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A I AKI 

COM 

Ye 


ICOMPUTER 
IENTHUSIASTS 


INGTON 


Wellington Atari Computer Enthusiasts 

APRIL. IP25 


Dear members, . 


No doubt it will be 


?tr 


letter box, but ops 
n our meetings -rrom uhe 

deadlines for the newsl 


that 

now 

and, 


have a new editor for 
as he has accepted the 
be exceedingly polite t 
to Bruce and, indeed, 

art 


wel 1 
- 4 - tt>g 

d \_ ww 

etter 
the 
job 
o him 
all 
i cl es 


Herewith WACE's newsletter for Apt ii 
into May before it arrives in your 
Linf orseen consequences of the change 
the second Wednesday of the month is 
have receded a week. At any rate, we 
newsletter. Bruce Tinsley is the man 
on a "suck it and see" basis, we must all 
(I do not want the job back!). All praise 

contributions to him as wel1 1 Keep those ietters, card= and 
rolling in. Bruce can be contacted at Databank-s Head Office. 

LAST MEETING 

Didn’t it go w.U! For ms the highlight o-f the meeting w.s the 
Running success of the "Bugbusting" format, coupled with t,.e of 

TVs or monitors to mete sure that ell eoul d see whet was 

o-ino on up front. The provision of multiple computers was a 

great help: the meeting just flowed along, and we hope to reproduce 
thesame ambience this time (ambience is in the dictionary). 

NEXT MEETING 

The next meeting is scheduled for Wednesday, 8 May. f^in, 

it will be held at the "LOAVES and FISHES" which is located behind the 
Anglican Cathedral in Molesworth St. in central Ellington TheJoors 
will open at 7.15 pm, slightly later than last month, and Bug.u-.ing 
Till beqin ss soon ss the computers are set up (would those wanting 
their bugs to be busted please bring their computers and other gear 
with them). The less informal part of the proceedings will be*in 

o 15 nm and will comprise: . , , , . . 

demonstrations of the new club tape and disks (including the late 

a Tl demonstration of how to interface an Atari and an electronic 
typewriter (who needs a printer ;•) 5 
newlv arrived commercial software; 

and sundry other matters (the eventual performance is always different 
to that planned by the committee). 


SUBSCRIPTIONS 

These are now due and payable, either 
mail to WACE, C/- PO Box 16011, Wellington 

OTHER MATTERS 


at the next meeting or by 
The subscription is fOO. 


Lynne Street, of 23 Gavin Place, Huntly is offering p ^°'[ 

bridges, "new and complete with a manual", for I n *.er - = ‘- e 

bers might wish to telephone Ms Street on (0S17) S7213 to confirm 


car 

member e mu. 
details of dispatch etc. 


Your committee wants to know how many H..ari 
unu.sab 1 e. 


Atari 1010s are currently 


Thats it, I quit 



EDITORIAL 


Just a short note from your new editor, while he tries to settle 
into the heady world of publishing. 

The only way a newsletter can succeed on a regular basis is by 
having articles available to print. In the past, the majority 
of these have been supplied by either the President, the 
Secretary, or other Committee members. What I would like each 
of you to do is to note down any items of interest, relating to 
either your Atari, or computing in general. Who knows, you 
might be the only person to stumble on to some little secret 
tucked away in the innards of this marvelous little machine of 
ours, and you should let the rest of us know about it. 
Contributions don't have to be of the highest precision, that's 
what an editor is for. 

If you do have something for me, you can, as Des has mentioned, 
find me at Databank Systems, on the corner of The Terrace and 
Boulcott Street. If I'm not in just leave it at reception. 

I look forward to your support during the next year. 

Bruce Tinsley . 

P.S. I dont have a printer, but as soon as I get one, I will be 
using TinyText, and not the companies word processor. 



AUCTION 


It was suggested at our last committee meeting that We have 
another auction. I had stated at the A.G.M. that We would not 
have another one but if there is enough interest it may be 
possible. It could be held in say, July to give me time to 
test the supply situation. Any member who has any hardware or 
software surplus to their recquirements please contact Eddie 
Nickless, phone (bus.) 872 023, or (home before 9.30p.m.) 881 
443. 

Any software must be original, NO COPIES PLEASE and the Club 
will take 10X commission . Give me the details of the item 
for sale and the reserve price. 


CLUB DISKS 


So -far, three "Club Disks" have been produced. They have been 
well received, and, over the months, more will be made available. 

Club Disk #1 comprises Arcade games. If you like shooting the 
s—t out of assorted aliens, then this disk is for you. If you don’t, 
then it isn’t. 


Club Disk #2 is a happy mixture of machine and basic language 
programmes, most from recent tapes. 

Club Disk #3’s most attractive feature is it’s "Menuplus" 
proaramme which, combined with an Autcrun. sys. , hoots up the dirt, and 
allows one to pick and chose from about ten other (basic or machine 
language) programmes. Another programme, "Polycopy", allows one to 
transfer simultaneously up to three programmes from disk to disk. 1 
now have it on a number of my basic disks. 


CLUB DISK #4 will be distributed at the next meet 
includes: 

Tinytext (the final upgrade). The strength of this programme 
it’s much improved printing speed as well as it’s ability to 
finished text as it would appear on the pace, is at up to 
characters per line. The instructions are embedded in the pro 
Fileindex. Bernard Kerr’s programme, which he demonstrated at 
meeting. Home grown and we are proud of it! 

Escape from Epsilon. From Antic magazine, a very coed game. T 
approved by my kids. 

Maniac. A public domain version of ' k r« z y cot 

Simon. A much improved version cf the classic. 

