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For The Serious User Off Personal Computers 

COMPUTiST 



Issue 51 



January 1988 



USA $3.75 



Canada & Mexico $7.00 



All Others $8.75 



Kevin Lepard's 

C Cryptarithmetic Helper 

Paul Johnson's 

D A.P.T. for Bard's Tale. 
Dungeon Mapper Revisited 

Matt Ownby's 

D A.P.T. for Ultima IV 

Carole Fox's 

D A.F.T. for Might & Magic 

Ralph Augenfeld's 

D RAMfactor mod for Laser 128 

John Weigley's 

C Getting Better Sound by... 
Using the cassette jacks 

D Making A Fast Boot Disk 




^o^£fz^^A = 



2400 AD Ci Aliens d Alphabet Zoo (^Amnesia 6 Bag Of Tricks d Bard's Tale I d Bard's Tale II d Battle Cruiser d Beach-head 
II d Below The Root d Black Magic dBody Awareness d Bridge 4.0 d Carriers At War d Catalyst 3.0 d Centipede d Championship 
Boxing d Championship Wrestling d Chessmaster 2000 d Combining The Elements d Commando d Creative Contraptions 
6 Einstein Compiler d Fat City d Fight Night 6 Flight Simulator v2.0 d Flm with Direction « GBA 2-0n-2 Championship Basketball 
tf Graphic Writer vl. IRA d Growing Up Small d House-on-a-disk d Intrigue dJet C% Jungle Hunt d Kinder comp d Knowing 
Numbers d Kung-fu Master d Law Of The West d Learning Well series d Letters And Words d Little Computer People d Make 
Your Own Murder Party d Manic Mansion d Master Diagnostics d Movie Maker d Music Construction Set dPinball Construction 
Set d Pitstop d Print Shop Graphics Library Holiday * Print Shop Ilgs d Rendezvous d Shapes And Patterns d Silent Service 
d Sorcerer d Spy vs Spy 1 & II d Stargate d Stellar 7 d Stickybear ABCs d Stickybear Drawing d Stickybear Numbers d Stickybear 
Printer d Stickybear Printer Library 1 & II d Stickybear Townbuilder d Super Boulder dash d Temple Of Apshai Trilogy 
d Tomahawk AThexder d Walt Disney's Card And Party Shop d Walt Disney's Cartoon Maker d Wings Of Fury dWord Maze 
d World's Greatest Baseball Game dZork III ^ Apple Ilgs sofikey. 



COMPUTIST 

PO Box 110846-T 

Tacoma, WA 98411 



BULK RATE 
U.S. Postage 

PAID 

Tacoma, WA 
Permit No. 269 



You have a 

LEGAL RIGHT 

to an ufiloclced 
backup copy 

of your 

commercial 

softiMf are 



Our editorial policy is that we do NOT condone 
software piracy, but we do believe that users are entitled 
to backup commercial disks they have purchased. 

In addition to the security of a backup disk, the removal 
of copy-protection gives the user the option of modifying 
programs to meet his or her needs. 

Furthermore, the copyright laws guarantee your right 
to such a DEPROTECTED backup copy: 



..."It is not an infringement for the owner of a copy of 
a computer program to make or authorize the making of 
another copy or adaptation of that computer program 
provided: 

1) that such a new copy or adaptation is created as an 
essential step in the utilization of the computer program in 
conjunction with a machine and that it is used in no other 
manner, or 

2} that such new copy or adaptation is for archival 
purposes only and that all archival copies are destroyed in 
the event that continued possession of the computer program 
should cease to be rightful. 

Any exact copies prepared in accordance with the 
provisions of this section may be leased, sold, or otherwise 
transferred, along with the copy from which such copies 
were prepared, only as part of the lease, sale, or other 
transfer of all rights in the program. Adaptations so prepared 
may be transferred only with the authorization of the 
copyright owner." 



United States Code title 17, §117 



COMPUTIST 



Publisher-Editor: Charles R. Haight 

Graphics Editor: Ben R. Haiglit 

Circulation: Karen Fifctpatrick 

Advertisii^: (206) 474-5750 

Publishing: SoftKey 

Printing: Valco Printing 



• Address all advertising Inquiries to: 
COMPUTIST; Advertising Department; PO 
Box I 10816; Tacoma, WA 984 I I 

• Mail all RDEX data-letters to: 

COMPUTIST RDEX 

POBox II0846.K 

Tacoma, WA 984 1 1 

• COMPUTIST does NOT pureliase editorial 
material. The entire editorial content consists 
of information submitted to COMPUTIST for 
publication in the shared interests of all 
COMPUTISTs. 

• Unsolicited material (manuscripts, letters 
to the editor, softkeys, A.P.T.s, playing tips, 
questions, etc., are assumed to be submitted 
for publication with all and exclusive rights 
belonging to COMPUTIST. 

• COMPUTISTs submitting RDEX material 
should follow the guidelines printed on the 
inside back cover. 

• Entire contHits copyright 1 988 by SoftKey 
Publishing, All rights reserved. Copying done 
for other than personal or Internal reference 
(without express written permission from the 
publisher) is prohibited. 

• The volunteer and paid editorial staff 
assume no liability or responsibility for the 
products advertised in the magazine. Any 
opinions expressed by the authors are not 
necessarily those of COMPUTIST magazine 
or SoftKey Publishing. 

• Apple usually refers to an Apple ][ 
computer and is a trademark of Apple 
Computers, Inc. 

SUBSCRIPTIONS: Rates (for 1 2 issues): 
U.S.-$32 U.S. 1st Class~f45 

Canada/Mex.-$45 Other Foreign-S75 

• Direct subscription inquiries to: 
COMPUTIST; Subscription Department; PO 
Box I 10846.T; Tacoma. WA 9S4( / 

• DOMESTIC DEALER RATES: 

Call (306) 474-5750 for more information, 

• Change Of Address: Please allow 4 
weeks for change of address to take effect. 
On postal form 3576 supply your new 
address and your most recent address label. 

• Issues missed due to non-receipt of change 
of address may be acquired at the regular 
back issue rate. 



COMPUTIST #51 



January 



For Apple-users ONLY: 
Why type those 
l-o-r)-g listmgs when 
you can just Upgrade 
your preser)t sub. to a 
Mag/5V4"Disk Combo 
subscriptm 

■ You may upgrade your current 
subscription to a magazine & disk 
combination by sending $5.50 ($6.50 
foreign) per remaining issue. 

Time to renew? 

■ Checic your mailing label to see if you 
need to renew your subscription. 

n Use the order form on this page to 
renew, and don't forget to send your most 
current mailing label to help expedite your 

renewal 

Moving soon? 

■ If you're moving, let us know at least 30 
days in advance. 

■ Issues missed due to non-reeiept of 
Chang e-of- Address may be acquired at the 
regular back issue rates, 

■ Remember, the Post Office does not 
forward third class mail unless requested, 
COMPUTIST is not responsible for 
replacing issues lost while forwarding order 
is in effect. 



Diarj 






zfEz::::;::::::, 
■■toEEEEEz: 



III 



■ Yes, I want to subscribe to COMPUTIST. Enclosed are funds for an annual (12 issue) subscription. 

I am... O A new Apple subscriber 

D A new IBM subscriber Name .^ 

n Renewing my current subscription 

D Changing my address (please include last mail label) 



:iD#_ 



Address 

City 



Apple— IBM subscription... 
D U.S. ■ $32 

D U.S./Canada/Mexico First Class - $45 
n All other Foreign - $75 

Apple-ONLY subscription,,, 
r U.S./Canada/Mexico First Class plus Library Disk ■ $ 1 00 Signature 
Q All other Foreign plus Library Disk ■ $ 140 



State 



Zip 



Country. 



-Phone. 



Exp. 



CP51 



U.S. Funds drawn on U.S. bank. Allow 4-8 weeks for first issue. Mail to: COMPUTIST; PO Box I 10846-T: Tatoma, WA 9841 I p06) 474-5750 



January 



COMPUTIST 51 




Editorial 



David G. Aiestander 32 

Ralph Augenfeld 27,17 

R. Bendel 37 

B. Dudley Brett 15 

Steve Charles . . . . t. i.,ss , ■ -32 

El Chucko ...»«..,.. 13 

Bob Colbert. ...,,,.,,. .36 

Christopher Dean 7, 36 

Rick Fabbre 18 

Carole Fox 28 

Dennis Gaunt . . . . „. , 37 

Ray Grimm 7 

A.L. Head..... 19 

Steve Herrington 7 

Jeff Hurlburt 22 

Tony H, Ikeda 13 

The Island Boys 19 

Paul A. Johnson 14 

Dick Lavalle 13 

Kevin Lepard .8 

Jack Moravetz 13 

Jack R. Nissel 33 

Matt Ownby ...,,..,.... 2 1 

Franco Panizzon IS 

Stanley Planton 12 

Scuzzy Port 7 

Mark G. Prestero 37 

Nicholas Siamson 36 

Scott M, Simon 16 

Edward Teach 28 

John Thomas . . . ..,_■. . 30 

Jerome Thelia 20 

John Weigley 24 



Wekeme to 1988 

Well it's 1988 and I have some new year resolutions. Of course, like any good busybody, 
I've made these resolutions for you. 



New Year's Resolutions 

I won't send original or copies of original disks. 

The onginals may be lost audit's illegal for us to iiave copies. 

D I will send all my letters to RDEX, on disk. 

You 'Uget the disk back aloag m'th an advance copy of your piece of the issue. 
And it helps speed up completioB of the magazine. 

D I will write my letters in the same format as the letters I read in RDEX. Except 
for drawing the Iraxes or printing my name in inverse. 

D I will always identify the computer I am writing about (lie, He, Ilgs, etc.). 

D I will always include the publisher's name along with any program name I 
mention. 



D I will always send BASIC programs and Super lOB controllers on disk. 
Please! 



BUGS: 



COMPUTIST #47, page 34. "Improving Locksmith's Fast Backup". 
It should read Sector edit track $09, sector $07. 

COMPUTIST »36, page 27. 

The hex dump for LC LOADER is missing the last byte. 
The bottonm line should read: 2100: i30 21 21 0F 0B F9 F3 



COBflPUnST #S1 



January 



COMPUTIST 



SI 



Table Of Contents 



Solik&^»: 



name , page 

2400 AD 20 

Aliens 37 

Alphabet Zoo 16 

Amnesia 2S 

BagOfTricb t37 

Bard's Tale 1 16 

Bard's Tale U 15 

Battle Cruiser 35 

'Beach-head II 35 

Below The Root 20 

Bhck Magic 25 

Body Awareness 15 

Bridge 4.0 37 

Carriers At War '\32 

Catalyst 3.0 W 

Centipede 34 

Championship Boxing 33 

Championship Wrestling ..33 

Chessmaster 200® 33 

Combining The Elements 30 

Comnumdo 33 

Creative Contraptions 30 

Einstein Compiler 20 

Fat City 33 

Fight l^lght 33 

Flight Simulator v2.0 f/ 

fun with Direction 15 

GBA 2-0n-2 Chmpionshlp Baskeiball. . . *19 

GraphicWriter vllRA *13 

Growing Up Small 15 

House-on-a-disk 35 

Intrigue 34 

Jet tS6 

Jungle Hunt 34 

Kinderamp 16 

Knowing Numbers 15 

Kung-fu Master 35 

Law Of The West 20 

Learning Well series 15 

Letters And Words 15 

Little Computer People 13 

Make Your Own Murder Party 34 

Manic Mansion , 35, 36 

Master Diagnostics 16 

Movie Maker 7, 34 

Music Construction Set 19 

Pinbali Construction Set 37 

Pitstop 34 

Print Shop Graphics Library' Holiday 34 

Print Shop lip '.....*-}3 



Rendezvous 18 

Shapes And Patterns 15 

Silent Ser\ice t/9 

Sorcerer 35 

SpyvsSpyi&ll 20,35 

Stargate 34 

Steliar7 m 

Stickybear ABCs 17 

Stickybear Drawing 17 

Stickybear Numbers 17 

Stickybear Printer 17 

Stickybear Printer Ubmry I & H 17 

Stickybear Townbuitder // 

Super Bouiderdash 16 

Temple Of Apshai Trilogy t^5 

Tomahawk 32 

Thexder *13 

Watt Disney's Card And Party Shop 28 

Walt Disney's Cartoon Maker 28 

Wings Of Fun t37 

Word Maze 18 

World's Greatest Baseball Game t^^ 

Zork III 35 

* Apple llgs softkey. 

t Softkey requires some other issue of 

COMPUTIST or is incomplete as published. 



■ A.F.T-a: 

Bard's Tale 14 

Lode Runner 25 

Might & Magic 28 

Ultima IV 21 

W. Disney 's Card And Part\' Shop 28 

Wizardry in ' 25 

Wizardry IV 36 



Autoduel 19 

King's Quest 19 

Manic Mansion 19 

Summer Games 20 

Tass Times In Tonetown 19 

Thexder 19 

^ere In World is C Sandiego ? 21 



January 



1988 



Editorial 4 

Bugs .4 

Most Wanted Softkeys 37 

The Cryptarithmetic Helper. . . , 

Kevin Lepard's program will help you solve those 
encrypted arithmetic puzzles for your AI class. 

Using EDD IV to 

Modify Tracks & Sectors 12 

Stanley Planton's Tips and specific 'how-to's on 
using the Essential Data Duplicator's powers. 

APT for Bard's Tale 

Dungeon Mapper Revisited. ... 14 

Panl Johnson's A.P.T. for The Band's Tale uses 
a modification of his Standing Stones dungeon 
mapper. 

RAMfactor mod for Laser 128. 17 

Ralph Augenfeid's 'how-to' keep your 
RAMfactor alive with just a few hardware changes. 

K.?Jkr Uliima IV 21 

Matt Ownby's APT tables plus your sector editor 
will put you in charge of even the Ilgs Ultima. 

Tlie Product Monitor 22 

Jeff Hurlburt continues his reviews with Deluxe 
Paint IT, We/come, Create A Calendar. Diversi- 
Cachc and Accolade 's Comics plus quick notes on 
iRvisi-Clues, Clip Art Gallery 1, Destroyer, The 
Spy's Adventures In N. America, Homework 
Helper: Math Word Problems. 

Get Better Sound *^ 

by using tlie cassette jaclts ^O 

John Weigley shows how to improve fidelity and 
even turn all sound to the cassette port. 

Maldng A Fast Boot Disli 26 

John Weigley 's article and a sector editor wiil hvve 
you booting in seconds. 

m for Might & Magic 28 

Carole Fox's tables and your sector-editor will help 
you reach the Inner Sanctum. 



L 



1 



Jamuury 



COMPUTIST #51 



N^w COMPVTIST readers using Apple Ih 
are advised to read this page carefully to avoid 
frustration when attempting to follow a sofikey 
or entering the programs printed in this issue. 

What is a softkey, anyway? 

Softkey is a term which we coined to describe 
a procedure that removes, or at least 
circumvents, any copy -protection on a 
particular disk. Once a softkey procedure has 
been performed, the resulting backup copy can 
usually be copied by the normal copy programs 
(for example: COPYA, on their DOS 3:3 
System Master disk). 

Commands and control keys 

In any article appearing in COMPUTIST, 
commands which a reader is required to 
perform are set apart by beingjn boldface and 
on a separate line. The iRETUHWl key must be 
pressed at the end of every such command 
unless otherwise specified. Control characters 
are specially boxed. An example of both is: 
li fQPl 

Press cm Next, place one finger on the Gr3 
key and then press CE, Remer nber to en ter 
this command line by pressing iRKTTIRHl , 

Other sp ecial combination keypresses include 
IBRESETl or lOBRESETl In the former , 
press and hold down Ifiot) then press iRESETj . 
In t he lat ter, press ar id hold down both CEED 
and i <i I then press iRESETl , 

Special requirements 

Special prerequisites for COMPUTIST 
articles, programs and softkeys are usually 
listed at the start under "■ Reguirements:". 

Software recommendations 

[3* Applesoft program editor such as Global 
Program Line Editor (GPLE). 

\Ff Sector-editor such as DiskEdit (in the 
COMPUTIST Starter Kit) or ZAP from Bag 
of Tricks. 

\Sf Disk -search utility such as The Inspector, 
the CIA or the Core Disk Searcher (in the 
COMPUTIST Starter Kit). 

0* Assembler such as the S~C Assembler from 
S-C software or Merlin/Big Mac. 

B* Bit-copy program such as Copy II Plus, 
Locksmith or K^sential Data Duplicator (EDD). 

{Ff Text-editor (that produces normal 



sequential text fdes) such as Appiewriter U, 
Magic Window II or Screenwriter H. 

SFf COPYA, FID and MUFFIN from the DOS 
3.3 System Master disk are also useful. 

Super lOB and Controllers 

This powerful deprotection utility (in the 
COMPUTIST Starter Kit) and its various 
Controllers are used in many softkeys, (It is also 
on each Super JOB Collection disk,) 

Reset into the Monitor 

Softkeys occasionally require the user to stop 
the execution of a copy -protected program and 
directly enter the Apple's system monitor. 
Check the foOowing list to see what hardware 
you will need to obtain this ability. 

Apple II + , lie, compatibles: 1) Place an 
Integer BASIC ROM card in one of the Apple 
slots, 2) Use a non-maskable interrupt (NMI) 
card such as Replay or Wildcard. 

Apple II + , compatibles: 1) Install an F8 
ROM with a modified reset- vector on the 
computer's motherboard as detailed in the 
Modified ROM's anicle (COMPUTIST #6 or 
Book Of Softkeys HI ) or die Dual ROM's 
article (COMPUTIST #19), 

Apple lis, lie: Install a modified CD ROM 
on the computer's motherboard. Cutting Edge 
Ent, (Box 43234 Ren Cen Station-HC; Detroit, 
Ml 48243) sells a hardware device that wUl give 
you this important ability but it will void an 
Apple //c warranty. 

Recommended literature: 

\If Apple II Reference Manual 

\EfDOS 3.3 manual 

\Ff Beneath Apple DOS, by Don Wordi and 

Pieter Lechner, from Quality Software 

lEf Assembly iMnguage For The Applesoft 

Programmer, by Roy Meyers and C,W, Finley, 

from Addison Wesley 

Keying in Applesoft programs: 

BASIC programs are printed in a format that 
is designed to minimize errors for readers who 
key in these programs. If you type: 
10H0ME:REMCLEAR SCREEN 

The LIST will look like: 
10 HOME : REM CLEAR SCREEN 
,,,because Applesoft inserts spaces into a 
program listing before and after every command 
word or mathematical operator. These spaces 



usually don't pose a problem except in line 
numbers which contain REM or DATA 
commands. There are two types of spaces: those 
that have to be keyed and those that don't. 
Spaces that must be typed appear in 
COMPUTIST as delta characters C). All odier 
spaces are there for easier reading. NOTE: If 
you want your checksums (See Computing 
checksums) to match up, you must key 
ONLY the '' spaces after DATA statements. 

Keying In Hexdumps 

Machine language programs are printed in 
COMPUTIST as hexdumps, sometimes also as 
source code, Hexdumps are the shortest and 
easiest format to type in. You must first enter 
the monitor: 

CALL '151 

Key in the hexdump exactly as it appears iii 
the magazine, ignoring the four-digit checksum 
($ and four digits) at the end of each line. A 
beep means you have typed something that the 
monitor didn't understand and must, therefore, 
retype that line. 

When finished, return to BASIC with: 

3D0G 

BSAVE the program with the filename, address 
and length paranjeters giv^n lo the article. 

Keying in source code 

The source code is printed to help explain a 
program's operation. To key it in, you will need 
the S-C Assembler OT you will have to translate 
pieces of the source code into something your 
assembler will understand (see table of S-C 
Assembler directives in COMPUTIST #17. 



Computing checksums 

Checksums are 4-digii hexadecimal numbers 
which tell if you keyed a program exactly as 
it appears in COMPUTIST, 

There are two types of checksums: one 
created by the CHECKBIN program (for 
machine language programs) and the other 
created by die CHECKSOFT program (for 
BASIC programs). Both appeared in 
COMPUTIST #1 and The Best of Hardcore 
Computing. An update to CHECKSOFT 
appeared in COMPUTIST #18. 

If the published checksums accompanying 
program listings and hexdumps do not match 
those created by your computer, then you typed 
the program incorrecdy . The line where the firet 
checksum differs has an error. 



6 



COMPUTIST #51 



January 



CHECKSOFT instructions: 

VOPiSijiieMme 
BRUN CHECKSOFT 

Get the checksums with: I & 1 and correct 
the program line where the checksums differ. 

CHECKBIN instructions: 

CALL -151 

VLOMi fiif.mme 

Install CHECKBIN At an out of the way place 

BRUN CHECKBIN, ASeOOO 

Get the checksums by typing the Starting 
address, a period andttie Ending address of the 
fUe followed by a I '^'^ \ . 

sss,eee\M\ 

Correct the lines at which tMe checksums 
differ. 



when 

writing a 
letter to... 

Appfe RDSXed 



t Remember that your letters or parts of them 
may be used in the Apple-users' Readers Data 
Exchange even if you don't address it to the 
Apple-RDEX editor. Correspondence diat 
gets published may be edited for clarity, 
gramnier and space requirements . 

t Because of the great number of letters we 
receive and the ephemeral and unpredictable 
appearance of our all-volunteer staff, any 
response to your queries win appear only in 
RDEX-Apple, so it would be more 
appropriate for you to present technical 
quesdons to die readers and ask for dieir 
responses which will then be placed in the 
RDEX-Apple section. 

• Address your letters to: 

COMPUTIST RDEX-Apple Editor 

PO Box 110846-K 

Tacoma, WA 98411 

• Although COMPUTIST can no longer 
purchase short sofikeys and articles, please 
continue to contribute diem but place them in 
a letter to the editor so that they get published 
in Ihe RDEX as soon as possible, 

— appieRDEXed 



Steve Herringtoii 



More praise for Clay Barrel's 

Senior Prom v3,0 

Although he receives it from just about 
everyone, I would like to add my praise for Mr. 
Clay HarreO and his Senior Prom v3.0. He's 
fixed all the problems with the first versions and 
it's now a superb piece of hardware all your 
readers should get. 

On top of it all, he provides unmatched 
service support and technical advice. Although 
it took him a lot of extra time and 
reprogramming effort, he even got it working 
on my He clone. I can't praise this kind of 
support enough. 



Scuzzy Port 



Interchanging Fonts between 

Elite, MultiScribe GS, & Deluxe Paint U 

You can interchange fonts between 
Writer's Choice Elite, MultiScribe GS, and 
Deluxe Paint II by copying each font file to the 
/SYSTEM/FONTS/ subdirectory of the 
selected program disk. 



Christopher Dean 



t Softkey for.. 



Eight Simulator v2,0 

SubLOGIC 



I have Flight Simulator v2.0 and by 
following the directions in COMPUTIST #45, 
I was able to make the corrections to the softkey 
for my copy. The corrections are listed below: 

AE28:4ai 
AE40:E8CO 
C0E9 
AE22G 



I 16 I Sector Edit: 

Trk Set Byte(s) From 



To 



$09 $0E $56-5E ? 



all EA's 



There is also a typo in the original softkey. 
The la^t byte of LC LOADER is not present 
(It is in die source code listing but not the 
hexdump), it should be an $F3. 

Now, the 48K version wiU work but the 
64K will not. The reason for this is that version 
2.0 uses more of the language card data than 
the softkey accounted for. It uses two extra 
memory pages ($FA00-$FB7B) for data. 
Fortunately , there are two blank sectors on track 
$00 where the data can be kept and loaded in. 

First, load the language card data into 
memory and write memory pages $6A00 and 
$6BO0 to track $00, sectors $0A, and $0B 
in that order. 

Then, type the following code into track 
$00, sector $00. That's it. 

The following routine checks for the RAM 
card itself and if there is one, copies ROM into 
it (so the boot will not crash) and reads sectors 
$0A and sectors $0B into it and continues with 
the boot. 

4C84IM 
18 8A 6A 6A 

6A 6A 09 CO SD DC 08 8D 
EC OS AD 83 CO AD S3 CO 
A2 00 8E 00 DO EC 00 DO 
' 00 4B CA DO FS AD 81 CO 
AD 81 CO AO 03 A2 00 BD 
00 FC 9D 00 FC IS DO F7 
EE Bl 08 EE B4 08 88 DO 
EC AD 83 CO AD S3 CO AO 
OA B9 6C 08 85 3D A9 00 
85 26 85 41 A9 FA 85 27 
A6 2B 20 5C C6 A9 FB 85 
27 AO OB B9 6C 08 85 3D 
A6 2B 20 5C C6 A6 2B 4C 
$8F0- 00 ID 



$884- 
$888- 
$890- 
$8W- 
$8A0- 
$8A8- 



$8C0 
$8(»- 
$8D0 



Ray Grim 



Softkey for... 



Movie Maiier 

Electronic Arts 



Thanks to John Wiegley (COMPUTIST 
#48) I was able to use my Sector Editor and 
change the bytes he suggested for Artie Fox on 
my program Movie Maker also from Electronic 
Arts. 



I 1 I Copy Movie Maker Program Disk 
Side A widi a sector copier and ignore the 
errors. 



January 



COMPUTIST #51 



1 2 I Make the following sector-edits: 
Trk Set Bytets) From To 



$01 %% $08 

$01 J0A $6A 

$01 S0A $5B 



03 
A9 

C5 



62 
EA 
EA 



That's if. Now copy side B and disk 2 (Data 
Disk) with any copier. 



Kevin Lepard 



+ IVIORE 

IVEONEY 



Recently in an artificial intelligence (AI) 
class, I was required to solve several 
cryptarithmetic problems in order to illustrate 
several of the procedures in AI. 

Cryptarithmetic is a puzzle in which 
letters have been snhstitnted for the numbers 
in a math problem. 

The object is to substitute an integer from 
O to 9 for each letter so that the problem works 
correctly. 

Obviously, each integer can be used only 
once in a problem. 

After working my way through two of these 
problems manually, it was painfully obvious 
that most of the effort required to solve 
cryptarithmetic problems was in constantly 
recalculating variables and checking to make 
sure that an integer had not been used twice. 

Being a busy college student who gready 
prefers activities other than slaving over 
cryptarithmetic, I quickly decided that my 
Apple would take on thejob of helping me solve 
cryptarithmetic. A short while later the 
Cryptarithmetic Helper emerged. 

Crypiarithmetic Helper 

The Cryptarithmetic Helper aids in solving 
cryptarithmetic problems by: 

1 Applying heuristics (basically a 'rule of 
thumb') to the initial problem to aid in the 
restriction of variables. 

2 Calculating possible values for 
remaining variables from the user input. 

3 Preventing multiple variables from 
possessing the same integer. 



4 Detecting errors in either column-sums 
or column-carries. 

5 Aiding in die easy chattge 6f valufes and 
column-carries, with appropriate recalculation 
of ftossible values. 

To use Cryptarithmetic Helper, first type in 
the Applesoft listing, then save it with the 
command: 

SAVE CRYPTARITHMETIC HELPER 

or some shorter file name, if you find that too 
long. 

In the following notes on Cryptarithmetic 
Helper, references to rows and columns are as 
shown in the following problem: 



5 4 3 2 1 

7 7 7 ! fl 



Column Number 

. , ■;,_,,_. Carry Values 

SEND ,;u-m^i.ii> ■.,,..,.< Row #1 

MORE ,.,:;■,,:,■.,.,■,...... Row #2 

M N E V ,,,., Row #3 

Column-Carries 

Also, the phrase "the carry of column A" 
(where X is any column) refers to the carry at 
the top of column X, not the carry generated 
by column JC 



The Commands 



191 I -display initial variable restrictions 

Ifr'JBl -restart program 

IBS I -start over on current problem 

IS^^QI -quit program 

HHor [O-get the help screen. 



When Ciypiariihmeric Helper displays values 
for variables for which substitutions have not 
been made, it displays ail possible numbers - 
not just integers - that would make the displayed 
madiematical statement true. 

Cryptarithmetic Helper may also display 
values that are already used in substitutions. 

Non-integer values usually indicate that a 
carry for which there is sufficient information 
to set is not set, and serve as reminders to set 
carries, since it functions more effectively when 
the carries are set. 

The display of used integers may be useful 
when values are not changed by the carries. 

Cryptarithmetic Helper also displays 
information such as: B = 8 or 9, This, too, 
indicates that a carry should be set. A version 
of Cryptarithmetic Helper diat prevented 
printing these was tested, but it was found that 
it could too often result in a problem that had 
substitutions made for al! the variables that did 
not generate errors because carries were not set. 



Information such as: 3 = 3 indicates that 
substitutions agree with the carries and no 
conflicts exist. 

How To Use It 

To enter a problem into Cryptarithmetic 
Helper, type in die first, second, and third lines 
as they appear, 

Cryptarithmetic Helper does not work with 
cryptarithmeticproblemsof more than3 lines. 
In addition, the first and second lines must ADD 
to the third line. 

If the problem is given as a subtraction 
problem, simply reverse it so that it is an 
addition problem. That is, if the problem 
appears as: 

MONEY 
-SEND 



Change it to: 



MORE 



SEND 
-HVIORE 

MONEY 



Also, when typing in the problem, do not 
include the operator, i.e, the + or - sign. 

For the problem given above, the first line 
would be entered SEND, the second line MORE, 
and the third line MONEY. 

Cryptarithmetic Helper accepts either upper 
or lower case letters, but all the letters must be 
the same case, otherwise the substitution routine 
will not work. 

To assign a value to a character, press that 
character and then the value you wish to assign 
it. If you try to assign a value to a character 
that has already been assigned, the program will 
beep and restart the "Take a guess" routine. 

Cryptarithmetic Helper will not accept 
attempts to assign non- numerical symbols to 
variables. 

To assign a value to a carry, press the 
colunm number of the carry you wish to assign 
and then the value you wish it to have, either 
O or 1 . You cannot assign numbers other than 
O or I to carries, and the program will not 
accept attempts to do so. 

To return a carry or variable to its initial 
state, press the variab le or the colunm of the 
carry and then press IRETURNI 



How It Works 

The first thing that Cryptarithmetic Helper 
does is set a normal height text window (POKE 
34,0), clear it (HOME), display the help screen 
(GOSUB 1800), then reset and reclear die text 
screen (the second POKE 34,0:HOME) 

Its second step is to take the input problem, 
make sure that none of it is simply a carriage 
return, and check it for internal spaces. 



COMPUTIST #51 



jaiMtwnf 



The program does this in lines 150— 260. 
If an inter nal space is found, or a row is entered 
as just a iRETUawl ^ the program asks for tlie 
row to be re-entered, 

Rl$, R2$, and R3$ contain the rows 1,2, 
and 3, respectively. 

Line 300 sets NC (for number of columns) 
to the longest row. Obviously the third row has 
to be as long or longer than the other two rows, 
so NC is always equal to the LEN(R3$). 

Line 340 maJces sure that the problem is 
not obviously unsolvablc by checking to see that 
the length of row 1 or 2 is not longer than row 
3, or that or 3 is not more than 1 letter longer 
than rows 1 or 2. 

Lines 380— 510 pad all the strings to the 
same length, for convenience in applying the 
initial heuristics. For every letter the string is 
shorter than NC, a space is added at the 
beginning. T$ is a dummy string used to hold 
the number of spaces to add to the rows. T$ 
is set to " " at the start of the routine and set 
to " " when the routine is exited. 

Lines 3S0 — 630 do the initial display. Line 
560 prints "?" over all the carries except the 
carry for column 1, which is obviously always 
O, and therefore displays a there. 

The problem is displayed twice. The 
problem on the left is the problem in its start 
state, which is usefiil for reference. It remains 
unchanged during the work period. The 
problem on the right displays the problem in 
its current state, with appropriate substitutions. 

All the letters are POKEd directly onto the 
screen so that Cryptarithmetic Helper will 
function properly in either 40 or 80 columns. 

Lines 61(li--llfD arc responsible for 
detecting any information in the initial problem 
that can restrict variables. Line 670 sets the top 
of the text window to below the problem and 
clears it with HOME. Lines 680 and 770 are 
responsible for looping through all the columns 
so that they are all checked for variable 
restrictions. Line 690 set L - for converted 
coLumn - to the offset necessary to PEEK the 
values in memory. 

Lines 700—760 print any restrictions that 
are found. This routine checks only unchanging 
left problem, so that the initial variable 
restrictions may be redisplayed at any time. 

Lines 810— 10O0 take guesses and 
C/yprarif/imefjc //e/per commands. Line 810 
sets the text window to near the bottom of the 
screen so that no information above will be 
destroyed. Line 820 takes the input, and lines 
830—880 check to see if it is a command. 

Line 890 checks to see if the user wishes 
to assign a value to a variable or a carry of an 
existing column. If it is a carry the program 
performs a GOTO UfflO, otherwise it continues. 

Lines 900—940 check through the rows 
to make sure that the variable is in the problem. 
If the variable is not in the problem, it restarts 
the "Take a guess" routine. If the variable is 



found, it asks for the value - V$ - with which 
to replace the letter. 

