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Jk T A R I 

B# il ■%COMPUTER 
ENTHUSIASTS 

ELLINGTON 

Wellington Atari Computer Enthusiasts t 



30 


Dear Members, 

Herewith the May newsletter. - * - ' - " -- 

NEXT MEETING 

"i 11 ,*- held at the TAB building on Lambton Quay at 
pm on 6 June (D Day!). We shall at that meeting have the usual range of 

Demoes, product evaluations, chit chat etc. Another club tape, no, 15, will be 
available to members. We shall also discuss a change of name for our group. As 
mentioned in last month's newsletter, the Justice Department will not accept 
Atari’s agreement that we can use their name as part of our's because it has 
not been provided ’under seal’. Therefore, to facilitate early incorporation, 
your Committee has agreed to place before members a recommendation, as 
follows: that the Club’s name be changed from "Wellington Atari Computer 

Enthusiasts Society" to 
"WAGE 

-an independent computer users’ group" " 

•3) The present name of the Club is included in the rules, and the rules 
state that they can not be altered "except by the majority of financial 
members present and voting at the AGM or at a Special General Meeting, 
provided that in the latter case 14 days notice shall be given to financial 
members, with specifications of the proposed alterations". MEMBERS ARE 
THEREFORE ADVISED THAT at the 6 JUNE meeting we shall hold a SPECIAL GENERAL 
MEETING to vote on the Committee’s recommendation that the club’s name be 
changed, to the form set out above. 

4)LAST MEETING 

Last month’s meeting went well. We demonstrated one printer and discussed 
the merits of two other’s (the latter were not demonstrated because Murphy’s 
Law dictated that the requisite "interface" did not arrive. The point to 
emerge, above all, was that members considering the purchase of a printer 
should make sure the proposed printer is compatible with the proposed 
word processor package. In particular, they should know whether an interface 

i^H eqUired or not ’ and -" if so ’ what interface. The Atari interface, while 
good, is expensive and hard to get. There are cheaper ways of "interfacing" a 

HoT U i? r - VJ ] th a .P rintsr: Roger Shepherd and Roqan Maxwell both havm a great 
deal of information available. In addition, Antic magazine has recently 

prepared some articles on printers etc which are available from the shops. 

received club ta P - 3 were made available to members: we hope they were well 

6)COPYRIGHT 

Mention was made at the last meeting that the copyright law was more 
restrictive in its application than had previously been thouqht. Your 
committee has therefore been reviewing the club’s operations'and is happy to 
make the following announcements: 

(a)Club Tapes - this programme will be able to continue at its present 
levei of activity. We have enough programmes in our library (ten disks with 
p iblic domain programmes have just been received from Antic and a further two 

-LnlaoSrftf ACE ’ t0 “• « 0 ‘"« ^ ^ addition, 

members? obtain programmes from other sources, including more from our 








1 

*< 


Lib ‘‘’irTn 1 ’ 5 '""'” "; ibrar r ‘ fittachbd is a statement fro. our Pregramme 

sr7sh^^?r\^ir?I>i n VEf s F :Se?r ° b; “ !; ?? b s* ph 

is 731176. ° d ' 3r ° du ‘ :t ‘v® operation. Dennis' telephone number 

(c)Hagazines — Your committee ha= ^nr-ociH +-h = +. „i . 
placed in the Wellington City Library’* hoi di ™'* ub . magaz 1 nes shall be 
vast increase in the availabiiiiv n/tho d 9j - The advanta ge would be a 
out-of-towners wi 1 1 bS olelSid ^ k 1 ?* e ' m f nes for ambers: 
magazines via their local library an^thp 3 " -F * eV \ cou |' I d obtain access to these 
members, the newslettSr wi 11 dShmS tJS "Interloan" system. To guide 

WO receive in the f \1>, SSii*5i ?Klo?t i £ f‘?« y 


arrangement, the 


$630. Ring him on ph. 


ssMit&ars: ss P r¥o , Jsi;!srUiSs l 'i,i? t iC 1 - 

7)ANOTHER SATURDAY MEETING^ ’ / * 

Secretary^hnowf " ant an ° ther Saiurda7 *“™ meeting? If so, let your 
B>ARTIDLES for SALE 

Printer. Ri na Ter "o!l°Jh. 729866 r S * lB St B715 an fltari 1027 Letter quality 
328473"’ NSli UPt ° n hL a near-new fltari 600 for sale at 

Cent i pede^$37.5o" 1 fTtridfl.,, Pacman S37.S0, 

Allan’s ph. is 367704. *-b.OO (no instructions for the last one). 

Logitec FT O 5001 M prrnteri S cin t be B ^?fined P cheip?y t °Shouf5 S-o^' " h ® reb V 

ST Contact ’r ^ *t, 00 - b0 - Sb °“‘ d ‘0-24 be ordered!' tf,l'prlcTtFlt Le*** 
propaganda end osrt?"our’secrrt'ary^hafb’ "°t ™° re detai1s and alb ° the 
Logitec's word-processing/interfacTng r S qi remenis.’ d ° BS " 0t r ™ embEr - the 
Yours sincerely, 

Des Rowe 
(Secretary) 

RANDOM THOUGHTS 
from CHRIS CAUDWELL 

Recently a friend carried out the "HI-RES" modification to my old metal model 
41<_ tape player.lt was detailed by a Mr CArl Evans in ANTIC FEB 84. Since then 
can now load about SOT. of the tapes which were previously unloadable. This 
included about half the programs on club tapes.The modification simply 

re K 1 ?K ln H t ^° *T esistors with 17. accurate ones available from Wisemans 
for uc each.The hardest part was findinq the resistors in my old 410, they 
are not where the photograph in the ANTIC magazine shows them. 

A Wellington Apple users group was formed last weekend.If they prosper 

they will make useful contacts because they will face the same issues we do 
with copyright etc. 


a blue 
afford 


Tired P f looking at your programs displayed in white text on 
background : Thinking of buying a green screen moniter but can’t really 
it? There is a poor mans answer. 

nop c 10 1 J ecr t /i u h w ^ ollowin 9 c °de in direct mode or in your program 

BE.-i, I-., 1: SE, 4, 12, 1 .You may need to adjust the brightness etc. of your TV 
but you win get green letters on a black background;Just like the screens at 
work! The effect is particularly interesting because according to the manual 
can-t alter the text colour in Graphics Mode 0.In practise what you 

do . ls make th e background green and turn down the brightness so you 
can t see it. Tor some reason you are left with green letters.' 

Finally can anyone help me find a supply of sticky back paper with 
traction feed holes dom the side for my SEIK0SHA printer? Quik Stick sell a 
minimum quantity of lo, (‘00 labels which would be 8yrs supply for the club 
newsletter mailing. 


I have used TINY 
September newsletter. 


TEXT for this article.The instructions 


were in the 


Now i t 
newsletter. 


is \OUR turn.Lets have more members 


views and experiences in the 



CLUB PROGRAM LIBRARY 


Since being appointed Program Librarian I have spent many hours 
compiling a list of programs held by club members. It is a long and 
continuing task but I have broken the back of it and my initial"efforts 
follow at the end of this article. I need everyones help to get the 
information in the list accurate amd up to date. If anyone can help by 
filling in where I have left a question mark, please either collar me at a 
club meeting or ring me at 731176 after hours. I am especially lacking 
in neat and tidy descriptions on what each program is about. A 
description of up to 50 characters for any of the programs you are 
familiar with will be very much appreciated. 


A word about the list. Each program has a unique 3 
number so if refering to a program, pleasr use the number 
name since some programs have the same name. 


or 4 d i g i t 
as well as the 


Another word about the list. You will notice the final column (field 
in data base jargon) is headed status. This refers to whether a program 
is subject to copyright. A "C" in this column means the program is 
subject to copyright and cannot be copied. A question mark means we 
are uncertain as to the status and the program will be treated as 
copyright until we ascertain otherwise. A "P" indicates the a 


is in the public domain and can be 
program is usually done by persons 
sword, otherwise known as pirates. 
theft in law and the club rules do 
activities. 


program 

freely copied. Copying a copyright 
wearing an eye patch and carrying a 
Copying of copyright software is 
not allow this to be part of club 


Yet another word. In the column I have noted those programs on 
club tapes by entering the number of the tape. These tapes can be 
obtained from Rogan Maxwell on club nights as per usual. 


Finally the programs in the list are all E^asic programs. I know of a 
number of Logo and other programs and these will appear in a future 
edition of the list. Remember folks I and relying on you to get the list 
accurate and up to date. 












WACE LIBRARY MARK 2 


Page 1 


PROG NAME 

TYPE 

DESCRIPTION 

PROS NO 

TAPE NO 

STATUS 

CHICKEN 

GAME 

BASIC. CHICKEN CROSSING ROAD. VERY GOOD 

101 

3 

P 

GOLDMINER 

GAME 

?- 

102 

- 

? 

NUMBER BATTLE 

GAME 

?- 

103 

- 

? 

BREAKOUT 

GAME 

?- 

104 


P 

SHOOTING STAR 

GAME 

?- 

105 

- 

? 

SAUCER LAUNCH 

GAME 

BASIC. SHOOT CLAY PI6E0NS 

106 

«*•- 

? 

TINE TRIAL 

GAME 

7- 

107 

3 

P 

ATTACK 

GAME 

?- 

108 

- 

? 

LUNAR LANDER 

GAME 

?- 

109 

4 

P 

STARBASE 13 

GAME 

BASIC. SHOOT ENEMY FROM YOUR STAR BASE 

110 

- 

? 

FOODS 

SAME 

7- 

111 

- 

? 

HART IAN EXPLORER GAME 

BASIC. FLY OVER AND LAND ON MARTIAN TERRAIN. GOOD 

112 

2 

P 

SOL I TARE 

GAME 

BASIC. CARD GAME CALLED PATIENCE IN NZ. GOOD 

113 

2 

P 

ALIEN INVADERS 

GAME 

7- 

201 

- 

? 

OIL MINER 

GAME 

BASIC. MANY PLAYERS DRILL FOR OIL. GOOD 

202 

S 

P 

KORD SCRAMBLE 

GAME 

7- 

203 

- 

? 

SUPERFONT 

UTILITY 

7- 

204 

- 

? 

WORD SEARCH 

EDUCAT 

BASIC. FIND NORDS IN LETTER MATRIX 

205 

3 

P 

CONCENTRATION 

EDUCAT 

BASIC 

206 

- 

? 

