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C@flSCl€E6/ the user group neujsletter for October 1979 




APPLE cor^apyriEH 

GHAPHICS TABLET 

The Graphics Tablet allows the 
user to convert graphic data into 
digital information that may be 
processed by the Apple computer 
system. Shapes traced or drawn 
freehand on the tablet surface are 
instantly displayed on the system 
monitor. Once created, an image 
may be stored on the system disk 
for later retrieval and modification. 
Block diagrams, architectural 
renderings, logic diagrams, 
schematics, mechanical shapes and 
fine art are a few of the applications 
of the Graphics Tablet. 

The Tablet system consists of 
15-1/2 inch by 15-1/2 inch tablet 
(11 inch by 11 inch active surface 
area), a mylar overlay stylus, 
diskette software interface and 
documentation. Unlike other tablet 
systems, the electronics and power 
supply for the Apple Graphics 
Tablet are integrated with the Apple 
computer. This results in a low pro- 
file tablet, fewer boxes to contend 
with, easier hook up, and higher 
reliability. 

The software support package is 
composed of a small assembly 
language fast draw routine and the 
master control software written in 
Applesoft BASIC. The fast draw 
routine is normally transparent to 
the user. It is activated by a call 
from the basic program and places 
the x-y coordinate pairs received 
from the interface into the data 
array specified by the calling 
program. Because this routine is 
written in assembly language, the 
system can process up to 120 
coordinate pairs per second. This 
means that unlike other systems, 
the Apple Graphics Tablet will keep 
up with the fastest hand motion. 

The primary user interface is 
provided by the Applesoft BASIC 
utility program. Macro functions. 



selected by pressing the pen on the 
designated square on the tablet 
overlay, provide the user with a 
variety of utilities designed to 
decrease the amount of time 
required to complete the job. 

Apple recognizes that these 
standard routines may not be 
optimum for every application. 
Since the standard software is 
written in BASIC the user may 
easily replace these functions with 
those written specifically for the 
intended application. The standard 
software package serves as an 
example of the way to expand or 
change the menu available on the 
tablet surface. A new mylar overlay 
is easily integrated into the tablet 
system using the menu alignment 
routine supplied with the system. 

The interface provides the first 
level of support for the tablet. It 
relieves the user of many of the 
mundane calculations often 
necessary with less sophisticated 
systems. Cursor following (marking 
the position of the pen when it is 
proximate to the tablet surface with 
a cross hair cursor on the display), 
0,0 coordinate origin positioning 
and scaling are all done with single 
commands to the interface. Only 
when the interface signals pen 
down is any action required of the 
host software. 

Specifications 

Digitizing area 

— 11x11 inches (280 mm x 
280 mm) 

Overall size 

— 15.5 X 15.5 X 1 inches 

(395 mm x 395 mm x 25 mm) 

Controller card size 

— 7x2. 75x .5 inches 

(178 mm x 70 mm x 13 mm) 
Pen size 

— 6 inches (152 mm) with 6 ft 
cable (1.8m) 

Data rate 

— up to 120 coordinate pairs per 
second 

Coordinate system 

— - absolute cartesian with 
selectable origin 

Output format 

— sixteen-bit binary coordinate 
pairs 



Interface levels 

- TTL— provided by Apple 
interface 

Scaling 

- user selectable 

Operating Modes — 

Selectable from tablet menu: 

Tablet modes 

- RESET 

- CLEAR 

- WINDOW 

- BG COLOR 

- DELTA 

- SOFT RESET 

- VIEWPORT 

- CALIBRATE 

- REDUCER 

Pen modes 

- PEN COLOR 

- DRAW 

- LINES 

- DOTS 

- FRAME 

- BOX 

Command functions 

- CATALOG 

- LOAD 

- SAVE 

- SEPARATE 

- SLIDE 

- AREA 

- DISTANCE 

Power requirements (supplied from 
Apple power supply) 

- 230 mA -t-5 VDC 

- 40 mA -t- 12 VDC 

- 20 mA - 5 VDC 

- 40 mA - 12 VDC 

Software/firmware 

- Control program in Applesoft 
BASIC 

- Quick draw routine in assembly 
language 

- Interface firmware in ROM 

Minimum hardware requirements 

- A2S1048 48K Apple II Plus or 
A2S0048 Apple II with 
A2B0009 Applesoft II firmware 
card 

- A2M0004 disc drive with 
controller 

- Black and white or color 
monitor order information 

- A2M0029 from your local 
dealer 

(More new items from Apple on page 7.) 





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FOR llilij)lU(Ci^'UV(j):!;in . . . 

The big news this issue is the 
establishment of the Apple Educa- 
tion Foundation, a not-for-profit 
corporation established by Apple 
Computer Inc. to further the 
development of education through 
microcomputer technology. The 
foundation has just reviewed the 
first group of applications for special 
project grants, and will be announc- 
ing the awards shortly. 

The next deadline for submitting 
applications is December 10th. 
Projects that emphasize the 
development of new instructional 




(This column is written as a service to Apple 
customers, and contains information on products 
that we feel to be of interest to the user com- 
munity. Apple Computer does not in any way 
recommend these products or warrant their 
suitability for use with Apple II or Apple II Plus 
Computers.) 