Lines 990— lOOO check to make certain 
that the input value is an integer or a carriage 
return if it is an integ er, the pr ogram checks 
for conflicts. If it is a iRETURHl , the program 
reinserts the character into the problem with 
substitutions by performing a GOTO to the 
"Reinsert letters" routine at lines 1190—1270. 

Lines 1040—1080 check for conflicts 
before substituting the variable on-screen by 
PEEKing the screen locations, converting that 
value to an ASCII code, and checking to see 
if its value equals V$ and that the character for 
which the value has replaced is die same as that 
for which V$ is to replace. That is CHR$ (PEEK 
(X + 20) - 128) = VS sees if what is on the screen 
in the problem with the substitutions equals V$ 
and PEEK(X) - 128 <> ASC{LTS} sees if the 
character in the problem without the 
substitutions is the same as LT$. If these 
conditions are true, then that variable value is 
used, and the "Take a guess" routine restarts. 
Otherwise the program docs a GOTO to the 
"Insert letters and carries" routine at lines 
1310-1380. 

Lines 1 110— 1 150 take carry substitutions. 
If the valueisnot a legitimate carry value (i.e., 
or 1) the program asks for a different value. 
If the value is legitimate, it docs a GOTO to 
"Insert letters and carries" at 1310—1380. 

The "Insert letters and carries routine," 
lines 1310-1380, finds the character in LT$ 
by PEEKing the screen locations on the problem 
without substitutions and POKEing V$ into the 
same place on the problem with substitutions. 
The program then enters the "Calculate 
Possible Values" routine. 

Lines 1420—1790 calculate possible 
values for variables that have not had a 
substitution made, and checks for conflicts in 
the information for which substitutions have 
already been made. Line 1420 sets the text 
window below the displayed problem and clears 
it with HOME, 

In this routine, A$, B$, X$, Y$, and Z$ 
contain the characters found in the carry of the 
next column, the carry of the column, the first 
row, the second row, and the third row, 
respectively. A, B, X, Y, Z contain ASCII 
values of A$, B$, X$, Y$, and Z$, 
respectively. Lines 1540— 1580 assign actual 
numerical values to A, B, X, Y, and Z if they 
represent values and not characters. If A, B, 
X, Y, and Z all are numbers, then line 1590 
checks to make sure they add properly. If they 
do, then the program performs a NEXT C to start 
checking the next column. Lines 1600-1660 
check for errors in the previously substituted 
data, and lines 1670—1780 offer suggestions 
on possible values for variables for which no 
substitutions have been made if possible. Lines 
1590— 17 80 work by checking preconditions 
and then calculating possible values based upon 



those conditions , A check such as X = V AL(XS) 
is true if X and X$ arc the same integer with 
X in integer form and X$ in string form. 
Lines 1830—1900 print the help screen. 

The Variables 

A —carry from the next column, 
AS —character in carry from the next 

column. 
B —carry from the column. 
B$ —character in carry from the next 

column, 
C — miscellaneous counter, 
L —converted column containing screen 

offset, 
LT$ —the letter or column that is to have a 

value assigned it. 
NC —number of columns, 
Rl$ -row 1, 
R2$ —row 2. 
R3$ —row 3, 
V$ —value to assign what is contained in 

LT$, 
X —general counter, or value from first 

row of problem, 
X$ —character from first row of problem, 
Y —value from second row of problem, 
Y$ —character from second row of 

problem. 
Z —value from third row of problem. 
Z$ —character from third row of problem. 

Start With These Problems 

SEND DONALD CROSS 
+MORE +GERALD +ROAD$ 

MONEY ROBERT DANGER 

If you really want to convince yourself that 
the Cryptarithmatic Helper does help, try 
solving one by hand first. 

If anyone discovers more initial heuristics or 
makes any interesting modifications to this 
program, I would be interested in knowing what 
they are. 



CRYPTARITMETIC HELPER 

20 REM * * 

30REM * CRYPTARITHIitATIC HELPER * 

40 REM * * 

50 REM * BY KEVIN LEPARD * 

60 REM * * 

70 REM ********************** 

80 REM 

90 REM SET NORMAL HEIGHT TEXTmNLm, SHOffHELP 

SCREEN 
100 REM 
lie POKE 34 , : HOME : GOSUB 1800 : POKE 34 , : HOME 



January 



COMPimST #51 



120 REM 

130 REM TAKE I NPlfT PROBLEM 

140 REM 

150 HOME : INPUT "ENTER'THE'FIRSrLINE"' ;RU 
160 FOR C = 1 TO LEN (RIS): IFMIDJ (R1$,C,1) = 

■"" THEN 150 
170 NEXT C 

180 IFR1S= ""THEN150 

190 HOME : INPUT "ENTER°THE°SECOND'LirJE°" ;R2$ 
200 FOR C= 1 TO LEN (R2$) : IFMID$ (R2$,C,1) = 

"°" THEN 190 
210 NEXT C 

220 IFR2$ = ""THEN190 
230 HOME ; INPUT "ENTER'THE'THIRD'LINE"' iR3$ 
240FORC=1TOL£N {R3$) : IFMIDS {R3$,C,1) = 

"'" THEN 230 
250 NEXT C 
260 IFR3$ = ""THEN230 

270 REM 
Zm^mSETTHENUMBEROFCOLUMNSTOTHE LONGEST 

R(M 
290 REM 
300NC=LEN (R3$) 

310 REM 

ll^mii MAKE SURE IT ISN'T OBVIOUSLY UNSOLVABLE 

330 REM 

340 I F NO > LEN {Rl$) + 1 OR NO LEN (R2$) + 
1 OR LEN (RIS) > NC OR LEN (R2S) > NC THEN 
PRINT : PRINT ■'VOU'HAVE'ENTERED'AN' 
LINSOLVABLE'PROBLEM." : PRINT ; PRINT 
■'PRESS'ANY'KEV'TO'RESTART" : PRINT : GET 
JK$: GOTO 10 

350 REM 

360 RmPAD THE STRINGS TO ALL THE SAME LENGTH 

370 REM 

380 IFNC = 1THEN510 

390 T$ = "'' 

400 IF NC - LEN (RIJ) < = THEN 460 

410FORC = 1TONC-LEN (RU) 

420TJ = T$ + '"" 

430 NEXT C 

440R1$=T$ + RU 

450 T$ = "" 

460 IFNC-LEN (R2$) < = THEN 510 

470 FOR C= ITONC-LEN (R2$) 

480T$ = TS+ ""■ 

490 NEXT C 

500 R2$ = T$ + R25 

510 TS= '■'■ 

520 REM 

530 REUDOTHE INITIAL DISPLAY 

540 REM 

550 POKE 34,0: HOME 

560 IF NC> 1 THEN FOR C = 1 TO NC - 1 : POKE 1024 

+ 20 + C, ASC ( "?" ) +128: NEXTC: POKE 1024 

+ 20 + NC, ASC ( "0" ) + 128 
570 I FNC = 1 THEN POKE 1024 + 21, ASC CO'') + 128 
580 FOR C = 1 TO NC 
590 POKE 1280 + C, ASC(MID$ (R1S,C,1)) + 128: 

POKE 1280 + C + 20, ASC (MIDMRli.C,l)) + 

128 



600 POKE 1408 + 0, ASC(MIDS (R2$,C,1)) + 128: 

POKE 1408 + C + 20, ASC (MIDI (R2$,C,1)) + 

128 
610 POKE 1536 + C, ASC ("-" ) + 128; POKE 1536 + 

C + 20, ASC ( '■-" ) + 128 
620 POKE 1664 + C, ASC(M1D$ (R3$,C, 1)) + 128: 

POKE 1664 + C+20, ASC (MID$ (R3$,C,1)) + 

128 
630 NEXT C 

640 REM 

(,m?m PERFORM INITIAL VARIABLE RESTRICTION 

660 REM 

670 POKE 34,7: HOME 

680 FOR C = 1 TO NC 

690L = ABS (NC-C + 1) 

700 IFC = NCANDMID$ (R1$,L,1) = "'" AND MIDI 
(R2$,L,1) =■"" THEN PR I NT MID? (R3$,L,1) 
" = l'a'THE'CARRV'OF'C0LUMN"' NC "IS'l" 

710 IFMID$(RU,L,1)=MI0$(R2S,L,1)ANDMID$ 
(RU, L,l) = MID${R3i,L,l) THEN PRINT MID$ 
(R1S,L,1); ■"ISTS'CARRV'OF'COLUMNS"' ;C; 
'■'AND'" ;C + 1; '"ARE'0" : GOTO 770 

720 IFMIDS (R15,L,1) =MID$ (R3$,L J) ANDC < 

> 1 THEN PRINT MID$ (R2$,L,1) "=0X 
CARRV'OFXOLUMNS'" ;C; "'8'" ;C + 1; '''ARE 
TOR" : PRINT "'=9XCARRy*0F' COLUMNS'" 
;C, "'8'" ,C + 1; "'ARE'l" 

730 IFMID$ (R2$,L,1) = MIDJ (R3$,L,1) ANDC < 

> 1 THEN PRINT MID$ (RU,L,1) '■=0'8' 
CARRY'OFXOLUMNS'" ;C; "'S'" ;C + 1; '''ARE' 
0°OR" : PRINT"'=9TCARRY'0F' COLUMNS'" ;C; 
"'&'" :C + 1; "'ARE'l" 

740 IFMIDJ (R1$,L,1) =MID$ {R3$,L,1) ANDC = 

1 THEN PRINT MID$ (R2i,L,l) "=0°a'CARRY' 

OF'COLUMN'2'IS'0" 
750 IFMID? {R2J,L,1) =MID$ (R3$,L,1) ANDC = 

1 THEN PRINT MID$ (R1$,L,1) "=0'S'CARRy' 

OF'COLUMN'2'IS'0" 
760 IFMIO$ (R1S,L,1) =MID$ (R2$,L,1) ANDC = 

1 THEN PRINT MIDJ CR3$,L,1) "'IS'EVEN." 
770 NEXT C 

780 REM 

immii TAKE A GUESS 

800 REM 

810 POKE 34,22: HOME 

820 GET LTS 

830 I F LTJ = CHR$ ( 1 7 ) THEN POKE 34 , : HOME : END 

: RBiCTRL-Q QUITS 
840 IF LT$ = CHRJ (9) THEN 640: REM CTRL-I RE 

APPLIES INITIAL RULES 
850 I F LTS = " ? " OR LT$ = V " THEN GOSUB 1800 : REM 

SHOW HELP SCREEN 
850 IFLT$ = CHRJ (18) THEN GOTO 80: RE*CTRL-R 

RESTARTS 
870 IFLT$ = CHR$(19)THENGOTO520: REU CTRL-S 

RESTARTS PROBLEM 
S80 IFLT5 = "'"THEN820 
890 I F LTS > "1" AND LTS < = STR?{NC) THEN GOTO 

1100 
900 FOR C = 1 TO NC 

910 IFMIDS (RIS, CI) =LTS THEN 960 
920 IFMIDJ (R2$,C,1) = LTS THEN 960 
930 IFMIDS (R3S,C,1) = LTS THEN 960 
940 NEXT C 



950 GOTO 820 

960 PRINT LTS; "'='" ; 

970 GET VS 

980 IFVS=CHRS (13) THEN GOTO 1160 

990 IFVS < "0" OR V$ > "9" THEN 970 

1000 PRINT VS 

1010 REM 

1020 REM CHECK FOR CONFL ICTS 

1030 REM 

1040FORC = 1TONC 

1050 IFCHRS( PEEK (1280 + 20 + 0- 128) =V$ AND 

CHRJ ( PEEK (1280 + C)) < > LTS THEN PRINT 

CHRS (7): GOTO 780 
1060 IFCHRS( PEEK (1408 + 20 + 0- 123) =VS AND 

CHRS ( PEEK (1408 + ) <> LTS THEN PR I NT 

CHRS (7): GOTO 780 
1070 IFCHRS (PEEK (1664 + C + 20)- 128} =VS AND 

CHR$ ( PEEK (1664 + ) < > LTS THEN PRINT 

CHR$ (7): GOTO 780 
1080 NEXT C 
1090 GOTO 1280 

1100 PRINT "CARRV'OFXOLUMN'" ;LTS; "'='" ; 
1110 GET VS 

11Z0 IFVJ = CHRS (13) THEN GOTO 1160 
1130 IFVS< "0" OR VS > "1" THEN 1110 
1140 PRINT VS 
1150 GOTO 1280 
1160 REM 

UTS REH REINSERT LETTERS 
1180 REM 
1190 IF ASC (LTS) -48 OVAL (LTS) THEN GOTO 

1220 
1200 POKE 1024 + 20 + (NC + 1 - VAL (LTS) ) , ASC ( 

"?" ) + 128 
1210 GOTO 1390 
1220 FOR C = 1 TO NC 
1230 IFPEEK (1280 + -128 = ASC (LTS) THEN POKE 

12B0 + C + 20, PEEK (1280 + C) 
1240 IFPEEK (1408 +C) -128= ASC (LTS) THEN POKE 

1408 + C+20, PEEK (1408 + 
1250 IFPEEK (1664 + -128 = ASC (LTS) THEN POKE 

1664 + C + 20, PEEK (1664 + C) 
1260 NEXT C 
1270 GOTO 1390 
1280 REM 

1290 REM INSERT LETTERS ANP CARRIES 
1300 REM 
1310 I F ASC (LTS) - 48 <> VAL (LTS) THEN GOTO 

1340 
1320 POKE 1024 + 20+ (NC + 1 -VAL (LTS)), ASC 

(VS) + 128 
1330 GOTO 1390: REM GOTO CALCULATE POSSIBLE 

VALUES 
1340 FOR C = 1 TO NC 
1350 IFPEEK (1280 + -128 = ASC (LTS) THEN POKE 

(1280 + 20 + C), ASC (V$) + 12e 
1360 IFPEEK (1408 + C)- 128 = ASC (LTS) THEN POKE 

(1408 + 20 + 0, ASC (VS) + 128 
1370 IFPEEK (1654 + C)-128 = ASC (LTS) THEN POKE 

(1664 + 20 + C), ASC(VS) + 128 
1380 NEXT C 
1390 REM 

1400 Rm CALCULATE POSSIBLE VALUES 
1410 REM 



ID 



COMPUUST #51 



January 



1420 POKE 34, 7: HOME 

1430 FOR C = 1 TO NC 

1440A = PEEK{1024 + 21 + NC-C-1) -128 

1450 B = PEEK (1024 + 21 + NC-C) -128 

1460 X = PEEK (1280 + 21 + NC-C) -128 

1470 Y = PEEK (1408 + 21 + NC - C) - 128 

1480 Z = PEEK (1554 + 21 + NC - C) - 128 

1490A$=CHR$ (A) 

1500B$ = CHR$ (B) 

1510X$ = CHR$ (X) 

1520V$ = CHR$ (Y) 

1530Z$ = CHR$ (Z) 

1540 I F A - 48 = VAL (AS) THEN A = A - 48 

1550 I F B - 48 = VAL (BJ) THEN B = B - 48 

1560 IFX-48 = VAL (X$) THENX = X-48 

1570 I F Y - 48 = VAL (Y$) THEN Y = V - 48 

1580 I F Z - 48 = VAL (Z$) THEN Z = Z - 48 

1590 IFX = VAL (X$) ANDY = VAL (YJ) AND Z = VAL 
(Z$) AND A =VAL (A$) AND B =VAL (B$) AND X 
+ V + B = (10*A) + Z THEN GOTO 1790 

1500 IFX = VAL (X$) AND Y = VAL (Y$) AND Z = VAL 
(Z$) ANDA = VAL(A$) ANDB = VAL(BS) ANOX 
+ Y + B < > Z + (10 * A) THEN PRINT 
'■ERROR°IN°C0LUMN°";C: GOTO 1790 

1610 I F X = VAL (XS) AND Y = VAL (Y$) AND Z = VAL 
(ZS) AND B = VAL (B?) AND C = NC AND X + Y + 
B = ZTHENGOTO1790 

1620 I F X = VAL (X$) AND Y = VAL (V$) AND Z = VAL 
(Z$) AND B = VAL (B$) AND C = NC AND X + Y + 
B < > Z THEN PRINT "ERROR'IN' COLUMN'" 
:NC: GOTO 1790 

1630 IFX$=""' ANDYS = "°" THEN IFZ = VAL(Z?) 
AND Z <> 1 THEN PR I NT "ERROR' I N'COLUMN'" 
;NC: GOTO 1790 

1640 I F X = VAL (X$) AND Y = VAL (Y$) AND Z = VAL 
(Z$) AND A = VAL (AS) AND B < > VAL (B$) 
THEN IFX + YOZ+ (10 * A) ANDX + Y + 
1 < > Z + (10*A) THEN PRINT "ERROR' 
IN'COLUWN'" :C: GOTO 1790 

1650 IFX = VAL(X5) ANDY = VAL (Y$) ANDZ = VAL 
(Z$) AND A <> VAL (AJ) AND B = VAL (6$) 
THEN IFX + V + BOZANDX + Y + BOZ 
+ 10 THEN PRINT "ERROR'IN' COLUMN'" ;C:GOTO 
1790 

1660 I F X = VAL (XJ) AND Y = VAL (Y$) AND Z = VAL 
(Z$)ANDA<>VAL(A$) AND Bo VAL (B$) 
THEN IFX + YOZANDX + Y + 1 OZAND 
X + Y<>Z + 10ANDX + V + l<>Z+ie 
THEN PRINT "ERROR'IN' COLUMN'" ;C: GOTO 
1790 

1670 I F X = VAL (X$) AND Y = VAL (y$) AND A = VAL 
(AS ) AND B = VAL ( B$ ) THEN PR I NT Z$ "'='" ; X 
+ Y + B- (10 * A) 

1680 IFX = VAL (XI) ANDY = VAL (YJ) ANDA = VAL 
(AS)ANDB<>VAL (BJ) THEN PRINT zr"="' 
;X + Y-(A* 10) "'OR'" ;X + Y+1- (A* 10) 

1690 IFX = VAL(X?)ANDY = VAL(Y$)ANDA OVAL 
(A?) ANDB = VAL(BJ) THEN PRINT ZV"='" ;X 
+ Y + B- 10; "'OR'" ;X + Y + B 

1700IFX = VAL(X$)ANDY = VAL(y$)ANDA<>VAL 
(AS) ANDEO VAL (BS) THEN PRINT Z$ "'='" 
;X + Y; "'OR'" ;X + Y+1; "'OR'" ;X + Y-10; 
"'OR'" iX + Y+1-10 

1710 IFX = VAL(XJ) ANDZ = VAL (ZS) ANDA = VAL 



(AS) AND B = VAL (B$) THEN PRINT Y?; "'='" 

;(Z+ (10* A)) - (X + B) 
1720 I F X = VAL (X?) AND Z = VAL (ZJ) AND A = VAL, 

(AS) AND B < > VAL (B$) THEN PRINT Y$; 

"'='" :(Z+(10* A)) -X; "'OR'" ; (Z + (10 

*A))-(X+1) 
1730IFX = VAL(X$)ANOZ = VAL(Z$)ANDA<>VAL 

(AS) ANDB = VAL(B$) THEN PRINT Y$; "'='" ;Z 

- (X + B); "'OR'" ;Z + 10- (X + B) 
1740IFX = VAL(X$)ANDZ = VAL(Z$)ANDA<>VAL 

(AS) ANDB < > VAL (BS) THEN PRINT YS; 

"'='" ;Z-X; "'OR'" ;Z-(X + 1); "'OR'" ;Z + 

10 -X; "'OR'" ;Z + 10- (X + 1) 
1750 I F Y = VAL (YS) AND Z = VAL (Z$) AND A = VAL 

(AS) AND B = VAL (BJ) THEN PRINT XS; "'='" 

;(Z+ (10 * A)) - (Y + B) 
1760 IFY^VAL (YS) ANDZ = VAL (ZS) ANDA = VAL 

(AS) AND B < > VAL (B$) THEN PRINT XS; 

"'='" ,(Z+(10* A)) - Y; "'OR'" ;(Z+ (10 

*A))-(Y + 1) 
1770 IFY = VAL(YS)ANDZ = VAL (Z$)ANDA<> VAL 

(AS)ANDB = VAL(BI)THENPRINTXS; '■'='" ;Z 

- (Y + B); "'OR'" ;Z+10- (Y + B) 

1780 IFY = VAL (YS) ANDZ = VAL (ZS) ANDAo VAL 

(AJ) ANDB< > VAL (BS) THEN PRINT XS; 

"'='" ;Z-Y; "'OR'" ;Z-(Y+1); "'OR'" ;Z + 

10 -Y; "'OR'" ;Z + ie- (Y + 1) 
1790 NEXT C; GOTO 780 
1800 REM 
1810 REM Wf/J* 
1820 REM 

1830 POKE 34,7; HOME 
1840 PRINT "HELP" 
1850 PRINT ; PRINT "CTRL-R'RESTARTS' 

CRYPTARITHMATIC'HELPER" 
1860 PRINT "CTRL-S'RESTARTS'THE'CURRENT' 

PROBLEM" 
1870 PRINT "CTRL-I'RE-APPLIES'THE'INITIAL' 

RULES" 
1880 PRINT "CTRL-Q'QUITS'CRYPTARITHMATIC 

HELPER" 
1890 PRINT "/'ORTRETURNS'YOU'TO'THE'HELP' 

SCREEN" 
1900 PRINT : PRINT "PRESS'ANY'KEY'TO'CONTINUE" 

; PRINT : PRINT: GET JK$: HOME: POKE 34, 22: 

HOME ; RETURN 



Checksums 


10 


- JBADD 


960 


- $2E86 


20 


- S9B13 


970 


- S4E0D 


30 


- $4D3B 


980 


- SDD4B 


40 


- SAD92 


990 


- $18E8 


50 


- SC899 


1000 


- SC6BC 


60 


' SFF65 


1010 


- S01E1 


70 


- SA3BF 


1020 


- S289B 


30 


- SA900 


1030 


- S176C 


90 


- S924D 


1040 


- S0F3A 


100 


" SCB63 


1050 


- SD8E9 


110 


- S4F3D 


1060 


- S05CB 


120 


- SE31C 


1070 


- J41D3 


130 


- SCECB 


1080 


- S77DE 


140 


- S15E7 


1090 


- S674F 


150 


- S8B26 


1100 


- S1254 



160 


- S171B 


1110 


- S671A 


170 


- $B4C4 


1120 


- $2F39 


180 


- SEF38 


1130 


- S5B6F 


190 


- J7AD9 


1140 


- $A070 


200 


- JACA2 


1150 


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210 


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1150 


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220 


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1170 


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230 


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1180 


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240 


- $4D3D 


1190 


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250 


- SIEEA 


1200 


- S7286 


250 


- SB537 


1210 


- S3855 


270 


- SCBCC 


1220 


- SCCEF 


280 


- $749B 


1230 


- SC377 


290 


- S6F1F 


1240 


- S142D 


300 


- SAE78 


1250 


- S23EE 


310 


- S8049 


1260 


- S3757 


320 


- SDD6A 


1270 


- $3944 


330 


- SB214 


1280 


- S2589 


340 


- S5CeF 


1290 


- S0F61 


350 


- S9B79 


1300 


- $770F 


360 


- S5539 


1310 


- $028E 


370 


- S0D76 


1320 


- $2DAD 


380 


- $973E 


1330 


- $2470 


390 


- S25F4 


1340 


- S755E 


400 


- S76A4 


1350 


- SAE3D 


410 


- $6E94 


1350 


- S0B3D 


420 


- S40BD 


1370 


- S97C7 


430 


- JD050 


1380 


- S4A58 


440 


- $ABB0 


1390 


- S6AE5 


450 


- $CB56 


1400 


- S7B18 


460 


- S6356 


1410 


- S123E 


470 


- S5061 


1420 


- S971A 


480 


- SD15B 


1430 


- SFF58 


490 


- SAF66 


1440 


- SDB9F 


500 


- SD2B4 


1450 


- $7258 


510 


- S0F09 


1460 


- $BC98 


520 


- SC2EE 


1470 


- $EEA7 


530 


- SB9E0 


1480 


- $5192 


540 


- $6F70 


1490 


- $7 FOB 


550 


- $876E 


1500 


- S52C2 


560 


- SEA70 


1510 


- S52F5 


570 


- $6F2F 


1520 


- SF02D 


580 


- SABCS 


1530 


- SD04A 


690 


- $D09B 


1540 


- $22EG 


600 


- $A6D2 


1550 


- $1322 


610 


- SBC4E 


1560 


- $9561 


620 


- S6F58 


1570 


- SFFAF 


630 


- S8A3E 


1580 


- $E351 


640 


- S2145 


1590 


- $0FE6 


650 


- SC6A5 


1500 


- $7499 


660 


- SE62D 


1610 


- S69D6 


670 


- S5D26 


1520 


- SC14E 


680 


- S7A4C 


1630 


- S9FC2 


690 


- S4783 


1640 


- $1A98 


700 


- SAE05 


1650 


- S214F 


710 


- $F35C 


1660 


- S36EF 


720 


- $B93B 


1670 


- SF174 


730 


- JCCB0 


1680 


- SCA2E 


740 


- S35F4 


1690 


- IB055 


750 


- S4515 


1700 


- $6552 


750 


- S7638 


1710 


- 17558 


770 


- S10C4 


1720 


- $C42C 


780 


- SDllC 


1730 


- S7AFC 



January 



COMPUnST #51 



11 



790 


- $0950 


1740 


- $1354 


800 


- $6D07 


1750 


- $A3F4 


810 


- $C5B2 


1760 


- $A9EF 


820 


- $3919 


1770 


- $E9A6 


830 


- $6DE0 


1780 


- $67AE 


840 


- $4F26 


1790 


- $9C3F 


850 


- $AB20 


1800 


- $BC58 


860 


- $4D0F 


1810 


^ $2F0F 


870 


- $0DBA 


1820 


- $8465 


880 


- $2B9A 


1830 


- $0829 


890 


- $AC82 


1840 


- $DDE3 


900 


- $304A 


1S50 


- $BC5A 


910 


- $AB7A 


1S60 


- $3405 


920 


- $7A29 


1870 


- $C875 


930 


- $4C8F 


1880 


- $FD30 


940 


- $A1C7 


1890 


- $3E33 


950 


- $77E9 


1900 


- $69A0 



Stanley Planton 



VsinqEDDIVTo 

Modify Tracks & Sectors 

■ Requirements 

n Apple ll-ish computer 

D Essential Data Duplicator (EDD) 4.N or 

4.N + 
D DOS 3.3 disk 
D 2 blank disks 

Are you frustrated by having to write 
complex conmillers im Super SOB, or wish that 
COPYA had some sector editing capabilities 
when you use it? Have you run into situations 
where you KNOW that there is a certain 
sequence of bytes on a disk, but you can't 
persuade your sector-editor to read the next 
track? 

There are a few useful tricks you can 
perform with the newer versions of EDD, both 
the EDD 4.N and EDD 4.N+ , that may solve 
your next difficult-to-nomialize problem for 
you. 

Most of us are familiar with the speed and 
efficiency oiEDD as a disk-copying utility, but 
may be iess comfortable with using EDD to 
scan tracks for either individual bytes or 
complex sequences of bytes, and with using 
EDD to change them automatically to other 
values. 

A major reason for this lack of familiarity 
with some of EDD's more powerfiil routines 
is due to the relative obscurity of the manual 
that comes with the program. Experienced, as 
well as novice users can be left somewhat 
puzzled by the author's lack of clarity and detail 
in explaining just what can be done with EDD, 
and how to do it. 

This article is an attempt to explain one of 
the more exotic functions of this popular 



program, and to give some examples of how 
EDD'fi power can be applied to problems. 

If you haven't already rushed out to your 
favorite software vendor to buy the '4.N' 
version of EDD, then you might want to do so 
after reading these tipsi 

Assuming that you have the program in 
question, boot it up, and look at the main menu. 
You will see that there are nine major options; 
select the second one: "CHA NGE 
PARAMETERS" and press iHETURHl 

Put a normal DOS 3.3 disk in your 
"ORIGINAL" drive tnormally Drive #2 for 
£01?), and ablank disk in the "DUPLICATE" 
jdrive. The "original" disk must be 
write-protected. 

From the "CHANGE PARAMETERS" 
menu, select the third option, "REPROGRAM 
PREWRITE ROUTINE", and press 
IRETURMI . The screen should show a display 
that looks something like this: 

CHANGE PREWRITE BYTE <S0 = ffil 

Note that the first number is the NUIUBER 
of the INSTRUCTION, and the second number 
is the actual instruction or value. EDD will 
perform sequences of instructions diat you type 
in; the trick is to tell EDD what to do when. 
If you arc looking at the printed BDD manual, 
most of the following is somewhat explained 
between pages 39 and 64. 

The instructions you will type in will tell 
EDD to read each track into RAM memory, 
but ALSO to check the track for sequences of 
bytes and to CHANGE these bytes to something 
else when it writes the track out to the 
"duplicate" disk. 

Thereisalot of power available to the user: 
you can change almost anything into anything 
else, and perform sector editing automatically 
without using a sector editor, once you figure 
out the instructions. 

Let's start by changing all the address 
headers on the disk we're copying. The standard 
values are D5 AA 96 for DOS 3.3, so let's tell 
EDD to change them to some other value, say 
D4AA96 (sound familiar?). The start of EDD' & 
PREWRITE instructions is byte #$00, so let's 
enter an appropriate value into this location, and 
follow it with more instructions to tell EDD to 
change all the D5 AA 96 headers on the disk to 
D4 AA 96 bytes. Some of the relevant 
instructions are as follows: 
lO Return, do next track 

20 Start on next instruction byte 

21 Loopbackuntjldone(go to next sector, etc.) 
31 Search for... 

36 Replace with... 

The fu^t instruction should be a #20 (start), 
followed by a #31 (look for), the values D5 AA 
96 (three bytes), a #36 (replace with), the three 
bytes D4 AA 96, a #21 (look for the next D5 AA 
96), and a #10 (go back, take a new track and 
start over). 

There is a trick to entering valued into th^e- 



EDD routines: yOu must use the spacebar 
between MOST entries; only use the 
iRETURWl following the value entered into the 
#00 instruction and the final value, I know that 
this sounds unclear, but try it. 

Rem ember, in COMPUTI ST the req uired 
I SPACE I is indicated by ' and iRETtlRMl must 
be pressed after the command line. You should 
type in the following: 

00 = 20 
20'31'D5^AA'96''36'W'AA'96"Z1'10 

OK? Now go back to the main menu of 
EDD and copy the DOS 3.3 disk to the blank. 
Try to boot the copy: it shouldn't boot if the 
above was correctly entered. If you scan a few 
tracks on the disk, you should find that every 
address header is now D4AA96. Right? Now, 
can you change it back? 

To get rid of the D4 AA 95 pattern, just 
switch the D5 and D4 values in the above 
instructions, tell EDD to look for all D4AA96 
headers and change them to D5 AA 96. 

The real beauty of EDD for this purpose 
is that it doesn't care how a track is formatted; 
it reads byte-to-byte, so you can normalize very 
weird and wonderous tracks and sectors widiout 
a great amount of difficulty . You can even skip 
around on the disk, if desired, as only tracks 
that are copied with the changed parameters are 
altered. Oh, the instructions to get rid of the 
D4s should look something like this: 

20'31'D4'AA'96"36^D5"AA'96^21"10 

Now copy the copy with these instructions 
entered into the "PREWRITE" routines. You 
should have a normal DOS 3.3 disk again! 

If you're like me, this experiment should 
give you a few ideas about how to approach the 
problem of normalizing bizarre tracks. 

Sometimes we want to copy a disk and to 
automatically change unwanted instructions 
whenever or wherever they are located. Let's 
say we want to get rid of calls to reboot die disk; 
frequently written to a track as: 

4C 00 C6 (/U77jp to $C600, rebMt). 

We can use the same kind of format as in 
our previous experiment, and tell EDD to 
change each and every occurence of these 
instructions to something else, such as: 
EA EA EA (do nothing, three times). 

The instructions for the PREWRITE 
routine in this case would read 

20'31''4C^OO''C6^36^EA''EA'EA'21'10 

You can scan for even longer sequences of 
bytes, if you desire; I've been using three-byte 
sequences for clarity. 

If you want to write simple copy -protection 
schemes for disks, you can combine some of 
the techniques that appear in COMPUTIST 
each month with EDD's power, and come up 
with some real challenges. An example of this 
might be to change address headers on every 
other track of a disk. 



12 



COMPUTIST ^1 



January 



There are a couple of ways to approach the 
problem, one involving telling the disk's DOS 
what to look for and how to handle it, the other 
being to tell the DOS to ignore some bytes, I'll 
choose the latter, and leave the reprog ramming 
of DOS itself to someone with more time. 



