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QOQOThe  Boston  Computer  Society 

SINCLAIR-TIMEX  USER  GROUP  NEWSLETTER 


Volume  2,  Issue  8 


August  1983 


This  newsletter  is  produced  to  inform  group  members  of  the  agenda  and 
logistics  for  future  meetings,  as  well  as  to  recap  and  amplify  the 
information  provided  at  the  last  meeting.  It  also  provides  a  forum  for 
members  and  interested  parties  to  communicate  what  they  have  learned  or 
developed  relating  to  Sinclair  and  Timex  computer  products.  Meetings  are 
open  to  the  public;  however,  attendees  are  encouraged  to  join  the  Boston 
Computer  Society  (BCS).  This  newsletter  is  free  to  members.  Back  issues 
are  one  dollar  each. 


USER  GROUP  MEETING 


Date:  Wednesday,  August  17,  1983 

Time :  7:00  p.m. 

Place:  Large  Science  Auditorium 

UMass ,  Harbor  Campus 
(Directions  on  last  page) 


At  the  August  meeting,  two  software  reviews  will  be  presented.  Brian 
Jefferis  will  review  the  Programmer's  Tool  Kit,  a  collection  of  machine 
language  program  development  tools  available  from  Softsync.  Jack  Hill  will 
review  Master  Math,  a  high  school  math  quiz  available  from  PMI.  Also,  Sue 
Mahoney  will  demonstrate  the  T/S  1500  computer.  There  will  be  a  period  for 
short  announcements  before  we  separate  into  smaller,  special  interest 
groups.  An  advanced  group  and  a  beginner's  group  are  planned. 


FUTURE  MEETINGS 

We  meet  every  month  on  the  third  Wednesday.  The  September  meeting  will 
be  on  the  21st.  Frank  Kaplan  from  Compusa  Corporation  of  Mountain  Side,  New 
Jersey  (formerly  Centronic  Corporation)  will  be  in  Boston  to  describe  the 
disk  controller  his  company  has  developed  for  the  T/ S  1000. 

The  October  meeting  will  mark  the  second  anniversary  of  the 
Sinclair-Timex  User  Group.  Please  give  your  ideas  for  this  special  meeting 
to  Sue  Mahoney  or  Allan  Cohen.  Remember  that  Allan  is  our  Meeting 
Coordinator.  If  you  have  suggestions  for  presentations  at  a  future  meeting, 
please  contact  Allan  or  Sue  Mahoney.  Submissions  for  our  newsletter  still 
go  to  Cliff  Danielson. 


HIGHLIGHTS  OF  THE  JULY  MEETING 


Sue  Mahoney  distributed  the  second  issue  of  Ramblings  at  the  July 
meeting.  Ramblings  is  a  newsletter  produced  by  Timex  to  which  Sue  is  a 
major  contributor.  It  is  planned  that  it  will  be  mailed  to  Timex  Computer 
Club  members.  Membership  in  the  Timex  Computer  Club  is  given  to  each  person 
who  has  purchased  a  Timex  computer  product  and  returned  the  enclosed  card, 
and  to  members  of  established  user  groups. 

Sue  also  brought  a  bibliography  of  Sinclair-Timex  books.  Over  30 
different  books  are  currently  available.  Three  U.S.  and  Canadian  magazines 
can  be  found  on  the  newsstands.  In  addition,  newsletters  produced  by 
commercial  and  user  organizations  supply  Sinclair-Timex  information. 

Sue  also  brought  a  catalog  of  T/S  1000  Series  software  and  brochures 
for  the  T/S  1500  and  T/S  2000  Series  computers.  The  catalog  identified  81 
software  offerings,  ranging  in  price  from  $9.95  to  $17.95,  in  four 
categories — home,  business,  education,  and  entertainment.  Sue  said  Timex 
will  be  shipping  both  the  T/S  1500  and  T/S  2000s  to  the  stores  in  August. 
Thus,  you'll  probably  be  able  to  purchase  these  in  late  September  or  early 
October.  Sue  had  copies  of  the  in-process  user  manuals  for  both  machines. 
Both  manuals  are  reportedly  much  improved  over  the  manual  for  the  T/S  1000. 

