats to the composition as 
desired. As you strike the 
drum, the beats are then 
played sequentially. Each 
beat can represent any num¬ 
ber of instruments. The 
tone, or “shape,” of the note 
is controlled by moving the 
second drumstick in the 
horizontal and vertical 
dimensions of the drum sur¬ 
face (the horizontal or jc- 
axis controls bass, and the 


vertical axis controls 
treble). 

The Radio Drum allows 
the performer to play elec¬ 
tronic music without using 
the keyboard of the synthe¬ 
sizer. Mathews says a syn¬ 
thesizer played on a keyboard 
always sounds like a key¬ 
board. The Radio Drum lets 
you modulate tones much 
more flexibly than with a 
keyboard, he says. And you 
don’t have to be an accom¬ 
plished pianist to play the 
Radio Drum. 

Currently, Mathews has 
the Radio Drum hooked up 
to a Data Translation acqui¬ 
sition board in an IBM PC- 
compatible. The conductor 
software can be used with 
Mathews’s own text editor 
for entering scores or with a 
more elegant scoring pro¬ 
gram developed by Dr. Le- 
land Smith of Stanford (and 
marketed by Passport Design 
continued 



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16 B YTE • MARCH 1989 


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MICROBYTES 


NANOBYTES 


jockey, a shock-jock by 
the name of Perry 
Stone, was on vacation. 
According to KSJO sta¬ 
tion manager David Bar- 
onfeld, the phone re¬ 
sponse to Wgz was 
“really excellent.” 

• A kind and gentle 
correction; Interstate 
Electronics (Anaheim, 
CA) wrote, most politely, 
and without even a hint 
of the “nyah-nyah" tone 
we hear so often when 
we goof up, to tell us of 
an error in our Septem¬ 
ber 1988 Microbyte on its 
chip set and 80- 
M FLOPS boards (page 
12). We stated that the 
Analog Devices 32-bit 
digital signal processors 
being used by Interstate 
are limited to fixed- 

continued 


of Half Moon Bay, CA, as 
Score). Mathews has also 
written an improvisation 
program for the Radio 
Drum; it allows you to play 
music interactively, without 
first entering a musical 
score. One drumstick con¬ 
trols the sequence up and 
down the musical scale; the 
other controls the interval. 


M emory chips will re¬ 
main a dy namic mar¬ 
ket, spurred by innovative 
designs, greater densities, 
and growing demand, a 
group of industry watchers 
we heard recently agreed. 
At a panel convened in New 
York by Hitachi America, 
analysts predicted that the 
current shortage in DRAM 
chips will be over by the 
middle of this year. 


Mathews hopes to de¬ 
velop a commercial version 
of the Radio Drum that will 
produce MIDI interface sig¬ 
nals directly, eliminating 
the need for the data acquisi¬ 
tion board. The MIDI 
model would allow the user 
to play the Radio Drum di¬ 
rectly connected to a synthe¬ 
sizer or to send the MIDI 


The rosiest projection for 
the chip industry was deliv¬ 
ered by Dan Klesken of 
Montgomery Securities (San 
Francisco): He predicted 
that total DRAM shipments 
would surge from 52.7 tera¬ 
bytes in 1988 to 480 terabytes 
in 1992, an increase of over 
nine times, fueled by grow¬ 
ing demand for personal 
computers, laser printers, 
and fax machines and by 


signals to the Conductor Pro¬ 
gram for use in composi¬ 
tion. It would also allow the 
drum to be used with any 
brand of computer. 

For further information, 
contact Max Mathews at the 
Center for Computer Re¬ 
search in Music and Acous¬ 
tics, Stanford University, 
Stanford, CA 94305. 


the emergence of such high- 
tech consumer products as 
digital VCRs and high-defi¬ 
nition TV. By 1995, Kles¬ 
ken said, 25 percent of 
DRAMs will be used for 
consumer products, 65 per¬ 
cent for microcomputers 
and peripherals, and only 10 
percent for minicomputers 
and mainframes. 

Klesken, however, cau- 

continued 


Analysts, Developments Offer Bright Chips Forecast 



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MARCH 1989 • BYTE 19 





MICROBYTES 


NANOBYTES 


point arithmetic. “Not 
true/' says Interstate. 
“The Analog Devices 
chip sets being used in 
our QUEN family proces¬ 
sors perform both 
fixed- and floating-point 
arithmetic,” We stand 
corrected and apologetic, 

• Scan this deal: 
Microtek (Torrance, CA) 
is tossing in some fine 
software with its Macin¬ 
tosh scanners. Buy a 
Microtek gray-scale scan¬ 
ner (MSF-400G, MSF- 
300GS, MSF-300G, 
MSF-30OQS, or MSF- 
3QQQ) and you'll get a 
free copy of Silicon 
Beach's Digital Dark¬ 
room. The company 
said it will also bundle in 
a free SuperPuint 2.0 
with every Mac scanner. 

• Several software pub¬ 
lishers were quick to state 
their support for 
DEC’s new desktop 
computers, Oracle said 
its relational DBMS will 
be available on the new 
VAXstations and DECsta- 
tions, under VMS, 

Ultrix, and MS-DOS; 
Autodesk will port 
AutoCAD to Ihe RISC- 
based DECstation 3100; 
LSI Logic will offer its 
Modular Design Envi¬ 
ronment (for engineering 
ASIC designs) on the 

3100; and Mathsoft is 
moving its MathStation 
problem solver/document 
producer to the new 
DECstations and VAX¬ 
stations, 

• Silicon Graphics 

(Mountain View, CA) 
says it has so far 
shipped 1000 Personal 
Iris systems. As we re¬ 
ported here when the ma¬ 
chine was announced 
last October, the $16,000 
Personal Iris represents 
a substantial drop in cost 
for a three-dimensional 
graphics workstation. 


tioned that chip makers may 
not be able to meet new de¬ 
mand unless they raise levels 
of capital investment. Be¬ 
tween now and 1990 alone, 
he said, the equivalent of 11 
major fabrication plants run¬ 
ning round the clock must 
be brought on line, at an in¬ 
vestment of over $5 billion, 
and chip yields must more 
than double. But he doubted 
that U.S. chip makers will 
gain in the market, predict¬ 
ing instead they will retain 
their current share of 15 
percent to 20 percent, or at 
best 25 percent. 

The picture for Asian 
producers is different: Capi¬ 
tal investment by Japanese 
chip makers is still two and a 
half times greater than by 
U.S. companies, he said, and 
Korean manufacturers—es¬ 


pecially Samsung, Goldstar, 
and Hyundai—are pouring 
billions of dollars into devel¬ 
oping capacity. 

Analyst Amy Wohl, of 
Wohl Associates (Bala Cyn- 
wyd, PA), said she sees 
hope in EEPROM chips, say¬ 
ing they will resolve the 
age-old “duality” of mem¬ 
ory—the division between 
volatile and permanent 
storage. 

Recent technical devel¬ 
opments signify that innova¬ 
tion will continue to drive 
the chip industry. Hitachi has 
confirmed that it is working 
on a 16- megabit CMOS 
DRAM and has offered tan¬ 
talizing glimpses of other fu¬ 
ture developments: 100- 
megabit DRAMs and chips 
based on superconducting 
ceramics. Researchers at the 


company’s lab cautioned 
that developments in materi¬ 
als physics will be neces¬ 
sary to achieve these aims. 

IBM and Texas Instru¬ 
ments both recently claimed 
breakthroughs in chip tech¬ 
nology. IBM researchers said 
they have devised a way, 
using advanced lithographic 
techniques such as electron 
beams or x-rays, to make 
CMOS chips with circuits 
one-quarter of a micron 
wide, permitting transistors 
that switch 30 billion times 
per second and chips with 
up to 256 megabits of stor¬ 
age. And T1 said it has built 
the world’s first quantum- 
effect transistors, which oc¬ 
cupy 100 times less space 
and switch thousands of 
times faster than the transis¬ 
tors used in today’s ICs. 


Mainstream Will Look More Three-Dimensional 


T hree-dimensional im¬ 
aging and animation has 
comprised a small, expen¬ 
sive, and very specialized 
segment of the computer 
hardware and software mar¬ 
ket. But there are signs that 
three-dimensional technol¬ 
ogy this year will begin to 
emerge into the mainstream 
of personal computing. 

And one of the big players in 
this small field will be 
Wavefront Technologies 
(Santa Barbara, CA). 

You’ve probably seen 
Wavefront's work on TV 
commercials and network 
spots, most notably during 
last year's Summer Olym¬ 
pics. Most of the slick graph¬ 
ics NBC used in the sum¬ 
mer games were created on a 
Silicon Graphics machine 


using Wavefront's three- 
dimensional animation 
software. 

While the big push for 
“fancy pictures” in 3-D 
came from Hollywood, 
Wavefront’s cofounders Bill 
Kovacs and Larry Bards 
say that scientific and engi¬ 
neering computing—not the 
entertainment industry—will 
bring 3-D into the 
mainstream. 

People in the technical 
market aren’t interested in 
theatrical animation. 

They’re interested in “de¬ 
scribing their problem,” 
says Kovacs, They can get 
part of the way with CAD 
and finite-element analysis. 
But to achieve true, realis¬ 
tic modeling of a physical de¬ 
sign, either you construct a 


physical model or you use 
three-dimensional render¬ 
ing, in which you add color, 
shading, and texture to the 
wire-frame or line image, 
and then apply motion to it. 

With sophisticated three- 
dimensional graphics hard¬ 
ware like the Silicon Graph¬ 
ics Personal Iris, priced 
under $30,000, the oppor¬ 
tunity is there to make three- 
dimensional modeling and 
animation available to a much 
broader base of users. The 
missing Jink is affordable 
software. Wavefront’s cur¬ 
rent software costs in the 
neighborhood of $40,000. 
Pixar (San Rafael, CA), 
which is a competitor of 
Wavefront, offers a complete 
hardware and software sys¬ 
tem priced over $60,000. 

The next step is to offer 
products at a much lower cost 
with easier user interfaces. 
We can expect these kinds of 
products to emerge some 
time this year. Barels expects 
IBM to offer three-dimen¬ 
sional capabilities on its RT 
PC, using a Silicon Graph¬ 
ics add-in board and Graph¬ 
ics Library. 


TECHNOLOGY NEWS WANTED, The news staff at BYTE is 
interested in hearing about new technological and scientific de¬ 
velopments that might have an impact on microcomputers and 
the people who use them. If you know of advances or projects 
relevant to microcomputing, please contact the Microbytes staff 
at (603) 924-9281, send mail on BIX to Microbytes, or write to 
us at One Phoenix Mill Lane , Peterborough, NH 03458. Art 
electronic version of Microbytes, which offers a wider variety of 
computer-related news on a daily basis , is available on BIX. 


m BYTE* MARCH 1989 











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Letters 


OS/2 Common Sense 
Didn't it occur to you that if Mark Mina- 
si's absurd claim (“The Good News and 
the Bad News," October 1988) that 
“background OS/2 processes slow down 
by a factor of 10 to 500 times” was even 
remotely realistic, others would have al¬ 
ready noticed? A 10-second compile, for 
example, that suddenly started taking an 
hour would be fairly obvious, it seems to 
me. 

It hasn't been noticed because it 
doesn't happen. There have been a lot of 
ridiculous benchmarks over the years, 
but these were some of the most 
egregious. 

String compares and such all run at 
exactly the same speed on a given pro¬ 
cessor, no matter what the operating sys¬ 
tem. If you think you see a difference 
under OS/2, it's only because you don't 
get an infinitely large and instanta¬ 
neously available time slice. When, as in 
Minasi's cases, the benchmark execution 
times are on the same order as these 
scheduling characteristics, of course the 
results are nonsensical. 

In a multitasking system, when and 
how much of the processor you get de¬ 
pends on the relative level of competition 
for resources, the task switch time, and 
the scheduling parameters. For example, 
if you have too many processes chasing 
loo little RAM, any multitasking operat¬ 
ing system will thrash, producing a very 
sudden and dramatic decline in through¬ 
put. (For OS/2 1.0 with the compatibility 
box, the threshold appears to be just 
below 2 megabytes.) Also, it's well 
known that getting in and out of read 


WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU Please 
double-space your letter on one side of the 
page and include your name and address. We 
can print listings and tables along with a 
letter if they are short and legible. Address 
correspondence to Letters Editor, BYTE, 
One Phoenix Mill Lane , Peterborough, 
NH 03458. 

Because of space limitations, we reserve 
the right to edit lettersGenerally, it takes 
four months from the time we receive a letter 
until we publish it. 


mode on an 80286 is expensive, but this 
is hardly the fault of OS/2. (Switching 
between protected processes or threads is 
quite fast.) 

OS/2 may have its warts, and if Minasi 
is suggesting that the scheduling param¬ 
eters (e.g., the way priority is calculated) 
should be tweaked, he may be right. But 
on other than toy problems, I think most 
designers are finding that OS/2's supe¬ 
rior kernel services (especially multi¬ 
threading) make significant perfor¬ 
mance gains easy to achieve. 

Douglas A. Hamilton 
Wayland, MA 

Others have noticed. Page 63 of the No¬ 
vember 1987 PC Tech Journal showed a 
test wherein a large assembly language 
program was run through MASM under 
different circumstances. The people 
there found that running the assembler in 
the background while running the BRIEF 
text editor in the compatibility box in the 
foreground slowed down the compile by 
4640 percent . Not all DOS programs 
cause this effect—I suspect it is the con¬ 
stant keyboard polling of most text editors 
that causes the damage. 

For some reason, I found that VEDIT 
slowed down the background more than 
IBM’s Personal Editor, which in turn 
slowed down the background more than 
BRIEF. The bottom line is that you ’re not 
going to use the compatibility box any 
more than you have to . 

‘‘Nonsensical " is a term that f s mean¬ 
ingful only when there is common sense 
of some kind. No one yet has common 
sense about OS/2, because it’s so new. 
It’s the common sense that I’m trying to 
help establish. 

Your comment about the 2-megabyte 
value in OS/2 L0 is well taken but really 
doesn’t apply , because the test was done 
on a 4-megabyte machine and swapping 
was disabled. 

I never disagreed with your contention 
that "switching between protected pro¬ 
cesses or threads is quite fast " By now, 
you have seen my November 1988 col¬ 
umn, where I discuss that. 

continued 


24 BYTE* MARCH 1989 
























dBASE Users—Attack 
the Mac with FoxBASE+/Mac 


New Frontiers, No Fears. 

FoxBASE+/Mac gives you the unprece¬ 
dented ability to run your dBASE pro¬ 
grams on the Macintosh immediately— 
without changing a single line of 
code! But there’s much more. With 
FoxBASE+/Mac you can create 
beautiful, robust applications that 
are truly Mac-like—using the 
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Speed and Power. 

FoxBASE+/Mac gives you speed to 
burn—plus the power and performance 
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FoxBASE + /Mac is by far the fastest 
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View Window. 

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BROWSE. 

FoxBASE+/Mac’s BROWSE feature 
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FoxBASE and FoxBASE + are trademarks of Fox Software. 
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licensed to Apple Computer, Inc. 



You can create stunning screens like this with FoxBASE + /Mac— immediately! 
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FoxBASE+/Mac is part of the award-win¬ 
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— Pox Software = 

Nothing Runs Like a Fox. 

Fox Software, Inc. (419) 874-0162 Ext. 320 

118 W. South Boundary » FAX: (419) 874-8678 
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Circle 106 on Reader Service Card 


MARCH 1989 • BYTE 25 







































LETTERS 


When you create PC database 
applications without Clipper," 
you place unnecessary 
restrictions on yourself' 



S pecifically designed for creating sophisticated applications, 
Clipper® takes you far beyond the limitations of other PC 
database development systems. 

Clipper’s open architecture, for example, allows user-defined 
functions as well as outside routines written in Assembler, C and 
many other languages, to be easily integrated into one seamless 
application. 

In addition to its ability to work with the dBASE* language, 
Clipper provides new language extensions and enhanced com¬ 
mands for creating menus, screens, windows, arrays and input 
validation. All saving hours of coding time. 

It ofTers a full-featured Debugger. A customizable error system 
to create your own error recovery strategy. Sophisticated record 
and file locking capabilities that make networking applications 
easier to create. And runs applications up to 20 times faster 
than dBASE. 


What’s more, Clipper produces .EXE files which free you from 
runtime modules, licensing costs, royalty fees, and additional 
software requirements. 

Clipper. 

Everything you’ve been asking for in a database development 
system. With a degree of freedom you’ve never experienced. 
The question now is, just how locked into your 
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Copyright €> 1989 Nantucket Corp. All rights reserved 

Clipper. Nantucket and the Nantucket logo arc registered trademarks ol Nantucket Corp. Other brand and product names 
are used for identification purposes only and may he trademark, or registered trademarks of their respective holders. 


Thanks for reading the column. The 
feedback is always helpful and interest¬ 
ing.—Msirk Minasi 

More on OS/2 

In “All Together Now” (September 
1988), Mark Minasi tests OS/2 1.0’s vir¬ 
tual memory manager. His BASIC pro¬ 
gram runs 650 times slower when using 
the virtual memory. (The execution time 
is 5487 seconds.) He claims that each 
memory access becomes a disk access 
once virtual memory is activated. 

The program was similar to this: 

for i=l to 500 : for j=l to 500 : 
a(i,j)=100 : nextj : next i 

(where 500 is the value of Minasi’s 
“ad”). 

Did he try a(j ,i) instead of a(i, j)? 
Execution must be some 500 times 
faster, almost as fast as in RAM. 

BASIC stores the matrices in column¬ 
wise order, so the offset of memory loca¬ 
tions (2-byte integers) is as follows: 

a(l, 1) : 2*0 ; a(l, 2) : 2*500 ; 

... ; a(l, 500) : 2*24500 
a(2, 1) : 2*1; a(l, 2) : 2*501; 

a(l, 500) : 2*24501 

a(500, 1) : 2*499 ; a(500, 2) : 2*999 ; 

... ; a(500, 500) : 2*24999 

If the virtual memory page size is 2K 
bytes, in each second memory access a 
full page must be written to and another 
read from disk. In other words, the whole 
array must be read and written 500 
times. If the disk transfer rate is 100K 
bytes per second and the array size is 500 
x 500 x 2 bytes = 500,000 bytes, then 
it takes some 2 X 500 x 500,000 / 100 
= 5000 seconds. 

This example clearly shows that if you 
have a memory system with more than 
one level, the programmer and/or the op¬ 
timizing compiler must rearrange code 
sequences to keep the number of data 
transfers between the memory levels to a 
minimum. 

And for the sake of correctness, the 
“time to process each byte” of data in the 
article must be in milliseconds, not in 
seconds. 

G. Mark 
Budapest, Hungary 

See my December column for a discus¬ 
sion of this. By the way, since the Decem¬ 
ber column was printed, two readers 
have asked why I ran the virtual memory 
tests on OS/2 1.0 rather than on the beta 

continued 


26 BYTE • MARCH 1989 


Circle 185 on Reader Service Card 






























PC EXPERTS AGREE: 


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ITHE INTELLIGENT CONCLUSION 

75 Kingsland Ave., 

Clifton, N. J. 07014 


Circle 211 on Reader Service Card 


MARCH 1989 • BYTE 27 















































3.04 MIPS 
3.52 MIPS 
4.59 MIPS 
4.91 MIPS 


AST Premium 386/20 _ , 

IBM PS/2 Model 80 (20 MHz)_ 

Compaq DeskPro 386/20 _ 

Everex Step 386/20 _ 

Power Meter MIPS Version 1.2. The Database Group. 


'We're coming to get you. 

Raymond Li, Kam Chow, 

Anne Russell, Wesley Wong 
Everex Project Engineers 


M If you’re afraid 
of monsters, please 
turn the page.” 

What makes our 
new computer 
unnervingly fast 
can be explained in 
three words: write 
back cache. 

Simply put, it 
means less work: 
you don’t write to 
the main memory 
every time you 
write to the cache. 

It’s an approach 
to memory 
management found 
only on mainframes 
and on Everex 
Step computers. 

And in a world 
where a 32k cache is 
the norm, ours 
expands to 256k. 

The Step 386. 

It’s a monster of 
a machine. 

Find out more 
about Step 386 and 
Step 286 computers. 
Call 1-800-3564283. 
Everex 

Computer Systems 
Division, 

48431 Milmont 
Drive, Fremont, 

CA 94538. 




STEP 




























LETTERS 


Microsoft OS/2 LL (These tests were 
conducted in July 1988, before the gen¬ 
eral release of 1.1.) In fact, l did try the 
virtual memory test on L1, but the early 
release crashed when OS/2 started swap¬ 
ping. This has since been fixed. 

—Mark Minasi 

Excel Above 

The matrix-handling capability of Excel 
is indeed a cut above statistical process¬ 
ing features in other spreadsheets, as 


“Multiple Regression with Excel" by 
Charles W. Kyd (November 1988) points 
out. In fact, using Excel and a little dili¬ 
gent effort, a user can replicate the func¬ 
tions of many statistical packages and 
provide individual tailoring of formats 
and reports. 1 have been using Excel in 
that manner in quality assurance and 
testing applications. 

Statistically significant outcomes, 
however, are judged according to what 
you might expect to see when only 


chance is at work. The tables in the back 
of statistics books assume that you are 
testing the relationship between only two 
of many possibly related collections of 
measurements, Kyd suggests that you 
should test all possible relationships, 
looking for the red herring that is now 
much more likely to appear by chance 
alone. That's like looking for a coin to 
come up heads once in 10 tosses and con¬ 
tinuing to toss the coin in sets of 10 until 
it happens, 

A safer and more statistically defen¬ 
sible method would be to plan which 
comparisons you will make before col¬ 
lecting the measurements and look only 
for the significance of those in the back 
of a statistics book. There is ample op¬ 
portunity here to fudge and announce 
that you were looking for the relationship 
that turned out to be the strongest when 
you weren't. Oh, well...some people 
cheat at solitaire, too. 

Charles E. Cliett 
Duluth , GA 

The Latest Road to True Salvation 

Walter J. Rotten kolber* complaining of 
being deluged by a flood of YAPL (yet 
another programming language), writes, 
“In the 30 years after the Mark 1 com¬ 
puter switched on in 1945,1 estimate that 
some three dozen programming lan¬ 
guages kept computers humming” (Let¬ 
ters, November 1988). Three dozen? 
Nonsense! You don’t count program¬ 
ming languages by the dozen, you count 
them by the gross. 

The heyday of YAPL was the 1960s. 
The programming language was the phi¬ 
losopher's stone of computing. The typi¬ 
cal nerd fantasy was “to design my own 
computer language.” 

Was the best version of ALGOL BAL- 
GOL, MAD, or JOVIAL (Jules's own 
version of IAL)? Should you do your text 
processing in COMIT? TRAC? TECG? 
SNOBOL? For list processing: Lisp? 
SLIP? or 1PL-V? Should users of DEC 
equipment choose DECAL, DIBOL, 
FOCAL, or MUMPS? 

Champions of problem-oriented lan¬ 
guages hotly defended their superiority 
over general-purpose languages. Should 
a civil engineer learn FORTRAN when 
COGO was available? Weren't problems 
of soil mechanics best dealt with in 
SEPQL? 

Naturally, programmers soon per¬ 
ceived that the real barrier to progress 
was the difficulty of writing new lan¬ 
guage compilers. So they addressed this 
problem (naturally) by devising new 
languages for the purpose. The Brooker- 

comimed 


GRAPHICS FOR MAC II 








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30 BYTE * MARCH 1989 


Circle 176 an Reader Service Card 






















THE BUS STOPS HERE! 


CompuStar: PS/2 and PC/AT Compatibility. 


Ask any computer expert about 
what type of system you should buy 
nowadays and you'll likely get a 
“pass the bus” response. Something 
like — “Well, uh, the PC/AT* bus 
is your best buy but, then again, the 
new PS/2* bus may become the 
next industry standard.” Great ad¬ 
vice, right? If trying to decide on a 
microprocessor weren’t tough 
enough, now you're expected to 
pick a bus, loo. 

RELAX, NOW THERE’S 
COMPUSTAR! 

The all new CompuStar from 
Wfells American not only lets you 
interchange microprocessors, you 
can also mix and match buses — a 
PC/AT bus, a PS/2 bus or. . .both. 

As your computing needs change, 
simply snap in a new processor 
or add an extra bus. You'll 
never again have to worry about buying 
the wrong computer system! 

FOUR COMPLETE SYSTEMS IN ONE. 

The CompuStar can be configured with any of tour 
microprocessors — an 8086, an 80286, an 80386SX, or 
an 80386. The processor and up to 16 megabytes of user 
memory have all been combined, using the latest VLSI tech¬ 
nology, on a single, plug-in CPU module. Plus, any time 
during the First year of ownership, CompuStar users can 
“trade-in” the CPU module they initially selected toward the 
purchase of any of the other more 
powerful modules. Nobody but Wells 
American gives you this kind of value. 



i]cnjM*4r_ 


A CONVERTIBLE BUS? 
TOURE KIDDING! 

No, we’re not. In feet, it may well 
be the most practical microcomputer 
I innovation ever. Say you've selected an 
I AT compatible CompuStar and later 
— want to add PS/2 compatibility. No 
problem! Snap in a PS/2 Bus and 
Adapter Module and you can use both 
buses in the same system. Likewise, 

» ” | if you’ve selected a PS/2 compatible 
I CompuStar and decide you want to add 
an AT bus, just snap in an AT Bus 
Module. Depending on configura¬ 
tion, the CompuStar can have up to 
/3 bus expansion slots — all AT 
slots, all PS/2 slots or a “split- 
bus” of AT and PS/2 slots. No 
matter which bus becomes the 
: industry “standard,” you'll have peace of mind knowing 
investment in a CompuStar will be protected. 



The CompuStar is also easily expanded. That’s because 
there are seven CompuStar disk/tape compartments — six 
accessible from the front and an additional full-height bay 
inside. All this in a sleek, compact tower design that will 
leave more room on your desktop than any of the so-called 
“desktop” models. 


A NEW IDEA FROM AN OLD COMPANY 

The CompuStar® Multi-Processor, Convertible Bus ,M 
Microcomputer. It’s no surprise that our engineers invent¬ 
ed it. After all, we’ve been making microcomputers longer 
than anyone else. . .even longer than IBM! And if that kind 
of experience doesn’t impress you, CompuStar’s service pro¬ 
grammes surely will. You can select an optional overnight mod¬ 
ule swap-out plan or on-site service from a reputable UK 
maintenance firm with more than 70 trained engineers dis¬ 
patched throughout the UK. And, of course, every CompuStar 
carries a full one-year factory warranty. 

FINALLY, AFFORDABLE TECHNOLOGY 

Think all this technology sounds expensive? It’s not. 
Thanks to CompuStar’s modular architecture, you pay only 
for the technology you need — and only when you need it. 
Plus, there is 
a wide variety 
of CompuStar 
display, tape 
and disk op¬ 
tions including 
a one gigabyte 
erasable opti¬ 
cal disk. You 
can choose a 
fectory pre- 
configured 
CompuStar or 
custom design 
one yourself. 

Just unlock the 
front panel and 

literally “snap- ™ 

in” a bus, CPU, memory or disk module in a matter of 
seconds. It’s system flexibility never before available. . . 
at any price. 

While one of our competitors (we won’t mention any 
names) threatens you with “missing the bus ” most simply 
pass the bus. Our new CompuStar, however, eliminates the 
bus problem altogether. Not to mention the processor prob¬ 
lem. Even the expansion problem. Prove it to yourself. Call 
today about our 31-day trial offer. Oh, and by the way, the 
next time anyone asks, tell ’em you know where the bus stops. 



Wells American 

— ^ Wells American International, Ltd: 


Victoria House, Desborough St. 

High Wycombe, Bucks., HP11 2NF 
TEL: (0494) 26211 • FAX (0494) 459540 


'Personal Computer AT. AT and PS/2 are trademarks of International Business Machines Corporation. 


Circle 2S1 on Reader Service Card 


MARCH I9B9 - BYTE 31 


















































LETTERS 


Morris Compiler Building System was 
spoken of with awe. PSYCO (Princeton 
syntax-directed compiler) was well 
known. And there must have been quite a 
few more, because in 1972 Steve Johnson 
named his contribution to the genre 
YACC (yet another compiler-compiler). 

A book by Jean Sammet appeared 
whose cover depicted a picture of the 
Tower of Babel, completely covered in 
tiny lettering with the names of computer 
languages. Three dozen? No, no, no. 


Walter! By her count, at that time, there 
were approximately 600 of them. 

In the 1970s, the tide shifted as peo¬ 
ple began to think that the real answers 
lay in YAOS (yet another operating sys¬ 
tem). Today, of course, the flood is 
down to a mere trickle, because we now 
understand that true salvation is to be 
found only in YAUI (yet another user in¬ 
terface). 

Daniel P. B. Smith 
Norwood, MA 


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must accompany order. 



32 B YTE • MARCH 1989 


Circle 186 on Reader Service Card 


Staying Alive 

The reports of our death are greatly exag¬ 
gerated. In Chaos Manor Mail (Novem¬ 
ber 1988), Jerry Pournelle mourned the 
passing of our company. Minnow Bear 
Computers. Considering that we are 
doing just fine, this came as quite a sur¬ 
prise to us. 

We’d appreciate your printing this let¬ 
ter, as many BYTE readers may mistak¬ 
enly believe we are no longer in business. 

Michael E. Nunamaker, President 
Minnow Bear Computers 
Champaign, IL 


FIXES 


• The text box entitled “Digitizers with a 
Twist” in our January Product Focus on 
digitizing tablets (“Graphic Details”) 
gave incorrect and incomplete informa¬ 
tion. The sonic digitizer mentioned there 
is made by Science Accessories Corp. 
(SAC), not Scientific Accessories, as we 
stated. The product’s correct model 
name is the GP-7 Graf bar Mark II. It 
provides an active area of 20 by 26 inches 
and sells for $1315. 

SAC also sells a three-dimensional 
digitizer called the GP-8-3D, as well as 
nine different sizes of its two-dimension¬ 
al GP-8 line. SAC can be contacted at 
970 Kings Highway W, P.O. Box 550, 
Southport, CT 06490, (203) 255-1526. 

We also omitted the address and phone 
number for Polhemus Navigation Sci¬ 
ences: P.O. Box 560, Colchester, VT 
05446, (802) 655-3159. 

• Our December 1988 Review Update, 
“Benchmarks at a Glance,” gave an in¬ 
correct FPU index rating for the Everex 
Step 386/20. The correct rating is 8.14. 

• Table 2 in “Multiple Regression with 
Excel” (November 1988, page 372) con¬ 
tained an error for cell B41. The expres¬ 
sion DataAvg should have been Data- 
Avg, as shown below: 

B4l=(MMULT(TRANSPOSE 
(Data-Avg),Data-Avg)/ 

(TRANSPOSE(Std)*Std))/(n-l) 

• Our January What’s New item on 
Pocket Soft’s .RTLink program (page 
84) should have noted that it does not 
work with Turbo Pascal, rather than 
Turbo C, according to Borland Inter¬ 
national. 

• The book review of Using QuickBASIC 
4 (December 1988) listed the location of 
the publisher, Que Corp., as Carmel, 
California. Que Corp. is in Carmel, 
Indiana. ■ 















Circle 47 on Reader Service Card 


Chaos Manor 
Mail 


Jerry Pournelle answers questions about his column 
and related computer topics 


DESQview Debate 
Dear Jerry, 

As a man who respects your opinions a 
great deal, I was appalled to read that you 
highly recommend DESQview. 

It seems to me that when I purchased 
DESQview, I wasted my money. I 
haven’t been able to get this turkey to do 
anything that I need it to do. 

Some of the applications that I use reg¬ 
ularly are Windows-specific (e.g., Page¬ 
Maker and In a Vision). So when I read 
of Quarterdeck’s advertising to the ef¬ 
fect that DESQview could run this type 
of application, I was quite excited; 
DESQview appeared to be able to blend 
into the DOS environment a little better 
than Windows, and I liked the idea of 
multitasking, which Windows does only 
with its print spooler. 

So far, the only way I’ve been able to 
get a Windows application to run under 
DESQview is to set up the command 
WIN PM, for example, which runs Page¬ 
Maker under Windows, which in turn 
runs under DESQview. Is that what they 
call running a Windows-specific appli¬ 
cation? If so, I’m underwhelmed by this 
achievement. Windows is still doing all 
the work. 

I’m sure it’s different for you. When 
Pournelle asks, I would think that an 
answer is generally forthcoming. But for 
those of us among what Quarterdeck ob¬ 
viously views as the great unwashed, I 
must seriously question the usefulness of 
a completely unsupported product such 
as this. 

Chris Doole 
Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada 

Maybe your problem has been com¬ 
pounded by the Canadian mail. Quarter¬ 
deck is not a very large company, but the 
people there have been quite responsive 
to requests, and not just from me. Mean¬ 
while, Pm using DESQview to write this. 

I don V particularly recommend it for 
80286 users (although it's probably bet¬ 
ter than nothing); with an 80386, you do 
need QEMM, Quarterdeck's 80386 
memory manager. 

I’ve used a lot of programs that attempt 


to let me do task switching, and 1 keep 
coming back to DESQview. —Jerry 

Easy Draws It 
Dear Jerry, 

In Computing at Chaos Manor (Sep¬ 
tember 1988), you talked about your 
aborted project of drawing maps on the 
Atari ST using the Atari laser printer. I 
own an Atari 1040 ST, and I considered 
upgrading to a 2-megabyte Mega ST and 
Atari laser printer. However, I made the 
following observations: 

• Atari supplies only a very bad Dia¬ 
blo emulator driver with the printer. 

• Most of the ST applications now sup¬ 
port the Hewlett-Packard printers as 
well as the Atari laser printer. 

• The Hewlett-Packard DeskJet is an 
excellent ink-jet printer, capable of 
240 characters per second (cps) in test 
mode and 300 dots per inch (dpi) in 
graphics mode, and it is supported by 
all the applications supporting the 
HP LaserJet (because both printers 
use the same command codes). 

For those reasons, I bought my Desk¬ 
Jet. A wealthier person would have 
bought the HP LaserJet II. However, I 
like to see what a printer is doing. The 
laser printers buzz and whir for some¬ 
times minutes (especially when you print 
graphics) before regurgitating a sheet 
that does not always satisfy you. With the 
slow but open-air DeskJet, I can actually 
see my work being printed, and I can stop 
the device if something goes wrong. 

For drawing your fantasy maps, I rec¬ 
ommend Easy-Draw 2 for the Atari ST, 
along with the Supercharger utility and 
the Easy-Tools desk accessory. As a 
freelance fantasy role-playing game- 

continued 


Jerry Pournelle holds a doctorate in psy¬ 
chology and is a science fiction writer 
who also earns a comfortable living writ¬ 
ing about computers present and future. 
He can be reached c/o BYTE, One Phoe¬ 
nix Mill Lane, Peterborough, NH 03458, 
or on BIX as “jerryp. ” 




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MARCH 1989 • BYTE 33 











CHAOS MANOR MAIL 


module writer, I used it and found it quite 
comfortable. Easy-Draw lets you create 
complex vector drawings, just like Mac- 
Draw. You can mix these objects with 
freehand drawings and bit-mapped 
graphics (converted from other utilities 
through the Supercharger utility). 

Once you've drawn a coarse freehand 
contour of, say, a shoreline or frontier, 
you can zoom in closely and break it into 
fine segments with Easy-Tools (called in 
from the accessory menu) and refine 


each segment, adding or deleting some, 
until the whole frontier looks perfect. 
Your drawings can be larger than one 
8 V 2 - by 11-inch cut sheet {the DeskJet 
driver I have allows 11 - by 17-inch draw¬ 
ings, printed on two pages—a little cut- 
and-paste work is required in this case). 

The package is sold by Migraph, 200 
South 333rd St., Suite 220, Federal Way, 
WA 98003, (206) 838-4677, for less than 
$200. The bottom line for a 1040 ST, a 
20-megabyte SH 205 hard disk drive, and 


KILL 8051 ** 
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WORLDWIDE CALL; 

Austria 

0222-387638 

Australia 

026641873 

Benelux 

+31-1858-16133 

Denmark 

026581II 

France 

0169412801 

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014642586 

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03 484832 

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0117710010 

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017404105 

Utest Germany 

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(408)866-1820 


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emulator and trace board 
make a sophisticated bug¬ 
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8031/8051 projects. Plug 
the EMUL51-PC into your 
PC, XT, AT or compa¬ 
tible and find bugs that 
other emulators cant. 

Our powerful software 
makes it a snap to use. 


The EMUL51PC comes with a 5JL cable, software and l year hard* 
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Easy-Draw is under $1500, which makes 
the combination very attractive. 

Frederic Mora 
Williamsburg, VA 

I certainly agree that the DeskJet printer 
is an excellent buy t perhaps the most ver¬ 
satile one you can get in its price range , 

As to laser printers laboring like Ae¬ 
sop* s mountain t / completely agree: / 
also like to see what *s being printed. On 
the other handlasers are fast enough 
that if things are mucked up, you haven't 
lost a great deal. — Jer ry 

Update from West Germany 

Dear Jerry, 

The German government is moving to 
split up the Bundespost! 1992 is bearing 
down on West Germany, and the govern¬ 
ment figured it had to do something 
about German protectionism. So the 
Bundespost will be split into three or 
four “ baby posts” a la Ma Bell a few 
years ago. Net result: nil. 

I've read a few analyses of the pro¬ 
posed splitting action, and they all seem 
to say that the “new, improved” Bundes- 
post(s) will be less efficient, more en¬ 
trenched, and less friendly to new tech¬ 
nology—if such a thing is possible. 

I am amazed at the number of people 
in Europe who write to BYTE and brag 
about how they have outfoxed their local 
postal, telegraph, and telephone services 
(PTTs) by importing U.S, communica¬ 
tion hardware. European PTTs are noto¬ 
rious for their lack of humor in such mat¬ 
ters. And advertising your crimes (from 
the PTT point of view) is pretty foolish. I 
wonder how these people feel when they 
come to work and find that all phone ser¬ 
vice has been shut off “for investigation 
of technical irregularities.” 

1 read recently that you are preparing a 
tome on OS/2. Have you ever tried the 
Pilot operating system? I am using it at 
work (not on PC-style hardware), and it 
is everything that OS/2 should be. And it 
works. 

So Apple is now suing Microsoft over 
the “look and feel” of Microsoft Win¬ 
dows. How does that affect OS/2 and 
Presentation Manager? As a denizen of 
the Xerox realm, I look on this with glee. 
I hope that Apple sets all sorts of prece¬ 
dents. And I hope that the Xerox legal de¬ 
partment is preparing a nice sharp stick 
to whack Apple with when Apple is 
through with its fun and games. 

Chuck Kuhlman 
Dossenheim, West Germany 

Thanks for another excellent report from 
Europe /—Jerry ■ 


34 BYTE 1 MARCH 1989 


Circle 189 on Reader Service Card 













C Programmers 


Proof is in the Performance 

db_FILE “provides faster file management 

Proven performer 

db_FILE™ from Raima is the only file manager you'll ever need. Other file managers deliver 
B-tree/ISAM capabilities, but they slow down as the application increases in size or com¬ 
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programmers in over 50 countries worldwide use db_FlLE. And, it's fast, 100% faster 
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db_FILE is written entirely in C for optimum portability. Unlike others, 
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Operating Systems Supported: 

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For the name of your dbJFILE distributor. 

CALL: 1 - 800 -db-RAIMA 

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Ask about the many other products and services 
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Raima Corporation 3245 146th Place S.E., Bellevue, WA 98007 USA (206)747-5570 Telex: 6503018237 MCI UW FAX: (206)747-1991 In Texas call: (214)231-3131 
International: U.K.: (0992) 500919 Germany: 07127/5244 Switzerland: (01)725 04 10 France: (1)47.72.77.77 Benelux: [+3U((0)2159)46 814 Sweden: (013)124780 
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Some views on why the NEC MultiSync 


There’s a lot more to the new MultiSync" 3D monitor from NEC 
than meets the eye. Because instead of making one monitor for each 

graphics board, we’ve devel¬ 
oped a monitor that enhances 


the performance of the modes on 
practically any board. 




With its new microprocessor-controlled digital tuning system, 
MultiSync 3D can adjust to a given video standard with a precision 
matched only by a few high-end single-frequency monitors. 

Making it perfectly compatible with virtually all systems and 
boards. From 8514A, SuperVGA and Mac II to VGA, EGA, MPA and 


Cs£ 

Computers and Communications 


36 BYTE* MARCH 1989 











































3D is the new monitor standard. 



CGA. For an incredible maximum resolution of 1024 x 768. 


What’s more, MultiSync 3D is equally compatible with you and your 


workplace. There are upfront controls, for easier access. A 14" non¬ 


glare screen on a tilt-swivel base, for more comfortable viewing. And, 


as you can see, there’s even a full 360 degree design. 


standards by which all other color monitors will be judged. 

IK * 'e qii! likCI :rarj£ini'k e[ NEC ElKlroniCE (USA! iff. 

For literature, call 1-800-826-2255. For technical details call NEC 


Home Electronics (USA) Inc. 1-800-FONE-NEC. 


NEC 

MARCH 1989 * B Y T E 37 


The way we see it, MultiSync 3D 


has dramatically raised the 


Side 

















Circle 90 on Reader Service Card 



Let Your Instruments 
Do The Talking.™ 




Talk to your instruments with 
DADiSP-488, Use over 150 func¬ 
tions to display and analyze your 
waveforms, as easy as typing a 
name. Run external data acquisition 
software, or your own analysis 
program. Create new functions 
with DAD ISP Macros: Kaw* 


I 

it 

■iiiiiiiiii O 

the First Spreadsheet 
designed exclusively for 
Scientists and Engineers. 

(617) 577-1133 

Ask about DADiSP for IBM-PC/XT/AT, 
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5000, and Sun Workstations. For further 
information write DSP Development 
Corporation, One Kendall Square, 
Cambridge, MA 02139, (617) 577-1133 

Mention this magazine mi receive an 
Evaluation Disk FREE, A $20 value. 




Ask Byte 


BYTE technical editors answer your questions 
on microcomputing 


Upgrading a Keyboard 

! have an IBM PC AT clone and a PC- 
style keyboard that I'd like to use to¬ 
gether. My AT clone isn't one of those 
that can accept an original PC keyboard, 
nor is the keyboard one that you can 
switch between a PC and an AT. 

I am aware that a keyboard controller 
chip has to be changed on either the 
motherboard or the keyboard. To me, it's 
worth it—Tve tried more than 50 PC 
clone keyboards, and the one 1 want to 
use is best for me. However, I don't want 
to mess with my motherboard if I can 
help it. 

The keyboard I have was originally 
supplied with the TeieVideo TS-1605 
Tele-XT (as its name implies, a long- 
defunct PC clone). With stiff keys and a 
giant palm rest, it is claimed to be elec¬ 
tronically identical to the original IBM 
PC keyboard; I opened it up, and T found 
a Toshiba 8035 microprocessor and a 
socketed ROM chip. 

Obviously, connecting this keyboard 
to my Databank AT, which has a Phoenix 
BIOS, gets me only a keyboard failure 
message and a keyboard that doesn't 
work. I'm hoping I can upgrade the key¬ 
board to AT functionality by upgrading 
the ROM chip. 

Jonathan Angel 
Palo Alto , CA 

/ can understand your falling in love with 
the feel of a particular keyboard t But the 
technical problems involved in analyzing 
the circuitry of your Tele Video keyboard 
and burning a new ROM are more com- 


IN ASK BYTE f BYTE editors answer questions 
on any area of microcomputing. The most rep¬ 
resentative questions will be answered and pub¬ 
lished, Send your inquiry to 

Ask BYTE 

One Phoenix Mill Lane 

Peterborough, NH 03458 

Due to the high volume of inquiries, vue can¬ 
not guarantee a personal reply . Alt letters and 
photographs become the property of BYTE and 
cannot be returned. 


plicated than 1 can describe in this col¬ 
umn . / suggest you try out some of the 
high-quality keyboards from Northgate 
or Key ironic. —S, W. 

Surprisingly Slow Card 

I need your help to understand the 
jumper and pin positions on my Western 
Digital WD1002A-27X hard disk drive 
controller card. I use it in conjunction 
with a Seagate ST-238R hard disk drive 
formatted to 30 megabytes. The setup 
runs OK, but when l execute the Norton 
Utilities 4.0, the disk index gives me a 
value of 0.5. I’m using this on a Turbo 
IBM PC XT compatible, switchable from 
4 to 8 MHz, so l should get a disk index 
of at least L0. 

I suspect that the jumper positions on 
the controller card may have something 
to do with the surprisingly low number. I 
tried varying the interleave factor to no 
avail Can you suggest some cure or per- 
haps pass on the address of Western Digi¬ 
tal so I can refer my questions to the 
people there? 

Basse O. Bondtote 
Kajang, Malaysia 

The Western Digital WD1002A-27X is a 
run-length-limited f 8-bit hard disk drive 
controller. It is compatible with your 
Seagate ST-238R hard disk drive * 

/ suspect you 3 re correct in thinking that 
the jumpers on the board are set incor¬ 
rectly. The specifications for your board 
are a vailable from Western Digital Corp. f 
2445 McCabe Wav , Irvine, CA 92714 , 
(714) 863-0102.—S. W, 

An XT Goes Overseas 
Having graduated to an IBM PC AT, I 
have decided to give my XT to my 
brother in England. There's only one 
problem: I don't want to carry the moni¬ 
tor to him because of its bulk. 

My brother questions whether my 
U.S.-manufactured XT will work with a 
British monitor. He seems to think that 
because the raster-scan rates of British 
and U.S. TV sets are related to the AC 
power of the respective countries (50 Hz 

continued 


38 BYTE- MARCH 1989 






















Dear nr. -- 

T^e results of «»«--«S^^rTI.^ « 
you'll find than quit® ^ * potential exists with 
surprise: the <£*»^ 8 ‘ “ thil argest sales will 
SE£ ^‘theTar -t the united states. 


Bostwick Parker Co 
New Product Sales Projections 



These sale. ^mca^the^rJ 



Morgan Steennian & Tuininga 


mm 

Mi0 
lip#* 


fc*vmr-s.,V>ti Tri>rT1<#J 


October 27, 1988 


*“*» ***»«.*■«» 
*nfc«t Ip 2M* 
rAA 


c f la , rle s BostwicJc 

^it-S— pany 

Michigan 49684 


Dear Mr. Bostwick: 


The results of ►>» 

surpr iae: "the^greabating*^Here r ® s ^an 1*2 1 think 
number three. L ? 31 ®!*. 130 **"* 131 ^ists witl 1 tere ®i ing 

Europe and the 


B °stwick Parker Co. 

New Produa Sales Projections 



!??■• " lo ® prolection. 


CAN YOU SPOT 
THE $700 DIFFERENCE? 


One of the nearly identi¬ 
cal samples you see above was 
printed with the HP Laserjet 
Series E. The other is from the 
Mannesmann Tally* MT905. 
Both are reprinted here exactly 
as they came out of the printers. 

But what might surprise 
you is the rather dramatic differ¬ 
ence in the manufacturers’ 
suggested retail prices. 

The Mannesmann Tally 
laser is $700 less. Yet it offers 
the same high quality output, 
lowers operating costs 25 per¬ 
cent, and prints at six pages 
per minute. 

The MT905 comes with 
the same resident type fonts as 
HP, accepts standard HP font 
cartridges, and lets you choose 
optional memory upgrades from 
one to four megabytes. 



MT905 Specifications 

■ Technology: scanning laser. 

■ Print Speed: 6-pages per minute. 

■ Resolution: 300 x 300 dpi. 

■ Emulations: HP Series*II. [optional 
emulations: Epson? IBM* Proprinter, & 
Diablo 630.] 

■ Standard I/Os: Serial & parallel. 

■ Memory: 512K. [upgrades: 1,2, & 

4 megabytes.] 

■ Typefaces: Courier medium & bold, 
line printer, accepts standard HP font 
cartridges or any downloadable font in 
HP-format, 6-resident fonts + 2 font 
cartridge slots. 

■ Paper Handling: 250-sheet input & 
output bins. Manual feed handles single 
sheets, envelopes, transparencies, 

and labels. 

■ Workload: 4,000 pages-per-month. 

■ Suggested Retail: $1,995. 


For more convenient 
paper handling, the universal 
paper cassette holds letter, legal, 
and international sizes, plus up 
to 15 standard envelopes. You 
can choose face-down output to 
keep long documents in the right 
order. And the manual feed lets 
you print labels or transparencies. 

So any way you figure, 
the answer still comes up the 
same. The Mannesmann Tally 
laser looks perfect. And so does 
the price. 

For the name of your 
nearest dealer, call the toll-free 
number listed below. 

MANNESMANN 

TALLY 

1 - 800 - 843-1347 

Ext. 198 

Epson and IBM are registered trademarks. 


Circle 152 on Reader Service Card (DEALERS: 153) 


MARCH 1989 • BYTE 39 












ASK BYTE 


Circle 8 on Reader Service Cord 



Break the 32M barrier without breaking 
your wallet with EZ-DOS 4.0. 

EZ-DOS 4.0 was developed by Digital 
Research as an alternative DOS for PCs. 
As such, EZ-DOS 4.0 allows 512M 
partitions and file/subdirectory PASSWORD 
protection. On-line HELP is another user- 
friendly feature. 

EZ-DOS 4.0 also comes with GEM/3 
Desktop, this windowing operating 
environment, 

GEW~*^ 


3 □ 


-A 


ja, n n n JJ J8 Jy[ 

B I i i ! Q □ JQ* 

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EZ-OOS 4.0 ....... $79.00 

with True BASIC_$99.00 

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Tel: (714) 531-6551 Fax; (714) 531 -8546 

CANADA 

Tel: (416) 591-6600 Fax: (416) 591-6808 
TAIWAN: 

Tel: (02) 542-4575 Fax: (02) 536-3405 
HONG KONG: 

Tel. 5-890-3707 Fax: 5-895-6241 

Dealer, Distributor & OEM inquiries welcome, 
VISA and Master Card accepted. 


40 BYTE ■ MARCH 1989 


for the U,K. and 60 Hz for the U*S.), the 
same is true of monitors. Can you tell us 
whether or not this is true? 

William Brown 
Katy, Texas 

Most monitors manufactured and sold as 
“PC compatible " are just that; they will 
work at a scan frequency of 30 Hz to 
maintain compatibility regardless of their 
country of origin. Problems would arise 
only if you attempted to use a composite 
or TV monitor; the European standard, 
as you mentioned t is different from that 
of the National Television System Com¬ 
mittee. European monitor manufacturers 
that sell in the U. S. can sell the same unit 
in both markets, provided it has dual 
power inputs.— S. A. 

Little Orphan Lisa 

Some years back, my department bought 
five Lisa (Macintosh XL) microcom¬ 
puters, which Apple Computer no longer 
manufactures. We have problems with 
them, and we have contacted Apple, but 
to no avail. We'd like to know sources of 
parts and kits, as well as books, because 
we want to keep our Lisas running. 
Could you give us suggestions for where 
to start looking? 

Shen Xioyang 
Department of Physics 
Shaanxi Teachers University 

Xian, PR China 

A good place to start looking is a t Sun Re¬ 
marketing, P.O. Box 4059, Logan, UT 
84321, (801) 752-7631 , Not only does 
the company provide upgrades that allow 
the Lisa to run Macintosh software, but it 
also is an authorized Lisa service center 
Check it our—' T, T* 

High-Speed Microcomputing 

I race a Limited Inboard Hydroplane in 
the 5-liter stock class. I use a 305 Chev¬ 
rolet as my power plant. The boat is capa¬ 
ble of 120 mph. 

f would like to develop an on-board 
computer to monitor engine functions 
while testing and racing. Eventually, I 
would like to be able to output perfor¬ 
mance data. 

I have gone through past issues of 
BYTE looking for a project that might fit 
my application. I have found other on¬ 
board computers, but their manufac¬ 
turers want an arm and a leg for them, 
and I run a low-budget operation. For ex¬ 
ample, I looked at a computer that moni¬ 
tored the eight exhaust temperatures, had 
room for an additional eight engine and 
clutch monitors, and cost more than 
$5000. I'm certain that the job can be 


done for a lot less than that* 

My problem is that I'm not exactly an 
electronics whiz. My background is in 
accounting. 

I also want to develop a digital device 
that would tell exactly what the timing of 
the engine is. I think this would be an 
easy device to develop, but I need some¬ 
one with the expertise and knowledge. 

Can you give me some direction? I 
have ideas, but not the skills to develop 
them. 

Rod Lewis 
Lake Oswego, OR 

There are several directions you could 
choose. Your options depend on whether 
you need monitoring and process control 
or just a way to record data for later 
analysis. 

Real-time process control would re¬ 
quire some on-board intelligence; the 
width of the processor bus is dependent 
on the number of inputs and outputs you 
require. Since you also need high tem¬ 
perature sensors, it might he best to con¬ 
tact an industrial control firm; you may 
be able to put together a small chassis PC 
bus, VMEbus t or Multibus solution with 
a processor and a few interface cards. 
The cost, however, is likely to be quite 
high because you f re looking for develop¬ 
ment for a single system, and the effort 
would require writing application 
software. 

Data acquisition without control 
would require only the sensors and a re¬ 
cording device, and it may be a more 
cost-effective solution. Data could be 
strobed, read in, and stored in memory 
with only a low-end processor (depending 
on the speeds and the amount of data re¬ 
quired), the sensors, some memory, and 
some interface logic. You could even pm 
together the timing monitor with no intel¬ 
ligence: A clock, an input line tapped 
(and stepped down) from the distributor 
circuit, and a counter would form the 
heart of the system. 

Your best bet if you are looking for a 
do-it-yourself solution is probably to 
check out some advanced hobbyist books 
and look for a design that would best suit 
your needs. You might also check out the 
single board computers that have ap¬ 
peared in BYTE in recent years.— S, A. 

A Correct Connection 
I have a Sony KX14CPI monitor that 
functions very well as a CGA output de¬ 
vice* What’s bothering me is whether its 
analog input is able to accept VGA ana¬ 
log output. Is it just a question of the cor¬ 
rect connectors? lam assuming that all 

continued 






















TOTAL POWER PROTECTION 

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gLACKOUTS Enabl6S USer 10 operate durin 9 complete loss 


BROWNOUTS User ls pr0,ec,ed ,rom low AC vo,,a9e b€, ° w 


102 volts. 


Automatic shutdown in overload situation to 
protect UPS from inverter burnout. 


OVERLOADS 

OVERVOLTAGE UPS mns on lnverter (117 vo,ts * when AC 


Clamps transients above 200 volts with 
an energy rating of 100 joules or less. 


TESTED and 
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Power Output 

120 Volt Models 

230 Volt Models 

250 WATT 

S 379.00 

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Suggested Retail 


PARA SYSTEMS, INC 


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Telephone: 
(214) 446-7363 


1-800-238-7272 

FAX: (214) 446-901 I TELEX: 140275 OMEGA 


= 


5 i 


I • ~ 

Optional Batteryracks Not Shown 


I LISTED 


Circle 198 on Reader Service Card 


MARCH 1989 • BYTE 41 







































ASK BYTE 



TECHNOLOGY 

FURNITURE 


The original AnthroCart. Mobile. 
Incredibly strong. So many ways to solve 
your space and equipment problems. 
Choose different sizes. Move 
shelves around. Add space saving 
options. 

AnthroCart. Welldesigned 
Technology Furniture. 

Look for our name. 


AnthroCart 

Call us for more information: 800 - 325-3841 




Made in U.S.A. 

All steel frame construction 
Easily holds up to 150 lbs. 



ANTT-RO 


Anthro 

Technology Furniture 

3221 N.W. Yeon St. 
Portland, OR 97210 
503-241-7113 
Telex: 940103 


analog RGB input monitors are the same. 
Is that correct? 

I would also like to clarify the impres¬ 
sion that I get from reading some of the 
computer ads in BYTE and other maga¬ 
zines. ATI seems to imply that its EGA 
card is able to output any mode to any 
monitor. This would mean, for example, 
that an EGA mode could be displayed on 
a monochrome monitor with shades 
rather than colors. This appears wonder¬ 
ful, since it is then possible to run any 
software with just the ATI card and what¬ 
ever monitor you happen to have. Is this 
right? 

Dr. Ono Meng Soon MRCP 
Petaling, Jay a 

You can use any analog RGB monitor as a 
VGA output device, provided the monitor 
has the proper bandwidth and you are 
able to make the proper connection . 
While I don 7 have the specs for the Sony 
monitor, a bandwidth of over 10 MHz is 
required for VGA adapters. You 'll have to 
make sure that the monitor is capable of 
640- by 480-pixel resolution, a quality 
not found in many displays sold for use 
under the CGA standard. 

EGA systems have a monochrome 
mode (mode 15) that can display graph¬ 
ics on a two-color monitor. Monochrome 
(black-and-white) monitors with gray¬ 
scale capability are usually sold for 
graphics work and offer high resolution. 
Any EGA card will work only with a TTL 
monitor or a multifrequency monitor with 
aTTLswitch.—S. A. 

Resurrecting the Dead 

I’m a beginning electronics/computer 
hobbyist (with a strong emphasis on “be¬ 
ginning”). Recently, I intercepted a ven¬ 
erable (circa 1976) Lanier LTE-3 “no 
problem” dedicated word processing sys¬ 
tem on its last trip out the back door of a 
local attorney. The system seems to be in 
good operating condition and includes a 
large integrated terminal (a 13-inch 
CRT, two 514-inch floppy disk drives, 
five card slots, and a full keyboard), 
some software, and a Qume daisywheel 
printer. 

I'm not interested in wrestling with an 
antiquated typing system in a modern 
business environment, but I would like to 
convert the terminal into a multifunction 
personal computer. Can I accomplish 
this in a cost-effective manner? 

I have no technical specs on the sys¬ 
tem, but the motherboard seems to be 
built around the following chips: the 
Intel 1D912, NEC D8080AFC, and 
NEC D8257C microprocessors, and 16 

continued 


AnthroCart and Technology Furniture are 
42 BYTE • MARCH 1989 registered trademarks of Anthro 



















OS/2 $199 

* Default initialization and the 
absence of declarations shorten 
programs. 

Large Model & 
Math Support 

PolyAWK is a large model impte- 
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PolyAWK Comes With 
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When you order PolyAWK you 
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AWK is to use, followed by a 
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PolyAWK is a complete implementation of AWK 
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PolyShell Bonus For MS-DOS! 


PolyShell gives you 96 of the most useful UNIX 
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e call "too, 

box language” because it is 
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EblyAWK is a powerful pattern matching language for 
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to do when ids found. IblyAWK searches a set .of files 
for lines matched by any of the patterns. When a 
matching line is found, the corresponding action is 
performed. A pattern can select tines by boolean 
combinations of tegular expressions and comparison 
operations on strings, numbers, fields, variables, and 
array elements; patterns may reference properties of 
the current input line or any other program variables. 
Actions may perform arbitrary processing on selected 
lines. The action language looks like C, but there are 
no declarations, and strings and numbers are built- 
in data types, 'feu can have multiple inpu t files and 
output files, regular expressions, userdefined func¬ 
tions, and run other programs, 

Saves You Time & Effort 

The most compelling reason to use PolyAWK is 
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Very Concise Code 

Where program development time is more 
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* The implicit input loop and the pattern-action 
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* Reid splitting parses the most common forms of 
input, while numbers and strings and the 
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■ Associative arrays use ordinary strings as the in¬ 
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ment a single-key database. 

* Regular expressions are a uniform notation for 
describing patterns of text. 






































ASK BYTE 


TMS4I16015NL ICs. Can the system be 
“liberated” with the replacement of one 
or more chips on the motherboard? 

A. I. Daniels Jr. 

Corpus Christiy TX 

I'd consider taking up wrestling. At least f 
be happy that the system works and see 
what mileage you can get out of it as is. 

The D8080AFC is none other than the 
wonderful old 8-bit 8080, grandfather of 
the 8088. The 8080 was at its peak in the 


early days of CP/M and the S-IOO bus. 
The D8257C is not a processor but a pro¬ 
grammable direct-memory-access con¬ 
troller for the 8080/8085family. Your 16 
TMS4116-15s add up to 32K bytes' 
worth of 150-ns dynamic RAM. 

To update the system, lift it up and 
move your desk underneath an AT clone . 
Perhaps the Qume has a Centronics-com¬ 
patible parallel port (though the Qume 
daisywheel printers I'm familiar with 
came with wide, multiline cables compat¬ 


ible with only Qume's interfaces), and 
you can use it with some PC or AT 
clone.—R. G. 

Parallel ATs 

Let’s take a hypothetical case. I have two 
IBM PC AT compatibles. One I use all 
the time. I use the other 10 percent to 20 
percent of the time, but 1 cannot do with¬ 
out it. Both have 640K bytes, a 1.2-mega¬ 
byte floppy disk drive, a 20-megabyte 
hard disk drive, and a parallel port. My 
dream is to use the second AT in a paral¬ 
lel/multiprocessing mode. 

Is this feasible under DOS or OS/2? If 
so, what additional hardware (e.g., 
memory, bus-to-bus link) would l need? 
Is such hardware available? If I have C 
source code, can I—using some overlay 
software—recompile that software so 
that it makes use of both machines? 

Do other readers find themselves 
needing a second AT but underutilizing 
it? Would the kind of software and hard¬ 
ware Fm dreaming about be a viable al¬ 
ternative to upgrading to a faster, more 
expensive machine? 

Ameesh Oza 
Martinez, CA 

It sounds like what you're dreaming 
about is building a parallel-processing 
system, not an easy feat by any means. 
First , you } d want to get the systems com¬ 
municating with one another at high 
speed, so you'd probably need to set up a 
bidirectional parallel port. You can do 
this by either buying a couple of parallel 
I/O boards or seeing if you can modify 
your existing parallel ports as described 
in 11 Why Microcontrollers, Part 2" by 
Steve Garcia in the September 1988 
BYTE. Then you'll have to work out 
handshaking details, communication 
protocols, and so on; you 're pretty much 
on your own in all this. 

And your problems have just begun, 
because getting high-speed communica¬ 
tions set up doesn 't guarantee that any of 
your software will make use of it. Unless 
the whole point of this exercise is the en¬ 
joyment you *11 derive from creating what 
amounts to your own operating system 
and application software, you ’re in for 
months and possibly years of hassle. 

Of course, another alternative is to set 
up a small network between the ma¬ 
chines. You could make this as simple or 
as elaborate as your pocketbook allows. 
But the computers could at least share 
disks and printers. So, for example, you 
could turn one AT into a remote print- 
spooling station so that it manages large 
print tasks white the other AT is free to 

continued 


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Emergency Shutdown 

At my company we have several IBM PC 
XT and AT computers operating in an 
unattended environment where it is im¬ 
portant to determine if a system is not op¬ 
erating because of a power, hardware, or 
software failure. 

Once failure is detected on a system, 
we want to energize or deenergize a relay 
that can be used to enable and disable 
other equipment. At some later point, we 
would analyze and correct the actual 
problem. 

We believe we need a device that could 
be signaled periodically via software 
control and would then begin a count¬ 
down process. If another signal was re¬ 
ceived before the countdown terminated 
(indicating valid operation), the counter 
would be reset; otherwise, the counter 
would expire and the relay would be 
switched. We can tolerate a time-out per¬ 
iod of several seconds (say, 2 to 5) to a 
few minutes (say, 1 or 2), Expansion 
slots are at a premium, so we would like 
to signal via an existing port: serial, par¬ 
allel, or, perhaps, keyboard. The cost 
needs to be low—$20 to $50. 

We have found some watchdog timers, 
but either they require special signals via 
an expansion board, they’re too expen¬ 
sive, or both. Since we don’t want to de¬ 
sign or build this device, do you know of 
any vendors that supply a device we could 
use for this purpose? 

Fred Schumann 
Boulder, CO 

The PC XT and AT already have their 
own timers, so you probably don V need to 
buy an additional one. Programming the 
timer in assembly language and BASIC is 
covered in good detail in Robert Jour- 
dain*s Programmer’s Problem Solver for 
the IBM PC, XT, and AT (Simon dt 
Schuster, New York: 1986). This book 
also contains good information on pro¬ 
gramming parallel printer and serial 
pons. You should be able to use either the 
RDY line on the parallel printer port or 
one of the serial port’s handshaking lines 
as input for your triggering signal. So 
there r s a good chance that t with some 
clever software , you don 7 need any addi¬ 
tional hardware.— R. G, a 


46 BYTE* MARCH 1989 


Circle 63 on Reader Service Card 































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MARCH 1989 • BYTE 49 
































































Think small in a big way 


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50 BYTE- MARCH 1989 


II DIGITAL RESEARCH’ 


Circle 83 on Reader Service Card (DEALERS: 84) 




Book Reviews 



Text, Context, 
and Hypertext: 
Writing with 
and for the Computer 

Edited by Edward Barrett 


MIT Press, Cambridge, MA: 
1988, 368pages, $29.95 


Reviewed by David A. Minded 

N ew methods of creating, 
manipulating, and stor¬ 
ing text are changing the na¬ 
ture of written language, and 
not necessarily for the better. 
Electronic machination can 
easily transform the wonder¬ 
ful and elusive ambiguity of 
language into a strictly regi¬ 
mented system of signs: Text 
becomes “strings," writers 
become “word processors," 
and readers become “users/ 1 
Writers, technologists, and 
critics alike are asking how 
these developments will 
change both the practice and 
the profession of writing. 

Text, Context, and Hyper¬ 
text, a collection of essays 
edited by Edward Barrett of 
MIT, attempts to address 
these difficult issues, as sum¬ 
marized in the book's subtitle , 
“Writing with and for the 
Computer," The essays deal 
with three general categories: 
technical documentation and 
the position of the writer in the 
computer industry, the educa¬ 
tion of technical writers, and 
hypertext and hypermedia* 

Writing, or “Information 
Development”? 

in “Information Development 
Is Part of Product Develop¬ 
ment—Not an Afterthought," 
Roger Grice of IBM outlines a 
strategy wherein technical 
writers become involved in 
software development in order 
to create more user-friendly 
products* This essay, how¬ 
ever, is more revealing as an 


example of how large corpora¬ 
tions assimilate and mutate 
writing and how technology 
and its associated jargon trans¬ 
form the role of the writer* 
Grice describes IBM's re¬ 
naming of the writer as an “in¬ 
formation developer" whose 


function becomes an engi¬ 
neering-! ike design of “infor¬ 
mation units." According to 
Grice, what distinguishes 
these new professionals from 
writers is that they “tend to get 
information from people 
rather than from books," 


work “as part of a team, " and 
“test the information for its 
usability*" 

Other articles in the book 
make similar suggestions that 
improved writing does not re¬ 
quire improved language but 
rather the proper placement of 
writers within the corporate 
hierarchy* Such changes will 
make the writer serve better as 
“communicator, integrator, 
and facilitator." To me, writ¬ 
ers have always been these 
things, and this rhetoric di¬ 
minishes the power of written 
text in favor of structure, hier¬ 
archy, and euphemism. 

Teaching on the Network 

Editor Barrett's own contribu¬ 
tion (which was coauthored by 
James Paradis) concerns the 
application of computer net¬ 
works to the teaching of writ¬ 
ing in the classroom. Instead 
of attempting to model “the 
cognitive processes of the 
mind” operating within writ¬ 
ing instruction, they chose to 
model the “social setting" of 
the classroom. The black¬ 
board is replaced by the com¬ 
puter terminal, students hand 
in their work over a network, 
and the instructor reviews and 
returns the work with elec¬ 
tronic notes. 

The authors found their 
classroom model quite suc¬ 
cessful, but students preferred 
teachers' comments in old- 
style hard copy covered with 
red ink. Barrett and Paradis 
seem enthralled with technol¬ 
ogy; they are so concerned 
with being in the technologi¬ 
cal avant-garde that they hesi¬ 
tate to accept such a low-tech 
solution as paper and pen. 

Classroom-oriented ap¬ 
proaches are useful as a kind 
of textual public-address sys¬ 
tem, but I doubt if one could 
real ly learn to write over a net¬ 
work. While computers can 
imitate and even improve so- 
coniinued 


ALSO REVIEWED 


C: An Advanced Introduction, ANSI C Edition 


Supercharging OS/2: Batch Files and Utilities 
Advanced QuickC 

Advanced Turbo C. A Programmer's Guide 
The Book of Fax 

Defense Applications of Artificial Intelligence 


ILLUSTRATION: ROWENA SMITH © 1989 


MARCH 1989 'BYTE 51 





















BOOK REVIEWS 



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cial settings, they should not 
replace them, and face-to-face 
instruction will always be 
more valuable than screen-to- 
screen instruction. 

Text, Context, and Hyper¬ 
text makes a significant con¬ 
tribution to the current debate 
on computer writing, but it 
suffers from an overly “tech¬ 
ie” emphasis. That several of 
the essays are poorly written 
and carelessly edited is a 
symptom of insufficient atten¬ 
tion to language as the root of 
all writing. Furthermore, a 
$30 book like this one, with a 
section on desktop publ ish ing, 
should not have several differ¬ 
ent typestyles and low-quality 
dot-matrix prints. 

The Poetics of Hypertext 

The most thoughtful essay of 
the book, “Hypertext and the 
Teaching of Writing” is writ¬ 
ten by John Slatin of the En¬ 
glish department at the Uni¬ 
versity of Texas. His thesis, 
that "‘hypertext is a literary 
concept,” parallels problems 
of hypertext with problems of 
poetry such as inter text uality 
(theessentially referential and 
connected nature of all texts). 
Slatin reminds us, through 
Ezra Pound and Marianne 
Moore, that “nodes, links, 
and structure" have long been 
prominent in literature, and 
that hypertextual writing is 
merely an explicit form of 
these connections. Further¬ 
more, it is through such nodes 
and the links between them 
that ideas emerge, so hyper¬ 
text is a powerful tool for both 
educators and writers. 

Slatin' s essay also repre¬ 
sents what 1 see as a new direc- 
tion in the critical thinking 
about writing and computers. 
It is among the few in Text , 
Context, and Hypertext to be 
free of a certain technological 
utopianism and disdain for 
what Barrett calls “rhetorical 
tradition." All too often, com¬ 
puter/cultural theorists fall 
prey to the “in 10 years well 
be able to do everything” syn¬ 
drome. Critical dialogue on 
these subjects certainly needs 
technically informed thinkers 
who can seriously engage new 


technologies. At the same 
time, these thinkers must be 
able to remove themselves 
from the thrill of progress and 
place such developments in 
their proper h istorical and cul¬ 
tural perspective. 

Text, Context t and Hyper¬ 
text covers a broad spectrum 
of technical and professional 
issues. But, when considering 
the impact of computers, we 
must ask ourselves, How did 
the invention of the typewriter 
affect the nature of writing, or 
the printing press, or, for that 
matter, the pen? 


BRIEFLY NOTED 


C: An Advanced Introduc¬ 
tion, ANSI C Edition by Nar- 

ain Gehani, Computer Science 
Press t New York: 1988, 265 
pages , $32.95. The denizens 
of AT&T's Bell Laboratories 
create a lot of language prod¬ 
ucts and the books that are 
needed to document them. 
Narain Gehani developed 
Concurrent C, a superset of C 
that facilitates parallel pro¬ 
gramming, for Bell Labs. He 
has written extensively about 
C, Concurrent C, and even 
Concurrent C + + , as well as 
Ada. 

The first edition of this 
book appeared in 1986; this 
edition reflects the changes in 
C requi red for conformance to 
the new ANSI standard. Ge- 
hani's two books nicely com¬ 
plement the existing C Bible, 
The C Programming Lan¬ 
guage, by his colleagues Brian 
Kernighan and Dennis 
Ritchie. 

The style of C: An Advanced 
Introduction, ANSI C Edition 
will be familiar to readers of 
K&R. Gehani states up front 
that he assumes that you al¬ 
ready know a fair amount 
about programming in lan¬ 
guages like Pascal, FOR¬ 
TRAN, and Ada. His book 
helps you learn how to use C 
but not necessarily how to pro¬ 
gram. But along the way, he 
explains C concepts that fre¬ 
quently take a long rime to 
learn on your own. The book 
continued 


52 BYTE * MARCH 1989 


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Clo?e Fqldfif /LMJr/btr>/XN ^1 entries 


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BOOK REVIEWS 


sticks to “advanced” C topics, 
such as type declarations, data 
abstraction, exception han¬ 
dling, and the C preprocessor. 

In addition to covering the 
fundamental areas, like con¬ 
trol-flow statements and oper¬ 
ators and expressions, Gehani 
concentrates on advanced in¬ 
formation, and he manages to 
be very readable and easy to 
follow, as well. For example, 
the chapter on functions ex¬ 
plains how to declare and call 
functions, the basics, but it 
then goes on to discuss func¬ 
tions with a variable number of 
parameters and the control of 
function visibility. 

Gehani devotes an entire 
chapter to independent compi¬ 
lation and data abstraction. 
This chapter provides a good 
discussion of breaking pro¬ 
grams up into modules so that 
you can protect data structures 
by making them local to a 
given module using the static 
storage class* 

This book contains a lot of 
code. While most of the list¬ 
ings are short, they illustrate C 
concepts meaningfully; many 
of the fragments come from 
larger, working programs* 

The book provides appen¬ 
dixes for both C + + and Con¬ 
current C that provide an over- 
view of these C supersets. 
While you cannot learn C + + 
or Concurrent C from these 
pages, you can get an idea 
about whether or not you could 
benefit from a more detailed 
explanation in another source. 

I can recommend this book 
to programmers who think 
they know C well and to pro¬ 
grammers who write a lot of 
code in other languages and 
want to learn C. Both will find 
many useful nuggets of infor¬ 
mation from a true program¬ 
ming wizard. 

— G. Michael Vose 

Supercharging OS/2: Batch 
Files and Utilities by David 
D. Busch , Addison- Wesley 
Publishing Company , Read¬ 
ing, MA: J988, 276 pages, 
$22.95. At first glance, the 
title of this book grabs your 
eye and makes you take notice, 
The promise of making OS/2 


even more powerful makes 
you want to know more. But 
then you begin to wonder if 
batch-file utilities are really 
going to improve OS/2. The 
answer is, probably not for 
most users. 

Not that some of the 48 util¬ 
ities offered aren't useful- 
many of them are, like the 
STAMPER.CMD utility that 
marks files with the current 
date, or ARCHIVE.CMD, 
which copies files not already 
backed up to an archive disk. 
In addition to some useful util¬ 
ities, this book nicely explains 
how each of these batch files 
works so that you can learn 
how to be a batch-file pro¬ 
gramming expert. 

But there's a fundamental 
problem here. OS/2 hasn't 
caught on up until now mostly 
because the world was await¬ 
ing the Presentation Manager, 
OS/2's graphical user inter¬ 
face. With PM, you won't be 
using batch files because you 
won't be talking to OS/2 from 
the command line. You won’t 
have to worry about path 
names and subdirectories, be¬ 
cause the OS/2 world will ap¬ 
pear in pictures you move with 
a mouse, not as filenames you 
copy and delete* 

Supercharging OS/2 seems 
to be caught in the OS/2 vapor¬ 
ware time warp, appealing to 
the people who used OS/2 like 
an advanced version of MS- 
DOS in the days before the ar¬ 
rival of the PM. It has intro¬ 
ductory chapters on OS/2 that 
rehash why this operating sys¬ 
tem will be important to per¬ 
sonal computing's future; 
there's nothing new here. It 
briefly explains OS/2 con¬ 
cepts like multitasking and 
time-si icing and concisely, al¬ 
beit simplistically, summa¬ 
rizes what’s different between 
OS/2 and MS-DOS. 

Reading this book was hard 
for me. I know a fair amount 
about OS/2, and I didn't like 
its condescending tone, 

I can’t recommend this 
book as a way to supercharge 
OS/2. As a tutorial on using 
batch files, however, it is use¬ 
ful though not unique; most of 
continued 


54 BYTE ■ MARCH 1989 


Circle 52 on Reader Service Card 


























































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DOING MORE FOR THE DATA PROCESS 


Circle 261 on Reader Service Card 


MARCH 1989 • BYTE 55 

















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Circle 277 on Reader Service Card 


MARCH 1989 • BYTE 57 







Circle 95 on Reader Service Card 


BOOK REVIEWS 


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58 BYTE* MA RCH 1989 Circle 165 on Reader Service Card 



the techniques will apply to 
MS-DOS as well as to OS/2. 
To learn about OS/2 batch-file 
programming, you might 
want to read a magazine article 
or your OS/2 user's manual in¬ 
stead and save $22,95, 

—G. Michael Vose 

Advanced QuickC by Werner 
Fiebel, Osborne/McGraw- 
Hill, Berkeley, CA: 1988, 711 
pages , $21. 95. A few years 
ago, it was fashionable to 
claim that “Real program¬ 
mers eat meat” as a parody on 
the consciousness-raised 
early-1980s male who was 
man enough to eat quiche. 
While that was a joke, pro¬ 
grammers do want "‘meat” in 
their programming texts. 
Werner Fiebel’s latest book 
satisfies such an appetite. 

Not really a book about 
QuickC as much as a book 
about C programming that 
happens to use QuickC, Ad¬ 
vanced QuickC features over 
600K bytes of source code. 
This code is not short snippets 
written just to explain a C con¬ 
cept; these fragments perform 
serious, useful tasks. The lists 
of routines in the book reads 
like a computer science cornu¬ 
copia: stacks, queues, linked 
lists, binary trees, parsers, 
data compressors, encryption 
routines, quadratic random- 
number generators, simula¬ 
tions, statistics models, and 
graphing routines. All this 
code is available on a disk from 
the author for an additional 
charge. 

The text accompanying the 
code describes the algo¬ 
rithms, sometimes ingreat de¬ 
tail, and is easy to follow. 
Long programs are broken 
down with paragraphs that ex¬ 
plain what each function in the 
program does. These explana¬ 
tions explore problems with 
any given algorithm, like the 
discussion of Quicksort's poor 
performance on small data 
sets, and presents programs 
that don't work the way you ex¬ 
pect them to, followed by a 
corrected version of the code. 

The section on data encryp¬ 
tion offers some puzzles you 
can play with to exercise and 


o better understand the encryp- 
tion algorithms. 

e The appendi xes i n th is book 

t summarize the QuickC com- 
e mands and probably offer 

- enough information about 
QuickC to let an experienced 

e Pascal programmer jump to 
QuickC with little difficulty, 
r But since QuickC offers exten- 

- sive on-line help and comes 
/ with a reference manual, the 
s material here probably won't 
o be of much use. But if you’re 

- like me, you’ll use the vast se¬ 
ll lection of routines that make 
d up the rest of the book over and 
s over.— G. Michael Vose 

Advanced Turbo C, A Pro- 
n grammer’s Guide by Donna 
Mosich f Namir Shammas , and 
k Bryan Flamig, John Wiley & 
Sons f New York: 1988, 339 
it pages, $21.95. AH too often, 
k programming books, even ad¬ 
it vanced ones, end up being no 
L more than expanded reference 
r manuals. Advanced Turbo C, 
however, covers material that 
s is absent from the Turbo C 
i- manuals (including version 
n 2.0) but also provides genuine 
s insight into the unique and 
s often complex nature of C pro- 

- grammmg, 

d The book beg i ns w ith a con - 

cise C summary but quickly 
n moves into deeper waters, de- 

- veloping in the next few chap- 

- ters a mouse-based text win- 
d dow system. The authors 
s should be complimented on 
n the handiness of their pro- 
,1 grams. The code is clear, well 

commented, and good for 
e learning. It is also efficient 

- and useful (conveniently di- 

- vided into header files and 
program files). Some readers 

n may want to include it in their 

- own libraries. 

e Advanced Turbo C goes on 

- to cover standard Turbo C 
h subjects, such as file I/O, 
e memory allocation, and “ge- 
r neric” programming. The 
a window system from the ear- 
s lier chapters, for example, is 

adapted for graphics. The 
a book concludes with a final 
project of a mini hypertext sys- 

- tem, a composite of tech- 
,1 niques previously discussed. 

i continued 

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BOOK REVIEWS 


What sets Advanced Turbo 
C above other programming 
guides is that the examples it 
uses are both educational sam¬ 
ples and useful routines. 

—David A. Mindell 

The Book of Fax by Daniel 
Fishman and Elliot King, Ven- 
tana Press, Chapel Hill, NC: 
1988,134pages, $12.95. The 
Book of Fax is a simply written 
feature- and benefit-oriented 
overview of fax machines 
aimed at businesspeople and 
other would-be fax purchasers 
who have a minimal interest in 
the technology. Even at 134 
pages, including the index, the 
book contains considerable 
padding, but when the authors 
get down to their subject, they 
cover the basics well. 

In this case, the basics are 
such things as features and 
benefits, price ranges and 
what you can expect to get for 
your money, channels for buy¬ 
ing a fax machine, and the ad¬ 
vantages and disadvantages of 
each. Some attention is paid to 
computer fax boards, as well. 
Throughout, the emphasis is 
on using fax. 

The authors discuss the 
technical aspects of fax only 
insofar as they affect the user. 
They only touch on differ¬ 
ences between group 1, 2, 3, 
and 4 coding, for example, 
and there is no discussion of 
coding methods or transmis¬ 
sion characteristics. If you 
want to understand how the 
technology works, look else¬ 
where. 

Because The Book of Fax is 
so determinedly nontechnical 
in its orientation, it doesn’t at¬ 
tempt to discuss installation 
and troubleshooting. It gives 
you tips on where to buy a fax 
machine and what to look for, 
but it won’t help you connect 
up your purchase or deal with 
the common problems with 
fax. 

The weakest parts of the 
book are the authors’ attempts 
to discuss the strategic and 
business applications of fax 
machines. The strongest parts 
are the wealth of practical tips 
for using fax machines. Fish¬ 
man and King alert the reader 


to the problem of fax junk 
mail, for instance, and they of¬ 
fer suggestions on how to deal 
with it. 

The Book of Fax is best used 
as an orientation tool. It will 
give a nontechnical person in¬ 
terested in fax an overview of 
the field. It provides a starting 
point for a would-be fax pur¬ 
chaser, but it is far from a com¬ 
plete guide.— Rick Cook 

Defense Applications of Ar¬ 
tificial Intelligence: Prog¬ 
ress and Prospects edited by 
Stephen J. Andriole and Ger¬ 
ald W. Hopple, Lexington 
Books, Lexington, MA: 1988, 
385 pages, $65. This is a col¬ 
lection of 20 essays about the 
“marriage of artificial intelli¬ 
gence technology and a host of 
Department of Defense prob¬ 
lems. ’’ The essays are grouped 
into four categories: the na¬ 
tional defense agenda, appli¬ 
cations exploring the Al-na- 
tional defense interface, case 
studies, and prospects and 
prognosis. The contributors 
offer up a good deal of new in- 
formation and food for 
thought. Naturally, most of 
the articles are strictly mili¬ 
tary in scope, but a few have 
wider application. 

What does it all boil down 
to? Hopple, using a somewhat 
strained metaphor, concludes 
that “the marriage between 
defense and AI has become a 
mature and fertile union—past 
the hype of the honeymoon but 
reassuringly distant from the 
divorce court as well. ” De¬ 
fense Applications of Artificial 
Intelligence definitely offers 
most AI readers an unusual 
perspective on their field of in¬ 
terest.— JackD. Kirwan ■ 

CONTRIBUTORS 


David A. Mindell is a techni¬ 
cal writer and consultant in 
Aspen, Colorado. G. Michael 
Vose is editor of the OS/2 Re¬ 
port. He lives in Peterborough, 
New Hampshire. Rick Cook is 
a journalist living in Phoenix, 
Arizona. Jack D. Kirwan is 
an assistant editor of The 
Energy Journal at the Univer¬ 
sity of Arizona in Tucson. 


60 BYTE • MARCH 1989 


Circle 181 on Reader Service Card 



















Our (HSI) Color Frame Grabber lets you change 
your image as fast as you change your mind. 

Welcome to the real-time world of color image processing, finally, we dropped out the color to show the intensity values—all 


If you work in a high speed environment with an IBM PC AT 
or compatible, you already know how complex and time-consuming 
RGB color processing is. In contrast, HSI processing lets you manip¬ 
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Add that to your power and memory! 

Our DT2871 (HSI) Color ™ Frame Grabber with its Aurora” 1 
software simply facilitates and accelerates conventional color image 
processing. Take a quick look at the “split personality 1n above and 
see why. 

The image on the upper left shows Data Translation President 
Fred Molinari's true colors in a frame captured directly from a 
video camera. Then, to illustrate the broad range of colors available 
to you, we changed the background hue value in the upper right 
image. Next we increased the saturation on Fred's shirt and tie, and 
adjusted both the RGB and HSI values on his snappy jacket. And 


in real-time. 

So, whether your application involves animation, cosmetic 
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DATA TRANSLATION 



World Headquarters: Data Translation, Inc., JM Locke Drive. Marlboro. MA 01752119* USA. (508) 461-3700 Tlx 951646 

United Kingdom Headquarters: Data Translate Lid.. The Mulberry Business Park, Wokingham, Berkshire RGU 2QJ, U.K. [07341 793638II* 940LL914 
West Germany Headquarters: Data Translation GmbH, Stuff garter Slrasse 66. 7120 Bietigherm-Bissingwii, West Germany 07142 54Q2 5 

IfttwnatEoMl Satei Offices: Australia [2) 6624255' Belgium {l) 735-2135;Canada [800] 268-0427; Chile [2) 25-3689; China ]408) 727-8222. (I) 863-721; Denmark (2) 274511; Finland (90) 372-144; France ffl 
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(HSI) Color Frame Grabber is a trademark and Data T ranslation is a registered trademark of Data Translation, Inc.. All other trademarks and registered trademarks are the property of their respective holders. 


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MARCH 1989 • BYTE 61 

























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System V/AT (complete) 

AT Runtime System 

649 

549 

249 

209 

286 DOS Merge 

SCO; 

249 

289 

XENIX SysV (comp.) 

1295 

999 

Operating System 

WENDIN: 

595 

479 

Operating System Toolbox 

99 

99 

SO 

80 

PC VMS 

99 

80 

Wend in-DOS 

139 

109 

OS/2 DEVELOPMENT TOOLS 


Btrieve for OS/2 

595 

455 

Epsilon for OS/2 

195 

151 

Greenleai Data Windows 

395 

CALL 

CSS Dev. Todttell for OS/2 

CALL 

CALL 

LOGITECH Modula-2 

349 

279 

MS Language* 

NeWS/2 

CALL 

495 

CALL 

CALL 

Panel Plus lar OS/2 

495 

395 

PolyAWK for OS/2 

199 

179 

Vitamin C (OS/2) 

345 

279 

Windows for Data (OS/2) 

395 

349 

PROTOTYPING 

C-Scape 

299 

282 

Dan Brie kiln's Demo Program 

II 195 

179 

Instant Replay 

150 

131 

Proteus 

149 

129 

Screen Machine 

79 

60 

Screen Star 

99 

85 

w/ source code 

198 

169 

REFERENCE GUIDES 

Command Tip* 

90 

80 

Norton On-Line Prog. Guide 

m 

75 

Tom Ret tig's HELP 

120 

105 

PASCAL COMPILERS 

Microsoft Pascal 

300 

189 

Turbo Pascal 

150 

105 

Turbo Pascal 5,0 Professional 

250 

175 

TURBO PASCAL LIBRARIES/ 


UTILITIES 

DATA BOSS 

399 

359 

Overlay Manager 

Pascal ASYNCH MANAGER 

45 

39 

175 

137 

PCX Toolkit 

90 

80 

POWER SCREEN 

129 

99 

Turbo Analyst 

99 

79 

turbo ASYNCHPLUS 

129 

99 

Turbo Geometry Library 

150 

135 

Turbo MAGIC 

199 

179 

Turbo Plus v. 5.0 

ion 

80 


NEW RELEASES 

PC-1 inl 3.0 

More C error checking than ever. 
50 new error messages, belter 
message control, supports larger 
programs, wild caret support, 
automatic generation of declara¬ 
tion*, faster standard library, 
autohelp, lour new flags, support 
lot ANSI C. Supports MS 5.1, 
Watcom and Turbo 2.0. 

List: *129 Ours; $101 

PC VMS V. 2.5 

The newest version of WENDIN'S 
VAX/VMS look-alike operating 
system is self-bootable, and wifi 
run most DOS software while ot¬ 
tering multiuser and multitasking 
capabilities. 

List *99 Outs: *80 

Green leaf ViewCmrnn 

Turn your PC Into a serial data 
analyzer. This combi nation of 
hard.ware and software iels you 
watch live ftS 232 communka- 
lions Send data from file or 
keyboard , set Triggers" to con¬ 
trol monitoring and capturing of 
data. A must for debugging com¬ 
er u n i cat! on appl Scat tons. 

List: $495 Ours: CALL 





















1,000 Brand Names 1-800-445-7899 


VM/386 

" VM/386 should be considered mandatory software as important as 

MS-DOS." ...Computer Language 10/88 

VM/386. PC Magazine Technical Excellence Award Winner, lets you 
create "virtual machines," each running its own 
MS-DOS application so you save valuable time while 
maximizing the performance of your 386 PC. Time 
consuming tasks like compiling code and run¬ 
ning bulletin boards no longer tie 
up your PC, because they run si- j 
multaneously. VM/386 offers the 
highest level of data integrity and 
software compatibility available in 
a multitasking operating environ¬ 
ment. Order your copy today! 

List: $245 Ours: $199 


7 




ESSENTIAL GRAPHICS 3.0 

Power Graphics for C. 

It's easy to add sophisticated graphics to any application with this 
seasoned library. It provides fast, reliable functions that support 99% 
of the graphics adapters in use. Essential 
Graphics' advanced capabilities include 3D 
graphics, stacked bar and pie charts, PCX 
files, world coordinates, viewports, rubber¬ 
banding and more. Input from mice, digi¬ 
tizers and light pens. Output to printers, 
lasers and plotters. And, unlike 
the competition, source is avail- 
— able and there are no royalties, 
30-day money back guarantee. 

~ List: $299 Ours: $229 

PANEL PLUS II 

The latest offering of this reliable, time-tested screen design product 
includes all new documentation, support for virtual screens, scrolling 
windows with mouse-controlled scroll bars, a screen design editor 
enhanced with new pop-up dialog boxes, and an improved C code 
generator. The full library 
source code included with 
PANEL Plus II allows your 
applications to be ported 
royalty-free between DOS, 

OS/2 (including dynalink and 
Presentation Manager support), 

Unix, VMS and other operating 
systems. 

List: $495 Ours: $395 


PANEL 
Plus II 



Roundhill Computer Systems 


MICROSOFT COBOL COMPILER 

The complete COBOL development solution for creating OS/2 and 
MS-DOS applications. It's certified high-level ANSI 85 COBOL. And 
it's a native code compiler, assuring 
extremely fast execution. 

MICROSOFT COBOL supports the 
enormous memory requirements of 
mainframe applications. Develop and 
maintain applications on a personal 
computer and port them to a mini¬ 
computer or mainframe. 

List: $900 „ 

Ours: $599 MtCTOSOtV' 


n 


This Month’s Specials 
from Raima Corp. 

LIST OURS 


dh.FILE 

395 

309 

Single user w/source code 890 

699 

Multi-user 

595 

469 

Multi-user w/source code 1390 1 

1099 

dh.RETRIEVF 

395 

309 

Single user w/source code 890 

699 

Multi-user 

595 

469 

Multi-user w/source code 1390 i 

1099 

WKS Library 

195 

169 


LIST OURS 

Turbo POWER TOOLS PLUS 

129 

99 

Turbo Professional 5.0 

125 

99 

Universal Graphics Library 

150 

121 

SCIENCE/ENGINEERING 

SOFTWARE 

css 

495 

459 

Derive 

200 

179 

DesignCAD 3-D 

299 

219 

EXP 

150 

129 

HiWIRE-Plus 

895 

805 

MathCAD 

349 

279 

MICRO-CAP III 

895 

759 

Microstat-ll 

395 

349 

Systat 

595 

549 

Tango PCB 

TECH'GRAPH’PAD 

495 

469 

395 

359 

TRANSLATORS 

Bas_C (Commercial) 

375 

323 

Bas Pas (Commercial) 

280 

242 

BASTOC 

495 

399 

Brooklyn Bridge 

130 

CALL 

dB2C 

299 

272 

dBx TRANSLATOR 

550 

469 

PROMULA. FORTRAN 

450 

409 

w/ Library Source 

745 

669 

386 SOFTWARE 

386 ASM/LINK 

495 

389 

386MAX 

75 

66 

386MAX PROFESSIONAL 

129 

115 

Concurrent DOS 386 (3 User) 

395 

349 

DESQview/386 

190 

165 

F77L-EM/32 

895 

805 

High C 386 

Microport 

895 

799 

System V/386 (complete) 

899 

799 

Runtime System 

299 

269 

MS Windows/386 

195 

130 

NDP C 386 

595 

529 

NDP FORTRAN-386 

SCO XENIX 

595 

529 

Operating System 

Sys. V 386 (complete) 

695 

1495 

589 

1195 

VP/IX (2-USERS) 

495 

399 

VP/IX (unlimited users) 

995 

799 

VM/386 

245 

199 

VM/386 Multiuser (unlim.) 

