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Full text of "Computer News 80 Vol 05 No 11 ( 1992)( Construction News Publishing)[ Nov 1992]"

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Computer News 50 


P.O. BOX 680/CASPER, WYOMING 82602-0680 


NOVEMBER 1992. VOLUME 5 NUMBER 11 


INDEX 


I/O-BUS DISK DRIVE INTERFACE 


by David Goben Page 2 


USE MDRAW TO CREATE T-SHIRTS 
by Dale Hill Page 4 


TRILOGY OF DISK RECORD PROGRAMS 
by Henry H. Herrdegen Page 5 


PRMREC3 & PRMREC4 PROGRAMS 
by Henry H. Herrdegen Page 6 


BANK STATEMENT PROGRAM 
by Robert M. Knowles Page 9 


A VISIT WITH DAVID GOBEN 


by David Goben Page 10 


CHRISTMAS HIGH RES WITH MUSIC 
by the CN80 Staff 
with excerpts by Robert W. Via Page 17 


MDRAW REVIEW 


by Dale Hill Page 18 
OPEN FORUM Page 20 
PROGRAM LISTINGS 

STATMENT/BAS Page 23 
MILESGAL/BAS Page 23 
MONTHS/BAS Page 24 
GRADES/BAS Page 26 
TRS-80 SHOPPERS GUIDE 

With CN80 Product Guide Page 27 


Vol. 5 No. 11 Page | 


307-265-6483 
$ 4.00 
EDITORIAL COMMENT 


On the front page of the January issue of 
this year we alluded to the secret projects 
called ExMagic4. One of those _ secret 
projects is now completed and ready for 
release. The code name ExMagic4 stood for 
external magic for the model 4 and there 
are several projects still in the works under 
that project title. But the I/O-BUS LD 
Model is finished now and is ready to ship. 


What is the I/O-BUS LD Model? It is an 
external drive interface for the model 4 
that connects to your 50 pin I/O bus and 
allows you to connect an external floppy 
drive to it. Just what you Model 4P people 
have been waiting for. The external drive 
can consist of one or two single-sided 180K 
drives, or double-sided 360K 5.25" drives, or 
double-sided 3.5" 720K drives. The 50 pin 
I/O Bus on your Model 4, 4P or 4D, is the 
large card edge connector that is labeled for 
use with a hard drive. The LD Model 
interfaces with low-density disk drives, 
which use the same 5.25 and 3.5 low-density 
disks that all of us have been using for 
years and which you now have in your disk 
collections. 


The I/O-BUS Interface comes complete with 
cable and software compatible for operation 
using TRSDOS 6.2, LS-DOS 6.3.x. 


There is a software package for LDOS 5.3.x 
available as a separate package, for those of 
you who want to run your external drives 
under that DOS, using the Model 4 in the 
the three mode. 


The I/O-BUS interface will not operate 
under TRSDOS 1.3, or read single-density, 
35 track formats. For more information turn - 
the News Flash artical on page 2. ener ew 


November 
1992 


SPECIAL CN80 NEWS FLASH!! 


I/O-BUS DISK DRIVE INTERFACE 
for the Model 4/4P/4D 
by David Goben 


Computer News 80 is proud to announce the 
development of a simple to use interface 
which plugs into the Model 4/4P/4D’s 50-pin 
I/O bus connector that will allow you to 
INSTANTLY add up to 2 external disk 
drives to the Model 4P, or add up to 2 
additional drives to the 4/4D (either as a 
second pair, making 4, or as a =3rd= pair, 
making 6), all without ANY modifications 
to your computer. Simply plug them in and 
go! 


THE WAY IT WAS 

For the past several years, countless 
dedicated Model 4P users have been in 
search of a simple way of adding extra disk 
drives to their beloved 2-drive-only 
computers. Most of them had asked in 
particular for an interface that would plug 
into the 50-pin I/O bus_ which would 
provide them with this sought-for support. 
During all that time, most of the TRS-80 
guru’s (as well as the even more numerous 
self-proclaimed guru’s) flatly stated that it 
was just totally impossible to utilize the I/O 
bus in that way. They said that the ONLY 
way to add extra drives to the Model 4P 
was to apply surgical modifications to the 
computer (a horror to non-hardware types, 
like me). The steps required for such a 
modification was outlined in an article by 
Tsun Tam in the January 1986 issue of 80 
MICRO magazine, and later reprinted in 
Volume IV.iii of The MISOSYS Quarterly. 
The down side to this approach was that 
these modifications required the user to 
become a virtual hardware hacker, and be 
willing to disassemble their beloved 
machine, use wire clippers to mutilate 
certain chip pins on the main board, add 
another chip, solder numerous wire jumpers 
into place, build a couple of new drive 
cables (not to mention risking rendering 
their computer totally inoperable), and 
hoping they can put it all back together and 
still have it running. But Gadzooks! Who but 
only a miniscule handful of people 
now-a-days might be willing to go through 
such a long and involved bother of hacking, 
especially if they had never done anything 
like that before? What about everyone else? 
Forget it! 


Vol. 5 No. 11 Page 2 


TOOT! TOOT! 

Well, knowingly tooting our own _ horns, 
CN80 has vigorously sponsored a_ costly, 
8-month secret project which Tim Worcester 
(an expert hardware man, who we should all 
praise with proliferous accolades) and I 
(doing the software) collaborated on, that 
ultimately cumulated in the development 
(along with numerous revisions, until it 
fully complied with CN80’s design 
specifications) of an external disk drive 
interface that simply plugs onto the 50-pin 
I/O bus connector on the back of the 4P, or 
on the bottom of the Model 4/4D. After 
that, all you have to do is to attach one of 
CN80’s external drive kits to it and install a 
simple software driver. It’s THAT easy! 
Voila! In a matter of seconds you suddenly 
have ready-to-use additional disk drives, 
with no fuss, no hassles, and best of all, you 
do not have to open your computer at all, 
and absolutely NO modifications are needed. 
Just plug it in and go. 


Even better, there is also no_- other 
additional software support necessary, 
unlike hard disk drives systems which are 
also interfaced through the I/O bus, CN80’s 
I/O-BUS DISK DRIVE INTERFACE does 
not require specific formatting or 
partition-defining software. After 
installation, you can use the drives just the 
same as you did with any other drive you 
already have on your present computer 
system with no need for extra software 
support. FORMAT, or CN80’s much better 
FFORMAT will work with the new drives 
with ease. 


The only exceptions we have been able to 
find in our extensive "beat a dead horse" 
testing process is that this package will 
=not= work with single density disks, but 
this is due to the double-density-only nature 
of the controller, itself; but who wants 
LESS storage space, anyway? And you have 
to use the Model 4’s natural 4MHz speed 
due to the clock requirements of the 
controller; but who wants to work at the 
snail-pace 2MHz SYSTEM (SLOW) speed? 
(clock speeds faster than 4MHz are OK.) 


MIX AND MATCH 

Also have a hard disk? No problem. Just 
add a Y-cable (available from CN80) and 
you can use the hard disk and the disk 
drive interface at the same time. Have your 
own external drives? No problem. Simply 


attach an inexpensive 34-pin female header 
socket connector onto your existing drive 
cable (also available from CN80 for $1.95) 
and you can use them with the interface 
(obviously, CN80 cannot be held responsible 
for unforseen problems which may possibly 
exist between their interface and an 
external drive system not supported or 
provided by them). 


MODEL III SUPPORT? 

As discussed earlier, due to the need for a 
minimal 4MHz clock speed (technically, 
3.6+), this drive system will not operate with 
any reliability on a standard Model III 
System with a 2MHz clock. However, if you 
also use LDOS 5.3 on a Model 4/4P/4D in 
the III mode, and work with the 4MHz 
clock using SYSTEM (FAST), a _ separate 
driver will be made available at an 
additional charge. No support for other 
Model III DOS systems are planned to be 
provided at this time. 


COMPATIBILITY 

99.99 % of all Model 4 software uses the 
System supervisory calls to access the disk 
drives. As such, these will work on the new 
drive system with full support. Naturally, 
due to the new system working off the I/O 
bus, thus requiring the use of separate port 
accessing than those which were specifically 
designed into the usual drive network on a 
Model 4, some software that accesses the 
actual physical disk drive ports =directly=, 
such as SuperUTILITY-4, will not work 
with the new drives. This is =not= a bug 
with their software or our hardware, but a 
=natural= consequence of lowest-level 
hardware communications. This is also the 
reason why a software driver is required for 
the new drives, so that the new, required 
ports can be accessed (technically, a 
software driver is =also= required for the 
Standard drive interface, but it is built 
right into the DOS, so you are not aware of 
its installation). Be that as it may, the 
programmers of those very few programs 
should not be held accountable, because 
until now, there was no other way to access 
disk drives =except= through the provided 
hardware ports on a Model 4 as they had 
been defined in 1981 for the original Model 
III system. Until a year ago, when we 
discussed with CN80 the idea of such an 
interface, I had never thought that such an 
idea would actually be developed (even 
though I had covered my butt at 80 MICRO 


Vol. 5 No. 11 Page 3 


magazine years ago by responding to people 
in the FEEDBACK LOOP column who had 
inquired about such an I/O bus interface, 
that it was indeed feasible, but no one had 
attempted it yet. Otherwise I’d be eating a 
lot of crow right now). 


CONCLUSION 

What a great way to add one or two of the 
high capacity 3-1/2" 720K disk drives, or 
the "standard" 5-1/4" 360K disk drives 


without opening your computer. And with 


no hardware hacking, and so incredibly easy 
to install, to boot! Now my Model 4P has 
become a 4-drive system by the simple act 
of just plugging in a cable. 

-David Goben 


I/O-BUS LD Disk Drive Interface, complete 
with cable and TRSDOS/LSDOS software. 
(External disk drives are not included.) 

$ 180.00 plus $ 4 S&H. 


LDOS 5.3.x software $29.95 plus $ 3 S&H 


SPECIAL NOTICE 

We made a special purchase of original 
Radio Shack External Mini Disk drives. 
These external disk drives have their own 
power supply, one full height single-sided 
drive and cable. They are brand new and in 
their original carton. 

RS Cat #26-1164 $69.95 plus $6 S&H. 

If you only want to add one disk drive unit 
to your Model 4, or 4D this would be a 
great buy. But remember they are only 
single-sided 180K drives. They would also 
make a great low cost addition to your 
model 4P using our I/O-BUS interface. 


MICRO-LABS SPECIAL 
Our special purchase of Radio Shack 
#26-1126 High Resolution Boards are GONE, 
If you waited to decide, sorry, you missed 
out on a great bargain. 


We _ still have the Micro-Labs High 
Resolution Boards available. If you missed 
out on the Radio Shack Board and order the 
Micro-Labs board during the month of 
November you can have one at $89 + $4 
S&H 


MDRAW II - Perfect for Creating T-Shirt 
Logos 
by Dale Hill 


With the enhancements by Gary Shanafelt 
and a three button mouse from CN-80, 
TRS-80 owners now have a program that is 
one of the easiest on the market to make 
t-shirt logos - including all Macintosh, 
MSDOS and Apple environments. What 
makes it so easy to make t-shirt logos using 
MDRAW? Well, the Mirror command and the 
ability to cut and paste from the two 
screens available. Apple programs I’ve used, 
simply can’t duplicate it, but the Mac can 
with its ability to work on two programs 
VIA the window command, and _ its 
clipboard. But MDRAW is just as good, is 
easier, and free! And only available to 
TRS-80ers. 


What are the ingredients for success in 
making a good t-shirt logo? 


Print ’N Wear transfers from Radio Shack (5 
for $10) 

MDRAW 4.4 (File Cabinet Vol. M4HRZ22) 
CN-80 Mouse package 

David Goben’s High Res Utilities (CN-80) 
Clip art screens (CN-80 File Cabinet) 
T-shirts 

Iron with a large surface of glass or other 
non-wood surface (my wife has a simulated 
glass, craft board) 

Permanent black marker 

Crayolas or map pencils 

Dotwriter Fonts (Optional) 

Bigger/CMD -MD4HRZ04 (File Cabinet) 


That is it. Figure it out in dollar terms for 
the non-hires machine, we are talking about 
less than $150, and for the high res 
machines, well, the cost is under 30 or 40 
bucks. Let me tell you, that is a lot cheaper 
than a Macintosh even with their reduced 
prices. 4 


Choose an icon from one of the screens and 
transfer it over to the second screen. That 
screen becomes your main screen. Make sure 
the icon is at the far left top corner of your 
Screen. Exit Mdraw and invoke 
BIGGER/CMD twice. The icon takes up now 
1/2 of your high res screen. Make your 
letters as big as you want. Fill them with 
the fill command or just leave them in 
outline form. When the screen is setup like 
you want it, Negate it (black on white) and 


Vol. 5 No. 11 Page 4 


Mirror it. Exit the screen and using David’s 
HRXPORT (DOUBLE) command, print it to 
a Sheet of paper. Do you like it? Put in a 
Print ’n Wear transfer and do the same 
thing again. Pretty snazzy indeed. 


Do not use a freshly reinked ribbon and 
move the friction tab all the way back. 
Sorry, we just can’t print out a real dark 
image without getting printing streaks across 
the transfer. Better to use the lighter print 
and go over it with a Sanford Sharpie 
Permanent Marker on all dark areas or 
outlines. Now color any images or non black 
fonts with crayola or map pencils. Acrylic 
paints may work too, but I haven’t tried 
them. 


At first, I ironed on my creation as is. 
Having tired of that, I am now cutting up 
the transfer and ironing on images and 
fonts separately. Sorry, you non-dot matrix 
people, your new technology leaves a little 
bit to be desired when making t-shirts. 
Don’t dump those old DOT MATRIX 
PRINTERS. 


Incidentally, after making a screen you can 
hit break and then type run and then break 
again. By typing @lprint (0), you can print 
to any DMP 7 pin printer and it looks great. 
Other options are as follows (1) Epson, (2) 
Enhanced Epson, Star Micronics, (3) Radio 
Shack LPVII, VIII, (4) Okidata 82A, (5) 
Centronics, (6) Okidata 92, (7) Anadex, (8) 
C. Itoh & NEC, and (9) Okidata Mic 84. 
With David’s HRXPORT/CMD, it. only 
works on Epson compatibles. 


The more I work with the new MDRAW II, 
the more creative things I find to do with 
it. 

-Dale Hill 


REMINDER 


If the last four digits on your mailing label 
are 92/11, then this is your last issue. Time 
to get your renewal in the mail. 


Moving? 
Remember to send us your new address. 


A TRILOGY OF DISK RECORD 
PROGRAMS For TRSDOS 1.3 and LS-DOS 
6.3 

by Henry H. Herrdegen 


Finally I have, what for me is the ultimate 
in a Disk/File record system. Some may be 
familiar with my previous attempts in the 
Model III environment, PGMREC/PGM, 
FILEDIR/BAS and _ the _ loosely related 
DIRPRTCM/BAS, and the first Mod 4 
program, PGMREC4/BAS. 


But the main stumbling block remained, 
Separate programs, and a lot of (hated) 
typing. The new "Trilogy": FILEDIR, 
PRGREC, and RECOPY solves a lot of that. 


The first FILEDIR3 and FILEDIR4 were 
presented in CN80O last month. This month 
we will follow up with PGMREC3/BAS and 
PGMREC4/BAS, the second in this Series. 
RECOPY3 and RECOPY4, new companion 
programs to PGMREC programs will follow 
in the December issue. 


Credit to whom credit is due, The FILEDIR 
in its initial format was published by Mike 
Salisbury in the old Micro Computer News 
in Feb 84, for the Model III. As it "PEEKS" 
the letters of the "CAT" directory on the 
screen, it was then not possible to transfer 
it to the 4, with its non fixed screen 
addresses. In the meantime, code to do just 
that has been made available, and enabled 
me to make the translation into Model 4 
BASIC. 


Writing the FILEDIR4 with this code, and 
building the item strings identical, so both 
programs could read and use them, solved 
the lesser two thirds of the PGMREC typing 
Chore: Read the disks with FILEDIR, and 
the Filename and Disk code is there, and all 
what’s left for PGMREC is to add the 
remarks. 


As I still use quite a bit of TRSDOS 1.3 
BASIC, and don’t see me transferring all my 
1.3 disks to 6.3, I went back to the old 
PGMREC/PGM and the FILEDIR for the 
model III, and brought them up to date, as 
close to the 4 programs as possible, so I can 
use the latest on both systems, and have 
identical looking lists. 


The new programs will read the old lists all 
right, but the columns will not be lined up 


Vol. 5 No. 11 Page 5 


properly if an item is added or changed. 
Three little correction programs will take 
care of that: for the Model 4, ADDSPCE4 to 
enlarge the 10 space disk code from 
PGMREC4 (89 03 26, CNdisk 5) to the new 
12, and for the Model III, DELSPCE3 to 
Shorten the 41 spaces from PGMREC/PGM 
(88 03 27, disk 3) to 12, and CORSPCE3 to 
take out the dots and correct the strings 
from the FILEDIR/BAS (91 05 14, disk 14). 


I think here is an apology in order. If you 
have used these old programs, and now 
think, why didn’t he do that in the first 
place? My programs are not planned ahead 
for publication, they are written for my 
own use, improved as I get new ideas while 
working with them, and at some point 
polished up a bit and submitted to CN80, to 
see if they want to publish them. That’s one 
reason I don’t use version numbers. In line 0 
(or 1) is the inception date in brackets, and 
the last change date behind it. That is 
updated every time I make a little 
"improvement". As an engineer, I realize that 
one has to "freeze" a design at some point, 
Otherwise it never gets to the shop, and this 
is it. 


Now, in order to make specific lists, to pick 
program groups, such as utility programs, 
games, graphic programs, etc, all mixed 
together from the various disk reads, in the, 
up to 500 item long "master" list: RECOPY 
comes to the rescue. With it, individual 
records can be copied from one list to 
another, specialized one. 


I know, it sounds like lots of work, and it 
is. But at least for the archive/master disks 
it’s well worthwhile. Once you have caught 
up with your present disks and programs, 
any additions or changes are easy. You have 
an instant reference where to find that 
particular utility program, you almost forgot 
you had, with a description of its features, 
without looking thru a pile of hard copies 
from READMEs or DIRs. You don’t even 
have to remember the filename, the (52 
character) remark will tell enough of its 
application and capability. Who remembers 
what is on all the CN80O disks, or the File 
Cabinet ones? And who wants to leaf thru a 
Stack of paper with repeating messages, 
maybe just overlooking the program one is 
searching for? Never mind that most listings 
don’t give a content, which I think is the 
forte of the PGMREC. 


Make a master list MASTERDISKS, one 
CN80DISKS, one FILECABINET, one for 
CODEWORKS, or whatever, then use 
RECOPY to pick out the records to make 
your specific subject lists, UTILITIES, 
GAMES, HOMEPROGRAMS, etc. And you 
have quick, comprehensive, alphabetical 
listings of all your programs. 


If Trilogy programs appear to duplicate two 
of the latest, and in their own frame very 
good "File programs", INDEX4 and 
ARRANGER II, it is not so. INDEX4 has 
the added remark facility, but is disk 
specific and not meant to make multiple 
disk lists, and ARRANGER, which has a lot 
of valuable functions, like Find, Scan, print 
labels, etc., can not add the remarks. And 
that was what made me start this in the 
first place. With our restricted 8 character 
program names, few can remember after a 
while, what SOMEPRGM/BAS is all about. 
Right? 


My thanks to Mike Salisbury, all others who 
contributed ideas and/or code, and also to 
Dick Houston for his article "Utility or 
Futility" in CN80 4.4/19, which gave me the 
kick in the you know where, to buckle 
down and do something about. these 
programs. I’m only sorry it took me so long. 


Make use of your "80"! 
-Henry H. Herrdegen 


PGMREC3 and PGMREC4 

New Program Record for the Model 3 and 4. 
(get File- and Disk names from FILEDIR 
list, just add remarks. for TRSDOS 1.3 and 
LS-DOS 6.3. 

by Henry H. Herrdegen 


PGMREC3 and PGMREC4 are _ further 
developments of my Model III 
PGMREC/PGM (CN80 1.12 and Disk #3), 
and the PGMREC4 (89 03 26, on Disk #5), 
and now, these new versions are compatible 
with the new FILEDIR_ programs. This 
solves a long standing beef of mine, that I 
had to type the whole string, Filename, Disk 
code and remarks, in order to make the lists. 
Now, with the FILEDIR, you can read disk 
CAT’s, make a list of files from several 
disks, and just add the remarks, change, add 
or delete with PGMREC. 


Vol. 5 No. 11 Page 6 


If you have not read the program 
description in CN80 1.12, then here is a 
recap: (/BAS extensions are omitted in this 
article, but will be on the actual filenames.) 


I was frustrated with the inability of all 
the automatic Directory programs known to 
me to add some meaningful remarks in 
order to jog your memory what the program 
SOMPROGM/BAS is all about. They were all 
nice and easy to use, just stick the disks in, 
anc you can have a list of one kind or the 
Other, but no means for any rem input. 


The PGMRECs can’t read a directory, but 
you can now load and read a FILEDIR list 
and add the remarks here. Otherwise you 
have to type the whole line in yourself. 
With the Filename, the disk code or codes 
the program is on (up to 12 characters), and 
a 52 character remarks line. It sorts the 
entries alphabetically, permits you to change 
all three entries, Filename, disk code(s) or 
remarks when you re-name or move a 
program, or clarify the remarks, without 
deleting and retyping the whole entry. It 
can print paginated hard copy with title, 
headings, and 50 entries per page. 


The programs (92 07 31) are written in 
TRSDOS 1.3 and LS-DOS 6.3 BASIC 
respectively. They are 177/178 program lines 
long, and need about 38.8K to run with the 
DIM set up for 500 entries per list, (actually 
501 with the item count in array F(Q), not 
shown at on-screen counters.), but will 
permit only about 300+ with all remarks at 
full length, thanks to string space 
restrictions. They are fully self-explanatory, 
with prompts leading you thru it, made 
foolproof (almost) with many checks for 
valid Filenames, string lengths, etc. They 
won’t let you leave without naming and/or 
saving a new or changed list, and so on. To 
sort in LS-DOS, you should have the 
BSORT/CMD from the TRSDOS 6.2 Utilities 
disk (RS# 26-0315) in your system. The old 
BASIC "swap" sort code gets too darn slow 
with larger files. But it’s still in the 
program, diverted to by an error trap, if 
BSORT can’t be found. The BSORT/CMD is 
one of the quickest I know. If not available 
to you, Dave Goben’s SORT4 can _ be 
substituted. But you will have to protect 
high memory, and initiate it before running 
the BASIC program (CN80 2.4 & Disk #5). 
The TRSDOS 1.3 version uses the inherent 
CMD"O" sorting. 


In the Print section are two things you may 
have to change or delete. The printer check 
in line 170, and the paper feed in line 184. 
I run a DMP 200 printer, and the code for 
its ready status is 63. If yours is different, 
Or your printer has no such code, you have 
to change the number or delete the "IF 
IN P(248)<>63 THEN 186 ELSE.." portion of 
line 170. But leave the rest of it. With this 
deletion, lines 186 and 188, the "not ready" 
message and _ return to Menu, become 
meaningless, but can be left in. The 
"LPRINT STRING$((86-Q),10)" in line 184 
feed’s the paper after the last page to a (for 
my printer) convenient tear-off position. 
You may have to change the "86" to suit 
your printer, or delete this piece of code. 
And if you don’t like the international 
format of YY MM DD dating, line 3 is the 
place where the computers MM DD YY 
format is rearranged. 