Alphsbee. A goodie nor 


,nc. It 


display 
St per 
; r a iT.mes. 

ested and 


he vour.i 


CLufc Disk #5 has not yet been started: nominations 
pr ogr ciiTiflr.es will 
D S S K G W G 


" 4 -.aK I S 





PRESIDENT’S PAGE 


At last count we had well over 500 program listings in our Print 
Library."A fair achievement" or even "Great Stuff!" would be an entirely 
gppp-Qpr-j ate response — but valuable as it is to have this resoucsj it is o* 
little practical use unless more of these program listings are typed up so 
that in their new form as computer programs they can be placed in the WAGE 
Program Library and,if you are interested in them,in your own 
col 1ections.Accordingly,one of the things that I would like to do this year 
is to qet many mere of the better programs in the Print Library transcribed 
onto tape or disk. 


You shouldn’t think,however,that the club hasn’t already done a fair 
amount of work in this area:it has.In fact since the first members began to 
met (informally) back in 1981, many willing people have spent long hours 
transcribing programs for communal use.But,as you will see from the list 
below of our most recent activity,we have been relying on a much too small 
group of people for progress in this area.I hope that we can change this. 


To keep you in touch with current work we are publishing our 
transcription list.It records the names and file numbers of the programs,the 
people who are typing them in,and where the programs are in the 

^pj«;cr i pt i on process .This process moves through the fol lowing n. ^g ss • 

a) program identified as worth transcription 

b) President calls for volunteer to type it up 

c) if successful response,volunteer given program and types it in 

d) volunteer passes program transcribed onto cassette/disk over to 
President 

f) President passes program to another volunteer for any debugging 
etc. required 

g) program sent to cur Programi Library 


From there the program -if 
quality - may possibly be reser 
, you will ha' 


l n 


it is public domain ar.d of sufficient 
,-ed for the club tape series. If it is not 
being able to get a. copy of it from the 


Library.But what if the program is not public demain?The legal advice that 
we have obtained indicates that if you have either bought a copy of the 
copvrqhfsd publication from which the program was drawn - or have borrowed 
that publication fram a public 1ibrary,then you may legal I / held a 
disk copy of the relevant transcited program. 


Thfc: Twi 1 GW 1 HQ *_ -3w i — i i 


is who is typing in 


stags 


'IS 



transcription process we are at.Incidentally,the next time we print this 
list we will add the sources of the programs. 


PROGRAM NAME 

FILE NO. 

TYPIST 

STATUS 

t- 

RECORD KEEPING 
PROGRAM 

5100/12 

Tom Larkin 

Being Typed 

CHAMPIONSHIP 

BOXING 

7500/23 

Tom Larkin 

Being Typed 

NIGHT FIGHTER 

7800/27 

Tom Larkin 

Being Typed 

WHAT IS IT? 


Chris Richardson 

Being Typed 

SMALL TALKER 


Chris Caudwel1 

Being Typed 

VERSE WEAVING 

o 

Chris Caudwel1 

Being Typed 

BIORYTHM 

5700/1 

Sandra Minshull 

Being Typed 

GRADEBOOK ATARI 

2030/3 

Mike Munro 

Being Typed 

AIR ATTACK 

7800/25 

Chris Richardson 

Being Typed 

TANK BATTLE 

7300/26 

Chris Macer 

Being Typed 

BARS 

2230/1 



Chris Richardson 

Being Typed 



GRAPH E’s 

2125/15 

Des Rowe 

Being Typed 

SAFE CRACKER 

? 

Chris Macer 

Being Typed 

DECISION MAKER 


Sandra Minshull? 

Being Typed 

HUNT THE RAIDER- 

7800/21 

Des Rowe 

Being Typed 

PATTERNS 


Sandra Minshull 

Being Typed 

EXOCET 

7800/29 

Sandra Minshull 

Being Typed 

SOLID STATES 
REVI5TED 

6100/7 


Process!ng 

MERCURY MINE 

7600/39 

Anne Minshull 

Process!ng 

SON OF 

SOLID STATE 

6100/S 


Processi ng 

MATT-EDIT 

6450/18 

Des Rowe 

Processi ng 

RIVER RAIDER 

o 

Eddie Warren 

Processing 

READING PROGRAM 

7252/1 

Eddie Warren 

Processi ng 

PITCH MAKER- 

•s 

Eddie Warren 

Processing 

MEMORY 


Eddie Warren 

Processing 

ORIGEN 


Eddie Warren 

Processing 

CALC 

2100/11 

Chris Macer 

Processing ? 




LIMITS to growth 


Anne Minshull 

Processing 

HORSEPLAY 


Paul Wood 

In 

Library 

RECTAN 

*■> 

Paul Wood 

In 

Library 

SPHERI 


Paul Wood 

In 

Library 

TURTLE 


Paul Wood 

In 

Library 

REACTION TIMER 


Anne Minshull 

In 

Li brary 

SMARTY 

7300/7 

Anr.e Minshull 

In 

i ; K,*- 

1 . 4-' i C.| I 

ANIMATE 

7 

Jeremy White 

In 

Library 

VIDEO SO 


Jeremy White 

In 

Library 

AUTOMATE 


Jeremy White 

In 

Library 

BUFFER- 

7 

Jeremy White 

In 

Library 

SCREEN DUMP 

9 

Jeremy White 

In 

Library 

CHARACTER EDITOR 

o 

Jeremy White 

In 

Li brary 

FLASHING CURSOR 

o 

Jeremy White 

In 

Library 

LINE RENUMBER 


Jeremy White 

In 

Library 

HEXDEC 


Jeremy White 

In 

Library 

DIGITIZE 

r> 

Jeremy White 

In 

Library 

STARS 3D DEMO 

o 

Jeremy White 

In 

Library 

SERVO CONTROLLEr 


Jeremy White 

In 

Library 

TIE FIGHTER 

7400/31 

Anne Minshull 

7 


SOLID STATES 

6100/6 

Anne Minshull ? 




