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till Aittie Wltlf $flx 





Volume T »To. ^ 



Autumn '97 



ADDRESS 



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3 



3 
4 
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6 

6 
7 
7 



10 
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12 
14 
15 
15 
16 
16 
19 



20 
25 
26 



MEMORY MAP 



ROUTINES 



Information and Chairmen — Trea$ury Note$ 
Input/Output — by Abed Kahale 
QPC 

RAMTop T3-2068 - Bob Swoger 
Got Milk? 

LarKen Graphic Adventure - Les Cottrell 
DownLoad from SOL BBS - Bob Swoger 
ZEBRA is back - Tim Swenson 
Sinclair E-Mail List 
From The Chairman's Disk — by Donald Lambert 

FILES 

Z88 Revisited - Donald Lambert 
D'You Know ? Internet - Al Feng 
More On QPC - Robert Harding 
QPC - The Missing Link - Al Feng 
Internet To LarKen - Les Cottrell 
Sequential Paragraph - David Lassov 
ZX-Team Fest - ZX-Team Magazine 
Menu Magic - David Lassov 
TeleCom Menu - David Lassov 
ZEBRA on the Net 

SUBROUTINES 

Unclassified Ads 
FWD Computing 
Sinclair Users List 




mmmm 



Established I 99 



ZXir QLive Alivel © 

The Tim ex/Sinclair NorthAmerican User Groups Newslette 



T/SNUG Information 



We wish, to support the following 
platforms: ZX-80/81, TS-1000, 
Spectrum, TS-2068, ZS8 and QL. If 
you have arty questions about any of 
these fine Sine! airs, contact the: 

Chairman 

Chief Motivator 
Donald S. Lambert (istug) 

Vice-Chairmen 

Tape & JLO PD Library 
D. G. Smith 
415 Stone St. 
Johnstown, PA 15906 
814 535-6998 

Z88 Library 
Dave Bennett (hatsug) 
1275 Timber View Dr. 
Mechanicsburg, PA 17055-9146 
717 732-4374 

ZX-81 PD Tape Library 
Ed Snow 
2136 Churchill Downs Cir. 
Orlando, FL 32825 
407380-5124 

RMG Entejrprises 

Rod Gowen (ccats) 
14784 S. Quail Grove Cir. 
Oregon City, OR 97045 
503 655-7484 FAX 503 655-4116 

TS-2068 

Rod Humphreys (vsug) 
10984 Collins PI. 
Delta, BC V4C 7E6 Canada. 
604 583-2819 

QL PD Library 
John Donaldson (catug) 

835 Foxwood Cir. 
Geneva, IL 60134-1631 
630 232-6147 

AERCO & ZSO Emulator 

Keith Watson 
41634 Amberly Dr. 
Mt. Clemens, MI 48038 

BBS -—GATOR— 
Bob Swoger (catug) 
613 Parkside Cir. 
Streamwood, IL 60107-1647 
630 837-7957 Woric 847 576-8068 

Any of the above can also be 
reached by e-mail through the 
MMCC BBS 847 632-5558 



ZXir QLive ALive! 

Is the newsletter of T/SNUG, the 
Timex/Sinclair North American User 
Groups, providing news and 
software support to the T/S com- 
munity ina VOLUME of four 
newsletters per year; beginning with 
the Spring (March) issue. 



T/SNUG' s main goal is to 
preserve and encourage the 
use of Sinclair computers 

by providing an open 
forum for the exchange of 
knowledge, building and 
maintaining of software 
libraries. Providing 
vendors, repair service and 
members with free ad 
space. 



It is the user groups and 
individual subscribers, rather than 
the vendors, that provide the 
pecuniary support for this 
newsletter. Vendors and developers 
receive this newsletter free of charge, 
though contribution from vendors 
and user groups is gratefully 
accepted. Please support our vendors 
and service providers whenever 
possible. 

If you have a problem or you 
have solved a problem, please share 
it with the rest of us. No problem 
will be considered unimportant. 



Editor/Treasttrer 

katMexi PD Library 



Bou can keep T/SNUG alive by 
an annual contribution of $12 
for one VOLUME made payable 
to Abed Kahale. Send check to:- 

ABED KAHALE 

3343 S FLAT ROCK CT 
SIERRA VISTA AZ 85635-6874 

520 378-3424 
Back copies are available for 
$0.75 each postpaid. 



of September 10, 1997, we 
have a balance of $833.29 



. .. ArtMcl^ 
Contributions 



Send in your articles by tape or disk 
and your inputs to: — 

DONALD S LAMBERT 
1301 KIBLINGER PL 
AUBURN IN 46706-3010 
Phone 219 925-1372 
By hardcopy, msdos or modem ( 3-28.8) to: 
Abed Kahale 
E-mail: AKahale@compuserve.com 



GATOR' s 

TWISTED PAIR 



To better inform the Sinclair Community, 
four 24-hour a day BBSs are now provided to 
serve you. You are encouraged to exchange mail 
and use the files sections of these boards. 
Bulletins and ads are available to all. 

Q-Box BBS 810 254-9878 

Utica, Michigan 
SCC Sever Jose Moreno 
http://members .tripod.com/~helpme/ 
SOL BBS 520 882-0388 
Tucson, Arizona 
MMCC BBS 847632-5558 
Arlington Heights, Illinois 
If you kno w the Internet E-Mail address of 
a Sinclair user, but do not have access to Internet, 
simply address your E-Mail to GATOR Sinclair 
on the 24-hour MMCC BBS and include the 
name and E-Mail address of the user you wish to 
reach. Then check the MMCC BBS from time to 
time if you expect a reply. 

We encourage you to exchange mail and 
contribute to the UPLOAD section. Call and 
register using your first, last name and phone 
number along with a password you won't forget. 
Write It Down! Do not try to do anything else at 
this time. 

When you call-in the next time, you will 
have Level 5 security and be able to enjoy full 
user privileges. The BBS has smaller sections 
called conferences. Select "J " for "Join a Confer- 
ence". Select "TIMET 1 to get into the Sinclair 
Section. The mail you then read will only be 
from other T/S users. Use extension .ART for 
articles, .ADS for ads and .NWS for news when 
UPLOADing. 

For help, contact the SYSOP, Bob Swoger, 
by leaving a message, mail E-Mail or phone. 
Bob_ Swoger-CENG108@email.mot.com 



ZXir QLive ALivet 



Autumn 1997 



Input/Output 



I have been informed that Jack Dohany was offering 
a Spectrum ROM which could be installed inside the case 
of a TS-2068 computer, in such a way that the resident 
Sinclair ROM would be switch-selectable. 

I wrote Jack Dohany, but my letter was never 
answered. Is this his correct mailing address? 

827 Vera Ave 
Redwood City, CA 94061 
This is the address I have for Jack Dohany. 
Do you have his E-mail address? 

/ don't have an E-mail address for Jack. 
Another question: Is there a source in America for 
Spectrum software on cassette tape, usable in TS-2068 
computers? I am thinking of such utilities as assemblers, 
not particularly interested in games. 

Seymour Miller 
109-14 Ascan Ave 1L 
Forest hills, NY 1 1375 
718 544-4508 

seymil@delphi. com 

/ do have the dual ROM with a switch to select 
either the TS-2068 or Spectrum ROMs. I am afraid 
this ROM is no longer available. 

One solution for you would he to get a 
Spectrum ROM Game Port plug-in from FWD or 
RMG. Of course it will work with other than game 
programs. 

The second solution is to get a LarKen Disk 
System. The LarKen DOS board has a open socket 
for a ROM. This ROM can be a LarKen Spectrum 
V2, Dohany corrected Spectrum or Dohany 
corrected TS-2068. Rod Gowen and Frank Davis 
may have them ail as well as Spectrum software. 

... It just keeps getting better! 

You and the others responsible for publishing the 
newsletter continue to do a fantastic job. Many thanks for 
the professional quality of your work. 

Hugh W. Scrrven Jr. 
Chute Vista, CA 
Thank you for the kind words, that is what 
keeps us going. 

Sender: Edk4@aol.com 

Greetings. I am the former editor of the NESQLUG 
News and a long-time QL'er. 

I am presently the Librarian of NESQLUG, and was 
reading the recent issue ofZXIR, which arrived today 
when, just as I got to the most interesting part of Bob 
Hartung's QPC article - *it disappeared* - arrggghhhh !!!! 
I hate when that happens 

I am VERY interested in the QPC, (which Bill Cable 
is going to demonstrate at our next meeting), and would 
greatly appreciate your sending me the remainder of that 



article so that I might share it with the other members. If 
you could Email it to me, I would be most indebted to you. 

Y'all are doing a great job. Keep it up, and keep it 
going. Thanks. 

Ed Kingsley 



oopsm 



Sorry for the 



inconvenience I caused you and other members. I 
didn't catch the mistake till it was too late after I ran 
all of the copies. 

Pages 19 and 20 are out of order, page 20 is 
there on the back of page 19. 

Glad to hear from you, I wish it was on a more 
pleasant subject 
Subject: Oops, sorry 

That's what I get for trying to think before I've had at 
least three cups of coffee. 

My apologies. I did look thru the issue, but the "Nose 
is part of the body" filler must have confused me, more 
than usual. 

Thank you for pointing this out without making me 
feel like an imbicile. I've made a number of such "re- 
arrangements" in the "NEWS", but nobody ever 
mentioned them to me. I guess they didn't notice or they 
didn't read the newsletter. At least you know I read your 
newsletter - and good it is, too. 

Ed Kingsley 
Edk4@aol.com 

Here is a correction from Robert Hartung:- 

f or any who did a double-take at a line in my 
first article which stated "similar to what 131 REN 
users have reported with sons: keyboards . . . * it 
was an example of what a text scanning device, 
OCR (Optical Character Recognition), and a spell- 
checker can conspire together to do when they get 
devious. The scanner gets an unclear image of 
adjoining characters, the OCR decides something in 
its memory matches that, and by coincidence a new 
word or character-sequence is created which just 
happens to be in the spell-checker dictionary. The 
result is computer-generated text that makes it 
sound like somebody's sons are up to something! 

Anyway, the original phrase was: "similar to 
what Dl REN users have reported with some 
keyboards. . . ." Also, some critical punctuation 
marks were dropped in the DO definition command- 
line, which should have read: 

OPEN_NEW #7, KEYS:PRINT #7, Wr_60 9 ; 
PRINT #7 ; "AL TKEY % CHR$(92)":PRINT #7, 
"ALTKEY CHR$(39), CHR$(34)*:PRINT #7, "ALTKEY 
%W:CLOSE 



ZXir QLive Alive! 



Autumn 1997 



Deal Abed : 

We have noticed, that the use of LYNX to search the 
net need not require typing http.7/ in front of every 
Universal Resource Locator (URL.) 

That is, instead ofENTERing 
lynx http://cnn.com 
in order to access the CNN web site, it is now only 
necessary to ENTER 

lynx crm.com 
and we get the same result! 

Now, this is when using lynx only and when accessing 
our internet Service Provider (ISP), so your results may 
vary, but it is worth TRYing out, since http;// is difficult for 
us to constantly have to type in before every URL. 
!!!!!!!!?!!! KEEP ON TIMEX 'n lUWAW.lHlUUU 

Abed, if you can, would 
you please reflect that message 
back to me? 

Please, let your readers 
know, that use of LYNX to surf 
the net need not always require 
those annoying, repeated key 
stokes of 

http:// 
Also, we do not all have 
access to the net at only $9.95 
per month!! 

Does that help?>Dave Lassov 

Abed 

Thanks again. We tried 
installing QPC on my 486 
Laptop, Sunday, to see how 
fast it would run, and 1) It 
DIDN'T and 2) It messed up 
my display something terrible. 
Everything is hi-contrast/lo- 
resolution and I can't figure out 
how to get it back the way it 
was .... Sigh ... 

Since Bill Cable is much 
younger than I am, maybe age 
didn't play a part in this one (?) 
Ed Kingsley 

Sorry to hear about the 
problem with the laptop. 



The video display driver 
software must not be 
compatible with the laptop. 

I had a simifar 
experience and as a last resort, I delete everything 
and started from scratch, very aggravating indeed. 

One of the many wonderful things about the TS2068 
is that there has been so much written to inform the user 
how to use all the features and capabilities. The manual for 
it is more informative than manuals I've seen for other 
brands. The way the memory is mapped makes 
programming a pleasure. The system ROM is located 
between 0 to 16383. The rest of space up to 65535 is RAM. 



Moving RAMTOP down to hide machine code is done by 
simply giving the command CLEAR followed by the 
address of the last byte of RAM you wish the computer to 
know about. 

The TS2068 manual tells us that if we want to display 
something on the screen, we just POKE something into the 
RAM space between address 16384 (16 X 1024) and 23296 
(16384 + 6912) or print something to one of 768 screen 
locations. 

Because TASWORD II is more like a line editor than 
a word processor, every character and space displayed on 
the screen is stored in predictable RAM locations. With the 
use of HEADER.B1 by Nazir Pashtoon for tape and Disk 
Doctor by George Chambers we find that the start address 
for TASWORD documents 33280. This is the address of 
the first character on the top left most position on the 

screen. 

If we do not enter 
printer controls into a 
TASWORD II document, the 
location of each character 
printed on paper and screen 
is easily located in RAM. If 
we want to see the text just 
entered into TASWORD II, 
we know to look for as much 
as 300 lines of 64 characters 
per line sorting at address 
33280 in RAM. Since 300 
lines of 64 characters is 
19200 bytes (300 * 64), the 
last character would be at 
address 52479 (33279 + 
19200). Hie sixth character 
on the fifth line would be at 
location 33541 found by : 

33279 + (4*64) 

+ 6 = 33541 

The following short 
program will display the first 
10 lines of a TASWORD II 
document named wpfile.Ct 
to the screen just as it 
appeared on the screen when 
you typed it into TASWORD 
in the 32 column mode: 

10 RANDOMIZE USR 
100; LOAD 

"wpfile.Ct" CODE 
33280 
20 FOR 1=33280 to 




"Friends, Romans and 
country men, lend me your 

ear," 

Willie didn't really mean it, take heart. 
Oh!! No Not my heart ... you don't 



I, 



(33279+(10*64) } 
30 PRINT CHR$ PEEK 
4 0 NEXT I 

This won't work very well with mscript because 
MSCRIPT lines are of indeterminate length. 