Kathi  Kuehn  was  introduced.  She  is  the  new  Director  of  Member  Program 
for  the  BCS.  She  is  on  the  BCS  staff,  full-time  devoted  to  coordinating  the 
needs  and  activities  of  the  now  27  user  and  special  interest  groups  of  the 
BCS.  In  addition,  she  has  responsibilities  for  managing  BCS  exhibits  and 
booths  at  shows,  and  for  future  member  programs  and  development.  We  were 
pleased  to  have  Kathi  at  our  meeting  and  look  forward  to  working  with  her. 

The  main  event  at  the  meeting  was  the  demonstration  of  the  Inter¬ 
controller  HV  (high  voltage)  Bus  developed  and  marketed  by  Intercomputer, 
Inc.  The  product  was  introduced  by  Irv  Frankel ,  Vice  President  of 
Intercomputer,  and  demonstrated  by  Arman  Toorian.  The  Intercontroller  is  a 
device  which  plugs  into  the  110-Volt  line  and  the  Sinclair-Timex  computer. 

Up  to  four  appliances,  such  as  lamps,  can  be  plugged  into  the  Inter¬ 
controller.  The  computer  can  then  control  the  power  to  each  of  the 
appliances,  individually,  using  POKEs  to  location  8192.  PAUSES  can  be  used 
to  control  the  time  for  switching  the  appliances  off  and  on.  The 
Intercontroller  uses  the  computer's  9-Volt  power  supply  and  draws 
approximately  100  milliamperes .  Inside  the  Intercontroller  are  solid  state 
relays  rated  for  6  Amperes  at  200  Volts  ac .  The  Intercontroller  sells  for 
$99.95.  Arman  also  demonstrated  a  product  called  the  Softbox  which  will 
interfaces  the  computer  with  up  to  four  Intercontrollers  or  other  products 
developed  by  Intercomputer.  Both  products  are  available  from  Intercomputer, 
P.0.  Box  90,  Prudential  Center,  Boston,  Massachusetts  02199,  (617)  437-1190. 

The  spring  issue  of  TEG  News ,  a  quarterly  newsletter  put  together  by 
users  at  Texas  Wesleyan  College,  in  cooperation  with  Timex,  specifically  for 
educators,  was  handed  out  at  the  meeting.  TEC  stands  for  Timex-Sinclair 
Educational  Computing.  This  first  issue  included  an  article  on  the 
versitility  of  the  T/ S  1000  for  education,  a  "Kids'  Korner,"  a  lesson  for 
teachers  explaining  how  to  teach  BASIC  to  first  graders,  a  user  section 
describing  how  to  set  up  a  classroom,  and  question  and  answers.  We  thank 
Dr.  M.  Mark  Wasicsko,  Associate  Dean  of  the  School  of  Education,  for  sending 
us  the  newsletters.  If  you  are  an  educator  and  would  like  to  get  on  the 
mailing  list  for  this  newsletter  (free!),  write  Dr.  Wasicsko  at  the  School 
€<f  Education,  Texas  Wesleyan  College,  Ft.  Worth,  Texas  76105. 


2 


TIME-OUT:  From  Dave  Miller  comes  the  following  comment  to  "Does  Anybody 
Know  What  Day  It  Is?"  which  appeared  in  the  last  newsletter.  Your  editor 
had  added  to  Jack  Hodgson's  article  that  the  year  2000  was  not  a  leap  year. 
In  addition  to  that  mistake,  two  lines  should  be  corrected  as  shown  below: 

120  LET  M=MTH+9 

140  LET  JDATE=INT( ( 1461*Y)/ 4)+INT( ( 153*M+2)/5)+DAY-l 


2000  IS  A  LEAP  YEAR  by  Dave  Miller 

The  year  2000  is  a  leap  year.  The  complete  rule  for  leap  years  in  the 
Gregorian  calendar  is  any  year  divisible  by  4  except  century  (centesimal) 
years,  i.e.,  years  divisible  by  100,  unless  that  century  year  is  divisible 
by  400.  2000  is  divisible  by  400,  so  it  is  a  leap  year. 

