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SATAN'S HOLLOW 


General Instructions 



MIDWAY MFG. CO. 



GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS 


FOR 

SATANS HOLLOW 


INSTALLATION 

1. Unlock and open the coin box door. 

2. Remove four (4) "CABINET LEVELING LEGS" from inside the coin box. 

3. Tip the cabinet to the side and remove the shipping cleats from its bottom. 

Locate the threaded holes - one in each corner - and install the "CABINET LEVELING 
LFGS" in them. 

Level the cabinet. 

When finished, the cabinet should be stable in the upright position. 

4. Plug the game into a standard A.C. wall outlet ONLY! 


- WARNING - 

Game MUST be 
properly grounded. 


5. The power ON/OFF switch 
° UPRIGHT MODEL: 

° MINI MODEL: 

° COCKTAIL TABLE MODEL: 


is located: 

On top of the cabinet toward the back. 

In the center of the cabinet back just below the rear access 
door. 

Underneath the cabinet on Player No. 2's side. 


LINE VOLTAGE SAFETY INTERLOCK SWITCHES 


Line voltage SAFETY INTERLOCK SWITCHES have been provided for your protection. The loca¬ 
tions of these SAFETY INTERLOCK SWITCHES are: 


1. UPRIGHT MODEL: Inside the rear of the cabinet on the right side of the rear access 

door. 


PART NO. M051-00941-A013 






2 


2. MINI MODEL: Inside the rear of the Cabinet on the right side of the rear access 

door. 

3. COCKTAIL TABEL: Inside the cabinet on the hinge side of the coin door. 


When the cabinet access door(s) are secured in place, the SAFETY INTERLOCK SWITCH plunger(s) 
are in a fully depressed condition. The game circuit can function normally. 

When any cabinet access door(s) are opened, the SAFETY INTERLOCK SWITCH plunger(s) are in a 
partially extended condition. This isolates the game circuit from the line voltage. 

To restore power to the game circuit with the access door(s) open, gently pull the SAFETY 
INTERLOCK SWITCH plunger(s) out to the fully extended condition. THIS IS TO BE USED FOR 
SERVICING THE GAME ONLY! 


SELF-TEST 


A slide switch is provided to make the game run a "Self-Test" on itself. The SELF-TEST 
SWITCH is located just inside the cabinet on the right side of the coin door frame as you 
face it. 

To put the game into the Self-Test mode; turn the game ON and let it warm up for a few min¬ 
utes. Then slide the SELF-TEST SWITCH to the ON position and actuate the "TILT" switch on 
the back side of the coin door just below the door lock to obtain the Self-Test-Menue dis¬ 
play on the monitor screen. 

When in the Self-Test mode, the monitor screen will display the results of certain test 
functions the game has run on itself. (These will be discussed in more detail later.) 


TO SERVICE THE CONTROL PANEL(S) 

1. UPRIGHT MODEL: 

° The controi panel is held in place by two latches, one on the left side and one on the 
right side of the cabinet. 

They are spring loaded to provide constant positive pressure on their latch plates. 

They can be reached through the coin door AFTER turning power to the game off. 

To release the latches, lift up and toward the center of the control panel. 

Once they are released, unhook them from their latch plates. 

° To remove the control panel: 

Raise it up and tilt it toward you until you can see the cable behind it. 



- 3 - 


Cradling the control panel between yourself and the cabinet, disconnect it from its ca¬ 
bling . 

The control panel is now free and can be removed. 

° To reinstall the control panel, reverse this procedure. 


2. MINI MODEL: 


° The control panel is held in place by two latches, one on the left side and one on the 
right side of the cabinet. 

They are spring loaded to provide constant positive pressure on their latch plates. 

They can be reached through the coin door AFTER turning power to the game off. 

To release the latches, lift up and toward the center of the control panel. 

Once they are released, unhook them from their latch plates. 

° To remove the control panel: 

Raise it up and tilt it toward you until you can see the cable behind it. 

Cradling the control panel between yourself and the cabinet, disconnect it from its ca¬ 
bling . 

The control panel is now free and can be removed. 

° To reinstall the control panel, reverse this procedure. 

3. COCKTAIL TABLE MODEL: 


° Each control panel is held in place by several screws, two on the inside of the cabinet 
and three along the bottom edge of the control panel. 

Turn the power off to the game. 

Open the coin box door and release the two latches on the inside of the cabinet up next 
to the table top. 

CAUTION: The right hand latch is very close to the HIGH VOLTAGE on the monitor. BE 

CAREFUL!! 

Once they're released, unhook them from their latch plates. 

Grasp the table top in the center above the coin door lifting up and to the side to 
tilt it open. 


CAUTION: 


Due to the weight of the monitor, EXTREME CARE MUST be taken when opening 
the cabinet. 



. 4 - 


Remove the screws which secure the control panel in place. 

° To remove the control panel(s): 

Disconnect it from its cabling. 

The control panel is now free and can be removed. 

° To reinstall the control panel(s), reverse this procedure. 

REMOVAL OF THE MAIN-DISPLAY-GLASS AND/OR THE T.V. BEZEL ASSEMBLY 

1. UPRIGHT MODEL: 

NOTE: In order to do this, the control panel MUST be removed first. See the "UPRIGHT 
MODEL" procedure. 

° Turn the power to the game off and remove the control panel. This frees the main-dis¬ 
play-glass so it can be lifted up. 

0 By putting your finger in the hole in the middle of the main-display-glass support, you 
can lift it up and out. 

° Remove the screws which secure the T.V. bezel assembly in place (front and back). 

° The T.V. bezel assembly is now free and can be slid out of the cabinet. 

0 To reinstall the T.V. bezel asssembly and the main-display-glass, reverse this proced¬ 
ure. 

2 . MINI MODEL: 

NOTE: In order to do this, the control panel MUST be removed first. See the "MINI MOD¬ 
EL" procedure. 

° Turn the power to the game off and remove the control panel. 

° Remove the screws which secure the glass clamping plate. 

° Lift out the glass clamping plate. This frees the main-display-glass so in can be 
lifted up. 

° By putting your finger in the hole in the middle of the main-display-glass support, you 
can lift it up and out. 

° Remove the screws which secure the T.V. bezel assembly and lift it out. 



- 5 - 


NOTE: Use the hole in the center of the main-display-glass support to grasp it. 

0 Reverse this procedure to reinstall the T.V. bezel assembly and the main-display-glass. 

3. COCKTAIL TABLE MODEL: 

NOTE: This may be done with the table top in the open or the closed position. If you de¬ 
cide to open the table top, TURN THE POWER TO THE GAME OFF FIRST. 

0 Remove the screws which secure the table top glass clamps in place. 

° Remove the table top glass. 

° Loosen the screws which secure the T.V. bezel-glass-clamps in place. 

Move the clamps to the side and the bezel glass may be removed. 

Remove the screws which secure the bezel assembly to the table top and the bezel with 
four bezel-glass-clamps may be removed. 

° To reinstall the T.V. bezel assembly and the table top glass, reverse this procedure. 


VOLUME CONTROL POT 


The volume control pot is located just inside the cabinet on the RIGHT side of the coin door 
frame. For adjustment, it may be reached through the coin door on ALL models. 

To make the sounds louder, turn the pot clockwise (s' as you face it. 

To make the sounds less loud, turn the pot counterclockwise S as you face it. 


VOLTAGE CONTROL POTS 


The voltage control pots are located on the Linear Power Supply P. C. Board. They are pre¬ 
set at the factory and SHOULD NOT be tampered with at all unless the distributors service 
department is contacted first. 


SELF-TEST 


The Seif-Test mode is a special mode for checking game play statistics as well as game 
switches and computer functions. It is the easiest and best way to check for proper opera¬ 
tion of the entire game. 

NOTE: Putting the game into Self-Test WILL NOT cause the game to erase any CREDITS it has in 
its memory when the Self-Test mode is entered. 

You may begin a Self-Test at any time by sliding the Self-Test switch to the "ON" position 
after the power to the game is on (Self-Test switch located just inside cabinet on right 
side of coin door frame). When this is done, the game wiil react as follows: 

1. If the game is in the Attract mode when the Self-Test switch is moved to the "ON" 


6 


position, it wiii finish the sequence ind then go into the Self-Test mode. This is il¬ 
lustrated by the display of the Self-Test Mode Menue on the monitor screen. 

2. If the game is in the Ready-To-Play mode or the Play mode when the Self-Test switch is 
slid to the "ON" position, it WILL NOT go into the Self-Test mode until AFTER the players 
last Missile Launcher has been lost (the game MUST be over). At this point, the game 
will go into the Self-Test mode. Again, this is illustrated by the display of the Self- 
Test Mode Menue on the monitor screen. 

3. The fastest way to enter the Self-Test mode is to slide the Self-Test switch to the "ON" 
position and then activate the "TILT" switch located on the back side of the coin door 
just below the lock mechanism. The game will then IMMEDIATELY go into the Self-Test 
mode. 


The Self-Test mode has eight (8) major catagories as illustrated by the following Figure of 
the Self-Test Mode Menue as it should appear on the monitor screen. 

1. It is easy to select what catagory you want to enter. By moving the Control Stick left 
or right, the Cursor at the left of the screen can be moved UP and DOWN, (left=UP) and 
(right=DOWN), until it is in front of the catagory you want to test. Release the Control 
Stick at this time. 

2. After the Cursor has been positioned, depress either "SHIELD" button on the console <^nd 
the monitor screen will display the test catagory you have selected. 

NOTE: There is one exception to this. If you position the Cursor in fornt. of the "PRE¬ 
SET" catagory on the Self-Test Mode Menue, when you press the "SHIELD" button on 
the console - - EVERYTHING, I repeat - EVERY THING ; including ALL in¬ 
formation in the "BOOKKEEPING" mode, and ALL operator selected options , will be 
set back to zero "0" and to the factory recommended settings - respectively . 

0 Once you are IN one of the Self-Test mode catagories, FOLLOW THE ON-SCREEN INSTRUCTIONS 
TO COFPLETE THE TEST. 

3. The next group of Figures show the CORRECT screen presentation for EACH catagory of the 
Self-Test mode. 

The first display of the Self-Test mode is the Self-Test-Mode-Menue. It should look like 
this: 

SELECT DESIRED TEST 


1 SELF DIAGNOSTICS 

2 SOUNDS 

3 PLAYER INPUT 

4 BOOKKEEPING 

5 MACHINE SETUP 

6 CHANNEL TEST 

7 PRESET 

8 GRID DISPLAY 



7 


(MENUE - CONTINUED) 

POSITION CURSOR BY MOVING 
CONTROL HANDLE 

HIT SHIELD BUTTON FOR TEST 


During the SELF DIAGNOSTICS section of the Self-Test mode, you will first see a cross hatch 
pattern on the screen for about 1/2 second. Second , you will see a lot of different colored 
bars shown on the monitor screen. These bars will be UNpainted one at a time from the top 
down. Third , you will see the screen painted Red, Blue, and Green in bars from the top 

down. Fourth , all the different colored bars you saw " Second " are displayed again. And 

fifth, the different colored bars are replaced by this message: "HIT SHIELD BUTTON TO 
EXIT". 

If the SELF DIAGNOSTICS find one or more bad ROM or RAM chips: instead of going through what 

is described above, the game will give you a written message as to which parts are bad. 

During the SOUNDS section of the Self-Test mode, the game will give a display which looks 
like the following: 


SELECT A SOUND 


1 ALL SOUNDS 

2 EXIT 

3 FLAME SOUND 

4 SHIELD SOUND 

5 BASE EXPLOSION 

6 MISSILE RELEASE 

7 BOMB 

8 DIVER RELEASE 

9 STEAL BASE 

10 FIRE BALL 

11 MUSIC 1 

12 MUSIC 2 

13 MIKE HIT 

14 TARGET HIT 

15 COIN 

16 EXTRA BASE 

17 BRIDGE BEGIN 

18 BRIDGE COMPLETE 

19 TILT 

20 10000 BONUS FLAG 

21 BRIDGE PICK UP 

22 1000 BONUS FLAG 

23 FLY BONUS FLAG 


POSITION CURSOR BY MOVING 
CONTROL HANDLE 


HIT SHIELD BUTTON FOR TEST 



8 


During the PLAYER INPUT section of the Self-Test mode, the game will give a display which 
looks like the following: 


1 COIN METER 

ACTIVATE ALL PLAYER INPUT 
SWITCHES AND DEVICES 

HIT TILT TO EXIT 

During the BOOKKEEPING section of the Self-Test mode, the game will give a display which 
looks like the following: 


As the Player Input 
Switches and Devices 
are activated, the Switch 
or Device activated is 
spelled out in the blank 
space indicated at right. 


SELECT A REPORT OR EXIT 

CHUTE 1 COINS _ 

CHUTE 2 COINS _ 

LONGEST GAME _ 

SHORTEST GAME _ 

HIGHEST SCORE _ 

LOWEST SCORE _ 

TIME REPORT 
SCORE REPORT 
EXIT 

POSITION CURSOR BY MOVING 
CONTROL HANDLE 

HIT SHIELD BUTTON FOR TEST 

In the TIME REPORT and SCORE REPORT sections of the BOOKKEEPING mode, the game will give 
displays which look like the following: 



TIME 

REPORT 


SCORE REPORT 

0 

TO 

30 SEC 

0 

TO 5000 PTS 

30 

TO 

60 SEC 

5000 

TO 10,000 PTS 

60 

TO 

90 SEC 

10,000 

TO 20,000 PTS 




(TIME REPORT AND SCORE REPORT - CONTINUED) 


- 9 - 


90 

TO 

120 SEC 

20,000 

TO 

40,000 

PTS 

120 

TO 

150 SEC 

40,000 

TO 

70,000 

PTS 

150 

TO 

180 SEC _ 

70,000 

TO 

100,000 

PTS 

3 

TO 

4 MIN 

100,000 

TO 

150,000 

PTS 

4 

TO 

5 MIN 

150,000 

TO 

200,000 

PTS 

5 

TO 

6 MIN 

200,000 

TO 

250,000 

PTS 


OVER 

6 MIN 


OVER 

250,000 

PTS 

HIT SHIELD 

BUTTON TO EXIT 

HIT SHIELD 

BUTTON 

to e; 


During the SETUP OPTIONS section of the Self-Test mode, the game will give a display whicl 
looks like the following: 


SETUP OPTIONS 
COIN CHUTE 1 

* = Factory recommended settings. *1 COINS FOR 

*1 CREDITS 

COIN CHUTE 2 
*1 COINS FOR 
*1 CREDITS 

*1 CREDITS FOR 
*3 BASES 

*2 CREDITS FOR 
*7 BASES 

EXTRA BASE AT 
*30,000 PTS 

*3 DIFFICULTY LEVEL 

EXIT 


USE SHIELD BUTTON TO 
POSITION CURSOR 
USE 1 AND 2 PLAYER 
BUTTONS TO ALTER 
OPTIONS 



10 


The Difficulty Level setting has a range of 1 to 9. With 1 being the easiest level of play 
and 9 being the most difficult level of play. We recommend that a setting of 3 be used as a 
beginning point. 

Game play can then be made MORE difficult or LESS difficult, according to the skill levels 
attained by the players in your area. 


During the CHANNEL TEST section of the Self-Test mode, the game will give a display which 
looks like the following: 


CHANNEL TEST 


CHANNEL 1 
CHANNEL 2 
CHANNEL 3 
CHANNEL 4 
CHANNEL 3 
CHANNEL 6 

HIT KICK BUTTON TO EXIT 


Once you enter the CHANNEL TEST section of the Self-Test mode, the game automatically tests 
Channels 1 through 6 giving a tone for each one as it checks it. After the 6th Channel is 
tested, the game automatically repeats the test until the Shield button is hit. It then 
goes back to the Self-Test Mode Menue. 


During the GRID DISPLAY section of the Self-Test mode, the game shows a white cross hatch 
pattern on the monitor screen. This is for alignment and/or test purposes. This pattern 
will remain on the monitor screen until the Shield button is hit. The game will then go 
back to the Self-Test Mode Menue. 


To leave the Self-Test mode, simply slide the Self-Test switch to the "OFF" position at ANY 
time. The game will then run through the ROM/RAM test display after which normal game func¬ 
tions will then return to the monitor screen. 



11 


SATANS HOLLOW 


OPTION SWITCH SETTINGS 

//////////////////SWITCH NO. 1 - AT B 3 - LOCATED ON SOUND I/O P.C. BOARD//////////////// 


2 COIN METERS 
*** 1 COIN METER 

SW#1 SW#2 SW//3 SW//4 SW#5 SW#6 SW#7 SW#8 SW#9 SW#10 

ON NOT NOT NOT NOT NOT NOT NOT 

OFF USED USED USED USED USED USED USED 

MINI / UPRIGHT 

ON 

COCKTAIL TABLE 

OFF 

FREEZE VIDEO 

ON 

*** NORMAL OPERATION 

OFF 


/////////////////SWITCH NO. 3 - AT D 14 - LOCATED ON SOUND I/O P.C. BOARD/////////////// 


*** NORMAL OPERATION 

SOUND I/O DIAGNOSTIC MODE 

SW#1 **SW//2 **SW#3 **SW#4 

OFF 

ON 

*** NORMAL OPERATION 
RAM/ROM TEST 

INDICATES TEST RESULTS VIA 
YELLOW L E D ON SOUND I/O 
BOARD: FAST FLASH = BAD ROM 
SLOW FLASH = BAD RAM 

OFF 

ON 

*** NORMAL OPERATION 
OSCILLATOR TEST 

OFF 

ON 

*** NORMAL OPERATION 

FILTER TEST 

OFF 

ON 

* THIS SWITCH NOT USED ON UPRIGHT MODELS. 

PART NO. 

** NO EFFECT IF SW#1 OF SWITCH NO. 3 IS IN THE "OFF" POSITION. 

M051-00941-A011 

*** INDICATES FACTORY RECOMMENDED SETTINGS. 



THE REMAINDER OF SATANS HOLLOW'S MOST COMMON OPTION SETTINGS ARE CONDUCTED DURING THE 
MACHINE SETUP PORTION OF THE SELF-TEST MODE. SIMPLY FOLLOW THE ON-SCREEN 
INSTRUCTIONS TO MAKE ANY ADJUSTMENTS YOU FEEL ARE NECESSARY. 


















12 


MCR II SYSTEM 

P. C. BOARD JUMPER OPTIONS 

/////////////////////V IDEO GENERATOR P. C. BOAR D///////////////////// 

MANUFACTURER 

EPROM NO. 

JW#1 JW#2 JW#3 JW#4 JW#5 JW//6 JW#7 JW#8 

MOTOROLA 

68764 

# 

B 


# 

* 

B 

B 

* 

68766 

# 

M 



B 

B 

B 

* 

INTEL 

2764 

m 

// 

# 

B 

# 

B 

B 

# 

T. I. 

2564 

# 

B 

B 

# 

1 

# 

# 

B 

//////////////////////////////c. P. U. P. C. BOAR D////////////////////////////// 

MANUFACTURER 

EPROM NO. 

