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June 1989 



The 




Canada $4.95 U.S. $3,95 



THE COLOR COMPUTER MONTHLY MA 



Summer 









The Evil 
Barden's 





of Castle Zhagwhar 
Puzzles 



m 





The Economy Printer Buffer, 
a Softball Statistics Program, 
Utilities, Graphics and More! 



Still pounding away at that keyboard? 




SAVE up to 19%" 

when you buy a joint sub- 
scription to the magazine and 
either rainbow on tape or 
rainbow ON DISK! A one-year 
subscription to the rainbow 
and rainbow on tape is only 
$91 in the U.S., $108 in Can- 
ada, $153 foreign surface rate 
and $188 foreign airmail. A 
one-year subscription to the 
rainbow and rainbow on 
DISK is only $115 in the U.S., 
$138 in Canada, $183 foreign 
surface rate and $218 foreign 
airmail.* 

Every month, these convenient 
services bring you as many as 24 
ready-to-run programs. Using the 
current issue of the rainbow as 
documentation, all you have to do is 
load and run them. A one-year com- 
bination subscription to the rain- 



bow and rainbow on tape or rain- 
bow on disk give you more than 230 
new programs! The typing time you 
save can be spent enjoying your 
CoCo! 



RAINBOW ON TAPE 
For No-Fuss Fun 

Back issues of rainbow on tape 
are available beginning with the 
April 1982 issue. A single copy of 
rainbow on tape is $10 within the 
United States; U.S. $12 in all other 
countries. The annual subscription 
rate for rainbow on tape is $80 
within the U.S.; U.S. $90 in Canada; 
and U.S. $105 for all other coun- 
tries.* 



RAINBOW ON DISK 

Offers OS-9 Programs 

In addition to all the programs 
offered on tape, part of one side of 
rainbow on disk is formatted for the 
OS-9 operating system. That means 
you can now get all the OS-9 pro- 
grams from the magazine — pro- 
grams that cannot be put on tape. 
Back issues of rainbow on disk are 
available beginning with October 
1986. Subscriptions to rainbow on 
disk are $99 a year in the U.S. Cana- 
dian rate is U.S. $115. All other 
countries, U.S. $130. Single copy 
rate is $12 in the U.S.; U.S. $14 in 
Canada; and U.S. $16 in all other 
countries.* 



To order by phone (credit card orders only), call (800) 847- 
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4492. 

Look for our envelope located between pages 66 and 67 for 
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for delivery of first copies. Joint subscriptions to the rainbow and rainbow on tape or rainbow on disk begin with the current issue. 

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order from a club), no license to make copies is conveyed or implied. Yes, your group may even purchase a subscription to our disk/tape services, but such purchase 
in no way authorizes that any copies be made of that original disk/tape. Specifically, this means that the original disk/tape itself may indeed be kept in a club library 
for use by members. However, a group purchase does not entitle club members, individually or as a group, to copy that disk/tape. 
Unauthorized copying of any copyright product is strictly illegal. The copyright (right to make copies) is in no way conveyed in the purchase transaction. 



r 




From Computer Plus to YOU 



m m m 



alter 




after 





BIG SAVINGS ON A FULL 

COMPUTERS 

Tandy 4000 HX 1 Drive 256 K 539.00 

Tandy 1000 TX 1 Drive 640K 799.00* 

Tandy 3000 NL 1 Drive 512K 1279.00 

Tandy 4000 1 Drive 1 Meg.Ram 1959.00 

Tandy 5000 MC 2 Meg. Ram 3799.00 

PRINTERS 

Radio Shack DMP-106 80 CPS 169.00 

Radio Shack DMP-132 120 CPS 199.00* 

Radio Shack DMP-440 300 CPS 549.00 
Radio Shack DWP-230 Daisy Wheel 269.00* 

Tandy LP-1000 Laser Printer 1899.00 

Star Micronics NX-1000 144 CPS 199.00 

Star Micronics NX-1000 Rainbow 269.00 

Panasonic KXP 1 1 80 1 92 CPS 249.00 

Panasonic KXP 1 191 240 CPS 299.00 

Panasonic KXP 1 1 24 1 92 CPS 399.00 

Okidata320 300 CPS 369.00 

Okidata 390 270 CPS 24 Wire Hd 515.00 

NEC Pinwriter P-2200 170 CPS 399.00 

MODEMS 

Radio Shack DCM-6 52.00 

Radio Shack DCM-7 85.00 

Practical Peripheral 2400 Baud 229.00 

Practical Peripheral 1200 Baud 149.00 



COMPLEMENT OF RADIO SHACK COMPUTER PRODUCTS 



14.95 
119.00 
59.95 
26.95 
299.00 



COLOR COMPUTER MISC. 

Radio Shack Drive Controller 99.00 
Extended Basic Rom Kit (28 pin) 14.95 
64K Ram Upgrade Kit (2 or 8 chip) 39.00 
Radio Shack Deluxe Keyboard Kit 24.95 
HI-RES Joystick Interface 8.95 
Color Computer Deluxe Mouse 44.00 
Multi Pak Pal Chip for COCO 3 
PBH Converter with 64K Buffer 
Serial to Parallel Converter 
Radio Shack Deluxe Joystick 
Magnavox 8515 RGB Monitor 
Magnavox Green or Amber Monitor99.00 
Radio Shack CM-8 RGB Monitor 210.00* 
Radio Shack VM-4 Green Monitor 99.00 
PBJ OK COCO 3 Upgrade Board 19.95 
PBJ 51 2K COCO 3 Upgrade CALL 
Tandy OK COCO 3 Upgrade Board 24,95 
Tandy 51 2K COCO 3 Upgrade CALL 

COLOR COMPUTER SOFTWARE 

TAPE DISK 

The Wild West (CoCo3) 
Worlds Of Flight 
Mustang P-51 FlightSimul. 
Flight 16 Flight Simul. 



25.95 
34.95 34.95 
34.95 34.95 
34.95 34.95 



COCO Util II by Mark Data 39.95 
COCO Max III by Colorware 79.95 
Max 10 by Colorware 79.95 
AutoTerm by PXE Computing 29.95 39.95 
TW-80 by Spectrum (CoCo3) 39.95 
Telewriter 64 49.95 59.95 

Telewriter 128 79.95 
Elite Word 80 79.95 
Elite Calc 3.0 69.95 
CoCo 3 51 2K Super Ram Disk 19.95 
Home Publisher by Tandy (CoCo3) 35.95 
Sub Battle Sim. by Epyx (CoCo3) 26.95 
Thexder by Sierra (CoCo3) 22.45 
Kings Quest III by Sierra (CoCo3) 31 .45 
FllghtSim.il bySubLogic (CoCo3) 31.45 
OS-9 Level II by Tandy 71 .95 

OS-9 Development System 89.95 
Multi-View by Tandy 44.95 
VIP Writer (disk only) 69.95 
VIP Integrated Library (disk) 149.95 

Prices are subject to change without notice. 
Please call for shipping charges. Prices in our re- 
tall store may be higher. Send for complete 
catalog 



Sale prices through 5/31/89 



CALL TOLL FREE 
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• LOWEST POSSIBLE PRICES 

• BEST POSSIBLE WARRANTY 

• KNOWLEDGEABLE SALES STAFF 

• TIMELY DELIVERY 

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P.O. Box 1094 
480 King Street 
Littleton, MA 01460 



SINCE 1973 



IN MASSACHUSETTS CALL (508) 486-3193 



TRS-80 is a registered trademark of Tandy Corp. 




Tabl e of Contents 1 



.-•n't ■>. 1 1 . : h vr 




110 



Coat 1 1 roc 



18 

Electro Dominoes 

Jeff Steidl 

^ new domino theory — 
puf /f on a Co Co and /f w/// 
be much faster, more fun 
and much more colorful 



22 % 

Self Portrait ^ 

James A. Tatarka 
A tribute to the CoCo 2 

28 

Fortune Teller 

Paul D. Burnham 

Use the pyramid method to 

answer your questions 



28 





41 

Castle Zhagwhar 

Keith Schuler 

An adventure in the 

kingdom of Lit h an a 



48 

Now You See It, % 
Now You Don't! 

Jean-Francois Morin 
Five optical illusions 
to display on your 
CoCo 3 monitor 

52 

CoCo in 3-D! 

Eugene Vasconi 

Put a new twist in computer 

graphics 

The CoCo Quiz 
Master 

Bill Bernico 

Astound your non-computing 
friends by making the CoCo 
a "know-it-all" 



June 1989 
Vol. VIII No. 11 

59 % 

Storm ^ 

B.J. Bryson 

Brew up a rainy day 

on your CoCo 

62 ^ 

EZRun 

Fred Kolesar 

Auto-run BASIC programs 

by typing just their filenames 

100 

The Economy *w 
Printer Buffer, 
Part 1of2 

Harleen Francisco 
Increase your computing 
productivity 



110 

Fun Stats 

Delbert Baker 

Keep statistics for your 

softbail team 

122 _ 

Selective W 
Directory Listings 

Richard Estrado 

A wildcard utility for those 

hard-to-find disk files 

136 

PR. B09 4> 

Richard Ries 

An OS-9 printer utility 



18 




4 



THE RAINBOW June 1989 



1 Nov i c e s Nich 
89 

Left Beats Right 

Keiran Kenny 

90 

Asteroid Dodge 

Clayton R. Moore 

90 

Elevators 

Paul Nalos 

91 

Wordmake 

Logan Bleckley, III 

91 

Diary 

Bradley Hurt 

92 

Disks Named "Miscl" 

Merle Miller 

92 

Sound Control 

Joel Hegberg 

93 

Simple Draw 

Darren Day 




The cassette tape/disk sym- 




~ bols beside features and col- 
umns indicate that the program listings 
with those articles are on this month's 

RAINBOW ON TAPE and RAIN- 
BOW on disk. Those with only the 
disk symbol are not available on 
rainbow on tape. For details, 
check the rainbow on tape and 
rainbow on disk ad on the inside 
front cover. 



Departments 



Advertisers Index 
Back Issue Info _ 

CoCo Gallery 

Corrections 



Letters to Rainbow 
Maxwell Mouse _ 

One-Liner Info 

One-Liners 

Racksellers 

Rainbow Info 



.160 
.147 
_26 
. 66 
_6 



. 58 
.156 
. 85 
.158 
_16 



Received & Certified 
Scoreboard 



_135 

94 

Scoreboard Pointers 96 

Submitting Material 152 

Subscription Info 154 



Co l umns 



80 a 

BASIC Training 

Joseph Kolar 

Boxcars, boxcars, boxcars 

78 

CoCo Consultations 

Marty Goodman 

Just what the doctor ordered 

84 

Doctor ASCII 

Richard Esposito 
The question fixer 

Education Notes ™ 

Steve Blyn 
Shooting math 

12 

Print #-2, 

Lawrence C. Falk 
Editor's notes 

98 

Turn of the Screw 

Tony DiStefano 

The DEFs of disk drives 



Wishing Well ^ 

Fred Scerbo 

The days of the week 



"Basically Speaking" and 
"Delphi Bureau" will return 
next month. 



1 Rainbow teefr 



140 

Barden's Buffer 

William Barden, Jr. 
Perplexing puzzles to ponder 



150 . 

KISSableOS-9 ^ 

Dale Puckett 

Building two handy tools 



"Accessible Applications" 
will return in August 



1 Product Revi e ws 



The Black Grid/SPORTSware _ 
Caladuril II — Weatherstone's 

End/Oblique Triad 



.130 



Chess-Nuts/Mousesoft Software 
Digitizer 3/DSD Software 



Floppy Filer/Gregory Software 

Hard Drive Utilities KB Enterprises. 
Kca\/King Cottage Industries 



Rustler/ King Cottage Industries 

Wargame Designer 

Icon Disk #*\/SPORTSware 



_126 
.132 
.134 
_132 
.129 
.128 
.131 

.133 



the rainbow is published every month of the year by FALSOFT, Inc., The 
Falsoft Building, 9509 U.S. Highway 42, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059, 
phone (502) 228-4492. THE RAINBOW, RAINBOWfest and THE RAINBOW and 
RAINBOWfest logotypes are registered ® trademarks of FALSOFT, Inc. • 
Second class postage paid Prospect, KY and additional offices. USPS N. 705- 
050 (ISSN No. 0746-4797). POSTMASTER: Send address changes to THE 
rainbow, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. Authorized as second class 
postage paid from Hamilton, Ontario by Canada Post, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. 
• Entire contents copyright ® by FALSOFT, Inc., 1989. THE RAINBOW is intended 
for the private use and pleasure of its subscribers and purchasers and 
reproduction by any means is prohibited. Use of information herein is for the 
single end use of purchasers and any other use is expressly prohibited. All 
programs herein are distributed in an "a9 is" basis, without warranty of any kind 
whatsoever. • Tandy, Color BASIC, Extended Color basic and Program Pak are 
registered ® trademarks of the Tandy Corp. • Subscriptions to the rainbow 
are $31 per year in the United States. Canadian rates are U.S. $38. Surface mail 
to other countries is U.S. $68, air mail U.S. $103. All subscriptions begin with 
next available issue. • Limited back issues are available. Please see notice for 
issues that are in print and their costs. Payment accepted by VISA, MasterCard, 
American Express, cash, check or money order in U.S. currency only. Full 
refund after mailing of one issue. A refund of 10/12ths the subscription amount 
after two issues are mailed. No refund after mailing of three or more magazines. 



The Rainbow 



i 



Editor and Publisher 

Lawrence C. Falk 

Managing Editor Jutta Kapfhammer 

Associate Editor Sue Fomby 

Reviews Editor Lauren Willoughby 

Submissions Editor Tony Olive 

Copy Editor Kelly Goff 

Technical Editors Cray Augsburg, 
Ed El/ers 

Technical Assistant David Horrar 
Editorial Assistant Vivian Turbeville 

Contributing Editors 

William Barden, Jr., 
Steve Blyn, Tony DiStefano, 
Richard Esposito, 
Martin Goodman, M.D., 
Joseph Kolar, Dale Puckett, 
Fred Scerbo, Richard White 

Art Director Meidi Maxedon 

Designers Sharon Adams, 
Teri Kays, Denise Webb 

Typesetter Renee Hutchins 



Falsoft, Inc. 



President Lawrence C. Falk 
General Manager Bonnie Frowenfeld 
Asst. General Mgr. for Finance 

Donna Shuck 
Admin. Asst. to the Publisher 

Kim Thompson 
Editorial Director John Crawley 
Asst. Editorial Director Judr Hutchinson 
Director of Production Jim Cleveland 
Chief Bookkeeper Diane Moore 
Dealer Accounts Judy Guashnock 
Asst. General Manager For Administration 

Sandy Apple 
Word Processor Manager 

Patricia Eaton 
Customer Service Manager 

Beverly Bearden 
Customer Service Representative 

Carolyn Fenwick 
Chief of Printing Services Melba Smith 
Dispatch Paul Bauscher 
Business Assistants Laurie Falk, 

Janie Stainback 
Chief of Building Security 
and Maintenance 

Jessie Brooks 
Advertising and Development 
Coordinator Ira Barsky 
Advertising Representatives 

Belinda Kirby, Kim Vincent 
Advertising Assistant Debbie Baxter 
(502) 228-4492 



For RAINBOW Advertising and 
Marketing Office Information, 
see Page 160 



Cover illustration 
by Fred Crawford 



June 1969 THE RAINBOW 5 



Foreign Characters 

Editor: 

I am a missionary in Quito, Ecuador. 
During 14 years of service here, the last 
seven have been enhanced through the use 
of Color Computers. I brought the first one 
here in 1982 and it continues to operate to 
this very day in our Bible Institute. I up- 
graded it from 1 6K to 64K myself. I learned 
basic, assembly language, OS-9 and much 
more with that old gray machine. It cost an 
arm and a leg at that time, but it has been 
worth it. 

Since then, I have greatly computerized 
our work here, using only Color Comput- 
ers. There is a CoCo system in every major 
ministry of our church — our boy's home, 
recording studio, book store and Christian 
Book distribution. Our maximum configu- 
ration is a CoCo 3 with 512K, a 15-Meg 
hard drive, OS-9 Level II and CM-8 moni- 
tor. It is used to maintain the entire opera- 
tion and inventory of over 1500 different 
Christian titles. 

Because of the isolation that we live in, 
even mail can be delayed many months. (I 
just received the November issue yester- 
day.) Sometimes mail doesn't even make 
it, which is very discouraging when one has 
paid more than double the subscription 
price just for postage. After living here so 
long, I consider the U.S. postal system to be 
one of the wonders of the world. People 
who complain about it should be sentenced 
to one year in a third-world country. 

The days are gone that I can take the 
luxury of typing in long and powerful pro- 
grams. Have all the talented programmers 
abandoned the CoCo world? Only pro- 
grammers can make the Color Computer 
the machine it should be! 

There is very little, if any, superior 
programming for the CoCo 3. There isn't 
even a really decent database. Simply porting 
programs over to the 80-column screen and 
speeding them up is an insult to the power 
built into the CoCo 3. 

I used a modified version of VIP Writer 
(one that I modified myself) that produces 
Spanish letters on its graphics screen which 
correspond with my printer's Spanish char- 
acters (Okidata 192). I have not upgraded 
to the new version of the program because 
I don't want to take the time to repeat the 
work of modifying it. 

IBM clones, and even the Tandy 600, 
provide the IBM G2 character set which 
works on most of our printers. It makes 

6 THE RAINBOW June 1989 



writing in Spanish so easy. Bill Barden's 
article on teaching the CoCo 3 the Tandy 
1000 character set (which is essentially the 
same as the IBM G2), was very well done. 
Thus, a CoCo 3 could produce Spanish 
documents on a G2 printer and display 
them simultaneously on the screen. Doing 
so from basic doesn't interest me though, 
and what I gather from the new CoCo 3 
word processors, there is no indication that 
any of them make the work of writing in a 
foreign language any easier. Only software 
that gives intelligent support for foreign 
language characters, such as IBM's G2 
standard using 8-bit data, will ever become 
very popular outside the USA. Isn't there 
any demand for foreign language charac- 
ters within the U.S. borders? I understand 
that foreign languages are still being taught 
in both high school and college. Max-10 
looks nice, but it doesn't support G2 char- 
acters. Even Tandy printers now support 
G2! 

It is far less important to the majority of 
buyers in a foreign land, if the program 
speaks another language (prompts in Span- 
ish) than it is if the program produces 
foreign language (the final product). 

I like the CoCo! It is a cheap computer 
with great value. What I ask of it does not 
require any new hardware. I only ask that 
consideration be made [for foreign charac- 
ters] while developing programs — espe- 
cially word processors, databases and 
spreadsheet programs. It should be as much 
a part of OS-9, as it is a part of MS-DOS. 

Reverend Kepler Nigh 
Quito, Ecuador 

The Best Kept Secret . . . 

Editor: 

Just a while ago, I was at a computer 
store talking to one of the salesmen who 
sells many different brand names — Atari 
to Samsung. I mentioned to him that I had 
a CoCo 3 and was learning OS-9. 1 asked 
him if he was familiar with OS-9, and he 
said, "No." 

I told him that it was a UNIX-like oper- 
ating system. He was stunned. The look on 
his face was worth many "bytes." He asked 
me, "Are you serious, UNIX has multi- 
tasking capability?" 

I told him that OS-9 did, too. He couldn't 
believe the CoCo could do that. Five min- 
utes later, he was still shaking his head. He 
just couldn't get over the fact that the CoCo 
could run an operating system similar to 
UNIX. 



The CoCo 3, unfortunately, is the best 
kept secret. 

Fred Lajoie 
Kentville, Nova Scotia 

BACK TALK 

Editor: 

With regard to the query by Al Bilinski 
(of Selkirk, Manitoba) who wanted to run 
DynaCalc on the CoCo 3: Australian Pe- 
ripheral Developments can provide a work- 
ing version of the RS-DOS DynaCalc which 
will run on the CoCo 3. 

Simply forward your original master 
disk along with $30 to the address listed 
below. The master disk will be returned 
with a working DynaCalc disk for the CoCo 
3, and instructions for making backups. 

John Poxon 

Australian Peripheral Developments 

94 Chatswood Road 
Slacks Creek. 4127 
Australia 

HINTS & TIPS 

Editor: 

I have been an avid rainbow reader and 
CoCo programmer for about six years now. 
I started out on a 1 6K ECB CoCo 2, quickly 
upgraded to 64K, two SSDD drives, CGP- 
115 and DMP-105 printers, Deluxe RS- 
232 Pak, Orchestra-90 synthesizer, etc. 

My chief reason for selecting a CoCo, 
other than the price, was the outstanding 
graphics capabilities. So, naturally, when 
the CoCo 3 became available, I had to have 
one! 

I have been especially delighted with 
several programs and articles in rainbow 
about replacing HSCREEN character sets with 
customized fonts, particularly Eric Wolf's 
Font Master (October '88, Page 41). After 
hand-entering four or five font sets, I dis- 
covered that I could load my old McPaint 
and Graphicom fonts into memory with an 
offset of &H749D, then resave them with 
start, end and exec addresses of &HF09D, 
&HF49C, &HF09D, respectively. Then they 
can be loaded directly into memory for 
HSCREEN use, or by Font Master to be 
edited. 

Some of my old fonts were saved as 
binary data files, rather than machine lan- 
guage files, i.e., 1 B 1, instead of 2 B l.With 
these, I cheated and used GregEterm to 
load them one by one, then resave them as 
machine language programs, which then 



_____ I 

A revolutionary program that allows you 
to use Basic Programs from OS9! OS9 
Level 2 is the future of the CoCo. Unfor- 
tunately, many Basic Programmers are 
afraid of using OS9 because it is difficult 
to use. RSB allows you to run Basic from 
OS9 & take advantage of the features such 
as multi-tasking, no-halt floppies and high 
speed operation. Req. OS9 Level II. 
Latest Version! Only $39.95 



CEBBS 

by Kevin Berner 

Best BBS for the CoCo 3. XModem 
Up/Downloading, unlimited menus, login, 
message base, built-in clock/calendar, ex- 
ecution of external programs. Sysop has 
full control of user's acess to menus, time 
on system and remote system access. Full 
Error Trapping. HyperlO Compatible. In- 
troductory Special $49.95. Req. CoCo 3 , 
1 Drive & RS232 Pack. 



VIP DATABASE TTT 

Best Database for CoCo 3. Features 
40/64/80 columns, easy-to-understand 
menu system, size limited only by disk 
space, LIGHTNING FAST in-memory 
sort, multiple search, built-in MATH 
PACKAGE, spooler and report generator 
, unlimited print formats & more. $69.95 


XENOCOPY-PC 

An amazingly versatile program that al- 
lows you to Format/ Duplicate/ Read/ 
Write/ Transfer Disks from 300 different 
computers (for ex. CoCo, IBM, PC-DOS, 
TRS-80 Model 3/ 4/ 100, Zenith, etc). Re- 
quires an IBM Compatible with 2 drives. 

Disk $79.95 (Note: You cannot run ML programs 
of one machine on the other) 


VIP CALC m 1 

Best Spreadsheet for CoCo 3. Features 4 
color menus, 32/40/64/80 column display, 
2 Mhz speed, more. Allows up to 1024 
rows x 512 columns. VIP CALC III also 
has up to 16 windows, trig, averaging, sort- 
ing, algebraic & sorting functions. Locate, 
block move/copy commands & limitless 
programmable functions. Works with any 
printer. Only $69.95 




MAX10 1 

Best Desktop Publishing / Document 
Creator for CoCo 3. Pull Down Menus, 
What You See is What You Get, UNDO, 
integrated text & graphics capability, mul- 
tiple fonts & more. Graphics can be im- 
ported from CoCo Max I,II,III, MGE, 
MGF, 5 Level DS-69, PMODE 4, 
HSCREEN 2/3. Supports DMP 105/ 130, 
EPSON MX/ *FX/ RXJ LX/ Gemini 10 
series, CGP-220 and OKI-92. Only $79.95 




5__-JV DACJvUr 

LIGHTNING 

The ultimate CoCo 3 disk copy utility! 
Reads the master disk & makes as many 
copies as you want. Even copies to unfor- 
matted disks! Supports 35/40/80 track 
drives & various step rates. From Colorven- 
ture. $19.95 

PRINTER LIGHTNING 

The Ultimate print spooler. Allows you to 
use your printer & simultaneously con- 
tinue with your programming. From Color- 
veniure. CoCo 3 Disk only $19.95 




ADOS 3 

Advanced Disk Operating System for 
CoCo 3. Comes on disk and is 
EPROMable!! Disk $34.95 ADOS (for 
CoCo 1,2): $27.95 




BASIC FREEDOM 

A Full Screen Editor for Basic Programs. 
Only $24.95 

VOCAL FREEDOM 

Turn your computer into a digital voice / 
sound recorder. Produces natural 
voice/sound effects. Req. inexpensive RS 
Amplifier (#277-1008) & any 
microphone. Only $34.95 

HACKER's PAC 

Allows you to incorporate voices created 
by Vocal Freedom into your own Basic & 
ML Programs. Only $14.95 




FKEYS TTT 

A user friendly, user programmable func- 
tion key utility that creates up to 20 func- 
tion keys. Includes EDITOR, DOS mods, 
DISABLE and its EPROMable! CoCo 3 
Disk Only $19.95! 


SIXDRIVE L 

Allows the use of 3 double-sided drives 1 
from RSDOS or ADOS. Only $16.95 1 




RGB Patch L 

Displays most games in color on RGBI 
Monitors. Only $24.95 1 




Color Schematic Designer [ 

by Prakash Mishra 

An excellent Circuit Schematic Design 
Software Package. Features HSCREEN 
display, Pull Down Menus, RGB/ Com- 
posite/ Monochrome support, 72 modifi- 
able symbols, hi-res fonts, UNDO 
command, Symbol Rotate/Line/ Box 
Draw, 3 layers of circuits & Screen Print 
Command for DMP/ EPSON/ GEMINI 
compatible printers. CoCo 3 Disk Only 
$39.95 /,-v 

— — u>- 




CoCoUtilll 

Transfers ASCII files/Basic Programs to 
IBM compatible computers & vica-versa. 
Requires 2-drive IBM Compatible. Disk 
$39.95 (Note: ML programs of one machine can- 
not be run on the other). Req MSDOS 3.2 or lower. 



HYPERIO Utilities 

by Kevin Berner 

Hard Drive Utilities: MSA Backup, Copy/ 
Kill/ Rename, Hard Disk Backup to Flop- 
pies (& vica-versa), wild card & more. 
Only $21.95 

Disk Doctor: Checks/locks out bad sec- 
tors. Only $17.95 

Hard Drive Zap: View tracks, sectors, 
modify data on your hard disk. Only $21.95 



Window Master 

Windows for your CoCo 3! Imagine using 
Pull Down Menus, Buttons, Icons, Edit 
Fields in your Basic Programs. Has 5 fonts 
in 54 sizes, superb Basic Editor & more. 
Requires CoCo 3, 1 Drive, RS Hi-Res In- 
terface & Joystick or Mouse. Only $69.95. 
Window Master & Hi-Res Interface, Only 
$79.95 



Programming Tools 

EDT/ASM 64D: Editor-assemblerl 
(Specify CoCo 1,2,3): $59.95 
SOURCE: CoCo Disassembler. $34.95| 
SOURCE 3: $49.95 

CBASIC: Best Basic Compiler. $149.95.] 
CBASIC III: $149.95 



COCO MAX III (with interface): $79.95 
COCO MAX II: Disk $77.95 Tape $67.95 
MAXFONTS #i,#2,#3,#4: Disk $19.95ea 
NX1000 Rainbow Driver: $19.95 
MAXPATCH: Run CoCo Max 2 on CoCo 
3. $24.95 



Telewriter 64 : Best Word Processor fori 
CoCo 1 & 2. Disk $57.95. Tape $47.95 
Autoterm: Modem Software. Disk $39.95 1 
Cas $29.95 

Pro Color File Enhanced 2.0: $59,95 



»••* 



MICROCOM SOFTWARE, 2900 Monroe Ave, Rochester.NY 14618 
For Detailed Order Information, refer to Page 17 of our 6-page Ad series(Pgs 7-17). 

To Place Credit Card Orders Call Toll Free 1-800-654-5244 (9am-8pm 7 days/week) 
Technical Support (4-8pm),; Order Status, Info, Technical Info; 716-383-8830 





1 T 1 



2N< 




allowed me to offset, load and resave them 
in a useful format. 

I hope this information can be of some 
use and save others the wear and tear on 
keyboard and fingertips I was experienc- 
ing. 

Keep up this outstanding publication. 

Mike Hungerford 
Escondido, California 

INFO PLEASE 

Editor: 

I usually know a good deal when I see 
one, but . . . six months ago I logged on to 
the CoCo Master's BBS (whose number 
was published in rainbow) and made a deal 
to purchase two double-sided drives (which 
were advertised on the board) from the 
SysOp, George Proulx. At my request, I 
asked him to add a case, power supply and 
cable, and told him I would pay for the extra 
parts and labor involved. He agreed. The 
total cost of this equipment was $215. The 
drives were paid off in November. Now for 
the problem. 

I contacted Mr. Proulx over the BBS, 
constantly asking him when he would be 
finished with my drives. He kept telling me 
they were just about done. Toward the 



middle of January, I contacted him again. 
This time he said they would be shipped to 
me within the next week. However, that 
was the last I've heard of him. 

Since then he has taken his board down, 
changed his phone number, and I found out 
today that he has moved. What am I to do? 
I worked hard flipping burgers to pay for 
those drives! Any information on the where- 
abouts of this bum will be quite helpful and 
appreciated. 

Peter Bott 
1103 School Street 
Jim Thorpe, PA 18229 



Diet Management 

Editor: 

I own a 64K CoCo 2 with one disk drive 
and would like to correspond with other 
CoCo owners who are diabetic. Anyone 
who is into programming who would like 
to assist me in writing a computer program 
to help manage a diabetic diet can write or 
call me. 

Donald J. Floodeen 
611-1/2 2nd Ave. SE, Ml 
Aberdeen, SD 57401 
605-225-9707 



BUYER BEWARE 



Editor: 

I am writing to let you and your readers 
know of the gross lack of responsibility of 
one of your advertisers — Diecom Prod- 
ucts, Inc. of Milton, Ontario. I am not the 
only one who has experienced major prob- 
lems with this company which are as fol- 
lows: 

First of all, in the past, Diecom has 
advertised software before it was actually 
available. I called to order Mission RusKn 
Assault and was told the game would not be 
available for two weeks, however, it had 
been advertised in the rainbow two months 
prior to my call. Medieval Madness was not 
available until three months after it was 
advertised in your magazine. 

Secondly, Diecom has been running its 
business from an answering machine, al- 
though the ad states "Personal Service 9-5 
E.S.T." On January 10th I called and left a 
message regarding software availability, 
but no one returned my call. I called again 
on the 2 1 st and on the second of February, 
still no returned calls. I decided to order 
The RAT package, especially after reading 
your reviewer's comments, and this is where 
my major problem began. 

The RAT, designed for 128K and 512K 
machines did not work with my Tandy 
512K upgrade. So what did I do? I called 



. . « silly me. Of course, they still haven't 
returned any of my calls. I had to go out and 
buy a new 128K CoCo 3 just to use the 
program. However, I still cannot use it to its 
full potential. A friend of mine experienced 
the same problem. He called Diecom sev- 
eral times also. We've both given up. 

This brings me to my final complaint: I 
am writing a CoCo 3 adventure using The 
RAT to create the graphics screens, but I ran 
into a bug in my program where the saving/ 
loading routine was causing conflicts. This 
time I wrote to Dave Dies, asking whether 
a new save/load routine is available for The 
RAT. (These are available for Color Max 3 
and CoCo Max IIL) To this date (March 
17), I still have not heard from Diecom. 

I own my own business and I know you 
must return calls and must support what 
you sell. Otherwise, you won ' t last. For this 
reason, I'm surprised Diecom has lasted as 
long as it has! 

JT. Rawlinson 
Toronto, Canada 



Diecom Products, Inc. has ceased ad- 
vertising its products in the rainbow, effec- 
tive with the November '88 issue. We sus- 
pect that it is no longer in business. 



More Suds? 

Editor: 

I am in charge of maintenance for a 
commercial laundry, and I was wondering 
if you or any of your readers know of any 
software designed for maintenance report- 
ing and scheduling. I have a CoCo 3, 128K, 
one disk drive, and printer. 

Tom Boy sen 
1456 Elsie Court 
Santa Rosa, CA 95401 

REQUEST HOTLINE 

Editor: 

A while ago I wrote about hooking up 
the CoCo to a device on an overhead pro- 
jector, showing a computer display to an 
entire class. The HJL monitor adapter has 
proved to work like a charm. Other adapt- 
ers work under OS-9 programs in the graph- 
ics modes, but HJL does it all. Unfortu- 
nately, one solution led to another problem. 

The Goldstar monitor sent with the 

adapter did not function. After plugging 

and trying all kinds of equipment, the long 
and short of it was that the CoCo and the 

Goldstar monitor did not work together. 
HJL has been very cooperative throughout 
and is sending another monitor. The HJL 
monitor adapter is a tight fit on my CoCo 
but is working well. The problem seems to 
be a slight incompatibility between the 
signal from the computer and the monitor. 
One or the other is a bit fussy about the 
signal. The reason the equipment works in 
some configurations was explained to me 
this way: Some equipment is more "forgiv- 
ing" and can handle slight differences in 
signals. 

When I was content with my b/w televi- 
sion, monitors were not in the picture. 
Buying an $88 monochrome monitor from 
Howard Medical changed all that. Would 
you and your technical staff consider doing 
some informational work on monitors in 
the future? I would like to have a more 
technical base to work from besides plug- 
ging and switching equipment. 

The main reason for switching is to 
avoid interference. The clarity of the color 
display is nice, but the majority of what I do 
is word processing or programming, for 
which a monochrome display is fine. My 
activities in the classroom include Logo, 
beginning programming and keyboarding. 
The CoCo, via the PC Viewer is making its 
way more into math classes. Teachers are 
missing out on a low-cost alternative if they 
don't give the CoCo a chance. One im- 
provement I am waiting for is a way to 
attach the disk drive cable permanently to 
the computer. Most of my trouble-shooting 
involves unplugging/plugging in the disk 
drive controller. The disk drive connection 



8 THE RAINBOW June 1989 



"... Just think of any word 
processing feature — chances 
arc very likely that Word Power 
has it ... packs a lot of features 
... excellent word processor..." - 
-- Rainbow's Word Processor 
Comparison Article "Deciding 
What's Right For You* April 
1989 Rainbow: Page 26. 



Word 
Power 3.2 



More Versatile • More Powerful With 



"... friendly... amazing execu- 
tion speed—much easier to use 
than VIP software & 2 other 
word processing systems Vve 
tried...very user-friendly. ..mas- 
sive text storage capacity 
...highest among word proces- 
sors..." - Rainbow Oct. 88 



Spooler •Calculator • Split-Screen # 2-Column Printing Review for word Power 



Unparalleled Power packed in this 100% ML Word Processor 
written from scratch for the CoCo 3! No other word processor 
offers such a wide array of features that are easy to learn & use. 



DISPLAY & SPEED 



Word Power 3.2 runs at double-clock speed 
and uses the true 80-column display with 
lowercase instead of the graphics screen. The 
result is lightning fast screen reformatting and 
added speed! All prompts are displayed in 
plain English in neat colored windows. The current column num- 
ber, line number, page number, percentage of free memory is dis- 
played at all times. Even the page break is displayed so you know 
where one page ends and the other begins. The Setup program 
allows you to change fore/background colors as well as (in)visible 
carriage returns. Word Power 3.2 can be used with RGB/Com- 
posite/Monochrome monitors as well as TV. 

MAXIMUM MEMORY 




Word Power 3.2 gives you over 72K on 128K andfover 
450K on 512K CoCo 3 for Text Storage - more 
memory than any other CoCo word-processor. 
Period. 



* »»»■»»' '"mnH"" *.*.«.« »,t i » » M < »-«-*-* iniiiiimi t.i.t, 



EFFORTLESS EDITING 

Word Power 3.2 has one of the most powerful and user-friendly 
full-screen editor with word-wrap. All you do is type. Word 
Power takes care of the text arrangement. The unique Auto-Save 
feature saves text to disk at regular intervals for peace of mind. 

Insert/Overstrike Mode (Cursor Style Changes to indicate mode);OOPS Recall 
during deIete;Type-ahead Buffer for fast typers;Key-Repcat (adjustable); Key- 
Click; 4-way cursor and scrolling; Cursor to beginning/end of text, beginning/end 
of line, top/bottom of screen, next/previous word; Page up/down; Delete charac- 
ter, previous/next word, to beginning/end of line, complete line, text before/after 
cursor; Locate/Replace with Wild-Card Search with auto/manual replace; Block 
Mark, Unmark, Copy, Move & Delete; Line Positioning (Center/Right Jus- 
tified); Set/Reset 120 programmable tab stops; Word-Count; Define Top/Bot- 
to m/Le ft/Right margins & page length. You can also highlight text 
(underline-with on-screen underlining, bold, italics, superscripts, etc.). Word 
Power even has a HELP screen which an be accessed any time during edit. 



t l t . M-m. «. 



SPLIT-SCREEN EDITING 

Splits the screen in half so you can view one portion of your text 
while you edit another. You'll love it! 



MAIL-MERGE 

Ever try mailing out the same letter to 50 different 



I ■ ■ ! 1 "PM H 11 Ml 1 M ■ ■ I I 11 

c Ar xv-> sv "^x-vi 



hxx 



X ■>!■ X ■I-XXX' X A"Ar X-X 

. - ->xx4 x x to ■: * x -x * 

|k«c xto xx 

! ■: ■:• :■: v v . ; : * awwawj 







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CALCULATOR 

Pop-up a 4-function calculator while you edit! Great for tables! 

SAVING/LOADING TEXT I 

Word Power 3.2 creates ASCII format files which are compatible 
with almost all terminal/spell-checking & other word-processing 
programs. Allows you to Display Free Space, Load, Save, Ap- 
pend & Kill files. The ARE YOU SURE? prompt prevents ac- 
cidental overwriting & deletion. You can select files by simply 
cursoring through the disk directory. Supports double-sided 
drives & step-rates. 



t I » ♦ « IJ.I.tt-I.U.1-1 It.' lTTl<»tl«.»l>«llt.»tll..«ITfllll««l.lll<«. 



tJUl-l-Lt-l-l-i-t-f J 



■li!iliItIiu!ilililiu'ijLili!jli 



PRINTING 

Word Power 3.2 drives almost any printer (DMP, EPSON, 
GEMINI, OKIDATA, etc). Allows options such as baud rates, 
line spacing, page/print pause, partial print, page number- 
ing/placement, linefeeds, multi-line headers/footers, right jus- 
tification & number of copies. The values of these parameters & 
margins can be changed anytime in the text by embedding Printer 
Option Codes. The WHAT YOU SEE IS WHAT YOU GET fea- 
ture allows you to preview the text on the screen as it will appear 
in print. You can view margins, page breaks, justification & more. 



PRINT SPOOLER 

Why buy a hardware Print Spooler? Word Power 3.2 has a built- 
in Spooler which allows you to simultaneously edit one document 
& print another. 



TWO-COLUMN PRINTING 

This unique feature allows you to print all or portion of your text 
in two columns! Create professional documents without hours 
of aligning text. 



SPELLING CHECKER 



1 






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Word Power 3.2 comes with spelling checker/dic- 
tionary which finds & corrects mistakes in your 
text. You can add words to /delete words from 
dictionary. 



■ * t r * * * mill, r * i 



r . * . . « t ....H.H..HM.UHKHHI I, t * 



PUNCTUATION CHECKER 

This checker will proofread your text for punctuation errors such 
as capitalization, double-words, spaces after periods/commas, 
and more. Its the perfect addition to any word processor. 




DOCUMENTATION 

Word Power 3.2 comes with a well-written instruction manual & 
reference card which makes writing with Word 
Power a piece of cake! Word Power 3.2 comes on an 
UNPROTECTED disk and is compatible with 
RSDOS. Only $79.95 




people? Could be quite a chore. Not with Word 
Power 3.2! Using this feature, you can type a letter, 
follow it with a list of addresses and have Word Power 
print out personalized letters. It's that easy! 

JlkJF VIICROCOM SOFTWARE, 2900 Monroe Ave, Rochester,NY 14618 

All Word Power 3.2 orders shipped by UPS 2nd Day Air at No Extra Charge in Continental US. 
For Detailed Order Information, refer to Page 17 of our 6-page Ad series(Pgs 7-17). 
To Place Credit Card Orders Call Toll Free 1-800-654-5244 (9am-8pm 7 days/week) 
Technical Support (4-8pm), Order Status, Info, Technical Info; 716-383-8830 




0I/C9VER 



PP 



2N 



is a definite weak link in a classroom with 
a lot of users. 

I'd also like to know the best way to get 
a better electronics background in order to 
eventually use the CoCo with robotics in 
the classroom. 

Michael Franich 
Lakeridge Jr. High School 
5909 Myers Road 
Sumner, WA 98390 

Thanks for the suggestion! Some hack- 
ers have made a short (1 to 2 inch) ribbon 
cable to go between the cartridge port and 
disk controller. Once installed, they can 
put the controller right in the CoCo 1 s case 
to keep it safe and out of the way. 

Mistaken Identity 

Editor: 

We'd like to ask your help in straighten- 
ing out a potentially damaging case of 
mistaken identity. 

On March 27, the Wall Street Journal 
carried a story about abuses of 900-number 
information services by unscrupulous in- 
formation services operators. One such 
operator was identified, in bold type, as 
Delphi Corporation. 

The company, of course, has nothing to 
do with us [DELPHI — General Videotex 
Corporation]. However, we have been 
getting telephone calls, mail messages and 
other feedback that indicates that there is 
considerable confusion in the minds of the 
public about the issue. 

We have been in contact with The Jour- 
nal. We suspect, however, that the confu- 
sion is spreading rapidly beyond readers of 
the Wall Street Journal to computer users 
in general. 

If you have the editorial space available, 
where you could mention the fact that our 
DELPHI has nothing to do with this Delphi 
Corporation of New York, it would be 
greatly appreciated. 

Thank you for your help. 

Wes Kussmaul 
DELPHI Chairman 
Cambridge, Massachusetts 

OS-9bow? 

Editor: 

I have been a subscriber to the rainbow, 
off and on, since I bought my first CoCo in 
1984. In the beginning I was thrilled with 
each issue. I spent hours typing programs 
into my computer, saving them to disk, 
running and debugging them, etc. Once in 
a while, I'd find a game that I liked, wear it 
out, learn how to win it every time, and then 
move on to my next favorite. 

When I finally got fed up with typing 



basic programs, I started typing in the ML 
listings with the little basic ML loader from 
your pages, then with an assembler. I got 
frustrated soon because somehow I couldn't 
get the ML programs to run. I decided that 
ML wasn't my cup of tea and moved on to 
the greener grass of OS-9. 

When I got OS-9 (Level II) 1 was con- 
tinually told to refer to such-and-such a 
page in the red manual (Level I type), 
because everyone assumed that I had Level 
I first. Well, I didn't, and I still don't. Dale 
Puckett's column seems, at first glance, to 
be informative, but there are many times 
when I find references to Level I processes 
that aren't included in Level II, which makes 
much of the information contained therein 
to be of no real value to me. 

My point is that I'd like to have the kind 
of excitement under OS-9 that I found with 
basic programs in the beginning. What I 
find in the rainbow, though, is 90 percent 
basic, 9 percent other and 1 percent OS-9. 
While my figures are, admittedly, bogus 
and exaggerated, you get the drift. How 
about an annual OS-9 issue to augment the 
annual Beginner's/Communication, etc., 
issues? If that's not possible, how about a 
subsidiary publication for OS-9 addicts? 
Call it OS-9bow or something, but cram it 
full of beginning, intermediate and advanced 
OS-9 projects. Teach us how to write proc- 
esses, use the system, modify it for our own 
needs, grow into it, and even generate other 
programs for the OS-9 community. 

William A. Smith 
Charleston, South Carolina 

See Lonnie Falk's "PRINT#-2," col- 
umn on Page 10 of the May '89 issue for an 
explanation on why it would not be feasible 
to print a strictly OS-9 magazine. 

As more OS-9 users become comfort- 
able with using the operating system, we 
will receive more submissions on OS-9, 
and therefore, will have more information 
available to share with the CoCo commu- 
nity. 

Attention OS-9 users and programmers: 
If you have experience using the OS-9 
operating system, we desparately want your 
submissions! 

KUDOS 

Editor: 

I have been an avid reader of rainbow 
since December 1985. It was your maga- 
zine that convinced me to purchase a Color 
Computer. Thanks for making a kids' toy 
into a computer that is more than just kid's 
stuff. I am writing because of the bold new 
direction your magazine is taking. In both 
your March and April issues, you have 
taken an area of interest to the CoCo com- 



munity and done an in-depth comparative 
article on it: It was hard drives in March and 
word processors in April. This is the kind of 
information available in the MS-DOS 
community but has been scarce in the realm 
of the Color Computer. 

Most readers do not have the resources 
to compare products themselves. Some are 
lucky enough to have access to the rain- 
Bowfests or to computer clubs where they 
can see the equipment or software run, but 
most of us are not that fortunate. I applaud 
your fine efforts in this area. 

Keep up the good work. I can't wait to 
see an article on spreadsheets. 

Jim & Lin Schulze 
Tell City, Indiana 

The Write Stuff 

Editor: 

Kudos to Dale Rickert and Simply Bet- 
ter Software's word processor, Simply Bet- 
ter. Kudos also to Cray Augsburg for his 
fine review, which led me to purchase the 
program. 

Not only did I get immediate service 
from SBS, I got a long, informative conver- 
sation with Mr. Rickert, a personal touch 
that gave me confidence to buy from a new 
company! 

I have tried close to a dozen CoCo word 
processors, and this one beats them all. It 
has features (like sorting and index and 
table of contents production) that I had only 
thought possible on programs costing 1 0 to 
20 times more! Mr. Rickert has come down 
firmly on the side of reasonably priced, yet 
powerful software. At $29.95 there should 
be no reason at all for this product to ever 
show up on the "pirating networks." 

Let's see more software of this kind and 
more of those comparative and highly in- 
formative articles, such as the rainbow has 
run on hard drives and word processors. 

Alan A. Klein 
(subscriber since 1981) 
Highland, West Virginia 

the rainbow welcomes letters to 
the editor. Mail should be addressed 
to: Letters to Rainbow, The Falsoft 
Building, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 
40059. Letters should include the 
writer's full name and address. Letters 
may be edited for purposes of clarity 
or to conserve space. 

Letters to the editor may also be 
sent to us through our Delphi CoCo 
SIG. From the CoCo SIG> prompt, 
type RRI to take you into the Rainbow 
Magazine Services area of the SIG. At 
the R AINBO W> prompt, type LET to 
reach the LETTERS> prompt and 
then select Letters for Publication, Be 
sure to include your complete name 
and address. 



10 THE RAINBOW June 1989 



I 



RSDOS Utilities 



COCO 3 SCREEN 
DUMP 



32/40/80 col. text, PMODE 4 
Graphics Dump. Single Key 
Operation allows snapshots-of 
screens even when programs 
are running! For DMP, Epson, 
Gemini & Compatibles. CoCo 
1&3. Disk $24.95 

SUPER TAPE DISK 
TRANSFER 

Disk~to-Disk,Tape-to-Disk, 
Disk~to-Tape,Tape-to-Tape 
Copy. Copies Basic/ML/Data 
Files. C0C0 1,2 or3. Min 64K 
Disk System, Disk $24.95 





DISK LABEL MAKER 

Allows elongated, normal & 
condensed format, Double 
Strike, Border Creation & 
multiple label printing. Sup- 
ports DMP , Gemini, Epson, 
Star & Compatibles. C0C0 
1,2,3. Disk $19.95 



HOME BILLrH 

MANAGER 

Allows you to enter bills under 
various categories and reminds 
you when they are due. C0C0 
1,2,3. Disk $19.95 



BOWLING SCORE 
KEEPER 

Allows you to save scores 
under individual/teams,edit, 
delete & compare scores. A 
must for anyone who wants to 
keep track of bowling perfor- 
mance. Dsk $19 SS (C0C0 



VCR TAPE 
ORGANIZER 




* MAILLIST PRO 

lie ultimate mailing hst 
program. Allows you to add, 
e<Ut, view, delete, change, sort 
(by zipcode or name) & print 
labels. Its indispensible!! Disk 
$19.95 (C0C0 1,2,3) 

COMPUTERIZED 
CHECKBOOK 

Let the C0C0 balance your 
checkbook. Allows you to add, 
view, search, edit, delete & 
print. Updates balance after 
each entry.For checking, 
savings & other accounts. Disk 
1.95 (C0C0 1,2,3) 3 



Allows you to index tapes by 
title, rating, type, play time & 
comments; sort titles al- 
phabetically & view/print 
selected tapes. If you own a 
VCR, this program is a MUST! 
Disk $19.95 (C0C0 1,2,3) 

DISK UTILITY 2.1A 

Utilize a directory window to 
selectively sort, move, rename 
& kill files. Lightning fast Disk 
i/o for format, copy, backup & 
much more. This will become 
your MOST USED program. 
C0C0 1,2,3. New Low Price! 
$2435 $16.95 



• ■ ti m n h 11 

■ U I If . tl . 





CALENDAR MAKER 

Generate Monthly calendars 
on your printer for any year in 
the 20th century. Disk Only 
$19.95. C0C0 1,2,3. 

BASIC Windows 

(by Kevin Berner) 

Allows you to run 6 Basic 
Program simultaneously. 
Great for many applications. 
512K C0C0 3. Disk Only $34.95 

ULTRAPATCH 
SYSTEM 

by Randal] Reid 

Patches the Superpatch ED- 
TASM + for 80 columns, 47K 
Buffer & more. C0C0 3.$19.95 

SMALL BUSINESS 
ACCOUNTING 

A sales-based accounting 
package with sales entry, ac- 
counts receivable/payable, 
Payroll, Income State- 
ment,Journal, Sales, Balance 
sheets & much more! $79.95 



Inventory Control/sales 
Analysis 

Disk Only $59.95 

Payroll 

Disk Only $59.95 

Accounts Recievable 

Disk only $59.95 

Accounts Payable 

Disk only $59.95 

Personal Bookkeeping 
2000 

Disk only $39.95 



OS9 



Start OS9 

An enjoyable Hands-on Guide 
to OS9 LII. Includes step-by- 
step tutorials, articles. Free 
disk includes examples & 
utilities. Req. 512K, OS9 Level 
II, 2 drives & monitor. 
Book + Disk $32.99 

The Goldberg Utilities 

Turbocharge your OS9 system. 
Allows you to find lost files, 
copy multiple files, sort lists, 
base conversion & much more. 
Disk only $24.95 

The Zapper 

Patch Disk Errors. Disk $19.95 

Disk Manager Tree 

Change/ create /delete direc- 
tories fast. Rq 512K LII $29.95 

Level II Tools 

Wildcards, tree & windowing 
commands & 22 more utilities. 
Disk Only $24.95 

Warp One 

Complete LII Windowing, 
Terminal, Auto Dial, macros, 
file transfer, capture, timer, 
chat, etc. Req. 512K OS9 Level 
II & RS232 Pack. $34.95 

Multi-Menu 

Create your own pull-down 
menus. Rq 512K,OS9 Level 2 
& Multi-Vue $19.95 

OS9 Level 2 BBS v2.0 

Supports Multiple users, 
Tsmon, login, chat, Message/ 
Mail Retrieval, Uloads,Dloads 
& much more. Req. 512K , 
Level 2 & RS232 Pack. $29.95 

Presto Partner 

RAM resident software which 
provides note-pad with cal- 
culator, calendar / alarm, 
phone book with auto-dial. 
Req 512K & OS9 
Only $29.95 



GSC File Transfer 
Utilities 

Transfer files to & from 
MSDOS/ OS9/ RSDOS / Flex. 
Req OS9 (LII for Multivue ver- 
sion), 2 drives, SDISK/ 
SDISK3. Standard Version: 
$44.95. Multivue Version: 
$54.95 




. MICROCOM SOFTWARE, 2900 Monroe Ave, Rochester,NY 14618 
For Detailed Order Information, refer to Page 17 of our 6-page Ad series(Pgs 7-17). 

To Place Credit Card Orders Call Toll Free 1-800-654-5244 (9am-8pm 7 days/week) 
Technical Support (4-8pm), Order Status, Info, Technical Info; 716-383-8830 



Xword 

Best OS9 Word Processor with 
true character oriented editing 
& more. $69.95 

XMerge 

Mail Merge for Xword. $24.95 

XSpell 

Spelling checker with 40000 
words. $39.95 

XEd 

OS9 Full Screen Editor. $39.95 

XDis 

OS9 Disassembler. $34.95 

XTerm 

Communications pro w/ Up/ 
Download, xmodem, serial/ 
RS232 Pack Support. $49.95 

Xdir & XCal 

Hierachial Dir & Cald. $24.95 

OS9 Level II Ramdisk 

Disk only $29.95 

Wild & MV Version 2.1 

Use wildcards with OS9 & re- 
arrange directory tree. $19.95 

EZGen Version 1.04 

Powerful OS9 bootfile editor. 
Change names, add/ delete 
modules, patch bytes, etc. 
$19.95 

PC-Xfer Utilities 

Format/Transfer files to/from 
MSDOS & C0C0. Level 1 or 
2. Requires SDISK(3). $44.95 

SDISK3 

Standard drive replacement 
module allows full use of 40/80 
track double-sided drives. Req 
Level II. $29.95 SDISK: $29.95 

WIZ 

Terminal Package with 300- 
19200 baud rates/windowing. 
Req. 512K/RS232 Pack. $49.95 

DYNASTAR 

Word Processor with Macros, 
terminals/windows, mail- 
merge & more. Only $99.95 

DYNASPELL 

Disk Only $79.95 
Both Dynastar & DynaSpell: 
$124.95 



m m 




DI/C4VCR 




9* 





. . . Something 
Akin to a Miracle 

I went to the roadshow version of the Broadway play Beehive, appear- 
ing here in Louisville a few weeks ago. Following the show, I got into 
a discussion with some of those who attended with me about how it 
was unfair to try to capsulize a decade into a neat little package. 

Beehive is in effect a history of the 1960s, with an emphasis on the 
female singers of the decade. Since events in history obviously cannot be 
isolated from each other, the show included several references to historical 
events of that time. 

I was somewhat disappointed by the play, contending that a decade is 
too long to survey in one fell swoop. Too much happens during that period 
of time. 

Later I started thinking about computing and time. And here in the last 
year of the 1980s, I wonder whether we really consider what an amazing 
achievement Tandy Corporation brought about with its introduction of the 
Color Computer almost a decade ago. 

First of all, the CoCo is the only computer to stand the test of a decade. 
While it is arguable that CoCo 3 is a different machine from the CoCo 1 
or 2, 1 do not believe they are essentially different. In fact, the earliest 
programs that ran on the original CoCo have no trouble whatsoever 
running on the CoCo 3. 

This is quite different from saying, for instance, that there is an Apple 
computer today just as there was then. Similarly, there was a Commodore 
(Pet) then; there is a Commodore computer now. Any resemblance 
between the versions, other than the name, is purely imagination. 

Second, with its introduction and successive upgrading of the CoCo, 



Programmer's Delight! 



Pokes, Peeks and Execs are your guides into the jungle of computer programming. These commands give you the power of 
Machine Language without leaving the security of BASIC. Each book is a collection of "inside" information, with explanations 
and examples to help you immediately put it to use. Everyone from the novice to the professional will find these handy books a 



wealth of information. 



300 POKES, 
N 




for COCO 



MO/80 column Screen Text Dump 
*Save Text/Graphics Screen to Disk 
* Command/Functions Disables 
•Enhancements for CoCo3 BASIC 
*128K/512K RAM Test Program 
•HPRINT Character Modifier 



Only $19.95 



500 POKES 
PEEKS,'N EXECS 



•Autostart your BASIC programs 
♦Disable Color BASIC/ECB/Disk BASIC 
commands 

•Disable Break Key/ Clear Key/ Reset Button 
•Generate a Repeat-key 
•Transfer ROMPAKs to tape 
•Set 23 different GRAPHIC modes 
•Merge two BASIC programs 
•And much much more!!! 

For CoCol,2 and 3. Only $16.95 
ALL 3 BOOKS for $39.95 



SUPPLEMENT TO 500 
POKES,PEEKS, N EXECS 

200 additional Pokes,Peeks and Execs (500 

Pokes Peeks 'N Execs is a prerequisite) 

•ROMPAK transfer to disk 

•PAINT with 65000 styles 

•Use of 40 track single/double sided drives 

•High-speed Cassette Operation 

•Telewriter, CoCo Max enhancements 

* Graphics Dump (for DMP printers) /Text 

Screen Dump 

For CoCo 1,2 or 3. Only $9.95 



UNRAVELLED SERIES 




COCO LIBRARY 



An invaluable aid for Basic and Machine Language programmers, these 
books provide a complete disassembly and annotated listing of the 
BASIC/ECB and Disk ROMs. These listings give complete, uninterupted 
memory maps of the four ROMs. Gain complete control over all versions of 
the color computer. 

EXTENDED COLOR BASIC UNRAVELLED: COLOR 
BASIC and EXTENDED BASIC ROM Disassembly: $39.95 
DISK BASIC UNRAVELLED: DISK BASIC ROM 1.1 and 
1.0 Disassembly : $19.95 

BOTH ECB AND DISK BASIC UNRAVELLED: $49.95 
SUPER EXTENDED BASIC UNRAVELLED: SUPER EX- 
TENDED BASIC ROM Disassembly for CoCo 3. $24.95 
COMPLETE UNRAVELLED SERIES (all 3 books): $59.95 



CoCo 3 Service Manual: $39.95 
CoCo 2 Service Manual: $29.95 
Start OS9 Book + Disk: $32.99 
Inside OS9 Level 11:13935 $19.95 
Rainbow Guide To OS9 Level II: $19.95 
Rainbow Guide To OS9 II (disk): $19.95 
Complete Guide To OS9 (Level 1): $19.95 
Complete Guide To OS9 (2 Disk): $29.95 
CoCo 3 Secrets Revealed: $m95T $16-95 
JKasic rrogramming Tricks* $12.95 
Assembly Language Programming(tepco) : $18 

Addendum For CoCo3 (tepco): $12 
Color Computer Disk Manual (with ref card): $29.95 





/■ft 

■' ':; PKnooiJin.ni)]: 



Games 

(All Games for CoCo 1,2,3 Disk unless specified) 

Warrior King (CoCo 3): $29.95 

In Quest of the Star Lord(CoCo3) : $34.95 Hint Sheet: $3.95 
Hall of the King 1,2,3: $29.95 ea Trilogy: $74.95 
Pyramix (Cubix for CoCo 3): $24.95 
Kung Fu Dude: $24.95 
Dragon Blade: $19.95 
Champion: $19.95 
White Fire of Eternity: $19.95 
Quest for the Spirit Stone (CoCo 3): $18 
Wargame Designer II (CoCo 3): $29 

TREASURY PACK #1: Lunar Rover Patrol, Cubix, Declathon, 
Qix, Keys of Wizard, Module Man, Pengon & Roller Con- 
troller. Only $29.95 

TREASURY PACK #2: Lancer, Ms. Gobbler, Froggie, Mad- 
ness & Minotaur, Ice Castles, Galagon, Devious. Only $29.95 
SPACE PAC: Color Zap, Invaders, Planet Invasion, Space 
Race, Space War, Galax Attax, Anaroid Attack, Whirlybird, 
Space Sentry & Storm Arrows. Only $29.95 
WIZARD'S CASTLE: A hi-res graphics adventure game filled 
with tricks, traps and treasures. Only $19.95 



V 




4-D Chess 



The ancient game of strategy movies into the future. Move your 
pieces through time as well as space. Req. RSDOS CoCo 3 & 
2 Players. Disk Only $24.95 




Speed Racer: Buckle your seatbelt and get ready to race in this 
Pole Position® type game. Only $34.95 
Pinball Factory: Design, Build, Edit and Play the classic game 
of Pinball. Only $34.95 

Demon Seed: Battle the flying, diving & bloodthirsty bats. Only 
$19.95 

Cash man: Explosive color, fast-moving animation and amazing 
sound-effects! Has over 40 levels! $29.95 
Fury: An action packed airborne dogfight simulation. $29.95 
Time Bandit: Fight the Evil Guardians, Killer Smurphs & more. 
Full animation & over 300 screens. $29.95 
Rommel 3D: Exciting 3-D Tank Combat Game. CoCo 2.$34.95 
Outhouse: One of the funniest, most original games. Excellent 
graphics, sound effects & playability. $19.95 
Mudpies: Crazy circus fun! Only $29.95 




MICROCOM SOFTWARE, 2900 Monroe Ave, Rochester,NY 14618 
For Detailed Order Information, refer to Page 17 of our 6-page Ad series(Pgs 7-17). 

To Place Credit Card Orders Call Toll Free 1-800-654-5244 (9am-8pm 7 days/week) 
Technical Support (4-8pm), Order Status, Info, Technical Info; 716-383-8830 




DUC*V£R 



Tandy brought computing into more homes 
and to more people than anyone ever has 
before. 

Now I know that is a strong statement to 
make, but I think it is true even though I 
cannot prove it — as you know, Tandy is 
not in the habit of releasing sales figures. 

I can say it because I know of several 
years when Tandy sold out "to the bare 
walls." If you consider the number of its 
domestic stores alone and figure what an 
average inventory must be, you come up 
with a startling amount of computers sold. 

Add to that the fact that the CoCo has 
never been an expensive computer. Yes, if 
you "fully equip" a unit, you end up with a 
cost comparable to an MS-DOS machine. 
But consider, you do not have to fully 
equip it to make it run — and run well. 

The rest of the computer world is talk- 
ing about 80486 processors; Steve Jobs' 
"NExT" computer, which costs $10,000; 
"diskless workstations" priced at only a 
couple thousand bucks; and good old OS- 
2, the "operating system of the future" 
(when Presentation Manager is finished, 
if ever). But every day, here at rainbow we 



/ wonder 
whether we realty 
consider what an 
amazing achieve- 
ment Tandy Corpo- 
ration brought 
about with its 
introduction of the 
Color Computer 
almost a decade 
ago" 





have people taking the CoCo to new heights 
and actually hundreds of people every 
month being added to our ranks. 

Every once in a while, I receive letters 
from people asking me where they can buy 
Lotus 1-2-3 or some other well-known 
MS-DOS program for their Color Com- 
puters. I reply that they cannot, but they 
can buy an excellent spreadsheet for the 
CoCo, any of a number of outstanding 
word processors and fine desktop publish- 
ing programs, and so on. 

If you have the bucks, you can get an 
excellent hard-disk setup for your CoCo. 
But wait. It isn't essential to have a hard 
disk to run anything, really. In counter- 
point to that, try running WordPerfect 5.0 
in your average Tandy PC or compatible 
on a pair of floppy disks. 

I believe, as I told my friends the night 
I saw Beehive, that a decade is too long to 
sum up in a few hours. But I can sum up the 
CoCo in one sentence: Considering the 
technology available at the time of its 
design, the CoCo is something akin to a 
miracle. 

— Lonnie Falk 




• 1 





METRIC INDUSTRIES, INC. 



Interface 




Model 101 
Serial to Parallel 

* Works with any COCO 

* Compatible with "Centronics" Parallel Input Printers 

* Just turn the knob to select any one of 6 baud rates 300-9600 

* Comes complete with cables to connect to your printer 
and computer 

* Can be powered by most printers 

Model 104 Deluxe Interface 
with "Modem Switch" 

* Same Features as 1 01 Plus 

* Built in Serial Port for your Modem or other serial device 

* Switch between Serial Output and Parallel Output 

* Comes with cables to connect to your computer and printer 

* Can be powered by most printers 

Model 1 05 Serial Switch 

* Connects to your COCO to give you 2 switch selectable 
Serial Ports 

* Comes with a 3 foot cable to connect to your computer 

* Now you can connect your Printer (or printer interface) 
and your Modem (or other serial device) to your COCO 
and flip the switch to use either device 

* Does not require power 



Cassette Label Printing Program 



New Version 2.1 prints 7 lines of information 
on Cassette labels 

Comes on Tape with instructions to transfer to disk 
Menu driven, very easy to use 
Save and Load Labels from Tape and Disk 
Uses the features of your printer to print standard, 
expanded, and condensed characters 
Automatically Centers Each Line of Text 
Allows editing of label before printing 
Program comes with 24 labels to get you started 
16K ECB required 



Some of the Printers 
That Can - 

Supply power for the 101 and 
1 04 are Radio Shack, Star, 
Okidata, Brother, Juki, and 
Smith Corona. 

Some of the Printers 
That Cannot - 

Supply power for the interfaces 
are Epson, Seikosha, 
Panasonic, Silver Reed and 
NEC. If your printer cannot 
supply power to the interface 
you can order your interface 
with the "P" option or you can 
supply your own AC adapter. 
We recommend the Radio 
Shack 273- 1431 AC adapter 
with a 274-328 connector 
adapter. 

Write or call for more 
information or for technical 
assistance. 



Price List 

Model 101 

Model 1 01 P 
Model 104 
Model 104P 
Model 105 



35.95 

41.95 
44.95 
51.95 
14.95 



Cassette Label Program 6.95 
Pin Feed Cassette Labels: 
White 3.00/100 
Colors (specify) 3.60/C 
Red-Blue- Yellow-Tan 



4 Pin Din Serial 
COCO Cables: 

Male/Male 6 foot 
Male/Female 6 foot 
Female/Female 6 foot 
Other Lengths Available. 

All items covered by a 
1 year warranty 



4.49 
4.49 
4.49 



Ordering Info 



Free Shipping in the 

U.S.A. (except AK and HI) 
on all orders over $50 
On orders under $50 
please add $2.50 for 
shipping and handling 
On orders outside the 
U.S.A. please write or call 
for shipping charges 



You Can Pay By: 

★ VISA or MasterCard 

★ C.O.D.-add$2.25 

★ Or send check or money 
order payable in U.S. funds 



Metric Industries Inc. 
P.O. Box 42396 
Cincinnati, OH 45242 

(513) 677-0796 



1 4 THE RAINBOW June 1 989 



512K BASIC 



(For 128K & 512K Computers) 

From the authors of Word Power 3.2, the best-selling Word Processor for CoCo 3, comes a revolutionary programming tool! 

Do you have a 128K or 512K CoCo 3? Are you being told that Basic will even run at double clock-speed and automatically slow 
you could only use 22K from Basic?? Don't believe it!! down for printer and disk operations. 



Lets face it. You bought your CoCo 3 so you could get better 
graphics, more speed and more MEMORY. Unfortunately as it 
comes, the CoCo 3 only allows you to use 22K for Basic 
Programs. A big disappointment for Basic Programmers. 

Introducing the revolutionary 512K Basic. It gives you up to 80K 
Basic program/variable space (64K for Basic Program/16K for 
variables) on a 128K CoCo and over 400K (384K Basic Program 
Space & 16K Variable Space) on a 512K CoCo! There are no 
new commands to remember and approximately 90-95% of the 
existing Basic Software will run without any modifications. 512K 
Basic is completely transparent to the user. You won't even know 
its there until you realize that you were able to type in a massive 
Basic program without the dreaded ?OM Error. And 512K 



Step up to 512K Basic. It's the tool you need to tap the full poten- 
tial of your CoCo 3. 512K Basic Requires a 128K or 512K CoCo 
3 with a disk drive. OS9 is NOT required. Only $39.95 

51 2K Upgrades for CoCo 3. 

(Only $139 with purchase of 512K Basic) 
Fully assembled, tested and ready to be shipped now. 
Comes with $100 worth of 512K Software: 

• 512K Backup Lightning • 512K Print Spooia: ^fc^ 

• 512K Memory Test •512KRamdisk "Bffl^ 

• OS9 Level 11 Ramdisk. 

No soldering. Comes with all instruction manuals. 
90 day warranty. New Low Price. Onh 
OK Upgrade Board: $39.95 



Oatarase 



KEYBOARDS , ETC. 



KEYBOARD EXTENSION CABLE: 
Move your keyboard away from the com- 
puter & type with ease. Use your existing 
keyboard with this ^ 
cable or leave your 
present keyboard in- 
tact and use a second 
keyboard. Only 
$39.95. 

Cable with CoCo 2 Keyboard: $49.95 
Cable with CoCo 3 Keyboard: $69.95 
CoCo 3 Keyboard (with free FUNCTION 
KEYS software value $14.95) :$39.95 

CoCo 2 Keyboard: $19.95 

ACCESORIES 





COMMUNICATIONS 
EXTRAVAGANZA 

1) Avatex 1200e Modem: Fully Hayes 
compatible 300/1200 w/ speaker, Auto- 
Dial/ Answer/Redial. 

2) MODEM CABLE: 4 pin/DB 25 (Reg. 

$19.95) 

3) Autoterm Software: (Reg $39.95) 

4) FREE Compuserve Offer & Acess Time 

5) UPS 2nd Day Air Shipping 

Only $129.95 
With Avatex 2400e instead of I200e: $229.95 



Avatex 1200e Modem Only: $85 
Avatex 2400e Modem Only: $189^- 



EPROM 



INTRONICS EPROM PROGRAMMER 

(for CoCo): Programs 2516-27512 & 
more! Includes software & complete 
documentation. Latest version. Lowest 
Price Anywhere! Only $137.95 
EPROM ERASER;Fast erase of 24/28 pin 
EPROMs. Only $49.95 
BOTH EPROM PROGRAMMER & 
ERASER: $179.95 
EPROMS: 2764-$8 27128-$9 
ROMPAK (w/ Blank PC Board 27xx 
Series): $12.95 

BLANK CARTRIDGE (Disk Controller 
Size): $10.95 - 

\ 



5 1/4" DS/DD Disks: $.40 each 
3 1/2" DS/DD Disks: $1.49 each 
5 1/4" Disk Case (for 70 disks): $9.95 
3 1/2" Disk Case (for 40 disks): $7.50 

Curtis Printer Stand: $19.95 
Surge Supresser Strip w/ 6 outlets: 
$14.95 

Curtis Static Mat: $24.95 



RIBBONS 



NX1000 Color Ribbon: $12.95 
NX1000 Black Ribbon: $8.50 
Seikosha, EPSON, DMP, 
Panasonic, Okidata, Gemini Rib- 
bons: $8.50 each 




AJr 



CABLES 

MAGNAVOX 8505/8515/8CM643 Analog RGB 
Cable: $24,95 

SERIAL-TO-PARALLEL INTERFACE: Use your 
parallel printer at high speed (300-9600 baud) with CoCo. Comes 
will all cables. Nosoftware compatibility problems. Only $44.95 
15" MULTIPAK/ROMPAK EXTENDER CABLE: 
$29.95 

VIDEO DRIVER: Use a monochrome/color monitor with 
your CoCo 2. Comes with audio/video cables. Excellent picture 
quality/resolution! $34.95 

RS232 Y CABLE: Hook 2 Devices to the serial port. Only 
$24.95 

Y CABLE: Use your disk system with Speech Pak,CoCo Max, 
DS69, etc. $27.95 

RGB Analog Extender Cable:$19.95 l\l 
SONY Monitor Cable: $29.95 V 
MODEM CABLE:4 pin to DI325.0nly $19.95 
2-POSITION SWITCHER: $29.95 
HI-RES JOYSTICK INTERFACE: $11.99 




wmmmm 



CHIPS, ETC 

Disk Basic Rom 1.1 (Needed for CoCo 
3): $29.95 ECB ROM 1.1:$29.95 
68B09E or 6809E Chip: $14.95 
MultiPak PAL Chip for CoCo 3: 
$19.95 

PAL Switcher: Now you can switch be- 
tween the CoCo 2 and 3 modes when using 
the Multi-Pak. You need the OLDER & 
NEW PAL chip for the 26-3024 Multipak. 

Only $39.95. With NEW PAL Chip: 
$49.95. 

UPGRADES 

64K Upgrade for CoCo I's, CoCo 
IFs with Cat #26-3026/27, 26-3134, 
26-3136: $29.95 

64K Upgrade for 26-3134 A/B 
CoCo II: $39.95 

(Free 64K Software incl. with 64K Upgr.) 



MICROCOM SOFTWARE, 2900 Monroe Ave, Rochester,NY 14618 j VISA 
For Detailed Order Information, refer to Page 17 of our 6-page Ad series(Pgs 7-17). 



"A MERICA 
[EXPRESS 



DI/CtVER 



To Place Credit Card Orders Call Toll Free 1-800-654-5244 (9am-8pm 7 days/week) 
Technical Support (4-8pm), Order Status, Info, Technical Info; 716-383-8830 



m 



How To Read Rainbow 



When we use the term CoCo, we refer to an affection- 
ate name that was first given to the Tandy Color 
Computer by its many fans, users and owners. 

The basic program listings printed in the rain- 
bow are formatted for a 32-character screen — so they 
show up just as they do on your CoCo screen. One easy 
way to check on the accuracy of your typing is to com- 
pare what character "goes under" what. If the charac- 
ters match — and your line endings come out the same 
— you have a pretty good way of knowing that your 
typing is accurate. 

We also have "key boxes" to show you the minimum 
system a program needs. But, do read the text before 
you start typing. 

Finally, the little disk and/or cassette symbols on the 
table of contents and at the beginning of articles 
indicate that the program is available through our 
rainbow on disk or rainbow on tape service. 



Using Machine Language 



The easiest way to "put" a machine language prog ram 
into memory is to use an editor/assembler, a program 
you can purchase from a number of sources. All you 
have to do, essentially, is copy the relevant instructions 
from the rainbow's listing into CoCo. 

Another method of putting an ML listing into CoCo 
is called "hand assembly" — assembly by hand, which 
sometimes causes problems with ORIGIN or EQUATE 
statements. You ought to know something about 
assembly to try this. 

Use the following program if you want to hand- 
assemble ML listings: 

10 CLEAR200 , &H3F00 : I =&H3FB0 

20 PRINT "ADDRESS: ";HEX$( I); 

30 INPUT "BYTE";B$ 

40 POKE I, VAL("&H"+B$) 

50 I=I+l:GOTO 20 

This program assumes you have a 16K CoCo. If you 
have 32K, change the &H3F00 in Line 10 to &H7F00 
and change the value of I to &H7F80. 



OS-9 and RAINBOW ON DISK 



The OS-9 side of rainbow on disk contains two 
directories: CMDS and source. It also contains a file, 
read . me . f i rs t, which explains the division of the 
two directories. The CMDS directory contains executa- 
ble programs and the source directory contains the 
ASCII source code for these programs. BASIC09 
programs will only be offered in source form so they will 
only be found in the SOURCE directory. 

OS-9 is a very powerful operating system. Because 
of this, it is not easy to learn at first. However, while we 
can give specific instructions for using the OS-9 



programs, you will find that the OS-9 programs will be 
of little use unless you are familiar with the operating 
system. For this reason, if you haven't "learned" OS-9 
or are not comfortable with it, we suggest you read The 
Complete Rainbow Guide to OS-9 by Dale Puckett and 
Peter Dibble. 

The following is not intended as a course in OS-9. It 
merely states how to get the OS-9 programs from 
rainbow on disk to your OS-9 system disk. Use 
the procedures appropriate for your system. Before 
doing so, however, boot the OS-9 operating system 
according to the documentation from Radio Shack. 

1) Type load dir list copy and press ENTER. 

2) If you have only one disk drive, remove the OS-9 
system disk from Drive 0 and replace it with the OS- 
9 side of rainbow on disk. Then type chd/d0 
and press enter. If you have two disk drives, leave 
the sytem master in Drive 0 and put the rainbow 
ON disk in Drive 1. Then type chd/dl and press 

ENTER. 

3) List the read . me . f i rs t file to the screen by typing 

list read. me. first and pressing ENTER. 

4) Entering dir will give you a directory of the OS-9 
side of rainbow ON disk. Tosee what programs 
are in the CMDS directory, enter dir cmds. Follow 
a similar method to see what source files are in the 
SOURCE directory. 

5) When you find a program you want to use, copy it 
to the CMDS directory on your system disk with one 
of the following commands: 

One-drive system; copy /d0/cmds/ filename /d®/ 
cmds/filename -s 

The system will prompt you to alternately place the 
source disk (rainbow on disk) or the destination 
disk (system disk) in Drive 0. 
Two-drive system: copy /dl/cmds/f/7ename/d0/ 
cmds/ filename 

Once you have copied the program, you execute it 
from your system master by placing that disk in Drive 
0 and entering the name of the file. 



The Rainbow Seal 




RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 



The Rainbow Certification Seal is our way of helping 
you, the consumer. The purpose of the Seal is to certify 
to you that any product that carries the Seal has actually 
been seen by us, that it does, indeed, exist and that we 
have a sample copy here at the rainbow. 

Manufacturers of products — hardware, software and 
firmware — are encouraged by us to submit their prod- 
ucts to the rainbow for certification. 

The Seal is not a "guarantee of satisfaction." The 
certification process is different from the review 
process. You are encouraged to read our reviews to 
determine whether the product is right for your needs. 

There is absolutely no relationship between advertis- 
ing in the rainbow and the certification process. 
Certification is open and available to any product per- 



taining to CoCo. A Seal will be awarded to any com- 
mercial product, regardless of whether the firm adver- 
tises or not. 

We will appreciate knowing of instances of violation 
of Seal use. 



Rainbow Check Plus 




The small box accompanying a program listing in 
the rainbow is a "check sum" system, which is 
designed to help you type in programs accurately. 

Rainbow Check PLUS counts the number and values 
of characters you type in. You can then compare the 
number you get to those printed in the rainbow. 
On longer programs, some benchmark lines are given. 
When you reach the end of one of those lines with your 
typing, simply check to see if the numbers match. 

To use Rainbow Check PLUS, type in the program 
and save it for later use, then type in the command RUN 
and press enter. Once the program has run, type new 
and press enter to remove it from the area where the 
program you're typing in will go. 

Now, while keying in a listing from the rainbow, 
whenever you press the down arrow key, your CoCo 
gives the check sum based on the length and content 
of the program in memory. This is to check against the 
numbers printed in the rainbow. If your number is 
different, check the listing carefully to be sure you typed 
in the correct basic program code. For more details 
on this helpful utility, refer to H. Allen Curtis' article on 
Page 21 of the February 1984 rainbow. 

Since Rainbow Check PLUS counts spaces and 
punctuation, be sure to type in the listing exactly the 
way it's given in the magazine. 

10 CLS:X=25G*PEEI<(35)+178 

20 CLEAR 25,X-1 

30 X=2S6*PEEI< (35)+17B 

40 FDR Z=X TD X+77 

S0 READ Y:W=W+Y:PRINT Z,Y;W 

S0 POKE Z,Y:NEXT 

70 IFW=79B5THENB0ELSEPRINT 

"DATA ERROR": STOP 
90 EXEC X:END 

90 DATA 1B2, 1, 106, 1G7, 140, 60, 134 
100 DATA 126, 1B3, 1, 106, 190, 1, 107 
110 DATA 175, 140, 50, 4B, 140, 4, 191 
120 DATA 1, 107, 57, 129, 10, 38, 38 
130 DATA 52, 22, 79, 158, 25, 230, 129 
140 DATA 39, 12, 171, 12B, 171, 128 
150 DATA 230, 132, 38, 250, 48, 1, 32 
160 DATA 240, 183, 2, 222, 48, 140, 14 
170 DATA 159, 1G6, 166, 132, 28, 254 
180 DATA 189, 173, 198, 53, 22, 12G, 0 
190 DATA 0, 135, 255, 134, 40, 55 
200 DATA 51, 52, 41, 0 



16 THE RAINBOW June 1989 



MULTIPAKS 



4 more expansion 
CoCo. Useful for RS232/Speech Packs, 
Hard Drive Interfaces & much more. 



CoCo 2 Multipak (26-3124) : Only $89 
GfcCd 3 PAL Upgrade for 

above Multipak: Only $19.95 



Add$5,p0 S&H, Pleas^ttbte that we hav^ limited 



MP! Locking Plate (Spec Cat #): 



.m il l 



LULU KJlfJrAiii Sl^liVlLJB/ 

Something wrong with your CoCo or your 
Multipak? We can help. We can repair 




0026 for service information. 

Other Products 



•*•■■»»■«, 



WStm Digitizer(with CSEE software): 
$149.95 

Gravis Advanced Joystick: $59.95 ea 
Magnavox BM7622 Amber Monitor & 
Cable:$99 



MAGNAVOX 8CM515 RGB 
MONITOR 

Razor-sharp picture p V>. - V'W^l 
quality for your CoCo! 




Analog/TTL 
Composite 
CoCo 2/3, _ 
stand & 2 year warranty! 
Only $265 (add $12 S&H/$40 in Canada) 

Magnavox RGB Cable for CoCo 3 and 
Composite Video / Audio <f 
purchase of monitor: $19.95 



DISK DRIVES for CoCo 2 & 3 



fh&0 a£&$ lot ^dealers selling disk drives for the CoCo. Why buy from us? 
Ffr$t| <^ New and made by Fujitsu. They are sleek, 

qiuetjailid fraVe a reputation of superb reliability. Second, our Drive 0 sys~ 
terr^ c^me with the acclaimed DISTO Controller - with gold-plated con- 
tacts. Third, pur Drive 0 systems come with the official 200 page Radio 
Shack Disk Manual. Fourth, you get $60 worth of our utility software (Disk 
Util 2.JA-& Super Tape/Disk Transfer) & our DISKMAX software which 
allows you to aeess BOTH sides of our drives. Our drive systems are head 
& shoulders above the rest. 



,: ? - W[3 



Drive 0 (WiuYDisio Controller, Case, Power Supply, 1 Drive Cable, Manual, Software): 



Drive 1 (With Case, Power Supply & software): $129 Bare 5 1/4* Drive: $89 
2 Drive System (With Disto Controller, Case, Power Supply, 2 Drive Cable, Manual & 
Software): $309 

1 Drive Cable: $16.95 2 Drive Cable: $ 22.95 4 Drive Cable:$ 34.95 



FD501 Upgrade Kit: $109 (Includes Bare Drive, 2 drive Cable & Instructions) 
FD502 Upgrade Kit: Call 716-383-8830 for pricing & availability. 



MM 



mmm* 



Complete w/ Seagate Hard Drive, Hard Drive Con- 
troller, B&B Interface, Cables, Case, Power Supply, 
Software (HYPER IO) & Instruction manuals. As- 
sembled/tested/formatted Just PlugWRun. This is 
the best hard drive deal for the CoCo. 



Seagate 20 Meg System: $509 
Seagate 30 Meg System: $539 



■ 




CoCo XT: Use 2 5-120 Meg Drives with your CoCo. 
Only $69.95 w/ Real Time Clock: $99.95 
CoCo XT ROM: Boots OS9 from hard/floppy. $19.95 
HYPERIO: Allows Hard Drive Use with RSDOS, 
Only $29.95 

HYPER III: Adds RAMDISK & Spooler to 
HyperlO .$12.95 

HYPERIO: Disto Versionrlf you have the Disto Hard 
Drive Interface, this program will allow you to use 



mmmmmmmm 



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• ; - ■ ■ ■ ' ■ ■ -r- ■ ' ii. 



AH Printer Systems inelude 1000 FREE sheets of paper! 



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tor Feed • Epson/IBM Compatible • Paper Parking • 1 Year Warranty, Only 




• Friction / Tractor Feed • Paper Parking 
Epson/IBM Compatible • 1 Year Warranty. Only 




em: 24-pin Printer •Trac- 
pr/Friction Feed • Epson/IBM Compatible 

# Paper Parking • 1 Year Warranty. Only $399 

NX-15 System: 9-pin Printer ^Wide Carriage 

• High speed draft printing • 1 Year Warranty: $399 





mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm — 



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DISTO PRODUCTS 



••• 



Disto Mini Controller $74,95 
Disto Super Controller: $99.95 
Disto Super Controller II: $129.95 

• Mini Eprom Programmer Add on: $54.95 

• Hard Disk Inter,:$39.95 W/RS232: $69.95 
# RT Clock & Parallel Interface: $34.95 

• MEB Adapter Add On: $34.95 

MULTI-BOARD ADAPTER: Printer Port, RT 
Clock & true RS-232 Serial Port. $74.95 
RS232 SUPER PACK: True RS-232 Port for 
your CoCo. Compatible with Tandy® Deluxe 
RS232 Pack. Includes DB25 Cable. Requires 
Multipak. Only $54.95 

-1 Board: Its here! $Call 



ilieROGOM SOFTWARE 2900 Monroe Avenue • Rochester, NY 14618 




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, Monitors, Drives, Computers) shipped by UPS 2nd Day Air in the Continental 




add sales tax. Our Australian Agent: Aust. Peripheral Development Ph:Q7-208~782Q. 

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Order Status, Info , Technical Support (4-8pm): (716)383-8830; Fax (716) 383-0026 





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1 F e atur e 



CoCo 3 Disk Cassette Modification 




A new domino theory — put it on a 
CoCo and it will be faster, more fun 
and much more colorful 




Electro Dominoes 



By Jeff Steidl 




Have you ever spent hours setting 
up dominoes, only to accidentally 
knock them down and have to start 
all over? Then, when you finally finish, you 
only get to watch them fall once. Maybe 
you don't have as many different colored 
dominoes as you would like, so watching 
them fall isn't too exciting. 

Electro-Dominoes solves these prob- 
lems and comes in the form of a very 
compact and powerful basic program. Af- 
ter running the program, there is a pause 
before the main workscreen appears. Here, 



Jeff Steidl spends much of his time writing 
basic and assembly language programs as 
well as designing computer systems and 
languages. He has eight years of program- 
ming experience, ranging from MC-10 to 
VAX, Jeff s other interests include mathe- 
matics, music and electronics. 

18 THE RAINBOW June 1989 



you can select an arrow or color with the 
joystick, placing the dominoes wherever 
you want. The color represents that on the 
sides of the dominoes, so when the domino 
falls, it turns that color. The arrow shows 
which direction the domino will fall — 
each domino can have up to two arrows in 
it. This allows as many as 16 paths of 
falling dominoes. To get rid of an arrow 
already on the screen , select the same direc- 
tion arrow and delete it with the joystick. 

After all of the dominoes are set up, you 
can knock them down. (Don't run out and 
get everyone to see it now, wait until you 
have debugged your setup.) Move the cur- 
sor over the domino you want to knock 
down and press H. Then enter a number (0 
to 1 5) for the top color of the dominoes. The 
computer draws your dominoes as seen 
from above, and beeps. You can now press 
the up-arrow to start the reaction. 

On the first run there is a good chance of 
having a bug in the works. Most often, it 



involves a group of dominoes that don't 
fall. This is caused by forgetting an arrow 
or pointing one to the wrong place. Another 
problem is the endless loop. This is caused 
by a group of arrows in which the last 
points to the first. To get out of an endless 
loop, do exactly what you do in basic; press 

BREAK. 

The last error is more subtle. When two 
arrows point to the same domino, the 
computer not only remembers the domino 
(and all the ones that it knocks down) 
falling once, but twice. This slows down 
the program some so, if you suspect it, 
double-check the workscreen. After watch- 
ing the dominoes fall, press H or R to return 
to the workscreen. 

If you break out of the program to do the 
impossible, end an endless loop, or just to 
do a directory, you can get back into the 
program by typing GOTO 1. The work- 
screen, as well as your domino setup is 
restored. To save a setup, press S and enter 



3 Fabulous Bargains! 

These specials will be withdrawn without notice. Don't miss them! 





The Dazzling Word Processor 



$ 



39 



95 




The Famous Graphics Creator 



$ 



49 



95 



Max-1 0: the Rolls-Royce of word processors. The only one with true 
graphic capability and dozens of type styles. Using your dot matrix printer 
you get from tiny footnotes (6 point) to big titles (24 point). 

The Rainbow review (1/89) said: "An incredible job of providing 
power, flexibility and speed in a program that is as easy to use as it is 
to pronounce! ... Max-10 takes a back seat to none, and is beyond 
comparison with most." Max-10, the only word processor with "What 
You See Is What You Get". A word processor you will love at first sight. 



CoCo Max III: now a classic and probably the most popular CoCo pro- 
gram ever, If the price was the reason that stopped you before, this special 
will delight you. Listen (Rainbow 3/88): "There are no limits to what you 
can do with this fabulous program. Speed, ease, animation, power and 
color, all in one package. CoCo Max III is the ultimate program for the 
CoCo 3." Check any Rainbow (up to 4/89) for complete info on CoCo Max. 

To top it off, we include a free Demo Disk plus the super CoCo Show 
program, which lets you make your own "slide shows". 



Save $70 

BOTH 

CoCo Max III and Max-10 for 

only 

$T Ck 95 



79 



Desktop Publishing: together, CoCo Max 111 and Max-10 form an 
unbeatable system for reports, flyers, invitations, greeting cards, signs, 
newsletters, etc. It's far beyond anything you've ever seen on a CoCo. 

Here is one of the hundreds of unsolicited letters we got: "Max-10 
and CoCo Max III are wonderful. They are the first Color Computer 
products I have purchased that were even better than I hoped for." 

At Colorware, we all work hard to make you feel that way and we 
thrive on your appreciation. 



About Max-10 

What the CoCo Community needs is a word 
processor that's rock solid, blindingly fast, 
feels like a Macintosh, makes all the others 
look boring, and does not cost $80 
Max-10 is just that and more. It allows on 
screen mixing of graphics and text, large 
headlines, multiple columns and full page 
preview (with graphics), 
we swear that Max-10 will add excitement 
to your word processing, and that's no small 
task! 

PRINTERS SUPPORTED: epsonfxmxrx lx 

AND COMPATIBLES; DMP 105.106.110.130; CGP220 
(B&W); OKI 182.92.192: STAR NX 10. NX 1000. 

Max~1 0 Add-ons 



~ Max-10 Fonts. 36 super fonts on 2 disks. 
Send for list. Order #C~23 $29.95 

NOTE: Max-10 and CoCo Max Fonts aren't interchangable. 

- Spell Checker 50000 word dictionary for 
online spell checking and dictionary lookup. 
Perfect seamless integration with Max-10. 
Order #C-24 $29.95 

System Requirements 

Max-10 and CoCo Max III Require: any 
CoCo 3; 1 or more disk drives; joystick or 
mouse; Radio Shack or Colorware Hi-Res 
Pack;a video or RGB monitor or a TV. 



About CoCo Max 

Whether you doodle for fun or do graphics 
for a living. CoCo Max will amaze you. It's a 
promise. " 

Its major features include: Huge picture 
area (2 full hi-res 320x192 screens). Large 
editing window. Zoom mode for detail work, 
28 point and click drawing tools. Shrink and 
stretch. Rotation at any angle (1.5° steps). 
51 2K memory support (all features work 
with 128Ktoo). Undo (Oops) feature to fix 
mistakes. Animation. Special effects. Color 
sequencing (8 colors, variable speed). 13 
fonts (more available). Each font has 8 sizes 
and 5 styles for thousands of possible 
combinations. Translate program to convert 
most types of pictures. CoCo Show "slide 
show" program. Miniload program to help 
use pictures with your software, Color edit- 
ing of patterns. Prints in single or double 
size. Select 16 of 64 available colors, all 64 
colors are shown at once for easy selection. 
Pull-down menus. 40 paint brush shapes. 
Two color lettering. Spray can. Amazing 
"flowbrush". RGB and composite monitor 
support. Colors print in 5 shades of gray. 

PRINTERS SUPPORTED: Epson rx.fx.mx.lx 

AND COMPATIBLES: STAR/GEMINI NX 10.NX 1000; 
DMP 100. 105, 106. 11 0.1 20. 130.200: OKI 82A.182.192; 
CGP 220(B&W) 

Color Drivers available. See next column. 



CoCo Max III Add-ons 

- Max Fonts disks. 95 fonts on 4 disks. 
Order #C-73 $49.95 

- Max Edit Create new fonts or edit existing 

ones. Order #C-16 $19.95 

~ Color Printer drivers for NX- 1000 
Rainbow (#C-2). CGP-220 (#C-1) or 
Okimate 20 (#C-3)..,... . each $19.95 

CoCo Max I and II 

- CoCo Max I on tape. Seeprevious ads or 
write for info. For CoCo 1 or 2. 

Order #C-7 $59.95 

- CoCo Max II. For all disk CoCos. Multi- 
pak or Y-Cable required. #C-85 > $69.95 

Digitizers 

Digitize any picture from any video source 
(VCR, camera...) for use with CoCo Max III 
and Max-10. 

DS-69. Requires Multipak. 2 pictures per 
second. Order #C-1 8. ....>„., $99.95 
DS-69B Faster; 8 pix/sec. #C-92... $149.95 



Call or Write Now 

(203) 348-9436 

Weekdays 9-5 EST 





Ordering Information: We accept Visa, Mastercard, Checks, and M.O. COD. is $4 extra. 
Purchase ordeisare subject to credit approval. CT residents add 7,5% sales tax, 
Shipping: $4perofder (usually UPS ground). UPS 2nd Day Air: $4 extra. Next Day sen/ice 
available. Canada: $6 per order (Airmail). Outside US and Canada: Add 10% of order total. 



COLORWARE 



COLORWARE 

242- W West Avenue 
Darien, CT 06820 



a filename; to load a setup, press L and 
enter the filename. To change dominoes in 
order to use a cassette system, change all 
occurrences of #W in lines 4, 10 and 1 1 to#V. 
(Make sure to have the auxiliary chord 
plugged in, and when saving, press the 



Record and Play buttons on the recorder 
before you press enter.) The program runs 
at double speed, except during file manipu- 
lations. The palette colors may be altered 
by changing the first 1 6 DATA values in Line 
23. Warning: Changing a basic line state- 



ment erases your setup — save it first! 

(Questions or comments concerning this 
article may be directed to the author at 605 
Evergreen, Holmen, WI 54636. Please 
include an SASE when requesting a reply.) 



$$tprs (Vi \ te: A Sijmptefilt* . DOM «' *:;. vi H, is 101% 
on this month's haiwow disk. f® use the sr~- 
press L after nttming wMkmS and follow the 
Hons |f ^ j j ? ift the 4i i{> ^ ? 





The Listing: DOMINOES 

J3 CLEAR999:PCLEARl:F=65497:POKEF 
, 0 : Z=15 : FORY=0TOZ : READA : PALETTEY 
,A:NEXT:CLS1:E=599:DIMA(Z) ,B(Z) , 
C(E) ,D(8) ,E(E) ,F(E) ,R(E) ,S(E) ,X( 
E) ,Y(E) :G=30:FORP=0TOE:X(P)=(P-I 
NT(P/G) *G) *9:Y(P)=INT(P/G) *9:R(P 
) =X (P) +8 : S (P) =Y (P) +8 : NEXT : FORN=l 
T08 : READA$ (N) ,D(N) :NEXT 

1 W=1:HBUFFW,39:T=65312:V=-1:U=2 
52 : H=74 : 1=2 : J=7 : L=3 : Q=12 : R=8 : S=6 
5496 1 COPYRIGHT 1989 FALSOFT, 
INCORPORATED 

2 POKEF,0:HCOLORR,0:HSCREEN2:FOR 
A=J3T0J:HDRAW"BM29 6, "+STR$ (A*Q)+A 
$ ( A+W) : NEXT : FORP=^TOZ : HCOLORP : HL 
INE (308,P*Q) -(319, P*Q+11) ,PSET,B 
F : NEXT : IFK=0THENK=W : GOT04 

3 FORX=j3TOE:HCOLORC(X) :HLINE(X(X 
) ,Y(X))-(R(X) ,S(X) ) ,PSET,B:A$="C 
8BM"+STR$(X(X) )+" , M +STR$(Y(X) ) :H 
DRAWA$+A$(E(X) ) : HDRAWA$+A$ (F (X) ) 
:NEXT 

4 CLOSE#W:POKEF,0:HLINE(R, 184) -( 
263,191), PRESET , BF : HCOLORR : HPRIN 
T(l, 23) , "Electro-Dominoes by Je 
ff Steidl" 

5 A=INT(JOYSTK(0)/I) :B=JOYSTK(W) 
/63:IFA<G THENM==0:B=INT(B*19) :X= 
A+B*G : A=A*9 : B=B*9ELSEB=INT ( B*Z ) * 
Q: IFA>G THENM=I:A«308ELSEA=296:M 
=W: IFB>84THENB=84 

6 HGET (A, B) - (A+J, B+J) , W: HCOLORRN 
D(Z) : HDRAW" BM"+STR$ (A) +" , "+STR$ ( 
B)+"BD4BR1R6L3U3D6" : A$=INKEY$ : IF 
A$= M H"THEN15ELSEHPUT (A, B) - (A+J, B 
+J) ,W: IFA$="S"THENipELSEIFA$="L" 
THEN 11 

7 IFBUTTON (0) THENIFM=2THENC=B/Q: 
Ml=O:G0T09ELSEIFM THEND=B/Q+W:M1 
=W:G0T09ELSEIFM1=£THENHC0L0RC:HL 
INE(A,B)-(R(X) ,S(X) ) ,PSET,B:C(X) 
=C: GOT05ELSEIFD=E (X) THENE (X) =F (X 
) : F (X) =£ELSEIFD=F (X) THENF (X) =J3EL 
SEIFE(X)=pTHENE(X)=D ELSEF(X)=D 
ELSE5 

8 HLINE(A+W,B+W) -(A+J, B+J) , PRESE 



T,BF:A$="C8BM"+STR$ (A) +" , "+STR$ ( 

B) :HDRAWA$+A$(E(X) ) : HDRAWA$+A$ (F 

(X) ) :SOUND2j3j3,W 

9 IFBUTTON (0) THEN9ELSE5 

1J3 N$=" Save:" :GOSUB12: POKES, 0:0 

PEN"0" , #W, N$ : FORY=,0TO525STEP75 : P 

OKEF,0:A$= ,l,f :FORX=Y TOY+H: A$=A$+ 

CHR$ (E (X) +H) +CHR$ (F (X) +H) +CHR$ (C 

(X)+H) : NEXT: POKES , 0 : WRITE rfW, A$ : N 

EXT:GOT04 

11 N$=" Load: ":GOSUB12: POKES, 0:0 
PEN"I" , #W, N$ : F0RY=PT0525STEP75 : I 
NPUT # W , A$ : POKEF , 0 : N=W : FORX=Y TOY 
+H:E(X)=ASC(MID$ (A$,N, W) ) -H:F(X) 
=ASC (MID$ ( A$ , N+W , W) ) ~H : C (X) =ASC ( 
MID$ (A$ , N+I , W) ) -H : N=N+L : NEXT : POK 
ES,0:NEXT:G0T02 

12 HCOLORO:HLINE(R,184)-(263,191 
) , PSET , BF : HCOLORR : A=18 : HPRINT (Q , 
23) ,N$:N$="" 

13 A$=INKEY$ : IFA$=CHR$ (13) THENRE 
TURNELSEIFA$=CHR$ (R) ANDA> 1 8 THENH 
COLORO : N$=LEFT$ (N$ , A- 19 ) : A= A+V : H 
LINE (A*R, 184 ) - (A*R+J, 191) , PSET, B 
F: ELSEIFA<G ANDA$>" "THENHCOLORR: 
HPRINT (A, 23) ,A$ :N$=N$+A$ : A=A+W 

14 G0T013 

15 N$="Color: " : G0SUB12 : HSCREENI : 
HCOLORVAL (N$ ) : FORY=0TOE: IFE ( Y) OR 
C(Y) THENHLINE (X(Y) ,Y(Y) )-(R(Y) ,S 
(Y) ) ,PSET,B 

16 NEXT : N=0 : A ( 0 ) =X : S OUND 2 J3j3 , W : PO 
KET+L,63 

17 IFINKEY$<>" A "THEN17 

18 P=V:FORA=0 TON:Y=A(A) :HCOLORC 
(Y) :HLINE(X(Y) ,Y(Y) )-(R(Y) ,S(Y)) 
, PSET , BF : IFE ( Y) THENP=P+W: B (P) =Y+ 
D(E(Y) ) :IFF(Y)THENP=P+W:B(P)=Y+D 
(F(Y)) 

19 NEXT:POKET,U:IFP=V THEN2 2 

2p N=V:FORA=0 TOP:Y=B(A) :HCOLORC 
(Y) :HLINE(X(Y) ,Y(Y))-(R(Y) ,S(Y)) 
, PSET , BF : IFE ( Y ) THENN=N+W: A (N) =Y+ 
D(E(Y) ) : IFF (Y) THENN=N+W: A(N) =Y+D 
(F(Y)) 

21 NEXT:POKET,0:IFN>V THEN18 

22 A$=INKEY$ : IFA$="H"THEN15ELSEI 
FA$="R"THEN2ELSE2 2 

23 DATA, 1,7,9, 1^,12, 14, 16, 32,21, 
28 , 31 , 52 , 54 , 58 , 63 , BD7BR4U6NF2G2 , 
-3J3 , BD7BR1E6NL2D2 , -29 , BD4BR1R6NH 
2G2 , 1 , BR1BD1F6NU2L2 , 31 , BR4BD1D6N 
E2H2 , 3 fi , BR7BD1G6NU2R2 , 29 , BR7BD4L 
6NE2F2 , -1 , BR7BD7H6NR2D2 , -31 /Rv 



20 



THE RAINBOW June 1989 




<« GJMMESOFT »> 

A new generation of Color Computer products 




MAXSOUND 

A High Quality Digital Audio Sampler and Sequencer 



RAINBOW 

CERT IF HUH XUM 
•KM. 



Turn your CoCo III into a REAL digital audio sampler with HIGH quality audio reproduction. Easily 
add exotic effects, ECHO, stuttering, speed shifting, sequencing, and reverse audio to BASIC or ML 
programs or GRAPHICS! Now includes Data Compression. Imagine recording any Voice, Music, or 
Sound effect and being able to use these DIGITAL recordings in your own programs! 3 disk sides 
includes: INTERFACT/BIN - ML driver for sound effects. G&M/BAS - Adds sound effects to 
Graphics. SHOWTIME and DEMO disks. SCOPE/BAS - Turns CRT into a Digital Oscilloscope to 
look at MAXSOUND waveforms. Version 3,0 upgrade (Includes improved ECHO and the ability 
to print NAMETAGS and locations to the screen and /or printer) »,♦,.. $6.95 + Shipping & Handling 

Call to hear 'OVER THE PHONE* Demo - 9am to 9pm VOICE only. 
DOWNLOAD Demo Files 300/1200/2400 24 hrs - 301-675-7626 MODEM only. 
Requirements (128k or 512k CoCo III only) DISK .... $59.95 



Games 



See previous Rainbow ads 
for complete descriptions. 



Utilities 



Warrior King $29.95 

In Quest of the Starlord $34.95 

Kung-Fu Dude $24.95 

Pyramix $19.95 

Hall of the King I,U or III each $29.95 
Dragon Blade $19.95 



Fkeys Iff $19.95 

Sixdrive $16.95 

Multi-Label III $16.95 

AD&D Companion $24.95 

MPI-C0C0 Locking Plates 

26-3024 or 26-3124 $ 7.95 



RAINBOW 

COtTiriCAIIOH 



V-Term Terminal Emulator 

Communicate with VAX, UNIX, Mainframe, and BBS Systems! 

-VT-100, VT-52, Vidtex (includes RLE graphics display), and standard CRT emulations. 

-Menus can be operated concurrently with other terminal functions. (Disk Basic!) 

•Full 28 line by 80 column screen, with 3 bottom lines protected for menus. 

•Serial port up to 2400 baud, RS-232 Pak up to 19,200 baud, DCModem Pak at 300 baud. 

-XModem, XModem-CRC, Y*Modem, and ASCII file transfers directly to disk or memory. 

•RAMDISK like buffer, Capture buffer, Snapshot, Conference mode, and 35/40/80 Tracks. 

NEW FEATURES: 15 -Entry autodialer, 10 Programmable macro keys for each system, compatible 

with Hyper I/O and RGBDOS harddrive systems, and baud rates up to 19,200! 

Version 03.00.00 upgrade $6.95 + S&H Disk (128k or 512k CoCo JU only) w*».* $39.95 



Telepak II (CoCo I/II/III) A TRULEY COMPATIBLE RS-232 INTERFACE! 

Now, from Orion Technologies, comes the answer to the continuing demand for an RS-232 interface. 
Telepak II now includes a 3 foot DB25 cable, gold card edge contacts, and low power drain (5v) 
components. Works on ALL Color Computers with or without a Multi-Pak interface. (MPI required 
on disk systems) Baud rates up to 19,200! (19.2 tested using V-TERM ver 3). Only .... $49.95 



| Toll Free 


1-800-441-GIME 


Order line | 


Technical assistance: 7pm to 9pm 
Orders: 9am to 9pm Eastern time 
On-line orders and up to date 
information: Delphi'* CoCo Sig 


G1MMESOFT 
P.O. Box 421 
Perry Hall, MD 21128 
301-256-7558 or 301-256-2953 


Add $3.00 for shipping and handling 
Add 93.00 for COD (USA only) 
MD residents add 5% sales tax 
VI 5A/MC/Ch&ck /Money Order/COD 



See your Co Co 2 in a new way 




By James A. Tatarka 




It in in 111 ill 111 in in in in m in in in in in in in i n i n m m in hi i n i n in i n i n i n m n 1 

22 THE RAINBOW June 1989 



For years, I have used my trusty 
CoCo 2 to write tests and create 
designs. My faithful computer 
has helped me to invent designs and 
pictures guaranteed to interest my 
students and amuse me. CoCo has 
followed me through my artistic efforts, 
patiently waiting until I got my creation 
just right. 

Self Portrait is a tribute to my un- 
complaining CoCo 2. Using 16K Ex- 
tended Color BASIC, this program 
creates a miniature CoCo 2 on the 
computer screen. Once the portrait is 
complete, the miniature CoCo's screen 
displays its name. The portrait's screen 
is then erased, and the miniature CoCo 
exhibits its educational value by pre- 
senting a visual aid for a lesson on 
Einstein's theory of relativity. Once the 
lesson is over, CoCo's portrait enter- 
tains its captivated audience with a 
juggling act. 

I expect to use my CoCo 2 for many 
years to come. Its graphic capabilities 
will help me to entertain my students 
and myself, and I hope that my salute 
to my CoCo 2 has amused you as well. 