The  program  in  last  month's  newsletter  produces  a  valid  result  for  any 
dates  between  March  1,  1900  and  February  27,  2100,  thus  should  be  adequate 
for  most  applications.  Below  is  a  more  general  version  of  the  same  program 
which  is  valid  for  any  dates  since  October  15,  1592.  In  1592,  Pope  Gregory 
XIII  established  the  current  calendar  by  omitting  10  days  from  the  previous 
calendar  and  ordering  that  the  algorithm  described  above  be  used  to 
determine  leap  years . 


Even  though  the  program  below  is  valid  for  any  date  since  1592,  do  be 
careful  with  old  dates.  Early  days  in  American  history,  for  example,  were 
based  on  the  English  calendar.  It  was  not  until  September  14,  1752  that  the 
Gregorian  calendar  was  adopted.  We  pay  taxes  on  April  15th  instead  of  the 
first  of  the  year,  for  example,  because  the  date  was  based  on  the  new  year 
of  the  English  calendar. 


20  PRINT  "ENTER  1ST  DATE:  MMDDYYYY" 

30  PRINT  "EX:  JAN.  2,  1983,  01021983" 
40  INPUT  A$ 

50  G0SUB  130 
60  LET  F1=F 

70  PRINT  ,, "ENTER  2ND  DATE:  (ENTER  0 
TO  EXIT)" 

80  INPUT  A$ 

90  IF  VAL  A$=0  THEN  GOTO  120 
100  GOSUB  130 

110  PRINT  , ."DAYS  BETWEEN  DATES:";  STR$ 

(ABS  (F-Fl))  - 

120  STOP 

130  LET  M=VAL  A$(  TO  2) 

140  LET  D=VAL  A$(3  TO  4) 

150  LET  Y=VAL  A$(5  TO  8) 

160  _IF  M<=2  THEN  LET  F=365*Y+D+31*(M-1) 
+INT  ((Y-l)/4)-INT  (3/ 4*( INT  (((Y-l)/ 
100)+1))) 

170  JGF  M>=3  THEN  LET  F=365*Y+D+31*(M-1) 
"INT  (.4*M+2.3)+INT  (Y/4)-INT  (3/4*(INT 
(Y/100)+1))  — 

180  LET  J=F— ( INT  (F/7)*7) 

190  LET  B$=" SATSUNMONTUEWEDTHUFRI" 

200  PRINT  , ,A$(  TO  2);"/";A$(3  TO  4); 
"/" ;A$(5  TO  8),B$(J*3+1  TO  J*3+3) 

210  RETURN 


The  NEW  independent  magazine  for  the  ZX81,  T/S1000 


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3 


WHAT'S  BECOME  OF  THE  SINCLAIR-TIMEX  RETAIL  NETWORK  by  Jack  Hodgson 


The  retailing  network  for  Sinclair-Tiraex  products  in  Boston  is  in  a 
shambles.  For  months  now  users  have  been  asking  the  user  group  about  where  to 
buy  Timex  products  and  what  Timex  is  doing  about  the  situation.  I've  known 
for  a  while  about  the  problem,  but  didn't  realized  how  bad  it  was  until  I 
looked  into  it . 

In  the  Boston  area,  there  seem  to  be  only  a  couple  of  places  that  are 
carrying  the  Timex  line:  Manufacturer's  Marketplace  in  West  Roxbury  and 
Shermans  on  Bromfield  Street  in  the  downtown.  Reportedly,  the  products  are 
still  available  at  some  Sears  and  Service  Merchandise  stores.  I've  not  been 
able  to  confirm  this. 


What  Seems  to  Be  the  Problem  Here? 

Working  from  a  list  obtained  through  the  Timex  toll-free  support  number, 

I  started  calling  stores  to  find  out  if  they  had  the  stuff,  and  if  not,  why. 
The  Timex  list,  by  the  way,  only  contained  one  of  the  places  that  I  found 
actually  selling  the  products.  It  did  contain  the  name  of  Star  Market.  Star 
Market  is  a  supermarket  chain.  According  to  a  person  I  contacted  at  the  main 
office,  Star  Market  "does  not  now,  nor  ever  has  sold  any  Timex  products.11 
However,  Timex  did  say  that  the  list  "wasn't  up  to  date." 

Timex  seems  to  have  given  up  on  finding  retail  stores  to  sell  the  printer 
paper.  The  first  thing  they  did  when  I  asked  about  the  printer  was  to  refer 
me  to  a  mail-order  address  •  Pardon  the  commentary,  but  I  thought  Timex  got 
into  this  thing  so  we  wouldn't  have  to  deal  with  mail  order  any  more! 