It MEGABYTES FOH 
YOUM APPLE 

Remember when you got your 
disk? Finally, no more stacks of 
cassette tapes everywhere, no more 
waiting and waiting for tapes to 
load. But, since you have a disk 
you've thought of a dozen new 
uses for your Apple, so now you 
have stacks of little disks 
everywhere. 

Well, there is a solution to your 
storage problem. No, it is not a disk 
filing system, although that might 
help. Corvus Systems has a 10 
Megabyte fixed disk for the Apple. 
The system is compact, and you 
can attach four of them to your 
system. 



By Roger Cutler 

Education Specialist 

computing materials will receive 
priority consideration. Further 
details on the funding procedures 
may be obtained from: 

Carolyn Stauffer, Administrator 
Apple Education Foundation 
20605 Lazaneo Drive 
Cupertino, CA 95014 

EPIC, the Education Program 
Information Center, is a special 
department of the Foundation that 
reviews and disseminates programs 
for the education community. 
Details can be obtained by writing 
Dr. Richard Ballard, EPIC Director, 
at the Foundation's address above. 



The price is $5390 for one, and 
$3390 for an add-on disk. 

Corvus Systems, Inc. 
900 S. Winchester Blvd. 
San Jose, CA 95128 
(408) 725-0920 

SUPEMTALKEM 

SuperTalker is a peripheral 
system for the APPLE II that allows 
you to digitize speech, then output 
high quality speech through a loud- 
speaker under program control. 

SuperTalker consists of three 
major components: the SuperTalker 
peripheral card, a microphone, and 
a loudspeaker. 

Price is $279, assembled and 
tested, FOB, Santa Cruz, CA. 

For more information, please 
write or call: 

Mountain Hardware, Inc. 
300 Harvey West Blvd. 
Santa Cruz, CA 95060 
(408) 429-8600 



HOME CONTROL 

A new foreground/background 
system for home control called 
Apple Butler gives the APPLE II 
the capability of running two pro- 
grams concurrently; one for the 
monitor and control of systems In 
your home, and one for any other 
task you care to do. 

The Butler provides up to 16 
analog inputs for temperature, light, 
moisture, or any other input data. 
Up to 32 switch inputs are provided 
for security or fire sensors, push 
buttons, magnetic reed switches, or 
on/off inputs or status indicators 
from controlled devices. Up to 32 
output latches are available for con- 
trol of output devices. 

Several control modules will be 
available for the Apple Butler 
system. The first will be a system to 
control a solar water heater, a 
solar-assisted home heating system, 
a water-heating fireplace, or a com- 
bination of the three. Other systems 
are planned for control of automatic 
swimming pool equipment, 
sprinkler systems, home or com- 
mercial greenhouses. 

The Apple Butler costs $595 
from your local APPLE dealer 
or from Home Computer Center, 
Inc. , 2927 Virginia Beach, 
Virginia Beach, VA 23452, 
(804) 340-1977. 



WKAPPLE YOOB APPLE 

Protect your APPLE from dust, 
coffee spills and idle fingers with a 
WRAPPLE; a heavy duty, beige 
colored, vinyl dust cover. Or get 
the WRAPPLE II, a dust cover that 
will cover both the computer and 
one or two disk drives set on top of 
the computer. The WRAPPLE Is 
$8.95 and the WRAPPLE II is 
$9.95. 

To order, send check or money 
order to: 

Henwood Enterprises, Inc. 
1833 E. Crabtree Dr. 
Arlington Heights, IL 60004 

Or call toll-free (800) 323-7360 and 
use your Master Charge, VISA or 
American Express credit card. 



OUTSII>€ THi 

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ifs/ the user group neuusletter for October 1979 



APPLE-8i 

Dann McCreary has announced 
APPLE-80, an 8080 simulator and 
debug package for the APPLE II. 
Now any 16K or larger APPLE II 
can run programs written for the 
8080. 

APPLE-80 executes all valid 
8080 opcodes and provides single- 
step, trace and run modes. All 
8080 registers are displayed on the 
APPLE screen and can easily be 
modified. 8080 I/O port addresses 
are arranged in a table for ease of 
modification. Up to eight break- 
points may be set to facilitate 
program debugging. 6502 
subroutines may be called directly 
from 8080 programs and 6502 
routines may be embedded in 6502 
programs. Vectored interrupts are 
also simulated. 

The complete APPLE-80 
package includes APPLE-80, 
APPLE-80 Manual, an 8080 demo 
program, and an APPLE-80 
Reference Card. Priced at 
$20.00 + $1.50 shipping and hand- 
ling, APPLE-80 may be ordered 
from: 

Dann McCreary 
Box 16435 - WA 
San Diego, CA 92116 

California residents add 6% sales 
tax. 



SUPEMCHIP 

SUPERCHIP is a firmware ROM 
that plugs directly into socket DO on 
your APPLE II to provide enhanced 
I/O. 