OTHER PRODUCTS 

895 

CALL 

FLOWCHARTING II 

229 

207 

MuLisp-87 

300 

219 

MuLisp-87 Interp/Compiler 

400 

299 

PC Scheme 

95 

79 

Pfinish 

395 

215 

PolyDoc 

199 

179 

Source Print 

97 

80 

Tree Diagrammer 

77 

70 

BLAISE COMPUTING 

ASYNCH MANAGER 

175 

137 

C TOOLS PLUS/5.0 

129 

99 

EXEC 

95 

76 

Key Pilot 

PASCAL TOOLS / TOOLS 2 

50 

45 

175 

137 

POWER SCREEN 

129 

99 

RUNOFF 

50 

45 

Turbo ASYNCH PLUS 

129 

99 

Turbo C TOOLS 

129 

99 

Turbo POWER TOOLS PLUS 

129 

99 

BORLAND 

Eureka: The Solver 

167 

119 

Paradox 2.0 

725 

529 

Paradox 386 

895 

625 

Paradox Network Pack 

995 

729 

SideKick 

85 

59 

Sidekick Plus 

200 

139 

Turbo Assembler/Debugger 

150 

105 

Turbo Basic 

100 

69 

Database Toolbox 

100 

69 

Editor Toolbox 

100 

69 

Turbo C 2.0 

150 

105 

Turbo C 2.0 Professional 

250 

175 

Turbo Pascal 5.0 

150 

105 

Turbo Pascal 5.0 Professional 

250 

175 

Database Toolbox 

100 

69 

Editor Toolbox 

100 

69 

Gameworks Toolbox 

100 

69 

Graphix Toolbox 

100 

69 



LIST OURS 

Numerical Methods Toolbox 

100 

69 

Tutor 

70 

45 

Turbo Prolog 

150 

105 

GREENLEAF SOFTWARE INC. 


Greenleaf Bus. MathLib 

325 

229 

Greenleaf Comm Library 

229 

169 

Greenleaf DataMath Interface 

75 

69 

Greenleaf DataWindows, DOS 

295 

209 

OS/2 Version 

395 

299 

Greenleaf Functions 

209 

149 

Greenleaf MakeForm 

125 

99 

OS/2 Version 

170 

135 

Greenleaf SuperFunctions 

265 

189 

Greenleaf TurboFunctions 

109 

79 

Greenleaf ViewComm 

495 

CALL 

LAHEY 

F77L 

477 

429 

F77L-EM/16 

695 

639 

F77L-EM/32 

A.I. DEVELOPER'S KIT 

895 

805 

OPERATING SYSTEM 

495 

459 

PERSONAL FORTRAN 77 

MEDIA CYBERNETICS 

95 

89 

Dr. HALO III 

140 

101 

HALO DPE 

195 

162 

HALO '88 

325 

229 

HALO '88 - MS Developers 

595 

399 

TurboHALO for C 

100 

80 

MICROSOFT 

MS BASIC/6.0 

295 

199 

MS C 

450 

299 

MS COBOL V. 3.0 

900 

599 

MS Excel 

495 

329 

MS FORTRAN 

450 

299 

MS Mach 20 

495 

329 

MS Macro Assembler 

MS Mouse Serial or Bus 

150 

99 

w/Paintbrush 



& Mouse Menus 

150 

99 

w/EasyCAD 

175 

119 

w/Paintbrush & Windows 

200 

139 

MS OS/2 Prog. Toolkit 

350 

229 

MS Pascal 

300 

199 

MS QuickBASIC 

99 

69 

MS QuickC 

99 

69 

MS Windows/286 

99 

69 

MS Windows/386 

195 

130 

MS Windows Dev. Kit 

500 

319 

MS Word 

450 

285 

MORTICE KERN SYSTEMS 


MKS Awk 

99 

85 

MKS Lex:Yacc 

249 

212 

MKS Make 

149 

127 

MKS RCS 

189 

161 

MKS SQPS 

495 

CALL 

MKS Toolkit 

199 

169 

MKS Trilogy 

119 

101 

MKS Vi 

149 

129 

NOVELL 

Btrieve 

245 

185 

Xtrieve 

245 

189 

Report Option 

145 

109 

Btrieve/N 

595 

455 

Xtrieve/N 

595 

459 

Report Option/N 

Netware C Interface for DOS 

345 

295 

279 

239 

Netware RPC 

950 

779 

Netware SQL 

595 

489 

Netware System Calls for DOS 

195 

159 

XQL 

795 

599 


PROGRAMMER’S POLICIES 

Phone Orders 

Hours 9 AM-7 PM EST. We accept 
MasterCard, Visa, American Express. 
Include $3.95 per item for shipping 
and handline. All shipments by UPS 
ground. Rush service available. 

Mail Orders 

POs by mail or fax are welcome. 
Please include phone number. 

International Service 

Phone number required with order. 
Call or fax for additional 
information. 

Dealers and Corporate Accounts 

Call for information. 

Unbeatable Prices 

We'll match nationally advertised 
prices. 

Return Policy 

30-day no-hassle return policy. Some 
manufacturer's products cannot be 
returned once disk seals are broken. 


In NY: 914-332-4548 
Customer Service: 914-332-0869 
International Orders: 914-332-4548 
Telex: 510-601-7602 


Fax: 914-332-4021 

Call or Write for 
Latest Free Catalog! 


1 - 800415-7899 


Programmer’s 




A Division of Voyager Telemarketing 
55 South Broadway, Tarrytown, NY 10591 


P, 




















A T R 0 P 



I our customers expect software that works. 
I All the time. The key to software quality is 
I exhaustive testing, it's also an engineer’s 
I worst nightmare, lint it doesn't have to be. 
I Because now you can automate your soft- 
ware testing. 

Introducing the Atron Evaluator. The first and 
only non-intrusive automated PC-based software 
testing tool. 

The Atron Evaluator automatically runs your soft¬ 
ware regression testing programs. All of them. All 
day. All night. Giving you thoroughly tested, higher 
quality software. 

The Atron Evaluator is hardware-based. And since 
it’s non-intrusive, software behavior is tested with¬ 
out the risk of alteration. Once your tests have run, 
you can refer to automatically generated test reports 
to double-check test results. 

The Atron Evaluator saves time. And time makes 
you money. Development cycles are shortened, so 
your software gets to market sooner. And while your 
test programs are running, you can be more produc¬ 
tive. Start a new project. Or go home. 

For more information about the Atron Evaluator, 
call us at 1-800-283-5933. And put an end to your 
worst nightmares. Automatically. 

Circle 33 on Reader Service Card 
In Europe, contact: 

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Phone; 061-338177 

QATraining limited, Cecily Hill Castle 
Cirencester, Gloucestershire, GL7 2IF, England 
Phone; (0285) 5m 


A Division ot CADRE Technologies 

Saratoga Office Center 
12950 Saratoga Avenue 
Saratoga, California 95070 




What’s New 

HARDWARE • SYSTEMS 



AST Gets Lower 
Than Low 

I f you're interested in the 
most cost-effective business 
or home computer from a 
reputable company, the AST 
Bravo/286 might fit your bill. 

It has a low price, a small foot¬ 
print with plenty of room for 
extras, and surface-mount 
technology. 

The system has an 8-MHz 
Intel 80286 microprocessor 
with no wait states and 512K 
bytes of system RAM. A 
CMOS memory module per¬ 
manently stores your installa¬ 
tion and setup information so 
you don't have to configure 
jumpers and DIP switches. 

The Bravo/286 also comes 
with a floppy disk drive con¬ 
troller for a 1.2-megabyte 
S^-inch f loppy disk drive, a 
101-key AT-style keyboard, 
an RS-232C port, a bidirec¬ 
tional parallel port, and sup¬ 
port for an 80287 math copro¬ 
cessor. The monitor is 
optional. 

Price: $1245; diskless ver¬ 
sion, $1095. 

Contact: AST Research, 

Inc., 2121 Alton Ave., Irvine, 
CA 92714, (714) 863-1333. 

Inquiry 1150. 


Bondwell Laptop 
Packs Desktop 
Punch 

T he superslim B200 lap¬ 
top from Bondwell in¬ 
cludes just about everything 
you need for applications like 
word processing and 
spreadsheets. 

The tried-and-true 8-MHz 
80C88 chip processes informa¬ 
tion at a respectable dip from 
a standard 720K-byte 3 !4 -inch 
floppy disk drive mounted in 
the side of this 2-inch-thick 


machine. Also standard is 
256K bytes of RAM, expand¬ 
able to 640K bytes, a built-in 
nickel-cadmium battery , and 
an AC power adapter. 

The keyboard includes 81 
keys with 10 programmable 
function keys. The display is 
a 1014-inch-wide LCD with an 
80-column by 25-row text 
display capability and 640- by 
200 -pixel resolution. 

MS-DOS 3.3 and GW- 
BASIC 3,22 come bundled. 
Connections can be made 
with the B2CKTS Centronics 
parallel port, an RS-232C 
port, and an RGB port. The 
laptop weighs 8 pounds. 

Price: $995. 

Contact: Bondwell Indus¬ 
trial Co., Inc., 47485 Sea- 
bridge Dr., Fremont, CA 
94538, (415) 490-4300, 

Inquiry 1151. 


Is Vour Networking 
Terminal Wyse? 

W hile the WY-212m 

network terminal seems 
to have all the components 
that the great-selling “dumb" 
network terminals have, it 
also has its own 12.5-MHz 
80286, 

The system comes with l 
megabyte of RAM, a 102-key 
PC-style keyboard, two RS- 
232C ports, a Centronics par¬ 
allel port, and a smaller foot¬ 
print than you’ll find on 
almost anything save laptops. 

Each WY-212m is de¬ 
signed to boot off a NetWare or 
3+Share file server through 
an optional Ethernet or Token 
Ring card in the system's 
only 16-bit (AT) card slot, or 


SEND US YOUR NEW PRODUCT RELEASE 

We *d like to consider your product for publication. Send us full 
information, including its price , ship date, and an address and 
telephone number where readers can get further information. Send 
to New Products Editor r BYTE, One Phoenix Mill Lane, Peter¬ 
borough, NH 03458. Information contained in these items is based 
on manufacturers w written statements and/or telephone interviews 
with BYTE reporters, BYTE has not formally reviewed each product 
mentioned. These items, along with additional new product 
announcements, are posted regularly on BIX in the microbytes, sw 
and microbytes, hw con ferences. 


you can add proprietary net¬ 
working hardware. 

Price: $1999. 

Contact: Wyse Technology, 
3571 North First St,, San Jose, 
CA 95134, (408)433-1000, 

Inquiry 1152. 


Wang 80386 
for Power Users 

T he PC 382 is a 20-MHz 
803 86-based mach i ne 
available in either a tower or 
desktop configuration that's 
especially designed for com¬ 
munications- and graphics-in¬ 
tensive applications, Wang 
Microsystems claims. 

A typical system includes 
2 megabytes of RAM, a 1.2- 
megabyte 5 ‘4 - inch floppy 
disk drive, a VGA controller, 
and a 68-megabyte hard disk 
drive. But in the Lradition of 
big-business systems suppli¬ 
ers, Wang can also supply the 
PC 382 stripped or with a 
multitude of upgrade 
capabilities. 

For example, you can ex¬ 
pand memory to 16 megabytes 
on the 32-bit paged/inter¬ 
leaved memory controller 
card, and there's room for 
two 8-bit and si x 16-bit cards 
on top of that. You can add a 
second 1.2-megabyte floppy 
disk drive or a smaller-capac¬ 
ity 5 l 4-inch floppy drive, or 
yon can add a 1.44-megabyte 
3^-inch floppy drive. Hard 
diskdrives range from 20 
megabytes to 321 megabytes. 

Monitors of the 12- to 16- 
inch monochrome and color 
variety are optional. 

Price: Typical system, 

$6825. 

Contact: Wang Microsys¬ 
tems, 10 Technology Dr., 
Lowell, MA 01851. (800) 
962-4727. 

Inquiry 1153. 

continued 


MARCH 1989 - BYTE 65 



















WHAT’S NEW 


HARDWARE • PERIPHERALS 



Light Pen Input 
Made Easier 

T he FT-1000 is a re¬ 
designed light pen from 
FTG Data Syst^fns, the com¬ 
pany that made the light pen a 
popular alternative to the 
mouse for the health care in¬ 
dustry and others. 

Surface-mount technology 
allows the new pen to be 42 
percent smaller, and it’s also 
lighter than before. The ca¬ 
bling that previously coiled 
all the way to the back of the 
pen has been replaced: There 
is about a foot of straight cable 
from the back of the pen be¬ 
fore the cable curls to finish its 
journey to the computer. The 
new pens are compatible with 
the IBM XT, AT, and Micro 
Channel architecture (MCA) 
machines. 

Virtually all the programs 
written for Microsoft Windows 
work with the FT-1000, es¬ 
pecially with the new N-33 
Windows driver that Micro¬ 
soft recently completed. 

To solve many of the jitter 
problems associated with pre¬ 
vious pens, FTG has added 
continuous tracking counters 
and vertical and video inter¬ 
rupts to the MCA board. 

Price: FT-1000, S249; XT, 
AT, MCA, or compatible 
board, $129 to $189. 

Contact: FTG Data Systems, 
10801 Dale St., Suite J-2, P.O. 
Box 615, Stanton, CA 90680, 
(714) 995-3900. 

Inquiry 1154. 


Digitizing Images 
Made Simple 

N o need for a frame grab¬ 
ber here. The EDC-1000 
is a complete package provid¬ 
ing a method to input image or 
picture data into your com¬ 
puter at near-real-time rates. 

The EDC-1000 is com¬ 
puter powered from a standard 
XT bus, and it provides a 
stream of 8-bit data corre¬ 
sponding to spacial bright¬ 
ness in a scene. It uses a 
charged-coupled-device 
image sensor, packaged in an 
almost 2-inch-square hous¬ 
ing, to help the camera sample 
an image into 192 by 165 
pixels; computer-controlled 
exposure and frame-scanning 
times range from 50 millisec¬ 
onds to 2 seconds. Power, 
timing, and video signals are 
carried on a single cable from 
the computer to the camera at 
up to 20 feet away. 

Your computer must have a 
floppy disk drive, 256K bytes 
of RAM, and a half-length 
XT or AT slot. The operating 


system must be DOS 2.1 or 
higher. And you can use either 
color or monochrome moni¬ 
tors. The software has CGA, 
EGA, VGA, and Hercules 
adapters and can save images 
in either Tag Image File For¬ 
mat or PC Paintbrush format. 
Price: $400. 

Contact: Electrim Corp., 

P.O. Box 2074, Princeton, NJ 
08543, (609) 799-7248. 

Inquiry 1155. 


A Scanner 
for Every Desk 

T he Kyocera A-800 flat¬ 
bed scanner can scan any¬ 
thing from 8^- by 11-inch 
photographs to pages in books. 

Once the document is 
scanned, you can scale it from 
25 percent to 1066 percent at 
resolutions of up to 800 dpi and 
then store it on your hard 
disk. (Because one 800-dpi- 
resolution letter-size image 
can consume as much as 3 
megabytes of hard disk ca¬ 
pacity, Kyocera recommends a 
few megabytes of disk space 


for scanned material.) 

Scan mode includes line 
art, six selectable patterns of 
halftone, and four, eight, and 
16 selectable gray levels. 

You need an XT or AT 
compatible with at least 512K 
bytes of free RAM operating 
under Microsoft Windows l .03 
or higher. The A-800 hooks 
into your computer’s parallel 
port. 

Price: $1985. 

Contact: Kyocera Unison, 
Inc., 3165 Adeline St., 
Berkeley, CA 94703, (415) 
848-6680. 

Inquiry 1156. 


Laser Printers 
Invade the Home 
Office 

T he Blue Chip Compact 
Laser Printer features an 
8 -page-per-minute print 
speed in a 17- by 18- by 11- 
inch package. It’s aimed at 
the home computer market, 
with serial ports and a Cen¬ 
tronics parallel port. 

On-board memory comes 
standard at 512K bytes, ex¬ 
pandable to 5 megabytes. Up 
to 128 fonts can reside in mem¬ 
ory at once, or they can be 
downloaded or loaded from 
font cartridges. 

Price: $2499. 

Contact: Blue Chip Interna¬ 
tional, Inc., 7305 West Boston 
St., Chandler, AZ 85226, 

(602) 961-1485. 

Inquiry 1157. 

continued 


Economy Ricoh Drive Rewrites on Optical Cartridges 


W ith the introduction of 
the RO-5030E rewrit- 
able optical disk drive, 
Ricoh could be trouble for 
such companies as Sony, 
Maxtor, and Hitachi. 

With what Ricoh calls 
“constant angular velocity 
tracking,’’ each RO-5030E 
has a data transfer rate of 1.4 


megabytes per second and an 
average access speed of 61 
ms. Data buffer memory for 
the 5 %-inch internal drive is 
256K bytes. 

Sustained data transfer 
rate is as fast as 100K bytes 
per second for recording, 
and up to 300K bytes for 
reading. 


The drive incorporates a 
SCSI controller and uses 
ISO-approved 5 %-inch opti¬ 
cal disk cartridges. Any re¬ 
writable optical media meet¬ 
ing ISO standards can be 
accessed using the magneto¬ 
optical writing/reading 
technology. Capacity is 512 
or 1024 bytes per sector, 297 


or 326 megabytes per side, 
and 594 or 652 megabytes 
per disk. 

Price: $3800; cartridges, 
$250 each. 

Contact: Ricoh Corp., Five 
Dedrick Place, West Cald¬ 
well, NJ 07006, (201) 882- 
2000. 

Inquiry 1158. 


66 B YTE • MARCH 1989 


















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a 


or ours: 


If you perform 
calculations, the answer 
is obvious. 

MathCAD 2.0. 

It’s everything 
you appreciate about 
working on a scratch¬ 
pad-simple, free-form 
math-and more. More 
speed. More accuracy. 

More flexibility. 

Just define your 
variables and enter your 
formulas anywhere on the screen, MathCAD 
formats your equations as they're typed. 
Instantly calculates the results. And displays 
them exactly as you're used to seeing them - 
in real math notation, as numbers, tables 
or graphs. 

MathCAD is more than an equation 
solver, Like a scratchpad, it allows you to add 


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text anywhere to 
support your work, 
and see and record 
every step You can 
try an unlimited 
number of what-ifs. 
And print your 
entire calculation as 
an integrated docu¬ 
ment that anyone 
can understand. 

Pius, MathCAD 
i loaded with powerful 
built-in features. In addition to the usual trig¬ 
onometric and exponential functions, it 
includes built-in statistical functions, cubic 
splines, Fourier transforms, and more. It also 
handles complex numbers and unit conver¬ 
sions in a completely transparent way. 

Yet, MathCAD is so easy to learn, you’ll 
be using its full power an hour after you begin. 


What more could you ask for? How about 
two new applications packs to increase your 
productivity? 

The Advanced Math Applications 
Pack includes 16 applications like eigenvalues 
and eigenvectors of a symmetric matrix, solu¬ 
tions of differential equations, and polynomial 
least-squares fit. 

The Statistics Applications Pack lets 
you perform 20 standard statistical routines such 
as multiple linear regression, combinations and 
permutations, finding the median, simulating a 
queue, frequency distributions, and much more. 

MathCAD lets you perform calculations in 
a way that’s faster, more natural, and less error- 
prone than the way you’re doing them now- 
whether you use a calculator, a spreadsheet, or 
programs you write yourself. So come on over 
to MathCAD and join 45,000 enthusiastic users. 

For more information, contact your dealer 
or call 1-800-MATHCAD (In MA: 617-577-1017). 


© m MtfhSofl, l«. 


Requires IBM PC* or compatible, 512KB RAM, graphics card 

IBM BC* tnternahonal Business Machines Corpaiation. 

MathCAD® MalhSoR. Inc. 


MathSoft, Inc., One Kendall Sq. r Cambridge, MA 02139 
MARCH 1989 * BYTE 67 



Circle 156 on Reader Service Card 







WHAT’S NEW 


HARDWARE • MONITORS 



Taxan Goes Where 
No Standards Have 
Gone Before 

T he Ultra Vision 1000 
from Taxan is designed 
with very high horizontal- 
scan-rate ranges—between 30 
kHz and 78 kHz for higher- 
than-standardized graphics 
boards. 

The 20-inch monitor is 
compatible with IBM and 
Apple Macintosh computers 
for desktop publishing and 
CAD/CAM environments. 
Input can include analog RGB 
and horizontal/vertical sig¬ 
nals on separate lines. 

The horizontal scan rates 
are barely low enough to han¬ 
dle the 31.5 kHz of VGA and 
the 35.5 kHz of 8514/A. 
Lower-frequency boards de¬ 
signed for CGA and EGA 
graphics won’t work with 
this monitor, but some CGA 
and EGA boards operate at 
higher frequencies. 

The board is partly de¬ 
signed for 1024- by 768-pixel, 
noninterlaced graphics with 
256 colors—an unspoken stan¬ 
dard, according to Taxan—at 
48.5 kHz horizontal and 60 Hz 
vertical. On the Macintosh 


computers, horizontal scan 
rates of 64 kHz produce 
1024- by 768-pixel resolution. 
The board will also support 
the 78-kHz horizontal frequen¬ 
cy that provides 1600- by 
1200 -pixel resolution for high- 
end imaging boards; these 
are useful in medicine, for ex¬ 
ample, for laser surgery, 
modulating laser wavelengths 
for image modifications. 

High resolution is partly 
due to the proprietary Dy¬ 


namic Beam Focusing fea¬ 
ture, Taxan says. DBF allows 
electron focusing from the 
center of the screen all the way 
to the outer edges. 

In addition, the Ultra Vi¬ 
sion 1000 includes a high-con- 
trast black background, and 
the screen is treated with an 
antiglare coating developed 
by the Optical Coating Lab in 
Santa Rosa, California. Dot 
pitch is 0.31 millimeters. 
Price: $3695. 


Contact: Taxan USA Corp., 
161 Nortech Pkwy., San Jose, 
CA 95134, (800) 544-3888. 

Inquiry 1159. 


Sony’s Multiscan 
Monitor Features 
Video Inputs 

T he GVM-2000 is an Na- 
tional Television System 
Committee-compatible 20- 
inch multiscan monitor that 
also accepts composite video 
inputs. 

It provides CGA, EGA, 

PGA, VGA, 8514/A, and Mac 
II modes for IBM compat¬ 
ibles and for compatibility with 
Apple’s Mac II. That com¬ 
patibility to synchronize to 
RGB inputs of 15 kHz to 36 
kHz (horizontal scan) is the 
nice thing about multiscan 
technology. Vertical scan 
ranges from 40 Hz to 100 
Hz. 

Yet the monitor also re¬ 
ceives analog or digital input 
from other video devices for 
applications like business pre¬ 
sentations. VCR output, for 
example, is 15.5 kHz. The 
GVM-2000 accommodates 
composite video inputs such as 
%-inch tape, Vi-inch tape, 
video tuners, videodisk play¬ 
ers, ED Beta, and Super 
VHS. 

Dot pitch is 0.55 millime¬ 
ters. Resolution is 720 by 480 
pixels, and maximum video 
resolution is 560 television 
lines. Standard broadcast 
television video is 525 lines, 
even though most televisions 
can display only about 420 
lines. High Definition Tele¬ 
vision video is 1125 lines. 
Price: $2495. 

Contact: Sony Corp. of 
America, One Sony Dr., Park 
Ridge, NJ 07656, (800) 222- 
0878; in New Jersey, (800) 
222-0879. 

Inquiry 1160. 

continued 


NEC MultiSync Features Digital AutoSync 


T he MultiSync 3D moni¬ 
tor from NEC Home 
Electronics has digital con¬ 
trols that automatically tune 
its 14-inch screen to 10 pre¬ 
set frequencies. You can also 
program an additional 19 
frequencies between the 
horizontal scan range of 15.5 
kHz to 38 kHz. 

The MultiSync 3D can 
automatically identify TTL 
and analog input signals and 
find matching synchroniz¬ 
ing information among the 
10 presets, or it can adjust to 
one of your nonstandard 
frequencies. 

It performs this function 


with a Z80 microprocessor, 
an EPROM, and 64K bytes 
of RAM. When you begin to 
receive a new image on the 
monitor, the microprocessor 
scans memory for similar 
digital maps of incoming 
waveforms. If none of the 
waveforms that are in mem¬ 
ory match the incoming 
image, you can manipulate 
the image with two buttons 
for vertical height adjust¬ 
ments, two for horizontal 
width adjustments, and two 
for horizontal positioning. 

A few seconds after your 
adjustments are made, the 
monitor writes the param¬ 


eters to memory. 

Support for Super VGA 
resolution is standard, along 
with support for the lower- 
resolution EGA and VGA 
graphics boards. The moni¬ 
tor is also compatible with 
the Macintosh II video card, 
which supports a 1024- by 
768-pixel interlaced resolu¬ 
tion. Dot pitch is 0.28 milli¬ 
meter. The MultiSync 3D 
weighs 35 pounds. 

Price: $1049. 

Contact: NEC Home Elec¬ 
tronics (U.S.A.), Inc., 1255 
Michael Dr., Wood Dale. IL 
60191,(312) 860-9500. 

Inquiry 1161. 


68 B YTE • MARCH 1989 




























Through Basic training? 
Graduate to Turbo Easd 


Turbo Pascal* is easy to learn, 
fast, powerful, and the most 
popular Pascal compiler in the 
world. 

When you graduate from 
Basic to Turbo Pascal, you 
have entirely new freedoms 
and powers. Modem, modular 
programming for one. Basic 
doesn’t support that. Complete 
control over your computer’s 
memory is another. Basic 
doesn’t give you that. 

Turbo Pascal’s .EXE files are 
streamlined and fast, just like the 
pros’. And Pascal doesn’t promote 
Basic flaws like "GOTO” that lead to spaghetti code. 

None of which matters as much as the spectacular difference 
Turbo Pascal makes to the size and speed of your programs. Basic 
is big and slow. Turbo Pascal is just the opposite. 

You’ll like Turbo Pascal 5.0’s environmental impact 

With Turbo Pascal, you’re in a completely integrated environment 
that includes source-level debugging. You can step code, watch 
expressions, change variables and set breakpoints. Edit, compile, 
run and debug. 


Turn pro for only $250 with 
new Turbo Pascal Professional 

This special package-Turbo 
Pascal Professional—includes 
everything you need for profes¬ 
sional programming in Pascal. 

■ New Turbo Pascal Version 5.0 

■ New Turbo Debugger* 

■ New Turbo Assembler* 

Turbo Debugger, recent 
recipient of PC Magazine’s 
Technical Excellence Award 

in the development tools category, 
lets you debug any size program 
and have up to 12 views of your code. Turbo Assembler is much 
faster than MASM and more compatible with MASM than MASM 
is with itself. Turbo Pascal Professional: it’s nothing but the best. 


A hist look at 5.0 

■ Fully integrated development environment 

■ .EXE files bigger than 64K 

■ New source-level debugger 

■ Demand Overlays 

■ 34,000 lines a minute on PS/2 Model 60 

■ EMS support 

■ RAM-resident context-sensitive Help 

■ Separate compilation by Units 


File edit ijim Cowylto Optiow 


Line 45 Col 50 Insert Indent 
MnnherOf Chi Wren ! integer: 
buffer: string: 
buff: string! 


all stack Ctrl-F3 
Mad procedure 
i ntegrated debugging 
tandalone debugging 
i isplay napping 
Refresh display 


ucedure AMEnjiloyeetEmpluyeePlr : Enployeei 
gin 

( Adit Ui linked list 1 

if HradPtr - nil thru ( initialize list pointer 1 

UeadPtr t= EnpioyeePtr 
else 

lailPtr'.HeatEnpluveePtr EaployeePtr: I a.l«i to end ) 

TailPtr :- EnplwftttPlr: t urdjte tail pointer ) 


c (HunberOf Enp 1 oyees J.' 


end: { AddEnployce ) 

- Match - 

•Buffer 'Turbo Pascal 5.0: Hore Power to the People* 

NnnberOf Fnplo<jees: 34 

HwdPlr'.HeitEnployeePtr^.Hanr 'Turbo IUn‘ 

HenAwii: 217236 

r^loMrePtr'.r: (NrttlE ’JomUwim Smith' :ATOttSS: 1 1224 P Street * :C ITYSTATE! IP •'' 

Ben i P 5 .Via rrsicE ; 8 hktx ; thhh 


The integrated development environment lets you easily write and debug real programs. 


You are not alone 

We’re here to help—whether on CompuServe, by phone to 
Tech Support or through User Groups. Borland revolutionized 
programming languages, made Pascal the worldwide favorite, 
and we’re committed to supporting you. Our manuals and 
tutorials—unlike most others—are clear, concise, and thoroughly 
professional. 

We also offer an extended family of Turbo Pascal Toolbox 
programs including source code: Runtime Library, Database 
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Numerical Methods Toolbox, and GameWorks. Borland is the 
Pascal one-stop shop. 

60-Day Money-back Guarantee.* 

‘Cujlow saluttchor. s ow main concern it wilhin GO Carrs oi ourchase ffw product does not perform m accordance mm our clans, call ou 
customer service department, and we «a arrange a -en.no "includes upgrade manual plus disks tar just J49 95 (plus tu lor CA and UA 
residents, and lb 00 tor Handing wtltun toe U S, HO 00 in Caradai Alt Bor and products are trademarks w registered trademarks of Bonanc 
mtemacoml. Inc Other b-and and product names are vademarks or registered trademarks of (her respectrve holders Copyright *1988 Bor and 
international, me BI-1M5A 


Forget the Basics for only $149.95 

Ready to move onward and upward from Basic? You can make 
easy entry to Pascal with 


5.0 for only $149.95. 

And if you’re a current 
Turbo Pascal 4.0 user, you 
can upgrade to the new 
version 5.0 for $49.95.** 

To upgrade only call 
(800) 331-0877, or for 
the dealer nearest you, call 
(408)438-5300. 


TUP"' - ' 

PAS TURBO 
PROf PASCAL 


n 


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BORLAND 


Code: MA01 


Circle 49 on Reader Service Card (DEALERS: SO) 






















Announcing a big leap in mouse technology. 


Itplll# ?’ 

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Circle ISO on Reader Service Card 
(DEALERS: 151) 





WHAT’S NEW 


Board Masters 
Voice Mail, Fax, and 
Communications 

T he Complete Communi¬ 
cator is an'XT- and AT- 
compatible board that pro¬ 
vides your computer with fax t 
modem, and sophisticated 
voice-mail capabilities. All 
you need is one standard ana¬ 
log telephone line from your 
local telephone company. 

With an on-board 6502 
microprocessor and software 
that takes up 75K bytes of 
RAM space, the board oper¬ 
ates in background mode. 

The voice-mail system allows 
up to 999 voice mailboxes, 
each of which can hold as 
many as 999 messages; each 
message can be up to 999 sec¬ 
onds long, the manufacturer 
claims. Once that mail is 
stored, you can program the 
board to call you and deliver 
your messages to whatever 
phone number you choose. 

The board also has a call- 
transfer function for when 
you're away from the phone. 
The fax capabilities are 
what you would normally ex¬ 
pect from any $800-range, 
stand-alone. Group III fax ma¬ 
chine, minus the scanning 
capabilities. You also get many 
features you can’t get on an 
inexpensive stand-alone fax 
machine, including auto-re- 
dial and scheduled transmis¬ 
sion for sending faxes when 
telephone rates are lowest; 
broadcast capability, with a 
distribution list that can be as 
long as 99 names; a pop-up 
window for sending faxes from 
within applications; person¬ 
alized cover sheets; and on¬ 
screen display of faxes, with 
zoom and scaling. 

The modem operates at the 
s tand a rd H ayes-compatible 
rate of 2400 bps. 

Price: $899. 

Contact: The Complete PC, 
521 Cottonwood Dr., Milpitas, 
CA 95035, (408) 434-0145. 

Inquiry 1162* 


HARDWARE • ADD-INS 



With The Complete Communicator, voice-mail sophistication 
greets fax and modem pragmatics. 


Exploit Your Apple 
lIGS’s Ensoniq 
Sound Chip 

he Sonic Blaster is a 
stereo digitizer that takes 
advantage of the Ensoniq 
sound chip on every Apple 
MGS, according to the manu¬ 
facturer, Applied Engineering, 
The Sonic Blaster is per¬ 
haps most impressive when it’s 
used for audio with a popular 
helicopter game called Toma¬ 
hawk. But it's also quite ef¬ 


fective for manipulating 
sounds for audio production 
from a number of sound 
sources, like home stereos, 
CD players, televisions, and 
microphones. The interface 
is a standard DIN connector. 

Included software lets you 
add effects such as echo, stut¬ 
ter, backwards, amplifica¬ 
tion, and variable rate. 

Price: $129. 

Contact: Applied Engineer¬ 
ing, 3210 Beltline, Suite 154, 
P.G. Box 5100, Dallas, TX 
75234,(214) 241-6060, 

Inquiry 1163. 


Speak Your Mind 
with the CAD 
Voice System 

T he Bug Voice Command 
System is a speech recog¬ 
nizer for CAD workstations. 

It features a 25-MHz TMS-320 
microcomputer. 

It includes its own 64K 
bytes of system RAM and uses 
only 15K bytes of memory on 
your AT-compatible computer. 
That RAM allows it to store 
up to 100 voice commands to 
perform such tasks as change 
screen perspective, change 
from line-drawing mode to 
circle-drawing mode, and 
move the cursor to the end¬ 
point of lines. 

The board and accessories 
are shipped with a starter lexi¬ 
con of 65 commands. Any 
CAD package that runs under 
DOS and accepts keyboard 
input is compatible. Command 
Corp. says. 

Price: $799. 

Contact: Command Corp., 

Inc., 6045 Atlantic Blvd., 

Suite 400, Norcross, GA 
30071,(404) 662-1598. 

Inquiry 1164, 

continued 



Upgrade Your AT with Disk-Caching Controller 


T he PM3011 controller 
card has its own 68000 
microprocessor to enhance 
AT performance- It works 
with a variable-size RAM 
cache that allows your AT or 
compatible to read and write 
to the controller cache while 
the controller card simulta¬ 
neously accesses the disk. 

This allows disk-intensive 
applications to run a dozen 
times faster than without the 
controller card, claims Dis¬ 
tributed Processing Tech¬ 
nology, because data access 
time can be increased 50 to 
150 times over that of con¬ 
ventional hard disk drives. 
The operation is transparent 


to the operating system, 
however, so special software 
drivers and ROM BIOS 
changes aren't needed. 

The cards use the same 
disk format as the Western 
Digital disk controller, so in¬ 
stallation means that you un¬ 
plug the existing controller 
and plug in the PM30H. 
Then you format the disk 
drive with the DPTFMT 
low-level format utility, en¬ 
abling the controller to re¬ 
map the disk drive geometry 
so the operating system 
thinks the drive is a standard 
ST506 drive. 

Four versions of the card 
are available—for an ST506 


interface; a run-length- 
limited interface; an ESDI 
interface; and ST506, ESDI, 
and surface-mount-device 
interfaces for the SCSI host 
bus used in minicomputers. 
Each board contains 512K 
bytes of cache RAM, ex¬ 
pandable to 16 megabytes 
with an optional cache ex¬ 
pansion card. 

Price: $1150; with the op¬ 
tional cache expansion card, 
$1280. 

Contact: Distributed Pro¬ 
cessing Technology, 132 
Candace Dr., P.O. Box 
1864, Maitland, FL 32751, 
(407) 830-5522. 

Inquiry 1165. 


72 BYTE - MARCH 1989 












Never before has this level of Reliability 
and Durability been available in floppy disks. 
Introducing the new RD Series from Maxell. 
Twice the durability of the disks you’re now using. 
Twice the resistance to dust and dirt. 

And the RD Series is ten times more reliable 
than conventional floppy disks. 

The Gold Standard has always meant maximum 
safety for your data Now it means even more. 















WHAT’S NEW 


HARDWARE • GRAPHICS 



Produce Your Own 
35mm Motion 
Picture Films 

T he Imprint system for 
the Amiga or Macintosh 
II with the Polaroid Palette 
film recorder lets you generate 
slides, negatives, transparen¬ 
cies, or instant prints. With an 
optional film “back,” you 
can even produce 35mm mo¬ 
tion picture films. 

With the Amiga system. 
Imprint can expose images 
composed in more than 16 
million colors to develop 
visuals from HAM (hold and 
modify), IFF (Interchange File 
Format), and DigiView’s 
RGB-IFF files. You can use 
several types of film with the 
systems and produce slides, 
prints, and transparencies. 

With the Mac, the Imprint 
supports PICT and PICT2, the 
standard picture formats. 

Optional “backs” are 
available in 4- by 5-inch and 8- 
by 10-inch sizes, bulk film 
(for as many as 250 exposures, 
versus the standard 36), 
spectra-type (the kind of in¬ 
stant film that develops be¬ 
fore your eyes), and the 35mm 
motion picture version. 

With the motion picture 
option, you bypass the NTSC 
conversion necessary to go 
from the computer screen to 
35mm film because you 
transfer digitally encoded 
images directly to the film. 
This gives you up to 1500 
frames on 100 feet of film. 

Of course, you must have the 
conversion between the film 
and videotape performed at 
your local full-service 
photography store. 

Price: Amiga peripheral 
with Polaroid Palette, $2495; 
Mac II board with American 
Liquid Light film recorder, 
$3995. 

Contact: American Liquid 
Light, Inc., 2301 West 205th 
St., Torrance, CA 90501, 
(213)618-0274. 

Inquiry 1166. 


Board Combines 
VGA and Frame 
Grabber 

P ublishers’ VGA com¬ 
bines a computer VGA 
card with a frame grabber 
and allows you to preview 
images prior to capture with¬ 
out a second monitor. 

The IBM PC XT- or AT- 


compatible VGA portion of the 
board has 256K bytes of 
RAM (expandable to 512K 
bytes) for graphics modes 
ranging from 640 by 480 pixels 
with 16 colors up to 1024 by 
768 pixels and 256 colors (with 
extra memory). You need a 
VGA-compatible multifre¬ 
quency or fixed-frequency 
analog monitor. 

Drivers are included for 
Microsoft Windows and Digi¬ 


Greater Than the Mighty 8514/A? 


T he Verticom HX-Series 
of add-in graphics co¬ 
processor boards offers 
more than five times the per¬ 
formance of IBM 8514/A 
display adapters, claims 
Western Digital Imaging. 
Yet all the boards are soft¬ 
ware compatible with the 
IBM 8514/A display adapter 
and can default to VGA. 

The Verticom HX16/AT 
and the HX16/MC (for the 
AT and Micro Channel ar¬ 
chitectures. respectively) 
feature 1 megabyte of RAM 
and can display 16 on-screen 
colors at up to 1024 by 768 
pixels. The HX256/AT and 
the HX256/MC provide 2 
megabytes of memory, 256 
colors, and the same resolu¬ 
tion as the two 1-megabyte 
boards. 

The boards are shipped 
with several drivers. These 
include the 8514/A adapter 


interface, AutoCAD ver¬ 
sions 9 and 10, AutoSketch, 
AutoShade, Microsoft Win¬ 
dows 2.1, and Verticom 
Twin Focus. Only multifre¬ 
quency monitors are sup¬ 
ported, however, because of 
the need to work up from the 
VGA standard of 31.5 kHz to 
the 1024- by 768-pixel re¬ 
quirements of 48.5 kHz. 

Kits are available for up¬ 
grading the cards to 256 
colors, and software devel¬ 
opers can choose from on¬ 
board palettes of 256,000 or 
16.7 million colors. 

Price: HX16/AT, $2495; 
HX16/MC, $2795; HX256/ 
AT, $3495; HX256/MC, 
$3795; HX-256C upgrade 
kit, $1195. 

Contact: Western Digital 
Imaging, 800 East Middle- 
field Rd., Mountain View. 
CA 94043, (415) 960-3353. 

Inquiry 1169. 


tal Research’s GEM. 

The frame grabber portion 
of the board captures 320- by 
200-pixel images in 64 gray 
scales in one-sixtieth of a sec¬ 
ond, from video cameras, 
videotape players, and other 
video sources. Unlike a flat 
scanner, the board captures 
three-dimensional images. 
And if the board is set up to 
capture a photo or other two- 
dimensional image, it can rep¬ 
licate a scanner. 

Price: $699. 

Contact: Willow Periph¬ 
erals, Inc., 190 Willow Ave., 
Bronx, NY 10454, (212) 
402-0010. 

Inquiry 1167. 


Synchronize Amiga 
Graphics with NTSC 

T he Commodore A2300 
Genlock board lets you 
merge Amiga 2000-gener¬ 
ated graphics with output from 
standard National Television 
System Committee (NTSC) 
video sources like VCRs, 
video cameras, and laser disk 
players. Or you can merge 
the Amiga graphics with PAL 
graphics. 

The board fits into the 
Amiga’s video expansion slot, 
coupling video with the 
Amiga’s inherent multitasking 
capabilities. For Amigas, 
standard resolution (in pixels) 
is either 320 by 200, 320 by 
400, 640 by 200, or 640 by 
400. 

The Amiga 2000 is easily 
upgradable, with seven Amiga 
or full-length XT or AT ex¬ 
pansion slots; a CPU expan¬ 
sion slot for a 68020, a 
68030, or math coprocessor 
boards; and a video expan¬ 
sion slot. 

Price: $399. 

Contact: Commodore Busi¬ 
ness Machines, Inc., 1200 
Wilson Dr., West Chester, 

PA 19380, (215) 431-9100. 

Inquiry 1168. 

continued 


74 BYTE • MARCH 1989 












ORACLE has led a revolution in PC 
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Version 5 . IB delivers a new level of 
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• SQL*Menu® NEW! Flexible inter¬ 
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I Since your 30-day money-back guarantee eliminates any risk 
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| fkm send □ 5 25“ High Density or □ 35" disks, 

| □ Professional ORACLE for MS-DOS wftbfree 

I ORACLE SQL'IUtor for SI299 .S 

| □ Professional OR AC LE for MS-DOS Trial 

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1 extended memory required, 2.SMB si Estendesi memory reran 

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aosefi PC tfCS/2 a iiiradis*. SMB memory SQL-Report. 

Writer (hm ava -a&ie to 05.2 ind Is mpEKedUy SGL-ftepcrt? 

I D Just send ORACLE SQL*Tmor for 1199S 

Minimum Requirements' ?5E* PC with h = rd fi-EA. Color 
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NAME 


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COMPANY 

srmEET^POi>3 

*■- [PPPPn.l 


errv 


STATE SP 


PHONE 


CRSOiTCARONO 

SiGtJATljRE 


CAflD EXPIRATION DATE 


MAG | 









































WHAT'S NEW 


HARDWARE • CONNECTIVITY 



Mac Reaches for 
Businesses’ Minis 

T he IDEAcomm Mac is a 
board for the Mac SE that 
allows twin-axial or twisted¬ 
pair connection to the IBM 
Model AS/400, System 36, 
or System 38 minicomputers. 

It also enables the Mac SE to 
connect to IBM 5294 minicom¬ 
puters and IBM 5251 Model 
12 cluster controllers. 

Once connected with pro¬ 
prietary file transfer protocols, 
the Mac emulates IBM termi¬ 
nals (Models 3180 and 3196 
and 5291 Model 1). Until 
now, that's something only 
IBM PCs have been able to 
do. The single Mac SE re¬ 
quirement is that it include 
2 x /z megabytes of RAM. 

Macs and IBM PCs are 
thus allowed bidirectional file 
transfer at 1 megabit per sec¬ 
ond and access to four concur¬ 
rent host sessions (including 
one printer session). You can 
observe all the host sessions 
simultaneously through a win¬ 


dowing feature. You can also 
accomplish several tasks at 
once if you're operating 
under MuhiFinder. 

Other standard features 
include password security 
and dynamic keyboard 


remapping. 

Price: $995. 

Contact: IDE Associates, 
Inc*, 29 Dunham Rd., 
Billerica, MA 01821, (508) 
663-6878. 

Inquiry 1170. 


Eliminate Ethernet 
Downtime with FTEL 

I f your Ethernet application 
can't afford downtime, even 
for a minute, the fault-toler- 
ant LAN system FTEL might 
be your answer. 

When the Novell NetWare 
network operating system and 
FTEL software on the file 
server detect a cable or trans¬ 
ceiver fault, the FTEL adapt¬ 
er on the file server switches 
from the primary transceiv¬ 
ers and cabling scheme to the 
backup transceivers and 
backup cabling. 

Price: FTEL 1.0 software 
and file server board, $10,080; 
adapter boards for nodes, 

$780 each. 

Contact: Alantec, 101 Ham¬ 
mond Ave, t Fremont, CA 
94539, (415)770-1050. 

Inquiry 1171. 


Get the Fax 
from Your Modem 


Removable Module Featured in V.32 Modem 


A removable, program¬ 
mable, checkbook-size 
module sets the V.32 mo¬ 
dem apart from CCITT 
V.32-compatible luxury 
modems from AT&T, Co¬ 
dex, Hayes, and others. Yet 
the N9635 from NEC Amer¬ 
ica performs as well as or 
better than its industry stb- 
lings, according to the 
company. 

For example, the N9635 
can keep up with Micro- 
corn's de facto data com¬ 
press ion/error-control soft¬ 
ware standards of up to MNP 
Level 5, allowing data trans¬ 
mission over standard ana¬ 
log telephone lines at up to 
19.2 Kbps. (However, MNP 
5 can only allow 19.2-Kbps 
transmission if both the 
transmitting and receiving 


modems operate under 
MNP 5 protocols.) 

The N9635 is also back¬ 
ward compatible with both 
the V.22bis standards and 
the Bell 212 and 103 stan¬ 
dards, allowing the N9635 
the capability of transmit¬ 
ting to and receiving from 
modems that operate in 
asynchronous modes of 
under 1200 bps. Adherence 
to the above standards also 
allows backward compati¬ 
bility with synchronous 
modems operating at data 
transfer rates under 9600 
bps. 

But the NEC N9635 mod¬ 
ule gives you several added 
benefits. For example, you 
can store dialing parameters 
and move them from one 
modem to another. You can 


also run diagnostic pro¬ 
grams on it to test the func¬ 
tionality of the other N9635 
modems in your office. 

If you're paranoid about 
office politics, you can al¬ 
ways remove the module and 
hide it when you ’ re not using 
it. And when NEC adds ad¬ 
ditional data compression 
and error-control software to 
its modems, it has promised 
to try to implement those en¬ 
hancements on the module. 
Price: $1495; with module, 
$1595. 

Contact: NEC America, 
Inc., Data and Video Com¬ 
munications Systems Divi¬ 
sion, 110 Rio Robles, San 
Jose, CA 95134, (800) 222- 
4632, ext. 1277; in Califor¬ 
nia, (408) 433-1277. 
Inquiry 1173. 


T he World Port 2496 is a 
tiny, battery-powered de¬ 
vice combining a 9600-bps 
Group III fax modem with a 
full-featured 2400-bps data 
modem. It's designed for por¬ 
table and laptop computers. 

The World Port 2496 has 
two standard RJ-11 telephone 
jacks for direct connection 
and an interface for acoustic 
coupler operation. It has a 
self-contained battery and 
measures 5 by 3 by 1 inches. 

The data modem portion 
retains all the features of the 
Touchbase Systems' World- 
Port 2400 portable modem, in¬ 
cluding a speaker and LED 
indicators. 

Price: $699. 

Contact: Touchbase Sys¬ 
tems, Inc., 160 Laurel Ave,, 
Northport, NY 11768, 
(516)261-0423. 

Inquiry 1172. 

continued 


76 BYTE * MARCH 1989 
















Tape Backup. 

The End of Database 
Russian Roulette. 



Why Risk a Disk Crash 
that Would Shoot Holes 
in Your Files? 

It’s fun to gamble. But not 
with priceless data-perhaps 
your most valuable business 
asset. That’s why it makes sense 
to protect your database invest¬ 
ment with a dependable tape 
backup system from Genoa. 

With our Galaxy™ and 
Galaxy/MC™ systems, you wont 
have to play fast and loose with 
your files any more. Instead, 
you’ll be backing them up 
fast-at 5 Mbytes a minute, or 
just a few minutes for your 
entire hard disk. And if you 
forget to do it, Galaxy’s auto¬ 
scheduler can do it for you. 
Automatically. 

Circle 112 on Reader Service Card 



Galaxy systems install fast 
too, and their simple command 
menus make them a breeze to 
operate. They fit right in with 
your IBM PC/XT/AT or com¬ 
patibles, and all PS/2 Systems- 
either standalone or networked. 
We even provide a Novell 
Advanced NetWare 86- or 286- 
compatible software driver, a 
$200 value—free. 

The Galaxy Family comes in 
external and internal models, in 


both 60-Mbyte digital cassette 
tape and 60- or 150-Mbyte 
cartridge tape. All with full one 
year warranties. 

Galaxy tape backup. Because 
every time that hard disk goes 
spinning around, you risk seeing 
endless data entry hours go up 
in smoke. For details, contact 
Genoa, 75 E. Trimble Road, 

San Jose, CA 95131. Phone 
(408) 432-9090; Fax (408) 
434-0997; Telex 172319; 

London 44-01-225-3247. 

© Genoa Systems Corporation, Galaxy and Galaxy/MC are 
trademarks of Genoa Systems Corporation. NetWare is a 
registered trademark of Novell, Inc. IBM PC r XT, AT and 
F5/2 are trademarks oflBM Corporation. 

Insist on 
_ GenoanValue. 

O Genoa 


MARCH 19RQ * BYTR 77 






CMO...Your Nationwide Source 



286 8 M Hl C J j Mct rwry Expandable » 

2K Motherboard M 

IB . n Mots (8 lb- BU 61 6 

assess?*** 

238 BIOS 

*»«Y C °^bS 

S£Sr&“ 0 '"-“‘ 

5wtase slols ^ $ 7< 

24 -Hour Butn *." e Mon not 

Amber Monochrome Qn Qlher 

Call tot Ut onna i0MG 38 

PC-TOO s (10 * -- 


system 


AMIGA 


Aegis Develop men I 

Draw Plus 2000 $159 

Sonix 49 

Videoscape 3D 139 

Cinema ware 

TV Sports 36 

Electronic Arts 

Deluxe Paint 11 99 

Deluxe Video 1.2 89 

Epyx Software 

XJ 500 Joystick 15 

Gold Disk Software 

Professional Page 259 

Micro Illusions 

Photon Paint 69 

Micro Systems Int. 

Raw Copy VI.3 44 

Micro Systems Software 
Excellence 189 

New Tek Inc. 

Digi-View Gold 149 

Digi-Paint 44 


MAGJNA\ DX 


■K M0B2 14 VGA Display 


199 


Sub-Logic Carp. 

Flight Simulator 31 
WordPerfect Corp. 

WordPerfect 


I8C 


i 


MACINTOSH 


Olympia 

NP-30 Mac L 50cps $289 

Seikosha 

SP-1000AP Mac 239 

Everex 

EMAC 20 Deluxe 20MB 595 

EMAC 60T 60MB Backup 895 

PCFC 

21MB SCSI Hard Drive 699 

Cornerstone 

Single Page Display SE 899 

DualPage Display SE 1699 

Magna vox 

9CM080 14" VGA Display 519 

RasterOps 

1948S Trinitron 3395 

Sigma Designs 

PageVtew SE 849 

LaserView II 1899 

New Image Technology 

MacScan Pro Sheetfeea 1399 

MacScan Pro Flatbed 1789 

Practical Peripherals 

Mac 2400 Stand Alone 239 

Shiva 

NetModem V2400 459 


MONITORS 


Amdek 

Video 210 Amber 85 

Video 410 TTL Monochrome 145 
Video 432 VGA Monochrome 169 
Color 732 VGA Color 399 

Cornerstone 

SinglePage Display 899 

Magnavox 

7BM623 12' TTL Amber 79 

CM8762 14" Comp./RGB 249 

9CM053 14" Hikes EGA 369 

9CM062 14" VGA Display 349 

NEC 

JC-H02 Multisync 589 

Packard Bell 

PB-1272 12" TTL Mono 79 

PB-1472 14" TIL 132 Col. 109 

PB-1422EG 14" HiRes EGA 359 

Polaroid 

Palette EGA Plus 2399 

Princeton Graphics 

Max-12e 12" TTL Amber 149 

Seiko Instruments 

CM’1430 14" VGA 649 

Taxan 

770+ Multi Vision Display 529 

Wyse Terminals 

WY’30 V 50. 60 Call 

Zenith 


ZFM-1490 14“ VGA Analog 639 


MULTIFUNCTION 


ATD- Z uckerfioard 

Color Half Card 79 

Monochrome Graphics Adpt 79 


AST 


Six Pak Plus Board 

$149 

VGA Plus Adapter 

389 

Boca Research 


TopHat 128K Expansion 

129 

Boca Ram/AT 0-4MB Board 

149 

Boca MultiEGA 

189 

DCA 


Irma 2 3278 Board 

749 



INTEL 8087 IBM 
PC/XT Coprocessor 
*88 


Emerald 

3XTwm 5251 Local Emulat. 669 

Everex 

Magic I/O AT Par/Ser 59 

Ram 3000 Deluxe 0-3MR Bd. 89 

Micro Enhancer EGA 169 

5th Generation 

Logical Connection 256K 479 

Hercules 

Graphics Card Plus 179 

Intel 

Above Board 2 Plus w/OK 319 

AboveBoard PS/286 w/512K 419 
AboveBoard Plus w/5l2K 429 

AboveBoard Plus I/O 512K 579 

Inboard 386/PC 80386 CPU 769 
80287-8 IBM XT 8MHz CoP 219 
80387-16 16MHz 80386 399 

Orchid Technology 
Pro Designer VGA 329 

TinyTurbo 286 285 




-re tivTr • xtAor'HiQHO 































For Quality Computer Products 


Paradise 

AutoS witch EGA 480 Adpt. Call 

Video 7 

Vega VGA Adapter S285 

Fas (Write Video Adapter 359 


STORAGE DEVICES 


American Power 

450AT + UPS Backup 439 

ATD-2 uc kerBoard 

Tandy 30MB HardCard 479 

Everex 

Floppy Stream 40 40MB Ini. 359 
Excel Stream 40T 40MB Int. 529 

Mini scribe 

8425 20MB 3 W’ 40Msec 259 

3650 40MB 5'A" 61 Msec 349 

6085 70MB 5W" 28Msec 599 

Mountain Computer 

TD-4340 40MB Int Tape 319 

TD-4440 40MB Ext. Tape 459 

Plus Development 

20MB HardCard 549 

Seagate 

ST-225 20MB w/com 269 

ST-238 30MB w/cont 289 

Sysgen 

Bridge-File 5 W Y External 249 

Smartltuage 60MB Internal 479 
QIC-File 60MB External 599 
Omni Board Controller 79 


COMPUTERS 


Amstrad 

PPC-640 Portable 

AST 

Premium 286 Model 80 1499 

Compaq 

Deskpm & Portable 286/386 Call 

NEC 

Multi mate Laptops Call 

PC-TOG 

640K 10 MHz 8088 Desktop 699 
512K 12MHz 80286 Desktop 999 

Sysgen 

ProSystem 12MHz w/40MB 1999 

Toshiba 

T1200 Floppy/HrdD Lptp Call 

Zenith 

80286/386 Desktops Call 

SuperSport 20MB w/Modem 1999 


COMMUNICATIONS 


Anchor 

6480 C64/126 1200 Baud 99 

520 ST520/1040 1200 Baud 129 
1200 Baud External 109 

Atari 

XMM301 XL/XE 300 Baud 44 

SX-212 ST Modem 89 

Avatex 

1200 HC External 99 

2400 Baud External 179 

ATD-Zucke rBoard 

2400 Baud External 129 

Evercx 

Evertzom 12 1200 Baud Int. 79 

Evercom 24 2400 Internal 149 

Evercom 24E+ 2400 Bd. Ext. 199 

Hayes 

SmariModem 1200 Baud 289 

Smart Modem 2400 Baud 439 

Intel 

2400B Classic Internal 249 


This Month’s Featured Product: 



1 


EPSON LX-800 

80 Column, 180 CPS Primer *179 


Murata 

Ml 200 Facsimile S779 

Practical Peripherals 

1200 Baud Internal 69 

2400 Baud Stand Alone 189 

Sharp 

FO-220 Facsimile Machine 999 

Supra 

2400AT 2400 Baud Atari 169 

ILS. Robotics 

1200 Baud Direct Ext, 109 

2400 Baud Direct Ext. 199 


PRINTERS 


fa 

Brother 


±1 

M-1709 240c ps f 132 CoL 

449 


HR-20 20cps Daisywheel 

359 

899 

HR-40 40c ps Daisywheel 

599 



EPSON FX-850 
264c ps. 80 Column 
^339 

Epson 

EX-1050 264c ps, 132 Col Call 

LQ- 500 lSOcps, 24-Wire 299 

LQ-850 330cps, 24-Wire Call 

LQ-950 264cps T 24-Wire Call 

LQ-1050 330cps, 132 Col Call 

Hewlett-Packard 

2225 Thinkjet 349 

NEC 

P2200 Pinwriter 24-Wire 349 

P5200 Pinwriter 265cps 579 

Okidata 

ML-182+ 180cps, 80 CoL 249 

ML-320 300cps, 80 Col 359 

ML-390 270eps, 24-Wire 499 

Panasonic 

KX-P1080i I44cps, 80 Col. 169 

KX-P109H 194cps, 80 CoL 189 

KX-P1124 I92cps, 24-Wire 349 

KX-PJ524 24-Wire, 132 Col. 579 


Star Micronits 

NX-1000 RainBow Color $239 
NX-2400 24-Wire, 80 Col. 369 

Toshiba 

ExpressWriler 311 New 


SOFTWARE 


Ashton-Tate 

dBase IV 479 

Mu hi Mate Advantage 11 289 

Borland 

Paradox R-Database 439 

Quattro 149 

Central Point 

PC Toob Deluxe 49 

DAC Software 

DAC-EA5Y Accounting 59 

5th Generation 

FastBack Plus 99 

Fox Software 

Fox Base + Development 199 

1MSI 

OptiMouse w/Dr, Halo lit 79 

Logictcch 

C7 Mouse w/Software 79 

ScanMan Scanner 219 

Lotus Development 

Lotus 1-2-3 299 




MECA 

Managing Your Money 

Meridian Technology 

CarbonCopy Plus 5 0 

Microsoft 

Serial or Buss Mouse 

MSC 

OmniMouse 

Peter Norton 

Advanced Utilities 

Peachtree 

Complete Accounting 

Quarterdeck 

DESQView 2.02 
Server Technology 
Easy La n Starter Kit 
Software Publishing 
1st Choice 3,0 
1st Publisher 2,0 
Professional Write 2.0 
The Complete PC 
Hand Scan For PC 
Complete Answer Machine 
Traveling Software 
Lap-Link Plus 
WordPerfect Corp. 
WordPerfect 5,0 
Xerox 

Ventura Publishing 2.0 


$119 

1J9 

109 

49 

79 

169 

79 

179 

89 

79 

179 

179 

269 

84 

219 

479 



PRACTICAL PERIPHERALS 
UCW Sind Abac Modem 
*69 


Four Source for Hardware, Software & Peripherals 


In U.S.A. 


800 - 233-8950 

In Canada call: 800-233-8949 

All Other Areas call: 717-327-9575 Fax call: 717-327 1217 
Educational, Governmental and Corporate Organizations 
Call toll-free: 1-800-221-4283 

CMO, 101 Reighard Ave., Dept, At, Williamsport* PA 17701 


Over 300,000 SATISFIED CUSTOMERS * MAJOR CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED 


POLICY: Add 3%£minmium £7.00) shipping and handl¬ 
ing Larger shipments may require additional charges. Per¬ 
sonal and company checks require 3 weeks to dear For 

taster delivery, use your credit card or send cashier's check -~****-^-.*- 

or bank money order Credit cards are not charged until we ship Pennsylvania 
and Maryland residents add appropriate sales tax. All prices are U S A. prices and 
are subject to change. All Hems are subject to availability Defective software will 
be replaced wnh the same item only Hardware will be replaced or repaired at our 
discretion within ihe terms and limits of the manufacturer’s warranty We cannot 
guarantee compatibility Alt sales are final and returned shipments are subject to 
a restocking fee We are not responsible for typographic or photographic errors, 

A103 


Circle 64 on Reader Service Card 









































WHAT’S NEW 


HARDWARE • OTHER 


Battery-Powered 
Data Logger 

T he Tattletale Model 6 is 
a feature-packed data log¬ 
ger for applications not only 
where AC isn’t readily avail¬ 
able, but where the machine 
sometimes has to run for 
months on end without atten¬ 
tion. Manufacturer Onset 
Computer claims that an ap¬ 
plication that takes two weeks 
to fill the power-switched 20- 
megabyte hard disk drive uses 
only eight alkaline A A cells. 
The Model 6 offers up to 2 
megabytes of storage capacity 
for about the price of 28K 
bytes on the popular Model 5 * 

It has 11 10-bit A/D chan¬ 
nels, 14 individually program¬ 
mable I/O lines, a UART (the 
RS-232C interface), four 
power modes, and its own 
operating system, TTBASIC 
The 10-bit converter can 
sample and store all 11 chan¬ 
nels at 100 Hz. Most of its 14 
individually programmable 
I/O lines have optional alter¬ 
nate functions, including 
counting, square wave gener¬ 
ation, software UART, and 
shift register I/O. 

A separate serial interface 
contains the drivers for the 
main 9600-bps UART. You 
offload stored results either 
using XMODEM or format¬ 
ting with TTBASIC Print 
statements. 

TTBASIC is much like 
BASIC, as the name implies, 
but it has an in-line symbolic 
assembler. You can also tailor 
the speed-critical portions of 
your applications with assem¬ 
bly language subroutines that 
you invoke directly from the 
BASIC program. 

A daughterboard accom¬ 
modates signal conditioning 
and I/O expansion while it 
provides physical support and 
brings up power and the digi¬ 
tal and analog I/O signals. One 
row of pins brings out inter¬ 
nal bus lines, allowing you to 
add specialized hardware. 



Price: $1750. 

Contact: Onset Computer 
Corp., 199 Main St., P.O. Box 
1030, North Falmouth, MA 
02556, (508) 563-2267, 
Inquiry 1174. 


Protect Expanded 
and Extended 
Memory 

T he UniSaver 100 is an 
uninterruptible power 
supply that provides power 
protection for LIM 4.0-com¬ 
patible expanded and ex¬ 
tended memory on your IBM 
XT, AT, or compatible 
system. 

In fact, it works to pre¬ 


serve and restore the actual 
computer processes taking 
place in RAM at the exact 
point of power interruption, 
claims manufacturer Universal 
Vectors, 

When AC power is re¬ 
stored to your computer, the 
contents of both the ex- 
panded/extendcd memory files 
and the RAM/system board 
files are transferred back to 
your operating RAM. Then 
processing resumes exactly 
where it left off. 

Price: $1495. 

Contact: Universal Vectors 
Corp., 580 Herndon Pkwy., 
Suite 400, Herndon, VA 
22070, (800) 777-7860; in Vir¬ 
ginia, (703) 435-2500. 

Inquiry 1175. 


Postmortem 
Diagnoses 1C Faults 
in Seconds 

T he Postmortem card is 
an in-circuit diagnostic 
module for the IBM XT, AT, 
and compatibles that attaches 
to the bus and detects faults 
on every IC in the motherboard 
down to individual pins. 

A set of BIOS chips re¬ 
places the motherboard BIOS 
for power-on self tests; a 
complete diagnosis of the en¬ 
tire base RAM is also made. 
Manufacturer Swisscomp says 
that up to 98 percent of IC 
faults are detected—and in less 
than 30 seconds. 

When the Postmortem de¬ 
tects a fault, it displays the 
code relating to the specific 
fault on an alphanumeric 
display. Or, if the video cir¬ 
cuit is operational, it will 
display the diagnostic results 
on the screen. The manual has 
IC diagrams and an index for 
quick fault-finding. 

Price; $459. 

Contact: Swisscomp, Inc., 

5312-56th Commerce Park 
BLvd., Tampa, FL 33610, 

(813) 628-0906. 

Inquiry 1176. 

continued 


Mouse Makes Lotus 1 -2-3 Input Faster 


A luxury mouse with an 
optical scanner add¬ 
on, an audio module, and 
software makes it quick and 
easy to input vast columns of 
numbers into Lotus 1-2-3, 
The MarqMouse lets you 
input numbers as fast as you 
can move the mouse scanner 
across them and audibly rec¬ 
ognize that the number is 
correct. That's about four 
limes faster than the fastest 
accountant could possibly 
key those numbers into a 
computer, the company 
claims. 

Besides the scanner com¬ 


ponents, the MarqMouse 
provides many features, in¬ 
cluding up to 600-dpi resolu¬ 
tion, ballistic control (i.e., if 
you move the mouse quickly, 
the curser jumps to atten¬ 
tion; if you move it slowly 
and carefully, the cursor 
doesn’t accelerate beyond 
first gear). 

You also get 16 levels of 
gray scale, the transparent 
scanning window, and a fea- 
ture for paintbrush-type 
scanning with wide strokes. 

When the MarqReader is 
upgraded for optical charac¬ 
ter recognition (OCR), you 


gel numeric recognition of 
even handwritten numerals, 
the transparent windows, and 
the audio feedback for accu¬ 
rate input. 

The MarqMouse is com¬ 
patible with the IBM XT, 
AT, PS/2s, and compatibles; 
your system should have at 
least 256K bytes of RAM. 
Price: Mouse, $199; scan¬ 
ner, $799; OCR system, 
$1299. 

Contact: Marq Technol¬ 
ogies, 6285 Nancy Ridge 
Dr., San Diego, CA 92121, 
(619)452-2373. 

Inquiry 1177, 


80 BYTE - MARCH 1989 













MICRO-CAP III. 

THIRD-GENERATION INTERACTIVE 
CIRCUIT ANALYSIS. MORE POWER. 
MORE SPEED. LESS WORK. 

MICRO-CAP III,™ the third generation 
of the top selling IBM® PC-based interac¬ 
tive CAE tool, adds even more accuracy, 
speed, and simplicity to circuit design and 
simulation. 

The program’s window-based opera¬ 
tion and schematic editor make circuit 
creation a breeze. And super-fast SPICE- 
like routines mean quickAC, DC, Fourier 
and transient analysis—right from 
schematics. You can combine simulations 
of digital and analog circuits via integrated 
switch models and macros. And, using 
stepped component values, rapidly gener¬ 
ate multiple plots to fine-tune your circuits. 

We’ve added routines for noise, impe¬ 
dance and conductance—even Monte 
Carlo routines for statistical analysis of 
production yield. Plus algebraic formula 
parsers for plotting almost any desired 
function. 



Transient analysis 







- 1 


.Mt 


r 






! 



il pi- i 

u 





■*T t 

1 L 

--E 











Schemat ic editor 



Modeling power leaps upward as 
well, to Gummel-Poon BJT and Level 3 
MOS—supported, of course, by a built-in 
Parameter Estimation Program and 
extended standard parts library. 

There’s support for Hercules? CGA, 
MCGA, EGA and VGA displays. Output for 
laser plotters and printers, And a lot more. 

The cost? Just $1495. Evaluation ver¬ 
sions are only $150. 

Naturally, you’ll want to call or write for 
a free brochure and demo disk. 




1021 & Wolfe Road, 
Sunnyvale, CA 94086 
(408) 738-4387 


MtCRO-CAPItt is a registered trademark of Spectrum Software. 
Hercules is a registered tnutenuirk of Hercules Computer Technology. 

r Jnc, 


Circle 235 on Reader Service Card 


MARCH 1989 * BYTE 81 








































WHAT’S NEW 


SOFTWARE • PROGRAMMING 



Let Your Fingers Do 
the Walking Through 
Turbo C 

Y ou can add a special 
menu 10 Turbo C’s main 
menu with VizitE and have a 
host of C functions at your fin¬ 
gertips. To use Vizit!, you 
select the type of function you 
need, and then browse 
through more than 400 func¬ 
tions and descriptions. 

You can search by cate¬ 
gory, by last used, or by wild 
cards. A quick reference to 
the C language is available, 
and an auto-insert feature in¬ 
stantly types in functions. 

Vizit! runs on the IBM PC 
with DOS 2.0 or higher and 
58K bytes of RAM. 

Price: $49.95. 

Contact: Computer Ties, 

4948 Thunderhead, El 
Sobrante, CA 94803, (415) 
223-6944, 

Inquiry 111!. 


CrossView 
Analyzes Volumes 
of Data 

C rossView is a data- 

analysis tool that works 
by identifying key patterns in 
large volumes of data. It offers 
an unlimited, multidimen¬ 
sional view of your data. 

You first collect data from 
micro, mini, or mainframe 
computer sources, and Cross- 
View compresses it with its 
Transformation Module, The 
Analysis Module lets you view 
and analyze any cross section 
of the array by identifying 
cells, rows, columns, and 
pages from the data elements. 
You can also revise the view 
with just a few keystrokes, 
according to DataEase. 

CrossView analyzes data 
using advanced compression 
and access methods such as 


ten soria I analysis, using vec¬ 
tor-processing technology 
and w-dimensional geometry, 
which are transparent to the 
user. The program stores only 
unique values within the data 
set, rather than each of the 
records, thus reducing the 
size of the data file, 
CrossView runs on the 
IBM PC with at least 640K 
bytes of RAM and DOS 3.0 
or higher. The company rec¬ 


ommends a hard disk drive 
and a CGA monitor. 

Price: Single-user version, 
$2000; multiuser server pack 
for up to six users, $3000; 
workstation pack for three ad¬ 
ditional users, $1000. 
Contact: Data Ease Interna¬ 
tional, Inc,, 7 Cambridge Dr., 
Trumbull, CT 06611,(800) 
243-5123; in Connecticut, 
(203) 374-8000. 

Inquiry 1107, 


Build a Bridge to Windows 


M icrosoft Windows, un¬ 
like other windowing 
environments such as Quar¬ 
terdeck’s DESQview, has 
never exactly been friendly 
to applications that aren’t 
written specifically for it. 
Although it’s possible to run 
popular applications such as 
Lotus 1-2-3 or dBASE in a 
system that uses Windows, it 
requires extra steps, and you 
need to exit Windows, 

But help is on the way, 
Softbridge Microsystems is 
shipping Bridge/286 and 
Bridge/386, programs for 
integrating non-Windows- 
specifie applications into the 
Windows environment. You 
can think of the programs as 
a sophisticated batch lan¬ 
guage that lets you integrate 
both Windows and non-Win¬ 
dows applications under 


Windows’ common graphi¬ 
cal user interface. 

Besides features that are 
similar to DOS’s familiar 
batch language, Bridge also 
allows you to design custom 
menus and dialog boxes, and 
set up sophisticated connec¬ 
tions including interapplica¬ 
tion messages. It’s all done 
using a standard ASCII fife. 
The Bridge program itself is 
actually a Windows pro¬ 
gram that makes it appear 
that all applications on a 
system are running under 
Windows, 

Both versions of Bridge 
work with all major DOS ap¬ 
plications, but Bridge/386 
takes advantage of the 
80386’s power to deliver 
true multitasking of both 
Windows and non-Windows 
applications. 


GCUSP Developer 
Upgraded 

G old Hill Computers has 
what it claims is a faster 
and smaller version of 
GCLISP Developer, a Com¬ 
mon Lisp that offers an im¬ 
proved graphical environment 
and support for Gold Hil l 
Windows. 

Version 3.1 runs 20 per¬ 
cent faster and uses up to 40 
percent less memory than 
version 3.0, according to the 
company. Another enhance¬ 
ment is that it generates code 
faster. 

GCLISP Developer 3.1 
runs on 80386-based IBM PCs 
with at least 640K bytes of 
RAM and at least 3 megabytes 
of extended memory. 

Price: $1995, 

Contact: Gold Hill Com¬ 
puters, Inc., 26 Landsdowne 
St., Cambridge, MA 02139, 
(617) 621-3300. 

Inquiry U08. 

continued 


Bridge/286 works with all 
80286-based systems and re¬ 
quires Windows/286. 

Bridge/386 requires an 
80386-based system and 
Windows/386. 

Softbridge has also devel¬ 
oped the Bridge Tool Kit, 
with specific interfaces for 
Microsoft Excel, dBASE III, 
and both C and assembly lan- 
guage. According to the 
company, an OS/2 version of 
Bridge for Presentation 
Manager will be avai lable by 
the middle of this year. 
Price: Bridge/286, $149; 
Bridge/386, $299; Bridge 
Tool Kit, $695. 

Contact: Softbridge Micro¬ 
systems Corp., 125 Cam- 
bridgePark Dr., Cam¬ 
bridge, MA 02140, (617) 
576-2257. 

Inquiry 1106. 


82 BYTE * MARCH 1989 





















ft f / I 

■ 

V l 


f f\ 1 

J, 'm • ’iiJffVl ' 




Cut loose from the LAN tangle with 
SCO XENIX and SCO FoxBASE+! 


W ith industry-standard SCO™ XENIX® System V and 
SCO FoxBASE+,™ you'll enjoy a real multiuser system 
that runs your existing dBASE III PLUS® code faster, easier, 
more reliably—and at half the cost! 

Greater Performance. With only a single PC and none of 
the traffic overhead required by a LAN server, 

The SCO Solution is lean and fast Users 
share SCO FoxBASE+, applications, and 
data files via inexpensive terminals—all 
with greater performance. 

Greater Profitability. The SCO Solution gives 
you more for your money for greater profit¬ 
ability. An 8-user SCO XENIX system costs about 
half as much as an 8-user IAN—and adding 
each new user costs two-thirds less! 

Greater Reliability. Because an SCO XENIX 
system is more reliable than a LAN, you’ll spend 
less time solving LAN problems and more time 
creating SCO XENIX-based solutions. 

Easier to Administer. SCO XENIX systems can be easily adminis¬ 
tered by end users. LANs are much more complicated—multiple 
PCs, multiple PC configurations, and multiple sources of failure. 


Enhanced dBASE III PLUS Functionality. SCO FoxBASE+ works 
just like dBASE ID PLUS, only better. It reads and writes the same 
data files, and runs your source code at compiled speed— 
without having to compile—for a shorter development cycle. 

Future Compatibility. An SCO XENIX system protects your 
investment because future compatibility is built in. 

By migrating your dBASE III PIUS applica¬ 
tions to The SCO Solution, you can cut 
your costs and increase your profits— 
both today and tomorrow. 

So cut loose from LANs and relax with 
a real multiuser solution — The SCO 
Solution—SCO XENIX and SCO FoxBASE+! 

SCO FoxBASE+ is also available for iargc: LINK® systems, and 
FonSASE+ is available for DOS systems. 

Relax with 
The SCO Solution 



SCO 



THE SANTA CRUZ. OPERATION 


' (800) 626-UNIX (626-8649) 
(408) 425-7222 
FAX: (408)458-4227 
TWX: 910-598-4510 SCO SAC2 

E-MAIL ...fuunettsco[info info@soi.COM 


Circle 286on Reader Service Card (DEALERS: 287) 

SCO XENIX System V mid the SCO XENIXfamily of software solutions are availablefor all 80286- and 80386-based industry standard and Micro Channel computers* 

SCOand the SCO logo are tidemarks cl The Santa Cm2 Operation Inc Micro Qunnel Is a irademarit if Intmiaiicnia! Business Machines Gwporattan. dBASE ID Fli£i e a registml tradefnirt of ArfuniEj^tf, XENIX Is i rcgKtatd iraifcnuri of MkrrneoA Cdporadcm F-nafiASE 4 is a iradanaA 
oTtS? Fern Software, ht lINK Is a registered dadamait of AW. ll) ' /83 












But they’re not all switching 
to the database management 
system you might expect. 

In a recent industry 
survey* two-thirds of the 
respondents who intended 
to buy a DBMS did not intend 
to buy dBASE. 

And, perhaps coinci¬ 
dentally two-thirds of recent 
R:BASE® buyers have used 
another DBMS before. 

Why are they switching 

to R:BASE? 

Because nobody 
really needs a DBMS: they 
only need what a DBMS 
can do. 

And users find that 
the friendly facade of other 
software is fine for questions. 

But R:BASE has the right 
answers for their information 
management needs. 

With R:BASE, you 
can handle all your data 
management (not just queries) 
without learning a single 
command. Our Prompt By 
Example (PBE) lets you point- 
and-pick, then R:BASE does 
the work. 

When you find that you’re repeat- Data is data, but 

ing yourself, you automate simply by record- information is power, 

ing your actions in a macro file. --- 

Or use our application generator R:BASE gives you that power, 

to quickly create complete, correct business And even impartial judges seem 

programs without touching a line of pro- to agree: PC Magazine, Software Digest, 

gram code. Datapro and IrfoWorld all just gave 


84 BYTE* MARCH 1989 








R:BASE their highest marks. 

Because to its ease-of-use, 
R:BASE adds speed, functionality 
and data integrity in a combination 
you don’t get with dBASE, Paradox, 
DataEase, Oracle or any of the 
other contenders. 

R:BASE is optimized for 
speed, with an intermediate code 



Software 


And networking is free for up to three 
users. It’s also easy so any single-user 
application can be run on a multi-user 
LAN with a single command. And our 
advanced concurrency control, unlike 
earlier-generation auto-refresh 
in other DBMSs, won’t bring your 
network to its knees when you 
expand with our Six-Pack or 
Network Unlimited versions. 


compiler that makes your appli 
cations sing. And a true com- 
pilerisonitsway CKHUpfO 

You can use its English- 
based language in command INFO R:BASE is the second-largest sell 

mode, to modify programs XA/f lffl H * n § DBMS in the world, and it’s 


Applications that just 
won’t quit. 


R:BASE writes for you, or to 
write your own solutions from scratch. 

Simple menus, prompts and 
our “paint-the-screen” techniques make 

sophisticated 
screens, forms and 
reports quick and 
easy to create. With 
R:BASE forms, you 
can view and 
update data from 
several tables at the 
same time. Create 



DO IH 


computed fields. Include scrolling regions 
so you can work with all the data from 
other tables. Add rules for data integrity 

And R:BASE is relational, so your 
rules stay with the tables-applications 
can’t avoid or change them. And forms 
can be set up to cascade changes through 
related tables. So you can trust the infor¬ 
mation you get. 

We also give you an SQL imple¬ 
mentation that even novices can use to 
create simple yet powerful queries. 


backed by all the training, service 
and third-party support you’ll ever need. 

It’s providing end-users with the 
information they need in large businesses 
and small. On stand-alone PCs and in 
networks sharing data with minis and 
mainframes. In insurance and real estate 
companies, factories and universities, 
government 
offices and the 
storefront down 
the street. 

Checkout 
what R:BASE 
can do for you 
with your local 
dealer, or write: 

Microrim, Inc., 

P.O. Box 97022, 

Redmond, 

WA 98073- 
9722. 

Call 1-800-624-0810 today. 

* Comp Liter & software J'tews, 9t5fB&. MJciorim and R=BASE are trademarks of Mtcronm, me. Other 
products and services mentioned are not. © Minorliru fnc. 1986. 



Circle 169 on Reader Service Card (DEALERS: 170) 


MARCH 1989 • BYTE 85 




















WHAT'S NEW 


SOFTWARE • SCIENTIFIC AND ENGINEERING 



Schematic Design 
with Extended 
Memory 

T he original CapFast 

CF1000 schematic design 
program from Phase Three 
Logic is now available in a ver¬ 
sion that bundles what used 
to be a 16-megabyte extended- 
memory option package. The 
new program also includes a 
packaging program that as¬ 
signs reference designators and 
pin numbers to physical 
packages. And CF1G00 now 
supports the Apple Laser¬ 
Writer and HP LaserJet, 

Other features included 
with the new CapFast are a 
schematic editor, a general- 
purpose symbol editor, a 2000- 
part symbol library, a parts 
list program, and interfaces to 
many printed-circuit-board 
CAD systems. 

The program runs on the 
IBM PC or PS/2 with up to 16 
megabytes of extended 
memory. 

Price: $495, 

Contact: Phase Three Logic, 
Inc,, 1600 Northwest 167th 
Place, Beaverton, OR 97006, 
(503) 645-0313. 

Inquiry 1118. 


A Math Assistant 

D irect from Hawaii 

comes a program to help 
you with algebra, trigonom¬ 
etry, calculus, and matrix al¬ 
gebra. Derive goes beyond 
statistics programs, the com¬ 
pany reports, by performing 
two- and three-dimensional 
plotting, integer factoring, 
and more. 

As a sort of expert system, 
the program includes probabil¬ 
ity, statistical, and financial 
functions. 

The program is menu- 


driven and runs on the IBM 
PC with 512K bytes of RAM 
and DOS 2.1 or higher. It is 
available in 5*4- or 3 Vi-inch 
versions. 

Price: $200. 

Contact: Soft Warehouse, 

Inc., 3615 Harding Ave., Suite 
505, Honolulu, Hawaii 
96816, (808) 734-580 L 

Inquiry 1116. 


Math on the Mac 

aple, a mathematics 
IVI program that previously 
ran on workstations and 


mainframes, is now available 
in version 4.2 for the Macin¬ 
tosh. The program was devel¬ 
oped by the Symbolic Com¬ 
putation Group at the 
University of Waterloo in 
Canada to perform computa¬ 
tion including integers, ratio¬ 
nal numbers, polynomials, 
tensor manipulation, symbol¬ 
ic and numeric approximation, 
indefinite integration, statis¬ 
tics, linear algebra, calculus, 
and differential equations. 

The program comes with a 
library of over 1500 mathemat¬ 
ical functions, which you can 
modify or extend. 

The Mac version of Maple 
includes a Session Window 
where commands and results 
are entered and displayed; a 
Text Window, where you de¬ 
velop commands, annotation, 
and programs; and a Graph¬ 
ics Window that you can scale 
and size. 

Maple 4.2 runs on the 
Macintosh with at least 1 
megabyte of RAM and a hard 
diskdrive. 

Price: $395. 

Contact: Brooks/Cole Pub¬ 
lishing Co., 511 Forest Lodge 
Rd., Pacific Grove, CA 
93950, (408) 373-0728. 

Inquiry 1117. 

continued 


Three forthe Measure 

C onverting units of mea¬ 
surement from one sys¬ 
tem to another is always a 
pain, especially with the dif¬ 
ferent systems used in differ¬ 
ent parts of the world, and 
for various scientific disci¬ 
plines. The past few months 
have seen a rush of programs 
that use your computer to do 
jobs like these. Here are 
three; 

A ccording to Geocomp, 

SI Plus (Standard Inter¬ 
national Units Plus) contains 
all the unit conversion fac¬ 
tors commonly used by engi¬ 
neers and scientists, as well 


as those involved in educa¬ 
tion, commerce, and design. 
SI Plus has over 80 classes of 
units, and the company 
claims over 70,000 different 
conversions are possible. SI 
Plus runs on the IBM PC. 
Price: $79, 

Contact: Geocomp Corp., 
66 Commonwealth Ave,, 
Concord, MA 01742, (800) 
822-2669; in Massachu¬ 
setts, (508) 369-8304. 
Inquiry 1113. 

F or you Mac users, Con- 
vertUnits is a unit-con¬ 
version program that's avail¬ 
able in both desk accessory 


and HyperCard stack ver¬ 
sions. GraphicText Applica¬ 
tions claims the program 
contains over 1500 different 
measurement units. 

ConvertUnits runs on any 
Mac with at least a megabyte 
of RAM. The HyperCard 
stack version occupies 242K 
bytes and requires Hyper¬ 
Card 1.2 or higher. 

Price: Desk accessory or 
HyperCard stack, $59.95; 
both versions, $74,95, 
Contact: GraphicText Ap¬ 
plications, 815 Princess Ave., 
Vancouver, BC, Canada V6A 
3E5, (604) 255-8077. 
Inquiry 1114* 


F inally, there's UNIT- 
ize, which is shipped in 
both desk accessory and ap¬ 
plication versions and runs 
on the Mac. The program 
lets you choose from more 
than 150 of the most com¬ 
monly converted quantity 
sets. UNITize also lets you 
create your own custom 
quantity sets, or create cus¬ 
tomized versions. 

Price: $59.95. 

Contact: Rainbow Bridge 
Software, Inc +J 4243 Hunt 
Rd,, Suite 210, Cincinnati, 
OH 45242, (800) 548-8871; 
in Ohio, (513) 984-6861. 
Inquiry 1115. 


86 BYTE - MARCH 1989 













QNXvs 


UNIX 

OS/2 


Architecture can make or break a computer system. 


Don’t make your systems bear the 
brunt of massive, monolithic monsters 
like Unix or OS/2. Instead, build your 
systems with QNX. The lean, efficient 
OS that’s flexible enough to support 
any application. 

MULTIUSER, MULTITASKING, 
NETWORKING,AND MORE... QNX 

is both multiuser and multitasking. 
OS/2 isn’t multiuser. Unix may be 
multiuser and multitasking, but it will 
hog a huge chunk of your hard disk and 
system memory. And neither Unix nor 
OS/2 can do integrated networking. 

QNX, on the other hand, hums along 
using an efficient 150K of RAM, yet 
provides a powerful multiuser, multi¬ 
tasking, and integrated networking 
environment. 

TRUE DISTRIBUTED PROCESSING. 

A QNX-based PC LAN lets any user 
share any resource on the network- 
programs, data, devices, even CPUs- 
without going through the bottleneck 
of a central file server. With QNX you 
get mainframe power at micro prices. 

ADDED VALUE FOR VARS. QNX is 

flexible enough to run on any mix of 


PCs, ATs, PS/2s, with or without dumb 
terminals. Even diskless workstations 
are supported. So whether you start 
small or grow to mainframe proportions, 
you can easily build and maintain 
powerful, fault-tolerant systems with¬ 
out spending a fortune on hardware. 

REALTIME PERFORMANCE. Only 
QNX combines the performance of a 
dedicated realtime executive with the 
convenience of a rich development 
environment that includes a host of 
utilities, C compiler, full-screen editor, 
symbolic debugger, and multiple full¬ 
screen windows. 

DOS SUPPORT. For those who need 
their daily dose of DOS, QNX allows 
a DOS application to run as a single 
task on each PC on the network. 

FREE TECHNICAL SUPPORT. While 
users of other operating systems have 
to cough up hefty fees for support, QNX 
developers enjoy free hotline support 
and free BBS access. You’ll get prompt 
answers to your questions and you’ll 
share ideas and insights with fellow 
developers in the QNX community. 


THE ONLY MULTIUSER, MULTITASKING, 
NETWORKING, REALTIME OPERATING 
SYSTEM FOR THE IBM PC, AT, PS/2, 

AND COMPATIBLES 

Multiuser 

10 (32) serial terminals per PC (AT) 

Multitasking 

64 (150) tasks per PC (AT) 

Networking 

2.5 Megabit token passing. 

255 PC’s and/or ATs per 
network. Thousands of users 
per network. 

Realtime 

4,250 task switches/sec (AT). 

Message 

Fast intertask communication 

Passing 

across the network. 

C Compiler 

Standard Kernighan and Ritchie. 

Flexibility 

Single PC, networked PC’s, 
single PC with terminals, 
networked PC's with terminals. 

No central servers. Full sharing 
of disks, devices and CPU’s. 

PC-DOS 

PC-DOS runs as a QNX task. 

Cost 

From US $450. 

Runtime pricing available. 


For further information or a free demonstration 
diskette, please telephone (613) 591-0931. 


It’s time to make the move to QNX. 

Circle 213 on Reader Service Card 

Quantum Software Systems Ltd. • Kanata South Business Park • 175 Terrence Matthews Crescent • Kanata, Ontario, Canada • K2M 1W8 



0 rts* at vt j no m no _-1 at m__ 



















WHAT’S NEW 


SOFTWARE • BUSINESS 


With PresentationPro, 

PICT files have never looked better!! 


Vs/ 



il 


OKLAH( 


PresentationPro works with the Crosfield Design System. 


Presentations on 
the Mac Desktop 

P resentationPro runs on 
the Mac and is compatible 
with Crosfield Design Sys¬ 
tems’ computer slide-produc¬ 
tion equipment. You can 
create presentations on your 
Mac and send the files to a 
Crosfield Design Systems de¬ 
sign station for enhancements 
or to a Crosfield film recorder 
for imaging. 

The program offers user- 
definable formats and style- 
sheets. You have global con¬ 
trol over background colors, 
including 10 predesigned 
custom backgrounds, plus the 
ability to have custom back¬ 
grounds created. You can im¬ 
port object-based PICT files 
with proportional or random 
scaling or positioning. 

PresentationPro runs on a 
Mac with 1 megabyte of RAM. 
Price: $295. 

Contact: StradeWare Corp., 
12600 West Colfax Ave., Suite 
B110, Lakewood, CO 
80215,(303) 232-8282. 

Inquiry 1123. 


Unix Project 
Management 
on the Mac 

M icro Planner for the 

Macintosh now comes in 
a version that runs under 
A/UX, enabling you to take 
advantage of the networking, 
file sharing, and centralized 
storage capabilities of a Unix 
host computer system. You can 
access data from a Unix host, 
create project management 


modules on the Mac, and 
then share the information 
with others on a Unix-based 
network. 

Micro Planner uses the 
critical-path method for deter¬ 
mining schedules and pin¬ 
pointing critical deadlines and 
potential problem areas with¬ 
in a schedule. Logic diagrams 
show the sequence and inter¬ 
relationships of tasks in a proj¬ 
ect. You also have the ability 
to select the best use of people, 
equipment, and money for 
single or multiple projects 
using the resource analysis 
method. 

The program supports 
“what-if” analyses and in¬ 
stantly recalculates schedules 
and budgets when you revise 
your input. You can compare 
different what-if scenarios 
on-screen. 

Micro Planner is also 
available in an IBM PC ver¬ 
sion, and you can use files on 
either platform, according to 
Micro Planning International. 
The Macintosh version runs on 
the Mac 512KE, Plus, SE, 
and II. The IBM PC version re¬ 
quires Windows and runs on 
any PC that supports Windows. 
Price: Mac or PC version, 
$595. 

Contact: Micro Planning In¬ 
ternational, 235 Montgomery 
St., Suite 840, San 
Francisco, CA 94104, (415) 
788-3324. 

Inquiry 1126. 


ZIPping around the U.S. 


T he ZIP where program¬ 
mer’s toolkit from Ef¬ 
fective Data Solutions helps 
you with business chores 
such as address processing, 
inquiry handling, invoice 
processing, shipping and de- 
livery, and sales manage¬ 
ment. 

The toolkit includes a 
function library and data file 
that let your programs re¬ 
trieve, check, and manipu¬ 
late ZIP codes. ZIPwhere 
also determines the local 
time of any place in the U.S. 
or the time difference be¬ 
tween any two places. And it 
can calculate the distance 
between any two points in 
the U.S. 

Your program specifies 


the name and location of the 
ZIPwhere Data File, and 
then you have access to all 
ZIPwhere functions. The 
company reports that a file 
with all data items included 
requires less than 1 mega¬ 
byte of storage. A minimum- 
configuration file requires 
only 53K bytes. 

ZIPwhere runs on IBM 
PCs running DOS 2.1 or 
higher. 

Price: $139; one update, 
$39; two semi-annual up¬ 
dates, $59; four quarterly 
updates. $99. 

Contact: Effective Data 
Solutions, 28225 Agoura 
Rd., Agoura Hills, CA 
91301,(800) 777-8818. 

Inquiry 1122. 


Organ izationware 

I n describing Vortex, Robo- 
tronics coined the term “or- 
ganizationware.” The pro¬ 
gram is an information 
management system that 
combines a database with soft¬ 
ware that you use regularly. 

The program comes with 
two word processors, a com¬ 
munications program, an im¬ 
port/export utility, and a vari¬ 
ety of business-oriented 
modules. 

Vortex run on the IBM PC 
with 640K bytes of RAM and 
DOS 3.3 or higher. 

Price: $595. 

Contact: Robotronics, Inc., 

11103 San Pedro, Suite 107, 
San Antonio, TX 78216, 

(512) 344-5511. 

Inquiry 1124. 


ProQube Goes 
Three-Dimensional 

F ormalSoft’s new spread¬ 
sheet, ProQube, is the 
successor to QubeCalc. The 
new three-dimensional spread¬ 
sheet provides 512 rows by 
512 columns by 512 individual 
pages in its worksheet. The 
program has the ability to ro¬ 
tate and slice across multiple 
sheets, allowing you to view, 
enter, and manipulate data 
from multiple worksheets on 
the same screen. 

