Skip to main content

Full text of "ZXir QLive Alive"

See other formats


Jfrnm (fat af "®lps ; &slpss" KtsES 





r 



MEMORY MAP 



ADDRESS ROUTINES 

2 T/ SNUG Information and Chairmen 

3 Input/Output - Help 

6 From The Chairman's Disk — TreaSury NoteS 

ARTICLES 

7 Smith's Chart — Edwin Phillips 

8 Computus Iterruptus — Wes Brozozowski 

10 Batteries for Z88 — Don Lambert 

11 Adjust DAT ASP ACE Please — AlFeng 

12 The Information Super Highway - Modems A. Kahale 

13 Complex ASCII Rotation — Tim Swenson 

15 Broken LINK — A. Kahale 

16 Z-SLO RS-232 Serial Interface 

17 To PRINT or not to LPRINT — by Jim Brezina 

SUBROUTINES 

19 Unclassified Ads 

23 The Best of the Plotter 

24 Mechanical Affinity - UPDATE! 

25 RMG Update 




FIG. 15-SINCLAIR RESEARCH'S FLAT-CRT 
TV. The 6 x 4 x 1-inch unit is expected to sell 
in the $100 range when it is introduced in 1982. 




FIG. 16 — FLAT CRT has phosphor coating on 
rear instead of front. Picture is viewed through 
the tube. 



ZXir QLive Alive! © 

Established 1991 The Timex/Sinclair NorthAmerican User Groups Newsletter 



T/SNUG Information 



T/SNUG 

Here is the list of T/SNUG 
Chairmen and how to contact them. We 
wish to support the following SIGs:- ZX- 
80/81, TS-1000, SPECTRUM, TS- 
2068, TC-2068, Z88 and QL. If you 
have any questions about any of these 
fine machines, contact the: 

Chairman 

ChiefMotivator 
Donald S. Lambert (ISTUG) 

Vice-Chairmen 

Tape & JLO PD Library 

D. G. Smith 
R 415 Stone St. 
Johnstown, PA 15906 
814535-6998 

Z-88 

Dave Bennett (HATSUG) 
329 Walton St. Rear 
Lemoyne, PA 17045 
717 774-7531 

ZX-81 PD Tape Library 

Ed Snow 
2136 Churchill Downs Cir. 
Orlando, FL 32825 
407380-5124 

RMG Enterprises 

Rod Gowen (CCATS) 
14784 S. Quail Grove Cir. 
Oregon City, OR 97045 
503 655-7484 FAX 503 655-4116 

TS-2068 
Rod Humphreys (VSUG) 

10984 Collins PL 
Delta, BC V4C 7E6 Canada 
604 583-2819 

QL PD Library 

John Donaldson (CATUG) 
835 Foxwood Cir. 
Geneva, IL 60134-1631 
708 232-6147 

BBS — GATOR 

Bob Swoger (CATUG) 
613 Parkside Cir. 
Streawood, IL 60107-1647 
708 837-7957 Work 708 576-8068 

Treasurer 

Editor &. LarKen PD Library 
Abed Kahale (CATUG) 
335 W. Newport Rd. 
Hoffman Estates, IL 60195-3106 



ZXir QLive Alive! 

Is the newsletter of T/SNUG, 
the Timex/Sinclair NorthAmerican 
User Groups, providing news and 
software support to the T/S com- 
munity in a volume of four 
newsletters per year; beginning 
with the Spring (April) - issue. 

T/SNUG's main goal is 
to keep our Magazine, 
our vendors and our 
repair service alive for 
the benefit of T/S users. 

These valuable services shall have 
free advertising space in this user 
supported Newsletter that they can 
see that we are still active out here. 
We must support their services 
whenever possible. 

Another T/SNUG goal is to 
unearth titles of all known 
Public Domain and commercial 
software available for all 
Timex/Sinclair machines, building 
a library and providing lists of that 
software showing both the source 
and the availability. 

Wc encourage your group to 
copy this newsletter and 
distribute it at your regular meet- 
ings to all your members. If you 
cannot copy this newsletter, a disk 
can be provided with the articles 
for use in your newsletter. 

If you feel T/SNUG should 
perform other tasks, let us know 
your feelings. If you have solved a 
problem in one of your software or 
hardware, please share it with the 
rest of us. 

You can keep T/SNUG alive by 
an annual contribution of $12 
for one volume made payable to 
Abed Kahale. Send check to> 

ABED KAHALE 
335 W NEWPORT RD 
HOFFMAN ESTATES IL 60195-3106 

Phone:- 708 885-4337 

Back Newsletter copies are 
available for 504 each postpaid. 




S 



end in your articles by tape 
or disk and your inputs to:- 

DON LAMBERT 

ZXir QLive Alive! Newsletter 

1301 KIBLINGER PL 
AUBURN IN 46706-3010 

Phone 219 925-1372 

Or by hardcopy, mail to:- 
Abed Kahale. (Address on this page) 

GATOR's 



!! SINCLAIR !! 

We have a 24 hour BBS and 
encourage you to exchange mail and 
contribute to the Upload Section. Use it 
and have fun!! — (8N1 300-2400 BAUD) 

Call 708 632-5558 

and Register using your first name, last 
name and phone number along with a 
password you wont forget, and Write It 
Downl Do not try to do anything else 
this first time because all the board 
options will be locked out. 

When you call-in the next time, you 
will have Level 5 security and be able to 
enjoy full user privileges. The BBS has 
smaller sections called conferences. Select 
'J' for 'Join a Conference' to see the 
different user groups. Select "TIMEX" to 
get into the Sinclair Section. The mail 
you then read will only be from other 
TIMEX Sinclair users but all SIGs share 
the same bulletins. Use extension ART 
for articles, ADS for ads and .NWS for 
news when uploading. 

Download articles appearing in 
this newsletter having .ZQA extension. 

For help, contact the SYSOP by 
leaving a message, mail, E-mail or phone. 
Bob Swoger, SYSOP — ==GATOR==— 

(Address & Phone to the left of page) 



ZXir QLive Alive! 



Fall 1994 



Input/ Output 



If you have a question, a problem or a soli>\ 
tion, why not send it to us. We will try to find an 
answer and we will all share it. Mail to: 

A. Kahale or D. Lambert 

( Addresses are on page 2) 



Computus Interruptus 

It has been long time since I've received any 
Timex/Sinciair related mail (and since I spent happy hours 
each weekend chatting with people who called to discuss 
my articles). That was a fun and interesting time. 

I have no problem with your reprinting my work; ifs 
nice to know ifs still "living on". Use it in good health. 

When you publish the reprints, I'd very much appre- 
ciate your sending me a courtesy copy of the issues that 
contain them. Not only is it nice to see the work reprinted, 
but I might be able to spot transcription errors (depends on 
how well my memory works). I do know that the original 
SINCUS News articles had some transcription errors from 
my original manuscript. 

SINCUS does still exist though they no longer publish 
a newsletter. Most of the members are now users of MS- 
DOS machines, but at least one member continues to ac- 
cumulate old Timex computers and is still busy working on 
projects with them. 

I never had an opportunity to work with any of the TS- 
2068 disk interfaces, though I did partially design one, 
though that was one project I never finished. It was to work 
with a bank switching unit that added memory banks to the 
system beyond the three that came built into the 2068, and 
used the bank switching software that Timex installed in the 
computer for the Bank Expansion Unit that they never re- 
leased. I did have that part reasonably well debugged, but 
our interests change. In any case, are the TS-2068 drive 
systems difficult to come by these days? What prices do 
they go for? 

I'm not sure which of my articles you have, but I pub- 
lished quite few on building Spectrum Emulator cartridges 
to make the TS-2068 run Spectrum software from Britain, 
and on ways to interface Spectrum peripherals to the TS- 
2068. We spent a lot of time using the Sinclair Interface 
One and Microdrive with the TS-2068. They were not quite 
as fast as a disk drive, but there were tons of available soft- 
ware that used the Microdrive, particularly assemblers and 
compilers, so they were the choice for me. The unfortunate 
consequence of that was that my path diverged from those 
who chose the peripherals made specifically for the TS- 
2068. That s why I asked you about the disk interfaces. It 
sounds as if you have a lot of experience in some of the 
things I never had the opportunity to check out. 



TTiis may or may not be of interest to you, but are you 
aware that there are Spectrum Emulator programs that allow 
other computers to run programs for the Sinclair Spectrum? 
There are several that run on MS-DOS machines, one for 
the Amiga, and even one to run on UNIX workstations un- 
der X- Windows. Hie emulator programs are about impos- 
sible to find on Bulletin Boards in the US, since there were 
not a lot of TS-2068/Spectrurn Emulator users in the first 
place, and the people using the emulator programs are 
mostly former Spectrum users. But in Europe and else- 
where, there are a great number of enthusiasts using these 
things. If you have or can get access to an INTERNET ac- 
count, there's a very active USENET discussion going on in 
the comp.sys.sinclair newsgroup, and there's an FTP site in 
Slovena(!!) from which ifs possible to FTP literally hun- 
dreds of Spectrum games and utilities for use with the 
emulator programs. 



The emulator programs themselves are capable of 
running even faster than the TS-2068/Spectrum ran, if they 
are run on a moderately fast machine. I have to tell my 
emulator to slow itself down, if I'm playing a game and 
want to be able to keep up when I reach "tough" parts of a 
game. One of the emulators, written by a fellow in the 
Netherlands, is shareware, and the registered version actu- 
ally allows you to build a simple circuit that plugs into the 
printer port of a PC, which allows your old tapes to be 
LOADed into the PC from a cassette recorderl His emula- 
tion is so good that even the speedloaded programs load 
without problems. I was pretty tickled tp watch it work the 
first time I tried it. Of course, you can set the emulator to 
SAVE/LOAD from disk, so the tape interface is just for 
converting your old tapes. 

Well, I didn't mean to babble on like that, but since 
you're looking for publishable material, I thought you might 
find that bit of information to be worth a second look. I 
wish you the best of luck with your publication and am glad 
to see that the Timex/Srnclair machines are still running 
strong. Take care. 

Wes Brzozowski 
Endicott, NY 

We thank you for the excellent CI series and we 
appreciate the information you provided. 

Basically, there are two DOS interfaces for the 
TS-2068, one is LarKen that can operate up to four 
800K disk drives and a 256K LarKen RAMDISK 
(SRAM). Spectrum, OS-64(64-column), Dohany's 
corrected TS-2068 and Spectrum EPROMs can be 
plugged in the doc board socket. Oliger DOS can 
operate up to four drives and up to 255 tracks per 
side and is compatible with the EPROMs. The JLO is 
still available from The John Oliger Co. I assume that 
you've heard of the 32-bit Quantum Leap and the Z- 
88 computers from Sir Clive. 



ZXir QLive Alive! 



Fall 1994 



We do know of Carlos Delhez EMU's, they are 
available from our vendors. Zdtion, 



Smith's 






:::: 



On my latest issue of ZQA!, there was inscribed "Your 
last issue". Since I do not wish this to be so, there is at- 
tached to this note a renewal check for $12 payable to you 
Since your organization is the last great hopes I certainly 
intend to do what I can to keep it alive. 

One other thing: I am enclosing a couple of tapes 
which you may not find too usual. They are the programs 
(also enclosed) for machine construction of the Smith Chart 
by the 2068. There ought to be a library somewhere for 
storing such trivia. I don't know whom of your chairmen 
serves as the librarian for such, so I ask that you route this 
to the cognizant keeper. 

This is original enough that I have been granted copyright 
on the base program, but this is only self-protection for me. 

Not many of your readers may be interested in this; 
but the chart, made into a calculator was much used in my 
working years as a microwave engineer in components and 
systems. The machine-generated charts are oval (or, more 
precisely, elliptical), and this is inherent in these machines, 
so I have gathered from the many books and articles I've 
read on these computers. But the programs are interesting, 
so I think, in the use of the DRAW command and in the tic- 
mark generations (not too well spelled out in the available 
literature). 

Application is straightforward, after program insertion, 
it takes a long time for first results to show on the CRT 
screen; why? I do not know. 

Should there not be a collector for documents like this, 
may I be one of many to suggest such an office? As one 
whose interest in computers is primarily computation rather 
than games, I should appreciate your letting me know what 
comes of this. 

Edwin N. Phillips 
Orange City, FL 

The tape was forwarded to our TS-2068 Librar- 
ian, D. G. Smith, and is presented in this issue for 
those who understand it and appreciate the work that 
was involved. The TS-2068 is slow when it comes to 
PLOTting from mathematical expressions as in line 
2010. / have used similar charts for acoustics that 
are not as involved as microwaves including reflec- 
tions, standing waves and so on. We thank you for 
sharing the program with us. ZMtm 

Did You Know? 



That Rod Gowen of RMG has been legally blind 
for the past five years, now with 20/800 and 20/1000 



vision, Retinitus Pigmentosa. To perform his work, 
he uses two closed circuit TV cameras for reading 
and writing that project the images/characters to a 
17' SVGA monitor through a Vista board, lots of $$$$ 
of course. The images and characters are magnified 
up to 60 times with white on a black background to 
render them readable. So please allow enough time 
for your order and if you have a problem, please get in 
touch with him. £ditw, 


It's Olde English 

Why is there a " b w instead of a letter " v " in your 
masthead. 

R. Arthur Gindin 
Princeton, WV 

We though that 'Old English' fonts 
were the appropriate characters to use 
for Sir Clive computers, albeit some characters are 
difficult to discern. You were not the first to ask this 
question. Cditon, 



iiillliiiil 



Tt came up again, so here is the low down. 