HOUSE CHICAGO 

ADVENT 

BASIC. THREE PARTS TO PROGRAM. 

207 

- 

? 

HOUSE CHICAGO 

ADVENT 

SECOND PART OF PROGRAM 

208 

- 

? 

HOUSE CHICAGO 

ADVENT 

THIRD PART OF PROGRAM 

210 

- 

? 

SABOTAGE 

GAME 

BASIC 

211 

- 

? 

MASTER GOLF 

GAME 

BASIC. PLAY GOLF 

301 

- 

? 

BLOCKADE 

GAME 

?- 

302 

- 

? 

BOING 

GAME 

BASIC. BARNEY BOUNCING ON A TRAMPOLINE. GOOD 

303 

• - 

? 

STRATA BLASTER 

GAME 

BASIC 

304 


? 

SUPER CHASE 

GAME 

BASIC 

305 

_ 

? 

PIAZZA HOTEL 

ADVENT 

BASIC 

306 

— 

? 

ENGINEER 

GAME 

BASIC 

307 

- 

7 

DOUBLE CANNON 

GAME 

BASIC 

308 


? 

CRANING 

EDUCAT 

BASIC 

309 


? 

CAVE 

GAME 

?- 

310 

- 

? 

LASER BARRAGE 

GAME 

BASIC 

311 

_ 

? 

SUPER FONT 

UTILITY 

CHARACTER SET EDITOR 

312 


? 

SKI 

GAME 

BASIC. SKI DOWN SLOPE 

313 

. 

? 

TOCATTA 

MUSIC 

BASIC. PLAYS ? TOCATTA 

401 


? 

JUGGLER 

SAME 

BASIC. JUGGLE BALLS 

402 


? 

DUEL 

GAME 

?- 

403 

- 

? 

PLAY KISS HELPER UTILITY 

BASIC. HELPS CONSTRUCT PLAYERS AND MISSILES 

404 

2 

P 

STELLAR DEFENDER SAME - 

BASIC 

405 


? 

THUNDER BIRD 

GAME 

BASIC 

406 

„ 

? 

WILD STRAHBERIES 

SAME 

BASIC. SIMILAR TO OXYGEN. FAIR 

407 

- 

? 

SUB HUNTER 

GAME 

BASIC. BIT SLOW 

408 

- 

? 

AIR LOCK 

GAME 

BASIC. ESCAPE FROM NUCLEAR EMERGENCY 

409 

- 

? 

DOCTOR WHO 

ADVENT 

BASIC. DOCTOR WHO MAIN PROGRAM 

410 

- 

? 

DOCTOR NHO 

ADVENT 

BASIC. INITIALISES DOCTOR NHO 

411 

- 

? 

COPY CAT 

GAHE/EDU 

BASIC. SAME AS SIMON. GOOD 

501 

5 

P 

POKER 

GAME 

BASIC. PLAY POKER WITH ATARI.NAS ZXGi.MOD'D BY KNH 502 

3 

P 

PUCKNAN 

GAME 

BASIC. LIKE PACKMAN. FOR PET, MOD’D BY KNH 

503 

- 

? 

IMHOTEP 

EDUCAT 

BASIC. FOR APPLE, MGD’D BY KNH 

504 


? 

CASINO ROYALE 

GAME 

BASIC. PLAY CASINO GAMES. NEEDS IMPROVING (KNH) 

505 

- 

? 

HAUNTED 

ADVENT 

BASIC. FOR ACORN. HQD’D BY KWH 

506 

- 

? 

BOMBER 

GAME 

BASIC. SHOOT TARGETS. AVG 

507 

- 

? 

URANIUM 

GAME 

BASIC. NEEDS PADDLES 

508 

- 

? 



—- ¥• 


?■ .i^y g w i h -w 



WAGE LIBRARY MARK 2 Page 2 


PROG NtME 

TYPE 

DESCRIPTION 

PROG NO 

TAPE NO 

STATUS 

ORCHARD 

GAME 

?BASIC. CATCH APPLES FALLING FROM THE SKY 

50? 

- 

? 

COL’iR 3 DIH 

DEMO 

?- 

510 


? 

TAG 

GAME 

BASIC. 2 PLAYER TAG GAME 

511 

- 

? 

HORSE RACE 

GAME 

BASIC. RACE FOR MANY PLAYERS. GOOD 

512 

- 

? 

DIRECTORY 

UTILITY 

BASIC. LIST FORMAT. PROS TO DISPLAY DISK DIRECTORY 

SOI 

- 

P 

FROG 

GAME 

WONT LOAD OFF DISK 

602 

- 

P 

BATS 

GAME 

WONT LOAD OFF DISK 

603 

- 

P 

CHICKEN 

GAME 

WONT LOAD OFF THE DISK 

604 

- 

P 

BANKSHOT 

SAME 

BASIC. LIKE BILLIARDS 

605 

2 

P 

DOGGIES 

GAME 

BASIC. SWAP DOGS AROUND IN MIN NO OF MOVES 

606 

2 

P 

SLOT MACHINE 

GAME 

BASIC. PLAY THE SLOT MACHINE. AVG 

607 

2 

P 

ROBOT 

GAME 

BASIC 

603 

- 

P 

ROBOT 

GAME 

BASIC. DATA FOR ROBOT 

609 

- 

P 

BLACK JACK 

GAME 

BASIC. SAME AS PONTOON 

610 

- 

P 

FINANCE 

UTILITY 

BASIC. PERSONAL FINANCE PROGRAM. WONT LOAD !! 

701 

- 

P 

FINANCE I 

UTILITY 

BASIC. PART OF FINANCE. WONT LOAD OFF DISK 

702 

- 

P 

FINANCE INSTRUCT 

UTILITY 

INSTRUCTIONS FOR FINANCE 

703 

- 

P 

SEPERATOR 

UTILITY? 

BASIC 

704 

- 

P 

SAVER AND MOVER 

UTILITY 

BASIC. PUTS TAPS ON DISK 

705 

- 

P 

PLAY MISS HELP 

UTILITY 

BASIC. PLAYER MISSILE HELPER 

706 

- 

P 

GRAPHIC 7 HELPER UTILITY 

BASIC. GRAPHICS MODE 7 HELPER 

707 

- 

P 

RANDQHAX 

UTILITY 

BASIC 

CO 

•3> 

- 

P 

JONESTR 

UTILITY 

BASIC 

70? 

- 

P 

JSTRM32 

UTILITY? 

?- 

710 

- 

P 

LOADER C 

UTILITY 

BASIC. OBJECT CODE LOADER CHARACTER VERSION 

711 

- 

P 

LOADER D 

UTILITY? 

BASIC. OBJECT CODE LOADER DATA STATEMENT VERSION 

712 

- 

P 

MERRY CHRISTMAS 

CARD 

BASIC 

801 


P 

CHRISTMAS MUSIC 

MUSIC 

BASIC. PLAYS CHRISTMAS CAROLS. 

802 


P 

GOBBLER 

GAME 

BASIC. LIKE PACMAN. BIT SLOW BUT GOOD 

803 

- 

P 

BALLOONS 

GAME 

?- 

804 

- 

P 

GRUBS 

GAME 

?- 

805 

- 

P 

TIGER 

GAME 

BASIC 

306 

- 

P 

EGGS 

GAME 

BASIC. CATCH EGGS FALLING OUT OF THE SKY. AVG 

CO 

<£> 

--4 

3 

P 

CASTLE HEX 

GAME 

?- 

80S 

4 

P 

TINY TEXT 

BUSINESS 

BASIC. WORD PROCESSOR PROGRAM. GOOD 

809 

3 

P 

JTERMODEM 

MODEM 

?- 

816 

- 

P 

MERRY CHRISTMAS? ? 

?- 

901 

- 

P 

MODEM 

MODEM 

?- 

962 

- 

P 

MEMORY DUMP 

UTILITY 

BASIC. DUMPS MEMORY TO SCREEN 

903 

- 

P 

GALLERY 

? 

?- 

964 

- 

P 

LUNAR 

GAME 

?- 

905 

- 

P 

DATA MAKE 

?- 

?- 

966 

- 

P 

PLUS AND ZERO 

GAME 

?- 

907 

- 

P 

SCEEN 

?- 

?- 

90S 

- 

P 

MOON 

?- 

7- 

909 

- 

P 

HUNCHERS 

GAME 

?- 

916 

- 

P 

CIPHER 6 

?- 

?- 

911 

- 

P 

TRUCKS 

GAME 

?- 

912 


P 

TIME TRIAL 

?- 

7- 

913 

- 

P 

INVENTORY 

BUSINES? 

7- 

914 

- 

P 

ROMAN CLOCK 

DEMO 

?- 

915 

- 

P 

SCRL1 ? 

?- 

?- 

916 

- 

P 

CRTL1 ? 

0 - 

?- 

917 

- 

P 

TINYTEXT 

BUSINESS 

BASIC. WORD PROCESSOR PROGRAM 

918 

- 

? 

GUESS THE ANIMAL EDUCAT 

BASIC. COMPUTER GUESSES ANIMAL YOU ARE THINKING OF 1601 

6 

P 



WACE LIBRARY MARK 2 Page 3 


PROS NAME 

TYPE 

DESCRIPTION 

PROG NB 

TAPE NO 

STATUS 

MINOR AND MAJOR 

MUSIC 

?- 

1BB2 


? 

UXB 

GAME 

?- 

1BB3 

- 

? 

BOGGLER 

?- 

?- 

1BB4 

- 

7 

CATACOMB PHA 

ADVENT 

7- 

10B5 

- 

? 

MASTER MAZE 

GAME 

?- 

1BB6 

- 

7 

SAFARI LAND ? 

EDUCAT 

?- 

1BB7 

- 

? 

MUSIC SCALE 

EDUCAT 

?- 

1008 


? 

ASE GUESSER 

EDUCAT 

?- 

1B89 

..... 

? 

SOLAR SYSTEM 

DEMO 

?- 

1010 

- 

? 

LEYET 

GAME 

?- 

1011 

- 

? 

TITAN 

GAME 

?- 

1012 

- 

? 

TITAN 

6 AME 

TITAN PART 2 

1013 

- 

? 

HARVEY NALL 

?- 

7- 

1014 

- 

? 

SPACE RESCUE 

?- 

?- 

1B15 

- 

7 

SHOKEY 

GAME 

?- 

1101 

- 

? 