ProQube also has presenta¬ 
tion-quality graphics, which 
include the ability to generate 
3-axis bar and area charts with 
various fonts and colors, ac¬ 
cording to FormalSoft. 

ProQube runs on the IBM 
PC with 640K bytes of RAM 
and DOS 2.0 or higher. 

Price: $247.50. 

Contact: FormalSoft, P.O. 

Box 1913, Sandy, UT 84091, 
(801)565-0971. 

Inquiry 1125. 

continued 


88 BYTE* MARCH 1989 















3X-LINK16 

the LAN ALTERNATIVE ! 


3X-LINK16 

HIGH-FLYING 

COMMUNICATIONS 


You have multiple PCs, laptops, PS /2s® and ATs. Some 51/4" and some 31/2" computers. 
You need to move files between any and all of them... 3X-LINK16® IS FOR YOU. 
BESIDES, 3X-LINK16® allows you to share printers and automate backups. 


3X-LINK16, 

Your file transfer solution... 

• is up and running in seconds. 

• connects up to 16 compatible micros through 
their parallel ports. 

• allows you to attach your printer through the 
same port. 

• transfers files at 500,000 bps. 

• copies files from remote micros in background, 
without interrupting remote programs. 

• supports cables up to 400 feet. 

In addition, 3X-LINK16... 

• automates repetitive file transfers with its 
autoscript features. 

• allows you to send messages to any connected 
PC with its internal E-Mail system. 

• lets you share any connected printer with its 
spooling option. 



U 

s 

A 



3X-LINK16 outperforms the competition 


SUMMARY OF FEATURES 

3X-WUM6* 

lap-link® 

Brooklyn Bridge* 

Maximum number of PCs linked 

16 

2 

2 

Connects to parallel port 

Yes 

No 

No 

Transfer speed (bps) 

500,000 

115,000 

115,000 

Transfers in background 

Yes 

No 

No 

Shares printers in background 

Yes 

No 

No 

Dual window interface 

Yes 

Yes 

Yes 

Cable supplied 

12 Ft. 

6 Ft. 

6 Ft. 

Automated file transfer 

Yes 

No 

No 

Check space before sending 

Yes 

No 

No 

Internal E-Mail system 

Yes 

No 

No 


THE CHOICE IS YOURS! 

3X-LINK16 comes complete with 3 1/2" and 5 1/4" 
software diskettes, parallel connectors, and a 12 
foot cable... all you need to connect two PCs for 
only $199. Additional stations can be added for 
$139 each. 

And you get our 30-day money back guarantee to 
insure your satisfaction. 

The only thing easier than choosing 3X-LINK16® is 
using it. 

For more information or to order 3X-LINK16® , § 

contact your local dealer or call: 800-327-9712, i 
or FAX: (201) 592-0908, or in N.J.: (201) 592-6874 § 

3X-LINK16, PS/2, Lap-Link, Brooklyn Bridge are registered trade marks § 
of 3X-USA, IBM, Traveling Software, White Crane Systems. 


3X USA Corp. One Executive Drive Fort Lee N.J. 07024 

Phone: (800) 327-9712 


Circle 10 on Reader Service Card 


MARCH 1989 • BYTE 89 













































Introducing the new small footprint 
FlexCache Z-Series. 

For fruitful comparisons. 



$2699.00 

Models 

ALR® 

FlexCache 

SX386-w«in 

Compaq® 

Deskpro 

286 - Mod to 

MICt*pfOC**Wr 

80386SX 

16MHz 

16^0. 

82386 Cache 

80286 

12MHz 

1 wait state 

Bench Mark* 

3.38 Mips 

L93Mlpi 

dot Man CTOPIHWU 

803S75X :swm 

00287 >2iwi 

Memory cium) 

!ms r™ 1 " 

64 0k 

Storage 

I44M&3 i /S' FD 
1.2MB.. 5 1/4-FD 

fixed Disk Opi.. 

1 

Qph6noJ{$22smj 

Wrrts 

Optics ($276,001 

4£MftcJ&n» 

Video 

tfl WVGA 

MBHWQ 




$3799.00 

AIR® Compaq® 

FlexCache Deskpro 

203 86Z Mod IQ 386tMo0 |Q 

60886 

20MHr 

64K8, EE 82305 
Cache 

80386sx 

16MHz 

4,78 Mips 

2,46 Mips 

80387. Waltek 

803673X 

iMB 

1MB 

T 

□pflanql (.4225. DO) 

JOMHHmi. 

liTDM&Oftni 

Optional (S27&BO? 

1 

20Mfl<2?Pi5, 

4OM0*3&m 

10 WtVSA 

300X600 

VSA44QX4W 


$5199.00 

ALR® 

Compocj® 

FlexCache 

Deskpro 

25386Z Moaic 20e- mop id 

60386 

80386 

25MHZ 

20MHz 

64KB.EE 62365 

32KB 

Cache 

Cache 

6.07 Mips 

4 68 Mips 

80387. Weitak 

80387. Weltek 

1MB ^22™^ 

1MB 

T 

OpNQOd(X275 0q) 

CwHond tsa 25.00) 

1 


JDMBdfrrri. 

taMMOn* 

MMfrdflft* 

15 HI VGA 

VGA 640 X 4B0 

M0X500 



Compaq and Compoq Deskpro 206. 366s and 20e ore registered trademarks of Compoq Computer Corp. PC’K^tk Is. o registered trademark of 
Muhisoft Carp. Deskvlew/ 386 is a registered trademark of Quarterdeck Office Systems. 



Award 
Winning 
FlexCache 
Architecture. 


With ALR’s 
award winning 
design, the Z-Series 
incorporates the 
most advanced form 
of cache management. 


90 BYTE ■ MARCH 1989 




























It's a fruitless 

comparison 

when 

ALR is the 

obvious choice. 


ALR FlexCache 
SX386Z 


No one compares 
with our three 'J £ a 
year warranty. 

ALRs quality is backed by 
an unprecedented three year 
warranty on all main CPU 
boards and a full one year 
warranty on entire systems. 
We also offer extended 
warranty programs and 
on-site servicing. 

And thereS 
comparably more. 

Each system includes PC- 
Kwik®. The disk caching 




name of your local authorized 
ALR reseller please call: 

1-800-444-4ALR 


y 

ALR FlexCache 
25386Z 

utility voted PC Magazine^ 

Editor's Choice. 

In addition. Info Worlds 
product of the year, 

DESQview 386®, the power¬ 
ful multitasking and win¬ 
dowing program is included 
with the FlexCache Z 
systems until May 31,1989. 

For more information on the 
FlexCache Z-Series or the 



ALR FtexCache 
20386Z 


m.- 


Advanced Logic Research, Inc. 

9401 Jeronimo, Irvine, CA 92718 
(714) 581-6770 FAX:(714) 581-9240 

For our Canadian office: 1-800-443-4CAN 
For our UK office: 1-800-444-4ALR 
For our Singapore-Asia/Pacific office: 

(65) 258-1286 FAX: (65) 258-1285 


Circle 12 on Reader Service Card (DEALERS: 13) 


MARCH 1989 • BYTE 91 











WHAT’S NEW 


SOFTWARE • CONNECTIVITY 



DataLAN PC 
Network 

D ataLAN is compatible 
with DOS, the IBM PC 
LAN Program, and other 
MS-NET-compatible network 
operating systems, according 
to Datapoint. The program 
supports Novell record-lock¬ 
ing protocols and uses the 
NETBIOS application pro¬ 
gram interfaces. It works with 
Ethernet, Token Ring, and 
ARC NET. 

The program can run 
using nondedicated servers. In 
addition, Datapoint has also 
introduced a dedicated server. 
The multitasking server can 
cache up to 32 megabytes and 
supports up to 12 gigabytes. 
An unattended network archi¬ 
val server supplies the back¬ 
up, which supports up to 35 
gigabytes of archival storage. 
Price: Four-user version, 
$595; eight-user version, 

$ 1195; 255-user version, 
$1995; dedicated server, 
$2495. 

Contact: Datapoint Corp,, 
9725 Datapoint Dr., San 
Antonio, TX 78284, (800) 
334-9968; in Texas, (512) 
699-7000. 

Inquiry 1129, 


Micro-to-Mainframe 
File Transfer 

lAf orking with Digital 
If C ommu n ic at ion As so - 
dates’ IRMAlink, FT/Ex- 
press transfers files from IBM 
mainframes and IBM PCs 
faster than any of its current 
file transfer products, the 
company reports. The program 
comes in two versions: one 
supports the V M/CMS operat¬ 
ing system, and the other 
supports the MVS/TSO operat¬ 
ing system. 

Price: CMS or TSO version, 
$9000 per CPU plus $1800 for 


yearly maintenance license. 
Contact: Digital Communi¬ 
cations Associates, Inc., 
1000 Alderman Dr M Alpha¬ 
retta, GA 30201, (404) 
442-4000. 

Inquiry 1131. 


Face-2-Face 

R ecently, a slew of re¬ 
mote control software 
programs have appeared on 
the market. Face-2-Face is an¬ 
other, but this one has the 
ability to communicate with 
Carbon Copy Plus. 

Face-2-Face is written in 
assembly language and uses as 
little as 65K bytes of RAM 
on an IBM PC. The program 
comes preconfigured for a 
variety of standard modems. 

The program was written 
with laptops in mind* accord¬ 
ing to Modem Controls. A 
phone book included with the 
program has a field for area 
codes: You type an area 
code, and the phone book 
automatically dials the 
number. 

Price: Host end, $149; re¬ 
mote end, $99. 

Contact: Modem Controls, 
432 North Clark St., Suite 
202, Chicago, IL 60610, 

(312)321-0018. 

Inquiry 1128. 


From Mac to PC and Back 


T he Mac Mail Gateway 
lets you send electronic 
mail between Macs and PCs 
over the Banyan VINES- 
based Network Mail and 
QuickMaiL The Gateway 
consists of the listener and 
the bridge. The listener runs 
as a VINES service on Ban¬ 
yan WIN ES/3 86 or 803 86- 
based servers. The bridge 
runs with the QuickMail Ad¬ 
ministrator program on a 
nondedicated Mac. The two 
communicate using the 
AppleTalk networking pro¬ 
tocol. You can connect Macs 
directly to the VINES server 


via Ethernet or through an 
Ethernet-to-LocalTalk 
bridge. 

Banyan reports that the 
Gateway is easy to install 
and requires no administra¬ 
tor intervention. With the 
Mac Gateway, you can also 
take advantage of other 
VINES mail gateways, such 
as SoftSwitch and EasyGate 
Fax, according to Banyan. 
Price: $795. 

Contact: Banyan Systems, 
Inc., 115 Flanders Rd,, 
Westbora,MA 01581, (508) 
898-1000. 

Inquiry 1127, 


Vaccinate 
Your File Server 

F oundation Ware, the 
maker of Corporate Vac¬ 
cine, has a vaccine for your 
file server. The program, 
called Certus, works with 
most network operating sys¬ 
tems and hardware, accord¬ 
ing to the company. 

When installing a LAN, 
the manager uses Certus to 
create a database of signature 
checks of programs approved 
for a given user or worksta¬ 
tion. The database then veri¬ 
fies the integrity of all pro¬ 
grams before loading them into 
memory, Found at ion Ware 
reports. 

The program monitors and 
audits systems used and keeps 
logs of ail software use. It 
will intercept malicious or ac¬ 
cidental attempts to write 
damaging information to hard 
disks. 

The company reports that 
Certus is the only product that 
can automatically recover 
file servers or hard disks from 
crashes due to damaged par¬ 
tition tables, boot tracks, File 
Allocation Tables, root 
directories, and CMOS infor¬ 
mation. This automatic re¬ 
covery feature, however, does 
not work on Novell file 
servers or other file servers 
with non-DOS partitioning 
and formatting. Foundation- 
Ware expects to solve this 
problem in a future version of 
Certus. 

Price: $495. 

Contact: Found at ion Ware, 
Inc., 2135 Renrock Rd., 
Cleveland* OH 44118, (800) 
722-8737; in Ohio, (216) 
932-7717. 

Inquiry 1130. 

continued 


92 BYTE* MARCH 1989 














Make your 
point without 
a trace of 
doubt* 


With the new 
HIPAD PLUS 

series* 


If you’ve ever used a digitizer, you 
probably were surprised that it didn’t 
do what you thought it would. You 
assumed that whatever you picked or 
moved or drew on the tablet would 
be accurately displayed on the screen 
and precisely reflected on output. In 
spite of its straight-forward appear¬ 
ance, it didn’t take you long to learn 
that all digitizers were not created 
equal, or accurate, or even easy to use. 

Today there’s a new line of digitizers 
that can meet your expectations. It’s 
the new HIPAD Plus™ series. With 
sizes ranging from a compact 12" X12" 
to a drafting-size 44" X 60,'' each model 
reflects Hi’s tradition of price/perform¬ 
ance excellence. 

Compare, for example, the sleek 9012 
and 9018 models (shown below) which 
contain Hi’s exclusive tilt-correction 
feature. This unique feature lets you 
use the stylus like a pencil—no need 
to hold it in an awkward perpendicular 
position. HFs tablet captures only 
the points touched by the tip of the 
stylus, so you can make menu selec¬ 
tions, create freehand drawings, move 
the screen cursor, or edit pixel-by- 
pixel—without a trace of doubt. 

If you prefer a handheld cursor, you’ll 
find Hi’s new four-button cursor has 
the same pin-point precision. (You’ll 
also like the way it feels in your hand.) 

The HIPAD Plus digitizers are 
compatible with both your CAD and 
graphics systems. Each model proc¬ 
esses coordinates rapidly (up to 200 
pairs per second) and has a resolution 
of up to 2,540 lines per inch. This all 
adds up to high performance and 
accuracy—and it means you won’t be 
replacing your tablet to meet the 
high-resolution demands of the future. 

And, with prices like $495* for the 
12"xl2" tablet and $795* for the 12'' 
xl8" tablet, HIPAD Plus is affordable. 
Make your point without a trace of 
doubt. For details, call 1-800-444-3425 
or 512-835-0900. 

HOUSTON 

INSTRUMENT 

A division of AMETEK 
8500 Cameron Road, Austin, TX 78753 


*USr suggested retail prices. HIPAD Plus and 
Houston Instrument are trademarks of AMETEK, Inc 


Circle 125 on Reader Service Card 














WHAT’S NEW 


SOFTWARE • CAD AND GRAPHICS 



CADvance 

Upgraded 

T hree-dimensional capa¬ 
bility , information man¬ 
agement, and expanded me¬ 
chanical and international 
engineering features have 
been added in the latest version 
of CADvance. 

Version 3.0 uses Visual 
Guidance System's user inter¬ 
face, which makes it possible 
to use any three-dimensional 
program, according to Isi- 
CAD. The interface also offers 
a three-dimensional refer¬ 
ence grid, a dynamic working 
plane, and a three-dimen¬ 
sional cursor that helps you to 
see your drawings on-screen 
as three-dimensional images. 

CADvance 3.0 offers a 
two-way link with dBASE II 
Plus. This eliminates the 
two-step process of converting 
CAD files to ASCII, then 
ASCII to database, according 
to IsiCAD. 

CADvance 3.0 runs on the 


IBM PC with 640K bytes of 
RAM, DOS 2.0 or higher, 
and a CGA or compatible 
graphics adapter. The pro¬ 
gram supports a mouse and a 
variety of digitizers* 

Price: $2995. 

Contact: IsiCAD, Inc., 1920 
West Corporate Way, P.G. Box 
61022, Anaheim, CA 92803, 
(714) 533-8910. 

Inquiry 1136, 


Schematic Editor 
for $99 

S uperCAD is a schemat¬ 
ic-entry program that 
comes with a netlist genera¬ 
tor, a library parts builder, and 
an ASCII screen editor. 

Library part files are cate¬ 
gorized according to generic, 


memory, m icrop races sor, 
programmable-logic-device, 
and digital-signal-processing 
chips. There is also a library of 
package outlines that assists 
you in laying out boards, 

SuperCAD is compatible 
with narrow and wide-car- 
riage, Epson or IBM-compat¬ 
ible dot-matrix printers. And 
you can print A- through E- 
size pages in low or high 
resolution. 

SuperCAD runs on the 
IBM PC with at least 320R 
bytes of RAM, DOS 2.0 or 
higher, CGA, EGA, or Hercu¬ 
les graphics capability, and a 
Mircosoft-compatible mouse. 
Price: $99* 

Contact: Mental Automa¬ 
tion, Inc., 5415 136th Place 
SE, Bellevue, WA 98006, 

(206) 641-2141. 

Inquiry 1133* 


Generic Caters to 
Novice CAD Users 

T he CADD Starter Kit, 
which includes Generic 
CADD Level 2, gives users a 
workbook tutorial, Generic's 
Basic Home Design symbol 
library, and tutorial and sam¬ 
ple drawings—all bundled to¬ 
gether to offer a complete in¬ 
troduction to drawing and 
drafting. 

The beginner will learn to 
create floor plans, elevations, 
product drawings, and alter¬ 
ations with the Starter Kit. You 
can also create flow charts, 
graphics, presentations, orga¬ 
nizational charts, forms, and 
flyers* 

The CADD Starter Kit 
runs on the IBM PC with 384K 
bytes of RAM, DOS 2,0 or 
higher, and a graphics card. 
Price: $159*95. 

Contact: Generic Software, 
Inc., 11911 North Creek 
Pkwy. S, Bothell, WA 
98011,(800)228-3601; in 
Washington, (206) 487-2233. 
Inquiry 1134, 

continued 


CAD on the Mac 

F lexiCAD is a two-di¬ 
mensional CAD pro¬ 
gram for the Macintosh* It is 
the first product from the 
new Amiable Technologies, 
The CAD and drafting 
program takes advantage of 
the icons and windows envi¬ 
ronment of the Macintosh. 
The program offers un¬ 
limited undo/redo features, 
a graphical macro builder 
for frequently used proce¬ 
dures, and context-sensitive 
on-line help and prompts* 
You can position tear-off 
menu boxes anywhere on the 
screen, and customize type¬ 
faces, line styles, colors, 
symbols, and more* 

FlexiCAD cannot accept 
scanned images because it 
uses object-oriented rather 
than bit-mapped graphics. It 
does accept input from trac¬ 


ing tablets and can import 
and export PICT files or, 
with an optional conversion 
utility, DXF files. 

The program uses the 
cut-and-paste clipboard for 
text and image swapping 
with desktop publishing 
packages. 

With FlexiCAD, you can 
have up to four drawing files 
active at once, and each can 
have multiple viewing win¬ 
dows. You can also have an 
unlimited number of layers 
in each drawing. Drawing 
functions include move, 
copy, rotate, mirror, scale, 
and fill, plus dynamic rub¬ 
berbanding, and a constraint 
tool that can restrict lines 
both to a grid and to angles 
that you specify. 

The program also offers 
Bezier* B-spline, and Cardi¬ 


nal curve commands for 
tracing and technical illus¬ 
tration. Other features in¬ 
clude auto-dimensioning 
with labels in both English 
and metric units for linear, 
radial, and angular dimen¬ 
sions; user-defined icons; 
and the ability to merge 
drawings and abort redraws 
in process. 

FlexiCAD runs on the 
Mac II or IIx with at least 2 
megabytes of RAM and a 
hard disk drive. The pro¬ 
gram also runs on the Mac 
SE with a 68881 math copro¬ 
cessor* 

Price: $895; with DXF file- 
conversion utility, $995. 
Contact; Amiable Technol¬ 
ogies, 3508 Market St., 
Suite 210, Philadelphia, PA 
19104, (215)222-9006. 
Inquiry 1132. 


94 BYTE - MARCH 1989 











Produce Programs in a Flash 



With Smalltalk-80, the Best in 
Object-Oriented Technology. 


It's amazing. 

In just a few years, object-oriented technology 
has become an overwhelming favorite. Witness the 
success of graphical user interfaces. But what's 
the best environment for developing these object- 
oriented programs? 

Fortunately, that’s no mystery. It’s the 
Smalltalk-SO” program development environment 
from ParcPlace Systems. Pioneers of object- 
oriented technology. 

We deliver the most complete, fully-integrated 
system available, with everything you need to 
quickly and easily develop and implement pro¬ 
grams. Including a library of reusable code mod¬ 
ules. Browsers, inspectors, and debuggers. Text 
and graphics editors. Online assistance. Dynamic 
cross referencing. And much more. 

In fact, Smalltalk-80 is so comprehensive. 
Byte Magazine (1/89) felt compelled to rave, it “... 
includes everything you need for program develop¬ 
ment Everything. And all the goodies are honest- 
to-God fully integrated.” 

Even better, Smalltalk-80 gives you true port¬ 
ability. Write programs on a UNIX* workstation 
and deliver them directly on DOS and MAC OS 
machines. Or vice versa. 

To make sure you start fast and stay productive, 
we provide the best tech support in the business. 
Including training, documentation, a hotline, 
and more. 

For details on Smalltalk-80, write: 

ParcPlace Systems 
1550 Plymouth Street 
Mountain View, CA 94043 

Call 1-800-822-7880, ext. 20; in California, 
415-859-1000, ext. 20. Or use E-Mail. Our address: 
info@parcplace.com. 

When you see what it can do, you won't 
believe your eyes. 


o$d 

FhrcFlace 

Smalltalk-80 is a trademark of ParcPlace Systems, Inc. UNIX is a registered trademark of AT&T. © 1989, ParcPlace Systems, Inc. 

MARCH 1989 • RYTF, 95 


Circle 100 nn Render Kervire Cnrd 













WHAT’S NEW 


Assistance 
for Quattro Users 

Q uattro-Assist 1.0 is a 
tutorial for Borland’s 
Quattro. It works in conjunc¬ 
tion with the Quattro user’s 
manual and covers data en¬ 
try» spreadsheet functions, 
graphing, macros, and 
printing. 

The tutorial was created 
with Instant Replay and is 
actually a simulation of the 
Quattro program, letting you 
work directly with Quattro in 
a controlled environment. 
Price: $79.95. 

Contact: Nostradamus, Inc., 
3191 South Valley St., Suite 
252, Salt Lake City, UT 
84109,(801)487-9662. 

Inquiry 1140. 


A Model Language 

M odel is a high-level ob¬ 
ject-oriented engineering 
language, according to its 
manufacturer. It is designed to 
provide solutions for real¬ 
time distributed process simu¬ 
lation and control. 

The language consists of 
math, logic, process control, 
man-machine, alarm, file 
management, and program 
control algorithms. Options 
include steam tables, front-end 
drivers, and LAN local/ 
remote system control. 

Model comes with a natu¬ 
ral-language interface prepro¬ 
cessor, a compiler, a screen 
display generator, and support 
utilities. 

To run Model, you need an 
IBM PC with at least 384K 
bytes of RAM. A math co¬ 
processor, color screen, and 


SOFTWARE • OTHER 


hard disk drive are 
recommended. 

Price: $395. 

Contact: Model Software, 52 
Curtis Court, Broomfield, CO 
80020, (303) 469-0826. 

Inquiry 1119. 


The Hunt for the 
Cursor Has Ended 

I f you’re spending too 
much time looking all over 
the LCD screen of your lap¬ 
top for the cursor, the No- 
Squint Laptop Cursor from 
SkiSoft is a memory-resident 
utility that may brighten your 
day—as well as your cursor. 

The software slows down 
the blink rate of the cursor. 
Since the cursor is controlled 
by hardware, the software has 
to take control. 

The No-Squint Laptop 
Cursor uses about IK byte 
of RAM and runs on DOS- 
based laptops. 

Price: $39.95. 

Contact: SkiSoft Publishing 
Corp., 1644 Massachusetts 
Ave., Suite 79, Lexington, 
MA 02173, (617) 863-1876. 
Inquiry 1138. 


Automatic Page 
Reader 

sing intelligent page 
analysis, ReadStar VI lets 
you convert hard copy into an 
electronic file regardless of 
multiple column structure, 
graphical images, varying 
fonts, and portrait or land¬ 
scape format, according to 
Inovatic. 

ReadStar VI uses a mathe¬ 
matical modeling algorithm to 
analyze character shapes 
globally. The program recog¬ 
nizes normally contrasted 
characters from 4 to 20 points. 
It can also read extended 
ASCII text, proportionally 


spaced characters, and 
kerned text, along with foreign 
characters, stylized fonts, 
near-letter-quality print, bold¬ 
face, italics, and underlined 
text. 

Inovatic reports an accu¬ 
racy rate of 99.9 percent and 
claims that ReadStar VI rec¬ 
ognizes text at a rate of 4500 
characters per minute. The 
program outputs ASCII text. 

The program runs on the 
IBM PC with 640K bytes of 
RAM, DOS 3.0 or higher, 
and a hard disk drive. It is 
compatible with most scan¬ 
ners, according to the 
company. 

Price: $2495. 

Contact: Inovatic, 1911 
North Fort Myer Dr., Suite 
708, Arlington, VA 22209, 
(703) 522-3053. 

Inquiry 1137. 


Macro Collection 
for R:Base Users 

R :Macros is a collection 
of over 60 utilities and 
techniques for automating 
common R:Base database 
tasks. These include a basic 
library of reusable code, in¬ 
structions for their use. and 
tips from programmers who 
designed the applications. 

R:Macros is divided into 
five sections: ready-to-use 
macros, database and appli¬ 
cation utilities, forms and re¬ 
port utilities, tips and tech¬ 
niques, and financial macros 
and templates. 

The program runs on the 
IBM PC with at least 456K 
bytes of free RAM and DOS 
3.1 or higher. 

Price: $99. 

Contact: Microrim, 3925 
159th Ave. NE. P.O. Box 
97022, Redmond, WA 
98073, (206) 885-2000. 

Inquiry 1141. 


The Repair 
Engineer’s Clone 

I nstead of boxing up and 
shipping your broken PC off 
to the repair shop, you can 
fix it yourself with an interac¬ 
tive guidance system from 
Cess Computers. Compu-Fix 
for Generic PCs runs on a 
separate, working machine, 
and offers trouble-shooting 
techniques and diagnostics to 
help you repair your mal¬ 
functioning system. 

The program takes you 
through steps, instructing you 
to perform simple actions 
and then querying you to deter¬ 
mine the result of that action. 
This process continues until all 
malfunctioning parts are 
properly identified and the 
unit is repaired. 

Instructions are displayed 
on-screen. The program is 
menu-driven, and repair ac¬ 
tions and results are described 
in the form of yes/no ques¬ 
tions. At the end of a repair 
session, the program pro¬ 
duces an audit report summa¬ 
rizing the actions taken, 
which parts are in working 
condition, which parts need 
replacing, and the actions 
taken to verify that these 
parts need replacing. 

The company reports that 
you don’t need any experience 
with computer repair, al¬ 
though it helps if you can rec¬ 
ognize basic computer parts. 

The program works to re¬ 
pair most DOS-based systems, 
including those with 8086-, 
8088-, 80286-, and 80386- 
based microprocessors. Cess 
reports that it works on laptops 
as well. 

Price: $499. 

Contact: Cess Computers, 

One Kendall Sq., Cambridge, 
MA 02139, (800) 888-2377; 
in Massachusetts, (617) 
494-4770. 

Inquiry 1139. 



96 BYTE* MARCH 1989 








BVTE 


International 



ILLUSTRATION: FRANK MILLER © 1989 


MARCH 1989 • BYTE 96IS-1 













<♦ 


sun 


SO 


Even as we speak, your Network may 
be about to be invaded by hordes of Macs, SUN 
^workstations et al., as your users realise that the 
world is no longer a totally Blue or exclusively DOS oyster. 

You have three choices. 

Change your job ... plunge into the appalling 
intricacies and expense of trying to get your current LAN to 
accept these newcomers ... or investigate TOPS. 

TOPS is an open system, distributed, a completely 
transparent approach to Local Area Networking that was 
originally adopted by SUN itself because it reflects their basic 
philosophy of total flexibility and Open Computing. 

It has also become the 3rd most-installed 
network system worldwide. 

TOPS cheerfully accepts DOS, Mac & SUN UNIX 
machines in any mix or proportion; 
doesn’t need a central file server; 


TOPS 


Now we’re talking 

Tops Division, Sun Microsystems, Sun House, 31-41 Pembroke 
Broadway, Camberley, Surrey. GU153XD. ah trademarksacknowledged 


why doesn’t it cost more? 

can be installed in minutes; lets each user go on using their 
own machine's familiar interface; is fully NetBIOS compatible 
...and so on, and so on. 

Want gateways to your mainframe or other networks? 
No problem. 

Want to keep adding more peripherals, more users, 
more bells & whistles? 

A doddle. 

TOPS. It’s what networking will be when everyone else 
catches up. A. 

TOPS from SUN 9 UJL I 

TEL 0276 62111 microsystems 


TOPS. Rush me details. 

Name 
Job Title 
Company 
Address_ 


TOPS division 


m an existing TOPS user. Please send me upgrade details. D 


BI/2/88 


Stand No. 2431. 


The user-friendly, 
multi-system, 
easy-fitting, 
tried ‘n’ tested, 
fully-featured, 
fast & flexible 
open network system 


96IS-2 BYTE* MARCH 1989 


Circle 453 on Reader Service Card 

































Short Takes 


INTERNATIONAL 


BYTE editors ’ hands-on views of new products 


A Parametric Design Program for Archimedes 


A parametric design pro¬ 
gram stores the relation¬ 
ships between objects in a 
drawing; rather than just the 
lines that depict the objects. 
The advantage of parameter- 
izing is that when you alter one 
part of the drawing, you can 
automatically recalculate all 
the parameters to preserve re¬ 
lationships. For example, sup¬ 
pose you define a line as being 
tangent to two circles, and you 
alter the size of one circle by 
entering a new value for its ra¬ 
dius. The program then re¬ 
draws the line so that it re¬ 
mains tangent to both circles. 

Oak Computer’s Para¬ 
metric Design Tool (PDT) is a 
parametric two-dimensional 
design package for the Acorn 
Archimedes. The program it¬ 
self is simply and smartly de¬ 
signed; you do everything 
from one screen display. The 
display consists of a black 
drawing area with a cross-hair 
cursor, surrounded by a frame 
that appears to be in bas-relief 
by the clever use of gray and 
white shading. 

The drawing screen is a 
window onto a virtual screen 
with a resolution of 1280 by 
1024 pixels. The command 
menu is hierarchically orga¬ 
nized, in typical CAD style, 
and it runs down the right- 
hand edge of the screen. You 
select commands by using the 
mouse to move the cursor onto 
the menu. The menu tree is 
never more than three levels 
deep; most of the time it is only 
two levels, and you can return 
to the top level by clicking on 
the Oak logo. For speed, PDT 
duplicates 12 of the most com¬ 
mon commands on function 
keys. 

Creating a drawing in PDT 
is very different from using a 
normal drawing package. 
First, you must decide what 


aspects of your drawing you 
would like to be parameter¬ 
ized. If I were drawing a fry¬ 
ing pan, some suitable param¬ 
eters might be PAN_RADIUS, 
HANDLE_LENGTH, and 
HANDLE_ANGLE. PDT re¬ 
fers to these parameters as sca¬ 
lars, and it gives you com¬ 
mands to list and alter them in 
your drawing. 

After I name my scalars, I 
enter their starting values, I 
can define scalars using ex¬ 
pressions involving other sca¬ 
lars, so that if I decree that all 
well-designed frying pans 
haveahandlethatis 1.23 times 
the diameter of the pan, I can 
enter HANDLE_LENGTH as 
1.23 * 2 * PAN_RADIUS. 
The biggest weakness of PDT 
version 1 is that it does not pre¬ 
serve the symbolic representa¬ 
tion of such expressions—you 
can’t edit them, you can only 
reenter them in full. The soft¬ 
ware developers say a future 
version may fix this. 

Next, you enter some con¬ 
struction points and lines from 
the Draw menu. These are the 
points and lines that define re- 
lationships; they appear dot¬ 
ted and are not part of the final 
drawing. So, for a frying pan, 
I might enter a circle of radius 
PAN_RADIUS, two lines for 
the handle and, perhaps, a sec¬ 
ond circle to end the handle. 

The Draw menu gives you a 
variety of commands so you 
can create construction lines. 


circles, and arcs defined by 
various relationships. Forex- 
ample, you can draw a line 
through two points, through 
one point at a given angle, to 
bisect a given angle, to make it 
perpendicular to another line, 
through one point parallel to 
another line, and tangent to 
two circles. 

A typical PDT drawing 
grows outward from a single 
anchor point when you add 
construction lines and circles 
that you have defined relative 
to previous ones. If your draw¬ 
ing gets too cluttered with con¬ 
structions, you can zoom in on 
an area to see better and pan to 
make any selected point the 
center of the screen. 

Only after you have fin¬ 
ished the constructions do you 
start your actual drawing, 
which is just a matter of draw¬ 
ing over some of the construc¬ 
tion lines using a second set of 
drawing commands. These 
lines appear solid and form the 
final drawing; the Display 
menu controls whether or not 
points and construction lines 
are visible. Now I can design a 
whole family of frying pans of 
different sizes without draw¬ 
ing a single new line—I just 
enter different values for 
PAN^RADIUS, and PDT re¬ 
draws a new pan of that size 
with the handle correctly 
proportioned. 

You can draw on up to 16 su- 
perimposed layers, each of 


which can be locked against 
alteration, and you can use a 
different pen color for each 
layer. PDT lets you give di¬ 
mensions to your drawings 
and automatically updates 
your drawings as you alter the 
parameters. This associative 
dimensioning system con¬ 
forms to the British Standard 
BS3G8. 

You can place text of any 
size and angle in a PDT draw¬ 
ing, but drawing and scaling 
such text is quite slow even on a 
machine of the Archimedes’ 
power. So, for boxes with lots 
of text, you can instruct PDT 
to temporarily replace the text 
with a cross or butterfly to 
speed redrawing during devel¬ 
opment. You can save rectan¬ 
gular screen areas as sprites to 
export into other Archimedes 
drawing or desktop publishing 
programs and plot your PDT 
drawings on Hewlett-Packard 
Graphics Language-compati¬ 
ble plotters in sizes from A5 to 
AO. You can also send your 
drawings to many dot-matrix 
printers or call a user-written 
screen dump routine for spe¬ 
cial devices that PDT does not 
support. 

The parametric nature of 
PDT lets you easily animate 
drawings. One of the demon¬ 
stration drawings is the cross- 
section of a four-stroke petrol 
engine, with a scalar called 
crankangle. As you alter 
crankangie through 360 de¬ 
grees, the engine goes through 
a cycle with the piston moving 
up and down and the valves 
moving in and out. PDT has a 
special section called Movies, 
which lets you save a sequence 
of snapshots created in this 
way and display them as a 
moving picture. 

Oak PDT is a good example 
of how the power of new-gen- 
contimed 


THE FACTS 

Parametric Design Tool 

Oak Computer Ltd. 

£295 

Cross Park House 


Low Green, Rawdon 

Requirements; 

Leeds LS19 6HA, U.K. 

Acorn Archimedes 

44-0532-502615 

Model 310, 410 or 440; 

Inquiry 919* 

a hard disk drive 


is recommended. 



MARCH 1989 - BYTE 96IS-3 











SHORT TAKES 


INTERNATIONAL 


eration processors like the Ar¬ 
chimedes can be harnessed to 
create a qualitatively new type 
of microcomputer application. 
It offers designers the same 
kind of “what-if* flexibility 
that the spreadsheet has pro- 


I f you like to draw and you 
have an Acorn Archimedes 
computer. Pro-Artisan gives 
you full use of the machine’s 
extraordinary video perfor¬ 
mance. Though Pro-Artisan 
contains some basic geometri¬ 
cal drawing operations, it is 
not a CAD/CAM-style pro¬ 
gram. It is intended to let you 
design freehand illustrations 
or other creative work that in¬ 
volves editing and collaging 
scanned pictorial materials. 
The program works in Ar¬ 
chimedes video mode 15, 
which gives you a resolution of 
640 by 256 pixels and a choice 
of 256 colors. In theory, mode 
15 puts some limits on your 
choice of colors, but Pro-Arti¬ 
san effectively sidesteps those 
limits and lets you use any 
color, anywhere you wish. 
The quality of mode 15 is not 
quite up to photographic stan¬ 
dards, but it is good enough to 
make copies of famous paint¬ 
ings that do not look “compu- 
terish.” Mainly, Pro-Artisan 
treats pictures as pure bit 
maps, with no concept of lay¬ 
ering or separate objects. 

You control Pro-Artisan 
with a mouse and a set of styl¬ 
ish menus that pop up at the 
current cursor position when 
you press the middle mouse 
button. An interactive help 
feature gives you a brief expla¬ 
nation of whatever you’re 
pointing to in a window at the 
bottom of the screen, I found 
the user interface intuitive 
enough that, with help on, I 
could pick up about two-thirds 
of Pro-Artisan without re¬ 
ferring to the manual. The 
menu system has two levels: 
the main menu and six sub¬ 
menus, which are organized 


vided for financial affairs. In 
addition, thanks to its anima¬ 
tion feature, it has enormous 
potential as an educational aid 
in engineering, physics, and 
related disciplines. 

—Dick Pountain 


by function. The submenus in¬ 
clude Draw, Banding, Sprite, 
Tool, Cut-and-Paste, and 
Disk. 

The Draw menu lets you 
draw freehand using a variety 
of brush shapes, including 
user-defined ones, or using a 
spray can. Choosing your 
colors from the pop-up palette 
of 256 shades, you can fill 
areas with solid or graduated 
tones and with circularly grad¬ 
uated tones to suggest curved 
surfaces. You can also make 
the graduation linear, loga¬ 
rithmic, or varied in steep¬ 
ness, Another useful drawing 
tool is Wash, which lets you 
blend and smudge colors to¬ 
gether like a wet brush over 
watercolors. 

Magic Brush is another ex¬ 
cellent tool in the Draw menu 
that lets you replace up to 25 
colors in a picture with alter¬ 
native colors. You specify the 
target and replacement colors 
by pointing to and clicking on 
the palette or by choosing a 
predefined range of tints of the 
same hue. For sophisticated 
tricks, it might take you a 
while to construct suitable 
Magic Brush color sets, so 
Pro-Artisan lets you save them 
on disk as separate resources. 


You use the Banding menu 
to draw geometric figures 
using the familiar rubber- 
banding techniques; it sup¬ 
ports rectangles, triangles, 
circles, ellipses, arcs, seg¬ 
ments, and polylines. This 
menu has a submenu for fitting 
Bezier curves through pairs of 
points; you can display a bit¬ 
mapped image in the back¬ 
ground, trace its outline as a 
wire-frame drawing using Be¬ 
zier curves, and then save the 
latter as a separate file. A grid¬ 
lock feature helps you place 
lines accurately, but it only 
supports one style of line that 
is a single pixel wide, empha¬ 
sizing that this is really a free¬ 
hand drawing tool rather than 
adraftingtool. 

The Sprite menu lets you 
manipulate chunks of a bit¬ 
mapped picture, as well as 
modify and montage complex 
pictures with stunning sim¬ 
plicity, achieving excellent re¬ 
sults. You can grab any part of 
a picture and paint with it; 
flip, invert, or stretch it; or 
place multiple copies of it. 

The Archimedes’ speed is 
such that you can do all this in 
real time, as i f it were a poor- 
man's Quantel Paintbox. The 
area you grab can be rectangu¬ 
lar or an irregular shape that 
you cut out by using the cursor. 
You can save grabbed sprites 
on disk to build 1 ibraries of clip 
art. 

The Tool menu contains a 
variety of gadgets, such as the 
Edge Detector, which lets you 
reduce your drawings to a 
paint-by-numbers outline, 
and Distort, which lets you fill 
an arbitrarily shaped area with 
a piece of picture grabbed 
from the Sprite menu. Forex- 


ample, you can simulate re¬ 
flection in a sphere by distort¬ 
ing a picture into a circle. 
Text-placing commands and a 
full font editor help you rede¬ 
sign characters. You can also 
load printer drivers and dump 
the screen to a variety of output 
devices, such as 9- and 24-pin 
dot-matrix printers, Hewlett- 
Packard LaserJet printers, 
and Integrex color ink-jet 
printers. 

Clares introduced the Cut- 
and-Paste menu for compati¬ 
bility with its older Artisan 
program; almost everything it 
does, you can do better in real 
time from the Sprite menu. 
The exception isthatthis menu 
lets you rotate cut images 
through arbitrary angles. In 
addition. Cut and Paste does 
not use up Sprite memory, 
which can be an advantage 
when memory is short. 

You use the Disk menu to 
save and retrieve pictures, 
sprites, fonts, color sets, fill 
patterns, and Bezier drawings 
as separate files. You can save 
your pictures as sprites (i.e., 
plain bit maps), which occupy 
160K bytes, or in a com¬ 
pressed format, which can 
squeeze them into as little as 
30K bytes. If you would like to 
export the pictures into other 
drawing programs, such as 
ArcDraw, then you must save 
them uncompressed. 

I discovered after writing 
this review that one of the soft¬ 
ware developers is a trained 
artist, which I had already be¬ 
gun to suspect, 

Pro-Artisan is a splendid 
drawing tool that provides 
many of the features found in 
expensive professional graph¬ 
ics systems such as Quantel 
Paintbox. Its powerful pic¬ 
ture-editing facilities would 
make it ideal for use with a 
scanner/digitizer or video 
frame grabber to montage and 
massage bit-mapped images. 
Though the resolution may not 
be adequate for print publish¬ 
ing except as line art, you 
could use the programasa pro¬ 
duction vehicle for video titles 
and credits. P.S.: It’s also 
enormous fun. 

—Dick Pountain 


THE FACTS 


Pro-Artisan 

Clares Micro Supplies 

£169.95 

98 Middlewich Rd. 

Requirements: 

Rudheath, Northwich 
Cheshire CW9 7DA,U.K. 

Acorn Archimedes 300 

44-0606-48511. 

or 400 series with at least 1 

Inquiry 920. 

megabyte of memory and 
a color monitor; 
a hard disk drive is 
recommended. 


Draw and Paint 

on Your Acorn Archimedes 


96IS-4 BYTE* MARCH 1989 










USA SOFTWARE IN EUROPE! 

NO COSTLY PHONE AND FREIGHT CHARGES! 
QUICK DELIVERY! LOW PRICES! 


Come pay us a visit at our new address 
Over 1,400 products available. 

Call today for price list. 


3B6\ ASM/Link By Fhar Lap Scftw 


Price 

| 

ADVANTAGE 386 C Bv Lifeboat__„__ $ 1079 

ADVANTAGE 386 Pascal By Lifeboat..- _ 11079 

FoxBA5E+/386 By Fo* Software ....$ 565 

Microsoft Windows/386 By Microsoft ... . $ 231 

NDP C-386 By Micro Way ....._,$ 805 

N DP Fortran-386 By MkroWay . .$ BOS 

NDP Windows By MicroWay...——„.$ 173 

OS/366 Software Developers Kit By a. t Architects $ 649 

Paradox 3B6 By Borland ............ $ 990 

SCO XENIX System V Complete 386 $ 1919 

System V/3B6 Complete By Microport Systems___$ 1191 

VM/386 By ICC. . ..........* 299 

X-AM/306 By IOC __..-.719 

ARTIflQALlNmUGENCE 

Arity/Prolog Com p it er & In te rp refer a* Anty corpinrtni. $ 785 
m u LI SP-B7 Devel opmenl System By Soft Warehouse S 549 

PROLOG-2 Professional By Expert Systems . .. $ 1079 

Turbo Prolog By Borland.......$ 169 

Turbo Prolog Toolbox By Borland .— ... $ 115 

ASSEMBLER* LINKERS & TOOLS: 

ADVANTAGE Disassembler By Lifeboat.... $ 3 15 

Microsoft Macro Assembler By Microsoft 

PI ink S6PJus By Phoenix Technologies __ 

Series 3,0 8086/88 Macro Assembler Sy^ iVptoftmM; 

Turbo Assembler and Debugger By Bor 

BASIC LAN&UAGE A T OOLS: 

Microsoft QuickBASIC By Microsoft .. 

Stay-Res Plus By Microlietp... 

True Basic By True Basic 
True BASIC Btrieve interface By True BASIC Company , S 89 

Turbo Basic By Borland-—---$ 115 

Turbo Basic Database Toolbox By Borland_.$ 115 


C LANGUAGE ; 

C-teip By Compel Sofaut..,.. 

Instant C By Rational System* - 


305 


--* 

- 

Microsoft C Compiler By Microsoft ...$ 315 

Microsoft Quick C Comp i ler By Microsoft $ 121 

Turbo c 2.0 By Borland .. | 170 

Turbo C 2-0 Professional By Borland —I 297 

C LIBRARIES ft TOOLS; 

C ASYNCH MANAGER By Blaise Computing 
C Library By POl.YTRON 


$ 215 
_$ 125 

C TOOLS PLUS Ely Blaise Computing ........... $ 159 

C Utility Library By Essential Software ■— . 213 

dBASE C Tools Programmer's Library By Ashton Tate $ 101 
Greenleaf Functions Library By Grwniwf Software „_»$ 227 

Muld-c Hy Cyfek . ... . ._$ 199 

Turbo C Tools By BLnw Computing ~ .-———$ 159 

COMPUTER AIDED DESIGN: 

AutoCAD Release 10 By Autodesk ......$4205 

AutoCAD Release 9 By Autodesk ...$3995 

AutoSketch Enhanced By Autodesk ._.....-.-$ 118 

Design Cad By American Small Business ...... 297 

Generic 3-D By Generic Software_____$ 355 

Generic Cadd By Generic Software........$ 105 

COBOL LANGUAGE & TOOLS: 

COBOL spll By Flexus_______. $ 519 

Level II COBOL, By Micro Focus....$ 459 

Microsoft COBOL Compiler y 3.§ By Microsoft ......$ 1049 

Realta COBOL By Realla ...„ $1398 

RM/COBOL Development System By Ryan-MdFartand ..$1117 
RM/Screens By RyamMcEariiind.. . .—$ 519 

COMMUNICATIONS; 

CARBON COPY PLUS By Meridian Technology.$ 239 

CrossTaI k XVI By Cro»TaJk/DCA $ 179 

Proramm Plus By Dutastorm Technologies ............ $ 85 

Rem ote2 By CrowTalk/ DCA.. . .— $ 179 

SmarTerm 220 By Pereaft __........____$ 217 

VTERM/22J0 By Coefficient Systems. . . $ 299 

CROSS DE V E L OPME NT : 

Lattice 68000 C Cross Compiler By Lattkz _____ $ 605 

Lattice 2-80 Cross Compiler By Lattice .,....$ 605 

Quelo 68000 Cross Assembler/Linker BrOudaOimpiny $ 779 
Series 3,0 Cross Assembler By 2500 AD Software S 285 

DATABASE & FI L E MA N AGEMENT: 

Btrieve By Novdl____ 

Xtrieve By Novell---_—- 

Xtrieve Report Option By Novell_„.. 

XQL By Novell 


c-tree with r-liee By FaiiCom... 

Clipper Summer '87 By Nantucket m 

d-tlH By FaiiCom ______ 

d Analyst By TranSc* System ™™™™ 


--$ 299 

..._ $ 323 

_193 

-. -S 959 

..._ $ 785 

__♦_ -$ 747 

...._ $ 599 

--$ 326 



dB_FILE By Raima Ccirpcralbn —. 
dB_Relrieve By Raima Corporation 

dBC III Plus By Lattice —-- 

dbFAST By dbfAST Inc.- 

DBXL Diamond By WemJTrch Systetr | 

Fox BASE + By Fox Software__ 

1NFORMIX-4GL By Informix . 

INFORMIX-ESQL By Informix 
1NFORMIX-SQL By Informix . 

Magic PC By Aker- 

PARADOX 2.1 By Borland .... 

QUICKSILVER Diamond By 
RAR Clipper/Foxbase+ Module By fla g 
R&R Relational Report Writer sycH 1 
R :B ASE FOR DOS By Microrim 
Reflex; The Analyst By Borland — 

DEBUGGERS: 

Periscope I By PERISCOPE Company 
Periscope III-IOMH* By FER|SCOF^m| 

DESK TQ f FU B USHINC: 

PageMaker By Aldus 
PagePerfect By imhi 
V entura Desktop Publisher By XFJ 
nu;ir rtoc; H irviTPr,XFVnnBn 

Back-It By Gazelle Systems 

Copy II PC By G:nt r.i I P aiSTfjOWWWW 
Copy It PC D^yrte Option Board Bv 

Disk 

Ck Plus Bv Firth t^ru-tution . 

MACE Utilities By Paid Mart Software .. 

Norton Advanced Utilities By FeterNortiw 
PC Tools Deluxe Bv CentralFocnl Software 

Q-DOS II Bi'GfliWlfcSyxtLin* - 

VVlttdavv DOS by Windnw [> i- 
EDITORS : 

■ByBostnn Butinas* Computing.. 

EpsifSffl ext Editor By LugaiuSollwiri’ 

KEDITByMaSii lit SnllWnti 1 

MKS VI By Mortice Ker 
5PF/PC By Command Techm.lo^y^ 

VEDIT PLUS By CompuView ..... I 

FORIRAN.LANCUACE & TOO] % 

ASMUT1L2 8c BUTTLE By Impulse E 

GRAFMATIC & PLOTMATIC By 

Microsoft FORTRAN Compiler b 

No Limit Fortran Library By MEF 

R M/Fortran Development Systerr hhHBHH 

GRAPHICS^ 

ADVANTAGE Graphics By Lifebos 
Essential Graphics By feamtial 

Graphic By Scientific EndaVnre __ 

CSS Graphic DvIpL Toolkit By Gr 

HALO '88 By Media Cybernetic* . . 

Me taW IN DOW/PL US Bv M*tagr* P n 
STATGRAPH1CS By STSC__ 

LOCAL A RE A NE TW OR K ING : 

Advanced NetWare 286 with Key 
Strieve/N By Move!] 

Dbase III Plus LAN Pack By Ashm 
FoxBASE+ Multi User By Fox Softw 
Networker Plus By lAWTech Syiti-n ■ 

Paradox For Network By Borland .. S 
SFT NetWare 286 w/Keycard or DG^ * Novril 

MACINTOSH PRODUCTS: 

Copy II Mac By Cemrai Poim BofEwanF.. 

Eureka: The Solver By Borland 
Fast Back By Fifth Oneraftcm .... 

FoxBASE-i- By Fox Soft w 
Freehand By Aldus 

Guide 2 By Owl International _— 

Microsoft BASIC Compiler By Microsoft , 

Microsoft FORTRAN Compiler By Mkztwoft — - - 


$1497 
S 897 
$ 1197 



SideKick By Borland —..__ 

$ 

___ . $ 

By Digitatk 

$ 

Turbo Pascal By Borland __...._ 



Turbo Pascal Database Toolbox By Borland ______$ 117 

MODULA-2 LA NG UAGE & TOOLS: 

Logitech Mod u I a-2 Comp ilex Sy Logitech ....._—— $ 123 

Logitech Modula-2 Window Pack By Logitech .S 65 

Repertoire/B trieve Toolkit By PMI $ 155 

OBJECT O R IENTED PROGRAM M ING: 

Actor By Whitewater Group -«— .. —-$ 599 



USA X SOFTWARE 

LIMMATQUAI116 • 8001 ZURICH, SWITZERLAND 
PHONE: (01)252-6710 FAX: (01) 2527795 TELEX: 814460 
(Attn: USA SOFTWARE) 


SmaJ | La] k/V By OiglTalk ^.......$ 143 

Smallfalk/V 286 By DigiTdk--- % 285 

Zorteth C++ Compiler By Zortech .— .... % 155 

OPERATI NG SYSTE M S & TOOLS: 

Concurrent DOS 386 3 Users By Digital Rcscairh _.......$ 409 

Double DOS By Soft Logic Solutions _... 75 

Microport DOS Merge 286 By Minopoit Systems __...$ 333 

PC-MOS/386 1 User By Software Link___27S 

QNX Development System for 1 User By Quantum_$ 851 

SCO VP/ix for XENIX 386 By Santa Cruz Operations ..$ 599 

SCO XENIX System V Complete 286 By Santa Cruz Op. $ 1559 

System WAT Complete By Mkropon Systems. $ 86^. 

Theos 266 By Thro*.—..— ~ 

Wend in-DOS By Wendin ... .5 t 


LTLl’S PC I 

n G r3 p h Jiy Boeing Computer Services 
Framework III By Ashton-Tate 
Guide 2 for PC By Owl EsUnmaiUonal _ 

Hayes Smart Mod cm 24I3B Halfcard Inter. 

LapUnk Plus Bv Travelling Software 
LMI FORTH-83 MetacnmpHer By l.^biMviKiry 
Lotus Agenda Bylaw 
Microsijfi OS/2 ProgrammcriitToblldl 
Norton Guides By Fefer NortonOxnpufit 
NljVirus Bv Orson 
PC/FORTH P y lAbcratory Mwtftsyfli 

FolyMake By Fblytroo.. 

FVCS Personal 8\ Polytron 
QEMM Expanded Memory 
RPG 11 Compiler By LdltlCC . 

SideKick Plus Bl Borinrvd 
SMK Seidl Make Utility RyS 
SSP/PC Scientific Subroutine ti 
TimeSIicer By Lifeboat 
Tornado Syfclitro bogie .. 

Vaccinate-Anti-Viral Program BySophoi 
WordPerfect-English By WonU'erfoct Crrp. .. 

Word Perfect-French By WordPvrfeei Orrp 

PASCAL LANGUAGE : 

Microsoft Pascal Compiler By Microsoft 
Professtoual Pascal By mLTAWarf 
T urbo Pascal Professional ByP-uriatui 
Turbo Pascal 5.0 Bv Bwiiwd 

gASGAUJaRARIES AN^B 

Qv e rl ,i v M a nag er Bv Turh. i] ’™ lt Stsfi w. ir. 

Pascal TOOLS By Bkbt Computing 
Pascal Trrols Programmer's Library By Ashton-TateT^I 

T-Debug Flu s By TuiboPciWcr Software.......$ 59 

Turbo Pascal Database Toolbox By Borland _115 

Turbo Pascal Developers Toolbox By Borland . $ 453 

Turbo PO WER TOOLS PLUS By BlaiEO Computing_..... $ 161 

TurboWINDOW/Paseal By Metagraphics .„.._121 

SCREE N DESI G N AND WI N DOWING: 

DESQview By Qua rtendeck.. . ...- $ 135 

Greenleaf Data Windows w/Souire ByOnwntursoOwpiir..$ 305 

Microsoft Windows By Microsoft . ......$ 121 

Microsoft W i ndows Development K it By Microsoft.$ 585 

PANEL Wm By Lifeboat......| 505 

POWER SCREEN By Blaise Computing. . . . .. $ 160 

Vitamin C By Creative Programming .275 

vLIB By Pathfinder Associates ....-...............$ 135 

Windows for Data By Vermont Creative..... $ 359 


BAS_C Commercial By GoToLcss Convmkm.......$ 305 

BAS^C Economy By CoToLeu Conversion . ................. $ 164 

BAS_PAS Commercial By GoToLess Conversion..$ 229 

BA5_PAS Economy By GoToLess Conversion.. $ 124 

d BX d BASE to C Translator By Desktop AI _S 775 

FGR_C By Coball Bine ...... $ 905 

Metaznorphos is By JH Shannon .$ 509 

UNIX/XENiX PRODUCTS: 

Microsoft COBOL Compiler - XENJX/2B6 Bv Microsoft $ 1159 

PANEL PLUS By Lifeboat ......$ 817 

Professional Fascal for Unix 386 By LF1- - -1 837 

SCO FOXBASE+ for XENIX 286 By Santa Cruz Oper.$ 959 

SCO Multi View for XENIX 286 By Santa Cruz Oper, % 479 

Terminal Control for XENIX By Mainstream Systems , mr ,-. $ 1199 
Windows for Data for XENIX 286 By Vermont Creative 5 1117 

Terms; EUROCHEQUE, AMERICAN EXPRESS, VISA, 
MASTERCARD. EUKOCAKD, CO-D 
30 day billing for qualified companies m Switzerland. 
Special discounts, for large or corporate buyers- All prices 
in LtS doUira, 

Add shipping charge from Zurich at prevailing rate* 
Prices subject h) change without notice, 

Hours; BJO AM 530 PM. 

B389 



Circle 464on Reader Service Card 


MARCH 1989 -BYTE 96IS-S 








































































































































































































Finally, there’s an SQL that gets back to 
BASIC. And COBOL. And C. And Pascal. 


As a programmer, you’ve probably already 
faced it—the database dilemma. Do you use an SQL 
for easy database handling, or a true programming 
language for maximum power and flexibility? 

Now you can do both with XQL? the relational 
data management system from the developers of 
Btrieve.® 

The Programmer’s SQL. With XQL, you 
can access your data with the ease of Structured 
Query Language through simple subroutine calls 
from traditional programming languages. XQL sup¬ 
ports standard SQL syntax, including subqueries, 
unions and security groups. 

XQL Relational Primitive Operations. 

In addition, XQL lets you bypass the SQL level and 
perform highly efficient, relational primitive opera¬ 
tions directly. You get all the functionality of a rela¬ 
tional database model without the constraints of a 
4th generation language. 

Building on Btrieve. The heart of Novell’s 
family of data management tools is Btrieve. By 
letting you access multiple records at a time, XQL 
adds a powerful dimension to Btrieve. XQL incorpo¬ 
rates sophisticated data manipulation features which 


allow you to access data by field name, move forward 
or backwards through the database, compute fields 
from other fields or constants, and even work with 
composite records built from multiple, joined 
Btrieve files, 

Like Btrieve, XQL offers features like multi¬ 
user support, fault tolerance, comprehensive 
documentation, and expert technical support. And 
you never pay royalties on your XQL applications. 

Solve the database dilemma with XQL, the SQL 
that speaks your language. See your authorized 
Novell dealer, or call us for more information. 


Novell GmbH 
Schiess-Strasse 55 
4000 Diisseldorf 11 
West Germany 
Tel. (0211) 5973-0 


Novell UK Ltd. 
Avon House 
Sweetwell Road 
Bracknell 
Berkshire 
RG121HH 
United Kingdom 
Tel. 0344 860400 


NOVELL 


%lS-6 BYTE* MARCH 1989 


Require*. Btrieve 4.1 x and PC-DOS or MS-DOS 2.x, 3.x. 


Circle 44$ on Reader Service Card 









What’s New 


INTERNATIONAL 



An 80386SX-based 
Computer 

M itac's MPC2386 is an 
80386SX-based com¬ 
puter that is compatible with 
the Micro Channel architec¬ 
ture and the IBM PS/2 Model 
50Z. 

The MPC2386 is based on 
Intel’s 803863X CPU running 
at 16 MHz with zero wait 
states. It has VGA-compatible 
graphics built into the main 
board and a 1.44-megabyte 
3^-inch floppy diskdrive; a 
5 % -inch floppy disk drive is 
available as an option. Other 
features include 1 megabyte of 
RAM, expandable to 8 mega¬ 
bytes, six expansion slots, and 
room for four storage de¬ 
vices, including 3 ^-inch hard 
disk drives from 40 mega¬ 
bytes to 100 megabytes. The 
included operating system is 
MS-DOS 33. 

The computer also features 
a front-panel power switch, a 
reset button, and a keyboard 
connector. A variety of moni¬ 
tors are available separately. 
Price: $3000 U.S. 

Contact: Mitac International 
Corp., 8th Floor, 585 Ming 
Sheng East Rd., Taipei, 
Taiwan, R.O.C., 886-02* 
5018231. 

Inquiry 949. 


MIDI for the Amiga 

N ow that Microdeal has 
introduced the Advanced 
MIDI Amiga Sampler 
(AMAS), you can add a full- 
featured 8-bit stereo audio 
digitizer, complete with a full 
implementation MIDI inter¬ 
face, to your Commodore 
Amiga, 

The digitizer accepts mono 
or stereo via its line input 
sockets, and an extra micro¬ 
phone input socket lets you in¬ 
put vocal signals directly. 

The MIDI sockets are for 
MIDI in, MIDI out, and 


MIDI thru, and hardware ver¬ 
sions exist for the A1000 and 
A500/A2000 formats. 

The sampler/editor soft¬ 
ware gives you a graphics/ 
mouse user interface; left, 
right, or stereo sampling at 
rates up to 28 kHz; dual-time 
and real-time oscilloscopes (1 
for each channel); a real-time 
spectrum analyzer; an auto¬ 
record trigger on input level; 
up to eight banks on a 2-mega¬ 
byte machine (200K to 250K 
bytes required per bank); up to 
10 stereo samples per bank; 
and filter on/off for computers 
with built-in filters. You can 
load and save samples in raw 
format or International File 
Format, 


All editing facilities work 
in mono or stereo. They in¬ 
clude cut, paste, insert, de¬ 
lete, copy, overlay, reverse, 
fade in and out, volume up 
and down, sample shrink and 
stretch, filter, stereo pan, 
stereo bounce, and channel 
swap. 

The MIDI support in¬ 
cludes selectable MIDI 
channels, polyphonic op¬ 
eration with up to four-voice 
polyphonic, and MIDI-con¬ 
trol led sample frequency shift. 
You can assign each sample 
in a bank to a MIDI note value 
and to a MIDI channel range, 
and play your samples from the 
Amiga keyboard {mono 
only). 


Price: £99.95. 

Contact: Microdeal, P.O. 
Box 68, St. Austell, Cornwall 
PL25 4YB, U.K., 44-0726- 
68020. 

Inquiry 950. 


Big Memory for IBM 
PS/2 Models 70 
and 80 

W ith IDEA max 80, you 
can add an 8-megabyte, 
32-bit memory-expansion 
board with dynamic wait-state 
assignment to your IBM PS/2 
Model 70, 80, or compatible 
running at clock rates up to 
25 MHz. 

Error checking detects 
memory-module failure and 
switches it out without crash¬ 
ing your system, while com¬ 
plete memory diagnostics 
pinpoint bad chip sets. An on¬ 
board ROM detects the 
amount of memory in the sys¬ 
tem and on the board and 
then automatically sets the cor¬ 
rect configuration after you 
install it. You can set the board 
to occupy one of 15 memory 
addresses, on 1-megabyte 
boundaries, which lets you 
install up to three boards in the 
same PS/2, 

IDEA max 80 comes with 
no memory. You can specify 
1-megabyte single in-line 
memory modules for up to 8 
megabytes, or 256K-byte 
SIMMs for a total of 2 mega¬ 
bytes; you can also have both 
types of SIMMs on the same 
board. IDEA max 80 lets you 
use chips with access times of 
120, 100, 85, or 80 ns, and it 
is compatible with the LIM/ 
EMS 4.0 standard. You can 
also use the board as a RAM 
disk. 

Price: £326 for a basic 
IDEA max 80 with no memory. 
Contact: IDE Associates 
Ltd., Tolworth Tower, Sur¬ 
biton, Surrey KT6 7DP, 

U.K., 44-01-390-5945. 
Inquiry 936. 

continued 


if you would like your new product considered for publication in 
the international section of BYTE, send press releases to BYTE, 
Attention: Martha Hicks, One Phoenix Mill Lane , Peterbor¬ 
ough, NH 03458, U.S.A.; or Dick Pountain, BYTE, McGraw- 
Hill Publishing Co . t 34 Dover St., London W1X BRA , U.K.; or 
Shouzou Watanabe, Editor in Chief Nikkei BYTE , 7-7, Kanda- 
Ogawamachi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 707, Japan . All press re¬ 
leases must contain price information, address, and telephone 
number. 


MARCH 1989 -BYTE 96IS-7 
































WHAT'S NEW 


INTERNATt 0 N A L 



Design, Develop, 
and Prototype 
Embedded Systems 

R eal Time Associates 1 
hardware and software 
package, called IN-BED, 
helps you design, develop, and 
prototype embedded control 
systems. The hardware con¬ 
sists of three components: a 
plug-in card, which requires a 
half-size slot in an IBM PC 
or compatible; the Develop¬ 
ment Interface Box (DIB), 
which is an EPROM emulator 
and blower; and the Develop¬ 
ment Object Board (DOB) or 
target, which contains its 
own Intel 8088 microprocessor 
and connects to the external 
devices you want to control. 

The software is a Modula- 
2 compiler with a window- 
driven user interface. It lets 
you move between an IBM PC- 
hosted system and one run¬ 
ning on the DOB. You can per¬ 
form all your software 
development in Modula-2 
without recourse to machine 
code, 

IN-BED offers you three 
modes of operation. During 
development and emulation, 
your program runs from the 
host via the DIB. After you 
judge that your program is 
working, you plug an 
EPROM chip into the DIB's 
zero-insertion-force socket 
and enter EPROM blow mode. 
In stand-alone mode, you 
plug the programmed EPROM 
into the DOB and run the 
prog ra m, Du ri ng development t 
you connect the host to the 
EPROM socket of the DOB via 
the DIB, which ensures that 
your final EPROMmed version 
is emulated exactly. 

Price: £1100 for IN-BED; 

£275 each for extra DOBs. 
Contact: Real Time Asso¬ 
ciates Ltd., Canning House, 59 
Canning Rd,, Croydon, 

Surrey CRO 6QF, U.K., 
44-01-656-7333. 

Inquiry 925- 


Plot Your Designs 
in Pen or Pencil 

T he pen-sorting function 
on Mutoh's F-910E plot¬ 
ter, which is available from 
Instagraphic, reduces the num¬ 
ber of pen-changing opera¬ 
tions by plotting all data that 
requires the same pen at one 
time. The pen and pencil plot¬ 
ter features a high-speed 
dual-processor architecture 
and l megabyte of buffer 
memory, with a vector-sorting 
function that reads 21 line 
segments beyond the current 
pen position to ensure the 
shortest possible pen path and 
smooth pen movement. 

You can plot your designs 
at 1131 millimeters per sec¬ 
ond, a maximum acceleration 
of 5.7 g's, and a pen response 
of 50 operations per second. 

In addition, functions such as 
gradual-curve processing and 
arbitrary setting of plotting 
pressure for various plotting 
tools (up to 600 grams for pen¬ 


cils and up to 300 grams for 
pens) helps to maintain line- 
quality excellence. 

The plotter can accommo¬ 
date up to 40 pencil leads of 
0.3 mm and 0.5 mm in diam¬ 
eter, and a special pencil head 
monitors the remaining lead 
in each holder to give you 
high-quality plotting while 
automatically changing pencil 
leads without operator inter¬ 
vention. The F-910E can han¬ 
dle eight ink, water-base 
ballpoint, ceramic, and dispos¬ 
able ink pens and most stan¬ 
dard paper, including tracing 
paper and double-mat ter 
polyester films in sizes from 
A4 to A0 + 

A 16-character by 4-line 
LCD display clearly gives you 
information such as the cur¬ 
rent plotter mode and the cur¬ 
rently used Stocker and its 
status. A bank of 14 LEDs also 
indicates the condition of the 
plotter and plotting param¬ 
eters. 

The Mutoh Graphics Lan¬ 
guage (M-GL) can emulate the 
F-900, as well as the Hew¬ 
lett-Packard 7585B and 7595A 
plotters. The F-910E comes 
with RS-232C and RS-422A 


serial and general-purpose 
interface bus interfaces. 
Price: £8500. 

Contact: Instagraphic Ltd., 
Victoria House, Victoria Rd., 
Bradford, West Yorkshire 
BD2 2DD, U.K., 44-0274- 
626027. 

Enquiry 952. 


An Accessory for 
Software Protection 

D ynamikey is a program¬ 
mable pocket-size hard¬ 
ware accessory for software 
protection on the IBM PC, XT, 
AT, PS/2s, and compatibles. 

Based on 256K bytes of 
nonvolatile read/write mem¬ 
ory, Dynamikey mounts on 
your computer's Centronics 
parallel port and does not in¬ 
terfere with normal operation 
of the printer, the company 
reports. You program Dynami¬ 
key directly on your IBM 
PC, and you can reprogram it 
at least 10,000 times, accord¬ 
ing to the company. 

Since the unit comes as a 
blank key, you can choose your 
own secret code. The number 
of codes is virtually unlimited, 
so you can assign a unique 
code to each user and to each 
software version, which is a 
.COM or. EXE file. 

You can verify the pres¬ 
ence of the correct Dynamikey 
from any point within the 
software and for any program¬ 
ming language using a sup¬ 
plied linked module. 

The software included 
with Dynamikey runs under 
DOS 2.0 or higher and re¬ 
quires at least 256K bytes of 
memory. 

Price: $30U,S. 

Contact: Mesa Computers, 
P.O. Box 737, Givatayim 
53100, Israel, 972-3-322201. 
Inquiry 934, 

continued 


96IS-8 BYTE* MARCH 1989 
























QuadGTi from Interquadram 




BRILLIANT 
PERFORMANCE 
BY A SUPER 
INTELLIGENCE. 


\GA is the latest business graphics 
standard to emerge from IBM\ 
QuadGTi is fntetQuadram s latest 
display of in telligence — an 
intelligent IGA hoard that will now 
add the crisp resolution, superior 
colour selections and abundant 
pallette range qfXGA to your IBM or 
compatible computer 

It really is a highly intelligent ; 
high-speed graphics adaptor 
How intelligent? \Xell, QuadGTi 
not only supports all 17 VGA modes 
with resolutions up to 800 by 600 f 
but is upgradeable to a staggering 
1024 by 768 resolution with the 
simple addition of256k more 
memory. 


It can sense whether you are 
running an 8 or 16 bit bus sy stem, 
and automatically configures itself 
to run at maximum speed 

It senses both the monitor type 
and the RAM on hoard the card 
automatically, and with the use of 
the software drivers included the 
result ivill be you 'll always get the 
highest resolution possible. 

It supports all new IBM VGA 
graphic modes plus existing EGA, 
CGA MCGA, MDA and Hercules, 
therefore QuadGTi is compatible 
with all of your existing andfuture 
software needs. Of course Register 
level and BIOS level compatibility are 
106% guaranteed 


You can employ QuadGTi with 
your current digital monitor or take 
advantage of new multi scanning or 
analog displays. 

You 'llfind its price performance 
ratio beats everything in sight 
So our super intelligent QuadGTi 
makes a very intelligent buy! 



GRAPHICS ADAPTORS AND MONITORS . MEMOKY/MUinFUNCTION BOARDS 
PRINTERS AND BUFFERS * COMMUNICATIONS AND NETWORKING SOLUTIONS ■ IBM COMPATIBLE PORTABLE COMPUTERS 

InterQuadram Limited, 653/4 Ajax Avenue, Slough, Berkshire SL14BG, England Tel: (0753) 36464. Telex: 847542 1NTQAD G. Fax: (0753) 77256, 

InterQuadram Computers GmbH (Germany), Hermannstr 52, D 6078Neu Isenburg, West Germany. Tel: (6102) 17095. Telex: (04J) 4177 25. Fax: (6102) 17 090, 
InterQuadram SAR.L (France), 136 rue Pem>net 92200 NEUIL1Y France. Tel: (!)47 22 5820. Telex: 615728 F liNTQUAD, Fax: (1) 46401015. 

AJI iTRctemitilci ftilly rea 


Circle 433 on Reader Service Card 


MARCH 1989 - BYTE 96IS-9 






































WHAT’S NEW 


INTERNATIONAL 


Serial-to-Parallel 
Made Easy 

A ccording to Micro Con¬ 
trol Systems* its Auto 
S-TO-P automatic seriat-to- 
parallel converter eliminates 
the need to set data tranfer 
rates and word formats. 

The Auto 5-TO-P is de¬ 
signed to connect the serial 
port of your computer to par¬ 
allel printers or plotters. You 
simply connect the cable to a 
printer and set the Auto 
S-TO-P to automatic, and it 
configures itself. You can also 
set data transfer rates man- 
ually from 110 bps to 9600 
bps. The device offers soft¬ 
ware (XON/XOFF) and hard¬ 
ware (RTS/DTR) handshak¬ 
ing and a 32-character buffer 
to guard against transmission 
overruns. 

Price; £55. 

Contact: Micro Control Sys¬ 
tems, Electron House* Bridge 
St +I Sandiacre* Nottingham 
NG10 5HA, U.K„ 44-0602- 
391204. 

Inquiry 937. 


A Laser PostScript 
Printer 

Y ou can purchase Texas 
Instruments * Omnilaser 
2106 laser printer in the 
ILK. from R.T.S. Tech¬ 
nology. The desktop laser 
printer understands Adobe’s 
PostScript page-layout lan¬ 
guage and prints six pages per 
minute. 

The Omnilaser 2106 
comes with a 150-sheet input 
bin and a manual feed; an 
optional 250-sheet input tray is 
also available. It can print on 
plain or colored paper in sizes 
from B5 to legal, as well as 
on labels, transparencies, and 
envelopes, all of which you 
can place face-up or face¬ 
down. 

A number of emulations 
are supplied, including those 


for the Hewlett-Packard 
LaserJet Plus* Diablo 630, 
Qume, and Epson printers 
and for the HP 7475A plotter. 
There are 35 resident fonts in 
serif and sans serif styles with 
bold and italic attributes. You 
can also plug in external font 
cartridges and download 
PostScript-compatible fonts. 

The Omnilaser 2106 
comes with 2 megabytes of in¬ 
ternal memory and RS-232C 
serial, Centronics parallel* R5- 
422, and AppleTalk inter¬ 
faces. 

Price: £3425, with three- 
month on-site warranty, free 
installation, and key-operator 
training. 

Contact: R.T.S. Tech¬ 
nology* St. Pancras Com¬ 
mercial Centre* Pratt St,* 
London NW1 0BY, ILK.* 
44-01-267-754 L 
Inquiry 922. 


Mitsubishi's First 
80386SX AX 
Machine 

M itsubishi Electric’s 
M3205 laptop AX ma¬ 
chine uses the 16-MHz 
80386SX CPU. It has L6 
megabytes to 7.6 megabytes 
of main memory, expandable 
in 2-megabyte units, a 1.44- 
megabyte 3 x /i -inch floppy disk 
drive* and a 20- or 40-mega¬ 
byte hard disk drive. The oper¬ 
ating system is MS-DOS 3.2 
and Microsoft Windows 2.0. 
Price: 650,000 yen for 
the 20-megabyte hard disk 
drive model; 45,000 for 
MS-DOS 3.2 and Microsoft 
Windows 2.0. 

Contact: Mitsubishi Elec¬ 
tric* Mitsubishi Denki Build¬ 
ing* 2-2-3 Mamnouchi* 
Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 100, 

Japan, 81-03-218-2333. 
Inquiry 947, 


Controllers 
for Nonimpact 
Print Engines 

T he RIP 1000 series of 
raster image processors 
from Eidolon provide high 
throughput and enhanced func¬ 
tionality for medium- and 
high-speed nonimpact print 
engines. You can configure 
them with one to four T414-15 
transputers and 1 megabyte 
to 16 megabytes of DRAM * 
which lets you match control¬ 
ler throughput and features to 
print engines from 12 to 100 
pages per minute. 

Ranging in performance 
from 10 to 40 MIPS* the con¬ 
trollers can achieve sus¬ 
tained-rate engine speeds and, 
depending on the engine, can 
print 240, 300, or 400 dpi. 

The RIP controllers sup¬ 
port standard 96-character 
ASCII character sets, the 
IBM Extended Graphics char¬ 
acter set, and print styles 
such as portrait, landscape* 
italic* emphasized, bold* sub¬ 
script and superscript, com¬ 
pressed, underlined, propor¬ 
tionally spaced, and forms 
overlay. Resident font styles 
are limited only by configured 
memory; you can download 
fonts and add optional font car¬ 
tridges, Seven of the most 
popular emulations are pro¬ 
vided, including those for 
Diablo 630; Qume; Data Prod¬ 
ucts; Hewlett-Packard Laser¬ 
Jet* LaserJet Plus, and 500; 
and Xerox 4045 and 3700. 

The RIP 1100 features one 
T414-15 15-M Hz transputer 
512K bytes of ROM * and I 
megabyte of RAM, expandable 
up to 5 megabytes, and it 
gives you a printing speed of 
12 to 30 ppm. The RIP 1200 
featu res two T414-15 15-M H z 
transputers* I megabyte of 
ROM, and 4 megabytes of 
RAM, expandable up to 16 
megabytes, and it gives you a 
printing speed of 28 to 100 


ppm. Both processors are 
available with a Centronics 
parallel interface* an RS-232C 
serial interface, a SCSI inter¬ 
face, or an optional RS-422 
interface* 

Price: £1500 and up, de¬ 
pending on volume and 
configuration. 

Contact: Eidolon Ltd., South 
Bank Technopark, 90 London 
Rd.* London SE1 6LN* 

U.K., 44-01-922-8822. 

Inquiry 946. 


A Data Tester 
for Field Engineers 

I f you are a data communi¬ 
cations engineer working in 
the field who needs diagnos¬ 
tic equipment that operates 
with a range of systems, the 
Model 5000 Multifunction 
Datatester combines the 
functions of several test de¬ 
vices into one compact, hand¬ 
held unit. 

The Model 5000 combines 
the functions of a full 25-lead 
breakout box; a bit- and 
block-error-rate tester; a termi¬ 
nal exerciser and emulator; a 
data monitor and data trap; 
and a cable tester with menu- 
driven test control, test routine 
storage, pulse-levd measure¬ 
ment, a flow-control test fea¬ 
ture, and primer output. All 
25 leads of the V .24/RS-232C 
serial interface are monitored 
by dual-state LED indicators* 
and there is also a Centronics 
parallel interface test function. 
An LCD readout gives you 
setup and operation commands 
in a logical menu method. 
[Vice: 1800 Swiss francs. 
Contact: Databox s.a., 48, 
Route des Acacias, 1227 
Geneva, Switzerland, 41-22- 
422130. 

Enquiry 953, 

continued 


96IS-10 BYTE* MARCH I9B9 








Monitors from INTERQUADRAM 
The complete range of displays 



mk r.wi Kip'.* RGnS 

k':::^::-:n n ::n Kx-ae-xa c::3 hmh] 

agv SE Si 

P5r2M5 W w| 

s -:: ^mkv5*«s 

^ til »^1 V y. A -. -J 


CXD/GAM Monitor 


InterQuadram, Europes I argent supplier 
of 3rd party monitors , now offer a 
comprehensive range of monitors . 

A7/ mon/fors are designed a/id 
/naiiu/acfLired ro rAe highest 
specification to meet your needs and 
suit your budget. 

AH Quad cam monitors have .in integral 
tilt and swivel base, giving users the 
optimum individual viewing position. 


EGA COLOUR MONITOR 
l4inch monitor, 0.31 mm dor pitch , 
supports EGA 640 x 330 resolutions. 

MULTI-SCAN MONITOR 
14inch TTL digital/analog VGA 
compatible monitor, auto picture sizing 
supports 800 x 600 . 

VGA ANALOG COLOUR MONITOR 
l4inch analog monitor, VGA compatible 
unlimited colour choice. 


VGA ANALOG MONO MONITOR 
Minch analog mono monitor ; VGA 
compatible. Capable of displaying 236 
grey scales. Flat screen for crisp dear 
images + 

CAD/CAM MONITOR 

Large 20inch monitor f supporting 
1280 x 1024 resolutions. Ideal for 
CAD/CAM & DTP applications. 


INTERQUADRAM 



InterQuadram Limited, 653/654 Ajax Avenue, Slough, Berkshire SL1 4BG, England. 

Tel: (44) 753 36464, Telex: 847542 INTQUAD G. Fax: (44) 753 77256 

GRAPHICS ADAPTORS AND MONITORS • MEMORY/MULTIFUNCTION BOARDS 
PRINTERS AND BUFFERS # COMMUNICATIONS AND NETWORKING SOLUTIONS • IBM COMPATIBLE PORTABLE COMPUTERS 

All Trademarks fully recognised. 


Circle 434 on Reader Service Card 


MARCH 1989 -BYTE 96IS-11 




















































GREAT NEWS: 



High Performance 
Network Kit from 


raff el elects 


High Performance Novell 
OEM PC Network for up to 8 
PC's. 


A powerful solution for your com¬ 
mercial and industrial network. 
As a special offer for Cebit 1989 
raffel electronics and Western 
Digital have put together a Kit 
consisting of Western Digital Ad¬ 
vanced Netware Vers. 2.12 ELS 
Level 2 for 8 User ( can be confi¬ 
gured as dedicated or nondedi- 
cated Server ), together with 2 
Western Digital High Performan¬ 
ce Ethernet Cards (JO Mbit/s) 


Special Price if ordered 
before 30. April 1989 

$ 2 . 453 ,- 

Ring us soonest for details of 
your nearest dealer or visit 
us at Cebit on the MITAC- 
Stand. Contact Robert 
Heslop. 

Halle G- Stand F32 -G 45 


raffel 


electronics GmbH 


EST GERMANY 
30 RATiNGEN 1 ■ GOTH AIR STRAGE 15 

. <0 21 02) 4 10 33 FAX (0 21 02) 49 02 23 


WHAT’S NEW 


NTERN ATI ON A L 


Japanese for RT PC 
AIX/6100 

I BM Japan has added a Jap’ 
anese-Ianguage processing 
function to the AIX/6100 
Unix system for the IBM/6100 
(RT PC) workstation and will 
provide the workstation free of 
charge to existing users of 
AIX/6100 2.2* 

You can use Japanese for 
filenames, directory names, 
comments, and high-level - 
language character constants. 
An input device that supports 
Japanese lets you also convert 
katakana-kanji characters 
and lets you display and print 
in Japanese. 

AIX (Advanced Interactive 
Executive) is compatible with 
Unix System V and BSD4.3, 
The Open Systems Foundation 
has approved version 3.0 for 
use as the base for the new 
Unix product. 

Price: 507,200 yen. 

Contact: IBM Japan Ltd., 
3-2-12 Roppongi, Minato- 
ku, Tokyo 106, Japan, 81-03- 
586-1111. 

Inquiry 942. 


Parallel Processing 
at 40 MIPS on Your 
IBM PC 

T he MTM-PC package 
brings four T414 or T8G0 
processing nodes to parallel 
processing on the IBM PC, 
XT, AT, and compatibles. 
Together with a dock speed of 
20 MHz and a memory-ac¬ 
cess time of 100 ns, you get a 
total processing speed of 40 
MIPS or 6 MFLOPS, accord¬ 
ing to Parsytec. 

Two integrated C004 chips 
support the electronic config¬ 
uration of 36 20-Mbps links 
to give you a variety of topol¬ 
ogy possibilities, including 
the cascading of many mod¬ 
ules. You can increase the 
power of the four T4I4 or 
T800 integrated processors 


on the full-size board by add¬ 
ing two transputer piggy¬ 
backs. Two channels let you 
connect remote transputer 
systems up to 30 meters apart. 

You can connect the 
MTM-PC to the compatible 
video, graphics, and parallel 
I/O transputer modules of the 
Megaframe series inside your 
IBM PC. You can also connect 
it externally to VME, Q-Bus, 
NuBus, SMP, and ECB sys¬ 
tems using the appropriate 
interfaces. Software support 
includes the new distributed 
operating system, HELIOS, as 
well as the Megatool develop¬ 
ment system with compilers for 
Occam, C, FORTRAN, Pas¬ 
cal, and Parallel Prolog. 

Price: 12,800 deutsche 
marks. 

Contact: Parsytec GmbH, 
Juelicher Strasse 338, D-5100 
Aachen, West Germany, 
49-241-166000. 

Inquiry 933. 


Automate Your 
Volume Mailings 

f your business handles 
large numbers of personal¬ 
ized correspondence that you 
print on pre-glued computer 
paper and mail without enve¬ 
lopes, you will appreciate 
SOFRAPLTs compact fold¬ 
ing and detaching machine. In 
just one step, the machine de¬ 
taches a document and folds it 
once or twice, then the high- 
pressure sealing unit seals it. 
You can utilize the machine’s 
functions separately or 
together. 

Price: 70,000 French francs. 
Contact: SOFRAPLI, 5-17 
rue Couste, B,P, 14, 94230 
Cac han, France ,33-1 -46-65- 
01-59, 

Inquiry 945. 

continued 


96IS-12 BYTE* MARCH 1989 Circle 446 on Reader Service Card 
























IBM compatible boards 
from INTERQUADRAM 


IBM PS/2 50/60/70/80 

QuadMEG PS/Q: Memory board for IBM 

PS/2 50/60 L Up t o 4Mb of Expanded, 

LIM 4 r Q & OS/2 Extended memory\ 

Quad board PS/Q; Multi-function board 
for IBM PS/2 50/60 L Up to 4Mb of 
Expanded, LIM 4.0 & OS/2 Extended 
memory, including 1 serial & 1 parallel 
port. 

QuadMEG PS/8: Memory board for IBM 
PS/2 70/80. Up to 8Mb of true 32bk 
memory . Supports Expanded, LIM 
4.0 & OS/2 Extended memory, 1 serial & 

1 parallel upgrade option. 

Quadboard PS/8: Multi function board for 
IBM PS/2 70/80. Up to 8Mb of true 32 


bit memory. Supports Expanded, LIM 
4.0 & OS/2 Extended memory includes l 
serial Sc 1 parallel port. 

Quad I/O: I/O ports for IBM PS/2 
50/60/70/80. *Quad I/O parallel*features a 
bi-directional parallel port. *Quad I/O 
serial includes 2 serial ports & 1 parallel 
port * 

IBM PC/AT 286/386 
Quadram AT: Up to 4Mb of Expanded, 
LIM 4.0 8c OS/2 Extended memory. 
Compatible with CPU speeds up to 24 MHz. 
QuadPort AT: 1 serial & I parallel port T 
with option of an additional 4 serial pons. 


IBM PC/XT 8088/8086 
Model 30 Quadboard: Up to 2Mb of EMS 
memory with 1 serial Sc 1 parallel port. 
QuadPort XT: 1 serial & 1 parallel port „ 
option of additional serial port. 

IBM PC/XT/AT 

Quad EGA: Autoswitching Graphics 
adaptor supporting EGA , CGA, MDA 8c 
Hercules. 

Quad GTi; 100 % register level VGA 
card supporting EGA , CGA, MDA 8c 
Hercules. 

All trademarks Fully recognised. 


INTERQUADRAM 


InierQuadram Limited, 653/654 Ajax Avenue, Slough, Berkshire SL1 4BG, England. 
Tel: (44) 753 36464. Telex: 847542 INTQUAD G. Fax: (44) 753 77256 

Germany: ImerQuadram Computer GmbH. Tel: (49) 6102 17095 
France: JnterQuadram S.A.RJL Tel: {33) 1 47225820 


INTERQUADRAM have distributors 
all over Europe 


HOLLAND: Akam Electronics bv. Tel: (0) 79 443200 PORTUGAL: Decada Equipamentos de Electronic a 
ICELAND: Mikro hf Tel: 91 635 610 c Cientificas S.A. Tel: 01 410 3420 

Ortolvutaekni-Tolvuk aup hf Tel: 9 1 687 220 SPAIN: SDL Tel: 91 413 72 46 
IRELAND: Sound Systems pk. Tel: 01 537841 SWEDEN: Dataimport AB. Tel: 08 716 94 55 

Q Fan Led. Tel: 01 521142 SWITZERLAND: Mini Peripherals AG. Tel: 042 36 58 77 


AUSTRIA: Micropoint Warenvertriebs GmbH. 
Telephone: 02236/82575 

BELGIUM: Trust International Tel: 02 660 8922 
Sagitta B V B A. Tel: 015 202322 
CYPRUS: Mechatronk Ltd. Tel: 02 444192 
DENMARK: Tech ware A!S. Tel: 02 94 81 19 
FINLAND: Amie GY, Tel: 90 673200 
GREECE; Atka Computer Systems SA.Tel: 01 7704802 


ISRAEL: Mono-Mode Trading Ltd. Tel: 03 5711 170-1 
ITALY: Tradinform S.rl Tel: 06 451911 
NORW AY: Dataimpon AS. Tel: Q5 314085 


TURKEY: Add-Kom Ltd STI. Tel: 4 1274272 
YUGOSLAVIA; Bqman Establishment (Liechtenstein). 
Teh 23945 



Circle 435 on Reader Service Cord 


MARPH 1QR0 ■ RYTF QrtISLn 






























WHAT'S NEW 


INTERNATIONAL 


Nihon Apollo 
Supports IBM 
Token Ring 

N ihon Apollo Computer 
now supports the IBM 
Token Ring at a data transfer 
speed of 4 Mbps. The com¬ 
pany is currently testing the 
16-Mbps Token Ring an¬ 
nounced by IBM last month 
and intends to support it in 
the future. 

The company also an- 
nounced the Apollo/TECHnet, 
which provides a direct link 
from its workstations to DEC- 
net, and commented that, in 
the near future, it will provide 
support for the IBM 3270/ 
3770 emulator, as well as for 
the following protocols: E- 
mail X.400, SNA LU6.2 inter- 
program communication, and 
packet-hand ling X.25. 
Contact: Nihon Apollo 
Computer k.k. T Akasaka Twin 
Tower Honkan 1 IF, 2-17-22 
Akasaka, Minato-ku, Tokyo 
107, Japan, 81-03-588-1561. 
Inquiry 943. 


A SCSI Controller 
Chip from NEC 

N EC’s/dPD72U SCSI 
controller chip offers 
hardware implementation of 
SCSI bus-sequence-control 
functions and a processing 
time reduction of 10 percent. 
The bus width to the CPU 
can be 8 or 16 bits, and the 
chip functions as both an ini¬ 
tiator and a target. 

The CPU side has eight 
16-bit data buffers, and the 
SCSI bus side has eight 8-bit 
buffers. The maximum SCSI 
bus-transfer rate is 4 mega¬ 
bytes per second synchronous, 
or 5 megabytes per second 
asynchronous. 

Price: About 10,000 yen per 
unit. 


Contact: Nippon Electric 
Co. Ltd., 5-33-1 Shiba, 
Minato-ku, Tokyo 108, 
Japan, 81-03-454-1111. 

Inquiry 938. 


Cheaper Than ICE 

T wo software develop¬ 
ment tods for EPROM- 
based microprocessor sys¬ 
tems, called fastROM and 
comROM, provide the bene¬ 
fits of in-circuit emulation at a 
fraction of the cost, accord¬ 
ing to Computer Solutions. 

An EPROM emulator, 
fastROM lets you test pro¬ 
grams on target boards with¬ 
out the need to blow and erase 
EPROMs. Computer Solu¬ 
tions claims you can download 
32K bytes of code to the em¬ 
ulator in less than 2 seconds. 
The fastROM unit connects 
to the Centronics port via a 
ribbon cable. You can expand 
the memory to 512K bytes by 
adding one 32K-byte by 8-bit 
RAM chip, and you can gang 
up a second unit to emulate 
16-bit-wide EPROMs. The 
supplied software lets you 
download binary, Intel, or 
Motorola format files, and it 
includes dump, edit, and patch 
utilities. 

The second tool, com¬ 
ROM, provides a temporary 
board-independent serial 
port for software development, 
testing, and diagnostics on 
EPROM-based microprocessor 
systems, so you don't need to 
build in a universal asynchro¬ 
nous receiver/transmitter 
chip. The comROM unit pro¬ 
duces a memory-mapped 
communications window in the 
EPROM address space, using 
only a few bytes of memory 
and allowing communica¬ 
tions at up to 38.4 Kbps. You 
can use the rest of the 


EPROM for your application 
and alter the address that 
comROM uses to avoid clashes 
with reset vectors. A zero- 
insertion-force socket on 
comROM accepts 27512 
EPROMs, or you can connect a 
fastROM during development 
work. 

Price: £195 each. 

Contact: Computer Solutions 
Ltd., Canada Rd., Byfleet, 
Surrey KT14 7HQ, U.K., 
44-09323-52744. 

Inquiry 924. 


Micro Channel- 
Compatible 
CD-ROM Interface 

S anyo Electric designed 
the ROM-B550 interface 
board so you can connect its 
RGM-3330S CD-ROM drive to 
IBM Japan's PS/55 Model 
5550-S/T and 5570-S/T 
computers. 

Price: 98,000 yen. 

Contact: Sanyo Electric Co. 
Ltd., 2-18 Keihan Hondori, 
Moriguchi-shi, Osaka 570, 
Japan, 81-06-99M181. 
Inquiry 940. 


Create Music on 
Your Model B 
or Master 128 

H ave you ever dreamed of 
using your computer to 
create music, but hesitated at 
the complexity and expense of 
full-scale music systems? Or 
perhaps you are interested in 
music but didn't know that 
you already own the most im¬ 
portant part of a desktop 
music studio? Either way, the 
Music 5000 Synthesizer Ju¬ 
nior is just what you've been 
waiting for: a complete pack¬ 
age for Model B or Master 128 
computers that gives you the 
power to create and control 
complete performances with 
a range of high-quality instru¬ 
ment sounds. 