We are very grateful to all those who are typing in programs , 0 nd/or 
who have typed them up in the past.But as I said above there are still many 
more good programs waiting to be typed in and I propose to bring a number of 
them to our ne;ct meeting to distribute. Do please volunteer : oil of *-■• = , =- -- e 
goc-d programs and none of us by himself could possibly enter in all those 
programs'that we would like to have.That's one reason why we’ve joined a 
club. 




Data, words; now software 
to process ideas w* 


SOFTWARE authors are driven 
these days by two ambitions, 
one technical, the other- corn- 
meretaL ' •* 

Technically, they are looking 
for ways to develop the next 
feneration of personal computer 
programs, software that pro¬ 
cesses ideas rather than num-. 
be re* or words. -. 

!* Commercially,- thpy are hop- 
inf their efforts will prove as. 
financially rewarding as Vlsi- 
Usi Corporation found “Vislcalc” 
or Lotus Development found 
“1-2-3." T • 

• Michael and Jeanette Bloor of 
Phoebe' Software beHeve they 
have realised the first ambition; 
if they are tight, they should 
have no difficulty realising the 
j a eo o n d. i 

I They have developed a pro¬ 
gram called “Progress," de¬ 
signed to automate working 
habits and procedures. The 
notion is not new; It has 
elements in common with Car¬ 
ton’s "Brainstorm,” Software 
Sciences office group automa¬ 
tion system and Xerox's screen 
Icons. But Phoebe has put it all 
together to create a powerful 
end novel package selling for 
only £500 (single user micro) or 
£1,000 (multiuser system, un¬ 
limited numbers of terminals). 

The Bloors are computer 
specialists now resident in Ire¬ 
land and with a background in 
financial and business consul¬ 
tancy. .The seeds of “Progress" 
were sown in their observation 
that one of their clients, a medi¬ 
cal supplies manufacturer, had 
to generate 102 pieces of paper 
.completed by 250 different 
people for its simplest product, 
a sterile polythene bag. 

If the manufacturing 
sequence was delayed — a criti¬ 
cal point this, where medical 


regulations Is concerned, up to 
30 new pieces of paper had to 
join the pile. 

So Phoebe started what was 
to be a three-year hunt for a 
computer-based answer. Michael 
Bloor says ruefully: “Every¬ 
body. knew what the problem 
was.' The reason an answer 
did not exist was because it was 
so bloody difficult" 

. Now with grants from 31 
‘(ICFC), the Development Capi- 
-tal Corporation and the Irish 
Government totalling tome 


Professional 
Personal -y; 
Computing',:^ 


£400,000, Phoebe Is ready to 
launch Progress at the Com pec 
computer exhibition next week. 

It has some clever program¬ 
ming tricks built in an which 
the Bloors will not elaborate, 
but basically the program 
operates on the thesis that 
there are set procedures in 
most businesses and that no 
progress is made unless in¬ 
dividuals carry out these pro-’ 
cesses in the right sequence. 

The example Phoebe uses is 
personnel recruitment The 
disc is inserted into the com¬ 
puter and “ booted up “ (loaded 
into computer memory). The 
top of tho screen shows icons 
of filing trays, documents, 
blank forms and so forth. 

* Using the cursor, the user 
•elects, say, a form marked 
' plan. (Phoebe is talking to 
ACT about voice activation, 
Hewlett Packard about touch 
screens and Apple about mice. 


but Michael Bloor prefers the 
simple, low-cost approach; he 
insists the' program has to 
work on a 64Kb computer with 
a low-resolution screen.) 

The user then draws up the 
plan of action—a job specifica¬ 
tion has to be written, adver¬ 
tisements designed, agencies 
informed. Only after responses 
from advertisements and agen¬ 
cies have been received can a 
short list of potential candi¬ 
dates be drawn up—and so oi£ 

Once the complete operation 
sequence has been “modelled’ 
in the computer, it can. be 
stored away until seeded.' 

Once activated to fill a 
vacancy. It Inexorably works 
through its allotted sequence of 
events. The personel officer, 
for example, will turn on his 
screen to find that he is 
required to draw up a job 
specification for the vacancy. 
The program will pot move 
forward until that chore is 
accomplished and the results 
stored away. 

Mr Bloor believes the pro¬ 
gram can be tuned to fit other 
office and industrial routines. 
He has not, however, managed 
to get rid of all those pieces 
of paper for his medical sup¬ 
plies client. 

The medical authorities have 
agreed to the use of Progress 
in the factory — as long as 
somewhere, every bit; of infor¬ 
mation held in the system is 
printed out as hard copy and 
stored away for six years. 

Progress runs on micro¬ 
computers using the CP/M 86. 
Concurrent CP/M, MS/DOS and 
PC/DOS operating systems and 
will soon be available for CP/M 
80 micros together with some 
minis and mainframes. ’ 

ALAN CANE 


ATARI HARDWARE!! 


810 Disk Drives $265 
810 Drive Kits $240 
kill Analog Upgrade, 
easy kit... $.’17 
810 Happy $185 
850 Interface $180 
8t*i Computer Kits, 

4kK electronic-. $1(8) 

•WO Computer Kit $47 
•18K Expansion $87 
81*1 Motiicrhnard $.17 
41*1 MotU-rlioard $15 
ROM ’B’ hoards $17 
T.TIA’ CPI' hoard $18 
Power Atlaplrrs $15 
I5K Memory hoard $1!* 

Microsoft Basic II $27 
Com-. Spanish $12.50 
Atari Pikit $211 
Basic cart kit $15 
Assemhk'r kit $15 

We have many parts and 1C chips!! 
MUCH, MUCH MORE!! 

FREE CATALOG!! 