* You may not share copyrighted material with 

others. You may change or modify the material 

(programs) to your hearts desire, it is yours. You may 

share or publish any and all modifications that you 

made, that part that you modified, it is your work and 

effort. 

As far as ZQA!© is concerned, only the name is 
copyrighted and not the material inside. Cdiiw 

Paul, 

Congratulation on your fine display of integrity and re- 
sponsibility. I am currently doing Desk Top Publishing. 

Pete Fischer 

Phoenix AZ 

Thanks for your efforts. Let's close the books. 

Derryck Turner 
Kirkland WA 



Received your postcard re SNUG. I had often wondered 
what had happened. I am unfamiliar with any one of the 
pubs, listed. So, I ask a favor of you. Please choose one for 
me. I am in love with the 2068 and have 5. I've managed to 
keep 3 working. Set me up with the one that devotes the 
most space to 2068' s. My regards, and regrets to Paul 
Holmgren. 

Mike Bowers 

Pittsburgh PA 

I never received any issue of SNUG. 

Dennis Silvestri 



ZXir QLive Alive! 



4 



Fall 1994 



New Haven CT 





Sincere thanks for your efforts. 

Larry Crawford 

London ON Canada 

Since Glenn has passed away, please send refund to me. 

Mrs. Glenn Ruch 
Lehighton PA 

Please send me subscription information for ZQA!. I would 
subscribe now but don't have the information. 

R. Barnett 
Ft Meyers FL 

Paul advised that I did not receive a complete 
list of SNUG members. So, I will be mailing 
Postcards to those who were not on the 
original list. 2cL&* 



1 1 1 m J 1 



We have all read complaints of mail delays between 
here and CANADA. The complaints have been that the mail 
between the two countries is like a diode, that is, correspon- 
dence travels well in one direction but not back in the other. 
Much of the trouble appears to be the Bottom Line. We 
here in the USA are told that postal Optical Character 
Readers machines require all UPPERCASE letters and NO 
Punctuation. We are also told the bottom line must conform 
to the format: 

VILLAGE/CITY STATE ZIP+4 COUNTRY 

Country seems to be op- 
tional when mailed to a destina- 
tion in the USA. The US Postal 
Service tells us that when we send 
mail to Canada, we are supposed 
to put in CN for the COUNTRY 
for the readers to read it properly, 
but we are told by our local Post 
Offices to write Canada in the 
country position as the present 
postal workers would send CN 
mail to Connecticut instead of 
Canada. I believe it! 
When receiving correspondence 
from Canada, we have responded 
to that correspondence using the 
return address on the letter head 
or on the envelope. One example 
was: 

J C NEWTON 
NORTHWEST RIVER 
LABRADOR A0P1 MO 

This one was returned to me from a post office in Mis- 
souri (MO). I added Canada to the bottom line of a new 
envelope and never heard a complaint from J. C. NEWTON 
again. 

At that time, looking at a map at work I could not find 
Labrador! Just lately, however, I found it in a State Farm 
Road Atlas under Atlantic Provinces in Newfoundland!, I 



even found a North West River on that map. It seems to 
refer to a place rather than a 150 mile long river. Seems also 
Northwest should have been two words! So, according to 
USA Postal protocol, my bottom line should have read: 
LABRADOR NF AOP 1M0 CANADA 

The Bottom Line for the Province codes that should be 
at the second position for the USA Postal readers: 
AB ALBERTA BC BRITISH COLUMBIA 

MB MANITOBA NB NEW BRUNSWICK 

NF NEWFOUNDLAND NS NOVA SCOTIA 

ON ONTARIO PQ QUEBEC 

SK SASKATCHEWAN YT YUKON TERRITORY 

PE PRINCE EDWARD ISL NT N. W. TERRITORIES 

What is the difference between Jurassic Park and 
IBM? One is a theme park with mechanical animals 
and the other is a movie. -==gator== — 







....... .-.^-^..^^j--,. .^ _u. .._ |S=-IT|5£^. ^ - - .1 * ■ .'-._-=:=t^!r_ 







m Capitalize everything, using plain block 
letters. No matter how legible your handwrit- 
ing may be, machines have trouble reading 

script. 

■ Omit ail punctuation in the 
address, except the 
hyphen in the 
ZIP+4 code. 

■ Use 
common 
abbreviations 
found in Publica- 
tion 65, National 
Five-Digit ZIP Coda 
and Post Office 
Directory, available in 
post office lobbies. 

■ Use the two-letter state abbreviations 
listed above, 

■ Use complete and correct ZIP Codes 
or ZIP+4 codes. Contact your tocal post office 
for ZIP Code information. 



I have enclosed a disk with two LarKen extended 
BASIC demos on it. These demos show where I am now 
with respect to the use of the LarKen extended BASIC win- 
dows and screen handling functions in the development of 
data base or any other types of programs. What I need is 
help in converting the LarKen extended BASIC part of the 
Data Entry routine to MC. The only way I have to convert 
my Timex BASIC or LarKen extended BASIC programs is 
the use of the UMACHINE compiler. This compiler prop- 
erly handles the conversio n of Timex BASIC to MC but can 

not properly convert LarKen 
extended BASIC to MC. I 
am satisfied that the pseudo 
three window display works 
well enough to proceed to 
produce a new series of pro- 
grams to replace my existing 
older programs which use 
the standard Timex 32 char- 
acter per line ROM font, 
even without the LarKen 
extended BASIC converted 
to MC. If however there is 
any chance that sending you 
these demos could interest 
some TS-2068 programmer 
in helping to convert the 
LarKen extended BASIC 
lines of the data entry rou- 
tine of the real three window 
display to MC, and I then 
have all three windows 
available to me for use in my programming, is well worth 
the effort. If you know of any programmer who can help 
with this work please get in touch and I will send a copy of 
the demos. Thank you. 

ROBERT SHADE 
3210 N BROAD ST 
PHILADELPHIA PA 19140-5008 




ZXirQLive Alive! 



5 



Fall 1994 



FROM THE CHAIR MA 



Seems this is the time of a lot of breakdown of 
equipment. I still have not gotten a replacement 
monitor that I really like for the working computer. I 
will keep looking for a monitor. Of course I haven't used 
RGB yet since I need a cord to be made up. That may be 
the solution with this monitor. 

The computer that was zapped is back and I don't 
know what John Hamner did to it since I received it by 
UPS yesterday and I finally got a lull in the frantic fix up 
ordeals in our house so that I could test it. It now works A 
O.K. like it did before. The only visible change is the addi- 
tion of a slide switch to switch the Spectrum ROM in and 
out. That is a relief to get that magnetic switch out of the 
way. I am now back with a keyboard that has better action 
than the other computer I was using. 

But the Spectrum mode will not work with the 
LarKen/Oliger interface attached to the computer. I haven't 
tried it with just one or the other. 

The only thing that I saw at the Dayton Computer- 
Fest in the flea market area that was not at a T/S 
table, was a TS-2068 for $20 and with the vendor's 
permission I got to take it to my table and test it In fact I 
pointed out the monitor that had the Fest greetings running 
that just could be seen from his table. Also with the com- 
puter as a package was a Craig portable cassette recorder of 
an earlier vintage. That, I haven't tested yet The whole 
package included three cassettes, two were of T/S software 
but the third was a recording of music and some comedy 
deal from radio I believe. But the entire package was not 
worn so maybe it had not gotten much use. I don't know 
how many TS-2068 computers that I now have. 

Keith Watson was demoing on his laptop (MSDOS) a 
TS-2068 emulator which he has almost gotten com- 
pletely programmed or so I understand. 

Bob Swoger was there and he bought some 1/2 
height working disk drives (5.25 40-track DSDD) 
so he may soon be using them in place of his single 
sided 40-track drives. He and his wife brought along a 14 
year old boy 




'S DISKS 

Donald Lambert 

I had a want list, some of the stuff wasn't even seen. I 
did get a good buy on printer ribbons from the same per- 
son that I bought from last year. Dont ask me how but 

one computer store 
\ ;i ^ ^ j§ takes the ribbons (still 

8l*saS$li ^\^BS sealed in plastic bags) 

out of the new printer 
boxes of Epson LX810 
printers and puts in 
another kind. At a 
price of $0.50 each, I 
bought a dozen. With 
a usable life of about three months that means about three 
years of ribbons if they don't dry out in the bag. (See 
Price Watch in the Ads section in this issue.) 

My eye operation (for cataract) was a success 
since I can see with that eye but not clearly. 
However, it is best early in the day since as the 
day goes by the eye gets tired and since the operated on 
eye is the dorninate eye. But I can see progress in better 
vision. But 12 weeks before it settles in — that seems ages 
since this is the fifth day since the eye was unbandaged. 

Joan Kealy reported that Radio Shack fixed her Mag- 
navox RGB monitor so it is like new. Cost was about 
$100. I think - Radio Shack is now in the repair busi- 
ness and not only on their merchandise. I should have 
taken my monitor to Radio Shack but then I didn't and it is 
gone. 

I went to the Summit City HamFest which is about 
twenty miles away and I got a Magnavox RGB monitor 
that looks like what I had go bad on'me, except that this 
one is a "Professional" which is only a difference in the 
name. Works great and for $35, so I did luck out. 
I realize that this is short but I have gotten too long winded 
in t he past 0/0. 

tyfefcome, S¥ew Memfen 




?, who is getting into the 



T/S computing with a T9r2068 outfitted with a LarKen disk 
interface. He was a fresh bit of enthusiasm and he has the 
making of a T/Ser since he scouted out a table that had 
some full height Tandon TM100-2A drives for $1.50 each 
and I went over with himto check on the drives. He offered 
the dealer $1.50 for the three drives he had out. He got the 
three drives, untested so he and Bob get to do the testing 
back in Chicago. PilHp Kwitkowski 

I have a disk drive power supply plus an interface rib- 
bon cable that I use to test disk drives and I had it along. 
That makes it so much easier to test drives at the Fest or at 
meetings. And of course I picked up a bunch of drives, 
will see what they are like later. 



Mort 


Binstock 


94 


Arthur 


Gindin 


94 






Expires 


Daniel 


Chattin 


8/94 


Fred 


Henn 


7/94 


Jeffrey 


Kuhlmann 


7/94 


Lafe 


McCorkle 


9/94 


Mike 


Stephens 


7/94 



®tm$uryr pfat$_ 

As of October 3, 1994 we have a balance of 
$481.20. 



ZXir QLive Alive! 



6 



Fall 1994 




nil 



til's Cliarf; 



by Edwin N. Phillips 




SHITHCHflRT 



The Smith's Chart is used in microwave applications. 
The program draws the elliptical chart and then plots 
the real and imaginary roots of the INPUTed values. 



SMITHPflTH 

p CIRCLES: 

0 TO I in 
.l-urii ts ; 

1 to 5 in 
units; 
5 to 10 ^n 
l 5-unit 
step . 

X CIRCLES: 

3 to .4 in 
. i-uni ts ; 
.6 to .3 
in .2-steps 
l to 2 «n 
uni ts; 

5 to 10 * n 

l 5-unit 

5t€P . 



0>REH 1©1993>EDUIN N. PHILLIP 



50 

sa 
->{* 

60 
100 
210 
120 
130 
140 
150 
ISA 
170 
230 
190 

200 
300 
310 
320 
330 
390 
400 
410 
420 
430 
440 
450 
500 
510 
520 
530 
540 
550 
600 
610 
620 
630 
640 
650 
730 
710 
720 
730 
740 
750 



REM "SHITHCHflRT" 

PRINT TAB 20; "SMITHCHflRT" 

PLOT 0,37 

DRRU 174,0 

REM "RCIRCLES^ 

FOR P.=0 TO 1 STEP .1 

GO SUB 300 

NEXT R _ 

FOR R=*l TO 5 STEP 1 
GO SUB 300 

NEXT R _ ^ M e 

FOR R=5 TO 15 STEP 5 
IF R*15 THEN GO TO 390 
GO SUB 300 

NEXT n 

LET RR= f <2*R+i) *87) / (R«H) 
LET BBsS7/(H+l> 
CIRCLE flfl,37,BB 
RETURN 

REH "XCIRCLE5" 

FOR X=-l TO .3 STEP .1 

LET R-24RTN X 

FOR B=.0002 TO R STEP .0002 
GO SUB 2000 

NEXT B 
NEXT X 

FOR X = . 4 TO .8 STEP .2 

LET fl -2 * RTN X 

FOR B=.O02 TO fi STEP .002 

GO SUB 2000 

NEXT 8 

NEXT X , 

FOR X=l TC 2 STEP 1 

LET fl=2*RTN X 

FOR O=.005 TO fl STEP .005 

GO SUB 2000 

NEXT B 

NEXT X 

FOR X-e TO 1« STEP S 

LET R=2*«TN X 

FOR B = .05 TO A STEP .05 

GO SUB 2000 

NEXT B 

NEXT X 



20,0; "DATUM" 
21,0.: "RERL?" 



20,0; "DATUM" 
21,0; "IHRC. ? 



300 PRINT AT 
3 IS PRINT RT 
320 INPUT R 
330 PRINT RT 
340 PRINT RT 
350 INPUT X 

863 LET 6*87+ C t Cft*R> + (X*X) -1) / < 
t. <R+1) * fR + 1) ) + <X*XJ J ) *87 
370 LET H=87+ < <2*X) / ( * <R+1) * <R+ 
CX*X) ) >*87 
PLOT G,H 
GO SUB 3000 
PRINT RT 30.0; "MORE?" 



