Skip to main content

Full text of "datapro :: alphanumeric terminals :: Datapro C25 ATT"

See other formats


dc i tt y iD 


Datapro Reports on 
Data Communications 


C25-046-1O1 

Terminals 


AT&T 

6500 Multifunction 
Communication System 



In this report: Product Summary 


Analysis -102 Editor’s Note 

Release 3.3 of AT&T’s controller 

Characteristics -106 software enables the 6544 controller 

to support up to four simultaneous 
Pricing -1 1 0 SNA host connections. AT&T also 


now markets the 6542 tabletop con- 
troller. The 6578, 6579, 6580, and 
6591 IBM plug-compatible displays 
have been superseded by AT&T’s 
659 ID, 6592D, and 6592F plug- 
compatible displays. 

Description 

AT&T’s 6500 Multifunction Com- 
munication System provides syn- 
chronous and asynchronous access to 
multiple computers and peripherals. 
AT&T markets a variety of 6500 
System-compatible and IBM plug- 
compatible display terminals and 
printers. Some system-compatible 
displays support multitasking. 

Strengths 

The flexible 6544 controller supports 
up to four simultaneous synchronous 
host connections, 32 synchronous 
peripherals and 32 asynchronous 
devices or computers, and access to 
X.25 and token-ring networks. Sup- 
port for simultaneous access to both 
synchronous and asynchronous ses- 
sions is a key feature of both the 
6544 and 6542 controllers. 


Limitations 

No major limitations. 

Competition 

IBM, Memorex/Telex, IDEA Cou- 
rier, Lee Data, and several others. 

Vendor 

AT&T 

Data Systems Group 
1 Speedwell Avenue 
Morristown, NJ 07960 
(800) 247-1212 
In Canada: 

AT&T Canada Inc. 

3650 Victoria Park Avenue 
Willowdale, ON M2H 3P7 
(416) 499-9400 

Price 

See pricing section. 


© 1990 McGraw-Hill, Incorporated. Reproduction Prohibited. Datapro Research. 
Delran NJ 08075 USA 


JUNE 1990 



Datapfo Reports on 
Data Communications 


C25-046-1O2 

Terminals 



Analysis 


Product Strategy 

In December 1985, AT&T introduced the 6500 
Multifunction Communication System, a product 
family that provides compatibility with the syn- 
chronous IBM 3270 system, as well as asynchro- 
nous communications. 

By the fourth quarter of 1987, AT&T had ex- 
panded the system’s functionality with additional 
products and enhancements, including three new 
plug-compatible displays, an adapter for the 6544 
controller to support plug-compatible devices, a 
6500 System-compatible color graphics printer, a 
local channel-connection option, increased asyn- 
chronous access capabilities, and terminal session 
capability for IBM-compatible PCs through 
adapter cards. 

Between April 1988 and March 1989, AT&T 
added the 6542 Tabletop Communication Control- 
ler, four additional plug-compatible displays, and a 
plug-compatible printer and printer controller. 
AT&T also provided system enhancements such as 
support for up to four simultaneous host connec- 
tions, two of which could use SNA/SDLC proto- 
cols; 32 ports for synchronous devices; and 32 
asynchronous connections. With Release 3.3 of 
AT&T’s controller software in February 1990, the 
6544 controller now supports up to four simulta- 
neous SNA hosts and a token ring connection. 

AT&T has long been a leader in the IBM 
3270-compatible terminal market, with over 
300,000 terminals installed. The company’s prod- 
ucts include the 40 Series, the 4540 family, and the 
E4540 line. Each product line provides basic, func- 
tional compatibility with corresponding IBM 3270 
products. 

Components of the 6500 Multifunction Com- 
munication System include the 6544 controller; the 
6518 Basic Function Display; the 6528 and 6529 
Standard Displays; the 6538 and 6539 Multitask- 
ing Displays; the 6591D, 6592D, and 6592F Plug- 
Compatible Displays; the 6571 and 6572 Color 

JUNE 1990 


AT&T 

6500 Multifunction 
Communication System 


Graphics Printers; the 6561 and 6562 Printer Con- 
trollers; and the 2-N-l and Coax Attachmate (3-N- 
1) PC adapters. 

The 6544 controller accommodates the older 
AT&T 4540 and E4540 displays and the AT&T 
4400 family asynchronous displays. The 6500 com- 
ponents operate over standard twisted-pair tele- 
phone wire or previously installed coaxial cable. 

The 6544 controller also supports multiple hosts 
and devices through 12 expansion slots, which hold 
different combinations of the following modules: 

• The Synchronous Host Module: provides three 
synchronous ports for the access of 3270 hosts 
(Bisync or SNA). 

• The Synchronous Device Interface Module: al- 
lows the attachment of up to 16 synchronous 
displays, printers, or PCs via twisted-pair wire. 

• The Asynchronous Host/Protocol Conversion 
Module: enables connection of up to eight asyn- 
chronous hosts or terminals; protocol conver- 
sion allows asynchronous terminals to access 
synchronous hosts. 

• The X.25 Interface Module: provides a connec- 
tor for IBM-compatible hosts supporting packet 
switched protocols. 

• The Local Channel Interface Module: provides 
connection for IBM mainframe byte multi- 
plexer, block multiplexer, or selector channel 
configurations in which the 6544 is within 200 
feet of the host. 

• The Plug-Compatible Device Interface Module: 
provides connection of up to 16 synchronous 
devices to the 6544 controller. 

• The Token-Ring Logic Module: allows devices 
connected to a 6544 controller to access a re- 
mote or local SNA host via a token-ring net- 
work. 

The 6542 Tabletop Controller accommodates one 
synchronous host and, with an optional expansion 
card, two asynchronous computers (or peripherals). 
Standard equipment includes four ports for plug- 
compatible devices. With an optional expansion 
card, up to eight devices can be supported. Data 
transmission speeds of up to 19.2K bps per port 
are possible. 

The 6500 controllers can communicate with a 
variety of host computers, including the IBM S/ 

360, S/370, 303X, 308X, 43XX, and IBM plug- 
compatible mainframes (PCMs) from various ► 

© 1990 McGraw-Hill, incorporated. Reproduction Prohibited. Datapro Research. 

Delran NJ 08075 USA 



dc i lC i JID 


Datapro Reports on Data 
Communications 


C25-046-101 

Terminals 


AT&T 

6500 Multifunction 
Communication System 



In this report: Product Summary 


Analysis -102 Editor’s Note 

Release 3.3 of AT&T’s controller 

Characteristics -105 software enables the 6544 controller 

to support up to four simultaneous 
Pricing -110 SNA host connections. AT&T also 


now markets the 6542 tabletop con- 
troller. The 6578, 6579, 6580, and 
6591 IBM plug-compatible displays 
have been superseded by AT&T’s 
6591D, 6592D, and 6592F plug- 
compatible displays. 

Description 

AT&T’s 6500 Multifunction Com- 
munication System provides syn- 
chronous and asynchronous access to 
multiple computers and peripherals. 
AT&T markets a variety of 6500 
System-compatible and IBM plug- 
compatible display terminals and 
printers. Some system-compatible 
displays support multitasking. 


Limitations 

No major limitations. 

Competition 

IBM, Memorex/Telex, IDEA Cou- 
rier, Lee Data, and several others. 

Vendor 

AT&T 

Data Systems Group 
1776 On-the-Green 
Morristown, NJ 07960 
(201)898-6000 
In Canada: 

AT&T Canada Inc. 

3650 Victoria Park Avenue 
Willowdale, ON M2H 3P7 
(416) 499-9400 

Price 

See pricing section. 


Strengths 

The flexible 6544 controller supports 
up to four simultaneous synchronous 
host connections, 32 synchronous 
peripherals and 32 asynchronous 
devices or computers, and access to 
X.25 and token-ring networks. Sup- 
port for simultaneous access to both 
synchronous and asynchronous ses- 
sions is a key feature of both the 
6544 and 6542 controllers. 


® 1990 McGraw-Hill, Incorporated. Reproduction Prohibited. Datapro Research. 
Delran NJ 08075 USA 


FEBRUARY 1990 



Datapro Reports on Data 
Communications 


C25-046-1O2 

Terminals 



Analysis 


Product Strategy 

In December 1985, AT&T introduced the 6500 
Multifunction Communication System, a product 
family that provides compatibility with the syn- 
chronous IBM 3270 system, as well as asynchro- 
nous communications. 

By the fourth quarter of 1987, AT&T had ex- 
panded the system’s functionality with additional 
products and enhancements, including three new 
plug-compatible displays, an adapter for the 6544 
controller to support plug-compatible devices, a 
6500 System-compatible color graphics printer, a 
local channel-connection option, increased asyn- 
chronous access capabilities, and terminal session 
capability for IBM-compatible PCs through 
adapter cards. 

Between April 1988 and March 1989, AT&T 
added the 6542 Tabletop Communication Control- 
ler, four additional plug-compatible displays, and a 
plug-compatible printer and printer controller. 
AT&T also provided system enhancements such as 
support for up to four simultaneous host connec- 
tions, two of which could use SNA/SDLC proto- 
cols; 32 ports for synchronous devices; and 32 
asynchronous connections. With Release 3.3 of 
AT&T’s controller software in February 1990, the 
6544 controller now supports up to four simulta- 
neous SNA hosts and a token ring connection. 

AT&T has long been a leader in the IBM 
3270-compatible terminal market, with over 
300,000 terminals installed. The company’s prod- 
ucts include the 40 Series, the 4540 family, and the 
E4540 line. Each product line provides basic, func- 
tional compatibility with corresponding IBM 3270 
products. 

Components of the 6500 Multifunction Com- 
munication System include the 6544 controller; the 
6518 Basic Function Display; the 6528 and 6529 
Standard Displays; the 6538 and 6539 Multitask- 
ing Displays; the 6591D, 6592D, and 6592F Plug- 
Compatible Displays; the 6571 and 6572 Color 

FEBRUARY 1990 


AT&T 

6500 Multifunction 
Communication System 


Graphics Printers; the 6561 and 6562 Printer Con- 
trollers; and the 2-N-l and Coax Attachmate (3-N- 
1) PC adapters. 

The 6544 controller accommodates the older 
AT&T 4540 and E4540 displays and the AT&T 
4400 family asynchronous displays. The 6500 com- 
ponents operate over standard twisted-pair tele- 
phone wire or previously installed coaxial cable. 
The 6544 controller also supports multiple hosts 
and devices through 12 expansion slots, which hold 
different combinations of the following modules: 

• The Synchronous Host Module: provides three 
synchronous ports for the access of 3270 hosts 
(Bisync or SNA). 

• The Synchronous Device Interface Module: al- 
lows the attachment of up to 16 synchronous 
displays, printers, or PCs via twisted-pair wire. 

• The Asynchronous Host/Protocol Conversion 
Module: enables connection of up to eight asyn- 
chronous hosts or terminals; protocol conver- 
sion allows asynchronous terminals to access 
synchronous hosts. 

• The X.25 Interface Module: provides a connec- 
tor for IBM-compatible hosts supporting packet 
switched protocols. 

• The Local Channel Interface Module: provides 
connection for IBM mainframe byte multi- 
plexer, block multiplexer, or selector channel 
configurations in which the 6544 is within 200 
feet of the host. 

• The Plug-Compatible Device Interface Module: 
provides connection of up to 1 6 synchronous 
devices to the 6544 controller. 

• The Token-Ring Logic Module: allows devices 
connected to a 6544 controller to access a re- 
mote or local SNA host via a token-ring net- 
work. 

The 6542 Tabletop Controller accommodates one 
synchronous host and, with an optional expansion 
card, two asynchronous computers (or peripherals). 
Standard equipment includes four ports for plug- 
compatible devices. With an optional expansion 
card, up to eight devices can be supported. Data 
transmission speeds of up to 19.2K bps per port 
are possible. 

The 6500 controllers can communicate with a 
variety of host computers, including the IBM S/ 


© 1990 McGraw-Hill, Incorporated. Reproduction Prohibited. Datapro Research. 
Delrah NJ 08075 USA 



Datapro Reports on Data 
Communications 


AT&T 

6500 Multifunction 
Communication System 


C25-046-1O3 

Terminals 


Company Profile 


Total Revenues and Expenses 

(in milfions) 



AT&T 


Corporate 

Headquarters 

AT&T 

550 Madison Avenue 
New York, NY 10022- 
3297 

(212) 605-5500 

In Canada 

AT&T Canada Inc. 

3650 Victoria Park Ave- 
nue 

Wlllowdale, ON M2H 3P7 
(416) 499-9400 

Officers 

CEO: Robert E. Allen 
CFO: Morris Tanenbaum 

Company Background 

AT&T’s business is mov- 
ing and managing Infor- 
mation, domestically and 
globally. That includes 
providing long distance 
telecommunications ser- 
vices through the compa- 
ny’s Worldwide Intelligent 
Network, as well as sys- 
tems, products, and ser- 
vices that combine 
communications and 
computers. 

AT&T states its mission Is 
to apply the talents, 
knowledge, and skills of 
its people to make the 
company the global 


leader in enabling cus- 
tomers to reap the bene- 
fits of information 
technology. 

The company’s major 
customer markets are 
business and govern- 
ment, consumers, the 
telecommunications In- 
dustry, and electronic 
equipment manufactur- 
ers. To business and gov- 
ernment institutions, 

AT&T offers a range of 
voice and data transmis- 
sion services as well as 
computer and data net- 
working products and 
systems. Communica- 
tions products sold, 
rented, and serviced by 
AT&T Include personal 
computers, midrange 
computers, software and 
peripheral equipment, 
PBX equipment, key tele- 
phone systems, and fac- 
simile machines. 

AT&T supplies switching 
systems, transmission 
equipment, and opera- 
tions support services to 
the telecommunications 
industry and manufac- 
tures advanced electronic 
components for high- 
technology firms. 


1988 was a year of strong 
actions for AT&T: Its reve- 
nues were the highest 
since divestiture on the 
strength of growth in 
product sales as well as 
growth in service reve- 
nues; the company 
shifted more of its people 
to sales or sales support 
jobs to further strengthen 
its market position. To 
meet a growing demand 
from Its customers, AT&T 
decided to speed up Its 
conversion to an all-digital 
long-distance network. 

Higher costs and ex- 
penses reflect the deci- 
sion to accelerate the 
modernizing of Its net- 
work. It was necessary to 


1987 1988 1989 

write down the value of 
older technology equip- 
ment, adding $6.7 billion 
to its costs and expenses. 
This action reduced 
AT&T’s earnings by $3.66 
a share, resulting in a loss 
for the year. Without this 
charge the company’s 
earnings would have in- 
creased to $2.11 per 
share. 

AT&T’s actions to in- 
crease sales, modernize, 
and reduce expenses en- 
hanced Its earnings po- 
tential. For the third 
quarter of 1989, the com- 
pany reported earnings of 
$699 million on revenues 
of $8.9 billion. 


360, S/370, 303X, 308X, 43XX, and IBM plug- 
compatible mainframes (PCMs) from various 
vendors. They can provide access to multiple hosts 
from the same display terminal. 


© 1990 McGraw-Hill, Incorporated. Reproduction Prohibited. Datapro Research. 
Delran NJ 08075 USA 


Competitive Position 

Over the years, AT&T’s former subsidiary. Tele- 
type, built up a large installed base of IBM 3270- 
compatible terminals; the company estimates that 
there are more than 300,000 terminals now in- 
stalled, including the 40, 4540, and E4540 families. 


FEBRUARY 1990 




Datapro Reports on Data 
Communications 


C25-046-1O4 

Terminals 



A View of the 6544 Controller 
The backplane of the controller contains 12 
expansion slots for connecting as many as four 
synchronous hosts, 32 synchronous devices, 
and 32 asynchronous devices. 

Prior to AT&T’s divestiture, Teletype had what 
amounted to an exclusive market, selling products 
primarily to the Bell Operating Companies (BOCs) 
for their internal use or resale to their customers. 

As much as 40 percent of Teletype’s business at 
that time was attributed to the company’s relation- 
ship with the BOCs. 

In 1985, AT&T Teletype became a wholly 
owned subsidiary of the Computer Systems Divi- 
sion of AT&T Information Systems. All sales activ- 
ities for Teletype-manufactured products were 
moved to AT&T headquarters in New Jersey, and 
product management was folded into a DTE divi- 
sion of the Computer Systems Division. The Tele- 
type name remains a legal entity for trademark, 
product brand name, and other purposes; as a com- 
pany, however. Teletype Corporation has been 
swallowed up by AT&T. 

The 6500 Multifunction Communication Sys- 
tem is AT&T’s most comprehensive (and ambi- 
tious) foray into the 3270 replacement market. The 
product line conforms to two important trends in 
the market: 

• Integration of personal computing capabilities 
into the 3270 cluster; and 


FEBRUARY 1990 


AT&T 

6500 Multifunction 
Communication System 


• Access to multiple hosts, including asynchro- 
nous computers. 

The 6500 product line places AT&T in a strong 
position to compete with IBM, as well as other 
3270-compatible vendors, including Telex, ITT 
Courier, Memorex, Lee Data, and Harris. IBM has 
taken steps to protect its huge and lucrative 3270 
installed base, however. 

In the third and fourth quarters of 1989, IBM 
released a more powerful breed of 3174 controllers 
which contain more powerful processors, support 
up to 6M bytes of memory (the former limit was 
4M bytes), and run Configuration Support B 
microcode — new controller software that supports 
up to 250 physical units. The microcode also works 
with IBM’s new Concurrent Communications 
Adapter to accommodate up to three synchronous 
host connections. Previously, only one connection 
was possible. In September 1989, IBM also an- 
nounced another generation of display terminals 
offering higher resolution, greater processing 
speed, more functions per keystroke, and a more 
attractive price. 

Release 2 of IBM’s Configuration Support B 
microcode, which will be made available in June 
1990, will make it possible to perform controller 
diagnostic procedures from a NetView console 
rather than through a terminal tied directly to the 
controller. Towards the end of 1990, IBM will also 
incorporate into the microcode another feature 
dubbed the Multi-Host Token-Ring Gateway. Us- 
ing the Concurrent Communications Adapter, this 
feature will support communications between any 
token-ring workstation or device and up to three 
hosts via the 3174. 

Vendors such as AT&T and Lee Data have 
competed against IBM by adding functionality to 
their own product lines, incorporating features 
such as windowing capabilities and simultaneous 
access to both synchronous and asynchronous 
hosts. Others, such as Memorex/Telex, strive to 
provide IBM plug-compatibility at the lowest pos- 
sible price. A number of vendors have long since 
withdrawn from this market, unable or unwilling 
to match IBM’s moves. The remaining participants 
will vie with IBM for what continues to be a grow- 
ing market segment. 

The Future of Display Terminals 

According to International Data Corporation 
(IDC), IBM holds about 50 percent of the market 

© 1990 McGraw-Hill, Incorporated. Reproduction Prohibited. Datapro Research. 
Delran NJ 08075 USA 


Datapro Reports on Data 
Communications 


AT&T 

6500 Multifunction 
Communication System 


C25-046-105 

Terminals 


for 3270 display stations; Memorex/Telex and 
AT&T control about 20 and 9 percent respectively. 
IDC predicted that annual U.S. display shipments 
would grow from 848,900 units in 1988 to 940,400 
units by 1992. 

Terminals continue to enjoy popularity be- 
cause of the large installed base of 3270 systems. 
Display terminals also take up less desk space than 
personal computers. Therefore, some users who 
don’t need the disk storage capability and process- 
ing power of a standalone PC prefer terminals in- 
stead. These displays, however, must now share the 
spotlight with a new breed of workstations de- 
signed to fill the gap between the PC and the dis- 
play terminal: the diskless workstation. 

With the proliferation of LANs, users are 
moving away from displays controlled completely 
by a host to intelligent DOS-based workstations 
supported by a file server. Equipped with large 
amounts of memory, diskless workstations perform 
much of the processing that the host would per- 
form for the display terminal, which improves sys- 
tem performance. Without disk drives and other 
features normally found on a standalone machine, 
they offer greater economy, simplicity, and security 
than a PC; all information is stored on the file 
server. Like a PC, however, the diskless worksta- 
tion can run DOS applications and has the process- 
ing power to support advanced capabilities. 

The 3270 terminal continues to flourish. But 
price wars have taken a toll on vendors, who must 
sell more units to make up for lower profits. To 
guarantee their financial stability and adjust to the 
changing market, more and more vendors are of- 
fering diskless workstations in addition to the tra- 
ditional line of display terminals. 


Decision Points 

The 6500 Multifunction Communication System’s 
key feature, reflected in its name, is multifunction- 
ality. The 6544 controller provides multihost ac- 
cess, both to asynchronous and synchronous 
computer systems. In addition, it can support color 
and monochrome multitasking displays, plug- 
compatible displays, personal computers, printers, 
adapters, and older AT&T 4540 and E4540 dis- 
plays. 

AT&T’s 6500 System-compatible display ter- 
minals offer a variety of features and capabilities 
not found on previous AT&T displays. Particularly 

© 1990 McGraw-Hill, Incorporated. Reproduction Prohibited. Datapro Research. 
Delran NJ 08075 USA 


interesting are the 6538 monochrome and 6539 
color multitasking systems, which can offer up to 
four multitasking windows that provide simulta- 
neous access to four distinct computer sessions in 
any combination of synchronous and asynchro- 
nous applications. 

The 6544 operates as a standard IBM 3274- 
type controller; through add-on modules, however, 
it can be upgraded to provide support for four syn- 
chronous host communications ports (including up 
to two local channel connections), as many as 32 
synchronous devices, up to 32 peripherals and 
computers, one X.25 network connection, and a 
token-ring connection. The 6544 controller’s 12 
expansion slots allow new capabilities to be added 
to the system as communications requirements 
grow. 

A major benefit of the 6544 and 6542 con- 
trollers is support for simultaneous synchronous 
and asynchronous sessions on a single terminal. 
This is a benefit currently shared only by Lee Da- 
ta’s Series 400 products. 

The 6500 System puts AT&T on a strong 
competitive level in the 3270 market; however, 
since the market has been dominated for so long by 
IBM, AT&T must still fight for a larger market 
share. 



Characteristics 


Models: Hardware — 6544 Multifunction Communication 
Controller; 6542 Tabletop Communication Controller; 
6518 Basic Function Display; 6528 and 6529 Standard 
Displays; 6538 and 6539 Multitasking Displays; 6591 D, 
6592D, and 6592F Plug-Compatible Displays; 6571 
Color Graphics Printer; 6572 Plug-Compatible Printer; 
6561 Printer Controller; 6562 Coax Printer Controller; 
the 2-N-1 Adapter; and the Coax Attachmate (3-N-1) 
Adapter. 

Software — 6500 System Controller Software Re- 
lease 3.3; Attachmate Control Program. 

Date of First Delivery: Hardware — 6544 Multifunction 
Communication Controller — December 1985; 6542 Ta- 
bletop Communication Controller — March 1989; 6518 


FEBRUARY 1990 



C25-046-1O6 

Terminals 


AT&T 

6500 Multifunction 
Communication System 


Datapro Reports on Data 
Communications 


Figure 1. 

Connections Supported by the 6544 Controller 



Printers 

AT&T’s 6544 Multifunction Communication Controller provides access to a variety of asynchronous and syn- 
chronous computers. 


Basic Function Display — December 1985; 6528 and 
6529 Standard Displays — December 1985; 6538 and 
6539 Multitasking Displays — December 1985; 6591 D, 
6592D, and 6592F Plug-Compatible Displays — March 
1989; 6571 Color Graphics Printer — September 1987; 
6572 Plug-Compatible Printer — September 1988; 6561 
Printer Controller — March 1986; 6562 Coax Printer 
Controller — March 1989; the 2-N-1 Adapter — November 
1987; and the Coax Attachmate (3-N-1) Adapter — 
November 1987. 

Software — 6500 System Controller Software Re- 
lease 3.3 — February 1989; Attachmate Control 
Program — November 1 987. 

FEBRUARY 1990 


Number Delivered to Date: Vendor did not specify. 
Serviced by: AT&T. 


System Components 

The AT&T 6500 Multifunction Communication System 
currently includes two communications controllers. 
Model 6544, AT&T’s flagship product, has been mar- 
keted since 1 985. Other products in the 6500 System 
family that work with the 6544 controller Include five 


© 1990 McGraw-Hill, Incorporated. Reproduction Prohibited. Datapro Research. 
Delran NJ 08075 USA 






Datapro Reports on Data 
Communications 


AT&T 

6500 Multifunction 
Communication System 


C25-046-1O7 

Terminals 



The 65 72 Printer is a serial, dot matrix color 
printer that prints at 100 cps in near letter 
quality or at 400 cps in draft quality. The 
unit's multicolor ribbons support four- or 
seven-color printing. 

6500 System display terminals, three IBM plug- 
compatible display units, a 6500 system-compatible 
printer and printer controller, an IBM plug-compatible 
printer and printer controller, and nine expansion mod- 
ules that extend the connectivity options of the user. 

The 6542 controller, made available in March 
1989, Is a lower-priced, table-top controller that sup- 
ports coaxial cable connections to up to eight IBM plug- 
compatible peripheral devices. 

The 6500 System supports a variety of host com- 
puters, including the IBM S/360, S/370, 3031, 3032, 
3033, 3081 , 3083, 3084, 4321 , 4331 , and 4341 ; with the 
appropriate software, the controllers can also support 
the IBM 8100, Series/1, System/36, and System/38. In 
addition to IBM synchronous hosts, the 6500 System 
supports connections to IBM plug-compatible main- 
frames (PCMs). The 6500 supports asynchronous con- 
nections to the AT&T 3B family and UNIX PC, the Digital 
VAX, and most other popular minicomputer families. 


Transmission Specifications 

When communicating synchronously, the 6544 control- 
ler provides maximum data rates of 64K bps for hosts 
supporting SNA and X.25 protocols and 19.2K bps for 
hosts supporting Bisync protocols. The 6500 System 
communicates with asynchronous hosts and peripher- 
als at a maximum 19.2K bps data transmission rate. De- 
vices can be connected up to 5,000 feet from the 6544 
controller. 

The 6542 controller supports data rates of up to 
19.2K bps for synchronous and asynchronous devices 
and hosts. 


© 1990 McGraw-Hill, Incorporated. Reproduction Prohibited. Datapro Research. 
Delran NJ 08075 USA 


Communications Controllers 

The 6544 Multifunction Communication 
Controller 

The 6544 controller supports up to four SNA and/or 
BSC host connections, 32 synchronous devices, and 32 
asynchronous devices or processors, depending on 
how it is configured. Devices can be located up to 5,000 
feet from the controller. 

AT&T 6500 System-compatible displays and print- 
ers are connected to the 6544 controller via twisted-pair 
telephone wire that is compatible with AT&T’s SYSTI- 
MAX PDS. Communications over coaxial cable is also 
possible through optional adapters. 

Standard equipment includes a Main Processor 
Module (also referred to as the A Card), dual 5V4-inch 
diskette drives for loading software, and 14 module 
slots, 12 of which are available for add-on expansion 
modules. An optional 20M-byte hard disk drive facili- 
tates program loading and increases controller software 
storage capacity. 

Self-test diagnostics are standard on the 6544 
controller. In addition, the 6544 supports two IBM net- 
work programs that reside on host computers: Network 
Problem Determination Application (NPDA) and Network 
Logical Data Manager (NLDM). 

The 6544 not only supports the 6500 System- 
compatible and plug-compatible displays, but can ac- 
commodate the older AT&T 4540 and E4540 displays. 
For asynchronous applications, the 6544 supports the 
attachment of the AT&T 4400 family of displays and the 
AT&T 600 line, as well as other asynchronous displays 
such as the Digital VT220 and VT100. 

Other printers, including AT&T 4540 and E4540 
printer models, may be added to a 6500 System cluster 
using the 6561 Printer Controller; one printer controller 
is required for each printer. 

Basic 6544 functionality provides access to a sin- 
gle synchronous host computer through a single 6500 
System display. The following nine expansion modules 
are available to provide additional multifunctional fea- 
tures: 

Synchronous Host Module (B Card): an expansion 
module that provides three SNA/BSC ports. Each mod- 
ule supports an aggregate data transfer rate of 38.4K 
bps. This allows two ports using the BIsync (or SDLC) 
protocol to operate at 19.2K bps, for example. Two Syn- 
chronous Host modules are needed in situations when 
there are two SNA hosts operating at higher speeds. 

The 6544 controller supports up to four of these mod- 
ules for a maximum of four hosts. 

The Synchronous Host Module may also support 
one SNA port operating at either 56K or 64K bps. At 
either of these higher speeds, only one port is used per 
card. 

Synchronous Device Interface Module (C Card): an 

expansion module that provides for the attachment of 
up to 16 synchronous displays, printers, and personal 

FEBRUARY 1990 



C25-046-1O8 

Terminals 


computers, including 6500 system-compatible devices, 
via twisted-pair wire. The 6544 controller accommo- 
dates two Synchronous Device Interface Modules, pro- 
viding for a maximum configuration of 32 synchronous 
devices. This module also permits connections to per- 
sonal computers using the 2-N-1 product. 

Asynchronous Host/Protocol Conversion Module (D 
Card): an expansion module that provides port connec- 
tions for up to eight asynchronous host computers or 
terminals. Protocol conversion allows asynchronous 
terminals to access synchronous hosts. The ports oper- 
ate at speeds up to 19.2K bps. Four Asynchronous 
Host/Protocol Conversion Modules can be added, pro- 
viding for a maximum configuration of 32 asynchronous 
connections. 

X.25 interface Module (H Card): an expansion module 
that provides one connector for IBM-compatible hosts 
supporting the Network Control Program Packet 
Switched Interface (NPSI) protocols. The connector 
supports either of the following interfaces: RS-232-C at 
speeds up to 19.2K bps or CCITT V.35 at speeds of 
48K, 56K, or 64K bps. Only one H Card may be in- 
stalled. 

