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Meeting News 


Well Spring has sprung!! I think I have used that tired phrase before. 
Usually I have to scratch my head to come up with.something to say in 
this column. This time is different, read on. 


Rolf Miller the treasurer has resigned effective June 1, 2000. I am 
looking for someone to take over this position. There is not a lot of 
work involved just very good bookkeeping. The busiest time. cf the year 
is from November to February when most members renew their membership. 
The person would open a bank account in their name and mine. Usually 
banks won't accept checks made out to the group as we are not 
incorporated. If you are interested or want to nominate someone please 
contact me. 


Jean Nance has also resigned as of mid May. I am looking for someone 
to take over the job of finding editors for the upcoming year. The job 
asks that the person find an editor and send them the file for the 
heading for the newsletter, the file containing the Cfficers and the 
policy page. The managing editor also gives help to the editor when. 
needed. A more detailed job description will be sent to anyone who is 
interested in the position. 


I would prefer the volunteers to have E-mail access but it is not 
necessary. It just makes the transfer of information so much faster. I 
will not turn anyone down because they do not have E-mail but it would 
be to everyone's advantage to have this feature. 


If you would like to volunteer for either one of these positions 
please contact me aS soon as possible. If you know of someone who is 
interested please as them to contact me. My address, telephone number 
and E-mail address are: | 


Tom Adams 

4427 39th Street 
Brentwood, MD 20722-1022 
(301) 927-8826 . 
tomadams@smart.net 


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MEETING 64/128 USERS THROUGH THE MAIL —- OFFICERS 
TOM ADAMS. President. BRIAN VAUGHAN, oe, 
4427 39th St. 2i0l Shoreline Dr. 
Brentwood, MD 20722-1022. 352, Alameda, CA 94501-6245. 
Group business and Membership Membership Addresses and Bicqraphies 
Printing and Distribution of MaiLink Corrections and Chanqes 
Ph. (301) 927-8826. 
email tomadams@smart.net. RICHARD J. SAVOY. Editor 
200 West Street #9 
FRANCIS REDMOND. Vice-president. Ware, MA 01062-9783 
Rt 7, Box 7614 Editor "MaiLink on Disk" 
Palestine, TX 75801. 
JOSEPH F. FENN 
ROLF L. MILLER, Treasurer. 3612 Puuku Makai Drive 
492 Anacapa St. Honolulu, HI 96818. 
Ventura, CA 93001. E-Mail Addresses and Changes 
Dues and Donations. 
(Checks to the trust account must LINDA J. TANNER. 
be made out to Rolf L. Miller). RR1, Box 120T 
Black, MO 63625-9702. 
JEAN NANCE. MaiLink Managing Editor Information" 
1109 Briarciiff Dr. Volunteers for "Resources". 
Urbana, IL 61801. 
TREASURER 'S REPORT From: Rolf L. Miller, Treasurer 
Following is a summary of the trust account as of March 31, 2000. ww 
Balance The Credits include all dues and donations 
1-31-00 $2470.03 1-1-00 $2606.03 received during the period. The Debits are 
Credits 333.00 947.00 all the expenditures during the period, the 
Debits 629.06 979 .06 largest part of which is the cost of 
3-31-00 2173.97 3-31-00 2173.97 printing and mailing the MaiLink and Bic 
pages. 
COMMODORE MAILINK POLICIES 
The Commodore MaiLink is published every other month by Meeting 64/128 Users Through the 
Mail. Copyright 1999 by Meeting 64/128 Users Through the Mail. Ali rights reserved. 
Permission given to reprint material if credit is given to "Meeting 64/128 Users Through 
the Mail." The names "Meeting 64/126 Users Through the Mail" and "The Commodore MaiLink”" 
are also copyrighted. Any and all opinions expressed in this publication are the views of 
the authors and in no way necessarily reflect the viewpoints, attitudes, or policies of 
Meeting 64/128 Users group uniess so stated or indicated. Neither Commodore MaiLink nor 
Meeting 64/128 Users Through the Mail advocates or condones the piracy of copyrighted 
software. All programs published are with the permission of the author or are, to the best 
of our knowledge, in the public domain. Software offered for sale is said by the seller 
to be either public domain or, if commercial, is the original disk with the original 
documentation. All manuscripts, or any material for review or publication should be sent 
to the editor of the next issue (see "Editor's Desk"). Commodore MaiLink reserves the 
right to edit submissions. aa 
Go 


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FROM THE EDITORS DESK -- Paul Berry 


To produce this issue I used a C=128 in 80 column mode, an 1802A 
monitor two 1581 and one 1571 disk drives numbered 8, 9 and 10 respectively 
and my printer was a dot matrix Star NX-1040 Rainbow using a black 
(reinked) ribbon. 


Most of the material submitted for this issue, came in on 5.25” disks 
in TWS format. Some came as text in email messages and some came as written 
pages. Since there is no shell account available in the this area I used a 
PC to receive the email and converted the text as MSDOS ASCII files to 
PetASCII files using the Big Blue Reader. As most of.you know, The Write 
otuff handles PetASCII files very easily. That is one of the reasons I 
prefer, and use, TWS. Where graphics (FGM clip art) appear, I used the 
Illustrator II version of TWS to fit them into the text. 


As the material arrived, I processed it as necessary, made a printout 
and saved it to a work disk as TWS documents. Producing the final copies 
was then just a matter of assembling the documents into the MaiLink page 
format. 


I want to say a large THANK YOU to all who submitted material for this 
issue. Without such material, editors would be hard pressed to fill up an 
issue of MaiLink. The interests of our membership is quite varied as this 
issue attests, and the amount of materiai is evidence of our members 
interest in Commodore computing. Later in this issue there are references 
to surveys of Commodore usage, and while the number of 8-bitters appears to 
be decreasing, we are none-the-less very active. 


I want to repeat Jean Nance's appeal to members to volunteer to be an 
editor. It is not difficult and frankly, I find it quite enjoyable. It 
offers me the opportunity to communicate with many of you that otherwise 
might just be a name on the membership list. 


wk k & 
The EDITOR FOR THE JULY ISSUE will be David O Mohr. 


He can accept, and would prefer, GeoWrite documents. 

He can accept GeoWrite documents as attachments to email provided they 
are in Wraptor V3 or Convert 2.2, 2.5 or 3.1 format. 

He can accept text as an email message. 

He can accept material on a disk as a PetASCII sequential text. 

He can accept material on either 5.25" or 3.5" disks. 

Members can log onto his BBS 503-325-2905 and UL a file if they wish. 


His mailing address is: 
<Sensei> David O. Mohr 
A.C.U.G. #447 
623 29th Street 
Astoria, Oregon 97103 


His email address is: ronin@pacifier.com 


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COMMODORE MAILINK MAY 2000 


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14 Years of Meeting 64/128 Users Through the Mail 


Gary Noakes 


in the May 1986 issue of Compute!'s Gazette, the User Group 
listing for the first time included "The 64 User Group of America", 
with Kirby Herazy listed as the founder and president. The members of 
the group (all 35 of them!) corresponded with each other through the 
mail, but there were no regular group mailings, no newsletter and no 
dues. In 1987, the group's name was chandeto "Meeting 64/1268 Users 
Through the Mail", and Jean Nance became the president. A membership 
list was started, containing a brief biography of each member,along 
with their Commodore system components and their computing interests. 
Later that year,a bi-monthly newsletter was started with the simple, 
if bland, name of Newsletter, with Jean Nance as the editor. Most of 
the articles were (and still are) written by the group members 
themselves, with occasional items of special interest reprinted from 
outside sources. There were still no dues required for membership in 
the group, so donations from the members themselves covered the cost 
of printing and mailing Newsletter. After three issues were published, 
a contest was held to give the newsletter a more interesting name, and 
from the suggestions submitted by the group The Commodore MaiLink was 
the standout winner. In 1988 with membership numbers and publishing 
costs climbing, annual dues of $5.00 were instituted. 