I 1 I Boot up a "clean" DOS, and enter the 



monitor. 
CAU.-151 



I 2 I Tell the DOS in memory to ignore the 
first byte of the address header, 

B954: 29 00 



3 I Re-enter BASIC. 



E(II(II3G 



|__i_| Init a disk. 

INIT HELLO 

Now you have a disk formatted for DOS 
3.3, but the DOS of which doesn't give a hoot 
about the first byte of the address header. 

I 5 I Copy your files to this disk. Copy this 
disk to a blank disk as follows: 

I el Copy the first three tracks (S00-$02) 
with NORMAL parameter settings. You don't 
want to totally destroy DOS, do you? 

I 7 I Use the power of EDD to change 
headers on the rest of the disk . It' s fun to change 
every other track, every third track, etc, to 
something other than a value of D5 AA 96 for the 
address header; you can have D5 AA 95 
swapping around with D4 AA 96, D6 AA 96, SB AA 
95, or anything else you want. 

When you've had enough fun, boot the disk 
you've produced. If you confined your 
creativity to tracks $03-$22, and didn't make 
TOO many mistakes entering parameters into 
EDD, you should have a disk that will still boot, 
but that has a degree of copy-protection. If you 
REALLY want to be creative, totally destroy 
unused tracks and vary the drive speed from 
track to track. OK? Now, undo it! 

If you've gone through ail of the above, 
you'll be ready to use EDD to solve the next 
'impossible' disk problem you encounter. Go 
get 'em[ 



Jack Moravet2 



Softkey for... 



Little Computer People 

Act) vision 



It seems that Activision has used a similar 
protection scheme on much of their software. 
Using the sector-editor in Copy 11 Plus v7.4. 



I scan for the bytes A9 56 85. Usually in the 
same sector about 64 bytes away will be the 
bytes 25 FC. By changing the bytes from and 
including the A9 55 85 to the 25 FC to EAs and 
changing the 25 FC to A9 FF will usually disable 
the nibble-count routine. 

For Activision's Little Computer People , I 
found the bytes A9 55 85 on track $O0, sector 
$0A beginning at byte $73. The 25 FC was 
found on track $00, sector .$0A beginning at 
byte $B3. 



Tony H. tkeda 



nigs Softkey for.. 



Thexder 

Sierra On-Line 



Here is a quick softkey for Thexder (a Ilgs 
game with great sound and graphics!) 

Block Byte(s) Froin To 



$552 $30 


B0 


8.0. 


$3B 


F0 


80 


S53 


90 


80 


175 


90 


80 



Enjojf^ and keep up the good work! 



Dick Lavallee 



*Ugs Softkey for.. 



GraphkWhter Version LIRA 

DataPak Software 



■ Requirements 

□ 3'.^"disk sector-editor 

D Prodos sector-editor for SVi "disks siich as 

BYTEZAP.PRO mod (COMPUTIST 

#48) or SAND.PRODOS. 
D Disk-to-disk copier for 3'/2 "disks (Copy II 

Plus v7.4, Divsrsi-copy v3,2, etc.). 
a Blank 3'^ "disk. 



1 1 1 Copy GraphicWritcr 


disk-to-disk. 


" 




1 2 1 Place the original in 


a safe place. 


1 3 1 With a 3 'A" ProDOS block editor 
make the following edits: 
Block Byte(s) From To 


$45C $12B D0 0A 
$3DC $15F 0005 


EAEA 
EAEA 



■ Requirements 

□ 5 W "disk sector-editor 

G Sector editor for 5 W "disk. 

G Copier tor 3'^" and 5W"disks. 

D Blank 3 '/4" disk. 

D ProDOS-formatted 5 W "disk. 



I 1 I Copy GraphicWriter disk to disk. 

I 2 [ Place the original in a safe place. 

I 3 I Copy PROGRAMS/GRAPHIC 
WRITER fronfi the duplicate 3 V; "disk to the 
5 W " -formatted disk. 

I 4 I Search the 5Vi "disk for the string 00 

0AA9AAD5 SF5A 

I 5 I Change 00 0A to EA EA. 

I 6 1 Copy the modified PROGRAMS/ 
GRAPHICWRTTER file from the 5 W "disk to 
the 3'A"duplicate disk. 

m Copy PROORAMS/HD.INSTALL 
from the duplicate 3 ^A " disk to the 5 W " 
formatted disk, 

I j I Search the 5 W " disk for the string D0 

05 A9 00 01 80 03 

I 9 I Change D0 05 to EAEA. 

I Iffl I Copy the modified PROGRAMS/ 
HD. INSTALL file from the 5 W "disk to the 
V/z" duplicate disk,. 



El Chucko 



*llgs Softkey for... 



Print Siiop LLgs 

Broderbund 



Not too big of a change but the protecfion 
is found in different places on various copies 
of the new Print Shop. On one copy I found 
it on block $2 A bytes $7F— 81 while on another 
it was on block $2F bytes S7F— 81, Using a 
block editor, search for: F0 AB 20 51 42 20 4F 67, 
Change 20 4F67 to EA EA EA. 

I don't even have a Ilgs but if I can conhibute 
to eliminating copy -protection, I'm more than 
happy to do it. 

© I have one that has been bothering me 
for a couple of years that maybe someone can 
help with. Crossword Magic 4,0 c&nbe>eAii\y 
copied by different methods. The backup will 
work for everything but printing the crossword 
puzzle. I bought the program for classroom use 
and guard it carefully since I am unable to back 
it up. It has several track $O0's and screwy 
headers. I have succeeded in normalising them 
but of course it won't run. Who can help me? 



January 



COMPUTIST #51 



13 



Paul A. Johnson 



Questions, questions, questions... 

C2) #1: Is there any way to get a copy of 
the aiticlcs from COMPUTIST jj'll about 
Ultsnm II & 1117 I am gatherins; a disk full of 
titilitieh; for the Ulriina series, the Talea of'the 
Unknown (Band's Tale) series, and the 
Wi2:ar(Jr}' .series. 

Also, does anybody have a program that 
will map the dungeons for Wizurdij'? My 
original was lost during a move before 1 started 
getting COMPUTIST, so I didn't have a backup 
and I can't write a dungeon mapper without the 
game, 

C2) #2: Doe.s anybtxly have any information 
about how the game is .saved on Elite! I wotild 
like to be able to write a character editor for 
this game, but t have no idea how the data is 
stored in the 10-sector bmary file. I've tried 
changing one thing and saving the game, but 
most of the file changes everytime I look at it, 
I would really appreciate some help. 

@ B: In COMPUTIST #47, Dr. Dracks 
stated that RDOS disks from SSI could be 
copied using an ARD. I tried doing this and 1 
was able to list the Applesoft program in 
memory, but I couldn't figure out how to 
transfer the files to another disi^. I have dBsnle 
for Normandy disk that is on its last legs and 
I would like to be able to copy it before it dies 
for good. 

A.P.r. far... 



Bard's Tale 



Dungeon Mapper Revisited 

U Rcqirirement.s 

[~ The Bard's Tale by Electrbnit Arts, 
□ Hi-res screen dump titility 

I enjoyed George Bigelow's article m 
COMPUTIST #47. 1 played the game without 
the aid of computer-generated maps, so I know 
what it is like to have to fight to the surface after 
a teleport, and not know if you're heading in 
the right direction. His program is good, but 
I could not easily understand the map on the 
screen. 

I solved this by digging up a dungeon 
mapper that I wrote for Standing Stones, also 
by Electronic Arts. 

I had to modify the program to suit the 
larger 22-by-22 dungeon levels, and also change 



the shape table used. The shape table was made 
with Apple Mechanic by Beagle Brothers, so 
it actually has twelve shapes instead of four. 

The first five .shapes in the table are 
basically the same as the shapes used by this 
program for The Bard's Ti^le. but they are 
larger, which gives a better looking 16-by-16 
map (for Standing Stones). I had to trim these 
shapes down to gel the larger dungeon level to 
fit on the hi-rcs screen. 

The tli^t shape used by this program (shape 
#6 in the table) is a wall. It is a straight line. 
The second shape used is a door. It is a straight 
line with two hash marks. The third shape is 
a secret door, and it is a straight line with one 
hash mark. The last shape used is a dot, and 
it represents any effects (stairs, messages, etc.) 
on the map 

Enter the BASIC portion of this program 
and save it as BARD MAPPER. Then enter the 
hexdump and save it to the same disk as 
SSSS.OBJ&. 

The program has several options, "Draw", 
"Print", and "Quit" are easy to understand, 
but "Menu" and "All Print" deserve some 
explanation.^ 

Hitting \M\ will toggle the screen from 
full-screen to split-screen graphics. This is 
helpful because the menu covers the bottom 
third of the map. 

The VK} option will send ALL of the 
levels to the printer, one at a time. I wouldn't 
try this option unless you have something else 
to do for about an hour. (Yes, it is slow, but 
the entire map gets printed ) 

This program will most likely have to 
modified so you can get the best use of it. 

One place to notice is in line 20. If you 
don't have two disk drives, then change DRV 
to 1. Then, after running the program and 
getting the command menu, replace the disi<: 
containing the program and object file with the 
dungeon disk. 

Another thing that may need changing is 
the hi- res dumping code in line 260. [ have a 
Pkiiso-U card hooked up to an Epson FX-80 
printer. The code I have in the program dumps 
the screen magnified 2 dots hori?.ontal and three 
dots vertical for every dot on the .screen. This 
slows the printing process, but I get bigger maps 
with more nxim tor 'special' descriptions. This 
string can be changed to whatever it takes to 
get your system to dump the screen. 

One suggestion that I have is to use this 
program to get a good looking map, and then 
use George's program to get an effects map to 
learn what the dots mean (That's what I do.) 

Also, if you want some help, but not too 
much, this progratn will give you the maps and 
the loctitions of special things, but you will have 
to go out and determine what the specials are. 

Good Luck and may your Bard never get 
laryngitis. 



BARD MAPPER 



10PRINTCHRI (4) "BLOAD'SSSS OBJ0,D1 ,A25000" 

: POKE 232,209: POKE 233,97 
20 SCALE= 1 : LO = L6384 : TF = 256 : il = : DRV = 2 : AI 

= "'MPDA" : DIMM$(16) 
30FORA = 0TO 16. READ MS (A): NEXT ; ^mREAD 

LEVEL NAMES 
40 REM POKE 768. 32: POKE 769. 227: POKE 770. 3: 
POKE 771.76: POKE 772.217: POKE 773.3: 
POKE 47092. 1 : REM READ SECTOR ROUTINE 
50.- DATA N0NE,CELLARS(1).SEWERS{2),SEWERS(3 
),SEWERS(4),CATACOI,IBS(5).CATACOMES(5 
),CATACOMBS(7),CASTLE(8}.CASTLE(9),C- 
ASTLE(10) ,TOiVER(n) ,T0WER(12) ,TOWER( 
13) ,T0WER(14) .TOWER (15) .TOWER (16) 
60 REM I^ENU 
70 HOME 
80 VTAB 21- PRINT "D)RAirLEVEL" : SPC( 13): 

"'RETURN "TO'QUIT" 
90 VTAB 22; PRINT "PjRIrNT'LEVEL'O.N'SCREEN" : 
PRINT "A)LL'LEVELS'TOTRlNTER" : PRINT 
"M)E.NU'-TOGGLE" :: VTAB 23: HTAB 25. 
INVERSE . PRINT MS (LVL): NORMAL 
100 POKE 49158.0 

110 X = PEEK (49152) : IPX < 12B THEN 110 
120 POKE 49168.0 
130 I F X = 141 THEN POKE 43624 , 1 . POKE 47@S2:, \:% 

HOME : VTAB 21: END 
140 FOR A = 1 TO 4 

150 IFCHRS (X-128) =UID? (A5.A,1) THE.N 180 
150 NEXT 
170 GOTO 60 

180 ONAGOSUB 200,230,300,420 
190 GOTO 60 
200 REM MENU TOGGLE 
210 POKE 49234 + M,0:M = (M = 0) 
220 RETURN 

230 REM SEND HI -PES SCREEN TO PRINTER 
240PRI,NTCHR$ (13) 4 CHR$ (4) "PRill" 
250 PR I. NT : PRINT : PRINT TAB ( 28}:Mt(LVL) 
260PRINTCHRS (9) ■'2.3H" : mii DUMP ROUTINE FOR 

PKASO-UCARD. 
270 PRINT CHRS (12); RBi FORff FEED 
280PRINTCHRS (4) "PRs'0" 
290 RETURN 
300 REM DRAI^'A LEVEL 
310 HOME . VTAB 21- INPUT "LEVEL^O'DRAif 

(1-16):-'" ,LVLJ 
320 IFLVL$= ""THENRETURN 
330LVL=VAL (LVLJ) 
340 I F LVL < 1 OR LVL > 16 THEN 310 
350 GOSUe 640 
360TRK = 15- ( (NT {LVL,/ 2+ ,5)) :SEC= 15 - {.( 

INT (LVL/ 2) * 2 = LVL) * 8) 
370 GOSUB 550 : SEC = SEC - ! : LO = LO 4 256 : GOSUB 

550: LO = LO - 256: REM READ INFO 
380 GOSUB 490: R^ti ORAif LEVEL 
390 SEC = SEC - 1 : GOSUB 550 : SEC = SEC - 1 : LO = LO 
4 255: GOSUB 550 : LO = LO - 255 : REM EFFECTS 
400 GOSUB 590 : REM DRAi? EFFECTS LOCATIONS 
410 RETURN 



14 



COMPUTIST #B% 



January 



420 Rm SEND ALL LEVELS TO PRINTER 

430 POKE 24999.1 

440 LVL = PEEK (24999) : GOSUB 640 : GOSUB 360 : REM 
READ I /\/FOSDRAiy LEVEL 

450 GOSUB 230: REKPRI/^TLEVEL 

460 IF LVL = 15 THEN RETURN 

470 POKE 24999, LVL + 1 

480 Q = PRE (0): GOTO 440 

A^^RBiDETERM/f^E ROOM CONFIGURATION 

500FORSQ = 0TO483:X= (SQ - ( iNT {SO/ 22} * 
22)) * 7 + 10:Y= m (SO / 22} * 7 + 10 

510 POKE 24576. PEEK (SQiLO}: REM Wr/iVro/ATC 
MEMORY FOR MACHINE CODE 

520 CALL 25000 : REM DETERMINE mERE MLLS GO 

530FORS = 1TO4: ROT= 32 - ((S - 1) * 32) + 80 
^^ (S > 2) : IF PEEK (24575 + S) THEN DRAW 
PEEK (24576 + S} + 5 ATX. 190 -Y 

540MEXTS: NEXTSQ: RETURN 

550POKE768,32: POKE 769, 227: POKE 770, 3: POKE 
771.76: POKE 772.217: POKE 773,3: POKE 
47092.1: W}l> READ SECTOR ROUTINE 

,560 POKE 43524, DRV: POKE 47082. DRV: POKE 
47083,0: POKE47084.TRK:POKE47085,SEC: 
POKE 47088, LO - INT {LO .■■' TF) * TF: POKE 
47089, INT (LO/TF): POKE 47090.0: POKE 
47091.0 

570 CALL 763 

580 RETURN 

'i'i^ mi EFFECTS LOCATIONS 

600FORSQ = 0TO483:X= INT (SO.- ( lNT(SQ/22) 
* 22)) * 7 4 10: Y= INT (SO./ 22) * 7 + 10 

510 IF PEEK (Sq'+ LO) THEN DRAW9ATX.190 -Y 

520 NEXT SO: RETURN 

630 REM PLOT GRID AND BORDER 

540 HGR : HCOL0R= 3 

650 FORX = 6 TO 150 STEP 7 : FORY = 29 TO 183 STEP 
7: HPL0TX.yTOX + l.YTOX+l.Y4lT0X.Y 
+ 1 : NEXT Y: MEXT X : REM PLOT GRID 

660 HPLOT 6 . 29 TO 6. 184 TO 151 . 184 TO 161 . 29 TO 
5 . 29 : REM BORDER 

570 RETURN 

Checksums 



10, 


- S5DC0 


350 


- $506C 


20 


- S217E 


360 


- S2302 


30 


- J.C229 


370 


- S2212 


40 


- S8F05 


380 


' J9E8C 


m 


- SA4FE 


390 


- SAC90 


m 


- S5477 


400 


- SF3A6 


» 


:- S04FE 


410 


- S7D53 


fi- 


- $0590 


420 


- $D7ED 


ll' 


- S2A75 


430 


- S1E0A 


100 


- SACE3 


440 


- SDC5C 


110 


- S71CA 


450 


- 1.4835 


120 


- S5356 


460 


- J70ED 


130 


- S5538 


470 


- $A6FC 


140 


- S8FE4 


480 


- $F075 


im 


- $E92A 


490 


- J39A3 


160 


- ICe48 


500 


- $3503 


170 


- $9854 


510 


- $21D8 


180 


- $8C9C 


520 


- $9EES 


190 


- $0062 


530 


- $04F7 


200 


- J78E9 


540 


- $C973 


210 


- i307A 


550 


- SCFE8 



220 
230 
240 
250 
260 
270 
280 
290 
300 
310 
320 
330 
340 



- JD33A 

- $10ED 

- $26DB 

- $0529 

- $E65B 

- $8CDD 

- $7Ce5 

- $0A0A 

- $72A0 

- $5ED5 

- $D453 

- $EB46 

- JBAEl 



560 
570 
580 
590 
600 
610 
620 
530 
640 
650 
560 
570 



$7ED2 
JF965 
$9221 
$BAFS 
$F143 
$95DF 
$140F 
$6CF6 
$B424 
$F344 
$8057 
$C707 



write -protect all 4 sides (as originals). 



SSSS.OBJ 



61A8 
61B0 
6188 
61C0 
61C8 
61D0 
51D3 
61E0 
61E8 
51 F0 
61F8 
6200 
6208 
6210 
6218 
5220 
5228 
6230 
6238 
6240 
6248 
6250 



A9 00 
80 03 
Ea6E 
60 6E 
60 FE 
60 0C 
00 43 
00 72 
00 80 
00 92 
29 24 
DB2B 
05 00 
2D 2D 
17 17 
El 10 
ICIC 
IE IE 
2D 05 
0E2D 
2D 05 
00 05 



SD0160 
60 80 04 
00 60 90 
00 60 90 
00 60 E0 
00 20 00 
00 47 00 
00 7A 00 
00 82 00 
D2 DB 2B 
56 20 20 
20 2D 24 
92 D2 De 
2D 00 BC 
17 17 17 
IClClC 
4D 49 49 
06 00 92 
00 92 DB 
00 92 DB 
00 05 00 
00 05 00 



8D 02 60 
60 A2 00 

03 FE 00 
06 FE 00 

04 D0 E8 
2D 00 39 
63 00 6A 
70 00 7E 

05 00 05 
20 25 B4 
00 92 02 
3E 20 20 
2B2D2D 
6E24 00 
40 49 49 
IC IC IC 
Fl IE IE 
DB 20 20 
20 74 25 
20 25 0E 
05 00 05 



JODDF 

^mi 

^m 

lfcU6 
$9470 
$0079 
$32B6 
S84A2 
S2BBF 
S79D6 
S2D1D 
SEA4E 
S8FD6 
$7107 
$E242 
SFF93 
S9988 
JFF22 
SA9FB 
$FF05 



B. Dudley Brett 



Softkey for. . 



Bard's Tale II 

Electronic Arts 



As revealed extensively before (last 
reference: Anic Fox in COMPUTIST ^47, 
page 29}, Eleetrojiic Arts continues to rely upon 
a track $06 nibble-count. The entry points to 
disk checks still use similar addresses, though 
these are located at slightly different places on 
the boot side of Baid \s Tale II. The easy way 
to produce a backup (i.e. COPYA-dbltt) disk is: 

I 1 I Format (INIT) the front side of a 
iilank disk with DOS .3.3. 

I 2 I Use a fastcopy to copy all four sides 
onto two disks, placing the boot disk onto your 
formatted side. Ignore the errors on track 6. 

I 3 I Using any sector editor, make these 
sector edits upon the copied boot side and then 



Trh Set Byte(s) 


Frotti 
40 6305 


To 


$01 $0C $00-02 


18 50.42 


$6F-71 


4C 69 05 


18 50 42 


01 0E $52-54 


20 03 A0 


18 50 4B 


;01 .0F t00-02 


40 69 A0 


18 60 DD 


J€F-71 


4C 69 A0 


18 60 DD 



Softkey for.. 



Learning Well series 



Mindscape 



Mindscape, in its educational programs 
{Learning Well sciies) relies upon altered 
address and /or data trailers. Sometmies the lirst 
byte of the address header may also be altered. 

Most commonly, a very simple, changing 
data trailer on several disks can be made 
COPYAabfe by turning off the trailer check in 
DOS 3.3 and copying with COPYA . The disks 
which are backed up this way aic: 



Body Awareness 



Fun witli Direction 



Letters and Words 



Knowing Numbers 



Shapes and Patterns 



Make a COPYA copy: 
LOAD COPYA 
POKE 47426,24 
RUN 

When done, make these sector-edits. 

TrRSct Byte(s) From To 



.$00 $03 342 



33 



18 



Growing Up Small 



One Mindscape piogram. Growing up 
Small, has altered address trailers, with D5 A A 
96 on even tracks atid D4 AA 96 on txld tracks. 
On some sectors the address trailer is also 
modified. Change DOS to ignore the first 
prologue byte and the epilogue bytes then run 
COPYA . 

CALL-151 
B954:29 00 
8989:18 60 
RUN COPYA 



January 



COMPUTIST #51 



15 



Sojtkey for... 



Klttdercomp 

Spinnaker 



Though A controller and Super lOB can be 
used (rcf: COMPUTIST #45, page 23), [ prefer 
iheDEMlJFFlN PLUS approach. This cutaili 
eapturing the Kindercomp RWTS using 
XFER.BOOT. Here is the procedure: 

I 1 I ForinaL a blank disk (use a fast DOS). 

INIT HELLO 

BLOAO XFER.BOOT 

I 3 I Insert ijriginal Kindercomp. 
PR#3 



I J I Run Kindercomp in exiended 



memory . 
CALL 768 



I 5 I And when the prompt appears: 
ICRESETl 

LHU Reenter the monitor. 

CALL-lSl 
BLOAD RESTORE 

set CS !o point It) RESTORE 
3F3:4C 00 03 

move RH7S iitto lower nie/iwn 
6SQ0<B800.BFFF[3y] 

BLOAO DEMUFFIN PLU5,A$4000 

Move DEMUFhi!^ into place 
803<4000.6000M 

Move Ktittierctmp R\^7S 
BeOO<fi800.6FFFM 

Run DEMUFFIN 
SQ3G 



I 7 I When DEMUFFIN asks for a 

filename use the wildcard (=) with no prompt, 

Sojikey for... 



Bard's Tale I 

Efeclronic Arts (EA) 



Ouiei< sector edits have been previously 
suggested in COMPUTIST. My copy had 
several calls to the EA nibble couni and rather 
than take a chance on having one of these 
causing a disk reboot, I decided to turn them 
all off! Here they are: 

I 1 [ Copy all 3 sides with a copier that 
ignores any cirors on track $06. 

I i I Make the following edits to the boot 
disk only: 



Trk 


Set Byte(s) 
$0B S47-49 


From 
20 F8 Aa 


To 


JGl 


IB 60 40 


101 


J0C $09-02 


4C59 05 


18 60 42 




J6F-71 


4C 59 05 


18 50 42 


101 


WE I4C-4E 


20 03 A0 


1S50 4B 




147-49 


20 F8 A0 


18 60 40 


S01 


S0F 100-02 


4C 69 A0 


18 60 DD 




MF-71 


4C 69 A0 


18 50 DD 



t Sofikey for. . 



Alphabet Zoo 

Spinnaker 



[ tried to use the Super lOB controller ni 
COMPuriSI' ff24, page 8 and COMPUTIST 
#29, page 9 but my original just would not 
copy. After using CIA . it was apparent that on 
several sectors the data trailers .seem to have 
some further alteration to that indicated in 
COMPI.ITIST. 

The answer to this is simply to turn off the 
trailer check in DOS with POKE 47426, 24 

NoW'- perform (he softkey as shown in 
COMPUTIST #24. Don'i forget the correction 
in COMPUTIST #29, 



Scott M. Simon 



Softkey for. . 



Super Boulder Dash 

Electronic Arts 



■ Requirements 

n 64k Apple 11 and up 
D Locksmith Fast Copy 
C Blank Disk 

The protection is similar to the protection 
used on most Electronic Art's games. Copy the 
disk with Locksmith last copy or any other 
copier that ignores errors. Edit the copy as 
follows: 
Trk Set 6yte{s) From To 



SSI S0A $52-54 6C54 00 
S01 S0F $00-02 4C69A0 



18 60 48 
18 60DD 



Well that's it. Have fun! 



Softkey for. . 



Master Diaguostics He 



Master Diaenostic.'i lie (MDUe) is a tiselul 
program that can test your Apple for proper 



performance in the ROM, R.'\M. 80-coiunin 
card, interface cards, disk drives, mouse, 
paddles, and more. It is also a disk-intensive 
program that loads code in segments while it 
is executing. With this fact in mind, one can 
understand the deadhne.ss otthe program's main 
drawback: It is copy-proiecied. 1 will detail the 
steps I went through to deprotect MDIIe. For 
(hose who want to crack the disk immediately, 
go to the "cookbook" instructions. 

The most useftil cracking tool that any hltcker 
can possess is a defined series of steps used to 
analyze a particular disk. The outcome of this 
analysis should determine if a disk uses a 
popular operating system and at least a hint of" 
what method of protection is ii.sed. 

Using my personal method of analysis, I 
discovered thai MDIIe uses an operating system 
similiarto DOS 3.3, is encrypted on disk, and 
has an altered data mark format. The fact that 
a "]" prompt appeared during booting told me 
that the DOS was fairly normal. 

A nibble editor showed me the altered 
address and data mark format. The same nibble 
editor {CIA llles) made me suspect thai the data 
was encrypted since the first few sectors on 
track $00 would decode, but the rest of the 
sectors would not. 

There are several w^ays of attacking these 
problems, but the best way is the method which 
knocks out all of the protection at once. 

How to do this? Simply i'ind a program that 
can use the protected disk's Read-W rile -Track - 
Sector [KWTS) to read the protected disk's 
sectors and that can use the normal DOS 3.3 
RWTS to write the sectors back in .standard 
format. 

For ihose of you w'ho haven't guessed, this 
program is Super lOB VI. 5. However, to use 
this, W'C must have a copv of the protected 
RWTS saved to the Super lOB disk and we must 
wriie a short controller for Super lOB lo use. 
Let us begin. 

Boot your DOS 3.3 d isk. It is assumed that 
you will hil IRETORWI after the commands 
listed here. Once DOS is in memory, type 
NEW. Then, POKE 40514,52. This patch to DOS 
will allow the greeting program lo be BRUN 
instead of RUN. Now. insert your blank disk 
and type INIT STARTUP. 

After the initialization process is finished, 
delete the file STARTUP from the newly 
formatted disk. Insert your MDIIe disk and type 
PR#6 to bo<it it. After it has booted, reset into the 
monitor and move the RWTS to address $19©© 
by typing 1900<:B800.BFFFM 

insen your DOS 3.3 disk and type C6O0G. 
After it has booied, reinsert your disk w-ith 
Super 10 B on it and type BSAVE 
RWTS.MD,AS1900,LS7FF. 

Having captured the RWTS, we must now' 
write a controller for Super lOB. Type NEW 
then enter the following controller and save it 
to disk. 



ii 



COMPUnST #51 



January 



Controller 



1300 REM SmP CONTROLLER FOR mi IE 

1010TK = 3 : LT = 35 : ST = 15 : LS = 15 : CD = WR 

: FAST = 1 
1020 GOSUB 360: GOSUB490: GOSUB 610 
1030 GOSUB 360- GOSUB 490: GOSUB 510: IF PEEK 

(TRK) =LT THEN 1050 
lUd TK = PEEK (TRK) : ST ^ PEEK {SCT} : GOTO 1020 
1050 HOME : PRINT "COPyDONE" ; END 
10010 PRINT CHR$ (A) '■BLOflD'RWTS.MD,AS1900" 

Controller Checksums 



1000 


- S355B 


1040 


- S0D4F 


1010 


- S2445 


1050 


- $8E0B 


1020 


- tC908 


10010 


- $F060 


1030 


- JFB9C 







This is basicany ihe swap controller 
Teatured in COMPUTIST #22 with line lOlO 
chanjjed to start copying at track $03, sector 
$m>. instead of at track $CXO. sector $0O. This 
is clianged because we do not want to copy the 
protected DOS. 

Load Super lOB VI. 5 then merge the 
MDlIc controller. Now, Super lOB will use the 
protected RWTS to read the original di.sl< and 
the normal RWTS to write to the copy disk. 
Type RUN and follow the instructions. After the 
copy is done, the copy should boot normally 
and it will be COPM-able. If you want to 
examine the files, it will pertbrm all DOS 
commands no r iti a 1 1 y . 

[ 1 I Boot DOS 3.3 and clear any Applcsolt 
program. 
NEW 



I 2 I Make hello program binary. 
POKE 40514,52 



I 3 I Insert blank disk and initialize, 
INIT STARTUP 



I 4 I Delete the hello prograr 
DELETE STARTUP 



L5_J Boot the MDIIe disk 

I 6 I Enter the monitor and move the 
RWTS. 
CALL -151 
1900<B80Q.BFFFM 



I 7 I Boot your disk with Super lOB on it 
I 8 I Save the MDIIe RWTS^ 
BSAVE RWTS.MD,A$1900,LS7rF 



9 1 Load Super lOB. 
LOAD SUPER lOB VI. 5 



I 10 I Type the controller and run Super 
[QB. 



Ralph Augenfeld 



t softkey addendum for. . 



Catalyst 3,0 

Quark 



1 have Catatyst ni 3.5" format, and could 
not de-protect it with the softtLcy in 
COMPUTIST ({'43. The one in COMPUTIST 
#44, by Kevin Sartorelli. however, worked 
line. The only trouble is that, in my veision, 
the patch to CA TAL YSTSYSTEM to jump to 
the monitor (step 4: 2175:4C 59 FF) should be 
changed to 219E:4C 59 FF. The rest of the softkey 
works fine. Many thanks to Mr. Sartorelli. 

t more Softkey s for... 



Stickybear Series 

Weekly Reader Software 



Oti the Sticky hear front, I have combined 
several of your softkey s into a method that 
seems to work on all my Stickybear chsks. [ 
have de- protected: 



ABCs 



Numbers 



Drawing 



Printer 



Towttbuilder 



Printer Library I & 11 



Only one that I have seems to have lurther 

pr(.)tcction, and that is Stickyhcur Mulh. 

First, follow'- Mare Lirrette's softkey in 
COMPUTIST #26, copy your origmal. and 
locate 01 S0 01 00 whh a disk .search utility. 
Find out the protected track and sector number 
(usually SOI , SOF), and where it i.s loaded to. 
Make the sector edit he recommends at 60 A2 
00 A2 00, and then Jump to Randy Ramirez' 
softkey in COMPUTIST #17 (also in Book of 
So ft keys #3) and execute both the move to 
S6000 from where the protected secU)r is 
loaded to, and the short wTite routine, 
substituting the appropriate track and sector at 
B7EB:D0 U SS. 

That's it! 



RAMfactor Mod 

for the Laser 128 



As of late I have heard a lot of talk about 
ROM disks and battery RA.VI, With the release 
of the Memory Saver card by Checkmate for 
the Ilgs, the Ilgs's own batteiy RAM, and the 
Ramdiaigcr for the Rain factor card (improved 
Slinky clone) by Applied Engmeering, ,one 
hears a lot about "Apple works in i5 .seconds 
from power-up[". 

As a 'lowly' Laser 128 ow-ner w-ith a one- 
megabyte Rainfactor card in a Central Point 
Software expansion box. I have taken 
"Appleworks in 15 seconds IVom power-up" 
for granted for some time now. 

First, let me say that I didn't sprmg for a 
Ramdrdrgt-r at $179. Instead, 1 use a single 
pole, single throw^ (SPST) togf;le switch and 
two pieees of wii-e. 

Here's how I do it 

The Laser 128 has an expansion slot on its 
side for one Apple compatible card, or a Laser 
expansion box, w-hich gives two slots. This box 
has its own 5 volt supply. There is an outboard 
plug-in 12 volt unit that gets dropped and 
regulated to 5 volts by a single IC on a heat sink, 

1 removed the IC and teed the box with 5 
volts directly. This ensures cool operation, 
further enhanced by a small fan sitting on top 
of the expansion box. 

These steps are not really necessary, but 
since 1 leave my expansion box on all the time, 
it is recommended. 

In any case, the extra pow'cr supply to my 
RAM board got me thinking, w-by couldn't I 
keep my data 'alive' if my computer is off and 
my expansion box is 'hot.' 

So. I tried shutting my computer off, W'hile 
keeping the power to my Ramlacior card. Of 
course, the data was trashed. It .seems that the 
data gets trashed at power-up! 