JW#1 JW#2 JW#3 JW#4 JW//5 JW#6 

NOTE: 

JUMPER OP¬ 
TION FOR 
PROGRAM 
ROMs ONLY. 

NUMEROUR MFR'S 

2532 

H 

# 

B 

B 

# 

B 

NUMEROUS MFR'S 

2732 

B 

# 

B 

B 

B 

# 

/////////////////////////S OUND I/O P. C. BOAR D///////////////////////// 

MANUFACTURER 

EPROM NO. 

JW#1 JW#2 


NUMEROUS MFR’S 

2532 

B 

# 

NUMEROUS MFR'S 

2732 

# 

* 


* = CUT JUMPER WIRES WHERE THIS SYMBOL APPEARS. 

// = LEAVE JUMPER WIRES IN WHERE THIS SYMBOL "#" APPEARS. 


The above table illustrates the fact that the Video Generator P.C. Board used in the MCR II 
System has 8 jumper wires, the C.P.U. P.C. Board used in the MCR II System has 6 jumper 
wires, and the Sound I/O P.C. Board used in the MCR II System has 2 jumper wires. 

Ail of the above Boards can be used with a variety of different SETS of EPROM chips. How¬ 
ever, these EPROMS are not all made by the same manufacturer and do have some internal dif¬ 
ferences. So, in order to make them function properly in their respective P.C. Boards, cer¬ 
tain jumper wires on these Boards have to be cut. 

The above table tells you which jumpers to cut (depending on which EPROM set you're going to 
use) by showing a under that jumper wires number. If there is NO under a jumper 
wires number, THAT PARTICULAR JUMPER WIRE IS NOT TO BE CUT. 

















































Troubleshooting 


Introduction 

The most common problems occur in harness 
components such as the coin acceptor, player con¬ 
trols, interconnecting wiring, etc. The TV monitor 
and PCB computer cause their share of problems 
too, but not as much as the harness and its compo¬ 
nent parts. TV monitor troubleshooting will not be 
covered here because it is covered in that section of 
this manual. 

As you already know, the PCB computer is a 
complex device with a number of different circuits. 
Some circuits remain basically the same among 
games, but overall there are a great many differences 
between them. PCB troubleshooting procedures, 
therefore, can be lengthy and will differ greatly 
among games. However, some basic Z-80 CPU 
information is involved in this section. 

General 

Suggestions 

The first step ih any troubleshooting procedure is 
correctly identifying the malfunction’s symptoms. 
This includes not only the circuits or features mal¬ 
functioning, but also those still operational. A care¬ 
fully trained eye will pick up other clues as well. For 
instance, a game in which the computer functions 
fail completely just after money was collected may 
have a quarter shorting the PCB traces. Often, an 
experienced troubleshooter will be able to spot the 
cause of the problem even before opening the 
cabinet. 

After all the clues are carefully considered, the 
possible malfunctioning areas can be narrowed 
down to one or two good suspects. Those areas can 
be examined by a process of elimination until the 
cause of the malfunction is discovered. 

Harness 

Component 

Troubleshooting 

Typical problems falling in this category are coin 
and credit problems, power problems and failure of 
individual features. 


NO GAME CREDIT 

For example, your prospective player inserts his 
quarter and is not awarded a game. The first item to 
check is if the quarter is returned. If the quarter is 
returned, the malfunction most certainly lies in the 
coin acceptor itself. First, use a set of test coins (both 
old and new) to ascertain that the player’s coin is not 
undersize or underweight. If your test coins are also 
returned, coin acceptor servicing is indicated. Gen¬ 
erally, the cause of this particular problem is a 
maladjusted magnet gate. Normally, this will mean 
slightly closing the magnet gate a little by turning the 
adjusting screw out a bit (see section on coin 
acceptor for more details). 

If the quarter is not returned and there is no game 
credit, the cause of the malfunction may be in one of 
several areas. First try operating the coin return 
button; if the coin is returned, the problem is most 
likely in the magnet gate. Enlarge the gap according 
to the coin acceptor service procedures. If this does 
not cure the problem, remove the coin acceptor, 
clean it and perform the major adjustment 
procedure. 

If the trapped coin is not returned when the wiper 
lever is actuated, you may have an acceptor jammed 
by a slug, gummed up with beer, a jammed coin 
chute, or mechanical failure of the acceptor mech¬ 
anism. In this case, first check for the slug that will 
generally be trapped against the magnet. If so, 
simply remove the slug and test the acceptor. If the 
chute is blocked, remove the acceptor and remove 
the jammed coins. If there is actual failure of the 
acceptor, remove the unit and repair as indicated in 
the coin acceptor service procedures. 

If the coin is making its way through the acceptor 
(that is, falling into the coin box), yet there is still no 
game credit, you either have a mechanical failure of 
the coin switch or electrical failure of the coin and 
credit circuits. The first place to begin is by checking 
the coin switch. Most of these switches are the 
make/break variety of micro switch, which is 
checked by testing for continuity between the NO, 
NC.and C terminals. When not actuated, the NC and 
C terminals should be continuous and the NO 
terminal open. When operated, the NO and C 
terminals should close and the NC should be open. If 
the coin switch checks out, examine the connections 
to the terminals to make sure there is good contact. If 
necessary, use the continuity tester and check from 
the terminal lug on the switch to the associated PCB 
trace. This will tell you if there is a continuous lineall 
the way to the credit circuit. 


5-1 



If the coin switch wires do not check out, the 
problem is in the computer — most likely in the coin 
and credit circuitry. 

If you do get game credit when a coin is deposited, 
but the game will not start when the start switch is 
pressed, you may have a problem in the start switch, 
the interconnecting wiring or in the computer. First 
check the switch. If the switch is OK, proceed to 
check the wiring. Again, make sure you go from the 
terminal lug on the switch to the PCB trace. This way, 
you will check the terminal contact as well as PCB 
edge connector contact. If the wiring is continuous, 
proceed to check the PCB credit circuit. If not. check 
each section of the wiring, until the discontinuity is 
located. If the wiring is OK, the problem must lie in 
the computer. 

Transformer and 
Line Voltage 
Problems 

Your machine must have the correct line voltage to 
operate properly. If the line voltage drops too low, a 
circuit in the computer will disable game credit. The 
point at which the computer will fail to work will vary 
some from game to game, but no game will work on 
line voltage that drops below 105 VAC. 

Low line voltage may have many causes. Line 
voltage normally fluctuates a certain amount during 
the day as the total usage varies. Peak usage times 
occur mainly at dawn or dusk, so if your machine’s 
malfunction seems to be related to the time of day, 
this may be a factor. A large load connected to the 
same line as the game (such as a large air condi¬ 
tioner or other device with an exceptionally large 
motor) may drop the line voltage significantly when 
starting up. This drop can result in an intermittent 
credit problem. In addition, poor connections in the 
location wiring, plug, or line cord may also cause a 
significant drop in power. Cold solder joints in the 
game's harness, especially in areas like the trans¬ 
former connections, interlock switch, or fuse block, 
may also produce the same results, although prob¬ 
ably on a more permanent basis. 

Sometimes location owners (especially in bars) 
replace light switches with dimmer rheostats, and 
the game is sometimes on the same line. Obviously, 
the voltage available to the game is going to drop 
dramatically when the dimmer is turned. 

In any case, the way to check for correct line voltage 
is with your VOM. Set the VOM to 250 VAC and stick 
the probes in the wall receptacle. If it’s OK here, 
check the transformer primary connections. If you 
do not get 117 VAC, examine the solder joints on the 
transformer, fuse block, and interlock switch. If you 
do get 117 VAC, the problem must be either in the 
transformer, harness connections, or in the PCB 
power supply. 


If you suspect the transformer, check its secondaries 
with the VOM set to 50 VAC and correlate the 
readings with the legend on the side of the trans¬ 
former. The transformer must also be correctly 
grounded, so check the ground potential as well, 
especially if there is a hum bar rolling up or down the 
TV screen 

HARNESS PROBLEMS 

Other harness problems include blowing fuses and 
malfunctioning controls. The repeating blown-fuse 
problem can sometimes be quite exasperating to 
solve, for short circuits have the tendency to occur in 
areas almost impossible to find. First, try inserting a 
new fuse, as old fuses age and blow without cause. If 
the new one also blows, you definitely have a short. 

The best way to approach this problem is by turning 
the power off and disconnecting devices that may be 
causing the problem, such as the TV, transformer, 
and PCB. Disconnect the devices by pulling off their 
connectors, but do not allow them to touch. If 
necessary, insulate them with small pieces of elec¬ 
trical tape. Then, connect your VOM across the 
terminals of the fuse block (all electrical power shut 
off), and set it to one of the resistance scales. This 
will save blowing a fuse each time you want to check 
the circuit. 

If the VOM reveals that disconnecting the devices 
removed the short, reconnect the devices one by one 
until the short returns. The last device connected is 
the one that is at fault. If the VOM reads a short even 
after the devices are disconnected, the fault must lie 
in the harness itself, and only patient exploration will 
reveal its location. First, carefully examine all the 
wiring, looking for terminals that may be touching, 
metal objects such as coins shorting connections or 
burned insulation. If necessary, use the VOM to 
check each suspected wire. 

MALFUNCTIONING CONTROLS 

One of the most common problems here is a bad 
potentiometer. Typically, a bad pot will cause the 
image to jump as it reaches a certain point. The only 
cure for this one is to install a new pot. 

If a feature that is operated by a switch (for example, 
joysticks, foot pedals, control panel buttons) does 
not operate at all, check the switch with a VOM or 
continuity tester to verify its operation. If the switch 
does not check out, replace it. If the switch is OK, 
you should suspect the input to the switch from the 
PCB. In this case, get out the harness and logic 
schematics and check to see what kind of input it is. 
In many cases, the input will be+5VDC. If so, use the 
VOM to check its presence. Normally, the switch is 
used to pull a +5 VDC line LOW to GND or to pull a 
LOW line HIGH. If the PCB output is missing, check 
the wire length from the PCB. If you find the signal at 
the PCB trace, the wire length or connection is at 
fault. If not, begin exploring the PCB using the logic 
schematics 


5-2 



A Glossary of 

Microprocessor 

Terms 

MICROPROCESSOR — one or several micro- 
circuits that perform the function of a computer’s 
CPU. Sections of the circuit have arithmetic and 
comparative functions that perform computations 
and executive instructions 

CPU — central-processing unit. A computing sys¬ 
tem’s “brain”, whose arithmetic, control and logic 
elements direct functions and perform computa¬ 
tions. The microprocessor section of a microcom¬ 
puter is on one chip or several chips. 

PROM — programmable read-only memory. User 
permanently sets binary on-off bits in each cell by 
selectively fusing or not fusing electrical links. Non¬ 
erasable. Used for low-volume applications 

EPROM — erasable, programmable, read-only 
memory. Can be erased by ultraviolet light bath, then 
reprogrammed. Frequently used during design and 


Introduction to the 
Z-80 CPU 


The term “microcomputer” has been used to de¬ 
scribe virtually every type of small computing device 
designed within the last few years. This term has 
been applied to everything from simple “micropro¬ 
grammed” controllers constructed out of TTL MSI 
up to low end minicomputers with a portion of the 
CPU constructed out of TTL LSI “bit slices.” How¬ 
ever, the major impact of the LSI technology within 
the last few years has been with MOS LSI. With this 
technology, it is possible to fabricate complete and 
very powerful computer systems with only a few 
MOS LSI components. 

The Zilog Z-80 family of components can be config¬ 
ured with any type of standard semiconductor 
memory to generate computer systems with an 
extremely wide range of capabilities. For example, 
as few as two LSI circuits and three standard TTL 
MSI packages can be combined to form a simple 
controller. With additional memory and I/O devices a 
computer can be constructed with capabilities that 
only a minicomputer could previously deliver. 

New products using the MOS LSI microcomputer 
are being developed at an extraordinary rate. The 
Zilog Z-80 component set has been designed to fit 
into this market through the following factors: 


development to get programs debugged, then re¬ 
placed by ROM for mass production. 

ROM — read-only memory. The program, or binary 
on-off bit pattern, is set into ROM during manufac¬ 
ture, usually as part of the last metal layer put onto 
the chip. Nonerasable. Typical ROM’s contain up to 
16,000 bits of data to serve as the microprocessor’s 
basic instructions. 

RAM — random-access memory. Stores binary bits 
as electrical charges in transistor memory cells. Can 
be read or modified through the CPU. Stores input 
instructions and results. Erased when power is 
turned off. 

LSI — large scale integration. Formation of hun¬ 
dreds or thousands of so-called gate circuits on 
semiconductor chips. Very large scale integration 
(VLS) involves microcircuits with the greatest com¬ 
ponent density. 

MOS — metal-oxide semiconductor. A layered 
construction technique for integrated circuits that 
achieves high component densities. Variations in 
MOS chip structures create circuits with speed and 
low-power requirements, or other advantages (static 
will damage a MOS chip). 


1. The Z-80 is fully software compatible with the 
popular 8080A CPU. 

2. Existing designs can be easily converted to 
include the Z-80. 

3. The Z-80 component set is at present superior in 
both software and hardware capabilities to any 
other microcomputer system on the market 
today. 

4. For increased throughput the Z80A operating at a 
4 MHZ clock rate offers the user significant speed 
advantages. 

Microcomputer systems are extremely simple to 
construct using Z-80 components. Any such system 
consists of three parts: 

1. CPU (Central Processing Unit) 

2. Memory 

3. Interface Circuits to peripheral devices 

The CPU is the heart of the system. Its function is to 
obtain instructions from the memory and perform 
the desired operations. The memory is gsed to 
contain instructions and in most cases data that is to 
be processed. For example, a typical instruction 
sequence may be to read data from a specific 
peripheral device, store it in a location in memory, 
check the parity and write it out to another peripheral 
device. Note that the Zilog component set includes 
the CPU and various general purpose I/O device 
controllers, while a wide range of memory devices 
may be used from any source. Thus, all required 
components can be connected together in a very 
simple manner with virtually no other external logic. 


5-3 



General Purpose Registers 

There are two matched sets of general purpose 
registers, each set containing six 8-bit registers that 
may be used individually as 8-bit registers or as 16- 
bit register pairs by the programmer. One set is 
called BC, DE and HL while the complementary set 
is called BC', DE' and HL'. At any one time the 
programmer can select either set of registers to work 
with through a single exchange command for the 
entire set. In systems where fast interrupt response is 
required, one set of general purpose registers and an 
accumulator/flag register may be reserved for 
handling this very fast routine. Only a simple ex¬ 
change command need be executed to go between 
the routines. This greatly reduces interrupt service 
time by eliminating the requirement for saving and 
retrieving register contents in the external stack 
during interrupt or subroutine processing. These 
general purpose registers are used for a wide range 
of applications by the programmer. They also sim¬ 
plify programming, especially in ROM based sys¬ 
tems where little external read/write memory is 
available. 

Arithmetic & Logic Unit (ALU) 

The 8-bit arithmetic and logical instructions of the 
CPU are executed in the ALU. Internally the ALU 
communicates with the registers and the external 


data bus on the internal data bus. The type of 
functions performed by the ALU include: 

Add Left or right shifts 

or rotates (arithmetic 
and logical) 

Subtract Increment 

Logical AND Decrement 

Logical OR Set bit 

Logical Exlusive OR Reset bit 
Compare Test bit 

Instruction Register and 
CPU Control 

As each instruction is fetched from memory, it is 
placed in the instruction register and decoded. The 
control sections performs this function and then 
generates and supplies all of the control signals 
necessary to read or write data from or to the 
registers, control the ALU and provide all required 
external control signals. 

Z-80 CPU Pin Description 

The Z-80 CPU is packaged in an industry standard 
40 pin Dual In-Line Package. The I/O pinsareshov n 
in the below figure and the function of each is 
described. 


M, 

MREQ 

SYSTEM J ioSo 

CONTROLS — 

RD 

WR 

RFSH 


CPU 

CONTROL 


HALT 

WAIT 

<_ 

INT 

NMI 

RESET 

S 


CPU /'BUSRQ 


BUS 

CONTROL 



<D 

+5V 

GND 



ADDRESS 

BUS 


DATA 

BUS 


5-4 




Ao'Ais 

(Address Bus) 

Tri-state output, active high. Aq-A 15 constitute a 16- 
bit address bus. The address bus provides the 
address for memory (up to 64K bytes) data ex¬ 
changes and for I/O device data exchanges. I/O 
addressing uses the 8 lower address bits to allow the 
user to directly select up to 256 input or 256 output 
ports. Ao is the least significant address bit. During 
refresh time, the lower 7 bits contain a valid refresh 
address 

□o-D 7 
(Data Bus) 

Tri-state input/output, active high. D 0 -D 7 constitute 
an 8-bit bidirectional data bus. The data bus is used 
for data exchanges with memory and I/O devices. 

Mi 

(Machine Cycle one)_ 

Output, active low. M, indicates that the current 
machine cycle is the OP code fetch cycle of an 
instruction execution. Note that during execution of 
2-byte op-codes, Ml is generated as each op code 
byte is fetched. These two byte op-codes always 
begin with C BH, DDH, EDH or FDH. Ml also occurs 
with IORQ to indicate an interrupt acknowledge 
cycle. 

MREQ 

(Memory Request) 

Tri-state output, active low. The memory request 
signal indicates that the address bus holds a valid 
address for a memory read or memory write 
operation. 

IORQ 

(Input/Output Request) _ 

Tri-state output, active low. The IORQ signal indi¬ 
cates that the lower half of the address bus holds a 
valid I /O address for a I/O read or write operation. An 
IORQ signal is also generated with an Ml signal 
when an interrupt is being acknowledged to indicate 
that an interrupt response vector can be placed on 
the data bus. Interrupt Acknowledge operations 
occur during M-, time while I/O operations never 
occur during M, time. 

RD 

(Memory Read) _ 

Tri-state output, active low. RD indicates that the 
CPU wants to read data from memory or an I/O 
device. The addressed I/O device or memory should 
use this signal to gate data onto the CPU data bus. 

WR 

(Memory Write) __ 

Tri-state output, active low. WR indicates that the 
CPU data bus holds valid data to be stored in the 
addressed memory or I/O device. 


RFSH 

(Refresh) _ 

Output, active low. RFSH indicates that the lower 7 
bits of the address bus contain a refresh address for 
dynamic memories and the current MREQ signal 
should be used to do a refresh read to all dynamic 
memories. 

HALT 

(Halt state) _ 

Output, active low. HALT indicates that the CPU has 
executed a HALT software instruction and is await¬ 
ing either a non maskable or a maskable interrupt 
(with the mask enabled) before operation can re¬ 
sume. While halted, the CPU executes NOP's to 
maintain memory refresh activity. 

WAIT 

(Wait) _ 

Input, active low. WAIT indicates to the Z-80 CPU 
that the addressed memory or I/O devices are not 
ready for a data transfer. The CPU continues to enter 
wait states for as long as this signal is active. This 
signal allows memory or I/O devices of any speed to 
be synchronized to the CPU. 

