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OOOOThe  Boston  Conputer  Society 


SINCLAIR-TIMEX  USER  GROUP  NEWSLETTER 


Way  is  this  nbn-riisws  av'ticie  ori  tne  front  page  of  this  much 
delayed  BCS  S/TUG  Newsletter  ?  Perhaps  oecause  every  word  in 
tit  comes  eitner  from  your  erstwhile  editor  with  the  exception 
of  John  Connell’s  effort,  from  tne  perennial  Mike  Coughlin, 
who  is  not  even  a  member,  pr‘ from  some  other  newsletter 
received  in  excha'nge.  It^^seems  that  our  membership  is  quite 
simply  doing  nothing.  Or  at  least  nothing  they  want  to  share 
with  the  wide-world.  There  has  been  continual  request  for  a 
newsletter,"  and’ a  few  volunteers  to  “help"  out,  but  no  news! 

Things  have  gbt  to  change.  The  membership  will  have  to 
take  more  responsibility  for  this  publication.  We  need  a  brief 
but  accurate  record  of  each  meeting.  The  volume  of  exchange 
newsletters  requires  that  readers  review  past  issues  to  glean 
information,  find  someone  out  there  must  be  using  softwav'e  the 
rest  of  the  group  hasn’ t  heard  of. 

If  we  hope  to  keep  some  interest  in  the  original  ZX 
machines  and  the  hundreds  of  TS1000’s  gatrhering  dust  around 
the  region,  members  will  have  to  let  us  know  what,  if 
anything,  they’re  still  doing  with  them.  (Mine  is  running  an 
Avaiov-i  Hill  game  I  got  for  ^£.00  at  Uni-Tech  without  the 
instructions.  Anybody  out  there  have  the  rules  to  "Midway"?) 

What’s  happened  to  the  FORTH  phreaks  ?  We  know  you’re  out 
there  somewhere  ?  Have  all  the  educators  who  thought  really 
cheap  computing  might  be  a  good  idea  given  up  ?  Can  our 
orphans  be  TOade  to  interface  with  some  of  the  newer  machines 
and  find  a  future  as  satellite  systems  ?  We  keep  hearing  aoout 
amazing  hardware  k luges  from  Dave  Miller;  is  no  one  else 
fiddling  about  with  ZX/TS  equipment  ?  The  machine  code  group 
is  still  meeting.  Who’s  going  to  write  up  their  proceedings  ? 

Anyone  having  material  to  submit  for  this  publication 
please  get  unfolded  typed  copy  in  column-forniat  to  me  for  the 
next  (and  hopefully  not  the  last)  newsletter!  which  will  come 
out  in  May.  * 

And  finally, i4.4f  we  are  to  have  more  than  four  4  page 
publications  a  year,  containing  anything  more  than  recaps  of 
oast  meetings  and  the  odd  tidbit,  someone  is  going  to  have  to 
contact  the  remaiihihg  Timex/Sinclair  suppliers  and  other 
appropriate  sources  to  garner  advertising. 

I’m  waiting.  Will  Stackman  Editor?  l&S  Raymond  St. 
Cambridge  MA  0£140  (617)  547-0655 


It  would  be  pleasant  to  report 
that  the  new  year  has  brought  some 
new  hopes  onto  the  scene  one  year 
after  the  demise  of  the  the  Timex 
Computer  Corp. .  Higginbottom  still 
remains  a  rumor;  a  less  and  less 
believable  one  in  the  face  of  the 
impending  Commodore/fltar i  price 
war.  Various  suppliers,  notably 
Games  to  Learn  By  in  CT. ,  and 
Zebra  Systems  in  NYC.  continue  to 
offer  what  limited  support  is 
available.  "Spectrumi z ing "  your 
2068  will  allow  you  access  to  a 
great  deal  of  software,  much  of 
which  must  be  purchased  by  mail 
from  the  U. K. .  However,  hardware 
peripherals  are  best  run  using  the 
Timex  buss.  Telecommunications  is 
becoming  popular  but  without  even 
one  local  T/S  BBS,  this  does 
little  to  advance  the  cause.  find 
very  little  has  been  done  to 
access  the  advanced  capabilities 
of  the  £068  (all  that  memory,  64 
or  80  column  screens, 
sophisticated  sound),  fi  number  of 
dedicated  users  are  out  there,  but 
without  surrounding  support  and 
hope  for  some  recognition,  let 
alone  gain,  things  seem  to  be 
stagnating.  Which  is  why  this 
newsletter  has  very  little  news. 