POKER SQUARE 

SAME 

?- 

1182 

- 

? 

ATARI BLASTER 

GAME 

?- 

1103 


7 

GAMBLER 

GAME 

?- 

11B4 

- 

? 

DEFENSE 

GAME 

?- 

1105 

- 

? 

STRATEGY STRIKE 

7 - 

?- 

1186 

- 

? 

SI 8 IDRAFT 

DRAW 

BASIC. DRAW SIMPLE COLOURED SHAPES. AVS 

1201 

- 

? 

FLIP IT 

GAME 

?- 

1202 

- 

? 

WATERFALL 

PICTURE 

BASIC. DRAWS PICTURE OF WATERFALL WITH SOUND 

1203 

- 

7 

BULL AND COWS 

7- 

HOW TO USE IT 

1204 

_ 

? 

OLD MACDONALD 

?- 

?- 

12B6 

• 

? 

LETTER AND NO 

EDUCAT 

?- 

1287 

. 

7 

ONE ON ONE 

GAME 

?- 

1208 


? 

JUMPING JACK 

GAME 

7- 

1289 


? 

DEFLECTOR 

GAME 

?- 

1210 

• 

? 

MATH FUN 

EDUCAT 

?- 

1211 

_ 

? 

TYPING TEACH 

EDUCAT 

?- 

1212 

_ 

? 

STUNTMAN 

?- 

?- 

1213 

• 

? 

WORD SCRAMBLE 

?- 

?- 

1214 

• 

? 

SPEED READING 

EDUCAT 

?- 

1215 


? 

SCREAMING DEMON 

GAME 

BASIC. PINBALL MACHINE 

1301 

7 

P 

BLOK 

GAME 

?- 

1302 


7 

DIGITIZER 

UTILITY 

? 

1303 


7 

CHUTES 

GAME 

?- 

1384 


? 

MUSIC KEYBOARD 

UTILITY? 

? 

1305 

• 

? 

VIDEO SB 

UTILITY 

BASIC. PRINTS 8 B COLUMNS TO SCREEN 

1386 

. 

? 

VIDEO SB 

UTILITY 

BASIC. DEMO PROGRAM FOR VIDEO SB 

1387 


? 

VIDEO 8 B 

UTILITY 

BASIC. PART OF VIDEO SB 

13B8 


? 

CASSETTE TO DISK 

UTILITY 

?- 

1309 


? 

DISK SPEED TEST 

UTILITY 

7- 

1310 


7 

FRONTIER 

DEMO 

?- 

1481 

_ 

? 

HOME BUDGET 

UTILITY 

?- 

1402 


7 

SPACEMINES 

GAME 

?- 

1483 


7 

WIZARD'S SWORD 

GAME 

BASIC. PART 1 OF GAME 

1404 

— 

? 

WIZARD’S SWORD 

ADVENT 

BASIC. PART 2 OF PROGRAM 

1405 


? 

WIZARD’S SWORD 

ADVENT 

BASIC. PART 3 OF PROGRAN 

I486 


? 

FLIP IT 

GAME 

BASIC. SAME AS OTHELLO OR REVERSI. GOOD 

1487 


7 

BAUDOT PRINTER 

UTILITY 

?- 

1488 

•» 

7 

FINANCE 

UTILITY 

?- 

1409 

. " 

? 

MICROTEXT 

UTILITY 

7- 

1410 


? 

TEXT READING 

UTILITY 

?- 

1411 

- 

? 





sir' twt*' 






WACE LIBRARY MARK 2 


Page 4 


~7 


PROG NAME 

TYPE 

DESCRIPTION 

PROG N0 

TAPE NO 

STATUS 

PiiKEY NOTICE 

MUSIC 

BASIC. NOTICE FOR POKEY PLAYER 

1581 

_ 

7 

POKY PLAYER 

MUSIC 

BASIC. PLAYER PROGRAM 

1562 

- 

7 

POKEY COMPILER 

MUSIC 

BASIC. COMPILER PQR POKEY PLAYER 

1503 

- 

7 

POKEY EDITOR 

MUSIC 

BASIC. POKEY PLAYER EDITOR 

1504 

- 

7 

FLICKER 

DEMO ? 

7 - 

1505 

- 

7 

SPIRAL GRAPHS 

DEMO 

?- 

1506 

- 

7 

PLAYER 3 

?- 

?- 

1507 

- 

7 

PLAYER 2 

7 - 

7 - 

1508 

- 

7 

PFINIT ? 

7 - 

7 - 

15@9 

- 

7 

CHECKING 

?- 

?- 

1510 

- 

7 

CAR RACE 

GAME 

?- 

1511 

- 

7 

ROAD LOCK 

7 - 

7 - 

1512 

- 

7 

CASSETTE DISK 

?- 

?- 

1601 

- 

7 

TRAPPED 

GAME 

7 

1602 

- 

7 

TRAPPED 

7 

SECOND PART OF PROGRAM 

1603 

- 

7 

TRAPPED 

? 

THIRD PART OF PROGRAM 

1604 

* 

7 

DATABASE SORT 

UTILITY 

7 

1605 

- 

7 

DATABASE SORT 

UTILITY 

SECOND PART OF PROGRAM 

1606 

- 

7 

DOODLE 

DEMO 

? 

1607 

- 

7 

GR 9 DISPLAY 

DEMO 

? 

1603 

- 

7 

GR 11 DISPLAY 

DEMO 

7 

1609 

• 

7 

ABOUT TINE 

? 

? 

1610 

- 

? 

MINI GOLF 

GAME 

7 - 

1611 

- 

7 

POKER SQUARE 

GAME 

7 

1612 

- 

7 

SHQKEY 

GAME 

7 

1701 

- 

7 

VOLCANO 

ADVENT 

7 

1702 

- 

7 

VOLCANO 

ADVENT 

SECOND PART OF PROGRAM 

1703 


7 

GTIA DEHQ 

DEMO 

7 

1704 

- 

7 

GR 9 DEHQ 

DEMO 

7 

1705 

- 

7 

ATLANTIS 

7 

7 

1706 


7 

STATES 

EDUCAT 

7 

1801 

• 

7 

REHSAHES 

EDUCAT 

7 

1802 

• 

7 

SLIDE 

EDUCAT 

7 

1803 

- 

7 

FUNCTION 

EDUCAT 

7 

1804 

• 

7 

HENDRY PRO 

EDUCAT 

7 

1805 

• 

7 

KULT 

EDUCAT 

7 

’ 1806 

- 

7 

FLAGS 

EDUCAT 

7 

1807 

- 

7 

SI NON 

EDUCAT 

7 

1901 

. 

7 

BEGINTYP 

EDUCAT 

7 

1902 

• 

7 

NATHPKG 

EDUCAT 

7 

1903 

_ 

7 

STATES 

EDUCAT 

? 

1904 

• 

7 

AMERICAS 

EDUCAT 

7 

• 1905 

- 

7 

METRICS 

EDUCAT 

7 

1906 

- 

7 

SPELLBEE 

EDUCAT 

7 

1907 


7 

MEMORY PRO 

EDUCAT 

7 

1908 


7 

MATH PRO 

EDUCAT 

7 

1909 

• 

7 

NUNBERS 15 

EDUCAT 

7 

1910 

- 

7 

NMBER LI 

EDUCAT 

7 

1911 

• 

7 

TOUCH 

EDUCAT 

7 

2001 

- 

7 

PRESCHL 

EDUCAT 

7 

2002 

_ 

7 

SCRAMS 14 

EDUCAT 

7 

2003 

- 

7 

WRDNATE 36 

EDUCAT 

7 

2004 

• 

7 

DRAGNET 48 

EDUCAT 

7 

2005 

• 

7 

MADLIB 

EDUCAT 

7 

20@6 

- 

7 

HANGMAN 

EDUCAT 

7 

2007 

; - 

7 





WAGE LIBRARY MARK 2 Page 5 


PROS NAME 

TYPE 

DESCRIPTION 

PROG N0 

TAPE NO 

STATUS 

FUNCTION 

EDUCAT 

? 

2008 


7 

MINUTE NTH 

EDUCAT 

? 

2009 

- 

? 

HATH2 

EDUCAT 

? 

2016 

- 

? 

ELLIPSE 

EDUCAT 

7 

2011 ' 

• 

? 

MATHWARS 

EDUCAT 

? 

2101 

- 

? 

ODDEVEN 

EDUCAT 

? 

2102 

- 

? 

PLURALS 

EDUCAT 

? 

2103 

- 

? 

VERBS 

EDUCAT 

? 

2104 

- 

? 

NOUNS 

EDUCAT 

? 

2105 

- 

? 

QUIZ PRO 

EDUCAT 

? 

2106 

- 

? 

C0PY8UIZ 

EDUCAT 

? 

2107 

- 

? 

HANGQUOT 

EDUCAT 

? 

2108 

- 

? 

GE08UIZ 

EDUCAT 

? 

2109 

• 

? 

HOONIND 

EDUCAT 

? 

2110 

- 

? 

HELP SYS 

EDUCAT 

? 

2111 

- 

? 

8 UIZHELF 

EDUCAT 

7 

2112 

- 

7 

LWRCASE GR2 

EDUCAT 

? 

2113 

- 

? 

BAGELS 

EDUCAT 

? 

2201 

- 

7 

TRAP 

EDUCAT 

? 

2202 

- 

7 

GEOGRAPHY 

EDUCAT 

? 

2203 

- 

? 

ROMANS 

EDUCAT 

? 

2204 

- 

? 

MLTBINGO 

EDUCAT 

? 

2205 

- 

? 

SCRAMNDS 

EDUCAT 

? 

2206 

- 

? 

SINENAVE 

EDUCAT 

? 

2207 

- 

7 

HANGMAN 

EDUCAT 

? 

• 2208 

• 

? 

BOURREAU 

EDUCAT 

? 

2209 

- 

? 

FANROSE 

EDUCAT 

? 

2210 


7 

NMSTATES 

EDUCAT 

? 

2211 

- 

? 

MATH8UIZ 

EDUCAT 

? 

2212 

- 

? 

STATECAP 

EDUCAT 

? 

2213 

- 

? 

TONER 

? 

? 

2301 

- 

? 

KNI6HTS- 

7 

BASIC. RESCUE THE FAIR MAIDEN FROM THE TONER 

2302 

- 

? 

CRICKETS 

GAME 

BASIC? CRICKETS AND CONVEYOR BELTS 

2303 

- 

? 

