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OOOOThe  Boston  Computer  Society 

SINCLAIR-TIMEX  USER  GROUP  NEWSLETTER 


Volume  3,  Issue  1 


GETTING  MORE  F'  Fc  O  M 
EACH  KEYSTRO K E 
by  Cliff  Danielson 

If  you  haven't  already  done 
so,  add  a  large  keyboard  to  your 
2X— SI  or  T/S  10GC!  The  external 
keyboard  will  greatly  improve,  not 
only  the  speed  and  accuracy  of 
data  entry,  but  also  your 
confidence  in  the  computer.  You 
may  either  purchase  a  new  keyboard 
designed  for  the  Sinclair  or 
modify  one  found  in  an  electronics 
junk  store.  The  junk  store 
approach  is  cheaper,  but  choose 
the  keyboard  carefully.  Select 
only  a  keyboard  with  metallic 
closure  switches  —  usually 
recognized  by  the  presence  of  only 
two  contacts  on  the  rear  of  each 
switch.  Make  sure  that  the 
previous  circuitry  is  exposed  such 
that  it  can  be  easily  removed  or 
modified.  Also,  choose  a  keyboard 
with  more  than  40. keys.  The  extra 
keys  can  be  used  to  add  new 
features . 

Wiring  of  the  salvage 
keyboard  is  easy.  There  are  eight 
address  lines  and  five  data  lines 
to  the  keyboard.  Each  address 
line  connects  with  the  anode  (the 
end  that  is  not  banded)  of  a  diode 
and  is  thus  easily  identified. 
Normally,  pressing  a  key  causes  a 
switch  closure  between  one  address 
uine  and  one  data  line.  Wire  each 
switch  of  the  new  keyboard  in 
parallel  with  the  corresponding 
switch  of  the  original  keyboard. 
This  can  be  done  by  duplicating 
the  circuit  on  the  Sinclair 
keyboard.  Now  for  those  extra 
keys . 

KEYSTROKES  oage  4 


January  1984 


DECEMBER 
M  X  CHI _ X  GHTS 

Boy  were  there  a  lot  of  Sinclair 
-Timex  Group  meetings  in 
December ! 

Because  of  some  confusion  in 
scheduling  and  co-ordination 
with  the  BCS  main  office  our 
group’s  general  meeting  was  held 
twice  last  month.  The  first  of 
the  two  was  on  Wednesday 
December  14. 

Sue  Mahoney  began  the  meeting 
with  some  opening  remarks  and 
presided  over  a  discussion  of 
the  state  of  the  Timex  Computer 
community  and  Timex  Corp’s 
marketing  strategy. 

This  was  followed  by  a 
demonstration  by  Sue  of  The 
Wordsinc  TS1000  Word  Processor. 
It  is  a  simple  but  useful  tool. 
Sue  indicated  that  she  was 
pleased  with  its  performance. 

Charles  Warner  of  Games  To  Learn 
By  (GTLB)  and  Marty  Warner  of 
Timex  were  there  to  tell  about 
their  resepctive  products. 

GTLB  demonstrated  a  couple  of 
its  educational  and  recreational 
game  programs.  Parti cul ar 1 y 
interesting  was  their  TS206B 

HIGHLIGHTS  Daae3 


1  O  REM 

Phew ! 

I  went  to  a  Sinclair- 
Time>:  meeting  on  three  out  o* 
the  -four  Wednesdays  last  month. 
What’s  kind  of  frightening  is  I 
enjoyed  it.  It  could  become 
habit  forming.  It’d  be  nice  but 
what  my  life  needs  right  now  is 
fewer  meetings  not  more. 

The  continueing  adventures  at 
Timex  Computer  Corp.  continue, 
sort  of.  A  good  source  within 
Timex  reports  that,  "The  Timex 
Computer  Corp.  is  no  longer." 