The  Very  Late  August  issue  of  the 
Triangle  Users  Group  from  Vfl. 
arrived  for  Xmas  (We’re  not  the 
only  ones  behind. )  Contains  a 
utility  for  printing  sideways  from 
Dick  Scoville,  ditto  a  review  of 
£068  FIG  Forth  put  out  by  Hawg 
Wild  Software  from  Little  Rock 
which  suggests  some  serious 
limitations  to  this 
implementation.  For  one  thing  it’s 
slow! 


The  following  tips,  aids,  hints 
were  compiled  by  Geo.  Mockr idge  in 
TIMELINEZ  from  the  San  Francisco 
Bay  Area. 

POKE  £3609,100  Actually  any  nurnbat 
between  0  and  £55.  This  will 
change  the  sound  each  keystroke 
makes  from  Click  to  Beep  and 
beyond. 

POKE  £369£,  255  Use  before  every 
PRINT  and  defeat  the  scroll. 

POKE  £3658, 8  To  get  Caps  Mode. 
POKE  £3658,0  To  go  back  to  U/L. 

POKE  £3561,  n  (n  =  i  to  35)  to 
control  repeat  time  for  key¬ 
strokes.  10  to  15  for  text. 

Try  USR  15002  to  get  out  of  an 
INPUT  loop  (without  crashing?) 

DIM  a$(704)  :  PRINT  AT  0,0;  OVER 

1;  PAPER  x;  INK  y;  a$  will  allow 
a  change  of  paper  and  ink  without 
clearing  the  screen. 


The  new  Zebra  Systems  Catalog  is 
available,  quite  extensive,  and 
listing  a  new  l.ow  price  for  the 
Koalapad  and  some  fancier  drawing 
software  for  the  same.  The  Zebra 
Talker  with  Text  to  Speech 
software  is  also  available  at  a 
comparable  price.  Modem  users  (see 
John  Connell’s  article)  may  want 
to  checkout  LETTERITER/BUFFERITER 
which  is  a  word processor 

specifically  designed  to 

interface  with  the  £040  printer 
and  the  £050  Modem.  The 
adventurous  may  want  to  get  a 
Spectrum  3  ROM  and  try  their  own 
conversion.  Write  to  Zebra 
Systems,  Inc. ,  78-06  Jamaica  Ave. , 
Woodhaven,  N.Y.  11421.  Their  BBS 
is  up  M— F  5:30  pm  to  9  am.  Sat, 
Sun.  &  Holidays  at  (718)  £96-££29. 


1 


BONTft  Software  in  California 
offers  two  routines  to  check  if 
the  2040  printer  is  on. 

For  ZX81/TS100/1500; 

1  REM  <=  CLS  ?flCS  STAN 

2  POKE  16516,71 

9996  LET  PRT  =  USR  16514 

9997  IF  PRT  > 16383  THEN  PRINT  " 
PRINTER  OFF" 

9998  IF  PRT  <=16383  THEN  PRINT 

"PRINTER  ON" 

9999  STOP 

FOR  TS  2068; 

1  REM  FLfiSH  CLS  G  THEN  LN  <> 

2  LET  PRT  =  USR(s+PEEK  23635+256* 
23636) 

9997  IF  prt  >16383  THEN  PRINT 

"Printer  off" 

9998  IF  prt  <=16383  THEN  PRINT 

"Printer  on" 

9999  STOP 


SINCLAIR  10^ 


^liiw 


i'M  km.. 