Now suppose you wanted to print out a portion of a 
VU-CALC spreadsheet to a large printer. Each VU-CALC 
cell is seven characters wide. There are 50 cells across. The 
address of the first character in the first cell is 34567. The 



ZXirQLive Alive? 



4 



Autumn 1997 



address of the last character in the last cell in the first row is 
(34567 + (50 X 7)) or 34567 + 350, Since there are 50 rows, 
the last byte in the VU-CALC file is 50 * 350 or 17500 + 
34567 or 52067. 

As you can see, we can use simple calculations to 
locate where each byte of a VU-CALC file and each byte 
of a TASWORD II file resides in RAM. Armed with this 
knowledge, we can write a program to move VU-CALC 
cell information directly to a Large Printer or into a 
TASWORD II tile for further formatting. 

Since the large printer can print only 10 columns with 
reasonable left and right margins rather than all 50 columns 
across the page, VC2LP.B1 asks you to choose the left 
most column to be printed. It then prints that and the next 
9 columns and all 50 rows below. 

TASWORD, being capable of 64 characters in a row, 
allows us to load 9 VU-CALC columns (9X7 = 63) into a 
TASWORD II file using VC2TAS.B1. The added 
advantage of doing this before printing is that the file can 
now be modified further for better readability of the 
spreadsheet. Since many of our spreadsheet applications 
don't require all nine columns there is usually room to 
improve the appearance of the printout by moving the 
columns apart and using complete words for headings 
rather than being limited to 7 characters. 

The two programs, VC2LP.B1 and VC2TAS.B1, are 
both provided as part of the LogiCall ensemble of 
programs available from Mechanical Affinity and RMG for 
$15. 

Thanks to Marie Kendall for alerting this author of a 
bug in an earlier version of VC2LP . B 1 . 

--== GATOR 

To: Swoger-CENG108 Bob ™ — 

From: fdavis@iquest.net@INTERNET 
Subject: Re: SinclairFEST 

Bob, it has been a long time since I have heard from 
you. I trust all is well. 

Carol came through her operation okay and will be 
back to normal in 3-4 more weeks. 

When is your picnic? I have about 13 boexes of TS 
and QL shir! on its way to me. some of this I would like to 
take up there. The guys from Michigan told me they 
wanted to go. any word on the SMUG people? I need to 
know times and where exactly, so as not to conflict with 
other events. Frank 

Thanks for reminding me. None of the CATUG group 
plan to go to Dayton this year. We probably should stay 
off that date because the SMUG and Q-BOX group 
and probably you may go to Dayton. Glenside usually has 
the picnic a week or three after Dayton, August is too 
uncomfortable. I shall put it to the membership for a solid 
date. THe stuff your getting, it isn't from RMG, is it? Our 
best to Carol for a speedy and comfortable recovery. 

Bob_Swoger-CENGl 08@email.mot.com 

Today, we shot off another article for ZQA, entitled 
TeleCOMM MAIN MENU. 

It refers to the menu, the listing of the menu, the 
CATalog ofRAMdisc, and the CATalog of disc drive #3. 



Well the first was printed on the BROTHER Ml 109 
in draft quality ONLY, since the NLQ was interfering with 
the 2068's second display file. SORRY!! 

The other four items are in BOTH NLQ by the Ml 109 
AND images by the 2040, since you can then pick and 
choose which version of the SCREENS to publish. 

But, please, each screen should appear in one form or 
the other! ! 

KEEP ON TIMEX'n Dave 

emanon(5)azstarnet. com 

Dear Abed, 

Thanx much to you and Don tor going to the trouble 
of getting my letter to you into the Summer Issue of ZQA. 
I hope it may help excite some interest among readers who 
may feel they don't want to invest in the full shot of 
upgrading to some of the recent developments in QL-ing, 
like new hardware that enables use of a hard drive, mouse, 
SVGA monitor, IBM-type KBD, etc. 

Some readers may have been puzzled by the line in 
the article which came out: "... appears similar to what 131 
REN users have reported with sons: keyboards. That, of 
course, should have read: "DI REN ... some keyboards.". I 
am familiar with quirky tilings like this that OCR can do 
with text from a scanner, especially with words the spell- 
checker fails to catch because they happen to match 
something else in its dictionary. Sometimes they can be 
hilarious 

To clarify this line, and aiso a couple critical 
punctuation marks that were dropped in the DO file 
definition, I thought I would start with these 
corrections and then go on to some other 
observations about QPC in a follow-up article. A 
hard copy is enclosed, and a disk file in DOS ASCII 
format. I also have Windows 95, WordPerfect 7.0, 
as well as DOS versions of Word 6.0, WordStar 6.0, 
PFS:Write, and of course QUILL in DOS and QDOS, 
if you can use a file in any of these formats. 

Robert Hartung 

Hunter/town, IN 

Dear Abed : 

Just mailed you another short article for inclusion in 
the next issue of ZQA. 

It is entitled SEQUENTIAL PARAGRAPHS and 
refers to both the TeleComm Main Menu and the Word 
Processor Main Menu. Also, it mentions some lines from 
its listing. 

Last week, we sent you two versions of the 
TeleComm Main Menu, and next week we'll send you two 
versions of the Word Processor Main Menu, So, this 
week, we sent only two versions of a short listing for 
SeqPar.B6 

I send two versions of these Hstings, both large 
printer and small printer, in order to offer you more 
flexibility in the formatting effort for the magazine. 

So, next week's article on the Word Processor Main 
Menu should complete my article submissions for this 
summer's issue of ZXir QLive Alive! 

KEEP ON T I M E X 6 n=»»>Dave 



ZXir QLive Alive ( 



5 



Autumn 1997 



■ G@mm fog tl i Sp gt^^ | r . I 

The following are the Spectrum graphic 
adventures i have downloaded from the Internet 
and think are worth sharing with anyone 
interested in this type of game: 

KINGKRBN Kings Keep - The little walking 
character can switch directions 
when jumping. Must recharge "burnt 
wand" to solve adventure.. (Only one 
! have solved.) 4 stars! 

SPLBND.BN Spell Bound - Third Magic Knight. 

Has instructions and looks 
promising. 4 stars! 

STORMB.BN Stormbringer - Fourth Magic Knight 
Has instructions and looks 
promising. 4 stars! 

KNHTYM.BN Knight-Tyme - Second Magic Knight 
has new character and looks similar 
to Kings Keep. Still a touch of 
arcade but has instructions and 
looks promising. 3 stars 

ARTHUR.BN Arthur - The view is as you would see 
it. Simple graphics, a little slow, but 
a true graphic adventure. 3 stars. 

MEGABK.BN Megabucks - Walking character type. 

Shows map (73 rooms) after failure 
which should be helpful. 2 stars. 

FRSKPS.BN Finders Keepers - First Magic Knight - 
more arcade style than others in this 
series. Comes with instructions. 
Many objects to dodge (not. my 
thing). 1 star 
I will share these with any readers interested. 

Specify SVa 400K or 3 1 /z 840K disk. Some others 

will be added to fill out bigger disks. (If you want 5% 

840K, send a formatted disk.) Contact: 

Les Cottrell 
108 River Heights Drive 
Cocoa, FL 32922-6630 

JACOTTRELL@JUNO.COM 



Dear Abed : 

Just mailed you another short article for inclusion in 
the next issue of ZQA. 

It is entitled Sequencial Paragraphs and refers to BOTH the 
TeleCom Main Menu AND the Word Processor Main 
Menu. Also, it mentions some lines from its listing. 

Last week, we sent you two versions of the 
TeleCOMM Main Menu, and next week we'll send you 
two versions of the Word Processor Main Menu. So, this 
week, we sent only two versions of a short listing for 
SeqPar.B6 

I send two versions of these listings, BOTH large 
printer AND small printer, in order to offer you more 
flexibility in the formatting effort for the magazine. 



So, next week's article on the Word Processor Main 
Menu should complete my article submissions for this 
summer's issue ofZIR QLive Alive 
KEEP ON T I M E X t n=>»»Dave 

Dear Abed 

In re-reading the last message I sent you on 
disk and hard copy, I thought perhaps there might be 
need for clarification on the use of compressed me- 
dia with QPC files. The users manual emphasizes 
that the QPC program itself must not be installed in 
a compressed partition or drive. If you decide to use 
this material, perhaps this clarification should be in- 
serted as in the second paragraph below. 

The first REM line is where a ZIP drive would 
be activated if you have one. Mine is the parallel 
port Epson version made by Iomega, for which 
this line call its universal GUEST driver, which is 
in the d:\EPSON directory. If you are using a 
removable hard drive that auto-installs on system 
start-up, then include the appropriate lines to do 
this in CONFIG.SYS and AUTOEXEC.BAT. 

if you have Stacker 4.0 installed on your 
system hard drive, be sure to include its DEVICE 
command in CONFIG.SYS, the necessary check- 
lines at the start of AUTOEXEC.BAT, and include 
d:\STACKER in the PATH line. Note that, while QL 
programs find their data may be stored in a 
Stacker-compressed partition., QPC itself must be 
installed in a non-compressed drive partition 

A Stacker-compressed disk or cartridge may 
also be activated independently by using the 
command in the second REM line, where d: is the 
drive-name for the medium with a Stacker 

Anywhere file. 

If no Stacker Anywhere file exists on the 
current cartridge, Then QPC will install normally, 
with access to the WINn cartridge if there is one. 
However, the batch file processing will halt if 
Stacker Anywhere activation occurs, so QPC -R - 
W n -P:1 must then be keyed in manually. 
Interestingly, after QPC emulation is terminated 
and EXIT is entered to end Stacker Anywhere, the 
batch file will try to start QPC again. It stops 
harmlessly with an error report 
With best regards, 

Bob Hartung 
2416 N. County Line Rd. 
Huntertown, IN 46748 

How To Download Document 
Files From The 

SOL BBS 

TS2068 users have noted the problem of 
downloading files from the SOL BBS in 
Tucson Arizona. I have found a way to get 



ZXir QLive Alive! 



6 



Autumn 1997 



downloads of the files. The problem is that 
MaxCom will not send the final block of the 
file if a FULL last block of date Isn't there to 
send, XMODEM routines are supposed to fill 
out the last block with CONTROL Z's as 
fillers for the last block. MaxCom's routine 
doesn't do this. I remember that other 
TS2068 XMODEM routines of the past also 
had this problem and the men of Canada 
fixed them. 

As the receiving computer is still waiting 
for the last block to store and therefore know 
when to store the file and exit the XMODEM 
routine properly, the receiving end times out 
and erases the file as the files is presumed to 
be corrupt. 

When you are waiting for the last block 
to be sent, (and you realize it won't be 
coming) turn off the TS2Q68. Use Chambers 
Disk Doctor to examine the disk you were 
writing to. Follow the instructions for disk 
doctor to restore the file. You will now be able 
to read the whole file save the last block. 

Does anyone out there have a fix for 
MaxCom's problem at the MaxCom end? 
Until then, maybe those document files could 
be filled out with some character at the end 
to be long enough for MaxCom to send the 
last block. 

Bob Swoger-CENGl Q8(^email.mot. com 

Abed, 

j found this while surfing the Het the other 
day. i thought that 




had gpne out of business. 

A few die-hard ZX-31ars may want to try 
their hands at building a 2X-8A kit. $40 seems 
a little steep, but the kit is pretty much 
impossible to get anywhere else. 

Tim Swenson 

Fremont, CA 
[See the Unclassified Ads] 

We have had some cool weather again. Of course 
that is what it is going to be very shortly 

This is the big weekend for Auburn with the ACD 
FESTI VAL (Antique / Classic cars). The Kruse auction 
grounds is getting filled up with vehicles and people. We 



go past it an our trips to Ft. Wayne so we see that action. 

Auburn is the only city that I know of where I can 
easily get run over by a car older than I am. 
Timex/Sinclair Still Lives. 
Sinclairly yours, 

Donald S. Lambert 



Sinclair E-Mail List 



Anson, Gerald 
Bennett, Dave 
Cable, Bffl 
CottreE, Les 
Cottrell, Les 
Davis, Frank 
Decourtney, Jeff 
Feng, Al 
Ganger Gary 
Ganger Gary 
Harbit, Ken 
Honeyball, Stuart 
Impellizzeri, John 
Kaczor, Jon 
Kahale, Abed 
Kingsley, Ed 
Lassov, David 
Liebert-Adelt, Peter 
Liebert-Adelt, Peter 
Miller, Seymour 
Parrish, Gil 
RTG 

Shepard, Jay 
SwensoftrTffft- 



jerrya@aztec.asu.edu 
dbennett@epix.net 
bcable@triton.coat.com 
jacottrell@juno.com 
cottrell@smtpius.pafb.af.mil 
fdavis@iquest.net 
1 04727. 1 1 1 O@compuserve.com 
alfeng@juno.com 
gangerg@dma.org 
venders@dma.org 
pogi@sierra.valleynet. com 
miracle@mail.internexus.co.uk 
75206. 1 565@compuserve.com 
75363. 1 127@compuseive.com 
akahale@compuserve.com 
edk4@aol.com 
emanon@azstamet com 
p.liebert@t-online.de 
Hebert@gsse.sm.de 
se:/mil@delphi.com 
107765.1 161@compuserve.com 
rtg@liardiink.com 
jshepard@netins.net 
s wens o n t@gee6tfecom 



Swentko, WaUter 
Swoger, Robert 
Taylor, Jeff 
Walterman, Don 
Washington, Barry 



wswentko@maroon.tc.umn.edu 

cengl08@email.mot.com 

jetaylor@spar.ca 

walterm@ix.netcom.com 

mfi)002@epfl2.epflbalto.org 




ZXir QLive Alive! 