The  source  explains  that 
the  TCC  has  been  essentially 
dissolved  and  all  it’s  functions 
absorbed  into  the  Timex  parent 
corp.  With  the  departure  of  TCC 
Vice  President  Dan  Ross  the 
hierarchy  now  seems  to  be:  Timex 
VP  Kirk  Pond  in  charge  with 
three  more-or-l ess  equal 
leutenants:  Doug  Smith,  Bill 
Skirm,  and  Dick  Longc. 

Charles  Warner  of  Games 
to  Learn  By,  a  Timex  retailer, 
after  a  meeting  with  Timex 
higher-ups,  says  that  he  senses 
a  new,  positive  feeling  there. 
"I’m  very  encouraged  by  their 
new  atti tude. " 

Warner  says  Timex  told 
him  they  planned  to  start  moving 
forward  again.  That  they  had  a 
renewed  sense  of  the  value  of 
their  products  and  were  going  to 
start  promoting  them  more 
aggressi vel y. 

If  all  this  is  so,  then 
it’s  good. 

A  Final  Note: 

Listen,  don’t  blame  it 
on  the  Post  Office,  this 
newsletter  is  late  this  month 
for  other  reasons.  I’m  sure 
vou’ll  be  able  to  find  something 
else  to  blame  on  the  Post 
Office. 


OIhe 
Q  Boston 
O  Computer 
O  Society 

This  newsletter  is  produced  to 
inform  group  members  of  the 
agenda  and  logistics  of  future 
meetings,  as  well  as  to  recap 
and  amplify  the  information 
provided  at  the  meetings.  It 
also  provides  a  forum  for 
members  and  interested  parties 
to  communicate  what  thay  have 
learned  or  developed  relating  to 
Si ncl ai r  and  Timex  computing. 
Meetings  are  open  to  the  public 
(non-member  admission  is  $3); 
however  attendees  are  encouraged 
to  join  the  Boston  Computer 
Society  (BCS)  This  newsletter 
is  free  to  members.  Back  issues 
are  one  dollar  each. 

DIRECTIONS  TO  MEETING:  The  S-T 
User  Group  meets  in  the  Large 
Science  Audi tiorium  (Room  8/2/ 
009)  of  the  University  of 
Massachusetts,  Boston  Harbor 
Campus.  It  is  located  only  3 
miles  from  downtown  Boston  and 
easily  accessible  by  public  and 
private  transportation.  From 
the  north  or  west,  take  the 
Southeast  Expressway  to  Exit  17. 

Turn  left  onto  Columbia  Road. 
Follow  construction  signs  to  get 
to  Morrissey  Boulevard  in  the 
direction  of  UMASS  and  the 
Kennedy  Library.  Bear  right  on 
traffic  island,  get  in  the  right 
two  lanes,  following  UMass/ 
Boston  signs.  Turn  left  at  the 
light  into  Campus.  From  the 
south,  take  Morrissey  Boulevard 
northward  to  the  campus.  On  the 
MBTA,  take  the  Red  Line  (Ashmont 
Train)  to  Columbia  Station. 
Transfer  to  the  free  University 
shuttlebus  in  the  T  parking  lot. 


n\ 


The  Sinclair  Timex  User  Group 

Sue  Mahoney 
Di rector 
c/o  BCS  Office 
or  203-755-2699 

Jack  Hodgson 
Publ i sher/Edi tor 
P.0.  Box  526 
Cambridge,  MA  02238 
617-354-7899 

John  Kemeny 

User  Group  Correspondent 
284  Great  Road,  Apt.  D5 

Acton,  MA  01720 

Beth  Elliot 

Group  Librarian 

c/o  Sinclair  Research 

50  Stanif ord  Street 

Boston,  MA  02114 

617-742-4826 

A1 lan  Cohen 
Meeting  Coordinator 

617-961-3453 

Jeff  Parker 
Adverti sing  Manager 
c/o  P0  Box  526 
Cambridge,  MA  02238 
617-354-7899 

The  Si ncl ai r  Timex  Newsletter  is 
publ i shed  monthly  by  the 
Sinclair  Timex  User  Group  of  the 
Boston  Computer  Society. 
Membership  in  the  BCS  is  #24  per 
year  which  includes  a 
subscription  to  its  magaz i ne 
"The  Computer  Update"  and 
subscription  to  two  of  its  group 
newsletters  (such  as  this  one) . 