INT 

(Interrupt Request) 

Input, active low. The Interrupt Request signal is 
generated by I/O devices. A request will be honored 
at the end of the current instruction if the internal 
software controlle d interru pt enable flip-flop (IFF) is 
enabled and if the BUSRQ signal is not active. When 
the CP U acc epts the interrupt, an acknowledge 
signal (IORQ during M! time) is sent out at the 
beginning of the next instruction cycle. The CPU can 
respond to an interrupt in three different modes that 
are described in detail in section 5.4 (CPU Control 
Instructions). 

NMI 

(Non-Maskable Interrupt) 

Input, negative edge triggered. The non mask able 
interrupt request line has a higher priority than INT 
and is always recognized at the end of the current 
instruction, inde pend ent of the status of the interrupt 
enable flip-flop. NMI automatically forces the Z-80 
CPU to restart to location 0066h. The program 
counter is automatically saved in the external 
stack so that the user can return to the program 
that was interrupted. Note that continuous WAIT 
cycles can preven t the cu rrent instructio n fro m 
ending, and that a BUSRQ will override a NMI. 

RESET 

Input, active low. RESET forces the program counter 
to zero and initializes the CPU. The CPU initializa¬ 
tion includes: 

1) Disable the interrupt enable flip-flop 


5-5 



2) Set Register I = OOh 

3) Set Register R =OOh 

4) Set Interrupt Mode 0 

During reset time, the address bus and data bus go 
to a high impedance state and all control ouput 
signals go to the inactive state. 


BUSRQ 
(Bus Request) 

Input, active low. The bus request signal is used to 
request the CPU address bus, data bus and tri-state 
output control signals to go to a high impedance 
state so that other devices can control these buses. 
When BUSRQ is activated, the CPU will set these 


buses to a high impedance state as soon as the 
current CPU machine cycle is terminated. 

BUSAK 

(Bus Acknowledge) 

Output, active low. Bus acknowledge is used to 
indicate to the requesting device that the CPU 
address bus, data bus and tri-state control bus 
signals have been set to their high impedance state 
and the external device can now control these 
signals. 

CLK 

(Clock) 

Single phase TTL level clock which requires only a 
330 ohm pull-up resistor to +5 volts to meet all 
clock requirements. 


5-6 





PLEASE NOTE: 


THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS SECTION 
IS TOLD IN AN EASY TO UNDERSTAND MANNER 
AND IS INTENDED TO AID THOSE WITHOUT AN 
ELECTRONICS DEGREE IN TROUBLESHOOTING AND 
REPAIRING THEIR GAMES T.V. MONITOR. 

IF YOU READ THROUGH THIS SECTION AND STILL 
HAVE QUESTIONS, PLEASE CONTACT YOUR DISTRIBUTOR 
OR MIDWAY MANUFACTURING COMPANY AT THE TOLL 
FREE NUMBER PROVIDED WITH YOUR GAMES PAPERS. 

OUR STAFF AND OUR DISTRIBUTORS STAND READY 
TO HELP YOU! 

THANK YOU 


r 


VI T.V. Monitor 




Color T.V 
Monitor 


Introduction: (How to 

use this section of your manual.) 

This section has been designed to simply familiarize 
you with one of the more mystical components in 
your game — the T.V. monitor. If you are an 
electronics technician who is quite knowledgeable 
on the subject, you may decide to just go to the 
schematics and start troubleshooting the defective 
monitor. But if you are like most people, a monitor is 
a T.V. set, and that means a complex doo-dad that 
means big buck repairs. This isn’t necessarily so. 
This section of the manual will acquaint you with the 
monitor and could just help you repair it if you feel 
adventurous enough to give it a try. If you have any 
knowledge of electronics, especially the use of a 
voltmeter, the repairs you can make are astonishing. 
Just keep in mind that ELECTRICITY CAN BE VERY 
DANGEROUS, SO BE CAREFUL!! 

If you want to understand how a monitor works, just 
read the "THEORY OF OPERATION” subsection. If 
you wish, you can follow along with the schematics. 
The information is presented in a very basic manner 
but more complete treatment of the subject can be 
found in the technical sections of bookstores. 

If you want to attempt to repair your monitor, it would 
be a good idea to read this whole section beginning 
to end before starting. Pay attention to all warnings 


and take them seriously. The more equipment you 
have the better, but a low cost Volt-Ohm-Milliameter 
can often do the trick. Here are the steps to take: 

1. Find the symptom that matches the problems 
your monitor has in the “SYSTEM — DIAG¬ 
NOSIS” subsection. The diagnosis tells the 
circuit or area the problem may be in and 
possibly even the actual component causing it. 

2. Once you have the circuit that is causing the 
trouble, read the "TROUBLESHOOTING” sub¬ 
section to learn the procedure for finding the 
bad part. 

3. Next, go to the schematic section and find the 
schematic that matches your monitor. It may be 
helpful to read the “DIFFERENCES BETWEEN 
MONITORS” subsection if you are unsure of 
which monitor you have. Use the schematic to 
see what parts are in the offending circuit. 

That really is all there is to it. Just remember that 
there are some bizarre or rare symptoms not 
covered, or that a monitor may have two or more 
different problems that only a genius, the experi¬ 
enced, or an experienced genius can figure out. But 
be patient, follow safety precautions, and remember 
that there is also literature available from the monitor 
companies through your distributor or from Midway 
Manufacturing Company on request. (There is atoll 
free number on the back side of the front cover of this 
manual.) 


6-1 



Symptom Diagnosis 


1. Insufficient width or heighth: 

A. Horizontal line (due to VERTICAL CIR¬ 
CUIT DEFECT). 

• Bad yoke. 

• Bad vertical output section. 

• Open fusible resistor in vertical section. 

• Bad height control. 

• Bad flyback. 

B. Vertical line (due to HORIZONTAL CIR¬ 
CUIT DEFECT). 

• Bad yoke. 

• Open width coil. 

• Open part in horizontal output section. 

2. Picture spread out too far or crushed in certain 
areas: 

A. Horizontal or vertical output transistor. 

B. Bad component in output circuitry. 

3. Line too close with black spacing: 

A. Problem in vertical section causing poor 
linearity. 

4. Poor focus and convergence: 

A. Bad high voltage transformer (“flyback”) or 
control. 

B. Focus voltage wire not connected to neck- 
board terminal. 

5. Colors missing; check: 

A. Interface color transistors. 

B. Color output transistors. 

C. Cracked printed circuit board. 

D. Color circuits. 

E. Video input jack. 

6. Picture not bright enough: 

A. Weak emission from picture tube. (Turn 
horizontal sync off frequency and put 
brightness all the way up for about 15 
minutes. Occasionally this cures the prob¬ 
lem.) 

7. Silvery effect in white areas; check: 

A. Beam current transistors. 

B. Weak picture tube emission. 

8. Too much brightness with retrace lines; check: 

A. Beam limiter transistors. 

B. Brightness and/or color blanking control 
set too high. 

9. Increasing brightness causes an increase in size 
and poor focus. 

A. Weak high voltage rectifier or regulation 
(high voltage unit). 


10. Small picture and/or poor focus: 

A. Low B+ voltage (power supply trouble). 

11. Vertical rolling: 

A. Vertical oscillator transistor, 1C, or circuit. 

B. No sync from logic board. 

12. Horizontal line across center: 

A. Vertical output circuit is dead (see symp¬ 
tom No. 1. A.). 

B. Vertical oscillator is not putting outthe right 
wave form. 

13. Picture bends: 

A. Horizontal sync needs adjusting. 

B. Magnetic or electromagnetic interference. 

14. Flashing picture, visable retrace lines: 

A. Broken neck board. 

B. Internal short circuit in the picture tube 
(arcing). 

15. Unsymmetrical picture or sides of picture: 

A. Defective yoke. 

16. No brightness, power supply operating — No 
high voltage for the picture tube; check: 

A. Horizontal oscillator. 

B. Horizontal amplifier and output. 

C. Flyback transformer (high voltage unit). 

17. No brightness, high voltage present; check: 

A. Heater voltage to the tube at the neck 
board. 

B. Screen-grid voltage for the tube. 

C. Focus voltage. 

D. Grid to cathode picture tube bias. 

18. No high voltage; check: 

A. For AC input to the “flyback". 

B. Horizontal deflection stages. 

C. Flyback transformer. 

D. Yoke. 

E. Power supply. 

19. No horizontal and vertical hold; check: 

A. Sync transistors and circuit. 

B. Wires and jack from logic board to the 
monitor. 

20. Wavey picture — (power supply defect); check: 

A. Transistors, diodes, electrolytic capacitors 
in the power supply. 


6-2 



21. Moving bars in picture: 

A. Ground connector off between monitor 
and logic boards. 

B. Defect in the power supply (see wavy 
picture symptom). 

22. Washed out picture (see picture not bright 

enough): 

A. Check video signal at the cathode pins with 
an oscilloscope. If there is about 80 volts 
peak to peak, the picture tube has weak 
emission. 

23. Monitor won’t turn on: 

A. Problem in the power supply: Check fuse, 
transistors, open fusible resistor. 

B. Shorted horizontal output transistor 


C. Defective high voltage disabling circuit. 

D. Crack(s) somewhere on main chassis 
board. 

24. Can’t adjust purity or convergence: 

A. Use a degausser to demagnetize the pic¬ 
ture tube carefully following your degaus¬ 
ser’s instructions. 

B. Picture tube defective. 

C. Metal foreign material is in picture tube 
shield. 

D. Nearby equipment is electromagnetically 
interferring. 

E. The poles of the earth are pulling off the 
purity. 

F. Poor focus or width of picture. 


Guide To Schematic Symbols 




THERMISTOR 

(POLARITY DOESN’T MATTER) 


IRON CORE TRANSFORMER 

(SUCH AS A FLYBACK) 



INDUCTOR, COIL, CHOKE FUSE 

(POLARITY DOESN’T MATTER) (POLARITY DOESN’T MATTER) 



(-) CATHODE 

(+) ANODE 


CATHODE (-) I 
ANODE (+) 


ZENER DIODE 


DIODE 



NPN TRANSISTOR 




VARIABLE RESISTOR, POT, CONTROL 

(POLARITY DOESN’T MATTER) 


—AAA/- 

RESISTOR 

(POLARITY DOESN’T MATTER) 




LINES ARE CONNECTED 


ELECTROLYTIC CAPACITOR 


LINES ARE NOT CONNECTED CAPACITOR 

(POLARITY DOESN’T MATTER) 


/ ' / OR — 

GROUND 


6-4 



Troubleshooting 


Troubleshooting monitors requires experience, pati¬ 
ence, and luck. The first step is to match the 
symptom the monitor displays to the diagnosis next 
to it in the “SYMPTOM-DIAGNOSIS” subsection. 
This will pinpoint the circuit the problem is probably 
in, and often the parts to check. Next, the circuit 
should be visually inspected to see if there are any 
parts broken, burned, or if something is there that 
shouldn’t be, like a loose screw, etc. Some parts go 
bad before others and should be checked first. In 
fact, following is the general order in which parts 
usually go bad: 

1. Semiconductors (like transistors, diodes, and 
integrated circuits). 

2. Fusible resistors. 

3. Electrolytic capacitors. 

4. Resistors. 

5. Capacitors and coils. 

Always remember that a monitor can bite like a 
snake. Even when it is turned off, capacitors hold 
voltage and will discharge it to you should you be 
touching chassis ground. The picture tube or CRT, 
itself, is a giant capacitor, so avoid the flyback anode 
plug hole. With the monitor on, the power supply 
circuit and/or the flyback, which puts out at least 
18,000 volts, CAN BE KILLERS!! Avoid handling 
power transistors (usually output transistors), yoke 
terminals, and other high power components when 
the monitor is on. 

WARNING: That picture tube is a bomb! 

When it breaks, first it implodes, then 
it explodes. Large pieces of glass 
have been known to fly in excess of 
20 feet in all directions. DO NOT 
carry it by the long, thin neck. Dis¬ 
charge its voltage to ground by 
shorting the anode hole to ground. 
Use a plastic handled screwdriver, 
connect one end of a wire with an 
alligator clip at each end to chassis 
ground and the other end to the 
metal shaft of the screwdriver. Using 
ONE HAND ONLY (put the other in 
your pocket) and touching ONLY 
the plastic handle of the screwdriver 
(DO NOT TOUCH THE METAL 
SHAFT) stick the blade of the screw¬ 
driver into the anode hole. Be pre¬ 
pared for a fairly loud pop and a 
flash. The longer the monitor has 
been turned off, the smaller the pop 
and dimmer the flash. But BE CARE¬ 
FUL, picture tubes will hold a very 


healthy charge for at least a week if 
not longer. Even after you’ve dis¬ 
charged it once, it may still carry a 
residual charge. It’s better to be too 
careful than dead, which is why 
electronic equipment always carries 
stickers referring servicing to quali¬ 
fied personnel. Handle the side with 
the viewing screen against your 
chest when changing it. ALWAYS 
wear safety goggles when handling 
the picture tube. 


To maintain the safety and performance of the 
monitor, always use exact replacement parts. For 
instance, the wrong components in the power sup¬ 
ply can cause a fire, or the wrong color transistor 
may give a funny color to the picture. Service your 
monitor on a nonconductive firm table like wood, 
NOT METAL, and take off all of your jewelry just in 
case. With all this in mind, you are ready to begin 
troubleshooting. 


Observe the picture carefully. Try to vary the 
appropriate control that would most likely affect your 
particular symptom. For example, if there is poor 
brightness or no picture, try turning up the bright¬ 
ness or contrast control. If the controls have no effect 
at all, chances are there is trouble with the control 
itself, the circuit it controls, or a nearby circuit that 
may be upsetting voltages. Go to the list of symptoms 
and determine with the schematic where the bad 
circuit is. 


CAUTION: 

Keep in mind that capacitors hold a 
charge as can the picture tube (for at 
least a week and usually longer), and 
could shock you. 


First, check for obvious visual defects such as broken 
or frayed wires, solder where it is not supposed to be, 
missing components, burned components, or cracked 
printed circuit boards. If everything looks good up to 
this point, make sure that diodes, electrolytic capaci¬ 
tors, and transistors have their leads connected in the 
right polarity as shown on the schematic and the 
circuit board. 

Turn on the power and measure the voltages at the 
leads of the active devices such as tubes, transistors, 
or integrated circuits. Any voltage that does not 
come within at least 10% to 15% of the voltage 
specified on the schematic indicates either a prob¬ 
lem with that device or a component connected with 
it in the circuit. The next step is to use the ohmmeter 
to narrow down the field of possible offenders. 


6-5 




To test a transistor, one lead of the ohmmeter is 
placed on the base; and the other lead placed just on 
the emitter, then on the collector. A normal transistor 
will read either high resistance (infinite), or little 
resistance (400 to 900 ohms), depending on the 
polarity of this type transistor. Then the leads should 
be switched, one remaining on the base, and the 
other switched from the emitter to the collector. Now 
the opposite condition should result: the resistance 
should be infinite if it was lower when the other lead 
was on the base. Consistantly infinite readings 
indicate an open, and a short is demonstrated by 0-30 
ohms on most of these test readings. Finally, place 
one lead on the collector, then the other on the 
emitter. No matter which lead is used, there should 
be infinite resistance. Any lower reading, such as 50 
ohms (which is typical on a bad transistor), indicates 
a short. 

This all sounds pretty confusing, but a little experi¬ 
ence on a good transistor will make you an expert in 
no time. Usually, the lowest ohmmeter setting is used 
for testing transistors. Once in a great while a 
transistor may check out good on this test, but may 
actually be “leaky" or break down only on higher 
voltages. If in doubt, change it. It is also wise to check 
the transistor out of the circuit just in case some 
component in the circuit is affecting the ohmmeter 
reading. 

A diode is tested like a transistor except it only has 
two leads. Again, there should be high resistance one 


way and little resistance the other. If it tests bad, take 
one lead out of the circuit in case some component is 
messing up the ohmmeter reading. 

NOTE: DO NOT leave soldering equipment on the 
leads too long since all semiconductors, 
especially integrated circuits, are easily 
destroyed by heat. 

Without special equipment, integrated circuits are 
checked by verifying the proper DC voltage on the 
pins and the correct AC wave form using an 
oscilliscope. BE CAREFUL: Shorting their pins can 
easily destroy them 

Resistors are checked with an ohmeter and should 
usually be within ten percent of the value stated on 
them and on the schematic. You may have to 
desolder one lead from the printed circuit board. If 
you wreck the foil on the board, carefully solder a 
small wire over the break to reconnect the conduc¬ 
tive foil. 

Capacitors are tricky. Their resistance goes up when 
checked with an ohmmeter which shows a charging 
action. As they suck up current from the meter, the 
voltage goes up and so does the resistance. If you are 
sure a particular circuit is giving you a problem and 
everything else checks out O.K., Electrolytic capaci¬ 
tors are prime suspects. Substitute a new one and 
keep your fingers crossed. 


Theory of Operation 


To understand what goes on inside the monitor, 
large general groups of circuits will be examined 
instead of laboriously analyzing the branches and 
small circuits that make up these groups. This will 
help avoid confusion and aid in a basic, concrete, 
knowledge of what makes up a monitor. 

THE POWER SUPPLY — 

The AC going to the monitor from the game trans¬ 
former is just like the voltage and current from your 
wall outlet. It jumps up and down going positive and 
negative sixty times a second. But a monitor needs 
nice, smooth DC; direct current, not alternating. So 
diodes chop up the AC and a big electrolytic 
capacitor filters it out to make it even smoother. 
Since the monitor is a big piece of electronic 
equipment, with many circuits demanding a lot of 
power from the power supply, there are also zener 
diodes and transistors to help maintain a nice, 
constant, smooth voltage so that the monitor circuits 
don’t jump around. And this is what happens when 
you see a wavy picture. There is AC creeping 


through the power supply, so it must be mal¬ 
functioning. If the voltage from the power supply is 
too low, the other circuits will be starved for power 
and you may see a small, wavy picture, or none at all. 

Some circuits receive voltages that are higher than 
what the power supply should put out. But they come 
from the flyback transformer which will be discussed 
later. 

THE INTERFACE SECTION OF THE 
CHASSIS — 

The interface section of the chassis is fairly easy to 
identify. It is right by the place where the video 
jack(s) from the logic board(s) plug into. There are 
sets of transistors that receive the separate red, 
green, blue, and sync information from the cables 
that come from the logic boards. The circuits jack up 
the voltage and match impedances, or in other 
words, prepare the logic board outputs for the 
circuits that will really amplify them for the output 
devices such as the yoke in the case of the sync, or 
the picture tube that shows the colors. 


6-6 


An interesting aside is that our sync is composite 
negative sync. That means two things: 

1. The sync is a negative going wave form. 

2. There are two pulses going at different speeds 
over the same wire: 

a. Vertical wave forms at 60 times per second 
(or Hertz) and 

b. Horizontal wave forms at about 15,750 
times per second (Hz). 