As an electrical engineer I like simple, 
elegant solutions. Hence. 1 discovered that 
grounding one of the pins that goes to the 
mysterious Rumchurgcr w rite-protects the card 
and ""15 seconds to Appleworks" suddenly 
became a realityl 

The details are as follows. First, a caveat. 
Obviously, monkeying with power supplies and 
RAM cards is not something for the klutz- 
oriented among us. Warranties go down tlie 
drain as can RAM chips, ROM chips, or all 
chips, as in fried (not french-). At this time, 
I can oiily i"ecommend tliis procedure toi" Laser 
128 (.iwners w-'ith a Ram factor card and an 
expansion box. After I describe the step-by - 
step. 1 will give hints to "real" Apple owners 
who W'-ant to experiment with their systems. 



[ January 



COMPUTIST #51 



i^ 



With the warnings in mind, remove ALL 

power from the computer and espafision box. 

Hold the Ranifactor board with the chips 

towards you. and you'll sec a 4-pin plug 
mounlt^d on the lelt far side of the board, it has 
a pair ol jumpers. 

Remove tlie left Jiand jumpef (nearer to the 
edge of the board) and replace with a miniature 
Japanese style 2-pin plug with two wires 
attached (I salvaged one from an ancient broken 
VCR). This is better than soldering, since it 
voids no warranties in an obvious way. 

Mount a singlc-polc, single-throw toggle 
switch on the back of the expansion box, and 
connect to the two wires. One of these wires 
is ground. When the switch is open, the card's 
data is protected. 

Replace card and carefully connect the 
power. 

Just before turning the compLiter off, open 
the switch. Leave the power on in the expansion 
box, i.e., the red LED should stay on. When you 
turn the computer back on, leave the switch 
open until the disk drives eome on. and then 
close the switch and boot or access the 
Ranifactor card normally. That's alll 

As stated earlier, this is only for a Laser 128. 
a Ranifactor card, and an expansion box. 
However, if an enterprising reader with an 
Apple II who doesn't mind voiding guarantees 
wants to fool around. I would direct them to 
the other two pins as a place to 'inject' power, 
as it were, with perhaps a rectifier diode acras.s, 
it. 

If the 'write-protect' bus is used as 
described before, it's possible to make it work, 
also. I'd like to hear from brave experimenters. 

Good luck, and remember to try and keep 
your board eool : external 5 volt supplies and/or 
a small fan will help, I hope there are other 
serious Laser 128 users .■backers who would like 
more modifications and tips; maybe even a 
column? 

P.S. If you want 'battery-backed' 
operation, you can simply place a small 
inexpensive gel-cell type lead -acid battery in 
series with a current limiting resistor across 
your external .supply. Use an ammeter to set 
your trickle charge' to a safe 2G ma. or so, 
and you're pn.itcctcd against power company 
outages or blown fuses, etc. Now you have 
"Appleworks for 20 years..." 



Rick Fabbre 



Softkey for.. 



Word Maze 

Learning Well 



axe. Word Maze is an interesting program for 
creating word mazes - the puzzles with words 
hidden is a square grid of letters. None of my 
bit copiers would touch this program. The 
presence of an applesott prompt during boot led 
me to believe the swap controller or CopvB 
would make a successful backup, however - no 
luek. 

A close examination of the disk with 
Disk view revealed the odd numbereti tracks 
have altered address headers of D4 AA 96 instead 
of the normal D5 AA 96. The first byte of the 
address epilog on all tracks has been changed 
to AF, but the second byte changes randomly 
from- track to track. 

Some research into my back issues of 
COMPLTIST - specifically Jim Harf a Arcade 
Boot Camp (COMPUTIST #44), Steve and Rod 
Smith's Dave Holle Protection (COMPUTIST 
#35). and David Alexander's Chess 7.0 
(COMPUTIST #48) - were just what I needed. 
Anyway, here's a controller for Super lOB 1 .5 
that will produce a good COPYA version of 
Word Maze. 

Controller 

1000 REM mRD HAZE CONTROLLER - 1 

1S10TK = :ST = :LT = 35 :CO = WR 

1020 Tl = TK . GOSUB 490 : GOSUB 1110 

1030 GOSUB 430 : GOSUB 100 : ST = ST + 1 : I F ST < 

DOS THEN 1030 
1040 IFBFTHEW1060 
1050 ST = :TK = TK + 1 : GOSUB 1110 : I F TK < LT 

THEN 1030 
1060 GOSUB 230 : GOSUB 490 :TK ^ Tl :ST = 
1070 GOSUB 430 : GOSUB 100 :ST = ST4l : IFST< 

DOS THEN 1070 
1080ST = 0:TK = TK^1 : I F6F = ANDTK< LT THEN 

1070 
1090 IFTK< LTTHEN 1020 
1100 HOME :AJ = "ALL'DONE" : END 
1110 POKE 47505 .207 : POKE 47413 .207 : POKE 

47426.24: IFTK/2 INT (TK ./ 2 ) THEN 

POKE 47445 .212 
1115 IFTK/2=INT(TK./2)TH£NP0KE47445 .213 
1120 RETURN 

Controller Checksums 



1000 - J355B 

1010 - $3266 

1020 - $A7C4 

1030 - SB1C5 

1040 - S35FA 

1050 - $7575 

1050 - $A022 



1070 - JAE27 

1080 - Se£E6 

1090 - S0D80 

1100 - S610E 

1110 - $542C 

1115 - $A09E 

1120 - $DDB0 



Well another program fell to the SlOB 1 .5 



C2) What do you suggest for a ProDOS 
block editor? How about putting one in 
COMPUTIST? Keep up the good work on a 
great magazine. 

P.S. You can change line 1010 to TK = 3, 
init adisk to boot L W. T and add a Fast DOS. 



Franco Panizzon 



Softkey for. , 



Rendezvous 

Peachtrec Software 



■ Requirement.^ 

i 1 Rendezvous Disk 

a Blank Disk 



The softkcys given in COMPUTIST #28 
and COMPUTIST #37 did not work for my 
version. 

My version is COP K/1 -able and can be 
cataloged but the copied disk will hang after the 
fir.st .screen. This indicates a normal or at least 
a semi-normal DOS and all I needed to do was 
to disable that annoying nibble count routine. 

I printed all the suspect files and after many 
hours found the offending code in the binary 
file RGO. 

The foilowmg is the code that I modified. 



ICIA- 


D0 01 


BNE $1C1D 


ICIC- 


CI 49 


CMP (J49.X) 


ICIE- 


A9 48 


IDA i'$48 


1C20- 


49 FE 


EOR «FE 


1C22- 


C8 


INY 


1C23- 


EE 00 0A 


INC J0A0e 


1C25- 


D0 04 


BNE $IC2C 


1C28- 


EE 68 IC 


INC $1C6S 


1C2B- 


D0 48 


BME I1C75 


1C2D- 


60 


RTS 



Notice that the BNK at location SICIA 
branches to the middle of the next line. The 
same occurs at $ I C26 where the BNE branches 
to the middle of the S1C2B statement. Let's sec 
what happens when wo follow' these branches.: 

ICID- 49 A9 EOR »SA9 
ICIF- 48 PHA 

and 



1C2C- 48 



PHA 



In both cases, it pushes phony data onto the 
stack. After the RTS, the CPU looks to the stack 
to find the location from which it came. 
However, it jumps to the wrong location and 
the program hangs. Also notice the BNE to 
$1C75 which reads: 



1C75- A6 34 
1C77- BDBCCe 



LOX $34 
IDA JC08C.X 



The location C08C gives it away (direct 
use of the disk drive). 

To circumvent the problem 1 first tried simply 
putting an RTS at location SICIA. The 
program ran farther but still crashed, I found 
that it needed the INC S0A00 and the INC 
$IC68 to run properly. 



i« 



COMPUTIST #51 



January 



I 1 I Use COPYA to copy Rendezvous 

onto your blank diskette, 

I 2 I Fix the file RGO. 

BLOAD RCO 

CALL -ISl 

1C1A:EE m OA EE 68 IC 60 

3D0G 

BSAVE RG0,A$1BQ0,LS04F0 

Now let's see if I can dock this tiling 
without running out of fuel , 



AX. Head 



i" Softkey Addendum for.. 



Silent Service 

MicroProse 



Since the Sileni Service softkey 
(COMPUTIST (fSO) anotlier release of Silent 
Service has come to my attention. In this 
release, the protection is exactly the same as 
previously described except that the t~iles \ \ 
and P are relocated on the disk. 

Backup this release by following the step- 
by-step procedure previously given but with the 
following change to the edits: 
TrK Set 81(18(5) From To 

105 $09 J3B 4C3D02 40 90 02 

107 m 08 95 85 68 50 A9 95 85 32 60 

F7 A9 18 85 02 
50 F9 



This release suggests that additional 
releases might be forthcoming that continue to 
relocate the files. If neither of the edits given 
are succesful, use your sector editor to scan ihe 
disk for the two appropriate strings and edit 
them as shovi'n below: 

Find 4C 3D 02 4C C2 and change it to 4C 90 02 . 

Find 08 95 85 58 50 and change it to A9 95 85 
32 60F7 A9 18 85 02 60F9 
That's all folks. 



The Island Boys 



Block-edit without 
a Block-editor 

A group of us here at the desk of the Island- 
Boys used one of your softkeys to deprotect 
Music Construcnon Set. 

One problem: what are people withoui 
block -editors supposed lo do'.' 

We found a novel solution for by-passing 
this obstacle. The idea is to load the ProDOS 



file containing the protection, make the 
neecssao' adjustments in memory, and write the 
changed file back to disk. Here's how it goes... 

Softkey for... 



Music Construction Set 

Electronic Arts 



r^ I Boot a ProDOS 8 disk and get into 
BASIC (use system utilitie.s or equivalent. 

r 2 [ The protection is in the file 
JIMSCODE. So... 
BLOAD JIMSCODE,A$20eO 



I 3 I Leap into the monitor: 
CALL -151 



I 4 I The protection is located at memory 
location $21CF. We are changing the bytes at 
$21CF from 49 20 to EAEA in order to change 
the disk check: 

21CF:EA EA 

This code can be viewed by typing 210OL. 

I 5 I Write the newly moA\fKd. JIMSCODE 
back to disk: 
BSAVEJIMSC0DE,A$2000,E18944 

Don't forget to put a write -protect slide in 
the 'ofr position before writing, and put it back 

'on' after writing. 

I 6 I Enjoy this weak music program, if 

you can. 

Note To modify' any of the files on the disk 
vvithoui a block editor, copy the files to be 
changed onto a ,S'i "diskette, make the edits 
using a sector- editor, and copy it back onto the 
Vh" disk. 

Then pick up a block editor as soon as 
possible {Pro-Byter IVotp Beagle Brp^ will do). 

llgs Softkey for. . . 



GBA 2-on-2 Climp, Baslcetball 



Activision 



GBA BasketbaU is a really good game with 
outstanding sound effects and graphics. After 
trying to make sense out of the protection, we 
stumbled upon this four-byte crack. 

Ill Make a copy using any copier (we 
used Copy U Plus). 

I 2 I Whip out your block editor (we used 
Pro-Byter) and read in block 608, pari b. 

I 3 I Search for the pattern k>; 50 20 F6 4F 
35. This pattern (MPv05) should be found at 
byle 157. 

I 4 I Change byte 157, or wherever the M 

might be, to EA. 



I 5 I Write it back to disk. You now have 
a deprotected copy. 

Playing Tips for. . . 



Tass Times In Tonefowii 



I Get a job with the Tonetown paper. 
I Waterfalls aren't walls, 
I Follow Ennio's instincts. 

Playing Tips for... 



Thexder 



I Not all walls are solid; arid some things are 

known to live in thein. 
I Some robots give you energy and Enmax 
points. 

Playing Tips for... 



Mmk Mmision 



1 The purple tentacle wants some food with 

a waxy aftertaste. 
I Jars are meant to hold water. 
I Where would you hide a key? 
I The package is by the mailbox. 
I .Nurse Edna's room has an up.stairs. 
I Paint Thinner can open unseen doors. 

Playing Tips for... 



King's Quest 



I The mushroom is on an island only birds can 

reach. 
I Tree climbing is good for your health. 
I Sir Graham should try his tuck in a welT to 

see his reflection of being a king. 
I Sleeping giants are worth the wait in gojd. 

Playing Tips for. , . 



Autoduei 



To get a lot of money, do thi.s: 

Make a really cheap car at ihe assembly. 

Store it in the garage. 

Type the number for Take A Car Out Of 

Storage. 
Wait until the list of cars appears. 
Take out the Autoduei Player disk. 
Insert ANY DOS 3.3 disk with something; 

on il. 
Select the number of your cheap car. 
Once the car is loaded from the DOS disk, 

take it out. 
Put th e Pla yer Disk back in. 
I Type I OC [ to see the car (what a messl); 

Sell it at the salvage yard. 
I You should get a bundle for it. 
Tliat's it. 



January 



COMPUTIST #51 



m 



Jerome Thclia 



Softkey for.. 



SpyvsSpyI,n 

Avantage 



■ Requirements 

D COPYA or similar 
□ a sector editor 

Avantage software was nice enougli to 
release Spy vs Spy f and // on the same disk 
a while back. A menu immediately after the 
boot asks which of the two you woidd like to 
play, then goes on to load one of die games into 
memory, performing a protection check before 
execution, 

the nice thing about this protection check 
is that both games load it into memory from the 
same place on the disk. Therefore, we need only 
alter this one check to deprotect two seemingly 
separate disk-checks. 

A boot-trace using the Locksmith Trace 
function reveals a JMP $0168 to a crash routine 
if this check is unsuccessful. 

The solution is to NOP out the JMP and allow 
the code to move onto the next instruction which 
resumes normal execution of the game. 

I 1 I Copy the original with COPYA or any 
fast disk copier. 

I Z I Perform the following sectdr-edits: 

Trk Set Byte(s) From To 

■m S06 $F0-F2 4DD8 01 EA EA EA 



Softkey for.. 



2400 AD 

Origin Systems 



■ Requirements 

a 2400 AD 
O Super lOB 
D a blank disk 

2400 AD is one of the latest releases from 
Origin Systems and bears a great resemblance 
to the UlrimR series. Although all the graphics 
are drawn differently, anybody who's played 
one of the Ultimas will experience some kind 
of deja Mi. Let me qualify' that by adding that 
it does not take anything away from this fine 
game which is challenging and a pleasure to 
play. 

I expected the protection to be similar to 
other Origin Systems games but was mildly 
dissappointed when my Ultima TV controller did 



not create a deprotected version. The protection 
is a little less harsh than Mocbius or Ultima IV 
in which the address prolog changes on every 
track. 

In 240& it alternates between the standard 
D5 AA 96 and D4 AA 96 on every other track. With 
this in mind, I simply altered my Ultima IV 
controller for the changing address prologues. 
The controller also starts on track $©0, ignores 
address and data epilogues and is set to read 
an abnormal RWTS read -trans late table. 

After miming the controller on die original , 
I booted it up expecting to be searching for an 
avalanche of sector edits I would have to 
implement before it would run. Amazingly, my 
backup ran flawlessly and I began to play the 
game on my merry way. 

This apparent lack of any disk checks has 
made me highly suspicious however and I will 
watch for and report any hangups in the later 
stages of the game and would encourage 
anybody who runs this controller to do the 
same. 



I 1 I Run the controller on side A of the 
game (side B is not protected). 

I 2 ) Enjoy the game. 

The character can be found on track $22, 
sector $O0 of the player disk. The attributes 
are in hexadecimal and money is stored in this 
manner: Byte(s) Value 

$C4_C5 01 00 = 100cre[iits 

Controller 

1000 REM 2400 A. D. CONTROLLER 

1010 TK = : LT=1 : ST = 15 : LS = 15 : CD = KR 

1020 POKE 47405, 24 : POKE 47406, 96 : POKE 

47497, 24 : POKE 47498, 96 
1030 POKE 47829, 3 : Tl = TK : GOSUB 490 
1040 GOSUB 190 ; C = C + 1 : GOSUB 610 
1045 IFC = 2THENGOSUB2000 
1050 TK = TK + 1 : LT = LT + 1 : IF PEEK (BUF) < MB 

AND TK < 35 THEN 1040 
1060 POKE 47405, 208 : POKE 47406, 19 : POKE 

47497. 203; POKE 47498, 183 :P0KE474829, 

213 : GOSUB 230 
1070TK = T1 : LT = 35 :GOSUB490 :GOSUB610 : IF 

PEEK (TRK) = LT THEN 1090 
1080 TK = PEEK (TRK) : ST = PEEK (SCT) : LT = TK 

+ 1 : GOTO 1020 
1090 HOME : PRINT "COPY DONE" : END 
2000 RESTORE : C = C - 2 : RETURN 
5000 DATA 213, 170, 150 
5010 DATA 212, 170, 150 

Controller Checksums 



1000 - $3568 

1010 - $F550 

1020 - $C466 

1030 - $59D7 

1040 - J7C0D 

1045 - JDEC7 

1050 - $A6BD 



1060 - $A3A2 

1070 - MED7 

1080 - $8DCB 

1090 - $2302 

2000 - $4EC7 

5000 - $3F7D 

5010 - SD4F5 



Here are a few quick softkeys that might 
be useful to some COMPUTIST readers: 

Softkey for... 



Law Of The West 

Accolade 



r 1 I Copy with a fast copier, 

I 2 I Make the following sector-edits: 

Trk- Set Byte(s) From To 



$00 S0B $22-23 A0 09 



18 60 



Softkey for. , 



Below the Root 



I 1 I Copy with a fast copier. 

I 2 I Make the following sector edits on 



side one: 

Trk Set Byte(s) From 
S00 S05 S3D-41 ? 



To 

00 FF Dl 5E 7B 



Softkey for. . 



Einstein Compiler 



I 1 I Copy with COPYA . 
I 2 I Make these sector edits: 

Trk Set Byte(s) From To 



$04 ;$2A-2C ? 



4C E2 91 



P.S. Please add Legacy Of The Ancients 
from Electronic Arts (EA) to your Most Wanted 
list. Since the protection is very new to EA, and 
the game is very challenging to play, perhaps 
one of your staff members wouldlike to tackle 
it. This protection could be the new trend for 
EA releases to follow and the game a classic 
among past releases. 

I would be willing to submit my original 
to give your staff a "crack" at h. 



£ 



Please DO NOT SEND ANY ORIGINALS 
or copies to COMPUTIST RDEXed 



Matt Ownby 



Flaying Tip foK. 



Summer Games 



20 



COMPUTIST #51 



January 



When you're doing the pole vault event, 
select a medium pole grip. Start running and 
when the man appears on screen, push the 
joystick down. Immediately after that, push it 
up. He should have his legs in the air ready to 
go over the bar. Before he even reaehes the bar, 
press the button and let him drop. Even though 
he didn't go over the bar, the game will think 
he made it over. This will let you get the 
world's record i 

A.P.T.for... 



Where in the World is C. Sandi^o 



To edit the number of cases that you've 
solved in Where In The World Is Carmen 
Sandiego?, read track $22, sector $0© off of 
side B (a copy or the original is fine), it will 
list all of the detective's names. 

After you've decided which one to edit, go 
to the end of their name and move over until 
you're one byte away from the next detective. 
That is the number of cases that you've solved. 

A note on one of Brian Troha's articles in 
COMPUTIST #49 page 15: On my version of 
Tass Times in Tonetown there is no protection. 

A.P.T.for... 



Ultima IV 



Since Danny Pollak's Ultimaker IV in 
COMPUTIST #30 failed to work on my Ugs, 
1 made a way to edit the characters using a 
sector editor instead. 

Each byte is different with each character. 
For example, character #2 starts at byte $34 
while character #8 starts at $F4. In that case 
wc will call the first digit of each byte the letter 
z. The value of z for each character is. . . . 
Characters 12 3 4 5 6 7 8 
Zifalue 1 3 5 7 9 B D F 



Table 1 



Read track S04. sector $04: 



T able 2 Types of characters 

Mage 

1 Bard 

2 Fighter 

3 Druid 

4 Tinker 

5 Paladin 

6 Ranger 

7 Shepherd 



Table 3 



Armor 






None 


1 


Cloth 


2 


Leather 


3 


Chain 


4 


Plate 


5 


Magic Chain 


6 


Magic Plate 


7 


Mystic Robe 



Table 4 



Weapons 



o 

1 

2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 

9 
A 
B 
C 
D 
E 
F 



Hands 

Staff 

Dagger 

Sling 

Mace 

Axe 

Sword 

Bow 

Crossbow 

Flaming Oil 

Halberd 

Magic Axe 

Magic Sword 

Magic Bow 

Magic Wand 

Mystic Sword 



Table 5 Supplies 

Read from track $14, sector S03 



Byte Item 



Category Amount 



Byte 



Effect 



number pc-)ssible ^^ Torches 



$z4 Sex 

($5C 
$z5 Type 

$z6 Health 

($C4=D, $C7^ 
$z7 Strength 

$z8 Dexterity 

$z9 Intelligence 

SzA Magic Points 

$zC-zD Hit Points 
$zE— zF Max Hit Points 

Note: Now add 1 to z 
$20— zl Experience 
$z2 Weapon in use 

$z3 Armor in use 



Guild 
item 



=Male, $7B=Fcma]e) 

0—7 (Table 2) 

4 
G, SDO=P, SD3=S) 

0-99 

0-99 

0-99 

0-99 

0-9999 

0-9999 



0D Gems 
0E Keys 
0F SeJttants 



O- 
1- 
1- 



-9999 

F (Table 3) 

7 (Table 4) 



lO 

11 

12 

13 

14,15 

17,18 

19 
lA 
IB 



cfc 



Stones 

Runes 

Bell, Book, 

Candle 

3 -part key 

Food 

Gold 

Silver Horn 
HMS wheel 
Evil Skull of 
Mondain 



(Stone) 
(Rune) 



0-99 



0-FF(255) 



(Items) 0-7 



0-9999 



Artifacts or 1 



ID 

IE 

IF 

20 

21 

22 

23 

25 

26 

27 

28 

29 

2A 

2B 

2C 

2D 

2E 

.2F 

30 

31 

32 

33 

3C 

3D 

3E 

'SF 
40 
41 

.42 
•43. 



44 

•45 

46 

47 

48 

49 

4A 

4B 

4C 

4D 

4E 

4F 

50 

51 

52 

53 

54 

55 

56 

57 

58 

59 

5A 

5B 

5C 

5D 



Cloth 
Leather 
Chain 
Plate 

Magic Chain 
Magic Plate 
Mystic Robe 

Staff 

Dagger 

Sling 

Mace 

Axe 

Sword 

Bow 

Crossbow 

Flaming Oil 

Halberd 

Magic Axe 

Magic Sword 

Magic Bow 

Magic Wand 

Mystic Sword 

Sulphur Ash 

Ginseng 

Garlic 

Silk 

Blood Moss 

Black Pearl 

Nightshade 

Mandrake 

Root 

Awaken 

Blink 

Cure 

Dispel 

Energy Field 

Fireball 

Gate Travel 

Heal 

Ice Ball 

Jinx 

Kill 

Light 

Magic Missile 

Negate 

Open 

Protection 

Quickness 

Resurrect 

Sleep 

Tremor 

Undead 

View 

Wind change 

x-it 

y-up 

z-down 



Armour 0-99 



Weapons 0-99 



Reagent 0-99 



Spell 



0-99 



If you want to know how to edit the eight 
vimes, look in COMPUTIST #43. 



January 



COMPUTIST #51 



21 



Jeff Hurlburt 






Ratings 

<5<J^2^^ SUPERB 

fJ^<3<! EXCELLENT 

^^3^. . . . .:-.v.,.t.v.vi.:v:. , VERY GOOD 
^^. . . , ..;.,,....,, . . „, . , . ,v,, . GOOD 

^. ..... . , , : , , FAIR 

® POOR 

(i® ,.w.. ...... .......... BAD 

®(i® DEFECTIVE 




<5<?<!^ 



Requires: 

C 768K Apple Ilgs 

D one liW drive 

D mouse 

B second drive (optional) 

■ Image writer II printer (optional) 

In case you 'missed the movie', 
"Electronics Arts Strikes Back" has been re- 
released a& Deluxe Paint n, a heavy-duty, blow- 
the-competition-away drawer/painter package 
including the first of several "Art Parts" 
volumes. 

Boasting such advanced capabilities as 
perspective generation, stencil -making, and 
color cycling, this is the first Apple painter to 
venture seriously into the arcane realm of video 
processing. 

With Deluxe Paint II you can work upon 
displays spanning up to 400 vertical lines (two 
screens) in either 16-color 320-dot or 4-color 
640-dot mode . LOAD and SAVE, but not 
DELETE, operate for standard unpacked $CI 
type files and for files packed in something 



called ' 'Apple Preferred format". While not die 
most efficient of pic compressors, the latter is 
a great space saver. Unfortunately, you will 
have to look elsewhere for unpacker 
documentation if you plan to incorporate any 
of the packed pictures in your programs. 

Printout can be multi-color or monochrome 
on Imagewriter II, at present the only printer 
supported. Other output options are Appletalk 
and modem. 

The, by now, 'standard' tools are all here- 
including variously shaped and sized brushes, 
sprays, line drawers, fills, and assorted shapes 
(filled and uidllled), plus a not- so-standard 
zoomahle magnify. 

Text fonts, which come in six styles, are 
available in bold, underline, and outline variants 
and several popular sizes. 

Cut/paste and copy may be to and from a 
clipboard or a 'spare page'. These, along with 
fiips, stretches, rotations (about X, Y, and Z 
axes), and a super-flexible symmetry tool are 
all accomplished via user-defined "custom 
brushes". Any part or all of a graphic can be 
lifted and used as the current brush for painting, 
fills, etc.; and perspective routines permit 
setting viewpoint for easy creation of realistic 
deptii and distance effects. "SAVE BRUSH" 
and "LOAD BRUSH" move a brush (and its 
palette) to and from disk without affecting the 
current graphic- very nice for handling selected 
picture pieces, whether or not they actually 
function as "brushes'. 

Whereas the above approach rates the much 
coveted Computist Programming Brilliancy 
Award, a strong rival is the powerful set of 
stencil -making commands. Basically, you can 
"lock" one or more colors to protect parts of 
a graphic from painting, sprays, fills, etc. thus 
creating a stencil or "frisket". Colors may be 
locked or unlocked at any time; and, as with 
brushes, stencils can be saved and loaded to 
disk. 

Deluxe Paint IT includes comprehensive 
palette adjustment controls but no provision for 
linking pic frames to produce animation. You 
can, however, achieve simple animation and 
other interesting effects via color cycling, A 
technique which rotates palette color positions 
at a user-selected rate, cycling is great for 
making waterfalls churn, balls bounce, and 
propellers whirl. 

With pull-down menus, clickable tools, 
etc. , the utility is almost entirely mouse driven, 
though you will need arrow keys to move the 
display when your work area extends beyond 
a screen or for positioning when using the 
magniiy option. Since practically all commands 
are also accessible via keyboard, clearing menu 
and tool bars results in an unobstructed, fully 
active work area. 

By far the most natural feeling, easiest to 
use of all Apple painter utilities. Deluxe Paint 
U is also among the best supported. 



First, an excellent tutorial moves you 
swiftly into practical applications; then "Art 
Parts" volumes ($29.95 each) supply a bonanza 
of clip art, brtjshes, lettering sets, and— most 
important— new ideas. Included are holiday 
motifs, plants, animals, exotic pattern sets, 
ships, and fantasy figures— just for starters. 
Very classy; but then, among llgs painters. 
Deluxe Paint H is THE class act. 




^; 



Requires: 

D 64K Apple n series (or Apple Ilgs set to 

monochrome) 
n one 5 W" drive 
D mouse 

■ second drive (optional) 

■ joystick/paddle for graphics (optional) 

■ printer (optional) 

As any business manager, club leader, or 
department chairman knows, a recurring 
bottleneck to achieving organizational aims is 
faulty within-organization communications. 
Targeting this problem, Abracadata has created 
Welcome!, a kind of do-it-all "electronic 
handbook" for storing and communicating 
information. 

Linking a collection of no-frills, get-the- 
job-done text and graphics utilities. Welcome! 
produces three types of output. Running the 
"Manager Disk", a person responsible for 
arranging and disseminating information can 
generate displays, printouts, or "Data Disks". 
The latter may be accessed, but not significantly 
altered, by other personnel running a "User 
Disk" copy. 

Text utilities guide production of directories 
(e.g. phone and mailing lists) besides helping 
organize such information as goals, 
departmental relationships, rules, benefits, 
etc... Organization charts, conference maps, 
device schematics, and other graphics are 
produced via line/box-drawing and labeling 
tools. Text and graphic information may be 
sorted, displayed, and output as hardcopy by 
both the "Manager" and "Users", greatly 
easing such productions as an orientation 
booklet for new employees. 

Including manual, "Manager'/ 'User" 
diskette, and an example-filled "Data Disk", 
Welcome! features pull -down menus with fully 
integrated mouse access and supports virtually 
every Apple-compatible printer and interface. 



22 



COMPUTIST m\ 



January 



Solid plusses are simplicity and ready 
avaUabiJity of so many disssemination flinctions; 
and the 'Manager-User' approach promotes 
efficient, controllable sharing of database 
access. On the other hand, Welcome's 40- 
column-only TEXT is bound to disappoint diose 
accustomed to an 80-column dispky ; and diere 
are many easier to use, more powerfiil utilities 
when it comes to developing graphics . Perhaps 
of most significance to an image-conscious 
manager, the program's outputs are decidedly 
bland- not the way to 'fire up' new employees 
or anyone else. Neat, yet lacking pizzazz, 
Welcome! is a good idea, but only a mediocre 
implementation. 



Create A Calendar 

by Designer Software 
$39.95 Epyx 



Requires: 

n 64K Apple II series 

D one 5W" drive 

n printer 

■ second drive (optional) 

Hardly anything is better for getting your 
affairs in order than a calendar, especially if 
the highlighted dates arc the ones you decide 
are important. With Epyx's Create a Calendar, 
birthday.s, club meetings, appointments, 
holidays- whatever- can become attention- 
catching calendar EVENTS. 

Compatible with most popular printers 
(I mage writer, Epson, Star, .,.), this versatile 
utility produces calendars in five formats. 
Printing a month, week, or pair of days per 
sheet, you can enter text and graphics for each 
date with plenty of space left for jotting notes. 
Of the (dates only) annual formats , a one-sheet 
version is handy for quick date-finding; and the 
six-sheet horizontal "banner" makes an 
attractive wall reference. 

Create a Calendar employs Printshop- 
compatible graphics, fonts, and borders 
(including those available on Epyx's own 
Scrapbook diskettes)- plus fonts, borders, and 
holiday /event graphics supplied on side two of 
the program diskette. Step-by-step, explicit 
prompts and an illustrated manual make entry 
and editing of key dates a breeze. One option 
adds standard holidays; and a "Repeat Date" 
function allows a single entry, such as a meeting 
of the Apple Users Group every second 
Samrday, to be repeated automatically over a 
range you specify. If requested, the program 
will also produce a listing of all events entered 
on the current calendar. Dates, text, and names 



of selected graphics for a calendar can be saved 
on a separate data diskette. One hint: since the 
printout routine has to be able to reload any 
graphics, it's a good idea to note the source 
diskette for each during editing. 

Results are impressive— much better, of 
course, than store-bought calendars. One 
notable flaw, actually the only one, is omission 
of automatic moon phase entry; gardeners and 
other concerned users will have to place these 
manually. Fun to use, with loads of room for 
creative expression, "Create a Calendar" is 
good until 9999 A.D.; whereupon you should 
request the version 2.0 update. Even .so, not 
a bad value. 



Diversi-Cache 



$35 



by Bill Basham 
Diversified Software Research 



Requires: 

D 512K Apple Egs 

D one Apple Disk Vh" drive 

D one 5 W " drive 

■ additional drives (optional) 

'Old time' Apple II computists will, no 
doubt, recall the amazement felt upon first 
booting a Beagle Bros./ProntoDos-patched 
diskette. Suddenly, stodgy old DOS 3.3 seemed 
to 'come alive' with programs loading in a 
fraction of pre-conversion time. Now, thanks 
to DSR's Diversi-Cache, Egs owners can 
experience much the same thrill of souped-up 
performance, 

Diversi-Cache speeds up Apple Disk 3.5 
I/O in two ways. First, whenever the current 
operating system does a 'block read', Diversi- 
Cache actually reads-in the entire track; second, 
you can activate a buffer (or "cache") which 
'remembers' everything read from the 
designated drive up to the limit of buffer 
capacity. The result is super-rapid access upon 
subsequent reads of files with blocks on the 
cached tracks. According to on-disk (text file) 
documentation, whether or not you enable the 
cache feature, DSR's track-read approach "... 
triples the speed of disk reads and doubles the 
speed of ProDOS writes". Only Apple Disk 3.5 
drives are affected, not UniDisk 3.5 or 5.25" 
drives. 