Lets make a little trip thru the program 
(different numbers for the 3 and 4 will be 
Shown with a slash between (3/4): 


In Line O is my way of version 
identification, the date the program was 
born in parentheses, and the last date any 
change was made, a short description and 
mention of credits, if any. Next is the 
initiation, setting the variables and printing 
the title and the first prompt (which list to 
load) onto the screen. Then come the various 
subroutines and the store and load (file) 
code. 


The program starts out with a title heading, 
and the question which file to load. If you 
answer this with a list name, or a plain 
<ENTER> the Menu appears. 


The menu gives 9 choices: <V>iew the list 
on screen (showing the list name and 
number of records in it), <H>ard copy the 
list, <A>dd to it, <C>hange a record, 
<D>elete an entry, <L>oad another list, 
<M>ake a new list (or rename existing one), 
<E>nd the program and stay in BASIC, or 
e<X>it to DOS. <L>, <E> and <X> will save 
the resident list to disk, if any changes 
have been made. 


The <V> choice will ask if you want the 
<T>otal list, starting on top, or with a 
certain letter. If no entry with that letter 
exists, Or you pushed a number or sign key, 
it will tell you so. I taught it to be polite, 


Vol. 5 No. 11 Page 7 


but .. you never know. The list comes up 
with the first 10/18 entries, and down arrow 
will get the next screen, with the last 
previous file on top. <@> get’s you back to 
the menu anytime, and <ENTER> at the 
end repeats the list. 


<H> will check if the printer is ready, and 
if not, get back to the menu. Here is where 
you may have to make some changes. It will 
print title, number of records, page number 
and a header plus 50 item lines on each 
page, end the intermediate pages with 
"cont’d" and the last one with "end of list". 
The paper then feeds out to a tear off 
position (change it?), and the menu is back. 


To <A>dd, the prompts will show the record 
number, ask for the Name, disk code and 
remarks. Each prompt _ indicating’ the 
maximum allowed length, and the program 
checking for conformance (I did not limit 
the input, but it will not accept too long 
strings, and tell you so). At the first prompt, 
your input is also checked if it’s a 
legitimate Filename. The finished entry is 
shown for approval or retyping ("no comma" 
warning), and, if <Y>es, will ask if you 
have more additions. If <N>o, automatic 
sorting takes place before return to the 
menu. 


The way the strings are set up, you have to 
avoid using commas in your remarks. Text 
after a comma will show up on screen and 
will get onto the disk, but will screw up the 
disk storage and consequent loading from 
the disk. Prompts at the proper places will 
remind you about this. Please watch out for 
this! It’s easy to put a comma in and 
overlook it (done it sometimes myself), and 
there is no check and rejection for it built 
in. Strings also differ from the ones made 
with the old PGMRECs, the III and the 4, 
mainly in a now 12 character Disk code 
space and 52 for the remarks. Two short 
programs, DELSPCE3 and ADDSPCE4, make 
lists created with the old programs 
compatible with the new one and the 
FILEDIRs. You can read and handle old 
lists without converting, but the column 
alignment will be lost. (See the PS.) 


To <C>hange a record comes in handy when 
you move programs around on your disks, 
Change a Filename, or want to change a 
remark. You enter the record name (or only 
part of it) you want to change, but you can 


scroll up or down if it is the wrong one. It 
asks which section you want to change, if it 
is now <C>orrect or still <W>rong (to change 
another section too). If correct, you can then 
Change the <N>ext, any <O>ther record, or 
go back to the menu <@>. If the Filename 
has been changed, the list is first re-sorted. 
A plain <ENTER> goes to the menu without 
changing anything. 


The <D>elete section puts a scrojl protected 
heading with instructions on the _ screen, 
shows the number of records in memory, 
and asks for the name of the record to be 
deleted. It also lets you scroll thru the list 
with the up or down arrow if you picked a 
wrong one. Punching <D> will delete the 
presently shown record without further 
warning, so be careful. The number of 
records will be visibly updated, and 
<ENTER> will get you to the menu. 


If you want to <L>oad another list, the 
program checks first if there were any 
Changes made to the list in memory, and if 
SO, save this list to disk (as do <E> & <X>), 
then ask for the new list’s name. 


<M> is going to ask if you want to make a 
<N>ew list, or <R>e-name the list in 
memory. It warns that <N> will clear the 
memory, but will save to disk what is there, 
IF any changes had been made. After all, if 
not changed, you can always re-load it from 
disk. Any other key but <N> or <R> will 
get back to the menu. A new list name will 
be checked for legality as is any other 
filename input. 


The two quitting choices, <E> and <X>, 
check for changes, the same as <L>. These 3 
menu choices also alert you if the list in 
memory has no name yet. This could happen 
if you bypass the first "List to be loaded.." 
prompt with <ENTER>, and then proceed to 
make a list with <A>dd. Perfectly legal way 
to start a list, but it will be shown with a 
question mark and dashes for a name. It is 
better to start a new list with <M> and 
<N>, and give it a name, even temporary. 


A new wrinkle is the possibility to preface a 
name with a _ period, if you want some 
entries sorted at the head of the list. For 
instance, a list of the disks, the listed 
programs are on. But the 12 permitted 
characters include the period, and it does 
not have to be a legal filename! 


Vol. 5 No. 11 Page 8 


A couple of "undocumented", read "not 
prompted" features are there too: a "null 
String", plain <ENTER>, will get back to the 
menu from all prompts asking for a string 
input (name), and in the *DELETE* section, 
a single "N" at the "Name..." prompt will 
get the next record in the list, saving some 
typing if you want to delete a row of 
entries. After using the "N", the arrow scroll 
works again. 


I think these programs are as foolproof as it 
is possible to make one. They will not crash 
if you ask for a non existing file or an 
impossible filename, and disk files are 
closed immediately after access. Error traps 
catch a possible disastrous "Disk full", 
(possible when adding remarks, and disk 
space is almost full already), prompting you 
to put a formatted disk into drive :l, and, 
at the <E>nd menu choice, save the file to 
this disk. The, now screwed up, original file 
is still on the disk, closed, but will give an 
"Input past end" error when loaded. The 
error trap will close the file, and lets you 
then handle it from the menu. If another, 
not trapped error should occur, it’s code 
number will be shown, the file closed, and 
you can <BREAK> out of the program and 
investigate. I have not’ disabled’ the 


<BREAK> key. 


I know it is a nuisance to update the record 
every time you add, kill or move a program, 
but our 8 digit filenames are in most cases 
inadequate to identify a seldom_ used 
program clearly. Not having a photographic 
memory, I have often asked myself what is 
program SOMPROGM/BAS?? And _ that 
prompted me in 84 to write the first 
forerunner of the PGMREC, with DATA 
storage (brrr). After a few metamorphoses, it 
became what it is today. Now, if I only 
would keep my lists up to date! 


DELSPCE3: Is a short, 14 line program for 
the Model III, to update old PGMREC/PGM 
lists to the new 12-12-52 character string 
format. It asks for a list name, checks each 
entry for a proper 12 space (not character!) 
disk code, corrects it if its the old 14 space 
format, re saves the corrected list, and tells 
you so. To let you know what’s going on, it 
displays the string number and if or if not 
a change has been made. At the end you can 
either update <A>nother list, <E>nd or 
e<X>it. 


ADDSPCE4: Is the same for the old Model 4 
10 space PGMREC4/BAS lists, also only 14 
lines long, and acting exactly as the above. 
Both short and sweet. I have all my old files 
converted without a hitch, even mixed ones 
I had generated during the switch over to 
12 spaces. 


Have fun, and keep the "80" alive! 
-Henry H. Herrdegen 


As with last month’s installment of this 
trilogy of programs they are too long to 
print in CN80, but they will be on our Disk 
Series #19, or if you want advance copies 
send $2 to cover postage and we will send 
you copies. Please specify if you want the 
Model 4 or Model 3. 


RECOPY3 & 4, the new companion programs 
to PGMRECs will be covered in_ the 
December issue. 


BANK STATEMENT PROGRAM 
by Robert M. Knowles 


I was thinking this morning about what I 
would send the next time I send a program 
to you and I thought I would tell you about 
how I keep records and the program I use to 
keep these records then I thought that I sent 
a program to help with your check book 
why not one to help with the bank 
Statement,I hope it is of some use to some 
one. 


Line 10: is just to clear the screen, when 
you type run you will have a clean screen 
to work on. line 20: tells you what the 
program does,it has nothing to do with the 
working of the program. line 30: you must 
Start some where so you start with your 
first outstanding check. Line 40: starts the 
loop. line 50: you continue’ to list 
Outstanding checks one at a time pressing 
<enter> after each check. Line 60: adds D to 
A and puts it in A so that A is always 
updated with each D. line 70: tells the 
program that if D is O then break out of 
the loop, if you press <enter> its the same 
as pressing 0. Line 80: is a blank line and is 
just to make the program easier to read. 


Vol. 5 No. 11 Page 9 


Line 90: is a beep and I find that it’s better 
with it then with out it. Line 100: you must 
enter your check book balance. Line 110: 
blank line again. Line 120: adds A which is 
all your out standing checks and B which is 
your check book balance and puts it in C. 
Line 130: this line gives you your answer 
and should agree with your statement and if 
it doesn’t it’s not the programs fault nor the 
computers, you get out what you put in. If I 
don’t get the right answer I start to look for 
where I made the mistake. 


Did I tell you that you have a built in 
clock, a lot of new users who just bought 
there model 4 don’t know that they have a 
built in clock, well you do and to turn it 
on, after you put the date and time in and 
you get the prompt in the lower left hand 
corner you put SYSTEM(CLOCK=ON) 
<enter> then SYSGEN<enter>. If you don’t 
put SYSGEN then when you turn off the 
computer you will lose it, if you put 
SYSGEN then every time you use that disk 
you will get the clock. If you won’t to turn 
it off instead of on you put off. After you 
tell the computer to turn the clock on the 
clock will come right on in the upper right 
hand corner. 


In August a bright young man wrote that 
instead of labels you could just put the 
envelope in the printer and print your 
return address right on the envelope, I never 
thought of that so I went to the computer, 
turned it on and no picture. I sent it off to 
CN80 to fix and they did a good job. How 
do I know they did a good job? Well, I no 
longer have the problem and the computer 
works well, so they must have done a good 
job. 


So after CN80 fixed my computer I tried 
the envelopes again and it works fine. This 
is what I found, load your return address 
program, you can leave the tractor drive on 
but you must open the paper bail so that 
the friction feed is engage then use an old 
envelope (one you don’t mind losing) to see 
just where the return address is going to 
fall. Then set the margin, one address at a 
time you can do a lot of them in no time at 
all. 


If you want to use the bank statement 
program and you have the one for doing 
your check book then call up your check 
book program and add this one to the end 


of it. What will happen? Nothing, your 
Check book program is a closed program, by 
that I mean that it is in a loop and when it 
reaches the end of the program it goes back 
to the beginning and round and round until 
you press break so it can’t run into the 
statement program. If you are doing your 
Statement and you find you have to check 
your check book then you press break and 
type run and your check book program will 
run then when you want to run your 
Statement program you type break then run 
AND THE LINE NUMBER THAT YOUR 
STATEMENT PROGRAM STARTS ON. If 
you don’t combine these programs you will 
find that it is a little tiring going back and 
forth. 

-Robert Knowles 


Get your name in print. 


Want to see your name in print, then send 
us your latest brain storm, hint or tip for 
using your favorite program. Send it in 
letter format or in the form of an article, 
saved on a disk in ASCII, or if you are 
using LeScript, Allwrite or Scripsit III, you 
don’t have to save it in ASCII, just send it 
in anyway. Don’t worry about the margin 
settings either, we will take care of that. 


You don’t have to have a program to go 
with your submission, but if you have a 
favorite program, send it in with a 
description of what it does and how to use 
it. 


We welcome all your ideas, hardware hints, 
software hints, or just plain ol’ tip on how 
you use your computer in your business or 
personal life. 


You’ll get a surprise package in the mail 
along with your name in print when your 
submission is printed. 


Please remember to send your submission on 
a disk saved in ASCII and to place your 
name and format type on the disk label, 
along with the names of the files. -CN80 


Vol. 5 No. 11 Page 10 


A VISIT WITH DAVID GOBEN 
by David Goben 


I1/O-BUS EXTERNAL DRIVES 

The cat’s out of the bag, and now you know 
what CN80 has been secretly up to. You 
have no idea how hard we had to fight the 
temptation to blurt out to people that we 
had done the “impossible” once we had 
reached the point where we knew that it 
was going to become a reality. I cannot 
stress enough how easy it is now to not only 
add additional disk drives to a Model 4P, 
but to allow the real drive-mongers out 
there to install up to 6 floppy drives on a 
4/4D (2 internal, 2 external, and 2 off the 
I/O-BUS). 


The first time I plugged the interface into 
the back of my Model 4P, I suddenly 
realized the significance of what had been 
created. After hearing all these years how 
you would have to make a lot of hardware 
modifications to one’s beloved machine (I’m 
a competent hardware hacker, but I wasn’t 
about to take a chance on goofing up and 
destroying my 4P), to instead be able to, in 
just a few short seconds, plug a device into 
the back of my machine and accomplish the 
same thing -- this is astounding! Plus the 
fact that CN80 insisted that the software 
installation be as easy and painless as 
possible, making adding additional drives a 
real breeze. The best part is, absolutely =no= 
hacker knowledge is required. If you know 
how to connect a printer to your computer, 
then you can add one of these drive units. 


CHEWING DAVID’S EAR 

Boy, have I gotten my ears chewed off since 
the last issue. Seems that my remarks about 
file defragmentation not being a problem 
was way out of line with the general 
population. I guess it just goes to show you 
that everyone computes differently. 
Previously, the way I had defragmented 
files was to FBACKUP files from one disk 
to a blank disk, or FASTBACK my hard 
disk, purge the hard disk directory, and 
then FASTREST them back into place. What 
I had not bothered to notice until these 
calls came in was that this process took up 
to 1 hour to complete a =full= face-lift of 
my hard drive (God knows how many more 
hours it would have taken with BACKUP or 
most "other" hard disk backup utilities). 


One user said that he made regular backups 


of his disks, but they were mirror-image 
backups, not file-by-file, as I do. Therefore 
his disks are not defragmented when they 
are backed up. Oh, yeah. Didn’t think about 
that. 


On top of this, I have received many 
comments from readers who said that they 
would jump on my Model 4 SubDirectory 
utilities if they had an easy, fast way to 
defragment the files between the various 
directories (my SubDirectory _ structure 
allows several different directories to 
co-exist, including within each other, but 
meanwhile sharing the same disk space and 
allocation scheme, which prevents 
Overwriting files with others). 


So I sat down and wrote DISKOPT/CMD. As 
its name implies, it is a disk optimizer; a 
file defragmenter. The beauty of it is that 
it will work on both hard disks and floppy 
drives, and the added feature of being able 
to support SubDirectories if they are on the 
disk. If you do not have SubDirectories, it 
works just as fast and easily. So if you have 
some Other optimizer and don’t plan to use 
my Model 4 SubDirectory utilities, you may 
as well stick with what you have, unless 
you want to use one that runs incredibly 
fast (most others I’ve seen have been written 
in BASIC, and run slow as snails). 


Now if you have SubDirectories, no matter 
how deep they are stacked, DISKOPT will 
process them with ease. Even better, 
DISKOPT will take full advantage of any 
unallocated extended memory to really kick 
the optimization process into high gear. 


DISKOPT is also fun to watch. After it has 
examined a disk and found all its files (and 
possible SubDirectory files), it will begin 
moving the files around on the disk in 
order to defragment them. While this is 
going On, you can watch it do its work by 
viewing an animated screen display, showing 
you where free space and allocated space 
are located, and watch the sections of disk 
data being moved from one place to another. 
It will also display the name of the file it is 
processing when it does so. If a file is larger 
than what can be stored in memory, the 
DISKOPT moves the file safely in blocks. 
DISKOPT will also pack the files down 
toward the lower end of the disk to 
minimize the risk of new files being readily 
fragmented. DISKOPT will also fix many 


Vol. 5 No. 11 Page 11 


directory errors "on-the-fly" as it processes 
the data, to avoid misallocations. 


Only after having written the utility, I 
began to realize how much faster it was to 
optimize a disk using this method, rather 
than the slow and cumbersome method I had 
been using and grown begrudgingly 
comfortable with for years. I never realized 
how much time I had spent on doing that, 
aS opposed to spending 2 or 3 minutes 
allowing DISKOPT to do on my hard disk 
(less than a minute on floppies) what I had 
been spending an hour to do before. 


If you have ever needed to defragment files 
and have been doing it the way that I had 
been doing it for years, you might like to 
give DISKOPT a try, and find yourself 
suddenly with more free time to spend with 
the family or a good book. 


By the way, this may sound like alligator 
tears, but I did not really want to write this 
utility. Although competition is good, the 
TRS-80 community must stick together as 
much as possible, and this means 
cooperation. Had it not been for the need to 
support the SubDirectory structure, 
DISKOPT would never have been written (it 
would have also given me a lot more free 
time, which I have really been needing 
lately). 


SUBDIRECTORIES CATCHING ON? 

I had an interesting conversation recently 
with a gentleman who told me that someone 
else has come out with a SubDirectory 
utility. This fascinated me, so I pressed him 
for details, to wit obtained the PD disk that 
it was on. It seems that Frank Slinkman 
took a different approach and _ wrote 
SubDirectory-like support for hard _ disks 
only. The method used was fascinating, 
because it was the same idea I had 
Originally came up with when I[_ was 
developing the project, but later abandoned. 
What Frank did was use the additional 
space on the directory cylinder to store 
additional directories. A disk directory can 
only be 34 sectors long. On some hard disk 
partitions, a logical cylinder can be as long 
as 256 sectors (my 20Meg unit has cylinders 
that are 128 sectors long). On such a huge 
cylinder, out of 256 sectors, only 34 are 
used, meaning that 222 sectors are not used. 
They are not used because reads from them 
will always produce an "Attempted to read 


system data record" error, because hard disks 
cannot actually write a thing called a 
"deleted data record", which floppy disks 
use, to write directory sectors. Because of 
this inability on the part of the hard disk, 
what its driver program does is simply 
checks to see if the program is trying to 
read from the directory cylinder, reads it, 
and then returns with an error 6 code, 
indicating a directory sector -read. This 
makes it difficult to store data in granules 
after the directory on that cylinder, because 
reading from them will ALWAYS produce 
that error. 


Therefore, that cylinder would be a nice 
place to store additional directories. On a 
cylinder of 256 sectors, this means that you 
can store 7 complete 34-sector directories. He 
also allowed the various directories to use 
the same system files by allocating them to 
point to the same _ space in all the 
directories. The only draw-backs I saw in 
the program was the fact that when you 
Changed directories, that you were forced to 
lose access to the partition’s main directory, 
because you cannot assign a_ different 
directory to a different logical drive. The 
second draw-back was that each directory 
maintained its own allocation table, which, 
when you changed directories, were copied 
to each of the other directories at total of 6 
times apiece (to ensure safe transfer). This 
slows down switching between directories on 
the order of a few seconds. Obviously, 
another programmer will always seem to 
think they know a “better” way of doing 
things (why should he and I be exceptions?), 
but I think that the directory swap could 
have been made instantaneous (and easier 
all-around) if only ONE allocation table was 
maintained. After all, it’s easy enough to 
test for, because it is at sector offset 0 from 
the start of the directory. This way there 
would be absolutely no need to copy the 
table between directories to ensure that they 
contain the same allocation information. Of 
course, this is at a cost of losing the ability 
of giving each directory a unique name. 


I had considered all these options when I 
began developing my SubDirectory structure, 
but had abandoned them. First of all, I 
wanted to make a directory independent of 
the logical drive it actually resides on. 
Although you can assign the "parent" 
directory’s logical drive to a "child" 
directory, you can just as easily assign it to 


Vol. 5 No. 11 Page 12 


a completely different logical drive number. 
Further, I wanted to provide the user with 
the ability to utilize SubDirectories on 
floppy disks as well, where it is a useful 
application. My idea was to allow the user 
to be able to group files together in any 
way they choose, although it is a good 
thought to group them by functions, such as 
utilities, support ffiles, etc. Secondly, 
sometimes an application, such as a C 
language compiler, which would be placed 
into one SubDirectory, but it would need to 
have support files, such as_ another 
SuBdirectory to store source files, and 
perhaps another to contain header files. 
Ideally, such support directories would be 
child directories of the C directory. In fact, 
this is exactly what I have done on my own 
system. I have a C directory which contains 
my C language compiler, optimizer, and 
support utilities. Within that, I have another 
SubDirectory which is called SOURCE, for 
source files, and another called HEADERS, 
for header files. This is something you could 
not do if you locked directories within the 
confines of the physical directory cylinder. 
Further, with my structure, you are not 
limited to the number of SubDirectories that 
can be stored on a disk or a hard disk 
partition. Even further, you can. stack 
directories one within the other to have 
virtually inexhaustible file space (of course 
I say "virtually" because one is always 
limited by free disk space itself). 


The method I use is fairly simple in that a 
SubDirectory can only be as long as the 
main (root) directory (differing here could 
cause serious problems). The SubDirectory is 
just a normal file that has a protection level 
of "no access". This helps prevent people 
from accidentally removing or purging them 
(my UNREMOVE utility is include to help 
you recover a SubDirectory if you in fact 
do accidentally remove one). The first sector 
of the file, which would normally contain 
the allocation table, instead maintains the 
directory level (tree branch location) of the 
SubDirectory. This is possible because each 
SubDirectory ALWAYS uses_ the_ root 
directory’s allocation table. This keeps 
things on a sane level, and prevents constant 
copying back and forth, which would be an 
extremely exhausting task if quite a number 
of SubDirectories are located at various 
levels on a disk or within a hard disk 
partition. My method ~= allows _ instant 
transitions between directories. 


I had thought long and hard about 
including system file support between 
directories, but if for some reason a person 
chose to purge all the ffiles in a 
SubDirectory, and they therefore purged the 
System files as well, then their allocation 
Space is lost, even though they are still 
recognized as viable directory entries by 
Other directories. Therefore the only logical 
alternative was to abandon such an 
approach. 


Of course, my own approach is not without 
its traps as well. For example, you would 
NEVER want to back up the SubDirectory 
files themselves; only their non-SubDirectory 
contents. If you backed up a SubDirectory 
file (a file with a /DIR extension), and then 
afterward changed the contents of the 
SubDirectory, and then restored’ the 
SubDirectory file back from where it was 
backed up to, it would regain its original 
face, and any changes would be lost, not to 
mention that the main allocation table 
would suffer. Therefore a rule of thumb is 
to =never= back up /DIR files, and always 
back up the contents of SubDirectories to 
their:own backup disks. This is actually not 
a complicated process (although I may make 
it sound that way). I cheat by using JCL 
files to maintain things on a safe level. If 
you obtain the Model 4 £SubDirectory 
Utilities and want to know how I do it, I'll 
Share that with you in this column. 