(Questions or comments regarding 
this program may be addressed to the 
author at 25 Manchester, Youngstown, 
OH 44509. Please enclose an SASE 
when requesting a reply.) □ 



James Tatarka has taught the sixth 
grade for 23 years and holds an MS in 
elementary education. He has had his 
CoCo 2 for five years and enjoys using 
it as a classroom aid. 



Dr. Preble's Programs 

Since 1983 



Pyramix 

This fascinating CoCo 3 game continues 
to be one of our best sellers. Pyramix is 
100% machine language written 
exclusively to take advantage of all the 
power in your 128K CoCo 3. The Colors 
are brilliant, the graphics sharp, the 
action fast. Written by Jordan Tsvetkoff 
and a product of ColorVenture. 

The Freedom Series 

Vocal Freedom 

I've got to admit, this is one nifty 
computer program. Vocal Freedom turns 
your computer into a digital voice 
recorder. The optional Hacker's Pic lets 
you incorporate voices or sounds that you 
record into your own BASIC or ML 
programs. This is not a synthesizer. 
Sounds are digitized directly into 
computer memory so that voices or 
sound effects sound very natural. One 
"off-the-shelf" application for Vocal 
Freedom is an automatic message minder. 
Record a message for your family into 
memory. Set Vocal Freedom on 
automatic. When Vocal Freedom "hears" 
any noise in the room, it plays the pre- 
recorded message! Disk operations are 
supported. VF also tests memory to take 
advantage of from 64K up to a full 
512K. Requires low cost amplifier (RS 
cat. *277-1008) and anv microphone. 

Mental Freedom 

Would your friends be impressed if your 
computer could read their minds? Mental 
Freedom uses the techniques of 
Biofeedback to control video game action 
on the screen .Telekinesis? Yes, you 
control the action with your thoughts and 
emotions. And, oh yes, it talks in a 
perfectly natural voice without using a 




speech synthesizer) Requires Radio | 
Shack's low cost Biofeedback monitor, 
Cat. *63-675. 

BASIC Freedom 

Do you ever type in BASIC programs, 
manually? If you do, you know it can 
be a real chore. Basic Freedom changes 
all that. It gives you a full screen editor 
just like a word processor, but for 
BASIC programs. Once loaded in. it is 
always on-line. It hides invisibly until 
you call it forth with a single keypress! 
This program is a must for programers 
or anyone who types in programs. By 
Chris Babcock and a product of 
ColorVenture. 

Lightning Series 

These three utilities give real power to 
your CoCo 3. 

Ramdisk Lightning 

This is the best Ramdisk available. It 
lets you have up to 4 mechanical disk 
drives and 2 Ram drives on-line and is 
fully compatible with our printer spooler 

below. 

Printer Lightning 

High capacity print spooler for CoCo 3. 

Load it and forget it--except for the 
versatility it gives you. Never wait for 
your printer again! Printer runs at high 
speed white you continue to work at the 
keyboard! Will operate with any printer 
you have already hooked to your CoCo. 

Backup Lightning 

This utility requires 512K. Reads your 
master disk once and then makes 
superfast multiple disk backups on all 
your drives! No need to format blank 
disks first! Supports 35, 40 or 80 track 
drives. 

COCO Braiile 

Produce standard grade 2 Braille on a 
Brother daisy wheel printer. Easy to use 
for sighted or blind user. No knowledge 
of Braille is necessary. Call tor free 
sample. The raised dots produced are 
easily touch readable by the blind. The 
print-to-braille algorithm is robust with 




I errors rarely being made — and. it has the 
ability to learn! 

Prices 

CoCo 3 only 



Mam Disk Lightning. Bisk $19.95 

Printer Lightning Disk $19.95 

Back Bp Lightning. Disk $19.95 

AH three. Disk $49.95 

Pyrmix. Disk ....$24.95 

CoCo 1,2, or 3 

Vocal Freedom. Disk $34.95 

Voewi Freedom Hackers Pac $14.95 

COCO BraiUe $69.95 

CoCo 2 or 3 only 

Mental Freedom Disk. $24.95 

Basic Freedom. Disk $24.95 



CoCo 1 or 2 only 

VDOS. The Undisk, a menu operated 
ramdisk for the CoCo 1 or 2. LOAD. 
SAVE. KILL. DIRECTORY, are all 
supported. Tape $24.95 

VDUMP. backup Undisk files to single 
tape file. Tape $14.95 

TPMWT. Print Undisk directory. 
Tape $9.95 

We Ship FAST! 

Add $2.50 shipping/handling 
in USA or CANADA 
Add $5.00 to ship to other 
countries 

Dr. Preble's Programs 
6540 Outer Loop 
Louisville. KY 40228 
24 Hour Order Line 

Visa. MasterCard. COD, Check 

(502) 969-1818 



■ 



The Listing: PORTRAIT 



0 

10 
15 

20 

30 
40 

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60 



COPYRIGHT 19 8 9 FALSOFT , INC 
***** COCO-2 SELF PORTRAIT * 



* **** 
***** 
***** 

* * ** * 



* 
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BY J • A . T ATARKA 
25 MANCHESTER 
YOUNGSTOWN, OHIO 
ZIP CODE 44509 

D=0 

PMODE4 : PCLS1 : SCREEN 1, 1 
70 DRAW M C0BM6,188R244E3U5H3NL244 
UHUHUHUHUHUHUHUHUHUHUHUOT 
UHUHUHUHUHUHUHUHRUHUHUHUHU5H2 LI 8 
5G2D5GDGDGDGDBU15BR5EUEUEUEUEUEU 
EUEUEUEUEUER163FDFDFDFDFDFDFDFDF 
DFDFD 

80 DRAW"BM6,188H3U5E3UEUEUEUEUEU 
EUEUEUEUEUEUEUEUEUEUEUEUEUEUEUEU 
EUEUEER193 

90 DRAW n BM50 , 90U80E4R146F4D80" 
100 LINE(55,95)-(119,96) ,PSET,B: 
LINE ( 5 3 , 9 8 ) - ( 1 1 9 , 9 9 ) , PS ET , B : LINE 
( 5 2 , 10 1 ) - ( 119, 10 2 ) , PSET , B : LINE ( 1 
35, 95) - (199 , 96 ) , PSET, B : LINE (135 , 
98) -(200, 99) , PSET, B: LINE (135,101 
)-(202,102) ,PSET,B 
110 LINE(50, 104)-(119, 105) , PSET, 
B : LINE ( 1 3 5 , 10 4 ) - ( 2 0 4 , 10 5 ) , PS ET , B 
120 DRAW"BMS2 , 112EUER90FDFL94BR6 
BUR30BR20R30 

130 DRAWBM55 , 85U70E2R140F2D70G2 
L140H2" 

140 DRAW " BM2 6 ,17 0R1 9 9 EHUHUHUHUHU 
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150 DRAW fl BM61 , 167R130HUHUHUL124G 
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160 DRAW H BM47 , 155R156FDFDFDL163E 

UEUEUBL2BD6E3R155F3 

170 DRAW"BH45,150R160 

180 DRAW !, BM48,145R155 

190 DRAW"BM55,140R142 

200 DRAW"BM45,140BR8BD5UEUEUBR11 

ND5 BR1 1ND 5 BR1 1ND5 BR1 1ND5 BR1 1ND5 B 

R11ND5BR11ND5BR11ND5BR11ND5BR11N 

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210 DRAW"BM54,145E2R141F2" 

220 DRAW !I BM48 , 145GDGDGBR13NU5BR1 

1NU 5 BR1 1NU5 BR 1 1NU5 BR 1 1NU 5 BR1 1NU5 

BR11NU5 BR11NU5 BR1 1NU5 BR1 1NU5 BR1 1 

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2 3 0 DRAW « BM4 6 , 1 50 E 2R 1 5 5 F 2 11 

240 DRAW"BM49 , 150GDGDGBR13NU5BR1 

1NU5BR11NU5BR11NU5BR11NU5BR11NU5 

BR11NU5BR11NU5BR11NU5BR11NU5BR11 

NU5 BR20NU5 BR 12 BUS FDFDF 11 

250 DRAW I, BM49,155E2R150F2 ,I 

260 DRAW"BM45,160U5BR20D5BR12U5B 

R12D5BR12U5BR12D5BR12U5BR12D5BR1 

2 U 5 BR 12 D 5 BR 1 2 U 5 BR 1 2 D 5 " 

270 1 



280 POKE178,0:PAINT(60,40) , ,0:P 
AINT(40,150) , ,0 

290 DRAW"C0 ; BM0 , 111R35" :DRAW"BM2 
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300 POKE178,1:PAINT(0,0) , ,0 

310 POKE178, 254 : PAINT (1, 179) , ,0 

320 DRAW"C1BM97,20U2H2L5G2D8F2R5 

NE2BR9H2U8E2R5F2D8G2NL5BR11H2U8E 

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330 DRAW M C1BM108 , 40H2L5G2D2F2R5F 

2D3G2L5H2BD2BR17U13NR6BD6NR6BD7R 

6BR10NU13R6BR10U13NR6BD6R6 

340 DRAW"C1BM80,70U13R5F2D3G2L4B 

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350 DRAW ,! BR6NU13BR10U13NL6R6" 

3 60 FORR=lTO 3000 : NEXT 

370 IFD=5THENGOSUB550 

380 IFD=3THENGOSUB570 

390 IFD=7THENGOSUB610 

400 PAINT (60, 40) ,1,1 

410 IFD=4THENGOSUB680 

420 IFD=10THENGOSUB610 

430 IFD=13THENGOSUB680 

440 IFD=9THENGOSUB610 

450 IFD=12THENGOSUB570 

460 IFD=14THENGOSUB610 

470 IFD-17THENGOSUB680 

480 PAINT (60, 60) ,1, 1 

490 IFD= 5 4THENDRAW ,, C0BM55 , 55R144" 

500 DRAW lf C0BM55,85U70E2R140FD70G 

2L140H2" 

510 D=D+1 : POKE17 8 , D : PAINT ( 60 , 85 ) 
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520 IFD=3THENGOSUB550ELSEIFD=5TH 
EN GOSUB570ELSEIFD<2 55THEN400 
530 IFD<255THEN400 
540 GOTO50 

550 FORR=2TO30 : CIRCLE (120, 47 ) ,R: 
NEXT 

560 RETURN 

570 COLOR0 : LINE ( 90 , 30 ) - ( 150 , 65 ) , 
PSET, BF 

580 DRAW"C1BM95, 60NR7U6NR7U6R7BR 

3BD4R5BD3NL5BD5BR3U12F4DFDFEUEUE 

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590 FORR=1TO300 0 : NEXT 

6£0 RETURN 

610 F0RR=1T03 3 

620 CIRCLE(90, 60) ,R,1. 555, .422,0 
630 NEXT 

640 FORR= 1TO 2500: NEXTO 
650 PAINT (60, 40) ,1,1 
660 RETURN 
670 PMODE4: RETURN 
680 PMODE4: SCREEN!, 1 
690 RETURN 



24 



THE RAINBOW 



June 1989 



It's Word Processor Trade-in Time Again! 

Send us ANY word processor and get VIP Writer III for $49.95! 

Include $3 for shipping. Send $52.95 and your old word processor to the address below. Offer expires 9/15/89 so 



Hurry! 



#90-908 



VIP Writer III Ver. 2 #Cat. 

VIP Writer ill offers screen widths of 32, 40, 64 & 80 - all with 24 lines and actual lower 
case letters using the CoCo 3's hardware display. It runs at double clock speed and has 4- 
color menus making VIP Writer III FAST and EASY to usel You can choose foreground, 
background, hilite and cursor colors from up to 64 hues. Color can be turned ON or OFF 
for the best possible display using a monochrome monitor or TV set. VIP Writer III has a 
context sensitive help facility to display command usage in easy to read colored windows. 

CUSTOMIZER & PRINTER INSTALLER 

VIP Writer III comes with a configuration / printer installation program which lets you 
customize VIP Writer III to suit your own liking. You can set screen width and colors as well 
as margins and more. You can also install your own printer and set interface type (serial, 
parallel or J&M), baud rate, line feeds, etc. Once done, you never have to enter these 
parameters again! VIP Writer III will load n' go with your custom configuration every time! 

MORE TOTAL TEXT STORAGE 

VIP Writer III has 106K total text storage in a 128K CoCo 3 (495K in 51 2K). VIP Writer 
III creales ASCII text files which are compatible with all other VIP Programs as well as 
other programs which use ASCII files. You can use VIP Writer III to even type BASIC 
programs! There is a ^8K text buffer (438K in a 51 2K CoCo 3) and disk file linking 
allowing virtually unlimited text space. VIP Writer III works with up to four disk drives and 
lets you display directories and free space as well as rename or kill disk files. In addition 
VIP Writer III is 100% compatible with the RGB Computer Systems Hard Disk. 

POWERFUL EDITING FEATURES 

VIP Writer III has a full featured screen editor which can be used to edit text with lines up 
to 240 characters long with or without automatic word wrap around. You can select 
type-over mode or insert mode. There is even an OOPS command to recall a cleared text 
buffer. Other editing features include: Type-ahead • typamatic key repeat and key beep 
for flawless text entry • end of line bell • full four way cursor control with scrolling • top 
of textfile • bottom of textfile • page up • page down • top of screen • bottom of screen • 
beginning of line • end of line • left one word ♦ right one word • DELETE character, to 
beginning or end of line, word to the left or right, or entire line • INSERT character or line 
• LOCATE and/or CHANGE or DELETE single or multiple occurrence using wildcards • 
BLOCK copy, move or delete with up to TEN simultaneous block manipulations • TAB key 
and programmable tab stops • word count • fine restore • three PROGRAMMABLE 
FUNCTIONS to perform tasks such as auto column creation and multiple copy printing. 



Rated "BEST" in RAINBOW Sept. 1988 
AUTOMATIC TEXT FORMATTING 

VIP Writer III automatically formats your text for you or allows you to format your text in 
any way you wish. You can change the top, bottom, left or right margin and page length. 
You can set your text flush left, center or flush right. You can turn right hand 
justification on or off. You can have headers, footers, page numbers and TWO auxiliary 
lines which can appear on odd, even or all pages. You can also select the line on which they 
appear I You can even change the line spacing! Parameters can be altered ANYWHERE I 

PREVIEW PRINT FORMAT WINDOW 

VIP Writer III features an exclusive format window which allows you to preview your 
document BEFORE PRINTING IT! You are able to move up, down, left and right to see 
centered and justified text, margins, page breaks, broken paragraphs, orphan lines etc. 

PRINTING VERSATILITY 

VIP Writer III prints TWICE as fast as any other CoCo word processor! It supports most 
serial or parallel printers using J&M JFD-CP or Rainbow interface and gives you the 
ability to select baud rates from 110 to 19,200. You can imbed printer control codes 
anywhere in your text file EVEN WITHIN JUSTIFIED TEXT! VIP Writer III also has 
TWENTY programmable printer macros which allow you to easily control all of your 
printers capabilities such as bold, underline, italics and superscript using simple key 
strokes. Other features include: multiple copy printing • single sheet pause • line feeds. 

BUILT IN PRINT SPOOLING 

VIP Writer III has a print spooler with a 57,000 character buffer which allows you to print 
one document WHILE you are editing another. You don't have to wait until your printer is 
done before starting another job! Some word processors DO NOT include this feature! 

50,000 WORD SPELLING CHECKER 

VIP Writer III includes VIP Speller (not FREEWARE) to check your text for misspelled 
words It has a 50,000 (not 20,000) word dictionary that can be added to or editea 

QUALITY DOCUMENTATION 

VIP Writer III comes with a well written 125 page manual which is Laser printed, not dot- 
matrix like the competition. It includes a tutorial, glossary of terms and examples for the 
beginner as well as a complete index! VIP Writer ill is truly the BEST you can buy. 

VIP Writer III includes VIP Speller 1.1. DISK $79.95 



Writer (I! or Library /W owners: Upgrade to the VIP Writer III 2.0 
for $10 + $3 S/H. Send ORIGINAL disk and $13 total. 



VIP Writer owners: Upgrade to the Writer III 2.0 for $49.95 + $3 
S/H. Send original disk and $52.95 total. 



VIP Database III *Cat. #90-915 

VIP Database III features selectable screen displays of 40, 64 or 80 characters by 24 
lines with choice of 64 foreground, background, hilite and cursor colors for EASY DATA 
ENTRY. It uses the CoOo 3's hardware screen and double clock speed to be the 
FASTEST database available! VIP Database III will handle as many records as will fit on 
your disks and is structured in a simple and easy to understand menu system with full 
prompting for easy operation. Your data is stored in records of your own design. All files 
are fully indexed for speed and efficiency. IN-MEMORY SORT of records is LIGHTNING 
FAST and provides for easy listing of names, figures, addresses, etc., in ascending or 
descending alphabetical or numeric order. Records can be searched for specific entries 
using multiple search criteria. The built-in mail-merge lets you sort and print mailing lists, 
print form letters, address envelopes - the list is endless. The built-in MATH PACKAGE 
even performs arithmetic operations and updates other fields. VIP Database III also has a 
print spooler and report generator which uses print forms you create. DISK $69.95 

VIP Database owners: Upgrade to the VIP Database 111 for 
$39.95 + $3 S/H. Send ORIGINAL disk and $42.95 total. | 

VIP Library /WDCE $179.95 

The VIP Library /WDCE (Writer Database Calc Enhanced) combines all six 
popular VIP application programs - VIP Writer III, Database III, Calc III, Speller, 
Terminal and Disk-ZAP - into one program on one disk called VIP Desktop. 
For VIP Library shipping please add $4 USA. $5 Canada. $10 Foreign. 

VIP Library owners: Upgrade to the VIP Library /WDCE for $99.95 
+ $3 S/H. Send ORIGINAL disk and $102.95 total. 

VIP Library /WDE owners: Upgrade to the VIP Library /WDCE for 
$1 0 + $3 S/H. Send ORIGINAL disk and $1 3 total. 

SD Enterprises info line (805) 566-1317 
PO Box 621 Carpinteria, Ca. 93013 

Non VIP Library orders add $3 for shipping and handling in USA. Canada $4. Foreign 

$6. COD orders add an additional $2.75. Checks allow 3 weeks for delivery. 

California residents add 6% sales tax. . 



VIP Calc m *Cat. #90-916 

FAST 4-color POPUP menus • PRINT SPOOLER 
32, 40, 64 and 80 Column HARDWARE display! 
Runs VERY VERY FAST at double clock speed! 

Now every CoCo 3 owner has access to a calculating and planning tool better than 
VisiCalc™, containing all its features and commands ana then some. VIP Calc III allows a 
large worksheet with up to 51 2 columns by 1024 rows! In addition, VIP Calc III has up to 16 
windows which allow you to compare and contrast results of changes. Other features 
include 8 AND 16 digit precision • trig, functions • averaging • algebraic functions • column 
and row ascending and descending SORTS • locate formulas or titles in cells • block move 
and replicate • global or local column width • limitless programmable functions • create 
BAR charts. Embed printer control codes for customized pnnting. Combine spreadsheet 
data with VIP Writer documents to create ledgers, projections, statistical & financial 
budgets and reports. DISK $6955 

VIP Calc owners: Upgrade to the VIP Calc III for $29.95 + $3 S/H. I 

Send original disk and $32.95 total. | 

Buy RGB-DOS for $29.95, 

Get Hard Disk support, new commands and a Disk Drive FREE!* 

Sounds too good to be true? If you own a Radio Shack FD 502 or other double sided Disk 
Drive, using RGB-DOS, you can access the other side of your Disk Drive giving a second 
disk drive absolutely free!* RGB-DOS also supports up to 2 Hard Drives that can be 
used by DISK BASIC as well as OS-9. RGB-DOS works with CoCo 1, 2 and 3 and 
supports double sided drives and faster stepping rates. Other features include: Full 
screen directory display shows drive #, free space and even a disk name! • RUNM 
command and FLEXIKEy Last Command Recall and Edit system • EPROM version executes 
any program when CoCo is turned on for hands free start-up. 64K Req'd. 

SD Enterprises credit card / COD order line. 

1-800-322-9873 ext3 



# Available through your nearby Radio Shack Computer Center® and participating Radio Shack stores and dealers 

or order direct from Express Order 8 " by dialing 1 -800-321-3133. 



CoCo Gallery 









1st Prize 

Pan this 

Howard ( . Rouse 

Last year pandas on loan from China were displayed at 
Busch Gardens. Howard captured the moment with 
CoCo Max III. 



SHOWCASE YOUR BEST! 

You are invited to nominate original work for inclusion in upcoming showings of "CoCo Gallery." Share your 
creations with the CoCo Community! Be sure to send a cover letter with your name, address and phone number, 
detailing how you created your picture (what programs you used, etc.) and how to display it. Also please include 
a few facts about yourself. 

Don't send us anything owned by someone else; this means no game screens, digitized images from TV 
programs or material that's already been submitted elsewhere. A digitized copy of a picture that appears in a 
book or magazine is not an original work. 

We will forward two first prizes of $25, one for the CoCo 3 and one for the CoCo 1 and 2; one second prize 
of $15 and one third prize of $10. Honorable Mentions may also be given. 

Please send your entry on either tape or disk to the CoCo Gallery, the rainbow, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, K Y 
40059. Remember, this is a contest and your entry will not be returned. 

— Tony Olive, Curator 




2nd Prize 

Dolphin 

Marc Vaillancourl 



A secondary student living in Ste-Foy, Quebec, Marc 
enjoys visiting the many BBSs in his area. The scene 

is designed with Color Max III. 




THE RAINBOW June 1989 





3rd Prize 

My Room 

4 

Y\;m Lan^lois 

This view of Y van's workstation was created from a 
basic program, which he wrote. From Laval, Quebec, 
Yvan likes to learn about hardware and OS-9 projects 
for his CoCo 1 and 2. 



1st Prize, Coco 1 or 2 

Knglish Heat 



( icoruc kowalski 



An electrical engineering student at Marquette 
University, George found some spare time to generate 
this image using Graphicom. He resides in Milwaukee, 
Wisconsin. 



Honorable Mention 

Ad Infinitum 

Kvilh Schulor 

A depiction of the shadowy realm between reality and 
fantasy. Of Merritt Island, Florida, Keith designed this 
basic program. His hobbies are swimming, drawing, 

model car racing and reading. 




June 1989 THE RAINBOW 27 



The answer lies not in the cards, 
but on the screen 



The CoCo Crystal Ball 



By Paul I). Burnham 



Many of us have an interest in or, 
at least, a fascination with as- 
trology, the zodiac, fortune tell- 
ing, etc. So why not bring these ancient arts 
and sciences to modern times with the use 
of your CoCo? 

Paul D. Burnham is Computer Operations 
manager for Miami County, Ohio. He is 
also a magician and a member of the Soci- 
ety of American Magicians. His other infer- 
ests include computer programming, ar^ 
audio-video, music and sports. 



You can with The Fortune Teller. 
Whether you have just a slight interest in 
your daily horoscope, or you are really into 
astrology and fortune telling, you'll get a 
kick out of this program. 

Don't worry if you do not have a disk 
drive — all the information is contained in 
the program itself. I designed it that way, so 
all you need is a CoCo with a minimum of 
64K fc and you're ready to foU- 

After running the -program and the ap- 
pearance qf the Lille jcre^ft. The Fortune 
Teller asks you a few quesi ions, such as the 



day's date, your birthdate, your name, etc. 
Answer these questions and you're off and 
running. 

The Fortune Teller describes your good 
points, bad points, type of career and mates 
best suited for you, lucky days, best colors 
and good fortune numbers. It uses informa- 
tion based on your zodiac sign and even 
more def ailed information based on the list 
of deacons and your ruling planets. 

A tier reading all of i his information, the 
program asks, if you have any questions. 
Yes, the Fortune Teller can answer yes or 



ThE RAINBOW June 1989 




Telewriter-128 

the Color Computer 3 Word Processor 



TELEWRITER: UNDISPUTED #1 



If you've read the other word processor ads, 
you've probably had your fill of cold lists of 
features, and claims of ultimate speed, power, 
and ease of use. So let's try to get past the 
overblown claims and empty buzz words— with 2 
simple facts: 

Fact 1: Telewriter is undisputedly the #1 most 
popular word processor on the Tandy Color 
Computers. 

Fact 2: Telewriter's exemplary ease of use and 
power have been acclaimed in numerous maga- 
zine reviews and in thousands of letters and calls 
from end users. 



THE OTHERS DON'T UNDERSTAND 



So why has Telewriter gained such a large and 
loyal following, while other Color Computer 
word processors have come and gone? Ironically, 
our competitors' ads tell you exactly why. 

For them, word processing is nothing more than 
features and numbers. The longer the list of 
features, and the bigger the numbers, the better 
the word processor. Or so they think. 

They just don't understand that power and ease of 
use are not gained by tacking on random features 
or throwing in freebie utilities or forcing you to 
use a cumbersome mouse. 

Real Power, true Ease of Use, and genuine Speed 
can only be attained through thoughtful, logical, 
intelligent design, attention to detail, and a com- 
mitment to the act and the art of writing. That's 
the Telewriter tradition, and that's the reason for 
Telewriter's phenomenal success. 



TELEWRITER-128: INTELLIGENT 
DESIGN PERFECTED 



And now, Telewriter-128, the latest Telewriter, 
uses the added hardware power of the Color 
Computer 3 to bring this intelligent design to its 
logical perfection. 

Telewriter-128 adds unsurpassed speed and 
important new features to the already impressive 
arsenal of Telewriter-64. Not just speed for 
speed's sake, or features for the sake of 
advertising— but speed where it counts and fea- 
tures that make you a more efficient, more effec- 
tive writer. 

Rainbow magazine put it this way: "Tele- 
writer-128 will set the word processing standard 
for the Color Computer 3 because it is so simple 
and user friendly. . . . The 81-page tutorial/user's 
manual is nicely done. It is written in easy to 
understand language but the program itself is so 
easy. . . . Most people will be able to use the 
software right out of the package." 



TELEWRITER-128 OR DESKTOP 
PUBLISHING 



Desktop publishing is nice for adding pictures 
and fancy fonts to newsletters or business 
presentations— but its graphics orientation sacri- 
fices some important capabilities when it comes to 
working with words. 

If your main concern is expressing ideas through 
words (notes, letters, reports, papers, novels, 
etc.), the dedicated word processing power of 
Telewriter-128 still provides the most efficient tool 
for the job. Each tool has its place— desktop 
publishing for striking visuals, Telewriter-128, for 
effective writing. 



TELEWRITER-128 OR TELEWRITER-64 



You can no longer afford to be without the ease, 
power, and efficiency, that Telewriter brings to 
everything you write. 



Telewriter-128 for the Color Computer 3 costs 
$79.95 on disk, $69.95 on cassette. 

For the Color Computer 1&2, Telewriter-64 costs 
$59.95 on disk, $49.95 on cassette. 

To order by MasterCard or Visa, 

call (619) 755-1258 anytime, or send check to: 

COGNITEC 

704 Nob Avenue 
Del Mar, CA 92014 

(Add $2 S&H. Caiifornians add 6% tax. To upgrade 
from TW-64 to TW-128 send original TW-64 disk and 
$41.95.) 

Telewriter is also available through your nearby 
Radio Shack Computer Center and participating 
Radio Shack stores and dealers— or order direct 
from Express Order by dialing 1-800-321-3133. 

Ask for: Telewriter-128 (disk) ... cat #90-0909 
Telewriter-64 (disk) .... cat #90-0254 
Telewriter-64 (cass) cat #90-0253 



FEATURES THAT MATTER: Telewriter s out- 
standing design and its complete set of features, put 
it in a class by itself, for smooth, efficient writing 
and letter perfect printed documents. Telewriter-128 
includes: 

- Unbeatable SCREEN PERFORMANCE: lightning 
fast paging and scrolling, on-screen text that never 
lags behind your typing, and a response that is 
always instantaneous, no matter how much text is in 
the buffer, or where you are in the document. 

26 User definable MACRO KEYS type your often 
used phrases and titles with a single keypress— saving 
you time and freeing your concentration for writing. 
User settable DUAL SPEED CURSOR moves you 
anywhere on the line, on the page, or in the docu- 
ment, fast or slow— you decide, with the touch of a 
finger. Fast PRINT PREVIEW MODE shows you 
text as it will print: headers, footers, margins, page 
breaks, page numbers, justification— saves time and 
paper and guarantees perfect looking documents 
everytime. 

Instant, ON-LINE HELP summarizes all Tele- 
writer-128 commands and special symbols. The On- 
line OPTIONS MENU lets you instantly customize 
the writing environment at any time to suit your 
precise needs (Screen/character color, Monochrome 
on /off, Key repeat/delay rate, 2 Cursor repeat/delay 
rates, Case-sensitivity of search, Auto file backup 
on/off, and more). A SINGLE FUNCTION KEY 
takes you instantly to any menu, so you never have 
to stop and think. 

The 24, 25 or 28 LINE SCREEN DISPLAY option 
lets you see 16% more on-screen text (28), or wider 
line spacing (25). The auto-loading OPTIONS FILE 
stores all your Macros, Print Format settings, and 
Options Menu settings, so they are always there 
everytime you run Telewriter-128. 3 pop-up STATUS 
WINDOWS tell you cursor position, word count, 



free space, etc. 

The QUICK SAVE feature lets you instantly save 
your current document with just 2 keystrokes and 
without leaving the editor. CURSOR THROUGH 
DIRECTORY to Load, Append, Rename and Kilt 
files— so you'll never type a filename after the first 
time. HANGING INDENTS help you organize ideas 
on the page more effectively. Also: Footers, Multiple 
Print, Print to Disk, Key Click, Key Repeat, 40/80 
Column Option, Overstrike, Word Delete, Nested 
Macros, Definable Foreign and Math Symbols and 
more, . . . 

And, of course, Telewriter-128 incorporates ail the 
Features of TELEWRITER-64, like: Works with 
absolutely any printer that works with your Color 
Computer (1, 2, or 3). Uses simple Embedded Con- 
trol Codes so all intelligent features of your printer 
are easily accessed, including: Underlining, 
Boldface, variable Fonts, Sub-script, Super-script, 
Italics etc. 

Format commands allow dynamically changing 
Margins, Headers, Spacing, Centering, etc., any- 
where in the document. Format menu sets Margins, 
Spacing, Page numbering, Baud rate, Lines per 
page. Justification. Chain Printing means the size of 
your printed document is unlimited. Also Single 
page and Partial Print. 

Fast full-screen editor with wordwrap, text align- 
ment, block copy/move/delete, global search and 
replace, wild card search, fast 4-way auto-repeat 
cursor, fast scrolling, forward and backward paging, 
settable tabs, word and line counter, full error pro- 
tection. Insert or delete anywhere on screen. Simple, 
easy to remember, "mnemonic" Editor Commands. 
Load, Save, Append, Partial Save files to disk or 
cassette. Kill, rename and list disk files. ASCII file 
compatibility. 



no questions, and they are not random yes 
or no answers. Better yet, it uses the Pyra- 
mid Method, used for years by many for- 
tune tellers. As with most of their answers, 
the meanings are not obvious at first. In- 



stead, you have to find the hidden meaning 
in each answer, which adds to the mystery 
and fun of the program. 

Give the Fortune Teller a try, maybe to 
spice up your next party. 



(Questions or comments concerning this 
program may be directed to the author at 
648 West Greene St., Piqua. OH 45356. 
Please include an SASE when requesting a 
reply.) 




.64 4504 81 

.56 4509 194 

172 4514 167 

.38 4518 196 



4001 ... 
4006 . . . 
4013 ... 
4021 ... 

4027 112 4523 103 

4036 246 4528 12 



4042 
4051 



.83 
197 



4533 
5000 



117 

23 



3506 189 4057 237 END 45 



The Listing: FORTUNE 



COPYRIGHT 1989 FALOSFT, INC 
************************* 



* 

* FORTUNE TELLER 

* COPYRIGHT (C) 1989 
* 

* 

* 



BY 

PAUL D. BURNHAM 



* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 



**************** 



FORTUNE TELLER 
COPYRIGHT (C) 198 

BY 

PAUL D. BURNHAM 



0 
1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 ************************** 

9 DIMW$(15) 

10 CLS: PRINT" 
*********" 

20 PRINT" 

*" 

30 PRINT" 
*" 

40 PRINT" 
9 *» 

50 PRINT" 
*" 

60 PRINT" 

70 PRINT" 
*» 

80 PRINT" 
****** 

90 FORD=1TO2000:NEXTD 

IfiP i*** INFORMATION ROUTINE 

110 CLS: PRINT "PLEASE ENTER REQUE 

STED INFORMATION. . . " 

120 PRINT: PRINT "TODAY'S DATE (MM 

/DD/YY) ?" 

125 LINEINPUTDA$ 

12 6 IFLEN (DA$) <>8THENPRINT"INCOR 
RECT FORMAT... TRY AGAIN .": GOT012 

ft 

130 PRINT: PRINT "YOUR BIRTHDATE ( 

MM/DD/YY)?" 

135 LINEINPUTDT$ 

13 6 IFLEN ( DT$ ) <>8THENPRINT"INCOR 
RECT FORMAT... TRY AGAIN .": GOT013 

0 

140 PRINT: PRINT" YOUR NAME?" 



* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 



******************** 



145 LINEINPUTNA? 

160 CLS : PRINT : PRINT : PRINT : PRINT " 
ONE MOMENT ..." 

170 PRINT@452, " . . .YOUR FORTUNE'S 

COMING UP." 
200 ■*** AGE ROUTINE 
210 TM$=MID$(DA$,1,2) :TD$=MID$(D 
A$,4,2) :TY$=MID$(DA$,7,2) 
220 BM$=MID$(DT$,1,2) :BD$=MID$(D 
T$,4,2) :BY$=MID$(DT$,7,2) 
230 TM=VAL(TM$) :TD=VAL(TD$) : TY=V 
AL(TY$) 

2 40 BM=VAL(BM$) :BD=VAL(BD$) :BY=V 
AL(BY$) 

250 IF TM>BM THEN 300 
2 60 IF TM=BM THEN 2 80 
270 TY=TY-1:GOTO300 
280 IF TD>=BD THEN 300 

2 90 TY=TY-1 
300 YO=TY-BY 

350 '*** ZODIAC ROUTINE 

3 51 IFBM=3 ANDBD>=2 10RBM=4 ANDBD<= 
20THENZO=1 : GOTO400 

352 IFBM=4ANDBD>=210RBM=5ANDBD<= 
20THENZO=2 :GOTO400 

353 IFBM=5ANDBD>=210RBM=6ANDBD<= 
21THENZO=3 :GOTO400 

354 IFBM=6ANDBD>=2 20RBM=7ANDBD<= 
21THENZO=4 : GOTO400 

355 IFBM=7ANDBD>=220RBM=8ANDBD<= 

2 2THENZO=5 : GOTO40 0 

356 IFBM=8ANDBD>=2 30RBM=9ANDBD<= 
22THENZO=6:GOTO400 

357 IFBM==9ANDBD>=2 3ORBM=10ANDBD< 
=22THENZO=7 : GOTO400 

358 IFBM=10ANDBD>=23ORBM=11ANDBD 
<=23THENZO=8 :GOTO400 

359 IFBM=11ANDBD>=240RBM=12ANDBD 
<=21THENZO=9 :GOTO400 

3 60 IFBM=12ANDBD>=220RBM=1ANDBD< 
=19THENZO=10 : GOTO400 

361 IFBM=1ANDBD>=20ORBM=2ANDBD<= 
19THENZO=11:GOTO400 

362 IFBM=2ANDBD>=20ORBM=3ANDBD<= 
20THENZO=12 : GOTO400 

400 '*** DECAN ROUTINE 

401 IFZ0=1THENIFBD>=21ANDBD<=29T 
HENDE=1ELSEIFBD>=11ANDBD<=20THEN 
DE=3ELSEDE=2 

402 IFZO=2THENIFBD>=21ANDBD<=29T 
HENDE=1ELSEIFBD>=11ANDBD<=20THEN 
DE=3ELSEDE=2 

403 IFZO=3THENIFBD>=21ANDBD<=30T 
HENDE=1ELSEIFBD>=11ANDBD<=2 1THEN 
DE=3ELSEDE=2 

404 IFZO=4THENIFBD>=2ANDBD<=10TH 
ENDE=2ELSEIFBD>=11ANDBD<=2 1THEND 



30 



THE RAINBOW June 1989 




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T2 - Cobster Terminal Package \xk 
T3 - Mikeyter Terminal Package 




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12 Basic Graphic Programs 
1 2 Basic Graphic Programs 
9 Coco 3 Graphic Programs 
22 Coco Max Pictures 
22 Coco Max Pictures 
22 Coco Max Pictures 
15 Coco Max Pictures 
22 .Bin Pictures 
22 .Bin Pictures 
14 Large .Bin Pictures 
8 Mge Pictures 
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Maepaint Graphic Editor 
5 Macintosh Pictures 




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H4 - Spelling Fix, Spelling Checker, + 





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E3 


U3 


GA3 


M4 


G4 


E4 


U4 


GA4 


M5 


G5 




U5 


GA5 


M6 


G6 


H1 


U6 


GAG 


M7 


G7 


H2 


U7 


GA7 




GB 


H3 


U8 


GAB 


A1 


G9 


H4 




GA9 


A2 


G10 






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GA11 


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G12 








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G13 








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G14 










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Please turn to pages 106 and 107 for our Subscription Software! 



ill — O xj xJO LUL — -L 


820 


IF09THENPRINT" QUESTION TOO 

™ M» Bf MM Ml M> MM M ■ M M % MA« M> 1 MM j£ MB* AbW mW mW Al ^m/ A * MM ^m/ 


/i c^c; TFZO=STHENTFBD>=2ANDBD<=12TH 


LONG 


r... TRY AGAIN. " :G0T07 50 


F'N , nF=PFT, c 5FTFBD>=13 ANDBD<=2 2THEND 

Xj 11 XjXj « J_J XJ »•/ Xj X. X Xj XJ r X »J nil iaJ XJ I-/ ^ X) X) X llUlt XJ 


825 


PRINT 


ij— 0 Xj IjO ill U Xj — * -L 


830 


F0RI=1T0C 

•m* ^M Mi X X Mb mm ^m mf 


4 06 TFZ0=6THENIFBD>=2ANDBD<=11TH 

t XJ VJ X 1 4J VJ VJ <1 llJUll X 1 imj la/ ^ X la/ XJ la/ ^ J» J»*** 


840 


L=LEN(W$ (I) ) 


FNrVE=2ELSEIFBD>=12ANDBD<= : 22THEND 

1 i ± ^ J J X^i & 1 i 1 1 * — J j^j _X X J Iw ' -A. Am LW U ^ A* AW * " mW 


850 


F0RJ=1T0L 


L JLXijL XJXj X 


860 


Q$=MID$ (W$ (I) , J. 1) 


4 07 TFZO=7THENIFBD>=2ANDBD<=12TH 

■J )C / X X XI VJ f JW 1 IJLj 11 -la 1 X/ aa/ ^ X tiil i-J 1/ *a/ ^ J> *a> A 


870 


GOSUB3000 


FNnF=2FLSFTFBD>=13ANDBD<=22THEND 

f_l JL | |_> l j ^ ^ J^j J i * — J Xw -A. X Am* ^ w AAA 1 *W 4m/ ^ AW AM mV A A AW * *■/ 


880 


W(I)=W(I)+Q 


iL — J Hi XjO LUL 1 


890 


NEXT J 


4 0S TF70=8THENTFBD>=3 ANDBD< : =14TH 

*t XJ O XI W Va/™ (J X 1 1 Xj 11 JW X U la/ r aj fial la* JW XJ ^» aV» "X at A A 


900 

/^ /^ 


IFW(I) <10THEN940 

^^^ m MP B> ^^^M ^B b^^Bi ^B^B 1 ^^Bl ^B> Bs aMaj^aJ ^B« V M M JJMr 


FMnF=9FT,^FTFBD>=15ANDBD<=23THEND 

~ , x \ L/Xj x Xj XJiaJ Xj X X XJ Xj X ««J rvi 1 w XJ 1— ' 6 J l nun xj 


910 


X=W (I) 


Hi — 0 Hi XjO LUX/ X 


920 

m*** M Am 


GOSUB1500 

M« W MW X/ AW mm* mW JW JW 


40Q TF70=QTHFNTFBD>=2 4 ANDBD<=3 0T 

4jU3 11 LJ v iv X il Xj 11 X 1 XJ J-J ^ x> ** rvj.< lJUU > *J ju 


930 

w -w JW 


Wf 1^ =x 


HENDE=1ELSEIFBD>=1ANDBD<=11THEND 

X X X^il AW Am! Mm. AW bAW,mW 1J «W X Am/ Am/ ^ AA 1 Ah/ AW 4—/ ^ mMi Wk» mW 4 A AW A » J—/ 


940 


NEXTI 


F=9FT. c !FnF=^ 

Xj x Xj XjO Xj XJ Xj J 


950 

aj «J JJ 


i*** PYRAMID ROUTTNF 

X X luU l X XJ Iv VJ VJ X X 11 Xj 


410 TFZO=10THENIFBD>=22ANDBD<=30 

*X X jV Xl (J VJ JU It/ X llJJll X X U X/ fca X XXll U 1/1/ ^» aJ JJ 


960 

aJ VJ Ja/ 


C=C-1 

Va> Va> X 


THENDE=1ELSEIFBD>=11ANDBD<=19THE 


970 


F0RI=1T0C 

A » A X A A mm X*/ w 


NDE=3ELSEDE=2 

11 L/lJ J U UUU l/U u 


980 

W Xb(» JW 


T fl) =Wf I) +WfI+l) 

x ^ x / 'M A / hi \ x i xy 


411 IFZO=11THENIFBD>=20ANDBD<=31 


990 


IFTfl) <10THEN1030 

M* M> A % I Mi /^r' A M JX MM M> 1 MW A** MB* A»» 


THENDE=1ELSEIFBD>=1ANDBD<=10THEN 

— 11U11 1/ JaJ Ja. XJ J— 1 XJ JV X J — ' i— / ^ XXill Xj XJ X-/ ^> Ja> IJ Ja 11X111 


1000 


X=T ( I ) 


DE=2ELSEDE=3 

Ah/ 4mJ 4W -AmJ «LJk/ AmJ Ap-/ XJ w 


1010 


GOSUB1500 

MMB MJB** MJM* M-^ MB* MB *M»* Jm* 


412 IFZO=12THENIFBD>=2ANDBD<=10T 

~ <X 4W X X 4W S— ' «i» 4W -X A> iAJ Al «Jw «k LJ Am/ M AAA 1 1m/ A—/ Am/ ^» X JW X 


1020 

X^J /-* 


Tfl) =X 


HENDE=2ELSEIFBD>=11ANDBD<=20THEN 

4> A4m m » ■/ mm AW Am mJW AJ MMb A AW Am/ mm» mm- A AA 1 Am/ AW Am/ ^ Art A/ «A» A A AmJ A 1 


1030 


NEXTI 


DE=3ELSEDE=1 

Xj Xj mj xj 1 u / xj Xj xj jl> 


1040 

x^/ ^ // 


FORI^ITOC 

A* MMT «M M MJ MJ «A> M^ 


6 00 PRINT ROUTINE 

VJ K/ >J X 1 V J_ 1 1 X 1\W VJ X Jk.ll XJ 


1050 


W f I ) =T f I ) 


610 CLS:PRINT M F 0 R T U N E" 

\W mIm A/ Vm> AJW • «■ A \ «Ajp A ' A A> A V mV *m/ A * m»m1 


1060 


NEXTI 


620 PRINT : PRINT " THIS FORTUNE IS 

VJ X< 1U X 1M 11 X • X 1\ J- 11 X X 111 kJ X Vl\ X VJ 11 Xj X i— / 


1070 


IFO1THEN960 

bm, A V ' mAm A A AAW A 1 bW >m JW 


FOR " ;NA$;". H 

X VA\ J/ AlAAW f • 


1080 

J-fJ V/^/ 


GOTO 3 500 


63 0 PRINT "YOU ARE " rYO: 11 YEARS 0 

VJ .J ij X X\ jjll X X SJ W fll' I 1 / X VJ / X Xj/7xX\taJ VJ 


1500 

J--J JU JU 


REDUCING ROUTINE 

A \AJ AW V— / \»f -A> A i vj A X *W T W mm mAb, Al AmI 


LD. 11 

mJm/ • 


1510 

A *W A JW 


X$=STR$ fX) 

A m ">JF mW A A. X *m# \ A A 1 


640 PRINT"YOUR BIRTHDATE IS M ;DT 

W A A/ A* A X ^bi A * A A* X«r X»/ A % AW -aMa A X <A> A A AW A A «A> AmI A mW / AW A> 


1520 

A W AW JW 


L1=LEN fX$) 

AW «Av AbAmJ A 1 V m m "M* y 




153 0 

MMk «W Mb* JW 


Y=0 


650 GOSUB4000 

>W *W 1/ XmI S/ mW xw aw * Jw JW Jm/ 


1540 

A *W A JW 


F0RK=1T0L1 

A V A\A\ ^b> mW Xb# AW -^mp 


660 GOSUB4500 

VJ VJ fj VJ NaT t_J VJ i-J Z «m/ XJ fj 


1550 

X */ aa/ XJ 


Y§=MIDS fXS , K. 1^ 

1 Y 1 1 X X/ aa? ^ < 1 aj/ f 1\ » X / 


700 OUESTION ROUTINE 

/ %J JJ V4/ VJ Xj CJ X X VJ11 X V VJ VJ X X 11 XJ 


1560 

X «••/ VJ XJ 


Yl=VALf YS^ 

x x v xxxj i x >y j 


7 05 CLS 


1570 

X -aJ / Xj 


Y=Y+Y1 

X XI XX 


710 INPUT 11 DO YOU HAVE A QUESTION 

■ A jM*' MB A » -MP ^m' A •MM r »M> M -tM 7 A AMB «• ▼ MMd M| «M j£ mlI mm* A ^Mb j^ » 


1580 

bm Mb** 1 ^m» jV 


NEXTK 

A < AkW A m AW m > 


FOR THE FORTUNE TELLER 11 ;YNS 

X Vl\ X 1 1 Xj X Vl\ X V/ 11 XJ X XJ ' 11 f 111 Y 


1590 

X aa/ aJ XJ 


X=Y 

all X 


72 0 IFYNS = m N m ORYNS=s || NO m THEN5000 

/ Xi JJ XX X 11 tJ 1 11 VJ 1 V X 11 *y> 11 VJ X llXjll aJ JkJ JkJ JU 


1600 


I FX< 1 0THEN 1 62 0 

X X A X JU X 1 IXj 11 X \J X> XJ 


73 0 CLS : PRINT 11 PLEASE ASK A YES O 

/ -J fj vUk/ • x i\ x 11 x x xjunu j_j /no i\ jti> x Xj t_? vj 


1610 

X VJ X X/ 


GOTO1510 

VJ VJ X VJ X aj X X/ 


R NO OUESTION THAT IS LESS THAN 

A% Al X*r ^Mj^ «W AW *W A *mW V/ A * mW m> AA A «A> ^mj mW AW AW hW hW «X X AAAA ^ 


1620 

MMk \^ AW JW 


RETURN 

m !• AW Mm W A VA i 


TEN WORDS IN LENGTH. AT THE EN 

X Xjll If V/lM/kJ Xll 1 11 ill VJ X 1 1 • «xX lllxi Xjl 1 


3000 

^JUJUJU 


PYRAMID DATA 

x xxvxxxiijvxj i/mn 


D OF THE QUESTION, PRESS SO 

AW W A A A A AaW W AW mW mV A W A 1 f Ai A \ AW mW mV mW NW 


3001 


IFQ$="A"THENQ=1 

m*b> bm g|t ™ff M M A M A MM * • mW 


ace bar ONCE AND THEN PRESS ent 

v4 W Nm" *mA A* >W A 1 >W AW A AA « AW mV A A AW A 1 AW A XAmI M mW ^p" A A W 


3002 

/ /^ 


IFQ$="B"THENQ=5 

.AM A ^£ •m' AW A A A AW A * mV 


er. 

A« • 


3003 

"W ArfT JW «W 


I FQ $= " C " THENO= 6 

WW A >m£ mjt \b* A A A AW A » ^^/ VW 


74 0 PRINT 

» a IJ X 1\11< X 


3004 

~J JUJU 1 


I FO $= " D " THEN0=4 

aia X Sf' XJ X llXil Va^ C 


750 C=0:P=0:P1=0 

/ «j jj Va» jy • x xj ■ x x k/ 


3005 
«j jj xj «j 


I FO $ » 11 E " THEN0= 2 

XX Vj(/ kj/ Xj XllXJllV^f/ x> 


7 60 INPUTOSS 

/ VJ XJ Xll X VJ X St 4 — ' V 


3 006 

•J X/ X/ VJ 


I FO $ = " F " THEN0=8 

XI Sc T X 111X11 O 


770 C=C+1 : P1==P+1 

/ 1 JJ V«> Va» 1 X • X X X 1 X 


3007 


I FO S = " G " THENO= 8 

IX ^ *J Vj X IIXjII 'jaj VV 


771 OL=LEN(OSS^ 

/ / X> Sc XJ^ XJXjII I Vc i -' V / 


^ 00a 


TFn$= H H"THFNO=T 

X X V Xl XXlXjliVa^— J 


772 IFMIDS f OSS . OL, 1^ <>" "THENPRI 

/ * x< 11 111 U y 1 ^ Sc ' V / Sc t 1 1 IXjII X 1\X 


3 009 


TFO$ = "T ,f THFNO=7 

X X y y"" X X 1 1 Xj 11 Sc ' 


NT M YOU FORGOT THE SPACE AT THE E 

11 X X VJ VJ X vl\wvl X1J>XJ laJ X flVXI X X11XJ XJ 


3010 


IFOS=" J"THEN0=6 

XI fcj/ LJ XllXJllV^ VJ 


ND OF THE QUESTION. ASK AGAIN." 


3 011 

w ^/ X X 


IF0$="K"THEN0=6 

XX \J, V 1 > 1 llJjliy VJ 


: GOTO75 0 

• vw >W JV > — ' ' mW 1 JW 


3012 

«J X Aa> 


IF0$="L"THEN0=5 

XX *T XJ X 1 IXJII \fj *J 


773 P=INSTRfPl,QSS , " ") 

# * W A> A A ■ M A> x\ V A A # ^ mW *y* / 1 

775 W$ rC)=MID$ fQSS^Pl/P-Pl) 


3013 

«J X/ X >J 


IF0S="M"THEN0=7 

xx xi llliJliv/ / 


3014 

Mb/ JW «A» * 


IF0$=s"N"THEN0=5 

XX V^/ y 11 X 1 1XJ Al VJ S 


780 IF P=OL THEN 810 

/ W JU/ MMb A> A. X^ m J «A> A A AW A * W A JW 


3015 

«J JJ aX aa/ 


IF0$="0"THEN0=8 

X X >ja^ tj> vj X 1 1 Xj 11 v^ w 


79J3 GOT077j3 


3016 


IFQ$="P"THENQ=5 


^ V"M, ^Mj ^ M% MB T M «M M M ^-ay. MH, ^M» M M OM ■ ■ aMk M Ml MM MM MMM aMk «k M MB M MM 

81j3 IFC<3THENPRINT"QUESTI0N TOO 


mm mb« «m mmm 

3017 


^^M M, _Aj fj ft aflM ■ A Ml «ak MMB M M .alBw _ 

IFQ$="Q"THENQ=6 


SHORT . . . TRY AGAIN . " : G0T07 5 j3 


3018 


IFQ$="R"THENQ=9 



32 THE RAINBOW June 1989 



Frank Hogg Laboratory 



Over 1 2 Years of Service, Support, and Friendly Help! 

leaieei spring sale bsh aaaa 



BOOKS 



START OS/9 
An Enjoyable, Hands-On Guide 
ToOS-9 Level II 
$32.95 Book and Disk 

If you have OS-9 Level 2 or are thinking of 
petting it, this book and disk will get you started 
in an enjoyable way. It makes OS-9 fun. The 
disk contains utilities and tutorials that are worth 
the price alone. Now there is a reason to get 
OS-9 



Inside 0S9 Level II 
SPECIAL ONLY 19.95! 

Are your tired of playing games with Level II? 
Do you want to find out what's going on inside 
OS9? This is the book for you! Over 200 pages 
of hints, kinks, bugs, source listings and much 
more. Written by the well known Compuserve 
SysOp, Kevin Darling. 'Must reading' says Dale 
Puckett in Rainbow! 



DynaStar 



THE Most Popular OS-9 
Word Processor! 

"It is an excellent word processor for business 
and home use, whether for clerical or program- 
ming work." RAINBOW Review April 1989, Page 
34. Also see July 1984, Page 220. 

FEATURES: Best OS9 editor/word processor/ 
text formatter, has everything you would expect 
and more, supports terminals and windows si- 
multaneously, auto-configurable, auto-indent for 
C and Pascal, mail merge for form letters. 

Pop-up help menus that can be disabled. 
WordStar command style. Files larger than mem- 
ory. Block manipulation, mark, move, copy, de- 
lete, read from disk, write to disk. Keyboard Mac- 
ros, (up to 29) to produce any key sequences, 
including commands! 

Supports multiple printers. Formatting Com- 
mands: Justification, word wrap, centering, head- 
ers, footers, macros, odd and even support, mul- 
tiple index generation, multiple table of contents 
generation and more! 

DynaStar word processor/formatter4607QQ 

SPECIAL ONLY 99.95 



DynaSpell 



by Dale Puckett 

20,000+ word dictionary included. Fast, slick, the 
best spelling checker available for OS9, Written 
by RainbowTech columnist Dale Puckett. 

DynaSpell spelling checker 75.00 

SPECIAL WHEN PURCHASED 
WITH DynaStar 25.00 



The Wiz 



The WIZ7&S& Super SPECIAL ONLY 59.95 
Includes Shareware WizPro Disk FREE! 

RS-232 Pak 49.95 
2400 Baud Modem (5 Year Warranty) 1 99*95 



Hard Drive Systems 



"Frank Hogg Laboratories has been 
selling hard-drive systems longer 
than any other RAINBOW advertiser" 



Sculptor 



Burke and Burke 

Burke & Burke based kit includes: Burke & 
Burke (B&B) XT PC interface. Hard drive with 
controller, 3 foot ST506 cable set. Hard Drive 
Case with 60 watt power supply and fan. 
Includes OS9 LI and Lll software. 1 megabyte 
transfer in only 45 seconds!! Twice as fast as 
other systemsType ahead under OS9. (No halt) 
Complete instructions. Easy one evening 
assembly. 

20 Meg Kit Complete 498.00 
30 Meg Kit Complete 548.00 
40 Meg Kit Complete 618.00 
Assemble fmt & test any of the above 50.00 

B&B OPTIONS: 
B&B Real Time Clock (add to above) 30.00 
B&B XT ROM Auto Boot from hard disk 19.95 
B&B Hyper I/O DECB on hard drive 29.95 
B&B Hyper III Ramdisk/spooter 19.95 



The Eliminator™ 

The Eliminator™ based kit includes Bruce 
IstecTs new interface 'the Eliminator'™ the 
Western Digital WD 1002-05 high speed 
controller. Features; fastest system available, 1 
megabyte transfer in only 37 seconds!! More 
than twice as fast as other systems! Supports 4 
floppy and 3 hard drives, type ahead (No halt) 
for both floppy and hard disk, autoboot OS9 
L1 or L2 from hard or floppy disk, 2 serial ports, 
1 parallel port and Real Time Clock socket. 
Hard drive with WD 1002-05 controller, ST506 
cable set, 3 foot 40 pin cable, Hard Drive Case 
with 60 watt power supply and fan, OS9 software 
for LI and Lll with source, Complete instructions. 
Easy one evening assembly. 

20 Meg High Speed Kit Complete 799.00 

40 Meg High Speed Kit Complete 899.00 

70 Meg High Speed Kit Complete 1335,00 
Assemble fmt & Test any of the above 60.00 

Eliminator OPTIONS: 

Real Time Clock chip 30.00 

Serial cable set (2 DB25) 30.00 

Parallel cable (Centronics) 30.00 

Floppy Cable Int & Ext 25.00 



Hard Drive Bits 
and Pieces 



The Eliminator™ Special 179.95 4^96 

See Eliminator OPTIONS also 

WD1 002-05 Controller 1 99.95 

B&B XT PC style interface 69.95 

B&B XT RTC interface w/clock/calendar 99.95 
See B&B OPTIONS also 

Hard Drive case with 60W P/S & Fan 99.95 

SPECIFICATIONS: size 16* deep, 5.5' high, 7" wide. €0 Watt 
pcwer supply with 3 drive type power connectors, quiet 1 2 volt 
DC fan, LED power indicator, color matches CoCo. Holds 2 
1/2 height hard or floppy drives and has card guided space for 
a PCB the size of a drive (like the WD1 002-05 controller) 



FBU Fast Hard disk Back Up 
R.S.B. RS Disk Basic under OS9 



75.00 
39.95 



Floppy Drives (5.25" and 3.5 FLOPPY DISKS) 
TEAC High Quality Drives - 1 Year Warr. 

FD55B 360K 40 Track DS 5.25" 1 18.00 

FD55F 720K 80 Track DS 5.25: 1 51 .00 

FD35F 720K 80 Track DS 3.5" 1 47.00 

(Bare drives, requires case and power supply) 



Version 1.16 

SPECIAL ONLY 199.95 

100% Object Code Compatible 
100% Data File Compatible 

Sculptor, a 4th Generation Language, is an 
applications generator, a database, and a pro- 
gramming language. With Sculptor you can de- 
velop an application in one tenth the time it 
would take in Basic. 

Now with version 1 .1 6 you can take applica- 
tions created on your CoCo and run them on 
PC's, Unix machines etc. (with the proper run- 
time) Sculptoris the most powerful program 
available for the CoCo. 

During this special introduction of version 1 .16 
we have reduced the price to ONLY $199,951 

Existing Sculptor users can update to 
version 1.16 for 60.00 

Requires OS9 Level il and 51 2K. 
Works with floppies or hard disks. 



News»a»Log! 



Subscribe FREE to our NEW 
Newsletter/Catalog. 

Sculptor Review, QT K-System 
Review, OS9/68K News, Special Prices 
on FHL Products 
Special Low Prices on Fax Machines, 
copiers, calculators, and much more. 
It's FREE! 



ORDERING INFORMATION 



VISA and M/C, check and C.O.D. 
Contential U.S. software shipping add 
$3.50 Ground - $6.00 Two Day Air. 
Hardware add $1 1 ground - $22 Two 
Day Air. Please call for Next Day Air 
costs and C.O.D. Foreign add 10% 
Shipping {Minimum $5 USD). NY 
residents please add 7% sales tax. 

Frank Hogg 
Laboratory, Inc. 

Since 1976 

770 James Street 
Syracuse, NY 13203 

Fax 315/474-8225 



Call 315/474-7856 



1 S"THENQ=9 
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3^19 IFQ$= 

3020 IFQ$= 

3021 IFQ$= 

3022 IFQ$= 
3022 IFQ$= 
3024 IFQ$= 
2025 IFQ$= 
3026 IFQ$= 
3030 RETURN 

3500 '*** PYRAMID ANSWERS 

2501 IFW(1)=1THENPRINT"BE ASSURE 
D THAT IN TIME SUCCESS WILL BE Y 
OURS AND YOUR HOPES WILL PROS 
PER, IF NOT THROUGH YOUR OWN 
DOING THEN AS THE RESULT OF 

SOME UNEXPECTED HAPPENING 
S." 

2502 IFW(l)=2THENPRINT ff THERE WIL 
L BE NO SUCCESS IF HESITATIO 
N HAS REPLACED DETERMINA 
TION. THE OPPOSITE SEXWILL HAVE 

A POWERFUL INFLUENCE IN BRINGI 
NG A NEGATIVE RESULT." 

3503 IFW(l)=3THENPRINT"YOU MAY E 
XPECT GAINS, ADVANCEME 
NT OR A BROADENING OF ACTIVITIE 
S, BUT YOU MUST HOLD FAST TO Y 
OUR PURPOSE AND NEVER LET YOURS 
ELF BE SWAYED IN DOING WHAT YOU 
DESIRE TO DO. " 

3504 IFW(l)=4THENPRINT"YOU WILL 
EXPECT FAR MORE THAN YOU WILL 
RECEIVE , FOR DISAGREEM 
ENT AND QUARRELING WILLRUIN YOUR 

PLANS. THIS WILL HAPPEN BE 

CAUSE OTHERS WISH TO TAKE ADVA 
NTAGE OF YOU." 

2505 IFW(l) =5THENPRINT"THERE IS 
THE CHANCE OF MUCH GOODCOMING TO 

YOU DURING A JOURNEY. YOUR QUES 
TION MAY BE ANSWERED AFTER YOU 

HAVE RECEIVED AN UNEXPECTE 
D LETTER OF MUCH IMPORTANC 
E." 

3506 IFW(l)=6THENPRINT"YOU MAY E 



SOMEONE 0 
WHAT YOU 
FULFILLED 
STEPS YOU 
WILL NOT 



XPECT ASSISTANCE FROM 
F THE OPPOSITE SEX. 
DESIRE IS GOING TO BE 
, AND IN THE END THE 

HAVE ALREADY TAKEN 
BE REGRETED." 

3507 IFW(l)=7THENPRINT"YOU MAY A 
NT I CI PATE POSITIVE RESULTS T 

HAT WILL INVOLVE YOU INRELATIONS 

WITH MANY PEOPLE. IF YOU ARE N 
OT INFLUENCED BY THE ADVICE OF 

ANOTHER, YOU WILL REAP JOY." 
3 508 IFW(l) =8THENPRINT !, THERE ARE 

MANY OBSTACLES AHEAD. YOU COULD 

SUSTAIN A REVERSAL OF FORTUNE. 

ALL SIGNS POINT TO FAILURE D 



0 TO THE ILL WILL AND MALICE OR 
INCOMPETENCY OF OTHERS." 

3509 IFW (1) =9THENPRINT"THERE ARE 
MANY OBSTACLES AHEAD, BUT KEEP 

A STOUT HEART AND ALL WILL BE W 
ELL. THE GREATER YOUR RISKS, TH 
E GREATER YOUR ULT IMATERE WARDS . 
SO HAVE COURAGE. " 

3510 PRINT: PRINT :GOT07 10 

4000 1 *** ZODIAC ANSWERS 

4001 IFZO=lTHENPRINT f, YOU WERE BO 
RN UNDER THE SIGN OF ARIES - THE 

RAM. YOU ARE A LEADER - CH 

OOSE A CAREER WHERE YOU CAN SHI 
NE BY YOURSELF. ": PRINT : LINEINPUT 
"PRESS enter TO CONTINUE ..." ;YN 

$ 

4002 IFZ0=1THENCLS: PRINT" YOU WIL 
L BE ADMIRED FOR YOUR SUCCESS 
THRU EXTRAORDINARY ACHEIVE 
MENTS. LEARN NOT TO TAKEON TOO 
MUCH AT ONCE - YOU WORK TOO HAR 

D - RELAX. YOU WILL FALLIN LOVE 
MANY TIMES THINKING EACH" 

4003 IFZ0=1THENPRINT"IS THE LOVE 
OF YOUR LIFE - SO MARRY ONLY 

AFTER LONG ENGAGEMENT- NEVER ELO 
PE. YOU ARE POPULAR AND MAKE FR 
IENDS EASILY - TO AVOID SORRO 
W FOR YOURSELF - CONTROL YOU 

R TEMPER AND TENDENCYTO BOSS PEO 
PLE . " 

4004 IFZO= 1THENPRINT : LINE INPUT " P 
RESS enter TO CONTINUE ..." ;YN$ 

4005 IFZO=2THENPRINT"YOU WERE BO 
RN UNDER THE SIGN OF TAURUS - TH 
E BULL. YOU WILL BE HAPPIEST DO 
ING SOME SORT OF CREATIVE WO 
RK. ": PRINT: LINEINPUT" PRESS enter 

TO CONTINUE. . .";YN$ 

4006 IFZO=2THENCLS:PRINT"YOU WI 
LL BE SUCCESSFUL IN YOUR CHOSEN 

CAREER. YOU MAKE CLOSE FRIEND 
SHIPS EASILY - AND WILL ENJOY 
MANY OF THEM. OBSTANANCE IS YOU 
R WORST FAULT - YOU REFUSETO ACC 
EPT CHANGE, THINKING OLD" 

4007 IFZO=2THENPRINT"WAY OF DOIN 
G IS BETTER WAY OF DOING. YOU 

WILL ENJOY VERY GOODHEALTH - DO 
NOT OVEREAT OR DRINKAND GET PLE 
NTY OF EXERCISE. ": PRINT :LINEINPU 
T"PRESS enter TO CONTINUE. .." ;YN 

$ 

4010 IFZO=3THENPRINT"YOU WERE BO 

RN UNDER THE SIGN OF GEMINI - TH 

E TWINS. MANY DIFFERENT C 

AREERS APPEAL TO YOU - IF YOU DO 

NOT SUCCEED, IT IS NOT DO TO L 

ACK OF TALENT, BUT BECAUSE YOU 



34 THE RAINBOW June 1 989 



li*ain for a Hish -Pa 




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Understanding you get only through experience 
You need no previous background in electronics to succeed 
with NRI. You start with the basics, rapidly building on the 
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Your incomparable hands-on training includes 
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NRFs unique Discovery Lab® lets you design and modify 
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h l A " floppy disk drive • 20 megabyte hard disk drive you 
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See other side for highlights of NRI "hands-on " 
computer training ► 




ELECTRONICS 



MictTKenrpLit.ri 



Learn at home in your 
spare time 

With NRI, you learn at your own 
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No classroom pressures, no night 
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Get all the facts from NRFs 
free 100-page catalog. Send today! 




Check one FREE catalog only. 

□ Computers and Microprocessors □ Security Electronics 

□ TV/Video/Audio Servicing □ Electronic Music Technology 

□ Robotics □ Digital Electronics Servicing 

□ Computer Programming □ Basic Electronics 



COMPUTERS AND 
MICROPROCESSORS 

This training prepares you to service all 
computers as you build your own fully 
IBM PC/XT-compatible computer. 
Total systems training includes 5 l A" 
floppy disk drive, 20 meg hard disk 
drive, monitor, test equipment, soft* 
ware, and the NRI Discovery Lab®. 





Name 


(Please print) 

( ) 


Age 


Address 


Telephone 




City 


State 


Zip 



For career courses approved under 
Gl Bill □ check for details. 



205-069 



Accredited Member National Home Study Council 



i 



Get In-Demand Computer Servicing 
Skills With NRI "Hands-On" Training 




Using NRI's unique Action Audio 
Cassette, you're talked through the 
operation and practical applications of 
your hand held digital multimeter— the 
basic, indispensable tool for the 
computer specialist 




You set up and perform electronics 
experiments and demonstrations using 
your NRI Discovery Lab®. You even 
interlace the lab with your computer to 
"see" keyboard-generated data. 




After you build this digital logic probe, 
you explore the operation of the Packard 
Bell detached "intelligent" keyboard and 
its dedicated microprocessor. 




Next, you install the 5VS floppy disk 
drive, learning disk drive operation and 
adjustment. You later improve your data 
storage capacity dramatically by 
installing a powerful 20 meg hard drive. 



Total Computer Systems Training, Only From NRI 

No computer stands alone . . . it's part of a total 
system. So if you want to learn to service and 
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the new Packard Bell VX88 com- 
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with and keep. 

The VX88 features full IBM 
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speed of an advanced CMOS V40 
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512K RAM and full expandability 
for future system growth. 




NO POSTAGE 
NECESSARY 
IF MAILED 
IN THE 
UNITED STATES 



BUSINESS REPLY MAIL 

FIRST CLASS MAIL PERMIT NO. 10008 WASHINGTON, D.C. 



POSTAGE WILL BE PAID BY ADDRESSEE 

School of 
Electronics 

McGraw-Hill Continuing Education Center 
4401 Connecticut Avenue, NW 
Washington, DC 20077-3543 




Mastery Is "Built-in" 

You assemble the Packard Bell 
"intelligent" keyboard, install the 
power supply and b l A" 
floppy disk drive, and 
attach the high-resolution 
I monitor. You then go on to 
install a powerful 20 meg 
hard drive— today 's most- 
wanted computer periph- 
eral—now included as part of your NRI 
hands-on training. 

The many demonstrations and ex- 
periments you perform as you build your 
Packard Bell computer system give you a 
total mastery of computer operation, 
based on a thorough knowledge of 
the intricacies of computer theory. 



1 00-Page Free Catalog Tells 
More, ..Send Today! 

Send the postage-paid card 
today for NRFs free 100 -page 
catalog that gives all the facts 
about NRI computer training, 
plus career training in robotics, 
TV/video/audio servicing, 
electronic music technology, and 
many other fields. If the card is 
missing, write to NRI at the 
address below. 



IBM is a registered trademark of International 
Business Machines Corp. 



School of 
Electronics 

McGraw-Hill Continuing 

Education Center 
4401 Connecticut Avenue, NW 
Washington, DC 20008 




I 



Sittfct & 3Bwfc« 



Purveyors of fine Color Computer Hardware and 
Software Since 1987 



INTERNATIONAL ORDERS: 
206-235-0917 



TOLL-FREE U.S. ORDER HOTLINE: 
1 -800- A DS-A HO Y 1-800-237-2409 



TECHNICAL SUPPORT: 
1-206-235-0917 



fnPl 




QuarterMeg 

25 6 K for $89.95! 

Price rtdudes 4 memory crips al our currant reference market prica Duo e 
tluci rating market conditions, prices ae subject to dtmga without no lice. 



A New Breed of CoCo 3 Memory Expansion 

Uses existing CoCo 3 64K x 4 memory chips! 

Our revolutionary circuit combines four 64K x 4 memory chips on 
the QuarterMeg board with the four Identical memory chips In the 
128K CoCo 3 to double your 0S9 and BASIC memory to 256K. 



QuarterMeg is Burke & Burke's revolutionary new 256K memory upgrade board for the 
CoCo 3. The QuarterMeg board uses only [4j memory chips to double your CoCo 3's 
memory to 256K. 

Both OS9 and BASIC recognize and use this extra memory automatically! Many 51 2K 
programs work superbly with QuarterMeg, but some 512K RS-DOS programs require 
compatibility patches. We include installation and utility software for both OS9 and BASIC. 

In addition, QuarterMeg's RAM disable jumper instantly switches your system between 
original 128K and fully expanded 256K mode. 

Zero-K QuarterMeg (no chips) - $39.95 
Standard QuarterMeg (4 chips) & Fat QuarterMeg (8 chips) 

>» MARKET PRICE «< 



Real BASIC for OS9! 



There is nothing wrong with your Color Computer. 
Do not attempt to adjust it. 



Burke & Burke's R.S.B. software gives you a complete, OS9-compatible version of Disk Extended Color BASIC. We've added new software for 
OS9- style graphics, sound, printer, and disk I/O. The BASIC you know and love is now running under Level 2 OS9 windows! 

R.S.B. loads and saves files using OSQ's file format, so we've also included utilities to transfer BASIC programs and data files betwen OS9 and BASIC 
disks. Of course, you can't use R.S.B. to run machine language programs, and some BASIC commands work slightly differently under R.S.B. 

Your BASIC programs can take full advantage of great OS9 features like hard disks, no-halt floppies, multi-tasking, and 2 MHz operation. 



R.S.B. requires a CoCo 3 with at least 128K RAM (256K strongly recommended), a floppy controller 
with either Tandy Disk BASIC or DISTO CoCo 3 CDOS, and Level 2 OS9. 



R.S.B. Version 1.2 
S39.95 ' 



CoCo-XT Hard Disk Interfaces 

Hundreds of Color Computer enthusiasts in the US, Canada, Europe, 
South America, and Australia love our affordable high-performance hard 
disk interfaces! 

Each includes a durable, fully enclosed metal housing, 100 page user 
manual, and software for use with HYPER-l/O or OSS. The CoCo XT-RTC 
adds a battery-powered real time clock / calendar tor 0S9 and BASIC. 



CoCo XT $69.95 
CoCo XT-RTC $99.95 

Technical Summary: 

NO HALT • 1 or 2 hard drives • 30% faster than SASI • Uses PC-type hard 
disk drives & controllers • 5 Meg to 120 Meg per drive • Does not use 
interrupts • Multi-PAK recommended • Works with 12 Volt Y-cables • 
Includes EZGen boot file editor for easy installation 

Share vour hard disk between BASIC and OS9 with HYPER-t/O 

(not included] 

The Profesional Touch: XT-ROM 2.3 



Install XT-ROM in your CoCo XT hard disk controller's BIOS 
automatically boots and reboots OS9 from your hard disk. 



ROM socket. 

r XT-ROM 
L $19.95 



It 



Select among any of two different hard disk boot files, two 
different floppy boot files, or your BASIC ROM at power-up 
XT-ROM gives your system that "professional touch". Great for 
unattended BBS, home security, or other fail-safe CoCo applications. 



r 



Wild & MV Version 2.1 

Use "wildcards" with most OS9 
commands, or rearrange your 
directory tree. Features 
recursive directory searches. 
A hard disk must! $19.95 



EZGen Version 1.06 

Powerful OS9 bootfile editor. 
Change module names, add or 
delete modules, patch bytes, or 
rearrange modules. Works on 
other files, too. $19.95 



OS9 Utilities 



HVPPR./ /D Now BASIC runs nard drives, 
Q 1 * C n m I / \J t)jg floppies, and more! 

HYPER-l/O modifies the Disk BASIC in your CoCo 1, 2, or 3 to provide a 
"Dynamic Disk Interface". Use your existing BASIC and M/L software 
with hard disk interfaces (CoCo XT, DISTO, LR), RAM Disks, and any mix 
of floppy drives from T60K to 720K each. Fully RESET protected, user 
configurable, expandable, EPROM-abte HYPER-l/O V2.6B is the most 
versatile CoCo hard disk DOS available. Please specify HYPER-l/O, 
DISTO HYPER-l/O, or LR HYPER-l/O when ordering. 



$29.95 



HYPER-III 



(Adds RAM Disk and Print Spooler to CoCo 3 HYPER-l/O. 

$12.95 

HYPER-l/O & HYPER-III work with your 
B&B, RGB, LR, or DISTO Hard Disk 



HYPER-I/Q Utilities J™™ 

by Kevin Berner copy, delete, and search operations 

on your HYPER-l/O directories. Great timesaver for moving data from 
floppy disk to hard disk, or for BBS maintenance. Kevin's DISK DOCTOR 
will lock out bad sectors on your hsrd or floppy disks, and includes a 
disk-zap utility designed specifically for use with HYPER-l/O. 

DISK Doctor $17.95 HYPER-l/O Hard Disk Utilities $21.95 






PE II $19.95 



l ^L— a a ^L-y j j PERTASCII is a single-user or 

IcK^_^[im multi-user word game for Level 2 
' — Tptj — OS9. The players are yourself, the 
I — V computer, other users on your 

system, or even friends that call in on 
a modem. 



Great for BBS and multi-user systems ... or play practice rounds 
against the computer to hone your skills! Includes a user-expandable 
15,000 word dictionary. 

Minimum 256K CoCo 3, Level 2 OS9, and one disk drive required. 
CoCo 2 and 128K owners: watch for our 128K / 64K version! 



Contact Frank Hogg 
Labs, Howard Medical 
Computers, or MlcroCom 
Technologies for 
information about 
complete Burke & Burke 
hard disk systems 



Hardware, or What? 

68B09E 2MHz Microprocessor $14.95 
4' Hard Disk Cable Set $17.50 
Blank 27128 EPROM $9.95 
(for HYPER-l/O) 

Hard Disk BIOS Socket Installed $7.50 



Don 7 be afraid of the dungeons 



Yet another does not return. ' 



*9.9S\ __ 

DAGGORPATCH puts the thrill back into your Dyna Micro Dungeons of Daggorath™ 
game cartridge by patching it to run from disk. Includes disk load & save, 
auto-repeat command, pause, DMP-100 screen dump, tape-to-disk, and morel 





m 




W 



P.O. Box 58342 
(206) 



Renton, WA 98058 
235-0917 



r ■ i 




WASHINGTON RESIDENTS PLEASE ADD 8.1% 
SALES TAX. COD's add $2.75. 
Minimum U.S. shipping & handling $3.00. 
$4.00 minimum shipping to Canada. 
Please allow 2 weeks for delivery. Overnight or 
2-day delivery available for in-stock Items. 
Telephone orders call (800) 237-2409 



/^5v 

RAINBOW 

CLHTiriCATION 
SEAL 



Burke & Burke Advertisement The RAINBOW June. 1989 (Composite B/W) 
Copyright 1989 by Burke & Burke 



CANNOT DECIDE WHAT TO DO." 

4011 IFZO=3THENPRINT:LINEINPUT"P 
RESS enter TO CONTINUE ..." ?YN$ 

4012 IFZO=3THENCLS : PRINT 11 ANYTHIN 
G CALLING FOR AN ALERT MIND SU 
ITS YOUR TASTES. IN LOVEYOU ARE 

SENSITIVE BUT FICKLE ANDYOU BLA 
ME YOUR OWN CHANGES OF ' HEART 0 
N OTHERS - YOU MUST CONCENT 
RATE ON MAKING MARRIAGE" 

4013 IFZO=3THENPRINT"HAPPY. CON 
TROL YOUR QUICK ' TEMPER - RA 
SH WORDS IN HASTE WILL BE YOU 
R UNDOING. THE BEST OUTLET FOR 
YOUR RESTLESSNESS IS HOBBIES - I 
F YOU NEED A CHANGE -TAKE UP A N 
EW HOBBY. " '.PRINT: LINE INPUT "PRESS 

enter TO CONTINUE. . . " ;YN$ 

4015 IFZO=4THENPRINT"YOU WERE BO 
RN UNDER THE SIGN OF CANCER - TH 
E CRAB. YOU WORRY TOMUCH ABOUT 
WHAT OTHERS THINK - CONTROL YOU 
R EMOTIONS . " : PRINT : LINEINPUT"PRE 
SS enter TO CONTINUE. .." ;YN$ 

4016 IFZO=4THENCLS: PRINT" YOU ARE 
FULL OF SELF-DOUBT AND SHYNESS 

, BUT OTHERS PLACE GREAT CONFIDE 
NCE IN YOU. YOU WILL GIVE AN 
D RECEIVE DEEP, LOYAL AFFECTI 
ON - ONLY MARRY FOR LOVE - WITHO 
UT IT YOU WILL NOT BE" 

4017 IFZO=4THENPRINT"CONTENT. C 
HOOSE A CAREER THAT BRINGS YOU 
INTO CONTACT WITH PEOPLE AND 
ACTIVITY. IF YOU DO NOT WORRY T 
00 MUCH - YOUR HEALTHWILL BE GOO 
D . " : PRINT : LINEINPUT"PRESS enter 
TO CONTINUE ..." ; YN$ 

4020 IFZ0=5THENPRINT"Y0U WERE BO 
RN UNDER THE SIGN OF LEO - THE L 
ION.' THE WORLD LOOKSTO YOU FOR 
LEADERSHIP AND GUIDANCE.": 
PRINT: LINEINPUT" PRESS enter TO C 
ONTINUE. . . " ;YN$ 

4021 IFZ0=5THENCLS:PRINT"BEWARE 
OF PEOPLE WHO AGREE WITH YOU, JU 
ST BECAUSE THEY WANT FAVORS 
FROM YOU. CONTROL YOUR TENDENC 
Y TO DOMINEER - PEOPLE ARE EAS 
IER LED THAN DRIVEN. IN WHATEVE 
R CAREER YOU CHOOSE - YOU" 

4022 IFZ0=5THENPRINT"WILL BE AN 
EXECUTIVE. YOU WILL NEVER HAVE 
TRIVIAL LOVE AFFAIRS - AND YOUR 
MARRIAGE WILL BE HAPPY IF YO 
U AVOID DOMESTIC QUARRELS.": 
PRINT: LINEINPUT" PRESS enter TO C 
ONTINUE. . .";YN$ 

4025 IFZ0=6THENPRINT"Y0U WERE BO 
RN UNDER THE SIGN OF VIRGO - THE 
VIRGIN. YOUR LIFE WILL NOT BE 



WASTED - AND YOU WILL NEVER 
REGRET WHAT YOU HAVE DONE.":PRIN 
T:LINEINPUT"PRESS enter TO CONTI 
NUE. . . " ;YN$ 

4026 IFZ0=6THENCLS:PRINT"IF YOU 
ACHEIVE FAME - YOU WILL EARN IT 
. YOUR GREATEST SUCCESS WILL BE 

IN A CAREER REQUIRING PATIENC 
E. USE TACT WITH OTHERS - DO NO 
T BE OVER CRITICAL. MARRY E 

ARLY IN LIFE - AND DO NOT" ' 

4027 IFZ0=6THENPRINT"INSIST ON A 

LWAYS HAVING YOUR WAY.": PRINT 
:LINEINPUT"PRESS enter TO CONTIN 
UE. . .";YN$ 

4030 IFZ0=7THENPRINT"Y0U WERE BO 
RN UNDER THE SIGN OF LIBRA - THE 

BALANCE. YOU ARE ABLE TO GET 
ALONG WITH PEOPLE EASILY - TH 

IS HELPS YOU MAKE FRIENDS AND 
SUCCEED IN BUSINESS. ": PRINT: LIN 

EINPUT"PRESS enter TO CONTINUE.. 

." ;YN$ 

4031 IFZ0=7THENCLS: PRINT" YOU WIL 
L MAKE A GOOD EXECUTIVE OR MANA 
GER. NEVER LISTEN TO ADVICE 
TO USE FORCE - YOU WILL SUCCEED 

BETTER BY USING REASON AND PER 
SUATION. IN LOVE YOU MUST RE 
MEMBER THAT EMOTIONS AND" 

4032 I FZ 0=7 THENPRI NT " NOT REASON 
ARE THE SOURCE OF PEOPLE'S AC 
TIONS. IN MARRIAGE YOUR SPOUSE 

DEMANDS ALL OF YOUR AFFECTION A 
ND WILL RESENT YOUR INTEREST TO 

OTHERS OF THE OPPOSITE SE 

X. " : PRINT : LINEINPUT"PRESS enter 
TO CONTINUE. . .";YN$ 
4035 IFZ0=8THENPRINT"Y0U WERE BO 
RN UNDER THE SIGN OF SCORPIO - T 
HE SCORPION. YOU WERE BORN T 
0 FIGHT HARD, LOVE DEEPLY, AND 

HATE BITTERLY . " : PRINT : LINEINPUT 
"PRESS enter TO CONTINUE ... ";YN$ 
403 6 IFZ0=8THENCLS:PRINT"F0R PEA 
CE OF MIND - YOU MUST CONTROL 

YOUR TEMPER, CONTROL YOUR VI 
OLENT HATES, AND DO NOT GIVE IN 
TO SUSPICION OR JEALOUSY.NO ONE 
WILL ACCUSE YOU OF LYING DOWN ON 

THE JOB. YOU WILL" 
4037 IFZ0=8THENPRINT"SUCCEED IN 
MANY LINES OF ACTIVITY. 
YOU WILL ATTRACT THE OPPOSITE SE 
X - BUT YOUR GRE ATE S TP I TFALL IS 
JEALOUSY. " : PRINT: LINEINPUT "PRESS 

enter TO CONTINUE. . . " ;YN$ 
4040 IFZ0=9THENPRINT"Y0U WERE BO 
RN UNDER THE SIGN OF SAGITTARIUS 

- THE ARCHER. YOU HAVE A GOOD 

CHANCE TO ACHEIVE SUCCESS AND 



36 THE RAINBOW June 1 989 



FAME. " : PRINT: LINEINPUT" PRESS en 
ter TO CONTINUE. " ;YN$ 
4j341 IFZO=9THENCLS : PRINT" SELECT 
A CAREER WHERE YOU DO NOTWORK WI 
TH TOO MANY OTHERS. YOU WILL SE 
LDOM QUARREL, BUT WILL FLARE U 
P IF CROSSED. YOU WILL HAVE GO 
OD LUCK IF YOU FOLLOW YOUR IN 
STINCTS. IN LOVE NO ONE" 
4j342 IFZ 0=9 THENPRINT "WILL QUITE 
LIVE UP TO YOUR IDEAL- LEARN TO 
LOOK AT THE GOOD QUALITIES A 

ND OVERLOOK THE FAULTS .": PR 

INT: LINEINPUT" PRESS enter TO CON 
TINUE. . ." ;YN$ 

404 5 IFZ0=1#THENPRINT"Y0U WERE B 
ORN UNDER THE SIGN OF CAPRICORN 
- THE SEA-GOAT. YOU MUST DEVEL 
OPE A SENSE OF HUMOR. ": PRINT: LIN 
EINPUT"PRESS enter TO CONTINUE.. 
.";YN$ 

4046 IFZO=10THENCLS: PRINT "BE CAR 
EFUL NOT TO MISS OUT ON OPPORT 
UNITIES WHICH REQUIRE IMAGIN 
ATION AND DARING. CHOOSE A CARE 
ER WHICH REQUIRES A STEADY 
, LEVEL HEAD. IN LOVE YOUARE CA 
UTIOUS AND HESITANT - YOU" 

4047 IFZO=10THENPRINT"WILL PROBA 
LLY NOT MARRY EARLY - BUT TO BE 
HAPPY - YOU MUST MARRY. GE 
T PLENTY OF FRESH AIR, AVOID WORR 
Y, AND WATCH YOUR USE OF ALCOHOL 

AND TOBACCO. ": PRINT: LINEINPUT" P 
RESS enter TO CONTINUE ..." ;YN$ 
4J350 IFZ0=11THENPRINT"Y0U WERE B 
ORN UNDER THE SIGN OF AQUARIUS - 

THE WATER-BEARER. YOU HAVE M 
ANY GOOD QUALITIES, SOYOU MUST 0 
VERCOME YOUR SHYNESS IN HUMAN R 
ELATIONSHIPS . " : PRINT : LINEINPUT" P 
RESS enter TO CONTINUE ..." ;YN$ 

4051 IFZ0=11THENCLS: PRINT" YOU HA 
VE AN ORIGINAL MIND - RELYON YOU 
R HUNCHES. YOU DO NOT MAKE F 
RIENDS QUICKLY - BUT YOU WILL N 
EVER LACK FOR THEM - YOU MUST B 
E PATIENT WITH THOSE NOT AS QUI 
CK AS YOU. YOUR EASY" 

4052 IFZ0=11THENPRINT"G0ING DISP 
OSITION COULD LESSEN YOUR SUCCE 
SS, BUT MANY CAREERS HOLD OPPOR 
TUNITIES FOR YOU. IN LOVE YOU H 
IDE YOUR AFFECTIONS - YOU MAY MA 
RRY WITHOUT A ROMANTICCOURTSHIP . 
": PRINT: LINEINPUT "PRESS enter TO 

CONTINUE. . .";YN$ 
4055 IFZ0=12THENPRINT"Y0U WERE B 
ORN UNDER THE SIGN OF PISCES - T 
HE FISHES. YOUR LIFE WILL BE FI 
LLED WITH RESTLESS ACTIVITY." 



: PRINT :LINEINPUT"PRESS enter TO 
CONTINUE. . .";YN$ 

4056 IFZ0=12THENCLS:PRINT"Y0U AR 
E VERY EASILY TAKEN ADVANT 
AGE OF. YOUR FRIENDS OVERLO 
OK YOUR FAULTS AND HAVE GENUIN 
E AFFECTION FOR YOU. WITHSELF-D 
ISCIPLINE YOU CAN RISE TO GREAT 
HEIGHTS - CHOOSE A CAREER" 

4057 IFZ0=12 THENPRINT "THAT DEALS 
WITH NUMBERS OF INDIVIDUAL 

S. YOU WILL PRO BALLY MARRY EARL 

Y - HAVE SEVERAL LOVE AFFAIRS - 
SOME MAYBE AFTER YOU HAVE MARRI 
ED. ": PRINT :LINEINPUT"PRESS enter 

TO CONTINUE. .. ";YN$ 
4060 CLS : RETURN 

4500 '*** DECAN ANSWERS 

4501 IFZ0=1ANDDE=1THENPRINT"MARR 

Y SOMEONE BORN IN LAST HALF OF M 
ARCH OR UNDER CANCER OR SAGI 
TTARIUS. LUCKY COLORS ARE RED 
AND YELLOW, BEST DAY IS FRID 
AY, AND GOOD FORTUNE NUMBER IS 2 



4502 IFZ0=1ANDDE=2THENPRINT"MARR 
Y SOMEONE BORN UNDER ARIES, LEO 
OR SAGITTARIUS. LUCKY COLO 
RS ARE TAN AND ORANGE, BEST DAY 



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(503) 254-7225 



June 1989 THE RAINBOW 37 



r 



IS TUESDAY, AND GOOD FORTUNENUMB 
ER IS 8," 

45,03 IFZ0=1ANDDE==3THENPRINT"MARR 

Y SOMEONE BORN IN FIRST HALFOF A 
PRIL OR UNDER LEO OR SAGI 
TTARIUS . LUCKY COLORS ARE YELL 
OW, LIGHT GREEN AND BLUE, BEST 

DAY IS MONDAY, AND GOOD FORT 
UNE NUMBER IS lJ 1 

45J34 IFZ0=2ANDDE=1THENPRINT"MARR 

Y SOMEONE BORN IN LAST HALF OF A 

PRIL OR AUGUST OR UNDER CAPR 

ICORN. LUCKY COLORS ARE YELL 

OW AND ORANGE, BEST DAY IS FRID 

AY, AND GOOD FORTUNE NUMBER IS 5 
if 

• 

45J35 IFZO=2ANDDE=2THENPRINT"MARR 

Y SOMEONE BORN UNDER TAURUS OR C 
APRICORN. LUCKY COLORS ARE PALE 

GREEN AND BLUE, BEST DAY ISTUES 

DAY, AND GOOD FORTUNE NUMBERIS 6 
it 

• 

45J36 IFZO=2ANDDE=3THENPRINT fl MARR 

Y SOMEONE BORN UNDER TAURUS, VIRG 
0 OR CAPRICORN, LUCKY COLO 
RS ARE BLUE, GRAY , AND BROW 
N, BEST DAY IS TUESDAY, AND GOOD 

FORTUNE NUMBER IS 6." 
45J37 IFZ0=3ANDDE=1THENPRINT M MARR 

Y SOMEONE BORN IN LAST HALF OF M 
AY, SEPTEMBER OR JANUARY. LUCK 

Y COLORS ARE BLUE, GREEN ANDGRAY 
, BEST DAY IS WEDNESDAY, ANDGOOD 

FORTUNE NUMBER IS 6." 
4508 IFZO=3ANDDE=2THENPRINT"MARR 

Y SOMEONE BORN UNDER LIBRA OR A 
QUARIUS. LUCKY COLORS ARE GREE 
N, YELLOW AND PALE BLUE, BEST 

DAY IS WEDNESDAY, AND GOOD FORT 
UNE NUMBER IS 5." 

45J39 IFZO=3ANDDE=3THENPRINT"MARR 

Y SOMEONE BORN UNDER LIBRA OR A 
QUARIUS. LUCKY COLORS ARE GOLD 
EN TAN AND GRAYISH BLUE, BEST 

DAY IS WEDNESDAY, AND GOOD FORT 
UNE NUMBERS ARE 8 AND 5." 
451J3 IFZ0=4ANDDE=1THENPRINT"MARR 

Y SOMEONE BORN IN LAST HALF OF J 
UNE, OCTOBER OR FEBRUARY. LUCK 

Y COLORS ARE LIGHT YELLOW, BLUE 

AND GREEN, BEST DAY IS MOND 

AY, AND GOOD FORTUNE NUMBER IS 2 
it 

. 

4511 IFZO=4ANDDE=2THENPRINT"MARR 

Y SOMEONE BORN UNDER SCORPIOOR P 
ISCES. LUCKY COLORS ARE VIOL 
ET AND GREEN, BEST DAY IS MOND 
AY, AND GOOD FORTUNE NUMBERSARE 

2 AND 5." 

4512 IFZO=4ANDDE~3THENPRINT"MARR 

Y SOMONE BORN UNDER CANCER, SCOR 



PIO OR PISCES. LUCKY COLORSARE 
SILVER GRAY AND VIOLET, BESTDAYS 

ARE MONDAY AND WEDNESDAY, AND 
GOOD FORTUNE NUMBER IS 3." 

4513 IFZ0=5ANDDE=1THENPRINT"MARR 

Y SOMEONE BORN UNDER ARIES OR S 
AGITTARIUS OR IN LAST HALF OF J 
ULY. LUCKY COLORS ARE GREE 
N, ORANGE AND GOLD, BEST DAYIS S 
UNDAY, AND GOOD FORTUNE NUMB 
ER IS 1." 

4514 IFZO=5ANDDE=2THENPRINT M MARR 

Y SOMEONE BORN UNDER ARIES, LEO 
OR SAGITTARIUS. LUCKY COLO 
RS ARE PURPLE AND GOLD, BESTDAY 
IS SUNDAY, AND GOOD FORTUNE NUMB 
ER IS 2." 

4515 IFZO=5ANDDE=3THENPRINT"MARR 

Y SOMEONE BORN UNDER ARIES, LEO 
OR SAGITTARIUS. LUCKY COLO 
RS ARE APRICOT, SCARLET AND VERM 
ILION, BEST DAY IS THURSDAY, AND 
GOOD FORTUNE NUMBER IS 9." 

4516 IFZ0=6ANDDE=1THENPRINT M MARR 

Y SOMEONE BORN IN LAST HALF OF A 
PRIL, AUGUST OR DECEMBER. LUCK 

Y COLORS ARE BLUE AND GREEN, BEST 

DAYS ARE SUNDAY AND TUES 

DAY, AND GOOD FORTUNE NUMBERIS 5 
ii 

4517 IFZO=6ANDDE=2THENPRINT M MARR 

Y SOMEONE BORN UNDER TAURUS, VIRG 
0 OR CAPRICORN. LUCKY COLO 
RS ARE DARK BLUE AND SLATE, BEST 

DAY IS WEDNESDAY, AND GOOD FORT 
UNE NUMBER IS 4 . " 

4518 IFZO=6ANDDE=3THENPRINT n MARR 

Y SOMEONE BORN UNDER TAURUS, VIRG 
O OR CAPRICORN. LUCKY COLO 
RS ARE LIGHT BLUE AND GREEN, BEST 

DAY IS SATURDAY, AND GOOD FORT 
UNE NUMBER IS 8." 

4519 IFZ0=7ANDDE=1THENPRINT"MARR 

Y SOMEONE BORN IN LAST HALF OF J 
ANUARY, MAY OR SEPTEMBER. LUCK 

Y COLORS ARE PALE BLUE AND YELL 
OW, BEST DAY IS FRIDAY, AND GOOD 

FORTUNE NUMBER IS 6." 
452J3 IFZO=7ANDDE=2THENPRINT"MARR 

Y SOMEONE BORN UNDER ANY SIGN 
EXCEPT SAGITTARIUS OR CANC 

ER. LUCKY COLORS ARE GREEN AND 
PINK, BEST DAYS ARE FRIDAY AND 
MONDAY, AND GOOD FORTUNE NUMB 
ER IS 6." 

4521 IFZO=7ANDDE=3THENPRINT"MARR 

Y SOMEONE BORN UNDER LIBRA, AQUA 
RIUS OR GEMINI. LUCKY COLO 
RS ARE PALE BLUE AND VIOLET, BEST 

DAY IS WEDNESDAY, AND GOOD FORT 
UNE NUMBER IS 5." 



38 THE RAINBOW June 1989 



9UH006 S'VSTEMV 





Become RASTANN, Warrior King, on the quest 
to regain his rightful crown, hidden deep within a 
sinister land. Battle monsters, gain magic and 
weapons, and travel through harsh wilderness 
and dark castle dungeons in this medieval realm. 
From the creator of Kung-Fu Dude comes this 
awesome arcade game for the CoCo III! Warrior 
King uses the most detailed 320x200 16 color 
graphics and high speed machine code to vault 
you into a world of fantasy. Dare ye challenge 
the many perils ahead in order to become WAR- 
RIOR KING? Req. 128K CoCo III, disk drive, and 
joystick. Only $29.95. 



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orpcops well furrti theft and oanvtructed. 

ri»ti *««< ham, |J{ft§ t gu| 

COttflftllD? fl 



This is THE graphic adventure for the CoCo 
III! Unparalleled 320x200 animated 
graphics will leave you gasping for more! 
You quest for the Phoenix Crossbow in this 
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sides of mind-numbing adventure! Req. 
128K CoCo III and disk drive. Only $34.95. 
Hint Sheet: $3.95. 

"A dynamite program! The best graphics 
I've seen to date on the CoCo III. You have 
to see it to believe it." 

— 8/88 Rainbow review 



Kuns-ru Dude 



r 



An exciting arcade game. The BEST karate 
game ever created for the CoCo! Destroy 
opponents and evade obstacles as you 
grow ever closer to your ultimate objective. 
Spectacular graphics, sound effects, and 
animation! Req. 64K CoCo, disk drive, and 
joystick. Only $24.95. 

"The CoCo karate gap has been filled 
and Kung-Fu Dude does it excellently. I 
highly recommend it!" 

— 2/88 Rainbow review 




All programs CoCo 1,2,3 compatible, unless otherwise stated 



Sundog Systems 

21 Edinburg Drive 
Pittsburgh, PA 15235 
(412) 372-5674 




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TRILOGY 



The epic adventure is back! The largest adven- 
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"The animated graphics are dramatic, detail- 
ed, and excellent ! " —11/87 Rainbow review 

"The adventure of a lifetime. Don't miss out I " 
— 7/88 Gamer's Connection review 




» 






Become a super- 
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Great graphics 
and sound ef- 
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Disk $19.95. 



DRAGON BLADE 



Another great 
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adventure! Can 
you Obtain the 
enchanted sword 
to slay the evil 
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Disk $19.95, 





Wm2m 



Enter the era of 
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for S/H. $3.00 extra for C.O.D. orders. PA 
residents add 6% sales tax. Authorship and 
dealer inquires welcome. 



■ 



4522 IFZ0=8ANDDE=1THENPRINT"MARR 

Y SOMEONE BORN IN LAST HALF OF J 
ULY, OCTOBER OR FEBRUARY. LUCK 

Y COLORS ARE RED AND PURPLE , BEST 
DAY IS THURSDAY, AND GOOD FORT 

UNE NUMBER IS 9." 

4 523 IFZO=8ANDDE=2THENPRINT ,f MARR 

Y SOMEONE BORN UNDER CANCER, SCOR 

PIO OR PISCES. LUCKY COLORS ARE 

RED AND BROWN, BEST DAY IS TUES 

DAY, AND GOOD FORTUNE NUMBERIS 3 
ii 

4524 IFZO=8ANDDE=3THENPRINT"MARR 

Y SOMEONE BORN UNDER CANCER, SCOR 

PIO OR PISCES. LUCKY COLORSARE 

ROSE AND BLUE, BEST DAY IS MOND 

AY, AND GOOD FORTUNE NUMBER IS 2 
ii 

4525 IFZ0=9ANDDE=1THENPRINT"MARR 

Y SOMEONE BORN IN JULY, NOVE 
MBER OR MARCH. LUCKY COLORSARE 
PURPLE AND YELLOW, BEST DAY IS M 
ONDAY, AND GOOD FORTUNE NUMB 
ER IS 3." 

4526 IFZO=9ANDDE=2THENPRINT"MARR 

Y SOMEONE BORN UNDER LEO, SAGI 
TTARIUS OR ARIES. LUCKY COLO 
RS ARE GREEN AND PURPLE, BEST 

DAY IS TUESDAY, AND GOOD FORT 
UNE NUMBER IS 4." 

4527 IFZO=9ANDDE=3THENPRINT"MARR 

Y SOMEONE BORN UNDER ARIES, LEO 
OR SAGITTARIUS. LUCKY COLO 
RS ARE GOLDEN BROWN, MAGENTAAND 
PUCE, BEST DAY IS SUNDAY, AND 
GOOD FORTUNE NUMBER IS 8 . " 

4528 IFZO=10ANDDE=1THENPRINT''MAR 
RY SOMEONE BORN IN LAST HALF OF 
APRIL OR AUGUST. LUCKY COL 
ORS ARE PURPLE AND BLUE, BESTDAY 

IS SATURDAY, AND GOOD FOR 
TUNE NUMBERS ARE 8 AND 5." 

4529 IFZO=10ANDDE=2THENPRINT"MAR 
RY SOMEONE BORN MID APRIL TO MID 

MAY, MID AUGUST TO MID SEP 
TEMBER OR LAST HALF OF DEC 
EMBER. LUCKY COLORS ARE BLUEAND 
RED, BEST DAYS ARE SATURDAY AND 
FRIDAY, AND GOOD FORTUNE NUM 
BERS ARE 8 AND 9." 

4530 IFZO=10ANDDE=3THENPRINT»MAR 
RY SOMEONE BORN UNDER TAURUS, VIR 
GO OR SAGITTARIUS. LUCKY COL 
ORS ARE DEEP BLUE AND GRAY, BES 
T DAY IS WEDNESDAY, AND GOOD FOR 
TUNE NUMBERS ARE 8 AND 4." 

4531 IFZ0=11ANDDE=1THENPRINT"MAR 
RY SOMEONE BORN IN JANUARY ORUND 
ER VIRGO OR LIBRA. LUCKY COL 
ORS ARE BLUE AND GREEN, BEST DAY 

IS SATURDAY, AND GOOD FOR 



TUNE NUMBER IS 7." 

4532 IFZ0=11ANDDE=2THENPRINT"MAR 
RY SOMEONE BORN UNDER GEMINI OR 
LIBRA OR IN LAST HALF OF JAN 
UARY. LUCKY COLORS ARE DARK BLU 
E AND GREEN, BEST DAY IS SAT 
URDAY, AND GOOD FORTUNE NUM 
BER IS 9." 

4533 IFZ0=11ANDDE=3THENPRINT"MAR 
RY SOMEONE BORN UNDER GEMINI, LIB 
RA OR AQUARIUS. LUCKY COLORSARE 

BLUE AND GREEN, BEST DAY IS FRI 
DAY, AND GOOD FORTUNE NUMBERSARE 
6 AND 9. 11 

4534 IFZ0=12ANDDE=1THENPRINT"MAR 
RY SOMEONE BORN UNDER CANCER OR 
IN LAST HALF OF SEPTEMBER OR OCT 
OBER. LUCKY COLORS ARE PUR 
PLE AND RED, BEST DAY IS TUE 
SDAY, AND GOOD FORTUNE NUM 
BERS ARE 4 AND 2." 

4535 IFZO=12ANDDE=2THENPRINT"MAR 
RY SOMEONE BORN UNDER CANCER OR 
SCORPIO OR IN LAST HALF OF FEB 
RUARY. LUCKY COLORS ARE MAU 
VE, GREEN AND INDIGO, BEST DAY 

IS THURSDAY, AND GOOD FOR 
TUNE NUMBER IS 3 . " 

4 53 6 IFZO=12ANDDE=3THENPRINT H MAR 
RY SOMEONE BORN UNDER CANCER, SCO 
RPIO OR PISCES. LUCKY COLORSARE 
PURPLE AND RED, BEST DAY IS MON 
DAY, AND GOOD FORTUNE NUMBER IS 
3." 

4550 PRINT rLINEINPUT" PRESS enter 

TO CONTINUE . . . " ; YN$ 
4560 RETURN 
5000 GOTO 10000 
10000 ■*** END ROUTINE 

10010 A$="L8;E;F;G;P16;L8;G#;G;F 
;P16" 

10020 B$="L2;E f » 
10030 CLS0 
10040 PRINT@160," 
A" 

10050 PRINT@224," PAUL D 

B U R N H A M" 
10060 PRINT@288," PRO 
GRAM" 

10070 X$=' , XA$;'» 
10080 FOR R=1T03 
10090 PLAY X$ 
10100 NEXT R 
10110 CLS0 

10120 PRINT@224," COPYRIGHT 

(C) 1989" 
10130 X$="XB$;" 
10140 PLAY X$ 

10150 FOR D=1TO1000:NEXT D 
10160 CLS 
20000 END 



40 THE RAINBOW June 1989 



1 F e atur e 




Kill the evil wizard and escape. . . 



Castle Zhagwhar 

By Keith Schuler 



In a different time far away, the small, 
magical kingdom of Lithana is thriv- 
ing. It is a peaceful kingdom with a 
just king on the throne, a good economy 
and happy people. 

One day an evil wizard arrives at an old, 
abandoned fortress outside the kingdom, 
called Castle Zhagwhar. He is a powerful 
wizard who wants to rule Lithana. So using 
his magical powers, he begins transform- 
ing entire forests into gigantic armies of 
vicious goblins who immediately begin 
attacking Lithana. 

The king's army is powerful, but they 
can't resist the goblins for long. So the king 
sends a decree throughout the kingdom that 
anyone brave enough to enter Castle 
Zhagwhar and dispatch the wizard will 
receive one-fourth of all the land in Lithana. 

The king waits many long weeks for a 
response to his decree when, at last, a poor 
young woodcutter named Gwydion answers 
the king's call. Gwydion is unskilled in the 
use of any weapons but is very strong and 
can run and jump well. The king in despera- 
tion gives the young man a map leading to 
Castle Zhagwhar, wishes him luck, and 
then returns to his throne to worry some 
more. 

Gwydion follows the map for many 
days but sees no goblins: They are off 
fighting in other parts of Lithana. At last he 
reaches his destination, the decrepid old 



Keith Schuler is a high school student who 
has been programming for seven years. He 
has learned other computer languages 
including assembly and C, and intends to 
become a computer programmer for NASA. 



fortress almost completely in shambles. 
The drawbridge is down and Gwydion 
enters. He comes to a staircase leading 
downwards and descends it. His adventure 
begins 

Castle Zhagwhar is a game that runs on 
the CoCos 1, 2 and 3 and requires 32K of 
memory. To play the game, type in the 
listing, save it to tape or disk, and run it. 
You will see the title page. Press any key 
and the game begins. 

Gwydion is the little blue man. Control 
him using the right joystick. Moving the 
joystick left or right causes him to run left 
or right. To climb a ladder or move under 
the ladder, press the joystick up. To de- 
scend a ladder, move over it, then press the 
joystick down. Moving the joystick down 
anywhere else causes Gwydion to duck. To 
make him jump, press the joystick button. 

