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Continuum elastic sphere vibrations as a model for 
low-lying optical modes in icosahedral quasicrystals 

E. Duvalf , L. SaviotJ , A. Mermetf , D. B. Murray § 

f Laboratoire de Physicochimic des Materiaux Luminescents, Universite Lyon I - 
UMR-CNRS 5620 43, boulevard du 11 Novembre 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex, France 
| Laboratoire de Recherche sur la Reactivite des Solides, Universite de Bourgogne - 
UMR-CNRS 5613, 9 avenue Alain Savary, BP 47870, 21078 Dijon Cedex, France 
§ Department of Physics and Astronomy, Okanagan University College, 3333 
University Way, Kelowna, British Columbia, Canada V1V 1V7 

E-mail: lucien . saviotOu-bourgogne . f r 

Abstract. The nearly dispersionless, so-called "optical" vibrational modes observed 
by inelastic neutron scattering from icosahedral Al-Pd-Mn and Zn-Mg-Y quasicrystals 
are found to correspond well to modes of a continuum elastic sphere that has the same 
diameter as the corresponding icosahedral basic units of the quasicrystal. When the 
sphere is considered as free, most of the experimentally found modes can be accounted 
for, in both systems. Taking into account the mechanical connection between the 
clusters and the remainder of the quasicrystal allows a complete assignment of all 
optical modes in the case of Al-Pd-Mn. This approach provides support to the relevance 
of clusters in the vibrational properties of quasicrystals. 



Submitted to: J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 

PACS numbers: 71.23.Ft, 63.22.+m, 6146. +w 

1. Introduction 

Quasicrystals are long-range ordered materials whose diffraction patterns present 
symmetries incompatible with translational invariance |2] . Most structural analyses 
of icosahedral phases have shown that they can be described as a quasiperiodic packing 
of group of atoms or "clusters" with a local icosahedral symmetry {e.g. pseudo-Mackay 
icosahedra) . 

Experimental electron density maps of crystal approximants have shown that more 
electrons are localized on clusters than between clusters jHj, supporting this idea of 
cluster building blocks. From the vibrational point of view, the experimental evidence 
for the resulting expected phonon confinement is less clear. Inelastic neutron scattering 
(as well as inelastic X-ray scattering 4J) on several icosahedral phases revealed that 
the excitation spectrum can be split into two regimes: acoustic and optical [SJ Ej- 



Continuum calculations for optical modes in icosahedral quasicrystals 



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The acoustic regime is characterised by well defined longitudinal and transverse modes 
which display a linear dispersion in the low wavevector q range. The high energy part 
of the excitation spectrum displays somewhat broadened bands (~4 meV width) of 
dispersionless excitations or optical modes. The cross-over between the two regimes is 
abrupt and occurs for wavevectors q between 3.5 and 6 nm _1 , i.e. for a wavelength of 
the order of D d (D d : cluster diameter). This shows up as a rapid broadening of the 
acoustic modes and an intermixing of phonon modes in the different branches. Although 
no gap opening has been observed, the energy position of the optical bands matches the 
crossing of the acoustic branch with pseudo-zone boundaries as defined by Niizeki jH]. 
These observations are in general agreement with the theoretical calculations of Hafner 
and Krajci for icosahedral quasicrystals [§| although these calculations do not provide 
a clear description of the optical modes. 

The low lying energy range of the so-called optical modes, which features acoustic- 
optical crossing points in the dispersion curves, suggests some substantial interaction 
with the acoustic modes. Along these lines, a hybridization scheme between acoustic 
and optical modes has recently been proposed [TU]. In this latter work, the so-called 
optical modes correspond to modes which are confined in the nanometric clusters. 