Autumn 1997 



FROM THE CHAIRMAN'S DISK 

Donald S. Lambert 



The older you get the faster time flies by; this has 
been an unusual summer. The month of July had 
a low of 38 to a high of 98 and then Saturday 
August 16th was a late afternoon storm with 2 inches of 
rain in an hour and a half and a total of 4,3 inches in about 
7 hours. No problems at my house but there were quite a 
few with water in their basements. 

■onday evening Masako, my non-technical wife, 
got uptight thinking the VCR had died when it 
.failed to run a borrowed tape recorded in Japan. 
What Had happened was that the batteries in the remote 
control had become exhausted. I got it going with the 
controls on the front of the VCR. I then checked an AAA 
battery I had and while it wasn't a new one it still had some 
voltage left. I used it with the battery with the highest 
voltage and it worked until 1 bought two new AAA 
batteries for the remote control. The Japanese run their TV 
programs differently. For the most part they will run all the 
advertisements for the program in one block of time. 
Another is that the soap operas only run for one year and 
then they start a new story line. 

11 my moaning about what to store in the 
EPROMs for the Z88 was solved when I was at a 
garage sale last weekend. There were these 
plastic boxes with a black foam insert for a nickel each, the 
boxes will hold two EPROMs and the foam cut to keep the 
EPROMs from sliding around in the box. I think that the 
boxes that are used to store trading {business) cards are 
about the right size to hold two EPROMs stacked on the 
other. That would be neater and cleaner to transport the 
EPROMs or to store them on a shelf. 

It is summertime and there has been little activity with 
the T/S in my household. Between honey-do projects and 




the trips to shop for Masako's trip to Japan in September, I 
had less time to play with my T/S stuff. Of course I did do 
some things with the Z88 and the power requirements. I 
did take a look at some of the stuff stored in the garage 
which generated the list of stuff I have to get out of the 
garage and the house. 

About Masako's trip to her home land: It is 
surprising how much can be saved by changing 
departure dates. By going 15 days later, a 
savings of $365 is made. Of course the travel agents and 
the aii'lines will not tell you these things but if y ou know 
you can get the information. 

I have harped about there being no stepping stone to get 
started in computing like the T/S computers but the 
little board computer called STAMP just might be one. 
But it looks like the programming is too much like IBM. 
Microsoft is trying to get all the market, there is no easy 
way to get started with IBM. 

"ow long will the T/S computers be used? Well, if 
the automobiles are an indication it is possible for 
.them to be in use by a very few a hundred years 
from now. This is automobile country and specifically 
those made in Indiana. On the streets here you 
occasionally see a Model T Ford being driven. So if you 
are working with a T/S computer and feel maybe that you 
are alone, yes maybe so but not that alone! It is just that a 
lot are not advertising their presence. For some of us it is 
just a matter of the T/S computers doing what we want 
them to do and not wanting to LEARN a new operating 
system and/or paying out that much money for the new 
system. So I plan to keep on with my trusty TS-2068 for 
as long as I can. 0/0 



I 
i: 



by Donald Lambert 





,nce again my Z88 with the internal RAM installed 
'came up with BAT LOW. But the other one still 
had batteries that did not come up with the BAT LOW. 
Was there something wrong with the computer or was it 
because I might have used batteries with less life left And 
how much current did the Z88 draw under normal use? I 
had questions and no answers. 

o I built a break out box so that I could put meters 
>on the current and the voltage. So after visualizing 
the break out box I found a little box to mount the 
connectors on and went to Radio Shack. By the time I got 
the breakout box built 1 realized that was only half the 
answer. On the internal battery/power supply how would I 
measure the battery voltage and current draw to get the 
difference between the operating mode and the sleep 
mode? And that was a puzzle, at first I thought of a metal 
strip taped to the batteries to get the leads out of the 
computer but then that would only allow the voltage to be 



measured. So I came up with an idea and I took a smaller 
diameter dowel and made a battery emulator connector. 
^WF' carefully measured the length of four AA batteries 
JL.and subtracted the amount the solder lug and flat 
head screw would take up and cut the dowel and then 
made one more cut in the middle. I then wound masking 
tape around the dowel near the end that was the contact 
end until it was slightly less in diameter than an AA 
battery. When i mounted the solder lug and the wire to 
bring the contacts outside the computer I then cut a grove 
in the masking tape to seat the wire in and put a turn of 
Scotch tape around the masking tape and the wire to hold 
in place. At the end of the two wires on the outside is a 
jack to plug in a power supply or battery box with a 
standard Z88 type plug. To keep the polarity correct I used 
red for positive and black for negative for ground. 

I had a HeathKit framing unit that had a variable ±15 
volts DC so I had an easy way to get the proper 



ZXir QLive Alive! 



8 



Autumn 1997 




voltages. I had my newly purchased digital multimeter to 
monitor the voltages. I used an analog multimeter set for 
miHiampers to read the current drawn by the Z88 under 
test, 

,n the Z88 with the internal 528K RAM and no 
'internal batteries and using the HeathKit to supply 
the power by way of the battery compartment (internal 
batteries) 1 set the HeathKit power supply to as near 6 
Volts as I could. First I checked the current draw and with 
the computer turned on the current draw was 80 MA. But 
in the sleep mode it was .8 MA. So back to the computer 
on mode and I slowly decreased the input voltage until the 
BAT LOW came on at 4.40 volts. 
I next checked the external battery jack and with the power 
supply set for 6 volts it drew 100 MA when turned on and 
.5 MA in the sleep mode. The BAT LOW came on at 5.10 
volts. 

So next I installed batteries dll 
internally and their 
unloaded voltage was 6.19 volts and 
I applied 7.5 volts DC through the 
external jack and the computer drew 
50 MA from mat and stopped 
supplying current at 5.87 volts. I 
found four batteries that gave a total 
of 5.01 volts and with the external 
jack supplying 6 Volts the current 
draw from the external jack was 90 
MA, it stopped supplying current 
when the external battery voltage 
reached 4.85 volts. 
"TBT have one other Z88 and it is 
JL set up with 128K RAMPAK 
and drew 60 MA from the power 
supply and at 5.2 Volts it reverted 
back to internal batteries. I suspect 
that the batteries are an their last legs from that since the 
other computer with low batteries cut out at 4.85 volts. 
That is why NiCad batteries do not supply very long 
running time. A NiCad should supply 1.25 volts right after 
being charged and they self discharge quite rapidly. In fact 
in about 20 days they are so far discharged that we would 
call them discharged. That is why if you use NiCad 
batteries you should use 6 and get 
7,5 volts to start with. I know, I know that they are sold as 
7.2 volts when in battery packs but they use the same logic 
in stating battery voltage as the auto industry does with the 
lead acid battery in automobiles. That battery fully charged 
is 6 times 2.2 or 13.2 volts. 
W junked out a 2/3 height disk drive in a case. The 
iBn case and the drive was all one piece. When I got to 
the bottom of the case there was this battery pack of ten 
AA NiCad batteries. I don't know how long the batteries 
had been laying around but they had a little charge left in 
them. The unit had a power supply requirement of 18 
VDC, But I had a Commodore power supply that put out 
15VDC without a load. I found the proper polarity and 
plugged it in and the batteries charged up nicely to almost 
13 volts. But since I had heard that NiCad batteries will 
self discharge I check them every few days and sure 



ZK 81 SPECTRUlVf 



enough after a couple of days the voltage started to drop. 
It would be far safer for the Z88 to retain data if alkaline 
dry cells are used and the battery voltage is checked often. 
One other alternative is to use the RENEWAL batteries by 
RAY-O-VAC which are rechargeable alkaline batteries and 
if you dont discharge then too much like only using them 
for 20% of their life you can recharge them (according to 
the company literature) for up to 100 times. However, they 
are more expensive than regular alkaline batteries and they 
use a special charger that is not cheap. The charge lasts like 
the shelf life of the battery and that is a long time. 

I use AA RENEWAL batteries in our clocks and they 
seem to last a long time. However, I recharge the 
batteries every few months so as not to discharge the 
batteries too much. 

On the Z88 the books report that the most current 

demanding action is when 
you SAVE to an 
EPROM. So that is 
something that I will have 
to test out and I will 
report when I do it. 
While an the subject of 
EPROMs I have a Z88 
EPROM eraser and it is 
designed to be plugged 
into 220 VAC. Of course 
since it was designed for 
use in the UK. they would 
go with the standard 
voltage of that country. 
There several ways to go 
to 220 volts but the 
easiest and most 
expensive is to get a 1 10 
DeytSCh€ to 220 VAC transformer. 

I saw several and Radio Shack has one too but they are 
heavy and bulky and run from $35.00 to $45.00 each. But 
there is another way without tearing into the eraser and that 
is to use two transformers. One to drop the voltage to 12.6 
VAC and then connect that output to a transformer that 
has a 6.3 VAC secondary to the 6.3 volt windings and then 
the formerly HO VAC will have 220 VAC. But in 
prowling the transformers and wall outlet power supplies I 
found a unit that supplies 18 VAC but the primary is 220 
VAC. The other day I found a plug-in deal that supplies 18 
VAC and will carry the load of an EPROM eraser then I 
have that problem solved. I connected them up 
temporarily and I got 216 VAC on the output. Close 
enough I think. More later on that 

f you have any suggestions or questions let me 
know. For my part I have thought of a battery box 
for the Z88 that includes 5 D cells to give a total voltage of 
7.75 with fresh batteries. I have thought of putting a 
IN4000 diode in series with the power until the voltage 
drops below 7.2 without the diode if that is a problem with 
the Z88. BUT! and external battery really needs a means of 
testing for when the voltage gets below 6 VDC. That way 
you would never inadvertently deplete the internal 
batteries. 0/0. 





ZXir QLive Alive! 



Autumn 1997 




fter much kicking and screaming, I 
reluctantly succumbed to utilizing electronic 
mail (e-mail). Mind you, this is after years of 
people giving me their e-mail addresses, 
asking me if I had one, and then telling me that they would 
write more often if I had an e-mail address, et cetera. 

Well, I finally found an occasion while I was at my 
local, branch of the Albuquerque Public Library where e- 
mail is verboten when I wanted to e-mail someone to 
comment on their Etruscan web site. Mind you, I lost that 
e-mail address, and I will have to return to the library to get 
it sometime in the future ... but that can wait. 

Being from the Chicago-school of Sinclair computing 
where cheaper is better, when I heard that there was at least 
one free e-mail service exclusive of other internet features, 
I figured that it was the one for me. The first one that I had 
heard of and the one that I am currently signed up with is 
JlJNO.COM. 

Surf's Up 

The first thing you have to do to access a free e-mail 
service is to locate them. This is most easily done by 
surfing the WEB. Of course, if you have WEB access then 
you probably have e-mail unless you are using a friend's 
access (their computer), the local library, or whiling-away 
your hours at a cyber-cafe. 

Well, I knew the service was 
called JIJN0.COM, so the 
presumption was that the Internet 
address would be the same. It is. 
Using almost any Web browser (I 
don't know if QMOSAJC will work, 
however) you can read the necessary 

information that tells you that you oan 

either down-load die software for free 
(I think they estimated a half hour download using a 28.8K 
modem), or have them send you a disk ($8.82) if you call 
them at 1-800-378-5866 and give them your credit card 
number. I'm sure they take checks, but the process is 
obviously delayed. 

Juno would appear to always be releasing upgrades of 
its software. I do know that the version which I received 
(1 .38) is not. the one I read about in May (1 .23). 

Newer isn't always better. There is an annoying flaw 
in the version that I received whereby the "dial-up" 
sequence is apparently corrupted by the "mcorning data 
upgrade." This took me several days to figure out, and I 
suspect that many people who receive the Juno software 
never do. What, it means is that each time I want to send or 
receive e-mail I have to re-initialize the dial-up sequence. 
This only takes a couple of minutes, but it is a nuisance. 

Auto-Spam? 

While Juno's e-mail service is monetarily free, the 
price you pay is having ads "tossed" at you in a small 
window near the upper right hand comer. 

This is not visually intrusive, but you will quickly 
understand why the minimum hardware recommendation 
is a 486 level PC since the speed of typing in e-mail 

ZXir QLive Alive! 




10 



reminded me of using any Windows-based word processor 
on my 20MHz 386. There is often a noticeable time lag 
between keyboard input and screen display. 

The problem (?) with the ads is that information 
about the products is sparse. When you "click here" to 
find out more, you are given a nrkiimal amount of 
information about the product and/or an order form. 
Advertisers would be wise to have an e-mail address so 
more information could be requested prior to ordering a 
product. I have not ordered anything, yet, though I have 
been tempted. 

The Ptoses ... 

I don't know what the standard text editing features 
are like for CompuServe and AOL users, but I can tell you 
that Juno's input box (for want of a better term) is actually 
a pretty good, but limited, word processor. [So is 
CompuServe 's. Ed] 

Editing is pretty much like on the few Windows word 
processors that I have used. 

What you cannot do with Juno's "word processor" is 
indicate fonts or font size. Considering the nature of e- 
mail. this makes sense to me. What is available is an easy 
to use Spell Checker which has the facility for a user's 
dictionary. 

E-mail addresses and recipient's 
names are stored in. an easy to use 
Address Book. 

E-mail files can be stored in 
different, user-named folders or as 
".txt" files. Similarly, "txt" files can 
be imported into Juno's software 
(with some limitations). 

The Juno software has "help" 
files; but, I haven't used them other 
than to try and resolve the "dial-up" problem. 