The hardware and software 
system consists of a 16-channel 
stereo digital sound genera¬ 
tor, a 32K-byte ROM module, 
and software, which consists 
of a dual 40-/80-track startup 
disk that also contains exam¬ 
ple music pieces. 

The synthesizer unit fea¬ 
tures 16 independent digital 
sound channels; a palette of 
15 waveforms, 15 pitch enve¬ 
lopes, and 15 loudness enve¬ 
lopes; ring modulation, FM, 
synchronization, and phas¬ 
ing; and stereo output with 
seven stereo positions. 

You can play single notes 
and chords over three octaves 
on the computer's keys, and 
you can use this function for 
solo performances with com¬ 
puter accompaniment or as you 
work on a new instrument 
sound. 

The Staff Editor lets you 
enter notes and rests by placing 
them directly on the scrolling 
staff or by playing on the music 
keyboard. You can add clefs, 
time signatures, key signa¬ 
tures, bar lines, chords, ties, 
dots, slurs, triplets, and du¬ 
plets by simply pressing a key 
or by selecting them from a 
pop-up menu. 

You can adjust volume 
faders and balance knobs of in¬ 
dividual parts while the 
music plays, guided by the 
real-time stereo-peak-level 
meters and note monitors, and 
set the tempo using the fader 
and digital beats-per-minute 
readout. 

With the Instrument De¬ 
signer, you can access instru¬ 
mental, percussion, synthe¬ 
sizer, and effects sounds, as 
well as set faders for trans¬ 
position, blend, and effect. 
While you replay the music 
or perform on the keyboard, 
you can instantly hear the ef¬ 
fect of your changes. 

The File Manager uses 
disk icons to load and store 
pieces. The quotes icon lets 

continued 









D-Link 

Local Area Network 


The 

Smart Solution 
To Your 

Multi-User Needs 


Industry Standard 

D-Link hardware and software products are designed to 
meet the industry-standard. This guarantees you against 
obsolescence* and ensures a long-lasting return on your 
investment. 


Our LANfmart Network Operating System is NETBIOS 
compatible and supports DOS 3,1 file/record locking 
standard. Hence, you can run all third party multi-user 
application software available on the market. 

Ease of Use 




Our high performance Ethernet Interface Card can 
network any combination of PC/XT/AT and PS/2 Micro 
Channel™* to share valuable resources across the network. 
Furthermore* it has the ability to support TCP/IP* 
NETBIOS* Novell's NetWare™* IBM PC LAN Program 
and Sun Microsystems’ 
PC-NFS™ software. 


D-Link LAN products are extremely easy to install and 
operate. Using pop-up windows, all options are listed on 
the screen for your ready selection to guide you through 
each operation. 


Affordability 


D-Link is designed for cost conscious users and carries a 
very reasonable price tag. Following the 
industry standard* D-Link is compatible 
with all major LAN products which ensures 
that your LAN will never become obsolete. 


3s- 


wiwwiitiimnn 

muiimisiiiiiiiii 


1/211E, A 

SYSTEMS INC. 


15-4 Fl„ No. l r Fu-Hsing North fid.. Taipei, Taiwan, R.O.C. 

Tel; {021773-2980 Fax: 886-2-781-5826 Telex; 10971 DATEX 


IBM PCrXTVAT. PSfJ, Micro are registered tradamarUa of irtLemediwiaJ BuBinoss Machdne Corporal™. 

Nil Ware is a registered trademark of Novell RiC- 


EShttnei is a registered (radediar* of Xarra Corporation. 

LANsman and D-Link are registered irademarki of Dates Systems Inc /Loealnet Cammunic^rans Inc. 


MARCH 1989 • BYTE 96IS-I5 


Circle 419 on Reader Service Card 



















WHAT’S NEW 


INTERNATIONAL 


you input a new filename, and 
the star icon lets you enter 
disk and operating-system 
commands. 

You can flip between the 
Staff Editor, Mixing Desk, In¬ 
strument Editor, and File 
Manager, even while the music 
is playing, and you can oper¬ 
ate conventional tape recorder 
controls to play, stop, wind, 
rewind, and pause the music, 
or hit loop play to repeat a 
section while you adjust the 
mix, instrument, and notes. 

The Music Arranger lets 
you enter title and pari descrip¬ 
tions in the text area and con¬ 
struct the piece by filling 
successive blank cells with 
music using the Staff Editor, 

The Music 5000 Synthe¬ 
sizer Junior comes with a stan¬ 
dard 5-pin DIN stereo audio 
connector for your hi-fi or 
other amplifier, a 1-MHz bus 


with a pass-on connector for 
compatible equipment, and 
an electrical cord with a power 
switch. The system requires a 
BBC Microcomputer Model B, 
B + , B+ 128K, or Master 
128 with a DFS disk drive and 
an amplifier system with a 5- 
pin DIN audio lead. 

Price: £99. 

Contact: Hybrid Technology 
Lid., Unit 3, Robert Davies 
Court, Nuffield Rd., 
Cambridge CB4 1TP, U.K., 
44-0223-316910. 

Inquiry 951, 


A Transputer Board 
for the IBM PS/2s 

oppy gives you a 20- 
MHz T8QG transputer, 4 
megabytes of 100-ns DRAM, 
two RS-422 20-Mbps serial 


ports, and a Micro Channel 
architecture bus connector, all 
on a card for IBM PS/2 
computers. 

Price: £2750. 

Contact: Quintek, 2 South- 
field Rd*, Wcstbury-on-Trym, 
Bristol BS9 3BH, ILK., 
444)272-628196. 

Inquiry 935, 


An IBM PC 
Silicon Disk 

icro Control Systems 
claims its solid-state disk 
system is faster than bubble 
memory and more robust than 
mechanical disk drives. You 
can use the Silicon Disk as a 
network file server, in haz¬ 
ardous or dirty environments, 
for applications like CAD/ 
CAM, which run very large 


programs with overlays, and 
for portable scientific data- 
logging systems. 

Designed for the IBM PC, 
XT, AT, and compatibles, the 
full-size board lets you trans¬ 
fer data at rates of up to 
300,000 bytes per second, 
compared to 50,000 for bubble 
memories and 27,800 For 
hard disks. You can store data 
on the Silicon Disk in bat¬ 
tery-backed RAM or in non¬ 
volatile EPROM. An on¬ 
board rechargeable battery can 
retain the contents of the 
RAM disk for four months be¬ 
tween charges. An optional 
programmer card lets you pro¬ 
gram boards populated with 
EPROM in your computer, and 
you can remove the EPROM 
disk boards from the machine 
with the data intact, accord¬ 
ing to the company. 

continued 




TEV1RJS 


the OCR system which fits 
nicely into your PC-based 
or SUN-based applications: 

° Text processing 
° Database management 
Q Form processing 
° Publishing 
D Archiving 
° Electronic mail 

* TEXIRJ5 recognizes monospaced and proportional fonts automatically, 

* Document and text format are preserved and stored directly into your wordprocessing file. 

* Data fields can be selected, recognized and stored in your choosen database format. 

* Graphics and text are scanned and processed at the same time. 

* Learning and correction procedures are available. 

Come and meet us at our booth in the CeBIT 89: 

Hali 6 

Stand G16-HI5 
(Pavilion of Belgium) 


imn@E 
n ECDQnmon 
InTEBnOTED 

5 ysTEms 


I (WAGE RECOGNITION INTEGRATED SYSTEMS 5 .A. 
PJace de I'University 4 
EM348 Louvain-fa-Neuve 
BELGIUM 

Tel.: 32/10/45.13.64 
Fax: 32/10/45.34.43 
Telex: 34129 



%IS-16 BYTE* MARCH 1989 


Circle 437 on Reader Service Card 

































ATs on ONE card! 


The QL 2286 board features TWO 80286 AT business/engi¬ 
neering workstations on ONE AT add-in card. Plug one or 
more QL 2286s into your Compaq or IBM AT's bus and 
create an instant network! 


TWICE THE POWER FOR HALF THE PRICE! 

QL 2286 features TWO 80286 processors with full 
EGA/CGA color support and up to TWO MB RAM per 
user, for about the price of ONE standalone AT. 
CAD/CAM, word processors, spreadsheets and 
thousands of Novell multiuser applications operate 
with lightning speed. 


JUST PLUG IT IN! 

Plug the QL 2286 into your fileserver's bus, con¬ 
nect a low profile, noiseless peripheral box to 
the board, attach your monitor, printer and 
mouse, load NetWare 286 or ELS (or Network- 
0S), and your installation is complete! No 
need for hubs, controllers, transceivers or 
complicated wiring schemes. 


ULTIMATE NETWORK SPEED! 


QL 2286 supports TWO independent users 


Each user has: 

■ 80286 AT processor 

■ 80287 math coprocessor (optional) 

■ 1 MB RAM (with expansion to 2 MB) 

■ EG A/C G A/Hercules video card 

■ Keyboard, Monitor, and Mouse or 
printer support 


COM I Port 

COM 2 Port (optional) 

Parallel Port (optional) 

Multisync color monitor 

support 


Network transfer is at AT bus speeds — 
that's as fast as you can go — which 
makes QL2286 ideal for processing disk 
intensive database applications. Data 
travels much faster on the bus than on 
controller based topologies that re¬ 
quire inefficient protocols, serial data 
paths and expensive controllers. 


NETWORKING AT ITS BEST! 

QL 2286 boasts an unsurpassed 
state of the art design that allows 
you to maximize performance and 
minimize cost. 


Put QL 2286 in your LAN plan and be TWO POWERFUL TOO! 

Call 1-800-648-2130 or (702) 883-7611 to ordor. 


Compaq 366 is a trademark of Compaq, Inc. 

IBM AT is a trademark of interna[ional Business Machines Corporation. 
Novell NetWare ts a trademark of Nowell, Inc. 


Made in the U.S. A. 



CUBIX 

CORPORATION 


Corporate Offices • 2800 Lockheed Way, Carson City, Nevada 89706 
Circle 417 on Reader Service Card 


Tel (702) 883-7611 • Fax (702) 882-2407 


MARCH 1989 ‘BYTE 96IS-17 


















WHAT'S NEW 


CC\l/e have just finished our 
first Multi-Lingual Scholar 1 " 
produced job — a service manual 
in Russian for SAAB Marine 
Electronics. The result was 
quite good and the customer 
is satisfied. It seems we cut 
his costs some 30%.}? 

— TEKNISK SPRAKSERVKE 
Vdslra Fntiunda, Sweden 

SOFTWARE HUT 
SPEAKS YOUR 


Multi Lingual Scholar?" a single software 
program for wordprocessing and high 
quality printing with multiple languages 
in the same document. Supports on¬ 
screen foreign characters — with accents 
and vowel points — with no hardware 
modifications. Arabic, Farsi and Hebrew 
edit right to left, and a font editor lets 
you design your own characters and 
customize keyboard layouts. ^ 




^ v< *' 




****** , 


•it 


°^w 

O °vT^v4f''«fi’ w T 


,S !i.^ elSe -515“' 


as 

C0* 






^ c* 

^^1 Of 


[Multi-Ungual 

ScfudtMs-s 

A product of 
Gamma Productions, Inc 

710 WiLshire Boulevard, Suite 609 1 
Santa Monica, CA 90401 USA 
TeJ 2B 394-8622 

Tlx: 510 600 8273 Gamma Pm SNM 

Requires IBM PC/XT/AT or compatible, 640K, 
graphics (Hercules CGA, or EGA), I dhk drive 1 
I parallel port. Works with most dot matrix 
(9- and 24-pin) printers and Hew let I Packard 
Laserjet + /Series II or compatible laser printers 


1 NT E R N AT 1.0 N A L 


Silicon Disk is offered 
with 13 configurations, which 
can be a mixture of RAM 
and EPROM, for a total of up 
to 3 megabytes of storage ca¬ 
pacity. You can install up to 
four boards in one IBM PC 
for a total of 12 megabytes of 
storage. 

Price: £299 to £2999, de¬ 
pending on the configuration. 
Contact: Micro Control Sys¬ 
tems, Electron House, Bridge 
St., Sandiacre, Nottingham 
NG1G5BA, U.K., 44-0602- 
391204. 

Inquiry 921* 


Transform 
Documents 
into ASCII Code 

ognicar is a universal 

document reader linked 
to an 80,000-word dictio¬ 
nary. It lets you transform any 
printed or typewritten text 
into ASCII code that MS-DOS, 
OS/2, or Macintosh com¬ 
puters can accept without 
learning, according to Cogni- 
soft. The system uses Al-based 
topological-ana lysis algo¬ 
rithms to identify any character, 
independent of font or size. 

First, Cognicar reads the 
document and transfers a re¬ 
duced image to the computer 
screen. You then define one or 
more text-reading zones on 
the screen using a cursor or 
mouse, and Cognicar initi¬ 
ates the recognition. The sys¬ 
tem takes care of the dif¬ 
ferent sizes and fonts of 
characters and eliminates un¬ 
wanted marks on the docu¬ 
ments. It automatically gen¬ 
erates an ASCII file or a 
window titled Text, in which 
you can examine, modify, re¬ 
print, store on disk, or trans¬ 
mit by modem. 

The system can capture 
images within documents, 
such as logos, diagrams, or 
chemical formulas, and store 
them in Tag Image File or 
Paint format. 

Cognicar runs on the IBM 


PC, XT, AT, PS/2s, and com¬ 
patibles equipped with a 
serial link, and on the Mae II, 
SE, or Plus. 

Price: 38,000 French francs. 
Contact: Cognisoft, 5 rue 
Denis Papin, 59650 Villeneuve 
d'Ascq, France, 33-20-04- 
94-84. 

Inquiry 948- 


Communicate with 
Your Cambridge Z88 

D ata flex Design’s com¬ 
munications package for 
the Cambridge Computer 
ZB8 laptop consists of a Pocket 
Stradcom modem (see 
What's New International, 
page 88IS-8, September 1988 
BYTE), a power adapter, a 25- 
to-9-pin serial cable, and a 
ROM-based communications 
program. 

The Pocket Stradcom is a 
full-featured V.22 modem 
smaller than a pack of ciga¬ 
rettes (75 by 55 by 25 mm) and 
powered by a single PP3-type 
9-V battery. The modem is 
Hayes-compatible and oper¬ 
ates at data transfer rates of 
300 bps and 1200 bps, full- 
duplex. It has auto-dial and 
auto-answer functions, plus a 
built-in speaker for call 
monitoring. 

The communications soft¬ 
ware, Z-Term 2.3 from Wonl- 
mongers, comes in a ROM 
cartridge so that it appears on 
the Z88's on-screen applica¬ 
tions index. New features in¬ 
clude full support for Packet 
Switch Stream (PS$) in termi¬ 
nal mode and a Prestel down- 
loader in view-data mode. It 
supports the XMODEM file 
transfer protocol, and you can 
store up to five numbers and 
log-on sequences. 

Price: £250. 

Contact: Dataf lex Design 
Ltd., Merton Park House, 2 
Jubilee Way, South Wimble¬ 
don, London SW19 3XD, 
U.K., 44-D1-543-6417. 
Inquiry 923. 

continued 


96IS-I8 BYTE* MARCH 1989 Circle 426 m Reader Service Card 










Microsoft Windows/386 


DESOvlew 


MegaOne. MegaFour. 
Your Compaq Computer 
Memory Solutions. 


You require maximum performance. Now you 
can achieve the performance you expect from your 
COMPAQ'* system. 

That's why Micron developed our MegaOne “ 
and MegaFour™ Memory Modules—to provide 
optimum utilization of the high performance features 
of your 386™ series of COMPAQ personal computers. 

Micron MegaOne and MegaFour boards 
increase the total system memory up to 16 megabytes 
in a single slot. And their 32-bit 
architecture can be used in your 
COMPAQ system running at 16, 20 or 
25 MHz for maximum performance 
with today's most sophisticated 
software. 

The Mega series is fully 
interchangeable with COMPAQ 


Memory Modules, So you have complete flexibility 
when designing your memory solutions. 

Like all Micron memory products, our 
MegaOne and MegaFour Modules are manufactured 
and tested under the industry's most stringent quality 
control standards. Plus they're supported by our 
service and warranty program. 

So choose the Mega Memory solution for your 
COMPAQ system by calling Micron at 01-959-3611. 

Micron. It's a name worth remembering. 


MegaOne and MegaFour are 
trademarks of Micron Technology Inc. 
COMPAQ is a registered trademark of 
Compaq Computer Corporation. 

386 is a trademark of Intel Corp. 



MICRON 

TECHNOLOGY, INC, 


See us at CeBIT 
Hall 7, Booth C42 


European Office; Trafalgar House, Grenville Place, Mil l Hill, London W73SA Phone; 01-959-3611, FAX: 01-959-6168 


UNITED KINGDOM 
Midwich Thame Ltd 
Phone - 0379-644131 


FRANCE 
Rep'Tmnic. SA 
Phone: (1)69288700 


BELGIUM 

MC A-Tronis 5PR L 
Phone: 04 U67 4208 


DENMARK 
Henckel Elektrcmik 
Phone:03-906333 


NORWAY 

BITEIektrunikkAS. 
Phone: {03) 84 7099 


SWEDEN 
GATE1 i ne A B 
Phone:08-7784440 


SWITZERLAND 

Anal ec AG 
Phone: 0 42-412441 


Circle 443 on Reader Service Card 


WEST GERMANY 
DNSGmbH 
Phone: 0 8142U8046 
Stening Electronic GmbH 
Phone: 02462/6098 






















WHAT’S NEW 


INTERNATIONAL 



OpTrans displays patterns and images as a dot-matrix gray¬ 
scale picture. 


Fraunhofer, 

Fresnel, and 
FFT with OpTrans 

Y ou can calculate optical 
Fraunhofer and Fresnel 
diffraction patterns and per- 
form image processing using 
Fast Fourier Transform with 
OpTrans, a program for the 
IBM PC, XT, AT, and com¬ 
patibles. The menu-driven pro¬ 
gram displays diffraction pat¬ 
terns and images as a dot¬ 
matrix gray-scale picture on 
standard CGA screens, and 
you can print them on Epson- 
compatible dot-matrix or laser 
printers. 

Standard input objects in¬ 
clude circles, rectangles, an¬ 
nuli, ellipses, and triangles, 
which you can arrange in lin¬ 
ear and two-dimensional 
arrays (regular and random) or 
combine to create objects 
using the keyboard or a mouse. 
You can also read in objects 
and images from a disk. 

The program lets you filter 
the diffraction patterns using a 
range of low-pass, high-pass, 
and band-pass amplitude, as 
well as Annular, Gaussian, 
radial power, Butter worth, 
phase, and defocus filters. 

You can graphically display the 
power spectrum, the log of 
the power spectrum, the mod¬ 
ulus, the phase, the real part, 
and the imaginary part indi¬ 
vidually or superimposed for 
any part of the transform. 

OpTrans requires DOS 2.1 
or higher, 5I2K bytes of 
RAM, and a CGA, EGA, 

VGA, or Hercules graphics 
adapter and screen. Six ver¬ 
sions of OpTrans are provided 
for different resolutions and 
for computers with or without 
math coprocessors. 

Price: $95 U.S. 

Contact: Technisearch, 

G.P.O. Box 2476V, Mel¬ 
bourne, Victoria 3000, Aus¬ 
tralia, 61-03-660-5100. 
Inquiry 964. 


Symbol-Oriented 

Drawing 

T he University of Leeds 
developed the Flowsheet 
software package for creating 
schematics from which you can 
extract the topology of dia¬ 
grams to input into other pro¬ 
grams, The package consists 
of two programs, Flowsheet 
and Xtract, that run under 
Microsoft Windows on the 
IBM PC and compatibles. 

A multilayer drawing pro¬ 
gram, Flowsheet contains li¬ 


braries of standard symbols 
you can use in electronics, en¬ 
gineering, computing, and 
business. The program also 
lets you design new symbols, 
line styles, and text characters 
and output a hard copy on 
A4- to AO-size paper. 

You use Xtract to analyze 
the topology of a diagram or 
chart, extract it, and then 
output it in a text format, 
which you can use as a report 
or input into other programs 
for further processing. 

The package lets you spec¬ 
ify the data structure model, 
which governs the format, 
and includes sample models 
for report generation. 

You can exchange data 
with other Windows applica¬ 
tions via the Clipboard or 


through the Dynamic Data Ex¬ 
change Protocol. The pack¬ 
age lets you associate text with 
any symbol or line and create 
applications in areas as diverse 
as cartography, circuit-board 
layout, computer flowsheeting, 
critical-path analysis, data 
modeling, text outlining, or 
site-layout planning. 

The Flowsheet package re¬ 
quires Microsoft Windows 
2.03 or higher, an IBM PC, 
XT, AT, or compatible, 64GK 
bytes of memory, a hard disk 
drive, and a mouse. 

Price: £495. 

Contact: The University of 
Leeds Industrial Services Ltd., 
175 Woodhouse Lane, Leeds 
LS2 3AR, U.K., 44-0532- 
333444. 

Inquiry 926. 


HyperKRS Stacks 
Up to HyperCard 

text-retrieval package 
for the Apple Macintosh, 
HyperKRS helps you search 
for any combination of words 
in a HyperCard stack up to 
200 times faster than Hyper¬ 
Card’s own FIND function, 
according to Pergamon Com¬ 
pact Solution, 

HyperKRS has two parts, 
the retrieval program and Hy- 
perlndexer, which automati¬ 
cally indexes the full text of 
HyperCard stacks. You can 
construct queries using logical 
combinations with AND and 
OR and use HyperKRS with 
hard disks or CD-ROMs, The 
speed of the program’s in¬ 
dexed retrieval method is un¬ 
affected by database size, ac¬ 
cording to the company. 

Price: £500. 

Contact: Pergamon Compact 
Solution, Headway House, 66- 
73 Shoe Lane, London EC4P 
4AB, U.K., 44-01-377-4918, 

Inquiry 928. 

continued 



96IS-20 BYTE* MARCH 1989 










Message for frustrated C users: Give it up! 
Use PCL in DOS or OS/2 


PCL will shorten your development times drastical¬ 
ly. PCL is a better language with a richer function 
set and it is m uch easier to use and learn than C, 

PCL does not crash your machine every five minutes 
while you are developing your program. You can 
display the contents of any variable or file, try out 
an PCL statement or call any procedure from the 
PCL command line. 

So you don't have to study HEX dumps or look at 
registers to find out what went wrong. And you don’t 
have to press Reset to bring your machine back to 
life. 


PCL is an interpreter/compiler. It gives you the rapid, in¬ 
teractive program development only an interpreter can of¬ 
fer as well as the execution speed you expect from a com¬ 
piler. Prototype and refine your application speedily and in¬ 
teractively, You can make PCL RAM-resident and use your 
favorite editor to hotkey from editing to testing with two key 
strokes. 

PCL is a well structured language with sensible keywords. 
So you can write programs you’ll still understand six months 
later. There are no reserved words, and no cryptic symbols. 
If you have struggled with C you'll appreciate that. And if 
you already know Pascal or Basic you'll learn PCL in a 
week. 


PCL is used in 26 countries. With our special offer price of £55 for the single user DOS version you can afford 
to let your copy of C gather dust and switch to a useable language. If you are ready for OS/2 choose the new PCL 
OS/2 version. 


Some key features of PCL: 

■ Sophisticated windows, boxes, frames and 
menus. Save and restore window coordinates as 
well as contents. Unlimited number of windows. 
Paint and redraw pop-up windows with ease 

■ Extremely fast screen displays. 

■ Array arithmetic. Built-in sort for text and numeric 
arrays. Arrays can use all available memory {to 
DOS limit). 

■ Extended text functions for searching, translating, 
verifying, parsing etc. 

■ Decimal arithmetic and full scientific function set 
with 16 digit precision, DATE, HEX and BINARY 
arithmetic. Automatic 80x87 support. 

■ Powerful file handling and disk management. 
Switch between sequential and direct access at 
any time Record and file locking for networking 
Fast ASCII and binary file modes, 

■ Dynamic record structures—fields can be added, 
deleted or reordered at run-time. 

■ User defined background task runs whenever the 
main program waits for keyboard input. 

9 Built-in RS232 drivers for fully buffered interrupt 
driven communications at any Baud rale from 
2 - 19200. 

■ Supports the international character set and the 
IBM graphics characters, but not pixel graphics 
which are incompatible with fast text display. 

■ Supports most standard INTEL assembler 
mnemonics for direct access to ports, controllers, 
interrupts etc. 

■ PCL can be made RAM-resident and called up 
from anywhere with two keystrokes Write your 
own resident applications or utilities. 


With PCLs EXECUTE function your program can call the 
interpreter as a subroutine and execute source code 
immediately. This is useful for building intelligent self modifying 
programs like Expert Systems, dynamic data dictionaries, 
spreadsheets, calculators etc. 

PCL needs to interpret a program only on the first pass, it 
generates extremely efficient machine code and reuses it 

In the OS/2 or the DOS developer's version you can save 
precompiled programs and eliminate the interpretation 
overhead altogether. 

The developers versions also include a royalty-free run time 
module and a source encryption utility for distributing your 
software to third parties. 


Dos PCL Single User 

£ 

55 

OS/2 PCL Single User 

£ 

80 

Dos PCL Developers Vers. 

£ 

195 

OS/2 PCL Developers Vers. 

£ 

220 

Upgrade from Single User 

£ 

150 


PCL OS/2 Version 1 is available now. 

It is upwards compatible with the DOS version, has unlimited 
program and data space and gives you an assured upgrade 
path to OS/2. 

PCL comes on 5.25 1 ' or 3.5" diskettes with a 255 page 
comprehensive manual. 

DOS PCL will run on any PC/XT/AT/PS2 and DOS 2.1 or 
above. 

OS/2 PCL runs in protected mode only and needs OS/2 
Version 1.0 or above. 


Prices do not include VAT. Orders dispatched within 24 hours. All orders and enquiries to: 


CALEND 


P.O. BOX 94, TWIi 

Telephone; 01 894 7409 


TWICKENHAM TW2 6DD 
^409 FAX: 01 755 0670 


MARCH 1989 -BYTE 96IS-21 














WHAT'S NEW 


INTERNATIONAL 



An OCR Program 
for the IBM PC 
and Macintosh 

A utoREAD, ISTC’s 

multifont optical charac¬ 
ter recognition (OCR) pro¬ 
gram, is available in three ver¬ 
sions: AutoREAD Microsoft 
Windows, AutoREAD MS’ 
DOS, and AutoREAD Mac¬ 
intosh. It can learn and read 
typed or printed documents 
and character sets, including 
accented letters and Greek 
and Cyrillic, in sizes from 5 
points to 20 points at 100 
characters per second. 

The program can also read 
up to seven fonts on the same 
page; variable pitch, kerning, 
and ligatures; all ASCII, ex¬ 
tended ASCII, and ANSI 
characters; and special charac¬ 


ters, such as $ and at a 
maximum line slant of one- 
quarter inch. 

The software offers vari¬ 
able rejection thresholds, as 
well as automatic and semi¬ 


automatic reading modes. You 
can use up to 99 windows to 
read text in columns, to skip 
drawings and illustrations to 
save time, or to read only vari¬ 
able zones of preprinted doc¬ 


uments, The system records in¬ 
formation it reads in text 
files, which you can then pro¬ 
cess directly for transmission 
or storage. You can also edit 
text files with a word proces¬ 
sor, such as Microsoft Word, 
WordPerfect, Textor, and 
Visio III, or with desktop pub¬ 
lishing software, such as 
Aldus PageMaker and Ventura 
Publisher. 

AutoREAD Microsoft 
Windows requires version 2.34 
or higher, and AutoREAD 
MS-DOS requires version 2.04 
or higher. Both versions run 
on the IBM PC, XT, AT, and 
compatibles with at least 
640K bytes of memory. Most 
popular scanners are sup¬ 
ported, including those from 
Apple, AST, Agfa, Canon, 
Fujitsu, Hewlett-Packard, 

IBM, Microtek, and Ricoh. 

continued 




PC-WAND B 



PWIOO Barcode Keyboard Emulator 
FW200 Barcode Terminal Wedge 
PW300 ON-LINE Barcode Reader 
PW800 Portable Barcode Reader 
PW950 Data Concentrator 
Job Generator 


* Scanner Pen Type, Laser Diode, CCD 
Auto LED Non-Contact, Slot 



unitech 


UNITECH COMPUTER CO. t LTD. 

2tKf F.» 325 Fuhsing N. Rd.. Taipei. Taiwan, ROC 

Tel: (02) 718-8610 Tlx: 13251 UNITEK 
Fax: (02) 718-9498 


9615-22 BYTE- MARCH 1989 


Circle 462 on Reader Senice Card 





























WE HAVE THE COMPLETE DEVELOPMENT 
ENVIRONMENT FOR YOUR REALTIME PROJECTS 


ICC C compiler, ANSI or K & R, the choice is yours. 
Processor specific extensions for maximum performance. 
Memory-based one-pass compiler (FAST!). 

PROMable code with over 20 symbolic formats. 

Many memory models incl. bankswitching (up to 8 MB). 
Built-in LINT type-checking. 

Demo available. 


//Series Assemblers for timecritical applications. 
Powerful macro facilities. Relocatable code. 

Available for most popular processors. 

O’TOOL Real Time Executive. 

Memory management. Interrupt handling. 

Unlimited number of processes on 64 priority levels. 
Time supervision. Monitor functions etc. 


C-SPY High Level Language Debugger. 

C-statement oriented. Window-based user interface. 
Memory-based. Trace. Logfile. 

Full symbolic information. Expression analyzer. 
Unlimited number of advanced breakpoints. 
Simulator or emulator mode. 

Demo available. 


Choose processor: 

Z8, Z80, 8048, 8051, 8085, 6801, 6811, 64180, 
6805, 6809, 6502, TMS9995, TMS7000, 1802, 
7800, 68K, 80C196, etc. 

on 

MS-DOS/OS-2, HP-UX, SunOS, Vax/VMS or Ultrix. 


eiAR 

SYSTEMS 


IAR Systems GmbH 

Josephspitalstr. 15 

8000 MUNCHEN 
West Germany 


IAR Systems Ltd. 


Garden Studios 

11—15 Betterton Street 


LONDON WC2E 9BP, England 


IAR Systems AB 

Box 23051 

750 23 UPPSALA 

Sweden 


Tel: +49 89 55 41 57 
Fax: +49 89 55 38 79 


Tel: +441 379 03 44 
Fax: +44 1 240 60 93 


Tel: +461815 79 20 
Fax: +46 1813 30 21 


Circle 430 on Reader Service Card 


MARCH 1989 'BYTE 96IS-23 













WHAT’S NEW 


Humanize your Computer! 

Lets face it, your computer can be pretty dumb. It 
just sits there, crunching numbers and displaying 
text and graphics. Does it think about what it's 
doing? Does it, heck! 


Suppose it tells you to buy $5000 
of ACME shares, wouldn’t you 
like to know why? If you could 
humanize the machine, maybe 
it could just tell you! 

That’s just why we at LPA 
developed flex: an object 
oriented, frame based Expert Systems toolkit. It 
gives your computer the power to think. 

To find out how to humanize your PC or Mac, why 
not give us a call? 


Logic Programming Associates Ltd 
Studio 4, RVPB, Trinity Road, London, 
SW18 3SX, England 
Phone: +44 1 871 2016 

Fax: +44 1 874 0449 




A Message To 
Our Subscribers 

F rom time to time we make the byte 

subscriber list available to other companies who 
wish to send our subscribers material about their pro¬ 
ducts. We take great care to screen these companies, 
choosing only those who are reputable, and whose pro¬ 
ducts, services, or information we fed would be of in¬ 
terest to you. Direct mail is an efficient medium for pre- 
senting the latest personal computer goods and services 
to our subscribers. 

Many BYTE subscribers appreciate this controlled use 
of our mailing list, and look forward to finding infor¬ 
mation of interest to them in the mail. Used are our 
subscribers’ names and addresses only (no other 
information we may have is ever given). 

While we believe the distribution of this information is 
of benefit to our subscribers, we firmly respect the wishes 
of any subscriber who does not want to receive such pro¬ 
motional literature. Should you wish to restrict the use 
of your name, simply send your request to the follow¬ 
ing address. 

BVTE Magazine 

Attn: Subscriber Service 
P.O. Box 555 

Hightstown, NJ 08520 itfE 


INTERNATIONAL 


Price: 5950 French francs 
and up. 

Contact: ISTC, 3, rue Sainte 
Felicite, F-75015 Paris, 
France, 33-1-45-32-80-01. 

Inquiry 955. 


Create Your Own 
Data Management 
Systems 

C ity Business Systems of¬ 
fers the O’Hanlon Data¬ 
base Solution (ODBS), a 
database programming lan¬ 
guage and multiuser applica¬ 
tion development system that 
lets you create data manage¬ 
ment systems under PC-DOS, 
Concurrent DOS, Unix, 

Xenix, or VAX/VMS and for 
networks such as Novell, 
Ethernet, or HiNeu 
ODBS is data-dictionary 
driven, which lets you restruc¬ 
ture a database without losing 
existing data, according to the 
company. The system lets 
you create applications that can 
manipulate up to 16 open 
files simultaneously, and it 
comes with screen-painting 
and report-generating tools, A 
source code editor lets you 
enter programs by making 
choices from a menu tree, 
which helps to eliminate syn¬ 
tax errors. 

You can use the file main¬ 
tenance program generator to 
automatical ly generate stand¬ 
alone data entry, and you can 
update programs from a set 
of input screens. The system 
lets you design pop-up menus 
using fields that you define in 
an ODBS application; the 
tracer/debugger lets you 
single-step programs, a Her 
field contents, and set 
breakpoints. 

The ODBS language is 
compiled and provides pro¬ 
grammers' interfaces to as¬ 
sembly language, Pascal, C, 
COBOL, and BASIC via the 
alien-call mechanism. Your 
compiled application code is 
portable between versions of 
ODBS without alteration. 


The authors claim your code 
will run faster than under C, 
Pascal, or compiled BASIC be¬ 
cause ODBS employs a B+ 
Tree record-retrieval mecha¬ 
nism, and the run-time sys¬ 
tem is written entirely in as¬ 
sembly language. The ODBS 
can handle up to 16 million 
records per file, with up to 
1000 fields of up to 255 bytes 
per record. Each file can 
have up to nine key fields for 
indexing, and keys can be up 
to 72 characters long. 

The PC-DOS version of 
ODBS requires DOS 3,1 or 
higher, at least 128K bytes of 
RAM, and a 20-megabyte hard 
disk drive. 

Price: £349 for a single-user 
system; £549 for a multiuser 
PC-DOS or Concurrent DOS 
system. 

Contact: City Business Sys¬ 
tems U.K. Ltd., Orchard 
House, Moreton Ave., Wal¬ 
lingford, Oxfordshire 0X10 
9RH, U.K., 44-0491-25089. 
Inquiry 931, 


Preventive Disk 
Maintenance 

P C-CheckDisk is a menu- 
driven preventive mainte¬ 
nance system for Floppy and 
hard disks. It monitors trends 
in your disk performance by 
testing the disk parameters and 
then writing a log file of the 
results for comparison with fu¬ 
ture tests. PC-CheckDisk can 
also monitor file fragmentation 
and disk rotation speed and 
access time, and it can make 
recommendations for correc¬ 
tive action. 

Price: £49. 

Contact: Pecan Software 
Europe, Victoria House, 10 
Kellaway Ave,, Henleaze, 
Bristol BS6 7XR, U.K,, 
44-0272-425012. 

Inquiry 932, 

continued 


96IS-24 BYTE- MARCH 1989 




































3270 BSC 


3270 SWA 


oax Gateway 


VMS 

UNIX 

XENIX 

PCDOS 

Macintosh 

NetBios LAN 


Sharing Information 

Whatever your industry, your computers 
need to share information with your 
mainframe. Or, they need to exchange 
data with other computers. In either 
case, you need a total communications 
solution. You need software, hardware 
interfaces and modems that all work 
together smoothly. You need CLEO! 

CLEO software products allow your 
computer to communicate with mini¬ 
computers and mainframes, and to 
emulate their workstations. Since 1981, 
CLEO has provided communications 
between micros, minis, and mainframes 
for the automotive, insurance, medical 
and banking industries. Today over 
78,000 CLEO users worldwide are 
running on all major computer brands. 
The greatest number of these users run 
CLEO software on IBM Personal 
Computers and NETBIOS LANs. 

See us at CEBIT, Hall #\1 > 
Stand C56-D5 5, Booth G9 


Complete 

Software/Hardware Package 

Every CLEO package contains all the 
software and hardware accessories 
you’ll need. Your selected CLEO SNA, 
BSC, or Coax software is packaged with 
1) an internal modem card for dial-up 
applications, or 2) an interface card and 
cable for use with your existing modem, 
or 3) a Coax card for local connectivity. 
There’s no waiting for non-CLEO 
add-ons. And, you get prompt, single- 



for most stand-alone packages, up to 
$1,995 00 for the 32-user SNA gateway 


Call us today to discuss 
your application. 

CLEO Software 
1639 North Alpine Rd. 
Rockford, IL 61107 
Telex 703639 
FAX 815/397-6535 

Headquarters: 

USA: 1-800/233-2536 

Illinois: 1-800/422-2536 
International: 815/397-8110 

Sales and Distribution; 

Benelux: 31 (O) 33-948888 
Canada, East: 800/361-3185 
Canada. West: 800/361-1210 
Canada, Montreal: 514/737-3651 
Colombia. S.A.: 12172266 
Denmark: 02 94 SI 19 
England: (0993) 776543 
France: 14686106 
Italy: (0331)634 562 
Mexico City: 596-5539 
Sweden: 46830780 


CLEO 



CLEO and 3780Plu$ arc registered trademarks of CLEO Software. IBM is a registered trademark of International Business Machines Corporation. 
















WHAT’S NEW 


NTERNATIONAL 


Professional 
Financial Software 

C XPERTeam developed 
Ea its Finexpert financial 
software with the Texas In¬ 
struments Personal Consultant 
Plus expert-system develop¬ 
ment tool. Finexpert is de¬ 
signed to help accountants, 
bankers, and financial man¬ 
agers produce financial re¬ 
ports by combining a spread¬ 
sheet with a knowledge- 
based financial planner. 

The program provides you 
with the documents you need 
to establish a complete fi¬ 
nancial analysis report and 
perform simulations and pre¬ 
dict forecasts. To achieve this, 
Finexpert consists of two 
sections. The first part works 
with Multiplan 3, Lotus 


L2-3, or Symphony to pro¬ 
vide all the financial state¬ 
ments and charts in addition 
to a forecasting function. The 
second part produces com¬ 
ments analyzing the situation 
and evolution of the com¬ 
pany, A paragraph of recom¬ 
mendations concludes the 
above comments, focusing on 
the strengths and weaknesses 
of the company, in addition to 
suggesting an action plan. 

You can edit the state¬ 
ments, set up the number of 
years you would like to eval¬ 
uate, guide the input of data, 
test the equilibrium and co¬ 
herence of the statements you 
input, insert new figures, 
and call files from external 
databases. Finexpert will 
automatically produce the bal¬ 
ance sheets, the profit and 
loss statements, the analysis of 
the balance sheets, the cash 


flow statements, the analysis 
of the production cycle, the 
working capital requirements 
analysis, and the main finan¬ 
cial ratios. 

The expert-system section 
of Finexpert helps you produce 
a complete report analyzing 
the evolution of the activity 
within the main significant 
financial concepts, the profit¬ 
ability of the company based 
on financial and economic in¬ 
dicators, the financial equi¬ 
librium according to the activ¬ 
ity growth rate, the risk faced 
by the company, a summary of 
the most critical points ana¬ 
lyzed previously, and action 
plans. Charts and text show 
the evolution of turnover, pro¬ 
duction, costs, added values, 
cash flow, financial costs, net 
profits, financial equilibri¬ 
um, and treasury. 

Finexpert runs under MS- 


DOS on the IBM XT, AT, and 
compatibles with 1 megabyte 
of RAM, a 10-megabyte hard 
disk drive, and a graphics 
screen. You can print your re¬ 
sults on 80-column printers. 
Price: $950 ITS. 

Contact: EXPERTeam, 83 
Blvd. Raspail, 75006 Paris, 
France, 33-1-45-49-33-84. 
Inquiry 962. 


An Accounting 
System That Grows 
with Your Business 

A s your business's day- 
to-day accounting needs 
grow, so does the SkyMaster 
4 integrated accounting sys¬ 
tem, according to Sky Soft¬ 
ware. The modular system 
maintains details of and sum- 
continued 


Finally, a magazine for Word Crunchers. 


The use of high technology to 
work with words has come a 
long way since 1971, when the 
Wang 1200. the first dedicated 
word process or, made its debut 
as the new-fangled alternative 
to the typewriter. 

Until new. keeping track 
of the explosion of new word¬ 
working products hasn't been 
easy. Most computer 
publications are preoccupied 
with trying to cover every 
single arcane piece of 
hardware and software extant, 
And they're clotted with ads 
word workers have absolutely 
no interest in. 

That's why we created 
Language Technology 


We have a single 
mission: inform profession¬ 
als who work with words 
about the technologies they 
need to do their jobs. 

We are a transnational 
publication with editors and 
correspondents in Paris, New 
York, London, Berlin and Tokyo 
— because in today's global 
village, good technology is as 
likely to come from Silicon 
Glen or Silicon Bavaria as from 
Silicon Valley. 

We break stories months 
before other magazines, LT 
readers were the first to learn 
about WordPerfect 5.0, IRON, 
online sex in France, the 
reasons behind the delay in 


CD-I, hypertext for PCs; IBM's 
grammar checker and Rank 
Xerox's machine translator 
We are not your normal, 
boring computer magazine. We 


have award-winning graphics 
and a lively, irreverent style. 

We Ye nut the only ones 
who believe LT is important. 
We are already must-reads at 


IBM, Aerospatiale. Siemens, 
Hitachi — even the CIA and 
the British Foreign Office, 

And the EC has just 
selected LT to conduct its 
official survey into the global 
language industries. 

Availabfe by subscription 
only, And, of course, money 
back if you're not satisfied 

Think of os as an upgrade 
for your wordprocessor. 


isr 


LHnGUHGI TECHnOLnCY 


r"ves, I need to know about word crunching! I 


Individual One Year 
I'M Years 

Corporate One Yea* 
Institution a! Two Years 
ij Amen J Master Card 


Surface? U US$ 40 
Surface □ USS 70 
Surface Q USS 70 
Surface □ US$ 130 


Airlift -JOSS 50 
Airlift a OSS 90 
Airlift IJ USS 80 
An lift JUS5 150 


J EwocarcJ J Diners Club U Visa 


Accoufll ULoribHi 

Eipim 

Signaan 



to Ey/Postnode/C r*i rfl ry 

j^PIsase mail ter Language Technology, P 0 &0* ?ME®, 100? KL Amjbenlain. The NnHhpflBwft _J 


96IS-26 BYTE- MARCH 1989 


Circle 439 on Reader Service Card 























AND NOW, SOMETHING 
EXTRA FROM ELONEX. 


Model 

CPU 

Speed 

Main 

Board 

Memory 

Hard 

Disk 

Drive 

Floppy 

Disk 

Drive 

Serial/ 

Parallel 

Ports 

Free 

Slots 

Mono 

System 

EGA 

Colour 

System 

VGA 

Colour 

System 

PC-88C 

Compact 

V20 

lOMhz 

640K 

20MB 

(65mS) 

360K/ 

720K 

1/1 

2 

£695 

£945 

£995 

PC-88S 

V20 

10MHz 

640 K 

20MB 

(65mS) 

360K/ 

720K 

1/1 

4 

£745 

£995 

£1045 

PC-286C 

Compact 

80286 

10 MHz 

640K 

20MB 

(65mS) 

1.2MB/ 

1.44MB 

2/1 

4 

£995 

£1245 

£1295 

PC-286S 

80286 
12 MHz 

640 K 

40MB 

(40mS) 

1.2MB/ 

1.44MB 

2/1 

5 

£1145 

£1395 

£1445 

PC-38BS 

80386 

20MHz 

1MB 

(max 8MB} 

44MB 

(28mS) 

1.2MB/ 

1.44MB 

2/1 

5 

£1995 

£2245 

£2295 

Authorised supplier of NOVELL and SCO XENIX. 


NO EXTRAS. 


When you buy a system from Elonex you won’t get 
any nasty surprises. All the prices quoted above are for 
complete systems, with a keyboard, monitor, mouse, 
MS-DOS 3.3, GW BASIC, GEM/3 (1st Word Plus,Paint), 
and a full set of manuals. All backed by a 12 month 
Warranty, and our Technical Hotline Support. 

We are regular suppliers to universities, colleges, 
and local and government authorities. We also have a 

Elonex (UK) Ltd. Rays House, North Circular Road. London NW1Q 7XB. 

Tfiiox 94017759 ELNX G, Fax 01-965 3246 

Tel 01-965 3225 

Elonox (UK) Ltd, 7-9 Campus Road, Bradford Science Park, Bradford, 

Wast Yorkshire BD71HR. Fax (0274f 307294, 

Tel (0274)307226 

ALL PRICES ARE EXCLUSIVE OF CARRIAGE AND VAT 


team of specialists ready to advise on Networked and 
Multi-user systems. 

If you would like to know more, please drop 
in to one of our showrooms. Alternatively give us a ring, 
or fill in the coupon below and we’ll send you our latest 
information pack. 

r Circle 423 on Reader Service Card 

| Please send me your latest information pack. C17 
Name Position 















































WHAT’S NEW 


INTERNATIONAL 


marizes the transactions be¬ 
tween your business and your 
customers. You can switch on 
options only when you need 
them and purchase the mod¬ 
ules separately. The system 
uses double-entry bookkeeping 
methods to help you maintain 
all accounts, and it also fea¬ 
tures password protection. 

The Sales Ledger module 
can handle 99 companies or 
departments. You input in¬ 
formation such as account 
number, account name, con¬ 
tact, customer address, tele¬ 
phone number, price band, 
and base currency. Functions 
include balance forward and 
automatic allocation, foreign 
debt revaluation, full audit 
trails, and invoice and credit 
notes. 

The module also lets you 
include account details from 
other software and create 


current transaction listings, 
statements, account detail 
lists, nominal ledger posting 
lists, aged debtor reports, 
turnover reports, and VAT re¬ 
turn reports, as well as mail¬ 
ing labels. 

With the Purchase Ledger 
module, you can produce a 
number of reports including 
current transaction listings, re¬ 
mittance advices and checks, 
available discounts, and aged 
creditor reports. 

You can keep track of busi¬ 
ness transactions such as sales, 
operating costs, assets, liabil¬ 
ities, and equity with the 
Nominal Ledger module. 

The module lets you have 12 or 
13 accounting periods, user- 
specified account groupings, 
group account analysis, and 
automatic prepayments and 
accruals. 

You can produce profit and 


loss reports, trial balances, 
balance sheets, and budget 
comparison reports, and links 
are provided to other Sky- 
Master 4 modules, including 
payroll, stock, sales and 
purchase order processing, 
and sales and purchase 
ledgers. 

The Stock Control module 
helps you maintain a record of 
each stock item and record 
each stock movement by sales 
made, deliveries received, or 
adjustments due. You can view 
the current position of each 
stock item, and the stock his¬ 
tory section gives you details 
of your transactions over the 
year. 

Sky Software structured 
the data files of the Payroll 
module so you can enhance 
and tailor it as your require¬ 
ments change. You can keep 
track of employer and em¬ 


ployee details, terms of em¬ 
ployment, and payment infor¬ 
mation, such as year-to-date 
figures with deductions and 
charges. The module lets you 
print payroll checks, as well as 
analyze the total payroll. 

You use the Sales Order 
Processing module to control 
all orders from initial entry 
to the final posting of a com¬ 
pleted invoice to the Sales 
Ledger module. 

SkyMaster 4 runs under 
DOS, Unix, and Xenix on a 
variety of popular computers. 
Price: £450 each for single- 
user modules; £700 each for 
multiuser modules with up to 
four users. 

Contact: Sky Software Ltd., 

13 New Rd., Bromsgrove, 
Worcestershire B60 2JG, 

U.K., 44-0527-36299. 

Inquiry 956. 

continued 



HASP-n 


Give your software maximum protection 
but eliminate customers' complaints 


Your customer can create backup copies 
of his programs but these copies cannot 
be used on a "HASPless" computer. 


Implementation is easy. You won't need 
the source program in order to protect 
your software, and yet if you have the 
source, we offer you the option to check 
for the HASP-II from within the program 
at any time. 

We have sold tens of thousands of plugs 
to dozens of satisfied customers worldwide 


For further information contact us at 

ALADDIN 

KNOWLEDGE 
SYSTEMS LTD_ 

P.O.B. 11141 Tcl-Aviv 61110, Israel 
Tlx.35770/1 COIN IL Ext. JBL 
Tel. 972-3-226286, Fax. 972-3-243540 


Hardware for Software 

HASP-II is a hardware device that 
connects externally into the printer port 
of the IBM PC/XT/AT and PS/2 families. 


Protection 


Special electronic circuits form a unique 
code allowing only your customers to 
operate the protected software. 


96IS-28 BYTE* MARCH 1989 


Circle 406 on Reader Service Card 














SELECT 


PAUSE 


CLEAR 


MULTIBUFFER 

MULTI PORT DATA BUFFER 


New: Inter-PC Fite Transfer 

J)ON'T~guY A tJTrwOZK UNTIL YOU HAv£ fZEAP THlT 

Users can now transfer multiple files of unlimited size between IBM 
& compatible PCs, irrespective of disk or PC types, with a user- 
friendly interactive program. The Multi buffer offers these network-like 
features at fraction of the cost of any network. Serial ports are 
required. 

User-configurable for future requirements 

The MULTIBUFFER can be factory- or user-configured with 1-7 
plug-in interface cards for up to 7 parallel ports or 14 serial ports, or 
a combination of parallel and serial. Each serial card provides two 
data ports. Data direction (input/output) of each port is selectable 
and all common baud rates and handshakes are supported. 

All users can send 

data simultaneously Jfl I I 

Each port is separately buffered. ’ BEPj 

allowing simultaneous data flow on I . 

all input and output ports. lnstafled^^^B®| 

_ ports can be used for any f I 

■ combination of PCs. printers / ^^ ^ m 

Hand plotters, / 


THE 

ULTIMATE 

PRINTER 

PLOTTER 

SHARER 


n Up to FOUR MEGABYTES 
w buffer memory \ I 

Bl her memorv is auton i atical 1 y allocated a 1 i d \ ‘ i 

deallocated to each user in real time from a V* 

common 'pool' of up to 4MB. 

Simple but powerful PC-based set-up 

All user-configurable features of the MULTIBUFFER 
are accessed via a user-friendly program running on a PC. 

No fiddly switches are used. Also, when the MULTIBUFFER is driven 
from several PCs, each user can activate a RAM-resident pop-down 
menu for printer selection and other useful functions. Setups are 
stored in non-volatile memory 

Highest-ever data throughput 

State-of the art high speed 16-bil CMOS technology allows up to 13 
input ports to receive data simultaneously at a full 9600 baud without 
si owing-down the PCs - much faster than other printer sharers. Data 
rates up to 38400 baud (serial) and 30000 bytes/sec (parallel) are 
possible - ideal for lasers and DTPS such as Ventura or Pacemaker. 

The perfect choice for CAD 


• Up Io 14 user-installable serial and/or 
parallel ports. 

• ALL INPUT/OUTPUT PORTS CAN BE 
ACTIVE SIMULTANEOUSLY. 

• Up to 4 MEGABYTES of common 
memory, automatically allocated and 
deallocated as required on each active port 

• SEVERAL PCs CAN SHARE ONE OR 
MORE PRINTERS OR PLOTTERS. 

• ANY PC CAN ACCESS ANY PRINTER OR 
PLOTTER. 




MEGASWITCH AS - Serial Data Selector 

• Single unrl multiplexer and 

demultiplexer with 2K buffer % Demultiplexer-ideal lor driving several 

• RS-232 and FtS-422 versions different printers from a PC. 2 incuts 

• Multiplexer - ideal for printer sharing and 4 Guipots 

4 inputs. 2 outputs. Can automatically # Software and manual selection PS232 
select any channel supplying data version - £169 


The MULTIBUFFER can allow THIRTEEN PCs 
to share a plotter - or 10 PCs to share 4 
plotters, and so on. You can now optimise 
the utilisation of a single high-performance 
plotter with AutoCAD. Robocad, Cadstarand 
most other popular CAD programs. 

MULTIBUFFER PRICES 


VzMb| IMS 


2MB 

4MB | 


Serial | 
Card | 


Parallel 

Caid 

£545i £695 

C995 

£1695 

£80 

£40 | 


RINGDALE 




MEGASWITCH AP - Parallel Data 

• Connects any of 4 inputs to one of 
2 outputs 

• Can automaticdtty switch to any 
channel supplying data 

• Ideal for laser printer sharing 


Selector 

• Universally compatible - works with all 
standard Centro rue computer and 
printer interfaces 

• Use ii with a Megabufter lor additional 
lime saving - £169 


PERIPHERALS 

Southdownview Way, 
Worthing, West Sussex BN14 8NRUK 
SALES, Tel: 0903 213131 
Tech/General, Tel: 0903 213752 
Fax: Tel: 0903 204296 


UK Delivery £6 per unit Cables from £15 All prices excluding VAT. Dealer and Export enquiries welcome. 


Telex: 94017822 Ring G 

































WHAT’S NEW 


Protect Your Copies of BVTE 


NOW AVAILABLE: Custom-designed library files or 
binders in elegant blue simulated leather stamped in 
gold leaf. 


Binders—Holds 
6 issues, opens 
flat for easy 
reading. 

$9.95 each, two 
for $18.95, or 
four for $35.95. 




Order Now! 


Mail to: Jesse Jones Industries, 

Dept. BY, 499 East Eric Ave., 
Philadelphia, PA 1934 

Please send_files;_ 

binders for BYTE magazine. 

Enclosed is S_ 

Add SI per file/binder for postage and 
handling. Outside U.S.A. add S2.50 per 
file/binder (US. funds only please). 
Charge my: (minimum SIS) 

A merican Express 

_Visa M asterCard 

_Diners Club 

Card f_ 

Exp. Date __ 

Signature_ 


CALL TOLL FREE (24 hours): 
1-800-972-5858 


Name: 


Address: 

City: _ 


State:_ Zip:_ 

Sanixtun guaransed. fatmrhjiuj mdeno add 6% win u* 

Alb* 5-6 ww driiwrv m d* US. 


BVTE S 


SOFTWARE 

SECURITY 



MODULE 

An easy to use 
hardware/software 
combination for securing 
data/programs. 


Our security modules 
can be used simply as 
'Dongles' through to 
advanced encryption - 
decryption systems. 


★ For IBM PC family (and compatibles) 

★ variants for other systems 

★ Advanced construction - rugged and compact 

★ Proven throughout the world 

★ Transparent operation - user friendly 

★ Driver software supplied for variety of applications 


CTL 


Control Telemetry of London 

11 Canfield Place. London NW6 3BT 

Tel: 01- 3281155 Telex 265871 ATTN: CJJ181 


INTERNATIONAL 


Image Processing 
for the IBM PC 

RIMA (for proper 
image analysis) is a pro¬ 
grammable image-processing 
system for the IBM PC and 
compatibles. It lets you input 
pictures from floppy disks, 
video recorders, ultrasonic 
scanners, or thermovision 
cameras; transfer pictures 
among picture fields; enlarge 
and reduce picture sizes; re- 
color pictures using lookup 
tables; and produce, run, and 
store picture-processing 
programs. 

Processing functions in¬ 
clude arithmetic and logical 
operations between pictures, 
statistical computations, histo¬ 
grams, and mean and stan¬ 
dard deviation. Various filters 
let you eliminate noise, 
equalize background, and 
sharpen edges. 

A built-in macro language 
lets you include sequences of 
complex processing tasks in a 
procedure file. Besides run¬ 
ning such internal programs 
in batch mode, you can com¬ 
municate with PRIMA inter¬ 
actively by typing or editing 
and entering or recalling 
PRIMA commands. 

You can display multiple 
colors using a single plane op¬ 
tion and create real color pic¬ 
tures using three picture 
planes. PRIMA can automat¬ 
ically fit the sizes of pictures 
and handle computation over¬ 
flows. You can add on further 
programs to process your 
pictures and adapt the program 
to solve any task. 

PRIMA runs under MS- 
DOS 2.0 or higher on the IBM 
PC, XT, AT, and compat¬ 
ibles with a minimum of 640K 
bytes of RAM, a math copro¬ 
cessor, a CGA monitor, one 
floppy disk drive, and a 20- 
megabyte hard disk drive. The 
program also requires a PC- 
VISION, PC VISION PLUS, 
DT2851, DT2853, or com¬ 
patible frame grabber; a sec¬ 


ond color monitor attached to 
the frame grabber; and a dot¬ 
matrix, ink-jet, or laser 
printer. 

Price: 3000 deutsche marks. 
Contact: SzKI, Computer 
Research and Innovation Cen¬ 
ter, Donati u, 35-45, P.O. 
Box 19, Budapest, Hungary, 
361-350-180. 

Inquiry 954. 


New Greenleaf 
Libraries for C 

T wo new C function li¬ 
braries, called Greenleaf 
Functions and Greenleaf 
Superfunctions, are now avail¬ 
able in the U.K. from Sys- 
temStar Ltd. 

Greenleaf Functions con¬ 
tains 296 C functions, includ¬ 
ing DOS and BIOS inter¬ 
faces, string functions, and 
support for RS-232C serial 
and Centronics parallel devices 
and printers. Time and date, 
video effects, and color text 
and graphics printing func¬ 
tions are also supplied, many 
of which are written in as¬ 
sembly language. 

In addition to the complete 
Greenleaf Functions library, 
Greenleaf Superfunctions 
contains more than 60 extras, 
such as an expanded memory 
interface, logical windows, 
mouse support, and en¬ 
hanced time and date 
functions. 

The Greenleaf libraries of¬ 
fer automatic installation and a 
variety of options. They run 
under DOS on the IBM PC, 

XT, AT, PS/2s, and compat¬ 
ibles, and you can use them 
with most popular C com¬ 
pilers, such as Microsoft C, 
Lattice C, and Turbo C. 

Price: £156 for Greenleaf 
Functions; £199 for Greenleaf 
Superfunctions. 

Contact: SystemStar Ltd., 

1-3 Parliament Sq., Hertford 
SG14 1EX, U.K., 44-0992- 
500919. 

Inquiry 927. 

continued 



96IS-30 BYTE* MARCH 1 989 Circle 416 on Reader Service Card 


Circle 449 on Reader Service Card 





































^ h If 

rrrnn 

1IVI ' 

■« 1 1 1 

JJUU 


PORTABLE PERSONAL COMPUTER 


80286 running at 12 MHz/6 MHz 

1 Mb RAM: Expandable internally to 3 or 5 Mb RAM 

Internal 40 Mb hard disk drive 

Internal 3.5" 1.44 Mb microfloppy disk drive 

640 x 400 pixel gas plasma display with four grey scales 

IBM (EGA! and IBM (CGA) compatible 

Also MDA and Hercules compatible (on external monitor) 

RGB connector/external keyboard port/parailel port/RS 2320' 

RJ-11 

36 W x 8.6 H x 36 D cm 6.8 kg 


Options: 

lnternal/2400 bps Hayes compatible modem (CC1TT) 
internal 2 Mb (4 Mb) Extended Memory card 
Expansion chassis for IBM PC/AT type card 

IBM and PC/AT are registered trademarks of International Business Machines 
Corporation Hercules is a trademark of Hercules Computer Technology Inc, 



For distribution please contact: 

SEMI-TECH MICROELECTRONICS CORPORATION 

P.Q. Box 3009, Markham Industrial Park 
Markham, Ontario, Canada L3R 6G4 
Fax: (4161475-1552 Telex 0 6 9 8 6749 

















































Circle 455 on Reader Service Card 


WHAT’S NEW 


INTERNATIONAL 



Systems West are specialists In 
transputer-based hardware and 
software products. We can pro¬ 
vide a full range of products and 
services- from transputer mod¬ 
ules to complete systems to 
consultancy. 

Transputer Modules 

These are industry-standard dual 
in line packages available in a 
range of sizes. The TM8011, the 
first of our TRAMs, set and still 
holds a world record. It packs the 
processing power of 10 VAX 11/ 
780s and a megabyte into a 
package occupying leas than 1.5 
cubic inches. Two, four, and eight 
megabyte TRAMS are now or will 


be soon available . 

TRAM Motherboards 

These make it practical to add the 
immense processing power of the 
iranspuler to your existing per¬ 
sonal computer or workstation. 
Our 5-s3ot TBX05 to r the AT lakes 
up only one host slot, accommo¬ 
dates up to 5 TRAMs, and costs 
only £295. 

Software and People 

Compilers, assemblers, and other 
development tools. Application 
packages, such as finite element 
software. And we are also hard¬ 
ware and software design con¬ 
sultants. 


5 


PARALLEL 

PROCESSING 

SOLUTIONS 


SYSTEMS WEST 

White friars, Lewins Mead 
Bristol BS1 2NT, England 
tel (0272)273 990 
fax (0272) 221 450 
telex 449 731 LPUK 






IEEE488 

Technology that hits the 
mark 

• For IBM-PC/XT/AT/3SB, IBMRT 6150, 
IBM PS/2, PHILIPS :YES and atl com¬ 
patibles 

• For MS-. PC DDS, OS/2, and UNIX 
» Extremely fast and easy to use 

software 

+ All HP-IB commands (QNSRQ etc.l 
are implemented 

• Compatible to ASVST, AutoCad 
National Instruments, CEC etc. 

• Real time error checking and bus 
analysing 

• Supported Basic (compiled), Turbo- 
Basic, (Turbo-) Pascal, Modula-2, 
Fortran, C, Turbo-C, Assembler etc. 

• Available in English, French and 
German 

• Analysing software for instruments 



Dealer + OEM welcome 


HqUHjnhflfsr Aibpe 45 

Wesl-On rmji ny 

PlWJTO *3 ■ 22T-«0E5g 

TelnLti*. -2627 - 2-21 - 42 JT girt Id, 
FAX * 3 - 2 Ii- 4 iTA 71 


Get More Out of 
Adobe Illustrator 

I f you are a designer who 
I uses Adobe Illustrator, Plot- 
Script lets you plot, preview, 
and add finishing touches to 
your artwork, as well as ae- 
cess a range of additional out¬ 
put peripherals, 

PlotScript is a graphics 
tool for the Macintosh that 
translates Adobe Illustrator 
PostScript to Hewlett-Packard 
Graphics Language (HPGL), 
.DXF, and PICT formats. The 
program implements stan¬ 
dard Macintosh window func¬ 
tions so you can size, move, 
scroll, and overlay windows. 
PlotScript lets you zoom in 
on your project, move and re¬ 
size illustrations, and incor¬ 
porate artwork into scanned 
images. You can plot illustra¬ 
tions or combine multiple 
drawings on a single page, or 
assemble them on multiple 
pages. 

The plotter driver lets you 
output your Adobe Illustrator 
drawings on pen plotters, 
film-cutting plotters, and elec¬ 
trostatic or thermal plotters. 

A file translator helps you gen¬ 
erate black-and-white or 
color paint, draw, or .DXF 
files from your PostScript 
artwork and manipulate them 
with paint, draw, or CAD 
software to change colors, 
merge images, or create 
three-dimensional objects or 
perspectives. The preview 
tool presents your illustrations 
in colors or gray levels on a 
Mac II screen, and a font con¬ 
verter tool translates charac¬ 
ter descriptions. 

PlotScript requires a Mac 
Plus with two 800K-byte 
floppy disk drives; the inter¬ 
nal drive should hold the start¬ 
up system disk, and the exter¬ 
nal drive should contain the 
PlotScript disk. A hard disk 
drive is strongly recommended 
for storing your projects and 
the HPGL files. 


Price: 80,000 Belgian 
francs. 

Contact: Euro Concepts 
s.a,, Avenue Montjoie 169 Bte, 
8, 1180 Brussels, Belgium, 
32-2-344-49-44. 

Inquiry 957. 


Scan and Edit 
under GEM and 
Microsoft Windows 

S oftware Dynamics’ 
Proimage is an image 
scanning and editing pro¬ 
gram that runs under GEM 
and Microsoft Windows. The 
scanner function lets you scan 
images from within applica¬ 
tions, such as Ventura Pub¬ 
lisher, Aldus PageMaker, 

GEM Paint, or Windows 
Paint, without leaving the ap¬ 
plication or the GEM/Windows 
environment. You can also 
run the scanner function under 
the run-time versions of 
GEM or Windows supplied 
with Ventura Publisher or 
Aldus PageMaker, respec¬ 
tively. 

In addition to giving you 
complete control of scanner 
features such as resolution, 
contrast, page size, gray 
scales, and dithering, Pro- 
Image lets you load Tag Image 
File Format files and store 
images in formats such as 
TIFF, .IMG, .MSP, .PCX, 
and CCITT Group 3 Com¬ 
pressed TIFF. You also get 
editing functions, such as 
copy, cut, paste, erase, mir¬ 
ror, invert, flip, zoom, and 
print; painting and erasing in 
a variety of patterns ; and an 
Undo feature that lets you re¬ 
move unwanted paint oper¬ 
ations. 

Proimage runs under 
GEM or Microsoft Windows 
on the IBM PC, XT, AT, and 
compatibles with at least 640K 
bytes of RAM and a hard 
disk drive. It supports most 

continued 


96IS-32 BYTE- MARCH 1989 Circle 432 on Reader Service Card 































The feel of a keyboard is a very personal thing. Touch can 
convey more about quality and reliability than the most 
poetic salesman. That is why Conductive Elastomer with its 
tactile feel and high reliability has become the discerning 
users choice, 

Built in a sandwich form using a small number of 
components the Conductive Elastomer keyboard is rugged 
and durable while providing the user with the positive 
break-over feel he has come to expect. 

Over the last five years EECO Maxi-Switch have become 
the world leaders in the manufacture of Conductive 
Elastomer keyboards, supplying major US and European 
OEMs with anything from the industry standard 101/102 
layout to complete custom layouts. 


Now the next chapter in the EECO Maxi-Switch story 
begins with the opening in 1989 of a European keyboard 
facility in Irvine, Scotland. Conceived as a total solution set 
up with full engineering and design services Irvine is your 
connection to the future. 

So you can continue to expect the EECO Maxi-Switch 
quality and service but now with a distinctly European 
flavour, 

Call now and experience the EECO Maxi Touch. 


EECO LIMITED 

Trafalgar Way. Bar H»ll 
Cambridge, CB3 8SQ, England 
Phone: Crafts Hill (0954) 60257 
T&lex: B17303 Fax: 0954 B2687 


A subsidiary of EECO trie., California, US. A 


Contact EECO European Headquarters for a full list of international distributors. 


«—I. _D_ 1 C, 


r— i 


MARCH 19R9 - BYTE 96IS-33 

































WHAT'S NEW 



PLUG IN DEVELOPMENT 
SYSTEMS FOR THE IBM 
PC/XT/AT/CO M P ATI B LE 

Ideal for industrial and 
educational applications 

Runs 68000 software. 10 Mhz CPU with 
RS232 Timer MMU DMA [2c, monitor/ 
debugger with |2c support, 'pop up 1 PC 
support, uses PC's sc reon/printer/keyboard/ 
disk/network, external l 2 C expansion, bus 
expansion, 512 bytes l 2 C EEPROM option 

PI-68070from £495 


COMPUSENSE Lid 
G8A WILLOUGHBY LANE 
LONDON N17 OSP 
Phone: 01 885 3300 
Fax: 01 801 2640 


Circle 413 on Reader Service Card 





idents can happen! 

4 Protect agalnsi spills, 

* dusL ash and grime; 

4 any of which could 

* ruin your keyboard. 

4 Saves servicing cosia, 
4 Stops erosion nf 


Pal. Pmd. 4 Raj Dw 

KADOR 

iinii 4 

Pontcpnon Ind. Est. 
AfiERCYNON 
v Typing Is unimpeirwd. MID GLAM. 

4 Easy fitting Instructions. CF4S 4EP U.K. 

Tel: 0443 740281 
Manufactured in U.K. by KADOR. f^x: 0443 741553 


A Made of clear. 

* flexible p.v.c. 

A Moulded to fit i 
w each and every key. 


% 


iJjdjU 



Circle 43S on Reader Service Card 


i N TERN 


popular scanners. 

Price: 449 deutsche marks. 
Contact: Software Dynamics 
GmbH, Remberti$tras$e62, 
2800 Bremen, West Ger¬ 
many, 49-04-21-320461. 
Inquiry 96L 


Stop That Virus 

K ilLVirus is a program 
from Incorporated Tech¬ 
nologies that checks the disks 
you are using for signs of a 
virus program. On finding a 
contaminated disk, the pro¬ 
gram automatically removes 
the virus and resets the sys¬ 
tem's records. The original 
data on the disk is not dam¬ 
aged, and the space taken up 
by the virus program is made 
available to you. 

A separate utility that you 
place on the AUTOEXEC file 
checks the computer for any 
virus program that may have 
found its way into your com¬ 
puter’s memory. 

KilLVirus runs under 
DOS 2.1 or higher on the IBM 
XT, AT, and compatibles 
with a minimum of 256K bytes 
of RAM. 

Price: $49.95 U.S. 

Contact: Incorporated Tech¬ 
nologies, 3-J, Gulberg-3, 
Lahore, Pakistan, 92-042- 
875000. 

Inquiry 939. 


Japanese 
PostScript 
Layout Software 

T he Line mote P$ page- 
layout software from Toyo 
Industries supports Japanese- 
language PostScript. The soft¬ 
ware for the NEC PC-9801 
personal computer can handle 
layouts, as well as text, fig¬ 
ures, and image editing. 

A single page is made of 
up to eight overlaid layers so 
that, for example, you can 
scan an image into one docu¬ 
ment and also trace it into 


96IS-34 BYTE* MARCH 1989 


T 1 0 H A L 


other documents. Characters 
can be from 7 points to 200 
points in size, with automatic 
line drawing and Japanese 
pronunciation-mark spacing. 
You can register figure data 
as separate parts and send your 
output directly to the Post¬ 
Script electronic typesetters, 
announced foT release in the 
near future. 

You can purchase just the 
Linernote PS page-layout soft¬ 
ware and the image-process¬ 
ing board or a total system, 
which includes the software 
and the board plus the NEC 
PC-9801RA5 color display, 
the PC-PR602PS Japanese 
PostScript printer, and an 
image scanner. 

Price: 1.1 million yen for the 
software and the image-pro¬ 
cessing board; 2.9 million 
for the total system. 

Contact: Toyo Industries 
Co. Ltd., 2-25 Suda-cho, 
Kanda, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 
101, Japan, 81-03-256-7355. 
Inquiry 944, 


Software for 
Telecommunications 

on tact is a software 
package you can use to 
access remote computers for 
E-mail, conferencing systems, 
Viewdata, and other infor¬ 
mation services, such as on¬ 
line financial and business 
databases, as well as to send 
and receive telex messages. 

E-mail facilities let you 
send messages, and the filing 
system helps you retrieve all 
the messages you sent in a par¬ 
ticular month to a particular 
person; you can even retrieve 
every message that contains a 
certain word. You can join 
electronic conferencing sys¬ 
tems, collect all new notes, 
and print them out so you can 
read them at your leisure. 

Contact's VT-100 and 
Prestel display modes help you 
access on-line databases. Un¬ 
like most other VT-100 emula- 
continued 





































1 * 1 

1 fl 1 

I ■ 1 

1 " J 

r * i 

i ■ i 

i ■_ i 

i 

■— i 
a i 

i * i 

MAGAZINE 


CHOICE 


Hardware* 


Emulation Boards 


Software 

Word Processing/ 
Desktop Publishing 

Microsoft Word 

$ 229 

Multimate Advantage II 

$ 269 

Lotus Manuscript 

$ 339 

Office Writer/Speller 

$ 259 

Pagemaker 3.0 

$ 529 

PFS:Professional Write 
Publisher's Type 

$ 119 

Foundry 

$ 259 

SPF/PC 

$ 159 

Sprint_ _ 

Ventura Publisher 

$ 129 
$ 489 

WordPerfect 5.0 ™ 

S 229 

Wordstar Pro 5.0 

$ 259 

Wordstar 2000+3.0 

$ 259 

Xy write III Pius 

Database Systems 

$ 219 

Clipper 

$ 449 

DBase IV 

$ 469 

Dataease 

$ 389 

DataPerfect 

$ 309 

Foxbase Plus 

Paradox : ±&ai$ 

S 189 
$ 429 

PFSrProfessional Tile 

S 179 

R Base for DOS 

$ 469 

Spreadsheets/ 
Integrated Packages 

All ways 

S 89 

Lotus 1-2-3 

3 309 

Lotus Agenda 

$ 269 

Lotus Hal 

$ 99 

Lucid 3-D 

$ 79 

Microsoft Excel 

S 309 

Microsoft Works 

$ 109 

G&A 

$ 209 

Guattro 

$ 149 

Smart System 

$ 449 

Supercale 5 

S 299 

Lotus Symphony 

$ 459 

Communications 

Carbon Copy+ 

$ 119 

Crosstalk XVI 

$ 99 

Crosstalk MK4 

$ 125 

PC Anywhere III 

S 89 

Procomm Plus 

$ 59 

Relay Gold 

3 159 

Smarterm( Per soft) 

call 

Smartcom Ell 

$ 149 

Statistics 

SPSS/PC + 

3 699 

Statgraphics 3.0 

Systat 40/ 

$ 569 

with graphics $ 519/679 

Desktop Environments 

MS Windows 286 

$ 69 

Sidekick PLus 

$ 129 


Graphics 

Chartmaster 

$ 

219 

Design CAD 

$ 

159 

Diagraph 

$ 

259 

Diagram Master 

$ 

209 

Lotus Freelance Plus 

$ 

329 

Graph Plus 

$ 

329 

Mtcrografx Designer 

$ 

449 

Harvard Graphics 

MS Chart 

$ 

279 

$ 

269 

PC Paintbrush Plus 

$ 

89 

Picture Perfect 

$ 

199 

Presentation Pak 

S 

229 

Publishers Paintbrush 

$ 

159 

Project Management 

Harvard Total P.M.III 

$ 

449 

Microsoft Project 4,0 

$ 

329 

Superproject Plus 

$ 

289 

Timeline 3.0 

$ 

349 

Languages/Utilities 

Fastback Plus 2.0 

$ 

99 

Lattice C 

$ 

229 

Norton Advanced 

$ 

79 

Microsoft C 

s 

299 

Mace Utilities 

$ 

65 

MS Fortran 4.0 

$ 

299 

Quick Basic/Quick C 

s 

69 

Turbo Basic 

$ 

65 

Turbo Pascal 5.0/Turbo C 

$ 

99 

Turbo Pascal Prof/C Prof 

$ 

169 

Accounting 

AccPac BP1 

$ 

279 

Great Plains 

$ 

499 

Peachtree Complete II 

$ 

159 


Computers jrra 

AST Premium 286 SI 475 
Samsung S550 40Meg 


w/EGA 

$1750 

Toshiba laptop T1000 

$ 850 

Multifunction Boards 


AST Advantage 


AST Rampage +286 

$ 549 

AST 6 Pak Plus (64k) 

$ 129 

AST Rampage/2 (0k) 

$ 189 

Everex RAM 4000 

$ 299 

Inboard 386AT 

$1129 

Inboard 386PC 

$ 799 

Intei AboveBoard Plus 

$ 439 

Display Boards 


ATI EGA Wonder x 800 

$ 259 

Paradise VGA Plus 

$ 289 

AST VGA 

$ 279 

Modems 


Hayes 1200/1200B 

$ 299 

Hayes 24O0/240DB 

$ 449 

Practical 1200 Internal 

$ 79 

US Robotics 2400 B 

$ 159 

Ventel 2400/24008 

$ 389 

Intel 2400B/2 (PS/2) 

$ 279 

Networking 


Arcnet Board - SMC 

$ 149 

Novell Adv.Netware 286 


2.12 

$1950 

Novel) ELS 

$ 450 

Tops for DOS 

$ 119 


AST 5251-11 + 

$ 629 

IRMA II PCA/MCA 

$ 725 

Monitors 


Amdek 41OA 

$ 149 

NEC Multisync II 

$ 629 

NEC Multisync GS 

$ 249 

Princeton HX-12+ 

$ 439 

Princeton MAX-12E 

$ 149 

Samsung Color 

$ 239 

Zenith ZVM 1490 

$ 679 

Printers/Plotters 


Epson FX-105Q 

$ 529 

Epson LQ-1050 

$ 829 

H-P 7475A 

$1475 

H-P LaserJet 11 Lr $1695 

Epson LG-500 

$ 379 

NEC 5300 

$ 749 

NEC P2200 

$ 389 

Okidata 320 

$ 375 

Okidata 321 

$ 519 

Okidata 393 

$1050 

Okidata 293E 

$ 675 

Panasonic printers 

call 

Complete Hand Scanner 

$ 169 

Toshiba P321SL 

$ 529 

Toshiba P341SL 

$ 719 

Toshiba P351SX 

$1075 

Logitech Scanman 

$ 199 

Mass Storage/Backup 


Bernoulli II Dual 

$1750 

Irwin Tape drives 

call 

Mountain 40MBJnt.Tape 

$ 389 

Plus Hardcard 20 Jvd 

$ 525 

Plus Hardcard 40 

$ 669 

Seagate ST251 -1 

S 479 

Seagate ST225 w/int. 

$ 289 

Seagate ST238 w/inl. 

$ 319 

Sysgen Bridge 

$ 299 

Input Devices 


Keytronics KB101 keybrd 

$ 99 

Logitech Hi-Rez Mouse 

$ 99 

Microsoft Mouse 

$ 109 

PC Mouse w/Paint 

$ 99 

Accessories 


Curtis Ruby 

$ 59 

Datashield S-100 

$ 69 

Logical Connection 

$ 449 

Masterpiece Plus 

$ 125 

256k Ram set 

call 

8087 math chip 

$ 119 

80287-8/80287-10 $259/299 

80387-16/80387-20 $459/519 


*CALl FOR SHIPPING COST 


A TTENTION CORPORA TE BUYERS: 

FACSIMILE ORDER SYSTEM 
(718) 438-2315 or (718) 972-8346 


Your Corporate Purchase Order is guaranteed priority hand¬ 
ling when you “fax" it in via our exclusive SOFTLINE FAXPE- 
DITE service Inquiries, RFP's and other communications will 
also receive prompt attention. 


A TTENTION INTERNA TIONAL BUYERS: 

GLOBAL ORDER SYSTEM 
627-30170 or 910-240 3918 
Int'I.Fax lines (718) 438-2315 or 972-8346 


SOFTLINE TELXPEDITE insures prompt response tor all your 
orders and inquiries. Payments may be made by bank check, 
wire transfer, Mastercard or Visa. Goods are shipped via Air 
Mail (recommended for small orders) or Air Frieght Add freight 
costs to prepayment, or goods are shipped freight collect 


Celebrating 5 years of Excellence 



Customer service hours: 9am - 5PM EST Mon.- 

Contact Fay Chayne, 

Director, Int’l Sales Dept. 



1333 60th Street 
Brooklyn, NY 11219 
TELEX: 627-30170 or 910-240-3918 
FAX: (718) 438-2315 


TERMS: All returns require prior authorization - 20% restocking fee on returns * PQ's accepted from qualified organizations * Visa or Mastercard add 3% - G.O.D.. Cash, Money order or bank 


r equire prior aumortzation - 20% restocking fee on returns ■ P0 s accepted from qu 

check nnlv — add S5 (In ner order - Pranaid comnanv nr personal Check — allow 2 weeks to Clear • Shiooina via UPS surface — add S5.Q0 oer item: UPS Slue- add $12 oer item * All orices 














WHAT'S NEW 










SwissFORTH 
FORTH Compiler 

SRS ROM/RAM 
Emulator 

FORTH Prozessor 

FORTH-SYSTEME 

ANGELIKA FLESCH 

Postfach 1103 
D-7814 Breisach a.Rh., FRG 
Telefon (+ 49) 7 66 7/551 
Telefax (+49)7 66 7/555 
Mailbox (+49)7 66 7/556 


Circle 424 on Reader Service Card 


IBM-PC BUS 

Input/Output Cards 

DIP-24 Opto-isolated digital Input 
D0P^24 Opto-isolated Darlington output 
PIO-48 TIL level digital input/butput 
DPC-10 Pulse counter/ttmef/generator 
DCM-1G 8 Inputs, 8 Outputs, CTC 
AIP Z4 12 Bit ADC input 
AOP-9 12 Bit DAC output 
AIS-I6 12 Bit isolated ADC input 
TIP-8 Thermocouple input 
510 2 RS232/422/4&5/20mA I/O 

ST-24 Screw terminal adaptors 
BXT Backplane extenders 
BP-5/11 5/11 Slot backplanes 


TECHNOLOGY 


Blue Chip Technology 
Main Avenue, Hawattlen Industrial Parle 
Manor Lane, De&aide CH5 3PP tLK. 
Telephone; (0244) 520222 
Tele*; 61471 Fa*; (0244)531043 


A 


Circle 411 on Reader Service Card 


INTERNATIONAL 


dons, Contact also provides 
scrolling windows and lets you 
capture the incoming data for 
use with your word processor 
or spreadsheet. 

A complete implementa¬ 
tion of the Viewdata standard 
gives you full color, graph¬ 
ics, flashing, double-height, 
and reveal, plus a full Tele- 
software capability. You can 
also capture Viewdata 
frames and print them out, or 
just capture the text part of a 
frame or sequence of frames 
and feed the results into your 
word processor or spreadsheet. 
Also, facilities are provided 
that let you transfer files with 
full error checking using 
standard Prestel protocols or a 
normal 8-bit binary mode. 
With Contact, your com¬ 
puter can automatically collect 
and prim out mail, as well as 
information from any remote 
mainframe. Other features 
include automatic call-logging, 
support of EPAD with a suit¬ 
able modem, and ASCII text 
and binary file capture. Con¬ 
tact operates under, but does 
not require, Microsoft Win¬ 
dows and GEM, 

Contact is available in two 
versions: one for the IBM PC 
and the other for the Amstrad 
PC 1512. Both versions require 
DOS 3,0 or higher. If you 
have a computer with a CGA, 
Contact gives you a mono¬ 
chrome display because the 
CGA is not capable of dis¬ 
playing the eight colors (or 
shades of gray) needed for 
Viewdata systems. If you have 
an EGA, then the display will 
be in full color, with graphics 
and a character font designed 
especially for readability. 
Contact also supports Her¬ 
cules cards, a variety of 
modems, and data transfer 
rates ofV.21 (300 bps), V.22 
and V.23 (1200 bps), and 
2400, 4800, and 9600 bps. 
Price: £79.95. 

Contact: X-On Software 
Ltd., 65 Victoria Rd., London 
N22 4XA, ILK., 44-01- 
881-3659. 

Inquiry 958. 


LPA Improves 
MacPROLOG 

N ew features of Mac¬ 
PROLOG 2.5, Logic Pro¬ 
gramming Associates* (LPA) 
incrementally compiled ver¬ 
sion of Prolog for the Macin¬ 
tosh (see What's New Interna¬ 
tional, page 88A-10, May 
1988 BYTE, and page 88IS-22, 
September 1988 BYTE), in¬ 
clude full access to the Mac 
Toolbox, property manage¬ 
ment, forward and backward 
call graphs, cross-referenc¬ 
ing, a box-model debugger. 
Hierarchical File System ac¬ 
cess and path control, ground 
operation under MultiFinder, 
and an interface to user-writ¬ 
ten routines in C and Pascal. 
Version 2.5 lets you enter 
queries and goals into any 
program window as well as 
print window contents from 
a program. 

MacPROLOG 2.5 is avail¬ 
able in a monochrome version 
and in a color version for the 
Mac II. At the same time, the 
company also launched its 
LPA Stand-Alone Application 
Generator (SAAG), a version 
of the compiler that produces 
applications you can run 
from the Macintosh desktop by 
double-clicking on them or 
from MultiFinder. 

Price: £495 for the mono¬ 
chrome version of MacPRO¬ 
LOG 2.5; £595 for the color 
version; £195 for upgrades 
from version 2.0; £495 for 
LPA SAAG. 

Contact: Logic Program¬ 
ming Associates Ltd., Studio 
4, The Royal Victoria Patri¬ 
otic Building, Trinity Rd., 
London SW18 3SX, U.K., 
44-01-871-2016, 

Inquiry 930, 

continued 


96IS-36 BYTE* MARCH 1989 















Com-'Ebk Data Systems, Inc. 

Special Offer—while supplies last—A Bahamas Cruise 5 days and 
4 nights with every 286 or 386 purchase. $675.00 value. Call for details. 


SPECIAL COMPLETE SYSTEM 

MODEL IQ-8088—1 SYSTEM 

10 mhz Mother Board—640K Ram 
(1) 360K Ftoppy Drive 

Mono Monitor—101 Keyboard 

Multi-I/O—Phoenix Bios 

Parallel, Serial Game Ports 

Printer Panasonic 1Q90i 

MS-DOS ver. 3,3 

20 MB Hard Disk 

$1295»° 

Model IQ 8088-5 

$89500 


286-S 



lions at a very reasonable 
price, our 266 Is built to suit 
your every need. 

YOUR PRICE 

$1695.00 

With CGA $1970.00 
EGA $2170.00 
VGA $2370.00 

MODEL IQ 80286-T 

Upright System $1795 

Available in 3 case styles 


We also carry a complete line of 
major brand computer 
peripherals. 

Don’t settle for what other 
companies offer. Quality and 
Service are the real values in 
COM-TEK Systems. 

STANDARD A/T MODEL IQ-80286-S 

SPECIFICATIONS 

MOTHERBOARD: 80286 microprocessor key selectable normal now available with 
Suntacs 80286 motherboard 6/12 MHz (8.0 mhz) and turbo (12.5 
mhz) processing speeds, socketed for the 8G287 math 
coprocessor, eight expansion slots (2 eight bit—6 sixteen bit), 
clock-cal, 1 meg. RAM included. Expands to 4 meg. MultJ I/O 
and Award Bios included 

200 watt, switching power supply with leads for 4 devices. 

(1) 1.2 meg, half height, dual sided—quad density floppy drive 
(1) 40 megabyte, half height, fixed disk drive. 40MS access 
time, 

COMTEK IQ 286 std. case with corporate security lock panel 
mounted reset switch, and status LED 
fixed disk. 


POWER: 

DISKS: 


CABINET: 


EDs for turbo, power and 


KEYBOARD: 


DISPLAY SET: 


WARRANTY: 


Enhanced style, 101 keys with LEDs to indicate MUM locks and 
CAPS lock siaius, separate cursor pad, numeric touch pad, top 
mounted function keys. 

Hi-res, text and graphics, monochrome card (Here, com pat.) 
hi-res, TTL amber monochrome monitor. 1 parallel port. 

1 year on parts and labor limited depot warranty, 30 day money 
back guarantee it not satisfied with our product, for any reason. 


-OPTIONS AVAILABLE 


386-S 

Powerful performer at a practical 
price. The ultimate for any 
business. Just in time for the 
tax season. Perfect for any 
accountant or business 
application. 


MODEL IQ 80386*8 
-THE SUPER WISE CHOICE! 


STANDARD A/T MODEL 1Q-803B6-S 


SPECIFICATIONS 

MOTHERBOARD: 


$3195.00 

CGA $3470.00 
EGA $3670.00 
VGA $3870.00 

Upright System $3495.00 
— as shown — 

80386-T $3395.00 

COM-TEK HAS DESIGNED THEIR POLICY TO BETTER 
SERVE, HELP AND PROTECT THEIR CUSTOMERS. 



CABINET: 

KEYBOARD: 

DISPLAY UNIT: 
WARRANTY: 


80366 microprocessor, user selectable (4 r 77 r 8,0 and 16,0 
mhz) upgradeable to 20 mhz. Processing speeds, socketed 
lor the 80287 and 80387 math coprocessor, eight expansion 
slots (3 eight bit, 4 sixteen bit, and 1 thirty-two bit), ctock- 
cal, 2 meg, RAM Included, upgradeable to 16 meg. 

Includes Phoenix Bios and Mu Eli-I/O card. 

200 watt, switching power supply with leads for 4 devices. 

(1) 1,2 meg, half height, dual sided—quad density floppy drive 
and 1.44 ftoppy. 

(1) SO megabyte, full height, fixed disk drive. Seagate. 

Full size AT style drawer cabinet with corporate security 
lock panel mounted reset switch, and status LEDs for turbo 
power and fixed disk. 

Enhanced style, 101 keys with LEDs to indicate NUM lock 
and CAPS lock status, separate cursor pad. numeric touch 
pad, top mounted function keys. 

Hi-res, text and graphics, monochrome card (Here, compat.) 
hi-res, TTL amber monochrome monitor, 1 parallel port, 

1 year on pans and labor limited depot warranty. 80 day money 
back guarantee if not satisfied with our product for any reason. 


COMTEK MAKES SURE ALL THEIR CUSTOMERS GET 
1st PRIORITY IN SALES—SERVCE—CUSTOMER 
RELATIONS 


COMTEK'S FRIENDLY STAFF IS BETTER TRAINED TO 
HELP AND SUPPORT YOU IN EVERY WAY POSSIBLE 
WITHOUT LEAVING YOU ON HOLD, 


30 DAY MONEY BACK GUARANTEE FOR ANY REASON—1 YEAR ON PARTS AND LABOR—LIMITED DEPOT WARRANTY 

SYSTEMS • SYSTEM OPTIONS • NETWORKING 

Conerg Assoc. Inc. aai p ICAR QDPf'IPIf'ATIfTMQ StepWise Computer Co 

270 Crescent Knowle Rd. 327 Fairmont Rd. 

Libertyville, IL 60048 in N.H.: 603-363-8333 1-800-942-4255 Outside of N.H. Long Valley, NJ 07961 

312-816-9218 RO. Box 221 201-876-5656 

Corner of 9 & 63, Chesterfield, N.H. 03443 

XT and AT are registered trademarks of International Business Machines. DEALER INQUIRIES WELCOME 

Circle 414 on Reader Service Card (DEALERS: 41S) MARCH 1989 -BYTE 96IS-37 














WHAT’S NEW 




FORTH INSTRUMENTATION 
__ COMPUTER 
/■"V -1 "/ 

TDS 
9090 



A powerful control computer based on the new Hitachi 
6303Y and high level language Forth. 100mm x 72mm. 
30K bytes RAM, 16K dictionary RAM/PROM, 256 bytes 
EEPROM, 16K Forth. You can attach 64 key keyboard, 
LCD and I*C bus peripherals. Built in are’ interrupts, 
multitasking, time of day dock, watchdog timer, full screen 
editor and symbolic assembler. 32 parallel and two serial 
jxirts Single power supply and low power 3mA OPERA- 


1 off £194.95 including manual and nnn.vnlatiU> RAM 


Triangle Digital Services Ltd 
100a Vfood Street, London E17 3HX 

Tfelephone 01-520-0442 TWex 2<5584 (quote M0775) 


Circle 461 on Reader Service Card 


INTERNATIONAL 


Plan and Monitor 
Your Project 

P RISM is a project plan¬ 
ning and monitoring sys¬ 
tem that you can use on a va¬ 
riety of projects. Its ability to 
support multilevel networks 
lets various levels of manage¬ 
ment view a project in differ¬ 
ent degrees of detail. You can 
define the calendar of work¬ 
ing days and holidays, and you 
can force an activity to start 
or end on, before, or after a 
specified date. 

You can analyze the cost 
trends for a particular depart¬ 
ment, budget head/cost ac¬ 
count, or work package, there¬ 
by focusing attention on 
critical issues. Exception re¬ 
ports and inquiries give you 
focused and relevant informa¬ 
tion for minimizing paper¬ 
work, and “what if* simula¬ 
tions help you assess the 
impact of managerial decisions 
in an unpredictable envi¬ 
ronment. 

PRISM helps you deter¬ 
mine the optimum project 
completion time and the low¬ 
est total project cost, forecast 
shortages or excesses of re¬ 
sources, and assess the impact 
of time and cost on resource- 
limited schedules. In addition, 
PRISM can transport infor¬ 
mation to and from dBASE III 
and supports Arrow Dia¬ 
gramming Method and Prece¬ 
dence Diagramming Method 
networking formats. 

The program has multi¬ 
colored networks, bar charts, 
pie charts, and histograms, 
which you can print on a color 
plotter or dot-matrix printer. 
You can perform a sort by se¬ 
lecting specific information 
based on departments or time 
periods, and you can monitor 
time, cost, and resources using 
the earned value concept. 

This feature lets you forecast 
cash and multiple resource 
requirements at any point of 
the project cycle based on the 


latest physical progress 
achieved. 