The sync is amplified by a sync amplifier transistor 
and sent on its way to the oscillators. The sync or 
timing information will be explained along with the 
oscillator shortly. 

The color information is sent via wires to the neck 
board where the main amplification occurs. This will 
also be discussed later. 


VERTICAL AND HORIZONTAL 
DEFLECTION - 

After the sync signal is amplified by the sync amp, it 
goes to two different sections, the vertical and 
horizontal circuits. Basically, the sync signals are for 
timing so the picture doesn't mess up since it is 
assmebled like an orderly jigsaw puzzle, but so fast 
that you can’t see the electron beams for each color 
painting the picture on the screen. This will all 
become clear soon. For now, we will follow the 60 
cycle component of the sync as it goes on its journey 
to the deflection yoke. 

The 60 cycle pulse goes to the vertical oscillator to 
make sure this circuit goes back and forth (or 
oscillates) at 60 times a second. Without this pulse 
keeping the circuit at the correct speed, it may get 
lazy and oscillate at 58 cycles or lower, or get 
ambitious and oscillate at 62 cycles or higher. At the 
wrong speed, the picture will start to roll up or down. 

A Wells Gardner 13" or 19" color monitor uses 
transistors for its sync section. An Electrohome 13" 
or 19" color monitor uses an integrated circuit IC501 
for its sync section. The idea is all the same. The 
output to the vertical amplifying transistors for all 
monitors must be a sawtooth wave form, sort of like a 
bunch of pyramids,racing to the yoke’s vertical coils 
at 60 times a second. 

Along the way to the output transistors, the 60 cycle 
pulse is shaped and amplified to do the job: the yoke 
magnetically pushes the electron beam to fill the 
screen out sideways looking at the screen with the 
greatest length going up and down. Or viewing the 
screen sitting like a home television set. The 
amplified vertical output fills the screen up and down. 
Watching a monitor like this, seeing only a horizontal 
line means a problem with the vertical coils of the 
yoke or anything from the vertical output section on 
back to the oscillator. 


The horizontal section is very similar with a few 
exceptions. The horizontal wave shape is more like a 
square and has a frequency of 15,750 cycles a 
second. Again, Wells Gardner uses transistors for the 
horizontal oscillator, and Electrohome uses the other 
side of IC501. Still, the effect is the same. If the 
oscillator isn’t going at the correct speed, the picture 
may move sideways, start to slant, or tear up with 
slanted thin figures. With both the vertical and 
horizontal of all monitors, there are variable resistors 
that change the speed of the oscillators up and down. 
This way you have controls that can make the correct 
frequencies to keep the electronic jigsaw puzzle 
nicely locked in place. If you’re driving in a car and 
next to you someone else is driving their car at 
exactly the same speed, it will appear that they are 
not moving. And this is why the sync frequency and 
the oscillators frequencies must match, so the 
picture doesn’t appear to move. 

The correct wave form is shaped and amplified in the 
circuitry just like in the vertical section. But the 
horizontal output transistor is a large power tran¬ 
sistor and not only serves to give current to the 
horizontal yoke windings, it also feeds the flyback 
transformer. 

THE FLYBACK TRANSFORMER (OR 
HIGH VOLTAGE UNIT) — 

The picture tube needs high voltage to light up, and 
the power supply can’t meet this demand. The 
flyback transformer receives current alternating at 
about 15,750 times per second from the horizontal 
output transistor. The “flyback” jacks up its input 
voltage and puts out a higher voltage alternating at 
the same speed. But, in your “flyback” there are 
diodes that chop up the alternating voltage to make it 
a smooth DC output just like in the power supply. 
This is what goes through that thick red wire to your 
picture tube. THIS AREA HAS ABOUT 18,000 
VOLTS ON IT AND IT CAN KILL YOU!! 

The “flyback” may be dangerous, but it is also 
generous. It has extra output windings which give 
voltage to the heater pins of the picture tube, voltage 
for the vertical deflection circuits, and picture tube 
screen-grid voltage. So in a way, the high voltage 
“flyback" is like a second power supply. 

COLOR CIRCUITS 

The color circuits are pretty straight forward. The 
signals go into the interface section where some 
amplification and impedance matching occurs. 
These circuits are pretty sparse and simple. Each 
color just has two transistors and a diode with some 
resistors and capacitors. From here, the AC color 
signal is sent by wires to the neck board. 

The color output circuits are on the neck board. The 
color signals going to the transistors are controlled 
by two variable resistors called drive controls. There 
only two, one for the red and one for the green. The 


6-7 



blue doesn’t have one. In the emitter part of each 
transistor is another variable resistor that is the cut 
off control. These controls vary the amount of 
amplified AC signal that goes to the cathodes of the 
picture tube. The more signal, the more color. The 
bases of each of these transistors are connected 
together and are all connected to the blanking and 
beam limiting transistors which are in the interface 
section. 

The beam limiter helps control the brightness level, 
and the blanking transistor rapidly turns the picture 
tube on and off so that retrace lines don't show up on 
the screen. By turning up the brightness on a good 
monitor, these four to six retrace lines can be seen 
slanting diagonally across the picture. 

PROTECTION CIRCUIT — 

To protect the high voltage section against voltages 
that are too high coming from the power supply 
which could cause X-rays to be emitted from the 
"flyback", a circuit senses the higher power supply 
voltage, and using a transistor, turns off the horizon¬ 
tal oscillator. Since the horizontal oscillator doesn’t 
work, the horizontal output transistor has nothing to 
feed the "flyback” which in turn has nothing to feed 
the picture tube. The monitor will be silent, have no 
picture, and will appear to be off. But don’t be fooled. 
There is still that excessive amount of voltage 
coming from the power supply. To find out, check 
the emitter on TR502 of the Wells Gardner monitors; 
or the emitter of X04 for the Electrohome monitor. 
Here are the voltages you should receive: 

Wells Gardner = 127VDC 
Electrohome = 120VDC 

The best place to measure this voltage on an 
Electrohome monitor is at a pin marked B1 on the 
chassis. This is because a 13 inch color Electrohome 


monitor, the G07-FB0 or G07-902, has an integrated 
circuit and very little else in the power supply. Still, 
there should be 120VDC at B1 

THE PICTURE TUBE (OR CRT) - 

The picture tube or CRT is an output device. In other 
words, the end result of the circuits work is displayed 
by this part. Actually, the output of other circuits is in 
the neck of the picture tube. 

First, there is the heater. The heater boils off 
electrons from the cathodes so that they (the 
electrons) shoot up to the screen to excite the 
phosphors so that the three phosphors emit three 
colors of light. 

The cathodes are next, and again they emit electrons 
to turn on the tube phosphors, making it glow. The 
cathode can arc or short to the heater resulting in no 
picture and a defective picture tube. 

Next come the grids. The first grid is grounded. The 
following grid is the screen grid which receives about 
300VDC depending on the brightness setting. The 
next grid closest to the picture tube screen is the 
focus grid which gets about one fifth the amount of 
voltage that is applied to the picture tube anode. 

After jetting from the cathode through all these grids, 
the electrons speed through a mask, a sheet of 
material with tiny holes, and then excite the tiny dots 
of phosphor in the inside surface of the picture tube 
screen. The green electron gun (or cathode and 
circuitry) spits out electrons which head for the 
green phosphors only. The same goes for the red and 
blue guns. The way the phosphor light blends 
determines the color seen. Should these electron 
beams become too intense, they may burn the 
phosphor. With the monitor off, this can be seen as a 
dark permanent image of the video information on 
the tube screen. 


Differences 
Between Monitors 


The easiest way to identify the brand of monitor you 
are working with, assuming you can't find the brand 
name written on it anywhere, is to see if there are two 
circuit boards rising up from the chassis toward the 
picture tube neck. In other words, they stand up, or 
are perpendicular to the chassis, with a black plastic 
bracket holding them in place. This is a description of 
a Wells Gardner monitor. They use separate boards 
for main chunks of circuitry. Therefore, you have a 
“power board" (the power supply), an "interface 
board” (the interface section), and a “horizontal/ 
vertical board” (for the deflection circuitry). Still, 
there are a few parts on the chassis, but most can be 
found on the board. An Electrohome monitor has no 


separate boards, except for the neck board, and just 
has a flat chassis. 

Another good way to determine which monitor you 
have is to check the transistor call out numbers that 
are printed on the chassis next to the part. For 
instance, on the neck board, one of the color output 
transistors is TR401. If you look through the 
schematics or the parts lists, you will find TR401 in 
the Wells Gardner literature. On the other hand, the 
neck board transistor may say XI01. XI01 can be 
found in the Electrohome literature. So, all Wells 
Gardner transistor call outs begin with TR, and 
Electrohome transistor call outs start with an “X”. 


6-8 




Parts 

Interchangeability 


Some parts can be interchanged on all of the 
monitors. Here are the rules: 

1. You CAN swap the voltage regulator TR502 or 
X01 on any Wells Gardner or Electrohome 19 
inch monitor. You CAN NOT swap the voltage 
regulator on the 13 inch Wells Gardner or 
Electrohome (G07-902) since the Electrohome 
uses an integrated circuit for the power supply. 

2. You CAN swap any resistor between monitors 
that has the same resistance, wattage rating, 
and tolerance. 

3. You CAN swap any capacitor between monitors 
that has the same capacitance, and voltage 
rating. 

4. PICTURE TUBES: 

Due to the fact that “ELECTROHOME” is now 
(October, 1981) using a picture tube with an 
internal shield, these picture tubes can be used 
in EITHER “WELLS GARDNER” or“ELECTRO- 
HOME” monitors. 


However, a “WELLS GARDNER" picture tube 
can ONLY be used in a “WELLS GARDNER” 
monitor. It will not function properly if installed 
in an “ELECTROHOME” monitor. The picture 
purity will be off. 

5. You CAN NOT change any part that is a safety 
part, one that is shaded in gray on the schematic: 
it MUST be IDENTICAL to the original. To do 
otherwise IS DANGEROUS. For instance, the 13 
inch Electrohome (G07-904) monitor “flyback”, 
looks identical to the 19 inch Electrohome 
(G07-904) monitor "flyback”. 

In fact, there is even a 19 inch Electrohome 
(G07-905) monitor (which is an obsolete model) 
with a similar looking “flyback”. NONE OF 
THESE ARE INTERCHANGEABLE!! 

6. You CAN change any of the parts between the 
G07-904 and G07-907. They're essentially the 
same monitor except that the G07-907 has a 
vertically mounted picture tube. 

If there is any doubt about what parts can be 
swapped between each manufacturer’s 19 inch and 
13 inch models, compare the manufacturer’s part 
number between each one. If they match up, they are 
the same part. 


6-9 



WELLS-GARDNER 19” COLOR 


MOSI-00087- 


MAIN BOARD MQ-29 



VER1/H0R 1 - 

BOARD ImT/OjI 


T R 502 
2 SC i 106 



2Tv 

08 | 

/ I60v | 


ITOI 

DEGAUSSING 

COIL 


2SC-I706 
2SCi106 
2SCIAS4 
2SC >693 


2 SA 608 
2SA826 
2SA654 
2 SC i 740 

2 SCU1 5 
2SAI25 


2SC2242 B c E 























-OF? MONITOR SCHEMATIC DIAGRAM 

-00087-AOI2 




















































NECK BOARD (MS/QG) 


Rif. No. 

Pari No. 

Description 


RESISTORS 

R401 

203X6500-709 

1.8k Ohm ± 5% 1/8W Carbon 

R402 

203X6500-709 

1.8k Ohm ± 6% 1/8W Carbon 

R403 

203X6500-709 

1.8k Ohm ± 5V. 1/8W Carbon 

R404 

203X6500-447 

150 Ohm ± 5% 1/8W Carbon 

R405 

203X6500-481 

220 Ohm * 5% 1/8W Carbon 

R406 

203X6500-447 

150 Ohm ± 5% 1/8W Carbon 

R407 

203X6500-508 

270 Ohm ± 5% 1/8W Carbon 

R408 

203X6500 508 

270 Ohm ± 5% 1/8W Carbon 

R409 

203X6500-800 

4.7k Ohm ± 5% 1/8W Carbon 

r4io 

203X6500-800 

4.7k Ohm ± 5% 1/8W Carbon 

R411 

203X6500-800 

4,7k Ohm ± 5% 1/8W Carbon 

R412 

203X9104-809 

12k Ohm ± 5% 2.0W Metal Oxide 

R413 

203X9104-809 

12k Ohm ± 5% 2.0W Metal Oxide 

R414 

203X9104-809 

12k Ohm ± 5% 2.0W Metal Oxide 

R415 

203X5601-313 

2.7k Ohm ± 10% 1/2W Comp. 

R416 

203X5601-313 

2.7k Ohm ± 10% 1/2W Comp. 

R417 

203X5601-313 

2.7k Ohm ± 10% 1/2W Comp. 

R418 

203X5602-254 

470k Ohm ± 10% 1/2W Comp. 

R419 

203X5602-185 

330k Ohm ± 10% 1/2W Comp. 

R422 

203X9105-117 

1.0 Ohm ± 10% 2W Metal Oxide 

R423 

203X5102-155 

270k Ohm ± 5% 1/4W Carbon 

VR401 

204X21154)14 

500 Ohm Varistor R Drive 

VR402 

204X21154)14 

500 Ohm Varistor B Drive 

VR403 

204X21154X16 

5k Ohm Varistor R Cutoff 

VR404 

204X2115006 

5k Ohm Varistor G Cutoff 

VR405 

204X2115006 

5k Ohm Varistor B Cutoff 

VR406 

204X20004)25 

1M Ohm Varistor Screen 


CAPACITORS 

C401 

202X7000-247 

1000 pF, 50V, 10% Ceramic 

C402 

202X7000-247 

1000 pF, 50V, 10% Ceramic 


Ref. No. 

Pari No. 

Description 

C403 

202X7000-247 

1000 pF, 50V, 10% Ceramic 

C404 

202X7110-019 

1500 pF, 2kV ± 10% Ceramic 

C405 

202X7150-018 

100 pF, 12kV, ± 10% Ceramic 

C406 

202X7050-483 

.01 uF, 500V, ± 10% Ceramic 

C407 

202X7110019 

1500 pF, 2kV ± 10% Ceramic 

C408 

202X8000550 

68 pF, 50V, ± 10% Ceramic 

C409 

202X8000550 

68 pF, 50V, ± 10% Ceramic 

C410 

202X8000550 

68 pF, 50V, ± 10% Ceramic 



SEMICONDUCTORS 

TR401 

200X3206-800 

Transistor, 2SC2068, 2SC1514 
(R output) 

TR402 

200X3206-800 

Transistor, 2SC2068, 2SC1514 
(G output) 

TR403 

200X3206-800 

Transistor, 2SC2068, 2SC1514 
(B output) 

X404 

201X2100-126 

Diode, IS2367 (protector) 

X405 

201X2100-126 

Diode, IS2367 (protector) 

X406 

201X2100-126 

Diode, IS2367 (protector) 



MISCELLANEOUS 

J401 

206X5003-729 

Socket, 5 Pin 

J402 

206X5003-983 

Socket, 3 Pin 

P401 

204X9600-329 

Plug, 5 Pin 

P402 

204X9600-254 

Plug, 3 Pin 


A * 297X2000-072 HIGH VOLTAGE ASSEMBLY (T701) FINAL ASSEMBLY PARTS 


A ★ R7 ' )1 

204X1625-058 

3.3 Ohm, ± 10% 10WWW Resistor 

A ★88X4)129-506 

19VJTP22 Pix Tube 

VR702 

204X3901-125 

Focus Control 

38A5554-000 

Assy. Purity Shld/Degausslng 

X701 


Diode (SI HV) ) 

205X9800-256 

Lateral/Purity Assembly 

X702 


Diode (SI HV) > Part of T701 

Air 202X1110-810 

Yoke, Deflection 

X703 


Diode (SI HV) ) 

208X2000-946 

CRT Socket 




297X20004)72 

HV Unit (T701) 




6A0397 

Plug, Line Cord 




9A2753-003 

Degaussing Coll (L701) 


INTERFACE BOARD (P305) 

(MODEL 19K4606) 

RESISTORS SEMICONDUCTORS 


R201 

340X3910-934 

91 Ohm, 5%, 1/2W Carbon 

TR201 

86X0121-001 

Transistor (NPN) 

R203 

340X3102-934 

Ik Ohm, 5%, 1/2W Carbon 

TR202 

86X0121-001 

Transistor (NPN) 

R204 

340X2101-934 

100 Ohm, 5%, 1/4W Carbon 

TR203 

86X0121-001 

Transistor (NPN) 

R206 

340X3331-944 

330 Ohm, 10%, 1I2W Carbon 

TR204 

86X0066-001 

Transistor (PNP) 

R207 

340X3102-934 

Ik Ohm. 5%, 1I2W Carbon 

TR205 

86X0066-001 

Transistor (PNP) 

R208 

340X3152-934 

1.5k Ohm, 5%, 1/4W Carbon 

TR206 

86X0066-001 

Transistor (PNP) 

R209 

340X2101-934 

100 Ohm, 5%, 1/4W Carbon 

TR207 

86X0121-001 

Transistor (NNP) 

R210 

340X3102-934 

Ik Ohm, 5%, 1/2W Carbon 

TR208 

86X0121-001 

Transistor (NPN) 

R211 

340X2331-934 

330 Ohm, 5%, 1/4W Carbon 

TR209 

86X0121-001 

Transistor (NPN) 

R212 

340X2331-934 

330 Ohm, 5%, 1/4W Carbon 

ZD201 

66X0040-018 

Diode, Zener, 6.8v, 5%, 0.5W 

R213 

340X2331-934 

330 Ohm, 5%, 1/4W Carbon 

ZD202 

66X0040-019 

Diode, Zener, 3.9v, 5%, 0.5W 

R214 

•340X2201-934 

200 Ohm, 5%, 1/4W Carbon 




R215 

340X2201-934 

200 Ohm, 5%, 1/4W Carbon 




R216 

340X2201-934 

200 Ohm, 5%, 1/4W Carbon 


MISCELLANEOUS 

VR201 

40X0590017 

1.5k Ohm, Black Level Control 







J201 

204X9300-958 

Socket, 6 Pin 




J202 

204X9300-958 

Socket, 6 Pin 


CAPACITORS 

J203 

206X5019-207 

Socket, 4 Pin 




P201 

204X9601-195 

Plug, 6 Pin 

C201 

45X0524-038 

1000 uF, 16V Electrolytic 

P202 

204X9601-195 

Plug, 6 Pin 




P203 

204X9600-845 

Plug, 4 Pin 




P205 

6A0393006 

Plug, 6 Pin 


6-12 



VERT/HOR BOARD (MT/QJ) 


Rat. No. 

Pari No. 