With Commodore users being such a, umm, thrifty bunch, the 
membership numbers dropped precipitously. but with good word-of-mouth 
and a steady place in the Commodore user group listings in the popular 
Commodore magazines, the group membership soon began climbing 
steadily. It reached a peak of more than 300 in the early 90s. And as 
the membership grew. so did the membership bic list, the size of The 
Commodore MaiLink itself, the cost of the postage required and ,of 
necessity, the membership dues, to $9, then $10, then $12 (for U.S. 
members), where it remains today. "Meeting 64/128 Users Through the 
Mail” has always been a non-profit organization and it relies solely 
on membership dues and the occasional member donation to continue 
publication. 

In 1994, the combined office of Group President/MaiLink Editor was 
(deservedly) split into two distinct offices. Frank Redmond became the 
new president,with Jean Nance keeping the "The Commodore MaiLink'" 
editor-in-chief position. In 1996 Frank stepped down and Tom Adams 
became the new group president, with Frank assuming the vice- 
president's position. Longtime members Brian Vaughan and Rolf Miller 
maintain the membership records and the group treasury, respectively. 

Today, Meeting 64/128 Users Through the Mail has about 165 members. 
The Commodore MaiLink averages 18-20 pages for each issue and is 
published regularly six times a year (the odd-numbered months). Each 
issue is edited by a volunteer from the group; the articles, still 
with only a few exceptions, are written and submitted for publication 
by members of the group. 

OQur membership includes users in the United States, Canada, 
Greece, France and Australia. Some of our members are or have been 
contributors to such publications as RUN, Compute's Gazette, Loadstar, 
Loadstar Letter and Commodore World: others are active contributors to 
the COMP .SYS.CBM and ALT.C64 newsgroups. All of our members love 


Commodore computing. 
4 





’ COMMODORE MAILINK MAY 2000 


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oe A SURVEY OF THE MEMBERSHIP by Rolf Miller 


The stated purpose of the Membership List (AKA the Bio's) is to 
provide the basis for individual members to communicate with one 
another. This makes the Membership List the heart of the group. After 
ali, the group is about Meeting 64/128 Users Through The Mail. 

Individual communication, though, is not the life blood of the 
group. Rather, what nourishes all the members is the bi-monthly 
newsletter of the group: the Commodore MaiLink. The proof of that is 
seen in the notations accompanying renewal checks. "MaiLink dues” is 
the most common memo. 

The vitality of the group, therefore, depends upon the MaiLink 
coming from its heart. While the common thread connecting all members 
is Commodore use, there is a broad range of interests. The contents 
of the MaiLink, then, must reflect the interests of all its members 
lest they starve. This requires editors cf the MaiLink to strive for 
well-rounded issues. 

Needless to say, members can greatly assist the editors in their 
task by writing articles about how they accomplish things with their 
Commodores. Indeed, according to the March 2000 Membership List, no 
fewer than 5% of the members are engaged in or express an interest in 
any given computer activity. This means that whatever you are doing 
with your Commodore, others are doing or interested about learning. 

Browsing through the information provided by the Membership List 
reveals the following. 

x Half the membership is on line. This is known because they 
include an e-mail address with their information. The domain name in 
those addresses tell something else: 50% of the internet users do soa 
with a platform other than Commodore. Yet, the inventory of computer 
equipment shows heavy commitments to Commodore use. 

Those who use or express interest in GEOS constitute a third of 
the group. And a good number of these GEOS users indicate that it is 
their primary operating system, citing Wheels, Post Script printing, 

-SUCu ; 

Well over 50% mention word processing as an activity. This 
includes the 15% who specify desk-top publishing and most GEOS users. 

Nearly 20% of the membership declare an interest in programming, 
including BASIC, machine, and other languages. 

A similar number express interest in playing games, strategy 
varieties outnumbering the arcade type. 

Other aspects of computing mentioned include music, involvement 
with genealogy programs, graphic manipulation, data base management, 
spreadsheets, hardware projects, HAM radio applications, ad 
infinitum. 


a i a a a a a. a. ae 3 


LET'S WELCOME A NEW MEMBER 


| RALPH AMBROSE, 4 B St. Trailer Square, Plant City, FL 33566-2916 

cr Ralph is retired. Hobbies: Stamp collecting, and travel. System: C-64, 
| 15941 disk drive. MPS-802 & Star NX-1000C printers, and a Zenith ZVM- 
121 monitor. Interests: Telecommunications, E-mail, 

(ambraja@aol.com). 





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COMMODORE MAILINK MAY 2000 


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A RESPONSE TO TOM ADAM'S SUGGESTION Fram Kager Hoyer 


In the March Mailink Tom Adams wondered if there is a way that 
someone could act as a central clearing house for all Commodore 
equipment. While that seems like a monumental undertaking for a 
Single individual, it wouldn't be so hard if a number of clubs 
throughout the country started @ program such as our Cincinnati 
Commodore Computer Club did in the fall of 1996. 

As Publicity Director, my name, address and phone number are used 
as the official contact for our club. In the fall of 1996 we started 
getting phone calls from people who had downgraded to a Windoze 
machine and wondered if anyone in our club would be interested in 
buying their "stuff". We developed a standard answer- "most of our 
members have several backup computers and disk drives. However, if 
you would like to contribute your items to the club, we will determine 
their value in today’s dollars and send you a letter giving you the 
total worth, That way you can deduct the amount from your income 
tax". If they didn't want to do that immediately, we invited them to 
bring their items to a club meeting and attempt to sell it. We also 
told them of our annual Swap Meet in October when they would also be 
welcome to bring their items for sale at no charge for space. We also 
give them an idea of what they can expect to get for their items. 

Well, the response started as a trickle and gradually built up to 
& steady influx of items throughout 1997. Since it was my idea. guess 
who the club decided should keep track of it??? Fortunately for our 
club, our Vice-president has a nice polé barn on his property that 
allows us to store all the hardware. He's also our resident repair 
tech and has a shop in his barn. The rest of the items are stored in 
my basement (much to my wife's chagrin). It's a good thing 1 retired 
in December of 1996, because it turned into almost a full time job to 
catalog all the donations, create the separate files, copy the disks 
and send letters to the donors. 

We also donate hardware to people who can't afford to buy a 
computer, but would like to learn. We have a standing invitation in 
all our meeting notices that we will donate computers to schools and 
home schoolers. We are currently in contact with an inner city church 
about loaning them computers. In the past three years we have donated 
a dozen systems to a local school system which had them for about size 
months before the parent's association got enough money together to 
buy that OTHER brand. We have donated systems to three home schoolers 
and a couple who came to our meetings from out of state. One 
requirement we stipulate to our donees is that 1f they should get 
another computer, we get the Commodores back. 

Most of the cartons we use are ones my wife and I accumulate at 
home. She's a Tupperware manager and I do custom picture framing, so 
between the two of us there is usually a carton suitable for shipping. 
Most of them we knock down for storage. We use egg cartons, styrofoam 
"peanuts", picture frame dust cover trimmings, whatever commercial 
bubble pack we accumulate and newspaper for packing. The club has had 
to purchase only a few cartons so far. I have sizes and prices from 
Staples, Office Max and Organized Living. If I see we will need to 
buy a carton, we tell the buyer and include it in the shipping 
charge. 





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COMMODORE MAILINK ‘MAY: 2000 - 


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Over the time period we have been doing this I have recorded the 
weight of hardware by itself, in it's original carton (when possible) — 
and in cartons we have collected to use for shipping. This way. when 
we get an order we can tell the buyer how much it will weigh and 
determine the shipping cost. 