Local Channel Interface Module (F Card): an expan- 
sion module that provides a connection to an IBM main- 
frame byte multiplexer, block multiplexer, or selector 
channel In configurations where the 6544 controller is 
located within 200 cable feet of the host. Users can 
equip each 6544 with one or two Local Channel mod- 
ules. The 6544 can support both remote and local hosts 
concurrently. 

Plug-Compatible Device Interface Module (K Card): an 

expansion module that allows users to establish plug- 
compatibility for up to 1 6 synchronous devices or two 
multiplexers. With Release 3.2 or later of the controller 
software, any plug-compatible display connected to this 
module can run up to five concurrent sessions In the 
same SNA host or different hosts. Users can add a sec- 
ond module for a total of 32 ports (provided that no C 
Card is being used). This module also permits connec- 
tions to personal computers using the Coax Attachmate 
(3-N-1) product. 

Nine-Port PCM Device Logic Module (K^'Card): a 

smaller, less expensive version of the K Card for users 
who need to support no more than nine plug-compatible 
devices or two multiplexers. This module requires Re- 
lease 3.2 or later of the controller software. 

Token-Ring Logic Module (T Card): enables devices 
connected to a 6544 controller to access a remote or 
local SNA host via a token-ring network. It also sup- 
ports communications between token-ring devices to 
communicate with a local or remote SNA host via a 
6544 controller. 


FEBRUARY 1990 


AT&T Datapro Reports on Data 

6500 Multifunction Communications 

Communication System 


Processor/Memory Logic Module (X Card): expands 
the memory capacity of the 6544 controller, allowing It 
to support the enhancements included in controller soft- 
ware Release 3.0 and later. 

6542 Tabletop Controller 

The 6542 supports connections to as many as eight 
IBM plug-compatible devices, one remote host, and up 
to two asynchronous devices (e.g., minicomputers, PCs, 
or peripherals). The 6542’s ports accommodate coax 
connections; however, any port can also support 
twisted pair wire connections using AT&T's Baiun 
Adapter. The 6542 does not support AT&T’s 6500 Sys- 
tem (non-plug-compatible) devices or any of the 6544 
expansion modules. 

Base 6542 functionality Includes one remote syn- 
chronous host connection, an asynchronous port for 
remote diagnostics, a 3V2-inch diskette drive, and sup- 
port for four directly connected IBM plug-compatible 
devices. 

The 6542 contains three expansion slots to ac- 
commodate three optional modules: 

• A Synchronous Device Interface Module provides 
four additional ports, making it possible to support a 
maximum of eight plug-compatible devices. 

• An Asynchronous Host/Protocol Conversion Module 
supports communications with two asynchronous 
devices. 

• A Memory Expansion Module provides the additional 
memory needed to support the Interface and conver- 
sion modules. 

Additionally, one of the 6542’s standard ports will allow 
the multiplexing of eight synchronous plug-compatible 
peripherals over a single coax cable using an IBM 3299 
multiplexer. When the multiplexer Is In operation, how- 
ever, all other ports remain Inactive. 


Displays 

AT&T 6500 System-Compatible Displays 

AT&T offers five 6500 system-compatible display units 
which Implement the protocols developed for the origi- 
nal 6500 System. All models support a tilt/swivel capa- 
bility; both color and monochrome (amber or green) 
displays are available. The units, developed for use with 
the 6544 controller, are described In more detail below. 

6518 Basic Function Display: This monochrome unit 
supports single session communications with one syn- 
chronous host; It does not support access to asynchro- 
nous hosts. The 6518 Includes a 14-inch screen, with a 
display capacity of 1 ,920 characters arranged in 24 lines 
of 80 characters each. The 6518 is functionally compati- 
ble with IBM’s 3178 and 3191 display stations. 


© 1990 McGraw-Hill, Incorporated. Reproduction Prohibited. Datapro Research. 
Delran NJ 08075 USA 



Datapro Reports on Data 
Communications 


AT&T 

6500 Multifunction 
Communication System 


C25-046-1O9 

Terminals 


6528 Standard Display: The 6528 monochrome display 
provides a “hot key” for switching between two ses- 
sions on a single host or different hosts. (Data transfer 
between sessions Is not supported, however.) Either 
session may be synchronous or asynchronous. The 

6528 Includes a 15-inch monochrome display screen, 
with display capacities ranging from 1 ,920 to 3,564 
characters; screen arrangements include 24 lines by 80 
characters, 32 lines by 80 characters, 43 lines by 80 
characters, and 27 lines by 132 characters. The 6528 is 
functionally compatible with the IBM 3180 display sta- 
tion in synchronous mode and with the Digital VT220 
display terminal in asynchronous mode. 

6529 Standard Display: This 14-inch color display in- 
cludes the same split-screen capability as the 6528. The 
6529 provides a four- or seven-color display, with dis- 
play capacities ranging from 1 ,920 to 3,564 characters. 
Screen arrangements include 24 lines by 80 characters, 
32 lines by 80 characters, 43 lines by 80 characters, and 
27 lines by 132 characters. The 6529 is functionally 
compatible with the IBM 3179 display station in syn- 
chronous mode and with the Digital VT220 display ter- 
minal in asynchronous mode. 

6538 Multitasking Display: This monochrome display 
provides up to four multitasking windows in any combi- 
nation of synchronous and asynchronous sessions. 
Window posItioning/browsIng/sIzIng speed is four 
inches per second horizontal and six inches per second 
vertical. The 6538 includes a 15-inch display screen, 
with display capacities ranging from 1 ,920 to 3,564 
characters; screen arrangements include 24 lines by 80 
characters, 32 lines by 80 characters, 43 lines by 80 
characters, and 27 lines by 132 characters. The 6538 
supports four screen formats, including 3270 operation, 
VT220 operation, full-extended attributing, and input 
and edit. An auxiliary I/O port and programmed symbol 
graphics are optionally available. The 6538 is function- 
ally compatible with the IBM 3180 display station In syn- 
chronous mode and with the Digital VT220 display 
terminal In asynchronous mode. 

6539 Multitasking Display: This color display provides 
up to four multitasking windows in any combination of 
synchronous and asynchronous sessions. Window 
posItioning/browsing/sizIng speed Is four inches per 
second horizontal and six inches per second vertical. 
The 6539 includes a 14-inch display screen, with display 
capacities ranging from 1,920 to 3,564 characters; 
screen arrangements include 24 lines by 80 characters, 
32 lines by 80 characters, 43 lines by 80 characters, and 
27 lines by 132 characters. The 6539 features four- or 
seven-color display capability and supports four screen 
formats, including 3270 operation, VT220 operation, 
full-extended attributing, and input and edit. An auxiliary 
I/O port and programmed symbol graphics are option- 
ally available. The 6539 Is functionally compatible with 
the IBM 3279-S3G display station in synchronous mode 
and with the Digital VT220 display terminal In asynchro- 
nous mode. 

© 1990 McGraw-Hill, Incorporated. Reproduction Prohibited. Datapro Research. 
Delran NJ 08075 USA 


Keyboards for 6500 System-Compatible Displays 
The 6518 display comes with a 122-key keyboard con- 
taining 24 external program function (PF) keys. This de- 
tachable keyboard has a typewriter-style layout and a 
low-profile design. Security keylock is a standard fea- 
ture. A three-year warranty is available with the 6518. 

The 6528, 6529, 6538, and 6539 displays are mod- 
ularly designed and can be upgraded or downgraded by 
switching logic bases and display monitors. They are all 
equipped with a 122-key keyboard that includes 24 pro- 
gram function (PF) keys and a VT220 template. The de- 
tachable keyboard contains a typewriter-style layout 
and a low-profile design. Security keylock Is a standard 
feature. 

IBM Plug-Compatible Displays 

Each of the following three 6500 plug-compatible dis- 
plays can operate with IBM 3270 controllers, the AT&T 
6544 controller, and the AT&T 6542 controller. The 
units’ display screens support tilt/swivel capabilities, 
and monochrome devices are available with amber or 
green phosphor characters. 

When connected to a 6500 controller running Con- 
troller Software Release 3.2 or later, these displays sup- 
port up to five simultaneous sessions with synchronous 
and asynchronous hosts. 

6591 D Plug-Compatible Display: This low-cost, mono- 
chrome display, designed for basic data entry, includes 
a 14-inch screen and a 122-key keyboard. The 6591 D is 
equivalent to IBM’s 3191 display family, supporting 
screen arrangements of 24 lines by 80 characters and 
32 lines by 80 characters. 

6592D Plug-Compatible Display: This monochrome 
display, equivalent to the IBM 3192-D display, features 
a 15-inch screen and a 122-key keyboard supporting 
record keystroke capabilities. The 6592D supports 
screen arrangements of 24 lines by 80 characters, 32 
lines by 80 characters, 43 lines by 80 characters, and 27 
lines by 132 characters. 

6592F Plug-Compatible Display: This display is the 
color equivalent of the 9592D. It includes a 14-inch, 
seven-color screen and a 122-key keyboard which pro- 
vides record keystroke capabilities. The 6592D sup- 
ports screen arrangements of 24 lines by 80 characters, 
32 lines by 80 characters, 43 lines by 80 characters, and 
27 lines by 132 characters. 


Printers and Printer Controllers 

AT&T offers a 6500 system-compatible printer and 
printer controller as well as an IBM plug-compatible 
printer and printer controller. The 6500 System printer 
products are designed for communications with the 
6544 controller alone; the plug-compatible printer prod- 
ucts support connections to both the 6544 and 6542 
controllers as well as IBM controllers. 


FEBRUARY 1990 



C25-046-11O 

Terminals 


AT&T 

6500 Multifunction 
Communication System 


Datapro Reports on Data 
Communications 


6571 Color Matrix Printer: The 6571 , a 6500 system- 
compatible matrix printer, provides color or mono- 
chrome text and graphics printing. The 6571 operates at 
speeds up to 400 cps in draft mode and 100 cps in near 
letter quality mode. The 6571 prints symbol graphics 
and supports one-, four-, and seven-color printing. The 

6571 Includes a full-function SNA control panel and LCD 
display, an operator-replaceable 18-wlre printhead with 
half-dot shift, and a tractor- or friction-feed platen with 
rear or bottom feed. Paper feed/posItionIng controls are 
also included. 

6572 Plug<Compatible Printer: The 6572 Is a coax 
(plug-compatible) version of the 6571 printer, offering all 
the same features. 

6561 Printer Controller: The 6561 Is a printer controller 
that enables the use of older AT&T 4540 and E4540 
printers as well as AT&T’s newer asynchronous printers 
in a 6500 System cluster. The 6561 adds new functions 
and applications to the older printers and includes a full- 
function SNA control panel, LCD display, and the follow- 
ing interfaces: SSI (twisted pair) in, SSI out, RS-232-C 
out, and Centronics parallel out. 

6562 Coax Printer Controller: The 6562 Printer Control- 
ler is a plug-compatible version of the 6561 that can 
connect to IBM 3274 or 3174 controllers. The 6562 sup- 
ports both parallel and serial asynchronous printers. 

Personal Computer Add-On Products 

The 2-N-1 Adapter, which runs AT&T’s Attachmate Con- 
trol Program, provides multisession, multiwindowing 
capability to PCs connected to the 6500 controller via 
twisted pair wire. Up to seven concurrent windows are 
possible: four 3270 sessions, two notepads, and one 
PC session. While the PC cannot access multiple hosts 
simultaneously, it can access multiple concurrent ses- 
sions on a single host. 

The Coax Attachmate (3-N-1) Card supports a 
connection from a PC to either the 6544 or 6542 control- 
ler via an RG62A/U coaxial cable, running AT&T’s At- 
tachmate Control Program and providing the same 
capabilities. 


Pricing 

The 6500 Multifunction Communication System compo- 
nents are available for purchase and lease through 
AT&T’s direct sales force or by calling (800) 247-1212. 
AT&T provides Installation and maintenance service 
through 1,000 nationwide sites. 

The 6500 Multifunction Communication System 
products carry a warranty from the date of purchase, 
guaranteeing that AT&T will replace any defective part 
or software free of charge during the warranty period. 
The company offers several Equipment Maintenance 
Agreement Plans, Including per-occurrence and con- 
tract plans. 


FEBRUARY 1990 


Equipment Prices 

Purchase 

Price 

($) 


6544 

Multifunction Communication Control- 

1,418 


ler 


6544 

Options: 



Synchronous Host Module 

383 


Synchronous Device Interface Module 

5,179 


Asynchronous Host/Protocol Conver- 

2,425 


Sion Module 



X.25 Interface Module 

1,369 


Local Channel Expansion Module 

3,668 


16-Port, Plug-Compatible Logic Mod- 

5,179 


ule 



Nine-Port PCM Device Logic Module 

4,672 


Processor/Memory Logic Module 

1,600 


Hard Disk Drive 

1,845 

6542 

Tabletop Communication Controller 

3,597 

6542 

Options: 



Synchronous Device Interface Module 

821 


Asynchronous Host/Protocol Conver- 

887 


Sion Module 



Memory Expansion Module 

1,281 

Controller Software Release 3.3 

27 

Displays 



6518 

Basic Function Display 

1,100 

6528 

Standard Display 

1,935 

6529 

standard Display 

2,085 

6538 

Multitasking Display 

2,755 

6539 

Multitasking Display 

2,880 

6591 D 

Plug-Compatible Display 

1,300 

6592D 

Plug-Compatible Display 

1,600 

6592F 

Plug-Compatible Displays 

1,750 

Printers and Printer Controllers 


6571 

Color Graphics Printer 

5,037 

6572 

Plug-Compatible Printer 

5,037 

6561 

Printer Controller 

1,002 

6562 

Coax Printer Controller 

1,643 

Personal Computer Options 



The 2-N-1 Adapter 

1,144 


The Coax Attachmate (3-N-1) Adapter 

1,144 


Attachmate Control Program 

323 


© 1990 McGraw-Hill, Incorporated. Reproduction Prohibited. Datapro Research. 
Delran NJ 08075 USA 



dotC l WD 


Datapro Reports on 
Data Communications 


C25-046-1O1 

Terminals 


AT&T 

6500 Multifunction 
Communication System 



In this report: Product Summary 


Analysis -102 Editor’s Note 

Release 3.3 of AT&T’s controller 

Characteristics -106 software enables the 6544 controller 

to support up to four simultaneous 
Pricing -110 SNA host connections. AT&T also 


now markets the 6542 tabletop con- 
troller. The 6578, 6579, 6580, and 
6591 IBM plug-compatible displays 
have been superseded by AT&T’s 
6591D, 6592D, and 6592F plug- 
compatible displays. 

Description 

AT&T’s 6500 Multifunction Com- 
munication System provides syn- 
chronous and asynchronous access to 
multiple computers and peripherals. 
AT&T markets a variety of 6500 
System-compatible and IBM plug- 
compatible display terminals and 
printers. Some system-compatible 
displays support multitasking. 

Strengths 

The flexible 6544 controller supports 
up to four simultaneous synchronous 
host connections, 32 synchronous 
peripherals and 32 asynchronous 
devices or computers, and access to 
X.25 and token-ring networks. Sup- 
port for simultaneous access to both 
synchronous and asynchronous ses- 
sions is a key feature of both the 
6544 and 6542 controllers. 


Limitations 

No major limitations. 

Competition 

IBM, Memorex/Telex, IDEA Cou- 
rier, Lee Data, and several others. 

Vendor 

AT&T 

Data Systems Group 
7776 On-the-Green 
Morristown, NJ 07960 
(201) 898-6000 
In Canada: 

AT&T Canada Inc. 

3650 Victoria Park Avenue 
Willowdale, ON M2H 3P7 
(416)499-9400 

Price 

See pricing section. 


© 1990 McGraw-Hill, Incorporated. Reproduction Prohibited. Datapro Research. 
Delran NJ 08075 USA 


APRIL 1990 



Datapro Reports on 
Data Communications 


C25-046-1O2 

Terminals 



Analysis 


Product Strategy 

In December 1985, AT&T introduced the 6500 
Multifunction Communication System, a product 
family that provides compatibility with the syn- 
chronous IBM 3270 system, as well as asynchro- 
nous communications. 

By the fourth quarter of 1987, AT&T had ex- 
panded the system’s functionality with additional 
products and enhancements, including three new 
plug-compatible displays, an adapter for the 6544 
controller to support plug-compatible devices, a 
6500 System-compatible color graphics printer, a 
local channel-connection option, increased asyn- 
chronous access capabilities, and terminal session 
capability for IBM-compatible PCs through 
adapter cards. 

Between April 1988 and March 1989, AT&T 
added the 6542 Tabletop Communication Control- 
ler, four additional plug-compatible displays, and a 
plug-compatible printer and printer controller. 
AT&T also provided system enhancements such as 
support for up to four simultaneous host connec- 
tions, two of which could use SNA/SDLC proto- 
cols; 32 ports for synchronous devices; and 32 
asynchronous connections. With Release 3.3 of 
AT&T’s controller software in February 1990, the 
6544 controller now supports up to four simulta- 
neous SNA hosts and a token ring connection. 

AT&T has long been a leader in the IBM 
3270-compatible terminal market, with over 
300,000 terminals installed. The company’s prod- 
ucts include the 40 Series, the 4540 family, and the 
E4540 line. Each product line provides basic, func- 
tional compatibility with corresponding IBM 3270 
products. 

Components of the 6500 Multifunction Com- 
munication System include the 6544 controller; the 
6518 Basic Function Display; the 6528 and 6529 
Standard Displays; the 6538 and 6539 Multitask- 
ing Displays; the 6591D, 6592D, and 6592F Plug- 
Compatible Displays; the 6571 and 6572 Color 

APRIL 1990 


AT&T 

6500 Multifunction 
Communication System 


Graphics Printers; the 6561 and 6562 Printer Con- 
trollers; and the 2-N-l and Coax Attachmate (3-N- 
1) PC adapters. 

The 6544 controller accommodates the older 
AT&T 4540 and E4540 displays and the AT&T 
4400 family asynchronous displays. The 6500 com- 
ponents operate over standard twisted-pair tele- 
phone wire or previously installed coaxial cable. 

The 6544 controller also supports multiple hosts 
and devices through 12 expansion slots, which hold 
different combinations of the following modules: 

• The Synchronous Host Module: provides three 
synchronous ports for the access of 3270 hosts 
(Bisync or SNA). 

• The Synchronous Device Interface Module: al- 
lows the attachment of up to 1 6 synchronous 
displays, printers, or PCs via twisted-pair wire. 

• The Asynchronous Host/Protocol Conversion 
Module: enables connection of up to eight asyn- 
chronous hosts or terminals; protocol conver- 
sion allows asynchronous terminals to access 
synchronous hosts. 

• The X.25 Interface Module: provides a connec- 
tor for IBM-compatible hosts supporting packet 
switched protocols. 

• The Local Channel Interface Module: provides 
connection for IBM mainframe byte multi- 
plexer, block multiplexer, or selector channel 
configurations in which the 6544 is within 200 
feet of the host. 

• The Plug-Compatible Device Interface Module: 
provides connection of up to 1 6 synchronous 
devices to the 6544 controller. 

• The Token-Ring Logic Module: allows devices 
connected to a 6544 controller to access a re- 
mote or local SNA host via a token-ring net- 
work. 

The 6542 Tabletop Controller accommodates one 
synchronous host and, with an optional expansion 
card, two asynchronous computers (or peripherals). 
Standard equipment includes four ports for plug- 
compatible devices. With an optional expansion 
card, up to eight devices can be supported. Data 
transmission speeds of up to 19.2K bps per port 
are possible. 

The 6500 controllers can communicate with a 
variety of host computers, including the IBM S/ 

360, S/370, 303X, 308X, 43XX, and IBM plug- 
compatible mainframes (PCMs) from various ► 

© 1990 McGraw-Hill, Incorporated. Reproduction Prohibited. Datapro Research. 

Delran NJ 08075 USA 



Datapro Reports on 
Data Communications 


AT&T 

6500 Multifunction 
Communication System 


C25-046-103 

Terminals 


Company Profile 
AT&T 


Corporate 

Headquarters 

550 Madison Avenue 
New York, NY 10022- 
3297 

(212) 605-5500 

In Canada 

AT&T Canada Inc. 

3650 Victoria Park 
Avenue 

Willowdale, ON M2H 3P7 
(416) 499-9400 

Officers 

CEO: Robert E. Allen 
CFO: Morris Tanenbaum 

Company Background 

AT&T’s business is mov- 
ing and managing infor- 
mation, domestically and 
globally. That Includes 
providing long distance 
telecommunications ser- 
vices through the compa- 
ny’s Worldwide Intelligent 
Network, as well as sys- 
tems, products, and ser- 
vices that combine 
communications and 
computers. 

AT&T states its mission is 
to apply the talents, 
knowledge, and skills of 
its people to make the 
company the global 
leader in enabling cus- 
tomers to reap the bene- 
fits of information 
technology. 

The company’s major 
customer markets are 
business and govern- 
ment, consumers, the 


telecommunications in- 
dustry, and electronic 
equipment manufactur- 
ers. To business and gov- 
ernment institutions, 

AT&T offers a range of 
voice and data transmis- 
sion services as well as 
computer and data net- 
working products and 
systems. Communica- 
tions products sold, 
rented, and serviced by 
AT&T include personal 
computers, midrange 
computers, software and 
peripheral equipment, 

PBX equipment, key tele- 
phone systems, and fac- 
simile machines. 

AT&T supplies switching 
systems, transmission 
equipment, and opera- 
tions support services to 
the telecommunications 
industry and manufac- 
tures advanced electronic 
components for high- 
technology firms. 

1 988 was a year of strong 
actions for AT&T; Its reve- 
nues were the highest 
since divestiture on the 
strength of growth In 
product sales as well as 
growth In service reve- 
nues; the company 
shifted more of its people 
to sales or sales support 
jobs to further strengthen 
its market position. To 
meet a growing demand 
from its customers, AT&T 


AT&T 

Financial Results 1987-1989 


Revenues 

(in billions) 



(in billions) Net Income 



decided to speed up Its 
conversion to an all-digital 
long-distance network. 

Higher costs and ex- 
penses reflect the deci- 
sion to accelerate the 
modernizing of its net- 
work. It was necessary to 
write down the value of 
older technology equip- 
ment, adding $6.7 billion 
to its costs and expenses. 
This action reduced 
AT&T’s earnings by $3.66 
a share, resulting in a loss 
for the year. Without this 


charge the company’s 
earnings would have in- 
creased to $2.11 per 
share. 

AT&T’s actions to in- 
crease sales, modernize, 
and reduce expenses en- 
hanced Its earnings po- 
tential. For the third 
quarter of 1989, the com- 
pany reported earnings of 
$699 million on revenues 
of $8.9 billion. 


© 1990 McGraw-Hill, Incorporated. Reproduction Prohibited. Datapro Research. 
Delran NJ 08075 USA 


APRIL 1990 




Datapro Reports on 
Data Communications 


C25-046-1O4 

Terminals 



A View of the 6544 Controller 
The backplane of the controller contains 12 
expansion slots for connecting as many as four 
synchronous hosts, 32 synchronous devices, 
and 32 asynchronous devices. 

► (Analysis continued) 

vendors. They can provide access to multiple hosts 
from the same display terminal. 


Competitive Position 

Over the years, AT&T’s former subsidiary. Tele- 
type, built up a large installed base of IBM 3270- 
compatible terminals; the company estimates that 
there are more than 300,000 terminals now in- 
stalled, including the 40, 4540, and E4540 families. 
Prior to AT&T’s divestiture. Teletype had what 
amounted to an exclusive market, setting products 
primarily to the Bell Operating Companies (BOCs) 
for their internal use or resale to their customers. 

As much as 40 percent of Teletype’s business at 
that time was attributed to the company’s relation- 
ship with the BOCs. 

In 1985, AT&T Teletype became a wholly 
owned subsidiary of the Computer Systems Divi- 
sion of AT&T Information Systems. All sales activ- 
ities for Teletype-manufactured products were 
moved to AT&T headquarters in New Jersey, and 
product management was folded into a DTE divi- 
sion of the Computer Systems Division. The Tele- 
type name remains a legal entity for trademark, 
product brand name, and other purposes; as a com- 

APRIL 1990 


AT&T 

6500 Multifunction 
Communication System 

pany, however, Teletype Corporation has been 
swallowed up by AT&T. 

The 6500 Multifunction Communication Sys- 
tem is AT&T’s most comprehensive (and ambi- 
tious) foray into the 3270 replacement market. The 
product line conforms to two important trends in 
the market: 

• Integration of personal computing capabilities 
into the 3270 cluster; and 

• Access to multiple hosts, including asynchro- 
nous computers. 

The 6500 product line places AT&T in a strong 
position to compete with IBM, as well as other 
3270-compatible vendors, including Memorex/ 
Telex, IDEA Courier, Lee Data, and Harris. IBM 
has taken steps to protect its huge and lucrative 
3270 installed base, however. 

In the third and fourth quarters of 1989, IBM 
released a more powerful breed of 3174 controllers 
which contain more powerful processors, support 
up to 6M bytes of memory (the former limit was 
4M bytes), and run Configuration Support B 
microcode — new controller software that supports 
up to 250 physical units. The microcode also works 
with IBM’s new Concurrent Communications 
Adapter to accommodate up to three synchronous 
host connections. Previously, only one connection 
was possible. In September 1989, IBM also an- 
nounced another generation of display terminals 
offering higher resolution, greater processing 
speed, more functions per keystroke, and a more 
attractive price. 

Release 2 of IBM’s Configuration Support B 
microcode, which will be made available in June 
1 990, will make it possible to perform controller 
diagnostic procedures from a NetView console 
rather than through a terminal tied directly to the 
controller. Towards the end of 1990, IBM will also 
incorporate into the microcode another feature 
dubbed the Multi-Host Token-Ring Gateway. Us- 
ing the Concurrent Communications Adapter, this 
feature will support communications between any 
token-ring workstation or device and up to three 
hosts via the 3174. 

Vendors such as AT&T, Lee Data, and 
Memorex/Telex have introduced communications 
controllers that support access to as many as four 
synchronous hosts, with multiwindowing on both 
synchronous and asynchronous sessions. In the 
past, however, Memorex/Telex has been most suc- 
cessful offering IBM plug-compatible controllers 

© 1990 McGraw-Hill, Incorporated. Reproduction Prohibited. Datapro Research. 
Delran NJ 08075 USA 


Datapro Reports on 
Data Communications 


AT&T 

6500 Multifunction 
Communication System 


C25-046-105 

Terminals 


Figure 1. 

Connections Supported by the 6544 Controller 



Printers 

AT&Ts 6544 Multifunction Communication Controller provides access to a variety of asynchronous and syn- 
chronous computers. 


and peripherals at the lowest possible price. IDEA 
Courier also offers a line of competitively priced 
IBM plug-compatible products. 

The Future of Display Terminals 

According to research performed by Dataquest, 
IBM holds about 50 percent of the market for 3270 
display stations. Memorex/Telex, AT&T, and 
IDEA Courier follow with about 29, 8, and 5 per- 
cent of the market respectively. International Data 
Corporation (IDC) predicted a growth of annual 
U.S. display shipments from 848,900 units in 1988 
to 940,400 units by 1992. 

© 1990 McGraw-Hill, Incorporated. Reproduction Prohibited. Datapro Research. 
Delran NJ 08075 USA 


Terminals continue to enjoy popularity be- 
cause of the large installed base of 3270 systems. 
Display terminals also take up less desk space than 
personal computers. Therefore, some users who 
don’t need the disk storage capability and process- 
ing power of a standalone PC prefer terminals in- 
stead. These displays, however, must now share the 
spotlight with a new breed of workstations de- 
signed to fill the gap between the PC and the dis- 
play terminal: the diskless workstation. 

With the proliferation of LANs, users are 
moving away from displays controlled completely 

APRIL 1990 






C25-046-1O6 

Terminals 


AT&T 

6500 Multifunction 
Communication System 


Datapro Reports on 
Data Communications 


by a host to intelligent DOS-based workstations 
supported by a file server. Equipped with large 
amounts of memory, diskless workstations perform 
much of the processing that the host would per- 
form for the display terminal, which improves sys- 
tem performance. Without disk drives and other 
features normally found on a standalone machine, 
they offer greater economy, simplicity, and security 
than a PC; all information is stored on the file 
server. Like a PC, however, the diskless worksta- 
tion can run DOS applications and has the process- 
ing power to support advanced capabilities. 

The 3270 terminal continues to flourish. But 
price wars have taken a toll on vendors, who must 
sell more units to make up for lower profits. To 
guarantee their financial stability and adjust to the 
changing market, more and more vendors are of- 
fering diskless workstations in addition to the tra- 
ditional line of display terminals. 

Decision Points 

The 6500 Multifunction Communication System’s 
key feature, reflected in its name, is multifunction- 
ality. The 6544 controller provides multihost ac- 
cess, both to asynchronous and synchronous 
computer systems. In addition, it can support color 
and monochrome multitasking displays, plug- 
compatible displays, personal computers, printers, 
adapters, and older AT&T 4540 and E4540 dis- 
plays. 

AT&T’s 6500 System-compatible display ter- 
minals offer a variety of features and capabilities 
not found on previous AT&T displays. Particularly 
interesting are the 6538 monochrome and 6539 
color multitasking systems, which can offer up to 
four multitasking windows that provide simulta- 
neous access to four distinct computer sessions in 
any combination of synchronous and asynchro- 
nous applications. 

The 6544 operates as a standard IBM 3274- 
type controller; through add-on modules, however, 
it can be upgraded to provide support for four syn- 
chronous host communications ports (including up 
to two local channel connections), as many as 32 
synchronous devices, up to 32 peripherals and 
computers, one X.25 network connection, and a 
token-ring connection. The 6544 controller’s 12 
expansion slots allow new capabilities to be added 
to the system as communications requirements 
grow. 