The idea of the game is to move from 
room to room by collecting yellow keys 
and using them to open the blue doors. To 
pick up a key, just run over it, and a key is 
shown in your possession in the blue bar at 
the top of the screen. To open a door, get a 
key, then run into the door. 

Also found throughout the castle are 
pots of gold worth 1 00 points. Pick these up 
by running over them. Keys are worth 50 
points; moving on to the next room, 350 
points. The score is shown in the blue bar in 
the upper left-hand corner of the screen. 

Castle Zhagwhar is very old, so the 
ladders are brittle and there are many holes 
in the floor. Jump over the holes, but never 
jump onto a ladder because it can break and 
may trap you in a room. There are also bats 
flying throughout the castle, biting any- 



thing they touch, so duck to avoid them 
even though sometimes they don't do 
damage. 

Falling one level through a hole causes 
Gwydion to lose 10 points of life, and 
getting bitten subtracts five points per bite. 
The amount of life Gwydion has left is 
shown as a green bar inside the blue bar in 
the upper right-hand corner of the screen. If 
the bar is reduced to zero, Gwydion dies. 

Also found in the castle are magic trans- 
porters and disintegrators. When stepped 
on, the transporters cause Gwydion to auto- 
matically jump to another part of the room. 
The disintegrators cause instant death when 
stepped on. 

Gwydion makes a deal with his fairy 
godmother that if he succeeds in reaching a 
certain point, he can summon her aid. To do 
this, you must accumulate a score of at least 
4000 points, then press the space bar. 
Gwydion 's life is then completely restored, 
but his fairy godmother sets him back a few 
rooms. Another life restorer is the Bonus 
Room. When Gwydion is in this room, 
collect all the treasure and escape before 
the red timer runs out, and his life will be 
completely restored. 

Scattered around the castle are bottles of 
magic healing elixer that Gwydion does 
not see right away. When he notices one, he 
automatically drinks it. Elixer cures five 
points of damage. Going to the next room 
also cures five points. 

Deep within Castle Zhagwhar is the evil 
wizard. He knows the young man is after 
him and is constantly searching for him 
with a magic crystal ball. If he finds 
Gwydion, he puts a curse on him that drains 



June 1989 THE RAINBOW 41 



the lad's life. So don't waste time! But 
that's not the only spell the wizard knows. 
He can throw fireballs, disintegrate the 
inanimate, cause things to disappear, magi- 
cally transport himself, and summon bats. 
Just remember, when the wizard dies, all 
his spells stop working. 

The castle is difficult to navigate through, 



making it hard to find and defeat the wiz- 
ard. Escaping Castle Zhagwar is even 
harder. Good luck. 

I hope you enjoy playing this game as 
much as I enjoyed programming it. Now 
Gwydion is prepared, the castle is before 
you. . . art thou ready? 

[Note: To run this program on the CoCo 



3, change POKE 65495, 0inLine80to POKE 
65497,0.] 

(Questions or comments about this 
program may be sent to the author at 325 
St. Pierre Ct.,Merritt Island, FL 32953. Be 
sure to send an SASE when requesting a 
reply.) □ 




450 
500 
580 
640 
700 
790 



232 
55 

236 

164 
32 

129 



123 830 113 



910 248 

960 205 

1040 194 

1100 239 

1 1 60 242 

1200 174 

END .140 



BY: KEITH SCHULER 



COPYRIGHT (CJ1989 



The Listing:ZHAGWHAR 

lp i **************************** 
* 

20 '* CASTLE ZHAGWHAR 

* 

* 

* 

50 f * 
* 

60 ! * FALSOFT INCORPORATED 
* 

70 ***************************** 
* 

80 POKE65495, 0:X=RND (-TIMER) : CLE 
AR150 : PCLEAR2 : PMODE1 , 1 : PCLS : DIMR 
R(ll,15) ,RL(11,15) ,ST(11,15) ,DU( 
11,15) ,F&(11,5) ,FL(40,8) ,BA(11, 6 
) ,MA(5) ,MB(5) ,MO$(5) ,BL(11,15) ,P 
A (10) ,PB(10) :CLS0:PRINT§192, " * 
* PLEASE WAIT ONE MOMENT ** 11 ; 
90 DRAW !, C3BM3,i4E2U2RF2ND2H2LU4L 
2G2NDE2R2DNR4U4C2U2R2D2C3BM28, 14 
H2U2LG2ND2E2RU4R2F2NDH2L2DNL4U4C 
2U2L2D2BM3 , 31C3U2E2F2ND2H2U4L2NG 
2R2R2NF2L2U2C2H2E2F2G2NU2" :GET(3 
1,0) -(20 ,15) ,RL,G:GET(0,0)-(11,1 
5) , RR, G : GET (0,16)-(11,31) ,ST,G 
ljSjS DRAW"C3BM1,47E4L2C2U2L2D2R2R 
2C3R4D2G2R4BM18,32D3G2H2NU3F2D4R 
2NE2L2L2NH2R2D2C2G2F2E2H2D2BM100 
, 100NR11R2U2NR4D4NR4 11 : GET (0,32)- 
(11,47) ,DU,G: GET (100, 98) -(111,10 
3),FB,G 

110 LA$="C3D24NR8U4NR8U4NR8U4NR8 
U4NR8U4R8NU4D20" : COLOR4 : LINE (0,0 
) - ( 40 , 6 ) , PSET , B : COLOR2 : LINE (0,2) 
- ( 40 , 4 ) , PSET , BF : FORT=0TO40STEP4 : 
PSET (T, 2, 4) :PSET(T+2,4,4) : NEXTT : 



GET(0,0)-(40,6) , FL, G 
120 DRAW"C3BM100,50U2R4ND4R2ND4R 
4D2" : GET (100, 48) -(111,54) ,BA,G:P 
CLS:M$ (1) = !, T803CDEFG n :M$ (2)="01T 
100FGFGABABCD" :M$ (3 ) ="01T3L4CP96 
CL3FL4P24C FAP 6 4 CFAP 6 4 CFAFA02 CO 1 A 
FCP64CP96CL3F' 1 :M$ (4) ="03T6CDEGP8 
DT5G ft 

130 DRAW ,f S 4 » S PCLS 3 : FORT=80TO8 2 : C 
IRCLE(T,60) ,18,2,1, .15, .65:CIRCL 
E(T+25,72) ,6,2,1, .15, . 70: NEXTT :D 
RAWBM80, 60C2NU14ND14BL3BD4NU11L 
2NU11NM-3 , +5R2U15E4R5NR5M+5 ,+4U2 
BM105 , 6 6NM-4 , -6M+6 , +4D5NM-6 , +4NF 
4RNF4U12L2ND12NE4L2NE4NH2UH2NL4D 
2L8" • 

140 DRAW"BM122,78NM+18,-19E2R4UN 
L4R4D2NR6D2R4E4NU4L2U4NM-3 , -2R2M 
-4,-2L6NL4U2L6NU4R2U6R2D2NL2U4NR 
4D2R8BE6BR8ND20G2ND18D2G2NR8G2NR 
10R4D12F4U2NH4NE2U2H4BU18BR14ND2 
2R2ND22NE4L2NE4NH2D22F4U2NH4E2BR 
20BD2G2L8UNR6H2R2ND2NL4NU16L2U16 
M+4 , -2NM+8 , +4 D2M+8 , +4M-10 , +8 " 
150 DRAW"BM30,90E4NM+6,+2D2M+6,+ 
2M+18,-2NM-10,+12NM-14,+12M-12,+ 
12BL8NG4NR16G2R16NE4L8NM-14,+12L 
2NM-12 , +12M-10 , +12NG2NM+18 , -2M+1 
8 , -4L2F2NM+4 , +4M+4 , +2E4BF4NR6F2R 
NU24R2U24NE2L2NH2R2D10E6NM+4 , +5D 
2M+4 , +5ND16R2D16NM-8 , +2U2M-8 , +4 " 
160 FORT=91T093 : CIRCLE (T, 111) ,6, 
2,1, .15, .70:NEXTT:DRAW"BM91,104N 
M-4 , -6M+6 , +4D5NM-6 , +4NF4RNF4U12L 
2ND12NE4L2NE4NH2UH2NL4D2L8BR24BU 
2ND10R2ND10NR8E2R6ND15F2ND17R2NE 
2R2NE2L4D17M+4 , +4L2NM-4 , -4R2D4G2 
NL2U2L13NG2E2NR10R2BU12M+6,+3BRl 
6U15M-2 , -4NM+2 , -4R2M+2 , +4D15 
170 DRAW"NM+6,+4L2M+8,+4E2U12NM- 
2 , -4R2NM-2 , -4D10NM+6 , +4L2M+8 , +4E 
2U12NM-2 , -4R2NM-2 , -4D10BR5BD2NR6 
F2RNU24R2U24NE2L2NH2R2D10E6NM+4, 
+5D2M+4 , +5ND16R2D16NM-8 , +2U2M-8 , 
+4" : FORT=190TO193 : CIRCLE (T, 111) , 
6,2,1, .15, .70: NEXTT 
180 DRAW n BM191,104NM-4,-6M+6,+4D 
5NM-6 , +4NF4RNF4U12L2ND12NE4L2NE4 
NH2UH2NL4D2L8BR2 6ND15NH4R2NH4D15 
NF4D2NL2U15M+6 , -5NF4ND2C1S8BM18 , 
4NR4D2R4D2NL4BR2U4R4D2NL4BD2BR2U 



42 



THE RAINBOW June 1989 



2E2F2NL4D2BR2NR4U4R4BR2NR4D2NR2D 

2R4BR2NR4U4R4BR2NR4D4R4NU4BR2U2E 

2 F2NL4 D2 BR2 R4U2 L4U2 R4 BR2 R4 L2 " 

190 DRAW"D4BU4BR6BD4R4U2L4U2R4BR 

2ND4R4D4NL4BR2U2NR2U2R4BR2R4L2D4 

BR4NU4R2NU2R2NU4BR2U2NR4E2F2D2BR 

2U4R4D2L4R2F2BR2NR4U2NR2U2R4BM83, 

,16ND4R4D2NL4U2BR2ND4R4D2L4R2F2B 

R2NR4U2NR2U2R4BR2NR4D2R4D2NL4BR2 

NR4U2NR2U2R4 BR2ND4F4U4BR2R4L2D4B 

R4R4U2L4U2R4" . , 

200 DRAW"BM3 6 , 150U4R3FGNL3FGNL3B 

R5U2NH2E2BR6D4U2R2NE2F2BR2NR4U2N 

R2U2R4BR2R4L2D4NL2R2 BR4U4NL2R2BR 

2D4U2R4NU2D2BR6R4U2L4U2R4BR2NR4D 

4R4BR2U4D2R4NU2D2BR2NU4R4U4BR2D4 

R4BR2NR4U2NR2U2R4BR2ND4R4D2L4R2F 

2BM90, 154GD2FBR2NR4U4R4BR2FD2GBR 

9U4BR2ND2R4D2NL4D2BR2 11 

210 DRAW M NR4U2NR4U2R4ND4BR2R4G2D 

2C4BM53 , 178ND4R4D2NL4U2BR2ND4R4D 

2L4R2F2BR2NR4U2NR2U2R4BR2NR4D2R4 

D2NL4BR2R4U2L4U2R4BR6BD4U2NR4E2F 

2D2BR2U4F4U4BR2F2NE2D2BR10U4D2R2 

NE2F2BR2NR4U2NR2U2R4 BR2F2NE2D2 11 : 

SCREEN1 , 1 

220 FORT=1TO2500:A$=INKEY$:IFA$= 
" "THENNEXTT 

230 SCREEN0 ,0 : DRAW'S 4 M : SC=0 : ST=2 

50 : S=1:WR=10 : Ll=63 : L2=102 : L3=14 3 

: L4=18 2 : FF=0 : WW=1 : FG=0 

240 IF(S=5 OR S=10)AND TI>1 THEN 

ST=250 

250 TR=0:ON S GOTO - 270 , 290, 310 , 3 
70,270,3 20,340, 3 20, 370,3 60,420 
2 60 PMODE1,1:PCLS:SCREEN0,0:FORT 
=6TO220STEP40 : PUT (T, 61) - (T+40, 67 
) , FL, PSET : PUT (T, 100) -(T+40, 106) , 
FL,PSET: PUT (T, 141) -(T+40, 147) , FL 
, PSET: PUT (T, 180) -(T+40, 18 6) ,FL,P 
SET : NEXTT : COLOR2 : LINE (0 , 0 ) - ( 255 , 
20) , PSET, B: PAINT (10 ,10) ,3,2:RETU 
RN 

270 GOSUB2 60 :F0RT=1T03 :READLX f LY 

: DRAW"BM"+STR$ (LX) + " , "+STR$ (LY) + 

LA $ : NEXTT : DATA 2 30, 139, 10, 98, 210, 

58, 60, 139,8,98, 62,58,30, 139,90,1 

39,190,139,234,99,148,99,10,58,2 

00,139,10,98,210,58 

280 LINE(118,30)-(131,160) , PRESE 

T,BF:GOTO510 

290 GOSUB260:FORT=1TO3: READLX, LY 
: DRAW M BM M +STR$ (LX) +" , "+STR$ (LY) + 
LA$ : DRAW"BM"+STR$ (LX+170) +" , "+ST 
R$(LY)+LA$: NEXTT 

300 LINE(82, 70)-(166, 190) , PRESET 
,BF:GOTO510 

310 GOSUB260:LINE(61,98)-(72,147 
) , PRESET, BF: LINE (4 6, 179) -(84,191 
) , PRESET , BF : LINE ( 110 , 13 9 ) - ( 140 , 1 



47), PRESET , BF : F0RT=1T06 : READLX , L 
Y:DRAW"BM"+STR$ (LX) +" , "+STR$ (LY) 
+LA$ : NEXTT : LINE (169,99)- (200, 110 
) , PRESET, BF:GOTO510 
320 GOSUB2 60:COLOR2:LINE(42,141) 

- (207 , 141) , PSET : COLOR1 : LINE (45 , 1 
74) -(59, 191) ,PSET,BF:LINE(90,174 
) -(98,191) , PSET, BF:LINE (106, 174) 
-(118, 191) , PSET, BF: LINE (170, 174) 
-(158,191) , PSET, BF: LINE (192, 174) 
-(206,191) ,PSET,BF:LINE(55,136) - 
(195,147) , PSET, BF 

330 LINE(195, 107)-(115, 100) , PSET 
,BF: LINE (50, 58) -(70,68) ,PSET,BF: 
FOR T=1T05 : READLX, LY: DRAW" BM f, +ST 
R$ (LX)+" , " + STR$ (LY)+LA$: NEXTT: GO 
TO510:DATA2 30,13 9,10,98,3 8,58,23 
0,58,74,58 

340 GOSUB2 60:COLOR1:LINE(40,175) 
-(255,191) , PSET, BF: LINE (45, 134) - 
(59,151) , PSET, BF: LINE (90, 134) -(9 
8,151) , PSET, BF: LINE (106, 134) -(11 
8, 151) , PSET, BF: LINE (170, 134) -(15 
8,151) , PSET, BF: LINE (192, 134) -(20 
6, 151) , PSET, BF: LINE (70, 54) -(200, 
70) ,PSET,BF 

350 LINE (135, 90) -(200,120) , PSET, 
BF : DRAW" C2BM2 45 , 100L12 " : FORT=lTO 
3 : READLX, LY: DRAW" BM"+STR$ (LX) +" , 

"+STR$ ( LY) +LA$ : NEXTT : GOTO510 : DAT 

A205, 58, 220,98, 10, 139 ,230,139,10 

,98,38,58,230,58,74,58 

360 GOSUB2 60:COLOR1:LINE(135,58) 

- ( 195 , 191) , PSET , BFt LINE ( 65 , 53) - ( 
79 , 160) , PSET, BF : DRAW"C3BM37 , 180R 
14BM65, 180R14BM88, 180R14C2BM215, 
180R14 " : F0RT=1T03 : READLX , LY : DRAW 
"BM"+STR$ ( LX) +" , "+STR$ (LY) +LA$ :N 
EXTT : GOT05 10 : DATA12 ,99,121,58,12 
1,139 

370 PCLS1:DRAW"S8BM70,90C3NR3D4R 
3EHNL3EHBR3NR4D4R4NU4BR2U4F4U4BR 
2D4R4U4BR2NR4D2R4D2NL4BR6U4R4D2L 
4R2F2BR2NR4U4R4D4BR2NR4U4R4D4BR2 
U4F2E2D4BR2BU4D2BD2RC1D" : F0RT=1T 
065STEP4 : COLOR2 t LINE (T , T) - ( 256-T 
,192-T) ,PSET,B:COLOR4 
380 LINE(T+2,T+2)-(256-(T-2) ,192 
-(T-2) ) , PSET, B: NEXTT: SCREEN1,0:P 
LAY"T4L4V3103L16. ; 1 ; L32 ; 1 ; L16 • ;1 
;L32;1;L16. ; 1 ;L32 ; 1 ;L16 . ;1.;L32;5 
;L16. ;8;L32;5;L16, ; 8 ;L3 2 ; 5 ;L16 . ; 
8 ; L3 2 ; 5 ; L4 ; 1 " : FORT= 1TO50 0 : NEXTT : 
LF=ST : TI=8 2 : GOSUB2 6 0 
390 DRAW"S4":COLOR4:LINE(0,24)-( 
80 , 24 ) , PSET : COLOR1 : LINE ( 100 , 139) 
-(130,147), PSET , BF : LINE (45,179)- 
(80, 191) , PSET, BF: LINE (148, 90) -(2 
00,147) , PSET, BF:DRAW"BM11, 139 fl +L 
A$ 2 DRAW"BM13 6,139"+LA$: DRAW"BM8 6 



June 1989 THE RAINBOW 43 



, 13 9 "+LA$ : DRAW" BM13 6 , 9 9 "+LA$ : DRA 
W ,, BM204,99"+LA$ 

400 LINE (0,99)-(70,106) , PRESET, B 
F : DRAW" BM2 3 6,59" +LA$ : DRAW" BM7 4 , 5 
9"+LA$ 

410 GOTO 510 

420 GOSUB260:LINE (0,22) -(255,191 

) , PRESET, BF:DRAW I, S8C2BM3 6, 34NR4D 

4R4BR2NR4U4R4D4BR2U4F4U4BR2BD4R4 

U2NL2D2L4U4R4BR2ND4R4D2L4R2F2BR2 

U2NR4E2F2D2BR4U4NL2R2BR2D4R4U4BR 

2D4R4BR2U2NR4E2F2D2BR4U4NL2R2 BR2 

R4L2D4NL2R2BR2NR4U4R4D4BR2U4F4U4 

BR2BD4R4U2L4U2R4BR2D2BD2UC1R" 

430 GOSUB660:PLAY"O2T5V31L1GCL2E 

GL3 . AL4EL1A03 CL2 D02 G03 L1C" : DRAW" 

C4S8BM20 , 65R4L2D4BR4U4D2R4NU2D2B 

R2NR4U2NR2U2R4BR6D4R2NU2R2U4BR2R 

4L2D4NL2R2BR2NR4E4NL4BR2BD4U2NR4 

E2F2D2BR2U4R4D2L4R2F2BR2U4R3FD2G 

NL3BR7U4D2R4U2D4BR2U2NR4E2F2D2BR 

2R4U2L4U2R4BR6D4R3EHNL3EH 

440 DRAW"NL3BR3NR4D2NR2D2R4BR2NR 

4U2NR2U2R4BR2ND4F4U4BM0,80NR4D2R 

4D2NL4 BR2NU4R4U4BR2NR4D4R4BR2NR4 

U4R4BR2NR4D2NR2D2R4BR2R4U2L4U2R4 

BR2NR4D2R4D2NL4BR2U2NR2U2R4BR2D4 

R4U4BR2D4R4BR2NU4R4BR3U2NH2E2BR5 

D4R3EU2HNL3BR3NR4D2NR2D2R4BR2R4U 

2L4U2R4BR2R4L2D4BR4U4R4D2L4 " 

450 DRAW"R2F2BR2NR4U4R4D4BR4U2NH 

2E2BR2NR4D2NR2D2R4BR2NU4R3EU2HNL 

3C3":PLAY"02AL203C02AGAB03C02F#A 

03 DCL4 02 BP4 L2 GFD " : DRAWBM4 /110U2 

NR4E2F2D2BR2U4F4U4BR2NR3D4R3EU2N 

HBUBR6F2NE2D2BR4NR4U4R4D4BR2NU4R 

4U4BR6NR4D2R4D2NL4 " 

460 DRAW"BR2U2NR4E2F2D2BR2U2NR2U 

2 R4 BR2 NR4 D 2 NR2 D2R4BR2BU4D4R4 BR4 U 

2NH2E2BR4NR4D2NR2D2R4BR2R4U2L4U2 

R4BR2NR4D4R4BR2U2NR4E2F2D2BR2U4R 

4D2NL4U2BR2NR4D2NR2D2R4BR2NU4R3E 

U2HL3BM38 , 118NR4D4R4BR2U2NR4E2F2 

D2BR2R4U2 L4U2R4 BR2R4 L2 D4 BR4NU4R4 

BR2NR4U2NR2U2R4BR6" 

470 DRAW"R4G4R4BR2U4D2R4NU2D2BR2 

U2NR4E2F2D2BR2R4U2NL2D2L4U4R4BR2 

D4R2NU2R2U4BR2D4U2R4NU2D2BR2U2NR 

4E2F2D2BR2U4R4D2L4R2F2" :PLAY"03L 

1CL2EGL3AP4EL1A04L1CL2D03G04L1C" 

: DRAW"C4BM34 , 140D4R4BR2R4L2U4NL2 

R2BR2R4L2D4BR4U4D2R4NU2D2BR2U2NR 

4E2F2D2BR2U4F4U4BR2BD4U2NR4E2 

480 DRAW"F2D2BR6R4L2U4NL2R2BR2NR 

4D2R4D2NL4BR6R4U2L4U2R4BR2BD4U2N 

R4E2F2D2BR2 BU4D2F2E2U2BR2NR4D2NR 

2D2R4BR2NU4R3EU2HL3BR6D4UC1R" : CO 

L0R3 : LINE (34 , 152) - (218 , 152 ) ,PSET 

:PLAY"03AL204C03AGAB04CL4EP8L8GL 

4F#G04DP803L8GL4F#GL104CCC" 

490 DRAW"C2BM85,170R4L2D4BR4U4D2 



R4NU2D2BR2NR4U2NR2U2R4BR6NR4D2NR 
2D2R4BR2U4F4U4BR2NR3D4R3EU2 " 
500 FORT=1TO6000:IF INKEY$=" " TH 
EN NEXT T : CLS : END ELSE CLS : END 
510 PN=2:TR=0:ON S GOSUB 530,540 
,550,590,530,560,580,560,590,570 
:PB$="S2C3NR10U2L2NR14U2L2NR18U2 
L2NR22U2NR2 2U2NR22U2NR22U2NR22BU 
2BR2C2R18L2U2L14R2U2R10" : F0RT=1T 
0 PN:DRAW"BM"+STR$ (PA(T) )+", "+ST 
R$(PB(T) )+PB$:NEXTT 
520 GOTO 600 

530 TN(1)=0:TN(2)=0:TN(3)=0:PA(1 
) =100 : PB ( 1 ) =179 : PA ( 2 ) =190 : PB ( 2 ) = 
99 : X=10 : Y=164 : KA=20 : KB=53 : LA=235 
: LB=4 3 : RETURN 

540 PA(1) =40:PB(1) =99: PA (2) =184: 

PB (2 ) =99 : X=10 : Y=164 : KA=128 : KB=53 

:LA=l90:LB=163 : RETURN 

550 PA(1)=50:PB(1)=139:PA(2)=128 

: PB ( 2 ) =99 : X=10 : Y=164 : KA=210 : KB=9 

3 : LA=2 3 5 : LB=4 3 : RETURN 

560 RA=45:RB=124:PA(1)=100:PB(1) 

=99:PA(2)=10:PB(2)=59:X=10: Y=164 

: KA=140 : KB=53 : LA=198 : LB=83 : RE TUR 

N 

570 PA(1)=238:PB(1)=99:PA(2)=238 

: PB (2 ) =13 9 : X=10 : Y=4 4 : LA =7 : LB=164 

: KB=5 3 : KA=2 3 5 : WY=Y : RETURN 

580 PA(1)=238:PB(1)=99:PA(2)=238 

: PB ( 2 ) =13 9 : X=3 5 : Y=164 : KA=50 : KB =5 

3 : LA=2 3 5 : LB=4 3 : RA=12 : RB=44 : RETUR 

N 

590 PN=10:PA(1)=58:PB(1)=139:PA( 
2)=220:PB(2)=139:PA(3)=238:PB(3) 
=179 : PA (4) =220: PB (4) =99 : PA (5) =19 
8:PB(5)=179:PA(6)=12:PB(6)=59:PA 
(7)=42:PB(7)=59:PA(8)=102:PB(8)= 
99:PA(9)=108:PB(9)=59:PA(10)=190 
:PB(10)=59:X=34 :Y=164:LA=232:LB= 
123 : KA=115 : KB=17 3 : RETURN 
600 DRAW"S4BM"+STR$ (KA) +" , "+STR$ 
(KB) +"C2D4L2U2NU2R8D2" : DRAW"BM"+ 
STR$ (LA) +" , "+STR$ (LB) +"C3BD2ND13 
E2R7F2D13L9 " : PAINT (LA+2 , LB+2 ) , 3 , 
3 : DRAW"BM"+STR$ (LA+2 ) +" , "+STR$ (L 
B+8)+"ClR2C3D":RN=0:BN=0:ON S GO 
TO 660,610,620,660,620,660,640,6 
20,660,630 

610 BN=2:BX(1)=10:BY(1)=44:BD(1) 
=1:BX(2)=230:BY(2)=44:BD(2)=0:GO 
TO650 

620 BN=2:BX(1)=10:BY(1)=124:BD(1 
) =0 : BX ( 2 ) = 100 : BY ( 2 ) =4 4 : BD ( 2 ) =0 : 1 
F S=4 THEN BX(1)=31:GOTO650 ELSE 
IF S=7 THEN BY(1)=84:GOTO650 ELS 
E GOTO650 . 

630 BN=4:BX(1)=70:BY(1)=84:BD(1) 
=1:BX(2)=120:BY(2)=44:BD(2)=0:BX 
(3)=100:BY(3)=124:BD(3)=1:BX(4)= 
100 : BY ( 4 ) =164 : BD ( 4 ) =1 : GOTO650 



44 THE RAINBOW June 1989 



640 BN=2:BX(1)=120:BY(1)=44:BD(1 
)=0:BX(2)=100:BY(2)=124 :BD(2)=1: 
GOTO 6 5 j3 

650 IFBN>j3THENFORT=lTOBN : PUT (BX ( 
T) , BY (T) ) - (BX(T) +11, BY (T) +6) , BA, 
PSET:NEXTT 

660 DRAW ,, BM6 / 6C1S8NR4D2R4D2NL4BR 

2NR4U4R4BR2ND4R4D4NL4BR2U4R4D2L4 

R2F2BR2NR4U2NR2U2R4BR2BDRBD2LRC3 

U3BR40C1D4R4 BR2R4L2U4NL2R2BR2NR4 

D2NR2D2BR6NR4U2NR2U2R4BR2BDRBD2L 

RC3U4 " : SCREEN 1 , 0 : FORT=2 0 0TOST : DR 

AW"BM M +STR$ (T) +" , 13C1S4NU4" : PLAY 

"T255L25503A" : PLAY"T4L4 " 

670 NEXTT:IFS=1THENDRAW"C2S8BM73 

,30NR4D4R4U2NL2D2BR2U4R4D4NL4BR2 

NR4U4R4D4BR2RU4NLR2FD2GNL2BR7NU4 

R4BR2NU4R4NU4BR2NR4U4R4BR2D4U2R2 

NE2F2BR3UBUU2D3C1R" : PLAY M O2L4T20 

CP10DP10EP10P10CP10DP10EP10P10CP 

10DP10EP10P10T2GG" : FORT=1TO1000 : 

NEXTT 

680 IFS=1 THEN LINE (73 , 30) - (200 , 
40) , PRESET, BF 

690 PO=0:KC=0:GOSUB1180:IF S=11T 

HEN RETURN ELSETIMER=0 

700 A=JOYSTK(0) :B=JOYSTK(l) :IFA> 

10ANDA<53 AND B>10ANDB<53 AND PO 

=^AND PEEK(65280)<>126 AND PEEK( 

65280)0256 THEN750 

710 IF PEEK(65280)=254 OR PEEK(6 

5280) =126 THEN780 ELSE 720 

720 IFA<5 ANDX>7THENX=X-9:ST=ST- 

• 2 : GOSUB1220 : PUT (X+9 , Y) - (X+20 , Y+ 

15) , BL,PSET:PUT (X, Y) - (X+ll, Y+15) 

, RL , PSET : P0=1 : G0T08 4 0 

730 IFA<10 ANDX>2 THENX=X-4 : PUT ( 

X+4 , Y) - (X+15 , Y+15 ) , BL, PSET : PUT (X 

, Y) - (X+ll , Y+15 ) , RL , PSET : P0=1 : GOT 

0840 

740 IFA>10ANDB>10ANDA<53ANDB<53T 
HENPUT (X , Y) - (X+ll , Y+15 ) , ST , PSET : 
PO=0:GOTO8 40 

750 IFA>58 AND X<233AND S04THEN 
X=X+9 : ST=ST- . 2 : GOSUB1220 : PUT (X- 
10, Y) - (X+5 , Y+15 ) , BL, PSET: PUT (X, Y 
)- (X+ll, Y+15) ,RR,PSET:PO=2:GOT08 
40 

760 IFA>53 ANDX<253-15THENX=X+4: 
PUT(X-4,Y) -(X+ll, Y+15) ,BL,PSET:P 
UT(X,Y)- (X+ll, Y+15) ,RR,PSET:P0=2 
:GOTO840 
770 GOTO810 

780 IF A<10 OR A>53 THEN 790 ELS 
EPUT(X,Y) -(X+ll, Y+15) ,BL,PSET:PU 
T(X, Y-15) - (X+ll, Y) ,ST,PSET:ST=ST 
-1 : GOSUB12 20 : PLAY"T2 5503 ; 12 ; 1" : P 
UT(X,Y-15) -(X+11,Y) ,BL,PSET:PUT( 
X,Y) -(X+ll, Y+15) ,ST,PSET:IFS=4 0 
RS=9 THENST=ST+1:GOTO8 40 ELSEGOT 
0840 



790 IFA<10 THEN800ELSEIFX>217THE 
N860 ELSEPUT(X,Y) -(X+ll, Y+15) ,BL 
, PSET: PUT (X+15, Y-15 ) -(X+26, Y) ,RR 
, PSET : ST=ST-1 : G0SUB12 20 : PLAY"T25 
503;12;1":PUT(X+13,Y-15) -(X+24,Y 
) , BL, PSET : X=X+2 5 : PUT (X , Y) - ( X+ll , 
Y+15) ,RR, PSET: IFS=4 0RS=9 THENST 
=ST+1:GOTO840ELSE840 
800 IFX<29THEN 860 ELSEPUT (X, Y) - 
(X+ll , Y+15 ) , BL , PSET : PUT (X-2 6 , Y-l 
5 ) - (X-15 , Y) , RL , PSET : ST=ST-1 : GOSU 
B1220:PLAY"T255O3 ;12 ; 1" : PUT (X-26 
, Y-15) -(X-15, Y) ,BL,PSET:X=X-25:P 
UT (X , Y) - (X+ll , Y+15 ) , RL, PSET : IFS= 
4 OR S=9 THEN ST=ST+1 : GOTO8 40 EL 
SE840 

810 IFB<10 AND PPOINT(X+5,Y-2)=3 
THEN PUTfX/YJ-fX+ll/Y+lS) ,BL,PS 
ET:Y=Y-40:PUT(X,Y) -(X+ll, Y+15) ,S 
T,PSET:GOTO840 

820 IFB>53 AND PPOINT (X+5 , Y+19 ) = 
3 THEN PUT(X,Y) -(X+ll, Y+15) ,BL, PS 
ET:Y=Y+40:PUT(X,Y) -(X+ll, Y+15) ,S 
T,PSET:GOTO8 40 

830 IFB>53 THEN PUT (X, Y) - (X+ll , Y 
+15) ,BL,PSET:PUT(X,Y) -(X+ll, Y+15 
) ,DU, PSET: P0=3 :GOTO 840 
840 IFST<243ANDRND(17+INT(L*1.5) 



REVIEWED: 
JAN 1989 



MJK & MJK3 DOS 
WHY BUY ADOS 3 
WHEN YOU CAN HAVE THIS! 



REVIEWED 
JAN 1989 

RAINBOW 

umnfiuitem 
IMl 



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PHILA., PA. 19120-3929 
PH0NE= 215-457-1809 VOICE 
BBS PH0NE= 215-457-7478 (300/1200) (8,N,1) 
COMPUSERVE ID 72317,437 (LEAVE PHONE #) 
DELPHI ID= COCOCONNECT 



June 1989 THE RAINBOW 45 



)=1 THEN DRAW"BM"+STR$(X+12)+"," 
+STR$ (Y+15)+"C4NU6R2NU10R2U6":PL 
AYM$ (4) : DRAW"C1D6L2NU10L2U6" : ST= 
ST+INT ( 7/S ) : FORT=200TOST : DRAW" BM 
"+STR$ (T) +»• , 13NU4 11 : NEXTT 
850 IF S=4 0RS=9 THEN TI=TI-1:PS 
ET (TI ,24,1) : IF TK1 THEN TI=1 

8 60 FOR T=1T0 PN: IF ( Y=PB (T) 

D X=>PA(T)-3)AND(Y=PB(T)-15AND X 
=<PA(T)+7)THEN 870 ELSE NEXTT : GO 
TO890 

870 TR=TR+1:DRAW"BM"+STR$(PA(T) ) 
+" , "+STR$ (PB (T) ) +"S2C1NR10H2NR14 
H2NR18H2NR22U2NR22U2NR22U2NR22BE 
2R18H2L14E2R10":DRAW"BM"+STR$(PA 
(T) ) + " , "+STR$ (PB(T) -2)+"S4C2U6BR 
4D6R4U6NL4BR4D6R4U6L4 " : PLAYM$ (1) 
: PA (T) =0 : PB (T) =0 : SC=SC+100 : DRAW" 

C1R4D6L4U6L4NR4D6L4U6BL4D6" 

880 GOSUB1180:GOTO700 

890 IF Y+15=KB+6AND X=>KA-3AND Y 

+15=KB+6 AND X<=KA+7THEN 900ELSE 

910 

900 KC=1:LINE(KA-2,KB) -(KA+12,KB 
+6) , PRESET ,BF: DRAW" C2BM"+STR$ (KA 
) + " , "+STR$ (KB) +"NR6F6NL6BR4U6R4D 
6NL4":PLAYM$ (1) : DRAW"C1NR4U6L4D6 
L4NL10H6R6 " : KA=0 : KB=0 : SC=SC+50 : G 
OSUB1180 : DRAW"C2BM136 , 4R4D2G2H2N 
U2F2D8NL2U2NL2 " : GOTO700 
910 IFPPOINT(X+5,Y+19)=l AND Y<1 
60 THEN FORY=Y TO Y+40 STEP4:PUT 
(X,Y-8) -(X+ll,Y+7) ,BL,PSET:PUT(X 
,Y) -(X+ll, Y+15) / ST / PSET:PLAY"T25 
502 C" : NEXTY : PUT ( X , Y-8 ) - ( X+ll , Y+7 
) , BL, PSET : Y=Y-4 : PUT (X , Y) - (X+ll , Y 
+15 ) , DU , PSET : FA=1 : ST=ST-10 : G0T09 

10 

920 IF S03999 AND SC<4351 THEN 
FG=1 

930 A$=INKEY$:IF FG=1AND A$=" "T 
HENPLAYM$(4) :PLAYM$(1) :FG=0 ELSE 
GOTO 9 50 

940 FORT=1TO20:SCREEN1 / 1:PLAY"L2 
55T255O3A":SCREEN1 / 0:NEXTT:RESTO 
RE : F0RT=1T015 : READLX , LY : NEXTT : S= 
6 : ST=250 : PCLS1 : FORT=1TO20 : SCREEN 
1,1: PLAY" A" : SCREEN 1 , 0 : NEXTT : PLAY 
"L4T4":GOTO240 

9 50 IFFA=1 ANDPPOINT(X+5,Y+19)<> 
1THEN FA=0 : PLAY M$ ( 2 ) : GOSUB1220 : 
GOTO700 

960 IFPP0INT(X+5 / Y+19)=l AND Y>1 
60 THEN ST=200:FORT=Y TO200 STEP 
4:PUT(X / T-4)-(X+ll / T+ll) f BL f PSET 
: PUT (X,T) -(X+ll, T+15) ,ST,PSET:NE 
XTT : PUT (X , T-4 ) - (X+ll , T+ll) , BL # PS 
ET : GOSUB1220 : GOTO700 
970 IFX=>LA AND Y= LB+ 1 ANDX=< LA+ 1 1 
ANDKC=1THENPLAYM$ (4) :SC=SC+350:G 
OSUB1180 : DRAW"S4" : S=S+1 : F0RAA=1T 



O500:NEXTAA: IFST<245THENST=ST+5: 
GOTO240 ELSE2'40 

980 IF(S=6ANDX>195ANDX<201AND Y= 
124) OR(S=7ANDX>23 3ANDX<246AND Y 
=34) OR(S=8ANDX>195ANDX<201AND Y 
=124) THEN 990 ELSE 1000 
990 F0RT=Y+15 TO Y STEP-2 : PUT (X, 
Y)-(X+11,T) / ST,PSET:PUT(RA / RB)-( 
RA+11,RB+15) , ST , PRESET: PUT (RA,RB 
) -(RA+ll/RB+15) / ST,PSET:PLAY"L25 
5T25502A" : NEXTT : LINE (X, Y) -(X+ll, 
Y+15) , PRESET, BF:X=RA: Y=RB:PLAY"L 
4T4" 

1000 IFSOWR OR WW=0THEN 1020 EL 
SEIF RND(3)<>1 THEN 1020 ELSE R= 
RND(4) : RR=RND ( 115) +5 : IFR=1 THEN 
RA=L1 ELSEIFR=2 THEN RA=L2 ELSEI 
FR=3 THEN RA=L3 ELSEIF R=4 THENR 
A=L4 ELSE1000 

1010 CIRCLE (RR,RA) ,5,1: PAINT (RR, 
RA) ,1,1 

1020 IF S=WR AND WW=1 AND FF=0 
THEN FF=1:PUT(218,WY) -(229,WY+15 
) , RL , PS ET : C0L0R2 : LINE ( 2 3 1 , WY ) - ( 2 
31,WY+15) ,PSET:FX=210:FY=Y+9 
1030 IF S=WR AND FF=1 THEN PUT(F 
X, FY) - ( FX+11 , FY+5 ) , BL, PSET : FX=FX 
-8: IF FX<=12 THEN FF=0 ELSEPUT (F 
X, FY) -(FX+11, FY+5) ,FB,PSET 
1040 IF S=WR AND FF=1 AND Y=FY-9 
AND X>=FX-4 AND X+1K=FX+15 THE 
N PLAY"T255L25501FGT4L4 " : ST=ST-1 
2 : G0SUB12 2 0 : PUT ( FX , FY) - ( FX+11 , FY 
+5) ,BL,PSET:FF=0 

1050 IF S=WR AND WW=1 AND RND (6) 
=1 THEN ST=ST-RND(3) :SCREEN1,1:P 
LAY"05T2 55L255GL4T4 " : SCREEN 1 , 0 : G 
OSUB1220 

1060 IFWW=1 AND S=WR THEN PUT (21 
8 , WY ) - ( 2 2 9 , WY+ 1 5 ) , BL , PS ET : LINE ( 2 
16 , WY ) - ( 2 16 , WY+15 ) , PRESET : LINE ( 2 
31, WY) -(231,WY+15) , PRESET 
1070 IFWW=1 AND S=WR THEN PUT (21 
8 , Y) - ( 2 2 9 , Y+15 ) , ST , PSET : C0L0R2 : L 
INE(216,Y) -(216, Y+15) ,PSET:WY=Y 
1080 IFSOWR ORYO164THEN1100 EL 
SEIFX>53 ANDX=<74 THEN1090 ELSE 
IFX>=30 ANDX<=45 THEN1090 ELSE I 
FX=>84 ANDX=<100 THEN1090 ELSE 1 
100 

1090 ST=200 : F0RT=1T015 : PUT (X, Y) - 
(X+ll , Y+15 ) , ST , PRESET : PLAY"L255T 
25504D" :PUT (X, Y) - (X+ll, Y+15) ,RL, 
PRESET : PLAY"E" : PUT (X, Y) -(X+ll, Y+ 
15) ,RR, PRESET: PLAY"F": PUT (X, Y) -( 
X+ll , Y+15 ), BL, PSET : NEXTT: PLAY "T4 
L4":GOSUB1220 

1100 IFY=164 ANDWW=1 AND S=WR TH 
EN 1110 ELSE1130 

1110 F0RT=1T07:PUT(218,Y)-(229,Y 
+15) ,BL,PSET:PUT(66,Y) -(77, Y+15) 



46 THE RAINBOW June 1989 



, ST, PRESET: PUT ( 66, Y) -(77,7+15) ,B 
L , PSET : PLAY »■ L2 5 5T2 5 502 A" : NEXTT : P 
LAY"L4T4 " : F0RT=1T015 : PUT ( 6 6 , Y) - ( 
77 , Y+15 ) , ST , PRESET : PUT ( 6 6 , Y ) - ( 7 7 
,Y+15) ,RL, PRESET: PUT ( 66, Y) -(77,Y 
+15) ,RR, PRESET 

1120 PUT(66, Y)-(77, Y+15) ,BL, PSET 
:PLAY"L255T25504DEF M : NEXTT :WW=j3: 
PLAY"L4T4 11 : C0L0R4 : LINE ( 132 , 63 ) - ( 
195,61) , PSET, B: LINE (13 2, 1J33) -(19 
5,101) , PSET, B: LINE (132, 143) -(195 
,141) , PSET , B: LINE (216 , Y) - (216 , Y+ 
15) , PRESET 

1130 TM=4100-S*85:IFTIMER>TM AND 
WW=1 ANDS04 AND S<>9 THENG0SUB1 
290 

1140 IFBN=0THEN700 ELSEFOR T=l T 
OBN:IF X<BX(T)+13 AND X+13>BX(T) 

AND POO 3 AND Y=BY (T) THEN ST=S 
T-5 : PLAY"T2 5504A M : GOSUB1220 : NEXT 
T:GOTO1150 ELSE NEXTT : GOTO1150 
1150 FORT^ITO BN: IFBD (T) =1THENBX 

(T)=BX(T)+4:PUT(BX(T) -4,BY(T) )-( 
BX (T) +7 , BY (T) +6) , BL , PSET : G0T0116 
0ELSE BX(T)=BX(T)-4:PUT(BX(T)+11 

, BY (T) ) - (BX (T) +2 6 , BY (T) +6 ) ,BL,PS 
ET 

1160 PUT ( BX (T) , BY (T) ) - (BX (T) +11 , 
BY(T)+6) ,BA,PSET:IFBD(T)=0 THEN1 
170 ELSEIFPP0INT(BX(T)+13,BY(T)+ 
6)Ol 0RBX(T)>=242 THENBD (T) =0 : P 
UT(BX(T) , BY (T) ) - (BX (T) +11 , BY (T) + 
6) ,BL,PSET:BX(T) =BX(T) -11: NEXTT: 
G0T07 00ELSENEXTT : GOTO700 
1170 IF PPOINT(BX(T)-2,BY(T)+6)< 
>1 OR BX(T)<=5 THEN BD(T)=1:PUT( 
BX(T) ,BY(T) )-(BX(T)+ll,BY(T)+6) , 
BL, PSET : BX (T) =BX (T) +11 : NEXTT : GOT 
0700 ELSENEXTT : GOTO700 
1180 SC$=STR$(SC) :TT=LEN(SC$) : CO 
L0R3 : LINE (70 , 3 ) - ( 130 , 17) , PSET, BF 
: DRAW ,f S8BM70 , 6C1" : F0RT=1T0TT : C$= 
MID$(SC$,T,1) 

1190 IFC$ = !I 0 M THENDRAW"R4D4L4NU4B 
E4BR2 "ELSEIFC$= ,l l ,, THENDRAW ,f BR2D4 
BR4BU4 n ELSEIFC$= n 2 "THENDRAW M R4D2 
L4D2R4BU4 BR2 "ELSEIFC$= lf 3 "THENDRA 
W l, R4D2NL2D2NL4BU4BR2 !l ELSEIFC$= ,t 4 
H THENDRAW ,f D2R3NU2NRD2BR3BU4 "ELSE 
IFC$= M 5 M THENDRAW f, NR4D2R4D2NL4BU4 
BR2 11 

1200 IFC$= ,, 6 ,, THENDRAW ff NR4D4R4U2N 
L4 BU 2 BR2 " ELS E I FC $= " 7 " THENDRAW" R4 
G2D2BR4BU4 ,, ELSEIFC$ = II 8 ,, THENDRAW M 
R4D4L4U2NU2R4U2BR2 "ELSEIFC$="9 "T 
HENDRAW fI R4D4NL4U2L4U2BR6" 
1210 NEXTT : DRAW " S4 ": RETURN 
1220 C0L0R3 :IFST<200 THEN ST=*200 
1230 LINE(250,2) -(ST, 16) ,PSET,BF 
•IF ST=200 THEN 1240 ELSE RETURN 
1240 PUT(X,Y) -(X+11,Y+15) /BL,PSE 



T: DRAW" C2BM"+STR$ (X) +" , "+STR$ (Y- 
4)+"BR6D2NR2NL2D6R6NR2NU2ND2L12N 
L2NU2ND2R6D10NL2NR2 " : PLAYM$ ( 3 ) 
1250 DRAW"S8BM75,30NR4D4R4U2L2BU 
2BR4BR2G2D2U2R4NH2D2BR2U4F2E2D4B 
R2NR4U2NR2U2R4BR6ND4R4D4NL4BR2BR 
2H2NU2F2E2U2BR2NR4D2NR2D2R4 BR2U4 
R4D2L4R2F2 " : A$=INKEY$ : IFA$=" "THE 
N12 60 ELSESCREEN0,0:PMODE1,1:PCL 
S : RESTORE : G0T02 3 0 

1260 DRAW"S8C2BM53 , 70NR4D4U2R4U2 
BR2NR4D4U2R4NU2L2F2BR2NR4U2NR2U2 
R4BR2NR4D2R4D2NL4BR2R4U2L4U2R4BR 
6BD2ND2NR4E2F2D2BR2U4F4U4BR2F2NE 
2D2BR10U4D2R2NE2F2BR2NR4U2NR2U2R 
4BR2F2NE2D2 " : A$=INKEY$ : IFA$=" "TH 
EN1270ELSESCREEN0 ,0 : PM0DE1 , 1 : PCL 
S : RESTORE : GOTO 230 

1270 DRAW"S8C2BM55,110R4L2D4BR4U 
4R4D4NL4BR6U4R4D2NL4U2BR2D4R4BR2 
BU4BD2ND2NR4E2F2D2BR4U2NH2E2BR6B 
D2ND2NR4E2F2D2BR2R4U2NL2D2L4U4R4 
BR2 BD2 ND 2 NR4 E2F2D2 BR2 R4 L2U4NL2 R2 
BR2ND4F4U4 " : A$=INKEY$ : IFA$=" "THE 
NDRAW"C"+STR$ (RND(3)+1) :GOTO1250 
1280 SCREEN0,0:PMODE1,1:PCLS:RES 
TORE:GOTO230 

1290 ST=ST-2 :GOSUB1220:PLAY"T255 
L25503GL4T4 11 : RETURN 



c©Q 3~ [D? "(^^"moI^o thana RarndTskTl 

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June 1989 THE RAINBOW 47 



F e atur e 



CoCo 3 





Five optical illusions to display on 
your CoCo3 monitor 



Now You See 





Now You Don't 





By Jean-Francois Morin 






After reading an article about 
optical illusions, I decided to try 
to draw some examples of them 
on my computer. I first drew the CoCo 
3 screen on a sheet of ruled paper, and 
then I traced the illusions on that 
"screen/' After drawing the pictures, I 
built them into one program. I have 
written some explanations in the pro- 
gram to make some illusions easier to 
Understand. 

The first illusion is a paradoxical 
picture with three branches at the left 
end and two at the right end. Try to see 
where the middle branch disappears. 

In the second illusion, there are 16 
black squares on a large white square. 
Watch the picture carefully and you 
should see gray dots at the white inter- 
sections between the black squares. 

The third illusion contains two iden- 
tical circles that are surrounded by 

Jean- Francois Morin is a 16-year-old 
beginning programmer who also enjoys 
swimming, reading books and biking. 
He uses his CoCo 3 for playing games, 
word processing, and making music and 
graphics. 



smaller and larger circles. If you look 
carefully at the two center circles, the 
left one should appear smaller than the 
right one. 

The fourth illusion is another para- 
doxical picture. It is a 3-D triangle that 
is impossible to build with wood or 
metal. 

The last illusion is made of horizon- 
tal, vertical and diagonal lines that don't 
seem to be parallel at all, but they are! 

For the "Press a key" that appears on 
each screen, I used the HPRINT com- 
mand. The POKE 59078, 33 command 
disables the automatic HCLS with the 
HSCREEN command ( POKE 55078 f 141 
to put it back). To copy 40-column text 
on the 640-by-192 screen, I used the 
POKE 53063, 33 and POKE 59063, 141 
that appear in "Our Highfalutin' Feline 
Does a CoCo 3 Fandango" by H. Allen 
Curtis (May '87, Page 52). 



(Questions or comments concerning 
this program may be addressed to the 
author at 16 Pare des Cormiers, Loret- 
teville, Quebec, Canada G2A 3R7. 
Please enclose an SASE if requesting a 
reply.) □ 



48 



THE RAINBOW June 1989 




.73 
227 
.85 



22 176 

END 158 



The listing: ILLUSION 

jS 'COPYRIGHT 1989 FALSOFT, INC 

1 POKE65497 # j3:ONBRKGOT03j3:PALETT 
EJZf , J3 : PALETTE 1 , 63 : PALETTE 2 , 0 : PALE 
TTE3 , 16 : PALETTE 4 , 32 : PALETTE5 , 63 : 
P0KE59J378,33 

2 HSCREEN2:HCLS:HPRINT(15 / lj3) ,"1 
llusions" :HPRINT(9,13) /'by Jean- 
Francois Morin" : F0RI==J3T064STEP8 : 
HLINE (1,1) -(32)3-1, 192-1) ,PSET,B: 
NEXT 

3 Z=l:FORI=4T028STEP8:HPAINT(I / I 
) ,I/4+Z,l:HPAINT( 1+32, 1+32) ,1/4+ 
Z / l:,Z=Z-l:NEXT:FORI=pT064STEP8:H 
LINE (I, I) -(32)3-1,192-1) , PRESET, B 
: NEXT : HLINE ( 1)34 , 184 ) - ( 2)37 , 191) , P 



RESET , BF : HPRINT (14,23) , "Press a 
key 

4 IFINKEY$= !,I, THENP=RND(16) -l:GOS 
UB2 8:GOT04 

5 HS CREEN)3 : WIDTH 4)3: PALETTE 3, 16 :C 
LS4 : ATTR3 , 3 : LOCATE 8 , 6 : PRINT "The 
first illusion is a": LOCATES, 7 :P 
RINT"paradoxical picture . At":LO 
CATE8 , 8 : PRINT "the left end, ther 
e are" : LOCATES, 9: PRINT" three bra 
nches , but one" : LOCATES , 1)3 : PRINT 
"disappears at the right 

6 LOCATE 8, 11: PRINT "end. ":GOSUB29 

7 HSCREEN4 : HCLS : FORI=l)3)3T01)3 1 : FO 
RJ=5 6 TO 5 7 : HDRAW" BM=I ; , =J ; R4 4 J3M+2 
)3,+5)3M-l)3,+15L45)3BU15NR46^BUl^R4 
3^NM-1J3 , <-25L2j3M-6 , -15NM+14 , -10L4 
)34BU1)3R42)3" :NEXTJ,I 

8 FORI=63T0123STEP25:FORJ=l)3)3T01 
J31:F0RK=I TOI+1 : HCIRCLE ( J , K) , 15 : 
NEXTK , J, I : POKE 5 9)3 6 3 , 3 3 : HSCREEN2 .: 
HPRINT (14, 22 ), "Press a key":HSCR 
EEN4:POKE59)363 , 14 1 : EXEC44539 

9 HSCREEN)3 : CLS : LOCATE 7 , 6 : PRINT"0 
n the next illusion, the": LOCATE 




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June 1989 THE RAINBOW 49 



7,7: PRINT" intersections between 
the" : L0CATE7 , 8 : PRINT"black squar 
es seem to be" '.LOCATE 7, 9: PRINT" 
grey, but they are only":LOCAT 
E7 ,10: PRINT" in your mind! " :GOSUB 
29:HSCREEN4 

10 HCLS:FORI=180TO479STEP80:FORJ 
=20TO169STEP40 : HLINE (I , J) - (1+73 , 
J+3 8 ) , PSET , B : NEXT J , I : HLINE (16/3,1 
0) - (519 , 191) , PSET, B: HPAINT ( 170 , 1 
5) :POKE59063 , 63 : HSCREEN2 : A$="Pre 
ss a key":FORI=6T016:HPRINT(5,I) 
, MID$ ( A$ , 1-5 , 1) : NEXT : HSCREEN4 : PO 
KE59063 , 141:EXEC44539 . 

11 HSCREEN0 : CLS : LOCATE 9 , 6 : PRINT" 
On the third illusion, ": L0CATE9 , 
7:PRINT"there are two identi-": 
L0CATE9 , 8 : PRINT"cal circles surr 
ounded" : LOCATE 9 , 9 : PRINT "by smal 

ler and larger" : L0CATE9 , 10 : PRINT 
"circles, but the left" : LOCATE9 

,11 

12 PRINT" circle looks smaller" 
:LOCATE9,12:PRINT"than the right 

one.":GOSUB29 . 

13 HSCREEN4 : HCLS : F0RI=1T014 :READ 
A , B , C : HCIRCLE (A, B) , C : HPAINT (A, B) 
: NEXT : P0KE5 90 6 3 , 6 3 : HS CREEN2 : HPRI 
NT (14, 22) , "Press a key" :HSCREEN4 
:POKE59063, 141 : EXEC44539 

14 DATA20p,96,13,200,66,25,140,8 

I, 25,140, 111, 25, 200, 126, 25, 260,1 

II, 25,260,81,25,460,96,13,460,81 
,8,430,89,8,430,103,8,460, 111,8, 

490,103,8,490,89,8 

15 HSCREEN0 : CLS : LOCATE 8 , 6 : PRINT" 
On the fourth illusion, ": LOCATES 
,7:PRINT"you will see another 
" : LOCATE 8 , 8 : PRINT"paradoxical pi 
cture. It":LOCATE8,9:PRINT"is a 
3-D triangle that" : LOCATE 8 , 10 

16 PRINT"appears easier to be 
": LOCATE 8, 11: PRINT "drawn on a s 
creen than" : LOCATES , 12 : PRINT"bei 
ng built with solid" : LOCATES , 13 
:PRINT"woodI":GOSUB29 

17 HSCREEN4 : HCLS : HDRAW" BM3 2 , 15 2M 
288 ,24R48M600, 156M576, 168L512M32 
, 152R48NM112 , 168R464NM568 , 140NM5 
76 , 168M3 12 , 3 6NL48NM3 3 6,2 4M112 , 13 
6NM80,152R352NM496, 152M312, 60NM3 
36,48M160,136 

18 PALETTE2,32:HPAINT(316,32) ,2, 
1:HPAINT (288 , 40) , 2 , 1: HPAINT (96,1 
50) ,2,1:HPAINT(336,32) ,3,1:HPAIN 
T(568,150) ,3,1:HPAINT(320,48) ,3, 



1 : POKE59 063,33: HSCREEN2 : HPRINT ( 1 

4, 23), "Press a key" :HSCREEN4 : POK 

E59063,141:EXEC44539 

19 HSCREEN0 : CLS : LOCATE 8 , 6 : PRINT" 
On the last illusion, ": LOCATES 
, 7 : PRINT "there are horizontal, 
" : LOCATE 8 , 8 : PRINT "vertical and 

diagonal" : LOCATES , 9 : PRINT"lines 
. They do not seem" : LOCATES , 10 : P 
RINT"to be parallel at all" :L0 
CATE8,11 

20 PRINT "but they are ! " : GOSUB29 

21 HSCREEN4 : HCLS : C$="M+16 , -8 " : A$ 
="XC$ ;U16XC$ ;D16" : B$="XC$ ;L32XC$ 
; R3 2 " : HDRAW" BM0 , 40XA$ ; XC$ ; Ul 6R16 
D8XC$ ; BM0 , 56XC$ ; D16XA$ ;XA$ ;XA$ ;X 
C$;U8BM0,168":FORI=1TO9:HDRAWA$: 
NEXT:HDRAW"XC$ ;U16R16D8XC$ ;BM0, 1 
84XC$;D16" :F0RI=1T011:HDRAWA$:NE 
XT: HDRAW" XC$;U8 

22 HDRAW"BM176 , 191XC$ ;D8BR16U16X 
C$ ; D16" : FORI=1TO10 : HDRAWA$ : NEXT: 
HDRAW"XC$;U16BR16D8XC$;BM256,191 

U8XC$ ; D16 " : F0RI=1T011 : HDRAWA$ : NE 
XT:HDRAW"XC$;BM432, 191XC$ ; D8BR16 
U16XC$ ;D16" :F0RI=1T05 :HDRAWA$:NE 
XT:HDRAW"BM512,191U8XC$;D16XA$;X 
A$;XA$;XC$; 

2 3 HDRAW" BM0 , 9 6R16 " : F0RI=1T06 : HD 
RAWB$ : NEXT : HDRAW" BM0 , 13 6XC$ ; L16U 
8R3 2 " : F0RI=1T07 : HDRAWB$ : NEXT : HDR 
AW"XC$ ;BM80 , 191" :F0RI=1T012 :HDRA 
WB$ : NEXT : HDRAW " BM1 1 2 , 1 9 IXC $ ; R3 2 " 
: F0RI=1T011 : HDRAWB$ : NEXT : HDRAW "X 
C$;BM336, 191 

24 FORI=1TO10:HDRAWB$: NEXT: HDRAW 
"BM368, 191XC$;R32" :F0RI=1T07 :HDR 
AWB$ : NEXT : HDRAW"U8L16XC$ ; BM592 , 1 
9 1XB$ ; XB$ ; BM62 4 , 19 IXC $ ; 

25 F0RI=1T016 : READA, B: HPAINT (A, B 
) : NEXT : DATA96 , 4 , 120 , 4 , 224 ,4,4,13 
2,352,4, 380,4,480,4,608,4,188,18 
8,636,4,636,48,636,3 6,636,112,44 
4,188,636,176,636,164 

26 HLINE(160,184)-(480,191) ,PRES 
ET , BF : POKE5 90 6 3 , 3 3 : HS CREEN2 : HPRI 
NT(11, 23) , "Press BREAK to end":H 
SCREEN4 : POKE59063 , 141 

27 GOT027 

28 FORI=1TO500:NEXT:FORI=0TO3:PA 
LETTEI+2 , P+I*16 : NEXT : RETURN 

29 . LOCATE 13 , 22 : ATTR3 , 3 , B: PRINT" P 

ress a key ...";: ATTR3 , 3 : LOCATE3 9 
, 23 :EXEC41329: RETURN 
30 HSCREEN0:POKE6549 6,0:CLS:CMP: 
PALETTE 3 , 16 : POKE59078 , 141 



50 THE RAINBOW June 1989 



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1 heaiure — 1 









Put a new twist in computer graphics 




We're about to change the defi- 
nition of 3-D graphics on the 
_ „_ Color Computer. Sure, any 
old computer can create simulated solid 
geometric images on the screen, but 
ours can actually make shapes appear 
to move in front of the screen! 

The 3-D process was devised by film- 
makers in their search for new ways to 
create realism in films and ajso as an 
audience-attracting gimmick. Most of 
us have probably sat either in a theatre 
or at home with 3-D glasses on and seen 
things appear to jump out at us from the 
screen. The sensation is quite simple to 
explain. Your eyes are two to three 
inches apart, and each sees a slightly 
different image from the other. The 
brain combines these images and, de- 
pending on how close the object is to 
your eyes, determines distance. 3-D 
takes advantage of this difference in 
creating the illusion of depth in two- 
dimensional pictures. 

The left lens in 3-D glasses is a red 
filter. When the eye behind this filter 



sees something red, it emphasizes that it will execute a PCLERR 8 and give you 

object while putting less importance on a menu screen — I would suggest doing 

other colors. The right, blue lens does the test screen first to adjust your TV 

the same thing with blue objects. (TV 3- or monitor to the proper shades of 

D uses red and blue lenses, whereas color. Any automatic color controls will 

theatre movies use red and green.) So need to be switched off and the tint or 

we end up with colored images that, hue control adjusted. Try to match the 

when combined in the brain, tend to put red and blue on the screen to the colors 

a depth perspective on the screen if done on a pair of 3-D glasses — too far off 

properly. and you won't get the desired effect. 

The 3-D processes on film and for the Pressing M in any part of the program 

Color Computer are a bit different, returns you to the menu. 
Film tends to make colors melt into one One of the best examples of the 

another, while the computer makes program's use is to employ it in an 

them much more definite. This results adjustment of Norm Cutter's Sinelines 

in the need to make adjustments, and program (October '83, Page 80). I've 

I've discovered some hints to use in added both red and blue color to the line 

creating your own pictures: so that when it moves and turns, it 

creates various colored patterns. You'll 

• Red objects appear in the back- also note a green line shown. This 
ground, while blue ones appear in the doesn't stay but is there to attract the 
foreground. eye to the main line. As the lines are 

• Green and white, universal to both drawn, you'll see the perspective shift as 
eyes, aren't dimensional, but green is a it seems to also move forward and 
good color to use to attract the eye to backward. 

a certain part of the screen. « Now find a pair of 3-D glasses — the 

• Designs must be very bold and show is about to start! 



The left lens in 3-D glasses is a red good color to use to attract the eye to backward, 

filter. When the eye behind this filter a certain part of the screen, « Now find a pair of 3-D glasses — the 

• Designs must be very bold and show is about to start! 

should have some movement. 

Eugene Vasconi is a helicopter pilot in (Questions or comments concerning 

San Antonio, Texas, as well as a mu- This program is the result of my this program may be directed to the 

sician and free-lance television pro- numerous experiments with 3-D. It is author at 12474 Starcrest 204, San 

ducer. His major interests on the CoCo menu-driven and self-explanatory. Antonio, TX 78216. Please enclose an 

are graphics and music. When you load and run the program, SASE when requesting a reply.) □ 



52 



THE RAINBOW 



June 1989 




150 30 

175 208 

196 189 

212 12 

END 39 



The listing: 3DGRRPHX 

ft 1 COPYRIGHT 1989 FALSOFT, INC 

1 GOTO 2 24 

2 W=0:CLS(3) :PRINT@39, "*** 3-D M 
ENU ***"; 

3 PLAY"V25" 

4 FORSX=1TO20:PLAY"V-O4L255T255C 
E-G":NEXTSX 

5 PLAY"V15" 

6 PRINT@131,"1 - TEST SCREEN 

11 ; : PRINT @ 1 6 3 , 11 2 - FOREGROU 
ND CIRCLE ";: PRINTS 195, "3 - J 
UMPING CIRCLE " ; :PRINT@227 

,"4 - ATOM SMASHER »; 

7 PRINT@259,"5 - YELLING FACE 

11 ; :PRINT@291, "6 - STARBURS 
T "; :PRINT@323,"7 - D 

IMENSIONAL SINELINES" ; : PRINT@355 
,"8 - DO IT YOURSELF " ; 

8 PRINT@417,"»PRESS NUMBER FOR 
SELECTION«"; : PRINT@ 450 , "**RETUR 
N TO MENU WITH [M] **" ; : PRINT@480 
,CHR$(143+32) ; 

9 W$=INKEY$ 

10 W=VAL(W$) 

11 IF W->1 AND W=<8 THEN GOT013 

12 GOT09 

13 FORWN=1TO20:CLS(7) :PRINT@198, 
"PUT ON 3-D GLASSES 11 ; :PRINT@301, 
"now" ; : PLAY"T255L25504FF#G" : FORP 
P=lTO10p:NEXTPP 

14 CLS(8) :PLAY"01DD#E":F0RPP=1T0 
50:NEXTPP,WN 

15 ON W GOTOX6, 28, 50,73, 34,138,1 
85,202 ; 

16 CLS(4):PRINT @38,"3-D- TEST S 
CREEN"; : PRINT® 130, "ADJUST THE FO 



TO MATCH THE 
3-D GLASSES. 
SQUARE SHOULD 
FRONT OF THE 
OPPOSITE ON T 



LLOWING SCREEN 
COLORS OF YOUR 
THE RIGHT BLUE 

APPEAR TO BE IN 
RED BACKGROUND — 
HE LEFT SIDE." 

17 PRINT© 3 8 4, "PRESS ANY KEY WHEN 
READY >[M] RETURNS YOU T 

0 THE MENU" 

18 1 **TEST SCREEN*** 

19 PMODE3,l:PCLS(3) 



20 COLOR5:LINE(125,0)-(125,196) , 
PSET 

21 PAINT(200,10) ,4,5 

22 COLOR4:LINE(30, 50) -(125,120) , 
PSET, BF 

23 COLOR3 : LINE- (220, 50) , PSET, BF 

24 EXEC44539 

25 W$=INKEY$:IF W$="M" THEN GOTO 
2 

2 6 PMODE3,l:SCREENl,l:GOT025 

27 ! **CIRCLE & LINES*** 

28 PMODE3,l:PCLS (5) :SCREEN1,1 

29 FORX=10TO250STEP5 

30 COLOR3 

31 LINE(125,10) -(X,30) ,PSET 

3 2 COLOR4 

33 LINE- (X, 170) , PSET 

34 COLOR3 

35 LINE-(125,10) , PSET 
3 6 NEXTX 

37 CIRCLE(125, 100) ,71,2 

38 PLAY"02L255T255CAFDFAG" 

39 CIRCLE (125, 100) , 70 , 2 : PAINT ( 12 
5,100) ,3,2 

40 FORX=1TO60STEP8: CIRCLE (125 ,10 
0),X,4:SOUND X,1:NEXTX 

41 DRAW"BM70 , 70 ;S6C5 ;R25D15L10D5 



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June 1989 THE RAINBOW 53 



R10D15L25U7R10U4L6U13R6U4L10U7" 

* ibBs ^BJ Jmmf Bb> BB pjV^ U *BB* Bb* p" j*» % BBJB BpT * 4» BBT BB BBf B^ B BB* *BB" X Arf BB A/ BB # 


88 S$- t, S"+STR$ (S)+»; " 

^^B^ ^W" ^^^^ ^^^^ ^™ ™ T B ^^^^ B B 


42 PAINT(75,75) ,4,5 


89 IF S=2^)THEN PM0DE1, 3 : SCREEN1, 


43 DRAW M BM137 . 71;S5 ;R23F5D31G5L2 

B BB B> » * B ■ W BBJB B. BB BBB BB f * * B BB BB BB BB BBB BB 4i BjB ^^^J BmJ 


1: SOUND S,l 


3U40BF9R8F2D23G2L8U2 6" 

^Bjr BB A f** ™"B *Bfe ^B ■ BB BBJB BB ^BJB *W SHW ^BB BB I^BB 


9j3 IF S=5pTHEN PM0DE1 , 5 : SCREEN1, 


44 PAINT ( 142 . 72 ) ,4,5 

b> •> b» b b m A b b)b » bbb •> bb ■ * bb Mm mm ^mw 


1: SOUND S,l 


45 DRAW"BM115 , 90 ;S5 ;R9D5L9U5" 

4 BB «— ^ B V#* ■* 1 1 b bjb bbb bb" » bb IpT J bub* bb J b % bb bb bb bbb bjb bjbt BB 


91 IF S=8 0THEN PM0DE1 . 7 : SCREEN1, 

^^^p ^^^B ^B ^P ^Mm ^B '^^^ B7 BB BBB BBB ^^^^ ^^B^ ^B ^ JBB BBB Mm B Bp B 


46 PAINT (117, 92) ,4,5 

* ^p* b» b b bjb A V bjb % BB «b r m mm* •»* y » 4 V bb 


1 : SOUND S , 1 


47 PLAY H 05L255T255BB-AA-GG-FE" 

*m 9 jb* MMmmwmh b b> bb" bbb aw Bbb* BB bb &b bib" Bp*" bjb* bbb A M b Bjb* Bb* bj bb 


92 RETURN 

BJ^ BB B^^^B MMM ^B^ ^B ^p^B r 


48 W$=INKEY$:IF W$="M" THEN GOTO 

• BB ■ T ™J M> * ■ A. *■ BB BB V BB Bl ■ V BB B B M A B> BBf B ™ BJB* \/ BB BB 


93 1 ** YELLING FACE** 

^^B ^^^B ^^^^B ^^^^B BJBJB ^B B BJJP B> BJ B' BBB 


2 ELSE48 


94 PM0DE1 : PCLS ( 2 ) : SCREEN1 , 1 


49 •** JUMPING CIRCLE** 

4 B^ BB* BB B A *riBB A • VP BjB «Bl B % BB BBJBBBjt 


95 CIRCLE (195, 70) ,20,4,1.3, .4, .3 


5j3 G=lj3 


96 CIRCLE (55, 7p) ,2^,4,1.3, .1, .9 


51 F0RP=1T08STEP2 

BB BB BB BJJ B Bl BB BP BB* BB IbT B> PM BB BBB7 


97 CIRCLE (125, 85) ,8^1,4 


52 PM0DE1 . P: PCLS (4) :SCREEN1,1 

BB BB B» B> BjB BBT BBJB BBS) V BJB B] BB) ^p»* BpBpIpBpV \ * / V B*B* ^pF A V^J «Bi^ pfc 1 «bW » BPS 


98 PAINT (125, 85) ,4,4 


53 F0RX=1T0115STEP5 

^BP - ^BT BB ^BF BB B> BBB> BP ^B* BB BB BB BB* BB BMP BB* 


99 CIRCLE(90,50) ,2^1,3 


54 SOUND X,l 

^BB^ ^P BB ^BB* ^BF B B BW ^B B B ^^^B 


1J30 CIRCLE (16^), 5^)) ,2^1,3 


55 Y=Y+1 


Ipl PAINT(9^,5^J) ,3,3 


56 COLOR (2+Y) 


102 PAINT (160, 60) ,3,3 


57 LINE(10+X / 10+(X/1.4) )-(240-X / 


103 F0RX=1T07 


18^)-(X/1.4) ) f PSET, BF 

58 COLORS : LINE (10+X, 10+ (X/l. 4) )- 


104 CIRCLE (160, 60) ,X,2 


105 CIRCLE(90, 60) ,X,2 


(240-X / 180-(X/1.4) ) /PSET.B 


lj36 NEXTX 


59 IFY=>3THEN Y=0 


107 DRAW"BM120,80;C3 ;S4;D10R15U1 


60 NEXTX 




61 COLOR5:LINE(0, 0) -(255. 195) .PS 

BBB '^P^' BBB ^B^ B> V ^B W BBB BB B> B BB » AWMr W «B B « BB » ■ BB BJpT M W «B *B 


108 CIRCLE (127, 95) ,15,3, .4 


ET: LINE (255,0) -(0.195) .PSET 

BBB BB m BBB BB B BBB* V, BB W «W M MMW M ■ # BBB BB' BB J| W BB BB BBB BB 


109 PAINT (127, 95) ,3,3 

110 CIRCLE (127, 135) ,45,2, .4 


62 CIRCLE (125. 95) . G. 2 : PAINT (125 . 

^B ^B^ BB> ^™ » W B^^B^^^B » BBB BBB ^B M BB' ^B^ B B ^B B BBB B BB BB BB BBB B> B BB » BB BBB BJ ■ 


95) ,2,2 


111 PAINT (127, 135) ,2,2 

112 PAINT (10. 10) ,5.4 

BJB BJJB BBB BB ^B ^B BB> BB B BJB » BJJB AWMr B BBB ±MMF M 9 ^MMr B BJ 

113 PLAY M V1 M : FORSX=1TO30 : PLAY f, L2 


63 CIRCLE (125 . 95) . G-l . 4 : PAINT (12 

^B ^B ^ BB Mm B B BBf BB \ BBB BBB BB B B BB J ■ ^B BBB ■ B B BJ Bff B> BBB B B ^B \ BBB BB 


5.95) ,4.4 


64 G=G+35 


55T25502V+FF#GG#" : NEXTSX: PLAY"V1 


65 NEXTP 


5" 


66 F0RSH=1T08STEP2 


114 DRAW ,I BM127,135" 


67 PM0DE1,SH:SCREEN1, 1 

bbt r b» v «h, BB mmw bb «bb F bb b b V bt b» b> « bbb bvb » bb m bb> 


115 FORS=1TO20STEP3 


68 FORPZ=1T095:NEXTPZ :PLAY"05T25 

W BB ^B BB B B BJ BBB BBB BB ^B^ BB Bb W B> V BBBB B> B> ||| BJ BaH B BJ BB B BJB BB Btfr BVJ> VB BB 


116 S$= ,I S I, +STR$(S)+";" 


5L255B-" 


117 SOUND S,l 

118 DRAW S$+ M C3 7BM-4,+l;L10U2R6U 


69 NEXTSH 

Bp* BjB" Bk b BBfl B> B> b BP B B 


70 W$=INKEY$:IF W$="M" THEN GOTO 

V kWMW * BB BBB B> ■ BB 14M BJB BB B BBB BB ■ V BB B B BB B B BBB Bit B BB BB BB BB 


2L6U4R6U2L6U2R10D6L2D1R2D5 " 


2 ELSE71 

BBf BBW BBBBB BBjfl B BJB 


119 FORPP=1TO150:NEXTPP 


71 GOT066 

• BBB BB BB B BB >B BP' 


120 NEXTS ! 


72 '**AT0M SMASHER** 

F BB B B> BJB BB B BB P"^ B * ■ B Bj ^ A * * B B 


121 DRAW M BM127, 135" 


73 F0RP=1T08STEP2:PM0DE1.P:PCLS( 

f BB B BB BB B BJB BJB BJB BB BB BB BB B^l BB BBB V BJB BB BB BB BP BBf BBB ■ BJB V BB BF BBBB \ 


122 FORS=1TO20STEP3 


4) : NEXTP 

M0 J B BJl B BBBB B BB BJB BB 


123 SOUND S+20,1 


74 PM0DE1, 1:SCREEN1, 1 


124 S$= n S"+STR$(S)+ n ;" 


75 SOUND 1,1 


125 DRAW S$+"C3;BM+2,+4;R8E2U8H2 


76 COLOR2:LINE(255.0)-(0.195) . PS 

W BB* BB BB BBBB BB B B "B B BB BJB B » BBB » BJB BB BB W Mm* M W. » BB BJB BB JF B -Mm BB 


L8D12BU4BR3U4R3D4L3" 

BBB BB BJJB BBB BB BB BB Mp BBB* BJJ B BB BB Mp BJk B BB BBB B BJBJB BB 


ET:LINE(0 # 0) -(255.195) . PSET 

BJB BJB B BBB BBB B • BB » ^PjB M ^BF Jl » BB BB BB W BBB BBT BB M W BB BBB BBJB BB 


12 6 FORPP=1TO150 tNEXTPP 

BBB BIB BB BJJ BB BJJ B B BB BJB B BB BBS BB B V B B BBf *B B BBB BJB BJB 


77 F0RS=lTO125 

f 9 bj bb A bbb bbb bb bb bjb> bb bb 


127 NEXTS 

BB BB • B B BIBB B B> BBB BB* 


78 GOSUB8 8 

m bb Bbb bb bb bb bbb bb bb 


128 DRAW M BM15, 100 ; C5 7R6D4L3D1R3D 

BJB U W BB BV Bbb B • B Bj/b B BBB BB » BBB Mm* 1/ ^ V *BJ# , B V BBT BJJB B BBJJjl BB BBB* BJB B B BB BB* 


79 CIRCLE (125, 95) ,S,3 

W «B BP* BBB B B BB bbbbjbbJ » B BP BB « B BB # # Bp* JF V 


5L6" 

BB bb Bb* 


8 0 NEXTS 

BB MMW Mm B BBJB B> Bj BJB BB 


129 PAINT (16, 100) ,3,3 

BJ MMM) B BJ Bp B> BBB B * BB \ BJB BB V BJB *B 1# / » BjB* ¥ BB 


81 F0RP=1T08STEP2 

^B BBB B ^B' B) BBB BBB BB ^B^ ^BB BJB BB BJB BB BJB 


130 DRAW M BM23 0 . 115 ;C5 ;L6D6R6U6" 

BJB BB *B BBB BB BBB BBT B*B B BJB BB Mm* W BB BB BBB* J BJB BB f BBB W Mm^r W -A. % W W 


82 PMODEl.PlSCREENl. 1 

^B BBB BJ B B ^BJB BJB BJ BBB B BB B BJJB BB B B BBB BBB B V BBB • BBB 


131 PAINT (23(3.115) ,3,3 

BBB B BBB BJB B 4 B B , ■ BB \ BP BB M W BBB BBB BB / V BB B BB 


83 W$=INKEY$:IF W$= ,I M U THEN GOTO 

BBJ ■ ^^^P B™ ^B »^^^B ^^B B B ^^^P BB B T ^B ^B BB BJI BJB Mm B B^B ^BB» BJB BB* 


132 PLAY"01" 


2 


133 F0RSX=1T04 : PLAY"L255T2550+CC 

BBB BB BB B BB BJJ B BB •> B BBB BJB BF BJ B B BB. B BP BBB BB BB BBJ BB BB BB BJB BBB* 


84 F0RPP=1T08P:NEXTPP:PLAY"01L25 


#GG#B-BDD#AA#EF" : NEXTSX 

| | ^BJ BB 1 | BIBB BB BJB BBB 1 J BB B A | BBJB BB B BJ> B> ^JbbJ B B BB bB b B 


5T255CC#D" 

BB BB BJ BB BB BBB BBB || ABB 


134 F0REY=4T06STEP2 : PAINT (90 . 60) 

BJB B» B B W Ban V L- B pJJJj Jt BBB BB V B»* jL BBJB B M • «W B B pBp JL V JbW I B* JLj/ # BB* Jb* J 


85 NEXTP 


,EY, 3: PAINT (160, 60) ,EY,3 


86 PLAY ff L255T25505B" 


135 NEXTEY 


87 G0T081 


136 W$=INKEY$:IF W$="M" THEN GOT 



54 THE RAINBOW June 1989 



02 ELSE 134 

137 ' **STARBURST** 

138 PM0DE1 , 1 : PCLS ( 3 ) :SCREEN1,1 

139 FORX=5TO110STEP2 
14p QQ=X 

141 IFX=>100THEN QQ=105 

142 PSET(QQ+15,QQ,4) 

143 PLAY"05L2 55T255B" 

144 PSET(X+12,X-5,3) 

145 NEXTX 

146 FORC=5T03STEP-l 

147 C$="C"+STR$(C)+"; n 

148 DRAW C$+"BM120, 100 ; S4 ;NE40NF 
40NG40NH40" 

149 PLAY"01L255T255CC#" 

150 NEXTC 

151 A=60:B=60:C=30:D=15:E=20:F=1 
5 

152 FORN=1TO120STEP2 

153 X=C+E*SIN(N/A*3.14) 

154 XX=X*5 

155 M=N*3 

156 GOSUB182 

157 Y=D-F*Z 

158 YY=Y*6 

159 W$=INKEY$:IF W$="M" THEN GOT 
02 

160 COLOR2:LINE(XX-30,YY)-(270-X 
X,180-YY) ,PSET 

161 C0L0R4 : LINE (XX-30 , YY) - (270-X 
X,18J3-YY) ,PSET 

162 NEXTN 

163 FORX=3TO108STEP3 

164 CIRCLE (120, 90) ,X, 2 

165 PLAY"L255T25501EF" 

166 CIRCLE ( 120 , 9J3) ,X-3, 3 

167 NEXTX 

168 FORX=110TO3STEP-2 

169 CIRCLE (120, 90) , X-2 , 4 

170 CIRCLE (120 ,90) ,X,3 

171 NEXTX 

172 F0RFC=1T015 

173 CIRCLE (120, 90) ,FC,4 

174 PLAY"L255T25501E-D" 

175 NEXTFC 

176 F0RFF=15T01STEP-1 

177 CIRCLE (120, 90) ,FF,3 

178 PLAY"L255T25501CC#" 

179 NEXTFF 

180 W$=INKEY$:IF W$="M" THEN GOT 
02 

181 GOT0138 

182 Z=SIN( (90-M)/57.296) 

183 RETURN 

184 ' **DIMENSIONAL SINELINES** 

185 PMODE3,l:PCLS(4) :SCREEN1,1:P 
LAY"O5V30" : F0RSX=1T04 : PLAY"L100T 
10-V<BGEC" :NEXTSX:PLAY"V15" 

186 PMODE3,l:PCLS(5) :SCREEN1,1 

187 B=0 : S=0 : D=0 : Q=0 : X=0 : 1=0 

188 B=B+I 



189 S=S+.l 

190 D=D+Q 

191 IF B>250 THEN PCLS : I=-2 

192 IF D>180 THEN Q=-2 

193 IF D<5 THEN Q=2 

194 IF B<5 THEN 1=2 

195 X=(SIN(S) *129)+129 

196 COLOR2:LINE(X,D+1)-(D,B+1) ,P 
SET:C0L0R3 

197 LINE (X, D) - (D, B) , PSET: C0L0R4 

198 LINE (X, D+l) -(D,B+1) , PSET 

199 W$=INKEY$:IF W$="M" THEN GOT 
02 

200 GOT0188 

201 '**D0 IT YOURSELF** 

202 CLS(7) 

203 PRINT@37,"** DO IT YOURSELF 

* * " ; 

204 PLAY"L4T204DCFL8G05C04L4AL8G 
05C04L4AL3F" 

205 PRINT@128," JOYSTICKS CONTRO 
L THE ENDS OF THE DRAWING LINE 

> PRESS [B] FOR 
BLUE LINE > [R] FOR 

RED LINE > [G] FOR 

GREEN LINE > [C] FOR 

CIRCLES" 

206 PRINT@320," > [CLEAR] 
TO ERASE > [M] FOR 
MAIN MENU" 

207 PRINT@448," ** PRESS ANY KE 
Y TO BEGIN **" 

208 EXEC44539 

209 PLAY"01V15L6T2 " : F0RSX=1T04 : P 
LAY"T>V+0+CFEDB-":NEXTSX:PLAY"Vl 
5L255T255" 

2 10 PM0DE3 , 1 : PCLS ( 3 ) : SCREEN1 , 1 

211 CP=4 ' 

212 J=JOYSTK(0) *4 :K=J0YSTK(1) *3 

213 L=JOYSTK(2)*4:M=JOYSTK(3)*3 

214 COLOR CP+1:LINE(J,K)-(L,M) ,P 
SET 

215 COLOR CP : LINE (J, K) - (L,M) ,PSE 
T 

216 CP$=INKEY$ 

217 IF CP$="R" THEN CP=4:PLAY"05 
B" 

218 IF CP$="G" THEN CP=2:PLAY"05 
G" 

219 IF CP$="B" THEN CP=3:PLAY"05 

220 IF CP$="C" THEN PLAY"05AB-B" 

:CIRCLE(J,K) , 10, 5: PAINT ( J, K) ,CP, 
5: CIRCLE (L,M) , 10 , 5 : PAINT (L, M) , CP 
,5 

221 IF CP$=CHR$(12) THEN PLAY"05 
C" :GOTO210 

222 IF CP$="M" THEN G0T02 

223 GOT0212 

224 PCLEAR8 : G0T02 



June 1989 THE RAINBOW 55 



1 F e at ure 



16K ECB 



Astound your non-computing friends 
by making the Co Co a "know-it-all" 




The 

CoCo Qu 
Master 





By Bill Bernico 




o 



One of the things that most im- 
presses non-computerists is a 
quiz-type program with 
answers evaluated by the computer. The 
computer lets you know if the answer 
you selected is right or wrong, and you 
get some sort of score at the end. 

These folks are likely to ask, "How 
does the computer know which is the 
right answer?" Sounds silly now that I 
have a few years of hacking behind me, 
but it was the very question I asked 
before I ever laid hands on a computer. 

Obviously, the computer doesn't 
know the answer. It's programmed to 
search the DfiTfi statements to find the 
right answer that you've put there — 



Bill Bernico is the author of over 200 
Color Computer programs and is a 
frequent RAINBOW contributor whose 
hobbies include golf writing music and 
programming. Bill is a drummer in a 
rock band and lives in Sheboygan, 
Wisconsin. 



nothing more, nothing less. This pro- 
gram is a good example of that kind of 
technique. 

I just happened to choose questions 
on computing for this quiz; if you have 
a certain category you'd rather build 
your quiz around, by all means feel free 
to change the DATA statements. It's that 
simple. 

Each DATA statement is made up of 
five parts. The first piece of DATA tells 
the computer which of those answers is 
the right one. Look at Line 300 in the 
listing. The 4 at the end of the DATA 
statement tells the computer that the 
first answer is the correct one. 

Using this technique, you can make 
up your own quiz. Just make sure you 
follow the flow as presented here. 



(Questions or comments concerning 
this program may be directed to the 
author at 708 Michigan Avenue, She- 
boygan, WI 53081. Please enclose an 
SASE when requesting a reply.) □ 



56 



THE RAINBOW June 1989 



ftware 



CF Just For the Fun of It ^fl 

Order any item by June 30, 1989, and you may have your choice 
of either the Silly Syntax story creation game (including two 
tories) or the Flying Tigers arcade game for only $1.95! 



s 



CAL LI GRAPH ER 

CoCo Calligrapher - Turn your 
Co Co and dot- matrix printer into 
a calligrapher's quill. Make beau- 
tiful invitations, flyers, certif- 
icates, labels and more. Includes 
three % inch high fonts. Works 
with many printers such as Ep- 
son, Gemini and Radio Shack. 
Over 135 additional fonts are 
available (see below). Tape /Disk; 
$24.95. 

OS9 Calligrapher - Prints all the 
same fonts as the CoCo Calligra- 
pher. It reads a standard text file 
which contains text and format- 
ting codes. You may specify the 
font to use, change fonts at any 
time, centering, left, right or full 
justify, line fill, margin, line 
width, page size, page break and 
indentation. Similar to troff on 
UNIX systems. Includes the 
same 3 fonts with additional 
fonts available below. Disk only; 
OS9 Level I or II; $24.95. 

Calligrapher Fonts - Requires 
Calligrapher above. Each set on 
tape or disk with 8 to 10 fonts; 
specify RSDOS or OS9 version; 
$14.95 each: 

Set#l Reduced and reversed originals; 

Set #2 Old Style and Broadway; 

Set #3 Antique and Business; 

Set #4 Wild West and Checkers; 

Set #5 Stars, Hebrew and Victorian; 

Set #0 Block and Computer; 

Set #7 Small: Roman, Italics, Cubes, etc; 

Set #8 Novelty fonts; NEW 

Set#0 Gallant and Spartan; NEW 

Set #10 Several Roman fonts; 

Set #11 Gothic and Script; 

Set #12 More Roman and Italic; 

Set #13 Several Courier fonts; NEW 

Set #14 Modern and Screen; NEW 

Set #15 Tektron and Prestige. NEW 

Economy Font Packages avail- 
able on disk only, with 25 to 30 
fonts; specify RSDOS or OS9; 
29.95 for any one or save by 
buying two or more at $19.95 
each: 

Pkg #1 - Above font sets 1, 2 and 3; 
Pkg #2 - Above font sets 4, 5 and 6; 
Pkg #3 - Above font sets 7, 8 and 9; 
Pkg #4 - Above font sets 10, 11 and 12; 
Pkg #5 - Above font sets 13, 14 and 15. 



Calligrapher Combo Package - Includes the Calligrapher 
and any two Economy Font Packages (your choice) for 
only $59.95. jgj] New Low Price! Specify RSDOS or OS9. 




The OS9 Font Massager - This 
OS 9 utility program allows you 
to do many things to Calligra- 
pher font files. You may create 
new fonts, modify existing 
fonts, invert fonts, compress 
fonts, double the height and/or 
width, halve the height and/or 
width and convert between OS9 
and RSDOS formats, $19.95. 



EDUCATIONAL 

Trig Attack - Ages 9 and up. An 
educational arcade game where 
players learn important math 
concepts as they play. Sound 
effects, colorful graphics. Excel- 
lent manual includes an introduc- 
tion to trigonometry. Tape/Disk; 
$19.95. 



INFORMATION MGT. 

TIMS (The Information 
Management System) - Tape or 
disk, fast and simple general data 
base program. Create files of 
records that can be quickly sort- 
ed, searched, deleted and update 
ed. Powerful printer formatting. 
Up to 8 user fields, sort on up to 
3 fields. Tape/Disk; $19,95. 

TIMS Mail - Tape or Disk based 
mailing list management pro- 
gram. Files are compatible with 
TIMS. Fast and simple to use. 
Supports labels 1, 2 or 3 across, 
Vk to 4 inches wide. Tape /Disk; 
$19.95. 

TIMS Utility - Utility compan- 
ion, for TIMS and TIMS Mail for 
multi-term search (AND and OR 
logic), global change and delete, 
split large files and more! 
Tape/Disk; $14.95. 



The Educational Combo - The 

Combo includes these educa- 
tional (and entertaining) games: 

Silly Syntax (ages 5 and up) 
story creation game with 2 
stories 

Galactic Hangman (ages 7 and 
up) animated graphics, with a 
700 word vocabulary 
The Presidents of the USA 

(ages 10 and up) a presidential 
trivia game 

The Great USA (aees 9 and 
up) a trivia game of the states 
Trig Attack (ages 9 and up) 
Zap those Trigs 

All five programs on one disk; 
$49.95 (save $50!). 



TIMS Combo Package - All 

three of the above programs: 
TIMS, TIMS Mail and TIMS 
Utility on one disk - $34.95. 



SPECIAL INTEREST 

Rental Property Income and Ex- 
pense Management Package - 
Maintain rental property income 
and expense records and. print re- 
ports, 28 expense categories. This 
program may be tax deductible. 
Disk only; $29.95. 

CoCo Knitter - Easy to use pro- 
gram to display or print instruc- 
tions to knit a sweater: Cardigan 
or Pullover; Round or V-neck; 
Raglan or Setrin Sleeve: 3 

f] 



weights of yarn; 8 sizes irom 
baby to man. Tape/Disk; $19.95. 
For a complete catalog of Sugar Software products and fonts, send a stamp and a label. 




*TRS-80 is a trademark of Tandy Corp. 



SUGAR SOFTWARE 

P.O. Box 7446 
Hollywood, Florida 33081 
(305) 981-1241 



All programs run on the CoCo 1, 2 and 8, S2K 
Extended Basic, unless otherwise noted. Add 
$1.60 per tape or disk for shipping and han- 
dling. Florida residents add 6% sales tax. COD 
orders add $5. Dealer inquiries invited. Orders 
generally shipped in 24-48 hours. No refunds 
or exchanges without prior authorization. 



The listing: COCOQUIZ 

0 1 COPYRIGHT 1989 FALSQFT, INC 
10 'COCOQUIZ 

2J3 1 FROM KROMICO SOFTWARE 
30 'BY BILL BERNICO 
40 ' 

50 DIMA$(20) ,B$(20) ,C$(2j3) ,D$(20 

) ,E$(20) ,B(20) :FORA=1TO20:READA$ 

(A) , B$ (A) , C$ (A) ,D$(A) ,E$(A) ,B(A) 

: NEXTA 

60 C=C+1 . * 

70 IF C<21 THEN 90 

80 C=0:GOTO 60 

90 IF B(C)=20 THEN 110 

100 CLS:PRINTA$ (C) :PRINTSTRING$( 

32,191) : PRINTTAB ( 9 ) "1.) ";B$(C) : 

PRINTTAB ( 9 ) "2.) ";C$(C) : PRINTTAB 

(9) "3.) ";D$(C) : PRINTTAB ( 9 ) »4.) 

M E$(C) :GOTO130 

110 D=D+l:IF D=21 THEN 210 

120 GOTO 60 

130 PRINT: PRINTTAB (7) :INPUT"SELE 

CT 1-4) ";E: PRINT 

140 IF E<1 OR E>4 THEN 130 

150 F=F+1 

160 IF E=B (C) THEN G=l : B (C) =20 : GO 

TO180 

170 G=0 

180 IF G=l THEN 200 

190 PRINTSTRING$(32 / 175) ; :SOUNDl 

, 2 : PRINT "WRONG ! WE'LL TRY THIS 

ONE LATER" ; : PRINTSTRING$ (32, 175) 

; :GOSUB 2 90: GOTO 60 

200 PRINTSTRING$(32 / 159) ; : SOUND1 

91,2:PRINT"RIGHTi THAT'S ONE MO 

RE FOR YOU . " ; : PRINTSTRING$ (32,15 

9);:GOSUB 290:GOTO 60 

210 IF F=20 THEN 230 

220 CLS:PRINT"YOU MISSED" ;F-20 ; » 

QUESTIONS": GOTO 240 

230 CLS: PRINT "VERY GOOD. . .NO WRO 

NG ANSWERS 

240 PRINT@324,"CARE TO TRY AGAIN 
(Y/N) 

250 IN$=INKEY$:IFIN$=""THEN 250 
260 IF IN$="Y"THEN RUN 
270 IF IN$="N"THEN CLS:LIST-30 
280 GOTO 250 

290 PRINT@484,"HIT ANY KEY TO CO 
NTINUE" ; :FORX=1507TO1531:POKEX,P 
EEK(X) -64 : NEXT :EXEC44539: RETURN 
300 DATA RESERVES BYTES OF STRIN 
G SPACE, CLS, CLEAR, CONT, OPEN, 2 
310 DATA CHECKS THE KEYBOARD AND 
RETURNS THE KEY THAT WAS HIT (I 
F ANY) ,RIGHT$, SCREEN, JOYSTK,INKE 
Y$ , 4 

320 DATA SETS THE COMPUTER'S POI 
NTER BACKTO THE FIRST ITEM ON TH 
E FIRST DATA LINE , RENUM , RESTORE 



,TROFF,PPOINT, 2 . 

330 DATA PRINTS A STRING OF CHAR 

ACTERS SPECIFIED BY ASCII CODE 

, STR$ , CHR$ , STRING$ , LEFT$ , 3 

340 DATA RESETS A POINT TO THE B 

ACKGROUNDCOLOR , RESET , SET , PSET , PR 

ESET,4 

350 DATA STORES GRAPHICS FROM SO 
URCE ONTOSTART/END RECTANGLE ON 
A SCREEN, GET, PUT, SOUND, INT, 2 
360 DATA SETS FOREGROUND AND BAC 
KGROUND COLOR , COLOR , CLS , PAINT , P 
CLS,1 

370 DATA DIMENSIONS ONE OR MORE 
ARRAYS , DATA , DIM , GOSUB , LIST , 2 
380 DATA REPLACES A PORTION OF A 
N OLD STRING WITH A NEW STRIN 
G , LEFT$ , RIGHT $ , MID$ , INKEY$ , 3 
390 DATA ERASES EVERYTHING IN ME 
MORY , CLS , PCLS , NEW , CLEAR, 3 
400 DATA SELECTS RESOLUTION AND 
FIRST MEMORY PAGE , P CLEAR, PMOD 
E, PCLS, PRESET, 2 

410 DATA PRINTS NUMBERS IN A SPE 
CIFIED FORMAT , PRINT , PUT , READ , P 
RINT USING, 4 

420 DATA LETS YOU INSERT COMMENT 
S IN A PROGRAM LINE , REM, LIST, D 
EL, SAVE, 1 

430 DATA RETURNS THE LENGTH OF A 

STRING , STRING$ , LEN , STR$ , PEEK, 2 
440 DATA RETURNS RIGHT PORTION O 
F ANY STRING , RIGHT$ , LEFT$ , STR 
$,STRING$,1 

450 DATA COMMAND USED TO CALL SP 
ECIFIED SUBROUTINES , GOTO , GOSUB , 
GET, LIST, 2 

460 DATA LOADS MACHINE LANGUAGE 
PROGRAM FROM DISK, LO ADM, CLOADM, 
LOAD,CLOAD,l 

470 DATA JUMPS TO SPECIFIED LINE 

NUMBER , GOSUB , GET , GOTO , LLIST , 3 
480 DATA LISTS PROGRAM LINES TO 
PRINTER , LIST , PRINT , INPUT , LLIST , 4 
490 DATA SELECTS EITHER GRAPHICS 
OR TEXT DISPLAY AND THE COLOR S 
ET , SCREEN , PCLS , PPOINT , PMODE , 1 



Maxwell PM^jqj ffffj 

Q ,l b Utia r "y w \ OML i ulL unun nK t ^33^i > p 

Mouse I I E ,.,1 ... ^ 1 



LOOKS LIKE IT'S Tlf 
FOR A REM SHOT I 



By Logan Ward 




g 

D 



<§> L.W. 198 4 H 

aonnnaBuao 



58 THE RAINBOW June 1989 



Saving your CoCofor a rainy day 




The Storm 



By B.J. Bryson 



6 



Wrapped in warm cozy covers, a 
child watches the pouring rain 
from ii second -story bedroom 
window, jumping every time the lightning 
flELshcs in the: midnight sky and shivering 
wiih delight when the thunder rumbles in 
the distance. A childhood moment seized 
my ihoughts as I took p^Tiui I in hand and 
put the image to paper. 

But something was missing — the pit? 
ter-palrer of raindrops on the windowpane b 
the ["I ashes of lightning, the das tain rum- 
bling of thunder t l\ occurred lome that my 
CoCo might be able to help. 

So I drew a ehikTs fate on a sheet of 
graph paper and filled in ihi! square* out- 
lining the area of my drawing, Then 1 
cranked up the computet sind set it to do 
graphics with Line 10. Next, 1 Wrote the 
DRAW and PAfffT QtSttllCt-icVIS tii Line 2Q T 
using the outlines on die graph paper as a 
guide in creaiing ihc DRAW instructions, 1 
followed this procedure with the hair, 
clothes, cover and window producing lines 
30 to 180. 

-—*•—-»■ 

8 J. Bfy0fl has f*e4ti working with com- 
piiiers sit ten f9S2. H$ enjoys * renting music, 
graphirs and animation on the Color 
Computer and faipes to find u Compute? 
S^htiie publishing company looking for a 
talented programmer 



concentrated on I he bright flush li ginning 
creates. Drawing and erasing die high- 
lights nFiigh filing (lashes Would have taken 
too long, so 1 decided to make a separate 
drawing of the high Li glued scene and use 
page-flipping lor lightning. With this plan 
to mind, 1 moved to graphics pages 5 to 8 
and copied the picture to the new area with 
Line laft, 




Going hack to die original drawing* I 
■added highlights with an orange pencil, 
copied these to the appropriate aj-eaia of die 
graph paper copy with the same pencil, 
and filled in l he squares, outlining only the 
orange areas, I [hen wrote I he DRAW and 
PAINT instructions in lines 200 lo 290, 
i is i ig die new outlines as a guide in creat- 
ing those instructions |br drawing. 

When finished with the highlights T 
went back lo tjte unhtghlighled picture 
wilh I .inc. 31)0, lossed in fciome thunder and 




lightning using Line 310, and kept every- 
thing going with Line lOOt), 

Al ibis poinL the program could dp [is 
thing. Bui something seemed to he miss- 
ing. Suddenly, iL struck me like a bnlL 
There was no rain! 

At first, 1 tried rand om [y pi oj ti rig d 01 s i r i 
die windowpane area.i but il looked more 
like snow than rah, Since I couldivt dunk 
of any other way to simulate rain falling 
fasi enough to look realistic^ 1 decided to 
try raindrops trickling down the window* I 
began by randomly choosing a set of coor- 
dinates in Line 320. Line 330 saves the 
chosen coordinate values in variables M 
and v and moves the vertical coordinate 
down a few spaces. If die coordinates 
iircn'l in ihfc windowpane an_-;i. Line 340 
randomly assigns new values thai are within 
die confines of this area, Final ]y 1 lines 350 
lo 370 rc s Het the pixels pointed to by the H 
and V variables* set the pixels pointed to by 
Lhe new coordinate values, and make a uofl 
pitter-patter sound. 

And die re it is! I hope you enjoy this 
program as much as 1 enjoyed writing It, 
Please feel free lo change and add to the 
program as the inspiration directs you r 
Most of all, have fun! 

{Questions or Cfjmments coflL-emtng this 
article may be addressed to the author ui 
PO Boy 295, MMmhrnvkin* NJ tiflQSti 
Please include m SASEwhen r$QimTitfg.a 
reply.) □ 

Jnn&19B9 THE RAINBOW 59 




50 108 

110 242 

190 108 



240 55 

300 75 

END 123 



The Listing: STORM 

1 ' STORM 

2 1 COPYRIGHT 1989 FALSOFT, INC 

3 1 BY B. J. BRYSON 

4 1 P. O. BOX 295 

5 1 MANAHAWKIN, NJ 08050 

10 PCLEAR8:PMODE4,l:PCLS: SCREEN 1 
/I 

20 DRAW M BM82,91;R3ERUHERULHUNR5H 

E2R4UEU2HE2UHU2HU3HU6E2RE2U2L5H2 

UGL3GNL3GRFGL2GFDNGF2G2FDF2D3FD4 

GDGD2GD2GDFD2GDFD" : PAINT (83 , 90) : 

DRAWBM90 ,75 ; C0L2BH2NDEUC1BR8BUH 

U7GND2E2ND8HE2L2": 1 FACE 

30 DRAW II BM102 / 74;HUEU4HU11EU2HL2 

U2H4GFDLUHLUHGUHUHUHGDGD5FL3GL7G 

DLGLG4D5FDLHGDFD2F2D2HGFDGH3LHGF 

D5LH2U2H2ND5U3HU6EF2EHU3FRFEH2EF 

2EHU3HU4RER5FEH2UHR2FEH2R5F3EHU2 

EUEUR2FEHURFRFEH2R2F5RFRF7D4GD8G 

DFD11RU7DFD6RU5" : PAINT (82 , 40) : 1 

HAIR 

40 DRAW"BM68,191;ULU2LU2NFLU3LUH 





MUTANT MINERS 

Battle mutant uranium miners in a run for your life, action-packed, 

arcade style game. 10 levels with 10 screens per level! 
100% Machine Language (CoCo 1, 2 or 3 and Joystick) $19.95 

BURIED BUXX 

Fly your helicopter into enemy territory, dig ^sj*' 
up the loot and return to base. 
Watch out for the ever-present patrol aircraft and 
ground based missiles. 
100% Machine Language (CoCo 1, 2 or 3 and Joystick) $19.95 

See Review 'Rainbow' 2/89 

REVENGE of the 
MUTANT MINERS 

CoCo 3 owners rejoice! Muntant Miners is back with game 
configuration mode and much more! 
Joystick required. $19.95 



Many more programs available Including: 

Fohtgih, Dfetease, Picture Puzzles, 
Quantum Leap and more. 




JR & JR SOFTSTUFF 

P.O. BOX 1 18 • Lompoc, CA • 93438 • (805) 735-3889 

Orders Accepted 24 Hours a Day. 
All Programs on Diskette Only. 

A\i orders add $3,00 shipping. C.O.D. orders $4.00 additional 
You can usually get us in person from 5-9 PM PST. 
If you get the machine, leave a message 
and we will call back at your convenience. 

CALL OR WRITE FOR A COMPLETE LIST OF AVAILABLE PROGRAMS. 