We use the USPS because the UPS agents close to me add their own 
charge to the UPS charge and are therefor more expensive. UPS pick-up 
is either non-existent because of the small number to ship or is 

exhorbitant because we don't ship on a regular basis. I have obtained 
& USPS Official Zone Chart (which tells me which zone to use for 
shipping from my Zip code) and their Mailers Companion Special Rates 
Issue so that we can tell buyers how much postage will be on their 
order. Software and printed matter can be shipped using the Book 
Rate, which is much cheaper than Parcel Post and is the same cost no 
matter how far it is shipped. 

The donations have slowed down in the last eight months or so. We 
used to get about one a month, and I would create a new set of files 
each month. Now they come in about once every three months. We got 
three at March's meeting. We have also received some Amiga items. 

The last donation of Amiga stuff was big enough that I will now create 
& separate set of files for it and delete the current items from our 
regular 8-bit lists. 

We now have over 1250 software items, 380 hardware items, 300 
accessory items, 150 books. 400 manuals and 4 magazines. Magazines 
don't stay around very long - as soon as people see there 18s a long 

ist of magazines, they are bought. The software file 1s now so big 
that no Commodore word processor can call the entire file into memory. 
That's why there are two sequential file readers on the disk we send, 
the file is read and not retained in memory. 

We advertise our items in the Mailink, LOADSTAR's Starboard, on 
the internet at comp.sys.cbm and on our web site - 
www.geocities.com/siliconvalley/grid/641z2. Most of our sales are 
generated from the internet and we have shipped items all over the 
continental United States, Canada, Finland, to a soldier in Germany 
via an APO Box and Australia. 

When we started this program in the fall of 1996 , our club's 
treasury was down to a mere $200.00 and we were seriously discussing 
whether to continue to finance a monthly newsletter that was costing 
about $50.00 each month to produce, or to cut it to a bi-monthly or 
quarterly publication. Since we started selling the items, we don't 
have that worry any more and our treasury is very healthy! 

Getting back to what I originally started to say (FINALLY!), if a 
number of clubs scattered across the country could figure out how they 
could do what we're doing, then the shipping costs to get stuff to 
then wouldn't be so costly and all us Commodore diehards could benefit 
from it. 

If anyone wants more information about how to set up a program 
like this or copies of my weights and carton measure lists just give 
me a holler! My phone number is 513/248-0025. 








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still more Heavenly Hash from Ed Hariler 
(Being mainly comments on the March issue of "MaiLink") 


Tom Adams wrote about a clearing house for C= equipment. Perhaps 
it would be better to have a coordinator, since there are already 
several clearing houses. Some have been listed in past issues of 
“MaiLink”. Since many do not want to ship large items, the coordinator 
could perform a valuable service by keeping track of how close a buyer 
is to the seller of desired large items. 


In the March issue on page i2 Rolf Miller wrote: "...a lot of 
members think a great deal of The Write Stuff (TWS) word processor." 
And why not? It is easy to learn and use, and has features that many 
word processors on other platforms still do not have. One feature of 
TWS which I really miss is the Note (or non-printing). Sometimes I 
update a disk file for a Family History Sheet from the notes I've made 
on the printed sheet, but I do not reprint the page(s). (Why print 
new pages when the information will soon be changed thru additions 
and/or corrections you've requested?) By adding a note to the disk 
file I know what IT update and when. If I should print the page by 
mistake (oops, wrong Harler family), all is not lost. I will have an 
updated sheet, but the note will not appear. 


TWS allows the easy creation of accented letters. There is 
probably a way to do that in 4@ non-C= word processors, but so far [I 
haven't found the method. Which brings up the fact that most C= 
programs come with a manual, while Wintel programs do not: that 
information must be purchased separately for another $20-50! (On-line 
help isn't all that great.) 


Sse far I have not encountered the TWS bugs/anomalies mention in 
the March issue. The only quirk I've encountered occurs during 
two-column printing. If the first column contains an imbedded command 
(italics, etc.}, then graphical characters will print in the second 
column. This usually causes the line to exceed the right-hand margin 
and print on the next line in the first column's space. Not only does 
the page look messy, but the words are garbled and the page's spacing 
slipshod. 


I wrote a BASIC program which displays a blinking cursor 
immediately after a letter typed. So far I have not figured out how to 
do the same thing in QBASIC. There are also other BASIC things which 
are easily done on the C= but require more programming in order to do 
the same thing in MS-DOS. Try doing a simple calculation on-screen! 
And in MS-DOS it's impossible to move the cursor to a previous screen 
line. Oh, if C= only had the sales pitch of an IBM or Microsoft. 


A word of caution comes to mind after reading Rolf's article on 
transferring files between different platforms. Don't do it wholesale 
as I did! Make a note of which disks have been transferred to the new 
format or put them in a special place so you know that you've complete 
your work with them. Try to do the transfers in groups (i.e., all 
addresses, letters, etc.). Definitely label all of the new disks, if 
it's only with the general category. 


8 


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I enjoyed reading the "Discussion About Printers." Somehow reading 
the information in print and at one sitting made a much different 
impression. I'd love to take Rolf's suggestion to go soak my 
printer's head, but I can't remove the rascal. (Bring on 

the samari sword!) My Friday Morning Computer Buddy gave me a 
Panasonic KX-P1123, which (unlike Joe Fenn's printer) works only in 
DOS. Strangely enough the Panasonic KX-P2023 worked in both DOS and 
Windows, but I had to go to special pains to get the C= to print in 
the type face I wanted. 


Dick Estel has a good point: "...communication is the bottom line." 
How to do something on a C= can be described in print, verbally. via 
e-mail or Morse code. The computer used to generate the words really 
has nothing to do with the description. Where graphics are concerned, 
however, a C= should be used in order to show the result which will be 
gotten. Using "Page Plus" (or another non-C= program) for graphics 
(other than for decoration) would certainly not be helpful. 


C= mentioned in the text on the back of the 1980s series computer 
stamp. It is also on the backup sheet. 


shortly after computers appeared in the market place, talk of the 
paperless office emerged, but never materialized. Now there are 
rumblings of paperless correspondence. There are several things that 
can't be sent via e-mail (e.g., collectibles), but anything that can 
be scanned is fair game. Knowing that, I feel certain that there's a 
C= programmer out there somewhere working on a better Commodore- | 
useable scanner. 


Store files in plain ASCII on 3.5" disks then they can be used 
immediately or after a single move from 5.25" disks or another word 


processor. 


Many of us use e-mail ona daily basis and we're able to communicate 
with more of our friends as they also get e-mail. This is one of the 
reasons that Internet traffic is estimated to be doubling in just 
under 13 weeks. Back in 1969 there were only four (4) Web hosts: and 
30 years later there are over 43 millicn. More amazing is that in 
1998 there were an estimated 829 million Web pages. The estimate for 
2002 is 7.7 billion pages. I sure hope someone comes up with a very 
efficient and fast search engine in the next two years, because no one 
has the time to scan all of those pages. 


Statistics make good reading and add to your store of trivia. It took 
the telephone 38 years to be a fixture in 30% of U.S. households, but 
it only took TV 17 years to reach the same 30%. The PC hit the mark 
in just 13 years. And the Web? Well, it made it in less than seven, 
however, in another three years (2003) it is estimated that the Web 
will be accessible to at least 50% of all U.S. households. 











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PETIT rire iti nTilire Teint Ure Ot ots er ee eo eo rer re eo re eo ee erie et Tt Tr rrerr tert Perit 


THE ABACUS & COMMODORE 


Po 00 es cones pecncasessorceene oe 2208 940 10 pwQueves: 


COMMODORE MAILINK MAY 2000 


by Rolf L. Miller 


The abacus is arguably the oldest counting device in the world. 


Yet, in spite 


preferred by not a few. 


of its antiquity, the abacus is still used, indeed, 
its reputation even inspired a software 


company that produced many very good Commodore programs to chose the 


name ABACUS. 