Juno also has on-line, automated Tech help which 
you can e-mail and request "docs" that may-or-may-not 
help. This is an automated system and so using it is 
problematical. 1 only received one of the several "docs" 
that I requested ... and finally, gave up and wrote a hard- 
copy letter indicating my problem and requesting a new 
copy of the software be sent "without charge" (we'll see) 
since the one I was sent was flawed. 

Requirements 

You will need a PC mnning Windows 3.1 (or, later) 
and at least a 9600 BAUD modem. 

Although I upgraded to a 33.6K BAUD modem, I 
received an automatic e-mail message on two separate 
occasions indicating that my transmission was at 2400 
BAUD or slower ... and, therefore unprocessed. The two 
times I received the message occurred after mid-day 
connections and apparently was the result of poor, local 
US West transmission which is only capable of a 
maximum 28.8K rate of transmission when everytiiing is 
working properly. Check with your local phone company 
before buying a too-fast modem (i.e., 56.6K). 

You will need about 10 Meg. of free space on your 

- Autumn 1997 



hard drive. I didn't have this back in May; and, I had to 
wait until I bought a larger hard drive before acquiring- and- 
instaHing the software. 

Limitations 

Apparently, there is a maximum number of e-mail 
messages you can send or receive in a given period. I am 
basing this observation on a Returned Message which I 
had attempted to send to "abqplondke@juno.com" (Jeff 
DeCourtney). I don't know what the limit is or if it is 
documented somewhere. I do know that I unexpectedly 
got the "unable to process" message which has previously 
come with a failed dial-up sequence in the past despite a 
connection "this" morning. Could I have exceeded my 
limit in just two weeks? 

The speed of your PC may not matter. If you have a 
great deal of patience, then you can probably get by with a 
386 level PC. If you don't want to notice the intrusion of 
the ads, then you will probably want a 200 MHz 686! I am 
using a REV(ed)-TO-486 running at a theoretical (?!?) 64 
MHz when the wind is blowing from the right direction. 

Of course, you cannot e-mail FAXes, nor to that 
telephone e-mail thing with the current Juno software; and, 
you cannot use NETSCAPE'S software, EUDORA, or 
anything other than the software Juno provides when 
accessing jisno.com (they do want to show you the 
underwriting ads, after all). 

Early Conclusion 



After being auto-SPAMmed, I don't know what the 
complaint is about SPAMmfng. Oh sure, the download 
time is a little longer. And sure, there is the expectation of 
getting messages from Mends or associates which you 
really want to read. But, with the Juno software it is easy 
enough to see from whom messages are sent and 
messages are easily deleted. I would presume that the 
same is true with other e-mail software; and so, 1 (you will 
remember, I'm the critical one) would have to say that all 
those PC/MAC users are a bunch of whinny ninnies who 
pretentiously believe that their time away from game 
playing or their chat room sessions (which is apparently 
where SPAMmers pick up most of their "victims'" 
addresses) is diminished. Give me a break. There is no 
"real" equation between SPAMming and junk FAXes or 
tele-marketing calls at dinner time (which is what the poor, 
delusionally oppressed SPAMmees feel) ... only a very 
weak analogy. 

So, while the jury should probably stay out a little 
longer, I would hazard to suggest that if you can live with 
the fore-mentioned limitations and flaws, then JUN0.COM 
is an acceptable e-mail provider for those who do not 
already have an Internet service provider or feel a need, to 
go WEB surfing every day. 

AID COMPUTUS, TO YOU .... 



by Robert Hartung 




or any who did a double-take at a line in 
my first article which stated "similar to 
what 131 REN users have reported with 
sons: keyboards . . . ," it was an example 
of what a text scanning device J OCR 
(Optical Character Recognition), and a spell-checker 
can conspire together to do when they get devious. 
The scanner gets an unclear image of adjoining 
characters, the OCR decides something in its 
memory matches that, and by coincidence a new 
word or character-sequence is created which just 
happens to be in the 
spell-checker 
dictionary. The result 
is computer-generated 
text that makes it 
sound like somebody's 
sons are up to 
something! 

Anyway, the 
original phrase was: 

"similar to what Dl REN users have reported with 
some keyboards. . . ." Also, some critical 
punctuation marks were dropped in the DO definition 
command-line, which should have read: 

OPEN_NEW #7, KEYS : PRINT #7 , "H0TJ30" : 
PRINT #7, "ALTKEY ' # * , CHR$ ( 92 ) " : PRINT 
#7 , "ALTKEY CHR$ (39) , CHR$(34)" : PRINT 
#7, "ALTKEY ' 3 ' , ' # * " : CLOSE 



A line editor might also be used to create a file with 
an unnumbered series of commands such as these, 
although one type of QL editor I tried that has a TSR mode 
of operation (Terminate and Stay Resident in memory) 
does not work in QPC for me. Apparently there is a 
conflict between the memory address it uses and the one 
required by QPC. Neither can the Toolkit 2 ED be used to 
directly create a DO file, but it can be used as follows to 
make a listing of numbered statements which create the 
above KEYS file when RUN: 




10 OPEN_NEW #7, KEYS 
20 PRINT #7,"H0T_G0" 
30 PRINT #7 /'ALTKEY ' # ' , CHR$ ( 92 ) " 
4 0 PRINT #7, "ALTKEY 
CHR$ (39) / CHR$ (34) " 

50 PRINT #7 , "ALTKEY '3 ','#'" 
60 PRINT #7 / "LRUN BOOT" 
7 0 CLOSE 



ZXir QLive Alive? 



11 



Autumn 1997 



available o$(n) definitions are shown here as examples, but 
the actual listing may include definitions in lines 1 through 

36 as shown in line 2. 

1 CLS: CLS #0: DIM o$(36,14): o$(l)= 

"QUILL23" 

2 o$ (2) -"XCHANGE" 

3 o$ (3)="DOkeys" 

37 FOR j=l TO 36 

38 AT j-l-18*(j>18),20*(j>18): PRINT 
CHR$ ( j +4 7+3 9* ( j >1 0 ) ) ; "=" ; o$ ( j ) 

39 END FOR j 

4 0 AT #0,0,0: PRINT #0; " Key: 0-9 
or a-z to LOAD" 

41s Ic=CODE { INKEY$ ) : AT # 0 ; 1 , 15 : 
PRINT #0;DATE$; " ";DAY$:IF slc=0 
THEN GO TO 41 

42 sl.s=s.l.c-47-39* (slc>57) 

43 IF o$(slc)=" 5 ' THEN RUN 

4 4 IF o$(slc)=' , DOkeys" THEN DO 
WIN5JCEYS : REMark KEYS in WIN5_ 

45 LD$="WIN5_" S o$(slc) & "...BOOT": 

LRUN LD$ 

4 6 DEFine PROCedure sv: SAVE 
WIN5_BOOT: RUN : END DEFine sv 

Once your o$ definitions are entered, the above 
BOOT routine requires only a single keystroke to load the 
desired program boot routine in the specified directory. 
Note that the directory names must be exactly the same as 
those in the o$ array. The boot listing below is the one I 
use in the XCHANGE directory to load the XCHANGE 

program: 

1 CLS: CLS #2 

2 AT #2,0,0: PRINT "1 - QUILL use 
DOC1 " 

3 PRINT "2 - QUILL use DOC2" 

4 PRINT "3 - ABAcus use ABA" 

5 PRINT "4 - ARCHIVE use DBF" 

6 PRINT "5 - EASEL use GRF" 

7 n=CODE(INKEY$)-4 8: IF n<l OR n>5 
THEN GO TO 7 

8 DEVJJSE 1,WIN5 DOCl_ 

9 DEV USE 2, WINS DOC2 



10 DEV_USE 3,WIN5_ABA_ 

11 DEVJJSE 4,WIN5_DBF_ 

12 DEV_USE 5,WIN5_GRF_ 

13 SELect ON n 

14 =1: DATA_USE WIN5_DOCl_ 

15 =2: DATA_USE WIN5_DOC2_ 

16 =3: DATA USE WIN5_ABA_ 

17 =4: DATAJJSE WIN5_DBF_ 

18 =5: DATAJJSE WIN5__GRF_ 

19 END SELect 

20 PROG_USE WIN5_XCHANGE_ 

21 PAR_USE SER 

22 EX "WIN 5_XCHANGE_X CH ANGE_EXE " 

23 STOP 

24 DEFine PROCedure sv: SAVE 
WIN5_XCHANGE_BOOT: END DEFine sv 

The apparent redundancy of repeating DEVJJSE 
definitions in DATA_USE allows the default data directory 
to be pre-set, for example, to the primary program of 
QUILL, while at the same time allowing the WIN5_ABA_ 
directory to be used for ABACUS by prefixing any data 
file name with just DEV3 . An alternative would be to key 
F6 and return to the XCHANGE SET option to change the 
default data directory. For other BOOT routines that 
involve a single program, such as QUILL 2.30, DEV1_ and 
DEV2_ definitions allow selecting as the default either the 
library directory DOCl_ or the current files directory 
DOC2 . These definitions remain active after an exit from 
the program that used them, so doing a RESET is usually 
advisable. The little sv procedure is included to make it 
easier to save a copy of the listing while testing it just by 
typing sv, 




If you have Stacker 4.G installed on your system hard 
drive, be sure to include its DEVICE command in 
CONFIG.SYS, the necessary check-lines at the start of 
AUTOEXEC.BAT, and include d:\STACKER in the PATH 
line. Note that, while QL programs find their data may be 
stored in a Stacker-compressed partition., QPC itself must 
be installed in a non-compressed drive partition. 




he QPC, a 68xxx emulator which runs a 
version of SMSQ, has certainly captured my 
imagination; but, some of the general 
information about it remains vague. Unlike 



the QXL ISA card which is limited to the on-card, 68040 
processor and memory resources, the QPC commandeers 
the resources of the 486-or-better host PC and the speed of 
your virtual QL is only limited by the host PC's clock 
speed (some say that a 386 will suffice; but, the processor's 
clock speed will undoubtedly be slower). However, what 
would appear to be missing is a natural NETwork link 
between a QPC'd computer and earlier QDOS devices. 

I don't know if NETworking a QPC has already been 
discussed in European newsletters such as QUANTA and 
QL TODAY since I don't subscribe to either. Perhaps, a 



"commercial" cable is already available. Perhaps the 
information for NETworking a QPC comes with the 
software » perhaps it doesn't. The point is, the information 
hasn't been made generally available, yet; and, the ability or 
inability to NETwork a QPC'd computer to existing QLs is 
a possible limitation of the QPC as an alternative to the 
QXL or a (SUPER) GOLD CARD for many looking to 
upgrade. 

If you are not interested in NETworking, then the 
point is moot; but, I feel that the potential to NETwork a 
QPC to another QDOS device will be important to me if- 
and-when 1 eventually get a copy at some point down the 
road. 

If you are concerned with the potential NETworking a 
QPC, then you might be interested in the following 



ZXtr QLive Alive! 



12 



Autumn 1991 




observations which I have made about the potential of 
cobbling up your own QPC-to-QL NETwork cable (NOTE: 
tiiis should also work for SMSQ'd ATARIs which I 
presume lack a hardware NETwork port). 

This Is Only Theoretical ... 
Working on the presumption that the QL's NETwork 
communications is RS-232 based, I took my VOM (Volt 
Ohm Meter) and started to check for possible continuity 
between the QL's NETwork ports and my QL's SERial 
ports. 

After less than a minute of "testing" I managed to 
ascertain that you should be able to connect PIN_1 (signal 
ground) and PIN_6 (+12V) of 
a female 9-PIN D- 
CONNECTOR [or, 25-PIN if 
your PC's SERial port is so 
sized] to (apparently) either 
the tip or stem of a mini- 
phono plug since there 
appears to be unimpeded 
continuity in the QL's 
NETwork socket. 

I haven't made a cable 
to test this, so I can't tell you 
if you can be indifferent 
about whether the tip or stem 
is hooked up as the signal ground. 
Of course, you will lose one of your PC's SERial ports to 
the NETwork, and the speed of communication will be 
limited to the speed you assign via DOS's MODE 
command [for example: MODE COM 1 :96,N,8,J . 

While it should be possible to use the host PC's 
SERial ports for NETworking, we will have to wait until an 
actual QPC user fabricates a cable in the aforementioned 
manner and reports back to all of us. 

SMSQ Goats 

The 1997 version of the QL GET TOGETHER 
sponsored by NESQLUG has come and gone and my two 
complaints against the SMSQ operating system apparently 
remain unresolved: 

1) diminished screen size; and, 

2) inability to use the TURBO compiler. 

The two problems may never be resolved. If they are 
"fixed" for the QXL, they will be for the QPC, and vice- 
versa. Since I have not received an OS upgrade for my 
QXL since receiving SMSQ v2.76b over half a year ago, I 
presume the problems persist. 

Based on direct correspondence between myself and 
Stuart Honeyball it would appear that Tony Tebby remains 
reluctant to correct the two, aforementioned problems. In 
so many words, I was informed that I could expect the 
SECOND COMING before any effort was made to correct 
SMSQ's two glaring flaws that remain. 

To Tony Tebby's credit, he did write the DrvLink 
program which eliminated the apparent high ratio of 
overhead vs. usable space on WINQ_ partitions. 

A Kluge By Any Name 

Due to dirninishing hard disk space on my host PC, I 
finally decided to move my QXL card to another PC that I 



cobbled together from spare (!) parts. The only monitor 
that I had available was a 15" vertical, monochrome 
monitor whose approximate vertical height is equal to that 
of a normal 20" monitor (that is, if you happened to 
consider a 20" monitor to be "normal"). 

Using the 15" monitor is a mixed blessing. The 15" 
monitor has a toggle which allows for either "normal" (but, 
reduced) ratio so that the viewed display is equivalent to 
about a 13" monitor or expanded height so that the 
equivalent would be a 20" monitor; but the expansion 
results in a display that resembles a composite monitor 
with visible scan lines. 

