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1 




? I the user grouf 



Wo 1 1 : i / 1 a IICVV i"elep|)OjH; 

lii.iinboi for Wmt.x oi" you with 
questions! ^ 

(408) 996-9868 

Write ii down arid keep it in a 
safe place. It's IMPORTANT! 

This is a direct line to our 
"Answer People," who are here 
to help you with APPLE II 
questions. Since it is a direct line, 
you won't have to leave a mes- 
sage with our PBX operator, or 
worse yet, have to wait on 
"hold" while someone else's 
questions are answered. If the 
line is busy when you call, it 
means "Please call back." 

Our question answering ser- 
vice has been revised in this 
manner in order to better serve 
you. It was found with the old 
system that phone messages 



would buck up feuibiy and ii 
took a supreme effort 'A. gei 
them all answered. When we. 
called you back, because of time 
7 ,i«iit j differences, quite often 
then was no one ilwve to answer. 

This new system should 
enable us to help you in a much 
more efficient manner. We would 
like your comments, both pro 
and con, but PLEASE put them 
in writing so as not to tie the 
phones up. 

When should you call Apple? 
Call us when your local User 
Group or your Dealer is unable 
to answer your question, then 
SHARE our response with them. 
In this way we will work together 
to continually improve the depth 
of technical support available 
locally. We're always happy to 
help you .... 




. . Apples everywhere 

Apple User Groups are 
sprouting everywhere, including 
Europe. If this keeps up (and 
we're sure it will) there will be 
an Apple User Group in every 
neighborhood. 
ALASKA 
APPLE-HOLICS 
Sra Box 1313 
Anchorage, AK 99502 
G. K. Inman 
(907) 344-1300 
2nd Tuesday of Month, 
7:30 P.M. 
CALIFORNIA- 
ABACUS USERS GROUP 
Byte Shop 
Hayward, CA 94540 
(415) 886-2980 
3rd Thursday of Month 
APPLE BYTE USERS GROUP 
14052 E. Firestone Blvd. 
Santa Fe Springs, CA 90670 
Loy Spurlock 
(213) 921-2111 
(714) 739-0711 
2nd Saturday of Month 
APPLE CORE 

Computerland of Thousand Oaks 

171 E. Thousand Oaks Blvd. 

Thousand Oaks, CA 91360 

Marion A. Clarke 

(805) 495-3554 

2nd Thursday of Month 

THE APPLE PICKERS 

Santa Rosa Computer Center 

604 Seventh Street 

Santa Rosa, CA 95404 

APPLE P.I.E. 

1st Thursday of Month, 

7:30 P.M. 

Collins Jr. High, Cupertino 

3rd Sunday of Month, 3:30 P.M. 



€OfMMb/thc«5 user group n 

Computer Plus, Inc., Sunnyvale 

Bobby Goodman (408) 255-5024 

Fred Viles (408) 298-3728 

APPLE USERS GROUP 

1 1074 San Pablo Avenue 

El Cerrito, CA 94530 

Scott Starkweather 

(415) 233-5010 

APPLE 

Computerland of Thousand Oaks 
171 E. Thousand Oaks Blvd. 
#104 

Thousand Oaks, CA 91360 
David Kay (805) 495-3554 
2nd Thursday of Month 
L.A. APPLE USERS GROUP 
11911 Wilshire Blvd. 
Los Angeles, CA 90025 
(213) 826-8498 
COLORADO- 
APPLE PI 
407 Peery Parkway 
Golden, CO 80401 
Austin R. Brown, Jr. 
(303) 279-5388 (home) 
(303) 279-0300 X2434 (work) 
1st Thursday of Month, 
7:30 P.M. 