Description 


RESISTORS 

R301 

203X6500-628 

820 Ohm, ± 5%, 1/8W Carbon 

R302 

203X6500-902 

12k Ohm, ± 5%, 1(8W Carbon 

R303 

203X6500-927 

15k Ohm, ± 5%, 1/8W Carbon 

R304 

203X6500-886 

10k Ohm, ± 5%, 1/8W Carbon 

R305 

203X6501-241 

330k Ohm, ± 5%, 1/8W Carbon 

R306 

203X6500-645 

Ik Ohm, ± 5%, 1/8W Carbon 

R307 

203X6500-689 

1.5k Ohm, ± 5%, 1/8W Carbon 

R309 

203X6500-724 

2.2k Ohm, ± 5%, 1/8W Carbon 

R310 

203X6501-285 

470k Ohm, ± 5%, 1/8W Carbon 

R311 

203X6501-065 

56k Ohm, ± 5%, 1/8W Carbon 

R312 

203X6501-126 

100k Ohm, + 5%, 1/8W Carbon 

R313 

203X6001-326 

10k Ohm, ± 5%, 1/8W Carbon 

R314 

203X6501-044 

47k Ohm, ± 5%, 1/8W Carbon 

R315 

203X6500-628 

820 Ohm, ± 5%, 1/8W Carbon 

R316 

203X6500-420 

120 Ohm, ± 5%, 1/8W Carbon 

R317 

203X6206-441 

2.2 Ohm, ± 5%, 1/2W Carbon 

R319 

203X6500-169 

100 Ohm, ± 5%, 1/8W Carbon 

R320 

203X6500-927 

15k Ohm, ± 5%, 1/8W Carbon 

R321 

203X6700-509 

560 Ohm, ± 5%, 1/2W Carbon 

R322 

203X9100-121 

22 Ohm, a 5%, 2W M.O. 

R323 

203X6500-689 

1.5K Ohm, ±5%, 1/8W Carbon 

R324 

203X6500-988 

27k Ohm, ± 5%, 1/8W Carbon 

R325 

203X6500-326 

47 Ohm, ± 5%, 1/8W Carbon 

R328 

203X6500-628 

820 Ohm, ± 5%, 1/8W Carbon 

R330 

203X6500-886 

10k Ohm, ± 5%, 1/8W Carbon 

R331 

203X6501-209 

220k Ohm, ± 5%, 1/8W Carbon 

R351 

203X6500-724 

2.2k Ohm, ± 5%, 1/8W Carbon 

R352 

203X6500-927 

15k Ohm, ± 5%, 1/8W Carbon 

R353 

203X6500-944 

18k Ohm, ± 5%, 1/8W Carbon 

R354 

203X6500-783 

3.9k Ohm, ± 5%, 1/8W Carbon 

R355 

203X6500-902 

12k Ohm, ± 5%, 1/8W Carbon 

R356 

203X65 r -0 561 

470 Ohm, ± 5%, 1/8W Carbon 

R357 

203X661.0-724 

2.2k Ohm, ± 5%, 1/8W Carbon 

R358 

203X6500-666 

1.2k Ohm, ± 5%, 1/8W Carbon 

R359 

2C3X6501-088 

68k Ohm, ± 5%, 1/8W Carbon 

R360 

203X5500-471 

27 Ohm, ± 5%, 1/4W Comp. 

R361 

203X6000-998 

1.2k Ohm, * 5%, 1/8W Carbon 

R363 

203X6500-666 

1.2k Ohm, ± 5%, 1/8W Carbon 

R364 

203X9014-988 

47k Ohm, ± 5%, 1W M.O 

R365 

203X6700-989 

56k Ohm, ± 5%, 1/2W Carbon 

R366 

203X6001-148 

3.3k Ohm, ± 5%, 1/8W Carbon 

R367 

340X2222-734 

2.2k Ohm, ± 5%, 1/2W Carbon 

R368 

203X6500-785 

3.9k Ohm, ± 5%, 1/8W Carbon 

R369 

203X6500-762 

3.3k Ohm, ± 5%, 1/4W Carbon 

R370 

302X6100-961 

Ik Ohm, ± 5%, 1/4W Carbon 

R371 

203X6104-751 

2.7k Ohm, ± 5%, 1/4W Carbon 

VR301 

204X2122-093 

Varistor, 250K Ohm, Vert. Hold 

VR302 

204X2114065 

Varistor, 20K Ohm, Vert. Size 

VR351 

2C4 X2114 059 

Varistor, 50K Ohm, Hor. Hold 


CAPACITORS 

C301 

203X1100-928 

0.15 uF, 50V, ± 10% Mylar 

C302 

203X1100-573 

0.022 uF, 50V, ± 10% Mylar 

C304 

203X1100-858 

0.1 uF, 50V, ± 10% Mylar 

C306 

203X0025026 

2.2 uF, 50V, Electrolytic 

C307 

203X1100-928 

0.15 uF, 50V, ± 10% Mylar 

C309 

203X1100-858 

0.1 uF, 50V, 4: 10% Mylar 

C310 

203X0010-011 

22 uF, 16V Electrolytic 

C311 

203X0020099 

1000 uF, 35V Electrolytic 

C312 

202X7000-469 

0.0082 uF, 50V, ± 10% Ceramic 


Rel. No. Part No. Description 


CAPACITORS (CONT.) 


C313 

203X0025-087 

47 uF, 50V Electrolytic 

C315 

203X0015-082 

10 uF, 25V Electrolytic 

C316 

203X1100-220 

3300 uF, 50V, ± 10% Mylar 

C317 

202X8000616 

100 pF, 50V, ± 10% Ceramic 

C351 

202X70Q0281 

1500 pF, 50V, ± 10% Ceramic 

C352 

202X7000-247 

1000 pF, 50V, ± 10% Ceramic 

C353 

203X1100573 

0.022 uF, 50V, ± 10% Mylar 

C355 

203X1100-858 

0.1 uF, 50V, ± 10% Mylar 

C356 

203X0015-105 

4.7 uF, 25V Electrolytic 

C357 

203X1201-013 

0.015uF, 200V ± 10% PP 

C358 

203X1201-034 

0.018 uF, 200V, ± 10% PP 

C359 

203X0040013 

4.7 uF, 160V Electrolytic 

C360 

202X7000-482 

0.01 uF, 50V, ± 10% Ceramic 

C361 

203X1100509 

0.015 uF,*50V, ± 10% Mylar 

C362 

203X0025-058 

10 uF, 50V Electrolytic 

C363 

203X1205-487 

0.01 uF, 630V, ± 10% PP 

C364 

202X7000482 

0.01 uF, 50V, ± 10% Ceramic 


SEMICONDUCTORS 

TR301 

200X4082-614 

Transistor, 2SA826Q 

TR302 

200X3174-006 

Transistor, 2SC1740Q 

TR303 

200X3174-006 

Transistor, 2SA1740Q 

TR304 

200X3174-006 

Transistor, 2SC1740Q 

TR305 

200X4049-081 

Transistor, 2SA490YLBGLI 

TR306 

200X3162-538 

Transistor, 2SC1625YLBGLI 

TR307 

200X3174-014 

Transistor, 2SC1740R 

TR308 

200X3174-006 

Transistor, 2SC1740Q 

TR351 

200X4085-415 

Transistor, 2SA854Q 

TR352 

200X3172-208 

Transistor, 2SC1722BKS 

TR353 

200X3174-006 

Transistor, 2SC1740Q 

TR354 

200X4082-614 

Transistor, 2SA826Q 

X301 

201X2010-144 

Diode, (SI) IS2473-T72 

X302 

201X2010-144 

Diode, (SI) IS2473-T72 

X303 

200X8000-026 

Diode, (GE), IN60TVGL 

X304 

200X8010165 

Diode (SI) ISS81 

X305 

201X2010165 

Diode (SI) ISS81 

X306 

201X2010165 

Diode (SI) ISS81 

X307 

200X8010102 

Diode (SI) MA26W 

X308 

200X8010-094 

Diode (SI) IS2473 

X351 

201X2010144 

Diode (SI) IS2473-T72 

X352 

201X2010144 

Diode (SI) IS2473-T72 

X353 

201X2010144 

Diode (SI) IS2473-T72 

X354 

201X2010144 

Diode (SI) IS2473-T72 

X355 

200X8220851 

Diode (Zener) RD10EBI 

X366 

200X8100130 

Diode (HS) RU-1 0.3 US 


MISCELLANEOUS 

J301 

204X9300958 

Socket, 6 Pin 

J302 

204X9300-958 

Socket, 6 Pin 

P301 

204X9601-195 

Plug, 6 Pin 

P302 

204X9601-195 

Plug, 6 Pin 

TH301 

201X0000534 

Thermistor 


TRANSFORMERS & COILS 

L351 

201X5200-091 

Coll, Horlz. Osc. 


POWER BOARD (MV) 





C503 

203X0010811 

22 uF, 16V Electrolytic 



RESISTORS 

C551 

203X0005846 

220 uF, 10V Electrolytic 

R501 

204X1725852 

180 Ohm, ± 10%, 15W WW 




R502 

203X6000808 

100 Ohm, ± 5%, 1/8W Carbon 


SEMICONDUCTORS 

R503 

203X6000-960 

Ik Ohm, ± 5%, 1/8W Carbon 




R504 

203X6000879 

560 Ohm, ± 5%, 1/8W Carbon 

TR501 

200X3174806 

Transistor, 2SC1740Q 

R505 

203X9014-965 

39k Ohm, * 5%, 1W M.O. 

A*TR502 

200X3145-404 

Transistor, 2SC1454 

R506 

203X6500842 

6.8k Ohm, ± 5%, 1/8W Carbon 

TR551 

200X3172-305 

Transistor, 2SC1723 

R551 

203X8500-420 

120 Ohm, ± 5%. 1/8W Carbon 

X501 

201X2230842 

Diode, (SI) Zener EQB01-06V 

VR501 

204X2050801 

Varistor Vert. Adj. 

X502 

201X2010144 

Diode, (SI) IS2473-T72 



CAPACITORS 


MISCELLANEOUS 

C501 

203X0040820 

10 uF, 160V Electrolytic 

J501 

204X9300958 

Socket, 6 Pin 

C502 

202X7000-281 

1500 pF, 50V, ± 10% Ceramic 

P501 

204X9601-195 

Plug, 6 Pin 




TH501 

201X0000618 

Thermistor 


6-11 




* 10 % 


6-13 






I0I.XI03 ond XIOS VIDEO AMP. 2SC484C 
1102.XI04 and X106 VIDEO AMR 2SA673C 






soman) 


• CAT HE AT EB 


Schematic Notes 

Unless otherwise specified 

Resistance: (£2) (K—K£2, 1/4 (W) carbon resistor 

Capacitance: 1 or higher-*- (pF), less than 1-»- (yF) 
working voltage-*- 50 (V) 
ceramic capacitor 
Inductance: (vH) 

Electrolytic Cap: Capacitance Value (^F)/working voltage (V), 
NP non-polar (or bipolar) electrolytic cap. 
Refer to the parts list for additional component information. 

3L indicates test point connection 
n k indicates chassis ground unless otherwise specified 


Hz indicates cycles per second 


00-4147-04 

G07-CB0 


For safety purposes (and continuing reliability) 

A replace all components marked with safety symbol with 
identical type. 

NO.TE: FR -*• fusible resistor <— 

Parts identification on circuit boards: 
e.g. SU1126A (R107 = R1107) 

SU3030A (R113 = R3113) 















Outside of the P.C.B. Ass’y 
Symbol 

A 

A 

A 

R05 

C04 

X01 

X02 

SC 

SC 

WA 


Description 

Picture Tube 19" 

ADeflection Yoke 
PC Magnet 
AFlyback Transf. 

Ahvr 

UNF Resistor 220ft,25W K 
C Capacitor 150pF, AC1.5KV 
Si. Transistor 
Si. Transistor 
Screw #8-% 

Screw V* x V* Pix Tube Mtg. .(4) 
Pyramidal Lock Washer (4) 

Nut Retainer, Pix Tube Mtg. (4) 
Clip — P.C.B. Support 
Standoff 

Wire Terminal (Gnd. Strap) 
Terminal Lug (Gnd.) 
Groundstrap Assy. 

Grounding Spring 
Wire Hook (Gnd. Strap) 

Purity Shield Holddown Clamp 
Support Brkt. RH 
Support Brkt. LH 
Chassis Base 
Yoke Wedge (3) 


Purity Shield Ass’y- Parts List 

Symbol 

D911, D912 


C911 

R921 


CRT Socket P.C.B. 

Resistors 

Symbol 

R3105 

R3106 

R3113 

R3114 

R3115 

R3116 

R3117 

R3118 

R3119 

R3120 

C3121 

Capacitors 

Symbol 

C3107 

C3108 

Coils 

Symbol 

L3101 


Description 

Degaussing Coil 
Rectifier 1 Amp 600V (2) 

Pin Terminal (2) 

Pin Terminal Housing 
Purity Shield (2 pcs.) 

Purity Shield (2 pcs.) 

Capacitor lOOnF 10% 400V 
Resistor, Wirewound 33 ft, 4W 
Fire Retardent Term. Strip 4 Lug 


Description 

V R 200 

V R 200 

V R 5K 

V R 5K 

V R 5K 

OM R 10Kft2W J 
OM R 10Kft2W J 
OM R 10Kft2W J 
Comp. R 3.3KftVfeW K 
Comp. R 3.3Kfty 2 WK 
Comp. R 3.3Kft'/ 2 W K 


Description 

E Cap. IOuF 250V A 

C Cap. lOOOpF DC1400V P 


Description 

Peaking Coil 


Ass’y (SU-3032A) Parts List 


Part Number 

17-7198-03 

A29779-D = 21-141-01 

A75034-B = 29-32-01 

A29951-B 

A46600-A 

QRF258K-221 

QCZ0101-005 

2SD870 

2SC1106A 

31-610818-06 

31-601418-12 

33-255-01 

33-494-01 

33-629-02 

33- 670-010R-02 

34- 228-03 
34-33-04 

34- 574-02 

35- 212-03 
35-3053-02 
35-2348-01 
35-3890-01 
35-3890-02 

38- 449-02 

39- 1233-01 


Part Number 

21-1007-30 

28-22-27 

34-708-01 

34- 709-01 

35- 3847-01 
35-3847-02 
48-171544-62 
42-113301-03 
34-492-09 


Part- Number 

QVZ3234-022 

QVZ3234-022 

QVZ3234-053 

QVZ3234-053 

QVZ3234-053 

QRG029J-103 

QRG029J-103 

QRG029J-103 

QRZ0039-332 

QRZ0039-332 

QRZ0039-332 


Part Number 

QEW53EA-106 

QCZ9001-102M 


Part Number 

QQL043K-101 


6-15 



REPLACEMENT PARTS LIST - ELECTROHOME 19” MONITOR 


Components identified by the A symbol in the PARTS LIST and on the Schematic have 
special characteristics important to safety. 

DO NOT degrade the safety of the set through improper servicing. 


Abbreviations for Resistors and Capacitors 


Resistor 


Capacitor 

C R 

Carbon Resistor 

C Cap. 

Comp. R 

Composition Resistor 

M Cap 

OM R 

Oxide Metal Film Resistor 

E Cap. 

V R 

Variable Resistor 

BP E Cap. 

MF R 

Metal Film Resistor 


CMF R 

Coating Metal Film Resistor 

MM Cap. 

UNF R 

Nonflammable Resistor 

PP Cap. 

F R 

Fusible Resistor 

MPP Cap. 
PS Cap 
Tan. Cap. 


Ceramic Capacitor 
Mylar Capacitor 
Electrolytic Capacitor 
Bi-Polar (or Non-Polar) 
Electrolytic Capacitor 
Metalized Mylar Capacitor 
Polypropylene Capacitor 
Metalized PP Capacitor 
Polystyrol Capacitor 
Tantal Capacitor 


NOTE: When ordering replacement parts please specify the part number as shown in this list including 
part name, and model number. Complete information will help expedite the order. 

Use of substitute replacement parts which do not have the same safety characteristics as specified, 
may create shock, fire or other hazards. For maximum reliability and performance, all parts should be 
replaced by those having identical specifications. 


SERVICE REPLACEMENT PARTS LIST 


Symbol 


Description 

Main P.C.B. Ass’y 
CRT Socket P.C.B. Ass’y 
Purity Shield Ass’y 


Part Number 

SU-1133A 

SU-3032A 

07-220083-03 


6-14 







Outside of the P.C.B. Ass’y 
Symbol 

A 

A 

A 

R05 

C04 

X01 

X02 

SC 

SC 

WA 


Description 

Picture Tube 19" 

ADeflection Yoke 
PC Magnet 
AFlyback Transf. 

Ahvr 

UNF Resistor 220J2.25W K 
C Capacitor 150pF, AC1.5KV 
Si. Transistor 
Si. Transistor 
Screw #8-% 

Screw V* x % Pix Tube Mtg. .(4) 
Pyramidal Lock Washer (4) 

Nut Retainer, Pix Tube Mtg. (4) 
Clip — P.C.B. Support 
Standoff 

Wire Terminal (Gnd. Strap) 
Terminal Lug (Gnd.) 
Groundstrap Assy. 

Grounding Spring 
Wire Hook (Gnd. Strap) 

Purity Shield Holddown Clamp 
Support Brkt. RH 
Support Brkt. LH 
Chassis Base 
Yoke Wedge (3) 


Part Number 

17-7198-03 

A29779-D = 21-141-01 

A75034-B = 29-32-01 

A29951-B 

A46600-A 

QRF258K-221 

QCZ0101-005 

2SD870 

2SC1106A 

31-610818-06 

31-601418-12 

33-255-01 

33-494-01 

33-629-02 

33- 670-010R-02 

34- 228-03 
34-33-04 

34- 574-02 

35- 212-03 
35-3053-02 
35-2348-01 
35-3890-01 
35-3890-02 

38- 449-02 

39- 1233-01 


Purity Shield Ass’y- Parts List 
Symbol 

D911, D912 

C911 

R921 


Description 

Degaussing Coil 
Rectifier 1 Amp 600V (2) 

Pin Terminal (2) 

Pin Terminal Housing 
Purity Shield (2 pcs.) 

Purity Shield (2 pcs.) 

Capacitor lOOnF 10% 400V 
Resistor, Wirewound 33 Q., 4W 
Fire Retardent Term. Strip 4 Lug 


CRT Socket P.C.B. Ass’y (SU-3032A) Parts List 


Part Number 

21-1007-30 

28-22-27 

34-708-01 

34- 709-01 

35- 3847-01 
35-3847-02 
48-171544-62 
42-113301-03 
34-492-09 


Resistors 


Symbol 

Description 


Part-Number 

R3105 

V R 

200 

QVZ3234-022 

R3106 

V R 

200 

QVZ3234-022 

R3113 

V R 

5K 

QVZ3234-053 

R3114 

V R 

5K 

QVZ3234-053 

R3115 

V R 

5K 

QVZ3234-053 

R3116 

OM R 

10KLJ2WJ 

QRG029J-103 

R3117 

OM R 

10KS22W J 

QRG029J-103 

R3118 

OM R 

10KJ22W J 

QRG029J-103 

R3119 

Comp. R 

3.3KS2V4W K 

QRZ0039-332 

R3120 

Comp. R 

3.3Kn’/ 2 W K 

QRZ0039-332 

C3121 

Comp. R 

3.3KJ2V 2 W K 

QRZ0039-332 

Capacitors 

Symbol 

Description 


Part Number 

C3107 

E Cap. 