APRIL 1990 


Major benefits of the 6544 and 6542 control- 
lers are access to as many as four synchronous 
hosts, and support for multiple concurrent syn- 
chronous and asynchronous sessions with window- 
ing. These capabilities, however, are also provided 
by Memorex’s 1174 Network Controller and Lee 
Data’s Datastar 5000 System. 

The 6500 System puts AT&T on a strong 
competitive level in the 3270 market; however, 
since the market has been dominated for so long by 
IBM, AT&T must still fight for a larger market 
share. 


Characteristics 


Models: Hardware — 6544 Multifunction Communication 
Controller; 6542 Tabletop Communication Controller; 
6518 Basic Function Display; 6528 and 6529 Standard 
Displays; 6538 and 6539 Multitasking Displays; 6591 D, 
6592D, and 6592F Plug-Compatible Displays; 6571 
Color Graphics Printer; 6572 Plug-Compatible Printer; 
6561 Printer Controller; 6562 Coax Printer Controller; 
the 2-N-1 Adapter; and the Coax Attachmate (3-N-1) 
Adapter. 

Software — 6500 System Controller Software Re- 
lease 3.3; Attachmate Control Program. 

Date of First Delivery: Hardware — 6544 Multifunction 
Communication Controller — December 1985; 6542 Ta- 
bletop Communication Controller — March 1989; 6518 
Basic Function Display — December 1985; 6528 and 
6529 Standard Displays — December 1985; 6538 and 
6539 Multitasking Displays — December 1985; 6591 D, 
6592D, and 6592F Plug-Compatible Displays — March 
1989; 6571 Color Graphics Printer — September 1987; 
6572 Plug-Compatible Printer — September 1988; 6561 
Printer Controller — March 1986; 6562 Coax Printer 
Controller — March 1989; the 2-N-1 Adapter — November 
1987; and the Coax Attachmate (3-N-1) Adapter — 
November 1987. 

Software — 6500 System Controller Software Re- 
lease 3.3 — February 1989; Attachmate Control 
Program — November 1987. 

Number Delivered to Date: Vendor did not specify. 

Serviced by: AT&T. 


© 1990 McGraw-Hill, Incorporated. Reproduction Prohibited. Datapro Research. 
Delran NJ 08075 USA 



Datapro Reports on 
Data Communications 


AT&T 

6500 Multifunction 
Communication System 


C25-046-1O7 

Terminals 



The 65 72 Printer is a serial, dot matrix color 
printer that prints at 100 cps in near letter 
quality or at 400 cps in draft quality. The 
unit’s multicolor ribbons support four- or 
seven-color printing. 


System Components 

The AT&T 6500 Multifunction Communication System 
currently Includes two communications controllers. 
Model 6544, AT&T’s flagship product, has been mar- 
keted since 1985. Other products in the 6500 System 
family that work with the 6544 controller include five 
6500 System display terminals, three IBM plug- 
compatible display units, a 6500 system-compatible 
printer and printer controller, an IBM plug-compatible 
printer and printer controller, and nine expansion mod- 
ules that extend the connectivity options of the user. 

The 6542 controller, made available in March 
1989, is a lower-priced, table-top controller that sup- 
ports coaxial cable connections to up to eight IBM plug- 
compatible peripheral devices. 

The 6500 System supports a variety of host com- 
puters, Including the IBM S/360, S/370, 3031, 3032, 
3033, 3081 , 3083, 3084, 4321 , 4331 , and 4341 ; with the 
appropriate software, the controllers can also support 
the IBM 8100, Series/1, System/36, and System/38. In 
addition to IBM synchronous hosts, the 6500 System 
supports connections to IBM plug-compatible main- 
frames (PCMs). The 6500 supports asynchronous con- 
nections to the AT&T 3B family and UNIX PC, the Digital 
VAX, and most other popular minicomputer families. 


Transmission Specifications 

When communicating synchronously, the 6544 control- 
ler provides maximum data rates of 64K bps for hosts 
supporting SNA and X.25 protocols and 19.2K bps for 
hosts supporting Bisync protocols. The 6500 System 
communicates with asynchronous hosts and peripher- 
als at a maximum 19.2K bps data transmission rate. De- 
vices can be connected up to 5,000 feet from the 6544 
controller. 


© 1990 McGraw-Hill, Incorporated. Reproduction Prohibited. Datapro Research, 
Delran NJ 08075 USA 


The 6542 controller supports data rates of up to 
19.2K bps for synchronous and asynchronous devices 
and hosts. 


Communications Controllers 

The 6544 Multifunction Communication 
Controiier 

The 6544 controller supports up to four SNA and/or 
BSC host connections, 32 synchronous devices, and 32 
asynchronous devices or processors, depending on 
how it is configured. Devices can be located up to 5,000 
feet from the controller. 

AT&T 6500 System-compatible displays and print- 
ers are connected to the 6544 controller via twisted-pair 
telephone wire that is compatible with AT&T’s SYSTI- 
MAX PDS. Communications over coaxial cable is also 
possible through optional adapters. 

Standard equipment includes a Main Processor 
Module (also referred to as the A Card), dual 5V4-inch 
diskette drives for loading software, and 14 module 
slots, 12 of which are available for add-on expansion 
modules. An optional 20M-byte hard disk drive facili- 
tates program loading and Increases controller software 
storage capacity. 

Self-test diagnostics are standard on the 6544 
controller. In addition, the 6544 supports two IBM net- 
work programs that reside on host computers: Network 
Problem Determination Application (NPDA) and Network 
Logical Data Manager (NLDM). 

The 6544 not only supports the 6500 System- 
compatible and plug-compatible displays, but can ac- 
commodate the older AT&T 4540 and E4540 displays. 
For asynchronous applications, the 6544 supports the 
attachment of the AT&T 4400 family of displays and the 
AT&T 600 line, as well as other asynchronous displays 
such as the Digital VT220 and VT100. 

Other printers, including AT&T 4540 and E4540 
printer models, may be added to a 6500 System cluster 
using the 6561 Printer Controller; one printer controller 
is required for each printer. 

Basic 6544 functionality provides access to a sin- 
gle synchronous host computer through a single 6500 
System display. The following nine expansion modules 
are available to provide additional multifunctional fea- 
tures: 

Synchronous Host Module (B Card); an expansion 
module that provides three SNA/BSC ports. Each mod- 
ule supports an aggregate data transfer rate of 38.4K 
bps. This allows two ports using the Bisync (or SDLC) 
protocol to operate at 19.2K bps, for example. Two Syn- 
chronous Host modules are needed in situations when 
there are two SNA hosts operating at higher speeds. 

The 6544 controller supports up to four of these mod- 
ules for a maximum of four hosts. 


APRIL 1990 



Datapro Reports on 
Data Communications 


C25-046-1O8 

Terminals 


The Synchronous Host Module may also support 
one SNA port operating at either 56K or 64K bps. At 
either of these higher speeds, only one port is used per 
card. 

Synchronous Device Interface Module (C Card): an 

expansion module that provides for the attachment of 
up to 16 synchronous displays, printers, and personal 
computers. Including 6500 system-compatible devices, 
via twisted-pair wire. The 6544 controller accommo- 
dates two Synchronous Device Interface Modules, pro- 
viding for a maximum configuration of 32 synchronous 
devices. This module also permits connections to per- 
sonal computers using the 2-N-1 product. 

Asynchronous Host/Protocol Conversion Module (D 
Card): an expansion module that provides port connec- 
tions for up to eight asynchronous host computers or 
terminals. Protocol conversion allows asynchronous 
terminals to access synchronous hosts. The ports oper- 
ate at speeds up to 19.2K bps. Four Asynchronous 
Host/Protocol Conversion Modules can be added, pro- 
viding for a maximum configuration of 32 asynchronous 
connections. 

X.25 Interface Module (H Card): an expansion module 
that provides one connector for IBM-compatible hosts 
supporting the Network Control Program Packet 
Switched Interface (NPSI) protocols. The connector 
supports either of the following Interfaces; RS-232-C at 
speeds up to 19.2K bps or CCITT V.35 at speeds of 
48K, 56K, or 64K bps. Only one H Card may be In- 
stalled. 

Local Channel Interface Module (F Card): an expan- 
sion module that provides a connection to an IBM main- 
frame byte multiplexer, block multiplexer, or selector 
channel in configurations where the 6544 controller Is 
located within 200 cable feet of the host. Users can 
equip each 6544 with one or two Local Channel mod- 
ules. The 6544 can support both remote and local hosts 
concurrently. 

Plug-Compatible Device Interface Module (K Card): an 

expansion module that allows users to establish plug- 
compatibility for up to 16 synchronous devices or two 
multiplexers. With Release 3.2 or later of the controller 
software, any plug-compatible display connected to this 
module can run up to five concurrent sessions in the 
same SNA host or different hosts. Users can add a sec- 
ond module for a total of 32 ports (provided that no C 
Card is being used). This module also permits connec- 
tions to personal computers using the Coax Attachmate 
(3-N-1) product. 

Nine-Port PCM Device Logic Module (K’ Card): a 

smaller, less expensive version of the K Card for users 
who need to support no more than nine plug-compatible 
devices or two multiplexers. This module requires Re- 
lease 3.2 or later of the controller software. 


APRIL 1990 


AT&T 

6500 Multifunction 
Communication System 


Token-Ring Logic Module (T Card): enables devices 
connected to a 6544 controller to access a remote or 
local SNA host via a token-ring network. It also sup- 
ports communications between token-ring devices to 
communicate with a local or remote SNA host via a 
6544 controller. 

Processor/Memory Logic Module (X Card): expands 
the memory capacity of the 6544 controller, allowing It 
to support the enhancements Included In controller soft- 
ware Release 3.0 and later. 

6542 Tabletop Controller 

The 6542 supports connections to as many as eight 
IBM plug-compatible devices, one remote host, and up 
to two asynchronous devices (e.g., minicomputers, PCs, 
or peripherals). The 6542’s ports accommodate coax 
connections; however, any port can also support 
twisted pair wire connections using AT&T’s Baiun 
Adapter. The 6542 does not support AT&T’s 6500 Sys- 
tem (non-plug-compatible) devices or any of the 6544 
expansion modules. 

Base 6542 functionality includes one remote syn- 
chronous host connection, an asynchronous port for 
remote diagnostics, a 3V2-inch diskette drive, and sup- 
port for four directly connected IBM plug-compatible 
devices. 

The 6542 contains three expansion slots to ac- 
commodate three optional modules: 

• A Synchronous Device Interface Module provides 
four additional ports, making it possible to support a 
maximum of eight plug-compatible devices. 

• An Asynchronous Host/Protocol Conversion Module 
supports communications with two asynchronous 
devices. 

• A Memory Expansion Module provides the additional 
memory needed to support the interface and conver- 
sion modules. 

Additionally, one of the 6542’s standard ports will allow 
the multiplexing of eight synchronous plug-compatible 
peripherals over a single coax cable using an IBM 3299 
multiplexer. When the multiplexer is in operation, how- 
ever, all other ports remain inactive. 


Displays 

AT&T 6500 System-Compatible Displays 

AT&T offers five 6500 system-compatible display units 
which implement the protocols developed for the origi- 
nal 6500 System. All models support a tllt/swivel capa- 
bility; both color and monochrome (amber or green) 
displays are available. The units, developed for use with 
the 6544 controller, are described in more detail below. 


© 1990 McGraw-Hill, Incorporated. Reproduction Prohibited. Datapro Research. 
Delran NJ 08075 USA 



Datapro Reports on 
Data Communications 


AT&T 

6500 Multifunction 
Communication System 


C25-046-109 

Terminals 


6518 Basic Function Display: This monochrome unit 
supports single session communications with one syn- 
chronous host; it does not support access to asynchro- 
nous hosts. The 6518 includes a 14-inch screen, with a 
display capacity of 1 ,920 characters arranged in 24 lines 
of 80 characters each. The 6518 is functionally compati- 
ble with IBM’s 3178 and 3191 display stations. 

6528 Standard Display: The 6528 monochrome display 
provides a “hot key” for switching between two ses- 
sions on a single host or different hosts. (Data transfer 
between sessions is not supported, however.) Either 
session may be synchronous or asynchronous. The 

6528 includes a 15-inch monochrome display screen, 
with display capacities ranging from 1 ,920 to 3,564 
characters; screen arrangements include 24 lines by 80 
characters, 32 lines by 80 characters, 43 lines by 80 
characters, and 27 lines by 132 characters. The 6528 is 
functionally compatible with the IBM 3180 display sta- 
tion in synchronous mode and with the Digital VT220 
display terminal in asynchronous mode. 

6529 Standard Display: This 14-inch color display in- 
cludes the same split-screen capability as the 6528. The 
6529 provides a four- or seven-color display, with dis- 
play capacities ranging from 1 ,920 to 3,564 characters. 
Screen arrangements include 24 lines by 80 characters, 
32 lines by 80 characters, 43 lines by 80 characters, and 
27 lines by 132 characters. The 6529 is functionally 
compatible with the IBM 3179 display station in syn- 
chronous mode and with the Digital VT220 display ter- 
minal in asynchronous mode. 

6538 Multitasking Display: This monochrome display 
provides up to four multitasking windows in any combi- 
nation of synchronous and asynchronous sessions. 
Window posItioning/browsing/sizing speed Is four 
inches per second horizontal and six inches per second 
vertical. The 6538 includes a 15-inch display screen, 
with display capacities ranging from 1 ,920 to 3,564 
characters; screen arrangements include 24 lines by 80 
characters, 32 lines by 80 characters, 43 lines by 80 
characters, and 27 lines by 132 characters. The 6538 
supports four screen formats, Including 3270 operation, 
VT220 operation, full-extended attributing, and input 
and edit. An auxiliary I/O port and programmed symbol 
graphics are optionally available. The 6538 is function- 
ally compatible with the IBM 3180 display station in syn- 
chronous mode and with the Digital VT220 display 
terminal In asynchronous mode. 

6539 Multitasking Display: This color display provides 
up to four multitasking windows in any combination of 
synchronous and asynchronous sessions. Window 
positioning/browsing/sizing speed is four inches per 
second horizontal and six inches per second vertical. 
The 6539 includes a 14-inch display screen, with display 
capacities ranging from 1,920 to 3,564 characters; 
screen arrangements include 24 lines by 80 characters, 
32 lines by 80 characters, 43 lines by 80 characters, and 
27 lines by 132 characters. The 6539 features four- or 

© 1990 McGraw-Hill, Incorporated. Reproduction Prohibited. Datapro Research. 
Delran NJ 08075 USA 


seven-color display capability and supports four screen 
formats, including 3270 operation, VT220 operation, 
full-extended attributing, and input and edit. An auxiliary 
I/O port and programmed symbol graphics are option- 
ally available. The 6539 is functionally compatible with 
the IBM 3279-S3G display station in synchronous mode 
and with the Digital VT220 display terminal in asynchro- 
nous mode. 

Keyboards for 6500 System-Compatible Displays 

The 6518 display comes with a 122-key keyboard con- 
taining 24 external program function (PF) keys. This de- 
tachable keyboard has a typewriter-style layout and a 
low-profile design. Security keylock is a standard fea- 
ture. A three-year warranty Is available with the 6518. 

The 6528, 6529, 6538, and 6539 displays are mod- 
ularly designed and can be upgraded or downgraded by 
switching logic bases and display monitors. They are all 
equipped with a 122-key keyboard that Includes 24 pro- 
gram function (PF) keys and a VT220 template. The de- 
tachable keyboard contains a typewriter-style layout 
and a low-profile design. Security keylock Is a standard 
feature. 

IBM Plug-Compatible Displays 

Each of the following three 6500 plug-compatible dis- 
plays can operate with IBM 3270 controllers, the AT&T 
6544 controller, and the AT&T 6542 controller. The 
units’ display screens support tilt/swivel capabilities, 
and monochrome devices are available with amber or 
green phosphor characters. 

When connected to a 6500 controller running Con- 
troller Software Release 3.2 or later, these displays sup- 
port up to five simultaneous sessions with synchronous 
and asynchronous hosts. 

6591 D Plug-Compatible Display: This low-cost, mono- 
chrome display, designed for basic data entry, includes 
a 14-inch screen and a 122-key keyboard. The 6591 D is 
equivalent to IBM’s 3191 display family, supporting 
screen arrangements of 24 lines by 80 characters and 
32 lines by 80 characters. 

6592D Plug-Compatible Display: This monochrome 
display, equivalent to the IBM 3192-D display, features 
a 15-inch screen and a 122-key keyboard supporting 
record keystroke capabilities. The 6592D supports 
screen arrangements of 24 lines by 80 characters, 32 
lines by 80 characters, 43 lines by 80 characters, and 27 
lines by 132 characters. 

6592F Plug-Compatible Display: This display is the 
color equivalent of the 9592D. It Includes a 14-inch, 
seven-color screen and a 122-key keyboard which pro- 
vides record keystroke capabilities. The 6592D sup- 
ports screen arrangements of 24 lines by 80 characters, 
32 lines by 80 characters, 43 lines by 80 characters, and 
27 lines by 132 characters. 


APRIL 1990 



Datapro Reports on 
Data Communications 


C25-046-11O 

Terminals 


Printers and Printer Controiiers 

AT&T offers a 6500 system-compatible printer and 
printer controller as well as an IBM plug-compatible 
printer and printer controller. The 6500 System printer 
products are designed for communications with the 
6544 controller alone; the plug-compatible printer prod- 
ucts support connections to both the 6544 and 6542 
controllers as well as IBM controllers. 

6571 Color Matrix Printer: The 6571 , a 6500 system- 
compatible matrix printer, provides color or mono- 
chrome text and graphics printing. The 6571 operates at 
speeds up to 400 cps in draft mode and 100 cps in near 
letter quality mode. The 6571 prints symbol graphics 
and supports one-, four-, and seven-color printing. The 

6571 Includes a full-function SNA control panel and LCD 
display, an operator-replaceable 18-wlre printhead with 
half-dot shift, and a tractor- or friction-feed platen with 
rear or bottom feed. Paper feed/positioning controls are 
also included. 

6572 Plug-Compatible Printer: The 6572 is a coax 
(plug-compatible) version of the 6571 printer, offering all 
the same features. 

6561 Printer Controller: The 6561 is a printer controller 
that enables the use of older AT&T 4540 and E4540 
printers as well as AT&T’s newer asynchronous printers 
in a 6500 System cluster. The 6561 adds new functions 
and applications to the older printers and Includes a full- 
function SNA control panel, LCD display, and the follow- 
ing interfaces: SSI (twisted pair) in, SSI out, RS-232-C 
out, and Centronics parallel out. 

6562 Coax Printer Controller: The 6562 Printer Control- 
ler is a plug-compatible version of the 6561 that can 
connect to IBM 3274 or 3174 controllers. The 6562 sup- 
ports both parallel and serial asynchronous printers. 

Personal Computer Add-On Products 

The 2-N-1 Adapter, which runs AT&T’s Attachmate Con- 
trol Program, provides multisession, multiwindowing 
capability to PCs connected to the 6500 controller via 
twisted pair wire. Up to seven concurrent windows are 
possible: four 3270 sessions, two notepads, and one 
PC session. While the PC cannot access multiple hosts 
simultaneously, it can access multiple concurrent ses- 
sions on a single host. 

The Coax Attachmate (3-N-1) Card supports a 
connection from a PC to either the 6544 or 6542 control- 
ler via an RG62A/U coaxial cable, running AT&T’s At- 
tachmate Control Program and providing the same 
capabilities. 


Pricing 

The 6500 Multifunction Communication System compo- 
nents are available for purchase and lease through 
AT&T’s direct sales force or by calling (800) 247-1212. 

APRIL 1990 


AT&T 

6500 Multifunction 
Communication System 


AT&T provides installation and maintenance service 
through 1,000 nationwide sites. 

The 6500 Multifunction Communication System 
products carry a warranty from the date of purchase, 
guaranteeing that AT&T will replace any defective part 
or software free of charge during the warranty period. 
The company offers several Equipment Maintenance 
Agreement Plans, including per-occurrence and con- 
tract plans. 



Equipment Prices 


Purchase 

Price 

($) 


6544 

Multifunction Communication Control- 

1,418 


ler 


6544 

Options: 



Synchronous Host Module 

383 


Synchronous Device Interface Module 

5,179 


Asynchronous Host/Protocol Conver- 

2,425 


Sion Module 



X.25 Interface Module 

1,369 


Local Channel Expansion Module 

3,668 


16-Port, Plug-Compatible Logic Mod- 

5,179 


ule 



Nine-Port PCM Device Logic Module 

4,672 


Processor/Memory Logic Module 

1,600 


Hard Disk Drive 

1,845 

6542 

Tabletop Communication Controller 

3,597 

6642 

Options: 



Synchronous Device Interface Module 

821 


Asynchronous Host/Protocol Conver- 

887 


Sion Module 



Memory Expansion Module 

1,281 

Controller Software Release 3.3 

27 

Displays 



6518 

Basic Function Display 

1,100 

6528 

Standard Display 

1,935 

6529 

Standard Display 

2,085 

6538 

Multitasking Display 

2,755 

6539 

Multitasking Display 

2,880 

6591 D 

Plug-Compatible Display 

1,300 

6592D 

Plug-Compatible Display 

1,600 

6592F 

Plug-Compatible Displays 

1,750 

Printers and Printer Controiiers 


6571 

Color Graphics Printer 

5,037 

6572 

Plug-Compatible Printer 

5,037 

6561 

Printer Controller 

1,002 

6562 

Coax Printer Controller 

1,643 

Personal Computer Options 


The2-N-1 Adapter 1,144 

The Coax Attachmate (3-N-1) Adapter 1,144 

Attachmate Control Program 323 


© 1990 McGraw-Hill, Incorporated. Reproduction Prohibited. Datapro Research. 
Delran NJ 08075 USA 



C25-046-101 

Terminals 


AT&T 4400 Series Display Terminals 



The 4425 is AT&T’s high-end asynchronous display terminal 
offering. The terminal is buffered and features horizontal split 
screen, windowing, 80-/ 122-column display capability, and 
compatibility with both the Unix operating system and the 
Digital VT102 display. An integral modem is optional. 

MANAGEMENT SUMMARY 

UPDATE: This report reflects the removal of the Teletype 
name from all AT&T display terminals. Teletype (based in 
Skokie, IL) has been absorbed into the Computer Systems 
Division of AT&T Information Systems; it remains the 
manufacturing arm of AT&T-IS. 

Since 1930, Teletype Corporation was responsible for man- 
ufacturing and supplying the Bell System’s teletypewriter 
equipment and, in recent times, computer display termi- 
nals and printers. The Bell System used Teletype products 
internally and resold them to end users on a tariffed basis. 
In addition. Teletype marketed its own products on a 
nontariffed basis directly to end users, and through a large 
network of dealers, distributors, leasing companies, and 
OEMs. 

The AT&T divestiture and deregulation have changed 
most of that. Teletype has been absorbed into the Comput- 
er Systems Division of AT&T Information Systems, and its 
Teletype and Dataspeed labels have disappeared from 
view. The company was known for a while as “AT&T 
Teletype,” but now products coming out of Skokie display 
only the AT&T logo. Some AT&T-IS terminal equipment 
is obtained from other OEMs, as well. 

AT&T’s family of display terminals encompasses the 4400 
Series, the E4540 Series (an IBM 3270-compatible line), 
Model 5620 (a bit-mapped graphics display), and the 6500 
Series (multifunctional replacements for the IBM 3270 


The 4400 Series is AT&T's latest generation 
of ASCII display terminal products, replac- 
ing the older 4400 models. The 4400 Series 
was formerly marketed as the 5400 Series 
by AT&T Teletype. Models 4410 and 4425 
are ANSI X3.64-compliant terminals. Model 
4418 is an asynchronous terminal that is 
designed to function in an IBM 3270 envi- 
ronment when used with a protocol 
converter. 

MODELS: 4410, 4418, and 4425. 
DISPLAY: All models contain a 12-inch dis- 
play with 80/1 32-column display capability; 
amber or white phosphor characters may be 
selected. All models have a tiltable display. 
KEYBOARD: The 5410 and 5425 feature a 
typewriter-style keyboard with 8 function 
keys; the 5418 features an IBM 3278-style 
keyboard with 24 function keys. Keyboards 
are detachable, and contain a low-profile 
design with height adjustment. 
COMPETITION: Wyse Technology, TeleVi- 
deo Systems, Applied Digital Data Systems 
(ADDS), Lear Siegler, Esprit Systems, and 
several others. 

PRICE: Purchase prices for the 4400 Series 
terminals range from $902 to $1 ,720. 


CHARACTERISTICS 

VENDOR: AT&T Information Systems, 1 Speedwell Ave- 
nue, Morristown, NJ 07960. Telephone (201) 898-2000. In 
Canada: AT&T Canada, 1500 Don Mills Road, Don Mills, 
Ontario M3B 3K4. Telephone (416) 449-4300. 

DATE OF ANNOUNCEMENT: 4410—April 1983; 
4418 — May 1984; 4425 — September 1984. 

DATE OF FIRST DELIVERY: 4410— Third quarter 1983; 
4418— May 1984; 4425— October 1984. 

NUMBER DELIVERED TO DATE: Information not 
available. 

SERVICED BY: AT&T Information Systems. 

MODELS 

The 4400 Series currently consists of the following three 
models. 

• 4410 — an asynchronous, conversational terminal. The 
4410 conforms to the ANSI X3.64 standard. It provides 
80/132-column display capability, horizontal split screen, 
editing capabilities, and five display attributes. 

• 4418 — an asynchronous, conversational terminal that fea- 
tures IBM 3270 emulation when used in conjunction with 
a protocol converter. It provides 80-/ 132-column display 
capability, conforms to the ANSI X3.64 standard, and 
includes an IBM 3278-style keyboard. 


MARCH 1986 


© 1986 DATAPRO RESEARCH CORPORATION, DELRAN, NJ 08075 USA 
REPRODUCTION PROHIBITED 



C25-046-102 

Terminals 


AT&T 4400 Series Display Terminals 


line) of products. The 4400 Series, E4540 Series, and 5620 
are equivalent to the former Teletype 5000 Series; the 6500 
Series are new products. 

The 4400 Series currently consists of models 4410, 4418, 
and 4425. The 4410 is a conversational, asynchronous, 
ASCII display based on the ANSI X3.64 standard. It fea- 
tures a monochrome 80-/ 132-column display, full editing, 
horizontal split screen, eight programmable function keys, 
visual attributes, and business graphics. The 4418 is similar 
to the 4410 but has an IBM 3270 look-alike keyboard, and 
is designed to replace a more expensive IBM 3270 terminal 
when used with a protocol converter. The 4425 is a buff- 
ered terminal that provides up to 78 lines of display in 
memory (80 column mode), and is compatible with Digital 
Equipment Corporation VT102/VT52 display terminals as 
well as the ANSI X3.64 standard. The 4425 features 38 
function keys and four fixed-program function keys. 

The 4400 Series terminals are designed for general-purpose 
asynchronous applications, as well as for use with AT&T’s 
3B line of computers. 

COMPETITIVE POSITION 

Prior to AT&T’s divestiture. Teletype Corporation pos- 
sessed what was, essentially, a built-in market. The compa- 
ny’s products were' sold primarily to the Bell Operating 
Companies (BOCs) for their internal use or for resale to 
their customers. At that time, as much as 40 percent of 
Teletype’s revenues were attributed to their business with 
the BOCs. As part of Computer Inquiry II, the BOCs were 
forbidden to sell new premises equipment to users during 
1983. Also as part of Computer Inquiry II, Teletype was 
prohibited from selling its products directly to end users. 
With the AT&T divestiture, the BOCs were divested from 
AT&T, thus loosening, to some extent. Teletype’s hold on 
them. Teletype remains a part of AT&T, while the BOCs 
are now free to purchase equipment from whatever source 
they prefer. 

All of this forced Teletype (which soon became AT&T 
Teletype) to change its strategy in the new, deregulated 
marketplace. As a result, the company poured more money 
into research and development, beefed up marketing, cut 
manufacturing costs in order to reduce prices, and estab- 
lished new distribution channels. 

In 1985, AT&T Teletype became a wholly owned subsid- 
iary of the Computer Systems Division of AT&T Informa- 
tion Systems. All sales and marketing for Teletype 
terminals was relocated to AT&T-IS headquarters in Mor- 
ristown, New Jersey. Teletype, based in Skokie, Illinois, 
will remain the manufacturing arm for the production of 
asynchronous and synchronous data terminals. However, 
the Teletype logo will no longer be found on the terminals. 

The 4400 line of asynchronous terminals competes with 
terminal product lines from independent vendors such as 
Wyse Technology, Tele Video Systems, Lear Siegler, Ap- 
plied Digital Data Systems (ADDS), Esprit Systems, Visual 
Technology, and several others. For general-purpose appli- 


• 4425 — an asynchronous, buffered terminal. The 4425 con- 
tains all of the features of the 4420, plus Unix operating 
system compatibility and Digital VT102 terminal 
compatibility. 


TRANSMISSION SPECIFICATIONS 

For the 4400 terminals, transmission is asynchronous, in 
half or full duplex, at speeds up to 19,200 bits per second; 
isochronous transmission is selectable on the 4425. Multi- 
point operation is available on all models except the 4410. 
All models conform to both the ASCII and ANSI X3.64 
communications protocols. Vertical parity generation and 
detection options are available. All models provide an EIA 
RS-232-C interface, as well as an auxiliary EIA RS-232-C 
printer interface. A self-test capability is standard. An 
integral modem/dialer is optionally available on all models. 
The integral modem is compatible with 212A-type modems 
for operation at 1200 or 300 bps. 

DEVICE CONTROL 

The 4410 and 4418 conversational display terminals trans- 
mit data a character at a time as it is keyed. The option menu 
is displayed on the screen in a “plain English” manner. 
Eight user- or host-programmable function keys are includ- 
ed on the 4410, each of which has up to a 50-character per 
key capacity in nonvolatile memory. Each function key has a 
corresponding screen label, with up to 16 characters dis- 
playable on each label. The 4418 contains 24 function keys. 
When used with a protocol converter, the 4418 emulates the 
IBM 3278 for both local and remote communications. The 
4418 features single-key access to all 3278-like keystrokes. 