Following  is  what  I  learned  from  the  stores  I  contacted.  Except  where 
noted,  I  spoke  to  the  sales  people.  The  views  are  theirs  and  not  necessarily 
those  of  their  employer. 

The  Video  Connection,  which  used  to  be  one  of  the  best  sources  of 
Sinclair-Timex  products  and  information,  has  only  a  little  software  left. 

They  are  trying  to  sell  out  what's  left.  According  to  the  salesman,  "we  are 
discontinuing...,  there's  not  a  hell  of  a  lot  of  market  in  'em.  No  one's 
interested ." 

A  clerk  at  Bradlees  told  me  that  they  were  only  temporarily  out,  and  that 
"we  expect  to  be  getting  more."  But  a  different  clerk  said  that  "everything's 
been  sent  back  to  (Timex')  warehouse." 

Tech  HiFi  said  they  decided  to  discontinue  because  the  computers  "have 
become  a  price  football.  You  can  pick  them  up  everywhere  for  below  our  cost, 
so  it's  no  sense  for  us  to  try  to  sell  them." 

Medi  Mart  reported  that  they  had  a  few  left,  but  "we're  not  too  happy 
with  it.  We've  had  lots  of  returns.  It  didn't  do  what  people  wanted  it  to." 
This  was  a  common  response.  Medi  Mart  said  many  customers  were  hopelessly 
discouraged  by  the  save/ load  and  RAM-pack  wobble  problems  and  return  their 
computers  thinking  they  were  broken. 

At  Zayres,  a  local  discount  department  store,  the  story  was:  "We  sent 
them  back  about  a  month  and  a  half  ago.  They  weren't  selling.  The  VIC-20  is 
cheaper  and  better." 

Markline  cited  "price  competition"  as  their  reason  for  discontinuing  the 

line . 


s. 


4 


All  was  not  negative.  The  Harvard  Coop  said  they  had  sent  back  the  T/S 
1000s  in  anticipation  of  the  arrival  of  the  !,new  Sinclair  computer,  soon.11 

One  Retailer's  Analysis 

Karen  Levitt  of  The  Bit  Bucket,  a  computer  store  in  Newton,  seems  to  have 
given  this  all  a  lot  of  thought.  f,When  it  (the  T/S  1000)  first  came  out  it 
was  very  viable,  with  the  VIC-20  at  $200.  But  now  the  retailer  has  zero 
margin.  The  cost  of  after-sale  support,  she  explained,  is  usually  built  into 
the  profit  margin  of  a  product.  But  when  retailers  are  only  making  a  couple 
of  dollars  profit  on  a  product,  they  can't  afford  to  spend  time  answering  a 
lot  of  questions. 

"We  want  to  support  our  customers,"  Ms.  Levitt  continued,  "but,  with  the 
Timex  computer,  we  couldn't  afford  to.  So  we  discontinued."  She  said  that 
the  buyer  of  a  Sinclair-Timex  computer  now  is  "flushing  $40  down  the  toilet 
because  there's  no  support  for  the  machine.  To  make  matters  worse,  this 
computer  requires  the  most  support  of  any  on  the  market.  The  buyers  must 
realize  that  they're  on  their  own." 

I  asked  Ms.  Levitt  if  The  Bit  Bucket  heard  any  complaint  from  Timex  or 
the  distributor  when  they  discontinued  the  product  line?  "Nope,  not  a  word. 
And,  as  for  us,  we  felt  a  sense  of  relief.  We  didn't  have  to  turn  away 
questioners  anymore."  She  volunteered,  "Your  user  group  is  the  best  thing 
going  for  the  computer.  It's  the  only  place  they  (the  consumer)  can  get  the 
support  they  need." 

Ms.  Levitt  said  that  The  Bit  Bucket  didn't  expect  to  carry  the  T/S  2000 
Series  computers  when  they  come  out.  She  felt  there  was  "almost  no  hope"  for 
a  revival  of  the  Timex  computer  as  a  widely  distributed  product  line. 

