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Full text of "The Rainbow Vol. 01 No 1 - Vol 8 No 11"

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May 1989 



Canada $4.95 U.'S, $3.95 




THE COLOR COMPUTER MONTHLY MAGAZINE 



Mixing Text 
and 

Graphics 

High-Density 
Screen Dumps 
for the Shoestring 
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Add Captions to the 
Pictures You Create 

Print Invitations;, Flyers, 
Newsletters, etc., 
in any Style You Want 

Use Two CoCos 
With One Drive 



Plus: An 8K Printer Spooler, 
Two New OS-9 Utilities, Lunar Lander, 
CoCo Derby and MORE! 





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IN MASSACHUSETTS CALL (508) 486-31 93 



TRS-80 is a registered trademark of Tandy Corp. 




Tabl e of Cont e nts ! 




28 



L Features 



20 

Text for Graphics 

Jack D. Welsh 

Add captions to the pictures 

you create 

28 

Lunar Lander ^ 

Jeff Donze 

A space shuttle simulation 
that lets you be the pilot 



42 

CoCo Derby 

Joe Wilensky 
And they're off! 



46 

Having a Party? ^ 

RJ. McCorkle 
Print invitations, flyers, 
classified ads, etc., 
in any style you want 



26 



54 

Wow! One Disk 
Drive, Two CoCos 

Jeff Baier 

Build this adapter to use two 
CoCos with one disk drive 

58 

Desktop Publishing 
Comes to the CoCo 

Jeffrey Parker 

A look at the desktop 

publishing packages and 

accessories 

68 

Font Selections % 
Made Easy 

Edward Jones 

Alter those fonts for printing 

chores 

82 

3-D Without Glasses 

William P. Nee 

Part XI: Machine language 

made BASIC 



May 1989 
Vol. VII No. 10 

86 

Printer Spooler 

Marc Genois 
A time-saver for CoCo 3 
users 

100 

High-Capacity 
Screen Dumps 

H. Allen Curtis 
High-density printer 
enhancements for the 
shoestring desktop publisher 

130 

The Forgotten Chip 

Carl Austin Bennett 
Get your modem to work 
with OS-9 for under $20 

138 A 

BASIC09 V 
Programming Tool 

Philip Brown 

Using Syscall to enhance 

BAS1C09 

144 . 

Chown *r 

Evan Robinson 

Sharing those system files 

42 




4 



THE RAINBOW May 1989 



Columns 



88 

BASIC Training % 

Joseph Kolar 
BASIC bird watching 

98 

BASICally Speaking ^ 

Larry Boeldt 

BASIC problems solved here 

142 

CoCo Consultations 

Marty Goodman 

Just what the doctor ordered 

40 

Delphi Bureau 

Don Hutchison 
That facts about FAX 
and the database report 

136 

Doctor ASCII 

Richard Esposito 
The question fixer 

56 

Education Notes ^ 

Steve Blyn 
Fraction action 

10 

Print #-2, 

Lawrence C. Falk 
Editor's Notes 

80 

Turn of the Screw 

Tony DiStefano 

The ABCs of Disk Drives 

Wishing Well W 

Fred Scerbo 
The twelve months 



D e partments 1 



Advertisers Index 
Back Issue Info _ 
CoCo Gallery 



Letters to Rainbow 
Maxwell Mouse 

Racksellers 

Rainbow Info 



,160 
_49 
_26 

_6 



Received & Certified 

Submitting Material 
to Rainbow 



.128 

.158 
_14 
.129 



Subscription Info 



.116 
.117 



I Rainbowt e ch 



146 

Accessible Applications 

Richard A. White 

More BASIC09 programming 

150 ^ 

Barden's Buffer 

William Barden, Jr, 
Interfacing for the all-thumbs 
CoCoNut 

"KISSable OS-9" 
will return next month. 



FsSffc ^he cassette tape/disk synv 
bols beside features and col- 
umns indicate that the program listings 
with those articles are on this month's 

RAINBOW ON TAPE and RAIN- 
BOW on disk. Those with only the 
disk symbol are not available on 
rainbow on tape. For details, 
check the rainbow on tape and 
rainbow on disk ad on the inside 
front cover. 



1 Novic e s Nich o 

74 

Hi-Res Screen Dump 

Shane Messer 

75 

The Timer 

Wayne Hufford 

75 

Beam3D 

Joseph Pendell 

76 

Hot Stuff 

Ric Pucella 

76 

Math Drill 

William A. Queen, III 

77 

$Chores$ for Dollars 

Steve Paul 

78 

Note Card 

Darrin Seats 



Product R e views 



BASIC Unravelled Series/ Microcom Software 118 

CoCo Graphics Designer Plus/Zebra Systems, Inc. 110 

CoCo 3 VfheeUSPORTSware 124 

DS-69B Digisector/77?e Micro Works 121 

Dino Da\abase/RAM Electronics 122 

Fontgen/Jfl & JR Softstuff 128 

KJV on Disk/SDS Software 124 

Keyboard Extender/^/* WKSoft 118 

Math Tutor/ZCr Systems 113 

Ore Ambush/SPORTSware 114 

Revenge of the Germs/ The Software Systems 116 

Printer Drivers for Home Publisher/randy 
Corporation 



Vehicle Cost Printouty/Wan Hanusiak 



.117 
.125 



THE RAINBOW is published every month of the year by FALSOFT, Inc., The 
Faisoft Building, 9509 U.S. Highway 42, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059, 
phone (502) 228-4492. THE RAINBOW, RAIN BO Wf est and THE RAINBOW and 
RAIN BO Wf est logotypes are registered ® trademarks of FALSOFT, Inc. • 
Second class postage paid Prospect, KY and additional offices. USPS N. 705- 
050 (ISSN No. 0746-4797). POSTMASTER: Send address changes to THE 
rainbow, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. Authorized as second class 
postage paid from Hamilton, Ontario by Canada Post, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. 
• Entire contents copyright © by FALSOFT, Inc., 1989. the rainbow is intended 
for the private use and pleasure of its subscribers and purchasers and 
reproduction by any means is prohibited. Use of information herein is for the 
single end use of purchasers and any other use is expressly prohibited. All 
programs herein are distributed in an "as is" basis, without warranty of any kind 
whatsoever. • Tandy, Color BASIC, Extended Color basic and Program Pak are 
registered • trademarks of the Tandy Corp. • Subscriptions to the rainbow 
are $31 per year in the United States. Canadian rates are U.S. $38. Surface mail 
to other countries is U.S. $68, air mail U.S. $103. All subscriptions begin with 
next available issue. • Limited back issues are available. Please see notice for 
issues that are in print and their costs. Payment accepted by VISA, MasterCard, 
American Express, cash, check or money order in U.S. currency only. Full 
refund after mailing of one issue. A refund of 10/12ths the subscription amount 
after two issues are mailed. No refund after mailing of three or more magazines. 



The Rainbow 



Editor and Publisher 

Lawrence C. Falk 

Managing Editor Jutta Kapfhammer 

Associate Editor Sue Fomby 

Reviews Editor Lauren Willoughby 

Submissions Editor Tony Olive 

Copy Editor Kelly Goff 

Technical Editors Cray Augsburg, 
Ed Ellers 

Technical Assistant David Horrar 
Editorial Assistants Wendy Falk Barsky, 

Contributing Editors 

William Barden, Jr., 
Steve Blyn, Tony DiStefano, 
Richard Esposito, 
Martin Goodman, M.D., 
Joseph Kolar, Dale Puckett, 
Fred Scerbo, Richard White 

Art Director Heidi Maxedon 

Designers Sharon Adams, 
Teri Kays, Denise Webb 

Typesetters Linda Gower, 
Renee Hutchins 



Faisoft, Inc. 



President Lawrence C. Falk 
General Manager Bonnie Frowenfeld 
Asst. General Mgr. for Finance 

Donna Shuck 
Admin, Asst. to the Publisher 

Kim Thompson 
Editorial Director John Crawley 
Asst. Editorial Director Judi Hutchinson 
Director of Production Jim Cleveland 
Chief Bookkeeper Diane Moore 
Dealer Accounts Judy Quashnock 
Asst. General Manager For Administration 

Sandy Apple 
Word Processor Manager 

Patricia Eaton 
Customer Service Manager 

Beverly Bearden 
Customer Service Representative 

Carolyn Fenwick 
Development Coordinator Ira Barsky 
Chief of Printing Services Melba Smith 
Dispatch Paul Bauscher 
Business Assistants Laurie Falk, 

Vivian Turbeville 
Chief of Building Security 
and Maintenance 

Jessie Brooks 
Advertising Coordinator Doris Taylor 
Advertising Representatives 

Belinda Kirby, Kim Vincent 
Advertising Assistant Debbie Baxter 
(502) 22B-4492 

For RAINBOW Advertising and 
Marketing Office Information, 
see Page 160 



Cover illustration 
by Fred Crawford 



May 1989 THE RAINBOW 5 





















ROW 





Double-sided DeskMate 3 

Editor: 

As an owner of a double-sided disk 
system I realized that using DeskMate J, 
with two disks configured for a 35-track 
single-sided system, was a waste of power. 
So I put everything in one double-sided 
disk. I just wanted to let you know that the 
package is now much more enjoyable to 
use. 

Here's what I did. First, format a blank 
disk as double-sided 40-tracks, using a 
customized OS-9 Level II system disk. 
Then, make a boot file on the blank disk 
using the configuration utility included with 
the Level II package containing the follow- 
ing options: p; t2;d0 -40dordl-40d;ddd0- 
40d; term-vdg; no windows unselect the w 
and wl that come selected within the util- 
ity); and 60 HZ (American Power) for the 
clock module. After the boot file is gener- 
ated, select the "No commands, stop now" 
option and your work with Conf i g will be 
finished. Now you have a bootable double- 
sided disk ready to receive the files from 
both DeskMate 3 disks. 

Here is how to d s a v e the files contained 
in the DeskMate 3 disks using pipes, so if 
your customized OS-9 Level II system disk 
doesn't handle pipes, prepare a new one 
that can do this, keeping in mind that pipes 
are useful when dealing with dsaves. 

With the OS-9 disk in Drive 0, load 
dsave, copy and makedi p. Insert DeskMate 
3's Disk 1 in Drive 0 and the newly 
formatted disk in Drive 1, type chd/do 
then, press enter, dsave /dO /dl I shell, 
and press enter and wait until the proce- 
dure is over. Then insert Disk 2 of Desk- 
Mate 3 in Drive 0 and type chd/do/cmds 
and press enter, dsave /dO /dl/cmds i 
shel 1 and press enter. Don't bother with 
the Error #218 message that will appear 
during this last saving procedure, they are 
"file already exists" errors and will denote 
only that there are some identical files in 
both disks of DeskMate 5. 

When the job above is done, boot this 
new version of DeskMate 3 and config it as 
you want remembering only that both the 
folders three and four must refer to directory 
/dO/cmds. After configuring your Desk- 
Mate 3 to match your hardware, don't for- 
get to put a write protect tab on the disk. 
And finally, just reboot your customized 
DeskMate 3 and start playing with it. Note 



that you will be able to format and backup 
40-track double-sided disks from within 
this new DeskMate 5. 

For those with only one disk drive, change 
the dsave commands accordingly and swap 
the disk when prompted. 

Albert Schriefer 
Salvador, Brazil 

Click'n Blink 

Editor: 

I want to contribute a small improve- 
ment to Mr. Dingle's excellent CoCo Pong 
program (January '89, Page 63). Consider- 
able improvement is achieved by the fol- 
lowing: 

Change Line: 

140 PC0PY1 TO 2:PC0PY1 TO 3 

Add line: 

155 PMODE 0,2 

Change lines: 

300 PSET (X.Y.l) : PC0PY2 TO 1 

310 IF PP0INT(X+MX,Y)=5 THEN MX 
=-MX:EXEC43345 

320 IF PP0INT(X,Y+MY)=5 THEN MY 
=-MY:EXEC43345 

Add Line: 

361 PC0PY2 TO 1 

Change Line: 

380 PC0PY2 TO 3 : SOUND100 , 5 : SOUND 
1,4:X=140:Y=RND(131 )+19:MS=-MX 
:MY=-MY : RETURN 

These line changes and additions re- 
move the blinking of the paddles and ball 
and add a small "click" when the ball is hit 
(EXEC43345 is a ROM call that does this) 
without appreciable loss of speed. 

John Murvine 
Ebensburg, Pennsylvania 



INFORMATION PLEASE 

Editor: 

I am using the genealogy program An- 
cestors, by Christopher Meek, to catalog 
relatives of the past. Unfortunately, the 
program has several draw backs, which 
Chris says he doesn't have the time to 
devote writing patches for. Since numer- 
ous people have written modifications or 



Telwriter-64, 1 was wondering if the same 
has been done for Ancestors. 

If anyone is familiar with adapting An- 
cestors please write to me. 

Paul Urbahns 
2887 Republic Avenue 
Radcliff f Kentucky 40160 

The Unknown Pirate 

Editor: 

Help! I'm a new CoCo user and was 
trying to make a copy of DeskMate that I 
purchased for my CoCo 2, and I turned off 
the CoCo before I took the disk out of the 
drive. No more program. Can anyone send 
me a copy? I'd be glad to compensate for 
someone's time and disk. 

Y. Jones 

Sorry, but if someone were to send you 
a copied disk they would be guilty of pirat- 
ing software. Your best bet is to contact 
your local Radio Shack dealer for a re- 
placement. 



Looking for an Ink Well 

Editor: 

I am the owner of the Mac Inker from 
Computer Friends in Portland, Oregon, one 
of your former advertisers. They are appar- 
ently no longer in business because my 
letter to them was returned marked "unde- 
liverable". Since I need some more printer 
ribbon ink, is there anyone who knows 
where I can buy black ink for printer rib- 
bons? 

Norman Thode 
7807 Finch Trail 
Austin, Texas 78745 

Most office supply stores should stock 
ink for re -inking ribbons. 

Editing the Point 

Editor: 

Can you help me? I am looking for an 
OS-9 Level II pointers editor (e.g., instead 
of an hourglass, a cloud with a couple of Z's 
in it). 

Scott Chase 
3 Thomas St 
Baxter 3911 
Victoria, Australia 



6 



THE RAINBOW May 1989 




AUTOTERM 

TURNS YOUR COLOR COMPUTER INTO THE 

WORLD'S 
SMARTEST TERMINAL! 

YOU'LL ALSO USE AUTOTERM FOR SIMPLE 
WORD PROCESSING & RECORD KEEPING 

EXTRA FEATURES ON COCO 3 DISK 

80 char, screen, 2400 baud thru serial port, 
95,000 to 475,000 character buffer. 



EASY COMMUNICATION + WORD PROCESSING + TOTAL AUTOMATION 



Full prompting and error checking. 
Step-by-step manual has examples. 
Scroll text backward and forward. No 
split words on screen or printout. 
Save, load, delete files while on line. 
Print, save all or any part of text. 300 
or 1200 baud. All 128 ASCII 
characters. Works with D.C. Hayes or 
any modem. Screen widths of 32, 40, 
42 51, 64. 

DISK VERSION SUPPORTS RS232 
PAK, XMODEM and SPLIT SCREEN 
FOR PACKET RADIO. 



Please hire the mentally retarded. 
They are sincere, hard working and 
appreciative. Thanks! 



Editing is super simple with the 
cursor. Find strings instantly too! 
Insert printer control codes. Specify 
page size and margins. Switch 
quickly between word processing 
and intelligent terminal action. Create 
text, correct your typing errors; then 
connect to the other computer, 
upload your text or files, download 
information, file it, and sign-off; then 
edit the receive data, print it in an 
attractive format, and/or save it on 
file. Compatible with TELEWRITER. 

CASSETTE $29.95 
DISKETTE $39.95 

Add $3 shipping and handling 

MC/ VIS A/CO. D. 



Advanced system of keystroke 
macros lets you automate any 
activity, such as dial via modem, 
sign-on, interact, sign-off, print, save. 
Perform entire session. Act as 
message taker. At start-up, disk 
version can automatically set 
parameters, dial, sign-on, interact, 
read/write disk, sign-off, etc. Timed 
execution lets AUTOTERM work 
while you sleep or play. No other 
computer can match your COCO's 
intelligence as a terminal. 

PXE Computing 

11 Vicksburg Lane 
Richardson, Texas 75080 

214/699-7273 



REQUEST HOTLINE 

Editor: 

I'd like to write a few words to you about 
a problem the whole European CoCo 
community faces. 

Month after month we avidly read the 
rainbow. Of course, we also read The Da- 
tabase Report, and that' s where our frustra- 
tions begin. We constantly read of interest- 
ing programs uploaded on Delphi, while 
knowing the programs are unavailable to 
us. The costs to go on-line on a BBS in the 
States from Europe are forbidding. 

According to the latest telephone direc- 
tory for Belgium, a conversation with the 
U.S., not involving an operator, costs more 
than $2 a minute. If the telephone link is 
made by an operator, it is almost $2.40 per 
minute. 

Furthermore, in Belgium and many other 
European countries, not many people have 
a modem. And moreover, there are only a 
few BBSs here, most uninteresting. 

We fully understand that Delphi is a 
commercial company with protected inter- 
ests. We do not expect free programs. But 
there must be a solution. Couldn't someone 
at Delphi put these programs on disk to be 



sold to CoCo users outside the U.S.? It 
certainly is not going to take away partici- 
pants from the BBS since buyers would be 
primarily those unable to log on or who 
have no modem. 

It may also discourage software piracy, 
a problem that has resulted from a complete 
lack of support for the CoCo market here. 

Ludo LeJeune 
Belgium 

Good idea! We'll discuss your sugges- 
tion with Delphi and keep you posted on 
the results. 

KUDOS 

Editor: 

I am a CoCo 3 owner as well as sub- 
scriber to this remarkable publication. 
Through the past year I have closely moni- 
tored the product reviews and after the 
January 1989 review of Max-10, I called 
and ordered CoCo Max III and Max- 10. 
The person I spoke with was polite and 
extremely professional, answering all my 
questions promptly and indicating that I 
would receive my software within 1 0 days. 

I anxiously awaited my order as this 
was my first purchase through the mail; six 



days later, during the Christmas season, I 
received my programs and am absolutely 
thrilled. My CoCo 3 has come to life, 
creating graphics and text effectively and 
efficiently. 

Thank you rainbow and Colorware. 

Paul S. Merchant 
Lawton, Oklahoma 

Living up to Promises 

Editor: 

Zebra Systems has one of the fastest 
delivery systems I have seen. I mailed a 
check for CoCo Graphics Designer Plus 
on February third, and received it on the 
10th. It took only seven days while a friend's 
order with another company, by credit card, 
took 14 days. 

The product not only arrived quickly, 
but lived up to its promises. It is much 
better than the older basic version. I found 
it easy to use and very powerful. 

It is nice to see that most companies 
have great service. I have ordered products 
from several other companies, but none 
had the speed that Zebra Systems showed. 

Kevin Donnelly 
Columbus, Georgia 



May 1989 THE RAINBOW 7 



Some Help from my Friends 

Editor: 

Recently, I took a computer test for a 
Jets Team competition. This was through 
my Physics class. There were tests that 
pertained to all areas of study (Physics, 
Math, English, etc.). I placed third overall 
of about 30 students from many different 
schools around the area. 

The test consisted of many flow charts, 
converting numbers to decimal, binary, 
hexadecimal and questions about comput- 
ers in general. There were also a lot of 
questions dealing with many languages 
(Pascal, Assembly Language and FOR- 
TRAN). 

I'm just writing to say that I couldn't 
have done that well without the articles I 
read from Dale Puckett and William Barden, 
Jr. They explained many technical things in 
an easy-to-read format. So, thanks and keep 
up the good work. 

Timothy P. DeJong 
Rock Valley, Iowa 

Out of Rough Water 

Editor: 

I want to thank Mr. Puckett and others at 
rainbow for your assistance in getting this 
old retired sailor out of rough water with 
Multi-Vue. After reading his instructions I 
had no trouble changing my boot. Now I 
enjoy using that program. 

I like using Computerware's word 
processor Screen Star, and would like to 
know if anyone has changed the screen 
driver so it will work with Multi-Vue? 
When I try going from OS -9 to Screen Star 
without rebooting I get the message that 
Screen Star takes a special driver. I would 
like to use it on an 80-column screen. 

MelvinA. Grow 
Alameda, California 

REVIEWING REVIEWS 

Editor: 

I am extremely dissatisfied with the 
program CoCo Newsroom. When I read the 
product review in your magazine, I was led 
to believe that this was a quality program. 
I find this is not the case. 

The Type-up subroutine does not allow 
for return to the main menu. There is no 
way that I could find to move to the Lay- 
Out program after preparing the text. This 
is not to mention the clumsy process for 
setting up the text. There is no wrap-around 
feature at all. If the word typed is too long 
for the line, it divides haphazardly between 
two lines of text. 



The Newspaper Picture Disk would not 
load. I suspect this was because it has no 
graphics programs on it to load. I wonder 
what else is missing from this program. 

All in all, this was a frustrating experi- 
ence. Paying good money for shoddy mer- 
chandise gives all software companies a 
bad name. I suppose it might be silly to 
expect a refund, but I am going to ask for it 
anyway. 

Dennis D'Ovidio 
Bristol, New Hampshire 

CoCo Newsroom, which was previously 
sold by Spectrum Projects and Microcom 
Software, is no longer on the market. Eric 
Wolf, the author of the program, has re- 
vised the program and has given Second 
City Software exclusive rights to sell the 
new version, now called Newspaper Plus. 

Second City Software is offering owners 
of CoCo Newsroom to upgrade to the new 
Newspaper Plus system for $ J 9.95. Simply 
send your original disks and manual, along 
with $19.95 to Second City Software and 
your original copy will be replaced with 
Newspaper Plus. 

For more information on Newspaper 
Plus, see "Desktop Publishing Comes to 
the CoCo" beginning on Page 58 of this 
issue. 

Another View 

Editor: 

I take mild exception to the review of 
Max- 10 by Jim K. Issel in the January '89 
issue of the rainbow. His unreserved en- 
thusiasm for the program is understand- 
able. It is a remarkable program for those 
who want a graphics-based word-proces- 
sor or desktop publisher. However, I think 
a word of caution is in order: this is not a 
word processor for the beginner or, for 
anybody's only word processing program. 
One reason is that as a graphics-based 
program, its printed output is painfully 
slow for text-only applications. For those 
who want to mix pictures with text or use a 
variety of fonts, that is a perfectly accept- 
able trade-off. But for those who will be 
using a word processor mostly for straight 
text, to type letters, memos, reports, etc., a 
character-based word processor like 
Telewriter- 128 would be easier to use and 
would be much faster in producing a printed 
copy. Also, for typing a straight-text docu- 
ment, I find the mixture of keyboard and 
joystick operations required by Max-10 to 
be unnatural and awkward compared to the 
keyboard-only operation of a character- 
based word processor. 



So, to alter Jim Issel's bottom-line 
comment, if you want to mix pictures with 
text, experiment with fancy fonts or un- 
usual layouts, this is a marvelous program 
that's a lot of fun to use — buy it, you'll like 
it! But if you want a work-horse word 
processor primarily for typing text, buy 
something else, you'll be glad you did. 

Dave Otis 
Montpelier, Vermont 

Copy Protection a Nuisance 

Editor: 

I purchased a CoCo 3 and must applaud 
MicroWorld for their good service. The 
one thing that I don't like about the new 
machine is its incompatibility with some of 
the best software, such as CoCo Max II. It 
seems that some programmer could come 
up with a way to fully emulate a CoCo 2 on 
the new machine. Part of this incompatibil- 
ity can be overcome by disabling all CoCo 
3 commands with POKE 65502.0 (POKE 
65503.0 to re-enable) and some others by 
running ROM RAM as published in previous 
editions of the rainbow. I have found that 
CoCo Graphics Designer requires ROM RAM, 
while Don t Forget! will run correctly after 
the poke. If anyone can find a simple method 
to run CoCo Max 11 please let me know, 

I have recently ordered Max-10, and like 
the features. What appalls me is the copy 
protection scheme, which will be a major 
nuisance when using a Hi-Res Joystick 
Interface. The ad, which states "disk not 
copy protected", is misleading, as it sug- 
gests that no protection is used. This hard- 
ware protection scheme would have been 
unknown to me if not for your thorough 
review in January. I have seen such devices 
for PCs, but had hoped not to see such for 
the CoCo. 

Francis G. Swygert 
Apo, San Francisco 

THE rainbow welcomes letters to 
the editor. Mail should be addressed 
to: Letters to Rainbow, The Falsoft 
Building, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 
40059. Letters should include the 
writer's full name and address. Letters 
may be edited for purposes of clarity 
or to conserve space. 

Letters to the editor may also be 
sent to us through our Delphi CoCo 
SIG. From the CoCo SIG> prompt, 
type Rfl I to take you into the Rainbow 
Magazine Services area of the SIG. At 
the RAINBO W> prompt, type LETT to 
reach the LETTERS> prompt and 
then select Letters for Publication. Be 
sure to include your complete name 
and address. 



8 THE RAINBOW May 1989 



Word 
Power 3.2 



More Versatile • More Powerful With 
Spooler # Calculator • Split-Screen ♦ 2-Column Printing 



"... friendly...amazing execu- 
tion speed...much easier to use 
than VIP software & 2 other 
word processing systems I've 
tried...very user-friendly...mas- 
sive text storage capacity 
...highest among word proces- 
sors..." ~ Rainbow Oct. 88 
Review for Word Power 



Unparalleled Power packed in this 100% ML Word Processor 
written from scratch for the CoCo 3! No other word processor 
offers such a wide array of features that are easy to learn & use. 



Jf _T » * 1 ?1 





m.. . . ..j... ............ «, ■ . . t . » » ----------------- »-.-.---*-»-*-J-*-fc ^ t , n . 

Word Power 3.2 runs at double-clock speed 
and uses the true 80-column display with 
lowercase instead of the graphics screen. The 
result is lightning fast screen reformatting and 
added speed! All prompts are displayed in 
plain English in neat colored windows. The current column num- 
ber, line number, page number, percentage of free memory is dis- 
played at all times. Even the page break is displayed so you know 
where one page ends and the other begins. The Setup program 
allows you to change fore/background colors as well as (in)visible 
carriage returns. Word Power 3.2 can be used with RGB/Com- 
posite/Monochrome monitors as well as TV. 



■:•:■:•:■>:•:• 



MAXIMUM MEMORY 

Word Power 3.2 gives you over 72K on 128K and over 
450K on 512K CoCo 3 for Text Storage - more 
memory than any other CoCo word-processor. 
Period. 




EFFORTLESS EDITING 

Word Power 3.2 has one of the most powerful and user-friendly 
full-screen editor with word-wrap. All you do is type. Word 
Power takes care of the text arrangement. The unique Auto-Save 
feature saves text to disk at regular intervals for peace of mind. 