Visual display attributes available on the 4410 and 4418 
include normal, blank, half intensity, blink, underline, and 
reverse video. The display screen may be horizontally split 
into a maximum of two static regions and one scrolling 
region. Editing capabilities include character and line in- 
sert/delete, as well as clear functions. Line drawing and 
special symbol graphics are available. The 4410 and 4418 
conform to the ANSI X3.64 standard. 

The 4425 buffered display can transmit data a character at a 
time from the keyboard, or by line/page/block from the 
display. Up to 78 lines of display memory are available when 
using the 80-column display format, and up to 54 lines of 
memory are available when using the 132-column display 
format. The 4425 contains all of the basic operating features 
of the 4410 and 4418 (including visual attributes and edit- 
ing), plus some additional features not found on the conver- 
sational models, including single or multiple character or 
line insert/delete. The 4425 is compatible with the Unix 
operating system and with the Digital VT102 display 
terminal. 

The 4425 provides three separate methods to access and 
manipulate the display memory; scroll mode, horizontal 
split screen, and windowing. Scroll mode allows the operator 
to scroll through display memory. The horizontal split 
screen feature is the same as found on the 4410 and 4418, 
with one scrolling region and two static regions. With win- 
dowing, the 4425’s memory can be divided into a maximum 
of four rectangles of varying lengths and widths, called 
workspaces. A window or viewport into each workspace can 
be created, and its position defined and located on the 
screen. One viewport can be overlapped or eclipsed with 
another. 

The optional integral modem feature allows the 4410, 4418, 
and 4425 displays to plug directly into a telephone line for 
manual dialing of calls from the keyboard, automatic dialing 
of stored numbers, or automatic repeat dialing. A security 
feature hides all or part of the dial command log-on string. 


© 1986 DATAPRO RESEARCH CORPORATION, DELRAN, NJ 08075 USA 
REPRODUCTION PROHIBITED 


MARCH 1986 



AT&T 4400 Series Display Terminals 


C25-046-103 

Terminals 


cations, AT&T will also go up against terminals from 
computer vendors like Digital Equipment Corporation and 
IBM. However, the chief market for the AT&T terminals 
will be for use with AT&T’s 3B line of computers. It is this 
market that will assure AT&T of continuing to hold the 
large market share that Teletype managed to carve out. 

ADVANTAGES AND RESTRICTIONS 

Teletype’s products have traditionally maintained a repu- 
tation for exceptionally good functionality and reliability, 
as well as for their rather high price tags. The AT&T 4400 
Series terminals retained the high degree of functionality 
offered by their predecessors, but prices have fallen some- 
what to reflect the current trends in the display terminal 
market. Still, the AT&T terminals are priced higher than 
many comparable terminals from the independent ven- 
dors. For the money, the AT&T terminals feature a variety 
of attractive features; these include 80-/ 132-column display 
capability, windowing (on the buffered models), and ANSI 
X3.64 compatibility. UNIX operating system compatibil- 
ity and Digital VT102 compatibility have been implement- 
ed on the 5425. An optional integral modem/dialer has also 
been added to the line. All AT&T 4400 Series terminals 
include a tiltable display and a detachable, low-profile 
keyboard. 

USER REACTION 

In Datapro’s 1985 Terminal Users Survey, conducted in 
conjunction with Data Communications magazine, a total 
of 32 users of the AT&T 4400 Series (then AT&T Teletype 
5400 Series) display terminals responded. These users rep- 
resented an installed base of approximately 1,500 units. 
The users were asked to rate their terminals with respect to 
seven specific categories. Their responses are summarized 
in the following table. 



Excellent 

Good 

Fair 

Poor 

WA* 

Overall performance 

26 

5 

1 

0 

3.8 

Ease of operation 

24 

7 

1 

0 

3.7 

Display clarity 

25 

4 

1 

1 

3.7 

Keyboard feel & usability 

13 

15 

3 

0 

3.3 

Ergonomics 

21 

7 

3 

0 

3.6 

Hardware reliability 

25 

5 

1 

0 

3.8 

Mfr.’s maintenance 

24 

5 

2 

0 

3.7 


service/technical support 

^Weighted Average on a scale of 4.0 for Excellent. 

When asked whether or not they would recommend the 
4400 Series terminals to other users, 26 of the respondents 
answered that they would; the remaining six did not answer 
the question. When asked what factors most influenced 


Screen labels are available to simplify dialing, and call 
progress status and prompts are displayed on the screen’s 
25tb display line. 

COMPONENTS 

4410/4418/4425 DISPLAY UNITS: Include a 12-inch (di- 
agonal) display screen, capable of displaying 24 lines of 80 
or 132 characters. One status line is available, plus 2 lines 
for screen labels. Characters are formed utilizing a 7-by-9 
dot matrix with descenders in a 9-by-13 field (80-column 
format), or using a 5-by-7 dot matrix with descenders in a 7- 
by-13 field (132-column format). White or amber phosphor 
characters are available. Two character sets are selectable: 
128 ASCII alphanumeric plus control characters, or 96 line 
drawing and special graphic characters. Other character 
sets available include United Kingdom, videotex mosaics, 
and securities industry. The screen features 7 tilt positions, 
a nonglare finish, and brightness control. 

4410/4425 KEYBOARDS: Feature a typewriter-style lay- 
out with a separate numeric cluster and 8 programmable 
function keys. Function keys offer 16 functions: 8 defined by 
the host and 8 defined by the user. Each function key is 
capable of storing 80 characters per key. The 4425 provides 
11 additional function keys, shiftable to provide 22 
functions. 

4418 KEYBOARD: Features a layout similar to that found 
on the IBM 3278, including 24 function keys. Otherwise, the 
4418 keyboard contains the same features found on the 4410 
and 4425 keyboards, including a low-profile design, tilt 
adjustments, and detachability. 

PRICING 

The AT&T 4400 Series display terminals are available for 
purchase only. Quantity discounts are available on the 
following schedule: 25 to 49 units — 10 percent; 50 to 99 
units — 15 percent; 100 to 199 units — 20 percent; 200 -1- 
units — 25 percent. 

Maintenance service for the 4400 Series terminals is avail- 
able from AT&T Information Systems field personnel. 
Maintenance contracts are available on a yearly basis. 

EQUIPMENT PRICES 

Purchase 

Price 

($) 


4410 Display Terminal 902 

4418 Display Terminal 1,080 

4425 Display Terminal 1 ,265-1 ,720 ■ 


their decision to purchase the AT&T terminals, nearly half 
(48 percent) cited the terminals’ features and/or 
functionality. □ 


MARCH 1986 


© 1986 DATAPRO RESEARCH CORPORATION, DELRAN, NJ 08075 USA 
REPRODUCTION PROHIBITED 




C25-046-101 
Display Terminals 


AT&T Teletype 5000 Series Display Terminals 



The 5425 is AT&T Teletype's high-end asynchronous display 
terminal offering. The terminal is buffered and features hori- 
zontal split screen, windowing, 80/1 32-column display capa- 
bility, and compatibility with both the UNIX operating system 
and the DEC VT102 display. An integral modem is optional. 


MANAGEMENT SUMMARY 

The 5000 Series products are AT&T Teletype’s new genera- 
tion of display terminals. (As a by-product of divestiture, 
Teletype Corporation recently changed its name to AT&T 
Teletype.) These new products cover a broad field, with 
new terminals for four different application areas: asyn- 
chronous conversational, asynchronous buffered, IBM 
3270-compatible, and intelligent dot-mapped graphics. 
This report will cover AT&T Teletype’s products in the 
first three application areas only. 

The 5400 family is AT&T Teletype’s asynchronous display 
terminal product line. It consists of two conversational 
terminals (5410 and 5418) and two buffered terminals 
(5420/2 and 5425). The 5410 Display is a low-priced, 
character mode asynchronous terminal. The 5410 con- 
forms to the ANSI X3.64 standard, and contains several 
features not normally associated with conversational ter- 
minals. These include: 80/ 132-column display capability; 
horizontal split screen; eight programmable function keys 
with associated screen labels; full editing features and 
visual attributes; and graphics capabilities. 

The 5420/2 is a buffered version of the 5420 (a production 
which is no longer offered). The 5420/2 provides up to 78 
lines of display memory in 80-column mode (54 lines in 
132-column mode). In addition to the horizontal split 
screen capability, a scroll mode and windowing capability 
are provided in order to access and manipulate the 5420/2’s 


The 5000 Series is AT&T Teletype's latest 
generation of display terminal products, re- 
placing the 4400 and 4540 product lines. 
The 5000 Series consists of two separate 
families of products: the 5400 asynchronous 
terminals, and the 5540 synchronous (IBM 
3270-compatible) terminals. All of the dis- 
play terminal models contain a new design 
enclosure, and feature lower prices than pre- 
vious Teletype display terminal products. 

MODELS: 5400 Family — 5410 and 5418 
Conversational Displays, 5420/2 and 5425 
Buffered Displays; 5540 Family — 5544 and 
5546 Controllers, 5548-12, 5548-22, 
5548-25 Display Terminals, 5549 Color Dis- 
play Terminal. 

DISPLAY: The 5410, 5418, 5420/2, 5425, 
and 5548-12 contain a 12-inch display; the 
5548-22, 5548-25, and 5549 feature a 13- 
inch screen. The 5410, 5418, 5420/2, 
5425, and 5548-25 feature 80/1 32-column 
display capability; the 5548-12, 5548-22, 
and 5549 feature 80-column display capa- 
bility only. All models have a tiltable display. 
KEYBOARD: The 5410, 5420/2, and 5425 
feature a typewriter-style keyboard with 8 
function keys; the 5418 features an IBM 
3278-style keyboard with 24 function keys. 
A variety of 3270-style keyboard layouts are 
available for the 5540 displays, including 
typewriter and data entry; all keyboard 
models feature 24 function keys. Keyboards 
for the 5400 and 5540 displays are detach- 
able, and contain a low-profile design with 
height adjustment. 

COMPETITION: 5400 Family — TeleVideo 
Systems, Applied Digital Data Systems, 
Lear Siegler, Esprit Systems, and several 
others; 5540 Family — IBM, ITT Courier, 
Telex, Lee Data, Memorex, and several 
others. 

PRICE: Purchase prices for the 5000 Series 
terminals range from $995 to $2,817. 


CHARACTERISTICS 

VENDOR: AT&T Teletype Corporation, 5555 Touhy Ave- 
nue, Skokie, Illinois 60077. Telephone (312) 982-2000. 

DATE OF ANNOUNCEMENT: 5410, 5420/2, 5544, 
5546, and 5548— April 1983; 5418 and 5549— May 1984; 
5425 — September 1984. 

DATE OF FIRST DELIVERY: 5410, 5420/2, 5544, 5546, 
and 5548— Third quarter 1983; 5418 and 5549— May 1984; 
5425 — October 1984. 


DECEMBER 1984 


© 1984 DATAPRO RESEARCH CORPORATION, DELRAN, NJ 08075 USA 
REPRODUCTION PROHIBITED 



C25-046-102 
Display Terminals 


AT&T Teletype 5000 Series Display Terminals 


memory. The 5420/2 also provides all of the operational 
and design features of the 5410, and is compatible with the 
older Teletype 40/1 and 40/2 terminals. 

The 5418 and 5425 are newcomers to the AT&T Teletype 
product line. The 5418 is a conversational terminal 
designed for both local and remote communications over 
IBM 3270 networks when used with a protocol converter. It 
features an IBM 3278-style keyboard layout, with single- 
key access to each 3278-like keystroke. Otherwise, all other 
features are the same as found on the 5410. The 5425 is an 
enhanced version of the 5420. The 5425 is compatible with 
the UNIX operating system, as well as with the DEC 
VT102 display terminal. 

The 5540 is a family of IBM 3270-compatible products; the 
new products are also compatible with Teletype’s existing 
4540 series of 3270-compatible controllers and displays. 
The 5540 family consists of two controllers (5544 and 
5546), three monochrome displays (5548-12, 5548-22, and 
5548-25), a color display (5549), and a line of printers. 

The 5544 is an IBM 3274-compatible control unit. Avail- 
able in 16-port and 32-port versions, the 5544 is a floor- 
standing unit. The 5546 is an IBM 3276-compatible, 
table-top control unit available in 6-port and 12-port ver- 
sions. Both controllers provide 5V4-inch dual floppy disks 
for software storage. Users can switch from BSC to SNA/ 
SDLC line protocol by changing disks. 

The 5548-22 Display Terminal is an IBM 3278 Model 2 
compatible unit containing a 13-inch display and a 1920- 
character display capacity. The 5548-25 is compatible with 
the IBM 3278 Model 5; it also contains a 13-inch screen, 
while providing selectable display capacities of 1920 and 
3564 (27 lines by 132 columns) characters. The 5548-12 is 
AT&T Teletype’s version of the IBM 3178, with a smaller 
(12-inch) display screen and a 1920-character display 
capacity. The 5549 is a 4-color display that includes a 13- 
inch screen and selectable 1920- and 2560-character (32 
lines by 80 columns) display capacities. All of the 5540 
displays can be configured with a choice of available key- 
boards, including typewriter-style, typewriter with external 
numeric pad, and data entry styles. 

COMPETITIVE POSITION 

AT&T Teletype’s 5000 Series covers three distinct market 
areas. The 5400 products are targeted at the low-priced 
ASCII terminal market, a segment in which Teletype has 
not traditionally been a major force. The 5400 terminals 
contain a high degree of functionality, and are priced at 
levels significantly below the older 40 and 4400 Series 
terminal that they are designed to replace. 

The 5540 family is Teletype’s new generation of IBM 3270 
replacement products. The new components are also com- 
patible with the existing Teletype 4540 products, a line 
which boasts a very large installed base and a high degree of 
user acceptance in the competitive 3270 replacement mar- 
ket. The new 5620 is an intelligent, dot-mapped graphics 
terminal which places AT&T Teletype in the intelligent 
terminal market for the first time. 


► NUMBER DELIVERED TO DATE: Information not 
available. 

SERVICED BY: AT&T Teletype Corporation. 

MODELS 

The 5000 Series consists of two separate families of 
products: the 5400 asynchronous terminals and the 5540 
3270-compatible terminals. (Another member of the 5000 
series, the 5620, is an intelligent graphics terminal and thus 
beyond the scope of this report.) The following paragraphs 
describe the terminals that comprise the 5400 and 5540 
product lines: 

5400 Family — 

• 5410 — an asynchronous, conversational terminal. The 
5410 conforms to the ANSI X3.64 standard. It provides 
80/132-column display capability, horizontal split screen, 
editing capabilities, and five display attributes. 

• 5418 — an asynchronous, conversational terminal that fea- 
tures IBM 3270 emulation when used in conjunction with 
a protocol converter. It provides 80/132-column display 
capability, conforms to the ANSI X3.64 standard, and 
includes an IBM 3278-style keyboard. 

• 5420/2 — an asynchronous, buffered terminal. The 5420/2 
provides all of the features of the 5410, plus 78 (80 
columns) or 54 (132 columns) lines of display memory, 
scroll mode, page mode, and windowing. Emulates the 
older Teletype Models 40/1 and 40/2, and replaces the 
5420. 

• 5425 — an asynchronous, buffered terminal. The 5425 con- 
tains all of the features of the 5420, plus UNIX operating 
system compatibility and DEC VT102 terminal 
compatibility. 

5540 Family — 

The 5540 is a family of IBM 3270-compatible display 
terminals, controllers, and printers. As with the older® 
Teletype 4540 family, the 5540 products operate under both 
BSC and SDLC line protocols. Members of the 5540 line 
include: 

• 5544 — a control unit that is compatible with the IBM 
3274 and is available in 16- and 32-port configurations; 

• 5546 — a control unit that is compatible with the IBM 
3276 and is available in 6-and 12-port versions; 

• 5548 Model 12 — a monochrome display terminal that is 
compatible with the IBM 3178; includes a 12-inch display 
screen with a 1920-character capacity and a detachable 
keyboard; 

• 5548 Model 22 — a monochrome display terminal that is 
compatible with the IBM 3278 Model 2; includes a 13- 
inch display screen with a 1920-character capacity and a 
detachable keyboard; 

• 5548 Model 25 — a monochrome display terminal that is 
compatible with the IBM 3278 Model 5; includes a 13- 
inch display screen with selectable 1920- and 3564-char- 
acter capacities and a detachable keyboard; 

• 5549 — a 4-color display terminal that is compatible with 
the IBM 3279 Model S2A; includes a 13-inch display 
screen with selectable 1920- and 2560-character 
capacities and a detachable keyboard. 

^ AT&T Teletype also provides a variety of printers for use 
with the 5540 family, including serial and line printers. 


© 1984 DATAPRO RESEARCH CORPORATION, DELRAN, NJ 08075 USA 
REPRODUCTION PROHIBITED 


DECEMBER 1984 



AT&T Teletype 5000 Series Display Terminals 


C25-046-103 
Display Terminals 


Prior to AT&T’s divestiture, Teletype Corporation pos- 
sessed what was, essentially, a built-in market. The com- 
pany’s products were sold primarily to the Bell Operating 
Companies (BOCs) for their internal use or for resale to 
their customers. At that time, as much as 40 percent of 
Teletype’s revenues were attributed to their business with 
the BOCs. As part of Computer Inquiry II, the BOCs were 
forbidden to sell new premise equipment to users during 
1983. Also as part of Computer Inquiry II, Teletype was 
prohibited from selling its products directly to end users. 
With the AT&T divestiture, the BOCs were divested from 
AT&T, thus loosening, to some extent. Teletype’s hold on 
them. Teletype remains a part of AT&T, while the BOCs 
are now free to purchase equipment from whatever source 
they prefer. 

All of this has forced Teletype (now officially AT&T Tele- 
type) to change its strategy in the new, deregulated market- 
place. As a result, the company has poured more money 
into research and development, beefed up marketing, cut 
manufacturing costs in order to reduce prices, and estab- 
lished new distribution channels. The results to date have 
been encouraging — AT&T Teletype posted a significant 
jump in net profits during 1983. AT&T Teletype now sells 
its products through distributors, OEMs, AT&T Informa- 
tion Systems (under the Dataspeed name), and AT&T 
International. The company also supplies equipment to the 
BOCs for internal use; the BOCs, however, are still not 
permitted to resell third party data processing equipment to 
their customers. 

In the deregulated market for terminals, AT&T Teletype 
now finds itself competing directly with a myriad of ven- 
dors. Its 5400 line of asynchronous terminals competes 
with product lines from vendors such as Tele Video Sys- 
tems, Lear Siegler, Applied Digital Data Systems, Esprit 
Systems, Visual Technology, and several others. The 5540 
product line competes with the IBM 3270 family, as well as 
with 3270-compatible products from ITT Courier, Telex, 
Lee Data, Memorex, and a number of others. 

ADVANTAGES AND RESTRICTIONS 

Teletype’s products have gained a reputation for func- 
tionality and reliability, as well as for their rather high price 
tags. The 5000 Series terminals retain the functionality 
offered by their predecessors, but prices have fallen to 
reflect the realities of competing in a deregulated market. 
The AT&T Teletype terminals feature a variety of attrac- 
tive features. The 5400 asynchronous terminals have been 
imbued with 80/1 32-column display capability, windowing 
(on the buffered models), and ANSI X3.64 compatibility. 
UNIX operating system compatibility and DEC VT102 
compatibility have been implelmented on the new 5425. 
An optional integral modem/dialer has also been added to 
the line. The 5540 synchronous terminals are interchang- 
able with existing Teletype 4540 components. All AT&T 
Teletype terminals include a tiltable display and a detach- 
able, low-profile keyboard. 

AT&T Teletype has fallen somewhat behind in the com- 
petitive 3270 replacement market, however. Although the 


► TRANSMISSION SPECIFICATIONS 

For the 5400 terminals, transmission is asynchronous, in 
half- or full-duplex, at speeds up to 19,200 hits per second. 
Isochronous transmission is selectable on the 5420/2 and 
5425. Multipoint operation is available on all models except 
the 5410. All models conform to both the ASCII and ANSI 
X3.64 communications protocols. Vertical parity generation 
and detection options are available. All models provide an 
EIA RS-232-C interface, as well as an auxiliary EIA 
RS-232-C printer interface. A self-test capability is stan- 
dard. An integral modem/dialer is optionally available with 
the 5410, 5418, and 5425. The integral modem is compatible 
with 212A-type modems for operation at 1200 or 300 bps. 

For the 5540 family, transmission is synchronous, in half- or 
full-duplex, at speeds up to 9600 bits per second. Both BSC 
and SNA/SDLC protocols are supported. The 5544 is com- 
patible with the IBM 3274 “C” models, while the 5546 is 
compatible with the IBM 3276 remote controllers. The 
following SNA descriptors are supported: Physical Unit 
(PU) Type 2, Logical Units (LU) Types 1, 2, and 3, and 
Format Identification (FID) Type 2. Displays and printers 
connect to the control unit via twisted pair or coaxial cable, 
at distances up to 5,000 feet (up to 2,000 feet only for the line 
printer models). Over nonswitched transmission facilities, 
half-duplex terminal operation is supported. Two EIA 
RS-232-C interfaces are standard. 

DEVICE CONTROL 

The 5410 and 5418 conversational display terminals trans- 
mit data a character-at-a-time as it is keyed. The option 
menu is displayed on the screen in a ‘^plain English’’ man- 
ner. Eight user-or host-programmable function keys are 
included on the 5410, each of which has up to a 50-character 
per key capacity in nonvolatile memory. Each function key 
has a corresponding screen label, with up to 16 characters 
displayable on each label. The 5418 contains 24 function 
keys. When used with a protocol converter, the 5418 emu- 
lates the IBM 3278 for both local and remote communica- 
tions. The 5418 features single-key access to all 3278-like 
keystrokes. 

Visual display attributes available on the 5410 and 5418 
include normal, blank, half-intensity, blink, underline, and 
reverse video. The display screen may be horizontally split 
into a maximum of two static regions and one scrolling 
region. Editing capabilities include character and line in- 
sert/delete, as well as clear functions. Line drawing and 
special symbol graphics are available. The 5410 and 5418 
conform to the ANSI X3.64 standard. 

The 5420/2 and 5425 buffered displays can transmit data a 
character-at-a time from the keyboard, or by line/page/ 
block from the display. Up to 78 lines of display memory are 
available when using the 80-column display format, and up 
to 54 lines of memory are available when using the 132- 
column display format. The 5420/2 and 5425 contain all of 
the basic operating features of the 5410 and 5418 (including 
visual attributes and editing), plus some additional features 
not found on the conversational models, including single or 
multiple character or line insert/delete. The 5425 differs 
from the 5420/2 in that it is compatible with the UNIX 
operating system and with the DEC VT 102 display termi- 
nal. The 5420/2 is compatible with the older Teletype 40/1 
and 40/2 display terminals. 

The 5420/2 and 5425 provide 3 separate methods to access 
and manipulate the display memory; scroll mode, horizontal 
split screen, and windowing. Scroll mode allows the operator 
to scroll through display memory. The horizontal split 
screen feature is the same as found on the 5410 and 5418, 
with 1 scrolling region and 2 static regions. With windowing, 
the 5420/2 and 5425 memory can he divided into a maxi- 


DECEMBER 1984 


© 1984 DATAPRO RESEARCH CORPORATION, DELRAN, NJ 08075 USA 
REPRODUCTION PROHIBITED 



C25-046 104 
Display Terminals 


AT&T Teletype 5000 Series Display Terminals 


company has recently added a color display to the 5540 
product line, it does not offer the wide range of product 
choices now available from such independent 3270-com- 
patible vendors such as ITT Courier, Lee Data, Telex, and 
Memorex; nor does it possess the product choices offered 
by IBM itself. Look for AT&T Teletype to significantly 
enhance the 5540 family in the near future, possibly with 
attachment capability for the AT&T Personal Computer 
Model 6300. These enhancements are necessary to protect 
the company’s installed base and possibly carve out a larger 
share of the lucrative 3270-replacement market. □ 


mum of 4 rectangles of varying lengths and widths, called 
workspaces. A window or viewport into each workspace can 
be created, and its position defined and located on the 
screen. One viewport can be overlapped or eclipsed with 
another. 

The optional integral modem feature allows the 5410, 5418, 
and 5425 displays to plug directly into a telephone line for 
manual dialing of calls from the keyboard, automatic dialing 
of stored numbers, or automatic repeat dialing. A security 
feature hides all or part of the dial command log-on string. 
Screen labels are available to simplify dialing, and call 
progress status and prompts are displayed on the screen’s 
25th display line. 

The 5540 family of components are compatible with the 
corresponding members of the IBM 3270 Information Dis- 
play System. The 5540 is also compatible with the Teletype 
4540 family, the company’s previous line of IBM 3270- 
compatible equipment. 

The 5540 terminals feature a separate user information/ 
status line, block or underline cursor with selectable blink, 
and self-test diagnostics. A selector light pen is optional. 
The displays connect to a cluster controller via twisted pair 
or coaxial cable at distances up to 5,000 feet. 

All software for the 5540 controllers is stored on dual 5V4- 
inch floppy disks; a user can switch from BSC to SDLC 
protocol by switching disks. The first port on the controller 
is reserved for the controller console, for communicating 
with the host and for setting options such as station 
addresses, configurations, and printer authorization matrix. 

COMPOIMEINITS 


5400 Family 

5410/5418/5420/5425 DISPLAY UNITS: Include a 12- 
inch (diagonal) display screen, capable of displaying 24 
lines of 80 or 132 characters. One status line is available, 
plus 2 lines for screen labels. Characters are formed utiliz- 
ing a 7-by-9 dot matrix with descenders in a 9-by-13 field 
(80-column format), or using a 5-by-7 dot matrix with 
descenders in a 7-by-13 field (132-column format). Green, 
white, or amber phosphor characters are available. Two 
character sets are selectable: 128 ASCII alphanumeric plus 
control characters, or 96 line drawing and special graphic 
characters. Other character sets available include United 
Kingdom, videotex mosaics, and securities industry. The 
screen features 7 tilt positions, a nonglare finish, and bright- 
ness control. 

5410/5420/5425 KEYBOARDS: Feature a typewriter-style 
layout with a separate numeric cluster and 8 programmable 
function keys. Function keys offer 16 functions: 8 defined by 
the host and 8 defined by the user. Each function key is 


capable of storing 80 characters per key. The 5425 provides 
11 additional function keys, shiftable to provide 22 
functions. 

5418 KEYBOARD: Features a layout similar to that found 
on the IBM 3278, including 24 function keys. Otherwise, the 
5418 keyboard contains the same features found on the 
5410, 5420/2, and 5425 keyboards, including a low-profile 
design, tilt adjustments, and detachability. 


5540 Family 

5544 CONTROLLER: A floor-standing control unit that is 
compatible with the IBM 3274 Control Unit. The 5544 is 
based on a 16-bit microprocessor; software is stored on 5 Vi- 
inch dual floppy disks. The 5544 is available in two models, 
featuring 16 and 32 device attachment ports. Both models 
support BSC and SNA/SDLC line protocols by changing 
diskettes. Built-in local and remote test features are 
included. 

5546 CONTROLLER: A tabletop control unit that is com- 
patible with the IBM 3276 Control Unit (it does not include 
an integral display like the 3276). The 5546 is based on a 16- 
bit microprocessor; software is stored on 5Vi-inch dual 
floppy disks. The 5546 is available in two models, featuring 
6 and 12 device attachment ports. Both models support BSC 
and SNA/SDLC line protocols by changing diskettes. Built- 
in local and remote test features are included. 

5548-12 DISPLAY TERMINAL: Includes a 12-inch 
(diagonal) display screen with a 1920-character capacity 
arranged in a 24-line by 80-column format. A user status line 
is also available. The 5548 Model 12 is designed to replace 
the IBM 3178 Display Station. Characters are formed 
utilizing a 9-by-14 dot matrix, and are displayed in white on 
a dark background. The EBCDIC character set is display- 
able. The screen features a nonglare finish, brightness 
control, and is tillable. 

5548-22 DISPLAY TERMINAL: Includes a 13-inch 
(diagonal) screen with a display capacity of 1920 characters, 
arranged in 24 lines of 80 characters each. A user status line 
is also available. The 5548 Model 22 is compatible with the 
IBM 3278 Model 2 Display Station. Characters are formed 
via a 9-by-14 dot matrix, and are displayed in white on a 
dark background. The EBCDIC character set is display- 
able. The display screen features a nonglare finish, bright- 
ness control, and is tillable. 

5548-25 DISPLAY TERMINAL: Includes a 13-inch 
(diagonal) screen with selectable display capacities of 1920 
(24 lines by 80 columns) or 3564 (27 lines by 132 columns) 
characters. A user status line is also available. The 5548 
Model 25 is compatible with the IBM 3278 Model 5 Display 
Station. Display formats are operator- or program-select- 
able. Characters are formed via a 9-by-14 dot matrix, and 
are displayed in white on a dark background. The EBCDIC 
character set is displayable. The screen features a nonglare 
finish, brightness control, and is tiltable. 

5549 COLOR DISPLAY TERMINAL: Includes a 13-inch 
(diagonal) screen with selectable display capacities of 1920 
(24 lines by 80 columns) or 2560 (32 lines by 80 columns) 
characters. A user status line is also available. The 5549 is 
compatible with the IBM 3279 Model S2A, as well as the 
basic versions of the IBM 3279 Models 3X. Characters are 
formed using a 9-by-14 dot matrix. Four colors are display- 
able: blue, green, red, and white. The EBCDIC character set 
is displayable. The screen features a nonglare finish, bright- 
ness control, and is tiltable. 