More  in  Sadness  Than  in  Anger 

I  don  t  think  there  is  "no  hope,"  but  I  do  think  that  things  must  change 
soon.  The  competition  is  fierce  and  the  stakes  are  high.  I  believe  in  the 
Sinclair-Timex  computer  design  and  philosophy.  It  has  a  legitimate  and 
valuable  place  in  the  personal  computing  community.  But,  if  people  can't  buy 
them  or  get  supplies  for  them,  they  will  go  elsewhere.  I  hope  that  the  user 
community  will  not  let  this  happen.  Speak  to  your  local  retailer  and 
encourage  them  to  carry  the  product.  They  may  not  realize  how  popular  it  is, 
nor  that  many  of  the  initial  problems  have  been  dealt  with.  One  user  in 
Oklahoma  City  has  done  just  that  with  some  success.  Also,  contact  Timex  and 
let  them  know  that  you  love  their  computers  but  hate  their  marketing  and 
they'd  better  get  it  in  gear  soon. 

Not  everyone  is  as  cynical  as  I  am  about  the  situation.  Seth  McEvoy  of 
the  CompuServe  Sinclair-Timex  special  interest  group  says,  "I'm  not  so  sure 
that  the  real  situation  is  bleak.  At  least  not  for  those  who  are  willing  to 
take  a  chance.  I  think  that  the  computer  field  right  now  is  in  a  panic  over 
Atari  s  and  TI  s  losses."  He  continued,  "I  don't  think  that  Timex  is  dead 
when  we  have  Sync,  Timex/ Sinclair  User,  and  Syntax — three  very  lively 
magazines.  After  all  there  are  what — two  million  Timex'  in  the  world?  Maybe 
three....  It  is  up  to  the  programmers  to  write  good  programs.  I  believe  if 
good  ones  are  written  someone  will  find  a  way  to  get  them  into  enough  hands. 

I  am  confident  about  the  future  of  Timex." 

Maybe  in  the  final  analysis  a  computer  system  must  be  supported  not  only 
by  its  manufacturer,  but  by  its  users.  If  we  want,  we  can  make  a  big 
contribution  to  the  future  of  Sinclair-Timex  computing  in  the  U.S.,  but  we've 
got  to  get  involved. 


5 


We  offer  up  to  20%  DISCOUNT  for  user 
Groups  and  Students  on  our  Peripherals  and 
Software  in  the  areas  of: 

•  Education  •  Home  Management 

•  Entertainment  •  Programming  Tools 

•  Utilities  •  Word  Processing 

AND 

•  Printers 

•  Flexible  Ribbon 
Connector 

•  High  Resolution 
Graphics 

AND  MORE 

NEW:  Software  on  cartridges,  Softbox, 
and  Intercontroller 

To  order  or  for  more  information  and  free 
brochure,  write  or  call  Intercomputer,  Inc. 

RO.  BOX  90,  Prudential  Center,  Boston,  MA 
02199  Tel.  (617)  437-1190 

Coming  soon:  A  full  line  of  Software  and 
Hardware  for  Timex  2000  and  other 
_ small  computers. 


A  LARGE  60  KEY  TACTILE  FEEL  KEYBOARD 
(MEASURES  10“  x  4”)  THAT  PLUGS  INTO  THE  SAME 
CONNECTORS  AS  EXISTING  KEYBOARD  ON  YOUR 
2X81  OR  TIMEX  SINCLAIR  1000.  IT  HAS  ALL 
SILKSCREENED  LEGENDS  IN  3  COLORS  ON  THE 
BASE;  MOLDED  LEGENDS  &  GRAPHICS  ON  KEY  TOPS 
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FOR  EDIT,  DELETE,  SINGLE  &  DOUBLE  QUOTES, 
COLON,  SEMI-COLON,  FUNCTION  &  STOP;  5“  SPACE 
BAR;  2  SHIFT  KEYS;  NUMERIC  KEY  PAD. 