1) ) + 
380 
390 
900 
910 
920 
930 
940 
950 
950 
970 
930 
990 
1000 

1010 __- .. - 

( lR + 1) *\R+1) tX*X) ) ' 487 

" / t ( CR + 1! 



PRINT RT 21,0;" (Y/N) 
INPUT . A* 
IF R$i"Y" 
IF R*i"N 
PRINT 
PRINT 
INPUT 
PRINT 
PRINT 
INPUT 



RT 
RT 
R 

RT 
RT 
X 



THEN 
THEN 

£0,0: 

21 ,0.; 



SO TO 
GO TD 
'* DATUM' 
"REAL? 1 



950 
1090 



20,0; "DATUM" 
21,0; "IMflG. ? 



LET 1*87+ t t CR*R) + CX*X) -li / i 



1020 
1) > + 
1023 
1025 
1030 
1040 
104-3 
104.5 
1850 
1050 
1070 
1080 
1090 
0; "STOP 
1100 IF 
1110 
1500 
1510 
1520 
1530 
1540 
1550 
1560 
1570 
1580 
1590 
1600 
1610 
1520 
1630 
1640 
1650 
1550 
1570 
1580 
1590 
1700 
1710 
2000 



LET J =87+ t <2*X) 
(X*X) ) ) *87 
LET Mal-G 
LET N=J-H 
DRRU M , N 
GO SUB 3800 
LET G-I 
LET HaJ 

PRINT: RT 20 , 0; "MORE?" 
PRINT RT 21,0; " IY/N) " 
INPUT Bt 

IF B*="Y" THEM GO TO 
IF B*»"N" THEN PRINT 



* iR + 



950 
RT 20, 



*N" THEN STOP 



B* 

STOP 
PRINT 

PRINT TAB 22 
PRINT TRB 22 
PRINT TAB 22 
PRINT TRB 22 
PRINT TAB 22 
PRINT TRB 22 
PRINT 
PRINT 
PRINT 

PRINT TRB 22 
PRINT 
PRINT 
PRINT 
PRINT 
PRINT 
PRINT 
PRINT 
PRINT 
PRINT 
PRINT 
RETURN 

FLOT 174-i.37*SIN 
<l-COS 5? /X) 
2010 PLOT 174— (3T*5IN 
+<l-COS B) /X) 
2020 RETURN 

DRAW 0,4- 
ORAU 3,-S 
ORRU 0,4 
DRRU 4,0 
DRRU -3,0 
DRRU 4,0 



TRB 22 
TRB 22 



TRB 22 
TAB 22 
TRB 22 

TRB 22 
TAB 22 
TAB 22 
TAB 22 
TAB 22 
TRB 22 



"R CIRCLES; " 
"0 TO 1 in" 
" . 10-uniTs ; " 
"1 to 5 in" 
"uni ts .; " 
"5 to 10 in" 
"1 5-unit" 
"step . " 

"X CIRCLES; " 

"0 to .4 in" 

" . l-uni ts ; " 
-.6 to .8" 
" i n.2-steps" 
"1 to 2 in" 
"uni ts ; " 
"5 to 10 in" 
"1 5-unit" 
"step . " 



B) /X,37* 11 
B) /'X , 87* (I 



5000 
3010 
3820 
3030 
384.0 
3050 
3060 



RETURN 



ZXir QLive Alive! 



7 



Fall 1994 



sxirriPUTLEi irrrEriF 




TUB 



bv Wes Brzozotvski 



Originally published in SINCUS NEWS, we are bringing 
you this series with the permission of the author. 

"All right", comes the chorus; "what's an 
Interrupt and why should I care?" I'll admit, Its 
possible to lead a normal happy life even if you've 
never heard of an Interrupt. But n that case, you'll 
have missed something that's at least lots of fun and, 
at most very useful. 

This series of articles will try to give something to 
everyone. Those who despise technical details will be 
able to pick out some programs that can be entered 
and immediately used, to give new power to their 
computers. Beginning machine code programmers will 
learn of a hidden bug in the system that can do 
weird things to their software. Advanced machine code 
programmers will find a versatile tool that will allow 
them to do things they may not have suspected 
possible. Those who like to build hardware will also 
find a few interesting tricks. By the end of this first 
article, we'll understand what Interrupts are and have a 
small program that demonstrates Interrupts in 
action and which may be of use once incorporated into 
a BASIC program. We'll build on this demonstrator 
program in the future. In order to accommodate the 
many levels of experience of various members, this 
article is laid out in topics. Each starts with simple 
explanations and progresses into technical detail. If 
you find yourself in too deep, the water becomes 
shallow again at the start of the next topic! 

IWhat is an Interrupt? 
Perhaps an analogy would be the best way to 
begin. Suppose, while you are reading this 
article, the telephone rings. You'll probably set the 
newsletter downs mentally remembering where you 
were and go answer the phone when you're done, 
you'll come back and resume where you left off, 
you've just serviced an Interrupt. Lets try 
another analogy. Suppose you find my articles so 
interesting that you absolutely can't be disturbed while 
reading them. Because of this, you unplug your phone 
before you start reading and plug it back when you're 
done. If the world outside tries to Interrupt you, you 
won't know and won't respond. During that time, 



you've disabled the interrupt. Now for one more 
analogy. Your neighbor knows you have a habit of 
unplugging your phone, so he comes to your house 
and rings your doorbell. He can see you through the 
window so you can't ignore him. You set down the 
newsletter, and open the door. You are servicing a 
Non-Maskable Interrupt (NMI). 

The TS-2068 has both maskable and non- 
maskable Interrupts activated by pulling one of two 
pins on the expansion connector to ground. When this 
happens, the present value of the program counter 
goes on the stack, and the machine starts executing at 
some new location, where the Interrupt handler 
software is. If it will make it easier to picture, it acts as 
though a CALL (machine code, but very much like a 
GOSUB) instruction has been added right where the 
computer happens to be running code. In fact, the 
Interrupt handler is written as a subroutine that actually 
can be CALLed. Exactly where in memory the Interrupt 
handler may be located will be dealt with later. 

The TS-2068 generates its own maskabie 
Interrupt every 1/60 second. This causes the 
keyboard to be scanned and the 3 byte system variable 
FRAMES to be increased by one count. This variable 
can be used as a clock or timer and, in fact is what the 
PAUSE instruction uses to determine whether it has 
waited long enough. (Have you noticed that the 
number that follows PAUSE is a count also in sixtieths 
a second?). This 60 Hertz interrupt is also 
synchronized to the beginning of each video frame on 
your TV or monitor, which can be useful. Its not hard 
to divert this Interrupt so it can do some work for us on 
top of its normal duties. We'll demonstrate this in a 
moment. 



2 



Can't an Interrupt disrupt a program 
that is running? 

Absolutely. One place where our phone 
answering analogy breaks down is in the fact that you 
remember having answered the phone, but the routine 
being Interrupted has no knowledge that its been 
temporarily set aside. This means that the Interrupt 
handler software has to be carefully written so as not to 
change anything unexpectedly. For example the first 
thing usually done is to PUSH all registers onto the 



M1 


Code FETCH cycie operation 


Ml 


Maskable interrupt 


M3 


Memory WRITE cycle 


M2 


Memory READ cycle 


NMI 


Non-Maskable Interrupt 


WR 


WRITE 


RAM 


Random Access Memory 


RD 


READ 


ROM 


Read Only Memory 


PJW 


READ/WRITE 


IORQ 


Input/Output Request 


El 


Enable Instruction 


AROS 


Application ROM-Oriented Software 


Dl 


Disable Instruction 


LROS 


Lanquage ROM-Oriented Software 


JP 


Jump 


EPROM 


Electrically Programmable Read Onlv Memory 


JR 


Jump Relative 


EEPROM 


Electrically Erasable Proq. Read Onlv Memory 


Z 


Zero 


EMU 


Emulator 


NZ 


Non Zero 


000H(000) 


Hexadecimal (decimal) 








ZXir Qlive Alive! 



8 



Fall 1994 



into place before it Returns to the program that was 
Interrupted. Therefore, even though the Interrupt 
handler may have temporarily changed the registers, it 
leaves them exactly as it found them. 

3 What about programs where the 
exact time required to execute a 
loop is critical? Won't an Interrupt 
change that timing? 

Yes it would, in such circumstances, an Interrupt could 
be disastrous. When such things are expected ( 
LOADing, SAVEing, BEEPing, LPRINTing are all 
examples) the maskable Interrupt is disabled with the 
Dl machine code instruction. The non-maskable 
Interrupt cannot be disabled, and could be quite 
disruptive if misused. It is normally not used with the 
TS-2068, and a ROM bug generated by Sinclair and 
faithfully copied by TIM EX, makes it nearly impossible 
to use any way. Next time, we'll investigate some 
hardware methods that get around this bug. 

The following experiments show how things can 
go when unexpected Interrupts appear, or when 
necessary Interrupts fail to materialize. I've mentioned 
that the TS-2068 generates its own maskable Interrupt 
(from now on, we'll just call it the Interrupt) every 
sixtieth of a second. This can be turned off in 
hardware by setting bit 6 or I/O port FFH (255). Its not 
quite the same as executing a Dl, but it has the same 
effect, and can be done from BASIC. 
TYPE IN: 

10 OUT 255,64 
20 PAUSE 5 

If you RUN 20, the program runs in a flash; 
PAUSE 5 doesn't take very Long after all. However, if 
you just RUN, the computer is locked up until you shut 
off the machine. Line 10 shut off the Interrupts. (The 
analogy now is not so much like unplugging your 
phone as it is shutting down the phone company! 
Fortunately, recent actions by the US Justice 
Department have prevented the analogy from seeming 
overly bizarre.) Remember the systems variable 
FRAMES is incremented every time an Interrupt 
occurs. PAUSE 5 waits for it to get incremented 5 
times. Unfortunately, with no Interrupts, FRAMES 
doesn't change and the computer sets out to prove 
that its more patient than its owner! 

For the case where we don't want Interrupts, 
those who own a TS-2040 PRINTER may type in the 
following: 

10 PRINT AT 10,10; "WES" 
20 RANDOMIZE USR 2562 
30 STOP 

40 PRINT AT 10,10; "WES" 
50 RANDOMIZE USR 2563 

The ROM routine at 2563 contains the COPY 
command. If you RUN this, you'll get a piece of paper 
with my name on it. However, the TS-2040 printer is 
controlled by a precisely timed set of pulses. An 
Interrupt would cause some of these pulses to be lost 



For this reason, the first instruction in the COPY 
command is Dl which disables the Interrupt. If we 
instead RUN 40, we will have skipped around the Dl 
instruction and the print sequence is disrupted 60 
times a second by unwanted Interrupts. This times my 
name comes out as a meaningless blur. I liked the first 
way better! 

The moral to machine code programmers is, no 
matter how tight the little loops in your programs, the 
computer is sneaking in 60 times a second unless you 
Dl first. Do that Dl before entering any critical timing 
loops and restore things later with El. Don't forget that 
the keyboard wont be scanned and FRAMES won't be 
updated while your Dl is active. 

4 Where does the Interrupt handler 
have to be placed in memory? Can I 
put it where I want it, or add my own 
handler? 

You have a Little control, in some cases. The non- 
maskable Interrupt always starts at location 0066H. In 
the TS-2068, this is in the ROM. I mentioned a bug 
there thai keeps us from normaiiy using this feature. 
We'll discuss this next time along with a different 
hardware method to correct the bad byte using the 
TIMEX ROM. 

The maskable Interrupt operates in 3 software 
selectable modes. MODE 0 causes the Interrupt to 
start executing at a location defined solely by external 
hardware. We won't use it here but it is mentioned for 
completeness. MODE 1 causes the Interrupt to start 
executing at location 0038H. This is how the TS-2068 
normally operates, and the Interrupt handler is located 
there. The TS-2068 Technical manual Section 5.3.1 
suggests a totally worthless method of intercepting the 
MODE 1 Interrupt; I consider it worthless because it 
can't be used along with BASIC. Let's be greedy and 
demand it all. Once again, we can use the 
AROS/LROS Board with a change to the Interrupt 
handler, but this still requires one to build the board, 
lets demand a software only BASIC comparable 
technique. It turns out that one exists! 

Our ability to easily use the interrupt lies in 
Interrupt MODE 2. In it the most significant byte of an 
address is kept in the Z-80's "I" register. The least 
significant byte is read from the data bus. 
IMPORTANT: users of Spectrum Emulators should 
note that Real Spectrums put a different value on the 
data bus FFH (255) than do TS-2068's (I've detected 
OF, 2F, 3F and 0E so far, with evidence that there may 
be others), For this reason, certain Spectrum software 
that uses Interrupt MODE 2 won't work on a TS-2068, 
even with an emulator. It appears that putting pull-up 
resistors in the data bus fixes this problem. (Only bit 2 
already has a pull-up resistor; probably used by code 
at location 0BFFH (3071) in the EXROM, for detecting 
whether additional memory expansion banks are 
present This will be the subject of another article, but 
it's worth pointing out here to explain why only 7, not 8, 
resistors are needed to enhance Spectrum emulators.) 



ZXir QLive Alive! 