PRISM runs under DOS 
3.1 or higher on the IBM PC, 
XT, AT, and compatibles 
with at least 512K bytes of 
memory, a 10-megabyte hard 
disk drive, and a 132-column 
dot-matrix printer. The com¬ 
pany recommends 640K bytes 
of memory, a color monitor, 
and a plotter with three colors. 
A version is also available 
that runs under Unix. 

Price: About $1500 U.S., 
which includes time, cost, 
resources, and graphics 
modules. 

Contact: Tata Consultancy 
Services, Air India Building, 
Nariman Point, Bombay 400 
021, India, 91-22-636- 
7261. 

Inquiry 963. 


Tools for AutoCAD 
Users 

C ardis designed its Luna- 
Series of software tools to 
help AutoCAD users. You 
use the three programs, Luna- 
Link, LunaEdit, and Luna- 
Library, together to transfer, 
edit, and store raster-scanned 
images you have taken from 
paper drawings or microfilm 
into your IBM PC or compat¬ 
ible running AutoCAD. 

First, you load a raster- 
scanned image file with Luna- 
Link. Using this image as a 
template, you recreate the 
drawing as an AutoCAD file, 
with all the AutoCAD drawing 
tools available. Cardis claims 
this process takes you minutes 
as opposed to the hours you 
would spend manually redraw¬ 
ing the image. 

With LunaEdit, you merge 
and alter the raster images you 
created with LunaLink. Un¬ 
like a conventional bit-map 
editor, it employs Auto¬ 
CAD’s drawing functions to 
modify the raster file. Using 

continued 


96IS-38 BYTE* MARCH 1989 













EUROPEAN VIDEOTEX 


PCbased 

VIDEOTEX HOST 

FROM 1 TELEPHONE-LINE 
UP TO 32 TELEPHONE-LINES 
ON ft SINGLE PC! 

KANT TO TRV? CALL 0031-78-158000 


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— 

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-■ 


MT-TEL 

a private videotex databank system 


Up to 32 users simultaneously 

MT-TEL is a high performance, low-priced 
private Videotex system. Due to its self- 
contained multi-tasking* multi-user operating 
system, the MT-TEL Videotex database 
system has a performance only found in 
mini s or mainframes. With commercially 
available I/O cards and modems, a standard 
PC AT can serve up to 32 users 
simultaneously, using your MS-DOS 3*25 

Quickly up and running 

The MT-TEL software comes with a 
comprehensive manual and is easy to 
operate. Due to a stailer database, which 
contains a number of sample videotex pages 
and all available editors (for pages, users* 
Information Providers* etc.), a new setup is 
easy and does not take much lime. 

Fully-blown software 

The MT-TEL package contains even hi ng a 
grown-up Videotex database system should 
have: Closed User Groups* Information 
Pro v i de rs* Daia-co] lecii on pages * E lee t ron ic 
Mail (Individual-. Group- and Registered 
E-Mail, Store-Mail, etc) T Dynamic pages. 
Log-files. Pass word-Prelection (3 levels}* 
Sub-Databases and a number of additions io 
the Prestcl Videotex normalisations* 

X25 Gateway 

You don't want to use (he Public Switched 
Network? MT-TEL can be interfaced to the 
X25 datanetwork us well through the 2.1 and 
2,2 type Gateway protocol. Almost any 
European country now has the V.A.R 
( Videotex Acces Point) structure connected 
lo its X25 data network* The MT-TEL 
system connects to that network by an X25 
Gateway interface. It enables you to be 
reached all over the country or all over 
Europe. 

A heavily tested 
software package 

Hie MT-TEL private Videotex databank 
software has been tested thoroughly in 
field-installations during several years. In 
use in Holland by a.o. the largest private, 
public Videotex databankComNet with over 


IIJ.000 users and 120 telephone lines* and 
also by Wehkamp, the major mailorder 
warehouse in the Netherlands to enable 
tele-shopping or Merck* Sharp & Dohme 
pharmaceutical industry, using an IBM 
System 38 front-end connection. In Belgium 
by Elma. the countries largest wholesaler of 
electrical goods. In Italy at the Borsa, the 
Milanese Stock Exchange* And added to that 
we can mention a number of .smaller 
systems, varying from 2 telephone-lines to 
over a 100* Proving that the MT-TEL private 
Videotex system is unbeatable in 
performance! 

Try it right now? That's possible 1 

If you have a Prestel Videotex terminal (or 
program on your PC}* try-out the MT-TEL 
system right now! Call the Dutch Com Net 
system, a large public databank and see for 
yourself how the MT-TEL software 
performs. Sorry, you can only acces a few of 
the 40*000 pages without be in g a member of 
the system. Of course you can subscribe to it 
(without any charge). But if you use the 
guest number, which is displayed on the 
Wellcome page you can try the system 
yourself* 

There are three phone-numbers (in Holland) 
which you can use and which will conned 
you to one of the front-ends each having 32 
telephone lines. Dial: (Holland’s eountrv 
code is 31 j 78 158000 or 78 156100 or 78 
159900. (Use standard P rest el settings 
1200/75 baud. ) 

Easily expandable 

MT-TEL was actually develnpped to serve 
up to 32 users simultaneously. It took a 
number of man-years to develop the software 
and test it in a real environment. So we 
decided that the price should be over 
$20 + 0G0;~ for the package, since it performs 
like Videotex software costing 5 to 3 0 times 
that amount on mini's and mainframes, 

But we are interested in selling a high 
number of packages and also to position the 
software in the low-end market for the 
smaller system* So now* we sell this 20.000 
dollar software With a protection device to 
setup smaller systems for a low price. 


Starting with a 2 telephone line system (plus 
the keyboard and the monitor of the system, 
so actually a 3-user system) for only 
$1095.-. 

A demo package ts available 

We have the same fully-blown Videotex 
Host software for you in a demo package. 
This demo-package has the same complete 
databank store- and retrieval structure as the 
real package (actually, it is the real package), 
but we restricted the software to use only the 
keyboard and the monitor of the computer 
itself to acces the system. You can use the 
demo package (and the official manual) to 
test it, even to setup a complete database 
and, if you are fully satisfied, buy the 
original package, allowing you to handle 
telecommunications completely. The demo 
and the original package are fully file- and 
function compatible. We’It even pay you 
hack the cost of the demo package w hen you 
buy the original software! 

The demo package will only cost you 
$245*- (including shipping in Europe), 

And remember, well send you she $20,000 
software for that price 1 

How to order or 
to obtain information 

You can order a demo or obtain a brochure 
by phone, by fax, by telex and (of course) by 
Videotex! Use your Eurocard, Mastercard, 
Visa or American Expresscard to have your 
order shipped today. 


Micro Technology b.v. 
Weteringsingel 6 
3353 GZ PAPENDRECHT 
NETHERLANDS 
Phone xx31-78-410977 
Fax xx31-78-150849 
Videotex Orderline: 

xx31 -78-158000 
Telex 62425 rntsft nl 


We are looking for dealers 
and distributors 

MARCH 1989 ‘BYTE 96IS-39 


Circle 442 on Reader Service Card 









WHAT'S NEW 


I N TER NATIONAL 





both LunaLink and LunaEdit, 
you can scan an existing 
drawing, alter just the parts 
you require using AutoCAD, 
and then output a new plot. 

LunaLibrary is a drawing 
manager designed specifically 
for the AutoCAD environ¬ 
ment, which interfaces to opti¬ 
cal disk drives. You can use it 
to create a drawing database 
and to archive, sort, search, 
or retrieve drawing files* The 
search parameters include 
drawing number, name, revi¬ 
sion level, date, department, 
designer, or others of your own 
choosing. 

Price: £995 for LunaLink; 
£495 for LunaEdit; £695 for 
LunaLibrary* 

Contact: Cardis, 392 Farn- 
ham Rd*, Slough, Berkshire 
SL2 1JD, U.K., 44-0753- 
821812. 

Inquiry 929. 


More Help 
for Modula-2 
Programmers 

T he TopSpeed Modula-2 
TechKit offers you useful 
technical information, util¬ 
ities, and program modules. 
Also included is the Top- 
Speed Assembler, which the 
company designed especially 
for TopSpeed Modula-2, It as¬ 
sembles 30,000 lines per 
minute and generates library 
files directly. 

TechKit contains the infor¬ 
mation you need to make 
RGMable code. You receive a 
ROMable version of the run¬ 
time library in TopSpeed As¬ 
sembler, ready for you to 
modify to your specific re¬ 
quirements, and a program 
that lets you specify exactly 


where you would like to place 
the various segments of your 
program. 

The RS module is an inter¬ 
rupt-driven asynchronous com¬ 
munications driver written 
entirely in Modula-2* It fea¬ 
tures full source code, buf¬ 
fered I/O, and a demonstration 
program to help you write 
communications programs. 

Using the TSR module, 
you can write a pop-up applica¬ 
tion* Simply place your pro¬ 
gram in a single procedure and 
pass the procedure to TSR, 
together with your memory re¬ 
quirement, and how you want 
it to activate your program. 

DOS interrupt 24H is the 
critical error handler that is 
called when a hardware error 
occurs, such as an open disk 
drive door or an off-line 
primer. The DOS version of 
this interrupt handler usually 


displays “Abort, Retry, Ig¬ 
nore? n With the TechKit* s 
critical error handler, you can 
take control of this interrupt. 
The TopSpeed Modula-2 
TechKit contains a complete 
set of procedures to interface 
to the Expanded Memory 
Manager, It also contains the 
start-up code and run-time 
code, which it automatically 
adds to all programs. The 
TechKit runs under DOS 2*0 
or higher on the IBM PC, XT, 
AT, PS/2s, and compatibles 
with at least 512K bytes of 
RAM and two floppy disk 
drives; a hard disk drive is 
recommended. 

Price: £34.95* 

Contact: Jensen Sc Partners 
U.K. Ltd., 63 Clerkenwell 
Rd., London EC1M5NP, 
U.K*, 44-01-253-4333. 

Inquiry 966* 

continued 








POS-EQUIPMENT 


X Window System* 

/ (frf 


As the European centre of X expertise, 1X1 
can help you exploit this important 


software standard 


* Documentation 



* Source Code 



Latest release of XI1 an 0.25" cartridge lape 
and IBM FC-AT formal floppies 5,25 fc 

Printers 


4 Training 

Displays C 

Keyboards / 

Scanners Applications for 


includes 4 day Programmer's Workshop 

* Consultancy 

Drawers MS-DOS/UNIX 


Call +44 223 462131 

dlGtriCh SINCE 19S8 


EE Limited 

Zahringer Sta/3e 326 

D-7B00 FREIBURG/Germany 

Phone 49-761-54915 

FAX 49-761-56881 


62-74 Burleigh Street, Cambridge. CBl 
lOJ, England 

* X Window System is a trademark of MTT 




i 

: : 




Circle 420 on Reader Service Card 






Circle 401 on Reader Service Card 


96IS-40 BYTE* MARCH 1989 























“OK, Ftn curious* What is it?" 

S3 is an Electronic Engineer’s Tool-kit. Since 
1978, Softy 1 and Softy 2 have been used to 
develop millions of pounds' worth of new 
products. S3 is Softy 3* 

S3 could be the only programmer you will ever 
need. S3 could also be the only development 
system you will ever need. S3 is a set-of- 
tools for designing, modifying and manu 
facturing products which contain Micro 
processors, EPROMS, EE PROMS, 

RAMS, EPLDS — programmable 
memory and logic of all kinds. 

That is what you do for a living isn't it? 

Or did they send you this magazine by mistake 
instead of Practical Beekeeping? 

“1 think I have all the tools I need" 

Engineers have discovered lately that they are 
more productive in a windowing, multitasking 
computer environment The PC workstation is 
now fashionable. Coffee-stained notebooks, 
boxes of tangled wire and two-legged-transistors 
are going out-of-style. Today you can sit down at 
a computer keyboard and tackle everything From 
design to documentation. At a keystroke you can 
re-assemble your source-file, download to your 
memory-emulator and run your program. The 

“Unbelievably good\ obviously 
designed by working engineers for 
working engineers " _ 


prototype of your new product will work exactly 
like the real thing, except that you can set break¬ 
points, examine variables and stack, debug the 
code and so forth. Logic Analysers, Storage 
Scopes, lots of instruments these days have 
RS232 or IEEE interfaces, and can be con¬ 
trolled in another task-window, to provide insight 
into what's going on. S3 fits in well, needing only 
a single RS232 port for complete remote controL 
In short, rf you value your time, isn't it time you 
bought yourself some proper equipment? 

“1 wonder — would I use it much?" 

S3 is a small computer which uses PROMS for 
storage like other computers use disks. A PROM 
in the front panel socket can be loaded as a work¬ 
ing program or as data. S3 can make this data- 
memory externally available, taking the place of 
any 25 or 27 series PROM in your prototype. If 
the Flying Write Lead is connected to the 
microprocessor’s write-line, it can emulate 
RAM too, by providing the WRITE input miss¬ 
ing from PROMS. This is a real advantage over 
simple ROM-emulators, because variables and 
stack can be inspected and the target system can 
feedback data. Memory is permanent, in effect, 

"I wouidn V dream of parting 
_ with it” _ 

because in standby mode only a tenth of a 
milliamp is drawn from the battery. S3 is ready 
for work next morning or next month — even if 
you’re not. 


You could poss¬ 
ibly put together a 
set-ofrtools equival¬ 
ent to S3, from several 
other products on the 
r market and you might even 
get them to work together. 
But you could waste a lot of 
time and spend a lot of money doing it. S3 is a 
solution, ready-made, here-and-now and cheap 
enough for engineers to have one each. 

“Why should I spend hard-earned 
cash?" 

Presumably to help you make some more cash, a 
little easier. 

“What's it like as a programmer?" 

S3, as it comes, will program any 24/28 pin 
EPROM/EEPROM that goes in the socket. Of 
course, the manufacturers, bless their little 
hearts, are always bringing out PROMS which 
use new programming methods. But not-to- 

*TIl bet you sell thousands of these ” 
worry, upgrading is usually a simple matter of 
installing the latest software which takes only a 
few seconds. We supply up grades at nominal 
cost in a PROM — or you can get ’em FREE by 
calling our Bulletin Board. 

“It's a bit of a risk. Does it work?" 

Yes! Do be careful; other makers go on about 
performance, yield, d ire-consequences and 
peace-of-mind to frighten you into buying their 
big, expensive Fromnters. Why not buy one of 
these on approval and compare it with S3? The 

“It beats the socks off the two ****s 
_ we've got” _ 

PROM makers supply free data-sheets which 
set-out the way to program their devices. You 
can check voltages and signals with an oscillo¬ 
scope. Speed comparisons — theirs, not ours — 
prove S3 to be faster. 14 secs to Program an Intel 
27C256, 3 secs to Load or Verify. Compare fea¬ 
tures, price, performance, decide which Prom- 
mer you like best and send the other one 
back. 

“What are the odds I will like it?" 

Better than 100 to 1. We know that because our 
products have a 28 day money-back trial-period 
and we get Less than 1 in 100 back, 

“Best bit of kit we\e bought this 
year” 


£495 buys S3, 
a programmer 
with knobs on 

S3 .... £495 

DISPLAY; SO character Liquid Crystal Display. 
KEYBOARD: 45 “real click keys" — metal'domes with buttons. 
PROGRAMS: 28/24 pin 25/27 series fEJEPROMS to 512fc. 
EMULATES: 28/24 pin 25/27 serita (EjEPROMS to 5!2k- 
PROGRAM RAM: 3k bi !ftes — program loads from socket. 
EMULATION RAM: 64k bytes of 100ns static CMOS RAM- 
INTERFACE: Bi'directional remote control bv serial RS232 
300. 600. 1200, 2400. 4800 or 9600 baud DS25 
socket with CTS/DTR handshake. (Actually, S3 
will receive Hies ai 9600,N ,8,1 at full speed 
without handshake). 

SIZE:. 7.3 x 4.4 x 1.8 ins. WEIGHT: l8oz. approx. 

~ ,4 vnJt 500ma/hr reehargeahl e mead. 

With mainS-supply connected you can edit or 
program continuously A fully charged battery will 
do several days* work e.g, 

EDIT for 45 hours. 

EMULATE for 6 hours. 

PROGRAM EGG0 fast or 100 slow PROMS 
or RETAIN program & slats for several weeks. 
CHARGING: 3 hrs on BOOST or 14 hrs on TRICKLE. 

Charging ends when battery-temperature rises 5°C. 
You can use S3 when charging, 

INCLUDES: Mb ins-Chargcr. ROM Emulator Lead, Flying Write 
Lead and Help ROM. 

S3 Editor/Assembler.£195 

Runs on IBM type PC/AT. Development Environment i.e. Two- 
W Endow Editor. Very Fast Macro-Assembler, Linker, Loader, S3 
Remote-Control Serial Interface AVAILABLE IN UK ONLY, 


\ 


SIZE\ 7.3 x i 
BATTERY: 8.4 voJ 
WORKLOAD; Wit 

pragrai 


Choose vour micro from the following list; 


1802 

1805 

TMS370 

TMS320IO 

TMS320CI5 

TMS320C17 

TM S3 2020 

TMS32QC25 

FR/3S7Q 

COP400 

COP440 

HMCS400 

64180 

65C02 

6502 

65C812 

65C816 

6800 

6801 

6301 

6802 

6803 

6303 

6804 

6805 

6809 

6309 

68HCII 

68000 

68010 

TMS7000 

irPD75O0A 

UPD7500B 

uPD780G 

UPD7806 

UPD7S10 

uPDVSl 1 

M740 

77P20 

8048 

8039 

8035 

8051 

8031 

8080 

8085 

8086 

8088 

80188 

30286 

TMS9900 

TMS9995 

TS94I10 

Z8 

ZSO 



S3 Developer's Package....... £195 

Inside information for engineers wishing to change S3 and develop 
their own applications. Environment as above, with 78CG6 Assem¬ 
bler. S3 BIOS ca lls and Circuit-Diagram. 

EPROMS 32 or 40 pins... £75 each 

Two modules, cover lmc$ and 2mcg H & 16 bit EPROMS 

8748/8749.£125 

XICOR 2212.£45 


EPLDS.£295 

Handles. Erasable Prnpajmntibtc Logic Devices. Works with 
PLPL and other manufacturers design software i.mostly free on 
request) to provide complete development package. Receives, 
translates, creates and transmits JEDEC files. Loads, bums and 

copies: 

22V10, IGR4, I6R6. l6R8 t I6L8, 20G10, EF300, EP3J0. 
LP320, F.P600, EP9G0, EP9|0, 18CVS, 50C30. 50C31.50C32, 
50C60, 60C90 from MMI, Atmel, Cypress, Altera. Gould, Intel. 
Texas, etc. 

Quotations in italics are typical 
unsolicited customers J comments 

28 days money-refund trial period 
Guarantee — both parts & labour 
3 yrs on S3, 1 yr on other hardware 

UK customers please add VAT 


g 


□ATAmAn cm- 

Lombard House, Cornwall Rd, 
DORCHESTER, Dorset DT I IRX 
England 

Phone..0305 68066 

Telex.... 418442 DATAMN G 

Fax ..0305 64997 

Modem.0305 251786 

V21, V22, V23* V22bis N 8 1 24hr 


Circle 467 on Reader Service Card 


MARCH 1989 -BYTE 96IS-41 


































WHAT'S NEW 


I N T ER NA TIO N A L 


Real-Time Data 
for Lotus 1-2-3 
and Symphony 

U sers of Lotus 1-2-3 and 
Symphony can now cap¬ 
ture data in real time from fi¬ 
nancial and marketing services 
over an asynchronous com¬ 
munications link with Run-A- 
Way from GMCS. 

You can import share-price 
data from a wire service di¬ 
rectly into Lotus 1-2-3 cells 
while you are working on a 
model by using a series of 
macros or a menu-driven sys¬ 
tem. Alternatively , you can 
switch to terminal-emulation 
mode and log onto an infor¬ 
mation service and then cap¬ 
ture data to a prespecified 
range of spreadsheet cells. 

Run-A-Way can access 
PresteL ICC, and Pont Advan¬ 
tage, or services like Reuters, 
using a special interface that 
you obtain from the informa¬ 
tion provider. It comes bundled 
with Aleph2’s Grafmania 
program, which lets EGA and 
VGA users see more data on¬ 
screen. You can display graphs 
in a window, which Graf¬ 
mania constantly updates as 
you change data in the 
spreadsheet, and set up a real¬ 
time graph, which constantly 
changes as you get new infor¬ 
mation from a wire service. 
Run-A-Way also comes with a 
set of templates that provide 
you with the necessary proto¬ 
cols for most of the popular 
services. 

Run-A-Way runs under 
DOS 3.2 or higher on the IBM 
XT, AT, PS/2s, and compat¬ 
ibles with a hard disk drive and 
60K bytes above the memory 
requirements of Lotus 1-2-3 
version 2.0 or Symphony 1.2 
or higher. 

Price: £395. 


Contact: Lotus Development 
(U.K.) Ltd., Consort House, 
Victoria St., Windsor, 
Berkshire SL41EX, ILK., 
44-0753-840281. 

Inquiry 965* 


Single-Tasking to 
Multitasking 
Made Easy 

D istribuidora de Libros 
Publicaciones y Otros 
claims its Process Manager 
lets your original program¬ 
ming style remain the same 
as you convert your program 
from single-tasking to multi¬ 
tasking. Process Manager is 
composed of a set of objec¬ 
tive modules, one user-defin- 
abie source program, two in¬ 
clude files, two sample files, 
and some assisted files. 

To run your program 
under the multitasking envi¬ 
ronment, you must first build 
your own program, which con¬ 
tains several processes. Each 
process is considered as an iso¬ 
lated task in memory with ex¬ 
ecutive priority and its own 
working variables. Processes 
can communicate with each 
other via the interprocess 
communications functions pro¬ 
vided in Process Manager or 
through public variables. 

You must then configure 
Process Manager to match 
your program's require¬ 
ments. You write a start-up 
program to start Process 
Manager running with your 
processes. By calling some 
functions provided in Process 
Manager, the start-up pro¬ 


gram creates a Process Control 
Block of all processes in your 
program and starts associated 
interrupt handlers to start the 
Process Manager working 
under the multiple tasks envi¬ 
ronment and to exit to DOS. 

You compile your program 
with the compilers and then 
link your program with Pro¬ 
cess Manager's modules. 

If you want to stop and run 
your program under the multi¬ 
ple tasks environment and 
exit to DOS, you must issue a 
function call where you 
would like the program to exit. 
As the control of the process¬ 
ing is passed to EndEDFS, Pro¬ 
cess Manager turns off the 
multiple tasks environment and 
switches the program to the 
instruction next to StartEDPS 
in the start-up program. 

Process Manager runs 
under MS-DOS 2,1 or higher 
on the IBM PC, XT, AT, or 
compatibles. A hard disk drive 
is recommended. 

Price: $195 U.S. 

Contact: Distribuidora de 
Libros Publicaciones y Otros- 
Yangtse, Santa Rosa 170B, 
Comuna Santiago, Santiago, 
Chile, 56-2-33-3034. 

Inquiry 959. 


A Multiprocessing 
Environment 
for MS-DOS 

M P is a software toolbox 
that gives you a multi¬ 
processing environment for 
MS-DOS 3.10 or higher and 
LANs supporting NetBIOS 
protocol or NetBIOS emula¬ 
tion. The toolbox lets you im¬ 
plement parallel algorithms 
that, until now, could only be 
simulated with a multitasking 
technique or implemented 
with very expensive hardware, 


claims Shany Computers. 

MP Startup lets a master 
submit a process to any avail¬ 
able or dedicated network 
station slave for remote 
execution. 

You can create communi¬ 
cations servers, file servers, or 
any other server that can si¬ 
multaneously support up to 
100 stations in a single net¬ 
work with MP Server. The 
software includes a task per¬ 
former that executes request 
tasks stored in the queue, and 
a transmitter that transmits re¬ 
sults to stations. MP Server 
includes station-to-server com¬ 
munications protocols, which 
you install in each station. 

MP Master lets you submit 
applications in background 
mode to available remote 
slaves while the remote unit is 
executing (e.g., compiling 
and printing) 5 and MP Sort lets 
you use several network 
slaves to simultaneously sort 
files or named pipe infor¬ 
mation. 

AH the software tools in¬ 
clude a low-level interface to 
NetBIOS and all network and 
NetBIOS routines. 

Price: $99 for the MP Start¬ 
up object code; $445 for the 
MP Server object code; $49 
for the MP Master object code; 
$99 for the MP Sort object 
code. The source code for each 
software tool is also 
available. 

Contact: Shany Computers 
Ltd,, 1 HahimeirSt., Natanya 
42304, Israel, 972-53- 
621905. 

Inquiry 960, 


9613-42 BYTE* MARCH 1989 














THE C LANGUAGE 

A new version of Turbo C with source level 
debugger Is now available, and maybe the new version 7 of Watcom C. 


MODULA -2 COMPILERS 


C COMPILERS 

Advantage C++ MS-DOS £395 
Aztec C86 Professional MS-DOS £110 
Aztec C86 Developer MS-DOS £165 


C CROSS COMPILERS 

We supply 2500AD, Aztec, Lattice, IAR and Hi-Tech 
Cross Compilers hosted on MS-DOS and targeted 
on Z80, 8085, 6502, 6801, 68HC11, 6301, 6809, 


Aztec C86 Commercial 

MS-DOS 

£250 

8051.68000 & 68020. Please call for information o 

Cl C86 Plus 


MS-DOS 

£290 

advice. 



Cl Optimizing C86 


MS-DOS 

£210 




De Smet C Programmer 

MS-DOS 

£ 95 

C INTERPRETERS 


De Smet C Professional 

MS-DOS 

£165 




ECO-C88 V4.0 


MS-DOS 

£ 70 

Latest v3.00 of C-terp has Improved debugging 

HIGH C (Metaware) 

vl. 4 

MS-DOS 

£380 

facilities. 



HIGH C 386 vl.4 


MS-DOS 

£545 




Hi-Tech C 


MS-DOS 

£115 

C-terp V3.0X 

PC-DOS 

£155 

Lattice C v3.3 

OS/26MS-DOS 

£240 

Interactive C 

PC-DOS 

£195 

Mark Williams LETS 

; C v4 

MS-DOS 

£ 60 

Introducing C 

PC-DOS 

£ 85 

Microsoft C v5 . 1 

OS/2&PC-DOS 

£275 

Living C Plus 

PC-DOS 

£135 

Microsoft Quick C 

vl.l 

PC-DOS 

£ 60 

Instant-C v3 

PC-DOS 

£380 

MIX C 


MS-DOS 

£ 20 

Instant-C/16M 

PC-DOS 

£680 

MIX Power C 6 lib 

s'ce 

PC-DOS 

£ 29 

RUN/C 

MS-DOS 

£ 60 

Turbo C v2 

TnrtlunrVa C 5 


PC-DOS 

Ms-nos 

£ 79 
f an 

RUN/C Professional 

MS-DOS 

£110 


The new Taylor Modula-2 challenges 

JP1 object code quality 


Logitech Modula-2 

OS/2 

£185 

Pecan P-Sys. w.Mod-2 

PC-DOS 

£ 80 

Farbware Modula-2 

MS-DOS 

£ 70 

FTL Modula-2 (sml.mem) 

MS-DOS 

£ 45 

FTL Modula-2 (lge.mem) 

MS-DOS 

£ 55 

FTL Modula-2 Developer 

MS-DOS 

£ 85 

Interface M2-SDS 

PC-DOS 

£ 75 

Interface M2-SDS-XP 

PC-DOS 

£185 

JPI Topspeed Modula-2 

PC-DOS 

£ 59 

Logitech Mod-2/86 Comp. 

3PC-DOS 

£ 58 

Logitech Mod-2/86 DevsysPC-DOS 

£145 

Modula Corp.PC Mod.2 

PC-DOS 

£150 

Taylor Modula-2 Dev Sys 

PC-DOS 

£505 

FTL Modula-2 Z80/CP/M-80 

£ 45 

Hochstrasser Mod.2 Z80/CP/M-80 

£100 

Modula-2 (Mod S/W) ATARI 520ST 

£ 75 

MacModula-2 v4.1 MACINTOSH 

£100 

Library source Is available with some compilers. 


Watcom Express C PC-DOS 
Watcom v6.5 Opt comp PC-DOS 
Zortech C v2 PC-DOS 
Zortech C Power Pack v2 PC-DOS 



Zortech C++ 

Aztec C86 Developer 
Aztec C86 Personal 
Cl Optimizing C86 
De Smet C Starter 
De Smet C Programmer 
De Smet C Enhanced 
Hi-Tech C 
Lattice C 
HIGH C {Metaware) Flex OS 286 
Aztec C Personal 1.06D CP/M-80 

Aztec Commercial 1.06D 
BDS C 1.60 Z80 

Eco-C v3.5.0 Z80 

Hi-Tech C Z80 

Mix C Z80 

Toolworks C/80 v3.1 
Aztec C65 VI.05 
Aztec C65 V3.20 
Aztec C68K MPW 
Aztec C68 

Aztec C68 Commercial 
Aztec C68 Developer 
Hi-Tech C 
Lattice C 

Mark Williams C v2 
Laser C 
Prospero C 


PC-DOS 

CP/M-86 

CP/M-86 

CP/M-86 

CP/M-86 

CP/M-86 

CP/M-86 

CP/M-86 

CDOS 


CP/M-80 
CP/M-80 
CP/M-80 
CP/M-80 
CP/M-80 
CP/M-80 
Apple DOS 
Apple PRO-DOS 
MACINTOSH 
MACINTOSH 
AMIGA 
AMIGA 
ATARI 
ATARI 
ATARI 
ATARI 
ATARI 


£ 60 
£220 
£ 29 
£ 59 
£ 90 
£230 
£130 
£210 
£ 85 
£125 
£165 
£115 
£330 
£380 
£110 
£180 
£ 65 
£ 45 
£ 99 
£ 35 
£ 40 
£180 
£230 
£ 85 
£ 55 
£250 
£165 
£ 99 
£ 85 
£110 
£150 
£ 85 


C LIBRARIES 


PROGRAMMING TOOLS 


Ada Compilers 
Assemblers & Libs 
Basic Compilers 
Basic Utilities 
BCPL Compilers 
C Interpreters 
C Utilities 
Comms.Libraries 
Database Libs. 
Dis-assemblers 
Engineers Libs. 
Forth 

Fortran Libraries 

Icon 

Lisp 

Nlal Interpreters 
Pascal Compilers 
Prolog 
Rise 

Smalltalk 


Algol Compilers 
AWK 

Basic Interpreters 
Basic Libraries 
C Compilers 
C Libraries 
Cobol Compilers 
Cross Assemblers 
Debuggers 
Editors 

Expert Systems 
Fortran Compilers 
Graphics Libraries 
Llnkers/Locaters 
Modula-2 
OPS 5 

Pascal Libraries 
Rexx 

Screen Libraries 
Snobol 


We stock many items for which there is no 
space in these advertisements. 


Prices do not Include VAT or other local taxes 
but do Include delivery In UK and Europe. 
Please check prices at time of order, ads are 
prepared some weeks before publication. 

This page lists some of our products. 

Call us for a complete pricelist. 

Order by phone with your credit card. 


Microsoft OS/2 programmers toolkits are now In 
stock. 

DATABASE 

Btrieve 

Btrieve v4.1lB 
Btrieve/Multi-tasking 
Btrieve/Network 
XQL 

C/Database Toolbox 
CBTREE 

C-Index/Plua 
C-ISAM (L,MS) 


OS/2 
MS-DOS 
MS-DOS 
MS-DOS 
PC-DOS 
PC-DOS 
(source any C) 
(source any C) 
MS-DOS 


C-to-dBase (source Cl) MS-DOS 
C-tree (source any C) 

R-tree MS-DOS 

db-VISTA III s'gle user PC-DOS 
db-FILE (most C's)s'gle MS-DOS 
db-RETRIEVE single-user MS-DOS 
Lattice dBCIII (L,MS) MS-DOS 
Lattice dBCIII+ (L,MS) MS-DOS 
SftFcus Btree&Isam (see any C) 
Virtual Memory File Man.PC-DOS 

GRAPHICS 

Enhanced Graphics Tlkt PC-DOS 
Essential Graphics v2 PC-DOS 
GFX Graphics PC-DOS 

Graphic v4.1(Cl,L,DS, MS)PC-DOS 
GSS Kernel system PC-DOS 

GSS Lattice Binding PC-DOS 
GSS Graph Dev Toolkit PC-DOS 
GSX Prog.Toolkit (DR) PC-DOS 
HALO '88 (MSC5,LAT,TC) PC-DOS 
MetaWINDOWS (CI,L,MS,T) PC-DOS 
MetaWINDOWS Plus PC-DOS 

Turbo WINDOWS/C (Turbo) PC-DOS 
Quick Windows/C (QC) PC-DOS 

SCREEN C WINDOWS 

Vitamin C (MS5.1) OS/24PC-DOS 
Blaise Power Scrn(MS4TC)PC-DOS 
Blaise View Mngr.(s'ce) PC-DOS 
Curses Screen Mngr. (L) PC-DOS 
Entelekon Windows(s'ce) PC-DOS 
Multi-windows (MS,L) PC-DOS 
Panel Plus (source) PC-DOS 

Vitamin C (source) PC-DOS 

Windows for Data (most) PC-DOS 
Windows for C (most C) PC-DOS 
Greenleaf Datawindows MS-DOS 
C-Scape v3 <MS,L,TC) MS-DOS 



£370 
£160 
£370 
£370 
£510 
£ 29 
£100 
£175 
£210 
£120 
£210 
£155 
£520 
£295 
£295 
£160 
£445 
£ 80 
£150 


£185 
£150 
£ 70 
£270 
£350 
£110 
£350 
£270 
£175 
£105 
£150 
£ 55 
£ 55 


£225 
£ 80 
£245 
£120 
£105 
£220 
£270 
£150 
£200 
£135 
£135 
£300 


OBJECT ORIENTATED LANGUAGES 


The Increasing acceptance of 
object-oriented programming has 
prompted this new section 

C SUPERSETS 


Advantage C++ 

(L,MS)PC-DOS 

£395 

Guidelines C++ 

(MS)PC-DOS 

£260 

Zortech C++ 

PC-DOS 

£ 90 

C-Talk 

PC-DOS 

£105 

SMALLTALK 


Smalltalk/V 

PC-DOS 

£ 75 

Smalltalk/V 286 

PC-DOS 

OTHERS 

£140 

Actor 

PC-DOS 

£370 

RisC 

PC-DOS 

£ 55 


GENERAL FUNCTIONS 


CQL (CTREE*BTRIEVE)s'ce PC-DOS 
C-Worthy Int.Lib (L,MS) MS-DOS 
D-Tree (source) PC-DOS 
Greenleaf (source) PC-DOS 
G'leaf Super Functions PC-DOS 
G'leaf Business Mathlib PC-DOS 
Smorgasbord (source) PC-DOS 
Blaise Tools Plus (see) PC-DOS 
Blaise Tools Plus/5.0 PC-DOS 
Blaise Turbo C Tools PC-DOS 
Blaise Light Tools (ZOR)PC-DOS 
ESI Utility Lib(source) PC-DOS 
Entelekon Funct(source) PC-DOS 
Phoenix Pforce (source) PC-DOS 
Pro-C (most C) PC-DOS 
Security Library object MS-DOS 
Resident-C (MS,L)(s'ce) PC-DOS 


£250 
£165 
£320 
£ 85 
£120 
£140 
£ 65 
£ 80 
£ 80 
£ 80 
£ 65 
£105 
£105 
£205 
£495 
£ 95 
£120 


COMMS LIBRARIES 

Blaise C Asynch(source) PC-DOS 
Essential Comms(L,MS,T) PC-DOS 
Greenleaf Comms(source) PC-DOS 
Multi Comms (L,MS) PC-DOS 

Zortech Comms (QC4TC) PC-DOS 

SCIENTIFIC LIBRARIES 


Wiley Scientif.Lib.v2 
Mathpak 87 (L,MS) 


ANY C 
MS-DOS 


£105 
£110 
£100 
£105 
£ 39 


£145 
£ 80 


PROGRAMMERS UTILITIES 


PC-Lint 


OS/2&MS-DOS £ 75 


Pre-C (Phoenix Lint) MS-DOS £175 

C-Documentor PC-DOS £195 

C-Scan PC-DOS £195 

C Toolset MS-DOS £ 90 

Lattice Cross Ref. MS-DOS £ 40 

REAL TIME & MULTI-TASKING TOOLS 

Csharp (CI,L,MS) s'ce MS-DOS £445 

Concurrent C (PC/MPX)sceMS-DOS £ 60 


Multi C (L,MS,Cl) 
Op.Sys.T'box (MS) s'ce 
Timeslicer v3.01 (L) 
Timeslicer v5 (MS) 
Over-C (L,MS) 


PC-DOS £105 
PC-DOS £ 65 
PC-DOS £160 
PC-DOS £160 
PC-DOS £225 


DISK COPYING SERVICE 

We can copy files to and from 600 disk 
formats Including CP/M, CP/M-86, MS- DOS, 
PC-DOS, ISIS, APPLE, SIRIUS, BBC, TORCH, 
APRICOT, HP-150, TRSDOS, DEC RT-11, 

IBM BEF, ATARI ST, AMSTRAD, MACINTOSH. 
Our charge Is £10.00 + disk ♦ VAT with discounts 
on small quantities and disks are normally 
despatched within 24hrs of receipt. 

For more Information call us. 


CROSS ASSEMBLERS 

We supply cross-assemblers by Avocet, 
2500AD.IAR Systems and Pecan hosted on MS- 
DOS, CP/M-86 and CP/M-80 with over 30 target 
processors. In total over 200 products with no 
space to list them here. We hold some stock but 
you should allow 10-14 days for delivery. Please 
call for Information or advice. 


GREY MATTER GREY MATTER GREY MATTER 

1 4 Prigg Meadow, Ashburton, Devon TQ13 7DF I I 4 Prtgg Meadow. Ashburton, Devon TQ13 7DF II 4 Pngg Meadow. Ashburton, Devon TQ13 7DF 

TEL (0364) 53499 I_ TEL. (0364) 53499 _I | TEL (0364) 53499 | 


96IS-44 BYTE* MARCH 1989 


Circle 428 on Reader Service Card 















































People use a Graphtec. 

Engineers who are serious about their work understand the 
importance of quality and accuracy. That's why they choose 
Graph tecs new AO-sized G Pi002 and Al-sized GPI102. 
Features that make these large-format plotters so popular 
include: an 80 cm/s pen speed, vector optimization, 0.005 mm 
mechanical resolution, HP-GL™ emulation and GP-GL™ 
command sets, and a long list of automatic functions. 

Get serious about your work, get a Graphtec. 


# See us at CeBIT *89 Stand no. A33, Hall 4. 


Recording the pa si Plotting the future 



GRRPWTEC CORPORRTION F.R. Germany: Graphtec GmbH Europe: Graphtec Europe GmbH United Kingdom: Graphtec (UK) Ltd. 

Mita 43rd Mori Bldg . 13-16, Mini 3^clifiine, Muhlbachstrssse 20 Borstcler Chiiussee &5-99A 21300 Hamburg 61* Environ House. Welshman's Lane, Naniwjch, 

Minato-ku, Tokyo 108. Japan Post Box 1132, D-8031 Scefeld (Obb > I F.R. Germany Cheshire CW 5 6AB, England 

Tel: (03) 453435II Telex; G24226S7 {GRAPH-J) Td; (08152) 7912 (0)-20 Fax: (OS152> 7912-99 Tel: (040) 511-5059 Telex: 2165630 (GTEC D) Tel: <0270 1 625-115 Fax: (0270) 626-733 


Circle 463 on Reader Service Card 


MARCH 1989 -BYTE 96IS-45 













































































































ATTENTION ALL CEBIT SHOW 
ATTENDEES AND EXHIBITORS! 

You are cordially invited to visit BYTE’s booth (Hall 6, Stand 
H30) at the CeBit Show starting March 8 in Hanover, 

Germany. 

Also, be sure to visit the following companies whose adver¬ 
tisements can be found on these pages of BYTE’s March 
International Edition: 


ABC COMPUTER LTD. 

HALL #5, 6 

STAND #C17-23, C18/23/20, C60/1 

BEST COMMUNICATIONS INC. 

HALL #6 

STAND #F64 


CLEO SOFTWARE 

HALL #17 

STAND #C56/C55 

BOOTH #G9 

DATEX 

HALL #7 

STAND #E22 


DTK COMPUTER, INC. 

HALL #5 

STAND #G06 


EECO 

HALL #4/10G 

STAND #C47 


FORMOSA MICROSYSTEMS, INC. 

HALL #6 

STAND #E19 


GIANTEK TECHNOLOGY CORP. 

HALL #6 

STAND #F64 


INTERQUADRAM 

HALL #6 

STAND #D55/D59 


IRIS 

HALL #6 

STAND #G16/H15 


MICRON, INC. 

HALL #7 

STAND #C42 


MIRO 

HALL #18 

STAND #C06 


RAFFEL 

HALL #6 

STAND #F32-G45 

(MITAC STAf 

SANTA CRUZ OPERATIONS 

HALL #3 

STAND #E10 


SOFTWARE DIRECTIONS, INC. 

HALL #6 

USA PAVILION 


TOP-LINK COMPUTER CO., LTD. 

HALL #6 

STAND #B54 


TREMON ENTERPRISES 

HALL #4 

STAND #G32 


UNITECH 

HALL #4,1.0G 

STAND #D55 


UNITRON 

HALL #5 

STAND #E35-36 



HANNOVER MESSE 



T'89 


Welt-Centrum BUro • Information •Telekommunikation 

8.-15. MARZ 1989 


96IS-46 BYTE* MARCH 1989 






PrintQ W High Productivity 
Print Spooling Software hr Power-Users. 


Boost your PC’s capabilities with 
PrintQ, the original, professional 
quality print spooler with mainframe 
power that lets you compute while 
you print. Without waiting and 
without wasting time. 

Run your application programs as 
usual. PrintQ intercepts documents 
bound for the printer, spools them 
to disk, and prints them automati- 
cally. Also PrintQ is completely 
programmable, 100% software 
and installs in seconds. 

The “Pop-up" Status Display allows 
you to view the print sequence and 
control document printing. Each 
document is maintained separately 
as a “PrintFile,” which can be con¬ 
trolled individually, to meet your 
specific needs. For example, you 
can print 5 copies of a memo, but 
only one copy of a letter. 


HiLite bars, tagging, menus and 
automatic prompting makes using 
PrintQ easy. 

■ Choose any of your printer’s fonts 
or functions for each or every 
PrintFile. 

■ Unload PrintQ completely from 
memory. 

■ View documents on screen with 
or without printing. 

■ Spooled reports can be exported 
to other programs (ASCII files). 

■ Automatically prints the number 
of copies you specify. 

■ Restart printing from any page. 

■ Start or stop printing at anytime. 

■ Powerful forms alignment 
capability simplifies working with 
pre-printed forms. 

■ Spool reports to disk to be 
printed out automatically whenever 


a printer is connected. 

■ Minimizes forms changes by 
grouping similar documents. 

■ Archives reports for reprinting. 

■ Print in order of priority. 

■ Wbrks with any printer or plotter. 

■ Control from a batch file and from 
within compiled languages. 

■ No program modifications 
required. 

■ Automatic help on every screen. 

■ Quick Start Card for fast, easy 
installation. 

Gua ra n te ed * * 

Try PrintQ. If you don’t fully agree 
that PrintQ saves time and 
increases productivity, return it 
within 30 days for a full refund. 
Order now. Call toll free 

1-800-346-7638 

extension 401 or see your local dealer. 
In New Jersey call 201-584-8466. 
Same day shipping on U.S. phone 
orders. 



USA Pavilion Hall 6 



Software Directions, Inc. 

1572 Sussex Turnpike 
Randolph, New Jersey 07869 


PrintQ 4.0 Offers PC 
Users These Powerful 
Advantages. 

■ Spools to disk, not RAM. 

■ Can be loaded into Expanded 
Memory (EMS). 

■ “Pop-up” Status Display using 

Corporate Licensing Available 

*DeaJer guarantees may differ. 



(Canada add 
$10.00, other 
foreign 
add $20.00.) 






Brings The State-OF-Art SMI 
To The Ultimate Success. 



No, 80286 


■ Enchances 80286 memory system performance and the 
whole system board manufactured using Surface Mount 
Technology under fully automated process 

* Fully compatible with IBM PC/AT, MS-DOS* and Xenix 
operation system and application softwares 

* Flexible architecture allows usage in any 80286 designed 
software package 

* Operates in Page mode with interleave memory subsysten 

* 12, 16 and 20MHz zero wait state operation 

* Programmable AT Bus dock timing to support various 
ADD-ON boards 

* Dual speed operation selective by hardware and software 

* Shadow RAM support for System BIOS and Video 
BIOS to improve BlOS-caLI intensive applications up to 
400% 

■ Advanced on board ACTIVE reset circuitry for stable 
power-on operation 

* On-board memory armed from 512KB expandable to 
on board 



■ Co-processor supported: 80287 — Operation speed 
selectable 

• Network supported: Novell network based on Ethernet oi 
Aroiet PC-Net based on DLink 

* AMI — American Megatrends [nc, Legal BIOS — indud 
Setup and Diagnostic program in ROM 

■ Power on default system configuration parameter for eas: 
on site system setup 

» PC/XT form-factor system board 


SURFACE MOUNT TECHNOLOGY 


In convertional board assembly technology, the component leads are inserted into holes through the printed circuits board (PCB) 
and connected to the solder pads, usually by means of wave soldering on the solder side (THROUGH-HOLE ASSEMBLY). In 
hybrid circuits (thick and film circuit), ie, leadless components — chips etc., are reflow soldered onto the ceramic on glass 
substrate in addition to the components already integrated on the substrate. Surface mounting is the new assembling method 
evolved from the above two techniques. 


ADVANTAGES 

Under this new technique, placement rate of components are 3 to 10 times faster than Dip Rate and the first pass yield will be 
much higher. When sizes of Surface Mount Components reduce, density of components and functions for a given area of circuit 
medium will be increased, in other words, size of finished products will be reduced. Moreover, surface-mounted packages have 
shorter lead lengths compared with the conventional type, this will improve the high frequency response and speed. 

ABC AND SMT 

ABC is aireauly introduced the Brilliant Enhanced Graphic Adapter (EGA) and Serial/Parallel Game Port Card (SPG) in Surfac 
Mount versions. Recently, we are very glad to announce the introduction of Surface Mount Technology in the 80286 MOTHER 
BOARD Manufacturing . ABC Computer Co Ltd is looking for your assistance to bring our SMT version 80286 to the world. 

All Products are registered and/or registered by their respective manufactures and are acknowledged. 

The above specifications are subject to change without notice. 


See Us At 



HANNOVER MESSE 

CeBIT'89 


8. - 15. MARZ 1989 


Hall 5 Stand No. C17-23, 

C1S-23/2Q & Hall 6 Stand 

No. C60/1 Hannover, West Germany, 


ABC 


ABC Computer Co. Ltd. 

Manufacturer & Exporter Circle 402 on Reader Service Card 

Basement 66 r Golden Shopping Centre, 148 Fuk Wah Street, Shamshuipo, Kowloon, Hong Kong. 



















Taiwan R.O.C. Special Advertising Section 


Taiwan’s High-Tech 
Advance into 
Worldwide Markets 



The year 1988 was a prosperous one 
for the Chinese microcomputer in¬ 
dustry. Although faced with many 
troubles including the N.T. dollar 
gaining value as well as the Japanese 
Yen, a shortage of DRAM with high¬ 
ly increased prices, slow product re¬ 
newal, disputes between employees 
and management, and strong compe¬ 
tition from Korean manufacturers, 
Taiwan’s information companies 
drew on their intelligence and strong- 
willed spirit to overcome serious ob¬ 
stacles and create strong growth dur¬ 
ing the 1980s. 

A Product Trend Perspective 

According to the analysis of the In¬ 
formation Promotion Council MIC 
(see table 1), the 1988 export figure 
for Taiwan’s microcomputers was 
2.26 million units, and the growth 
rate was 16 percent higher than that 
in 1987. The export value was $1,264 
billion (U.S.), 69 percent higher than 
in 1987. The average growth rate of 
information product exports was 42 
percent in 1988. However, it was the 
high growth rate of 69 percent for 
personal computers that was especial¬ 
ly impressive. 







Taiwan R.O.C. Special Advertising Section 


Also impressive were the statistics 
for the export areas for Taiwanese 
microcomputer products. According 
to the information collected by the In- 
formation Promotion Council MIC 
(see table 2), the European market has 
surpassed the U.S. market to become 
the largest export market. This is the 
result of aggressive sales promotion in 
Europe. 

Although the growth rate for the ex¬ 
port of microcomputer products to the 
U.S. market in 1988 was 87 percent 
compared to 56 percent to the Euro¬ 
pean market, the overall ratio of ex¬ 
ports is 38 percent versus 47 percent. 
The U.S. market still dominates 45 
percent of the overall exports of 
Taiwan’sinformation products. 
Whether this market holds will signifi¬ 
cantly influence the development of 
the information industry in Taiwan. 

Finding avenues to diversify the dis¬ 
tribution of exports is a major goal of 
China’s export trade policy; however, 
the industry cannot neglect the con¬ 
straints of the existing markets. 


Table 1 : Export Status of Information Products for Taiwan 
1987 and 1988. 

Amount: Million US$ 
Quantity: Thousand Units 


Year 

1907 

1988 

Growth Rate in 1988 

Product 

Quantity 

Amount 

Quantity 

Amount 

Quantity 

% 

Amount 

% 

Minicomputer 

0.2 

1.8 

0.3 

3.4 

50 

89 

Microcomputer 

1958 

759 

2264 

1264 

16 

69 

Disk Drive 

655 

97 

800 

119 

22 

23 

Printer 

73 

44 

93 

41 

27 

-7 

Terminal 

1530 

414 

1952 

513 

28 

24 

Monitor 

7022 

847 

7550 

1243 

8 

47 

Other 

Peripheral 

Products 


80 


95 


19 

Computer Parts 

- 

1458 

- 

1968 

- 

35 

Total 

- 

3701 

- 

5246 

- 

42 


Source of Data: Information Promotion Council MIC 

Table 2: Statistics of Export Area for Taiwan’s Information Products in 1988 


Year 

Area 

Overall 
Information 
Products (%) 

Microcomputer 

(%) 

Disk 

Drive 

(%) 

Printer 

(%) 

Terminal 

(%) 

Monitor 

(«*) 

Parts 

(%) 

United 

45 

38 

55 

54 

65 

45 

43 

States 

(24) 

(87) 

(28) 

(-12) 

(15) 

(16) 

(26) 


37 

47 

27 

35 

26 

40 

33 

Europe 

(64) 

(56) 

(-5) 

(0) 

(34) 

(92) 

(91) 

Asia- 

14 

10 

17 

8 

8 

11 

19 

Pacific 

(100) 

(152) 

(152) 

(0) 

(95) 

(101) 

(63) 


4 

5 

1 

3 

1 

4 

5 

Others 

(-12) 

(-12) 

(-70) 

(0) 

(28) 

(24) 

(76) 


100 

100 

100 

100 

100 

100 

100 

Total 

(39) 

(69) 

(23) 

(-7) 

(24) 

(36) 

(35) 


Source of Data: Information Promotion Council MIC 
Note: Figures in parentheses () represent growth rate 


96IS-50 BYTE* MARCH 1989 




































SIIG® offers three vital links: 
systems, LAN products and people. 


You get more than high 
performance 286 systems, 386 
systems. Arcnet and Ethernet 
products from SIIG. SIIG 
connects you with our innovative 
design engineers, dedicated 
production technicians, 
concerned technical support 
personnel, knowledgeable sales 
representatives, distributors 
and dealers. Let SIIG’s people 


link solutions to your needs. 

V y SUG, Inc. Taipei 

SURE TECHNOLOGY INC. 

Suite 14-3, No. 415, Hsin-Yi Road 
Sec. 4. Taipei. Taiwan. R.O.C. 

TEL: (02) 703-6100, 700-9155 

TLX: 10582 RECTRON 

FAX: 886-2-7098181 • 886-2-7552989 


Circle 454 on Reader Service Card 


MARCH 1989 - BYTE 96IS-51 










Speed Runs in 
the Acer 1100 
Family. 


Acer has taken the raw power of the 
80386 chip and channeled it into three 
of the fastest 32-bit personal computers 
available today: the 23MHz, 20MHz and 
16MHz 1100 Family. 

Our family of affordable 
performance-leaders gives you a full 
spectrum of powerful machines that let 
you finally set the pace of your work. 
From general business to complex 
engineering and software development 
applications, Acer’s 1100 Family gives 
you the answer. 

Computing With Cache Memory 

The Acer 1100/25 and 1100/20C put 
powerful memory caching and balanced 
zero-wait-state performance at yonr 
fingertips. Their exclusive architecture 
harmonizes all components, cache 


Jmd, 386™ and m&l are registered trademarks of Intel Carp, Weitek 1 167 and 3167 are registered trademarks of Wekek Corp. UNIX Ls a registered trademark of AT&T. Microsoft. 
XENIX, MS-OS^:, Windows/336 and MS-DOS are registered trademarks of Microsoft Corp. NetWare Is a registered trademark of Novell Inc. 

%lS-52 BYTE* MARCH 1989 














































memory, disk cache, and quick-access 
hard disks to push zero-wait-state 
performance to new levels, giving you 
the blazing fast system throughput 
needed for complex applications. And 
the Acer 1100/16 features a unique 
interleaved memory architecture 
that makes zero-wait-state 16MHz 
power an even more affordable 
alternative for high-powered business 
applications. They also give you three 
of the best dollar/MIPS ratios available 
in the world today. 

Unique 3 2-bit Bus 

What’s more, the 1100/25 and 20C’s 
two 32-bit slots support multiple bus 
masters, making true multiprocessing 
possible. The slots also give you a 
future expansion path, allowing you to 


increase total system memory to 24MB 
with high-speed memory boards. And 
for number-intensive business and 
scientific applications, all 1100 
computers support Intel 80387 and- 
Weitek 1167 or 3167 math coprocessors. 

Get Your Work Done Faster 
Each 1100 computer is designed to give 
you an edge in performance while 
maintaining compatibility with industry- 
standard software and hardware. Each 
lets you choose from MS-DOS, 
Windows/386, MS-OS/2, XENIX, UNIX 
and NetWare support. Each also provides 
an excellent platform for LAN file serving. 
And each 1100 personal computer 
comes with Microsoft Windows/386 and 
an Acer Mouse at no extra cost, giving 
you a user-friendly interface that gets 
your work done faster. 


Situated to Meet Your Needs 
All Acer personal computers are backed 
up by Acer’s 12 years of experience in 
the manufacturing of quality computer 
products and a global distribution net¬ 
work covering over 75 countries 
worldwide. To find out more about 
how the Acer 1100 Family puts your 
computing needs in perspective, contact 
any of Acer’s 10,000 dealers around the 
world. 


AceR (♦ 

The Word for Value 


Regional Offices: 1U.S.A.. San Jose. Tel: (400) 922-0333 ■ U K.. London. Tel: (01) 569-2978 ■ W Germany. Dusseldorf. Tel: (0211) 6508 0 ■ Japan. Tokyo. Tel: (03) 463-3222 ■ R.O.C., Taipei. Tel: (02) 713-2252. 

Circle 403 on Reader Service Card MARCH 1989 • B Y T E 96IS-53 


















































Taiwan R.O.C. Special Advertising Section 


U.S. Microcomputer Market 
Growth Trends for 1989 

The U.S. personal computer market 
continued its growth in 1988. Accord' 
ing to the estimates of such of U.S. 
consulting companies as Dataquest 
and Info Corp., the annual growth 
rate for sales was about 17 percent in 
1988 compared to 1987, while the 
growth rate for IBM PC compatibles 
was as high as 23 percent. It is predict¬ 
ed that the growth will continue but at 
a rate of about 10 percent in 1989* Tai¬ 
wan's information companies must be 
aware of these market trends. 

One attractive situation in 1988 was 
that the sales of 80386 SX systems to¬ 
talled about 100,000 units. It is predicted 
the sales will be 1.4 million units this 
year, 14 times higher. Although the 
1988 growth rate of sales in the U.S. 
market was 69 percent for Taiwanese 
companies, the major arenas are still the 
medium and low price markets. 

The recognition of brand image re¬ 
mains poor because OEM markets re¬ 
main the focus for Taiwan’s informa¬ 
tion companies. Although this situ¬ 


ation can be maintained operationally, 
no future benefit is achieved. By way of 
contrast, Korean companies heavily 
promoted their sales last year and grad- 
ually created recognition of their 
brands. Taiwanese companies must 
work aggressively in this promotional 
activity. 

In the worldwide market, sales are 
growing. The annual growth rate in 
microcomputer sales was about 13 per¬ 
cent in 1988 compared to 1987* It is 
predicted that the growth rate will be 
12 percent higher in 1989. In the IBM 
PC and compatible products market, 
the annual growth rate was 26 percent 
higher in 1988 compared to 1987. It is 
predicted that the growth rate will be 
25 percent higher in 1989. 

As for the U.S. personal computer 
manufacturers, IBM, Apple, Zenith, 
and Compaq remain among the major 
companies. IBM sold L3 million PCs 
in 1987 and about 1,58 million PCs last 
year. It is predicted chat IBM will em¬ 
phasise the PS/2 and OS/2 markets 
this year, and related sales will be a 
good indicator for these markets. It is 


also predicted that IBM will introduce 
a PS/2 90 system in the fourth quarter 
of 1989. Other PS/2 products (the 50, 
50Z, and 70) continue to be popular. 

Other than Apple, which does not 
produce IBM compatibles, IBM’s 
major competitors in the U.S. market 
include Zenith, Compaq, and many 
others. Compaq maintains a high 
price policy for its products, and has 
also joined nine other companies to 
defeat IBM’s MCA standard. They in¬ 
tend to promote EISA as the next 
major standard. 

In 1987 the top 10 U.S. computer 
manufacturers were IBM, Apple, Tan¬ 
dy/Radio Shack, Commodore, Ze¬ 
nith, Compaq, Atari, Sharp, Epson, 
and NEC. In 1988, the order became 
IBM, Apple, Zenith, Commodore, 
Tandy/ Radio Shack, Compaq, Atari, 
NEC, Epson, and Sharp. Their order 
has changed only slightly. 

How to Reach the Next Step? 

The U.S. information market is large, 
with over 60 percent of the worldwide 
market for both hardware and software 
products. If this market were lost, the 
information industry would slump 
greatly. The U.S. market is also impor¬ 
tant as it is an open market, providing 
equal competition, and consequently 
is the best place to market products 
with export-oriented features. 

The microcomputer industry has 
tremendous potential. Its function has 
important implications for human so¬ 
ciety overall. Taiwan is fortunate to 
enter this field at this time and become 
a strong competitor in the internation¬ 
al market. For this, Taiwan owes ap¬ 
preciation to its information pioneers 
and their achievements. As a fortunate 
result, Taiwan has had the opportuni¬ 
ty to make major advances at the be¬ 
ginning of this industry. But the future 
market will mature gradually. Strategic 
planning and competitiveness will be 
necessary for success, and it will not be 
as easy to achieve visibility. 

The 1989 growth rate may be ap¬ 
proximately 30 percent, but the actual 
numbers are not as important as 
thinking carefully how to reach the 
next step. 



96IS-54 BYTE* MARCH 1989 













Z-1: FAX Communication Card 


PC 

English, German, 
French Version— Z-FAX 


Hail 004 1.0G 
STAND NO.: G32 


Features: 



► Z-1: A fax commuhicahon/high speed data modem card 
(called the Z-FAX modem card) 


► Z-2: An optional facsimile machine interface card 
(called the Z-FAX I/O card) 


1. On line help in different language version 

2. Resident Sending 

3. Graphic Editor (Include Display, Scan, Print) 

4. Link User Text Editor 

5. Phone Book 

6. Direct or store-and-forward fax transmission 

7. Foreground and background fax reception 

8. High-speed file transfer 

9. Scheduled and batch transmission 

10. Manual, auto-dialing and redialing 

11. Instantaneous fax viewing 

12. Communication log look-up 

13. Ability to interface with other software such as PC Paintbrush, 
Wordstar, Dr. Hallo and any ASCII text editor 

14. Peripherals connection supported 

- Printer like Epson, HP Laserjet and fax machine 

- Any kind of scanner and fax machine 



Manufacturer & Exporter 

TREMON ENTERPRISES CO. f 
LTD. 


P.O. Box 55 — 441, Taipei 10405, Taiwan, R.O.C. 
Office: 11/F, No. 101, Sung Chiang Rd., 

Taipei, 10428, Taiwan, R.O.C. 

Tel: (02) 506-9074 (8 lines). 


































Taiwan R.O.C. Special Advertising Section 


WHO’S WHO 

IN TAIWAN’S INFORMATION INDUSTRY 


Acme Technology Corp. 

Person^ Contact; John Tseng 
Fax: 886 2 7681987 

To pursue perfection and provide good service 
are Acme’s management ideals and the goals we 
seek to achieve always- In the past year, based on 
market demand, we constantly researched new 
developments. This is important not only be¬ 
cause today’s science and technology are chang¬ 
ing, but to face the computer market at this time, 
all participants with a global outlook must pro- 
mote their products more actively. 

This must be done to meet the demand of the 
entire market. In the past we have cooperated 
with the "VLSI 11 and the “GENOA" Taiwan 
agency to develop popular AT motherboards 
and high-resolution display cards- These high- 
quality products reached many markets world¬ 
wide, receiving high praise from our customers. 

In the future, as now, we will strive to honor 
and follow our management goals. We sincerely 
hope to win your acceptance, ft 


Bering Information Co., 

Ltd. 

Ftersoms! Contact: Jeffrey Oven 
Fax: 886-2-5007144 

The Bering Information Co., Ltd. (TVS), is an 
experienced manufacturer of quality color and 
monochrome monitors and has been researching 
and developing products for OEMs since 1983, 

As a specialist in the production of visual 
display units, Bering supplies a full line of moni¬ 
tors, including 14-inch, 15-inch, and 19-inch 
EGA, PS/2 VGA, and multisync with VGA- 
Plus color units. Monochrome units include 14- 
inch and 15-inch green, amber, and paper-white 
screen formats. 

Also available are add-on cards with advanced 
color monitor capabilities such as VGA 
(800X600), EGA (800x600; 640x480), and 
many other display enhancement products 
which yield the full potential of the Bering moni¬ 
tor line, while offering “one-stop sourcing 11 for 
satisfied customers around the world. 


Best Communication Inc. 

Persona! Contact: Fleming How 
Faxt 886 2 7165703 

Best Communication Inc., established in 
1986, is owned by a group of veteran C C engi¬ 
neers, who have years of experience in the de¬ 
sign, production, and marketing of telecom¬ 
munication products. During 1987-1988 Best 
earned step by step a high reputation for manu¬ 
facturing six models of modems with superior 
quality for both the European and North Amer¬ 
ican markets. Countries currently approving the 
specification of Best modems are PTT Sweden, 
PTT the Netherlands, NZPO New Zealand, FTT 
Switzerland, JATE Japan, FCC the United 
States, FTT Finland, FTT Belgium, P T India, 
and Taiwan. Approvals from PTT Australia, 
SAPO South Africa, BAST UK., PTT Norway, 
and FTZ West Germany are still pending. 

With unceasing effort, new products were de¬ 
signed and evaluated in 1988 and will be brought 
out by the first quarter of 1989. These products 
include a 2400- bps modem with error correction 
MNP class 4 or 5, a CC1TT V-32 recommenda¬ 
tion 9600-bps modem with MNP 5, a 
PC/XT/AT fax card with friendly, multifunc¬ 
tion software, and a handy mechanical scanner 
for a total desktop solution. ifr 

Chuntex Electronic Co., Ltd. 

Personal Contact: Steue Chen 
Fax: 886-2-3919780 

Chuntex Electronic Co., Ltd., started in 1982 
with simple subassemblies. Through the efforts 
of a diligent team of engineers tn research and 
development, we have since become one of the 
best known manufacturers and design houses in 
Taiwan for color and monochrome monitors. 

With more than 450 employees currently in¬ 
volved in the area of production and 35 engi¬ 
neers in the R&D division, we arc steadily pro¬ 
ducing 20,000 units of color monitors and 10,000 
units of monochrome monitors per month. All 
work is performed in a 90,000 square foot manu¬ 
facturing facility. 

We have been exporting our monitors to more 
than 40 different countries in Europe, North and 
South America, Asia, and the Middle East. 
With our efficient support, quality, price, and 
delivery, all of our customers are gaining large 
shares m their markers. We would like to sincere¬ 
ly invite you to share our prosperity by promot¬ 
ing our monitors to your market. & 



96IS-56 BYTE- MARCH 1989 
























MAIN PRODUCTS: 

U5900: 25MHz 80386 System 
U5909: 16MHz 80386SX System 
U3700VS: 16MHz 80286 System 
U3700: 12MHz 80286 System 
U5200: 12MHz Laptop 80286 
DR-DOS? Concurrent DOS-386®supply 


SEE US: 


* Cebit ’89 March 8-15 



Booth E35-36. Hall 5 
HANNOVER, W.GERMANY 
* COMDEX/spring ’89 APR 10-13 
Booth 0118, MC CORMICK place 
CHICAGO, USA 

NITRON INC. 


HEAD OFFICE 3TH FL NO- 542-3 CHUNG CHENG ROAD, 23138 HSIN TTEN, TAIPEI, TAIWAN. R O C, TELEX: 32445 UNITHONS 
TEL (EJ2J S171BB1 {5 LINES) FAX: (02) 9157308 

USA BRANCH: 322 PASEO TESORO. WALNUT CA 91789 TEL: 5382254. 5982360. FAX: (714) 5302432 

WEST GERMANY BRANCH KLEMENSSTBASSE 7. D-4Q54 NETTETAL 2. TEL (02157) 1616 FAX: (02157) 16H. 


DA-DOS, CONCURRENT DOS ARE TRADEMARK OF DIGITAL RESEARCH INC 

Circle 463 on Reader Service Card 


MARCH 1989 -BYTE 961S-57 




































Taiwan R.O.C. Special Advertising Section 


C & D Technology Inc. 

Personal Contact: Calvin Y eh 
Fax: 886-2-7916312 

What works well today should work well to¬ 
morrow. C&.D products are no exception. 

C & D Technology Inc., a leading computer 
maker, provides a range of computers through 
our distributors worldwide, for both “MAN- 
DAX” registered brand names and OEMs. We’re 
never satisfied with current success. To come up 
with top products is our responsibility. When 
our background is examined, you will find C &. 
D an experienced, capable, developing, and hon¬ 
est organization. 

We’re introducing the following items to meet 
the increasing demands of today’s users and to 
keep users up to the minute: 

-G2 12MHz zero-wait-state 286 mainboard 
-NEAT 12/16MHz zero-wait-state 286 main- 
board 

Option: P9 daughter board 

(386SX-16MHz/ 386-20MHz selectable) 

-386 20MHz zero-wait-state mainboard 
-Black-and-white display portable PC with 
double super-twist, contrast rating 1:20 to ease 
the user’s eyes 

-Complete system featured as requested. 

With the abovementioned new items, we offer 
advanced computer technology to our buyers, ft 


Datatronics Technology, Inc. 

Personal Contact: Scott Liu 
Fax: 886-2-76406/4 

Datatronics Technology, Inc., was established 
in 1984 in Taipei, Taiwan, as a leading manufac¬ 
turer of computer peripherals and data commu¬ 
nications products, especially modems. 

The auto-dial, auto-answer modems available 
from Datatronics’** are in a series of stand-alone, 
pocket-sized, and card versions meeting Bell 
standards and CCITT recommendations for 
dial-up and leased-Iine operations in both syn¬ 
chronous and asynchronous mode. The modems 
have been granted FCC registration and certifi¬ 
cation in the U.S., as well as PTT approval in 
several other countries, for direct connection on 
telephone lines and networks. 

In addition to compatibility with the Hayes"* 
AT command set, the Datatronics modems sup¬ 
port extra features such as voice data discrimina¬ 
tion, voice-data switching, error correction, and 
dynamic telephone number storage. 

The production capacity of Datatronics is 
250,000 or more modems annually. The 
modems are mainly exported under the brand 
name of Discovery"*. However, Datatronics also 
welcomes orders of private labels and customer 
designs. 

A pocket-sized acoustic coupler is also avail¬ 
able, in addition to modems. ft 


Eastern Fairyland Inc. 

Personal Contact: Tony Huang 
Fax: 886-2-5057550 

EH 386 
Main board 

* Intel 80386 microprocessor 

* 20MHz system clock 

* System support functions: 

7 channel DMA 

16 level interrupt 

3 programmable timers/system clock 

* Coprocessor: 80387 (optional) 

* 8MHz I/O bus timing compatibility of 16MHz 
on board 

* Battery backup for CMOS configuration table 
and real-time clock 

* 8 Input/output (I/O) slots: 
one 32-bit 

four 16-bit 
three 8-bit 

* System memory board 

The 32-bit system memory board expanded to 
4MB or 10MB uses static-column dynamic 
RAM to permit fast access with zero wait 
state. ft 


E-Tech Inc. 

Personal Contact: Long Chang 
Fax: 886-35-777751 

E-Tech Inc. announced its new BulletModem 
E9696 at Comdex/Fall *88 in Las Vegas. 

It is fully compatible with and reportedly per¬ 
forms better than other CCITT V.32 modems. 
The V.32 modem is a 9600-bps full-duplex 
modem and can be operated over dial-up and 2- 
wire/4-wire leased lines. 

At the heart of the E9696 is the Rockwell 
modem chip set R9696 DP, which might be the 
best V32 modem chip set available worldwide. In 
addition, E-Tech uses the Trellis Coded Modula¬ 
tion (TCM) and MNP class 5 to guarantee 100 
percent error-free data transmission and simulta¬ 
neous throughput on two channels. 

Prior to November 1988, E-Tech introduced 
other modems in the BulletModem series: E2400 
(with MNP class 4), E2400M (with MNP class 5), 
PC2400, PC2400M, PS2400, PS2400M, and 
E9612 (with MNP class 5 and 9600-bps pseudo 
full duplex). 

Located at the Science-based Industrial Park 
in Taiwan, E-Tech Inc. concentrates its efforts in 
the data communication field and all of its high¬ 
speed BulletModems are now the phase one 
product line. According to E-Tech’s marketing 
plan, the company will target 1 percent of the 
world’s modem sales within the next two years. 
Its E9696 V.32 modem is priced at $2495. ft 


Expert Electronic Co., Ltd. 

Personal Contact: Jennifer Liu 
Fax: 886-2-7061442 

Expert Electronic Co. introduces a safe, high 
capability, continuously developing computer 
security system—POSARCS PC. “POSARCS" is 
the acronym for “Power On Security And Re¬ 
mote Control System.” This security system’s 
biggest difference, when compared with other 
brand computers, is that POSARCS’ indepen¬ 
dent CPU controls the switching "on” and “off" 
of electric power. This is not the same as using 
keys for security, which arc easy to lose and du¬ 
plicate, or using software for security, which is 
easy to damage. POSARCS is the only PC de¬ 
signed with an independent electric power system, 
and useable with an RS for remote capabilities. 

Applications include PCs using POSARCS, 
as well as networked companies and schools. 

Currently in production are the Security 30 
and Security 286 models. In March 1989, we 
plan to announce the Security 386. ft 


Formosa Microsystems, Inc. 

Personal Contact: Mike Sher 
Fax: 886-2-7659739 

Established in March 1988, Formosa Micro¬ 
systems is a high-tech-oriented company concen¬ 
trating in the product development of hard disk 
controllers, designed by experienced in-house 
software and hardware engineers. 

The master ADC (advanced disk controller) 
card is the highest performance hard disk and 
floppy control card available for the PC/AT bus 
with the ST 506-type interface. Standard fea¬ 
tures include a look-ahead cache, RAM buffer, 
1:1 interleave, and high-speed 10MHz bus inter¬ 
face, as well as universal floppy disk controller 
for 1.2MB/360K 5Vi-inch disks and 1.44MB/ 
720KB 3 Vi-inch floppy disk drives. 

Formosa Microsystems, Inc., offers a full line 
of hard disk and floppy control cards, including 
MFM and RLL formats, all with high quality 
and reliability. ft 


Hotai Technology Co., Ltd. 

Personal Contact: Jack Tsai 
Fax:886-2-7417814 

Hotai is a professional computer exporter and 
manufacturer in Taiwan, founded in 1981 by 
Managing Director Mr. Jack Tsai. 

Hotai’s engineers do more than develop reli¬ 
able products such as the PC/XT/AT/386 and 
HTT-30 (Model 30 compatible) Add-on Card. 
Their newest product, introduced in November, 
is the HTK-A252 (Baby 386 Motherboard), 
which has been through complete testing and 
quality control. The excellent quality is corn- 
firmed by our customers. ft 


96IS-58 BYTE* MARCH 1989 













FORMOSA 



MICROSYSTEMS 


r551 HANNOVER MESSE 

LlICbJITJ? 

8* - 15. M A R Z1 989 
HALLE 6 El 9 



’'''1024x768 Display 


F ormosa Microsystems would 
like you to imagine a com¬ 
pany a lot like your own. 
Strong and well-established yet 
dynamic and growing, Formosa 
Microsystems is composed of people 
who inspire confidence. And like 
your company, we also believe 
cooperation is the key to any suc¬ 
cessful business partnership. 
Formosa Microsystems has recently 
completed the development of a 
new PaeLIT VGA/1024 card. Palit 
VGA/1024 offers resolution up to 
1024 x 768 with 16 colors out of a 
palette of 256K to support IBM 8514 
type monitors. Palit VGA/1024 is 



Circle 425 on Reader Service Card 


totally compatible with MS Window 
2.0 and MS Window/386 in virtual 
mode and is OS/2 compatible. This 
unbeatable combination of superior 
quality and state-of-the-art features 
is at an unmatched price. Besides using 
registered levels compatible to VGA, 
EGA, CGA, MDA and HERCULES, 
our VGA card also has fully automatic 
mode switching and is compatible 
with a wide variety of monitors with 
auto detect. Even more special, 
our analog display supports 
more different dis¬ 
plays than many 
models costing 
significantly more. 


For a complete set of specs on our 
VGA card or our other products as 
well as information on becoming a 
distributor, please contact us directly. 


PaiJT Is THE TRADEMARK OF FORMOSA MICROSYSTEMS. INC 


IBM Ms WINDOW 2.0. MS WINDOW/386. OS/2. EGA. VGA. AND 
HERO LES ARE REGISTERED TRADEMARKS 


FORMOSA MICROSYSTEMS , INC. 

3F, 1015 Ming Shen E. Rd. Taipei Taiwan, R.O.C. TEL: 886-2-7627023 • FAX: 886-2-7659739 • TLX: 17118 FORMICRO 










Taiwan R.O.C. Special Advertising Section 


Giga-Byte Enterprise Co., Ltd. 

Personal Contact: Jack Ko 
Fax: 886-2-9184839 

Giga-Byte Enterprise Co,* Ltd., makes some of 
the highest quality mainboards and add-on 
cards that the industry has to offer. They also 
use their expertise to make a full line of compat¬ 
ible computers. The company employs more 
than 65 people in their 8*280 square foot facility. 
Capacity of the plant stands at 1,000 main- 
boards, 5*000 add-on cards* and 800 systems per 
month. The plant is presently producing 700 
mainboards, 20,000 add-on cards, and 300 sys¬ 
tems per month. 

The company is in the European and Austra¬ 
lian markets at this time but is working on ex¬ 
panding their markets to include the Middle 
East and South Africa. 


Good Way Industrial Co., Ltd. 

Personal Contact: Robert Tsao 
Fax: 886-2-5056377 

Since 1974, Good Way has been a specialty 
factory for manufacturing data communication 
equipment. Currently* our main products are (1) 
computer cables, (2) data switches, and (3) net¬ 
work accessories. Our popular items are Apple 
Talk, Phone-Net compatible kits* and an SCSI 
terminator. Also, we have completed develop¬ 
ment of our newest items—data voice integrator 
wall plate and snap-on DB-connector, and 
hoods. 

Our policy is to provide a one-year warranty, 
professiona 1 serv ice* a nd fast dell very, ft 


In Win Development Inc. 

Personal Contact: Joe Wart£ 

Fax: 886-2-5012-450 

Established in 1986* In Win was originally a 
manufacturer of computer cases. They soon 
added PC power supplies to their list of offerings 
due to rising market demand. 

Recent improvements to the mammoth facil¬ 
ity include a department for in-house designed 
and manufactured metal oxide field transistors 
and the installation of equipment for producing 
plastic injection molded computer enclosures. 
This type of PC case* which is resistant to high 
frequencies up to 1Q0K* or three times the 
amount of conventional cases* represents the 
major upcoming trend in the computer industry. 

The In Win Co.'s entire power supply line fea¬ 
tures a new generation of capabilities* including 
reliable voltage switching* low heat build-up* sta¬ 
ble regulation* and current mode controller that 
reduces standby power consumption and ex¬ 
tends the service life of all computers. 

(continued) 


Built-in electrical safety features meet both 
UL and CSA guidelines. Users can be sure that 
an In Win switching power supply will run flaw¬ 
lessly even under continuous high-voltage situa¬ 
tions, while providing outstanding protection 
from shorting, surges, and the emission of radi¬ 
ated interference, ft 


The Jow Diaw Enterprise 
Co., Ltd. 

Personal Contact: Micro Chen 
Fax: 886-2-7837850 

Z-Nix is a growing company and has been in 
the computer field for about eight years. The 
safes have doubled in the last six months, Z-Nix’s 
turnover last year amounted to US $20*000,000. 

Z-Nix is known for making molds for com¬ 
puter cases, diskette storage boxes, copy holders, 
keyboard drawers* monitor movers, and so on. 

Also well-known as an OEM mouse manufac¬ 
turer, Z-Nix i§ introducing a full line of Z-Nix 
advanced super mouse packages, which are the 
most reliable and long-lasting mice 
manufactured, ft 


Monterey International 
Corp. 

Personal Contact: Michael Chang 
Fax; S86-2-50739L2 
Historical highlights: 

1977: Monterey Inti. Corp. established. 

1981: Monterey presented the first PC keyboard 
made in Taiwan, 

1982: Monterey started manufacturing personal 
computers, 

1985: Monterey presented its first IBM PC/XT 
compatible computers, Monterey products en¬ 
tered the American market, Monterey started 
selling semiconductors. 

1986: Key tech Electronic Inc, established and 
bought its land and factory building tn Tamsui. 
1987; Established Monterey Electronics Inc. 
(U.S. A.),and Monterey End. Corp. European Li¬ 
aison Office. Monterey presented its 386 PC, 
1988; Monterey adopted its Profit Center 
System. 

Current product series: 

MS-24 S/16MHz small footprint 80286-16 
system 

MS-23 8/12MH* 80286-12 system 
MS-21 6/10MHz 80286-10 ystem 
MS-33 80386-20 tower system running at 
8/12/16/24MHz 

MS-25 8/12MHz 80286-12 SLIM system 

MS-15 All-In-One 10MHz 8068 SLIM system 

*MS-35 80386SX 16 system 

*MS-36 80386 25 cache memory system 

*WS-25 80286-12 workstation 

*VGA card* Ethernet Card* Arcnet card. ft 


NEST Technologies Corp. 

Personal Contact : G,C, Chen 
Fax: 886-2-7073687 

NEST Technologies Corp. was founded in 
1988 to serve as the bridge between chip and sys¬ 
tem by conducting product development for Tai¬ 
wan's computer manufacturers and chip makers. 

At present, computer motherboards and 
graphic cards contribute most of the NEST's 
total revenues. However* with well-trained and 
experienced specialists in various fields, the com¬ 
pany expects its long-term objective will be fo¬ 
cused on graphics systems, digital signal process¬ 
ing products, and system integration technology, 

NEST's main products—the Advanced VGA* 
25MHz cached 80386 Baby AT* and 20/16MHz 
NEAT—have quickly gained a reputation for 
performance and reliability. The Advanced 
VGA is fully compatible with VGA, EGA, 
CGA, MDA* and Hercules HGC, and provides 
programmable resolutions from 320x200, 256 
colors, to 800x600, 16 colors, with a color palette 
that supports 262,144 colors. The VGA sup¬ 
ports software such as ACAD Release 9* Win¬ 
dows 386* GEM, Lotus, and Ventura. A DIP 
switch selects the optional "screen saver" func¬ 
tion with a default value of 15 minutes. 

The Double Cache 80386 Baby AT running at 
36MHz clock with zero-wait-state* with NEST- 
Cache software and Cache hardware controller, 
increases the system performance dramatically. 
The motherboard supports operating systems 
such as DOS, OS/2, XENIX* and Novell net¬ 
work Q.S. 

NEST Technologies Corp, is a young and out¬ 
standing company. Export sales are 70 percent, 
with the remaining 30 percent sold locally. For 
the export market, the United States and Eu¬ 
rope are the biggest customers. 

In the future, the company hopes to seek li¬ 
censees* resellers* or agents to further expand the 
market. ft 


Pei Chow Industry Co., 

Ltd. 

fVrsona? Contact: Michael Hsu 
Fax: 886-2-5634166 

PARCO is a professional manufacturer of 
monitors. Our current products are 14-inch 
monochrome* color, EGA, VGA, and multi- 
VGA monitors. 

At the beginning of 1989, PARCO will offer 
the following new devices: 14-inch color multi¬ 
sync* 14-inch monochrome 31.5 KHz* and three- 

mode 15.75/18.432/41.85 KHz. 

PARCO’s products are all over the world. To 
work toward the future is PARCO's sincere aim. 
To offer perfect products with reliable quality is 
PARCO's goal. ft 


96IS-60 BYTE- MARCH 1989 













COMPUTEX >89 

June 6-12, 1989 

Let Computex give you a hand! 


CHW EXIEBNA HMDE 
DtrtlOfWENl COWCl 


(mi) 


ASSOCIATION 


Venues: TWTC EXHIBITION HALL 

CETHA EXHIBITION HALL (Sungshan Domesiic Airport) 
Contact CETRA EXHiBmON DEPAPmEHT 
5 Hsinyi Road, Seciion 5, Taipei IQSOa Taiwan, Republic of China 
Tel: (021)725-1111 * Fax: 886-2-7254314 * Telex: 38094 TPEWTC 
Branch Offices: 

• New \forft-CrrDC Ina * Tel: (212)532-7055 * Fax: (212)2134169 

• San Francisco-Far East Trade Service Inc, 

Tel: (415)7884304 * Fax; (415)7380488 

• Chicago - Far East Trade Service Inc. 

Tel: (312)321-9338 * Fax: (312)321-1636 


Circle 418 an Reader Service Card 


MARCH 1989 * B Y T E 96IS-61 























Taiwan R.O.C. Special Advertising Section 


RCS Technology 
Corporation 

Personal Contact; Pamela Hsiao 
Fax: 886-2-5363696 

RCS Technology Corporation is an estab¬ 
lished manufacturer and exporter of anti-static, 
anti-radiation (VLF) products, 

RCS's major products: 

1. RCS VDT filter: The frame is flexible—new 
material; blocks up to 983 percent VLF radia¬ 
tion; 100 percent static shielding effect; average 
conductivity for every point on the mesh, 

2. Computer cover 

3. Keyboard strip 
RCS’s new products; 

RCS has a new line of anti-static products made 
of 100 percent conductive fiber, such as car seat 
covers, steering wheel covers, and computer op- 
era tor aprons, which have been proven to dissi¬ 
pate VLF radiation. Moreover, woven materials 
made of 100 percent conductive fibers are also 
available for the international market. ft 


Running Electronic Inc. 

Personal Contact; Hardee Yen 
Fax: 886-2-7356500 

You ere running with the best PC interface 
and system with Running Electronic Inc. You 
may be interested in our newly developed PC 
items. Running keeps you ahead of the times and 
the hardware race. We offer quality PC products 
and services you can rely on at competitive 
prices. Contact us for your next mainboard, in¬ 
terface card, or PC-compatible system. ft 


Silicon Integrated Systems 
Corp. 

Personal Contact: Jimmy Huang 
Fax: 886-2-773109 

Silicon Integrated Systems designs, manufac¬ 
tures, and markets application-specific inte¬ 
grated circuits for use in the high-tech industry, 
SIS accepts the responsibility to provide the best 
possible service to its customers and to engage in 
cooperative ventures with other companies, do¬ 
mestically and overseas, in the development of 
new products and processes, 

Despite its short history, SIS has several ac¬ 
complishments and is considered the most pros¬ 
perous company in this field. This is supported 
by the following facts: 

*Sole supplier of full-line CMOS mask ROM 
(32K/64K/128K/256K/512K/1M) in Taiwan 
*Full line of computer and telephone ICs 
*US $1?M sales amount in 1988 
*More than 30 products developed in 1988 
The future of SIS looks very brighr, SIS is 
committed to looking toward the future and 
learning from the past. ft 


Sertek International Inc. 

Personal Contact: Amy Chen 
Fax: 886-2-501252 1 

When it opened its doors in 1977, Sertek In¬ 
ternational Inc. of Taiwan faced a dilemma. On 
one hand, Taiwan’s abundant supply of low- 
cost, quality engineering and technical man¬ 
power rendered the country a perfect place to lo¬ 
cate a high-technology trading firm. On the 
other hand, the company knew, this advantage 
might be completely undermined by the fact that 
anything it marketed would automatically have a 
“made in Taiwan’ 1 stigma attached to it in the 
global market. 

As with any international company which is 
growing as quickly as Sertek, the challenge in the 
future will be to avoid spreading itself too thinly. 
Given its past strategy of maintaining a high 
density of technical knowledge in its ranks, this 
resolution will continually be a part of Sertek’s 
corporate philosophy. 

In the Taiwan domestic market, it is Sertek’s 
global perspective that has garnered a great deal 
of admiration for the company. The trading firm 
has assumed the position of local distributor for 
a number of well-respected, international hard¬ 
ware and software companies including Philips, 
AT&T, Sun, Daisy, Microsoft, AshtonTate, 
Autodesk, Lotus, Intel, T!, and NS, 

Sertek’s success in both international and do¬ 
mestic markets provides a good model for the 
host of new companies which have focussed on- 
hiring marketing experts, but skimped on build¬ 
ing a staff that has good, honest know-how. 

Features include: 

*Fully compatible with IBM XT and PS/2 
Model 30 

*8086 or V30 CPU operation with variable 
8/10/12MHz speed 

* 16-bit data bus operation 

*FDC on board can support four floppy disk 
drives with the following capacities 360KB, 
720KB, L2MB, and 14MB. 

* Bi-directional printer port, PS/2 mouse, 
game port, and one serial and parallel on board 

*XT bus hard disk standard IDE connector 
on board, meaning no HDC (hard disk control 
ler) is required, ft 


Silitek Corporation 

Personal Contact: Dominic Cfiang 
Fax: 886-2-7731601 

Silitek was established in 1978 to design and 
manufacture custom precision OEM parts, also 
specializing in electronic assembly and electronic 
component supply. 

(continued) 


Today Silitek has six divisions which produce 
custom-designed molded rubber parts; plastics; 
electronic assemblies; electronic connectors; and 
stamped, precision-machined, and semiconduc¬ 
tor products. 

Our most recently devleoped product is a 
Rubber Switch Keyboard with a positive tactile 
feel and a life cycle of over 20 million key 
depressions. 

Each of Silitek's six divisions has implemented 
a total quality control program to ensure rigid 
conformance to exact customer specifications. 
From conceptual design through development to 
final production, our intention is to thoroughly 
understand both design specifications and final 
performance requirements—and through this 
understanding to produce dimensionally correct 
components which function at a superior level. 

We use Extensive Statistical Process Control 
(ESPC) in our quest to attain a low parts-per- 
million defect rate, regardless of the technical de¬ 
gree of difficulty in component manufacting and 
electronic assembly. ilk 


Sun Moon Star Co., Ltd. 

fbrsemal Contact Qmis Yang 
Fax: 886-2-7071809 

The Sun Moon Star Group, founded in 1945, 
is a progressive corporation on the rise. By using 
forward-looking concepts in managing today’s 
businesses, they are establishing themselves in¬ 
ternationally as a truly multidimensional enter¬ 
prise with over 2500 staff members. 

Their strong R&D group, a special series of 
tests, QA/QC and process control, and fully 
FCC-authorized laboratories for testing proto¬ 
types of EMI and other safety standards, pushed 
them to reach their highest level of revenue yet. 
In 198? it reached US $300 million, and their 
current projection for 1988 is targeted at US 
$500 million. 

To meet the current marketing trend of the 
C&C, the Sun Moon Star Group combines ad¬ 
vanced computer technology with superior tele- 
communciation capability to create an end prod¬ 
uct that surpasses the needs of the users, 
whether large-scale corporations or single opera¬ 
tors, in search of easy-to-use, fault-free 
equipment. 

The SMS product line in the computer field 
includes the PC/AT 286, NEAT 286, 386, 
386SX, add-on cards, power supplies, UPS, 
modems, and other computer peripheral 
equipment. 

With many years of experience, the SMS 
Group has an exact understanding of what a PC 
user needs—superior performance, reliable ser- 
vides, technical support, reasonable prices, and 
mutual firm cooperative planning. In a word, 
what Sun Moon Star offers is long-term 
commitment. ft 


96IS-62 BYTE- MARCH 1989 










We have the 
HIGHEST Resolution 




We have the HIGHEST Resolution 


2-ISIix, the well-known OEM Mouse Manufacturer, is introducing the 
full line of our advanced Super Mouse packages which are the most 
reliable and long-lasting mice manufactured. 


Our Super Mouse offers the resolution of 250 dots-per-inch as 
compared with all other ordinary mice which only give you the reso¬ 
lution of 200 dpi. so it makes your desktop drafting, publishing, and 
applications operations so much more enjoyable than it used to be. 


When it comes to a Super High 
resolution mouse. Z-Nix Super Hi- 
Re$ Mouse is the best and only 
mouse which gives you the high¬ 
est resolution of 340 dots-per- 
inch (as compared with other so- 
called HiRes mice with 320 dpi} 
for a power user like you who 1 
deserve the best and smoothest 
performance delivered by this 
desktop companion. 





PS/2" COMPATIBLE 
Lifetime Warranty 
For All different 
application needs 

Z-Nix Super Mouse is fully compatible with 
all popular programs. Being cost-effectively 
prices, it is the only mouse you CANNOT 
AFFORD to be WITHOUT Fordiversity in user 
application needs, the Z-Nix mouse can come 
bundled with CAD or Paint program. 

Naturally, Z-Nix mouse comes with a 
Lifetime warranty since Z-Nix mouse is built 
around our advanced technology, high- 
quality, reputation, support, and our best 
service 

Because we know it is more than just a 
tiny input device - it carries a lot of YOUR 
SELECTIONS. 



Super Serial 
Mouse 

DR. HALO 111* 


Super Hi- 
Resolution 
Mouse 

wfTurbO CAD™ 


Super Bus Mouse 
DR. HALO III™ 



THE JOW DIAW ENTERPRISE CO., LTD. 

No. 1, Alley 49, Lane 149, Nan Kang Rd., 
Sec. 3, Taipei, Taiwan, R.O.C. 

Fax: (02) 783-7850 

P.O. Box: 18-56, Taipei, Taiwan, R.O.C. 
Telex: 12674 2DUCOM 
Tel: (02) 783-7777 (Rep.) 


Circle 457 on Reader Service Card 


MARCH 1989 -BYTE 96IS-63 






Taiwan R.O.C. Special Advertising Section 


Sure Technology Inc. 

Perjtmai Contact; Jrerte Shih 
Fax: 886-2-7098/8/ 

Sure Technology Inc, is a joint venture of 
SIIG, Inc., a well-known U.S. hi-tech computer 
design and research firm located in Fremont, 
California, and of Rectron, Ltd,, one of the top 
two rectifier manufacturers in the world and one 
of the most famous computer OEM manufac¬ 
turers in Taipei, Taiwan. 

All the products carried by Sure Technology 
Inc. are designed by SHG's advanced engineering 
laboratory staffed with senior engineers, and 
then are produced by Rectron, Ltd. Rectron has 
years of experience in production, with modern 
facilities and strict quality control procedures. 
Under strong support from SIIG and Rectron, 
Sure is always capable of supplying superior 
products in the market. 

Currently, Sure services European and Asian 
customers with various add-on cards, AT 386 
and AT 286 systems, and integrated communica¬ 
tion products to fulfill a total modern office 
automation solution. 

To provide better technical support and to 
share the benefits of lower cost with its custom¬ 
ers, Sure is planning to merge with SIIG to be 
SIIG, Inc. Taipei in June, Join us as part of our 
future prosperity. & 


Tailon Enterprises Corp. 