© 1984 DATAPRO RESEARCH CORPORATION, DELRAN, NJ 08075 USA 
REPRODUCTION PROHIBITED 


DECEMBER 1984 



C25-046-105 
Display Terminals 

AT&T Teletype 5000 Series Display Terminals 


5540 KEYBOARDS: Keyboards are available with the 
following layouts: typewriter-style, typewriter-style with ex- 
ternal numeric pad, and data entry. All keyboards are 
detached, plug-compatible with each other, and feature a 
3270-like layout. All keyboard styles feature 24 program- 
mable function keys; up to 12 of the keys (PFl through 
PF12) can be executed via a single keystroke. The key- 
boards are detached and feature a low-profile design that 
meets the 30mm DIN height standard, and feature tilt 
adjustments of 5, 8, or 12 degrees. All alphanumeric keys 
repeat, and audible key click is selectable; tactile feedback is 
standard. The keyboard is connected to the display monitor 
via a coiled cord. When not in use, the keyboard stores on a 
shelf underneath the display. 

5540 PRINTERS: A variety of printers are available for use 
with the 5540 controllers. Three matrix character printers 
are offered, featuring maximum print speeds of 30 (dot 
matrix), 55 (full character), and 340 (dot matrix) cps. All 
three printer models provide 132-column print capability. 
Two line printers are offered, in either tabletop or floor- 
standing versions. Both line printers operate at 300 1pm and 
are available in an 80-column friction feed version, or in an 
80/132-column tractor feed version. Also offered is an 80- 
column forms access printer. The printers use the AT&T 
Teletype Standard Serial Interface (SSI) signalling method 
for communications with the 5544 and 5546 controllers, and 
operate with data streams in the 3270 Data Stream Com- 
patibility (DSC) format. Logical Unit Type 3, or the SNA 
Character String (SCS) format. Logical Unit Type 1. 

PRICING 

The AT&T Teletype 5000 Series components are available 
for purchase only. In accordance with Computer Inquiry II, 
AT&T Teletype is not permitted to sell new customer- 
premise equipment to end-users. AT&T Teletype products 


are available to end-users only through third-party resellers 
(OEMs) and distributors, as well as through AT&T Infor- 
mation Systems and AT&T International. 

Maintenance service for the 5000 Series terminals is avail- 
able from AT&T Teletype’s product service organization; 
there are over 100 service centers located throughout the 
United States. 


Purchase 

Price 

Models ($) 


5400 Family — 

5410 Conversational Display 902 

5418 Conversational Display 1,080 

5420/2 Buffered Display 1,492 

5425 Buffered Display 1,265-1,720 

5540 Family — 

5544 Controller (16-port) 6,176 

5544 Controller (32-port) 8,038 

5546 Controller (6-port) 3,518 

5546 Controller (12-port) 3,727 

5548-12 Display (w/Data Entry 1,411 

Keyboard) 

5548-22 Display (w/Data Entry 1,785 

Keyboard) 

5548-25 Display (w/Data Entry 2,095 

Keyboard) 

5549 Color Display (w/Data Entry 2,573B 

Keyboard) 


DECEMBER 1984 


© 1984 DATAPRO RESEARCH CORPORATION, DELRAN, NJ 08075 USA 
REPRODUCTION PROHIBITED 




C25-046-101 

Peripherals 


AT&T Dataspeed 40 Service 


AT&T, through its Bell System operating companies and 
certain other concurring carriers, offers the Dataspeed 
40 service, which is composed of special configurations 
of the Teletype 40 display terminal family. (See Report 
C25-830-101 for equipment details.) AT&T offers 
interstate Dataspeed 40 service for both Private Line 
Service under AT&T Long Lines Tariff 260 and 


Dataphone Digital Service under Tariff 267. Full details 
of these services are presented in Reports C3 1-046-351 
and C3 1-046-251 respectively. The available offerings 
and rates are presented below. (Contact your local 
telephone company for availability and cost of intrastate 
Dataspeed 40 service.) 


usoc 

Number** 


Monthly Installation 
Charge Charge 


Asynchronous Dataspeed 40 Terminal Equipment (Teletype Model 40/1, 40/2, or 40/3) 


4TC^ 

Keyboard Display unit (Teletype 4025 KD) with basic features; includes 24-line display buffer and pedestal 
mount 

$170 

$214 

4D1* 

Teletypewriter compatibility features for 40/2 operation; requires item 4T3, 4T4, or 4T5 

13.45 

— 

4D2* 

Key control for selection between two transmission modes 

Keyboard Display Printer unit (Teletype 4025 KDP) with basic features; includes 24-line display buffer 
and friction-feed printer: 

9.20 


4TF* 

Printer under display, pedestal mount 

258 

246 

4TH^ 

Print adjacent to display, pedestal mount 
Additional display buffer storage for items 4TC, 4TF, and 4TH; 

258 

246 

4Tr 

48-line display buffer 

12.65 

50.40 

4T2^ 

72-line display buffer 

Additional editing features; includes protected format, tabulation, highlighting, substitute character, and 
message preparation alarm; for items 4TC, 4TF, and 4TH; 

25.20 

50.40 

4T3* 

24-line display buffer 

22.70 

126 

4T4> 

48-line display buffer 

26.50 

126 

4T5* 

72-line display buffer 

30.20 

126 

4TG* 

Receive-Only Printer (Teletype 401 1 ROP), friction feed 

158 

183 

4T9^ 

Buffer for item 4TG, 1000 characters 

12.65 

126 

4TJ* 

KD to ROP or Wide Platen Printer (1 32-col. tractor feed) Connection Arrangement 
Selective Calling Station Arrangement; 

8.80 

190 

DJO* 

For 1050/1200 bps transmission 

75.60 

— 

DJW* 

For 2400 bps transmission; requires item 4T3, 4T4, or 4T5 

122 

— 

DJX* 

Individual Receiver Selection; for DK or ROP 

40.40 

122 

DJB* 

Third Call Directing Code Recognition 

3.80 

50.40 

DJ8* 

Message Waiting Alarm and Parity Check on Roll Call 

6.30 

50.40 

4TS* 

ROP Item Selector; responds to two types of codes to permit an ROP to receive signals from the line at 
1 200 bps 

133 

441 


Each subsequent code change 

Synchronous Dataspeed 40 Terminal Equipment (Teletype Model 40/4) 

Keyboard Display Unit (Teletype 4026 KD); 


478 

4TO 

Display unit with attached keyboard 

83.50 

61.15 

4TP 

Display unit with detached keyboard 

83.25 

61.15 

4TQ 

Upper/lower case 

3.65 

48.95 

4EC 

Single Display Station; requires item 4ED 

180 

306 

4ED 

Binary Synchronous line protocol 

29 

— 

4TR 

Printer, 80-column friction feed 

125 

61.15 

4ST 

Printer, 132-column tractor feed 

214 

201 

40C 

Printer, 80-column noise-reduced friction feed 

Station Cluster Controller (Teletype 4001 SCC); accommodates up to six Device Cluster Controllers 
(item 4TV); requires item 4TM: 

151 

184 

4TT 

For Device Cluster Controllers one to four 

220 

122 

4TU 

For Device Cluster Controllers five and six 

Device Cluster Controller (Teletype 4002 DCC); accommodates up to four KD's (item 4TO or 4TP or five 
Printers (item 4TR) in any combination of six devices; requires item 4TM and at least one 4TO or 4TP: 

24.45 

48.95 

4TV 

For one or two devices 

192 

122 

4TW 

For four additional devices 

Mini Cluster Controller (Teletype 4003 MCC); requires item 4TM and at least one 4TO or 4TP; 
accommodates up to three devices: 

40.40 

48.95 

4TX 

For one KD and zero or one Printer 

226 

122 

4TY 

For one additional KD or one additional Printer 

25.70 

48.95 

4EACM 

Keyboard Display Amplifier (Teletype KDA); for use with item 4TO; supports a KD at up to 250 cable feet 
from a DCC or MCC; cabinet mounted 

36.70 

208 

4EANM 

Keyboard Display Amplifier (Teletype KDA); for use with 4TO or 4TP; supports a KD at up to 350 cable feet 
from a DCC or MCC; in-line mounted 

41.60 

208 

4EB 

Extension Arrangement; extends maximum distance supported by a KDA (item 4EACM or 4EANM) by 
250 cable feet 

10.40 

48.95 

4D3 

Keyboard Display Lock; for item 4TO 

4.30 

30.60 

4NC 

External Numeric Cluster Keyboard; for item 4TO, 4TP, or 4EC 

7.95 

91.80 


MAY 1981 


© 1981 DATAPRO RESEARCH CORPORATION, DELRAN, NJ 08075 USA 
REPRODUCTION PROHIBITED 



C25-046-102 

Peripherals 


usoc 

Number** 

AT&T Dataspeed 40 Service 

Dataspeed 40 Options 

Monthly 

Charge 

Installation 

Charge 

4TL 

Tractor Feed for an ROP or KDP printer 

$29 

$ — 

4TM 

Additional Pedestal 

8.80 

50.40 

4TN 

Paper Accumulating Rack 

1.55 

50.40 

4T7 

Paper Winder 

8.20 

50.40 

4T8 

Copy Holder 

3.50 

50.40 

4PP 

Printer arrangement for grade B 16-pound, 3-ply rolled paper with 8- or 10-pound carbon paper 
interleaved and single-copy fanfold paper 
Environmental Enclosures for use with: 

12.20 

48.95 

4EK 

KD with detached keyboard (item 4TP) 

61.15 

122 

4EP 

Printer (item 4ST or 4TR) equipped with item 4TL 

31.85 

122 


* For Tariff 260 only. 

**USOC~Uniform Service Order Code.B 


© 1981 DATAPRO RESEARCH CORPORATION, DELRAN, NJ 08075 USA MAY 1981 

REPRODUCTION PROHIBITED 



C25-046-301 

Terminals 


AT&T E4540 Series Display Terminals 



The E4549 is a four-color display terminal available in two 
models. The E4549-42 provides a 1,920-character display cap- 
city; the E4549-43 provides selectable 1,920- and 2,560-charac- 
ter display capacities. Both models include a 13-inch screen and 
choice of detachable keyboards. 

MANAGEMENT SUMMARY 

UPDATE: This report reflects the removal of the Teletype 
name from all AT&T display terminals. Teletype (based in 
Skokie, IL) has been absorbed into the Computer Systems 
Division of AT&T Information Systems; it remains the 
manufacturing arm of AT&T-IS. 

Since 1930, Teletype Corporation was responsible for man- 
ufacturing and supplying the Bell System’s teletypewriter 
equipment and, in recent times, computer display termi- 
nals and printers. The Bell System used Teletype products 
internally and resold them to end users on a tarilfed basis. 
In addition. Teletype marketed its own products on a 
nontarilfed basis directly to end users, and through a large 
network of dealers, distributors, leasing companies, and 
OEMs. 

The AT&T divestiture and deregulation have changed 
most of that. Teletype has been absorbed into the Comput- 
er Systems Division of AT&T Information Systems, and its 
Teletype and Dataspeed labels have disappeared from 
view. The company was known for a while as “AT&T 
Teletype,” but now products coming out of Skokie display 
only the AT&T logo. (In January 1986, AT&T announced 
that it will phase out the manufacturing of data terminals 
and teleprinters at the Skokie plant over the next two 
years.) Some AT&T-IS terminal equipment is obtained 
from other OEMs, as well. 

The E4540 Series (formerly known as the 5540) is a family 
of IBM 3270-compatible products. The E4540 components 
are not plug-compatible with IBM’s products; in other 


The E4540 Series is AT&T's third genera- 
tion of IBM 3270-compatible display termi- 
nal products, replacing the AT&T Teletype 
4540 product line. An enhanced version of 
the older 4540 family, the E4540 line fea- 
tures local and remote cluster controllers, 
monochrome and color display terminals, 
and printers. As part of the product line, 
AT&T also makes available an asynchronous 
host adapter and a personal computer at- 
tachment feature. E4540 displays and print- 
ers attach to E4540 controllers via twisted- 
pair wire or coaxial cable. 

MODELS: E4544 and E4546 Controllers; 
E4548-12and E4548-25 Display Terminals; 
E4549-42 and E4549-43 Color Display 
Terminals. 

DISPLAY: The E4548-1 2 contains a 1 2-inch 
display screen; the E4548-25, E4549-42, 
and E4549-43 feature a 1 3-inch screen. The 
E4548-25 features 80/1 32-column display 
capability; the E4548-1 2, E4549-42, and 
E4549-43 feature 80-column display capa- 
bility only. All models have a tiltable display. 
KEYBOARD: A variety of IBM 3270-style 
keyboard layouts are available for the E4540 
Series displays, including typewriter and 
data entry; ail keyboard models feature 24 
function keys. Keyboards for the E4540 dis- 
plays are detachable, and are available in 
both high-profile and low-profile designs. 
COMPETITION: IBM, ITT Courier, Telex, 
Lee Data, Memorex, and several others. 
PRICE: Purchase prices for the E4540 Se- 
ries terminals range from $1 ,495 to $2,265; 
E4540 Series controllers are priced from 
$4,000 to $16,300. 


CHARACTERISTICS 

VENDOR: AT&T Information Systems, 1 Speedwell Ave- 
nue, Morristown, NJ 07960. Telephone (201) 898-2000. In 
Canada: AT&T Canada, 1500 Don Mills Road, Ontario 
M3B 3K4. Telephone (416) 449-4300. 

DATE OF ANNOUNCEMENT: E4544, E4546, and 
E4548— April 1983; E4549— May 1984. 

DATE OF FIRST DELIVERY: E4544, E4546, and 
E4548— Third quarter 1983; E4549— May 1984. 

NUMBER DELIVERED TO DATE: Information not 
available. 

SERVICED BY: AT&T Information Systems. 

MODELS 

The E4540 Series is a family of IBM 3270-compatible 
display terminals, controllers, and printers. As with the 


MARCH 1986 


© 1986 DATAPRO RESEARCH CORPORATION, DELRAN, NJ 08075 USA 
REPRODUCTION PROHIBITED 




C25-046-302 

Terminals 


AT&T E4540 Series Display Terminals 


words, they cannot be mixed in with IBM devices in the 
same configuration. 

The E4540 family consists of local and remote cluster 
controllers (E4544 and E4546), monochrome displays 
(E4548-12 and E4548-25), color displays (E4549-42 and 
E4549-43), and a line of printers. Printers and displays 
attach to the controllers via twisted-pair wire or coaxial 
cable. Recent additions to the E4540 line include the E4540 
Asynchronous Adapter, that allows E4540 terminal users to 
access asynchronous hosts via the keyboard; and the SSI 
IRMA Emulator, that provides for PC attachment (AT&T 
PC 6300, IBM PC/PC XT/PC AT, and IBM-compatible 
PCs) to an E4540 controller. 

The E4544 is an IBM 3274-compatible control unit. Avail- 
able in 1 6-port and 32-port versions, the E4544 is a floor- 
standing unit. The E4546 is an IBM 3276-compatible, 
tabletop control unit available in 6-port and 12-port ver- 
sions. Both controller models provide 5V4-inch dual dis- 
kettes for software storage. Users can switch from BSC to 
SNA/SDLC line protocol by changing disks. 

The E4548-12 Display Terminal is an IBM 3278 Model 2 
and 3 1 78-compatible unit containing a 1 2-inch display and 
a 1,920-character (24 lines by 80 columns) display capacity. 
The E4548-25 is compatible with the IBM 3278 Model 5; it 
features a 13-inch screen while providing selectable display 
capacities of 1,920 and 3,564 (27 lines by 132 columns) 
characters. The E4549-42 is a 4-color display that includes 
a 13-inch screen and a display capacity of 1,920 characters; 
the E4549-43 also contains a 1 3-inch screen, but includes 
selectable 1,920- and 2,560-character (32 lines by 80 col- 
umns) display capacities. All of the E4540 displays can be 
configured with a choice of keyboards, including typewrit- 
er, typewriter with external numeric pad, and data entry 
styles (all of which contain 24 programmable function 
keys). The keyboards can be chosen with high- or low- 
profile designs. 

AT&T also provides a variety of character matrix and full- 
character belt printers for use as part of an E4540 Series 
configuration. 

COMPETITIVE POSITION 

Prior to AT&T’s divestiture. Teletype Corporation pos- 
sessed what was, essentially, a built-in market. The compa- 
ny’s products were sold primarily to the Bell Operating 
Companies (BOCs) for their internal use or for resale to 
their customers. At that time, as much as 40 percent of 
Teletype’s revenues were attributed to their business with 
the BOCs. As part of Computer Inquiry II, Teletype was 
prohibited from selling new premises equipment to users 
during 1983. Also as part of Computer Inquiry II, Teletype 
was prohibited from selling its products directly to end 
users. With the AT&T divestiture, the BOCs were divested 
from AT&T, thus loosening, to some extent. Teletype’s 
hold on them. Teletype remains a part of AT&T, while the 


older AT&T Teletype 4540 family, the E4540 products 

operate under both BSC and SDLC line protocols. Members 

of the E4540 line include: 

• E4544 — a control unit that is compatible with the IBM 
3274 and is available in 16- and 32-port configurations, as 
well as in remote and local versions; 

• E4546 — a remote control unit that is compatible with the 
IBM 3276 and is available in 6-and 12-port versions; 

• E4548-12 — a monochrome display terminal that is com- 
patible with the IBM 3178 and 3278 Model 2; includes a 
12-inch display screen with a 1,920-character capacity and 
a detachable keyboard; 

• E4548-25 — a monochrome display terminal that is com- 
patible with the IBM 3278 Model 5; includes a 13-inch 
display screen with selectable 1,920- and 3,564-character 
capacities and a detachable keyboard; 

• 4549-42 — a 4-color display terminal that is compatible 
with the IBM 3279 Model S2A; includes a 13-inch screen 
with a 1,920-character capacity and a detachable key- 
board; and 

• 4549-43 — a 4-color display terminal that is compatible 
with the IBM 3279 Model 3X; includes a 13-inch display 
screen with selectable 1,920- and 2,560-character capaci- 
ties and a detachable keyboard. 

AT&T also provides a variety of printers for use with the 

E4540 family, including serial and line printers. 


TRANSMISSION SPECIFICATIONS 

For the E4540 Series terminals, transmission is synchro- 
nous, in half- or full-duplex, at speeds up to 9600 bits per 
second (except for the E4544 Local Cluster Controller, 
which supports speeds up to IM bps). Both BSC and SNA/ 
SDLC protocols are supported. The E4544 remote control- 
lers are compatible with the IBM 3274 “C” models, while 
the E4546 controllers are compatible with the IBM 3276 
remote controller. The following SNA descriptors are sup- 
ported: Physical Unit (PU) Type 2, Logical Units (LU) 
Types 1, 2, and 3, and Format Identification (FID) Type 2. 
Displays and printers connect to the control unit via 4-pair 
twisted wire or coaxial cable, at distances up to 5,000 feet 
(up to 2,000 feet only for the line printer models). Over 
nonswitched transmission facilities, half-duplex terminal 
operation is supported. 

The E4544 and E4546 remote controllers can attach to the 
following IBM host computers: S/360, S/370, 3030, 3081, 
and 4300 via a channel-attached 2701, 2703, 3704, or 3705 
communication processor or front-end; S/370 Models 115, 
125, 135, and 138 via integrated adapters. A single host 
processor can be attached. The E4544 local controller com- 
municates with the IBM S/370, 43XX, 303X, or 308X hosts 
in SNA or Extended 3272 modes. 

Communications with asynchronous host computers is en- 
abled via the AT&T E4540 Asynchronous Adapter. The 
adapter provides for full-duplex asynchronous transmission 
at 300, 1200, or 2400 bps. The E4540 Asynchronous Adapt- 
er provides eight asynchronous modem ports. 

When operating in asynchronous mode, the E4540 remote 
controllers use the SSI/EIA Multiplexer attachment. The 
multiplexer c^nects to any port on a remote controller and 
provides eiglft RS-232-C interfaces to asynchronous mo- 
dems. The E4544-31 SB can accommodate two multiplex- 
^>- ers; all others can accommodate one. 


© 1986 DATAPRO RESEARCH CORPORATION, DELRAN, NJ 08075 USA 
REPRODUCTION PROHIBITED 


MARCH 1986 



AT&T E4540 Series Display Terminals 


C25-046-303 

Terminals 


BOCs are now free to purchase equipment from whatever 
source they prefer. 

All of this forced Teletype (which soon became AT&T 
Teletype) to change its strategy in the new, deregulated, 
marketplace. As a result, the company poured more money 
into research and development, beefed up marketing, cut 
manufacturing costs in order to reduce prices, and estab- 
lished new distribution channels. 

In 1985, AT&T Teletype became a wholly owned subsid- 
iary of the Computer Systems Division of AT&T Informa- 
tion Systems. All sales and marketing for Teletype 
terminals were relocated to AT&T-IS headquarters in Mor- 
ristown, New Jersey. Teletype, based in Skokie, Illinois, 
remains (for the time being) the manufacturing arm for the 
production of data terminals; however, the Teletype logo 
will no longer be found on the terminals. 

In January 1986, AT&T announced that it will phase out 
the manufacturing of printers and data terminals at the 
Teletype plant in Skokie. This move will result in the 
layoffs of approximately 800 of the 2,000 workers now 
employed at the former Teletype headquarters. The move 
comes as part of AT&T Information Systems’ planned 
reduction of 24,000 jobs. The manufacturing of printers 
and data terminals will be transferred to AT&T’s Little 
Rock, Arkansas facility, which was formerly also a Teletype 
facility. It would seem that Teletype, as a company, is 
slowly disappearing. The Teletype name remains a legal 
entity for trademark, product brand name, and other 
purposes. 

The E4540 Series is AT&T’s replacement for the older 
Teletype 4540 family of IBM 3270 replacement products. 
The new components are also compatible with the existing 
Teletype 4540 products, a line which boasts a very large 
installed base (approximately 300,000) and a high degree of 
user acceptance in the competitive 3270 replacement 
market. 

Within this market, the E4540 Series competes against 
IBM, as well as with the 3270 product lines from indepen- 
dent vendors such as Telex, ITT Courier, Memorex, Lee 
Data, Harris, and several others. 


ADVANTAGES AND RESTRICTIONS 


Teletype’s products have gained a reputation for function- 
ality and reliability, as well as for their rather high price 
tags. The AT&T E4540 Series terminals retain the func- 
tionality offered by their predecessors, but prices have 
fallen to reflect the realities of competing in a deregulated 
market. In addition, a variety of enhancements (thus, the E 
in E4540) have been made in this new family of products. 
Color terminals, compact monochrome terminals, and a 
wider variety of printers are now a part of the E4540 
product line. In addition, selectable synchronous and asyn- 
chronous operation from a single terminal is now possible 
through the addition of the E4540 Asynchronous Adapter. 


► DEVICE CONTROL 

The E4540 family of components are compatible with the 
corresponding members of the IBM 3270 Information Dis- 
play System. The E4540 Series is also compatible with the 
older AT&T Teletype 4540 family, the company’s previous 
line of IBM 3270-compatible equipment. 

The E4540 terminals feature a separate user information/ 
status line, block or underline cursor with selectable blink, 
and self-test diagnostics. A selector light pen is optional. 
The displays connect to a cluster controller via twisted-pair 
wire or coaxial cable at distances up to 5,000 feet. 

All software for the E4540 controllers is stored on dual 5 Vi- 
inch diskettes; a user can switch from BSC to SDLC proto- 
col by switching disks. The first port on the controller is 
reserved for the controller console, for communicating with 
the host and for setting options such as station addresses, 
configurations, and printer authorization matrix. 

The E4540 Asynchronous Adapter allows an E4540 display 
terminal to access both IBM 3270-compatible networks and 
asynchronous data bases. The Asynchronous Adapter con- 
sists of a small module and a program diskette. The module 
connects to an E4544 or E4546 remote controller; each 
module provides the E4540 display terminals connected to 
the controller with access to eight RS-232-C asynchronous 
modem ports with line speeds up to 2400 bps. Once the 
program is downloaded from the diskette, the user of an 
E4540 display can select synchronous or asynchronous op- 
eration by pressing a single key. When in asynchronous 
mode, the E4540 display is compatible with application 
programs based on the ANSI X3.64 protocol and Digital 
Equipment Corporation VTIOO and VT52 terminal opera- 
tion. A horizontal split screen mode is selectable for display- 
ing and interacting with synchronous and asynchronous 
data simultaneously. 

The SSI IRMA Emulator allows an AT&T 6300 personal 
computer, an IBM PC, PC XT, PC AT, or IBM-compatible 
PC to attach to an E4540 Series controller. The SSI IRMA 
Emulator consists of a plug-in circuit card and an emulator 
program on diskette. The emulation program allows the PC 
to emulate an E4540 display. 

COMPONENTS 

E4544-31 SA REMOTE CLUSTER CONTROLLER: A 
floor-standing control unit that is compatible with the IBM 
3274 Control Unit. The E4544-31 SA is based on a 16-bit 
microprocessor; software is stored on 5V4-inch dual dis- 
kettes. The controller provides for the attachment of up to 16 
devices (1 display minimum; 8 printers maximum) in a 
remote cluster. Support for both BSC and SNA/SDLC line 
protocols is provided by changing diskettes. Built-in local 
and remote test features are included. 

The E4544-31 SA provides for the attachment of E4540 
Series display terminals and printers; it does not support 
attachment of IBM devices. 

E4544-31 SB REMOTE CLUSTER CONTROLLER: A 
floor-standing control unit that is compatible with the IBM 
3274 Control Unit (C models). The E4544-31 SB is based on 
a 16-bit microprocessor; software is stored on 5V4-inch dual 
diskettes. The controller provides for the attachment of up to 
32 (1 display minimum; 8 printers maximum) devices in a 
remote cluster. Support for both BSC and SNA/SDLC line 
protocols is provided by changing diskettes. Built-in local 
and remote test features are included. 

The E4544-31 SB provides for the attachment of E4540 
Series display terminals and printers; it does not support 
attachment of IBM devices. 


MARCH 1986 


© 1986 DATAPRO RESEARCH CORPORATION, DELRAN, NJ 08075 USA 
REPRODUCTION PROHIBITED 



C25-046-304 

Terminals 


AT&T E4540 Series Display Terminals 


Another important trend in the 3270-replacement market 
is the addition of personal computers to a standard 3270 
configuration. With the SSI IRMA Emulator (a version of 
the industry’s most popular micro-mainframe link, the 
Irma board from DCA), E4540 Series users can connect an 
AT&T 6300 Personal Computer, an IBM PC, PC XT, or 
PC AT, or certain IBM-compatible PCs to an E4540 
controller. 

A disadvantage of the E4540 Series is the product line’s lack 
of plug-compatibility with the IBM 3270 family of prod- 
ucts. AT&T E4540 components cannot be mixed in with 
IBM 3270 components in the same configuration; thus, the 
product line must be sold as a complete package. AT&T has 
recently introduced the 6500 Multifunction Communica- 
tion System, a new generation of 3270-compatible prod- 
ucts. The question now would seem to be whether or not 
AT&T will phase out the E4540 Series in favor of the new 
6500 product line. □ 

► E4544 LOCAL CLUSTER CONTROLLER: A floor- 
standing local control unit that can operate in SNA or 
Extended 3272 modes. The E4544 Local Cluster Controller 
is based on a 16-bit microprocessor; software is stored on 
5V4-inch dual diskettes. It supports up to 32 devices (1 
display minimum; 8 printers maximum) in a local cluster. 

The E4544 local controller provides for the attachment of 
E4540 Series display terminals and printers; it does not 
support attachment of IBM devices. 

E4546-31 SA REMOTE CLUSTER CONTROLLER: A 
tabletop control unit that is compatible with the IBM 3276 
Control Unit (it does not include an integral display like the 
3276). The E4546-31 SA is based on a 16-bit microproces- 
sor; software is stored on 5y4-inch dual diskettes. The 
E4546-31 SA provides for the attachment of up to 6 devices 
(1 display minimum; 5 printers maximum) in a remote 
configuration. Support for both BSC and SNA/SDLC line 
protocols is provided by changing diskettes. Built-in local 
and remote test features are included. 

The E4546-31 SA provides for the attachment of E4540 
Series display terminals and printers; it does not support 
attachment of IBM devices. 

E4546-31 SB REMOTE CLUSTER CONTROLLER: A 
tabletop control unit that is compatible with the IBM 3276 
Control Unit (it does not include an integral display like the 
3276). The E4546-31 SB is based on a 16-bit microproces- 
sor; software is stored on SVi-inch dual diskettes. The 
E4546-31 SB provides for the attachment of up to 12 devices 
(1 display minimum; 6 printers maximum) in a remote 
configuration. Support for both BSC and SNA/SDLC line 
protocols is provided by changing diskettes. Built-in local 
and remote test features are included. 

The E4546-31 SB provides for the attachment of E4540 
Series display terminals and printers; it does not support 
attachment of IBM devices. 

E4548-12 DISPLAY TERMINAL: A monochrome display 
terminal that includes a 12-inch (diagonal) display screen 
with a 1,920-character capacity arranged in a 24-line by 80- 
column format. A user status line is also available. The 
E4548-12 is designed for compatibility with the IBM 3178 
Display Station. Characters are formed utilizing a 7-by-9 
dot matrix, and are displayed in white on a dark back- 
ground. The 96 EBCDIC/ ASCII character set is displaya- 
ble. The screen features a nonglare finish, brightness con- 
trol, and is tiltable. 


The E4548-12 attaches to the E4540 Series controllers; it 
does not attach to IBM controllers. 

E4548-25 DISPLAY TERMINAL: A monochrome display 
terminal that includes a 13-inch (diagonal) screen with 
selectable display capacities of 1,920 (24 lines by 80 col- 
umns) or 3,564 (27 lines by 132 columns) characters. A user 
status line is also available. The E4548-25 is compatible 
with the IBM 3278 Model 5 Display Station. Display 
formats are operator- or program-selectable. Characters are 
formed via a 7-by-9 dot matrix (5-by-7 dot matrix in 132- 
column mode), and are displayed in white on a dark back- 
ground. The 96 EBCDIC/ASCII character set is displaya- 
ble. The screen features a nonglare finish, brightness 
control, and is tiltable. 