Advertising  space  is  avai 1 abl e 
in  this  pub 1 i cat i on  on  a 
limited,  first  com#  first  served 
basis.  The  rate  is  *60  per 
quarter  page .  At  this  time  no 
other  ad  sires  are  available. 

For  detailed  rate  and  discount 
information  contact  the 
Advertising  Manager  or  the 
Pub  1 l sher . 


HIGHLIGHTS  continued 

hi— res  drawing  and  painting 
program,  "Art  for  All  Ages". 

With  this  program  the  user  can 
create  all  sorts  of  high 
resolution  images  on  the  Timex 
Col  or  Computer.  These  images  can 
be  edited,  saved  and 
incorporated  into  other 
programs.  It  sells  for  *16.95. 
Call  GTLB  at  413-268-7505. 

In  addition  to  programs  from 
GTLB  we  were  shown  some  upcoming 
games  from  another  source.  We 
saw  "Cycle  Path",  a  motorcycle 
chase  game  with  terr i f i c 
animated  graphics;  "Crazy  Bugs", 
a  F'acMan  look-a-likes 
"Androids" ,  a  maze  adventure; 
and  cartridge  version  of  "FI ight 
Si mul ator " . 

Part  Two  of  the  December  Meeting 
was  held  the  foil owi ng  Wednesday 
downstairs  in  the  small  science 
auditorium.  Co-chairs  Will 
Stackman  and  Jack  Hodgson  met 
with  about  twenty  attendees  and 
demonstrated  Simulusion's 
"Marvelous  Music  Machine" 
reviewed  here  a  few  months  ago, 
and  the  British  Sinclair  ZX 
Spectrum  Computer,  the 
predecessor  of  the  TS2068. 


MACHINE  l_  «=*  fNi  <3  LJ  f-\  C5-  EE 
AND  HARDWARE  DESIGN 
SUB  —  C3  FC  O  U  F* 
by  Dick  Forsyth 

The  major  presentation  at  the 
December  meeting  of  the  Machine 
Code  sub-group  was  a 
demonstration  of  "Hot  Z"  bv  Jacl 
Hodgson.  A  complete  and  powerful 
editor  and  di ssassembl er  program 
for  machine  code  programmers. 

"Hot  Z"  most  impressed  this 
writer  with  its  ability  to 
single  step  through  a  program, 
displaying  the  status  of  the 
registers  and  flags  at  each 
step . 


continued  next  page 


continued  from  previous  page 

Two  candidates  -for  "Project 
Dazy"  were  presented,  dulv 
appreciated,  and  returned  -for 
modification.  "Project  Dazv"  is 
a  -forum  -for  the  presentation  of 
short  machine  language  displav 
programs  written  by  group 
members.  You  can  get  details  on 
participating  in  "Project  Dazy" 
from  group  leader  Bob  Heath. 

The  January  meeting  of  the 
machine  language  sub-group  tool 
place  as  usual  on  the  1st  monday 
of  the  month  at  Itek  Optical  in 
Lex i ngton . 

Bob  Heath  demonstrated  his  home 
budget  program.  Written 
entirely  in  machine  code,  it  is 
very  user  friendly,  with  well 
thought-out  prompts  and 
displays.  The  integer  arithmetic 
system  is  space  efficient  and 
allows  fast  cal cul ati ons.  I t  is 
an  impressive  effort. 

The  first  "dazy"  program  to  meet 
project  specif ications  was 
incorporated  into  the  overall 
program  and  tested.  Several 
modi f i cat ons  to  improve  program 
operation  were  made  in  an 
interesting  session. 