-i..  :  4:, 


OSBOeiBBOSO 
O  ra  B  B  a  n  Cl  B  B  c 


LORDING  Tja 
FLASH 
BONUS 
UIERS 
3D  PLAf'P 
SELF  LI^ 

SANDA?'® 

tape  unlock^ 

STANDARD  HC  LOADES 
PHASOS 

try  THIg 
JUST  FOR  FL® 

SIN^ 


FLOUEia 
ETCHSKETCB 
SPEED  LANDES 
DODG§ 

KEYGRM§ 

TOUCH  TYPS 
STATISTIC® 

SLOPl 
FN  PLOg 
NICH§ 

SUPER  FN  PLOg 
EXTENSION  TO  . .g 

B 

multiple  PROGRPHS  XH 
PRINTER  HI  REB  ■•Sr.uRfl 

MAGAZINE  B 
MAGAZINE  S 
CUBIC  MA^g 

DRAGON*  S  DEATH  _ 

OSCILISOOPg 
16K  TAPE  UTIL ITS 
ISK  ASSEMBLES 
TEXT  P 
TEXT  2,g 

TIMEX  SINCLAIR  100® 

JRC  POST^ 

PRINTER  HI  R^ 


INDIANA  SENT 

Us  thejlR  oupertape  to  REUIEU 
Xn?  CATALOG  ABOUE  WAS  PRINTED 
OUT  By  the  first  PROGRAM.  A 
NAME  READER.  THIS  COLLECTION  IS 

since  its 

SIDES  LOADING 

CAN  BE  tricky .  THIS  NOTE  URS 
T'/PED  USING  TEXT  EDITOR  2.3 
yNIpH  CAN  BE  ADAPTED  FOR  30 
COLUMN  OUTPUT .  THE  IMAGE  BELOW 
CURIOSITIES  ALSO 
INCLUDED.  DOCUMENTATION  IS 

UAPIABLE,  BUT 
WHOLE,  AN  INTERESTING 
CONGLOMERATION. 


1 


4 


MODEM  NOTES 

The  software  supplied  with  the 
Westridge  £050  Modem  only  lets  a 
TS  Computer  act  as  a  "dumb" 
terminal,  a  receiver  with  no 
memory.  Anything  to  be  saved  must 
be  copied  from  the  screen  on  a 
£040  printer. 

The  so-called  "Smart  II" 
software  for  the  £068,  by 
contrast,  allows  the  computer  to 
store  up  to  £7K  bytes  of 

information  received.  Text  can 
then  be  reviewed  on  screen  later, 
printed  out  on  any  compatible 
printer,  or  saved  onto  tape. 

This  software  also  allows  the 
user  to  transm, it  previously 

prepared  text  material  either  from 
software  memory  (editable  only  by 
backspace  deletion)  or  from 

text  files  prepared  on  a  word- 
processor  (e. g.  Tasword  )  and 
loaded  into  memory  for 

transmission. 

The  following  hints  suppose 
that  you  have  worked  with  your 
£050  after  carefully  reading  the 
manual,  and  that  you  are 
proficient  in  £068  "BASING". 

1)  The  memory  (called  ’the  buffer’ 
in  the  manual)  starts  at  decimal 
location  £6710,  the  same  location 
where  BASIC  programs  start. 
PY'ograms  will  therefore  be 
contained  in  the  ’ buffer’ . 

£)  Then,  to  print  out  a  buffer  of 
say  5000  bytes,  one  would  enter 

FOR  n=£6710  TO  31709;  LPRINT 
CHR%  PEEK  n;:  NEXT  n 
To  save  this  data  to  tape,  enter 

SAVE  "buffer"  CODE  26710,  5000 

3)  The  text  you  receive  (from 
other  computers)  will  contain  CR 
(carriage  returns,  ASCII  13)  and 
sometimes  LF  (linefeeds,  ASCII  10) 
as  well.  " Smart erm  II"  lets  you 
suppress  either  or  both  of  these. 
If  you  plan  to  printout  the 
’buffer’  later  on  a  full-width 
printer,  the  results  look  best 
with  linefeeds  suppressed  (LF 


suppression:  ON)  but  carriage 

returns  left  on  (CR  suppression 
:OFF) 

4)  CON,  whatever  that  is,  should 
be  set  to  NONE. 

5)  Sometimes  prepared  text  will 
not  have  a  CR  at  the  end  of  each 
line.  Tasword,  for  example,  does 
not. It  also  has  unwanted  space 
between  paragraphs.  Possible 
solutions  include  using  a  symbol 
(such  as  #)  to  denote  CR  and 
copying  the  text  byte-by-byte 
using  BASIC,  ie  first  POKE  13 
anywhere  there’ s  a  #,  then 
suppress  all  spaces  (ASCII  32) 
after  a  #.  In  other  words, 
reprocess  your  prepared  file 
before  dumping  it  to  memory  for 
transmission. 