Room 271, Green Center 
Colorado School of Mines, 
Golden 

FLORIDA— 
(No name yet) 

Southern Microcomputer Co. 
5901E Northwest 151st Street 
Miami Lakes, FL 33169 
Victor Steeb 
(305) 821-7401 

HAWAII- 

APPLE USER GROUP 
7110COhana-Nui Circle 
Honolulu, HI 96818 
Dennis Nyhagen 

ILLINOIS- 
NORTHWEST SUBURBAN 
APPLE II USERS GROUP 
650 Pompano Lane 
Palatine, IL 60067 
Ken Rose 

(312) 359-6723 (home) 
(312) 467-8578 

INDIANA 

INDY APPLE PICKERS 
c/o Home Computer Center 
21 1 5 E. 62 Street 
Indianapolis, IN 46220 
Doug Mcintosh 



eujsl@ti.or for June 1979 



NEBRASKA- 
APPLE SAUCE OF LINCOLN- 
OMAHA 
2055 'O' Street 
Lincoln, NE 68510 
Russ Genzmer 
(402) 435-4467 
NEW JERSEY- 
APPLE TREE OF CENTRAL 
N.J. 

1411 Greenwood Drive 
Piscataway, NJ 08854 
Steve Toth 
(201) 968-7498 

NEW MEXICO - 
THE APPLE CORPS 
Personalized Computer Services 
1 803 Corte del Ranchero 
Alamogordo, NM 88310 
Earl J . Nielsen 
(505) 437-8447 

NORTH CAROLINA 

GREEN APPLES 

c/o Greensboro Byte Shop 

218 North Elm St. 

Greensboro, NC 27410 

Nancy Tenell 

(919) 275-BYTE 

MARYLAND- 
MARYLAND APPLE II USERS 
GROUP 

Computerland Unlimited, Inc. 
907 York Road 
Towson, MD 21204 
Kevin Parks 
(301) 321-1553 

MASSACHUSETTS- 
APPLESEED 
1 7 Saxon Road 
Worcester, MA 01602 
Donald M. Isaac 

MISSOURI- 

I I I H APPLE JACKS OF 

ST. LOUIS 

P.O. Box 8452 

St. Louis, MO 63132 

Creighton Calfee 

PENNSYLVANIA— 

(No name yet) 
Computerland of Harrisburg 
4644 Carlisle Pike 
Mechanicsburg, PA 1 7055 

TENNESSEE- 
APPLE PI 

Rt. #12, Cherokee Hills 
Sevierville, TN 37862 



( ^ppfe ffimp? jte(f lie. 



Richard C. Secrist 

(Formerly APPLEachian Users 

Group) 

UTAH- 
APPLE 

Tripower Electric 
80 E. 4500 Street 
Murray, UT 84107 
Bruce Lerner 
(801) 262-0860 
WISCONSIN- 
WISCONSIN APPLE USERS 
c/o Cybernetic Mechanism 
P.O. Box 1 1463 
Milwaukee, WI 5321 1 
Ken Blochowick 
(414) 964-6458 

BELGIUM- 
EUROPEAN COMMUNITIES 
COMPUTER CLUB 
c/o R. Ettore 
59, Rode Beukenlaan 
1970 Wezembeek-Oppem 
Belgium 
FRANCE- 
APPLE OH DIP 

8, Place Ste-Opportune-7500 1 
Paris, France 
Schraen Dominique 

508-46-21-508-47-71 



J1l_ jK, 
/ I \ 

/L < 



Apple Magazine is here! The 
first issue of Apple is now avail- 
able from your local APPLE 
dealer. The new magazine will be 
published three or four times a 
year, and each issue will have a 
different theme. The theme of 
this issue is education, or more 
specifically, how computers can 
be used in education. 



ikicc s/ the user group newsletter for June 1 979 < ppfe i o = n ster inc. 



In addition to articles on ed- 
ucation, the magazine contains 
our catalog and information on 
some new apple products. 
MORE CONTRIBUTED 
SOFTWARE 

Volumes 3-5 of the Contri- 
buted Software Library are now 
available. These volumes are 
particularly well documented, so 
you should have no difficulty 
using them. 



a | ^ r n j 

by Roger Cutler, educational 
Specialist 

With the next issue of CON- 
TACT we begin a regular "EDU- 
CATOR'S CORNER" column of 
news and ideas for educators. We 
know that many schools and 
teachers around the country have 
purchased APPLE IPs. We hope, 
through this column, to let you 
know what other educators are 
doing with their APPLES. Many 
publications have asked us to 
locate interesting projects and 
articles written by educators. Let 
us hear from you, so that we 
may pass along the news to 
others. 