2UHU4 HU5R2 ER3 FR3 FR3 FEH2L2 HLURERE 

REREHLGLGL 4 HU2 EUE 4 UE 3 UE9RERE 6REU 

EUEU2EU4HU4HU3HU2HU4H2U2HUHU2EFD 

FDFEUHU2RF2DF8L2HLGFRFRFR2F2RF4R 

F3RF5DFDFDF3D12GD3GD3GD2GDGDG3DG 

10DG6DG4LG9BM65 , 183 ; RF 3 RFRFRFRF2 

DBL8UH" : 'RIGHT COVER 

50 DRAW !, BM74,157;E4U2RU2RUR2URUR 

2UR2 URUR2 URURURURUR2 UR 2 EUR3 ENRGL 

3GL4 DL2 DLDLDL2 FL2 FL3 FL3 FNRL2 FNRL 

3 FNRLDL2 FLG2D2LD3L" : PAINT (80 , 191 

) : 'RIGHT COVER FOLD 

60 DRAWBM0 , 188 ; E3UE2U2EUEUE2UE3 

UDFD8GD3GDGDG4" : PAINT (0,191) : ■ 

LEFT COVER BACK 

70 DRAWBM42, 191 ;U2HU2HUHU2HUHU3 
HUH2UH2U4F6RFEH2LH3U2ERE2U3H2R3F 
R2F2D2FD5GD6GD4GD4FD2FDFD2" : PAIN 
T(43, 191) : 'LEFT COVER BOTTOM 
80 DRAW"BM3 6 , 155 ;U2R2E2U4HUHUHUH 
2UHU2HUHU3EUEU2ENU2FDFDFDF5RFR2F 
RFR2FRFRFR2FRF3D2L2H3GF2D2GL7HGF 
2RFD2GL7HL9": PAINT (45, 150) ; ' 
LEFT COVER TOP 

90 DRAW" BM71, 141 ; L2ULHLGDNFLHEUH 
LG 2 H 2 UHL 2 UHL 3 EUHNLU 2 H 2 NLGNU 2 R3 NE 
DFRER2FNRDGDFRE2NUF2RR2FRNFLGDF2 
RER2NEFNDHLG2 D2 11 : PAINT (65,137) :D 
RAWH5 C0LURURDBL4 DLULURBL3 LBU2 LE 
HDHDBH2UC1U": 'LEFT PJ BOTTOM 
100 DRAW"BM73,134;LULUHUH2LHNLEU 
HLG2HLHLH2GU2L3GHL2EHGU2NLD2R3EF 
RFRF2R3NU2R2ENHR2NU2FGDFR2D2NR2D 
2" : ' LEFT J>J MIDDLE 
110 DRAW"BM67, 120 ;U5EU3G2LNH2LG2 
LHU2NRFLHLD4FDR2ER2ND2R2F2D" : PAI 
NT (65, 116) : DRAWU6C0LFL2FLBLLC1L 
C0LEL2E2" : 'LEFT PJ TOP 
120 DRAW"BM66,109;C1LHLHL2U3ER2E 
R2ER4GDGDGDGHLG": PAINT (66, 106) : ' 
LEFT COLAR 

130 DRAWBM72 , 104 ;RFNDL3FBD4ND5F 
ND13ED17FNU10FNU5FDU4FD2EDRFBG2L 
DRDRD4FU6ED5" : 'BUTTONS 
140 DRAW"BM75,102;ER2E2UER2F2RF2 
DFGFLHGFLHGLHUNR2H2 LH" : PAINT (81, 
102) : DRAWBM74 , 99 ;R4UEU3L3GDGD2" 
:PAINT(75, 97) : 'RIGHT COLLAR AND 
THROAT 

150 DRAW"BM75, 104 ;RDR3 DFR2D2FRE2 
FRE2UD4GD2GDL2GDFR2E3URD5LG2D2R3 
NUL3 D2 LUHLGH2 LU2 LHLR2EUHL2 GUR2EU 
HL2UE2ULEUHU2": PAINT (80, 111) : ' 
RIGHT PJ TOP 

160 DRAWBM77 , 120F4DL2NU3FDLFR5D 
R2GD2L3NFUHULU" : 'RIGHT PJ BOTTOM 
170 DRAWBM84 , 121 ; C0R2DL2BR4UBU2 
RBU7 BL2 LFL2 FLBL2 DBD2 DL2 ELBU2 LEL2 
URBE2RDLBH2LEL2ELBEBURC1D" : 'LEFT 
TOP PJ DESIGN 

180 DRAW"BM164,17;M164,101;M223, 



60 THE RAINBOW June 1989 



131 ;U3M165 ,101;M22 3 , 13jZf ;UM165,1# 
1 ; M165 , 17 ; M2 2 1 , 0 ; L12M164 , 17 ; M2 12 
, 0 ;R3M165 , 17 ;M2 18,0; BM151 , 116 ;M 
151 , j3RM152 / 116 ;LM255 ,186 7 31423^,1 
91 ;M127 , 112 ;R3M149 , 118 ;R2" : PAINT 
(245,191) : 'WINDOW 

190 PCOPYlT05:PCOPY2T06:PCOPY3TO 
7 : PCOPY4T08 : PMODE4 , 5 : SCREEN1 , 1 
20p DRAW f, BM41,191;U7LND7LND7U3LN 
D4U2LND5LUND6LU2ND5HND2LU2LUHUHU 
2 BR7 BU 3 L4 BL3 BD3 HU2 EU2 EU5HUHLHUHU 
3 HU5 HU9 EU3 EUE 3 U2 HLHU2 EUE 5URURURU 
RURURURUF2 L2 FL2 DGDLG4DFEUD6FD5 " : 
PAINT (33,155):' LEFT COVER 
21J3 DRAW"BM52,191;U6HUHU2HU5EU4E 
U6HUHUHLHL4HLUR6FR4FR4FRFRE2UH4L 
HLHNR5NR6DNR6FNR6RFR2U6H2NR7 FNR7 
FNR7RFNR5 FNR4 FNR2U6 LH 11 : PAINT (50 , 
191) : PAINT (56, 155) : 1 LEFT COVER 
INSIDE 

220 DRAW"BM74,191;L3ELULULBD3BL2 
HUHU2LULEL2EL2EUGNU6LU12D3GD4R17 
U8HHHL2HNL2UBU2L3NR5ERHR6U3E2UEU 
5REU2 R2 EUR2 URURERE 2 RE 3 R3 ER3 ER BM 
116 , 191 ;UEUE4UE2EUE2UEHU2E3UEE4U 
E 2 UEU 3 EU 2 EU 6 HU 4 HUHUHUH 2 UH 2 " : PAIN 
T(110, 191) : 'RIGHT BLANKET BOTTOM 
230 DRAW"BM61, 108 ; L2HGNL2U2L3DLH 
ELHUE3RER6F2R2 " : PAINT (59 , 104 ) : DR 
AW fl BU2R5DR2UNRHL10HU3EUERERFR2FR 
FR2 FR2 f ' : PAINT (65,95) :DRAW"BM95,1 
03 ;HUHULULH3LHUE2UE2F2DFDBR2EHUH 
2DFDF" : PAINT (89 , 93 ) : 1 COLAR, NECK 
AND RIGHT BLANKET TOP 
240 DRAW"BM88 , 84 ;D2GD2GDGL7HLHLH 
LHU2HU2HU3EU2EUEU5EUE2R6HUL2BU5R 
L2 ERDBE 2 BU2R2 L3 HR2 ER3 HR5HRU2 LNU2 
RF2NL2 DNL2 DNL2 FNL2 BR3ED5 LR2NU3 BD 
2DLDBD3BL4D2FD3FD2FDU3RNU8LD3GDL 
D3GD2NL5BG2G3":PAINT(75,84) : 1 
FACE 

250 DRAW"BM104,74;GDGUL2DLULUR4H 

L2URU2RU4LND4U5LU2FU7RU2GULU2LUH 

3D3NRGULU2": 'RIGHT HAIR 

2 60 DRAW M BM62 , 78 ; LULH2LD2RD3RD3H 

GNU 6U4 LNU3 GNU 1 3 HNU 2 5UHNU 2 0U 3 HNU 1 

4U4LU9FE3NUND2NF3R3U2LNUNDR2F2RF 

EHL2NHR2U3 LU2NU4LU6REND3RND3RD2N 

R4ER3UH2UNR3FR3FH2UHR2DR4F3RU6RU 

3F2R3H2U3LFNDF3RU3L" : 'HAIR 

270 DRAW"BM58 ,138 ; LBH2LBH2LHLDHN 

L2U4FDG2U2NLUNL4NRURE NL3UNL4HLE 

UR2 FDR2 GR4 DRL1 2 D2 L2HULUR3U2 BRL4 

ND3LU4R3NGUHL2ND2REF2R2DRFNR2GL7 

U4R2NR3NU3RU3RNU2R3D2R2NR2ULU4NL 

3NU2 RDR3UUH2 LR4 GNR4 FR3 GLFNR3FL4 D 

RDR2NUFRDRNU2FNU2R2 " : ' LEFT PJ 

280 DRAW"BM69,141;DRU2R2NU6RND2N 

U3RU3BR12BU2ENU3RNU6EHUERFU2FNR2 

UNR2HL2NDR3UER4LND2HL2U5RND6ED3R 

2 DHU5HNULNGNLHNLRU4 FL2 BL2 LBU4R2U 



3HND4UH2 1 ': 'RIGHT PJ 

290 DRAW"BM223,129;M223,0; BM149 

, 118 ;M13 6 , 112 ;L3M149 , 118 ;M132 , 11 

2;L2M149,118;":PAINT(215,100) : • 
WINDOW 

300 PMODE4 , 1 : SCREEN1 , 1 : 1 SHOW 
UNHIGHLIGHTED PICTURE 
310 IFRND(100)=1THENFORT=1TO9+RN 
D(9) :PMODE4,l+((RND(2)-l)*4) :SCR 
EEN1 , 1 : NEXTT : PMODE4 , 1 : SCREEN1 , 1 : 
PLAY"01T255L255V31CDGFEV25BGDCV1 
0AFEBV15GEDBACV5EDBF" : ' THUNDER 
AND LIGHTNING 

320 R=RND (10) : 'CHOOSE COORDINATE 
330 H=H(R) :V=V(R) : V (R) =V (R) +S (R) 
: ' SAVE CORDINATE VALUES AND MOVE 
VERTICAL COORDINATE DOWN 
340 IF V(R)>27+H(R)/2.25 OR H(R) 
<165 THEN H(R)=165+RND(51) :V(R)= 
22+RND(90) - (H(R) -80) /8 : S (R) =RND ( 
3): 'CHOOSE NEW COORDINATE VALUES 
IF COORDINATES AREN'T IN WINDOW 
350 PRESET (H,V) : PRESET (H+1,V) : ' 
ERASE OLD VALUES 

360 PSET(H(R) ,V(R) ,1) :PSET(H(R)+ 

1,V(R) ,1) : 'PLOT NEW VALUES 

370 IFRND(10)>3THENPOKE140,250+R 

ND(5) :EXEC43350: ' PITTER-PATTER 

SOUND 

1000 GOTO310: ' GO BACK TO THUNDE 
RAND LIGHTNING ROUTINE /E\ 



BYTE BACK 
AT TAXES 
WITH TRY-O-TAX 



available for CoCo, MSDOS, TRS-80 



revised for '88 law changes 



prompts for easy guided use 



calculates 1040, 1040A, 2441, 2106, 6502 



calculates schedules A-F, SE 



computer generated substitute forms 



FREE TAX ESTIMATE PROGRAM 



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CHECKS WELCOME CARDS, CO.D 

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SHIPPING 



$44.99 



TRY-O-BYTE, 1008 Alton Circle, Florence, S.C. 29501, (803) 662-9500 



June 1989 THE RAINBOW 61 



Featur e 



Auto-run BASIC programs by typing just 
their filenames 





By Fred Kolesar 




ouldn't it be nice if BASIC 
programs would load into 
CoCo's memory and run just 
by typing it's filename. No more typing 
RUN then fumbling for that *&!% shift 
quote (if I had a nickel for every time 
I've missed the shift key and typed run2 
filename), EZRun makes several 
changes to the CoCo including a patch 
to load and auto run BASIC programs 
with just a filename. Table 1 gives a brief 
explanation of what EZRun does. 

To use EZRun on a 64K CoCo just 
put a REM at the start of each line marked 
"CoCo 3 Only" and be sure the CoCo 
2 is in the all-RAM mode before run- 
ning EZRun. 

I've included a fully commented 
EDTASM source code (Listing 1) for 
the auto-run module. The source file is 
a conditional assembly. Setting the 
expression on Line 600 to O or 1 will 
assemble the object code for either Disk 
BASIC 1.0 or 1.1 respectively. Beginners, 
don't use the /SR switch if you assemble 
this file. EZRun is a multiple ORG pro- 
gram and cannot be assembled as a 
single record. 



Fred Kolesar is the owner of a small 
business in Westfield, Pennsylvania. 
After buying his first computer in 1984, 
he quickly became addicted to pro- 
gramming. He and his wife, Cindy, have 
two daughters, Kristina and Nichole, 
ages seven and six, who are now pro- 
gramming his old CoCo 2. 



Lines 

12 



22 



At the expense of only five bytes I've 
made it PC relative. EZRun will func- 
tion properly anywhere in memory as 
long as the hook at SAF90 points to the 
new location. Memory address SAF90 
is a JSR instruction with the next two 
bytes being a hexadecimal address 
pointing to EZRun. 

When you press ENTER after typing 
at the keyboard, BASIC must intepret 
and execute what you have typed. BASIC 
attempts to match what you have typed 
with its list of reserved words. If it can't 
find a match, BASIC assumes you are 
assigning a variable name and jumps to 
its LET routine. LET grabs the variable 
name then looks for an = token (for 
example, TEST31)* When BASIC checks 
for the equal sign and it's not there it 
returns a Syntax Error message. This is 
where EZRun steps in. 

EZRun performs the syntax check 
and returns control to BASIC if the equal 



Description 

Contains the Read/ Data 
PALETTE command. Data 
can be any color number 0 
to 63. The first eight 
numbers are background 
palettes 0 to 7 and the sec- 
ond eight are foreground 
pallettes 0 to 7. A single 
space separates the fore- 
ground and background 
color numbers. The space is 
for quick editing of the 16 
palettes. While in the Edit 
mode press S (search sub- 
command) then the space 
bar; the edit cursor jumps to 
the center of the 16 palettes. 
To change a background 
palette count backward 
from 7. For foreground 
palettes count forward from 
0. If you're not using a CoCo 
3 put a REM at the start of 
Line 12. In this way, should 
you upgrade to a CoCo 3, 
you'll need only delete the 
REM to use the CoCo 3 line. 
Do the same with all "CoCo 
3 Only" lines. 

Contains the printer baud 
rate. Change the value after 
the comma to suit your sys- 
tem. CoCo's standard baud 
rate is 600 (POKE 150,87). 
Baud 1200 is 150, 40; 1800 



Lines 



Table 1 
Description 



is 150, 25; and 2400 is 150, 
IB. The printer switches 
must be set equal to the 
CoCo's rate or you get gar- 
bage on the printer. Re- 
member, higher baud rates 
mean faster printing: Set the 
printer switches to the high- 
est setting available and 
make the appropriate poke 
to match the CoCo with 
your printer. 
24 Contains the disk-drive step 
rate. If you get I/O errors 
when trying to load at this 
rate, press the Reset button 
and put a REM at the start of 
Line 24. 

26 Cuts the disk access delay in 
half. Try it, if it doesn't work 
for you, do as in Line 24. 

28 Enhances the OK prompt. 
Address 2394 holds the de- 
fault drive number. Poking 
44014 with this value +48 
changes the 0 to the default 
drive number. Poking 
44015,62 changes the l< to 
the Greater Than symbol >. 
34 to 44 Patch the DRIVE command 
so that it will update the 
prompt whenever it's used. 
For example, type DRIVE 2, 
then press ENTER and the 
prompt changes to '2>'. 



62 



THE RAINBOW June 1 989 



CoCo 3 Disk 64K Disk Modification 



me 



sign is present. Otherwise EZRun as- 
sumes you have typed a filename and 
attempts to load and run the program. 

Because Color BASIC'S LET routine 
only preserves the first two characters 
of a viable name, EZRun has to tempor- 
arily patch Disk BASIC'S filename rou- 
tine. Lines 2600 to 4400 make a patch 
that brings Disk BASIC back to the 
subroutine GETLEN, lines 5300 to 8000. 
GETLEN removes the hook in Disk BASIC 
and converts any operator tokens that 
Color BASIC may have put into the input 
buffer. The Subroutine then returns to 
Disk BASIC with the input buffer loca- 
tion in Register X and the filename 
length in Register B. After Disk BASIC 
has finished processing a valid filename, 
control returns to lines 4500 to 4900, 
which send control to CoCo's load and 
run routines. 

Note: Lines 2000 to 2200 will abort 



Lines 



Description 



Type DRIVE 0 then press 
ENTER. Now the prompt is 

'0>\ 

48 Lets you enter PCLEfiR 0 
through B within a program 
or direct mode. 

52 Replaces the awkward 
SHlFT-@ combo that puts 
CoCo on hold . Pressing 
BREAK alone does the job of 
holding the CoCo, and 
SHIFT-BREAK will function 
as the BREAK key. 

54 Makes SHlFT-space bar 
function as SHIFT-Up arrow. 
I use the EDIT command a 
lot while programming in 
BASIC and the space bar is a 
lot handier than the arrow. 
60 to 76 Poke the EZRun object code 
into memory and patch the 
LET statement. This allows 
you to load and run a BASIC 
program just by typing its 
filename, lord and RUN work 
as before. 
90 to 95 Error check data lines 66 to 
70. This must be done sepa- 
rately from the actual poke 
routine in Line 76. Assign- 
ing a new variable while 
making the patch will lock 
up the computer. 



Listing 1: 



AUTO RUN PATCH ** 12/88 



FAAjJ 
FAA0 El 
FAA4 26 
FAA6 0E 
FAA8 D6 
FAAA 5C 
FAAB 26 
FAAO 86 
FAAF B7 
FAB 2 F7 



FAB 8 DD 
FAB A IF 
FABC C3 



9999 

■997* 



AF90 

AF9pf BD FAA? 



9F 00A6 

n 

9F 
68 

4B 

n 

0959 
P95E 



FAB 5 FC C950 



76 

59 
9m 



FABF FD C950 
FAC2 8E C2A6 
FAC5 BD C938 



FAC8 7E CA6C 



99999 

99m 
99299 
99m 
99m 
99599 

99699 DBFLAG 
99199 DB10 

99*99 DBll 

99999 STORE 

91999 
91199 *** 

91199 
91299 HOOK 
91499 
91599 *** 

91699 

91199 FNCK 

9m9 
91999 

92999 MAYBE 

92199 
92299 
92399 
92*99 
92599 

92699 
92199 

92899 
92999 
93999 

93199 
93299 
93399 

93^99 OSl 

93599 

93699 

93199 

93899 READY 
93999 

94999 
94199 

94299 

94399 READY 
94499 

94599 

94699 

94199 
94899 
94999 

9^999 
95199 

95299 



FACB DC 76 



FACD FD C950 



FAD? CE 
FAD 3 34 
FAD 5 5F 



49 



EDTASM+/P1-PP-PP PAGE 1 



Copyright <C) 1988 
Kolesar B/S 
7 Ladd Road 
Westfield, pa. 16950 



TITLE 
EQU 

EQU 
EQU 
EQU 



1 

9 

$76 



RUN PATCH ** 12/88 

* Conditional assembly flag 
9 -1.0 dos / 1 - 1.1 dos 



* 2 unused bytes in low ram 



org hook where LET statement does syntax check 
ORG $AF9? 

JSR FNCK * new syntax check for LET 



org new 
ORG 
CMPB 
BNE 
JMP 
LDB 
INCB 
BNE 
LDA 
STA 
STB 
COND 
LDD 
ENDC 
COND 
LDD 
ENDC 
STD 
TFR 
ADDD 
COND 
STD 
LDX 
JSR 
ENDC 
COND 
STD 
LDX 
JSR 
ENDC 
COND 
JMP 
ENDC 
COND 
JMP 
ENDC 



syntax check in ram above Super E.C.B. 
SFAAJJ 

[$A6] * do syntax ck for 
MAYBE * not I could be filename 
$9F * process new variable 

$68 * msb of line#/$FF-direct mode 

* SFF+1 is 9 
ERROR * not 9 f can 1 1 be direct mode 
#3 * direct mode, do RUN"Filename 

$959 * run flag. 3-close files/run 
$95E * merge flag. ?-*no merge 
DB1JJ-DBFLAG 

$C8A2 * D-Basic 1. J7 jsr address 
DBll -DBFLAG 

$C95fJ * D-Basic 1,1 jsr address 

STORE * save it for later 

PC,D * our ram location into D 

#GETLEN-0S1 * offset to Getlen sub 
DB1J3- DBFLAG 

$C8A2 * hook it in D-Basic 1.0 

#$C28E * point X at 'BAS* ext 

$C88A * let D-Basic 1.0 process f/n 

DBll -DBFLAG 

$C950 * hook it in D-basic 1.1 

#$C2A6 * point X at 1 BAS » ext 

$C938 * let D-Basic 1.1 process f/n 



95399 GETLEN LDD 

95499 COND 

95599 STD 

95699 ENDC 

95199 COND 

95899 STD 

95999 ENDC 

96999 LDU 

96199 PSHS 

96299 CLRB 

96399 



DB10- DBFLAG 

$C9BE * let D-basic l.JI load/run f/n 
DBll -DBFLAG 

$CA6C * let D-basic 1.1 load/run f/n 

D-Basic will JSR back to here while processing 

D-basic' s f/n routine checks for a valid 
variable. Upon exit X»v location :B« length 



STORE * D-basic normal jsr address 
DB10- DBFLAG 

$C8A2 * remove my hook in 1.9 
DBll -DBFLAG 

$C950 * remove my hook in 1.1 



#$2DC 
U 



* input buffer, f/n is here 

* save f/n starter- 

* now get length in B 

* & strip any operator tokens 



June 1989 THE RAINBOW 63 



Protect and highlight 
gour important 
magazine collection 

with sturdy 
RAINBOW binders 




Distinctive, Durable RAINBOW Binders 

the rainbow is a vital resource to be referred to 
again and again. Keep your copies of the rainbow safe 
in our quality, distinctive binders that provide^ngi 
plete protection. X*SMS 
These attractive red vinyl binders showcase your 
collection and ensure your rainbows are in mint 
condition for future use. Each binder is richly em- 
bossed with the magazine's name in gold on the front 
and spine. They make a handsome addition to any 
room.""""" v '^ v 

Put an End to Clutter 

Organize your workspace with these tasteful bind- 
ers. Spend more time with your CoCo and eliminate 
those frustrating searches for misplaced magazines. 

A set of two binders, which holds a full 12 issues of 
the rainbow, is only $13.50 (plus $2.50 shipping and 
handling). 

Special Discounts on Past Issues 

To help you complete your collection of the rain- 
bow, we're offering a special discount on past issues 
of the magazine. 

When you place an order for six or more back issues 
of the rainbow at the same time you order binders, 
you are entitled to $1 off the regular back issue price. 
To order, please see the "Back Issue Information" 
page in this issue. 

Know Where to Look 

You may purchase the "Official And Compleat index 
To THE RAINBOW" for $1 when you purchase a set 
of binders. This comprehensive index of rainbow's 
first three years (July 1981 through July 1984) is 
usually priced at $2.50. 



YES. Please send me 



set(s) of RAINBOW binders 




Take advantage of these special offers with your binder purchase: 

Save $1 off the single issue cover price for back issues. Minimum order of 6 magazines. Please 
enclose a back issue order form from a recent issue indicating magazines wanted. 

Purchase the "Official and Compleat Index to THE RAINBOW" for $1. (Regular price $2.50.) 



State 



ZIP 



(These offers good only with the purchase of a rainbow binder set) 

Name 

Address 

City 

□ My check in the amount of is enclosed. (In order to hold down costs, we do not bill.) 

Charge to: □ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 

Account Number Expiration Date 

Signature 

Mail to: Rainbow Binders, The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. 

Binders are $13.50 per two-binder set plus $2.50 shipping and handling. If your order is to be sent via U.S. mail to 
a post office box or foreign country, please add $2. Kentucky residents add 5% sales tax. U.S. currency only, please. 
In order to hold down non-editorial costs, we do not bill. 

For credit card orders call (800) 847-0309, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST 

All other inquiries call (502) 228-4492. 



FAD 6 


A6 




06400 COUNT 


IDA 




* get a byte from the input 


FADS 


27 


IB 


06500 


BEQ 


FNEND 


* 0 byte is end of buffer 


FADA 


5C 




06600 


INCB 




* not end. add 1 to count 


FADB 


85 


8? 


06700 


BITA 


#128 


* test bit 7 


FADD 


27 


F7 


06800 


BEQ 


COUNT 


* clr! not a token 


FADF 


IF 


51 


06900 


TFR 


PC,X 


* where are we in ram? 


FAE1 


3? 


89 P01A 


07000 OS2 


LEAX 


TABLE- 


■0S2,X * X has Table address 


FAE5 


Al 


81 


07100 Tl 


CMPA 


,X++ 


* match token side of table? 


FAE7 


27 


06 


07200 


BEQ 


T2 


* yes. 


FAE9 


6D 


84 


07300 


TST 


,x 


* end of table? 


FAEB 


26 


F8 


07400 


BNE 


Tl 


* no. keep looking 


FAED 


20 


09 


07500 


BRA 


ERROR 


* not in the table 


FAEF 


A6 


82 


07600 T2 


IDA 




* X-l. byte from ascii side 


FAF1 


A7 


5F 


07700 


STA 


-l.u 


* replace token in buffer 


FAF3 


20 


El 


07800 


BRA 


COUNT 


* keep checking input buffer 


FAF5 


35 


10 


07900 FNEND 


PULS 


X 


* f/n start in X for D-basic 


FAF7 


39 




08000 


RTS 




* let D-basic cont. f/n ck 


FAF8 


7E 


B277 


08100 ERROR 


JMP 


$B277 


* syntax error 








08200 *** 




1st byte of each double byte is token 












value 


of the operator. 2nd byte is the 












ascii 


value 


FAFB 




8327 


08300 TABLE 


FDB 


$8327 


* » 


FAFD 




AB2B 


08400 


FDB 


$AB2B 


* + 


FAFF 




AC2D 


08500 


FDB 


$AC2D 


* - 


FB01 




AE2F 


08600 


FDB 


$AE2F 


* / 


FB£3 




AF5E 


08700 


FDB 


$AF5E 


* A 


FB£5 




AD 2 A 


08800 


FDB 


$AD2A 


* * 


FB07 




B23E 


08900 


FDB 


$B23E 


* > 


FBJ79 




B43C 


09000 

r r r r 


FDB 


$B43C 


* < 


FB0B 




00 


09100 


FOB 


0 


* end of table flag 






0000 


09200 


END 




* 


WW? TOTAL ERRORS 











EZRun if reached from within a run- 
ning BASIC program line. 

EZRun is limited to filenames that do 
not begin with a reserved word. The 
filename poker won't work, basic 
matches the reserved word POKE and 
changes it to a single byte token (146). 
While executing the input, BASIC jumps 
to the POKE routine instead of LET. Of 
course you can't POKE R so a Syntax 
Error is returned from the POKE routine. 

This can be handled in two ways. You 
can use the old methods of typing RUN 
"POKER"/ LORD "POKER", R or rename 
problem files with the prefix X, for 
example, XPDKER. Since CoCo doesn't 
have any reserved words beginning with 
X this will force the interpreter to 
execute the LET routine and allow 
EZRun to step in. 

I hope these enhancements make 
CpCoing as user friendly for you as they 
hatve me. 

(Questions or comments regarding 
this utility may be directed to the author 
at 7 Ladd Road, Westfield, PA 16950. 
Please enclose an SASE when request- 
ing a reply.) □ 



Listing 2: EZRUN 

0 '*** Copyright (C) 1988 

1 1 COPYRIGHT 19 89 FALSOFT,INC 

2 «*** Kolesar B/S 
4 i*** 7 Ladd Road 

6 i*** Westfield, PA. 16950 
8 GOSUB90: RESTORE 1 go check dat 
a. return if ok! 
10 ** read/data palette command 

(COCO 3 ONLY) 
12 FORF-0TO15 : READC : PALETTEF , C : N 
EXT : DATA18 ,,0,9,36,38,27,45,38, 0 
,18,0,63,54,0,36,27 
14 WIDTH 80:CLS2 ' (COCO 3 ONLY) 
16 ATTR 3,1 1 (COCO 3 ONLY) 
18 VERIFY ON 

20 IFPEEK(49474)X48THENDB=1: ' d 
isk basic 1.1 if ><48 
22 POKE 150,40 'set printer baud 
at 1200 

24 IFDB=1THEN POKE55318 , 20 : POKE5 
5232, 0 ELSEPOKE55075,20:POKE5498 
9,J3 'set 6ms step rate 

26 IFDB=1THEN POKE5518^ , 18 : POKE5 

5181, 18:POKE55182,18 ELSEPOKE549 

37,18:POKE54938,18:POKE54939,18 

'nop second delay loop 

28 POKE 44014, PEEK(2394)+48 :POK 

E 44015,62 1 new prompt 0> 

30 POKE 44016,32 ' replace carri 

age return after new prompt 

3 2 '* patch DRIVE command 

34 IFDB=1THEN POKE52942 , 126 : POKE 



52943, 0:POKE52944, 243 ELSEPOKE52 
72 2,126:POKE52 72 3 ,0 : POKE52724 , 24 
3 'jmp 243 

36 POKE 243,247 : POKE 244,9 : POK 
E 245,90 1 stb 2394 
38 POKE 246,203 :POKE247,48 1 ad 
db #48 

40 POKE 248,247 :POKE249,171 : PO 
KE 250,238 ' stb 44014 
42 POKE 251,192 : POKE 252,48 ' s 
ubb #48 

44 POKE 253,57 ' rts 

46 '* patch PCLEAR command 

48 POKE 38543,33 : POKE 38563,33 

'pclear0 brn f/c error 

50 ' 

52 POKE 41598,19 ' change < BREAK 

> to equal <SH>-<@> 

54 P0KE41591,95 ' change <SHF>-< 

SPACEBAR> to equal <SHF>-< A > 

56 '* patch LET for Autorun enha 

ncement 

58 ' * to relocate patch change 1 
ine 60. variable 'A f is the sta 
rt location of the patch, ' B 1 is 
start+length of the patch. ('A 
=&HFAA0 1 to 1 A=&H new address'). 

Also match data in line 74 to 
the new address 
60 A=&HFAA0:B=A+&H6B:GOSUB7 6 
62 IFDBX1THENPOKEA+22,200:POKEA 
+23 , 162 : POKEA+32 , 200 : POKEA+33 , 16 
2 : POKEA+3 6 , 142 : POKEA+38 , 200 : POKE 



June 1989 THE RAINBOW 65 



A+39 , 138 : POKEA+41, 201 : POKEA+42 , 1 
9j3:POKEA+46,200:POKEA+47,162: • p 
atch Autorun for l.p D-basic 

64 A=&HAF9p : B=A+&H02 : GOSUB76 : END 
66 DATA E1,9F,00,A6,26,02,0E,9F, 
D6, 68,5C,26,4B,86,03,B7,J39, 
59,F7,09,5E,FC,C9,5j3,DD,76, 
1F,50,C3,00,0F,FD,C9,50,8E, 
C2 

68 DATA A6,BD,C9,38,7E,CA,6C,DC, 
76,FD,C9,50,CE,02,DC,34,40, 
5F,A6,C0,27,1B,5C,85,80,27, 
F7,1F,51,30,89,00,1A,A1,81, 
27 

70 DATA 06,6D,84,26,F8,20,09,A6, 
82,A7,5F,20,E1,35,10,39,7E, 
B2,77,83,27,AB,2B,AC,2D,AE, 
2F,AF,5E,AD,2A,B2,3E,B4,3C, 
00 

72 •* line 74 is M/L for JSR $ 
FAA0 



74 DATA BD, FA, A0 

76 FORF=A TO B : READH$ : POKEF , VAL ( 
"&H"+H$) : NEXT: RETURN 

89 • * error check data lines 

90 FORF= 0 TO 1 5 : RE ADA : NEXT 1 read 
data past the palette settings ( 
COOO 3 ONLY) 

91 B=3 6: 0=4117 : L=66 : GOSUB95 1 
data check line 66 

92 0=4274 :L=68:GOSUB95 1 

data check line 68 

93 0=3724 :L=70: » data check 1 
ine 70 

94 ' * Fall to line 95. Return to 
line 8 if data is ok. Error mes 

sage if not. 

9 5 E=0 : F0RF=1T0B : READH$ : E=E+VAL ( 
"ScH"+H$) : NEXT:IFEXC THENPRINT"D 
ATA ERROR IN LINE "L: END ELSE RET 
URN /R\ 





Corrections 







"Doctor ASGIP'(February 1989, Page 99): The address 
given for Merle Kemmerly, author of Telstar 32, is an old one. 
His current address is: 



Merle Kemmerly 
150 5. Atlanta St., 
Roswell, GA 30075 



"High Capacity Screen Dumps, Part l"(May 1989, Page 
100): We have been inf^rrjied of several corrections and 
clarifications for this article by H. Allen Curtis. They are as 
follows: 

1) Page 101, Column 2, first full sentence: Change the name 

DESKTOPH to DESKTOP L. ^ ; ' 

2) Page 101, Column 2, third full paragraph : Change the phrase 
"if you have made" to ''including." 

3) Page 101 ; Column 3, third full paragraph: You must preceed 
the insert indicated in the last sentence with a comma in Lifle 
740 of the program. In other words, insert ,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(15). 

4) Page 103, Column 2, third full paragraph: Change the phrase 
"there's no need to" to "you must now." 

5) Page 103, Column 3, second full paragraph: Replace the 
second and third sentences with: 

Save the second screen as previously, but this time use the 
filename DUMPL2. Repeat the process used to obtain the second 
file and save the third screen as DUMPL3. 



"CoCo Does Windows and a Whole Lot More"(March 1989, 
Page 100): There is a minor bug in the demo program (TicrTac- 
Toe) that causes it to think a move has been made if you open 
a window over the game and then click to close the window.'Tq 
correct this, change lines 690, 760, 880 and 980 to: ® ^ 

GOSUB 13000 :CX=-1:CY--1: GOTO 560 

"A Patch for a Pateh"(Febrtiary 1989, Page 80): As pub- 
lished, the patches to Super Patched EDTASM to allow the use 
of the CoCo 3's Hi-Res screens work only with Disk BASIC 1.0. 
Users of Disk basic 1.1 will appreciate the following correc- 



tions. If you are starting from scratch and have the source code 
from the September 1983 issue, make the changes to those lines 
shown in the following table: 

Line DOS 1.0 DOS 1.1 

149 $CEA2 $CF7E 

172 $CF07 ICFE3 

258 $CA3B $CAE9 

298 $C8A4- ^r-^mS2, 

321 $C468 V : $C48D 

392 $CBD2 $CCAC 

Alternatively, if you want to use the SPATCH program in- 
cluded on the February 1989 RAINBOW ON DISK, follow the steps 
below: 

1) Insert EDTASM ROM Pak and turn on the CoCo. 

2) At the prompt, press Z and enter, 

3) Type U COOO 1000 27 FF and press ENTER. 

4) Put a fresh tape in the cassette recorder, press Play and 
Record. 

5) Type P EDTASM 1000 37f F 1000 and press ENTER. 

6) Turn the CoCo off, plug in the disk controller and power 
machine back up;i; 

7) Copy S PATC H (from the February 1989 rainbow on disk) to 
a fresh disk. 

8) Enter CL0ADM" EDTASM and save it to disk using; SAVEM 

"EDTASM" , &H1000 , &H37FF , &H1000. 

9) Enter and run the following program: 

vtf P C L EA R8 ; W I DTH 32 : GOTO 10 

1' *****c0py right 1988 randall r 

,eid, 

5 sav e 0 d0sp atgh m : e no • 

lib L0ADM" EDTASM. W: : L0ADM"S PATCH " 
W • F0 RA-0T05: READ A$ , B $ ,0$ : POKE 
VAL ( "&H "+A$ ) , VAL"H M +B$ ) : POKE V 
A L ("&H " +A$ ) +1 ,VAL( "&H " +C I ) : NEXT 
30 DATA 16CD, if.; 7E , 1654, CF >£3 . 0 E 
3 0 , CA, E9 ,0E7E, C9 , 5 2 .0EB1.C4 , 8 D , 0 
F55 , CC , AC 

40 SAVEM n ED+/BIN w ,&H0E00 ,&H37 FF; 
&H0E00 

50 END /R\ 



66 THE RAINBOW June 1989 



Use our 800 number! 



For credit card orders, you may want to phone in your subscription. Our 

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We accept VISA, MasterCard and American Express. 

Subscriptions to the rainbow are $31 a year in the United States. Canadian 

rate is $38 (U.S. funds only). Surface rate elsewhere is $68 (U.S.). Airmail 

is $103 (U.S.). All subscriptions begin with the current issue. Please allow 

6 to 8 weeks for the first copy. Kentucky residents add 5% sales tax. 

In order to hold down non-editorial costs, we do not bill. 



Send Me Rainbow Magazine! 

Which Tandy Color Computer do you use? □ CoCo 1 □ CoCo 2 □ CoCo 3 

Here's your chance to have a Pot O' Gold full of programs, articles and information about 
CoCo every month of the year! 

As the premier magazine for the Tandy Color Computer, THE RAINBOW has more of 
everything — and greater variety, too. Do yourself and your CoCo a favor and subscribe to 
THE RAINBOW today! 

YES! Sign me up for a year (12 issues) of THE RAINBOW. 

□ NEW □ RENEW (attach label) 

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Address 

City State ZIP 

□ Payment Enclosed (payment must accompany order) 
Charge: □ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 

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Just call (800) 847-0309 anytime from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. Credit card orders only. 
Subscriptions to rainbow on tape are $80 a year in the United States, $90 (U.S. 
funds) in Canada and $105 (U.S.) in all other countries. 

rainbow on disk is $99 a year in the United States, $115 (U.S.) in Canada and $130 
(U.S.) in all other countries. 

Individual issues of rainbow on tape are $10 in the U.S., $12 (U.S.) in Canada and 
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add 5% sales tax. 

rainbow on tape and rainbow on disk are not stand-alone products; you need the 
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the rainbow magazine is a separate purchase. 



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YES! Sign me up: □ NEW □ RENEW (attach label) 

□ RAINBOW ON TAPE □ RAINBOW ON DISK 

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Charge: □ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 

Account Number . _ 

Signature Card Expiration Date 



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* 

The Biggef 1 
The Best 
The \ndispensaWe 



The 




THE COOR COMPUTER MONTHLY MAGAZINE 



THE RAINBOW is the biggest, best, brightest and 
most comprehensive publication a happy CoCo 
ever had! THE RAINBOW features more programs, 
more information and more in-depth treatment of 
the Tandy Color Computer than any other source. 

A monthly issue contains nearly 200 pages and 
up to two dozen programs, 14 regular columns and 
as many as 12 new product reviews. And advertise- 
ments: THE RAINBOW is known as the medium for 
advertisers — which means every month it has a 
wealth of information unavailable anywhere else 
about new products! Hundreds of programs are 
advertised in its pages each month. 

Every single issue of THE RAINBOW covers the 
wide spectrum of interests in the Tandy Color 
Computer — from beginners' tutorials and arcade 
games to telecommunications and business and 
finance programs. Helpful utilities and do-it- 
yourself hardware projects make it easy and fun to 
expand your CoCo's capabilities. And, monthly 
reviews by independent reader reviewers take the 
guesswork out of buying new software and hard- 
ware products. 

Join the tens of thousands who have found THE 
RAINBOW to be an absolute necessity for their 
CoCo. With all this going for it, is it surprising that 
more than 90 percent of THE RAINBOW subscrib- 
ers renew their subscriptions? We're willing to bet 
that, a year from now, you'll be doing the same. 



Rainbow On Tape 

& Rainbow On Disk! 



— great ways to bring THE RAINBOW into your life. 
Each month, all you do is pop the tape into your 
cassette player or the disk into your drive. No more 
lost weekends. As soon as you read an article about 
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Just think how your software library will grow. 
With your first year's subscription, you'll get almost 
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ON DISK, you'll also get all the OS-9 programs. 

RAINBOW ON TAPE and RAINBOW ON DISK — 
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To get your first heaping helping, just fill out and 
return the attached reply card. No postage neces- 
sary. 



■I— .■ 



t MW m 
i AM 

I MW 





VIDEO DIGITIZER 



The Rascan Video Digitizer is a state - 
of -the -art image processing system 
designed to take advantage of your 
Color Computer 3's graphic capabilities. 

The Rascan Video Digitizer connects 
easily to any color or black & white video 
camera, video recorder or video disc 
player and captures images with 
precision accuracy. 

Why settle for a 256 x 256 image area 
when the Color Computer can display so 
much more? We asked that question 
ourselves. Our only answer was to provide 
an image area of 640 x 200 and 
320 x 200! Say good - bye to those 
useless lo -resolution images created by 
other digitizers on the market. 

Life is not simply black & white, that's why 
we added living color to our Digitizer. 
Now, through the use of advanced 
programming techniques, 512K Color 
Computer 3 owners can capture images 
from their video camera and display 
them in 4096 Super Hi -Resolution 
graphics! 



Capture images effortlessly. Simply select 
the image capture option and turn your 
Rascan unit on. Within seconds your 
image will be captured and displayed 
on your screen. Images can be fine tuned 
by use of the contrast and brightness 
knobs found on the Rascan unit. 

Rascan also features a professional 
pop-up menu system which will allow for 
easy palette manipulation and color 
painting of captured images. 

The Rascan Video Digitizer comes 
complete with Rascan driver software, 
an easy to read manual sample graphic 
images disk and print driver disk (support- 
ing most printers). Although no further 
graphic editors are necessary to produce 
quality images, Rascan images can be 
easily loaded into ColorMax and 
CoCo Max graphic editors. 

Whether your interests are in desk -top 
publishing, report generation or simply for 
fun, the Rascan Video Digitizer will 
provide you with images of near photo- 
graphic quality! 



FEATURES 



RASCAN DS-69b 
YES NO YES NO 



Support of 640 x 200 1 6 Level Grey Images 


X 






X 


Support of 640 x 200 4 Level Grey Images 


X 






X 


Support of 320 x 200 16 Color Images 


X 






X 


Support of 4096 Hi-Res Color Graphics in 5 1 2K mode 


X 






X 


Support of Multiple Image Buffers in 51 2K mode 


X 






X 


Control of Contrast & Brightness via Control Knobs 
found on Digitizer 


X 






X 


Professional, Easy to Use Pop-Up Menu System 


X 






X 


Designed Exclusively to Take Advantage of the power 
of the Color Computer III 


X 






X 


Built in Histograph Utility to Aid in Image Quality 


X 






X 


Easy to use Paint and Palette editing, no need for additional 
Graphic editors 


. X 






X 


15 Day Full Money Back Guarantee 


X 






X 


Interface through Joystick Ports 


X 






X 


Requires additional cost of YCable or Multl-Pak interface 




X 


X 





THE 
RASCAN 
VIDEO 
DIGITIZER 



$ 159 



95 



— NO RISK GUARANTEE — 

If you are not completely satisfied 

with the performance of your 
Rascan Video Digitizer, you may 
return it, undamaged within fifteen 

days for the full refund of the 
purchase price plus shipping costs. 






DISCOVER 



s 


4;. 


I 













P.O. Box 6907, Burbank, CA 91510-6907 
(818)566-3571 • BBS: (818) 772-8890 
Toll free: 800 877-2232 ext. 139 



Personal checks, money orders, and American C.O.D. orders accepted. 
Include $3.00 for S/H. $2.50 extra for C.O.D. orders. (Cal. res. add 6.5% tax.) 
ATTENTION PROGRAMMERS: Game Point Software Is looking for talented 
writers. Top royalties guaranteed. 



I F o aturo 




The twelfth in a series of tutorials 
for the beginner to intermediate 
machine language programmer 



Machine Language Made BASIC 
Part XII: And the Music Played On 



This month we'll use many of the 
machine language routines dis- 
cussed in previous articles to cre- 
ate a music program that plays six voices 
(notes) simultaneously, and lets you change 
the timbre of the notes to create different 
sounds. First, let's decide what to put in 
the program and how to do it. Trying to 
make this as much like the PLAY command 
as possible, I suggest using the following 
values: 

Note (C - B) with a sharp (#) or flat (-) 
Octave (1 -5) 
Tempo (1-5) 

Length: 1 = whole note (#$80) 

2 = half note (#$40) 

3 = quarter note triplet (#$15) 

4 = quarter note (#$20) 

5 = thirty- second note (#$4) 

6 = sixteenth note (#$8) 

7 = eighth note triplet (#$A) 

8 = eighth note (#$10) 

*9 = sixty-fourth note (#$2) 
Rest 

*Use for separating like notes or play- 
ing grace notes. 

Since there are no graphics for this 
program, start it very low in memory to 
give plenty of room for each chord. Set 
Location $FF/100 to #$E00 and ORG at 
$2000. Reserve one memory byte for a note 
counter(N0TECT RMB 1) and load it with #6, 
since there are six notes in each chord. 
Reserve one memory byte each for Tempo, 
Length, Octave and temporary Octave 1. 
Chord information is put in as FCC lines. 
Once you set the Octave, Tempo and Length, 

Bill Nee buked the "snowbird" trend by 
retiring to Wisconsin from a banking ca- 
reer in Florida. He spends the long, cold 
winters writing programs for his CoCo. 



By William P. Nee 

you do not need to re-enter them unless 
they change. 

Label the start of the notes as NTABLE, 
remembering that using FCC lines enters the 
character's ASCII number (A = #$41, 1 = 
#$31, etc.). (EDTASM+ only allows 250 
characters per FCC line.) You can also number 
the NTABLE(s) for easy reference or correc- 
tions at each stanza, movement, page, etc. 

The vocabulary check pauses or "reads" 
each chord. First, load Register X with the 



The Listing: 6V0ICES 

WW * 









00100 


2999 


CE 


4100 


00110 START 


2993 


8E 


2111 


00120 


2996 


C6 


06 


00130 CHORD 


2008 


F7 


2461 


00140 


200B 


A6 


80 


00150 VOC 


200D 


1027 0FEF 


00160 


2911 


81 


3B 


00170 


2913 


27 


F6 


00180 


2015 


81 


52 


00190 REST 


2017 


26 


16 


00200 


2019 


FC 


2462 


00210 


201C 


ED 


CI 


00220 


201E 


CC 


0000 


00230 


2021 


ED 


CI 


00240 


2023 


ED 


CI 


00250 


2025 


ED 


CI 


00260 


2027 


ED 


CI 


00270 


2029 


ED 


CI 


00280 


202B 


ED 


CI 


00290 


202D 


20 


D7 


00300 


202F 


81 


54 


00310 TEMP 


2031 


26 


0C 


00320 


2033 


A6 


80 


00330 


2035 


80 


30 


00340 


2037 


C6 


14 


00350 


2039 


3D 




00360 


203A 


F7 


2462 


00370 


203D 


20 


CC 


00380 


203F 


81 


4C 


00390 LEN 


2041 


26 


0F 


00400 


2043 


A6 


80 


00410 


2045 


80 


30 


00420 


2047 


108E 


2436 


00430 



location of the NTABLE (LOX #NTABLE). 
Register X will now always contain the 
current chord location in the NTABLE. Load 
Stack U with the location $4 1 00, where the 
numerical value of each note is stored and 
saved. Load Register A with the contents of 
Register X (get the first character in the 
note chord) and increase Register X by one 
(LDA ,X+). 

Is the first character an R? If not, go to 
the next check. If it is a Rest, load Register 



$FF/100«#$E00 
ORG $2000 



LDU 

LDX 

LDB 

STB 

LDA 

LBEQ 

CMPA 

BEQ 

CMPA 

BNE 

LDD 

STD 

LDD 

STD 

STD 

STD 

STD 

STD 

STD 

BRA 

CMPA 

BNE 

LDA 

SUBA 

LDB 

MUL 

STB 

BRA 

CMPA 

BNE 

LDA 

SUBA 

LDY 



#$4100 

#NTABLE 

#6 

NOTECT 
,X+ 

PLAYER 

#«; 

VOC 

#'R 

TEMP 

TEMPO 

,U++ 

#0 

,U++ 

,U++ 

,U++ 

,U++ 

,u++ 
,u++ 

CHORD 

#'T 

LEN 

.X+ 

#$30 

#20 

TEMPO 
VOC 
#'L 
OCT 

,X+ 

#$30 

#LTABLE 



START OF FIRST CHORD 

SIX NOTES TO THE CHORD 

GET THE FIRST CHARACTER 
IF IT'S ZERO THATS ALL 

PASS OVER A ";" 
IS IT A REST 

GET THE TEMPO AND LENGTH 
THEY START EACH CHORD 
FILL IN SIX ZERO NOTES 



IS IT TEMPO 



GET THE TEMPO NUMBER 
FOR DIFFERENT TEMPOS 



IS IT LENGTH 



GET THE LENGTH NUMBER 



THE RAINBOW June 1989 




DISK 
CONTROLLER 

We at OWL-WARE are 
pleased to announce that we 
have purchased the rights to all 
of the Color Computer 
Products of J&M Systems. 
J&M has had more experience 
with CoCo controllers than any 
other supplier (except for 
Radio Shack® itself) and we 
are proud to add them to our 
nest! OWL-WARE will now be 
producing J&M controllers 
under the OWL brand. These 
controllers all use J&M's 
proven designs, with some 
minor improvements, and they 
will serve you for years to come. 

• All gold contacts 

• Works with all CoCo 
models (1,2,3) 

• Holds 2 switchable ROMS 

• Positive switching by 
simple jumper or optional 
external switch (No erratic 
software or pokes re- 
quired) 

• Buffered I/O lines to help 
prevent burn-out if unit 
accidentally pulled out 
with the system on 

• Latching chips are sock- 
eted to speed repairs 

• Does not use the WD 1773 
chip which caused 
problems with many CoCo 
3 systems and is now dis- 
continued 

• Attractive all metal case 

• Dealer inquiries now in- 
vited 



CONTROLLER ortllilll 



See the next 2 nages for more 
drive and software specials 
from OWL-WARE 




Disk drives are not our only business, but they sure are our 
main business! We have been selling hard and floppy drives for 
the CoCo longer than any other Rainbow advertiser. Our double 
sided drives are brand new, half-heights with a full one year 
warranty! The full-height drives offered cheap by our competi- 
tion are used or surplus! 



lillllllllliM 




lllllliili 

IIlltl$^ 





CASE AND 
POWER 
SUPPLY 

In recent months it has be- 
come very difficult to obtain de- 
pendable, safe power supply 
and cases for floppy drive sys- 
tems. They just couldn't pass 
our quality control. OWL- 
WARE has now produced a 
case and power supply that you 
can be proud to own and use. 
We believe that this is the best 
and most attractive drive case 
available for any computer. 

• Built in surge protector! 
(we believe that this fea- 
ture is unique in CoCo 
drive cases) 

• Sleek, modern design 

• Heavy-duty power supply 

• Fully shielded data cable 

• Modular power supply 
construction for ease of 
repairs 

• Stackable case design 

• Dealer inquiries now in- 
vited 





IJIiiill 



More 




©WL-WARE 



P.O. Boxlltf-A 
Mertztown, PA 19539 
- ORDER LINES (only) — 
(800) 245-6228 
(215) 682-6855 (PA) 




Pro ven 



On the Razor's Edge of 



Basic and OS-9 Hard 
Drive Systems 

Proven Performance for Demanding Home or 

Business Users 



Every hard drive which has been 
produced by OWL-WARE during the 
last 3 years is complete. A system con- 
sists of software, hard drive, controller, 
heavy-duty power supply, and LR Tech 
Interface. There are no hidden costs for 
assembly or testing. When a drive sys- 
tem is ordered, we fully assemble, test, 
and burn-in the system for 3 full days. 
This ensures dependability and op- 
timum performance. 

We have now been supplying CoCo 
hard drive systems and parts for more 
than 3 years. This is the longest history 
in the CoCo market of any system. 
Some other advertisers are stating that 
they have one of the most reliable sys- 
tems for the CoCo with all of 4 months 
history in the CoCo hard drive market*. 
We have reached our position in the 
hard drive market by providing our cus- 
tomers with a quality product that they 
(and we) can be proud to own and use. 



Because of many requests for a lower 
price system in kit form, we are now 
selling a kit of all parts at a significant 
discount compared to our regular 
prices. We recommend this kit (or any 
kits offered by any other supplier) only 
to those who have experience in 
electronic assembly and OS-9. 

We have LR Tech and Burke & Burke 



For OS-9 
Levels 1 
and t 


















Kit Prices: {As above fcut using Burke & Burke bus adapter) 









OWL Hard Drive BASIC 3 

There have been several ads in this 
magazine about BASIC for Color 
Computer hard drive systems. These 
ads sometimes only tell a part of the 
story. Our BASIC system price in- 
cludes assembly, testing, and 3-day 
burn-in period. We do not require a 
Multi-pak to operate. 

Our hard drive systems are fast, reli- 
able, and reasonable in price. This has 
been proven by hundreds of users over 
the past 3 years. We do not have to turn 
off error checking for speed. We 
achieve high speed BASIC from a uni- 
que indexing method. 

The table below will summarize some 
of the key points about our BASIC hard 
drive system and the B&B system. We 
believe that we have the best BASIC in- 
t erf ace for CoCo hard drives available. 

BASIC Hard Drive Systems* 

Feature OWL B&B 



Drive Portion 
Available at 
One Time 



Entire 



Partial (4 
sections) 



User Sets 

BASIC/OS-9 

Partitions 



YES 



Yes 




Add to Exist- 
ing OS-9 
Drive Without 
Reformat 



YES 



No(?) 



Drives 0-3 
Hard/Roppy 



YES 



No 



Built in Park 



YES 



No 



Speed 1 



FAST 



Fast 



*A11 feature details are believed to be 
true at time of writing and are subject 
to change. We believe that our BASIC 
hard drives are the fastest due to our in- 
dexing method, but both systems are 
fast and we sell both. On ours all 
BASIC commands work including 
DSKINI, DSKI1 and DSKOl 

Prices: With/Without Hard 

Drive 



$35./$79. 



Technology 



the Color Computer Frontier 




Bonus! 

Special 

Bundled 

Software 

with any 

Disk Drive 

Purchase! 




Floppy Drive Systems 

The Highest Quality for Years of Service 

(We have located a number of unused, surplus single sided drives for 
those who wish a quality, inexpensive system.) 

Drive 0 Systems (Half Height, Double Sided, Direct 
Drives) $199. (Same but Single sided) $185 

Drive 0 systems complete with drive, controller, legal DOS, 

cable, case, power supply, and manual 

Drive 1 Systems (Half Height, Double Sided, Direct 
Drives) $129. (Same but Single sided) $115. 

New 3.5", 720K Drives for OS-9 with case & 

Power Supply $179. 

Drive 1 Systems have drive, case, power supply. (You may 
require optional cable and/or DOS chip to use) 

Special for 0/1 Combos (Drives 0,1,2,3) $295. 



illiiiliiiiililill 



|pb$los^ o£ your 




-Model 

lliilliioi 





All drives are new and fully assembled. 
We ship only FULLY TESTED and 
CERTIFIED at these low prices. We 
use Fuji, YE Data, and other fine 
brands. No drives are used or surplus 
unless otherwise stated to you when 
you order. We appear to be the one of 
the few advertisers in Rainbow who 
can truly make this claim. We have 5 
years experience in the CoCo disk 
drive market! We are able to provide 
support when you have a problem. 



Drives 1 Year Warranty 




(pilpiiiiil^ll^ 



111 



OWL WARE Software Bundle 



Disk Tutorial/Utilities/Games 
DISK TUTOR Ver 1.1 

Learn how to use your disk drive from 
this multi-lesson, machine language 
program. This tutor takes you through 
your lessons and corrects your mistakes 
for a quick, painless disk drive introduc- 
tion. (This professionally written tutor 
is easily worth the bundle's total price.) 

OWL DOS 

An operating system that gives faster 
disk access and allows the use of 
double-sided drives. Corrects a floating 
point number error on early CoCo sys- 
tems. 

COPY-IT 

Quickly copies selected programs be- 
tween disks. A wild card option selects 
groups of programs to copy. 

VERIFY 

Verifies reading of each sector. Bad 
sectors are listed on the screen. 

2 GAMES 

We will select 2 games from our stock. 
These sold for more than $20 each. 

If sold separately this is more than $125 
worth of software!! 

Do not mistake this software with 
cheap, non-professional "Public 
Domain" software which is being of- 
fered by others. All of this software is 
copyrighted and professional in quality. 
The tutor is unique with us and has 
helped thousands of new users learn 
their disk drive. t 

only $27.95 
(or even better) 
only $6.95 with 
any Disk Drive Purchase!! 

g>ur ^prices, include & discount for cash 
ut cro not mcluae shipping. 

OWL-WARE has a libera! warranty policy. During the warran- 
ty period, all defective items will be repaired or replaced at our 
option at no cost to the buyer except for shipping costs. Call 
our tech number for return. Return of non-defective or un- 
authorized returns are subject to a service charge. 



p.o. Biillilll 



D with the current tempo, store it at Loca- 
tion U, and increase U by two. Then clear 
Register D, store it at Location U, and 
increase U by two. Do this five more times 
to get the six notes, and return to the vo- 
cabulary check. If the character is not T, go 
to the next vocabulary check; if it is, read 
the next character, which must be a num- 
ber. Since it is in ASCII, subtract #$30 to 
get the actual number value; multiply this 
by 20 (just to get tempo changes) and store 
the result in TEMPO. Go back to the vocabu- 
lary check; if the character is not L, go to the 
next check; if it is, read the next character, 
which must be a number. Again, subtract 
#$30 to get the number value. 

The actual note lengths are stored in 
LTABLE, so if you load Register Y with the 
LTABLE location and Register B with the A 
value in the table ( LDB A , Y), Register B will 
then contain the actual note length. Go back 
to the vocabulary check; if the next charac- 
ter is not an O, go to the next check. If it is, 
read the next character, which must be a 
number. Subtract #$30 to get the number 
value (1 to 5) and store it in OCTAVE. Go 
back to the vocabulary check. 

If the character isn't any of the above, it 
must be a note (C, D, E, F, G, A, B). First, 
increase the note location by two. Notes are 
always bytes 3 to 14, in our chord; the first 
two bytes are the tempo and length. Be- 
cause there are 12 steps in an octave, con- 
vert a C to Note 1, D to Note 3, etc. The 
notes are in ASCII format so subtract #$41 
to get a number value (A will = 0, B will = 
1, etc.). 

CTABLE gives the note number assigned 

to each letter (A is the 10th note, B is the 

11th note, G is the 8th note, etc.). Load 

Register Y with the CTABLE location and 

load Register B with the A value (LDB A , Y) 

to get the actual note value (C=l, D=3, 

E=5, F=6, G=8, A=10 and B=12). Now, 

check the next character to see if it is a sharp 

(#) or flat (-); if it's a sharp, increase the 
note value by one (C#=2, F#=7, etc.); if it's 

a flat, decrease the note value by one (E-=4, 
B-=ll, etc.). Don't use C- or B# as they 
will blow the program. 

If the next character after the note is not 
a sharp or a flat, decrease the vocabulary 
location by one, back to it' s previous loca- 
tion. Now convert the note to a value the 
computer can use to play it. First, decrease 
the note numbers one to 12 by one, to get 
numbers from zero to 11, then load the 
current OCTAVE into a temporary 0CT1. 
Multiply the note number (zero to 11) by 
two. 

The location SCALE contains the fre- 
quency for each note (zero to 11). Each 
frequency is two bytes - that's why we 
multiplied the note number by two. If we 
load Register Y with the scale location and 



204B E6 


A6 


00440 


LDB 


A,Y 


GET THE LENGTH VALUE 


204D F7 


2463 


00450 


STB 


LENGTH 




2050 20 


B9 


00460 


BRA 


voc 




2052 81 


4F 


00470 OCT 


CMPA 


#'0 


IS IT OCTAVE 


2054 26 


09 


00480 


BNE 


NOTE 




2056 A6 


80 


00490 


LDA 


,x+ 




2058 80 


30 


00500 


SUBA 


#$30 


GET THE OCTAVE NUMBER 


205A B7 


245F 


00510 


STA 


OCTAVE 




205D 20 


AC 


00520 


BRA 


voc 




205F 33 


42 


00530 NOTE 


LEAU 


2,U 


INCREASE CHORD LOCATION BY TWO 


2061 80 


41 


00540 


SUBA 


#$41 


GET THE LETTER COUNT 


2063 108E 2440 


00550 


LDY 


#CTABLE 




2067 E6 


A6 


00560 


LDB 


A,Y 


GET THE LETTER VALUE 


2069 A6 


80 


00570 


LDA 


,X+ 


CHECK FOR SHARP OR FLAT 


206B 81 


23 


00580 CSHARF 


CMPA 


#•# 


IS IT A SHARP 


206D 26 


03 


00590 


BNE 


CFLAT 




206F 5C 




00600 


INCB 




INCREASE THE NOTE VALUE BY ONE 


2070 20 


09 


00610 


BRA 


STORE 


IS IT A FLAT 


2072 81 


2D 


00620 CFLAT 


CMPA 


#'- 


2074 26 


03 


00630 


BNE 


CDEC 




2076 5A 




00640 


DECB 




DECREASE THE NOTE VALUE BY ONE 


2077 20 


02 


00650 


BRA 


STORE 




2079 30 


IF 


00660 CDEC 


LEAX 


-i,x 


IT WASN'T EITHER; DECREASE THE 


LOCATION 












207B 5A 




00670 STORE 


DECB 




GET NOTE VALUE 0-11 


207C B6 


245F 


00680 


LDA 


OCTAVE 




207F B7 


2460 


00690 


STA 


0CT1 


TEMPORARY OCTAVE 


2082 86 


02 


00700 


LDA 


#2 




2084 3D 




00710 


MUL 






2085 108E 2447 


00720 


LDY 


#SCALE 




2089 EC 


A5 


00730 


LDD 


B,Y 


NOTE FREQUENCY FOR OCTAVE 0 


208B 7A 


2460 


00740 ROTATE 


DEC 


0CT1 




208E 27 


04 


00750 


BEQ 


SAVE 


OK IF IT'S OCTAVE 0 


2090 58 




00760 


AS LB 




IF NOT, DOUBLE THE FREQUENCY 


2091 49 




00770 


ROLA 






2092 20 


F7 


00780 


BRA 


ROTATE 


NOW IS OCTAVE 0 


2094 ED 


C4 


00790 SAVE 


STD 


»U 


STORE THE 2 -BYTE FREQUENCY 


2096 7A 


2461 


00800 


DEC 


NOTECT 


ONE LESS NOTE TO GET 


2099 27 


18 


00810 


BEQ 


LOOP 


CHORD'S GOT ALL SIX NOTES 


209B A6 


80 


00820 


LDA 


,X+ 




209D 81 


3B 


00830 


CMPA 


#»; 




209F 27 


06 


00840 


BEQ 


FINISH 


NO MORE NOTES IN THIS CHORD 


20A1 81 


4F 


00850 


CMPA 


#'0 


OCTAVE CHANGE? 


20A3 27 


AD 


00860 


BEQ 


OCT 




20A5 20 


B8 


00870 


BRA 


NOTE 


MUST BE ANOTHER NOTE 


20A7 CC 


9m 


00880 FINISH 


LDD 


#0 




20AA 33 


42 


00890 CFIN 


LEAU 


2,U 


FILL IN THE CHORD WITH ZEROS 


20AC ED 


C4 


00900 


STD 


,u 




20AE 7A 


2461 


00910 


DEC 


NOTECT 




20B1 26 


F7 


00920 


BNE 


CFIN 


ALL DONE? 


20B3 FC 


2462 


00930 LOOP 


LDD 


TEMPO 


GET THE TEMPO AND LENGTH 


20B6 ED 


54 


00940 


STD 


-12, U 


PUT THEM AT START OF CHORD 


20B8 33 


42 


00950 


LEAU 


2,U 


START OF NEXT CHORD 


20BA 16 


FF49 


00960 


LBRA 


CHORD 




20BD 


20 


00970 TITLE 


FCC 


/ * CHINESE SERENADE * 


BY 




HERMAN 


FLIEGE/ 




210F 


0D00 


00980 


FDB 


$0D00 




2111 


54 


00990 NTABLE 


FCC 


/T5L804DC03A02F#F#F# ; 04DCO3ADCO2A ; 04DC0 


3A02DDD ; 04DC03ADC02A/ 








214B 


4F 


01000 


FCC 


/04D03B-GO2GGG;O4GO3DO2B- ;04D03B-G02DDD 


;O4D03B-GDO2B-;/ 










2180 


4F 


01010 


FCC 


/04DC03AF#F#F# ; 04A03DC02A ; 04DC03A02D ; 04 


DC03ADC02A;/ 










21B1 


4F 


01020 


FCC 


/04D03B-GO2G;04B-O3D02B-;O4DO3B-GO2D;O4 


D03B-GD02B-;/ 










21E3 


4F 


01030 


FCC 


/04DC03A02F#F#F# ; 04DC03ADC02A ; 04DC03 A02 


DDD;04DC03ADC02A/ 










2219 


4F 


01040 


FCC 


/04D03B-G02GGG;04G03D02B-;04D03B-G02DDD 


;04D03B-GD02B-;/ 










224E 


4F 


01050 


FCC 


/04DC03A02F#F#F# ; 05D04D03DC02A; 05D04D02 


D;04F#DC03DC02A;/ 










2284 


4F 


01060 


FCC 


/04GD03B-D02B-G ;R; L405G04G02G01G ; / 


22A4 


4C 


01070 


FCC 


/L804DC03A02F#F#F# ; 04DC03 ADC02 A ; 04DC03 A 


02DDD ; 04DC03ADC02A/ 








22DC 


4F 


01080 


FCC 


/04D03B-G02GGG;04G03D02B-;04D03B-G02DPD 


;O4D03B-GDO2B-;/ 










2311 


4F 


01090 


FCC 


/04DC03AF#F#F# ; 04A03DC02A ; 04DC03A02D ; 04 


DC03ADC02A;/ 










2342 


4F 


01100 


FCC 


/04D03B-G02G;04B-03D02B-;04D03B-G02D;04 


D03B-GD02I 


'-;/ 










2374 


4F 


01110 


FCC 


/04DC03A02F#F#F# ; 04DC03ADC02A ; 04DC03A02 


DDD;04DC03ADC02A/ 










23AA 


4F 


01120 


FCC 


/04D03B-G02GGG ;04G03D02B- ;04D03B-G02DDD 


;04D03B-GD02B-;/ 











72 THE RAINBOW June 1989 



23DF 


4F 


01130 


FCC 


/04DC03A02F#F#F# ; 05D04DO3DC02A ; 05D04DO2 


D;04F#DC03DC02A;/ 










2415 


4F 


01140 


FCC 


/04GD03B-D02B-G;R;L405G04G02G01G;/ 


2435 


00 


01150 


FCB 


0 


END OF THE MUSIC 


2436 


0080 


01160 LTABLE 


FDB 


$0080 


NOTE LENGTHS 

AW A. mwm* AMill AAA Ari> 


2438 


4015 


01170 


FDB 


$4015 




243A 


2004 


01180 


FDB 


$2004 




243C 


080A 


01190 


FDB 


$080A 




243E 


1002 


01200 


FDB 


$1002 




2440 


0A0C 


01210 CTABLE 


FDB 


S0A0C 


NUMBER VALUES FOR NOTE LETTERS 

A. 1 W 4 m,Mm* U« » A A Af v A> Aj > A V %^ A> Ah Mm A> A^ AlahaT 


2442 


0103 


01220 


FDB 


$0103 




2444 


0506 


01230 


FDB 


S0506 




2446 


08 


01240 


FCB 


S08 




2447 


02B6 


01250 SCALE 


FDB 


S02B6 


NOTE FREQUENCIES 


2449 


02DF 


01260 


FDB 


S02DF 




244B 


030B 


01270 


FDB 


S030B 




244D 


0339 


01280 


FDB 


S0339 




244F 


036A 


01290 


FDB 


S036A 




2451 


039E 


01300 


FDB 


S039E 




2453 


03D6 


01310 


FDB 


S03D6 

y v x-* v 




2455 


0410 


01320 


FDB 


$0410 




2457 


044E 


01330 


FDB 


S044E 




2459 


048F 


01340 


FDB 


S048F 




245B 


04D5 


01350 


FDB 


$04D5 




245D 


051E 


01360 


FDB 


S051E 




245F 




01370 OCTAVE 


RMB 


1 




2460 




01380 OCT1 


RMB 


1 




2461 




01390 NOTECT 


RMB 


1 

•Mm 




2462 




01400 TEMPO 


RMB 


1 




2463 




01410 LENGTH 


RMB 


1 








01420 


ORG 


S3000 




3JW 6F 


C4 


01430 PLAYER 


CLR 


TT 
» u 


END THE MUSIC WITH ZEROS 


3002 BD 


A928 


01440 


JSR 


SA928 

y *A J dm Q 


CLS 


3005 8E 


20BD 


01450 


LDX 


#TITLE 




3008 CC 


04E5 


01460 


LDD 


#S4E5 


PRINT 0 LOCATION 


300B DD 


88 


01470 


STD 


S88 

y w O 


INTO nTTR^DR TOflATTON 


300D BD 


B99C 


01480 


JSR 


SB99C 

y U mW & \f 


PRINT THE TTTTE 
x sVAfciai a n£f hill 


3010 8£ 


30CB 


01490 FILL 


LDX 


#TCIJRVE 


<?TART OF TTMRRF rTTRVF 


3013 CE 


4000 


01500 


LDLT 






3016 EC 


81 


01510 LOOP3 


LDD 


1 ATT 




3018 ED 


CI 


01520 


STD 


D++ 

| Wl 1 




301A 1183 


4100 


01530 


CMPU 


#S4100 

Try tlJDjv 




301E 25 


F6 


01540 


BLO 


LUUrJ 




3020 34 


01 


01550 


PSHS 


CC 




3022 1A 


50 


01560 


ORCC 




NO TNTFRRTTPT<5 


3024 5F 




01570 


CLRB 






3025 BD 


A9A2 


01580 


JSR 


SA9A2 


SET SOUND ON 


3028 BD 


A976 


01590 


JSR 


SA976 




302B 86 


3F 


01600 


LDA 


#S3F 


T.OT^ OF T OOATTfiNQ AT ^^FtJO - C *J 


FFF 










302D IF 


8B 


01610 


TFR 


A DP 


cut THF HP TJTrfiTCTPO Tfi it^VC 
OIL J. ItlL Ur rULo J.O J. SLt\ XU rryff 


302F 86 


40 


01620 


LDA 


#S40 


START OF TOT7RUF TOOATTHN 
uinni ur luunvL luua i lull 


3031 97 


C0 


01630 


STA 


SC0 




3033 0F 


CI 


01640 


CLR 


SCI 




3035 0F 


C2 


01650 


CLR 


$C2 




3037 97 


C3 


01660 


STA 


$C3 

T w w 




3039 0F 


C4 


01670 


CLR 


$C4 




303B 0F 


C5 


01680 


CLR 


$C5 




303D 97 


C6 


01690 


STA 


SC6 

y w 




303F 0F 


C7 


01700 


CLR 


$C7 




3041 0F 


ca 


01710 


CLR 


$C8 




3043 97 


C9 


01720 


STA 


$C9 




3045 0F 


CA 


01730 


CLR 


$CA 




3047 0F 


CB 


01740 


CLR 


SCB 




3049 97 


CC 


01750 


STA 


y \j \j 




304B 0F 


CD 


01760 


CLR 


sen 




304D 0F 


CE 


01770 


CLR 






304F 97 


CF 


01780 


STA 


yuc 




3051 0F 


D0 


01790 


CLR 






3053 0F 


Dl 


01800 


CLR 


yUl 




3055 108E 


4103 


01810 PLAY 


LDY 


jti ai an 


CTATJT OV ^UflOTIC Tn^ATTOM 
alAAl Ut UnUruJo L,UOAXXUIM 


3059 6D 


A4 


01820 LOOP1 


TST 


v 

» » 




305B 27 


65 


01830 


BEQ 






305D EC 


Al 


01840 


LDD 




OFT THE TFMPO AND LENGTH 


305F 97 


D3 


01850 


STA 


SD3 


TEMPO 


3061 97 


D4 


01860 


STA 


SD4 


TFMPORARY TFMPO 


3063 D7 


D2 


01870 


STB 


SD2 


LENGTH 


3065 A6 


9F 3FC0 


01880 LOOP2 


LDA 


TS3FC01 


GET ALL THE T CURVE VALUES 

\J mmt mm iAArf Av A H mwm» m\ ^m* W » A^ ■ 4 « W w Ajrf 


3069 AB 


9F 3FC3 


01890 


ADDA 


[$3FC3] 




306D A9 


9F 3FC6 


01900 


ADCA 


[S3FC6] 




3071 A9 


9F 3FC9 


01910 


ADCA 


[S3FC9] 




3075 A9 


9F 3FCC 


01920 


ADCA 


[S3FCC] 




3079 A9 


9F 3FCF 


01930 


ADCA 


[S3FCF] 




307D B7 


FF20 


01940 


STA 


$FF20 


PUT THEM IN PIA 


3080 DC 


CI 


01950 


LDD 


$C1 





Register D with the B value in the scale, we 
get that note's frequency. However, that 
frequency is only for the lowest octave. As 
in actual music, each octave increase will 
double the note's frequency, so it is neces- 
sary to first decrease the temporary 0CT1 (1 
to 5) by one to get 0 to 4. If it is a zero, it is 
in the lowest octave and doesn't need to 
have the note frequency changed. If it is 
greater than zero, shift Register D (the note 
frequency) to the left (double it) with: 

ASLB 
ROLA 

Then decrease the temporary Octave 1 
count by one. If the temporary OCT is still 
not zero, keep decreasing it and doubling 
Register D. When 0CT1 is finally zero, save 
the note frequency by storing it at Location 
U. 

Since we now have a note, decrease 
NOTECT by one. If NOTECT has reached zero, 
that is the end of the chord. If the NOTECT is 
not zero, check the next character in the 
chord. If it is a that's the end of the 
chord (fill up the remainder of the chord 
with zeros). If it is an 0 branch to OCT, or 
else branch always back to note. 

When a chord is complete, the tempo 
and length are stored at the beginning of the 
chord location and the whole process starts 
back at CHORD. If the first character of a 
chord is zero, it means the music is over. Be 
sure that the last entry in the NTABLE is FCB 
0. 

Each chord is now 14 bytes long — one 
byte each for the tempo and length and two 
bytes each for the six notes. You can give 
your program a title. The program will 
accept a ";" between chords to make it 
easier to read them. It is not necessary to 
make each chord a separate FCC line. 

First, a word about a new register, the 
DP register. When using a command like 
LDA $C0, EDTASM+ first looks to the DP 
register to get a one-byte number to go 
before the $C0. Since the DP register is 
initially set to zero, the command is really 
LDA $OOC0. However, you can change the 
DP register. If using a lot of commands 
involving locations from $3F00 to $3FFF, 
let the DP register assign the $3F, and you 
assign the other half. This saves both time 
and memory. 

We can't directly set the DP register, 
however. Since it is such an important 
register, the computer doublechecks whether 
you actually want to change it. So, use this 
to change it: 

LDA #$3F 
TFR A, DP 

Now, using LDA SCO, the computer actu- 



June 1989 THE RAINBOW 73 



3082 E3 


A4 


01960 


ADDD 




NOTE 1 


3084 DD 


CI 


01970 


STD 


$C1 




3086 DC 


C4 


01980 


LDD 


$C4 




3088 E3 


22 


01990 


ADDD 


2,Y 


NOTE 2 


308A DD 


C4 


02000 


STD 


$C4 




308C DC 


C7 


02010 


LDD 


$C7 




308E E3 


24 


02020 


ADDD 


4,Y 


NOTE 3 


3090 DD 


C7 


02030 


STD 


$C7 




3092 DC 


CA 


02040 


LDD 


$CA 




3094 E3 


26 


02050 


ADDD 


6,Y 


NOTE 4 


3096 DD 


CA 


02060 


STD 


$CA 




3098 DC 


CD 


02070 


LDD 


$CD 




309A E3 


28 


02080 


ADDD 


8,Y 


NOTE 5 


309C DD 


CD 


02090 


STD 


$CD 




309E DC 


D0 


02100 


LDD 


$D0 




30A0 E3 


2A 


02110 


ADDD 


10,Y 


NOTE 6 


30A2 DD 


D0 


02120 


STD 


$D0 




30A4 0A 


D4 


02130 


DEC 


$D4 


DECREASE TEMPORARY TEMPO 


30A6 26 


0E 


02140 


BNE 


DELAY 




30A8 0A 


D2 


02150 


DEC 


$D2 


DECREASE LENGTH 


30AA 26 


04 


02160 


BNE 


C0NT1 




30AC 31 


2C 


02170 


LEAY 


12, Y 


NEXT CHORD LOCATION 


30AE 20 


A9 


02180 


BRA 


L00P1 




30B0 D6 


D3 


02190 C0NT1 


LDB 


$D3 


TEMPO 


30B2 D7 


D4 


02200 


STB 


$D4 


TEMPORARY TEMPO 


30B4 20 


AF 


02210 


BRA 


LOOP2 




30B6 30 


84 


02220 DELAY 


LEAX 


,x 


JUST MAKES A QUICK PAUSE 


30B8 30 


84 


02230 


LEAX 


,x 




30BA 86 


n 


02240 


LDA 


#0 




30BC 86 


n 


02250 


IDA 


#0 




30BE 86 


99 


02260 


LDA 


#0 






AJ 




DD a 

DKA 


LUUr/ 




30C2 4F 




02280 OVER 


CLRA 






30C3 IF 
0 


8B 


02290 


TFR 


A, DP 


SET THE DP REGISTER BACK TO ZER 


30C5 35 


91 


02300 


PULS 


CC 




30C7 BD 


A974 


02310 


JSR 


$A974 


SOUND OFF 


30CA 3F 




02320 


SWI 




RTS IF IN BASIC 


30CB 


1415 


02330 TCURVE 


FDB 


$1415 




30CD 


1516 


02340 


FDB 


$1516 




30CF 


1718 


02350 


FDB 


$1718 




30D1 


1819 


02360 


FDB 


$1819 




30D3 


1A1A 


02370 


FDB 


$1A1A 




30D5 


1B1C 


02380 


FDB 


$1B1C 




30D7 


1C1D 


02390 


FDB 


$1C1D 




30D9 


1E1E 


02400 


FDB 


$1E1E 




30DB 


1E1F 


02410 


FDB 


$1E1F 




30DD 


2020 


02420 


FDB 


$2020 




30DF 


2121 


02430 


FDB 


$2121 




30E1 


2222 


02440 


FDB 


$2222 




30E3 


2223 


02450 


FDB 


$2223 




30E5 


2324 


02460 


FDB 


$2324 




30E7 


2424 


02470 


FDB 


$2424 




30E9 


2424 


02480 


FDB 


$2424 




30EB 


2425 


02490 


FDB 


$2425 


■ 


30ED 


2525 


02500 


FDB 


$2525 




30EF 


2525 


02510 


FDB 


$2525 




30F1 


2525 


02520 


FDB 


$2525 


• 


30F3 


2525 


02530 


FDB 


$2525 




30F5 


2525 


02540 


FDB 


$2525 




30F7 


2524 


02550 


FDB 


$2524 




30F9 


2424 


02560 


FDB 


$2424 




30FB 


2424 


02570 


FDB 


$2424 




30FD 


2423 


02580 


FDB 


$2423 




30FF 


2323 


02590 


FDB 


$2323 




3101 


2322 


02600 


FDB 


$2322 




3103 


2222 


02610 


FDB 


$2222 




3105 


2121 


02620 


FDB 


$2121 




3107 


2121 


02630 


FDB 


$2121 




3109 


2120 


02640 


FDB 


$2120 




310B 


2020 


02650 


FDB 


$2020 




310D 


1F1F 


02660 


FDB 


$1F1F 




310F 


1F1E 


02670 


FDB 


$1F1E 




3111 


1E1E 


02680 


FDB 


$1E1E 




3113 


1E1D 


02690 


FDB 


$1E1D 




3115 


1D1D 


02700 


FDB 


$1D1D 




3117 


1D1C 


02710 


FDB 


$1D1C 




3119 


1C1C 


02720 


FDB 


$1C1C 




311B 


1C1B 


02730 


FDB 


$1C1B 




311D 


1B1B 


02740 


FDB 


$1B1B 




311F 


1B1A 


02750 


FDB 


$1B1A 




3121 


1A1A 


02760 


FDB 


$1A1A 




3123 


1A1A 


02770 


FDB 


$1A1A 




3125 


1A19 


02780 


FDB 


S1A19 




3127 


1919 


?279? 


FDB 


$1919 





ally executes LDA $3FC0. Since speed is 
critical in a music program, use the DP 
register frequently, remembering to set it 
back to zero when finished. 

Next, is how to create a timbre curve 
(TCURVE), which is a numerical plot of the 
frequency each voice traces on a graph — 
all the highs and lows. It is this curve that 
gives each musical instrument its distinc- 
tive sound. 

You can make a different curve for each 
voice, but this program uses the same curve 
for all six. Be sure that no single curve byte 
times the number of voices is greater than 
255. In this curve, the highest byte can be 
255/6 = 42 or #$2A. 

The curve is stored from $3000 to $30FF 
(256 bytes). The two ROM subroutines set 
the computer to play notes. Next, set the DP 
register to #$3F. The location of our 
TCURVE(s) is stored at $(3F)C0, $(3F)C3, 
$(3F)C6, $(3F)C9, $(3F)CC, and (3F)CF. 
Now, load Register Y with the chord start 
location; the first thing the program will 
check is if the chord stents with zero. If so, 
this is the end of the music and the program 
turns off the sound and ends; if not a zero, 
the program loads the current tempo into 
$(3F)D3, a temporary tempo into $(3F)D4, 
and the length into $(3F)D2. 

The TCURVE value for each voice is added 
together and stored in $FF20. Note 1 is 
stored at $(3F)C 1 , Note 2 at $(3F)C4, Note 
3 at $(3F)C7, Note 4 at $(3F)C A, Note 5 at 
($3F)CD, and Note 6 at $(3F)D0. Remem- 
ber, each note is two bytes long. The tem- 
porary tempo in $(3F)D4 is decreased by 
one. If it is not zero, a short delay (pause) is 
executed just for timing, then the program 
adds together the second byte of each timbre 
curve. 

This continues until Tempo 1 has reached 
zero. When it has, the length is decreased 
and the whole cycle repeats until both the 
length and the tempo have reached zero. 
Register Y is loaded with the start of the 
next chord location, and everything repeats 
until all of the chords have been played and 
the program ends. 

You may find it easier to enter the 
music one FCC line at a time, and then play 
it. Be sure to keep a FCB 0 at the end of the 
music. You can also watch your text pro- 
gram more closely, this way, to be sure it 
is not running into the TCURVE. If there are 
a lot of notes, you can relocate the TCURVE 
and chord start locations. If there are six 
different TCURVEs, you will have to change 
locations. Just be sure that the start of each 
TCURVE is stored at $(DP)C0, $(DP)C3, 
$(DP)C6, $(DP)C9, $(DP)CC and $(DP)CF. 

( Questions or comments about this tuto- 
rial may be directed to the author at Route 
2, Box 21 6C, Mason, WI 54856-9302. Please 
enclose an SASE when requesting a reply.) 



74 THE RAINBOW June 1989 



3129 


1919 


0280? 


FDB 


$1919 


317B 


0C0C 


03210 


FDB 


$0C0C 


312B 


1818 


02810 


FDB 


$1818 


317D 


0C0C 


03220 


FDB 


$0C0C 


312D 


1818 


02820 


FDB 


$1818 


317F 


0B0B 


03230 


FDB 


$0B0B 


312F 


1818 


02830 


FDB 


$1818 


3181 


0B0B 


03240 


FDB 


$0B0B 


3131 


1818 


02840 


FDB 


$1818 


3183 


0A0A 


03250 


FDB 


?0A0A 


3133 


1717 


02850 


FDB 


$1717 


3185 


0A09 


03260 


FDB 


$0A09 


3135 


1717 


02860 


FDB 


$1717 


3187 


0909 


03270 


FDB 


$0909 


3137 


1717 


02870 


FDB 


$1717 


3189 


0908 


03280 


FDB 


$0908 


3139 


1616 


02880 


FDB 


$1616 


318B 


0808 


03290 


FDB 


$0808 


313B 


1616 


02890 


FDB 


$1616 


318D 


0707 


03300 


FDB 


$0707 


313D 


1616 


02900 


FDB 


$1616 


318F 


0707 


03310 


FDB 


$0707 


313F 


1515 


02910 


FDB 


$1515 


3191 


0606 


03320 


FDB 


$0606 


3141 


1515 


02920 


FDB 


$1515 


3193 


0605 


03330 


FDB 


$0605 


3143 


1515 


02930 


FDB 


$1515 


3195 


0505 


03340 


FDB 


$0505 


3145 


1515 


02940 


FDB 


$1515 


3197 


0505 


03350 


FDB 


$0505 


3147 


1514 


02950 


FDB 


$1514 


3199 


0404 


03360 


FDB 


$0404 


3149 


1414 


02960 


FDB 


$1414 


319B 


0404 


03370 


FDB 


$0404 


314B 


1414 


02970 


FDB 


$1414 


319D 


0403 


03380 


FDB 


$0403 


314D 


1313 


02980 


FDB 


$1313 


319F 


0303 


03390 


FDB 


$0303 


314F 


1313 


02990 


FDB 


$1313 


31A1 


0303 


03400 


FDB 


$0303 


3151 


1313 


03000 


FDB 


$1313 


31A3 


0303 


03410 


FDB 


$0303 


3153 


1313 


03010 


FDB 


$1313 


31A5 


0303 


03420 


FDB 


$0303 


3155 


1312 


03020 


FDB 


$1312 


31A7 


0303 


03430 


FDB 


$0303 


3157 


1212 


03030 


FDB 


$1212 


31A9 


0404 


03440 


FDB 


$0404 


3159 


1212 


03040 


FDB 


$1212 


31AB 


0404 


03450 


FDB 


$0404 


315B 


1111 


03050 


FDB 


$1111 


3 IAD 


0404 


03460 


FDB 


$0404 


315D 


1111 


03060 


FDB 


$1111 


31AF 


0405 


03470 


FDB 


$0405 


315F 


1111 


03070 


FDB 


$1111 


31B1 


0506 


03480 


FDB 


$0506 


3161 


1110 


03080 


FDB 


$1110 


31B3 


0606 


03490 


FDB 


$0606 


3163 


im 


03090 


FDB 


$1010 


31B5 


0707 


03500 


FDB 


$0707 


3165 


11711? 


03100 


FDB 


$1010 


31B7 


0808 


03510 


FDB 


$0808 


3167 




03110 


FDB 


$1010 


31B9 


0909 


03520 


FDB 


$0909 


3169 


m? 


03120 


FDB 


$1010 


31BB 


0A0A 


03530 


FDB 


$0A0A 


316B 


0F£F 


03130 


FDB 


$0F0F 


31BD 


0B0G 


03540 


FDB 


$0B0G 


316D 


0FJ7F 


03140 


FDB 


$0F0F 


31BF 


0C0D 


03550 


FDB 


$0C0D 


316F 


0F0E 


03150 


FDB 


$0F0E 


31C1 


0D0E 


03560 


FDB 


$0D0E 


3171 


?E?E 


03160 


FDB 


$0E0E 


31C3 


0F10 


03570 


FDB 


$0F10 


3173 


0E0E 


03170 


FDB 


$0E0E 


31G5 


1011 


03580 


FDB 


$1011 


3175 




03180 


FDB 


$0E0D 


31C7 


1212 


03590 


FDB 


$1212 


3177 




03190 


FDB 


$0D0D 


31C9 


1314 


03600 


FDB 


$1314 


3179 




03200 


FDB 


$0D0C 




2000 


03610 


END 


START 



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1 1 1 1 1 . 1 1 ' i * i i , , i . 1 1 1 1 1 1 i' i i 



June 1989 THE RAINBOW 75 



L-E4u€ati on Not e s 



16K ECB 



Our youngest child was born eight years 
ago when our first CoCo was purchased. 
Time has flown by quickly and Shari is 
now completing second grade. She has 
recently taken possession of our original 
computer, which has been upgraded, of 
course, but retains its charming outward 
appearance — the chicklet keyboard and 
steel gray color (worn out here and there). 
It is as reliable as ever. 

Shari is now full of math facts from 
school, her nightly homework including 
reviews of new things learned each day. 
Last week, she even surprised us with 
some pre-algebra examples. This learning 
method of practice and mastery is custom- 
ary for her grade level, and we often use a 
variety of computer programs with the 
CoCo to aid her in maintaining those skills. 

This month's article presents a new 
method of reviewing some basic math 
skills, concentrating on mental addition 
and subtraction. Also reinforced is the 
skill of thinking first before determining 
which operation is needed to compute 
each example. 

The particular program provides a ran- 
dom starting-off number at the bottom 
right corner of the screen, a random target 
number to be reached at the bottom left 

Steve Blyn teaches both exceptional and 
gifted children, holds two master's de- 
grees, and has won awards for the design 
of programs to aid the handicapped. He 
owns Computer Island and lives in Staten 
Island, New York. 



Math target practice 



Shooting 
Math 



By Steve Blyn 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 

corner. At the top of the screen are eight 
random numbers that include plus and 
minus signs. The object of the game is to 
shoot the numbers at the top of the screen, 
altering a given number to the target number. 
Below is an example: 

+8 -3 -7 +5 +1 +6 -4 +2 



14 TIMER 42 

The bottom left number (14) is the 
target number to be reached while the 
bottom right number is the starting num- 
ber. The child must first determine that 
using addition is probably the best — but 



not the only — way to begin solving this 
problem. As is often the case with math 
problems, there are several ways to reach 
a solution. 

The target may be reached by shooting 
+2 and +5 at the top, or by shooting -3, +6 
and +2 twice. Part of the fim for students is 
to find how many ways an answer can be 
found. If the student understands negative 
and positive numbers, the amount of pos- 
sible solutions becomes much greater. 

The asterisk in the illustration repre- 
sents the shooter, and arrow keys permit 
the student to move the shooter left and 
right. When the shooter is directly below 
the desired number, the space bar is pressed 
to shoot the number that is then added or 
subtracted accordingly to the running total 
at the bottom right of the screen. A round 
is won when the proper amount obtained 
in the running total corresponds to the 
target amount shown in the bottom left of 
the screen. Music plays and the student 
may press either enter to get another ex- 
ample or E to end the program. 

A timer that allows roughly 100 sec- 
onds was incorporated to help focus atten- 
tion on the task at hand. Without the timer 
it may be too tempting for the child to 
shoot randomly at numbers for the fun of 
it, eventually solving the example. You 
may alter the timer's length or remove it 
by revising or deleting Line 180. 

Creatively alter any part of the program 
to help your child/students with math prac- 
tice. We at Computer Island always enjoy 
hearing of new ideas for our programs. 



The Listing: MATHSHOT 



10 REM "MATHS HOOT" 

20 REM" STEVE BLYN, COMPUTER ISLAN 

D, STATEN ISLAND, NY, 1989" 

30 CLS0:TIMER=0:A=5+RND(15) :G=5+ 

RND(15):IF A=G THEN 30: REM A=TAR 

GET AND G=RUNNING TOTAL 

40 FOR T=1024 TO 1052 STEP 4 

50 RR=RND(2):IF RR=1 THEN R=43 E 

LSE R=45 

60 NN=48+RND(9) 

70 POKE T,R:POKE T+ 1 , NN : NEXT T 
80 FOR T=1056 TO 1087: POKE T,156 
:NEXT T: FOR T=1440 TO 1471: POKE 
T,156:NEXT T 
90 X=32 :Y=24 :C=8 

100 RESET (X-1,Y) :RESET(X+1,Y) : SE 

T (X,Y,C) 

110 A$=INKEY$ 

120 IF A$=CHR$(9) THEN X=X+1 

130 IF A$=CHR$(8) THEN X=X-1 

140 IF X<2 THEN X=l 

150 IF X>61 THEN X=62 

160 IF A$«CHR$(32) THEN G0SUB 21 

0 

170 M=INT( TIMER/ 60) : PRINT@448 , A; 
: PRINT @ 4 7 4 , G ; : PRINTS 4 60 , "TIMER" ; 
M; 

180 IF M>99 THEN PRINT@458," TIM 
E IS UP ";:GOTO 410 



190 IF A$="" THEN 110 

200 GOTO 100 

210 PLAY"O4L150A» 

220 FOR Y=22 TO 6 STEP -2: PLAY" C 
DC" : SET (X, Y, 8 ) :NEXT Y 
230 FOR Y=24 TO 6 STEP -1 
240 RESET(X,Y) :RESET (X+l, Y) :NEXT 
Y 

250 SET(X,24,8) 
260 Y=24 

270 H=PEEK(INT(X/2)+1024) 

280 IF H<48 THEN 380 

290 IF H>58 THEN 380 

300 H$=CHR$(H) :J=VAL(H$) 

310 I=PEEK(INT(X/2)+1023) 

320 K=PEEK(INT(X/2)+1022) 

330 IF 1=45 THEN G=G-J 

340 IF K=45 THEN G=G-J 

350 IF 1=43 THEN G=G+J 

3 60 IF K=43 THEN G=G+J 

370 PLAY "L50GFEDC" 

380 PRINT@448,A; : PRINT@474 , G ; 

390 IF G=A THEN PRINT@458 , "YOU W 

IN ! ! !";:GOTO 410 

400 RETURN 

410 FOR T=l TO 5 : PLAY"CDEFGFEDC" 

: NEXT T 

420 E$=INKEY$ 

430 IF E$=CHR$(13) THEN RUN ELSE 
IF E$="E" THEN 440 ELSE 420 
440 CLS : END 



76 THE RAINBOW June 1989 





XTERM 

OS-9 Communications program 



• Menu oriented 

• Upload/download Ascil 
or XMODEM protocol 



• Definable macro keys 

• Works with standard serial port, RS232 
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• Execute OS-9 commands • Works with standard screen, Xscreen 



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WORDPAK or DISTO 80 column board 



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ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE 



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ACCOUNTS PAYABLE 

Designed for the maintenance of vendor 
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0C0 Consultat i ons 



Double- or Single-Sided? 

/ purchased two Radio Shack drives 
around 1982 (Cat. nos. 26-3029 and 26- 
1161 A ). Both are full-height with case and 
power supply. How can 1 tell if they are 
double- or single-sided? 

Donald M. Challans 
Carlinville, Illinois 

All drives Radio Shack sold for the 
Color Computer prior to the current FD 
502 half-height drive were single-sided. 
Most were 40-track capable, and capable 
of stepping as fast as 6ms per track. But the 
very first drive marketed for the Color 
Computer (Cat. No. 26-3022) had only 35 
tracks and could not step faster than 20 ms 
per track. 

The Cat. No. 26-1 161 A drive you refer 
to appears in my 1982 Radio Shack cata- 
log as a Model III external drive unit. It is 
single-sided, probably 40-track, and com- 
patible with the Color Computer. 

As for telling if a drive is single- or 
double-sided, you need to inspect the drive. 
Sometimes this can be done without re- 
moving the case. Peer into the opening 
where the disk is inserted and look for: 
Single-sided drives with one head on one 
side of the disk, and on the other side a 
pressure pad, often made of white felt. 
Double-sided drives with two heads facing 
each other, one reason why you should 
never close the gate on a double-sided 
drive with no disk inside. 

Note that the older Radio Shack full- 
height drives tend to be selected as Drive 
0, 1 , 2 and 3 via a special cable that has 
teeth missing from its connectors. Most 
other brand drives, including more recent 
Tandy drives, accomplish disk drive num- 
ber selection via jumpers on the disk drive. 

Serial Connections 

Is it possible to connect more than one 
serial device into the I/O port on the back 
of my CoCo 3? Is there a database pro- 
gram capable of storing both digitized 



Martin H. Goodman, M.D., a physi- 
cian trained in anesthesiology, is a 
longtime electronics tinkerer and out- 
spoken commentator — sort of the 
Howard Cose 11 of the Co Co world. On 
Delphi, Marty is the SIGop of RAIN- 
BOW'S Co Co SIG and database man- 
ager of OS-9 Online. His non-computer 
passions include running, mountaineer- 
ing and outdoor photography. Marty 
lives in San Pablo, California. 

78 THE RAINBOW June 1989 




CONSULTATIONS 

By Marty Goodman 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 



pictures and text and then retrieving them? 

Clay Daetwyler 
Washington, Pennsylvania 

You cannot hook up more than one 
serial device to the CoCo port at one time. 
However, various companies, such as Micro- 
corn, sell switchers that allow convenient 
switching between one of two or three 
serial devices (such as between a printer 
and a modem). 

I know of no database program like the 
one you are describing. Too much memory 
and disk storage is required by such an 
application for it to be economical to de- 
velop and market such a program for the 
CoCo. I recommend a Macintosh since 
those applications are well developed on it. 
But be prepared to spend a minimum of a 
couple thousand dollars to get it up and 
running. 

CoCo Crashing 

My 512K CoCo 3 has been intermit- 
tently crashing, putting garbage on the 
screen and turning on the disk drives. Could 
my Multi-Pak be at fault? 

Christiane Tom 
Verdun, Quebec 

It is easy to determine if your Multi-Pak 
is at fault: Simply remove the Multi-Pak 
from the system, plug the disk controller 
directly into the CoCo 3 and see if the same 
problem occurs. 



The older Multi-Paks (Cat. No. 26-3024) 
need to be upgraded by adding a new PAL 
chip, which can be ordered from any of a 
number of rainbow advertisers. It has been 
suggested that you must use one upgrade 
newer (26-3 1 24) Multi-Paks with a special 
satellite board, such as the one described in 
my October '88 article ["Quick Fixes," 
Page 58], but I have yet to hear a confirmed 
report that this is required if you are careful 
not to use old, obscure add-on cards that 
are addressed to ports above $FF7F. 

Surprise for ROM Pack Owners 

How can 1 put the ROM packs Rad 
Warrior and Super Pitfall onto disk? I do 
not own a Multi-Pak and am very reluctant 
to plug and unplug my disk controller. 

Steve Griffith 
Signal Mountain, Indiana 

Part of the information needed to do 
this is posted in the Games database on 
Delphi. All you need to figure out is how 
to dump all 32K of the ROM pak to tape, 
then disk. Eventually someone will post 
how-to instructions for doing that. 

Owners of Multi-Paks will be inter- 
ested to know that by the time of the 
Chicago '89 RAINBOWfest, a device 
should be available from Zebra Systems 
that allows owners of Multi-Paks to run off 
disk any ROM pak game ever made, pro- 
vided this is in your Multi-Pak. The Wild 
Card ROM pak emulator will also be of 
interest to those developing ROM soft- 
ware for the CoCo 3. 



CoCo Running Hot 

My 512K CoCo 3 tends to run hot. Is it 
best to unplug it when 1 am not using it? 

R. Daniels 
Aurora, Colorado 

Yes, it is best not to run the machine all 
day if you are using it for only a couple of 
hours. At the same time, it is better to not 
switch it on and off several times within a 
short period because the shock of power- 
ing up and down causes more wear and 
tear on the machine than a half-hour of 
solid operation. 

One of the problems of the CoCo 3 is its 
somewhat marginal power supply. In past 
columns I've discussed various remedies 
for this problem — fans, replacing the 
existing power transistor and a heat sink 
with high current handling the parts (like a 
TO 3 case 2N3055 transistor and a thick, 
finned aluminum heat sink), or simply 



leaving the cover off the CoCo to allow for 
better convective cooling. These sugges- 
tions may help. 

Multi-Pak and CoCo Max III Clash 

When my upgraded 26-3024 Multi-Pak 
is used with my CoCo 3 , CoCo Max III ( an 
older version) crashes. Colorware says I 
have to pay for a new version to fix the 
problem. Is there any way to fix the Multi- 
Pak instead? 

Dylan Kucera 
Newmarket, Ontario 



I am unaware of any specific problems 
caused by a properly upgraded 26-3024 
Multi-Pak. In theory, the presence of the 
Multi-Pak is expected to produce, in some 
situations, minor timing problems with 
certain types of code. I know of no fix for 
such problems. You could try replacing all 
the chips in the Multi-Pak with a LS- or F- 
series chips (that offer shorter gate delays) 
and replacing the PAL chip with a network 
of a LS- or F-series TTL logic chips. It 
hardly seems worth the effort, however. 

As a possible compromise, try desold- 
ering and socketing just the LS367 and 
LS245 chips in the Multi-Pak, replacing 
them with S-series 367 chips and F-series 
245 chips. This has some effect in decreas- 
ing the added gate delays caused by the 
Multi-Pak, though I don't know if it will 
solve your problem. 

For the Sufficient Hacker 

Can I adapt a Hercules type IBM mono- 
chrome graphics card to the CoCo 3 ? This 
would give 640-by-350 general purpose 
graphics resolution in monochrome. How 
about other, higher-resolution cards or 
hooking the old Tandy X-Pad to the CoCo 
3 at 2 MHz? Also, how can I make a 2 
megabyte upgrade for the CoCo 3? 

Lorenz Christophe 
Charleroi, Belgium 

While a sufficiently single-minded 
hacker can do any of the things you sug- 
gest, I am quite confident that you will 
never see any of those things widely avail- 
able for the CoCo 3 end-user. The reasons 
are the cost of such maneuvers and the lack 
of available software to take advantage of 
such things. And so, instead, there is a 
good market for such hardware modifica- 
tions and the extremely high price of memory 
chips. Consider this: 640-by-350 is not 
much greater than 640-by-200. Not enough 
to spend the $ 1 50 or so that such a modifi- 
cation would cost (plus the cost of a Multi- 



Pak). And there are few, if any applica- 
tions, commonly in use by large numbers 
of CoCo owners requiring more than 5 1 2K 
of memory. The $320 worth of memory 
chips plus the cost of the add-on board for 
a 2-Meg upgrade is far better spent on a 
hard drive system. 



Adding Drives 

What sort of drive can I add to my FD 
501 drive system? Can I add a 40- or 80- 
track double-sided drive? Or does the 
drive I add have to be a single-sided 35- 
track drive like the FD 501? 

Ron Mills 
Bonnyville f Alabama 

First of all, the drive in the FD 501 
system is a TEC brand model 501 40- 
track single-sided drive. Thirty-five-track 
drives or single-sided; 40-track drives have 
not been made for many years. Next, yes 
you can hook a variety of 40- and 80- track 
drives together, but you have to know 
what you are doing. And, actually ,it makes 
little sense to have one double-sided and 
one single-sided drive in the same system, 
since then you will not have a convenient 
way of making backups of the double- 
sided drive. There is no way to read the 
"other side" of a double-sided drive on a 
single-sided drive. It is physically impos- 
sible. You can, as a temporary measure, 
get a double-sided drive and install it, but 
you will soon want to get a second one of 
the same number of tracks, and toss out 
the FD 501 single-sided drive. 

Note that while under OS-9, it is rela- 
tively easy to support different drive types. 
Under RS DOS this is rather tricky. I have 
consistently recommended ADOS (from 
SpectroSystems) for help with setting up 
systems using different kinds of drives. 
But you still need to know about drive 
selection, terminator resistors, cabling, 
and the like. 



Extended ADOS 3 

/ have four questions: How can I best 
use my 80- track drives under Radio Shack 
Disk basic? Can I use the 6K of space so 
profligately wasted by the picture of the 
three Mugateers in my CoCo 3 ROM for 
useful software, like SIGMON, and how 
could I do this? How can I put four 8K 
DOSs inside a 2 7256 EPROM and use that 
in my disk controller, which is geared to 
using a 2764 EPROM? Finally, how can I 
force my CoCo 3 to power up with a 
different palette color set? 

Thierry Lorenz 
Fontaine, Belgium 



In response to questions one and four, if 
you do not have a hard drive, then Ex- 
tended ADOS 3 (which is soon to be re- 
leased, and requires a 27128 EPROM) is 
your best bet for supporting 80-track drives 
under RS DOS. If you do use a hard drive, 
then you might want to consider Hyper- 
I/O from Burke and Burke, which is geared 
to hard drive systems but can support other 
storage media as well. ADOS (ADOS 3 or 
Extended ADOS 3) will also allow you to 
configure your CoCo so that when you 
burn it into a DOS EPROM, the computer 
comes up with whatever palette and col- 
umn width (32, 40 or 80) you want. 

Concerning your second question, us- 
ing the spare 6K in the ROM is possible but 
is one of those things that "if you have to 
ask how, don't try it." It involves signifi- 
cant hardware competence in desoldering 
and socketing a ROM chip, intimate knowl- 
edge of Disk basic and the GIME ROM 
select control. But I do know one software 
developer who has done almost exactly 
what you've suggested. "How-to" instruc- 
tions for it would fill a good-sized article, 
though. 

Now, to address Question three. Using 
a single 27256 chip as four banks of 8K 
DOSs is easy: Just burn the four DOSs into 
the chip, then raise pins 26 and 27 (the A 1 3 
and A 14 lines on the chip) up in the air 
when you insert the chip into the 28-pin 
socket intended for a 2764. Tie each of 
those two lines high (to +5 volts, Pin 28) 
via a4.7K ohm resistor. Then hook to each 
of those pins an SPST switch to ground. 
By putting those two SPST switches (which 
can be mini toggle or DIP switches) into 
any of their four possible combinations of 
settings (00, 01, 10, and 1 1) you can select 
each of the four banks in the EPROM. 
What you are doing here is providing for 
manual switching of the status (high or 
low) of the two high-order address lines on 
the chip. 

Your technical questions are wel- 
comed. Please address them to CoCo 
Consultations, THE rainbow, P.O. Box 
385, Prospect, KY 40059. 

We reserve the right to publish only 
questions of general interest and to edit 
for brevity and clarity. Due to the large 
volume of mail we receive, we are unable 
to answer letters individually. 

Questions can also be sent to Marty 
through the Delphi CoCo SIG. From the 
CoCo SIG> prompt, pick Rainbow 
Magazine Services, then, at the RAIN- 
BO W> prompt, type RSK (for Ask the 
Experts) to arrive at the EXPERTS> 
prompt, where you can select the "CoCo 
Consultations" online form which has 
complete instructions. 



June 1989 THE RAINBOW 79 



I BASIC Tra ining 



16K ECB Ls 

LZ 



We made a few utility programs, but 
somehow missed the PRINT @ screen, so 
this month we'll make a 32-by-16 PRINT @ 
screen. 

Look at Listing 1, then key lines 1,10 
and 60. Line 20 creates the first boxcar, 
which contains the directions to create two 
rows. In size S4, A$="R255D12L255D12". 
The super-boxcar contains four A$ boxcars 
consisting of eight rows. Line 40 prints 
them on the screen, has an engine, 
DRAW H S4C4BM0.0\ coupled to two super- 
boxcars, B$,andacaboose,+"R255". S4C4 
can be omitted from the engine because of 
the default syndrome. Likewise, you can 
have an extra super-boxcar, +B$. 

I decided to use SI 6, since the raw 
material in boxcar A$ is easily converted 
from S4 to SI 6. Because SI is four times 
larger than S4, we need one-fourth of the 
size needed in S4. 

Divide the numbers in R255D12L255D12 
by four and you get R64D3L64D3. This re- 
quires the engine in Line 40 to contain SI 6 
and even the not needed C4. There is no 
change in the number of boxcars, though 
the caboose should be +"64" +"R255", or 
+B$ will draw the 1 7th row. You have three 
ways to construct the bottom row: 

Key in Lines 20 and 40, then run the 
program. Seventeen rows are created in- 
stead of 16, but you do not need an extra 
border program line. 

At Line 30 the boxcar C $ is created in S4 , 
which must be put in the boxcar to tell 
CoCo you are changing size. (It can be 
placed inside the engine at Line 50.) 

C$ creates two vertical lines. A super- 
boxcar, D$, contains four regular boxcars 
consisting of eight columns. In Line 50 the 
engine begins as the left border and tacks 
on four super-boxcars , D $ . After two super- 
boxcars are concatenated, you are in dan- 
ger of overloading the train. A small engine, 
DRAW, is required to assist in pulling the rest 
of the train, while a caboose is required to 
add the third column. Can you use an extra 
+D$ instead of +"D191"? 