9 



Fall 1994 



In the spirit of true greediness, wanting our own 
Interrupt handler to work even without pull-up 
resistors, we will want to tolerate any value on the data 
bus. We even want to tolerate variable values on the 
data bus. Fortunately, there's a renegade Spectrum 
add-on joystick that does just such a thing during 
Interrupts. This is fortunate for us, because it caused 
our British friends to solve the problem for us. 

One thing I haven't mentioned is that the address 
assembled from the "I" register and the data bus is 
NOT the address of the Interrupt handler! It is the 
ADDRESS OF THE ADDRESS of the Interrupt 
handler. Although this makes It a bit more difficult to 
understand MODE 2, it lets us put the handler 
wherever we want; we can even change It easily while 
a program is running. In designing our Interrupt code, 
we'll borrow rather heavily from the solution proposed 
by Tom Webb, in Advanced Spectrum Machine 
Languages, Melbourne House. If we put FEH (254) in 
the "I" register but don't know what will appear on the 
data bus the machine will get the address of the 
Interrupt handler from somewhere between locations 
FEOOH (6524) and FFOOH (5528Q). If we fill this 257 
byte block with FDH's (253), then the address of the 
Interrupt handler will I always be FDH FDH! This is 3 
bytes before the block of FD's, and is just long enough 
for a JP instruction, to the real Interrupt handler. Doing 
this, our software only fix for the hardware problem 
takes up only 260 bytes of memory, and its all in one 
continuous block! We have 255 bytes of memory 
available above the FD block and it would be most 
convenient to locate our Interrupt handler there. We'll 
end the handler with a JP to the ROM Interrupt 
handler, so that the keyboard will still be scanned, as 
usual. (Being lazy as well as greedy, we'd rather not 
do that ourselves!) 

5 Can we do something useful with 
this handler? 
There's nothing wrong with being practical, so 
why not? There are a number of Spectrum programs 
that use MODE 2 to actually add new commands to 
BASIC. The following program will give a much 
simpler, but distinctly related example by adding a new 
function to the TS-2068. As long as the Interrupt is 
enabled, you can immediately COPY the screen to the 
printer by simultaneously pressing SYMBOL SHIFT 



and BREAK. This can even be done while a program 
lO REM IM2 D*irtonstrat i or> F'rogr 

AtU . 

2f> REM Causes a Copy-Screen Wh 
en BREAK and SYMBOL-SHIFT are pre 
ss*d together. 

30 CLEAR 65020 

40 FOR j =65024 TO 6528U5 POKE 

1,233: NEXT j 

50 POKE 65021,195: POKE 650^2, 
Qs POKE 65023,255 r ^ ti __. n 

60 FOR j=652Bl TO 653 14i READ 
k: POKE jrk: NEXT j 

70 DATA £2, 254, 237, 7 1,237, 94,^ 
01,243, 197,213,229,62, 127,219,25 
4, 246, 224, 254, 252, 32, 6, 243, 6, 1 92 
,205,5, 10,225,209, 193, 24 1 , 195, 56 

,o 

90 RANDOMIZE USR 652B1 
is running, and even in the middle of a PRINT 
statement. When the copy is done, the program will 
continue, completely oblivious to the fact that it's been 
Interrupted. The printout will include the edit line. 

Certain BASIC commands disable the Interrupt. 
During such intervals, this copy-screen function won't 
work. These commands are (LOAD, SAVE, VERIFY, 
MERGE, COPY, LLIST, LPRINT and BEEP). Some 
commercial machine code programs also disable the 
Interrupt. Add the following to your own BASIC 
program (exact line numbers aren't important, as long 
as you get the lines in the right order.) Make sure your 
program executes it once; more times won't hurt, but 
they won't help, and take a few seconds to run. Once 
this is done, the copy-screen command is active, and 
will remain so, even if you STOP the program and 
LOAD in a new one. 

The NEW command shuts off the Interrupt mode, 
but leaves the code intact, so that it can be reactivated 
with only the RANDOMIZE USR 65281. 

We'll save a discussion of the program for next 
time, and we'll discuss the problems of relocating it, 
and how to modify it to print only part of the screen. 
Until then, you might get some enlightenment 
amusement / frustration by taking it apart, to see how it 
works. The correct answer will be printed here next 
time! 







by Don Lambert 



Richard Men mentioned this topic and I finally saw 
the displays in a store. The batteries are RAYOVAC 
RENEWAL REUSABLE ALKALINE. While it has been 
mentioned that life can be more than 25 recharges even at 
twenty five it is quite a savings if you use a lot of batteries. 
Off hand I don't know how many batteries that a Z88 
requires but I suspect 4 AA cells. And with that as an 
example and needing two sets of alkaline batteries so that 
you can be using one set while the other set has been 



recharged and is waiting for use let us take a look at how 
much difference there is in prices. The regular alkaline are 
8/$4.79 and for 50 sets of batteries it would cost 25 X $4.79 
or $119.75. But with rechargeable alkaline batteries the 
charger is $19.00 plus the batteries are 4/5.97 so a set for 
fifty uses of batteries is $30.94 or just a shade over one 
fourth the cost of none rechargeable batteries. The 
rechargeable batteries have a shelf life of 5 years whether 
new or recharged. The literature compares the rechargeable 



ZXir QLive Alive! 



10 



Fall 1994 



with Ni-Cad which according to the literature loose 1% of 
their power each day while waiting for use. I was surprised 
that they did not compare the costs of the rechargeable to 
that of the regular alkaline which is what I did. I believe 
that any battery appliance used should be considered as a 
prime user of the rechargeable alkaline batteries. They are 
available in AAA, AA, C and D cells but not the 9 volt 
battery. The charger listed above is only for the AAA and 
the AA cells. The one that will charge all the rechargeable 
alkaline batteries is, I think, about $30.00. Of course the 
cost of the larger batteries goes up. Another factor is that 
there is not the dangers to environment since the 
rechargeable do not have cadmium in then and starting 
next year no mercury. Currently they are 99.975% free of 
mercury. The AAA and the AA batteries charge in 3 to 5 
hours and the others charge overnight. 

I called their 800 number and got some further 
information in that the batteries survive best if they are not 
My discharged before recharging. Unlike Ni-Cads they 
work best if they are recharged often. As far as output, the 
information that I got was on a D cell and I was quoted 5.5 
amp-hours but not at what load on the battery. But if the D 
cell was continually fully discharged then at the end of 25 
cycles the amp-hours would drop to 2.2. But I was told that 
the batteries were not like Ni-Cad or regular alkaline and 
were different in use. 

I suppose like when Ni-Cad were first used it would 
take an awareness of the difference to get the most life out 



of them. But money wise replacing either with rechargeable 
alkaline battenes is much cheaper. 

According to the literature that I received short depth 
of discharge cycles will yield over 100 cycles of use. But 
each time they are used the useful capacity of the battery 
will lessen. In deep discharge of the batteries will result in 
after 25 cycles a battery that will end up with a capacity of 
a Ni-Cad. 

The special charger samples the batteries voltage and 

then gives the battery a jolt of 
charge and then samples the 
voltage and does that 120 
times a second until the 
battery voltage is at 1.65 volts. 
Then if the battery is fully 
charged it does not damage 
the battery to leave it on the 
charger continuously if not in 
use. Once charged the battery 
does not get more charge 
unless it is less than the set voltage and then it might get 
one surge of charge a day or less. Each battery in the 
charger is charged separately so that any can be put in at 
any time. A light indicates when a battery is fully charged. 

Looking at the specs for AA size it shows a load of 
3.9 ohms (flashlight) drawing 308 MA at 1.2V and a 
battery decline to 1 .0V in 3.9 hours in continuous duty. 0/0 




Adjust 



Please 



So, I was reading through the March/April NITE- 
TIMES NEWS and there was a comment that 
John Donaldson had brought a beta-version of 
the new QLAMBer program to the March meeting; 
but, it had received an "unfavorable review" from 
John according to Larry Sauter "because of a bug 
caused by incorrect operating system compatibility." 
HMMMmmm. Just when you think ifs safe to go 
into the water - GLUG (or, should I say 
"GULAG"?!?). 

I thought, "Okay. It was an early version (I don't 
remember what version of the program he received, 
though I'm pretty sure I had indicated that it was a 
"beta-version" of the program) ... in fact, it might have 
been the prototype that did not yet access 'page 2'."1 
know some early, beta-versions did not recognize 
HD disks, and one even had trouble with mi- 
crod rives. 

But, just what was the "system incompatibility" 
that was described by Larry Sauter? 

Having developed/compiled (TURBO 2.00) 
QLAMBer with a GOLD CARD and MINERVA 1 .82, I 
figured it should be compatible with just about 



everything out there since MINERVA seems to get 
stricter and stricter as the version number gets 
higher. 

I had even tested version 2u001 it on a 51 2K QL 
with MINERVA 1.97. No problem. 




D£C U UTILITIES CLOCK 



Then, I tested version 2u001 with a plain-Jane 
(JSU) QL with only 128K and a TK2_dongie on the 
back. Again, no problem. 

Then I ran the GOLD CARD with MINERVA 1.97 
and C-R-A-S-H. 

So much for compatibility with everything! Well, 
back to the salt-mines! 



ZXir QLive Alive! 



11 



Fall 1994 



Now, I'm thinking, "As far as I know, this setup 
doesn't exist within CATUG; but, what happened with 
the GOLD CARD?" 

Well, six hours later, I finally concluded that the 
only resolution was to re-compile the program using 
a greater amount of OBJECT DATA that the 
program uses (grabs). The result is 
QLAMBer_min(erva), though some might think of it 
as QLAM Ber_M AX(im us) ! 

QLAMBer_min allocates a whopping 64K of 
OBJECT DATASPACE to the program and is only 
necessary if you experience a program crash imme- 
diately after the program displays the files on the 
medium. 

If you are compiling with TURBO and are having 
difficulties with MINERVA 1.97 (or, higher?), then try 
re-compiling with a greater DATASPACE allocation, 
it seemed to work in this one instance, it may help 
you. 

QLAMBer 

Out-of-town readers of the NITE-TIMES NEWS 
may be wondering what the QLAMBer 
program is that John Donaldson "demo 
(-nstrat/-lish)ed" at the March 19, 1993 CATUG 
meeting. 

QLAMBer is intended to be the successor 
program to QLUSTer, though new features such as 
sub-D!Rectory access and removal have now been 
implemented in QLUSTer. 

QLAMBer — QL(utilities)_A_M(oving)_ 
B(ox)/e(nhanced)r(elease) — operates much the 
same as QLUSTer except that a_moving_box now 
selects the file instead of a singie_key. 

As with QLUSTer, six SuperTOOLKIT2 
keywords are accessed [WCOPY, WDELete, 
SPooL, RENAME/WREName, WSTATus]. 
TK2_EXTensions (on most disk interfaces) are the 
only extra code needed to run the program. 

Because QLAMBer succeeds QLUSTer, the 
screen is similar.A screen page is "shifted" (if appli- 



cable) by simpiy pressing a [shift] + [cursor] key 
combination. If you have more than 76 files in a 
single directory, then simply press the down arrow 

~EF13 COPY tT2] da-flLE fF33 Hard-CQPY [F43 rHtif£ EF53 pr<HJlEU 



page i & 8+ fUev 

21/1448 sectors 

Easel 
editor 
FLlST.i*) 
crof_H08 
GPRINLprt 
blank-doc 



(esc) EXIT 

WJt fipij PLATYPUS 1789.5 Kt lobytes 



backup 

filed 

quU.HOB 

zip.cafe 

printerjfet 

CtW»©.C0» 



crCHIUE 

convert 

QLuttSLCGtf 

arOOOB 

turbo.code 

IBTf.W5.dot 

SJfeyDef 



Abacus 

disced 

QWfter 

ccta.HOe 

jffjj-code 

P82380.dat 

90ISK-> 



/[cursor_down] key in tandem with a [shift] key. 

If you want to "page" to flp2_ from flp1_ then 
simply press the right arrow key in tandem with a 
[shift] key. 

To "page" back to flp1_ from flp2_ then simply 
press the left arrow key in tandem with a [shift] key. 

Using the [ConTRoL] key with either the left or 
right arrow key will access a different type of device 
of like numerical value (that is, from flp2_ to ram2__; 
mdv2_ to flp2_; mdv1_ to flp1_, ram1_ to flp1_; 
win1_ to flp1_; and, so on). 

Sub-DIRectories are accessed when the [ 
filename ] selected is appended with the ' ->' suffix. 

SELECT_DEVICE is used to RETurn to the 
main directory. 

Filenames longer than 32 characters are NOT 
recognized by the program. 

QLAMBer requires SuperTOOLKIT coding 
installed via ROM (or, RAM) prior to LOADing. 

QLAMBer easily multi-TASKs using either the 
QRAM environment or within TASKMASTER. 

QLAMBer is available as an "Issue Disk" from 
UPDATE! 

HAPPY TRAILS, 

AND COMPUTING, TO YOU ... 



The Information Super Highway 



Communications " MODEMS 101 



6^ Qj4>6ed \j£oaJuz/e 



Computers use binary codes of "ON" bit which has f» 
value of 1 and "OFF" bit which has a value of 0 for 
sending information across short distances to serial 
peripherals such as serial printers and modems. 

Computers voltages from 5 to 15 volts for an "ON" 
bit and from -5 to -15 volts for an "Off' bit. But to send 
information over the telephone lines, computers need to 
modulate this digital information into analog format the 
telephones use; in other words convert it into variable pitch 



sound instead of beeps, then demodulate it at the other end 
-o that the receiving computer can understand it. Hence. 
:;e device that does this takes its name from MOdulate 
DEModulate => MODEM. 