SPELLING ERRORS 

I recently got a complaint from a user who 
had purchased the SuperSCRIPSIT Spelling 
Verifier from CN80 for his Model III, 
running under TRSDOS 1.3. He _ reported 
that it worked flawlessly, until it came to 
the last spelling error in the document file. 
If he selected SKIP, the computer would 
reboot. He got around this problem by 
selecting CORRECT, and _ then _ pressing 
ENTER. This had me going batty, until I 
discovered that SuperSCRIPSIT Spelling 
Checker that Radio Shack sold also did the 
very same thing! It seems that there is a 
problem in SuperSCRIPSIT version 1.3.0 
when it is run under TRSDOS 1.3. It does 
not crop up under other DOSes. But this 
kind of bug-a-boo can almost be expected 
from SS _ 1.3.0. Previously, people had 
reported so many bugs in SS 1.3.0 that they 
went back to using version 1.2.8, which had 
less bugs. 


Vol. 5 No. 11 Page 13 


The spelling verifier works fine under 
previous versions of SS, and under other 
DOSes, such as LDOS. In this case, the error 
is a combination of SS 1.3.0 and TRSDOS 
1.3, but not in the spelling verifier itself. 
Therefore, the only suggestion I can make is 
for the user who insists on using SS 1.3.0 
and TRSDOS 1.3 (while testing the error, I 
really began to realize exactly how 
incredibly slow TRSDOS 1.3 was), then if 
they are to do any spelling checking, either 
with the R/S spelling checker, or with my 
spelling verifier, that they should place a 
weird word at the end of the document that 
the speller will find as in error, and the 
user should select CORRECT and then press 
ENTER, to prevent a reboot. 


TESTING FOR HI-RES 

Because the RADIO SHACK hi-res board 
and the MicroLabs board have a couple of 
differences, I have been asked by a couple 
of programmers how one can detect the 
differences between them, and how a person 
can write a program that will work with 
them both without having to write separate 
programs to do so. Well, the method I use is 
based upon the work of David Miller, of 
POSTMASTER fame. This same _ principle 
routine as outlined here is what I am using 
in my own programs. This is machine code, 
so skip the listing if you want and read the 
discussion following it: 


X EQU 80H 

Y EQU 81H 
DATA EQU 82H 
OPTN EQU 83H 
RSMIX EQU 8EH 


SINITHR: 
LD A,11110000B 
OUT (OPTN),A 
XOR A 
OUT (RSMIX),A 
LD CX 
OUT (C),A 
INC C 
OUT (C),A 
INC C 
CALL INITSUB 
RET NZ 
LD A,640/8+1 
OUT (X),A 
XOR A 
CALL INITSUB 
LD A,I<! 
RET Z 


XOR A 
RET 


INITSUB: 
IN B,C) 
OUT (C),A 
IN A,(C) 
OR A 
RET NZ 
DEC A 
OUT (C),A 
IN A,(C) 
OUT (C),B 
INC A 
RET 


We use this routine by simply inserting a 
CALL $INITHR in our program, usually 
toward the start. If it returns with the NZ 
flag, then a hi-res board is not installed. If 
it returns with the Z flag set, then register 
A contains the value to be merged with 
hi-res commands to accommodate both R/S 
and M/L boards. The method is simple, and 
can even be done from BASIC. What we 
have to do is first see if a hi-res board is 
present, and if so, we have to derive a flag 
to make the different board compatible. 


The R/S and M/L boards differ in 2 major 
areas: the use of bit | of the options register 
(OPTN), and the size of the hi-res memory. 
On the R/S board, bit 1 of the options 
register is used to enable video wait states. 
By setting this bit, snow that would 
Otherwise be seen on the screen will be 
eliminated during hi-res screen updates. 
However, bit 1 of this register is used by 
the M/L board to allow mixed screens, 
allowing BOTH the hi-res screen and the 
normal screen to be displayed at the =same= 
time (the R/S board uses bit 0 of port 8EH 
for this feature. The second major 
difference is in the size of the hi-res screen 
buffer. The R/S board uses a full 32K RAM 
buffer (built into the board), which allows 
an address range of 128 x 256 bytes (this 
translates to 1024 x 256 screen dots). The 
M/L board, on the other hand, only has a 
20K RAM buffer, and allowing us _ to 
address only 80 x 240 bytes (640 x 240 
screen dots). 


We first test the hi-res screen address at 0,0. 
If nothing can be altered there, then it is 
assumed that no hi-res board is there. If a 
board is detected, then we test the 8lst byte 
column of the board (horizontal bits 640 


Vol. 5 No. 11 Page 14 


through 647). If something can be altered 
there, then an R/S board has been detected, 
otherwise we know it is a M/L board. 


The value returned when the Z flag return 
State is obtained, is a mask to apply to all 
commands being sent out to the options 
register. We can stuff this return value into 
a routine that will execute out command. 
For example, whenever we wish to send a 
command to the hi-res board, we want to be 
Sure that the proper bit 1 state is set for 
whatever board is installed. We could do 
this simply enough by stuffing the returned 
value into our command _ routine. For 
example, if we stuffed the return code into 
an address called RSMIX, we could execute 
a hi-res option command be setting register 
A up for the desired options, and then call 
a command I call HRCMD: 


HRCMD OR $-$ 

RSWAIT EQU $-1 
OUT (OPTN),A 
RET 


This function is very basic. What happens is 
that the bit indicating the presence or 
non-presence of a R/S board is merged into 
the command, and then sent out to the 
options register. I have _ seen_ so-called 
"expert" programmers who will litter their 
programs with individual port writes, rather 
than call a simple subroutine, "for the sake 
of efficiency". Well, that efficiency goes out 
the window if you wrote your fast code for 
one board or the other, and someone who 
has the “other" board must go through a 
heck of a lot of work into order to patch 
the program to work with their board, if 
there is enough room to do the patching. 


MOUSE PROGRAMMING 

While I’m in a programming mood, I’d like 
to pass on a hint about how to write smooth 
mouse interfacing into a machine language 
program. One programmer recently 
complained that when they read the mouse 
Status, to check on a button press, that they 
would wait until the button is _ released 
before performing a selected action, but this 
causes the cursor to suddenly "jump" to 
another location on the screen, because 
while the button is being held down, the 
user may still be moving the mouse. 


The way that I eliminated this problem was 
to save the X and Y coordinates once a 


button has first been detected as being 
pressed. I then wait until the button is 
release, and then reset the mouse coordinates 
to the position the mouse was at when the 
button was initially pressed. For example, 
following is a simple machine language 
function that will perform such a task. It 
returns NZ if a button (any of the three 
possible) has been pressed. Z is returned if 
no button was pressed. By checking for a 
NZ state on return, the programmer can 
take appropriate action: 


STSTMSE: 
LD B,]1 
SVC 120 
AND I11B 
RET Z 
PUSH AF 
PUSH HL 
PUSH DE 

TSTLP: 

LD B,l 

SVC 120 
AND I11B 
JR NZ,TSTLP 
POP DE 

POP HL 

LD B,2 

SVC 120 

POP AF 

RET 


What happens here is very simple. We first 
get the status of the mouse, which returns 
the bit mask for the buttons, as well as the 
X and Y coordinates in registers HL and 
DE respectively. If a button is not pressed, 
then a return is made to the caller with Z 
set. Otherwise registers AF, HL, and DE are 
pushed onto the program stack. We then loop 
around the TSTLP area and wait until no 
buttons are pressed. Once all buttons are 
released, the saved X and Y coordinates are 
popped off the stack, the mouse cursor 
position is reset to where it was when the 
button was first pushed, then the original 
button status is obtained and returned to 
the caller with NZ set. 


It is amazing how much_ smoother a 
mouse-driven program works with such a 
routine installed. It also appears to operate 
much more professionally. | 


UNDOCUMENTED SL-90 FEATURE 
The excellent Seikosha SL-90+ 24-pin printer 
which CN80 sells has a really handy 


Vol. 5 No. 11 Page 15 


undocumented feature, I recently discovered 
by accident. As documented, you’ can 
activate certain special features when you 
turn the printer on, by holding down a 
front panel button when power is applied. 
For example, by holding the LF _ button 
down when you turn it on, the printer will 
go into a draft-mode self-test. To do a 
letter-quality self-test, hold both the LF and 
the ON-LINE buttons down when you turn 
it on. Another handy feature is holding 
down the FF button when you turn it on. 
This activates the hex dump mode. A person 
developing software to drive that printer (or 
for any other printer that you do not have 
readily at hand) can use this feature to see 
if the codes you intend to have sent out are 
in fact what you wanted, and in the order 
you desire. 


Recently when I was trying to do a letter 
quality self-test, one of my fingers slipped 
off the LF button, so that I was only 
pressing the ON-LINE button when I 
applied power. To my surprise, a printer 
switch display was printed, showing me the 
Current power-on states of the option 
switches (concealed in the well of the 
printer beneath a black slide-off panel). 
Gee, what a great way to see what options 
are set without digging out my pen-light? 


DISK I/O AND BANKS 

While developing my DISKOPT utility, it 
brought to mind a little known fact that I 
would like to pass along to _ other 
programmers. Although it would be really 
nice if we could load an extended memory 
bank, and read disk sectors directly to it, 
we cannot because when device I/O is done, 
the DOS temporarily installs bank 0O (the 
normal upper 32K of memory on a Model 4), 
executes the I/O function, and_ then 
re-installs the original bank before returning 
to the calling routine. The reason this is 
done is so that device drivers that may be 
located in upper memory can be accessed, 
since when an alternate bank is active, 
anything stored in upper memory is hidden, 
the system would crash if you tried to 
access such a hidden driver. So you can see 
the necessity of such a "bother". 


The way around it is to buffer the block of 
data is be transferred to or from the disk. 
To read a sector to an extended bank, you 
would activate the selected bank, read the 
disk sector into a temporary buffer in lower 


memory (usually beginning at addresses 
x’3000’ through x’7FOO’ -- this can be lower, 
but I won’t get into it here), and then copy 
it to the desired location in the bank 
memory. Of course, there =is= an incredibly 
easy solution to this, by which you can 
directly read from/write to disk and banked 
memory if the device driver is in low 
memory, but the solution will be for those 
of you who are curious enough and creative 
enough to figure it out. 


STORE VS MEMORY 

By the way, if another know-it-all tries to 
"correct" me again be stating that I =should= 
say STORE instead of computer memory, or 
RAM, I won’t be responsible for my actions 
(this bout has been going on with several 
people and me since 1987). STORE is a slang 
word used in the main-frame world to 
generally describe the computer memory, 
Shortened from STORAGE, which is also 
another description of RAM and memory, 
but more generally of external storage 
devices, which was an offshoot of the term 
MASS STORAGE, which referred _ to 
magnetic tapes, hard disks, disk drives, and 
Other storage mediums. In a computer 
dictionary, STORE is described as 1) To 
transfer an element of information to a 
device from which the unaltered 
information can be obtained at a later date. 
2) To retain data in a device from which it 
can be obtained at a later time. 3) The 
British term for storage. 


Now that we all know what it means, maybe 
we can lay this 5-year feud to rest (fat 
chance). 


END OF FILE POINTING 

Someone recently contacted me and asked 
how one could, from machine language, 
position a disk file I/O pointer to the end 
of a file, so that additional sequential data 
can be tacked.on. Well, the solution is easy 
Or hard, depending upon how that file was 
previously maintained. 


The easy solution is to open the file and 
then execute an @EOF supervisory (SVC) 
call. This will point the I/O pointer for that 
file to the position one byte beyond the last 
byte written to the file. 


This method can run into trouble if an "end 
of file" byte is tacked onto the end of a file 
when it is closed. This is what happens with 


Vol. 5 No. 11 Page 16 


SCRIPT files (a null byte is added to the 
end), and TED (a X’1A’ byte is added to the 
end). Other programs often do the same 
general thing (all text files in the MS-DOS 
world have an X’1A’ end of file byte). Even 
though you could go ahead and append 
additional sequential information, if you 
load the file into the program. that 
originally wrote it, it will stop at the end of 
file byte, so any additional information is 
lost. How do you get around that? Easy. If 
you know that the file has an end of file 
byte tacked onto it, you can "backspace" the 
I/O pointer by temporarily setting the 
logical record length of the file to 1, and 
executing a @BKSP SVC. For example, the 
following function can be _ called _ to 
backspace a file with any logical record 
length from 1 to 256 by one byte (NOTE: 
DE points to an OPEN file control block): 


PEOF: 
SVC 65 
PUSH HL 
PUSH BC 
LD HL,9 
ADD HL,DE 
LD C(HL) 
LD (HL),1 
SVC 61 
LD (HL),C 
POP BC 
POP HL 
RET 


What we have done is first executed the 
@PEOF SVC (65), then saved the current 
logical record length to register C, set the 
LRL to 1, execute the @BKSP SVC (61) to 
back up the one byte, and then reset to 
actual LRL. 


I have seen a number of applications that 
do full-sector I/O in order to speed up the 
disk accesses tremendously, but the 
programmer does not maintain the end of 
file offset byte. Direct full-sector I/O is 
much faster because it does not perform 
system calls except when a full sector’s 
worth of data is stored in memory. It is 
easiest to do this when the I/O buffer is on 
a "page" boundary. A page is an individual 
256-byte block of memory that has a null 
byte offset. Thus the address 3400H is on a 
page boundary because the last 2 digits, the 
page offset byte, is null, thus pointing to 
the very start of page 34H. Although using 
the @PUT SVC is much shorter, it is also 


=much= slower than using the following 
small function (NOTE: DE points to the file 
control block, the byte to be sent is in 
register A, HL is altered, and ERROR is a 
general error processing function the author 
must write): 


PUTBYT: 
LD HL, BUFFER 
LD (HL),A 
INC L 
CALL Z,WRSEC 
LD (PUTBYT+1),HL 
RET 


WRSEC SVC 75 
RET Z 
JP ERROR 


Of course, we must be able to close the file, 
and ensuring that any data stored within 
the buffer is sent, if present. A lot of 
programmers go only this far. But by just 
adding a little more code, they can also add 
an end of file byte offset during the file 
closing process (NOTE: DE points to the file 
control block): 


CLOSE: 
LD HL,5 
ADD HL,DE 
LD A,(PUTBYT#1) 
LD (HL),A 
LD HL,BUFFER 
OR A 


CALL NZ,WRSEC 
SVC 60 
RET 


What we did here was to point HL to the 
EOF offset byte storage address within the 
file control block pointed to by DE. The A 
register was then loaded with the offset 
pointer for the next storage location within 
BUFFER. This was stuffed into the FCB+5 
location. We then checked if A contained a 
non-zero value. If it does, then new data has 
been written to the buffer which has yet to 
be sent to the disk file. Thus we call the 
write sector routine if this is the _ case. 
Finally we execute a @CLOSE SVC, which 
closes the file. You now have a super-fast 
disk writing function. You also have a 
means of appending sequential data to the 
end of a file, to include one which has an 
end of file byte. 


Vol. 5 No. 11 Page 17 


Would you believe that a couple of weeks 
ago I was desperate to find things to write 
about? Happy Computing! 

-David Goben 


DISKOPT UTILITY Package 

A disk optimizer and file defragmenter for 
hard drives and floppy disk drives. 

- Order from CN80. -- $ 29.95 plus $ 3 S&H. 


CHRISTMAS HIGH RESOLUTION 
PICTURES COMBINED WITH CHRISTMAS 
MUSIC 

or 

Could this be the beginning of Multi-media 
on the TRS-80s? 

by the CN80 Staff 


Christmas is only a few weeks away and 
here is a beautiful Christmas card idea for 
your TRS-80 friends. 


Sometime this past summer Art McAninch 
our Model I expert and guru, noticed a 
group of programs on Compuserve that 
utilized the Symphony 90 music library and 
high resolution pictures. He kindly sent us a 
copy of this group of programs prepared by 
Robert W. Via, who is a CN80 subscriber. 


The following are excerpts from Mr. Via’s 
readme/now file on the disk. 


XMAS91 Play and See 


This program requires the Symphony 90 
Music Board and the PLAY/CMD Program 
by David Goben. Other requirements include 
at least 128K of memory to take advantage 
of the fast graphics loading program, and of 
course, a high resolution graphics board. 


Running the program is possible with the 
64K memory using SAVLOAD and Orchestra 
90 programs, but the SYMF999/JCL file will 
need rewriting and the /SYM files changed 
to /ORC. This program is a reconfiguration 
of Steve Jerkins’ version placed in the 
Compuserve LDOS library in 1990 for Model 
III users. This version is for the Model 4, 
and the music programs have been altered to 
avoid screen. print over the _- graphics 
displays. 


The Music and graphics program will show 8 
scenes and play 8 Tchaikovsky selections 
from The Nutcracker. Total time is about 24 
minutes. 


To run the program unaltered, type DO 
SYMF999/ICL (ENTER) and the JCL file 
will do all the work. 


The FGCLS/CMD and FGLOAD/CMD 
programs were obtained from the File 
Cabinet (c/o Computer News 80 High 
Resolution Catalog Volume MD4HRZO1) and 
were written by Paul Bradshaw. 


The FGHR/DOC file is included if your 
interested in the features of these two 
programs. 


Have a MERRY CHRISTMAS and enjoy! 
-Robert W. Via 


Robert certainly did a great job with this 
innovation of combining hi-res pictures with 
background music. We only wish that we 
had received a copy of his efforts last 
November so we could have shared it with 
our readers. But you can have a copy of 
these programs (2 single-sided disks) by 
sending the customary $2 per disk to cover 
postage and handling and we will send you 
a set. 


What this collection of programs 
demonstrates also, is that you could have 
many combinations of high _ resolution 
pictures shown on the screen with any 
variety of Symphony 90 music playing in 
the background. How about the 1812 
Overture with a pictures from Gary 
Shanafelt’s Civil war collection, or the 
Battle Hymn of the Republic, these and 
Other ideas are endless. 


There has been a lot of hype in the IBM 
clone world about presentation programs. 
That is the sales gimmick tool where you 
build flash cards on the screen with text 
about your product, and accompany it with 
background music. Hopefully the prospect 
does not get bored looking at your ad hype 
as it flashes up on the screen, because you 
are flooding him with background music to 
smooth the way for your pitch. Does this 
give you any additional ideas? You might 
not. want to lug a model 4 around to your 
prospects office, a model 4P might do the 
trick though. But how about a model 4 set 


Vol. 5 No. 11 Page 18 


up in your store or office to display your 
sales pitch? 


We would be interested in your 
combinations and would gladly make them 
available to our readers. Maybe Robert Via 
has come up with a new offering for this 
year? Anyway, we are going to ask him. 
-CN80 


MDRAW, A Mouser’s Dream 
by Dale Hill 


I had an early copy of MDRAW and had 
actually ran the program, but that was 
before my mouse and long before Gary 
Shanafelt started messing around with it. 
With Gary’s newest version of MDRAW, 4.4, 
the program iS a mouser’s bomb shell. 
Frankly, I like it, granted the program has 
some flaws, but the pluses far exceed the 
minuses. I have had the opportunity to use 
the program for the last few months, and 
when it comes to one sheet flyers, MDRAW 
and my Model 4P is first choice over the 
MAC Plus I use at my office. 


The new version of MDRAW, on 128K 
machines, sports three different screens: two 
working screens and a hidden screen. Thus, 
while making a flyer I can cut and paste 
off of one screen while building the 
document on the other. After every 
successful change, I can save my working 
screen, just in case I foul up. The main two 
Screens are toggled with the @ (each) key, 
while the third screen can be saved to, by 
using the W key. 


With the help of some helpful computerists, 
I have personally prepared three 180K 
diskettes full of icons. Most of these icons 
are the same ones that can be found in the 
CN-80, Icon Catalog used by Post Master, 
Since the icons are all basically derived 
from a huge MS-DOS base. I use MDRAW to 
make fancy posters, greeting cards and 
professional looking awards. 


One of the real problems with MDRAW is 
its lack of any other support for fonts other 
than the copyrighted DOTWRITER fonts. 
Before those fonts became unavailable to the 


general public, I purchased several diskettes 
full of the ones that I thought I would ever 
need. But don’t let that scare you, not at 
all; even with Dotwriter fonts, I find myself 
having to build and move letters on screen, 
which is easy with Gary’s enhancements. 


I find with the mouse that I can make all 
kinds of fonts fairly quickly, and if you 
will save your font screens or combine your 
efforts, you can surely come up with lots of 
letters, words and sentences that you like on 
saved screens. With the (G) get function, the 
user can capture a portion of one screen and 
quickly transfer it to another screen. After 
a screen is built, you can actually move 
things around the screen with the (G) get 
function and delete the old area by using 
the (C) option. The use of the different 
screen idea is great, and to Gary, I must 
click my mouse. The mouse is an integral 
and vital part of the MDRAW. 


A Zoom mode has been included as well, 
and once in it, the mouse becomes hard to 
control, but the arrow keys are quite 
adequate moving around the screen and 
using the F keys to turn off or on the 
pixels. So, what can you do with MDRAW. 
Well, a whole heck of a lot. 


Dividing the screen up into 4 parts, I can 
make cards that have pictures on all pages, 
not just the outside and inside page as Print 
Shop does. (Incider A+ features an article in 
the September issue explaining how to do 
this on an Apple and a program called 
Magic Paint.) With MDRAW it is easy. First 
make your front page on the lower right 
hand fourth of the screen. Then make your 
last page on the left, lower level quarter. 
Then by hitting (1) for inverting and (M) 
for mirror, the lower screen switches to the 
top part of the screen. Don’t worry about it. 
Now make your other two quarters, and you 
have your card ready to print. 


My suggestion is that you have got to have 
David Goben’s High Res Utilities to be 
successful with MDRAW cards. When you 
think you have the card ready, Negate it in 
MDRAW or FLIP it using David’s utilities. 
Now we are ready to print. Using the 
(Double) parameter of the HRFXPRT/CMD, 
the card prints out perfectly - ready to fold 
and to be mailed. Each face of the card will 
have a picture staring you in the face. 


Vol. 5 No. 11 Page 19 


1/O-Bus Interface 


Another thing that I use MDRAW for is 
making very professional posters and awards 
using thermographic powders. When printed 
out, a fresh, dot-matrix printing will let the 
powders stick to the ink. When placed in the 
300 degree oven for about 30 seconds, you 
have a, raised-lettered award. Impressive, 
impressive. (FAUST Thermographic Supplies, 
457 E First Ave., Roselle, Ny. 07203) 


Right now, I am experimenting on making 
T-SHIRT transfers with MDRAW. (see 
leading article on page 2) MDRAW works 
perfectly, with its ability to Mirror the 
screen and then print it out on the transfer 
paper. After that, the printout can be 
colored with a crayons. I now have a t-shirt 
that displays a green-screened Model 4P that 
says "I do it on a Model 4P Personal 
Computer". With only 4 papers per package, 
you DO NOT want to make a mistake; and I 
am yet to be satisfied with my output. 
Print’n Wear works on any dot matrix 
printer and needs to be ironed on the 
t-shirt. The transfer paper can be purchased 
as PRINT’n Wear from FOTO-WEAR INC. 
(908-205-6549) 


I appreciate MDRAW because, with it, I 
have realized how valuable a high res 
drawing program can be. MDRAW is limited, 
and if I were going to buy a commercial 
program, I would want to see all of the 
enhancements that this program has with 
several more: (1) The ability to rotate, 
magnify, and shrink objects on screen. (2) 
The availability of fonts where MDRAW at 
this time is limited. (3) The ability to print 
out both vertically and horizontally. The 
latter problem is obvious, since MDRAW is 
useless when trying to make a vertical Post 
Master-like poster. (Post Master has 
MIRRORING capability, but simply does not 
work well enough for FOTO-WEAR.) 
MDRAW version 4.44 GET it. TRY it. 
MOUSE it! 