Actually, Line 50 can be assembled 
(engine; four super-boxcars; small engine; 
caboose;) to read: 

50 DRAW"BM0,0"+D$+D$+D$+D$:DRAW"D191" 

DRAW is required to set the third column. 

Using an extra super-boxcar B$ in Line 
40 and D$ in' Line 50, instead of +"R255 M 

« 

Florida-based Joseph Kolar is a veteran 
writer and programmer who specializes in 
introducing beginners to the powers of the 
Color Computer 



Developing a PRINT @ 
screen utility program 

Boxcars, 
Boxcars, 
Boxcars 

By Joseph Kolar 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 



and "D191", respectively, saves seven bytes. 
Again, save a copy of your work. 

The graphic screen, 64-by-32, is actu- 
ally the PRINT @ screen divided into four 
quadrants. We will create the graphic char- 
acter set, CHR$(128) through CHR$(143) 
for use on the Hi-Res screen, as well as 
GET -PUT to draw. 

If you didn't sayonara the new utility, 
don't. If you did, load it back in by typing 
DEL60 and 1000 GOTO 1000. 

Look over Listing 2. Key in Line 2, the 
DIM line; A(2) through H(2) and Al (2) 
through HI (2). A through H are the eight 
configurations of the 8-by- 1 2 graphic C H R $ 
boxes; Al through HI are the mates. For 
instance,CHR$(133) is the mate of 
CHR$(138); CHR$(129) is the mate of 
CHR$(142). 

While developing the graphic set you 
don't want the P R I NT @ screen, so type in 1 5 
GOTO 200 to bypass the utility for now. 
Each box is 8-by- 1 2, calculated by dividing 
the number of full screen spaces, 256x 192, 
by the PRINT ©screen, 32x16. (256/32=8; 
192/16=12; 8x12). 

At Line 200, you can begin drawing the 
designs in pairs so that Line 200 houses one 
and Line 210 houses the mate. 

The first, CH R$ ( 1 28 ) , is located at (0,0); 
painting is done in C4. The painless way to 
figure the PA I NT coordinates is as follows: 

For color in the upper-left quadrant, 
augment the starting coordinates by +2,+2; 
for the lower-left quadrant, augment the 
starting coordinates by +2,+8; the upper- 



right quadrant, augment +6,+2; and the 
lower-right quadrant by +6,+8. 

The pairs and assigned variables are: 

CHR(128) A CHR$(143) Al 

(137) B (134) Bl 

(131) C (140) CI 

(133) D (138) Dl 

(139) E (132) El 

(142) F (129) Fl 

(141) G (130) Gl 

(135) H (136) HI 

From the listing, key in lines 200 through 
350, copying the designs on graph paper. 
Create them from the data in each program 
line and use the paint coordinates to shade 
them in. 

When finished, check them out by first 
putting them in GET statements and assign- 
ing them the proper identifying variable. 

Take the beginning coordinates extracted 
from the appropriate DRAW line, and add 
+200 to the DRAW line number used for the 
associated GET.Thus, DRAW line 200 +200= 
GET line 400. DRAW line 250+200 produces 
GET line 450. 

Since each graphic character occupies 
an 8-by- 12 area, to the beginning coordi- 
nates, (0,0), add +8,+12. (0+8=8; 0+12=12). 
The ending coordinates = (8,12). After a 
few lines, you'll get the hang of it. In fact, 
the vertical coordinates are always (H,0)- 
(H,12). Likewise, the horizontal compo- 
nent, H, always ends as 0 in the starting 
coordinate and eight in the ending coordi- 
nate. 

The quickest and surest way to proceed 
is to L 1 5T2 00; add 200 to the D RAW line to get 
the G ET line number (Use the coordinates in 
the listed line as the beginning coordinates 
in the GET line); calculate and add the 
ending coordinates; add the assigned vari- 
able and tack on G. Without referring to the 
GET part of the listing, work them out and 
key them in. 

When you've keyed in all the GET state- 
ments, run the program to check for any 
Syntax errors. Check the graphics charac- 
ters for the proper variables assigned as 
well as any errors in the listing. 

In order to use PRINT @, or graphic 
utility, make the following additions: 

3 GOTO 199 
99 GOTO 99 
DEL100 

199 PM0DE3,1:PCLS 
600 PCLS:SCREEN1.0 
999 GOTO 20 

Now you must start at a horizontal 
coordinate that is divisible by eight, 
(0,8,16,...240) and a vertical coordinate 



80 THE RAINBOW June 1989 



that is divisible by 1 2, (0, 1 2, 24, 36,... 1 80). 

Key in the following test line: 610 
PUT( 240, 180)- (248,191) ,A, PSET, then run 
the program . Substitute all the variables, 
one at a time, and check them out. To get rid 
of the utility, put a REM in front of Line 999, 
masking it. 

There is a flaw in this utility; you can't 
use the last column to set graphic blocks. 
(There is a way to force it, but we won't do 
so.) Instead, you get the proverbial bunched- 
up junk. It's a trade-off — loss of the last 
column for easily calculated even-num- 
bers. You can't use ending coordinates 
(256,192); 256 is out of CoCo's range. You 
can use 192-255 on the vertical because 
they all are equivalent, in this case, to 191 
and within CoCo's range. 

Substitute other values for those in Line 
610. This gives you the feel of working 
with coordinates adaptable to the grid inter- 
secting points. 

One advantage over the staid Lo-Res 
graphics is that you can remove the utility 
and align the designs to any pair of starting 
coordinates such as (4,4), (7,12), (3,25). 
However, the +8,+12 must be added con- 
sistently for the ending coordinates to get a 
viable graphic character. 

The grid needs locating guides, so I 
divided the screen into four quadrants. Type 



in: 

60 DRAW'*:C2BM128,0D96NU28NR128D96C4 M 

Note the cross-hair Line 60 ending in C 4 . 
I didn't want to take a chance. CoCo is 
reminded to return to C4 after the cross- 
hairs are created in C2. 

The utility may make the character set 
appear distorted due to the way the set is 
drawn or to a shadow inherent on your TV. 
Blank areas are partly overprinted on the 
grid lines, so it is important to wipe out the 
utility by masking Line 999. 

The acid test is to create a design on the 
utility and then wipe it out to see what is 
left. 

Delete Line 610 and any other lines 
introduced while conducting the test, making 
sure the utility is operational, then unmask 
Line 999 and run the program. The utility 
should now be divided into four quadrants. 

Here's an idea! Place CHR$(140), CI, in 
the box two lines above the white horizon- 
tal guideline, directly left of the vertical 
white line. The starting coordinates are 
(120,72). A PUT Line 700 is created. (See 
Listing 2.) Another PUT Line 10 creates a 
similar box next to it. Now run the pro- 
gram, each line in succession. 

Can you anticipate my next move? If 



you can't, you may be considering an alter- 
nate move as a springboard to greater things. 

After you finish Line 770, take a break. 
Did you notice that when making a design 
that returns to the point of origin, such as a 
circle or oval, rather than proceeding in a 
clockwise or counter-clockwise direction, 
the graphic blocks are set according to the 
horizontal orientation? This is to simplify 
hunting for coordinates. Since any blocks 
in the same horizontal row have the same 
beginning and ending vertical component 
coordinates, it's easy to get confused with 
the jumble of coordinates constantly ma- 
nipulated. 

A few curliques were added beginning 
with Line 800, and I abandoned the con- 
straints of the formal block locations be- 
ginning with Line 840. The graphics char- 
acters are manipulated into position across 
the box delineator lines, using odd num- 
bered vertical coordinates. It is sometimes 
a bit difficult so take it slow. 

Lines 880 and 890 center the characters, 
while Line 900 creates a bit of color in the 
middle, from the 4-by-6 box square of 
CHR$(135) , H.Anyoneof E,F,GorH willfit 
in, but it's easier to work with H because the 
4-by-6 box is oriented in the upper left- 
hand quadrant. It's exercise to move it — 2, 
-3 to center in the exact middle. 




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June 1989 THE RAINBOW 81 



Mask Line 999 to get rid of the utility. 

The four curliques, B and Bl, can be 
separated a bit more. The test is relocating 
the four units to give better symmetry to the 
design, pull in the two vertical members, or 
improve the design. 

Incidently, you can use the DRAW and 
PA I NT statements to fill in the central area. 



However, there's no sense in GETting without 
PUTting. The raw material has already been 
created. Use it! 

Before working on the program, save a 
copy. Try these changes: 

10 PM0DE4.1: PCLS : SCREEN1 , 1 
600 PCLS : SCREEN1 , 1 



Then run the program. 

Now, change lines 10 and 600 to the 
other screen. SCREEN1 , 0 .Change line 199 
to 199 PM0DE4,1:PCLS and run the pro- 
gram. 

Change lines 10 and 600 back to 
SCREEN1 , 1 and run the program. 



Listing 1: B0XCAR1 

0 1 PRINT @ 

1 CLEAR50 0 

10 PMODE3,1:PCLS:SCREEN1,0 

20 A$="R64D3L64D3":B$=A$+A$+A$+A 

$ 

30 C$="S4D191R8U191R8" :D$=C$+C$+ 
C$+C$ 

40 DRAW"S16C4BM0,0"+B$+B$+B$ 

50 DRAW"BM0,0"+D$+D$+D$+D$:DRAWD 

$ 

60 GOTO60 
Listing 2: B0XCAR2 

4 

0 , LISTING2 

1 CLEAR500 

2 DIM A(2) ,B(2) ,C(2) ,D(2) ,E(2) ,F 
(2) ,G(2) ,H(2) ,A1(2) ,B1 (2) ,C1 (2) , 
Dl(2) ,E1(2) ,F1(2) ,G1(2) ,H1(2) 

3 GOT0199 

10 PMODE3,1:PCLS:SCREEN1,0 

20 A$="R64D3L64D3 " : B$=A$+A$+A$+A 

$ 

30 C$="S4D191R8U191R8" : D$=C$+C$+ 
C$+C$ 

40 DRAW"S16C4BM0,0"+B$+B$+B$ 

50 DRAW"BM0,0"+D$+D$+D$+D$:DRAWD 

$ 

60 DRAW"C2BM128,0D96NL128NR128D9 
6C4 lf 

99 GOT099 

199 PMODE3 , 1 : PCLS 

200 DRAW"BM0,0R8D12L8U12" :PAINT( 
2,2),, 4,4 

2 10 DRAW " BM10 , 0 BR8 BD 1 2 BL8 BU 1 2 11 : P 
AINT(12,2) ,1,4 

220 DRAW" BM20 ,0BR4R4D6L8D6R4U12 11 
: PAINT (26, 2) , 4 , 4 : PAINT (22 , 8 ) ,4,4 
230 DRAW" BM3 0 , 0R4 D12R4U6L8U6 " : PA 
INT (32, 2) ,4, 4: PAINT (3 6, 8) ,4,4 
2 40 DRAW" BM4 0 , 0R8 D6L8U6 » : PAINT ( 4 
2, 2), 4, 4 

250 DRAW"BM50,0BD6R8D6L8U6" : PAIN 
T(52 f 8) ,4,4 

260 DRAW" BM60, 0R4 D12 L4U12 ": PAINT 
(62,2) ,4,4 

270 DRAW"BM70,0BR4R4D12L4U12" : PA 
INT(76,2) ,4,4 

280 DRAW"BM80,0BR4R4D6L4U6":PAIN 
T(86,2) ,4,4 

290 DRAW"BM90,0R4D6R4D6L8U12" :PA 
INT(92,2) ,4,4 

300 DRAW"BM100,0BD12BR4R4U6L4D6" 
:PAINT(106,8) ,4,4 , 



3 10 DRAW" BM110 , 0R8D6L4D6L4U12 " : P 
AINT(112,2) ,4,4 

320 DRAW"BM120,0BD6R4D6L4U6":PAI 
NT(122,8) ,4,4 

330 DRAW"BM130,0R8D12L3U6L4U6":P 
AINT(132,2) ,4,4 

340 DRAW" BM140,0R4D6L4U6": PAINT ( 
142,2) ,4,4 

3 50 DRAW"BM150,0BR4R4D12L8U6R4U6 
156,2) ,4,4 
0,0)-(8,12) ,A 
10,0X18, 12 
20,0)-(28,12 
30,0)-(38,12 
40,0)-(48,12 
50,0)-(58,12 
60,0)-(68,12 
70,0)-(78,12 
80,0)-(88,12 
90,0)-(98,12 
100,0)-(108,12) ,F,G 
110,0)-(118,12) ,F1,G 
120,0)-(128,12) ,G,G 
130,0)-(138,12) ,G1,G 
140,0)-(148,12) ,H,G 
150,0) -(158,12) ,H1,G 



» : PAINT 
400. GET 
GET 
GET 
GET 
GET 
GET 
GET 
GET 
GET 
GET 
GET 
GET 
GET 
GET 
GET 
GET 



PCLS:SCREEN1,0 



PUT 
PUT 
PUT 
PUT 
PUT 

PUT 
PUT 

PUT 

PUT 
PUT 
PUT 

PUT 

PUT 
PUT 
PUT 
PUT 
PUT 
PUT 



G 

A1,G 

B, G 
B1,G 

C, G 
C1,G 

D, G 
D1,G 

E, G 
E1,G 



410 
420 
430 
440 
450 
460 
470 
480 
490 
500 
510 
520 
530 
540 
550 
600 
700 
710 
720 
730 
740 
T 

750 
760 
T 

770 
T 

800 
810 
820 
T . 
830 
ET 
840 
850 
860 
870 
880 
890 
T 

900 PUT(126,93)-(134,105) ,H,PSET 

999 GOTO20 

1000 GOTO1000 



120,72) -(128,84) ,C1,PSET 
128,72) -(13 6,84) ,C1,PSET 
112,84) -(120, 96) ,D1,PSET 
136,84) -(144,96) ,D,PSET 
112,96)-(120,108) ,D1,PSE 

13 6,96) -(144,108) ,D,PSET 
120 , 108 ) - (128 , 120) , C,,PSE 

128, 108) -(13 6, 120) ,C,PSE 

112, 60) -(120, 72) ,B1,PSET 
13 6, 60) -(144, 72) ,B,PSET< 
112,120) -(120,132) ,B,PSE 

136,120) -(144, 132) ,B1, PS 

88,87) -(96,99) ,C1,PSET 
80,87) -(88,99) ,C1,PSET 
160,87) -(168,99) ,C1,PSET 
168, 87) -(176,99) ,C1,PSET 
126,36)-(134,48) ,D,PSET 
12 6,144) -(13 4, 156) ,D, PSE 



82 



THE RAINBOW June 1989 



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tor ASCII 



Memory Jumpers 

/ would like to know if I could use the 
jumpers on my CoCo 2 to increase the 
memory to 64K? I noticed on one of the 
chips, there is a section marked 128K and 
64K, and there are two bar strips in the 
middle of the board. What are they for? 

Darrell D. Garrison 
Michigan 

The jumpers on the board are for the 
different-sized ROMs in bits (64K — 8K 
times 8 for Color basic, and 128K — 16K 
times 8 for Disk Color basic). See Marty 
Goodman's Upgrading CoCo' s Memory in 
the March '89 issue to upgrade your memory 
to 64K. 

AND . . . 

/ have been programming for eight years 
now. Every once in awhile I come across a 
program that uses AND in a strange way, 
that is, 4 AND 2. What is the purpose of this? 

Terry Ritchie 
Have lock, North Carolina 

What you describe is a logical or Boolean 
AND. For example, suppose X=45 (which in 
binary is 00101101) and Y=35 (binary 
00100011), were AN Ded together (Note: 1 

AND 1 = 1,1 AND 0 = 0,0 AND 1 = 0,0 AND 
0 = 0) as follows: 

0 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 <-x 



0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 <-Y 



we get: 

0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 

which is 33 decimal. This type of arithme- 
tic is used for both speed (faster than multi- 
plication and division) and convenience 
when manipulating registers. 

Oops! 

Regarding your answer to M. Willing- 
ham in the rainbow, February '89, I've 
tried and tried to get it to work, but always 
get a TM Error in Line 5010. Is there a 



Richard Esposito is the principal engi- 
neer for EDM Corporation. He holds 
bachelor's, master's and doctorate 
degrees from Polytechnic Institute of 
Brooklyn. He has been writing about 
microcomputers since 1980. 

Richard Libra is a simulator test 
operator for Singer Link Simulation 
Systems Division. 




By Richard E. Esposito 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 

with Richard W. Libra 

typographical error in the listing? 

Rand Boland 
Arvada, Colorado 

Sorry for the typo. The = following the 
quote in that line should really be a +, the 
non-shifted character on the same type- 
writer key. 

Citizen Arrest 

/ bought a CoCo 3 three months ago and 
have a Citizen 120-D printer that is Epson- 
compatible. I'm interested in printing 
graphics, and so bought DeskMate 3. The 
problem is, it won't print the graphics. Is 
DeskMate 3 compatible with my printer? If 
not, is there a fix in DeskMate 3, or is the 
problem in the arrangement of the SW-1 
(eight microswitches)? I also typed the 
program DUM PBAS (rainbow, September '88, 
Page 98 ) and it doesn't work either. I hope 
you can help me. 

Jorge Lopez Rodriguez 
Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico 

Tandy, with a few exceptions, releases 
all CoCo graphics programs with drivers 
for Tandy/Radio Shack printers that recog- 
nize a different set of graphics codes than 
the more common Epson/IB M-compatible 
printers. The Tandy printers print a row of 
graphics seven dots high while the Epson/ 
IBM printers do eight at a time. The high 
order-bits correspond to the opposite pins 
in the two protocols. It should be apparently 
now, that fixing these programs for your 



printer is not a simple task, but involves 
almost a complete rewrite of the printer 
drivers. 

Pin-out Figures 

Is there a way of making my CoCo disk 
drive (FD 502) work on any of the Tandy 
IBM-compatibles ? 

Dennis Craig 
La Vista, Nevada 

CoCo floppy-disk drives are hardware- 
compatible with the IBM standard. If you 
cannot figure out the pin-outs, keep in mind 
that you can order a maintenance manual 
for any Tandy product from Radio Shack 
National Parts. 

Editor Troubles 

I've been having some trouble with my 
CoCo 3 and the £DIT command. When I am 
editing a program that has been saved in 
the ASCII format, EDIT refuses to recog- 
nize lines that LIST fine, but get a UL 
(Unidentified Line) Error with EDIT. This 
problem also occurs when I try to edit a 
program that was saved in ASCII format, 
but is now in basic What is going on here? 
Also, what is the proper poke and counter- 
poke for high speed on the CoCo 3 ? (These 
pokes appear in Marc Campbell;s basic 
editor, Buddy, July '88, Page 34.) 

Brian Davidson 
Idaho Falls, Idaho 

If you type the ASCII text for a program 
using a word processor, and you are not 
careful, you might add spurious carriage 
returns, causing the problems described 
above. The pokes are Speed up: POKE 
&HFFD9.0, and Slow back down: POKE 
&HFFD8.0 . 

Screen Sizing 

/ am presently using a CoCo 3 with a 
Magnavox Amber Monitor, and a Tandy 
Direct-Connect Modem Pak. Is it possible 
to change my screen size to a 40-by-24, 
instead of the 32-by~I6 that I get when I 
access my modem? 

Donald Nelson 
Indianapolis, Indiana 

The 32-by-16 screen is programmed 
into the Pak's ROM. Using Mikeyterm, 
available on tape or disk (See April's col- 
umn.), can give you the resolution you 
want. 

Direct-Connect Commy 

Is there any way to use Tandy's DCM-3 



84 THE RAINBOW June 1989 



I 



- 



Direct-Connect Modem with the Commo- 
dore 128? Also, I heard of a graphics tablet 
that Tandy used to make. Where can I find 
this? 

Ian Coveny 
Warsaw, New York 

The Commodore has a strange non- 
standard serial port. (See Marty Goodman's 
April column for details.) Tandy used to 
sell an X-Pad for $349. They were closed 
out at Radio Shack stores for $99 over two 
years ago. I doubt that you can find any 
available. 

A Better Spreadsheet? 

/ am currently using DynaCalc for my 
spreadsheet purposes and am able to say 
that I am quite impressed and pleased. Just 
out of curiosity, are you aware of a better 
spreadsheet, maybe one that compares to 
Lotus that is compatible with OS-9 Level 
II? Also, what can I do to expand the 
memory capability of DynaCalc to take 
advantage of my 512K and how can I get 
rid of the extra linefeed during printout? 
The manual says any value up to and in- 
eluding eight. 

John Wilson 
Las Vegas, Nevada 

DynaCalc is currently OS-9's best. There 
are very few OS-9 programs accessing more 
than 64K each, primarily because Tandy/ 
Microware has never released a large 
memory version C compiler for the CoCo. 
Check the output of xmode / p to make sure 
it is set at - 1 f . Also check the settings on 
your printer. You can also get double spac- 
ing if you print a line larger than your 
printer is capable of and it wraps. 

Tricky Tracks 

/ just purchased an FD 502 drive. On 
OS-9, 1 configured my system to 40 tracks. 
While in a 40-track setup, I tried to make a 
copy of my system master. When OS-9 read 
off of the 3 5 -track system master, it gave me 
a Read Error (Error 244). I tried copying 
the system master in 35-track setup, and 
when OS-9 started to write to the 40-track 
formatted disk, it gave me a Wrong Type 
Error (Error 249). How can I use 40- 
tracks? Tm puzzled. 

Brennan A. Cropper 
Port Barre, Louisiana 

The way to make a 40-track system is to 
use Config from /dO to make a 40-track 
system on a 35-track formatted disk in / d 1 . 
Use the resulting disk to boot up again. 



Then format a new disk in / d 1 , use Cobbler 
on the disk in / d 1 , copy all files over to / d 1 
and it will finally be your 40-track boot 
disk. 

Disk Dilemma 

/ have a CoCo 2 (Model 26-3026 ). When 
I try any disk commands, the disk drive 
goes on and runs and will not stop! The 
disk-drive light will not go on either. I have 
tried the disk controller and drive on my 
other CoCos and have no trouble with it. 
The CoCo works good with cassette and 
ROM Pak programs plugged-in, with no 
trouble. Extended Color bask programs 
run fine, which I think tells me the ECB 
ROM chip is working. What components 
can I check? 

Ned Bassick 
Fairfield, Connecticut 

The CoCo 2 does not supply 12 volts at 
the ROM port, as the older, larger CoCos 
did. It sounds like the controller is for one 
of them. The solution is to get a newer five- 
volt-only controller, a Multi-Pak Interface, 
which supplies the 12 volts, or kludge up a 
12-volt source. 

Patch Patching 

In the January '88 issue, Page 55, you 
printed a patch for Disk EDTASM, by 
Roger A. Krupski. I had to make two changes 
to his program before it would work with 
my CoCo 3: 

335 GOTO 350 
610 DATA END, 0 

Without these added lines, I got a Disk F ull 
Error, and an SN (Syntax) Error in Line 
480. 

Lt. Day 
Zanesville, Ohio 

Thanks for sharing the info. 



For a quicker response, your questions 
may also be submitted through rain- 
bow's CoCo SIG on Delphi. From the 
CoCo SIG> prompt, pick Rainbow 
Magazine Services, then, at the RAIN- 
BO W> prompt, type ASK for "Ask the 
Experts" to arrive at the EXPERTS> 
prompt, where you can select the "Doc- 
tor ASCII" online form which has com- 
plete instructions. 



One- Liner Contest Winner . , . 

Issue commands to your CoCo 
3's cassette recorder with this one- 
liner, which controls the audio 
and motor functions. Press Fl to 
turn on audio and motor; press F2 
to turn them off. Press ALT to 
CLDRD the program; press CTRL to 
CLORDM the program. 

The listing: 

10 CLS : PRINT© 128 , " Fl-ON 
F2»OFF ALT-CLOAD 
CTRL*=CLOADM" : IFPEEK (343) ~191THE 
NAUDIOON:MOTORON:GOTO10ELSEIFPEE 
K ( 3 4 4 ) -19 1THENAUDIOOFF : MOTOROFF : 
GOTO10ELSEIFPEEK(341)=191THENCLO 
AD : GOTO10ELSEIFPEEK ( 342 ) «19 1THEN 
CLOADM : END : GOT01f5EL5El# 

Paul Fogle 
Mountain Grove, MD 



(For this winning one-liner contest entry, the 
author has been sent copies of both The Third 
Rainbow Book of Adventures and its companion 
The Third Rainbow Adventures Tape.) 



One- Liner Contest Winner . . . 



After prompting the user for a 
beginning arid ending address, 
this short utility prints the ad- 
dresses and their contents to the 
screen. If the PRINT command is 
changed to PRINT8-2, the infor- 
mation will be sent to the printer. 

The listing: 

10 CLS : PRINT£ll, "PRINT PEEK" : PRI 
NT: INPUT "TO LIST THE r POKED * VAL 
UES OF A RANGE OF ADDRESSES , INP 
UT (B) BEGINNING, (E) ENDING A 
DDRESS. INPUT B,E" ;B r Et FORA-B T 
O E: PRINT A PEEK ( A) ; :NEXTA: PRINT 
: PRINT : INPUT "DO AGAIN ( Y/N) : " ? P 
$ : IFP$— "Y"THEN1£ELSEEND 

William L. Duke 
Gardnerville, NV 



(For this winning One-liner contest entry, the 
author has been sent copies of both The Third 
Rainbow Book of Adventures and its companion 
The Third Rainbow Adventures Tape.) 



June 1989 THE RAINBOW 85 



Expanding Horizons 

Take your CoCo beyond the 
limits of floppy diskettes — 
connect to DELPHI, your 
complete online business 
and personal resource. 
With your modem and a local 
phone call, select from tens of 
thousands of downloadable 
programs, meet friends from 
across the globe, or tap into the 
world's most comprehensive 
databases to expand the 
horizons of your CoCo. ^| 

Your Resource for 
Color Computers 

DELPHI'S special 
group for owners of 
Tandy Color 
Computers is sup- 
ported by the people 
who bring you RAINBOW 

Access extensive databases 
where you can upload your 
favorite files and download 
programs written by other 
personal computer enthusiasts. 
Chat with other members and 
resident experts in Conference, 
use electronic mail, and post or 
respond to messages in Forum. 

OS-9 Online 

In OS-9 Online, DELPHI'S 
interest group for fans of the 
OS-9 operating system, you'll 
meet other members, download 
files, and get tips to help you 
make the most of your CoCo. 



What 

your CoCo 

really 



was 




meant 
for. 



RAINBOW Online 

DELPHI is your online connection to 
RAINBOW, You can renew your 
subscription, meet other 
Color Computer owners, 
order software or hard- 
ware, or inquire about 
products. You can even 
download programs pub- 
lished in RAINBOW. 




Wallet-Friendly 

You can access DELPHI with a local 
phone call from almost anywhere in 
the United States. There is NO extra 
charge for using Tymnet or Telenet, 
NO monthly minimum, NO 
premium for 1200 or 2400 bps, and 
connect rates are a low $7.20/hour. 



FREE Lifetime Mem bership 

As a RAINBOW subscriber, you 
get a FREE lifetime DELPHI mem- 
bership ($29.95 value) which in- 
cludes a credit worth one evening 
hour of usage ($7.20). 
If you don't already subscribe to 
RAINBOW, just request a subscrip- 
tion when you sign-up to DELPHI, 
and, for the $31 subscription fee, 
you'll get the same great deal! 

Sign up now - Online! 

With your CoCo and modem: 

1. Dial 1-617-576-2981.* 

2. Once connected, 
press RETURN once 
or twice. 

3. At Username:, type 
JOINDELPHI 

4. At Password:, type 
RAINBOW, if 

you already subscribe to 
RAINBOW. 

Type SENDRAINBOW, if you 
do not yet subscribe and wish to 
do so. 

5. Have credit information ready. 

* Or call DELPHI Member Services 
by voice at (800)544-4005 to 
obtain a local access phone 
number. 




No Risk 



With DELPHI there is no risk. You 
can cancel your membership within 
30 days and pay only for your usage 
beyond the initial one-hour credit. 



DELPH I 



The World's Premier Online Information Service 

General Videotex Corporation • Three Blackstone St • Cambridge MA 02139 

800-544-4005 • 617-491-3393 




i - | 



If you have an idea for the "Wishing 
Well" submit it to Fred do the rain- 
bow. Remember, keep your ideas spe- 
cific, and don f t for get this is basic. All 
programs resulting from your wishes 
are for your use, but remain the prop- 
erty of the author. 

Just recently I finished reading George 
Burns' touching tribute to his late wife, 
Grade: A Love Story. In it, a poker-faced 
George asked: "Grade, how many days 
are there in a year?" 
'Seven," she replied. 
'Seven?" George questioned. 
'Seven. Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, 
Wednesday, Thursday, Friday and Satur- 
day. If you know any more, George, just 
name them." 

While I won't try to decipher the logic 
behind Grade's innocent confusion, I 
thought it an interesting way to introduce 
this month's program: Calendar II: The 
Days of the Week. 

Fred Scerbo is a special needs instructor 
for the North Adams Publis Schools in 
North Adams, Massachusetts. He holds a 
master's in education and has published 
some of the fir st software available for the 
Color Computer through his software firm, 
Illustrated Memory Banks. 



Building on last month's 
Calendar program 



Just Say 



lnight, 



Grade" 



By Fred B. Scerbo 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 

It is not so much a sequel as much as a 
"prequel" to Calendar, but last's month's 
program was so much fun to write I couldn't 
help putting it out first. 

Calendar I helps students identify the 
months of the year using graphic draw- 
ings. This month, we will concentrate on 
learning the days of the week. There are no 
fancy graphics, largely because I could not 
think of any to logically convey a specific 
day. (Sunday was easy, but Wednesday? 
Prince spaghetti day?) 

As in recent months, this program helps 



fill a void in early childhood education 
computer software. 

Calendar II is simple to operate. There 
are no menus or difficult instructions; to 
run the program, just press enter after 
seeing the titlecard. You are then pre- 
sented with a screen titled "Days of the 
Week," with numbers one through seven 
highlighted in a row of boxes. When the 
first day, Sunday, appears, the number one 
flashes on the screen. Pressing enter ad- 
vances the screen to the next day, continu- 
ing until the @ button is pressed. The days 
keep looping to impress upon the child that 
even though Sunday is the first day, it also 
follows Saturday from the previous week. 

After pressing the @ key, the screen 
displays "Press the Number" and then gives 
a random day of the week. The child 
presses a number ( 1 to 7) that corresponds 
to the day shown. If the correct number is 
pressed, a row of smiling faces appears at 
the bottom of the screen; if incorrect, it 
shows a row of frowns. 

Pressing enter allows you another shot 
at the day shown; pressing the @ key gives 
you the scorecard and pressing C contin- 
ues, restarts or ends the program. That's all 
there is to it. Let your young ones try it 
along with Calendar /, to help them be- 
come more comfortable with the com- 
puter and keyboard. □ 




225 126 

290 115 

END 219 



The Listing: WEEKDAYS 



1 REM*************************** 

2 REM* THE DAYS OF THE WEEK * 

COPYRIGHT (C) 1989 * 

BY FRED B. SCERBO * 
60 HARDING AVENUE * 
NORTH ADAMS , MA 01247 



3 REM* 

4 REM* 

5 REM* 

6 REM* 



7 REM*************************** 

8 CLEAR2000 

9 CLS0 

10 PRINTSTRING$ (32,2 20) ;STRING$( 
32, 156) ; : FORI=1T019 2 : READA : PRINT 
CHR$(A+128) ; : NEXT 

15 PRINTSTRING$ (33,128);: F0RI=1T 
08 : PRINTCHR$ (205) CHR$ (205) CHR$ (2 
00)CHR$ (128) ; :NEXTI 
20 FORI=1TO8:PRINTCHR$(204)CHR$( 
204)CHR$(200)CHR$(12 8) ; :NEXT 
25 PRINT@357, " AN INTRODUCTION 



TO " ; :PRINT@389, " THE DAYS OF T 
HE WEEK "; 

30 PRINT6421," BY FRED B.SCERB 
0 " ; :PRINT@453, 11 COPYRIGHT (C 
) 1989 " ; 

35 DATA110, 108, 109, 101, 108, 108,1 
09 , 100 , 110 , , 9 6 , 109 , 108 , 109 , 100 , 1 
11, , 100 , 110 , 100 , 110, 108 , 105, 101, 
108 , 108 , 109 , 100 , 110 , 108 , 108 , 109 
40 DATA106,,,101,,,101,,106,,,10 
1, , , ,110,106, ,106, ,106, ,101,101, 
, ,101, ,106, , ,101 

45 DATA106, , ,101,99,99,103, ,106, 
, ,101,99,103, ,106,109, ,106, ,106, 

,101,101,99,99,103, ,107,99,99,10 
3 

50 DATA106, , , 101 , , , 101 , , 106 , , , 10 

1,, 100, ,106,100,106,106, ,106,, 10 

1,101, , ,101, ,106,100,98, 

55 DATA106, , ,101, , ,101, ,106, , ,10 

1,, 96, ,106, ,108,106, ,106, ,101,10 

1,,, 101,, 106,, 100, 98 

60 DATA107, 99, 103, 101, 98, ,103,97 

,107,99,106, 103,99,103,97,107, ,9 

7,107,97,107,99,102,101,98,96,10 



May 1989 THE RAINBOW 87 



3,97,107, ,,101 

65 X$=XNKEY$:IFX$<>CHR$(13)THEN6 
5 

70 PMODE0,1:PCLS1:SCREEN1,1 

75 FORI=0TO250STEP37:LINE(I,50) - 

(30+1,80) , PRESET, BF: NEXT 

80 FORI=0TO250STEP37:LINE(I+4,54 

) -(2 6+1,76) ,PSET,B:NEXT 

85 DRAW"BM16,70C1S4U10NG2BR32R6D 

5L6D5R6BR3 2R6U5NL4U5NL6BR30D5R6U 

5D10BR3 2R6U5L6U5R6BR30NR6D10R6U5 

NL6BU5BR3 2R6D4GD5" 

90 DRAW"BM10,2 6C0R2NU12R10U12NL1 

2BR6ND12R10D6NL10D6U12BR6F6NE6D6 

BR12R8U6L8U6R8BR16ND12R10D12NL10 

BR6U6NR8U6R8BR16R6ND12R6BR6D12U6 

R10D6U12BR6NR8D6NR8D6R8BR16NU12R 
8NU8R8NU12BR6NR8U6NR8U6R8BR6NR8D 
6NR8D6R8BR6U12D6R2NE6F6" 
95 COLOR1,0 

100 LINE (0,0) -(252,2) , PRESET, B 
105 LINE(0, 40)-(252, 38) , PRESET, B 
110 LINE (0,0) -(2,40) , PRESET, B 
115 LINE(252, 0)-(256, 40) , PRESET, 
B 

120 LINE(0, 90) -(252,92) , PRESET, B 
125 LINE(0, 144)-(256, 192) , PRESET 
, BF 

130 LINE(4,148)-(250,186) ,PSET,B 
F 

135 A$ (1) ="BR16R10U6L10U6R10BR6D 
12R10NU12BR6U12F12NU12BR6" :D$="R 
2NU12R10U12NL12BR6ND12R10D6NL10D 
6U12BR6F6NE6D6 " : A$ ( 1) =A$ (1) +D$ 
140 A$ (2 ) ="BR14U12R8ND12R8D12BR6 
U12R10D12NL10BR6U12F12NU12BR6"+D 

$ 

145 A$ (3 ) = ff BR12U12L8R16BR6D12R10 
U12BR6NR8D6NR8D6R8BR6R10U6L10U6R 
10BD12BR6"+D$ 

150 A$(4)= ,! NU12R6NU12R6NU12BR4NR 
8U6NR8U6R8BR4R2ND12R8D12NL10BR4U 
12F12U12BR4NR8D6NR8D6R8BR4R6U6L6 
U6R6BD12BR4"+D$ 

155 A$(5)="BR10U12L6R12BR6D12U6R 

8U6D12BR6NU12R8U12BR6ND12R8D6L6F 

6BR6R8U6L8U6R8BD12BR6"+D$ 

160 A$ (6)="BR24U6NR8U6R8BR6ND12R 

8D6L6F6BR6NU12BR6"+D$ 

165 A$(7)= n BR2R8U6L8U6R8BR6ND12R 

8D6NL8D6U12BR6R6ND12R6BR6D12R8U1 

2BR6ND12R8D6L6F6BR6"+D$ 

170 COLOR0,1 

175 FORI=1TO7:LINE(0,100)-(256,1 
34) , PRESET, BF 

180 DRAW H BM2 , 130C0S8" : DRAW A$(I) 
185 DRAW" BM4, 13 1C0S8": DRAW A$(I) 
190 Q=I*37-37 

195 LIxNE(Q+4,54)-(26+Q,76) ,PSET, 
B 

200 LINE(Q+4,54)-(26+Q,76) ,PRESE 
T,B 



205 X$=INKEY$:IFX$=CHR$(13)THEN2 
15ELSEIFX$="@"THEN2 2 5 
210 G0T0195 
215 NEXT 
220 GOTO170 

225 LINE(0, 100)-(256, 134) , PRESET 
/BF 

230 LINE (6, 6) -(248,34) , PRESET, BF 
235 W=RND(7) : DRAW"BM2 , 130C0S8 " :D 
RAW A$(W) 

240 DRAW"BM4 , 131C0S8 " : DRAW A$(W) 
245 DRAW"BM16,26S4U12R10D6NL10BR 
4D6U12R10D6L6F6BR4NR10U6NR10U6R1 
0BR4NR10D6R10D6NL10BR4R10U6L10U6 

R10BR18ND12L6R12BR4D12U6R8U6D12B 
R4NR8U6NR8U6R8BR16ND12F12U12BR4D 
12R10U12BR4ND12R6ND12R6D12BR4R2N 
U12R10U6NL10U6NL12BR4NR8D6NR8D6R 
8BR4U12R10D6L6F6" 

250 X$=INKEY$ : IFX$="@"THEN315ELS 

EIFX$=" "THEN250 

255 X=VAL(X$) :IFX=0THEN250 

260 IFX>7THEN250 

265 FORP=1TO10:Q=X*37-37:LINE(Q+ 

4,54) -(2 6+Q,76) , PSET, B : LINE- (Q+4 

,54) , PRESET, B:NEXTP 

270 IF X=W THEN2 95 

275 NW=NW+1:FORK=0TO200STEP40:CI 

RCLE(2 8+K,168) ,20,0, .9:CIRCLE(28 

+K, 176) ,8,0, .9, .5,l:PSET(24+K,16 

4,0) :PSET(32+K, 164,0) : NEXTK 

280 X$=INKEY$:IFX$=CHR$(13)THEN2 

85ELSEIFX$="@"THEN315ELSE280 

285 LINE (4, 148) -(250,186) , PRESET 

, BF 

290 GOTO250 

295 NC=NC+1:FORK=0TO200STEP40:CI 
RCLE(2 8+K,16 8) ,20,0, .9:CIRCLE(28 
+K,170) ,8,0, .9,1, .5:PSET(24+K,16 
4,0) :PSET(32+K, 164,0) : NEXTK 
300 X$=INKEY$:IFX$=CHR$(13)THEN3 
05ELSEIFX$="@"THEN315ELSE300 
305 LINE (4, 148)-(250, 186) , PRESET 
/BF 

310 G0T0225 

315 CLS : PRINT@101 , "YOU TRIED"NC+ 
NW"TIMES &": PRINT© 165, "ANSWERED" 
NC" CORRECTLY" 

320 PRINT§229, "WHILE DOING"NW"WR 
ONG . " 

325 NQ=NC+NW:IF NQ=0THEN NQ=1 

3 30 MS=INT(NC/NQ*100) 

335 PRINTS 2 9 3, "YOUR SCORE IS"MS" 

%." 

340 PRINT© 3 57 , "ANOTHER TRY (Y/N/ 
C) ?"; 

345 X$=INKEY$:IFX$="Y"THEN RUN 

350 IFX$="N"THENCLS : END 

355 IFX$="C"THENSCREEN1 , 1: LINE (4 

,148) - (250, 186) , PRESET, BF:GOT02 2 

5 

360 GOT0345 ^ 



88 



THE RAINBOW June 1989 



the rainbow is a teaching environment and we realize that the 
majority of our readers will always be beginners. In our 
continuing effort to always keep the new user in mind, and in 
addition to the many beginner feature articles and programs 
published in every issue, "Novices Niche" contains shorter 
basic program listings that entertain as well as help the new 
user gain expertise in all aspects of the Color Computer: 
graphics, music, games, utilities, education, programming, etc. 




Left Beats Right i 

By Keiran Kenny I 4K 

Not long ago I read an article maintaining that left-handed 
people react about one-fiftieth of a second faster than right- 
handers in sports like tennis. I forgot the details of the scientific 
explanation, but if you look at the number of left-handers among 
the top-seeded and most successful tennis players, it seems that 
there is something to it. 

Reaction lets you test the theory. A cursor appears at the top of 
the screen, and after a random period it drops down the screen. You 
are prompted to use your left and right hand alternately to stop it 
before it has dropped ten screen spaces. If you press the space bar 
before it starts to fall, you "jump the gun" and have to start again. 
Your score is 10 minus the number of screen spaces remaining if 
you stop it. 

The loop in Line 140 holds the cursor at each position just long 
enough to make it visible. The value D L in Line 10 can be increased 
if you want. 

Although I am right-handed, my left hand scored consistently 
better than my right. Now, if I can get some training in ambidex- 
terity. . . see you at Wimbledon. 

■ 

The Listing: REACTION 

0 »REAXION« by Keiran Kenny, 

Sydney, 1989. 

1 1 COPYRIGHT 1989 FALSOFT , INC 
1J3 DL=2 

20 FORT=1TO20 : CLS0 

30 IFT/2=INT(T/2)THEN50 

40 PRINT"RIGHT HAND" ;: GOTO 60 



50 PRINT "LEFT HAND" ; 
60 PRINT@16,CHR$ (159) ; 
70 GOSUB280 

80 IFINKEY$=CHR$(32)THENPRINT@45 
4, "YOU JUMPED THE GUN 1 " ; : GOSUB2 8 
0:CLS0:GOTO30 

90 PRINT§16,CHR$ (128) ; :P=48:FORX 
=1TO10 

100 PRINT@P,CHR$(159) ; 

110 PRINT@P,CHR$ (128) ; 

120 IFINKEY$=CHR$(32)THEN160 

130 P=P+32 

140 F0RD=1T0DL : NEXT 

150 NEXT:X=X-1 

160 IFT/2=INT(T/2)THEN180 

170 SR=10 -X : TR=TR+SR : PRINTS 3 90 , " 

RIGHT SC0RE"SR"/ 10" ; : GOTO190 

180 SL=10-X:TL=TL+SL:PRINT@390, " 

LEFT SC0RE"SL"/ 10"; 

190 GOSUB280 

200 K$=INKEY$ : NEXTT 

210 CLS0:PRINT@228,"RIGHT SCORE" 

TR"/ 100"; 

220 PRINTO260," LEFT SCORE"TL"/ 
100"; 

230 PRINT® 3 2 6, "TRY AGAIN? Y/N" ; 
240 K$=INKEY$:IFK$=""THEN240 
250 IFK$="Y"THENTR=0 : TL=0 : GOTO20 
2 60 IFK$="N"THENCLS : END 
270 GOTO240 

280 FORD=1TO300+RND(600) : NEXT: RE 
TURN 

June 1989 THE RAINBOW 89 




Asteroid Dodge 
By Clayton R. Moore 



In Asteroid you are allotted three ships. The object of the game 
is to avoid the asteroids (graphic blocks) coming up the screen 
toward you. Your ship (the letter V) is located at the top of the 
screen. Maneuver your position to the right or left using the 
joystick. Pressing the fire button clears the screen of all oncoming 
obstacles. Use this option sparingly to avoid impending disaster. 

After accumulating 500 points you reach Level DL The entrance 
to Level II is a wall with a few openings stretching across the 
screen. Your goal is to pass through an opening without hitting the 
wall. 

Levels continue to change every 500 points in a similar fashion. 
Additionally, more screen-clearing bombs are awarded on com- 
pletion of each level. The score is shown at the end of the game. 
How far can you get? 

The Listing: ASTEROID 



P 
IP 

20 

30 
Ap 

5p 

60 

70 

80 



COPYRIGHT 198 9 FALSOFT, INC 
1 **************** 

•* ASTEROID DODGE* 
» * BY * 

'* C. MOORE * 

'* JULY 1988 * 
• **************** 

L=l 
P=16 
90 POKE65495,0 
100 CLS 

110 X=JOYSTK(0) 

120 IF X>37 THEN A=l ELSE IF X<2 

5 THEN A=-l ELSE A=0 

130 IF P+A<0 THEN A=0 ELSE IF P+ 

A>31 THEN A=0 

140 P=P+A 

150 PRINT@P, "V" ; 

160 FORI=lTOL 



Elevators 

By Paul Nalos 




In this game you are a red dot, maneuvered with the right 
joystick. The object of the game is to keep from going off the 
screen limits. The dot jumps if you press the fire button and 
responds to right and left movements of the joystick accordingly. 

The Listing: ELEVATOR 

p 1 COPYRIGHT 1989 FALSOFT, INC 

10 L=2 

20 C=2 

3j0 CLSj3 

Ap GOSUB 29p 

5p L=L+1:IF L>31 THEN L=0 
6p E=L-1 : IF E=-l THEN E=31 
lp FOR DR=£ TO 5 
Qp DI=DR 

9p IF EL=1 THEN GOSUB 17$ : GOTO 1 
6p 



17 p PRINTS RND(32)+447,CHR$ (RND( 
127)+128) ; 
18p NEXT I 
19 p PRINT@480 

2pp IF PEEK(1056)+P=175 THEN M=M 
+ 1 

21p IF PEEK(1056+P) <>96 THEN 29J3 

22j3 IF C<-3 THEN 25p 

23p IF PEEK(6528j3)=126 THEN CLS: 

C=C-1 

24$ IF PEEK(65280)=254 THEN CLS: 
C=C-1 

25p SC=SC+1 
26p L1=L1+1 

27p IF Ll=5pp THEN L=L+1 : L1=0 : SO 

UND l,l:GOTO A3p 

2Qp GOTOllp 

29p FOKE65315,63 

3pp F0RI=1T075 

31p PRINT@P,CHR$(RND(127)+128) ; 

32p POKE65312,RND(255) 

33 p NEXT 

3Ap CLS 

35p M=M-1 

36p C=p 

31p IF M=-3 THEN 39p 
3Bp GOTOllp 
39p CLS 

App PRINT@lj38 , "gameover" ; 
Alp PRINT@140,"SCORE";SC 
42,0 END 
A3p CLS 

AAp FORI=447T0479 

A5p PRINT@I,CHR$(12 8) ; 

A6p NEXT 

470 F0RI=1T06 

AQp PRINT@RND(32)+447, " " ; : 
A9p NEXT 
5pp GOTOll^ 



Ipp SET(DI,L,C) 

Hp RESET (DI,E) 

12p Sm ( 63 -Bt,i 3,1^1,,, G) 

13p RESET(63-DI,31-E) 

lAp SET(31-DI,31-L,C) :RESET(31-D 

I,31-E) 

15p SET(32+DI,L,C) : RESET (3 2+DI , E 
) 

16p NEXT DR 

17p IF Y=32 OR Y=-l THEN PLAY"GC 
11 : END ELSERESET (XI , Yl) :X1=X:Y1=Y 
:SET(X,Y,4) 

IBp IF Y=31 THEN Y=Y+1 : GOTO 17 p 
19p IF POINT (X, Y+l) Op THEN Y=Y- 
l:GOTO 17p 

2pp IF Y=3p THEN Y=Y+l:GOTO 17p 
21p IF POINT (X, Y+2 ) =p THEN Y=Y+1 
:GOTO 17J3 

22p IF JOYSTK(0) >50 THEN X=X+2 
23p IF JOYSTK(p)<lp THEN X=X-2 
2Ap P=PEEK(6528p) :P=P OR 128 
25p IF P<>255 THEN Y=Y-1 



90 



THE RAINBOW June 1989 



260 IF X>63 THEN X=63 310 FOR X=0 TO 63 

270 IF X<0 THEN X=0 3 20 SET(X,Y,8) 

280 GOTO 50 330 NEXT X,Y 

290 REM SCENE 340 X=0:Y=0 

300 FOR Y=0 TO 31 STEP 6 350 RETURN 



Wordmake 

By Logan Bleckley, 




WordMake lists 20 letters on the screen from which you try to 
form 10 words at least four letters long. Being a short program, no 
spell-checker is incorporated into the game. Your score is shown 
after 10 words have been spelled. 

The Listing: WORDMAKE 

0 1 COPYRIGHT 1989 FALSOFT, INC 

2 »■■ WORDMAKE 11 BY LB.. 10/ 8 8 

3 ONBRK GOTO200 

4" Z=RND(100) :FORQ=1TO2:Y=RND(100 
) : NEXTQ : CLS 

5 PRINT§3 3 , "CAN YOU MAKE 10 WORD 

5 OF THIS?" 

6 PRINT" 2 &3 LETTER WORDS NOT ALL 
OWED! « 



8 F0RQ=1T015 

10 A=RND(2 6)+64 

20 B$=B$+CHR$ (A) 

30 NEXTQ 

40 PRINT§102,B$+"AEIOU" 

50 1 

60 FORQ=1TO10 

70 PRINTQ; :INPUT">";C$ 

72 D=LEN(C$) :IFD=4THENF=F+10 

73 IFD<4THEN70. 

74 IFD=5 THEN G=G+15 
76 IFD=6 THEN H=H+20 
78 IFD>6 THEN J=J+30 
80 NEXTQ 

8 2 SC=F+G+H+J : PRINT" «<SCORE>» " 
,SC"! ! !" 

90 PRINT"GOOD! ! AGAIN? HIT [ENTER] 

100 INPUTZlRUN 
110 CLS: LIST 
200 END 




Diary 

By Bradley Hurt 



CoCo3 
Disk 



This program helps you keep a personal diary. Type in the 
listing, then save it and run the program. At the prompt "What 
Month?" enter a month, using a maximum of eight characters. This 
creates a filename. The next prompt is "What Day?". Type in the 
day, creating the filename extension. Now you will see either 
"This month doesn't exist!" or the diary page already created for 
that date. If the month doesn't exist, press the Y key to create a file. 
At the "Dear Diary" screen, enter your message of the day. File 
length is limited to eight lines of text minus seven characters. 

The Listing: DIARY 



0 CLEAR 2000 

1 1 COPYRIGHT 19 89 FALSOFT, INC 
5 POKE &H95C9,87:POKE 65314, 20 :P 
ALETTE 13,63 

10 ON ERR GOTO 85 
15 ON BRK GOTO 80 
20 CLS:L$=" " 



25 PRINT 11 < <DIARY> 

> =<BRAD HURT>= 

ii • 

30 PRINT "WHAT MONTH? ": LINE INPUT 
M$:PRINT"WHAT DAY? (EX 025)": LIN 
E INPUT DAY$:GOSUB 45 
35 GOTO 20 

40 CLS: PRINT "DEAR DIARY ,"; CHR$ ( 1 
3) ;LAG$;CHR$ (13) ; "ANY KEY TO CON 
TINUE ":EXEC 445 3 9 : CLOSE#l : RETUR 
N 

45 OPEN"D", #l,M$+"/"+DAY$ 
50 FIELD#1,255 AS L$ 
55 IF L0F(1)<1 THEN 60 ELSE 40 
60 CLOSE#l : OPEN"D" , 1 ,M$+"/"+DAY$ 
,255:FIELD#1,255 AS L$:PRINT"THI 
S MONTH DOESN'T EXIST !": PRINT" DO 
YOU WANT TO START THIS MONTH (Y 
/N)?";:EXEC 44539: IF INKEY$="N" 
THEN CLOSE#l:KILL M$+ "/ " +DAY $ : RE 
TURN ELSE GOTO 65 
65 'START NEW DAY OF MONTH 
70 CLS: LINE INPUT "DEAR DIARY, 

June 1989 THE RAINBOW 



91 



" ;LAG$ 

75 LSET L$=LAG$:PUT#1,2:CL0SE#1: 
RETURN 

80 PRINTCHR$ (13 ) ; "ARE YOU SURE ( 
Y/N) ?" ; :EXEC 44539: IF INKEY$<>"Y 
" THEN GOTO 20 ELSE CLOSE #1: END 
85 IF ERNO=31 THEN RUN 



90 IF ERNO=l THEN PRINT" ?SN ERRO 
R IN 11 ;ERLIN: END 

95 IF ERNO=28 THEN PRINT" DISK FU 

LL ERROR";: EXEC 4 4539: RUN 

100 IF ERNO=2 6 THEN RUN 

1)35 PRINT" 7UNDEFINED ERROR IN LI 

NE " ;ERLIN: END 



Vj^WWes 



Disks Named "Miscl" 

By Merle Miller 




Are there others of you out there who have a bunch of disks 
named "MISCL?" I had so many, one of my early wishes was for 
a listing on paper of the programs on each disk. There are plenty 
of programs to provide this, but each always has some little 
something I don't like. 

Over a period of time, and with bits and pieces from rainbow, 
I put together MM DIR. It makes a hard copy of your miscellaneous 
programs on disks, saving you time when looking for a specific 
program. Set the printer at 1 200 baud or change the rate in Line 20 
to suit your needs. 

The Listing: MMDIR 



0 1 COPYRIGHT 1989 FALSOFT, INC 
10 'THIS IS "MM DIR" W/A$,B$,C$, 
X$ f Y$ / Z $ 



2j3 POKE15j3,4j3 

3j3 PRINT"DISK NAME/ # " : INPUTX$ : PR 
INT " CAT . NO . " : INPUTZ $ : PRINT" DATE 
" : INPUT Y$ : PRINT "PRINTER READY? (Y 
) " :INPUTA$:PRINT#-2,CHR$(3j3) ; "DI 
SK ";X$;" - CAT# ";Z$;" DATE ";Y 
$ : POKE 111, 254 : DIR: PRINT: PRINT "FR 
EE GRANS" :P0KE111, 254 : PRINTFREE ( 

40 PRINT "DO YOU WANT TO ADD NOTE 
S? (Y/N) " 
5j3 INPUT A$ 

6j3 IF A$=" Y"THEN 7j3 ELSE END 
1$ CLS : WIDTH4j3 : LOCATE2 , 2 : PRINT "E 
NTER 8j3 CHAR. MAX. FOR EACH LINE" 
:LOCATE8,3:PRINT"USE HYPENS-NOT 
COMMAS " : LOCATE 2 , 8 : PRINTB$ : INPUTB 
$ : PRINT#-2 , B$ : LOCATE 3 , 20 : PRINT"W 
ANT ANOTHER LINE?" : LOCATE3 , 22 : PR 
INT" (Y/N) " : INPUT C$ : IFC$="Y"THEN 
7j3 ELSE END 



Sound Control 

By Joel Hegberg 




Sound Control is a short program that allows you to toggle 
sound output on and off in basic. It multitasks using Basic's 
interrupts so you don't know it's there until you use SOUND, PLAY, 
or AUDIO commands. 

Simply enter the program into your Color Computer, save it, 
and then run it. The program searches for typing errors in the DATA 
statements and notifies you of needed corrections. Remember to 
resave the program if you make any changes. Once the program is 
running perfectly, a message appears displaying, "Sound Control 
Is Now Installed." To disable and enable sound, press the ctrl and 
S keys at the same time. This is very useful for playing noisy 
programs when everyone's asleep. 

Sound Control should work on any Color Computer with the 
newer keyboard (like the one the CoCo 3 comes with) and at least 
64K of memory. If you are using a CoCo 1 or 2, first run a ROM- 



RAM converter program like the one on Page 1 57 of the May ' 88 ' s 
issue of the rainbow (Listing 3). Also, for CoCo 1 and 2 users, 
pressing the Reset button disables the program. Simply type in 
POKE 65503,0 and it is re-enabled. 



The Listing: SNDCTRL 



0 
10 

20 

30 

4j3 

50 

60 

70 

80 CLEAR5j3j3,327££:CLS:IFPEEK(269 
) *256+PEEK(270)=327j32THENPRINT"S 



1 COPYRIGHT 198 9 FALSOFT, INC 
SOUND CONTROL 

CREATED FEBRUARY 2, 1989 BY 
JOEL MATHEW HEGBERG 
93 6 NORTH TWELFTH STREET 
DE KALB, ILLINOIS 60115 



92 THE RAINBOW June 1989 



OUND CONTROL ALREADY INSTALLED." 
:END 

9j3 T1>0:LT=0:T=32700:LN=J3:RESTOR 
E 

1J30 RE ADA $ 

110 IFLEN(A$)=3THEN150 

12j3 IFA$="**"THEN180 

130 A=VAL("&H"+A$) : POKET , A : LT=LT 

+A : TL=TL+A 

140 T=T+l:GOT01j3j3 

15J3 A=VAL("&H"+A$) 

16j3 IFAOLT THEN PRINT "DATA ERRO 

R IN LINE #";LN+240:STOP 

17J3 LT=j3:LN=LN+lj3:GOT01j3j3 

18J3 READ A$:A=VAL("&H"+A$) 

19j3 IFAOTL THENPRINT" ERROR IN D 

ATA STATEMENTS .": STOP 

PCKE521,PEEK(269) :POKE522,PE 



EK(27j3) 

210 F0RT=1^^T01^6:READA: POKET, 
A:NEXTT:EXEC10^ 

22j3 CLS: PRINT "SOUND CONTROL IS N 
OW INSTALLED." 
23j3 END 

24J3 DATA FF, 0 , 34 , 76 , B6 , 1 , 56 , 81 , B 
F,27,9,7F,7F,524 

25j3 DATA BD , 35 , 76 , 6E , 9F, 2 , 9 , B6 , 1 
, 55,81, FB, 26, 52E 

26j3 DATA F0 , B6 , 7F, BD, 2 6 , EE , 43 , B7 
,7F,BD,B6,7F,761 

27j3 DATA BC, 43 , B7 , 7F, BC, 81, FF, 27 

,7,86, 39,B7,A9, 6BE 

280 DATA A2,2j3,7,86,CE,B7,A9,A2, 

86,86,B7,A9,76,7J31 

290 DATA 20 , CC, ** , 205E 

300 DATA 142, 127, 19j3, 191, 1,13, 57 



Simple Draw 

By Darren Day 



16K Disk 
Cassette 
Modification 



Simple Draw is a bare-bones drawing program created to work 
with all CoCos. Commands are simple to use and the listing is 
fairly simple to understand. 

The joysticks are used to position the graphics cursor on the 
desired screen position. The fire button sets a point on the screen, 
and the C key clears a point on the screen. The clear key clears the 
whole screen, the S key saves a whole screen on a disk (or cassette) 
file named SCREEN, and the L key loads the SCREEN file into 
memory (the screen). 

While you probably won't get a picture printed in "The CoCo 
Gallery" using this program, it still can be used to create interesting 
title screens for your programs. Just insert a program line such as: 

10 L0ADM M SCREEN" : EXEC 

Simply press a key to continue the program. I hope that this 
program will be helpful and enjoyable. 

The Listing: SIMPLDRA 

)3 ' COPYRIGHT 198 9 FALSOFT, INC 
5 1 SIMPLE DRAW 

DARREN B. DAY 
JULY 198 8 
1)3 1 FOR CASS. I/O CHANGE SAVEM 
TO C SAVEM & LOADM TO CLOADM 



IN LINE 35. 
15 CLS()3) 

2) 3 X=J0YSTK(J3) : Y=INT ( JOYSTK(l) /2 
) 

25 IF PEEK(65280)=126 OR PEEK(65 
280)=254 THEN SET (X, Y, 5) 

3) 3 A$=INKEY$ 

35 IF A$="C n THEN RESET (X, Y) ELS 
E IF A$=CHR$(12) THEN RUN ELSE I 
F A$="S" THEN SAVEM "SCREEN 11 , 1)32 
4,1536,44539 ELSE IF A$= n L" THEN 
LOADM "SCREEN" 

4) 3 IF P0INT(X,Y)=5 THEN 2j3 

45 SET(X,Y,5) : SOUND 255,1:RESET( 
X,Y) :GOTO 2)3 



Submissions to "Novices Niche" are welcome from everyone. We 
like to run a variety of short programs that can be typed in at one 
screen sitting and are useful, educational and fun. Keep in mind, 
although the short programs are limited in scope, many novice 
programmers find it enjoyable and quite educational to improve the 
software written by others. 

Program submissions must be on tape or disk. We're sorry, but 
we cannot key in program listings. All programs should be supported 
by some editorial commentary, explaining how the program works. 
If your submission is accepted for publication, the payment rate will 
be established and agreed upon prior to publication. 



June 1989 THE RAINBOW 93 




I Give us your best: Join the ranks of these courageous CoCoists in showing the Color Computer world your 
I high score at your favorite micro-diversion. We want to put your best effort on record in the rainbow's bi- 
monthly "Scoreboard" column. All entries must be received 60 days prior to publication. Entries should be 
printed — legibly — and must include your full name, address, game title, company name and, of course, your 
high score. Each individual is limited to three score entries per month. Send your entries to Scoreboard, 

C/O THE RAINBOW. 

For greater convenience, your high scores may also be sent to us through the MAIL section of our Delphi 
CoCo SIG. From the CoCo SIG> prompt, pick MAIL, then type SEND and address to: EDITORS. 



12,825 



AO VANCED STAR*TRENCH (THE RAINBOW, 7/86) 
4,750; ; ★Stephane Martel, Laval, Quebec 
41500 Frankie DiGiovanni, Olney, MP;; 
4,476 David Schaller, Clarkston, WA 
AN DRONE (Radio Shack) 

20,820 ★Gary Budzak, Westervllie, OH 
ASTRO BLAST (Mark Data) 

49,356 ★Brian S. Brame, Lakeside, CA. 
48,825 ; Tony Bacon r lvtt< Vernon, IN 
J24.980 ; Matthew Smith, Cburtenay, British 
Columbia 
ATOM ( Radio Shack) 

Round 2 Cobalt (#24) James Donegan, 
Saurgerties, NY 
BASH (SRB Software) 

744,900 *Andy Carter, North Charleston, SC 
BEAM RIDER (D & D Software) 
1,062,400 *Rose Snyer, Cincinnati, OH 
673,160 ★James Snyer, Cincinnati, OH 
BEE ZAPPER (THE RAINBOW, 9/87) 

28,275 v ^William Currie, Bryans Road, MD 
15,785 David Hartmann, Osoyoos, British 
Columbia 
Frederick Lajoie, Middleton, Nova 
Scotia 

BIOSPHERE (Radio Shack) 

64,000 *Ty Stocksdale, Racine, Wl 
BLITZ (THE RAINBOW, 6/88) 

126,400 ★Jerry Anderson, Jacksonville, FL 
69,150 Ryun Schlecht, Gackle. ND 
63,150 Kreig Bryson, Woodstock, GA 
BOUNCING BOULDERS (Diecom Products) 
24,186 * Dennis Zobel, Centereach, NY 
16,874 Michael Zobel, Centereach, NY 
10,930 Patrick Garneau, Ste-Croix, Quebec 
8REWMASTER (NOVASOFT) 

51,925 *Wendy Staub, Moundsville, WV 
CASH MAN (MichTron) 

9,870 ★Martin Parada, Arcadia, CA 
CAVEWALKER ( Radio Shack) 

209,870 *Todd Von Natta, Isle of Palms, SC 
34,720 Chris Kremo, Bethel, CT 
30,309 Cathy England Kimble, Glendale, AZ 
CLOWNS & BALLOONS (Radio Shack): 
688,960 ★Faye Keefer, Augusta, GAf 
217,500 Frankie DiGiovanni, Olney, MD 
70,180 "Charles Andrews, Delta Jet, AK 
COLOR BASEBALL (Radio Shack) 

596-0 ★•Frank C. D'Amato, Brooklyn. NY 
iTpm Gherubino, Brooklyn, NY 
•Brian S. Brame, Lakeside, CA 
•Wes Latimer, Grangeville, ID 
•Joel Stocksdale, Racine, Wl 
•Kevin Wannemacher, Payne, OH 
:i tJohn Valentine, Marlborough, CT)r 
S*Ryan Murray, Herri n, IL 
yijohn Breckel, Wilmington, OBf 
♦Scott Galvao, Tiverton, Rl 
♦Jennifer Johnson, Meriden, Cf : : : < 
^Karen Rimiller, Adams, NY £ 
♦Matthew Snider, Pinehurst, TX?-; 

Greg Allen, Atwater, 
♦Jason Trammel, Murphysbbro, IL 
♦Chris Donato, Euclid, OH 
COLOR CAR (NOVASOFT) 

343,075Vs?*^ncan Cameron, Chippewa Falls,- 
Wl 

•.••316^6 V: Alan Martin, Cornwall, &tarib^ 
COLOR POKER (THE RAINBOW, 4/83) 
100,107,600 "★Earl Foster, Lynchburg, VAS 



^ Current Record Holder • Shutout 

THE CONTROLLERS (THE RAINBOW, 2/88) 
365 ★Roger Ranee, Charleston, SC 
308 Erin Carlton, Charleston, SC 

CRYSTAL CASTLES (Thunder Vision) 

51 6,220 *Jason Trammel, Murphysboro, IL 

DALLAS QUEST (Radio Shack) 



81 
85 
85 



86 
86 
86 



702,520 
400,000 
282,070 
174,410 



★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★ 

* 



595-0 

412-0 

389-0 

387-tH 

27641 

238-0 

172*0 

14M> 
137-0- 
137-0 
132-0 
130^0 
,130-2 
126-0 
113-0 



★ Brad Wilson, Lithia Springs, GA 
Paul Summers, Orange Park, FL 
David and Shirley Johnson, Leicester, 
NC 

Roy Grant, Toledo, OH 
Melanie Moor, Florence, AL 
Curtis Trammel, Murphysboro, IL 
DEE MOV (THE RAINBOW, 1/87) 

50,566 ★Frankie DiGiovanni, Olney, MD 
43,806 Domingo Martinez, Miami, FL 
39,320 Matthew Smith, Courtenay, British 
Columbia 
DEMOLITION DERBY (Radio Shack) 

1 1 3,200 *Gary Budzak, Westervllie, OH 
100,500 Richard Winkelbauer, Bronx, NY 
DEMON ATTACK (Imagic) 

279,435 *Jon Hobsoii, Plainfield, Wl 
202,260 Tom Briggs, Hillsdale, NY 
89,285 Upton Thomas, Arnold, MD 
DESERT PATROL (Arcade Animation) 
631 ,450 ★Chris Lucero, Denver, CO 
505,250 Ricky Turkett, Marlow, OK 
234,300 Steven Turcotte, Matane; Quebec 
DESERT RIDER (Radio Shack) 

80,703 ★Thomas Payton, Anderson, SC 
68,353 Mike Alt, San Juan Capistrano, CA 
65,351 Jason Hackley, Clinton, CT 
DEVIL ASSAULT (Tom Mix) 
1 ,866,100 ★Stephana Martel, Laval, Quebec 
623,550 Dale Krueger, Maple Ridge, 
British Columbia 
DOWNHILL (THE RAINBOW, 1/89) 

10 ★James Donegan, Saugerties, NY 
10 *Ryun Schiecht, Gackle, ND 
DOWN LAND (Radio Shack) 

125,450 ★Pat Norris, O'Fallon, MO 
99,982 Eric Mellon, Newark, DE 
99,980 Danny Wimett, Rome, NY 
DRACONIAN (Tom Mix) 

137,810 ★Chris Lucero, Denver, CO 
127,870 Michael Mullen, Buffalo, NY 
DRAGON FIRE (Radio Shack) 

160,835 ★Eric Olson, Wheaton, IL 
146,325 Stephane Martel, Laval, Quebec 
FIRESTORM (THE RAINBOW, 1/86) 
22,5u5 



11,250 
5,680 
5,180 



★Chad Presley, Luseland, 
Saskatchewan 
Stephane Martel, Laval, Quebec 
Kathy Rumpel, Arcadia, Wl 
Mark Brlssie, Nashville, TN 
GALACTIC ATTACK (Radio Shack) 

31,100 ★Upton Thomas, Arnold, MD 
29,030 David Czarnecki, Northampton, MA 
26,370 Jeff Remick, Warren, Ml 
GALAGON (Spectral Associates) 

751.020 ★Sofia Giorgi, Brasilia, Brazil 
357,890 Jason Clough, Houston, TX 
328,820 Bernard Burke, Lee's Summit, MO 
GANTELET (Diecom Products) 
65,398,298 ★Phil Wooding. Renovo, PA 
. 45,235,820 Ken Hubbard, Madison, Wl 
23,643,720 Geran Stalker, Rivordalo. GA 
GANTELET II (Diecom Products) 
65,399,289 ★Corey Kepler, Renovo, PA 



GANTELET II (continued) 

17,701,060 Bryan Bell, Manassas, VA 

55,015 Andy Freeman, Turtle Lake, Wl 
GFL CHAMPIONSHIP FOOTBALL II (Tandy) 
1,046-0 *Mark E. Wentroble, Tyler, TX 
825-0 Ryan Grady, Newbury Park, GA ; 
83-3 Charles Reve de Cotret, Laurent, 
Quebec 

GHANA BWANA (Radio Shack) 
2,350,750 ★Michael Heitz, Chicago, IL 

Joseph Delaney, Augusta, GA 
Tom Jones. Milan, IL 
Kelly Jones, West Salem, OH 
Caraann Jentzsch, Dufur, OR 
GIN CHAMPION (Radio Shack) 

2,224-0 ★♦Lee Deuell, Shelf Rock, I A 
1 .602-0 ♦Jimmy Garner, Ft. Worth, TX 
1,120-0 ♦Kim Johns, Port Cog., British 
Columbia 

GRANDPRIX CHALLENGE (Diecom Products) 

67,710 *H. Drngwell, Litchfield, CT 
GROBOT (Children's Computer Workshop) 

9,665 *Wendy Staub, Moundsville, WV 
8,090 Curt Label, Louisville, KY 
HELICOPTER HERO (THE RAINBOW, 3/88) 

4,608 ★ Jerry Anderson, Jacksonville, FL 
103 Phil Holsten, Moraga, CA 
76 Chris Nuwer, Lock port, NY 
HITCHHIKER'S GUIDE TO THE GALAXY (infocom) 
400/359 *Roy Grant, Toledo, OH 
400/422 Jeff Holtham, Waterloo, Ontario 
400/510 Brad Wilson, Lithia Springs, GA 
IRON FOREST (Diecom Products) 
5,671,500 ★Douglas Paulson, Richfield, ID 
Gabriel Riley, Richfield, ID 
Charles Boyd, Amarillo, TX 
Janet Boyd, Amarillo, TX 
Ricky Turkett, Marlow, OK 
JOKER POKER (THE RAINBOW. 3/87) 
62,067,906 ★Carole Rueckert, Mansfield, OH 
47,505,822 Blain Jamieson, Kingston, Ontario 
21,733,284 Jon Fogarty, Yale, Ml 
JUNIOR'S REVENGE (Computerware) 
2,503,000 ★Stephane Martel, Laval, Quebec 
257,600 Keith Cohen, Rocky Mount, NC 
JUNKFOOD (THE RAINBOW, 11/84) 

535,760 ★Charlie Ginn, Augusta, GA 
356,850 Jon Hobson, Plainfield, Wl 
18,990 Joel Klein, Indianapolis, IN 
KING PEDE (T&D Software) 

83,855 ★Mike Snyder, Alien, OK 
KNOCK OUT (Diecom Products) 

472,995 *-Frank D'Amato, Brooklyn, NY 
183,675 Rush Caley, Port Orchard. WA 
KORONIS RIFT (Epyx) 

188,250 ★Mario Zuvieta, McAlleh/TX 
186,710 Tony Harbin, Cullman, AL: x 
KUNG-FU DUDE (Sundog Systems) 

32,000 ★Tony Geitgey, University Park, PA 
14,305 David Schulze, San Antonio, TX 
12,150 Cody Deegan, Fallon, NV 
THE LAIR (Freebooter Software) 

1 1 2,940 ★James Walton, Pittsburgh, PA 
LANDER (T&D Software)' : 

780 ★Ari Enkin, Neapen, Ontario 
LASER SURGEON: THE MICROSCOPIC 
MISSION (Activision) 

42,767 ★Joe Stanley, Harrisburg. IL 
LUNAR-ROVER PATROL (Spectral Associates) 
73,500 *Aron Wuelfing, Gladwin. Ml 



4,088,000 
3,173,200 
2,676.300 
1,376,850 



THE RAINBOW June 1989 




LUNAR-ROVER PATROL (continued) 

66,200 Chuck Lehotsky, N. Jackson, OH 
45,700 Kameron Pence, Little Rock, AR ■ 
.; MARBLE MAZE/D/ecom Products) 

353,220 *Davld Boland, Dubuque, f A 
'• i: .vf N r; .'.';v..-:30^$0. ■ ' ' Amber Reynolds, White 'tiffiy&^VhT!': 
i : S::b'}b::S* ,■ Saskatchewan;: .^^^^^ 

AMAZING WORLD OF MALCOLM MORTAR (Radio Shack) 
i;^:-:r-'- : ;'>:- y T$A5r: ■« ,★ Joshua Wanagei, F're^yiH'e'^Sr.-Ul^-' ; <£: 
•::-- ; £:/^^ : 5& : : ' ; :?Kreig Bryson, Woodstock, ISA 

F ;7i<33S Thomas S. Corbltt III, Yaupon Beach, 

^MEGA-BU<if«ao7oS/7acK| 
: * viSiOQO; ★Matthew Smith, CourtenaV; British; ; 
. Columbia, Canada ' 
10,044 Douglas Bacon, Middletown^GT:; O/. 
; $,309 Alan Kramer, Cooksville, MD> ^ ; 

MEMOCARDS (THE RAINBOW, 8/87) 

3,1 20 ★ Lise Gagne, St-Davld, Quebec 
1 ,964 Scott Walotkiewicz, Tworivers, Wl 
1,640 Sara Mittelstaedt, Kiel, Wl 
MINE RESCUE (SRB Software) 

670,200 *Chuck Lehotsky, N. Jackson, OH 
MISSION: F-16 ASSAULT (Diecom Products} 
565,395 *Tony Bacon, Mt. Vernon, IN 
468,750 Karen Jessen, Cleveland, OH 
-355,570 Stirling Dell, Dundafk, Ontario 
MISSION: RUSH'N ASSAULT (Diecom Products) 
1,210,550 ★Robert Mefferd, Rockford, OH 
787,300 Tony Bacon, Mt. Vernon, IN 
361,750 Clay Jones, Wooster, OH 
212,500 Kelly Jones, West Salem, 
195,250 Kelly Jones, West Salem, OH 
MONSTER MAZE (Radio Shack) 

52,510 ★Chris Kremo, Bethel, CT 
12,950 Paul DeVita, Vallejo, CA 
ON6-ON-ONE (Radio Shack) 

1,310-0 ★•Jon Breckel, Wilmington. OH 
1,302-0 •Thomas Pay ton, Anderson, SC 
1,280-0 •Randy Sunderland, Page, WV 
1 ,276-0 ©Jonathan Dorris. Indianapolis, IN 
1,260-0 •Brandon Reece, Chickamauga, GA 
OPERATION FREEDOM (THE RAINBOW, 8/85) 

49,690 ★Craig Schneider, North Piatte, NB 
OUTHOUSE (MichTron) 

534,060 *Kay Foxe, Kansas City. MO 
59,641 Sam Zehei, Coal Center, PA 
38,640 Dave Staub, Moundsville, WV 
PAPER ROUTE (Diecom Products) 

248,400 ★Cathy E. Kimble, Glendale, AZ 
; 150,560 Heather Hamblen, Bar Harbor, ME 
PITFALL II (Activision) 
1,568,500 *Sandy Baker, Martin City, Montana 
1,519,500 Jim Hammons, Martin City, Montana 
1 ,085,500 Tracey Lee Slack, Atwood, Ontario 
071,500 Aaron Florence, English, IN 
586,500 Jonathan Toloski, Tomngton, CT 
POOYAN (Datasoit) 
1 ,286,050 ★Craig Schneider, North Platte, NB 
626,700 Charles Rene de Cotret, Saint- 
Laurent, Quebec 
566,850 Lois Crowson, East Alton, IL 
POPCORN (Radio Shack) 

150,560 ★Tom Cherubino, Brooklyn, NY 
105,560 Heather Condit, Grafton, ND 
26,889 Claude Jafbert, Matane, Quebec 
25,450 Dianne Mozietti, Pittsburgh, PA 
PROSPECTOR (THE RAINBOW, 12/88) 
27,650 *Ryun Schlecht, Gackle, ND 
■ 16,100 Sara Mittelstaedt, Kiel, Wl 
1 5;150 Cray Augsburg 
" $000 Chris Nuwer, Lockport, NY 
4,100 Angie Mittelstaedt, Kiel, VVr l 
4,050 Jutta Kapfhammer 
PYRAMID 2000 (Radio Shackp 

;*Darren King, Yorkton, Saskatchewan 
220 *Mike Snyder, Allen, OK 
PY8AMI* f Cp/dr Ventura) 

68,550 ★Andy Freeman, Turtle &ke,WI 
67,850 Richard Winkelbauer, Bronx, NY 
■;■ 37.950 Blain Jamieson, Kingston, Ontario ; 



QUIXfTom Mix) 

8,407,772 *John Haldane, Tempe, AZ 
RAD WARRIOR (Epyx) 

4,112 ★Randy Stocksdale, Racine, Wl 
4,048 Jonathan Fullerton, Gardiner, ME 
3,936 Matthew Smith, Courtenay, British 
Columbia 
RADIO BALL (Radio Shack) 
1,780,870 ★Jocelyn Gagne, St-David, Quebec 
1,761,030 Eric Mellon, Newark, DE 
1,666,670 Lise Gagne, St-David, Quebec 
REACTOID (Radio Shack) 

8,055 ★Gary Budzak, Westerville, OH 
RED WARRIOR (Radio Shack) 

5,488 ★Scott Godfrey, Nashua, NH 
4,164 Roger Ranee, Charleston, SC 
4,01 1 Erin Carlton, Charleston, SC 
RESCUE ON FRACTALUS (Epyx) 
1 ,000,948 ★Steven Ujvary, Calgary, Alberta 
323,167 Kenneth Hill, Sevema Park, MD 
RETURN OF JUNIOR'S REVENGE (Co(orware) 
1 ,792,800 ★Chad Presley, Luseland, 
Saskatchewan 

ROGUE (Epyx) 

71,833 *Jon Fogarty, Yale, Ml 
65,529 Joseph H. Campbell, Norfolk, VA 
SAILOR MAN (Tom Mix) 

427,700 ★Marnie Schalm, Edson, Alberta 
247,900 Jason Bauer, Menominee, Ml 
231,900 Jessica Wiikins, Seymour, TN 
SAN DS OF EGYPT (Radio Shack) 

67 ★Tristan Terkuc, Richmond, Ontario 
82 Edward Rocha, Cobleskill, NY 
SAUCER DEFENSE ( THE RAiNBOW, 4/87) 
95,000 *Kevin Hilton, Conway, AZ 
40,000 David Hartmann, Osoyoos, British 
Columbia 

SCRATCH GOLFER (THE RAINBOW, 3/89) 

63 ★Leif Smedberg, Churubusco, IN 
SHAMUS (Radio Shack) 

61 ,745 ★Scott Galvao, Tiverton, Rl 
50,840 Chris Kremo, Bethel, CT 
SHOOTING GALLERY (Radio Shack) 

36,830 ★Patricia Strakey, Littleton, CO 
27,270 Jocelyn Hellyer, Montgomery, IL 
25,510 Donald Knudsbn, Minot, ND 
SHOOTN RANGE (THE RAINBOW, 8/87) 
55,623 ★PaulRobbins, Picayune, MS 
1 4,702 Richard Winkelbauer, Bronx, NY 
1 3,794 Phillip Hoisten, Modesto, CA 
SILPHEED (Game Arts) 

80,603 ★Frankie DiGiovanni, Olney, MD 
SLAY THE NERIUS (Radio Shack) 

73,091 ★Jeff Remick, Warren, Mi 
65.921 Chris Lucero, Denver, CO 
63,476 Chris Kremo, Bethel, CT 
21,410 Scott Severtson, Jamestown, NY 
SNEAKY SNAKE (THE RAINBOW, 8/87) 

137 *Guy Greene, Bradenton, FL 
102 Mike Ait, San Juan Capistrano, CA 
91 Chris Nuwer, Lockport, NY 
SPACE ASSAULT (Radio Shack) 

13,1 10 ★Jeff Remick, Warren, Ml 
7,280 Jason Kopp, Downs, IL 
6,200 John Weaver, Amsterdam, NY 
SPACE INVADERS (Spectral Associates) 

3,920 ★Arl En kin, Neapen, Ontario 
SPEED RACER (MichTron) 

1 03,1 20 *Ricky Turkett, Marlow J OK 
97,400 Jeff Morrison, Marlow, OK 
96,420 Karen Rimiller, Adams, NY 
96,000 Amber Reynolds, White City, 
Saskatchewan 
SPEEDSTER (THE RAINBOW 8/87) 

250,500 ★Kevin Hilton, Conway, AZ 
211,300 Paul Robbins, Picayune, MS 
1 1 7,080 Bill Millington. Meriden, CT 
SPIDERCIDE (Radio Shack) 

27,730 *Mike LeBrun, Cornwall, Ontario 
SPRINGSTER (Radio Shack) 

303,520 ★Mavis Hartmann, Osoyoos, British 



SPRINGSTER (continued) 

Columbia 

200,670 Denise Root, Thorndale, PA 
41 ,230 Jason Trammel, Murphysboro, IL 
STAR BLAZE (Radio Shack) 

8,950 ★Richard Durksen, Grunthal, Manitoba 
6,550 Flint Weller, Swarthmore, PA 
STOCK 3 (THE RAINBOW, 11/88) 
77,386,525 ★Guy Greene, Bradenton, FL 
STRATA (THE RAINBOW, 5/88) 

4,380 ★Blain Jamieson, Kingston, Ontario 
4,040 Ryun Schlecht, Gackle, ND 
3,110 Kathy Rumpel, Arcadia, Wl 
2,992 Alan Lindaberry, Thorndale, PA 
SUPER PITFALL (Radio Shack) 
1 ,752,500 ★Bruce Hoffsommer, Ridley Park, PA 
1,708,000 John Lipstraw, Rising Star, TX 
1,700,000 Tom Jones, Milan, IL 
TEMPLE OF ROM (Radio Shack) 

604,000 ★Troy Graham, Arnold, MD 
507,700 Adam Broughton, Morris, PA 
303,600 Tim Hennon, Highland, IN 
TETRIS (Radio Shack) 

4,258 ★Chuck Lehotsky, N. Jackson, OH 
THEXDER (Sierra Oh-Line) 
2,033,000 ★Frankie DiGiovanni, Olney, MD 
1,823,900 Tom Gauwitz, Roanoke, IL 
1,411,700 Steve Hallin, Biloxi, MS 
Tl ME BANDIT (MichTron) 

76,030 ★Brent Morgan, Centerville, OH 
59,020 Stephanie Morgan, Centerville, OH 
TOADER (THE RAINBOW, 2/89) 

5,117 *Jon Hobson, Plainfield, Wl 
TREKBOER (Mark Data) 

123 ★Roy Grant, Toledo, OH 
132 Matthew Fumich, Munford, TN 
TRIG ATTACK (Sugar Software) 

196,000 ★Cassaundra Stewart, Sacramento, CA 
TUTS TOMB (THE RAINBOW, 7/88) 

54,344 ★Brian Brame, Lakeside, CA 
53,280 William Currie, Bryans Road, MD 
VARLOC (Radio Shack) 

2,502 ★Frank D'Amato, Brooklyn, NY 
2,032 Tony Harbin, Cullman, AL 
2,032 Edward Rocha, Cobleskill, NY 
VICIOUS VIC (THE RAINBOW, 7/86) 
18,813 ★Talib Khan, Bronx, NY 
15,063 John Coniey, Everett, WA 
WARRIOR KING (Sundog Systems) 

18,700 *Jason Bauer, Menominee, Ml 
WILDWEST (Tom Mix) 

52 ★Farrell Kenimer, Phoenix, AZ 
35 ★Paul Summers, Orange Park, FL 
WISHBRINGER (intocom) 

400/201 ★Brad Wilson, Lithia Springs, GA 
WIZARD'S DEN (Tom Mix) 

593,950 ★Richard Winkelbauer, Bronx, NY 
426,350 Leif Smedberg, Columbia City, IN 
195,050 Mark Touchette, Preston, CT 
WRESTLE MANIAC (Diecom) 

956,971 ★Marc Reiter, Cincinnati, OH 
546,315 Louis Bouchard, Gatineau, Quebec 
ZAKSUND (Elite Software) 

557,900 ★Tom Cherubino, Brooklyn, NY 
357,550 Martin Parada, Arcadia, CA 
268,350 Tony Bacon, Mt, Vernon, IN 
ZAXXON (Datasoft) 
2,061,000 ★Byron Alford, Raytown, MO 
1,950,000 Blake Cadmus, Reading, PA 
ZONERUNNER (Radio Shack) 

65,535 ★Scott Godfrey, Nashua, NH 
65,535 ★Mike Woycheshen, Coquitlam, British 
Columbia 

ZORK l(lnfocom) 

350/328 ★Konnie Grant, Toledo, OH 

350/587 Matthew Yarrows, Easthampton, MA 



— Vivian TurbevilJe 



^★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★^ 



June 1989 THE RAINBOW 95 



★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★^ 





In conjunction with the rainbow's Scoreboard, we offer this bi-monthly 
column of pointers for our game-playing readers' benefit. If you have some 
interesting hints, tips or responses to questions, or want help yourself, we 
encourage you to write to the Scoreboard, c/o the rainbow. 



In response to questions from; 

* Chad Presley: In Wild West, if you 
give Jenny the fake map, she will send 
Black Bart u* tfic canyon. Luaao the 
tree, climb the rope and ihen ins a good 
irittf to use the dynamic. 1 have no idea 
what to do nefcU 

Patrett Kenimfr 
PhoettLx, Arizonu 

* Alan Lind sherry: In Dungeons of 
Dtiggomthi you do not need a ring to 
kill the tfcrne giant. You need the wijoden 
sword and Leather shield. You musi kill 
the snake in order to gel the shield. 
A Hack with the shield, press M and run 
away. Then, go after him again urn i i I 
your heartbeat climbs up. or until he 
dies. A t'ser ki I ling the giant, press E and 
see i f he left you a ri ng ■ You tori II nol gti 
the steel ring right away, Firsi you will 
get the Vulcan ring, then iroti and so on. 

In Dungeons of DagRorathi to get 
Ihe Wifcard, am \ supposed 40 go tip in. 
the d ungeon r or go d own i n ihe hole* of 
(he dungeon? 

Chuck Cur pine lio 
Rerisscietfr, Yark 

* Frankie DiGiovanni: in Dungeon* of 
Dtiggotwlh, to incanl die Supreme! ring, 
you my st first read the beginning of the 
book, where- you vviil find another name 
for the ring. Ne*t look up the meaning 
uf the word in the dictionary^ you will 
find Ihe right word, but in the wrong 
form. The word is a synonym for xu- 
prettte. After finding die correct word, 
you tfrill I'inish the game. 

K there any way to gel the scroll left 
by the wizard Vunage? Also, what does 
the flask do 1 / 

Derek Wood 
Sydney, Nova Scot id 

■ Alan Lindaberry: In Bedlam* to get 
past the dou. you will need the blue piJJ 
Find the meuh PuL the blue pill in the 
meal and feed ir to the dog. He will die 
mid you wi 1 1 be able to pass. To get the 



green key H stand outside the shock room 
and get it widi the window hook. Be- 
fore yon leave ihe- kennel, be sure you 
have {he green ke y , au it is necessary to 
escape. 

Jon Hobxoti 

Ffalnfield, Wisconsin 

m Frank ie DiGiovaflni: \n (lame let If to 
get out of the firs! room of the nine- 
teenth level, open the door in the bot- 
ftjnvrigliL corner of the room. 

Jonathan Wanatfei 
Freest He, New York 

Here are some hinh i'or The Inter- 
bank Incident'. The first things y ou need 
are the tracker and die rod. When you 
have lhese 1 go to each of the four titles 
and use the tracker with the rod filled 
into the tracker. This will tell you where 
Ihe hideout b located, You will also 
need six of the eight clues thai the 
people will give you before you can 
enler the hideout. 

Here are el few more tips: : Read the 
newspaper to the guard and give him 
the matchbook al the air force base in 
Germany; buy the lady on the beach a 
drink; gives the dice to the guy bi dte 
casino In Rio; and be sure to have either 
the rope or the Code book to solve rhe 
adveuiUTCL 

Oavid Ring 
Lytmvi t Nebraska 

lit the interbank Incident, what do 
you da with the; diet, hi-level gold card, 
newspaper, hundred dollar bill, ring and 
postcard? There ate lots of door* I can 
unlock tapftrLitieniii, sauvenior shop, 
Eifel Tqwer> ulc,), but J ean\ enter I jto 
back and forth arid never gc! anywhere. 

Homniei ftrnehl 
Satan Mau^ Louisiana 

En Shenanigans, how do I convince the 
computer to ope a the trap door in ihe 
cavern IQ I can go up, get my pole and 
ivin the game? 

V>avid MeCaV 
Franklin, North Carolina 




In In Quest for the Stafford, do you ft 
anything alt he lake. 7 How dt^ you get pH 
ihe m Etc hi aery 7 

In Horror Nouse. where do you find 
the key to get out of the house? 

Matthew .Smith 
Bourirnuy* British C&lumbfd 

In Cafadurii Flame of Light, "where do 
you get the birdseed to Teed the parrot/ 
How do you get through the four locked 
doors, What do you do with 1 he (jfin vtyor 

bdt? 

Anne Benson 
Unianlown, Ohio 

in. A Mazing World of Mateom Mor- 
tar, when l\t\ through all ihrec mavets, 
hew uan 1 collect the thr^e magic bricks 
and Still trup Ma I com Mortar to get into 
l^ev&l Two 1 ' 

William C MtUington 
Meriden r Connecticut 



In Dragon Blade, 1 have come to a 
huge stone door after locating the. whirl- 
pool T but I can 1 ! open it. 

In Dallas Quesf, how do you kill Lhe 
spider? 

Scott Brady 
Lake Worth, Florida 

la Sea Que$L \ have the uia Hoik* but 
I canX u*e the air compressor. What else 
do 1 need to do? 

Irt The Blark Sanctum, every time I 
Lvpe GC1 MiseaR or euter mirror the 
strten locks up, What should E do from 

here J J 

Greg Dotsha 
Wilustanj North Dakota 

To respond to oilier readers' inqntrie^ 
and requests for assistance, r^pl v (fl 
^Seor4ibOBfd Pointers* e/o THE RAIN- 
BOW* KCl Bom 385, Prospect* KV 
40059. We will share your reply wllh ai\ 
"Scoreboard* readers ui an a|ieoming, 
issue. 

For grater convenience, lE ScoreboHrd 
Poinlers n anH re^uL^ Tor j^tstanee may 
flho be sent 14 m through the MAIL 
section of our Delphi CoCo SIC > From 
Ihe Co Co SIG> prompt, $tek MAIL,, 
1 hen type SEND and u duress In: CO I TORS , 
Wt .sure to include your complete nuni* 
ii nd address. 



★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★^ 



- 





wmm fir® urn 



Window Master V2.2 

The hottest new program available for the 
Color Computer 111 I Now you can have 
Windows, Icons, Buttons, Pull-Down Menus, Edit 
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It supports up to 31 Windows on the display, 
multiple fonts in 54 possible sizes and styles, 
Enhanced Basic Editing and much more. It adds 
over 50 Commands and Functions to Basic to 
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In fact it has so many features it would take 
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It is completely compatible with existing Basic 
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It requires 1 Disk Drive, R.S. Hi-Res Interface & 
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Window- Ware 

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powerful formatting capability, works with any 
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Window Basic Compiler - A Basic Compiler 
similar to CBAS1C only it compiles all the 
Window Basic statements to create super fast 
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Window Master $99.00 
Window EDT/ASM - A full featured 
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Font/Icon Editors - A utility disk with the 
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Advanced Programmers Guide - A 
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RAMDISK is an ALL Machine Language 
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compatible with Enhanced Color Disk Basicl Plus 
it allows your CoCo-3 to run at double speed all 
the time even for floppy disk access! II It will not 
disappear when you press reset like some other 
ramdisk programs. The MEMORY tester is a fast 
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Requires 512K & Disk $19.95 



CBASIC Editor/Compiler 

The ULTIMATE Color 
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If you want to write fast efficient machine 
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CBASIC is the only fully integrated Basic 
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CBASIC supports all the enhanced hardware 
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it exceptionally easy to use, not like some other 
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CBASIC is a powerful tool for the Beginner as 
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Compiled Basic Commands and Functions that 
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files, Tape, Printer and Screen I/O. It supports 
ALL the High and Low Resolution Graphics, 
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Enhanced Color Basic, including Graphics H/GET, 
H/Put, H/Play and H/DRAW, all with 99.9% 
syntax compatibility. 

CBASIC makes full use of the powerful and 
flexible GIMI chip in the Color Computer 3. It 
will fully utilize the 128K of RAM available and 
install 2 Ultra Fast Ramdisks if 512K is available, 
for program Creation, Editing and Compilation. 
You can easily access all 512K of memory in a 
Compiled program thru several extended 
memory commands that can access it in 32K or 
8K blocks and single or double bytes. 

CBASIC has its own completely integrated 
Basic Program Editor which allows you to load, 
edit or create programs for the compiler. It is a 
full featured editor designed specifically for 
writing Basic programs. It has block move and 
copy, program renumbering, automatic line 
number generation, screen editing, printer 
control and much more. 

Coco 1,2 or 3 Disk $149.00 



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DataPack HI Plus Vl.l 

SUPER SMART TERMINAL PROGRAM 
A UTOPILOTand AUTO-LOG Command Proetssors 
X -MOD EM DIRECT DISK FILE TRANSFER 
VT.Jflfl & VT-52 TERMINAL EMULATION 

No lost data even at 2400 Baud on the Serial port. 

8 Selectable Display Formats, 32/40/64/80 columns 
ASCn & BINARY disk file transfer via XMODEM. 
Directly record receive data (Data Logging). 
VT-100 emulation for VAX, UNIX and other systems. 
VT-100/52 cursor keys .position,, PF & Alt. Kbd. keys. 
Programmable Word Length, Parity, Stop Bits . 
Complete Full and Half Duplex operation, 
Send full 128 character set from Keyboard 
Complete Editor, Insert, Delete, Change or Add. 

9 Variable length, Programmable Macro Key buffers. 
Programmable Printer rates from 110 to 9600 Baud. 

Send Files from the Buffer, Macro Keys or Disk. 
Display or Print the contents of the 50k Buffer. 
Freeze Display & Review information On line. 
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Built in 2 Drive RAMDISK for 512K RAM. 
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"The SOURCE 9 ' 

DISASSEMBLER & SOURCE 
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The SOURCE will allow you to easily & quickly 
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beautiful, Assembler Source code. 

• Automatic label generation. 

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• Disassemble programs Directly from disk. 

• Automatically locates address. 

• Output listings to the Printer, Screen or both. 

• Generates Assembler source directly to disk. 

• Built in Hex/Ascii dump/display. 

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DISK EDITOR ASSEMBLER 

EDT/ASM III is a Disk based co-resident Text 
Editor & Assembler. It is designed to take 
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It has 8 display formats from 32/40/64/80 
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EDT/ASM III has the most powerful, easy to use 
Text Editor available in any Editor/Assembler 
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• Local and Global string search and/or replace. 

• Full Screen line editing . 

• Easy to use Single key editing commands. 

• Load & Save standard ASCII formatted files. 
■ Block Move & Copy, Insert, Delete, Overtype. 

• Create and Edit files larger than memory. 
The Assembler features include: 

• Supports Conditional IF/THEN/ELSE assembly. 

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• Supports standard Motorola directives. 

• Allows multiple values in FCB & FDB directives 

• Allows assembly from the Buffer, Disk or both. 

Coco 1, 2 or 3 Disk $59.95 



Turn of the Scr e w 



In last month's column, I covered the 
ABCs of how a disk drive works — its 
mechanical parts and how it accesses the 
data available on the disk. I'll continue on 
that track, giving more detail to the differ- 
ences between 40- and 80-track drives. 
Part of the article will concentrate on de- 
signing a small circuit that allows CoCo 
users to read standard CoCo disks with an 
80-track drive. 

The need for 80-track drives came about 
with the need to store more data on one 
disk. If a 40-track double-sided drive can 
hold 360K of data, then an 80-track double- 
sided drive should hold 720K of data. In 
fact, it does. But instead of going back to 
the 8-inch drive, which has more data 
storage, the manufacturer decided to double 
the amount of data by doubling the amount 
of tracks on the same-size disk. The only 
problem with this is that it becomes in- 
compatible with the 40-track drives. The 
differences make it impossible for an 80- 
track drive to read a 40-track disk. 

One difference between the two is 
obviously the number of tracks. But how is 
that possible, when both are 514-inch drives? 
Well, the difference is in track size. On a 
40-track drive the track density is 48 TPI 
(Tracks Per Inch). At 48 TPI, it takes just 
under one inch to make 40 tracks. If you 
look at a disk, one inch is about enough 
room to fit 40 tracks. If 40 tracks take up 
one inch, then 80 tracks take up two inches; 
that's too much to fit on a 514-inch disk. So 
the disk drive manufacturers decided to 
make the tracks thinner and closer to- 
gether. To make them fit on the same size 
disk, the track density was doubled to 96 
TPI. That allows 80 tracks to fit on the 
same size disk. 

This, however, causes a few problems 
for both the drive and disk manufacturers. 
So the read and write head had to be made 
thinner and the stepping mechanism more 
accurate. This adds to the cost of the drive. 
In addition, the disk has to hold twice the 
data and be of better quality. Since the 
track size is smaller (thinner), the mag- 
netic surface is smaller. In order to get the 
same reliability, the quality must be better 
— both with the heads and disks. When 



Tony DiStefano is a well-known early 
specialist in computer hardware projects. 
He lives in Laval Ouest, Quebec. Tonys 
username on Delphi is DISTO. 



Stepping into the world of 
40- and 80-track drives 



The DEFs 
of Disk 
Drives 

By Tony DiStefano 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 



using 80-track drives, it is recommended 
that you use 96 TPI-rated disks. If you 
don't, you may not have any problems 
while the disks are new, but in the long run 
valuable data is safer with this type of disk. 

Now, lets step back a little. The mecha- 
nism that steps the head back and forth is 
usually a motor called a stepper that can 
precisely rotate within certain speed lim- 
its. When Radio Shack first started selling 
drives, it took 30ms. (milliseconds) to 
make each step, but as motors improved, 



48 TPI 

0 



drives had shorter stepping times. Today 
an average 40-track drive has a stepping 
time of 6ms. When the 80-track drives 
came out, the manufacturer wanted it to be 
just as fast, so they increased the stepping 
time again to 3ms. 

Look at Figure 1 . It shows a few tracks 
on a typical disk. On the left side of the 
drawing are tracks made by a 40-track 
drive at 48 TPI. The track on the outer edge 
is Track 0; the next is Track 1 , then Track 
2 and so on. Tracks made by an 80-track 
drive are twice as thin as those of a 40- 
track drive. Notice, though, that Track 0, is 
on the outer edge on both sides. 

Take a disk formatted in a 40-track 
drive and place it in an 80-track drive. If 
you step the 80-track drive to Track 0, you 
can read it; trouble starts when you want to 
read the next track and so on. Look again 
at the right-hand side of Figure 1 . Imagine 
that you step the 80-track side one track 
inward to Track 1 . Now move over to the 
right-hand side and see where you are. On 
the 40-track side, you are still on Track 0, 
yet the software expects Track 1 . Now step 
in again. The software expects Track 2 but 
gets Track 1 . For every track stepped, the 
result is half of what you expect. If you 
step up to Track 10, then you only get 
Track 5. 

Stepping in or out, the ratio is always 2 
to 1 . Knowing this, I thought I could make 
a circuit that would generate two pulses for 
every one that came in. It would then be 



96 TPI 

0 




Figure 1 



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possible for an 80-track drive to read a 
standard 40-track disk. After a few experi- 
ments I came up with a doubling circuit. 
For every step pulse coming into the drive, 
two pulses come out. 

When stepping a standard 40-track drive, 
the CoCo's controller waits a minimum of 
6ms between steps. For an 80-track drive 
with a 3ms step rate, this is relatively slow. 
In fact, it can step twice as fast, so the 
circuit has time to step between steps. 

Examine the circuit in Figure 2 used to 
make the double stepper. It consists of two 
TTL chips and a handful of passive com- 
ponents. 

First it takes one pulse that comes in 
and changes it into two pulses. U2B acts as 
a buffer so that the second pulse doesn't 
trigger the circuit into oscillation. U 1 is a 
dual monostable multibrator. The first part 
(U1A) is used as a delay. The pulses that 
come in on STI are very short and are 
coming in at every 6ms. I say short be- 
cause they are short compared to the cir- 
cuit's delay of 3ms between pulses. That is 
half the time between incoming pulses. 
(Remember that an 80-track drive can step 
every 3ms.) When a pulse enters into the A 
input of U1A, Q* (Pin 4) goes low and 
stays low for 3ms. Nothing happens until 
Q* goes high again. The B input of U1B 
circuit starts on the rising edge of Q*. 
When this pin gets a rising edge, it starts 
timing a much shorter pulse, about 4ps, 



Figure 2 



the same pulse length as the incoming step 
pulse. 

Now let's look at what happens to the 
STO point in the circuit. The first (origi- 
nal) pulse happens; STO sees one pulse; 
that triggers a pulse at U1A; about three 
milli-seconds later, a pulse triggers U1B. 
If the switch S 1 is closed, the short pulse 
generated by U1B (4us) goes through U2A 
and appears at STO. At that point the drive 
gets a second pulse to step. If S 1 is opened, 
the pulse goes nowhere. 

Construction for this project is not dif- 
ficult. Besides parts, it requires opening 
your drive case and modifying the drive, 
which takes some electronic skills and 
should be done only by someone with 
experience in soldering and circuit modi- 
fying. 

Concerning parts, look at the circuit in 
Figure 2. These are all the parts you need 
— four resistors, four capacitors, two chips 
and one switch. You'll need a small proto- 
board on which to mount all the parts. 
These are available at any Radio Shack 
store, unlike some of the other parts. 

Connect all the pins to the chips; un- 
mentioned pin numbers should be left un- 
connected. Pin 16 of Ul and Pin 14 of U2 
should be connected to +5 volts. Pin 8 of 
Ul and Pin 7 of U2 should be connected to 
the ground. After all the components are 
mounted on the small board, it's time to 
mount the whole thing into your drive. I 



can only give you guidelines since the 
great variety of 80-track drives makes it 
difficult to be exact. 

First you need to find a place to fit the 
board — once fitted, you have to connect 
5 volts and ground. A voltmeter here is 
handy but not necessary. Locate the power 
connector to the drive. There are 5 volts, 
1 2 volts and ground at the connector. Pin 4 
is 5 volts and pins 2 and 3 are ground. The 
next step is to find the 34-pin edge connec- 
tor. Locate Finger 20 and a convenient 
location, then cut the trace that leads to it. 
Solder the connection labeled STI to the 
side of the cut that leads to the finger, and 
solder another connection labeled STO to 
the other side of the cut. Mount the switch 
somewhere on or near the front of the 
drive, then reassemble the drive assembly 
and turn everything on. 

Now insert a 40-track disk in the 80- 
track drive, turn the switch on, and type 
DIR. If it's not working, check your work; 
if you have a digital probe, use it. 

Now that you have the circuit working, 
you need to know how to use it. While in 
OS-9, leave the switch off. This allows 
you to access all 80 tracks. (You must use 
the 80-track descriptor.) When you want 
to read standard 40-track disks, turn the 
switch on, use a 40-track descriptor and 
read the disk. Do not try to write on a 40- 
track disk with an 80-track drive. It will 
not work properly. /R\ 



June 1989 THE RAINBOW 99 



Printer Buffer 



Part 1 of 2 



Listing or sending data to a printer can 
be a time-consuming task, while the 
computer is forced to slow down 
because its rate of operation is tied to the 
through-put of the associated printer. Wait- 
ing foi such a system can be a frustrating 
experience. The Economy Printer Buffer 
solves this problem. It appears as a high- 
speed printer to the host computer, taking 
data as fast as it is supplied and passing that 
data to the associated printer as it is re- 
quired. Your computer will not waste its 
valuable time printing but will be available 
for its primary purpose — computing! 

Features 

As shown in the schematic (See Figure 
1 the heart of the Economy Printer Buffer 
is a 6803 eight-bit microprocessor. The 
6803 has built-in peripheral functions: A 
serial interface, a 16-bit timer and Input/ 
Output lines. These functions allow us to 
build a very compact system. 

Storage capacity is 64K bytes of mem- 
ory (eight 4164-type dynamic RAMs). Two 
types of interfaces are selectable: parallel 
to parallel, or serial to parallel. The serial to 
parallel interface may be set up in one of 
two different ways: internal (9600 baud 
using the internal 6803 clock) or external 
(150, 300, 600, 1200, 2400, 4800 or 9600 
baud). These external baud rates are pro- 
duced by dividing the E clock and feeding 
that clock back into the 6803 at Pin 10 
(P22). 

Two LEDs are provided to indicate status: 
one for Full/Busy and one for Error/Dupe. 
Two switch-functions are provided for 
control input to the buffer: one for reset, the 
other for obtaining a duplicate output of the 



Harleen Francisco is a pediatric nurse 
who enjoys working with children. Her 
hobbies include music, horseback riding 
and computers. Harleen, together with her 
husband, Gene, design and develop com- 
puter peripherals. 



By Harleen Francisco 

buffer storage. 

The use of special counters, SAMs, or 
one-shots for memory refresh are unneces- 
sary; refresh of the dynamic memory is 
accomplished by the system software. The 
software refresh is transparent to the opera- 
tion of the buffer. 

Interfaces 

Parallel (Centronics type) interfaces are 
accomplished by a Peripheral Interface 
Adapter (PIA). The cables used for these 
interfaces may be up to six feet. 