IOuF 250V A 

QEW53EA-106 

C3108 

C Cap. 

lOOOpF DC1400V P 

QCZ9001-102M 

Coils 

Symbol 

Description 


Part Number 

L3101 

Peaking Coil 

QQL043K-101 


6-15 



Semiconductors 


Symbol 

Description 

Part Number 

X3101 

Si. Transistor 

2SC1514VC 

X3102 

Si. Transistor 

2SC1514VC 

X3103 

Si. Transistor 

2SC1514VC 

Miscellaneous 




Symbol 

Description 

Part Number 

A 

ACRT Socket 

A76068 

Main PCB Ass y (SU-1133A) Parts List 


Resistors 




Symbol 

Description 

Part Number 

R1406 

V 

R 200 ft 

QVZ3230-002 

R1408 

V 

R 200ft 

QVZ3230-002 

R1410 

CMF 

R 6.8ft1W J 

QRX019J-6R8 

R1414 

OM 

R 3.3K ftlW J 

QRG019J-332 

R1415 

OM 

R 2.7K ftlW J 

QRG019J-272 

R1421 

OM 

R 12Kft2W J 

QRG026J-123Z 

R1422 

V 

R 10K ft 

QVZ3230-014 

AFR1401 

AF 

R 68ft2W K 

QRH024K-680M 

AR1503 

Acmf 

R 11.8Kft’/4W+1% 

QRV142F-1182 

R1504 

V 

R 5K ft 

QVZ3230-053 

R1509 

OM 

R 10Kft2W J 

QRG026J-103Z 

R1512 

OM 

R 8.2Kft2W J 

QRG026J-822Z 

R1514 

OM 

R 820ft2WJ 

QRG026J-821Z 

R1515 

CMF 

R 8.2 ftl W J 

QRX019J-8R2 

R1522 

CMF 

R 4.7ft1W J 

QRX019J-4R7 

R1523 

OM 

R 68ft2W J 

QRG026J-680Z 

R1528 

OM 

R 390ft1W J 

QRG019J-391 

R1534 

ZN 

R 

ERZ-C05ZK471 

VR1501 

ZN 

R 

ERZ-C05DK271 

AR1703 

Acmf 

R 39ft’/ 2 W+1% 

QRV122F-3902 

AR1704 

ACMF 

ft 7.68Kfty<W +1% 

QRV142F-7681 

AR1901 

APosistor 

A75414 

R1902 

UNF 

R 2ft7WK 

QRF076K-2RO 

R1903 

CMF 

R 4.7ft3W J 

QRX039J-4R7 

R1904 

OM 

R 10Kft2WJ 

QRG026J-103Z 

R1905 

OM 

R 18Kft1W J 

QRG019J-183 

AQ1908 

Acmf 

R 47ft'/ 2 W +1% 

QRV122F-470Z 

AR1909 

V 

R 2Kft 

QVP5A0B-023E 

R1910 

Acmf 

R 2.74Kfty<W +1% 

QRV142F-274I 

AFR1901 

Af 

R 220ft'/ 2 W K 

QRH124K-221M 

Capacitors 




Symbol 

Description 

Part Number 

Cl 301 

BPE 

Cap. 3.3uF 50V A 

QEN61HA-335Z 

Cl 402 

Tan. 

Cap. 2.2uF 16V K 

QEE51CK-225B 

Cl 407 

E 

Cap. 4.7uF 6.3V A 

QEW51JA-475 

Cl 411 

E 

Cap. IOO.uF 160V A 

QEW52CA-107 

C1412 

E 

Cap. 3.3uF 160V A 

QEW52CA-335 

Cl 508 

PP 

Cap. 5600uF 50V J 

QFP31HJ-562 

AC1512 

App 

Cap. 2000pF DC1500V J 

QFZ0082-202 

AC1513 

App 

Cap. 2000pF DC1500V J 

QFZ0082-202 

AC1514 

App 

Cap. 2000pF DC1500V J 

QFZ0082-202 

C1515 

pp 

Cap. 0.53uF DC1200V J 

QFZ0067-534 

Cl 520 

BPE 

Cap. 3.3uF 50V A 

QEN61HA-335Z 

Cl 523 

E 

Cap. luF 160V A 

QEW62CA-105Z 

Cl 524 

M 

Cap. 0.1 uF 200V K 

QFM720K-104M 

AC 1531 

APP 

Cap. 2000pF DC1500V J 

QFZ0082-202 

AC 1532 

App 

Cap. 1500pF DC1500V J 

QFZ0082-152 

Cl 904 

E 

Cap. 

QEY0034-001 

Cl 905 

E 

Cap. IOuF 250V A 

QEW52EA-106 


6-16 



Coils 

Symbol 

Description 

Part Number 

LI 502 

Linarity Coil 

A39835 

LI 503 

Width Coil 

C30380-A 

LI 504 

Heater Choke 

C30445-A 

Transformers 

Symbol 

Description 

Part Number 

T1501 

Hor. Drive Transf. 

A46022-BM 

T1503 

Side Pin Transf. 

C39050-A 

Semiconductors 

Symbol 

Description 

Part Number 

IC1501 

1C 

HA11244 

X1101 

Si. Transistor 

2SC1685(R) 

X1102 

Si. Transistor 

2SA673(C) 

X1103 

Si. Transistor 

2SC1685(Ft) 

X1104 

Si. Transistor 

2SA673(C) 

X1105 

Si. Transistor 

2SC1685(R) 

X1106 

Si. Transistor 

2SA673(C) 

X1301 

Si. Transistor 

2SC1685(R) 

XI302 

Si. Transistor 

2SC1685(R) 

XI303 

Si. Transistor 

2SA673(C) 

XI304 

Si. Transistor 

2SC1685(R) 

XI305 

Si. Transistor 

2SC1685(R) 

XI401 

Si. Transistor 

2SD478 

XI402 

Si. Transistor 

2SD478 

XI501 

Si. Transistor 

2SC2610BK 

X1901 

Si. Transistor 

2SC2688 (K.L.M.) 

XI902 

Si. Transistor 

2SC1890A (E.F.) 

D1101 

Si. Diode 

W06A 

D1102 

Si. Diode 

W06A 

Dll 03 

Si. Diode 

W06A 

D1301 

Si. Diode 

1SZ473H 

D1401 

Si. Diode 

1SZ473H 

D1402 

Zener Diode 

RD10F(C) 

D1503 

Si. Diode 

HF-1 

D1504 

Si. Diode 

V09E 

D1505 

Zener Diode 

RD11 E(B) 

D1506 

Si. Diode 

W06A 

D1507 

Si. Diode 

1SS81 

D1508 

Si. Diode 

1SZ473H 

AD1701 

AZener Diode 

RD20EV2 

AD1901 

ASi. Diode 

1S1887A 

Adi 902 

ASi. Diode 

1S1887A 

AD1903 

ASi. Diode 

1S1887A 

Ad 1904 

ASi. Diode 

1S1887A 

ADI 905 

AZener Diode 

RD6.8EV3 

Miscellaneous 

Symbol 

Description 

Part Number 

AF1901 

AFuse 1.25A 

QMF53U1-1R25S 

AF1902 

AUL Fuse 3A 

QMF66U1-3R0S 


6-17 




6-18 










■aftaa 




j 


Schematic Notes 

Unless otherwise specified 

Resistance: (£2) (K— K£2, M—M£2), 1/4 (W) carbon resistor 
Capacitance: 1 or higher-*- (pF), less than 1-*- (,/F) 
working voltage-*-50 (V) 
ceramic capacitor 
Inductance: (vH) 

Electrolytic Cap: Capacitance Value (^F)/working voltage (V), 
NP -*■ non-polar (or bipolar) electrolytic cap. 
Refer to the parts list for additional component information. 

( ‘2- indicates test point connection 


G07-FBO 

00-4147-03 


^ indicates chassis ground unless otherwise specified 
Hz indicates cycles per second 

For safety purposes (and continuing reliability) 

A replace all components marked with safety symbol with 
identical type. 

NOTE: FR -► fusible resistor«— 

Parts identification on circuit boards: 
e.g. SU1126A (R107 = R1107) 

SU3030A (R113 = R3113) 







REPLACEMEN f PARTS LIST - ELECTROHOME 13” MONITOR 


Components identified by the A symbol in the PARTS LIST and on the Schematic have 
special characteristics important to safety. 

DO NOT degrade the safety of the set through improper servicing. 


Abbreviations for Resistors and Capacitors 

Resistor Capacitor 

C R : Carbon Resistor C Cap. : Ceramic Capacitor 

Comp. R : Composition Resistor M Cap : Mylar Capacitor 

OM R : Oxide Metal Film Resistor E Cap. : Electrolytic Capacitor 

V R : Variable Resistor BP E Cap. : Bi-Polar (or Non-Polar) 

MF R : Metal Film Resistor Electrolytic Capacitor 

CMF R : Coating Metal Film Resistor MM Cap. : Metalized Mylar Capacitor 

UNF R : Nonflammable Resistor PP Cap. : Polypropylene Capacitor 

F R : Fusible Resistor MPP Cap. : Metalized PP Capacitor 

PS Cap : Polystyrol Capacitor 

Tan. Cap. : Tantal Capacitor 

NOTE: When ordering replacement parts please specify the part number as shown in this list including 
part name, and model number. Complete information will help expedite the order. 

Use of substitute replacement parts which do not have the same safety characteristics as specified, 
may create shock, fire or other hazards. For maximum reliability and performance, all parts should be 
replaced by those having identical specifications. 


Symbol 

Description 

Part Number 


Main P.C.B. Ass y 

SU-1103A 


CRT Socket P.C.B. Ass’y 

SU-3016A 

Outside of the P.C.B. Ass’y 

Symbol 

Description 

Part Number 

AV01 

APicture Tube 

370ESB22(E) 

Adyoi 

A Deflection Yoke 

C29123-V 


PC Magnet 

A76366-A 


Wedge 

C30006 


AFlyback Transf. 

A19183-A 

Arii 

AFocus V R 

A46606-A 

AR05 

UNF Resistor 220^, 25W. K 

QRF258K-221 

AC04 

Ac Capacitor 150 pF, AC1.5KV 

QCZ0101-005 

X01 

Si. Transistor 

2SD869 

IC01 

1C Regulator 

STR383 

L01 

Degausing Coil 

21-1007-31 


Degausing Coil Pin Terminal (2) 

34-708-01 


Degausing Coil Pin Terminal Housing 

34-709-01 


Groundstrap Ass’y. 

34-697-04 


Groundstrap Wire Terminal 

34-228-03 


Groundstrap Spring (2) 

35-3560-01 

BR 

Support Bracket RH 

35-3919-01 

BR 

Support Bracket LH 

35-3919-02 

SC 

SCREW 10-V4 Pix Tube Mtg. (4) 

31-631018-08 

WA 

Pyramidal Lockwasher (4) 

33-255-01 


Clip P.C.B. Support (2) 

33-629-02 


Ground Lug 

34-33-04 

CH 

Chassis Base 

38-452-01 


6-19 







Main P.C.B. Ass y (SU-1103A) Parts Ust 


Resistors 


Symbol 

Description 

Part Number 

R1406 

V R 200ft 

QVZ3230-022 

R1408 

V R 200ft 

QVZ3230-022 

R1410 

CMF R 6.8ft1W J 

QRX019J-6R8 

R1414 

OM R 3.3Kft1WJ 

QRG019J-332 

R1415 

OM R 2.7Kft1W J 

ORG019J-272 

R1421 

OM R 12Kft2W J 

QRG029J-123 

R1422 

V R 10KS2 

QVZ3224-014H 

AFR1401 

AF R 68ft 2W K 

QRH024K-680M 

AR1503 

ACMF R 11.8Kft%W+1% 

QRV142F-1182 

R1504 

V R 5Kft 

QVZ3230-053 

R1509 

OM R 10Kft2W J 

QRG029J-103 

R1511 

OM R 5.6Kft2W J 

QRG029J-562 

R1514 

OM R 680ft 2W J 

QRG029J-681 

R1515 

CMF R 8.2 ftlW J 

QRX019J-8R2 

R1522 

CMF R 4.7ft1W J 

QRX019J-4R7 

R1523 

OM R 56ft2W J 

ORG029J-560 

R1528 

OM R 390ft 1WJ 

ORG019J-391 

R1534 

ZN R 

ERZ-C05ZK471 

VR1501 

ZN R 

ERZ-C05DK271 

AR1703 

ACMF R 39KftV£W +1% 

QRV122F-3902 

AR1704 

ACMF R 7.68Kft'/4W +1% 

QRV142F-7681 

AR1901 

APosistor 

A75414 

R1902 

UNF R 2ft7W K 

QRF076K-2R0 

R1903 

CMF R 5.6ft3W J 

QRX039J-5R6 

R1904 

OM R 10Kft2WJ 

QRG026J-103Z 

AFR1901 

AF R 220ft V4W K 

QRH124K-221M 

Capacitors 

Symbol 

Description 

Part Number 

C1402 

Tan. Cap. 2.2uF 16V K 

QEE51CK-225B 

C1411 

E Cap. IOOuF 160V A 

QEW52CA-107 

C1412 

E Cap. 3.3uF 160V A 

QEW52CA-335 

Cl 508 

PP Cap. 5600pF 50V J 

QFP31HJ-562 

C1511 

E Cap. 47uF 160V A 

QEW52CA-476S 

AC1512 

APP Cap. 2000pF DC1500V J 

QFZ0082-202 

AC1513 

APP Cap. 2000pF DC1500V J 9 

QFZ0082-202 

AC1514 

APP Cap*. 2500pF DC1500V J 

QFZ0082-252 

C1515 

PP Cap. 0.53uF DC1200V K 

QFZ0067-534 

Cl 520 

BPECap. luF 50V A 

QEN61HA-105Z 

Cl 524 

M Cap. 0.1 uF 200V K 

QFM72DK-682M 

Cl 904 

E Cap. 

QEY0034-001 

Cl 905 

E Cap. IOuF 250V A 

QEW52EA-106 

AC1907 

AMM Cap. 0.1 uF AC150V Z 

QFZ9008-104 

Colls 

Symbol 

Description 

Part Number 

L1501 

Peaking Coil 

A753S0-6 

LI 502 

Liniarty Coil 

A39934 

LI 503 

Width Coil 

C30380-A 

L1504 

Heater Choke 

C30333-A 

L1901 

Line Filter 

A39475-J 

Transformers 

Symbol 

Description 

Part Number 

T1501 

Hor. Drive Transf, 

A46022-BM 

T1503 

Side Pin Transf. 

C39050-A 


6-20 



Semiconductors 

Symbol 

IC1501 

X1101 
X1102 
X1103 
X1104 
X1105 
X1106 
XI301 
X1302 
XI303 
XI304 
XI305 
X1401 
XI402 
XI501 
X1701 
D1101 
D1102 
D1103 
D1301 
D1401 
D1402 
D1503 
D1504 
D1505 
D1506 
D1507 
D1508 
AD1701 

Adi 901 

ADI 902 
AD1903 
AD1904 

Miscellaneous 

Symbol 

AF1901 

AF1902 


Description 

I.C. 

Si. Transistor 
Si. Transistor 
Si. Transistor 
Si. Transistor 
Si. Transistor 
Si. Transistor 
Si. Transistor 
Si. Transistor 
Si. Transistor 
Si. Transistor 
Si. Transistor 
Si. Transistor 
Si. Transistor 
Si. Transistor 
Si. Transistor 
Si. Diode 
Si. Diode 
Si. Diode 
Si. Diode 
Si. Diode 
Zener Diode 
Si. Diode 
Si. Diode 
Zener Diode 
Si. Diode 
Si. Diode 
Si. Diode 
AZener Diode 
ASi. Diode 
ASi. Diode 
ASi. Diode 
ASi. Diode 


Description 

A Fuse 1A 
AUL Fuse 3A 


Part Number 
HA11244 

2SC1685(R) 

2SA673(C) 

2SC1685(R) 

2SA673(C) 

2SC1685(R) 

2SA673(C) 

2SC1685(R) 

2SC1685(R) 

2SA673(C) 

2SC1685(R) 

2SC1685(R) 

2SD478 

2SD478 

2SC2610BK 

2SC1685(P-S) 

W06A 

W06A 

W06A 

1S2473H 

1S2473H 

RD10F(C) 

HF-1 

V09E 

RD11E(B) 

W06A 

1SS81 

1S2473H 

RD20EV2 

1S1887A 

1S1887A 

1S1887A 

1SI 887A 


Part Number 

QMF53U1-1R0S 

QMF66U1-3R0S 


6-21 



CRT Socket P.C.B. Ass’y (SU-3016A) Parts List 


Resistors 

Symbol 

R3105 

R3106 

R3113 

R3114 

R3115 

R3116 

R3117 

R3118 

R3119 

R3120 

R3121 


Description 

V R 200n 

V R 200S2 

V R 5KJ2 

V R 5KO 

V R 5K£2 

OM R 10KS22W J 
OM R 10KO2W J 
OM R 10Kfi2W J 
Comp. R 3.3KflViW K 
Comp. R 3.3KfiV^W K 
Comp. R 3.3Kfi%WK 


Capacitors 

Symbol 

C3107 

C3108 


Description 

E Cap. IOuF 250V A 
C Cap. lOOOpF DC1400V P 


Coils 

Symbol 

L3101 

Semiconductors 

Symbol 

X3101 

X3102 

X3103 


Description 
Peaking coil 

Description 

Si. Transistor 
Si. Transistor 
Si. Transistor 


Miscellaneous 

Symbol 

A 


Description 

A CRT Socket 


Part Number 

QVZ3234-022 

QVZ3234-022 

QVZ3234-053 

QVZ3234-053 

QVZ3234-053 

QRG029J-103 

QRG029J-103 

QRG029J-103 

QRZ0039-332 

QRZ0039-332 

QRZ0039-332 


Part Number 

QEW52EA-106 

QCZ9001-102M 


Part Number 

QQL043K-101 


Part Number 

2SC2611 

2SC2611 

2SC2611 


Part Number 

A75522 


6-22 



VII. Coin Door Maintenance 


SPECIAL NOTE: If you have any questions about the coin acceptors in your game(s), please feel 

free to contact their manufacturers, 
every acceptor mechanism. 

Each manufacturer's name is PROMINENTLY imprinted on 

Metal mechanisms only: 

Metal and Plastic mechanisms: 

COIN MECHANISMS, INC. 

COINCO COIN ACCEPTORS, INC. 