Though supplied on a 5.25" 
ProDOS/8-forinat Master diskette, Diversi- 
Cache is said to be compatible with "any 
operating system", including the mini-disk 
variants of DOS 3.3; so there are several routes 
to installation. Upon booting the Master, a 
STARTUP menu option allows appending the 



utility to the PRODOS file on a diskette in the 
slot and drive you specify. When booted, the 
patched ProDOS (/8 or /16 1.1-1.2) 
automatically installs i^jVers/'-CacAe. (Another 
option, incidently, permits removal of the 
patch.) 

Divcmi-Cache may also be installed via a 
BRUN CACHE or launched as a ProDOS SYS file. 
Finally, if requested, the Master STARTUP 
will write the necessary routines directly into 
memory. Diversi-Cache resides in bank 02 and 
is not deactivated by a 'warm start' boot. 

Once installed, "Cache" appears as a desk 
accessory along with "Co ntrol Panel", etc. 
when you press ICJBESC I Here you may set 
buffer size (O-80OK), drive(s) to cache (1,2, 
or "both"), or even mrn-off Diversi-Cache. 
The "both" cache option is actually "either", 
since switching from one drive to the other 
clears the buffer. 

When first activated, Diversi-Cache normally 
defaults to the largest buffer size available and 
selects drive 1 as the cache drive. Chiefly to 
permit large, memory-hungry applications to 
act as installers, a Master diskette "Reconfigure 
Cache" option lets you set default buffer size 
along with default cache drive. 
(Recommendation: do this only on a copy of 
the Master.) 

I tried ovA Diversi-Cache on several diskettes 
including an assortment of ProDOS/8 utilities. 
Deluxe Paine II (ProDOS/ 16 1.1) and 
"ORCA/M" (aProDOS/16 1.2-based 65816 
assembler from Byte Works). With buffer size 
at OK- to check the 'built-in' speed boost- 
things certainly went faster, though the x3 read 
and x2 write speed figures only obtain for 
relatively large, reasonably contiguous files. 
(Reading a track instead of a block doesn't help 
much if the file is one or two blocks in length 
or a large file spread out all over physical 
diskette space,) 

Performance, however, is hardly shabby. 
For example, load time for AppSeworks 2.0 
dropped from 19 to 9 seconds; and access to 
an A WP file went from 4 seconds to 2 , In an 
ideal case— a single, large picture file— load 
time did, indeed, go from 6 to 2 seconds. 

As expected, the multiplier is smaller for 
boots, especially for ProDOS/16 applications, 
which tend to spend alot of time finding, 
loading, and arranging a host of set-up files. 
StiU, the time saved is sure to be appreciated. 
A typical case is Deluxe Paint II, where load 
time (selector + program) dropped from 134 
seconds to 96. Booting the program as a 
Diversi-Cache installer (as opposed to having 
Diversi-Cache active before the boot) added no 
observable delay. 

Running with an active buffer, even a 
relatively small one, turns out to make a world 
of difference. 



January 



COMPUnST #51 



23 



With buffering at 256K, Deluxe Paint H 
total boot time drops to 70 seconds! ; and when 
moving back and forth among several 
ProDOS/8 utilities (caehe= 8O0K), response 
quickly approached ramdisk speed. (Unlike 
ramdisk, Divorsi-Cache allows drive turn-on, 
which adds a slight delay.) Possibly more 
impressive is the affect on ORCA/M. Imagine, 
an editor/aBsembler/1 inker system that becomes 
increasingly interactive with use! 

DlyershHack 

Included free with Djvcrsi-Cache is a neat 
little desktop utility named "Diversi-Hack" . 
With it, you can interrupt any program which 
doesn't disable desktop access and dump screen 
text or send keystrokes to your printer. The 
utility aiso lets you enter the monitor- perhaps 
to examine and modify program variables- then 
return to the desktop and resume execution. 
The Diversi-CM-he with "Diversi-Hack" 
Master diskette is unprotected, with shareware 
distribution encouraged. That is, copy 
recipients, who decide to keep and use the 
software, send-in the purchase price to DSR 
receiving, in return, a user number and low- 
cost updating priviledges. Actually, I can't think 
of a better 'protection' scheme. At twice the 
price of "Cache" -I- "Hack" , nothing you 
plug-in or bo<it-up can do more to enhance the 
performance of your Ilgs. 




Requires: 

D 64K Apple n series 
IZ one 5W" drive 
■ joy Stic (optional) 

Remember all those times your favorite 
comic book hero seemed about to close down 
the forces of evU, only to stumble into some 
'obvious' trap. 

Well, now you can work off years of 
frustration guiding the moves of Steve Keene, 
thrillseeker in an honest-to-goodness comic 
book adventure complete with 'balloon' 
dialogue and up to four annimated frames per 
hires screen. 

In Accolade's Comics, the frames appear 
one -at-a- time as you select Keene 's script and 
make other choices which affect the course of 
this pulp-grade, rescue-thc-kidnapped-scientist 
scenario. With six diskette sides, there's ample 
room for branching, sometimes into very 



different story lines, often into deadly peril. 
Besides the expected cast of dastardly no-goods, 
eight challenging arcade hazard sequences are 
just waiting to be sprung, (eg. Keene vs. the 
robots, Keene swinging over a pool of sharks, 
etc., etc.) 

Though you begin with five lives, it's just 
as well that a game-save option is included and 
that the arcades can be practiced separately. 
Fast-moving and clever. Comics offers good 
artwork and entertaining, multiple-replay 
adventuring. Add humor and well-executed 
arcades, plus the incentive of a High Scores 
roster maintained on-disk, and you have just the 
kind of action-packed 'reading' ardent contic 
book devotees dream of. (*Bubblegum not 
included.) 

Fast Frames, ETC. 

ihvisi-clues 

Recognizing that hard core adventurers are 
unlikely to move on to new challenges with old 
ones hanging, Infocom now offers an "Invisi 
Clues" hint booklet ($7.95) for each text 
adventure. The typical package includes a map 
plus booklet with key questions (e.g. "Where 
is the third magic jewel?") arranged in roughly 
chronological order. Beneath a question are 
three or more increasingly specific hints, each 
revealed by over-wiping the selected space with 
a yellow marker supplied in the package. You 
decide how much of a clue to request with no 
worry about stumbling across solutions to other 
puzzles. 

CUp Art Gallery ii 

Aetivision's Ciip An Gallery // ($29.95) 
is a newly released horizon -expanding 
collection of Paintworks /"/us-compatible 
graphics on 3,5" media. Here you will find 
borders, alphabet sets, and patterns along with 
animal, school, and sports groups plus much 
more— roughly 600 graphics in all! 
hicidentally, Paintworks PJus (version l.l) now 
accepts "Apple Preferred format" packed files 
(as well as unpacked $C1 type and original 
version packed files). This means '1.1' users 
can direcdy access most Electronic Arts "Art 
Parts" materials. 

Destroyer 

Epyx's Destroyer (S39.95 for 128K) is a 
GA rO-type naval combat/ strategy arcade 
featuring beautiful double-hires graphics with 
good animation and sound. Action sequences 
include searches, anti-aircraft fire, depth charge 
runs, and more. Unfortunately, all of this neat 
stuff greatly exceeds alloted memory space; so 
you have to put up with numerous annoying disk 
access delays, moving with painful slowness 



from section to section in the heat of combat. 
Playability, of course, craters. Too bad; but this 
is no way to run a ship. 

The Spy's Adrentures in N. America 

Penguin/Polarware's The Spy 's Adventures 
In North America ($17,95) involves 1-6 players 
in a race to nab the demented trouble-maker, 
Dr. X. Moving through up to 27 regions in the 
U.S., Canada, and Mexico, you view 
beautifully done scenes (in double-hires on 
128K machines), read brief, travel brochure 
descriptions of area highlights, and contact 
mysterious agents for clues to Dr, X's hiding 
place. Great parlor-gaming/geography-leaming 
fun, T/ie Spy 's Adventures series also includes 
editions covering Europe, South America, Asia, 
Africa, and the Pacific Islands. (for64K/128K 
Apple n series) 

Homework Helper: Matb Word Problems 

Recognizing that even fairly successful 
students can be stymied by word problems. 
Spinnaker has come to the rescue with 
Homework Helper: Math Word Problems (two 
diskettes, $49.95). Accessing an extensive 
problems library, the program provides step- 
by-step guidance in solving those ever-popular 
"age", "distance", and "mixture" toughies, 
PLUS allowing you to enter your own problems 
and even obtain printouts. A hi-res screen fill- 
in- the- knowns- and- unknowns format 
encourages developing an organized approach, 
while a user-friendly "Algebra Calculator" 
solves the equations you create, (requires 64K, 
printer optional) 

Tips 

For nice, compact printouts of DSR on-disk 
documentation, all you need is the machine code 
quickie listed below and a word processor that 
can accept TXT files as input. 

CALL -151 

0300: AO 00 84 03 Ag 10 85 04 
0308: Bl 03 C9 OD DO 09 A9 OA 
0310: 91 03 20 ID 03 BO 05 20 
0318: ID 03 90 EC 60 E6 03 DO 
0320: 02 E6 04 A5 04 C9 70 60 
0328: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 
BSAVE NOCH, AS300, L$28 

It replaces each line-ending CR with a 
SPACE to allow ftill-page, 17 cpi printouts. 
Paragraph-ending CR's are not affected. 

To use it with Diversi-Cache 
documentation just: 

BLOAD CINST,TTXT,A$1000 

CALL 768 

BSAVE CIHST,1TXT,AS1000,L10000 

(Any TXT files larger than 48 blocks should 
be spht.) 



24 



COMPUTIST #51 



January 



Vendors 



AbracaData 

P.O. Box 2440 

Eugene, OR 97402 

(503-342-3030) 

Accolade 

20813 Stevens Creek Blvd. 

Cupenino, CA 95014 

(408-446-5757) 

Activision 

P.O. Box 7287 

Mountain view, CA 94039 

(800-227-9759 

in California call 415-940-6044) 

Diversified Software Research 

34880 Bunker Hill 

Farmington, MI 48018-2728 

(800-835-2246, ext. 127) 

Electronic Arts 

1820 Gateway Drive 

San Mated, CA 94404 

(415-571-7171) 

Epyx 

600 Galveston Drive 

P.O. Box 8020 

Recl\yood City, CA 94063 

(408-745-0700) 

Infocom 

125 Gam bridge Park Drive 

Cambridge, MA 0214O 

(800-262-6868) 

Fei^uiii Software 

260O Kesiinger Road 

P.O. Box 311 

Geneva, IL 60134 

(312-232-1984) 

Spinnaker 

One Kendall Square 

Cambridge, MA 02139 

(617^94-1220) 



John Wiegley 



A.P.T.for.. 



Lode Runner 



Getting More Men 

Getting additional men for Lode Runner is 
a easy task. We simply locate where the 
program loads the number of men ($05) and 
change it to FF. 



First I used Cop/ //F/us's catalog feature 
to find the load address and length of Lode 
Runner. Theseare A$80O and L$810O. The 
program starts at $800 and ends at $8900 
($800 -I- $8100). 

I booted a DOS 3.3 disk, inserted Lode 
Runner, bloaded the file and entered the 
monitor: 

BLOAD LODE RUNNER 
CALL -151 

I then searched for the bytes that load the 
number of men using the monitor search 
command. In machine code, a direct load of the 
A-register (accumulator) with five would be 
$A905. The monitor search command looks for 
an address so we need to reverse the two hex 
bytes for everything to work out right. Search 
for $05A9 between the limits of $80O and 
$89O0. 

05A9<8(10.89QOS 

This search resulted in three possibilities: 
296E- 43AA- 4496- 

I cheeked each of these locations and found 
that 296E and 4496 subsequently stored the 05 
to the same location. I changed the 05 to FF in 
both these numbers and it worked. 

There was one other minor problem. DOS 
doesn't allow a binary save with a length value 
greater than $8O0O. However, a simple poke 
will change that limit to $FFFF. 

I 1 I Change the binary length limitation, 

POKE 43364,255 

I 2 I Insert your Lode Runner disk and 

BLOAD LODE RUNNER 

CALL-lSl 

296F;FF 

4497:FF 

BSAVE LODE RUNNER, A$800, L$810e 



I 4 I Enjoy. 
A.P.T.for... 



Wizardry III 



Transferring Characters 

From Wizardry I & II 

to Wizardry III 

■ Requirements 

n Wizardry Iff Scenario Disk and Boot 
n Initialized disk 
D Blank disk 
L" A sector-editor 



It's a bit more difficult to retain character 
values when transferring people from Wizardry 
1 or 2 to Wizardry 3. 

Use your Sector Editor and read Track $1A, 
Sector $0F, Start looking at the .sectors around 
this area until you find your characters names 
flashing, the characters are each about 3/4 
sectors long. If you find one where the 
character's name is at the top you are lucky. 
If you find one where it is half way down or 
at the bottom, you will have to look around on 
other sectors nearby or not .so nearby for the 
rest. When you find the rest of the character 
look at the two bytes just preceeding the next 
character's name (or actually the byte that 
denotes length of the next character's name) and 
write down these bytes. Now if the bytes are 
01 and 08, this means you have %o\ved KnJght 
of Diamond.'i and Proving Grounds. If the 
numbers are 01 and 40, you are a conqueror 
of Proving Grounds and the Staff of Gnilda 
holder. The left number is Proving Grounds and 
the right h Knight of Diamonds. A number one 
to solve the left, and a number eight to solve 
the right. To make the character valid in 
Wizardry ffl you must add $20 to the right 
number. 



sector editor and read 
sector $02, track $1A, 



I 1 I Transfer Wizardry } or 2 characters 
to Wizardry 3. CAUTION: put a w rite-protect 
tab on the disk you are transferring from and 
make sure there is enough room on the target 
disk. Do NOT attempt to take the Rite of 
Passage! This will make it so you cannot have 
characters like your old ones. 

I 2 I Use your 
around track $1A, 
sector $OF, and all of track SIB, and some of 
track SIC and maybe SID and possibly $1E to 
find your characters. 

I 3 I Add $20 to the very last byte in the 
character and enter the number you get. 

I 4 I Write any sectors you chariged to the 
disk. 

I 5 [ Do this for the whole party and then 
load them up in Gilgamesh's Tavern and have 
fun! 



Sofikey for. . 



Black Magic 

Datasolt 



Here is an update to my last letter 
(COMPUTIST M%) with some other 
miscellaneous information. 

■ Requirements 

D A sector editor 

n Senior PROM V3.0 



January 



COMPUnST #51 



25 



If you read my last letter you probably 
copied Black Magic with the parameters I gave 
and found that on most backups the death screen 
was garbaged or you couldn't get to the High 
Scores or if you did they were garbage too. I 
have, after much work, come up with a working 
softkey tor Black Magic. 

I 1 I Enter Senior Prom's main menu. 
Change the Prolog's to read: 
Address Prolog : D5 AA AD 
Data Prolog : D5 AA 96 

Do not touch the DOS error flag option! ! ! 

I 2 I Copy tracks $01— 10 and $12—22. 

I 3 I Restore the prologs and then change 
them again to read: 
Address Prolog : D5 AA 96 
Data Prolog : D5 AA AD 

I 1 I Clear the DOS error flag. 

I 5 I Copy track $00. 

I 6 I Make the following sector edits; 

Trk Set Byte(s) From To 

S00 $02 145 95 AD 
S00 $09 $1F AD 96 



Softkey for. . 



I 7 I Boot up the copy with Senior Prom 



I 8 I If the copy boots fine then you are 
done. The entire program should work. 

I 9 I If the drive grinds and t he copy d oes 
not work, It-JHESETt and press iDELETEl to 
enter the monitor. Type: 

lAFOL 

Look at the displayed code for the three 
bytes 2C 50 C0. When you find them write 
down the exact memory location of the ZC. 

I 18 I Enter the address in sector zero as the 
following sector edit: 

Trk Set Byte(s) From To 



$00 $00 $CB-CC 00 IB 



(see note) 



Note: Take the address you found, for 
example $1AFF, and reverse the digits to make 
FF lA. Enter these two numbers in bytes SCB 
and $CC. 



I 11 [ You can now enjoy a deprotected 
-version of Black Magic. 

For those who are proficient at Senior 
FROMmg. I found the bytes that store: The 
number of arrows in each box (presently 
random), the number of spells you have, and 
the number of arrows you have. With some 
simple sector editing you can easily make each 
arrow box contain 60 arrows and stop your 
spells and arrows from decreasing, but I don't 
want to spoil the challenge of trying to get 
Zahgrim's STAFF (hint, hint). 

Hint: the bytes are stored in the zero page. 



Amnesia 

Electronic Arts 



This is for all the other people who tried 
to run my deprotected version of i4/nnes/a found 
that you couldn't lake anything! To fix this 
problem, recopy the disk and the make the 
following different sector edit: 

Trk Set Byte(s) From 

$09 $04 $AE-AF 



To 



D0A7 



01 A5 



This will defeat the checksum and install 
a harmless compare function which has no 
effect on the program. 



Get Better Sound 
by using the cassette jacks 

Have you ever wondered why Apple put 
cassette ports on the back of the Apple when 
hardly anyone who has disk drive uses them? 
I have found a very useful function for these 
ports. 

Finit of all any program which can come 
out of the cassette port can be run through an 
earphone. Plug the 3.5mm end of the earphone 
in the port closest to the right side of your 
computer. Then just choose the cassette option, 
such as in Wavy Navy and in Music 
Con.ttruction Set, and listen in through your 
earphone. You can also tape what you play by 
plugging one end of a a cord with a 3.5mm plug 
on both ends in the OUT jack (the one closest 
to the right) and the other end the MIC jack (the 
larger microphone hole on the cassette player). 
Then just press PLAY and RECORD while the 
music is playing. 

For those who already know this I will tell 
you something you probably do not know. You 
can convert any deprotected machine language 
based program to play through the cassette jack. 
Wonder how'? I'll show you: 

All sound on the Apple 11 (except for 
Mockingboards and other sound cards) toggle 
the location $CO30 in ROM to produce a click. 
When this location is toggled repeatedly, it 
produces a tone. These tones are used to create 
music. The cassette sound production works 
exactly the same but with the location $C020. 

By changing the number SC03O or the 
bytes $30 CO to $20 CO all sound generated 
runs through the cassette OUT port and can be 
recorded. To do this just use a sector editor with 
a scan feature to scan for all occurrences of 30 
C0. 

Check all occurrences and if a 2C or AO 
precedes the 30 C0 then change the 30 to a 20 
and write the sector back. Do this to the whole 



disk and when you boot it up, every sound the 
program generates will be converted to the 
cassette OUT jack or to your earphone or tape 
player. 



Making a fast boot disk 

■ Requirements 

C Sector editor 

n 48K slave disk (blank) 

D A favorite machine language utility that is 

under 33 -sectors long and does not require 

DOS commands 

If you read the article in COMPUTIST #44 
you probably said "Great, but what if my 
routine requires reading and writing to the 
disk?". I have a semi-simple answer to that 
question (or not so simple to beginners). 

First what you need is a disk that will load 
the RWTS and then immediately beginning 
executing your program. 

To solve you need the boot sector of 48K 
slave disk that just reads RWTS into $B60O— 
BFFF. You also need a machine language utility 
(that you use a lot or you wouldn't be going 
through this trouble) that is 32 sectors or less 
and does not require DOS coriimands, 

I first did this with Locksmith Fast Disk 
Copy, which I converted into a file with 
COMPUTIST #43 and it now boots in 3.5 
seconds. I will now begin the lengthy 
explanation of how to do this. 

Start with a blank 48K slave disk. Find out 
how many sectors it takes up and use the 
following chart to make a simple sector edit: 
If your utility is 15 sectors or less convert 
the sectors used into the following two bytes: 
First before I give you the chart, do this. Get 
the number of sector the file takes up in the 
catalog. Convert this into a hexadecimal number 
and minus one. This is the top sector it will 
need. 

Use this chart to find out what byte to put 
in the catalog to free those exact sectors:. 

Byte 1: Sectors FEDCBA98 
1111 

The above binary number was generated 
by a program that used sectors B and below. 
The number is 15 or $0F. This chart is very 
easy to use just take the top sector and make 
that a one and every sector below it a one, and 
make every sector above it a zero. Such as this 
example that used sectors 9 and down 

Bytes IS 2; 

Sectors: FEDCBA98 76543210 

00000011 11111111 

And convert these two numbers from 
binary to hexadecimal. This example happens 
to be the numbers $03 and $FF. 



26 



COMPUTIST #51 



January 



If your program is more than 16 sectors 
than just make these two numbers SFF and do 
the same as we just did for track 2 but to find 
out the number of sectors used on track two, 
just minus sixteen from the number of sectors 
in the program. Enter the two numbers you 
come up with for byte 1 into these byte on track 
11 

Trk Set Byte{s) From To 

$11 %m $3C ?? ?? the two numbers 



For the two bytes for track 2, if you have 
any, make this sector edit also 

Trk Set Byte{s) From To 



$11 $00 $40 



???? the next two 



If your program takes exactly 32 sectors 
then all four numbers are SFF. 

Now that you have freed the tracks to the 
exact size specifications, boot up the disk with 
the program and BLOAD the program. Insert the 
disk you have been working on and BSAVE the 
program with $4 added to the address and $4 
subtracted from the length. Type CALL -151 and 
find out what the four bytes you didn't save 
were and write them down. Sector edit those 
four bytes onto the first tour bytes of the startmg 
sector minus 1 (sector 6 if it starts on sector 
7). Now we are going to work on the loading. 

Boot up your sector editor again and take a 
look at track $O0, sector $01. Make the 
following changes: 

Trk Set Byte(s) Fron To 



$00 $01 $15 


02 


note 1 


m 


m-. 


note 2 


>m 




note 3 


'IS'E 


M 


note 1 


^^ 


m 


rote 2 


$Ae- 


GE 


EE 



Note 1 : starting track of your program 
Note 2: starting sector on starting track 
Note 3: starting address of your program 

in low-high order (IE S2©00 is 00 20) 
Write protect the tracks one and two so you 

can still use this disk for data. Make these sector 

edits: 



Trk Set Byte(s) From 



To 



$11 $00 $3c-3F 11 11 mm 
$40-43 n 11 mm 



00 00 00 00 
00 00 00 00 



Your program should now load in a matter 
of seconds. 

A note to banners 

For those beginners to programming out 
there I should give you some titles to look out 
for. Being a probably Intermediate to Advanced 
programmer myself I have found some excellent 
programs out there that some of you haven't 
bought because you don't know if they are any 
good. Some of these are: 



Senior PROM V3,0 which I have had for 
a year now and is my #\ favorite piece of 
hardware (even over my Image writer 11) and 
my best utility, (you can get the sector editor 
up and running with its own RWTS in less than 
a second if you are fast). 

Bag of Tricks 2 with which you can reskew 
disks, recover lost catalogs and files, examine 
tracks without having to understand all about 
nibble code dumps (but it helps) and it has a 
•sector editor with a 78 COMMAND !?! help 
menu which has everything from macros to 
labels for locations on a disk. 

Locksmith 6.0 with a 19 second copy 
program (with 64K auxiliary memory and two 
drives). The ability to encrypt files so no one 
else can look at them, and file parameters to 
automatically copy files. These are just a few 
of it's abilities. 

Copy II Plus (whatever version is out now) 
which can do all DOS and ProDOS work and 
with a very versatile Bit Copy program, 

MsrIittPro, a ftiUy featured macro assembler 
which supports 65C02, 6502, and 65802 
usage and which supports relocatable code and 
a program to derive source code straight frpni 
machine language programs! 



Ralph Augenfeld 



To the reader who discovered the "absolute 
reset" (Jim S. Hart) on the Laser 128 
(COMPUTIST H9), 1 nominate you for a 
"Wozzie" (a "Cloney?") award . Not oidy 
does the combination of I^^Ml take you 
directly from any program into the monitor on 
ROM version 3.0, but it can bring you back 
again. 

It also can get you out of ' 'frozen' ' monitor 
states where normally only a re-boot can release 
you. Further, if you have a program which is 
"reset pro tected" or, in other words, pressing 
iBRESETl does not re-boot or wipe out your 
memory, you can go from the monitor back to 
your program where you left off! Go from Copy 
II Plus to the monitor and right back to where 
you left off with this method! Also, it replaces 
having to type 3D0G to get back to BASIC, 
and can be used exactly like an "NMI" card 
to enter the monitor from protected programs. 

backups via Wildcard 

Speaking of non-maskable interrupt cards, 
using my Wildcard III have found quite a few 
programs that can be backed up and made into 
a simple self-running DOS (Quick-, of course) 
disk. Some surprising single load programs 
include Where in the World is Carmen 
Sandiegoiaidt one, and not "U.S.A."), EDD 
IV, & Hardball. 

I also back up some DLM software, like 



Teddy Bear-reh of Fun, and Create with 
Garfield, Deluxe using the "capture the boot" 
approach. To do this with these and many other 
similarly protected programs, boot the origitial 
disk to the first menu, and then save the 
program according to the instructions for your 
card. Make a self-booting copy of this menu, 
and then copy the entire original program using 
any copy utility to the back side of the disk. 
Now, when you boot the disk and the first menu 
comes_u£, flip the disk to the other side, and 
press I.C Jor whatever the program asks for to 
continue. 

Normalizing Polarware's 
Electric Crayon series 

Here is a way to make completely normal 
ProDOS copies of some other children's 
software, namely Polarware's Electric Crayon 
series. 

1 received my Sesame Street Opposites disk, 
and much to my chagrin, I could not catalog, 
copy, bit-copy, or in any way back up this 
ProDOS 1,1,1 release. Well, after some 
raspberry yogurt came close to destroying all 
my daughter's pictures on the master, I realized 
that children's software must be backed up! 
When I used the "STOP" command from the 
pull-down menu, I realized that the normal 
ProDOS "quit protocol" was intact, as 1 was 
presented with the opportunity to specify the 
prefix and pathname of the next program. Of 
course, I chose CopyRPlus as my prefix, and 
Util, system as my pathname, and guess what? 
Now, apparently, since Copy II Plus was 
running under a "modified" ProDOS (a no-no), 
it cataloged, and copied normally! I formatted 
a blank disk with the name /OPPOSITES (same 
as original), copied a new "normal" ProDOS 
from my Copy II Plus, and then copied all the 
files (except ProDOS, of course) from the 
original to my new disk. 

That's it,.. a perfect ProDOS copy, ready for 
RAM card, hard disk, a collection of all these 
games on a 3,5" disk, etc. 

And other notes.... 

As per my last letter about saving data on the 
Ramfactor card when the computer is off. 
Applied Engineering now has replacements for 
two of its chips on the card which draw less 
current, and therefore hopefully generate less 
heat, and run longer from a battery during a 
power outage. The cost is S2O,O0, 

k\io. Copy U Plus V^.S,0withtheabOity to 
bit copy and sector edit 3 ,5" disks, sometimes 
right to a hard disk, and several other new 
features should be available in late 
December, 1987, according to Central Point 
Software, In addition, their new drive controller 
card is much smaller, draws less current, and 
seems to run better, as does the new "quiet" 
version of their 3,5" drive. 



January 



COMPUTIST #51 



27 



Softkey for.. 



Edward Teach 



Softkey for. . 



Walt Disney's Cartoon Maker 

Bantam Software 



This is a rather tute item that a friend 
purchased and then could not back up. My first 
go at inspecting a disk is Lovksmkh fast copy. 
Even if it does not copy the disk it will show 
what tracks are protected. 

This disk had protection on tracks $©3 and 
$11. Also protected was sector $0F on track 
SOD, Using a nibble editor showed track S03 
was sectorless and that track $11 had the 
epilogues changed to FF FF . 

Using Super lOB 1 copied track $1 1 to my 
LocksmkheA copy. The disk still would not 
catalog. So on track Sll sector $©0 change 
byte $01 from 00 to U, Writing this to disk 
will allow a catalog. 

Looked good so far, the disk oven had a 
HELLO program. Loading the HELLO 
program showed that the next file loaded was 
SSPROT$$L 

This program was encrypted and rather 
hard to decipher. Once run it reads track $03 
and verifies that the original disk is in the drive. 
Then die program SSPROT$$A is called. After 
a dozen or so hours and a few reams of paper, 
I decided to scan around the disk. Interestingly 
I came across a one sector program that did not 
appear in the catalog. It was really nice of the 
programmer to leave this program on the disk. 
Once I placed it back in the catalog and ran it, 
the main program started and worked perfectly, 

I 1 I Init both sides of a disk, deleting the 
HELLO programs afterwards 

I 2 I BRU M FID, an d when prompted for the 
slot #, press I RESET I , 

I 3 I Enter the monitor,, 
CALL -151 
B9S8:18 60 
B9ZS:18 60 
803G 



I 4 I Now copy all the files except: 
SSPROT$$l 
SSPROTSSA 
HELLO 
CREDIT. CMP 

\ 5 I Enter the following Hello program 
and save it on side one of the copy disk. 
10 HOME: POKE 34,23 
20 PRINT CHRS(4)"MAXFI[.ES1" 
30 PRINT CHRS(4)"BRUN FUN" 
40 END 

Side two is copy a .. enjoy.. 



Disney's Card And Party Shop 

Bantam Software 



This software is protected almost 
identically to the Cartoon Maker except that 
Bantam was nice enough to not change the 
epilogues on track $1 1 . But, you still have to 
change track $11 sector SO© byte SOI from 
00 to 11, in order to get a catalog. 

Now that you have placed the catalog back 
on the disk, copy all files except the ones listed 
above. Use the same HELLO program except 
you must change the brun program from FUN 
to START. 

A.P.T.far... 



Card And Party Shop 

Bantam 



Freedom of speech for Mickey Mouse 

Is it possible to have an A.P.T. on a non- 
game?? Scan through the Cartoon Maker 
program named FUN and you will find a list 
of the 'dirty' words that Minnie and Mickey 
should never say. In fact the program deletes 
these words from any text you have typed. 1 
changed all the words to nonsense words, after 
all if we have freedom of speech in THE 
COMPUTIST, shouldn't the mice have the 
same in an unprotected copy? 



Carole Fox 



French characters and 
American IIGS Software 



® 



Could anyone help me? 
I am trench and I use Eg s American software 
like Multiscribc GS, DeLuxe Paint II, 816 
Paint. . . 

They all use the fonts from 
/SYSTEM/FONT. These fonts are 
international : you can find the characters used 
in America and Europe, 

The list of these languages is given when 
you choose 'tJpiions - Display language and 
keyboard layout' from the Control Panel, 

Using this 'Option' will give you the 
French Layout (you will type A instead of Q 
for instance) but will not give you the foreign 
characters like d fe h. ? . . . 

You will have { instead of ^ and @ instead 
of h, 

I found out that within the font system, each 
of these characters has a different ASCII code: 
7C for { and 8F for i. 



That is where I am stuck. What do I have 
to look for or what do [ have to change in the 
software that uses the font folder to get French 
Characters? 

A.P.T. for... 



Might and Magic 



A little help to reach 
Tlie INNER SANCTUM 

■ Requirements 

n A sector editor (I used Copy il Plus) 
C Migiit and Magic, side B 

Reading "[/se your sector editor and 
become the Master of Skadowkeep 's dangers" 
did ease my conscience, I had been 'visiting' 
the other side of Might and Magic for some 
time. 

Cheating will not make you the master of 
Might and Magic but it sure helps. To reach 
the Inner Sanctum you will need your wits to 
solve some puzzles. That is what makes Mf^At 
and Magic such a fascinating game. 

What's Where 

If you are really stuck use your sector editor 
and scan the disks for data, (Remember, you 
will NOT find everything!) 

There are four sides: 
SIDE A: The boot disk 
SIDE B: Characters and towns 
SIDE C: Outside 
SIDE D: Castles and Caves 

How your Merlin or Lancelot 
becomes Superman! 

Use your sector editor to read track $©5, 
sector $6© of Side B, You should find the name 
of your first character. There are approximately 
2 characters in each sector. 

Follow the table and strengthen your 
characters. Change the bits according to the 
table. Don't forget to write the sector back to 
disk when you arc finished with your changes. 

All numbers should be written in 
hexadecimal. Do not rush for your calculator 
if you posess a Ilgs: CALL -161 and type: = 
followed by your decimal number. The 
computer will give you the hexadecimal 
number. 

Experience points and gems are back to 
fl-ont. Example: Experience - 216790 points = 
$00 22 2B 81 will be written 81 2B 22 00 



28 



COMPUTIST #51 



January 



rofite 1 



Byte offset Description 



S00-0F 

$10 

$1M2 

$13 

$14 

$15-16 

S17-1S 

$19-1A 

$1B-1C 

$1D-1E 

$lF-20 

$21-22 

$23-24 ■ 

$25 

$27-2A 

$2B-2C 

$2D-2E 

$2F-30 

$31-33 

S34-35 

S36-37 

S39-3B 

$3C 

$3D 

$3E 

$3F 

$40-45 

$46-4B 

$4C-51 

$52-57 

$58-59 

$5A-5B 

$5C-5D 

$5E-5F 

$60-61 

$62-63 

S64-65 

$66-67 

Table 2 



value . 
$01 
$.©2 
value . 