MOTTIE 

GAME 

BASIC? CAN YOU CORNER THE MOTTIE FORCES 

2304 

- 

? 

WILD NEST 

GAME 

BASIC? THE NILD AND NOOLY NEST 

2305 

- 

? 

OLD MAC 

GAME 

BASIC? EDUCATIONAL HATCH GAME 

2306 

- 

? 

GTIA PAD 

UTILITY 

BASIC. GRAPHICS TOOL 

2307 

• 

? 

SHUTTLE 

? 

? 

2308 

- 

7 

GR 9 Mi! 69 

UTILITY 

BASIC. GRAPHIC 9 SCREEN DUMP TO EPSON PRINTER 

2309 

- 

? 

P 

7 

7 

2310 


? 

LANDER 7 

? 

? 

2401 

- 

? 

HELLO 

? 

? 

2402 

- 

? 

TINY TEXT 2 

UTILITY 

? 

2403 

- 

? 

CITYSCRL 

? 

? 

2404 

- 

? 

ESGSNTCH 

? 

? 

2405 

. **■ 

? 

RAM TEST 

UTILITY 

? 

2406 

- 

7 

HATHHARS 

? 

7 

2407 

- 

? 

PLURALS 

EDUCAT 

? 

2408 

- 

? 

HELI 

? 

? 

2409 

- 

7 

SOUNDS 

? 

? ife ■ 

2410 

- 

? 

CUBE 

? 

? 

2411 

- 

? 

PMHELP 

? 

? 

2412 

- 

? 

QUICK DOS 

? 

? 

2501 


7 

QUICK DOS 

? 

? 

• 2502 

- 

7 

8 MENU 

? 

? 

2503 

- 

7 



WACE LIBRARY MARK 2 


Page 6 


PROS NAME 

TYPE 

DESCRIPTION 

PROS N9 

TAPE NO 

STATUS 

8 UIK DOS 

? 

? 

2504 


? 

S MENU 

? 

? 

2505 * 

- 

? 

8 UIK DOS 

7 

? 

2504 

~ 

? 

CANNIBAL 

? 

? 

2507 

- 

? 

STARBLSESB 

? 

? 

2508 

- 

? 

DEPTH CR6 SB 

? 

? 

2509 

- 

? 

HPLQADER 

? 

? 

2510 

- 

? 

MPL0ADER2 

? 

? 

2511 

- 

? 

DECHEX 

? 

? 

2512 

- 

? 

DECHEX 

? 

? 

2513 

- 

? 

HEXDEC 

? 

? 

2514 

- 

? 

HEXDEC 

? 

? 

2515 

- 

? 

MISSILE 

? 

? 

2514 

- 

? 

ATRAIN 

? 

? 

2517 

- 

? 

SUSS 

? 

? 

2518 

- 

? 

Nxse 

? 

? 

2519 

- 

? 


RECORD CQUNT= 291 




IO 


WE WILL HAVE YOU TAGGED or IS IT 1984? 

i 0 

■■■■;■■ the last Club Committee meeting it was decided that we would 

start issuing name tags to all members when they attend club meetings. 
What we are going to do is have a plastic pin—on tag tor everyone in the 
club. These will be kept in some semi logical order in a box at the door 
.so that when members arrive they will take their name tag and wear it 
throughout the meeting. Come pumpkin hour and we have to leave, the 
tags will be handed back as you go out the door ready tor the next time 
you attend a meeting. 


There were two reasons why the Committee decided to do this. 
Firstly to ensure that everyone gets to know everyone's name. It you 
are like most ot us you torget someones name about 3€>0 milliseconds 
atter being told. We think this will help members ot the club get to 
know each other especially members who turn up tor the tirst time. 


The second reason is that we have some suspicions that one or two 
people turn up to the meetings and are not members. That is they have 
not paid their subscriptions. While we cannot point the tinger at anyone 
and don't like making allegations, we have our doubts. What will happen 
now is all those club members who have by definition paid their 
subscriptions will have a name tag to wear. Anyone who is not a club 
member and does not have a tag will be allowed to attend one meeting 
and thereafter be expected to join the club. 


I am sure that you all agree it is a good idea to introduce name 
tags. Just one minor point. The first time we try this there will no 
doubt be some things which go wrong like your name is spelt wrong or 
we don't know your first name or you have paid up already but we didn't 
make you a tag or heaven forbid we have made you a tag and you haven't 
paid up. If anything is incorrect then tell whoever'is manning (can 
anyone de-sex this word) the door and we will fix it. You shouln't have 

any problem talking to the person because they should be wearing their 
name tag. 






**STOP PRESS**STOP PRESS**STOP PRESS**STOP PRESS**STOP PRESS** 

FOR SALE: Kevin Holland (tel 694.838) has two disks for sale at $30 each: 
(a) Jump-man (32K) 

Cb) Dimension X 


MESSAGE FROM JENNY: Disk Drive, Memory Upgrade and 800XL:I'm still waiting for 
all of these at the time of writing. 


CLUB TAPES: BUGS AND THINGS 

Several members have reported problems with the last educational tape (#13). 
Here are some answers, with corrections supplied by Lonny Carey: 

MEET THE ROMANS 

This is a 16K+ program. Sorry we forgot to label it as such. 

BAGELS 

PROBLEM: During the program the ESC key is used for the option of finishing. 
This is a disk option, so for the cassette version delete L.10000 or change it to 
10000 END 

CANNIBALS AND MISSIONARIES. 

PROBLEM: Program crashes at beginning - error message unreadable. This is a 
lack-of-mempry fault for 16K. To correct, delete all REMarks - kill lines 
10,20,30,40,50,1760,1800,1950 and half the instructions (lines 2040-2058) 

MEMORY MATCH 

Several people have reported non-loading but we haven’t had time to check this 
one out yet. Could be another inadvertent 16K inclusion. 

OIL MINER (Club tape #?) 

PROBLEM: If there is more than one player and only one joystick, the other 
players must use control-arrows and RETURN. To correct: 

Change L.90 to 90 JS=STICK(0): IF JS=15 THEN RETURN 
Change L.95 to 95 TRIG=STRIG(0): IF TRIG THEN RETURN 
This suggests what to do if you have a 600XL with only 2 joystick ports and a 3 
or 4 player game written in Basic. 

HOWEVER 

The club makes up tapes in large numbers, and gets only occasional 

feedback. Please tell Des which programs you thought were good, which okay but 
could be improved, which you thought disappointing. We need those comments, 
positive and negative. 

This page written on a L0GITEC printer using an AXIOM AT-846 interface from 
COMPUTER PALACE; 600XL with AtariWriter. 






BY LOUISE KEHOE IN CALIFORNIA 


_ “ WHAT CAN a home com¬ 
puter do? What use is to to 

I me?" Such basic consumer 
questions cut through the hyper¬ 
bole and rhetoric that surround 
the home computer industry. 

Like the child who shouted 
“ the emperor has no clothes ” 
in Hans Christian Andersen’s 
fairy tale, they reveal a web of 
pretence. Surely, everybody 
knows what a home computer 
docs, don’t they ? 

Not accordin': to some of the 
leading U.S. makers. Answering 
these basic questions is the 
biggest challenge facing home 
computer \anufacturers. 

according to Mr Don Esferidee. • 
president of IBM Entry Systems 
Division which nroduces the 
IBM “ nc.” As TRM prooares to 
enter the consumer market with 
a U.S.SfiOO to U.S.5700 home 
computer called Peanut, the 
computer giant is still trying 
to work out what its home com¬ 
puters wilt be used for, he 
reveals. 

Past exnerirncc- of computer 
use offers them little help. “Our 
market research tells us that 
two-thirds of the (JBMV pcs 
sold arc used for some kind of 
business application, and two- 
thirds are located in the home.” 
says Esteridge. IBM knows 
what businesses do with com¬ 
puter, and personal computers, 
“but* people don’t Think like 
businesses, and they don’t want 
to," says Esteridge. 

“ I like to describe a personal 
computer as a productivity 
tool, but when I tell my neigh¬ 
bours that, I get a blank stars. 
They are quite happy with their 
typewriter, they have no prob¬ 
lems balancing their cheque¬ 
books with paper, pen and 
calculator, and they are" quite 
comforable with shoe-box files. 

*• We can tell them that com¬ 
puters are fun, that they are 
creative, that they are an 
Investment in the future.” But 
thore answers, Esteridge says, 
are not enough if the computer 
“fad" is to endure to become 
a long-term consumer market. 
:hciHome computer users fall 
into four categories, according 
to Apple Computer. They are 
concerned parents who buy 
computers to give their child¬ 
ren a head start in the computer 


age. They are people with a 
practical — often job-related — 
purpose such as writing a book. 

Others are ” anti-obsoletists ” 
who fear being left behind in 
the rush of new technology, or 
they are hobbyists who just like 
playing with computers. 

In the U.S., they will buy a 
total of 5m units valued at 
US$2bn. This year, according 
to Future Computing, a Richard¬ 
son, Texas, market research 
firm, the researchers predict 
that by 1988 annual sales will 
rise to a staggering 15.8m units 


micro 


ing the glamour of home com¬ 
puters.” says Apple Computer 
marketing manager Chris 
Bowman. Advertisements fea¬ 
turing movie stars do not 
address the real issue of the 
value of the computer to the 
consumer, he stresses. “We 
should be publicising real 
applications. 

“ It is hype to tell the world 
that home computers are ‘user 
friendly.’ Saying that ‘every¬ 
one will soon own a home com¬ 
puter’ is not true, and may in 
fact build up consumer resist- 


“ I like to describe a personal computer as a pro¬ 
ductivity tool, but when I tell my neighbours that, 
I get a blank stare ” 


worth close to USS6bn. The 
figures specifically exclude com¬ 
puters that serve dual office/ 
home applications. 

To live up to those predic¬ 
tions, home computer makers 
. are beginning to recognise that 
they must discard the preten¬ 
sions and exaggerations that 
have surrounded the commer¬ 
cialisation of the home 
. computer. ■ 

To extend the use of home 
i computers beyond previously 
i identified consumer groups, 
: manufacturers must find more 
1 practical applications for their 
i machines, they are beginning to 
i recognise. 

“ The industry has been sell- 


ancc. People do not like to be 
told what they are going to 
do. 

“If the public’s perceptions 
of home computer applications 
do not catch up with reality, 
then the home computer 
market will falter. The home 
computer could become the 
crockpot of the late 1980s—a 
hype and bust market.” 