A full-s 
rods. The co 
column rod ho 
cross bar. 


and each top bead represents five. 
towards the cross bar. 


ize abacus consists of a frame containing thirteen column 
lumns represent one's, ten's, hundrec's, and so on. Each 
lds five bottom beads and two top beads, separated by a 


Each bottom bead represents one within its column's value 


A bead is counted by moving it 
Thus, the abacus is clear (zero) when all the 


beads are away from the cross bar. 


OONBO0000000000 
OOSCOV90000000 


DOO0O9000N0000 
OOO0000000000 
OOGOOTOCGONON00O 
COSTOOV0000000 
OCO090O090000000 


Counting 
placed on the 
the rightmost 
next column 1 
shows Sz. 


OCO09000 0000008 
COVSGOOV200O OO 


en ee ae eee ee seem aeee aw ee a eee come 
mn Ge SRE CEE wipes Shee Ciees Gee Geer au Gee ee orem 


OO00000GO0000 
COO0GO00000000 
O000000000000 
OVO90000000000 
OOSOOS00 00000 


The simp 
In fact, skil 
what 1S possi 
90 was added 
key presses: 

Further 
accomplished. 
key presses, 
in the ten's 
column to sub 


begins from the right, as usuai. So, the number two is 
abacus by moving two bottom beads up to the cross bar in 
column. Fifty 1s added by moving one top bead in the 
eft (5 teen's) down to the cross bar. The abacus now 


le way abacus works allows for very rapid manipulation. 
led users can produce results on an abacus quicker than 
ble on any keypad device. Think about the example where 
by sliding one bead. To add 50 with keys requires four 
the + key, 3. 0, and the = key. 
speed comes from the way various calculations are 

For instance, whereas adding 8 to the 52 requires three 
the abacus user with a single motion pushes one bead up 
column to add i0 while moving two beads down in the one's 
tract 2 (52 + 10 - 2 is the same as 52 + 8). 


10 





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- COMMODORE ‘MAILINK MAY 2000 


O86 900 CSOD ELC WHETS 10100 CORES OD 00 C00 SOSED 08 OF 8 ECE TCOS COE LETE SE NF: 


By the way, just as spelicheckers can be used to catch miskeyed 
letters, the abacus can be used to guard against erroneous numeric 
input. Because values are placed on an abacus ina different way, it's 
not likely that an error in keying numbers will be duplicated in 
sliding the beads. Therefore, if the results of a series of entries 
accomplished on both the keypad and abacus agree, odds are the work is 
error-free. 

Things do not endure just because they work. Rather, they endure 
because using them is uncomplicated. As seen, the abacus fits that 
description. So does the Commodore, and that no doubt explains the 
response given by a Commodore user to an unprintable remark ridiculing 
his use of a "relic." 

"If a thing is no longer useful just because it is old," he 
posed, "why is the abacus still around?" 

In the world of computers, there is nothing easier to use than a 
Commodore. Nor are there any with less problems. And while it can be 
argued that its lack of complexity limits what it can do, it, like the 
abacus, does what it does very well. Indeed, no small number continue 
to use their Commodores because what these very functional machines do 
accomplish encompasses most, if not all, of what they do with a 


computer. 


a a Se, Se ie a ee Se a, a Se, ee a of 


BASIC KNOELEDGE: Screen Tricks by Gary Noakes 


Basic programmers are forever being told, if you need speed, you 
need to learn machine language. But one of the first things that 
budding ML programmers are told is to learn to use the built-in ROM 
routines wherever possible. This leaves the Basic programmer to 
wonder-—-WHAT ROM routines? 

eaSte on any computer can be made more efficient by tapping into the 
bul n power of the ROMs. This 1s sometimes referred to as 

aa uaaecd. Ge "machine-specific" programming because it utilizes the 
PEEK, POKE and SYS (or CALL) commands built into the Basic language, 
but the addresses following these commands are unique to each 
computer. While this limits the portability of Basic code between 
computers (a C-64 machine-specific program won't run on a native mode 
C-128, for example), it optimizes the program for the targeted 
computer. Some of the machine specific routines are as simple as a 
Single SYS, others require setting up or must be used in conjunction 
with other routines. This power enables Basic programmers to achieve 
greater speeds or even perform feats that are impossible with 
traditional, transportable Basic. 

The programming examples presented here are C-64 specific. All of 
the routines are fully explained so that you can knowledgeably import 
them into your own programs. This should make them easy for all but 
the most novice programmer to use. Each line of code has been kept 
short so that the examples can be more easily understood. This slows 
down execution time somewhat but the learning aspect takes 


precedence. 


i 














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COMMODORE MAILINK MAY 2000 


Cveaean erase vccete reve sesoecrooses COOE ened eed DES OrEseLO TE TEREED ED SeSEs eNOS OOSS IER SEE TETOTY SECO ESCD SRST EO ES OERY jeeeee sececctecs covectssecemenccesesccstoccee saree 08 9b w ete 88S Oved Co Se en ESOS SOON CSET ONE OS DESeas Seton SEEDS REESE EUS SeSEteRESE ETE ESESN SE DEE TEODE SO SoU yCENUSEE! ONG PEERS ESE COE Leen eEE Sere NNEC arenes aaundents Senet In seteccenenceenaeee 


Type in Screen Trick 1.1 and run it. It's a loop that pokes a 
reversed space to every screen location in each of the sixteen = 
colors: 


10 rem:screen trick 1.1:f1ili with poke 
20 a=1024:b=2023:c=160:0=55296-4 

30 printchrs (147) 

40 ford=0to15:fori=atob 

90 pokeoti,d:pokel.c 

60 next:next | 


This is one of the most time-intensive programs in Basic. Even 
though all literal numbers are converted to variables to make it as 
fast as possible, this routine still takes 120 seconds to complete. 
Now type in and run Screen Trick 1.2: 


10 rem:screéen trick 1.2:fast fill 
20 a=1024:b=1063:c=160:0=55296-a 

30 hi=int(a/256) :lo=aand255 

40 printchrs (147) 

90 ford=0tol5 

60 fori=atob: pokeot+ti,d:pokei,c:next 
7G fori=l1to24 

8G poke7&1,i:poke782,0:sys58636 

90 poke780,hi:pokel72, lo:sys59848 
100 next:next 


Although it takes more code to set it up, the end result is ey 
essentially the same as Screen Trick 1.1 but takes only 20 seconds to 
complete! 


While most of Screen Trick 1.2 1s generic Basic, some of it may be 
unfamiliar. Line 30 contains the calculations to figure the high byte 
(hi) and low byte (lo) of address 1024 (a). Lines 80 and 90 contain 
routines that tap directly into the Kernal ROM and require some 
explanation. 

The screen consists of a grid of 1000 locations (0-999). The rows 
(lines) are numbered 0-24, the columns are numbered 0-39. Locations 
781 and 782 are the .X and .Y registers, respectively. Poking these 
locations is the same as LDX and LDY in ML. The PLOT (or PRINT AT) 
routine in line 70 uses these locations to position the cursor. This 
means that the cursor can be placed anywhere on the screen and your 
text printed with the syntax: 


poke781, (Row) :poke782, (Column) :sys58636:print”"Text" 


Location 58634 is the documented Read/Set Cursor entry point. By 
poking the X/Y values ourselves, we can bypass STX and STY (SToreX ane 
SToreY, the first two bytes of Read/Set Cursor) and then jump directly 
into the routine where needed. 

Line 90 pokes the high byte of the screen address into location 780 
(equivalent to LDA, Load Accumulator) and the low byte into location 
172 {the work pointer for the Screen Scroll routine) then calls the 
Move Screen Line at location 59848 to take 40 bytes from the indicated ae 
screen position and copy it to the current cursor position. 