Modems communicate one bit at a time using serial 
transfer. The standard serial transfer uses 9 wires of which 
only two wires actually transfer data, the rest manage the 
transfer process and provide signal ground, to prevent 
statics and interference. 



ZXir QLive Alive! 



12 



Fall 1994 



Your communication software's dial command 
transmits a signal ATDT (ATtention: Dial Tone) followed 
by a phone number to your modem which goes off-hook - 
picks-up the phone so to speak - and dials out using 
DTMF (tone) as opposed to pulse dialing in this case. 
When the modem on the other end receives a ring, it sends 
a signal RI (Ring Indicator) to the software telling it to 
issue a command to pick up the phone. When the remote 
modem picks up the phone, your modem sends out a 
hailing tone, and the remote modem responds with a 
higher pitch tone. The modems then exchange information 
(cackle) about how to transfer data in a handshake, rate 
(BAUD - bits per second), type of transfer (ASCII, x- 
modem etc.) and settings (8N1) to determine the size of 
data packets the systems will exchange. Hence the word 
protocol is used to describe this exchange. 

Once the communications are established the 
modems send a DCD (Data Carrier Detect) signal, which 
continues until the modems either hang up or get cut-off. 

A data packet is a group of bits that constitutes a 
single character. The 8 in the setting 8N1 refers to the 
number of data bits in the packet. Each packet is enclosed 
by a Start bit and a Stop bit that tells the receiving modem 



where the packet begins and ends. The 1 refers to the 
number of stop bits in the packet 

Data packets sometimes contain a special parity bit 
that the modem use for basic error checking. Parity can be 
set to Odd, Even or None. When panty is Even the 
transmitting system sums up the Os and Is and gives the 
parity bit a value of £ or 0, whichever makes the total an 
even number. If the receiving modem gets a different 
result, it assumes that the transmitted data is incorrect and 
requests a re-transmit from the other modem. 

When a communications session is over, each of the 
computer's software sends an ATH (ATtention: Hang) 
command to its modem instructing it to go on-hook, hang- 
up. Or when the other modem loses the data signal carrier 
(DCD) it also hangs up. 

DTR <-> Data Terminal Ready 
DCD «-> Data Carrier Detect 
DSR <-> Data Set Ready 
ATA ATtention: Answer 
ATO <-> ATtention: (go) On-line 



Complex ASCII Rotation 



Tim Swenson — QL Hacker's Journal 



Having been a Unix system administrator, I know 
how mail can bounce and be sent to the 
"Postmaster" for resolution. As "Postmaster" I 
read other persons mail to figure out where it was 
supposed to go. I like to tell people that e-mail is about as 
private as a post card. You don't write very private stuff on 
a post card, so dont do it with e-mail. 

Another general rule of e-mail is not to write anything 
in a mail message that you would not like to see on the 
front page of your local newspaper. 

I got to thinking about using encryption for e-mail ( 
encryption is a hot topic these days). But, I did not want to 
go the extremes of using Public-Key encryption or DES. 
Since the whole idea is to make your mail unreadable to 
the general perusal, a fairly simple algorithm would work. I 
also wanted something that could be very easy to port and 
was not dependent on any computer platform. So, the 
whole scheme had to rely heavily on the password the user 
uses. 

/*~\ "T" 7" now to the details. What this program 
■ 1 1^ does is more than just simple rotation of 
V^>/ JL m^the characters. Simple rotation is just 
adding a constant number to all characters. If you rotated 
by 2, A becomes C, B becomes D, etc. Way too simple. 
So to mix it up, a rotation array is made out of the 
password. For each letter of the password, a MOD 7 is 
done and the results put into the array. The longer the 



password the longer the array. You could make the 
program do simple rotation with a one character password. 

Once the array is created, the program goes through 
the input file, using the rotation array to rotate a number of 
characters. The program will cycle 'through the rotation 
array many times (like a circular queue) until it reaches the 
end of the input file. The output file has the general look of 
the input file (newlines are not touched), but the words are 
now meaningless. 

This encryption is not unbreakable, but to 99% of the 
population it is unreadable. Someone would have to be 
pretty determined to try to unencrypt it. 

Since this was a fairly simple program to write, I 
wrote a version in SuperBasic and C. When I get my 
FORTRAN compiler up and running, IH try to port it to 
FORTRAN. Then IH try Pascal to try out Computer One 
Pascal. 

100 OPEN #3, con_250xl50a50x50 

110 PAPER #3,0 : INK #3,4 : BORDER #3,4 : 

CLS #3 

120 INPUT #3, "Name of Input File : 
" ;in_file$ 

130 INPUT #3, "Name of Output File : 
" ;out_fileS 

140 INPUT #3, "Password : ";password$ 
150 INPUT #3, "Rotate or Unrotate (U/R) : 
" ; rot$ 

160 IF rot$="r" THEN rot$="R" 
l-?0 IF rot$="u" THEN rot$="U" 



ZXir QLive Alive! 



13 



Fall 1994 



ISO IF rot$<>"U" AND rot$<>"R" THEN GO TO 

150 

190 DIM rot (30) 

200 REMark Create Rotation Array 
210 pass_len = LEN (password? ) 
220 FOR x = 1 TO pass_Ien 

230 rot(x) = CODE (password? (x) ) MOD 7 
240 NEXT x 

250 OPEN_IN #4,in_file$ 

260 OPEN_NEW #5,out_file$ 

270 rot_mark = 1 

280 REPeat loop 

290 IF NOT EOF (#4) THEN 

300 in$ = INKEY$ (#4, -1) 

310 ELSE 

320 EXIT loop 

330 END IF 

340 IF CODE(in$) < 32 THEN 

350 PRINT #5,in$; 

360 ELSE 

370 LET temp = CODE(in$) 

380 IF rot$="R" THEN temp = 

temp+rot ( rot_mark) 

390 IF rot$="U" THEN temp = temp- 

rot ( rot_mark) 

400 ' PRINT #5, CHR$ (temp) 

410 END IF 

420 rot_mark = rot_mark + 1 

430 IF rot_mark > pass_len THEN 

rot_mark - 1 ' 

440 END REPeat loop 

450 CLOSE #4 : CLOSE #5 

4 60 PRINT #3, " Done " 

470 CLOSE #3 

Complex ASCII Rotation 

This program takes as input a password and an ASCII 
file. From the password a rotation queue is derived. Then 
the incoming file is processed using the rotation queue to 
rotate each character differently then those to its left and 
right. The end result is an output file with the rotated text. 
The program also reverses the process and will produce the 
original text out of the rotated file. 

V 

#define ROTATE 1 
#define UNROTATE 0 

^include <stdio_h> 

/* Global Array for holding Rotation 
Queue */ 

int rot_array [30] ; 
main ( ) 

{ 

int c, i, fdl, fd2, rot_mark, pass_len, 
rot ; 

char *p as sword ; 

printf ("Enter the Input File : "); 

fdl = open_f ile ( " r" ) / 
printf ("Enter the Output File : "); 

fd2 = open_f ile ( "w" ) ; 



printf ( "Enter a Password : "); 
gets (password; ; 
pass_len = strlen (password) / 
/* generate the rotation array from the 
password */ 

for ( i=l; i<=pass_ien; i++) 

rot_array[i] = password! i] % 7; 
printf ("Rotate or Unrotate (U/R) : "); 
c = getchar ( ) ; 
putchar (c) ; 
printf ("\n" ) ; 

if ( c == 'R' || c == ' r* ) 

rot = ROTATE; 
else 

rot = UNROTATE; 

/* Start of the main rart of the program 
*/ 

rot_mark = 1; 
while (( c=aetc(fdl)) != EOF) 
{ 

if ( !isprint(c) ) 

putc (c, fd2; ; 
else { 

if ( rot == ROTATE ) 

c = c + rot_array [ rot_mark] ; 

else 

c = c - rot_array [ rot_mark] ; 
putc ( c, f d2 ) ; 
rot_mark++; 

if ( rot_mark > pass_len ) 
rot_mark = 1; 

} 

} 

printf ("\n Done!\n\n"); 

} 

/* This procedure gets a file name and 
opens it. if it fails, it aborts the 
program. It takes three values "r", "w", 
"a" for Read, write, Append. 

Usage: file_pomter = open_f ile ( " r" ) ; 
V 

open_file (rwa) 
char *rwa; 

{ 

char filename [30] ; 

int fd; 
gets (filename) ; 

fd = fop en (filename, rwa); 

if ( fd == NULL) { 

printf ("\n Error Opening File! 

\n" ) ; 

abort (-1) ; 

} 

return fd; 

} 



QL HACKER'S JOURNAL 
C/O TIM SWENSON 
5615BOTKINS RD 
HUBER HEIGHTS OH 45424 USA 

(513) 233-2178 

*** swensotc@ss2.sews.wpafb.af.mil 
tswenson@dgis.dtic.dla.mil 



ZXir QLive Alive! 



14 



Fall 1994 



SPMOll LINK 



The folding of the SINC-LINK. the end of 
the Best of the Best Sinclair newsletter era. leaves 
a large gap in the Sinclair community. For more 
than twelve years, SINC-LINK provided us with 
top-notch articles and programs on all of the 
Sinclair computers — very thorough with help 
available on what ails you. 

George Chambers, Hugh Howie and Jeff 
Taylor were the nucleus of the Newsletter. 
George, the most prolific, Bob Mitchell, Larry 
Crawford. Hugh Howie and very many more. 

As George puts it; "We have become long in 
the tooth and, at least for my part, I want to 
move onto other things. " — a state-of-the-art 
486. He will still be available for advice on 
problems we may encounter; "I shall be 
maintaining my TS-2068 computer system for 
some time to come. " 

I can appreciate how publishing a newsletter 
can become a chore after so many years 
especially when articles become scarce. Although 
I enjoy working on the Newsletter, I do spend 
some 40 hours, learning Desk Top Publishing; 
editing, spell-checking, formatting, printing and so 
on, and then some, for affixing labels, stuffing 
envelopes, stamps etc. 



From the editor 

the learning curve became very short for the 
initiated but with a penalty of more memory 
requirements both for RAM (8 Megs.) and disk 
space. It is too early to go into Multimedia unless 
you know your DMA's, IRQ's and I/O addresses. 
If you are finicky like myself, you would still like 
to write your own TS-2068 programs and have 
them run just the way you like, unless you are 
going into Visual BASIC or C++ prograrnming. 
Good luck, bon chance to all. 




"Any of you intoMSDOS?" 
George, you've probably discovered that 
MSDOS is still archaic by Sinclair standards 
although it seems that the end is near for it after 
Chicago (Windows 95) takes over in 95. It is 
clunky and not user friendly with limitations and 
intimidation; no true multitasking a la QL. 
Windows software, canned programs I don't dare 
disturb, have improved greatly to being more 
intuitive and user friendly in the last 12 months; 



EXECUTIVE OFF! CI 




TORONTO TIHE.V-SINCLAIR 
USERS CLUB 



X 

SECRETARY \ 
ACTIVITIES t 
QL CONTACTS 
NEWSLETTER: 
LIAISON OFFICER 
I Out-of-town 



( AREA CODS 416) 
RENE BRUNEAU (931-9749) 
BILL LAW90N ( 444-0772 ) 
GEORGE CHAMBERS ( 751-7339 ) 
LOU LAFERRIERE ( 820-3725 ) 
HUGH HOWIE I 634-4929 > NOTE NEW 
JEFF TAYLOR ( 244-8383 ) 
GEORGE CHAMBERS. 14 RI CHOKE COURT, 
SCARBOROUGH. ONTARIO MIX 2Y1 
( 416-751-7539 ) 



905 



ZXir QLive Alive! 



15 



Fall 1994 



Z-SIO RS-232 Serial Interface 



The Purpose of this article is to show how to convert, 
with the addition of few inexpensive components, a 
WC-2050 (TS-2050) modem board into a general 
purpose RS-232 serial interface. You can attain, with the 
appropriate modem and software, speeds up to but not 
exceeding 9600 BAUD for less than $40. LarKen MaxCom 
provides the software for 1200 BAUD and Figure 6 
provides the elements for software that you can write. You 
can still find some of these surplus boards; (try RMG and 
Mechanical Affinity or check the FOR SALE ads in this 
issue) or, convert that extra modem that you might have. 
This is not a beginner's project. Zd*to* 

BLOCK DIAGRAM 

Figure 2. shows a block diagram of the modem 
board. The address decoding, crystal oscillator, frequency 
divider and 8251 serial I/O, and power supply portions 
provide nearly all we need for an RS-232 interface. As a 
complete modem, the input and output serial data available 
at the points marked A and B, would be connected to the 
modem's analog circuitry and translated between tone 
frequencies and voltage levels. For an RS-232 interface we 
need to redirect these signals to DC voltage level 
translators. 

RS-232 PARTS 

Next take a look at Figure 3. It shows a schematic of 
the recommended RS-232 adapter circuit. The parts list is 
contained in Figure 4. 
Notice that there are 
only three ICs. An 
MCI 889 Line Receiver 
is used to buffer the 
incoming signals; an 
MCI 888 Line Driver is 
used to buffer the 
outgoing signals; and an 
Intersil ICL7662 
switching regulator is 
used to develop the 
required negative supply 
voltage from the 
modem's +9 Volt 
supply. In our prototype 
we used a 9-Pin Male Atari Joystick style connector for our 
RS-232 output, but you can directly wire in a cable or. 
another choice of connector. 