Insert/Overstrike Mode (Cursor Style Changes to indicate mode);OOPS Recall 
during delete;Type-ahead Buffer for fast typers; Key-Repeat (adjustable); Key- 
Click; 4-way cursor and scrolling; Cursor to beginning/end of text, beginning/end 
of line, top/bottom of screen, next/previous word; Page up/down; Delete charac- 
ter, previous/next word, to beginning/end of line, complete line, text before/after 
cursor; Locate/Replace with Wild-Card Search with auto/manual replace; Block 
Mark, Unmark, Copy, Move & Delete; Line Positioning (Center/Right Jus- 
tified); Set/Reset 120 programmable tab stops; Word-Count; Define Top/Bot- 
tom/Left/Right margins & page length. You can also highlight text 
(underline-with on-screen underlining, bold, italics, superscripts, etc.). Word 
Power even has a HELP screen which an be accessed any time during edit. 



SPLIT-SCREEN EDITING 

Splits the screen in half so you can view one portion of your text 
while you edit another. You'll love it! 



MAIL-MERGE 

Ever try mailing out TnTsame^ttenSn^ 



□ 



irterent 

people? Could be quite a chore. Not with Word 
Power 3.2! Using this feature, you can type a letter, 
follow it with a list of addresses and have Word Power 
print out personalized letters. It's that easy! 



™WJAWA™'mU.U.W.W.'.V.WJ 



• V« ( Vm i 



CALCULATOR 

Pop-up a 4-function calculator while you edit! Great for tables! 

SAVING/LOADING TEXT 



Word Power 3.2 creates ASCII format files which are compatible 
with almost all terminal/spell-checking & other word-processing 
programs. Allows you to Display Free Space, Load, Save, Ap- 
pend & Kill files. The ARE YOU SURE? prompt prevents ac- 
cidental overwriting & deletion. You can select files by simply 
cursoring through the disk directory. Supports double-sided 
drives & step-rates. 



'.V.V.Vi'iV.'.V.V.V.'.V.Vi'.'.ViV.V.'.*.** AW.^*.^W.*AV^S*iV.V.V.^\V.\\\V.V.S^*.S\^V.\%V.'.V.'.Vi , .*.V.'.'.'i*i' 1 , 1 '.'. , .'. , .V.'. 



PRINTING 

Word Power 3.2 drives almost any printer (DMP, EPSON, 
GEMINI, OKIDATA, etc). Allows options such as baud rates, 
line spacing, page/print pause, partial print, page number- 
ing/placement, linefeeds, multi-line headers/footers, right jus- 
tification & number of copies. The values of these parameters & 
margins can be changed anytime in the text by embedding Printer 
Option Codes. The WHAT YOU SEE IS WHAT YOU GET fea- 
ture allows you to preview the text on the screen as it will appear 
in print. You can view margins, page breaks, justification & more. 



PRINT SPOOLER 

Why buy a hardware Print Spooler? Word Power 3.2 has a built- 
in Spooler which allows you to simultaneously edit one document 
& print another. 



TWO-COLUMN PRINTING 

This unique feature allows you to print all or portion of your text 
in two columns! Create professional documents without hours 
of aligning text. 



SPELLING CHECKER 



PSi ^Sv " : : * ■ ■ 


ocwx >vx-x-> 


.* *'. ■ .'. V . 








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-0" Ivtt "J-J" X ■> K ■> > ■C-><X«>. ■> .■ 




Word Power 3.2 comes with spelling checker/dic- 
tionary which finds & corrects mistakes in your 
text. You can add words to /delete words from 
dictionary. 



* 1 ' * ...»■■»».%■. . . i ....... ... . .fi 



PUNCTUATION CHECKER 

This checker will proofread your text for punctuation errors such 
as capitalization, double-words, spaces after periods/commas, 
and more. Its the perfect addition to any word processor. 

DOCUMENTATION z®®®^^ 




Word Power 3.2 comes with a well- written instruction manual & 
-v.- reference card which makes writing with Word 
Power a piece of cake! Word Power 3.2 comes on an 
UNPROTECTED disk and is compatible with 
RSDOS. Only $79.95 

(Word Power 3.1 owners can get Word Power 3.2 Upgrade FREE by sending 
proof of purchase & $5.00 to cover S&H costs & instructions) 



r7i L\} 




DUGtWR 



JhJF MICROCOM SOFTWARE 

2900 Monroe Ave, Rochcstcr,NY 14618. Order Status, Info, Technical Info: 716-383-8830 
To Order: Refer to Page 17 of our 6-pagc ad scries: (Pgs. 9-17) 

Credit Card Toll Free Orderline 1-800-654-5244 (9ani-8pm 7days/week)' 




i 




Balancing 

a RAINBOW 



One of the most difficult things 
about publishing THE RAINBOW 
has always been the job of 
booking the magazine every month. 
Booking, you see, is the process by 
which we select the stories and articles 
that will appear in its pages. 

Managing Editor Jutta Kapf- 
hammer, Submissions Editor Tony 
Olive and a number of others all con- 
tribute to this process. They do a signif- 
icant job, based on a few guidelines set 
up by me. Those guidelines are simply 
that we must have a broad range of 
ideas, topics and things you can do with 
your CoCo in each issue. 

One thing that amazes me, as we 
approach our Eighth Anniversary Issue 
and begin our ninth year of publication, 
is how well our staff handles this proce- 
dure. Another is that the more things 
change, the more they stay the same. 

What I mean is that almost since 
rainbow's inception, we have received 
letters and calls asking us for "more" of 
this or "less" of that. Frequently on the 
very same day, I get letters stating 
readers' opinions that we have "too 
many games and not enough serious 
stuff" and that we have "too much 
technical material and not enough 
games or fun projects." The same goes 
for "too many little simple things" and 
"not enough short, simple programs." 

I have always taken the position that 
as long as both sides complain, both 
sides are getting what they want. Re- 
member, THE rainbow reaches a wide 



audience of paid circulation — some 
65,000 in all. (By the way, that is not 
"readership," because we have never 
used that sort of figure. Some maga- 
zines do, figuring something like 7.3 
people read each issue and quoting that 
number. We never do.) 

One of the reasons for this is because 
the shape of the CoCo Community is 
ever-changing. And it changes within 
the scope of a year as well. It is no secret 
that more CoCo sales are made in the 
November-January period than any 
other and these users are new to our 
world. We try to hand-hold a little more 
in the earlier part of the year than at 
other times; it is one of the reasons our 
"Beginner's Issue" comes out in January 
of each year. 

Still, except for the occasional lost or 
torn-up magazine — usually the fault of 
the postal systems we use (United States 
and Canadian, plus a lot of other coun- 
tries to a lesser extent) — the "content" 
issue is the one we hear the most about. 

There are several reasons for it, and 
one of them is simply that of scale. Take 
the 160-plus pages in this month's issue 
and devote 20 of them to games, and 
you end up with readers deep into OS- 
9 who are unhappy that 20 pages are 
"wasted" on games. Yet that represents 
but 13 percent of the total available 
pages. Of course 20 pages is about half 
the total available if we were, say, a little 
50-page magazine. 

At one time we considered splitting 
THE RAINBOW up into two parts — a 





COLOR 
SCHEMATIC 




Best Desktop Publishing / Document 
Creator for the CoCo 3. Features Pull 
Down Menus, What You See Is What You 
Get , UNDO, integrated text & graphics 
capability , multiple fonts & more. 
Graphics can be imported from CoCo 
Max mm, MGE, MGF, 5 Level DS-69, 
PMODE 4, HSCREEN 2/3 pictures. Sup- 
ports: DMP 105/130, EPSON 
MX/FX/RXLX/ Gemini 10 Series, CGP- 
220 and OKI-92. Only $79.95 

VIP CALC III 

Best Spreadsheet for your CoCo^. 
Features 4 color menus, 
32/40/64/80 column display, 2 Mhz 
speed & more. Allows up to 1024 
rows x 512 columns. VIP Calc III 
also has up to 16 windows, trig, 
averaging, sorting, algebraic & 
sorting functions. Locate, block 
move/copy commands & limitless 
programmable functions. Works 
with any printer. Only $69.95 

Font Disk #1,#2 for CoCo Graphics 
Designer: $19.95 each 

GAMES 

(Disk only) 

(CoCo 1,2 & 3 except where mentioned) 



WARRIOR KING (CoCo 3): $29.95 
IN QUEST OF STAR LORD(Animatcd Graphics Adventure 
for CoCo 3) : $34.95 Hint Sheet: $3.95 
HALL OF THE KING 1,2,3: $29.95 Each Trilogy: $74.95 
FLIGHT 16: $34.95 
I>YRAMIX(Cubix for CoCo 3): $24.95 
KUNG FU DUDE: $24.95 
DRAGON BLADE: $19.95 
CHAMPION: $19.95 
WHITE FIRE OF ETERNITY: $19.95 
QUEST FOR THE SPIRIT STONE (CoCo 3): $18 
WARGAME DESIGNER (CoCo 3): $29 
TREASURY PACK#1: Lunar Rover Patrol, Cubix, Declalhon, 
Qix, keys of Wizard, Module Man, Pengon, & Roller Con- 
troller .Only $29.95 

TREASURY PACK #2: Lancer, Ms. Gobbler, Froggie, Mad- 
ness & Minotaur, Ice Castles, Galagon, Devious. Only $29.95 
SPACE PAC: Color Zap, Invaders, Planet Invasion, Space 
Race, Space War, Galax Attax, Anaroid Attack, Whirlybird, 
Space Sentry & Storm Arrows.Only $29.95 
WIZARD'S CASTLE: A hi-res graphics adventure game filled 
with traps, tricks, treasures. Only $19.95 



By Prakash Mishra 

An excellent Circuit Schematic Design 
Software Package for CoCo 3. Features: 

* Runs in 640x192 at 1.8 Mhz 

* Pull Down Menus 

* Keyboard/Mouse/Joystck Support 

* RGB/ Composite/Monochrome 
Monitor Support 

* 72 Modifiable Symbols 

* Multiple Hi-Res Fonts 

* Multiple UNDO Command 

* Symbol Rotate/Line/Box Draw 

* Supports 3 Layers of Circuits 

* Powerful Screen Print Command for 
DMP/Gemini/Epson Printers 

* Complete Documentation 

Only $39.95 




RSB 



A Revolutionary Program that allows you 
to use Basic Programs from OS9! 

OS9 Level 2 is the future of the CoCo. Un- 
fortunately, most Basic Programmers are 
"afraid" of using OS9 because it is dif- 
ferent from Basic. Introducing RSB! It al- 
lows you to run Basic from OS9 and take 
advantage of features such as multitask- 
ing, no-halt floppies and high speed 
operation. RSB is your first step into OS9! 
Req. OS9 Level II. Only $39.95 




The ancient game of strategy moves into 
the future. HSCREEN 2 for normal play, 
HSCREEN 4 for triple level play. Move 
your pieces through time as well as space. 
Req.RSDOS 128K CoCo 3 and 2 Players. 
Disk Only $24.95 



ULTRAPATCH SYSTEM 

by Randall Reid 

Patches the Superpatch EDTASM + <! 
for 80 columns, 47K Buffer (ap- 
proximately 3000 lines!) & more. Req 
CoCo 3. Only $19.95 



XENOCOPY-PC 

An amazingly versatile program that allows you to Format/Duplicate / Read/ 
Write disks from over 300 different computers. For example you could trans- 
ferprograms between CoCo, IBM, PC-DOS, TRS-80 Model 3, TRS-80 Model 
4, TRS-80 Model 100, Xerox 820, Zenith, Kaypro II, Novell , NEC DOS and 
much much more!! Send for FREE List. Requires an IBM Compatible with 2 
drives. Disk $79.95. 

512K BACKUP LIGHTNING 

(From Colorventure) 

The ultimate CoCo 3 disk copying utility! ! Reads your master diskette once 
and then makes as many copies as you want. It automatically formats an un- 
formatted disk while copying! Supports 35, 40 or 80 track drives with various 
step rates. A must for any disk user!! Only $19.95 

PRINTER LIGHTNING 

(From Colorventure) 

Never wait for your printer again!! This Print Spooler allows you to print to 
your printer and simultaneously continue with your programming. No need to 
wait for those long printouts! Disk Only $19.95 

BASIC FREEDOM 

A Full Screen Editor for Basic Programs! ! A Must for anyone who writes Basic 
Programs. Only $24.95 

VOCAL FREEDOM 

Turn your computer into a digital voice / sound recorder. Produces natural 
voices/ sound effects. Req. inexpensive RS Amplifier (#277-1008) & any 
microphone. Only $34.95 

HACKER'S PAC 

Allows you to incorporate voices created by Vocal Freedom into your own 
Basic and ML programs. Only $14.95 ^ 



MICROCOM SOFTWARE 




"A MERICA 

[EXPRESS] 



2900 Monroe Ave, Kochcslcr.NY 14618. Order Status, Info, Technical Info: 716-383-8830 
To Order: Refer to Page 17 of our 6-page nd scries: (Pgs. 9-17) 

Credit Card Toll Free Orderline 1-800-654-5244 (9ani-8pm 7days/week) 

Order Status, Info, Technical Info: 716-383-8830 





"serious" magazine and a "fun" maga- 
zine. However, after discussions with a 
lot of people, some surveys of readers 
and some hard thinking, we decided this 
would be neither practical nor useful to 
the CoCo Community as a whole. 

Yes, we would probably have 
stemmed some of the complaints, but 
our research showed we would have 
forced easily a third of you to buy two 
magazines. We would have also ended 
up pressuring our advertisers to adver- 
tise in two places. 

Both of those would have been silly 
for us to do — and destructive to the 
CoCo Community. 

That is why our booking process is so 
important. We make sure we have a 
balance because that is what we want 
and what our research says the vast 
majority of you prefer. If you are a game 
fanatic, we've got a bunch of pages of 
material for you; if you are heavily into 
OS-9, we have a bunch of pages for you, 
too. And we will continue to do so. 

All we ask is simply to look at what 
you get, not what someone else gets, 
too. By appealing to the entire CoCo 
Community as we do, we can afford to 
produce a top-quality magazine for you 
every month, hold onto columnists you 



like, and provide a way for you to learn 
all the excellent new products available 
to you by our advertisers. 



'We make sure we have 
a balance because that 

is what we want and 
what our research says 

the vast majority of 
you prefer. " 



THE RAINBOW is an inexpensive pur- 
chase both for you and for our adver- 
tisers. Assume we deliver 165 pages a 
month for 12 months: That costs you 
just a a little more than a penny a page. 
If, say, we delivered 50 pages every 
other month, the magazine would cost 
you five cents a page even if we cut our 
subscription rate in half. 

As far as advertisers are concerned, 
a comment made by Terry Simons of 
Des Moines, Iowa, in his CoCo club 
newsletter is a good case in point. He 
quotes information and rates from THE 



rainbow and from a newsletter with a 
claimed circulation of about 1,000. If we 
use Terry's figures, it costs about $30 to 
reach 1,000 people through THE RAIN- 
BOW, while the cost for reaching the 
same 1,000 people in the newsletter he 
mentioned would be $180. 

That is pretty much off the subject. 
I was saying that we at THE RAINBOW 
work hard to give you a balanced 
magazine that is useful to everyone. I 
think our editors do a fine job, and 1 
know most of you agree. For those who 
sometimes get frustrated, consider the 
scale of what you hold in your hands 
right now. It is an important consider- 
ation. 

Meanwhile, here in Kentucky, the 
flowers are beginning to bloom and we 
are making plans for the Eighth Anni- 
versary Issue. It is what we call "Derby 
season," because the Kentucky Derby is 
right around the corner. 

Derby is exciting and so is spring. But 
here, there is nothing quite as exciting 
as planning another Anniversary Issue 
and looking forward to serving all of 
you and the CoCo Community in the 
years ahead. 

— Lonnie Falk 




METRIC INDUSTRIES, INC 





A 


* 




L 



Model 101 

Serial to Parallel Printer Interface 

* Works with any COCO 

* Compatible with "Centronics" Parallel Input Printers 

* Just turn the knob to select any one of 6 baud rates 300-9600 

* Comes complete with cables to connect to your printer 
and computer 

* Can be powered by most printers 

Model 104 Deluxe Interface 
with "Modem 




99 



it Same Features as 101 Plus 

* Built in Serial Port for your Modem or other serial device 

* Switch between Serial Output and Parallel Output 

* Comes with cables to connect to your computer and printer 

* Can be powered by most printers 

Model 105 Serial Switch 

* Connects to your COCO to give you 2 switch selectable 
Serial Ports 

* Comes with a 3 foot cable to connect to your computer 

* Now you can connect your Printer (or printer interface) 
and your Modem (or other serial device) to your COCO 
and flip the switch to use either device 

* Does not require power 



Cassette Label Printing Program 



New Version 2.1 prints 7 lines of information 
on Cassette labels 

Comes on Tape with instructions to transfer to disk 
Menu driven, very easy to use 
Save and Load Labels from Tape and Disk 
Uses the features of your printer to print standard, 
expanded, and condensed characters 
Automatically Centers Each Line of Text 
Allows editing of label before printing 
Program comes with 24 labels to get you started 
1 6K ECB required 



Some of the Printers 
That Can - 

Supply power for the 101 and 
1 04 are Radio Shack, Star, 
Okidata, Brother, Juki, and 
Smith Corona. 

Some of the Printers 
That Cannot - 

Supply power for the interfaces 
are Epson, Seikosha, 
Panasonic, Silver Reed and 
NEC. If your printer cannot 
supply power to the interface 
you can order your interface 
with the "P" option or you can 
supply your own AC adapter. 
We recommend the Radio 
Shack 273-1 431 AC adapter 
with a 274-328 connector 
adapter. 

Write or call for more 
information or for technical 
assistance. 



Price List 

Model 101 35.95 

Model 1 01 P 41.95 
Model 104 44.95 
Model 104P 51.95 
Model 105 14.95 
Cassette Label Program 6.95 
Pin Feed Cassette Labels: 
White 3.00/100 
Colors (specify) 3.60/C 
Red-Blue-Yellow-Tan 



4 Pin Din Serial 
COCO Cables: 

Male/Male 6 foot 
Male/Female 6 foot 
Female/Female 6 foot 
Other Lengths Available. 

All items covered by a 
1 year warranty 



4.49 
4.49 
4.49 



Ordering Info 



Free Shipping in the 

U.S.A. (except AK and HI) 
on all orders over $50 
On orders under $50 
please add $2.50 for 
shipping and handling 
On orders outside the 
U.S.A. please write or call 
for shipping charges 



You Can Pay By: 

* VISA or MasterCard 

* C.O.D.-add$2.25 

* Or send check or money 
order payable in U.S. funds 



Metric Industries Inc. 
P.O. Box 42396 
Cincinnati, OH 45242 

(513) 677-0796 



1 2 THE RAINBOW May 1 989 



GoCo 3 Utilities Galore 

(CoCo 2 Versions included where specified) 
(All Programs are for RSDOS unless specified) 



SUPER TAPE/DISK 
TRANSFER 





* Disk-to-Disk Copy * Tape-to-Disk Copy 

* Tape-to-Disk Auto Relocate 

* Disk-to-Tape Copy * Tape-to-Tape Copy 
Copies Basic/ML/Data Files. CoCo 1,2 or 3. 
Req. min. 64K Disk System. Disk Only $24.95 



CEBBS 

Best BBS for CoCo 3. Xmodem Up/Downloading, 
unlimited menus, login, message base, built-in 
clock/calendar, execution of external programs. 
Sysop has full control of user's acess to menus, time 
on system & remote system access. Full Error Trap- 
ping. IlypcrlO Compatible! Reg. $59.95. Intro. Spe- 
cial $49.95. Min Req CoCo 3, 1 Drive, RS232 Pack. 



DISK UTILITY 2.1 A 



a 



A multi-featured tool for USER FRIENDLY 
disk handling. Utilize a directory window to 
selectively sort, move, rename & kill file entries. 
Lightning fast Disk I/O for format, copy & back- 
up. Single key execution of Basic/ML programs. 
This will become your MOST USED program ! ! 
CoCol,2or3. Req. Min. 64K.Disk Only $24.95 




MAILLIST PRO 



The ultimate mailing list program. Allows you 
to add, edit, view, delete, change, sort (by zip- 
code or name) and print labels. Its indispen- 
sible!! Disk $19.95 (CoCo 2 version included) 



DISK LABEL MAKER 

Allows you to design professional disk labels! 
Allows elongated, normal and condensed for- 
mat for text. Double Strike, Border Creation, 
and multiple label printing. Its a MUST for any 
user with a disk drive. Supports DMP 
105/106/110/120/ 130/430, GEMINI, STAR, 
EPSON and compatibles. (CoCo 2 version in- 
cluded). Only $19.95 




COCO UTILII ^ 



(Latest Version): Transfer CoCo Disk files to 
IBM compatible computer and vica-versa. Re- 
quires 2-Drive IBM Compatible. Disk $39.95 



RGB PATCH 

Displays most games in color on RGB monitors. 
CoCo 3 Disk $24.95 



COMPUTERIZED 
CHECKBOOK 




>cr~5 



Why bother with balancing your checkbook? 
Let the CoCo do it for you. Allows you to add, 
view, search, edit, change, delete and printout 
(in a table/individual entry format) checkbook 
entries. Updates balance after each entry. Al- 
lows files for checking, savings, and other ac- 
counts. Disk $19.95. (CoCo2 version included) 




BOWLING SCORE 
KEEPER 



An excellent utility to keep track of your bowl- 
ing scores. Allows you to save scores under in- 
dividuals or teams. You can edit change, delete, 
and compare scores. A must for anyone who 
wants to keep track of his or her bowling perfor- 
mance. Disk $19.95 (CoCo 2 version included) 



VCR TAPE ORGANIZER 




Organize your videotapes with this progiam. 
Allows you to index tapes by title, rating, type, 
play time and comments. Also allows you to sort 
titles alphabetically & view/print selected tapes. 
If you own a VCR, this program is a MUST!! 
Disk $19.95 (CoCo 2 version included) 



COCO 3 SCREEN DUMP 



32, 40, 80 column text dump, PMODE 4 
Graphics Dump. Single Keystroke Operation al- 
lows you to take snapshots of your screens even 
when programs are running! Works on DMP's, 
Epson, Gemini and compatibles. CoCo 1, 2 and 
3. Disk $24.95 




HOME BILL MANAGER 



Let the CoCo keep track of your bills. Allows 
you to enter bills under various categories and 
reminds you when they are due. Disk $19.95 



CALENDAR MAKER 



• « » i < • • i 

t M ti n n w u 



Generate monthly calendars on your printer for 
any year in the 20th century. Disk Only $19.95 
(CoCo 2 version included) 



ADOS 3 

Advanced disk operating system for CoCo 3. 
Comes on disk and is EPROMable!! Disk 
$34.95. ADOS (for CoCo 1,2): $27.95 



MICROCOM SOFTWARE 





AMEH1CAH 




EXPHESI 



OI/CWER 




2900 Monroe Ave, Rochcstcr,NY 14618. Order Status, Info, Technical Info: 716-383-8830 
To Order. Refer to Page 17 of our 6-page ad scries: (Pgs, 9-17) 

Credit Card Toll Free Orderline 1-800-654-5244 (9am-8ptn 7«hiys/week) 

Order Status, Info, Technical Info: 716-383-8830 



Start OS9 

An Enjoyable Hands-on Guide to OS9 Level II. In- 
cludes stcp-by-step tutorials, articles. Free disk in- 
cludes examples & utilities. Req. 512K, Level 11,2 
drives & monitor. Book + Disk: $32.95 



The Zapper: Patch Disk Errors. $19.95 
Disk Manager Tree: Change, create & delete 
directories quickly. Req. 512K LIL $29.95 
Level If Tools: Wildcards, tree commands, win- 
dowing & 22 more utilities. 128KReq. $24.95 
Warp One: Complete LII Windowing, Terminal, 
Auto Dial, macros, file transfer, capture,timer,chat, 
etc. Req. 512K. Only $34.95 
Multi-Menu: Createyour own pull-down menus. 
Req. 512K & OS9 Level II. $19,95 
OS9 Level II BBS 2.0: Supports multiple users. 
Tsmon, Login, chat, Message/Mail Retrieval, 
Uloadx,Dloadx & much more! Req. 512K. $29.95 



XWord: Best OS9 Word Processor with true 
character oriented editing & more. $69.95 
XMerge: Mail Merge for Xword: $24.95 
Xspell: Spelling Checker, 40000 words. $39.95 
XEd: OS9 Full Screen Editor. $39.95 
XDis: OS-9 Disassembler. $34.95 
XTerm: Communications pro. w/ Up/download, 
xmodem,serial /RS232 pack support. $49.95 
XDir & XCal: Hierarchial Dir. & Calc. $24.95 



OS9 Level II RAMDISK: Must for any Level 
II user. Req512K. $29.95 



GSC File Transfer Utilities: Transfer files 
to & from MSDOS/OS9/RSDOS & Flex. Req. OS9 
(LII for Multivue Version),2 drives, 
SDISK/SDISK3. Standard Version: $44.95. Multi- 
vue Version: $54.95 



PC-Xfer Utilities: Programs to format/transfer 
files to/from MSDOS diskettes to CoCo Under 
Level 1 & 2. Requires SDISK or SDISK 3. $44.95 
SDISK 3: Standard drive module replacement al- 
lows full use of 40/80 track double-sided drives. Req. 
OS9 Level II. $29.95. SDISK: $29.95 



Wild & MV Version 2.1: Use "wildcards" with 
OS9 & re-arrange directory tree. $19.95 

EZGen Version 1,04: Powerful OS9 bootfile 

editor. Change names, add/delete modules, patch 
bytes, etc. $19.95 



WIZ: Terminal Package with 300-19200 baud 
rates/windowing. Req 512K & RS232 Pack. $79.95 



DYNASTAR: Word Processor with Macros, ter- 
minals/windows, mail-merge & more. Only $99.95 
DYNASPELL: $79.95 
Both Dynastar & DynaSpell: $124.95 




How To Read Rainbow 



When we use the term CoCo, we refer to an affection- 
ate name that was first given to the Tandy Color 
Computer by its many fans, users and owners. 

The basic program listings printed in the rain- 
bow are formatted for a 32-character screen — so they 
show up just as they do on your CoCo screen. One easy 
way to check on the accuracy of your typing is to com- 
pare what character "goes under" what. If the charac- 
ters match — and your line endings come out the same 
— you have a pretty good way of knowing that your 
typing is accurate. 

We also have "key boxes" to show you the minimum 
system a program needs. But, ofo read the text before 
you start typing. 

Finally, the little disk and/or cassette symbols on the 
table of contents and at the beginning of articles 
indicate that the program is available through our 
RAiNBOWONDiSKor rainbow on TAPEservice. 



Using Machine Language 



The easiest way to "put" a machine language program 
into memory is to use an editor/assembler, a program 
you can purchase from a number of sources. All you 
have to do, essentially, is copy the relevant instructions 
from the rainbow's listing into CoCo. 

Another method of putting an ML listing into CoCo 
is called "hand assembly" — assembly by hand, which 
sometimes causes problems with ORlGiNor EQUATE 
statements. You ought to know something about 
assembly to try this. 