With Superchip, your APPLE 
can display: 

— Graphics and text freely 
mixed anywhere on the 
screen 

— Full ASCII character set 
including lower-case letters 

— 31 additional non-ASCII 
characters 

— Reversed video on both input 
and output 

— Rotated characters for vertical 
and upside-down printing 

— Any character you can create 
in an 8 X 7 dot grid 



When entering program state- 
ments or data, Superchip adds 
single keystroke editing capabilities 
to the APPLE: 

— Move cursor up or down 

— Clear the screen and home 
the cursor 

— And more! 

Superchip requires a minimum of 
16K RAM (32K if you plan to also 
use Disk II) and supports the 
following functions: 

— Integer BASIC 

— Applesoft ROM card (RAM 
Applesoft is not supported) 

— Printing through either the 
Serial or Parallel Interface 
Card 

— A Character Editor, Disk II 
Interface and Text Editor are 
also available. 

Prices are: 

Superchip $99.95 

Character Edit Cassette $19.95 

Disk Interface Cassette $19.95 

Word Processor Cassette $19.95 

Shipping Charge (each) $ .75 

From: 

Eclectic Corp. 

2830 Walnut Hill Lane 

Dallas, TX 75229 



CAHD BEADEM 

Now, all you need is a standard 
*2 pencil, a card, and the new 
MR-500 mark sense card reader to 
quickly and easily enter data into 
your APPLE. 

Here's all you have to do. 
One— program the card by marking 
with the pencil. Two— feed the card 
into the reader slot. Three— the 
reader automatically turns on, the 
card is fed through, and data is 
entered into memory. 

The MR-500 is lightweight, 
compact, and plugs right in to your 
APPLE. 

Price is $750. For details, write 
or phone: 

Chatsworth Data Corp. 
20710 Lassen Street 
Chatsworth, CA 91311 
(213) 341-9200 



EDITOH / ASSEMBLEH 

Software Concepts has 
announced an Editor/ Assembler for 
the APPLE II. 

The editor can create and modify 
integer BASIC, APPLESOFT, and 
assembler programs. Edit features 
include string search replacement, 
tabbing, block line moves, simple 
macros, and search windows. 

The two-pass assembler can 
assemble up to ten disk-based 
source files and create a program 
listing and standard APPLE DISK II 
binary files. It uses eight character 
symbols, all standard 6502 opcode 
mnemonics, and has six additional 
pseudo opcodes. Operands may 
contain numeric parameters, sym- 
bols, and arithmetic expressions. 

The price is $55.00 from your 
local dealer or: 

Software Concepts 
P.O. Box 1112 
Cupertino, CA 95015 



LOWEE-CASE FOH 
YOOK APPLE 

Both Integer BASIC and 
Applesoft II can manipulate the 
ASCII codes for lower-case letters 
in string variables, but until now 
there has been no efficient way to 
display the results on the screen. 
The Lower Case Adapter (LCA) 
solves this problem. Its features 
include: 

— Plugs in with no modifications 
to the APPLE. Easily removed 
if warranty service is needed for 
either the APPLE or the LCA 

— Displays lower-case letters with 
descenders 

— Sample software included for 
use with either BASIC 

— No memory overhead as with 
firmware and software methods 
that utilize APPLE'S HI-RES 
graphics 

— Fully compatible with Disk-II 
DOS 

— Compatible with text editors 
from Applecations Unlimited 
and Programme 

— Compatible with most printers 
that have lower-case 



|appte*»m^tef inc. 



The Lower Case Adapter does 
not interfere with any existing 
features of the APPLE or any of 
the standard software or firmware. 

Price is $49.95. For more 
information, or to order write: 

Dan Paymar 
P.O. Box A-133 
S.C. 6800 

Costa Mesa, CA 92627 

or phone (714) 645-1411 after 

6:30 p.m. 

DISKETTE STOHAGE 

The SRW library cases provide 
minidiskette users with convenient 
and efficient access to floppies in 
envelopes. It is an excellent archival 
storage system with optimum pro- 
tection against environmental 
conditions such as temperature, 
excessive humidity, moisture 
condensation and contaminants. 
The library case is an excellent 
safeguard for recorded information 
during shipping and storage. 

For more information, see your 
local APPLE dealer or contact: 

SRW Computer Components 
Company 

18009-D ky Park Blvd. 
Irvine, CA 92714 
(714) 557-7060 

SELECTMIC INTEBFACE 

Looking for high-quality printing 
for your Apple? Then the Escon In- 
terface System may be just what 
you need. By choosing one of the 
four available models, you can in- 
terface any Selectric to any micro 
or minicomputer. 

There are no permanent 
modifications to make to your 
Selectric and it can still be used as a 
typewriter. 

Prices are: 



SlOO 

Parallel 

RS232 

IEEE-488 



$496.00 
$525.00 
$549.00 
$560.00 



For more information, call or 
write: 

Escon Products, Inc. 
171 Mayhew Way, Suite 204 
Pleasant Hill, CA 94523 
(415) 935-4590 




Electronic Messages 

It seems that the age of 
telephone communications has 
reached microcomputers. ABBS 
(Apple Bulletin Board Systems) are 
springing up all over. If your Apple 
has communication capability (a 
modem, etc.) then give one of 
these numbers a yell. If you have 
an ABBS, or know of one not 
listed here, drop us a note so that 
we can list it. 