When the 15" is toggled to 
maximize the display height, the 
resultant SMSQ display is almost 
the same as viewed on my 14" 
VGA monitor. The problem is 
that the characters generated are 
now only 3/4 the normal width. 

In other words, to get an 
SMSQ display that appears 
"normal" you will need to acquire 
a 20" monitor. This means that 
laptops need not apply for every 
day QPC emulation at the current 
time. 

Having said that, I have repeatedly heard that a QXL 
card lias been installed in a TOSHIBA laptop and that it 
was possible to toggle the display between the diminished 
and a non-diminished size. Until someone sends me the 
specific details of the observed TOSHIBA phenomenon, I 
have to presume that the capability is proprietary to the 
TOSHIBA. 

Regardless, the TOSHIBA portables with ISA 
expansion slots are old, still very expensive and definitely 
very heavy. I have to presume that the owner of the 
TOSHIBA-QXL combination either does not read ZQA! or 
chooses to keep knowledge of how to expand the SMSQ's 
display to himself. Maybe this can be resolved via QBOX 
by one of ZQA!' s readers who telecommunicates, and s/he 
can report back to all of us as to how the keyboard 
prestidigitation was accomplished on aforementioned 
TOSHIBA. 

For The Record ... 

While I am grateful to still be using a QDOS 
compatible computer, I think that too many QDOS/SMSQ 
(computer) users (in general?) are too passive (i.e., 
"grateful" for getting anything new) to complain; and, 
almost any "bone" will do. If I had known that SMSQ's 
display would remain crippled, then I would never have 
gotten a QXL card, and currently that is what is keeping 
me from buying a copy of the QPC software. 

I suppose that if keep complaining about SMSQ long 
enough then I suppose I should consider migrating 
permanently to the DOS and (dare I say it?) WINDOWS 
environment ... after all, QuickBASIC can't be that different 
from SuperBASIC ... 



Happy Trails, 
find Compuiinq, To hrtau 



ZXir QLive Alive! 



13 



Autumn 1997 



rom 




LarKen-2068 



Les Cottretl 



There is a large number of Spectrum programs on tiie 
Internet. One site is address ftp^/ftp .nvg.nnit.no/pub 
/Sinclair 1 have cataloged over 4000 programs on that site 
so far. They are in a format that can he read with the Z80 
Spectrum Emulator(for the PC) after being decompressed. 
They are mostly games. I find the adventure games 
interesting so I have downloaded just over 200 from the 
adventure category. My all time favorite game is Kings 
Keep, a graphic adventure. There are over 50 in the graphic 
category, but so far I have found most to be mislabeled 
arcade style games. I am about half way through and have 
only found half a dozen that I would call graphic 
adventures. The 150 or so text adventures appear to be 
labeled properly. 

Now that I have found a few good ones the next step 
is to try to move them over to my 2068. At first I thought 
it might not be possible,. Persistence has finally paid off. 
There may be an easier way, but at least 1 can now do the 
job. 

First, the file is downloaded from the Internet to PC 
in. compressed format (zipped). Then the file is unzipped 
as an emulator file with either a .Z80 or .sna extension 
(both are similar to the LarKen NM1 snapshot. 

The .sua files must be loaded into the emulator and 
then SAVEd in the .Z80 format. 

The emulator came with a set of conversion files that 
will convert .ZS0 in to a simulated tape file with a .tap 
extension. If you have the emulator the file is Z802TAP 
and is used like a DOS command such as Z802TAP 
KNIGHTYM..Z80 A:\KNIGHTYM. .TAP.. Also I discovered 
that the emulator utilities also contained a conversion file 
that would save a ,tap file straight to tape, This file is 
TAP2TAPE and the syntax for this example is TAP2TAPE 
A:\KNIGHTYM.TAP The utility TAP2TAPE needs to be 
in the same directory as Z80.exe in order to work. 

The next step was a hardware project to allow for an 
old fashioned tape save from the PC. 1 spent a good while 
trying to adjust the adapter to save files TO the PC before I 
realized that it didn't need any adjustment to save files 
FROM the PC. At: this point the PC emulator would save a 
basic program to tape just like the 2068. The adapter 
connects to the parallel printer output on the PC with jacks 
for tape in and out. 

After bumbling around with the tape level controls 
(remember that?) I was able to get a program into the 2068. 
And of course all that was left was to do a LarKen NMI- 
save and I had a program I could run on the 2068. 

"STRANGE NETWORK!" 

A trick for moving files between two 2068s with 
different disk systems is to do a tape LOAD " " on one 
computer and a SAVE " " on the other going thru a signal 
booster. This same trick works going from the PC to the 
2068 using the TAP2TAPE utility. So I only have to wait 
for the tape load routine once as it loads into the 2068. My 
sons laugh at my strange "network". The biggest difficulty 
with this process is one of logistics. The PC being used is 

ZXir QLive Alive! 



made from spare parts and is mounted on the side of my 
2068 computer desk. The monitors are side by side on top. 
The PC keyboard is on a slide out tray just under the 2068 
keyboard, and there's the mb. It seems impossible for me 
to remember which keyboard to use next. © 

Now that I have accomplished this, how do I make it 
available to the 2068 community? 

I talked to David Lassov about the SOL bulletin 
board. The number of programs available is larger than the 
available disk space. He suggested that I send him disks 
mat can be made available on request. I will send disks as 
they are filled and he can advise users when they are 
available. 



Tape input 



z80 adapter 




Abed suggested that 1 send a list to ZXir QLive for 
publication and offer to send LarKen users programs on 
request. As soon as a couple of disks are filled, the list will 
be forwarded to Abed 'and if anyone is interested they can 
contact me. 

And even if no one else cares I am still having fun 
with my 2068 ! jacottreH@juno.com 

LPT port 

■ - PBO (2) 



OUT 

< ® — 1 10 K Hr 



12 0 k} 



4.7n 



+5V (18) 



4K7 



25K 
linear 



IN 



330 



680n 



•«* — * 



BUSY (11) 



PE (12) 



<► GND (19) 



(10) 



Simple tape adapter for PC's 



14 



Autumn 1997 



by David Lassov 



Here we are going to discuss program 
SeqPar. B6 ; which SOL BBS uses in order to 
compose messages, to be uploaded to The 
Net or to other BBSs. 

It is accessed, by a PRESS of "6" at the 
TeleCom Main Menu or by a press of "a" at 
the Word Processing Main Menu. 

We refer to it as "message WRITER" in 
the TeleCom menu. But, SeqPar is really the 
heart of Bill Jones' BASIC CODE for 
implementing sequential paragraph files in 
Udbm.B6, his suite of all data base managers 
for the 2068. 

We have so selected SeqPar.B6 for two 
reasons: 

1. SPEED of textual entry 

2. LACK of control codes 

As can be seen from the enclosed listing, the 2068 
does most of its work inside "cat.Cl", machine code at 
24355 or rapidly building a character string out of our 
keyboard entries. Please see line #150! That's why SeqPar 
is so fast. The only control code, left in the resulting text 
file, is a CHR$ 13 (ENTER, according to the User Manual.) 
ENTER is used as a record separator, where the record is a 
paragraph, in, this case, and the paragraph is of variable 
length and contains sentences. 

So. what's with sequential paragraph files and SOL 
BPS, anyway! 

Well, the software we use is a glorification of Larry 
Kenny's MaxCom, and it has difficulties, 
telecommunication with modern equipment and/or 
software, especially as control codes frequently cause 
MaxCom to leave its rapid MC for special servicing by 
slower BASIC code. 

We have included a simple menu of SeqPar options, 
coded Inline so as not to require a separate screen string of 
perhaps two disc blocks. You can see it as the second 



command of line 1094. Also, the machine code, cal.CL, is 
already on RAMDISK for use with the Daisy routines. 
After all, RAMDISK allows 48 tracks/blocks, at most! 

24-57 ON ERR RESET : RANDOMIZE U» 
R CODE "d": CLOSE BURL 9- : »-E» 
mm-""; GO TO URL "I©93" 
4.500 CLS : SO 6UB.WL "BS*; : _ R«Jj 
DOMIZE USR CODE d ; C ^ T ^ ,. 1 ' , Jc 
put -sap Fits n to «e a«* f ljn 

£ Z$: BEER URL "e,2",UflL ; *24" : I 
NPUT "The Fa 16 tui L I be. read into 
Chr Pi Us having a sxngte 3- R* 

fggggBHBflHMBl for sruihg -? 
".; LINE m$: LET '**"•, G k 

RNOOMIZE USR CODE "d" : OPEN #VRL 

401s'lIt x »CODE "": ON ERR SO TO 
URL "4035": FOR n«l TO, X 
NPUT *E; LINE ft*: IF x <L_EN n* iH 
EN LET x =LEM n* 

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7 S 7x)T RRNDOtllZE USR CO&E V:,C 
LOSE BURL "5" : LET tast^CODe : 

! 5fT" f Pi ""CODE " " 

4.08© RANDOMIZE USR CODE "d": OPE 

? 4s?0 R on"Irr Z go to url ;'*02®*;, fo 

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N LET l?iS=;STR5 (URL R$+WL • ^ 

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-i to rn - INPUT «5; LINE n$ : HEX 
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im Disc, DC* •? : SO SUB R 
STURM 

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"4" RND PI<Z) ; SO TO URL lgS2 

9999 CLERR : SO SUB URL "0097 : 
RANDOMIZE USR CODE "d". SRUE "5* 





HOME?- 




< ZX-81 with the LCD screen 
among others 

ZX-81 running a plotter > 



ZXir QLive Alive! 



15 



Autumn 1997 



by David Lassov 



Speaking with George Chambers has always seemed 
INSTRUCTIVE to me. Guess it's the facility of the BRITS 
and the CANUCKS with the Queen's English, that gives 
them their entertaining TAKE on the concerns of us 
provincials. 

Anyway, considering the prospects 
of the Timex-Sinclair, Model 2068, always ^ 
leads George into a diskussion of menus. 
Thus, it seems that, after thoroughly 
plumbing the depths of the machine's text 
and graphic capabilities in both basic and 
code, serious discissions of system 
capabilities resolve themselves into 
comparisons between different menus. 

Of course, George and his Toronto Timex-Sinclair 
User's Club were long in the supply of outstanding 
menus. Compare the TTSUC LarKen Disk Library, 
available from Abed Kahale, our esteemed 
Editor/Treasurer. 

As an early example of eight-bit computer technology 
on a personal scale, the 2068 is ideal for the manipulation 
of character strings and word processing. Character strings 
are convenient for storage and retrieval of text. 

Processing of graphical data proves to be a problem 
for the 2068, in terms of not only time but also space, 
since it takes only a single byte to specify most characters, 
whereas 64 pixels are needed to specify the same 
information graphically. 

Hence, the utility of Mega-Hertz cycle times, modem 




This is our most heavily used menu, since it supports 
SOL BBS, and SOL BBS is on-line all the time. Notice, 
that a PRESS of "2", "3", "4", or "S" READs one of the 
versions of MaxCom into the Home Bank from Disk Drive 
A, as can be seen from line #170 on. MaxCom BBS 
Software is available from RMG at 503-655-7484. 



Drive, from #0 to #4 as desired. From line #60 can be 
seen, that we select the desired drive, by executing the 
routine at line #1000. Then, line #2000 gives us the CAT. 

As can be seen from line #70, a PRESS of "1" 
generates a NEW of any Disk Drive from #0 to #4, as 
chosen by the routine at line #1000, again. Of course, any 

~ZXkQLive Alive! 



speeds in the scores of Kilo-BAUDs, and Mega-Bytes of 
RAM. 

Notable exceptions and extensions include Bill 
McKelveVs fax facility and Stan Lemke's Pixel Print 
Professional. Pixel Print is on disks by TTSUC entitled L- 
10, L-28, and L-37. We are almost through 
with acceptance testing of ASAPfax 
hardware/software. And, Interbank Data 
Base by Larry Crawford on Disk #30 by 
IMEstSriC TTSUC is utterly amazing. Surely, there 
are others, but that's about the best, that are 
available to us, here in Tucson, Arizona. 
iyfjg|*#^ Also, note well, that these excellent 
™ extensions of 2068 capabilities to graphical 

applications incorporate the RAMDISK for both speed 
and storage. 

So, our menus for spreadsheet/modeling/simulation 
and for telecommunications are either rather static or little 
used. 

We bring this up, because we wish to diskuss several 
of our other menus, which have seen heavy use during the 
decade of the 90's , 

We have spent a lot of time and effort on our Word 
Processing Menu, several years in fact !! It selects from 
among Bill Jones' suite of word processors, in support of 
his Daisy. We will return to the Word Processing menu, 
since much of it has already been considered over the past 
three years of ZQA? magazine. But, we start with the 
TeleCOMM Main Menu. 

AUTOSTART file on the selected drive is thus 
automatically LOADed. 



TeleCom Main Menu 


******************** * * * * * * * ******** * * * * * * * 


CAT logs 


0 




Drives 


1 






2 


BBS — autonomous 




3 


BBS ■ — clocked 




4 


TERM — autonomous 




5 


TERM — clocked 


MessageWritter 


6 




MSCRIPT 


7 






8 


Disk Manager 




9 


Quit COPY 




a 


MOVE ramdisk 




b 


Recover CAT 




c 


Steal disk name 




d 


Create/Chng name 


Set clock 


e 






16 



A PRESS of "T LOADs Bob Mitchell's version of 
Jack Dohany's MSCRIPT, customized and extended for 
Larry Kenny's DOS. Also included are modifications for 
Bill McKelvey's ASAPfax facility. So. it's really hadedl 
Disk #51 out of the TTSUC LarKen Disk Library contains 
several versions of MSCRIPT, ready for LKDOS and 
available from our esteemed Editor/Treasurer, Abed 
Kahale, 

The best way to get ASAPfax for your 2068 is to 
contact Bill McKelvey via QBOX BBS at 810-254-9878 or. 
SOL BBS at 520-882-0388. 