817 Industrial Drive 

860 Eagle Drive 

Elmhurst, IL 60126 

Bensenville, IL 60106 

Phone (312) 279-9150 

Phone (312) 766-6781 


COIN DOOR MAINTENANCE 

METAL COIN ACCEPTOR MECHANISMS 

Periodically, the metal coin acceptor mechanism(s) 
must be removed from the coin door and cleaned. 

1. Make sure the power to the game is off. 

2. Unlock and open the coin door. 


3. Remove the coin acceptor mechanism as shown 
in Figure 7-1. 

□ Push down on the two spring loaded latches. 

□ While holding the latches down, pull the top of 
the coin acceptor mechanism toward you. 

□ Release the latches and lift out the coin accep¬ 
tor mechanism. 



TO REMOVE 
PUSH LATCHES 
DOWN 


PLACE PEGS 
IN SLOTS 
TO REPLACE 


PUSH MECHANISM IN 


PULL MECHANISM OUT 


Figure 7-1 Removing and replacing coin acceptor 


7-1 













4. Clean the magnet of all foreign particles. See 
Figure 7-2. 

□ This may be accomplished by swinging the 
gate open as shown in the above figure. 

5. Remove the cradles and undersize levers and 
clean the bushings. (A pipe cleaner makes a good 
bushing cleaner.) 

□ Also clean the pivot pin. 

6. Whenever needed, the coin acceptor should be 
cleaned with hot water and cleanser in the follow¬ 
ing manner: 

□ Place the coin acceptor in boiling water for 
about ten minutes. 


CAUTION: BE CAREFUL NOT TO BURN YOUR¬ 
SELF. 


□ Next, use a brush and kitchen cleaner to 
remove all remaining foreign matter from the 
unit. 

□ Rinse the coin acceptor in clean boiling water. 

□ Dry the coin acceptor thoroughly by using 
filtered compressed air to blow it dry. 

NOTE: The reason we recommend using boiling 
water is that it evaporates faster than cold water 
and speeds drying time. 


7. To lubricate the coin acceptor: 

□ Use ONLY powdered graphite and put it ONLY 
on the moving parts of the coin acceptor. These 
parts are called out in Figure 7-3. 

□ Be extremely careful to keep the powdered 
graphite away from paths that are traveled by 
the coins. 


— WARNING — 
DO NOT USE OIL 
TO LUBRICATE THE 
COIN ACCEPTOR. 


8. Check the coin chute for obstructions such as: 
paper, gum, etc. 

9. Reinstall the coin acceptor to the coin door. See 
Figure 7-1. 

□ Place the two pegs at the coin acceptor's base 
into their retaining slots. 

□ Now push the top of the coin acceptor toward 
the coin door until it snaps in place and is held 
there by the two spring loaded latches 

10. Close and lock the coin door 



SCREWDRIVER BLADE 
ACROSS SURFACE 


APPLY POWDERED 
GRAPHITE HERE 



Figure 7-2 Cleaning the metal coin acceptor Figure 7-3 Lubricating the metal coin acceptor 


7-2 









SQUEEZE PINS 
TOGETHER 
TO UNLOCK 


SWING BOTH GATES OPEN 


HOLDING BOTH GATES TOGETHER, 
PUSH UP AND PULL OUT 


Figure 7-4 Opening the plastic coin acceptor 


PLASTIC COIN ACCEPTOR MECHANISMS 

The plastic coin acceptor mechanism(s) must be 
removed periodically from the coin door and 
cleaned. 

1. Make sure the power to the game is off. 

2. Unlock and open the coin door. 

3. Remove the coin acceptor mechanism(s) as 
shown in Figure 7-1. 

□ Push down on the two spring loaded latches. 

□ While holding the latches down, pull the top of 
the acceptor mechanism toward you. 

□ Release the latches and lift out the mechanism. 

4. Squeeze the two pins indicated in Figure 7-4 
together to open the mechanism and break it 
down into its three basic parts. 

□ Clean the mechanism in hot soapy water. It 
never rusts. 

□ Rinse the mechanism in clean hot water and 
allow it to dry. 


□ Reassemble the mechanism (it never needs 
lubrication). 

5. Check the coin chute for obstructions such as: 
paper, gum, etc. 

6. Reinstall the coin acceptor to the coin door. See 
Figure 7-5. 

□ Place the two pegs at the coin acceptor’s base 
into their retaining slots. 

□ Now push the top of the coin acceptor toward 
the coin door until it snaps in place and is held 
there by the two spring loaded latches. 

7. Close and lock the coin door. 


NOTE: See Figure 7-6 for instructions on how to 
set the plastic coin acceptormechanismstoeither 
accept or reject Canadian quarters. 


7-3 







ACCEPTOR CAN BE SET TO ACCEPT U.S. 
QUARTERS ONLY OR BOTH U.S. AND 
CANADIAN QUARTERS. 


MAGNET 


SLIDE MAGNET TO EXTREME RIGHT (AS 
SHOWN) TO ACCEPT BOTH U.S. AND 
CANADIAN QUARTERS. 


TO ACCEPT U.S. QUARTERS ONLY, SLIDE 
MAGNET TO EXTREME LEFT. 


Figure 7-5 Changing the plastic coin acceptor to accept American or Canadian quarters. 






DESIGNATION LIST 


DESIGNATION 

* description 

CI,C2 

4,7 mf 2Sv rd tdnt 

C3,C4 

22 mf 6v " 11 

C5,C6 

470mf 6v dx elect 

C7-C10 

.1 mf 50v dx.cr. 

CPI 

220mf 25v ax elect 

CP2,CP3 

.1 mf 50v dix.cr 

RI.R2 

2.7KA 1/4w 5°/ 0 CRBN 

R3,R4 

27A . 

RS-R8 

1 A l/2w " 

U 1,U2 

MB3730 

Jl 

3 PIN STRT KK 156 

4 n II I' 

J2 

3. 

2 11 11 H 

HSA1.2 

HEATSINK ASSY 

MHI-MH4 

HEYCO BUSHING 


H- 


MHI 


EET 


3 PIN 


2 PIN 

\_ 

/ 


C9 


C7 


CP2 


HSAI 


| I 1 Ul _ I 1 


do, 


cm 

HO 


C 2 p 


C5 


C5E 


E 

[R 2 


IMH3 

■r• 



PROJECT EN6. C MEDNICI 


DIM TOLERANCES 

UNLESS OTHERWISE SPEC 
CONCENTRICITY T.l R 002 

CsTJon tron 

DRN TJ K 

1 

FRACTIONAL 1 1/64 

DECIMAL ♦ 005 

MECH (;hk 

MAT t 

HOLE DIA + 002- 000 

ANGLE ±1'2° 

E L EC CHK 

f INISH 

DO NOT SCALE DWG 

L .in h/ 


mmm 








CROSS REFERENCE LIST 


DESCRIPTION OTY 

DESIGNATION 

PART NO 

,1 mf 50v axjcr 

6 

C7-C1Q, 

CP2jCP3 

0986-008001100 

4.7 mf 25v rd.tant 

2 

CI,C2 

0986-00800-3100 

22 mf 6v 

2 

C3.C4 

0986 00800 1600 

220mf 25v ax.&lcc 

1 

CPI 

0986-00800-3200 

470mf 6v '• •• 

2 

CS,C6 

0986-00800-1700 

1A1/2W 5% 

4 

RS-R8 

0062-026D3-1XXX 

27m/4 w 

2 

R3,R4 

0062-068B3-1XXX 

2.7K " 

2 

RI.R2 

0062-199 B3-IX XX 

MB3730 

2 

U1,U2 

0066-188XX-XX4X 

2PIN STRTKKI56 

1 

J2 

3000-16367-0200 

3. 

2 

JI.J2 

3000-16367-0300 

4. 

1 

Jl 

3000-16367-0400 

HEATSINK ASSY 

2 

HSAI, 

HSA 2 

A986-OOOIO-EOOO 

HEYCO BUSHING 

4 

MHI -MH4 

00)7-00042-0014 

PC BOARD 

1 


A080-9091QE000 


THIS DWG IS CONFIDENTIAL & PROPERTY OF MIDWAY MFG CO f | 





















FEI A101 



J5-10 COUNTER RTN 


UNREG.AUX. V 


J5-I4 CONTR. LAMPS 


wo ® UNREG. FILTERED V 45-is audio cut. 



PROJECT ENO! L. DEKKER 

ust r. ** SATANS HOLLOW 

MIDWAY MFG. CO. 

— ^ 


FULL 

«o r, 1 PER. 

l><» TOLEBANI.Z-, 

'"‘v . .... V 

_ 

5/3/82 


POWER SUPPLY 125 VA ! 

W/CKT SUPORT M05I-00945-D007 

A082-904I2-0000 1 


"ONE SHOT 



















































QTY 

DESIGNATION 

PART NOS 

1 

Clot 

0986-00800-0300 

2 

CI04.C200 

0066-00800-3000 

78 

CP2-CP7, C P9-CPI4,CPi6*CP20, 
CP22-CP28.CP30-CP37. 

0686-00600-2200 


CP39- CP50, CP52-CP57, 

CP 69'CP64, CLI5 ’Cl36 


1 

CIOS 

0686-00800-0100 

2 

CI02 * CP66 

0986-00800-0200 

5 

CP6 t CP2l,CP29,CP38 

0686-00800-340 


CP5I 


4 

CPI.CPI5.CP58.CP65 

0986*00800-3300 

SEE NOTE 



6 

RI26.RI27.RI33 *134, 

0062-05IB3-IXXX 


RI40.R 14* 


1 

RI06 

0062- 063B3-1XXX 

1 

RII9 

0062- II0B3- IXXX 

1 

RI05 

0062- I33B3-IXXX 

2 

RIOS,Rill 

0062-I44B3-IXXX 

3 

RI2I.RI2 8.RI35 

0062-I56B3-IXXX 

3 

RI23, RI30.RI36 

0062- I59B3-IXXX 

2 

RH7.RII 0 

0062- 16 2 83-1XXX 

1 

RI20 

0062-17483-IXXX 

13 

RI02,RI07,RI09,RII6. 

RI24,RI29.R137,R20I, 

0062 *179 B3-IXXX 


R203-R207 


1 

R104 

0062-18383-IXXX 

3 

RI25.N;3l,R'3d 

0062- I93B3- IXXX 

4 

RI0I.RH2 .R208.R209 

0062- 21183- IXXX 

2 

RMI.RM4 

0986-00804-2400 

2 

RM2.RM3 

0986- 00804-4600 

1 

0101 

09 86- 00801-0300 

1 

DI02 

0986- 00801-0100 

1 

0101 

0986-00802 0200 

1 

QI02 

0986 - 00802-0100 

6 

QI03-QI08 

0986 - 00802-0300 

3 

All, 69,00 

0986- 00803-0400 

2 

D8.E9 

0986- 00803-1007 

1 

C8 

0986- 00803 1006 

2 

CII.CI2 

0906-00803-1004 

1 

E 8 

0986- 00803-9500 

4 

88.B M, E 4.E5 

0986- 00803*0600 

2 

A9.AI0 

09 86-00803-1500 

2 

BI0.C9 

0986-00803-1005 

2 

E7.G7 

0986-00803-9900 

1 

B7 

098C-00803-1002 

1 

E6 

0986— 00803-1900 

2 

61.66 

0986-00803-1000 

7 

DIO, Dll t 012, F8, 

0986-00803-9700 


F9.G9.GI0 


1 

A1 

0986 00803-1003 

2 

F7.G8 

0986-00803-9800 

2 

01.06 

0986-00803-0800 

2 

A3.F3 

0986 — 00 803 *0900 

4 

F4.F5.G2.G5 

0986-00803-1001 


A 2 

0986- 00803-220‘j 

1 

85 

0986- 00803-7800 

1 

63 

0906-00803-7700 

1 

F2 

0986-00803-8700 

1 

FI 

0986-00803-2000 

• 

82 

0986-00803-8100 

| 

F 6 

0986-00803-1008 

1 

F10 

0906“ 00803-9600 

I 

A12 

090600803-8900 

1 

612 

0986-00803-9000 

1 

BI2 

0986-00803-9100 

f 

Gil 

0986-00803-9200 

I 

E3\ 

0986-00804-3200 

1 

D2 \ 


1 

D3 


i 

l 

04 ! ROM/EPROM 

05 r OPliONS KIT 

0628 - 00803 - 0100 

1 

06 \ 


1 

D7 


1 

63 / 


1 

G4 / 




6SEE NOTE 

5 

l 10 l-L 105 


IOUH WW 

5 

LI06-LII0 

0986-00804-0200 

IOUH MOLDED 

6 

LIH-LII6 

0986—00804-330p 

8 PIN 1C SOCKET 

2 

ICSAI2, ICSGI2 

0986-00804-3600 

16 PIN " 

2 

ICSAI2A, ICSGI2A 

098 6-C 0804- 3700 

20PIN " 

3 

ICSBI2, ICSE3. 

ICS on 

0986-00804-3800 

24 PIN" 

2 

ICSB2, ICSF6 

0986-00804-3400 

28 PIN" 

10 

ICSB3, ICSD2, 

ICSD3, ICSD4, 

ICSD5. ICS06, 

ICS07, ICSF10, 
ICSG3.ICSG4. 

0986-00804-3900 

40PIN " 

1 

ICS05 

0906--00804-3 300 








DESIGNATION DESCRIPTION 

Cl, 2 IOO pi AX. ELECT 

c 101 100 pf AX. CER. 

CPI-3, 5-10 
CPI2-20,22-27, 

CP29-33,35,36, 

CP38-4I,43-47, .0l>uf AX. CER. 
CP49-54, 56-61, 

CP63-67, 69-71. 


CP4,11,21,28,34, 

CP37,42,48,55, lOjuf 25V AX. TANT. 
CP 62,68 


RIOI —119,201,202. I K I/4W 5% 


RMI.2 

8PIN IK SIP 

RM 3 

10 PIN 1 K SIP 


1C 

A 

1 

EPROM 

1C 

A 

2 

74 LSI57 

1C 

A 

3 

74 LS157 

1C 

A 

4 

74 L S157 

1C 

A 

5 

74 LS 157 

1C 

A 

6 

74 LS157 

1C 

A 

7 

74 LSI57 


IC 

B 

1 

EPROM 

1C 

B 

2 

74 LS 19-4 

IC 

8 

3 

74 LS 194 

IC 

B 

4 

74 LS 32 

IC 

B 

5 

422 

IC 

B 

6 

422 

IC 

8 

7 

74LS32 


IC 

IC 

c 

c 

1 

2 

EPROM 

74 L S 194 

IC 

c 

3 

74 LS 194 

IC 

c 

4 

74 LS 32 

IC 

c 

5 

422 

IC 

c 

6 

422 

IC 

c 

7 

74 LS 32 

IC 

D 

1 

EPROM 

IC 

0 

2 

74 LS 194 

IC 

D 

3 

74 LS 194 

IC 

D 

4 

74 LS273 

IC 

D 

5 

74 LS 157 

IC 

D 

6 

74 LS 157 

IC 

D 

7 

74 L S 273 


IC 

E 

2 

74 LS 194 

IC 

E 

3 

74 LS 194 

IC 

E 

4 

74 LS 374 

IC 

E 

5 

74 LS 157 

IC 

E 

6 

74 LS 157 

IC 

F 

2 

7400 

IC 

F 

3 

74 S 04 

IC 

F 

4 

74 LS 374 

IC 

F 

5 

74 LS 157 

IC 

F 

6 

74 LS 157 

IC 

G 

1 

74 LS 86 

IC 

G 

2 

74 LS 20 

IC 

G 

3 

74 LS 283 

IC 

G 

4 

74 LS 283 

IC 

G 

5 

74 LS 283 


DESIGNATION DESCRIPTION 


1 

H 

1 

74 LS 86 

IC 

H 

2 

74174 

1 c 

M 

3 

74 S 74 

IC 

H 

4 

74175 

IC 

H 

5 

74174 

IC 

H 

6 

74 LS 157 

IC 

J 

2 

74 LS 30 

IC 

J 

3 

7430 

IC 

J 

4 

74 LS273 

IC 

J 

5 

422 

IC 

J 

6 

74 LS 157 


IC 

K 

1 

74161 

IC 

K 

2 

74 30 

IC 

K 

3 

7474 

IC 

K 

4 

74161 

IC 

K 

5 

422 

IC 

K 

6 

2114-2 


IC 

L 

1 

74 L S 20 

IC 

L 

2 

7408 

IC 

L 

3 

7474 

IC 

L 

4 

74 LS283 

IC 

L 

5 

422 

IC 

L 

6 

2114-2 

IC 

L 

7 

74 LS 157 


IC 

M 

i 

7430 

IC 

M 

2 

7432 

IC 

M 

3 

74 S 74 

IC 

M 

4 

74161 

IC 

M 

5 

422 

IC 

M 

7 

74 LS 157 

IC 

N 

1 

•430 

IC 

N 

2 

7427 

IC 

N 

3 

74 LS273 

IC 

N 

4 

74 LS 283 

IC 

N 

5 

74 LS 245 

>c 

N 

6 

7404 

IC 

N 

7 

74 LS 157 


ICS Al ,Bl,CI,DI. 28PIN 1C SOCKET 

ICS 85,6,C5,6, 22PIN 1C SOCKET 

J5,K5,L5,M5. 

IC3K6.L6. 18PIN 1C SOCKET 


J 3,4,5 24 PIN SOCKET 


JWI-8 JUMPER WIRE 


BBI, 2 BUSS BAR 




































CROSS REFERENCE LIST 


ZD 


( S&P 


& 


LPLJ 


(CPU) 


(£p7i[) 


3 


la m J 


<£7?i> 







i @) <£?*$> 


( giTaj ) 


4 11 m ,,, w*** *- 

80 .01 >if 50V 4X.CER. CPI-5, CP5-I0, 

CPI2-20.CP22-27, 
CP29-S3,CP35,3€, 
CP 38-41,CP43-47, 
CP49-54.CP56-6I, 
CP63-67, CP69-7I. 


11 

10 pi 25 V AX. TANT. 

CP4,II,21,28,34,37, 

CP 42,48,55,62,68. 

2 

100 pi 25 V AX. ELECT. 

C 1,2 

21 

IK 1 /A W CRBN. FLM. 

R101 - 119, 201,202 . 

2 

IK 8 PIN SIP 

RM1,2. 

1 

1 K 10 PIN SIP 

RMS 

2 

2H4 -2 

K6, L 6. 

1 

7400 

F 2 

1 

7404 

N 6 

1 

74S04 

F 3 

1 

7408 

L 2 

2 

74LS20 

G 2 , L 1 

1 

7427 

N 2 

4 

7430 

J3 , K2 , Ml, N 1 

1 

74LS30 

J 2 

1 

7432 

M2 

4 

74LS32 

84,7, C 4,7 , 

2 

7474 

K 3, L 3 

2 

74S74 

H3, M3 

2 

74LS86 

G 1, H 1 

18 

74LSI57 

42,3,4,5,6,7, D5,6 
E 5,6, F 5,6,G6,H6, 

J 6, L 7, M 7, N 7. 