Thw  Machine  Language  and 
Hardware  Design  Sub-Group  meets 
on  the  first  Monday  of  the  month 
at  Itek  Optical  in  Lexington. 

For  details  and  directions  call 
Bob  Heath  davs  at  276-2424. 


are  explained.  The  first  uses 
only  passive  components,  namely 
diodes,  and  allows  EDIT, 

T"'  TJ'  T  ^  M7  ^  rn  \ i  ii  — p  ?  *  » *  /— « pi—  ^  j 

~  ~  ~  ,  Di’jr  ,  ,  r  U  w  1  j.  U  i\!  ,  aiiL  w 


uhe  Brit  is! 


version 


single  switch  closure.  The  second 
circuit  uses  active  components, 
but  can  generate  any  shifted 
function.  (Note  that  these 


circuits  are  not  new.  Two  years 
ago  they  were  discussed  during 
User  Group  meetings.  Henry  April 
expanded  upon  the  diode  approach 
to  also  allow  : ,  ; ,  ? ,  and  / . 

Henry  implemented  his  design  with 
the  E— Z  Key  keyboard.  The  active 
circuit  approach  was  first 
described  in  Syntax  in  March 
1981 .  ) 


The  circuit  for  the  diode 
approach  is  given  below.  The 


ft, 


Address 


"KH 


NEW 


a 


anode  of  two  diodes  is  connected 
to  an  extra  switch.  The  cathode 
end  of  one  diode  is  connected  with 
address  line  AS,  the  address  line 
going  to  the  shift  key,  and  the 
free  end  of  the  second  diode  is 
connected  to  the  address  line  for 
the  desired  function.  The  other 
side  of  the  switch  is  connected  to 
data  line  DO,  the  same  data  line 
as  are  the  shift  and  other 
possible  functions  for  the  diode 
approach . 


KEYSTROKES  continued 


With  the  addition  of  simple 
circuitry,  it  is  possible  to 
obtain  shifted  functions,  such  as 
EDIT  or  the  cursor  controls,  with 
a  single  keystroke.  Normally,  the 
shifted  functions  require  both  the 


shift  key  and 
be  depressed , 
requiring  two 
two  hands.  Tw 
the  single  key 


the  function  key  to 
an  operation 
fingers  —  really 
o  circuits  pro  v  i  d  n  c 
str o k e  canal i 1 i t v 


The  active  component  approach 
uses  two  chip  types:  the 
74LS125A,  tristate  buffer,  and  the 
74LS21,  dual  4- input  AND.  The 
number  of  chips  required  depends 
upon  the  number  of  function  keys 
implemented.  (Dave  Wood 
implemented  23  functions  with  10 
chips.*  Diode  logic  can  be  used, 
in  some  cases,  in  place  of  the 


V 


OT  (it'll 

Fu'.vC  HcfUS 


Fewer  to«o 
KeVi 


Normally,  the  buffer  is  in  an  high 
impedance  state  —  an  open  switch. 
When  a  level  signal,  such  as  a 

switch  closure  to  ground,  is 
applied  to  the  control  for  the 
buffer,  the  buffer  repeats  its 
input  signal  —  a  closed  switch, 
ihe  AND  is  used  to  detect  the 
closure  of  any  of  the  function 
switches  and  control  the  tristate 
suffer  corresponding  to  the  shift 
key.  Thus,  with  the  closure  of 
c**e  switch,  two  buffers  are 
enabled  and  the  computer  will 
sense  two  switch  closures. 


fA  BASIC 
bv  Dave  Wood 


ERASER 


The  -following  5-line  BASIC 
program  demonstrates  several 
useful  machine  language  concepts. 
One;  it  shows  the  idea  o-f 
entering  machine  code  as  decimal 
character  triplets,  which  are 
translated  into  decimal  numbers 
by  the  VAL  instruction  using 
three  characters  at  a  time.  Two: 
it  shows  the  use  o-f  the  print 


butter  at  16444  -for  temporary 
storage  of  a  short  machine  code 
program.  Three;  the  program 
itself  shows  the  application  of  a 
number  of  ROM  routines 

TFAST  (02E7h)  will  temporarily 
place  the  computer  in  FAST  mode. 
LINEADDR  (09D8h)  will  locate  the 
memory  address  of  a  BASIC  line, 
given  its  line  number  in  the  HL 
regi ster . 