12 





a on COPE OES LODE ES D2 SOO TESSE RSS DESSS Hr de sees FA SOCSLES EET ERE E ORDER OE EESs OE CEE OED IDE SOS CORO REIEESs FO oe Oe coe ympesccoeeete: 0000008 PRG ROD ED OO OOS CU Se Fes ce seed EN 889 1EE SDS TCORSCRSES DDFS DOES: PEROT ESD NPOOIEDES GOSS FOF CE OTDUOT ON OS ELE OET ESE SEES DE 54S SOREDS SESS f PED OES SUSE TESTES Ot SURSSTU SESE CEOS OO PET OSES ON OL ORT OESOS OE EREETEEOES COE0 8008888: 


“COMMODORE. MAILINK MAY 2000 


Pe oe ee ee ert ee er rie od rr re eo ee ee re ee ore iii er ere re ed 


Move Screen Line is used by the operating system (05) whenever lines 
are scrolled on the screen (such as when listing 4a program). By using 
Plot to control the cursor position and Move Screen Line together, the 
screen fills ina fraction of the time it takes norma! Basic 

As a complement to Move Screen Line, type in and run Screen Trick 


Foot 
—~ 6 
oo ~~ e 


10 rem:screen trick 1.3:fast fill & clr 
20 a=1024:b=1063:c=160:0=55296-a 

30 hi=int(a/256) :lo=aand255 

42 printchrs (147) :poke782,0 

90 ford=O0told 

60 fori=atob:pokeoti,d:pokei,c:next 
70 fori=l1to24 

80 poke781,1:sys58636 

90 poke780,hi:pokel72,1lo:sys59848 
100 next 

110 fori=24to0step-i1 

120 poke781,1i:sys59903:next 

130 next 


Notice the last statement in line 40--since the value in 782 will 
remain constant throughout the operation. we can move it out cf the 
loop. Location 58636 in line 80 references the value in 782, using one 
less operation and further speeding up loop execution time. 

The Clear Screen Line routine in line 120 clears the entire line 
columns 0-39) at the position indicated by Plot. Now try Screen Trick 
.4 


10 rem:screen trick 1.4:fast fill & hlfelr 
290 a=1024:b=1063:c=160:0=55296-a 

30 hi=int(a/256) :lo=aandZ5o 

40 printchr$ (147) :poke782,19 

20 ford=Ctol5 

60 fori=atob:pokeoti,d:pokei,c:next 

7QO fori=l1to2z4 

80 poke781,1i1:sys58636 

90 poke7&0,hi:pokei72,lo:sys59848 

100 next 

110 fori=24to0step-1 

i120 poke781,i1:poke782,19:sys59905:next 
130 next 


By poking a new value (19) into 782 in line 40 (again, keeping it 
cout of the loop) and then jumping into the Clear Screen Line routine 
at address 59905, the row is now cleared ONLY from column O to the 
value in 782. Although these examples use a loop to clear the screen, 
either can be used to clear any number of full or partial lines. 

When printing characters to the fortieth screen column, the cursor 
‘wraps around" at the end of the display, switching from 40-column 
screen (display) lines to 80-column logical (programming) lines. The 
addition of a semicolon at the end of a 40-character line of screen 
output allows using the far right column, but subsequent printing to 
the screen can sometimes be unpredictable. 


3 


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COMMODORE MAILINK MAY 2000 


ea cogrecacasen Sewsones epeseees: ee teeusbocste saseees ce seceerscore mm evar gouncr ct sgesua cee set ccceccns petserareres ores: 


Screen Trick 1.5 demonstrates the problem by printing a 40-column 
background with a box overlaid on it. Type it in and run it: 


10 rem:screen trick 1.5:corrupted print 
20 1$="[40 *j" 

30 b$="[rvs on] [18 spaces]" 

40 printchrs (147); 

20 fori=1to024:print1l$; :nex 

60 print" fhome] [6 cursor downs]"; 

70 fori=1to4:printtab(11)b$: next 


The only way to cure the problem is by resetting the line links. 
This can be done individually for each offending line or they can all 
be reset from within a loop. Now type in and run this program: 


10 rem:screen trick 1.6:corrected print 
20 a=217:b=242:c=128 

30 1$="[40 *]" 

40 b$="[rvs on] {18 spaces]" 

90 printchr$ (147); 

60 fori=ito24:printl$;:next 

70 fori=atob: pokei,peek(i)or1i28:next 

80 print" [home] [6 cursor downs]"”; 

90 fori=1to4:printtab(11)b$:next 


The Line Link Table runs from locations 217 to 242 (variables A ane 
B). The table is reset in line 70. 

By using the Line Link Tabie in conjunction with three other ROM 
routines, we can do something that seems impossible in Basic. Type in 
Screen Trick 1.7, press Run/Stop-Restore, list the program and then 
run it: 


10 rem:screen trick 1.7:screen bob 
20 a=217:b=242:c=128 

30 fori=itos 

40 fori=1to0l0:sys58726:sys99749: next 
290 fori=atob: pokei,peek(i)orc:next 
60 fori=itol0O:sys59626:next 

7Q next 


Here are what the SYS addresses in lines 40 and 60 de: 
Home the cursor 


Insert a blank line 
Scroll the screen 


SYS 58726 
SYS 59749 
SYS 59626 


The Line Link Table is reset after inserting each new line at the 
Home position to restore 40-column screen integrity. Without it, the 
OS gets VERY confused about where the cursor is supposed to be (put a 
REM in front of line 50, rerun the program and see for yourself). 
While this example would come under the heading of "stupid screen 
tricks", it illustrates some useful techniques. 


14 


iy 


a 


abo poewenewsete coeecnes 14 O toeseoreve peCeeS 


COMMODORE MAILINK MAY 2000 


2 90 0C eer eR entences Punee SESE tESOES ECOL ES DELOSESES HOOT ES Te REO EENESEPSS OEE OD DEL OS FOR 28S BOER YS IDOE SODED ETP Gnt BUSES TELE STLED EE COSE Tse DE DONE LE OTRN LONE oe 


Here's the same program with a small ML program used to clear the 
jine links: 


10 rem:screen trick 1.8:screen bob w/m]l 

20 fori=49152t049165:reada:pokei.,a:next 

30 forl=1to5 

40 fori=ltol0:sys58726:sys59749:next 

90 sys49152 

60 fori=itoiO:sys59626:next 

7O next 

80 data 162,0,161,217,9,128,149,217,232,224,25, 208.245, 96 


The machine language routine is short enough to be included in the 
program itself, rather than being loaded from disk. It's also 
relocatable to anywhere you have 14 bytes of free space. 

Screen Trick 2.0 15 a program that uses previously described 
examples and some new code to demonstrate various ways of wiping 
(clearing) the screen. Unfortunately, it's far too long to publish as 
a type-in, but it will be available on the MaiLink disk for this 
issue. 

if you have any suggestions for future Basic programming subjects or 
any questions, I can be reached by snailmail or email. 


ey Oe Se A A ee, ae Se. a Se a ae a. Se ce 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Dear Mailink Editor, 


Dick Estel describes & condition where TWS-128 crashes occur when 
using macros. This might not be his problem, but I have found a hang- 
up problem that exists with TWS-128, Illustrator I and II. 

First, amending macros, if they are to be saved, must be the 
only text on the screen. On a new screen, press Control Shift M. 
scroll to where you want your new macro to appear. Press Control 1 to 
activate the insert mode. Add your macro at the place just below 
where you want it. The item there will be pushed ahead of your new 
macro. When through, press return and the old item wiil jump the the 
position just under the new entry. Press Control s and the amended 
macros will be saved to the disk. 