What will a home computer 
do for the average consumer? 
Atari president of computer 
sales Don Kingsborough offers 
the blunt answer: “not very 
much.” 

“We have got to stop over¬ 
promising—selling computers 






1 ‘ » i tv L 


with the promise that they will 
change peoples lives.” 

Software will eventually pro¬ 
vide the answers to what a 
home computer does, but so far 
the software does not live up 
to the promises the industry is 
making, he believes. 

“The industry is scrambling 
to keep up with its publicity,” 
says Dan Ross, vice-president 
of Timex Computer Corporation 
which sells Sinclair-designed 
home computers in the U.S. 
“The central issue is that the 
consumer is confused.” lie com¬ 
pares the home computers 
offered today to the first con¬ 
sumer-priced automobile, the 
Ford Model T. 

“The Model T sold because 
it met a basic need that was 
evident to the consumer. Can 
we say the same of the home 
computer?” he asks. “There is 
a lack of clarity in this indus¬ 
try, we have not clearly 
answered a consumer need. We 
use high technology jargon and 
we continually discount prices.” 
The net effect 'is frustration for 
the consumer, says Mr Ross. 

So far, the industry appears 
to have identified the issues, but 
not to have come up with satis¬ 
factory answers. Some lay the 
problem of finding real applica¬ 
tions for the home computer on 
the shoulders of software pro¬ 
ducers. Others believe that if 
home computers are cheap 
enough the consumer will work 
out what to do with them. 

“Interest in home computers 
is self generating,” says 
Myrddin Jones, vice president 
of marketing for Commodore 
Business Machines, which has 
led the decline in home com¬ 
puter prices to become the lead¬ 
ing home computer manufac¬ 
turer in the U.S. 

He suggests that the indus¬ 
try should be concerned with 
making home computers easier 
to usf, offeryjg greater support 
and training to retailers and 
consumers, making the 
machines interactive with other 
- home electronics products such 
as video disc players and with 
improving the “playability” of 
home computers with better 
graphics. 













• ■«.: * >.< ; 
’** *W’ -V ' 

i’i?--•'#•'*' 


|6 


THE 


ASIAN WALL S' 




Personal Computers Inspire 

agazines 5 but Shakeout Seen 


OP FIVE MICROCOMPUTER 
CONSUMER MAGAZINES 


<*} 

.v?,; 


3- 


£. 

f 

}' 


yx%- ■ 

■ ;■ By Theresa Engstrom 

Special to The Asian Wafl Stteet Journal 

V-'L' BOSTON — John Hayes, associate pub- 
. * Usher of Byte magazine, was mystified when 
he got a flurry of reader complaints that the 

• November issue — the largest ever with 728 
r-Vpages — was late. When Mr. Hayes 

Investigated, lie found that the issue hadn’t 

• only been a recordbreaker, • but a 
backbreaker as well. 

“The problem was a basic reluctance on 
the part of mailmen to carry it,” says Mr. 
Hayes. “Wherever mailmen still carry the 
mail on their backs, the magazines were 
being delivered three or four at a time over 
the course of a week or two.” 

These days it isn't uncommon for 
mailmen to be slinging computer magazines 
thicker than telephone books. There are 9.1 
million personal computers in the U.S., and 
last year the 14 largest computer magazines 

• alone carried $116 million of advertising 
aimed at their owners — a 122% increase 
from a year earlier. 

That much money looking for a home has 
inspired a rash of publications. Depending on 
how “magazine" and “computer" are 
defined, there arc 150 to 400 computer maga¬ 
zines on the market. About a dozen maga¬ 
zines cover only International Business Ma¬ 
chines Corp.'s Personal Computer; there’s 
PC. PC World and PC Week, for starters. By 
one count, 60 new magazines devoted to 
• personal computing appeared last year. 

Survival of the Fittest 
. The field may be too crowded to sustain 
that pace. “1 believe that 30 or 40 books may 
fold this year," says James Callan, vice 
president at C Systems Ltd., a market re¬ 
search firm. He’s considered an optimist, he' 
adds. Some people in the advertising indus¬ 
try predict that 80% of the existing computer 
magazines will go under. 

: Every magazine hopes to survive by carv¬ 
ing its own niche in the market. But with so 
much space to fill between ads and so many 
similar publications, that’s not easy. 

“There’s a lot of redundancy in the edito¬ 
rial,” notes Sheila Clarke, who reads 57 
computer magazines every month for 
Adscope Inc., a Goldendale, Washington, re- 
'searchfirm. 

Ip the February issue of Byte, there were 
articles titled "Benchmarks and Perfor¬ 
mance Evaluation,” “Don’t Bench Me In” 

. and “Benchmark Confessions." Other topics 
in the magazines range from the zany (“PC 
Passion and Other Romances”) to the in¬ 
scrutable (“MSPRO: MS-DOS on the S-100 
Bus”). 

Virtually all the ads are for computers 
and related items. Computer-mag; zine read¬ 
ers might seem like a good audi nee for 
other advertisers, but readers have criticized 
’ magazines that have tried running non- 
" computer ads. They say they read the maga¬ 
zines as much for the ads as for the editorial 
copy. ■ *' 

Many of the magazines were begun by 
entrepreneurs. Allan and Margot Comstock 
Tommervik started their first magazine, 
Softalk, for Apple computer users on $40,000 


in seed money. Less than four years later, 
the Tommerviks value their four : magazine : 
empireat about $12 million. 

Now big companies are seizing the mar¬ 
ket, either by buying magazines or starting 
new ones. » 

McGraw-Hill Inc. bought Byte and Popu¬ 
lar Computing from a New Hampshire entre¬ 
preneur, Virginia Londoner, in 1979. Both are 
among the most popular and lucrative. An 
industry researcher describes Popular 
Computing as “plain vanilla," but adds, “It’s 
done well. When McGraw-Hill chooses to put 
out a magazine, they know how to do it.” 

The first magazines to suffer from the 
heated competition have been some of those 
aimed at a general computing audience. 
Magazines targeted at beginning computer 
users run into trouble, too, when the user 
outgrows them. For those reasons, such well- 
known magazines as Micro Discovery and 
Desktop Computing were killed in the past 
year. Another general magazine. 
Microcomputing, is being revamped by its 
owner, CW Communications Inc., to appeal 
to more-sophisticated readers. 

Hayden Publishing Co. has tried to avoid 
the entry-level problems by publishing a 
more advanced version of its Personal 
Computing, designed to appeal to secorid- 
■and third-year readers. When subscribers 
send in their renewal notices, they automati¬ 
cally start receivingthe “enhanced” version, 
says William Wooven, circulation director. 

One fairly safe route seems to be to 
devote the magazine to a winning computer 
model like the IBM PC. CW Communica¬ 
tions’ PC World, which began last year, 
expects total revenue of about $30 million 
this year, up from $13 million last year. 

, It’s important to bet on the right model, 
though. Advertising sales have been 
“clisappointing” for a magazine devoted to 
Digital Equipment Corp, personal comput¬ 
ers, says Patrick Kenealy, editor of Digital 
Review. That’s probably because sales of. 
Digital’s personal computers have been slug¬ 
gish. And a would-be publisher of a magazine 
for Timex-Sinclair users was caught by sur¬ 
prise when Timex announced it was quitting 
the home computer market just 10 days after 
he bought the magazine. 

Problems of Success, 

These so-called “machine specific” mag¬ 
azines make up about half the titles among 
personal computer magazines, with the trend 
toward an even narrower focus. There’s a 
magazine called UNIXAVorld, dedicated to 
an operating software system. Another mag¬ 
azine, Wall Street Computer Review, deals 
solely„with personal computer applications in 
the investment industry'. • ‘ 

Even great success, however, has its 
drawbacks. Some of. tM magazines are 
growing so fat that they’re testing the limits 
of print technology. . .. 

So publishers are trying to trim pages—;., 
while increasing profits. One way is to raised 
advertising rates. Compute!, owned by a unit. 
of ABC Publishing Cos., raised its rates 72%. 
last year.'Ad pages still rose 51%, but reve- ' 
nue increased about 400%. In January, the ■ 


• v v.’.rr-‘“ v; c 

■A. 


Ranked By Estimated 1983 

Gross Ad Revenues ' * 

Millions 

27.5 
16.8 

11.8 

9.7 

7.5 





creative 
competing 




Source: Communications Trends Inc., 
Larchmont, N.Y. 


magazine raised its rates again. 

Some publishers attempt to spin off anoth¬ 
er magazine to take some of the ad load. 
Hayden Publishing Co., owner of Personal 
Computing, last fall introduced a sequel. 
Personal Software. - 

As already-thick magazines increase 
their frequency, editors are desperate for 
copy. “We’re sweeping the paper off the 
floor” to fill the magazine, says an editor 
whose publication recently went from month¬ 
ly to twice a month. 

At least one magazine printed a list of 
programs that will run on the IBM PCjr — 
lifted directly from IBM press releases. And 
even in-the best.magazines, the almost sym¬ 
biotic relationship between computer maga¬ 
zines and ‘ the industry can lead to 
embarrassing boosterism. In the March is¬ 
sue of Byte, an editorial apologizes that “in 
some recent cases, Byte lias been guilty of 
insufficient editorial zeal in purging promo- 
tional material from certain articles.” 

Freelance writers, not traditionally 
known for their financial successes, doubly 
are finding the computer magazines a boor- 
at $750 to $1,000 per article. 

Technical knowledge is no longer a pre¬ 
requisite, either. “Once you know anything 
about computers, it’s easy to pop off 20 tips 
for $1,000,” says Paul Somerson, an editor at 
PC. Mi’. Somerson says he bought his first 
^computer to retype a pornographic novel and 
fell in love with the machine. He wrote 
article and submitted it to PC, and now he 
,spends his, days writing about computers 
instead of sex. -— 


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T.A.C. 

T-A.C. (Tactical Armor Command, Avalon Hill, $30.00) is a World War 
II armored simulation. You choose tanks, field guns, and infantry from 
any one of four countries (U.S., Great Britain, Germany, and Russia) 
You direct their attack upon the enemy forces. 

From the menu you choose one or two players, skill level (if playing 
the computer), any one of five scenarios, and the points each player 
gets for his forces (from 12 to 224). 