A PRESS of "8" brings up JFORM by Jack, which 
enables convenient access to his DFM. We thus gain a 

Autumn 1997 



IS CLERn §5535 

?3 PSPER 0; 6GRD£~ 0: INK 6: C 
L.3 : PRINT PRPER 2.: ZNK 7; " 

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; RANDOMIZE USR CODE "d" : N 

CW S3 IF 33= ! 'a" THEN RfiMDL'HlZE US 
R CGi>E "d*-: LOP.D " r d bk yp a 

qQ IF af='S" THEN RflNDuWIZE Us 
P CODE S! .i " LOfiD "SeqFar *86" 

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R CODE "d'\; LORD " U2c4«8L" 

1155 IF 3 3*= : '7" THEM RPNDOHIZE U3 
R COC-E "d": LOP.D "fiiiSd ,cT" 

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P "Or-E "J" :■ JLGSD = : JFGEW.SL" 

130 IF S$="b lJ THEN RANDOMIZE US 
P C DDE "d 3< : LOPD "RECCAT - SI" 

14© IF a5="C" THEfi RANDOM IZE 
° GO«>E "d" . LOAD "THIEF* Si" 

ic$~IF THEM RSMDOMIZE US 



LORD "DSKNAM -SI" 



ixm tf 5 $ " THEM RANDOM l2E U5 
R CODE" M d" : LORD "SETCLK .CD*'C05t 
: RAN DOM IZE USA UAL "64000"; GO 
TO VAL "20" 

i70^P«N&CMJZE USA CODE "4 -' bO 

1 laS^If aS="£" THEN RANDOMIZE US 
R CODE "d" : LOAD "ttaxCOM.BX" 

180 IF sjs"3" THEN RANDOMIZE US 
R CO&E ' ! d J ' : LDhD- "HaxCOM-BT^ 

50© Ir 3i= !, 4." THEM RANDOMIZE US 
R CODE a 'ci" : LOAD "TETSHax -BX^_ 

21J3 IF ^S= J> 5" THEK RANDOMISE U5 
R CODE "d"; LOrtD l, TEf?H3X r ST =: 

^SS GO TO yftL :s ?0" 
ieaS CLS : PRINT AT UAL "19", UAL 

" S 51 ; " Wh i i h Dri va ?7 ' : PRINT N 
CRT S5N PI.UflL M 4"; ""PRESS 0, 1/ 
3. or 4 PAUSE NOT FX: LE 

T d=GGDE INKEV5-00DE "9": RftHpgij 
IZE USR CODE "d": GO TG i: RETUfi 
N 

RANDOMIZE USR CODE "d !l : CPT 

PR USE NOT PI: RETURN 
CLERP 30600: ft AND OH IZt U5h 
rnrvF " f " : RUN 

S-3SS CLEAR 30«S0: R AMD DM IZE USR 
CODE "d": SRl'E "Henu.81" LIME PI 

vast airay of commonly used LKDOS utilities : NAME a 
disk, FORMAT a disk, CATalog a disk, FULLCAT a disk, 
BACKUP JFORM, LOAD a file, RENAME a file, ERASE 
a file, BATCH ERASE, MOVE a file, BATCH MOVE, and 
BACKUP DFM. You can get JFORM and DFM from 
RMG at 503-655-7484. 

A PRESS of "9" brings up Richard Kurd's lk2cy, for 



hjperrapid disk copies among drives 0, 1, 2, and 3. 
Routine Mcy is up from TTSUC Disk #2 by George 
Chambers, available from Abed. We note, that hyperrapid 
disk copy facilities are completed amongst ALL the Disk 
Drives #0, #1, #2, #3, and #4, by PRESSing "a", as 
follows: 

A PRESS of "a" brings up rdbkup by Richard Kurd, 
for hyperrapid backup and/or restoring between 
RAMDISK and Disk Drives #0, #1, #2, or #3. Now, 
rdbkup is ONLY from Disk #33 by Chambers & Mitchell 
of the TTSUC LarKen Disk Library, available from Abed. 

A PRESS of "b" brings up RECCAT from out of the 
DUS ensemble of LKDOS utilities by Kris Boisvert. It 
performs a hyperrapid recovery of a corrupted CATalog, 
by READing what's still on the rest of the disk. The drives 
go from #0 to #3, and one can easily corrupt the entire 
disk, in the case of the attempted recovery of a badly 
contaminated disk. So, be careful when using RECCAT at 
the very first sign of CATalog problems! The DUS disk is 
available from F. W. Computing. 

A PRESS of "c" brings on Thief out of DUS, which 
enables one to COPY the name field of one disk onto that 
of another disk. This is useful, when the name field is long 
and the source disk is bad, for but one example. 

A PRESS of "d" brings up DSKNAM, another of 
Kris's routines out of DUS, to permit the modification 
and/or update of an existing name field on disks in drives 

from #0 to #3. 

Lastly, a PRESS of "e" READs Jack's on-line clock, 
by LOADing software from RAMDISK. This also permits 
resetting and/or reformatting the clock. Call Jack Dohany 
at 415-367-7781, and ask about the Dallas Smart W atch for 
2068/Spectrum! 

As a tradeoff between speed at the keyboard and 
limited storage space on RAMDISK, we CODEd the menu 
image INLINE at lines #20, #30. and #40 along with 
options #0 and #1 at lines #60 and #70, respectively; we 
READ options #2, #3, #4, and #5 from Disk Drive A; and. 
everything else is LOADed from RAMDISK. A review of 
the CATalogs for RAMDISK and for DD#3 show how the 
software is stored. 

fe«**wfeays* Davis for DUS - 



AUTOSTART 
MoXCOH «ST 
Max CON * CI 
H3X bbS . CI 
TERMS x .EX 



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ZXirQLive Alive! 



17 



Autumn 1997 



IH'JERSE 0i 



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XF SKb THEN 



THi 

j=. •-• =? j-r - -•■ — 

■ 3 i+l-b-a*32 



235 
2 28 
TO £5© 

S4.0 LET es=P££* 

1 . 2.20 : IF 32 < * C 
.-i -r-»-« 

"s^rsTs GO TO 156 
=5= OM £R« RESET : 
2E5 LET % i-e i 

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L EH u i«i+64. THEN BEEP SS , 2 , 14- : 

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= 55 IF U<=2 THEM LET Sfl*- 
267 Ir LEN US^l-b + i-e*32+481 T 

»EN PRINT RT COiUitSl-b+l-^* 332 

T 2s4 ; ir ^<I4 AND 51-fcrI-3*32fi3S 
•Ti-EM US THEN PRINT AT 8;M$;.2i + 
TG 3i-b*:Ua#32*4.B0.i t 

•HEN PRINT f)T 0 , ® ; u $ 
TO Si + l-b-8*32+*8€54 

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THEN LE l a =a - .1 : LET b-^j. . 

L "ls© S I? a LE& U*'«i THEN LET R±=R1 
-1 • LET IF Ba-I THEN LET 

Ss£I: LET 

=SK ftO TO 205 , . 

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b = -l THEN LET b=31: LET 3 =* - 1 : I 
F a a -1 THEN LET b =0 : LE i a=0: 
T 3i=fiUi 

S9S GO TO 305 , r 

300 PRINT at a , t>; CHR* c ; : LeT 
S = USl TO alUCHR* c+ustai + 1 fO 5 
LET LET al-31+1: Ir 

2 THEN LET £=0: LET o =3 + 1 

«s n print ft ; u$(ai-b*i-s: ~z 

~302 IF ai-b+i-a*3S+430<LEN u f T 
HEN PRINT RT 0 , 0; U $ t a i-b+ 1-3 *32 
TO al-b + l-a*32 + 460); . „ „ 

3 0E PP. INT AT a , h, CUES 

i <dST , "f? 'si -s>£^;rf 

«£M « FT J t d2+l TO 3241? : LET 

' * =u $ £ TO d.20 + y 3 -V Al +2 TO > : L |T 
■3 2=0: LET di-3. LET aisl: TO 

3 IS IF di=2 fiNP d2<ai THEN LET 
•jlaO: LET 34»i: LET d2=0: GO lU 

•-, Q £?! 

~ : =>~=? jF di = l THEN PRINT ttRND; AT 
INUEPSE i;"P&5iti_on CufiOf 
to CLOCK END , Then EDIT ; PRXN 
T RT «,b. DUER l: FLASH 1 ;"..'/: 
££f£r* S 2 3 15 ; GO TO CODE " P'JK " 
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PR 2 NT «RN&; RT 




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a 1- 1 ' +Uj (a 1 + 1 TO ) : 

THEN GO TO I5S 

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b <V) THEN LET S=S-I- 

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THEN GO TO 



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Si=l: IF a 4- € 1 OR 2<34 

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"- OO 3UB 3£S: GO TO 301 _ 

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set. OR ERASE Qu Dtss sn d enter o i. 
r i n 9 n to i n sert " : inp ut _^ 

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SE »S • GLS : GO TO 1052 

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DDf ~' ,s : : GO SUB S00; RETURN 

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: PAPER URL "Z"^ , .- -=.,« 

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cH'&qde let 33*cod£ " ,s let 

10aS°^LS PRINT ' "ENTER SESUEMC 
IRL PRRAGRRPH FILES ' ' ' ' ' ' 1* <S > 

- • • • < = > qiitT"' GO S3 US URL SIS : 
sn in f^G«!L "S" OR URL "S"<xJ*U 



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lOSS LET dl=COD£ " 
LET sy»CODE " 
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nd; 

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'2"+URL "224-eS" 

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P CODE "d": CLOSE ttURL "B" : LET 
rsS = ""' SO TO URL "10S3" 
999? CLS ; PRINT *RNO; .WEW_Pro9r 
% DiSC, DDI* T : GO SUB R 

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■ • POME i-iRL ,5 8£00"<URL •' - 

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PL "1 : LET Pd« C2: AMD Z<fl.\+^5t 

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acaa CLEAR : GO SUS URL "9997": 

q? 3 r.B5" LINE URL "9993" ; GO TO 
URL "9993" 



ZXir QLive Alive! 



18 



Autumn 1997 





Customers' Comments: 

'It is a piece of computer history," 



"I built one back in 1985, 1 am buying one now so my 
grandson can build it as soon he's old enough. " 

From a NASA engineer 
"... Send me four more kite, I am using them as 
controllers for a project." 

"I'd like to buy two ZX-S1 kits, one to build and one to 
keep just the way it is. It was my first computer..." 

"I collect and have over 200 different old computers, 
send me an already built ZX-81 for my collection...." 



Back in the 1 980's when Sinclair stopped 
selling these machines we purchased two 
lots of close-out inventory. But, as it 
turns out, we really had no economical 
way to sell the items till now, with the 
advent of the Internet. Anyone who has 
built a 2X81 kit will tell you of the sense 
of accomplishment and satisfaction they 
got from actually assembling a computer 

from basic components. 

$30 Plus $10 for shipping and handling 

WARNING! We Do Not Ship Outside The Us & Canada 

Payment Terms 

Checks, Money Orders and Visa or Mastercard 
Check/Money Order orders must be prepaid and drawn on a US bank. Please allow 5 business days for clearance 

Visa and Mastercard 
Items are shipped the same day the charge is processed 
Credit card orders can be made over the phone. Call 212-675-8414 ^mgm 
Make payment out to Zebra Systems, Inc. and mail to: ^BSfcaJr^- 
Zebra Systems, inc. " I 

122 W26th St. Suite. 904 
New York, NY 10001 
can also FAX your orders to 212-675-8980 
Add $10 shipping for one unit, $5 for each additional unit - Shipping is by UPS ground. 




7 ,X81 Kits 




You 





New York State residents must add 8.25% sales tax. 




Basics ofTimex Sinclair 1500/1000 BASIC 

A copy of this book is shipped free with each ZX-81 kit. 
Allen Wolach, Separately priced $12.95 



BASIC Basics for the Timex/Sinclair 1500/1000 

A copy of this book is shipped free with each ZX-81 Mt. 
Michael Barnett/ZSimon Barnett, Separately priced $12.95 




The Ins and Outs of the Timex TS-1000 & ZX-81 

Don Thornassoru $12.95 



Computer Interfacing Technique in Science Timex/Sinclair 

1500/1000 
Paul Field & John Davies, $12.95 

ZX-81 BASIC Programming (in Spanish language) 

Steve Vickers (Traducido y adaptado) A copy of this book is shipped free for asking if 
you just pay for additional shipping cost. Separately priced $ 10 

VU-CALC and VU-FILE (The Organizer) 
Getting Serious With Your Timex/Sinclair 

Pricing will be announced after we sort through the warehouse to determine if we 
have the software on tape. 




ZXir QLive Alive! 



19 



Autumn 1997 



U n c i n 


: :^^': ; : : : : i|a^:;"-:K 

3& 


S 1 T ! 


j -.jg -{J |§|| 



Ads 



it is free! 



Place your ads here, 

Mail to: A. KAHALE 3343 S FLAT ROCK CT SIERRA VISTA AZ 85635-6874 



SPECTRUM for your 2068 

If you are a LarKen LK-DOS owner and would like to run 
SPECTRUM programs on your system, we will supply a V2 
EPROM, socket and 74HCT32 for $12 which includes shipping and 
handling. The installation instructions are in your LarKen manual. 
We shall not be responsible for your install job. AERCO owners 
need only the EPROM for $10 forwarded to LarKen,. 