Use the following program if you want to hand- 
assembie ML listings: 

10 CLEAR200,&H3F00:I=&H3F80 

20 PRINT "ADDRESS: ";HEX$( I); 

30 INPUT "BYTE";B$ 

40 POKE I, VAL("&H"+B$) 

50 I = I+l:GDTO 20 

This program assumes you have a 16K CoCo. If you 
have 32K, change the &H3F00 in Line 10 to &H7F00 
and change the value of I to &H7FB0. 



OS-9 and RAINBOW ON DISK 



The OS-9 side of rainbow on disk contains two 
directories: CMDS and SOURCE. It also contains a file, 
read . me . f i rst, which explains the division of the 
two directories. The CMDS directory contains executa- 
ble programs and the SOURCE directory contains the 
ASCII source code for these programs. BASIC09 
programs will only be offered in source form so they will 
only be found in the SOURCE directory. 

OS-9 is a very powerful operating system. Because 
of this, it is not easy to learn at first. However, while we 
can give specific instructions for using the OS-9 



programs, you will find that the OS-9 programs will be 
of little use unless you are familiar with the operating 
system. For this reason, if you haven't "learned" OS-9 
or are not comfortable with it, we suggest you read The 
Complete Rainbow Guide to OS-9 by Dale Puckett and 
Peter Dibble. 

The following is not intended as a course in OS-9. It 
merely states how to get the OS-9 programs from 
rainbow on disk to your OS-9 system disk. Use 
the procedures appropriate for your system. Before 
doing so, however, boot the OS-9 operating system 
according to the documentation from Radio Shack. 

1) Type load dir list copy and press enter. 

2) If you have only one disk drive, remove the OS-9 
system disk from Drive 0 and replace it with the OS- 
9 side of rainbow on disk. Then type chd/d0 
and press enter. If you have two disk drives, leave 
the sytem master in Drive 0 and put the rainbow 
ON disk in Drive 1. Then type chd/dl and press 

ENTER. 

3) List the read . me . f i rs t file to the screen by typing 

list read. me. first and pressing ENTER. 

4) Entering dir will give you a directory of the OS-9 
side of rainbow on disk. To see what programs 
are in the CMDS directory, enter dir cmds. Follow 
a similar method to see what source files are in the 
source directory. 

5) When you find a program you want to use, copy it 
to the CMDS directory on your system disk with one 
of the following commands: 

One-drive system: copy /d0/cmds/ filename /d0/ 
cmds /filename -s 

The system will prompt you to alternately place the 
source disk (rainbow on disk) or the destination 
disk (system disk) in Drive 0. 
Two-drive system: copy /dl/cmds/ filename 'dQ/ 
cmds/ filename 

Once you have copied the program, you execute it 
from your system master by placing that disk in Drive 
0 and entering the name of the file. 



The Rainbow Seal 




rainbow 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 



The Rainbow Certification Seai is our way of helping 
you, the consumer. The purpose of the Seal is to certify 
to you that any product that carries the Seal has actually 
been seen by us, that it does, indeed, exist and that we 
have a sample copy here at the rainbow. 

Manufacturers of products — hardware, software and 
firmware — are encouraged by us to submit their prod- 
ucts to the rainbow for certification. 

The Seal is not a "guarantee of satisfaction." The 
certification process is different from the review 
process. You are encouraged to read our reviews to 
determine whether the product is right for your needs. 

There is absolutely no relationship between advertis- 
ing in the rainbow and the certification process. 
Certification is open and available to any product per- 



taining to CoCo. A Seal will be awarded to any com- 
mercial product, regardless of whether the firm adver- 
tises or not. 

We will appreciate knowing of instances of violation 
of Seal use. 



Rainbow Check Plus 



3f 



The small box accompanying a program listing in 
the rainbow is a "check sum" system, which is 
designed to help you type in programs accurately. 

Rainbow Check PLUS counts the number and values 
of characters you type in. You can then compare the 
number you get to those printed in the rainbow. 
On longer programs, some benchmark lines are given. 
When you reach the end of one of those lines with your 
typing, simply check to see if the numbers match. 

To use Rainbow Check PLUS, type in the program 
and save it for later use, then type in the command run 
and press enter. Once the program has run, type nen 
and press enter to remove it from the area where the 
program you're typing in will go. 

Now, while keying in a listing from the rainbow, 
whenever you press the down arrow key, your CoCo 
gives the check sum based on the length and content 
of the program in memory. This is to check against the 
numbers printed in the rainbow. If your number is 
different, check the listing carefully to be sure you typed 
in the correct basic program code. For more details 
on this helpful utility, refer to H. Allen Curtis' article on 
Page 21 of the February 1984 rainbow. 

Since Rainbow Check PLUS counts spaces and 
punctuation, be sure to type in the listing exactly the 
way it's given in the magazine. 

10 CLS:X=256*PEEI<(35)+178 

20 CLERR 25,X-1 

30 X=256*PEEI< (35) +178 

40 FDR Z=X TO X+77 

50 READ Y:W=W+Y:PRINT Z,Y;W 

60 POKE Z,Y:NEXT 

70 IFW=7985THEN80EL5EPRINT 

"DATA ERRDR":STDP 
80 EXEC X:END 

90 DATA 182, 1, 106, 167, 140, 60, 134 
100 DATA 126, 183, 1, 106, 190, 1, 107 
110 DATA 175, 140, 50, 48, 140, 4, 191 
120 DATA 1, 107, 57, 129, 10, 38, 38 
130 DATA 52, 22, 79, 15B, 25, 230, 129 
140 DATA 39, 12, 171, 128, 171, 128 
150 DATA 230, 132, 38, 250, 48, 1, 32 
160 DATA 240, 183, 2, 222, 48, 140, 14 
170 DATA 159, 166, 166, 132, 28, 254 
180 DATA 189, 173, 19B, 53, 22, 126, 0 
190 DATA 0, 135, 255, 134, 40, 55 
200 DATA 51, 52, 41, 0 



14 



THE RAINBOW May 1989 



1 



Books That Can Launch A 1000 Programs!! 

Pokes, Peeks and Execs are your guides into the jungle of computer programming. These commands give you the power of 
Machine Language without leaving the security of BASIC. Each book is a collection of "inside" information, with explanations 
and examples to help you immediately put it to use. Everyone from the novice to the professional will find these handy books a 
wealth of information. cqq POKES 

PEEKS.'N EXECS 




300 POKES, 
PEEKS, N 
for COCO 



*40/80 column Screen Text Dump 
*Save Text/Graphics Screen to Disk 
* Command/Functions Disables 
♦Enhancements for CoCo3 BASIC 
♦128K/512K RAM Test Program 
*HPRINT Character Modifier 



Only $19.95 



♦Autostart your BASIC programs 
•Disable Color BASIC/ECB/Disk BASIC 
commands 

♦ Disable Break Key/ Clear Key/ Reset Button 
♦Generate a Repeat -key 
♦Transfer ROMPAKs to tape 
♦Set 23 different GRAPHIC modes 
♦Merge two BASIC programs 
♦And much much more!!! 

For CoCo 1,2 and 3. Only $16.95 
ALL 3 BOOKS for $39.95 



SUPPLEMENT TO 500 
POKES,PEEKS, 'N EXECS 



200 additional Pokes,Peeks and Execs (500 
Pokes Peeks 'N Execs is a prerequisite) 
♦ROMPAK transfer to disk 
•PAINT with 65000 styles 

♦ Use of 40 track single/double sided drives 
•High-speed Cassette Operation 
♦Telewriter, CoCo Max enhancements 

• Graphics Dump (for DMP printers) /Text 
Screen Dump 



For CoCo 1,2 or 3. Only $9.95 




UNRAVELLED SERIES 




COCO LIBRARY 



An invaluable aid for Basic and Machine Language programmers, these 
books provide a complete disassembly and annotated listing of the 
BASIC/ECB and Disk ROMs. These listings give complete, uninterupted 
memory maps of the four ROMs. Gain complete control over all versions of 
the color computer. 

EXTENDED COLOR BASIC UNRAVELLED: COLOR 
BASIC and EXTENDED BASIC ROM Disassembly: $39.95 
DISK BASIC UNRAVELLED: DISK BASIC ROM LI and 
1.0 Disassembly : $19.95 

BOTH ECB AND DISK BASIC UNRAVELLED: $49.95 
SUPER EXTENDED BASIC UNRAVELLED: SUPER EX- 
TENDED BASIC ROM Disassembly for CoCo 3. $24.95 
COMPLETE UNRAVELLED SERIES (all 3 books): $59.95 



CoCo 3 Service Manual: $39.95 
CoCo 2 Service Manual: $29.95 
Inside OS9 Level II: $39.95 
Rainbow Guide To OS9 Level II: $19.95 
Rainbow Guide To OS9 II (disk): $19.95 
Complete Guide To OS9 (Level 1): $19.95 
Complete Guide To OS9 (2 Disk): $29.95 
CoCo 3 Secrets Revealed: $19.95 
Basic Programming Tricks: $12.95 
Assembly Language Programming(tepco): $18 

Addendum For CoCo3 (tepco): $12 
Color Computer Disk Manual (with ref card): $29.95 
Start OS-9 (Book & Disk): $32.99 




OTHER SOFTWARE ... 

COCO MAX III (with hi-res interface): $79.95 
COCO MAX II: Disk $77.95 Tape $67.95 
MAXFONTS #1,.#2,#3,#4: Disk $19.95 Each 
NX1000 Rainbow Driver for CoCo Max III: $19.95 
MAXPATCH: Run COCO MAX II on COCO 3. $24.95 

EDT/ASM 64D: Editor-assembler (specify 1,2,3) $59.95 
SOURCE: CoCo Disassembler $34.95 SOURCE III: $49.95 
CBASIC: Best Basic compiler $149.95 CBASIC III: $149.95 

TELEWRITER 64 (COCO 1&2) :Best Word Processor for 
CoCo 1 & 2. Disk $57.95 Tape $47.95 

AUTOTERM:Modem software Disk $39.95 Cas $29.95 
PRO-COLOR FILE *ENHANCED*: $59.95 

VIP DATABASE III 
Best Database for CoCo 3. Features 40/64/80 columns, size 
limited only by disk space, easy to understand menu system 
LIGHTNING FAST in-memory sort, multiple search, built- 
in mail merge, built-in MATH PACKAGE, print spooler and 
report generator, unlimited print formats & more. $69.95 



MJF 



WINDOW MASTER 

The hottest program for your CoCo 3!! Imagine using Win- 
dows, Pull-Down Menus, Buttons, Icons, Edit Field, and 
Mouse Functions in your Basic Programs. No need to use 
OS9. It uses the 640x255 (or 320x255) hires graphics mode 
for the highest resolution. Up to 31 windows can appear on 
the screen at one time. Need extra character sets? Window 
Master supports 5 fonts in 54 sizes! How about an enhanced 
Editor for Basic? It gives you a superb Basic Editor which 
leaves the standard EDIT command in the cold. And don't 
forget that many existing Basic/ML programs will operate 
under Window Master with little or no changes. In fact, it 
does NOT take up any memory from Basic. Requires 1 Disk 
Drive, RS Hi-res Interface & Joystick or Mouse. Includes 
128K & 512K Version. $69. 95 Window Master & Hi-Res In- 
terface. Only $79.95 

FKEYS III 

A user friendly, user programmable function key utility that 
creates up to 20 function keys. Includes EDITOR, DOS 
mods, DISABLE, and its EPROMable! Disk $19.95 

SIXDRIVE 

Allows the use of 3 double-sided drives from RSDOS or 
ADOS. Only $16.95 



MICROCOM SOFTWARE 




rAMERt.CAH 
"^EXPRESS 



DI/CGVER 




2900 Monroe Ave, Rochcstcr,NY 14618. Order Status, Info, Technical Info: 716-383-8830 
'fo Order: Refer to Tagc. l7 : $$our 6-page ad scries: (Pgs. 9-17) 

Credit Card Toll Free Orderline 1-800-654-5244 (9ani-8pm 

Order Status, Info, Technical Info: 716-383-8830 




7days/week) 




512K BASIC 



(For 128K & 512K Computers) 

From the authors of Word Power 3.2, the best-selling Word Processor for CoCo 3, comes a revolutionary programming tool! 

Do you have a 128K or 512K CoCo 3? Are you being told that Basic will even run at double clock-speed and automatically slow 
you could only use 22K from Basic?? Don't believe it! ! down for printer and disk operations. 



Lets face it. You bought your CoCo 3 so you could get better 
graphics, more speed and more MEMORY. Unfortunately as it 
comes, the CoCo 3 only allows you to use 22K for Basic 
Programs, A big disappointment for Basic Programmers. 

Introducing the revolutionary 512K Basic. It gives you up to 80K 
Basic program/variable space (64K for Basic Program/16K for 
variables) on a 128K CoCo and over 400K (384K Basic Program 
Space & 16K Variable Space) on a 512K CoCo! There are no 
new commands to remember and approximately 90-95% of the 
existing Basic Software will run without any modifications. 512K 
Basic is completely transparent to the user. You won't even know 
its there until you realize that you were able to type in a massive 
Basic program without the dreaded ?OM Error. And 512K 



Step up to 512K Basic. It's the tool you need to tap the full poten- 
tial of your CoCo 3. 512K Basic Requires a 128K or 512K CoCo 
3 with a disk drive. OS9 is NOT required. Only $39.95 

512K Upgrades for CoCo 3. 

(Only $160 with purchase of 512K Basic) 
Fully assembled, tested and ready to be shipped now. Comes 
with $100 worth of 512K Software: 

• 512K Backup Lightning • 512K Print Spooler 

• 512K Memory Test • 512K Ramdisk 

• OS9 Level II Ramdisk. 

No soldering. Comes with all instruction manuals^O day war- 
ranty. Only $188 
OK Upgrade Board: $39.95 



KEYBOARDS , ETC. 

KEYBOARD EXTENSION CABLE: 
Move your keyboard away from the com- 
puter & type with ease. Use your existing 
keyboard with this g 
cable or leave your ^ U 
present keyboard in- ^^^K^q£\ 
tact and use a second (bc^^^* ' 
keyboard. Only t^f* 
$39.95, 



Cable with CoCo 2 Keyboard: $49.95 
Cable with CoCo 3 Keyboard: $69.95 
CoCo 3 Keyboard (with free FUNCTION 
KEYS software value $14.95) :$39.95 

CoCo 2 Keyboard: $19.95 

ACCESORIES 



COMMUNICATIONS 
EXTRAVAGANZA 

1) Avatex 1200e Modem: Fully Hayes 
compatible 300/1200 w/ speaker, Auto- 
D ial/Answer/Redial. 

2) MODEM CABLE: 4 pin/DB 25 (Reg. 

$19.95) 

3) Autoterm Software: (Reg $39.95) 

4) FREE Compuserve Offer & Acess Time 

5) UPS 2nd Day Air Shipping 

Only $129.95 
With Avatex 2400e instead of I200e: $229.95 




Avatex 1200e Modem Only: $85 
Avatex 2400e Modem Only: $189 > «<-> 



Oatarase 



EPROM 



INTRONICS EPROM PROGRAMMER 

(for CoCo): Programs 2516-27512 & 
more! Includes software & complete 
documentation. Latest version. Lowest 
Price Anywhere! Only $137.95 
EPROM ERASERiFast erase of 24/28 pin 
EPROMs. Only $49.95 
BOTH EPROM PROGRAMMER & 
ERASER: $179.95 
EPROMS: 2764-$8 27128-$9 
ROMPAK (w/ Blank PC Board 27xx 
Series): $12.95 

BLANK CARTRIDGE (Disk Controller 
Size): $10.95 



51/4" DS/DD Disks: $.40 each 
3 1/2" DS/DD Disks: $1.49 each 
5 1/4" Disk Case (for 70 disks): $9.95 
3 1/2" Disk Case (for 40 disks): $7.50 

Curtis Printer Stand: $19.95 
Surge Supresser Strip w/ 6 outlets: 
$14.95 

Curtis Static Mat: $24.95 



RIBBONS 



NX1000 Color Ribbon: $12.95 
NX1000 Black Ribbon: $8.50 
Seikosha, EPSON, DMP, 
Panasonic, Okidata, Gemini Rib- 
bons: $8.50 each 




CABLES 

MAGNA VOX 8505/8515/8CM643 Analog RGB 
Cable: $24.95 

SERIAL-TO-PARALLEL INTERFACE: Use your 

parallel printer at high speed (300-9600 baud) with CoCo. Comes 
will all cables. No software compatibility problems. Only $44.95 
15" MULTIPAK/ROMPAK EXTENDER CABLE: 
$29.95 

VIDEO DRIVER: Use a monochrome/color monitor with 
your CoCo 2. Comes with audio/video cables. Excellent picture 
quality/resolution! $34.95 

RS232 Y CABLE: Hook 2 Devices to the serial port. Only 

$2495 

Y CABLE: Use your disk system with Speech Pak,CoCo Max, 
DS69, etc. $27.95 

RGB Analog Extender Cable:$19.95 t\l 
SONY Monitor Cable: $29.95 \\ 
MODEM CABLE:4 pin to DD25.0nly $19.95 
2-POS1TION SWITCHER: $29.95 
HI RES JOYSTICK INTERFACE: $11.99 




MICROCOM SOFTWARE 




£ SSBM® 



rmmmrmffm 

l i / 1 1 U 1 1 U / •' UJ. f. 



CHIPS, ETC 

Disk Basic Rom 1.1 (Needed for CoCo 
3): $29.95 ECB ROM 1.1:$29.95 
68B09E or 6809E Chip: $14.95 
MultiPak PAL Chip for CoCo 3: 
$19.95 

PAL Switcher; Now you can switch be- 
tween the CoCo 2 and 3 modes when using 
the Multi-Pak You need the OLDER & 
NEW PAL chip for the 26-3024 Multipak. 

Only $39.95. With NEW PAL Chip: 
$49.95. 

UPGRADES 

64K Upgrade for CoCo Fs, CoCo 
IPs with Cat #26-3026/27, 26-3134, 
26-3136: $29*95 

64K Upgrade for 26-3134 A/B 
CoCo II: $39.95 

(Free 64K Software incl. with 64K Upgr.) 



OIJCWER 



2900 Monroe Ave, Roehcstcr,NY 14618. Order Status, Info, Technical Info: 716-383-8830 
To Order: Refer to Page 17 of our 6-pagc ad scries: (Pgs. 9-17) 

Credit Card Toll Free Orderline 1-800-654-5244 

Order Status, Info, Technical Info: 716-383-8830 





New OS9 Products 



r B&B HyperlO System) 



Hard Drive Utilities: MSA Backup, 
Copy/Kill/Rename, Hard Disk 
Backup to Floppies (vica versa), 
wild card & more. Only $21.95 • 
Disk Doctor: Checks/locks out bad 
sectors. Only $17.95 
Hard Drive Zap: View tracks, sec^ 
tors, modify data on your hard disk. 
Only $21.95 



DS69B Digitizer: Use your CoCo 3 to 
display pictures from your VCR or video 
camera. Includes C-SEE 33 software, 
Only $149.95 

Gravis Joystick: The BEST joystick for 
your CoCo. Tension, rotary,center- 
ingjfree-floating controls with 3 buttons: 
$59.95 

IMtPI Locking Plate (specify Cat #):$8 

Coming Soon: ROMPAK Wild card: 
Lets you transfer ANY Rompak to disk. 



MAGNAVOX 8CM515 RGB 
MONITOR 

Razor-sharp picture 
quality for your CoCo! 
Has 14" screen, 
Analog/TTL RGB, 
Composite Inputs for 
CoCo 2/3, Speaker, tilt- 
stand & 2 year warranty! 
Only $265 (add $12 S&H/$40 in Canada) 

Magnavox RGB Cable for CoCo 3 and 
Composite Video / Audio Cable Set with 
purchase of monitor: $19.95 




DISK DRIVES for CoCo 2 & 3 



There are a lot of dealers selling disk drives for the CoCo. Why buy from us? 
First, all our drives are Brand New and made by Fujitsu. They are sleek, 
quiet and have a reputation of superb reliability. Second, our Drive 0 sys- 
tems come with the acclaimed DISTO Controller - with gold-plated con- 
tacts. Third, our Drive 0 systems come with the official 200 page Radio Shack 
Disk Manual with floppy disks; everything you need to get started. Fourth, 
you get $60 worth of our utility software (Disk Util 2.1A & Super Tape/Disk 
Transfer) & our DISKMAX software which allows you to acess BOTH sides 
of our drives. Our drive systems are head & shoulders above the rest. 

Drive 0 (With Disto Controller, Case, Power Supply, 1 Drive Cable, Manual, Software): 

$209 

Drive 1 (With Case, Power Supply & software): $129 Bare 51/4" Drive: $89 

2 Drive System (With Disto Controller, Case, Power Supply, 2 Drive Cable, Manual & 

Software): $309 „■„, 

1 Drive Cable: $16.95 2 Drive Cable: $ 22.95 4 Drive Cable:$ 34.95 
FD501 Upgrade Kit: Bare Drive, 2 Drive Cable & Instructions: $109 



HARD DRIVE SYSTEMS/ 
INTERFACES 



Complete w/ Hard Drive, Western Digital Con- 
troller, B&B Interface, Cables, Case, Power Supply, 
Software (HYPER IO) & Instruction manuals. As- 
sembled/tested/formatted. Just Plug'N'Run. This is 
the best hard drive deal for the CoCo. 



Seagate 20 Meg System: $509 
Seagate 30 Meg System: $539 



CoCo XT: Use 2 5-120 Meg Drives with your CoCo. 
Only $69.95 w/ Real Time Clock: $99.95 
CoCo XT ROM: Boots OS9 from hard/floppy. $19.95 
HYPERIO: Allows Hard Drive Use with RSDOS. 
Only $29.95 HYPERIO: Disto Version:If you have a 
DISTO Controller w/ Hard Drive Interface, this 
program will allow you to use your Hard Drive from 
RSDOS!! Only $29.95 




PRINTERS 



1000 Sheets of paper included X* ivH/JtL With every printer 

NX1000 Rainbow System: NX1000 Color Printer w/144 CPS draft • Friction/Trac- 
tor Feed • Epson/IBM Compatible • 1 Year Warranty. Only $289 

NX1000 System: NX1000 Printer w/ 144 cps Draft • Friction/Tractor Feed 

• Epson/IBM Compatible • 1 Year Warranty. Only 
$199 

Panasonic KX-P1080i II System: Panasonic Printer 
w/ 144 cps Draft • Tractor/Friction Feed 

• Epson/IBM Compatible • 2 Year Warranty. Only 
$189 

Panasonic KX-1592 System: Panasonic Printer 
w/216 cps Draft • 16.5" Wide Carriage • 2 Year Warranty: $399 




DISTO PRODUCTS ... 



Disto Super Controller: $99.95 Disto 
Super Controller II: $129.95 

• Mini Eprom Programmer Add on: $54.95 
• Hard Disk Add On: $49.95 
• RT Clock & Parallel Interface: $39.95 
• MEB Adapter Add On: $24.95 

MULTI-BOARD ADAPTER Printer Port, 
Faster RT Clock & true RS-232 Serial Port. 
$59.95 

RS232 SUPER PACK: Here it is! True RS-232 
Port for your CoCo. Compatible with Tandy® 
Deluxe RS232 Pack. Includes DB25 Cable. Re- 
quires Multipak. Only $54.95 



MICROCOM SOFTWARE, 2900 Monroe Avenue • Rochester, NY 14618 




[MasterCard ] 
jA 



0I/C«VER 



To Order: All Orders $50 & above (except Printers, Monitors, Drives, Computers) shipped by UPS 2nd Day Air in Continental US. 
We accept Visa,MC, Amex,Discover, Check & MO. Please add $3.00 S&H ($10 for Drives/Printers) in continental US; foreign culd 
10% S&H (Min $5). NYS Residents please add sales tax. Our Australian Agent: Aust. Peripheral Development. Ph: 07-208-7820 

Credit Card Toll Free Order line 1-800-654-5244 (9am-8pm 7 days/week) 



Order Status, Info, Tech, Info: (716)-383-8S30. FAX: 716-383-0026. BBS: 716-671-1449 



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— — — ~— ■ 



HOW DO Y00 GIVE A RAINBOW? 



It's simple — 



a rainbow gift certificate . . . 



Let a gift subscription to the 
rainbow carry the premier Color 
Computer magazine right to 
your friend's doorsteps, the 
rainbow is the information 
source for the Tandy Color Com- 
puter. 

Each month, your friends will 
enjoy the intelligent programs, 
reviews and articles written ex- 
clusively for their CoCo. 

First, your gift will be an- 
nounced in a handsome card. 
Then, all year 'round, they'll re- 
member you and your thought- 
fulness when they get each edi- 
tion of the rainbow — pages 
loaded with delightful programs, 
regular columns and plenty of 
helpful hints and tips. 

Generosity benefits the giver, 
too. There'll be no more tracking 
down borrowed copies of the 
rainbow. Your collection will be 
safe at home. 

Give a rainbow gift certificate 
and let your friends in on the fun. 
the rainbow is the perfect com- 
panion for the Color Computer! 

Get your order to us by May 25 
and we'll begin your friends' 
subscriptions with the July issue 

Of RAINBOW. 



Please begin a one-year (12 issues) gift subscription to 

THE RAINBOW for: 



Name 



Address 
City 



I 
I 

j From: 

! Name 



.State 



ZIP 



Address 
City 



.State 



ZIP 



□ My payment is enclosed. 
[ Bill to: □ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 
i Acct. # Exp. date 

i Signature 



Mail to: 

Rainbow Gift Certificate, The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, 
KY 40059 

For credit card orders call (800) 847-0309, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. 
All other inquiries call (502) 228-4492. 



Subscriptions to THE rainbow are $31 in the United States; U.S. $38 in Canada. The surface rate 
to other countries is U.S. $68; the air rate, U.S. $103. Kentucky residents add 5% sales tax. U.S. 
currency only, please. All subscriptions begin with the current issue. Please allow 6 to 8 weeks for 
delivery. In order to hold down non-editorial costs, we do not bill. 



3 Fabulous Bargains! 

These specials will be withdrawn without notice. Don't miss them! 





The Dazzling Word Processor 



$ 



39 



95 




II 



The Famous Graphics Creator 



49 



Max-10: the Rolls-Royce of word processors. The only one with true 
graphic capability and dozens of type styles. Using your dot matrix printer 
you get from tiny footnotes (6 point) to big titles (24 point). 

The Rainbow review (1/89) said: "An incredible job of providing 
power, flexibility and speed in a program that is as easy to use as it is 
to pronounce! ... Max-10 takes a back seat to none, and is beyond 
comparison with most." Max-10, the only word processor with "What 
You See Is What You Get". A word processor you will love at first sight. 



CoCo Max III: now a classic and probably the most popular CoCo pro- 
gram ever. If the price was the reason that stopped you before, this special 
will delight you. Listen (Rainbow 3/88) : "There are no limits to what you 
can do with this fabulous program. Speed, ease, animation, power and 
color, all in one package. CoCo Max III is the ultimate program for the 
CoCo 3." Check any Rainbow (up to 4/89) for complete info on CoCo Max. 

To top it off, we include a free Demo Disk plus the super CoCo Show 
program, which lets you make your own "slide shows", 



Save $70 

BOTH 

CoCo Max III and Max-1 0 for 

only 

I $7A 95 



79 



Desktop Publishing: together, CoCo Max III and Max-10 form an 
unbeatable system for reports, flyers, invitations, greeting cards/signs, 
newsletters, etc. It's far beyond anything you've ever seen on a CoCo. 