Following the idea that the clusterlike nature of quasicrystals is crucial for both 
sound waves jTU] and electronic properties, we propose a detailed identification of the so- 
called optical modes in quasicrystals, based on the approach of fundamental vibrational 
modes of nanospheres. The first kind of analysis that we apply (free sphere model, 
section EJ) is to consider clusters as the elemental structural entities of quasicrystals. 
In this way, we can account for the low lying optical modes, since the model gives 
frequencies which compare well with those experimentally found both for i-Al-Pd- 
Mn and i-Zn-Mg-Y. These modes are spheroidal and/or torsional vibrations of the 
corresponding clusters. Although crude, this description turns out to already provide 
satisfactory estimates of the optical mode frequencies in a model without any freely 
adjustable parameters. In a second stage (sphere weakly coupled to a matrix, section 0}, 
the cluster picture is given further realistic input by considering the vibrational coupling 
with a surrounding matrix, to tentatively account for cluster /cluster interactions and/or 
clusters overlapping. This latter model is found to match more completely with the 
experimental observations, particularly with respect to the damping parameters of the 
considered modes. 

2. Vibrations of nanospheres and scattering of acoustic waves 

For almost twenty years, studies have been carried out on the vibrational modes of 
approximately spherical nanometric clusters or nanocrystals embedded in glasses or in 
macroscopic crystals using Raman or Brillouin light scattering ^TJ EH [SI [13 EE]- 
For these embedded nanocrystal systems, the observed low-lying modes correspond well 
to those of a free continuous- medium nanosphere of density p d , longitudinal speed of 
sound v d , transverse speed of sound v d and diameter D d . The vibrational modes of 



Continuum calculations for optical modes in icosahedral quasicrystals 



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such a sphere were studied for the first time by Lamb ^7j. The modes of a free sphere 
are characterized by a polarization index p that denotes either spheroidal (SPH) or 
torsional (TOR) modes, the usual quantum numbers £ and m of spherical harmonics 
and the harmonic index n. Among the spheroidal modes the simplest are the spherical 
(£ — 0), dipolar (£ = 1) and quadrupolar (I = 2) modes. The mode frequency v v i mn 
is inversely proportional to the diameter D c i and proportional to the (longitudinal or 
transverse) sound speed v p in the material of the nanosphere: 

Sp£nVp / -j \ 

Vmn = — Pi l-U 

where vtor = ^, vsph = and S p i n is a constant for modes of type (p,£,n). The 
numerical values of S p # n were found long ago for a free vibrating sphere. 

In a recent work ^Bl it was shown that a sphere embedded inside a matrix 
scatters acoustic waves more efficiently when their frequencies match certain values 
which turn out to be generally very close to the free sphere eigenfrequencies. More 
precisely, it is possible to calculate the position and width of these resonances 
using the so-called Complex Frequency Model (CFM). The interesting point is that 
these resonances do not depend on the nature of the incident acoustic waves (plane 
waves, spherical waves, longitudinal, transverse, ...). Therefore, we can expect these 
resonances to be important even when many spheres are involved. This is similar to 
the "hard" and "soft" scatterers picture invoked to interpret sound mode broadening in 
quasicrystals [TU] . 

In the following, we will apply this continuum mechanical model to very small 
clusters (less than 2 nm diameter). Also the application of continuum type boundary 
conditions at the interface between the icosahedral cluster and the rest of the quasicrystal 
is an idealization. A more accurate treatment would need to consider an atomic level 
description of the cluster and its interface However, despite these limitations, our 
numerical results are in good agreement with experiments. 

In order to illustrate the applicability of nanosphere mode analysis to quasicrystals, 
we first consider the results of the free sphere model (because it requires fewer 
parameters) for Al-Pd-Mn and Zn-Mg-Y. Then, in order to account for a more realistic 
situation and a more complete vibrational pattern, we examine the case where Al-Pd-Mn 
clusters are weakly coupled to a surrounding matrix. 

3. Free sphere model 

3.1. Al-Pd-Mn 

The shape of the icosahedral clusters in Al-Pd-Mn is nearly-spherical. The number of 
atoms per cluster (~ 51) can be considered as sufficient to approximate the lowest-energy 
confined modes by those of a continuum sphere. Using the approach described in [TBI], 
the frequencies of the vibrational modes were calculated for a continuous-medium free 
nanosphere with a diameter equal to the size of the cluster, i.e. D d = 1.0 nm |2"T1 12"2"1 12H] . 



Continuum calculations for optical modes in icosahedral quasicrystals 



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Table 1. Calculated vibrational energies for a free cluster of Al-Pd-Mn of diameter 
D c i = 1.0 nm. Corresponding experimentally observed optical modes are indicated in 
superscripts. 