Bob Swoger Address on page 2 

747 <3fltglji ^xmitlatnr 

So you like to fly, the 747 Flight. Simulator for SPECTRUM by 
Derek Ashton of DACC. Requires a SPECTRUM equipped 2068. 
Supplied on LarKen SSDD or DSDD LarKen disk for $10 which 
goes to Derek now working at Motorola with Bob. 
Bob Swoger Address on page 2 

pnt Chips 
Programmable Array Logic chips are available for 

some Timex and QL's from:- 

NAZIR PASHTOON 
NAP Ware 
940 BEAU DR APT 204 
DES PLAINES IL 60016-5876 
Phoii6(eve.) 847 439-1679 

A Strategic Generic War Game for the TS-2068 

GIllklBST 

> Available on tape, or disk, AERCO, Oliger. Game and map 
SAVEs in BASIC allows conversion to your system. 

> Completely in fast machine code. Games can be SAVEd and 
CONTINUEd. Price $19.95 + $2.50 S&H. 

Order from:- or:- 
LLOYD DREGER SMUG 
2461 S. 79THST BOX 101 

WEST ALUS Wi 5321 9 BUTLER Wl 53007 

The John Oliger Co. 

11601 Widbey Dr. 
Cumberland IN 46229 
The John Oliger Floppy Disk System 
FOR THE TS-2068 
DiskWokks 
Expansion Board 
2068 User Cartridge 
Disk Boards *A w & "B" 
2068 Parallel Printer Port 
2068 EPROM Programmer 
2068/SPECTRUM Joystick Port 
DFh Mapped Universal VO Port board 
Vpp Power Supply 
User Manual only : $5.00 (Read before you buy) 



Service For America's 

Favorite Home Computers and Their Accessories 

SINCLAIR 

TIMEX ADAM ATARI IBM OSBORNE 
TI COMMODORE TRS-80 
BUY SELL TRADE UPGRADE 

FOR SALE 
486DX2-80 Computer $600 + tax 

340 Meg. HD, 8MB RAM, 1.44 Floppy, Keyboard, Mouse, 
VGA color monitor. 

586DX-133 Computer $775 + tax 

500Meg. HD, 8MB RAM, 1.44 Floppy, Keyboard, Mouse, 

SVGA color monitor. 
686-P1 20+ Computer $ 1 025 + tax 
1 GB HD, 16 Meg. RAM, 1.44 Floppy, Keyboard, Mouse, 
SVGA color monitor 
14.4 Fax/Modem $45 
8X Multi-Media Kit $ 1 75 
Repair Charge Exampies 

TS-1000, ZX-81, 1016 RAMPack, Memotech, ZEBRA Talker, 
MIRACLE Centronics, RAM Centronics. 
$5.00 each + parts & shipping. 
TS-2020, 2040, PC-8300, ZX-80, TI-99, Z-SIO, Byte-Back, 
AERCO 2068 Centronics, BASICare, LarKen RAMDisk 
$10.00 each + parts & shipping. 
TS-2068, Spectrum, A&J MicrD, Miracle 512K, LarKen 1000 & 
2068 FDI, Kempston FDI, Cumana FDI, CST FDI. 

$15.00 each + parts & shipping. July 1, 1996 
Reasonable flat rate plus parts and shipping. 
Write or call for prices SASE appreciated 




PUT 





RT1, BOX 117 
CABOOL MO 65689 
Phone 41 7 469-4571 41 7 467-4571 

PROFILE - ZX-81 (tic-tac-toe) 
ZX-TEXT - Word Processor 
ZX-CALC - Spreadsheet 
Business Software 

Cycle Accounting Financial Report Generator 
ZX-CALENDAR - Time Management 
ZX-81 TS-1000 TS-1500 



ZXir QLive Alive! 



20 



Autumn 1997 



TS-2068 

Albert F. Rodriguez 

A.F.R. Software® 

1605 PENNSYLVANIA AVE 204 
MIAMI BEACH FL 33139 

305 531-6464 

Make David an Offer 

ZX-81/TS-1000 TS-2068 
Hardware Kits 
Real Time Clock I/O Controller RS-232 
Centronics l/F 1 6K & 64K RAM 300 BAUD 
Modem A-D Converter<assembied) 
BYTE-BACK INC 
536 LONG TER 
LEESVILLE SC 29070 



IIIIIIP 
■ SOFTWARE 



QLAMBer $20 

QLuMSi $20 

QLUTter $20 

Upgrades $5 



1i 



91 4 RIO VISTA CIR SW 
ALBUQUERQUE NM 87105 
(505)843-8414 



In 






& 

Bill Cable 




ARCHIVE Based QL Software 

QLerk - A complete financial program for the QL 
QLerk software (v3.2 1 ) with tutorial $29 
QLerk manual $29 
QLerk software & manual $50 

DBEasy - A menu based database system 
DBEasy software (v1 .6) $24 
DBEasy upgrade from V1 .5 $7 

DBProgs - A toolkit of ARCHIVE procedures 
DBProgs software (v1 .8) $ 1 8 

DBProgs upgrade from V1.7 $7 

DBTutor - A general purpose learning program 
DBTutor software(v1 ,5) $ 1 2 

PC DBEasy - Just like QL DBEasy but, you 



must have PC ARCHIVE to use It. 

PC DBEasy software (v1 .3) $12 

WOOD & WIND COMPUTING 
RR3 BOX 92 
CORNISH NH 03745 USA 
Phone (603) 675-2218 
Email : bcabie@triton.coat.com 

ID € HI 1 II € € UI It) € $ 



Hardware 5 Software 

352 7 th Ave. 15 th Fir. 
New York, NY 10001 
Phone 212 631-7563 
Fax 212 947-5069 Voice mail pager 917 490-8407 






810 254-9878 

1 4 hours a day 
300 to 14400 bps 

Supporting all Sinclair and Timex users Fidonet 
echomaii areas for Sinclair computers Lots of 
new files for you to download such asTS-2068 
emulator for those who use a PCGive us a call 
and let us know what you want to see 
Message area and file area 
QL International, Quanta, QL Hacker's Journal, 
Spectrum/2068, ZX-81/TS-1000, Z88, NetMail, 
emulators, pointer, FDFormatfor QXL/QDOS 

etc.. 

Sysop John J Impellizzeri 
Co-Sysop Don Walter man 
Utica, Michigan, USA 



LIST 



ail 



ews 



er 



Tike Long IsI&imI Sinclair/Times Users Oroup 

Robert Malloy, Treasurer 
412 Pacific St. 
Massapeque Park, NY 1 1 762 

Robert Gilder, Submissions 
69 Jefferson PI. 
Massapequa, NY 1 1 758 



ZXir QLive Alive! 



21 



Autumn 1997 



New England Sinclair QL Users Group 

16 HIGHLAND AVE 
SAUGUS MA 01906 
617 233-3671 

QL Hacker's Journal 



Supporting All QL Programmers 
Timothy Swenson, Editor 

38725 LEXINGTON ST 230 
FREMONT CA 94536 
(510)790-7034 
Email: swensont@projtech.com 

CATS Newsletter 

The Capital Area T/S Users Group 

BARRY WASHINGTON 

7044 CINDY LN 
ANNANDALE VA 22003 
301 589-7407 
BBS 301 588-0579 
internet mf0002@epfi2.epflbalto.org 




Chicago Area Timex Users Group 
PHILLIP KWITKOWSKI 

2106 DOVER LN 
ST CHARLES !L 60174 
603 584-6710 

The Rmmtop 

Newsletter 

The Greater Cleveland T-S User Group 

Thomas Simon editor 
615 SCHOOL AVE 
CUYAHOGA FALLS OH 44221 
E-Mail CIS 73177,333 

Jon Kaczor production 
4568 WILLIAMSON AVE 
BROOKLYN OH 44144 
75363.1 127aCOMPUSERVE.COM 



Peter Liebert-Adelt 
LUETZOW STR 3 
D-38102 BRAUNSCHWEIG 
GERMANY 

Email: p.iiebe rt@t-online.de 



WANTED: One complete (Portuguese) Timex Disk Sys- 
tem, including Spectrum buss adapter and emulator. 

Leon Howell 

6150 MONUMENT DR D 
GRANTS PASS OR 97526 



FOR SALE: make offer including postage. If offer is 
accept it will be Wrote in stone and I will write you for the 
payment. 

Please list the item number and the item name so 
that there is no missunderstanding of what you are 
making the offer on. While I thing that all are working I 
can not guarantee that all are. I will designate those that 
I know do work. 

1 . ) Mindware printer with spare ribbon & five rolls of paper & 
documentation. Five pounds shipping weight. 

2. ) ZX printer and two rolls silver paper & documentation, 
three pounds shipping weight, will need a I amp power supply 
and if one is wanted can be supplied and weight will go up 
about one pound. 

3. ) TS-1000 with 64k memory internally installed mounted in a 
suntronics key board case, the computer has both a tv and 
monitor jack, no manual or powersupply or cables. zxSl man- 
ual powersupply and cables can be supplied but weight will 80 
up a pound each for manual and powersupply . 

4. ) TI keyboard mounted in a wood case with a 15 pin connec- 
tor that plugs into an interface board and also a forth rorn TS- 
1000 computer. No TS-1000 or 2068 computer but does not 
work on a TS- 2068 for some reason. Great for checking a TS- 
1000 with a bad keyboard. The forth computer is switchable 
from TS-1000 mode to forth by way of the channel change 
switch on the bottom which means that you change the TV 
channels. The forth computer is out of the case. 4 pounds 
shipping weight. 

5. ) 2 teak 1/2 height 5.25" 40 track (400k) disk drives tested and 
working. Note: the ribbon cable connector is upside down to 
what other drives have their cable connectors. Shipping weight 
7 pounds. 

6. ) TS-1000 computer board (out of case) on wood base with 
keyboard and mule legends and has TV/monitor jacks. No 
manual or power supply or cables but could be included if 
wanted. Five pounds shipping weight 

7. ) TS-1000 computer complete in original box with all parts. 
Not known if working. Three pounds shipping weight. 

8. ) 5.25 full height 40 track (400k) disk drive in case with power 
supply. Eight pounds shipping weight. 

9. ) TS-1000 or 1500 computer carrying case. Three pounds 
shipping height. 

10. ) 10 TS-1000 computer boards out of case (foil wrapped and 
one file 60 keyboard overlay to put over the keyboard of a TS- 
1000. Four pounds shipping weight. 

1 1 . ) TS-2040 connector like on the 2040 printer new never been 
used pass through board and shell. Eight ounces shipping 
weight, 

12. ) Memotech 16k RAMPACK version with switches to use 
with 16K rampack 

for 32K of memory in orgkial box and documentation. Not 
known if working. One pound shipping weight. 

13. ) Memotech 16K RAMPACK version with switches to use 



ZXir QLive Alive? 



22 



Autumn 199' 



with 16K RAMPACK for 32K of memory with documentation. 
Not known if working. One pound shipping weight. 

14. ) assembled and tested Hunter board (for 8 to 16K memory- 
area) with 

ne SRAM chip and documentation. Two pounds shipping 
weight. 

15. ) Disk drive case and power supply with two full height 5.25 
40 track disk drives mounted inside. Ten pounds shipping 
weight. 

16. ) Disk drive case and power supply with one 5.25 40 track 
disk drive. Six pounds shipping weight. 

17. ) Unassembled kits for use on the TS-1000. Oliger expan- 
sion board kit; Oliger 64K memory board kit all parts; 2764 
EPROM read kit. Also an MRP 64K memory board and dy- 
namic RAM chips. All have docs. Three pounds shipping 
weight. 

18. ) Z-Dubber cassette load aid for the TS-1000. AAA battery 
holders corroded but new battery holders included. Partial kit 
for a Z-dubber included. One pound shipping weight. 

19. ) ZX81 1 6K RAMPAK tested and working! One pound 
shipping weight. 

20. ) 2 TS-1016 16K RAMPAKs tested and working. One 
pound each shipping weight. 

21. ) PC830G, TS-1000 almost clone computer. Uses TS-1016 
RAMPAK and printer. No power supply or cords. Documen- 
tation in one manual in Chinese and one in English, has sound 
chip and different and better cassette SAVE and LOAD than 
TS-1000. TV display at bottom of memory so as screen 
changes the location of program changes so machine code is 
wild. Has both TV and monitor jack. Has joystick port but no 
Iocs. Works. Uses 12 volt DC at 1 amp power supply with 
center postive (caution a TS-2068 power supply is the reverse 
of that and will zap the computer.) Four pounds shipping 
weight. 

22. ) 2 TS-1016 RAMPAKs have the key missing on the con- 
nector. May or may not be working. 1 did have one working 
on the PC8300. One pound shipping weight. 

uonaia o. Lam Den 
1301 KIBLINGER PL 
AUBURN IN 46706-3010. 


6 Sync Vol.3 #3 through Vol.4 #2 

12 Syncware News Vol.2 #1 through Vol. 3 #6 

1 " u " (Catalog) Vol. 1 June/83 thru June/84 

6 Syntax Vol.3 #3 and Vo).5 #7 thru #11 

17 Time Designs Voi.#3, #6, Voi.2 #1, #5, #6 

Voi.3 #1 Through Vol.4 #6 
8 Timex Sinclair User Vol.1 #1 through #7 
21 T-S Horizons Issue #1 through #21 
28 UPDATE Jan. 88 through Oct. 94 

Hardware 
1 TS-2968 computer - Never been used. 
1 Amdek (# AMDISK III) dual disk drive. 
1 Used TS-2040 printer with 3 extra rolls of paper. 
1 Used Zebra FDD disk drive. Good for spare parts. 
1 Westridge TS-2050 modem, rarely used. 
1 ProScan FX-200, never used. 

Make an Offer on Any Item or Ail 

Fred Henn 
2oU N rKcNUH KLJ 
AMHERST NY 14228-2033 
Ph. a Fax 716 691-9495 


FOR SALE: Radio Shack CGP-1 15 Color Graphic Printer 
/Plotter, like new condition, $65.00. 