Here is one of the hundreds of unsolicited letters we got: "Max-10 
and CoCo Max III are wonderful. They are the first Color Computer 
products I have purchased that were even better than I hoped for." 

At Colorware, we all work hard to make you feel that way and we 
thrive on your appreciation. 



About Max-10 

What the CoCo Community needs is a word 
processor that's rock solid blindingly fast, 
feels like a Macintosh, makes all the others 
look boring, and does not cost $80 
Max-10 is just that and more. It allows on 
screen mixing of graphics and text, large 
headlines, multiple columns and full page 
preview (with graphics). 
We swear that Max-10 will add excitement 
to your word processing, and that's no small 
task! 

PRINTERS SUPPORTED: epson fx.mx.rx.lx 

AND COMPATIBLES; DMP 105,106.110,130: CGP220 
(B&W); OKI 182.92.192; STAR NX- 10. NX- 1000. 

Max-10 Add-ons 

- Max-10 Fonts. 36 super fonts on 2 disks. 
Send for list. Order #C-23 $29.95 

NOTE: Max-10 and CoCo Max Fonts aren't interchangable. 

- Spell Checker 50000 word dictionary for 
online spell checking and dictionary lookup. 
Perfect seamless integration with Max-10. 
Order #C-24 $29.95 

System Requirements 

Max-10 and CoCo Max HI Require: any 
CoCo 3: 1 or more disk drives; joystick or 
mouse; Radio Shack or Colorware Hi-Res 
Pack;a video or RGB monitor or a TV. 



About CoCo Max III 

Whether you doodle for fun or do graphics 
for a living, CoCo Max will amaze you. It's a 
promise. 

its major features include: Huge picture 
area (2 full hi-res 320x192 screens). Large 
editing window. Zoom mode for detail work. 
28 point and click drawing tools. Shrink and 
stretch. Rotation at any angle (1 .5° steps). 
51 2K memory support (all features work 
with 128Ktoo). Undo (Oops) feature to fix 
mistakes. Animation. Special effects. Color 
sequencing (8 colors, variable speed). 13 
fonts (more available). Each font has 8 sizes 
and 5 styles for thousands of possible 
combinations. Translate program to convert 
most types of pictures. CoCo Show "slide 
show" program. Miniload program to help 
use pictures with your software. Color edit- 
ing of patterns. Prints in single or double 
size. Select 16 of 64 available colors, all 64 
colors are shown at once for easy selection. 
Pull-down menus. 40 paint brush shapes. 
Two color lettering. Spray can. Amazing 
"flowbrush". RGB and composite monitor 
support. Colors print in 5 shades of gray. 

PRINTERS SUPPORTED: epson rx.fx.mx.lx 

AND COMPATIBLES; STAR/GEMINI NX 10.NX-1000: 
DMP 100. 105. 106. 11 0,1 20. 130.200: OKI 62A.162.192; 
CGP 220<B&W) 

Color Drivers available. See next column. 



CoCo Max III Add-ons 

- Max Fonts disks. 95 fonts on 4 disks. 
Order #C-73.. ... $49,95 

- Max Edit Create new fonts or edit existing 
ones. Order #C-16 $19.95 

- Color Printer drivers for NX-1000 
Rainbow (#C-2). CGP-220 (#C-1) or 
Okimate 20 (#C-3) each $19.95 

CoCo Max I and II 

^ CoCo Max I on tape. See previous ads or 

write for info. For CoCo 1 or 2. 

Order #C-7 $59.95 

- CoCo Max II. For all disk CoCos. Multi- 
pak or Y~Cable required. #0-05....... $69.95 

Digitizers 

Digitize any picture from any video source 
(VCR. camera...) for use witn CoCo Max III 
and Max-10. 

DS-69. Requires Multipak. 2 pictures per 

second. Order #C-18 $99.95 

DS-69B Faster; 8 pix/sec. #C-92... $149.95 



Call or Write Now 




Ordering Information: We accept Visa, Mastercard, Checks, andM.O, C.0,Dis$4 extra. 
Purchase orders are subject to credit approval. CT residents add Z5% sales tax. 
Shipping: $4 per order (usually UPS ground), UPS 2nd Day Air: $4 extra. Next Day sen/Ice 
available. Canada: $6 per order (Airmail). Outside US and Canada: Add 10% of order total, 



COLORWARE 



COLORWARE 

242-W West Avenue 
Darien, CT 06820 



Add captions to the pictures you create 
for bulletins, posters, advertisements, 
banners, greeting cards, etc. 



Text for Graphics 

By Jack D. Welsh 



Lots of great graphics programs 
have been published by THE 
RAINBOW, and many times while 
using these programs I've wished that I 
could add text to my creations. I wrote 
this program to do just that. 

The program will work on any system 
consisting of at least 32K Extended 
Color BASIC and a cassette recorder or 
disk drive system. For printouts you'll 
need a printer and a screen dump pro- 
gram compatible with your printer. [See 
Richard Lack's "Get the Picture With 
Gemini Screen Print" (May 1985, Page 
45); Mark Sullins' "Picprt: Good 
Things Come in AU Sizes" (May 1985, 
Page 72 for dot-matrix printers)', John 
Handis' "A Full Page Dump for the 
DMP-I05" (May 1988, Page 92); and 
David Fitzsimmons' "Penumbral 
PrintsVor the Gemini Wx (May 1986, 
Page 95.] After typing in the listing, save 
it to a couple of disks so you won't lose 
your work. 

When you run the program, you will 
see a display of the PMODE 4 graphics 
pages. Press SHIFT and CLEAR to clear 
the screen if it doesn't contain a picture 
or contains memory garbage. You are 
now in the Position Mode. In the center 
of the display you will observe a blink- 
ing pixel. 

Now press I and then 0. This adjusts 
the cursor movement to increments of 
10. The cursor will move 10 pixels in the 
direction of the arrow when you press 
an arrow key. Pressing any other 
number key in conjunction with the 1 
key will set the cursor movement incre- 
ment to that number of positions. If the 
cursor reaches the far right side, it will 
jump to the far left side if pressed again, 



Jack Welsh is an income tax consultant 
who learned programming through 
reading publications and manuals. 



THE 



INNER 1 S 
C I RC IE- 




Text was added to this graphics image to make a sign. (Graphics taken from Art Deli, 
courtesy Specialty Projects.) 



FUNCTION 


KEY 


HOME CURSOR 
TEXT I1O0E 


"H" KEY 
ALT; KEY 


POSITION H0DE 


CLEAR KEY 


SAUE PICTURE 


•/,v> : !. •ljf.;T;T" : " i: "" i \ nr : 

M S' W KEY 


LOAD PICTURE 


"L" KEY 


CURSOR STEP RATE 


t;0 KE Y 


CHANGE TEXT SIZE 


"@L" KEY 





S tl ALL E ST 

SHALL 




lEDIUn 




BIG 


REAL 


BIG 



and vice versa. On the top and the 
bottom of thedisplay this does not 
occur; the cursor merely stops at the top 
or bottom. 

You may now use the arrow keys to 
position the cursor anywhere on the 
screen you want to place text. Press ALT 
to jump into the Text Mode, and type 
your message or desired text. Press @ 
and then type some more. The @ key 
switches text sizes up to the fifth size 
and then starts back over at the smallest 
size. 



To return to the Position Mode, press 
CLEAR. You can move the cursor to 
another position on the display to add 
more text. To load or save a picture, get 
into the Position Mode and press L or 
S, respectively. 

To place text onto an already saved 
picture, make sure that the desired 
picture file is in one of your disk drives. 
After loading this program press L. 
Follow the prompts and the picture will 
pop onto the screen; you can then add 
text anywhere on the picture you desire. 



20 



THE RAINBOW May 1989 



After completing your masterpiece, 
press S. You are prompted to name your 
creation, and it is saved to disk. 

To save or load a file to or from a 
drive other than the current one, just 
type the drive number, a colon and the 
picture filename. It will be loaded or 
saved to the requested drive when you 
press ENTER. 

The characters used in this program 
are made up of DRRW strings in lines 90 
through 620. The variable array 
CHflR$ (*) is used to define the DRRW 



strings, where x corresponds to the 
ASCII value of the key pressed. You can 
use your imagination to define other 
pictures or graphic stamps using DRAW 
strings. For instance, change Line 150, 
which defines the character A, to 150 
CHAR$(65) = "R4U4L4D4". Now when 
you press the A key, it will print a box 
on the screen in any of the five sizes that 
you choose with the @ key. Some of you 
with artistic talent can make great use 
of this feature! 
To run the program on a cassette 



system, change Line 1250 to 1250 CSA- 

VEM PICNAME$,&H600,&H1DFF,0. Then 

change LDADM in Line 1320 to CLDADM. 

I have found this program useful to 
make bulletins, posters, news ads and 
banners that I then print out, using my 
favorite screen dump program. 

(Questions or comments concerning 
this program may be addressed to the 
author at RDttl, Box 112, Conneaut 
Lake, PA 16316. Please enclose an 
SASE when requesting a reply.) □ 





460 



151 BW 
64 113(13 



90 163 END 9 



I 




it. %;>' 



The listing: GRAFTEXT 



p * GOfYBIGHT 1989 FALSO^iK©: 

lp REM TEXT FOR GRAPHICS 

2p REM COPYRIGHT (C) SEPT 1987 

%P REM BY JACK D. WELSH 

4J0 REM CONNEAUT LAKE, PA 

5p GOSUB 880 

60 ■** SETS UP MEMORY & DEFINES 
ARRAYS & CONSTANTS 
lp CLEAR l$ppp 
Bp 0=2:SCALE=4 



9P DIM CHAR$ (2pp) 
Ipp DIM K$(5pp) :-K-0 
lip R=l 
12 P INOl 
13 p '** DEFINES CHARACTERS 
NES Ipp - 570 
14 p CHAR$(73)* ,, R4L2U8L2R4" 
150 CHAR$(65)»"U3R4D3U6H2G2D3 M 
160 CHAR$ (66) = ,, U4R3L3U4R3FlD2G-lfc 
1D2G1L3" 

170 CHAR$ (67) « M R3E161L3H1U6E1R3F 
I" 

180 CHAR$ ( 58 ) = M BU1U1BU3U1» Wl- 

190 CHAR$(68)« H U8R3F1D6G1L3» 

200 CHAR$ (69) ="R4L4U4R2L2U4R4^ 

210 CHAR$(70)= ,f U4R3L3U4R4» 

220 CHAR$(71)^"R3E1U2L1R1D2G1L3H 

1U6E1R3F1 11 

230 CHAR$ (72)="U8D4R4D4U8»S€w 



ARCADE STYLE 
JOYSTICK JUST 
FOR THE COCO 

NOU GET THE RESPONSE YOU 
UJ/\f\J~T LUHILE PLAYING YOUR 

FAVORITE COCO GAME. 
MO\/E T ME CONTOURED GRIP 
JUST A FRACTION OR AN 
INCH IN ANY DIRECTION AND 

INSTANTLY YOUR COCO IS 
PERFORMING YOUR COMMAND. 
FEATURES: 

>k auto fire lockdown 

releases continuous 
stream of bullets 
He dual fire buttons 

use either thumb 
or trigger finger 
>fc suction cup base 

for one hand play 
>k 6 micro- switches 

for super sensitivity 

To get your own Questran 
joystick, send $29.95 to 



QUESTRON 
P.O. Box 1D13 
Rochester, IN 46975-1013 
or call 
219-223-558/i 
C.O.D.s add $3.00 











THE RGB HARD DISK 

A warranty can replace your Hard Disk Drive, 
but not the valuable data it contains! Think 
about this BEFORE you buy a used or rebuilt 
hard drive. 

RGB Computer Systems uses only BRAND 
NEW Hard Disk Drives. Controllers and Com- 
ponents, all with the Full Manufacturers 
Warranty. 

Due to the unique design of our components 
and software, RGB also has the fastest and 
most reliable data transfer in the industry! 

The RGB Hard Disk System fully supports both 
BASIC and OS-9, and provides the ability to 
boot up OS-9 completely from the Hard Disk 
without the need for special EPROMS or the 
loss of Disk Basic. 

If you need a Fast, Reliable Hard Disk System 
and don't mind spending a few dollars more for 
Quality, please give us a call today! 

COMPUTER /^\ 





SYSTEMS 



RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 




294 STILLWELL AVE 
KENMORE, NY 14217 



(716) 876-7538 









May 1989 THE RAINBOW 21 



T & D SOFTWARE PRICE 



l£»A||l* Ji4 llll M 

ISSUE #1, JULY 1982 


tAAiir jita t*rn ■" (Ann 

ISSUE #8, FEB., 1983 


19491 1 P" 1±A\ f A P* P*T A AAA 

ISSUE #15, SEPT. 1983 


iodic una adaii mo a 

ISSUE #22, APRIL 1984 


ii>Mir n4fl kinif Ana a 

ISoUc #29, Nuv. 1984 


_ ■■" """ 1 ' :, ">' ' L " 

• " n ^'[?>"» >i 5""- v-'^i'if >1- j 1 /.-.;*' "": 

icciir ijoc f ■ litter iriQc 
ISSUE #3o, JUnc i9o5 


COVER 1 


COVER 8 


MYSTERY COVER PT.2 


i ip ai ti i i itkiTn 

HEALTH HINTS 


. DISK ROLL OUT 


API P"AT A A A 1 li* : A ■' 

SELECT A GAME 2 


ri A A r" tt a a a i y 

RACE TRACK 


DEFEND = 


AAl A till 1 |p A 

GOLD VALUES 


A 1 mi 1 A A 

GLIBLIBS 


ROBOT ON 


VIDEO COMPUTER 


■ i A k im i Ait 

HANGMAN 


3 DIMENSIONAL MAZE 


fAriy IklATAI lATIAklA 

TREK INSTRUCTIONS 


Ai A^i i prt m i t~ i .r n 

CLOTHER SLITHER 


> Jl II Ti A A * i/ \ - 

MULTIPONG 


AAPPAI t Ai J&iPl IP Ai A / ' 

SPEECH SYNTHESIS 


MUSIC ALBUM 


COCO CONCENTRATION 


TREK 


BIBLE 1 & 2 


ADVENTURE GENERATOR 

f kWK k*.l* t WI Ik, , W W 1 IM Ml 1 -Sr 1 **■ 


SPEECH RECOGNITION 


LIFE EXPECTANCY 


AUTO LINE NUMBERING 


HIGH TEXT MODIFICATION 


BIBLE 3 & 4 


QUEST ADVENTURE 


SPACE LAB : 


WORD TESTS 


ML TUTORIAL PT.3A 


ASTRO DODGE 


CATCH ALL 


QUARTER BOUNCE 


AUTO COMMAND 


KILLER MANSION 


ML TUTORIAL PT.3B 


DR. COCO 


INVADER 


DUAL OUTPUT 


COMPUTER MATCHMAKER 


BARTENDER 


NUCLEAR POWER PLANT 


PEG JUMP 


ALIEN RAID 


KEY REPEAT 


KNIGHT & THE LABYRINTH 


CALENDAR 


DUAL BARRIER 


MORSE CODE 


MOON ROVER 


FULL EDITOR 


STAR SIEGE 


ROBOT WAR : 


BRICKS 


PURGE UTILITY 


10 ERROR IGNORER 


METEOR 


TALKING SPELLING QUIZ- 


ISSUE #2, AUG. 1982 


mniip ii a a ■ m nnn a a a a 

ISSUE #9, MARCH 1983 


IAAIIP f 1 A A A A*P" A A A A 

ISSUE #16, OCT. 1983 


IAAIIP ilAA || k 11 a^AAj 

ISSUE #23, MAY 1984 


IA AIII* /iAA HPA JAAi 

ISSUE #30, DEC. 1984 


ISSUE #37, July 1985 


UFO COVER PT. 1 


T* 11 IT k A A A 1 1 i k 1 P 1 A Al f P H A. 

TIME MACHINE COVER 


MYSTERY COVER 


MONEY SAVERS 1 & 2 


A J A W>| a * a pt M ■ 

MATH HELP 


■ ■ Ak 'if*A A ' AAA'ATP'A r- 

CHESS MASTER 


BIORYTHM 


TRIG DEMO 


B0P0TR0N 


STOCKS OR BOMBS 


' |p» JkM| > jpfc. afc>> « p-b « IpXI, 1^1 irHP i'-i'' 

ZECT0R ADVENTURE 


BIBLE 5-7 


BOMBARDMENT 


nwnA i tin a p Ai t r~ r\r\ a 

. PYRAMID OF CHEOPS 


A I A r" ATA At/ A^AAl 1 

DIRECTORY RECALL 


111 > I 1 Jh af% 1 1 m , 

WALL AROUND 


WORLD CONQUEST 


A I 1 1 a li fAPIf A pni iriiTl mP 

SHIP WREK ADVENTUBIi 


BLACK JACK 


PROGRAM PACKER 


VECTOR GRAPHICS INST. 

W 1 ^* V V N^i I 11 IP III W M f ^/ 1 4 


COCO TECHNICAL LOOK PT 1 


DRAG RACE 


FILE TRANSFER 


COST OF LIVING 


BUDGET . 


VECTOR GRAPHICS 


NUCLEAR WAR INST. 


MINE FIELD 


FOUR IN A ROW 


FRENZY 


: ELECTRONIC DATE BOOK 


SKYDIVER 


THERMONUCLEAR WAR 


T^NOTES TUTORIAL 


MARSHY 


BUSINESS LETTER 


ML TUTORIAL PT.4 


SWERVE AND DODGE 


CIRCUIT BREAKER 


T & D PROGRAM INDEXER 


TAPE CONTROLLER 


OUICK THINK 


TAPE DIRECTORY 


NIMBO BATTLE 


MOUSE RACES 


SYSTEM STATUS 


CATACOMB 


QUEST INSTRUCTIONS 


BLOCK-STIR 


TAPE ANALYSIS UTILITY 


SUPER SQUEEZE 


ERROR TRAP 


AUTO TALK 


QUEST FOR LENORE 


COCO ADDING MACHINE 


LIFE GENERATIONS 


DATA FALL 


DROLL ATTACK 

« ^ft'. "* - ■ £ ■- ,'■ .•■N ■■" zP - V" ' f 


SGR8PAK 


iaaiip a i n Ap i> w iAAn 

ISSUE #3, SEPT. 1982 


IAAIIP nAf\ t Ann a a aa 

ISSUE #10, APRIL 1983 


IAAIIP" HA*m ftlAII j AAA 

ISSUE #17, NOV. 1963 


IAAIIP ii A A II ||| r JAA| 

ISSUE #24, JUNE 1984 


lAAlir i/A<4 11 li JAAp 

ISSut #31, JAN. 1985 


. ^J'fS^VV 
innnr iinn iliA annr 

ISSUE #38, AUG. 1985 


UFO COVER PT;2 


Tt" k i t i • r\. A i i r— A 

TENTH COVER 


THANKSGIVING COVER 


a a- _ _ . yfc J a am aa a— a a— v 

DIR PACK & SORT 


"- ■ l L B *a. ■ a p ^ am a^V an. a* *-< -aa >^ n4 a- 

TREASURES OF BARS00M 


GOLF PAR3 


BASKETBALL 


1*1* / A Aft A 1 A Af AAkiAr~A 

PYRAMIO OF DANGER 


3-D TIC-TAC-TOE 


BRICK OUT 


BATTLEGROUND 


1 k 1 l^f'A af*k^«. A 1 1 ll-f ft ■ T | J pft p— 

WIZARD ADVENTURE 


CHUCKLUCK 


TYPI.NG TUTOR 


l k mi/ r* A a 

INDY 500 


a— a «\ m m ■*> p— 1 II II HI 1 aTs A 1 af *~l*l t n 

COCO TECHNICAL LOOK PTf 2 


. AT A k 1 AT A A k 1 At* r" A' 1 ' ' "* li t A . 

STRUCT. COMPILED LANG, 


i/lYl* ' PiPAlAkl'' 

KITE DESIGN 


SLOT MACHINE 


ML TUTORIAL PT.5 


COLLEGE ADVENTURE 


USA SLIDE PUZZLE 


MINIATURE GOLF 

t ¥ H « " 1 » - A 1 MWA»l 


ROBOTS 


ALPHABETIZER 


TINYCALC 


MEMORY GAME 


51 *24 SCREEN EDITOR 


STAR DUEL 


G0M0KU 


NFL PREDICTIONS 


STOCK MARKET COMP 


DUNGEON MASTER 


51 *24 SCREEN EDITOR 


ARITHMETIC FOOTBALL 


AMULET OF POWER 


FLAG CAPTURE 


YAH-HOO 


WEATHER FORECASTER 


CITY INVADERS 


GRID RUN 


LINE COPY UTILITY 


ROBOT BOMBER 


MISSILE ATTACK 


GRIO FACTOR INST 


PRINTER SPOOLER 


SPIRAL ATTACK 


DISK PLUMBER 




SCREEN PRINT 


GRID FACTOR 


STEPS 


FAST SORT 


SUPER RAM CHECKER 




BRJKPONG 


DRAW 


SNAKE 


MUNCHMAN 


GRAPHIC HORSE RACE 


IP (Mil* mm nhT -inn*! 

ISSUE #4, OCT. 1082 


1 A A | If- it A A Jk \J J AAA 

ISSUE #11, MAY 1963 


IAAIIP" HA A nr A ^ APIA 

ISSUE #18, DEC. 1983 


IA AI IP J/AP 11111/ JAAJ 

ISSUE #25, JULY 1984 


IAAIIP li A A P>PA ' A AAPI 

ISSUE #32, FEB. 1985 


ISSUE #39, SEPT. 1985 


■ i it\ a r* a a 1 1 1" 

UFO RESCUE 


r» i r"k /p~ k n" | | A A% i P A 

ELEVENTH COVER 


A 1 1 A 1 ATk AAA A Ai 1 1~ A 

CHRISTMAS COVER 


CLOCK 


DR. S1GMUND 


DRUNK DRIVING 


TANK BATTLE 


A AAl tr Al f 

ARCHERY 


A 1 i ■ A A r~ 1 « 

CLIMBER 


COCO TECHNICAL LOOK PT,3 


4 PXJh M B # 1 *« pm 1 -ft pft, ft a #V« ft a ** 

ICE WORLD ADVENTURE 


, -v 'A i— i ■< ■ '4 -t > k ' V*i P* #*k' 

CAR MANAGER 


DRIVEWAY 


FROG JUMP 


GALACTIC CONQUEST 


SKID ROW AOVENTURE 


LOTTERY ANALYST 


af* *v i i p" 4if> •» ' pi i *'4 > 

SQUEEZE PLAY 


SOUNDS 


ML TUTDRIAL PT 6 

■ V 1 W 1 W ■ trf 1 II*. Iks 1 ■ /v 


WARLORDS 

III II Iks ^* 1 1 !■/ \-/ 


MONEY MAKER 


BASIC COMPILER 


SUPER BACKUP 


BALLOON DROP 


MLT DICTIONARY 


STATES REVIEW 


PIN-HEAD CLEANING 


MUSIC CREATOR 


RECIPE MACHINE 


MIND BOGGLE 


BASIC SPEED UP TOT. 


MATH TUTOR 


LINE EDITOR INST. 


MEANIE PATROL 


ANTI-AIRCRAFT 


COCO-TERRESTRIAL ADV. 


METRIC CONVERTOR 


MACHINE LANGUAGE DATA 


LINE EDITOR 


TRI-C0L0R CARDS 


UNREASON ADVENTURE 
TALKING ALPHABET 


CALORIE COUNTER 


GRAPHIC QUAD ANTENNA 


PRINTER UTILITY INST, 


BOOMERANG 


SHAPE RECOGNITION 


JACK-O-iANTERN 


GRAPHICS PROGRAM 


PRINTER UTILITY 


BUBBLE BUSTER 


DISK BACKUP 


SUPER VADERS 




CATERPILLAR CAVE 


MUTANT WAFFLES 


R0C0CHET 


SPACE PROTECTOR 


AUTOMATIC EDITOR 


ISSUE #5, NOV. 1982 


1 A A IIP" HA A || |||F _i A A A 

ISSUE #12, JUNE 1983 


IAAIIP 11 A f\ | k 11 j A A A 

ISSUE #19, JAN. 1984 


1 A A IIP .11 A A J| ■ IA A A A 

ISSUE #26, AUG, 1984 


IAAIIP ilAA mm A n mIAAP* 

ISSUE #33, MAR, 1985 


ISSUE #40, OCT. 1985 


ART Al A /-» i\m lfr\ 

CATALOG COVER 


T( i 7f*" 1 rTI t AAk JP*PS 

TWELFTH COVER 


A A klklPA 

BANNER 


h J V Mb a* \ j a* p* aw r** v # p. a^4 , I '■■ 

PEEK POKE & EXECUTE 


LIGHT CYCLE 


A T at- »V iPfti IPft- i P ' 1 - 

STAR TREK 


BOWLING 


A I 1 A ftTtk 1 A .A kill" At J 

SHOOTING GALLERY 


PROBE 


SAUCER RESCUE 


PAINT 


■ TtjA A AM .#*k 'A »•» , 1 ft Ptf A' 

HAM RADIO LOG 


PROGRAM INVENTORY 


AAfc AA ATA A A^ A 

BOMB STOPPER 


DISK DIR. PROTECTOR 


YOUNG TYPER TUTOR 


SHEET SHOOTING 


AA AA If ill 44.''' 