Spheroidal Torsional 
E (meV) E (meV) 



1 = 





n 


= 


22.8° 4 








n 


= 1 


52.2 




1 = 


1 


n 


= 


16.3° 3 


26.6 






n 


= 1 


32.7 


42.0 


1 = 


2 


n 


= 


12.2° 2 


11.5° 2 






n 


= 1 


23. 1° 4 


32.9 



Both longitudinal and transverse sound speeds in the clusters were approximated with 
the bulk sound speeds in the Al-Pd-Mn quasicrystal, i.e. = 6500 m/s and vJ L = 
3500 m/s [211 • Table H] displays the so-obtained frequency values for the fundamental 
(n = 0) and the first harmonic (n = 1) of each type of mode (SPH or TOR) and angular 
momentum £. 

The optical modes of Al-Pd-Mn quasicrystals observed by inelastic neutron 
scattering jB] have the following approximate energies: Eq\ — 7 meV, E02 — 12 meV, 
E03 — 16 meV and E04 — 24 meV, with hardly any dependence on wavevector q. The 
results of the free sphere model calculations presented in table d permit the following 
assignments: 

02: the E02 — 12 meV mode corresponds to the spheroidal and torsional £ = 2 
fundamental modes. Both of these modes are five-fold degenerate. 

03: the E03 — 16 meV mode corresponds to the triply degenerate dipolar £ = 1 
spheroidal mode. 

04: the Eqa, — 24 meV mode corresponds to the spherical £ = mode and also to the 
five-fold degenerate quadrupolar £ = 2,n = 1 spheroidal mode. 

It turns out that the free sphere calculations are able to provide an accurate 
assignment for all of the optical mode energies except for the lowest one (01) (as 
described in section 01 calculations taking into account the cluster-matrix interaction 
allows the "missing" mode 01 to be accounted for). For each of these modes, we might 
expect the inelastically scattered intensities to scale with the corresponding total number 
of modes, taking into account their degeneracy. Such tentatively appears to be the case 
when examining the reported lineshapes 6>]. However, to make a detailed comparison 
would require a quantitative analysis of the inelastic scattering intensities of individual 
modes, which is beyond the scope of this work. 

In order to further assess the relevance of the free sphere description to the low 
energy optical modes in quasicrystalline structures, we now examine the case of Zn-Mg- 
Y. 



Continuum calculations for optical modes in icosahedral quasicrystals 



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Table 2. Calculation of vibrational energies for a free sphere of Zn-Mg-Y of diameter 







1 o 


nm. 














Spheroidal 


Torsional 










E (meV) 


E (meV) 


I = 





n 


= 


124 02 








n 


= 1 


31.6 




1 = 


1 


n 


= 


10.8 02 


19. 6° 3 






n 


= 1 


20.7 


31.0 


I = 


2 


n 


= 


8.9 01 


8.5 01 






n 


= 1 


15.5° 3 


24.3 



3.2. Zn-Mg-Y 

The icosahedral quasicrystal Zn-Mg-Y has clusters of diameter D c \ = 1.2 nm [7j. We 
calculated the energies of a free spherical cluster having the same diameter (D c i = 1.2 
nm) as the Zn-Mg-Y clusters and the same sound speeds as bulk Zn-Mg-Y : = 4800 
and = 3100 m/s. The results are given in table [2 

Once again, the calculated vibrational energies are found to compare well with 
those of the optical modes measured through inelastic neutron scattering, i.e. E Q1 — 8 
meV, E 02 - 12 meV and E 03 - 17 meV : 

01: the E i ~ 8 meV mode corresponds to the five-fold degenerate spheroidal and 
torsional £ = 2 modes (whose frequencies are usually almost the same), 

02: the E02 — 12 meV mode corresponds to the spherical £ = and the spheroidal 
dipolar £ = 1 modes, 

03: the E03 — 17 meV mode corresponds to the five- fold degenerate quadrupolar 
£ — 2, n — 1 and the triply degenerate torsional £ = 1 modes. 

Much like the results obtained for Al-Pd-Mn, the free sphere model is found to 
provide a sound description of all the optical modes in Zn-Mg-Y. The above assignments 
are restricted to the low energy range (E < 30 meV) where modes were unambiguously 
identified experimentally. 