6)  When  transmitting  such  text  to 
a  mainframe,  the  first  few  bytes 
after  a  CR  can  be  garbled. 
Inserting  a  dozen  ASCII  0’s  (no 
operation)  .  after  each  ASCII  13 
(CR)  gives  the  big  one  time  to 
catch  up  (or  something  like  that). 

The  Westridge  £050  Modem  makes 
it  quite  feasible  to  use  your  TS 
2068  for  both  recreational 
computing  and  communicating  with 
that  mainframe  at  work  an  hour’s 
drive  away.  Try  out  the  BCS  BBS  at 
(617)  646-3610  (when  it’s  up)  or 

more  reliably,  Yellowdata  at  (617) 
489-4930. 

John  Connell  (413)  596-6869 


10  PRINT  CODE  CHR$  RND; 

20  GOTO  10 

10010001111101110010100000010110 

00011000100000001100100111001000 

00000101010101101001111001010011 

00110010111100110111010110000001 

10100101001110100111000000100111 

11110010110110110000010011110101 

NEED  fl  FEU  COIN-FLIPS  7 


1 


7)  If  you  try  to  transmit  500® 
□ytes  of  text  previously  prepared 
and  loaded  via  CODE  £671®,  5®®®, 
you  will  discover  unfortunately 
that  your  Westridge  Modern  will  not 
cooperate. 

It  seems  that  Smarterm  II  doesn’t 
believe  that  the  buffer  contains 
your  text  i.e.  BUFUSD  must  equal 
50®®  or  more.  I  have  not  yet 
discovered  where  to  POKE  this 
value. 

Instead  I  fill  the  duffer  with 
enough  bytes,  say  500®,  before 
loading  the  actual  text.  No,  you 
don’t  nave  to  type  "x"  5®®®  times. 
There’s  a  trick. 

Turn  off  your  modern.  Switch 
duplex  to  half.  Write  a  few  bytes, 
say  "abcdef ghi j " ;  BUFUSD  now 
equals  1®.  Transmit  this 
"buffer".  Since  the  modem  is 
off,  "tranrnission"  is  very  fast; 
and  the  1®  bytes  are  copied  into 
the  buffer  because  the  setting  is 
half  duplex.  BUFUSD  has  been 
doubled. Repeat  this  process,  BUFSD 
is  doubled  again  and  now  equals 
40.  Ten  such  "transmissions"  will 
quickly  fill  the  buffer  with  51£® 
bytes. 

You  may  now  load  and  transmit 
your  text.  Good  luck. 

J.C. 


1  REM  <=  CLS  ?RCS 

2  PfH(E  16516,71 

9996  LET  FRT=iJSR  16514. 

9997  IF  PRT>16383  THEN  f^mCT  “PR 
INTER 

9998  IF  PfTT<=16383  THB<  PRINT 
RINTER  OH- 

9999  STC»»  ;  RBI  FOR  751008 


1  REM  FLASH  CLS  8  THEN  LNO 

9996  LET  prt^USR  C5-»PEEK  23635-1^2 
56SPEBC  236%) 

9997  IF  prt  >16383  TfCN  miNT  “Pr 
inter  Off- 

9998  IF  prt<=16%3  THB<  PRINT  -P 
rinter  oi»- 

9999  STCN»  :  REH  for  2068 


MORE  2068  TIPS  »N  HINTS 

Got  a  long  load.  If  you  don’t  want 
auto-run,  add  BEEP  to  the  SAVE 
instruction,  ie  SAVE  "Long  load"; 
BEEP  5, 1.  If  you  want 
auto-run,  make  the  target  line  a 
BEEP. 

Want  SCROLL  for  your  2068.  Try  POKE 
£3692,  1  or  £  where  you’d  scy'oII  on 

a  ZX8i. 

Problems  with  non-compat i bi 1 ity 
between  Spectrum  software  and  the 
various  adapters  (ROMSwitcn, 

Chameleon,  etc. )  have  been  traced 
to  i0K  ohm  pill-up  resistors  used 
in  the  Spectrum  to  insure  that  IN 
statements  from  the  keyboard  read 
£55  when  no  key  is  pressed.  The 
Timex  keyboard  is  different.  Most 
converters  can  be  modified  with 
approriate  resistors;  some  newer 
models  already  have  oeen. 