The serial interface uses the full-duplex 
Serial Communications Interface (SCI) 
within the 6803 microprocessor. This inter- 
face operates using a standard form. Each 
character-set consists of one start-bit, eight 
data-bits and one stop-bit. The 9600 baud 
rate uses the internal timer of the 6803 for 
its clock source. If any other baud rates are 
desired, an external baud clock must be 
used. This arrangement is illustrated in 
Figure 2. 

The correct baud rate frequencies re- 
quire that a 4.9152 MHz crystal be used. 
This results in a clock rate of 1 .2288 MHz 
at the microprocessor. A clock rate greater 
than 1.0 MHz requires 6803-1; however, I 
have used normal 6803' s with no prob- 
lems. If you already have a 6803, try it. 

Hardware 

All members of the 6803 family have a 
multiplexed address/data bus when in their 
expanded mode. Address lines AO to 7 are 
multiplexed with the data lines DO to 7 on 
Port 3. An address-strobe pulse occurs during 
the low phase of Enable-Sign E. The ad- 
dress is guaranteed to be valid on Port 3 
only during the falling edge of AS , at which 
time it is frozen by an LS373 latch IC. 
Address lines A8 to 15, produced by Port 4, 
are not multiplexed and are valid through- 
out most of the Enable cycle. 

During the E-clock high phase, Port 3 
either presents data for writing, or expects 
to see data for reading.Read/Write line R/ 



W should be lowered only during the posi- 
tive E phase to prevent erroneous writing. 
Data is read by the processor during the E- 
signal falling edge. As with all multiplexed 
bus systems, care must be taken to ensure 
that all device output buffers are disabled 
during the E-signal low phase; otherwise 
bus contention will result. After having 
obtained essentially separate address and 
data buses, connection of the 27 16 EPROM 
and 6821 PIA is easy. 

Memory decoding is arranged to keep as 
much of the 64K byte address space as 
possible free for buffer RAM, while using 
a minimum of ICs. As the software is less 
than 1 K byte long, only half of the 27 1 6 is 
used, but Address-Line A10 is tied high 
through a 2K resistor. 

Most systems using dynamic RAMs 
have RAM controllers to generate timing 
signals and to refresh the memory inde- 
pendently. These controllers tend to be 
costly, but, as their performance is not 
essential in this application, I chose to use 
a software technique (described later). As a 
bonus, the hardware required to implement 
this is minimal. 

To reduce the number of pins used on 
the 64K byte dynamic RAMs, address lines 
AO to 7 are multiplexed with lines A8 to 1 5 
using two signals, called Row- Address 
Strobe (RAS) and Column- Address Strobe 
(CAS). The address bus is multiplexed 
with the E-signal using two LS157 quad 
two-to-one line multiplexers. The timing 
allows it to be used directly as RAS during 
the E-signal low phase. 

Generating CAS is a little more diffi- 
cult. When the RAM is accessed, the RAM 
E-signal is clocked through two D-type 
latches by the microprocessor input clock. 
The E-signal is derived from the processor 
clock and is one quarter of its frequency. 
The D-type devices are, however, held 
clear during the E-signal low phase (while 
CAS is held high). In order to meet data set- 
up times for the processor and RAMs, CAS 
is also conditioned by the R/W signal. 



100 



THE RAINBOW June 1989 



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June 1989 THE RAINBOW 101 



Hence, CAS will fall only if RAM E is true, 
and if during the high E phase the latches 
have been clocked twice for a write and 
only once for a read. 

Modular Software 

The software is interrupt-driven and 
consists of five modules: initialization, 
parallel data in, parallel data out, serial data 
in and RAM refresh. 

During initialization, a vector jump-table 
is set up in the scratch-pad RAM for Inter- 
rupt Request (IRQ) and Software Interrupt 
(SWI) instructions. The jump address in- 
serted depends on the operating mode. 
Interrupt vectors for IRQ and SWI point to 
the jump-table and can, therefore, indi- 
rectly enter the appropriate handling rou- 
tine without the need to poll the interrupt 
sources. 

Interrupt-handling software for parallel 
data-input is entered following a positive 
edge on the Host Data-Strobe Signal (HDS). 
Similarly, the Data-Output Handler is en- 
tered following a positive edge on the printer 
acknowledge signal (HACK). 

The first printer data-strobe (output) is 
forced by executing a Software Interrupt 
instruction (SWI). This instruction in the 
vector jump-table will have been set to 
point to the parallel output service routine 
during initialization. Although the SWI 
instruction is essentially intended for use 
by in-circuit emulators (for example, in 
break-point generation), it is an elegant 
way to force an interrupt. Note that SWI is 
not maskable. 

Further printer data-strobe pulses are 
generated automatically as the subsequent 
printer-acknowledge signal causes the data- 
output handler to be re-entered. The next 
byte to be sent is then written into the PIA, 
and a further data-strobe pulse is generated 
by the on-board handshake logic. 

Similarly, acknowledge pulses to the 
host are also generated automatically 
whenever the input PIA port is read. 

If the buffer becomes full, the Busy line 
is asserted and the buffer-full LED lights. 
Acknowledgement for the last character 
strobed is not sent before space for the data 
becomes available. The Busy line is cleared 
before sending the acknowledgment. 

Serial data transfer is performed in a 
way similar to parallel data transfer (apart 
from the handshaking and buffer-status 
differences). 

Simple Code 

Much of the buffer software is straight- 
forward, as seen from the sample listing 
(See Figure 3). The two address pointers 
are BUFI N and BUFOUT. After checking that 
the buffer is not already full, the program 
reads the PIA, which causes an acknowl- 



4 fm. mm. . t. | 

04570 ** 








04580 ** 


IRQ1 : 


PIA INTERRUPT HANDLER I 


04590 ** 


(HOST 


INTERFACE) 




04600 ** 


ENTERED DUE TO; DATA STROBE +VE 


04610 ** 








04620 ** 


EMPTST 


: ENTRY POINT FROM SCI I 


04630 ** 








04640 








04650 *IRQ1 


LDX 


BUFIN 


1 ' aW 1 a. y»v 

6803 


04657 IRQ1 


LDA 


PORT1 




04658 


ORA 


//BFULL1 




04659 


STA 


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BUFIN 




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04680 


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04720 


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#$2E 


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04730 


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04740 


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QUIT . . 




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LDA 


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04748 


AN DA 


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04749 


STA 


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04750 


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REGA 




04760 


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0 ,x 




04770 


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LIMIT 




04780 








04790 * 


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BUFIN 


6803 


y-S 4 P*\ 4~\ 4**L 

04800 


STU 


BUFIN 




04810 








04820 EMPTST 


LDA 


FLAG 




04830 


BEQ 


QUIT 




04840 


CLR 


>FLAG 




04850 


LDA 


MODE:-:; 




04860 


BEQ 


QUIT; 




04870 


SWI 






04880 QUIT 


RTI 






04890 








04900 ** 









Figure 3: Sample buffer code 




This photo shows the completed project (circuit board with parts) 

without the case. 



102 



THE RAINBOW June 1989 



The CoCo Graphics 
Designer Plus 



BANNERS, SIGNS 
& GREETING CARDS 



In Jim Issel's complete review in the May 89 
issue of Rainbow (page 1 1 0), he said 

"...a top notch program. The graphics | 
are superb; the documentation excel- 
lent; the user interface simple, easy to 
use and efficient; and the price makes 
it a steal ... this really is one program 
that everyone can use." 

The CoCo Graphics Designer Plus 

(CGDP), lets you combine borders, text, and 
pictures from it's built in collections (and 
from our supplementary disks) to make 
great looking banners, signs, and greeting 
cards. It is very easy to use, and has been 
favorably compared to Broederbund's ever 
popular "Print Shop" program on Apple and 
IBM computers. 

It runs on a CoCo 2 64K or CoCo 3 with a 
disk, mouse or joystick, and compatible 
printer. Most popular dot-matrix printers are 
supported. 

Print Shop, Apple, and IBM are trademarks of their respective 
companies. 

CoCo Graphics Designer Plus $29.95 

Supplementary CGDP Disks $14.95 each: 
Border Disk#1 contains 176 borders . Font Disk A 
and Font Disk B contain 10 fonts each. Picture 
disks #2,#3, and #4 contain 120 picture each. See 
our full page ad in the May 89 Rainbow on page 
145. 

FastDupe li 

The FASTEST disk copier ever! Fastdupe II will 
FORMAT and BACKUP a disk in only one pass 
(up to 23 grans) and can make up to 4 disk copies 
at once in 2 minutes! The "must have" utility for 
every multiple disk drive owner. CoCo I, II, & III 64K 

Disk Utility 2.1 A 

A multi-featured tool for USER FRIENDLY disk 
handling. Utilize a directory window to selectively 
sort, move rename & kill file entries. Lightning fast 
Disk I/O for format, copy & backup. Single key ex- 
ecution of both BASIC & Machine Language pro- 
grams. CoCo l,ll, & III 64K $955 

CoCo Checker 

Could something possibly be wrong with your 
CoCo? How can you tell? CoCo Checker is the 
answer! CoCo Checker will test your ROMs, 
RAMs, disk drives & controller, printer, keyboard, 
cassette, joysticks, sound, PIAs, VDG, internal 
clock speed, Multi-Pak Interface & more! CoCo I, II 
64KDisk .„ ............*ia95 

Mulit-Pak Crack 

Save ROMPAKs to your 64K disk system using 
the RS Multi-Pak interface. Eliminate constant 
plugging in of ROMPAKs by deeping your PAK 
software on disk. Includes POKES for "PROBLEM" 
ROMPAKs including: Cyrus, Dragon Fire, Demon 
Attack, Downland, & Stellar Lifeline. (Will NOT 
crack CoCo 3 32k PAKs.) CoCo l.lljl 64K $16.95 

Tape to Disk Utility 

A powerful soft- 
ware package 
that quickly and 
easily transfers 
programs from 

tape to disk and disk to tape automatically. Ideal 
for copying Rainbow on Tape to disk! Also copies 
tape to tape, & prints tape & disk directories. 

CoCo IJI & III -:-::::-:--:--:-- :r -:;— 

Comming soon! Look for Zebra's new 
a full Graphics User Interface; Make 





1 




1 






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New ROM Cartridge 

Emulator for Multi- 
Pak Owners and 
Game Designers. 

This piece of hard- 
ware and software 
magic reads the con- 
tents of any CoCo 
ROM cartridge up to 
32K onto a disk. The 
cartridge program can then be run on the ROM car- 
tridge emulator independently of the original car- 
tridge. Great for game aficionados and developers. 
Requires CoCo 2 or 3, 64K Mulit-Pak, & disk drive. 
WILDCARD ROM Cartridge Emulator. $119.95 

Atari-to-CoCo 
Joystick 
Adaptors 

With this adaptor 
you can connect 
any Atari type joy- 
stick to your CoCo. 
Atari joysticks respond faster, center better, 
and are more rugged than CoCo Joysticks. They 
will improve the play of many CoCo games. The 
adaptor also features a built-in 6-ft. extender 
cable. 

Order JSA1 Joystick Adaptor $12.95 

Kraft Atari ACE Compatible Joystick $6,95 

Sundog's Warrior King, one of the hottest current 
action games, and superb with our adaptor $29.95 




Adaptor 



Joystick 



Include $3 S&H, UPS COD add $3. Checks, 
MO's & VISA/MC accepted. 

Zebra Systems, Inc. 

78-06 Jamaica Ave. 
Woodhaven, NY 11421 
(718) 296-2385 




Telepatch li 

If you own TeleWriter-64 there's no need to buy an 
expensive new word processor to get the latest 
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ahead buffer, overstrike mode, repeating keys, key 
beep, faster cursor movement, faster disk I/O, 
print spooler, TRUE block moves and much more! 
Includes WIZARD proportional on-screen characters 
with TRUE lowercase! Requires Telewriter-64, 
CoCo IJIJI! .$1655 

Car Sign Designer 

Design eye catching 5 
inch diamond shaped 
signs. Very easy to 
use and gives great 
printouts. Includes 2 
plastic sign holders and suction cups. CoCo li or 3 
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CoCo CSD without yellow paper $9.95 

CoCo CSD plus 50 sheets of special 

very bright yellow paper $14.95 

Schematic Drafting Processor 

Supports most popular dot-matrix printers. Save 
time and design pro looking diagrams using a 480 X 
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30 common electronic symbols W/10 user-definable 
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can save your diagrams to disk for later retrieval. 
Prints to most popular Dot-Matrix printers! CoCO 
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Printer Font Generator 

Write files using any CoCo word processor ( TW- 
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Fururistic and Block! A character-set editor is in- 
cluded! Supports most popular dt-matrix printers 
(Epson, Gemini, Star, Tandy, Okidata). CoCo 1,11, 
HI64K .$1635 




CoCo 
Mouse 
$19.95 

Radio Shack TRS-80 
Color Mouse Cat. No. 26-3025 (one button). Limited 
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please. At this price they'll last a week 

HDS Floppy Disk Controllers 

We have 80 new floppy disk controllers. These 
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SPRINT Serial-to-Parallei 
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Zera's SPRINT Serial-to-Parallel printer interface 
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WICO 
Trackball 

Plugs into either 
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WICO CoCo Trackball „ 429.95 

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A Hi-Res graphics casino blackjack simulation and 
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FKEYS III f@]p] 

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that gives you 




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A productibity enchancement too 
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Level 1 CoCO I, II, II $1655 

CoCo II Screen Dump 

This is THE porgram to use to make hardcopies of 
CoCo II Hi-res graphics with Radio Shack dot- 
matrix printers (DMP105,130, etc.) and EPSOn 
compatibles (Star Micronics, Panasonic, etc.) 
CoCO II Screen Dump will dump HSCREEN 1-4, & 
PMODEO-4 screens. 1 6 patterns can be customized 
for any color on the screen. CoCo III $6.95 

CoCo II Font Bonanza PLUS! 

Replace the PLAIN CoCo II HPR1NT text charac- 
ters from a menu of INCREDIBLE fonts or use the 
hi-res editro to modigy or create your own! Two 
disks include fonts: Modern, Bold, Italics, Bubble, 
Computer, Fancy, Shadow, Romoan, Outline, 
Greek, Deco and lots more.! CoCo 3 128K 
n $1995 

Color Max-3 Font Editor 

If you own Color Max 3 and want more fonts, this 
is your answer! The Color Max 3 Font Editor al- 
lows you to create or modify hi-res fonts for Color 
Max 3. Several fonts are included: Crystal, Glyph- 
ic, Dowenhill, Old eanglish, Film, and Stripe. {Fonts 
and editor are also compatible with aThe Newspa- 
per Design System!) $1235 



Figure 4: Front side of circuit board (shown actual size). 




Figure 5: Backside of circuit board (shown actual size). 



104 THE RAINBOW June 1989 



o 



..«> • V L • * • * * 



TO PRINTER 



mm host 



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•14 



GND 1 

1 cd 1 *°» 



DUPE 



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5 



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5 



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D5 



□ 7 



Di 



C3 



OS 



Rl - 
RB - 
RIO 
R1H 
R13 
R1S 
R17 
DI - 
XL1 



R7 
R9 

- Rll 

- R14 
R1S 



D2 



10K OHMS 
150 OHMS 
3K OHMS 
10K OHMS 
2K OHMS 
2K OHMS 
2K OHMS 
1N914 
4.9152 MHZ 



CI 10 uf 

C2 - C4 20 pf 

C3 .01 uf 

cf 100 Uf 

cd .1 uf 

01 2N3904 

IC1 74LS11 

IC2 74LS04 

IC3 MCM1488 



IC4 74LS00 

ICS 74LS27 

ICS 74LS74 

IC7 6S03-1 

ICS 74LS373 
IC9 - IC10 74LS157 

IC11 MCM271S 

IC12 6SA21 

IC13 - IC20 41S4 



Figure 6: Parts placement and parts list. 



edge strobe and stores the acquired data. 
After being incremented the input pointer 
BUFIN is checked to ensure that it remains 
within the circular-buffer address range by 
calling subroutine LIMITas shown in the 
sample listing. 

Buffer-status byte FLAG is next tested to 
check whether or not the buffer was previ- 
ously empty. If so, F LAG is cleared and this 
forces execution of the printer interface 
interrupt-handler through an SWT instruc- 
tion. This restarts the DS/ACK handshake 
after the buffer becomes empty. 

Hidden Benefits 

A large part of the actual code (See the 
listing on Page 108.) is common to both 
serial and parallel communication. 

Refreshing of the dynamic RAM is 
carried out by software, executing a string 
of no-operation (BRN) every 2ms. This 
increments the address bus 256 times, which 
ensures that every column is refreshed 
through an RAS-only refresh at least once 
in 2ms. 

An output-compare feature on the 
MC6803 processor is used to generate the 
periodic 2ms interrupt. The on-chip timer 
is a free-running incrementing counter which 
has an associated output-compare register. 
When the content of this compare register 
is equal to that of the counter, an interrupt 
can occur. 

In this system, it is standard that during 
execution of each RAM refresh module the 
output-compare register is loaded with the 
value of the timer plus 2ms. Port P21 is set 
up to fall when this time elapses, pulling the 
Non-Maskable Interrupt (NMI) low and 
causing the RAM refresh handler to be re- 
entered. 

Interrupt Priority, as the normal output- 
compare function, was considered too low 
for the RAM refresh module. Using Port 
P21 to activate NMI effectively has moved 
this Interrupt Priority to the highest posi- 
tion, apart from Reset. For my technique 
the software execution overhead is about 
12 percent, but in this application that is of 
no real consequence. 

We will continue next time with con- 
struction and troubleshooting. In the mean- 
time, however, you can start constructing a 
printed circuit board (See Figures 4 and 5.) 
and gathering parts (See Figure 6.). 

[The printed circuit board (a double- 
sided board) is available for $25 from the 
author at the address below. Also available 
is the programmed EPROM for $10.] 

(Questions or comments concerning this 
project may be addressed to the author at 
8332 Peggy Street, Tampa, FL 33615. 
Please include an SASE when requesting a 
reply.) □ 



June 1989 THE RAINBOW 105 



T & D SOFTWARE PRICE 



lAAilr jt j lilt \j» ^ Aha 

ISSUE #1, JULY 1982 


ISSUE #8, FEB., 1983 


ft M 4ft ft ft ftft j mm aa Mh ftftM _a ma AM 

ISSUE #15, SEPT. 1983 


ISSUE #22, APRIL 1984 


IP" it AA ftlAkJ aft Mr A mt 

ISSUE #29, NOV. 1984 


ISSUE #36, JUNE 1985 


COVER 1 


COVER 8 


MYSTERY COVER PT.2 


HEALTH HINTS 


DISK ROLL OUT 


SELECT A GAME 2 


RACE TRACK 


DEFEND 


GOLD VALUES 


GLIBLIBS 


ROROT ON 
nuou i uii 


VIDFO COMPUTER 

V IUL v UuItIiU lull 


HANGMAN 


3 OIMENSIONAL MAZE 


TREK INSTRUCTIONS 


CLOTHER SLITHER 


MULTIPONG 


SPEECH SYNTHESIS 


MUSIC ALBUM 


COCO CONCENTRATION 


TREK 


BIBLE 1 4 2 


ADVENTURE GENERATOR 


SPEECH RECOGNITION 


LIFE EXPECTANCY 


AUTO LINE NUMBERING 


HIGH TEXT MODIFICATION 


BIBLE 3 & 4 


OUEST ADVENTURE 


SPACE LAB 


WORD TESTS 


ML TUTORIAL PT.3A 


ASTRO DODGE 


CATCH ALL 


QUARTER BOUNCE 


AUTO COMMAND 


KILLER MANSION 


ML TUTORIAL PT.3B 


DR, COCO 


INVADER 


DUAL OUTPUT 


COMPUTER MATCHMAKER 


BARTENDER 


NUCLEAR POWER PLANT 


PEG JUMP 


ALIEN RAID 


KEY REPEAT 


KNIGHT & THE LABYRINTH 


CALENDAR 


DUAL BARRIER 


MORSE CODE 


MOON ROVER 


FULL EDITOR 


STAR SIEGE 


ROBOT WAR 


BRICKS 


PURGE UTILITY 


10 ERROR IGNORER 


METEOR 


TALKING SPELLING QUIZ 


ISSUE #2, AUG. 1982 


I M IIP* irA k ■ ■ m ma ft ft j mAfA 0% 

ISSUE #9, MARCH 1983 


ft ^ft aft ft ft bb . - -m\ mm aft tfhWft* _a aa A aft 

ISSUE #16, OCT. 1983 


t ft*» m*A ■ ft mW it r*. J k ftft ft a aft aft A 

ISSUE #23, MAY 1984 


1 m. A—t ft ■ mm it aft aft ■% bh aft a a% a% a 

ISSUE #30, DEC. 1984 


| —m m— , , ft r , Jk. mmm ' ft ■ ft ft %W a aft mm, mt 

ISSUE #37, JULY 1985 


UFO COVER PL 1 


TIME MACHINE COVER 


MYSTERY COVER 


MONEY SAVERS 1 & 2 


MATH HELP 


CHESS MASTER 


OiORYTHM 


TRIG DEMO 


BOPOTRON 

Uvl \J 1 1 1UI1 


STOCKS OR RflMRS 


7FCTDR AnVFNTIIRF 


BIBLE 5-7 


BOMBARDMENT 


PYRAMID OF CHEOPS 


OIRECTORY RECALL 


WALL AROUND 


WORLD CONQUEST 


SHIP WREK ADVENTURE 


BLACK JACK 


PROGRAM PACKER 


VECTOR GRAPHICS INST. 


COCO TECHNICAL LOOK PL 1 


DRAG RACE 


FILE TRANSFER 


COST OF LIVING 


BUOGET 


VECTOR GRAPHICS 


NUCLEAR WAR INST, 


MINE FIELD 


FOUR IN A ROW 


FRENZY r >.-.. 


ELECTRONIC DATE BOOK 


SKYD1VER 


THERMONUCLEAR WAR 


T-NOTES TUTORIAL 


MARSHY 


BUSINESS LETTER- 


ML TUTORIAL PT.4 


SWERVE ANO DODGE 


CIRCUIT BREAKER 


T & 0 PROGRAM INDEXEB 


TAPE CONTROLLER 


QUICK THINK : '.'w; 


TAPE DIRECTORY 


NIMBO BATTLE 


MOUSE RACES 


SYSTEM STATUS 


CATACOMB 


QUEST INSTRUCTIONS 


BLOCK-STIR 


TAPE ANALYSIS UTILITY 


SUPER SQUEEZE 


ERROR TRAP 


AUTO TALK 


QUEST FOR LENORE 


COCD ADDING MACHINE 


LIFE GENERATIONS 


OATA FALL 


0R0LL ATTACK 


SGR8PAK 


A MA MA ■ K V> i r MA M M KW -d 4fe *h M 

ISSUE #3, SEPT. 1982 


■ it MA A ■ W ■ • J MA A pk a-k ft A _J 4« a a», 

ISSUE #10, APRIL 1983 


ISSUE #17, NOV. 1983 


ft a% aft m ft mm w i a%. A « ■ A ■ ft mwA a aft aft A 

ISSUE #24, JUNE 1984 


1 M. mft ■ I mW tlM mm ■ mm M ft _» M « p 

ISSUE #31, JAN. 1985 


1 n ft* ■ ft V 11 A #ft Mil dPm -mm ft% MA P> 

ISSUE ^3B, AUG, 1985 


UFO COVER PT.2 


TENTH COVER 


THANKSGIVING COVER 


DIR PACK & SORT 


TREASURES OF BARS00M 


GOLF PAR3 


BASKETBALL 


PYRAMID OF DANGER 


1-D TIH-T AC-TOE 


BRICK OUT 


RATTI ERRDUNO 


WIZARD AOVENTURE 


CHUCKLUCK 


TYPING TUTOR . 


INDY 500 


COCO TECHNICAL LOOK FT. ? 


STRUCT. COMPILEO LANG; 


KITE DESIGN 


SLOT MACHINE 


ML tUTORIAL PT.5 


COLLEGE ADVENTURE 


USA SLIOE PUZZLE 


MINIATURE GOLF 


ROBOTS 


ALPHABETIZER 


TINYCALC 


MEMORY GAME 


51 '24 SCREEN EDITOR 


STAR DUEL 


G0M0KU 


NFL PREDICTIONS 


STOCK MARKET COMP 


DUNGEON MASTER 


51 *24 SCREEN EDITOR 


ARITHMETIC FOOTBALL 


AMULET OF POWER 


FLAG CAPTURE 


YAH-HOO 


WEATHER FORECASTER 


CITY INVADERS 


GRID RUN 


LINE COPY UTILITY 


ROBOT BOMBER 


MISSILE ATTACK 


GRID FACTOR INST. 


PRINTER SPOOLER 


SPIRAL ATTACK 


DISK PLUMBER 




SCREEN PRINT 


GRID FACTOR 


STEPS 


FAST SORT 


SUPER RAM CHECKER 




BRIKPONG 


DRAW 


SNAKE 


MUNCHMAN 


GRAPHIC HORSE RACE 


■ AA JK ft ■ n 1 . A 4% _a MA ah Jhi 

ISSUE #4, OCT. 1982 


A Jft *IA ft ft mm . , * - A Ml a h a ^ Jk ^ ^ 

ISSUE #11, MAY 1983 


ISSUE #18, DEC. 1983 


ft ,0A a% ■ a mm . . aft mm ft d 4 ft ft m . aft aft 

ISSUE #25, JULY 1984 


ft aft aft. ■ a bh ■ . aa aft a . a aft aft Ba 

ISSUE #32, FEB. 1985 


a aft aftft ■ ■ mm tt ma ft% aft mm* >_ a aft aft an 

ISSUE #39, SEPT, 1985 


UFO RESCUE 


ELEVENTH COVER 


CHRISTMAS COVER 


CLOCK 


DR. SIGMUND 


DRUNK DRIVING 


TANK BATTI E 


ARCHERY 


CLIMBER 


cncn tfchnicai i nnK pt ^ 


ICF WCRI D ACVFNTIIRF 


CAR MANAGFR 
own i v i mi i rvj u n 


DRIVEWAY 


FROG JUMP 


GALACTIC CDNQUEST 


SKIO ROW ADVENTURE 


LOTTERY ANALYST 


SQUEEZE PLAY 


SOUNOS 


ML TUTORIAL PT.6 


WARLORDS 


MONEY MAKER 


BASIC COMPILER 


SUPER BACKUP 


BALLOON DROP 


MLT DICTIONARY 


STATES REVIEW 


PIN-HEAD CLEANING 


MUSIC CREATOR 


RECIPE MACHINE 


MIND BOGGLE 


BASIC SPEEO UP TOT. 


MATH TUTOR 


LINE EDITOR INST. 


MEANIE PATROL 


ANTI-AIRCRAFT 


COCO-TERRESTRIAL ADV. 


METRIC CONVERTOR 


MACHINE LANGUAGE DATA 


LINE EDITOR 


TRI-COLOR CARDS 


UNREASON ADVENTURE 


CALORIE COUNTER 


GRAPHIC QUAO ANTENNA 


PRINTER UTILITY INST. 


BOOMERANG 


SHAPE RECOGNITION 


TALKING ALPHABET 


JACK-O-LANTERN 


GRAPHICS PROGRAM 


PRINTER UTILITY 


BUBBLE BUSTER 


DISK BACKUP 


SUPER VADERS 




CATERPILLAR CAVE 


MUTANT WAFFLES 


R0C0CHET 


SPACE PROTECTOR 


AUTOMATIC EDITOR 


4 a jm m m mm hH ft, a mm a ■ j M m n 

ISSUE #5, NOV. 1982 


Hawa tr% lip* i j am. ma « ft ■ & » h j 0t mA 

ISSUE #12, JUNE 1983 


m -mm m\- a m mm t . . aft ft A\ A ft _a ah mm a 

ISSUE #19, JAN. 1984 


ISSUE #26, AUG. 1984 


i n. J~m ft i r~ i j r% r% ■ ■ ■ m% _> ■% aft m 

ISSUE #33, MAR. 1985 


■ A 1 IIP tt AtH rt ft%«ft^ _* A a% pa 

ISSUE #40, OCT. 1985 


CATALOG COVER 


TWELFTH COVER 


BANNER 


PEEK POKE & EXECUTE 


LIGHT CYCLE 


STAR TREK 


BOWLING 


SHOOTING GALLERY 


PROBE 


SAUCER RFRCUF 

On UUL LI ntuuUL 


PAINT 


HAM RADIO I OR 


PROGRAM INVENTORY 


BOMB STOPPER 


DISK DIR. PROTECTOR 


YOUNG TYPER TUTOR 


SKEET SHOOTING 


COCO WAR 


PROMISSORY- LOANS 


VALLEY BOMBER 


OPTICAL CONFUSION 


O-TEL-0 


GUITAR NOTES 


DISK LABELER 


CHECKBOOK BALANCER 


STAR FIGHTER 


WORD PROCESSOR 


OLYMPIC EVENTS 


Ml DISK ANALYZER 


SHIP WAR 


TRIGONOMETRY TUTOft 


WHEEL OF FORTUNE 


WORD SEARCH 


DOUBLE OICE 


PERSONAL DIRECTORY 


ELECTRIC COST 


CONVOY 


ML TUTORIAL PT.7 


ASTRONAUT RESCUE 


COCO OATABASE 


NAUGHA ADVENTURE 


MULTIKEY BUFFER 


BAG-IT 


MERGE UTILITY 


STAR TRAP 


BATTLE STAR 


EGGS GAME 


NUKE AVENGER 


SPECTRA SOUND 


RAM TEST 


PIE CHART 


COCO-PIN BALL 


DISK DIRECTORY PRINT 


CURSOR KING 


CONVEYOR BELT 


LANDER 


FORCE FIELO 


MONTEZUMAS DUNGEONS 


SPEED KEy 


SAND ROVER 


ISSUE #6, DEC. 1982 


ft ma MA a a mm . _ a a . ■ ft ft ft a A ^ » ^ a* 

ISSUE #13, JULY 1983 


ISSUE #20, FEB. 1984 


m aft aft ft m pi , , mm. mm* aft mm p. w a am a, 

ISSUE #27, SEPT. 19B4 


ft J*k ■ ft mm w* ma A\ m psl aM ft ft a _aft aft ■» 

ISSUE #34, APRIL 1985 


A dWA dWA ■ ft a _i It ft #ft ft m _mt aWA MA mm 

ISSUE #41, NOV. 1985 


CHRISTMAS COVER 


THIRTEENTH COVER 


INTRODUCTION 


COCO TO COM 64 


HOVER TANK 


GRUMPS 


RAINDROPS 


FLASH CARD 


HINTS FDR YOUR COCO 
nil* i o run i uun uuuu 


RAI ACTIC SMIIfifil FR 


PnWFR SWflRO 


niSK DRIVF SPFFD TFST 


STOCK MARKET 


ICE BLOCK 


ESCAPE ADVENTURE 


INDY RACE 


TERMITE INVASION 


SOLAR CONQUEST 


ADVANCE PONG 


COSMIC FORTRESS 


SEEKERS 


ACCOUNT MANAGER 


SPELLING CHECKER 


GAS COST 


OESTROY 


MAIL LIST 


MASTER BRAIN 


CASSETTE MERGE UTILITY 


DOS BOSS 


RIME WORLD MISSION 


SOUND ANALYZER 


OOLLARS & CENTS 


LIST CONTROLLER 


STRING PACKING TUTORIAL 


NINE CARD CHOICE 


WUMPUS 


CREATIVITY TEST. 


ML TUTORIAL PT.8 


DISKETTE CERTIFIER 


SPACE DUEL 


MUSIC GENERATOR 


CHARACTER EDITOR 


VOICE DATA 


SDSK COPY 


ROM COPY 


BUGS 


FYR-DRACA 


GflAPHIC TEST 


ML TUTORIAL PT.1 


MUSIC SYNTHESIZER 


BASIC RAM 


TRAP-BALL 


DRIVE TEST 


GRAPHIC LOOPY 


LOONY LANOER 


CRAWLER 


SNAFUS 


BALLOON FIRE 


GRAPHIC TOUR 


B0L0 PRINT 


ISSUE #7, JAN, 1983 


ISSUE #14, AUG. 1983 


ISSUE #21, MAR. 1984 


ISSUE #28, OCT, 1984 


ISSUE #35, MAY 1985 


ISSUE #42, DEC. 1985 


NEW YEARS COVER 


MYSTERY COVER 


BASIC CONVERSIONS 


HANGING TREE 


SELECT A GAME 1 


HOME PRODUCT EVALUATION 


LIST ENHANCER 


ROW BOAT 


FINANCIAL ADVISE 


CHECKERS 


TAPE PROBLEMS 


YAHTZEE 


SUPER PRECISION GIV. 


COMPUTER TUTL RT. 1 


CASTLE STORM 


FOOTBALL 


STROLL TRIVIA 


DISK UTILITY 


BOMB DIFFUSE 


INDEX DATA BASE 


OOS HEAD CLEANER 


MORE PEEKS & POKES 


SOFTBALL MANAGER 


MACH II 


SPACE STATION. = 


DISK ZAPPER 


COCO TERMINAL 


SPELLING CHECKER 


FONTS DEMO 


ELECTRONIC BILLBOARD 


ML TUTORIAL PT,.g; 


coco-MONrroR 


SNAKE CRAWLER 


SOUND DEVELOPMENT 


CLOWN DUNK MATH 


CAR CHASE 


SHOOTOUT 


COCO-ARTIST 


WAR CASTLE 


WORD GAME 


ALPHA MISSION 


SUPER MANSION ADVENTURE 


FIND UTILITY 


ROBOT COMMAND 


SKY FIRE 


SCREEN REVERSE 


DOS ENHANCER 


SLOT MACHINE GIVE AWAY 


CYBORG INS. 


TEST SCREEN PRINT 


EASY BASIC 


AUTO COPY 


KNOCK OUT 


TEXT BUFFER 


CYBORG FACES 


HIGH RESOLUTION TEXT 


DOTS 3-D 


RAT ATTACK 


HAUNTED HOUSE 


TUNNEL RUN 





SUPER SAVINGS 

Single Issue $ 8.00 ea. 

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6-10 Issues $ 5.00 ea. 

11 or more Issues $ 4.50 ea. 

All 80 Issues $220.00 

Purchase 20 or more issues and 
receive a free 6 month subscription. 



Every Issue Contains 
10 or More Programs 
Many Machine Language 
Programs 

Available for COCO I, Hand 
All Programs Include 
Documentation 



• We send 
1 st Class 
No Charge 

* Personal 
Checks 
Welcome! 



RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 



BLOWOUT 



lOOUt W^Q, JHN. ISdU 


iCCIIE £Rft AMR iQPR 
(OOUt SF3U, MUU. ISOD 


ICCMC i*x7 MAD 10R7 

looUt fruf, fVlHn, lao/ 


ICCIIC iftRJ HPT 10(17 
IobUt 704, UUI. 190/ 


ICCIIC 471 MAV 10RQ 
ibdUt #1 1| IYIAY 130O 


ni ICI (MP PAMMflMC 

UUbLINu LANNUNd 


Dl ICIMCCC IMWrMTDDV 

bUoUvtbb iNVfcNIUnY 


1 Hb oAKbHY 


bAHUblN rLAN 1 b 


burbn LUI IU 


WATER COST 


D & D ARENA 


ENCHANGED VALLEY ADV. 


FORT KNOX 


RQBOT ADVENTURE 


ZIGMA EXPERIMENT 


DISK CLERK 


SAFE KEEPER 


ELECTRONICS FORMULAS 


MAZE 


1 It | FA | A It | j^l | I ^\ VA K A 

MUSICAL CHORDS 


FXSX «x i k FX I 4 P* t i 

PC SURVEY 


WAR 1 


rs ft ■ 1 1 / f i ft i xr i if ps rx A AA 

SNAKE IN THE GRASS 


It ft I (Ttr r A 

YAHTZEE 3 


FA • ^ w A ^A PA A 

SAFE PASSAGE 


^F FX P" a f% 1 i FX F ■ 1 k i | 1 v 

TREASURE HUNT 


pa fx a a Fx fx ft FA a fx ■ r~ 

BOMB DISABLE 


FX 1 * FA ■ P" 1 1 1 ft ■ PX 

CYCLE JUMP 


PXI 1 ft FA P* PX 

PHASER 


PASSWORD SCRAMBLER 


pX FX fx f ^ m a i fx F a t f pa a ^F fx fx 

SCREEN GENERATOR 


PX 1 a ft ■ FX PX 1 ft ft £ ^™ FX 

PIANO PLAYER 


AF AI J FS*ni/ ¥< I XF FX FA 

GEOMETRY TUTOR 


Alia lx fA i% IX 1 A VF 1 A 

SHAPES & PLATES 


GUNFIGHT 


ASTRO SMASH 


>x fa fx f" A fx /x | ipF -r 

SPREAD SHEET 


1 1 a fx F\ 

WIZARD 


A^F A PX k ft t A A A 

STAR WARS 


i/rt/n * r"\ ft itt pa\ f 

KEYPAD ENTRY 


NFL SCORES 


pii at k i a kirl ii tr n 

SLOT MANEUVER 


ai kir rs r» ■ i f* r~ 

GAME OF LIFE 


fi, f" A T" A A A. 1 1 A A ^ J 

ELECTRONICS 14 


STYX GAME 


rx A fx a i /x Tn rx i iik 1 fx 

BARN STORMING 


1 ll 4 1 A 1 FX ft A A "^P" 

LIVING MAZE 


r* i f* rs f Px ps ft 1 1 fa pa 

ELECTRONICS 7 


rA FX a a l AT F" PXt fa FX a ■ FA ^X 1 

PRINTER CONTROL 


ft i at »- fa rtti J p - paat 

PRINTER DIVERT 


ni j a fa j i FX Alir 

SMASH GAME 


Aril riP A AAI 1 

GEM SEARCH 


f" 1 l>SillSr* All II II a xA PS 

FLIGHT SIMULATOR 


MAZE 2 


tCCIIC W-jld CCD 4AQC 

IdSUc 744, Pen. lHob 


ICOIIC MK-i CCDT -tdtttt 

IbbUfc wui, otr 1. lytJo 


IobUt #00, ArnlL iyo/ 


iOCMIC UCC II All 41)01 

IboUc ffob, NOV. 1987 


icciic un*i liilic 4noo 

ISSUt #72, JUNE 19oo 


HOME INVENTORY 


AbbcT MANAuEH 


ACCUUINIb PAYABLE 


TAXMAN 


FLYING OBJECTS 


NINE BALL 


MONEY CHASE 


PRINTER GRAPHICS 


DAISY WHEEL PICTURES 


THREE STOOGES 


PRINTER BEVIEW , 


FISHING CONTEST 


SIMON 


CHILDSTONE ADVENTURE 


HOSTAGE 


■ rA i fa P»k ft ^* ■ 1 P* ft i AT i ' ■ r~. r~" 

EXPLORER ADVENTURE 


RIP OFF 


rx ft ■ i r* i i A 1 fx i ■ pa i Kr rx 

PANELING HELPER 


SIR EGGBERT 


PROGRAM TRIO 


fa w\ a ft ■ * f* i * ■ ^ fa fa fa • i 

SPANISH LESSONS 


1 I a a 1 PX F^ P» F" 

HAND OFF 


a ai il T" I px ft i s r» fx 

MULTI CAKES 


FX PX rfA I I r L i FX ■ ■ p» f^ 

CROWN QUEST 


GLADIATOR 


a r \ «a fa r* 1 k pa ^ 

CROSS FIRE 


rx 1 in APT F" ^ 

BUDGET 51 


FX ft PA PX ft FA F" 

CAR RACE 


FA \ / ft a ni i i i i a 

GYM KHANA 


1 1 FX A FX ft ft I FK ■ ■ , 

US & CAN QUIZ 


PA Aba fx a i i ^™ pa 

RAM SAVER 


1 1 A A 1 >"s a px 

VAN GAR 


F J r- FX*T" PX FX ft ■ 1 PS FA 1 

ELECTRONICS 1 


PA FX FA J*X A ' PX PX a ft L ft ft*- FX 

COCO 3 DRAWER 


1 F FX FX ft PX PX V / 

JEOPARDY 


/■a pv At/ i a r> \ / 

GRAY LADY 


r\rtO P*allll ATAA 

DOS EMULATOR 


r> A T"Y'I V T A ill/ 

BATTLE TANK 


r A As*n a i k 

FOOTBALL 


r* i p" rs TP rs A A 1 1 a a j ™ 

ELECTRONICS 1^ 


IA\/ATtAl/ rtlni |T 

JOYSTICK fNPUT 


k |FI 1 nini/ 

MEM DISK 


DISKETTE VERIFY 


p" i p* fa at rs FX ft 1 1 PS PS Fi 

ELECTRONICS 8 


A PS FS /X pi fa ps i a I T* 

COCO 3 PRINT 


COSMIC SWEEPER 


VARIABLE REFERENCE 


l a lr* i rx p*v <x 

WEIRDO 


Ai lAn 

CHOP 


AXIS P Art A ft ft AI III iA A TT A A 

CTTY COMMUNICATOR 




ICQIIC HKO HfT 1QRK 
IOoUl ffOt, Uui. 190D 


IQQ1IF 4x0 MAV 10R7 

lobut f?wy, mHT iao/ 


icciic wfiR ncr 10Q7 

lObUC rFDD, Utb. 190/ 


ICCIIC «71 fill V 10QQ 
IbbUt ff/J, JULT laOo 


iNLUMt rnUrtnlY MuMl. 


APPnilMTC DCPtTIWAQI C 

AUUUUrvIo HtLtlVAbLt 


otNbULUbY 


UIMb HUUM AUvblvlUnb 


rUnblbN UbJbUlb 


ELECTRONIC BILLBOARD 2 


WORKMATE SERIES 


HOME PLANT SELECTION 


0S9 TUTORIAL 


CHESS FUNDAMENTALS 


MOUNTAIN BATTLE 


CALENDAR 


CHECK WRITER 


RIVER CAPTAIN 


WATERFOWL QUIZ 


T-i i r~ ri aI »t 

THE FIGHT 


t| It J a A| fx k I 

INVASION 


■ if i mrnAI ir 

HELIRESCUE 


fa fs i i ft i rs prrr ATis 

SOUND EFFECTS 


1 ft II 1 A 1 I I 1 \ / A 

WHAMMY 3 


COCO KEENO 


THE TRIP ADVENTURE 


r v ft fx fx FX ■ ft 

KABOOM 


PA P - I . FX PA FX FX 1 

BETTING POOL 


ft FX ft iFkl API ft FX F T| I tA PX 1 ft 1 

ADVENTURE TUTORIAL 


HOCKEY 


f- f\ FX XT" FX A /*> r* 

FOOT RACE 


i l p* 1 ft r FX FX ft i /x 

NEW PONG 


A rSi It ki AT* 

ADVANCE 


ai rs ai r* A 

CIRCLE 3 


t /A *\ k fa * | |—i * 1 | I - n l 1 o 

LOGICAL PATTERNS 


p*i i rx rx w Ti ir or* • i 

FLIPPY THE SEAL 


AnAAJ i r* fc T" 

CROQUET 


lift XT | 1 AT ft Ai P— a 

MATH TABLES 


r- fx * IPS A *T*I A h 1 A 1 TAlA 

EDUCATIONAL TRIO 


hi i-i a ■ p" n /a pa ppii 

ON SCALE SCREEN 


^AAPPkl /*» A 1 Ai il k VAPl 

SCREEN CALCULATOR 


n 111 A*rtA k l I/fI/ia 

FUNCTION KEYS 


r* i r~ a *r* AAA 1 1A rs /a 

ELECTRONICS 9 


uiAiYr i i pa r* rs i x** A PS 

WRITE-UP EDITOR 


1 In r PS y « i pm nn 

LIBERTY SHIP 


A PA 1 F fx 1 1 II FX FX IX 

ABLE BUILOERS 


ZOOM 


k FXk ft 1 F PX AF FA 1 I fa PX F** FX 

LOWER TO UPPER 


PA t ATI IISp A a A i > P" r*v 

PICTURE PACKER 


SINGLE STEP RUN . 


1^1 IIAPiA P* FX PX FX FX /X 

SUPER ERR0R2 


P* 1 r FX AF rX A 1 1 FX PX Fk 

ELECTRONICS 2 


N010S 


A I A A 1 1 a PAl t 

AIR ATTACK 


IQCIIF HAR ADDIf HOOK 
lodUc #40, ftrnIL iSoD 


lOOUt ffOi}, NUV. I9DD 


IbbUt ffDU, JUMt 130/ 


ICCIIC -ttRI 1AM 1QQQ 

ibbut frO/, jan. lyoo 


icciic ui a iiii Ai ict -iona 
looUt ff/4. AUuUal laiJo 


brtUIAL fcvtNIb ntlvllnL'tn 


UUnb MLL 


JUd bub 1 INu 


a i mm I IDDADV 

AUUIU LlbnAnY 


i/mcn patai np q 
VlUbU UAIALUb o 


DISK LOCK 


LUCKY MONEY 


LABELS 


SAVE THE EARTH 


ONE EYE WILLIE 


SMALL BUSINESS MANAGER 


COOKIES ADVENTURE 


CATCH A CAKE 


WEIGHTS ANO MEASURES 


JAVA 


BOMB RUN 


a I 1 FA P" 1 tOT 

NICE LIST 


/X FX PS /S, ft ft A ~TT PX 1 I 

COCO MATCH 


i ai ft i a v A Ah at! i rx r* A 

LOW RES PICTURES 


a * ft ■ r~ t~ rx i a 

GAME TRIO 


IT fc » I Ip**a 

TANKS 


•*> FX A 1 llAl t /X ■ | (•ttp pX 

.. SPANISH QUIZZES 


PX FX PX AY FX 

ROBOTS 


i ft r fx fx px pa pa i i a i «pf fx 

WORD COUNTER 


FX PA ft FA ft 1 ft 1 1 AF ft i r a PXPX ft PX PX 

CRIONAUT WARRIOR 


AT ft pa* nITA 

TAR PITS 


PV k Ik 1 ~P* f*~ FX 1 "t*FX PA. 

,: PAINT EDITOR 


fx px x 1 rx ft j** p" rx /x 

STREET RACERS 


PA a FX ft PX ft ¥ 

BACARAT 


^— | it ■ w | FX ft^ px PX ft ft ( ^F 

ENVELOPE PRINT 


#A « h r rt 1 1 I*" 

BASEBALL 


fS A IHl ir* FX ft i /S FX I k t FX P" PX . 

CARVERN CRUISER. 


r% FXk ft 1 k 1 ft I FX #X . 

BOWLING 3 


pa a 1' t 1 p* A i i f px 

BATTLE SHIP 


px ft ft m pxpxit If fa 

RAM DRIVE 3 


\ ■ i la a fA *A P*» Pi a API FA a 1 PA ■ ■ IflA 

NUMBER RELATIONSHIPS 


' #X 1 1 t rx r\ i i P\*f* i 

SNAP SHOT 


ELECTRONICS 3 


ELECTRONICS 10 


MODE 2 UTILITY 


ROULETTE 


ft a pk FX a yx ft FX JP« 

MEGA RACE 


GRAFIX 


TAPE CONVENIENCE 


XMODEM TRANSFER 


fa i X** ft"A a 1 ' *- fa t FA PA 

GLOBAL EDITOR 


i . t FX IF 1 ' FX *■ k k y 

KICK GUY 


KRON 


PENQUIN 


CAVE It- 


1CCHIC UA1 MAV iOfift 


iobUt ff04, utu. lytfo 


ICCIIC il II V 10R7 
looUt ffDl, JULY 1907 


ionic »ico ccd 1000 
ISSUt wbot rbb. lyoo 


ICCIIC itIK CCDT ftQDO 

ISSUt ff/O, StPT. 1300 


^UDICTRAAC 1 ICT • 

LHnlalMftb Lib! 


JUd LUb 


til UHUbH 


LUINrlLb 


flDAPlll A Ul IMT 

UnALULA HUNT 


BLACK HOLE 


PEGS 


SUBMISSION WRITER 


WORD COUNTER 


HELP TRIO 


PITCHING MANAGER 


DIGITAL SAMPLING 


KEYS ADVENTURE 


SQUIRREL ADVENTURE 


SHOWDOWN DICE 


ni d ■ an af\ i i ' Iff 

SYMBOLIC DIFF. 


k 1 kk 1 FX I F* A PX k >Fk 1 "T* k 1 FX ^ 

JUNGLE ADVENTURE 


■ ft i a ■ ■ rx ft pa r~ i"k 

WALLPAPER 


ft PXP" ft A FA fx P* f\ 

AREA CODES 


AF a Pa *X ft PX -J ft FX k |F> i AP 

TARZAR 1 ADVENTURE 


BUG SPRAY 


FA ft I ft IT FX #Xi FX FX PA 

PAINT COCO 3 


FX 1 IPX PX PA P™ PX A *X ft ft 1 ft ft ft I PA 

CHOPPER COMMAND 


px rx ft i ft i px A l/r px 

DRAW POKER 


ft PX ft ft eft 1 PA ft ■ 

ARAKNON 


f\ m . , i FX F* FA a FS^ 1 ■ J F* 

OWARE CAPTURE 


CONVERT 3 


1 t a 1 PX P* PX PS AF A ft ■ PX 1 ft I FX FX PX fX FX #X t^F F PS 

UNDERSTANDING OPPDSITES 


X** 1 1 FX AF 1 P" FX ft AF FX 

TURTLE RACES 


fa ft PA I ipi fx* a ft rx P~ »» FS pxxr*i a ■ PX 

CASHFLOW REPORTING 


EASY GRAPHICS 


^A a ft FX 1 1 AP l™~ FX ^t F PX P* 

COMPUTER TYPE 


f% k ^F PA ^X PX F* PX 1 FX ■ j * i | FA 

BIT CODE PLOTTING 


F * ^ PAXF PX FX ft 1 1 FX FA J _ft 

ELECTRONICS 11 


fa a« a PA ft 1 ft FN I P* Aft^ >f F* FX 

GRAPHIC LETTER 


F^k F" P* P4 T k FX 1 J FX a 1 ^ m k i 

DESERT JDURNEY 


px a a i *a f" PX ^f ft k ii i fx 

PANZER TANKS 


F 1 P* FX PX FA ft I ft FA FX ft 

ELECTRONICS 4 


ft a ■ ■ ft *^™l A FX p" a i 

MULTI SCREEN 


^•w p^ a a« 1 ft ft FX F PX tXFPX FX 

GRAPHIC EDITOR 


SCREEN CONTROL 


A ft PX fX FA A /X 

MRS PAC 


■ y k ft I FX P«F AF 

KING PEDE 


A A ft i A ft ■ A A 1 A IT 

CANON PRINT 


ft PX FX FX F** FA FX .'PA FA'PX ft F 

ADDRESS BOOK 


f— i ii | p» n M FX FX a if AA a AP 

FULL ERROR MESSAGE 


PX 4 FA ft kft k B ft 

BIG NUM 


RAIDER 


FX FA A FX ' *PF a ■ ft 1 1 FX 

COCO TENNIS 


SQUARES . <: . 

,- /> ;i..-.*.V.- 


ICCIIE #AR II IMP 10PR 

looUt #4o, June isoD 


ICCIIC #CC 1AM 1007 
IboUt ffOD, JAN, laO/ 


ICCIIC URO AIIR 10P7 

looUt tFDc, auu. iyo/ 


ICCIIC MAD 10QO 

IbbUb ifm, MAH. lyoo 


ipclir nnr -tilOD 

ISSUE #7o, OCT. 1988 


PUCCTCD 


pdai*ic onni/ 
bnAUt tJUUK 


□ChlCIDhl tiH AKlAPCIUCMT 

rbNblUN MANAbblvlbN I 


Drtl IPC PAflCT 

rULILb uAUbl 


CI IDCD Dl IT"7 Q 

bUrbn dLIIZ 3 


TV SCHEDULE 


MAIL LIST 


HERB GROWING 


STAMP COLLECTION 


CHAMBERS 


BASE RACE 


DOWN HILL 


CATOLOGER UTILITY 


BARRACKS ADVENTURE 


TRIO RACE 


n Ak i a k i in ik ir n ji i a 

ROMAN NUMERALS 


ptnr* F-FX \_j 

FIRE FOX 


rx a i rs r* rx rx 

RAIDERS 


CITY/TIME 


r* a at i i t rs A A A r* A 

EARTH TROOPER 


.("if rx / \ FX FX 1^ /\ ^ 

ASTRO DODGE 


1 1 1 1 T 1 fX FX FX ft ■ TP PX FX I 

JETS CONTROL 


A 1 |— > lift PS P" X™ |xii > px 

ALPHABETIZING 


111 1 A 1 A A AAA 

HI-LO/CRAPS 


«x -r a px a a p* 

STARGATE 


HIRED ANO FIRED 


GALLOWS 


U.F.O. 


OLYMPICS 


BOWLING SCORE KEEP 


MULTI COPY 


DIR MANAGER 


ELECTRONICS 5 


HI-RES CHESS 


JOYSTICK TO KEYBOARD 


AUTO MATE 


FIRE RUNNER 


RAMBO ADVENTURE 


ELECTRONICS 12 


KEYBOARD TO JOYSTICK 


SCROLL PROJECT 


GRAPHICS BORDER 


BLOCKS 


DOUBLE EDITOR 


OISK TUTORIAL 


NOISE GENERATOR 


COSMIC RAYS 


MULTI SCREEN CAVES 


DOUBLE BREAKOUT 


SAILORMAN 


IfkOiir iiiA nil v/ -4nnr 

ISSUE #49, JULY 19B6 


IbSUE #56, FEB. 1987 


lOftkllF jiCri npnr JAM1 

ISSUE #63, SEPT. 1987 


lAAllP |i*aa PA aVntxkil J AAA 

ISSUE #70, APRIL 1986 


ISSUE #77, NOV. 1988 


«X 1 a PX 1 IXP I - FX A jX 1 1 

COMPUTER I.O.U. 


fx a ■ pv ■- * rx a~ Fx pa fx a a I ^f 

CALENDAR PRINT 


FX a 1 *™ v~» ft rX ^X 1 ^F 1 1 I FA / — FX 

GENEOLOGIST HELPER 


PA 1 FA .IAI FA PX J PX 

BLOTTO DICE 


PA FA 1 I FA ^ m FX a PA P* 1 ^ 1 ■ a #x 

POLICE CADET #2 


DISK DISASSEMBLER 


- ; CRUSH 


SMART COPY 


SUPER COM 


STARSHIP SHOWDOWN 


BAKCHEK 


GALACTA 


MAINTENANCE REPORTING 


GENESIS ADVENTURE 


MUSIC COMPOSER 

1 V 1 VF XF 1 V* Vf If II XF 1 1 


PACHINKO 


OCEAN DIVER 


C0C03-C0C0 2 HELPER 


PLANETS 


COUPONS/REBATES 


STOCK CHARTING 


CLUE SUSPECT . 


OIRECTORY PICTURE 


PHK/WAR 


PROGRAM LIBRARY 


HAUNTED STAIRCASE 


WORO EDITOR 


SUB ATTACK 


SIGN LANGUAGE 


BOY SCOUT SEMAFORE 


CANYON BOMBERS 


ALIEN HUNT 


SAVE THE MAIDEN 


ARX SHOOTOUT 


HOUSEHOLD CHORES 


DRAGONS 1 & 2 


DEMON'S CASTLE 


CAVIATOR 


ELECTRONICS 13 


MAXOMAR ADVENTURE 


GRAPHIC SCROLL ROUTINE 


PICTURE DRAW 


ELECTRONICS 6 


MAGIC KEY 


CHUCK LUCK 3 


AUTO. BORDER 


DIG 


MONKEY SHINE 

, ' - - ', - ; " *** ' „ 


SNAP PRINT 


BUZZARD BATE 




MAIL TO: 


i Name 




CIF 



ISSUE #78, DEC, 1988 

POLICE CADET #3 

TANK TURRET 

WAR OF THE WORLOS 

SPINSTER CAFE 

COCO SIZE 

SIGN MAKER 

LEGAL DEDUCTIONS 

BOOKKEEPING 

CAR LEASE 3 

WAREHOUSE MUTANTS 

ISSUE #79, JAN. 1989 

POLICE CADET #4 
POKER 3 
TILER TEX 
BATTLE 
INSIDE THE COCO 
COCO B,B.S 4 . 
HOT OIRECTORY 
VCR TUTORIAL 
PRINTER CONTROLLER 
THE KING 

ISSUE #80, FEB, 1989 

SCRABBLE 
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MINI GOLF 3 
ULTIMATE TERMINAL 3 
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- -^Ti 




: 


— 

r 1007 .... 






........ 28 






173 




1025 .... 


...... 145 




1034 .... 


205 










1050 .... 


...... 188 















10 REM HECONOMY 

20 REM START ADDRESS 18432 (4800) 

30 REM END ADDRESS 20479 (4FFF) 

40 FOR X=18432 TO 20479 

50 READ A$ 

60 A$="&H"+A$ 

70 POKE X,VAL(A$) 

80 NEXT X 

1000 DATA FF,FF,FF,FF,FF,FF,FF,F 
F , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , 
FF , FF , FF , FF , FF /FF /FF, FF , FF , FF , FF 

1001 DATA FF,FF,FF,FF,FF,FF,FF, F 
F , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , 
FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF, FF , FF , FF , FF , FF 

1002 DATA FF,FF,FF,FF, FF,FF,FF,F 
F , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , 
FF, FF, FF, FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF 

1003 DATA FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , F 
F , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , 
FF, FF, FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF 

1004 DATA FF, FF, FF, FF, FF, FF, FF, F 
F , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , 
FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF 

1005 DATA FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , F 
F , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , 
FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF 

1006 DATA FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , F 
F , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , 
FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF 

1007 DATA FF, FF, FF , FF, FF, FF f FF,F 
F , FF > FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , 
FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF 

1008 DATA FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , F 
F , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , 
FF , FF, FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF 

1009 DATA FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , F 
F , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , 
FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF 

1010 DATA FF, FF, FF, FF, FF, FF,FF, F 
F , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , 
FF , FF , FF, FF, FF, FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF 

1011 DATA FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , F 
F , FF; FF, FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , 
FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF 

1012 DATA FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , F 
F , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , 



FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF 

1013 DATA FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , F 
F , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , 
FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF 

1014 DATA FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , F 
F , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , 
FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF 

1015 DATA FF, FF, FF, FF, FF, FF, FF, F 
F , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , 
FF, FF, FF, FF,FF, FF, FF, FF, FF, FF, FF 

1016 DATA FF, FF, FF, FF, FF, FF, FF, F 
F, FF, FF, FF, FF, FF, FF, FF, FF, FF, FF, 
FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF 

1017 DATA FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , F 
F , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , 
FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF 

1018 DATA FF, FF, FF, FF, FF, FF, FF, F 
F, FF, FF, FF, FF, FF, FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , 
FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF 

1019 DATA FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , F 
F , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , 
FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF 

1020 DATA FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , F 
F , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , 
FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF 

1021 DATA FF, FF, FF, FF, FF, FF, FF, F 
F , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , 
FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF 

1022 DATA FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , F 
F , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , 
FF , FF , FF, FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF 

1023 DATA FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , F 
F , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , 
FF , FF , FF , FF , FF, FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF 

1024 DATA FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , F 
F , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , 
FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF 

1025 DATA FF, FF, FF, FF, FF, FF, FF, F 
F , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , 
FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF 

1026 DATA FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , F 
F , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , 
FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF 

1027 DATA FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , F 
F , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , 
FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF 

1028 DATA FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , F 
F , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , 
FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF 

1029 DATA FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , F 
F , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , 
FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF 

1030 DATA FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , F 
F , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , 
FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF 

1031 DATA FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , F 
F , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , 
FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF 



108 THE RAINBOW June 1989 



1032 DATA FF, FF, FF, FF, FF, FF, FF, F 
F,FF,FF,FF,FF , FF, FF , FF , FF, FF, FF , 
FF, FF, FF, FF, FF , FF , FF, FF , FF, FF , FF 

1033 DATA FF, FF , FF, FF, FF, FF, FF, F 
F, FF, FF, FF, FF, FF, FF, FF , FF,FF , FF, 
FF , FF , FF, FF, FF , FF, FF , FF , FF, FF , FF 

1034 DATA FF, FF, FF, FF, FF, FF, FF, F 
F> FF, FF, FF, FF, FF, FF, FF , FF , FF, FF, 
FF , FF, FF , FF , FF, FF , FF , FF , FF, FF , FF 

1035 DATA FF, FF, FF, FF , FF , FF , FF, F 
F, FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , 
FF , FF , FF, FF , FF , FF, FF, FF , FF, FF , FF 
103 6 DATA FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , F 
F , FF, FF, FF/FF, FF , FF , FF , FF, FF , FF, 
FF, FF, FF, FF, FF , FF, FF , FF , FF, FF, FF 

1037 DATA FF, FF, FF , FF, FF , FF , FF, F 
F, FF, FF, FF, FF, FF, FF , FF ,FF , FF, FF, 
FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF, FF, FF, FF, FF 

1038 DATA FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , F 
F, FF, FF , FF , FF, FF , FF , FF, FF, FF, FF, 
FF, FF , FF, FF, FF , FF, FF, FF, FF, FF , FF 

1039 DATA FF, FF, FF , FF, FF, FF , FF, F 
F, FF, FF, FF,FF, FF, FF, FF, FF, FF, FF, 
FF , FF/FF , 04 , FF , FF , FF, FF , FF , FF , FF 

1040 DATA FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , F 
F,8E,00,4F, 86, 20, 97,02,86 ,50 , 97, 
00 , 8 6 , 12 , 9 7 , 0 3 , 9 7 , 0 1 , 8 6 , 10 , 9 7 , 0 8 

1041 DATA CC ,09,97, DD, 0B, 86 , FF, B 
7,FC ; 02,86,3E,B7,FC,01,B7,FC,03, 
8 6 ,2E, B7 , FC , 01 , B7 ,FC,03,BD, FD, 7 E 

1042 DATA 86,7E,97,23,97,20,CE,F 
E , 74 , DF , 2 1 , FE , FE , D0 , DF , 2 4 , D6 ,02 , 
C4,0C, 54 , 54 , D7, 2F, 26,02 , 8D, 72 , 5A 

1043 DATA 26,0A,8D,6D,86,2F,B7,F 
C, 03, 01, 01, 01, 5A,26,07,8D,71,86, 
2 F , B7 , FC , 0 1 , 5 A , 2 6 , 0A, 8 6 , 2 F , B7 , FC 

1044 DATA 01 ,B7 , FC, 03 , 01 ,0 1 ,5F,C 
E,FC, 80, 3A, A6 ,00 , CE,00 , 50,3 A, A7 , 
00 , 5 C , 8 1 , 0 4 , 2 6 , EF , DF , 2A,CC, FB , FF 

1045 DATA DD,2 6,DD,2C,7F,00,2E,0 

E, 96 , 2F,26 , 1A, 8D, 29 , 96 , 02 , 44 , 25 , 
FB, 8D, 16, 8D, 4E, 8D, 2F,8D, 57 ,24, F6 

1046 DATA 96,02 , 44, 24, F7, 8D,41,2 
0 , E 6 , 3 F , 8 D , 4 9 , 20 , FC , 8 6 , 0 5 , CE , 00, 
00 , 09 , 2 6 , FD , 4A, 2 6 , F7 , 3 9 , CE , FD, C7 

1047 DATA DF, 24, 96, 11, 96, 12, 86,1 
A ,97, 11, 20 , 11, 20 ,0F, CE, FE , 50, DF , 
24 , DF , 2 1 , 9 6 , 11 , 8 6 , 0E , 97 , 11,86, FF 

1048 DATA 97,13,39,FF,FF,FF,FF,F 

F , FF, FF , FF , FF, FF ,FF,C6, 0 5, 96,02, 
84 ,02 ,26,02 , CB,08 , D7, 10, 3 9 , 96,02 

1049 DATA 0D,2B,2C,DE,26,8D,29,D 
F,2A, 01,01, 86, AA ,9 7,22,80, A6 ,96, 
02 , 2B ,16, CC ,00, 4F , DD, 26, 96,02 , 8A 

1050 DATA 40,97,02, 2A, F8 , BD , FD, 4 
4,96, 2F, 27 ,01, 3F,0C, 84 ,AF, 97,02, 
39,08, 8C,FC,00,25,03,CE,00,50,39 

1051 DATA D6,11,96,12,DE,2A,9C,2 



6, 26, 04, C6, 40, 20,0 6,A7, 00, 8D,E4, 
DF , 2 A , 5 8 , 2 A , 0 6 , D 6 , 0 2 , C A , 40 , D7 , 0 2 

1052 DATA 96, 02, 85, 10, 26, 34, DC, 2 
A, C3, 10,00 , 9C, 26 , 25 ,0E, 83 , FB, FF, 
23, 26, C3, 00 ,50, 93 , 26,23 , IF, 20, 04 

1053 DATA 93 ,26, 23, 19,21, FE, 21, F 
C, 8A, 10,97,02 , DC , 26 , C3 ,00 , FF, DD, 
28,83 , FB, F F, 2 3 , 0 5 , C3 , 00 , 50 , DD , 2 8 

1054 DATA 20, 23, 96, 02, 8A, 10, 97,0 
2, DE, 2A,9C , 26, 26,07 ,86, 2 E , B7 , FC, 
01,20, 1C, 96, 02, 84, EF, 97, 02, B6 , FC 

1055 DATA 00,A7,00,BD,FD,BD,DF,2 
A , 9 6 , 2 E ,2 7 , 08 , 7F , 00 , 2 E , 9 6 , 2 F , 2 7 , 
01 , 3 F , 3B ,96 , 11 ,85 ,80, 27, 1C, 9 6,12 

1056 DATA 81 , 13 , 26, 16 , 86 , 0A, 97 , 1 

I , 0E , 96,11, 85 , 80,27, FA, 9 6 , 12, 81, 

II , 26, F4 , 0F ,8 6 ,0E, 97 , 11,20,07 , B6 

1057 DATA FC,02,96,08,96,0D,DE,2 
6 , BD, FD , BD, DF, 2 6 , 9C , 2A, 2 6 , 0F , 09 , 
DF , 2 6, 9 6 ,2F,26 , 04 , 8 6 , 0 A ,97, 1 1 , 97 

1058 DATA 2E,20,38,A6,00,B7 ,FC,0 
2 , D6 , 2 F , 54 , 2 1 , 02 ,97, 1 3,96,0 2 ; 8 5, 
10 , 27 , 2 6 , 54 , 2 5 , 0C , DE, 28 , 9C , 26, 2 2 

1059 DATA ID, 20, 15, 20, 13, 20, 11 ,B 
6 , FC ,00 , DE , 2 A , A7 ,00, BD , FD, BD, DF , 
2A, 86 , 2F,B7 ,FC, 01, 96,02 ,84 , EF, 97 

1060 DATA 02 , BD, FD ,8B , 3B ,8 6 ,11 , 9 
7,08, DC, 09 , C3 , 00, 20 , DD, 0B, 01,21 , 
6E, 21 , 6C , 2 1 , 6A , 2 1 , 68 ,21, 66, 21 , 64 

1061 DATA 21, 62, 21, 60, 21, 5E, 21, 5 
C, 21, 5A, 21, 58, 21, 56, 21, 54, 21, 52, 
21, 50 , 21, 4E , 21, 4C, 21, 4A, 21,48,21 

1062 DATA 46,21,44,21,42,21,40,2 
1 , 3 E ,21 , 3 C , 2 1 , 3 A ,21,38,21,36,21, 
3 4 ,21, 3 2 , 2 1 , 30 , 2 1 , 2 E , 2 1 , 2 C , 2 1 , 2 A 

1063 DATA 21,28,21,26,21,24,21,2 
2, 21, 20, 21, IE, 21, 1C, 21, 1A, 21, 18, 
2 1, 16, 2 1,14, 21, 12, 21, 10, 21, 0E, 21 

1064 DATA 0C,21,0A, 21,08 ,21,06, 2 
1,04 , 21, 02, 21, 00, 21, FE, 21, FC, 21, 
FA, 21, F8 , 21, F6 , 2 1 , F4 ,21, F2 , 2 1, F0 

1065 DATA 21,EE,21,EC,21,EA,21,E 
8,21 , E 6 ,21, E 4 , 2 1 , E2 , 21, E0 , 21 , DE , 
21, DC ,2 1 , DA, 2 1 , D8, 21 , D6, 2 1 , D4 , 21 

1066 DATA D2,21,D0,21,CE,21,CC,2 
1,CA, 21 ,C8 , 21 , C 6 , 2 1 , C4 , 21 , C2 , 2 1 , 
C0 , 2 1 , BE , 21, BC ,2 1 , BA , 2 1 , B8 ,21, B6 

1067 DATA 21,B4,21,B2,21,B0, 21, A 

E, 2 1 , AC, 2 1 , AA , 2 1 ,A8 , 2 1 , A 6 , 2 1 , A4 , 
21, A2 , 21,A0, 21, 9E,21,9C,21, 9A,21 

1068 DATA 98,21,96,21,94,21,92,2 
1,90,21,8E,21,8C,21,8A,21,88,21, 
86 ,21, 84,C3,09,9A,DD,0B,86, 10,97 

1069 DATA 08 , 3B , FF , FF, FF, FF , FF, F 

F , FF, FF , FF , FF , FF , FF, FF , FF , FF,FF, 
FF, FF, FF, FF, FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF , FF 

1070 DATA FF,FF,00,23,FC,90,FC,9 
0 , FE , 7 4 , FE, 2 0 , 00 , 20 , FE ,D1,FC,90 



June 1989 THE RAINBOW 109 




'1 iS c 



s. 





1? 




\30 !-..«• -i'. 




^' : 'l5Pf I 1 '. 1 '-' ' 





110 THE RAINBOW -JLfflfHSBS 




.^fctferlGolpr Computer 
" 3^M-atx>ut ^n^ohing the larger, game file or totals-to-date display. It then 



WMUfj^^^^Y ; t'0tal data and averages in the roster file. adding 'aft gk$E* \ I F staf$ 

The display module prompts you for a for each new city string. 

For optional changes, the pi?tf£pi 

f$t $n$ muc h more expensive reads the necessary file and prints it to the 
"Wli just takes a little more screen. The print module prompts you again 
BrHaps a few more tedious tasks for a game file or totals-to-date. It then 
fej|;ahd program swapping. Thanks reads the necessary file and prints a report 
j&erful basic; it does some things with an abbreviated name and all the proper 

statistics. The roster review module prints 
Ifferttiy, I decided to use the CoCo to the full name, address and phone number of 

ttistics on my softball team. I shopped each player to the screen. 
^Stics programs but found most were An accessory program, COPYFILE (List- 



mm 



D I Mensioned to allow a maximum rp$t#j 
20 players. (Our local city softball )^ 
allows only 20 players on a roster,) If , 
need a longer roster, change all the bl'MeJi 
sion statements to reflect the number 
need. (Notice that all these programs at? 
01 Mensioned the same, so any change iL 
one program should be repeated in an^ 
other program used.) If you are going 



|i|tiicjus statistics. We play softball for ing 6), can be used to keep a backup copy of keep the statistics for more than one teartii 



keep our statistics for fun too. So I your data disk on a one-drive system. The 

ffy$unStats. I used it to keep the offen- program prompts you first to choose a 

Statistics for our softball team, the roster file or a game file to copy. If you 

fyloes, last season. It was not entirely choose to copy a game file, it then prompts 

Exiting and debugging the program, you for a game number if necessary. The 

f It/was enjoyable to pass out stat sheets proper file is read into an array and you are 

peryone. prompted to place the destination disk in 

: £<fm$tats is not just one but several the drive. It then stores the chosen file on 

learns. I started out making it just one the new disk. (A note to JDOS and other 

igram, but it kept growing until there enhanced-DOSusersrYoudon'tneedCOPY- 

2't eftough memory for efficient string F.I LE and all the other programs to work as 

ations, of which it has many. well in JDOS as Disk basic. 

SfpJhe basic functions are covered by the Another accessory program, RSTRFXR 

$ms, FUN STATS (Listing 1) and RSTRMKR (Listing 3), or RoSTeRFiXeR, recalculates 

tpg 2). The other programs accom- the totals for the roster file. While entering 

imperial or unusual functions. a game file, I made a mistake and did not 

pSTOMKRR (RoSTeRMaKeR) is used at discover it in time to correct it. The first 

!$iftof the season to set up the roster as time I used it, I realized that I could use 



you may want to change the word ROSTER 
Line 190 to identify the team. Again, notioji* 
that all the programs use the same convenM* 
tions in calling the roster file so that anj^ 



a 



vi; 



change in one program must be repeated iit; 



the other programs. And finally, if you doit 
not want your roster sorted (for instance, tcr| 
keep your roster in accord with the basicVf, 
batting order), you can delete the sort with 1 ; 
out harm to the operation of the program.;? 
To do this, delete lines 3 10 to 390 and the i 
PRINT@12" SORTING" statement from Line § 
300. 

Now save your customized version to &i 
working disk and a backup disk, then typtyj 
RUN and start using it. 

You are first asked for the season. The 
program uses the last two characters you 



s file containing the players ' these same features in a program to prepare enter added to the word RO ST E R to form F 1 $£ ■ 




^access 

$ames, addresses, phone numbers and special files or reports for perhaps a week- 

£tive statistics. It is a direct-access end tournament or a particular month. So I 

ly^ause after each game is entered, the rewrote it to include the special file and 

^'ll^Uriiulative statistics are updated. report printing routines. Til say more about 

■ F U N S T AT S is the real workhorse of the this later. 
^«Mroup. It is used to enter the individual 

f^^^ne files, print or display the statistics for Using the Roster Maker 

jingle game or the totals-to-date, and After you have RSTRMKR typed in, saved 

}'§j/fp&ni 6r display the roster entries. The game to disk and loaded into memory, there are a 

0. - entry module does several things: prompts few things to do before using it. First, go to 

' ' y 0U for the individual performance data, Line 1 60 and change C 1 $ and C 2 $ to the city 

calculates the averages, stores the data and names you will be using, remembering to 

averages for a game in a sequential file, limit the city, state and ZIP entry to no more 

updates the performance totals, recalcu- than 20 characters. CI $ and C2$ are simply 

lates the total averages, and restores the shortcuts so that the same city name does 

not have to be typed many times. If you 

wish, you can eliminate their use entirely 

by deleting lines 160 and 270, and deleting 

Delbert Baker is an analytical chemist for 12 INPUT from Line 260 so the program 

the U.S. Bureau of Mines. FunStats repre- responds only to a string input. You may 

sents an encounter between two of his fa* also add more cities by defining more strings, 

vorite hobbies. adding to the prompt on Line 260, and 



which is then used to name the roster file, 
(The roster file is called using Fl $ and use^ 
Buffer 2 in these programs.) 

Next, you are prompted for player infor- 
mation < — the player's first and last name, 
address, city, state, ZIP and phone number. 
There is room for 24 characters of first and 
last name; 30 characters of address; 20 
characters of city, state and ZIP code; and 
eight characters (including the hyphen) of 
the phone number. 

When finished entering players, type 
ST0 P and press enter to end the session and 
move on to the sort. STOP must be typed in 
capital letters because there is a programmed 
SHiFT-0 when entering players so that low- 
ercase letters can be used in the printout. 

Next, you are prompted to select the 
screen or disk for output or to quit. Select- 
ing the screen produces a three-at-a-time 
display of player information just entered 
and then returns you to the prompt when 




7/ 

ft 



June 1989 THE RAINBOW 111 



finished. Selecting Disk stores the roster 
file on the working disk and again on the 
backup disk. Finally, selecting Quit closes 
the file and exits to basic. 

Now you are ready to go on to FUN - 
STATS. 

Using FunStats 

Once FUNSTATS is in memory, go to 
lines 1080, 1090, 5040 and 5050 and change 
the word BUFFALOES to your own team 
name. The team name is part of the pro- 
gram so you don't have to type it in every 
time you enter a game. It is not stored with 
any of the disk files. 

Next, if you changed the word RO ST E R in 
RSTRMKR, go to Line 280 and change the 
word ROSTER to the same thing. If you 
don't, the program will go looking for a file 
called ROSTER — and won't find it. If you 
changed the DIM statements in RSTRMKR, go 
to lines 170 to 240 and change those DIM 
statements also. For the two DIMensional 
arrays, the first is the number of players, the 
second is the number of statistics entries for 
each player. U, SU$ and SA$ are temporary 
variables used in the program and are D I M - 
ensioned to match the number of statistics 
entries. 

Save your customized program to both a 
working and backup disk.Type RUN and 
press enter . Now we'll go into actually 
using FUNSTATS, module by module. 

The first FUNSTATS module is the game 
entry module, reached by selecting 1 from 
the menu. The screen is cleared and you are 
asked for a game number, the name of the 
opposing team, whether your team is the 
home team or not, the number of runs 
scored by each team, and the game date. 
The game number and the last two charac- 
ters of the game date are added to GN to 
name the file in which the data for the game 
is kept. The game number can go as high as 
9999 and still leave enough room to make 
a valid file name. Once this data is entered, 
the file is opened and the data recorded. The 
program then moves to the entry of the 
actual player performance data. 

The player data entry section uses the 
abbreviated name strings found when the 
program was started. These appear on the 
screen one by one along with prompts for 
the individual data items. The first prompt 
you see asks if this player played in this 
game. A "yes" answer moves you on through 
the prompts in a normal manner for data 
entry. A "no" answer enters a zero value for 
all data and calculation items and moves 
you on to the next player. Now on to data 
prompts. 

The first prompt is AT BATS (not OFFI- 
CIAL AT BATS). The program uses it as plate 
appearances and makes corrections to it for 
the calculations. The next prompt, RUNS, 



tells how many times a player has scored, 
while HITS (in our league), records a hit 
anytime a runner gets on base without a 
walk. (See the end of this section to find out 
how to account for errors and fielders choice 
entries.) The remaining prompts are WALKS , 
followed by DO U B L E S, T R I P L ES , H OM E RS and 
SACS (sacrifice flies). They are self- 
explanatory. RB I records the runs batted in, 
while TIMES ENOED INNING is a source of 
curiosity. We keep this statistic because 
errors and fielders' choices are ignored in 
our league. 

That completes the entered data items. 
The final three statistics are calculated items: 
the batting, on base and slugging average. 

Since we don't keep any data on errors 
and fielders' choices, none of these calcu- 
lations take them into account. The batting 
average is the number of hits divided by the 
quantity derived from subtracting the 
number of walks and number of sacrifices 
from the number of plate appearances. The 
on-base average is the number of hits plus 
number of walks divided by the number of 
plate appearances minus number of sacri- 
fices. The slugging average is the average 
number of bases gained per hit, calculated 
by adding the number of hits, doubles, 
twice the number of triples, and three times 
the number of homers together and divid- 
ing the result by the number of hits. This 
yields a slugging average between one and 
four. 

That completes the statistics items for an 
individual player. At this point the player's 
abbreviated name string, indicating whether 
a player played in the game, and a string 
composed of the individual statistics is 
written into the game file. The program 
then updates the total stats string in the 
roster file and restores it there, then goes on 
to the next player. The program keeps a 
count of the players and automatically exits 
the entry section when it runs out of them. 

Occasionally while entering data, the 
program seems to hang up. However, it is 
just cleaning up its string-handling over- 
head and will be back momentarily. 

Now let's talk about keeping track of 
errors and fielders' choices for those of you 
who are more serious than we are. The 
easiest way to keep track of them is to 
combine them into one data item (for ex- 
ample, E&FC) and to substitute that item 
for the ended innings (EI) item. It is then a 
simple matter to edit the calculations on 
lines 1190 to 1210 and 1330 to 1350 to 
reflect their use if desired. Of course you 
can keep track of them without using them 
in your calculations. This way your aver- 
ages seem higher too. 

Another way to keep track of errors and 
fielders' choices is to keep them as separate 
data items. This is more difficult unless you 



don't mind wasting half a sector on each 
roster file entry by using it to store three 
bytes. 

The roster file is set up to use 128 bytes 
for each record, or half of a sector. To 
maintain this and add the necessary vari- 
ables, I suggest using the ended innings 
variable for one and create another by snatch- 
ing three bytes from the name and address 
fields. This increases the number of statis- 
tics kept on each player from thirteen to 
fourteen. You must reDIMension those ar- 
rays that include the statistics entries. 

Then go to lines 1 190 to 1210 and lines 
1330 to 1350 and alter the calculations to 
your satisfaction. Lines 1220 to 1290 and 
lines 1360 to 1430 must be reworked to 
concatenate all the data items into a single 
string. Don't forget to edit the FIELD state- 
ments on lines 1075 and 6020 and on Line 
520 of RSTRMKR. 

1 chose to assemble the individual stats 
into one long string for the disk files be- 
cause I dreaded the idea of thirteen separate 
CVN statements, followed by 17 separate 
LSET statements, to build the file. As it 
turned out, it probably would have been 
easier. 

This completes the discussion of the 
game entry module of FUNSTATS. The rest 
of the program is much simpler and straight- 
forward. 

The second FUNSTATS module is the game 
or totals display reached by selecting 2 
from the main menu. When selected, the 
screen is cleared and you are prompted to 
choose whether you want to see a game file, 
the totals-to-date, or return to the main 
menu. If you choose to view a game, you 
are then prompted to enter a game number. 
The proper game file is then read into the 
computer and the statistics displayed, player 
by player, on the screen in a format very 
similar to the input screen. 

If you choose to view the totals-to-date, 
the screen is cleared and you are prompted 
to enter the date. Entering the date is op- 
tional and you may simply press enter. The 
statistics are then displayed, player by player, 
on the screen, again in a format similar to 
the input screen. Finally, if you choose the 
main menu, it is whisked back onto the 
screen. 

The third F U N ST AT S module is the report- 
printing routine, reached by selecting 3 
from the main menu. When selected, the 
screen is cleared and you are prompted to 
choose a game report, a statistics-to-date 
report, a roster listing, or to return to the 
main menu. If you choose to print a game 
report, the screen is cleared and you are 
prompted for a game number. The entered 
game number is then checked in memory 
and if not there, the proper game file is read 
into the computer. You are then prompted 



112 THE RAINBOW June 1989 



to make sure the printer is on and the paper 
positioned. The report is headed by the 
game number, the home team and visiting 
team's score, and the date the game was 
played. Then a label header is printed, 
followed by the individual players' abbre- 
viated name strings and statistics entries. 

If you choose to print a statistics-to-date 
report, the screen is cleared and you are 
prompted for a date. The date is optional 
but highly recommended. You are then 
prompted to check that the printer is on and 
paper positioned. The report is labeled as a 
totals report and the rest printed in the same 
format as the game report. Our team had 
thirteen players, and I found it possible to 
put two game reports and a totals report on 
one page. 

When printing a roster listing, the screen 
is cleared and you are prompted again to 
check the printer and paper. A simple list- 
ing of the name, address and phone number 
of each player is then printed. When you are 
finished, choose the main menu. 

The fourth and final section of FUNSTATS 
is the roster review module, reached by 
selecting 4 from the main menu. When 
selected, the screen is cleared and ROSTER 
LISTING is printed at the top of the screen. 
Then the name, address and phone number 
of each player is printed to the screen, three 
players at a time. The module automati- 
cally returns to the main menu when out of 
players. 

Two other modules to FUNSTATS are 
subroutines called by the program that can't 
be accessed from the menu. The first opens 
and reads in a game file and passes the 
statistics string. The second opens and reads 
in the roster file and is called by the pro- 
gram before a menu selection can be made. 

For those who have a 16K system and 
might want to break FUNSTATS into separate 
programs, be sure to include the proper file- 
input subroutines with the modules that 
require them. 

Accessory Programs 

Perhaps I missed something, but I 
couldn't get Disk basic to perform a single- 
drive copy operation. So I wrote COPYFI LE 
for when I am working in Disk basic. If you 
are using JDOS don't bother to use the 
COPY FILE program. 

As mentioned already, if you made any 
changes in the OIMension statements, the 
file-naming methods, or the roster file fields 
in the other programs, also make those 
changes in this program. 

When running COPYFI LE, you are first 
prompted to copy a roster file, game file or 
to quit. When you choose to copy a roster or 
game file, you are then prompted for the 
necessary file identification and the file is 
read into memory. The program assumes 



that the source disk is the one in the drive. 
You are then prompted to place the destina- 
tion disk in the drive, and the file is written 
to it. When the write operation is done, you 
are sent back to the initial prompt. 

Now we come to RSTRFXR (RoSTeR- 
FiXeR). If you keep a backup disk or never 
make mistakes while entering a game file, 
you won't need to use this program. Again, 
if you made any changes to the previous 
programs, you need to repeat them for this 
program. 



"Games are identified 
solely by their number, 
and the program is 
configured to accomo- 
date a season consisting 
of consecutively 
numbered games." 



The program first prompts for the sea- 
son, then reads in the roster file and finds 
the abbreviated name strings. It prompts 
for a starting and ending game number — 
if you are repairing a botched roster file, 
enter 1 for the starting game number, with 
the last game entered correctly as the end- 
ing game number. When preparing a spe- 
cial report, enter the number of the first 
game included in the report as the starting 
game number and the last game included in 
the report as the ending game number. 

The program then reads in the respective 
game files and uses the data to construct a 
new total statistics array. As you may have 
concluded by now, games are identified 
solely by their number, and the program is 
configured to accomodate a season consist- 
ing of consecutively numbered games. 

When the new totals have been calcu- 
lated, you are prompted to save the new 
array as the roster file or a special file or to 
send it to the printer. To save it as the roster 
file, the array reconstructs the total statis- 
tics string and is stored to disk as the roster 
file. To save the data as a special file, you 
are prompted for a name of eight or less 
characters, and the total statistics strings 
are rebuilt from the array and stored on the 
disk in the roster file format, under the new 
file name. Essentially what you have cre- 
ated is another roster file covering a speci- 
fied range of games. 

If you choose to send the new data to the 



printer, a report is produced in approxi- 
mately the same format as the FUNSTATS 
program. For both a printout and a disk file, 
there is the save to disk and the print option. 
To do more than one special report at a 
sitting, exit the program and start from RUN 
each time to keep from mixing up variables 
in memory. 

This completes the FUNSTATS group of 
programs. Included are the following two 
short programs to aid those typing in the 
listing. You may find them useful in the 
debugging stages. They are GMFLCHK (List- 
ing 4) and CLRRSTR (Listing 5) or GaMe- 
FiLeCHecK and CLeaRRoSTeR. Use 
GMFLCHK to look at the contents of the game 
files directly. Use C LRRSTR to reset the total 
statistics strings of the roster file to contain 
nothing but zeroes, as it does when RSTRMKR 
is used. 

The printer I used with these programs is 
a TRS-80 DMP 100 with minimal special 
features and generic control codes, so the 
printer routines should work as is with any 
other Tandy dot-matrix printer. If you have 
a different printer, you may need to rework 
the printer routines. 

Other Notes 

The roster file is a direct (or random) 
access file that is named using F 1 $ ; it uses 
Buffer 2. The roster file records are each 
128 bytes long and contain five fields. The 
first field is the name field NF$ and is 25 
bytes; the second is address field AF$ and is 
30 bytes; the third, city field CF$ at 20 
bytes; the fourth, phone field PF$ at eight 
bytes; and the fifth is statistics field SF$ at 
45 bytes. 

The game files are sequential, named 
using F$ and Buffer 1. Since they are se- 
quential, the records have no specific length. 
At the start of each game file is the game 
number GN$, the name of the other team 
0T$, and one-byte string HT$ containing a 
yes or no answer to the question "Are we 
the home team?" 

Rl$ and R2$ contain, respectively, the 
home and visiting team's score followed 
by the game's date, D$. These initial entries 
are followed by an entry for each player 
consisting of three strings. The first of the 
three is the abbreviated name string N2$; 
the second, a one-byte string that answers 
the question "Played in this game?"; and 
the third, the 45-byte statistics string. So 
after the initial strings are stored, the rest of 
the file is composed of these three, repeated 
for each player in the roster. 

If you need to reenter a game file without 
affecting the roster file, you can use FUN- 
STATS with a slight modification. Do this 
by loading FUNSTATS and add the lines: 
1301 NEXT K and 1302 CLOSE, then press 
enter. Be sure to delete these lines or to 



June 1989 THE RAINBOW 113 



reload the program before proceeding with 
normal use. 

You may have noticed that once a spe- 
cial report file is stored on disk using 
RSTRFXR, there is no provision for reopen- 
ing and printing it out again. To do that, use 
FUN STATS. First, note the file name from the 
disk, then load FUNSTATS and add the line: 
6005 F 1$=" filename" , using the filename 
from the disk. Run the program, select the 
print module, and select the statistics-to- 
date report. At the date prompt, you may 



enter a note other than the date, such as a 
tournament name. Check the printer, posi- 
tion the paper, and press enter. Remember 
to delete the extra line before going on to 
other functions. 

One final note to CoCo 3 users: I wrote 
this program using a CoCo 1, expanded to 
64K. I upgraded to a CoCo 3 and had 
trouble getting the program to work, but 
after many frustrating hours, found that the 
string manipulations were overwriting some 
of the higher line numbers of the program. 



To get around this, enter PCLEAR1 before 
loading the program. Also, if you find you 
are being dumped with an Out of String 
Space Error message, try adjusting the 
amount of memory reserved by the CLEAR 
statement. 

( Questions or comments concerning this 
project may be addressed to the author at 
4780 SE Christopher Ave., Albany, OR 
9732 7. Please include an SASE when re- 
questing a reply.) □ 



r 












L/ 330 


85 


3010 


88 




1070 


117 


3130 


50 




1200 


75 


3210 


23 




1300 


142 


4070 


73 




1420 


222 


5130 


127 




2050 


234 


END 


160 




2210 


240 







Listing h FUNSTATS 

0 • COPYRIGHT 1989 FALSOFT, INC 

100 REM FUNSTATS 

110 REM SOFTBALL. STATS PROGRAM 

120 REM DELBERT BAKER COPYRIGHT 

1987 

130 REM 32K ECB COCO 1 

140 REM RSDOS 1.0 OR JDOS 1.11 

150 REM 



A$(20) 
P$(20) 
GS$(20) 
SA$(13) 
PL$(20) 



160 CLEAR 5000 
170 DIM N$ (20) , 
180 DIM C$ (20) , 
190 DIM ST$(20) 
200 DIM SU$(13) 
210 DIM N2$ (20) . _. , 
220 DIM S$(20,13), T$(20,13) 
230 DIM S(20,13), T(20,13) 
240 DIM U(13) 

270 CLS:LINE INPUT"SEASON (YY) : 

";Y$ 

280 Y$=RIGHT$ (Y$ , 2) : Fl$="ROSTER" 
+Y$ 

290 GOSUB 6000 

300 CLS : PRINT : PRINT@47 , "MENU" : PR 
INT 



310 PRINT" 1. 
T 

320 PRINT"2. 
TOTALS": PRINT 
330 PRINT" 3. 
INT 

340 PRINT"4. 
NT 

350 PRINT"5. 



ENTER A GAME" : PRIN 
DISPLAY A GAME OR 
PRINT A REPORT": PR 
REVIEW ROSTER" : PRI 
QUIT" : PRINT 



W W f Jm> mm ^ A 1 •&* >m* W W -k. I ^ 4\ mmm m\ . mm, 

360 PRINT@452 , "WHICH ONE' 1 ;: INPUT 
B 

370 IF B<1 OR B>5 THEN 360 
380 IF B=5 THEN 410 



390 ON B GOSUB 1000,2000,3000,40 
00 

400 GOTO 300 
410 CLOSE: END 

999 REM NEW GAME DATA ENTRY MODU 
LE 

1000 CLS : PRINT : LINE INPUT 11 GAME N 
UMBER? » ;GN$ 

1010 PRINT: LINE INPUT 11 OPPOSING T 
EAM? M ;OT$ 

1020 PRINT: LINE INPUT" ARE WE THE 

HOME TEAM? (Y/N) " ?HT$ 
1030 PRINT: LINE INPUT "WHAT DID W 
E SCORE? ";R1$ 

1040 PRINT: LINE INPUT"WHAT DID T 
HEY SCORE? ";R2$ 

1050 PRINT: LINE INPUT "GAME DATE 
(MM/DD/YY) : ";D$ 

1060 PRI NT : F $ = " GM " + GN $ +RI GHT $ ( D $ 
,2) 

1070 OPEN"0" , #1 , F$ : OPEN"D" , #2 , Fl 
$,128 

1075 FIELD#2,25 AS NF$,30 AS AF$ 
,20 AS CF$,8 AS PF$,45 AS SF$ 
1080 IF HT$="N" THEN 1090 ELSE T 

l$="BUFFALOES":HS$=Rl$:T2$=OT$:V 
S$=R2$:GOTO1100 

10 90 Tl $=OT$ : HS $=R2 $ : T2 $=" BUFFAL 
0ES":VS$=R1$ 

1100 CLS: PRINT "GAME NO. ";GN$:PR 

INT "HOME ";T1$;" ";HS$ 

1110 PRINT"VISITORS ";T2$;" »; 

VS$: PRINT "PLAYED ";D$ * 

1115 WRITE #1, GN$,0T$,HT$,R1$ / R 

2$,D$ 

1120 FOR K=l TO R 

1130 CLS:PRINT N2$(K):LINE INPUT 
"PLAYED IN THIS GAME (Y/N)? ";PL$ 
1135 IF LEFT$(PL$,1)="N" THEN 14 
80 ELSE 1140 

1140 INPUT"AT BATS";U(1) :INPUT"R 
UNS";U(2) 

1150 INPUT"HITS";U(3) :INPUT"WALK 
S";U(4) 

1160 INPUT " DOUBLES" ;U (5) :INPUT"T 
RIPLES";U(6) 

1170 INPUT"HOMERS";U(7) :INPUT"SA 
CS";U(8) 



114 THE RAINBOW June 1989 



1180 INPUT II RBI'S";U(9) :INPUT"TIM 

ES ENDED INNING" ;U( 10) 

1190 IF (U(l)-U(4)-U(8) )=0 THEN 

U(11)=0 ELSE U(11)=U(3)/(U(1)-U( 

4)-U(8)) 

1200 IF (U(l)-U(8) )=0 THEN U(12) 
=0 ELSE U(12) = (U(3)+U(4) )/(U(l)- 
U(8)) 

1210 IF U(3)=0 THEN U(13)-l ELSE 
U(13) = (U(3)+U(5)+2*U(6)+3*U(7) )/ 
U(3) 

1220 FOR Y=l TO 10 : SA$ (Y) =STR$ (U 
(Y) ) : NEXT Y 

1230 FOR Y=l TO 10: L=LEN(SA$ (Y) ) 
:SA$(Y)="00"+RIGHT$(SA$(Y) ,L-1) : 
NEXT Y 

1240 FOR Y=l TO 10 : SA$ ( Y) =RIGHT$ 
(SA$(Y) ,3) :NEXT Y 

1250 FOR Y=ll TO 13 : SA$ (Y) =STR$ ( 
1000*U(Y)+.5) :NEXT Y 
1260 IF U(ll)=l THEN SA$(11)="1. 
000" ELSE IF U(11)=0 THEN SA$(11 
)="0.000" ELSE SA$(11)="0."+MID$ 
(SA$(11) ,2,3) 

1270 IF U(12)=l THEN SA$(12)="1. 
000" ELSE IF U(12)=0 THEN SA$(12 
) ="0.000" ELSE SA$(12)="0."+MID$ 
(SA$(12) ,2,3) 

1280 SA$(13)=MID$(SA$(13) ,2,1)+" 
."+MID$(SA$(13) ,3,3) 
1290 GS$(K)="":FOR Y=l TO 13:GS$ 
(K)=GS$(K)+SA$ (Y) :S(K,Y)=U(Y) :NE 
XT Y 

1300 WRITE #1,N2$(K) ,PL$,GS$(K) 

1305 REM NOW PARSE THE ROSTER FI 
LE STATS AND UPDATE 
1320 FOR Y=l TO 10 : T (K, Y) =T (K, Y) 
+U(Y) :NEXT Y 

1330 IF (T(K,l)-TCfc,4)-T(Kv8))=0 
THEN T(K,11)=0 ELSE T(K,11)=T(K 
,3)/(T(K ( l)-T(K,4)-T(K,8)) 
1340 IF (T(K,1) -T(K,8) ) =0 THEN T 
(K,12)=0 ELSE T(K,12)=(T(K,3)+T( 
K,4))/(T(K,1)-T(K,8)) 
1350 IF T(K,3)=0 THEN T(K,13)=1 
ELSE T(K,13)=(T(K,3)+T(K,5)+2*T( 
K,6)+3*T(K,7) )/T(K,3) :T(K,13)=IN 
T(1000*T(K,13)+.5)/1000 
1360 FOR Y=l TO 10 : SU$ (Y) =STR$ (T 
(K,Y) ) :NEXT Y 

1370 FOR Y=l TO 10 : L=LEN (SU$ (Y) ) 
:SU$(Y)="00"+RIGHT$(SU$(Y) ,L-1) : 
NEXT Y 

13 80 FOR Y=l TO 10 : SU$ (Y) =RIGHT$ 
(SU$(Y) ,3) :NEXT Y 

1390 FOR Y=ll TO 13 : SU$ ( Y) =STR$ ( 
lj300*T(K,Y) + .5) :NEXT Y 
1400 IF T(K,11)=1 THEN SU$(11)=" 
1.000" ELSE IF T(K,11)=0 THEN SU 
$(11)="0.000" ELSE SU$ (11)="0."+ 
MID$(SU$(11) ,2,3) 



1410 IF T(K,12)=1 THEN SU$(12)=" 
1.000" ELSE IF T(K,12)=0 THEN SU 
$ (12)="0.000" ELSE SU$(12)="0."+ 
MID$(SU$(12) ,2,3) 

1420 SU$(13)=MID$(SU$(13) ,2,1)+" 
."+MID$(SU$(13) ,3,3) 
1430 ST$ (K)="":FOR Y=l TO 13:ST$ 
(K)=ST$(K)+SU$(Y) :NEXT Y 
1440 LSET NF$=N$ (K) :LSET AF$=A$ ( 
K):LSET CF$=C$ (K) : LSET PF$=P$(K) 
: LSET SF$=ST$(K) 
1450 PUT #2,K 
1460 NEXT K 
1470 G=R: CLOSE: RETURN 
1480 GS$(K)=STRING$(45,48) 
1490 FOR X=l TO 13 : S (K,X) =0 : NEXT 
X 

1500 WRITE #1,N2$(K) ,PL$,GS$(K) 
1510 GOTO 1460 

1999 REM GAME OR TOTALS DISPLAY 

2000 CLS: PRINT" DISPLAY A <G>AME 
OR <T>OTALS TO DATE OR GOTO THE 
<M>AIN MENU."; 

2010 B$=INKEY$:IF B$="G" THEN 20 
20 ELSE IF B$="T" THEN 2190 ELSE 
IF B$="M" THEN RETURN ELSE 2010 
2020 CLS: LINE INPUT "GAME NO. ";G 
A$ 

2030 IF GA$=GN$ THEN 2040 ELSE G 




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June 1989 THE RAINBOW 115 



N$=GA$: GOSUB 5010 

2040 CLS: PRINT S0, "GAME NO.: ■ ; GN 

$: PRINTS 16, "PLAYED: ";D$ 

2050 PRINT @ 3 2, "HOME: " ;T1$ ; "-" ;H 

S$ 

2060 PRINTS64, "VISITOR: ";T2$;"- 
ii ;VS$ 

2070 PRINT@9 6,STRING$(32,"-") :X= 
G 

2080 FOR K=l TO X 

2090 PRINT@128,N2$ (K) 

2100 PRINTS192, "AT BATS: ";S(K,1 

) : PRINTS208 , "RUNS : ";S(K,2) 

2110 PRINTS224, "HITS: ";S(K,3):P 

RINT§240, "WALKS: ";S(K,4) 

2120 PRINTS256, "DOUBLES: ";S(K,5 

) : PRINTS 2 7 2, "TRIPLES: ";S(K,6) 

2130 PRINT@288, "HOMERS: ";S(K,7) 

:PRINT@304,"SACS: ";S(K,8) 

2140 PRINTS 3 20 , "RBI 1 S : ";S(K,9): 

PRINTS 3 3 6, "END INN: ";S(K,10) 

2150 PRINT @ 3 5 2 , " BAT AV: ";: PRINT 

USING" # . ###" ; S (K, 11) :PRINT@3 68, " 

ON BS AV: "; :PRINTUSING" #.###" ;S 

(K,12) 

2160 PRINTS384 , "SLUG AV: ";:PRIN 
TUSING"#.###";S(K,13) 
2170 PRINTS448, "PRESS ANY KEY TO 
CONTINUE"; :B$=INKEY$: IF B$="" T 
HEN 2170 

2180 NEXT K:GOTO 2000 

2190 CLS:LINE INPUT "TODAY 1 S DATE 

: ";TD$ 

2200 CLS: PRINTS 3 2, "TOTAL STATS A 
S OF ";TD$ 

2210 PRINTS96,STRING$(32,"-") :X= 
R 

2220 FOR K=l TO X 

2230 PRINTS128,N2$(K) 

2240 PRINTS192, "AT BATS: ";T(K,1 

) :PRINTS208, "RUNS: ";T(K,2) 

2250 PRINTS224, "HITS: ";T(K,3):P 

RINTS2 40, "WALKS: ";T(K,4) 

2260 PRINTS256, "DOUBLES: ";T(K,5 

) : PRINTS 2 7 2, "TRIPLES: ";T(K,6) 

2270 PRINTS 2 8 8, "HOMERS: ";T(K,7) 

:PRINTS304, "SACS: ";T(K,8) 

2280 PRINTS 3 20, "RBI 'S: ";T(K,9): 

PRINTS336, "END INN: ";T(K,10) 

2290 PRINTS352 , "BAT AV: ";: PRINT 

USING" #.###";T(K, 11) :PRINTS368, " 

ON BS AV: "; :PRINTUSING" #.###" ;T 

(K,12) 

2300 PRINTS384, "SLUG AV: ";:PRIN 
TUSING"#.###";T(K,13) 
2310 PRINTS448, "PRESS ANY KEY TO 
CONTINUE"; :B$=INKEY$: IF B$="" T 
HEN 2310 

2320 NEXT K:GOTO 2000 

2 999 REM REPORT PRINTING ROUTINE 

3000 CLS : PRINT :PRINT"<G>AME REPO 



RT" 

3010 PRINT :PRINT"<S>TATS TO DATE 
REPORT" 

3020 PRINT :PRINT"<R>OSTER LISTIN 
G" 

3030 PRINT: PRINT "<M>AIN MENU": PR 
INT : PRINT 

3040 B$=INKEY$:IF B$="" THEN. 304 

3050 IF B$="G" THEN 3060 ELSE IF 
B$="S" THEN 3160 ELSE IF B$="R" 
THEN 32 20 ELSE IF B$="M" THEN R 

ETURN ELSE 3040 

3060 CLS: LINE INPUT "GAME NO. ";G 
A$ 

3070 IF GA$=GN$ THEN 3090 ELSE G 
N$=GA$ 

3080 GOSUB 5010 

3085 REM GAME REPORT 

3090 INPUT "PRINTER ON? PAPER POS 

ITIONED? PRESS <ENTER> WHEN RE 

ADY" ; B$ 

3100 PRINT #-2, "GAME NO. ";GN$;" 

";"HOME ";T1$;" — "HS$;" " ; "VIS 
ITORS ";T2$;" — ";VS$;" " ; " PLAYE 
D ";D$:PRINT#-2 
3110 X=G 

3120 PRINT#-2,CHR$(10) ;CHR$(15) ; 
TAB ( 4 ) "NAME" ;TAB (20) " AB R 
H BB 2B 3B HR SAC RBI EI 
BA OBA SLA";CHR$(14) ;CHR$(1 

3130 FOR K=l TO G 
3140 PRINT#-2,N2$(K) ;TAB(20)S(K, 
1) ;TAB(24) S (K,2) ;TAB (28 ) S (K, 3 ) ;T 
AB(32)S(K,4) ;TAB(36)S(K,5) ;TAB(4 

0) S(K,6) ;TAB(44)S(K,7) ;TAB(48)S( 
K,8) ;TAB(52)S(K,9) ;TAB(56) S (K, 10 
) ;TAB(60)S(K,11) ;TAB(67)S (K,12) ; 
TAB(73)S(K,13) 

3150 NEXT K:GOTO 3000 

3160 CLS: LINE INPUT "TODAY 1 S DATE 

: ";TD$ 

3165 INPUT "PRINTER ON? PAPER POS 
ITIONED? PRESS <ENTER> WHEN RE 
ADY.";B$ 

3170 PRINT#-2,CHR$(10) ;TAB(24) ;C 
HR$ (15) ; "STATISTICS REPORT AS OF 

" ; TD$ ; CHR$ ( 14 ) ; CHR$ ( 10 ) 
3180 PRINT#-2,CHR$(10) ;CHR$(15) ; 
TAB ( 4 ) "NAME " ; TAB ( 20 ) " AB R H 

BB 2B 3B HR SAC RBI EI 
BA OBA SLA";CHR$(14) ;CHR$(1 

3190 FOR K=l TO R 

3200 PRINT #-2 , N2$ (K) ;TAB(19)T(K, 

1) ;TAB(23)T(K,2) ;TAB (27) T (K, 3) ;T 
AB(31)T(K, 4) ;TAB(35)T(K,5) ;TAB(3 
9)T(K, 6) ;TAB(43)T(K,7) ;TAB(47)T( 
K,8) ;TAB(51)T(K,9) ;TAB ( 55) T (K, 10 
) ;TAB(59)T(K,11) ;TAB ( 64 ) T (K, 12) ; 



116 



THE RAINBOW June 1989 



TAB(72)T(K,13) 

3210 NEXT K:GOTO 3000 

3215 REM MAKE A HARDCOPY OF THE 
ROSTER 

3220 CLS: INPUT "PRINTER ON? PAPER 
POSITIONED? PRESS <ENTER> WHE 
N READY. " ; B$ 

3230 PRINT#-2,CHR$ (31) ;TAB(17)CH 
R$(15) ; "ROSTER" ;CHR$( 14) ;CHR$(30 
) ; CHR$ ( 10 ) 
3240 FOR K=l TO R 
3250 FOR X=l TO 10 : IF RIGHT$ (N$ ( 
K),l)<>" " THEN 3260 ELSE N$(K)= 
LEFT$(N$(K) ,LEN(N$(K) )-l) :NEXT X 
3260 FOR X=l TO 10 : IF RIGHT$(A$( 
K),l)<>" " THEN 3270 ELSE A$(K) = 
LEFT$(A$(K) , LEN (A$ (K) ) -1) :NEXTX 
3270 PRINT#-2,N$(K) ;TAB (22 ) A$ (K) 
;TAB(46)C$(K) ;TAB(66)P$ (K) 
3280 NEXT K:GOTO 3000 

3999 REM ROSTER REVIEW 

4000 CLS:PRINT TAB ( 13 ) "ROSTER LI 
STING" :Y=1 

4010 PRINT "PRESS ANY KEY TO CONT 
INUE"; 

4020 B$=INKEY$:IF B$="" THEN 402 
P 

4030 CLS: FOR K=Y TO Y+2 

4040 PRINTN$ (K) : PRINT A $ (K) : PRINT 

C$(K) ;TAB(23)P$ (K) : PRINT 

4050 IF K=R THEN 4080 ELSE 4060 

4060 NEXT K 

4070 Y=Y+3:GOTO 4010 

4080 PRINT@481, "THAT'S ALL — PRES 

S ANY KEY"; 

4090 B$=INKEY$:IF B$="" THEN 409 
0 ELSE RETURN 

4999 REM INPUT A GAME FILE 

5000 CLS: LINE INPUT "GAME NO.: "; 
GN$ 

5010 F$="GM"+GN$+Y$ 

5020 OPEN "I",#1,F$ 

5030 INPUT #l,GN$,OT$,HT$,Rl$,R2 

$,D$ 

5040 IF HT$="N" THEN 5050 ELSE T 
1$=" BUFFALOES" : HS$=R1$ : T2 $=OT$ : V 
S$=R2$:GOTO 5060 

5050 Tl $=OT$ : HS$=R2 $ : T2 $="BUFFAL 



OES":VS$=Rl$ 
5060 G=0 

5070 IF EOF(l)=-l THEN 5100 
5080 G=G+l:INPUT #1,N2$ (G) , PL$ (G 
) ,GS$(G) 
5090 GOTO 5070 

5095 REM NOW PARSE THE STAT STRI 
NG 

5100 FOR K=l TO G 

5110 FOR Y=l TO 10:S$(K, Y)=MID$( 

GS$ (K) ,3 *Y-2 , 3 ) : NEXT Y 

5120 Z=31:FOR Y=ll TO 13:S$(K,Y) 

=MID$(GS$(K) ,Z,5) :Z=Z+5:NEXT Y 

5130 FOR Y=l TO 13 : S (K, Y) =VAL(S$ 

(K,Y) ) :NEXT Y 

5140 NEXT K 

5150 CLOSE # 1 : RETURN 

5999 REM INPUT THE ROSTER FILE A 
ND FIND N2$ 1 

6000 CLS: PR I NT "READING THE ROSTE 
R FILE." 

6010 OPEN "D",#2,F1$,128:R=L0F(2 
) 

6020 FIELD #2,25 AS NF$,30 AS AF 
$,20 AS CF$,8 AS PF$,45 AS SF$ 
6030 FOR K=l TO R 
6040 GET #2,K 

6050 N$(K)=NF$:A$(K)=AF$:C$(K)=C 
F$:P$ (K)=PF$:ST$ (K)=SF$ 
6060 NEXT K 

6065 REM PARSE THE STAT STRING 
6070 PRI NT " PARS ING THE STAT STRI 
NG" : FOR K=l TO R 

6080 FOR Y=l TO 10 :T$ (K, Y) =MID$ ( 

ST$(K) , 3*Y-2,3) :NEXT Y 

6090 Z=31:FOR Y=ll TO 13:T$(K,Y) 

=MID$(ST$(K) ,Z,5) :Z=Z+5:NEXT Y 

6100 FOR Y=l TO 13 : T (K, Y) =VAL(T$ 

(K,Y) ) :NEXT Y 

6110 NEXT K 

6115 REM FIND N2$ 

6120 PRINT "FINDING THE 2ND NAME 

STRINGS" : Q$=" , " 

6130 FOR K=l TO R:M=INSTR(1,N$ (K 
) ,Q$)+1 

6140 N2$(K)=LEFT$(N$(K) ,M) 

6150 NEXT K 

6160 CLOSE # 2 : RETURN 



Listing 2: RSTRMKR 

0 1 COPYRIGHT 1989 F ALSO FT, INC 

100 REM ROSTERMAKER 

110 REM DELBERT BAKER COPYRIGHT 

1987 

120 REM SET UP A NEW ROSTER FILE 

130 CLEAR 5000 

140 DIM N$(20) , A$(20) 

150 DIM C$(20) , P$(20) 



160 Cl$="Aibany, OR 97321" :C2$=" 
Corvallis, OR 97330" 
170 CLS:PRINT@9,"NEW ROSTER FILE 
" : PRINT 

180 INPUT"WHAT SEASON IS THIS";Y 
$ : PRINT 

190 Fl$="ROSTER"+RIGHT$ (Y$, 2) 
200 X=l : CLS : PRINT@4 , "ENTER PLAYE 
R INFORMATION" 

210 LINE INPUT"LAST NAME: ";NA$ 



June 1989 THE RAINBOW 117 



220 IF NA$="STOP" THEN 300 
230 LINE INPUT" FIRST NAME: ";NB$ 
240 N$(X)=NA$+","+NB$ 
250 LINE INPUT "AD DRESS : ";A$(X) 
260 LINE INPUT"CITY, STATE ZIP 
1 2 INPUT :";C$(X) 
270 IF C$(X)="1" THEN C$(X)=C1$ 
ELSE IF C$(X)="2" THEN C$(X)=C2$ 
ELSE 280 

280 LINE INPUT"PHONE NUMBER: ";P 

$(X) : PRINT 

290 X=X+1:GOTO210 

300 X=X-1 : CLS : PRINT® 12 , "SORTING" 
310 F=0 

320 FOR Y=l TO X-l 

330 IF N$ (Y) <=N$ (Y+l) THEN 370 E 

LSE 340 

340 S1$=N$(Y) :S2$=A$(Y) :S3$=P$(Y 
) : S4 $=C$ ( Y) 

350 N$(Y)=N$(Y+1) :A$(Y)=A$(Y+1) : 
P$ (Y) =P$ (Y+l) : C$ (Y) =C$ (Y+l) 
360 N$(Y+1)=S1$:A$(Y+1)=S2$:P$(Y 
+1)=S3$:C$ (Y+1)=S4$:F=1 
370 NEXT Y 

380 IF F<>0 THEN 310 ELSE 390 
390 PRINT "SORTING DONE . " : PRINT 
400 PRINT" <S>CREEN OR <D>ISK OR 



<Q>UIT" 

410 PRINT: PRINT "PRESS <S> OR <D> 
OR <Q>" 

420 B$=INKEY$:IF B$="S" THEN 430 
ELSE IF B$="D" THEN 510 ELSE IF 
B$="Q" THEN END ELSE 420 

430 Y=l 

440 PRINT"PRESS ANY KEY TO CONTI 
NUE . " ; 

450 B$=INKEY$:IF B$="" THEN 450 

460 CLS: FOR K=Y TO Y+2 

470 PRINT N$(K): PRINT A$(K):PRIN 

T C$ (K) ;TAB(20) P$ (K) : PRINT 

480 IF K=X THEN 400 ELSE 490 

490 NEXT K 

500 Y=Y+3:GOTO 440 

510 OPEN"D" , #2 , Fl$ , 128 : SB$=STRIN 

G$(45, "0") 

520 FIELD #2,25 ASNF$,30 ASAF$ 
,20 AS CF$,8 AS PF$,45 AS SF$ 
530 FOR K=l TO X 

540 LSET NF$=N$(K): LSET AF$=A$ ( 

K) : LSET CF$=C$ (K) : LSET PF$=P$(K) 

: LSET SF$=SB$ 

550 PUT #2, K: NEXT K 

560 CLOSE 2 : PRINT "ROSTER STORED 

AS ";F1$: GOTO 400 



Listing 3: RSTRFXR 

j3 ' COPYRIGHT 1989 FALSOFT, INC 
100 REM ROSTERFIXER (RSTRFXR) 
110 REM RECALCULATION OF THE TOT 
AL STAT STRING 

120 REM COPYRIGHT 1987 DELBERT B 
AKER 

130 REM 32K ECB COCO 1 
140 REM 

150 CLEAR 5000 
160 DIM N$(20) ,A$(20) 
170 DIM C$(20) ,P$(20) 
180 DIM ST$ (20) ,GS$ (20) 
190 DIM SU$(13) ,SA$(13) 
200 DIM N2$(20) ,PL$(20) 
210 DIM S$(20,13) ,T$(20,13) 
220 DIM S (20, 13) ,T(20, 13) 
230 DIM U(13) 

2 40 CLS : LINE INPUT" SEASON (YY) : 

H;Y$ 

250 Y$=RIGHT$(Y$,2) : Fl$="ROSTER" 
+Y$ 

2 60 OPEN" D" , # 2 , Fl$ , 12 8 : R=LOF ( 2 ) 
270 FIELD #2,25 AS NF$,30 AS AF$ 
,20 AS CF$,8 AS PF$,45 AS SF$ 
280 FOR K=l TO R 
290 GET#2,K 

300 N$ (K)=NF$:A$ (K)=AF$:C$(K)=CF 
$:P$(K)=PF$:FOR Y=l TO 13:T(K,Y) 



=0:NEXT Y 

310 NEXT K: CLOSE #2 

320 PRINT" FINDING THE 2ND NAME S 

TRING" :Q$=" , " 

330 FOR K=l TO R: M=INSTR ( 1 , N$ (K) 
,Q$)+1 

340 N2$=LEFT$(N$(K) ,M) 
3 50 NEXT K 

3 60 CLS: PRINT" THIS PROGRAM I 
S TO PREPARE SPECIAL REPORTS AN 
D TO REPAIR A BOTCHED STAT STRIN 
G IN A ROSTER FILE . » 
370 PRINT "ENTER A RANGE OF GAME 
NUMBERS ATTHE PROMPTS .": PRINT 
380 LINE INPUT "START AT GAME NO. 
: ";SG$: PRINT 

3 90 LINE INPUT "END AT GAME NO.: 
";EG$: PRINT 

400 PRINT "PLACE THE GAME DATA DI 
SK IN THE DRIVE." 

410 LINE INPUT" PRESS <ENTER> WHE 
N READY. ";B$ 

420 SG=VAL(SG$) :EG=VAL(EG$) 
430 FOR X=SG TO EG 

440 GN$=STR$(X) :L=LEN(GN$) :GN$=R 

IGHT$(GN$,L-1) 

450 F$="GM M +GN$+Y$ 

460 OPEN"I",#l,F$ 

470 INPUT #l,GN$,OT$,HT$,Rl$,R2$ 
,D$ 



118 THE RAINBOW June 1989 




s o 



w 




by Steve Bjork 

A hostile space fortress has been spotted at the outer 
edge of our galaxy. Destroy this menacing battle platform 
by navigating your spacecraft with the utmost skill to scale 
walls; dodge force fields; blow up fuel tanks; dog fight 
defense ships; evade comets and ultimately disable the 
powerful robot overlord! 