•  Memory  Expansion 
RAMS 

•  Interface 

•  QSAVE-Quick 
Loading 


MASS.  RESIDENTS  ADD  5%  SALES  TAX 
SHIPPING  &  HANDLING  $4.00/UNIT 

QUANTITY  DISCOUNTS.  WE 
WILL  ACCEPT  MC/VISA.  PLEASE  INCLUDE  rs.  EXP. 
DATE  AND  SIGNATURE.  FOR  MORE  INFORMATION 
SEND  SASE.  SEND  INQUIRIES,  CHECK  OR  MONEY 
ORDER  TO: 


E-Z  KEY 
SUITE  75 

711  SOUTHERN  ARTERY 


QUINCY, MA  02169 


FOLLOW-UP  TO  COMPUTER  IN  A  DRAWER 

Last  month  we  featured  Werner  Horlbeck' s  computer  system.  Following  are 
answers  to  several  questions  we  received  about  the  information  presented. 
Werner  designed  a  power  supply  which  fits  neatly  in  a  drawer  with  his  computer 
and  powers  both  his  T/ S  1000  and  his  tape  recorder.  The  power  supply  u$es  a 
12.5-Volt  center-tapped  transformer  from  Radio  Shack.  Werner  rectified 
(full-wave)  the  output  of  the  transformer  and  filtered  the  rectified  signal 
with  a  300  microfarad  capacitor.  When  rectified,  the  output  was  much  greater 
than  required  by  the  computer .  Thus  Werner  used  an  adjustable  voltage 
regulator  chip  (Radio  Shack  part  number  317)  to  drop  the  output  dc  voltage  to 
9  Volts.  He  did  the  same  for  a  center-tapped  signal  (6.25  Volts)  to  derive  a 
regulated  6  Volts  for  the  tape  recorder. 

Synchronize  is  located  in  Kerrville,  Texas  (a  typographical  error).  The 
adhesive  key  tops  for  Werner's  large  keyboard  were  purchased  from  Mule 
Electronics,  Venice,  California.  Both  Synchronize  and  Mule  Electronics  have 
advertised  in  past  issues  of  Sync .  If  you  would  like  further  information 
about  Werner's  system,  he  welcomes  your  calls,  (617)  252-3956. 


MACHINE  LANGUAGE  GROUP 

The  Sinclair-Timex  machine  language  special  interest  group  will  meet  at 
7:00  p.m.  on  September  7  at  ITEK  Optical  Systems  in  Lexington.  Contact  Bob 
Heath  for  details  and  directions.  He  can  be  reached  during  the  day  at 
(617)  276-2424. 

6 


ZX  COMPUTING 


There  is  a  new  magazine  on  the  newsstands  in  the  Boston  area, 
specifically  at  Out— of— Town  News  and  Nini's  Corner  in  Harvard  Square, 
Cambridge.  It  is  ZX  Computing,  a  bimonthly  (every  2  months)  publication  from 
the  United  Kingdom.  It  features  articles  about,  and  programs  for,  all  of  the 
Sinclair  computers.  It  contains  lots  of  programs  listings,  many  for  the 
Spectrum.  It  also  has  lots  of  U.K.  advertisements.  ZX  Computing  is  much 
larger  than  any  of  the  U.S.  magazines  and,  for  $3.75  per  issue,  it  is  a  very 
worthwhile  investment. 


DECIMAL  TO  FRACTIONS  by  Dave  Miller 


Below  is  a  program  which 
will  convert  a  decimal  value, 
less  than  1.0,  to  a  fraction. 

The  fraction  is  to  the  nearest 
l/64th.  This  program  should  be 
useful  in  scaling  dimensions 
when  working  with  wood  or  metal. 
The  program  tells  you  to  cut  a 
piece  which  would  be  0.197 
inches,  for  example,  to  13/64 
inches.  Note  that,  if  you 
change  M  in  line  number  40  to  a 
different  value,  it  is  possible 
to  get  different  fractions. 


10  CLS 

20  PRINT  "DECIMAL?" 

30  INPUT  D 

31  PRINT  D 
40  LET  M=64 

50  LET  A=INT  (D*M+.5) 

60  LET  C=A/2 

70  IF  INT  (C+.5)OC  OR  C=0  THEN  GOTO  100 
80  LET  M=M/2 
90  LET  A=A/2 
95  GOTO  60 
100  PRINT  A;"/";M 

110  PRINT  "DIFFERENCE:"; INT  (lE4*(A/M-D)+.5)/lE4 


WHAT  DO  YOU  WANT 
FOR  YOUR 
TIMEX  SINCLAIR? 