INSTALLATION PROCEDURE 

Before installing the RS-232 adapter board, be 
sure you have a working modem board in front of 
you. It is not important that the modem's analog 
section be working as long as the digital portion of 




the board is working. Of course if the entire modem 
does work, the digital portion will work. 

NOTE: There is a wiring error on some of the surplus 
boards, 74C00 pin 11, should be connected to MCI 44 12 
pin 12 while 74C00 pin 12, should be connected to the 
8251 pin 23. These connections are reversed on some of 
the surplus boards. 

Build up the circuit shown in figure 3. The parts are 
easy to find. A small PCB card such as the ones available 
from radio shack will do fine. 

CONSTRUCTION HINTS 

The RS-232 adapter board requires 9 signals from the 
modem board: 

OUTPUT SIGNALS:- RTS, TX, DTR 

INPUT SIGNALS:- RX, CTS, DSR 

POWER SIGNALS:- GROUND, +5 Volts, +9 Volts 

Eight of these signals are available at the pins of the 
8251 serial I/O chip. The only signal not present on the 
chip is the +9 volt power, which can be picked up on one 
side of the modem's DATA Light Emitting Diode (LED). 
Our prototype board (shown in Figure 1), takes advantage 
of this and uses a pin-and-socket arrangement to make the 
8 connections at the IC. First a 28-pin IC socket-is soldered 
right on top of the 8251. Then pins are soldered onto the 
RS-232 PC Board so that the board can plug in, right on 
top of the IC. The ninth signal required is made by 
attaching a single wire between the RS-232 board and the 

+9 Volt power where the 
LED is. The positive side of 
this LED is the lead closest 
to the corner of the modem 
board. 



TRACE CUTS 

You must make three trace 
cuts on the modem PC 
board. This is to disconnect 
the three modem input- 
signals that go from the 
modem's analog section to 
the 8251 chip. These signals 
are replaced with those 
coming from your RS-232 
adapter board. The traces to be cut are shown in Figure 5. 

SOFTWARE & TESTING 

To test out your RS-232 by itself you can do a simple 
wrap around test by temporarily connecting CTS to RTS, 
and TX to RX. The software driver for the modem is 
shown in figure 6. Under this test arrangement, whatever 
you send out will be wrapped around and received back. 



ZXir QLive Alive! 



16 



Fall 1994 




IC1 
IC2 
J1.J2 
J3 
A1 
A2 
R1 

PC89-C 
C3 

IC3 

C1 

C2 

A3 
XI 



FIGURE 4. UC2050-TO-RS232 PARTS LIST 

MC1489 QUAD LINE RECEIVER 

MC1488 QUAD LINE DRIVER 

WIRE JUMPERS, 0.3 INCH 

WIRE JUMPER, 4.5 INCH 

CONNECTOR, DB-9 MALE "JOYSTICK TYPE" 

DUAL ROW WIRE-WRAP HEADER PINS 

RESISTOR, 1K 1/4W 

PRINTED CIRCUIT BOARD 

0.1UF 25V CER. DISC. (SUPPLY BYPASS) 
POWER SECTION - VERSION ONE 

INTERSIL ICL7662 POWER CONVERTER IC 

10UF 16V ALUM. ELECTROLYTIC (CHARGE PUMP) 

10UF 16V ALUM. ELECTROLYTIC (OUTPUT) 
POWER SECTION • VERSION TWO 

2.5MM OR 3.5MM JACK (NEGATIVE POWER) 

AC POWER ADAPTOR 





:> 

• 1 fE 4 



FIGURE 2. MODEM BLOCK DIAGRAM 

FIGURE 6. Sample TS2068 BASIC driver 
for wrap-around test at 1200 BAUD. 
Change 78 in line 14 to 79 for 300 baud. 

10 out 119,0: rem send Zero to 

clear UflPT chip 

11 OUT 119 , 0 

12 OUT 119 ,0 

1 3 O UT 119,54 R E M U H RT r e S £ t 
14- OUT 119,75: REM 1200 b, 3 bit 

NO pan ty 
15 OUT 1 19 , 55 : REM En able Xm i t 

and Re ce i ve 
20 REM Each byte sent OUT 115 
lu ill a r i v e on the Transmi t 
line or" t h e R 5-^32 port , 
25 REM Ex amp Le : 
30 PRINT "This is a test." 
40 LPRINT "This is a test." 
50 LET a$="This is a test. 
O SUB 1000 

60 PRINT "End of TEST." 
70 LPRINT "End Of TEST." 
80 LET a$="End of TEST." GO 5 
UB 1000 
90 STOP 

1000 LET i =LEN 3$: IF i =0 THEN G i 1 ' 
O TO 1050 f> 
1010 FOR X=l 




1020 OUT 11 5, CODE a $ i x ? 
1030 PRINT CNR 5 IN 115, 
1040 NEXT x 
1050 RETURN 



■ , 

PAUSE 4 ; , 



■ * 



To PRINT? or not to LPRINT? — That is the Question 



bv the late Jim Brezina 



Each new book I have bought on the TS2068 has taught 
me quite a bit about programming on the computer. 
The things I have learned lately about the keyword PRINT 
are quite interesting. 

The latest book I purchased, "Introduction to 2068 
Machine Language" by Dr. Lloyd Dreger, explained quite a 
bit about it. Many times I have entered programs with the 
command "PRINT#0;" or the command "PRINT #1;". I 
found that the command would cause whatever followed it 
(a string or numbers) to be printed to the bottom two lines 
on the screen. However, in order for that information to 
remain on the screen, one has to provide some means to 
prevent an error statement or INPUT from appearing there. 
That can be done by a PAUSE or by following it with 
along FOR - NEXT loop. All the PRINT # commands are 
to be followed by a semicolon. Dr. Dreger's book informs 
me that "PRINT #2;" will PRINT to the upper screen which 
is the same thing that PRINT also does. The next PRINT 
command "PRINT #3;" will send the printing to the printer. 
This will be either the 2040 printer or a full size printer as 
long as you have the printer driver LOADed and initialized. 

Is there a PRINT #4? Yes, I have found it used by the 
"ZTALKER". [andLKDOS] It is the means by which 
words are entered to make the "ZTALKER" talk. However, 
some words do not sound right if spelled normally, so you 
might have to misspell them to get the "ZTALKER" to 
sound right. I have not seen anything about using anything 
above #4 in these PRINT statements in the above manner. I 
have seen them used in 
another manner which 
I will explain later on. 

An interesting thing 
about this PRINT #3 
setup is that, you can 
also enter LIST #3 and 
it will LIST to the 
printer. Another thing 
you can do is with the 
LPRINT and LLIST 
commands. LPRINT#2 
and LLIST #2 will go 
to the screen instead of 
the printer. 

A number of years 
iVago, I saw an article on one of the uses of the OPEN # 
command. This was originally intended for use with disks, 
however, it can also be used for printing without a disk 
system. The manner in which it was used was to enter 
"OPEN #2". The TS2068 will not let you enter "OPEN #2" 
alone but it will let you enter "CLOSE #2" by itself. To enter 
"OPEN #2" you must follow it with a comma (the comma is 
the only punctuation mark that works) and one of the 
following letters in quotation marks: "S" for the upper part 
of the screen. "K" for the lower part of the screen (with 




ZXir QLrve Alive! 



18 



something like PAUSE to keep the PRINT on the screen) 
"P" for printing to the printer. This will cause anything in a 
PRINT statement to go to where the letter indicates. 

The most useful way of ENTERing this command is, 
"OPEN #2,"P". After ENTERing this command, 
whether in immediate mode or in a program, eveiything in 
the program that is in a PRINT statement will go to the 
printer. 

The simplest way of redirecting the PRINT to the screen is 
to enter "CLOSE #2" . I have seen one article that said to 
enter "OPEN #2,"S", but, that to me is a waste of 
keystrokes and it still leaves the channel open. 
I have found that the only channel that works that way is 
channel 2. You can use any one of the other 15 channels to 
send PRINT statements to the printer, but you must follow 
them with the command: "PRINT #(channel you are us- 
ing);" followed by what you want printed. An example of 
this is as follows: - 
10 OPEN #5,"P" 

20 PRINT #5: "Mary had a little lamb" 

30 CLOSE #5 
A while back I found a little program (I believe it 
was in TS HORIZONS) that works like a simple 
word processor. The original program was written as 
follows: - 

10 INPUT AT 21,0; AT 0,0; LINE A$ 
20 LPRINT A$ 
30 GO TO 10 

What happens 
with this program 
when you run it, 
is a cursor appears 
on the top of the 
screen. As you 
enter letters they 
are printed to the 
top of the screen 
and the cursor 
moves ahead of 
the letters. The 
entered string 
does not have 
quotation marks. 
Almost, everything 
works as normal except the down arrow. It is the 
BREAK key for this program You can even use the 
CAPS LOCK for this program You can enter 
graphics too. When you key the ENTER key, what 
is on the screen is printed to the printer. The screen 
would then be erased. 

Of course, a full sized printer will not PRINT the 
graphics. You can also use the ENTER key for a 
Linefeed. For a full sized printer, you will have to have 

your printer d river LOADed in and initialized. 

~~ Fall 1994 



I tried an alteration on the program by changing the 0,0 in 
line 10 to 1,0. Then I added a line 5 to PRINT the numbers 
through 0 all the way across the screen. I found that this 
line would remain on the screen at all times while the rest 
of the text would be erased with ENTER to PRINT to the 
printer. I also found that corrections could be made to the 
text. I tried putting a semicolon after LPRINT A$;. This 
had a drawback as one had to add spaces to fill the printers 
buffer or the entire text would not be printed out. 
In an old issue of Time Designs Magazine, one writer asked 
if there was a way to get the 2068 to PRINT direct to the 
printer without using a monitor. Tim Woods answered that 
he knew of no way of doing this. The next issue contained 
quite a few letters in answer to that question, but, none of 
them really gave an answer to do what the writer wanted. 
One of the answers gave me the following idea, but it still 
does not do what the writer wanted. 
5 POKE 23692,2 

10 LET A$ = INKEY$: PRINT A$; : LPRINT A$; 



15 PAUSE 20 
20 GO TO 5 

The POKE 23692,2 makes the text on the screen scroll 
up when the screen fills instead of breaking out. The 
semi-colons after the A$ keeps the printing on one line, 
otherwise, there would only be one letter to a line. The 
PAUSE is necessary, as without it you would not be able 
to get your finger off a key fast enough so it wouldn't 
repeat. What happens is that the printer will PRINT out a 
line of text when the printer's buffer is full or you key 
ENTER. 

This program has a number of disadvantages. There is no 
cursor on the screen. You cannot delete screen letters with 
the 0 key. You can move the unseen cursor with the arrow 
keys and correct words on the screen, but, you cannot 
change what is in the printer's buffer. The result is that your 
mistakes will GOTO the printer. You can still break out of 
the program with the CAPS SHIFT & BREAK keys. CAPS 
LOCK cannot be used. 





Place your ads here, it is free! 

Mail to: A. KAH ALE 335 W NEWPORT RD HOFFMAN ESTATES IL 601 95-31 06 



SPECTRUM for your 2068 

Tf you are a LarKen LK-DOS owner and would like to run 
jPECTRUM programs on your system, we will supply a V2 
EPROM, socket and 74HCT32 for $12 which includes shipping and 
handling. The installation instructions are in your LarKen manual. 
We shall not be responsible for your install job. AERCO owners 
need only the EPROM for $10 forwarded to LarKen. 
Bob Swoger Address on page 2 

74 7 ^imxxUtat 

So you like to fly, the 747 Flight Simulator for SPECTRUM by 
Derek Ashton of DACC. Requires a SPECTRUM equipped 2068. 
Supplied on LarKen SSDD or DSDD LarKen disk for $10 which 
goes to Derek now working at Motorola with Bob. 
Bob Swoger Address on page 2 



PUh Chips 



CONQUEST 

^ Completely in fast machine code. Games can be SAVEd 
and CONTINUEd. 

^ Available on tape, or disk, AERCO, Oliger. Game and map 
SAVEs in BASIC allows conversion to your system. Price 
$19.95 + $2.50 S&H. 

Order from:- or 
LLOYD DREGER SMUG 
2461 S. 79THST BOX 101 

WEST ALLIS Wl 5321 9 BUTLER Wl 53007 



Programmable Array Logic chips are available for 
some Timex and QL's from:- 

NAZIR PASHTOON 

NAP_Ware 

940 BEAU DR APT 204 
DES PLAINES IL 60016-5876 
Phone(eve.) 708 439-1679 

J3. Strategic (generic War (^ame 
for the 2068 



The John Oliger Co. 

11601 Widbey Dr. 
Cumberland IN 46229 

The John Oliger Floppy Disk System 

FOR THE TS-2068 
DISK BOARDS "A" & "B" 
DISKWORKS 
EXPANSION BOARD 
2068 User Cartridge 
2068 EPROM Programmer 
2068 Parallel Printer Port 
2068/SPECTRUM Joystick Port 
DFh Mapped Universal I/O Port board 
Vpp Power Supply 
User Manual only : $5.00 (Read before you buy) 



ZXir QLrve Alive! 



19 



Fall 1994 



FOR SALE Print Factory on disk for the 

TS-2068 LarKen and Oliger. $5 for those who own the tape 
version. Those who order it long ago and never received it, 
please contact me, you should get what vou ordered. 