COCO WAR 


PROMISSORY-LOANS 


VALLEY BOMBER 


OPTICAL CONFUSION 


0-TEL'O 


GUITAR NOTES 


DISK LABELER 


CHECKBOOK BALANCER 


STAR FIGHTER 


WORD PROCESSOR 


OLYMPIC EVENTS 


Ml DISK ANALYZER 


SHIP WAR 


TRIGONOMETRY TUTOR 


WHEEL DF FORTUNE 


WORD SEARCH 


DOUBLE DICE 


PERSONAL DIRECTORY 


ELECTRIC COST 


CONVOY 


ML TUTORIAL PT.7 


ASTRONAUT RESCUE 


COCD DATABASE 


NAUGHA ADVENTURE 


MULTIKEY BUFFER 


BAG- IT 


MERGE UTILITY 


STAR TRAP 


BATTLE STAR 


EGGS GAME 


NUKE AVENGER 


SPECTRA SOUND 


RAM TEST 


PIE CHART 


COCO-PIN BALL 


DISK DIRECTORY PRINT 


CURSOR KING 


CONVEYOR BELT 


LANDER 


FORCE FIELD 


MONTEZUMAS DUNGEONS 


SPEED KEy 


SAND ROVER 


iaaiip i j p* n p a *t a aa 

ISSUE #6, DEC. 1982 


IAAIIP HAl ft fill k# j AAA 

ISSUE #13, JULY 1983 


1 A A IIP 1 r A A PI" n ^ A A A 

ISSUE #20, FEB. 1984 


IAAIIP j i A*-# APAT -lAAaf 

ISSUE #27, SEPT. 1984 


i aai ir j/A a it nh ii «i aap 

ISSUE #34 , APRIL 1985 


. lAAIil* ii AI A, klAkll ■■ iAAP 

ISSUE #41, NOV, 1985 


CHRISTMAS COVER 


THIRTEENTH COVER 


INTRODUCTION 


api A aflK aFV «1 j-* a^S aP» a. A aPI A 

COCO TO COM 64 


4 ' I Alt i PH - A k II Jl V 

HOVER TANK 


mmi inA J \ 

GRUMPS 


RAINDROPS 


FLASH CARD 


HINTS FOR YOUR COCO 


GALACTIC SMUGGLER 


POWER SWORD 


p^ i- rffta. ft > vtmi jp AM^tivM ^v^HanW*'' 

DISK DRIVE SPEED TEST 


STOCK MARKET 


ICE BLOCK 


ESCAPE ADVENTURE 


INDY RACE 


TERMITE INVASION 


SOLAR CONQUEST 


ADVANCE PONG 


COSMIC FDRTRESS 


SEEKERS 


ACCOUNT MANAGER 


SPELLING CHECKER 


GAS COST 


DESTRDY 


MAIL LIST 


MASTER BRAIN 


CASSETTE MERGE UTILITY 


DOS BOSS 


RIME WORLD MISSION 


SOUND ANALYZER 


DOLLARS & CENTS 


LIST CONTROLLER 


STRING PACKING TUTORIAL 


NINE CARD CHOICE 


WUMPUS 


CREATIVITY TEST 


ML TUTORIAL PT.8 


DISKETTE CERTIFIER 


SPACE DUEL 


MUSIC GENERATOR 


CHARACTER EDITOR 


VOICE DATA 


SDSK COPY 


ROM COPY 


BUGS 


FYR-DRACA 


GRAPHIC TEST 


ML TUTORIAL ft A 


MUSIC SYNTHESIZER 


BASIC RAM 


TRAP-BALL 


DRIVE TEST 


GRAPHIC LOOPY 


LODNY LANOER 


CRAWLER 


SNAFUS 


BALLOON FIRE 


GRAPHIC TOUR 


BOLD PRINT 


1 A A A IP ■ J v* ■ » A ■ ^ MAM 

ISSUE #7, JAN. 1983 


ISSUE #14, AUG, 1983 


ISSUE #21, MAR, 1984 


1 AAl IF HAA AAV j AA 1 

ISSUE #28, OCT, 1984 


.-. lAAlir* '' : 1(AP<'' - 'illA'tJf - A A Ai- 

ISSUE #35, MAY 1985 


■ AA'tlP' II A A --' AA A ' jJ AAA 

ISSUE #42, DEC. 1985 


NEW YEARS COVER 


MYSTERY COVER 


BASIC CONVERSIONS 


HANGING TREE 


SELECT A GAME 1 


HOME PR00UCT EVALUATION 


LIST ENHANCER 


ROW BOAT 


FINANCIAL ADVISE 


CHECKERS 


TAPE PROBLEMS 


YAHTZEE 


SUPER PRECISION DIV. 


COMPUTER TUTL PT, 1 : 


CASTLE STORM 


FDOTBALL 


STROLL TRIVIA 


DISK UTILITY 


nAi in PilCd IPC 

BOMB DIFFUSE 


INDEX DATA BASE 


DOS HEAD CLEANER 


MORE PEEKS & POKES 


A/Yrrr a a r i * ai a a r>rn 

SOFTBALL MANAGER 


MACH II 


SPACE STATION 


DISK ZAPPER 


COCO TERMINAL 


SPELLING CHECKER 


FONTS DEMO 


ELECTRONIC BILLBOARD 


ML TUTORIAL PT.;2: 


COCO-MONITOR 


SNAKE CRAWLER 


SOUND DEVELOPMENT 


CLOWN DUNK MATH 


CAR CHASE 


SHOOT OUT 


COCO-ARTIST 


WAR CASTLE 


WORD GAME 


ALPHA MISSION 


SUPER MANSION ADVENTURE 


FIND UTILITY 


ROBOT COMMAND 


SKY FIRE 


SCREEN REVERSE 


60S ENHANCER 


SLOT MACHINE GIVE AWAY 


CVBOR& INS, 


T£ST SCREEN PRINT 


EASY BASIC 


AUTO COPY 


KNOCK OUT 


TEXT BUFFER 


CYBORG FACES 


HIGH RESOLUTION TEXT 


DOTS 3-D 


RAT ATTACK 


HAUNTED HOUSE 


TUNNEL RUN 






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Every Issue Contains 
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ISSUE #43, JAN. 1986 

DUELING CANNONS 
WATER COST 
ZIGMA EXPERIMENT 
MUSICAL CHORDS 
SAFE PASSAGE 
PASSWORD SCRAMBLER 
GUNFIGHT 
KEYPAD ENTRY 
STYX GAME 
PRINTER DIVERT 

ISSUE #44, FEB, 1986 

HOME INVENTORY 
NINE BALL 
PRINTER REVIEW 
EXPLORER ADVENTURE 
SPANISH LESSONS 
CROSSFIRE 
RAM SAVER 
GRAY LADY 
JOYSTICK INPUT 
COSMIC SWEEPER 

ISSUE #45, MAR. 1986 

.INCOME PROPERTY MGMT. 
ELECTRONIC BILLBOARD 2 
MOUNTAIN BATTLE 
THE FIGHT 
COCO KEENO 
HOCKEY 

LOGICAL PATTERNS 
ON SCALE SCREEN 
LIBERTY SHIP . 
SINGLE STEP t^N; 

ISSUE #46, APRIL 1986 

SPECIAL EVENTS REMINDER 
DISK LOCK 

SMALL BUSINESS MANAGER 

BOMB RUN 

TANKS 

TAR PITS 

BASEBALL 

NUMBER RELATIONSHIPS 
ROULETTE . 
GLOBAL EDITOR 

ISSUE #47, MAY 1986 

CHRISTMAS LIST 
BLACK HOLE 
PITCHING MANAGER 
SYMBOLIC DIFF, 
BUG SPRAY 
OWARE CAPTURE 
EASY GRAPHICS 
DESERT JOURNEY 
SCREEN CONTROL. . 
FULL ERROR MESSAGE 

ISSUE #48, JUNE 1986 

CHESTER 
TV SCHEDULE 
BASE RACE 
ROMAN NUMERALS 
ASTRO DODGE 
HIRED AND FIRED 
MULTI COPY 
AUTO MATE 
SCROLL PROJECT 
NOISE GENERATOR 

ISSUE #49, JULY 1986 

COMPUTER I.O.U. 
DISK DISASSEMBLER 
8AKCHEK 
PACHINKO 
STOCK CHARTING 
HAUNTED STAIRCASE 
CANYON BOMBERS 
DRAGONS 1 &2 
GRAPHIC SCROLL ROUTINE 
AUTO BORDER 



ISSUE tf5tl> AUG. 19IHi 

BUSINESS INVENTORY 
Dtp MEM 
DISK GLERK 
PC BWEY 
TREASURE HUNT 
SGflfcfiN GEAHiPATQR 
0.:;Tni] 5Mfl!^ 

ni. y:uncs 

Ui'JIN STDftMlNG 
SMASH GAME 

ISSUE #51, SEPT. IMS 

MONEY" CHASt 
l-IHHIMG DCiJTFSn 
Hll« OFF 
HAND OfF 
6UL6ET 5T 

wwgar 

COS EMULATOR 
MEM DISK 

VtfUARiE REFIjfifWE 

issut #sz s act. 

ACCOUNTS RECEtiABLE 
WORKMATE SERIES 
CALENDAR 
tf+VASION 

T!€ TRIP ADVENTURE 
FDDT RACE 
FUR? 1 ' TIIF 5EAL 
SCREEN CALCULATOR 
ABLE UUILlttRS 
SUPER E3VIQR2 

issue m, nov, nm 

COPE KILL 
LUCWV MONEY 

i:/:riH /in';i:NTi..n[ 

NICE Ll&t 
£P.«H QUIZZES 
PAINT EWTOR 
CARNEW CRUISER 
SNAP SHOT 
MEGA RACE 
KICK GUY 

issue m, dec. im 

J03 LOG 
i- : ;^ 

QIC3TAJ SAMPLING 

JUXGLE rtDYfcNI'IJft£ 
MINI LflCLl 3 
CONVERT 3 
■COMPUTER TYPE 
PAWZEft TAUKS 
MRE PAC 
HiG HUM- 

ISSUE #55, JAM. 1987 

GRADE BOM 

LIST 
MWN HILL 
FIRE FOK 
JETS CONTROL 
SALLOWS 
Dlfl MANAGER 
FlflR TiLINNFR 
GRAPHICS BORDER 
COSr&C HAYS 

IS&UE uM. FEB. 1937 

CA. FNPAR PRINT 

GflUSH. 
R4LACTA 

■>■■!: AN PIWR 
CUin SU5FFC1 

mnn edituii 

AL Di HLUJI 
EfcWTC S CA&T|,E 
MILIUflE DiiAW 
□iLi 



ISSUE *57, MAR. 1987 
THE BAKERY 

ENCHASED VALLEY ADV. 
SAFE KEEPER 
WW 1 

HOMP- WSARLH 
PHAKC PI.AVER 
fiPRE/J] SHEET 
£L!)I MANEUVER 
LIVING MrtZE 
SEW SEARCH 

ISSUE ^5B, APRIL 1987 

ACCOUNTS PiIYAHlE 
" : " Ml-: GRAPHICS 

man 

PANELING HELPER 
MULTI CAKES 
CAB CtACE 
ELECTRONICS I 
RATTIF TANK 
DISKETTE VERHY 
WEIRDO 

ISSUE #59, MAY 1987 

GENEOLOGY 

HOME PLANT SELECTION 

CHECK WRITER 

HELIRESCUE 

KABOOM 

NEW PONG 

CROQUET 

FUNCTION KEYS 

ZOOM 

ELECTRONICS 2 

ISSUE #60, JUNE 1987 

JOB COSTING 
LABELS 
CATCH A CAKE 
COCO MATCH 
ROBOTS 

STREET RACERS 
BOWLING 3 
ELECTRONICS 3 
GRAFIX 
KRON 

ISSUE #61, JULY 1987 

EZ ORDER 

SUBMISSION WRITER 
KEYS ADVENTURE 
WALLPAPER 
CHOPPER COMMAND 
UNDERSTANDING OPPOSITES 
BIT CODE PLOTTING 
ELECTRONICS 4 
KING PEOE 
RAIDER 

ISSUE #62, AUG. 1987 

PENSION MANAGEMENT 
HERB GROWING 
CATOLOGER UTILITY 
RAIDERS 
ALPHABETIZING 
U.F.CL 

ELECTRONICS 5 
RAMBO ADVENTURE 
BLOCKS 

MULTI SCREEN CAVES 

ISSUE SEPT. 1987 

GENEALOGIST HELPER 
SMART COPY 

MAINTENANCE REPORTING 

CTOsnra a mhipeh 
ninncusnv pilrkie 
sun atial*; 

SAVE THE MAIDEN 
■5 A VIATOR 
tUE^.T fWlllCS f> 
MLlNKtV S-iHINL 



ISSUE #64, OCT. 1987 

GARDEN PLANTS 
FORT KNOX 

ELECTRONICS FORMULAS 
SNAKE IN THE GRASS 
CYCLE JUMP 
GEOMETRY TUTOR 
WIZARO 
GAME OF LIFE 
ELECTRONICS 7 
FLIGHT SIMULATOR 

ISSUE #65, NOV. 1987 

TAXMAN 

DAISY WHEEL PICTURES 
CHILDSTONE ADVENTURE 
SIR EGGBERT 
CROWN QUEST 
GYM KHANA 
COCO 3 DRAWER 
FOOTBALL 
ELECTRONICS 8:; 
CHOP 

ISSUE #66, DEC. 1987 

ONE ROOM ADVENTURE 
OS9 TUTORIAL 
RIVER CAPTAIN 
SDUNO EFFECTS 
BETTING POOL 
ADVANCE 
MATH TABLES 
ELECTRONICS 9' 
LOWER TO UPPER 
NOIDS 

ISSUE #67, JAN. 1988 
AUDIO LIBRARY 
SAVE THE EARTH 
WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 
LOW RES PICTURES 
WORD COUNTER 
BACARAT 
BATTLE SHIP 
ELECTRONICS 10 
TAPE CONVENIENCE 
PENQUIN 

ISSUE #68, FEB. 1988 

COINFILE 
WORD COUNTER 
SQUIRREL ADVENTURE 
AREA CODES 
ORAW POKER 
TURTLE RACES 
ELECTRONICS 11 
MULTI SCREEN 
CANON PRINT 
COCO TENNIS 

ISSUE #69, MAR. 1988 
POLICE CADET 
STAMP COLLECTION 
BARRACKS ADVENTURE 
CITY/TIME 
HI-LO/CRAPS 
OLYMPICS 
HI-RES CHESS 
ELECTRONICS 12 
DOUBLE EDITOR 
DOUBLE BREAKOUT 

ISSUE #70, APRIL 1968 

BLOTTO DICE 
SUPER COM 
GENESIS ADVENTURE 
PLANETS 
PHK/WAR 
SIGN LANGUAGE 
ARX SHOOTOUT 
ELECTRONICS 13 
MAGIC KEY 
SNAP PRINT 



ISSUE *7t, MAY Ifl&fl 
SUPEH LOTTO 
ROBOT ADVENTURE 
MAZE 

VArfTZTC 3 
S-v.grjR 

SHAPES A PLATES 
STAB WARS 
TLECTIWNina 14 
WINTER CDNIRLIL 
MA^E 2 

ISSUE rr72 JUNE 19B6 

FLVING OBJECTS 

THREE STOOGES 

H05-TA5E 

PROGRAM TRKJ 

G-ADLA1DR 

lJJi £ LAN '.*JIZ 

JEOPARDY 

ELECTRONICS ft 

CCCO 3 PRINT 

CHV COMMltoCATGft 

ISSUE #TS, JULY tm 

fOrtlGN QB.ECT& 
CHESS FUnCaMENTALS 
WATERFOWL QUIZ 
WHAMMY 3 
USVEWTURF TUTORIAL 
C'^CLE 3 

EDUCATIONAL TR£ 
WRITE-W EDHDR 
PKTCJRF PACKrR 
AIK ATTACK. 

ISSUE #74, AUGUST 1SB5 
V-KD CATALOG 3 
ONE EYE WILLIE 
JAVA 

-LiAML TRID 
^fliOMUl flAUKKJR 
ENVELOPE PHIM 
RM1 DRIVE J 
MODE 2 UTHJTY 
JfMODEM THWfiFER 
CAVE II 

ISSUE *75. SEPT. 1DS0 

DRACULA :^T 
NTiLP T RI0 

WMwrn rxcr 

TARTAR 1 ADVENTURE 
AHAKHDN 

CASHFLOW HWm l?JG 
GRAPH LC LETTER 
GRAPHIC EDITOR 
ADDRESS BDCff 
SQuA>RES 

ISSUE Hie, ACT. 

Byl ! tR BLII2 3 
CHAWBfRS 
TRIO RACE 
EARTH TRD0PE8 
STAR&ATE 

EOViV ING SCORE KEEP 
JOYSTICK TO KrvnC'ARP 
K>"YH0ARD TO JOYSTICK 
DISK riJTDRini 
SAlLOHMftN 

ISSUE n-77, NOV, 1SSB 

pc.. inr cad[t u? 

STARSHiP SHOWDOWN 
MUSIC COMPOSER 
nODFONSi/REBATES 

n«:<7J?AH i in?TARV 
BC'Y 3D:)UT sema^dre 
HOUSEHOLD CHORES 
MAXOMAK ADVFNTlJRF 
CHUCK I UCh 3 
tlU. /Anij liAli 



issue m, dec. m& 

PZJJCE WOET ^3 
TANK TUPRET 
WAR Or THE WORLDS 
5FINSTER CAfp 
DXD SIS 

S£n maker 

LE£AL DEDUC1IQNS 
BOOKKEEPING 
CAR. LEAEE 3 
WAREHOUSE MUTAMS 

ISSU£ HW, JAN. \m 

POLICE CAEET ^ 
P^KER n 
TlLF.RTO 

FiArrLt 

INK-IDE T^£ POOO 
CflDL' L 

HOT DIRECTORY 
VCR TUTOPIAL 
PRINTER CONTROLLER- 
THE KING 

l&S-UE -UI . FEB, 1439 

iftFlABdLt 
EmLING CHECKER 
SAMiSlCNt 
FAMILY «UO 
HARNESS RACING 
MINI GOLF 3 
ULTIMATE TERMWAi. 3 
WETV^WK TUTORIAL 
~l IT -^FTVfflRK 
:MDNEYDTOLY 



"/ pat &y finr 

c4tv& fir & rrjtuu'/;- 
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CHARS' (74-) = "H1U2D2F1R2E1U7L2R 

CHARS (7 5) ="U4R1F4H4E4G4L1U4" 
260 CHARS (76)= "R4L4U8 " 
270 CHARS (77) «»U8F2E2D8 J ' 
28j3 CHARS (78) ="U8D1F4D3U8 " 
#|0C£MR$ (79)="R3E1U6H1L3G1D6FX« 
300 CHARS (80) =»U8R3F1D3G1L3 " 
I jj3 CHARS (81) = »R2F1H1R1E1U6H1L3G : 

320 CHARS (82 ) = " U8 R3 F 1 D3 G1L3 R2 F3 » 

3 30 CHARS (83 ) = s,, HlUlDlFlR3ElU2Hli. 

3H1U2E1R3F1D1" 

340 CHARS ( 84 ) ="BR2U8L2R4" 
350 CHARS ( 8 5 ) = " H1U 7 D7 F 1R2 E 1U7* 

360 CHARS .(86) ="BR2H2U6D6F2E2U6" 
: f7j|SCHAR$ (87)="U8D8E2F2U8" 
■S^/CHARS (88) ="U2E2H2U2D2F4D2U2H 

n 

3:90 CHARS (89)=" BR2U4H2U2 D2F2E2U2 

| CHARS (90)="R4L4U2E4U2L4 » 
#10 CHARS (48) ="H2U4E2R1F2G4E4D4G 
2 LI" 

4 2 0 CHARS (49) ="R2U8G2E2D8R2 " 
430 CHARS (50) ="R4L4U2E1R2E1U3H1L 
2G1" 

440 CHARS (51) ="H1F1R2E1U2H1L1R1E 
JU2H1L2G1" 

450 CHARS (52) ="U4L2U4D4R5L3U3" 

460 CHARS (53 )= ,, H1U1D1F1R2E1U2H1L 
13&4R4 " 

:; 470 CHARS ( 54 ) ="H1U2D2F1R2E1U2H1L 
2G1U4E1R2F1" 

480 CHARS (55) ="U2E4U2L4D1» 

490 CHARS (56) ="H1U2E1R2L2H1U2E1& 

2F1D2G1F1D2G1L2" 

500 X=0:Y=30 

510 CHAR$(57)="BU4R4L4U4R4D7G1L2 
HI" 

520 CHARS ( 63 ) ="BR2U1BU2U1R1E1U2H 
1L3G1D2" 

530 CHARS (46) ="R1U1L1D1" 

540 CHARS (44 ) =s"R1D2L1R1U2L1" 

550 CHARS (39) ="BR1BU5U2H1" 

560 CHARS ( 3 6 ) £ 1 • H IF 1R3 E IU2 H1L3H1U 

2E1R3F1H1L1U1D10" 

570 CHARS (42) = slf E5BD5H5 t, 

580 CHARS ( 6 1 ) »" BU2R5BU2L5R5 " 

590 CHAR$ (34) SS "BU6U2BR2D2" 

600 CHARS(47)=*"BU1E5" 

610 CHARS (33) ="BR1U1BU2U5" 

620 CHARS (45 ) ="BU3R3 ** 

630 X-128:Y=96 

640 GOTO 980 

.650 '** GETS INPUT AND DRAWS TEX 

TIN LINES 600-830 

660: B$=INKEY$ : IF B$=»" THEN 660 

670 IF B$=CHR$(12) THEN PMODE 4, 

1: SCREEN 1,1: GOTO 950 

680 IF ASC(B$)=64 THEN . SCALE=SCA 

LE+4:GOTO 660 

690 IF B$=CHR$(92) THEN PCLS5 
"700 IF SCALE>20 THEN SCALE=4 
710 IF B$=CHR$(92) THEN PCLS5:X= 
-8:Y=30 

;720 IF ASC (B$) =8 THEN GOTO 900 
530 N=ASC(B$) 

740 IF B$=CHR$ (13) THEN X*0:Y=Y+ 
SCALE*4:GOTO 660 

750 IF X> (255- (SCALE* 2) J THEN X« 

#iY«Y4(SCALE*4) 

^60 IF Y>192 THEN Y=192 

770 X$="BM"+STR$ (X) + " , "+STR$(Y) 
'^^■^^^^^g^ (SCALE) +"C"+STR$ ( 



C) +" ; " 

790 K$(K)=B$ 
800. A$=*X$+CHAR$(N) 
810 DRAW S$+A$ 
820 K=»K+1 

830 IF TRIG*1 THEN K=K-1 : C=2 : TRX 

G=0:X==X-(SCALE*2) 

840 X=X+(SCALE*2) 

850 D=2 

860 GOTO 660 

870 '** SETS UP SCREEN ^ODE^ 
880 PMODE 4,1: SCREEN ftjjg; 
890 RETURN 

900 « HANDLES BACKSPACE ROUTOSfe- 
WHEN GOING FROM A LINE TO LINE A 
BOVE, 

910 IF K<1 THEN K=0 :GOTO 660 

920 IF X<5 THEN X=INT ( 255/ (SCALE 

*2) ) *(SCALE*2) :Y=Y-(SCALE*4) 

930 K=K-1 : B$»K$ (K) : TRIG^l : C=5 : X=* 

X-(SCALE*2) :GOTO 680 

940 '** BEGINNING OF CODE TO POS 

ITION THE CURSOR 

950 IF PPOINT(X,Y)~2 THEN GO&^ 
90 

960 D$~INKEY$ 

970 IF PPOINT(X,Y)<>5 THEN GOTO 
1010 

980 PRESET (X,Y) 

990 FOR COl TO 50:NEXT 

1000 PSET(X,Y) 

1010 IF D$*="I" THEN GOTO 1160 
1020 IF D$«"S" THEN GOSUB 1220 
1030 IF D$="L" THEN GOSUB 1290 
1040 IF D$=CHR$(64) THEN SCALE=4 
: GOTO 660 

1050 IF D$*=CHR$(92) THEN PCLS5 
1060 IF D$~CHR$(72) THEN X=0 : Y=0 
1070 IF D$=CHR$(9) THEN X=X+INC: 
GOTO 960 

1080 IF D$=CHR$(8) THEN- X«X-INC 

1090 IF X>255 THEN X=0 

1100 IF X<0 THEN X=255 

1110 IF D$=CHR$(10) THEN Y=Y+INC 

1120 IF D$=CHR$(94) THEN Y=Y-INC 

1130 IF Y>192 THEN Y=192 

1140 IF Y<0 THEN Y«0 

1150 GOTO 950 

1160 C$=INKEY$:IF 0$="" THEN 116 
0 

1170 INC=VAL(C$) 

1180 IF INC<0 OR INC>9 THEN GOTO 
1160 

1190 IF INK=0 THEN INC=10 
1200 GOTO 950 

1210 '** ROUTINE TO SAVE A PICTU 
RE 

1220 CLS 

1230 PRINT §32*8+5, "PICTURE NAME 
> 11 ; 

1240 LINE INPUT PICNAME$ 

1250 SAVEM PICNAME$,&H0E00,&H25F 

F 1 0 » 

1260 PMODE 4,1: SCREEN 1,1 
1270 RETURN 

1280 '** ROUTINE TO LOAD A PICTU 
RE 

1290 CLS:PRINT 632*8+5 , "NAME OF 

PICTURE TO LOAD" 

1300 PRINT@32*9+10,"> "? 

1310 LINE INPUT PICNAMES 

.1320 LOADM PICNAMES 

13 30 PMODE 4,1: SCREEN l,* 

1340 RETURN 



24 THE RAINBOW May 1989 



VIP Writer III Ver. 2 #Cat. #90-908 

VIP Writer III offers screen widths of 32, 40, 64 & 80 - all with 24 lines and actual lower 
case letters using the CoCo 3's hardware display. It runs at double clock speed and has 4- 
color menus making VIP Writer IN FAST and EASY to use! You can choose foreground, 
background, hilite and cursor colors from up to 64 hues. Color can be turned ON or OFF 
for the best possible display using a monochrome monitor or TV set. VIP Writer III has a 
context sensitive help facility to display command usage in easy to read colored windows. 

CUSTOMIZER & PRINTER INSTALLER 

VIP Writer \\\ comes with a configuration / printer installation program which lets you 
customize VIP Writer III to suit your own liking. You can set screen width and colors as well 
as margins and more. You can also install your own printer and set interface type (serial, 
parallel or J&M), baud rate, line feeds, etc. Once done, you never have to enter these 
parameters again ! VIP Writer III will load n' go with your custom configuration every time! 

MORE TOTAL TEXT STORAGE 

VIP Writer III has 106K total text storage in a 128K CoCo 3 (495K in 51 2K). VIP Writer 
III creates ASCII text files which are compatible with all other VIP Programs as well as 
other programs which use ASCII files. You can use VIP Writer III to even type BASIC 
programs! There is a 48K text buffer (438K in a 51 2K CoCo 3) and disk file linking 
allowing virtually unlimited text space. VIP Writer III works with up to four disk drives and 
lets you display directories and free space as well as rename or kill disk files. In addition 
VIP Writer III is 100% compatible with the RGB Computer Systems Hard Disk. 

"In the beginning there was VIP Writer and users saw that it was 

good, But it's not the best anymore. There's a new word 
processor to claim the crown... " -RAINBOW SEPT. 1988 

POWERFUL EDITING FEATURES 

VIP Writer III has a full featured screen editor which can be used to edit text with lines up 
to 240 characters long with or without automatic word wrap around. You can select 
type-over mode or insert mode. There is even an OOPS command to recall a cleared text 
buffer. Other editing features include: Type-ahead • typamatic key repeat and key beep 
for flawless text entry • end of line bell • full four way cursor control with scrolling • top 
of textfile • bottom of textfile • page up • page down • top of screen • bottom of screen • 
beginning of line • end of line • left one word • right one word • DELETE character, to 
beginning or end of line, word to the left or right, or entire line • INSERT character or line 
• LOCATE and/or CHANGE or DELETE single or multiple occurrence using wildcards • 
BLOCK copy, move or delete with up to TEN simultaneous block manipulations • TAB key 
and programmable tab stops • word count • line restore • three PROGRAMMABLE 
FUNCTIONS to perform tasks such as auto column creation and multiple copy printing. 

Writer III or Library /W owners: Upgrade to the VIP Writer III 2.0 
for $1 0 + $3 S/H. Send ORIGINAL disk and $1 3 total. 