BASIC  software  incompatibility 
is  often  due  to  a  difference  in 
RAMTOP.  l6K  programs  are 

part icul ary  vunerable.  Consult 
approriate  manuals  for  necessary 
modifications.  (An  article  would  ae 
welcome. ) 

An  Atari-compatible  trakoall  can  be 
adapted  for  use  with  £068  by 
cutting  the  trace  from  pin  7  and 
then  run  a  jumper  from  pin  7  to  6ND 
(Pin  £9  on  the  Z-S®  can  be  used). 
This  will  not  change  joystick 
performance  as  this  line  is 
supposed  to  be  logical  low  which 
GND  will  supply. 

Now  that  cheaper  RBG  monitors  are 
appearing  (Panasonic  composite/ RBG 
have  been  seen  for  around  1^£0®  ! ) 

E.  Arthur  Brown’s  Interface  ($19.  95) 
may  be  a  good  investment  although 
tinkering  seems  to  be  required.  Be 
prepared  to  adjust  your  "pots".  The 
Sears  monitor  and  its  accompanying 
cable  seems  to  be  the  easiest  to 
use.  (Cost  around  $35®  on  sale) 


BRANB-H 

Oyep  a  year  ayo^  TRS  announced 
the  MC-10,  a  miniature  color  com¬ 
puter  with  a  token ized  BASIC  prob- 
3.biy  intended  to  compete  with  our 
TS2868.  Marketed  with  no  apparent 
enthusiasm  and  euen  less  supports 
conw^uter  became  an  "orphan" 
almost  iiraned iate ly ..  selling  at  re¬ 
duced  prices  u^ere  auailable. 

Conv>arison  with  the  2068  are  in- 
structiue.  Both  keyboards  haue  real 
keMS .  but  HC-10  has  only  3  func¬ 
tions  a  key,  with  "control"  to  the 
ig-ft  used  for  tokens  and  "shi+t" 
to  the  right  for  punctuation  and 
gr-sphics.  Although  it  can  be  ex¬ 
panded  to  16K  RAM,  the  MC-10  starts 
,Dff  with  only  3,142  bytes  RAM  due 
to  the  Micro-Color  system. 

Its  color  capabalities  are  uery 
limited,  of  course.  The  only  text 
screen  is  a  rather  ghastly  green 
with  black  letters  -  no  changes 
possible.  Only  lo/res  block  gra¬ 
phics  can  be  used  with  pixel  color. 
In  fact,  despite  the  ingenuity  of 
this  miniscule  system,  color  is 
probably  best  avoided  on  this 
corfiputer . 

However,  since  the  whole  system 
»ias  sold  for  under  $100  minus  prin¬ 
ter  , <a  small  thermal  with  moving 
hiisdi  .perhaps  other  virtues  might 
be’ found. There  is  a  RS23c _ interface 
for  modems  and  printers.  Cassette 
mass  storage  is  as  fast  as  the 
2068.  but  there  is  no  Verify 
co?rima.nd.  In  fact,  the  Remote 
Control  shut-off  included  on  the 
special  hook-up  cord  required  is 
not  ir^D  len»nted .  But  a  RESET  button 
is  built  ini  Many  TRS  BASIC 
pnograiTss  ca.n  be  used  ‘.a.  1  though  none 
can  be  loaded  from  the  CoCo) .  Error 
TTsessages  are  two  letter  ab¬ 
breviations  and  useful.  The^SOUNB 
function  is  comparable  to  BtEP . 

These  limited  capabilties  might 
still  fr:ake  this  a  usable  teaching 
machine,  but  the  implementation  of 
BASIC  and  the  lack  of  a  line  editor 
precludes  even  this  use.  Keyboard 
Vauout  is  "logical"  but  barely  func 
tional.  BIM,  BATA,  S-.  REM  have  not 
token  ized.  iwhile  functions 
such  as  SGN  and  LOG  are.  The  arrow 
keys,  in  the  absence  of  an  editing 
system,  are  almost  irrelevant. 


So  u#iy  should  we  care?  TS2068 
is  incontrovertably  the  better  com¬ 
puter  and  about  as  available.  The 
same  number  were  probably  sold. 
There  is  much  more  TS  user  and  3rd 
psnty  support;  there  is  even  more 
residual  manufacture  support  for 
the  TS868. 