Microcomputers represent a 
new and exciting medium for 
teaching and learning. During the 
next year there is going to be an 
explosion of educational soft- 
ware and courseware. We at 
Apple want to support and help 
coordinate these efforts. We need 
to know what you are doing and 
what your needs are. 

As many of you know, the 
Minnesota Educational Comput- 
ing Consortium (MECC) has 
selected the APPLE 11 micro- 
computer for the Minnesota 
School system. It is converting 
many of its educational programs 
to run on the APPLE II, often 
with graphics, color and audio 
enhancements. Watch this new 
column for news of how you can 
obtain these programs. 

Another interesting project is 



underway at the Lawrence Hall 
of Science at Berkeley, Cali- 
fornia. In a special outreach 
project, the Hall is visiting 
schools in the San Francisco Bay 
Area with a van full of APPLE 
IPs, bringing classes in program- 
ming to students right in their 
classroom. Joyce Hakansson, 
director of the project, reports 
an enthusiastic response wher- 
ever the "Apple Cart" goes. 

Finally, we have plans at 
Apple to support education in 
many ways. You can expect to 
hear about them in the EDU- 
CATOR'S CORNER. 




Well, here are some of the 
much praised subroutine Calls 
for the APPLE. This started out 
to be quite a project as most of 
the more obscure calls are buried 
deep in the heads of people back 
in Engineering. Then, just as we 
really got to digging, we re- 
ceived a copy of the ABACUS 
(Apple Bay Area Computer Users 
Society) newsletter. These guys 
have already done all the work! 
So, if what you need is not here, 
write to ABACUS at the follow- 
ing address for a copy of their 
list. 

ABACUS 

2850 Jennifer Drive 
Castro Valley, CA 94546 

It seems from the number of 
questions we get that most peo- 
ple consider Peeks, Pokes, and 
Calls to be somewhat magic. 
We've even had people ask for 
the Poke that would increase the 
capacity of their DISK II's! In 
light of this, maybe a short 
explanation of terms is necessary. 



PEEK— This command allows 
you (or your program) to 
examine a specific byte of 
memory. It will always re- 
turn a decimal number in the 
range of "0" to "255". The 
address to be examined is 
always specified in DECI- 
MAL too. (This means that 
"PRINT PEEK (768)" will 
display the contents of 
address $300.) 

POKE-Sort of the partner of 
PEEK. This command stuffs 
a specified decimal number 
into an address. "POKE 
768,255" will change the 
contents of address 768 
($300) TO 255 ($FF). This 
command is useful for plac- 
ing a machine language sub- 
routine into memory. (See 
the TONE ROUTINE on 
page 45 of your "RED REF- 
ERENCE MANUAL". 
CALL— This command runs a 
subroutine already in ROM 
(Read Only Memory) or a 
routine "POKED" into RAM 
(Random Access Memory) 
by your program. Again, see 
the TONE ROUTINE in your 
manual. 

So, without further delay, 
let's plunge into the interesting 
world of PEEK, POKE, and 
CALL . . . 

NO T E: THE POINTERS 60-63 
SPECIFY THE BEGINNING. 
AND ENDING ADDRESSES 
FOR A TAPE SA VE OR LOAD 
DA TA BLOCK THEY TELL 
THE TAPE ROUTINE WHERE 
TO FIND THE DA TA TO BE 
SA VED AND OR LOADED. 
MACH LANGUAGE LOAD: 

POKE 60, BEGIN MOD 256 
(LOW ORDER START 
ADDRESS) 

POKE 62, END MOD 256 
(LOW ORDER END 
ADDRESS) 

POKE 63, END /256 (HIGH 
ORDER END ADDRESS) 

CALL-259 READS THE 
TAPE/IN PORT 



cortoocc i/ the user group newsletter for june 1979 



MACH LANGUAGE SAVE: 

POKE 62, END MOD 256 

(LOW ORDER END 

ADDRESS) 

POKE 61, BEGIN /256 

(HIGH ORDER START 

ADDRESS) 

POKE 62, END MOD 256 
(HIGH ORDER END 
ADDRESS) 

POKE 63, END /256 (HIGH 
ORDER END ADDRESS) 

CALL-307 WRITES OUT TO 
TAPE 

NOTE: VERIFY ROUTINE 
LOOKS LIKE THIS. WE SPECI- 
FY THE BEGINNING OF 
BLOCK A, THE SOURCE 
BLOCK AND THE END OF 
BLOCK A. WE THEN SPECIFY 
THE BEGINNING OF THE 
DESTINA TION BLOCK. 