"VIP Writer III, Version 2, has almost every conceivable feature 
one could ask for... you'll find VIP Writer's 125 page tutorial a 

real prize and professionally packaged. VIP Writer III ...way 
ahead of whatever sin second place." -RAINBOW APRIL'89 



VIP Writer owners: Upgrade to the Writer ill 2.0 for $49.95 + $3 
S/H. Send original disk and $52.95 total. 



AUTOMATIC TEXT FORMATTING 

VIP Writer III automatically formats your text for you or allows you to format your text in 
any way you wish. You can chanqe the top, bottom, left or right margin and page length. 
You can set your text flush left, center or flush right. You can turn right hand 
justification on or off. You can have headers, footers, page numbers and TWO auxiliary 
lines which can appear on odd, even or all pages. You can also select the line on which they 
appear! You can even change the line spacing! Parameters can be altered ANYWHERE ! 

PREVIEW PRINT FORMAT WINDOW 

VIP Writer III features an exclusive format window which allows you to preview your 
document BEFORE PRINTING IT! You are able to move up, down, left and right to see 
centered and justified text, margins, page breaks, broken paragraphs, orphan lines etc. 

PRINTING VERSATILITY 

VIP Writer III prints TWICE as fast as any other CoCo word processor! It supports most 
serial or parallel printers using J&M JFD-CP or Rainbow interface and gives you the 
ability to select baud rates from 110 to 19,200. You can imbed printer control codes 
anywhere in your text file EVEN WITHIN JUSTIFIED TEXT! VIP Writer III also has 
TWENTY programmable printer macros which allow you to easily control all of your 
printers capabilities such as bold, underline, italics and superscript using simple key 
strokes. Other features include: multiple copy printing • single sheet pause • line feeds. 

BUILT IN PRINT SPOOLING 

VIP Writer III has a print spooler with a 57,000 character buffer which allows you to print 
one document WHILE you are editing another. You don't have to wait until your printer is 
done before starting another job! Some word processors DO NOT include this feature! 

50,000 WORD SPELLING CHECKER 

VIP Writer III includes VIP Speller (not FREEWARE) to check your text for misspelled 
words It has a 50,000 (not 20,000) word dictionary that can be added to or edited 

QUALITY DOCUMENTATION 

VIP Writer 111 comes with a well written 125 page manual which is Laser printed, not dot- 
matrix like the competition. It includes a tutorial, glossary of terms and examples for the 
beginner as well as a complete index! VIP Writer III is truly the BEST you can buy. 

VIP Writer III includes VIP Speller 1.1. DISK $79.95 



VIP Database III #Cat. #90-915 

VIP Database III features selectable screen displays of 40, 64 or 80 characters by 24 
lines with choice of 64 foreground, background, hilite and cursor colors for EASY DATA 
ENTRY. It uses the CoCo 3's hardware screen and double clock speed to be the 
FASTEST database available! VIP Database III will handle as many records as will fit on 
your disks and is structured in a simple and easy to understand menu system with full 
prompting for easy operation. Your data is stored in records of your own design. All files 
are fully indexed for speed and efficiency. IN-MEMORY SORT of records is LIGHTNING 
FAST and provides for easy listing of names, figures, addresses, etc., in ascending or 
descending alphabetical or numeric order. Records can be searched for specific entries 
using multiple search criteria. The built-in mail-merge lets you sort and print mailing lists, 
print form letters, address envelopes - the list is endless. The built-in MATH PACKAGE 
even performs arithmetic operations and updates other fields. VIP Database III also has a 
print spooler and report generator which uses print forms you create. DISK $69.95 

VIP Database owners: Upgrade to the VIP Database III for 
$39.95 + $3 S/H, Send ORIGINAL disk and $42,95 total. 

VIP Library /WDCE 

The VIP Library /WDCE (Writer Database Calc Enhanced) combines all six popular VIP 
application programs - VIP Writer III, Database III, Calc 111, Speller, Terminal and Disk- 
ZAP - into one integrated program on one disk called VIP Desktop. DISK $179.95 

For VIP Library shipping please add $4 USA. $5 Canada. $10 Foreign. 

VIP Library owners: Upgrade to the VIP Library /WDCE for $99.95 
+ $3 S/H. Send ORIGINAL disk and $102.95 total. 

VIP Library A/VDE owners: Upgrade to the VIP Library /WDCE for 
$10+ $3 S/H. Send ORIGINAL disk and $13 total. 



SID lEoattcBiripirSscBS 

©(503) 663-2865 ^POB 1233 Gresham. OR 97030 

We accept VISA / MASTERCARD and C.O.D. orders by phone. 

Non VIP Library- orders add $3 for shipping and handling in USA. Canada $4. Foreign 

$6. COD orders add an additional $2.75. Checks allow 3 weeks for delivery. 

#• Available through your nearby Radio Shack Computer Center® 

and participating Radio Shack stores and dealers - or order 

direct from Express Order SM by dialing 1-800-321-3133. 



VIP CalC lH *Cat. #90-916 

FAST 4-color POPUP menus • PRINT SPOOLER 
32, 40, 64 and 80 Column HARDWARE display! 

Runs VERY VERY FAST at double clock speed! 

Now every CoCo 3 owner has access to a calculating and planning tool better 
than VisiCalc™, containing ail its features and commands and then some. VIP 
Calc Hi allows a large worksheet with up to 512 columns by 1024 rows! In 
addition, VIP Calc III has up to 16 windows which allow you to compare and 
contrast results of changes. Other features include 8 AND 16 digit precision • 
trig, functions • averaging • algebraic functions • column and row ascending and 
descending SORTS • locate formulas or titles in cells • block move and replicate 
• global or local column width • limitless programmable functions • create BAR 
charts. Embed printer control codes for customized printing. Combine 
spreadsheet data with VIP Writer documents to create ledgers, projections, 
statistical & financial budgets aid reports. DISK $69.95 

VIP Calc owners: Upgrade to the VIP Calc ill for $29.95 + $3 S/H, I 

Send original disk and $32.95 total. [ 

Buy RGB-DOS for $29.95, 

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BASIC as well as OS-9. RGB-DOS works with CoCo 1, 2 and 3 and 
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I F e atur e 



CoCo 3 




A space shuttle simulation that lets you be the pilot 



Lunar . 
Lander 



• By Jeff Donze 



m 



* 





A 



s remote pilot, it is your job to land the 
unmanned lunar landers at designated 
landing sites. The company that has 
hired you is counting on you to land its 
expensive ships safely on the surface of the 
moon. The valuable payloads these ships carry 
are in your hands. If any cargo is lost or 
damaged, you will be fired by the shipping 
company. For each successful landing, how- 
ever, you will be paid based on the landing site 
and the type of cargo on board. After landing 
at the five different sites, you will be promoted 
to a higher cargo class. You then return to the 
first site, but this time with a heavier load. 
Remember, heavier loads increase fuel con- 
sumption, but they also increase pay. Good 
luck! This is Lunar Lander. 

The program runs on any 128K Color 
Computer 3. All you need to run it is a disk- 
or cassette-based system and a joystick. Any 
joystick will do, but Tandy's deluxe joystick 
works best because it is self-centering. The 
program can also be set to work whether you 



Jeff Donze is an eighteen-year-old college 
student who, besides programming, enjoys 
playing the guitar and skiing. 



28 



THE RAINBOW May 1989 



Telewriter-128 

the Color Computer 3 Word Processor 



TELEWRITER: UNDISPUTED #1 



If you've read the other word processor ads, 
you've probably had your fill of cold lists of 
features, and claims of ultimate speed, power, 
and ease of use. So let's try to get past the 
overblown claims and empty buzz words— with 2 
simple facts: 

Fact I: Telewriter is undisputedly the #1 most 
popular word processor on the Tandy Color 
Computers. 

Fact 2: Telewriter's exemplary ease of use and 
power have been acclaimed in numerous maga- 
zine reviews and in thousands of letters and calls 
from end users. 



THE OTHERS DON'T UNDERSTAND 



So why has Telewriter gained such a large and 
loyal following, while other Color Computer 
word processors have come and gone? Ironically, 
our competitors' ads tell you exactly why. 

For them, word processing is nothing more than 
features and numbers. The longer the list of 
features, and the bigger the numbers, the better 
the word processor. Or so they think. 

They just don't understand that power and ease of 
use are not gained by tacking on random features 
or throwing in freebie utilities or forcing you to 
use a cumbersome mouse. 

Real Power, true Ease of Use, and genuine Speed 
can only be attained through thoughtful, logical, 
intelligent design, attention to detail, and a com- 
mitment to the act and the art of writing. That's 
the Telewriter tradition, and that's the reason for 
Telewriter's phenomenal success. 



TELEWRITER-128: INTELLIGENT 
DESIGN PERFECTED 



And now, Telewriter-128, the latest Telewriter, 
uses the added hardware power of the Color 
Computer 3 to bring this intelligent design to its 
logical perfection. 

Telewriter-128 adds unsurpassed speed and 
important new features to the already impressive 
arsenal of Telewriter-64. Not just speed for 
speed's sake, or features for the sake of 
advertising— but speed where it counts and fea- 
tures that make you a more efficient, more effec- 
tive writer. 

Rainbow magazine put it this way: "Tele- 
writer-128 will set the word processing standard 
for the Color Computer 3 because it is so simple 
and user friendly. . . . The 81-page tutorial/user's 
manual is nicely done. It is written in easy to 
understand language but the program itself is so 
easy. . . . Most people will be able to use the 
software right out of the package." 



TELEWRITER-128 OR DESKTOP 
PUBLISHING 



Desktop publishing is nice for adding pictures 
and fancy fonts to newsletters or business 
presentations— but its graphics orientation sacri- 
fices some important capabilities when it comes to 
working with words. 

If your main concern is expressing ideas through 
words (notes, letters, reports, papers, novels, 
etc.), the dedicated word processing power of 
Telewriter-128 still provides the most efficient tool 
for the job. Each tool has its place— desktop 
publishing for striking visuals, Telewriter-128, for 
effective writing. 



TELEWRITER-128 OR TELEWRITER-64 



You can no longer afford to be without the ease, 
power, and efficiency, that Telewriter brings to 
everything you write. 



Telewriter-128 for the Color Computer 3 costs 
$79.95 on disk, $69.95 on cassette. 

For the Color Computer 1&2, Telewriter-64 costs 
$59.95 on disk, $49.95 on cassette. 

To order by MasterCard or Visa, 

call (619) 755-1258 anytime, or send check to: 

COGNITEC 

704 Nob Avenue 
Del Mar, CA 92014 

(Add $2 S&H. Califomians add 6% tax. To upgrade 
from TW-64 to TW-128 send original TW-64 disk and 
$41.95.) 

Telewriter is also available through your nearby 
Radio Shack Computer Center and participating 
Radio Shack stores and dealers— or order direct 
from Express Order by dialing 1-800-321-3133. 

Ask for: Telewriter-128 (disk) ... cat #90-0909 
Telewriter-64 (disk) .... cat #90-0254 
Telewriter-64 (cass) cat #90-0253 



FEATURES THAT MATTER: Telewriter's out- 
standing design and its complete set of features, put 
it in a class by itself, for smooth, efficient writing 
and letter perfect printed documents. Telewriter-128 
includes: 

Unbeatable SCREEN PERFORMANCE: lightning 
fast paging and scrolling, on-screen text that never 
lags behind your typing, and a response that is 
always instantaneous, no matter how much text is in 
the buffer, or where you are in the document. 

26 User definable MACRO KEYS type your often 
used phrases and titles with a single keypress— saving 
you time and freeing your concentration for writing. 
User settable DUAL SPEED CURSOR moves you 
anywhere on the line, on the page, or in the docu- 
ment, fast or slow— you decide, with the touch of a 
finger. Fast PRINT PREVIEW MODE shows you 
text as it will print: headers, footers, margins, page 
breaks, page numbers, justification— saves time and 
paper and guarantees perfect looking documents 
every time. 

Instant, ON-LINE HELP summarizes all Tele- 
writer-128 commands and special symbols. The On- 
line OPTIONS MENU lets you instantly customize 
the writing environment at any time to suit your 
precise needs (Screen/character color, Monochrome 
on/off, Key repeat/delay rate, 2 Cursor repeat/delay 
rates, Case-sensitivity of search, Auto file backup 
on/off, and more). A SINGLE FUNCTION KEY 
takes you instantly to any menu, so you never have 
to stop and think. 

The 24, 25 or 28 LINE SCREEN DISPLAY option 
lets you see 16% more on-screen text (28), or wider 
line spacing (25). The auto-loading OPTIONS FILE 
stores all your Macros, Print Format settings, and 
Options Menu settings, so they are always there 
everytime you run Telewriter-128. 3 pop-up STATUS 
WINDOWS tell you cursor position, word count, 



free space, etc. 

The QUICK SAVE feature lets you instantly save 
your current document with just 2 keystrokes and 
without leaving the editor. CURSOR THROUGH 
DIRECTORY to Load, Append, Rename and Kill 
files— so you'll never type a filename after the first 
time. HANGING INDENTS help you organize ideas 
on the page more effectively. Also: Footers, Multiple 
Print, Print to Disk, Key Click, Key Repeat, 40/80 
Column Option, Overstrike, Word Delete, Nested 
Macros, Definable Foreign and Math Symbols and 
more. . . . 

And, of course, Telewriter-128 incorporates all the 
Features of TELEWRITER-64, like: Works with 
absolutely any printer that works with your Color 
Computer (1, 2, or 3). Uses simple Embedded Con- 
trol Codes so all intelligent features of your printer 
are easily accessed, including: Underlining, 
Boldface, variable Fonts, Sub-script, Super-script, 
Italics etc. 

Format commands allow dynamically changing 
Margins, Headers, Spacing, Centering, etc., any- 
where in the document. Format menu sets Margins, 
Spacing, Page numbering, Baud rate, Lines per 
page, Justification. Chain Printing means the size of 
your printed document is unlimited. Also Single 
page and Partial Print. 

Fast full-screen editor with wordwrap, text align- 
ment, block copy/move/delete, global search and 
replace, wild card search, fast 4-way auto-repeat 
cursor, fast scrolling, forward and backward paging, 
settable tabs, word and line counter, full error pro- 
tection. Insert or delete anywhere on screen. Simple, 
easy to remember, "mnemonic" Editor Commands. 
Load, Save, Append, Partial Save files to disk or 
cassette. Kill, rename and list disk files. ASCII file 
compatibility. 



are using a TV or an RGB monitor. 
Before starting, read the appropriate 
section below on loading. 

Tape Owners 

As I explain how to save, load and 
modify this program, I will assume you 
have read chapters 13 and 14 in your 
Color Computer 3 Extended BASIC 
manual. You need to know how to 

CLOAD, CSflVE, SKIPF and EDIT. 

If you will be typing in these pro- 
grams, you should have an extra tape 
handy to make backup saves. I'll refer 
to this second tape as the backup tape 
and the other as the main tape. If you 
don't subscribe to RAINBOW ON TAPE, 
you will have to type in listings 1 and 
2 (landergg and lander) and remove 
any errors. Do not run them, but save 
them in order on the backup tape. If you 
have an RGB monitor, change CM$ to 
RB$ in Line 230 of LANDER. This tells the 
program that you have an RGB mon- 
itor. You are now done with the backup 
tape. Put it in a safe place and keep it 
in case something happens to the main 
tape. Next, rewind the main tape and 

type CLOAD "LANDERGG". Type SKIPF to 

skip past Listing 2, LANDER — this is 
important. Press Play and Record, then, 
type RUN. 

LANDERGG then saves two binary files 
containing graphics on the tape. It will 
take about 15 minutes to run and two 
minutes to save, but you only have to 
run it once. Rewind the tape and type 
CLOAD "LANDER" and then type RUN. 

Disk Owners 

Start by formatting a new disk using 
the D5KINI command. That is, put a 
blank disk in Drive 0 and type DSKINI0. 
Type in Listing 1, LANDERGG, and remove 
any errors. (Do not run it yet.) Edit lines 
980 and 1000; change C5RVEM to 5AVEM. 
Now save it on your new disk. If you 
have typed the program, you will want 
to save it on another disk as a backup. 
Next, type in Listing 2, LANDER. Change 
CLOADM in lines 70 and 80 to LOfiDM. If 
you have an RGB monitor, change CMS 
in Line 230 to RG$. This tells the pro- 
gram that you have an RGB monitor. 
Save it on the new disk. Again, if you 
have typed in this program be sure to 
save it on another disk with LANDERGG 
as a backup. Put the new disk back in 
the drive and load and run LANDERGG. 
This is the graphics generator; it saves 
two binary files containing graphics to 
the disk. It will take about 15 minutes 
to run, but it only has to be run once. 
All you have to do now is type 

RUN"LANDER". 



After you run LANDER, the program 
loads the two binary files. Disk systems 
load in only a few seconds, but tapes 
take about two minutes to load. The 
screen clears to black before you see the 
title screen. Press the joystick button 
and there is a short paragraph much like 
one at the start of this article. Press the 
button again to start the game. 




"A s a remote pilot, it 
is your job to land 
the unmanned lunar 

landers at 
designated landing 
sites. " 




The screen clears to black for about 
10 seconds while the computer draws 
the first landing site. If your joystick is 
not self-centering, push it slightly to- 
ward the middle. If it is down too far 
the ship's jet comes on, and it will go too 
high, ending the game. At the top of the 
game screen the computer shows the 
Landing Site number and the Cargo 
Class number. On the right side of the 
screen is a red bar, the Fuel Level 
indicator. At this point, you should see 
the craft floating across the top of the 
screen under the words "Landing Site." 
Now is a good time to practice control- 
ling the ship's angle by moving the stick 
horizontally, that is, to the left and 
right. 

Notice that the joystick does not 
work like an Atari. If you move it to the 
far left, the ship's jet points all the way 
to the left. It works the same to the right, 
but if you put the stick in the middle, 
the ship's jet points down. Move the 
stick slightly to one side, and the ship 
will turn to that side proportionally. 
Pulling the stick down controls the 
ship's engine. 

When the game starts the ship is in 
orbit, and you must slow it down to 
make it fall. To do this, wait until the 
ship is on the left half of the screen and 
pull the joystick all the way to the 
bottom-right. Stop thrusting when you 
see that the ship is falling. Now the rest 
is maneuvering. Try to get the ship so 
it is slowly falling straight down directly 
over the landing pad. While guiding 
your ship use less thrust than you think 



you need. Using too much thrust causes 
the ship to shoot off too fast. 

You can only land the ship on the 
landing pad shown. The landing pad is 
the gray and maroon rectangle. To land 
successfully, the ship must be all the way 
on the pad, not hanging off one side. 
The ship must also be level. If the ship 
touches while it is tilted at all it will 
crash. Finally, the ship must go very 
slow. Almost any left to right motion 
will cause a crash. Accidents will also 
occur if the ship is descending too fast 
when it touches down. 

If you have a centering joystick like 
Tandy's, you may want to set the cen- 
tering controls on the bottom to X-Free 
and Y-Centering. This way the stick 
moves freely from left to right, but 
snaps back if you pull it down. If you 
are using a cassette you should know 
that pressing the Reset button will 
destroy some of the graphics, and the 
program will try to reload the two 
graphics files. If you do press the Reset 
button be sure and rewind the tape 
before running the program. 

For those of you who have some 
experience programing on the CoCo 3, 
there are two parts of this program. The 
first part changes one of the HPUT 
options to allow you to XOR graphics to 
the screen. The second doubles the 
buffer space used for HPUT and HGET. 

The first change is simple. It changes 
the NOT option for HPUT to XOR. XOR is 
used to save time by making the pro- 
gram run faster. When you put a picture 
on the screen using XOR, you can erase 
it by putting the same picture using XOR 
again. One disadvantage is that the 
background for the picture and the 
screen must be zero, or the picture's 
colors will not be correct. 

This second change is more compli- 
cated. I would not reccomend it for 
beginners. However, if you have expe- 
rience with CoCo 3 graphics you might 
like to expand the Hi-Res GET/PUT 
buffer. Doing so allows you to have a 
greater variety of graphics in your 
program. The book tells us that we have 
7932 bytes to use for graphics storage. 
If you look at the memory map on Page 
311 you will see Hi- Res GET/PUT buffer 
memory. A few lines down you will see 
an area marked "Unused" by BASIC. 
These two areas are the same size. If we 
tell it to, we can have the CoCo use the 
unused area as a secondary buffer. The 
number that tells the CoCo what me- 
mory to use for buffers is at SE0D4. The 
dollar sign means hexadecimal; you can 
use hex in BASIC by replacing $ with &H. 
The normal value at this location is $34. 



30 



THE RAINBOW May 1989 




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The number for the secondary buffer is 
$37. To select the secondary buffer use 
this command: 

POKE &HE0D4,&H37 

To go back to the normal buffer use: 

POKE &HE0D4,&H34 

Whichever buffer you select will be used 
for HBUFF, HGET and HPUT. To trick the 
CoCo into using the secondary buffer 
you must mark it as free. To do this use: 

LPOKE &H6E000,2SS:LPOKE &H6E001, 
255 

You can also mark the normal buffer 
free with: 

LPOKE &HGB000,255:LPOKE &HG8001, 
255 



When designing your own program 
using this technique you should keep 
the following things in mind. At the 
start of your program mark both 
buffers as free. This will eliminate 
redefining errors. Select one of the 
buffers and do all the HBUFF's for that 
buffer. Then select the other buffer, and 
do the HBUFF's for that buffer. As long 
as you always use the same buffer sizes, 
the graphics in the buffer will not be 
affected. With all the buffers defined 
with HBUFF, you can now GET and PUT 
graphics to or from either buffer space 
depending on which one you select. 
Avoid pressing the Reset button. This 
destroys some of the graphics in the 
normal buffer space. If your program 
only puts graphics on the screen, you 
may want to divide the program into 
two parts. The first part draws graphics 
and HGET's them, the second part uses 
the graphics from the first part. 



This is the way Lunar Lander works. 
Redefine buffers with HBUFF at the start 
of each part. This way you only need to 
run the first part once. CoCos with 
512K can also use numbers from 0 to 
$2F for even more buffer space. Re- 
member, each area must be marked free 
and needs its own hbuff's. To save the 
graphics buffers, examine lines 880 
through 1020 of LRNDERGG, and to load, 
look at lines 70 and 80 of LfiNDER. When 
saving and loading, the poke to SFFA2 
intrudes on BASIC'S memory. To be safe, 
always load and save in the first few 
lines, and always type POKE &HFFA2, 
&H3A before going on to the rest of the 
program. If you don't, some of your 
program will disappear. 

(Questions or comments concerning 
this article may be directed to the author 
at 7341 Holly Park Drive, Concord, OH 
44060. Please include an SASE when 
requesting a reply). □ 



Editor's Note: For your convenience, the two 
binary files generated by Listing 1, LANDERGG, are 
included on both RAINBOW ON TAPE and DISK. To 
execute the program, simply load and run LANDER. 




210 ... 


...254 


360 .. . 


...202 


540 


85 


730 .. . 


...139 


910 


139 


END 


....42 



Listing 1: LflNDERGG 

0 1 COPYRIGHT 1989 FALSOFT, INC 

TnJ I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 
III I I I 

20 * Lunar Lander Graphics Gener 
ator • 

30 • By: Jeff Donze 



40 



Copyright 1988 



5jg i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i 
i i i • i i 

60 ON BRK GOTO 1020 

70 POKE 65497,0 

80 HSCREEN 2 

90 R=RND (-98765) 

100 POKE &HE0D4, &H34 

110 PI=3. 14159 

120 DEF FNR(X)=X/57,29577951 
13J3 DEF FNS(X)=ATN(X/SQR(-X*X+1) 

) 



140 DEF FNE(X)=INT(X/2) *2 

150 YO=15:XO=40:AO=-90 

160 FOR AN=0 TO 10:AO=AO+15 

170 YL=200:XL=200: RESTORE: HBUFF 

AN+1,684 

180 READ A$MF A$="*" THEN 450 
190 IF A$="C" THEN READ C:HCOLOR 

C:GOTO 180 
200 IF A$="L" THEN READ XI, Yl:GO 
SUB 10 30: READ X2,Y2:GOSUB 1040 :H 
LINE (XI , Yl) - (X2 , Y2 ) , PSET ELSE 2 3 
0 

210 IF X2<XL THEN XL=X2 

2 20 IF Y2<YL THEN YL=Y2 

2 30 IF A$="P" THEN READ X1,Y1,PC 

,BC:GOSUB 1030:HPAINT(X1,Y1) ,PC, 

BC 

240 IF A$="-" THEN READ Xl,Yl:GO 
SUB 1030:HLINE-(X1,Y1) , PSET 
250 IF XKXL THEN XL=X1 
2 60 IF YKYL THEN YL=Y1 

2 70 GOTO 180 

280 DATA C, 1,L,0, 13 , 3, 6,L, 1, 10,9 
, 11 , L , 9 , 13 , 9,7,L,9, 8,14,8 
290 DATA L, 13, 4, 15, 13, L, 13, 4, 11, 
4, -,11, 5, -,13, 5 

300 DATA L, 8, 4, 8, 5, -,9,5, -,9,4, - 
,8,4 

310 DATA L, 10, 3, 10, 2, -,8,2, -,8,1 

320 DATA ' L,' 6,1 ,5,1, 5,0, -,4,0 

3 30 DATA C,2,L,11,13, 10,12,L,8,6 
, 9 , 6 , - , 10 , 5, -,10, 4, -,9,3, -,8,3 
340 DATA C, 3, L, 5, 10, 8, 10, L, 3, 9, 8 
, 9 , L, 3 , 8 , 8, 8, L, 4, 7, 8, 7, L, 4, 6,7,6 
3 50 DATA L, 4, 5,7, 5, L , 4,4, 7 , 4 , L , 4 
, 3, 7, 3, L, 4, 2, 7, 2, L, 4, 1,4,1 

360 DATA L, 8, 13, 5, 13, -,6,12,-, 8, 



32 THE RAINBOW May 1989 



Frank Hogg Laboratory 



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VISA and M/C, check and C.O.D. 
Contential U.S. software shipping add 
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Fax 315/474-8225 



Call 315/474-7856 



12,L,10,13,10»,13.C,4 

370 DATA 11,13,3,11, 3, -,11, 2,-, 12 
2 - 12 3 

380 DATA L,10 7 ll,10,9,-,13,9,-,1 
3, 10, -,10,10 

3 90 DATA C,8, L,6, 14,4 , 16, -,4,20, 
-,8,32, -,12, 20, -,12, 16, -,10, 14,- 

,6,14 . 