It is worth noting that from group theoretical selection rules , only the spherical 
and spheroidal quadrupolar modes can be observed by Raman scattering, as experiments 
confirm (these selection rules can be broken for anisotropic materials or under resonant 
excitation). No such selection rules exist for inelastic neutron scattering. Besides, it 
should be noted that the degeneracies of the aforementioned modes (in any case for 
£ < 2) are not lifted by lowering the symmetry from spherical to icosahedral. This 
provides a supplementary justification for using spheres to approximate the icosahedral 
clusters. 

The present calculation predicts undamped vibrational modes whereas the observed 
excitations are somewhat broadened (~4 meV). This may be at least partly attributed 
to a variation of actual quasicrystal cluster masses, since structural studies showed that 



Continuum calculations for optical modes in icosahedral quasicrystals 



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there are several chemical decorations on the same cluster skeleton or by introducing a 
cluster matrix interaction. Moreover, as evidenced in the Al-Pd-Mn case with the 01 
mode, the free sphere model does not account for all vibrational modes when the clusters 
are embedded in a matrix, even if the cluster /matrix coupling is weak. In the following 
section, it is shown that calculations taking into account the cluster /matrix interaction 
can account for the "missing" 01 mode and for the finite width of the modes. 

4. Sphere weakly coupled to a matrix: the Al-Pd-Mn case 

The mode frequencies of embedded clusters can be calculated knowing the elastic 
properties of both the clusters (p c i, and v^) and the neighboring matrix (p m , 
and v^) and by assuming the continuity of the stresses and of the atomic displacements 
upon crossing the cluster /matrix interface [TH] . From Murray and Saviot pH], it 
is possible to determine the spectral width of a confined mode as functions of the 
elastic constants and densities of both the cluster and the matrix. As expected, the 
weaker the contrast of elastic constants and densities between cluster and matrix, the 
stronger the derealization of the cluster mode in the matrix and the larger its spectral 
width. Furthermore, from the same authors [T%] . taking into account the cluster /matrix 
interaction leads to "extra modes" that involve the coupled motions of the cluster and 
the surrounding matrix. These modes will be referred to as mixed cluster-matrix modes. 

Similarly to the free sphere modes, the frequencies of the cluster-matrix modes 
are inversely proportional to the cluster diameter. The more notable modes of this 
type are the librational torsional (TOR,£ = 1) mode and the rattling spheroidal dipolar 
(SPH,£ = 1) mode. Both of these modes correspond to semi-rigid oscillations of the 
cluster linked to its surroundings. The frequencies of these last two kinds of modes are 
zero for a free cluster. 

To phenomenologically model the weakness (i.e. mechanical flexibility) of the 
joint between the nanosphere representing the nanometric clusters and the matrix, we 
introduce an additional "X-layer" consisting of a softer (in terms of elastic constants) 
and lighter medium, as in a previous work j2Ej- Note at this point that such a 
simplified model only aims to account for a possible partial derealization of the cluster 
vibrational wavefunction, due to its interaction with an environment. The calculation 
of the clusters eigenmodes requires the knowledge of the X-layer parameters (density 
Px, longitudinal speed of sound v x , transverse speed of sound v x and thickness dx)- 
Since these parameters are a priori unknown, they were numerically adjusted so that 
both librational and rattling mode energies fit with that of the lowest energy optical 
mode (Eoi — 7 meV). 

In table El the calculated X-layer model vibrational energies and the phonon full 
widths at half maximum (FWHM) are given using the same cluster as before with an 
intermediate X-layer. The parameters of the X-layer giving rise to a lowest optical mode 
energy of 7 meV are sound speeds v x = 2000 m/s and v x = 1000 m/s, mass density 
px = 3.4 g/cm 3 and thickness dx = 0.05 nm. Although the X-layer may be viewed 



Continuum calculations for optical modes in icosahedral quasicrystals 



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Table 3. Calculated energies for a Al-Pd-Mn cluster, diameter D c i = 1.0 ran, weakly 
bonded to the rest of the quasicrystal by a soft X-layer. 