A.E.C.S. 

Ft, Lauderdale, FL 
(305) 566-0805 

AKRON DIGITAL GROUP 

Akron, OH 
(216) 745-7855 

COMPUTER COMPONENTS, INC. 

Lawndale, CA 
(213) 370-3160 

COMPUTER COMPONENTS. INC. 

Westminster, CA 
(714) 989-1984 

COMPUTER MERCHANT 

San Diego, CA 
(714) 582-9557 

COMPUTER MART 

Springfield, MO 
(417) 862-7852 

FORT WALTON BEACH 

Destin, FL 
(904) 243-1257 

HAWTHORNE 

Hawthorne, CA 
(213) 675-8803 

HOUSTON 

Houston, TX 

(713) 977-7019 

KORSMEYER ELECTRONICS 

Huntington Beach, CA 

(714) 964-4346 

MARINA DEL REV 

Marina Del Rey, CA 
(213) 821-7369 



MIAMI 

Miami, FL 
(305) 821-7369 

NEW YORK 

Long Island, NY 

(212) 448-6576 

PEOPLES' MESSAGE SYSTEM 

Santee, CA 
(714) 449-5689 

PERIPHERALS UNLIMITED, INC. 

Signal Hill, CA 

(213) 424-3506 

PERSONAL COMPUTERS OF 
CHICAGO 

Chicago, IL 
(312) 337-6631 

SAN ANTONIO 

San Antonio, TX 
(512) 657-0779 

SAN FERNANDO VALLEY 

Canoga Park, CA 
(213) 340-0135 

SAN FRANCISCO 

San Francisco, CA 
(415) 668-4246 




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INVISIBLE WRITING 

Some programs using HIRES 
graphics require the ability to plot 
on one page of graphics while 
displaying the other. This really isn't 
hard, in fact just a POKE will do it 
for you. (Note that before this will 
work you must use a HGR or an 
HGR2 command to initialize 
HIRES.) 

To change the page HPLOTted 
to, POKE 230,32 for page 1, and 
POKE 230,64 for page 2. This has 
no effect on which page is 
displayed, but changing that is just 
as simple. POKE - 16300,0 to 
display page 1, or POKE 
- 16299,0 to display page 2. 



€&m€l6/ the user group nei 



ujsletter for October 1979 




DOS Update for Dual 
Drive Users 

DOS 3.2 has been shipping for 
some time now and, we are happy 
to report, has been remarkably bug- 
free. However, DOS users with two 
DISK II's on a single controller have 
reported problems. These problems 
usually manifested themselves as 
seemingly random "DISK I/O 
ERRORS." Often the copy program 
would fail outright or create a 
diskette that was unreadable. Since 
this was a sporadic problem, it was 
very difficult to track down. 

What was found was that the 
read/ write head was not always 
where DOS thought it was. 
Although DOS deselects a drive 
before seeking on the other drive, 
and the deselect is supposed to 
shut down the drive electronics, a 
filter capacitor on the drive has the 
effect of keeping the drive enabled 
for about 100 milliseconds after 
deselect. Thus, when reading and 
writing alternately to both drives, 
the head of the previously accessed 
drive can sometimes step itself as 
much as half a track off, while the 
other drive is stepping normally. 
When the drive is reselected to 
operate on the same track, DOS 
still trusts the head to be where it 
was, and this leads to the I/O er- 
rors. The solution we implemented 
was to wait 100 milliseconds before 
seeking, when the drive is powered 
up. Since powerup and seek time is 
substantial compared to the 100 
millisecond delay, there is no loss in 
performance. Additionally, the copy 



program has been changed to verify 
that each track is properly 
duplicated (this makes it slower but 
more reliable) . 

Congratulations to the lab 
engineers who found this elusive 
problem. Now comes the most 
important part, getting this correc- 
tion out to you. 

To do this, we have created a 
revision of DOS 3.2 entitled, 
appropriately enough, DOS 3.2.1. 
Your local Apple Level 1 Service 
Center now has a copy of this new 
release which works with both the 
Standard (Integer) and Plus 
(Applesoft) versions. It contains 
revised versions of the following: 

1. DOS 3.2.1 

2. Update 3.2.1 

3. Copy 

We suggest that Apple users 
operating two disks on the same 
controller obtain this version. For 
users with one disk, or with disks 
on separate controllers, there is no 
problem, and therefore, no need to 
get the change. 

To get your current DOS 3.2 
Diskette updated to 3.2.1, simply 
bring it to your local Level 1 
Service Center (Note: you must 
bring the original master diskette, 
the one with the Apple DOS Label 
on it.) The Dealer will process your 
diskette, updating it with the 
versions listed above, and return it 
to you. Every effort will be made to 
do this within 24 hours of the time 
you bring it in. That's all there is to 
it. In the event that there is no con- 
venient way for you to get your 
diskette to your Dealer's Service 
Center, you may mail it (be sure to 
pack it securely) to our Cupertino 
Service Facility. The address is: 

Apple Computer Service, 

20605 Lazaneo Drive, 

Cupertino, California 95014, 

Attention: DOS Update. 