Six years after this arcade hit was first released on the 
Color Computer 1 } world renown software author Steve 
Bjork brings one of his most popular and most requested 
games to the Color Computer 3 market 

ZW puts your flying skills to the ultimate test in this 
100% M/L game featuring 5 Mega-Bytes of Super-Res 
Graphics and Digital sound! At last, a program that 
actually out shines the original arcade version!!! Requires 
a Color Computer 3 128K disk system. 

REG. $29.95 Introductory Special $24.95! 




NUT 
DILEMMA 



by Nickolas Marentes 

Angry Angelo has raided Antonio's Donut Factory 
sending the entire complex amuck! Donuts have come 
alive and are jumping around in wild frenzies. Machines 
have gone out of control throwing cooking fat, dough and 
icing sugar everywhere! You must help poor Antonio climb 
ladders, Jump platforms and ride elevators to reach the 
top floor and shut down the factory's power generator 
which will restore law and order, 

Disk. , .$19.95 



WE NOW ACCEPT. . . 





r 



DISCOVER 




AMER 




SS 



ALL PROGRAMS REQUIRE A COLOR COMPUTER 3 DISK OR TAPE SYSTEM (unless indicated). 

Personal checks, money orders, and American C.O.D. orders accepted. Include $3.00 for S/H. $2.50 extra 
for C.O.D. orders. (Cat. res. add 6.5 % tax.) 

ATTENTION PROGRAMMERS: Game Point Software is looking for talented writers. Top royalties guaranteed. 




by Nickolas Marentes 

Help Rupert infiltrate "Music Box Records" and collect all of his 

stolen notes which are scattered 
throughout the complex. Ride 
the crazy elevators and beware 
of the security robots on patrol. 

This strategy arcade game 
features 17 different, 16 color 
graphic screens and some of 
the hottest digitized percussion 
music and vocals you've ever 
heard. Disk or Tape. . .$24.95 





Based on a popular arcade game 
sounds like "Art Gannoyed"). 
BASH challenges you to clear the 
screen by "BASHING" your 
ball through multiple brick lay- 
ers. Of course you'll have help 
getting through this 20 level 
game by activating options like, 
Slow Ball, Expanded Paddle, 
Multi-Bail, and more! 

$24.95 



by Steve Bjork 

which we can't mention (But 





by Nickolas Marentes 

Enemy alien creatures have 
been identified entering our so- 
lar system, their destination: our 
home planet! Their goal: the 
total annihilation of our race. 
They must not be allowed to 
land! 

An action arcade game featur- 
ing high quality 16 color gra- 
phics and sound effects. $24. 95 



Stttt- CCC7D 



KICK f COftt I UilC 



AAA A A A A A A A 




RES CUE by Steve Bjork 

A terrible mine disaster has just occured and it will be up to you 
and your talents to enter the 
mine, jump the pits, avoid the 
spikes, fight off the bats and 
other creepy crawlers and get 
air to the needy victims. Mine 
rescue features over 2 mega- 
bytes of arcade-style graphics, 
real time music and multiple 
mine levels. Hours of fun! 

$24.95 




hu Stovo Rinrk ^MM 



by Steve Bjork 

$24.95 (Extra Glasses $2.95) 




POINT 



P.O. Box 6907, Burbank, CA 91510-6907 
(818) 566-3571 • BBS: (818) 772-8890 
Toll Free: 800 877-2232 Ext. 139 



480 G-JJ:CLS:PRINT"WORKING ON GAM 
E" ;X 

49^f IF EOF(l)— 1 THEN 580 

500 G=G+1: INPUT #1,N2$ (G) , PL$ (G) , 

GS$(G) : PRINT N2$(G) 

510 FOR Y=l TO 10:S$(G,Y);=MIP$(G 

S$(G) ,3*Y-2,3) :NEXT Y 

530 FOR Z=l TO 10:T(G,Z)=T(G,Z)+ 

VAL(S$(G,Z) ) :NEXT Z 

540 IF (T(G,1)-T(G,4)-T(G,8) )=0 

THEN T(G,11)=0 ELSE T(G,11)=T(G, 

3)/(T(G,l)-T<<3,4)-T(G,8) ) 

550 IF (T(G,1) -T(G,8) ) =0 THEN T( 

G,12)=0 ELSE T(G,12)=(T(G,3)+T(G 

,4))/(T(G,l)-T(G,8)) 

560 IF T(G,3)=0 THEN T(G,13)=1 E 

LSE T(G / 13)=(T(G,3)+T(G / 5)+2*T(G 

,6)+3*T(G,7) )/T(G,3) 

570 GOTO 490 

580 CLOSE #l:NEXT X 

590 PRINT "REBUILDING THE STAT ST 

RING": FOR K=l TO R 

600 FOR Y=l TO 10 : T$ (K, Y) =STR$ (T 

(K,Y) ) :NEXT Y 

610 FOR Y=l TO 10 : L=LEN (T$ (K, Y) ) 
:T$(K,Y)="00"+RIGHT$(T$(K,Y) ,L-1 
) : NEXT Y 

620 FOR Y=ll TO 13 : T$ (K, Y) =STR$ ( 

1000*T (K, Y) + . 5) :NEXT Y 

630 IF T(K,11)=1 THEN T$(K,11)=" 

1.000" ELSE IF T(K,11)=0 THEN T$ 

(K,11)="0.000" ELSE T$ (K, 11) ="0 . 

"+MID$(T$(K,11) ,2,3) 

640 IF T(K,12)=1 THEN T$(K,12)=" 

1.000" ELSE IF T(K,12)=0 THEN T$ 

(K,12)="0.000" ELSE T$(K,12)="0. 

"+MID$(T$(K,12) ,2,3) 

650 T$(K,13)=MID$(T$(K,13) ,2,1)+ 

"."+MID$(T$(K,13) ,3,3) 

660 FOR Y=l TO 10 : T$ (K, Y) =RIGHT$ 

(T$(K,Y) ,3) :NEXT Y 

670 ST$ (K)=" M :FOR Y=l TO 13:ST$( 

K) =ST$ (K) +T$ (K, Y) :NEXT Y 

680 NEXT K 

700 CLS : PRINT " GAMES ";SG;" TO" ;EG 
; " RECALCULATED . " : PRINT 
710 PRINT"SAVE TO <R>OSTER FILE. 
" : PRINT 

720 PRINT"SAVE TO <S>PECIAL FILE 
. " : PRINT 



730 PRINT "SEND TO <P>RINTER. " : PR 
INT 

740 PRINT"<Q>UIT": PRINT 
750 PRINT"<R>, <S>, <P>, OR <Q>: 
" / 

760 A$=INKEY$:IF A$="R" THEN 780 
ELSE IF A$="S" THEN 770 ELSE IF 
A$="P" THEN 850 ELSE IF A$="Q" 

THEN 940 ELSE 760 

770 CLS: LINE INPUT"INPUT SPECIAL 
FILE NAME (8 OR LESS CHARACTE 

RS) :";F1$:IF LEN(F1$)>8 THEN 770 

780 REM GOSUB 900 

790 0PEN"D",#2,F1$,128 

800 FIELD#2,25 AS NF$,30 AS AF$, 

20 AS CF$,8 AS PF$,45 AS £F$ 

810 FOR X=l TO R 

820 LSET NF$=N$(X) :LSET AF$=A$(X 
):LSET CF$=C$ (X) :LSET PF$=P$(X): 
LSET SF$=ST$(X) 
830 PUT#2,X:NEXT X 

840 CLOSE #2: PRINT "FILE STORED A 
S ";F1$:G0T0 710 

850 CLS: PRINT "PRINTER ON? PAPER 
POSITIONED?" 

860 PRINT"PRESS <ENTER> WHEN REA 
DY.": INPUT B$ 

870 PRINT#-2, TAB (21) "SPECIAL REP 
ORT FROM GAME" ;SG; " TO"; EG 
880 PRINT#-2,CHR$(10) ;CHR$(15) ;T 
AB(4) "NAME", 'TAB (20) " AB R H 

BB 2B 3B HR SAC RBI EI B 
A OBA SLA" ;CHR$ (14) ;CHR$(10) 
890 FOR K=l TO R 

900 PRINT#-2,N2$(K) ;TAB(19)T(K, 1 
) ;TAB(23)T(K,2) ;TAB (27 ) T (K, 3 ) ;TA 
B(31)T(K,4) 7TAB(35)T(K,5) ;TAB(39 
)T(K,6) ;TAB(43)T(K,7) ;TAB(47)T(K 
,8) ;TAB(51)T(K,9) ; TAB (55) T(K, 10) 
;TAB(59)INT(1000*T(K,ll)+.5)/100 
0;TAB(64)INT(1000*T(K,12)+.5)/10 
00; 

901 PRINT#-2,TAB(72)INT(1000*T(K 
,13)+.5)/1000 

910 NEXT K 
920 GOTO 700 

930 REM A$=INKEY$:IF A$="" THEN 
810 ELSE IF A$="Q" THEN 820 ELSE 
240 

940 CLOSE: END 



Listing 4: GMFLCHK 

0 • COPYRIGHT 1989 FALSOFT, INC 
5 CLS: INPUT "GAME NO.";Z$ 
7 F$="GM"+Z$+"87" 
10 OPEN" I" , #1, F$ 

20 INPUT* 1,GN$,0T$,HT$,R1$,R2$,D 
$ 



30 PRINT GN$,0T$,HT$,R1$,R2$,D$ 

40 IF E0F(1)=-1 THEN END 

50 INPUT#1,N2$,PL$,GS$ 

60 PRINT N2$,PL$,GS$ 

70 A$=INKEY$ 

80 IF A$="" THEN 70 ELSE 40 

90 END 



120 



THE RAINBOW June 1989 



ListingS: CLRRSTR 



0 ' COPYRIGHT 1989 FALSOFT, INC 

10 OPEN"D",#2,"ROSTER87",128 

20 FIELD#2,25 AS NF$,30 AS AF$,2 

0 AS CF$,8 AS PF$,4'5 AS S?$ 

30 R=LOF(2) :SB$=STRING$(45,"0") 

4/3 FOR X=l TO R 

50 GET #2,X 

6/3 N$=NF$:ST$=SF$ 

7/3 PRINT N$: PRINT ST$ 



8/3 PRINT" CLEAR THIS ONE? (Y/N) " 
90 A$=INKEY$ 

1/3/3 IF A$="N" THEN 13/3 ELSE IF A 

$="Y" THEN 110 ELSE 9/3 

110 LSET SF$=SB$ 

120 PUT #2,X 

130 NEXT X 

140 CLOSE: END 



Listing 6: COPYFILE 



0 1 COPYRIGHT 1989 FALSOFT, INC 

100 CLEAR5000 

110 DIM N$ (20) ,A$ (20) 

120 DIM C$ (20) ,P$ (20) 

130 DIM ST$(20) ,N2$(20) 

140 DIM PL$(20) ,GS$(20) 

150 CLS: PRINT: PRINT "COPY <R>OSTE 

R FILE,": PRINT 

160 PRINT"COPY <G>AME FILE,":PRI 
NT 

170 PRINT"OR <Q>UIT .": PRINT 

180 PRINT"R,G, OR Q? : » ; 

190 A$=INKEY$:IF A$="R" THEN 200 

ELSE IF A$="G" THEN390 ELSE IF 
A$="Q" THEN 560 ELSE 190 
200 CLS:LINEINPUT"SEASON (YY) : " 
/ Y$ 

210 PRINT :PRINT"COPYING ROSTER F 
ILE FOR THE ";Y$;" SEASON" 
220 Fl$="ROSTER"+RIGHT$(Y$,2) 
230 OPEN "D",#2,F1$,128:R=L0F(2) 
240 FIELD #2,25 AS NF$,30 AS AF$ 
,20 AS CF$,8 AS PF$,45 AS SF$ 
250 FOR K=l TO R 
260 GET#2,K 

270 N$ (K) =NF$ : A$ (K) =AF$ : C$ (K) =CF 
$:P$ (K)=PF$:SP$ (K)=SF$ 
280 NEXT K 
290 CLOSE #2 

300 PRINT" PLACE THE DESTINATION 
DISK IN THE DRIVE. PRESS <ENTER 
> . " » 

310 INPUT Z 

320 OPEN "D",#2,F1$,128 

330 FIELD #2,25 AS NF$,30 AS AF$ 

,20 AS CF$,8 AS PF$,45 AS SF$ 



3 40 FOR K-l TO R 

350 LSET NF$=N$(K) :LSET AF$=A$(K 
):LSET CF$=C$ (K) :LSET PF$=P$(K): 
LSET SF$=SP$(K) 
360 PUT #2,K 
370 NEXT K 

380 CLOSE #2:PRINT"ROSTER COPIED 
":FOR X=l TO 500:NEXTX:GOTO150 
390 CLS:LINEINPUT"SEASON (YY) : " 
;Y$: PRINT 

400 LINEINPUT "GAME NUMBER: ";GN 
$ 

410 F$="GM"+GN$+Y$ 

420 OPEN "I",#1,F$ 

430 INPUT #l,GN$,OT$,HT$,Rl$,R2$ 

,D$ 

440 G=0 

450 IF EOF(l)=-l THEN480 

460 G=G+1: INPUT #1 , N2$ (G) , PL$ (G) 

,GS$(G) 

470 GOTO 450 

4 80 CLOSE #1: PRINT "PLACE THE DES 
TINATION DISK IN THE DRIVE. PRE 
SS <ENTER>." 

490 INPUT Z 

500 OPEN "O", #1,F$ 

510 WRITE #1,GN$,0T$,HT$,R1$,R2$ 

,D$ 

520 FOR K=l TO G 

530 WRITE #1,N2$(K) ,PL$(K) ,GS$(K 
) 

540 NEXT K 

550 CLOSE #1 : PRINT "GAME FILE COP 
IED.":FOR X=l TO 500:NEXTX:GOTO1 
50 

560 END /» 



June 1989 THE RAINBOW 121 



A wildcard utility for those hard-to-find disk files 



Selective Directory Listings 

Using Wildcards 

By Richard Estrado 



Have you ever had to strain your 
eyes looking through a long 
directory listing for one hard- 
to-pin-down program? Or search 
through a large batch of disks for one 
file or group of files? Or even worse, try 
to find a file whose filename you just 
can't remember: Well, Wildcard may be 
just the help you need. 

Wildcard is a utility that enhances the 
DIR command of the CoCo 2 or 3, 
enabling it to display selective directory 
listings using wildcards. It requires a 
Tandy Color Computer 2 or 3 with 
Extended Disk BASIC versions 1.1 or 
2.1, at least 64K of RAM and one disk 
drive. 

Here's how Wildcard works: 

1) The DIR command can be used as 
usual with either a drive number follow- 
ing it or not. DIR or DIR1 etc. . . 

2) The user can enter a filename only 
according to BASIC'S standard syntax 
for entering filenames. DIR "FILE -EXT" 

or DIR "FILE/EXT:1" 

3) The user can use one wildcard in 
either the filename or extension. The 
character used for the wildcard is the 
asterisk (*). DIR "FILE.*" or DIR "FI*.BfiS" 

In the above examples, all characters 
in the filename or extension occurring 
from the point of the wildcard are 
disregarded by the search routines in 
Wildcard. The result in Example 1 is 

Richard Estrado has studied and taught 
Computer Science for the past four 
years at Fatima College, Trinidad. 



Listing 1: 


pLDBitv 


f. 

00010 * WILDCARDS 










00020 * 












00025 * COPYRIGHT l$&9 FALGflFT F Ib'C 






00026 * 








503B 




00027 


ORG 


$503B 




503B 4F 




00030 START 


CLRA 






503 G 8E 


5042 


00040 


LDX 


#WILD 


LOAD ADDR OF WILD IN X 


503F BF 


C1F1 


00050 


STX 


$C1F1 


STORE IN JUMP TABLE ENTRY 


5042 A6 


9F 00A6 


00060 WILD 


LDA 


[$A6] 


CHAR CURRENTLY BEING PROCESSED 


5046 81 


22 


00070 


CHPA 




IS IT (») ? 


5048 27 


03 


00080 


BEQ 


GTFN 


IF SO THEN GET FILE NAME 


504A 16 


7C5G 


00090 


LBRA 


$CCA9 


ELSE RETURN TO OLD DIR 


504D 17 


76E5 


00100 GTFN 


LBSR 


$C935 


GET FILE NAME ECT. 


5050 B6 


094C 


00110 


LDA 


$094C 


GET FIRST CHAR OF FNAME 


5053 BB 


09?4 


00120 


ADDA 


$0954 


ADD FIRST CHAR OF EXT 


5056 81 


54 


00130 


CMPA 


#84 


IS IT n *,* n ? 


5058 1027 


7C4D 


00140 


LBEQ 


$CCA9 


IF SO THEN GOTO OLD DIR 






00150 * 












00160 * SET :M DSKON PARAMETERS 


5050 BO. 




00170 * 








C79D 


00180 


JSR 


$C79D 


MAKE SURE FAT IS VALID 


505F BD 


B958 


00190 


JSR 


$B958 


PRINT CARRIGE RETURN 


5062 CC 


1102 


00200 


LDD 


#$1102 




5065 97 


EC 


00210 


STA 


$00EC 




5067 07 


EA 


00220 


STB 


?EA 


* 


5069 C6 


03 


00230 


LDB 


#3 


* SET CP DSKCON PARMS 


506B D7 


ED 


00240 STORE 


STB 


$ED 




506D 8£ 


0600 


00250 


LDX 


#$600 


* F-0 EHT X TO DISK BUFFER 


5070 9F 


EE 


00260 


STX 


$EE 


* 


5072 BD 


D6F2- 


W270 . 


JSR 


$D6F2 


READ A SECTOR 


5075 IF 


13 


00280 COMP 


TFR 


x.u 


COPY X POINTER TO '% 


5077 A6 


84 


00290 


LDA 


,x 


LOAD FIRST CHAR OF DIRECTORY 


5079-27 


45 


003JJ0 


BEQ 


AD VAN 


IF 0 THEN ADVANCE POINTER 


507B 43 




00310 


COMA 




CHECK END OF DIRECTORY; $FF 


507C 1027 009A 


00320 


LBEQ 


END 


IF IT IS, THEN END 






00330 * 












00340 * COMPARE FILE 


NAME 








00350 * 








5080 108E 094C 


00360 SERCH1 


LDY 


#$09 4C 


POINT, Y TO START OF FILENAME 


5084 A6 


A4 


00370 COMF1 


LDA 


,Y 


LOAD CHAR OF FILENAME IN ACCA 


5086 81 


2A 


00380 


CMPA 


#'* 


IS IT AN ASTERISK? 


5088 1027 000F 


00390 


LBEQ 


SERCH2 


IF SO , GO SEARCH THE EXTENSION 


508C Al 


C0 




CMPA 




COMPRE WITH DATA IN I/O BUFFER 


508E 26 


30 


00410 


BNE 


AD VAN 


IF MISMATCH THEN AVANCE 


5090 108C 0953 


00420 


CMPY 


#$953 


CHECK FOR END OF FILENAME 


5094 27 


05 


00430 


BEQ 


SERCH2 


IF AT END, START EXT SEARCH 


5095 31 


21 


00440 


LEAY 


1,Y 


INCREMENT FILENAME POINTER 


5098 7E 


5084 


00450 


JMP 


COMF1 


LOOP TO COMF1 


509B 30 


08 


00460 SERCH2 


LEAX 


8>X 


SET X POINTER TO EXT 


509D IF 


13 


00470 


TFR 


x.u 


COPY THIS VALUE TO U 



1 22 THE RAINBOW June 1 989 



509F 108E 


0954 


00480 


LDY 


#$954 


POINT Y TO EXTENSION 


5J3A3 A6 


A4 


00490 C0MP2 


LDA |: 




LOAD CHAR OF EXT IN ACCA 


5JJA5 81 


2A 


00500 


CMPA 


#«* 


IS IT AN ASTERISK? 


5JJA7 1027 


0023 


00510 


LBEQ 


DUMP 


IF SO THEN DUMP DIR ENTRY 


50AB Al 


C0 


00520 


CMPA 


,U+ 


COMPARE CHAR IN I/O BUFFER 


50 AD 27 


04 


00530 


BEQ 


C0MP3, 


IF MATCH THEN GOTO COMP 3 


5J7AF 3j? 


18 


00540 


LEAX 


-8,X 


ELSE RESET X POINTER 


50B1 2j? 


0D 


00550 


BRA 


AD VAN 


AND ADVANCE TO NEXT DIR ENTRY 


5JJB3 108C 


0956 


00560 COMP 3 


CMPY 


#$956 


CHECK FOR END OF EXT 


50B7 26 


n 


00570 


BNE 


NEXT 


IF IT'S NOT THEN GOTO NEXT 


5JJB9 20 


13 


00580 


BRA 


DUMP 


ELSE DUMP DIR ENTRY 


5JJBB 31 


21 


00590 NEXT 


LEAY 




INCREMENT EXT CHAR POINTER 


5j?BD 7E 


50A3 


00600 


JMP 


C0MP2 


LOOP TO COMP 2 






00610 * 












00620 * ADVANCE THE 


DIRECTORY 


POINTER 






fine, "in 








50Cj? 3)7 


88 20 


ftftC/.ft A TM7AW 


LEAX 


32;x 


INC. MAIN BUFFER POINTER 


5JJC3 8C 


mv 


fine, c ft 


CMPX 


#§700 


ARE WE AT END OF BUFFER? 


50C6 26 


AD 


ftnc.cn 
y)p ODJ) 


BNE 


COMP 


IF NOT THEN LOOP TO COMP 


50C8 5C 




CICf A 7flf 


INCB 




INCREMENT SECTOR POINTER 


5J7C9 CI 


0B 


ftftZQft 


CMPB 


#11 


CHECK WITH MAX SECTOR N0# 


50CB 23 


9E 


ftftiQft 


BLS 


STORE 


IF >U THEN GOTO STORE 


5J7CD 39 




00 7 00 


RTS 




IF AT END, RETURN TO BASIC 


















n ft 10 ft * nrtwp 
Jp]4/ZJ4 " JJUMx 


THE DIRECTORY LINE 






fiftfift 








50CE 3J7 


18 


ftm /. n wrruB 
007^0 DUnr 


T V A V 




xUl -ADJUST X POINTER 


50DJ7 35 


40 


00750 




rr 
u 




50D2 BD 


A549 


00/00 


vl OA 






50D5 34 


40 


(1/1 «r ■? flf 

007/0 


PQH<! 
r o no 


IT 

u 




50D7 34 


04 


nni o n 
00780 


PSHS 


B 


SAVE B ; SECTOR POINTER 


50D9 34 




00/90 


PSHS 


X 


SAVE X;I/0 BUFFER POINTER 


5JZDB C6 


08 


ft n a nn 
00800 


LDB 


#8 




50DD BD 


B9A2 


00Ol)tf 


JSR. 


SB9A2 


★ 


5JZEJ? BD 


CD1B 




JSR 


SCD1B 




50E3 C6 


03 




LDB 


#3 


★ 


50E5 BD 


B9A2 




JSR 


5B9A2 


* 


50E8 BD 


CD1B 


00850 


JSR 


5CD1B 


* 


5JJEB E6 


00 


jff Jff □ O Jff 


LDB 


0,X 


* THIS SECTION OF CODE 


50ED CI 


0A 


0afi70 

yjyi q i y> 


CMPB 


#10 


* SIMPLY DUMPS THE DIRECTORY 


5J3FEF 1024 


0003 


00880 


LBCC 


CLEAR 


* ENTRY WHICH HAS PASSED THE 


50F3 17 


7C25 


00890 


LBSR 


$CD1B 


* COMPARISON CHECKS ABOVE 


50F6 4F 




00900 clear; 


CLRA 




* 


50F7 BD 


BDCC 


00910 


JSR 


SBDCC 




50FA 17 


7C1E 


00920 


LBSR 


$CD1B 


* 


5JJFD AE 


E4 


00930 


LDX 


vS 




50FF 86 


42 


00940 


LDA 


#§42 




5101 AB 


0C 


00950 


ADDA 


12, X 


* 


5103 17 


7C12 


00960 


LBSR 


$CD18 


★ 


51^6 E6 


0D 


00970 


LDB 


13, X 


* 


5108 17 


7C13 


00980 


LBSR 


$CD1E 


★ 


510B IF 


89 


00990 


TFR 


A,B 


* 


510D 4F 




01000 


CLRA 




★ 


510E BD 


BDCC 


01010 


JSR 


SBDCC 


* 


5111 BD 


B958 


01020 


JSR 


$B958 


* 


5114 35 


10 


01030 


PULS 


x 


RESTORE X 


5116 35 


04 


01040 


PULS 


B 


RESTORE B 


5 118 2,0 


Ao 


01050 


BRA 


ADVAN 


GO ADVANCE POINTER 


511A 39 




01060 END 


RTS 




RETURN TO BASIC 




0000 


01070 


END 






00000 TOTAL ERRORS 











that all files with a name of FILE and 
any extension is listed. In Example 2, all 
files with the first two characters FI and 
an extention of BPS are listed. 

4) The user can specify two wildcards 
in one filename, but if the filename is 
*.*, all files are listed. Also keep in 
mind that if the filename is *.*, the 
drive number in the filename is ignored. 

Type in the assembly language code 
(Listing 1) given in EDTASM+ and 
assemble it. After a successful assembly 
(no errors), exit from the assembler. At 
the BASIC prompt type the following 
line: 

SPVEM-WILD" , 20539 , 20762 , 20539 

The trailing numbers in the above line 
are decimal equivalents to the locations 
of the labels END and start in the source 
code. To use it, just enter LORDM 

"NILD":EXEC20539. 

You can alternatively type in the 
BASIC program and save it with this line: 

5PVE"WILD". 

After running the program, control is 
automatically transferred to the routine 
from the old DIR command. Therefore 
it is not necessary to type EXEC every 
time you wish to use the wildcard 
feature. 

One important point for CoCo 2 
users is to put the machine into all- 
RAM mode before running the pro- 
gram. Since the CoCo 3 is always in this 
mode, it does not require that step. 
Joseph Forgionie's RLLRRM program 
("Prompt Attention," July '87, Page 97) 
puts the CoCo into an all-RAM mode. 
The program is found in Listing 3. 

(Questions or comments about the 
program may be directed to the author 
at 43 Sapphire Crescent, Diamond 
Vale, Diego Martin, Trinidad, West 
Indies. Please include an SASE if re- 
questing a reply.) □ 




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See Us On DELPHI 



June 1989 THE RAINBOW 123 



Listing 2: WILDBRS 



10 

2) 3 

3) 3 

4) 3 
46 
50 
70 
8)3 



********************** 

* WILDCARD UTILITY * 

* By Richard Estrado * 

* * 

* RUN THE PROGRAM * 

* IN "ALL RAM" MODE * 
********************** 

COPYRIGHT 1989 FALSOFT, INC 
9)3 DATA 79,142,80,66,191,193,241 
,166, 159, )3, 166, 129, 34, 39, 3, 22, 12 
4,92,23,12)3,229,182,9,76,187,9,8 
4,129,84,16,39,124,77,189,199,15 
7,189,185,88,204,17,2,151,23 6 
1)3)3 DATA 215,234,198,3,215,237,1 
42, 6, )3, 159, 2 3 8, 189, 214, 242, 3 1,19 
, 166 , 132 , 39 , 69 , 67 , 16 , 39 ,0 , 154 , 16 
,142,9,76,166,164,129,42,16,39,0 
,15,161,192,38,48,16,14)3,9,83,39 
5 49 

110 DATA 33,126,80,132,48,8,31,1 
9,16,142,9,84,166,164,129,42,16, 
39,0,35,161,192,39,4,48,24,32,13 
,16,140,9,86,38,2,32,19,49,33,12 
6,80 

120 DATA 163,48,136,32,140,7,0,3 
8,173,92,193, 11,35,158,57,48,24, 
53,64,189,165,73,52,64,52,4,52,1 
6,198,8,189,185,162,189,205,27,1 



98,3,189,185,162,189,205,27 
130 DATA 230,0,193,10,16,36,0,3, 
23,124,37,79,189,189,204,2 3,124, 
30,174,228,134,66,171,12,23,124, 
18,2 30,13,2 3,124,19,31,137,79,18 

9,189,204,189,185,88,53,16,53,4, 

32,166,57 

140 • 

150 FOR X=20539 TO 20762 

160 : READ I 

170 : POKE X,I 

180 NEXT X 

190 EXEC 20539 

200 END 



Listing 3: ALLRAM 



THIS PROGRAM WILL PUT THE 
COCO 2 INTO ALL RAM MODE 



10 1 
20 1 
30 ' 

40 DATA 26,80,142,128,0,127,255, 
222,166,132,127,255,223,167,132, 

48,1,140,255,0,38,239,28,159,57 
50 FOR A=&HE00 TO &HE18 
60 : READ X 
70 : POKE A,X 
80 NEXT 

90 EXEC&HE00:POKE 65503,0 
100 END 



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Caladuril II — Weatherstone 9 s End 
Passing on the Torch 



If you've negotiated other role-playing, 
puzzle-solving games and think you have 
seen it all, this one's for you. In order to 
successfully finish Caladuril II — 
Weatherstone' s End, you must have the 
crafty inventiveness of Leonardo da Vinci, 
the guile of an aborigine tracker, the mind 
of Rube Goldberg and the patience of Job. 

This is not a difficult game. It is a ring- 
tailed, solid-gold near-impossibility. The 
"Scoreboard Pointers" department in 
rainbow can expect a flood of letters begging 
for advice and hints. The question is: Will 
there be anybody out there with answers? 
Those who know some of them can 
justifiably chortle with glee and congratulate 



themselves on solving each diabolical puzzle 
that presents itself. Even if you never get 
to the game's end, there are plenty of 
obstacles you can be proud of solving. 

The scenario seems standard: Olin, son 
of Jamerend, has been sent by the sages to 
recover the legendary Weatherstone on 
Lord's Isle. To do that, he must somehow 
overcome shipwreck, negotiate maze-like 
architecture, solve complicated puzzles 
and defeat the awesome power of Silmnoleh 
before returning the Weatherstone to its 
rightful place so that the disastrous weather 
can be stopped. Variation on a theme? 
Perhaps, but what makes Caladuril II so 
different are the absolutely sly and devious 



puzzles. Nothing is useless. Almost every 
item has a purpose; many items can be 
combined and used together. Timing and 
paying attention to what happens when 
you do certain things are critical. 

Above all, you must think! Caladuril II 
is not an arcade game where you mindlessly 
blast away at swarming enemies. It requires 
exercising every last ounce of creative 
brainpower you have. Even though not 
mentioned in the instructions, this could 
be an excellent game for two people to 
work on, either together or separately. As 
time passes (days or weeks), new ideas 
will suddenly arrive — maybe at inopportune 
moments when you can't immediately 
charge into your computer room and try 
them — which may, repeat may, be the 
answer to the one situation you've been 
mentally screaming about for so long. 

The game comes on two disks for the 
CoCo 3. You can back up the Play disk but 



126 



THE RAINBOW 



June 1989 



not the Boot disk. There is a one-year 
warranty, however. The instructions advise 
you to put a write-protect tab on the original 
Play disk before using the backup procedure. 
This is especially good advice if you're 
using one drive. 

There is one slight catch. Due to certain 
proprietary routines, the game will not use 
the advanced features of a disk operating 
system such as ADOS 3 or a Disk basio 
compatible hard disk DOS. Apparently it 
will still play on those systems but won't 
use their advanced capabilities. This doesn't 
strike me as a big problem. 

If you mess up, there is a game-save 
option that I recommend you exercise often. 
Since the system allows only one game- 
save per Play disk, I recommend you make 
several Play disks. One really great feature 
is the "Concede" command. This allows 
you to return to the nearest non-critical 
point in the game in case you messed up 
big time, thus avoiding having to go all the 
way back to the beginning if you fall into 
the lava. 

The instruction booklet also includes a 
short history of the Fall of Tarin, the events 
that led to today's current situation. Tolkien 
aficionados may note some close similarities 
in names (this lends to the overall 
atmosphere). 




The graphics are terrific, thanks to the 
256-by-192, 16-color screens and the 
number of graphics tiles. At least you have 
some nice, clear pictures to look at while 
you're pulling out your hair trying to solve 
the latest mystery. In fact, they are some of 
the best graphics to be seen on a CoCo 3 
with RGB monitor. (Take a look at the 
lightning as only one example.) An RGB 
monitor isn't absolutely necessary, of course, 
but it certainly adds to the viewing pleasure. 

The playing screen is divided into four 
sections: (1) the Play Screen (in color), 
where you maneuver the little figure that is 



Olin; (2) the Visible Objects area, which 
explains exactly what you're seeing; (3) 
the Inventory and; (4) the Text and Command 
Area. At first it seems that the Play Screen 
could be larger, but after a few minutes 
you'll appreciate the other displays. Plus, 
the memory saved allows for much more 
involved scenery and more exotic objects. 

You move Olin about by means of the 
arrow keys. By using two at once you can 
move him at various angles, which is itself 
a bit of a challenge, to keep him from 



bumping into things. There are some very 
tight spaces in the tunnels. 

Between moves, you type commands 
onto the screen, using one of the nearly 70 
available verbs. All you have to do is 
figure out which ones work. There are 
instructions on how to tie two verbs together, 
using special linking words, but patience 
is a definite virtue while you're learning. 
Having a dictionary handy is probably a 
good idea. 

Now for some hints and comments. The 



The Two Bel 

Oblique Triad, founded in March of 
1987, was created to be a vehicle for owners/ 
programmers JeffNoyle and Dave Triggerson 
to write and play software of their own 
design. For their first offering, the game 
Caladuril, Flame of Light, the two left the 
marketing chores to another company. Now 
they are doing their own marketing, however, 
and have just come out with an exciting 
sequel to Flame of Light, Caladuril II — 
W eather stone s End. 

The game's concept, presentation format 
and actual programming was done by Jeff 
Noyle, who also designed the graphics and 
auxiliary items. Dave Triggerson worked 
out the disk I/O and translation of English 
commands into computerese. 

Both partners are avid fantasy and science 
fiction fans, with somewhat differing tastes. 
However, they teamed together to produce 
quite an impressive computerized "alternative 
reality" package. Moreover, they've done 
their homework; when queried, they granted 
the similarity between the name Caladuril 
and Galadriel, stating that Caladuril is a 
combination of two Elvish words meaning 
"flame of light." (Before the really serious 
Tolkien students get upset about possible 
translation mistakes — don't fret about it. 
The combination serves the purpose well, 
and has a certain ring to it.) 

Caladuril II is written entirely in machine 
code, using the double clock speed mode; 
Triad says that is the only way to get speed 
and smoothness on a CoCo 3. They also 
used 256-by-192, 16-color screens instead 
of 320-by-192 screens, which gives them 
some extra room on the Play disk to display 
certain objects up close when you look at 
them. It appears to me that they have used 
the CoCo 3's capabilities to the maximum 
possible while providing an enjoyable and 
intriguing game. 

The company develops software 
exclusively for the CoCo. All current 
programs are for the CoCo 3, except one: 
Caladuril, Flame of Light. That one they * ve 



ind the Triad 

decided to rerelease, and it is written for any 
64K CoCo 1, 2 or 3 with one drive. If 
demand is heavy enough, they might develop 
more programs for the CoCo 2, but they 
consider the CoCo 3 to be the future. Although 
the bulk of their business is through mail 
order, they have had a few visitors and 
certainly don't discourage customers who 
want to drop by instead of using the mail. 

To the two programmers, packaging and 
accompanying "goodies" are very important. 
Caladuril II has a large map plus a pouch of 
real "Power Stones" to give you the feel of 
the game. 

The future? Next out is The Seventh 
Link, a role-playing adventure with multiple 
characters, multiple worlds and 3-D dungeons. 
In addition to the three program disks,it 
includes a 30-page manual with illustrations, 
two double-sided maps, a quick reference 
card, a burnt and blackened copy of a "last" 
log entry and — a strip of simulated 
superconductor wire. Any other items, such 
as liquid nitrogen, are up to you as you 
immerse yourself in the story line. 

A sound digitizer/editor called Studio 
Works is also in production; linked with that 
is a hardware analog-to-digital converter 
under development. And they expect to 
have a CoCo 3-D M*rble M*dness type of 
game ready for the October RAINBOWfest. 

Jeff Noyle and Dave Triggerson spent 
three years, off and on, programming 
Caladuril, Flame of Light. When that was 
complete, they began work on Caladuril II. 
Their own interest plus requests from buyers 
of the original game prompted them to take 
on that task pretty much full-time. 

The company name? Oblique Triad refers 
to the three slanted color bars on top of your 
CoCo. Go ahead, take a look; they're there, 
aren't they? The company's declared aim is 
"to produce software packages that are the 
pinnacle of quality in their category; the 
best the CoCo has seen." 

They are off to a terrific start. 

□ 



June 1 989 THE RAINBOW 1 27 



A New Dimension in Alternate Realities 



Manfred stood on the bridge's dark planks, 
his black bearskin battle uniform whipping 
in the cold wind shrieking through Skull 
Canyon. His heavy sword was already 
unsheathed and in his strong right hand. At 
the opposite end of the bridge, the foremost 
Plisn warrior stepped onto the scarred oak 
planking. "We meet again, demon-spawn/* 
he shouted above the howling wind. 

"We do indeed, Manfred of Arcsip." The 
foremost Plisn warrior, who had no name 
other than that given to him in fear by those 
he had defeated, smiled grimly through 
jagged teeth. "This time you will not escape 
me. 

Manfred smiled in return. He had waited 
many planting seasons for this moment. He 
sensed a sharp-eyed presence: The archers 
of Karultee were concealed in the dark 
woods behind him, sturdy bowmen ready to 
send their thrumming arrows into the lightly- 
armored Plisn hordes as soon as he raised 
his sword. He knew also that the cavalry 
from the ringed fortresses in Wazoo would 
soon arrive, completing the elaborate trap 
he had so painstakingly calculated. 

As he started to raise his sword, a 
blackboard filled with arcane, student- 
scribbled symbols appeared in his mind's 
eye. For an instant that froze time, he was 
once again Manfred Arthur Mueller, math 
teacher at Pasco High School. Then the 
image was gone, the wind had returned and 
he could sense bows bending as his sword 
rose higher. 

Is this man suffering from a delusion or 
an inappropriate daydream? Nope, he's 
involved in what is now known as an "alternate 



description of an item is often a clue on 
how to use it. Don't forget to look at 
objects. Just remember that 99.9 percent 
of the objects are there for a reason. 




For the mappers in the crowd, at least 
two of the areas in the game are not capable 
of being mapped by the grid-square method. 
The mine, for example, just wanders here 



reality," That's the latest term for fantasy or 
science fiction where the hero or heroine is 
suddenly transported to another place, perhaps 
another time. Theories of parallel universes 
existing in uneasy coexistence with ours 
become a strange sort of reality as the 
adventurers flip back and forth between 
worlds while trying to right some terrible 
wrong or accompl ish some mission given to 
them — often against their protests — by 
forces they don't understand. 

Why this current fascination with alternate 
realities? Some believe that it's the ultimate 
form of escapism, in which people of ordinary 
talents and moderate courage can identify 
with people of extraordinary talent and 
courage (who also have pure hearts and just 
causes) — and alleviate some of the pressures 
in their lives. 

Reading this type of fiction allows us to 
believe that if things really got tough, each 
of us would be able to dredge up the courage 
and strength to defend our loved ones and 
defeat the "system." 

Stephen King, in his book Danse Macabre, 
examined horror movies and theorized that 
the movies reflected the greatest fears of 
their respective decade: mutations caused 
by radiation, alien invaders, illegal medical 
experiments and so on. By extension, many 
of our current fears seem to huddle around 
the idea that individuals are being smothered 
and buried in "the system's" lack of caring 
about us. So, stories that tell us about people 
who fought "The Evil Ones" (or City Hall!) 
and won are encouraging even though they 
are basically illogical and ignore the fact 
that, as Frederick the Great of Prussia wrote, 



and there. The castle can be grid-mapped; 
it contains rooms in a somewhat logical 
sequence. However, the teleporters (the 
pulsing diamond shapes) will disorient 
you somewhat. Don't overlook anything; 
think how things could be used with each 
other. 

The Teleport Maze, should you get that 
far, can be mapped somewhat if you account 
for the fact that. . . huh-uh. Figure that bit 
out for yourself. One portion of it contains 
25 teleportals, enough to please even the 
most jaded player — and that's only part 
of the maze. Later on you'll encounter 
massive, Lovecraftian architecture, as if 
you'd been brought to the dreaded and 
shunned island of R'lyeh. If your 
imagination is operating at full speed, you'll 
see what might be green ooze dripping 



"God is always with the strongest battalions." 

For those who want to get more closely 
involved in the process, there are computer 
programs that put you right in the middle of 
the whole mess. You have to solve various 
complex puzzles, accumulate what appears 
to be useless junk that turns out to be vital 
later on, decide which path to take in what 
is generally a maze designed by the Marquis 
de Sade on a bad day, and defeat a series of 
nightmarish monsters thrown into your path. 
This is what we call "fun." The advantage, 
of course, is that if you do get doused in 
watermelon-flavored acid, are shrunk to the 
size of a lemon drop, get carved up by a 
ravenous ogre wielding a door-sized axe or 
fall into a pit of highly-irritated aardvarks, 
you can always start the game again. 

What an Adventure is not is totally 
relaxing. People have been known to become 
obsessed with games and play them for 72 
hours straight. They then return tothe job 
that caused the stress they were trying to 
escape in the first place and mutter strange 
phrases while taking notes about new ways 
to defeat the Moon Lord's deadly maze and 
rescue the princess. (If fellow employees 
begin to avoid you more than usual, you 
might be spending too much time in the 
Crimson and Gray Halls of Wazoo, Wally.) 

On the other hand, the next time you take 
the golden locket to the third level in the 
Tower of Thlingel's Doom, you just might 
figure out how to avoid the mirror's 
mindbending gaze and open the large 
mahogany chest. 

You won't know unless you try, will 
you? □ 



from those Cyclopean buildings, while a 
quiet but sinister voice whispers, "Cthulhu 
fhtagn." 

So, if you combine elements of the 
Cthulhu mythos, the Ring trilogy, Tom 
Sawyer, the Scout manual and Hints from 
Heloise, you are ready to tackle Caladuril 
II — W eather stone' s End. Break out the 
notebooks, the Thesaurus, the graphing 
paper and pencils, turn your brain up to 
"high" and settle down for a long siege. 
You are going to be frustrated and dismayed 
at times, but you will have a real feeling of 
accomplishment every time you solve one 
of the enigmas. 

P.S. Don't come to me for advice and 
hints. My descriptions of the various areas 
are based on the extensive help Oblique 
Triad sent me so that I could better evaluate 



128 



THE RAINBOW June 1989 



the game. They also swore me to secrecy. 
So from here on, you're on your own. 

Good luck to you. It's going to be a 
tough but enjoyable journey. 

(Oblique Triad, 32 Church St., Georgetown, 
Ontario, Canada L7G 2A7, 416-877-8149; 
$32 US, $38 CDN, $2.50 S/H) 

— John M. Hebert 



CoCo1,2&3 



1 Softwar e— - 
Kcal — 

Calendar-Generation 
for Your 

DMP-Compatible 

Kcal is a hybrid (part basic and part 
machine language) calendar-generation 
program that allows you to print a calendar 
7 inches high by 8 inches wide with your 
comments and notes inserted in the 
appropriate dates. 

To use Kcal, you must have a Color 
Computer 1 or 2 with at least 32K of 
memory and Extended Color basic, or a 
Color Computer 3. Other equipment 
required includes a dot-matrix printer and 
a cassette or disk drive. I received the disk 
version. 

Once booted with a RUN "KCAL'* 
statement, a menu appears that gives you 
the option to load, save, edit or print a file. 
There is also a "quit" option. 

Kcal is very easy to use; the 18-page 
manual is well-written and quite explanatory 
— it even has a "Hints and Help" section 
and a "Notes" page. 

I consider the Edit File function to be 
the heart of the program, for here is where 
you will spend the most time. Upon entering 




"1 have seen many 
appointment-maker 
and a few 
calendar-maker 
programs in my 
t experience, 
but I think Kcal has 
them all beat. 




• • • 




this option, you are prompted for the year 
you want to view. The calendar-generation 
calculations are based on January 1, 1988, 
so you can view only the years from 1988 
forward. After you choose the year, you 
are asked which month of that year you 
want. Pressing only the enter key will 
return you to the year prompt. Once you 
select a month, a calendar for that month 
appears on the screen. Moving a cursor up, 
down or across the month, you can stop on 
any date, enter a message consisting of 
three lines with up to 15 characters each, 
then move to another date or return to the 
month or year prompts. 

The Print File option outputs a calendar 
to your printer in a 7-by-8 inch format. The 
size is nice, and the calendar is easy to look 
at, in standard calendar format with the 
month spelled out at the top followed by 
the year, both in expanded print. The days 
of the week are spelled out across the top 
of the "date-box" columns, with each "date- 
box" being approximately 1 inch square. 
Your message for a date, if any, is printed 
at the bottom. There is enough room for 
you to write notes at a later time, such as 
for a doctor's appointment or dinner 
engagement. 



I experienced no problems using any of 
the program's functions. Kcal is very user- 
friendly. (Although there is no way to set 
your printer's baud rate from inside the 
program, you can do this before running 
Kcal.) I was inserting and editing messages 
within a few minutes of running the program. 
I actually found myself having fun as I 
retrieved my commercial-type calendar 
from the dining room and began entering 
special dates, federal holidays and friends' 
and relatives' birthdays. 

I have seen many appointment-maker 
and a few calendar-maker programs in my 
computer experience, but I think Kcal has 
them all beat, especially when it comes to 
performance and the bottom line — price. 
It's hard to find a better deal for your 
DMP-compatible, although it would be 
nice to be able to use this program with 
other printers. 

(King Cottage Industries, 1814 Valley St. 
NE, Poulsbo, WA 98370, 206-697-5576; $6: 
First product review from this company 
appearing in THE RAINBOW.) 

— Richard L. McNabb 



1 Softwar e 



CoCo 1 ,2 & 3 



Hard Drive Utilities- 
Support for 
Hyper-IlO 

More and more CoCo owners are 
purchasing hard drives these days, turning 
their already powerful systems into super- 
powerful setups. And it seems that nearly 
all of these hard drive owners are using the 
Burke & Burke Hyper-HO operating system. 
New users quickly learn that hard drives 



Live rock 'n ro/i -- a coo/ jazz band - a baroque trio 
Do it a// yourself w/th the he/p of your CoCo! 

If you've never heard what a CoCo and a MIDI synthesizer can do together, you're in for a i 
real treat! Your CoCo can act as a sophisticated music controller. Use it to compose music 
on a graphics screen that looks just like printed music, and then play it on your synthesizer 
for incredible 8-part music. Or use it as a ten track tape recorder; advanced programming 

then lets you edit, modify, and perfect your performance as much as you wish. 

• Lyra (an 8 part MIDI music composition program; a great way to enjoy all the music 
you could never hope to play!) $59.95 

• Lyra Lybrary (a 16 disk collection of music transcriptions for Lyra) $14.95 each disk 

• The Lyra Companion (a 100 page book packed with tips on using Lyra) $9.95 

• CoCo MIDI 3 (a complete professional quality MIDI sequencer) $150.00 

• FBEDIT (Edit and create new voices for the FB-01) $29.95 





Rulaford Research 

P.O. Box 143 

Imperial Beach, CA 92032 
(619) 690-3648 (evenings 6-10 PT) 



June 1989 THE RAINBOW 1 29 



can easily become cluttered, overflowing 
with files. Finding that one file you need 
can become a real undertaking — taking 
hours, if not days, to unclutter a hard drive 
system. Hard Drive Utilities was written 
with these Hyper-I/O users in mind. 

Before you attempt to run this software 
you must first have Hyper-I/O booted in 
memory with the correct drivers loaded. 
The software will operate on a CoCo 1, 2, 
and 3 with at least 64K of memory, Disk 
basic and Extended Color basic. The main 
program is completely commented and 
easy to modify if you want to custom- 
design it to your system. 

Hard Drive Utilities is a piece of cake 
to boot — simply run HDUTIL.BAS. After 
you run it, a menu of options will appear 
(you choose an option simply by pressing 
its number). The options will let you back 
up device to device, back up to floppies, 
restore from floppies, search/copy/rename/ 
kill files and more. 

These options are self-explanatory, and 
they all offer the hard drive user helpful 
utilities. I especially liked Option 3, Backup 
Hard Drive to Disk. The advantage of this 
option over other look-alike software is 
that every sector of a floppy disk is used; 
the files are backed up in a compressed 
format. This allows maximum storage per 
floppy for your system. The compressed 
files backed up to disk cannot be read 
normally by basic until they are restored to 
the hard drive under Option 4. It is not 
necessary to back up the entire hard drive; 
you can back up just a specified section. 
This is a fabulous feature. Many times I 
only want one area of my hard drive backed 
up. 

Another super feature of this software 
is its ability to use wildcard filenames. So, 
if you need to search for afile but you can't 
remember the exact spelling of its filename, 
the wildcard feature can be a big help. 

Hyper-I/O users whose hard drives are 
stuffed full of files will really appreciate 
this software. It operated efficiently on my 
30-Meg hard drive, searching for files. I 
used Hard Drive Utilities on both my 64K 
CoCo 2 and on my 5 12K CoCo 3, but the 
software didn't even know the difference 
between the two machines. It would have 
been nice if the author had distinguished 
between the CoCo 2 and the CoCo 3 so that 
CoCo 3 users wouldn't have to endure the 
32-column screens. 

The software is delivered on a 35-track 
floppy disk with seven pages of 



documentation, and the disk is not copy- 
protected. If you're pulling your hair out 
trying to find lost files within your hard 
drive, Hard Drive Utilities is just what the 
doctor ordered. 

(KB Enterprises, 435 Brightwaters Drive, 
Cocoa Beach, FL 32931, 407-799-3253; $21.95 
plus $1.50 S/H: First product review from 
this company appearing in THE RAINBOW.) 

— Brian R. Smith 



Softwar e 



CoCo 1 ,2 & 3 



The Black Grid- 
Riddle of the 
Black Box 

Logic puzzles — they drive me crazy! 
I once helped a friend get revenge on a 
Rubik's Cube by blowing it to kingdom- 
come with a 30-30! Really! I'll show you 
the video tape. 

Well, despite that, I keep buying them. 
I own several logic games for my CoCo 3, 
but none of them have caused my hair loss 
to accelerate as quickly as The Black Grid 
from SPORTSware. 

The game is played on an eight-by- 
eight grid by a single player. You use the 
joystick to place yourself (the cursor) at 
the end of a row of blocks and shoot an 
invisible ray down the row, trying to locate 
hidden targets. There can be from two to 
nine targets hidden, depending on the 
difficulty level selected. The object is to 
find all of them in as few shots as possible. 
One of four things can happen on each 
shot: a hit, a detour, a reflection or a clean 
miss. 

Hits and reflections produce a single 
marker where you are standing, while misses 
and detours produce two markers, one 
where you are standing and one at the 
point where your ray exited the grid. From 
these markers, you must deduce the locations 
of the hidden targets in the grid. When you 
think you know where one is, place your 
cursor on the block and press the firebutton 
to mark it. You can change your mind at 
any time until you actually end the game. 

Are you unimpressed? Does this sound 
too easy? Let me warn you, don't 
underestimate this puzzle. At the higher 
levels, this could make the preacher cuss! 

Oh, sure, with only two or three targets, 



it's fairly easy to figure out where they are 
hidden. At four and five that ray starts to 
bounce around inside the grid a little. At 
six and seven, you'd better have some 
coffee ready because you're going to be up 
for a few hours. At eight and nine it might 
be time to switch from coffee to something 
a bit stronger. It's not impossible for the 
ray to bounce around in the grid and exit 
through the block right next to where you 
are standing — and hit absolutely nothing. 
It's also possible for the ray to be fired 
from the upper-left corner and register a 
hit on a target that is hidden in the lower- 
right corner. Since you can't fire diagonally, 
that may sound quite impossible. I assure 
you, it's possible. I've been there! 

Once you've decided where you think 
all the targets are, press the E key and they 
will be revealed to you. You will be charged 
10 penalty points for each wrong guess. 

The game, and I use that term loosely, is 
played on any CoCo 3 using the Shack's 
regular or deluxe joystick. Don't try Atari 
sticks with an interface; they won't work. 
The program arrived on disk with no 
indication as to whether a tape version is 
available. I would hope that tape is available 
since some newer CoCoNuts don't have 
drives yet, and I would hate to see them 
miss out on this. 

Two practice games are included as a 
tutorial to help you learn the rules. Study 
them — you'll need them later. 

When you register a miss or a detour, 
two markers are generated, one at each end 
point. When another miss or detour is 
registered, two more markers of a different 
color are generated. This makes keeping 
track of individual shots a breeze. 

At the higher levels a "peek" feature is 
included to let you sneak a peek every now 
and then. Use of the peek feature costs you 
points, so use it sparingly! 

Instructions for play are also located 
right in the program. This makes it very 
difficult to misplace them. I always like to 
have hard copy of program instructions, 
but in this case that may be impossible. 
Game play is easier to understand by using 
the tutorial rather than looking at a diagram. 
The only necessary instructions are printed 
right on the disk: RUN "BLK GRID". 

The Black Grid does not have a lot of 
"bells and whistles." It doesn't need them. 
With this type of game they only get in the 
way. 

The only fault, if you can call it that, is 
that joystick control is somewhat sensitive. 



130 THE RAINBOW June 1989 



If you move the stick too quickly you'll 
find yourself jumping all over the grid. 
This is due mostly to the limitations of the 
stick itself, not the program. 

A couple of things should be noted if 
you are considering buying the game. At 
the higher levels especially, the game may 
be too difficult for the younger set to play. 
This is a thinking person's game all the 
way, and there are too few of this type 
around. You really have to think! 

Also, you will probably need to take 
time to study the in-program instructions 
and go through the practice games. If you 
don't, it's easy to become confused by 
what those little markers are telling you. 

The Black Grid sells for $21. If you 
enjoy pulling your hair out over logic 
games, spend the money. You ' 11 be bald in 
no time. 

(SPORTSware, 1251 S. Reynolds Road, Suite 
414, Toledo, OH 43615, 419-389-1515; $21) 

— William Baird 



1 Software 



CoCo 1 & 2 



Rustler — 
Word Gaines 
at the Scaffold 

Rustler is a Hangman-type game written 
in basic for CoCos 1 , 2 and 3 with at least 
32K of Extended basic. Cassette and disk 
versions are available. As everyone knows, 
Hangman is a game in which players try to 
guess the letters to a word without hanging 
their "man." 

Rustler comes with a file called WORDS, 
which is a list of 500 words from which the 
program randomly chooses words for play 
(but never the same word twice in one 
play). Other files included are three utilities: 
FSORT, a machine language program, and 
RED IT and RCOPY, two basic programs. 
We'll talk about these utilities later. 

Upon loading and running Rustler, you 
are greeted by the title screen and a song 
that plays for a short while. The screen 
changes after the song and you are asked 
for the filename of the file that contains 
words you want to use. 

When the word file has been located 
and loaded by Rustler, the playing screen 



is then drawn in P MODE 3 graphics. This 
screen contains the scaffold, an area for 
the letters you guess and an area for the 
word to be guessed. Every letter you enter 
is displayed onscreen to save you from 
making the same choice twice. If you do 
choose a letter already given, the program 
notifies you of this. 

Correctly guessing the word results in a 
rendition of the song/'m an Old Cowhand 
From The Rio Grande. If you run out of 
guesses, The Ballad of Tom Dooley is 
played. Either way, you get to see the word 
you were trying to uncover. 

Now for the utilities. 

The basic program REDIT allows you to 
create your own list of words. A word file 
can hold up to 500 words of one to 20 



letters each. REDIT loads and executes the 
file FSORT, which handles the majority of 
the input/output needed to create a word 
list. 

Another available option lets you check 
for exact duplicates of words in a file. The 
manual states that this procedure takes 
about 10 minutes, but checking a file of 
500 words with three duplicate words on 
my 64K CoCo 2 took less than three minutes. 
You can also print or edit a word file. 

I had the opportunity to talk to the 
author of this program, and he brought to 
my attention a fatal error that can occur 
when using REDIT and inserting words into 
a file. This error occurs if the user 
accidentally enters a non-alphabetic 
character into the word list. (The manual 



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June 1989 THE RAINBOW 1 31 



warns you not to try to enter numbers or 
special symbols.) 

RCOPY is used to back up the machine 
language program, FSORT. 

Some people might think Rustler would 
be too simple a game for them. But let me 
tell you, as a 33-year-old, that I found 
Rustler to be quite challenging at times 
and also fun to play. So did my wife and 
our daughter. Trying to guess words with 
20 characters is hard enough, but a lot of 
games were also lost trying to guess words 
with only three characters, and I still have 
not gone through the whole 500-word list. 

Rustler and its accompanying programs 
are very user-friendly, and the author seems 
to have thought out each program well. I 
myself am looking forward to more 
programs from this company. Rustler is an 
excellent value. 

(King Cottage Industries, 1818 Valley St. 
NE, Poulsbo, WA 98370, 206-697-5576; $5: 
First product review from this company 
appearing in THE RAINBOW.) 



Softwar e 



CoCo3 



Chess-Nuts — 

Chess on a Shoestring 

Chess-Nuts, the new program offered 
by Mousesoft Software for the Color 
Computer 3, requires a disk drive and 
RGB monitor. It is a chessboard simulator 
rather than a game in itself. No rules of 
chess are implemented, including the basic 
one that white always moves first, and no 
concession has been made for a player 
who wants to take on the computer. Also, 
the game does not supply the rules of 
chess, nor does it cancel illegal moves. 

The software is loaded by entering the 
LOADM "*'* command. Once the game has 
been loaded, it executes automatically — 
a nice touch. A Set/Reset graphics title 
screen appears, and then the program 
switches to the CoCo 3's Hi-Res graphics. 
The program presents a menu and offers 
options for going to the board screen or 
exiting from the program. The graphic 
representation of the chess pieces is sharp 
and accurate, but this benefit would be lost 
without the RGB monitor. Those with a 
TV or composite monitor would not 
appreciate the software because the colors 
would not be correct, and the 80-column 



text, which is all that is utilized, would not 
be legible. 

Play commences when the coordinates 
for a piece are entered. The piece disappears 
and returns to the screen when the second 
set of coordinates is entered. Coordinates 
are presented in a fashion similar to those 
in the game Battleship. The columns are 
numbered one to eight, and the rows are 
labeled A to H. 




One nice feature of the program is the 
ability to replace a piece on the board. This 
comes in handy when an opponent captures 
one of the pieces either intentionally or 
accidentally. Simply specify the color, piece 
and position, and it returns to the screen. 
This convenience is also useful when the 
player needs to promote a pawn that has 
reached the opposite end of the board. 
Pieces can replace those already in play. 

The program's manual is a small 
pamphlet that slides into the disk jacket — 
a useful location for preventing the loss of 
the instructions. The information is adequate 
for loading and playing. The text is easy to 
understand, requiring only a brief viewing 
before playing a game. Someone can run 
the program in five minutes, ready to 
challenge a friend to a quick round of 
chess. A game save feature lets users carry 
on prolonged games. 

The program is simple to operate but 
lacks many features that could have been 
included. The price of this game is $19.95 
— relatively steep for a CoCo program of 
this caliber. People looking for a computer 
program that doesn't require another player 
should look elsewhere. However, if you 
want a computerized version of a chess 
game that is ready to play against an 
opponent (and allows cheating), then Chess- 
Nuts is a good deal. 

(Mousesoft Software, P.O. Box 18038, Mil- 
waukee, WI 53218, 414-466-3617; $19.95: 
First product review from this company 
appearing in THE RAINBOW.) 

—Fred Miller 



Software 



CoCo 1 , 2 & 3 



Floppy Filer — 
Keep Your Files 
Organized 

My computer time is precious to me. 
After all, there are only so many hours in a 
day, and I can't spend all of them in front 
of the computer. That's why I hate to 
misplace a program. I want to spend quality 
time with my computer; I don't want to 
spend valuable minutes trying to remember 
which floppy holds the application I need 
to complete a project. I need to know 
where everything is when I need it. I need 
to keep my disks organized. 

That's why the program Floppy Filer is 
perfect for me. The program, which runs 
on any CoCo, creates an alphabetized list 
of all of your disks. When you run the 
program you are presented with the 
following choices, which are selected using 
the up and down arrow keys: 

1) Input Disk Directory 

2) Sort List 

3) Save List to Disk 

4) Load List from Disk 

5) Print List 

6) Set Parameters 

7) Quit 

The first time you run the program, you 
will want to choose Option 6, Set Parameters, 
first. This option lets you enter the default 
drive and the printer baud rate. You can 
change the default drive and baud rates 
easily. 

Once you have entered the defaults, 
Option 1, Input Disk Directory, asks for a 
one- to seven-character identifier (name) 
for the disk in the drive. The program then 
reads the disk's directory and stores the 
directory in the computer's memory, so 
you won't have to replace the program 
disk after each directory is read. The program 
sorts according to filename, and it takes 
four minutes to sort a maximum of 1 150 
files. A message is displayed if you reach 
the maximum file limit. You can then save 
the current list and begin a new one. When 
the list is saved to disk, the data file has an 
extension of . FPF. 

When loading a list from disk, the 



1 32 THE RAINBOW June 1 989 



program will display a "File not Found" 
message if the name of the file entered 
can't be located. If this happens, you are 
prompted to re-enter the filename. 

If you send the data to a printer, the 
information is printed in three columns, 
each containing the filename and extension 
followed by the disk identification. When 
you print to the screen, you can return to 
the menu rather than listing all the files. 

Before ending a session, the program 
will verify that you really want to quit. If 
you didn't want to quit, it will return you to 
the menu. If you have a CoCo 3, you 
should either reboot or turn off the computer 
after using it because some commands 
won't work after ending the program. 

Floppy Filer is written in basic but 
includes a machine language sort. The 
disk is not copy-protected, so you can (and 
should) make a backup for your own use. 
The thorough instructions are supplied in 
an eight-page booklet. 

I liked Floppy Filer; it's functional and 
easy to use. The program can help you 
avoid hours of frustration when you try to 
locate an elusive program. If you want to 
organize your floppies and make your 



computer time a little more efficient, then 
this program is for you. 

(Gregory Software, Box 573, Kirkland, IL 
60146, 815-522-3593; $8: First product re- 
view for this company appearing in THE 
RAINBOW.) 

— Lee Deuell 



1 Softwar e 

Wargame Designer 
Icon Disk #1 — 
A Strategist's Tool 

"Front rank . . . Fire!" Crack! "Rear rank 
. . . Fire!" Crack! "Front rank . . . Fire!" 
Crack! 

The Zulus stopped momentarily as the 
volleys tore into their ranks, then came on 
again. And again, but bravery was no 
match for rifles and the disciplined British 
Army. This time. There was also, after all, 
the Battle of Isandhlwana — the British 
Army's version of Custer's Last Stand. 



SPORTSware's Icon Disk #1 is out, 
wargamers. You can recreate the Battle of 
Rorke's Drift with one of the eight terrain/ 
units sets. You need a CoCo 3, a disk drive 
and the Wargame Designer package (see 
the August 1988 review of Wargame 
Designer). The neat part is that you don't 
really need any artistic talent, which was a 
great comfort to me. Oh, sure, you can 
modify the available symbols/graphics just 
as you can on the original Wargame Designer 
system. In fact, I've already modified the 
standard military symbol for self-propelled 
artillery. Piece of cake. 

' *' .::V::sV-''''"*V*v ;Vt!>-: ' ^ \V ■' "•• 

"This icon disk is for 
the serious wargamer, 
one who knows what 
happened at Rorke's 
Drift, during the 
Wagonbox Fight or at 
the second Battle of 
TobruL " 



* ultra # ultra * ultra * 



ULTRA- BASE 

The ultimate database program for 
the CoCo 1, 2, or 3 with at least 
64K. 

Keep track of over 500 names and 
addresses, with up to 32K of infor- 
mation in memory at any time. 

Alphabetizes by first or last 
word in any of the seven categories. 

Arranges positive numbers in 
numerical order. 

Multiplies any two designated 
categories to obtain lists with 
total value. 

Prints mail labels with up to 
four lines from any designated cat- 
egories. 

Very "user friendly", just make 
choices from the self-explanatory 
menu to tell the program what you 
want to do. 64K Tape or Disk. 



TO SEE TOTHIAN'S OTHER 

INNOVATIVE IDEAS - WRITE 

AND HAVE YOUR NAME PLACED 

ON OUR FREE MAILING LIST. 

NO OBLIGATION. 

FREE CALENDAR PROGRAM 1 
WITH YOUR SUMMER ORDER J 



ULTRA -MERGE 

Create personalized letters, forms 
etc. using your favorite word 
processor program and ULTRA-BASE. 

Use your word processor program 
to create an ASCII master copy of a 
letter (or whatever), leaving blanks 
at various strategic places within 
it. 

Then, use ULTRA-MERGE to print 
personalized copies of this letter 
by filling in the letter's blanks 
with data taken from the categories 
you specify within the designated 
ULTRA-BASE files. Print one letter 
for each record in the specified 
ULTRA-BASE file, or you can write 
the letter for a designated name, 
zip code, town, state or whatever. 
64K disk. 

Three ULTRA Ideas from 



ULTRA-CAT 

Organize your program collection in 
a fast and nearly effortless 
manner. Simply insert one of your 
program disks into the drive, and 
ULTRA-CAT reads them and creates a 
7-category ULTRA-BASE file describ- 
ing the contents of that disk. Keep 
a separate file for each of your 
disks, or merge all of the individ- 
ual files into one massive file 
containing information on about 1000 
different programs - and this entire 
file can be in memory at one timel 
Then, using the powerful sorting, 
editing, and printing abilities of 
ULTRA-BASE itself, you can have the 
most organized program collection in 
the country. Requires at least 64K. 



ULTRA-BASE DISK OR TAPE 



$24. 95 



ULTRA-BASE AND ULTRA-MERGE. $39.95 



ULTRA-BASE AND ULTRA-CAT. 



$39.95 



ULTRA-BASE , ULTRA-MERGE , AND 
ULTRA-CAT $54.95 



ADD $2.00 S/H 
ADD $4.00 FOR U.P.S. 
ADD $3.00 FOR CO.D. 
PA residents Add 6% 
Sales Tax 





TOTHIAN SOFTWARE 

Box 663 
Rimersburg, PA 16248 



June 1989 THE RAINBOW 133 



There is no instruction booklet. You 
don't need one, either. All the help you 
need is contained in the one-step-at-a-time 
menu, plus your basic knowledge of the 
Wargame Designer system, undoubtedly 
learned from juggling the odds on your 
attacks against Moscow. The instruction 
booklet that comes with Wargame Designer, 
as you already know, gives you the 
modification and design techniques. 

The two-sided disk has a total of eight 
unit/terrain sets, plus palette color files. 
The sets include the following: 

1. humans, elves (spelling a la Tolkien) 
and Ores 

2. standard military symbols (U.S. Army 
type) 

3. humans and ghosts (plus things that 
go bump in the night) 

4. robots 

5. desert armies (8th Army and 
Afrikakorps?) 

6. British and Zulus 

7. adventurers (and adventuresses) 

8. Cowboys and Indians 

You don't need to start from scratch to 
view both sides of the disk. While in the 
Examine Icons mode on one side, just flip 
the disk over before returning to the main 
menu. Since you're not dealing with a 
picky OS-9 setup, CoCo could care less 
about the data or execution directory. 

Once you've chosen which set to use, 
transferring it to a game disk is ridiculously 
easy. The series of menus and steps prevents 
all goofups except deliberately premeditated 
acts of electronic hara-kiri. OK, so now 
you've got a whole new set of icons on a 
game disk. Simply consult the Wargame 
Designer booklet on building anew game, 
using the regular steps to assign terrain 
features and units. This is now the time to 
modify the icons to suit yourself. 

You should do this on a spare gaming 
disk, that is, one that you meant to transfer 
the new icons to and intend to change the 
map and scenario on. Otherwise, if you 
start to play a previous game, you are 
going to have a very strange-looking map. 
Even the newest Tolkien recruit is not 
going to mistake the terrain around Moscow 
for Minas Tirith or the Pelennor Fields. 

SPORTS ware says that newer versions/ 
scenarios of Wargame Designer will use a 
joystick to control menu selection and 
play. While this will be handier than 
plunking away at the keys, hopefully we'll 



be allowed an option. There are a lot of us 
clumsy oaves out here who have trouble 
with joysticks. Of course, "oaves." If that 
rule works with elves and loaves of bread, 
why not for the plural of "oaf? 

This icon disk is for the serious wargamer, 
one who knows what happened at Rorke's 
Drift, during the Wagonbox Fight or at the 
second Battle of Tobruk. It's especially 
useful to the graphically inept wargamer, 
who is sick and tired of trying to draw his 
or her own symbols and having them look 
like somebody crawled inside the monitor 
and got crazy with a blunt crayon. By the 
way, you can also print out an "inventory" 
of each set for future reference and note- 
taking when you're recreating a battle. 

On the other hand, if you don't already 
have Wargame Designer, the f con Disk #1 
won't do you a bit of good unless you like 
looking at excellent graphics for their own 
sake. 

My only suggestion would be to add the 
capability to move the unit icons or terrain 
icons or both, just in case some of us do 
want Ores and elves at the Battle of Moscow. 

Bottom line: an excellent buy. 

(SPORTSware, 1251 S. Reynolds Road, Suite 
414, Toledo, OH 43615, 419-389-1515; $15) 

— John M. Hebert 



wvttWCnv 

Digitizer 3 — 
Collect a Library 
of Sounds 

Sound digitizing has been around for a 
long time, and in different forms, from 
early radio and phonograph records to 
laser discs and sound synthesizers. Now 
the CoCo can digitize sound with a program 
like Digitizer 3, Digitizer 3 digitizes sound 
"samples" from a radio or tape recorder. A 
"sample" is just what you'd think — a 
segment of a sound and not the whole 
thing. 

After a very colorful bootup, you press 
the break key to begin: The word "digitize" 
issues from the monitor or TV speaker. 
Only if your right joystick is plugged in 
can you continue with the program and 



make selections from the menu. (Here's an 
important hint the directions neglect to 
mention: You must keep your printer turned 
off, or you will have printer garbage every 
time you play back a sample.) Digitizer 3 
uses the speed-up poke to ensure that the 
digitized sound is crisp and clear. 

From the main menu selection you can 
choose Option 1, "Test Tape," to hear 
what a taped recording would sound like 
digitized. The second selection lets you 
actually digitize a sound sample. The third 
selection lets you play back your digitized 
sample or a sample you loaded in. Selections 
4 and 5 save and load samples. Selection 6 
lets you view the directory. 

To load a sample you have to type in 
your selection. (Since the program is 
joystick-driven anyway, it would be nice if 
you could use the joystick to choose the 
sample you want from a directory.) The 
documentation is fair. 

Digitizer 3 lets you choose "delay" and 
speed of your sample, both in recording 
and playback. The faster the speed you use 
to record the sample, the higher the quality 
(think of the three recording speeds on a 
VCR: The slower speed yields more 
recording time but at the expense of quality; 
conversely, the higher speed yields higher 
quality but less recording time). 

With this program you can have fun 
digitizing various samples of instruments, 
voices or any recorded sound, even from 
the radio. It would be nice, however, if you 
could make the samples a lot longer and 
somehow incorporate them into other 
programs for special effect (Those who 
know their way around a piece of basic 
code may be able to do this). 

As an ex-music teacher, I would 
appreciate having much longer samples 
and being able to digitize a whole song or 
piece of music and then record it back onto 
tape, from which it could be played through 
a stereo system. Of course, sound digitizing 
programs are memory hogs — a digitized 
sample can easily build until it expands 
beyond what memory and storage devices 
can hold. But this program is good for 
what it does, generating short samples of 
digitized sounds. 

(DSD Software, 12 Undercliff Drive, Scar- 
borough, Ontario M1M 1 AS, 416-267-8920; 
$12.99: First product review for this com- 
pany appearing in THE RAINBOW.) 

— Hadley Hazen 



134 THE RAINBOW June 1989 




The following products have recently been received by THE RAINBOW, examined 
by our magazine staff and issued the Rainbow Seal of Certification, your assurance 
that we have seen the product and have ascertained that it is what it purports to be. 



CC3Flags, a one- to six-player game of world con- 
quest for the CoCo 3. The goal is to employ your 
armies to conquer all the territory you can. It uses the 
CoCo 3's 16-color screen and features keyboard or 
joystick control. SPORTSware, 1251 S. Reynolds 
Road, Suite 414, Toledo, OH 4361 5, (419) 389-1515; 
$21. 

CoCo 3 Game Disk, a menu-driven collection of 10 
Hi-Res board-type games written in basic for the 
CoCo 3, The games come in three categories: "brain" 
games {Up Top, Letters and Swap); puzzles (Daisy, 
Numbers, Switch and Squares); and two-player games 
(Trap3, Indian Giver and Hounds). For the CoCo 3 
and a disk drive. Aftamonow Software, 46 Howe St., 
Milford, CT 06460, (203) 878-3602; $10. 

CoCoRun-12, a program that does "pseudo 
multitasking" of CoCo 2 programs. The programs to 
be managed by CoCoRun-12 cannot modify the basic 
ROMS — CoCoRun-12 assumes you are always in 
all-RAM mode. CoCoRun-12 is incompatible with 
programs that require 64K (which means they do a 
ROM/RAM switch). Requires a 5 1 2K CoCo 3. Roger 
Hallman, 2150 S. 32 St., Milwaukee, Wl 53215, (414 ) 
383-1532; $19.95. 

DIR-MGR+, a disk directory management program 
that backs up the current directory to an unused 
granule, writes the backup to Track 17, repositions a 
filename in a directory, inserts "dummy" filenames, 
and kills or renames files. Hard copies of the directory 
can be printed in two or three columns. Requires a 64K 
CoCo 1, 2 or 3 and a disk drive. Mike Forrest, 14030 
Peyton Drive, #203, Dallas, TX 75240, (214) 235- 
0256; $14.95. 

Disassembler, a program that will disassemble files 
with a starting address greater than or equal to 15000 
(3A98 Hex — can be offset) and an ending address 
less than or equal to 27600 (6BD0 Hex). Outputs in 
decimal or Hex. BDS Software, P.O. Box 485, Glen- 
view, IL 60025, (312) 998-1656; $5. 

Foods II, a program that prints out your daily and 
average intakes of protein, carbohydrates, fat and 
calories after you input one or more days of what you 
eat from a list of 181 foods. Comes on tape or disk for 
64K disk systems or 16K cassette systems. A printer 
capable of printing 90 columns is required. Mike 
Forrest, 14030 Peyton Drive, #203, Dallas, TX 
75240, (214) 235-0256; $14.95. 



King's Quest III: To Heir is Human, the next install- 
ment of the King's Quest series for the CoCo 3. For 
years the evil wizard Manannan has been kidnapping 
young boys to be his slaves, then slaying them before 
their 18th birthdays, when invariably they begin to 
think of escape. Now it is you who is approaching an 
1 8th birthday. Can you secretly learn magic and out- 
smart Manannan? The program comes on five disks 
for the 512K CoCo 3; hard drives are supported. 
Sierra On-Line, P.O. Box 485, Coarsegold, CA 
93614, (209) 683-4468; available at $34.95 from 
Tandy Express Order, (800) 321-3133, No. 26-3285. 

KJV37, the books of Galatians, Ephesians, Philippi- 
ans, Colossians, I Thessalonians and II Thessalonians 
of the King James version of the Bible on disk in 
ASCII format for CoCos 1, 2 and 3. The text can be 
imported into a word processor that supports ASCII. 
BDS Software, P.O. Box 485, Glenview, 1L 60025, 
(312) 998-1656; $3. 

Leisure Suit Larry in the Land of the Lounge 
Lizards, a 3-D animated game that features Larry, 40 
years old and single (and a bit of a nerd), just looking 
for the kind of girls his mother warned him about. The 
player becomes Larry for a night, making the rounds 
of bars, casinos and discos, propositioning women, 
trying to lose his. . .nervousness. The characters 
"walk, talk, and even ignore your best pickup lines." 
Requires a 5 12K CoCo 3 and a disk drive. Sierra On- 
Line, Inc., P.O. Box 485, Coarsegold, CA 93614, 
(209) 683-4468; $39.95. 

Lister, a program for owners of the Smith-Corona L- 
1000 Daisy-Wheel printer that lets them print out 
basic listings. The program to be listed must be saved 
in ASCII on Drive 0. BDS Software, P.O. Box 485, 
Glenview, 1L 60025, (312) 998-1656; $5. 



Menu Maker, a program that lets users design menu 
screens and then writes a basic program to display that 
screen. The resultant program also supports menu 
choice selection and contains simulated subroutines 
for each selection. Gregory Software, Box 573, 
Kirkland, IL 60146, (815) 522-3593; $8. 

Nine-Times, a bimonthly magazine on disk de- 
voted to OS-9, containing articles, reviews, programs 
and their documentation. Requirements include a 
CoCo 3 with 128K or 512K, a disk drive and OS-9 
Level II, JWT Enterprises, 5755 Lockwood Blvd., 
Youngstown, OH 44512, (216) 758-7694; $34.95 for 
one-year subscription. 

Peninsular War, a one-player strategic simulation of 
Wellington's peninsular campaign against the French 
during the Napoleonic War of 1805. The player takes 
the part of the British commander defending Spain 
against the computer-controlled French force. For the 
CoCo 3 and a disk drive; RGB monitor recommended. 
SPORTSware, 1251 S. Reynolds Road, Suite 414, 
Toledo, OH 43615, (419) 389-1515; $21. 

Wargame Designer II, an upgrade to a military stra- 
tegic construction set that includes the Wargame De- 
signer game design system and four ready-to-play 
scenarios. New features include a new menu system, 
a new icon editor, default values for all modifiers and 
unit attributes, and the addition of joystick control in 
all modules. Users create their own scenarios, armies 
and battlefields. For a CoCo 3 floppy disk system. 
SPORTSware, 1251 S. Reynolds Road, Suite 414, 
Toledo, OH 43615, (419) 389-1515; $25. 



First product received from this company 



The Seal of Certification is open to all manufacturers of products for the Tandy 
Color Computer, regardless of whether they advertise in THE RAINBOW. 

By awarding a Seal , the magazine certifies the program does exist — that we have 
examined it and have a sample copy — but this does not constitute any guarantee 
of satisfaction. As soon as possible, these hardware or software items will be 
forwarded to THE RAINBOW reviewers for evaluation. 

— Lauren Wilfoughby 






June 1989 THE RAINBOW 135 



Featur e 

A print utility for OS-9 



PR.B09 



By Richard Ries 



OS-9 is wonderful. It is small and 
tight as an operating system, and 
quite useful once you've learned 
the ropes. But many times when I list a 
program, I find a line of code sitting on a 
perforation, so I wrote PR . B09, a print util- 
ity that: 

1) Titles each page 

2) Skips over perforations 

3) Indents basicu9 listings 

4) Converts too-long lines into right-sized 
ones 

5) Splits compound lines into multiple lines 

6) Puts an extra form-feed in at the end of 
the listing to make tearing the paper off 
easier. 

The program, once written and packed, 
is invoked from the OS-9 prompt: 

pr( "your_f i 1 e_path" ) 
To run it as a background task, use: 

pr(' , your_file_path ,, )& 
Or it can be run from basic09 with: 

run pr("your_file_path") 

Richard Ries is an electronics technician 
who integrates hardware and software at 
work, and programs at home. 



The Listing: Pr 




PROCEDURE 


pr 


Of Of Of Of 

9999 


(* print BASIC09 files with pagination *) 


OT Of Oi /N 

0029 


(* and indentations . *) 


or or / Of 

0040 


(* USAGE: 


or or / a 

0049 


(* " pr( "pathname") 


005F 


(* -if just " pr is typed, a usage message *) 


008E 


(* be shown *) 


009C 




or or a 

009D 


ON ERROR GOTO 130 


00A3 




00A4 


PARAM filename: STRING [24] 


00B0 




00B1 


(* declare variables *) 


00C8 


DIM xx : INTEGER 


00CF 


DIM slash: INTEGER 


00D6 


DIM init: BOOLEAN 


00DD 


DIM indent : BOOLEAN 


00E4 


DIM yy:STRING[2] 


00F0 


DIM jump: STRING 


00F7 


DIM dayt: STRING [12] 


0103 


DIM linein, temp :STRING[ 256] 


0113 


DIM linecount ,pagecount:BYTE 


011E 


DIM disk* printer, pointer: BYTE 


012D 




012E 


(* declare constants *) 


0145 


DIM MAXLINE : INTEGER 


014C 


DIM PAGELEN : INTEGER 


0153 


DIM FF: STRING [1] 


015F 


DIM LF: STRING [1] 


016B 


DIM DQ : STRING [1] 


0177 


DIM DOUBLE : STRING [ 1 ] 


0183 


DIM SINGLE : STRING [ 1 ] 


018F 




0190 


(* Assign values *) 


01A3 


(* max chars . per line *) 


01BC 


MAXLINE: -70 


01C3 


(* max lines per page '*) 


01DB 


PAGELEN :-6 6 


01E2 


(* form feed *) 


01F1 


FF:-CHR$(12) 


01F9 


(* line feed *) 


0208 


LF:-CHR$(10) 


0210 


(* double quotes *) 


0223 


DQ:«CHR$(34) 


022B 




022C 


(* GEMINI PRINTER CODES 


0244 


(* DOUBLE- width print 


025A 


DOUBLE :«CHR$( 14) 


0262 


(* GEMINI PRINTER CODES 


02 7 A 


(* single- width print 


0290 


SINGLE:=CHR$(20) 


0298 




0299 


(* initial indent length *) 



136 THE RAINBOW June 1989 



02B4 


jump:=" " 




(* no indentations i yet *) 


02DA 


indent ;*FALSE 


/•■Ann 

02E0 


(* this is the first time thresh *) 




lnit Js'iKUfc 




^ ** scu up uai>e J 




03LC 


RUN date ( day t) 


>J32o 




JJ3Z7 


OPEN #disk, filename : READ 


0333 


OPEN ^printer , Vp : WRITE 






0341 


(* loop until file is done *) 


035E 


WHILE N0T(E0F(#disk) ) DO 


JJ3o9 


(* get line *) 


0377 


READ #disk, linein 


0381 




pf382 


(* remove line feeds to prevent double- spacing *) 


^3B5 


REPEAT 


03B7 


pointer : «SUBSTR(LF , linem) 


MAMA 

03C3 


IF point erO0 THEN 


*\ M mmm 

03CF 


temp : -RIGHT? ( linein, LEN( linein) -pointer) 


03E0 


1 ine in : »LEFT$ ( 1 ine in , po int er - 1 )+t emp 


y*f mm n 

03F3 


END IF 


03F5 


UNTIL point er«0 


0400 




0401 


(* is this the first page? *) 


041E 


IF in it THEN 


mm f f\ mm 

0427 


GOSUB 120 


ft t it r> 

042B 


init: -FALSE 


^ A3 1 


ENDIF 


0433 




0434 


(* is this a new procedure? *) 


0452 100 




0456 


IF LEFT$ ( 1 ine m , 9 ) PROCEDURE " THEN 


046E 


(■*■ yes- mark it *) 


0480 


linein:-"*** "+linein 


0490 


ELSE 


0494 


^ • mm ♦ . 4 * N jp> «k * • « . k 

(* Is it a line number? Comments are indented, too *) 


04CA 


IF LEFT$(linein,l)>"9 H OR LEFT$ (linein, 1)~"(" THEN 


04E5 


(* is there a key word? *) 


04FF 


IF LEFT$(linein,2)-"IF" OR LEFT$ (linein, 3) -"FOR" OR LEFT$ 




(linein, 4)«»L00P" OR LEFT$ (linein, 5)-" VHILE" OR 




LEFT? (linein, 6) -"REPEAT" OR LEFT$ (line m , 6 )-"EXITlF" 




m* v t"» it 

THEN 


055A 


(* if so, then indent *) 


0572 


indent ; «TRUE 


0578 


ENDIF 


05 7A 


(* is it an END- word? *) 


0593 


IF LEFT? (linein, 3)-*" END" OR LEFT$(linein,4)« ,f NEXT" OR 




LEFT? (linein, 5)— "UNTIL" THEN 


05C2 


(* decrease indent size if not "END" *) 


05E9 


IF LEN(linein)>4 THEN 


05F6 


jump : -LEFT? (jump ,IJ.N( jump) -2) 


0606 


ELSE 


060A 


(* reset tha jump length *) 


0625 


jump:«" " 


0631 


ENDIF 


0633 


ENDIF 


0635 


mm m mm m m m mm mmm — ^ *■ ■ a # *J i V 

C* if the word is "ELSE" then decrease indent *) 


0665 


m* %Xm _" y _ J * J _ ,_. » - J~ i_ ^ *V_ _ 1 J _4 mm S mm mm, mmm m mmm mm -m J 1»A# \ 

(* size, and indent after the line is printed- *; 


06 96 


li IJir Qlinein, H^— JilibCi' lnc»N 


06A9 


jump i — mr 1 9 \, jump , ljlin ^ j ump j > 


06B9 


indent : -TRUE 


06BF 


ENDIF 


06C1 




06C2 


(* add indent to input line *) 


06E0 


1 ine in : -j ump+iinein 


06EC 


ELSE 


06F0 


(* we got a line number *) 


070A 


pointer : -SUBSTR (" " , linein) 


0716 


(* add some spaces *) 


072B 


temp : -LEFT? (linein , pointer) +jump 



Constants are declared at the beginning 
of the program. The printer codes are for a 
Star Gemini 10 and are listed in the initial- 
izing portion of the program. If your printer 
uses other codes, replace the ones there 
with the ones you need. (They should be in 
your printer's manual.) 



"Control words, 
such as For, While 
or Repeat cause an 
indentation on the 
next line. The end 
words like Next, 
Endwhile or Until 
cause 'outdenta- 
tion\" 



How it Works 

PR.B09 is commented, so you can fol- 
low the program's details. One of the first 
lines, even before the parameter declara- 
tions, is the error-trapping line. This allows 
you to type in the program's name alone, 
and the program tells you how to use it. 
P R . B 0 9 reads a line from a file and looks for 
certain words and symbols. If one is found, 
the line is adjusted as necessary, then printed. 
Comments, remarks and quotes are skipped 
over. Lines with backslashes (\) are split at 
the backslash. 

Control words, such as For, While or 
Repeat cause an indentation on the next 
line. The end words like Next, Endwhi 1 e or 
Until cause "outdentation". If the line is 
too long to fit on the printer, it is split at the 
last available space. The first part is printed, 
the remainder treated as a newly input line. 
This repeats until the line is less than the 
maximum line length. After all lines are 
printed, the program goes to the end of the 
page and sends out a form feed to allow a 
tear at the perforations. 

PR.B09 shows one of the nice things 
about OS -9. If you don't like the way 
something works, you can write a program 
to replace it. 



(Questions or comments concerning this 
program may be addressed to the author at 
361 Deauville, Blvd., Copiague, NY 11 726. 
Please be sure to enclose an SASE when 
requesting a reply.) □ 



June 1989 THE RAINBOW 137 



073B 



linein:-LEFT$(temp,5)+RIGHT$(linein,LEN(linein) -pointer 



Using OS-9 
Programs on 
RAINBOW 
ON DISK 

One of the most common questions we 
encounter daily is "How do I boot the OS- 
9 side of my rainbow on disk?" This is a 
very broad question, indeed. It entails sev- 
eral aspects of OS-9, many of which are not 
readily apparent to the novice user. 

First, the OS-9 side of RAINBOW ON DISK 
is not bootable. That is to say, the disk does 
not contain any of the OS-9 system files 
necessary for operation under OS-9. In 
order to use the OS-9 files on rainbow ON 
DISK, you must first purchase the OS-9 
operating system from Radio Shack. Then 
you must boot the operating system ac- 
cording to the instructions in the OS-9 
manual. 

Let' s travel this tangent for a moment — 
it is somewhat important to understand the 
situation. The OS-9 operating system for 
the Color Computer is available only from 
Radio Shack and its authorized dealers. To 
the best of my knowledge, the only bootable 
OS-9 applications software you will find is 
marketed by Tandy. No third party soft- 
ware is directly bootable — you must pur- 
chase OS-9 from Radio Shack before you 
can make use of any programs offered 
anywhere but by Radio Shack. 

Once you have booted OS-9, you can go 
to work with rainbow on disk. How you 
go about it will depend on your current 
system. If you are using OS-9 Level I, enter 
the following command line at the 0S9: 
prompt: 

load dir "list copy 

This will load the Dir, List and Copy 
commands from the CMDS directory of your 
system disk in Drive 0. After this, when 
you issue one of these commands, it will 
execute from memory. This is faster and 
also allows you to remove the OS-9 system 
master from the drive. Just don't issue any 
other OS-9 commands until you have put 
the system master back in Drive 0. Users of 
OS-9 Level II will be happy to know the 
operating system automatically loads these 
commands into memory when it boots. 
Now you are ready to insert rainbow ON 
DISK and get under way. 



) 

0753 END IF 

0755 ENDIF 

0757 (* are we close to the end of the page? *) 

0781 IF linecount>PAGELEN-6 THEN 

0791 GOSUB 120 

0795 ENDIF 

0797 

0798 (* if line is too long, do word- wrap *) 

07C0 WHILE LEN ( 1 ine in ) >MAXLINE DO 

07CE (* look for last space, and break there *) 

07F8 FOR xx:-MAXLINE TO MAXLINE-20 STEP -1 

0813 EXITIF MID$(linein,xx,l)-" " THEN 

0826 (* just leave *) 

0836 ENDEXIT 

08 3A NEXT xx 

0845 

0846 <* adjust pointer *) 

085A xx:-xx-l 

0865 <* trim line *) 

0874 temp:-RIGHT$(linein,LEN(linein)-xx) 

0885 linein:-LEFT$(linein,xx) 

0891 

0892 (* search for quotation marks, comments, and backslashes *) 

08CD GOSUB 110 

08D1 

08D2 (* print the line, and adjust it *) 

08F5 PRINT #pr inter, line in 

08FF linecount :-»linecount+l 

090A linein:-jump+temp 

0916 (* end of too- long line routine *) 

0939 END WHILE 
09 3D 

093E (* regular- length line, and remainder of too- long line *) 

0979 temp:-"*' 

0980 (* search for quotation marks, comments, and backslashes *) 
09BB GOSUB 110 

09BF "'"«■-• 

09C0 (* print the line, and adjust it *) 

09E3 PRINT #printer,linein 

09ED IF indent THEN 

09F6 jump:»jump+" n 

0A03 indent : «FALSE 

0A09 ENDIF 

0A0B linecount :*linecount+l 

0A16 (* end of file loop *) 

0A2C END WHILE 

0A30 CLOSE #disk 

0A36 (* go to end of page *) 

0A4D PRINT #pr inter, FF 

0A57 (* add extra blank page .*) 

0A71 PRINT Sprinter, FF 

0A7B CLOSE #pr inter 

0A81 END 

0A83 

0A84 110 

0A88 (* test for comments, quotes and backslashes *) 

0AB7 FOR xx:-l TO LEN(linein) 

0AC9 

0ACA (* check for comments *) 

0AE2 yy:-MID$(linein,xx,2) 

0AF0 IF yy"(* w THEN 

0AFE (* if there is one, look for matching comment *) 

0B2E FOR xx:-xx+l TO LEN(linein) 

0B44 yy:-MID$(linein,xx,l) 

0B52 EXITIF yy-"*)" THEN 

0B60 yy:-»« 

0B67 ENDEXIT 

0B6B NEXT xx 

0B76 ENDIF 

0B78 

0B79 yy:-MID$(linein,xx,l) 

0B87 (* check for quotation marks *) 

0BA6 IF yy-DQ THEN 

0BB3 (* if there is one, look for matching quote *) 



138 THE RAINBOW June 1989 







FOR xx:-xx+l TO LEN(linein) 


0BF7 




yy : »MID$ (line in , xx , 1) 






EXITIF yy-DQ THEN 


0C12 




yy;-»« 


0C19 




ENDEXIT 


JJC1D 




NEXT xx 


^C28 




ENDIF 


0C2A 




EXITIF yy-'V THEN 


j?C37 




(* print line to backslash *) 


0C54 




slash:«xx 


0C5C 




(* subroutine to print compound lines *) 


0C84 




PRINT #printer,LEFT$(linein,slash-l) 


0C95 




1 ine in : -RIGHT? ( 1 ine in , LEN ( 1 ine in) - s la sh ) +t emp 


0CAA 




jump ;=»jump+" M 


0CB7 




line count :-linecount+l 


0CC2 




indent: -FALSE 


0CC8 




GOTO 100 


0CCC 




ENDEXIT 


0CD0 




NEXT xx 


0CDB 




RETURN 


j?CDD 






j?CDE 






0CE2 




(* print header *) 


0CF4 




IF init THEN 


0CFD 




pagecount 






ELSE 






FOR xx:»l TO 5 


0D18 




PRINT #pr inter 


0D1E 




NEXT xx 


0D29 




ENDIF 


0D2B 






/"ITS 1 /** 

yD2C 




print #prmter » dayt ; 


0D37 




PRINT #printer, DOUBLE; 


0D42 




PRINT #printer,TAB((5j?-LEN(filename))/2); filename; 


0D59 




PRINT #pr inter , SINGLE ; 


JJD64 




PRINT #pr inter, TAB ( 50 ) ; "Page no: pagecount 


0D7E 




PRINT #printer 


j?D84 




line count :»2 


0D8B 




page count : »pagecount+l 


0D96 




RETURN 


0D98 






0D99 






0D9A 






0D9B 


130 




0D9F 




(* error- handling routine *) 


0DBC 




errno ; =ERR 


0DC3 




PRINT 


0DC5 




IF ermo-215 OR ermo«216 THEN 


jJDDA 




PRINT "File "; filename; " not found!" 


0DF5 




ELSE 


JJDF9 




IF ermo-56 THEN 






PRINT 


0EJZ8 




PRINT "Usage: pr ("; DQ; "filepath"; DQ; ")" 


0E2E 




PRINT 


JJE30 




END 


JZFE32 




ENDIF 


0E34 




PRINT "Error #"; errno 


j?E43 




ENDIF 


0E45 




END 


0E47 






0E48 






PROCEDURE 


date 


9999 




(* set up to print as month- day-year *) 






PARAM dayt i STRING [12] 






DIM month: INTEGER 


W3A 




DIM mo(12):STRING[3] 


J304B 




DIM xx, yy: INTEGER 


0056 






fl?57 




month : -VAL(MID$ (DATE$ ,4,2)) 


0064 




FOR xx:-l TO 12 


0074 




READ mo(xx) 


007D 




NEXT xx 


0038 




dayt :«mo (month) +" , "+MID$ (DATE$ , 7 ,2)+" , 19"+LEFT$ (DATE? ,2) 


00A9 




DATA "Jan" , "Feb" , "Mar" , "Apr" , "May" , "Jun" , "Jul" , "Aug" , "Sep" , 






"Oct", "Nov", "Dec" 


00F5 




END 



If you are using a single floppy-drive 

system, replace the system master in Drive 

0 with rainbow on disk and enter chd /do. 