FRANK DAVIS 
UPDATE! Magazine 
POBOX 1095 
PERU IN 46970 

Service For America's 

Favorite Home Computers 
And Their Accessories 

SINCLAIR 

TIMEX ADAM ATARI 
IBM OSBORNE TI 

COMMODORE 
BUY SELL TRADE UPGRADE 

Write for prices S ASE appreciated 

COMPUTER CLASSICS 

RR 1 BOX 117 
CABOOL MO 65689 

Phone 417 469-4571 



MIRACLE 512K EXPANDERAM 
TRUMP FLP/RAM 
TRUMP2 DISK CARD (0)K VO 
ALL THREE FOR 



S60 
$35 
$60 
$120 



Includes a copy of Qluster, QLuMsi and QLamber. 



fit Jeng 

914 RIO VISTA CIR SW 
ALBUQUERQUE NM 87105 
(505) 843-8414 



SOFTWARE 



t 



a 



PROFILE -ZX-81 (tic-tac-toe) 
ZX-TEXT™ - Word Processor 
ZX-CALC - Spreadsheet 

Business Software 

Cycle Accounting Financial Report Generator 
ZX-CALENDAR - Time Management 

ZX-81 TS-1000 TS-1500 
TS-2068 
Albert F. Rodriguez 



A.F.R. Software® 

1605 PENNSYLVANIA AVE 204 
MIAMI BEACH FL 33139 
305 331-6464 

Make David an Offer 

ZX-81 TS-1000 TS-2068 

Hardware Kits 
Real Time Clock I/O Controller 
RS-232 Centronics l/F 16K& 
64K RAM 300 BAUD Modem 

A-D Converter (assembled) 

BYTE-BACK INC 

536 LONG TER 
LEESVILLE SC 29070 

TS-1000/ZX-81/TS-1500 Software by 
TIMEX Orbyte Canaan 
Res ton Quicksliva 

also for 

TS-2068/Spectrum and QL 
T/S Books 
Hardware for ZX-81/TS-1000 

TEJ Computer Products 

2405 GLENDALE BLVD STE208 

LOS ANGLES CA 90039 
24 Hr. Order line: 213 669-1418 

FOR SALE: Complete TS-1000, TS-2040 printer in their 
original boxes and three rolls of thermal paper. Mint condition. 
For $35 P/shipping. 

Complete Atari system, 800XL computer, printer, modem, 
software and books. Mint condition. $95 P/shipping 

ROBERT CURNUTT 

10400 TRUXTON RD 
ADELPHI MP 20783 

f R6 6 13 t 6 I 

If you have sharp metal where the cable is on your disk drive 
and want to protect your cable from wear here is a deal. I 
have some plastic protectors that are 3.5 inches long (49 of 
them) and some that are 2.75 inches long. They are easy to cut 
to length if necessary. The protector are such that they will slide 



ZXir QLive Alive! 



20 



Fall 1994 




onto metal or plastic up to about .050 inches thick. Send a 
SASE and I will send you up to 3 per request. 

DONALD S LAMBERT 
1301 KIBLINGER PL 
AUBURN IN 46706-3010 

<SET IN TOUCH 

With European Users 

Fidonet linked 

QBox-USA 

810-254-9878 

24 hours a day 
Xmodem124 SEAIink Telink 

300 to 2400 BAUD (14400 soon) 
Runs entirely on Sinclair QL 
Maintains a link with European BBS's that carry 
QL related message areas. 
PD on-line,' UPLOAD, DOWNLOAD 
SYSOP John J. Impellizzeri 
'How-TV is in the April, 94 UPDATE! Magazine 

FOR SALE : Timex printer paper, 3 rolls - $5.00 + postage. 

FRED STERN 
PO BOX 264 
HOLBROOK NY 11741 
516 737-0963 eve. 



Z88 



Memory, Printers Disk Drives, Software, 
EPROMs, Modems Mobile Phones 
Mike Fink 

Domino Cubes 

484 W 43rd ST STE 27 Q 
NEW YORK NY 1 0036-6329 
21 2 971 -0368 (ring six times) 

WANTED: MINI-MOD AND Z-COM documentation on ' 
modem programs for the T/S 1000. 

FREDERIC STERN 
P O BOX 264 
HOLBROOK NY 11741 
516 737-0963 



WANTED: Looking for instructions or documentation on 
the ZX Assembler/Disassembler by Bob Berch. 

WAYNE KNAUST 

2 PEAR TREE CT 
ST. PETERS MO 63376 

WANTED: am size keyboard, educational software and 
a replacement ULA chip for the TS-1000. 

ALEX SWEITZER 

RD 1 BOX 207 
FAYETTE CITY, PA 15438 

WANTED: Articles or material for the QL and the Z88 for 
publication in ZXir QLive Alive!. Also articles on any other T/S 
computer. Can't publish what we do not have. Will accept even 
handwritten notes. 

DONALD S LAMBERT 
1301 KIBLINGER PL 
AUBURN IN 46706-3010 

WANTED: 64K RAMPACK (prefer Memopak but any 
would be considered); HOT Z, DE-BUGGER, ASSEMBLERS 
for the TS-2068; HUNTER BOARD for the TS-1000. 

WAYNE KNAUST 

2 PEAR TREE CT 
ST PETERS MO 63376 

FOR SALE: Olivetti PR2300 Ink- Jet printer, like new, in 
original box with extra cartridges, $75.00; Radio Shack CGP- 
115 Color Printer/Plotter, $75.00. T/S 2050 Modem complete, 
in original box, $35.00. 

D G SMITH 
R 415 STONE ST. 
JOHNSTOWN PA 15906 
(814)535-6998. 




in: 

ews letter 

Tie Long Island Smclair/Timex Users Group 
Annual dues to receive LISTing is $16.00. Fred Stem is the 
editor and is doing great in keeping it going. 

LIST 
HARVEY RAIT 
5 PERI LN 

VALLEY STREAM NY 1 1581 

THE PLOTTER 



14784 S QUAIL GROVE CIR 
OREGON CITY OR 97045 



ZXir QLive Alive! 



21 



Fall 1994 



International QL Report 

The Difinitive Information Source 
15 KILBURN CT 
NEWPORT Rl 02840 USA 



QL 



Hacker's Journal 



Supporting All QL Programmers 
Timothy Swenson, Editor 
5615BOTKINS RD 
HEUBER HEIGHTS OH 45424 
613 233-2178 



New England Sinclair QL Users Group 
16 HIGHLAND AVE 
SAUGUS MA 01906 
61 7 233-3671 

WANTED : AERCO disk drive interface for the TS-1000. I 
will consider a purchase either with or without drives. I will 
even consider a repair-it-yourself. 

FRED STERN 
PO BOX 264 
HOLBROOK NY 11741 
516 737-0963 eve. 

WANTED: DEAD QL's, Spectrums or add-on boards. 
Will pay $20 plus shipping for complete defective units. 

D WALTERMAN 
PO BOX 176 
TROY Ml 48099-0176 
810 656-4108 

From Nuts & Volts 

RMG 

ENTERPRISES 

Supports 
Timex/Sinclair Users! 

Call or FAX for information on 
prices and availability, hardware or 



software and books 
You can send a legal 



and 500. 



Request list & price sheets 



Send $4 for a Giant Import Gift Catalog - 
Not computer related 

Public Domain Software 
Sell Your Unused Computer 
Related Items Here 

We also cany extensive PC shareware 

Allow 6-8 Weeks for Delivery 
Send check or money order to: 

RMG Enterprises 
14784 S QUAIL GROVE CIR 
OREGON CITY OR 97045 
or call and use your VISA or MasterCard 

503 655-7484 (8AM-6PM Tue-Sat) FAX 503 655-41 1 6 



QZX 



The Jomal Covering Amateur Radio & 
Sinclair Computers 

ALEX BURR K5XY 
2025 O'DONNELL DR 
LAS CRUCES NM 88001 

FOR SALE : QZX Index. 59 pages. $10 Postpaid. & 
PC-DRAW a printed circuit designer for the TS-2068 $9.00 pp. 

A F BURR 
2025 O'DONNELL DR 
LAS CRUCES NM 88001 

WANTED: "The Explorer's Guide" by Mike 
Lord and "SPECTRUM Wargaming" by 

Owens & Fisher. 

PHILLIP JOE 
800 BOWIE LN 
GREENWOOD MS 38930 

FOR SALE: Complete Hunter non-volatile Board Kit 
board kit with memory and docs for $30 pp. 

ELIAD WANNUM 
c/o UPDATE! MAGAZINE 
PO BOX 1095 

PERU IN 46970 



P r i 



RIBBON RE-INKING 

We can re-ink your used printer ribbons for a fraction of the 
cost of anew one. 

BSM Consulting 
41 F STREET 
EDWARDS CA 93523-2314 
880 546-1588 

from Computer Shopper 



ZXir QLive Alive! 



22 



Fall 1994 



PRINTER RIBBONS in sealed plastic package. For 
EPSON FX/MX/RX 100 series. Not $3.00 each, but 2/$ 1.00 
plus S&H. Or 6/S3.00, 60/S25 includ. S&H. 

JOHN MANUS 
3609 CEDAR HILL DR NW 
HUNTSVILLE AL 35810 
205 852-2142 

from Nuts & Volts 

3.5 M Floppy 720K 

with case and cable 
Made for Tandy Easily converted for QL 
Model 25-1061 $24.95 

PRIME COMPONENTS INC 
150 W INDUSTRY CT 
DEER PARK NY 11 729 
516 254-0101 

Dealers, 

T/SNUG will run your ads for free, just send us a list 
of your products. Our members are paying to see what you 
have to offer. We, at T/SNUG, feel that this will help you to 
stay around longer. Send to Don Lambert or to Abed Kahale. 
We shall send you this Newsletter for free for as long as you 
and we are still around. 

AERCO 
BOX 18093 
AUSTIN TX 78760 

Thomas Simon 
CUYAHOGA VALLEY SOFTWARE 
615 SCHOOL AVE 
CUYAHOGA FALLS OH 44221 

JACK DOHANY (Developer) 

390 RUTHERFORD 
REDWOOD CITY CA 94061 

JOHN MCMICAEL (Developer) 
1710 PALMER DR 
LARAMIE WY 82070 
307 742-4530 

Bill Ferebee 
MOUNTAINEER SOFTWARE 

749 HILL ST #9 
PARKERSBURG WV 26104 
304 424-7272 

Bill Russell 
RUSSEL ELECTRONICS 

RD1 BOX 539 
CENTER HALL PA 1 6828 

Mark Stueber 
SHARP'S COMPUTER CENTER 
7244 MECHANICSVILLE TPKE 
MECHANICSVILLE VA 23111 
804 730-9697 FAX 804 746-1 978 



SUNSET ELECTRONICS 
2254 TARAVAL ST 
SAN FRANCISCO CA 94116 

Bill Cable 
WOOD & WIND COMPUTING 
RR 3 BOX 92 
CORNISH NH 03745 
603 675-2218 

Send them a LS ASE and ask for information about 
their current products and/or services. 

C C A T S & RJVIG Enterprises 
Are Pleased To Announce 

The Best Of 



THE PLOTTER 

ZX-81 TS-1000 TS-2068 QL 

Contents are exclusively those developed and 
published by THE PLOTTER authors over 
the past 12 years. 
Price: $14.95 pp. per copy. 

Companion Disk IeI 

with all the TS-2068 programs on it. Specify disk 
size/tracks - LarKen or Oliger $9.95 PostPaid 

To Order: 

Send your check or money Order to: 
RMG Enterprises 
14784 S QUAIL GROVE CIR 
OREGON CITY OR 97045 
Call and use your VISA or MasterCard 

503 655-7484 (8AM-6PM Tue-Sat) FAX 503 655-4116 





Over 1 00 pages 8.5X1 1 Comb Bound 


Name 




Address 




City/State/ZIP 




Disk size/type 



ZXir QLive Alive! 



23 



Fall 1994 





UPDATE! Magazine 

The only known, privately produced Sinclair computer magazine that 
covers ALL of the Sinclair computers. We are now starting our 8 th year of 
publication ! ! ! 

We are a large quarterly magazine that is 
produced on Sinclair computers. We cover the QL, 
Z88, TS-2068, Spectrum and the ZX-81 . Minimum 
issue size is 50 pages, and does include ads from 
Sinclair dealers. The price is $18 in US$ in North 
America; $22 elsewhere, and we do accept the 
British Pound or the German Mark equivalents for a 
subscription. 

Send all funds and requests for a new 
subscription to: 
UPDATE! MAGAZINE 
PO BOX 1095 
PERU, IN 46970 USA 

Checks, travelers checks, cash are all acceptable. 

MECHANICAL AFFINITY 

Serving All CiL Users 

PAUL HOLMGERN 
5231 WILTON WOOD CT 
INDIANAPOLIS IN 46254 

3 1 7 29 1 -6002 evenings & weekends 

Page Designer 3, the QL easiest to use full featured desk 
top publishing program, Comes with loads of fonts 
and diparts in a 4 disk set. You can even use HDF 
fonts from Digital Precisions Professional Publisher, as 
well as other diparts from other QL programs. Our 
price is $83. 