ZAPDIF  (0A5Dh)  will  erase  memory 
from  where  HL  points  up  to,  but 
not  including,  where  DE  points. 
RMODE  (0207h)  will  return  the 
computer  to  the  original  mode  ( 
FAST  or  SLOW) . 

RST  8  goes  to  the  system  error 
return. 

This  BASIC/machi ne  code  program 
will  erase  a  block  of  BASIC 
program  extending  from  where  the 
cursor  is  pointing  to  the  end  of 
BASIC.  To  use  the  program,  simply 
set  the  cursor  and  enter  GOTO 
100.  By  using  the  error  exit  ( 
RST  8)  rather  than  return,  the 
erase  program  is  oblivious  to 
self  destruction  -  it  can  erase 
itself  with  no  ill  effects.  Do 
make  sure  that  line  100  is 
correct  before  you  run  it.  The 
string  should  contain  63 
characters  with  no  blanks. 

100  LET  X$=" 20523 10020420 10064 
2052 1 60092350420 1 20642050930 1 0 
205007002207255" 

110  FOR  1=0  TO  20 

120  POKE  16444  +  1,  VAL  X$  <3* 1  +  1 

TO  3* ( 1+1 ) ) 

130  NEXT  I 

140  RAND  USR  16444 


The  machine  code  in  statement  100: 


CD  E7  02  CALL  TFAST  Go  to  temporary  FAS7’ 

_A  0A  4o  LD  HL .  (E— F'F'C)  Fetch  line  no.  of  cursor 

CD  D8  09  CALL  LINEADDR  Get  address  of  that  line 

EB  EX  DE.HL  Move  addr.  to  DE 

2A  oC  40  LD  HL , (D-FILE)Get  addr.  past  BASIC  end 

CD  5D  0A  CALL  ZAPDIF  Erase  BASIC 

CD  07  02  CALL  RMODE  Return  to  original  mode 

EE  EST  9  Return  control  to  svstem: 

FF  DEFP  FF  and  provide  "0"  return  code 


WHAT  DO  YOU  WANT 
FOR  YOUR 


copyright  1983  IrvfoWorld 
reprinted  with  permission 


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Review:  Timex  2068 
Color  Computer 


BY  MICHAEL  WEISENBERG 

Contributor 

The  Timex/Sinclair  2068  Personal 
Color  Computer  resolves  many  of 
the  complaints  users  of  its  prede¬ 
cessors  —  specifically  the  T/S  1000  and 
T/S  1500  —  have  lodged.  It  has  real  keys; 
its  larger  size  is  easier  to  work  with;  it  has 
a  better  tape  interface;  it  even  has  an 
on/off  switch.  We  believe  that  this  ma¬ 
chine,  designed  to  compete  with  the 
Commodore  64  and  the  Radio  Shack  Color 
Computer  and  priced  at  under  $200,  offers 
many  desirable  features  usually  found  on 
more  expensive  machines. 

The  2068  is  a  more  convenient  size 
than  its  tiny  brothers,  measuring 
14V2  X  7V2  X  IV2  inches.  Its  keys  actually 
click  when  you  press  them  —  with  this 
machine,  you  can  touch-type. 

Instead  of  the  puny  2K  of  RAM  offered 
on  the  T/S  1000  and  the  16K  of  RAM  that 
comes  with  the  T/S  1500,  the  T/S  2068 
comes  with  a  respectable  48K  of  user 
memory  that,  according  to  the  company,  is 
expandable  by  bank  switching  to  16 
megabytes. 