CENTURIAN 

ENTERPRISES 

P.O. BOX 3233 

SAN I.U1S OBISPO. CA 

93403-3233 

(H05) 544-6616 

VISA & MC 

Office Mrs: Mon-Thurs. 10-5 


-:y * 


SHAPES AND SOUNDS 
fOR THE ATARI : ' 

(software) - - . ’ 

John Wiley and $ons 
<505 Third Arc. 

New Yrrk. NY 10158 
(212)850-6000 , V 

:»45 : "* 

This set includes two disks of expand¬ 
able, sound and graphics effects written 
to Aon BASIC for beginning and first-’ 

’ time"programmers. According td 
; the effects can be used to create - 
dramatic sound and light shpws of. 
rpusic arid pulsating graphic^ as well 
'sl>rilnrful iximouter 









r~r« ~-»:» 7 iWi_ 

rgj|CUE2aK* 


SB EBB 
BBELBI 

:i dbbbb 

; i DDSBB 


THEE 


tvi’fl Ifflltf SI 



ST 



m n n p p m —wm 

THE MOST VERSATILE AND POWERFUL 
PERSONAL COMPUTER 

Main Operating 

Processor System 

• MCS68000 16/32 bit central • GSX Graphics kem, 

processing unit -Bit block transfer 

-8 32-bit data registers -Vector drawing 

-8 32-bit address registers • GEM user interface 

-16-bit data bus -Icons 

-24-bit address bus -Windows 

-7 levels of interrupts -Mouse controller 

-56 instructions, 14 addressing -Pop-up menus 

modes, 5 data types -Memory managemen 

_ -Real-time clock 

Keyboa r d - video p or 

• Standard typewriter style 

• Ergonometric height and • Television 

angle • Composite video 

• 18-key numeric keypad • RGB 

• Contains separate • High-res mono 

microprocessor monitor 


DROP DOWN 
MENUS: _ 

Information is just a mouse cfick 
away. Move the mouse pointer, 
a menu bar highlights the infor¬ 
mation. 

FOLDERS: 


Just like paper on a desk, store 
and retrieve information horn 
organized folders on disk for 
quick reference. 


DISKS: _ 

Your folders and documents 
are stored on 3.5 inch 
microdisks or hard disk for fast 
access. 

DESKTOP 

UTILITIES 


Stationery, a calculator, and 
applications software are as 
handy as a dick of the mouse 
button. 


• GSX Graphics kemal 
-Bit block transfer 
-Vector drawing 

• GEM user interface 
-Icons 

-Windows 
-Mouse controller 
-Pop-up menus 
-Memory management system 
-Real-time clock 

Video Ports 

• Television 

• Composite video 

• RGB 

• High-res monochrome 
monitor 


Sound Effects 
and Music 

• General Instruments sound 
chip 

-Frequency controllable from 
30Hz to above audible 
-3 channels, separate frequency 
and volume control 
-Dynamic envelope controls, 
ADSR, noise generator 

• MIDI interface to control ex¬ 
ternal synthesizers 

Mouse 

• Eliminates the need for exten¬ 
sive user training 

Flexible operation 


Graphics 


* 32K bit-mapped screen 

* 3 graphics modes 

•320 X 200 pixels, 16 colors 
-640 X 200 pixels, 4 colors 
-640 X 200 pixels, 
monochrome 

• 512 colors (8 levels each of 
red, green, and blue) 

Interfaces 

• Centronics parallel for 
printers 

* RS232C for modems 

• Disk controller and interface 

* High speed hard disk inter¬ 
face (1.33mps) 

• 2 joysticks ports lone is con¬ 
figured for a mouse) 


The Atari ST personal computer’s display is as familiar as your desktop, complete with all the objects you usually 
work with, such as documents, file folders, a calculator, scissors, paperclips and of course, a wastebasket. With 
overlapping windows you see your work just like you would on your desk. The STs cut & paste task-sharing ability 
makes integrating documents easier on screen than at your desk! The 130ST standard with 128K RAM...ONLY 
S399. The 520ST boasts a substantial 512K RAM.. .ONLY $599. 


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2160 W. 11th Avenue 
Eugene, OR 97402 


cuyciic, un . . . N 

ijw t jty A hXuMl 

efiuwt’ 1(4 *\mI fiUtr H 

Your ATARI 1 Headquarters! ***"~*hX^ c 


BULK RATE 
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PAID 
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Permit No. 215 


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Met In. 












, How to pick the 

fT 

next software winner 


THE GREAT triumph of the 
personal computer has been its 
ability to bring computer power 
to individuals. This' has hap¬ 
pened through the introduction 
of software packages and ways 
of using the powers locked up in 
the machine that were thought 
impossible In the now ancient 
days of data processing. 

Visicalc was. perhaps, the 
best example of a piece of soft¬ 
ware that made the micro 
useful to those other than pro¬ 
grammers. It brought financial 
computing to small companies. 

Visicale’s imitators and its 
descendants have never had 
quite the impact that the 
original did back in the early 
davs of the micro business. 

Now. the micro industry is 
looking around for a follow-on 
to the Visicalc success. 

One of the most likely con¬ 
tenders is in the field of skills 
training. Much of the 
emphasis of the Government- 
backed Alvey project is on the 
sort of software that will 
encapsulate human skills in a 
computer and enable the rest 
of us to take advantage of 
them. 

But we shall have to wait a 
few years for the so-called ex¬ 
pert system to become as 
ubiquitous as the Visicalc-style 
spreadsheet programs are 
today. 

In the meantime, there are 
other methods of putting 
human skills on to computers. 
Human Edge, a California 
based software company re¬ 
leased a batch of packages 
earlier this year aimed at pro¬ 
viding management, sales and 
marketing skills in the form of 
a training package on the IBM 
PC. 