-Dale Hill 


[For MDRAW II VERSION 4.4 Order File 
Cabinet Disk #M4HR2Z22] 









Four External 
Floppy Drives 
using the 





CNN NW 


CNS 
v 





Open Forum 


Q: I have a TRS-80 Model 4D, orginally 
64K RAM. I use Allwrite for word 
processing and label making operation, even 
though Allwrite is an extinct animal as far 
as its maker is concerned. Back when 
Anitec was advertising in Computer News 
80, I purchased and _ installed their 
MegaMemory board with 2 meg of 
additional memory. I also purchased 
LeScript, but haven’t used it much, since I 
was already fairly familiar with Allwrite 
and, in many respects, I consider Allwrite to 
be more versatile. 


I find that when 32,323 characters have 
been put in memory, using Allwrite, the 
memory will accept no more. What does the 
2 meg of added memory do for me, except 
enable me to have a large memdisk? Is there 
a "patch" to Allwrite that would allow the 
extra memory to be used? 

W. E. H. Humboldt, TN 


A: We are not aware of a patch for 
Allwrite, but if there is one we are sure 
that one of the Allwrite users out there will 
let us know. 


Also we are sure to hear from the many 
who think LeScript is the best word 
processor out. But like anything else, 
everyone has their own opinion about 
application programs. We for example don’t 
use Allwrite or LeScript, preferring a 
different (here un-named to save being 
attacked) word processor. 


If you use LeScript you need all that 
memory to write very large documents. The 
very reason Anitek developed the additional 
memory was not to compliment the Model 4, 
as much as to allow their LeScript program 
to compete with other word processing 
programs that did not require such huge 
memory capacity. 


Aside from the BCX spreedsheet program 
that does use the extra memory if you have 
it installed, to date we know of no other 
programs that require such huge storage. 
And you are right it does give you a large 
capacity MEMDISK, which if you are a 
programmer would be an asset. Otherwise it 
is memory that has no other value, in our 
Opinion of course. 


Vol. 5 No. 11 Page 20 


We will wait to receive counter opinions and 
pass them along. We too, can always change 
our minds if someone will present a valid 
argument for the additional memory. -CN80 


Q: I have a Radio Shack DMP-200 printer, 
but the print head has gone bad and one 
has been on order from Radio Shack for 
several months and they don’t seem to be 
able to get it. Do you know of a source for 
a print head for the DMP-200. 


A: A company named Northstar 
Matrix-Serv, has informed us that they will 
repair any print head for any printer that 
was ever made. They also will sell the 
complete print head for any machine. As 
most Radio Shack printers were 
manufactured by one of the name brand 
printer companies, Northstar can_ cross 
reference the RS Model number to the 
original manufacturer to supply the print 
head. For example DWP-410 was 
manufactured by Richo, DMP139 series by 
Seikosha (the reason we carry the Seikosha 
line). We have been fortunate ourselves not 
to have to purchase from Northstar, but we 
have talked _— several times to their 
management and have recommended them to 
many users. So far we have not heard from 
those users that they could not get what 
they needed. -CN80 


Contact: 


Northstar Matrix-Serv 
7940 Ranchers Road 
Minneapolis, MN 55432 


1-800-969-009 or (612) 785-1075 


Q: Could you sell me a printer driver for 
Radio Shack DMP-2100P printer for use on 
IBM Compatable computer 386DX/33, 3.5HD 
and 5.25HD. 

-E. D. S. Reynoldsburg, OH 


A: Print drivers are not made for printers, 
they are programmed into specific 
application programs for use with various 
printers. For example Word Perfect, if it did 


not have a print driver for a particular 
printer listed in its software you would 
have to contact the producers of Word 
Perfect to see if they had a driver or would 
write a driver for your needs. Chances are 
they would refuse to write you one if your 
printer was not one of the popular ones in 
use. The DMP-2100P being from the era that 
Radio Shack tried to make all their printers 
so they would not work on any thing other 
than a Radio Shack computer we doubt that 
you will be able to use it with the 
IBM-clone at all, even to just dump a screen 
to the printer. 


We would suggest that you think of 
updating to a newer printer that like the 
Seikosha SP-2400 nine pin, or SL-90 24 pin 
printer which have both the ability to work 
with your TRS-80 and IBM computer. You 
could connect them to both computers with 
an A-B switch and have one printer that 
would print from either computer. -CN80 


Q: WOW! Last week I installed my 
MicroLabs Hi-Res board using your PBC 
extension to clear the Anitek Megamem 
board and booted up. It’s unbelievable that 
my 4P can produce this level of display 
quality. I’m totally satisfied with the board, 
the supplied MicroLab software and most 
especially with the PostMaster dis and 
David Goben’s utilities. As you can see from 
the enclosed order, I’ve been bitten by the 
Hi-Res bug. I’ve also ordered about half of 
the MicroLabs applications and games. I 
can’t wait. 


I also just received the font chip for my 
SL-90 printer that you had ordered for me. 
It’s also installed and working perfectly. 
Thank you for allowing me to upgrade. The 
ex-owner of this printer wasn’t aware that 
the fonts chip existed or she says that she 
wouldn’t have bought her laser printer! 


You might also notice that I’ve ordered 
more memory and PAL chips. This is 
because I’ve picked up a third Model 4 
computer. It has been in the attic of a 
friend’s nephew’s house for the last 6 years. 
After vacuuming out the dead pill bugs and 
sunflower seeds, it booted up and the drives 
work fine. 


Vol. 5 No. 11 Page 21 


The only problem is the characters aligned 
with the left edge are being clipped in half 
vertically. Is this a maladjustment of the 
CRT gun or is a video chip the problem. I 
can live with the problem if necessary since 
the new compute is being used to teach 
fellow instructors the basics of word and 
data processing but if possible I can do some 
repairs. 

-M. G. Napa, CA 


A: To clarify the mention of the SL-90 
upgrade fonts, this subscriber purchased the 
SL-90 used from a friend, but it did not 
have the additional 9 fonts ROM chip in it, 
which we supplied him with. All the SL-90 
printers now have the additional Fonts 
installed at the factory and there is no 
additional upgrade to be concerned with. 


It is very hard to diagnose your TV problem 
without being able to check out the CRT 
control board. But if you have tried 
adjusting the vertical, horizontal hold and 
other adjustments on the board and checked 
the CRT itself and have not corrected the 
problem, then you could have a_ bad 
potentiometer on the control board, or one 
that has a bad solder joint. As in our last 
issue we wrote that there are no quick fixes 
because your computer is made up of several 
systems all working in conjunction with 
each other. 


Perhaps some of our more’ experienced 
TV hackers can send us some suggestions on 
where to locate the more common causes to 
the problem you describe. -CN80 


Q: The Seikosha SL-90 printer I recently 
purchased from CN80 is working perfectly 
in all respects except one. I am not able to 
get all tab stops to line up [using LeScript] 
vertically when printing in the 
proportional-space mode, and printed lines 
do not justify right when calling for 
Simultaneous left and right justification. 
These problems do not occur when printing 
mono-spaced. 


I am using a Model 4P computer with 
LS-DOS 6.3 and LeScript 1.90 Word Processor 
(same as LeScript 2.0 but without the 
spelling dictionary). LeScript printer driver 


K165 handles all proportional printing tasks 
beautifully except for the two _ problems 
mentioned above. Varing character density 
(width) or font setting does not help. 


The LeScript manual states that on 
proportional-space printers LeScript precisely 
calculates tab distances for each tab in each 
line to ensure that all tab stops line up 
down the page. However, this does not seem 
to be happening. 


I would sincerely appreciate any help or 
advice you may be able to give me with 
respect to solving the tab printing and 
justification problems. Thanks in advance 
for any assistance you may be able to 
provide. 

R. M. J. Westboro, MA 


A: If you have been following the recent 
discussions of the difference between the 
new 24 pin printers and the older 9 pin 
printers in CN80, you will recognize that 
there is a great amount of difference 
between how the 24 pin printer works over 
the nine pin. As demostated in the need for 
David Goben’s POSTMASTER24 program to 
use David Miller’s PostMaster program with 
the 24 pin printers. 


Knowing that the LeScript program has not 
been updated for several years and that 
update was made before 24 pin printers 
became popular or affordable, we suspect 
that the print drivers in lLeScript were 
written to conform to the them standard 9 
pin printers. 


The only thing that we can suggest is that 
you contact Peter Ray - according to his 
answering machine he is still in business for 
one hour three times a week? (407) 259-9397. 
And see if he will produce a print driver 
for LeScript that will be compatible with 
todays 24 pin printer standards. 


As in the question above all print drivers 
for application programs are part of each 
individual application program. Print drivers 
do not come with any printers, printers are 
manufactured with a standard set of 
instructions that it understands when 
received from the computer. These standard 
instructions are found in you _ printer 
manual and are what the programmer uses 
to place in his program. -CN80 


Vol. 5 No. 11 Page 22 


LTR: Because it was recently mentioned in 
CN80, a few of your readers know that 
Apparat released Version 2.5 of NEWDOS-80 
for use with the Model 3 with a hard drive. 
I doubt that many know, however, that they 
also released a Model IND80 version 2.5 for 
those who used the RS 5 MB hard drive 
with the Model 1. If you will recall, the 
early RS 5 MB hard disk also had a Model 1 
adapter to adapt the SO line drive bus to 
the 40 line bus in the Model 1. I was one of 
their Beta testers for the Model 1 version of 
ND80-2.5. As with the Model 3. version, 
installation was tedious with a complex 
Pdrive syntax. 


I think that one of the things that hurt 
Apparat was their unwillingness to write an 
upwardly compatible DOS for the Model 4. 
Furthermore, LDOS and its offspring were 
simpler to use in addition to being disk 
compatible between the Models 1, 3 and 4. 


My Model One went to my daughter a 
number of years ago and is now providing 
faithful service to a retired school principal. 
Although I use a MS-DOS machine for 95% 
of my computing needs, I still use my old 
Model 4P with the RS 5S MB hard drive for 
some of my favorite programs. 


CN80 remains a valuable periodical to me. 
Keep up the good work. 
-P. H. D. MD, Boise ID 


we ee ee en en Bee ee Be ee Bee ee ee Be i At Bt Rt tt At Mt ttt it ttl 


CLOSEOUT SPECIAL 


INSIDE CP/M 
by David E. Cortesi 


A Guide for Users and Programmers with 
CP M86 and MP/M2 


Brand New in original shrink-wrap. 
$ 6 each, includes shipping and handling. 


We have about a 100 of these books, and to 
make room those that are not sold by Dec. 
Ist are going to the landfill. 


ed ed ed Pe a PP a Pl a Ml Ol PO Pl A OM a A a Pl SO Me Mt ll PO Pl Pt Ph 


Ir MODEL | SERVICE AND REPAIR ull 


Art McAninch - (806) 273-6378 
122 Pecan - Borger TX 79007 


STATMENT/BAS Program Listing Number One by Robert M. Knowles 
For Model 4 Basic 


10 CLS | 

20 ‘PROGRAM TO HELP WITH YOUR BANK STATEMENT 
30 INPUT"ENTER FIRST OUTSTANDING CHECK'";A 

40 WHILE A ’*BEGIN LOOP 
50 INPUT"ENTER NEXT OUTSTANDING CHECK";D 

60 A=A+D 

70 IF D>O THEN WEND "END LOOP 
80 PRINT 

90 SOUND 1,1 

100 INPUT"ENTER CHECK BOOK BALANCE";B 

110 PRINT 

120 C=A+B 

130 PRINT"THIS BALANCE SHOULD AGREE WITH YOUR STATEMENT";C 
140 SOUND 1,1 


MILESGAL/BAS Program Listing Number Two Author Unknown. 


This is a simple type-in program that we have taken from some of the new files destined for the File 
Cabinet Collection. The program calculates the miles per gallon for any length of time you select. 

lf you make a mistake entering your data the program states "?Redo from start" it is referring to 
re-enter the line requested and not to start all over again. 


10 CLS 

20 A$=STRINGS$(80, 131) 

30 PRINT A$ 

40 PRINT TAB(25)"MPG CALCULATOR BASIC MODEL 4" 

50 : 

100 PRINT A$ ° 

110 PRINT:PRINT:PRINT:PRINT:PRINT 

120 PRINT TAB(28)"PRESS ANY KEY TO CONTINUE" 

130 A$S=INKEY$:IF A$="" THEN 130 

140 CLS 

1000 REM***** GAS****** 

1010 REM RHKKKKKKKKKKKKKPYAT A INITIALIZATION # * 4444 44 ee aH 
1020 M= 1000 

1030 PRINT " ENTER THE INITIAL MILEAGE, DATE OF RECORDING " 
1040 INPUT MO,DO$ 

1050 PRINT “ENTER THE GASOLINE USED (0 WHEN FINISHED) 
1060 FOR | = 1 TOM 

1070 G=O 

1080 INPUT G 

1090 IF G=O THEN 1120 

1100 G1=G1+G 

1110 NEXT | 

1120 PRINT "ENTER ENDING MILEAGE,DATE" 

1130 INPUT M9,D9$ 

1140 REM******* eee eee eKKXDPROCESSING AREAZAAAREAAEAAEKAKER 
1150 M=M9-MO 

1160 C=M/G1 

1170 PRINT 


Cont'd on the next page. 


Vol. 5 No. 11 Page 23 


1180 
1190 
1200 
1210 
1220 
1230 
1240 
1250 
1260 
1270 
1280 


Whe 


PRINT 

PRINT NAKKKKKKEKKEKEKEKERKEKEKKEKEKEKEKRKEKEKEKEEKERKEKE" 
PRINT "FOR THE PERIOD ";DO$;"-";D9$ 

PRINT " MILES DRIVEN:";M 

PRINT " GASOLINE USED:";G1 

PRINT " AVG MILES/GALLON:";C 

PRIN TX 88 EAR AK AERA RE KAKA KEKE KEEKREKKEKEKEKEREKEREEEK" 
REM HHKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKDPROGRAM TERMINATION POINT RAR RAAERAARRRR KKK K 
PRINT 

PRINT 

END 


n you type "RUN" the program will ask you questions and below are typical entries as they would 


appear on the screen. 


ENTER THE INITIAL MILEAGE, DATE OF RECORDING 


? 12 


345,09/10/92 


ENTER THE GASOLINE USED (0 WHEN FINISHED) - note that is a zero. 


? 21 
? 16 
? 18 
? 22 
20 


-note as if you made four separate gasoline purchases. 
-note that is a zero. 


ENTER ENDING MILEAGE, DATE 
? 13456,09/25/92 


KKK 


FOR 


KREKKKKEKEEKEKKKEKKKKEEEKEKEKEKEEEKEKEEKEEKKEER 


THE PERIOD 09/10/92-09/25/92 
MILES DRIVEN: 1111 


GASOLINE USED: 77 
AVG MILES/GALLON: 14.42 


KKK 


KRKEKKKKKKEKEKEKKEEKEKEKREKEKEKKEEKEKEKERKEEKEKE 


MONTHS/BAS Program Listing Number Three Author Unknown 


Here 
child 


is a nice little program that is written like a game, and may be useful in working with your 
ren in learning the number of days in the months. 


100 CLEAR:CLS 


110 
120 
130 
140 
150 
160 
170 
180 
190 
200 
210 
220 
230 


PRINT @ (2,14),"";:;PRINT CHR$(151);STRING$(9, 131); CHR$(171) 
PRINT @ (8,14),"";:PRINT CHR$(149);STRING$(9,32);CHR$(1 70) 
PRINT @ (4,14),"";:PRINT CHR$(149);", MONTHS ";CHR§$(170) 
PRINT @ (5,14),"";:PRINT CHR$(149);STRING$(9,32); CHR$(1 70) 
PRINT @ (6,14),"";:PRINT CHR$(181);STRING$(Q9, 176);CHR$(186) 
PRINT @ (9,4),"";:PRINT "THIRTY days hath SEPTEMBER," 
PRINT @ (10,4),"";:;PRINT "APRIL, JUNE, and NOVEMBER." 
PRINT @ (11,4),"";:PRINT "All the rest have THIRTY-ONE," 
PRINT @ (12,4),"";:;PRINT "But FEBRUARY has TWENTY-EIGHT," 
PRINT @ (13,4),"";:;PRINT "Except on LEAP YEAR, TWENTY-NINE." 
PRINT @ (16,4),"";;PRINT "When the name of a month appears" 
PRINT @ (17,4),"";:PRINT "on the screen, enter the number" 
PRINT @ (18,4),"";:PRINT “of days in that month." 


Cont'd on the next page. 


Vol. 


5 No. 11 Page 24 


240 
250 
260 
270 
280 
290 
300 
310 
320 
330 
340 
350 
360 
370 
380 
400 
410 
420 
430 
440 
450 
460 


GOSUB 550 

CLS 

DATA JANUARY,31 

DATA FEBRUARY,28 

DATA MARCH,31 

DATA APRIL,30 

DATA MAY,31 

DATA JUNE,30 

DATA JULY,31 

DATA AUGUST,31 

DATA SEPTEMBER,30 

DATA OCTOBER,31 

DATA NOVEMBER,30 

DATA DECEMBER, 31 

R=INT(RND(0)* 12+ 1) 

FOR L=1 TO R 

READ S$,C$ 

NEXT L 

CLS 

PRINT @ (5,9),"";:;PRINT "MONTH is ";:PRINT S$ 
PRINT @ (9,9),"";:INPUT "How many days ";D$ 
D=VAL(D$):IF D<28 OR D>31 THEN:PRINT @ (12,9),"";:;PRINT "Use numbers 28 to 31.":PRINT @ 


(13,14),""::;PRINT "Try again.":GOSUB 550:GOTO 430 


470 
480 
490 
500 
910 
520 
530 
540 
950 
560 
570 
580 
990 
600 
610 
620 
630 
640 
650 
660 
670 
680 
690 
700 


Vol. 


IF C$="28" THEN C1$="Twenty-eight" 
IF C$="30" THEN C1$="Thirty" 

IF C$="31" THEN C1$='"Thirty-one" 
IF D$=C$ THEN PRINT @ (12,15),"";;PRINT "CORRECT" ELSE PRINT @ (12,16),"";:;PRINT "WRONG" 
PRINT @ (14,7),"";:;PRINT C1$;" days hath ";S$§;"." 

GOSUB 550 

RESTORE 

GOTO 380 

PRINT @ (20,12),"";:;PRINT "Press any key":PRINT @ (21,10),"";:PRINT "Press <ESC> to end 
A$=INKEY$:IF A$="" THEN GOTO 560 

IF A$=CHR$(27) THEN GOTO 590 

RETURN 

CLS:PRINT @ (9,2),"";:PRINT "Do you want to stop? <Y/N>" 

A$=INKEY$:IF A$="" THEN GOTO 600 

IF A$="y" OR A$="Y" THEN GOTO 640 

IF A$="n" OR A$="N" THEN RETURN 

GOTO 600 

PRINT @ (14,2),"";:;PRINT “Is anyone waiting to play? <Y/N>" 

A$=INKEY$:IF A$="" THEN GOTO 650 
IF A$="y" OR A$="Y" THEN RUN 

IF A$="n" OR A$="N" THEN GOTO 690 
GOTO 650 





END 
Happy Thanksgiving 
From 
All of us at CN80 
5 No. 11 Page 25 


GRADES/BAS Model 3 Basic Program Listing Number Four Author unknown. 


This is a program which operates in Model 3 Basic that will average student grades. 


100 PRINT" STUDENT GRADES" 

110 PRINT" TRS-80 MODEL 3 BASIC" 

130 PRINT:PRINT:GOSUB470 

140 PRINT" ENTER EACH STUDENT BY NAME AND GRADES" 
150 PRINT" IN DATA STATEMENT LINES" 

160 PRINT" BEGINNING WITH LINE 600" 

170 PRINT" EXAMPLE:" 

180 PRINT" SEE SAMPLE LINES 600 THRU 604" 

190 PRINT" NUMBER 999 MUST BE THE LAST NUMBER USED" 
200 PRINT" FOR DATA ENTRY." 

210 PRINT" DATA ’END’ MUST BE THE LAST DATA ENTRY" 
240 PRINT 

250 PRINT" ENTER A ’1’ TO BEGIN" 

270 INPUTS 


280 CLS:N=0:C=0 

285 N1=0:C1=0 

290 PRINT" STUDENT GRADE AVERAGE" 
300 PRINT"NAME";TAB(10)"GRADE(%)" 

310 PRINT 

320 READAS$:IFA$="END"THEN430 

330 PRINTA$;" ": 

340 READB:IFB =999THEN400 

350 PRINTB;" ": 

360 N=N+1 

370 C=B+C 

390 GOTO 340 

400 S1=INT((C/N)+.5):PRINT” AVE=";S1:GOSUB470 
410 C1=S1+C1:N=0:C=0:N1=N1+1 

420 GOTO 320 

430 RESTORE:PRINT 

440 A1=INT((C1/N1)+.5):PRINT'CLASS AVERAGE WITH ";N1;" STUDENTS" 
450 PRINT “IS ";A1;" PERCENT" 

460 END 

470 FORT=1TOS900 

480 NEXTT:RETURN 

600 DATA "JOHNNY PRICE",60,70,50,67, 79,999 

601 DATA "SUE PRICE",89, 78,80, 72,80,999 

602 DATA "PETER SMITH",45,60, 78,80,90,999 

603 DATA "MARY JONES",80,90,86,87,92,999 

604 DATA "END" 





External Floppy Drives Connected to your Model 4P 
No internal wiring. Just Plug the I/O-Bus in, plug 
the external floppy drives into it and run. 