Txt87Plus, an excellent word processor that allows you to 
use drivers for all the latest printers, gives you many 
fonts as well as columns and precise control of paper 
size and print size. Our price is $ 1 20. 
LineDesign version2, a top of the line superb vector 
drawing program package that allows you to mix 
many! fonts and graphics ( 1 0 disk set) with your 
artwork. The price is $ 1 53. 
Data Design 3, a fast pointer driven database that is easy to 

setup and use for the QL. The price is $85. 
Qliberator 3.36, compiles virtually all SuperBasic, and it is 

easy to use, with QL and QXL. The price is $75. 
Contact us for all your QL needs, We'll do our best) 



FRANK DAVIS 
513 E MAIN ST 
PERU IN 46970 

317 473-803 1 evenings & weekends 

Trump Cards, disk interface for two 300K or 720K disk 
drives, 896K of memory and TK2, reconditioned for 
$100. 

Gold Cards, 3 drive disk interface, 2 meg. memory, TK2 
and 1 6 MHz speed, New for $300, reconditioned 
one for $230. 

Super Gold Cards, built in 4-drive adaptor disk interface, 
68020 processor, 4 Meg. of memory, runs at 25 
MHz. speed, built-in true parallel printer port (with 
printer cable) and the latest TK2. The price is $480. 
Contact us about our Trump, or Gold Card trade-in 
program. 

Sinclair QL Printers, Black with QL logo, 9-pin printers that 
are made to run with the QL (serial). Price is $60. 

CUESHELL, the new graphic oriented desktop program 
for the QL, it gives you program options on the 
screen, which you can easily control, change or 
launch. It is a pointer environment driven and makes 
full use of level 2 drivers. Our Price is $82. 



ZXirQLive Alive! 



24 



Fall 1994 



to 

Clearance Sale 



We have a limited supply of some of these items 
and when they are gone, they're gone! 

RMG0107 2040 thermal paper (3 rolls) Reg.$2.00 S.75+PH 
RMG0102 TS 1000 computer package Reg.$29.95 $12.50 
RMG0105 TS 1016 16KRAMPACK Reg. $10.95 $2.00 
RMG0442 Magic Bridge 16KRamPack Reg. $3.00 $.75 
RMG0999 1000/1016 base pad Reg. $2.50 $.75 

(Holds TS1000 and RAMPACK-rubber) 

RMG0436 CompUSA 1000 keyboard bleeper Reg. $ 5.00 $1.00 
RMG0586 PC8300-TS1000 clone computer Reg. $39.95 J25.00+PH 
RMG0634 E-Z KEY keyboard interfecePCB Reg. $10.00 $3.00 

(Requires parts and soldering) 

RMG0672 Book-The ins & Outs of tsiooo Reg. $ 3.00 $.75 

RMG0910 TSIOOO Dust Cover (Vinyl) Reg. $3.50 $1.00 

RMG0241 Book-Sams Beg/Tnt Manual Reg. $6.00 $1.50 

RMG0370 Book-Sams Int/Adv Manual Reg. $6.00 $1.50 

RMG0469 Book-TS2068 Basics & Beyond Reg. $ 5.00 $2.00 

RMG0945 Alphacom 32 Painter Reg. $39.95 $25.00+PH 

RMG0366 Thompson Case-holds 12 QLMdvs Reg. $2.00 $ 1.00 

All TS-1000 cassette software (Timex brand) 10 pes for 
$1.50+PH. All TS-2068 cassette software (Timex brand) 10 
pes for $2.50+PH. All TS SOFTSYNC TS-1000 software 
(cassettes) 10 pes for'S 3.00+PH 

(Minimum order is 10 pieces on either) 
Grab Bag Special! Our choices- 10 pieces 1000 S/W only 
$1 .00+PH. 10 Pieces 2068 S/W only $2.00+PH 

For Listing Of Available Titles Send Legal SA.S.E 
Minimum Order: 10 of either type - Shipping:$6.00 per order 
of 10 tapes 

Shipping on the above items is $6.00 ininimum per 
order. Items with a (+PH) after price = extra shipping. 
Shipping is $6.50 if ordering one of these items only. $4 extra 
if ordered with other items. No more than $15 shipping per 
order (example: 10 pes software plus 2040 printer = $9.50 
shipping) Canada - add 10% of total order (including 
shipping) to the totaL 

This List Is From Folks Who Do Not Need The Items! 

Now It Could Be Yours! 

1> TRS Tape Recorder $15.00 
1 > TS-2068 Power Supply $20.00 
1> Book-Sams Beginner/Intermediate Manual $5.00 
1 > Book-Brain Games $5.00 
Super Special:-- All Of The Above For Only $40.00 pp. 
For Above Item(S) Please Use Reference # BWU1291 

1> Sinclair QL Package-Complete Set In Good Shape! 
$550.00 Includes: QL computer w/PSION s/w, JSU 
ROM. New Membrane, QL VISIONS RGB Monitor, QL 
NLQ Printer, All Cables. A Real Collector's Find! All Or 
None! 

1> QL Computer W/PSION S/W COLECO P/S Needs 

Membrane - $ 75.00 
1> Set PHILLIPS 5.25" 1/2 HT 720K Drives $150.00 
In Case With Power Supply And Cables 



1 > I. C. E. EPROM Cartridge $20.00 

1> Transform Keyboard Cover S5.00 

1> Microbridge S/W -(QL)-FLP S20.00 

l>DBEASYonFLP $10.00 

1 > Cable C Disk: FLP Filer $ 1 0.00 

1 > PASTE ART VI :FLP $5.00 

1> QLIBERATOR MDV W/Manual $25.00 

20> Update Magazines $25.00 

16> IQLR Magazines $25.00 

18> TIME DESIGNS Magazines $20.00 

1> Taking The Quantum Leap book $20.00 

1> Sinclair QL COMPUTING Book $5.00 

1 > QL Survivors Source Book $5.00 

1 > QL ICONTROLLER Cursor Controller $25.00 

1> ZX81 16K RAMPAK $5.00 

1>TS Telecommunications Manual 2068 $6.00 

10> QUANTUM LEVELS Magazines (QL) $12.50 

For Above Items Please Use Reference # CLU1293 

1> 6 Pack TSIOOO S/W W/Docs - Includes Shipping! $5.00 

1> SHARP 4602 LAPTOP, 2 720K Floppy Drives, 640K 
RAM 10MHZ, 2 Serial/1 Par Ports - RGB/CGA Port - 
5.25" Floppy Port - 2 Battery Packs - DOS 3.30 Backlit 
LCD Screen - Case With Many Pockets Also Included - 
All In Like-New Condition. Includes AC Adapter. 

Make Us An Offer! (Reasonable!) $ 475.00pp 

For Above Items Please Use Reference # JCU0989 

CNSN-1 All Prices Include Shipping! July 30, 1994. 

More Items That Would Like To Find A New Home! Read 

This! 

1> PC To QL Monitor Adapter (use QL monitor on PC) 
$45.00 . Like your QL Vision Monitor? Want to use it on 
your PC? This adapter w/power supply will allow you to do 
that with any CGA output. 

1> TS-2068 In Wooden Case W/Large KB/Reset/More 
$85.00pp 

1> DMP-430 15" Dot Matrix Printer (Good Shape) 
$110.00pp 

For Above Item(S) Please Use Reference # DSU1 190 

1> BSR 1200 BAUD External Modem - Like New! $35.00 
1> TANDY CoCo Package $40.00 
1> Composite Monochrome 12" Monitor $45.00 
1 > TS-2068 w/monitor cable for RGB $85.00pp 
1> LarKen DOS disk package: 2 FH drives in case w/PS, 
LarKen controller and cart, cables $275.00pp 
1> LarKen RAMDISK256K $150.00pp 
For Above Item(S) Please Use Reference # REGU0591 

1> TS-1000 In KRADLE Keyboard w/added RAM $100.00 
A Real Collector's Item! 

1> Melbourne House Software Pack-8 Pieces $25.00 
1> SOFTSYNC Software Pack, 9 Pieces $25.00 
1> Software Farms HI-REZ Software Pack, 3 Pieces $20.00 

All 3 Titles For The 1000 
1> TIMEX Software Pack, 3 Pieces $ 1 0.00 

1> Magazine/Book Pack~3 Books/2 1 Mags $25.00 
For Above Items Please Use Reference # FRSU0792 



ZXir QLive Alive! 



25 



Fall 1994 



1 > MIRACLE QL Printer Interface $40.00 
1>QL Technical Guide S10.00 
2> AERCO FD-68 Disk Interface w/256K RAM S105.00EA 
1 > COLECO Power Supply For Use With FD-68 $5.00 
1 > RITE MAN 9 Pin Dot Matrix Printer $ 1 1 5.00 

Includes: Tractor/Roll Feed w/8 Ribbons Graphics 
Compatible. 

For Above Items Please Use Reference g RDSU0393 

1 > Timex Sinclair 1 000/ZX8 1 Users Manual $2.50 
1 > The Timex Personal Computer Made Simple $2.50 
1> Mastering Your TS1000 Personal Computer $2.50 

Collector's Items 

LIPINSKTS Software Buyer's Guide To TS Products And 
Services In Loose Leaf Binder S10.00+3SH 
For Above Items Use Reference # HCU0793 

1> Magnavox Monitor Model 8M7622-074B (Amber 
Composite) $55.00pp 
For The Above Item(S) Please Use Reference # FSU0494 
CN SN - 3 Last Updated June 6, 1 994 

Here Is A Great Collection Of Items For You! 

(I) Q-SAVE fast load amplifier (back panel removed) with 

both cassette software and EPROM firmware module, 

all docs $38 

(1) R.A.M. 2716/2732 EPROM burner and reader (mapped 8- 
16K). This is a really nice board with driver software/firmware 
and excellent docs which I built but never tested. Has (2) 
Textool ZIF sockets for bum and (4) Aries ZIF sockets for 
read, (2) 8255 A. Has other options. Requires inexpensive 
power supply (like Oliger's EPROM burner ps.). Connects 
via short ribbon cable. I have over $150 invested in this board 
requires final adjustment, Docs. $40 

RAM chips 4116-1. Most with slightly shortened leads. 
About 90 available at $ 1 0 for all 

(I) Byte Back Modem. Fully socketed. Built it myself and 
modified to new address in the 0-1 6K block. Software, all 
docs including kluge data included. Kluging necessitated 
removal of the case (included) but this modem could be 
converted back to stock without any trouble. Works fine $30 

(1) Timex 16K RAMPACK, used, in original boxes. $4 each 
2I%1. (Add $3 shipping for both $1.50 for one) 

(6) TS-1000 RAMPACKs all setup for the Hunter bank 
switch project in TS Horizons. The two small boards of each 
bank are joined together edge to edge with soldered-in 20 
gauge wire jumpers to make a single long (very strong) board. 
Each long board has the edge connector modified to provide-a 
standard Sinclair feedthru (the toughest part of the project). 
The entire 6-card stack is bolted rigidly together with small 
threaded rod and plastic spacers. I never got more than three 



i or four of these boards to run together. That was before 1 
■ became aware of the evils of excessive bus loading. This 
I might be cured with buffering and really should have been 

i * — 1 

j addressed more carefully in the article- Docs, software 
i included. $15 

j (3) TS-1000 motherboards. Complete and guaranteed to be 
I OK $7 each 

! (1) PC8300 Chinese ZX-81 clone - unused with original box. 
! Has chiclet keyboard, sound capabilities and despite all 
j inaccurate advertising, it will run existing ZX-81 programs 
| ONLY if they are entirely in BASIC. $20 + $3 extra shipping. 

i 

(I) 300/1200 Baud modem board made by Hayes for an 
OEM. Still in the anti-static pack. It has diagrams enabling 
one to add the 1488, 1489 and power supply that the board 
lacks. A first class piece of hardware. $ 1 5 

Use Reference # WU0491 

CNSN-4 Last Updated: August 3 1 , 1 993 

NOTICE! 

Policy Change At RJV1G Takes Effect Immediately! 

Effective September 1, 1994, any phone calls for 
assistance with computer related problems, whether for the 
TS computers or IBM clones, will be classed 
"CONSULTATION CALLS" and these will be billed out at 
$20 per hour starting with the first minute. Minimum charge 
will be $1.00. We have been here for all of our customers at 
no cost to you except for the phone call and have given 
thousands of hours to further the use of computers. With the 
expertise that we have gained having cost us a lot over the 
years, it is time to recoup some of our losses. If we do not do 
this, we will have to close our phone lines and stop doing 
"business as usual". We want to continue to help you with 
any and all problems that we are capable of helping with. If 
we cannot help, we will refer you to someone who is capable 
of helping. That referral alone should be worth something. 
You would not expect to call a doctor or a lawyer to ask them 
questions without expecting to pay for their time. If all I have 
that you need is inside my head and you want to make use of 
the knowledge there, then it will be there for you, as long as I 
get paid for it. Don't get us wrong, we will still gladly accept 
calls for price information and phone orders without a charge 
being made for them. The new policy, ONLY applies to 
"how do I do this" type calls. The only exception to this new 
policy will be for paid-up members of CCATS user group. 

More favorable letters have arrived regarding the book 
THE BEST OF THE PLOTTER. We are pleased that you are 
happy with our efforts, As of this writing, we have not 
shipped the disks out yet, but again, we want to make sure 
that they are as complete and "bug free" as is Possible. 



RMG Enterprises 

14784 S QUAIL GROVE CIR 
OREGON CITY OR 97045 
503 655-7484 8AM-6PM Tu.-Sat 24 hour FAX 503 655-411 6 



ZXir QLrve Alive! 



Fall 1994