The Management Edge, the 
Rales Edge and the rest arc 
designed to enhance skills in 
these areas by putting users 
through their paces in front of 
a personal computer. It is too 
early to say how successful this 
angie will he but it will cer¬ 
tainly be interesting to sec how 
it goes. 

In the UK. skill-building is 
being approached from a 
different angle. 

At the London School of 
Economics, for example, the 
Decision Analysis Unit is look- 
in" at wavs that' decision¬ 
making skills can be helped 
using a personal computer. 
Using a system railed Maud, the 
Unit is implementing the ideas 
of an American psychologist 
called George Kelly together 
with those of other thinkers 
including the Cambridge 
U n i versi: ? ma th c ma ticia n, 


Frank Ramsey. 

Dr Lawrence Phillips of the 
unit describes Maud as " an in¬ 
teractive system for helping to 
solve ill-formed problems .that 
are characterised by multiple 
objectives." 

He cites the simple example 
of choosing a job. In this case 
the users enter the options 
open to them—that is a number 
of different job prospects. The 
system goes on to request data 
about the differences between 
the options entered and asks the 



BY PHIL MANCHESTER 

The danger is that 
we may all have the 
same piece of software 
advising us 


user to enter ratings on a scale 
of one to nine. 

The process is repeated until 
a bank of data about the users’ 
perception of the problem is 
built up. It then produces aa 
analysis based on those 
judgments. 

" It is very unusual that the 
scales that you start off with 
are the ones that you end up 
with—the process is iterative 
and can even show you some 
new insights into the problem.” 
explained Phillips. 

Unlike the so-called expert 
systems currently being deve¬ 
loped under the Alvey project 
and elsewhere. Maud makes no 
attempt to understand the data 
—it merely analysts the struc¬ 
ture that the user places on it. 

The LS" has been experi¬ 
menting with a more sophisti¬ 
cated version of the same idea 
for what it calls the Decision 
Conference. 

“ The most important part of 
a Decision Conference is that 
it gets managers to see a shared 
view of their problems — very 
often they will see them only 
from thei' own personal pers¬ 
pective.” Phillips noted. 

Similar work is being done 
at the University of Bath with 
a system called Cope. Colin 
Eden, a researcher at Bath, 
described Cope as a ” system 
for manipulating ideas” and 
commare.l it with a product 


launched at the beginning of 
this year by Caxlon—the Brain- - 
storm. 

"It is much more sophisti- j 
cated than that and a lot more 
flexible." Eden said. 

Although Cope requires a 
much larger computer to work 
effectively, the idea could be . 
transported to a micro espcci- . 
ally as they grow in storage 
capacity. 

In light of the sort of product 
that could be in the pipeline 
for personal computer users in 
the future, Eden Jtas some in¬ 
teresting insights into this type 
of software. 

“ I think the quantitive 
approach to problem solving 
can be misleading. It implies a 
logic which does not map onto 
the way the mind works. What 
we really do when we solve 
problems is to play around with 
concepts and ideas—and talk 
to people.” he said. 

Personal computers could 
play an important part in the 
process of playing around with 
ideas as a means of enhancing 
those skills that arc difficult to 
define—how to manage, how to 
sell and how to make effective 
decisions. 

The danger is that we may 
all have the same piece of soft¬ 
ware advising us. 

DOCUTEL/Olivetti has cut the 
suggested retail price of its 
MIS personal computer range. 
The portable and desk-top 
models arc to drop in cost by 
S500. Each machine comes 
with the MS.DOS 1.25 operating 
system and a set of eight pro¬ 
grammes of business software. 

The company says that the 
price reduction is in response 
to similar moves by other 
personal computer makers. 

0 IBM and Northern Telecom 
seem to be following the same 
paths with the IBM PC AT and 
Northern Telecom’s family of 
Xenix-based Vienna products. 
Both have chosen to use the 
Xenix operating system and th" 
same processing chin—the Intel 
2S5—for the machines. 

Northern Telecom has already 
started shipment of the first 
systems using this combination 
but sees IBM’s move as a step 
towards a world standard. 

0 Texas Instruments has also 
announced an 18.2 Mbyte 
Winchester Disk for the TI 
professional computer. This is 
for business computing apn> 
cations where several machines 
arc connected together by a 
local area network and share a 
common database. 







Home Computers Do More Office Work 

By Boa Davis A* a result, the survey shows, computer Group senior analyst In charfe of ti 

M thc Asian w«tL Sntrr Journal buyers think different attributes are Impor- survey. 


By Boa Davb 

Spec*»f It Tin Asian Wall Stout Journal 

BOSTON — Home-computer owners, who 
for years couldn't find mudi to do with their 
machines except play fames, increasingly 
•re using their computers to do office work 
at home. 

That's one oT the findings in a new 
16-volume survey of 3.000 computer-owning 
households conducted by Yankee Group, a 
Boston consulting concern. The study also 
shows that home-computer sales are con¬ 
centrated in a relatively few outlets, that 
many consumers have or soon will buy a 
second computer and that software piracy 
is common. 

Yankee Group charges J70.000 for the 
full survey, which includes, among other 
things, data from 50-minute telephone inter¬ 
views of recent purchasers of computers 
made by Apple Computer Inc., Internation¬ 
al Business Machines Corp., Tandy Corp.'s 
Radio Shack. Commodore International 
Ltd. and Atari Inc. 

Although only 4% said they bought a 
computer primarily to do office work at 
home, many soon become hooked. The sur¬ 
vey estimated 20% of home-computer own¬ 
ers use computers for office work; 49% said 
they expected to use their computers this 
way within two years. 

The survey found 45.8% of consumers 
buy computers for the home primarily to 
learn about the machines, to run education¬ 
al programs and to play games. Fewer than 
1% buy a computer for such esoteric uses 
as home banking, electronic mailing or 
plugging into computerized information 
services. 