MACH LANGUAGE VERIFY: 

POKE 60, BEGIN MOD 256 

(LOW ORDER BEGIN 

ADDRESS) 

POKE 61, BEGIN /256 

(HIGH ORDER BEGIN 

ADDRESS) 

POKE 62, END MOD 256 
(LOW ORDER END 
ADDRESS) 

POKE 63, END /256 (HIGH 
ORDER END ADDRESS) 

POKE 66, VERIFY START 
MOD 256 (LOW ORDER 
ADDRESS) 

POKE 67, VERIFY START 
/256 (HIGH ORDER 
ADDRESS) 

CALL-458 VERIFY 
COMMAND 

EXP: 800<1000. 1FFV 

MONITOR VERIFY 
FORMAT 

NOTE: MOVE AND VERIFY 
WORK THE SAME WA Y. THEY 
TAKE 60 and 61 AS THE BE- 
GINNING OF BLOCK A, THE 
SOURCE BLOCK. 



THEN TAKE 62 and 63 AS THE 
END OF THE BLOCK A, THE 
SOURCE BLOCK. THEN TAKE 
66 and 67 AS THE BEGINNING 
OF THE DESTINA TION 
BLOCK OR VERIFY BLOCK B. 

MACH LANGUAGE MOVE: 
POKE 60, BEGINNING OF 
SOURCE MOD 256 (LOW 
ORDER ADDRESS) 
POKE 61, BEGINNING OF 
SOURCE /256 (HIGH 
ORDER ADDRESS) 

POKE 62, ENDING OF 
SOURCE MOD 256 (LOW 
ORDER ADDRESS) 
POKE 63, ENDING OF 
SOURCE /256 (HIGH 
ORDER ADDRESS) 

POKE 66, BEGINNING OF 
DESTINATION MOD 256 
(LOW ORDER ADDRESS) 
POKE 67, BEGINNING OF 
DESTINATION /256 (HIGH 
ORDER ADDRESS) 

CALL-468 MOVE COM- 
MAND 

EXP: 800<4000. 5000M 

APPLE II MONITOR DIRECT 
CALLS LIST 
CLEAR SCREEN: 

CALL-936 
LINE FEED: 

CALL-922 
SCROLL SCREEN: 

CALL-912 
NORMAL MODE: 

CALL-380 
INVERSE MODE: 

CALL-384 
DISPLAY REGISTERS: 

CALL-321 
ENTER MONITOR: 

CALL- 155 
RING BELL: 

CALL- 198 
SAVE REGISTERS: 

CALL- 182 
VERT TAB: 

POKE 37, VT 
VERT TAB: 

POKE 37, VT 
SCAN INPUT BUFF: 

CALL- 144 
LIST INTEGER: 



CALL-81 17 

BASIC 
RUN INTEGER: 

CALL-6090 

BASIC 
SAVE INTEGER: 

CALL-3776 

BASIC 
LOAD INTEGER: 

CALL-3973 

BASIC 

SOME ADDITIONAL 
MONITOR CALLS: 
CLEAR GR SCREEN 

CALL-1998 
CHANGE COLOR +3 

CALL-1953 
RESET TEXT MODE 

CALL-1233 
ADVANCE CURSOR 

CALL- 103 6 
BACKSPACE CURSOR 

CALL- 1008 
CURSOR MOVE UP 

CALL-998 
CURSOR MOVE DOWN 

CALL-922 
SCROLL SCREEN 

CALL-912 
CLR TO END OF LINE 

CALL-868 
CLR TO END OF SCREEN 

CALL-958 
HOME AND CLEAR 

CALL-936 
WAIT FOR KEY PRESS 

CALL-756 
END AND CLEAR WORK SPC 

CALL-81 92 (INTEGER 

BASIC KILL!) 
RETURN TO MONITOR 

CALL-167 (SET TEXT 

MODE) 