The E4548-25 attaches to the E4540 Series controllers; it 
does not attach to IBM controllers. 

E4549-42 COLOR DISPLAY TERMINAL: A 4-color dis- 
play terminal that includes a 13-inch (diagonal) screen with 
a 1,920-character (24 lines by 80 columns) display capacity. 
A user status line is also available. The E4549-42 is compat- 
ible with the IBM 3279 Model S2A. Characters are formed 
using a 7-by-9 dot matrix. Displayable colors are blue, 
green, red, and white. The 96 EBCDIC/ASCII character set 
is displayable. The screen features a nonglare finish, bright- 
ness control, and is tiltable. 

The E4549-42 attaches to the E4540 Series controllers; it 
does not attach to IBM controllers. 

E4549-43 COLOR DISPLAY TERMINAL: A 4-color dis- 
play terminal that includes a 13-inch (diagonal) screen with 
selectable display capacities of 1,920 (24 lines by 80 col- 
umns) or 2,560 (32 lines by 80 columns) characters. A user 
status line is also available. The E4549-43 is compatible 
with the IBM 3279 Model S2A, as well as the basic versions 
of the IBM 3279 Models 3X. Characters are formed using a 
7-by-9 dot matrix. Displayable colors are blue, green, red, 
and white. The 96 EBCDIC/ ASCII character set is dis- 
playable. The screen features a nonglare finish, brightness 
control, and is tiltable. 

The E4548-43 attaches to the E4540 Series controllers; it 
does not attach to IBM controllers. 

E4540 KEYBOARDS: The E4548 display terminals are 
configured with the T5 keyboard as standard, which is a 
typewriter-style keyboard available in either high- or low- 
profile designs. Also available are two additional keyboards: 
a low-profile keyboard with a typewriter-style layout, and a 
low-profile keyboard with a data entry layout. 

All keyboards are detached, plug-compatible with each oth- 
er, and feature an IBM 3270-type layout. All keyboard 
styles feature 24 programmable function keys; up to 12 of 
the keys (PFl through PF12) can be executed via a single 
keystroke. All alphanumeric keys repeat, and audible key 
click is selectable; tactile feedback is standard. The key- 
board is connected to the display monitor via a coiled cord. 
When not in use, the keyboard stores on a shelf underneath 
the display (monochrome displays only). The low-profile 
keyboards feature a design that meets the 30 mm DIN 
height standard, and include tilt adjustments of 5, 8, or 12 
degrees. 

T5 High-Profile Keyboard — an 87-key keyboard with a 
typewriter-style key layout and a 12-degree (70 mm) stepped 
keyrow profile. 

T5 Low-Profile Keyboard — an 87-key keyboard with a type- 
writer-style key layout and a 5-degree (30 mm) stepped 
keyrow profile. 


© 1986 DATAPRO RESEARCH CORPORATION, DELRAN, NJ 08075 USA 
REPRODUCTION PROHIBITED 


MARCH 1986 



AT&T E4540 Series Display Terminals 


C25-046-305 

Terminals 


Low-Profile Typewriter Keyboard — an 87-key keyboard 
with a typewriter-style key layout, an external numeric pad, 
and a 5-degree (30 mm) stepped keyrow profile. 

Low-Profile Data Entry Keyboard — an 87-key keyboard 
with a data entry-style key layout and a 5-degree (30 mm) 
stepped keyrow profile. 

E4540 PRINTERS: A variety of character and line printers 
are available for attachment to the E4540 Series controllers. 
The printers use the AT&T Standard Serial Interface (SSI) 
signaling method for communications with the E4544 and 
E4546 controllers, and operate with data streams in the 
3270 Data Stream Compatibility (DSC) format. Logical 
Unit Type 3, or the SNA Character String (SCS) format. 
Logical Unit Type 1. 

The E4540 Series low-speed character matrix printer 
(E45AP102AAA) prints at 10 cpi and 6 Ipi, handling forms 
3 to 15 inches wide and 11 inches long. The high-speed 
character matrix printer (E45AP201 AAA) prints at 5, 10, or 
16.7 cpi and 6 or 8 Ipi; forms can be 3 to 16 inches wide, and 
up to 14 inches long. The Letter Quality Printer prints at 10, 
12, or 15 cpi and 3, 6, or 8 Ipi. 

E45AP102AAA Matrix Printer — a floorstanding character 
printer with a print speed of 30 cps. Printing is bidirectional, 
using a 4-by-7 dot matrix and a 132-column tractor feed 
mechanism. The upper-/lowercase EBCDIC character set is 
used. 

E45AP201AAA Matrix Printer — a tabletop character print- 
er with print speeds of 200 or 340 cps. Printing is bidirec- 
tional, using a 4-by-7 dot matrix and a 132-column tractor 
feed mechanism. The upper-/lowercase EBCDIC character 
set is used. 

Letter Quality Printer — a tabletop daisywheel printer with a 
print speed of 55 cps. A form-length dial, top-of-form feed 
switch, reset switch, alarm/clear switch, and word propor- 
tional spacing switch are standard. The upper-/lowercase 
EBCDIC character set is used. 

The E4540 Series line printers are full-character, impact 
belt printers which print at 10 cpi and 6 Ipi. Forms can be 
from 4 to 9.5 or 15 inches wide, and 3.75, 5.5, or 11 inches 
long. 

E4011-3BXO Belt Printer — a tabletop belt printer with 
print speeds of 220 or 300 1pm. An 80-column friction feed 
mechanism is standard; the monocase EBCDIC character 
set is used. 


nism is standard; the upper-/lowercase EBCDIC character 
set is used. 

E4011-4LXO Belt Printer — a tabletop belt printer with 
print speeds of 220 or 300 1pm. A 132-column tractor feed 
mechanism is standard; the monocase EBCDIC character 
set is used. 

E4011-4MXO Belt Printer — a tabletop belt printer with 
print speeds of 220 or 300 1pm. A 132-column tractor feed 
mechanism is standard; the upper-/lowercase EBCDIC 
character set is used. 

E4011-4AXN Belt Printer — a floorstanding belt printer 
with print speeds of 220 or 300 1pm. An 80-column tractor 
feed mechanism and forms access are standard; the mono- 
case EBCDIC character set is used. 

E4011-4DXN Belt Printer — a floorstanding belt printer 
with print speeds of 220 or 300 1pm. An 80-column tractor 
feed mechanism and forms access are standard; the upper-/ 
lowercase EBCDIC character set is used. 

E4504-1CEF Belt Printer — a floorstanding belt printer with 
print speeds of 220 or 300 1pm. A 132-column tractor feed 
mechanism is standard; the monocase EBCDIC character 
set is used. 

E4504-1CFF Belt Printer — a floorstanding belt printer with 
print speeds of 220 or 300 1pm. A 132-column tractor feed 
mechanism is standard; the upper-/lowercase EBCDIC 
character set is used. 

E4540 ASYNCHRONOUS ADAPTER: Diskette-resident 
emulation software that allows an E4540 Series display 
terminal to emulate Digital VTIOO asynchronous terminal 
operation and normal synchronous operation. The E4540 
Asynchronous Adapter consists of a small module (which 
connects to a BSC cluster controller) and a program dis- 
kette. The module provides the displays connected to the 
controller with access to eight asynchronous modem ports; 
two E4540 Asynchronous Adapter modules may be used 
with 32-port controllers. 

SSI IRMA EMULATOR: Allows a personal computer to 
attach to an E4540 Series controller, emulating an E4540 
Series display terminal. The AT&T 6300 Personal Comput- 
er, IBM PC, PC XT, and PC AT, or IBM-compatible PCs 
may be attached. The SSI IRMA Emulator consists of a 
plug-in circuit card (for the PC) and emulation software on a 
diskette. The SSI IRMA is an OEMed version of the 
Digital Communications Associates (DCA) Irma product. 


E4011-3EXO Belt Printer — a tabletop belt printer with 
print speeds of 220 or 300 1pm. An 80-column friction feed 
mechanism is standard; the upper-/lowercase EBCDIC 
character set is used. 

E4011-4GXO Belt Printer — a tabletop belt printer with 
print speeds of 220 or 300 1pm. An 80-column tractor feed 
mechanism is standard; the monocase EBCDIC character 
set is used. 

E4011-4JXO Belt Printer — a tabletop belt printer with print 
speeds of 220 or 300 1pm. An 80-column tractor feed mecha- 


PRICING 


The AT&T E4540 Series components are available for 
purchase only; quantity discounts are available. 


Maintenance service for the E4540 Series components is 
available from AT&T Information Systems field personnel. 
Maintenance charges are billed on a monthly basis; monthly 
rates vary depending on user location. The maintenance 
rates shown in this report are the maximum maintenance , 
charges. 


MARCH 1986 


© 1986 DATAPRO RESEARCH CORPORATION, DELRAN, NJ 08075 USA 
REPRODUCTION PROHIBITED 



C25-046-306 

Terminals 

AT&T E4540 Series Display Terminals 


EQUIPMENT PRICES 


Purchase 

Monthly 

Mainte- 

Price 

nance 

($) 

($) 


E4544-31 SA 

Remote Cluster Controller 

6,800 

33 

E4544-31 SB 

Remote Cluster Controller 

12,350 

34 

E4544 

Local Cluster Controller 

16,300 

65 

E4546-31 SA 

Remote Cluster Controller 

4,000 

30 

E4546-31 SB 

Remote Cluster Controller 

4,400 

31 

E4548-12TA 

Display Terminal; w/low-profile T5 keyboard 

1,495 

12 

E4548-12TF 

Display Terminal; w/high-profile T5 keyboard 

1,695 

12 

E4548-25TA 

Display Terminal; w/low-profile T5 keyboard 

2,065 

12 

E4548-25TF 

Display Terminal; w/high-profile T5 keyboard 

2,265 

12 

E4549-42 

Color Display Terminal; requires keyboard 

1,840 

— 

E4549-43 

Color Display Terminal; requires keyboard 

1,840 

— 

T5 

High-Profile Keyboard 

425 

— 

T5 

Low-Profile Keyboard 

225 

— 


Low-Profile Typewriter Keyboard; w/external numeric pad 

335 

— 


Low-Profile Data Entry Keyboard 

225 

— 

E45AP102AAA 

Matrix Printer 

2,498 

17 

E45AP201AAA 

Matrix Printer 

3,868 

32 


Letter Quality Printer 

4,950 

— 

E4011-3BXO 

Belt Printer 

3,973 

28 

E4011-3EXO 

Belt Printer 

3,973 

28 

E4011-4GXO 

Belt Printer 

4,208 

28 

E4011-4JXO 

Belt Printer 

4,208 

28 

E4011-4LXO 

Belt Printer 

5,170 

30 

E4011-4MXO 

Belt Printer 

5,170 

30 

E4011-4AXN 

Belt Printer 

4,785 

28 

E4011-4DXN 

Belt Printer 

4,785 

28 

E4504-1CEF 

Belt Printer 

5,595 

30 

E4504-1CFF 

Belt Printer 

5,595 

30 

E4540 

Asynchronous Adapter 

1,500 

2 


SSI IRMA Emulator 

1,045 

11 


SSI/EIA Multiplexer 

1,500 

2 


© 1986 DATAPRO RESEARCH CORPORATION, DELRAN, NJ 08075 USA 
REPRODUCTION PROHIBITED 


MARCH 1986 



C25-046-501 

Terminals 


AT&T 6500 Multifunction Communication 

System 


clcilc^sro 

ANALYSIS 


UPDATE: The 6500 Multifunction Communication Sys- 
tem is AT&T s newest IBM 3270 replacement product line. 
Based on the modular 6544 controller, the 6500 System 
provides access to both synchronous and asynchronous 
hosts. AT&T provides a variety of system-compatible and 
plug-compatible display terminals for use with the 6500 
System in both monochrome and color versions; multitask- 
ing capability is also available. Personal computing capa- 
bility can be added to the system via standard MS-DOS 
personal computers (PCs), including the AT&T 6300 and 
6300 Plus. 

Two years ago, AT&T introduced the 6500 Multifunction 
Communication System, a family of products that pro- 
vides compatibility with the synchronous IBM 3270 sys- 
tem, as well as asynchronous host computers and 
functions. In September 1987, AT&T announced several 
enhancements that expand the system’s functionality and 
increase its capabilities. Included in the announcement 



AT&Ts 6500 Multifunction Communication System provides 
multiple host access, as well as asynchronous/synchronous 
operation. A variety of displays and printers are available for 
use with the 6500 System, which is based on the modular 6544 
controller. 


VENDOR: AT&T, 1 Speedwell Avenue, Mor- 
ristown, New Jersey 07960. Telephone (201) 
898-2000. 

CANADIAN DISTRIBUTION: AT&T Canada, 
1 500 Don Mills Road, Ontario M3B 3K4. Tele- 
phone (416) 449-4300. 

MODELS: 6544 Multifunction Communication 
Controller; 6518 Basic Function Display; 6528 
and 6529 Standard Displays; 6538 and 6539 
Multitasking Displays; 6578, 6579, 6580, and 
6591 Plug-Compatible Displays; 6571 and 6581 
Color Graphics Printer; and the 2-N-1 Adapter. 
KEYBOARD: All models include a detachable 
1 22-key keyboard featuring a low-profile design. 
ADAPTER: The 2-N-1 Adapter is for use with 
AT&T 6300, 6310, or compatible personal com- 
puters. 

COMPETITION: IBM, Telex, ITT Courier, Memo- 
rex, Lee Data, and several others. 

PRICING: The basic 6544 controller is priced at 
$7,880; various modules for the controller range 
in price from $2,215 to $3,920. Display termi- 
nals range in price from $1 ,950 to $2,895. The 
prices of the plug-compatible displays range from 
$1,165 to $1,705. The 2-N-1 Adapter costs 
$1,045. 


REPORT HIGHLIGHTS: PAGE 

Product Evaluation 502 

Market Position 503 

SPECIFICATIONS 504 

PRICING 508 


are five new plug-compatible displays, an optional plug- 
compatible controller module, and a local channel-con- 
nection option. The company also announced increased 
asynchronous access capabilities. 

AT&T has long been a leader in the IBM 3270-compatible 
terminal market, with well over 300,000 terminals in- 
stalled. The company’s products include the 40 Series, the 
4540 family, and the current E4540 line. Each product line 
provides basic, functional compatibility with correspond- 
ing IBM 3270 products. 

The 6500 product line provides access to multiple hosts 
from the same display terminal. Components of the 6500 
Multifunction Communication System include the 6544 


NOVEMBER 1987 


© 1987 DATAPRO RESEARCH CORPORATION. DELRAN, NJ 08075 USA 
REPRODUCTION PROHIBITED— FOR REPRINTS, CALL 1-800-328-2776 



C25-046-502 

Terminals 


AT&T 6500 Multifunction Communication System 



Shown above is the outside view of the 6544 controller. The 
backplane of the controller contains 12 expansion slots for 
connecting as many as 3 synchronous hosts, 32 synchronous 
devices, and 32 asynchronous devices. 


controller; 6518, 6528, 6538, 6578, 6580, and 6591 mono- 
chrome displays; 6529, 6539, and 6579 color displays; and 
the 6571 and 6572 color printers. The 6500 family also 
accommodates the older AT&T 4540 and E4540 displays; 
AT&T 4400 family asynchronous displays; and a variety 
of personal computers, including the AT&T 6300 and 
6300 Plus PCs and the IBM PC/XT/AT. The 6500 com- 
ponents operate over standard twisted-pair telephone wire 
or previously installed coaxial cable. 

The 6544 Multifunction Communication Controller is the 
central component of the 6500 System. It supports up to 
32 synchronous devices, up to 32 asynchronous devices, 
and 12 module slots, which hold the following: 

• Synchronous Host Module — provides synchronous 
ports for the access of 3270 hosts (Bisync or SNA). This 
module supports a 19.2K bps transmission speed and 
provides access to up to three host computers, depend- 
ing upon their speed and protocol. 

• Synchronous Device Interface Module — provides for 
the attachment of up to 16 synchronous displays, print- 
ers, or PCs via twisted-pair wire and supports up to four 
modules. 

• Asynchronous Host/Protocol Conversion Module — pro- 
vides for connection of up to eight asynchronous hosts 
or terminals; protocol conversion allows asynchronous 
terminals to access synchronous hosts and supports up 
to two modules. 


• X.25 Interface Module — provides a connector for IBM- 
compatible hosts supporting packet switched protocols. 

• Local Channel Interface Module — provides connection 
for IBM mainframe byte multiplexers, block multi- 
plexers, or selector channel configurations in which the 
6544 is within 200 cable feet of the host. 

• Plug-Compatible Device Interface Module — provides 
connection of up to 16 synchronous devices to the 6544 
controller. 

The 6500 family includes five displays: the 6518, a basic 
synchronous display; the 6528 monochrome and 6529 
color displays, which provide a split-screen capability so 
that the user can display one synchronous and one asyn- 
chronous session simultaneously; and the 6538 mono- 
chrome and 6539 color multitasking displays, which 
provide up to four multitasking windows in any combina- 
tion of synchronous and asynchronous sessions. In asyn- 
chronous mode, the 6528/6529 and 6538/6539 displays 
emulate the Digital Equipment Corporation VT220 dis- 
play terminal. The 6500 display keyboards are detached 
and feature a low-profile design. 

AT&T also offers four display terminals that are plug- 
compatible with 3270 controllers. The coax displays offer 
all the ergonomic features of the units listed above and 
also support “hot-key” capabilities when attached to the 
6500. Model 6578 is an alternative to the IBM 3278 and 
3178 displays. Model 6579 is an alternative to the IBM 
3279, 3179, and 3192C display terminals. Model 6580 can 
be used instead of IBM 3129D and 3180-1 displays, and 
Model 6591 is an alternative to the IBM 3191 display. 

The Single Session Irma option adds personal computing 
to the 6500 System by providing support for the AT&T 
6300 and 6300 Plus PCs, as well as the IBM PC/XT/ AT 
and other IBM-compatible PCs. The Single Session Irma 
option is compatible with DCA’s Irma product and con- 
sists of a feature card (which plugs into an expansion slot 
on the PC) and software. 

The 2-N-l adapter, for use with AT&T 6300, 6310, or 
compatible PCs, is a PC-based software/hardware feature 
that provides seven concurrent windows: four multises- 
sion windows, two notepads, and one PC session. 

The 6500 family components can communicate with a 
variety of host computers, including the IBM S/360, S/ 
370, 303X, 308X, 43XX, and IBM plug-compatible main- 
frames (PCMs) from various vendors. 

PRODUCT EVALUATION 

The 6500 Multifunction Communication System’s key 
feature, reflected in its name, is multifunctionality. The 
6500 System provides multihost access, both to asynchro- 
nous and synchronous computer systems. In addition, a 


© 1987 DATAPRO RESEARCH CORPORATION, DELRAN, NJ 08075 USA 
REPRODUCTION PROHIBITED— FOR REPRINTS, CALL 1-800-328-2776 


NOVEMBER 1987 



C25-046-503 

Terminals 


AT&T 6500 Multifunction Communication System 


6500 configuration can include color and monochrome 
multitasking displays, plug-compatible displays, personal 
computers, printers, adapters, and older AT&T 4540 and 
E4540 displays. AT&T’s 6500 display terminals offer a 
variety of features and capabilities not found on previous 
AT&T displays. Particularly interesting are the 6538 
monochrome and 6539 color multitasking systems, which 
can offer up to four multitasking windows that provide 
simultaneous access to four distinct computer sessions in 
any combination of synchronous and asynchronous appli- 
cations. Currently, IBM offers this capability only on its 
3270-PC, which is roughly three times the cost of the 
6539. 

The key to the multifunctional capabilities of the 6500 
System is the 6544 controller. The 6544 operates as a 
standard IBM 3274-type controller; it can also be up- 
graded, via add-on modules, to provide support for three 
synchronous host communications ports, one high-speed 
(64K bps) synchronous port, eight asynchronous hosts 
and terminals, and X.25 networks. The 6544 controller 
contains 1 2 module slots and can be expanded as a user’s 
communications requirements grow. A major benefit of 
the 6500 System is its ability to access both synchronous 
and asynchronous hosts from a single terminal. This is a 
benefit currently found only on Lee Data’s Series 400 
products. Users have eagerly awaited IBM’s introduction 
of a new-generation 3274 controller supporting many of 
the same capabilities found on the 6544; AT&T has 
beaten IBM to the punch this time. 

The 6500 System puts AT&T on a strong competitive 
level in the 3270 market; however, since the market has 
been dominated for so long by IBM, AT&T is still in a 
position of scrambling for a market share. 

MARKET POSITION 

Over the years, AT&T’s former subsidiary, Teletype, built 
up a large installed base of IBM 3270-compatible termi- 
nals; the company estimates that there are some 300,000 
terminals now installed, including the 40, 4540, and 
E4540 families. Prior to AT&T’s divestiture. Teletype had 
what amounted to a built-in market for its products, sell- 
ing primarily to the Bell Operating Companies (BOCs) for 
their internal use or resale to their customers. As much as 
40 percent of Teletype’s business at that time was attrib- 
uted to the company’s relationship with the BOCs. 

Divestiture has caused a number of changes, particularly 
to Teletype. First, the company lost its captive market. 
Then came changes to Teletype itself The company’s 
name was officially changed to AT&T Teletype Corpora- 
tion. In 1985, AT&T Teletype became a wholly owned 
subsidiary of the Computer Systems Division of AT&T 


Information Systems, with all sales for Teletype-manufac- 
tured products being moved to AT&T headquarters in 
New Jersey and product management folded into a DTE 
division of the Computer Systems Division. The Teletype 
name remains a legal entity for trademark, product brand 
name, and other purposes; as a company, however. Tel- 
etype Corporation has been swallowed up by AT&T. 

The 6500 Multifunction Communication System is 
AT&T’s most comprehensive (and ambitious) foray into 
the 3270 replacement market. The product line conforms 
to two important trends in the market: 

• Integration of personal computing capabilities into the 
3270 cluster; and 

• Access to multiple hosts, including asynchronous com- 
puters. 

The 6500 product line places AT&T in a strong position 
to compete with IBM, as well as other 3270-compatible 
vendors, including Telex, ITT Courier, Memorex, Lee 
Data, and Harris. At one time, it was enough to offer 
3270-compatible controllers, terminals, and printers at a 
lower price than IBM. IBM, however, has moved to pro- 
tect its huge and lucrative 3270 installed base by introduc- 
ing a generation of products that provide a number of new 
and attractive features at considerably lower prices. The 
competitors, including AT&T, have countered by adding 
functionality to their own product lines and lowering 
prices even further. A number of vendors have withdrawn 
from this market, unable or unwilling to match IBM’s 
moves. The remaining participants will vie with IBM for 
what continues to be a growing and profitable market 
segment. 



The 6572 Printer is a serial, dot matrix color printer that 
prints at 100 cps in near letter quality or at 400 cps in draft 
quality. The unit's multicolor ribbons support four- or seven- 
color printing. 


NOVEMBER 1987 


© 1987 DATAPRO RESEARCH CORPORATION, DELRAN, NJ 08075 USA 
REPRODUCTION PROHIBITED — FOR REPRINTS, CALL 1-800-328-2776 




C25-046-504 

Terminals 


AT&T 6500 Multifunction Communication System 


SPECIFICATIONS 


MODELS: 6544 Multifunction Communication Control- 
ler; 6518 Basic Function Display; 6528 and 6529 Standard 
Displays; 6538 and 6539 Multitasking Displays; 6578, 
6579, 6580, and 6591 plug-compatible displays; 6571 and 
6581 Color Graphics Printer; and the 2-N-l Adapter. 
DATE OF ANNOUNCEMENT: November 1985; some 
components announced in September 1987. 

DATE OF FIRST DELIVERY: December 1985; the 
2-N-l Adapter and all plug-compatible displays were 
scheduled for availability in November 1987, with the 
exception of the 6591, which will be available in April 
1988. 

NUMBER DELIVERED TO DATE: Information not 
available. 

SERVICED BY: AT&T. 

SYSTEM COMPONENTS 

6544 MULTIFUNCTION COMMUNICATION CON- 
TROLLER: The 6544 controller supports up to 3 synchro- 
nous hosts, 32 synchronous devices, and 32 asynchronous 
devices or hosts, depending on how it is configured. Con- 
nection to the 6544 is through AT&T’s Standard Serial 
Interface (SSI) unshielded twisted-pair wire that is com- 
patible with the AT&T Premises Distribution System 
(PDS). Devices can be located up to 5,000 feet from the 
controller. For users with coaxial cable already installed, 
coaxial adapters are available to connect devices to the 
6544 via coax. The basic 6544 contains a Main Processor 
Module, a dual diskette drive for loading software, and 14 
module slots, 12 of which are available for add-on expan- 
sion modules. The basic 6544 configuration provides 



The Model 6579 plug-compatible display station, announced 
in September 1987, is a $1,705 unit featuring a 14-inch color 
monitor and a 122-key keyboard. The 65 79 was designed to be 
a replacement for the IBM 2279, 3179, and 3192C displays. 


access to a single synchronous host computer through a 
single 6500 System display. Add-on expansion modules 
are available to provide additional multifunctional fea- 
tures. The following expansion modules are available. 


Synchronous Host Module — an add-on expansion module 
that provides simultaneous access to more than one syn- 
chronous host. The 6500 System supports up to three of 
these modules, operating at a maximum or aggregate 
speed of 38.4K bps, but only two of the three can support 
Bisync and/or SNA/SDLC protocols. For example, this 
allows two ports using the Bisync (or SDLC) protocol to 
operate at 19.2K bps, but if a third 19.2K bps Bisync (or 
SDLC) port is needed, two synchronous host modules are 
required. The Synchronous Host Module may also sup- 
port one SNA port operating at either 56K or 64K bps. At 
either of these higher speeds, only one port is used per 
card. Two Synchronous Host modules are needed in situ- 
ations when there are two SNA hosts operating at higher 
speeds. 


Synchronous Device Interface Module — an add-on expan- 
sion module that provides for the attachment of up to 16 
synchronous displays, printers, and personal computers 
via twisted-pair wire. The 6500 System accommodates 
two Synchronous Device Interface Modules, providing for 
a maximum configuration of 32 synchronous devices. 


Asynchronous Host/Protocol Conversion Module — an add- 
on expansion module that provides port connections for 
up to eight asynchronous host computers or terminals. 
Protocol conversion allows asynchronous terminals to ac- 
cess synchronous hosts. The ports operate at speeds up to 
19.2Kbps. Four Asynchronous Host/Protocol Conversion 
Modules are accommodated, providing for a maximum 
configuration of 32 asynchronous connections. 


X.25 Interface Module — an add-on expansion module that 
provides one connector for IBM-compatible hosts sup- 
porting the Network Control Program Packet Switched 
Interface (NPSI) protocols. The connector supports either 
of the following interfaces: RS-232-C at speeds up to 
19.2K bps or CCITT V.35 at speeds of 48K, 56K, or 64K 
bps. 


Local Channel Interface Module — an add-on expansion 
module that provides connections for an IBM mainframe 
byte multiplexer, block multiplexer, or selector channel in 


© 1987 DATAPRO RESEARCH CORPORATION, DELRAN, NJ 08075 USA 
REPRODUCTION PROHIBITED— FOR REPRINTS, CALL 1-800-328-2776 


NOVEMBER 1987 





C25-046505 

Terminals 


AT&T 6500 Multifunction Communication System 


Desktop 

Processors 


Departmental 

Processors 


Divisional 

Processors 


Engineering 



Corporate 
Mainframe #1 


Corporate 
Mainframe #2 


West Coast 

Regional 

Computer 


Printers 


Figure 1. AT&T’s 6500 Multifunction Communication System provides access to a variety of asynchronous and synchronous host 
computers. 


configurations where the 6544 is located within 200 cable 
feet of the host. Users can equip each 6544 with one Local 
Channel module. 

Plug-Compatible Device Interface Module — an add-on ex- 
pansion module that allows users to establish plug com- 
patibility for up to 16 synchronous devices; users can add 
a second module for a total of 32 ports. 

The AT&T Multifunction Communication System sup- 
ports a variety of host computers, including the IBM 
S/360, S/370, 3031, 3032, 3033, 3081, 3083, 3084, 4321, 
4331, and 4341; with the appropriate software, the System 
can also support the IBM 8100, Series/ 1, System/36, and 
System/38. In addition to IBM synchronous hosts, the 
6500 System supports connection to IBM plug-compatible 
mainframes (PCMs) from vendors such as Amdahl, Con- 
trol Data, IPL, National Advanced Systems, and Magnu- 
son. Asynchronous computers that may be accessed 
through the 6500 System include the AT&T 3B family 
and UNIX PC, the Digital VAX, and most other popular 
minicomputer families. AT&T 6500 System displays and 
printers are connected to the 6544 controller via twisted- 


pair telephone wire (compatible with AT&T’s Premises 
Distribution System). Communications over previously 
installed coaxial cable is possible with the addition of 
optional adapters. 

The 6544 also supports the older AT&T 4540 and E4540 
displays. For asynchronous applications, the 6544 sup- 
ports the attachment of the AT&T 4400 family of displays 
and the AT&T 600 line, as well as other asynchronous 
displays like the Digital VT220 and VTIOO. Other print- 
ers, including AT&T 4540 and E4540 printer models, may 
be added to a 6500 System cluster using the 6561 Printer 
Controller; one printer controller is required for each 
printer. 

Self-test diagnostics are standard on the 6544 controller. 
In addition, the 6544 supports two IBM network pro- 
grams that reside on host computers: Network Problem 
Determination Application (NPDA) and Network Logical 
Data Manager (NLDM). 