Shoppers have different uses in mind for 
different computers. Those looking to buy 
Apple and Commodore computers, for in¬ 
stance. want them mostly for educational 
reasons, while IBM personal-computer buy¬ 
ers are more interested in word processing 
and doing office work at home. 




O -V 

€ia 


K 


As a result, the survey shows, computer Group senior analyst In charge of the 
buyers think different attributes are Impor- survey, 
tant In different machines. Shoppers are Nearly half of the home-computer buyers 

swayed most by price in choosing a Com- shop for machines in discount stores and 
modore computer, by software availability department stores, the survey said, and 
in choosing an Apple and by the manufac- several large outlets account for the bulk of 
turer's reputation In choosing an IBM. the sales. The biggest outlets were K mart 
Computer owners often become Corp.. which sold 17J% of the computers, 
dedicated hobbyists, the survey Indicates, and Radio Shack, which sold 15.7%. Com- 
One-fifth own two or more computers and puter stores as a group accounted for only 
about one-fourth plan to buy another com- 15.2% of the total, 
puter within two years. On average, com- Yankee Group also surveyed consumers 
puter owners also have a library of 10 who didn't own computers. About 40% of 
computer programs; Apple owners had an them said they Just didn't need one for the 
.average 29 programs. home. 

But one-fifth of the computer owners But those who do own a computer are 
said they copied software, presumably with- glued to their keyboards more than eight 
out paying for it. "That suggests a great hours a week and spend 3.5 fewer hours 
deal of piracy." said Clive Smith, a Yankee with their families than do other people. 

65C02 

Optimized Systems has available a CMOS version ot the 6502 
microprocessor, called a 65C02, which can directly replace the normal 
6502 in an Atari computer. This chip requires less power, therby tunn¬ 
ing a lot cooler, and for the assembly language programmer, it otters 
27 new OP codes. Currently, however. MACI65 la the only assembler 
to support these codes unless you write your own Macros, or include 
It via a .BYTE command. Here are the new commands with a bnei 
description of each: 

BRA -branch always. This Instruction works like alt the other 
branch Instructions, except it always branchs, and is therefor like a 
JMP but taking up one less byte of memory and one less cycle to ex¬ 
ecute. 

INA 6 DEA. Increment and decrement the Accumulator. Works the 
same as INX, DEX. INY, A DEY. 

PHX, PHY, PLX. PLY. These instructions work like the PLA and PHA 
Instructions, only pushing the respective register instead of the Ac¬ 
cumulator 

STZ. This stores a zero into the following location but doesnl affect 
any register. Address modes available are ABSOLUTE; ABSX (ZERO 
PAGE); (ZPG*) 

TRB. This complements the Accumulator, AND's it with the 
specified memory location, and stores the results in the meory loca¬ 
tion. 

TSB. This ORA's the Accumulator with the memory location, and 
stores the results in the memory location. Both TRB & TSB use only 
ABSOLUE and ZEROPAGE addressing 

JMP (ABSOLUTE*). This instruction takes the absolute address, 
adds the X register, and jumps to that location. It is a very powerful 
way o»setting up a table of JMP addresses, which are then indexed 
through the X register. 

Additionaly the BIT instruction has two new addressing modes; AB¬ 
SOLUTE* and ZEROPAGE*. 

There is also a very useful new addressing mode. A common 
assembly language instruction sequence is; LDY »0 
IDA (zero page),Y 

The new addressing mode is OPCODE £ero page). The Y register is 
not used, but one can use the indirect mode as if Y was setto zero. 
The following instructions can be used with this mode; ADC, and, 
CMP. EOR, LDA. ORA, SBC, STA. 

\ w frc-E 




1,0 3 


*1 T 



•Everybody needs candy. Everybody needs stationery. 

Everybody needs microcomputers."_ 


CURRENT CONTENTS® 
© 1983 by-Si® 



,*.W - 




i 

f. 

*f 


By T. R. Rdd 


l^lll VSCf 

*oftware product. Top View, ‘ . 
pf . * ■ reminds me of Wagner’s “ParifaT? * 
r- ft’s partly because TcpView. which quite * 
possibly wiU turn out to be the most J: \7‘ 
important new personal computer V 
•development of 1985, should be in the. 
stores right around Easter time. Easter is *■ 
the season, of course, when opera 
Companies traditionally perform Richard 
• Wagner's strange but majestic opera about 
Parsifal, a medieval Knight of the GraiL 
In this insanely wonderful musical saga, 

which has more twists and loops than a 

beginner's first program in BASIC, Parsifal 
and his colleagues devote their fives to a 
mystic quest for the Holy GraiL 
In our time, that search for the Holy Grail 
has become a metaphor for any effort to - 
, reach a grand, but elusive, goal. In the 
: personal computer context, the most 
Important such goal fitting the industry is 
the quest for compatibility, for some 
^tahdardjhat will permit all hardware and 

software to be interchangeable among all 
computers or systems. 

Not long ago, when the IBM-PC was new 
and its MS-DOS operating system was in its 
infancy, a single standard of compatibility 
seemed possible. There were a few 
holdouts—a few rotten Apples, you might ' 
aay—but many thought the industrywide 
' standard was around the comer. 


J 


l 


V The experts aren't so sure today. IBM is 
producing new versions of its computer 
(such as the AT) that aren’t even compatible 
with other IBM micros, much less imHiim 
from other manufacturers. And with each 
new version of MS-DOS, the IBM 
implementation (known as PC-DOS) varies a 
little more from the operating system 
available for other machines. 

Some industry watchers see in these 

developments sinister proof that IBM plane 
, to budd a waO of incompatibility around its 
j personal computer products and thus cut off 
I at the knees all those companies now 
| making IBM clones. 