CALL- 155 (RESET BEEP) 
CALL-151 (RESET NO 
BEEP) 
DISPLAY REGISTERS 

CALL-321 (A=XX X=XX 

Y=XX P=XX 

S=XX) 
GET A LINE OF INPUT: 
CALL-665 LF PROMPT 

AND WAIT FOR 

INPUT 
CALL-662 PROMPT AND 

WAIT FOR 

INPUT 
CALL-657 WAIT FOR 

INPUT 



concoct 5/ the user group n 



ewsletter for June 1979 



ALL THESE RESPOND TO ESC 
AND ARROWS. 
TO FIND INPUT CHARAC- 
TERS LOOK AT THE INPUT 
BUFFER BY PEEKING 512 to 
767 DEC ($200 to $2FF HEX) 



Disk Magic 



How many times have you 
started merrily programming in 
Integer Basic only to find out 
that you should have been using 
Applesoft? Well, for you Disk II 
owners, here's a trick that can 
save you a lot of typing. 

Enter this line anywhere you 
have room in your program. In 
the example we've used line 
"0", but this could be any 
available line number. (For this 
example, the symbol "@" 
means "Control D".) 
PRINT "©OPEN X": POKE 
33,33: 

PRINT "©WRITE X": LIST: 
PRINT "©CLOSE": END 
When this line's entered, type 
the command "RUN' ' and press 
"RETURN". Your program will 
now open a file called "X" and 
list itself into that file. When that 
operation is complete, get into 
Applesoft with the "FP" com- 
mand and EXECute the file. 
Viola! Your program is now in 
Applesoft just as though you had 
entered it from the keyboard! 

Bocli lo Block and 
White 

If you are one of the pio- 
neers that bought your APPLE 
before the days of the color 
killer modification (S/N 60000, 
and you use a color TV as a 
monitor, then this hardware 
modification may be of interest 
to you. 

First add two parts, a 
2N3904 transistor (or equiva- 
lent) and a 1.5K resistor, to the 



breadboard section of your 
Apple as shown in figure 1 . The 
transistor base and one end of 
the resistor should be tied 
together. Then wire the other 



o o 



999 991 
999991 
9 9 9 1 9: 



B B < 



9 9 9 1 9 9 91 9 1 9 

gndQ 

9999999999 9 9999 i 



end of the resistor to IC F 14- 
pin 4, wire the transistor emitter 
to ground. The capacitor next to 
the edge on the corner will do as 
a ground. 

To test the final product, 
put your APPLE back together 
and turn it on; go into BASIC, 
type GR, then type TEXT. The 
screen should go from color to 
black and white. 

IMPORTANT! Please wait 
until your APPLE is a year old 
before making this modification 
as it will void your warranty. 




OUTSII 



ORCHARD 



mt mi 



iple u 



eresl 



This column is written as a service to 
Apple customers, and contains informa- 
tion on products that we feel to be of 
interest to the user community. Apple 
Computer does not in any way recom- 
mend these products or warrant their 
suitability for use with the Apple II 
Computer. 



. . . BASIC Teacher 

This BASIC teaching package 
contains 1 3 lesson programs 
6-16K in length. Lessons 1-12 
teach Integer BASIC. The topics 
covered include statements and 
commands, keyboard control 
functions, loading and running 
programs, etc. Lesson 13 uses 
graphics and sound to explain 
peeks, pokes, and calls a user 
may need to produce graphics 
and sound effects. 

Price of the BASIC Teacher 
is $19.95 on tape or $29.95 on 
disk. For a more detailed descrip- 
tion of this package contact 
Charles Mann & Associates, 1926 
South Veteran Avenue, Los 
Angeles, CA 90025. 

. . . The big cover-up 

Want to keep your Apple 
clean and happy? Then buy it a 
Computer Canopy dust cover. 
They are made of heavy padded 
vinyl and come in 12 colors. 

Delivery is three weeks from 
Digital Dynamics Inc., P. O. Box 
27243, San Antonio, TX 78227. 
(512)' 231-2012. 





cordsice 3/ the user group newsletter for june 1979 spte e©fwpyfegf inc. 