Responding  to  complaints  from  users  of 
other  Timex  systems,  Timex  has  given  the 
T/S  2068  color.  The  user  can  select 
border,  background  and  character  colors. 

Graphics  were  primitive  on  the  two 
simpler  machines.  The  2068  can  address 
separately  any  of  512  X  192  pixels  and,  in 
its  Extended  Color  Mode,  give  each  row  of 
8  pixels  —  the  width  of  one  character  — 
its  own  color. 

Although  some  users  and  third-party 
vendors  have  devised  tricky  ways  of 
adding  sound  to  the  1000  and  1500,  the 
computers  are  not  designed  for  such 
usage.  The  2068  has  sound  capabilities 
that  make  it  rival  the  best  synthesizers, 
controlled  programmatically  with  key¬ 
boards  that  are  part  of  the  BASIC.  The 
Beep  command  generates  tones  that  span 
more  than  ten  octaves,  with  frequencies 
varying  by  as  little  as  one  thousandth  of  a 
tone  and  durations  up  to  ten  seconds  in 


steps  as  small  as  one  thousandth  of  a 
second.  You  can  generate  tones  much 
lower  and  higher  than  the  human  ear  can 
hear. 

The  Sound  command  generates  three 
simultaneous  channels,  enabling  you  to 
compose  music  in  harmony.  You  have  very 
sophisticated  control  over  this  synthesiz¬ 
er,  permitting  not  just  the  composition  of 
music,  but  also  the  development  of 
interesting  sound  effects  for  your  pro¬ 
grams.  And  —  if  you  know  what  you’re 
doing  —  you  can  generate  speech. 

The  quality  of  the  built-in  speaker  is 
the  only  complaint  we  have  about  the 
2068.  Clicks  and  beeps  sound  fine,  but 
synthesized  speech  is  pretty  raspy.  You 
can,  however,  easily  connect  an  external 
speaker. 

Tape  saving  and  loading  on  the  2068 
considerably  more  flexible  than  on  earlier 


Open  £.  Close  #,  Move,  Cat,  Erase  and 
Reset  commands  make  evident. 

The  2068  is  fast  compared  to  its  “baby 
brothers.”  The  1000  and  1500  spend  60% 
of  their  time  maintaining  the  screen 
display  in  software.  The  two  machines 
have  a  Fast  mode  that  turns  off  the  display 
during  calculations,  blanking  the  screen.  If 
you  want  the  screen  display  to  remain  in 
place,  the  computer  has  to  run  in  Slow 
mode,  making  programs  run  painfully 
slow.  A  program  that  executed  on  the 
2068  in  2.8  seconds,  on  the  1500  in  Fast 
mode  took  1 1.5  seconds  and  in  Slow  mode 
required  an  agonizing  1  minute,  10.5 
seconds. 

The  2068  is  easy  to  set  up.  You  plug  its 
power  supply  into  the  wall  and  into  a 
socket  at  the  rear  of  the  computer  marked 
“Power.”  You  attach  a  switch  box  to  the 
VHF  terminals  on  your  TV  and  connect 


and  the  like  for  the  T/S  2068. 

The  excellent  users’  manual  is  aimed  at 
beginners,  taking  them  from  no  know 
ledge  of  computers  to  being  able  to  write 
extensive  programs  for  the  2068.  The 
manual  was  obviously  written  by  a  writer, 
not  a  programmer.  The  manual  starts  with 
the  basics  of  setting  up  the  machine.  The 
book  includes  much  information  for  ad¬ 
vanced  programmers  on  using  machine 
code,  accessing  system  variables,  how 
memory  is  mapped  and  how  variables  are 
stored.  The  table  of  contents  and  index  are 
extensive,  and  the  appendices  are  filled 
with  useful  tables  and  advanced 
information. 