Vol. 5 No. 11 Page 26 


Special Purchase of Never Used Software Sale 


BOOKS PRICE PROGRAMS _from OTHERS PRICE 

SCELBI "8080" SOFTWARE GOURMET GUIDE 5.00 MOD 1/3. WEERD (CASSETTE PROGRAM) 5.00 

MOD 1 57 PRACTICAL PROGS & GAMES in BASIC 5.00 MOD 1/3. ATTACK FORCE (CASSETTE PROGRAM) _ 5.00 

MOD 1 MICROCOMPUTER PRIMER 5.00 MOD 1/3 SUPER NOVA (CASSETTE PROGRAM) 5.00 

MOD 1 REFERENCE CARD 1.50 MOD 1/3 BFBLIB-Basic Faster & Better Lib. 10.00 

MOD 1 LEVEL II SYSTEM REFERENCE CARD 1.50 MOD 1/3. BFBDEM-Basic Faster & Better Demon. 10.00 
MOD 1/3. MULTIDOS 75.00 

PROGRAMS from MISOSYS MOD 1/3 AUTOLOADER 10.00 

PRO-MACH2 10.00 MOD 1/3 MODEM80 10.00 

PRO-ZCAT 10.00 MOD 1/3 POWERMAIL + w/TEXTMERGE 25.00 

PRO-X-FTS 10.00 MOD 1/3. POWERDOT 10.00 

PRO-ADE 10.00 MOD 1/3. ELECTRIC WEBSTER - HYPENATION 10.00 

PRO-SAID 10.00 MOD 1/3 POWERMAIL PLUS 20.00 

X-FTS 10.00 MOD 1/3. ELEC. WEBSTER - GRAMMAR & STYLE 15.00 

ADE 10.00 

MACH2 10.00 MOD 1/3/4 TINYPAY 10.00 
MOD 1/3/4 MSCRIPT - WORD PROCESSOR 20.00 

PROGRAMS from OTHERS MOD 1/3/4 SIFTER SHIFTER 10.00 

MOD 1 DOSPLUS - OP SYS v.3.5.0 30.00 MOD 1/3/4 LTERM 10.00 

MOD 1 INSTANT ASSEMBLER 10.00 

MOD 1 MULTI-DOS 75.00 MOD 3 SPACE WARP CASSETTE 5.00 

MOD 1 ALCOR MULTI-BASIC 25.00 MOD 3 26-1584 CHECKWRITER 80 15.00 

MOD 1 ALCOR C (DISKS ONLY) 15.00 MOD 3 INSTANT ASSEMBLER 10.00 

MOD 1 STARCROSS 10.00 MOD 3 CNVBASIC/CMD 10.00 

MOD 1 PLANETFALL 10.00 MOD 3 ZMAIL 10.00 

MOD 1 ZORK Il 10.00 MOD 3 ALCOR C (DISKS ONLY) 15.00 

MOD 1 SORCERER 10.00 MOD 3 SUPERCROSS/XT 60.00 

MOD 1 WITNESS 10.00 MOD 3 ALCOR MULTI-BASIC (DISKS & MANUAL) 25.00 

MOD 1 DEADLINE 10.00 MOD 3 ALCOR MULTI-BASIC v.1.0.1(DISKS ONLY) 15.00 

MOD 1 SUSPENDED 10.00 

MOD 1 VERSAPAY ROLL 15.00 MOD 3/4 VERSAPAYABLES 15.00 

MOD 1 VERSAPAYABLES 15.00 

MOD 1 ENCHANTER 10.00 MOD 4 SUPERLOG 50.00 

MOD 1 FLIGHT SIMULATOR (CASSETTE) 7.00 MOD 4 700-2298 UPGRADE TRSDOS to 6.2.1 10.00 

MOD 1 LAZYCOMM 10.00 MOD 4 DATAGRAPH - DMP2100 10.00 

MOD 1 SUPERCROSS/XT 60.00 MOD 4 DATAGRAPH - EPSON 10.00 

MOD 1 DISK INDEX 10.00 MOD 4 DATAGRAPH - LPVIII/DMP 120-420 10.00 

MOD 1 MODEL 1 LOG 10.00 MOD 4 LETTERSET DESIGN SYSTEM - DMP/OKI 25.00 

MOD 1 26-2213 LDOS 5.1.3/R OP SYS 30.00 MOD 4 LETTERSET DESIGN SYSTEM - EPS/ITO 25.00 

| MOD 4 MSCRIPT - WORD PROCESSOR 20.00 

MOD 1/3 26-2017 ASSEMBLY TUTOR (CASSETTE) 5.00 MOD 4 ELECTRIC WEBSTER-GRAMMAR & STYLE 15.00 

MOD 1/3 26-2011 SERIES | ED.ASSEM.(CASSETTE) 10.00 MOD 4 SUPERCROSS/XT 60.00 

MOD 1/3. GALAXY INVASION (CASSETTE) 10.00 MOD 4 POWERMAIL PLUS 20.00 
MOD 4 TAS SPECIAL EDITION #19 10.00 

COLOR COMPUTER SOFTWARE - _ Super Discounted Prices 

Limited Quant. Catalog Memory Media Original Our 

On hand Number Description Req. Type Price Price Each 

2 26-3276 PHANTOMOGRAPH 512K DISK 39.95 10.00 

1 26-3267 T/S WORD - OS-9 64K DISK 34.95 8.00 

2 26-3095 COLOR BASEBAL 16K ROMPAK 10.95 5.00 

3 26-3072 THEXDER 128K ROMPAK 24.95 5.00 

1 26-3248 CHILDPACE ? DISK 30.95 5.00 

2 26-3106 PERSONAL FINANCE Il 16K ROMPAK ? 5.00 

3 26-3299 RESCUE ON FRACTALUS 128K DISK 29.95 10.00 

5 26-3271 MICROSCOPIC MISSION 128K DISK 20.95 5.00 

4 26-3272 SUB BATTLE 128K DISK 29.95 10.00 

8 26-3080 SHANGHAI 128K ROMPAK 24.95 10.00 

3 26-3165 PREDATOR ? ROMPAK 34.95 10.00 

3 26-3078 SPRINGSTER (no doc’s) 128K ROMPAK ? 2.00 

2 26-3161 SOKO-BAN ? ROMPAK 29.95 5.00 

2 26-3174 RAMPAGE 128K ROMPAK 34.95 10.00 

4 26-3100 MIND ROLL 128K ROMPAK 34.95 10.00 

tT 26-3093 DUNGEONS-DAGORATH 16K ROMPAK 29.95 5.00 

2 26-3035 MULTIVUE - OS-9 CCIll DISK 49.95 15.00 

2 26-3188 OS-9 LEVEL Il =o BOOK 10.95 5.00 

8 26-3244 WINNIE THE POOH 64K DISK 14.95 2.00 

2 26-3245 DONALD D’S PLAYGRD 64K DISK 14.95 2.00 

10 26-3247 MICKEY’S SPACE AVENT 64K DISK 24.95 5.00 


All items new, never used and in their orginal shrink wapper. Sold as is / no returns. 
Add shipping & handling charrges: $4.00 first item, $1.00 each additional item up to a maximum of $10.00 for UPS ground service. 


Computer News 80 
REPAIR AND UPGRADE SERVICE 
FOR MODELS Ill, 4, 4P AND 4D 


* UPGRADE INSTALLATIONS 

* MEMORY EXPANSION TO 128K 

* HIGH RESOLUTION BOARDS 

* RS232 COMMUNICATION BOARDS 
* DOUBLE SIDED DISK DRIVES 

* OTHER UPGRADES AVAILABLE 


We give you a firm quotation on all work to 
be done prior to doing the work. If you do 
not approve your computer is returned to 
you. A small diagnostic fee and _ return 
Shipping costs will be charged. 


You supply your own shipping carton and 
ship the computer to us for repair, via 
United Parcel Service. Please remember to 
insure your shipment. Return packaging and 
Shipping costs will be included in our 
quotation for any repairs or installation 
Charges. We can supply you with the 
shipping carton for a small charge if you 
need one. 
For more details call 
307-265-6483 


Our shipping address is: 
Computer News 80 
1220 Jamaica Drive 
Casper, WY 82609 


RESTORATION SERVICE 

If you have an original application program 
disk that needs to be restored, send it and 
$5.00 to cover the postage and handling. 
Please remember that it must be an original, 
legally owned by you, master disk. We will 
not restore copies of original program disks. 
There are many commercial games and other 
programs that we will not have in the 
archives, so it is best to call first and check. 


FILE TRANSFER SERVICE 

If you want to have your files transferred 
from one media to another. Such as having 
your files transferred from 5-1/4 disks to 
3-1/2 we can do that for you. If you want 
to have files transferred from an IBM 
(MS-DOS) format to a TRSDOS/LS-DOS 
format, or from TRS-80 to IBM (MS-DOS) 
we can provide that service. However we do 
not have the equipment to handle 8" disks. 
Call or write for further details concerning 
the transfer service. 





or 
seca XS 


MOUSEDOS 


by Leonard Lorden 


Load MOUSEDOS (Mouse Plus by 
David Goben is required) and select an 
icon from the screen display. Disk Drive 
Icon, displays a new menu and mini- 
keyboard. Write your command line. 
Utility Icon, displays several DOS 
commands and utility icons, click the 
mouse on the desired command icon or 
click the Exit icon to return to the main 
menu. 

Included are icons for AUTO, 
BACKUP, BOOT, CONV, COPY, FILTER, 
FORMAT, FORMS, LINK, LIST, 
REMOVE, RENAME, RESET, ROUTE, 
SET, SETKI, SPOOL, SYSTEM, VERIFY. 

Fancy in appearance, easy to 
understand and use. A must for mouse 
users. § 25 plus (Y) S&H 


CP/M 


Now only $140. Pickles & Trout CP/M-2.2m for your Radio 
Shack TRS-80 Model-II, -12, -16, or -6000 computer. 





Still running “less-than-the-best”” We can upgrade your 
existing CP/M software (Lifeboat, P&T, ATON, What- 
ever) to the latest Pickles & Trout CP/M-2.2mH release, 
only $65. [Includes new manuals, full screen editor, full 
utilities, double sided disk support, and more.] 


RAMD — Let your P&T CP/M use the 68000, memory as 


a super-speed disk drive, only $49. 


REFORMATTER — Your TRSDOS system can read/ 
write CP/M diskettes, only $49. 


Looking for a CP/M program? WordStar, dBASE? 
Give us a call. 


TriSoft 


1825 East 38 1/2 
Austin, TX 78722 
1-800-531-5170 
1-512-472-0744 





Ge MOUSE DRIVER 
by David Goben 
Complete Mouse Driver Program 
and printed manual for 2 or 3 button mice 
for use with your Model 4 
Write your own mouse programs in Basic 
or other program languages. 
$10 plus, $3 Shipping & Handling 
Published and Distributed by 


Computer News 50 


CN80 
Three Button Mouse 


and adapter for RS-232 connection. 
$ 26.95 plus $ 4.00 S&H 


Extender Cable for Model 4 with 
the RS-232 connector out the bottom. 
$ 8.00 plus $ 2.00 S&H 


Use an AB switch to connect both Mouse and Modem 


Computer News 80 


The CN80 MOUSE HOUSE 


MTK 
by David Goben 
Complete Mouse to Keyboard Interface 
and printed manual for 2 or 3 button mice. 
Model 4 - Mouse Driver Required to use. 
Take over your keyboard, arrow keys 
with MTK, makes playing games easy. 
$18 plus $3 Shipping & Handling 
Published and Distributed by 


Computer Hews £0 


CN80 COMBINATION 
MOUSE PACKAGE 


Includes Three Button Mouse 
Adapter for Model 4 connection 
(4s with connector out the bottom require an additional cable) 
The Mouse Driver Program 
The MTK Mouse to Keyboard Program 
For Model 4 with RS-232 out the back $52.95 


For Model 4 with RS-232 out the bottom $59.95 
Plus $ 4 Shipping and Handling 


120ns and 150ns Chips 


64 K UPGRADE KITS FOR MODEL 4 $12.95 
Our Kit consists of eight 64k 150ns 128 refresh cycle 
dynamic ram chips, plus instructions and Memory Test Disk. TT PRRRRR 
$4.00 S/H in the US. $6.00 APO,FPO. $ 8.00 AK,HI and Canada. ae : 
>>>» > D> D>D> De DPD» D> D> D>: D> Do D> D> D> D> Do: D> Dp Dp: Dp Dp D> D>D> Dp D> D> 
64K 120ns 128 refresh cycl. chips $ 2.75 ea. 
16 Chips are required for use with Anitek Speed Up Kits. 
$4.00 S/H in the US. $6.00 APO,FPO. $8.00 AK,HI and Canada 
PAL CHIP - needed to upgrade Non-Gate Array Model 4s 
$ 8.00 each shipping and handling included. 





ROMCLOCK4 OR ROMCLOCK3 
UTILITY PROGRAM PACKAGE 
by David Goben 
The new clock operating program that works 


on SmartWatch, No-slot Clock and the CN80 
ROMCLOCK. Simpler to operate and takes less 
memory than previous SmartWatch programs. 
Complete program and manual. 
¢ 5.00 each add (Y) S&H 





ROMCLOCK Clock Chip 
AND ROMCLOCK4 or 3 PROGRAM 
from Computer News 80 

The clock chip will install in any Model 4 or 3 
computer. It provides keeping time for year, 
month, date, hour, minute, and seconds. Plug 
it in and never have to type the time and date 
again: It has a lithium power cell that lasts 
over 10 years. Complete with _ installation 
instructions and support. 

$ 28.65 add (Y) S&H 






1'DIM BULLETIN BOARD HOST SYSTEM by Leonard Lorden 


CN80 NEWCOMERS GUIDE 


Reprint of CN80 Newcomers Corner 

articles, part 1 to part 8. 
Learn what’s important to start computing 
on a Radio Shack computer. Covers the basic 
DOS commands like Backup and Format and 
many more’ subjects, written in _ plain 
easy to understand English. 

$7.95 (V) S&H 


Color Coded Disk Labels 
1/2 cent each. 
Don’t miss this bargain. 100 colored labels, 
with write protect tabs. 50 cents per package 


(U) S&H. 


See our Product Guide for other great 
label prices. 








IDIM (I did it my way) Bulletin Board Host System is a completely new software 
System written for the Model 4. It comes with a 22 page manual full of instructions 
on how to get started and three disks of programs for setting up your own bulletin 
board system, or upgrading your existing system. Many new operating features have 
been added to this bulletin board program by the author. For those who would like to 
review its features send $2 to cover the cost of mailing and we will send you a copy 
of the manual for your inspection. 





Computer News £0 
BACK ISSUES 


Single Issues $4 each (V) S&H 
Complete Volume Sets 
1988 Volume | $18, 1989 Volume 2 $20 
1990 Volume 3 $22, 1991 Volume 4 $24 
Complete Volumes are bound ina 
ring binder, free CN80 Index Disk 
with each order. Add (Z) S&H 


NewDos 90 $70 


Formerly NewDos 86 


The NEWDOS80 Enhancement Package 
by Warwick Sands of Australia 
Order from Computer News 80 
Specify Model I or Model III Version 
Add $4 Shipping & Handling in US, $6US for Canada 
=_.$7US for shipment to other countries. rile RT 


Full support from the author. 


$ 80, plus (Y) S&H. 


LASER AND DOT MATRIX 


ummm, PRINTER DRIVERS 


ALLWRITE HP LASER SUPPORT PACKAGE * $20.00 
ALLWRITE HP DESKJET SUPPORT PACKAGE? $20.00 
SUPERSCRIPSIT HP LASER DRIVER ** $20.00 
SCRIPSIT PRO HP LASER DRIVER* $20.00 
SUPERSCRIPSIT FX80 DRIVER ** $17.95 
sh 


SCRIPSIT PRO FX80 DRIVER* $17.95 
*Modes 4/4P/AD ** Model III, 4/4PAD 
Laser drivers support normal, bold, italics and 
proportion! print with right band tustificaton 

Hi-Res UTILITIES PACK AGE 

by David Goben $15.00 +(Y) S&H 
9 utilites to perform general graphics 
maintenance from DOS Ready. 
PostMaster SUPPORT UTILITIES 

by David Goben $39.00 +(Z) S&H 
10 programs which allow you _ to 
Create your own icon libraries for 


Post Master. 
For Model 4/4P/4D Computers Only. 












Symphony 90 é 
Opening a new era of TRS-80 Computer Generated Music 


Use the full power of your Model 4 
Free Music Library Catalog with each order 


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esa Lurn your Model 1, 





Model 3, or Model 4/4P/4D 


In to a Programmable 


for Player or Composer System 
Plus a Limited Time Offer of 
Free Menu Disk and Music Library Disks 


Jo Symphony 90 
Music Library Catalog 


Complete Catalog of Symphony 90 
Music on Disks Ready to use with 
the Symphony 90 Play System 
$3.00 - Shipping & Handling Included 


The PLAYER SYSTEM will play preprogrammed music files from the Symphony 90 Music 
Library or Orc-90 files. The Library Menu disk allows you to select and play all the files on a 
disk, or play one at a time. The COMPOSER SYSTEM allows you to write and edit your own 
music files. Together both Playar and Composer give you a complete music system that 
allows you to listen to prewritten rusic files or to compose your own music files. But, if you 
only want to listen to a great variety of music compositions, then purchase only the Player 
System. Model Ill versions are also available if you do not have a Model 4. 






Calculator with 


ASTROCAL 


by VERNON B. HESTER 







Designed for the student, or professional. Engineers, lab 
technicians, accountants, real estate brokers, designers, 
anyone who does repetitive or complex mathematical 
calculations. 





Jo wai 90 or: “ Sympfiony 90 
Music Player Only System Sa Music Bese ed System 10,000 Program Storage Location, 84 Labels, 100 





Addressable Memory Registers, True Algebraic Entry. 


Symphony 90 Interface with built-in amplifier and volume 
control. Use with your stereo amplifier and speakers, Or use 
with your headphones or separate speakers from the built-in 
amplifier. 

Interface sold only with the Symphony 90 Composer or 
Player software. The interface is not sold separately 
See Product Guide for prices. 





This unique product intergrates mathematical programming 
functions in to a single convenient application. Develop 
scientific, financial and statistical programs with ease. 







$29.95 Add (Z) S&H 






Model 4 TRS-80 Spreadsheet Programs by David Goben 


BC X THE SPREADSHEET FOR THE 90'S 

For Model 4 128K+. If you have been looking for a Model 4 spreadsheet that is powerful, yet really easy to learn, or are 
wanting to replace your current s-l-o-w and cumbersome spreadsheet program, then consider BCX; The Business Calculator for 
extended memory Model 4s. With BCX you can calculate sales projections, income taxes, personal budgets, cost estimates, 
engineering changes, balance your checkbook, plus thousands of other applications, limited only by your own imagination. BCX 
lets you play "what if’ with your figures as you plan your spreadsheet strategies. BCX remembers your formulas so that when 
you make changes, the entire spreadsheet can be automatically updated to reflect those changes. A sampling of the dozens of 
powerful professional BCX features are: 


Can support up to 1 megabyte of extended memory. 

Can use most current extended memory configurations: 128K, XLR8er, SuperMEM, HyperMEM, and MegaMEM. 
Can read and use most VisiCalc templates with little or no changes. Fully formula compatible with VisiCalc! 

Can read and use all Busy-Calc templates. 

On-line quick reference help with in-depth detailing. 

Pop-up window command menus in English -- no more cryptic guessing games or constant checking of manuals. 
Fast screen-scrolling with many screen control features. 

Supports your dot matrix, daisywheel, deskjet and laser printer with powerful in-program printer control features. 
A huge hand-holding, hands-on tutorial to get you on your way to mastering BCX and making it work for you. 
Many powerful replication and data manipulation features. 

A handy Quick Reference Manual, and MUCH MORE! 


BCX The way spreadsheets should be. $109 DEMO disk $15. Add (Z) S&H 


£ 
% 
¥ 
% 
* 
% 
% 
* 
+ 
* 
% 


BUSY-CALC The Family & Small Business Spreadsheet Program 


For Model 4 64K. A powerful, full-featured, fully supported spreadsheet program for home and small business use. 64 x 64 cell 
matrix with powerful function, math, and referencing support. Can support extended memory up to 4 32K banks. Includes a 
detailed hands-on tutorial and quick reference manual. $79.95 DEMO disk $10. Add (Z) S&H 


AVAILABLE DIRECTLY From GOMputer News 80 





ARRANGER II 


100% Machine Language Disk Index Program for the TRS-80 Model |, Ill, 4/4D/4P 
Automatically recognizes all major TRS-80 disk operating system formats. 


The ARRANGER II written by Dan Foy almost ten years ago, is a master index system that 
automatically records the names of your programs, what disks those programs are on and the 
type of disk operating system the disk was formatted under. 


Program Capacity 11,000 programs optimum, 8,000 typical, 255 filenames per 
disk, 255 disks per library data file. 

Disk Drive Compatibility Reads 5-1/4" or 3-1/2" single-sided or double-sided; 35, 40, 80 
track, and is auto self-configuration. 

Functions Add Delete Scan View Find (Search) Print Rename Change 
Update Toggle Locate Manual Backup Exit 

Printouts Prints out three column 8-1/2 x 11 pages with your programs 
listed in alphabetical order or by extensions. Prints labels with 
Disk name, DOS type, and Type of disk, (system or data.) 

System Requirements Model I/III/4/4P/4D with one or more drives and 48K or more. 


The greatest aid to keeping track of your disk library ever created for the TRS-80 computers, 
Your programs are printed in easy to read vertical alphabetized columns, unlike the horizontally 
alphabetized rows of the CAT program. You keep all your library on one disk in one library 
regardless of their DOS format type. 


$39.95 (Y) S&H Another CN-80 Exclusive Brought back from obscurity. 





Model Ill/4 TRS-80 Word Processing by David Goben 
SCRIPT 


Word processor for Model I/III/4. Like Disk SCRIPSIT should have been. Support Disk SCRIPSIT features, plus dozens of other 
enhancements. A poor man’s word processor with loads of powerful editing and printing features. Please specify computer 
system and DOS when ordering. $37.95 | 


SCRIPT SPELLING VERIFIER 

For I/Ill/4. Extremely powerful spelling checker/corrector for SCRIPT, Disk SCRIPSIT, ALLWRITE, ASCII, TED, and other ASCII 
format files. Features over 75,000 words. You can add up to 17,000 words to a personalized user dictionary. $37.95 
S&H. Specify computer model when ordering. 


SUPERSCRIPSIT SPELLING CHECKER 


For \II/4. Adds spell checking/proofreading capability to SuperSCRIPSIT. Fully integrated into the word processor. Called from 
the SuperSCRIPSIT main menu. Just select the PROOFREAD option from the menu. $37.95 










Add (Z) S&H, please refer to the CN80 Product Guide Shipping Charge Schedule 





TRS-80 DISK OPERATING SYSTEMS (DOS) 


FOR MODEL III COMPUTERS OR 
FOR MODEL 4/4P/4D OPERATING IN THE 3 MODE 
TRSDOS 1.3 Operating System Disk Only 7.00 (X) S&H 


LDOS 5.3.1 Operating System Disk & Instructions 39.95 (Y) S&H 
FOR MODEL 4/4P/4D COMPUTERS 
LSDOS 6.3.1 Operating System Disk & Instructions 39.95 (Y) S&H 
CN80 subscribers can obtain an additional 5% discount on these DOS packages by 


supplying your subscription number with your order. Discounts do not apply to shipping 


and handling charges or sales tax. No sales tax is added to shipments outside Wyoming. 








¢ PRINT, to format and print text files; 


¢ PRT, to print control codes and graphics characters; 
¢ RECLAIM, to remove unused high memory modules; 
¢ SETMOD, to set or reset files’ MOD flags; 
¢ SETVIS, to make files visible or invisible; 
¢ SWAP, to exchange disk drive numbers; | 
- UNFILTER, to remove a filter from a device without resetting the device; 
© VLOAD, to display specially formatted disk files; and 
¢ VSAVE, to save the display to a specially formatted disk file. 
The Utility Disk comes with a help file, a 23-page manual, and full support from the author. 


Order your copy today for only $14.95 


Introducing 


ED-IT for the Model 4 


by Mark Allen Reed 


For TRSDOS 6.2 or LS-DOS 6.3. ED-IT is a brand 
new full-screen text editor that combines powcr, ver- 
satility, and ease of use. Its features include fast opera- 
tion, a large text buffer (nearly 47K with no high memory 
modules installed), an easy-to-use menu system (activated 
by the <BREAK> key), three special programming modes 
(for assembly language, BASIC, and C), word-wrap capa- 
bility, block operations (including delete, copy, move, 
save, and load), search operations (including find, change, 
Change to the end of the file, repeat last find or change, 
and jump to specific line number), and the ability to enter 
any ASCII character into the document. ED-IT also al- 
lows you to execute nearly any DOS command without 
leaving the editor or affecting the text buffer. You can 
view a disk directory, purge unwanted files, even 
FORMAT and BACKUP from within ED-IT! 