400 DATA P, 8, 18, 8, 8 
4 10 DATA C , 9 ,L, 7,14 ,5, 16,-, 5, 20, 
-,8,28, -,11, 20, -,11, 16, -,9,14,-, 
7,14,P, 8, 18,9,9 

420 DATA C,10,L,8,14,6,16,-,6,19 
, -,8,25 ,,-,10, 19, -,10, 16,-, 8, 14, P 
,8,18,10,10 

430 DATA C, 11, L, 8, 15, 7, 16, -,7,19 
, - , 8 , 20 ,-,9,19,-, 9,16,-,8,15,P,8 
,18,11,11 

440 DATA L , 8 , 15 , 8, 20 , * 

450 HGET (FNE (XL) ,YL) - (FNE (XL) +35 

,YL+35) ,AN+1 

4 60 HCLS : NEXT AN 

470 ' Saturn 

480 HCLS 

490 POKE &HE0D4,&H37:LPOKE &H6E0 
00 , &HFF: LPOKE&H6E001 , &HFF 
500 HBUFF 1,1620 

510 C(1,1)=0:C(1,2)=7:C(2,1)=7:C 
(2, 2) =6 

520 FOR RA=PI/2 TO 3*PI/2 STEP P 
1/90 

530 IF RND(0)>.8 THEN HSET(100+C 
OS(RA) *19,100+SIN(RA) *17,7) 
540 NEXT RA 

550 FOR R-6 TO 19 STEP l.lJH-17 
560 F=(R-5)/7:W=INT(F) : F=F-W 
570 FOR RA=PI/2 TO 3* PI/ 2 STEP P 
1/90 

580 HSET (100-COS(RA) *R,100+SIN( 

RA)*H,C(W+1,1-(RND(0)<F) ) ) 

590 NEXT RA,R 

600 A=0:FOR R=34 TO 42 

610 HCIRCLE (100,100) ,R, 6, .14, .8 

5-A, .68 

620 A=A+.0015:NEXT R 

630 HCIRCLE ( 100 , 100) , R, 7 , . 15 , . 8 

5-A, .69 

640 HDRAW "C0BM82 , 95NR5DNR5DR5 " 
650 HGET (5:6, 82) -"(144, 117) ,1 
660 ' Mars 

670 HCLS: HBUFF 2,1800 

680 FOR RA=PI/2 TO 3* PI/ 2 STEP P 

1/90 

690 IF RND(0)>.7 THEN HSET(160+C 

OS(RA) *29,100+SIN(RA)*29 ; 7) 

700 NEXT RA: FOR R=2 TO 29 

710 F=R/15:W=INT(F) :F=F-W 

720 FOR RA=PI/2 TO 3*PI/2 STEP P 

1/110 

730 HSET (160-COS(RA) *R,100+SIN( 

RA) *29,C(W+I,1-(RND(0)<F) ) ) 

740 NEXT RA, R: HGET (130 , 70) - (188 



,129) ,2 

750 1 Earth 

7 60 HCLS: HBUFF 3,3200 

770 FOR C=3 TO 1 STEP -1 : READ D$ 

,E$,R1,R2 

780 HCIRCLE (300 , 100) , 41 , C : HDRAW 

"BM300 , 60XD$ ; BM300 , 140XE$ ; " 
790 HCIRCLE (285 , 90) , Rl , C , 1 . 1 : HP 
AINT (285,90) ,C,C 

800 HCIRCLE (270,111) ,R2,C, .9:HP 

AINT (270,111) ,C,C 

810 HPAINT (298, 65) ,C,C:HPAINT ( 

298,138) ,C,C:NEXT C 

820 HCIRCLE (300 , 100) , 41 , 0 

830 DATA "C3D18L15M-10,-4H4", "U2 

0L18M-10,+6" ,14,16 

840 DATA "C2D15L15M-8 / -3H2","U18 

L16M-ll,+6" , 12, 14 

850 DATA "C1D13L14M-8 , -5" , "U15L1 
5H-10,+5",10,12 

860 C(1,1)=0:C(1,2)=5:C(2,1)=5:C 
(2, 2) =4 

870 FOR RA=PI/2 TO 3*PI/2 STEP P 
1/45 

880 IF RND(0)>.65 THEN HSET(160+ 
COS(RA) *40, 100+SIN(RA) *40,6-RND( 
2)) 

890 NEXT RA:H=40:FOR R=0 TO 40 
900 F=R/41*2 :W=INT(F) :F=F-W:P=R/ 
40 

910 FOR RA=PI/2 TO 3*PI/2 STEP P 
1/127 

920 XO=COS (RA) *R:YO=SIN(RA) *H 
930 C=HPOINT(300+XO,100+YO) 
940 IF C=0 OR RND(0)>P OR RND (0) 
>(4-C)/3 THEN C=C(W+1,1-(RND(0)< 
F) ) ELSE C=l 

950 HSET (160-XO,100+YO,C) 

960 NEXT RA,R:HGET(120,60)-(198, 

139),3:POKE &HE0D4,&H34 

970 POKE &HFFA2,&H34:POKE 65496, 

0 

980 CSAVEM "LANDER1",&H4000 ; &H5F 
FF, &HA027 

990 POKE &HFFA2,£tH37 

1000 CSAVEM "LANDER2 " , &H4000 , &H5 

FFF,&HA027 

1010 CLS: PRINT" DONE." 

1020 POKE &HFFA2 , &H3A: POKE 65496 

,0:END 

1030 X2=X1:Y2=Y1:GOSUB1040:X1=X2 
:V1=Y2 : RETURN 

1040 X2=X2-8 :Y2=Y2-7 :R=SQR(X2*X2 
+Y2*Y2) 

1050 IF Y2<0 THEN A=FNS ( -X2/R) +P 
I: GOTO 1080 

1060 IF Y2>0 THEN A=FNS (X2/R) :GO 
TO 1080 

1070 IF X2>0 THEN A=FNR(90) ELSE 

IF X2<0 THEN A=FNR(270) 
1080 A=A+FNR (AO) : X2=XO+SIN (A) *R: 
Y2=YO+COS (A) *R: RETURN 



34 THE RAINBOW May 1989 




.222 1010 154 1820 

54 1170 161 1970 

, . .166 1320 177 2150 

1 1470 66 2300 

850 . , ... 45 1 650 , . 171 END 



,.30 
..74 
.161 
.31 
. 14 



300 FOR M=0 TO 3 : READ XT(N,M),YT 
(N f M) : NEXT M,N 



Listing 2: LRNDER 

10 
i 

2p 



I 
I 

40 
i 

50 



COPYRIGHT 1989 FALSOFT, INC 

I I I 1 I I I I I I I I I I I I ! 1 I I I I I I I I I I 



Lunar Lander 

By: Jeff Donze 

Copyright 1988 
i i t i t i i t i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i 



60 CLS:ON BRK GOTO 130: ON ERR GO 

TO 100 

7j0 POKE &HFFA2 , &H3 4 : CLOADM !, LANDE 
Rl" 

80 POKE &HFFA2 , &H3 7 : CLOADM M LANDE 
R2" 

90 POKE &HFFA2 , &H3 A : GOTO 140 

100 POKE &HFFA2,&H3A:CLOSE 

110 IF ERNO=2 6 THEN PRINT "FILE 

NOT FOUND IN" ; ERLIN : STOP 

120 PRINT "ERROR #";ERNO;" IN LI 

NE" ; ERLIN: STOP 

130 STOP 

140 CLEAR: ON BRK GOTO 150 
150 POKE 65497,0: POKE &HE0D4,&H3 
4:LPOKE &H68000 , 2 55 : LPOKE &H6800 
1, 255 

160 FOR N=l TO 11:HBUFF N,684:NE 
XT N 

170 DIM XO(10) ,YO(10) ,HT(10) ,VT( 
10) ,XT(10,3) ,YT(10,3) ,TC(4,3) ,C( 
15) ,M(5) 

180 PD$="C12U3RD2EURXPX$;XPX$;XP 

X$ ; XPX$ ; XPX$ ;XPX$ ; BLD2LGR2BR" 

190 PX$="C13G3RE3BRC12G3RE3BR" 

200 POKE &HEF0B , &HA8 

210 RG$="0063 5 60709083 604 3 65254 6 

336070700" 

2 20 CM$="00631632 1109070407383 66 
352161600" 

23 0 FOR N=0 TO 1 5 : C ( N ) = VAL ( MI D $ ( 
CM$, N*2+l, 2) ): PALETTE N,0:NEXT N 
240 HSCREEN 2 

2 50 FOR N=l TO 5: READ M (N) : NEXT 
N 

2 60 DATA 1,6,1,1,6 

270 FOR N=0 TO 4 : FOR M=0 TO 3 : RE 

AD TC(N,M) : NEXT M,N 

280 DATA 0,0,0,0,0,0,0,8,0,0,8,9 

,0,8,9,10,8,9,10,11 

290 FOR N=0 TO 10 : READ XO(N),YO( 

N) ,HT(N) ,VT(N) 



310 


DATA 


24, 6,-. 965, . 


298,- 


9, 


-7, 


6, 


-7, 7, 


3,-5,10 








320 


DATA 


22 ,7,-. 866, . 


500,- 


11/ 


-4, 


4, 


-8, 8, 


1,-2,10 








330 


DATA 


18, 8,-. 707, . 


707,- 


11, 


•-If 


2, 


"9, 8, 


-1, 1,11 








340 


DATA 


13, 8, -.500, . 


866,- 


11, 


- 2, 


0, 


-9, 7, 


-3, 3,10 








350 


DATA 


9, 8, -.298, . 


965,- 


11, 


- 4, 


-3, 


-9, 6, 


-5, 6, 9 








360 


DATA 


8, 7, +.000,1 


.00,- 


9 , 


. 7, 


"5, 


-8, 5, 


-6, 8, 7 








370 


DATA 


6, 6,+. 298, . 


965,- 


7, 


• 9/ 


-7, 


-6, 3, 


-7,10, 5 








380 


DATA 


7, 6, +.500, . 


866,- 


4 , 


,11, 


-8, 


-4, 1, 


-8,10, 3 








390 


DATA 


8, 6, +.707, . 


707,- 


1, 


,11, 


-9, 


-2,-1, 


-8,11,-1 








400 


DATA 


8, 6,+. 866, . 




2, 


,11, 


-9, 


0,-3, 


-7,10,-3 








410 


DATA 


8, 6,+. 965, . 


298, 


4 , 


,11, 


-9, 


3,-5, 


-6, 9,-6 








420 


1 Title Screen 








430 


ON BRK GOTO 4 40 








440 


POKE 


&HE0D4 , &H34 








4 50 


GOSUB 


1620:HCLS:R 


=RND( 


-123) : 



GOSUB 2350 

460 HCOLOR 1 : GOSUB 1450: GOSUB 16 
10 

470 FOR X=25 TO 280 STEP 8 

480 TN=INT(ABS (SIN(X/30) *4)+.5) : 

GOSUB 1430 

490 HPUT (X,85) -(X+34,120) ,3,OR 

500 FOR T=l TO 40 

510 IF BUTTON (0)=1 THEN 540 

520 NEXT T:HPUT (X, 85) - (X+34 , 120 

) ,3, OR 

530 NEXT X:GOTO 470 

540 HCOLOR 0: GOSUB 1450 

550 HPUT (X, 85) -(X+34,120) ,3, OR 

560 HCOLOR 1:HPRINT (14, 2), "Luna 

r Lander" 

570 HPRINT (5, 4), "As remote pilo 

t, it is your job" 

580 HPRINT (3, 5), "to land the un 

manned cargo ship at" 

590 HPRINT (3, 6), "the designated 

landing site. For" 
600 HPRINT (3,7), "each successfu 
1 landing you will" 
610 HPRINT (3,8), "be paid accord 
ing to the landing" 
620 HPRINT (3, 9), "site and the c 
argo class. You" 
630 HPRINT (3, 10), "will also be 
given a bonus for" 
640 HPRINT (3 , 11) , "conserved fue 
1. Every 5th landing" 
650 HPRINT (3, 12), "you will be p 
romoted to a higher" 



May 1989 THE RAINBOW 35 



660 HPRINT ( 3 , 13 ) , "cargo class w 

ith higher fuel 1 ' 

670 HPRINT ( 3 , 14 ), "consumption . 

Slow the ship by" 
680 HPRINT (3, 15) , "using a right 
ward thrust, and" 
690 HPRINT (3, 16), "it will drop 
from orbit • Use" 
700 HPRINT (3, 17) , "right joystic 
k. Pull down to" 
710 HPRINT (3,18) , "thrust, and a 
djust angle with left" 
720 HPRINT (3, 19), "and right pos 
itioning. Good luck!" 
730 HPRINT (9,22) , "Press button 
to start." 

740 IF BUTTON (0) =0 THEN 740 
750 1 New Game 
760 LV=0:CC=1:SC=0 
770 1 New Screen 

780 LV=LV+1:IF LV>5 THEN LV=1:IF 

CC<5 THEN CC=CC+1 
790 GOSUB 1490:HCOLOR 1: HPRINT ( 
2,0) , "Landing Site: "+STR$ (LV) 
800 HPRINT (22,0) , "Cargo Class:" 
+STR$ (CC) 

810 HV=3:W=0:G=.1:X=30:Y=30:HC= 
. 1 : VC= . 1 : FL=100 : FC=CC* . 1 : 0=1 : IH= 
HV 

820 PN=10 : TN=0 : GOSUB 1430:GOSUB 
1390: GOTO 860 
8 30 1 Main Loop 

840 GOSUB 1390: IF PN<PR THEN PN= 
PN+1 ELSE IF PN>PR THEN PN=PN-1 
850 HPUT (XD, YD)-(XD+34,YD+35) ,L 
N+1,0R 

860 LN=PN:XD=INT( (X-XO(PN) )/2) *2 
:YD=Y-Y0(PN) 

870 T=0:FOR N=0 TO 3:T=T OR HPOI 

NT ( X+XT ( PN , N ) , Y+ YT ( PN , N ) ) : NEXT N 

880 HPUT (XD,YD)-(XD+34,YD+35) ,P 

N+l, OR: GOSUB 1430 

890 GF=G: IF 0 THEN GF=G* (IH-HV) : 

IF HV<4 OR Y>3 4 THEN 0=0 

900 X=X+HV:Y=Y+W:HV=HV-HT(PN) *T 

N*HC:W=W+GF-VT(PN) *TN*VC 

910 IF 0 THEN IF X>290 THEN X=28 

920 F=FL-TN*FC : IF F<0 THEN F=0 

930 IF F<FL THEN HLINE ( 312 , 112-F 

L) - ( 3 17 , 112 -F) , PRESET , BF 

940 FL=F : IF T<12 THEN 840 

950 ' Touch Down 

960 HPUT (XD,YD)-(XD+34,YD+35) ,L 

N+1,0R:HC0L0R M(LV) 

970 IF Y<25 THEN 1150 ELSE IF T= 

15 AND (X<20 OR X>290) THEN 1240 

980 TA=HP0INT(X-8, Y+7) AND 14:TB 

=HP0INT(X-h7, Y+7) AND 14 

990 IF W<1 AND ABS(HV)<.2 AND P 

N=5 AND TA=12 AND TB=12 THEN 12 9 

0 

1000 TN=0: GOSUB 14 30: FOR N=l TO 



1010 HCIRCLE (X,Y) ,N*5,12-N:HCIR 
CLE (X, Y) ,N*5-5, 12-N 
1020 HPAINT (X, Y-N*5+3) , 12-N, 12- 
N: NEXT N 

1030 PLAY "01L255":FOR 0=1 TO 2 
1040 FOR M=l TO 4:TN=M:G0SUB 143 
0 : TN=M-1 : GOSUB 1430: PLAY "ABC":N 
EXT M 

1050 FOR M=4 TO 1 STEP-1 : TN=M-1 : 

GOSUB 1430 :TN=M: GOSUB 1430: PLAY 

"ABC": NEXT M,0 

1060 TN=0: GOSUB 14 30 

1070 HPRINT (4, 10), "You have era 

shed the ship! " 

1080 HPRINT (4,11) , "Being very d 

ispleased to see" 

1090 HPRINT (4,12) , "their expens 

ive ship destroyed," 

1100 HPRINT (4, 13), "the company 

has fired you. " 

1110 HPRINT (4,16) , "Career Earni 
ngs: $"+RIGHT$ (STR$ (SC) , LEN (STR$ 
(SC))-1) 

1120 PLAY "O2L10AGFGFEFL2C" 
1130 HPRINT (4,18) , "Press button 
to play again. " 

1140 FOR T=l TO 6000: IF BUTTON (0 
)=0 THEN NEXT: GOTO 450 ELSE 760 
1150 HPUT (XD, YD) - (XD+3 4 , YD+35) , 
LN+1,PSET 

1160 HPRINT (6, 7), "The ship has 

left the gravita-" 

1170 HPRINT (4,8) , "tional pull o 

f the moon, and you" 

1180 HPRINT (4, 9), "were not able 

to land it. The" 
1190 HPRINT (4, 10), "ship was los 
t in space forever." 
1200 HPRINT (6, 12), "Due to the 1 
oss of a costly" 

1210 HPRINT (4,13) , "craft and it 

s cargo, you were" 

1220 HPRINT (4, 14) , "dismissed fr 

om the company." 

1230 GOTO 1110 

1240 HPRINT (4, 7), "Your ship has 

drifted out of" 
1250 HPRINT (4, 8), "radio range, 
and you were unable" 
1260 HPRINT (4, 9), "to prevent it 
s destruction on" 
1270 HPRINT (4, 10), "the lunar su 
rface." 

1280 GOTO 1200 

1290 HPUT (XD, YD) -(XD+34, YD+13) , 
LN+1 

1300 LP=1000+500*LV+100*CC:FB=IN 

T( (FL) *10) :SC=SC+LP+FB 

1310 HPRINT (4, 6), "Great Landing 

1320 HPRINT (4,8) , "Landing Pay: 



36 



THE RAINBOW May 1989 



|*'*^p||ipSTR$ (LP) , LEN (STR$ (LP) ) 

~1 ) 

13.3/3 H PRINT (4, 10), "Fuel Consumt 
ion; "+STRS (INT ( 100-FL) ).+'»% Bonu 
s: $"+RIGHT$ (STR$ (FB) , LEN ( STR$ ( F 
B) ) -1) 

1340 HPRINT (4,12) , "Total Earnin 
gsi"^£i*RIGHT$ (STR$ (SC) , LEN (STR$ ( 

SC) )-l) :■■ ■ i\r , ,'. • ,' 

"1350 PLAY"03L12FGAGAB0+CP160-BP1 
60+L2C" • > $*§ iiij ;:-.'-.\;, \' V ; . 

136)3 HPRINT (4 , 14) , "Press button 

for next landing." 
1370 IF BUTTON (0 ) =0 THEN 1370 EL 

SE &^Z^yMiMMi rS^v$- " 

"1380 • Get Post ion and Thrust>'. 

1390 PR=INT(JOYSTK(0) *10/63) 
1|40J0- IF JOYSTK(l)>31 AND FL>0 TH 
EN TN=INT ( ( JOYSTK ( 1 ) -32) *5/32) E 
LSE TN=0 SSIS'S^^W 
1410 RETURN '^^^^^^j^M^. 

1420 ' Set Thrust Palette Colors 
14 30 FOR N=8 TO 11 : PALETTE N,C(T 
C(TN,N-8) ) :NEXTN: RETURN 

; &$i$M^Mit!e Message 
1450 HPRINT (14,4), "Lunar Lander 

Fl 

1460 HPRINT (13, 6), "By Jeff Don 

1470 HPRINT (14,18) , "Press butto 
n . " : RETURN 

1480 •' Draw Game Screen 

1490 GOSUB 1620:HCLS '".V- • K-'^'v. „•.„ 

1500 PALETTE 8,63:HCOLOR 8:HPRIN 

T (11,0), "One Moment Please." 

.1510 R=RND(-12349-LV) :GOSUB tilj0 

1520 POKE &HE0D4,&H37 ||| 

1530 ON LV GOSUB 1630,1760,1910, 

2040,2190 ' - - ''- "y-\- r ' 

1540 POKE &HE0D4,&H34 

1550 HCOLOR 15: HLINE (0,10) -(15, 

isi^ftiflf IF ''yi^f^-Z '. ' ■ •> 

1560 hline ( 3 00 , 10 ) - ( 3 1 

1570 HCOLOR 1: HLINE (311, 11) -(31 

8'-,;iT4)VPSKP,B ; • ISSTv Fv>; 

1580 HCOLOR 6: HLINE (312, 12) -(31 
7, 112) ,PSET,BF 

1590 '^^iil^ffii^ 

1600 HCOLOR 15: HLINE (0,J3)-(319, 
10),PSET,BF 

1610 FOR N=0 TO 15 : PALETTE N,C(N 

■pMW : - N : RETURN iift^l^'Cft > - 
1620 FOR N=0 TO 15 : PALETTE N,0:N 
EXT N: RETURN §S#l£l 
1630 SX=52:SY=92: GOSUB 23 90 J| 
1640 HDRAW "C14BM0 , 150R15E2RFDF2 
L2U2F2DRFDFDFDR2D3R3FD2F2R2FR2" 
1650 HDRAW "R4FR6FR8FR10ER4ER2EU 
ER2U2RDRE2R2DR2F2D2R2F2R2E2RE2" 
1660 HDRAW " RE 2 RE 2 UEUEU 2 EU 3 EU5 EU 
8E2RD3FR2FR3FR2FR3F2D2FDFR3F2R" 



Em, 



I ■ MM, ,. 



1670 HDRAW " FRFDFR2 FD2 R2 FR3 ER3 ER 
2ER3ER2E2RE2R2D2FRD2FDFDFR2ER2 " 
1680 HDRAW "E2R2E2R2FR2F2D2R2DFD 
FD2 FD3F2RFR2 FR3 FR4R3 0R4ER4 ER3E " 
2.690 HDRAW "R2ER2ERERE2R2ER2ER3E 
R4 FR3 FR2 F2RF2R2R40 " 
1700 HPAINT (0,191) ,14,14 
1710 HDRAW "C7BM0,174R15FR5FR4FR 
5FR6FR5 FR7 FR6FR8 FR9 FR8 FR7 FRFR5 " 
1720 HDRAW "ERER2ER4ER3ERE2UEU2E 
U3 EU4E2RER3 FRF2 DFDFD3 ERFDFRF2R" 
1730 HDRAW "FR3F2 UFRFR4 ER2E2 RER2 
ER3ER4ER6ER5FR8FR7FR8ER30FR5F2" 
1740 HDRAW "R2ER3 SR5EREUER2 FRFR3 
FR5FR6FR5 FR4 ERER3 ER5ER20 
1750 HPAINT (0,191) ,7,7: HDRAW l''® 
M2 19 , 17 8XPD$ ;": RETURN 
1760 SX=202 : SY=105 :GOSUB 2410 
1770 HDRAW "C14BM0 , 130R15E2RE2RE 
R2 R3 FRFDF2 D2 FD2R2 FDFRFR2 FR3 ER2 " 
1780 HDRAW "ER3ER2E2UEU2EU3EU2E2 
RERER2 ER3 FR3 F2D2R2DFD2FD3FD4F2 " 
1790 HDRAW "D4FD3FD2FD2FD3FD4FD3 
FD2 FD3 FD2 FDFRFR2 FR3FR2 5ERER2ER" 
1800 HDRAW " EREUEU 2 EU 3 EU 2 EU 3 EU4 E 
U5EU4EU3ERER2ER3ER2EU5EU6EU7EU" 
1810 HDRAW "EU3EUE2ERE2ER2D2R2F2 
D2F3D2F3R2 FR2F2RF2 RFRFR2 FR2FR3 •« 
1820 HDRAW " ER2 ERE 2 RE 2 RE 3 REUEU 2 E 
U3EU4EU5EU6ED3FD5DF4DF3DF4DF3D" 



lining 



••••••• 



COMPUTER ISLAND EDUCATIONAL SOFTWARE 

French Baseball $19.95 

Spanish Baseball 19.95 

Cocowheel of Fortune 

(for Coco3/RGB Monitor). 19.95 

Number Sequences 19.95 

Signed Numbers 19.95 

Area and Perimeter 19.95 

Context Clues Grade 2... 19.95 

Cocojot 16.95 



^^^^^^^^^ 

Add $1.00 postage, NY res. add tax 
VISA, MC - Send for free catalog 

rTTTTTTTT 1 1 1 I ' l ' l ' l ' l ' l HUUM WWWWI 1 111. llVi H ' l ' l I I I ' 1'IWI ..1 I J T^^^^^^^^I I I 1 1 1 1 I U I 



May 1 989 THE RAINBOW 37 



183J3 HDRAW " 



1840 HPAINT 
1850 HDRAW " 
RE4REF2RF2DF 
1860 HDRAW " 
FRF 2 DRFR2 FR3 
1870 HDRAW " 
E4 '. 
1880 HDRAW " 
2F2R3 

HDRAW " 



F3D2FD2FDF 2 RFR3 FR4FR 
FR3 FR4 FR5FR6R2 0 " 
,191) ,14,14 
BM0,168R15E3RE2RS3 
3DF2DF3RFR2 ERE 2 RE 2 " 
RER 2ER3FRFR2F2DF2DFD 
FR4FR45ER4ER3ER4ER" 
ER3ERE 2 RE 3 RE 4RE2RS3R 

ERE 3 RE 4 RE" 
RE 3 RE 2 R2ER2DFD4FD3FD 

FR4FR5FR3FR4F" 
R4FR5FR8FR6FR5FR7R20 



it 



HPAINT (J3 /191) , Wi 71 HDRAW " B 
M105, 18 4XPD$ ; 11 : RETURN 
19 10 SX=100 : SY=105 : GOSUB 2 4 30 
^9 20 HDRAW H C14BM0,140R15ER5ER4E 
R3 ER4ER2ER4ER3 ER2ERE2 E RER 2 ERE 2 M 
19 30 HDRAW » RE 2 RER2 ERER2ER3 ER4 FR 
F2RF3RF2RFDF2DFDFD3FD2F2RFR2 FR" 
1940 HDRAW "ERERE 2 RE 3 RE 2 RE 3 REUEU 
E 2UE 3UE2UEU2EU3EU2 R2FRF 2RF3 RF2" 
1950 HDRAW "RF2RF3RFDFD2FD6FD7FD 
8FD8R30EU2EU6EU6F2DFDF2DF3DFD2 M 
ff 9 60 HDRAW "FDF2DF3DF4DF2 DFRFR2F 
R3 FR4 FR2 FR3 ER3 ER2 ERER2 ERER2 E 2 R ,f 
1970 HDRAW "E3RE3RE2RER2ER3FR2FR 
F2RF3RF4RFR2FR3 0 M 
1980 HPAINT (0 , 191) , 14 , 14 
1990 HDRAW H G7 BM0 , 1 6 4R15E 3 RE 3 RE 3 
RE 2 RE3RE4RF2DF3DF2 DFRFR2 ERE2R2 ,f 
2000 HDRAW "ERE2RE3F2E2RE2F3DF2D 
F4DF2DF5DF4D2FDFRFR2FR3FR4FR5F ,f 
2010 HDRAW "R6ER4ER3ER5ER2ER4ER3 
ER2 ER3 ER5ER6FR5 FR4 FR2 FR4 FR5FR6 » 
2020 HDRAW » FR7 FR5 FR6FR4 FR6ER5ER 
4ER7ER4ER6ER4ER8ERER6F2R40" 
2030 HPAINT (0,191) f 7,7: HDRAW "B 
M170| 161XPD$;":RETURN 
2040 SX=2 50 : SY=105 : GOSUB 23 90 
2^50 HDRAW M C14BM0 , 165R15ER4F2R3 
FR2 ER2ER4ER3 ER2 ER2 ERERE 2 RE 3 RE 2 . » 
2,060 HDRAW 11 RE 3 RE 2 RE 3 RERE 2 RER2 ER 
3 ERE 2 RE RE 2 RE 2 FRF 2 FRF 2 RF 3 RF 2 RFR 11 
2070 HDRAW 11 F2 RF0FD3 FD4 FD 3 FD6 FD4 
FD7FR30EU5EU4EU6EUEU2EUEU3EU2E" 
2j380 HDRAW ,f U2EUEU2E2UEU2EU2E2F3 
DFDF2 DF3E 2 R2EREUEU 2 EUE 2UE3UE2U" 
2090 HDRAW "E3UE2UE3UE2UER2ERE3U 
E 4 RE 3UE2 F2DF2 DF3D FD2FD3FD2FD3F" 
2 100 HDRAW "DFD3FD2FRF2E3UE3UE2U 
E 3UE2 F D2F2DF3DF DF 2 DF DF 3 DF2 RF 3 R » 
2 110 HDRAW "F3RFR2ERE2RE 4 RE 3 RE 2 R 
E5R20" 

2120: HPAINT (0,191) ,14 ,14 
2130 HDRAW "C7BM0, 173R25ER5ER4ER 
5ER3ER2ER4ER5FR2FR3FR3FR2 FR2F2 ,f 
2140 HDRAW n RFRFR2 FRFR8 FRFRFR6 FR 
3 FR2R4 5ER4ER3 ER2ERER3 ER2ERERE2 " 
2150 HDRAW 11 RE2RERE 2 RERE 2 UE 2UE 3 U 
E2UEU2EU3EDFD2FDF2DF3DF4DF3 DF2 » 



2160 HDRAW "DF3E2RE3RE2RE4RE3RE2 
RERE2RERE2UE2F2 DF2DF3DF2DF4DF3 " 
2170 HDRAW "DF3DF2E4RE3RE2RE4RE3 
RE5RER2 0 " 

2180 HPAINT (0,191) ,7,7 : HDRAW" BM 

126,1 85XPD $ ; " : RETURN 

2:190 SX=85:SY=105: GOSUB 2410 

2200 HDRAW "C14BM0 , 140R15E2RE2RE 

2RE 2 F 2 R2 F 2 RF 2 RF 2 RFRFR2 FRFR2FR2 » 

2210 HDRAW " FR3FR4ER3 ER2 ERER2ERE 

2RE2UE2UE2UE2UE2F3DF3DF2DF2DF2" 

2 2 20 HDRAW "E2RE2RE3RE2F2RF2RF2E 

2 RE 2 RE 3 UE 2 UE 2 F 2 RF2RFRF2 RFR2 FR2" 

2230 HDRAW "ER2ERE2UE2UE2F2DF2DF 

2D2FD2FD2FD4F2DFD3G2D3FD 6GD3 F2 " . 