$oi 

$02 
$03 
value . 

$01 
$02 
$03. 
$04 
$05 
$06 
value . 

$oi 

$02 
$03 
$04 
$05 



Name 

Sex (see Tabic 2) 

Alignment (now -base) 

Race (sec Table 2) 

Class (see Table 2) 

Intellect (now -base) 

Might (now-base) 

Pcrsonnality (now-base) 

Endurance (now -base) 

Speed (now -base) 

Accuracy (now-base) 

Luck (now -base) 

Experience level (npw-basB?) 

Age 

Experience points 

Spell points (now) 

Spell points (base) 

Spell level 

Gems 

Hit points (now) 

Hit points (base) 

Gold 

Attack Class (I think!) 

Armour Class 

Food 

Condition (sec Table 2) 

Equipment - 6 items 

Back pack - 6 items 

Equipment magic charges 

Back pack magic charges 

Magic 

Fire 

Cold Protection 

Electricity 

Acid percentages 

Fear 

Poison 

Sleep 



SEX 
male 
female 

ALIG>MJC]SIT 

good 
neutral 

evil 

CLASS 

knight 

paladin 

archer 

cieric 

sorcerer 

robber 

RACE 

human 

elf 

dwarf 

gnome 

h-orch 



value Condition 

(the numbers in between give a cotnbinatioii.. . 

example: $03) 

$0© GOOD!! 

$01 asleep 

$02 blinded 

$03 asleep.blinded 

$04 silenced 

$08 diseased 

$10 poisoned 

$20 paralysed 

$40 unconscious 

$FF ERADICATED!! 

Somewhere between $40 and $FF should be 

dead and stone! 

Table 3 (255 items). List of the best pans. 

$1S flaming club 

?0^ club of noise 

'$1A dagger -^ 2 

$1B hand axe-l-2 

$ 1 C spear -t- 2 

SID short sword-l-2 

SIE mace -I- 2 

:$]P flail -h 2 

'1^ scimitar-t-2 

•^ battle axe 4-2 

$23: long sword -F 2 

$24 royal dagger 

^^S} dagger of mind 

^2# diamond dagger 

$27 electric spear 

$28 holy mace 

$29 unholy mace 

$2A dark flail 

.^. flail of fear 

^ft lucky scimitar 

^^ mace of undead 

I^J- cold axe 

'^m.^ electric sword 

^^ flaming svi'ord 

l^^ij sword of might 

sword of speed 

sharp sword 

accurate .sword 

sword of magic 

immortal sword 

axe protector 

axe destroyer 

X!XX!X"s sword 

adamantine axe 

ultimate sword 

element sword 

magic sling 

cross bow -1-2 

short bow 4- 2 

long bow 4- 2 

cross bow luck 

cross bow speed 

lighting bow 

flaming bow 

giant bow 

the magic bow 

staff of lighl 

cold glaive 

curing staff 

minotaur'axe 



$33 
$34 
$35 
$36 

^A 
$3B 
$3C 

$47 
$48 
$49 
$4A 
MB 

SS& 
$6B 
$60 



m 



$CA 

$CB' 

$CC 

$CD 

$CE 

$CF 

$P© 

$D1 

$02 

m^ 

$D6 

$D7 

$D8 

$D9 

$DA 

$DB 

$DC 

SE1 

SE2 

SE3 

$E4 

$E5 

$E6 

$E7 

$E8 

SE9 

$EA 

$EB 

$EC 

$ED 

SEE 

$EF 

$F0 

$F1 

$F2 

$F3 

$F4 

SF5 

$F6 

$F7 

$F8 

$F9 

$FA 

SEE 

$FC 

$FD 

$FE 



thunder hammer 
great axe 4- 3 
flambcrge 4- 3 
sorcerer staff 
staff ol" magic 
demon \s glaive 
devil's glaive 
the flamberge 
holy flamberge 
evil flamberge 
ring mail 4- 3 
chain mail 4- 3 
splint mail 4- 3 
plate mail 4- 3 
blue ring mail 
red chain mail 
X!XX!X'platc 
holy plate 
ut]-holy plate 
ultimate plate 
bracers ac8 
belt of power 
model boat 
defense cloak 
knowledge book 
ruby idol 
sorcerer role 
power gauntlet 
cl erics 's beads 
horn of death 
potion of life 
precision ring 
return scroll 
teleport helm 
youth potion 
bells of time 
magic oil 
magic vest 
slar saphir 
wealth chest 
gem stack 
diamond collar 
lire opal 
anobtainium 
vellum scroll 
ruby whistle 

kings pass 

merchant pass 

crystal key 

coral key 

bronze key 

silver key 

gold key 

diamond key 

cactus nectar 

map of desert 

laser blaster 

dragon tooth 

wyvern eye 

medusa head 

ring of okrim 

b queen idol 

w queen idol 

pirates map a 

pirates map b 

thundranium 

key card 

eye of goros 



January 



COMPUTIST #SI 



29^ 



John Thomas 



The Softkey 



Sofikey for. . 



Creative Contraptions 

Bantam Software 



■ Requirements 

D Apple n series (with 64K) 
D Creative Contraptions Disk 
C Copy U Plus 

D A slave disk initialized by Diversi-DOS or 
other fast-DOS 



Background 

Creative Contraptions, part of Bantam 
Software's Micro-Workshop Series, will 
remind you of Rocky 's Boots. The idea is to 
build machines to do specific tasks such as wake 
you up in the morning, walk the dog, beat the 
heat, or the like, using pulleys, levers, springs, 
magnets, and assorted animals. The game 
teaches simple machine principles, cause/effect 
relationships, and deductive reasoning. Its 
features make it entertaining to users aged 7 and 
up— a good reason to deprotect it„ 

The Protection 

Examining the disk with TRAX and the 
Copy nPlus Nibble and Sector Editors reveals 
a normal format with the following exceptions: 

Track $03 on both sides is 'funny.' It 
vaguely resembles a normal format ('normal' 
= 16 sectors per track, each composed of sync 
field, address field, smaller sync field, and data 
field.) Here, a sync field (FF F7 F6 EF EE) 
followed by a quasi-address field (AB AB AB FF 
D5 D5 FF...) recurs at roughly the correct 
intervals. 

Track $ 1 1 on both sides have an abnormal 
address epilog (D5 M EB). 

The VTOCs (Volume Table of Contents- 
used by DOS 3.3 to locate files on a disk) on 
both sides are slightly abnormal, 

TRAX reports track $22, sector $05 on 
side 1 as having a 'damaged' data field. 

Additionally, a disk check is implemented 
by the HELLO program. After consulting a 
friend who has some experience with Bantam's 
protection scheme, I concluded that the above 
outlined protection is the norm for this 
company. Further, the softkey presented in this 
article may be all that's needed to crack 
Bantam's other (circa 1985) releases. 



Some of the protection can be fixed by 
copying the disk with the Copy I! Plus DISK 
copy utility. This is a sector copier that 
ignores read errors by producing an empty 
sector (all zeroes in the data field) on the target 
disk whenever read errors occurr on the source 
disk. Track $03 (the 'funny' one) and track $22 
arc properly neutralized here, but none of the 
data on track $1 1 is transferred to die copy disk, 
so certain sectors on this track (both sides) must 
be ported over individually with the Sector 
Editor. 

Byte $01 in the VTOC tells DOS which 
track has the catalog. This byte must be changed 
from 00 to 11 on each side. The Bantam DOS 
(tracks $0O— $02) is replaced with Diversi- 
DOS by using the Copy II Plus COPY DOS 
utility and the Diversi-DOS slave disk. 

(Create your slave disk by Ixxrting any disk 
with Diversi-DOS. Remove it and put a blank 
disk in the drive. Type INIT HELLO and press 
IRETURHI 'I 

Finally, the disk check is selectively 
skipped in the boot process by changing the boot 
program to the file LOADERBIG, using yet 
another Copy U Plus utility, CHANGE BOOT 
PROGRAM, 

I 1 I Use the DISK COPY utility on Copy 
II Pius to copy both sides of the Creative 
Contraptions disk. Ignore any read errors on 
tracks $03, $51, and $22 on side 1 and tracks 
$03 and $1 1 on side 2. 

I 2 I Use the Copy II Pius Sector Editor to 
copy side 2, track $11, sectors $0F, $0E, and 
$OD (the only catalog sectors used on this side) 
from the original to the copy disk. Here's how: 

a. Get to the Sector Editor and put the 
original disk in th e selected drive. 

b. Press CE to PATCH RE AD/WRI TE. 

c. Use arrows keys and l UiT^M' J to 
select CUST OM. 

d. Press I RETURN I 3 times to get ready to 
change WANTED EPILOG. 

e. Type D5. This is the first byte of track 
$irs address epilog . 

f. Press I ESC I twice. This is all the 
patching that's needed. 

g. With the original in the drive, press 
[B (for READ), then type 11 and pres s 
IHETURNI , then type F and press [RETURMj . 
This directs the Seaor Editor to read sector $0F 
on track $11 of the original disk. 

h. Remove the original disk from the disk 
drive and replace it with the copy disk . Press 
[wD (for WRITE) and press iRETURWj twice. 
This tells the Sector Editor to write the sector 
back to the copy disk, replacing the empty 
sector on the copy. 

i. Repeat steps g and h on sectors $0E and 
SOD. 



I 3 I Put the original back in the drive and 
read sector $0O from the same track, same 
side, and change byte $01 from 00 to 11 
before writing the sector back to the copy disk. 

Here's how 

a. Read track $11, sector $00 of the 
original disk (as i n sub-step a above). 

b. Press I K I This moves the cursor to 
the right one position to byte $01 . Cu rsor 
mov emen t is affected with the LJJ LLJ LfU 
and \MI} keys. (A weakness of the Sector 
Editor, I feel -the arrow keys should move the 
cursor!) 

c. Press CS]. This selects the ENTER 
HEX VALUES option, ,____, 

d. Type 11 and press I RETUR NJ . press 
I ESC I This changes the value of byte $01 
from $00 to $11, 

e. Switch disks and write the sector back 
out as in step h above. 

I 4 I Repeat the same procedures on side 
1 as given in steps 2 and 3. Side 1 needs catalog 
sectors $OF, $OE, $0D, and $0C, so you'll 
be copying 4 catalog sectors as well as copying 
and changing the VTOC (sector $00) this time. 

I ji I Use the Copy U Pius utility, COPY 
DOS to copy the DOS from the Diversi-DOS 
slave disk to the copy disk. 

I 6 I Use the Copy II Plus utility, 
CHANGE BOOT PROGRAM to select die file 
LOADERBIG as the boot program. 

Enjoy your COPYA-able copy of Creative 
Contraptions. 

Softkey for. . . 



Combining the Eiements 

D,C, Heath and Co 



■ Requirements 

C Apple II + , lie. Tic (64K) 
D Combining The Elements disk 
D Copy II Plus version 6.0 or later 
D BASIC. SYSTEM found on ProDOS 
USERS.DISK 

Background 

D.C, Heath has published an engaging 
group of software packages that may be used 
to teach the concepts of the physical sciences 
to Middle School and Junior High School 
students. Combining the Elements (CTE) 
introduces the periodic table, atomic structure, 
and chemical bonding. A student's work may 
be saved on the disk and thus developed over 
multiple sessions. Repeated disk access by the 
CTE disk (and the lone backup provided by 
Heath) and a d^k check routine make it difficult 
to share among a larger group of students. 



30 



COMPUTIST m\ 



January 



The protection used on the disk includes, 
along with the disk check, one track that has a 
funny' format to foil COPYA and bit copiers 
and probably as the object of the disk check. 

Track $19 has one huge sync field with a 
single string of non-sync bytes in the middle 
of the field that read: BF CF F3 FC. The bytes 
outside of this sync field are all FFs, so no 
program data is lost by using a sector copier 
that can ignore errors to 'clean' this track up. 

The rest of the disk is perfectly normal of 
format. 

After copying the disk with Copy II Plus, 
I printed its catalog with fJe lengths (again with 
Copy II Plus). This revealed an ordinary- 
looking set of ProDOS files. 

The file F^oDOS appears first, followed by 
some picture files and a file called 
MOLE. SYSTEM which, as I discovered, 
included the main program and the disk check. 

The other files are binary and contain data 
that the program uses. 

When I tried to boot my new copy disk, 
ProDOS loaded itself in, then there were a few 
seconds of disk access. 

After a split-second pause, first drive 1 
came on, then drive 2, then the screen cleared 
and a BASIC prompt and cursor appeared. 

A quick call to the Monitor showed that 
RAM from the end of the text screen ($07FF) 
to $BFFF had been cleared as well. 

A disk check routine seemed to be taking 
control of things. 

ProDOS-based disk check routines in my 
experience have used either direct disk access 
(search the disk and/or memory for 
LDA $C08C,X), or calls to ProDOS' 
Machine Language Interface (search for 
JSR $BFO0). 1 used Copy II Plus' sector 
editor to search the disk for clues to direct 
access first (8CC0). 

The ProDOS Bootstrap Loader on track 
$0, and ProDOS itself, on track $4, directly 
access the disk drive controller card. Closer 
inspection of this code revealed nothing out of 
the ordinary. In searching for calls to the MLI 
(20 00 BF), again I found only the ordinary ones 
diat ProDOS itself makes. 

The source code of calls to the MLI always 
take the form: 

JSR $BF00 Jump to ML/ eg 1 1 handler 

DFB function code Over 20 functions 
DA addr psrnn I ist Each function has its 
own parameter ! ist 

As ProDOS processes these calls, it digs 
out of the stack the return from subroutine 
address, then adds $©3 to it in order to skip 
over the function code and parameter list 
address bytes so it can return to an executable 
instruction when the call is done. The function 
code telis ProDOS which device-independent 
ftinction is to be performed. 

('Device-independent' means the 
programmer does not have to be concerned with 



slot or drive number, or even what kind of disk 
drive.) 

The parameter list holds such inforniation 
as the pathname and address of a data buffer. 
For our purposes, the most important thing is 
the function code, a very specific indicator of 
what ProDOS is up lo as a program calls it for 
file or block-level access. 

Next, I booted my ProDOS Users disk. 
This puts ProDOS and BASIC.SYSTEM (the 
BASIC interface) in place, 

ProDOS SPY 

I then ran a nifty utility called ProDOS SPY 
by Ken Manly. I found it in the February 87 
issue of Nibble (of all places!) It works like 
PROSHADOW, but additionally supplies the 
MLI function name (and filename if accessing 
a file.) 

I turned on my printer and ran 
MOLE. SYSTEM. I sat fascinated as the SPY 
program traced ProDOS' search for the file, 
opening and reading it, and finally grinding to 
a halt as it tried to 'READ BLK' (read block) 
number $C0 into memory beginning at 
$0800, first from drive 1 , then from drive 2, 
Here was the disk check routine, caught in the 
act! 

Further study of the output from my printer 
and ProDOS SPY revealed that no other file 
but MOLE. SYSTEM had been accessed. 

MOLE.SYSTEM (good name for the 
varmint at this point) must have been using a 
self-modifying routine to READ the BlocK. The 
next step was to trace the file itself. 

It loads in at $2000 as most ProDOS 
TYPE: SYS files do. The first instruetion there 
is a JMP to $8031. 

8031 LSR $03F4 Scramble power-up byte 
8034 JSR S803A Bui Id disli check code at 

$IDC5 
8037 JMP $1DC5 Do disl< check 
803A LDX #S60 Tfie code from here 
803C BEO $8046 to $8059 but Ids the 
803E LDY *($FF disk check rout ine 
8040 JSR $8048 

8059 RTS 

« The it istruction at $803 1 forces reboot upon 
pressing ISRESETl . Using code from pages 
$3D through $46 as a seed, the disk check code 
builder at $8D3A leaves the following code at 
$IDC5: 



1DC5- 


4E ca ID 


LSR 


S1DC8 


1DC8- 


DC 


??? 




1DC9- 


CE ID 6E 


DEC 


$6E1D 


IIKC- 


D0 1D 


BNE 


$1DEB 


IDCE- 


40 


RTI 




IDCF- 


C9 3E 


CMP 


#53E 



code, that is, executing the code on paper 
reveals how the code rebuilds itself. The LSR 
instruction at $1DC5 modifies the byte 
immediately following it at $1DC8. This byte 
will now contain an ROR instruction which 
fiirther modifies another, and so on. After 
running it, the above code now becomes: 

Shift bits right 3t $1DC8 
1DC5- 4EC8 ID LSR $1DC8 

Rotate bits right at $!DCE 
1DC8- 5E CE 10 ROR JIDCE 

Rotate bits right at $1DD0 
IDCB- 6E D0 ID ROR S1DD0 

Set up some of the exit code 
IDCE- 20 C9 IF JSR $1FC9 



These instructions ultimately build the way 
out at $IEOB... 



Exit happi !y 
lEDB- 4Ce4 1F JMP 



S1F84 



And the disk checking JSR to the MLl at 
$1E24. 

Call MLI 
1E24- 20 00BF JSR $8F00 

Function code for READBLK: $80 
1E27- 80 V.I 

Address of parm list: $!E16 
1E28- 15 IE ASL SIE.X 

On error. A-register holds error code, 

with carry flag set 
1E2A- F0 02 BNE $IE2£ 

This is die call that ProDOS SPY caught 
turning on my disk drives trying to read block 
SCO into page $08. With all this code in place, 
I found that typing 1F84G from the Monitor widi 
my copy disk in the drive started up the program 
nicely. 



The Softkey 



This code doesn't make much sense upon 
first inspection. It's sprinkled with ???s and 
references to obscure addresses. Tracing the 



The deprotection of CTE involves copying 
the original, renaming MOLE.SYSTEM , and 
adding BASIC.SYSTEM to die copy. Here's 
why: This will leave you in BASIC'S immediate 
mode when the disk is booted. As bootable 
ProDOS disks boot, the Bootstrap loader loads 
and executes die file ProDOS, When ProDOS 
is up and running, it checks the disk for the first 
file in the volume directory which both has 
.SYSTEM as the last 7 characters of its 
filename, and is a System file (type: SYS). 
Here, we want BASIC.SYSTEM to be that file, 
ootMOLE.SYSTEM . Next, boot the copy disk 
and BLOAD and execute MOjLE.^ySriM to the 
point of the disk check. Then interrupt and 
resave MOLE.SYSTEM so it begins at the 
point where the phantom disk check routine 
exits. When it's ready, DELETE this file from 
disk and BSAVE it as a BINary file in its modified 
form. All that's needed then is to add a short 
STARTUP program to the disk which will run 
the modified MOLE.SYSTEM. 



January 



COMPUTTST #51 



31 



I 1 I Use Copy li Plus' DISK COPY to 
copy the CTE disk. Ignore the read error on 
track $19. 

I 2 I Use Copy II Plus' COPY FILES to 
put a copy of BASIC.SYSTEM on the new 
copy disk. 

I 3 I U.se Copy II Plus to RENAME the file 
MOLE. SYSTEM on the new copy disk to 
MOLE. SYS so that ProDOS will run 
BASIC.SYSTEM upon booting. 

I 4 I Insert the new copy disk in your boot 
drive and boot it. 

j 5 I BLOADthesystemfileMOLf.^r^. 
and get into the Monitor. 
BLOAD MOLE.SyS, TSYS, ASZOOO 
CALL-lSl 



1 6 I You're going to need iHBESETl to 
interrupt the program after it builds the 
necessary code, so bypass the LSR $03F4 
instruction at $803 1 with die command 80340. 
This starts the program running and 
building the diskcheck code at $1DC5, but be 
ready to hit iBRESETl a split second later as 
soon as the light on the disk drive comes on. 
Timing is important. 

aOMG 
IBRESETl 



I 7 I Get into the Monitor again and check 
to see that the needed code is intact, 

CALL-151 
1FS4L 

You should see... 
1F84- 20BD1F JSR $1F8D 
lFe7- 20 A7 IF JSR $1FA7 
IF8A- 4C00 20 JMP $2000 



I 8 I Get back to BASIC and use 
BASIC.SYSTEM to delete MOLE.SYS and 
save a new, modified version of the file. 

3D0C 

DELETE MOLE.SyS 

BSAVE MOLE.SyS, A$1F84, E$805A 

I 9 I Reset BASIC pointers and enter and 
save a short BASIC program as a STARTUP 
file. 
NEW 

10 REM STARTUP BY J. THOMAS 
20 PRINT CIIR$(4) "MOLE.SYS" 
SAVE STARTUP 

That's it! 



David G AleTtander 



The present softkey is incomplete due to 
employment-related, time constraints which 



forced me to put the project on hold tor the time 
being. However, I thought that the results of 
my analysis thus far might be of interest to other 
COMPUTIST readers and possibly generate 
some feedback, 

t Softkey for. . . 



Carriers at War 

Strategic Studies Group 1984 



The game is a simulation of World War 11 
fleet carrier operations in the Pacific which is 
played on a honeycomb shaped grid. 

The disk can be easily backed up using 
Copy II Pius bitcopy system or the like. 

The protection comprises a '"Customized 
Disk Operating System" by Keating Computer 
Services P/L. There does not appear to be any 
secondary protection such as a nibble count. 

The customized operating system appears 
to rely heavily on concepts from the stone age 
which were probably rejected by Woz at an 
early stage in the development of the Disk n 
system. 

More specifically, each track on the disk 
comprises 10 sectors, each having a data field 
of512bytes which is 4-by-4 encoded using the 
same scheme as the address field. 

The address headers are D6 AA B5, 
reminiscent of DOS 3.2. 

There does not appear to be a file structufe 
per se. Instead, various blocks of data which 
may be considered to constitute "pseudo files" 
are mapped to specific sectors on the disk and 
read/ written directly by specifying the track and 
sector numbers. 

A sector read routine is found on track 
$00, sector SOO (the boot sector) which is 
readable by the disk controller card and 
converts each consecutive two bytes of data on 
the disk to one byte in memory using the shift, 
mask and combine technique which is 
conventionally employed for reading address 
fields, 

A clone of this routine is found in the main 
DOS at $BE8D— $BEFE. A block of data or 
pseudo file is read/written in integral numbers 
of consecutive sectors /memory pages through 
a JSR to a vector at $3 DO which holds a JMP 
instruction to $BD0O. Prior to the jump the 
parameters for disk access are stored in memory 
locations $00— S05 as follows. 
$00 = first memory page 
$01 = last memory page 
$02 = ? 

$03 = conimaiiid code 
= seek 
/ = read 
2 = write 
7A = init 
$04 = starting track 
$05 = starting sector 



For example, a representative set of 
parameters stored at $8A93 arc 40 57 00 01 02 
00 which correspond to "read a block of 
consecutive sectors starting at track $02, sector 
$O0 into consecutive memory pages 
$40-$57". 

The routine for copying the parameters 
from page $8A to page SO© and then jumping 
to the disk access vector at $3D0 starts at 
$8ADi and disassembles as follows. 



8AD1 LDX 


mm 


8AD3 LDA 


?8A93,Y 


8AD6 STA 


$00. X 


3AD8 INY 




8AD9 INX 




8ADA CPX 


#$06 


8ADC BCC 


8AD3 


BADE JSR 


?03D0 



The obvious method for converting the disk 
to 16-sector, 6-by-2 encoded format would be 
to plug the alien read routine into the DOS 3.3 
RTWS, disconnect the postnibble routine, and 
use the resulting modified RWTS in the Super 
lOB swap controller. I tried that, but must have 
missed some details because the controller 
would not read the disk. 

I therefore resorted to the expedient of 
reading blocks of data from disk to memory 
using the Carriers' DOS and writing them back 
to a DOS 3.3 disk using SREAD/S WRITE and 
an Applesoft controller. 

Capturing the main program and saving it 
to a DOS 3 . 3 disk in bootable form using a copy 
card such as H^iWca/riZf or a manual procedure 
poses no particular problem. However, the 
Carriers' DOS is incapable of reading DOS 3.3 
because it lacks pre nibble and postnibble 
routines. 

There would appear to be two alternatives 
in converting Carriers to the DOS 3.3 
environment. The first would be to rewrite the 
Carriers' DOS so that it would read and write 
to 6-by-2 encoded sectors. The second would 
be to map the pseudo files which are read by 
the program as blocks of sectors, convert them 
to DOS 3.3 binary files and change the disk 
access commands from the parameter setup and 
jump to the $3D0 vector to BLOAD and 
BSAVE commands. 



Steve Charles 



Softkey for... 



Tomahawk 

Datasoft 



■ Requirements 

n Sector editor/disk scanner 
D Blank disk 



32 



COMPUTIST #51 



January 



I recently purchased Tomahawk, a new 
helicopter simulator from Datasoft. 

Because the original disk isn't write- 
protected (invitation lo disaster), I made a 
backup copy of it. Although it copied without 
any errors, upon booting it just hung up and 
displayed "Please use original disk". 

Why is this (and other simulators) 
protected? The instruction manuals are a 
nessessity for these complex programs. Anyone 
recieving a copy of these type of programs 
won't be able to use them anyway, and they 
may become interested enough to go out and 
buy an original. End of digression. 

Searching thru memory yielded the 'Bad 
Disk' code routine at $ 4563. 

Looking further, I found a nibble count in 
the high end of page $44. Sure enough, in the 
middle of the nibble count (at S44CB) was a 
jump to $4563, preceded by a RTS instruction 
(Return From Subroutine). I replaced the first 
byte of the jump (4C) with a RTS (60) and 
restarted the program. 

Success! Now I had to change the code on 
the disk. With a disk scanner (I use Copy 11 
Plus), I searched for the instruction to be 
replaced, 4C 63 45. 

No luck - Datasoft had encoded the data 
on the disk. Time to boot trace! 

To my surprise, even the boot sector (track 
$00, sector $00) was encoded. Looking at the 
first instruction, the code jumped to the end of 
the sector, where there was a simple decryption 
routine tor that page. 

On the chance that the same routine might 
be also used for the rest of the disk, I encoded 
4C 63 45 with it to get 98 C6 8A. Scanning the 
disk for these bytes, I found a match at track 
$00, sector $05, byte $CB. Replacing die first 
byte with an encoded RTS (C0), I rebooted the 
disk. Finally, success! 

I 1 I Make a copy of Tomahawk with any 
normal copier. 

I 2 I Make the following sector edit : 

Trk Set Byte(s) From Tg' 



t00 $05 $CB 



$98 



its 



If the code is moved elsewhere on your 
disk, scan for 98 C5 8A and replace the 98 with 

aC0. 



Jack R, Nissel 



Here arc some softkeys that have worked 

for me. 



Softkey for. . 




I 1 1 Boot your DOS 3,3 system disk, 

I 2 t Tell DOS to ignore checksum and 
epilogues and run COPYA . 
POKE 47426,24 
RUN COPTA 



I 3 I Make the following sector edits to tlie 
copy you just made. 

Trk Set Byte(s) From To 



S00 $02 $72-77 60 EA EA EA 
EAEA 



A9 E4 8D 25 
40 60 



I A I Write the sector back to the disk. 
Softkey for, . . 



Championship Boxing 

Sierra On-Line 



I 1 I Boot your DOS 3,3 system disk, 

I 2 I Tell DOS to ignore checksum and 
epilogues and run COPYA. 
POKE 47426,24 
RUN COPYA 



I 3 I Make the following sector edits to the 
copy you just made, 

Trk Set Byte(s) From To 



$18 $07 $68 



D0 0D EA EA EA EA 0D D0 



I 4 I Write the sector back to the disk, 
Softkey for... 



Championship Wrestling 

Epyx 



I 1 I Boot your DOS 3,3 system disk. 

I Z I Tell DOS to ignore checksum and 
epilogues and run COPYA. 
POKE 47426,24 
RUN COPYA 



I 3 I Make the following sector edits to the 
copy you just made. 



Trk Set Byte(s) From 



To 



$00 $05 $7C-7D A5 F4 

$93-95 6CFCFF 



A9E7 

4C 7A BB 



I 4 I Write the sector back to the disk, 
Softkey for... 



Chesswaster 200© 

Software Toolworks 



I 1 I Boot your DOS 3.3 system disk. 



I 2 I Tell DOS to ignore checksum and 
epilogues and run COPYA. 

POKE 47426,24 
RUN COPYA 



I 3 I Make the following sector edits to the 
copy you just made. 

I 4 I That's it. 
Softkey for... 



Commando 

Data East 



I 1 I Boot your DOS 3.3 system disk. 

L2_J Tell DOS to ignore checksum and 
epilogues and run COPYA . 

POKE 47426,24 
RUN COPYA 



I 3 I Make the following sector edits to the 
copy you just made. 

Trk Set Byte(s) From To 



$00 $06 $00-01 A0! 



18 60 



[ 4 I Write the sectors back to the disk, 
Softkey for... 



Fat City 

Optimum Resource 



I 1 I Use any fast copy program that can 
ignore errors. 

I 2 I Copy disk and ignore a read error on 
track $01. 

I 3 [ Make the following sector edits to the 
copy you just made. 

Trk Set Byte(s) From To 



$02 $06 $00-02 A0 3CFB 



I8 60F7 



I 4 i Write the sector back to the disk. 
Softkey for... 



Fight Ni^t 

Accolade 



The softkey shown in COMPUTIST #46 
would not work on my copy because none of 
the bytes were the same . For those of you who 
had the same problem, this simple softkey 
should work. 



I 1 I Use any fast copy program that can 
ignore errors. 

I 2 I Copy disk and ignore a read error 

on track 22. 



January 



COMPUTIST #51 



33 



I 3 I Make the following sector edit to the 
copy you just made, 

Trk Set Byte(s) From To 



$0E 100 I2E 



F0 



00 



I 8 I Write the sector back to the disk. 
Softkey for... 



Intrigue 

Spectruni Holobyte 



I 1 I Boot your DOS 3.3 system disk, 

I Z I Change DOS and Run COPYA. 

CALL-151 

B954:4A C9 6A DO EF 
B9SB:18 fiO 
RUN COPYA 

That's it. 
Softkey for... 



Pitstopn 

Epyx 



i 1 I Boot your DOS 3.3 system disk, 

I 2 I Tell DOS to ignore checksum and 
epilogues and run COPYA. 

POKE 47426,24 
RUN COPYA 



I 3 I Boot your DOS 3.3 system disk again. 

I 4 I BRON MASTER CREATE 

I 5 I Specify [BOOT] as the greeting 
program name and copy DOS to your new 
Pitstop II disk. 

I 6 I Make the following sector edit to the 
copy you just made. 

Trk Set Byte(s) From To 



$00 J05 S« 



$06 



$34 



I 7 I Write the sector back to the disk, 
Softkey for... 



Jungle Hunt 

Atari so ft 



I 1 I Boot your DOS 3.3 system disk, 

I 2 I Tell DOS to ignore check,sum and 
epilogues and run COPYA . 

PORE 47426,24 
RUN COPYA 

I 3 I BootyourDOS3,3systemdiskagain. 
I 4 I BRUN MASTER CREATE 



I 5 I Specify [A\ as the Hello program 
name and copy DOS to your new Jungle Hunt 
disk. 

I 6 I Make the following sector edit to the 
copy you just made. 

Trk Set Byte(s) From To 



$00 S0D $42 



06 



32 



I 7 f Write the sector back to the disk. 
Copy II Plus softkey for., , 



Print Shop 
Grapiiics Library Holiday 



Broderbund 



If you make a copy using C«/i>'//fVus v7.4 
the: copy will be depratected, 

^ Sojikey for... 



World's Greatest Baseball Game 

Epyx 



The softkey shown in COMPUTIST #48 
worked on side 1 , disk A of my copy, but in 
order to get side 2 to work I did the following 
in addition to that softkey. 



I 1 I Copy normal DOS to side 2 disk A 
of the copy you made, 

I 2 I Boot DOS 3,3 system disk. 

I 3 I Put in copy so you can write to side 
2 then type: 
NEW 

10D$ = CHRS(4) 

20 PRINT DS'RUN TRADING PROGRAM" 
SAVE HELLO 

Softkey for... 



Centipede 

Atari soft 



I 1 I Boot your DOS 3,3 system disk, 

I 2 I Type; 
CALL-151 
8928:18 60 
B988:18 60 
RUN COPYA 



I 3 I Make the following sector edits to the 
copy you just made. 

Trk Set Byte(s) From To 



$00. $03 $35 


AA 


DE 


$3F 


DE 


AA 


$91 


AA 


DE 


$9B 


DE 


AA 



I 4 I Write the sector back to the disk. 
Softkey for... 



Stargate 

Atarisoft 



111 Boot your DOS 3,3 system disk, 
n~l Type: 



CALL-151 
B928:1S 60 
B988:18 60 
RUN COPYA 



I 3 I Make the following sector edits to the 
copy you just made. 