Now the trick to using macros which doesn't appear in the manual: 
Macros will not go into the first line of a text. I usually start my 
text with a note (Control n). After that, press Control m and that 
turns on the macros. Press the macro defined on the left of the 
equals Sign and press space bar. The macro will be printed on the 
screen. 

I, too, had problems with the macros hanging up the program until 
I discovered that using the first line is a no-no. If you want the 
macro to be in the first line, you can put a return in the first line, 
then your macro and then go to the first line and delete the return. 
That will put the macro on the first line. 


W. R. Kennedy 


15 


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sue, Rolf Miller offered a good suggestion for 
s cool by placing them on top of the metal shield 

e; however, not everyone has room on their work 
e the large shield. For many years, I have used a 
2"x4 1/2" bucking EBiock found at hardware stores to place 
wer supply. It elevates it and acts as a great heat sink 
the power suppiy much cooler. And for many years, I have 
15441 drive with its top cover and metal shield removed sc 
‘rates cooler. When not in use, I cover the exposed oe 

owel. also said that he cieaned his drive R/W head 
i te alcohol . I recommend using a Q-Tip ae hea in 190 
c ly denatured alcohol as it does not leave a film on the 
At my ee I have to ask the pharmacist for a pint bottle 
is product as it is not on the store shelves. 


bt. F4 
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Brian Vaughan 
* & &* & ke ke whe Ke RUE KRLhLULU LULU LO KO‘ 
In the March 2000 issue, I stated an ongoing problem I was 


experiencing with RSs TWo 128 BB Speller. Many correctly speiled words 
fall with av in them) were being identified as misspelled. I was 


blaming the ea eee Larry Holiday was kind enough to send me a4 
known good dictionary disk. He also gave me a couple suggestions to 
try if the problem persisted. I found my problem to be my working copy 


of the BB Speller pregqram disk (all three copies). When I used my 
original program disk, I had no problem. Made new working copy and 
now ail is well. THANK YOU Larry Holiday. 

Arvid Nelson. 


we ee ke ee WM RK Ow OOOH 


Many thanks to Rolf for his answers to some of my questions about 
JPEG in the March MaiLink. Also many thanks to our member Jonn 
Guillory. who also sent me a long letter about JPEG and some other 
graphic files. I don’t know if I will ever understand it all. It 
aqifficult ($) to decide whether to get into the digital camera fad, 
I wili wait until I do understand. 

I have another question about Illustrator Both I and Ii. They 
both have a "Help" screen which has some “miserable colors". Light 
green on light grey just do not have enough contrast. My TWS, &80- 
column disk has the same screen but has much better green on black. I 
have had no success in trying to save the "bb cust" program from TWS 
to Illustrator. When tried, program (Illustrator) will not load. (i 
did this on a scratch disk so I haven't lost anything}. Where in 
Illustrator are the color vectors for the help screens? I have spent 
&@ iot of time looking, but it is beyond me. Any help? 

W. R. Kennedy, 


}.J 
Mm tf 


we Re Ke we ee OK Oe Ole Oh ei 


Mary Spink would like infcrmation on where to obtain ribbons for her 
MPS 801 printer, and how to use the MPS 801 printer with Printmaster. 


Mary Spink P.O... BOx 222 Three Rivers. MA 01080-0322 


16 


oP ome meee CEOR sens Ems esonetae as renerns DOG LOTR ETAT ESOT IOEOEENOSASO PART OD ORs LORE CREES NS OF DEES ao ep mE ROGER EARewES NT EE ED TT ESSA ET TE EST EOD E DEO ssl FO ESES Oy EE ERE SES DaLEROOOE ES FOES POSSE BES EH EOE OESS H pmb SOD SESE ESIS ESE COTS EL DOD ESEDE CODE ESOS E080 E008 OS TERPS EES £002 BHERE SS SEES DE ROE ETE EE OERESS OE CSOD OHOE HES COCEF EET OTE PEED EEE SREEEESE OSS ES EET EED ESSE ED ORS FOOSE EOL E TD CORSET ES SOS ERED OO EF ERG DESe SIH DEOs Fas mien ste OO tol DEeeeeenetbeLes emee 


FROM THE MAILINK ON DISK EDITORS CORNER! by Richard Savoy 


COLLECTION COMPLETE: I now have a compiete collection of the 
“Mailink on Disk" thanks to William Haleen, Ken Barskey,Zen Coylmuck 
and the efforts of Tom Adams to obtain from Fred Knerr's daughter some 
of the materia! from his estate and Jean Nance effort to steer me in 
the right direction to obtain the missing disks. Now all the back 
issues are available for one dellar each postpaid. some of the early 
issues are Mailink text witheut added public domain programs and 
grouped together on a single disk. Double sided disks are used for the 
copies, if you are interested check with me first and I'll send a 
list. 

WHAT'S NEW FOR MAY: Gary Noakes "Font Mangler" program (article 
elsewhere in this issue} will take up most of the back side of the 
Commodore Mailink on Disk May issue, but we are having a FREE BONUS 
9.209" DISK with C-64 programs. Many of the programs on this disk are 
from 1993 disks of the month from Melbourne Commodore Computer Club 
(M.C.C.C.) in Australia the largest group in that country, I took an 
assortment from their February through April,1993 plus some other 
programs. 

SUBSCIBE TO THE COMMODORE MAILINK on DISK; If you aren't a 
subscriber you don't have to wait till January, you can start anytime 
and you wili receive the current issue and and the latest bonus issue 
and the next five issues, which are mailed about two weeks after the 
current Mailink newsletter 1s mailed. 


PRICES FOR THE COMMODORE MAILINK on DISK ARE AS FOLLOWS: 
$7.90/year in US. $8.70/year in Canada 
$10.00/year every where else $1.50 single back copies 

U.S.A.Funds only. 


PAYABLE TO: RICHARD SAVOY,250 WEST STREET # 9, WARE, MA 01082-9783 


eK we ee we Re kk Ke ee OK OKO le 


Exclusive on the MAILINK ON DISK: FONT MANGLER by Gary Noakes 


A new C-64 program on this issue's MaiLink On Disk is Font 
Mangler a utility for manipulating character sets en masse, for 
copying characters between character sets, and for doing other 
character set tasks that sometimes need to be done, but that most font 
editors don’t handle well. if they attempt to handle them at all. Font 
Mangler is not a font editor but is designed to work in conjunction 
with one. If you do any work with fonts, font editors, or do any 
programming that uses redefind characters, you can probably find 
something useful in the program. 

The main program itself is compiled, but the full commented source 
code is included on the disk, as is the commented source code for the 
program that was written to generate the eight help screens that are 
loaded by Font Mangler (they live under the Basic ROM and are accessed 
through video bank switching, so you may find the techniques involved 
“interesting and/or instructional). Also included is a program to 
generate a chart of the screen codes of the Commodore character set 
(80-column printer only) and twenty-five fonts to experiment with. 