The updated disk will be mailed 
back as soon as possible. 

Note: Nothing in this revision 
changes the documentation in the 
DOS 3.2 — Do's and Don'ts of 
DOS manual (A2L0012). It's still 
current and will remain current for 
any 3.2 series DOS release. 



EHHATA 

In CONTACT 4 we gave you an 
incorrect telephone number for 
Interactive Structures, Inc., the peo- 
ple who make an analog input card 
for the APPLE II. The correct 
number is (215) 382-8296. 

A couple of the Local User 
Groups listed in CONTACT 5 were 
wrong. They should be: 

MARYLAND APPLE II USERS 
GROUP 

Computer Unlimited, Inc. 
907 York Road 
Towson, MD 21204 
Kevin Parks 
(301) 321-1553 

WISCONSIN APPLE USERS 
c/ o Cybernetic Mechanism 
P.O. Box 11463 
Milwaukee, WI 53211 
Ken Blochowiak 
(414) 964-6645 




('^;fi'i',C'_')iiiJff'S-; 

Here is the new list of latest 
APPLE II User Groups. If we still 
don't have your group in our 
files, write or call us. 

BRITISH COLUMBIA 

APPLE BRITISH COLUMBIA 
Ralph Dawson 
2922 East 25 Ave. 
Vancouver, B.C. 

CALIFORNIA 

APPLE USERS GROUP 
c/ o Computerland 
1815 Ygnacio Valley Rd. 
Walnut Creek, CA 94596 

BYTE SHOP 
4 West Mission St. 
Santa Barbara, CA 93101 
(805) 966-2638 



6 



CAROLINA 

CAROLINA APPLE CORE 
Wilbur Andrews 
5212 Inglewood Ln. 
Raleigh, NC 27609 
(919) 787-3509 

CONNECTICUT 

APPLELIST 

55 Pardee Place 

New Haven, CN 06515 

Marc Goldfarb 

(203) 562-4907 (work) 

(203) 397-1407 (home) 

FLORIDA 

MIAMI APPLE USERS GROUP 
c/o David Hall, Sec. 
2300 N.W. 135th St. 
Miami, FL 33167 

THE APPLE COMPUTER 
ENJOYMENT SOCIETY 
671 NE 56th Street 
Fort Lauderdale, FL 33334 
(305) 772-4768 

KANSAS 

APPLEBUTTER 
10049 Santa Fe Dr. 
Overland Park, KS 66212 
(Last Wed. each month) 

LOUISIANA 

TheB.R.A.N.C.H. 

(BATON ROUGE APPLE NETWORK 
OF COMPUTER HOBBYISTS) 
4661 Tupello St. 
Baton Rouge, LA 70808 
(504) 924-0636 
Allen Simpson 

MICHIGAN 

THE MICHIGAN APPLE 
Computer Club 

32905 W. 12 Mile Rd. Suite 320 
Farmington Hills, MI 48018 

(313) 979-5298 

MISSOURI 

APPLE JACKS 
c/o Odel Small 
P.O. 24202 
St. Louis, MO 63130 

MICRO & PERSONAL COMPUTER 
CLUB OF ST. LOUIS 
Futureworld, Inc. 
12304 Manchester Rd. 
St. Louis, MO 63131 

(314) 965-4540 

NEW YORK 

THE MID HUDSON APPLE CORE 
ASD Office Systems 
Rt. 55 — Vanwyck Plaza 
Poughkeepsie, NY 12603 

APPLE BYTER'S CORP. 
Buffalo Saving Bank 
Sheridan-Harlem Branch, 
Community Room 
3980 Sheridan Dr. 
Amherst, NY 14226 
(3rd Fri. each month) 



NEW JERSEY 

APPLE USERS GROUP 
c/o Computer Encounter 
2 Nassau St. 
Princeton, NJ 08540 
(609) 924-8757 

OHIO 

DAYTON AREA APPLE USERS GROUP 
c/o Computer Solutions 
1932 Brown Street 
Dayton, OH 45409 

PENNSYLVANIA 

THE COMPUTER HOUSE 
1000 Greentree Rd. 
Pittsburgh, PA 15220 
(412) 921-1333 

VIRGINIA 

S.E. VIRGINIA APPLE ORCHARD 

George Guild Jr. 

117 Cardinal Drive 

Hampton, VA 23664 

(804) 850-0626 (home) 

(804) 764-7081 (work) 

WISCONSIN 

ADAM & EVE, APPLE II USERS' GROUP 
lis. Handcock St. 
Madison, WI 53703 
(608) 256-5306 



WHATS NEW, APPLE? 
(cont'd) 

APPLE WRITER: A New 
Way to Write from Apple 
Computer Inc. 