. . . They laughed when I sat 
down to play 

Turn your Apple into a con- 
cert organ. Play the keyboard 
just as you would an organ. And 
you can save your compositions 
for later play or editing. $9.50 
from Computers Etc. . . , 13 A. 
Allegheny Ave., Towson, MD 
21204. (301) 296-0520. 

. . . Space Pilot 

Try your hand at landing a 
space ship on the moon. The ship 
responds exactly as a real one, so 
you've got to be good to keep 
from crashing. $9.50 for your 
32K Apple from Computers Etc. 

. . . Continuing Medical 
Education 

This approach to continuing 
medical education uses a disk- 
based 32K Apple II to deliver its 
courseware. Lectures written by 
80 prominent authors from 30 
medical schools present inter- 
active and individualized conver- 
sations for AMA Category 1 
credit to the physician/user. 

Approximately 60 lectures, 
lasting 30-45 minutes, are cur- 
rently available in Internal 
Medicine, Surgery, Primary Care, 
Urology, and Psychiatry. Addi- 
tional lectures are being devel- 
oped in these and other areas. 

If you would like to receive 
more information about this 
system, please write or call 
Milliken Communications Corp., 



. . . Fast Floating Point 

The AMD95 1 1 Fast Floating 
Point Processor Board increases 
the computation speed of the 
APPLE II such that the calcula- 
tion of 5000 sines requires only 
about 24 seconds rather than 
133 seconds. The table below 
shows the speed increases for 



1100 Rearch Blvd., St. Louis, 
MO 63132. 1 (800) 325-4136. 
. . . Home control 

A new foreground/back- 
ground system for home control 
called Apple Butler gives the 
Apple II the capability of run- 
ning two programs concurrently; 
one for the monitor and control 
of systems in your home, and 
one for any other task you care 
to do. 

The Butler provides up to 16 
analog inputs for temperature, 
light, moisture, or any other 
input data. Up to 32 switch in- 
puts are provided for security or 
fire sensors, push buttons, mag- 
netic reed switches, or other 
on/off inputs or status indicators 
from controlled devices. Up to 
32 output latches are available 
for control of output devices. 

Several control modules will 
be available for the Apple Butler 
system. The first will be a solar 
heating control system to control 
a solar hot water heater, a solar 
assisted home heating system, a 
water-heating fireplace heating 
system, or a combination of the 
three. Other systems are planned 
for control of automatic swim- 
ming pool equipment, sprinkler 
systems, home or commercial 
greenhouses. 

The Apple Butler costs $595 
from your local Apple II dealer 
or from Home Computer Center, 
Inc., 2927 Virginia Beach Blvd., 



FUNCTION 


AMD951 1 


X=SGN(I) 


14 seconds 


X=SQR(I) 


1 5 seconds 


X=SIN(I) 


24 seconds 


X=COS(I) 


24 seconds 


X=TAN(I) 


27 seconds 


X=ATN(I) 


27 seconds 


X=LOG(I) 


25 seconds 



various math functions: 

The price for the fully 
assembled and tested board is 
$450.00, including shipping and 
handling. From your local Apple 
dealer or Computer Station, 
3659 Nameoki Road, Granite 
City, IL 62040. 1 (618) 452-1860. 

)ARI) APPLESOFT II 

14 seconds 
250 seconds 
1 33 seconds 
135 seconds 
246 seconds 
224 seconds 
1 14 seconds 



Virginia Beach, VA 23452. (804) 
340-1977. 

. . . Apple '21' 

Here is a true Las Vegas 
Blackjack game. One, two, or 
three players can challenge the 
"dealer" to win on the table. 
This game keeps track of all your 
winnings and losses and gives you 
a balance when you leave the 
table. Any player can quit or 
join at any time without disturb- 
ing the game. 

The program requires 24 K 
and uses the Apple HIRES 
routines. 

Price is $9.95 from Softape, 
10756 Vanowen St., North 
Hollywood, CA 91605. 

. . . Light Pen 

A new light pen that installs 
directly into the Apple II I/O 
sockets is now available from 
Symtec Inc. The light pen can be 
used on any standard TV or dis- 
play monitor in black and white 
or color and can provide x,y co- 
ordinate values of up to 255 in 
y and up to 5 1 1 in x. That's 
good enough to isolate a single 
hi-resolution point. 