I don’t see it that way. I think IBM is 
smart enough to realize that it, too, has a 
strong interest in a single personal 


. *v~ f*.* 

the Future Comj&t' 


! ' computer standard. That may be the real 
purpose behind TopView. 

TopView is IBM’s brand-new “operating 
environment* for its PC. XT, and AT * 
.-personal computers (the new program is not 
available for the PCjr). " 

|excuse a little jargon, it isa 
Vmdow-based multitasking program." That 
is. TopView divides the screen into windows 
and lets you run several different programs 
at the same time, one m each window. 

I had a chance to test drive TopView the 
other day and found it a useful tooL You can. 
for example, call a bulletin board on your ’ 
modem program and then, while it is Hiding 
and making the connection, shift to another 

* 

. J 0 PView also permits easy movement of • 
data from one window to the ™>rt T^t is 
it lets you create your own integrated ’ ‘ 

program—a la Symphony and 1 

Framework—using the spreadsheet, ’ 

database and writing programs you’re using 

nght now. IBM says most major applications 

programs will run under TopView. 

^ TopView is priced wefl below 

some other "multitasking* programs and it 
offers features the competitors <ioQ*t have. 

fRKl rvl^np iff* _ _ i . • • 


, ’v?« i & ;Y 

r*n v • •• 



WASHING Tnw W IRINFRS/M4»r.M IB ii 


campaign ever, and TopView a 
strong bet to be a big hit 

But the real importance of TopView. I 
submit, is that it offers a new standard—a 
new method for achieving compatibility 
among competing computer systems. 

The new test for ‘compatibility.* I think, 
no longer wiU be whether a computer can 
run all IBM-PC or IBM-AT software (not 
even other IBM machines can do that). It 
will be whether a machine or program can 
run with TopView. 

As computer expert Rick Cook puts it. 
TopView provides a... well-defined 
interface to hardware and software. By 
year*s end, the standard is probably going to 
be TopView compatibility', not IBM-PC 
compatibility.' ’ 

If that happens. TopView wifi indeed turn 
out to be the most significant development 
of the year—perhaps of the decade. 

And that would be something in ring 
about. Wagner, where are you when we 
need you? _ 


MASS COMPUTER STORAGE SYSTEMS 

Optimism for the optica] disk 

• — | changed flies are cur 


X . N . VIEW of the embryonic'few if 7ny potential users re- 
state of the market. Frost and vealing their hands, the exact 
Sullivan in a recent report* destination of the unite is un 
shows notable optimism about dear. 

Mies of optical disk stores in But F&S produces a break- 
t5° r ioM 1S yMr and ^ down by applications of where 
P *Th? u lbe uni ls are going. Transac- 

The market research company tion recording could be the 

BrPdirf t that in IVoetnpn Furnn* ..._ . 1 



changed flies are currently on 
magnetic tape or disk, micro¬ 
fiche. or even paper. Banking, 
insurance, airlines, credit cards 
and the Government are the 
main areas. 

Mapping/remote sensing, 
magnetic disk back-up and tele¬ 
communications store-and- 
forward systems arc each nr®. 


The main contender for the 
European market in 1SS4 is 
Hid to be Storage Technology 
Corporation (38m of sales in 
, 1984), but since the report was 
compiled the company has run 
into financial trouble and Frost 
and Sullivan’s other two main 
contenders. Philips and Thom- 
aon-CSF, placed In equal second 
place with. 34m each, may come 
to the fore. Shugart’s Hies are 
put at 32m, Matsushita’s at Jim. 

. But. plenty of other U.S. com¬ 
panies either offer, or are likely 
to offer systems. Including Drex- 
ler, RCA, NCR, Kodak. Control 
Data, 3M, Texas Instruments, 
and Xerox. As ever, IBM re¬ 
mains a dark horse and could 
influence and seriously impact 
the market on entry. The com¬ 
pany has not, as yet, made any 
definitive' announcements. F&S 
Indicates that most of the Euro¬ 
pean and Japanese electronics 
majors are likely to take an 
interest. ;. ' 

On the technology front the' 
search has been on for a better 
recording surface than tel¬ 
lurium, which in its pure fosn 
oxidises within two years. 
Approaches to better archiving 
qualities have - included alloy- 
, ing tellurium with arsenic and 
! selenium, hermetically sealing 
the discs and using glass sub- 
tives like polymer/dye binders 
(Kodak) an dsilver halides are 
being developed, and Drexon’s 
silver/polymer combination has 

makers are believed to have 
had yield and consistency prob- 
. terns. 

j Most manufacturers are now 
I claiming a useful life in excess 
I of 10 years. But it is interest¬ 
ing’ that the U.S. Library'of 
Congress, now piloting an 
Integrated Automation system' 
using Thomson-CSF disks, l>e^ 
lieves that long life is not * 
worry—they plan simply t(pre¬ 
record at intervals, ..which is 
what happens with magnetic 
media at the moment In addi¬ 
tion, non-erasability, far from 
detracting, seems to make opti¬ 
cal disks more attractive in 
industries like banking, where 
It provides protection against 
tampering and gives a com¬ 
plete audit trail. 