Spheroidal Torsional 











E (meV) 


FWHM (meV) 


E (meV) 


FWHM (meV) 


£ = 





n = 





24.5° 4 


1.4 










n = 


1 


51.4 


0.8 






1 = 


1 


n = 





6.6 01 


2.4 


7.0 01 


0.6 






n = 


1 


16.9° 3 


0.4 


26.2° 4 


0.4 






n = 


2 


32.1 


0.6 






1 = 


2 


n = 





14.6° 2 


1.6 


13.2° 2 


0.6 






n = 


1 


22.8° 4 


0.6 


31.9 


0.6 



as the so-called "glue" regions interconnecting the clusters [U 12 El, the so-obtained 
X-layer parameter values are only meant to model a weak linking between the cluster 
and its surroundings; they cannot be given a firm physical meaning. The surrounding 
matrix was modelled as a thick shell surrounding the X-layer with an infinite radius. 
The sound speeds and mass density of the surrounding matrix were set equal to those 
of the cluster, hence of the bulk quasicrystal. Note that the so-called "matrix modes" 
[TH] are not given here because of their huge damping; they are irrelevant to the present 
investigation. 

The comparison of the free cluster vibrational energies (table with those of the 
cluster linked to the surroundings (table EJ) shows that the cluster/matrix interaction 
does not significantly change the vibrational frequencies (the parameters of the X-layer 
and of the matrix have only a weak effect on most of the optical mode energy positions). 
The main differences originate from non-zero FWHM's and the appearance of cluster- 
matrix mixed modes (rattling and librational ones) in the latter case. These mixed 
modes are relatively strongly localised on the cluster. Thanks to the X-layer model, the 
lowest energy optical mode 01 can now be assigned to the triply degenerate librational 
mode (TOR,£ = l,n = 0) and also to the triply degenerate spheroidal rattling mode. 
The assignment of the other modes, 02 and 04, remains unchanged, while the 03 mode 
now corresponds to the first harmonic (n = 1) of the triply degenerate dipolar I — 1 
spheroidal mode. Obviously, the lowest-energy mode depends relatively strongly on the 
cluster-surroundings bonding, the properties of which are not well known. Therefore, 
at the present stage, it should be considered cautiously. 

The approach we have proposed in this article relies on no further assumption 
than a cluster based structure that has widely been reported for both z-AlPdMn and 
«-ZnMgY. Cluster modes are a natural consequence of a structure having a nanometric 
relief. In that sense, equivalent modes are expected to occur for non-iscosahedral cluster 
structures (for instance cylinders exhibit radial breathing modes like those observed in 
carbon nanotubes). So far, most inelastic neutron studies and computer simulation 
studies have assigned the low energy optical modes to the dynamics of single atoms. 
Such assignment derives from the ability of both techniques to probe the dynamics 



Continuum calculations for optical modes in icosahedral quasicrystals 



8 



inherent to a particular species, yet they do not provide information about the precise 
nature of the modes which involve the considered atom. The cluster origin of the optical 
modes is not necessarily in contradiction with single atom dynamics: the participating 
ratio of a single atom to a cluster mode is expected to depend on the nature of the atom 
and its location within the cluster as well as on the type of cluster mode. 

5. Conclusion 

The optical modes observed by inelastic neutron scattering in icosahedral Al-Pd-Mn 
and Zn-Mg-Y quasicrystals correspond well to the modes of free continuous-medium 
nanospheres having the same diameter as their building clusters and the same sound 
speeds as in the bulk quasicrystal. 

The model of the nanosphere is expected to be valid only for the lowest-energy 
modes corresponding to the fundamental modes or, at most to their first harmonics, 
i.e. modes for which the separation between maxima and minima of the vibrational 
wavefunction is much larger than the interatomic distance. 

The linking of the clusters with their surroundings (as phenomenologically modelled 
by the X-layer model) partially delocalizes the confined modes in the matrix. Due to the 
interaction, through the "glue" regions, between neighbouring clusters, cluster modes of 
same symmetry are expected to couple, thereby establishing a coherence among them. 

Acknowledgments 

The authors are very grateful to M. de Boissieu, R. Currat, S. Francoual and E. Kats 
for illuminating discussions. 

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