Timex’s  2068  Personal  Color  Comput¬ 
er  is  an  excellent  product,  which 
compares  well  with  computers  costing  far 
more.  It  has  features  that  make  it 
attractive  to  a  wide  audience,  from 
beginners  to  assembly-language  program¬ 
mers.  For  under  $200,  you  get  a  lot  of 
computer.  # 


The  Timex/Sinclair  2068,  priced 


at  under  $200,  offers  many  desirable 
features  usually  found 
on  more  expensive  machines. 


models.  In  addition  to  being  able  to  save  a 
program  on  tape,  you  can  save  a  program 
so  it  will  begin  executing  at  a  certain  point 
when  loaded.  On  the  1000  and  1500, 
loading  a  new  program  also  removed  the 
current  program  from  memory,  but  the 
2068’s  Merge  command  leaves  the  old 
program  in  memory.  On  the  earlier 
machines,  you  had  no  way  of  knowing  a 
program  did  not  load  until  the  tape  ran  out. 
The  2068  displays  different  loading  pat¬ 
terns,  depending  on  whether  it  is  search¬ 
ing  for  a  program,  has  found  it  or  is 
actually  loading  it;  and  displays  the  name 
of  each  program  it  finds.  After  saving  a 
program,  you  can  use  the  Verify  command 
to  make  sure  the  program  was  correctly 
saved. 

Commercial  programs  are  available  on 
tape,  which  take  about  two  minutes  to 
load,  or  on  plug-in  cartridges,  which  take 
about  two  seconds  to  load.  The  tiny  {2xh 
inches  by  23A  inches  by  less  than  xh  of  an 
inch)  cartridges  fit  into  a  slot  normally 
concealed  under  a  small  door  next  to  the 
keyboard. 

Timex  obviously  plans  to  offer  storage 
devices  other  than  tape.  The  BASIC 
language  supplied  wth  the  machine  con¬ 
tains  certain  commands  that  currently  do 
not  do  anything  and  are  listed  in  the 
manual  under  the  heading,  “Commands 
for  Future  Peripherals.”  Disk  drives 
should  become  available,  as  the  Format, 


the  other  end  to  the  2068,  You  set  a 
switch  on  the  bottom  of  the  2068  to  2  or  3, 
whichever  channel  isn’t  used  in  your  area. 
Turn  on  the  computer,  and  it  waits  for  you 
to  begin  programming  or  to  load  a 
program  from  tape.  If  the  program  is  on 
cartridge,  you  must  switch  off  the 
computer  first.  When  you  turn  it  back  on, 
the  auto-loading  program  begins  running 
almost  instantaneously. 

Once  you  get  used  to  the  single-stroke 
entry  of  keywords  possible  on  this 
machine’s  keyboard,  the  2068  is  easy  to 
use.  Each  key  has  five  different  symbols  on 
it.  In  case  you  find  any  of  this  process 
tricky,  Timex  supplies  an  excellent  tutorial 
on  cassette.  It  demonstrates  the  use  of 
every  key,  all  the  modes  and  how  to 
produce  each  of  the  five  or  more  possibili¬ 
ties  on  each  key.  At  the  end  of  the 
extensive  introduction  to  the  keyboard, 
the  tutorial  tests  you,  asking  how  to 
produce  each  of  the  possible  symbols  and 
keywords  and  giving  you  hints  if  you 
respond  incorrectly. 

The  demonstration  package  also  in¬ 
cludes  a  simplified  form  of  turtle  graphics 
and  a  home-accounting  program. 

Just  as  an  entire  submarket  sprang  up 
for  developers  of  software  and  peripherals 
for  the  T/S  1000  and  T/S  1500,  look  for 
many  developers  to  jump  in  with  word 
processors,  assemblers,  other  languages, 
expanded  memories,  disk  drives,  printers 


InfoWrold 


Timex  2068 
Color  Computer 


Setup 

a. 

□ 

u. 