Discover Apple Computer's new 
way to be more creative and effi- 
cient at practically anything you 
write. The Apple Writer uses all the 
advantages of the Apple computer 
and that saves you time. This new 
product accomplishes typographical 
error correction, file editing and 
document revisions quickly with 
minimal effort. That's important to 
any creative thinker. 

By entering text on the keyboard 
of the Apple Computer, you see it 
displayed on the monitor. Easy 
retrieval of your files from the 
diskettes, allows for effortless text 
corrections or revisions. 

Features 

Character-oriented rather than 
line-oriented text editing permits 
easier editing. 



Editing feature permits three 
methods of deletion of text (char- 
acter, word and paragraph) and 
two methods of insertion of text 
(character and file) . Cursor Control 
Mode allows easy movement 
throughout the text. Moves blocks 
of text within a document, two easy 
ways. 

Stores documents easily on 
floppy disks with up to 95 pages of 
text per diskette. Any length docu- 
ment can be printed using the load 
and continue printing feature. 

Allows partial documents to be 
saved to separate disk files, and 
recalled later for insertion into other 
documents. 

Printer Commands include: left 
or right justify, fill-justify or center- 
ing. Also sets left, right, top and 
bottom margins; line length of 
page, line spacing, page numbering 
and page heading. Many of these 
commands may be embedded on 
your text allowing dynamic format- 
ting. 

Recovers automatically from 
system errors to protect documents. 

Permits check of length of 
unused working file space (docu- 
ment in memory) . 

Permits use of DOS commands 
from editor, allowing you to catalog 
or delete files stored on diskette. 

Has Global search and replace, 
allowing replacement of any 
characters or words throughout a 
document. 

Displays up to 24 lines of 40 
characters of text, with upper case 
shown as inverse characters. 

Minimum Hardware 
Requirements 

Apple II or Apple II Plus with 48K 
RAM 

One Disk II required (second drive 

optional) 
Monitor or TV Screen 

Apple Writer has too many 
features to explain here. Ask your 
dealer for a demonstration. Sug- 
gested Retail Price is $75.00. 



1 



€@fiIl€E6/ the user group neiusletter for October 1979 




Dollars and Cents 

This program (and the subroutine at lines 2000 
through 2060) will format your numeric output into a 
"Dollars and Cents" format. It's simple and fairly fast. 
An advantage to using this subroutine is that it does 
very little string manipulation. This means that the 
dreaded "garbage collection" will occur less often than 
with other methods! 



3LIST 

100 
110 

120 
130 
140 
150 
1 6>0 
170 



REM 
REM 
REM 
REM 
REM 
REM 
REM 
REM 



PRINT USING 
SIMULATOR 
AUG 79 
J. CROSSLEY 



i 80 
190 
200 
210 
220 
230 
240 
250 
260 
270 
280 
290 

300 

1000 

1010 

1020 

1030 

1040 

1050 

1060 

1070 

1080 

1090 

1100 

2000 



N = 



REM 



5: REM 



2000 



LET 
REM 
LET S 
REM 
HOME 
FOR X 
PRINT 
GOSUB 
PRINT 
NEXT X 
PRINT 

PRINT "UNFORMATTED 
TTED" 
END 
REM 
REM 
REM 
REM 
REM 
REM 
REM 
REM 
REM 
REM 
REM 
X$ = 

10 



SET NUMBER 
OF DECIMALS 

SET FIELD 
WIDTH 



TO 5 STEP . 501 



THIS IS THE 

SUBROUTINE. 
IS 'X 'N'/ AND 



X 



N 



FORMA 



FORMATTING 
THE INPUT 
'S ' 
TO 



IS THE NUMBER TO BE 
BE PRINTED 
IS THE NUMBER OF 
DIGITS RIGHT OF '. ' 
IS THE WIDTH OF THE 
RIGHT JUSTIFIED 
PRINTING FIELD 



N + 



+ STR* 
. 5) ) 



< INT (X •» 



2010 Q LEN (X*) - ( VAL (X*) < 
0) 

2020 PRINT SPC ( S - Q * (Q > N - 
1 ) -- ( N + 2 ) ■» ( Q < - N + 1 
) ); 

2030 PRINT MID* < X*; 1 + ( VAL ( 

X*) < 0); (Q <: ■■■■ N) + (0 - N 

) * ( Q > N ) > i 
2040 PRINT MID* ( "0. 00", 1 + < <N 
+ 1 ) < Q), 1 +• (N - Q + 2) * 

(Q < N + 2) ); 
2050 PRINT RIGHT* ( X*, N * (Q > 

N ) + ( Q - 1 ) •» ( Q < N ) ) ; 
2060 RETURN 



Literal Input 

Here is another GC (garbage collection) forestaller 
with some nice additional benefits. It allows you to 
enter commas, quotes and colons into Applesoft 
without getting an "EXTRA IGNORED" error for your 
efforts and works just as well for either keyboard or 
disk input. Here's what it does. 

— Line 100 defines a string variable at a known 
memory location. (This name can be anything you 
wish. We just happened to use IN$.) 