Suite  simply,  there  are  no  token 
ised  popular  machines  currently 
marketed.  Corrarodore  BASIC  permits 
a  curious  set  of  abbreviations. 
There  are  utilities  which  allow 
assigning  function  keys,  etc.  to 
speed  typing  in  other  systems.  But 
Those  of  us  who  prefer  programming 
to  typing  have  few  options.  The 
failure  of  the  MC-10  and  the  demise 
of  TIMEX  leaves  the  aging  QWERTV 
keyboard  as  the  default  computer 
input  once  again.  Whichis  one  more 
reason  to  wait  for  the  GL.  Maybe 
there'll  be  a  I'vorak  version  with 
tokens  moved  as  well. 


* 

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/ 

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/  : 

/ 

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>  * 


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r 


MOBS  OS-BOARD  ME30RI  fOS  ZX-81/T3-1000 

New  meaory  chips  are  available  that  reduce 
the  need  for  the  vobhl7  BAM  pack.  The 
original  ZZ-81  used  two  ^  x  4  bit  SAM 
chips  while  the  TS-1000  uses  one  2k  x  8 
chip.  Vlhile  ^  X  8  memories  are  available, 
they  are  expensive  (about  $40)  and  haj^  to 
install  since  something  must  be  unsoldered. 

Inmos  Corp.  makes  miJX  x  4  memory  which  can 
easily  replace  the  two  memories  that 

are  used  on  most  ZX-81 ' s .  The  IKS  1420-1 OL 
sells  for  $8.35  in  small  qxiantlties.’  Only 
three  pins  must  be  changed  on  each  new 
memory.  Find  two  20  pin  DIP  sockets  whose 
pins  will  plug  into  the  old  memory  sockets. 


Bend  pin  19  of  the  new  sockets  so  they 
stick  out  to  the  side  and  not  connect  to 
old  pin  18.  Then  plug  the  new  socl^ets  in 
the  old  so  the  overhanging  end  is  towards 
the  edge  connector,  as  shown  in  the  dotted 
lines  in  the  diagram.  Pin  20  is  soldered 
to  the  5  volt  supply  (a  short  connection) , 
while  pins  1  and  19  are  soldered  to  All 
and  A10.  I  used  fairly  long  connections, 
as  shown,  but  you  could  find  a  shorter 
connection  with  a  little  searching. 

Plug  in  your  new  memory  chips  and  test. 

You  should  notice  an  Increased  delpy  for 
the  reversed  K  to  appear.  The  command 
PRINT  PEac  16389*256  -  I6384 
will  retxirn  4096  if  everything  is  working. 


^  sockets 

beginner),  be  sure  to  use  22  pin  sockets, 
even  thou^  you  will  have  to  bend  5  pins 
out  of  the  way.  Why?  Because  someone  is 
going  to  make  a  16k  x  4  memory  chip. 


If  this  airticle  has  really  inspired  you  to 
do  a  memory  modification,  remember  MosteR 
is  selling  a  32k  i  8  bit  memory  in  a  28  pin 
package.  It  souldn*t,  take  many  changes  to 
the  Sinclair/Tlmex  board  to  make  it  fit. 
Price  is  supposed  to  be  around  $50,  part 
number  is  MK4856.  I 


TIMEX/SINCLAIR 
GAMES  TO  LEARN  BY 


Charles  Warner 
P.O.  Box  575 
2  South  Street 
Williamsburg.Mass. 

01096 

413-268-7505 


igarbuiarp' 


David  Oubay 
RO.  Box  78 
28  Claire  Hill  Rd. 
Collinsville, Ct. 
06022 

203-673-7089 


T/S  2068  Computer  Program  Recorder 

T/S  2040  PRINTER  fiOMSlUITCH 

§nftuiarp= 

OVER  -50-  TS/2068 
-40-  TS/1500 
includes:  1000 


HOME/  BUSINESS /EDUCATIONAL 

WORDPROCESSOR  /  GAMES 

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The  Boston  Computer  Society 
One  Center  Plaza 
Boston,  MA  02 1 05 


|rM 

22  MAY  / 

I  •JaasX 


NON-PROFIT 


Circle  Chess  Group 
A.  F.  Stanonis 
P.O.  Box  63 
Des  Plaines,  IL 


60017