The game is a stepped-up version of the TANKTICS game (also by 
AVALON HILL). This time, the computer not only does all the com¬ 
putations, but controls the map as well. Each turn consists of several 
parts. The first part is tactical sighting. This is when the "active" unit 
looks for all units in its line of sight (friendly and enemy). Next is the 
strategic sighting. Now the tactical sighting is put on the overall map. 
Then comes the movement phase. Players set the speed for their 
units. Then comes the indirect fire phase. Armor units may fire in¬ 
directly at enemy units (both seen and unseen). Infantry and field guns 
may load/unload in this phase. Then comes the second part of the 
movement phase. When a player presses the button, the unit begins to 
move. Players can turn their units by moving the joystick, but it is very 
easy to oversteer. 

I love the indirect fire mode. With a squadron of tanks, a skilled 
player can wipe out most slow tanks, all dismounted field guns, and 
infantry halftracks. !n the engagement scenario, a player can lose half 
his force in a single turn. But to keep a player from losing interest too 
soon, there are four skill levels and four other scenarios. These range 
from static defense to stalemate. In some scenarios there are 
minefields to worry about, besides the other player. 

The graphics are excellent. The scrolling is outstanding. There is 
some sound, but this is not the same quality as the graphics. The 
game designer must have spent some time collecting all the Informa¬ 
tion on almost 40 different tanks. The computer determines the effec¬ 
tiveness of a shot by computing the armor thickness, weapon caliber 
time tracked, and speed. 

Overall, I think this is very good. But as a Squad Leader fan, I find a 
maximum of eight units constricting. And the map is not very large 
once a main battle tank gets rolling. This is one of the best wargames 
I've seen in a long time. 

—Aaron Ness 


DIMENSION X 

DIMENSION XfSynapse Software $30), aside from being a graphics 
spectacular is also very playable and "wears well." It is sort of a cross 
between STAR RAIDERS and Synapse's own game, ENCOUNTER 

The objective of DIMENSION X is to eliminate enemy saucers 
before they eliminate you and/or get control of the "Capital" 
(represented as a square on a grid map in the upper right corner of the 
screen display). 

As the game begins an intialization screen appears which give you 
choices as to the level you wish to play.the strength of your shields, 
and the number of alien saucers you wish to encounter. When you 
make these choices you are immediately projected to the main screen 
display — and what a display it 13 ! You are in the cockpit of your own 
ship looking over a scrolling 3-D landscape with mountains and tun¬ 
nels in the background and a biue sky and clouds overhead. Moving 
your joy stick forward moves your ship forward ove' the chsckerboa, d 
surface of the planet. You may also move back or from side to side by 
moving the joy stick. This visually gives you the effect of "zooming” in 
and out as well as traveling at great speed. 

Enemy saucers appear from time to time and fire at your ship. You 
either dodge their shots while firing back or your shields ere destroyed 
and the game ends. 

The top of the screen has, in addition to (1) the grid map, (2) a scan¬ 
ner to help you locate enemy saucers, (3) a fuel gauge, (4) a shield 
status indicator, as well as (5) a message board which warns you of 
various hazards. Despite all of these “aids" and the graphic display, 
the screen is not cluttered. 

To move from one grid to another it is necessary to pass through 
tunnels at the edge of each sector. In the tunnel the display changes. 
What you see is laterally shifting planes representing the edges of the 
tunnels and a series of gates which you either go over or under. If you 
hit the sides of the tunnel or do not avoid the gates you will sustain 
damage. At the novice level these gates are not difficult — but at 
higher levels with increased speed I got frustrated at times. 

One of the squares on the grid map ha.-, an "F" on it. This represents 
where you need to go to automatically replenish your fuel supply and 
to repair all damages sustained in battle. 

If you succeed in destroying all of the saucers you will be given a 
rating and classification on a final screen (shades of STARRAIDERS). 

I succeeded once in reaching a class 1 status mostly by luck. The 
highest level, labeled "Expert", is too fast for me to master as yet. 

This is a good game. It has had good staying power and variety 
There are a lot of subtleties to DIMENSION X which are discovered on¬ 
ly by playing it. I do very well on the battle field but not so hot 
maneuvering in the tunnels. The graphics alone make this game a wor¬ 
thy addition to the Atari repertoire. 

— Graham Smith 


BASIC XL 

I don’t impress easily. A product has to be quite good for me to give 
it the green light. In the case of BASIC XL ($99 OSS), I am impressed 
all over myself. I received my computer programming training on Main¬ 
frame computers. Most of these have extremely good editors and very 
powerful versions of BASIC. Needless to say, I wa3 rather shook when 
I bought my ATARI and found many of the high level commands I was 
used to were missing. And, while the ATARI editor is the best of all 
home computers, it still lacks many features. 

The first thing the programmer will notice is the improved editor. 
Automatic line numbering, built-in renumber, and block line deleting 
make it much easier to modify programs. Another powerful aid to pro¬ 
gramming is the TRACE function. The trace function is not be par¬ 
ticularly useful in graphic programming, as it kills all graphic mode 3 
and functions only in GR.O. On the other hand, if you are going buggy 
trying to find just where the extra characters crept into that siring, this 
is the ticket. 

There are other nice features to the editor, and some which are 
useable through the editor OR in deferred mode in programs. First, 
and probably the most desirable is the DIR(ectory) command, if you 
are like me you probably don't update your disk labels often enough. 
This makes it fun trying to find which disk has what. Also accessible 
are most of the standard DOS commands, which saves PLENTY of 
time if the program you are developing does any file manipulation, 
such as creating data files. All in all, the editor is among the nicer I 
have seen. The only more powerful editors are those on larger 
machines which COMPILE the basic programs prior to running them. 

One thing you will notice about BASIC XL right away is it runs 
FAST. Without any modifications to existing programs, any largeish 
program will run noticeably quicker. As an example, I booted MASTER- 
TYPE(tm) with BASIC XL in the computer. While the program was 
thinking it was running at 25 WPM, I counted 34 WPM. Again, this is 
with absolutely NO changes to 'he program. On top of this, there is a 
nifty command which comes in very handy. "FAST" tells the computer 
to do a basic pre-compile on the program. I won't take the time to ex¬ 
plain its operation here, but it can make a very significant differance in 
speed. 

One of the things that bothered me the most when I got my ATARI 
was the lack of string arrays. Once I got used to building my own str¬ 
ing arrays, I felt better and found that if I worked at it I could to 
anything other Basics could do. BUT, it took a lot of extra programm¬ 
ing. BASIC XL has all of the string handling fea'"res of the best micro¬ 
computer basics. Not just string arrays, but MIDS, LEFT$, and RIGHTS. 
Also included is the FIND command, which makes string searching 
quite a bit easier. This does not force you to use these commands, as 
the normal ATARI string handling features are also available. 

Not being a mathematician, and avoiding number crunching as 
scrupulously as possible, I couldn't see any changes in the math func¬ 
tions. So I compared the command lists in the ATARI BASIC and 
BASIC XL manuals. Sure enough, no changes. (At least none I could 
find). 

For people like myself who just LOATHE mucking about with the 
details of setting up and manipulating PLAYER MISSILE graphics, 
there are a whole flock of commands to simplify the process of using 
PMo. This should open the use of PMG to many programmers who 
have avoided it in the past. 

Let's not forget the error codes. ATARI BASIC simply gives you a 
number when it encounters an error. BASIC XL not only gives you a 
number, but a short explanation of the type of error encountered. 
Those of you who don't goof up enough to have memorized all of the 
error codes (like I have) will appreciate this feature. It will save you 
from looking everything up in the manual. 

Those of you who Intend to do any serious programming in BASIC 
should strongly cons'der picking up BASIC XL. Not only do the 
features make programming easier, but the increased speed in many 
cases is enough to make the difference between a clunky game and a 
fast, smooth one. Those of you writing application-type software will 
find it faster and easier. I have used all of the enhanced Basics that I 
have seen for the ATARI. Of them ail, BASIC XL Is the best. In my opi¬ 
nion, this is a MUST for BASIC programmers. 

Now, Is anybody listening at ATARI. I have talked with Bill Wilkin¬ 
son at OSS. He assures me BASIC XL could be implemented in the 
new 1450XLD (if there really is to be such a thing) without making any 
mods to the operating system OR the circuit boards. If you plan on 
putting out an advanced personal computer, you should use the most 
advanced implementation of BASIC available. I seriously believe the 
search for a better Basic ends hero. 


Klrt Stockweil 






lb 



BUMPAS REVIEWS 

Scroll I ($20. Superware. 2028 Kingstiouse Rd., Silver Spring, MO 20904 
301-236-4459) is a machine language program you can use as a 
subroutine in a program of your ov.n design. Your programs may now 
easily include continuous scrolling in 8 directions. You may also 
control the speed ol the scroll, and you can change the ANTIC 
character mode. You can do all this without having to understand all 
the details ol fine scrolling. 

The manual is not a tutorial, but use ol this program can be very 
instructive tor someone learning about scrolling. The user is referred 
to "De Re Atari'and to the October. 1983 issue ot ANALOG magazine 
lor more information on line scrolling. The 5 page manual describes 
the simple steps needed to incorporate the routine into a program. 

The disk also contains a demo program with a map ol the Western 
Pacific Ocean. The scrolling routine is supplied in the form of a string 
variable, but it is also supplied in DATA statement format in case you 
cannot use a long string variable. 

I've always been a bit intimidated by scrolling. This package makes 
me want to experiment with it in several programs. 


BUMPAS REVIEWS 

Eastern House Software (3239 Linda Dr., Winston-Salem, NC 27106) 
has done Atari, tnc. a BIG favor. They have removed one of the most 
Important reasons one might want to keep an 800 rather than buying 
an XL 

MONKEY WRENCH It is now available in cartridge form for Atari XL 
computers. The price will be $50 as of June 1, 1984 (the announced 
date of availability). We’ll be sure to let you know how well it works as 
soon as we've seen a copy. 

LETTER WIZARD (Datasoft, $50) is the latest word processor for the 
Atari. I've been using TEXT WIZARD lor nearly three years now, so I've 
oeen eagerly awaiting Datasoft's improved product. And it is improv¬ 
ed. There is a Main Menu from which the user may proceed to Edit a 
document, to Print a document, or to go to a Menu of disk file manage¬ 
ment functions including: Formatting a disk, renaming, deleting, lock¬ 
ing and unlocking files. The disk directories are displayed in double¬ 
column format on the screen, with the space bar used to continue if 
more than one page is needed. The disk directories may also be called 
up from within the editing mode. There is a status window at the bot¬ 
tom of the Edit screen showing the file name, amount of RAM 
available, and the number of words and disk sectors in the file. 