□ 

□ 

ML» 

B 

Ease  of  Use 

□ 

□ 

□ 

b 

Performance 

□ 

□ 

□ 

b 

Documentation 

□ 

□ 

□ 

B 

Serviceability 

□ 

□ 

□ 

B 

m 

■ 

■ 

_ 

■ 

Summary:  Timex’s  2068  Personal 
Color  Computer  is  an  excellent 
product  that  compares  well  with 
computers  costing  far  more.  It  has 
features  that  make  it  attractive  to  a 
wide  audience,  from  beginners  to 
assembly-language  programmers. 

Product  details:  List  price,  $199.95. 
Equipped  with  Z80  CPU;  Sinclair 
BASIC;  48K  RAM;  24K  ROM  for 
system  and  BASIC;  television 
adapter;  cables  and  connectors; 
demonstration  tape,  output  port  for 
printer  and  other  peripherals; 
joystick  socket.  Manufactured  by 
Timex  Computer  Corporation, 
Waterbury,  CT  06720;  (203)  574- 
3331. 


T  S  U  S  El  Ft 

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INTERFACE 


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P0  BOX  155 


FAST  MODE  /  CONTINUOUS  DISPLAY 


PICTURE  THIS  — 

•  CONNECTING  THE  HS-1  INTERFACE  TO  A  SPARE 
TS1000  CREATES  A  COMPUTING  SYSTEM  THAT  IS  QUICK 
AND  RESPONSIVE  LIKE  MANY  OF  THE  HIGHER  PRICED 
PERSONAL  COMPUTERS 

•  FAST  MODE  FLICKER  NO  LONGER  OCCURS  WHEN 
ENTERING  PROGRAM  LINES  AND  DATA 

•  SCREEN  DISPLAYS  OF  PROGRAM  LISTINGS  AND  OUT¬ 
PUT  APPEAR  AT  AMAZING  SPEEDS 


KIT  BUILDERS: 

ASSEMBLY  IS  MADE  EASY  WITH  A  SOLDER-MASKED 
SILKSCREENED  PC  BOARD  HIGH  QUALITY  1C  CHIPS  (WITH 
SOCKETS)  AND  GOLD  PLATED  CONNECTORS  PROVIDE 
RELIABILITY  AND  LONG  LIFE  OTHER  TIMEX/SINCLAIR 
PERIPHERALS  MAY  BE  ATTACHED  VIA  A  REAR  CARD-EDGE 
CONNECTOR  INSTRUCTIONS  AND  SOFTWARE  (<1K)  ARE 
INCLUDED 


MAIL  ORDERS  TO 


Vick  sb  ur  g 
MICHIGAN  49097 


•  SOFTWARE  LIKE  FLIGHT  SIMULATOR  WILL  HAVE 
RESPONSE  TiMES  LIKE  A  FIGHTER  JET' 


TECHNICAL  SUMMARY: 

THIS  UNIQUE  SYSTEM  USES  DIRECT  MEMORY  ACCESS  TO 
COPY  THE  DISPLAY  FILE  FROM  A  FAST  MODE  COMPUTER 
TO  A  SLOW  MODE  TSlOOO  WHICH  THEN  PRODUCES  THE 
DISPLAY  THE  RESULTING  SPEED  GAIN  IS  AN  IMPRESSIVE 
5  5  TIMES  FASTER  THAN  A  SINGLE  COMPUTER  IN  SLOW 
MODE 


INTERFACE  DESIGN 

PO  BOX  151 
REXFORD.  NY  12148 


HS-1  KIT  $78 

HS-1  WIRED  AND  TESTED  $98 

CABLE  (9  INCHl  $19 

SHIPPING  $  4 


NY  STATE  RESIDENTS  ADD  TAX 
PAYABLE  BY  CHECK  OR  MONEY  ORDER 


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GO  Computer  Society 

Three  Center  Plaza 
Boston,  MA  02108 
617-367-8080 


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Paid 

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