Trk Set Byte(s) 


From 


To 


$00 $03 $35 


AA 


DE 


$3F 


DE 


AA 


$91 


AA 


DE 


$9B 


PE 


AA 



I 4 I Write the sector back to the disk,: 
Softkey for. . . 



Movie Mak^r 

Electronic Arts 



I 1 I Use any fast copy .program that can 
ignore errors, 

I 2 I Copy all four sides ai the origiiial 
disks and ignore a read error on track $06 of 
disk 1 , side A, 

I 3 I Scan disk 1 , side A for the byte string 
4C 69 A0 and change them to 1S60DD. The byte 
string may be found several times so scan the 
whole side of the disk and replace the string 
each time it is found, 

I 4 I Don't forget to write the sectors back 
to the disk, 

Softkey for... 



Make Your Own Murder Party 

Electronic Arts 



I 1 I Use any fast copy program that can 
ignore errors, 

I 2 I Copy both sides of the original disk 
and ignore a read error on track $06 of side A 

I 3 I Scan side A for the byte string 4C 69 
A0 and change them to 18 60 DD, The byte string 
may be found several times so scan the whole 
side of the disk and replace the string each time 
it is found. 



34 



COMPUTIST #51 



January 



I 4 I Don't forget to write the sectors baek 
to the disk. 

Softkey for. , . 



Manic Mansion 

LucastUm Games 



This title is distributed by Activision and 
uses the same protection as do several other 
recent Activision releases. 



I 1 I Use any fast copy program to copy 
both sides of the disk . 

I 2 [ Using your sector editor search side 
1 for the string that begins A9 56 85. 

I 3 I Look ahead until you find the string 
38 2A 25 FC. 

I A I Starting with the byte with the value 
A9 that you found in step 2, change all the 
bytes to EA up to, but not including the bytes 
with the value 25 FC that you found in step 3. 

I 5 I Change the 25 FC to A9 FF. 

I 6 I Write the sector back to the disk, 

Softkey for... 



Kung-fu Master 

Data East 



I 1 I Boot your DOS 3.3 system disk. 

I 2 I Tell DOS to ignore checksum and 
epilogues and run COPY A. 
POEE 47426,24 
RUN COPTA 



I 3 I Make the following sector edits to the 
copy you just made. 

Trk Set Bytefs) Prom To 

$00 105 J00-01 A0 00 18 60 



I 4 I Write the sector back to the disk. 
Softkey for. . . 



Spy vs. Spy volume I&2 

A vantage 



This title is distributed by Accloade and 
uses a protection scheme somewhat like recent 
Activision releases. 



I 1 I Use any fast copy program to copy 
both sides of the disk. 

[ 2 I Using your sector editor search side 
1 for the string that begins A9 56 85. 

I 3 I Look ahead until you find the string 
38 2A 25 00. 

I 4 [ Starting with the byte with the value 



A9 that you found in step 2, change all the 
bytes to EA up to, but not including the bytes 
with the value 25 00 that you found in step 3, 

I ? I Change the 25 00 to A9 FF. 

I 6 I Write the sector back to the disk. 

Softkey for... 



Sorcerer 

Infocom 



I 1 I Boot your DOS 3.3 .system disk. 

I 2 I Type: 
CAU-151 
B925118 60 
B9&S:ie 60 
BE4S:18 
B8rB:2g 00 
RUN COPYA 



I 3 I Make the following sector edits to the 
copy you just made. 

Trk Set Byte(s) From To 



S00 $02 $5D BC 

$FB-FC C9 BC 



AD 
29 00 



I 4 ] Write the sector back to the disk. 
Softkey for... 



Zorkm 

Infocom 



I 1 I Boot your DOS 3.3 system disk. 

I 2 I Typei 
CALL-151 
B925:1S 60 
BSeSilS 60 
BE48:18 
B8FB:29 00 
RUN COPTA 



I 5 I Make the following sector edits to the 
copy you just made, 

Trk Set Byte(s) From To 



S00 %m $50 BC 

$FB-FC C9 BC 



AD 
29 00 



I 6 I Write the sectors back to the disk, 
Softkey for... 



Batik Cruiser 

strategic Simulations 



/ djdn 't do this next softkey myseif, hut I 'm 
told that it will work. 

I 1 I Boot your DOS 3.3 system disk. 



I 2 I Type: 
CALL-151 
B942:18 
B957:00 
RUN COPYA 



I 3 I That's it, 
Softkey for... 



House-on-a-disk 

Activision 



[ 1 I Use any fast copy program to copy 
both sides of the disk, 

I 2 I Using your sector editor search side 
1 for the string that begins A9 56 85. 

! 3 I Loolc ahead until you fmd the string 
38 2A25FC. 

1 4 I Starting with the byte with the value 
A9 that you found in step 2, change all the 
bytes to EA up to, but not including the bytes 
with the value 25 FC that you found in step 3. 

I 5 I Change the 25 FC to A9 FF. 

I 6 I Write the sector back to the disk. 

Something interesting... 

Here is something that I found out that you 
might find interesting and useful. 

On Side 1, track $11, sector $01, bytes 
$00—08 is where the information is stored for 
the character. 

If you have not yet written to side 2, (make 
several copies of side 2 before you write to 
them), changing the value of bytes $00—08 
will produce a different little computer person. 
He will look basically the same, but he will have 
a different name, he also may have different 
color hair, or some type of hat on, etc. 

You must start each byte with the number 
3, (example 31, 33, 36, etc.). 

t Correction to the softkey for... 



Temple OfApshai Trilogy 

Epyx 



My softkey in issue COMPUTIST #48 was 
not complete. The softkey shown will only work 
if you first copy your original disk using the 
Copy Jf Plus v7.4 parms and then using the 
copy you made as the disk you copy from using 
COPYA as shown in the softkey, 

t A problem with the softkey for... 



Crisis Mountain 

Microlab 



None of die COMPUTIST softkey s had 



January 



COMPUTIST #51 



35 



worked for my copy of Crisis Mountain. 

(5) When I figured out a softkey that seemed 
to work, (the same softkey shown in 
COMPUTIST ffSQ sent in by The Hacksaw), 
I found out that although you could now disk 
eopy it, once you saved a high score to it the 
disk would not boot again. 

If anyone has a fix for this please send it in. 

t Partitd softkey for... 



Stellar 7 

Penguin 



The softkey for The Quest shown in 
COMPUTIST #41 will deprotect this title 
except for the same problem as in Crisis 
Mountain: Once you save a high score the disk 
will not boot again. 

<2) Can anyone tcD me vifhere the high scores 
are stored for the following: 

1. Swasiibuckler by Datamost 

2. Situation Critical by Prism Software 

3. Cavern Creatures by Datamost 

4. BC's Quest for Tires by Sierra On-Line 

It would be helpful if when you sent in 
softkey s you showed the name of the company 
who put out the title that the softkey is for since 
the same title may have been put out by several 
different companies at different times. 

As to allowing people to send in softkey s 
for other computers. I am totally against it!!! 
If there was a large demand for diis there would 
be at least one magazine now publishing to meet 
this demand, I don't believe there is any, and 
this tells me that there is not enough demand 
to support such a magazine. 

However the demand for the deprotection 
of Apple software has supported COMPUTIST 
for the past 6 years and I feel it would be a 
disservice and a slap in the face to the many 
people who have supported it, to lose any space 
to non- Apple software. 

I realize that some of these titles are old and 
other softkeys for them may have been 
mentioned in the very early issues of 
COMPUTIST, but as someone who has, within 
the last year, gotten into computing I know that 
there are other new computer users and new 
readers of COMPUTIST who may benifit from 
them. 



Bob Colbert 



A.P.T.for... 



Wizardry rv 

Sir Tech 



Wizardry IV Codes 

Wizardty IV gives you three 4-digit 
numbers and prompts you for the fourth. Using 
this table, you can quicidy and easily derive the 
fourth code. 

First look up the three numbers in the left 
half of each of the three columns. 

Next write down the three corresponding 
codes from the right half of each of the three 
columns. 

Now add up the numbers. If number is 5 
digits, subtract 9000, and repeat subtraction 
until number is 4 digits. 

Example: Given 2338 1753 2451. Looking 
at the table, the corresponding number to 2338 
is 6375, Write this down. Repeating this with 
the other two four-digit codes, you get 6704 
and 8981. The sum of 6375, 6704, and 8981 
is 22,060. Now subtract 90O0 from this and 
you get I3,O60. Again subtract 9000 and you 
have 4060. 



Authorization codes 


Code #1 


Code n 


Code #3 


1080-8771 


1086-0000 


1193-0000 


1211-1280 


1219-1488 


1282-8510 


1386-6528 


1516-7814 


1529-9475 


1556-8090 


1588-9399 


1502-1451 


1607-9125 


1669-1330 


1712-9012 


1735-8696 


1753-6704 


1757-8556 


2138-4251 


2194-9354 


2219-8449 


2293-1026 


2301-7555 


2313-9190 


2338-6375 


2362-3161 


2377-8896 


2395-6353 


2437-6150 


2451-8981 


2470-3160 


2480-2293 


2770-8866 


2783-2544 


2800-1764 


2812-9871 


2892-5107 


2897-4925 


2910-1315 


2919-3105 


2922-3479 


2941-1190 


2990-1102 


3014-5023 


3032-8839 


3137-3205 


3243-8265 


3278-9832 


3303-6727 


3369-7684 


3414-9682 


3463-4306 


3538-7509 


3547-1066 


3587-7452 


3779-6269 


3816-1374 


3852-4943 


3868-3350 


3996-9299 



Christopher Dean 



■\ Softkey for.. 




This letter is to inform COMPUTIST 
readers that/ef by Sublogic can be deprotected 
by using the Flight Simulator softkey in 
COMPUTIST #36 with just a few 
modifications. 



The disk format is the same, and the DOS 
is the same, the only differences being that/e( 
does not have any 'language card data' (even 
thought it ha-S a load routine in DOS for one) 
or any write routines. 

The following procedure will enable one 
to deprotect Jst with the Fiiglit Sitnuiator 
softkey. 

I A I The first step is to follow the Might 
Simulator softkey up to step six. At step six 
replace with the following steps: 
1D3E:4C 59 FF j 

1D03G 



I B I Now insert the work disk with the 
Flight Simulator programs. 
0600G 

BSAVE JETBOOT2,A$lDOe,L$300 
BSAVE JETDO$,A$2(II(IKII,LS600 



I C I Next, make the following changes to 
Flight Simulator's, programs: 
CALL- 151 
BLOAD copy 
103B:FC 
lOeOiAF 
1063:4F 

BSAVE JETCOPY,AS1000,L$C7 
BLOAD DDS L0ADER,A$1F09 
1F38:3C 

BSAVE JETDOS L0ADER,A$1F09,L$54 
BLOAD NEWDOS, AS2154 
216D:81 21 
217Z:C7 21 
21BB:2B 22 
BSAVE NEW JETD0S,A$21S4,LSE7 



I D I Finally, follow the rest of the Flight 
Simulator softkey excluding the DOS memory 
wipes (to clean up the code) , the write routines , 
and any procedures relating to language card 
data (including the sector edits), in other words, 
all that has to be done is copy JET with 
JETCOPY, JETDOS, and JETBOOT2, then 
write the Jet programs and BOOTl to track 
S00 in the same manner listed in the Flight 
Simulator softkey. 



Nicholas Siainsoii 



Here are sdftkfeys for Manic Mansion and 
Aliens. Both Activision programs can be copied 
with COPYA . The protection is similar to the 
protection used on Spindizzy in COMPUTIST 
#48, p.21. 

Softkey for... 



Manic Mansion 

Activision 



36 



CQMPDTEST #51 



January 



I 1 I Copy both, sides of Manic Mansion 
with COPYA. 

I Z I Use your sector-editor and make the 



following changes on side 1 of the disk: 

Trk Set Byte(s) From To 

$130 $0C 156-95 A9.,.2A 
$96-96 25 FC 



a 1 1 EAs 
A9FF 



Softkey for.. 



Aliens 

Activision 



I 1 I Copy both sides of Aliens with 
COPYA. 

I 2 I Use your sector-editor and make the 
following changes on side one of the disk: 

Trk Set Byte(s) From To- 



$0B S0E $5B-9A A9...2A 
$9B-9C 25 FC 



all EAs 
A9FF 



Dennis Gaunt 



Softkey for,. 



Bridge 4,0 

Artworjt 



Bridge 4.0, a mediocre bridge program by 
Artworx is easily deproteeted by using the 
softkey given for Computerbridge in 
COMPUTIST #44. It consists of: 



RUN COPYA 

|[.:cl 

70 

CALL-151 

B942:18 

3D0G 

RUN 

Trk Set Byte(s) 


From 


To 


400 $03 $91 


DF 


DE 


Copy n Plus 


softkey for,. 




Plnball Construct/on Set 



My version of Pinbail Construction Set 
resisted all of my attempts at deprotection. Since 
I didn't have a softkey specifically for this 
program in my back issues of COMPUTIST, 
I used the Copy ffPlus v7.1 to do it. This disk 
has 3 parameters for Pinball Construction Set 
(Alt.). The parameters, which are entered in 
the Create A Parameter option, are: 



TO-T4, Sector Copy 

S»ctoi Edit,Track 3,S»ct(»r 06, DOS 3.3,4A; 

EA/EA/EA 
T7-T22,Sectai Copy 

The subsequent copy gives a read error on 
track $G>6 but this doesn't matter. 



R. Bendel 



t Softkey for.. 



Wings Of Fury 

Brodcrbund 



I received a copy of Wings of Fury and the; 
first thing I did was to check out any other wares 
that Broderbund just put out. 

Hey, look at this; Eric Taylor's softkey for 
Bank Street Writer 3 in COMPUTIST #47. 

My crack is to use Locksraitii to bit-copy 
$00-22 both sides, then boot up your Copy H 
Pius v5.2 (old). DOS patch 3.3 and read track 
%<m sector $0B and type in Table I of the Bank 
Street Writer 3 softkey. Write it back to the disk 
only on side A. Then make your drive busy..., 

P.S. It was made in Lacrosse and it was 
cracked in Lacrosse> 



Mark G. Prestero 



t Softkey addendum for... 



Bag Of Tricks 

Quality Software 



I recently tried to use the softkey given the 
Book Of Softkey s volume I for Quality 
software's Bag Of Tricks with no success at 
getting the programs to perform disk operations 
properly. 

After considerable experimenting, I was 
able to determine that my version of the 
program had, in the SUPPLEMENT program, 
code which sent the program to page $9B for 
DOS entry. This caused the program to crash. 
With the help of the Loeksnuth Automatic Boot 
Tracer, I found the area which caused the 
problem, made a change to send the program 
to the correct DOS location and have had no 
problems with any of the unprotected Bag Of 
Tricks programs. 

The change I made should be added to step 
18 is: 

5553:B7 



MOST 

WANTED 

Softkeys 



Afi\f Muse 

Accolade Comics Accolade 

Agent U.S.A. Scholamc. 

Airheart Broderbund 

Atgeblasler Davidsofi dt Associares 

Algebra I Inreligent Tutor 

Apple Super Pilot Apple 

Ballbktzer Epyx 

Bftkince of Power Mindacape 

Bandits Sinus Software 

Bank Street filer Broderbuftd 

Brain Bank The Observatory 

Captain Goodnight Broderhutid 

Car Builder Opiiuni R<;:fOurie 

Cfuimpiottship Ba^ebali Activmon 

Cohssus tV Firebird 

Create with Garjldd DLM 

Cross dues Science Research 

Crossword Magic Mindscape 

Crypt of Media Sir Tech 

DB Master V4.0 StfffJifA'are 

Deep Space Sir Ter.k 

Earth Orbitittg Stmion (EOS) Electronic Art 

Fay: The Masked Woman Digitech Sofiwar^' 

Fay's Word Rally Digitech Software 

Fay: Word Hunter Digitech Software 

Fun Bunch Unicorn 

Gemstone Healer SSI 

GoldFinger Mindscape 

Goonies Parasofi 

GradeBusters 1-2-3 Gradehusier.i 

Gutenburg Jr. & Sr. Micromaiion LTD 

Handicapping System Sports Judge 

Hardball II (g.<) Accolade 

J ^ S Grade Book J ^ S Software 

Jigsaw Microfun 

Le Francois Par Ordinateur D. C Heath & Co 

Legacy of the Ancients Electronic Arts 

Marble Madness (Ilgsj Electronic Ans 

Mathbtaster Ekividion & A!i.'nx:ia!es 

Microwie 22 & 23 Scholastic Software 

Mind Mirror Electronic Arts 

Movie Monster Game Epyx 

Odin Odesta 

Operation Frog Schtylastic Software 

Peeping Tom Microiab 

Personal Finance Manager Apple Computer 

Prime Plotter Primesoft Corp. 

print Master Unision \^orld 

Frv-FootbaU Sports Judge 

Quiz Castie Digitech Software 

Silent Service H (gs) Microprose 

Snoggle Broderbuitd 

SteUar 7 Penguin Software 

Success with Typing VL2 Scholastic Si^twarc 

Super Factory Sunburst 

Think Tank Living Video 

Tower of Myraglen II (gs) PBI software 

Type! Broderbund 

Visiblend Microiab 

Where in the USA « C Saa Diego Broderbund 

Work Force JI Core Concepts 

The Works First Star Software 

Zorro Datasofi 



January 



COMPUTIST #51 



37 



€OMPI]TIST back issues 



Features: Super Boulderdash 
APT -writer •Softkeys to Activision/ MECd' 
and PFS ProDOS/ software •Double F-8 
ROM space w/o motherboard surgery •Ace- 
Apple bimodal Switch •Using Sider hard 
drives 3^':", 800K drives, S 5M" drives in 
DOS 3.3 • Softkeys: -kM^ni *AlterEeo 

• Alternate Reality * Amazing Reading 
Machines ^Amazon •American Challenge 

• Arcade Album # I •Arithmetic Critters 

• Award Maker •Baseball Database 

• t^' Bard's Tale II: Destiny Knight •BC's 
Quest for Tires • Bop 6 Wrestle • Champ. 
Boxing * Champ. Wrestling • Clock Works 

• Commando •Computer Prep for SAT 

• Conflict In Vietnam •Counting Critters 

• Crisis Mountain •Dataquest 50 States 
ti- Deluxe Paint II •Dino Eggs •Disney 
Card S Party Shop •Disney Comic Strip 
Maker iVDraw Plus •Eidolon • Electric 
Crayon ABCs • Expedition Amazon 

• Pacemaker * First Letter Fun •Fish Scales 

• Fun From A— Z •Game Maker •GBA 
Champ. Basketball •GFL Champ. Football 
'> Graphicwriter LCR/LIR •Great Road 
Race •Hacker II •Hardball •InfilSrator II 

• Instant Music •James Bond C07: A View 
To A Kill •Jenny's Journeys •Kung Fu 
Master •Little People •List Handler 

• Manic Mansion •Mastery Arithmetic 
Games •Market Place •Master of Lamp 

• Math Rabbit •Microzine #17 •Might 
and Magic •Mission In Solar System 

• Moebius t^ Music Construction Set 

• Music Studio * Number Muncbers •Paint 
With Words li- Paintworks Plus •Path 
Tactics •pfsiFile •pfs:Graph •pfs:Plan 

• pfs:Report •pfs:Write •Phonics Prime 
Time •Portal •Principal's Assistant li- Print 
Shop ProDOS 8 v 1 .4 • Print Shop Holiday 
Edition •QuickflashI -i^Reader Rabbit 

• Realm of Impossibility •Robot Odyssey 
I v.3,0 •Rocky Horror Show •Rocky's 
Boots V 4,0 •Saracen ^Shanghai •Silent 
Service *Skylab •Sound Tracks •Speedy 
Math *Spindizzy •Street Sports Baseball 

• Sub-Mission • Super Boulderdash • Tass 
Times in Tonetown i^Thexder •Top Fuel 
Eliminator •Word Handler •Word 
Munchers •Words at Work •World Karate 
Champ. •Writer's Choice: Elite *Zard3x 
V5.2.I 



Features: Eliminate some 
ProDOS erroneous error messages "Date/time 
without a clock card 'Sector surgery: recover 
lost files "Generating Applesoft programs 'on- 
the-fly' 'Product Monitor reviews 9PLUS: 
How to convert List Handler files into 
standard text files 'How to make 
GRAPHIC,GRABBERv3 run on the llgs 'Laser 
128 'absolute' RESET •Playing Tips for: 
Bard's Tale 11, Conan, Donkey Kong, Hacker 
1, Hard Hat Mack, Orbitron, Print Shop 
Companion, Spdlbreaker, Spy Hunter, Ultima 
4 •A.P.T.s for: Infiltrator, Lode Runner, 
Montezuma's Revenge, Swordthrust series 
RDEX Softkeys: 'Addition Logician 
•Animate 'Arcade Boot Camp 'Arctic Fox 
•Bard's Tale II 'Cat'n Mouse •Counting 
Critters "Dam Busters t 'Destroyer "Draw 
Plus V 1 .0 'Dr. Ruth's Comp. Game Of Good 
Sex 'Echo 1.0 'E.D.D, 4 'Gamemaker 
•Hard Ball 'Infiltrator 'List Handler t 

• Locksmith 6.0 Fastcopy T "Magic Slate 
•Math Critters •Millionaire 'Mind Mirror 
•One On One 'Paintworks Plus v I .ffl 

• Paintworks Plus vl.l •PHM Pegasus 

• Portal 'Quotient Quest 'Reader Rabbit 
•Sa under' s Chemistry CAI 'Science Toolkit 
'Shanghai 'Strip Poker t 'Super Bunny 
•Super Sunday •Swordthrust series f •Term 
Paper Writer 'Thief 'Top Fuel Eliminator 
•Typing! t 'Up-n-Down 'Willy Byte 
•Writer's Choice - Elite vl.0 'Writing A 
Character Sketch 'Writing A Narattve. . 



Features :Dungeon Editor S 
Encounter Editor for Ultima 111 'APT for 
Shadow keep 'Soft key for Shadowkeep 

• Softkey for Apple Business Graphics 

• RDEX Softkeys: '8 1 6 Paint GS 'Amnesia 
•Arctic Fox 'Award Maker Plus 'Bard's Tale 
II 'Betterworking Word Processor 'Beyond 
Castle Wolfenstein 'Black Magic 'Bookends 
Extended 'Bop 6 Wrestle 'Chess 7.0 
•Chessmaster 3000 'Deluxe Paint GS 
•Destroyer 'Hacker II 'Hacker 11 GS 
'Hardball 'Infiltrator 'Instant Music GS 'J- 
Bird 'Mabel's Mansion 'Marble Madness 
•Mean 1 8 GS Golf 'Megabots 'Might S 
Magic 'Miner 3049er 11 'Mouse Word 
•Music Construction Set GS 'Music Studio 
GS 'New Oregon Trail 'Paintworks Plus I .© 
GS 'Paintworks Plus 1.01 GS 'Paul 
Whitehead Teaches Chess •PHM Pegasus 
•Poetry Express 'Print Shop color version 
•Rambo: First Blood part II 'Rocky Horror 
Show 'Sargon 111* 'Shanghai GS 'Spindizzy 
•TelePorter 'Temple Of Apshai trilogy 'Top 
Draw GS 'Transylvania 'Ultima 1 •World's 
Greatest Baseball Game 



Features: Infocom-text Reader 
Enhancement 'Color Ulti mapper mod to 
Ultimapper IV 'Towne Mapper utility for 
Ultima 1"^ 'Dungeon Mapper utility for Bard's 
Tale 'Hardware Corner: Interrupting Your 
Apple 'Softkey for Charlie Brown's 1 ,2,3s 

• RDEX Softkeys: 'Guitar Wizard 
•Gemstone Warrior 'Notable Phantom 
■Micro Wine Companion 'Stickybear Printer 
•Note Card Maker 'Starcross 'Wishbringer 
'Dinosaur Dig 'Dam Busters 'Pirate 
Adventure 'Infiltrator 'MECC software 

• Banner Catch 'Turtle Tracks 'PES File 
'Microzine #12, #13, /^I4 -Marble 
Madness 'Writer Rabbit 'Arcticfox 'Age Of 
Adventure 'Might And Magic 'Space Station 
'Alternate Reality 'Mindshadow 'Gemstone 
Warrior 'Strip Poker 'Lucifer's Realm 
'Manuscript Manager 'Bank Street Writer 
111 •Kids On Keys 'The Missing Ring 'Graphic 
Solution 'Empire 1, 11 'Championship Golf 



Softkeys 'Advanced 
Microsystems Technology programs 'Word 
Attack 'Star Blazer 'Science Toolkit 'The 
Color Enhanced Print Shop 'Video Vegas 
•The Handlers 'K.C. Deals On Wheels 'Law 
Of The West 'Break The Bank Blackjack 
'Foundation Course In Spanish 'OGRE 
•Puzzles And Posters 'Features 'The Shift 
Key/Lower Case Option For 11+ 'Amazing 
Computer Facts 'Shape Magic utility 
• review: Multiscribe 



Softkeys 'Mouse Calc 'Sands of 
Egypt 'Number Farm •Agent U.S.A. 'Wavy 
Navy 'Kindercomp 'Flight Simulator Update 
'Raid over Moscow 'Crime Stopper 'Key 
Perfect 5, 'The Final Conflict 'Miss Mouse 
'Snoggle 'Features 'Write Protecting the 
Microsoft RAM Card 'Keys to Success on the 
Franklin Ace 'Modified F8 ROMs on the 
Apple //,' 'Core 'Owner's Review of Copy 
Master 11 



Softkeys 'Arcade Boot Camp 
'Goonies 'Zorro 'Coveted Mirror 'Crimson 
Crown 'Compubridge 'Fleet System 3 
'Microwave 'Escape 'Catalyst 3.0 'Number 
Farm 'Alphabet Circus 'Joe Theisman's Pro 
Football 'Black Cauldron 'Intern, Gran Prix 
'Features 'Making DOS I ess Utilities 'Pixit 
Printer Drivers 'Review: Z-RAM Memory 
Expansion Board 'Reading the Joystick . . 



COMPUTIST 51 



January 



more back issues 



Softkeys •Graphics Expander 
"Irtfomiation Master •Certificate Maker "Elite 
•Catalyst 2.0 and 3,0 •Murder On The 
Mississippi •Temple Of Apshai Trilogy •Troll 
Associates programs 'Spell It •Regatta ^Cdex 
Training programs •Think Fast ^Features 
•How to Write-Protect your Slot Zero 
•Capturing Locksmith 6.0 Fast Copy 
•Revisiting DOS to ProDOS and Back 'Core 
•Computer Eyes/ 1: a Review ^AFTs •Sword 
of Kadash S Rescue Raiders •Ultimaker IV 



Softkeys 'Light Simulator 
•Beach-Head •Monty Plays Scrabble •Raeter 
•Winnie the Pooh 'Infocom Stuff, Kabul Spy, 
Prisoner II 'Wizardry I 6 1 •Lucifer's Realm 
•The PFS Series •Dollars and Sense •Strip 
Poker "Coveted Mirror 'Wizard's Crown 
•The Swordthrust Series •Axis Assassin 
■Manuscript Manager 'The Crown of Arthain 
'Address Book 'Decimals 3,0 'Dragonfire 
'Features 'Auto Duel Editor •Wizard's 
Crown Editor 'Questron Mapper 'Core 'The 
Games of 1986 in Review 'Adventure Tips 
'Ultima IV 

^1 1 Softkeyx 'The Periodic Table 
•Gemstone Warrior 'Inferno 'Frogger 
•Story Maker 'Adventure Writer 'Mummy's 
Curse 'Zaxxon 'The Quest 'Pitfall II 
•H.E.R.O. 'Features "A Two-Drive Patch for 
Winter Games 'Customizing the Speed of a 
Duodisk 'Roll the Presses Part Two; 
Printshop Printer Drivers 'The Games of 
1986 

^kO Softkeys 'Adventure Writer 'E-Z 
Learner 'Mychess II 'Raster Blaster 
'Cranston Manor 'Ghostbusters 'Designer's 
Pencil •The American Challenge 
'Encyclopedia Britannica Programs 'Crime 
Wave Features 'Taking the Wiz out of 
Wizardry 'Adding a Printer Card Driver to 
Newsroom 'Core Games of 1986 



Softkeys 'MIDI/S + 'Homeword 
v2.l 'Borrowed Time 'Amazon 'Speed 
Reader ][ 'Discovery! 'M-ss-ng L-nks series 
•Donald Ducks 's Playground 'Mastering the 
SAT 'Copy ][ Plus 4.4C 'Master of the 
Lamps 'One on One 'Bridge Baron •A.E. 
'Great American Cross-Country Road Race 
'Computer Preparation for the SAT 'Castle 
Wolfenstein 'Luscher Profile •Skyfox 'Silent 
Service 'Echo Plus 'Swashbuckler •Randamn 
'Features •Electronic Disk Drive Swapper 
•Abusing the Epilogues •Print Shop 
Companion's Driver Game '0}re •Keyboard 
Repair •Fixing the Applesoft Sample Disk 



Softkeys 'Cyctod •Alternate 
Realty •Boulder Dash I S II •Hard Hat Mack 
(Revisited) •The Other Side •F- 1 5 Strike Eagle 
•Championship Lode Runner 'Gato V 1.3 
• I, Damiano •Wilderness 'Golf's Best 
'Features 'The Enhanced/ Unenhanced //e 
'Looking into Flight Simulator's DOS 'Core 
'Appavarex 'Installing a RAM disk into DOS 



Softkeys 'Under Fire 'Pegasus 
][ 'Take I (revisited) •Flight Simulator II 
vl,05 (part 2) 'Magic Slate 'Alter Ego 
• Rendezvous •Quicken 'Story Tree 
•Assembly Language Tutor 'Avalon Hill 
games 'Dark Crystal 'Features 'Playing 
Karateka on a //c 'Track Finder 'Sylk to Dif 
'Core "Breaking In: tips for b^inners •Copy 
][ Plus 6.0: a review •The DOS Alterer . . 



Softkeys 'Flight Simulator II v 
1 .05 'AutoDuel 'Critical Reading •Troll's 
Tale 'Robot War 'General Manager 
•Plasmania 'Telarium Software 'Kid writer 
V 1 ,0 •Color Me 'Features •ScreenWriter 
meets Flashcard •The Bus Monitor 
•Mousepaint for non-Apples 'Core "The 
Bard's Dressing Room 'APT "Championship 
Lode Runner . ... ^ .... 



Softkeys 'Olymbpic Decathlon 
•Hi-res Cribbage 'Revisiting F- 1 5 Strike Eagle 
•Masquerade •The Hobbit 'Pooyan 'The 
Perfect Score 'Alice in Wonderland 'The 
Money Manager 'Good Thinking 'Rescue 
Raiders 'Feature: Putting a New f 8 on Your 
Language Card 'Core "Exploring ProDOS 
by instaling a CPS Clock Driver 



Softkeys •Crisis Mountain 
'Terripin Logo 'Apple Logo II •Fishies 1 ,0 
•SpellWorks 'Gumball •Rescue at Rigel 
•Crazey Mazey 'Conan 'Perry Mason: The 
Case of the Mandarin Murder 'Koronis Rift 
'Feature 'More ROM Running 'Core 
•Infocom Revealed , . , 



Softkeys 'Word Juggler 'Tink! 
Tonk[ 'Sundog v3.0 'G.l. Joe & Lucas Film's 
Eidolon 'Summer Games II 'Thief •Instant 
Pascal 'World's Greatest Football Game 
'Graphic Adventure # I 'Sensible Grammar 
5 Extended Bookends •Chipwits 'Hardball 
•King's Quest II 'The Worid's Greatest 
Baseball Game 'Feature "How to be the 
Sound Master 'Core •The Mapping of 
Ultima IV , . 



Softkeys •Revisiting Music 
Construction Set 'Cubit •Baudville Software 
'Hartley Software 'Bridge 'Early Games for 
Young Children 'Tawala's Last Redoubt 
'Print Shop Companion 'Kracking Vol II 
•Moebius •Mouse Budget, Mouse Word & 
Mouse Desk •Adventure Construction Set 
'Feature 'Using Data Disks With Microzines 
•Core 'Super lOB vl.5 a Reprint 



^9 1 Softkeys 'Trivia Fever 'The 
Original Boston Computer Diet •Lifesaver 
•Synergistic Software 'Blazing Paddles 
•Zardax •Time Zone 'Tycoon 'Earthly 
Delights 'Jingle Disk 'Crystal Caverns 
'Karate Champ 'Feature 'A Little Help 
With The Bard's Tale 'Core 'Black Box 
•Unrestricted Ampersand. . . ,;. !*»;* -„S55: ,*. 