— Lines 220-290 poke a short machine language 
routine into page 3 of your Apple's memory. This 
routine changes the pointer to the string in memory to 
point at the Input Buffer ($200) . 

— Line 350 calls the new input routine and the MID$ 
function moves a copy of the new string into main 
memory so that it isn't overwritten by the next input. 

Here's a cute trick for using this routine with random 
access disk files. Say your program is reading a file for 
the third field in each record. Using this routine, the 
syntax for that would be: 

CALL 768: CALL 768: CALL 768: IN$ = MID$(IN$,1) 

The first two calls are dummy INPUTs but, unlike 
the normal DOS "INPUT IN$" command, perform no 
string operations. 

Try it. You'll like it. 



3LIST 

100 
1 10 
120 
130 
140 



LET IN* ==•■ "X" 
TEXT : HOME 
REM 

REM THE FIRST VARIABLE 
REM DEFINED MUST BE A STRING 



150 REM 
160 REM 
170 REM 



THIS STRING WILL REG 
INPUT FROM THE CALL 



VE 



8 



180 REM THIS POKES THE INPUT 

190 REM SIMULATOR ROUTINE 

200 REM INTO MEMORY. . , 

210 REM 

220 FOR J - 768 TO 788 

230 READ I 

240 POKE v). I 

250 NEXT v; 

260 DATA 162, 0, 32, 117, 253, 160, 2 

270 DATA 138, 145, 105, 200, 169, 

280 DATA 145, 105, 200, 169, 2, 145 

290 DATA 105, 96 

300 REM 

310 REM NOW TO USE IT ! 

320 REM 

330 PRINT "TYPE IN ANY CHARACTER 

S YOU WISH: " 

340 PRINT 

350 CALL 768. IN* = MID* ( IN*, 1 > 

360 REM 

370 REM THIS IS AN " INPUT IN*" 

380 REM BUT IGNORES "," St ":" 

390 REM 

400 PRINT 

410 PRINT "AND HERE'S WHAT YOU T 

YPED IN; " 

420 PRINT : PRINT IN* 

430 PRINT 

440 PRINT "NOTE THAT EVEN QUOTES 

, COMMAS AND" 

450 PRINT "COLONS GET THROUGH UN 

SCATHED. " 

460 PRINT : PRINT "NOW LET 'S WR I 

TE IT TO THE DISK. " 

470 PRINT CHR* (4) "OPEN TEMP" 

480 PRINT CHR* <4) "WRITE TEMP" 

490 PRINT IN* 

500 PRINT CHR* (4) "CLOSE" 

510 PRINT : PRINT "AND READ IT B 

ACK IN. . . " 

520 LET IN* = " " 

530 PRINT CHR* (4) "OPEN TEMP " 

540 PRINT CHR* (4) "READ TEMP" 

550 CALL 768: IN* = MID* ( IN*, 1 ) 

560 PRINT CHR* < 4) "CLOSE" 

570 PRINT : PRINT IN* 

580 PRINT : PRINT "TA~DAA! ! ": END 



1 



Restore to Line Number 

We've had some questions from people asking how 
to do a RESTORE statement to a particular line 
number. It's really not too difficult. The next program is 
a quick demonstration of how to do this. 



3LIST 

DATA ZERO 

1 DATA ONE 

2 DATA TWO 

3 DATA THREE 

4 DATA FOUR 

5 DATA FIVE 

6 DATA SIX 

7 DATA SEVEN 

8 DATA EIGHT 

9 DATA NINE 

10 REM 

11 REM THESE ARE THE DATA LINES 

12 REM 

1000 REM THESE POKES ENTER THE 
1010 REM RESTORE PROGRAM INTO 
1020 REM MEMORY 
1025 REM 

1030 POKE 768, 201: POKE 769, 82: POKE 
770,208: POKE 771,38: POKE 7 
72, 32: POKE 773, 177: POKE 77 
4,0: POKE 775, 32: POKE 776, 1 
03: 

1040 POKE 777, 221: POKE 778, 32; POKE 
779,82; POKE 780, 231: POKE 7 
81, 32; POKE 782, 26: POKE 783 
, 214: POKE 784, 144: POKE 785 

.> 8: 

1050 POKE 786, 160; POKE 787, 4; POKE 
788, 177: POKE 789, 155: POKE 
790, 201 : POKE 791, 131 : POKE 
792, 240; POKE 793, 3; POKE 79 
4, 76: 

1060 POKE 795, 124: POKE 796, 217: 
POKE 797, 165: POKE 798, 155; 
POKE 799, 164: POKE 800, 156: 
POKE 801, 56: POKE 802, 233; POKE 

803, 1; 

1070 POKE 804, 32; POKE 805, 80; POKE 
806, 216; POKE 807, 76: POKE S 
08, 166; POKE 809, 217; POKE 8 
10, 96 

1075 REM 

1076 REM THESE POKES SET TO 

1077 REM JUMP TO THE RESTORE 

1078 REM PROGRAM 

1079 REM 

lOSO POKE 1013, 76; POKE 1014, 0; POKE 
1015, 3 

1084 REM 

1085 REM THESE POKES ENTER THE 

1086 REM OWERR FIX FROM PAGE 82 

1087 REM INTO MEMORY 

1088 REM 

1090 POKE 810, 104: POKE 811, 168: 
POKE 812, 104; POKE 813, 166; 
POKE 814, 223: POKE 815, 154; 
POKE 816, 72; POKE 817, 72: POKE 