System Displays 

The 6500 System supports five System display units and 
four IBM plug-compatible units. All models support a 


NOVEMBER 1987 


© 1987 DATAPRO RESEARCH CORPORATION, DELRAN, NJ 08075 USA 
REPRODUCTION PROHIBITED— FOR REPRINTS, CALL 1-800-328-2776 













C25-046-506 

Terminals 


AT&T 6500 Multifunction Communication System 


tilt/swivel capability, and monochrome, amber, or green 
displays are available. Each display connects only to the 
6544 controller. The units are described in more detail 
below. 

6518 BASIC FUNCTION DISPLAY: This monochrome 
unit accesses only synchronous hosts. The 6518 includes a 
12-inch display screen, with a display capacity of 1,920 
characters arranged in 24 lines of 80 characters each. The 
6518 is functionally compatible with the IBM 3178 dis- 
play station. 

6528 STANDARD DISPLAY: This monochrome display 
provides a split-screen function for the simultaneous 
viewing of one synchronous session and one asynchro- 
nous session with “hot-key” switching between sessions. 
The 6528 includes a 15-inch display screen, with display 
capacities ranging from 1,920 to 3,564 characters; screen 
arrangements include 24 lines by 80 characters, 32 lines by 
80 characters, 43 lines by 80 characters, and 27 lines by 
132 characters. The 6528 is functionally compatible with 
the IBM 3180 display station in synchronous mode and 
with the Digital VT220 display terminal in asynchronous 
mode. 

6529 STANDARD DISPLAY: This unit is a color display 
that provides a split-screen function for the simultaneous 
viewing of one synchronous session and one asynchro- 
nous session with “hot-key” switching between sessions 
and “change-host” capability via command line. The 6529 
includes a 14-inch display screen, with display capacities 
ranging from 1,920 to 3,564 characters; screen arrange- 
ments include 24 lines by 80 characters, 32 lines by 80 
characters, 43 lines by 80 characters, and 27 lines by 132 
characters. The 6529 features four- or seven-color display 
capability. It is functionally compatible with the IBM 
3179 display station in synchronous mode and with the 
Digital VT220 display terminal in asynchronous mode. 

6538 MULTITASKING DISPLAY: This monochrome 
display provides up to four multitasking windows in any 
combination of synchronous and asynchronous sessions. 
Window positioning/browsing/sizing speed is four inches 
per second horizontal and six inches per second vertical. 
The 6538 includes a 15Tnch display screen, with display 
capacities ranging from 1,920 to 3,564 characters; screen 
arrangements include 24 lines by 80 characters, 32 lines by 
80 characters, 43 lines by 80 characters, and 27 lines by 
132 characters. The 6538 supports four screen formats, 
including 3270 operation, VT220 operation, full-extended 
attributing, and input and edit. An auxiliary I/O port and 
programmed symbol graphics are optionally available. 
The 6538 is functionally compatible with the IBM 3180 
display station in synchronous mode and with the Digital 
VT220 display terminal in asynchronous mode. 

6539 MULTITASKING DISPLAY: This color display 
provides up to four multitasking windows in any combi- 
nation of synchronous and asynchronous sessions. Win- 


dow positioning/browsing/sizing speed is four inches per 
second horizontal and six inches per second vertical. The 
6539 includes a 14-inch display screen, with display 
capacities ranging from 1,920 to 3,564 characters; screen 
arrangements include 24 lines by 80 characters, 32 lines by 
80 characters, 43 lines by 80 characters, and 27 lines by 
132 characters. The 6539 features four- or seven-color 
display capability and supports four screen formats, in- 
cluding 3270 operation, VT220 operation, full-extended 
attributing, and input and edit. An auxiliary I/O port and 
programmed symbol graphics are optionally available. 
The 6539 is functionally compatible with the IBM 3279- 
S3G display station in synchronous mode and with the 
Digital VT220 display terminal in asynchronous mode. 

The 6528, 6529, 6538, and 6539 displays are modularly 
designed and can be upgraded or downgraded by switch- 
ing logic bases and display monitors. 

Plug-Compatible Displays 

All of the 6500 plug-compatible displays can operate with 
IBM 3270 controllers, as well as the AT&T 6544 control- 
ler. The units’ display screens support tilt/swivel capabili- 
ties, and monochrome devices are available with amber or 
green phosphor characters. 

6578 PLUG-COMPATIBLE DISPLAY: This unit is a 
monochrome display that has a 3178 screen format, a 
14-inch monitor, and an 87-key keyboard. The 6578 is 
functionally compatible with IBM 3278 and 3178 dis- 
plays. 

6579 PLUG-COMPATIBLE DISPLAY: A color display 
available with four or seven colors, this unit measures 14 
inches and has 3179 screen formats and a 122-key key- 
board. It is functionally compatible with IBM 3279, 3179, 
and 3192C displays. 

6580 PLUG-COMPATIBLE DISPLAY: This mono- 
chrome display has 3180 screen formats and a 122-key 
keyboard. The 6580 is functionally compatible with IBM 
3192D and 3180-1 displays. 

6591 PLUG-COMPATIBLE DISPLAY: This mono- 
chrome display has a 14-inch flat screen and an IBM-type 
122-key keyboard. It is functionally compatible with IBM 
3191 displays. 

Options 

In addition to the 6544 controller and a wide variety of 
displays, the 6500 also incorporates a number of options, 
described below. 

2-N-l ADAPTER: This adapter, recently introduced by 
AT&T, is for use with AT&T 6300, 6310, or compatible 
personal computers. The PC-based software/hardware 


© 1987 DATAPRO RESEARCH CORPORATION, DELRAN, NJ 08075 USA 
REPRODUCTION PROHIBITED— FOR REPRINTS, CALL 1-800-328-2776 


NOVEMBER 1987 



C25-046-507 

Terminals 


AT&T 6500 Multifunction Communication System 


unit offers enhanced connectivity to the 6500 controller. It 
is available with a 3270-type keyboard. The 2-N-l pro- 
vides seven concurrent windows: four multisession win- 
dows, two notepads, and one PC session. 

6518 KEYBOARDS: The 6518 display can be configured 
with either of two available keyboards. One keyboard 
contains 87 keys, an external numeric pad, and 12 func- 
tion keys; the second keyboard contains 99 keys and 24 
external program function (PF) keys. The keyboard has a 
typewriter-style layout and a low-profile design and is 
detachable. Security keylock is a standard feature. A three- 
year warranty is available with the 6518. 

6528/6529/6538/6539/6500 PC KEYBOARD: The 6528/ 
6529 Standard Displays, 6538/6539 Multitasking Dis- 
plays, and 6500 PC are equipped with a 122-key keyboard 
that includes 24 program function (PF) keys and a VT220 
template. The keyboard contains a typewriter-style layout 
and a low-profile design and is detachable. Security key- 
lock is a standard feature. 

SINGLE SESSION IRMA ADAPTER: This PC adapter 
allows the AT&T 6300 and 6300 Plus, IBM PC/XT/ AT, 
and other PCs running the MS-DOS operating system to 
function as a workstation on the 6500 System. The Single 
Session Irma Adapter consists of a feature card that plugs 
into an expansion slot on the PC, as well as supporting 
software. It provides CMS, TSO, and IBM file transfer. 
The adapter is compatible with the Irma board from 
DCA. 

6571 COLOR MATRIX PRINTER: The 6571 is a matrix 
printer that provides color or monochrome text and 
graphics printing. The 6571 operates at speeds up to 400 
cps in draft mode and 100 cps in near letter quality mode. 
The 6571 prints symbol graphics and one-, four-, or seven- 
color printing is supported. The 6571 includes a full- 
function SNA control panel and LCD display, an 
operator-replaceable 18-wire printhead with half-dot shift, 
and a tractor- or friction-feed platen with rear or bottom 
feed. Paper feed/positioning controls are also included. 

6572 PLUG-COMPATIBLE PRINTER: The 6572 is a 
coax version of the 6571 printer, offering all the same 
features. 

6561 PRINTER CONTROLLER: The 6561 is a printer 
controller that enables the use of older AT&T 4540 and 
E4540 printers in a 6500 System cluster. The 6561 adds 
new functions and applications to the older printers and 
includes a full-function SNA control panel, LCD display, 
and the following interfaces: SSI (twisted pair) in, SSI out, 
RS-232-C out, and Centronics parallel out. 


TRANSMISSION SPECIFICATIONS 

When communicating with synchronous host computers, 
the 6500 System provides maximum data rates of 64K 
bps for hosts supporting SNA and X.25 protocols and 
19.2K bps for hosts supporting Bisync protocols. The Syn- 
chronous Host Module supports access to as many as 
three synchronous hosts, two of which may be supporting 
SNA software. The 6500 System communicates with from 
1 to 32 asynchronous hosts at a maximum 19.2K bps data 
transmission rate. Devices can be connected up to 5,000 
feet from the 6544 controller. 

PRICING 

The 6500 Multifunction Communication System compo- 
nents are available for purchase and lease through 
AT&T’s direct sales force or by calling (800) 247-1212. 
AT&T provides installation and maintenance service 
through 1,000 nationwide sites. 

The 6500 Multifunction Communication System products 
carry a warranty from the date of purchase, guaranteeing 
that AT&T will replace any defective part or software free 
of charge during the warranty period. The company offers 
several Equipment Maintenance Agreement Plans, includ- 
ing per-occurrence and contract plans. 

The following price list includes single-quantity purchase 
prices for various 6500 System products. As of press time, 
prices for some 6500 System products had not yet been 
set. For those prices, and for volume pricing, contact 
AT&T Information Systems. 

EQUIPMENT PRICES 



Pur- 

chase 

Price 


($) 

6544 Multifunction Communication Controller 

7,880 

Synchronous Host Module 

2,400 

Synchronous Device Interface Module 

3,920 

Asynchronous Host/Protocol Conversion Module 

2,215 

X.25 Interface Module 

3,510 

Local Channel Expansion Module 

3,350 

16-Port, Plug-Compatible Logic Module 

4,730 

6528 Standard Display 

1,950 

6529 Standard Display 

2,195 

6538 Multitasking Display 

2,645 

6539 Multitasking Display 

2,895 

6578 Plug-Compatible Display 

1,165 

6579 Plug-Compatible Display 

1,705 

6580 Plug-Compatible Display 

1,615 

6591 Plug-Compatible Display 

1,165 

6561 Printer Controller 

915 

6571 Printer 

4,000 

6572 Plug-Compatible Printer 

4,000 □ 


NOVEMBER 1987 


© 1987 DATAPRO RESEARCH CORPORATION, DELRAN, NJ 08075 USA 
REPRODUCTION PROHIBITED— FOR REPRINTS, CALL 1-800-328-2776 




C25-046-501 

Terminals 


AT&T Multifunction Communication System 



The AT&T Multifunction Communication System provides 
multiple host access, and synchronous/asynchronous opera- 
tion. A variety of displays are available for use with the 6500 
system, including the 6539 Multitasking Display, shown here. 
The 6539 display provides 4- or 7- color display capability, and 
can display up to four multitasking windows, in any combina- 
tion of synchronous or asynchronous sessions. 


MANAGEMENT SUMMARY 

AT&T, via its Teletype subsidiary, has long been a leader in 
the IBM 3270-compatible terminal market, with well over 
300,000 terminals installed. The earlier generations of 
3270-compatible products offered by AT&T and Teletype 
include the 40 Series, the 4540 family, and the current 
E4540 line. Each of these product lines provided basic 
functional compatibility with the corresponding IBM 3270 
products. 

In November 1985, AT&T introduced the 6500 Multifunc- 
tion Communication System, a family of products that 
provides compatibility with the IBM 3270 system, plus 
access to asynchronous host computers and functions. The 
6500 product line provides access to multiple hosts, both 
synchronous and asynchronous, from the same display 
terminal. Components of the 6500 Multifunction Commu- 
nication System include the 6544 controller; 6518, 6528, 
and 6538 monochrome displays; 6529 and 6539 color 
displays; and 6571 color printer. Also introduced was the 
6500 PC, an equivalent to the IBM 3270-PC. The 6500 
family also accommodates the older AT&T 4540 and 
E4540 displays; AT&T 4400 family asynchronous displays; 
and a variety of personal computers including the 
AT&T 6300 and 6300 Plus PCs, and the IBM PC, PC XT, 
and PC AT. The 6500 components operate over standard 

APRIL 1986 


The 6500 Multifunction Communication 
System is AT&T's newest IBM 3270 re- 
placement product line. Based on the modu- 
lar 6544 controller, the 6500 system 
provides access to both synchronous and 
asynchronous hosts. AT&T provides a vari- 
ety of display terminals for use with the 
6500 system, in both monochrome and col- 
or; multitasking capability is also available. 
Personal computing capability can be added 
to the system with the new 6500 PC, or via 
standard MS-DOS PCs, including the 
AT&T 6300 and 6300 Plus. 

MODELS: 6544 Multifunction Communica- 
tion Controller, 6518 Basic Function Dis- 
play, 6528 and 6529 Standard Displays, 
6538 and 6539 Multitasking Displays, 
6571 Color Graphics Printer, and 6500 PC. 
DISPLAY: The 6518 includes a 12-inch dis- 
play, the 6528 and 6538 a 15-inch display, 
and the 6529 and 6539 a 14-inch display. 
The 651 8, 6528, and 6538 are monochrome 
displays, while the 6529 and 6539 are 4- or 
7-color displays. The 6518 provides a 24- 
line by 80-column screen format; all other 
models feature four selectable display for- 
mats, including 27 lines by 1 32 columns. 
KEYBOARD: A choice of 87- and 99-key 
keyboards is available for the 651 8; all other 
models include a 1 22-key keyboard. All key- 
board models feature a low-profile design 
and are detachable. 

COMPETITION: IBM, Telex, ITT Courier, 
Memorex, Lee Data, and several others. 
PRICE: The basic 6544 controller is priced at 
$7,880; various modules for the controller 
range in price from $2,215 to $3,920. Dis- 
play terminals range in price from $1 ,950 to 
$2,895 (the price for the 651 8 has not been 
announced). 


CHARACTERISTICS 

VENDOR; AT&T Information Systems, 1 Speedwell Ave- 
nue, Morristown, NJ 07960. Telephone (201) 898-2000. In 
Canada: AT&T Canada, 1500 Don Mills Road, Ontario 
M3B 3K4. Telephone (416) 449-4300. 

DATE OF ANNOUNCEMENT: November 1985. 

DATE OF FIRST DELIVERY: December 1985; some com- 
ponents scheduled for availability in 1986. 

NUMBER DELIVERED TO DATE: Information not 
available. 

SERVICED BY: AT&T Information Systems. 


© 1986 DATAPRO RESEARCH CORPORATION, DELRAN, NJ 08075 USA 
REPRODUCTION PROHIBITED 



C25-046-502 

Terminals 


AT&T Multifunction Communication System 


!>■ twisted-pair telephone wire; they can also operate over 
previously installed coaxial cable. 

The multifunctionality of the 6500 family stems from the 
6544 Multifunction Communications Controller. The 6544 
supports up to 32 synchronous devices and up to 16 
asynchronous devices. It provides 12 available module 
slots, into which the following expansion modules may be 
plugged: 

• Synchronous Host Module — provides synchronous ports 
for the access of 3270 hosts (BSC or SNA). Speeds up to 
19,200 bps are attainable. Depending on speed and proto- 
col, up to three hosts can be accessed. 

• Synchronous Device Interface Module — provides for the 
attachment of up to 16 synchronous displays, printers, or 
PCs via twisted-pair wire; up to two are supported; 

• Asynchronous Host/Protocol Conversion Module — pro- 
vides for connection of up to eight asynchronous hosts or 
terminals; protocol conversion allows asynchronous ter- 
minals to access synchronous hosts; up to two are sup- 
ported; and 

• X.25 Interface Module — provides a connector for IBM- 
compatible hosts supporting packet switched protocols. 

Displays available as part of the 6500 family include the 
6518, a basic synchronous display; the 6528 monochrome 
and 6529 color displays, that provide a split screen capabil- 
ity that allows the user to display one synchronous and one 
asynchronous session simultaneously; and the 6538 mono- 
chrome and 6539 color multitasking displays, that provide 
up to four multitasking windows in any combination of 
synchronous and asynchronous sessions. In asynchronous 
mode, the 6528/6529 and 6538/6539 displays emulate the 
Digital Equipment Corporation VT220 display terminal. 
Keyboards for the 6500 displays are detached and feature a 
low-profile design. 

AT&T has introduced the 6500 PC, a functionally compati- 
ble version of IBM’s 3270-PC, for use with the 6500 system. 
The 6500 PC offers four host sessions, two note pads, and 
one PC session, for a total of seven user-configurable 
windows. Personal computing can also be added to the 
6500 system via the Single Session Attachmate option, 
which supports the attachment of the AT&T 6300 and 
6300 Plus PCs, as well as the IBM PC, PC XT, PC AT, and 
other IBM-compatible PCs. The Single Session Attachmate 
option is compatible with DCA’s Irma product, and con- 
sists of a feature card (which plugs into an expansion slot on 
the PC) and software. 

The 6500 family components can communicate with a 
variety of host computers, including the IBM S/360, S/370, 
303X, 308X, 43XX, and IBM plug-compatible mainframes 
(PCMs) from various vendors. Asynchronous hosts such as 
the AT&T 3B family and the Digital VAX can also be 
accessed. 


► CONFIGURATION 

A variety of configurations are possible with the 6500 
Multifunction Communication System, depending on how 
the 6544 Multifunction Communication Controller is config- 
ured. The 6544 contains 14 module slots, 12 of which are 
available for optional add-on expansion modules. The basic 
6500 system configuration supports single-host, 3270 syn- 
chronous operation via one 6544 Controller and one 6500 
system display terminal. Four different expansion modules 
are available for integration in the 6544 controller. 

• Synchronous Host Module — when simultaneous access to 
more than one synchronous host is required, the Synchro- 
nous Host Module is used. Up to three of these modules 
can be supported in the 6500 Multifunction Communica- 
tion System. The Synchronous Host Module supports 
three communications ports at a maximum or aggregate 
speed of 38.4K bps operating with BSC, SNA (two maxi- 
mum), or a combination thereof. For example, this would 
allow two ports using BSC protocol to operate at 19,200 
bps. If a third BSC port operating at 19,200 bps was 
needed, two synchronous host modules are required. The 
Synchronous Host Module may also be used to support 
one SNA port operating at either 56K or 64K bps. When 
using either of these higher speeds, only one port per card 
may be used. If support for two SNA hosts operating at 
higher speeds is required, two Synchronous Host Modules 
are needed. A further example using these higher speeds 
would be the utilization of two Synchronous Host Mod- 
ules, each supporting one SNA host at 65K bps and a third 
module supporting one BSC host at 19,200 bps. 

• Synchronous Device Interface Module— an add-on expan- 
sion module that provides for the attachment of up to 16 
synchronous display terminals, printers, and personal 
computers via twisted-pair telephone wire (compatible 
with the AT&T Premises Distribution System). Two mod- 
ules may be added to the 6544, for a total of 32 synchro- 
nous devices supported. 

• Asynchronous Host/Protocol Conversion Module — an 
add-on expansion module that provides for connection of 
up to eight asynchronous hosts or terminals. Protocol 
conversion allows asynchronous terminals to access syn- 
chronous hosts. The ports operate at speeds up to 19,200 
bps, with an aggregate speed for the entire card of up to 
48,000 bps. Two modules may be added to the 6544, for a 
total of 16 asynchronous connections. 

• X.25 Interface Module — an add-on expansion module that 
provides one connector for IBM-compatible hosts sup- 
porting Network Control Program Packet Switched Inter- 
face (NPSI) protocols. The module can be configured in 
two ways: an El A RS-232-C interface at 19,200 bps, or a 
CCITT V.35 interface at 48,000, 56,000, or 64,000 bps. 

AT&T 6500 system displays available for use with the 6544 
controller include the 6518 Basic Function Display; the 
6528 (monochrome) and 6529 (color) Standard Displays; 
and the 6538 (monochrome) and 6539 (color) Multitasking 
Displays. The 6544 also supports the older AT&T 4540 and 
£4540 displays. For asynchronous applications, the 6544 
supports the attachment of the AT&T 4400 family of dis- 
plays, as well as other asynchronous displays like the 
Digital VT 220 and VT 100. AT&T has introduced the 6571 
Color Graphics Printer for use in a 6500 system cluster. 
Other printers, including AT&T 4540 and E4540 printer 
models, may be added to a 6500 system cluster using the 
6561 Printer Controller; one printer controller is required 
for each printer. 

Personal computing capabilities can be added to the 6500 
system in two ways. AT&T has introduced the 6500 PC, 
which is functionally equivalent to the IBM 3270-PC. The 


© 1986 DATAPRO RESEARCH CORPORATION, DELRAN, NJ 08075 USA 
REPRODUCTION PROHIBITED 


APRIL 1986 



AT&T Multifunction Communication System 


C25-046-503 

Terminals 


X> COMPETITIVE POSITION 

Over the years, AT&T’s Teletype subsidiary has built up a 
large installed base of IBM 3270-compatible terminals; the 
company estimates that there are some 300,000 terminals 
now installed, including the 40, 4540, and E4540 families. 
Prior to AT&T’s divestiture. Teletype had what amounted 
to a built-in market for its products, selling primarily to the 
Bell Operating Companies (BOCs) for their internal use or 
resale to their customers. As much as 40 percent of Tele- 
type’s business at that time was attributed to their relation- 
ship with the BOCs. 

Divestiture has caused a number of changes, particularly to 
Teletype. First, the company lost its captive market. Then 
came changes to Teletype itself. The company’s name was 
officially changed to AT&T Teletype Corporation. In 1985, 
AT&T Teletype became a wholly owned subsidiary of the 
Computer Systems Division of AT&T Information Sys- 
tems, with all sales for Teletype-manufactured products 
being moved to AT&T-IS headquarters in New Jersey, and 
product management folded into a DTE division of the 
Computer Systems Division. The Teletype name remains a 
legal entity for trademark, product brand name, and other 
purposes; it would appear, though, that as a company 
Teletype Corporation has been swallowed up by AT&T. 

The 6500 Multifunction Communication System is 
AT&T’s most comprehensive (and ambitious) foray into 
the 3270 replacement market. The product line conforms 
to two important trends in the market: 

• Integration of personal computing capabilities into the 
3270 cluster; and 

• Access to multiple hosts, including asynchronous 
computers. 

The 6500 product line places AT&T in a strong position to 
compete with IBM, as well as the other 3270-compatible 
vendors — a group that includes Telex, ITT Courier, 
Memorex, Lee Data, Harris, and a number of others. At 
one time, it was enough to offer 3270-compatible control- 
lers, terminals, and printers at a lower price than IBM. 
However, IBM has moved to protect its huge (and lucra- 
tive) 3270 installed base by introducing a new generation of 
products that provide a number of new and attractive 
features at considerably lower prices. The competitors, 
including AT&T, have countered by adding additional 
functionality to their own product lines, and lowering 
prices even further. A number of vendors have withdrawn 
from this market, unable or unwilling to match IBM’s 
moves. The remaining participants will vie with IBM for 
what continues to be a growing and profitable market 
segment. 

ADVANTAGES AND RESTRICTIONS 

The key feature offered by the 6500 Multifunction Com- 
munication System is found in the product line’s name; 
that is, its multifunctional capabilities. The 6500 system 


6500 PC includes built-in connectivity to the 6544 control- 
ler. The AT&T 6300 and 6300 Plus PCs, IBM PC, PC XT, 
and PC AT, and IBM-compatible PCs can be added to a 
6500 cluster via the Single Session Attachmate Adapter. 
The adapter consists of a plug-in feature card and support- 
ing software; one adapter is required for each PC on the 
system. 

The AT&T Multifunction Communication System may be 
connected to a variety of host computers, including the 
IBM S/360, S/370, 3031, 3032, 3033, 3081, 3083, 3084, 
4321, 4331, and 4341. The 6500 system is also supported, 
with the appropriate software, for use with the IBM 8100, 
Series/1, System/36, and System/38. In addition to the 
IBM synchronous hosts, the 6500 system is supported for 
connection to IBM plug-compatible mainframes (PCMs) 
from vendors such as Amdahl, Control Data, IPL, National 
Advanced Systems, and Magnuson. Asynchronous comput- 
ers that may be accessed include the AT&T 3B family and 
Unix PC, the Digital VAX, and most other popular mini- 
computer families. AT&T 6500 system displays and print- 
ers are connected to the 6544 controller via twisted-pair 
telephone wire (compatible with AT&T’s Premises Distri- 
bution System). Communication over previously installed 
coaxial cable is possible with the addition of optional 
adapters. 

TRANSMISSION SPECIFICATIONS 

When communicating with synchronous host computers, the 
6500 system provides maximum data rates of 64K bps for 
hosts running under SNA and X.25 protocols, and 19,200 
bps for hosts running under BSC protocols. Up to three 
synchronous hosts may be accessed via the Synchronous 
Host Module; a maximum of two of the hosts can be running 
under SNA. When communicating with asynchronous com- 
puters, the 6500 system provides for a maximum data rate of 
19,200 bps; 1 to 16 asynchronous hosts may be accessed. 
Devices can be connected up to 5,000 feet from the 6544 
controller. 

DEVICE CONTROL 

For synchronous operation, the 6544 Multifunction Com- 
munication Controller provides support for the 6518 Basic 
Function Display, 6528 and 6529 Standard Displays, and 
the 6538 and 6539 Multitasking Displays. The 6518 display 
provides support for a single synchronous session; it does 
not support asynchronous operation. The 6528 and 6529 
displays feature a split screen capability that can display 
one synchronous and one asynchronous session simulta- 
neously, with “hot key” switching between sessions. One 
session of each type is supported. The 6538 and 6539 
displays provide up to four concurrent multitasking win- 
dows, in any combination of synchronous and asynchronous 
sessions. Data can be transferred from window to window. In 
asynchronous mode, the 6528, 6529, 6538, and 6539 emu- 
late the Digital VT220 display terminal. In synchronous 
mode, the 6518 is compatible with the IBM 3178; the 6528 is 
compatible with the IBM 3178 and 3180; the 6529 is 
compatible with the IBM 3179; the 6538 is compatible with 
the IBM 3180; and the 6539 is compatible with the 
IBM 3279-S3G. 

Peer-to-peer messaging is a standard feature on all 6500 
system displays. Users can send messages to other selected 
users, or broadcast messages to all users via the 6544 
controller. A keystroke record and playback feature is also 
standard. With this feature, users can store commonly used 
characters and commands, allowing them to execute com- 
plex operations with a single keystroke. 

Personal computing capabilities can be added to a 6500 
system cluster in either of two ways. First, AT&T has 


APRIL 1986 


© 1986 DATAPRO RESEARCH CORPORATION, DELRAN, NJ 08075 USA 
REPRODUCTION PROHIBITED 



C25-046-504 

Terminals 

AT&T Multifunction Communication System 


Asynchronous Processors 


Synchronous Processors 


Desktop 

Processors 


Departmental 

Processors 


Divisional 

Processors 


Engineering 



Corporate 
Mainframe #1 


Corporate 
Mainframe #2 


West Coast 

Regional 

Computer 


Printers 


Figure 1. The AT&T Multifunction Communication System provides access to a variety of host computers, both synchronous and 
asynchronous. 


provides multi-host access, both to asynchronous and syn- 
chronous computer systems. In addition, a 6500 configura- 
tion can include color and monochrome multitasking 
displays, personal computers, printers, and older 
AT&T 4540 and E4540 displays. AT&T’s 6500 display 
terminals offer a variety of features and capabilities not 
found on previous AT&T displays. Particularly interesting 
are the 6538 monochrome and 6539 color multitasking 
displays, which can offer up to four multitasking windows 
that provide simultaneous access to four distinct computer 
sessions, in any combination of synchronous and asynchro- 
nous applications. Currently, IBM offers this capability 
only on its 3270-PC, which is roughly three times the cost 
of the 6539. AT&T has also introduced its version of the 
3270-PC, the 6500 PC; like the 3270-PC, the 6500 PC offers 
four host sessions, two note pads, and one PC session, for a 
total of seven user-configurable windows. 

The key to the multifunctional capabilities of the 6500 
system is the 6544 controller. The 6544 can operate as a 
standard IBM 3274-type controller; it can also be upgraded, 
via add-on modules, to provide support for three synchro- 


introduced the 6500 PC, which is functionally equivalent to 
the IBM 3270-PC. The 6500 PC provides four host ses- 
sions, two note pads, and one PC session, for a total of seven 
user-configurable windows. Personal computing can also be 
added to the 6500 system via the Single Session Attachmate 
option, which supports the attachment of the AT&T 6300 
and 6300 Plus PCs, as well as the IBM PC, PC XT, PC AT, 
and other IBM-compatible PCs. The Single Session Attach- 
mate option is compatible with DCA’s Irma product, and 
consists of a feature card (which plugs into an expansion slot 
on the PC) and software. 


COMPONENTS 

6544 MULTIFUNCTION COMMUNICATION CON- 
TROLLER: The 6544 controller supports up to three syn- 
chronous hosts, 32 synchronous devices, and 16 asynchro- 
nous devices or hosts, depending on how it is configured. 
Connection of devices to the 6544 is via SSI (AT&T Stan- 
dard Serial Interface) unshielded twisted-pair wire, compat- 
ible with the AT&T Premises Distribution System (PDS). 
Devices can be located up to 5,000 feet from the controller. 
For users with coaxial cable already installed, coaxial 
adapters are available to connect devices to the 6544 via 
coax. The basic 6544 contains a Main Processor Module, a 
diskette drive for loading software, and 14 module slots, 12 


© 1986 DATAPRO RESEARCH CORPORATION, DELRAN, NJ 08075 USA 
REPRODUCTION PROHIBITED 


APRIL 1986 












AT&T Multifunction Connmunication System 


C25-046-505 

Terminals 


nous host communication ports, one high-speed (64,000 
bps) synchronous port, eight asynchronous hosts and ter- 
minals, and X.25 networks. The 6544 controller contains 
12 available module slots, and can be expanded as the 
user’s communications requirements grow. A major bene- 
fit of the 6500 system, though, is its ability to access both 
synchronous and asynchronous hosts from a single termi- 
nal. This is a benefit currently found only with Lee Data’s 
Series 400 product line. Users have eagerly awaited IBM’s 
introduction of a new-generation 3274 controller, with 
many of the same capabilities found on the 6544; AT&T 
has beaten IBM to the punch this time. 