Personal Contact: Ming Yang 
Fax: 886 2 5060618 
Factories: 

Plant 1: Focus divider, doubler, triplet, bleeder 
Plant 2: Flyback transformer 
Plant 3: Aluminum basket and some speaker 
parts and assembly 
Plant 4: Hi-fi and car speakers 
Plant 5: Disperse dyes, basic dyes, reactive dyes, 
direct dyes, textile auxiliary 
Plant 6; Dyeing acrylic for customers 
Present main markets: 

L U.S.: Cooperating with factories such as Para 
dyne, Philips BCC, Honeywell, and Mars 
2, Europe: Cooperating with factories such as 
Compix, El fa, Vifa, Wharfedale, and Sciron 
3* Others: Asia, South America, and Canada 


Taiwan Video & Monitor 
Corp. 

Personal Contact; Ceilia Yang 
Fax: 886 2 7716678 

TVM was founded in 1978 with its main busi¬ 
ness in electronic components. TVM concen¬ 
trated its focus onthe monitor field and, in 1981, 
came up with the world's very first three-in-one 
Multi-Display Color Monitor MD-3. 

(continued) 


This eventually developed into TVM *5 first 
successsul MD series family line, made up of 
MD-3V, MD-7, MD-S, and MD-24. With its 
motto fixed on “Producing superior quality 
products only, 15 through years of steady growth, 
TVM is going as strong as ever in both produc¬ 
tion output and market share worldwide. 

TVM has designed a Multi-Function Multi¬ 
sync Monochrome Monitor, which is simplified 
in one monitor to meet the requirements of all 
cards. 

The second generation monitors include MD- 
It/MG-II, MD-300/600/700, and VGA com¬ 
patible monitors, MD-12, MD-14, MG-12, and 
MG-14. 

The most advancedVGA series monitors, 
SuperSync 2A and SuperSync 3A, both in color 
and monochrome, will be ready to ship out in 
the early spring of 1989. & 


Techpower Co., Ltd. 

Personal Contact; Frank Chen 
Fax: 886-2-7/53105 

Techpower Co. started in personal computers 
in 1983. This company is enjoying the boom of 
done IBM PC/XTs and ATs. In 1988, Tech¬ 
power started to invest in laptop machine devel¬ 
opment, predicting that the laptop will be the 
star of personal computers in 1989. 

Techpower announced its T-260G, 80286-16 
CPU-based laptop personal computer in Novem¬ 
ber 1988. The high-speed performance of the 
CPU and the 80287-10 coprocessor (optional) 
makes this machine a good companion. 

The T-2600 is equipped with one 1.44MR 
floppy drive and a standard 20MB fast access 
time, half-height hard disk made by Conner Pe¬ 
ripheral Co. A 10MB hard disk is optional. 

The memory size ranges from 512K to 4MB 
based on the size of of the RAM chips. This ma¬ 
chine will meet high memory demand applica¬ 
tions. Two serial ports can easily connect exter¬ 
nal devices such as a mouse or modem. The 
printer port is at the rear of the panel. 

The Techpower T-2600 now is available in two 
versions, 80286-12 and 80286-20, and is priced as 
a standard configuration, 


Top-Link Computer Co., 
Ltd. 

fbrsonal Contact; David Ku 
Fax: 886-2-9018569 

Top-Link is a medium-sized company with 
over 60 employees, most of them engineers. 

Marketing plan: 

A. Develop OEM business worldwide, 

B. Set up sales office in Europe. 

C. Keep new products phase in marketing. 

feonemued) 


Top Link's Future scope; 

For the Hanover CeBIT exhibition, Top-Link 
plans to exhibit a 386SX-based laptop with 
VGA compatible display. 

The major export product to West Germany is 
its laptop. Other export regions are Northern 
Europe, U.S., Canada, and Australia, 

Top-Link can broaden its export offerings 
when its master production quantity reaches 
over 3K per month. t3t 


The Third Wave Publishing 
Corp. 

Personal Contact: Robert Lee 

Fax: 886-2-7658767 

The Third Wave Publishing Corporation, a 
subsidiary of Acer, is one of Taiwan's best- 
known and major producers of peripherals. 
TWP is the R.O.C.'s largest software, peripheral, 
and publications company. Sales in 1987 were 
US $5.8 million and will exceed the US $10 mil¬ 
lion goal for 1988. 

The Third 'ttfevels product line includes the 
Generation Adaptation Products (GAP) series of 
peripherals, designed to enable the computer 
user to bridge the technological gap between dif¬ 
ferent high technology systems—for example, in 
system upgrades and transport of data between 
incompatible systems. Initial products on the 
market are a line of external drives consisting of 
six models covering all major types of PS/2, PC, 
laptop, portable, and Commodore applications, 
for both H/z-inch and SVMnch floppy disk 
media. 

A more recent development in the range of 
products offered by TWP has been the inclusion 
of hard and floppy disk controller cards. The 
purpose of the cards is primarily to increase stor¬ 
age capacity and access time efficiency. Cards in¬ 
clude an AT ESDI H/FDC, AT RLL/MFM 
H/FDC, and an XT RLL/MFM HDC, 

The automation industry represents another 
major area where comptuer technology finds in¬ 
creasing applications—and TWP Finds opportu¬ 
nity. The Third Wave has it Keyless Data Collec¬ 
tion series to facilitate the processing of 
information at all levels of computerization. The 
series provides users with a time-saving, cost-ef¬ 
fective method of data input that is virtually 
error free, The company’s bar-code reader line 
presently consists of four models: a keyboard em¬ 
ulator, an RS232/422 interface reader, a porta¬ 
ble, hand-held reader, and an on-line reader ex¬ 
pandable up to a 128-unit network. 

In late summer 1988, TWP entered into the 
forms publication arena, releasing ACEFORM, 
desktop form-composition software, using the 
Microsoft Windows environment. Feature for 
feature, it offers as much, or more, than other 
packages costing substantially more, yet is easy 
to learn and convenient to use. 


96LS-64 BYTE- MARCH 1989 












LHTin 


CHASE 

The Chase Manhattan Bank, N.A. 

CURRENCIES SELLING BUYING 
TT/QO TT OD 

TG £ 


w, 


e are the first supplier of Computerized Foreign Currency Exchange 
Boards ond Moving Message Signs in Toiwon. Our experienced engineers 
develop software and hordwore systems ond compatible products of our 
Boards ond Signs. Our products oe with multifunctional ond under-go stria 
quality control. Pleose contaa us for detail immediately. 


▼ PS-3208 


C. JAMIE* TEC HNOi 


SB STG £ 

m US s 

151 aust S 

— D MARK 100 
SB » K s 
□ JAP Y 100 
II MAL % 100 
NOTES 
SB STG £ 

■ us S 

■ MAL S 100 


BQBBSD ROMOS B9QS0 
GOSOBO BSBS8B iiSSSS, 

Baasea bbbsru owm 

BG3BR S3B3B8 BBOi 
H888BG BGBE 

SELLING BUYING 

mmao oobogo a 

M 

somati bc-bqAs ~ 


-C 0 T1 r UTERI Zi 

[GIftftTSTflP ) PS232 NOUIf 

--MESSAGE S!< 

CONNECTED WITH IBM PC 


A Specie Designs 


MODEM 


MSI 


(A) Computerized Foreign Currency Exchange Doard con be 

used with IBM PCs ond its compatible products or MODEM to display information. 
We provide the relative ond eosy-to-operote software system. A remote controlled 
keyboard is ovoiloble for direa transmitting. 



Computer 


Personal 


I mnrtTAictssiT/wuiTAiicsim asm us liir 

urrimuiSALi 

£9 NEW YORK 

USD 

'lit BBSS 

C MONTREAL 

CAD 


L0NT00 

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wfjeaQ ■ 

■ TIKIIOLMA 

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Hi- OSLO 

N0K 

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+- KDOPEMIAMINA DKK 

RSaSBD 

1 ififi FRANKFURT 

DEM 

tiSOBQQ 

■“ AMSTERDAM 

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BEL 

QM8B3 

1* ZURICH 

CHF 

BBBQBQ 

|kl PAR IlSi 

FRF 

asima 

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BBiWBB 

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ATS 

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pte nmas 

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■ MADRID 

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JPY 


$MELBOURNE 

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REYKJAVIK 

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(D) Our Multicolor Moving Massage Sign Systems con also be utilized with 
the help of IBM PC ond its compatibles or MODEM. 

Circle 427 on Reader Service Card 

SEE US AT 


Giantstar 


manufacturer & exporter 

OIANTEK TECHNOLOGY CORP. 


fTpl HANNOVER MESSE 

[□CeBIT'89 


RB-2002 ► 

Features: 

* No limit in distance of transmitting. 

• One computer con control ot least 256 moving message signs ot the some 


time. 


• Synchronous or asynchronous display. 

• High speed doto display, no disploy doto limit, doto con be saved in disk. 

• LED c‘ ‘ ‘ 


) dot motrix 6x8 


a 


- IS MARCH 1989 


HALL 006 STAHD F64/1 


P.O. BOX 79-64 TAIFCI, TAIWAN. R.O.C. 

Office, io/f.. no. 95. sec 1 . cwunc chihg s. rd.. taipci. Taiwan. r.o.c 

TCI, 866-9-3318158 CRCPJ TLX, 99933 GWMTOC PAX, 886-9-3618790 


EGA Laptop — 
Anytime, Anyplace 


I 80287 Expansion (optional) 


PROCESSOR 

■ 80286 CPU. I0/I6MH, Landmri speed 

■ Real time dock/calendai 

EXPANSION 

■ 2 Expansion dofc. t lull sue, 1 kali sac 

■ 2 Serial ports ■ I Parallel part 

PLASMA DISPLAY 

■ 640 x 400 4-Gray scale plasma screen ■ IBM EGA/CGA/MDA compatible 

■ IBM EGA/CGA/HERCULES compatible on external monitor 

■ Brightness and contrast control 

DISK DRIVES 

■ Built-in 40 MB 3.5* had disk dnve with auto parking while power s off 

■ Built-in 1.44 MB 3.5* llopy disk ■ One PC Happy connector 
lor external dsk cfcrve (3G0K/I.2M-5.25*; 720K/1.44M-3.5*) 

KEYBOARD 

■ 85 Keys ■ IntemaUextemal keyboard 
switching tor optional external keyboad 

■ Tactile & N-Key rollover 

MEMORY 

■ 2MB RAM on-board, expandable to 4MB with user 
direct accessible memory 1C socket on main board 

DIMENSIONS 

■ 400(D) x 370(W) x 100(H) mm. 

15.7(D) x 14.6(W) x 3.9(H) inches 

POWER SUPPLY 

■ 90-240 V AC, 95 W, auto switchmg power supply 

WEIGHT 

■ 7 % (17.4 Lbs.) 

ACCESSORIES INCLUDE 

■ Carrying bag with shoulder strap ■ User s manual 


PLASMA 

DISPLAY 



WARRANTY 

■ One year limited warranty 

OTHERS 

■ Multi-layer coating tiller 


CONFIGURATION 

SWITCHES 



(IBM PC/XT. AT. AND EGA/CGA/MDA/HERCULES ARE REGISTERED Ha||e 6 B 54/1 
TRADEMARKS OP TUP INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES CORP ] 


HANDLE 

'M 


EXTERNAL KEYBOARD CONNECTOR 


TOP-LINK COMPUTER CO.. LTD. 

No. 6. Lane 333. Hsin Hsu Rd.. Hsin Chuang. Taipei. Taiwan. R.O.C. 
Fax: 886-2-9018569 Telex 31182 Tel: 886-2-9013576 - 8 9041551 

Circle 459 on Reader Service Card 


















































Taiwan R.O.C. Special Advertising Section 



Tremon Enterprise Co., Ltd. 

Personal Contact: Steve O. Yang 

Fax: 886-2-5073412 

* Established: 1981 

* Capital: US $2,000,000 

* Employees: 200 

* R&D: 20 engineers 

* Space: 5,000 square meters 

* Activities: Manufacturer and exporter for data 
communications, buffering and switching de¬ 
vices, and accessories. 

* Current sales and R&JD focus: Fax card and 
relevent software. Dedicated software engi¬ 
neers ensure consistent commitments to cus¬ 
tom-specified software requirements and im¬ 
provements on user interface. 

* Strong hardware engineering support facili¬ 
tates the customer’s obtaining PTT approval 
and consistent quality. 


Twinhead International 
Corporation 

Personal Contact: John Lin 
Fax: 886-2-7130898 

Founded in April 1984, Twinhead Interna¬ 
tional Corporation is a designer and manufac¬ 
turer of personal computer systems and com¬ 
puter peripherals. 

Twinhead is also famous for its display cards, 
such as MDA, EGA, SEGA, Magic™ VGA, and 
Magic™ Combo. The Magic™ Combo is a video 
display card combining both monochrome and 
color modes. It supports not only monochrome 
and color displays, but also emulates 16 shades of 
color on a monochrome monitor. Plantronics, 
Hercules, and 132-column display modes are 
also supported. & 


Unitron Inc. 

Personal Contact: Osnick Liaw 
Fax: 886-2-9157398 

Unitron is the partner you need. Founded in 
1979, Unitron has distinguished itself in the PC 
field. Strong R&JD, stringent quality control, full 
support, and excellent service are our main pri¬ 
orities. We provide a full product line of high- 
performance PCs to meet your requirements. 
With branch offices in the U.S., West Germany, 
and Japan, Unitron has established distribution 
channels in over 50 countries. To be our partner, 
please contact us for the special sales package 
showing our main products: 

U5900: 25MHz 80386 system 
U3980: 16MHz 80386SX system 
U3700VS: 16MHz 80286 system (NEAT) 

U3700: 12MHz 80286 system 

U5200: 12MHz 80286 laptop system & 


Union Pacific Industries 
Co., Ltd. 

Personal Contact: John Liu 
Fax: 886-2-7828402 

Union Pacific Industries Co., Ltd., has a long 
history of experience and modern, computerized 
facilities. 

We provide specialized OA and PC system 
combinations, including computer caddies and 
chairs, and computer lights. For PC or OA use, 
furniture is designed professionally to meet the 
end user's demands. 

We also provide several types of lighting fix¬ 
tures and lamps, including halogen, PL, incan¬ 
descent, hanging, track, wall, table, floor, touch, 
and I.R. switch styles, made of solid brass, brass- 
plated metal, wood, ceramic, plush, and 
fabric. tY 



80286-16 LAPTOP 



TECHPOWER, T-2600 is advanced design, high resolution gas plasma personal 
computer. 80286-16 CPU based, 60287-10 math-processor. CGA display built in 
with 640 x 400 resolution. I printer port, 2 serial ports and external video output. 

T-2600 with 1.44 MB floppy drive and 20MB or 40MB, high resistance of 30G (Operating), 
special laptop purpose hard disk makes this machine more reliable when moving and 
weight only 13 pounds (5.98KGS). 

Advanced full range AC power 90V-260V design ensures the safty use all the world. 
1200/2400 BPS internal modem built in (option) makes globe communication possible. 

T-2600 will be a partner at home and in the office. 


TECHPOWER CO., LTD. 

3F-3 No. 719 Ming Tsu E. Rd., Taipei, Taiwan 
Fax: 886-2-7153105 Telex: 29905 TAIDEX 
Tel: 02-715-1205/717-2881/712-6460 


96IS-66 BYTE* MARCH 1989 


Circle 456 on Reader Service Card 


































ROOM 1201 12TH EL NO- 136 SEC- 3 JE Al RD, TAIPEI, TAIWAN. 

R.O.C. TEL: 886-2-7091451 FAX; 886-2-7073687 

IBM PC/AT, OS/2, XENIX. Htrculrt, Novell are trademarks of thdr owners. 


High Performance 


Advanced VGA 


nEXT 

TECHNOLOGIES 


* VGA, EGA, CGA. MDA and Hercules 
HGC fully compatible, 

■ programmable resolution frum 3 ZD x 206 , 
2 S 6 enters 10 BOO u 600 , 16 &$ors 

* Cater palette supports 262 , 144 coteffi- 

* Fastest access la on-bosnl 256K RAM by 
internal 32 bit bus architecture 

* Supports digital and analog monitors 
with various, frequencies 

* Double seem line Junction. 

* 32 MHz dot clock. 

■ Software drivers ter AUTOCAD. 

Window, GEM, Lotus, Ventura, elc. 

* Proprietary "'Screen Saver" function 
Patent No- 77205002 


Re safer Licensee OEM 

inquiry welcome 


Double CACHE 

25MHz m With CACHE 

* Intel B038C CPU running 25 MHz clock., 
zero waiLstaw 

- Proprietary NESTCACHL software increases 
disk performance by 3006% 

* Optional 20 MHz 30307 numeric 
coprocessor, 

* Advanced cache controller using tour-way 
set-associate architecture- and 32K bytes 
cache memory. 

■ 16 Mega bytes RAM board, with wail state 
selecting jumper 

* Standard flaby-AT size. 

* Supports operating systems such as DOS, 
GS«, XENIX, Novell network, etc. 


Circle 444 on Reader Service Card 



98.9% Radiation and 100% Static 
Free Working Environment 

1989 Brand-New Design & Price 


RCS SSI VDT Filter 

■ 98 9 % radiattnn and 100% sane lire level 

* EELminttfcs glure und reflection 

* Flexible ff;inn: fliisd on curvy and flat 

* EffcctLvfl cni both color and mono VDTs. 

* Ibder aino useful ter TV walrheni. 

ACS 587 Rnti-flttfiotun Rpron 

* Avoid radiation of micro 
wave oven 

■ Prevent from radiation of 
computer 


Distributor Welcome 


RCS 583 Anti-Static Keyboard Strip 

» Off era fiifl static protection to computers. 

• iladf rtf highly couduaivc fibera 

• Induiln a it-faeter pmualln* curd. 

» Utilities computer's Lifespan. 

ACS 582 Anti-StntI Computer Cover 
RCS 588 Anti-Static Car Seat Cover 
RCS 590 Antistatic Fabric 
RCS 593 Anti-Static Steering Wheel Cover 


see us at: 

a 


RCS 


RCS TECHNOLOGY CORPORATION 

12E, No-140, Sung Chians ltd-. TolpeL Fax: 886-2-5363696 

Taiwan. R.O.C. Tel: 886-2-5512614 Telex: 28902 RCSTEC 


THE HIGHEST PERFORMANCE 
BOARD IN THE 386 WORLD 

A STATE-OF-THE ART DESIGN FROM 
AMERICAN MEGATRENDS INC. U.S.A. 



KAOTEC 80386-20 SYSTEM 


TR-8000 386-20 MINITOWER CASE 
TR-0001 DESKTOP 





KAOTEC 80286-16 SYSTEM 


TR-6001 DESKTOP 
TR-6002 SLIM CASE 


SPECIFICATIONS 

•64KB CACHE 
MEMORY 

•INTEL 32 BIT B0386-20MHZ 
CPU 

-128K ROM (AM I BIOS + EGA 
BIOS) 

•SOCKET FOR 80387 CO¬ 
PROCESSOR 
-20MHz SYSTEM CLOCK 
■SYSTEM CLOCK SWITCH 
BY KEYBOARD (AMICLK 
FDR EUROPEAN KEY¬ 
BOARD PROGRAM) 

•fl LAYERS P,C.B + 

*6 EXPANSION SLOTS: 

1 x 32, 4x16, 1x8 

♦ OPTION 2 MB/8 MB RAM 
BOARD CAN BE EXP¬ 
ANDED TO 10MB/18MB BY 
INSTALLING 8MB PIGGY 
BACK 

-AMI BIOS-386 BUILT-IN- 
SET-UP 6 DIAGNOSTICS 
•PERFORMANCE NORTON 
SI23 0 LAM ARK TEST 
30MHz 

*32 BIT ROM BIOS FASTER 
THAN SHADOW RAM 
■DALLAS SEMiCONDOCTOR 
REAL TIME CLOCK 
DS-1287A; WITH AN 
INTERNAL ENERGY 
SOURCE POWER DURABLE 
OVER tO YEARS 
(MAINTAINS AN ACCURACY 
OF 1 MINUTE PER MONTH 
AT 25*C) 

• EMS DRIVER AVAILABLE 
BY SOFTWARE OF AMI 
SEEMS 


• AMD 80286-10/80286-12 
MICRO-PROCESSOR 

• 6MHZ, 8MHZ. ID MHZ or 
12MHZ SYSTEM CLOCK 
WITH LED INDICATOR 

■SOFTKEY SELECTABLE 
SYSTEM CLOCK 

• HARDWARE RESET 
JUMPER 

■ 512K/640KJ1024K/204BK/ 
4098K BYTES RANDOM- 
ACCESS MEMORY (RAM) 

• DALLAS SEMICONDUCTOR 
REALTIME CLOCK 
DS-12B7A WITH AN 
INTERNAL ENERGY 
SOURCE POWER DURABLE 
OVER 10 YEARS (MAIN¬ 
TAINS AN ACCURACY OF 
1 1 MINUTE PER MONTH 
AT 25"C) 



HWA HSIN ELECTRONIC CO., LTD. 

SF.. NO 12, LANE 538. CHUNG-CHENG RD,. HSlNTlEM. TAIWAN, R.O.C. 

TEL 986^915337$ FAX: 886-2-9196892 TELEX: 3S210TRONIX 


Circle 447 on Reader Service Card 


Circle 429 on Reader Service Card MARCH 1989 -BYTE 96IS-67 




























Taiwan R.O.C. Special Advertising Section 


Computex Taipei 1989 


Showing the latest products in*the world’s most 
advanced and fastest growing industry, Compu¬ 
tex Taipei ’89 will be held at the Taipei World 
Trade Center Exhibition Hall and the CETRA 
Exhibition Hall at the Sungshan Domestic Air¬ 
port June 6 through 12, 1989. 

As with last year’s show, the 1989 event will be 
split into two exhibition areas to cater to the 
large number of participants, with a shuttle bus 
operating between them. 

At the 1988 show, there were 519 exhibitors, 
of whom 351 came from Taiwan and 168 from 
abroad, occupying 1,460 booths. Among those 
attending were 4,260 foreign visistors from 65 
countries and 120,000 from within Taiwan. 

According to the organizers, the China Exter¬ 
nal Trade Devleopment Council (CETRA) and 
the Taipei Computer Association (TCA), the 
number of both exhibitors and attendees will be 
higher this year. 

Among the foreign participants last year were 
such leading international companies as Seagate, 
Miniscribe, Microsoft, Epson, Philips, Wang, 
and Thompson. Of the foreign visitors, 45 per¬ 
cent came from Asia, 21 percent from North 
America, 20 percent from Europe, 5 percent 
from Australia, and 3 percent from Africa. 

According to a survey conducted by CETRA, 



more than 90 percent of last year’s participants 
and visitors found Computex ’88 to be so reward¬ 
ing that they will return for this 1989. 

Reinforcing the booths display in the main 
body of the hall will be a full program of semi¬ 
nars and meetings held in side rooms to provide 


information on the latest trends in the industry. 

Among the leading product categories on 
display will be mainframe computer systems, 
mini and microcomputer systems, switching 
power supplies, printers, laser printers, termi¬ 
nals, bar-code readers, keyboards, uninterrupti¬ 
ble power supplies, fax equipment, micro-telex 
equipment, copier equipment, diskettes, hard 
disk drives, interface cards, add-on cards, univer¬ 
sal disk controller cards, motherboards, multi¬ 
function cards, modem cards, LAN cards, 
EPROM writers, EGA, CGA, MGA, speed 
cards, serial/parallel cards, PC/AT, PC/XT, 
mini AT, turbo, color monitors, monochrome 
monitors, mice, P.O.S. systems, and other com¬ 
puter products and services, computer accesso¬ 
ries, and trade media. 

Taiwan ranks first in the world as a supplier of 
monitors, second in terminals, third in personal 
computers, and is a leading source of keyboards, 
add-on cards, motherboards, 386 machinery, 
and PS/2 compatibles. With increased emphasis 
on R&cD, Taiwan is fast becoming one of the big¬ 
gest IC design centers also. 

Computex ’89, therefore, will consolidate Tai¬ 
wan's position as a leading maker of computer 
products and a main center for the information 
industry in Asia. ft 


/AMz 

TKtwxjtogy Corp 


Apr 1989 


IS 


Your Choice 


( VLSI P9 386SX 


* I6MIIZ 0-WfS Mfc 
W/PAGEMODE CONTROLLED 

* SYSTEM 


T 



Dec 1988 


Au«. 1988 


Am- 


ACME TECHNOLOGY CORP. 


6TH PI.. 133. Chung Hsiao E. Rd.. Section 5. Taipei. Taiwan. R.O.C 
TEL: (02)7644201. 7631863 TLX: 29107 KAI BOARD FAX: (886-2)7681987 



Professional Frame Grabber 

286/386 


Color Application 

SCREEN RESOLUTION: 

• 512x512 pixels 
INPUT : 

• NTSC or PAL . RGB 
OUTPUT• 

• NTSC or PAL . RGB 
PIXEL COLORS- 

• 32768 colors display 


B/W Application 

• 512x512 pixels 

• RS-170, RS-330, CCIR 

• RS-170, CCIR , RGB 

• 256 gray levels (8 bits) 


Software: 

Custom software and system integration are available 



VISIONETICS 


TAIWAN OFFICE: 

34 East-4th Industrial Road, 
Science-Based Industrial Park, 


Hsinchu, Taiwan, R.O.C. 


INTERNATIONAL ™ (pas> 7/21/6 

Fax: (035) 772170 





























See whatTVM multisync monitors do for 
any PC " video standard. 


: picture-perfect 

display of software in MDA, Hercules ® CGA, BGA > 
MCGA, VGA. and even higher resolutions. 


TVM multisync monitors give i 
Hen 


In color or the worlds first monochrome 
multisync monitor both work with IBM® PC f 
PS/2 < Macintosh® and compatibles. And 
automatically adjust to horizontal scanning fre¬ 
quencies from 15 KHz to 38 KHz in TTL or 
analog. So you get TVM reliability, support and 
value with future video standards, too. 

Get 56% higher monochrome reso- 
lution than the NEC® MultiSync GS. 

The MG-11 monochrome multisync displays 
resolutions up to 1024 x 768 pixels. That’s better 
than most monochrome multisync monitors— 56 


percent higher than the NEC MuttiSync GS. And 
equal to color monitors costing hundreds of 
dollars more, like the NEC MultiSync XL or IBM 
8514, The MG-H shows graphics in 256“ distinct 
gray shades, so it's perfect for today's most ad¬ 
vanced programs. And for future applications from 
imaging to 3-D solid modeling. 

Get Brilliant TVM multisync colors 
in up to 1024x768 resolution. 

The MD-11 color multisync provides rich 
col ors and crisp display of resolutions up to 
1024 x 768 pixels. It s ideal for programs such 
as 1-2-3®, AutoCAD® and even desktop 
publishing applications like Pagemaker^ that 
combine text and graphics. 


standards agencies you can count on outstanding 
performance and reliability. 

So contact TVM today. See for yourself ltow r 
TVM monitors make every resolution picture 
perfect. 


Key 

Features 

MG/J 

Monochrome 

MD-1I 

Color 

Mode 

Multisync 

Multisync 

Max. Res. 

1024x768* 

1024x768* 

Screen Size 

14 inches 

14 inches 

Option 

Adapters 

Prisma®EGAMAX, 
VGAMAX, IBM 8514/A, 
or equivalent 

Signal Link'* ** 
Prisma* BGAMAX, 
WAMAX ; or 
equivalent 


You can depend on 
monitors from the 
professionals. 


TVM makes a broad line of multisync, VGA , 
EGA and CGA monitors, built and tested to exac¬ 
ting specifications. Just like the millions of quality 
monitors we've built for customers in more than 
60 countries. And since we carry the approvals of 
the world s leading safety and communications 



‘Requimprope? software drivers ami video display card. * 'Formerly calledTV-Mowe 


®<§ 



The Professional Monitor Company 


1AIWAN VIDEO & MONITOR CORP. P.O. Box 3338, Taipei. Taiwan, R.O.C. • Telephone: 886.2-776-5318 • Fax: 886-2.721-4798 • Telex: 28190 TVMTWN 
Distributors and telephone numbers AUSTRALIA Keller Automation 03-543-7244 * CANADA TVM Video &, Monitor Canada Inc, (604) 871-8111 Fix: {604} 8734770 and Canara Technologic* Inc. (416) 8902525 * 
HONG KONG Macro Business Appliances Co., Ltd. 852^299601-9 ■ INDONESIA P.T.H.L Enterprise 62 -21-672697 - KUWAIT Zaid ALKazmu Sans Trading Co. 965-2437200/2411544 ■ NEW ZEALAND Meta* StetNZ) 
Ltd. 64+607450 • NORWAY Coddco AS 47-41-22113 * PHILIPPINES Compe* International 63-2-213020/218991 * SAUDI ARABIA Ebrahitn Bin jassim Al-Jnssim 966-3^32109 * SINGAPORE Advanced Computer System 
Pte„ Ltd, 65-2967211/2932937 and Goh Electronics (3} Pit,, Ltd. 65-7329898 - SWITZERLAND Psnatronic AG Zurich 41-I-SIO3210 • UNITED STATES Tm & Graphic Video MonitorCorp, (7H) 9854788 Fax: (714} 985-8377 

TVM and, the TVM logo are registered trademarks of TVM Corp. IBM is a registered irademaric and PC and PV2 are trademarks of IBM Carp PageMaker is a registered trademark of Aldus Corporation. AutoCAD is a registered trademark of Autodesk, Inc. 
Hercules is a registered trademark of Hercules Computer Thdinotogy, Inc. 1-3-5 is a registered trademark oF Lotus Development Carp. Prisma is a registered trademark of Prisma Graphics. MultiSync is a registered trademark of NEC Corporation, 
Copyright© I9SBTVMCorp. 

Circle 479 on Reader Service Card 


MARCH 1989 'BYTE 96I&-G9 
















Communication Series For the Whole World 


| WHH ■ FAX CARD 

BEST SCANNER 

BEST MODEM 

BES1 


COMM. SOFTWARE 



FAX CARD 




mi 

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im 



■■1 

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'■*« 

■■■ 

IIII 

■■■ 

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■■■ 


■■■ 

mi 

■■■ 

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hi 

■■■ 


*w.J COMPATIBLE 

•auto speed ma nor* dgoo 7200 / 

4800/2400 

•BACH GROUND OPERA TION 
•SCHEDULED (DELA Yl SEND/NO 
•AUTODIAL AUTOANSWER 
•FAX VOICE RECOGNITION 
•ALARM FOR voicf.reqlf.si 
•COMPATIBLE WT/II POPULAR SCANNER 
•COMPATIBLE WITH POPULAR LASER 
PRINTER, AND ALSO LOW COST DOT 
MATRIX PRINTER 
•FILE IMPORT AND FILE FORMA T 
CONVERSION 
•BUILT-IN EDITOR 
•MERCUL US/CGA /EGA DRIVER 
•AUTOMATIC TIME DATE AND PAGE 
JOURNALING 
•SCANNER INTERFACE 


Circle 409 on Reader Service Card 


MODEM 


CCITT V.2J/22/22N/S/2J, BELL 105/2 12A. MAYES COMPATIBLE. AUTODIAL 
AUTO ANSWER. MNP ERROR CORRECTION. AUTO SPEED SELECTION. STAND 
ALONE & INTERNAL 




SCANNER 


HhCOM IS A GENERAL TELE 
COMMUN/CA TION PACKAGE TMA T RUNS ON 
PC /AT/XT AND IS COMPATIBLE WITH THE 
HAYES COMMAND SET AND: 

•WINDOW ORIENT A TED 
•M/N/TEL. PRESTEL VT52. VTIOO. ANSI. 
BTX EMULATION 

•RERM/T. XMODEM. YMODEM FILES 
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BYTEs International Section offers you the unique 
opportunity to market your computer products to the 
most influential, technically-sophisticated audience 
across Europe. In fact, 89% of BYTE’s European 
readers are involved in corporate purchase decisions. 

BYTE attributes its international growth to the 
continued excellence of its editorial content, as well as 
to the unique opportunity it provides for advertisers 
wishing to reach non-U.S. countries. This unique 
opportunity is BYTE’s International Section, a 
combination of monthly editorial pages and 
advertisements appearing only in copies distributed 
outside of North America. The Section contains 
customized editorial for BYTEs non-U.S. readers that 
focuses on the latest international products available. 

BYTE’s paid circulation in Europe is 75,500. And, in 
Europe the average copy of BYTE is read and passed 
along to 3 additional readers making a total European 
readership of 295,000. 

As we approach 1992, it’s vital that you expand your 
markets throughout Europe. BYTE is the only 
magazine with a special International Section that can 
deliver the entire European personal computer market 
and at an incredibly low cost. 

If you plan to attend CeBit in Hannover 
visit the BYTE Stand H 30 located in Hall 6. 

For advertising information, contact Karen Lennie 
or Ros Weyman (German speaking) in BYTE’s 
London office: 34 Dover Street, W1X 4BR. 
Telephone 01-493-1451. 


EVTE 



96IS-72 BYTE* MARCH 1989 


































































Short Takes 


CarrierNET 


Turbo EMS 


PC-Write 3.0 


CCC Model 2400 


Picture Publisher 


Current Events 

W hat would happen if you 
plugged your IBM PC's 
serial port into a 110-volt 
power outlet? If you're using 
CarrierNET, you'd have a 
LAN* From Carrier Current 
Technologies, CarrierNET 
includes communications 
software and a specialized 
modem that attaches to your 
PC’s serial port and transmits 
at up to 38,400 bps. 

The key to CarrierNET lies 
in a small putty-colored box 
that connects the PC’s serial 
port to a power outlet. The box 
accepts serial transmissions 
from the PC, assembles the 
data into packets, and broad¬ 
casts it asynchronously over 
the neutral and ground con¬ 
nections that run to every 
power outlet* 

Each node is essentially a 
modem that uses a proprietary 
set of communications proto¬ 
cols, including an error-cor¬ 
rection scheme that detects 
and retransmits lost or dam¬ 
aged packets. The box also in¬ 
cludes a surge suppressor that 
protects your serial port. 

Every LAN requires a me¬ 
dium access scheme. Carrier¬ 
NET relies on a collision- 
avoidance method in which 
each modem listens for a car¬ 
rier tone before attempting to 
transmit. If the line is in use, 
the modem waits and tries 
again* If a collision occurs 


BYTE editors ’ hands-on views of new products 



THE FACTS 


CarrierNET 

$298 per PC; $219 for 
peripheral sharing only 

Requirements: 

IBM PC, XT, AT, or 
compatible with a floppy 
disk drive, 256K bytes 
of RAM, a serial port, 
and DOS 2,0 or higher; 
a hard disk drive 
is recommended. 


during a transmission, each 
modem issues a time-out and 
resumes transmitting after a 
random period. 

CarrierNET has RAM- 
resident communications soft¬ 
ware called ExcellNet. The 
basic version supports periph¬ 
eral sharing only and costs 
$219 per workstation. The 
version I tested ($298 per 
workstation) included drive- 
or subdirectory-level pass¬ 
word security, E-mail and file 
transfer capabilities, and 
some DOS functions, like the 
ability to view directories on 
other PCs* 

The prerelease device I re¬ 
ceived was limited to 19,200 
bps, and the preliminary soft¬ 
ware and documentation were 
a little rough around the edges. 
Nevertheless, I was able to get 
my office AT clone and two 
80386 portables up and run¬ 
ning quickly. The E-mail and 


Carrier Current 
Technologies, Inc. 
1804 West Southern 
Pkwy* 

Building A-112 
Durham, NC 27707 
(800) 222-0377; in 
North Carolina, 
(919) 490-4970 
Inquiry 1061. 


DOS functions worked with¬ 
out a hitch. Ii took about 1 
minute to transfer a lOOK-byte 
file between computers (1600 
bps). When I sent more than 
one file, however, the network 
bogged down. Two lOOK-byte 
files sent simultaneously to 
my AT clone arrived error- 
free, but they took over twice 
as long to transmit. Fortu¬ 
nately, you can set ExcellNet 
to operate in background 
mode. 

But the real problems began 
when I moved one computer 
from BYTE’s third-floor edi¬ 
torial offices to other floors. 
CarrierNET claims a range of 
up to 1 mile, but I couldn’t es¬ 
tablish any communications 
from the fifth floor. From the 
first and fourth floors, I could 
reach only one of the two 
workstations on the third 
floor. Further, transmissions 
became unacceptably slow: 


Calling up a one-screen direc¬ 
tory on a remote PC took over 
2 minutes. 

CarrierNET won’t work if 
your building has more than 
one transformer or has any 
crossed neutral and ground 
connections. It also won't 
work with surge suppressors 
that support common mode 
filtering. Unfortunately, I 
didn't have time to track down 
the problem . 

When CarrierNET works, 
it works well. Sharing a 
printer attached to your PC is 
easy and quick, thanks to Ex¬ 
cellNet’s spooling capability. 
Once you’ve configured Ex¬ 
cellNet, files transfer auto¬ 
matically to the remote 
printer. Transfers are consis¬ 
tently error-free, if not always 
fast. Also, the menu-driven E- 
mail system is easy to use. And 
the DOS commands let you 
copy, delete, and rename 
files, as well as construct and 
remove subdirectories on re¬ 
mote PCs. 

CarrierNET seems best 
suited for small groups of 
users who share printers and 
transfer files occasionally. 
Before buying, however, 
check with an electrician to 
make sure that CarrierNET 
will work in your building. 

—Rob Mitchell 


Almost-Magic 
EMS Emulation 

M ore and more of today’s 
sophisticated applica¬ 
tions have the built-in capabil¬ 
ity of using memory above 
MS-DOS’s 640K-byte limita¬ 
tion, as long as that memory 
complies with the LIM/EMS. 
The result is much-improved 
performance* But there are a 
few roadblocks on the high¬ 
way to that nirvana. 

continued 


MARCH 1989 - BYTE 97 













SHORT TAKES 



The RAM above 640K 
bytes in today's systems is ex¬ 
tended memory, and MS-DOS 
has no built-in way of manag¬ 
ing it. You need some way of 
converting it to EMS. The eas¬ 
iest way is to buy an add-in 
board specifically designed 
for EMS. But with memory 
prices sky-high, that's not a 
viable alternative unless you 
have a bottomless wallet. 

Turbo EMS is a software 
package that neatly handles 
these difficulties. It's an ex- 
panded-me mory emulator th at 
simulates the working of an 
expanded-memory board run¬ 
ning EMS 4.0, It will neatly 
turn the extended memory in 
your system into what your ap¬ 
plications will see as EMS 
memory. 

Expanded-memory emula¬ 
tors aren't new, but their reli¬ 
ability has improved of late. 
And Turbo EMS has an addi¬ 
tional unique feature, [f your 
system doesn't have extended 
memory, it willturn your hard 
disk drive into pseudo-EMS 
memory. Instead of swapping 
EMS memory segments to and 
from RAM, it swaps them to 
your hard disk drive. 

I quickly found that, with a 
few exceptions. Turbo EMS 
isn’t the type of program you 
take out of the package, load, 
and run with nary a thought. 
But I did find the extensive in¬ 
stallation utility well designed 
and helpful, 

Turbo EMS does an exten¬ 
sive check of your system dur¬ 
ing installation, but it can be 
fooled. It was unable to detect 
that I was using my 2 mega¬ 
bytes of extended memory as a 
disk cache. The documenta¬ 
tion told me I had to turn off the 
cache, but this took some dig¬ 
ging. It also warned me that 
failure to uninstall memory- 
resident programs that use ex¬ 
tended memory could result in 
“data corruption,” 

There are other areas where 
you can get into trouble. For 
example, most programs that 
use EMS don't care where in 
memory the 64K-byte page 
frames used for data swapping 
reside. But some programs do. 
Applications like DESQview, 


Turbo EMS 

$99.95 

Requirements: 

IBM PC, XT, AT, PS/2, 
or compatible with at least 
256K bytes of RAM and 
MS-DOS 2,1 or higher. 


Paradox, and Windows re¬ 
quire specific page-fra me 
alignments. Turbo EMS’s 
documentation was helpful, 
but it took some research. 

After you’ve filled in all the 
options, Turbo EMS installs a 
device driver call in your 
CONFIG.SYS file. Then you 
reboot your system and go—or 
so I thought. After I rebooted, 
applications kept telling me 


PC-Write Gets 
Serious 

I n 1983, Quick soft entered 
the word processor market 
with PC-Write, a shareware 
alternative to much more ex¬ 
pensive programs. Because of 
its low price and good techni¬ 
cal support, PC-Write did 
well: Here was a word proces¬ 
sor that could do most of what 
its users wanted and at a frac¬ 
tion of what the others cost. 
However, the early versions 
lacked features that made 
many potential buyers pause. 
It could handle files of up to 


Lantana Technology, Inc. 
4393 Viewridge Ave. 
Suite A 

San Diego, CA 92123 
(619) 565-6400 

Inquiry 1(162. 


that they couldn’t detect any 
EMS memory in my system, I 
eventually found out why. 
About halfway through the 
manual, you're told you have 
to use a utility to turn on the 
EMS emulation. Problem 
solved. But there’s a lesson 
here: With Turbo EMS, it’s 
absolutely essential to read the 
documentation carefully and 
plan your installation. 


only 6QK bytes of RAM, it 
didn’t support columns, and 
the spelling checker was 
somewhat too cumbersome. 

With PC-Write3,0, Quick- 
soft has fixed the major draw¬ 
backs of previous versions. 
Not only will its longtime fans 
appreciate the improvements 
(after all, they suggested 
many of them), but first-time 
buyers or compulsive switch¬ 
ers would also do well to con¬ 
sider it. 

The first thing I noticed is 
the command line, which tells 
you everything that you ever 
wanted to know about your 
file, such as what line you’re 


Once I got Turbo EMS run¬ 
ning, I ran Paradox 2.0 and 
several other applications with 
my “new” 2 megabytes of ex¬ 
panded memory. The results 
were impressive. I could ac¬ 
cess Large databases more 
quickly, and common com¬ 
mands worked noticeably 
faster. 

Then 1 tried the program on 
a system without any extended 
memory, using the hard disk 
drive instead. 1 wasn't im¬ 
pressed. Turbo EMS's swap¬ 
ping of data to and from the 
hard disk drive doesn’t make 
much performance difference 
over the normal swapping that 
any sophisticated application 
does anyway. It's especially 
true with a slow 65-millisec¬ 
ond drive. Using a fast 25-ms 
drive, or, even better, a cach¬ 
ing disk controller, does speed 
things up a bit. 

Turbo EMS does an excel¬ 
lent job of converting your ex¬ 
tended memory to EMS, 
opening up a whole new world 
of performance with applica¬ 
tions designed to take advan¬ 
tage of expanded memory. But 
don't expect its hard diskdrive 
EMS emulation to make a big 
difference in performance. 
There is, however, a definite 
niche for it. Some applica¬ 
tions, like the latest version of 
Ventura Publisher, are begin¬ 
ning to require EMS to use 
certain features. 

—Stan Miastkowski 


on, how many lines are in the 
file, percentage of memory 
the file occupies, filename, 
and basic function key com¬ 
mands, At first, 1 found all 
this information distracting. 
But when displaying error 
messages or performing a 
search-and-replace operation, 
or if you're about to overwrite 
something, the program 
blocks out the command menu 
unless it pertains to your cur¬ 
rent operation. 

Version 3.0 can handle any 
file up to the size of your sys¬ 
tem's available memory, but I 
didn't notice any speed loss in 

continued 


98 BYTE- MARCH 1989 













Embedded systems designers have already used CrossCode C in over 291 different applications. 


CrossCode C comes with four 
powerful tools to help you program your 
68000-based ROMable applications 

From C source to final object, each tool takes you 
one step closer to your finished ROMable design 


C rossCode C is designed specifically 
to help you write ROMable code for 
all members of the Motorola 68000 
family. Four powerful tools take you from 
C source to object code: 

1. COMPILER: To get truly ROMable 
code, you have to start with a truly 
ROMable compiler. Here are three 
CrossCode C features that you won’t find 
in any ordinary C compiler: 

• Compiler output code is split into five 
independent memory sections that you 
can assign into ROM or RAM as you 
please. 

• You can optimize the code for your 
application because you control the sizes 
of data types. For example, you can 
optimize for speed by using two byte 
intSy or get maximum versatility by 
using four byte ints. 

• You can easily write assembly language 
routines that call C functions and vice 
versa, because the compiler uses simple, 
well documented parameter passing 
conventions. 

2. ASSEMBLER: CrossCode C 
comes with a Motorola-style assembler 
that has all the features that assembly 
language programmers require. In fact. 


you could write your whole application 
with it: 

• The assembler features an advanced 
macro language, conditional assembly, 
'‘include" files, and an unlimited size 
symbol table. 

• Detailed cross references show you 
where you’ve defined and referenced 
your symbols. 

• After a link, you can actually convert 
your "relocatable" assembler listings 
into "absolute" listings that contain 
absolute addresses and fully linked 
object code. 

3. LINKER: The CrossCode C linker 
is designed to handle truly huge loads. 
There are no limits on the number of 
symbols in your load or on the size of your 
output file. And you can always count on 
full 32 bit target addressability, because 
the linker operates comfortably in the 
highest ranges of the 68020’s address 
space. 

4. DOWNLOADER: CrossCode C 
comes with a down loader that puts you in 
touch with all EPROM programmers and 
emulators. It can convert your load into 
Motorola S-Records, Intel Hex, Tek Hex, 
Extended Tek Hex, and Data I/O ASCII 


Hex. You can also produce a binary image 
and convert that image into any format 
you might want. In all formats, bytes can 
be split into EPROMs for an 8, 16, or 32 
bit data bus. 

Why Wait 

Once you start using CrossCode C, you 
may just wonder how you ever got the job 
done before! It’s available under 
MS-DOS for just $ 1595, and it runs on all 
IBM PCs and compatibles (640K memory 
and hard disk are required). Also available 
under UNIX & XENIX. 

CALL TODAY for more information: 

1 - 800 - 448-7733 

(ask for extension 2002) 

Outside the United States, please dial 

PHONE: 1-312-971-8170 
FAX: 1-312-971-8513 

SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT SYSTEMS, INC. 

DEPARTMENT 22 
4248 BELLE AIRE LANE 
DOWNERS GROVE. ILLINOIS 60515 USA 

CrossCode'* is a trademark of SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT 
SYSTEMS, INC. MS-DOS® is a registered trademark of 
Microsoft. UNIX® is a registered trademark of AT&T. XENIX® 
is u registered trademark of Microsoft. 












E POWER! 

FOR ONLY 

189 . 95 ! 


V: A database 
PC thaL has 
III+ power, Report 
Writer, and Compiler 
all in one package! Now 
you can buy a powerful 
dBASE Itl+ work-alike 
that includes more 
features and power than 
any other competitive 
product on the market, at a 
fraction of the cost! 


"dBMAN competes directly with dBASE ///+, if runs many operations 
much more quickly and costs less than half the price.'* Brute Brown, 
PC Ma gazine> 


Unlimited Power. We extended the dB ASE III+ language to 
bring you to a new level of programming power and versatility. 

Reports without programming! With our Report Writer you 
can easily create invoices, sales statements, form letters, 
employee lists, multi-lined and columnar reports, and more. All 

without programming! 


Speed unequalled in performance* dBMAN V*s Greased 
Lightning! Compiler executes dBASE applications up to 16 
times faster than dBASE III+ , and comes with an unlimited 
distribution runtime license at no extra cost! 


We are offering a 30 day money back guarantee if not fully 
satisfied. fWhen purchased from a Versasoft authorized dealer.) 

And, our multi-user version of dBMAN for Novell, IBM PC Net 
retails for only $499.95! 


just compare our price with the competition; 


Program 

Interpreter 

Compiler 

Report Writer 

TOTAL 

dBMAN V 

SI 89.95 

included 

included 

$189.95 

Fox BASE 

$395.00 

$495.00 

$149.95' 

$1039.95 

Clipper 

N/A 

$695 00 

$149.95' 

$84495 

Quicksilver 

$199.00 

$599 00 

$149.95* 

$947,95 

dBASE Ilk 

$795.00 

NM 

$149.95' 

$944,75 

dBASEIV 

$1295.00 

included 

included 

$1295.00 


* Suggest'd rafatf to comparable relational tulJ-acresfi report writer 


dBMAN Highlights: 

□ dBASE II and dBASE 111+ compatibility 

□ 320 extended commands and functions 

□ Password protection and data security at liatd 
level; 

□ BCD numbers 

□ Single command menus: vertical, horizontal, 
scrollable and pull down menu 

LI Program! debugflerj'aditor 

Report Writer Highlights: 

□ User defined pop-up windows and more,.. 

□ 9 group levels 

Ut Conditional printing ot any dams 

□ Compute running sums, counls, averages, 
mtomurns and maxirmims 

□ Relate and report from up to 9 database Tiles 
wlih lookup {one la one) and Scan {on© to 
many] relations and more. - 


Multi-User Version: 

J Locks records and files as a sel to 
prevent deadlock 

□ Supports transaction update and roll 
back {Novell TTS system) and more. 

□ Available lor Novell Network. IBM 
PCNel. Xerox, UNIX and other major 
operating systems. 


Call today to order your 
copy of dBMAN V ! 



VERSASOFT 



Versasoft Corporation 

4340 Almadan Expwy, Suite £50 
San Jose, CA 05118 
Phone:408-723-9044 
Telex: 650-263-5806 
Fax:408 723-9046 


II COM, Microsoft. AT&T Bell 


SHORT TAKES 



1 LfcUcirti k 


P3«*«u pr 

tss tin* sf the fg t loivlftg- funct-len 



&|v= .nfci-watl*.- *CChjT PC-Hr-it* epfli-aUar.s 3 nd 

fsatur'-B*. 

H e -‘-. 

ba^lt tg £35 y mv m 3 th* fiU juau mrt. w 

rkirig. bn. 

El ,,i! . 

En+S+ tr* mtmt ;ef 4 fll* to adit Or great*. 



Enter the of a *lJf-to p+ Int. 



jst 1 EfLrfctory of dLali Fil*fj pick ana to *dlt 

ou" brjnt. 




THE FACTS 


PC-Write 3.0 
$89 

Requirements: 

IBM PC, XT, AT, 

PS/2, or compatible with 
448K bytes of RAM 
(320K bytes without the 
spelling checker) and 
DOS 2.0 or higher. 


cursor response. It went from 
top to bottom of a 5QK-byte 
file in less than a second, and 
the program found and re¬ 
placed 34 occurrences of a 
word in 6 seconds on my IBM 
PC XT compatible. On 
BYTE's keystroke count 
benchmark test for word pro¬ 
cessors, PC-Write scored a re¬ 
spectable 228, compared to 
WordStar's 234 (see table 2 on 
page 110 in the May 1988 
BYTE). You can also print 
from within the program, in¬ 
stead of using a separate print 
program, and with enough 
memory, you can buffer the 
print file for faster printing. 

I found the spelling checker 
a bit quirky, although it is an 
improvement over the one in 
the previous version—but 
then, I've never met a spelling 
checker I liked. PC-Write’s 
spelling checker looks for 
misspellings by checking if 
the word in question is in the 
master or user list. One- and 
two-letter words are ignored. 
Sometimes, the program 
f lagged a plural of an offend- 


Quicksoft 
219 First Ave. N 
Suite 224 

Seattle, WA 98109 
(206) 282-0452 

Inquiry 1063. 


ing word, only to offer its sin¬ 
gular as a possible replace¬ 
ment. But if this happens to 
your favorite word too often, 
you can easily remedy h by 
adding the word to the 50,000- 
word dictionary. Version 3.0 
lets you edit and execute most 
commands without leaving the 
spell search mode. 

The program now finds du¬ 
plicate words, and all guesses 
are displayed on the command 
line. You can also link and 
check related files. A nifty 
feature called shorthand mode 
lets you create macros, so you 
have to hit only a letter or two 
for commonly used words and 
phrases. You can toggle this 
feature on or off. Bob Wal¬ 
lace, president of Quick soft, 
said the program's dictionary 
is constantly updated (regis¬ 
tered users can call the com¬ 
pany with suggestions). 

Another feature is its ability 
to store columns as literal 
ASCII text, letting you import 
Lotus 1-2-3 print files into the 
program. You can also mark 
continued 


100 BYTE - MARCH 1989 


Circle 262 on Reader Service Card 
































Howto 

move a mountain, 
level a building, 
rule the world, 
erase the past, 

make a million, 
and draw attention 


to yourself. 



You can draw anything with AutoSketch* But 
that’s only the beginning. Then, you can move it. 
Make sure it’s level. Scale it to size. Or draw in rules. 

Don't like it? Erase it. Want it bigger? Stretch 
it. Need details? Zoom in. Want more of the same? 
Duplicate it. 

AutoSketch is the precision drawing tool that 
does amazing things. In up to 10 working layers. 
And because it’s also easy to learn (takes about an 
hour), you won’t have a long, drawn-out start-up 
process. That makes it the perfect complement to 


your word processing or desktop publishing 
package. 

So get AutoSketch for your PC*. For just 
$99 95, you'll accomplish things you never 
thought possible. And who knows what kind of 
attention that might get you. 

To order AutoSketch directly, or for more 
information, call 1-800-223-2521. For the name of 
your nearest AutoSketch Dealer, call 1-800-445- 
5415, ext.l.or write to AutoSketch, 2320 Marinship 
Way, Sausalito, CA 94965. AUTODESK, INC. 


■AutoSketch runs on IBM PC/XT/AT and 100% compatible computers, and supports IBM’s PS/2 AutoSketch is registered in the U S Patent and Trademark Office by Autodesk.Inc 
IBM and Personal Computer AT are registered trademarks, and Persona) Computer XT and PS/2 are trademarks, of international Business Machines Corporation 


Circle 34 on Reader Service Card 


MARCH 1989 'BYTE 


101 




SHORT TAKES 


Reduce 

C Programming 
for MS Windows 
by 75% 


Introducing C_ialk/Vfcews ■, a major 
productivity tool (or Microsoft* Windows 
program development ir> 0. Slash your MS 
Windows program development time by up 
to 75% through (he powerful! object oriented 
programming (OOP) technology of C_talk. 
With Cjalk/Views, the most common 
elements of all MS Windows programs are 
packaged into reusable soltware 
componenis-objeci classes. Over forty 1 
software component are included as a 
complete applications development 
framework. These object classes provide an 


easy-to-team and powerfully consisted 
interface to the rich tunctionalily of MS 
Windows. C talk/Views is also a real OOP 
environment. Use the software 
components as they are, or extend them 1o 
meet the most demanding applications 

Cuming soon .C talk/Views for the 
Apple Macintosh* .. now your MS Windows 
program wilt port to the Mac with little or no 
change! 

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columns and move, copy, or 
delete them. 

Each registered user of PC- 
Write receives two free up¬ 
grades, Instead of an upgrade, 
you can get a PageMaker im¬ 
port filter, DCA (Document 
Content Architecture) conver¬ 
sion package, LaserJet font 
manager, or the source code. 
Other goodies that cost extra 
(but most of wh ich you can get 
through Quicksoft at a dis¬ 
count) include French and He¬ 
brew capabilities (including 


voice support in Hebrew), 
Grammatik III, the InSet 
graphics capturer and extra 
fonts, and more* 

With PC-Write 3*0, Quick- 
soft has dispelled any notion 
that it's not a '‘serious 11 prod¬ 
uct. The technical support 
folks are also friendly, knowl¬ 
edgeable, and patient. Even if 
the price were not under $100, 
this would still be a word pro¬ 
cessor most worthy of your 
consideration. 

—Dave Andrews 


A Real Deal: 2400-bps Modem 
for $95 



W hen I first saw the ad 
from Compu Com 
Corp. for a $95 2400-bps 
modem, I was more than a lit¬ 
tle skeptical. I remembered 
how my father would say that 
things that appeared too good 
to be true usually weren't. 
Given that only recently have a 
few 1200-bps modems made 
their way to under $100, and 
that typical prices for 2400- 
bps modems range from $179 
to about $350, the CCC ad 
promised a lot. So I gave the 
company a call. 

The CCC Model 2400 
modem is an internal short 
board designed for the IBM 
PC or compatibles. It is based 
on a Texas Instruments chip 
set that results in a sparsely 
populated—and therefore eco¬ 
nomical—board. The board 


includes two standard modu¬ 
lar telephone jacks (a cable 
also comes with it) and a 
speaker with an external vol¬ 
ume control* 

Like most personal com- 
continued 


THE FACTS 


CCC Model 2400 

$95 

Requirements: 

IBM PC or compatible 
with at least one available 
bus slot. 

Compu Com Corp. 

1275 Palamos Ave* 
Sunnyvale, CA 94089 
(408) 732-4500 

Inquiry 1065. 


Circle 122 on Reader Service Card 
srtEM r p»c. im 


102 BYTE • MARCH 1989 



























How lb Get In On Our 
Frequent Flyer Program 



Our new software product will 
increase the speed of any PC system 
so dramatically that we’re tempted to 
include a pilot’s license (and seat- 
belt) as standard equipment 
We call it FAST! And from the 
moment you load it, you’ll find 
that’s an understatement. A gross 
understatement 
Using any benchmark or perfor¬ 
mance test you choose, FAST! 


Data Transfer Rates 
In Kilobytes Per Second 



IBM XT IBM AT COMPAQ 

DESKPRO 386 


■ Base Rate 

■ With Fast* 


multiplies the actual processing speed 
of your system, by four times... six 
times. . . eight times... or more, 
depending on your system and 
application. 

With FAST!, a IBM XT system 
easily outraces a Compaq Deskpro 
386, using a standard data transfer 
performance benchmark. And 
without enhancing the hardware in 
any way. 

We’ve got a winner on our hands. 

Speed Enliarace m c nf , 

Without Hardware Upgrades 

Our remarkable enhancement is 
achieved by very simple means. We 
took a well-known speed-enhance¬ 
ment technique called “disk caching," 
and improved it By a mile. 

FAST! literally anticipates what 
data your CPU will be seeking, and 
reads that data from your drive or 
floppy into a special RAM buffer (or 
“cache”), before the CPU asks for it 

Which means that your CPU 
spends almost no time waiting for 
disk reads, the most notorious time- 


glutton of all. The more disk-inten¬ 
sive your application (database, for 
example), the more time FAST! will 
save you. 

And since FAST! reduces drive read 
time drastically, it also reduces wear 
and tear on your drive, extending 
its life. 

RWT mow* Away The Competition 

Priced at just $99, FAST! is 


FAgTI 



competitively priced with other disk- 
enhancement utility software. Yet it 
offers vastly superior results - four 
times the performance of the closest 
competitors. 

And it’s hundreds less than 
hardware upgrade options like faster 
drives, turbo boards, or entire system 
upgrades, while again offering supe¬ 
rior speed enhancement. And FAST! 
works with XT, AT, 386 and PS/2 
systems, in conventional, extended 
or expanded RAM. 

If you want to give your computer 
breakneck processing speed, get 
FAST! To order, call Future Computer 
Systems at (603) 894-6975. Oi; ask 
your local computer dealer. 

For FAX orders: (603) 894-6670 



Future Computer Systems 
26 Keewaydin Drive, Building H2 
Salem, NH 03079 
(603) 894-6975 


XT AT and PS/2 are trademarks of httenatioiul Buunm Machine* C orporation Compaq DESKPRO is a trademark of Compaq Computer Corporation FAST’ is a trademark of Future Computer System* 


Circle 107 on Reader Service Card (DEALERS: 108) 


MARCH 1989 •BYTE 103 


















SHORT TAKES 


The Electronic Darkroom 


puter modems, the CCC unit 
uses the Hayes-compatible AT 
command set, and it has a 40- 
character command buffer. It 
also adjusts automatically to 
lower transmission speeds of 
1200 bps or 300 bps. 

I installed the modem in my 
Hyundai Super 286c with no 
problems. The board requires 
you to deal with only two 
jumpers. One jumper selects 
COM port 1, 2, 3, or 4; the 
other sets the default (on or 
off) for the auto-answer 
mode. 

The package comes with a 
shareware communications 
program called Boyan (ver¬ 
sion D3), which has a license 
fee, should you decide to use 
it, of $35. Boyan is a fairly 
straightforward, no-frills pro¬ 
gram. It does have one signifi¬ 
cant drawback, as do many 
programs of this type: It sup¬ 
ports only COM ports 1 and 2. 
This simply means that if you 
need to assign the modem to 


port 3 or 4, you cannot use 
Boyan. 

I assigned the modem to my 
system’s port 3 and used it 
with Procomm Plus. In addi¬ 
tion to calling local access 
numbers, which provide rela¬ 
tively clean communications 
lines, I also sent and received 
ASCII files on a daily basis via 
standard long-distance ser¬ 
vice at 2400 bps and 1200 bps. 
And although my experience 
didn’t constitute a scientific 
test, the number of occasional 
line-noise glitches was about 
the same as on a USRobotics 
Courier 2400. 

I didn’t do any exhaustive 
lab line-noise tests, but in real- 
world use, the CCC Model 
2400 worked fine. This is the 
first 2400-bps modem I’ve 
seen for less than $100, and 
it’s a bargain. It comes with a 
two-year warranty and a 30- 
day money-back policy. 
That’s a very good deal. 

—Dennis Allen 


P icture Publisher is an 

image editing software 
package billed as an “elec¬ 
tronic darkroom.’’ I used it to 
edit and manipulate a set of 
scanned gray-scale images to 
increase their clarity or re¬ 
move flaws. 

Once you have Microsoft 
Windows, Picture Publisher, 
and any Tag Image File For¬ 
mat (TIFF) picture files 
loaded and ready to go, a suite 
of useful tools is at your dis¬ 
posal. These tools include 
Grey map functions, which let 
you adjust or enhance gray¬ 
scale values; Mask functions, 
which let you create freehand 
or geometric shapes to either 
protect an area from global 
edits or mark an area for edits; 
Retouch, which you use to 
smooth, brighten, feather, or 
add texture to an image; Edit 
functions, which provide cut- 
and-paste features; and Pro¬ 


cess functions, which you use 
to view, crop, scale, or other¬ 
wise ready images for final 
placement on a page. 

You use basic utilities like 
Undo, Apply, and Zoom to 
implement or delete your 
edits. You can access the tools 
and utilities via Windows’ 
pull-down menus, the Astral 
Picture Window icons, or the 
function keys. 

To actually edit an image, 
you move between the Win¬ 
dows interface and the Astral 
Picture Window. The Astral 
Picture Window is basically a 
full-screen window within the 
Windows environment. When 
you work in the Astral Picture 
Window, Picture Publisher 
paints to a full VGA screen so 
you can see 64 levels of gray 
and manipulate 256 levels of 
gray. I found it easy to move 
between the two interfaces. 

It is also easy to create spe- 


How the competition stands 


Introducing the modem with a sleek new 
stand-up* design. Telebit’s new T1000 Multi- 
Speed modem. The modem that not only looks 
different, but is different. With more features. 
More performance. And a surprisingly low price, 

More modem for less money. 

What makes the T1000 so different? 

For one, you get a choice of more speeds. The 
T1000 can send and receive data at 300,1200, 
2400, or 9600 bps using ordinary dial-up 
phone lines. 

So the T1000 can talk to your installed 
base of low-speed modems, plus the large 
installed base of Telebit" and other PEP™ high¬ 
speed modems. 

But it costs about the same as a 


2400 bps error-free modem. 

Another difference? The T1000 runs at 
9600 bps with any type of data—without com¬ 
pression. Error free. With MNP and PEP 
error detection and correction. 

The T1000 fits right in. 

The T1000 Multi-Speed modem even talks 
Hayes—right from the box. And if you’re using 
the AT command set or even Smartcom HI 
software, we’re compatible. You won’t need new 
software. And you won’t need new commands. 

The T1000 also has internal support for 
the most widely-used communications protocols 
—Kermit, Xmodem, Ymodem and UNIX’s 
UUCP So you can transfer files up to 3 times 
faster than any other modem. 
















SHORT TAKES 



cial-effect images with Pic¬ 
ture Publisher. For example, 
you can posterize a photo, 
which groups gray tones with 
ones of similar value, or you 
can change an image’s thresh¬ 
old, which converts gray tones 
to either black or white to 
create line art. 

The two functions that I 
found particularly fascinating 
were Retouch and Grey map. 
Retouch lets you adjust the 
gray values assigned to a pixel 
using a paintbrush. You can 
easily implement all kinds of 
changes, like sharpening the 
image via an edge-enhancing 
filter or painting over flaws on 
an image using a gray tone of 
your choice. I used the sharp¬ 
en feature to give better defi¬ 
nition to some of my fuzzy 
images. 

The Grey map functions let 
you do complex adjustments or 
fairly quick adjustments in 
brightness or contrast. 

I ran the product on a PS/2 


Model 80 running Microsoft 
Windows 2.03. The documen¬ 
tation clearly explained basic 
image-preparation concepts 
and was easy to follow. While 
I found the product easy to use, 
anyone buying it should have 
some familiarity with both 
Windows and basic desktop 
publishing and darkroom con¬ 


cepts. Edited images can be 
ported to page layout, presen¬ 
tation graphics, or word pro¬ 
cessing software that accepts 
TIFF or the Encapsulated 
PostScript Font format. If 
you’re a serious desktop pub¬ 
lisher, Picture Publisher is 
worth a look. 

—Jan Fiderio ■ 


THE FACTS 


Picture Publisher 

$595 

Requirements: 

With an IBM PC: VGA 
card, analog monitor, 
Microsoft Windows 2.03 
or higher, Windows- 
compatible mouse, 640K 
bytes of RAM, and DOS 
2.0 or higher; a hard disk 
drive is recommended. 
With an IBM PS/2: 
Windows 2.03 or higher, 
Windows/PS/2- 
compatible mouse, 640K 
bytes of RAM, and DOS 
2.0 or higher. 

Astral Development Corp. 
Londonderry Sq. 

Suite 112 

Londonderry, NH 03053 
(603) 432-6800 

Inquiry 1066. 


up to Tblebit’s newest modem. 


And here’s another big difference. Since 
the T1000 runs the most popular communi¬ 
cations software at the highest possible speeds. 
You can take full advantage of packages like 
Hyper ACCESS, Crosstalk-Fast, MicroPhone II, 
and Acknowledge. 

Just plug us in, and the T1000 will fit 
right in. No matter what your environment. 

Remote management for ease of use. 

Here’s the final difference. The T1000 
offers a host of remote management features. 
Including remote access, remote configuration 
and remote diagnostics. 

So get the modem that’s head and 
shoulders above the rest. In features and per¬ 
formance. At just the right price. Telebit’s new 




T1000 Multi-Speed Modem. 

Call 1-800-TELEBIT or 
(415) 969-3800, today. 

Or write Telebit at 
1345 Shorebird Way, Moun¬ 
tain View, CA 94043-1329. 
Fax:(415)969-8888. 

Because no one gets the 
message through like Telebit. 


T1000. 


TELEBIT 

C1988 Telebit Corporation. Telebit is a registered 
trademark and PEP is a trademark of Telebit Corpora 
tion. Other brands or product names are trademarks of 
their respective holders. 

Optional 

Circle 248 on Reader Service Card 

WfM 






00 

































The fastest possible 
way to create the fastest 
MS-DOS programs 

possible. 


fbr Persotuti Computers Riamiitg 
the MSt OS/2 or MS-DOS* 
Operating System 



Microsoft C Optimizing Compiler 5.1 Techbox 

primizations that generate the fastest code for DOS 
and OS/2 systems. 

- In-line code generation. 

- Loop optimizations. 

- Elimination of common subexpressions. 

Full OS/2-system support to break the 640K barrier. 
~ " t run under DOS and the OS/2 


Libraries. 

• Small, medium, compact, large, and huge memory models. 

• Mix models with NEAR, FAR, and HUGE 1 

• Fast compilation (10,000 lines/minute) with f 
QuickC™ 

• Fastest math, in-line 8087/80287 instructions, and 
floating-point calls. 

• More complete support of proposed ANSI standard. 

• Over 350 library functions, including a graphics library. 

Microsoft CodeView 

• Full OS/2 systems support. 

* Debug applications of up to 128 MB under the OS/2 
systems. 

- Debug multithreaded programs and Dynamic Link 
Libraries. 

• Source-level debugging for precise control over 
programs. 

- Dynamic breakpoints in the source. 

- Debug programs written in a variety of Microsoft 
languages. 

- Full symbolic display of C structures. 

- Interactively follow linked lists and nested structures. 

- Watch variables, memory, registers, and flags. 

Other Utilities 

• Fast linking (twice as fast as the C 4.0 version linker). 

• OS/2 incremental linker - up to 20 times faster than a 
full link. 

• OS/2- and MS-DOS reconfigurable programmer’s 
editor 


Everything about Microsoft* C Optimizing 
Compiler version 5.1 is dedicated to the profes¬ 
sional programmer. 

Fast code. Fast development. Fast debug¬ 
ging. And full support for both MS-DOS® and 
the OS/2 systems in a single package. 

There’s no faster C code on a PC, because 
powerful optimizations, such as in-line code 
generation and loop enregistering, generate 
executables that are compact and efficient. 
The documentation even teaches you special 
coding techniques to squeeze every last bit of 


speed out of your code. 

Fast code isn’t all you get. Under MS® OS/2, 
the 640K barrier is gone so you can write C pro¬ 
grams as large as a gigabyte.You can call the 
operating system directly Create more respon¬ 
sive programs (multiple threads allow program 
operations to overlap). And build Dynamic Link 
Libraries (DLLs) that can be shared, saving 
valuable memory DLLs also allow your main 
programs to be smaller, so they load faster. You 
can even write a single Family API program 
that runs under both MS-DOS and MS OS/2. 


106 BYTE* MARCH 1989 





















The fastest possible 
way to create the fastest 
MS OS/2 programs 

possible. 


For Atswio/ Computers Running 
the MS, OS/2 or MS-DOS, 
Opeiuting System 



Microsoft C Optimizing Compiler 5.1 Techbox 


ptimizations that generate the fastest code for DOS 
and OS/2 systems. 

- In-line code generation. 

- Loop optimizations. 

- Elimination of common subexpressions. 

1 Full OS/2-system support to break the 640K barrier. 

- Family API programs that run under DOS and the OS/2 


Libraries. 


QuickC™ 

• Fastest math, in-line 8087/80287 instructions, and 
floating-point calls. 

• More complete support of proposed ANSI standard. 

• Over 350 library functions, including a graphics library. 

Microsoft CodeView 

• Full OS/2 systems support. 

- Debug applications of up to 128 MB under the OS/2 
systems. 

- Debug multithreaded programs and Dynamic Link 
Libraries. 

• Source-level debugging for precise control over 
programs. 

- Dynamic breakpoints in the source. 

- Debug programs written in a variety of Microsoft 
languaj 

- Fullsy 

- Interactively 

- Watch v 

Other Utilities 

• Fast linking (twice as fast as the C 4.0 version linker). 

• OS/2 incremental linker - up to 20 times faster than a 
full link. 

• OS/2- and MS-DOS reconfigurable programmer's 
editor 


Microsoft Editor is the first reconfigurable 
text editor for programmers that lets you de¬ 
velop under MS-DOS and MS OS/2. Under 
MS OS/2, multitasking lets you edit one file 
while you compile another, which cuts develop¬ 
ment time. You can even generate multiple com¬ 
piles that report errors directly back into your 
source code. 

Microsoft CodeView® is the highly acclaimed 
window-oriented source-level debugger that 
makes debugging not only fast, but extremely 
efficient. You can view program execution 


while you watch variables and register values 
change. And under MS OS/2 you can debug 
multi-threaded applications, DLLs, and pro¬ 
grams as large as 128 MB. The Microsoft C 
Optimizing Compiler 5.1, designed for the pro¬ 
fessional programmer. It’s all the speed you 
need. Call (800) 541-1261. 

Microsoft 

Making it all make sense; 

Microsoft, the Microsoft Jcga. MS. MS-DOS. and CodeView are registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation. 

MARCH 1989 -BYTE 107 

























The Only Character 
Recognition System 



That Outperforms Ours 


Nature's character recognition system can be 
trained to read any language. Flagstaff Engineer¬ 
ing's SPOT OCR Text Reader is also trainable. 
It has read text printed in thousands of typefaces 
in over 130 different languages! 

The SPOT OCR Text Reader works just like a 
typist who reads a page, then uses a keyboard 
to transfer the information on the page into a 
computer file—except SPOT uses a scanner for 
eyes and outputs the text directly into standard 
text files. SPOT is also faster. It can read up to 
35 characters per second on a 16MHz AT, and 
up to 65 characters per second on a 25MHz 
machine (that's 780 words per minute). SPOT 
supports most major makes of scanners. 

Using sophisticated statistical techniques, 
SPOT recognizes characters like the brain does: 
by examining their shape and context. Like 
nature's original, SPOT is very flexible. It can 
glance over an entire page or zoom in on a 
few lines of text. SPOT can read newspapers. 


magazines, books, manuals, invoices, contracts, 
government documents, columns, tables .. . just 
about any printed text. And SPOT keeps getting 
better. The new Version 3.0 is faster, more 
accurate, easier to use, and better documented 
than its predecessors. 

Since 1982, Flagstaff Engineering has provided 
visionary data conversion solutions for thou¬ 
sands of companies worldwide. SPOT is already 
increasing productivity and making life easier for 
many publishers and researchers, accountants 
and telemarketers, medical and legal offices, 
archival and transcription services. 

Wouldn't your business benefit from fast, 
accurate, and low-cost OCR software? Give us 
a call and let our application specialists explain 
how you can save time and money with SPOT, 
the OCR text-entry solution. 


SPOT- 

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FLAGSTAFF 

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Helping People Read a World of Information 


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EXPERT ADVICE 



Jerry hands out 
the kudos for 
the most distinguished 
products of 1988 

I have got 8 million things to do. At 
dawn tomorrow I catch an airplane 
to New England, where I’m sched¬ 
uled to do some briefings about the 
space program, as well as attend a BYTE 
Editorial Exposition. Meanwhile, 
Christmas is in a few days, and I’ve done 
no shopping at all. I found Larry Niven’s 
present last spring, so that’s set, and 
Mrs. Pournelle can handle the rest—ex¬ 
cept of course for her own, which, with 
luck, I’ll pick up in New Hampshire. 
Surely they have interesting presents? 

Meanwhile, this is the last column of 
the year, which means it’s time for my 
annual Chaos Manor Awards. BYTE has 
recently instituted annual awards, and 
it’s about time; I’ve nothing against the 
other magazines’ awards, but I do think 
BYTE has unique expertise in this field. 
The BYTE awards are the result of a vote 
of the BYTE editors, and they are “offi¬ 
cial”; you saw them in the January issue. 

The Chaos Manor Awards come under 
different rules. They aren’t “official” 
from BYTE, just from me. There’s no 
vote, although I may check with other 
BYTE editors to see if they have had 
problems I didn’t notice. Eligibility is the 
year I got a product, not the year it came 
out. Finally, the usual Chaos Manor 
rules apply: unless otherwise noted, this 
is all stuff that I’ve personally used and 
beat the devil out of. 

1988 

This has been an interesting year. I be¬ 
gan this column a few weeks ago by set¬ 
ting up a GrandView outline (I’ll get 
back to GrandView later). Within a 
week, I had more than enough items to 


COMPUTING AT CHAOS MANOR ■ Jerry Pournelle 


Chaos Manor 
Awards 


fill three columns. I’ve acquired a lot of 
useful stuff this year, and much of it first 
came out in 1988. Some of these products 
aren’t earthshaking, but they’re all 
darned useful. By me, 1988 was a very 
good year for computer users. 

Most Useful Computer 

The clear winner in this category is the 
Cheetah 386, which is built up from a 
Cheetah motherboard and memory in¬ 
stalled in a “tower” configuration. Intel 
furnished the chip set (the 80386 and 
80387). Big Cheetah runs at 25 MHz. It 
would run faster if I got Intel to send me 
faster-rated chips, and I just may do that; 
although I have to say that Big Cheetah 
already runs fast enough for anything 
I’m likely to do. The BIOS is by Award. 
So far it has been compatible with every¬ 
thing I’ve tried, including the new 
DESQview 3.0. 

Just about everything I have said about 
Big Cheetah could be said about the Ze¬ 
nith Z-386 (although that runs at 16 
MHz, still fast enough for nearly any¬ 
thing I do). It happens that I use Big 
Cheetah a bit more than I do the Zenith, 
but it could be the other way around. 
That is, I never experiment on my pri¬ 
mary machine; and since I’m always 
mucking about with new software and 
boards and equipment, something has to 
be the experimental machine. 

I keep a generic IBM PC AT clone that 
came from Larry Aldridge’s Sterling 
Solutions (1824 South Starfire Ave., Co¬ 
rona, CA 91719) for stuff I’m really 
doubtful about. For a fair test, however, 
all the stuff—boards and software- 
should be run with an 80386 since, in my 
judgment, the 80386 is the wave of the 
future. The Z-386 serves as the 80386 
test-bed, and it has never failed me. 
When Larry Niven needed a new com¬ 
puter, I had no hesitation in recommend¬ 
ing the Z-386, which is what he bought. 
Still, Big Cheetah is faster, and I do use 
him a bit more; so that’s the machine of 
the year, with the Z-386 as runner-up. 


The 80286 chip, originally greeted 
with enthusiasm when the AT came out, 
has proven to be a dead end. For one 
thing, while it’s easy to get from virtual 
mode (where the 80286 pretends that it’s 
a fast 8086 like you have in your PC) to 
protected mode (which is genuine 16-bit 
operations that can directly access 16 
megabytes of memory), getting back 
from protected mode to virtual mode re¬ 
quires a kludge you have to see before 
you’ll believe it. 

That’s not the worst problem. If Intel 
had been able to make 80286s of consis¬ 
tent quality, the chip might still have a 
protected-mode future, but they didn’t. 
Instead, we have a number of steps and 
revisions of the 80286, and they are not 
all alike. Programs running in virtual 
mode aren’t likely to notice, but when 
you move into protected mode, it can 
make a real difference. Thus, anyone 
programming for the 80286 in protected 
mode must find a least common denomi¬ 
nator of the chip to write to. That is pos¬ 
sible, but since it’s also difficult and 
expensive, it’s generally confined to 
large programming outfits. Much of the 
driving force in this industry comes from 
small programming companies. 

There is useful 80286 software, but in 
general, the future of the 80286 is to be 
used as a kind of fast 8086, while the 
80386 has a great future. The 80286 
won’t be abandoned quickly because 
there are so many of them out there, but I 
see a definite trend toward software writ¬ 
ten just for the 80386. Most important, 
there will be compilers and code genera¬ 
tors using the 80386’s special features. 

Disk Drive of the Year 

Big Cheetah’s disk drive is the Priam 
ESDI 330-megabyte hard disk drive, and 
that gets the award in this category. 

I’m very happy with the trend to ever- 
larger hard disk drives. I didn’t predict it; 
indeed, one of Pournelle’s laws was “Sil¬ 
icon is cheap, but iron is expensive.” 

continued 


MARCH 1989 -BYTE 109 





CHAOS MANOR 


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To Our 
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Many BYTE subscribers ap¬ 
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Used are our subscribers’ names 
and addresses only (no other 
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he Amiga 
2000 is the clear winner 
as most-improved 
computer. 


This was formulated back in the days of 
the S-100 bus, and it was intended to 
warn users that it was a lot easier to up¬ 
grade a machine that used a bus and 
cards than the single-card computers that 
were the S- 100’s chief rivals, but I also 
applied it to disk drives. I was quite cer¬ 
tain that spinning metal would soon give 
way to something without moving parts, 
like magnetic bubble memory. 

1 still think that eventually that has to 
happen—doggone it, it really is easier to 
fabricate complex silicon than to make 
high-precision spinning platters and 
heads—but it’s also very clear that it 
won’t happen soon. I’m seeing reliable 
gigabyte drives that fit into an AT chas¬ 
sis. Priam has a 700-megabyte drive that 
[ suspect will be next year’s drive of the 
year; in seven years of using Priam 
drives, from the original 20-megabyte 
drive to the 330-megabyte unit I use now, 
I’ve never lost any data, 

Priam shares this award with itself: 
that is, J also have their 330-megabyte 
SCSI MacDisk for the Macintosh IL Of 
course, it uses the same hardware as Big 
Cheetah’s disk drive, so this is really 
only one award. The MacDisk sure is 
handy: I’ve noticed that the Mac II hard 
disk seems to fill up even faster than PC 
hard disks do. It’s probably the graphics 
and image files. Priam was kind enough 
to donate a 330-megabyte MacDisk to the 
Lowell Observatory, and it’s about time 1 
publicly thanked them. I'll report on 
using microcomputers at the Lowell Ob¬ 
servatory soon. 

Most Improved Computer 

The Amiga 2000 is the clear winner 
here. It’s not just the hardware upgrade 
to the 68020 chip and a new chip set with 
more video RAM (although those cer¬ 
tainly helped). Commodore has also 
greatly improved the operating system. 
The Amiga 2000 will now boot from its 
hard disk; there’s no more Kick start with 
a floppy disk and then calling in the 
Workbench, The disk access times have 
been improved dramatically: it used to 


be that you could go get a sandwich while 
the Amiga read in a medium-length file. 

The Amiga 2000 is now good enough 
for most things you’d like a computer 
for. For example, WordPerfect users 
will find their favorite editor works fine 
on the new Amiga. Indeed, the whole 
software base is expanding rapidly. 

I was just up to the Stanford Linear 
Accelerator Center (SLAC), where they 
use Amiga 2000s as workstations for 
both secretarial and scientific staff. A 
great deal of the work is done locally, 
while the Amiga’s multiprocessing capa¬ 
bility keeps it connected to their big 
mainframe. SLAC has developed soft¬ 
ware to let the mainframe initiate an 
Amiga task while the Amiga is doing 
something else. They use Donald 
Knuth’s TbX scientific text formatter; 
there’s an excellent implementation for 
the Amiga. Incidentally, the X in TeX is 
a Greek chi, so it’s pronounced “tek.” 

SLAC has developed a whole slew of 
software for the Amiga. I was quite 
frankly impressed with what the SLAC 
people can make the Amiga do. If Com¬ 
modore could manage to get the SLAC 
software—most of it is public domain— 
and distribute it with the Amiga, it would 
go a long way toward making the Amiga 
a machine for the rest of us. 

Most Useful Peripheral 

Hands down, the most useful new pe¬ 
ripheral I acquired this year is the Maxi¬ 
mum Storage WORM (write once, read 
many times) drive. Runner-up is Infor¬ 
mation Storage’s WORM drive. I find 
the Maximum Storage software a bit 
handier than Information Storage’s 
WORM TOS. Both WORM drives work 
very well. Both have recently come out 
with high-density formats that get even 
more data on one WORM cartridge. 

The main function of a WORM drive 
is to back up all my work: fiction, pro¬ 
grams, data brought in by E-mail, every¬ 
thing of value, WORM storage disks cost 
about a dollar a megabyte; and unlike 
other backup media, the WORM saves 
everything. You can page back on the 
WORM and find every version you ever 
saved. This can be invaluable for pro¬ 
grammers. It’s no bad thing for fiction 
writers, either. 

Since the computer sees the WORM as 
just another disk drive, you can use it to 
store compilers, word processors, and 
other software that is read and not writ¬ 
ten to, thus saving hard disk space. 

The really neat thing about a WORM 
is that you don’t mind using it to back 
things up, since it works with COPY or 

continued 


110 BYTE* MARCH 1989 









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CHAOS MANOR 


XCOPY, just like any other disk drive. 
The WORM isn't a great deal slower than 
your regular hard disk drive (well, it’s 
slower than mine, but my Priam disk 
drive goes at an amazing 14 millisec¬ 
onds; the WORM is more like 75 ms); 
consequently, it takes not much longer to 
make backup copies than it did to save 
the files in the first place. Once saved, 
they’re nearly eternal. My practice is to 
alternate WORM cartridges, with the 
one not in use at the moment residing in a 
safe-deposit box at American Vault; that 
way, even if Chaos Manor burned down, 
I’d have most of what I’ve been working 
on. 

I’ve said it before, but I’ll repeat it 
here: anyone doing serious software de¬ 
velopment should get a WORM drive. 
It’s likely to be one of the best invest¬ 
ments a software development firm can 
make. 

LANtastic 

I don’t have fixed categories in the Chaos 
Manor Awards; I invent categories to fit 
products that have impressed me. That 
description certainly fits Artisoft’s 
LANtastic, which I’ll call the LAN of 
the year. LANtastic consists of an 8-bit 
board and peer network software. Instal¬ 
lation of both hardware and software is 
simple, and once done, any station on the 
network can configure itself to make 
none, all, or part of its files available to 
other stations. Since it is a true peer net¬ 
work, nothing can be accessed without 
prior permission. 

LANtastic allows network access to a 
CD-ROM drive; the DOS extensions 
need be installed only in the remote ma¬ 
chines. Since LANtastic works through 
DOS, it’s possible to access WORM 
drives and nearly everything else. 

There are faster LANs, but so far I’ve 
found LANtastic to be more than ade¬ 
quate for every task I’ve given it. I was 
even able to use it to network the DOS 
side of the Amiga to my PC. 

PowerPoint 

By far the most useful Mac product of the 
year was Microsoft’s PowerPoint. This 
program lets you make and organize 
briefing slides; I used it to prepare the 
SSX (Space Ship Experimental) briefing 
for the incoming Bush administration. 
PowerPoint typifies both the good and 
bad points about the Mac: once you 
understand the techniques, it’s easy to 
use, but many of those techniques can be 
discovered only through learning com¬ 
puter folklore. 

PowerPoint makes one-sheet briefing 

continued 


112 BYTE • MARCH 1989 


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CHAOS MANOR 


charts that the program documentation 
calls “slides.” Slides can incorporate 
both text and graphics. If you have a 
briefing logo, it can be pasted onto the 
presentation master, and it will then ap¬ 
pear on every chart. I scanned in the 
logo—a stylized SSX rocket super¬ 
imposed over a globe—with the Apple 
Macintosh scanner, another of those 
products that are infuriatingly excellent: 
it works fine, but you really have to work 
to outsmart the software, which seems 
perpetually to offer you options you want 
but which are grayed out (and thus not 
available). On the other hand, when you 
do figure this stuff out, it works splen¬ 
didly. The logo really looks great. 

PowerPoint charts or slides can be 
shown on-screen, photographed with 
something like the Datacam computer 
screen camera to make actual slides, or 
printed on a LaserWriter. The Laser¬ 
Writer will print on acetate for overhead 
projectors. However you do it, the final 
product looks very professional. 

There is also a notes system: each 
chart is produced in miniature at the top 
of a page, after which you can add any 
notes you like. When you print the brief- 


owerPoint 
makes one-sheet 
briefing charts that are 
called slides. 

ing charts, you can also, if you wish, 
print the notes files. 

If your company is much involved with 
giving briefings and presentations, it’s 
probably worth buying a Mac and a 
LaserWriter just to have this program; 
the output is that good. 

Getting there may drive you nuts. 

For example: when you print your 
charts, PowerPoint offers the option of 
normal printing, one chart per page, or 
“handout” style, which puts up to six 
charts (in miniature) on each sheet. This 
is a great way to give out briefing sum¬ 
maries, and when we finished the SSX 


briefing, I wanted to make handouts. 
When I did, though, there at the top of 
each page in a nice shadowed box were 
the words “Presentation Title,” and at 
the bottom it said “Presented by:” fol¬ 
lowed by blank space. Clearly not what I 
wanted. If there had to be a “Presentation 
Title” box, it ought to have a title I had 
given it. I didn’t care to have “Presented 
by: blank” on every page, either. 

The PowerPoint documents are clear, 
detailed, and very long. If I were a pro¬ 
fessional document manager, I’d read 
that book from beginning to end. Alas, 
I’m not, and indeed I was in a great hurry 
and had no time to read a few hundred 
pages; since what I wanted was to title the 
presentation, I looked up “title” in the 
index. There was nothing there. Nothing 
under “presentation” or “presented by,” 
either. 

Eventually I figured it out: just as 
there is a “Master Slide” onto which you 
paste your logo and all the other stuff you 
want on every briefing chart, there’s a 
“Handout Master” that does the same 
thing. All it takes is editing that. It all 
makes sense, too, once you cotton onto 
the philosophy. 



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Plugging you into tomorrow 


Call 1-800-344-4273. In Minnesota, (612) 922-8055. 


114 B YTE • MARCH 1989 


Circle 81 on Reader Service Card 










CHAOS MANOR 


It still wasn’t all that easy to do things. 
For reasons I have yet to understand, the 
Handout Master insists on showing the 
Presentation Title in color, and when I 
try to use the facilities to change the color 
scheme, I get a bomb, “Sorry, a system 
error has occurred,” and error message 
05; none of which makes life easy if you 
are trying to make charts to take to the 
transition team and your airplane leaves 
in 5 hours. 

I managed a kludge that seems to have 
worked. The “color” scheme the system 
gives me is so dark I can’t read it, but I 
just typed in the Presentation Title blind 
and trusted to luck that when it printed in 
black and white it would look all right; 
and Lo!, it did. 

I had other problems like that and was 
able to work around them all. I think 
using a Mac is a bit like learning Lisp: if 
you fool around with it long enough, 
there’s a kind of “Aha!,” after which 
everything is simple. I sure hope so. 

Meanwhile, despite all the problems, 
PowerPoint let me make up a complex 
and highly professional presentation in a 
couple of evenings; in my old aerospace 
days, it would have taken the presentation 


art group at least a week to do a job that 
good, and the cost would have been 
greater than the value of the Mac II. 

The Mac II and PowerPoint are seri¬ 
ously good stuff. 

Printing 

The printer of the year is the big Kyocera 
F-3010 laser printer. As I’ve said before, 
I really have no business hanging onto 
this much printer, but I’m sure glad they 
don’t want it back just yet. The F-3010 
emulates nearly every printer known, 
and it prints an honest 15 pages a minute 
of double-spaced Times Roman text 
(complete with italics and boldface). I 
printed a novel in well under an hour. 
Like most modern laser printers, the F- 
3010 stacks the output upside down. 

Meanwhile, Mrs. Pournelle reminds 
me that the Mannesmann Tally laser 
printer continues to work reliably in her 
end of the shop. It also happens to use the 
Kyocera print engine. 

Laptops 

Despite its weight—it really is giving me 
a permanent list to port—the laptop I 
carry is the Zenith SupersPort 286, 


which is a full AT-compatible machine 
with a 20-megabyte hard disk drive. The 
screen is readable, and I get an honest 
3-plus hours on each charge. I’ve carried 
the SupersPort to a lot of places, and al¬ 
though I really wish it weighed less, I 
find that I’m not willing to swap it for 
one of the other laptops we have here at 
Chaos Manor. 

I did discover that the SupersPort isn’t 
as easy to use in my Bronco II as was its 
predecessor, the Z-183. The SupersPort 
is both smaller and heavier than the Z- 
183, and when you have to balance the 
machine on your lap while being driven 
at freeway speeds, that difference is im¬ 
portant. I did manage to work with the 
SupersPort: I got a bungee cord and used 
that to hold the machine up against the 
dash, with its battery pack resting on the 
shelf above the glove compartment. The 
cord held the machine in place despite 
bumps and curves, and I was able to 
write several hundred words an hour. 

For writers, the difference between 
the SupersPort and the Z-183 isn’t all 
that great; either will do the job nicely. 
The SupersPort is, of course, faster and 

continued 


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Plugging you into tomorrow 


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Call 1-800-344-4273. In Minnesota, (612) 922-8055. 


Circle 82 on Reader Service Card 


MARCH 1989 • B Y T E 115 









CHAOS MANOR 


more powerful. The screen can fold to a 
wide variety of angles, making the Su- 
pe rsPort easier to use on airplanes. The 
fact is that I have both machines, and I’m 
sitting on an airplane writing this on the 
Supers Port, which 1 suppose says it all, 

GrandView 

The software product of the year is Sy¬ 
mantec's GrandView, which is an out¬ 
line processor. That may not sound very 
important, but GrandView is, particu¬ 


larly when used in conjunction with 
DESQview. GrandView is generally the 
first DESQview window I open; that 
way, I can get the day's schedule, then, 
when Fm doing other things, jump back 
to one or another GrandView outline to 
add notes on stuff that has to be done or 
insert ideas for columns and stories. 

GrandView might not be quite so valu¬ 
able without DESQview; it’s the instant 
availability that makes the program vi¬ 
tal. Since it lets you have several Grand¬ 


View windows open at the same time, 
GrandView under DESQview gives 
rapid access to a calendar, files on future 
columns, files on books in progress, and 
so on, 1 can be connected on-line to BIX, 
get an idea for a future column, jump 
over to GrandView, record it, and get 
back to BIX in seconds. 