9 



ceimcc ^ / the user group neuusletter for October 1979 [ '■;::';";"<"(■ :o !ii^i|,':'J- lif'V'^iv [\ip:„ 



818, 152: POKE 819, 72: POKE 8 
20. 96 

2000 REM 

2010 REM SET UP QNERR AND START 
2020 REM THE MAIN PROGRAM 
2030 REM 

2040 ONERR GOTO 3030 

2050 LIST - 9 

2060 INPUT "WHICH LINE DO YOU WA 
NT ?"; LN 

2070 RLN 
2080 REM 

2090 REM LINE 1 1 30 IS DOES A 
2100 REM 'RESTORE TO LINE LN ' 
2110 REM 

2120 READ A* 
2130 PRINT 

2140 PRINT "AND THE DATA IS. . . " 

; A* 
2150 PRINT 

2160 GOTO 2050: REM DO IT AGAIN 
3000 REM 

3010 REM ERROR HANDLER 

301 1 REM 

3012 REM ALONE EXECUTES THE 

3013 REM ONERR FIX 

3020 REM 

3030 IF PEEK < 222 > = 90 THEN PRINT 
: PRINT "THAT 'S NOT A DATA L 
INE! "; CHR* (7) : Z>. : GOTO 20 
50 

3040 REM 

3050 REM THIS IS FOR 

3060 REM UNDEFINED STATEMENT 

3070 REM 

3080 IF PEEK (222) = 254 THEN PRINT 
: PRINT "TRY TYPING A NUMBER 
! "i CHR$ (7) : ?y. : GOTO 2050 

3090 REM 

3100 REM THIS IS FOR 

3110 REM BAD RESPONSE TO INPUT 

3120 REM 

3130 REM IF NOT ONE OF THE 
3140 REM ABOVE ERRORS THEN END 
3150 END 

3 

What's In This System, 
Anyway? 

This last program (CONFIG) , does a quick look at 
the machine language code, if any, located in your 
Apple's I/O slots. Since this code is different for each 
peripheral, it's possible to tell just what interface card is 
in a particular slot. 

The bytes being read are $Cn05 and $Cn07, where 
n is the slot number. For instance, these bytes both 
contain $48 (72 decimal) for an Apple Parallel Printer 
Interface. 



3LIST 

100 REM THIS PROGRAM FIGURES 
110 REM OUT WHAT CARDS YOUR 
120 REM APPLE HAS IN WHICH 
130 REM PERPHERIAL SLOT. 
140 REM 

150 REM THIS IS DONE BY THE 
160 REM PROGRAM LOOKING AT 
170 REM THE CODE IN AN ON- 
180 REM BOARD ROM AND DOING 
190 REM A QUICK CHECK ON A 
200 REM FEW BYTES 
210 REM 

220 TEXT : HOME : PRINT : PRINT 
SYSTEM CONFIGURATION ( 
CONFIG)": PRINT 
230 DIM S5<4) ; S7(4) : DISK 1: COM 

= 2: SERIAL = 3: PTR = 4 
240 DATA 3. 60, 24, 56, 56, 24, 72, 72 
250 FOR I = DISK TO PTR: READ S5 

( I ), S7< I ) : NEXT 
260 DIM NA* < 4 ) 

270 LET NA*<DISK) - "DISK CONTRO 
LLER " 

280 LET NA*(COM) = "COMMUNICATIONS" 
290 LET NA*( SERIAL) = "H. S. SER 
lAL" 

300 LET NA*(PTR ) = "PARALLEL PRI 

NTER " 
310 DIM CS(2) 
320 LET ClOO = 49408 
330 LET C700 = 50944 
340 FOR S - ClOO TO C700 STEP 256 
350 FOR K ~ TO 2 
360 LET CS(K> - 
370 FOR I " TO 255 STEP 8 
380 LET CS(K) = CS(K) + PEEK (S 
+ I > 

390 NEXT : NEXT 

400 IF CS(0) < > CS(1 ) OR CSd ) 
•C > CS(2) OR CS(2) <: 256 OR 
CS(0) < 256 OR CSd ) < 256 THEN 
470 

410 PRINT "SLOT NO. "<S - 49152) 

/ 256" HAS A"; 
420 FOR I " DISK TO PTR 
430 IF PEEK <S + 5) = 85(1) AND 

PEEK (S + 7) = S7( I ) THEN PRINT 
" "NA*( I ) i : I 99 
440 NEXT I 

450 IF I = 5 THEN PRINT "N UNKN 

OWN"; 

460 PRINT " CARD" : GOTO 480 

470 PRINT "SLOT NO. " (S - 49152) 

/ 256" IS EMPTY" 
480 NEXT : END 

3 



10