If you have two floppy drives, leave the 
system master in Drive 0 r place RAINBOW 

ON DISK in Drive 1 and enter chd /dl. In 

either case, the chd command tells OS-9 

what disk and directory you want to work 

with. It selects your current data directory. 

Until you use chd to select a different 

working directory, OS-9 will assume you 

want the commands you enter to act on the 

files in the selected directory. 

Now, to see what is in the root directory 
of rainbow ON DISK, just type dir and 
press enter. You will see one file named 
read .me . f i rst. You will also see at least 
one file listed whose name is in all upper- 
case letters. This is not a file. The accepted 
standard used with OS-9 dictates that we 
use all uppercase letters to indicate a "file" 
is really a subdirectory. So, you will see 
CMDS and/or SOURCE listed as subdirectories 
on the disk. To get to the CMDS directory, 
enter chd cmd s . This selects the C M DS direc- 
tory as your working directory. Enter chd 
. . to get back to the root directory. You can 
now enter di r to see what is in that direc- 
tory. You can alsouse copy to copy the files 
to your system disk if you want. The CMDS 
directory is used to hold compiled C or 
assembled ML programs. If no assembly or 
C programs are published in a given month, 
you won't find this directory on the disk. 

On the other hand, the SOURCE directory 
contains any ML, C or BASIC09 source 
code, as well as any procedure files pub- 
lished that month. We don't put packed 

BASIC09 files on RAINBOW ON DISK. It is 

expected that you will load the source and 
pack it, if you want, following the instruc- 
tions in the BASIC09 manual. 

To get to the SOURCE directory from the 
root, type chd source and press ENTER. If 
you have selected CMDS as your current 
directory as above, you can get to SOURCE 
by typing chd ../source and pressing 
ENTER. Once there, you can use di r to see 
the contents of this subdirectory. You can 
also use 1 1 st to see the actual source code 
files or copy to copy the files to another 
disk. 

As a final word, before you can use any 
of the programs on rainbow on disk, you 
will have to know what they do and how to 
use them. You can gain this information by 
reading the articles in the magazine. 



— Cray Augsburg 



June 1989 THE RAINBOW 139 



RAINBOWTECH 



16ECB /l^Bo 





Years ago, the question would have baffled puzzle freaks 
for CoCo users, the solution takes about a minute. 



Perplexing Puzzles 



By William Barden, Jr. 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 



I'm a puzzle freak, but I've never had a flair for solving puzzles 
quickly. I'd rather find the answer to a puzzle with brute force on 
a computer. It's amazing what can be done on the CoCo to solve 
puzzles. In this column I'll provide some old and new ones, all of 
which can be solved on the CoCo by clever or not-so-clever 
programming. I'll give you the answers, but I'll also give you four 
puzzles without answers, which I'll provide in a later column. 

Puzzle 1: Programs in Memory 

A CoCo buff named Rupert has three free slots in his Multi-Pak 
Interface. He has seven game cartridges, labeled A, B, C, D, E, F 
and G. In how many different combinations can Rupert arrange 
three game cartridges from the seven? One way is to insert 
cartridges A, B and C. Another is to insert cartridges A, B and G. 
Order is not important (it doesn't matter which slots the three 
cartridges fit in). 

Solution 

This problem is known as a "combination of n things taken k at 
a time". To make the explanation easier, suppose we have five 
cartridges labeled A, B, C, D and E, and three empty slots. We 
could use these combinations: 

ABC, ABD, ABE, ACD, ACE, ADE, BCD, BCE, BDE and CDE 

A way to list all the combinations is to start at the left of the list 
of all things; A, B, C, D, E; and pick the first three: ABC. Now 
substitute a new item for the last item, working towards the right: 

ABD, ABE. The AB sequence is now exhausted, so move to the 
right and work with AC — ACD and ACE. The AC sequence is 
now exhausted, so move to the right and work with AD — ADE. 
All three item sequences starting with A, have been exhausted, so 
move to the right and work with BC — BCD, BCE and then BD 
— BDE. Finally, work with CD — CDE, and so on. 

This process can be implemented in a program as shown in 
Listing 1. It finds all combinations of seven things taken three at 
a time — the three slots of the Multi-Pak filled with seven 
cartridges. Variable P represents the index 1 to 7 of the far left item 
of the three, Variable Q, the index of the middle item, and Variable 



Bill Barden has written 27 books and over 100 magazine articles 
on various computer topics. His 20 years 7 experience in the 
industry covers a wide background: programming, systems analy- 
sis and managing projects for computers ranging from main- 
frames to micros. 



R, the index of the far right item. The three variables index into 
array A$, which is filled with A, B, C, D, E, F and G. The three 
variables are changed just as they are manually, moving from left 
to right. The print lists all possible combinations — 35 in all: 



ABC 


ACE 


AEF 


BCG 


BFG 


CFG 


ABD 


ACF 


AEG 


BDE 


CDE 


DEF 


ABE 


ACG 


AFG 


BDF 


CDF 


DEG 


ABF 


ADE 


BCD 


BDG 


CDG 


DFG 


ABG 


ADF 


BCE 


BEF 


CEF 


EFG 


ACD 


ADG 


BCF 


BEG 


CEG 





Puzzle 2: Buying Disks 

Diskettes at one Radio Shack store in Pudd, Wyoming are sold 
16, 17, 23, 24, 39 and 40 to a package. A customer wants exactly 
100 disks, no more, no less. Assuming that packages cannot be 
broken, are there any combinations of packages that will make up 
exactly 100 disks, or will the customer have to travel to the Pudd 
Computerland store for his purchase? (Adapted from an old Henry 
E. Dudeney puzzle.) 

Solution 

You could work this out manually, but I just hate to waste 
scratch paper when there's a perfectly good CoCo ready to crunch 
through hours of comparisons. . . Here's a little preprocessing to 
make the problem palatable: There cannot be any more than six 1 6- 
disk packages — that's 96 disks. Similarly, there cannot be more 
than five 17-disk packages, 85 disks, four 23-disk packages, four 
24-disk packages, two 39-disk packages, or two 40-disk packages. 
Therefore, 100 disks will have to be made up from these 23 
packages: 

16, 16, 16, 16, 16, 16, 17, 17, 17, 17, 17,23,23,23,23,24, 24,24, 
24, 39, 39, 40, 40 

There cannot be more than six packages (seven packages of 1 6 
disks is 1 1 2 disks). Also, there has to be more than two packages 
(two 40-disk packages is 80 disks). There are three to six packages 
to make up 100 disks, if this is even possible. 

A computer solution to this is shown in Listing 2. It's similar 
to the first problem — 23 things taken three to six at a time. For 
each combination, a check is made to see if the combination equals 
exactly 100 items. If so, the answer is printed. There will be some 
redundancy as the program works through packages that hold the 
same number of items. Listing 2 shows the combinations of six 



140 THE RAINBOW June 1989 



items. The variables and total computation can easily be changed 
for three, four and five items. However, when the program is run 
for six items from a possible 23, a result is found: 

16+, 16+, 17+, 17+, 17+, 17+ = 100 disks 

This technique can be found for other similar problems. In 
Computer Science classes, the classic problem is a "Knapsack" 
problem: Given a knapsack that can hold 60 pounds, what is the 
optimum packing of various items weighing different amounts 
and with varying degrees of value? 

Puzzle 3: Palindromic Square Numbers 

A palindrome is a number or word which reads the same 
forwards or backwards (the most famous palindromic sentence is 
"A man, a plan, a canal — Panama!"). An example of a palin- 
dromic number is 12344321. How many squares of 1 to 1000 are 
palindromic? A square of 1 is 1, of 2 is 4, of 3 is 9, of 4 is 16, of 
25 is 625, and so forth. 

Solution 

It would have baffled puzzle freaks years ago. On the CoCo, 
however, it takes only about a minute. The program is shown in 
Listing 3. The trick is to convert the numeric form of the number 
to a string so the digits can be compared. This is done easily by the 
STR$ function. However, this function uses a leading sign, a blank 
when the number is positive, as all squares are. The RIGHTS 
function lops off the leading blank. 

The program uses two variables — L, which points to the 
leftmost digit of the string, and R, which points to the far right digit 
of the string. If the leftmost and far right digits are the same and the 
R and L pointers cross, the square is palindromic and is printed. The 
results are: 



1 


1 


2 


4 


3 


9 


11 


121 


22 


484 


26 


676 


101 


10201 


111 


12321 


121 


14641 


202 


40804 


212 


44944 


264 


69696 


307 


94249 


836 


698896 



It's interesting to note that only the last square has an even 
number of digits and that 10 of the numbers are also palin- 
dromic. 

There are fewer cubes that are palindromic, but all cube 
roots of palindromic cubes to 1000 are palindromic. Modify the 
program to J-I*I*I to find them. 

Puzzle 4: Interest Compounding 

I recently received a pleasant surprise. One of my forefathers 
had invested one month's salary in 1688 — a total of $1 — at the 
then phenomenal rate of 8 percent interest per year in First Pilgrim 
Savings and Loan in Massachusetts. He evidently forgot about it 
and it wasn't until recently that First Pilgrim was able to track 
down the only surviving relative — me. The account called for the 
interest to be compounded at the end of each year, that is, added to 
the principal amount. At the end of the first year, the $1 had risen 



VIP Writer 1.1 

RATED "BEST" IN SEPT '88 "RAINBOW" 

VIP Writer has all the features of VIP Writer III described elsewhere in this 
magazine except the screen widths are 32, 51 , 64 & 85. Screen colors are black, 
green & white, double clock speed is not supported, Spooler and menus are 
unavailable because of memory limitations. Even so, VIP Writer is the BEST word 
processor for the CoCo 1 & 2! Version 1.1 includes the configuration program 
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VIP Speller works with ANY ASCII file created by most popular word processors - 
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VIP Calc 1.1 

"MORE USEABLE FEATURES" FEB. 1985 "RAINBOW" 

VIP Calc has all the features of VIP Calc III described elsewhere in this magazine 
except the screen widths are 32, 51 , 64 & 85. Screen colors are black, qreen and 
white, double clock speed and Spooler are not supported. Even so, VIP Calc is the 
most complete calc for the CoCo 1 & 2! Version 1.1 has faster and more reliable 
disk access and improved display speed. DISK $59.95 

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June 1989 THE RAINBOW 141 



to $ 1 .08, at the end of the second year, the $ 1 .08 had risen to $ 1 .08 
* 1.08 = $1. J 6, and so on. How much did I collect — $2037, 
$50766, $127,536 or $10, 644, 533, 790? 

Solution 

Incredibly, I collected $ 1 0,644,5 3 3 ,790 ! ( However, taxes were 
$10,644,533,780.) Listing 4 shows the computations. A single 
dollar invested for nine years at 8 percent interest, with interest 
compounded (added to the principal) once per year is worth 1 .08* 
1 .08 * 1 .08 * 1 .08 * 1 .08 * 1 .08 * 1 .08 * 1 .08 * 1 .08 = $ 1 .99900463, 
about twice the original principal. 

As an approximate rule of thumb: If you take the interest rate 
and divide it into 72, you '11 find the number of years it takes for the 
principal to double. For example, an account with 12 percent 
interest will double in 72/12=6 years. The $1 in the First Pilgrim 
account doubles in 9 years to $2. At the end of 18 years, it's worth 
$4. At the end of 27 years it's worth $8. At the end of 36 years, $ 1 6. 
At the end of 45 years, $32; 54 years, $64; 63 years, $ 1 28; 72 years, 
$256; 8 1 years, $5 1 2; 90 years, $ 1 024; 99 years, $2048; 1 08 years, 
$4096; 1 17 years, $8192; 126 years, $16,384; and so forth. 

Listing 4 also handles compounding at intervals of greater than 
one year. If interest is compounded quarterly, that $10,644,533,790 
turns out to be worth $20,902,886,000! The difference is that 
interest on interest earns more money. If the interest is com- 
pounded monthly, the accumulated amount is $24,46 1 ,233,600. If 
the interest is compounded daily, as in many accounts, the accu- 
mulated amount is $26,419,329,300. If you think that compound- 
ing has diminishing returns, you're right. Suppose the money was 
compounded every second? Or every 1/10 second? The growth 
reaches a limiting amount - about $26,800,000,000. CoCo basic, 
with it's high precision, is ideally suited for such interest compu- 
tations, and is at least as accurate as mainframe computers. 

Puzzle 5: A Cryptarithm 

A cryptarifhm is a puzzle in which letters are substituted for 
digits in an arithmetic problem. The answer is usually solved by 
logical reasoning. For example, the cryptarithm: 

SEAM 
x T 
MEATS 

can be worked out to be: 

4973 
x 8 
39784 

A different type of cryptarithm (attributed to Joseph Ellis 
Trevor) is: 

PPP 

PP 

PPPP 
PPPP 
PPPPP 

where each P is a prime digit of 2, 3, 5 or 7. For example, the result 
could be 53572. What is the correct answer? 

Solution 

The key to this puzzle is in the possible permutations that the 
multiplicand (the number on the top) and the multiplier (the 
number on the second line) can take. Unlike the combinations of 



Puzzles 1 and 2, permutations are order dependent. Let's consider 
the multiplicand first. There are four possible digits per position 
and four digit positions. Starting from the lowest number, it's easy 
to count up: 

2222 
2223 
2225 
2227 
2232 
2233 
2235 
2237 
2252 
2253 
2255 
2257 
2272 
etc. 



Just count as you would in counting decimal numbers, moving 
to the next higher digit position when necessary. The last numbers 
in this sequence are: 

7772 
7773 
7775 
7777 

As there are four digits — 2, 3, 5 and 7 — the total number of 
permutations is 4 to the forth, or 256. The multiplier has two digits 
and can be 22, 23, 25, 27, 32, 33, 35, 37, 52, 53, 55, 57, 72, 73, 75 
and 77 — 16 permutations in all. 

This means there are 256 times 1 6 = 4096 permutations that can 
be checked for validity in a computer program. Each of the two 
partial results and the final result can be checked to make certain 
they contain only the digits 2, 3, 5 or 7. Listing 5 shows the 
program. 

The variables in this program are arranged as follows: 

A3 A2 Al 

B2 Bl 

C4 C3 C2 CI 
D5 D4 D3 D2 

R5 R4 R3 R2 Rl 

The multiplicand starts at 222 and the multiplier at 22. For each 
pass through the program the multiplier is incremented — 22 
becomes 23, which becomes 25, which becomes 27, which be- 
comes 32, and so forth up to 77. At 77, the multiplier is reset to 22 
and the lowest digit of the multiplicand is incremented. 4096 
permutations are processed, from 222/22 through 777/77. For 
each permutation, the digits of the multiplicand, multiplier, partial 
results, and result are checked to see if all are 2, 3, 5 or 7. If so, the 
answer is displayed and the program continues. If not, the program 
continues. The five lines of digits are also kept as single numbers 
for ease of computation — variables A, B, C, D and R. The single 
answer is displayed as: 

7 7 5 

3 3 

2 3 2 5 
2 3 2 5 
2 5 5 7 5 



142 THE RAINBOW June 1989 



r 



Barden's Buffer Domiciife;^ 



N 



Radio Shack 



Puzzle 6: Random Number Generator 

A CoCo scientist wants to generate a series of random numbers. 
She decides that a good way to do it is to square a four-digit number 
and take the four middle digits as the new number, square the new 
number, take the four middle digits, and so forth. The number she 



uses as the "seed" for the random number generator is 3792. Why 
is this not a good idea? 

Solution 

One has to be very careful in generating random numbers. Most 
schemes produce numbers that are not truly random at all. It's not 
sufficient to say — "Well, I'll start with a number, multiply by 
27,128, add 10,000, and then divide by 34." In the scheme of this 
puzzle, starting with 3792 produces 3792*3792 = 14,379,264. 
Taking the middlefour digits of the result produces 3792 again. 
The random number sequence is, therefore, 3792, 3792, 3792, etc. 
The program that illustrates this is in Listing 6A. 

A better random number generator multiplies some seed num- 
ber by a prime, adds a prime, and then truncates the result, as 
shown in Listing 6B. 

A sequence produced by this code is: 

20680 
31642 
42604 
53566 
64528 
9954 
20916 

Notice anything unusual about it? Right — there are even 
numbers only. We '11 leave it up to the reader as an exercise to come 
up with a good random number generator. A good random number 
generator should have an even distribution of the digits 0, 1, 2, 3, 
4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9, and should not repeat more often than a few 
billion numbers or so. The code in basic is from $BF3B. . . . 



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June 1989 THE RAINBOW 143 



Puzzle 7: Getting to Radio Shack 

The nearest Radio Shack store to me is located about 10 blocks 
away, as shown in Figure 1. I'm diagonally opposite the Radio 
Shack store. I usually walk four blocks south and then six blocks 
east to get to it. Just for fun, though, I've been varying the route. 
Yesterday I walked two blocks east, two blocks south, three blocks 
east, two blocks south, and then one block east to get to the store. 
Today, I'll try a different route. Assuming that I don't walk any 
extra blocks, in how many different ways can I get to those Archer 
soldering irons? 

Solution 

Obviously, I will never have to walk more than 10 blocks, and 
I'll have to walk a total of six blocks east and a total of four blocks 
south regardless of the route. If I let 1 represent one block east and 
0 represent one block south, then all possible routes are found in 
the sequence: 

0000000000 
0000000001 
0000000010 
0000000011 
0000000100 



1111111111 

Each number in this sequence is made up of 10 ones or zeroes 
(for the ten blocks). There are 1024 numbers in the sequence, 
0000000000 to 1111111111. However, most numbers are not 
valid. Only those numbers that have six ones (six blocks east) and 
four zeroes (four blocks south), define a valid route. Figure 2 
shows an example. 

To find the valid routes, therefore, just count in binary from 
0000000000 through 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 and check each number for six 
ones. Each number with six ones defines a valid route. As it turns 
out, there is a formula to express this — it defines the number of 
permutations (order dependent) arrangements of routes given a 
fixed number of things. In this case there must be six east 
increments and four south increments, so the formula is: 




10! 1 x2x3x4x5x6x7x8x9x 1 0 permutations 7x8x9x 1 0 



6! 4! 1x2x3x4x5x6 



1x2x3x4 1x2x3x4 



28 characters in this message, 224 bits. That's $22.40 and too 
much to pay." moaned Murray , the CoCo hacker. "Don't worry — 
I can cut your costs in half. But the person on the other end must 
know the code.," said the CoCo Guru. How did he do it and what 
was the code? The message was: 

"MARY. MERRY CHRISTMAS . MURRAY . " 
and the normal ASCII coding is: 

01001101 01000001 01010010 01011001 00101110 01001101 
01000101 01010010 01010010 01011001 00100000 01000011 
01001000 01010010 01001001 01010011 01010100 01001101 
01000001 01010011 00101110 01001101 01010101 01010010 
01010010 01000001 01011001 00101110 = 224 bits 

Solution 

There are various data compression schemes, but one of the 
most popular is known as Huffman Coding. It represents the most 
frequently occurring characters with the fewest bits, usually 
starting at one or two bits. Less frequent characters may have even 
more than the eight bits ASCII uses, but the average character 
length is generally less than eight bits, often half that. 

There's a purely mechanical way to get a Huffman Code. 
Arrange the characters used in order of use in a list. In the message 
above, this arrangement is: 



= 7x3x10 = 210 



6-R 4-M 3-A 3-Y 3-. 2-S 1-C 1-E 1-H 1-1 1-T 1-U 1-blk 



The program shown in Listing 7 counts in binary from 
0000000000 through 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 . For each value, a check is 
made of the number of ones. If it is six, a count is incremented and 
an asterisk is placed before the line listing the value. Then the route 
is drawn on the graphics screen. At the end of the program all 210 
routes have been listed and drawn. 

Puzzle 8: Compressing Data 

"I have a message I want to send via the DelCompuGenie 
communications network, but they charge $.10 per bit. There are 



Now form a "tree" node taking the two least frequent characters, 
as shown in Figure 3. Put this tree node in order in the list and use 
the next least frequent character to form a new node. Continue in 
this fashion until you have an entire tree. Now label left branches 
of the tree zero and right branches one. Reading down the tree will 
give the code for each character. 10001 is the code for H, for 
example. Now code each character of the message with its code. 
Notice there are no breaks for the characters. The program in 
Listing 8 reads the code, providing it knows the code beforehand. 
In a long message, this code can be sent first, before the actual 
encrypted message. The Huffman-encoded message here is 96 
bits, only 43 percent of the 224 bits used in normal ASCII. We've 
used a string to hold the bits here, but in actuality, the 96 bits would 



144 THE RAINBOW June 1989 



Decreasing Occurrence- 



3® 3© 2© I© W M 1© © 1© 1© 







Final Troo 



Find H = 10001 




16, 

Jlttr 



1(U) 1(1) 1(T) 1 



e3 



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be held in 12 bytes. 

The scheme for Huffman encoding can be used for a message 
of any type and any length. 

Reader's Challenge 

Here are four puzzles similar to the ones above. Try your hand 
at them and send your answers to me at the following address: 

P.O. Box 3568, Mission Viejo, CA 92692 

Best answers for each question will be given special mention in 
this column, and a genuine machine-embossed certificate of CoCo 
puzzle-solving prowess. 

Challenge Number One 

A pair of dice has six faces per die with 1 , 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 dots 
per face. Can you provide a program that will list all of the ways 
torolla2,3,4,5,6,7, 8,9, 10, 1 1 and 12 and give the odds for each 
number? 

Challenge Number Two 

Can you find a CoCo-related cryptarithm to fit this form? 

X X X X 
± X X X X 



X X X X X 



Or any form? 



Challenge Number Three 

In Puzzle 8, 224 bits were reduced to 96. Suppose there is a list 










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June 1989 THE RAINBOW 145 



of 4096 common words (such as cat, and, house) that can be sent. 
The words are known to the sender and receiver. Can you describe 
a scheme that will enable a CoCo user to compress a message even 
more than 43 percent? 

Challenge Number Four 

Are there any numbers that equal the sum of the cubes of their 
digits? Forexample, the cubes of the digits of 126 are l,8and216. 
The sum of the cubes of the digits is 1 + 8 + 216 = 225. 

See you next month with more CoCo topics. □ 



Listing 1: PUZZLE1 



Ij3j3 ' PRINT 7 THINGS TAKEN 3 AT 
A TIME 

11J3 N=7 : K=3 : CT=,0 
120 DIM A$(N) 

13J3 A$ ( 1 ) =" A" : A$ (2) = "B" :A$ (3) ="C 
" :A$ (4) ="D" : A$ (5) ="E" : A$ ( 6) ="F" : 
A$(7)="G" 

14J3 FOR P=l TO N-K+l 

150 FOR Q=P+1 TO N-K+2 

16J3 FOR R=Q+1 TO N-K+3 

170 PRINT A$(P) ;A$(Q) ;A$(R) 

180 CT=CT+1 

190 NEXT: NEXT: NEXT 

200 PRINT CT 



Listing 2: PUZZLE2 



100 ' BUYING DISKETTES 
110 N=23:K=6 
120 DIM A (N) 

130 A(1)=16:A(2)=16:A(3)*-16:A(4) 

=16:A(5)=16:A(6)=16 

140 A(7)=17:A(8)=17:A(9)=17:A(10 

)=17:A(11)=17 

150 A(12)=23:A(13)=23:A(14)=23:A 
(15)=23 

160 A(16)=24:A(17)=24:A(18)=24:A 
(19)=24 

170 A(20)=39:A(21)=39 

180 A(22)=40:A(23)=40 

190 FOR P=l TO N-K+l 

200 FOR Q=P+1 TO N-K+2 

210 FOR R=Q+1 TO N-K+3 

220 FOR S=R+1 TO N-K+4 

230 FOR T=S+1 TO N-K+5 

240 FOR U=T+1 TO N-K+6 

250 IF A(P)+A(Q)+A(R)+A(S)+A(T)+ 

A(U)=100 THEN PRINT: PRINT A(P) ; 

A(Q) ;A(R) ;A(S) ;A(T) ;A(U) 

260 PRINT 

270 NEXT : NEXT: NEXT: NEXT: NEXT :NEX 
T 




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1 46 THE RAINBOW June 1 989 



Listing 3: PUZZLE3 



lj30 1 PALINDROMIC SQUARE NUMBERS 
11^ FOR 1=1 TO 1000 
120 J=I*I 

130 A$=RIGHT$(STR${J) , LEN,(STR$ ( J 
))"!) 

140 L=l: R=LEN (A$) 

150 IF MID$(A$,L,1)<>MID$(A$,R,1 
) THEN GOTO 180 

160 L=L+1: R=R-1: IF R<L THEN PR 
INT I,A$: GOTO 180 
170 GOTO 150 
180 NEXT 



Listing 4: PUZZLE4 

100 1 INTEREST COMPUTATION 
110 INPUT "PRINCIPAL: 11 ; P 
120 INPUT ■•% PER YEAR:"; R 
130 R=R/100 

140 INPUT "# OF COMPOUNDING PERI 

ODS PER YEAR:"; N 

150 INPUT "# OF YEARS:"; Y 

160 PRINT P*(1+R/N)^(Y*N) 

170 GOTO 110 



Listing 5: PUZZLE5 

100 1 2-3-5-7 CRYPTARITHM 

110 A3=2: A2=2: Al=2 : B2=2 : Bl=2 

120 A=A3*100+A2*10+A1 

130 B=B2*10+B1 

140 C=B1*A 

150 D=B2*A 

160 R=A*B 

180 C4=INT(C/1000) : C=C-C4*1000 
190 C3=INT(C/100) : C=C-C3*100 
200 C2=INT(C/10) : C=C-C2*10 
210 C1=C 

220 D5=INT(D/1000) : D=D-D5*1000 
230 D4=INT(D/100) : D=D-D4*100 
240 D3=INT(D/10) : D=D-D3*10 
250 D2=D 

260 R5=INT(R/10000) :R=R-R5*10000 
270 R4=INT(R/1000) : R=R-R4*1000 
280 R3=INT(R/100) : R=R-R3*100 
290 R2=INT(R/10) : R=R-R2*10 
300 R1=R 

310 IF C4<>2 AND C4<>3 AND C4<>5 

AND C4<>7 GOTO 500 
320 IF C3<>2 AND C3<>3 AND C3<>5 

AND C3<>7 GOTO 500 
330 IF C2<>2 AND C2<>3 AND C2<>5 

AND C2<>7 GOTO 500 
340 IF Cl<>2 AND Cl<>3 AND Cl<>5 

AND Cl<>7 GOTO 500 
350 IF D5<>2 AND D5<>3 AND D5<>5 



The 




THE COLOR COMPUTER MONTHLY MAGAZINE 



Back Issue 

4 

Availability 




BACK ISSUES STILL AVAILABLE 

Have you explored the wealth of informa- 
tion in our past issues? From our very first, 
four-page issue to many with more than 300 
pages of material, it's all just for CoCo users 
— a great way to expand your library! 

A WORLD OF INFO AT A BARGAIN PRICE 

All back issues sell for the single issue 
cover price. In addition, there is a $3.50 
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is a $5 charge for the first issue, plus a $1 
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MOST ISSUES STILL AVAILABLE 

Issues July 1981 through June 1982 are 
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Due to heavy demand, we suggest you 
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To check availability and order, review and 
fill out the form on the next page and mail 
it with your payment to: 

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P.O. Box 385 
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June 1989 THE RAINBOW 147 



BACK ISSUE ORDER FORM 

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AND D5<>7 GOTO 500 
360 IF D4<>2 AND D4<>3 AND D4<>5 

AND D4<>7 GOTO 500 
370 IF D3<>2 AND D3<>3 AND D3<>5 

AND D3<>7 GOTO 500 
380 IF D2<>2 AND D2<>3 AND D2<>5 

AND D2<>7 GOTO 500 
390 IF R5<>2 AND R5<>3 AND R5<>5 

AND R5<>7 GOTO 500 
400 IF R4<>2 AND R4<>3 AND R4<>5 

AND R4<>7 GOTO 500 
405 IF R3<>2 AND R3<>3 AND R3<>5 

AND R3<>7 GOTO 400 
410 IF R2<2 AND R2<>3 AND R2<>5 
AND R2<>7 GOTO 500 
420 IF Rl<>2 AND Rl<>3 AND Rl<>5 

AND Rl<>7 GOTO 500 
4 25 PRINT 

" ;A3;A2;A1 

"; B2; Bl 
ii 

" ;C4;C3;C2;C1 
PRINT D5;D4;D3;D2 

PRINT M " 

PRINT R5;R4;R3;R2;R1 
IF Bl=2 THEN Bl=3 ELSE IF Bl 
=3 THEN Bl=5 ELSE IF Bl=5 THEN B 
1=7 ELSE Bl=2: IF B2=2 THEN B2=3 

ELSE IF B2 = 3 THEN B2=5 ELSE IF 
B2=5 THEN B2=7 ELSE B2=2 
510 IF B2<>2 OR Bl<>2 THEN GOTO 
530 

520 IF Al=2 THEN Al=3 ELSE IF Al 
=3 THEN Al=5 ELSE IF Al=5 THEN A 
1=7 ELSE Al=2: IF A2=2 THEN A2=3 

ELSE IF A2=3 THEN A2=5 ELSE IF 
A2=5 THEN A2=7 ELSE A2=2 : IF A3= 
2 THEN A3=3 ELSE IF A3=3 THEN A3 
=5 ELSE IF A3=5 THEN A3=7 ELSE A 
3=2 

530 IF A3=2 AND A2=2 AND Al=2 AN 
D B2=2 AND Bl=2 THEN STOP ELSE P 
RINT 11 . " ; : GOTO 120 



430 
440 
450 
460 
470 
480 
490 
500 



PRINT 
PRINT 
PRINT 
PRINT 



ii 



ii 



ii 



ii 



Listing 6A: PUZZLE6A 




100 ' PSEUDO-RANDOM 


NUMBERS 


110 N=3792 




120 M=N*N 




130 A$=MID$ (STR$ (M) , 


4,4) 


140 PRINT A$ 




150 N=VAL(A$) 




160 GOTO 120 





Listing 6B: PUZZLE6B 

100 ' BETTER PSEUDO-RANDOM NUMBE 
RS 

H0 S=123456 

120 S=S+64153 



148 



THE RAINBOW June 1989 



121 S=S+12345 

130 S=S-INT(S/65536) *65536 
140 PRINT S 
150 GOTO 120 



Listing 7: PUZZLE7 



GRIDS 



100 ' BLOCK 
110 P=0 

120 10=0: 11=0: 12=0: 13=0: 14=0 
: 15=0: 16=0': 17=0: 18=0:^19=0 
130 10=10+1: IF 10=2 THEN 10=0:11 
»I1+1:IF 11=2 THEN 11=0:12=12+1: 
IF 12=2 THEN 12=0 : 13=13+1 : IF 13= 
2 THEN 13=0: 14=14+1: IF 14=2 THEN 

14=0:15=15+1 
140 IF 15=2 THEN 15=0 : 16=16+1: IF 

16=2 THEN 16=0: 17=17+1: IF 17=2 
THEN 17=0: 18=18+1: IF 18=2 THEN I 
8=0: 19=19+1: IF 19=2 THEN GOTO 35 

150 CT=I9+I8+I7+I6+I5+I4+I3+I2+I 
1+10 

160 IF CT=6 THEN P=P+1: PRINT »* 
" ELSE GOTO 3 30 
170 PMODE 3,1 
180 SCREEN 1,0 
190 PCLS 

200 DRAW M BM119,90 M 
210 IF 19=1 
DRAW "D3 ft 
220 IF 18=1 
DRAW "D3" 
230 IF 17=1 
DRAW "D3" 
240 IF 16=1 
DRAW "D3" 
250 IF 15=1 
DRAW "D3" 
260 IF 14=1 
DRAW M D3" 
270 IF 13=1 
DRAW !, D3" 
280 IF 12=1 
DRAW ,! D3" 
290 IF 11=1 
DRAW "D3" 
300 IF 10=1 
DRAW "D3" 
310 FOR 1=0 
320 SCREEN 0,0 

330 PRINT I9;I8;I7;I6;I5;I4;I3;I 
2?I1;I0 

340 GOTO 130 

350 PRINT P; "PERMUTATIONS" 



THEN 


DRAW 


"R3" 


ELSE 


THEN 


DRAW 


"R3" 


ELSE 


THEN 


DRAW 


m R3 it 


ELSE 


THEN 


DRAW 


"R3" 


ELSE 


THEN 


DRAW 


n R3 it 


ELSE 


THEN 


DRAW 


ii R3 n 


ELSE 


THEN 


DRAW 


,f R3 n 


ELSE 


THEN 


DRAW 


!. R3 lt 


ELSE 


THEN 


DRAW 


"R3 » 


ELSE 


THEN 


DRAW 


H R3 II 


ELSE 


TO 500: NEXT 





Listing 8: PUZZLES 

lj30 1 HUFFMAN CODING 



110 DIM A$(13) 

120 A$(l)="ll" 

130 A$(2)="001" 

140 A$(3)="011" 

150 A$(4)= ,, 101" 

160 A$ (5)="0001" 

170 A$(6)="0101" 

180 A$(7)="1001» 

190 A$(8)="10000" 

200 A$(9)="10001" 

210 A$(10)="01000" 

220 A$ (11) ="01001" 

230 A$(12)="00000" 

240 A$(13)="00001" 

250 B$="RMAY.SCEHITU " 

2 60 C$="001011111010001001100001 

11110100001100110001110100001010 

10010010110101000100100000111101 

11010001" 

270 1=1 

280 FOR J=l TO 13 

290 IF MID$( C$, I, LEN ( A$ ( J ) 

) ) = A$( J ) THEN GOTO 320 
300 NEXT 
310 STOP 

320 PRINT MID$( B$ , J, 1 ); 
330 1=1+ LEN ( A$( J ) ) 
340 GOTO 280 



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June 1989 THE RAINBOW 149 



RAINBOWTECH 




OS-9 Level II 



Building Two Handy Tools 



Many times during the past year 
I've wished for a utility to find a 
file buried somewhere 10 levels 
deep in the bowels of an OS-9 directory 
tree. Since that utility has never surfaced, 
I decided it would make a good project and 
an excellent subject for a basic09 program- 
ming tutorial. Because of the nature of the 
problem and the path traveled to find the 
solution, I'm presenting two handy utili- 
ties this month — DiskDir and Find. We'll 
make an intermediate stop at Find It and 
consider several diversions along the way. 
Even though this month's code looks simple, 
the process used to get there is not. 

First, Heed This Advice! 

Back up those hard disks before some- 
thing happens! 

You may have noticed that "KISSable 
OS-9" didn't appear last month. I was too 
busy finding out that if you tempt fate long 
enough, it'll find your number. In Febru- 
ary, my 20-megabyte hard disk was wiped 
out by a runaway program. It may have 
been a virus or worm carried in a program 
someone sent my way, or it may have been 
because I was half asleep after a long day 
at the salt mine and wasn't paying close 
enough attention. I'll never know the an- 
swer, because I'm not going to run the 



Dale L. Puckett, a freelance writer and 
programmer, serves as director-at-large 
of the OS-9 Users Group and is a member 
of the Computer Press Association. His 
username on Delphi is DALEP: on packet- 
radio, KOHYD @ N4QQ; on GEnie, 

D.PVCKETT2; and On CIS, 71446,736. 



By Dale L. Puckett 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 

suspect program again. In fact, I won't 
plug that disk into any of my drives unless 
it's to format it. 

I must have read a hundred articles 
urging me to back up my hard disks during 
the past year. Unfortunately, I didn't heed 
the warnings. As a result, I spent all my 
spare time for two or three weeks attempt- 
ing to restore lost data. Believe me, it takes 
a long time to restore a hard disk when the 
data it contained is spread across 150 
unorganized floppy disks. Even more time 
and money is consumed when you have to 
return to your favorite online service and 
download many of the files a second time. 
So back it up, now! 

One good thing did come out of the 
rebirth of my hard disk, however. I paid a 
lot more attention to my organization, 
right from the start. For example, I now 
have only 1 2 files — nine are directories at 
the root level. 

And I paid attention to the all-impor- 
tant, though not highly advertised, I T . SAS 
byte in the hard-disk descriptor. When I 
first received the hard-disk drive, I must 
have been going through another of those 
careless periods. Frank Hogg sent me a 
device descriptor for the new hard drive 
with the IT . SAS byte set at 1. Not paying 
attention, I loaded hundreds of files before 
I noticed the mistake. Before long, access 
to the files on the hard disk slowed down to 
the sleepy pace of an original Radio Shack 
35-track floppy disk running with an 
unmodified 30-millisecond stepping rate 
— well, maybe not quite that slow. 

After discovering the error, I used one 
of the public-domain Dmode utilities to 
change the IT.SAS byte to $20. Then I 
cobbled a new OS-9 boot file, and access 
to files created after the change came like 



greased lightning. After the crash, I in- 
stalled a device descriptor with the proper 
IT.SAS value right from the start. The 
system flies! 

Finding That Lost File 

Soon after driving a hard disk with an 
operating system equipped with a hierar- 
chical file system like OS-9, you'll be 
thrilled with the power and organizational 
capability. Later, when you've forgotten 
the ingenious idea behind the organization 
of your files, you see the liability of a 
hierarchical file system: "Let's see, did I 
store the recipe for fried eggs in the FOOD 
directory or did I store it in BREAKFAST?" 

If you use a more powerful computer at 
work, it's easy to become spoiled. For 
example, when I can't remember where I 
stored a file on the Macintosh desktop 
publishing system at work, I go to the 
Apple menu and run a desk accessory 
named Find File, then give it the name. A 
few seconds later, it gives me the location 
of the file. 

After manually searching for hundreds 
of files during the past several months, it 
was obvious that because of the prolifera- 
tion of hard disk drives, a find file for 
Color Computer OS-9 is desperately needed. 

There are two stand-alone utilities you 
can run from the OS-9 command line. 
Eventually, this core code may be incor- 
porated into a menu-driven application 
run from Multi-Vue. The listing names for 
this month are: Diskdir, Dodir, Findit, 
Find and Checkdi r. 

The algorithm that makes it work can 
be studied in the listings Checkdi r and 
Dodir. The other three listings contain 
code that drives Checkdi r or Dodi r. 

You will need to Pack the five proce- 



150 



THE RAINBOW June 1 989 



dures to your CMDS directory before 
execution. Some execution examples fol- 
low: 

diskdir <ENTER> 
diskdir /dd/com <ENTER> 

If you exercise the first option above, 
Diskdir immediately begins to print a hier- 
archical listing of the directory of the 
default drive, /dd, to the Color Computer 
screen. If you have need for a hard copy, 
type: di skdi r >/p, then press enter. 

If you chose the optional command 
line, you can start your listing at a speci- 
fied directory. For example, the command 
line above produces this listing: 



PRO 
genie 
cis24 
del phi 
prostuff 
mac 
SIGS 
C I Sma i 1 

abc 
GENIEmai 1 

def 
DELPHImai 1 

ghi 

kjl 
MACmail 

mno 

max9. ar 

The utility Findit is an earlier version of 
Find that works like most programs coded 
with a basic interpreter. It prompts you for 
the information it needs. For example: 

0S9: findit <ENTER> 

Type a few characters from the name of 

the file you need: max 

Type the path to the directory you 

would like to start in: /dd/com 

max9.ar is in /DD/COM/SIGS/MACmai 1 . 

OS-9 users, on the other hand, want 
most of their programs to run in a unified 



manner. In general, they want to supply 
any needed parameters to a program on the 
command line. And they want to be able to 
redirect the output of the program to a file 
or any number of devices. The utility Find 
does this for you. Here are a few samples 
of Find's command-line syntax: 

find max /dd/com <ENTER> 

max9.ar is in /DD/COM/SIGS/MACmai 1 

find max <ENTER> 

Type the path to the directory you 
would like to start in: /dd/com/sigs 
max9.ar is in /DD/COM/SIGS/MACmail 

find <ENTER> 

Type a few characters from the name of 

the file you need: max 

Type the path to the directory you 

would like to start in: <ENTER> 

icon. max is in /DD/CMDS/ICONS 

max9 is in /DD/CMDS 

max9.ar is in /DD/COM/SIGS/MACmai 1 

maxdemo.vef is in /DD/DOCUMENTS 

AIF.max is in /DD/TOOLS 

Since we pressed the enter key in re- 
sponse to Find's second question, it auto- 
matically started its search for the string 
max in the root directory of the default 
drive /dd. It found five files containing the 
string among the hundreds of files stored 
on the hard disk. 

How They Work 

Because of the process used to solve the 
Find File problem, these utilities will not 
break any speed records. For example, on 
a 20-megabyte hard disk containing 697 
files, spread throughout 42 directories, in 
13380 sectors, Find took approximately 
three minutes to locate four filenames. By 
comparison, the longest Find File search 
I've ever seen on a Macintosh II is 40 to 45 
seconds. 

On the up side, the Color Computer 
running OS-9 is a multitasking computer. 
This means you can start Find running in a 
Level II window, then press the clear key 
over to another window and resume work 



on another article or program while Find is 
searching. 

To turn Find and Diskdir into more 
ideal background utilities calls for a two- 
step addition, which Til discuss next month. 
Needed first is a system call to get the 
process number of Find while it is running. 
Then a second system call sets the priority 
of that process just a bit below the majority 
of the other processes running on the 
computer. A word processor, for example, 
will have a higher priority and continue to 
operate smoothly while Find chugs along 
faithfully in the background. Every few 
minutes you can press the clear key to 
toggle over to the other screen and see if 
Find has located the missing file. 

Why It's Slower 

The procedures Checkdir and Dodir 
are the core modules in finding missing 
files or printing hierarchical listings of 
files on hard disk. They use a technique 
known in programming circles as recur- 
sion. While this means that the code pub- 
lished this month is shorter than normal, at 
the same time debugging a recursive pro- 
gram can be quite time-consuming. Yet it 
will be very cost-effective in the future, in 
terms of time saved while looking for 
missing files. 

Recursion is very memory-intensive in 
some programs; however, that problem 
has not yet been found with Find and 
Diskdir. In fact, the 8K workspace re- 
quested by RunB appears to be plenty for 
these two programs. 

To write a program like Find or Diskdir 
requires a way to look at all the directories 
on a disk. Since directories are stored as 
simple files, part of the solution is easy — 
simply open the directory file and read it. 
Reading the file, you will learn the names 
of all the other files in the directory. 

The catch is when you suddenly realize 
that this list of files most likely contains 
the names of other directories. But do you 



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June 1989 THE RAINBOW 151 




Submitting 

Material 
To Rainbow 

Contributions to the rainbow 
are welcome from everyone. We 
like to run a variety of programs 
that are useful/helpful/fun for 
other CoCo owners. 

WHAT TO WRITE: We are inter- 
ested in what you may wish to tell 
our readers. We accept for consid- 
eration anything that is well- 
written and has a practical appli- 
cation for the Tandy Color Com- 
puter. If it interests you, it will 
probably interest lots of others. 
However, we vastly prefer articles 
with accompanying programs 
which can be entered and run. The 
more unique the idea, the more the 
appeal. We have a continuing need 
for short articles with short list- 
ings. These are especially appeal- 
ing to our many beginners. 

FORMAT: Program submis- 
sions must be on tape or disk, and 
it is best to make several saves, at 
least one of them in ASCII format. 
We're sorry, but we do not have 
time to key in programs and debug 
our typing errors. All programs 
should be supported by some ed- 
itorial commentary explaining 
how the program works. We also 
prefer that editorial copy be in- 
cluded on the tape or disk using 
any of the word processors cur- 
rently available for the Color Com- 
puter. Also, please include a 
double-spaced printout of your 
editorial material and program 
listing. Do not send text in all 
capital letters; use upper- and 
lowercase. 

COMPENSATION: We do pay 
for submissions, based on a 
number of criteria. Those wishing 
remuneration should so state 
when making submissions. 

For the benefit of those who 
wish more detailed information on 
making submissions, please send 
a self-addressed, stamped enve- 
lope (SASE) to: Submission 
Guidelines, the rainbow, The Fal- 
soft Building, P.O. Box 385, Pros- 
pect, KY 40059. We will send you 
comprehensive guidelines. 

Please do not submit material 
currently submitted to another 
publication. 




152 THE RAINBOW June 1989 



know if one of these files is a directory? 
Unfortunately, OS-9 does not mark its 
directory files as directories. In fact, each 
directory entry, file or directory is identi- 
cal. It contains a string that can be up to 29 
characters long, followed by a three-byte- 
long logical-sector address that tells the 
operating system where it is stored on the 
disk. 

Because this entry does not contain 
information telling you it is a directory, 
you must open each file to check it. The 
classic approach, taken by OS-9 program- 
mers writing hierarchical directory utili- 
ties, has been to open the file, point to the 
logical sector number, calculate the loca- 
tion of the file-attribute byte within the file 
itself, seek to that location and then go get 
that byte. If the attribute indicates the file 
is a directory, the programmer then opens 
it and proceeds to the next task. 

The problem with this approach is that 
it uses a lot of processor time to perform 
math required to calculate the location of 
the byte containing the attribute. The code 
required looks something like this: 

attr_ptr=di r_rec.byte3*65536. :di rjnec.byte2*25&tdi r 
_rec . bytel 

open tfpath, pathl i st : read 

seek iffpath, attr_ptr*256Get #path, 

attr 

Close #path 

The calculations are no big deal if per- 
formed only occasionally. But when you 
perform them on each file of each disk 
(which can contain thousands of files) . . . 
you get the idea. 

Our approach uses a bit of common 
sense and logic suggested by WizPro au- 
thor Bill Brady. When he confronted the 
same problem while writing his FMenu 
routine within WizPro, he found if a file 
was a directory by attempting to change 
the current working directory to it. If he 
received an error from the system, he 
knew that he had tried to change the work- 
ing directory to a file that is not a directory. 
If no error was received, it was a directory. 

The core decision code in the programs 
looks like this: 

3000 ON ERROR GOTO 3010 
en :-0 

CHD DirEntry 
3010 en=ERR 

IF en = 0 THEN 

tempdi r:-" . " 

Di rLevel :=Di rLevel+1 

RUN dodi r ( tempdi r , Di rLevel ) 

CHD 

Di rLevel :=Di rLevel -1 
ELSE \ It's a file ! ! ! 
ENDIF 

After resetting the error flag in the line 
following Line 3000, 1 attempted to change 



the directory to one with the name of the 
file just found. If it is a directory, the error 
code is zero and you can list its contents. 

But before doing that, I increase the 
value of Di rLevel by one. This value 
"pretty prints" the listing to show the level 
of the directory being listed. 

How do you list the contents of a new 
directory? Simply run Dodi r again. That's 
what is meant by recursive. It literally runs 
itself again when it needs to solve the 
problem at hand. 

The Tricky Part 

When you have a program that insists 
on running itself over and over again, you 
can wind up in deep trouble and quite 
confused if you don't tell it when to put the 
brakes on its inward attitude. This problem 
occurred early on because of the structure 
of an OS-9 directory. 

If you open and read any OS-9 direc- 
tory, you will always find two familiar 
names at the top of each list. Those entries 
are the parent and current directories and 
are not visible when running the OS-9 Di r 
utility command because the program skips 
them. However, when writing your own 
program to access a disk directory, you 
must take this into account. It is taken into 
account in just one line in the utilities 
Checkdir and Dodir: 

IF DirEntryO*. AND DirEntryO"." 
AND DirEntryO"*" THEN 

PRINT TAB( Di rLevel *5 ) ; DirEntry 
G0SUB 3000 \ REM Is file a directory, 
if so process it! 
ENDIF 

Essentially this line allows the printing 
of all filenames, except the parent and 
current directory, and anything marked 
with an asterisk (*}. So what's this * all 
about? 

The asterisk was the solution to a frus- 
trating problem that ran our program around 
and around in circles until it was solved. 
The * is there because an OS-9 directory 
contains not only a listing of the name of 
each file it contains but also a listing of the 
name of every file ever held. This means 
that every file created and later deleted is 
still listed in an OS-9 directory. 

Obviously you don't want these files 
listed. In addition, they drive the recursive 
logic in the program nuts. To understand 
what is going on, place a number of P R I NT 
statements in your code to help debug it. 
At one point during development, I in- 
serted five extra lines. My code looked 
like this: 

PRINT "Returning from GoSub, adir is: 
adir 



IF adir THEN 

RUN readdir(target,tempdir) 
PRINT "After running readdir re- 
cursively, adir is adir 
CHD \." 

• • • etc 

3000 ON ERROR GOTO 3010 en=0 

PRINT "We are looking at entry 
Hits (EntryNum) 

PRINT "Our working directory be- 
fore the CHD is 

Shell "pwd" 
3010 en :=ERR 

PRINT "Our error number is en 
IF en=0 THEN \ REM It's a directory 

. . . etc 

When we ran this code, we received a 
printout like this: 

Returning from GoSub, adir is False 
Returning from GoSub, adir is False 
We are looking at the entry B09 
Our working directory before the CHD 
is /H0/PR0GS/B09 
Our error number is 216 
Returning from GoSub, adir is False 
We are looking at the entry C 

* * * 6 1 C • 

Studying these lines tells you the course 
the program travels while it runs. When it 
doesn't show up where expected, you know 
to investigate. Eventually, I got to the 
bottom of things in this manner. 

Two More Tricks 

Two more questions deserve attention. 
First, how does basic09 handle parameter 
errors? The answer to this question is needed 
to make Find and Dodir act like OS-9 
programs written in C or assembly lan- 
guage. Another question is how to kill the 
procedure smoothly after finding the file 
you are looking for. In the quest for these 
answers we also discovered a trick that 
tells which directory a file is located in and 
a way to remember the current data direc- 
tory used when starting the program. 

The answer to the parameter error han- 
dling is found by studying the code in 
Listing 1, Find. Here's the core: 

ON ERROR GOTO 200 
target :=temtarg 
200 en=ERR 

IF en=56 THEN 

INPUT "Type . . . " ; target 

EN0IF 

The key is that target is a DIMensioned 
variable. However, temtarg is a parame- 
ter. If there is a Parameter Error (Error 56), 
then no memory has been allocated for it. 
This means that every time you access it in 
the program, the error signal appears. 
Because of this, you must set an error trap 
at each location where you plan to access 
a parameter to insure trapping the right 
one. 



Killing a basic09 procedure smoothly is 
another interesting proposition. For ex- 
ample, the standard way for a user to abort 
from the program by pressing the break 
key is to check for an Error Number 002, 
not 005 as you might think. 

While 005 is the value of the break key, 
it generates a Signal 2 that is fed back to 
basic09's error-trapping routine. You must 
look for the 002 error from the keyboard- 
abort- signal handler to get out of the pro- 
gram. 

This raises another point where caution 
is required. When handling signals (i.e., a 
keyboard abort), you cannot debug the 
program from within basic09 itself. You 
must first pack the code and run it from the 
OS-9 Shell, where it will run under RunB. I 
first fell into this "gotcha" when working 
with mouse signals. But that was a year 
ago and it took me a while to figure out 
why the break key was knocking me straight 
out of the program instead of following my 
error-trapping code. Beware. 

To abort a procedure that runs by exer- 
cising other procedures (Find running 
checkdi r, for example), you must supply 
a Boolean parameter that passes back and 
forth between one procedure and the next. 
I used a parameter named k i 1 1 i t. When a 
procedure returns with kill it true, it 
immediately ends, carrying the value of 
the ki 1 1 1 1 to the procedure that called it. 
Eventually it gets back to the top level 
where I use the Chd command to move 
back to the current working directory, in 
which I started. Then I exit the program. 

The Pwd Trick 

It takes a while to find how to store the 
path to a directory so you can return to it 
later. The OS-9 utility will do the job of 
reporting a location on the screen. But that 
isn't much good if it doesn't tell the pro- 
gram itself. 

Since the code in pwd itself is recursive 
and quite complicated, I again searched 
for an easier way, deciding to use a tempo- 
rary file. With basic09's Shell statement, I 
called OS-9 and ran pwd. Its output was 
directed to a file named wdirtemp or 
tempwdi r. Unique names are used in case 
you run both programs at the same time. 

After writing the directory name to the 
disk file, the file opens and reads into an 
OS-9 variable. The Chd command is used 
then, with this variable as a parameter. If 
you happen to run a RAM disk and store it 
there, it's nice and fast. 

Perhaps you'll find other tricks to help 
you with these deceptively simple listings. 
Next month I plan to put a menu-based 
front end on them and maybe add an alter- 
native format. Till then, keep on hacking. 

□ 




TANDY COMPUTERS 

Tandy 1000-HX 256K 5 1/4"D. 535.00 

Tandy 1000-SL 384K 5 1/4"D. 675.00 

Tandy 1000-TL 640K 3 1/2"D. 955.00 

Tandy 3000-NL 51 2K 3 1/2"D. 1275.00 

Tandy 4000-LX 2 Meg 3 1/2"D. 2999.00 

Tandy 4000 1 Meg 3 1/2" D. 1890.00 

Tandy 5000MC 2 Meg 1 Drive 3825.00 

Tandy 5000MC 2 Meg 40 Meg 4955.00 

Tandy 5000MC 2 Meg 84 Meg 5395.00 

Tandy 1 400LT 768K 2 Drives 1 335.00 

Tandy 102 24K 430.00 

Tandy Color 3 1 28K 1 55.00 

MONITORS & CARDS 

VM-5 Monochrome Green 115.00 

CM-5 Color RGB 220.00 

CM-11 Color RGB 315.00 

EGM-1 Color RGB (EGA) 510.00 

Magnavox 9CM053 Color EGA 365.00 

Packard Bell Monochrome TTL 89.00 

NEC Multisync II Color 625.00 

Tandy EGA Card 205.00 

Paradise Basic EGA Card 195.00 

Video 7 Vega/Deluxe 239,00 

DRIVES 

Color Computer Drive 0 225.00 

5 1/4" External Drive 1000HX 180.00 

Tandy 20 Meg Hardcard 450.00 

30 Meg Hardcard 395.00 

20 Meg Hard Drive 1400LT 775.00 

5 1/4" External for Tandy 1400 215.00 

Seagate 20 MegHard Drive 219.00 

Tandy 1 000/SX7lX Controller 69.00 

MODEMS 

Prac. Peripherals 1200B Internal 75.00 
Prac. Peripherals 2400B Internal 175.00 

Packard Bell 2400B Internal 140.00 

PRINTERS 

DMP-106 Dot-Matrix 165.00 

DMP-132 Dot-Matrix 285.00 

DWP-230 Daisy Wheel 345.00 

Epson LX-800 Dot-Matrix 1 89.00 

Epson FX-850 Dot-Matrix 375.00 

Epson LQ-500 Dot-Matrix 315.00 

Epson FX-1050 Dot-Matrix 489.00 

Panaonic KX-P1 180 Dot-Matrix 195.00 

Panasonic KX-P1 191 Dot-Matrix 260.00 

Panasonic KX-P1 124 Dot-Matrix 369.00 

Please write for complete price list. 

We carry more items than listed here. 



All prices and offers may be changed or withdrawn without notice. Adver- 
tised prices are cash prices. C CD accepted add 2Wt> (minimum charge 
$10.00). M.C., Visa add 2%. All non defective items require return 
merchandise authorization Call tor RMA Number betas returning 
Delivery is subject lo product availability Add 1 v?% tor shipping and 
handling. $5.00 minimum charge. 

TM - Registered Trademark of Tandy, Epson, and IBM 
Monday thru Friday 9am - 5pm EST. 

□ □□□□ 

□ □□□□ 
■ 

□ □□□□ 
□□□□□ 

124 South Main Street, Perry, Ml 48872 
CALL 1-517-625-4161 or TOLL-FREE 
1-800-248-3823 



p 


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rgrainrpQE? ■ 







June 1989 THE RAINBOW 153 




About 
Your 
Subscription 



Your copy of the rainbow is 
sent second class maiL You 
must notify us of a new address 
when you move. Notification 
should reach us no later than 
the 15th of the month prior to 
the month in which you change 
your address. Sorry, we cannot 
be responsible for sending 
another copy when you fail to 
notify us. 

Your mailing label also 
shows an account number and 
the subscription expiration 
date. Please indicate this ac- 
count number when renewing 
or corresponding with us. It 
will help us help you better and 
faster. 

For Canadian and other non- 
U.S. subscribers, there may be 
a mailing addressshown that is 
different from our editorial of- 
fice address. Do not send any 
correspondence to that mail- 
ing address. Send it to our edi- 
torial offices at Falsoft, Inc., 
The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 
385, Prospect, KY 40059. This 
applies to everyone except 
those whose subscriptions are 
through our distributor in Aus- 
tralia. 



Listing 1: Find 



PROCEDURE 


find 


9m 


PARAM temtarg , tempath : STRING 


000 B 


DIM target , pathname : STRING 


0016 


DIM savewdir , test : STRING 


0021 


DIM path, en: BYTE 


00 2C 


DIM killit: BOOLEAN 


0033 




0034 


ON ERROR GOTO 100 


003A 


• 


003B 


killit: -FALSE 


0041 


en:-0 


0048 




0049 


SHELL "pwd > /dd/wdirtemp" 


005F 




0060 100 


IF en-218 THEN 


006F 


SHELL "del /dd/wdirtemp" 


0083 


SHELL "pwd > /dd/wdirtemp" 


0099 


END IF 


009B 




009C 


OPEN #path, "/dd/wdirtemp" 


00B1 


GET #path,savewdir 


00BB 


CLOSE #path 


00C1 




00C2 


ON ERROR GOTO 200 


00C8 




00C9 


target : -temtarg 


00D1 




00D2 200 


en-ERR 


00DB 


IF en-2 THEN 


00E7 


GOTO 400 


00EB 


END IF 


00ED 




00EE 


IF en-56 THEN 


00FA 


INPUT "Type a few character 


• 


, target 


013C 


END IF 


013E 




013F 


ON ERROR GOTO 300 


0145 




0146 


pathname : -tempath 


014E 




014F 300 


en-ERR 


0158 


IF en-2 THEN 


0164 


GOTO 400 


0168 


ENDIF 


016A 




016B 


IF en-56 THEN 


0177 


INPUT "Type the path to the 




.pathname 


01BA 


IF pathname-"" THEN 


01C6 


pathname :-"/dd" 


01D0 


ENDIF 


01D2 


ENDIF 


01D4 




01D5 


RUN checkdir (target , pathname , 


01E9 




01EA 400 


CHD savewdir 


01F2 


SHELL "del /dd/wdirtemp" 


0206 


END 



0208 
0209 



Listing 2: Findit 



PROCEDURE findit 

0000 DIM target, pathname: STRING 

000B DIM savewdir, test: STRING 

0016 DIM path,en:BYTE 

0021 DIM killit: BOOLEAN 
0028 

0029 ON ERROR GOTO 100 
002F 




154 THE RAINBOW June 1989 



0030 


SHELL "pvd > /dd/vdirtemp" 


0046 




0047 100 


IF en-218 THEN 


0056 


SHELL "del /dd/wdirtemp" 


006A 


SHELL "pwd >/dd/wdirtemp" 


007F 


ENDIF 


0081 




0082 


OPEN #path,"/dd/vdirteinp" 


0097 


GET #path,savevdir 


00A1 


CLOSE #path 


00A7 




ft n a o 

jJJJAo 


ON ERROR GOTO Lyy 


00AE 




00AF 


INPUT "Type a few characters from the name of the file you need: " 




.target 


00F1 


INPUT "Type the path to the directory you would like to start in: " 




, pathname 


0134 




0135 


IF pathname-"" THEN 


0141 


pathname : -"/dd" 


014B 


ENDIF 


014D 




014E 


RUN checkdir (target , pathname , klllit ) 


0162 




0163 200 


CHD savewdir 


016B 


SHELL "del /dd/wdirtemp" 


017F 


END 


0181 




0182 




0183 





Listing 3: Di skdi r 




PROCEDURE diskdir 


0000 


PARAM temstartdir: STRING 


0007 


DIM savewdir .pathname: STRING 


0012 


DIM path, DirLevel: BYTE 


00LD 


DIM klllit i BOOLEAN 


0024 




0025 


ON ERROR GOTO 100 


002B 


en:-0 


0033 


killit: -FALSE 


0039 




003A 


SHELL "pwd >/dd/tempwdir" 


004F 




0050 100 


IF en-218 THEN 


0060 


SHELL "del /dd/tempwdlr" 


0074 


SHELL "pwd >/dd/tempwdir" 


0089 


ENDIF 


008B 




008C 


OPEN #path , "/dd/tempwdir " : READ 


00A3 


GET #path, savewdir 


00AD 


CLOSE #path 


00B3 




00B4 


ON ERROR GOTO 200 


00BA 




00BB 


pathname : -temstartdir 


00C3 




00C4 200 


en-ERR 


00CE 


IF en-56 THEN 


00DB 


pathname : -"/dd" 


00E5 


ENDIF 


00E7 




00E8 


ON ERROR GOTO 300 


00EE 




00EF 


DirLevel :=0 


00F6 




00F7 


RUN dodir (pathname .DirLevel, killit) 


010B 




010C 300 


CHD savewdir 


0114 


SHELL "del /dd/tempwdir" 


0128 


END 

> 


012A 





MORE BAUD 
LESS BUCKS 



Save Time and Money with a Surprisingly 
Affordable 2400/1200/300 BPS Hayes - 
Compatible Modem for any Computer. 

Don't be fooled by the low cost of these 2400 baud 
modems. These are high quality modems made in the 
USA, with performance features unmatched by 
competitors costing three times as much. 

This is full-featured Hayes compatible modem that 
works with any computer. It features superior Hayes 
compatibility, advanced digital signal processing, and 
adaptive equalization for great performance and 
reliability. All of this in a compact, attractive go- 
anywhere package thafs not not much larger than a 
paperback book. 

Convenience features like call progress tone detection, 
auto-dial and auto-answer, a call progress speaker with 
volume control, a second jack for a local phone, on 
board diagnostics. 

Money saving premiums for sign-up and connect time 
for Delphi, The Source, CompuServ, etc. Software 
available: ProcCornm (PC) + 5; QuickLink (Mac) + 5; 
WizPro is free (shareware). 

Backed by two year mfg. warrantee, so you can buy 
with confidence that comes with 1 1 years of 
telecommunication experience. 

2400/1200/300 BPS modem $125.00 

(Please add 2.50 shipping and handling) 
Dealer inquiries welcome. 

GCS FILE TRANSFER UTILITIES 

See: Review - December Rainbow. 

Dale Puckett - November Rainbow. 

The GCS File Transfer Utilities provide a simple 
and quick method to transfer text and binary files from 
and to a variety of floppy disk formats. 

Just place the PC (MSDOS), RSDOS, FLEX or 
MINI-FLEX disk into your disk drive - enter a simple 
command and the file is copied into a OS-9 file. File 
transfer back is just as simple. Under Multi-Vue 
version, just select command from one of three menus. 
Commands Dir of PC, RS or FLEX disk 

Dump disk sector of PC, RS or FLEX 
Read file from PC, RS or FLEX disk 
Write file to PC, RS or FLEX disk 
Rename file on PC disk 
Delete file from PC disk 
Format PC disk 
Single, Double sided disks. 

Single, double density disks. 
35, 40 or 80 track floppy drives. 
8 or 9 sectors (PC). 
First level sub-directories (PC). 
Binary files. Use pipes for direct 
and multiple transfers. 
OS-9. 2 drives (one can be hard or 
ramdisk - one floppy 40 T DD DS). 
Multi-Vue for Multi-Vue version. 
SDISK (SDISK3 for COCO ill). 



Extensive 
Options 



Requires 



GCS File Transfer Utilities for CoCo 



Multi-Vue 
Standard 
SDISK or 



version 
version 
SDISK3 



$54.95 
$44.95 
$29.95 



Standard diskettes are OS-9 format (5.25") add $2.50 lor 3.5". 
Orders must be prepaid or COD. VISA/MC. Add $1.75 S&H. 
COD Is additional. 

GRANITE COMPUTER SYSTEMS 

Route 2 Box 445 Hillsboro, NH 03244 
(603) 464-3850 

OS-9 te a trademark of Microware Systems Corporation and 
Motorola Inc. MS-DOS is a trademark of Microsoft Corp. 
FLEX to a trademark of TSC, Inc. 



June 1989 THE RAINBOW 155 




About 
The One-Liner 
Contest . . . 

the rainbow's One-Liner 
Contest has now been ex- 
panded to include programs 
of either one or two lines. 
This means a new dimen- 
sion and new opportunity 
for those who have "really 
neat" programs that simply 
just won't fit in one line. 

Here are the guidelines: 
The program must work in 
Extended basic, have only 
one or two line numbers and 
be entirely self-contained — 
no loading other programs, 
no calling ROM routines, no 
poked-in machine language 
code. The program has to 
run when typed in directly 
(since that's how our read- 
ers will use it). Make sure 
your line, or lines, aren't 
packed so tightly that the 
program won't list com- 
pletely. Finally, any instruc- 
tions needed should be very 
short. 

Send your entry (prefera- 
bly on cassette or disk) to: 

THE RAINBOW 

One-Liner Contest 

P.O. Box 385 
Prospect, KY 40059 




Listing 4: Checkdi r 



PROCEDURE checkdir 



0000 PARAM target, pathname: STRING; killit : BOOLEAN 

0011 TYPE r ecor d-f name (29): BYTE ; lsn3,lsn2,lsnl:BYTE 

002F DIM fmentry: record 

0038 DIM DirEntry:STRINO[29] 

0044 DIM index , Char Count : INTEGER 

004F DIM en,DirPath:BYTE 

005A DIM tempdir: STRING 

0061 DIM adir: BOOLEAN 

0068 

0069 ON ERROR GOTO 3010 
006F 

0070 IF killit THEN END 
007A ENDIF 

007C 

007 D index-0 

0084 en:-0 
008B 

008C CHD pathname 

0091 OPEN #DirPath, pathname :READ+DIR 

009D SEEK #DirPath,0 

00A6 

00A7 REPEAT 
00A9 

00AA IF killit THEN END 

00B4 ENDIF 

00B6 

00B7 SEEK #DirPath, index \ GET #DirPath, fmentry 

00CB IF fmentry. f name (l)-0 THEN 

00DC DirEntry:-"*" 

00E4 ELSE 

00E8 CharCount:-0 

00EF Dir Entry-"" 

00F6 

00F7 REPEAT 

00F9 CharCount-CharCount+1 

0104 DirEntry-DirEntry+CHR? (LAND (fmentry . f name (Char Count ) , 

127)) 

011A UNTIL fmentry. f name (Char Count )>127 OR CharCount=28 

0132 DirEntry :-DirEntry+"" 

013D ENDIF 
013F 

0140 IF DirEntryO". ." AND DirEntry-O" . " AND DirEntryO"*" THEN 



015E IF SUBSTR(target,DirEntry)O0 THEN 

016E PRINT DirEntry; " is in "; 

017E SHELL M pwd" 

0185 ENDIF 

0187 GOSUB 3000 

018B REM Is file a directory? If so, process it I" 

01B8 ENDIF 

01BA index: -index+32 

01C5 UNTIL EOF(#DirPath) 

01CE CLOSE #DirPath 

01D4 END 

01D6 

01D7 3000 ON ERROR GOTO 3010 

01E0 en:-0 

01E7 CHD DirEntry 
01EC 

01ED 3010 en: -ERR 
01F6 

01F7 IF en-2 THEN 

0203 killit:-TRUE 

0209 END 

020B ENDIF 
020D 

020E IF en-0 THEN \REM It's a directory 

022D tempdir:-". " 

0235 RUN checkdir (target, tempdir, killit) 

0249 CHD " . . w 

024F ELSE \REM It's a file 

0261 ENDIF 

0263 RETURN 

0265 



156 



THE RAINBOW June 1989 



f ictino ^* nnrii r 


PROCEDURE dodir 


n 

9999 




PARAM pathname : STRING ; DirLevel : BYTE; killit : BOOLEAN 






TYPE record>fname(29) : BYTE; lsn3 , lsn2 , lsnl : BYTE 


0031 




DIM fmentry: record 


003A 




DIM DirEntry : STRING f»29 J . 


0046 




DIM Index , CharCount : INTEGER 


0051 




DIM en , D 1 r Pa t n : BYTE 


005C 




Dili tempdlr : biKlNCj 


000 J 






0064 




ON ERROR GOTO 3010 


006A 






00 6 B 




IF Kllllt THEN END 


0075 




l-« \7 f* T» 

ENDIF 


0077 






0078 




en:»0 


t*r fr T tt 

997^ 




index=0 


0086 






0087 




CHD pathname 


A f\ 

008 C 




OPEN #Dir Path, pathname :READ+DIR 


0098 




SEEK #DirPath,0 


aj ■ m 

00A1 






00A2 




REPEAT 


00A4 






00A5 




IF Kill it THEN END 


00AF 




ENDIF 


00B1 






00B2 




SEEK #DirPath, index \ GET #DirPath, fmentry 


00C6 




IF fmentry. f name (1)»0 THEN 


00D7 




DirEntry:™"*" 


/"r /"r t> 

00DF 




ELSE 


00E3 




CharCount :=0 


00EA 




DirEntry-"" 


00F1 






00F2 




REPEAT 


00F4 




Cha rCount=Char Count +1 


00FF 




D ir En try=-D irEn try+CHR$ ( LAND ( fmentry . f name ( CharCount ) , 






127)) 


0115 




UNTIL fmentry . f name (CharCount )>12 7 OR CharCount«28 


012D 




D ir Entry : -D irEntry+" " 


0138 




\1 7\ T" 

ENDIF 


013A 






013B 




IF DirEntryO" . . " AND DIrEntryO ', " AND DIrEntryO"*" THEN 


0159 




PRINT TAB(DirLevel*5) ; DirEntry 


0166 




GOSUB 3000 


016A 






016B 




REM Is file a directory/ it so, process it 


0195 




ENDIF 


0197 






/v ^ rt rt 

0198 




Index :»index+32 


01A3 




UNTIL E0FC#Dlrrath) 


01AC 






01 AD 




CLOSE #Dirratn 


01B3 




Ti™l X kTfH V "OO X KIT 1 V "DO T KIT 

PRINT \ PRINT \ rRINl 


01B9 




END 


01BB 






01BC 


3000 




01C5 




en:-0 


01CC 




CHD DirEntry 


01D1 






01D2 


3010 


en : -ERR 


01DB 






01DC 




IF en-2 THEN 


01E8 




kill!t:=TRUE 


01EE 




END 


01F0 




ENDIF 


01F2 




IF en-0 THEN \REM It's a directory 


01F3 




0212 




tempdir:-" . ■ 


021A 




DirLevel:=DirLevel+l 


0225 




RUN dod ir ( t empdir , D ir Level , kil 1 it ) 


0239 




CHD " . . " 


023F 




DirLevel :=DirLevel-l 


024A 




ELSE \REM It's a file 


025C 




ENDIF 


025E 




RETURN 


0260 










ITS 



SUMMER SPECIALS 
FROM SPORTSware 



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Design your own icons for units and terrain 
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it's own unique attributes. Play war games YOU 
designed! Keyboard or joystick control, game save 
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R.O.T.C. AND FORT APACHE scenarios included. 
Ready to play! 4 disk sides of fun! 

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528 ready to use unit & terrain icons. 
A MUST HAVE WGD II accessory. 
Superb graphics! Jusl $14 

GRIDIRON STRATEGY 

Get ready for the BEST 1 & 2 player game of foot- 
ball around. The most realistic football simulation 
for the C0C03! Only 517 

WEEKLY WINNER 2.0 

Just ' playing" the lottery? Get serious and start 
WINNING! We've seen WW2.0 hit 4 & 5 of 6 in 
Ohio. Play 3, 4 and 6 digit lottos. Fast, easy to use 
ML program. Invest in your future NOW! $15 

^ NEW! CATALOG ON DISK 

Seeing is believing! Send just S3 for our NEW 
Catalog On Disk. Then deduct $3 from the cost of 
your next order! Many NEW products illustrated! 
Order Yours Today! 

CC3 FLAGS 

If you like Parker Bros. RISK, you'll love 
CC3FLAGS. A game of world conquest for 1 to 6 
piayers. Great graphics and definitely addictive! 
SUMMER SALE S19 

C0C03 WHEEL 

Recently updated! 200 puzzles (and you can add 
MORE). Play your favorite game show at home! 1 
to 6 can play. NOW $19 

BLACK GRID 

An intriguing puzzle for the COC03. "You'll be pull- 
ing your hair out with this one." JUST $19 

$r NEW , PENINSULAR WAR 

You command the British Forces in Spain 1805. 
This historic simulation puts you in Wellington's 
shoes against superior French forces during the 
Napoleonic War. ONLY $19 

NEW! THE RUSSIAN CAMPAIGN 

Another REALISTIC campaign from the days of 
Napoleon. Can you defeat the Russian army and 
capture Moscow? JUST $19 

NEW! BIG SCREEN 

Add another 8K to COC03's HIRES Graphics 
Screens. Scroll up & down. 33 lines of text. All 
BASIC! Just add this subroutine to existing or new 
BASIC programs. A BASIC programmers utility! 

ONLY $12 

CC3 CRAM 

Save most COC03 graphic screens to disk in 6 or 
less granules, not 16! JUST $12 

VISA & MASTERCARD accepted. FREE 
SHIPPING **GET GHOST HUNTERS FREE with 
ANY ORDER** 
A $15 Value! Catalog orders excluded. 



SPORTSware 

1251 S. Reynolds Road, Suite 414 
Toledo, Ohio 43615 

(419) 3S9-1515 



June 1989 THE RAINBOW 157 



Racksellers 



These Fine Stores Carry THE RAINBOW 

The retail stores listed below carry the rainbow on a regular basis and may have other 
products of interest to Tandy Color Computer users. We suggest you patronize those In your 
area. 



ALABAMA 

Birmingham 

Brewton 

Florence 

Greenville 

Madison 

Montgomery 

Tuscalooso 

ALASKA 

Fairbanks 

ARIZONA 

Cottonwood 
Lake Havasu 

City 
Phoenix 
Tempe 

Tucson 

ARKANSAS 

Fayetteville 
Ft. Smith 
Little Rock 

CALIFORNIA 

Berkeley 
Citrus Heights 
Hollywood 

La Jolla 

Los Angeles 

Marysvllle 

Napa 

Oakland 

Rancho 

Murieta 
Sacramento 

San Francisco 



Santa Monica 
San Jose 
Santa Rosa 
Stockton 

Sunnyvale 
Torrance 

COLORADO 

Aurora 
Colorado 

Springs 
Denver 
Glenwood 

Springs 
Grand 

Junction 
Longmont 

DELAWARE 

Newark 
Wilmington 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 

Washington, 
DC 



Jefferson News Co 
McDowell Electronics 
Anderson News Co. 
M & B Electronics 
Madison Books 
Trade 1ST Books 
Injun John's, Inc. 

Arrow Appliance/Radio Shack 

A&W Graphics Co. 

Book Nook 
TRI-TEK Computers 
Books, Etc. 
Computer Library 
Anderson News Co. 

Vaughn Electronics/Radio Shack 
Hot Off the Press Newsstand 
Anderson News Co. 

Lyon Enterprises 
Software Plus 
Levity Distributors 
Stef-Jen, Inc. 

Butler & Mayes Booksellers 
Circus of Books (2 Locations) 
Bookland 

Bookends Bookstore 
DeLauer's News Agency 

Software Plus 
Deiberf s Readerama 
Tower Magazine 
Booksmith 
Bookworks 
Castro Kiosk 

Midnight Special Bookstore 
Computer Literacy Bookshops 
Sawyer's News, Inc. 
Harding Way News 
Paperbacks Unlimited 
Computer Literacy 
El Camino College Bookstore 

Aurora Newsstand 

Hathawa/s 
News Gallery 

The Book Train 

Read more Book & Magazine 
City Newsstand 

Newark Newsstand 
Normar, Inc.— The Smoke Shop 



FLORIDA 

Boca Roton 
Clearwater 
Dania 
Davie 

Ft. Lauderdale 

Gainesville 
Jacksonville 
Merritt Island 
North Miami 

Beach 
Panama City 
Pensacola 
Pineltas Park 
South 

Pasadena 
Starke 

Sunrise 
Tallahassee 



Chronichles 
News Room 
World News, Inc. 

Great American Book Co. 
The Avid Reader 
Dania News & Books 
Software Plus More 
Bob's News & Book-Store 
Ciarks Out of Town News 
Paper Chase 
Book Co. 
The Open Door 

Alrnar Bookstore 
Boyd-Ebert Corp. 
Anderson News Co 
Wolfs Newsstand 

Poling Place Bookstore 
Record Junction Inc. 
Radio Shack Dealer 
Sunny's at Sunset 
Anderson News Co. 
DuBe/s News Center 



FLORIDA (cont'd) 

Titusville 

GEORGIA 

Atlanta 
Bremen 
Forest Pork 
Jesup 
Thomasvllle 
Toccoa 

IDAHO 

Boise 
Moscow 

ILLINOIS 

Belleville 
Centra lia 
Champaign 
Chicago 
Decatur 



East Moline 
Evanston 
Kewanee 
Lisle 

Lombard 
Newton 
Paris 
Peoria 



Springfield 



Sunnyland 
West Frankfort 
Wheeling 

INDIANA 

Angola 

Berne 

Bloomington 

CrawfordsvJIle 

Dyer 

Franklin 

Ft. Wayne 

Garrett 

Indianapolis 



Lebanon 
Martinsville 
Richmond 
IOWA 
Davenport 
Des Moines 
Fairfield 

KANSAS 

Hutchinson 
Topeka 

Wellington 
Wichita 

KENTUCKY 

Hazord 
Henderson 
Hopklnsvllle 
Louisville 
Middletown 
Newport 
LOUISIANA 
Baton Rouge 
Lockport 
New Orleans 
Monroe 

MAINE 

Bangor 

Brockton 

Caribou 

Oxford 

Sanford 



MARYLAND 

College Park 



Computrac 
Border's 

Bremen Electronics/Radio Shack 
Eflers News Center 
Radio Shack 
Smokehouse Newsstand 
Martin Music Radio Shack 

Book Shelf, Inc. 
Johnson News Agency 

Software or Systems 
Books & Co., Inc, 
Bookmark 

B. Dalton Booksellers 
Book Emporium 
K-Mart Plaza 
Northgate Mall 
Book Emporium 
Norrls Center Bookstore 
Book Emporium 
Book Nook 
Empire Periodicals 
Bill's TV Radio Shack 
Book Emporium 
Book Emporium 
Sheridan Village 
Westlake Shopping Center 
Illinois News Service 
Book Emporium 
Sangamon Center North 
Town & Country Shopping Ctr. 
Book Emporium 
Paper Place 
North Shore Distributors 

D & D Electronics 
Radio Shack 

White Cottage Electronics 
Book Corner 
Koch's Books 
Miles Books 
Gallery Book Shop 
Michiana News Service 
Finn News Agency, Inc. 
Bookland, Inc. 
Borders Bookshop 
tndiana News 
Southside News 
Gallery Book Shop 
Radio Shack 
Voyles News Agency, Inc. 

Interstate Book Store 
Thackery's Books, Inc. 
Kramers Books & Gifts 

Crossroads, Inc. 

Palmer News, Inc. 

Town Crier of Topeka, Inc. 

Dandy's/Radio Shack Dealer 

Lloyd's Radio 

Daniel Boone Gulf Mart 
Mart's News & Gifts 
Hobby Shop 

Howley-Cooke Booksellers (2 Locations) 
Software City 
Simon's Castle News 

City News Stand 
TV Doctor/Radio Shack 
Sidney's News Stand Uptown 
The Book Rack 

Magazines, inc. 
Voyager Bookstore 
Radio Shack 
Books-N-lhlngs 
Radio Shack 



University Bookstore 



MASSACHUSETTS 

Boston 

Brockton 

Cambridge 

Ipswich 

Uttleton 

Lynn 

Swansea 

MICHIGAN 

Allen Park 

Birmingham 

Durand 

E. Detroit 

Hillsdale 

Holland 

Kalamazoo 

Lowell 

Muskegon 

Niies 

Perry 

Riverview 

Rose vi lie 

MINNESOTA 

Burnsvilte 

Crystal 

Edina 

Minneapolis 
Minnetonka 
Roseville 
St. Paul 



Wlllmar 

MISSOURI 

Farmington 
Flat River 
Florissant 
Jefferson City 
Kirksville 
St. Louis 

MONTANA 

Butte 

NEBRASKA 

Lincoln 
Omaha 

NEVADA 

Carson City 
Las Vegas 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Manchester 
West Lebanon 

NEW JERSEY 

Atlantic City 
Cedar Knolls 
Clinton 
NEW MEXICO 
Albuquerque 
Santa Fe 

NEW YORK 

Amherst 
Brockport 
Brooklyn 
Elmira Heights 
Fredonia 
Hudson Falls 
Huntington 
Johnson City 
New York 



Rochester 



Eastern Newsstand 
Voyager Bookstore 
Out Of Town News 
Ipswich News 
Computer Plus 
North Shore News Co. 
Newsbreak, Inc. 

Book Nook, Inc. 

Border's Book Shop 

Robbins Electronics 

Merit Book Center 

Electronics Express/Radio Shack 

Fris News Company 

The Book Raft 

Lowell Electronics 

The Eight Bit Corner 

Michiana News Service 

Perry Computers 

Riverview Book Store 

New Horizons Book Shop 

Shinder's Bumsviile 
Shinder's Crystal Gallery 
Shlnder's Leisure Lane 
Shinder's (2 Locations) 
Shinder's Ridge Squcre 
Shinder's Roseville 
Shinder's Annex 
Shinder's Maptewcod 
Shinder's St. Pauls 
The Photo Shop 

Ray's TV & Radio Shack 
Ray's TV & Radio Shack 
Book Brokers Unlimited 
Cowley Distributing 
T&R Electronics 
Book Emporium 

Plaza Books 

Nebraska Bookstore 
Nelson News 

Bookcellar 
Hurley Electronics 
Steve's Books & Magazines 

Bookwrights 
Verham News Corp. 

Atlantic City News Agency 
Village Computer & Software 
Micro World II 

Page One Newsstand 
{Downtown Subscription 

Village Green-Buffafo Books 

Lift Bridge Book Shop, Inc. 

Cromland, Inc. 

Southern Tier News Co., Inc. 

On Line: Computer Access Center 

G A West & Co 

Oscar's Bookshop 

Unicorn Electronics 

Barnes & Noble— Sales Annex 

Coliseum Books 

Eastern Newsstand 

Grand Central Station, Track 37 

200 Park Ave., (Pan Am #1) 

55 Water Street 

World Trade Center #2 
First Stop News 
idle Hours Bookstore 
International Smoke Shop 
Jonll Smoke 
Penn Book 
State News 
Walden Books 
World Wide Media Services 
Microcom Software 
Village Green 
World Wide News 



158 THE RAINBOW June 1989 



NORTH CAROLINA 

Cary 

Chapel Hill 
Charlotte 
Hickory 
Jacksonville 
Kemersville 
Lexington 
Marion 

Winston-Salem 

OHIO 

Akron 
Canton 
Chardon 
Cincinnati 
Cleveland 
Columbiana 
Columbus 



Dayton 



Dublin 
Fairbom 



Rndley 

Lakewood 

Lima 

Miamisburg 
Parma 
Warren 
Xenia 

Youngstown 

OKLAHOMA 

Oklahoma 

City 
Taklequah 
Tulsa 

OREGON 

Eugene 
Portland 



Salem 

PENNSYLVANIA 

Allentown 

Altoona 

Bryn Mawr 

Feasterville 

King of Prussia 

Malvern 

Reading 

Temple 

West Chester 

Wind Gap 

York 

RHODE ISLAND 

Newport 



News Center in Cary Village 
University News & Sundry 
Newsstand Inf I 
C 2 Books & Comics 
Mlchele's. Inc. 
K&S Newsstand 
Martin's News Stand 
Boomers Rhythm Center 
K&S Newsstand (3 Locations) 
Rainbow News Ltd. 

Churchill News & Tobacco 
Little Professor Book Center 
Thrasher Radio & TV 
Cinsoft 
Erieview News 
Fidelity Sound & Electronics 
B5 Software 
Micro Center 
The Newsstand 
Books & Co. 
Wilke News 
Wright News & Books 
Book Barn 
News-Readers 
Sandbox Micro Systems 
Wilke's University Shoppe 
Open Book 

Lakewood International News 

Edu-Caterers 

Wilke News 

Bookmark Newscenter 

Book Nook, Inc. 

Fine Print Books 

Plaza Book & Smoke Shop 



Merit Micro Software 

Thomas Sales, inc. dba Radio Shack 

Steve's Book Store 

Libra Books — Book Mark 
Fifth Avenue News 
Rich Cigar Store, Inc. 
Sixth & Washington News 
Copltol News Center 
Checkmate Book 

Owl Services 
Newborn Enterprises 
Bryn Mawr News 
Global Books 
Gene's Books 
Personal Software 
Smith's News & Card Center 
Software Corner 
Chester County Book Co. 
Micro World 

The Computer Center of York 
Toligate Bookstore 

Bellevue News 



SOUTH CAROLINA 

Charleston Hts. Software Haus. Inc. 

Clemson Newsstand 
Ray's #1 

Palmetto News Co. 
Software City 



Clemson 
Florence 
Greenville 
Spartanburg 



TENNESSEE 

Brentwood 
Chattanooga 

Knoxvilie 

Memphis 
Nashville 



Smyrna 

TEXAS 

Big Spring 
Desoto 
Elgin 
Ft. Worth 
Harlingfon 



Bookworld #5 
Anderson News Co. 
Guild Books & Periodicals 
Anderson News Co. 
Davis-Kidd Bookseller 
Computer Center 
Davis-Kidd Booksellers 
Mosko's Race 
R.M. Mills Bookstore 
Deiker Electronics 

Poncho's News 
Maxwell Books 
The Homing Pigeon 
Trinity News 
Book Mark 



UTAH 

Provo 

VIRGINIA 

Danville 
Hampton 
Lynchburg 
Norfolk 

Richmond 

WASHINGTON 

Port Angeles 
Seattle 

Tacoma 

WEST VIRGINIA 

Huntington 
Madison 
Parkersburg 
South 
Charleston 

WISCONSIN 

Appleton 
Cudahy 
Kenosha 
Madison 

Milwaukee 
Waukesha 

ARGENTINA 

Cordoba 

AUSTRALIA 

Blaxland 
Klngsford 

CANADA* 
ALBERTA 

Banff 

Bonnyville 

Brooks 

Calgary 

Claresholm 

Drayton Valley 

Edmonton 

Fairvlew 

Fox Creek 

Ft. Saskatche- 
wan 
Grande 

Cache 
Grande 

Centre 
Hlnton 
Innisfall 
Leduc 
Lethbrldge 
Lioydminster 
Okotoks 
Peace River 

St. Paul 

Stettier 

Strath more 

Taber 

Westlock 

Wetaskiwln 



Valley Book Center 

K&S Newsstand 
Benders 

Self Serve Software 
l-O Computers 
Turn The Page 
Volume ! Bookstore 

Port Book & News 
Adams News Ca, inc. 
Bulldog News 
B & I Magazines & Books 
Nybbles 'N Bytes 

Nick's News 
Communications, LTD 
Valley News Service 

Spring Hill News 

Badger Periodicals 
Cudahy News & Hobby 
R.K. News, Inc. 
Pic A Book 
University Bookstore 
Juneau Village Reader 
Holt Variety 

Information Telecommunicatlones 



Blaxland Computers 
Paris Radio Electronics 



Banff Radio Shack 
Paul Tercier 

Double "D" AS.C. Radio Shack 
Billy's News 

Radio Shack Associated Stores 
Langard Electronics 
CMD Micro 
D.N.R. Furniture & TV 
Fox City Color & Sound 
AS.C. Radio Shack 

Ft. Mall Radio Shack, ASC 

The Stereo Hut 

The Book Nook 
Jim Cooper 
L & S Stereo 

Radio Shack Associated Stores 
Datatron 

Lloyd Radio Shack 
Okotoks Radio Shack 
Radio Shack Associated Stores 
Tavener Software 
Walter's Electronics 
Stettier Radio Shack 
Wheatland Electronics 
Pynewood Sight & Sound 
Westlock Stereo 
Radio Shack 



BRITISH COLUMBIA (confd) 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 



Bumaby 
Burns Lake 
Campbell 

River 
Chilllwack 



Compulit 

VT. Video Works 

TRS Electronics 
Charles Parker 



Coquitlam 
Coortenay 
Dawson Creek 
Golden 
Langley 
Nelson 
New West- 
minster 
Parksville 
Penticton 

Sidney 
Smlthers 
Squamish 
Vancouver 



100 Mile 
House 

MANITOBA 

Altona 

Lundar 

Morden 

The Pas 

Selkirk 

Vtrden 

NEW BRUNSWICK 

Moncton 
Sussex 

NEWFOUNDLAND 

Botwood 
Carbonear 
Labrador City 

NOVA SCOTIA 

Halifax 

ONTARIO 

Angus 

Aurora 

Concord 

Exceter 

Hanover 

Huntsviile 

Kenora 

Kingston 

Listowel 

South River 

Toronto 

QUEBEC 

LaSalle 
Pont. Rouge 

SASKATCHEWAN 

Assinibola 
Estevan 
Moose Jaw 
Nipiwan 
Regina 

Saskatoon 
Shellbrooke 
Tisdale 
Unity 

YUKON 

Whitehorse 

JAPAN 

Tokyo 

PUERTO RICO 

East Isla Verde 



Cody Books LTD 
Rick's Music & Stereo 
Bell Radio & TV 
Taks Home Furnishings 
Langley Radio Shack 
Oliver's Books 

Cody Books LTD 
Parksville TV 
DJ.'s 

Four Corner Grocery 
Sidney Electronics 
Wall's Home Furniture 
Kotyk Electronics 
Active Components 
Friendlyware Computers 
Granville Book Ca 
Siliconnectlons Books LTD 

Tip Top Radio & TV 

LA WiebrLtd. 
Goranson Elec. 
Central Sound 
Jodi's Sight & Sound 
G.L. Enns Elec. 
Archer Enterprises 

Jeffries Enterprises 
Dewitt Elec; 



Seaport Elec. 
Slade Realties 

N.P. Investments (Mall Drugs) 

Atlantic News 

Micro Computer Services 

Compu Vision 

Ingram Software 

J. Macleane & Sons 

Modern Appliance Centre 

Huntsviile Elec. 

Donny "B" 

T.M. Computers 

Modern Appliance Centre 

Max TV 

Dennis TV 

Gordon and Gotch 

Messageries de Presse Benjamin Enr. 
Boutique Bruno Laroche 

Telstar News 
Kotyk Electronics 
D&S Computer Place 
Cornerstone Sound 
Regina CoCo Club 
Software Supermarket 
Everybody's Software Library 
Gee. Laberge Radio Shack 
Paul's Service 
Grant's House of Sound 

H&O Holdings 



America Ado, Inc. 



The Color Computer Store 



Also available at all B. Dalton Booksellers, and 
selected Coles and \N.H. Smith in Canada, 
Waldenbooks, Pickwick Books, Encore Books, 
Barnes & Noble, Little Professors, Tower Book & 
Records, Kroch's & Brentano's, and Community 
Newscenters. 



June 1989 THE RAINBOW 159 



Advertisers Index 



We encourage you to patronize our advertisers — all of whom support the Tandy Color 
Computer. We will appreciate your mentioning the rainbow when you contact these firms. 



Alpha Software Technologies . . .81 
Arizona Small Computer 



Company ,, 143 

Burke & Burke 35 

CRC/Disto ....146 

Cer-Comp 97 

Cinsoft 81 

CoCo Connection. . 45 

Cognitec 29 

Colorware > ., — 19 

Computer Island 75 

Computer Plus 3 

D.P. Johnson 151 

Danosoft 51 

Dayton Associates of 

W. R. Hall, Inc.. ....131 

Delphi 86 

Dr. Preble's Programs 23 

EZ Friendly 49 

Frank Hogg Laboratories 33 

Game Point Software . . < . . .67, 119 

Gimmesoft 21 

Granite Computer Systems . . . .155 

HawkSoft, Inc. .., .149 

Howard Medical 162, IBC 

JR & JR Softstuff* ,.60 

JWT Enterprises , 115 

Ken-Ton Electronics 145 

Magus Systems Engineering . . . .49 

Metric Industries 14 

MichTron .. . , !? . ..BC 

Microcom Software ... .7, 9, 11, 13, 

15,17 
Microtech Consultants 

Inc u....... 77 

NRI Schools Insert 

Orion Technologies ....... , ... .53 

Owl-Ware 69, 70,71 

Perry Com puters .153 

Ciuestron * .».■*. ... »?*■ » » ; .. : . . »;.., . . <»:.. . . .75 



1 60 THE RAINBOW June 1 989 



RGB Computer System 145 

Rainbow Binder . .64 

Rainbow on Tape & Disk IFC 

Rulaford Research 129 

SD Enterprises 25, 141 

Second City Software 161 

Simply Better Software 37 

SPORTSware 157 

Sugar Software 57 



Sundog Systems 39 

T & D Software ...31, 106, 107, 124 

Tandy/Radio Shack 125 

Tepco 1 23 

Tothian Software 133 

True Data Products 83 

Try-O-Byte 61 

Vidicom . 47 

Zebra Systems 103 




9509 U.S. Highway 42 
P.O. Box 385 
Prospect, KY 40059 

FAX (502) 228-5121 



BSE: $19.95 
Basic Screen Editor, a full screen 
editor to supplement regular EDIT 
commands. Works on the CoCo 
1&2 and with the CoCo 3, WIDTH 
32, 40 and 80 is supported! Com- 
plete screen cursor control plus 
features to make EDITing Basic 
programs a snap! BSE, a "must 
have utility. Our low price was the 
only corner that was cut on this 
quality program. 64k Disk 

CHECK-09MV: $25.95 
Version 2.1 NOW supports full 
EDITing command! Check-09MV 
interacts with MultiVuefor FAST & 
EASY checkbook balancing. No 
more waiting for your bank state- 
ment for an ending balance. 
Check-09MVwill produce a check- 
by-check running total of your 
account in an easy to use format 
that eliminates those monthly sur- 
prizes! 512k Disk 

VIP LIBRARY: $149.95 
This popular 'intergraded' pack- 
age includes VIP Writer, Terminal, 
DataBase, Calc, and Disk Zap 
which can fix a disk with I/O errors. 
64k Disk 

VIP Writer III w/Dictionary $79.95 
VIP DataBase III $69.95 
VIP Calc III $69.95 



SPECIAL: Order any VIP program 
from SCS and receive an addi- 
tional program at NO EXTRA 
CHARGE! Call or write for details. 

SOFTWARE BY CdorVenture 
Ram Disk Lighting-512k $16.95 
Printer Lighting-1 28k $1 6.95 
BackUp Lighting-5l2k $16.95 
All 3 for only $42.95 

Hi-Res Joystick Driver $19.95 
Max Patch $19.95 
Both for only $34.94 

MAX-10 $78.45 
CoCoMax 111 $78.45 



NEW PRODUCTS FROM SCS 

WORD SEARCH: $22.95 
Word Search Generator Utility will 
create simple to complex Word 
Search puzzles. The whole family 
will enjoy generating their own 
puzzle. Word Search Generator 
Utility is ideal for newsletters or 
monthly flyers. Full printer and 
disk supported. 64k Disk 

SPACE RAIDERS: $1 6.95 

| Fast action arcade game that will 
test your skill and reflexes! Pro- 
gramallowsyouto save orload in 
your high scores and is CoCo 1 , 2 
& 3 Compatible. 32k Disk 

STARPIC UTILITY: $19.95 
STARPIC PICTURE UTILITY will 
print PMODE pictures on your 
Star NX-1000 printer. STARPIC 
works within a Point 'N Click pull 
down menu environment. Loads 
in ANY /MAX extension picture 
file. Select different PMODE 
screens and even 'INVERT' your 
picture! This is a full featured, 
easy to use graphics picture 
printer utility. 64k Disk 

DMP-PIC UTILITY: $19.95 
Same full features as STARPIC, 
but supports the Tandy DMP 
printers. 64k DISK 

STAR*MAX: $24.95 
Finally, an easy to use, full fea- 
tured ColorPrint Utility forthe Star 
NX-1000 Rainbow Printer. Print 
CoCoMax 3 or ColorMax pictures 
in living color and bring your 
CoCo 3 screen to the printed 
page. 128k Disk 

CGP*MAX: $19.95 

Same basic program as StarMax, 
but, CGP-MAX is for your Tandy 
CGP-220 color printer. 128k Disk 

UltiMusE III $54.95 
The Utiimate Music Editor that 
has the others saying 'What If../? 
Experience the difference! Re- 
quires, OS-9 Level 2, & MIDI Key- 
board. 512k Disk 



ADOS 3: $34.95 
The popular Disk Operating Sys- 
tem from SpectroSystem for the 
CoCo 3. 128k Disk 

MY DOS: $14.95 
Access Double Sided Drives, use 
the J&M Controller with the CoCo 
3, DIR commands simplified & a 
host of other special features. 64k 

SCS can custom 'burp' your pur- 
chased DOS for only $15! This 
includes the price of the EPROM 
chipand the BURN charge. Call or 
write for details. 

OS-9 SOLUTION: $24.95 
Tame the hostile environment of 
OS-9 SOLUTION! Replaces 20 of 
the command calls with single 
keystroke, menu driven com- 
mands. No more long and com- 
plex pathnames or syntaxes to 
remember! Works with either OS- 
9 Level One or Two. 

SDP: $22.95 
Schematic Drafting Processor, a 
FAST & EASY to use Electronic 
Drafting Processor. Create de- 
signs using a 480x540 screen with 
6 viewing windows. Over 30 elec- 
tronic symbols & 10 definable 
symbols. Even supports Logic 
gates & Multipin chips! Print a 
hard copy or save to disk for later 
editing. NOW CoCo 3 Compat- 
ible. 64k Disk • ■ 

MULTI-PAK CRACK: $24.95 
Allows you to save your ROM-PAK 
programs over to disk.. .WHERE 
THEY BELONG! includes POKES 
for problem PAKs and the new 1 6k 
PAKs. 64k Disk. 

CoCo Calender Deluxe $1 9.95 
Blackjack Royale $16.95 
Tape/Disk Utility $19.95 
CoCo Keyboard $6.95 
TelePatch $24.95 
Pyramix (CoCo 3) $1 9.95 

Start OS-9 (Book & Disk) $34.95 



THE NEWSPAPER PLUS $48.95 

DeskTop Publishing for the CoCo 3? With the ALL NEW NEWSPAPER PLUS, 
you can create complete and sophisticated Banners, Headlines along with 
Text Columns and Graphics. NEWSPAPER PLUS allows for importing differ- 
ent pictures, fonts and fill patternsfrom diskfor that pro-look. Comes complete 
with 22 fonts, 50 NewsArt pictures and fill patterns. 128k Disk 
THE NEWSPAPER GRAPHICS DISK I $19.95 
NewsArt A thru Z: 26 disks of Clip Art for NEWSPAPER PLUS $9.95 ea. 



MASTER CARD -VISA 
C.O.D.- MONEY ORDERS 

ADD $2.50 SHIPPING 
($4.50 FOREIGN) AND 
AN ADDITIONAL $2.50 
FOR C.O.D. ORDERS 

Allow 1 to 3 weeks delivery 



E 
C 

o 

N 
D 



C 

T 
Y 



S 
O 



w 

R 



P.O. BOX 72956 
ROSELLE, IL 
60172 

ORDER 
312-653-5610 

BBS 
312^307-1519 




MAGNAVOX BCM515 COLOR 

• 80 Column 

• Use with Coco, Tandy "iOOO's, IBM PC 
CC-3 RGB cable 19.95 



$279(i4ship) 




MAGNAVOX 7622 AMBER 

• 80 Column 

• Built in Speaker 



$98 (7 ship) 





_ 



DRIVE 0 PLUS 

• Double sided 360K MPI 52 

• Disto Controller and cable 

$178.45 (5 ship) 



STAR NX-1O0OR COLOR 

• Built in back tractor paper feed 

• Joe Walker Star Max Color printer 
driver and SP-C 

converter add $40 $249 {5 ship) 




A. DISTO 3 in 1 Board $59.45 

B. DISTO MEB $30.00 

C. DISTO RS-232 $49.95 





VIDEO AMPLIFIER VA-1 

required in CoCo 1 or 2 to drive 
monitor $29.45 (2 ship) 



Hard Drive — Complete! 

20,000,000 Bytes or the equivalent 
to 125 R.S. 501's on line are packed 
into this hard drive, pre installed and 
ready to run. This complete, easy to 
use package includes a Seagate 20 
Meg Hard Drive, a DTC 5150 Con- 
troller and interface*, heavy duty 
case & power supply, and a 1 year 
warranty. This 20 meg Hard Drive 
will also work with Tandy and IBM 
clones. Basic driver, $29.95, lets you 
access this hard drive without need 
for OS-9. 
(9 ship) 





HD-1 20 Meg 
HD-2 30 Meg 
HD-3 40 Meg 

*Burke & Burke 



$499 
$549 
$598 




DOUBLE DRIVE 0 + 

Two double side 360K Teac 55B 
Disto controller & cable 

$310(8ship) 



Hi 




SSm^JsK* 1 * Legs**-** ^ 

rr. . b ■* — i ■ 



PAL UPGRADE PAL -1 or 2 

Makes multi-pack interface work with 
Coco 3. Specify 26-3024 or 26-312W 

$14,95 (2 ship} 




30 Day Money Back Guarantee 

Howard Medical's 30-day guarantee 
is meant to eliminate the uncertainty 
of dealing with a company through 
the mail. Once you receive our 
hardware, try it out; test it for 
compatability. If you're not happy 
with itforany reason, return it in 30 
days and we'll give your your money 
back (less shipping.) Shipping 
charges are for 48 states. APO, 
Canada and Puerto Rico orders are 
higher. 



JUl 




inr 

Howard Medical Computers 

1690N. Elston 
Chicago, Illinois 60622 

Order Status and Inquiries 
312-278-1440 

Show Room Hours 
8:00 - 5:00 M-F 
10:00-3:00 Sat. 

24 Hour Order Line 

800-443-1444 




Ill 



STAR NX1 

Dot Matrix; 1 44 CPS 

Back Tractor & Friction Feed 

Needs SP-C $189 (5 ship) 




HOWARD SP-C 

Serial to Parallel Converter 
Connect CoCo to Parallel Printer 
$6fl.45 {2 Ship) 




DISTO 

Original Disto Controller 
2 ROM Slots; Gold Platted Contacts 

t98(2shJp) 



1 




DISTO DC-7 

Mini Disk Controller for CoCo 1 , 2, 3 
Includes RS 1 .1 . Modifyed to access DS 
Drives $75 (2 ship) 



RS1.1 DOS 

ROM Chip for Disk Controller 
Works for CoCo 2 or 3 

$25 {2 ship) 



TEAC55B 

360K Double Sided Half Ht. Floppy 
Fits R.S. 501 & 502 

$98 (2 ship) 



REDUCED!^ 





RICOH RF800 
Group 3 & 2 Compatible 
200 by 200 Resolution 

$695 (7 ship) 





MICRO WORKS DIGITIZER 

• DS-69B Color 1 .5 Second/Picture $1 50 

• DS-69 B&W 2 Second/Picture S 1 00 






Y CABLE 
WORDPAK-RS 



$28 
$49 



RICOH RIPRO JR. COPIER 

• 15 second warm up 

• User replacable master unit 

$595 (7 ship) 




MEMORY 

• 512K Bare Board $40 

• Populated 512K & Software $1 1 9 

• 64K SChip For Co Co 2 $30 



Ltljl 



TOT 



r 



Howard Medical Computers 
1690 N. Elston 
Chicago, Illinois 60622 

Order Status and Inquiries 

312-278-1440 

MasterCard • Visa • Discover 
American Express 
C.O.D. ■ School P.O.'s 



24 Hour Order Line 

800-443-1444 



1 



Speed Racer 



As the checkered flag drops your pulse rises in this lively arcade 
game. The road twists to the horizon on the 3-D panorama that sets 
the stage for exciting racing. Vie for time as you glide through the 
curves at incredible speeds. Step through the gears to stay ahead of 
the pack, but be quick! Some will stop at nothing to see the end of 
the race, or the end of you! Four challenging raceways, complete 
with obstacles and colorful 3-D scenery test your skills in this Pole 
Position™ type game. 

32K Color Computer required... $34.95 




jrOVEI 



go SP 



) "-^.■rflijl 

0 ttOM 




PINBALL 

FftCTORV! 




er KARY MCFADOEN 

PUV/ER 1 PLAYER 2 

'8^88381 khEfctel 



; PLAYER 3 PLAYER 4 



9OT888I 19266581 



Pinball Factory 

Video games come full circle in this tribute to the original arcade 
game, Pinball, Classic pinball springs to life as never before, with 
fresh new angles that only a computer can offer. Crisp graphics, 
sound, and fast smooth action give this machine-language arcade 
game a realistic, responsive feel you'll hardly believe. There are 
even "tilt" buttons that let you "bump" the machine. In addition to 
playing a great game of pinball, you can enjoy hours of creative 
pleasure as you design, build, edit, and play your own screens. 

64K Color Computer required... $34.95 



Demon Seed 



■ inn wm ii r- 1 1 rr I 



1 » U Hf 
-1.1.1 

1 1 IT1 1 1 1 1 ■ ■ 



' * ™ " 1 1 ■! 1 1 1 - 1 1 1 1 H I I 



The first waves of flying, diving, bloodthirsty bats are arriving. 
Move, fire, and move again. It's a never ending battle. If you are 
lucky enough to defeat the bats, be ready for a much greater 
challenge, The Evil Derhons themselves. Destroy a wing and 
another takes its place. Only a direct hit can save you now. It will 
take great skill to triumph. If you do, then you better be ready for 
the End. The Demon Flag Ship descends to destroy your remaining 
ships. Your only hope is to penetrate the hull, break through the 
shield, and destroy the dreaded Gargoyle. 

— A * 1 

s 32K Color Computer required. ..$19.95 



I 



MichTron is always looking for programmers and programs. If you are interested in working- with one 4 
of the most respected company's in the computer software field please give us a call. 




For more information 

on these or other fine products 

call our knowledgeable staff! 



Michfrori 

576 S. Telegraph 
Pontiac, MI 48053 
(313) 334-5700 




Dealer inquiries welcome. 
Visa and Mastercard accepted.