I have the notes for this column on 
GrandView, which is what makes it pos¬ 
sible for me to be writing while on this 
airplane. I really wonder how I ever got 
along without GrandView* 

Scan Man 

The gadget of the year is Logitech's 
ScanMaru This consists of a PC board, 
software, and a hand-he id scanner you 
drag across whatever it is you want to 
bring into your PC. ScanMan only scans 
images; it doesn’t convert text into 
ASCII files. However, once you have an 
image file, you can sometimes use Flag¬ 
staff Engineering's Spot OCR (optical 
character reader) software to make the 
conversion. 1 say "sometimes" because, 
while Spot seems to be the current state 
of the art in OCR software, there's still a 
good way to go before you can scan in 
and read everything you might want to. 

If you intend to do a lot of scanning, 
particularly of text and documents, 
you'll probably be better off with the 
Hewlett-Packard full-size scanner; but 
for occasional work, ScanMan is easy to 
use and affordable. 

Languages 

The language of the year is Microsoft's 
QuickBASIC 4.5. This release cleans up 
bugs in version 4.0, and it also makes a 
number of significant changes in the user 
interface. You can still get the old inter¬ 
face back if you want it. 

When I began this column years ago, 
much of it was devoted to language de¬ 
bates: which was the best language for 
programming a microcomputer? Theo¬ 
rists agreed on one thing: BASIC was not 
the language of choice, either for teach¬ 
ing programming or for writing useful 
programs. On the other hand, most of the 
early programs were written in Micro¬ 
soft BASIC, largely because there just 
weren’t many other choices. For a while 
there, it was either BASIC or assembly 
language. 

The main objections to BASIC were 
that it was not strongly typed and there 
weren’t any control structures. BASIC 
code tended to be full of GOTO state¬ 
ments, and any large BASIC program re¬ 
sembled a basket of cooked spaghetti. 
The program logic was impossible to foL 

continued 


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116 BYTE • MARCH 1989 


Circle 200 on Reader Service Card 




























































You No Longer Have to Share the 
Lower 640K With Your Debugger 




Periscope I’s new board uses ZERO memory in the 
lower 640K. Yet It has plenty of room to safely store 
all debugging information, like symbols, as well as the 
powerful Version 4 software. 

Periscope's hardware adds 
the power to solve the really 
tough debugging problems. 

The break-out switch lets you 
break into the system any time. 

You can track dawn a bug 
instantly or just check 
what's going on t without 
having to reboot or power 
down and back up. That’s 
really useful when your 
system hangs! The switch is 
included with Periscope 1, 

Periscope If, and Periscope HI. 

Periscope l has a NEW hoard 

with 512K of write-protected RAM, user-expandable to 1MB, for the Periscope software, 

symbol tables, and all related debugging information. Normal DOS memory 
(the lower 640K) is thus totally freed up for your application, and Periscope 
is protected from being overwritten by a run-away program The new 
board's footprint is only 32K, so you can use it in PC, AT, and 386 systems 
with EGA/VGA and EMS boards installed (not possible with the previous 
56K board). It can also be used with Periscope III to provide additional 
write-protected memory. 

Periscope III has a board with 64K of write-protected RAM to store the 
Periscope software and as much additional information as will fit, AND.. . 

The Periscope IN board adds another powerful dimension to your 
debugging. Us hardware breakpoints and real-time trace buffer let you 
track down bugs that a software-oriented debugger would take too long 
to find, or can’t find at all! 


Ths NEW Periscope I 
memory board keeps all debugging 
information out of the lower G40K, Can be used in 
PCs, ATs, and 366s with both EGA/VGA and EMS boards 
installed The Periscope break-cut switch enables you to 
recover tram a hung system Included with Models \, II, and III 


The Periscope III hardware-breakpoint board captures information in real-time, so you 1 !! find bugs that can't be 
found with a software-based debugger. 


What’s New in Periscope 
Version 4: 

• View local symbols from Microsoft C 
(Version 5) 

• Debug Microsoft windows applications 

• Set breakpoints in PUNK overlays 

• Improved source-level support 

• Monitor variables in a Watch window 

• 80386 debug register support 

• Debug using a dumb terminal 

• PS/2 watchdog timer support 

• Ust mixed-case symbols 

• Set breakpoints on values of Flags 

• Much more! 

■ Periscope I includes a NEW full-length 
board with 512K of write-protected RAM; 
(user-expandable to 1MB); break-out 
switch; software and manual for S795. 

■ Periscope 11 includes break-out switch; 
software and manual for (175. 

■ Periscope 1I-X includes software and 
manual (no hardware) for 1145. 

■ Periscope 111 includes a full-length 
board with 64K of write-protected RAM, 
hardware breakpoints and real-time trace 
buffer; break-out switch; software and 
manual. Periscope III for machines run¬ 
ning up to 10 MHz with one wait-state is 
(1395 Plus the new Model I board, (1995, 

Due to the volatility of RAM costs, prices 0 n board 
models are subject to change without notice. 

REQUIREMENTS: IBM PC, XX AT PS/2, 
80386 or close compatible (Periscope III 
requires hardware as well as software compat¬ 
ibility, thus wilI not work on PS/2 or 80386 
systems); DOS 2.0 or later; 64K available 
memory (I28K at installation time); one disk 
drive; an 80-column monitor 


■ Periscope’s software is solid r comprehensive, and 

flexible. 

It helps you debug just about any kind of program you can write. . thoroughly and 
efficiently 

Periscope's the answer for debugging device drivers, memory-resident, non-DOS, and 
interrupt-driven programs. Periscope works with any language, and provides source and/or 
symbol support for programs written in high-level languages and assembler. 


Call us with your questions. Wet! he happy 
to send you free information or help you de¬ 
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Order Your Periscope, 
Toll-Free, Today! 

800-722-7006 

MAJOR CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED 


David Nani an, President of Underware, Inc, 
(of BRIEF fame) says this about the new 
Periscope Version 4; 

"Periscope has always been an unbelievable 
assembler-level debugger. Version 4 has 
turned it into a terrific source-level debugger 
as well. Aside from major enhancements like 
the source-level improvements, all the little 
changes make a really big difference, too. For 
instance, symbol lookups and disassemblies 
are noticeably faster, and highlighting the 
registers that have changed really makes life 
easier. Once again, Periscope has raised the 
industry standard for debuggers!'* 


Periscope software A 
350+ page manual 



The 

Periscope 

Company, Inc. 


1197 PEACHTREE ST. • PLAZA LEVEL 
ATLANTA, GA 30361 • 404/875-8080 


Circle 203 on Reader Service Card 


MARCH 1989 ■ BYTE 117 



















CHAOS MANOR 


low, if it existed at all; many of those 
early BASIC programs “just growed.” 

That’s all changed now. QuickBASIC 
4.5 has all the control structures you’ll 
ever need. It has IF.. .THEN.. .ELSE, 
CASE, DO WHILE, DO UNTIL, and so 
forth, all of which have been in BASIC 
for some time. It also has subroutines 
that can be called by name, and they are 
nearly indistinguishable from Pascal 
procedures. QB 4.5 subroutine variables 
can be local, local and static (a static 


variable doesn’t go away when you exit 
the subroutine), or global. 

While QB 4.5 isn’t as strongly typed 
as Pascal, there are variable types, in¬ 
cluding records that work pretty much 
the same way that records do in Pascal. 
In a word, all the necessary data struc¬ 
tures are there. It’s still possible to write 
spaghetti code, but it’s just as easy to do 
things right. 

The result is a language quite good 
enough for complicated programs, as 


well as for quick-and-dirty jobs. I don’t 
doubt that you can do a great deal more 
with C and that the resulting program 
will run faster; on the other hand, if you 
don’t do a lot of programming in C, you 
won’t do any. C is a language that lets 
you do in one line what it takes several 
lines of Pascal or BASIC to achieve. The 
result is that it’s much harder to read the 
program, and if you put a large C pro¬ 
gram aside for a few weeks and then go 
back to it, you are likely to find it’s going 
to take a long time to figure out what you 
did. With BASIC, you can usually just 
pick up the work and start adding to it. 

I can make about as good a case for 
Borland’s Turbo Pascal as I can for QB 
4.5; but the fact remains that the major 
programming work I’ve done this year 
was on Mrs. Poumelle’s reading pro¬ 
gram, and that has been done in QB 4.5. 
Also, when I have a quick job to do—file 
format conversions, for example—I find 
that I tend to use QB 4.5 because it’s so 
simple to do. 

I suspect that the future belongs to ob¬ 
ject-oriented languages, like Smalltalk 
or Actor; but at the moment, the lan¬ 
guage I actually use is QB 4.5. 

Software Trendsetter 

There are hardware differences between 
PC and Mac computers, but they’re less 
important every year. For most users, 
the essential difference is the general 
philosophy of their operating systems. 
The Mac has always been visual and 
graphics-oriented, and Mac software in 
general has been developed to take ad¬ 
vantage of that. Some of that software 
was so good that many of us thought it 
was worth buying a Mac to get it. Of 
course, much of this software was con¬ 
cerned with desktop publishing and 
document preparation, typified by pack¬ 
ages like PowerPoint. 

There were also programs like Micro¬ 
soft’s Excel and Softview’s MacInTax. 

Many analysts said the most important 
computer event of 1988 was the introduc¬ 
tion of OS/2 and Presentation Manager. 
That may be true, but I have my doubts; 
even Microsoft says the installed base of 
OS/2 won’t be very large for another cou¬ 
ple of years. In my judgment, the 1988 
improvements in Windows were consid¬ 
erably more important. Provided that 
you have a good EGA video system, you 
can now get both Excel and MacInTax 
for your AT. You don’t even need Win¬ 
dows; both programs come with run¬ 
time packages that take care of the job. 

That trend will continue. Windows, 
and in particular Hewlett-Packard’s 

continued 


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118 BYTE- MARCH 1989 


Circle 258 on Reader Service Card 

















WE WELCOME INTERNATIONAL ORDERS 
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Call ter pries hr my settwtn Item not lachM I* 
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1 818 705-1895 US 1800 281-6603 CA 1800 328-4473 US 


Circle 59 on Reader Service Card 


MARCH 1989 • BYTE 119 

























































































































CHAOS MANOR 


Items Discussed 


Actor.$495 

The Whitewater Group 
Technology Innovation Center 
906 University Place 
Evanston, IL 6020 J 
(312) 491-2370 
Inquiry 1098. 

Amiga 2000.......,,..,,.,$2195 

Commodore Business Machines, Inc. 
1200 Wilson Dr. 

Brandywine Industrial Park 
West Chester, PA 19380 
(215) 431-9100 
Inquiry 1039, 

Cheetah 386 ..$2195 

Cheetah International, Inc. 

107 Community Blvd., Suite 5 
Longview, TX 75602 
(800) 243*3824 
Inquiry 1040, 

Connection 

Coprocessor.....,.$995 

Intel Corp t 

Personal Computer 

Enhancement Operation 

5200 Northeast Elam Young Pkwy. 

Hillsboro, OR 97124 

(800) 538-3373 

Inquiry 1041. 

DESQview .$129.95 

Quarterdeck Office Systems 
150 Pico Blvd. 

Santa Monica, CA 90405 
(213) 392-9851 
Inquiry 1042. 

DiskPac .....$399 

Tandon Corp. 

405 Science Dr. 

Moorpark, CA 93021 
(805) 523-0340 
Inquiry 1043. 

Dungeon Master...$39.95 

Oasis Systems/FTL Games 
6160 Lusk Blvd., Suite C-206 
San Diego, CA 92121 
(619) 453-5711 
Inquiry 1044. 

Empire.....$49.95 

Interstel 
P.O. Box 57825 
Webster, TX 77598 
(713) 486*4163 
Inquiry 1045. 


ESDI Drive....$3460 

MacDisk...$3995 


Priam Corp. 

20 West Montague Expressway 
San Jose, CA 95134 
(408) 434-9300 

Inquiry 1046. 

F-3010...$8395 

Kyocera Unison, Inc. 

3165 Adeline St. 

Berkeley, CA 94703 
(415) 848-6680 
Inquiry 1047. 

GrandView.......$295 

Symantec Corp. 

Living Videotext Division 
117 Easy St. 

Mountain View, CA 94043 
(415) 964-6300 

Inquiry 1048. 

LANtastic....$399 

Artisoft, Inc, 

3550 North First Ave., Suite 330 
Tucson, AZ 85719 
(602) 293*6363 

Inquiry 1049. 


Lap-Link Mac.........$139.95 

Lap-Link PC,.....$129.95 


Traveling Software, Inc. 

18702 North Creek Pkwy. 

Bothell, WA 98011 

(800) 343-8080; in Washington, 

(206) 483-8088 
Inquiry 1050. 

Logic Gem ..,.$198 

Sterling Castle Software 
702 Washington St., Suite 174 
Marina del Rey, CA 90292 
(213) 306-3020 
Inquiry 1051, 


Mace Utilities 5.0..$99 

GRASP .$149 


Paul Mace Software, inc. 

400 Williamson Way 
Ashland, OR 97520 
(503) 488-2322 

Inquiry 1052. 

PC-Write 3.0 ...$89 

Quick soft 

219 First Ave. N, Suite 224 
Seattle, WA 98109 
(206) 282-0452 

Inquiry 1053. 


PowerPoint....... $395 

QuickBASIC4.5 ...$99 

Microsoft Corp. 


16011 Northeast 36th Way 
P.O.Box 97017 
Redmond, WA 98073 
(206) 882-8080 

Inquiry 1054. 

ScanMan ......$299 

Logitech International SA 
6505 Kaiser Dr. 

Fremont, CA 94555 
(415)795-8500 
Inquiry 1055. 

Spot.....$995 

Flagstaff Engineering 
1120 Kaibab Lane 
Flagstaff, AZ 86001 
(602) 779-3341 
Inquiry 1056. 

SupersPort 286.$4999 

Zenith Data Systems 
1000 Milwaukee Ave. 

Glenview, IL 60025 
(312)699-4800 
Inquiry 1057. 

Turbo Debugger.$149.95 

Borland International, Inc. 

1800 Green Hills Rd. 

P.O. Box 660001 
Scotts Valley, CA 95066 
(408) 438-8400 
Inquiry 1058. 

WORM 

internal.. $1888 

external...$2088 

Information Storage, Inc. 

2768 Janitell Rd. 

Colorado Springs, CO 80906 

(303)579*0460 

Inquiry 1059. 


WORM 

500-megabyte (external).. $4450 

AFX4100 (internal)...$4250 

Maximum Storage, Inc. 

5025 Centennial Bivd. 


Colorado Springs, CO 80919 
(719) 531-6888 

Inquiry 1060. 


120 BYTE* MARCH 1989 









































TopSpeed’s seamlessly integrated 
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VID (Visual Interactive Debugger): 
power without complexity. 


Sieve benchmark measured by the 
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TechKit $59.95 
VID $59.95 

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OS/2 Compiler $195.00 


. TopSpeed " is surety one of the OS/2 version now available: Runs in protected mode under 

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Kent Porter Full support of all OS/2 calls* Same integrated confi gurable 

Dr. Dobbs Journal e nvironme nt as the DOS vers ion. 


‘JPI Modula-2 looks like another 
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Dick Fountain 
BYTE Magazine 


The Compiler Kit indudes: High-speed optimizing compiler (3,000-5,000 
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4t JPI TopSpeed is simply the best 
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J of I^scal, Ada & Modula-2 


VID (Visual Interactive Debugger); An integrated multi-window symbolic 
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In England and Europe contact: 

Jensen & I^utncnjUK Ltd. h 63 ClerkenweEl 
Road, London ECJM5NP. Phone: (01)253-4333. 
DOS Compiler: 09.95, TechKit £34.95, VID 
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Handling charges: In UK please phone for 
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products, £2 for each add'I product. 


The lediKH "includes: Assembler source for start-up code and run-time library* 
JPI TbpSpeed Assembler (30*000 lines/min.), TSR module* communica¬ 
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Also available: Utah SuperSort®. a fast sort program callable from Utah COBOL; Utah FORTRAN; Utah 
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Utah COBOL is a trademark of Ellis Computing. Inc. © 1987 Ellis Computing, Inc. 


CHAOS MANOR 


NewWave Windows implementation, 
will go far to erase the differences be¬ 
tween the PC and the Mac. Add object- 
oriented languages like Actor, and it may 
not be long before just about everything 
that runs on the Mac can about as easily 
be run on a PC. Apple’s lawsuit against 
Microsoft and Hewlett-Packard was ill- 
advised, and I suspect that Apple already 
regrets it; both Apple and Hewlett-Pack¬ 
ard would be better off if those resources 
had been invested in new technology 
rather than paid to lawyers. So would we 
all. Still, it’s not hard to understand 
why Apple is afraid of what Windows 
portends. 

Software Tool of the Year 

Hands down, the software tool of the 
year is Borland’s Turbo Debugger. I 
first saw this as a demonstration at Phi¬ 
lippe Kahn’s house a year or so ago, and 
I’ve been waiting for it ever since. If you 
use any Turbo products, you’ll find the 
Turbo Debugger pretty simple; the inter¬ 
face is pretty much the standard Borland 
Turbo menu system. There’s a good 
manual, but you won’t often need it. 

One of Turbo Debugger’s neatest fea¬ 
tures is the ability to run on a remote ma¬ 
chine, so that if your program crashes, 
the Debugger isn’t dead and may be able 
to find out what some of the problems 
were. 

Borland continues to make excellent 
software tools, and by its existence, it 
forces other major software publishers to 
improve their products to stay competi¬ 
tive. We all benefit. 

Most Significant Hardware 

The most significant hardware develop¬ 
ment last year was Intel’s Connection 
Coprocessor board. That may be a bit 
stronger statement than I meant, but I 
won’t withdraw it. 

Another Pournelle law states, “One 
user, at least one CPU’’; the Intel Co- 
Processor carries this further to “one 
task, one CPU.” The Coprocessor has an 
on-board 80186, software in ROM, and 
its own memory. There’s also provision 
for a modem. The result is a small com¬ 
munications computer hosted by your 
AT. It can call another Coprocessor, in¬ 
quire for messages, send and receive 
messages (including fax images), and in 
general manage most of your communi¬ 
cations activities, and do it while the host 
computer does other things. 

There are things about the Intel Co- 
Processor that I’d change, but in my 
judgment, this pacesetter was the most 
significant hardware development I got 

continued 


122 BYTE* MARCH 1989 


Circle 97 on Reader Service Card 

































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SUPF.HSPOHT 3 $ 1*93 

SUFERSPGHT 20MB HD $ 2218 

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Wall*: VSLi lfiOK Dilv, $ 198 

Wcllcc 5,15 r 1.3M Drive t 248 


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NEC 

Powermate fe 


1 Enh. lOHHi $ 1239 

2 % 1567, 

EX IHB 43M $ 2729 

SX2HSH0H $ 3619 
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394/30 4 3475 



HARD 

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$ 
5 
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% 
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DISK 


MODEMS 



NEC MULTISYNC El 

$559 



* 241 
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Plwprod 336 Mwdri tool 5744 



AT&T 



TOSHIBA 


TIOOO * 777 TllODHB i 2397 

tizoof 8 1392 tiioo'M $ 3078 

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267 

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448 

659 

334 

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DRIVES 

PLUS 

TOM Manicard $ 498 

HAVE* 

33000 laternal $ 229 

14008 Internal $ 368 


1DM Mnrdirard 5 629 

1200 External $ 268 


TOSHIBA 

l.S" 720K $ 88 

a.ft" i.t4M S 126 

3400 Exierbal $ 397 

2400P psi'i $ 359 

us ROftoncs 

1200 IntrmaJ $ 95 


5.IB” 96QK $ 89 

2400 liuernal $ 164 


sai'iJM S 89 

1200 Erlzmal $ 99 


AMR SJJ F (arPft|3 $ 239 

2400 External $ 177 


AKDEK Laaerdzlvr 

tetth Mil Bopkabell $ 799 

SUPIA 

2400 Internal $ 98 

3400 Externa! $ 13 8 


VIDEO 

CARDS 


5 
% 
S 
S 

s 
f 

Nltra tutor Card $ 

Pandits Amw* 4*0 $ 
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* 


144 

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272 

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COMPUTER 

SYSTEMS 


IBS Model 96 
386 Model 120 
266 Moriri 140 
ZB6 Model 170 


306 Model JIAO 


$ 1448 
$ 2010 
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CITIZEN 

EPSON 

OKI DATA 

PANASONIC 

PRVMTF1K 

PRINTERS 

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1 PftlO'ikHd* 

5 

463 
















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549 

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184 







KX-.pl 0601 

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198 

AST Talbolaaei/PS 

$ 

3383 

P7l6"vdde 

$ 

644 

1B0P 

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199 

Lfreoo 

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189 

ito 

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329 

KX-F109II 

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218 




CP7 16 ' Color 

5 

733 

MSPriO 

$ 

268 

FX-S50 

$ 

339 

121 

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463 

XX-Pi 0S3t 

i 

344 

DECONIX ISO 

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332 

1 P220D 10" wide 

$ 

359 

M&P-I5E 

$ 

369 

FX-iQiO 

« 

488 

m IBM Parallel 

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KX-P1124 

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329 

DECOWX 3O0W 

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515 

PBXL J6" L Cfllor 

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877 

MSPaO 

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337 

m-500 

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293 TDM Parallel 

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436 




PSXL 16” Color 

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MSP 60 

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737 

3W Color 

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1045 




4440 BOO Ipm 

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5979 




Proatlet* IS 

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533 

LQ IS5D Color 

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KX-P3131 17 epa 

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QMS PS-ftl 0 2MB 

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4098 

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417 

Tribute 124 

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1500 15-cpi 

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Tribute 224 

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XEROX 4020 Color 

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1166 










Law Pannet 

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SOFTWARE 

Alda* Paaotnaket 3.0 $ 488 

$ 109 

395 
98 
118 
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98 

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196 

288 

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318 

64 


SCANNERS 


SOFTWARE 


a P1n« 
t-Ploa 146 


KST Ufbtrtron 


OCR 

LS300 w/lnl 
*G6 LS30Q OCR 


$ 1233 
S 1798 
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$ 
$ 
5 
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% 
$ 

Macro Aim 5.1 $ 

$ 

Paradua 1.1 $ 

Paradox a.o $ 

PF5: Pro Writ* $ 

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Q1A $ 

INTEL 
$ 
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5 


HOST 4.77MHz 
SWT * MHa 
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Circle 188 on Reader Service Card 


MARCH 1989 • BYTE 123 




















































CHAOS MANOR 


this year. I hope to see a lot more co¬ 
processors in the next few years. 

Good Stuff 

In addition to my awards, I like to com¬ 
mend other significant products that 
don’t quite fit into the award system. 
Some, for example, set or exemplify 
trends. Others are just good stuff that 
someone ought to say good things about. 
Call this the Chaos Manor honorable 
mention list. 

Item: Traveling Software. This com¬ 
pany pioneered communications between 
laptop computers and the rest of the com¬ 
puter world, and they’ve been putting out 
good products ever since. This year, 
their trendsetters included a program to 
link the Macintosh to the PC and another 
to link up the new Sharp Wizard pocket 
computer to the PC world. If you don’t 
have the Traveling Software catalog, get 
it. It’s likely you’ll find they sell some¬ 
thing you need. 

Item: DESQview, especially when 
combined with the Phar Lap DOS exten¬ 
sions. Between them, these two pro¬ 
grams can do just about everything that 
OS/2 can, while letting you run all your 


old software at the same time. In my 
judgment, the main reason DESQview 
and Phar Lap haven’t really taken off in 
sales—and they’re doing quite well 
now^is the high price of memory, and of 
course that hurts OS/2 quite as much as it 
does DESQview. 

Item: PC-Write 3.0. This shareware 
program improves every year, and it has 
become quite good enough for nearly 
anything you’d ever want a text editor 
for. Being shareware, you can get a copy 
and try it before you pay anything. I don’t 
know what will be the future of 
shareware, but I do know that if it has a 
future, that will be in large part due to 
the efforts of Bob and Meagan Wallace. 

Item: Flagstaff Engineering’s Spot 
OCR software. I find in general it’s still 
cheaper to send one of my old paperbacks 
overseas to one of those shops that key in 
text than it is to scan it in; but for short 
jobs, those that have to be done quickly, 
and jobs involving typescript or dean, 
well-set type, Spot is more than good 
enough. Someday we’ll have hardware 
and software capable of reading in just 
about everything ever printed. Spot isn’t 
there yet, but it’s getting us closer. 


Item: Tandon’s removable Disk Pacs. 
Tandon pioneered removable hard disk 
drive technology. This year, it matured 
to usefulness. We used a pair of Tandon 
computers in two locations, with Disk 
Pacs to transfer programs and data. You 
can’t throw these hard disks around— 
Tandon recommends that you treat them 
as you would an expensive camera—but 
they do withstand daily transportation. 
Tandon machines come both with and 
without floppy disk drives; a system 
without a floppy disk drive can be kept 
quite secure, since it’s easier to keep 
track of Disk Pacs than floppy disks. If 
the Disk Pacs are locked into a safe, the 
computer data is as secure as your docu¬ 
ments are. 

We’ve had good results with Tandon’s 
AT machines. 

Item: Mace Software. Paul Mace was 
the first person to realize that you could 
recover data from an accidentally for¬ 
matted hard disk. Since that time, the 
Mace utilities have been expanded to in¬ 
clude a whole bunch of useful stuff. 

This year’s major Mace product is 
GRASP, a PC screen-management sys- 

catttinued 



A Size 

For Sore Eyes. 

37" Intelligent Color Display Monitor. 

There’s a new dimension in production and presentation technology from 
Mitsubishi Electronics. Bold, brilliant colors on a large 37 display monitor* 
mean your presentation will be seen like never before. A presentation that can 
be clearly viewed without eye or neck strain. Even with the house lights up. 

Advanced features include compatibility with IBM® 1 CGA, EGA, PGC, 
PS/2™ and Apple® Macintosh™ II computers. Unique auto-tracking dr- 
cuitry for ease of use. Plus maximum versatility to accept TTL, analog, or 
television-type NTSC signals. 

It all adds up to greater impact. One look at the high resolution 37" display 
and you'll agree it’s a size for sore eyes. 

For more information on the XC3710 or the names of authorized 
Mitsubishi Electronics monitor resellers near you, please call 
L800-556d234, extension 209. In California, call 1-80£M41'2345, 
extension 209. Or write, Mitsubishi Electronics America, Inc., 

Computer Peripherals Division, 991 Knox Street, Torrance, 


California 90502. 


A 


MITSUBISHI 

ELECTRONICS 


124 BYTE- MARCH 1989 


*35" viewable 

IBM is a registered trademark ot International Business Machines Corp. Apple is a registered trademark ol Apple Computer, Inc. 

Circle 111 on Reader Service Card (DEALERS: 178) 











Micro Channel Solutions. 



BOCARAM.MCA 50Z — "... the product that 
answers the need for total IBM compatibility." 
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BOCARAM. MCA 50Z, BOCA RAM 50/60. BOCA.MCA PARALLEL, and BOCA. MCA SERIAUPARALLEL are trademarks of Boca Research, Inc. All other references to computer systems, software 
and peripherals use trademarks owned by their respective manufacturers. © Copyright 1968 Boca Research, Inc. 

See us at CeBIT *89 - 
Hannover Fair 
U.S. Pavillion - Booth #S1 
March 8-15,1989 

6401 Congress Avenue, Boca Raton, FL 33487 • Phone: (407) 997-6227 • FAX: (407) 997-0918 

Circle 48 on Reader Service Card MARCH 1989 -BYTE 125 


BDCR 


RESEARCH INC 










CHAOS MANOR 


tem that makes it simple to build up ani¬ 
mated displays and otherwise do spectac¬ 
ular visuals by calling GRASP routines 
from BASIC, C, or Pascal programs. 
This is another of those companies that 
keep coming out with excellent stuff; you 
ought to get the Mace catalog. 

Item: The Whitewater Group's Actor 
programming language. The real prob¬ 
lem with Windows is that it's hard to 
learn how to write programs for it* Ac¬ 
tor, an object-oriented language, makes 
Windows programming enormously eas¬ 
ier, and it is a giant step in the right 
direction. 

Logic Gem 

I mentioned this last month * Now I have a 
copy. The only reason I don't make 
Logic Gem the Software Tool of the Year 
is that I just haven't had enough time to 
work with it; but I’ve seen enough to 
know I like it, and I’m pretty sure it will 
be on next year's honors list* 

The blurb on the back of the Logic 
Gem document says, “Logic Gem does 
for program logic what spreadsheets do 
for numbers." That’s a pretty good de¬ 
scription. Logic Gem lets you make large 


truth tables, check for logic conflicts, 
and then automatically generate code 
that can be incorporated into your pro¬ 
grams. It has already saved me several 
hours, and I haven't had it a week. 

Highly recommended* 

Game of the Year 

This one's a tie: Dungeon Master, for 
either the Atari ST or the Amiga, is spec¬ 
tacular. The visuals are stunning, and 
the game can really get you involved* Ex¬ 
ploring the 14-level dungeon took me 
about a month, and I found myself play¬ 
ing it a great deal more than I should 
have. 

The other game of the year is Empire, 
for the Atari ST, the Amiga, or an EGA- 
equipped PC. I get a lot of computer 
games, and I try a lot of them, but find 
myself coming back to this one again and 
again. 

Winding Dow n 

There's a tie for book of the year, too: 
Charles Murray's In Pursuit of Happi¬ 
ness: And Good Government (Simon and 
Schuster, 1988) and John Keegan’s The 
Mask of Command (Penguin, 1988). 


They’re both important books, and I 
don't use that phrase lightly. 

It's late at night, and I'm late with this 
column, which I'm finishing on the 
SupersPort in a room in the Jack Daniels 
Motor Inn in Peterborough, five days be¬ 
fore Christmas* Since I started this col¬ 
umn, I have flown to Boston, then driven 
up here to New Hampshire. I've also at¬ 
tended the first BYTE Editorial Exposi¬ 
tion and gone to a birthday dinner for my 
BYTE technical editor, Stan Wszola. 

I'd better get some sleep, I sure hope 
1989 is as good a year as 1988 has 
been. ■ 


Jerry Pournelle holds a doctorate in psy¬ 
chology and is a science fiction writer 
who also earns a comfortable living writ¬ 
ing about computers present and future. 
Jerry welcomes readers 1 comments and 
opinions. Send a self-addressed, stamped 
envelope to Jerry Pournelle , c./o BYTE, 
One Phoenix Mill Lane, Peterborough, 
NH 03458. Please put your address on 
the letter as well as on the envelope. Due 
to the high volume of letters , Jerry cannot 
guarantee a personal reply. You can also 
contact him on BIX as 'jerryp, " 





TO BUY A MOUSE-TRAK 


Count them. With MOUSE-TRAK, 
five fingers do all the work. Because 
it uses trackball technology, input 
and precision control is at your 
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With CAD* Desktop * | 

Publishing or Spreadsheet f 

applications, MOUSE-TRAK is easier, faster, more 
relaxed and a lot more comfortable to use than 
ordinary input devices. 



_MOUSE-TRAK OFFERS YOU OFT IONS_ 

2 or J bun tons — speed control — Multiple Inrerfocmg 

MOUSE-TRAK is stationary. Only the highly 
efficient trackball moves, eliminating tiresome 
arm and wrist movement. You can operate 
MOUSE-TRAK in your hand, even sit back 
with it on your knee. It plugs into your 
computer and needs no additional power supply. 
User definable input keys are in easier-to-use 
locations. The uniquely patented shape has 
been developed through 
rigorous ergonomic 
studies of hand 
sizes and 

r';-y finger geom- 

etry. Made 
r in the U.S., 
MOUSE-TRAK 

126 BYTE ■ MARCH 1989 





is already in use by the military in planes, subs and tanks* 
Engineers at IBM™, Texas Instruments™ and Motorola™ are 
also using MOUSE-TRAKS * 

MOUSE-TRAK carries a money 
back guarantee, If you don’t 
like using MOUSE-TRAK 
K within 30 days, we’ll 

refund your money. 

And* if you do like \ 
it, we’ll give you $10 
for your old mouse. 

MOUSE-TRAK 
W ranges in price from 

M $139-$ 189, 

Call us toll- 
Jff free for the 

M complete story 

m on MOUSE- 

TRAK and the name of a dealer near you. 

^ JKk Our new brochure is available upon request* 



MOUSE-TRAK combines mouse inter¬ 
face technology with the convenience 
and precision of a tracking ball. There’s 
no watted motion or time. 


1 - 800 - 533-4822 

(in Texas 214-494-3073) 




3121 Semen Street, Garland. Term 73042 USA. Telefax. 2144944159 

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© 19 SB Mxet Systems, Inc. All ngfiLs raisered. Quick-C and CodeView are 
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USA: Rainbow Technologies. Inc., 1 SOU -A Mitchell South, Irvine, CA92714 • (714)261-0220 • TELEX: 3B6078 • FAX: (714)261-0260 
©Copyright 19S9 Rainbow Technologies,. Inc-All product name* are trademarks of their respective manufacturers. 






EXPERT ADVICE 


APPLICATIONS PLUS ■ Ezra Shapiro 


TRACKBALL 

Madness 

Mice aren’t as nice, ~ " 

but they may r “ 

live a lot longer L- — Jr 1 - . ; — - 



■ 1 very time I have to deal with a 

I_j hardware malfunction, I begin 

’ to wonder why 1 own com- 
puters. When my Abaton Pro- 
Point trackball started acting up, I once 
again entered that nightmare zone that all 
users dread. Before it ended (that’s as¬ 
suming it has ended), things got pretty 
bizarre. The story is a good example of 
the kind of convoluted logic that drives 
the computer industry. 

Let me begin by stating that Fm ad¬ 
dicted to trackballs; since switching to 
these devices for use with my PC AT 
done and my Macintosh, Fve eliminated 
the sharp arthritis-like pains in my elbow 
that came with constant mouse use. 

And ProPoint for the Mac seems to be 
a nifty product, nicely styled and ergo¬ 
nomically superior to many other track¬ 
balls Fve seen. The position of the two 
buttons to the lower left of the ball is bet¬ 
ter suited to righties than to lefties, but 
since Fm right-handed, the design is 
ideal for me. F ve become absolutely de¬ 
pendent on ProPoint, so when it stopped 
responding to left-right motion, I was 
panic-stricken. 

I blew away whatever dirt I could see 
within the device, but that didn’t help* 
Then I prodded and banged for a while, 
to no avail. I sighed and wrote the track¬ 
ball off as dead. 

As I hadn’t bothered to send in my reg¬ 
istration card, the following morning I 
called the mail-order desk at Computer- 
ware to buy a new one* When I explained 
my problem, a pleasant man told me to 
hold off and to try a call to Everex* of 
which Abaton is now a division* 

“Don’t be silly,” he said. “They guar¬ 
antee these things, and you might be able 


to save yourself a lot of money.” 

Wow, a helpful retailer! Duly im¬ 
pressed, I phoned Everex. Sure enough, 
the fact that I still had the original in¬ 
voice was good enough, and the company 
issued a return authorization on the spot. 
I was told that the repair would take about 
a week from when Everex received the 
unit, and it would be returned to me by 
whatever shipping method I used to get it 
there. So I packed up the trackball and 
sent it off by Federal Express, next-day 
delivery* 

Two weeks later, on a Tuesday, I 
called to find out why I hadn’t received 
my repaired trackball, and I was told that 
it was scheduled to be shipped Thursday 
at the latest* 

“So I’ll have it for the weekend?” 

“Definitely,” came the reply. 

By late Friday, with no trackball in 
sight, I called again* 

“There’s a backlog,” I was told. 
“Your unit will be shipped at the begin¬ 
ning of next week. M 


Fine. Tuesday rolled around, and 
nothing happened* Wednesday, I called 
Everex again. “What’s the problem?” I 
inquired. 

“I don’t know,” said the customer ser¬ 
vice representative* “There’s a backlog. 
I’ll see what I can do.” 

“Why is there a backlog?” I asked. 
“What’s going on?” 

The customer service person sighed. 
“Nobody will tell me.” 

“You mean you’ve talked to the engi¬ 
neers and the technicians, and no one can 
offer an explanation?” 

“That’s about it*” 

At this point, I decided it was time to 
do a little poking. I called a friend of 
mine with an engineering background, 
who has worked with trackballs, and de¬ 
scribed the situation. “Everex will rue 
the day they stuck a guarantee on that 
puppy,” he chuckled. “It’s a design 
flaw, not a malfunction* Building a 
trackball suspension that won’t deterio- 

continued 


ILLUSTRATION: CLAUDIA TANTILLO © L9S9 


MARCH 1989 * BYTE 129 



























APPLICATIONS PLUS 


rate quickly is not a trivial matter; it can 
be done, but they haven't done it. YU bet 
you anything you don’t get the same unit 
back.’ 1 

1 also telephoned the press relations 
person at Everex to find out whether 
there was some major problem with the 
ProPoint. No, I was told, the delay was 
more likely to be due to getting parts 
from suppliers than to any design flaw; 
the ProPoint T s failure rate was in line 
with those of other trackballs- With com¬ 
pletely opposite explanations, I had no 
choice but to wait. 

Finally, VA weeks after the process 
had started, a Federal Express delivery 
arrived from Everex containing a brand- 
new ProPoint with a different serial 
number. I called my engineer friend 
again. 

“How long had you been using the 
trackball, and how long is the guaran¬ 
tee?’* he asked. 

“Four months,” I replied. “And the 
guarantee is five years.“ 

“That's three a year,” he said. “I pre¬ 
dict that the new trackball will fail in 
four months, and you'll go through this 
again. Unless they change the design, 
you'll have to do it 15 times to get past the 
guarantee.” 

Ouch. I'm not sure what to make of all 
this. The facts are these: The guarantee 
is for real. The trackball certainly failed, 
and it was replaced with a new unit. 
Everyone at Everex was friendly and 
polite. I’d buy products from Everex 
again, and I recommend the company to 
friends. 

But would I recommend the trackball? 
I guess I'll have my answer in another 
four months or so. 

One final thought from my friend. 
“Everex acquired Abaton to get into the 
Mac market, but they're primarily a PC 
company. Now that IBM has endorsed 
mice, the market for third-party pointing 
devices is heating up fast. If the ProPoint 
is really a solid design, then why hasn't 
Everex brought out a PC version of it?” 

Stay tuned, 

Microsoft at Work 

Microsoft's upgrade to Works for the 
Mac (2.0) is a truly curious thing. The 
company has managed to take an enor¬ 
mously flexible integrated software 
package, add a tremendous array of sub¬ 
stantial features and improvements, yet 
make the product only slightly more use¬ 
ful than it was to begin with. This is no 
mean feat; I find myself simultaneously 
awed and irritated, a very strange feeling 
indeed. I still recommend the product 
highly—it can easily handle 80 percent to 


I find 
that I am 

simultaneously awed 
and irritated about 
Works 2. 0. 


90 percent of most routine application 
tasks—yet I'm not sure I’d recommend 
the upgrade to anyone who already owns 
the program. 

The three most grandiose additions to 
Works—a spelling checker, a macro re¬ 
corder, and powerful drawing facili¬ 
ties—all fail to measure up to what I 
would have expected from Microsoft. 
The spelling checker is unacceptably 
slow, and it does not let you check as you 
type. The macro recorder offers no capa¬ 
bilities for editing, branching, or modi¬ 
fying the speed of playback; it merely 
spits back recorded keystrokes as fast as 
it can. Thus, it’s useless for anything but 

Items 

Discussed 

Microsoft Works 2,0......$295 

Microsoft Corp. 

16011 Northeast 36th Way 
P,0. Box 97017 
Redmond, WA 98073 
(800) 426-9400 
(206) 882-8080 
Inquiry 102 L 

ProPoint......$139 

Everex Systems, Inc. 

48431 Milmont Dr. 

Fremont, CA 94538 
(800) 821-0806 
(415) 498-1111 
Inquiry 1022, 

WorksPlus Spell 2,0 ...$79.95 

Lundeen and Associates 
P.O.Box 30038 
Oakland, CA 94604 
(800) 233-6851 
(800) 922-7587 (California) 

Inquiry 1023. 


the simplest of functions, like inserting 
boilerplate phrases into text. 

You access the drawing tools as a 
mode within the word processor or the 
spreadsheet, rather than firing up a sepa¬ 
rate new module. This is handy if you 
want to add little pictures to an existing 
document, but once you scratch the sur¬ 
face of this feature, it's downright odd. 
You get the basic palette for drawing 
lines, rectangles, polygons, ovals, and so 
on, with patterns and fills, and you can 
even draw lines that end with arrow¬ 
heads. However, every time you create 
an object, the program changes back to 
the selection pointer, in direct violation 
of Apple’s guidelines for software de¬ 
sign. Very annoying. 

You get a customizable snap grid, but 
you can't see it on the screen; there's also 
no vertical ruler bar, so positioning of 
objects is haphazard at best. The text tool 
will let you form blocks of text, a rudi¬ 
mentary sort of page layout, but you have 
to either type the text right there or paste 
from the Clipboard, and the spelling 
checker won't work on objects created in 
draw mode. 

The communications module, always 
the program's weakest link, has not been 
improved as far as I could tell. There’s 
still no way to automate log-on proce¬ 
dures, unless you count the macro re¬ 
corder, which is a sorry solution at best. 
This was one of my biggest gripes with 
earlier versions of Works; I wish it had 
been fixed. 

The spreadsheet allows nearly double 
the number of rows as Works 1.1 (from 
9999 to 16,832), but remember you’re 
limited by RAM, so this may be moot. 
Microsoft has added new functions for 
date and time, and you can attach notes 
to individual cells. There’s no way to 
link worksheets, but you can play games 
with the Clipboard and the macro re¬ 
corder. Both the spreadsheet and the 
database now offer the ability to choose 
one font/size/style per document, but 
you can't mix attributes. 

The Works 2.0 database will accept 
spreadsheet calculation functions within 
records, and the report generator now 
has scroll bars and margin control. The 
package is still lacking a logical field 
type (e.g., Yes/No or True/False), which 
would have been a simple but utilitarian 
improvement. 

The word processor has gained a few 
niceties, like the ability to print labels 
two and three across, search and replace 
on tab and carriage-return characters, 
and decimal tabs. Forget enhancements 
like multiple-line headers, indexes, 

continued 


130 BYTE * MARCH 1989 










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75 

DESKTOP PUBLISHING 



ByLine 

295 

185 

GEM/3 Desktop Publisher 

299 

189 

Pagemaker 

595 

429 

PFS: First Publisher 

129 

79 

Ventura Desktop Publisher 

899 

590 

GRAPHICS 



AutoSketch 

100 

85 

Chart Master 

375 

205 

Chart Master Premium Pack 

395 

225 

Chart 

395 

272 

Drafix 1 Plus 

295 

265 

Freelance Plus 

495 

322 

Graph-in-the-Box 

140 

109 

Harvard Graphics 

495 

313 

In a Vision 

495 

290 

Sign Master 

245 

140 

Time Line Graphics 

195 

119 

LANGUAGES 



APL'PLUS 

695 

476 

Lattice C 

450 

279 

Lahey FORTRAN F77L 

477 

453 

Microsoft C 

450 

299 

NDP Fortran or C-386 

595 

529 

Turbo C 

150 

105 

Turbo C Professional 

250 

175 

Turbo Pascal 

150 

105 

Turbo Pascal Professional 

250 

175 

Zortech C+ + 

100 

90 

PROGRAMMING UTILITIES 


Flowcharting II Plus 

229 

207 

Interactive Easyflow 

150 

135 

OPT-TECH SORT/MERGE 

149 

99 

PolyAWK 

99 

90 

Pro-C 

495 

459 

Windows for Data 

295 

259 

LOTUS ADD-ONS 



4Vlews 

150 

119 

4Word 

100 

79 

@bASE 

195 

121 

Allways 

150 

117 

At Liberty 

295 

199 

Graph-ln-the-Box 

140 

109 

Inword 

100 

80 

Look & Link 

100 

64 

Note-lt Plus 

80 

68 

Noteworthy 

80 

59 

R & R (Lotus Version) 

149 

119 

See More 

80 

65 

Sideways 

70 

45 

Smartnotes 

80 

69 

Spellln! 

80 

65 

Sqzl Plus 

100 CALL 

PLANNING 



Harvard Total Project II 

595 

515 

Project 4.0 

495 

340 

Super Project Expert 

695 

515 

Time Line 3.0 

595 

345 

Time Line 2.0 

495 

306 

SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING 

Asystant Plus 

895 

849 

DADISP 

795 

719 

Eureka: The Solver 

167 

119 

Gauss Math » Stat Package 

395 

359 

HIWIRE-Plus 

895 

805 

Labtech Notebook 

995 

799 

MathCAD 

349 

279 



LIST OURS 

Turbo Assembler/Debugger 150 105 

Turbo C 2.0 150 105 

Turbo C 2.0 Professional 250 175 

Turbo Lightning 100 50 

ning Word Wizard 70 49 


Lightning Word Wizard 

3 and Lightning 


Turbo Lightning 
Word Wizard 
Turbo Pascal 5 0 
Turbo Pascal 5.0 Professional 250 
Tutor 70 


AIIVAKTACE 

SOFTWARE 


Micro-Cap III 

T3 Scientific Word Process< 
Tango PCB 
TK Solver Plus 

SPREADSHEET 

LOTUS 1-2-3 
Multiplan 
PC-Excel 
Supercalc IV 

STATISTICS 

CSS 

Microstat II 
NWA Statpak 
SPSS/PC 
Systot 

Systot/Sygraph 

WINDOWS 

Actor 

DesqVIEW 

VM/ 386 

Wlndows/286 

Windows-'3 86 

Windows Devel. Toolkit 

WORD PROCESSING 

Displaywrite IV 
Manuscript 
Multimate Adv II 
Q & A Write 
Samna Word IV 
Volkswriter V3 
Word Perfect v 5.0 
Word 

Wordstar Pro v. 5.0 

UTILITIES 

1DIR * 

Copy II PC 

Copy II PC Option Board 

Disk Optimizer 

Disk Technician 

Disk Technician Plus 

Fastback Plus 

HTEST 

Mace Utilities 

Norton Commander 

Org Plus 

PC Tools Deluxe 

Prokey 

Sidekick 

Software Carousel 

V Cache 

V Feature Deluxe 
Vopt 

Xtree 
Xtree NET 
XtreePro 

ASHTON TATE 

ByLine 

Chart Master 


LIST OURS 


LIST OURS 

1495 

1269 

Chart Master Premium Pack 

395 

225 

595 

499 

C Tools Graphics Library 

90 

69 

495 

469 

C Tools Programmer’s Library 

90 

69 

395 

349 

dBASE III + 

695 

385 



dBASE IV 

795 

485 



dBASE IV Developer's Edition 

1295 

899 

495 

289 

dBASE Mac 

495 

325 

195 

129 

dBASE Programmer s Utility 

90 

69 

495 

299 

Diagram Master 

345 

190 

495 

349 

Diagram Master Prem Pack 

365 

206 



Draw Applause 

495 

309 



Framework III 

695 

405 

495 

459 

Front Runner 

195 

121 

395 

349 

Full Paint 

100 

65 

399 

359 

Full Write Professional 

395 

236 

795 

749 

Map Master v 6.01 

395 

240 

595 

70* 

549 

7no 





495 429 
130 89 

245 169 

99 69 

195 130 

500 319 


495 425 
495 322 
565 271 

349 207 
595 313 

295 170 

495 228 
450 199 
495 290 


95 

40 


59 

35 


159 139 

70 63 

100 89 

190 175 

189 109 

90 79 


99 

75 

80 

79 
130 
85 

80 
60 


85 

45 

59 

69 

81 

59 

60 
55 


120 111 


60 

70 


55 

60 


Terms & Policies 

All prices subject to change without notice. We 
accept Visa. MC. AMEX (2% surcharge on AMEX) 
Shipping $4 per Item sent UPS Ground. Allow 14 
days for personal/company check clearance. 
Returns subject to 15% restocking lee. RA # re¬ 
quired PO's welcome from Fortune 1000 and other 
qualified organizations. 



295 249 
129 111 


295 185 

375 205 


Turbo Prolog 

LOTUS DEVELOPMENT 

Agenda 
Freelance + 

| Graphwriter II 
1 Hal 

Lotus 1-2-3 
Lotus Metro 
1-2-3 Report Writer 
Manuscript 
Signal 
Symphony 

MICROSOFT 

MS BASIC/6 0 
MS C 

MS COBOL 
MS Excel 
MS FORTRAN 
MS Learning DOS 
MS Mach 20 
MS Macro Assembler 
MS Mouse Bus or Serial 
w/ Paintbrush & Mouse 
Menus 
w/ EasyCAD 

w/ Paintbrush & Windows 
MS Multiplan 
MS OS/2 Prog Toolkit 
MS Pascal 
MS Project 4.0 
MS QuickBASIC 
MS QuickC 
MS Sort 
MS Windows 
MS Windows/386 
MS Windows Dev. Kit 
MS Word 
MS Works 


150 109 

150 105 

175 
45 
150 105 


395 299 
495 322 
495 337 
150 89 

495 289 
85 59 

95 69 

495 325 
595 553 
695 422 


295 199 
450 299 
900 599 
495 299 
450 299 
50 40 

495 329 


150 

175 

200 

195 


PRIMARY TARGET 


MICROSOFT EXCEL. 

The soul of the new machines. 

Microsoft Excel takes full advan¬ 
tage of the power of 286- and 386- 
based computers. 

It lets you work faster and consoli¬ 
date data more easily. It lets you 
create annual-report-quality output 
and produce presentation graphics. 
And it lets you create macros easily 
and build custom programs. 

Since Microsoft Excel Is compat¬ 
ible with Lotus 1-2-3, It's easy to 
integrate into your office. 

Find out why we call it the most 
powerful spreadsheet for powerful 
personal computers 
List. $495 Ours: $299 


99 

119 

139 

129 


350 229 
300 199 

495 340 


99 

99 

195 

99 

195 

500 


69 

69 

130 

69 

130 

319 


450 199 

149 99 




LIST OURS 


LIST OURS 

Multimate Adv II 

565 

271 

PETER NORTON PUBLISHING 

Pascal Tools Prog Lib. 

90 

72 

Norton Commander 

89 

55 

Programmer's Utility II 

90 

69 

Norton Editor 

75 

50 

Rapid File 

295 

195 

Norton Guldes:OS/2 

150 

109 

Sign Master 

245 

139 

Norton Gulde$:Specify Lang. 

100 

75 

BORLAND 

Eureka: The Solver 

167 

119 

Norton Utilities 

Advanced Version 

100 

150 

59 

99 

Paradox 2.0 

725 

529 




Paradox Network Pack 

995 

729 

SOFTWARE PUBLISHING 


Paradox 386 

895 

625 

Harvard Graphics v. 2.1 

495 

313 

Quattro 

247 

169 

Harvard Total Project Mgr. 

595 

515 

Reflex & Reflex Workshop 

200 

139 

PFS: Access 

140 

91 

Reflex Data Base Systems 

150 

109 

PFS: First Choice v. 2.0 

159 

104 

Reflex Workshop 

70 

49 

PFS: First Publisher v. 2.0 

129 

75 

SldeKick 

85 

59 

PFS: Graph 

140 

91 

Sidekick Plus 

200 

139 

PFS: Professional File 

249 

155 

Sprint 

199 

139 

PFS: Professional Plan 

249 

161 

Superkey 

100 

69 

Professional Write v. 2.0 

199 

125 

Turbo Basic 

100 

69 

US Mapmaker 

149 

89 


In the U.S. call: 


ADYANTAfiE 1-800-333-3141 
SOFTWARE 


N.Y./ International : 914-332-0756 
Fax:914-332-4021 

55 South Broadway, Suite B. Tarrytown, NY 10591 


Circle 14 on Reader Service Card 

























APPLICATIONS PLUS 


tables of contents, and such; they haven't 
been implemented. 

New overall features include a simple 
page preview much like that in Word, the 
capability to save and name a “Works 
Desktop" file that will launch a given set 
of documents* and a “Stationery" file 
format—as close as you can get to a style 
sheet in Works, though the trick works 
only if you open a Stationery document 
and resave it as something else. 

On the whole, Works 2.0 is a better 
program* but Microsoft seems to have 
opted for slickness rather than raw 
power. I keep saying that Works could be 
an excellent tool for experienced users; 
meanwhile* Microsoft keeps adding 
frills for novices. In spite of constant 
denials* I can’t shake the feeling that 
Microsoft is trying desperately to hold 
back Works so it doesn't cannibalize the 
market for its other software products. 
Oh* well. 

In the meantime* Eve been playing 
with a nearly bulletproof beta version of 
Tim Lundeen's WorksPlus Spell 2.0, 
and it is still an excellent companion for 
Works. Why would you need a spelling 
checker for a program that already has 


one? Simple. WorksPlus Spell offers 
greater speed* checking as you type* hy¬ 
phenation* word lookup* and a glossary 
command that lets you store and expand 
abbreviations. None of this is available in 
the Works spelling checker. Whatever 
version of Works you own, WorksPlus 
Spell is a requirement. 

Annual Confession 

Every March since I began this column* I 
take a little time to list the hardware and 
software that l use personally. As Eve 
written quite a bit about these programs 
in the past year. I’ll just reduce the exer¬ 
cise to a few short lists: 

* Primary hardware; Mac SE with a 16- 
MHz Radius 68020 accelerator and a Jas¬ 
mine Direct Drive 160. Software: Mi¬ 
crosoft Works with WorksPlus Spell, 
PageMaker, Canvas, Microsoft Word* 
Excel, Reflex Plus* More* Prototyper* 
Course Builder, Microphone II* Desk¬ 
Top Express, Suitcase II, DiskTop* 
QuicKeys, QuickDEX* FontSizer, Su- 
perGlue, LetraStudio, Fontographer*, 
FreeHand, TOPS, and various Adobe 
typefaces. 


* Secondary hardware: Tandon PCA-40 
(AT clone) with a MicroSpeed FastTrap 
and a Logitech Bus Mouse. Software: 
WordStar 5.0* Framework III, Lotus 
1-2-3 with Funk's Worksheet Utilities, 
Mirror II, Procomm, PC-Write* Xy- 
Write, Professional Write 2.0* Memory- 
Mate, Reflex* Ready!, Cruise Control, 
Pop Drop, Ventura Publisher* Page¬ 
Maker, TOPS, and various Bitstream 
typefaces. 

* Portables: Cambridge Z88 and NEC 

PC-8500. 

* Favorite nonclass if table computer: 
Canon Cat with the Cat 180 printer. 

* Favorite device: Apple LaserWriter 
IINT (solid* clean, and fast enough for 
anyone but the truly demented). 

* Next purchase: A flatbed scanner. ■ 


Ezra Shapiro is a consulting editor for 
BYTE, You can contact him on BIX as 
l4 ezra. ” Because of the volume of mail he 
receives, Ezra * regretfully, cannot re¬ 
spond to each inquiry. 

Your questions and comments are wel¬ 
come. Write to: Editor , BYTE, One 
Phoenix Mill Lane, Peterborough, NH 
03458 . 


For Quicker Program Development 

the 805TC Compiler 

The 2500 A.D. 8051 C Compiler offers an alternative to Assembly Language solutions. Quicker 
program development. Simpler program testing. Easier program maintenance. 


• Full Kemigham & Ritchie C 

• All data types, including Float & Double 

• Reentrant Libraries 

• Internal, External or Mixed Data Modes 

• Special Function Register support 

• In-line Assembly Language 

• Listings reflect actual linked addresses 


Function prototyping ANSI extensions 

• Full math Library, including Trig functions 

• Interrupt ha ndler support 

• Bank switched memory support 

• Internal bit field support 

• Linked Assembly language 

• Generates RQMable code 


The 8051 C Compiler package includes the 2500 A.D. 8051 Macro Assembler, Linker, Librarian, 
Standard Library and Math Library and is priced at $500.00 for MSD0S systems. 


Tb order call Toll Free: 

1 800 843-8144 


25004D9CFTVWREINC 


In Colorado: 
Fax: 

Telex: 


I 719 395*8683 
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752659/AD 


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P.0. Box 480 
Buena Vista, CO 81211 


The Right Software for The Right Micro at The Right Price 


132 BYTE* MARCH 1989 


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HOURS: Mon. Tru. Thurs. SAM Till 6PM, Frl. SAM Till 1:30PM, Sun. 9:30AM Till 5PM, Closed On Sat. 



f EXECUTIVE 

- pfjQ T Q & supply CORP. 



LAPTOPS 


yRBBS 

^ AY QATAVUE 


SPARK-EL 


B40K, 2-3.5 720K Disk Drives, 
Supertwisi Backlit Display, 
vfUT Fax Portable 

1275.90 



PRINTERS 


New I DATA VIEW SPARK 1-Floppy Drive. A 
1.20MB Harp Drive.1769.95 

TOSHIBA (sold In Stors Only} 

TOSHIBA T-1000.CALL 

TOSHIBA T-1200F/FB CALL 

TOSHIBA T-120QH8.GALL 

NEW! TOSHIBA T-3100E.CALL 

TOS HI BA T-3200/T-5100.CALL 

ZENITH 

ZENITH 184-1. 1489,75 

ZENITH 184-2 2199.75 

ZENITH Supareport 266 Model 20 W/20MB 

Hard Drive.2965.75 

ZENITH 286 W/40MB Hard Drtve.3309.7S 

MITSUBISHI 

MITSUBISHI 268L Laptop w^OMB Hard 
Drive.2394.00 

NEC 

NEC MullispeeP HD. LOW PRICE 

LAPTOP ACCESSORIES 

HOLMES 2400 Modem t/AJI LaptopsCALL 
WORLD PORT 2400 Baud Modem235.Q0 
Dlconfc Portable Printer.304.98 


DESKPRQ 286, 12MHz, 1.2 Floppy Drive, 
Seagate 40MB Hard Drive (40ms)2Q65.00 
NEWI COM PAD 386V2QE W/40MB Hard 

Drive. 4749.00 

NEWI COMPAQ SLT/206 Portable W/20MB 
Hard Drive 4049,00 



AST PREMIUM 286 

10 MHz, 512K, 1.2 Floppy Drive, 
Seagate 40MB Hard Drive (48ms) 

1719.90 



HARDWARE 

intel 



KX-P 1124 

24 Pin, Narrow Carriage 
192 CPS Draft. 63 CPS NLQ, 
Trader Feed Included 

LOW PRICE 


PANASONIC 1 Ml 1. 

. . 169.75 

NEWI PANASONIC 1181.. 

EPSON 

CALL 

EPSON 

LX-0OO. 

175.75 

EPSON 

LQ-500 

206.00 

EPSON 

LQ-850. 

.518.00 

EPSON 

LG-1050. 

.734.50 

EPSON 

FX-850.. 

. 338.50 

EPSON 

FX-1050. 

437.50 


INTEL 80287-6 
NEWI INTEL Above Board Plus.. 

INTEL 60367-20 MHz. 

Logitech Hi-Res Mouse. 

Logitech dear Mouse 

DPI HS-300Q Scanner. 

PARADISE VGA Professional... 
NEWt PARADISE VGA Plus 16 
MICROSOFT Mouse 
NEW? NEC Multisync IIA Monitor 

ZENITH Perfect Monitor. 

SONY 1302 Monitor w/Stand 
PLUS 20MB Card LOW 

TOSHIBA 3Va" Drive w/KIt 


205.00 
396,00 
419.00 
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397,00 
299.90 
99,95 
CALL 
CALL 
669.00 
PRICE 
.99.00 




NEW! AST 366C w, r 64K Cache Memory. 20 
MHz, 1MB Ram, 1.2 Floppy Drive, 40MB 
Herd Drive (26ms).3199,00- 

COMPATIBLES 

IBM-XT Compatible, 1-360 Floppy Drive, 
1-3QMB Hard Drive 757.00 

IBM-AT Compatible, 12MHz, 512K, 1.2 
Floppy Drive, Seagate 40MB Hard Drive 
(28ms).1319.00 


I APPLE 


COMPUTERS CALL 


TOSHIBA (Sold In store Only) 
NEW? TOSHIBA Expresswriler 311 CALL 
NEW! TOSHIBA 321SL Color , CALL 

TOSHIBA 341 SL., . CALL 

TOSHIBA 351 SX.CALL 

NEC 

NEC 2200 339.00 

NEC P5209 515.00 

NEC P5300.669.00 

PRINTER SALE! 

H,P. LaserJet II wJToner.CALL 

H.P, DeskJet.CALL 

STAR NX-1000 169,95 

APPLE Imagewriter II.439.00 


SOFTWARE 

NEW! SAMNA AMI. 97.75 

NEWI GEM Arl1ine.269.75 

XY Write w/AI A Carte . .215.95 

ASK SAM. .166.00 

BrTSREAM Fonts CALL 

XEROX Ventura Publisher 2.0. Low Pride 

PROCOM Plus. 42.95 

MICROSOFT Excel 2,1.299,95 

FORMWORK w/FIII & File.79.00 

PFS Firs! Publisher 69.00 

NOTA BENE 3,0.248,50 

LUCID 3D.07.99 

Q & A ..... .189.99 

INTUIT Quicken 31,95 

MANAGING Your Money 5.0.115,95 

TOBIAS PC/Tax Col .45.95 

CHIP SOFT Turbo Tax.,42.79 

DAC Easy Accounting 3.0.57,00 

NOLO Will Maker. ..30.95 

SPIN RITE. 46,99 

FASTRAX. 32.95 







FAX MACHINES 

PANAFAX 



TYPEWRITERS 

& Word Processors 


Dictation E< 


UF-150. w .IN STOCK 

UF-250. IN STOCK 

SHARP 

FO-22Q ... CALL FQ-200 ... CALL 

FO-420 .CALL FO-550.CALL 

FO-700 . CALL FO-BOO CALL 

CANON FaxPhonos 

FaxPhone 8. CALL FaxPhone 15 CALL 
FaxPhone 20 GALL FaxPhone 25 CALL 

FAX 270 .. CALL FAX350.CALL 

FAX 630.CALL 

RICOH 

FAX-10E . . CALL FAX-20E . 

FAX-60E ., .. CALL FAX-70E 

MURATA 

M-1200 619.90 M-1600 . 

PANASONIC 

KXF 100 CALL KX-F 120 

TOSHIBA Pric. »Mk 

3300.999,90 3700.1299.90 

Model 30100.799,90 

SANYO 

Model 515H.IN STOCK 

BROTHER 

FAX 60 wfAnswering Machine IN STOCK 

FAX PAPER 

ate"x9a' 49.95 B'A^ i 'x^6A r 59.90 

8Mt"x328 r . 74.95 

FAX Cleaning Kit.29.95 




COPIERS 

Canon 




SMITH CORONA 

FWP-60.469.90 

PWP-40 IN STOCK PWP-BO IN STOCK 

NEW? PWP-100.IN STOCK 

XL-1000 Typewriter.. Special 119,90 
XL-25O0 ..,. CALL XI>5500 , CALL 
XD-7500 . . CALL XQ-9500 . CALL 


PANASONIC 


CALL 

CALL 


. 749.90 


CALL 



KX-W 1500 Word Processor IN STOCK 
KX-R 320 . CALL KX-R 330. CALL 
KX-R 340 169.90 KX-R 350 229.90 


BROTHER 


WP-55 Word Processor IN STOCK' 
NEW! WP-490 CALL 

AX-26.CALL AX-28.CALL 

* Free Spreadsheet Program vriPurchase of 
WP-55 Word Processor 



OLYMPUS Pearfcorder 

L-200.137.90 S-907.35.90 

S-911. 59 JO S-93Q. 99.90 

T-1Q10 Transcriber.159JO 

S-804.CALL S-81G.CALL 

T2000. . CALL T-2Q20. . CALL 

PANASONIC 

RN-15. , 129,90 RN-38 ,.. CALL 

RN-B9 79.90 RN-10S.CALL 

FIN-115. 39.90 RN-125 CALL 

RR-900, ,179.90 RRJ70 CALL 

RR-980.CALL 

SANYO 

TRO6KJ0 . . CALL TRC-5680 . . 79.90 

TRC-2550.149,90 

TRC-5200 229.90 TRC-5020 .179.90 

TRC-4100 . 227.90 TRC-4141 .178.90 

TRC-6000A 227,90 TRC-8010A . 165.90 

TRC-8700 239.90 TRC-8070.185 90 

TRC-9100 . 239.90 TRC-9010 190. SO 

SONY 


M-100B 

CALL 

M-750V 

GALL 

BM-12. 

CALL 

BM-560. . 

CALL 

BM-75 

GALL 

BM-S15T. 

CALL 


CALL 


NORELCO 

5B5 89,90 590.119,90 

SOS 299.90 510 374,90 

2505.259,90 M G-4000. . 349,90 


PC-3.369.90 PC-5.CALL 

PC-5L Legal Size.CALL 

NEW! PC-6.CALL 

NEW! PC-fiRE....CALL 

PC-7 Zoom Copier . ..CALL 

Black Cartridges. .. 79J5 

8Vjx 11 Paper (5000 sheets).40.50 

TELEPHONES 

Answering Machines Specials 
KX-T 1412. CALL KX-T 141S CALL 
KX-T 1423. CALL KX-T 1424 , 69.90 

KX-T 1427 LCD w/TTme Announced 09 JO 
KX-T 1622. CALL KX-T 1720 , CALL 

FF-1700 Cordless "Top Haled" 109.90 

DATABANKS 


PSION 


ORGANISER II. IN STOCK 

SHARP 

GZ-7000 WIZARD . # . , AH STOCK 

EL-6250H Dial Master.53.90 

CASIO 

CASIO SF-3000 1BK.69 JO 

CASIO IF-8000 Digital Diary .... .119.90 








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WHY DESIGN YOUR PRODUCT 
AROUND A COMPUTER? 


Now, you can design the computer 
into your product. 



Little Board/286 


408 - 734.2800 

FAX: 408-754-2939 TLX: 4940302 


Built-in vs. built-around. External 
systems mean boxes, boards, backplanes, 
cables, and reliability problems. Ampro’s 
Little Boards give you a complete system on 
a single board you can build right into your 
product. 

Small size. Big power. Eliminate the bulk 
and constraints of multi-board, backplane- 
bused systems. Embed a Little Board. 

Little Boards require just 2/3rds the power 
and volume of a 5 l A " floppy disk drive. But 
they give you the full power of a PC or AT®. 

Fully compatible, little Board/286 and 
Little Board/PC are functionally identical to 
multi-board PCs and ATs. They run PC- 
DOS™ 2.0 to 3.X. They run DOS languages, 
compilers and applications. That means 
you’ll be standing on a firm foundation of 
proven hardware and software. 

Ampro’s Single Board Systems. Every¬ 
thing is included except a keyboard, power 
supply and CRT. Up to a Megabyte of RAM. 
RS-232C and Parallel ports. AT/PC-compat- 
ible controllers and bas expansion. EGA/ 
CGA/MDA and Hercules™-compatible 
video options. Even optional solid-state 
disk. Plus SCSI support for hard disk, tape, 
optical drives, bubble drives... you name it. 
What’s more, they offer low power con¬ 
sumption (+5VDC, less than 8W) and a 
wide operating temperature range (0 to 
60°C). Perfect for standalone operation 
and harsh environments. Anywhere that 
reliability is a critical consideration. 

Available worldwide. For information 
and the name of your nearest U.S. or inter¬ 
national Ampro representative, call us at the 
number below. Or write on your letterhead 
for Little Board Product information. 



COMPUTERS, INCORPORATED 
1130 Mountain Vicw/Ahiso Road, Sunnyvale, CA 9^089 


Reps: Australia—61 3 720-3298; Austria—43-222/45 45 01; Canada—(604) 438-0026; Denmark -45 3 6$ 20 20; Finland-338 0 385-322; France—331 4502-1800; Germany, Wesl-49 89 
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134 B YTE “ MARCH 1989 










EXPERT ADVICE 

DOWN TO BUSINESS ■ Wayne Rash Jr. 


♦ What Hath 

Comdex Wrought? 



Wayne roams the halls 
of COMDEX and 
discovers the ubiquitous 
“COMDEX fact” 


O nce there was a time when you 
could depend on COMDEX to 
provide a couple of stunning 
industry developments. No 
more. COMDEX has become an im¬ 
mense project filled with hype and won¬ 
der, where the first fact you discover is 
that even the best walking shoes made by 
L.L. Bean may not be equal to the task. 

This fact, of course, leads to further 
“COMDEX facts.” In his book A Colder 
Eye , noted author and critic Hugh Ken¬ 
ner (a member of the BIX writers confer¬ 
ence) describes Irish facts as “anything 
they tell you in Ireland.” A COMDEX 
fact, then, is “anything they tell you at 
COMDEX.” 

COMDEX Facts 

The first COMDEX fact I encountered 
concerned the existence of a 33-MHz 
80386-based IBM PC AT clone. I classi¬ 
fy this rumor as a COMDEX fact be¬ 
cause Intel has yet to ship a 33-MHz ver¬ 
sion of the 80386 processor. A couple of 
companies exhibited what they claimed 
to be such machines, but they were actu¬ 
ally using processors designed for slower 
operation. 

Then there is WingZ by Informix, a 
COMDEX fact for such a long time that it 
is nearly a COMDEX legend. WingZ is 
supposed to be a superspreadsheet for the 
Macintosh. But to date, this unseen 
product is serving only as a vehicle for 
the distribution of thousands of gym 
bags, because most users are more famil¬ 
iar with the orange and yellow bags with 
the WingZ logo than they are with Infor¬ 
mix. Perhaps one day the promise will 
become a product that will deprive hun¬ 


dreds of bag-seekers of their just spoils. 

Fortunately, there was more to COM¬ 
DEX this year than COMDEX facts. One 
of the advantages of this conference’s 
having grown so large is that, with some 
careful observation, you can now spot 
trends. This year’s trends hold some 
promise for business computer users. 

Three of the most important trends in¬ 
volve databases aimed at corporations, 
local-area networking, and OS/2.1 think 
it’s incorrect to call this the year of the 
database, or the LAN, but this is a year 
in which you will see some important 
elements begin to come together. These 
are evolutionary changes, of course, but 
the result of this process is a solid trend 
toward change. 

Databases 

Structured Query Language is finally 
coming to small computers in a useful 
fashion. Several vendors exhibited ver¬ 
sions of SQL database packages designed 
for the corporate environment. Some of 


these suppliers are already shipping 
products—Oracle and XDB among them. 
Other software should be shipping by the 
time you read this, including SQL server 
software from Oracle, Novell, and Ash- 
ton-Tate. WordTech and Borland also 
exhibited SQL front-end software. 

WordTech Systems currently sells 
dBXL and Quicksilver, a dBASE clone 
and a dBASE compiler, respectively. 
The company has reached agreements 
with Oracle, Novell, and Gupta Technol¬ 
ogies to convert dBXL and Quicksilver 
into dBASE language front ends for SQL 
database software. The results of these 
conversions will provide firms with vari¬ 
ous ways to upgrade existing dBASE lan¬ 
guage applications to the point where 
they can access the company mainframe. 

Not to be outdone, Ashton-Tate was 
busy showing dBASE IV, which has em¬ 
bedded SQL. By this spring, there 
should also be a dBASE SQL server. In 
the meantime, the embedded SQL means 

continued 


ILLUSTRATION: RANDY LYHUS © 1989 


MARCH 1989 • BYTE 135 













DOWN TO BUSINESS 


you can develop applications containing 
SQL and put them into production as 
soon as the server software becomes 
available. 

Finally, XDB Systems announced it 
also would offer a dBASE language front 
end for the SQL server product. XDB, 
though, did not announce where it plans 
to obtain its dBASE front end. 

An interesting aside came to light 
when Ashton-Tate announced it was 
taking legal action against Fox Software 
and the Santa Cruz Operation for their 
sales of FoxBASE. Very likely, the win¬ 
ner in this fray will be WordTech Sys¬ 
tems, the company that had previously 
contracted with Ashton-Tate for the use 
of the dBASE language. While Ashton¬ 
Tate is fighting off clones, it looks as if 
WordTech will be signing up new SQL 
vendors. 

LANs 

For several years now, columnists have 
been predicting the “Year of the LAN.” I 
won’t add to the noise. There probably 
won’t be a Year of the LAN for the sim¬ 
ple reason that LANs arrived quietly and 
established themselves while we were 


I hile 
Ashton-Tate is 
fighting off clones, 
it looks as if WordTech 
will be signing up 
new SQL vendors. 

distracted by other issues. In other 
words, the Year of the LAN has probably 
already happened. 

Instead, we are seeing a year of 
considerable growth and maturation. 
LANs are becoming more a part of the 
business world, and, for some applica¬ 
tions, SQL database servers are be¬ 
coming more integrated into the applica¬ 
tions. LAN manufacturers are working 
on ways to enhance their interoperability 
and utility. 


Novell, the leader in LAN operating 
software according to a recent BYTE 
poll, is introducing Macintosh connec¬ 
tivity with its NetWare 2.15. This prod¬ 
uct will allow a Macintosh II or SE with 
an Ethernet interface card to work on a 
Novell network. Novell has also intro¬ 
duced its OS/2 Requester—software that 
lets you use OS/2 on the same networks 
with non-OS/2 systems. 

Meanwhile, other LAN software con¬ 
tinues to evolve. WordPerfect Corp. 
showed WordPerfect Office, a package 
the company refers to as group produc¬ 
tivity software. Office works with 
Novell or NetBIOS networks. It provides 
E-mail and group scheduling, along with 
such functions as a calculator and note¬ 
pad. WordPerfect’s idea is to provide a 
consistent feel to the software, so that 
users familiar with its other products 
will feel right at home with the new 
additions. 

OS/2 

At COMDEX, I saw some evidence that 
actual software will exist for OS/2. Bor¬ 
land International has begun shipping a 

continued 


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ECOSOFT 


136 BYTE* MARCH 1989 


Circle 94 on Reader Service Card 










Aw.. .What the Heck! 


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Many of the older, more cumbersome CAD systems 
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producing useful drawings In a matter of minutes! 
In a recent CAD contest only one contestant was 
able to match our drawing time. The package sold 
for $3000,00. The other CAD packages took up to 
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cost up to $5000.001 

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The first question asked by many people is* 
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Circle 19 on Reader Service Card 


MARCH 1989 -BYTE 137 





Circle 113 on Reader Service Card 


DOWN TO BUSINESS 


SOLUTIONS 


Bigger— 

Vfeature Deluxe ™ lets your DOS system 
use hard disks it thought it couldn't, all in one 
bootable piece—no artificial partitions! You 
can even span your old drive with the new one 
for more capacity. Use RLL, ESDI* or SCSI* 
and laugh at DOS partition limits, Si20 

DUB-14^' takes a different approach to 
drive expansion, stretches your ATs Drive Table 
to support the drive YOU choose! Comes with 
setup and Jowrievel format routines, and it’s OS 
independent. $95 

Faster— 

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repetitive accesses by storing data in RAM as 
you read it so it's there for you the next time 
you need it—no waiting! Works with any type 
of memory, caches up to 15 Mb* bundles accel¬ 
erators for your diskettes, screens, and 
keyboard. $59.95 

Vopt ™ saves head morion by eliminating 
DOS file fragmentation. In a few seconds at 
boot time* Vopt arranges all your files neatly 
in contiguous clusters so you won’t waste any 
rime reading them back. Bundles timing and 
diagnostic utilities. $59.95 

Safer— 

Vlock ™ protects your system and its data 
from vandals and accidents. System access 
passwords control booting, activity menus 
decide who does what to which files, even locks 
out Ctl-Break during boot! $135 

Easier— 

Vtools™ is a slick set of disk management 
tools for DOS and OS/2. Display directories 
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multiple versions* find and manipulate 
categories of files, and more! $49.95 


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138 BYTE- MARCH 1989 


A 

il tthe 

COMDEX show, I saw 
some evidence that 
actual software will 
exist for OS/2. 


version of Paradox for that operating sys¬ 
tem. Borland has said that it will begin 
shipping a version of SideKick for OS/2 
with Presentation Manager by the first 
quarter of this year. 

Lotus was showing Lotus 1-2-3 ver¬ 
sion 3* which will use OS/2. It still isn’t 
clear when the company will start ship¬ 
ping that long-overdue upgrade. OS/2 
software vendors generally agree that 
memory prices will have to moderate be¬ 
fore this operating system will become 
widely accepted* 


Business Impact 

What does all this mean to you? As 
usual* COMDEX contained both good 
and bad news. The good news is that with 
the current state of LANs and SQL soft¬ 
ware* microcomputer-minicomputer- 
mainframe connectivity may finally be¬ 
come seamless. The bad news is that 
moving out of the current state of the art 
will be expensive. 

The good news was demonstrated at 
COMDEX through the use of the (as-yet- 
unreleased) SQL version of Paradox* 
which was shown accessing SQL data¬ 
bases from three other database manage¬ 
ment systems, Paradox SQL was able to 
select information from any of the tables 
and from a combination of tables. The 
tables have also been from Oracle and lo¬ 
cated on a VAX or from DB2 and located 
on an IBM mainframe. 

Software such as Paradox SQL will 
lead to seamless distributed processing, 
probably in the near future. Nearly all 
the required components are in place 
now. Still missing is a product that pro¬ 
vides an easy way to use the Oracle 
server. Now the Oracle server must re- 

coruinued 


Items Discussed 


dBXL.. .*...**.$199 

Quicksilver .*. $599 


WordTech Systems, Inc, 
21 AKrinda Rd. 

Orinda* CA 94563 
(415) 254-0900 

Inquiry 986* 


dBASEIV .. $795 

Developers * version ... $ 1295 

Ashton-Tate 


20101 Hamilton Ave. 

Torrance* CA 90502 
(213) 329-8000 

Inquiry 981. 

Novell NetWare 2*15 
(Price not yet available) 

Novell, Inc, 

122 East 1700 S 
Provo* UT 84601 
(801) 379-5900 
Inquiry 984* 

Oracle SQL Server.*.$2495 

Oracle Corp. 

20 Davis Dr, 

Belmont* CA 94002 
(415) 598-8000 
Inquiry 983* 


Paradox (single user).,.,.$725 

Borland International 
1800 Green Hills Rd. 

Scotts Valley, CA 95066 
(408) 439-1060 
Inquiry 982* 

WingZ 

(Price not yet available) 

Informix Software* Inc. 

16011 College Blvd. 

Lenexa* KS 66219 
(913) 492-3800 
Inquiry 987* 


WordPerfect Office 

File server ..... . . ...$495 

Each additional station . $140 

WordPerfect Corp. 


1555 North Technology Way 
Orem, UT 84057 
(801)227-4010 

Inquiry 985* 


















The things electric line 
transients do to a computer are 
enough to make you sick. 

Like spiking its incoming 
voltage and stealing important 
bits of information. 

Relentlessly attacking its 
sensitive circuits until it can’t 
take ary more. Then serving 
up the knockout punch. 

Worst of all, they usually 
get away with it. 

Wrong suspects named. 

When data is missing, key¬ 
board operators put the finger 
on software programs. 

And computer manufac¬ 
turers take the rap for 
hardware failures. 

Meanwhile, electrical 
contaminants such as 
spikes, sags, surges, brown¬ 
outs and blackouts go free. 
Ready to strike again. 

Regardless of who’s 
...... .. 


convicted of the crimes, inno¬ 
cent computer owners must pay 
the price. In idled employees. 
Lost productivity Inaccurate 
files. And maintenance costs. 

Emerson snares culprit. 

Electrical transients are in 
for a big surprise when an 
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System is on duty. 

A trap. They go in, but never 
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We make the most complete 
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For a free brochure and 
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I glsMISRSQN 

tm Computer Power 

Computers Won’t Run Right 
On The Wrong Fuel. 

Cirri* OR nn RmA*t Krrvir* r*w*f fTlRAT FRK QQ\ 















Circle 263 on Reader $en ice Card 

See us at COMDEX/Sprmg in Chicago Booth #2175 April 10-13 

DOWN TO BUSINESS 


side on a database server that runs 
Xenix, an environment many users find 
difficult to manage. Fortunately, at 
COMDEX, Oracle announced an OS/2 
version of the server, ft should be avail¬ 
able by the time you read this. 

Nothing at COMDEX held much hope 
for an early change to OS/2. If anything, 
reasons to stay with MS-DOS or the Mac 
continue to grow. Now that Presentation 
Manager is shipping, OS/2’s memory re¬ 
quirement has grown to about 5 mega¬ 
bytes, depending on what you want to run 
in addition to the operating system. You 
could easily spend more on memory than 
you did on your computer. As yet, there 
is no software that offers a compelling 
reason to move to OS/2. 

The lack of OS/2 software, plus in¬ 
creased performance and reduced prices 
on some systems, will affect the purchas¬ 
ing strategy for many businesses. Cur¬ 
rently, 80286 versions of AT clones are 
readily available at prices significantly 
lower than for an 80386, either in its SX 
version or in the full 32-bit version. 
Meanwhile, there is virtually no widely 
used software that requires the 80386. 
With 20-MHz versions of the 80286 now 
being shipped, there is not even much of 
a speed difference. 

What’s a business to do? Unless a spe¬ 
cific application actually requires the 
processing ability of an 80386, it may not 
pay to buy one, ft’s a reasonably safe bet, 
given a three-year economic lifetime, 
that there will be relatively little addi¬ 
tional software actually requiring the 
80386 during the time you will have the 
80286 machine. After all, even though 
the 80286 has been around for several 
years, virtually all software is still writ¬ 
ten for the 8088, 

The time will eventually come when 
the software for the 80386 or its suc¬ 
cessors starts to become a factor. Then 
you will start buying those machines. 
They will cost less, and you won’t have 
lost anything in the meantime. Admit¬ 
tedly, l am offering a low-tech approach 
to computing, but nothing I saw at 
COMDEX contradicts this conservative 
strategy. ■ 


Wayne Rash Jr. is a consulting editor for 
BYTE and a member of the professional 
staff of American Management Systems , 
Inc, (Arlington, VA). He consults with the 
federal government on microcomputers 
and communications . You can contact 
him on BIX as “waynerash, ” or in the 
11 to . wayne " conference . 

Your questions and comments are wel¬ 
come. Write to: Editor, BYTE, One Phoe¬ 
nix Milt Lane , Peterborough f NH 03458. 


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NX-2400 .$3104,95 

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EPSON 

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FX-850.... . $339.95 

LQ-5G0. . $315.95 

LQ-850. . $529.95 

LQ-950 . $589.95 

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LG-2550....... #919.05 

LX-80... .#199 95 

NEC 

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P5200. . J499.95 

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I SAME W/30MB HARD DRIVE..... . $1499 

I SAME W/40MB HARD DRIVE . .,$1599 

LOGITECH MOUSE MZ .*»* 

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Microsoft 


142 BYTE* MARCH 1989 


Trademarks, arc registered to [heir respective companies. 





EXPERT ADVICE 

MACI NATIONS Don Crabb 


4 A MACINTOSH 

Retrospective 



Looking back 
at the first five years 
of a revolution 


B y the time you read this, the idea 
of a five-year retrospective for 
the Macintosh will probably 
seem pretty lame; I missed the 
anniversary date by a couple of months. 
But since Fm writing this in early De- 
cember of 1988, please indulge me, 

I was cleaning out the office in my 
home today (always a thrill), going 
through a closet to toss out some of the 
oldest computer flotsam (most of it soft¬ 
ware that runs on computers that don't 
exist anymore). 

1 came to the old Macintosh software 
heap. There I found the original cartons, 
manuals, and disks for software that 
amazed us all in 1984; the original Sys¬ 
tem kit, MacPaint, Mac Write, MacTer- 
minal, Microsoft Multiplan, and Micro¬ 
soft BASIC Interpreter. 

I remember thinking at the time that 
the Mac was pretty hot stuff and that it 
was going to revolutionize the way we 
think of and use personal computers. IFs 
been five years since the Macintosh was 
released, so I asked myself whether it 
really revolutionized anything. 

Consider the evidence from the Mac's 
point of view. The Mac, though bigger, 
faster, and more expensive, is still the 
Mac. Its interface is still the same. Pull¬ 
down menus. A mouse. Icons. Windows 
with scroll bars. Decent sound. Nice 
graphics that work with any application. 
Good built-in system support for stan¬ 
dardized functions as part of the operat¬ 
ing system. 

Color has been added, and so has 
background processing with the Multi- 
Finder. But if a Mac 12SK user of 1984 
could have been placed in a hermetically 
sealed room that very year, and released 


now to try out an 8-megabyte Mac IIx, he 
or she would have little trouble using it. 
The Macintosh has evolved since its 1984 
introduction, but it T s still the same kind 
of machine. In fact, the Mac has become 
a second standard after the IBM PC. 

Now consider the evidence from the 
DOS point of view. In 1984, DOS was 
somewhere around version 2.xx. Its in¬ 
terface consisted of a helpful A: > or 
C: > prompt, and dandy error messages 
like “File allocation tab bad,” Menus 
were for ordering food at a restaurant, 
not commanding your PC. A mouse was 
something you had exterminated; you 
certainly wouldn't tolerate one on your 
desktop. Icons were found in Greek Or¬ 
thodox churches, not on your screen. 
Windows were on your house, not your 
computer display. Sound consisted of 
some wonderfully annoying buzzes and 
beeps. Graphics were CGA at worst, 
Hercules at best (but then compatibility 
was an issue). System support for stan¬ 
dardized functions was weak and re¬ 


quired major-league driver hacking. 

By 1988, DOS was giving way to OS/2 
with its Presentation Manager graphics, 
windows, icons, and mice. Sound was 
being improved. System support for 
database, networking, and other func¬ 
tions was being added. In short, the 
transmutation of the DOS interface to 
look like the Mac interface was in full 
swing. If you took a 1984 DOS user from 
that same hermetically sealed room and 
plopped that user down in front of a PS/2 
Model 70 running OS/2 and the Presen¬ 
tation Manager, the reaction would be 
unequivocal: “How do I get the A: > 
prompt?” 

By any measure, the Macintosh has in¬ 
deed revolutionized the way personal 
computers interact with people. Mostly 
for the better, I think. When the largest 
computer manufacturer in the world 
(IBM) gets together with the largest PC 
software vendor (Microsoft) to put to¬ 
gether a PC user interface that mimics 

continued 


ILLUSTRATION: ROBERT KAUFMAN © 19R9 


MARCH * BYTF, 14.1 




Circle 130 on Reader Service Card 


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the Macintosh's interface, I think we 
have evidence of a bonaf ide revolution. 

It’s a Taxing Time of the Year: 
MacInTax Tax View 

Nobody likes to fill out federal income 
tax forms. Fortunately, however, if s one 
of those repetitive, numerically intensive 
tasks that can be simplified with the right 
program on the right computer. The 
right computer is, of course, the Macin¬ 
tosh, and I think the right program is 
MacInTax. I’ve been using MacInTax 
since it first appeared in time for the 
1985 tax year. It's simply wonderful. 1 
can't imagine how I ever kept my busi¬ 
ness depreciation calculations straight 
without it. 

Over the past four years I've used and 
tested many of the tax-preparation pro¬ 
grams that run on the PC and the Mac. 
Of the personal or professional tax-prep¬ 
aration programs on the market, MacIn¬ 
Tax is by a large measure the easiest to 
learn and use. And at $119, it's also a 
bargain, especially since you can get 
yearly updates (which include new man¬ 
uals) for only $55. MacInTax is so easy 
to use because its interface is simple and 
straightforward, yet still surprisingly 
sophisticated. 

While many tax-preparation programs 
mimic the structure of those dreaded IRS 
forms, MacInTax takes that strategy to 
its limit: its on-screen display duplicates 
the IRS forms exactly (to the extent that 
72 pixels per inch allows). So you just fill 
out the on-screen forms the same way 
you filled out the old paper forms. This 
method means that if you've ever filled 
out a tax form before, you already know 
how to use MacInTax. 

Items 

Discussed 

MacInTax 1988.$119 

annual update.,... ... $55 

SoftView, Inc, 

4820 Adohr Lane, Suite F 
Camarillo, CA 93010 
(805) 388-2626 
Inquiry 1101. 

Master Juggler LOO...$69.95 

ALSoft, Inc. 

P.O.Box 927 
Spring, TX 77383 
(713) 353-4090 
Inquiry 1102. 


Need to fill out some of the other 
forms and schedules? No problem with 
MacInTax. They're all in the pull-down 
menu. You can have as many forms open 
as you need, although you can run out of 
memory, especially under MultiFinder 
on a i-megabyte Mac. 

If you hit a rough spot and need some 
help or want to see the IRS instructions 
for a particular entry, just double-click 
on the block in question. If the entry 
amount is calculated using an on-screen 
worksheet or is transferred from another 
form or schedule, double-clicking will 
pop up that worksheet, form, or schedule 
onto the screen and link it with the others 
and the 1040 form automatically. What 
could be simpler? I've never been able to 
figure out why other tax-preparation pro¬ 
grams don't work this way. It seems so 
natural. 

Printing has always been a strong suit 
of MacInTax, and it remains so. MacIn¬ 
Tax will print all IRS forms, including 
the signature Form 1040, onto plain 
paper, using either a LaserWriter or an 
Imagewriter. 

I tested MacInTax by turning it loose 
on my taxes, then my wife's, and finally 
on some test returns l cooked up that use 
just about every schedule the IRS has 
ever conceived. MacInTax was accurate, 
fast, and flawless in all my tests. I never 
ran into any of the weird problems that 
seem to plague some of the other tax- 
preparation programs I've used. 

When 1 did have a question that the on¬ 
line help couldn't answer, the manual 
did the job nicely. MacInTax supplies 
more than 30 different forms and sched¬ 
ules, along with nine calculation work¬ 
sheets that are handy as scratchpads; they 
are saved with the forms, but they don't 
get primed for the IRS's scrutiny. 

MacInTax can also convert your previ¬ 
ous year's tax return to work with the 
current version of the program (once 
you've saved the old forms under new 
names). This could save you some typing 
on your 1988 tax return if a lot of last 
year's data hasn't changed for this year's 
return. 

MacInTax also integrates with the 
most popular financial-management 
programs on the Mac, including Andrew 
Tobias's Managing Your Money, Mac- 
Money, Quicken, and Dollars and Sense. 
You can import information from any of 
these systems directly into MacInTax 
with just a few keystrokes. This means 
you can have a fully integrated manage¬ 
ment, financial-planning, and tax-re¬ 
porting system if you use MacInTax with 
one of these systems. 

continued 


144 BYTE- MARCH 1989 


































Laser Feeder 890 


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MacBusiness. 


You'll get at least twice as much done per 
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desktop publishing We make getting down 
to MacBusiness as easy as apple pie 

Our LaserFieeder 890 provides three, 
220-sheet paper bins plus one bin for 40-60 
envelopes for your LaserWriter. With the 
LaserFteder 890 in place, changing paper 
type or printing an envelope is a simple 
mouse dick instead of a bite out of produc¬ 


tion time, thanks to BDTs resource software. 

When two paper types are the norm, 
BDT offers its Model 880 Laserfeeder, provid¬ 
ing two 220-sheet paper bins plus an envelope 
bin at a nearly 20 percent reduction in cost. 

If you need LOTS of paper and enve¬ 
lope choices, consider the Multifeeder: five, 
200-sheet trays, one envelope tray. Same 
simple print dialog Same clear displays. 

Huge production time savings. 


For further information, please call or 
write: BDT Products, Inc, 17152 Armstrong 
Ave., Irvine, CA 92714. Outside California: 
800-FIND BDT—(800-346-3238). Inside 
California: 714-660-1386. 



Easy as Apple Re 


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Apple the Apple U>go, Macintosh and laser Water ft an? trademarks of Apple Computer, fm , 


Circle 42 on Reader Service Card (DEALERS: 43) 


MARCH 1989 ■ B YTE 145 









MACINATIONS 


For PC users who have wandered into 
this column, there is good MacInTax 
news for you, too. Last year, SoftView 
produced a Microsoft Windows version 
of the program, and it continues this 
year. The Windows version is markedly 
slower than the Mac, though, even on a 
fast 80286 machine. To get performance 
akin to the Mac version, you'll need an 
80386, 

Although Fve said it before, it bears 
repeating: MacInTax is the best personal 


computer tax-preparation program 
around. If you do your own taxes and 
don't have MacInTax, make your life a 
whole lot easier and get it soon. 

Font/BA Juggler to the Max: 

Master Juggler 

I never used to worry much about how 
many fonts or desk accessories I needed 
or used. I had gotten to be pretty good at 
hacking the system using FEdit Plus, so 
I could always change the maximum 


number of desk accessories allowed each 
time a new system was released. But 
after you’ve done that little trick a couple 
of times, it loses its appeal. Because of 
this, I began to cast about for a better 
solution. 

The answer, of course, was either 
Suitcase or Font/DA Juggler. For a vari¬ 
ety of reasons too boring to list, I settled 
on Font/DA Juggler Plus as having just 
the right stuff for me. Well, Fve become 
addicted. No more system hacking of 
desk-accessory limits for me. 