Provided with the light pen is 
a demonstration cassette written 
in integer BASIC. A complete 
listing of the light pen routine 
and suggested uses for the light 
pen is included in the applica- 
tions manual. 

Price for orders is $249.95. 
Advanced orders and inquiries 
can be directed to Computerland 
of Southfield, 29673 North- 
western Hwy., Southfield, MI 
48034, (313) 356-8111, 11am- 
6:30pm Tues-Fri; or Symtec 
Inc., P. O. Box 462, Farmington, 
MI 48024. 

. . . APPLE CLOCK 

A Real-Time Calendar/Clock 
for Apple II keeps time and date 
in 1 msec increments for over a 
year. The calendar, clock, and 
event timer functions are easily 
accessed from BASIC; and a re- 
chargeable battery keeps the 
clock "ticking" when the com- 
puter is off. A software con- 




10260 Bandley Drive 
Cupertino, California 95014 
(408) 996-1010 



THIRD CLASS 
U.S. Postage Paid 
Permit No. 
3440 
San Francisco, CA 



concacc 5/ the user group newsletter for june 1979 



G 



trolled interrupt is provided to 
allow pre-programmed activities 
to take place. 

By adding the Apple Clock 
to this manufacturer's Remote 
Control System you have real- 
time control and monitoring of 
remote devices over regular AC 
wiring. 

Price of the Apple Clock is 
$199 assembled and tested. 
Delivery is 30 days. Mountain 
Hardware, Inc., 5523 Scotts 
Valley Drive, Scotts Valley, CA 
95066. (408)438-4734. 

. . . Quality Software 

This company has a new line 
of software for the Apple II. 
TEXT EDITOR ($17.95) allows 
management of free form text. 
U-DRAW ($ 1 7.95) is a hi-res 
programmable graphics editor 
with tape I/O. ELECTRIC 
CRAYON ($17.95) is a graphics 
editor similar to U-DRAW, but 
in lo-res color. MUSIC BOX 
($12.95) gives three octave 
sound with no additional hard- 
ware. NUMBER CRUNCHER 
($9.95) is a set of single preci- 
sion math and ASCII to HEX 
subroutines. CHRISTMAS 



TAPE ($9.95) is a musical Christ- 
mas caroler with blinking color 
Christmas tree. Also available are 
games at $12.95 each. 

Available from Apple dealers 
or the Muse Co., 7112 Darling- 
ton Drive, Baltimore, MD 21234. 
(301) 661-8531. 

. . . Hello Houston, this is Apple 
control 

Energy Technology has 
announced an interface for the 
Apple II that allows a user to 
remotely control any 24V, 
1 10V, or 220V utility or appli- 
ance to which an Energy Tech- 
nology remote unit is attached. 
The system utilizes Energy Tech- 
nology's industrial remotes 
which consist of 1 1 0V plug-in, 
24V thermostat override, 24V 
non-thermostat override, and 
220V in-line models. All units 
are shipped completely 
assembled and tested. The Apple 
II Interface is $189.00; remotes 
range in price from $85.00 to 
$120.00. Energy Technology, 
Inc., 102 Conway, P. O. Box Q, 
Las Cruces, NM 88001. (505) 
524-8615. 



. . . Trade you my PET for your 
Apple 

If you, or one of your 
friends, bought a PET or a TRS- 
80 and now want to trade up to 
an APPLE II, don't dispair, there 
is a way. Newman Computer 
Exchange will buy that used 
machine. They have a used com- 
puter "blue book" and pro- 
cedure letter that your friendly 
Apple dealer can get by writing 
or calling: 

Newman Computer 

Exchange, Inc. 

1250 North Main Street 

P. O. Box 8610 

Ann Arbor, MI 48107 

(313) 994-3200 

Here are examples of their 

trade-in allowance: 

TRS-80 

TRS-80, 4K, level I $225.00 
CRT-41 Recorder 20.00 
1 2" Video Display 70.00 
$315.00 

PET 

2001-8K $400.00 
You can't get all your money 
back, but you can get half of it 
back, which you can then apply 
to a new APPLE II. 



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