Many program features are applied by use of the three function keys 
In combination with other keys. Letter Wizard moves away from the 
use of Control Key combinations to permit users to embed control 
characters in the text of documents. The format for these embedded 
commands requires the Atari Logo key (inverse) to type the letters 
“ch”, together with the decimal number of the control code. This 
feature allows me to get more use from my IDS printer than is possible 
with most word processors. A very powerful feature. The rhanual says I 
must precede each control code with (inverse) "ch27” (the decimal 
value of the ESC key), but for the IDS at least, this code is not helpful. 
Only the control code of the printer feature I’m using Is required. Since 
the inverse key must be toggled on and off, the program features re¬ 
quiring this key usually require two more key-strokes than other word 
processors 

Letter Wizard adds two new cursor controls: Now the user can jump 
to the beginning or end of any line. And flexibility in handling margins 
is expanded by permitting “relative" margins. Without resetting the 
margins of the printed page, you now may set off the margins of 
paragraphs within your text. The temporary margins may be inside or 
outside the margins of the document as a whole. A very sensible and 
easy way to handle this problem. No more calculating how wide the 
paper is. Now you need only decide how many spaces the margins will 
move, inside or outside your other margins. 

You no longer have to worry about having the cursor at the top of 
the file for saving and loading. If you want to save less than all of a 
document into a file, separate commands are available to save 
everything below the cursor. In the same manner, files may be append¬ 
ed below the cursor with another command. If you make a mistake 
when you delete a block of text, a new command permits you to 
restore the deleted block. This is a handy feature! 

Now for the bad news. The program does not function with any dou¬ 
ble density disk drive. I can't help think this is a severe marketing er¬ 
ror. Double density drives are flooding the market for the Atari. This 
program requires users to take a step backwards. And after I've con¬ 
verted all my text files to double density, too! Less important, Letter 
Wizard has abandoned the support for double-column printing. My 
guess is the greater printer support achieved in Letter Wizard has 
made it necessary to drop this feature. 


nRMPP I rr 

. In BRUCE LEE (Datasoft. 19808 Nordhoff Pi rn . 

| * 30 ). Oatasof. points the CA 9131 '■ 

! Bruce Lee. you must work your way throunh ,n ^ Mde 9ames ' As 

f » r r c ; n rdb o= 

being pursued by a large sumowrestler eaiiMi re i , °‘ n9 m,s - You are 

Sssssr* - •rrt 

manuanmpheVthlTdyTu^ulTwInand'oe 6 !’ 96S qU “ e '' ar ' ed Th * 

sortie into the wizard s castle w,n d. ioooS? w,2a,d - "ext 
survive through me first 10 rooms so I Ve °" y beeo able 

point out yet ° 1 haven 1 been able <° check this 

ot^r S op”ons e 2 a p'aye q sTakmn C , 0mpU,er: Oa,aso » has P™** *«o 

Player. This las. opt^n?simauelnH S T COmpu,er ' ana P' a Yer vs. 

than most arcade-style games One nil' 9 ' Ve thtS game a lon 9 er ,if e 
other runs me Green Yam . Th c P " Jns Bruce Lee whll « 

— Nickolas Chrones 


GUITARADE 

=saSsr»« 

negligible. ^ d ' S ’ 0rl10 " 31 V6rV h ' 9h and ^SSs 
(Q There is another function to change the default mode from sharps 

&SS£ 5 L~~SS~ 

with^ATARHJOO 800XL°i 20 O)d'This'program is compatible 

— Aaron Ness 










'7 


Boulder Dash 

(First Star Software, $J 3 ) 

This is a very good arcade-style game modeled after the pooular 
Dig-Oug game. The fact that it s produced by First Star, a company 
well known for it s hi-res graphic pages, should give you some idea of 
the well-done screens. 

d * n ! he 9 ame y° u tnove a constantly digging ant-like creature called 
Hockford through the earth, avoiding death by a falling boulder, or by 
any of the cave s other occupants. To score points, you must collect 
rainbow colored jewels which dot the different caves, while keeping 
an eye on the ever falling time limit. 

After all the jewels in a cave are collected, you advance to the next 
cave, which, of course, is more difficult. In the beginning caves, there 
are just boulders and jewels, but beyond these easy' levels are ones 
containing deadly fireflies, butterflies, or even the dreaded Amoeba 
These seldom visited lower levels are extremely difficult because of 
combinations of these characters. 

There are options for one or two players, a pause feature and an 
allowance for difficulty selection. The documentation is adequate but 
could be better. H ' 1 

The game has its funny parts too. For instance, if you pause for a 
bit. Rockford will begin tapping a foot, patiently waiting fora response 
from the player. 

This is a popular game around our house. Even my parents enjoy 
playing It. and that's pretty rare for them to enioy an arcade style 
game. The best attribute of the game is challenge This is one of the 
hardest games I've yet seen lor the Atari. II you lo.e a good challenge 
this one s for you. * ' 


— Tim Ebling 


For EPSON owners 

Do you own an EPSON printer? Do you want to customize it? The 
Fingerprint add-on board (Dresselhaus, 837 E. Alosta, Glendora, CA 
91740 ($70) turns the 3 buttons (Online, FF, LF) into a powerful way to 
program your printer. Change to compressed, emphasized, italic or 
even the very tiny “subscript" print handy for disk labels. Does much 
more, and very nice to have. Requires you to take your printer apart, 
and some dexterity required. Another way to customize your EPSON is 
described in the CSRA Newsletter as quoted from the Charlotte PC 
Newsletter. 

EPSON MX-80 Modlficaton 
by Wayne Setzer 
(Article modificated.by M.D.) 

This article describes modifications to the Epson MX-80 to allow 
you to use both the Graftrax-80 character set as well as the Graftrax 
Plus set on the same printer, so you can use block graphics as well as 
the advanced features of the Plus. 

The Epson uses 3 2716 (2K) EPROM's for the character set. By using 
2732’s (4k), and a switch to use either the lower or upper 2k, you can 
switch to the character set you want. First program the 2732's with the 
Graftrax-80 in the lower 2k and the Graftrax-Plus in the upper 2k. Install 
the EPROM's in their respective sockets, leaving out pin 21. Tie all the 
pin 21’s together with a small gauge wire (a wire wrap tool works fine 
—M.D.). Connect pin 21 to the common post of a SPOT switch, and 
mount switch on the back of the printer. Connect one side of the SPOT 
switch to Vi5 volts and the other side to ground. (A ground can be 
found marked on the right circuit board, and 5 Volts can be obtained 
from the front part of the cut J1, which must be cut if you use an 
EPROM instead of a ROM-M.D.). To use theGraftrax-80, set the switch 
to ground, and for Graftrax-Plus to + volts. Be sure to turn printer OFF 
before changing the switch setting. (Fingerprint works with the above 
modification, somehow sensing the different printer codes —M.D.). 

Because a different team assembles the text part and the listings 
part of the newsletter, two articles last month did not have the listings 
printed due to a lack of communication. They are in this issue— 
Device Handlers by Greg Menke and the TldBits article by Dale Lutz 
Sorry! 

Also, the Global Change program last month had an omission: 
change Line 800 to read at the end “THEN 920”. 



XBASIC 

(by George Schwenk (c) 1983 by SUPERware 2028 Kingshouse RO 
Silver Spring MO 20904) 

Description: Atari BASIC enhancement 
Medium: Disk or cassette 

Requirements: disk drive or cassette recorder, Atari BASIC, 16K RAM 
(XBASIC uses less than 3K of RAM) 

Cost: $29.95 


XBASIC adds a library of thirty new functions which will help you 
accomplish otherwise time-consuming programming chores with 
relative ease. Each of these machine language subroutines is 
accessed by the USR command from Atari BASIC. 

The disk version of XBASIC contains an initialization file and six 
examples of short programs which use several of the functions. A 
thirty-page manual concisely describes each of the functions with 
examples of how to incorporate them in BASIC programs, but does 
not explain much about how it all works. However. SUPERware offers 
to provide the source code to those who might wish to modify or 
better understand what Mr. Schwenk has done. The cost for the 
vD U /c?r' COde 15 S5 ' Furthermore - permission is given to include 
StiPFfl commerc,al software, provided credit is given to 


v nen.fs, of, —/% W /wiv i» vuioi. oy lyping 

X = USR(DLIST). V0U Wl11 961 3 d ' Sk direc,0,y lisl,n 9 without calling 

If you have w.shed Atari BASIC had string arrays you might 

a, I> m« CI DcrS 3ASlC S fOUr su,n!5 ,unr - ,icns SDIM dimensions string 
arrays. PS FH puts a character string into a string array GSTR qe's a 

suh'slr „ e n a, r,n9 ,r ? m an array; ,NSTR aaa 'C"es 9 a stnng array^ a 

substring. Also included are three similar array functions for integers. 

I/O functions are PCHRS. GCHRS. SSAVE and SLOAO Use PCHRS 
to put bytes from RAM to a disk or cassette tile: GCHRS gets them 
ctxwc hese are 9reat lor sav,n9 or load,n 9 your own character sets 
saves lhe screen : SLOAO loads it from disk or cassette 
SMOVE. a related 'unction, changes the RAM area to be displayed on 
the screen, which is useful for page flipping. 

'unctions are CLM (clear memory). FILL (fill memory). 
MOVE (move memory from one location to another- used for character 
sets or players, etc.). DPEEK (double peek a two-byte sequence) and 
OPOKE (a two-byte poke). 

Also included are two timing functions. STIMER (set timer) sets a 
countdown timer. DELAY waits lor the amount of time you specify 
Two sound functions. VDIM and XSOUND, are used to play a 
sequence of sounds during vertical blank interrupt, one sound each 
1/60tn ot a second. 


XBASIC has a special graphics call (SGR) which makes it easy to 
set up ANTIC modes 4 and E. with or without a four-line text screen 
For example. "GR.0:DUM s USR(SGR.2)”sets up a full-screen four- 
color ANTIC mode 4 screen. 

Finally. XBASIC provides seven player/missile graphics functions, 
which enable, move, set the size and color of. and detect collisions of 
players and missiles. PMOVE moves the desired player to any x.y 
location and uses shape data from any part of RAM. 