ED-IT is powerful enough for a programmer, yet 
simple enough for the casual user. It is excellent for edit- 
ing README files, patch listings, and job control lan- 
guage (JCL) files. ED-IT comes with a complete instruc- 
tion manual and full support from the author. Order your 


copy today for only $17.95 (plus shipping and 
handling) from Computer News 80, P.O. Box 680, 
Casper, WY 82602-0680. 


Sixteen Model 4 Programs! 


Mark Reed’s Model 4 Utility Disk now contains 16 useful utilities for every Model 4 owner: 


¢ CLOSE, to close all open files on a disk; 
¢ CMDEDIT, to provide command line editing and recall at "DOS Ready’; 
¢ CMDINST, to install CMDEDIT on the system disk in drive zero; 

¢ CMDSTORE, to install CMDEDIT’s special high memory storage area; 
¢ DSP, to display control codes and graphics characters; 

* MAPMEM,, to list all low and high memory modules; 

¢ MOVE, to transfer files from one drive to another; 


News 80, P.O. Box 680, Casper, WY 82602-0680. 

















































(plus shipping and handling) from Computer 






Sideways and Banner 
Printing Utility 
for Dot-Matrix Printers 


for Model 4 (TRSDOS and 
LSDOS) 


$34,95 


SHOUT YOUR 
MESSAGE IN 
A BANNER! 


plus $4 per order shipping/handling 


LONG: Did you ever have to print out a spreadsheet that was too wide for your printer? 
You spent the rest of the afternoon with scissors and tape putting all those little pieces Into 
one useable printout. Well, LONG is the answer to your problem... no more cutting and 
taping. LONG twists your printer's output SIDEWAYS and prints spreadsheets (or any text 
file) of any width the Jong way on one continuous sheet of paper. 


LOUDI: Get your message across in no uncertain terms — now you, your computer and 
your dot-matrix printer can shout HAPPY BIRTHDAY MOM in eight inch high letters in any 
of five special type styles. Create banners, signs, posters or oversize greeting cards with 

ease. Anything you can type can be printed Joudly in gigantic letters! 


Dot-matrix printers supported: AMT Office Printer, Anadex DP-9625B, DP-9000A, DP-9500A, DP+9001A, 
DP-9501A, Apple Dot Matrix Printer, Imagewriter, Imagewriter Il, Base 2, BMC MicroGraphic, Cannon PJ-1080, 
Centronics 150-3, 352 and 739, C. Itoh 8510 Prowriter, 8600B, 8610 BPI, CTI CT-80, Data General 4434, 
DataProducts SPG8050, SPG8070, 8010, DataSouth DS-180, Diablo P11, C-150 Inkjet, DEC LASO, all Epson 
and compatibles, Facit 4510, Genicom, Gemini 10X/10XPC/15X, Hewlett Packard Thinkjet, QuietJet and 
HP82905, IBM Graphics printer and compatibles, QuietWriter, Proprinter, IDS Prism 80/132 (with Dot Plot), 
445, 560, MicroPrism, JDL 750, 750C, Legend 880/1360, Mannesman Tally Spirit and MT85/86/160, MPI 
(Sprinter, Printmate 99 and 150), NEC 8023AC, P560, P565, P660, P665, P760, P765, Okidata 82/83 (with 
Okigraph or PC-Write), 84, 92, 93, 192, 193, 292 and 293, Panasonic 1091, Radio Shack DMP Models 
100,110,120, 200, 400, 420, 500, 2100 & CGP-220, Tandy DMP-130, TI 850, 855, Toshiba 24 pin printer. 


Eee 
Computer Neus SO 
P.O. BOX 680 
CASPER, WYOMING 82602-0680 


ORDER BOTH REMBRANDT 
AND LONG AND LOUD 
FOR $ 67.50 
plus $ 4.00 S/H 
AND SAVE!! 





HOWE SOFTWARE FOR MODEL I, Ill AND MODEL 4/4D/4P 


Pubiished and Distributed by Computer News 80 


TYPITALL Word Processor $ 49.95 

Word processor upwardly compatible with SCRIPSIT -- it reads your old SCRIPSIT files and uses the same 
formatting and cursor movement commands. Send any control/graphics character to the printer. Print formatted 
text on the screen, or send it to a disk file for later printing. Merge data from a file during printing. Assign any 
sequence of keystrokes to a single control key. Call up to 16 help screens at any time. Move cursor forward or 
backward by character, word, line, paragraph or page. Complete with easy to read manual. 


TYPITALL Word Processor with Spelling Checker $ 79.95 


Optional spelling checker has 29,500 word dictionary -- verify a 3.500 word document in less than two minutes. 


SYSTEM DIAGNOSTIC $69.95 | 
Complete tests for every component of your TRS-80 Model 1, 3, or 4 (separate versions for each model). 
ROM:checksum test. RAM:three tests. Video Display: character, video RAM, signal. Keyboard: every key contact 
tested. Line printer: character tests. Disk Drives: disk controller, drive select, track seek, read sectors, formatting, 
read/write/verify data with or without erasing, disk drive timer, disk head cleaner. Single/double density, single 
sided or double sided drives from 1 to 99 tracks. RS-232-C Interface: connector fault, data transmission, 
framing, data loop, baud rate generator. - Specify version when ordering. 


SMART TERMINAL $ 19.95 

The intelligent telecommunications program for TRS-80 Model 1, 3, 4 or 2/12 CP/M. Memory buffer for sending 
and receiving file. Automatic transmission and reception of data. Character translations, true BREAK key, and 
help screens. 


HOWE SOFTWARE FOR TRS-80 AND MS-DOS SYSTEMS 





SMALL BUSINESS ACCOUNTING WITH PAYROLL $99.95 

Based on the Dome Bookkeeping Record #612, this program handles bookkeeping and payroll for a small 
business. Bookkeeper provides single entry ledgers for income and expenses, computes monthly and yearly 
summaries. Payroll handles up to 99 employees, wii1 automatic deductions of F.I.C.A. and Federal income tax. 
State tax and three optional deductions also included. Prints payroll and expense checks, Form 941 reports and 
W-2 Forms. 


MAILING LIST $ 79.95 

Create arid maintain mailing lists of up to 32,767 names and addresses. Up to five-line entries, including title, 
first and last names, optional second line, address, city, state, zip code, optional fifth line and telephone 
number. Sort or search for names by any field. Prints labels in 1, 2, 3, or 4 adjustable columns or on 
envelopes. Print form letters with any substitutions. 


HOME BUDGET and CHECKBOOK ANALYST  $ 49.95 

A complete checkbook program combined with budget comparisons, income and expense analysis, and 
projections. Computes current checking balance. Also handles non-check expenses, bank debits, and income. 
Monthly and year-to-date summaries, yearly projections based on data up to a known month. 


SMALL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT SYSTEM = $ 149.95 

A complete point-of-sale program for a small business. Order desk handles order entry, invoicing. Includes 1,999 
8 character part numbers. Bookkeeper maintains general ledger. Inventory produces sales_ reports. 
Installation sets program to your business. 


ADD SHIPPING AND HANDLING TO ABOVE PRICES 

In the U.S. Add $ 3.00 for single program order. Two or more programs per order add $4.00 S&H. 
Canada, PR, HI, AK, and Mexico add $5 for single program order, $6 for two or more programs per order. 
Overseas write for shipping costs, and advise if surface or air mail is wanted. 


C.0.D orders in the US only, -- Sorry no credit card orders accepted. Check or Money Order only. 
Mail orders to: Computer News 80 

P.O. Box 680 

Casper, WY 82602 

307-265-6483 






TAN 
E> 





g 


Fast System Programs for the Model Ill/4 by David Goben 
FBACKUP 


THE VERSATILE FAST DISK BACKUP UTILITY 

For Model 4 DOS 6x or Model Ill LDOS 5.3. FBACKUP is a program to be used in place of BACKUP when backing up files 
between drives. FBACKUP operates up to 8 times faster than BACKUP, is much friendlier, and provides you with many new 
features; alphabetized backups, single drive backups, use optional extended memory recognized by the DOS for a huge copy 
buffer, tell you how many disks will be needed for a backup, and more! Like BACKUP, FBACKUP will not backup files larger 
than the backup disk (see FASTBACK for this feature). $15 State Model 3 or 4 when ordering. 


FASTBACK 


THE FAST HARD DISK BACKUP SYSTEM 
For Model 4 DOS 6.x or Model Ili LDOS 5.3. No hard disk backup utility is faster or easier to use than FASTBACK. NONE! 
FASTBACK is even faster than BACKREST, and on top of that provides much more versatility and ease of use! FASTBACK 


provides the friendliness of FBACKUP, but will backup and restore files larger than the backup disks. Like FBACKUP, 
FASTBACK can backup and restore files using prompts, whole or partial file specifications, and allows you to use parameter 
flags such as NEW, OLD, MOD, INV, and more. FASTBACK will even calculate how many disks will be required for a backup 
job. Unallocated extended memory recognized by the DOS, if present, will be used for a huge copy buffer. $29.95 

State Model 3 or 4 when ordering. 


FFORMAT 


THE FAST DISK FORMATTING UTILITY 

For Mode! 4 DOS 6.x or Model Ill LDOS 5.3. FFORMAT is the absolutely FASTEST disk formatting utility available from anyone! 
Format your 3-1/2" or 5-1/4" disks trouble free for any format in up to half the time! FFORMAT wiil format a i-sided double 
density 40-cylinder disk in 18 seconds! Works like FORMAT/CMD, but has greater versatility, options and speed. You can even 
apply a high level format and verify read the partitions of your hard disk with FFORMAT -- no more fumbling with one or 
more separate utilities to do this. You can even purge all files from a disk in seconds when you specify the PURGE and 
VERIFY=NO parameter. Specify BIG and QUERY=NO for easy 2-sided 80-cylinder formats on 3-1/2" disks. Eliminate the 
doldrums of your time-consuming disk formatting ritual with FFORMAT. $15 State Model 3 or 4 when ordering. 


Add (Z) S&H, please refer to the CN80 Product Guide Shipping Charge Schedule 









DAVID’S MODEL 4 FILE UTILITIES 
For TRSDOS/LS-DOS 6.x. Nine great file handling utilities to save you hours of work. DSPTXT: view ASCII files in forward and 
reverse, with word wrap, printed form setup, and inbedded graphics. INDEX4: list a disk’'s directory in alpha order -- add 
comments to describe them. ERASE: ensure data security -- totally erase all traces of a file from a disk. UNREMOVE: recovers 
file which have been removed via the REMOVE, KILL, or PURGE commands. SAVBAS: save an in-memory BASIC program after 
leaving BASIC. Plus many others. $9 


DAVID’S MODEL Ill LDOS FILE UTILITIES 


Like above, but for LDOS 5.x. Contains eight utilities (SAVBAS not needed). Priced as above. 


DAVID’S MODEL 4 SYSTEM UTILITIES 

For TRSDOS/LS-DOS 6.x. 16 powerful system support utilities to streamline system maintenance. XMEMDISK: the most powerful 

memdisk program going. XDRIVE: allows 1 drive to emulate 2. ONEPASS: the most powerful single-pass disk duplicator yet. 

rei verify the integrity of your disks. PRINT: control your printer from the DOS command level. Plus many more. $16 
S&H. 


DAVID’S MODEL Ill LDOS SYSTEM UTILITIES 
14 powerful system support utilities for LDOS 5.x. Features programs described above, less XMEMDISK. Also features VIDX to 
greatly enhance your screen and character control. Priced as above. 


DEA: THE DISK EDITOR/ASSEMBLER 

The most powerful I/III/4 integrated editor/assembler going. Contains both I/IIl and 4 versions. Has more enhanced features than 
any other. Conditional assembly, long label names, and plentiful math functions are only a part of its list of powerful features. 
Only thing not supported is Macros. This package also includes a disassembler, cross referencing utilities, and plenty of 
programming examples. DEA was used to write all the programs listed in CN80 by David Goben! DEA features the ability to 
reference addresses in, or include code from other disk files during an assembly. $49.95 


T62DOSXT 
Extends the dating capabilities on TRSDOS 6.2.x DOS disks to Dec 31, 1999 with full compatibility with older, pre 6.3 DOS 


dating formats, as well as the newer dating format for LS-DOS 6.3. Includes many optional system patches, plus numerous 
useful utilities. $18 


PACK for TRS-80 & MS-DOS 


Pack, unpack, compress, or superpack BASIC programs for faster operation and more efficient use of disk space. TRS disk 
includes versions for both Models I/Ill and 4. MS-DOS version requires DOS version 2 or higher. Please specify computer 


system when ordering. $17.95 
Add (Z) S&H, please refer to the CN80 Product Guide Shipping Charge Schedule 






























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| 
es 





COMPUTERS 



















Model 3, 2 Dr. $135 Tandy 1000 SX $295 
Model 4, 2 Dr. $195 Tandy 1000 TX $375 
Model 4, 2 Dr. 128K $195 Tandy 1000 SL $375 
Model 4P, 2 Dr. $175 Tandy 1000 TL $395 
Model 12 $345 Tandy 1000 TL-2 $415 
Model 4D $345 Tandy 1000 TL-3 $435 
Tandy 2000 HD $295 Tandy 2000 2 FD $195 
Tandy 6000 HD $595 CM-5 $ 99 
Tandy 3000, 4000 Call CM-11 $165 
Tandy 1000 RLX w/30 Meg $495 CM-2 $135 
Tandy 1000 EX/HX $135 CM-1 $ 99 
Tandy 1000 A 2 FD $195 VM 5 $ 65 
Tandy 1000'HD $245 VGM 220 $225 






HARD DRIVES 


for model 3's and 4's 










Tandy 5 Meg HD. $195 
Tandy 12 Meg HD. $225 
Tandy 15 Meg HD. $245 


*All hard drives include cable and software. 


ACCESSORIES 


Tractor feed for 2100 













Tractor feed for DW II, 510 $ 95 
Tractor feed for 410 (new) $ 39 
DW Il sheet feeder (new) $ 95 


DMP 2100 Sheet Feeder 


LAPTOPS 









WP-2 $145 
Model 200° $308 Tandy 1500 HD $795 
Model 600 $145 Model 102 $225 
Tandy-1400 LT $395 Nec 8201 16K $ 85 


Tandy-1100 FD $435 


PRINTERS 













DMP 105, 106 $ 65 DMP 2110 24Pin $395 
DMP 120 $120 DWP 210 $175 
DMP 130 $ 99 DWP 410 $195 
DMP 133 $115 DWP 510 $225 
DMP 200 $115 DWP II $195 
DMP 420 $145 DWP 520 $245 
DMP 430 $145 Line Printer 5 $ 75 
DMP 2100 24Pin $295 Diconix 150 Inkjet Portable $ 95 
DMP 2100P 24Pin $345 Brother HR 5 Portable $ 55 





SOFTWARE 


Model 4 Software 


INVENTORY CONTROL $ 25.00 
SUPER SCRIPSIT DICTIONARY $ 25.00 
PASCAL (PROGRAMMING) $ 25.00 
TRS 80 C (PROGRAMMING) $ 25.00 
TK SOLVER (128K REQUIRED, MATH, GRAPHS, TABLES) $ 20.00 
MONTEZUMA STAR PAK $ 20.00 
C BASIC (CPM, MPM, OR C/P NET REQUIRED) $ 25.00 
MONEY DECISIONS | BASIC INVESTMENT ANALYSIS $ 25.00 
TRS DOS VERSION 6 4, 4D $ 29.00 


Model 3 Software 


PAYROLL $ 10.00 
ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE SETUP $ 10.00 
INVOICE WRITER $ 20.00 
TRS 80 BUSINESS GRAPHICS ANALYSIS PAK $ 20.00 
PROFILE Ill PLUS (DATABASE) $ 30.00 
VISICALC (SPREADSHEET) $ 30.00 
SCRIPSIT (WORD PROCESSOR) $ 25.00 
SUPERSCRIPSIT (WORD PROCESSOR) $ 40.00 
SERIES | EDITOR ASSEMBLER (PROGRAMMING) $ 20.00 
PASCAL (PROGRAMMING) $ 35.00 
COPY CAT 3 (DISK ONLY) $ 10.00 


“All equipment is guaranteed to be in good working order. 


MULTIPLAN (SPREADSHEET) $ 35.00 
PROFILE 4 PLUS $ 45.00 
VERSA LEDGER Il (KEEP TRACK OF CHECK BOOK AND GL) $ 35.00 
DOUBLE DUTY (128K REQ. USE 2 DIFFERENT PROGRAMS) $ 29.00 
TRS DOS 6.2 UTILITIES $ 29.00 
COMPUTER GRAPHICS $ 30.00 
VISICALC $ 25.00 
FORMATION $ 20.00 
VIDEO TEX PLUS $ 25.00 
MICRO COURIER $ 20.00 
INVENTORY CONTROL $ 15.00 
COORDINATED ACCOUNT SYSTEM (GL, AP, JOB COSTING) $ 30.00 
BUSINESS CHECKWRITER $ 20.00 
TIME MANAGER $ 20.00 
BUSINESS GRAPHICS ANALYSIS PAK $ 25.00 
DISK SYSTEM OWNERS MANUAL $ 29.00 
ZAXXON (GAME) $ 15.00 
DIPLOMACY (GAME) $ 15.00 
POWER TOOL $ 15.00 
POWER DRAW $ 15.00 


“Equipment is cleaned and tested. 


*Drives are cleaned and timed as needed. 


We accept VISA & MasterCard or C.O.D. The above prices do not reflect shipping cost. Inventory changes daily; 
please call for availability. If you don't see what you need, please call and we will do our best to locate it for you. 


PACIFIC COMPUTER EXCHANGE 


The One Source For Used Tandy Equipment! 
1031 S.E. Mill, Suite B » Portland Oregon 97914 


(RNR) DRR-2949 


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A 
by J. F. R. "Frank" Slinkman 


Send GIF (Graphics Interface Format) high resolution graphics to and receive high 
resolution graphics from computers of different types with your Model 4 and 
GIF4MOD4. 


A HIGH RESOLUTION BOARD IS HIGHLY RECOMMENDED BUT NOT REQUIRED. 
If you have a high resolution graphics board, GIF4MOD4 will decode any GIF image up 
to 640 pixels x 480 pixels x 256 colors and put the image on your screen. If you do not 
have a high resolution board installed in your Model 4, GIFMOD4 converts a GIF format 
to /HR format. The HR utilities packages available from CN80 will print out the /HR 


images O O inter. 
Bes on your printer. CONVERSION TO GIF FORMAT 
The HR2GIF program included in this package converts your /HR, /CHR, and /BLK 


files to the GIF format so they can be viewed on IBM, MAC and other computers. 


$37.95 + (Y) S&H 


ACCURATE 
SIMULATION OF A 
1930’S MILLS 


SLOT 
MACHINE 


by J. F. R "Frank" Slinkman 


Want to see a real rendition of a working slot 
machine on your Model 4 computer screen? 
Then SLOT4 is the one that will do it. True 
revolving dials for payoff, moving handle, with 
coin dropping .sound. 


Amuse yourself and your kids for hours on end. 
Entertain your guests at your next party with 
your computer by letting them play SLOT4. 
Model 4 with High Resolution Board Required 
$14.95 + (Y) S&H 


Order from Computer News 80 


Order from Computer News 80 


ACCURATE 
SIMULATION OF A 
VIDEO POKER 


MACHINE 


- —- ee eT ee ee 


by J. F. R "Frank" Slinkman 


Play real poker on your computer’ with 
remarkable screen renditions of the playing 
cards. Optimum video poker strategy can be 
used on VIDPOKR4 or to play the real thing in 
Atlantic City or Nevada. 


Any Poker fan will really enjoy playing against 
the computer, or practice the winning strategy 
that is included with this game package. 


Model 4 with 128K and High Resolution Board 
Required 


$19.95 (Y) S&H 


Order from Computer News 80 





PRINTERS FROM CN80 WITH PROVEN COMPATIBILITY 
SEIKOSHA SP-2400 SEIKOSHA SL-90 PLUS 


9 Pin Printer 24 Pin Printer 
80 Column Printer 80 Column Printer 
300 Characters Per Second 240 CPS draft / 80 CPS LQ 
IBM and Epson Compatible IBM and Epson Compatible 
Standard Parallel Interface Standard Parallel Interface 
Built-In Push Tractor & Friction Feed Built-In Push Tractor & Friction Feed 
Easy Front Panel Controls Easy Front Panel Controls 
Paper Parking Paper Parking 
Graphics Graphics 360 Resolution 
Two year Manufacturer’s Warranty Two year Manufacturer’s Warranty 


$ 179 $ 279 


Add $ 6.00 S&H, Shipped by UPS only. 


Fully supported by CN80 and completely 
compatible with PostMaster, Rembrandt, 
Long and Loud and all the programs, 
published by CN80. Will work with any 
Model III/4,4P or 4D computer. 


SP2400 Ribbons 

CN1041 $6.40 ea. $5.90 six or more. 
SL-90 Ribbons 

CN1046 $7.25 ea. $6.75 six or more. 


SEIKOSHA 





PostMaster 4 on. Kus £0 





PostMaster by David P. Miller is a program that lets you create Posters, Letterheads and Mailing 
Labels with icons, borders, and many different character fonts using your dot matrix printer. The 
program runs on TRS-80 Model 4/4P/4D, with 64K or 128K of memory that has a MicroLabs or 
Radio Shack high resolution board installed. 







This program has received the highest praise from reviewers of any program ever written for the 
Model 4. It allows you to use thousands of icons, borders, and fonts that are available from the 
File Cabinet Icon Library, it also allows you to add your own icons, borders and fonts. 







Printers supported: Radio Shack DMP-130, -130A, -131, -132, -133, -430, -2100P, also any Radio 
Shack DMP printer with a 3-digit number with "3" as the second digit. All Epson and IBM printers. 
All other dot matrix printers that are Epson and IBM emulation printers. Seikosha SP-2000, 
-2000Plus, -2400. Okidata Microline 182 and 192. Panasonic KX-P1091, -1092, -1124, nonsuffixed. 
Star 10X, -15X, -NP, -NX, LC-10. C-ITOH 1510, 8510, C-130. (Note - Dot Matrix printers providing 
300-dpi or 180-dpi may not work with PostMaster and no guarantees can be made concerning 
them. 









Printers that are not supported are: Radio Shack DMP-110, -120, -400, -500, -2100. Panasonic 
suffixed printers 1124i, 1124e, etc. Okidata 82, 92, and Daisy wheel printers. 






Order from Computer News 80................-$40..... add S&H (Z) 






(NGMINGN 5.25" Floppy Disk Drive 


Low Power Consumption Plus High Performance 


CUSTOM IC design in the read/write and control circuits gives maximum 
performance and low power consumption. A pop-up mechanism protects against 
mischucking upon disk insertion, allowing disks to be loaded/unloaded with ease. 
Chinon 5.25" floppy disk drives provide high speed access (3 ms) 


DOUBLE SIDED HAIf HEIGHT DRIVES 
Install in any Model 3/4/4P/4D 


(NEHINEN 3.5" Micro Floppy 


High Storage Capacity 


5-1/4" SPECIFICATIONS 


$67 each 5-1/4 or 3-1/2 
Complete with installation instructions 


and CN80’s support. Add $4 S & H per 
order in US. 