QL Computer, new, never used. Package includes: Trump Card 
(768K), P/Supply, manuals, extra motherboard (if wanted), 
printer cable and 24 Micro-Drive cartridges (10 preprogrammed 
and 14 blank) $125. 

WANTED: PC Magazine, Vol. 3, No.. 23 (Nov. 27, 1984) 
and/or Vol. 6 No. 19 (Nov., 1987). Also "Printers" issue be- 
tween 1990- 1993. 

D G SMITH 

A AC CTHMC CT 

410 O 1 UNt o 1 . 
JOHNSTOWN PA 15906-1609 
(814)535-6998 


WANTED: Terminal program(s) to run TS-2050 modem on 
TS-1000 and TS-2068 in cassette format. Machine code tutor 
for the 2068 (Knighted Computers - 2 cassettes) or similar for 
2068 or 1000. 

E 4825 ST ANTHONY LN 
POST FALL ID 83854-8812 


FOR SALE: 960101 Half Height Quad Density 5.25" (720K) 
Floppy Disk Drives. $25 each or 10 for $150. 

5 IBM XT 10M HD 640K RAM 360 FDD monochrome 
monitor & keyboard serial and parallel ports $200 

IBM 286 20M Hard Drive 1M RAM 1.2M and 1.44M Floppy 
Drives monochrome monitor & keyboard serial and parallel ports 
$350 

Computer Classics 

RT1,Box117 
Cabool MO 65689 
41 7-469-4571 


TS-2068 books 

1 Technical Manual - Time Designs Magazine 

1 The Timex Sinclair 2068 Explored - (Tim Hartnell) 

1 T/S 2068 Basics And Beyond - (Sharon Z. Aker) 

2 User Manuals - T/S 2068 Personal Color Computer 
1 Beginner/intermediate Guide (Fred Blechman) 

1 Intermediate/Advanced Guide (Jeff Mazur) 
1 Pro/File 2068 (Thomas B. Woods) 

TS-IOOO & ZX-81 books 

3 User Manuals (1000) 

1 T/S 1000/ZX81 User's Handbook (T. Terrell & R. Simpson) 

1 ZX81 Basic Book (Robin Norman) 

1 1000/ZX81 Basic Book (Robin Norman) 

1 ZX81 BASIC Programming (Steven Vickers) 

1 ZX81 Programming For Real Applications (Randle Hurley) 

1 37 Timex 1 000/Sinclair ZX81 Programs For Home, School, Office 

(Edard Page) 

1 Brain Games (John Stephenson) 

The Explorer's Guide - ZX81 & T/S 1000 (Mike Lord) 
, Mastering Machine Code - T/S 1500/1000 (Toni Baker) 
8 QuarTerS - Spring/85 through Winter/86 

1 (SQ) Syntax Quarterly Voi,2 #1 
28 SUM August/84 thru July/86 

2 Sync (Special issue) 1982? 


LogiCail 6,0 

Tke Firm-al Version. 

Newly updated, easy-to-read, LarKen 
LrMJvjo ver.o ivianuai 

includes missing information related to the JLO and the 



ZXir QLive Alive f 23 Autumn 1997 



Tasman 4 B' CPI, mouse and re-numbering program. 

Updated version 8.0 LogiCall Manual 

with sections on utilities and BASIC drivers for 
modified commercial software and switching system 
ROMs without powering down. 

Available now for $1 5 from 
FWD Computing & RMG Enterprises 

From Scotland 

MOTIVATION 

The New Name in Sam Coupe Software 
Zenith Graphics & MOTIVATION presents 

Edition 1 £4.00 Or ail 3 editions for £ 1 0 

Edition 2 £4.00 

Edition 3 £4.00 Pius an extra FREE disk 
called EXTREME (issue 0) 
The Edition Trilogy of disks are packed full with loads of good, 
addictive and playable games, demos plus amazing utilities and 
if bought with Extreme, you'll also enjoy many scarce and some 
never released programs! 
Single Extreme issue costs only £ 1 .75 
So don't delay — Post today 
We want to act as an outlet where we can put new Sam Coupe 
owners in touch with other Sam owners and organizations. 

Spectrum software on tape 
We are now selling NEW Elite utilities: Notepad 1.0 (WP), 

Prowriter (Notepad 2. 1 ), Dirman (512K only) £4.99 
Please send your money orders and contributions to: 
ALEC CARSWELL 
MOTIVATION 
16 MONTGOMERY AVE 
BEITH AYRSHIRE KA15 1EL 
UNITED KINGDOM 

The ZX Spectrum 48/128 Emulator 
for IBM & Compatables: Z80 Version 2.01 

Turn your PC into a real ZX Spectrum 48/128! 
The fastest, most compatble and most complete emulator 
available! Main features: 
=>- Full Spectrum emulation, border, flash, beeper, Interface 1, 
Microdrive in cartridge file, RS232 input and output redirection 
to file, COM or LPT, joystick support, 128K sound through 
Soundblaster or internal speaker, built-in monitor, 
=>- Able to load ANY, even protected or speed-saved program 
from tape, to save to tape, to redirect tape loads and saves to 
disk for easy file access, 

=>■ 2500 line English documentation, frequently-asked- 
questions file, PostScript file of doc, keyboard help screen, utili- 
ties to convert Spectrum screens to -.GIF and .PCX files, con- 
vert snapshot files and tape files from 5 other Spectrum emula- 
tors to own format and W to read DISCiPLE and +D disks. 
=>- Z80 processor amulabon including R register, inofficial in- 
structions, inofficial flags, 

=>- Runs okay under DOS, Windows and DesqView, 
=> Full source code of emulator and utilities included! 
Runs on any 640K PC; too slow for practical use on PC/XTs 
but fast enough on AT's ; runs at about 100% on 16MHz AT's 
(can be slowed down on faster machines), uses 
VGA/EGA/CGA or Hercules. 
This program costs US $20. You will receive a 3.5" DD disk 
(5.25" disks on request), and you'll be kept Informed about up- 



dates. Please send bank notes (bills), name and address to: 

Gerton Lunter 

PO BOX 2535 
NL-9704 CM GRONINGEN 
NETHERLAND 
If you send a cheque, please add US $15 extra and allow 4 
weeks for delivery. 




What is it? 

Like QL World and IQLR before. QL Today is a general 
magazine for everybody who has a QL or compatible. It Will 
contain listings of events, news, reviews of hardware and soft- 
ware, meeting reports, articles on programming, explanations of 
computing mysteries, histories of QL alumni. We are attempt- 
ing to carry on from where IQLR left off but will improve 
things in the process. Most of all, though, we need plenty of 
feedback fi-om readers so that the magazine can provide what 
you actually want. 

Who is doing it? 

QL Today is being published by Jochen Merz Software. 
Jochen Merz has been supplying software for the QL for sev- 
eral years and has built up a good reputation for quality and fair 
trading. The representative in Britain is Miracle Systems Ltd. 
who take subscriptions and do the distribution. The articles in 
the magazine are written by a number of prominent QLers and 
the editor is Dilwyn Jones. 
May/June 96 issue. 

Subscriptions: 

Germany (+ German add-on) DM 70 

England DM 60 £25 

Rest of the world DM70 £30 

Back-issues are available for DM 12 (incl postage) 

Checks should be made payable to Jochen Merz Software or 

Miracle Systems Ltd. 

German Office: 
Jochen Merz Software Tel. +49 203 50201 1 
im stillen Winkel 12 Fax. +49 203 502012 

47169 Duisburg Boxl +49 203 502013 

Germany Box2 +49 203 502014 

English Office: 
Miracle Systems Ltd. ~ Tel. +44 1454 883602 
20 Mow Barton Fax, +44 1454 883602 

Yates, Bristol 

United Kingdom BS17 5NF 
Editor 

Dilwyn Jones Tel. +44 1248 354023 

41 Bro Emrys Fax. +44 1248 354023 

Tal-Y-Bont, Bangor, Gwynedd 
United Kingdom LL57 3YT 



ZXir QLive Alive! 



24 



Autumn 1997 



SINCLAIR Resources 

Jack Dohany (Developer - 2068) 
627 VERA AVE 
REDWOOD CITY CA 94061 

John McMlchaei (Developer - Graphics) 
1710 PALMER DR 
LARAMiEWY 82070 

Bill Russell (QL) 
RUSSEL ELECTRONICS 

RR1 BOX 539 
CENTER HALL PA 16828 

Keith Watson 



AERCO & 280 Emulator 

41634 Amberly Dr. 
Mt. Clemens, Ml 48038 

TEJ Computer Products 
2405 GLENDALE BLVD STE208 

LOS ANGLES CA 90039 
24 Hr. Order line; 213 869-1418 



SUNSET ELECTRONICS (TS- 1000/2068) 
2254 TARAVAL ST 
SAN FRANCISCO CA 941 1 6 

Send them a LSASE and ask for information about 
their current products and/or services. 



RMG Enterprises Is Still Alive 

If you would like a complete listing of all the items we have for 
sale, please send a large envelope (6X9) SASE with at least $.80 
postage on it. You will receive more than 20 pages of listings. 
For questions or comments, feel free to call or write, 

RMG Enterprises 

14784 S QUAIL GROVE CIR 
OREGON CITY OR 97045-8844 
503 655-7484 10AM - 7PM (Pacific) Tues. - Sat 



lYIft CwmiMiti 

Formerly: Mechanical Affinity 
For all Your Needs 





ZX-81/TS-IOOO 

Computers 
Hardware/Acces series 
Software 

Frank D«nri3 

PO Box 17 

Mexico, IN 46958 USA 
31 7-473-8031 Tues.-Sat. Only, 6 -9 PM 
FAX: 31 7 472-0783 6PM- 11AM 
E-Mail: INTERNET.fdavis@iquest.net 

Http://members. tripod.com/~FWDcomputing/index. html 



ZXir QLive Alive! 



25 



Autumn 1997 



fox* i£ht&> €&| 3L* 

QPC - the QL emulator for the PC 
The Writer's Package - QL Thesaurus & 

Style-Check 
BASIC Linker - SuperBASIC 
Black Night - The best chess program 
The AURORA - The Graphics Card, from 
51 2X256 to 1024X768, up to 256 colors 

Other Sinclair ProcSuots 

Oliger Disk Drive System 
LarKen/JLO Disk Drive Board 
Oliger MotherBoard kit 
Rainbow Interface 
TS-1 000 in a Full Size Keyboard Case 
TS-1000 Full Size Printer Cables 
TS-2040 32 column Thermal Printer w/paper 
If you own either an Amiga or a PC 

ie Speccy CD 1996 
Retro Gold CD 



Z88 Computer 

Basic Z88 Computer, vinyl carrying case and manual, new $170 
Z88 Computer, vinyl carrying case, used in working order $1 1 5 
Z88 Computer, non-working for parts. $60. 
EPROM Cartridges 
32Kfor $20 or (3) for $50, 1 28K for $52, 256K for $77. 

RAMs 
32K RAM Cartridge for $25. 
128K RAM Cartridge for $46. 
51 2K RAM Cartridge for $90. 
1 Meg. RAM Cartridge for $172. 
Z88 Serial Printer Cable for $10. 
Z88 Serial to Parallel Printer Interface for $46. 
MACLINK to Z8S, Macintosh to Z88, cable, program, cartridge 

for $26. 

PCLINK to Z88, PC to Z88 cable, program, cartridge for $26. 
Both PCLINK & MACLINK for $50. 
QLINK to Z88, QL to Z88 programs $20. 
AMIGALINK, Amiga to Z88 disk, cable, cartridge for $27. 
Topper, molded hard plastic cover to protect Z88 for $22. 
Z88 MAGIC, best book available for the Z88 for $25. 
BBC BASIC, use this book and learn to fully use the built-in 
language of your Z88 computer, limited supply, priced at $30. 
Z88 Source Book 3rd edition, with your choice of 3 QL or PC 
format disks of PD & Shareware programs for the Z88 for $9. 
NEW!! Z88 Keyboards for replacement, only $22. 
Replacement LCD for $25. 



vw _ Sinclair Users List 

Jtr us compile a list of all Sinclair users. Please provide the editor with a list of 

members in your Group. 



CATUG 



Jeff 


Decourtney 


John 


Donaldson 




Dorinson 


Cy 


Herre 


Abed 


Kahale 


Frank 


Kapel 


Phil 


KwitkowsM 




Lebowitz 


Gary 


Lessenberry 


Leo 


Majewski 


Frank 


Mills 


Robert 


Murh 


Jon 


Pagano 


Nazir 


Pashtoon 


Larry 


Sauter 


Robert 


Swoger 


Lee 


Thoreson 


George 


Zimmerman 


RMG 




Rod 


Gowen 


FWD 




Frank 


Davis 


ZXir QLive Alive! 



Carol 


Davis 


Computer 


Classic 


Dan 


Elliot 


VSUG 




Rod 


Humphreys 


Marie 


Kendall 


TTSUC 




George 


Chambers 


LIST 




Robert 


Gilder 


Robert 


Malloy 


CATS 




Francine 


Sklar 


Ruth 


Fegley 


Barry 


Washington 


GCTSUG 




Thomas 


Simon 


Jon 


Kaczor 


WNYXII 




Dane 


Stegman 


Richard 


Norek 


The John 


Oliger Co 


John 


Oliger 


26 



SMUG 




Neil 


Schultz 


LLoyd 


Dreger 


Q-Box 


USA 


John 


Impeilizzeri 


Don 


Walterman 


AFR 


Software 


Albert 


Rodriguez 


Domino 


Cubes 


Mike 


Fink 


Wood St 


Wind 


Bill 


Cable 


NESQLUG 




Ed 


Kingsley 


HATSUG 




Dave 


Bennett ^* 



Platypus 



Al 



Software 

Feng 




Autumn 1997