The 6500 system puts AT&T on a strong competitive level 
in the 3270 market. However, in a market dominated so 
long by IBM, AT&T is still in a position of scrambling for 
market share. □ 

of which are available for add-on expansion modules. The 
basic 6544 configuration provides access to a single synchro- 
nous host computer via a single 6500 system display. Add- 
on expansion modules are available to provide additional 
multifunctional features. The following expansion modules 
are available. 

Synchronous Host Module — an add-on expansion module 
that provides simultaneous access to more than one synchro- 
nous host. Up to three Synchronous Host Modules are 
supported. The Synchronous Host Module supports three 
communications ports at a maximum or aggregate speed of 
38.4K bps, operating with BSC, SNA (two maximum), or a 
combination of the two. The Synchronous Host Module can 
also be used to support one SNA port operating at 56K or 
64K bps. When using these higher speeds, only one port 
card may be used. If support for two SNA hosts operating at 
higher speeds is required, two Synchronous Host Modules 
are needed. 

Synchronous Device Interface Module — an add-on expan- 
sion module that provides for the attachment of up to 16 
synchronous displays, printers, and personal computers via 
twisted-pair wire. Two Synchronous Device Interface Mod- 
ules can be accommodated, providing for a maximum config- 
uration of 32 synchronous devices. 

Asynchronous Host /Protocol Conversion Module — an add- 
on expansion module that provides port connections for up 
to eight asynchronous host computers or terminals. Protocol 
conversion allows asynchronous terminals to access syn- 
chronous hosts. The ports operate at speeds up to 19,200 
bps. Two Asynchronous Host/Protocol Conversion Mod- 
ules can be accommodated, providing for a maximum config- 
uration of 16 asynchronous connections. 

X25 Interface Module — an add-on expansion module that 
provides one connector for IBM-compatible hosts support- 
ing the Network Control Program Packet Switched Inter- 
face (NPSI) protocols. The connector can be optioned for 
either of the following interfaces: RS-232-C at speeds up to 
19,200 bps, or CCITT V.35 at speeds of 48,000, 56,000, or 
64,000 bps. 

Self-test diagnostics are standard on the 6544 controller. In 
addition, the 6544 supports two IBM network programs that 
reside on host computers: Network Problem Determination 
Application (NPDA) and Network Logical Data Manager 
(NLDM). 

6518 BASIC FUNCTION DISPLAY: A display that can be 
used to access synchronous hosts only. The 6518 includes a 
12-inch display screen, with a display capacity of 1,920 


characters arranged in 24 lines of 80 characters each. The 
display screen contains tilt/swivel capability. Amber or 
green phosphor characters are available. The 6518 is func- 
tionally compatible with the IBM 3178 display station; it 
can connect only to the 6544 controller. 

6528 STANDARD DISPLAY: A monochrome display that 
provides a split screen function, for the simultaneous view- 
ing of one synchronous session and one asynchronous ses- 
sion. Only one session of each type is supported, with “hot 
key” switching between sessions. The 6528 includes a 15- 
inch display screen, with display capacities ranging from 
1,920 to 3,564 characters; screen arrangements include 24 
lines by 80 characters, 32 lines by 80 characters, 43 lines by 
80 characters, and 27 lines by 132 characters. The display 
screen contains tilt/swivel capability. Amber or green phos- 
phor characters are available. The 6528 is functionally 
compatible with the IBM 3180 display station in synchro- 
nous mode, and with the Digital VT220 display terminal in 
asynchronous mode. It can be connected only to the 6544 
controller. 

6529 STANDARD DISPLAY: A color display that pro- 
vides a split screen function, for the simultaneous viewing of 
one synchronous session and one asynchronous session. 
Only one session of each type is supported, with “hot key” 
switching between sessions, and “change host” capability 
via command line. The 6529 includes a 14-inch display 
screen, with display capacities ranging from 1,920 to 3,564 
characters; screen arrangements include 24 lines by 80 
characters, 32 lines by 80 characters, 43 lines by 80 charac- 
ters, and 27 lines by 132 characters. The display screen 
contains tilt/swivel capability. The 6529 features 4- or 7- 
color display capability. It is functionally compatible with 
the IBM 3179 display station in synchronous mode, and 
with the Digital VT220 display terminal in asynchronous 
mode. The 6529 can be connected only to the 6544 
controller. 

6538 MULTITASKING DISPLAY: A monochrome dis- 
play that provides up to four multitasking windows, in any 
combination of synchronous and asynchronous sessions. 
Window positioning/browsing/sizing speed is 4 inches per 
second horizontal, and 6 inches per second vertical. The 

6538 includes a 15-inch display screen, with display capaci- 
ties ranging from 1,920 to 3,564 characters; screen arrange- 
ments include 24 lines by 80 characters, 32 lines by 80 
characters, 43 lines by 80 characters, and 27 lines by 132 
characters. The display screen contains tilt/swivel capabili- 
ty. Amber or green phosphor characters are available. Four 
screen formats are available, including 3270 operation, 
VT220 operation, full extended attributing, and input and 
edit. An auxiliary I/O port and programmed symbol graph- 
ics are optionally available. The 6538 is functionally com- 
patible with the IBM 3180 display station in synchronous 
mode, and with the Digital VT220 display terminal in 
asynchronous mode. The 6538 can be connected only to the 
6544 controller. 

6539 MULTITASKING DISPLAY: A color display that 
provides up to four multitasking windows, in any combina- 
tion of synchronous and asynchronous sessions. Window 
positioning/browsing/sizing speed is 4 inches per second 
horizontal, and 6 inches per second vertical. The 6539 
includes a 14-inch display screen, with display capacities 
ranging from 1,920 to 3,564 characters; screen arrange- 
ments include 24 lines by 80 characters, 32 lines by 80 
characters, 43 lines by 80 characters, and 27 lines by 132 
characters. The display screen contains tilt/swivel capabili- 
ty. The 6539 features 4- or 7-color display capability. Four 
screen formats are available, including 3270 operation, 
YT220 operation, full extended attributing, and input and 
edit. An auxiliary I/O port and programmed symbol graph- 
ics are optionally available. The 6539 is functionally com- 
patible with the IBM 3279-S3G display station in synchro- 


APBIL 1986 


© 1986 OATAPRO RESEARCH CORPORATION, DELRAN. NJ 08076 USA 
REPRODUCTION PROHIilTED 



C25-046-506 

Terminals 


AT&T Multifunction Communication System 


nous mode, and with the Digital YT220 display terminal in 
asynchronous mode. The 6539 can be connected only to the 
6544 controller. 

The 6528, 6529, 6538, and 6539 displays are modularly 
designed, and can be upgraded or downgraded by switching 
logic bases and display monitors. 

6500 PC: The 6500 PC is a personal computer that is 
functionally equivalent to the IBM 3270-PC. The 6500 PC 
offers four host sessions, two note pads, and one PC session, 
for a total of seven user-configurable windows. The 6500 PC 
includes a high-resolution display screen, and connects to 
the 6544 controller. 

6518 KEYBOARDS: The 6518 display can be configured 
with either of two available keyboards. One keyboard con- 
tains 87 keys, with an external numeric pad and 12 function 
keys; the second keyboard contains 99 keys, with 24 exter- 
nal program function (PF) keys. The keyboard has a type- 
writer-style key layout, a low-profile design, and is detach- 
able. Security keylock is a standard feature. 

6528/6529/6538/6539/6500 PC KEYBOARD: The 6528/ 
6529 Standard Displays, 6538/6539 Multitasking Displays, 
and 6500 PC are equipped with a 122-key keyboard that 
includes 24 program function (PF) keys and a VT220 tem- 
plate. The keyboard contains a typewriter-style key layout, a 
low-profile design, and is detachable. Security keylock is a 
standard feature. 

SINGLE SESSION ATTACHMATE ADAPTER: A PC 
adapter that allows the AT&T 6300 and 6300 Plus, IBM 
Personal Computer, PC XT, and PC AT, and other PCs 
running the MS-DOS operating system to function as a 
workstation on the 6500 system. The Single Session Attach- 
mate Adapter consists of a feature card that plugs into an 
expansion slot on the PC, and supporting software. It pro- 
vides CMS, TSO, and IBM file transfer as well as IBM 
API. The adapter is compatible with the Irma board from 
DCA, and is supplied via an OEM agreement with Attach- 
mate Corporation (Bellevue, WA). 

6571 COLOR MATRIX PRINTER: The 6571 is a matrix 
printer that provides color or monochrome text and graphics 
printing. The 6571 operates at speeds up to 400 cps in draft 
mode, and 100 cps in near letter-quality mode. Programmed 
symbol graphics can be printed; 1-, 4-, or 7-color printing is 
supported. The 6571 includes a full-function SNA control 
panel and LCD display. An operator-replaceable 18-wire 
printhead, with half-dot shift, is utilized. A tractor or fric- 


tion feed platen, with rear or bottom feed, can be used. Paper 
feed/positioning controls are also included. 

6561 PRINTER CONTROLLER: The 6561 is a printer 
controller that enables the use of older AT&T 4540 and 
E4540 printers in a 6500 system cluster. The 6561 adds new 
functions and applications to the older printers. The 6561 
includes a full-function SNA control panel, LCD display, 
and the following interfaces: SSI (twisted pair) in, SSI out, 
RS-232-C out, and Centronics parallel out. 

PRICING/SUPPORT 

The 6500 Multifunction Communication System compo- 
nents are available for purchase and lease, via AT&T’s 
direct sales force, or by calling (800) 247-1212. Installation 
and maintenance service is provided by the AT&T Informa- 
tion Systems Service Organization, located at 1,000 sites 
nationwide. 

The 6500 Multifunction Communication System products 
carry a 90-day warranty from the date of purchase. AT&T 
Information Systems will replace any defective part or soft- 
ware free of charge during the warranty period. AT&T oilers 
several Equipment Maintenance Agreement Plans, includ- 
ing per-occurence and contract plans. 

The following price list includes single-quantity purchase 
prices for various 6500 system products. As of press time, 
prices for some 6500 system products had not yet been set. 
For those prices, and for volume pricing, contact AT&T 
Information Systems. 

EQUIPMENT PRICES 


Purchase 

Price 

($) 


6544 Multifunction Communication Controller 7,880 

Synchronous Host Module 2,400 

Synchronous Device Interface Module 3,920 

Asynchronous Host/Protocol Conversion Module 2,215 

X.25 Interface Module 3,510 

6528 Standard Display 1 ,950 

6529 Standard Display 2,195 

6538 Multitasking Display 2,645 

6539 Multitasking Display 2,895 

656 1 Printer Controller 915B 


© 1986 DATAPRO RESEARCH CORPORATION, DELRAN, NJ 08075 USA 
REPRODUCTION PROHIBITED 


APRIL 1986 



C25-046-701 

Terminals 


AT&T Personal Terminal Model 510 


MANAGEMENT SUMMARY 

AT&T’s entry in the integrated voice/data terminal (IV DT) 
market is the Personal Terminal Model 510, introduced in 
March 1985. Designed for use with the AT&T System 75 
and System 85 PABXs, the Model 510 includes a 9-inch 
display, integral telephone handset, speakerphone for 
hands-free operation, autodialer, built-iii calculator and 
calendar, and a telephone directory with 100 listings (up to 
200 listings with the optional Directory Cartridge). Data 
capabilities, available via an integrated digital data mod- 
ule, include character and block mode transmission at 
speeds up to 19,200 bps, 2 pages of data memory, 
40/80/132 column modes, and multiple screen windows. 
Simultaneous voice and data transmission is possible over 
one physical line to the PABX. 

The features mentioned above can be found on most 
IVDTs on the market today; the Personal Terminal Model 
510, however, is a unique product. With the Model 510, 
AT&T has introduced the first IVDT with touch-sensitive 
screen capabilities. The Workstation Design Group of 
AT&T Information Systems Laboratories has designed and 
patented a “soft” touch-sensitive screen for the Model 510. 
The soft screen utilizes a silicon gel, giving the screen a 
softer, more cushiony feel. The user is actually provided 
with tactile feedback when the screen is touched, unlike 
many other “hard” touch-sensitive screens. Targets on the 
screen, represented by circles, provide the user with a menu 
of choices or functions. When a target is touched, the circles 



The AT&T Personal Terminal Model 510 is an integrated 
voice/data terminal (IVDT) equipped with a touch-sensitive 
screen. Designed for use in conjunction with the AT&T Sys- 
tem 75 and System 85 PABXs, the Model 510 provides one- 
touch access to voice and data functions. 


AT&T Information Systems' Personal Ter- 
minal Model 510 is an integrated voice/data 
terminal designed for use with the AT&T 
System 75 and System 85 PABXs. The 
Model 510 includes a patented ''soft" 
touch-sensitive display screen, for one- 
touch access to voice and data features; a 
retractable alphanumeric keyboard is op- 
tional. Standard features of the Model 510 
include a 9-inch display, integral telephone 
handset, built-in speakerphone, and a tele- 
phone dial pad. 

MODELS; Personal Terminal Model 510. 
DISPLAY: The Model 510 features a 9-inch 
display screen with a 27-line by 80-column 
display format as standard; 40- , 80-, and 
132-column display modes are selectable. 
The screen is touch-sensitive, using a pat- 
ented "soft" touch technique that provides 
the user with tactile feedback. 

KEYBOARD: Voice and data features are ac- 
tivated through the touch-sensitive screen. 
A 72-key alphanumeric keyboard is optional- 
ly available. 

INTEGRATED HANDSET: An Integrated 
telephone R-handset is located to the left of 
the display; a built-in speakerphone and 
telephone dial pad are also included. 
COMPETITION: Northern Telecom Display- 
phone; Rolm Cypress; GTE XT300E Action- 
Station; InteCom/Wang Keystone; ITT 
Telecom InfoStation; Mitel SuperStation; 
Ambi AmbiSet; and others. 

PRICE; The Personal Terminal Model 510 is 
priced at $1 ,795; the optional keyboard is 
$ 100 . 


CHARACTERISTICS 

MANUFACTURER: AT&T Information Systems, 1 
Speedwell Avenue, Morristown, NJ 07960. Telephone (201) 
898-2000. 

IN CANADA: AT&T Canada, 1500 Don Mills Road, On- 
tario M3B 3K4. Telephone (416) 449-4300. 

MODELS: Personal Terminal Model 510. 

DATE ANNOUNCED: March 1985. 

DATE FIRST INSTALLED: May 1985. 

NUMBER INSTALLED TO DATE: Contact vendor. 

MODELS 

The Personal Terminal Model 510 is available in digital 
(510D) and analog (510A) versions. Standard features in- 


MAY 1986 


© 1986 DATAPRO RESEARCH CORPORATION, DELRAN, NJ 08075 USA 
REPRODUCTION PROHIBITED 




C25-046 702 
Terminals 


AT&T Personal Terminal Model 510 


are transformed into squares, additionally providing the 
user with visual feedback. This visual and tactile feedback 
reduces the possibility of input errors on the Model 510’s 
screen. 

In phone mode, the targets on the screen allow the user to 
select lines (from among 4 line appearances), activate 
features such as conference calls, transfer, hold, and drop, 
retrieve phone messages, provide notification of other mes- 
sages such as electronic mail, and dial a number from the 
100-listing local directory^ The Model 510 provides one- 
touch access to all System 75/85 PABX Unified Messaging 
services via an on-screen 40-character display. In data 
mode, the targets on the screen provide for one-touch auto 
log-in to data bases such as Dow Jones. A time manager 
and on-screen calculator are also included. 

For extensive data applications, users may configure the 
Personal Terminal Model 510 with an optional alphanu- 
meric keyboard. The keyboard includes 72 keys, including 
eight function keys, cursor control keys, and a “Dial It” key 
that provides the same one-touch telephone dialing as the 
touch screen. The keyboard has a low-profile design, and 
retracts into the terminal’s base when not in use. The data 
capabilities of the Model 510 are stored in an asynchronous 
integrated digital data module within the terminal, and can 
be accessed through the touch screen or the keyboard. The 
Model 510 can transmit asynchronous data in character 
and block modes, at speeds up to 19,200 bps. Other stan- 
dard data functions include horizontal/smooth scrolling, 
multiple display windows, 2 pages of data memory, and 
protected fields/forms support. 

Each Personal Terminal Model 510 is equipped with a 
software cartridge that provides the user with an introduc- 
tion to the Model 510 and training in its use. Two optional 
software cartridges are also available. The Directory Car- 
tridge doubles the capacity of the local directory (from 100 
listings to 200), or it can be used to back-up the local 
directory; the Security Cartridge performs the function of a 
software lock to prevent unauthorized access to the 
terminal. 

COMPETITIVE POSITION 

Despite predictions of rapid growth at its outset, the market 
for integrated voice/data terminals (I VDTs) remains slow- 
moving and only marginally successful. A number of rea- 
sons for the disappointing performance of this market have 
been proferred, including the lack of concrete applications 
for the devices and the targeting of the executive segment as 
the prime users of I VDTs. Whatever the reasons, many 
companies who founded their businesses on the premise 
that the IVDT market would be a lucrative one have run 
into financial difficulties. 

The most successful of the IVDT vendors have been the 
PABX makers. Northern Telecom, which founded the 
IVDT market with the introduction of the Displayphone in 
1981, has done reasonably well with the product, selling it 
in conjunction with their highly successful SL-1 PABX 
product. Likewise, telecommunications vendors such as 


elude a 9-inch touch-sensitive display screen; telephone 
handset with 7-foot connecting cord; built-in speakerphone 
with on/off button and volume control; telephone dialing 
pad, phone button, privacy button, and microphone on/ofF 
button; message waiting lamp; software cartridge port; and 
Centronics-compatible parallel printer port. A 72-key, low- 
profile alphanumeric keyboard is optionally available. The 
keyboard is retractable, and can be stowed in the terminal’s 
housing when not in use. The Model 510 is a compact device, 
with dimensions of IIV2 inches high, 1378 inches wide, and 
14V8 inches deep, and a weight of I8V2 pounds (without the 
optional keyboard). Optional software cartridges for direc- 
tory expansion and security functions are available. For data 
applications, the Model 510 conforms to the ANSI X3.64 
standard for command codes. 

TRANSMISSION SPECIFICATIONS 

The AT&T Personal Terminal Model 510 provides four line 
appearances plus a dedicated data line. Voice and data may 
be simultaneously transmitted over a single line to the 
AT&T System 75 or System 85 PABX. An asynchronous 
integrated digital data module provides for asynchronous 
data transmission over the PABX, in character or block 
modes, half- or full-duplex, at speeds from 300 to 19,200 
bps. Parity checking is provided, along with flow control and 
answerback. A Centronics-compatible parallel printer port 
is included. 

The Personal Terminal Model 510D must be plugged into a 
110-120 V outlet. The digital voice terminal is connected via 
a standard 8-position modular jack for connection to AT&T 
System 75 or System 85 Digital Communications Protocol. 
The telephone handset is connected via a standard 4-pin 
modular jack. The optional alphanumeric keyboard is con- 
nected via an 8-wire keyboard jack in the rear of the unit. 
The Personal Terminal Model 510A provides two modular 
jack connections for analog lines. 

/or mote information on the AT&T Information Systems^ 
System 85, see Report TC07-070NV-101, For more informa- 
tion on the AT&T Information Systems, System 75, see 
Report TC07-070NV-30L 

DATA FEATURES 

An integral digital data module provides the Personal Ter- 
minal Model 510 with data terminal capabilities. In data 
mode, the Model 510 conforms with the ANSI X3.64 stan- 
dards for command code compatibility. The Model 510 is 
also compatible with the older AT&T 513 BCT. The Model 
510 provides for both character and block mode 
transmission. 

Using the touch screen, one- or two-touch access to the 
following data features is available: communications with 
System 75 or System 85 applications processors; access to 
resident services such as Message Center and Electronic 
Document Communication; and links to public data bases 
for access to stock prices, financial reports, and newswires. 
In data mode, an on-screen keyboard is provided, with touch 
targets for the simplification of data entry and retrieval. 
One-touch access to on-line data bases is also provided via 
the touch screen. 

For more intensive data applications, users can optionally 
add an alphanumeric keyboard to the Model 510. Automatic 
log-in is provided to AT&T processors and other UNIX- 
based processors. 

Standard data features include 2 pages of data memory; 
vertical/horizontal smooth scrolling; visual attributes in- 
cluding underline, blank, reverse video, and half-intensity; 
multiple screen windows; 40/80/132-column display modes; 


© 1986 DATAPRO RESEARCH CORPORATION, DELRAN, NJ 08075 USA 
REPRODUCTION PROHIBITED 


MAY 1986 



C25-046-703 

Terminals 


AT&T Personal Terminal Model 510 


AT&T, Rolm, InteCom (in a joint venture with Wang), 
Mitel, GTE, and ITT Telecom have all introduced IVDTs 
as an add-on device for their PABX lines. It is primarily 
these vendors who have found, at least for now, a viable 
market for these products. 

AT&T has unveiled a number of IVDTs for use with their 
PABX systems, including the Dimension, System 85, and 
System 75. These include the 5 1 5 BCT, an intelligent IVDT 
that could be downloaded to emulate a number of different 
ASCII terminals. However, the Personal Terminal Model 
5 10 is technologically superior to these earlier IVDT prod- 
ucts. The Model 510’s touch-screen capability makes it the 
first IVDT on the market to utilize this technology. With 
the number of features that most IVDTs are designed to 
access via a single keystroke, the implementation of a touch 
screen for this type of device is a logical and smart step. In 
fact, it would seem that touch-sensitive screens are ideal for 
the types of applications for which IVDTs are designed. We 
feel that the Personal Terminal Model 5 10 will carve itself a 
respectable niche in this marketplace, not only because of 
the strength of AT&T, but also due to its technological 
advantages. 

ADVANTAGES AND RESTRICTIONS 

As we have just mentioned, the most attractive feature of 
the Model 510 is its touch-sensitive screen. AT&T has 
patented the screen used on the Model 510; it is a “soft” 
touch screen, that provides improved tactile feedback over 
most conventional touch screens available today. The 
screen implements a silicon gel that gives the screen a soft, 
cushiony feeling. When a target is pressed, the screen 
actually gives, providing the user with positive tactile 
feedback. In addition, visual feedback is supplied; the 
targets, when they are touched, change from circles to 
squares. These 2 features virtually eliminate the chance for 
an input error using the touch screen. The screen is also 
designed so that it will not go out of alignment. Unlike 
other touch screens, that use a separate grid of light beams 
on top of the screen, the Model 510’s screen uses the light 
from the gun that paints the screen. 

For ease of use, the Model 510 is unmatched by any other 
comparable product. When the “Phone” button on the 
terminal console is depressed, the phone mode screen 
appears. The phone mode screen includes 4 line appear- 
ances, each of which is activated by touch. Status displays 
tell the user if a line is idle, active, or on hold. Also 
displayed are messaging functions, targets for programma- 
ble System 75/85 features, and 8 touch blocks that provide 
menus for additional functions. Three of these blocks 
provide access to the local directory, time manager, and 
calculator. 

For data functions, the screen provides one-touch access to 
private and public data bases. For more intensive data 
applications, an optional keyboard is available. Additional 
software cartridges provide the Model 510 with training 
courses for new users, additional directory space, and 
security features. 


protected field/forms support; and separate user- and host- 
programmable screen labels. 

VOICE FEATURES 

The voice features on the Personal Terminal Model 510 may 
be used in the traditional manner, or via the touch screen. 
For traditional use, a telephone dial pad is provided on the 
terminal console. The integral handset may he used; for 
hands-free operation, the speakerphone button activates the 
built-in speakerphone. The microphone on/off button pro- 
vides the caller with privacy. 

For touch screen operation, the user presses the phone 
button on the console. The screen is then activated, provid- 
ing the user with a menu of operations which are activated by 
touching a “target,” or touchpoint, on the screen. The target 
apperas as a circle; once pressed, the circle becomes a 
square, providing the user with visual confirmation that the 
target has been pressed and its associated function 
activated. 

The activated touch screen has 4 distinct parts. The top part 
of the screen provides the 4 telephone line appearances; the 
state of the line (idle, active, or hold) is displayed by a status 
message next to the line display. Calls from and to individ- 
uals within the company are also identified. To the right of 
the line appearances, displays provide call notifications and 
preset time alarms. Below that are touch targets for Confer- 
ence, Transfer, Drop, and Hold functions. 

The second section of the screen provides the messaging 
functions. When the Message Waiting lamp on the terminal 
console lights, the user can retrieve the message by touching 
a target on the screen. With Unified Messaging (available 
on the System 75/85), this includes all items addressed to 
the user’s electronic mailbox via Message Center Service, 
AUDIX, Electronic Document Communication, and Leave 
Word Calling. 

Below the messaging section are 9 touch targets that may be 
programmed for any System 75 or System 85 application 
desired. 

At the bottom of the screen are 8 menu blocks, that generate 
menus for additional Model 510 functions. These include 3 
resident services: 

• Time Manager — maintains a list of daily objectives and 
acts as a personal reminder system, with audible alarms; 

• Calculator — converts the screen to a calculator for mathe- 
matical calculations; and 

• Local Directory — maintains a personal list of up to 100 
names, addresses, and telephone numbers, or automatic 
log-ins to data bases. Numbers from the local directory 
can be dialed via a single touch of the target beside the 
name displayed on the screen. 

Two optional software cartridges are available to plug into 
the Model 510. The Directory Cartridge doubles the number 
of listings in the local directory from 100 to 200; it can also 
serve as a backup device, for the copying of an entire 
directory, specified directory group, or the Time Manager 
service. The Security Cartridge performs the function of a 
software lock to prevent unauthorized access to the terminal 
and its functions. An electronic serial number from the 
cartridge is stored in the terminal; to change the password, 
the user must insert the security cartridge with the same 
electronic serial number. On-screen privacy is provided by 
the privacy button; when it is depressed, the entire screen is 
blanked. 


MAY 1986 


© 1986 DATAPRO RESEARCH CORPORATION, DELRAN, NJ 08075 USA 
REPRODUCTION PROHIBITED 



C25-046-704 

Terminals 


AT&T Personal Terminal Model 510 


As an IVDT product, the Personal Terminal Model 510 is a 
functional and easy-to-use addition to a System 75 or 
System 85 PABX. The only drawback of the device, or of 
AT&T’s IVDT product line, is the lack of local processing 
capabilities (such as those found on the Rolm Cedar). Look 
for AT&T to introduce a PC-compatible IVDT (possibly 
based on the 6300 PC) in the near future. □ 


► COMPONENTS 

CRT DISPLAY UNIT: The Personal Terminal Model 510 
includes a 9-inch (diagonally measured) display screen. The 
display format is 27 lines of 80 characters each; separate 
user- and host-programmable screen labels are displayed at 
the bottom of the screen. Characters are displayed in green 
phosphor on a black background, and formed using a 6-by- 
10 dot matrix in an 8-by-12 dot cell. Visual attributes 
available include underline, blink, half-intensity, and re- 
verse video. A 256-character set is displayable. 

The Personal Terminal Model 510’’s display screen is touch- 
sensitive; both voice and data applications may be accessed 
via the touch screen. The screen provides a menu of func- 
tions in both phone and data modes. These functions are 
activated by touching a “target,” which is represented by a 
circle on the screen. The Model 510 has a patented “soft” 
screen; a silicon gel is used to give the screen a cushiony 
feeling. Thus, the user is provided with tactile feedback 
when using the screen. In addition, when a target is touched, 
the circle is transformed into a square, verifying that the 
target has been touched and the associated function 
accessed. 

HANDSET/SPEAKERPHONE: An integral telephone 
handset (R-handset) is located to the left of the display 
screen on the Model 510. A built-in speakerphone is located 
below the display screen, on the right-hand side of the 
display console. Speakerphone volume control is also 
included. 

UPPER KEYBOARD: Various keys are available on the 
display console of the Model 510. A standard 12-key tele- 


phone dial pad is located just to the right of the R-handset. 
Just above the dial pad are located the Phone button (which 
activates the phone mode screen display). Privacy button 
(that provides security by blanking the display), and Mes- 
sage lamp (which indicates that a message is waiting). 
l.ocated above the built-in speakerphone are the Speaker- 
phone On/Off button (which enables hands-free operation) 
and the Microphone On/Off button (mute). Lamps indicate 
the status of the speakerphone and microphone buttons. 

ALPHANUMERIC KEYBOARD: An alphanumeric key- 
board is optionally available for use with the Personal 
Terminal Model 510. The keyboard contains 72 keys in a 
typewriter-style layout, including cursor control keys, 8 
function keys, and a Dial It key, which allows for one-key 
dialing of numbers from the keyboard. The keyboard has a 
low-profile design, is detachable, and stows under the termi- 
nal console when not in use. 

PRICING 

The Personal Terminal Model 510 is available for purchase, 
only, through AT&T Information Systems’ direct sales; the 
customer has the option of installing the unit or contracting 
for installation with AT&T Information Systems. The Mod- 
el 510 carries a one-year warranty from the date of purchase; 
during the warranty period, AT&T-IS will replace any 
defective part free of charge. After the warranty period, 
AT&T-IS offers several Equipment Maintenance Agree- 
ment Plans, including both per-occurence and contract 
plans. For maintenance service, the AT&T Information 
Systems Service Organization can be contacted by calling 
1 (800) 922-0354. 

EQUIPMENT PRICES 

Purchase 

Price 

($) 


Personal Terminal Model 510 1,795 

Alphanumeric Keyboard 100 

Directory Cartridge 70 

Security Cartridge 50 ■ 


© 1986 DATAPRO RESEARCH CORPORATION, DELRAN, NJ 08075 USA 
REPRODUCTION PROHIBITED 


MAY 1986