360K Capacity 
40 cyl. (track) 


Compatible with all 

Model |, Ill, 4/4P/4D Computers 
TWO DRIVE INTERNAL DRIVE CABLE and All their operating systems. 
$10 add $2.00 S&H in US. S&H , 
included when ordered with drives. 3-1/2" SPECIFICATIONS 


| 720K Capacity 
* One Year Manufacturer's Warranty 80 cyl. (track) 












THOUSANDS 
OF PROGRAMS 











Programs as low as 15 cents each. 
Order your printed catalogs today ! 










MODEL 4 CATALOG $2.00 
MODEL 1/3 CATALOG $2.00 
Hundreds of Utility, Business, Game, Educational 
and Communication Programs are in each catalog. 
HIGH RESOLUTION CATALOG $2.00 
Hundreds of /HR format pictures, 

including nudes and other artworks. Ready to 

use alone or create PostMaster Icons or Clip Art. 
MAC/PAINT CATALOG $2.00 
Hundreds of files created with MacPaint. 

View on the Model 4 or print using Mac Utilities. 















SYMPHONY 90 CATALOG $3.00 
Hundreds of music files ready to play. 

PostMaster ICON CATALOG Free 
ALLWRITE FONTS CATALOG Free 






Disk Volume Prices: 1 to 10 Volumes $3.50 ea. (X) S&H, 11 to 20 Volumes $ 3.25 ea. (Y) S&H, 
21 and over $3.00 ea. (Z) S&H. 5-1/4" or 3-1/2" disks. No extra charge for 3-1/2" disks. 


Download Through The Mail 











Superior Hardware. The Grafyx 
Solution provides 153,600 pixel elements 
which are arranged in a 640 x 240 or on 
the Model III a 512 x 192 matrix. Hundreds 
of new business, personal, engineering, and 
educational applications are now possible. 
The hi-res display can be shown on top of 
the standard display containing text, special 
characters, and block graphics. This 
simplifies program debugging, text labeling, 
and upgrading current programs to use 
graphics. The Grafyx Solution fits complete- 
ly within any tape or disk based Model 4, 
4D, 4P, or Ill. Installation is easy with the 
plug-in, clip-on Grafyx Solution board. 


SAVE WITH OUR HIGH RESOLUTION 


Grafyx Solution” 
Hi-Resolution Graphics for Mod 4/4D/4? /Ill 





Superior Basic. Over 20 commands 
are added to the Basic language. These 
commands will set, clear or complement 
points, lines, boxes, circles, ellipses, or 
arcs. The hi-res screen can be printed on 
any of 30 popular printers or saved or 
loaded to disk without leaving Basic. Areas 
may be filled in with any of 256 patterns. 
Sections of the screen may be saved and 
then put back using any of five logical 
functions. Labels can be printed in any 
direction. The viewing area can be 
changed. The entire screen can _ be 
complemented or cleared. Graphics Basic 
provides dot densities of 640 x 240, 320 
x 240, 160 x 240, and 160 x 120, all of 
which can be used in the same display. 








COMBINATION PACKAGE 


NUMBER ONE 


HIGH RESOLUTION BOARD FOR MODEL 3/4/4P/4D 
Distributed by Computer News 80 Free Draw Program 


Included 


Superior Software. The board 
comes with over 40 programs and files 
which make it easier to use, serve as 
practical applications, demonstrate its 
capabilities, and serve as programming 
examples. The software works’ with 
TRSDOS 1.3, 6.1.2, 6.2, 6.3; Dosplus 
3.4, 3.5, 4, LDOS; and Newdos80. The 
Grafyx Solution is also supported by 30 
optional applications programs: Draw, 
Bizgraph, xT.CAD, 3D-Plot, Slideshow, 
Mathplot, Surface Plot, Chess, etc. 
Purchase a Grafyx Solution Hi-Res 
Graphics Board for $ 99.00 and 
receive a free copy of DRAW a 
powerful graphics program which 
allows drawing or designs to be 
easily created on a Model 
Ill /4/4P /4D. 

$ 99.00 Add (Z) S&H 


Specify Model 3, Model 4p, 
Model 4 Gate Array, or 
Model 4 Non Gate Array 
when ordering. The boards 
are different for each. 

Please include phone number. 


ALREADY HAVE YOUR HIGH RESOLUTION 
BOARD INSTALLED - THEN 


SAVE WITH OUR HIGH RESOLUTION 
COMBINATION PACKAGE 


MicroLabs Grayfyx Solution Board 


MicroLabs Draw Program 
PostMaster Program 

Hi-Res Utilities Program 
PostMaster Support Utilities 


NUMBER TWO 


PostMaster Program 
Hi-Res Utilities Program 
PostMaster Support Utilities 









Five HiRes File Cabinet Volumes 

A $210.50 value if purchased seperately. 

All for the Super CN80 low price of 
$166.95 


Add (Z) S&H 





Five HiRes File Cabinet Volumes 
A $111.50 value if purchased seperately. 
All for the Super CN80 low price of 

$ 75.95 


Add (Z) S&H 





ANSITERM 4 


by Richard VanHouten 


TRS-80 Model 4 High Resolution 
Communications Program. 


Supports ANSI (American National Standards 
Institute) and AVATAR control codes. IBM 
graphics and file transfer by X-modem or 
Y-modem. 


System requires Model 4 with Modem and 
High Resolution Board. 


Program complete with printed manual. 


$ 30.00 (Y) S&H Order from CN80 


CONNECTORS 
DESCRIPTION 


FLAT RIBBON CABLE CONNECTORS 
Pin Male Edge Card Mating Connector 
Pin 25x2 Edge Card/Female 
Pin 25X2 Header Female/Socket 
Pin 25x2 Header Male/Plug w/mounting 
Pin 25x2 Header Male/Plug no mounting 
Contact Centronics Male (Printers) 
Pin 17x2 Header Female/Socket 
Pin 17x2 Edge Card/Female 
Pin 17x2 Header Male/Plug No Mounting 
Pin 17x2 Header Male/Plug W/Mounting 
Pin DB25 (RS232) Male/Plug 
Pin DB25 (RS232) Female/Socket 


PC BOARD MOUNT 
34 Pin 17x2 Box Header - Straight Solder 
50 Pin 25x2 Box Header - Straight Solder 


CONNECTOR S&H 

Add $ 2.00 Shipping and Handling if 

ordered alone. 

Shipping and Handling included if ordered with 
other items. 








2400 Baud External Modem | 


from Computer News 80 


$ 78 


Plus $4 S &H 


2400 baud transmission speed 
Hayes compatible 


Compatible with Model 3/4/4D/4P 
Compatible with IBM PC/XT/AT 
Auto dial/answer 

Eight status indicator lights 

Built-in speaker with volume control 
Second jack for local phone 

Call progress and error detection 
Ten year manufacturer’s warranty 
Manufactured in the USA 


Complete with all cables and 


TRS-80 Communication Software 


EXTENSION BLOCKS AND FLAT CABLE 














PRICE 





DESCRIPTION 






EXTENSION CONTACT BLOCKS 
34 Pin 17x2 PCB Socket - 3/16" High 5.50 
34 Pin 17x2 PCB Socket - 5/16" High 5.50 
34 Pin 17x2 PCB Socket - 5/8" High 5.50 








EXTENSION S&H 
Add $ 2.00 Shipping and Handling if 

ordered alone. 

Shipping and Handling included if ordered with 
other items. 









FLAT RIBBON CABLE 
25 Conductor .38 per ft. 
34 Conductor .51 per ft. 
50 Conductor .75 per ft. 











CABLE S&H 
Add $ 3.00 Shipping and Handling if 

ordered alone. 

Shipping and Handling included if ordered with 
other items. 











CUSTOM CABLES BUILT UPON REQUEST 
Call for price quotes. 






TOP OVAL ITITY PRINTER RIBBONS 


























Printer | Radio Shack CN80 Type Price Each for 
— CE, Number Number ——CC“‘($UWUCOOn@ ~=“6 OF :_~ More 
LP I, II, IV 26-1413 CN1001 FABRIC REFILL 5.55 5.05 
LP III, V 26-1414 CN1002 FABRIC CART, 6.38 5.88 
LP III, V 26-1414 CN1003 FABRIC REFILL 4.79 4.29 
LP VI/VIII,DMP 400/420 26-1418 CN1004 FABRIC CART. 5.60 5.10 
LP VII, DMP 100 26-1424 CN1038 FABRIC CART. 6.00 4.50 
DMP_110 26-1283 CN1005 FABRIC CART. 6.58 6.08 
DMP130/130A/132/133/107 26-1236 CN1006 FABRIC CART. 6.40 5.90 
DMP130/130A/132/133/107 26-1238 CN1007 FABRIC REFILL 5.00 4.50 
DMP 500 26-1482 CN1008 FABRIC CART. 13.40 12.90 
DMP 120, 200 26-1483 CN1009 FABRIC CART. 7.00 6.50 
DMP 120, 200 26-1489 CN1010 FABRIC REFILL 4.85 4.35 
DMP 430 26-1296 CN1013 FABRIC CART. 12.25 11.75 
DMP 440 26-2809 CN1014 FABRIC CART, 19.30 18.80 
DMP 2100, 2100P, 2110 26-1442 CN1015 FABRIC CART. 6.10 5.60 
DMP 2100, 2100P, 2110 26-1442 CN1016 FABRIC REFILL 4.85 4.35 
DMP 2120 26-2834 CN1017 FABRIC CART. 13.05 13.05 
DMP 2120 26-2836 CN1018 FABRIC REFILL 7.90 7.40 
LMP 2150 26-1287 CN1019 FABRIC CART, 8.00 7.50 
DWP II, DWP 410/510 26-1419 CN1020 MULTI-STRIKE CT. 5.35 4.85 
DWP IIT, DWP 410/510 26-1419 CN1021 M-S REFILL 4.50 4.00 
DWP II, DWP 410/510 26-1449 CN1022 FABRIC CART, 6.55 5.95 
DWP II, DWP 410/510 26-1449 CN1023 FABRIC REFILL 5.45 4.95 
DWP 520, 230, 210 26-1445 CN1024 MULTI-STRIKE CT. 5.15 4.65 
DWP 520, 230, 210 26-1445 CN1025 M-S REFILL 4.50 4.00 
DWP 520, 230, 210 26-1458 CN1026 FABRIC CART, 5.60 5.10 
DWP 520, 230, 210 26-1458 CN1027 FABRIC REFILL 4.80 4.30 
DWP 220 26-1299 CN1028 MULTI-STRIKE CT. 7.95 7.45 
DWP 220 26-1299 CN1029 M-S REFILL 3.60 3.10 
DMP 300/2102 26-2819 CN1030 FABRIC CART. 7.15 6.65 
DMP _300/2102 26-2819 CN1031 LONG LIFE CART. 6.85 6.35 
ALPS ASP-1000 900-2326 CN1032 FABRIC CART. 6.60 6.10 
EPSON FX/MX/RX-80 900-2327 CN1033 FABRIC CART. 5.50 5.00 
EPSON LX/80/90 900-2328 CN1034 FABRIC CART. 5.00 4.50 
PANASONIC KXP1090 900-2331 CN1035 FABRIC CART. 6.10 5.60 
PANASONIC KXP1090 900-2331 CN1036 LONG LIFE CART. 7.35 6.85 
STAR MICRON. NX1000 900-2332 CN1037 FABRIC CART, 6.45 5.95 
PANASONIC KXP1180/1190/1191 CN1039 FABRIC CART. 6.90 6.40 
PANASONIC KXP1180/1190/1191 CN1040 LONG LIFE CART. 7.60 7.10 
SEIKOSHA SP-2000 CN1041 FABRIC CART, 6.40 5.90 
DMP 50000 EN 043 FABRIC REFILL 5.30 ~~ 4.80 
DMP 430 00044 CUFABRIC REFILL 5.60 ~=~———5 10 
ALPS ALLEGRO 24 CN1045 FABRIC CART. 7.225 6.75 


ALL RIBBONS ARE BLACK, CART.= Plastic Cartridge, REFILL= Refills Only/No Cartridge. 
Add for Shipping and Handling 


1 to five items add (Y) .... 6ormore items add (Z) 
Please refer to the CN80 Product Guide Shipping and Handling Schedule. 


Some ribbons for the older Radio Shack printers are not stocked, but are still 
available by special order, please allow an additional week shipping time. All 
stock ribbons are shipped within 24 hours from the time the order is received. 
C.O.D orders accepted. Government and educational institution purchase orders 
are accepted. Sorry, we do not accept credit card orders. 


Computer Hews SO Prduct Guide 


BACK ISSUES, INDEX, & REPRINTS 


CN80 BACK ISSUES Individual Copies $ 4.00 (V) 
Available from Vol 1 No. 1 January 1988 
All of 1988 Bound $ 18.00 (Z) 
All of 1989 Bound $ 20.00 (Z) 
All of 1990 Bound $ 22.00 (Z) 
All of 1991 Bound $ 24.00 (Z) 
CN80 INDEX on Disk $ 2.00 (V) 
Complete index for CN80 1988 thru 1991. 
24 classifications of search. 
Specify LSDOS 6.3 or TRSDOS 1.3 
CN80 NEWCOMERS GUIDE VOL 1 $ 7.95 (V) 


Reprint of all CN80 "Newcomers Corner” part 1 to 8. 


CN80 DISK SERIES 
NUMBER 1 

All the programs printed in Vol 1 No. 1 thru No. 6. 
NUMBER 2 

All the programs printed 


$ 5.00 each (V) 


n Vol 1 No. 7, 8 and 9. 


NUMBER 3 

All the programs printed in Vol 1 No.10, 11 and 12. 
NUMBER 4 

All the programs printed in Vol 2 No.1, 2 and 3. 
NUMBER 5 

All the programs printed in Vol 2 No.4, 5 and 6. 
NUMBER 6 

All the programs printed in Vol 2 No.7, 8 and 9. 
NUMBER 7 

All the programs printed in Vol 2 No.10, 11 and 12. 
NUMBER 8 

All the programs printed in Vol 3 No.1, 2 and 3. 
NUMBER 9 

All the programs printed in Vol 3 No.4, 5, and 6. 
NUMBER 10 

All the programs printed in Vol 3 No.7, 8, and 9. 
NUMBER 11 

All the programs printed in Vol 3 No.10, 11, and 12. 
NUMBER 12 

All the programs printed in Vol 4 No. 1, 2, and 3. 
NUMBER 13 

All the programs printed in Vol 4 No. 4, 5, and 6. 
NUMBER 14 

All the programs printed in Vol 4 No. 7, 8, and 9. 
NUMBER 15 

All the programs printed in Vol 4 No. 10, 11 and 12. 
NUMBER 16 

All the programs printed in Vol 5 No. 1, 2 and 3. 
NUMBER 17 

All the programs printed in Vol 5 No. 4, 5 and 6. 
NUMBER 18 

All the programs printed in Vol 5 No. 7, 8 and 9. 
NUMBER 19 

All the programs printed in Vol 5 No. 10, 11 and 12. 
NUMBER 20 

All the programs printed in Vol 6 No. 1, 2 and 3. 
NUMBER 21 

All the programs printed in Vol 6 No. 4, 5 and 6. 
NUMBER 22 

All the programs printed in Vol 6 No. 7, 8 and 9. 
NUMBER 23 


n Vol 6 No. 4, 5 and 6. 


All the programs printed 


For your convenience advance orders for the Disk Series 
are accepted. Disks are shipped to you automatically as 
soon as they are ready. Write or call for free CN80 Disk 
Series Catalog. 

PLEASE NOTE: All CN80 DISK SERIES are on FLIPPY 
5-1/4"disks; TRS/LS-DOS 63 format on Side 1 and 
TRSDOS 1.3 format on Side 2. Also available on 3-1/2" 
disks @ $5.50 each (LSDOS 63.1 or LDOS 5.3.1 format 
only). Each Disk Series has Bonus programs. 


MANUALS & PROGRAMS PUBLISHED BY CN80 
MARK REED'S MOD 4 UTILITY DISK $ 14.95 (Y) 
Sixteen useful utilities for every Model 4 owner. 


MARK REED’S MODEL 4 ED-IT $ 17.95 (Y) 
For TRSDOS 6.2 or LS-DOS 6.3. New full-screen text 
editor. Powerful enough for a programmer yet simple 
enough for the causal user. 


PATCH UTILITY PROGRAM FOR TRSDOS 1.3 $ 10.00 (V) 
by Henry H. Herrdegen. This program contains all the 
patches for TRS-DOS 1.3, patches for Scripsit, and for 
"Profile IIl+, plus program to install the patches. 


Z80 MACHINE LANGUAGE TECHNIQUES $ 22.95 (Z) 
For the TRS-80 by Don Ady. 236 8-1/2 x 11 pages. 
"Presenting all the required fundamentals of Machine 

Language Programming, with practical applications.” 


$ 17.95 (Y) 


PACK for Model 1/3/4 
BASIC Program Packer by David Goben. 

PACK - MS-DOS Version $ 17.95 (Y) 
BASIC Program Packer by David Goben. 

DEA Disk Editor and Assembler $ 49.85 (Z) 


For Mod I/III/4 by David Goben. Extends your computing 
power and Assembling Language editing 
and assembling. 118 Pages 8-1/2 x 11 format. 


T62DOSXT Upgrade TRS 6 Dating $ 18.00 (X) 
by David Goben. Extends TRSDOS 6.x date entry 
beyond Dec. 31, 1987, patches & utility programs. 


BUSY-CALC Spreadsheet Program $ 79.95 (Z) 
by David Goben. Small business & family spreedsheet 
program. Model 4/4P/4D; TRSDOS 6.x, LSDOS 6.3.x. 

BUSY-CALC DEMO DISK ONLY $ 10.00 (V) 
Redeemable against purchase price of BUSY-CALC. 


BCX Spreadsheet Program $109.00 (Z) 
by David Goben. For Model 4's with Extended Memory 
(minimum of 128k required). 


BCX DEMO DISK ONLY $ 15.00 (V) 
Redeemable against purchase price of BCX. 
DAVID'S MODEL 3 FILE UTILITIES $ 9.00 (Y) 


by David Goben. Eight powerful programs for LDOS 5.x. 


DAVID’S MODEL 3 SYSTEM UTILITIES $ 16.00 (Y) 
by David Goben. 14 powerful programs designed for use 
with LDOS 5.x systems. 


DAVID'S MODEL 4 FILE UTILITIES $ 9.00 (Y) 
by David Goben. Nine powerful programs that save 
hours of work for TRS/LSDOS 6.x systems. 


DAVID’S MODEL 4 SYSTEM UTILITIES. $ 16.00 (Y) 
by David Goben. 16 powerful programs designed for use 
with TRS/LSDOS 6.x systems 

SCRIPT Word Processor $ 37.95 (Y) 

for Model |, Ill, or 4/4P/4D by David Goben. 

Specify Version when ordering: 

Model Ill TRSDOS 1.3 

Model | or Ill LDOS 

Model | NEWDOS/80 v 1 

Model | or Ill NEWDOS/80 v 2 
Model 4/4P/4D TRSDOS/LSDOS 6.X 
Model 4/4P/4D DOSPLUS 


CN80 PRODUCT GUIDE - Oct/92 - Page 1 


SCRIPT SPELLING VERIFIER $ 37.95 (Y) 
by David Goben. 
SUPERSCRIPSIT SPELLING CHECKER $ 37.95 (Y) 


by David Goben. 

Specify version when ordering Spellers 

Model |, Ill, 48k, 2 disk drives minimum required. 
Model 4 64k, 2 disk drives minimum required. 


MODEL 3 FBACKUP by David Goben $ 15.00 (Y) 
LDOS 5.x. Very fast and versatile backup utility. 

MODEL 4 FBACKUP by David Goben $ 15.00 (Y) 
Very fast and versatile backup utility for Model 4. 

MODEL 3 FASTBACK by David Goben $ 29.95 (Y) 
LDOS 5.x systems. Very fast hard drive backup prg. 

MODEL 4 FASTBACK by David Goben $ 29.95 (Y) 
TRS/LSDOS 6.x systems. Very fast hard drive prg. 

MODEL 3 FFORMAT by David Goben $ 15.00 (Y) 
Fast FORMAT for Model 3 using LDOS 5.3.x. 

MODEL 4 FFORMAT by David Goben $ 15.00 (Y) 


Fast FORMAT for Model 4 using LSDOS 6.3.x. 


HARD DISK BUILDER by David Goben $ 10.00 (V) 
Build your own hard disk driver. 

HI-RES UTILITIES PACKAGE by David Goben’ $ 15.00 (Y) 
Nine utilities to perform general graphics 
maintenence from DOS ready. 


POSTMASTER SUPPORT UTILITIES by D.Goben $ 39.00 (Z) 
Ten programs create icons for PostMaster. 

POSTMASTER 24 by David Goben $ 15.00 (Y) 
Utility programs allow PostMaster by David Miller, to be 
used on a 24 pin dot matrix Epson compatible printer. 


SUBDIRCTORY by David Goben $ 19.95 (Y) 
Build subdirectories on your hard drive or floppies. 


REMBRANDT Graphics Toolkit $ 39.95 (Z) 
by Spectre Technologies. Graphic software for Mod 
4/4D/4P, TRSDOS/LSDOS, hi-res board is not required. 
Order both Rembrandt and Long & Loud for $ 67.50 (Z) 


LONG & LOUD Sideways & Banner $ 34.95 (Z) 
by Spectre Technologies. Mod 4/4D/4P TRSDOS/LSDOS, 
Order both Rembrandt and Long & Loud for $ 67.50 (Z) 


ASTROCAL by Vernon B. Hester $ 29.95 (Z) 
Turn your Model 1, 3, 4/4P/4D in to a programmable 
calculator. Manual and diskette w/built-in operating 
system, ready to run. Specify computer Model 1,3,4. 


TRSCAN by J.F.R. Slinkman $ 45.95 (Z) 
Scanner program for Chinon DeskScan 2000 with Model 
4 using LSDOS 6.3.0 or 6.3.1. 


ROMCLOCK3 UTILITY PACKAGE $ 5.00 (Y) 
by David Goben. Clock operating system for SmartWatch 
or No Slot Clock LDOS 5.3.1 version. 


ROMCLOCK4 UTILITY PACKAGE $ 5.00 (Y) 
by David Goben. Clock operating system for SmartWatch 
or No Slot Clock TRS/LS 6.3.1 version. 


POSTMASTER $ 40.00 (Y) 
by David P. Miller Make labels, letterheads 
Posters with a variety of Fonts and picture Icons. 


ARRANGER Il $ 39.95 (Y) 
by Dan Foy. Disk index program for TRS-80 Model |, 
Ill, 4/4D/4P. Automatically recognizes all major TRS-80 
disk operating system formats. 


ANSITERM 4 $ 30.00 (Y) 
by Richard VanHouten. TRS-80 Mod 4 Hi-Res 
Communications Program. Supports ANSI & AVATAR 
control codes, IBM graphics, & file transfer by X or Y 
modem. Hi-Res board required. 


IDIM by Leonard J. Lorden $ 80.00 (Y) 
Model 4 BBS Host System Program. Build your own 
custom Bulletin Board. 


MOUSEDOS by Leonard J. Lorden. $ 25.00 (Y) 
Build your own DOS command menu with the cursor 
operated by a mouse. Easy to set up, easy to use. 