17 








Agnnenes evr creare sean is Ogee tonne Sees eee ormnser eT ET ETeENEESUDOSOGERER =e CEEEEE TONNES IEG OROLIECCCES COREE TORE OISE DS EENEDE NESE OCDIOD OOS COEDS ORE EET ESIESIREDFCONT Er BUTTE OL Eber ese gece Eee FEAR STOTSEEL SE SEES PDO ORSS BEES UROTS DSAOESSORDREOaL ODES SOOT DEDEDE DEL TE HORE EE FE LECeROE SOE DEL OE GENS OEL DOO E SRS O Est MaE REEL eerSOE SE SEtOD ED ED mess RO~ ENTE SF RESEES FERS RIMOOESEESON DEMS SOO tAteaeCeunN nee ESOS CBOR ATAU ESE SOD 1E0 seeeH ts tenet eonneeersecae sete s 


nenceae aaen vsacasensoosenrasgngseenens seneensrecaeen sagton sacs 0150001 BECt Oeste eaer es suEED sees eas ieeeb ac subs OsO0Es SOSONSES POUETOODE SAD OFEEsanaTaeIOE EI SSE De teDaeee IDOL hE FOES SOLEUS ERIE REN ICEDE LS PESUO DS IRS DIOR CEEE GOS IFODI EES OSES DAES CIO EEOH SDDS e CEE En areEs cesenEnEsaseasonetS Len OLOnE EOE DOSE PEREaD Yoni PesSeenee IDLE NOFOO ET BESET SOREN IOI SIAESE OL SHSEOI BORO DENS LE EOEED ED ONE Tone ver eSaleOa EDGES ODED DEG ST OaeEs bee FEneneserernaeeeres 


Truth in Labeling Statement: Font Mangler is very loosely based 
upon and a totally rewritten, much-enhanced version of, Font Man (Font 
Manipulator), a program that I contributed to the old Cee64 Alive! 
disk magazine many years ago. If some of the options in Font Mangler 
seen familiar, you may be one of the dozen or so people on the entire 
planet that has actually SEEN Font Man. You have my apologies. 

About the name: If you had seen what this pregram did to a4 font 
during the early stages of development, you wouldn't ask. 


i a, a a ee ae Se a, i i Si a a an. 


A SURVEY OF COMMODORE USERS. by Paul Berry 


Cameron Kaiser, in conjunction with Computer Workshops, Inc. has 
sponsored a very comprehensive survey of Commodore users throughout 
the world that was available to those Commodore users who have access 
to the Internet. As of late February, 275 Commodore users had 
completed the questionnaire via the Internet, and Cameron wrote the 
following brief summary of the resuits to date: 


2000 Commodore 8-bit Users Survey Results 


Sponscred by Computer Workshops, Inc. 
The Big Picture: Here's what the survey says in @ nutshell. 


The average Commodore 8-bit user of today is male, aged 28-31, 
lives either in North America or Europe and got his first 
Commodore 13 to 14 years ago. He owns four to seven Commodore 
8-bit computers of varying kinds, and anywhere up to s1x ther 
computers besides. He owns between five and eight disk drives, 
and probably has a couple of datasets too, and about four te 6 
joysticks. He primarily uses BASIC as his operating system, and 
uses a PC or other kind of “more modern" computer to access the 


Internet. He probably uses an emulator of some sort. ils 
Commodore is not his primary computer, but when he is using it, 
it's most likely for games or. iess likely. programming and 


actual work. 
The complete summary of the survey can be seen at 
http: //www.armory.com/rv spectre/cwi/survey .html 


Since this survey was conducted on the Internet, I obtained Cameron's 
permission to copy it and include it in this MaiLink issue for those 
of you who don't have internet access. The survey appears as the last 
two pages of this issue, which you can complete, remove and send to 
Cameron so that the survey can be expanded to include information from 
Commodore users who are not on the Internet. 


When a new (updated) summary is available, I am sure it will be 
included in a future issue of MaiLink. 


18 


hee ee se eee tenes et aeenen tect b0en neat tOL endear Sees Pa Deeeeesebes te seooErerest EOD Elo Or ere ceneeeREteseE Senta R ben ssOESe we SEES OF ODS Ea Se PEMD OUEE OOS SOON OF FDEOEESE DES OF SET TESS ESOS EE EI SOD EESS HESS TOEP OD RESETS ESTES USE PR ODOESS EOOEES EE DOSTELOS OO STDTE STS OO SSH e500 On8 EE BOCET GLOCEED SONS L ODE EE EEEN FEF ECE DESOE DEL ES FEF Oger ES ORO ESEE EF DEES DODO REE DE ET ES OE SHEE ENED ENO ES FOR CCN ED EE FEN ECS FE OEHE EESTI OSETS BOOT ESE et OEE TIOT ET SCOR DE ESOS FETE CES FeHE CS 


COMMODORE MAILINK MAY 2000 


OOO ooh Dn oo en De Ot ee en eer ere reer res eo rr ee ee et ee tit tee et ti irette Teer tire tere Tre ero Te Te rrerrer yy TT er TErErTTrrerrrrirritirir rrr eerriiirreerrrerrrirerrririirreri Terrier eerie y erry 


FOR SALE OR TRADE 


I have a bunch of Compute Gazette and RUN magazines that I no 
longer have any interest for. A totai of 63 full issues and 38 issues 
of the Commodore section only of Compute when it was part of the 
Compute magazine. I have the Compute Gazette disks for Aug-87 thru 
Jul-€9 except Jui—-88. 

I would like to sell all of the above for a fair price but I do 
not want to go te the trouble of packaging and shipping them. I will 
meet anyone within 100 miles of Texarkana, TX and exchange them for 
the above stated fair price. If nobody is that near, I would consider 
having them packaged and shipped but the fair price would go up 
somewhat. 

e-mail me or call 903-667-2839 if you are interested. I also have 
an assortment of software. 

If interested, e-mail me at: big-train@att.net 


Waiter Johnson. 


* we we ew Ke ke ke UO OK lel rl 


The Cincinnati Commodore Computer Club has a LOT of used commercial! 
software for sale at very reasonable prices. The club also has lots 
of used computers, disk drives. monitors. some printers. books and 
accessories at bargain prices. Because of the low prices, postage 
Will be appreciated. 


1. Send a floppy mailer with your return postage and address for 
separate lists provided on a 5-1/4" floppy disk as sequential files. 
The files can be accessed directly using sequential file readers on 
the same disk. or; 


send SASE for copies of the lists for Commmodore hardware, 
tware, accessories and books on individual lists: to: 
Cincinnati Commodore Computer Club 
c/o Roger Hoyer 
31 Potowatomie Trail 
Milford, OH 45150 
phone: 513/248-0025 


of 


Mb 


> a i Se an Se a a a ae Se ee Se, ae. a af 


For Sale by Roger Detaille 
Koala Pad $20 

symphony Stereo Cartridge $12 
2-Grive 21 sec copier/cable $12 


Shipping included -— money order only 


19 











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< eOonceaecsrasgeuse. oneecess oe eee a 
° o000ntee sc0s cectecweeoceenes. 


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oh or re irr ore tier iirit tito tt Toth 


TABLE OF CONTENTS 


Page 
Meeting News by Tom Adams - - - - -------------- 1 
Officers --------+- --- - -- e- eee ee ee Hee 9 
Treasurers Report - ----- 7-7-7 - errr ere eer fe ee 1D 
MaiLink Policies ------~-----*+---------- 7 
Editors Desk by Paul Berry- - - --------------- 3 
July Editor - David Mohr - ----------------- 3 
14 Years of MUTIM by Gary Noakes - - ------------ A 
Membership Survey by Rolf Miller - ------------- 5 
NeW MEMDeCr “2: Sos te Se eee ae ee ae Se ee ee 5 
Response to Adams' Suggestion by Roger Hoyer - - ------ 6 
Heavenly Hash by Ed Harler - - - -------------- B 
Abacus and Commodore by Rolf Miller - - - - - A EE 10 
Screen Tricks - Gary Noakes - - - ------------- ‘tek 
Letters to the Editor 
W. R. Kennedy - - - ~~ ------ err er er ee 15 
Brian Vaughn - - - 7-7-7 7-7-7 7 > ee re rr re 16 
Arvid nelson - -- ----- rr rrr rere ee 16 
W. R. Kennedy ~-~ - ~ - --- 7-7 7-> er - er err re 16 
Mary Spink - - -- 7 7-7 er errr rrr rrr 1G 
Mai bink on Disk Bai-tor’ Ss Corner Se Seem Sos ee ee See ayy 
Font Mangler - ----------r- rrr re rer rr 7 
Summary of Commodore Users - - - ------------- 19 
For Sale or Trade - - - --7- - - ~~ - 7-7 er rrr rer er er Ke 1 
Commodore Users Questionnaire - - -- ------- Attachment 


20 





2 
« 


's Commodore &-bit Users Survey —- MaiLink Version 


c) 


ameron Kaiser 


Fease complete the above questionnaire and return it to: 


Cameron Kaiser 
puter Workshops, Inc. 