With this in mind, 1 was pleased when 
ALSoft released the latest version of Jug¬ 
gler a few months back. They called it, 
appropriately enough, MasterJuggler 
This baby does what it says: It allows you 
to juggle a bundle of fonts, sounds* 
Fkeys, and desk accessories with your 
Mac. It keeps them open and available 
whenever you need them, without chok¬ 
ing the system. The desk accessories will 
appear in the regular Open Apple Menu 
in a scrollable list, with MasterJuggler 
always listed first, so you can get to it 
easily. 

MasterJuggler works as a start-up 
document (I NIT) that you drag into your 
System folder. Once open, Master¬ 
Juggler gives you access to all the fea¬ 
tures of Font/DA Juggler Plus, as well as 
a bunch more that I find useful. There 
are pop-up menus for MasterJuggler, and 
for any application and its windows; and 
a utility that detects any resource con¬ 
flicts among all your desk accessories, 
Fkeys, or sounds. 

It also has an application list that 
allows program selection from running 
and predefined programs. This is a 
handy adjunct to MukiFinder, since you 
can also hide windows each time you 
change an application (so your screen 
doesn’t get too cluttered). 

MasterJuggler is one of those Mac util¬ 
ities that you wonder how you ever got 
along without. ALSoft just sent me an¬ 
other item from its growing list of util¬ 
ities, MultiDisk, a jazzy disk partitioner 
that I’ll report on next time. ALSoft is 
definitely a company to watch when it 
comes to providing clever, inexpensive, 
but nicely executed Macintosh utility 
programs. ■ 


Don Crabb is the director of laboratories 
and a senior lecturer for the computer 
science department at the University of 
Chicago. He can be reached on BIX as 
decrabb , ” 

Your questions and comments are wel¬ 
come. Write to: Editor , BYTE, One 
Phoenix Mill Lane, Peterborough, NH 
03458l 


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ENTER OUR OTHER CRACKPOT ENGINEER. Our president is a mechanical engineer One ot 
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146 B YTE * MARCH 1989 


Circle 46 an Reader Service Card 


















Virtual Memory for DOS! 


MicroWay is your best source for the 
software and hardware needed to get true 3 2 
bit performance from your 3Q6. These include 
our NDP 32-bit compilers that run on Unix or 
MS-DOS using the Phar Lap tools. Starting with 
release 1.4VM, NDP Fortran and C not only 
access 4 gigabytes of memory, but run with 
Phar Lap’s new VMM extension which provides 
386 protected mode virtual memory. Now you 
can run a program with a 30 megabyte array 
on a 2 megabyte system simply by having 30 
megabytes of free space on your hard disk. 

Micro Way also offers transputer based 
parallel processing boards and languages that 
run in an XT, AT, or 386. Each of the T800 RISC 
processors on these boards packs the power 
of a 20 MHz 386/1167, Our best selling board, 
the Quadputer2™, has four TfiOOs and boasts 
40 Ml PS/6 megaflops of processor throughput. 


Dr Robert Atwell, leading defense scientist 
calculates that NDP Fortran-386 is saving him 
$12,000 per month in rentals of VAX 
hardware and software while doubling his 
productivityf 


Fred Ziegler of AspenTech in Cambridge, 
Mass, reports ,7 ported900,000 lines of 
Fortran source in two weeks without a single 
problem /' A spen Tech's Chemical Modeling 
System is in use on mainframes worldwide 
and is probably the largest application to ever 
run on an Intel processor 


Dr. Jerry Ginsberg of Georgia Tech reports, 
"My problems run a factor of six faster using 
NDP Fortran-386 on an mW 1167 equipped 
386/20 than they do on my Micro VAX II ." 


Our NDP compilers and NDP utilities are the 
key to the two to fi ve-fold increase in speed that 
themW1167 provides The compilers generate 
mainframe style code, while our utilities simplify 
ports to/from the PC or mainframe. A new utility 
enables our NDP compilers to call HALO 88, 
If you are curious about the benefits of the 
NDP/mWl 167 approach, consider the follow¬ 
ing (price estimates are for complete systems): 


Coprocessor 

Speed (Flops) 

Price 

80287-10 

80387-20 

mW1167-20 

80,000 

440,000 

2,100,000 

$3,000 

$5,000 

$6,000 


When driven by a 32-bit compiler, the 
mW1167 approaches the speed of a $600,000 
VAX 8650! In fact, many of our users have 
reported increases in turnaround of 2 to 4 times 
that of their VAX! Call us at (508) 746-7341. 




32-Bit Compilers and Tools 


NDP Fortran-386™ and NDP C-386™ Com¬ 
pilers generate globally optimized, mainframe 
quality code. Both run in 386 protected mode 
under Unix, Xenix or Phar Lap extended MS- 
DOS, The memory model employed uses 2 
segments, each of which can be up to 4 
gigabytes. They generate code for the 80287, 
80387, 3167 or mW11G7. Both include high 
speed EGA graphics extensions written in C 
that perform BASIC-like screen operations. 

* NDP Fortran-386™ Full implementation of 

FORTRAN-77 with Berkeley 4.2 and 
Fortran-66 extensions.. $595 

. NDP Fortran-386/VM. $695 

, NDP Fortran-386/UNlX .$795 

* NDP C-386™ Full implementation of AT&rs 
PCC with MS and ANSI extensions.... $595 

* NDP C-386/VM.$695 

* NDP C-3S6/UNIX . .. ..$795 

Phar Lap 386/VMM extensions are supported 
by the VM releases of NDP Fortran and C. 
Virtual memory is used automatically by the 
compilers and the code they generate. This 
makes it possible to compile and run programs 
as large as the free space on your hard disk, 

Phar Lap Development Tools.$495 

Phar Lap Virtual Memory Manager . . $295 

NDP Windows™ — NDP Windows includes 80 
funotions that let you create, store, and recall 
menus and windows. It works with NDP 0-386 
and drives all the popular graphics adapters 
.Library: $125, C Source; $250 

NDP Plot™ — Calcomp compatible plot pack¬ 
age that is callable from NDP Fortran. It in¬ 
cludes drivers for popular plotters and printers. 
Works with CGA, MDA , EGA and VGA., $325 

NDP/FFT™ — Includes 40 fast running, hand 
coded algorithms for single and double dimen¬ 
sioned FFTs which take advantage of the 32-bit 
addressing of the 386 or your hard disk. Call¬ 
able from NDP Fortran with mW1167 and 

80387 support...$250 

387FFT for 16-bit compilers.$250 

NDP to HALO '88 Graphics Interface — This 
module enables you to call graphics routines in 
HALO 88 from NDP Fortran or C.$100 


MicroWay ® N 

80386 Support 

v (508) 746-7341 y 


Parallel Processing 


Vldeopuler™ 

The highest performance graphics card on the 
market. Uses a T800 and Tl 34010 in conjunc¬ 
tion with a 130 MHz BmokTree DAC. The 
board comes with one meg of system RAM, 
one meg of video RAM and a library of graphics 
primitives. It runs standalone or in conjunction 
with a transputer network and drives 32 and 64 
KHz analog monitors...., $4995 

Monoputer2™ 

The world's most popular PC transputer 
development product now extends the memory 
available for developing transputer applica¬ 
tions from 2 to 16 megabytes. The board fea¬ 
tures a DMA bus interface for fast I/O, 


Monoputerf with T414 (0 MS).$995 

Monoputer2 with T800 (0 MB).$1495 


Quadputer2™ 

This board for the AT or 386 can be purchased 
with 2,3 or 4 transputers and 1 or 4 megabytes 
of memory per transputer. Two or more Quad- 
puters can be linked together to build networks 
with mainframe power which use up to 100 or 
more transputers.from $3495 

Transputer Compilers and Applications 
These Parallel languages are designed for the 
Monoputer2 and Quadputer2, 

Logical Systems Parallel C.$595 

3L Parallel C or 3L Parallel Fortran . . $895 

MicroWay Prolog Interpreter.$750 

Mlcrofleld- Finite element analysis .. $1600 

ParaSoft: Parallel Environment-$300 

Performance Monitor .., $200 
C Source Lever Debugger $300 
T800/NAG™ (See N DP/NAG) .$2750 

387BASIC™ — Our 16-bit MS compatible 
compiler introduces numeric register variables 
to produce the fastest running 80x87 code on 
the market......$249 


Weitek-Based Coprocessors 


mWI 167™is built at MicroWay using Weitek 
components and includes an 80387 socket. 


mW1167-16.$996 

mW1167-20 .$1595 

mW1167 Microchan nel-16.$ 1295 

m W1167 Microchan nel-20.$1595 

Weitek 3167-20 .$1995 

Weitek 3167-25 .$2495 


Intel Coprocessors and RAM 


8037 . $93 

8037-2 . $135 

80287-8 .$215 

80287-10 .. $245 

80C287A (CMOS) .$310 

80387-16 . $385 

80387-16SX.$340 

80387-20 .$440 

80387-25 .. .$550 

287Turbo-12 (for AT compatibles)_$350 

RAMpak™ -1 meg 32-bit memory module 
for Compaq system memory board .. . $650 

256K 100ns DRAM .$13 

256K SIMMS . $119 

1MB SIMMS . $450 


(All of our Intel coprocessors include STTest.) 


Intelligent Serial Controllers 


MicroWay's AT0™ and ATI 6™, the fastest 
intelligent serial controllers, run in AT, 80386 
and PS/2 PCs. They come with drivers for UNIX 
and XENIX. ATS... $895ATI6... $1295 


32-Bit Applications 


PSTAT-386 — Popular mainframe statistics 
package. Full version was ported.$1495 

NDP/NAG™ — Features a library of 268 en¬ 
gineering and scientific numerical algorithms. 
Callable from NDP Fortran .$695 


12 MHz PC Accelerators 


FaalCACHE-286 12 MHz .$299 

SuperCACKE-266 12 MHz .$399 

FaslCACHE-286 9 MHz .$199 


Micro 

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Way 

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USA FAX 503 - 746-4678 Australia 02-439-8400 Germany 069-75-1428 


MARCH 1989 - BYTE 147 































































Finally, a Mouse 
Thai Won’t 


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148 BYTE * MARCH 1989 


Circle 191 on Reader Service Card 














The jury is still out 
on whether OS/2 will be 
a hit or a miss 


I have just returned from COMDEX. 
There are four basic post-COM- 
DEX columns: the “COMDEX is 
really dying, and it says something 
about the industry” column, the “Boy, I 
didn’t get any sleep, and my feet hurt a 
lot” column, the “COMDEX is misman¬ 
aged” column, and the “Gee, there was a 
lot of neat stuff’ column. I’ll give you all 
four for the price of one. 

I brought a pair of Rockport shoes— 
the most comfortable almost-dressy shoe 
in the land—so my feet weren’t too bad. 
And yeah, it was a pain waiting in the 
lines, but you get to meet people and hear 
things while waiting. There were also 
some noteworthy items vis-a-vis OS/2. 

The OS/2 LANscape 
The LAN Manager really makes OS/2 
shine. It has good performance, well- 
documented interfaces, and, most im¬ 
portant, support from many vendors. 
3Com showed its LAN Manager-based 
34*Open software. With 3-I-Open (as 
with Microsoft’s own LAN Manager), 
DOS and OS/2 workstations can share a 
LAN. That’s important because a lot of 
DOS machines will never run OS/2. 

Since the two operating systems share 
a common file system, DOS and OS/2 
workstations will work together com¬ 
fortably, and the upgrade from DOS 
applications to OS/2 applications can be 
leisurely. Of course, at some point you’ll 
want to switch from, say, the DOS Lotus 
1-2-3 to the larger (and, I hope, faster) 
OS/2 Lotus 1-2-3, but you won’t have to 
switch right away. 

3Com also showed a graphical net¬ 
work traffic monitor—a tool you use to 
gauge network activity. It’s not in a 


EXPERT ADVICE 

OS/2 NOTEBOOK ■ Mark Minasi 


Not Quite 
COMDEX/2 Yet 



league with mainframe network manag¬ 
ers, but I expect that will be remedied. 

Torus Systems showed a LAN Man¬ 
ager product, too. Torus makes a graphi¬ 
cal front end for NetBIOS-oriented 
LANs; it’s called Tapestry, and it has 
been in the DOS world for several years 
now. It offers the usual E-mail and file 
and print services, but with an icon- 
based user interface. Tapestry I sup¬ 
ported small LANs, but Tapestry II can 
connect to remote sites using X.25 and, 
the company claims, can support hun¬ 
dreds of workstations. 

Unfortunately, the Moulton, Minasi & 
Company Charles Babbage Memorial 
Computation Center is a mite short of 
hundreds of workstations, so I can’t test 
the claim, but I’ll keep my ear to the 
ground. Like most LAN Manager-de¬ 
rived products, it can talk to both DOS 
and OS/2 servers and workstations, 
though in its current configuration, Tap¬ 
estry’s graphical enhancements work 
only on DOS machines. 


The startling thing about talking with 
LAN Manager vendors was their enthu¬ 
siasm. Everyone that I talked to who had 
used the LAN Manager’s application 
programming interface agreed that it 
greatly simplifies the construction of 
LAN applications. The Torus folks said 
the support that LAN Manager provides 
is “straightforward, allowing us to spend 
time adding value to our product.” An¬ 
other LAN Manager supporter, Infor¬ 
mation Builders, said the same thing 
with respect to the port of its multiuser 
database. Focus, from DOS to OS/2. 

OS/Too Many Promises 

COMDEX offered an easy way to spot 
OS/2 products: They had an “OS/2” sign 
hanging off the ceiling. Some were dis¬ 
appointing—either an 80286 or 80386 
machine demonstrating that it could run 
OS/2, or a Windows application that 
looked “just like what the Presentation 
Manager version will look like in Ql,” 

continued 


ILLUSTRATION: JANET MARCH © 1989 


MARCH 1989 -BYTE 149 













OS/2 NOTEBOOK 


that is, by March 31, 1989. 

I stumbled across an application that 
showed quite a bit of promise but didn't 
get much attention: Micrografx '5 Mir¬ 
rors program. Micrografx is mainly in 
the graphics business, and it makes a 
number of excellent object-oriented 
drawing programs for Windows, like In a 
Vision, Windows Draw, and Designer. 
The company has now ported Designer 
over to the Presentation Manager and 
was demonstrating it in living color—not 


the Windows version, the PM version. It 
ships, again, sometime in this quarter, 
and I’m looking forward to its release. 

Mirrors came from the process of com 
verting Designer from Windows to PM. 
The Micrografx folks wrote a Windows- 
to-PM conversion utility to simplify the 
matter. Figuring that others could use 
the utility, they decided to offer it to the 
outside world as Mirrors. Any OS/2 de¬ 
veloper should look at it. The example of 
Mirrors conversion I saw—Designer- 


looked pretty good, and Micrografx is to 
be commended for offering a product to 
make PM development easier. 

What we really need, however, is a 
Windows/PM fourth^generation lan¬ 
guage-something that is a simplified 
Windows application generator. Too 
many people roll their eyes when I sug¬ 
gest that they port their applications to 
Windows/PM. 41 Do you know how diffi¬ 
cult that is?" they respond. 

As I’ve said before, Windows/PM pro¬ 
gramming is very different from what 
most programmers are used to. Not bad 
different, just different different. A lan¬ 
guage designed from scratch for Win¬ 
dows would be of help here, something 
simpler than the usual PM code—C pro¬ 
grams consisting largely of strung-to¬ 
gether Windows procedure calls. Some 
attempts have been made to produce such 
a language for Windows, but thus far 1 
have n ’ t se en any th i ng c ompel ling. 

NewWave 

You've heard the hype. "NewWave 
makes Windows useful." “A whole new 
way of using the computer." And so on. 

It’s ail true. 

1 was skeptical when I strode up to the 
Hewlett-Packard booth. But I soon saw 
the light. Don't get me wrong—New¬ 
Wave isn't ready yet. The demonstration 
crashed a lot, and it suffered from the 
fact that it's built atop an already re¬ 
source-intensive platform, namely, Win¬ 
dows 286. But it made me want to work 
with Windows. 

NewWave starts out with a Macintosh¬ 
like screen showing file folders. Each 
folder is an associated group of files—a 
subdirectory, perhaps, that contains 
spreadsheets, graphs, and text relating to 
a particular project. You can open a 
folder and click on any of the files. This 
is slightly different from Windows, 
which starts you out looking at the MS- 
DOS Executive, basically just a disorga¬ 
nized directory of your files. Of course, 
NewWave, like Windows, knows that 
when you click on, say, a .WKl file, it 
should activate Lotus 1-2-3 and feed the 
WKl file to it. 

The real fun begins, however, when 
you use a NewWave application. When 
you take a graph created by NewWave's 
graphics program and paste it into a 
document created by NewWave’s word 
processor, the word processor invokes 
the graphics program to handle the ugly 
printing details, so the word processor 
needn’t include redundant code. 

This goes beyond the usual Windows 
clipboard: When the numbers change in 

continued 



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H«F+ ScanJet Scanner with Starter IQ. 


FLOPPY DRIVES 

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INTEL CormerKon Coprotoiier 

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EVEREX 125Mb Lntarndfapi *1,099 

CDC90Mb HH SCSI. 

CDC 155 FH 5CS|„ tw ,„ t , 

COC 300 FH SCSI.. 


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MAXTOR XT-114014QMb .* 1 ,*9 5 

MICRO POLIS 1335 65Mb 20mSEC.. 
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2Mb RAM, 72Mb DrU, 60Mb Tqp= 8 De* S-f 

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'Novell ELS NcrWaf 2B6 Uvd 1 
N^rpll Syifaini Mngr 8 Uwr btnio Tubctoli 
2400 Ifaud Modern W/K Anj^heito For Support 

*4 ArcNet carda, cabie, 4- port panive bub 

'3 ARC PTaTurba8e, 10 MHi, 640K, Si*, 
XTRON (J'rKSfJdKT. 


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MINISCRIBE 3085HH22n,S<K 72Mb.$ 779 

DrMsCardj-anvane can faito# in ^rnfaulkiF 
MINISCRIBE DdVeCardi 20 XT 20Mb ,.S 279 

MINISCRIBE Drive Card 30Mb._ 5 355 

MINISCRIBE 8225 XT 20Mb W/CTRL.| 259 

MINISCRIBE 8425E 20MB 40m$ 3.5 H ...$2*9 


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PC SOFTWARE & MIG 

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Aibton-Tote dBase 111 ....$ 379 

RFS: Proimiiorid Fifa..... 109 

WardTech DfiXL [dSaw 3] "Diamond',^., H $115 

Carbon Copy Plu» JSSKiK?* $ 109 

PCAnywhafo.. 85 

VolkiWritor 3+ S|3r 

MkrotoftWord,__ 

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US R0BOTKS Courier HST to 19,200 bp* $ *29 

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SportiTer 1200 E $ 98 / 1200 PC.$*8 


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AST Hot Shot28*- lOXT Accel Bd.$3*9 

AST I/O MINIM XT or AT ... 75 

AST RAMPAGE 28* 512K...$ 395 

AST RAMPAGE 2 lor XT 256K. - Ml. 30.5 279 
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EVEREX UltragFwhlcv 819‘Mai%Ffarni..CAU 

EVEREX floppy Sj, G, 0...$ 89 

EVEREX PWLu^. EGA 640*480 + pri..$ 139 

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INTEL Abov. BD/ieO'PCMB 4020 512K $ 3 79 
INTEL 802 87-3... $ 240/8 0287-10.$ 2*9 


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the graph, the graph changes in the text, 
as with the “hot link” that the ill-fated 
Lotus Jazz used on the Mac. Unfortu¬ 
nately, for NewWave to become truly 
useful, we’d have to hope that a lot of 
folks would write NewWave applica¬ 
tions. I just complained about writing 
Windows applications—NewWave appli¬ 
cations are just Windows applications 
with more code added. 

NewWave links to voice mail and 
LANs. Hewlett-Packard intends to sup¬ 
port X Windows and OS/2’s PM with it. 

Finally, NewWave answers what is, to 
me, one of the most important arguments 
against WIMP (windows/icons/mice/ 
pointers) interfaces—lack of a batch ca¬ 
pability. NewWave has something called 
the NewWave Agent, which is basically a 
macro or batch file capability. There’s 
the usual batch language that looks like a 
DOS .BAT file. Agent can also record 
and play back things that you do interac¬ 
tively. All in all, it’s very nice. Take this 
with a grain of salt, though—I had only 
45 minutes to play with the product. I’ll 
report more as I learn more. 


faster and faster 80286 chips, had a 
display room where it basically said 
“386SX: Just Say No.” AMD is annoyed 
about the feeling in the industry that the 
80286 is not the chip of choice. The com¬ 
pany makes 80286 chips because it used 
to get Intel’s chip designs through a tech¬ 
nology transfer agreement. Intel decided 
not to share the plans for the 80386, how¬ 
ever, so AMD is seeking legal recourse 
to get the 80386 plans and is pushing the 
80286 as hard as it can. 

AMD ably demonstrated that, head to 
head, a 16-MHz 80286 is faster than a 
16-MHz 80386SX, assuming you’re run¬ 
ning only real-mode programs (DOS) or 
80286 protected-mode programs (OS/2). 
The 80286, of course, lacks several cru¬ 
cial 80386 features, but AMD argues 
that these features are of interest only to 
power users. A good argument, which 
was articulately defended by its engi¬ 
neering staff—AMD sent well-informed 
people to its COMDEX booth. 

I had a few quibbles, however. When I 
countered, “Couldn’t everyone use the 
ability to do DOS multitasking” and 
pointed to the fragility of OS/2’s com¬ 
patibility box, the AMD people dropped 
dark hints about an external memory 
management unit for the 80286 in the 
offing. 

“You mean something that could make 
the compatibility box more bulletproof?” 
I asked. 

“You’re on the right track,” they re¬ 
plied. Who knows? Maybe we needn’t 
sell our 80286 machines yet. Then again, 
if a judge tells Intel to hand over the 
80386 plans tomorrow, we may never 
hear of this mystery chip. 

Finally, while at COMDEX, I tried to 
listen to everyone who’d answer the 
question, “Is OS/2 going to be a suc¬ 
cess?” For most, this is unfortunately a 
religious question—no middle ground. 
The answer was either “Yes, of course, 
and you’re a fool to even ask the ques¬ 
tion,” or “No, of course not, and only a 
fool would even be interested.” There 
seemed to be about a 50/50 split on 
whether OS/2 will make it or not. What 
do you think? 

Next month. I’ll continue building the 
inexpensive OS/2 workstation. ■ 


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EXPERT ADVICE 


C0M1: ■ Brock N. Meeks 



The Protocol Pack 


Putting XMODEM 
and its file transfer heirs 
through their paces 


P rotocol, as we saw last month, is 
an accepted way of doing things* 
For diplomats, protocol means 
ritual; for communications soft¬ 
ware, it’s a mixed bag of connections, 
characters, and signals that can be 
understood at both ends of the connec¬ 
tion, Once you've solved this communi¬ 
cations equation, you've only just begun. 

The proliferation of file transfer proto¬ 
cols provides you with an arsenal for 
attacking any file transfer situation and 
application. As we saw last month, the 
venerable XMODEM has evolved into a 
more robust protocol—larger block 
length, better error checking—and has 
spawned hybrid offspring, such as 
YMODEM (which offers batch file 
transfer, time- and date-stamped files, 
and IK-byte blocks) and ZMODEM 
(which offers streaming protocol, a very 
efficient error-correction scheme)* 
However, with all these file transfer 
variants, many people have still never 
ventured beyond XMODEM for file 
transfers* The prevailing attitude seems 
to be, “If it ain't broke, don't fix it.” 
That philosophy will get you by, but only 
if you're uploading or downloading an 
occasional file. For anyone transferring 
files on a regular basis, there axe more 
efficient protocols than XMODEM. 

I ran the file transfer protocols I dis¬ 
cussed last month through their paces 
under a variety of common conditions. 
Before I get to the results, I want to intro- 
duce another protocol into the mix: Win¬ 
dowed XMODEM, or W/XMODEM, 

Through the Windows 

Windowed protocols, such as W/XMO¬ 
DEM, are an attempt to improve 



throughput by avoiding the start-stop ap¬ 
proach implemented in the ACK/NAK 
send and receive scheme of XMODEM, 
Windowed protocols assume that the 
blocks, or “packets,” are received with¬ 
out error, a kind of “expect the best” ap¬ 
proach. Such protocols do not wait for 
the ACK before sending the next packet. 

The receiving systems do send ACK 
signals; the sending systems just don’t 
rely on receiving that ACK before send¬ 
ing the next packet* If an error occurs, 
the receiver sends a NAK to the transmit¬ 
ting computer; if the transmitting com¬ 
puter still has the failed packet in its 
memory , it resends it and proceeds* And 
there’s the catch. 

The failed packet must still be in the 
transmit buffer, and that buffer has a fi¬ 
nite length. All windowing protocols set 
a maximum window size; W/XMODEM 
uses a four-packet window. This means 
that the transmitting computer can send 
a maximum of four packets without get¬ 
ting a reply from the host* If this weren't 


the case, error recovery wouldn't be 
possible* 

Now let’s take a look at the tests, 

Basic Bits 

The basic criterion for judging the effi¬ 
ciency of a protocol is to measure its 
throughput. Throughput, as defined 
here, is the amount of information being 
transferred from one system to another in 
the form of bits per second (bps). 

Each character transferred consists of 
8 bits* In addition, computer communi¬ 
cations requires that the system send a 
start and stop bit, as well. The start bit 
lets the receiving computer know that the 
next 7 or 8 bits contain information. The 
stop bit tells the receiving computer that 
the whole character has been transmitted 
and to prepare for the next character* 
(These start/stops are also called /ram- 
ing bits because they frame the data bits.) 

All this means that each character (8 
bits) sent actually “costs” 10 bits. Thus, 

continued 


ILLUSTRATION: JAMES YANG © 1989 


MARCH 1989 - BYTE 1S5 





















C0M1: 


Table 1: Results of tests using Procomm Plus and a 2400-bps modem to 
upload and download a 45K-byte file across the country over regular 
telephone lines. The straight ASCII transfer, included for comparison, was 
riddled with errors. The ZMODEM transfer was the winner, while XMODEM 
fared miserably. 

Protocol 

Speed 

Throughput 

Efficiency (%) 

ASCII (upload) 

1200 

880 

73 

ASCII (upload) 

2400 

1720 

71 

ASCII (download) 

1200 

1170 

97 

ASCII (download) 

2400 

2325 

96 

XMODEM (upload) 

1200 

647 

54 

XMODEM (upload) 

2400 

1534 

64 

XMODEM (download) 

1200 

663 

55 

XMODEM (download) 

2400 

1600 

66 

YMODEM (upload) 

1200 

1045 

87 

YMODEM (upload) 

2400 

2200 

91.6 

YMODEM (download) 

1200 

1090 

91 

YMODEM (download) 

2400 

2035 

84 

YMODEM-g (upload) 

1200 

Failed 

N/A 

YMODEM-g (upload) 

2400 

Failed 

N/A 

YMODEM-g (download) 

1200 

Failed 

N/A 

YMODEM-g (download) 

2400 

Failed 

N/A 

ZMODEM (upload) 

1200 

1120 

93 

ZMODEM (upload) 

2400 

2268 

94.5 

ZMODEM (download) 

1200 

1158 

96 

ZMODEM (download) 

2400 

2305 

96 

W/XMODEM (upload) 

1200 

940 

78 

W/XMODEM (upload) 

2400 

1700 

70 

W/XMODEM (download) 

1200 

690 

57 

W/XMODEM (download) 

2400 

2100 

87.5 

N/A = not applicable 





under optimum conditions, a 2400-bps 
modem would send 240 characters per 
second (cps), since 2400/10 = 240. In 
reality, this rarely happens. Why? File 
transfer overhead, or artificial delays, 
are imposed on each data transfer by any 
of several factors. These delays are in¬ 
curred in your file transfers by network 
flow controls (XON/XOFF), satellite re¬ 
lays, noisy telephone lines, and the send¬ 
ing and receiving of ACK/NAK signals. 

To figure out the efficiency of a proto¬ 
col, you divide the throughput by the 
rated speed of the modem. First, deter¬ 
mine the number of characters per sec¬ 
ond transferred; you divide the file size 
by the total number of seconds needed to 
transfer it. To figure the throughput in 
bps, you multiply the cps by 10. To fig¬ 
ure the efficiency, you divide the speed 
in bps by the rated speed of the modem. 
Here’s an example of a 26,624-byte file 
(26K bytes) that took 126 seconds to send 


via a 2400-bps modem: 

26,624/126 = 211.30 cps 
211.30 x 10 = 2113 bps 
2113/2400 = 88 percent efficiency 

In the Field 

Using Procomm Plus and a 2400-bps 
modem on an XT-class PC, I uploaded 
and downloaded a 45K-byte file from my 
home in San Francisco to a bulletin 
board in Washington, DC, over a regular 
telephone line. For comparison’s sake, I 
also performed an ASCII (straight text, 
no protocol) upload and download. The 
results are shown in table 1. 

At first glance, the straight ASCII file 
transfer looks pretty good, but statistics 
lie. The upload was done with flow con¬ 
trol (XON/XOFF) enabled. The down¬ 
load had no such flow control; as fast as 
the text scrolled across the screen, I cap¬ 
tured it to disk. 


What these figures don’t show is that, 
even with flow control, the text took sev¬ 
eral hits, and several large passages of 
the text were garbled and therefore unus¬ 
able. The same thing happened with the 
download. I was receiving text very fast, 
but noise on the line introduced long 
strings of garbage characters. The result¬ 
ing file increased in size because of the 
extra garbage characters, and the text 
was unusable. And, of course, straight 
ASCII text is useless for transferring exe¬ 
cutable files. 

As expected, XMODEM transfers 
were terminally slow due to the turn¬ 
around time needed to send the ACK/ 
NAK signals after every 128-bit block. 
Over voice-grade lines, the file transfer 
had to resend several failed blocks. 

ZMODEM was the overall best per¬ 
former. The streaming aspect of ZMO¬ 
DEM is responsible for this; the protocol 
doesn’t depend on any ACK signals from 
the host computer. It simply keeps send¬ 
ing unless it receives a NAK, at which 
time it falls back to the failed block and 
starts to retransmit from that point. 

YMODEM performed well because of 
the lK-byte packet size that reduces the 
interaction of ACK/NAK signals be¬ 
tween the computers. 

YMODEM-g failed all the tests. With 
no error correction in the protocol and no 
use of error-correcting modems, failed 
blocks went undetected and uncorrected. 
The file transfers attempted just 
wouldn’t work. 

W/XMODEM performance was sur¬ 
prisingly poor, in part owing to its small 
window size (four packets); however, its 
efficiency was still better than that of 
XMODEM. The windowing aspect of 
W/XMODEM allows it to send four 
times the data of a regular XMODEM 
transfer before it has to check to see if 
any failed packets were sent. This de¬ 
creases the turnaround sufficiently. 

For XMODEM, regardless of file 
transfer rate, the protocol must receive 
an ACK/NAK for every packet sent, and 
when transferring packets in 128-bit 
blocks, that means a lot of time wasted 
on turnaround. These tests suggest that 
windowing improves efficiency some¬ 
what, but not as much as going to YMO¬ 
DEM or ZMODEM with their larger 
block length. 

I then performed the same tests, using 
the same setup, over Telenet’s packet- 
switched network. (See table 2.) 

Telenet introduces its own flow con¬ 
trols, and when combined with the host’s 
flow control, uploads and downloads 
tended to suffer. 

continued 


156 BYTE • MARCH 1989 








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COM I: 


Table 2: Results of the same tests as in table 1 1 performed over Telenet T s 
packet-switched network. Note that the efficiency of all the file transfer 
protocols was decreased. XMODEM suffered the worst , probably because of 
the combination of its short block length and Telenet's flow controls . 


Protocol 

Speed 

(bps) 

Throughput 

(bps) 

Efficiency (%) 

ASCII (upload) 

1200 

745 

61 

ASCI! (upload) 

2400 

1688 

71 

ASCII (download) 

1200 

1096 

91 

ASCII (download) 

2400 

2160 

90 

XMODEM (upload) 

1200 

545 

45 

XMODEM (upload) 

2400 

1058 

44 

XMODEM (download) 

1200 

417 

35 

XMODEM (download) 

2400 

700 

30 

YMODEM (upload) 

1200 

956 

79 

YMODEM (upload) 

2400 

1995 

83 

YMODEM (download) 

1200 

1058 

88 

YMODEM (download) 

2400 

2024 

84 

YMODEM-g (upload) 

1200 

Failed 

N/A 

YMODEM-g (upload) 

2400 

Failed 

M/A 

YMODEM-g (download) 

1200 

Failed 

N/A 

YMODEM-g (download) 

2400 

Failed 

N/A 

ZMODEM (upload) 

1200 

1069 

89 

ZMODEM (upload) 

2400 

2200 

92 

ZMODEM (download) 

1200 

1089 

90 

ZMODEM (download) 

2400 

2289 

95 

W/XMODEM (upload) 

1200 

786 

65 

W/XMODEM (upload) 

2400 

1985 

82 

W/XMODEM (download) 

1200 

587 

48 

W/XMODEM (download) 

2400 

1865 

77 


WA = not applicable 


XMODEM performed miserably. The 
long turnaround time after each 128-bit 
block, combined with the delays of Te¬ 
lenet, wreaked havoc on download time. 

ZMODEM again won out as the best 
performer. This is no surprise, since 
ZMODEM was specifically designed to 
operate over packet-switched networks. 
Telenet’s network operates over satellite 
links, and there are inherent delays in the 
network. These delays slow up the ACK/ 
NAK signals between computers. Be¬ 
cause ZMODEM doesn’t expect any 
ACK signals, it overcomes this pitfall. 

YMODEM performance placed sec¬ 
ond; again, because of the lK-byte 
packet size, the delays in turnaround are 
diminished. 

YMODEM-g failed over Telenet, as it 
did over voice-grade lines. Use of error- 
correcting modems would help solve this 
problem, but to get full performance out 
of this protocol, you really need error- 


correcting modems and leased lines. 

W/XMODEM had fewer errors over 
Telenet than voice grade lines. That’s be¬ 
cause the packet-switched network is de¬ 
signed to carry data and, therefore, is 
less susceptible to noise than ordinary 
phone lines. But W/XMODEM’s effi¬ 
ciency over Telenet showed a decrease in 
all tests, except for the 2400-bps upload. 
Why the discrepancy? Perhaps there was 
less traffic on the network during the 
2400-bps tests; my notes show that these 
tests were done around midnight, while 
the others were done during early eve¬ 
ning. As traffic increases on a network 
like Telenet, the network must perform 
many more “housekeeping” functions. 
Housekeeping involves everything from 
addressing each packet to figuring out 
the packet’s correct routing. At any one 
time, thousands of packets are traveling 
over Telenet, and when traffic increases 
it's possible to run into a kind of infor¬ 


mation gridlock. Conversely, when 
you’re using the network during off-peak 
times (usually late at night), there's less 
traffic and, therefore, less housekeeping 
needed. 

The Envelope, Please 
ZMODEM is the overall winner, so why 
are people still using XMODEM? Habits 
are hard to break. Clearly, you can save 
time and money by switching to a differ¬ 
ent protocol. The trouble is, not all sys¬ 
tems support ZMODEM . 

If you find yourself facing extensive 
file transfers, and ZMODEM isn’t avail¬ 
able, try YMODEM. Most systems, in¬ 
cluding BIX, now support YMODEM. 
The popular TBBS bulletin board soft¬ 
ware program also supports YMODEM. 
The 1 K-byte packet size of YMODEM 
makes this an efficient protocol, as the 
tests show. Using YMODEM is no great 
technical leap for the user, and XMO¬ 
DEM fans will have no trouble switching 
to this more efficient protocol. 

On Your Own 

Several factors come into play when run¬ 
ning tests like these. I used real-world 
examples, so your mileage may vary. 
Tests under lab conditions would be 
much different, but nobody transfers 
files under laboratory conditions. 

Your choice of a long-distance phone 
company plays into the equation, too. 
I've found US Sprint to be more reliable 
than MCI, perhaps due to its fiber-optic 
network. AT&T is still the best route for 
its consistently clean lines, but it’s also 
more expensive than US Sprint. (Note 
than the rate difference in long distance 
carriers is much smaller than it was a few 
years ago. The difference between US 
Sprint and AT&T long distance charges is 
often only a few cents per minute.) 

The bottom line is to run your own 
tests; there are several other protocols 
not covered here—I’ll save those for an¬ 
other column, In the meantime, don’t be 
afraid to experiment with new protocols. 
At worst, you’ll waste some time but 
satisfy your curiosity. At best, you’ll in¬ 
crease your on-line productivity and de¬ 
crease those monthly telecommunica¬ 
tions bills. For my money, that’s a good 
reason to take a chance on change, ■ 


Brock N. Meeks is a San Francisco-based 
freelance writer who specializes in high 
technology. You can reach him on BIX as 
"brock." 

Your questions and comments are wel¬ 
come. Write to: Editor, BYTE, One 
Phoenix Mill Lane, Peterborough, NH 
03458. 


158 BYTE * MARCH 1989 










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EVEREX 


206 h 10MHz. 0 Wbiil. 

1149 

206,10MHz, 1 Wail. 

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PFS: First Publisher2.0.73 

Venture Publisher 2 0 , 470 


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Chartmasler. 199 

Design Cad 2D 4 3D.148 

Diagram Master.199 

Easy Cad. 109 

Generic Cad. 49 

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Grasp. 79 

Harvard Graphics 2.1 . 265 

In-A-Vision.298 

Math Cad 2.0 . 245 

Microsoft Chart 3.0. 225 

Newsroom Pro ,.,. 55 

PFS FJr$l Graphics 1.0.87 

PFS Rrsl Publisher 2.0 . 73 

Printshop. 33 

Showpartner FX . 199 


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Lattice C Compiler $220 

Microsoft C Compiler Ver. 5.0 Call 

Microsoft Fortran Ver 4.1 . 260 

Microsoft Macro Assembler Ver. 5.1 ... 84 
Microsoft Pascal Call 

Microsoft Quick Basic 4.0.59 

Microsoft Quick C . . Call 

Ryan McFarlan Fortran.390 

Ryan McFaden Cabot. 612 

Turbo Basic.Calf 

Turbo C 2.0 .. Call 

Turbo Pascal 5.0.Call 

Turbo Prolog 2.0. 90 


MULTI-USER SOFTWARE 


DBase IV Lan. Cali 

FoxBase ■ , .5299 

Microsoft Word.205 

Word Perfect 5,0.Call 

Word Perfect Modules.ea79 


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Remote II... 95 


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PROJECT MANAGER 

Microsoft Project . -.5299 

Super Project Plus. 255 

TimEline3.0 ..323 

Harvard Tot a I Project Mg r 3 . 369 


Borland Sprint ........$122 

GrammatkcNI 49 

Grandview .169 

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Product Focus ■ Large-Screen Monitors 



Large-screen monitors 
add a new dimension 
of clarity to 
graphics applications 


Steve Apiki 
and Stanford Diehl 


B igness has an aesthetic attrac¬ 
tion all its own. From ancient 
monuments to cars of the fif¬ 
ties, people have always been 
fascinated by sheer size. But when you’re 
selecting a monitor, bigness is more than 
a matter of aesthetics—it actually adds 
utility to the system. 

Dedicated CAD workstations usually 
include large displays, but the benefits of 
a big monitor go beyond CAD. Enlarging 
the display size enhances virtually every 
graphical application, from desktop pub¬ 
lishing to the myriad software products 
designed for windowing environments. 

Extra screen size translates to an addi¬ 
tional level of magnification. For CAD, 
more display space allows the designer to 
see fine detail and, at the same time, 
gauge the relationship of individual com¬ 
ponents to the overall drawing. Desktop 
publishing page displays attain true 
WYSIWYG only if the screen is large 
enough to accommodate an entire page 
layout. 

If s also true that graphical user inter¬ 
faces (e.g., Macintosh, Windows, Pre¬ 
sentation Manager, and DESQview) are 
made more efficient with larger desk¬ 
tops. The trend toward graphical inter¬ 
faces for general applications makes 
investing in a large-screen monitor an at¬ 
tractive proposal. 

We looked at 10 monitors that are rep¬ 


Upscale Monitors 


resentative of the types of large-screen 
color displays available (see table 1). 
Pricing and features vary, but all the 
units have 19- or 20-inch screens. They 
vary in resolution from an EGA-compat¬ 
ible 640- by 480-pixel display to a 1280- 
by 1024-pixel display. While our pri¬ 
mary focus was on the 10 color monitors, 
Rick Grehan also evaluated two popular 
monochrome models that are commonly 
used for desktop publishing (see the text 
box “The Monochrome Option” on page 
170). 

We divided our tests into two catego¬ 
ries; low-level objective tests using in¬ 
dustry-standard test equipment, and sub¬ 
jective evaluations. For the low-level 
tests, we used a Microvision analyzer to 
determine common performance mea¬ 
surements, such as spot size and mis- 
convergence. 

To test compatibility and to get a feel 
for how the monitors work in real-world 
situations, we ran subjective tests using 
graphics adapters appropriate for each 
monitor. Our pool of graphics boards in¬ 
cluded a Paradise EGA card, an IBM 
VGA controller, an NEC MultiSync 
board, and a Control Systems Artist 12 
card. Test software was made up of Auto¬ 
CAD Release 10 and a palette-shifting 
display program developed by the BYTE 
Lab. Photos of each monitor’s display of 
text are provided on page 168. 

Setting the Background 

Color monitors operate by activating red, 
green, and blue phosphor dots arranged 
in combinations on the inside face of the 
CRT. Each dot can be turned on by any 
of three electron guns that generate the 
three primary colors. The two monitor 
components that contribute to perfor¬ 
mance are the electron beam drive cir¬ 
cuitry and the glass bottle, with its phos¬ 
phorescent dots, that makes up the CRT 
itself. 

Fabricating a bottle with uniform 
phosphor distribution over an area as 
large as 19 inches is a difficult process 


that adds significantly to the high cost of 
large-screen displays. The bottle’s con¬ 
tribution to the monitor’s appearance, 
however, is limited to determining the 
fineness of the dot spacing and the curva¬ 
ture of the screen. The distance separat¬ 
ing each dot in an RGB trio is called the 
monitor’s dot pitch. While dot pitch rep¬ 
resents an absolute resolution limit, ob¬ 
tainable resolution is more dependent on 
the driver circuitry than it is on the pitch 
of the monitor. 

The monitor’s internal circuitry con¬ 
verts input signals front the graphics 
controller into electron gun drive sig¬ 
nals. The guns scan across the face of the 
CRT at a rate determined by the horizon¬ 
tal scan frequency. As the beams scan 
each line, the guns switch on and off to 
light individual pixel groups. The fre¬ 
quency with which the guns can be 
switched is determined by the video 
bandwidth specification. The scan con¬ 
tinues line by line, top to bottom; a moni¬ 
tor’s vertical frequency measures the 
time required to retrace all the lines that 
make up a screen. 

Bandwidth and horizontal frequency 
together determine a monitor’s resolu¬ 
tion. The total number of dots that a 
monitor can display is determined by the 
bandwidth (number of dots per second) 
divided by the vertical frequency (1/sec¬ 
onds per screen). Since the vertical fre¬ 
quency must be at least 50 Hz to avoid 
flicker, high resolution depends on high 
bandwidth. 

The greater the horizontal frequency, 
the more lines that can be retraced in a 
given vertical scan interval. Higher hori¬ 
zontal frequency therefore translates to 
greater vertical resolution. Higher verti¬ 
cal scan rates let displays react more 
quickly and are thus better suited for ap¬ 
plications involving animation, 

A technique known as interlacing lets 
the monitor trade reaction time for 
greater vertical resolution. Interlacing 
involves scanning only every other scan 
line with each vertical pass. An inter- 


162 BYTE* MARCH 1989 






laced monitor has increased vertical res¬ 
olution, but the two passes required for 
each screen refresh make reaction time 
longer, and some flicker may become 
noticeable. 

Video standards like EGA and VGA 
include specifications for bandwidth and 
horizontal frequencies, so these ratings 
play an important part in determining a 
monitor’s compatibility with a given 
standard (see table 2). Multiscan moni¬ 
tors—those with variable horizontal fre¬ 
quencies—automatically synchronize 
with adapter outputs that are within their 
range. Monitors that are capable of great¬ 
er than 640- by 480-pixel resolution re¬ 
quire nonstandard graphics cards to 
drive them beyond the realm of VGA. 
Nonstandard adapters will not run all 
graphics applications at high resolution; 
vendors must include drivers for each 
software product. 

Monitor inputs can be TTL, analog, or 
both. Graphics adapters that can display 
many different colors (VGA and higher) 
or that have very high bandwidths are 
commonly analog; adapters with capa¬ 
bilities equal to or below EGA usually 
require TTL monitors. 

User controls, once limited to contrast 
and brightness, now often include so¬ 
phisticated adjustments for display posi¬ 
tion and alignment. Many monitors also 
feature a degaussing button to eliminate 
stray magnetic fields that can cause 
interference. 

Behind the Screens 

Our Microvision Superspot 100 system 
performs a variety of objective tests on 
CRTs, returning hard data on key speci¬ 
fications like spot size, misconvergence, 
time variance, blooming, and voltage 
regulation. Each parameter measures the 
accuracy and consistency of the moni¬ 
tor’s display: Spot size determines 
screen resolution, while the other mea¬ 
surements reflect the severity of image 
errors introduced by the monitor. 

continued 



A11/Center/Dynam ic/Extents/Left/Preu i 
First corner: Other corner: 

Connand: 












Table 1: A roundup of large-screen color monitors shows a wide range of features and prices. 


Chugai Cadvision CPD-2040 
Colorgraphic Communications EG2040 
Electrohome ECM 1911 
Hewlett-Packard D1187A 
Intecolor MegaTrend/2 E01923 
Microvitec Definition 1019/SP 
Mitsubishi HA3905K 
Mitsubishi HL6905TK 
Nanao FlexScan Model 9500 

NEC MultiSync XL 


Price 

Size 

Display area 
(H x V) 

$3495 

19" 

14.2" x 10.3" 

$2200 

19" 

13" x 10" 

$2995 

19" 

15" x 11.5" 

i 

20" 

14.2" x 10.8" 

$2395 

20" 

13.75" x 10.3T 

$2395 

19" 

15.3" x 11.2" 

$2720 

20" 

13.8" x 10.4" 

$3650 

20" 

13.8" x 10.6" 

$3999 

20" 

14.2" x 10.6" 

$3195 

19" 

13.8" x 10.2" 


Maximum Horizontal Bandwidth 
resolution dot pitch 


1280 x 1024 

0.31 mm 

120 MHz 

640 x 480 

0.31 mm 

65 MHz 

1230 x 960 

0.31 mm 

35 MHz 

1280 x 1024 

0.31 mm 

100 MHz 

640 x 480 

0.31 mm 

45 MHz 

800 x 600 

0.31 mm 

40 MHz 

1024 x 800 

0.31 mm 

50 MHz 

1280 x 1024 

0.31 mm 

100 MHz 

1280 x 1024 

0.31 mm 

120 MHz 

1024 x 768 

0.31 mm 

65 MHz 


1 Evaluation unit is a production prototype, pnce not available at press time 
N/A = Information not available from manufacturer 


The Superspot 100 employs a linear 
photodiode array composed of 512 pho¬ 
tosensitive scan elements. Housed within 
an optic module, the array derives a pro¬ 
file of an external light source by sam¬ 
pling the response from each photodiode 
element over a specified time interval. 
This grants us a glimpse of the monitor’s 
true performance that goes beyond sub¬ 
jective evaluations and vendor-provided 
specifications. Unfortunately, we were 


unable to test the Chugai Cadvision 
monitor because our pattern generator 
was incompatible with the Cadvision’s 
requirements. 

Before setting up our tests, we had to 
take into consideration the intensity 
range of each monitor, so as not to penal¬ 
ize monitors with a wide range (see fig¬ 
ure 1). Intensity, most often measured in 
footlamberts, or ft-L (a common unit of 
luminance), reflects the actual screen 


brightness. Although we have adjusted 
those tests that are affected directly by 
intensity range, you should still keep fig¬ 
ure 1 in mind as you evaluate the results 
of these tests. 

A wide intensity range offers greater 
control and flexibility. The Intecolor 
MegaTrend/2 sports an impressive inten¬ 
sity range from 10 ft-L to 30 ft-L; the 
Electrohome ECM 1911, on the other 
hand, ranges from approximately 6 ft-L 




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164 B YTE • MARCH 1989 















Scan frequency 

Vertical 
scan frequency 

Interlaced 

Video 

input 

Connectors 

Dimensions 

(inches) 

Weight 

(lbs.) 

58-70 kHz 

60 Hz 

No 

Analog 

BNC 

20 x 20 x 20 

68.2 

20.0-32.0 kHz 

40-100 Hz 

No 

TTL 

9-pin d-sub 

17 x 18 x 19.5 

66 

15-36 kHz 

45-86 Hz 

Yes 

Analog. TTL 

9-pin d-sub 

17.2 x 19 x 20.8 

72.8 

30-64 kHz 

50-90 Hz 

No 

Analog 

BNC 

17.7 x 19.6 x 21.0 

69.7 

31.5 kHz 

N/A 

No 

Analog 

15-pin d-sub 

18.6x18.9x20.5 

62 

15-36.5 kHz 

45-100 Hz 

No 

Analog, TTL 

9-pin d-sub 

17.6 x 18.5 x 19.4 

59 

15.7-35.5 kHz 

45-80 Hz 

No 

Analog, TTL 

BNC, 15-pin d-sub 17.7 x 19.6 x 21.0 

66 

30-64 kHz 

50-90 Hz 

No 

Analog 

BNC 

17.7 x 19.6 x 21.0 

64 

31.5 kHz, 48-50 kHz, 

55-75 Hz 

No 

Analog 

BNC 

18.5 x 19.5 x 22.1 

83.6 

64-78 kHz 







21.8-50 kHz 

56-80 Hz 

No 

Analog, TTL 

BNC, 9-pin d-sub 

18.8 x 18.9 x 21.5 

59.4 


to 8 ft-L. For misconvergence, time vari¬ 
ance, and voltage regulation tests, we set 
the monitors to a medium intensity level 
of 11 ft-L, except for the ECM 1911, 
which could reach an intensity of only 
8 ft-L. 

The Superspot 100 measures both 
horizontal and vertical widths of a scan 
line. By deriving the vector sum of these 
two measurements, you can determine 

continued 


Table 2: A summary of video standards; compatible monitors must conform to 
these specifications. 


Graphics 

adapter 

Maximum 

resolution 

Video 

bandwidth 

Horizontal 
scan rate 

Vertical 
scan rate 

Total 

colors 

CGA 

640 x 200 

14.3 MHz 

15.8 kHz 

60 Hz 

16 

EGA 

640 x 350 

16.3 MHz 

21.9 kHz 

60 Hz 

64 

VGA 

640 X 480 

25.2 MHz 

31.5 kHz 

60 Hz 

256k 


ibout customer satisfaction. 







I'd also like information on your fax machines. 


MH389 


_l 


HARRIS/3M 


Offer is valid for a limited time and other restrictions and limitations apply; see your Harris/3M 
sates representative for details. ©1988 Harris/3M Document Products, Inc. Harris is a trademark 
of the Harris Corporation. 3M is a trademark of the 3M Company. 


“1 

Yes, I’d like to know more about Harris/3M copiers 
and the Harris/3M Copier Promise. 

Send to Harris/3M, P.0. Box 785, Dayton, OH 45401 

NAME_ 

COMPANY NAME_ 


Circle 119 on Reader Service Card 


MARCH 1989 • BYTE 165 




















PRODUCT FOCUS 
LARGE-SCREEN MONITORS 


the diameter of a single spot. This repre¬ 
sents the beam’s spot size. While the dot- 
pitch specification sets the resolution 
limit, the spot size gives a more practical 
measure of the monitor’s fineness. We 
measured the spot size at center screen 
(see figure 2). 

We also took readings at four different 
brightness levels, representing the full 
intensity range of each monitor. We did 
not adjust these results for brightness 
level because the absolute spot size is im¬ 
portant for many applications. There¬ 
fore, you should use the graph in con¬ 


junction with figure 1. For example, the 
MegaTrend/2 and the NEC MultiSync 
XL have similar spot sizes at low inten¬ 
sity, but the MegaTrend/2 achieves this 
result at more than double the intensity. 
Each bar in the graph represents the cu¬ 
mulative result of spot sizes at all four 
brightness levels. For all the graphs (ex¬ 
cept figure 1), a smaller bar indicates 
better performance. 

In a perfectly designed monitor, spot 
size will remain constant from the center 
of the screen (best case) to the corner of 
the screen (worst case). Figure 3 charts 


the change in spot size from center to 
corner. The Nanao FlexScan Model 
9500 registered the smallest amount of 
change. The Mitsubishi monitors re¬ 
turned contrasting results: the Diamond 
Scan HL6905TK varied little, while the 
HA3905K fluctuated widely at each 
brightness level. 

As intensity increases, the spot size 
tends to enlarge, adversely affecting the 
monitor’s resolution. Figure 4 tracks the 
extent of this blooming. We adjusted the 
results so that the data reflects the actual 
bloom and not the monitor’s intensity 


Figure 1: A map of the intensity range for each monitor. 

The Intecolor MegaTrend/2 sports an impressive range of 20 
footlamberts. 

Figure 2: Beam spot size at center screen. The stacked bars 
are cumulative results for four different brightness levels. 

Figure 3: This test tracked the change in spot size from center 
screen to the corner. Ideally, spot size should remain constant. 

Figure 4: A graphical illustration of how much a spot will 
enlarge, or "bloom, ” as intensity increases. Results were 
adjusted for intensity range. 

Figure 5: Each bar in the stack represents time variances at 
different frequencies—high-frequency jitter, moderate- 
frequency swim, and low-frequency drift. Low values are 
desirable. 

Figure 6: These results show how well the red, blue, and green 
electron beams are aligned. The lower the error, the better. 

Figure 7: We examined change induced by energy variances 
la reflection on the quality of voltage regulation) at the top and 
at the side of the screen. The stacked bars show cumulative 
results. Monitors with the shortest bars fared the best. 


Intensity 



I 


£ 

o> 

cu 

| 

1 

c 

w 

c 

D 


4 


2 


1 


0 


Blooming 



□ Center 

□ Corner 


H H n H 


/ 


/ 


<t® 


/ 


J? 


*7 


jr /xjr 


i 


Time variance 



166 B YTE • MARCH 1989 



























































PRODUCT FOCUS 


LARGE-SCREEN MONITORS 


range. The FlexScan and the Mitsubishi 
HA3905K bloomed little; the Color- 
graphic Communications EG2040 suf¬ 
fered from excessive blooming. 

The three types of time variations— 
high-frequency jitter, moderate-fre¬ 
quency swim, and low-frequency drift- 
can all be annoying and can contribute to 
eyestrain. The Superspot 100 measures 
time variance by sampling the shift of 
the beam position at three different fre¬ 
quency intervals (see figure 5). Measur¬ 
ing jitter involves sampling the beam’s 
position every half second; similar sam¬ 


ples are taken at 10-second intervals for 
swim and every 60 seconds for drift. 

Four different tests registered time- 
dependent horizontal variance at center 
screen, horizontal variance at the corner, 
vertical variance at center screen, and 
vertical variance at the corner. Each bar 
in the stack represents an average of the 
four figures. Microvitec’s Definition 
1019/SP performed poorly on all three 
variance measurements, while, once 
again, the FlexScan scored well. 

Misconvergence defines the alignment 
error of the red, blue, and green electron 


guns. Displays with high misconver¬ 
gence can display color inaccurately. We 
tested both horizontal and vertical mis¬ 
convergence (see figure 6). The tests 
track red-to-green, blue-to-green, and 
red-to-blue error; these three values are 
averaged to determine overall horizontal 
or vertical error. The best monitors will 
return results close to the zero line, re¬ 
flecting low error and precise alignment. 

Both Mitsubishi monitors displayed 
low error on the horizontal misconver¬ 
gence tests, along with the Hewlett-Pack- 

continued 


Spot size (center) 



Spot size change 



Average misconvergence 



Voltage regulation 



MARCH 1989 • BYTE 167 












































































































PRODUCT FOCUS 


LARGE-SCREEN MONITORS 


swimm 1 ng 
SWIMMING 
6 wimming 


Chugai Cadvision CPD-2040 


summing 
SUMMING 
su inning 


Electrohome ECM 1911 


suinnmg 

SUMMING 


symmiYig 

SWIMMING 


summing 


swimming 

SWIMMING 

swimming 


Colorgraphic Communications EG2040 Cornerstone Technology DualPage 


summing 

SWIMMING 


Elite Designview 19 


swimming 

SWIMMING 


Intecolor MegaTrend/2 


summing 
SUMMING 
suinning 


Mitsubishi HA3905K 


Microvitec Definition 1019/SP 


summing 
UINHING 
wimmina 


Nanao FlexScan Model 9500 


summing 

SWIMMING 


su inning I suinniiii 


Hewlett-Packard D1187A 


s w i mmin g 
SWIMMING 


SU i inn i ng I swimming I swimmin g 


Mitsubishi HL6905TK 


summing 

cii jyy i y r 

JL § Is S ^ 5 S'HJt. 


sy i Pifi i iw 


NEC MultiSync XL 


Photo 1: Sample text displays for each monitor. Varying levels of contrast , clarity , and resolution (in the relative density 
of each character) are evident. Monitors shown with other than standard IBM characters do not support standard 
graphics adapters. 


168 BYTE* MARCH 1989 




























PRODUCT FOCUS 


LARGE-SCREEN MONITORS 


ard D1187A and the Electrohome ECM 
1911. The latter two also scored well on 
the vertical misconvergence tests. Keep 
in mind, however, that we tested the 
ECM 1911 at a lower intensity level. 

Another factor that can contribute to a 
lack of consistency is poor voltage regu¬ 
lation. A good monitor should keep the 
beam in the same position at both low 
energy levels (with most of the screen 
dark) and high energy levels (mostly 
bright). To measure the quality of a 
unit's voltage regulation (see figure 7), 
we marked the position of a horizontal 
line at the top of a black screen and mea¬ 
sured the change in position of that line 
when all bits were turned on. We then 
tracked the movement of a vertical line at 
the side of the screen in the same way. 
The FlexScan and the DI187A displayed 
the best voltage regulation. The FlexScan 
and the HL69Q5TK had perfect voltage 
regulation at the side of the screen. 

The Big Picture 

The results of our subjective evaluations 
are described below. For each monitor, 
we tested compatibility with the graphics 
boards described earlier. We also evalu¬ 
ated overall display quality (see photo 1) 
and examined the color output using a 
VGA and EGA palette-display program, 
where applicable. 

Chugai Cadvision CPD-2040: The 
Cadvision sits in a class by itself—it’s the 
only large-screen monitor we reviewed 
that doesn't maintain compatibility with 
any PC graphics standard (see photo 2). 
This monitor, which is available for 
$3495, requires a high-resolution board 
like the Control Systems Artist 12, and 
so it could not be run through our 
EGA/VGA test equipment. 

The display is best suited for CAD or 
other detailed work, and not for use as a 
primary monitor. Its most common use is 
as the second monitor in a two-monitor 
command/display system. The Cadvision 
does, however, show some flicker when 
it*s placed close to another monitor; we 
tested it alongside a Compaq VGA dis¬ 
play and found disturbances when the 
tubes were less than 2 feet apart. 

Though we couldn't do objective test¬ 
ing, the Cadvision's display is clear and 
sharp. There were no problems with 
bright spots near the edges of the screen 
and no noticeable misconvergence. Setup 
is simple, with a front-panel power 
switch and four rear-panel BNC connec¬ 
tors for video input. The monitor rests 
easily on the standard tilt/swivel stand. 

If you require 1280-by 1024-pixel res¬ 
olution but don’t need compatibility with 
standard cards, the Cadvision may be an 


option worth considering. 

Colorgraphic Communications 
EG2040: At the low end in both resolu¬ 
tion and price, the EG204G offers large- 
screen EGA performance for a relatively 
modest $2200. While the maximum res¬ 
olution, 640 by 480, is high enough for 
VGA, the monitor supports TTL inputs 
only. 

The rear panel features two 9-pin d- 
sub connectors, one for TTL in and one 
for TTL out, so you can daisy chain simi¬ 
lar monitors. There's a rear-panel de¬ 
gaussing button. The 2-foot-long cable 
supplied with the EG2040 is much too 
short, but it's a standard EGA cable, and 
replacements are easy to come by. 

The display itself had a few problems 
when we tested it with the Paradise EGA 
card: noticeable overscan lines near the 
top and left side, and visible horizontal 
bars across the screen. Color contrast 
was quite good, lessening the washed-out 
look of most large-screen monitors. 

Electrohome ECM 1911: Although 
most monitors with the kind of resolution 
specifications the ECM 1911 sports 


(1230 by 960) have horizontal scan rates 
in the 60-kHz range, this interlaced 
monitor has scan frequencies compatible 
with all IBM video standards (15 kHz to 
36 kHz), and it worked flawlessly when 
connected to the IBM VGA controller. 

The tinted CRT surface mutes reflec¬ 
tions but contributes to lower contrast 
and decreased brightness. We noted 
white overscan lines near the edges of the 
screen, but a rear-panel overscan switch 
can increase the display size and push the 
lines out of view. 

Our monitor came with no manual, 
which made determining the function of 
the unusual rear-panel switches diffi¬ 
cult, There is an auto-position switch and 
four screw knobs for each vertical and 
horizontal size and position. Master po¬ 
sitioning knobs override the position of 
the other screw knobs. 

The $2995 ECM 1911 handles both 
TTL and analog inputs through separate 
rear-panel connectors. 

Hewlett-Packard D1187A: We evalu¬ 
ated a production prototype D1187A, as 

continued 



Photo 2: The Chugai Cadvision offered good resolution but was not multi syncing. 
It's best suited for CAD applications. 


MARCH 1989 - BYTE 169 






















PRODUCT FOCUS 
LARGE-SCREEN MONITORS 


The Monochrome Option 

Rick Grehan 



Photo A: The Cornerstone Technology DualPage was the 
better of the monochrome units. 


H igh-resolution mono¬ 
chrome monitors are 
currently the darlings of 
desktop publishers. These 
users need the elbowroom to 
work with full pages of text 
on-screen, but they can’t al¬ 
ways justify the cost of 
high-resolution color dis¬ 
plays. Although these dis¬ 
plays are also suitable for 
some CAD operations, it’s 
often difficult to represent 
different elevations or an 
object’s components using 
black and white only. Con¬ 
sequently, these displays are 
aimed primarily at people 
involved in the publishing 
industry. 

DualPage 

The Cornerstone Technol¬ 
ogy DualPage derives its 
name from its ability to 
display two full pages of text 
on a vast 19-inch diagonal 
screen (see photo A). Al¬ 
though it’s a monochrome 
display system, you can purchase the 
DualPage’s controller board outfitted 
with additional memory in increments 
to provide two, four, or 16 levels of 
gray. Its ability to display gray scales is 
combined with a maximum resolution of 
1600 by 1280 pixels. 

You can install the DualPage’s cus¬ 
tom controller board in either an IBM 
PC XT or AT (or compatible) as either 
the primary or secondary display. The 
DualPage will be content to coexist with 
a Monochrome Display Adapter (MDA) 
or Hercules adapter already in your ma¬ 
chine (a table in the manual shows 
jumper and switch settings, as well as 
the addresses to the DualPage’s display 
memory maps). 

On boot-up, the DualPage appears to 
the system as a Hercules color graphics 
adapter. DualPage comes with a packet 
of disks that include programs that let 
you switch between 40-row and 80-row 
DOS display formats. Both modes pro¬ 
vide 96 columns, resulting in a “flat¬ 
tened” look in the 80-row mode. The 
remainder of the programs on the disks 
are drivers for applications like Ventura 


Publisher, AutoCAD, Lotus 1-2-3, and 
others. 

While installing the drivers for Lotus 
1-2-3, I uncovered the only real prob¬ 
lems I had with the DualPage, and most 
of these had to do with the manual. 
First, when I tried to adjust the bright¬ 
ness, I found only a single knobless 
plastic stem in the back of the monitor. I 
consulted the manual’s index, which re¬ 
ferred me to page 3-9. There was no 
page 3-9. When 1 determined that the 
adjustment on the back was indeed for 
brightness, I discovered that the Dual- 
Page is so big (it measures 15^ inches 
high by 18 inches wide by 16^ inches 
deep) that I couldn’t adjust the bright¬ 
ness and watch the screen. 

Then I found—by trial and error— 
that the manual had left out a critical 
step in installing the Lotus 1-2-3 graph¬ 
ics drivers. This was easy to fix, and the 
results were worth it: a whopping 75 
rows by 96 columns of spreadsheet. 

I tested the DualPage using BYTE’s 
low-level graphics benchmarks. The 
display was running in Hercules-emula- 
tion mode, and it turned in a perfor¬ 


mance of about 5.2 seconds 
on the text benchmark and 
1.6 seconds on the graphics 
benchmark. 

The DualPage includes a 
monitor, an adapter, and 
driver software. It also in¬ 
cludes a one-year limited 
warranty. The adapter will 
run in the IBM XT, AT, 
PS/2 Model 30, and com¬ 
patibles. The unit is avail¬ 
able in three configurations: 
black and white ($2395), 
with four levels of gray 
($2550), and with 16 levels 
of gray ($2995). 

Elite Designview 19 

Elite’s Designview is a hefty 
19-inch monitor that touts it¬ 
self as a WYSIWYG display 
with 1280 by 1024 resolu¬ 
tion, 96 dots per inch, and a 
1 -to-1 aspect ratio. This 
makes it particularly well- 
suited to desktop publish¬ 
ing-circles on-screen will 
show up as circles on your 

newsletter. 

The Designview comes with its own 
controller board and—on boot-up—em¬ 
ulates either an MDA or a CGA moni¬ 
tor. Unlike the DualPage system, whose 
controller is built on custom hardware 
from the ground up, the Designview’s 
controller is based on the Intel 82786 
graphics coprocessor (see “Inside the 
82786 Graphics Chip” by Bill Nicholls, 
August 1987 BYTE). On-board, the De¬ 
signview adapter carries its own 512K 
bytes of video memory. 

The Designview’s 38-page manual 
leads you through the procedure of in¬ 
stalling drivers for your favorite appli¬ 
cation. On the supplied disks, you’ll 
find drivers for AutoCAD, PageMaker, 
Gem, Lotus 1-2-3, and many other ap¬ 
plications. As an added bonus, the De¬ 
signview’s engineers sneaked a Micro¬ 
soft InPort device connector onto the 
controller board. This means you can 
attach a mouse to the controller. In an 
era when the mouse is becoming indige¬ 
nous to the computer desk, it’s nice to 
see someone tying it so closely to the 
display system. 


170 BYTE* MARCH 1989 














PRODUCT FOCUS 


LARGE-SCREEN MONITORS 


The Designview turned in poor fig¬ 
ures on the low-level text benchmarks, 
but it produced more acceptable times 
on the graphics benchmarks. Specifi¬ 
cally, for the 40-column text bench¬ 
mark, the Designview averaged 40.4 
seconds; for the 80-column text, it 
turned in an average time of 48.1 sec¬ 
onds; and for the graphics benchmark 
(modes 4, 5, and 6) the Designview’s 
times averaged out to 1.7 seconds. 

I don’t find the poor text benchmark 
times bothersome, however. I can’t 
imagine anyone purchasing a large 
display, only to run it under DOS in 
CGA text-emulation modes. This dis¬ 
play is in its element when working with 
large-area graphics applications, and 
the graphics benchmarks look quite rea¬ 
sonable. Still, if you do decide to use 
your own word processor with the De¬ 
signview, you’d have to be a mole not to 
be able to read the display’s large, 16- 
by 32-pixel text. 

The cursor-positioning portion of the 
text benchmarks showed up a quirk in 
the Designview’s controller. While the 
cursor was being positioned rapid-fire 
all over the screen, the display tended to 
jump and flicker. I contacted the engi¬ 
neers at Elite, who attributed the prob¬ 
lem to an interaction between the tech¬ 
nique used to refresh the screen and the 
controller’s 8-bit bus width. Elite’s en¬ 
gineers stated that the screen flicker oc- 
cured in only a limited number of appli¬ 
cations (indeed, I observed the flicker 
only during the text benchmark) and 
that when the 16-bit bus version of the 
board was released, the effect would 
disappear. 

At $1695, the Designview includes 
all hardware and software: monitor, 
board, cabling, and disks with drivers— 
plus a three-year parts and labor war¬ 
ranty. The board is compatible with the 
IBM XT, AT, and clones. (The docu¬ 
mentation mentions no specific DOS 
dependency—this probably depends 
more on the application programs than 
on their drivers.) At press time, Elite 
said that a 16-bit version of the board 
should be available for the same price by 
the time this article reaches print. Elite 
plans to offer an upgrade to owners of 8- 
bit boards: For $150, you can send the 
company your 8-bit board, and Elite 
will swap it for a 16-bit board. 


Rick Grehan is director of the BYTE 
Lab. He can be reached on BIX as 
,4 rick_g. ” 


Hewlett-Packard was still preparing an 
initial production run when this article 
went to press. The company assured us 
that the model we reviewed would be 
identical to the production model, which 
is scheduled for release early this spring. 
Price had not yet been determined for the 
unit. 

At first glance, the D1187A seems to 
be akin to Mitsubishi’s large-screen 
HL6905TK, with the same cabinet de¬ 
sign and similar specifications. Like the 
HL6905TK, this monitor has a wide 
range of horizontal frequencies that 
made it compatible with all the analog 
graphics cards we tried. Input connec¬ 
tions are via five BNC connectors, for 
red, green, blue, and separate or com¬ 
posite syncs. 

Position and size adjustments are 
made through controls located behind a 
panel cover on the right side of the moni¬ 
tor. There are two multiple-selection 
switches: one for channel selection and 
one for parameter selection. Each chan¬ 
nel represents a different input fre¬ 
quency. Screen parameters like horizon¬ 
tal and vertical position can be adjusted 
and saved for each channel, so switching 
between graphics adapters requires only 
one initial adjustment. 

There are 10 channels. You can set 
seven of these for any valid input fre¬ 
quency; two are reserved and preset with 
appropriate VGA and Macintosh II set¬ 
tings. Channel 0, the “auto” channel, ac¬ 
cepts up to 11 settings separated by at least 
3 kHz; it automatically locks itself to the 
input frequency and uses the correct pre¬ 
sets. Channel 0 comes with three common 
frequencies preset from the factory. 

The picture display itself is bright, and 
the screen shows virtually no reflec¬ 
tions. The monitor exhibited no notice¬ 
able jitter when we ran it close to the 
Compaq 13-inch tube. 

Intecolor MegaTrend/2 E01923: The 
Megatrend/2, like the Cadvision, is a sin¬ 
gle-input-frequency monitor. Its 31.5- 
kHz horizontal scan rate and 640 by 480 
resolution make it best-suited for VGA 
and Mac II operation. It sells for $2395. 

The monitor has an excellent ergo¬ 
nomic design, with a small-footprint tilt- 
and-swivel stand coupled with front- 
panel power and degaussing switches. 
The antiglare screen reduces reflections 
to some extent. 

We ran the MegaTrend/2 from an IBM 
PS/2 VGA board. As with many of the 
units we tested, it showed some overscan 
brightness near the perimeter of the 
screen. It also displayed some irregular¬ 
ity in color: There were two faint red ver¬ 
tical lines on one side of the screen that 


remained even after degaussing. 

Microvitec Definition 1019/SP: Mi- 
crovitec’s large-screen monitor features 
compatibility with all IBM graphics 
standards and sells for $2395. Resolution 
goes to 800 by 600 pixels; the display is 
noninterlaced. 

The unit has separate 9-pin d-sub con¬ 
nectors for TTL and analog inputs, lo¬ 
cated at the back of the monitor. There is 
also a switch for manually selecting the 
number of colors in TTL mode, or for 
setting the monitor to automatically fol¬ 
low the colors generated by the graphics 
controller. Unfortunately, the power 
switch is also on the rear panel—hard to 
reach behind the 19.4-inch-deep unit. 
Front-panel switches enable input selec¬ 
tion (TTL/analog), position and size ad¬ 
justment, and the usual brightness and 
contrast control. 

We tested the display with IBM’s VGA 
controller. While the 1019/SP delivered 
excellent color quality, crisp contrast, 
and good brightness levels, it also had a 
few problems. The most important of 
these was the tendency for the image to 
bow at each side, making for curved 
lines and noticeable misconvergence in 
the corners. There were also some over¬ 
scan lines on the screen, as was the case 
with many of the monitors. 

Mitsubishi HA3905K: The HA3905K 
provides compatibility with all the IBM 
graphics standards and offers 1024 by 
800 resolution. The $2720 unit scans 
from CGA frequencies to just beyond 
VGA, and it also supports the Mac II and 
Apple IIGS boards. It proved compatible 
with the IBM VGA board. 

The rear of the monitor has five BNC 
connectors and a 15-pin d-sub connector 
socket. You can choose TTL or analog 
inputs. While in TTL mode, you can set 
text-only mode with white, green, or am¬ 
ber text, or graphics mode with 8, 16, or 
64 colors. The selection switches are 
poorly labeled and arranged in a diagram 
that’s not related to their function. 

But the difficult configuration is only 
one of the unit’s problems. The screen 
shows uneven brightness patterns, result¬ 
ing in a splotchy look at low light levels, 
and some overscan lines are noticeable. 

Mitsubishi Diamond Scan HL6905TK: 
Virtually identical to the Hewlett-Pack¬ 
ard D1187A in external design, the 
HL6905TK features 1280 by 1024 reso¬ 
lution and 30- to 64-kHz scanning for 
$3650. 

The HL6905TK monitor has the same 
channel setup as the Dll87A. You can 
set viewing parameters for seven chan¬ 
nels, and the monitor also has preset 

continued 


MARCH 1989 • BYTE 171 










PRODUCT FOCUS 


LARGE-SCREEN MONITORS 


channels for Mac II and VGA operation. 
Its broad scan-frequency range made it 
compatible with all the analog graphics 
controllers we used in our tests. 

The HL6905TK has a clear screen that 
provides excellent brightness but gener¬ 
ated sharp reflections and was hard to 
use in bright light. Unlike the D1187A, it 
has an additional switch for selecting in¬ 
ternal (sync on green) or external sync 
signals. 

While the display showed excellent 
contrast and was generally a good per¬ 
former, we noticed some nonuniform 
horizontal lines that round toward the 
edges of the display. The disturbance was 
visible only at low light levels, however. 

Nanao FlexScan Model 9500: The 
FlexScan’s wide-ranging input frequen¬ 
cies and top-of-the-line 1280 by 1024 
resolution make it suitable for almost any 
PC application. Handy front-panel con¬ 
trols and a tilt-and-swivel base contribute 
to a simple setup and make adjustments 
easy (see photo 3). But premium perfor¬ 
mance carries a premium price—the 
FlexScan sells for $3999. 


P 

hoosing 

the right monitor 
depends heavily on 
your application. 


Input frequencies range from 31.5 
kHz to 78 kHz, with a few gaps between 
the three multiscanning channels. There 
are no channel presets, as with the 
HL6905TK and the D1187A, but front- 
panel knobs for position and size provide 
quick picture adjustments. The front 
panel also includes degaussing and 
power switches. For fine-tuning, there 
are signal attenuation and convergence 
adjustment knobs on the back. Input is 
through five BNC connectors; there are 
also corresponding output BNC jacks for 
the red, green, and blue analog signals. 


The antireflection CRT produced al¬ 
most no glare, even in bright light. Con¬ 
trast was excellent—almost as good as 
the 13-inch Compaq monitor we used for 
comparison. While the monitor worked 
fine with all our analog controllers, it 
showed one compatibility problem when 
using AutoCAD and the Artist 12 board: 
The display had a high background green 
level, giving the picture a strong green 
tint. Disconnecting the external sync in¬ 
put fixed the problem. The problem 
didn’t show up with any other combina¬ 
tion of application and adapter that we 
tried. 

NEC MultiSync XL: As the extra-large 
version of the original multiscanning 
monitor, NEC’s $3195 MultiSync XL 
comes from a line with an outstanding 
reputation. This unit deserves the praise: 
It’s easy to configure and easy to use. 
Also, it provides excellent color contrast. 

There are two types of input connec¬ 
tor, BNC and d-sub. The 9-pin d-sub 
socket limits the bandwidth to 65 MHz. 
but it can be used for TTL or analog in¬ 
puts. When in TTL mode, you can select 
monochrome text or color graphics and 
set the colors, much as you can on the 
HL6905TK. Positioning switches are 
hidden behind a panel on the front of the 
monitor, and a degaussing button is posi¬ 
tioned underneath the unit. The package 
includes a tilt/swivel base. 

Colors are on par with the 13-inch 
Compaq VGA. Contrast is also better 
than average: It gives the MultiSync XL 
less of a washed-out image than most of 
the other large-screen devices. The mon¬ 
itor works with EGA, VGA, and NEC 
MultiSync adapters. The one problem we 
had came when we used the MultiSync 
XL close to the Compaq monitor—the 
MultiSync XL’s screen showed unac¬ 
ceptable flicker when the displays were 
less than 2 feet apart. 

The Best of the Biggest 

Choosing the right large-screen monitor 
depends heavily on your application. For 
pure desktop publishing work, the mono¬ 
chrome monitors deliver impressive res¬ 
olution and full-page displays for less 
money. For dedicated CAD work, the 
Chugai Cadvision CPD-2040 offers 
some impressive specifications. The 
NEC MultiSync XL still sets the stan¬ 
dard for flexibility and ease of use. 
Three of these monitors, though, stand 
out on both our subjective and objective 
tests: the Hewlett-Packard D1187A, the 
Mitsubishi Diamond Scan HL6905TK, 
and the Nanao FlexScan Model 9500. 

The HL6905TK offers 1280 by 1024 

continued 



ill BYTE* MARCH 1989 





















MAXXICAD 





• Model mode (3D) or picture mode (2D) 
selectable at any time 

• Optional “pop-up*' icon or text command 
structure 

• A dynamic on screen example available for 
each of 200 + commands 

• Displays up to 14 active views 
simultaneously 

• Dynamic rotation and translation of views 

• Modification of entities 

• Complex surfaces 

• Dimensioning and tolerancing includes 18 
options 

• Multiple utility commands available during 
sessions 

• Efficient file storage, security, back-up and 
recovery 

• Three levels of documentation 

• 24 hour telephone availability 


"Maxxicadd stands as one of the most 
promising CAD products in today's market." 

"Maxxicadd's remarkably simple user 
interface and on-line animated help facility 
is a dealer's dream come true. Within a day, 
any dealer (or, for that matter, user) can 
learn enough of the package to be giving 
demonstrations. ” 

- Reprinted from Computer Graphics Today, August, 1988 


“Engineering Tools For The Twenty First Century ” 



Call toll-free for more information and 
a demonstration disk. 

1-800-628-2828, Ext. 923 


COMPUTER RESOURCE TECHNOLOGY CORP. 2164 East Broadway Road, Suite 310 Tempe, Arizona 85282 (602)921-9639 


Circle 65 on Reader Service Card 


MARCH 1989 • BYTE 173 

































PRODUCT FOCUS 


Computers For 
The Blind 

Talking computers give 
blind and visually 
impaired people access 
to electronic 
information. The 
question is how and 
how much? 

The answers can be 
found in “The Second 
Beginner’s Guide to 
Personal Computers for 
the Blind and Visually 
Impaired” published by 
the National Braille 
Press. This 
comprehensive book 
contains a Buyer’s 
Guide to talking 
microcomputers and 
large print display 
processors. More 
importantly it includes 
reviews, written by 
blind users, of software 
that works with 
speech. 

This invaluable 
resource book offers 
details on training 
programs in computer 
applications for the 
blind, and other useful 
information on how to 
buy and use special 
equipment. 

Send orders to: 
National Braille Press Inc. 
88 St. Stephen Street 
Boston, MA 02115 
(617) 266-6160 

$12 .95 for braille or cassette , $14.95 for 
print. ($3 extra for UPS shipping) 

NBP is a nonprofit braille printing and 
publishing house. 


LARGE-SCREEN MONITORS 


Company 

Chugai Boyeki America 
55 Mall Dr. 

Commack, NY 11725 
(800) 422-6707 

Inquiry 1027. 

Colorgraphic 
Communications Corp. 

5388 New Peachtree Rd. 

Atlanta, GA 30341 
(404) 455-3921 

Inquiry 1028. 

Cornerstone Technology 
1883 Ring wood Ave. 

San Jose, CA 95131 
(408) 279-1600 

Inquiry 1029. 

Electrohome, Ltd. 

809 Wellington St. N 
Kitchener, Ontario 
Canada N2G 4J6 
(519) 744-7111 

Inquiry 1030. 

Elite Business Applications 

4201 Remo Crescent Dr. 

Bensalem, PA 19020 
(215) 639-9567 

Inquiry 1031. 

Hewlett-Packard 

Customer Information Center 
19310 Prune Ridge Ave. 

Cupertino, CA 95014 
(800) 752-0900 

Inquiry 1032. 


Information 

Intecolor Corp. 

2150 Boggs Rd. 

Duluth, GA 30136 
(404) 623-9145 

Inquiry 1033. 

Microvitec, Inc. 

1943 Providence Court 
Airport Perimeter 
Business Center 
College Park, GA 30337 
(404) 991-2246 
Inquiry 1034. 

Mitsubishi Electronics 
America, Inc. 

991 Knox St. 

Torrance, CA 90502 
(213)515-3993 

Inquiry 1035. 

Nanao USA Corp. 

23510 Telo St., Suite 5 
Torrance, CA 90505 
(213) 325-5202 

Inquiry 1036. 

NEC Home Electronics 
(U.S.A.), Inc. 

Personal Computer 
Products Division 
1255 Michael Dr. 

Wood Dale, IL 60191 
(312) 860-9500 
Inquiry 1037. 


resolution, low blooming, consistent spot 
size from center to corner, and adequate 
voltage regulation. A broad scan range 
provides excellent compatibility. Only 
excessive variance and a hefty price tag 
hold it back. 

The D1187A hangs near the top of the 
pack on almost every test we performed. 
It boasts the lowest spot size at center 
screen, and only the FlexScan posts a 
better corner spot size. Furthermore, its 
impressive spot size is not degraded at 
high intensity or when moving from cen¬ 
ter to corner. Variance measurements are 
within acceptable limits, and it scores 
well on both convergence tests. Round 
this off with 1280 by 1024 resolution and 
the best voltage regulation of the group, 
and you have a monitor that’s hard to 
beat. Depending on how Hewlett-Pack¬ 


ard prices this model, it may deserve a 
close look. 

At $3999, the FlexScan was the most 
expensive monitor we tested. Not sur¬ 
prisingly, it was also among the best, at¬ 
taining top-of-the-line status for every 
specification and every test. It boasts 
1280 by 1024 resolution, extremely ver¬ 
satile scanning frequencies, fine spot 
size, the lowest blooming of the bunch, 
the least amount of change from center to 
corner, the best marks on all three vari¬ 
ance tests, consistently low misconver- 
gence error, and excellent voltage regula¬ 
tion. If you want the best, pay the price; 
because without a doubt, this is it. ■ 


Steve Apiki and Stanford Diehl are BYTE 
Lab testing editors. They can be reached 
on BIX as “apiki*’ and “sdiehl. ” 


174 B YTE • MARCH 1989 













Xerox 
Shows Off 
Ventura 
Publisher al 
Conference 

MTOtTKilXl ^h - BMC 


Shuttle 


Ventura Scoop 


Version 1,1 Redefines 

Desktop Publishing—Again 

mu. nr, - xjw, -r™ 


Xerox 
Shows Off 
Venture 
Publisher at 
Conference 


Shuttle 


Desktop Publishing—Again 


Ventura Scoop 


Ventura Scoop 


It's Awkward to Work on a landscape Monitor...When Your Document is Portrait 


PPt/s Versatile Multi View Me niter with GrafixPro 
Gives You the Best of Beth Views 

VGA compatibility High resolution. Full-page display. Now 
you can have it alL.at a remarkable low price . .. with 
the new MuEtJView Monitor When you add GrafixPro — 
PPL's VGA register level compatible controller board — you 
get 512K display memory and the ability to support 
landscape or portrait views on the same screen! So from 
publishing to spread sheets, you no longer have to switch 
between two monitors. You can do it ali with the MultiView 
monitor and GrafixPro VGA controller board. 


MultiView Monitor Features 

■ FulPpage, Multi-scan capabilities 

■ Supports CGA, EGA, MDA, Hercules and VGA graphic 
standards 

■ Analog and Digital (TIL) signal inputs 

■ High-resolution landscape [1024 x 768) or portrait (800 x 
1000) modes with automatic screen size adjustment 

■ Paper white 15" screen 

■ £335 list price 


For more information, call Today! 1 - 609 - 924-1153 Ext. 19 

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GrafixPro features 

■ High resolution with 512K display memory 

■ Includes display drivers for Windows, GEM. Ventura, AutoCad, Lotus 
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■ Supports MDA, CGA, EGA and VGA monitors 

■ Text modes include 132,1D0, 80 and 40 columns 

■ Works with IBM PC/ATs and compatibles 

■ £595 list price 

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Id 


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PUBLISHING LABS 

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19 Wall Street, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 

Circle 207 on Reader Service Card 



WE PUT THIS AD SIDEWAYS TO MAKE A POINT 






































FLEXSCAN 9070S, PC Hi-Res 
That Looks Like a Million. 



1024 dots X 768 lines Graphics (Non-interlace) 
AutoCAD 


The FLEXSCAN 9070 Multiple Scan 
monitor is of course compatible with 
other multi-scans, but includes 
improvements that will give you the 
professional edge which is the mark 
of a good investment. 

You can extend your multi-scan range 
from 20kHz to 50kHz in practical terms. 
This means that, at the 48-50 kHz 
range, you can make use of PC 
CAD/CAE capabilities at a resolution 
of up to 1024 dots X 768 lines. 

The FLEXSCAN 9070 takes advantage 
of non-interlace high resolution signal 
as high as 1024 X 768 to provide you 
with a flicker free display at much 
brightness. You can also use the 
9070 with IBM PS/2 or VGA 
compatible boards at a high resolution 
mode like 800 x 600 and 1024 x 768 
(non-interlace). 

The FLEXSCAN 9070 provides a 
16-inch screen, large enough for 
CAD/CAE and 3-D projections, yet 
small enough to fit comfortably into 
your home work space. 



Also, for your convenience, all 
controls and switches, including the 
alternate video input, are located 
within easy reach on the front panel. 
The FLEXSCAN 9070 is compatible 
with a wide range of IBM, Apple, and 
other products, allow you to use 
all of today's popular programs---at 
a resolution that looks like a million. 


FLEXSCAN 

MODEL 9070S 

• IBM VGA(PS/2), 8514/A, PGC, EGA 
compatible and CAD/CAE use. 

• Apple Mac. II and SuperMac Spectrum 
compatible 

• Max. 1280 dots X 800 lines high resolution 

• 1024 dots X 768 lines display on 

Non-Interlace signal delivers flicker-free 
high-res graphics 

• 20kHz to 50kHz horizontal scan automatic 
adjustment. 50Hz to 80Hz vertical scan 
automatic adjustment 

• 16 inch, 0.31mm dot pitch and newly 
developed XF(Extended Field) Gun to 
obtain both brightness and sharp focus. 

• Front mounted controls including the input 
signal select switch between 2 video input. 

• Selecting white or Amber displays colored 
application in shades of gray or amber 

• Tilt-Swivel stand standard 


NANAO 

NANAO USA CORPORATION 

23510 TELO AVE .SUITE 5 TORRANCE, CA 90505 
PHONE (213) 325-5202 FAX (213) 530-1679 


Specifications are subject to change without notice. 


APPLE. Macintosh D registered frademteks oi Apple Compute.s ate ARTIST ARTIST i Plus. ARTIST to ARTIST WI6 tiademaiks at Conecl System* me IBM. IBM 
PC, XT. AT and PS/2 are registered trademarks cit Intern atonal Busness Machines Corporator SuperMac is a trademark o' SuperMac Technology SuperEGA RiRes 
Super VO A end SuperVOA HiRee **> eademark* of Genoa System CorpcvMKm Orchid Deagner VGA Orchid Designer VOA-J. TurtooEGA end T.at»VGA ate kademerk* ct 
Ore tad Technology Paradise VGA Professional Card Paradise VGA Plus Card and Autos with EGA are trademarks at Paradise Systems. Inc Paradise Systems Is a 
•egmered trademark of Paradae Systems Inc VEGA Deki«e and VEGA VGA are trademark* of Video seven me Memeus r* a legiwereo trademark of Metneus Corporation 
anagraph I* a trademark Of knegraoh Corporation AutoCAD is a registered trademark at Autodesk Inc GEM is a registered k ado mart, of digital Research Inc Lotus and 
1-2 3 are registarod trademarks ot Lotus Development Corporation SgmaVGA and S<gma£GA are trademarks of Sigma designs. Inc FLEXSCAN 19 a trademark of NANAO 
CORPORATION NANAO >S a registered trademark nt NANAO CORPORATION 


176 RYTF. • MARCH 1989 


Cirri* nn Prnrlrr Cnnl ffiFAI IftJi 














System Review 


Laptop 

Dilemma 



Choosing between 
the Compaq SLT/286 
and the Ogivar 286 
means defining 
your needs 


Jeff Holtzman 


The Compaq SLT/286 (left) and the Ogivar 286. 


L aptop computers appear to be di¬ 
verging into two groups. The 
first group, typified by the 
Compaq SLT/286, offers bat¬ 
tery power for computing wherever you 
are. The second group, including the 
Ogivar 286, is constrained by the need 
for AC power but usually offers an im¬ 
proved display using a plasma or electro¬ 
luminescent screen. 

Compaq’s new SLT/286 combines a 
VGA-compatible backlit supertwist LCD 
screen, a 12-MHz 80C286, a decent key¬ 
board, a fast hard disk drive, expandabil¬ 
ity, ease of servicing, and intelligent 
energy management. It’s all packed into 
a diminutive case that occupies about as 
much space as two IBM Technical Refer¬ 
ence manuals and weighs about as much 
as three bricks. Its only flaw is its cost, 
which approaches the five-digit mark for 
a fully expanded configuration. 

Ogivar’s 286 is a more traditional en¬ 
try. From a distance, the machine bears a 
strong resemblance to Toshiba’s T3100 
and T5100 series. It’s an AC-power-only 


machine with an EGA-compatible plas¬ 
ma display, a 12.5-MHz 80286, and an 
unusual keyboard that supports a French 
character set. 

The Basics 

The SLT/286 comes in two configura¬ 
tions: the Model 20 ($5399) and the 
Model 40 ($5999). The two machines are 
identical except for the hard disk drives— 
20-megabyte and 40-megabyte, respec¬ 
tively. Both drives have average access 
times under 30 milliseconds and 1 -to-1 
interleaving. You can upgrade a Model 
20 to the larger drive, but it’ll cost you 
$1399, more than twice the difference in 
price between the Models 20 and 40. 

Both Compaq models include as stan¬ 
dard equipment a 1.44-megabyte floppy 
disk drive; 640K bytes of memory; a 
serial port; a parallel port; ports for an 
external VGA monitor, external floppy 
disk drive or tape backup unit, external 
keyboard, and external numeric keypad; 
and a special port that allows the 
SLT/286 to dock with a desktop expan¬ 
sion chassis. The machine runs at either 
8 or 12 MHz, keyboard-selectable. 

Compaq says that the expansion chas¬ 
sis provides two standard 16-bit slots, as 
well as connectors for a standard VGA 
monitor, an Enhanced keyboard, and a 
printer. Unfortunately, the expansion 
chassis was not available for this review. 

Compaq also offers several internal 
expansion options: a second serial port 
or a 2400-bps Hayes-compatible modem; 
up to 3 megabytes of memory, which can 
be configured as either extended or ex¬ 
panded (EMS 3.2) memory; and a math 
coprocessor, either an 8-MHz 80287 or a 
12-MHz 80C287. Compaq has adapted 
its version of OS/2 1.0 Standard Edition 
for the SLT/286. 

The 1-megabyte memory boards mea¬ 
sure about 3 Vi by 114 inches and are pop¬ 
ulated on both sides with surface-mount 
chips. The boards plug into a small edge 
connector that provides the sole mechan- 

continued 


MARCH IQ8Q • RYTF 177 















REVIEW 
LAPTOP DILEMMA 


Compaq SLT/286 


Company 

Compaq Computer Corp, 

20555 FM 149 
P.O. Box 692000 
Houston, TX 77269 
(713)370-0670 

Compone