GIF4MOD4 $ 37.95 (Y) 
by J.F.R. Slinkman. Send or receive GIF hi-res graphics 
to & from different types of computers with your Mod 4. 


SLOT4 $ 14.95 (Y) 
by J.F.R. Slinkman. Accurate simulation of 1930's Mills 
slot machine. True revolving dials, moving handle, 
and realistic sound effects. Mod 4 & Hi-Res required. 


VIDPOKR4 $ 19.95 (Y) 
by J.F.R. Slinkman. Play real video poker on your 
computer. Remarkable screen renditions of playing cards. 
Mod 4, 128k, & Hi-Res required. 


The CN8O MOUSE HOUSE PRODUCTS 

MOUSE+ DRIVER by David Goben $ 10.00 (Y) 
Complete Mouse Driver Program and manual for 2 or 3 
button mice for Model 4. Write your own mouse 
programs in BASIC or program language. 


M T K by David Goben $ 18.00 (Y) 
Mouse to Keyboard Interface program w/manual for 2 or 
3 button mice for Model 4. MOUSE DRIVER Required. 


THREE BUTTON MOUSE $ 26.95 (Z) 
Three button mouse and adapter for RS-232 connection. 
NOTE: Model 4s w/RS-232 connector pointing down 
require an Extender Cable $8.00 + $2.00 S&H. 


CN80 COMBINATION MOUSE PACKAGE 
M4s w/RS-282 connector out the back $ 52.95 (Z) 
M4s w/RS-232 connector on the bottom $ 59.95 (Z) 
Includes: 3 button mouse w/adapter, and extender cable 
if needed (see pricing above), Mouse+ Driver program 
and M T K Interface program. 


MOUSE HOUSE HOLSTER $ 1.75 (X) 
Holds mouse on side of computer out of the way. 

MOUSE PAD $ 2.45 (Y) 
Better Mouse control, foam pad nonslip surface. 

MOUSE CABLE ADAPTERS $ 2.95 (W) 
Male 9 pin to Male 25 pin 

BOOKS 

DISK INTERFACING GUIDE/MOD | $ 1.85 (V) 
by William Braden Jr. Out of print book. 

101 COMPUTER BUSINESS IDEAS $ 7.95 (A) 


by Wally Wang. “If you'd like your computer to work for 
you-and help you earn money-this is the book to read." 

HOW TO GET STARTED WITH MODEMS $ 8.95 (A) 
by Jim Kimble. "...covering everthing the beginning 
modemer needs to know-from purchase and installation’. 

SIMPLE COMPUTER MAINTENANCE & REPAIR $ 2.95 (A) 
by Wally Wang and Scott Millard. "...understandable, 
inexpensive and easy maintenance solutions. 

THE OFFICIAL COMPUTER WIDOW’S $ 7.95 (A) 
(and Widower’s) HANDBOOK by Experts on "Computer 
Widow/Widowerhood. Enjoyable...Funny...Perfect gift. 

ROOKIE PROGRAMMING $ 8.95 (A) 
by Ron Dippold. Introduction to programming for 
beginners and newcomers. BASIC, C and Pascal. 

INSIDE CP/M $ 6.95 (Z) 
by David E. Cortesi. A guide for Users & Programmers 
with CP/M-86 & MP/M2 


LASER and DOT MATRIX PRINTER DRIVERS 
ALLWRITE HP LASER SUPPORT $ 20.00 (Y) 
PACKAGE, Model 4/4P/4D 


CN80 PRODUCT GUIDE - Oct/92 - Page 2 


ALLWRITE DESKJET SUPPORT $ 20.00 (Y) 
PACKAGE, Model 4/4P/4D 

SUPERSCRIPSIT HP LASER DRIVER $ 20.00 (Y) 
Model 1,II1,4/4P/4D 

SCRIPSIT PRO HP LASER DRIVER $ 20.00 (Y) 
Model 4/4P/4D 

SUPERSCRIPSIT FX80 DRIVER $ 17.95 (Y) 
Model 1,1I1,4/4P/4D 

SCRIPSIT PRO FX80 DRIVER $ 17.95 (Y) 


Model 4/4P/4D 


LASER SOFT FONT PACKAGES 

SPECIFY WORD PROCESSOR: 
SuperSCRIPSIT for the Model III 
SuperSCRIPSIT for the Model 4 
Scripsit PRO for the Model 4 


Font style Point Size (Height of Letter) 

Century 10 point 
Amertype 10 point 
Legal 10 point 
Helvetica 10 point 
Optimas 10 point 
Palitine 10 point 
Times Roman 10 point 
Palitine 12 point 
Centrum 12 point 
Optimis 12 point 
Helvetica 12 point 
Palitine 8 point 


Each Font Package supports normal, bold and italics 
printing of letters. Thirty-six soft font packages in all, 
Twelve soft fonts for each word processor supported. 


Prices are $10 for each soft font package, plus (Y) 
Discounts for multiple font orders are: 

5 Font Packages for $ 45.00 (Z) 

10 Font Packages for $ 90.00 (Z) 

12 Font Packages for $ 96.00 (Z) 


FILE CABINET CATALOGS 

MODEL 4 TRS-80 PUBLIC DOMAIN $ 2.00 (V) 
MODEL 4 HIGH RESOLUTION $ 2.00 (V) 
MODEL 4 MACPAINT HIGH RESOLUTION $ 2.00 (V) 
TRS-80 MODEL 1/3 PUBLIC DOMAIN $ 2.00 (V) 
SYMPHONY 90 MUSIC LIBRARY CATALOG $ 3.00 (V) 


SYMPHONY 90 MUSIC SYSTEMS FOR THE MODEL 4 


SYMPHONY 90 COMPOSER SYSTEM $ 39.95 (Z) 
Specify Model 4 or Model 3 Version 
SYMPHONY 90 PLAYER SYSTEM $ 17.95 (Z) 


Specify Model 4 or Model 3 Version 


SYMPHONY 90 MUSIC INTERFACE UNIT WITH AMPLIFIER 
Sold only with Composer or Player program. 


Interface and Composer System $114.00 (Z) 
Specify Model 3 or Model 4 Versions. 
Interface and Player System $ 92.00 (Z) 
Specify Model 3 or Model 4 Versions. 

Y CABLE $ 18.00 (Y) 


50 pin edge-card connectors. Enables hard drive and 
Symphony 90 (or ORC 90) to be used at the same time. 


TRSLINK LIBRARY DISKS 
TRSLINK issue 1 to 48 only 
(5-1/4" LSDOS 6.3 or 5-1/4" TRSDOS 1.3) 
Complete set 1 to 48 $ 36.00 (Z) (Flippy Disks Only) 


$ 1.50 (W) 


SPECIALTY PROGRAM 
SPECTECH Disk#1 $ 5.00 (V) 
A collection of electronic and other formula programs. 


DISK OPERATING SYSTEMS (DOS) 


TRSDOS 1.3 R/S Cat # 26-0312 $ 7.00 (X) 
Model 3, Disk Operating System and BASIC 

LDOS 5.3.1 | $ 39.95 (Y) 
Model 3 Disk Operating System and Basic Interpreter. 

LS-DOS 6.3.1 R/S Cat # 700-2297 $ 39.95 (Y) 


Model 4 Disk Operating System and Basic Interpreter 


LABELS 
One Wide Labels for Mail or Disks Pressure Sensitive, 
Quality Guaranteed. 


3-1/2 x 15/16 Plain Permanent Mailing Labels 


1000 per package $ 4.22 (B) 
5000 per Box (One Box) $ 11.95 (B) 
More than one 5000 pc. box $ 10.95 (B) 
3-1/2x 1-7/16 Plain Permanent Mailing Labels 
1000 per package $ 5.25 (B) 
5000 per box $ 22.95 (B) 
More than one 5000 pc. box $ 20.66 (B) 
4 x 1-7/16 Plain Removable Labels 
1000 per package $ 7.45 (B) 
5000 per box (One Box) $ 26.95 (B) 
More than one 5000 pc. box $ 24.95 (B) 
4 x 1-7/16 Plain Permanent Mailing Labels 
1000 per package $ 5.25 (B) 
5000 per box (One Box) $ 22.95 (B) 
More than one 5000 pc. box $ 20.66 (B) 
DISKETTES 
FLOPPY DISKS $ .40 (C) 


5-1/4 Double/Single Sided Disks DD. 100% Error Free 
Lifetime Guarantee with Paper Sleeves, Labels & 
Read/Write Tabs. 


FLIPPY DISKS $  .60 (C) 
5-1/4 Single Sided DD on both sides. Premium Quality 
with two notches by factory. American made by Name 
brand mfg. 100% Error Free. With Paper Sleeves, Labels 
& R/write Tabs. 


3-1/2" DISKS $ .69 (D) 
Premium Quality DS/DD by Major US mfg. Complete with 
sleeves and labels, 100% Error Free, Lifetime Warranty. 
American Made - Bulk Platinum Brand by Syncom. 

5-1/4" TYVEK SLEEVES (25 per pk) $ 1.25 (U) 

COLOR CODED DISK LABELS 
Five Color 5.25 Write-On Disk Labels 
10 labels w/10 read-write tabs per sheet 
100 per package $ 50 (U) 


FLOPPY DISK MAILERS 
Self-Sealing Mailer package of 10 
Holds one or two 5-1/4 floppy disks. 


$ 3.35 (Y) 


SELECTOR SWITCHES 
A-B SWITCH, PARALLEL $ 18.75 (Z) 
With three female 36 conductor centronics connectors. 


A-B SWITCH, SERIAL, RS232 $ 18.75 (Z) 
With three DB25 Female connectors. 

THREE POSITION SERIAL SWITCH $ 20.95 (Z) 
w/4 DB25 Female connectors 

FOUR POSITION SERIAL SWITCH $ 22.95 (Z) 


w/5 DB25 Female connectors. 


CABLES REQUIRED BETWEEN AB SWITCH and PRINTER 


Printer to Selector Switch 6 $ 13.49 (E) 
Printer to Selector Switch 10’ $ 15.95 (E) 
Printer to Selector Switch 15’ $ 18.95 (E) 


CN80 PRODUCT GUIDE - Oct/92 - Page 3 


RS232 SERIAL CABLES 

RS232 Serial Cable 6 ft. $ 8.95 (E) 
Equal to Radio Shack #26-240, Male - Female 

RS232 Serial Cable 6 ft. $ 8.95 (E) 
Equal to Radio Shack #26-249, Male - Male 


RS232 NULL MODEM Cable 6 ft $ 9.95 (E) 
Connect two computers together. 
RS-232 EXTENDER CABLE $ 8.00 (Y) 


For computers w/RS-232 connector pointing down on 
the bottom of the computer. 


HARD DRIVE CABLES 
HARD DRIVE CABLE 4 ft $ 16.00 (Y) 
w/50 pin Edge Card connector & H D pin connector. 


PRINTER CABLES for TRS-80 & 1000 COMPUTERS 


Flat Ribbon 6’, Mod III/4/4D&P $ 12.95 (E) 
Printer Cable 

Flat Ribbon 12’, Mod III/4/4D&P $ 15.00 (E) 
Printer Cable 

DISK CLEANING, DUST COVERS 

5-1/4" DISK DRIVE CLEANING KIT $ 4.90 (Y) 

3-1/2” DISK DRIVE CLEANING KIT $ 5.25 (Y) 

UNIVERSAL PRINTER DUST COVERS $ 9.75 (Y) 


For printers up to 16" wide, anti-static vinyl, 
soft tear-resistant, elastic bottom. 


INTERNAL HALF HEIGHT DOUBLE SIDED DISK DRIVES 


Internal Half Height 5-1/4 360K $ 67.00 (Z) 
Internal Half Height 3-1/2 720K $ 67.00 (Z) 
Half Height Filler Plate $ 4.00 (V) 
Internal 2 Drive Cable $ 10.00 (xX) 


Specify: Model 4 Gate Array or Non-Gate Array. 
Model 4D or 4P. S&H included when ordered with 
drives. 


EXTERNAL HALF HEIGHT DOUBLE SIDED DISK DRIVES 
COMPLETE WITH CASE AND POWER SUPPLY 


One Disk Drive Unit $143.00 (S) 
One 5-1/4 360K or One 3-1/2 720K Unit. 
Two Disk Drive Unit 193.00 (S) 


Two 5-1/4 360K drives, or two 3-1/2 720K drives. 
Or one 5-1/4 360K and one 3-1/2 720K drive. 


MEMORY CHIPS for MODEL 4 

64K UPGRADE KIT $ 12.95 (Z) 
Includes 8 150ns 128 refresh cycle dynamic ram chips, 
plus instructions and Memory Test Disk. 

64K 120ns CHIPS $2.75ea (Z) 
120ns 128 refresh cycle chips. 16 chips are required for 
use w/Anitek Speed Up Kits. Includes installation 
instructions and Memory Test Disk. 

PAL CHIP $8.00ea (V) 
Required to upgrade Non-Gate Array Model 4s. 


MICRO-LABS HIGH RESOLUTION BOARDS 

GRAFYX SOLUTION for Model 3/4/4P/4D $99.00 (Z) 
Free Draw Program included. Specify Model when 
ordering because the boards are different for each Model. 
Model 3, Model 4P, Model 4 Non-Gate Array or Model 4 
Gate Array. 


MISCELLANEOUS HARDWARE 

HI-RES BOARD EXTENDER BLOCK $ 5.50 (X) 
Used to raise graphic board when other boards have 
been installed. Normally not required. Can also be used 
to raise other 34 pin header, type boards. 
Specify height: 3/16", 5/16", or 5/8" 


ROMCLOCK4 - CLOCK CHIP $ 28.65 (Y) 
Clock chip with ROMCLOCK4 or ROMCLOCKS Utility 
program package and installation instructions. Keep time 
and date current. 10 year lithium battery. 

ASTEC 65 WATT POWER SUPPLY $ 82.00 (Z) 

for Model 4/4P/4D. 


ADD SHIPPING & HANDLING CHARGES LISTED BELOW TO YOUR ORDER 
($10 Maximum S&H charge for United Parcel Ground Service. Add the shipping and handling charges per item ordered) 
if it exceeds $10 for shipment in the 48 states then add only $10 to your order for shipping and handling) 


(A) - Add $2 for 1 to 4 books in US; $3 in PR, AK, 
Hi, APO, FPO, & Canada; $4 all others. 

(B) - Add $2 for ea. label package. $4 for 1 box 
of labels. $3 per box for more than a one 
box shipment. 

(C) - Add $1.50 for 10 floppy or flippy disks; 
for more than 10 add $2.50. Minimum order 10 
disks. 

(D) - Add $2.50 for 10 or less 3 1/2" disks; $2 
for ea. additional 10 disks. 

(E) - Add $4 for one or more cables. 


(S) - Add $6 Shipping & Handling 


(T) - Add $4 for One Item; $6 for Two or More. 
(U) - Add .50 cents per package. 

(V) - Shipping & Handling Included. 

(W) - Add $1 Shipping & Handling. 

(xX) - Add $2 Shipping & Handling. 

(Y) - Add $3 Shipping & Handling. 

(Z) - Add $4 Shipping & Handling. 


Shipments are made by UPS whenever possible. Please use street address when ordering. Orders to Canada and PO Boxes 
must include phone number. Consistent with industry standards no refunds are made for software, manuals, intergrated 
circuit chips or computer parts. Replacement limited to defective material only. No returns without written authorization. 

Check or Money Order Payment Only - We do not accept Credit Card orders. C.O.D. add an additional $4.00 per order. 
APO, FPO, HI, AK, PR, and Canada add an additional $2 per order unless otherwise stated. Wyoming Residents Only add 


4% Sales Tax. 


Prices subject to change without notice. 


Order from: Computer News 80, PO Box 680, Casper, WY 82602-0680; (307)265-6483 
Monday thru Friday - 8am thry 5pm - Mountain Time 


Government, School, and Rated Corporation Purchase Orders Welcome 


CN80 PRODUCT GUIDE - Oct/92 - Page 4 


1/O-BUS LD INTERFACE 


for EXTERNAL FLOPPY DISK DRIVES 


Add external floppy disk drives to your 
Mode! 4P - no internal wiring - plug the 
interface into the external 50 pin 1/O 
connector on your 4P and ~plug_ your 
external disk drives into it. 


T/Maker 
Tandy 2000 or IBM Compatible disks 


T/Maker Integrated Software includes: 


SPELLING CHECKER 

DATABASE SPREADSHEET 

BAR CHARTS UTILITITES 
APPLICATIONS LANGUAGE 


Add additional floppy disk drives to your 
Model 4 or 4D - again just plug the 
interface into the 50 pin I/O bus connector 
and add floppy disk drive 4 & 5. 


WORD PROCESSOR 


Software for TRSDOS 6.2.x and LS-DOS 


Add $6.00 for ground shipment or $8.00 for 2nd day air ; 
6.3.x and cable included. 


shipment. California residents add 8&1/4% sales tax. 


T/MAKER RESEARCH COMPANY 
812 Pollard Road (Suite 8), Los Gatos, CA 95030 


(408) 866-0127 
T/ Master (The Next Generation for DOS) $177 


Compatible with hard drives connected. 
Controls Double-Sided 5.25 360K, 3.5 720K 
or Single-Sided 180K drives. 


$180 + $4 S&H 


I Hate Algebra 


THE INCREDIBLE WINDOWS 3.0 SPREADSHEET 
THAT WORKS LIKE A CALCULATOR 


Software for LDOS 5.3.x $ 29.94 + $3 S&H 
additional. For use with the Model 4 in the 


$39.95 


lil mode. 





Classified Co«p«ter Hews 80 Classified 


MODEL 3+4 public domain programs, free 
disk catalog, JaRick Software, 4201 71st 
Ave N., Brooklyn Center, MN 55429. 
Over 2000 to choose from Drop us a line. 


MODEL 4P w/128k, green screen, 2 
drives, original manuals & software, $150. 
Also MODEL 100 _ portable laptop 
computer w/carrying case, external disk 
drive, A/C adapters, & original manuals, 
$150. I’ll pay shipping. Call after 5 PM 
EST (914)273-5718 





MODEL [I/III/IV | software 4sale. Send 
LSASE to TRS80, 1718 Morrison, Canton 
MI 48187 for list. 


Portable TANDY RADIO SHACK CPM 
COMPUTER SYSTEM COMPLETE offers 
lowcost, hi-quality WP, SS & Online svcs. 
Portable TRS80-4P w/2tFD+WP,SS Progs, 
manuals + Daisy Prntr $375 plus ship 
203/255-5220 


FOR SALE: GENUINE RADIO SHACK 
HARD DRIVES for Models 3 & 4. 5 Meg 
$175. 10 Meg $225. 15 Meg $275. 20 Meg 
$325. 35 Meg $455. Formatted under 
LS-DOS 6.X. New MISOSYS RSHARD5/6 
driver included. Do it yourself special, 
(No Bubble) $125. Includes controller, P/S, 
fan, cables, driver. Install your own 
ST-506 bubble, half or full height. 
Instructions included. All cables included. 
Add S&H to all prices. All hardware 
used, tested, warranted 90 days. Call: Roy 
T. Beck 213-664-5059 after 6pm California 
Time, or Write: 2153 Cedarhurst Dr, Los 
Angeles, CA 90027 


Selling Model W4 software, books, a 
Model 3, multipen plotter, etc..Write for 
list to: 

R YVES BRETON 

PO BOX 83 

SIN PLACE D’ARMES 

MONTREAL, QUE, CANADA 

H2Y 3E9 


USED ORIGINAL DISK DRIVES: ss/dd, 
180k $25; ds/dd 320k $35; plus $4 S&H. 
Replacement Keyboards, CRT Screens & 
Misc parts. Call: CN80 (307)265-6483 for 
availability & prices. 


NEW RS EXTERNAL MINI DISK DRIVES 
w/one single sided full height drive, its 
own power supply & external drive cable. 
26-1164 $69.95 plus $6 S&H. Call or Order 
from CN80. 


Model 4P for $150 plus $20 S&H. USED 
DMP 110 Printer w/Dust Cover & extra 
printer ribbons $65 plus $4 S&H. Color 
Computer 2 w/16k $30, w/manual, plus $4 
S&H. RS 15Meg Hard drives (we only 
have two) $200 plus $6 S&H. Call or 
Order from CN80. 


CLASSIFIED AD RATES 
$1.00 per line. A line is 35 characters or 
spaces wide. Minimum ad charge $6.00 


OS LD SS Ss eS Oo OO Se ee a 








These external disk drives come in a 
metal case with power supply, power 
cord, and 4 ft. drive cable which plugs 
into the external disk drive connector 
on your computer. External disk drives 
are shipped complete via UPS ready for 
you to use, just plug them in and run. 
Plus you get our full support and two 
year warranty. 


Add convenience and 720K storage space 
with 3-1/2 disk drives to your system. 
Complete with all cables ready to go 

at one low price. 
FULL TWO YEAR WARRANTY 
On all parts and labor. 


" 3-4/2 DISKS 


Double Sided Double Density 


Premium Quality 
by Major US Manufacturer 
69 Cents Each 


Complete with labels and sleeves 
100% Certified Error Free, Lifetime Warranty 
Add $2.50 for shipping 10 or less, 
Add $2.00 for each additional 10 disks. 





ABSOLUTE LY THE BEST 








Copyright (c) 1992 
Construction News Publishing Co. 


PO 


BOXED BRAND NAME DISKS 
10 Mil. Jackets 5-1/4 Double-Sided or Single Sided 


$ 7.40 per box of 10 


Computer News SO 


) EXTERNAL DISK DRIVES 
From 
Computer Vewe SO 


ALL DISK DRIVES ARE HALF 
HEIGHT DOUBLE-SIDED DRIVES 
One disk drive unit $ 143.00 
with one 5-1/4 360K 
or 3-1/2 720K unit. 
Two disk drive unit § 193.00 
with two 5-1/4 360K drives 

or two 3-1/2 720K drives 

or one 5-1/4 and one 3-1/2 drives. 


Add $ 6.00 Shipping and Handling in 
the US only, all others contact us for 
shipping costs. COD orders add $3.75 
CHECK OR MONEY ORDER, NO CREDIT CARDS 





Only one computer diskette is 
platinum perfect, only one gives your 
computer the confidence to store ali 
your critical data. 

PLATINUM SERIES computer 
diskettes are certified 100% error-free, 
all the bits are ready to work for you. = 

For the best in data protection. = 
award your computer PLATINUM 
SERIES diskettes. 5 4 /4 Floppy Disks 
ee a ee Oe 


From the World of 


om 


Double/Single Sided 
Double Density 10 Mil Heavy Jacket 
Premium Quality Made In USA 
100% Guaranteed Error Free 


$9.75 for 25 










BULK RATE 
US POSTAGE 


PAID 





Box 680 





Computer News 80 Published 
monthly at a _ subscription § rate 
for 12 months of $24 mailed 
bulk rate in the United States. 
Mailed first class in the US $86. 
Canada and Mexico Aijr Mail 
Only $35.50 US funds. All others 
surface mail $42 US funds. Write 
for Air Mail/Par Avion rates in 
countries other than Canada and 
Mexico. 


Classified ad rates: $1.00 per line 
of 35 characters or spaces, per 
issue. Minimum of $6.00 per 
issue. 


5/11 


CASPER. WYOMING 82602-0680 





FORWARDING & RETURN POSTAGE GUARANTEED 
AOORESS CORRECTION REQUESTED 


CASPER, WY 82601 
PERMIT NO 309