3 

74161 

K 1 , K 4 , M 4 . 

2 

74174 

H2,5 

1 

74175 

H4 

8 

74LSI94 

B2,3,C2,3,02,3,t2,3. 

1 

74L5245 

N 5 

4 

74LS273 

04,7, J4.N3 

5 

74LS283 

G 3,4,5 L4.N4, 

2 

74LS374 

E 4 , F 4 

8 

93422 

85,6,C5,6, J 5, 

K 5, L5, M 5 

1 

EPROM 

4 1 ( VG 4) 1 

1 

EPROM 

8 1 ( VG B) 1 

1 

EPROM 

Cl ( VG C ) f 

1 

EPROM 

D 1 ( VG D )' > 

6 

JUMPER WIRE 

JWI -8 

2 

BUSS BAR 

BBI.2 

l 

P C. BOARD 


3 

24 PIN SOCKET 

J 3,4,5 

4 

28 PIN SOCKET 

ICS4I,BI,CI,DI 

6 

22 PIN SOCKET 

ICS 85,6,C5,6, 



J5,K5,L5,M5 

2 

18 PIN SOCKET 

ICS K6.L6 


5$<&-%%Boo-iooo 
0986 - 00600 - 2900 


0996 - 00900-2400 

0999 - 00900-4900 

0062- 17993-IXXX 

0986-00804-1100 

0986-00804-1000 

0986-00803-2300 

0986-00803-2800 

0986-00803-8300 

0986 00803-3100 

0986-00803-3200 

0986-00803-3400 

0986-00803-3500 

0986-00803-3600 

0986-00803-4300 

0986-00803-4400 

0986-00803-3700 

0986-00803-4500 

0986-00803-4100 

0986-00803-4200 

0986-00803-2400 


0906-00803-2500 
0906-00803-2600 
0986-00803-2700 
0986-00803-2900 
0986-00803-3000 
0986-00803-3800 
0986-00803-3900 
0986 00803-4000 
0986-00804-0800 


ROM/ t PPOM OPTIONS KI 

0628-00803-302 6 

0986-00805-0200 
0986-00804-0900 
4080 -9I399-E000 

0986-00804-4700 

0986-00804-0300 

0986-00804-0700 

0986-00804-0600 


IG. 

ATISH GHOSH 




P 






Pz 

RE VISIONS 



us.o o-s ATA NS’HOLLOW 

MIDWAY MFG. CO. 

F84NXUN PR ILL 

r>T S'. ALf ORC. 


"none 

NO * lo ° ' per 

' IS 


M* • 1 

ASS’Y DRAWING 



° 


“ 

/4 


VIDEO GENERATOR P.C 


M051 - 0 0 9 41 - A007 


: l "' 1 

9 / 1/82 


A084-91399-A941 


_ 


_ 




































A082 — 909 10 — E000 


MO5 I - 00 98 6- E 0 I I 



MHH3A2E 











DESIGNATION LIST 


DESIGNATION * 

DESCRIPTION 

0101 

2N3772 XSTR 

0103 

2N3772 XSTR 

0104 

TIP31 

HS1 

HEAT SINK 

MH HSA1C 

SHOULOER WSH 


MH HSA2C 

SHOULDER WSH 

MH HSA3A.3B 

SHOULDER WSH 

MHQ101A 

4-40X8 SLT PAN 
SHOULDER WSH 

MHQ101C 

INSL TO-3 

MHQ101D 

WSH 4-40-.250-018 

MHQ101E 

4-40 HEX NUT 

MHQ103A 

4-40X8 SLT PAN 

MHQ103B 

SHOULDER WSH 

MHQ103C 

INSL TO-3 

MHQ103D 

WSH 4-120-.250-018 

MHQ103E 

4-40 HEX NUT 

MHQ104A 

4-40X8 SLT PAN 

MHQ104B 

SHOULDER WSH 

MH0104C 

INSL TO-220 

MHQ104D 

WSH 4-120”.250-018 

MHQ104E 

4-40 HEX NUT 




CROSS REFFERENCE LIST 


DESCRIPTION 

Q'ty 

DESIGNATION * 

PART * 

2N3772 XSTR 

2 

0101,103 

0945-00808-0100 

TIP31 

1 

Q104 

0945-00808-0200 

HEAT SINK 

1 

HS1 

0945-00806-0000 

4-40X8 SLT PAN 

WSH 4-120-.250-018 

3 

MHQ101A 

MHQ103A 

MHQ104A 

0017-00101-0510 

WSH 4-120-.250-018 

3 

MHQ101D 

MH0103D 

MH0104D 

0017-00104-0071 

SHOULDER WSH 

7 

MH HSA1C.2C 

MH HSA3A.3B 

MHQ101B 

MHQ103B 

MHQ104B 

0945-00807-0000 

INSL TO-3 

2 

MHQ101C 

MHQ103C 

0945-00809-0300 

INSL TO-220 

1 

MHQ104C 

0945-00809-0600 

4-40 HEX NUT 

3 

MHQ101E 

MH0103E 

MHQ104E 

0017-00103-0002 


** NOTE 

## THIS ASSOCIATED HARDWARE IS ON POWER SUPPLY BOM 
AND SHOWN HERE ONLY FOR REFFERENCE. 


proj.eng; l.dekker 

US' O < -N K(CK 

MIDWAY MFG. CO. 

FRANKLIN PK ILL 

1 DO NO r SC ALE DWG 


SC ALE 

NO , D ! PER 

DIM TOLERANCES 

UN LI S'- J^EOIIU) 

HOll (JiA If 002 ooo 

ONN ^ 

i^° - 

■>*” 9/ 1 /82 


HEAT SINK ASS'Y DRAWING 

_ 

M05I - 00945 - A008 


























DESIGNATION LIST 


DESIGNATION DESCRIPTION 


CIOl-CI03 

I0MF 25V AX TANT 

CI04-CI27 

.1 MF 50V AX. CER 

C.98-CI29 

47PF 50V AX. CER. 

0131 

10 MF 25V AX. TANT 

Cl34, Cl 37 

IMF 20V AX TANT. 

Cl 38 

fOMF 25V AX. TANT. 

C 1 3° 

.047 MF 100VMYLAR 

0 4 0 

- 01M F 50V AX. CER 

C1 42 

IOOPF 50V AX CER 

Cl 43 

.IMF 50VAX. CER. 

Cl 44 

33PF 50V AX. CER 

CI45-CI56 

.00 22MF iOOV 10%MYLAR 

C i 5 7- C159 

IMF 20V AX TANT 

C 16i 

330 PF 50V AX. CER 

C i 62-CI 64 

IMF 20V AX TANT 

Cl 65 

330PF 50V AX. CER 

CI66.CI67 

IOMF 25V AX TANT 

i 72 

10MF 25V AX TANT 

CI73 

.OIMF 50V AX. CER 

C50I-C509 

.IMF 50V AX CER. 

CPI 

4 70MF 16V AX..ELECT 

CP 2 - PI2 

OIMF 50V AX CER 

CP 13 

470MF 16V AX. ELECT. 

CPi 4 —CPI9 

.OIMF 50V AX CER 

CP20 

IOMF 25V AX. TANT 

CP2I-CP27 

.OIMF 50V AX. CER- 

CP29-CP33 

.0IMF$0V AX. CER. 

CP34 

IOMF 25V AX TANT 

CP35-CP46 

.OIMF 50V AX. CER 

CP47 

470MFI6V AX ELECT. 

CP^8-CP5l 

OIMF 50V AX.CER 

CP52.CP53 

IOMF 25V AX TANT 

CP54 

470MF 16V AX ELECT 

CP202-CP204 

IOMF 25V AX. TANT 


RI0I-RI07 

4 .7K OHM !/4W 5 % CARBON 

Rl 08-RI3I 

2 20 OHM" 

R 1 3 5 

33 K 

Rl 38 , R141 

I80K 

RI4 2 

10,0 K 

R i 4 4 , R14 5 

620K 

Rl 46 

IOK 

Rl 4 8 

IOOK 

R I49.RI50 

6? OK 

Rl SI 

IOK 

RI52 

IMEG 

RI53 

IK 

RI54 

IMEG 

RI55.RI56 

IOK 

RI57.RI58 

I.2K 

RI60.RI6I 

330 OHM " 

RI62 

220OHM" 

RI63 

1.2 K 

RI64 

? 2 OHM " 

RI65.RI66 

4 7 K 

R'73—R'78 

5.6K 

Rl 79, RI96 

2 4K 


RI97-R202 

5-6K 1/4 W 5% 

CARBON 

R203-R208 

33K 


R209 R2II 

I3K 


R2I3 

27K 


R ? 1 4 - R 21.9 

33K 


*220-R222 

■3K 


R?24 

27K 


R225.R226 

4 ?K 


R 227 

IK 


R22 8 

4.7K 


R23I 

300 OHM" 


R232 

4 7K 


R233 

3K 


R234.R235 

4.7K 


R 239 

100 OHM " 


R30I-R306 

2.7K 


R40I 

IK 


R402 

4.7K 


R403-R404 

33K0HM " 


R405-R407 

4.7K 


R50I-R509 

220 OHM" 


R5I0 

2.7K 



DESIGNATION DESCRIPTiafl. 


RMI 

4.7K IOPINS.I.P. 

RM2-RM5 

2.7K IOPINS.I.P. 

RM7 

4 ?K 8 PIN S.l.P. 

RM8 

820 OHM" 

RM9 

I.8K ‘0" 

RMI4 

4.7K 10" 

DI0I-DI03 

IN4I46 

0105*0107 

IN4I48 


Ql 01-0103 
QI04 


ICAI 
A4 • 

" A5 
" A6 
" A 7 
" A8 
" A9 
" AIO 
“ All 
" AI2 
» A»3 

" 92,84,05 
" 87, B8 
" B9 
"BIO 
"Bl I 

"BI2.BI3 
" BI4 


TIP 110 
2N4403 


7406 
74LS273 
74LSS74 
IK X 8 RAM 
ROM/EPROM 0 

" I 

" .. 2 

“ ”3 

74LS245 

Z-80 CPU 

74LS08 

74LS244 

74LSI 38 

74LS670 

74LS32 

74LS670 

74LSI38 

74LSI74 


ICC6 

"CIO 

•*c»l 

"CI2 

"CI3 


"06 
"07-D9 


7407 

MC 3403 

74LS04 

MCI4024 

7427 

74LS367 

LM3900 

74LS02 

MC140I6 


’"Dll 
“DI2 
"D13 
" E 2 
"EIO 
"EM 
“El2 
" F2 
"F3-F5 
"F6.F7 
"F8-FI0 
FI! 

" F12 


74190 

PR0MSB2A 

74166 

74LS244 

MC3403 

74161 

74126 

74LS2 44 

74LSI9I 

AY-3-8910 

74LSI9I 

7 474 

74 SO 4 


•CSA6-ICSAI0 
" A12 
“ D 12 
" F6.F7 


24PIN 1C SOCKET 
40PIN" 

16 PIN" 

40 PIN" 


JI.J2 

J3 

J4 

J5 

J6 


24 PIN KKIOO RT. ANGLE 

CONN. 

5 PIN 

K KIOO " 


3 PIN 

KKIOO " 


13 PIN 

KKIOO" 


5 PIN 

KKIOO" 


18 PI N 

KKIOO" 


4 PIN 

K KIOO " 


7 PIN 

KKIOO" 


2 PIN 

KKIOO " 



JWI.JW2 JUMPER WIRE 

LEO 3 YELLOW LED 



CROSS RFFEF 


DESCRIPTION 

yi r 

33PF 50V 5% AX.CER 

1 

47 PF 50V AX.CER 

2 

IOOPF 50V 5% AX CER 

1 

330PF 50V AX CER 

2 

.0022 MF IOOV 10% MYLAR 

12 

.047MF IOOV MYLAR 

1 

.OIMF SOV AX CER 

47 


.IMF 50V AX. CER 

34 

IMF 20VAX.TANT 

8 

IOMF 25V AX. TANT. 

15 

470 MF 16V AX. ELECT. 

4 

22 OHM I/4W 5% CARBON 

1 

100 OHM " 

1 

2200HM" 

34 

300 OHM" 

1 

330 OHM" 

2 

IK 

3 

I.2K 

3 

2.7K 

7 

3K 

1 

4.7K " 

19 


SWI 

SW3 

SW4 


10 POSITION DIP 
8 " 

PUSH BUT TON S.W. 


5.6K 

IOK 

I3K 

24K 

27K 

33K 


12 

4 

6 

2 

2 

15 


XTAL I 


16 MHZ CRYSTAL 


MHQI0I-MHQI03 SNAP 


100 K 
I80K 
620K 
I MEG. 














jan. 



8200HM 8PIN S.I.R 
I.8K IOPINS.I.P 

2.7K IOPINS.I.P. 

4,7K 8PINS.IP. 

4.7K 10PIN SIP 

IN4I48 

2N4403 
Tl P HO 



74LS02 

74LS04 

74S04 

7406 

7407 
74 LS08 

i 7427 
74LS32 
| 7474 
74126 
74LSI38 
74 I 6 i 


74166 

74LSI74 

74190 

74LSI9I 

74LS244 

74LS245 

74LS273 

74LS367 

74LS374 

74LS670 

AY-3-8910 

LM 3900 

MC3403 

MCI40I6 

MCI4024 

PR0MSB2-A 

RAM IK X 8 

ROM/EPROM 0 

.. .. | 

.. 2 

.. 3 

Z-80 >3880) 


1 

RMS 

0986-00805-0800 

1 

RM9 

0986 -00805 0600 

4 

RM2-RM5 

0986-00805-0500 

1 

RM7 

0986-00805-0400 

2 

RMI.RMI4 

0986-00805-0300 

6 

DIO’ -0103,0'05 -0107 

0986-00801-0200 

1 

0104 

0986-00802-0500 

3 

O'QI -Q’03 

0986-00802-0400 

l 

06 

0986-00803-7400 

1 

Cl' 

0986-00803-6900 

1 

FI2 

0986-00803-6600 

I 

Al 

0986-00803-7600 

1 

C6 

0986-00803-5900 

1 

A13 

0986-00803-7300 

1 

CIS 

0986-00803-7200 

i 

BIO 

0986-00803-6100 

1 

Fll 

0906-00803-6700 

1 

EI2 

0986-00803-6800 

4 

87,60.812,813 

0986-00803-6500 

1 

Ell 

0986-00803-5100 

1 

013 . 

09 86-00803-5300 

1 

014 

0986-00803-7500 

l 

01. 

0986-00803-9400 

6 

F3F5.F8-F 0 

0986- 00803*5600 

5 

B2.B4,05, E 2.F2 

0986-00803-4800 

1 

All 

0986-00803-6400 

1 

A4 

0986-00803-4700 

l 

CI4 

09 86-00 803-7000 

1 

AS 

0 9 86-00803-4600 

2 

B9.BII 

0906-00803-6300 

2 

F6.F7 

0986-00603-8500 

1 

03 

0986-00803-4900 

2 

C10, EIO 

0986-00803-5000 

3 

07-09 

0986-0000?-620Q 

1 

CI2 

0986-00803-7100 


012 

09 86-00803-8200 

1 

A6 

0986-00803-8000 

1 

A7\ 


1 

AS ) EPROM/ROM 

0 6 2 8-008 03-3000 

1 

A9 V OPTIONS KIT 


1 

AlO' 


1 

AI2 

0986 -00803-5500 



16 PIN 1C SOCKET 
24 PIN" 

40 PIN" 


I 

5 

3 


ICSDI2 

• CSA6 - ICSAiO 
ICSAI2.ICSP6.ICSF 7 


0966-00804-1400 
09 86 -00004 -16 00 
0986-00804-1500 


PART NOS. 


Cl4 4 0986-00800-0900 

028,029 0986-00800-2800 

CI42 0986 -00800-1 OOQ 

CI6I.CI65 0986-00800-1300 

Cl 45-CI56 0906-00800-1200 

039 0986-00800 2600 

CP2-CPI2 ,rpi4- CPI9. 0986-00800-2000 

CP2I-CP27 CP29-CP33, 

CP35-CP46.CP48-CP5!, 

040,C 173 

CI04-C127.CI43.C5OI-C5O9 0986-00800-1100 

034,037, CI57-CI59*CI62-CI64 0986-00800-14 00 

C o 20,^P34,CP52'CP53,CP202*CP204 l 0906-00800-0700 

C101-003.031,038,066,067, Cl 72 
CPl,CPI3,CP4?,CP54 0986-00800-2700 


R 16 4 
R239 

RI08-RI31 ,RI62,R50I-R509 
R23I 
R160-RI6I 
RI53.R227.R40I 
RI57.RI58.RI63 
R30I- R306.R5I0 
R233 

Rl0l-RI07.PI65.RI66.R2 25,R226, 
R2 28.R232. R234.R235.R402. 
R405-R407 

RI73-RI70, RI97-R202 
Rr46.Rl5l.RI55.RI56 
R209-R2II.P220-R222 
R179, R196 
R2I3.R224 
R135.R203* R 208, 

R2!4- R2I9.R403-R404 

RI42.RI48 

RI38.RI4I 

RI44.RI45.RI49.RI50 

RI52.RI54 


0062—063B3-IXXX 
0062-1 I0B3-IXXX. 
0062-I33B3-IXXX 
0062-14 IB3-IXXX 
0062 - 144 B3— IXXX 
0062- 17983-IXXX 
0062-1 83B3-IXXX 
COc; • •>003- I XXX 
0062-20IB3-IXXX 
0062-211 B3-IXXX 


0062-2I5B3- IXXX 
Q062-227B3-IXXX 
0062- 233P3-I XXX 
0062 —245B3-IXXX 
0062-24783-1XXX 
0062-25IB3-IXXX 

0062-275B3- IXXX 
0062- 287 B3-1XXX 
0062- 3I3B3-IXXX 
0062— 323B3-IXXX 


2PINKK 100 RT. ANGLE CONN 

1 

J6 

3000-16366-0200 

3 PIN " 

" 

1 

J3 

3000-16366-0300 

4 PI N " 


I 

J5 

3000-1 6366-0400 

5 PIN " 


2 

J3.J4 

3000-16366-0500 

7PIN " 


1 

J6 

3000-1 6366-0700 

I3PIN " 


1 

J4 

3000-16366-1300 

I8PIN " 

" 

1 

J5 

3000-1 6366-1600 

24PIN" 


2 

JI.J2 

0986-00804-4700 

JUMPER WIRE 


2 

JWI.JW2 

0986-00804-400C 


YELLOW LEO 


LEO 3 


0986-00804-2000 


8 POSITION DIPSW I SW3 0986 00805-0900 

I0P0SITI0N DIP SW I. SWI 0986-00805-1000 

P0 SWITCH I sW4 0986-00805-1700 


!6 MHZ CRYSTAL W/3RD LEAD I XT A L 0986-00805-1100