Optical disk storage seems 
bound to succeed on space and 
cost considerations alone. The 
Philips 30cm digital disc for 
example,. .can hold 0.5m pages 
of text or 30,000 TV-like 
images. RCA and Philips both 
expect disk prices to drop to 
the 310 to $20 within a few 
years, which would bring media 
costs to 0.2 per cent megabit— 
and a megabit is the equivalent 
of about 1,000 pages of A4 type¬ 
written text. 












































































WAGE TARES *1 


#23 


•1 - #5 WITHDRAWN - SEE BELOW 


•6 

SIDE 1 

DEFENCE 

ANIMAL 

6TIA BALL DEMO 


SIDE 2 
TOUCH-TYPE 
FLAGS 
CUBE DEMO 


17 

SIDE 1 

SCREAMIN DEMON 
ROSE PLOTS 


SIDE 2 
ROAD BLOCK 
NUMBER PUZZLE 
ANTIC 4 & 5 DEMO 


«8 

SIDE 1 
OIL MINER 
COLOUR RAINBOW 


«10 
SIDE 1 
MINI GOLF 
MOO 


#12 
SIDE 1 
CHOPPEROIDS 
MLX 

VERIFY Si XREF 


SIDE 2 
WORD SEARCH 
SPELLING BEE 


SIDE 2 

WORM-SQUIRM 

DEPTH-CHARGE 


SIDE 2 
ALPHABLOX 
NIGHT FLYER 


•9 

SIDE 1 
WAGE LOADER 
XMAS SPECIAL 
FLIPIT 
HOOKEY 
BLACKJACK 
PAC INVADERS 

#11 

SIDE 1 
NOUNS 

FUNCTION MACHINE 
(24K) 
DRAGNET 
TAXMAN 

SOUTH ISLAND DIS 


SIDE 2 

ROUNDUP (M/C) 
STONES OF WRATH 
LADDER MAZE 
ATARI BLASTER 


SIDE 2 

GEOGRAPHY QUIZ 
ALPHABET TRAIN 
HANGMAN 
WORD SCRAMBLE 
MATH FUN 


FOR #13 AND ALL SUBSEQUENT TAPES: 

TO FIND THE START OF SIDE NUMBER TWO, TYPE "POKE 54018,52". THIS WILL CAUSE YOU? 
CASSETTE TO RUN WHEN THE PLAY BUTTON IS DOWN. SET THE COUNTER TO 000 BEFORE YOU START. 
WHEN YOU HEAR THE "LEADER WHISTLE" NOTE THE NUMBER ON THE COUNTER. THIS IS WHERE TIC 
FIRST PROGRAM STARTS. (APPROX. 20 ON #14) 


#13 
SIDE 1 

MEET THE ROMANS 

PRESCHOOL 

MEMORY MATCH 

BAGELS 

MATH PACKAGE 


SIDE 2 

MATHWARS 

MADLIBS 

CANNIBALS & MISS. 
BOURREAU 
DRAGNET 
MATHEMATICS 


#16 
SIDE 1 

PLANETARY DEFENCE 
(M/C) 


#17 

SIDE 1 
COUNTING 
ALGEBRA 1 
WORLD CAPITALS 
DOMINOES 
SCRIPTURE QUIZ 
YAT-C 


SIDE 2 
BATS 

ETCH-A-SKETCH 


SIDE 2 

ALGEBRA DRILL 
DIVISION 
MULTIPLICATION 
IMPROPER FRACTIONS 
EQUIVALENT FRACTIONS 
ADDING FRACTIONS 


#14 

SIDE 1 

SIDE 2 

KONG 

PROOF READER 
MISSILE BASE 

#15 

SIDE 1 

SIDE 2 

YAT-C 

ARTILLERY 

PETALS 

REVERSE 

DRAW 



BEST or WACE #1 - *5 

«1B 


SIDE 1 

SIDE 2 

SIDE 1 

SIDE 2 

LOGO 

SCRAMBLED EGGS 

LIVEWIRE 

CREATE-A-FONT 

DOGGIES 

MASTER CATALOGUE 

RETROFIRE 

MESSAGE 

HARVEY WALLBANGER 

GOBBLERS 

CLEWSO 

ROMAN CLDCK 

TINYTEXT 

DAIRY FARMING 

SOUNDS 

MENU 

CASTLE HEX 


LUNAR RESCUE 

BUBBLE SORT 

BANKSHOT 


COLOUR UTILITY 

KEYBOARD 



LONG DIVISION 

FUGUE 



• 

SWAT.TYPO 

♦19 




SIDE 1 

SIDE 2 



FILLERUP (M/C) 

TROUBLESOME WORDS 

#20 


BAR CHARTS 

RACE TO 100 

SIDE 1 

SIDE 2 

WHEELS (DEMO) 


OLD MACDONALD 

ODDS AND EVENS 



ESTIMATION 

VERBS 



UNSCRAMBLE 

PLURALS 

#21 


COUNTING 

HANGMAN 

SIDE 1 

SIDE 2 

ALGEBRA ONE 

HANGMAN QUOTES 

RATS (M/C - ACTION) 

CRICKETS 



WORMS " 

REACTOR 



LIFE " 


#22 


TOCCATA 


SIDE 1 

SIDE 2 



3D TIC TAC TOE 

MEMORY MATCH 



WHIRL (DEMO) 

COMPUTER BLUES 

*23 




SIDE 1 

SIDE 2 



DUNGEON OF THE GODS CHRISTMAS CARD 

#26 


ELIZA 

12 DAZE OF XMAS 

SIDE 1 

SIDE 2 

KRAZY KLIMBER 

PINETOP 

TRAP 

HANGQUOTES NZ 

BULL ANT 

MAPLE LEAF 

ALPHABET MUSIC 

TYPEATTACK 


SOUND AND LIGHT 

APTITUDE TEST 

FRENCH 



SIGHT WORDS 

NUMBERLINE 



LAST SUPPER 


*24 


JOYSTICK MATHS 


SIDE 1 

SIDE 2 

MAKE A SENTENCE 


MYRIAPEDE 

SPANISH 

MUSIC TONES 


COMPUTER CUBE 

TYPING EVALUATION 



AIR ATTACK 

BALLDROP 



READER 

CALENDAR 

#27 



NERD 

SIDE 1 

SIDE 2 



SLOT MACHINE 

BOWLING ALLEY 

*25 




SIDE 1 

SIDE 2 



FIRE BUG 

WORD SCRAMBLE 



ANGLO TO METRIC 

WACE DISC MENU 




REACTION TIMER