Softkeys ' Millionaire • SSI's 
RDOS • Fantavision ' Spy vs. Spy • 
Dragonworld ' King's Quest ' Mastering the 
SAT ' Easy as ABC • Space Shuttle • The 
Factory • Visidex ME' Sherlock Holmes 
' The Bards Tale • Feature • Increasing Your 
Disk Capacity • Core • Ultimaker IV, an 
Ultima IV Character Editor. . .„ „,,v*,.i*., 



January 



COMPUTIST 51 



COlfXPUXISX 



Softkeys • Threshold • 
Checkers v2.1 • Microtype ■ Gen. & 
Organic Chemistry Series " Uptown Trivia 
• Murder by the Dozen • Windham's 
Classics • Batter Up • Evelyn Wood's 
Dynamic Reader • Jenny of the Prairie " 
Learn About Sounds in Reading • Winter 
Games • Feature * Customizing the 
Monitor by Adding 65C02 Disassembly • 
Core * The Animator 



Sofikeys * Ultima IV • Robot 
Odyssey • Rendezvous • Word Attack & 
Classmate • Three from Mindscape ■ 
Alphabetic Keyboarding • Hacker • Disk 
Director • Lode Runner • MIDI/4 • 
Algebra Series • Time is Money • Pitstop 
n • Apventurc to Atlantis • Feature • 
Capturing the Hidden Archon Editor • 
Core " Fingerprint Plus: A Review • 
Beneath Beyond Castle Wolfenstein (part 
2). 



Softkeys • Microzines 1-5 • 
Microzines 7-9 | Microzines (alternate 
method) • Phi Beta Filer • Sword of 
Kadash • Another Miner 2049er • 
Learning With Fuzzy womp • Bookends • 
Apple Logo ri • Murder on the Zinderneuf 
• Features * Daleks: Exploring Artificial 
Intelligence • Making 32K or 16K Slave 
Disks • Core • The Games of 1985: part II 



Softkeys • Cannonball Blitz • 
Instant Recall • Gessler Spanish Software 

• More Stickybears • Financial Cookbook 

• Super Zaxxon • Wizardry • Preschool 
Fun 'Holy Grail • Inca • 128K Zaxxon 

• Feature • ProEdit • Core * Games of 
1985 part I 



Softkeys • DB Master 4.2 • 
Business Writer • Barron's Computer SAT 
• Take 1 • Bank Street Speller • Where 
In The World Is Carmen Sandiego • Bank 
Street Writer 128K • Word Challenge • 
Spy's Demise • Mind Prober • EC's Quest 
For Tires • Early Games ■ Homeword 
Speller • Feature - Adding IF THEN 
ELSE To Applesoft • Core • DOS To 
ProDOS And Back 



Softkeys • Electronic Arts 
software • Grolier software • Xyphus • 
F-15 Strike Eagle • Injured Engine • Mr. 
Robot And His Robot Factory • 
Applecillin II • Alphabet Zoo • Fathoms 
40 • Story Maker • Early Games 
Matchmaker • Robots Of Dawn • Feature 
• Essential Data Duplicator copy parms • 
Core 'DOS-Direct Sector Access 



Softkeys* Choplifter • Miifploi 
• Flashcalc • Karateka • Newsroom • E- 
Z Draw • Gato • Dino Eggs • Pinball 
Construction Set • TAC • The Print Shop: 
Graphics Library • Death In The 
Caribbean • Features • Using A.R.D. To 
Softkey Mars Cars • How To Be The 
Writemaster • Core * Wheel Of Money 



Softkeys • Miner 2049er • 
Lode Runner • A2-PB1 Pinball • The 
Heist "Old Ironsides • Grandma's House 

• In Search of the Most Amazing Thing 

• Morloc's Tower ■ Marauder • Sargon 
III " Features • Customized Drive Speed 
Control • Super lOB version 1.5 • Core 

• The Macro System 



Softkeys • Sargon III " 
Wizardry: Proving Grounds of the Mad 
Overlord and Knight of Diamonds • The 
Report Card VI. 1 • Kidwriter • Feature 

• Apple ][ Boot ROM Disassembly " Core 

• The Graphic Grabber v3.0 • Copy 11 + 
5.0: A Review • The Know-Drive: A 
Hardware Evaluation • An Improved 
BASIC/Binary Combo ..... ... 



Softkeys • Rendezvous With 
Rama • Peachtree's Back To Basics 
Accounting System • HSD Statistics Series 
• Arithmetickle • Arithmekicks and Early 
Games for Children • Features • Double 
Your ROM Space • Towards a Better F8 
ROM • The Nibbler: A Utility Program 
to Examine Raw Nibbles From Disk • 
Core • The Games of 1984; In Review- 
part II 



1 ^9 Softkeys • Sensible Speller for 
ProDOS • Sideways • Rescue Raiders • 
Sheila • Basic Building Blocks • Artsci 
Programs • Crossfire • Feature * Secret 
Weapon; RAMcard • Core • The 
Controller Writer • A Fix For The Beyond 
Castle Wolfenstein Softkey • The Lone 
Catalog Arranger 

Part 1 «^....,,:,.,..^,„:.::,.v..^..-::..>.;.:^;: 



JL Softkeys • Data Reporter • 
Multiplan • Zork • Features * PARMS for 
Copy II Plus • No More Bugs • APT's 
for Choplifter & Cannonball Blitz • 
'Copycard' Reviews * Replay • Crackshot 
• Snapshot • Wildcard 



To order 
available 
back Issues of 
COMPUTIST 
use the 
order form 
on the right 



To order 
out-of-print 
issues of 
COMPUTIST 
Use the 
order form 
and listing 
on pages 42-43 



PGecue »eiu( Ehcjw amUCabCe casuu 


(mdlen &Sm>uj ikki: 




Issue Mag 
S4.75 


Disk Mk 
$9.95 $12.95 


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Computing 3 . . . . D 


• • 


Best of Hardcore Computiiig.. d 


1 


Core Special Comln 510 1 

(All three CORE magailnes) 


1 


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frequently referenced in current issues. 



Back Issues and Library Disk Rates 



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• US, Canada, Mexico library disk rate - $9.95 each. 

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® "Both" disk and magazine rates for: 

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C ^J R E 3 Games: CopistnjctingYourOwrJoystlck'CompilingGames'G^M/rflfl^/EtreOver 
30 of ttie latest and best* Pick Of The Pack: All-time TOP 20 games* Destructive Forces* EAMON* Grapfiics (ilagician 
and GraFORTH* Dragon Dungeon a. 

CT^^R^Z 2 Utilites: Dynamic Menu* High Res: Scroll Demn* GOTO Label: Replace* Line Find* 
Quick Copy; Copy* 

CT^VlmE 1 Graphics: ti/lemory Map* Te>ct Graphics: Marquee* Boxes* Jagged Scroller* Low Res: 
Color Character Chart* High Res: Screen Cruncher* The UFO Factory* Color* Vector Graphics: Shimmering Shapes* A 
Shape Table Mini- Editor* Block Graphics: Arcade Quality Graphics for SASIC Programmers* Animation 

lis race VG COnlpUlinff 3 HyperDOSCreator*MenuHello*ZyphyrWars*VectorGraphlcs*f^eview 
of Bit Copiers* Boot Code Tracing* Soffkey lOB* Interview with 'Mike' Markkula 



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COMPUTIST 51 



Out-Of -Print issues 

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^S *SoJikeys: 'Magic Window II 
•Multiplan ^Features: •Parameters for 
Locksmith 4. 1 "Page Flipper "String Plotter 
•Three-D Wall Draw BCore: Checksums 
* Input: "Reviews of unprotected 
commercial software 



«S •Sofikeys: "Bag of Tricks 
•Multiplan ^Readers ' Sofikeys: "Visiplot 
/Visitrend •Sneakers •Wizardry ^Features 
•No More Bugs: The Sequel "Hidden 
Locations Revealed "Map Maker 9 A. P. T.s 
•Choplifter * Adventure Tips "Cranston 
Manor •Strange Odyssey >:.; . < . . 



^X ^Features: Ultima II Character 
Editor * Sofikeys: "Ultima II "Witness 
•Prisoner II "Pest Patrol * Adventure Tips: 
•Ultima n & m ©Copy H Plus Farms 
Update . , .... , »...i 



^3 9 Sofikeys: "Homeword "Aztec 
•$Bag of Tricks "Egbert II "Starcross "Hard 
Hat Mack "The Home Accountant 
^Reader's Sofikeys: "Dark Crystal 
•Screenwriter n •Visifile "Lancaster "Bill 
Budge's Triolgy of Games "Sammy 
Lightfoot "Amper-Magic "Buzzard Bait 
9Freature: "Getting on the Right 

iraCK . . . ■.r^.kXi: *-i?iLJi*'..,i'(,--*=,.s-'>;*'-.r:* ■:■:*;#■>»•■ |i>i^' 



^^ ^Sofikeys: "Pandora's Box "Donkey 
Kong "Caverns of Freitag "Visifile 
^Features: "Program Enhancements: 
Quick. Bug "Personalizing A Program 
"Modified ROMs *Review "Essential Data 
Duplicator "The CIA *Core: "Data 

Bases. ... ..^ ..;... ^ .: ;.^ ■..■: . i- : , . . : j :i . i 



M 9 Sofikeys: "Zaxxon "Mask of the 
Sun "Crush "Crumble & Chomp "Snake 
Byte "DB Master "Mouskattack 9Features: 
•Making Liberated Backups That Retain 
Their Copy Protection "S-C Assembler: 
Review "Di-sk Directory Designer *Core: 
"COREfilcr: Fart I "Upper & Lower Case 
Output for Zork 



CS ^Sofikeys: "Robotron 'Legacy of 
Llylgamyn 'The Artist •Data Factory v5.0 

• EDD rV •Reader's Sofikeys: "Spy Strikes 
Back "Hayden Software "Apple LOGO 

• Features: "Review of the Bit Copiers 

• Core: "CORE filer "Pro DOS Data 
Encrypior •Adventure Tips: "Ulysses and 
The Golden Fleece "Serpentine "Ultima II 
"Castle Wolfenstein "Death in the 
Caribbean "Zork I "Zork II "Gruds in Space 
"Enchanter "Infidel "Serpent's Star • iVhiz 
Kid: "How Data is Stored on Disk 



SV •Sofikeys: "Sensible Speller "Sierra- 
On-Line Software "The Visible Computer: 
6502 •Reader's Sofikeys: "Visidex "Music 
Construction Set •Gold Rush •Visitcrm 
•Cosmic Combat •Features: 'Super lOB 
•Adventure Tips: •Pirate Adventure "Mask 
of the Sun "Colossal Caves "Transylvania 
"Death in the Caribbean 'Zork II •Core: 
•Word Search Generator "ProDOS to DOS 
"ProDOS on a Franklin Ace : ^ . 



lO 



• Sofikeys: "Arcade Machine 
"Bank Street Writer "Minit Man •Reader's 
Sofikeys -Senible Speller IV 'EDD IV 
"*Krell LOGO "Canyon Climber 
• Features: •The Controller Saver 
•Examining Protected Applesoft BASIC 
Programs "Crunchlist II •Core: "Applear 
- Voice Aynthesis "Introducing the 65SC802 
and 65SC816 Chips "Review - Dino Eggs 
•Adventure Tips: "Cranston Manor •Zork 
I "Planetfall "Mission Asteroid "Time Zone 
"Suspended "Critical Mas? "Zork II "Castle 
Wolfenstein ..,,..,«....,..:. ., . i 



1 1 •Sofikeys: "Sensible Speller 
"Exodus: Ultima III •Readers ' Sofikeys: 
•SoftPom Adventure 'The Einstein 
Compiler v5.3 "Mask of The Sun 
•Features: 'Copy II Plus v4.4C: Update 
Of An Old Friend "Parameter List For 
Essential Data Duplicator •Core: 
•Ultimaker m "The Mapping of Ultima III 
•Ultima n...The Rest Of The Picture •. 



1 ^S •Sofikeys: "Zoom Graphix 
•Flip Out "Lion's Share "Music 
Construction Set •Reader's Sofikeys: "Hi- 
Res Computer Golf 11 "Suicide "Sabatage 
"Millionaire "Time is Money "Type Attack 
•Feai are J /Pseudo-ROMs on the Franklin 
Ace •Core: "Psychedelic Symphony "The 
CORE Disk Searcher "The Armonitor 
•Adventure Tips: "Cranston Manor ■ 
Enchanter "Kabul Spy "Colossal Caves 
"The Witness "Pirate Adventure "Ultima: 
III- Exodus "Adventureland , , 



•Sofikeys: "Laf Pak "Beyond 
Castle Wolfenstein "Transylvania "The 
Quest "Electronic Arts "Snooper Troops 
(Case 2) "DLM Software "Learning With 
Leeper "TellStar •Core: "CSaver: The 
Advanced Way to Store Super I OB 
Controllers "Adding New Commands to 
DOS 3.3 •Fixing ProDOS 1.0.1 BSAVE 
Bug •Review: "Enhancing Your Apple 
•Feature: • Locksmith 5.0 and Locksmith 
Programming Language 



•Features: •Super lOB vl.2 
Update "Putting Locksmith 5 .0 Fast Copy 
Into a Normal Binary File "Batman Decoder 
Ring 'A fix for DiskEdit •Sofikeys: 
•Seadragon "Rocky's Boots "Knoware 
"PES Software "Computer Preparation SAT 
-•MatheMagie •Review: "Boulder Dash . 



42 



COMPUTIST 51 



of COIMPUTIST are 

full-sized and center-stapled. 



1 S3 ^Softkeys: •Mastertype 
•Stickybear BOP "Tic Tac Show ^Reader's 
Sojikeys: •The Financial Cookbook "Escape 
from Rungistan 'Alien Munchies 
• Millionaire "Plato » Features: 
•MREAD/MWRT Update mCore: •A Boot 
from Drive 2 •DB Master's Data 
Compression Techniques • \¥hiz Kid: 
•DOS and the Drive - Part One ^Adventure 
Tips: "Time Zone 'Mission Asteroid 
•Enchanter "Zork I "Ultima • Ultima II 
•Death in the Caribbean •Gruds in Space 
"Zork in "Starcross .,...-..,-,,.,,■,., ^ ,.,, , 



X M *Softkeys: "The Print Shop 
•Crossword Magic •The Standing Stones 
•Beer Run 'Sky fox 'and Random House 
Disks ^Features: "A Tutorial For Disk 
Inspection and the Use Of Super lOB "S-C 
Macro Assembler Directives (reprint) 
• Core; "The Graphic Grabber For The 
Print Shop "The Lone Catalog Arranger 
Part Two. , .,>.,.,., . , ....,..,...., 



19 



See available back issues.. 



see Available back issues., 



^Softkeys; "Schola.stic Version 
of Bank Street Writer •Applewriter //e 
•SSI's Non-RDOS Disks mReaders' 
Sojikeys: 'BPI Accounting Programs and 
DesignWare Programs * Features: 
•Installing a Free Sector Patch Into 
Applewriter //e •Simple Copy Protection 
• Core: •The Games of 1984: In Review 
•65C02 Chips Now Available "Checksoft 
v2 



See available back issues. 



^S 1 * Sojikeys: "DB Master version 
4+ "Dazzle Draw •Archon •Twerps 
•Readers ' Sojikeys: •Advanced Blackjack 
•Meg a works •Summer Games "College 
Entrance Exam Prep •Applewriter revisited 
•Features: •Demystifying The Quarter 
Track 'Core •Proshadow: A ProDOS Disk 
Monitor 



Isiu«f 



211. 
18 
IV 
15 
14 
13 
12 
11 
10 



8. 

e 



4. 

3. 



Magiiine Ijl>r. Disk Both 
S4.75 $9.9S $12.35 



[IZI 
CD 
CD 

en 
en 
en 

en 
en 

CZI 

en 
en 

en 
en 
en 
en 
en 
en 



en 
en 
en 
en 
en 
en. 
en 
ezt 
en 
en 
en 
en 
en 
en 
en 
en 
en 



en 
en 
en 
en 
en 
en 
en 
en 
en 
izn 
en 
en 
en 
en 
en 
en 
en 



Some disks apply to more than one issue 
and are shown as taller boxes. Special 
"Both" disk & magazine comjbination 
orders apply to one issue and its 
conesponding disk. 



■ Please send the 'zeroxed' copies and/or library disks of these out-of-print issues 
of COMPUTIST whose boxes I have checked on the left. I understand that these 
are not originals, jiist full-sized, center-stapled back-up copies made on your office 
copier. The disks are normal library disks that I could order using the Available 
Back Issues form on page 41. 



Name . 



ID#. 



Address . 



City 



State 



Zip 



Country. 



. Phone _ 



Exp. 



Signature _ 



_CP51 



Prices given un order farm are for US, Canada & Mexico orders. Other fureign urders: $8.75 for each back 
'mat, $11.95 for eacii lihrar}' disk, and $18.95 for Combination magazine back issue and library disk. 

• US funds drawn on US bank. • Most orders shipped within 5 working days, however please aUow 
up to 4 weeks delivery for some orders. • Most orders shipped UPS, so please use street address. 

• In Washington state, add 7.8% sales tax. tSend check/money order to: 

COMPUTIST PO Box 110846-1 Tacwna, WA 98411 (204)474-5730 



January 



COMPUTIST #51 



Software Package 



11 + 



Software Package 



II + 



II gs 



816 Paint S45. 

Aiihaart S24. 

Award Maker Plus S24. 

Bank Street WriUr 64K S46. 

Bank Street Speller $46. 

Bank Street Mailer 64K S46. 

Bank Street Filer 64K &46. 

Bank Street Writer Plus (128K) S46. 

Bank Street Mailer 128K S46. 

Bank Street Filer 128K S46. 

Beagle Graphics $35. 

Beyond Zork S27. 

Black Cauldron S27. 

Captain Goodnight $24. 

Championship Karate ■ $14. 

Cli)} Alt Gallery (for Paintwoiks Plus) S20. 

Copy II Pius S23. 

Dazzle Draw - $40. 

Defender of the Crown S32. 

Destroyer S2S. 

DiakQuirk SIB. 

Draw Plus S52. 

F-15 Strike Eagle SZ4. 

Fantavision $34. 

Flight Simulator D S36. 

Gamemaker ■ $34. 

GPLE S29. 

The Graphics Studio S42. 

Gunship $27. 

Hacker II S25, 

Hardball S22, 

Hitchhiker's Guide $28, 

Inliltrator C S28, 

Jet $29. 

Karateka $24. 

King's Quest II $32. 

Knight of Diamonds $23. 

Labrinth 328. 

Legacy of Llylgamyn S26. 

Lodeiunner $24. 



S4S.«a 



Macroworks 

Math Blaster 

Math Rabbit 

Mean 18, Ultimate Golf. 

Merlin ProDOS 

Might 8i Magic 

Millionaire II 

Mousewrite 

Multiscribe 

Music Studio 

Paintworks Plus 



S2<. 

. sza. 

. SZ7 
. $23 
.$66 
. S32 
. $33 
. $99 
$45 
. S52 
. SS2 



flfl G 
88 11 

MO 

ait □ 
»»n 

MD 
MO 
Bit D 
MD 
88 D 
88 
88 
88 
88 D 
88 
88 
88 D 
88 
88 G 
08 
.00 
.00 D 
.00 Cj 

.0»D 
MD 
.58 D 
MD 
MD 
.88 
.88 D 
.88 D 
.88 D 
.88 D 
.88 D 
.80 3 
.88 li 
.88 J 

.00 n 
.00 a 

.00 [I 

MC 
MD 
MO 

M a 

MD 
MD 
.88 D 
.88 D 

.88 n 
.88 D 



S27.00 :: 



S48.8t D 



$38.88 D 
$28.88 D 



S32.00 



$99.88 U 
$66.88 D 



Portal Saa.aa n 

The Print Shop $34.88 il $40.88 ^ 

Print Shop Companion S27.88 D 

Print Shop Graphics Library: 

Disk One $16.58 D 

Disk Two S16.58 D 

Disk Three S16.58 G 

Pro-Byter $28.88 D 

Racter S38.88 D 

Reader Rabbit $27.88 D S34.88 1 

Rescue Raiders $23.88 D 

Rocky's Boots S34.88 D 

Science Tool Kit: Master Module S46.88 D 

SDI S32.88 n 

Shanghai S24.88 U $38.08 L 

Silent Service S23.88 D 

Solo Flight S23.00 G 

Space Quest S32.88 J 332.88 L 

Star Trek- The Kobayashi Alternative $27.88 Z 

Star Trek H- The Promethean Prophecy 327.88 u 

Stickybear Series: 

ABC's $24.88 D 

Math 1 324.88 U 

Math n $24.08 D 

Numbers 324.88 D 

Reading 324.88 Q 

Shapes 324.88 G 

Typing $24.88 D 

Writer S24.88 C 

Sub Battle Simulator 325.88 T $27.88 □ 

Sub Mission 327.88 D 

Summer Games 314,00 G 

Super Macroworks S38.88 u 

Tass -nmes in Tonetown. $24.88 C 324.88 G 

The Tower of Myraglen 332.88 D 

Thexdei $23.88 G 

Topdraw S66.88 G 

Type $38.88 G 

Typing Tutor IV 332.88 D S32.00 G 

Video Vegas 318.88 G 

Visualizer ■ 353.88 G 359.08 D 

Where in USA is Carmen San Diego $26.58 G 

Where in World is Carmen San Diego 330.88 G 

Winter Games 325.00 D $27.00 G 

Wizardy $32.08 G 

Word Attack $28.88 G 

WordPerfect ml SpeUing Checker- 395.88 G $95.00 G 

World Games 325.88 L 327.88 G 

Writer's Choice EUte 368.88 G 

Writer Rabbit $24.88 G 

Zork Trilogy 346.88 G 



N.HTnp 








_ID#_ 




• Cost of 
Softwaie 

STIRTDTAT. 

• Plus 

SHTPPTMG 




Arldrs.i'iK 








C'iTV 

PniintTV 


State 
Phorc 


Zip 








• Plus 
(in WA) 

SalBS TAX 










_ Exp, 




CP51 


■ TOTAL 

















COMPUTIST #51 



January 



check our 

LOW 

software 

prices 

for 

AppieU 

ngs 
software 



How To Order 



• US orders: Check the appropriate box for your selection. 
For Apple II gs software, check the appropriate box in the 
right-hand column. 

• Please add $3 per order for shipping & handling. Orders 
over $200 receive free shipping. 

• Most orders shipped UPS, so use your street address. 

• Washington state, please add 7.8% sales tax. 

• Offer good while supphes last. 

ft All products are for the Apple II systems unless 
othervjise specified. 

• Foreign Orders: Please inquire as to appropriate 
shipping fees. 



Send orders to: 



Softkey Publishing 

PO Box 110816-T 

Tacoma, WA 98411 

(206) 474—5750 



"K APPLE COMPATIBLES Zf 

^LOWEST PRICES ANYWHERE! ^ 

lMEG/80 COL BD i«/25eK+Soriware (lie) .... S99 

IMEG HAM BO tor IIGS W/256K (89 

Above W/512K add J39 1 MEG add 199 

64K/80 COL BD New Lower Power (Me) $35 

16K RAM Board (11+) J3S 

12eK RAM BD. New Lower Power {[[*) S69 

80 Columrt Board Vtdex Comp [11+) (49 

Super Serial Board {ll+/c) $49 

Graphic Par BDW/6FT CBL (H»/e/g5) $45 

280 CP/M BD Microsoft Comp (t/e/gs) $38 

Cooling Fan w/surge protect (ll+/e) $29 

GS Super Cooling Fan (llgs) $25 

Numeric Keypad 16 Keys (He) - . . 135 

Joystick (Specify ll+/c/e/gs) $15 

Joystick w/Fire on stick (+/c^e/gs) J25 

Mint Vacuum Cleaner w/ Attachments. $10 

A/B Switchbox Parallel or fiS-232 $29 

Disk Drive H/H (Specify llt/c/e/gs) $129 

Disk Controller Board (ll+/e/gs) $39 

Eprom Programmer (ll*/e/gs) $49 



ONE YEAH WARRANTY ON ALL PRODUCTS 

CALL/WRITE FOR COMPLETE LIST 

^ADD $3 SHIPPING (Per OPDER. not per item) 



NEXO DISTRIBUTION 

914 East 8th StrMt, Suite 109 

National City, CA 92050 

(619) 474-332S 10am-6pm Mon-FH 

UNIV & SCHOOL P.O.'t WELCOMEl 
VISA/MC OKAY— C.O.D. ADO $2.00 



COMPUTIST 51 




Happy New Year to all IBMusers! 



Finally, after serving the 
deprotection needs of the community 
of Apple-users for 6 years, 
COMPUTIST has opened its pages to 
another computer, and a whole new 
audience will discover the secrets of 
deprotection in this all -new IBMusers 
Reader's Data Exchange (IBM-RDEX). 

Editorial 

Getting a foothold in a traditionally 
Apple-dedicated magazine is going to 
be tough. It costs kilo-bucks to print 
COMPUTIST, and it has been going 
through financially rough times 
recently, as most readers know. 

Apple-user subscribers will not 
subsidize a non-apple column. And 
they shouldn't have to. IBMusers 
RDEX must take care of itself. I think 
that IK of new subscribers in a year's 
time would warrant expansion of 
IBMuser's RDEX to 8 or 16 more pages 
of important data than debuted in this 
issue. 

In principle and in format, IBM- 
RDEX will follow the successful lead of 
Apple-RDEX at first. Apple RDEX 
succeeds as a forum because their 
readers respond promptly to each 
issue, and their reponses are in the 
very next issue!. It's very lively and 
up-to-date because COMPUTIST is 
composed that very month and not 
months ahead of time like most 
magazines. 

Can IBM-RDEX emerge as a 
leading forum for deprotection as has 
Apple-RDEX? Let's try! 



IBM-RDEX needs: 

1. About IK of new subscribers. 
Subscribers who (on their subscription 
form - page 3) check the box marked 
'I am a new IBM subscriber'. 

2. Clear, concise, simple softkeys 
presented in a logical, step-by-step 
fashion. 

3. Tutorials On cofiy-prbtection and 
disk formatting. 

4. Useful and fun programs created by 
COMPUTIST readers for the benefit of 

m 

5. Notes, opinions, reviews.... 

6. A.P.T.s and Playing Tips, too. 

Please send only material you 
originated. Please don't just copy (or 
print-out) material down-loaded from 
BBS. Send all contributions to: 

IBM-RDEX editor 

COMPUTIST 
PC Box 110846-T 
Tacoma, WA 98411 

Remember that your letters or 
parts of them may be used in the IBM- 
RDEX section even if your don't 
specifically address it to the IBM-RDEX 
editor. We reserve the right to publish 
any correspondence we receive. And 
what does get published may be edited 
for clarity, grammer and space 
requirments. 

Because of the empheral and 
unpredictable appearance (and 
disappearance) of our part-time and 
volunteer staff, any response to your 
written queries will appear only in the 
IBM-RDEX so it would be more 
appropriate for you to present 



technical questions to the readers and 
ask for their responses which will then 
be placed in the next issues. 

COMPUTIST does not purchase 
articles or programs .... fBM-RDEXeci 



Other Words 

We also need to build up our own 
MOST WANTED SOFTKEYs to let our 
readers know which programs to work 
on and what softkeys to send in for 
publication. 



Finally..,, 

Please put out the word: 

COMPUTIST 

nowr has an 

IBM-RDEX 

So IBMusers, please 
subscribe. The more 
that subscribe, the 
more pages can be 
added to COMPUTIST 
that wrill be dedicated 
to IBM-RDEX. 

Just use the subscription form on 
page three and check the box marked: 

"I am a new IBM subscriber!" 

P.S." If you have access to any BBS, 

leave a message about COMPUTIST 

IBM-RDEX. 



NOT THE END 



46 



COMPUTIST #51 



January 



COMPUTIST's... 




No 'Input' or 'Readers 
Softkey & Copy Exchange' 

The old INPUT and the READERS 
SOFTKEY AND COPY EXCHANGE 
columns have now been combined into the 
new Readers Data Exchange (or RDEX, 
pronounced AR-DEX). 

All softkey s, comments, articles, 
questions, answers, fixes and bugs and 
almost any other information that must be 
printed in a timely fashion will be placed in 
RDEX. 

Although we will print letters and article- 
softkey submissions that are received as only 
printed text, we would prefer that they be 
submitted on disk. 

We no longer purchase 
articles or softkeys 

That's right. The author's 'by-line' is the 
only payment offered to COMPUTIST 
writers who get published. Even the staff is 
composed of unpaid volunteers. 

Of course, COMPUTIST reserves the 
right to edit and publish ANY contribution 
(whether submitted as a letter-to-the-editor 
or article- softkey) in the RDEX section. 

All published contributions become the 
property (and are copyrighted as part) of 
COMPUTIST magazine. 

How to get your name on 
RDEK contributors list 

Whether you are contributing data to 
RDEX or just asking a question, we urge 
you to follow these writer's guidelines. 

U All contributions and submissions 
should be submitted in both printed 
format and on disk. 

D Your printout must use only one side 
of the paper. 

n Text should be double-spaced using a 
non-compressed font with both upper 
and lower case. 

D A letter quality mode is preferred , with 
each page torn at the perforation only. 



Pages need not be stapled together. 
n The first page should contain the 
following data: 

TITLE OF WORK 

FULL NAME OF AUTHOR 

ADDRESS 

PHONE NUMBER 

D Each page of the manuscript and 
program listing should include the 
author's name, the title of the work, 
and die page number in the upper right 
hand comer. 



A standard text file on a 
DOS 3.3 5V4" fioppy disk 

The article and any accompanying 
program should be submitted as a standard 
t«xt file on a DOS 3.3 disk. Label the disk 
with die tide of the work and the author's 
full name and address. 

ON DISK, TEXT MUST BE SINGLE- 
SPACED ONLY, Please identify your 
editing program. 

We always try to return your disks as soon 
as possible. Still, to protect ourselves, we 
must say that we are not responsible for 
unretumed submissions. 

Here's how best to 'talk' 
to COMPUTIST readers 

A. Always assume that your reader is a 
novice and explain all buzzwords and 
technical jargon. Pay special attention to 
grammar and punctuation, we require 
technical competence and good, readable 
style. 

B. A list of hardware and software 
Requirements should be included at the 
beginning of the manuscript. When 
published, this list will be offset from the 
main text, 

C. Include the manufacturer's or publisher's 
name when a commercial program or 
product is mentioned, 

D. When submitting your own programs, 
first introduce the purpose of the program 
and features of special interest. Include 
background information describing its use. 



Tips for advanced uses, program 
modifications, and utilities can also be 
included. Avoid long print statements and 
use TABs instead of spaces. 

Remember: A beginner should be able to 
type the program with ease, A program will 
not accepted for publication without an 
accompanying article. 

These articles, as well as articles on 
hardware and DOS modifications MUST 
summarize the action of the main routines 
and include a fully remarked listing, 

F. GENERAL ARTICLES may include 
advanced tips, tutorials, and explorations of 
a particular aspect of Apple computing. 

G. SOFTKEYS must contain detailed step- 
by-step procedures. Number each step 

For each softkey, first introduce the 
locking technique used and then give precise 
steps to unlock the copy -protected program. 



Please do NOT send any 
original commercial disks 

We accept articles which explain locking 
techniques used in several programs 
published by the same company. 

H. APTs or ADVANCED PLAYING 
TECHNIQUES can deal widi alterations to 
a program, deleting annoying sounds, 
acquiring more points in play and avoiding 
hazards. 

Again, provide siep-by-step instructions 
to complete each APT and, explain each 
step's flinction. 

Please mail all letters, short articles and 
softkeys to the RDEX Editor. When accepted 
for publication, they will be 
IMMEDIATELY edited, typeset and 
entered into the next RDEX. 

Remember that we cannot purchase these 
contributions. 

RDEXed 

PO Box 110846-T 

Tacoma, WA 98411 



COMPUTIST jrai 



The Hacker'i UltlMle Copy t DeprotMilon UIIIHy 

Super lOB Collection ! 




VlllU 



Disk Inspection and the Use of Super lOB. 

Hins how to write 



a Drogram 

ct the software 

ntroller 
ifier siejjs are required to 



fuji-:ro;'iriev S-: 
Oi 



^ --^_tfaa«g--rtiat^g^53ag— <a 



■ Yes, please send me The Super lOB Collection 

Includes both disks with Super lOB version 1.5, 
COMPUnST #32, PLUS a reprint of "Disk Inspection and 
the Useof Super lOB", 

D US/Canada/Mexico for $16.00 
D Other Foreign for $20.00 

Send to: Super lOB Collection 

PO Box 110846-T Tacoma, WA 98411 



or call: (206) 474-5750 for 



orders. 



Iv 



*Requrres at least 64K of memory. 

** Although some controllers will completely deprotect the program 
they were designed Tor, some will not, and therefore require their 
corresponding issue of COMPUTIST to complete the deproteelion 
procedure. 



N;ime 






IDif 




Address 








r\rv 
Ctjuntri' 


State 

Phone 


_ Zip 


Exp. 




Signature 








_ CP51 



Most orders are shipped within 5 working days, however, please allow 
4 to 6 weeks for delivery, Washington residents, please add 7.8% sales tax. 

US funds drawn on US banks 



■III II 



COMPUTIST 51