3612 Birdie Drive 
La Mesa, CA 91941-8044 


a. 


Directions: Please answer all questions as accurately as possible. 
Enter appropriate word, number or checkmark in the blanks. 


What 28 your Gender? cremmom ME LS mmm Female 

WHat: 2S) Our AGC Stites How many years ago did you get your First CC Pu 

Your geographical area: .........EUrOpe mom ASIA ow, America 
tee Sy AMEriCa eres SREP EGH-  — — § <eecrrs Australiasia 


What Commodore 8-bit equipment do you own (indicate number)? 


nee Sea Me “Or TO hOMe’ eae. OR RO4S OP sad 10 4 * rr ere 2000 Series PET 

sates . 64 cites IO tuum HGducator/Pet 64 ume JO000 Series PET 

patties 64C tite Pet 128° jc, OEner 264 um 4000 Series PET 

wnenen OAG dese eo eit! OO —.-- 86000 Series PET 
- 6465 jae. Vee oO sue COs a, SC INC) ace eect 

What other Commodores do you own (indicate number)? 

wou Any Commodore PC toes AMLGa D200 ,2000 seems Amiga 600,1200 

eee CBM 900 witie, DIV toto CDS 2 

eeeres Amiga 1000 wwe AMiga 3000 .— Amiga 4000 


wtte: GTier “COMMOCOREG (Gomi CIsS. ONS ch ri ss eth a ce ha ee, 


W \t Commedore 8-bit-series peripherals do you own (indicate number)? 


Disk Drives: ww. wckOaOr ideas . 1541 (brown) atti AE Shc 1541 If 
Bites LOO f cms Ov. (HOU 1200). we OST -sise 2031 
ee 4040 eee: so) OO eaten “2a U mee OF DU LOOL 

Datasets: eciies. So om  Pilus/4 Dataset ee C2N Dataset 

Monitors: anicene. ed Oe diye see Oe igi A Le mows, £E02 
een 1901 tui ee Ywetoas SE OO 2a uu. LOB4 

Printers: uu. 1520 dene ee —~—<Ct*«Cs 1526 wwe MPS-801 
Bee ie MPS-802 Stas MPS-803 wom MPS-1000 

Mouse: ietccds 290 0 ie Te Oe 

REU: a. 1700 Pes eh os) 8 Sees 7 OS 

Modems: inine LOOO7 16 70 mum VICMODEM 


OCNer iC= peri Oey ahs: Cm Fs ad te tile 


weweceeesccoces ese 


Third party peripherals (do not include fastloaders or utility cartridges). 








sce JOY Stick _.. Any dataset clone 
Modems : —.. Any C= compatible ume ANY YEeQuUIring RS5232 converter 
Accelerators: ——-lurbomaster  .......Flash8 eee YORU: aban Other 
Light pen: __._-Flexidraw vee EGumate Koala Other 
Touch Pads: we E = = eeuede . Animation Station orm CNEL 
REUs : euiQGOORAM: i$ ates ~BBGRAM __— JUICk Brown Box — 

ovum MD RAMLink um Ary C=REU clone mm SKHEY 
Hard Drives: wwut. Kernal wwe MD HE i Ither 
Disk Drives: —_--pnhancer 2000 ...WFSD Excelerator — Indus GT MSD single 

to MSD Guat mmm MD FD-22000- ......CMD FD-4000 _..........Other 
YyNse: tei DAL ex Planes 18 | _--Other 
F.anters: ~-OkKimate 10 mumK imate 20 many C= compatible Okidata 

owe otar NX-10C Star NX--1000C —W.0ther (no interface) 
Interfaces: uw £etec Super Graphics or Super Graphics Jr. _ JeoCable 

jupsCaraco- FG ~ .aia% Other Cardco ore ENE 











Ut eo cartridges, fastloaders and hardware upgrades. 
een Epyx eee —-« SUper Snapshot (5 or lower) 
dee CMD arty pCe eee super Snapshot 5 
peer Dolphin DOS uum ACCESS Mach 5 for C= 64 
bytes Final Cartridge I or II to ACCESS Mach. 5 for C= 128 \) 
eerene Final Cartridge III ue Cinemaware Warpspeed 
ee Action Replay (5 or lower) om timeworks Partner 128 
own Action Replay 5 — 
What Commodore cperating systems do you run? (Basic assumed :))} 
ee Wheels cue SEPM 2c out QOS RGD cues. | pS 
soteaes CMD Gateway pee: OPM weds 3 peciee LOH VOS 
GECS (2.0 or lower) —.. LUnix pee ASLEF LX 


Which do you prefer? 2c 


Other computers you own (D 
soe ANY Intel “PC 

. Any Macintosh or clone 
Any Apple II including 
: Any Sinclair Computer 
tue AMY Atari 8—bit. (excep 
Atari: ST 


ao ceeaneeoneee: 


en eereecoes 


eveoeee 


Peer wes senece 


rene reenooorecsos Coseeerabococenosssoooes 


Any natively CP/M based system (Cromemco, 


oo Ot et eetees b Conenseseeens De gegeesencceets Sveneuetes ante BO On Che caredacenuses ot eseseesesee ees cert bboreeesnestoce 


o not include Amigas) 
Any Texas Instruments 
sees LOMmy Lutor 


TI-99 series 


eecevoesesetecosos 


TI GS ne -~ Any MSX, MSX+ or MSX2 (No consoles) 
uum Landy Colour Computer 
t games) ome ANY Tandy TRS (Except Colour) 


Kaypro etc.) 


Mark the ways you access the Internet 
y y , 


America Online 
Cable modem service 
DSL service 

Direct Ethernet 


Wewevenoerercess 


Aneto to IAN 
Mark the emulators you use 
wm NG Emulator 
VICE on Unix 


VICE on Win32 


Hoo neon 


emnveccotossneccos 


tetas VICE OM: Oc her platform 


Power 64 on Mac 
we Minus 4 


Moemaceteresetose 


What publications do you s 
Loadstar sseciels Loads 
sedeat! . Other (list) 


sevencaseoooetarae 


What do you use your Commo 
Games 
Educational/teaching 
mem Word processing, produ 


. Graphics 
Ss Quy Commodore ~bit 1X2 
Ou you buy new Commodor 


Would you buy new Commodor 


Oboe caver ree eeeee 


qo vans eeeconeroses 


The last question! 


* Additional comments, har 


* Enclose any non-returnable 


bores ucren tess ta sgoat eo tnntese Fe teeeeoresetonoonoteees: 


PPP/SLIP from PC to generic provider 
Shell access from PC to generic provider 
shell eccess: from C= to generic provider 
PPP/SLIP from C= to generic provider 


eOrscrenccsacetoce 


Prercececerocsoore 


tue FYORO: On: Unix jes CCOO64 On. DOS oe 
Sites OO "OR AMIGa jj gsuer CCS64 on Wins2 
umm Frodo on Mac ie C64S 
.. Frodo on BeOS cues PCOA 
wee POO ORM WINGO. § Amaedd A64 
uuee GOO4 (not the magazine) 
ubscribe to? 
tar letter ww. (ClO cy ae Commodore Gazette 
dore 8-bit for’? 
hee . Music 
ace Programming and development 
ctivity mum Lnternet Access 
ur primar stem wen LOS sae NS 
e B= ‘a 3 Bieta a? poner YES kiirisivion No 
e B-bit hardware? dots Ns § efter No 
dware I didn't cover, suggestions, etc: 


} 


photos, clippings, etc. that may app!