There are two ways to use XBASIC. The first is to add it to an 
existing program. The procedure is to LIST "D:YOURPROG" (or LIST 
C: ). LOAD XBASIC. and then initialize XBASIC by typing GOSUB 
32500 in the immediate mode. [XBASIC uses line numbers 1*12 and 
32490-32502.| Next. ENTER your proqram back into memory Finally 
type X = USR(XSAVE):SAVE "D.YOURPROG " (or CSAVE) This 
procedure will save XBASIC along with your BASIC program. 

The second method is to use XBASIC when writing a new program. 
You must begin by loading and initializing XBASIC before typing in 
your program. When editing your XBASIC programs, it is necessary to 
begin each editing session by initializing XBASIC. and to use 
X =USR(XSAV£) before saving. I learned that the hard way, although I 
hack read the directions prior to starting. My problem is I like to save 
my programs frequently, and I occasionally forgot to use XSAVE or 
else forgot to initialize XBASIC at start-up. 

XBASIC uses page 6. I spent several hours trying to convert a 
program from a magazine to XBASIC, only to discover it would not 
operate correctly because it already had a non-relocatable machine 
language routine stored in page 6. Although 40 bytes (1561-1600) are 
used only by DLIST and are free for your use unless you use DUST 
you must face the reality of this limitation to XBASIC if you already 
use other routines designed for page 6. The obiect code for XBASIC is 
stored as part of the variable name table. 

I find it difficult to recommend XBASIC to beginners, but more 
experienced BASIC program developers may find these new functions 
facilitate faster programming, as well as faster program execution. Mr. 
Schwenk appears to be a conscientious programmer who offers 
others a way around re-mventing the wheel. And if you are one of 
those hackers who like re-inventing in the hopes of making a better 
wheel, perhaps you should take advantage of his gracious offer to 
provide the source code. 


—Deloy Graham 



■JLL 


I gi aa k w 


If anyone can be 
credited with inspir¬ 
ing the launch of 
New Zealand’s first 
magazine dedicated 
purely to home com¬ 
puters, it is perhaps 
five-year-old 
Gregory McCall, of 
Bucklands Beach. 
Gregory is only 'just 
learning to write by hand, 
and to understand what he 
reads. But already he is 
using his family's Commo¬ 
dore 64 computer. 

"It is the future here 
today," said his father Eric, 
ague 30, who with his 
brother-in-law Ashley 
I Noble edits Computer 
jlnput magazine, which has 
i appeared on newstands in 
the last few weeks. 

"He can recognise let¬ 
ters, and 1 just showed him 
how to use the space bar," 
he recalls of Gregory. 

"Next thing I knew, 1 
came home and he had 
typed a whole programme 
into the computer. 

“What is it going to be 
like in 10 years’ time?” 

Light-hearted 

It was that question that 
spurred Mr McCall and Mr 
Noble into the decision to 
produce their new monthly 
magazine. 

Mr Noble's father, Mr j. 
T. Noble, of Glenficld, a 
semi-retired advertising 
representative, was roped 
in as advertising manager. 

'What we are providing 
is light-hearted, non-profes¬ 
sional journalism written 
by the guys next door," said 
Mr McCall. 

This is not the first com¬ 
puter magazine in New 
Zealand. That honour 
would have to go to the 
Auckland-based journal of 
the New Zealand Computer 
Society, Interface, the Sep¬ 
tember issue of which 
offered 68 pages for $1.50. 

A year ago it was joined 
by Systems Digest, a $2 
quarterly issued free to 
subscribers to Management 
magazine and, like Inter¬ 
face, aimed primarily at 
business readers. I 

The first computer hob-1 
byists’ magazine. Bits and ! 
Bytes, also celebrated its j 
first anniversary last : 
month, it is edited by two 
Christchurch journalists,] 
[with a strong input from 


Auckland hobbyists, and 
claims a circulation of 7000 
at $1 a copy. 

New Zealand Computer 
Scene was next to appear, 
also from Christchurch, in 
the middle of this year. Its 
September issue had 56 
pages for $1.95, and like 
Bits and Bytes, it covers all 
uses of microcomputers, 
both at home and at work. 

They are not experts; tfor 
do they work full-time on 
the project Mr McCall de¬ 
signs and sells business sta¬ 
tionery for the printers 
Clark and Matheson, while 
Mr Noble is a draughts¬ 
man. 

Finally, the New Zea¬ 
land Small Computer 
Guide 1983 hit the streets 
with a print run of 14,000 
and a $3.95 price tag in 
July, aimed at businesses 
thinking of buying a com¬ 
puter. 

Its editor, Auckland pro¬ 
gramming specialist Clive 
Wilson, plans to have a 
quarterly called Computer 
Reviews on sale at $5.95 
within the next few weeks. 
Its 120 pages will contain 
half-page reviews of almost 
every computer available 
in this country. 

Glossy Paper 
But in all this welter of 
glossy paper. Eric McCall 
could find nothing pitched 
at his level — nothing, that 
is, which ignored expensive 
business applications and 
concentrated on what most 
home computers are being 
used for; games.. 

In its slim 24 newsprint 
pages, Computer Input at¬ 
tempts to fill this gap with 
reviews of commercially 
available game cassettes 

and the new Colour Genie 
computer. 

But its main feature, and 
the one Mr McCall believes 
makes it well worth $1.50, 
is that it actually prints 
game programmes which 
readers can key into their 
computers for nothing. 


Enthusiast 

Prizes are offered for the 
best, programmes submit¬ 
ted for publication by 
readers, and if any are 
good enough, Mr McCall 
plans to pass them on to 
software firms instead of 
publishing them. 

He also offers to find 
answers to people’s ques-, 
tions, and provides a mail¬ 
order service for popular 
programmes. 

And if the initial re¬ 
sponse is any guide, 
Gregory McCall is not the 
only youngster who has 
been waiting for just such a 
magazine. From 5400 
copies printed, more than 
100 subscriptions have al¬ 
ready came back. 

A 32-page November 
issue is due out late next 
week. Newsprint is being 
abandoned and from now 
on, even home game en¬ 
thusiasts will follow their 
passion on glossy paper. 


FRIDAY, AUGUST 26,1983 



TECHNOLOGY 

By ANDREW POLLACK 


Computerizing Computer Magazines: 
New Art Form — or Another Oddity 

N EW YORK — The next t hing to be computerized might be the 
corapfer magazines. 

A few will soon have floppy disks containing computer programs to 
accompany the printed articles. In some cases, the entire magazine will be 
distributed on floppy diskettes instead of on paper. 

The diskette magazines, with names like Microzine and Magazette, 
could become a new an form, combining the best erf the two media. Or 
they could become oddities, like the little flexible phonograph records 
inserted into magazines. 

One use for floppy disks inserted into magazines would be to contain 
programs that are discussed in the 
magazine’s articles. Many comput- ] ~ 

er magazines contain such pro- As in printed 
grams in printed form, but these r 

must be painstakingly typed into a 
computer. Having a diskette with 
the program on it would be much 
easier. 

Magazines on floppy disks can 
also be “interactive,” meaning the 
readers can respond to questions 
and play with computer programs 
instead of just reading about them. 

Those trying such magazines also 
think the disks could be a form of 
advertising, with software compa- 


magazineg, certain 
features will be 
repeated, such as a story 
in which children ran 
answer questions and 
influence the plot. 


nies providing samples of their programs. 

The Microsoft Corp., a leading software company, will insert a demon- 
«ration disk containing its new word-processing program, Microsoft 
Word, into the November issue of PC World, a magazine for users of the 
IdM personal computer. The disk will allow users to try out features of 
the program but not to store or print out what they write, so that they will 
have to buy the program if they like what they see. 

Such a sample might be needed to get people interested in a new word- 
processing program, since many computer owners already have such a 
program. "Suddenly you get 100,000-plus bona fide IBM users to Uy out 
yemrproduct, David Bunnell, publisher of PC World, said of the disk 

Ziff-Davis, which publishes PC magazine, the archrival of PC World, 
has just introduced PC Disk magazine, which includes a disk con tainin g 
eight to twelve programs and a manukL 8 

Programs for Children 

Others seek ttxput the entire magazine on a disk. Scholastic Inc. which 
publishes educational material, is planning a software magazine called 
Microzine, for children, containing educational and eiuwt.mm. nf pr0 _ 
grams. As in primed magazines, certain features will be repeated each 
month, such as a story in which the children can answer questions and 
influence the plot 

There are several small, little-known diskette magazines in existence, 
such as the I.B. Magazette, which stands for “interactive, bi-directional 
m ag a zi n e on diskette.” It is for IBM personal computer owners. Users 
receive a disk containing programs and tutorials on various subjects. 
They can comment on the various programs and articles, ccnv the (terns 
they want to keep, and mail back the disk. Another disk publication, the 

Fkanklin iSnL ^ ** be “ 8 or 8 ani2ed b y Jose P h M - Segal, founder 5 the 

Such magazines face many challenges, however, not the least of which 
is the cost. “The total printing cost of a magazine is a couple of dollars,*' 
said Kenneth G. Bosomworth, president of International Resource De¬ 
velopment, a consulting firm in Norwalk, Connecticut. ‘To add a flexible 
disk adds another two, three, four bucks in with it.” 

As a result, disk magazines will cost as much per issue as many 
magazines cost per year. PC Disk sells for $30 an issue, or $20 an issue [or 
a six-issue subscription. Advertising is also expensive. Microsoft will 
spend several hundred thousand dollars on its floppy insert in PC World. 

A full-page ad would cost $8,000. 

Delicate Disks in V.S. Mail 

Another problem is that each model of computer requires a different 
disk, so diskette magazines can be aimed only at users of particular 
computers. Even inserting and mailing the delicate disks inside a maga¬ 
zine can be tricky. “It’s phenomenal what happens to things that go 
through the U.S. mail,” said Rowland Hanson, vice president of corpo¬ 
rate communications for Microsoft. 

, New technologies also threaten such diskette magazines Some compa¬ 
nies think software could be distributed through magazines in the form of 
bar codes, sui h as those used at supermarkets. They could be printed on 
m a gazin e pap x and entered into a computer by scanning the code with a 
hand-held reader. Also coming is the distribution of software over 
telephone lines. 

Those behind the magazines are convinced they will fill a niche. “It’s 
really not much different from what happens in the book world,” Mr. 
Segal said. “It’s considered a big coup for a book to be serialized in The 
New Yorker.” 


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