•  Applications 

•  Utilities 

•  Games 

•  Expansions 

•  News  and  Reviews 

•  Practical  Advice 


Get  all  this  every  month  with  SYNTAX  newsletter. 
Everything  you  need  to  get  the  most  from  your  ZX/TS 
computer.  Just  $29  for  a  full  year  of  SYNTAX, 
devoted  to  your  computer. 

Order  yours  today. 


617/456-3661 

MC/VISA/AMEX/DINERS 


SYNTAX  RD  2  Box  457, 
Harvard,  MA  01451 


SERIOUS  PROGRAMMERS 

“MUST-HA  VE“  UTILITIES 
For  ZX-81  and  T/S  1000  Computers 

F1LE*SYS  (f**t,  flexible,  reliable)  $10 

.Read/Write  Cassette  Data  Tape  Files 

FILE*  BASIC  (Include*  FILERS YS  function*)  *15 
.Save/Merge/Erase  BASIC  Segments 

FILE*  VARS  (require*  FILE*8YS  or  *8 ASIC)  *  5 
_  Save/Restore  Strings  &  Arrays 

BASIC* OLAY  (permit*  ful  use  of  «4K  RAM)  «  -jq 
.  Overlay/Copy  BASIC  Segments 

COPY*  (dupicate*  protected  tape*)  $10 

Copy  Standard  Cassette  Tapes 

HEXAS*  (generates  relocatable  code)  $10 

Symbolic  Hex  Assembler  -  (in  basic) 

LOGIC*  (provides  true  logic  functions)  £  c 

AND,  OR,  XOR,  NOR,  NAND,  NOT  *  ° 

-Simple  user  interface  via  USR  function 

-Wed -documented  user  manuals 

-  On  tape  cassette  in  relocatable  machine  language 

— Check  or  MO  deftvers  now 

Sinus  Ware  8A3E  ,of  10,0 

6  Turning  Mill  Road,  Lexington,  MA  02173 


7 


FOR  MORE  INFORMATION 


Sue  Mahoney,  Director  of  the  Sinclair-Timex  User  Group 
c/o  The  Boston  Computer  Society  or  call  (203)  573-3816. 

Jack  Hodgson,  Publisher 

P.0.  Box  526,  Cambridge,  MA  02238,  (617)  354-7899. 

Cliff  Danielson,  Editor 

14  Davis  Road,  Chelmsford,  MA  01824,  (617)  256-4638. 

John  Keraeny,  Contributing  Editor  and  User  Group  Correspondent 
284  Great  Road,  Apt.  D5,  Acton,  MA  01720. 

Beth  Elliott,  Librarian. 

Allan  Cohen,  Meeting  Coordinator,  (617)  961-3453. 


ADVERTISING  INFORMATION 
Computer  Related  Products  and  Services  Only 
Open  Rate:  $40  per  Quarter  Page 
For  Rate  Card  and  Discount  Information  Contact  the  Publisher 


DIRECTIONS  TO  THE  MEETING:  The  Sinclair-Timex  User  Group  meets  in  the  Large 
Science  Auditorium  (Room  8/2/009)  of  the  University  of  Massachussetts  of 
Boston,  Harbor  Campus.  The  Harbor  Campus  is  only  3  miles  from  downtown  Boston 
and  easily  accessible  by  public  and  private  transportation.  From  the  north  or 
west,  take  the  Southeast  Expressway  to  Exit  17.  Turn  left  onto  Columbia  Road. 
Enter  the  rotary  and  take  the  first  right  (Morrissey  Boulevard).  Bear  right 
on  the  traffic  island,  following  UMass/Boston  sign.  Turn  left  into  the 
Campus.  From  the  south,  take  Morrissey  Boulevard  northward  to  the  campus.  On 
the  MBTA,  take  the  Red  Line  (Ashmont  Train)  to  Columbia  Station.  Transfer  to 
the  free  University  shuttlebus  in  the  T  parking  lot. 


OOThe  Boston 
OO  Computer  Society 


Three  Center  Plaza 
Boston,  MA  02108 
617-367-8080 


Nonprofit 
U.S.  Postage 
Paid 

Permit  1138 
Boston,  MA 


Circle  Chess  Group 
A.  F.  Stanonis 
P.0.  Box  63 

Des  Plaines,  IL  60017 

-  -  *  * _ _ _