2240 HDRAW "CG2D4R30U2EU6HU2EU2H 

2UE2U4EU5EU3EU2E2UE2UE2U2EU2EU" 

2250 HDRAW "E2F2R2FDF2DF2DF3DFRF 

R2 ERE 2 RE 2 RE 3 RE 2 RE 3 RE 2 F2DF2DF3D" 

2260 HDRAW "F2E2UE2UE3F2 RF 2 DF2 E 3 

RE3RE3RE3RE3RE3R20 " 

2270 HPAINT (0 , 191) , 14 , 14 

2280 HDRAW "C7BM0 , 165R15F2RF2RF2 

F2RE2RE2RE2RE2RE2RE2E2R4F3R2FR" 

2290 HDRAW " ER2 ER3 ER2 ERERE 2 RE3RE 

2F2R3F2RF2RF2RF2DF3DF2R4F2E2RE" 

2300 HDRAW "RE2RE3RE2RE2F2RF2DF2 

DF 3 DF 2 D FR 2 ER2 ERE 2 RE 3 RE 2 F 2 RF 2RF " 
2310 HDRAW "RF2RF2RF2RF2RR30E2RE 
2RE2R3ER4ER3FR3 FR2 ER3 ERER2ERE2 " 
2320 HDRAW "RE 2 RE 3 RE 2 RE 3 RE 2RE 3 RE 
2F2RF2DF2DF3DF2E3RE2UE3UE2UE2R" 



2330 HDRAW "E3F4R20" : HPAINT 
91) ,7 , 7 : HDRAW "BM173 , 18 1XPD$ ; » 
2340 RETURN 

2350 FOR N=l TO 150:HSET (RND(28 
5)+10,RND(181)+10,RND(5) ) : NEXT N 
2360 FOR N=l TO 3 : X=RND (285) +15 : 
Y=RND( 17 1)+10 

2370 HDRAW "BM=X ; , =Y ; C5NR4NL4ND4 
NU4C4NDNUNLNR" :HSET (X,Y,1):NEXT 

2380 RETURN 

2390 HCIRCLE (SX, SY) ,17,15: HPAIN 
T (SX, S Y ) , 1 , 15 : HPAINT ( SX , SY) , 0, 



2 400 HCIRCLE (SX , SY) , 17 , 0 : HPUT 
SX-44 , SY-17) - (SX+44 , SY+16) , 1 , <"""'"'" 
RETURN 

2410 HCIRCLE (SX, SY) , 40 , 15 : HPAIN 
T (SX,SY) ,1,15: HPAINT (SX,SY) ,0, 

15' ' ", t^^Fp^^ft'-'P'^' ' 

24 20 HCIRCLE (SX, SY) , 40 , 0 : HPUT ( 

SX- 4 0 , S Y-40 ) - ( SX+ 3 8 , S Y+ 3 9 ) ,3 , OR : 

RETURN 

24 30 HCIRCLE (SX , SY) , 29^ 15 : HPAIN 
T (SX, SY) , 1 , 15 : HPAINT (SX, SY) ,0, 

1 s 

2 4 40 HCIRCLE (SX,SY) ,29,0:HPUT ( 
SX-30,SY-30)-(SX+28,SY-f 29) ,2 ,OR: 
RETURN 



38 



THE RAINBOW May 1989 



Color Computer I, II, III 
Free Software for Drive 0 Systems 

CoCo Checker...Test roms, rams, disk drives and & controller printer, keyboard cassette & more. 
Tape/Disk Utility-Transfers disk to tape and tape to disk. 



159 



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Drive 0 



179 



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Other Drive Specials 



119 



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for new Radio Shack 
includes: 

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• Mounting Hardware 



Full Ht Drive 89 95 

Full Ht Drive Ps/Case 1 29 95 

Slim Line Drive 99 95 

Slim Line Drive Ps/Case... 139 95 

2 Slim Drives Ps/Case 239 95 

Disk Controller 59 



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Dual 1 / 2 ht Ps & Case 54 95 

Dual Full Ht. Ps & Case 79 95 

Disk Controller 59 95 



10 Diskettes 

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1000, 1000A, 

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D el phi Bur e au 



Several users have recently asked 
what networks are. We use Telenet and 
Tymnet to get onto Delphi, but what is 
a network? Good question! 

Think of networks as really cheap 
long-distance phone calls. Yet networks 
are highly sophisticated, stretching 
from coast to coast, linking your home 
phone with the Delphi mainframes in 
Boston. Networks gather the transmis- 
sions from many computer users across 
the U.S. and funnel them into Delphi at 
10 million bits per second through fiber- 
optic transmission facilities and even 
satellites in some cases. Delphi sorts out 
these transmissions, then prepares 
responses for all of the users. It then 
sends the responses into the network 
and back to the users. 

Networks such as Telenet and 
Tymnet will never be as fast as commun- 
ications between two computers. These 
must divide their time between thou- 
sands of users, while PC-to-PC connec- 
tions involve only two computers. 
Delphi is also a multiuser system and, 
like any system, will slow down if 
dealing with thousands of users. 

Why, then, does Delphi use networks 
like Telenet and Tymnet? Simple. It's 
less expensive for the users. Networks 
are an economical alternative to long- 
distance calls. You have the option of 
calling Delphi direct through your local 
phone company, but most users don't 
do that. While Delphi reduces your 
connect charges by about $1.20 per 
hour, if you call direct, youll have to 
pay long-distance charges of about $15 
per hour. It's a trade-off: The user gets 
a somewhat reduced speed of perform- 
ance, but also a lower phone bill. 

To avoid slowdowns when many 
users are online, try calling Delphi 
during the nonpeak hours. Generally, 
Delphi is busiest from around 9:00 p.m. 
through midnight, Eastern time. If you 
access the system at another time, you'll 
find things run somewhat faster. Avoid 
signing on when the Trivia Quiz game 
is running unless you intend to play. TQ 
is very popular and has dozens of 
players online during its hours. 

Don't confuse Delphi and Telenet/ 
Tymnet. Delphi is a service based near 



Get the facts about FAX 



At 

Your 

Service 



By Don Hutchison 

Database Manager Emeritus 

Boston. Telenet and Tymnet are tele- 
communications networks that operate 
throughout the United States. They are 
two completely separate operations. 

FAX Service Available on Delphi 

At times, it is advantageous for me to 
send a letter to noncomputer people 



from my computer. The advantage is 
speed — you can send overnight or 
"next day" mail from your computer. 

I looked around and was amazed to 
find that Delphi has a FAX interface in 
its mail system. Just blast a text file into 
the system, and it will be FAXed to the 
FAX phone number you specify. 

For those who aren't familiar with 
FAX, it stands for facsimile transmis- 
sion. It sends a copy (facsimile) of a 
sheet of paper to another machine 
through the phone system. It's a copy 
machine connected to your phone. To 
use it, just feed the original into your 
FAX machine, call the remote FAX 
machine, and a copy of your document 
is teleported to the other machine. 

How do you use the FAX interface on 
Delphi? It's easy, really. First, re- 
member you must be at the main 
DMAIL menu. (DMAIL stands for 
Delphi Mail.) If you're at the CoCo SIG 
prompt, you can get to DMAIL by 
typing, go dmail. If you want to enter 
the FAX system directly, you can type 
go dmail Fax and youll be there. 

Sending text messages to Group III 
facsimile machines requires you to 
know the area code and phone number 
of the FAX machine you are calling for 
messages destined to the United States, 



Don Hutchison works in Birmingham, 
Alabama, as a senior project engineer 
involved in the design of industrial 
control systems. His Delphi username is 

DONHUTCH1SON. 



Database 



OS-9 Online 

In the General topic of the database, 
Stephen Macri (DRACMAN) sent us the 
Level II bootlists for use with MultiVue> 
the Wiz and Deskmate 3 tti run these 
programs from a RAM disk or DS disks. 
The Applications topic brings us Jeff 
Blower (SEBJMB), who uploaded a Mur- 
phy's Law program. Robert Parker 
(SYSTEMX) sent us a fortune cookie 
program. 

In the Utilities topic, Steve Clark 
(STEVECLARK) posted a utility to deter- 
mine execution times of programs. John 
Beveridge (JOHNTORONTO) sent us 
version 1.6 of YAZ, Yet Another Zapper 
and Afa/i, a program which replaces OS- 
9*s Help command. Jim Woodward (JIM- 
WOOD) uploaded a file comparison 
program. Roger Krupski (HARDWARE- 
HACK) uploaded CMPFix, a filter for 
generating a ModPatch compatible file 
from the output of CMP. Rich Ries 
(RRIES) sent us the C source code for an 
1NKEV$-Iike program. 

The Patches topic includes Greg Law 
(GREGL), who uploaded a patch to the 
popular RS-OS9 program. Roger 




Krupski sent us a small patch for fixing 
the Boot module in OS-9 Level II to shut 
off the floppy drive motors after loading 
a file. Denny Skala (DENNYSKALA) 
uploaded a patch for the Level II clock 
module to allow it to access the Burke & 
Burke real-time clock directly. 

The Telcom topic brings us Newton 
White (PERFUMER), who uploaded 
version 1.4.2 of OS Term by Vaughn 
Cato. Bill Brady (OS9UGED) posted a 
small patch file that corrects some 
Xmodem downloading bugs in The Wiz. 
In Graphics & Music Bob Montowski 
(GRAPHICSPUB) sent us some Gemini 
printer fonts. Jim Buck (COCOROGUE) 
posted an UitimusB file from the song 25 
or Six to Four. 

CoCoSIG 

In the General topic of the database, 
Brian White (BR1ANWHITE) posted 
additional documentation files for 
MAX- 10, which were obtained directly 
from the program's author, Dave 
Stampe. Kevin Leger (KEVINLEGER) 
posted a file describing how to use a 
monochrome monitor on a CoCo 3. 



40 



THE RAINBOW May 1 989 



Canada and the Caribbean. For inter- 
national FAX, you need to know the 
country code, city code and phone 
number of the destination terminal, 

A FAX message can be created in 
your workspace and sent at the filename 
prompt, or it can be typed live. The 
same message can be sent to multiple 
FAX machines by simply entering each 
destination number when prompted. 
FAX messages may be up to 50,000 
characters in length. That's a lot of 
information. 

If you want to include page breaks in 
your copy, enter /page as a separate line 
of text at each appropriate place in the 
message. 

The rates for sending FAX messages 
are as follows: 



Destination 


First 


Additional 




Page 


Half 






Pages 


United States 


$1.25 


$0.50 


Canada 


$2.00 


$1.00 


International 


$7.00 


$2.00 



A page is defined as 2500 characters, 
a half-page as 1250. Each FAX sent to 
multiple numbers will be billed at the 
above rates. You can send them 
throughout the day, generally within 
minutes. You will receive notification if 
your FAX is not sent. 



There are all kinds of uses for this 
service — Valentine's Day messages, or 
if you forget someone's birthday and 
want to send a "quick card" via FAX. 
Business uses are almost endless, the 
best benefit being the speed of informa- 
tion flow. 

Changing of the Guard 

For those who have not read Forum 
Message 48439, 1 have elected to retire 
from my duties as the Database Man- 
ager on the RAINBOW CoCo SIG. With 
a new job, I don't feel I can do justice 
to normal database duties any longer. 

Replacing me will be Tim Koonce, 
whose username on Delphi is TIM- 
KOONCE. Tim is a graduate student at 
Berkeley studying mathematics. Since 
he is a frisbee freak, he should have all 
the qualifications to handle the "quirk- 
iness" of our databases and to field user 
questions. 

Assisting Tim will be Eddie Kuns 
(EDpiEKUNS) and Dave Archer (DAVE- 
ARCHER), so please address your ques- 
tions to them concerning the database. 
Jim Reed (J1MREED), Marty Goodman 

(MARTYGOODM AN), Greg Law (GREGL) 

and Rick Adams (RICK ADA MS) will also 
be online to help out as needed. 

Please join me in welcoming Tim to 
the staff of the CoCo SIG. I'm sure he'll 
do a fine job! □ 



The CoCo 3 Graphics topic brings 
Richard Trasborg (TRAS), who posted 
some dithered DS69B pictures from 
Mike Trammell. Mike's pictures are 
always popular. Jason Forbes (CO- 
COB KID) posted some fractal images. 
Dan Shargel (TRIUMPH) uploaded his 
original drawing of the Rush logo and a 
loader program for View Master, How- 
ard Rouse (HOWARDC) posted his favor- 
ite original CM3 pictures. John Beve- 
ridge posted a picture file which describes 
the internal structure of the MAX- 10 
"clicker." 

In the Utilities & Applications topic 
Philip Woodring (PHILWOOD) uploaded 
an HSCREEN4 printer dump program for 
the CGP-220. Roger Carlson (PERCH) 
posted a program to generate the statis- 
tical process control charts used in many 
industries. Eric Parish (ERICPAR) sent us 
an improved version of his popular 
planetarium program. Jim Pogue (JIM- 
POGUE) uploaded the parallel port driv- 
ers for use with the hardware project in 
the November and December '87 issues 
of the RAINBOW. John Beveridge posted 
a program to calculate intermodulation 
products. Edwin Albert (EEA) sent us a 
quickie program for booting TW-128. 
Ken Wuelzer (WUELZERKEN) uploaded 
version 2.7 of his very popular KDSK 



program. Jerome Kalkhof (GRUM- 
CLUB) sent us a program that prints any 
ASCII file to the printer or the screen. 

Hardware Hacking brings Marty 
Goodman (MARTYGOODMAN), who 
posted text files describing how to fix an 
Epson MX-80 printer and how to con- 
struct a "cable connector masher.*' 
(Mashers everywhere will be interested.) 

In the Games topic of the database, 
Alan DeKok (ALANDEKOK) posted a 
set of patch files for the Thexder game. 
Fred McDonald (FREDMCD uploaded a 
nice line game. Robert Combs (ROB- 
COMBS) sent us a missile game. 

In the Music & Sound topic Ken 
Furlow (SAPPHIRE2) favored us with 
eight more of his favorite Musica songs. 
George Hoffman (HOFFBERGER) sent 
us another of his favorite Lyra songs. 

The Telecommunications topic brings 
Greg Miller (GREGM1LLER), who up- 
loaded Version 2.5 of his popular termi- 
nal program GETerm. The latest version 
features direct-to-disk downloading and 
Ymodem support, among other goodies. 
Mike Andrews (M ANDREWS) posted an 
alternate IBM-style character set for the 
popular CoCo 3 terminal program, V- 
Term. Edwin Albert uploaded a text file 
describing the use of an Avatex 1200E 
modem with the CoCo 3. ^ 




TANDY COMPUTERS 

Tandy 1000-HX 256K 5 1/4"D. 535.00 

Tandy 1000-SL 384K 5 1/4"D. 675.00 

Tandy 1000-TL 640K 3 1/2"D. 955.00 

Tandy 3000-NL 512K 3 1/2"D. 1275.00 

Tandy 4000-LX 2 Meg 3 1 /2"D. 2999.00 

Tandy 4000 1 Meg 3 1/2" D. 1890.00 

Tandy 5000MC 2 Meg 1 Drive 3825.00 

Tandy 5000MC 2 Meg 40 Meg 4955.00 

Tandy 5000MC 2 Meg 84 Meg 5395.00 

Tandy 1 400LT 768K 2 Drives 1 335.00 

Tandy 102 24K 430.00 

Tandy Color 3 128K 155.00 

MONITORS & CARDS 

VM-5 Monochrome Green 115.00 

CM-5 Color RGB 220.00 

CM- 11 Color RGB 315.00 

EGM-1 Color RGB (EGA) 510.00 

Magnavox 9CM053 Color EGA 365.00 

Packard Bell Monochrome TTL 89.00 

NEC Multisync II Color 625.00 

Tandy EGA Card 205.00 

Paradise Basic EGA Card 195.00 

Video 7 Vega/Deluxe 239.00i 

DRIVES 

Color Computer Drive 0 225.00 

5 1/4" External Drive 1000HX 180.00 

Tandy 20 Meg Hardcard 450.00 

30 Meg Hardcard 395.00 

20 Meg Hard Drive 1400LT 775.00 

5 1/4" External for Tandy 1400 215.00 

Seagate 20 Mea Hard Drive 219.00 

Tandy 1 000/SX7TX Controller 69.00 

MODEMS 

Prac. Peripherals 1200B Internal 75.00 

Prac, Peripherals 2400B Internal 175.00 

Packard Bell 2400B Internal 140.00 

PRINTERS 

DMP-106 Dot-Matrix 165.00 

DMP-132 Dot-Matrix 285.00 

DWP-230 Daisy Wheel 345.00 

Epson LX-800 Dot-Matrix 189.00 

Epson FX-850 Dot-Matrix 375.00 

Epson LQ-500 Dot-Matrix 31 5.00 

Epson FX-1050 Dot-Matrix 489.00 

Panaonic KX-P1 180 Dot-Matrix 195.00 

Panasonic KX-P1 191 Dot-Matrix 260.00 

Panasonic KX-P1 1 24 Dot-Matrix 369.00 

Please write for complete price list 
We carry more items than listed here. 



All prices and offers may be changed or withdrawn without notice. Adver- 
tised prices are cash prices. C O D. accepted add 2<Vb (minimum charge 
$10.00) M.C.. Visa add 2%. All non defective items require return 
merchandise authorization. Call for RMA Number before returning. 
Delivery is subject to product availability. Add 1Vi% for shipping and 
handling, $5.00 minimum charge 

TM - Registered Trademark of Tandy, Epson, and IBM 
Monday thru Friday 9am - 5pm EST. 

□ □□□□ 

□ □□□□ 

□□GOD 
□□□□O 

124 South Main Street, Perry, Ml 48872 
CALL 1-51 7-625-4 tfif or TOLL-FREE 
1-800-248-3823 



p 




n 


in 


I9 


i 


HJDDUDOtPJ. 





May 1989 THE RAINBOW 41 



eat u re 



And they 're off! 



CoCo Derby 




By Joe Wilensky 



* or those of you who can't always 
go to the races as often as you'd 
like, here's an entertaining alterna- 
tive: a day at the races at the TRS-80 
Raceway! Place your bets — the CoCo 
Derby is about to begin! 



This game runs with a 16K Color 
Computer with Extended Color BASIC. 
The game starts with the title screen, a 
few musical tones and the message 
"Setting up". You are then asked if you 
want to use the speed-up poke during 
the running of the race. Each race is 



Joe Wilensky is a political science major 
at the State University of New York at 
Binghamton. His other interests include 
theater and cartooning. 

42 THE RAINBOW May 1989 



about a minute and twenty seconds 
without the speed-up poke, about a 
minute with it. 

After deciding whether or not to use 
it, choose the number of races to run in 
the game (as many as you want), and the 
number (1 to 4) and name of each 
player. If you have less than four play- 
ers, the computer will play the others. 

After selecting the players, a score- 
board appears with columns for the 
name, wallet, horse bet on and amounts 
bet for each player. The players now 
choose from four horses. You can bet on 
any one you want, even if someone else 
has picked it. The players taken by the 
computer bet and pick horses automat- 
ically. Then each player places the 
amount of his or her bet. You can't bet 
more than you have in your wallet, and 
any player who loses all of their money 
has to drop out of the game, which 
means no more betting or picking 
horses. With bets made, you are told to 
press ENTER to start the race. 

The PMODE 4 screen appears and the 
racetrack is drawn, with four separated 
lanes. The top lane is for Horse I, the 
second for Horse 2, and so on. A shor- 
tened version of the call to the post is 
played, twice for the first race, once for 
all other races. The horses appear one 

4 



at a time, drawn with detail and a rider. 
After a short delay, a low tone sounds 
— and they're off! 

The running horses actually move 
their feet and bob their heads. This is 
achieved with GET -PUT, using two sepa- 
rate figures of a running horse. During 
the race the pictures alternate quickly, 
giving speed and animation to the 
horses. 

There is a clearly marked finish line 
and as each horse hits it, a musical tone 
plays and the number of the horse is 
ranked as it finishes. After the fourth- 
place horse crosses, there is more music. 
Push any key to return to the score- 
board. Each player's wallet is adjusted 
accordingly; those who don't win lose 
the amount they bet from their wallets, 
and those who win gain their wager. 

Betting for the next race begins, and 
that is how the game goes. At the end 
of the last race, the scoreboard appears 
and the computer states who has won 
and the player's number, and more 
music is played. 

(Questions or comments eont'eming 
this program may be directed to the 
author at I Oak Ridge Place, 4C, East- 
Chester y NY 10709. Please include an 
SASE when requesting a reply.) □ 













\ 


/ 1220 . 


■ * j * • 71 


2140 . . 


...183 




1400 .. 


. ; . 252 


2350 . « 


...204 




1610 , 


» f « > 29 


END . 


, . *<60 




1880 . 


...49 







The Listing: DERBY 

0 1 COPYRIGHT 1989 FALSOFT, INC 
1000 ! The CoCo Derby! 
1010 ' 

1020 'By Joe Wilensky 

1030 f l Oak Ridge Place 

1040 'Eastchester, N.Y. 10709 

1050 1 title screen 

1060 CLS3 

1070 PLAY"V25" 

1080 PRINT@224, "WELCOME TO THE T 
RS-80 RACEWAY 1 ! !"; 
1090 SCREEN0 , 1 



1100 PLAY"T5CEGP15CEGP15CEG" 

1110 ! put horses in arrays 
1120 CLS0 

1130 PRINT" SETTING UP..."; 

1140 F0RX=1T0RND(RND(RND(98 5) ) ) : 

T=RND (TIMER) :NEXTX 

1150 «H=HORSE ARRAY, R=# OF RACE 

S 

1160 'P=# OF PLAYERS , P$(X)=NAME 

OF PLAYER (X) 
1170 RN=1 

1180 DIMH(3,2) ,1(3,2) 

1190 PMODE4 , 1 : PCLS 

1200 DRAW"BM12 9, 98" 

1210 DRAW"R3BR1BD1D2NG2R1U2D2R1U 

2D1R1D1U1ND1R4L1D1NF3R3NF2L3U2R1 

E1U1R3L1U1L1D1L1D1L2BL2U1R1E1G1L 

1D2L5" 

1220 PRESET(132,99) 

1230 GET(127, 96) -(145,104) ,H,G 



1240 DRAW"BM160,98 ;R3BR1BD1D2D1R 


1650 


NEXTX 


lDlFlHlUlR2ElFlRlNUlDlGlEltJ2E3Rl 


1660 


FORX=lTOP 


L1U1L1D1L2H1NE1L1D1BL3D1R2BR2BNU 


1670 


IF W(X)=0THEN1730 


1R2NG2G1L5D1R2 " 


1680 


PRINT@256,P$ (X) ", WHAT'S YO 


1250 PRESET (165 ,98) : PRESET (166 , 9 

9 » 9 9 \ § 


UR BET" ; :INPUTB(X) 


8) 


1690 


PLAY"T25501ACEFF+" 


126J3 GET(158,96)-(176,104) ,I,G 

* * 9 9 \ 9 f 9 9 9 


1700 


IF B(X)>W(X)THEN1680 


1270 PCLS 


1710 


IF B(X)<.5 THEN168^ 


1280 'questions to player(s) 


1720 


PRINTS ( (X*32)+21)+32 f B(X) ; 


1290 CLS 0 


1730 


NEXTX 


1300 PRINT ,f USE HIGH-SPEED POKE 11 ; 


1740 


F0RT=1T04 6 0 : NEXTT 


:INPUTQ$:CLS0 


1750 


IFP=>4THEN1820 


1310 INPUT f, HOW MANY RACES" ;R 


1760 


F0RX=P+1T04 


1320 IF R<1 THEN 131J3 


1770 


IF W(X)=0 THEN 181^ 


133 0 INPUT"HOW MANY PLAYERS (1-4 


1780 


B(X)=RND(151)+49 


) ,f ;p 


1790 


PRINT@( (X*32)+21)+32,B(X) ; 


1340 IF P<1 OR P>4 THEN13 30 


1800 


PLAY"T4EC" 


1350 PRINT 


1810 


NEXTX 


13 60 FOR X=l TO P: PRINT "NAME OF 


1820 


PRINTQ4 16, "PRESS <ENTER> TO 


PLAYER"X; :INPUTP$ (X) :NEXTX 


START RACE NUMBER"RN" . " ; 


1370 IFP<4THEN FOR X=(P+1) TO 4: 


1830 


IF INKEY$OCHR$(13)THEN183j3 


P$ (X) ="TRS-80" :NEXTX 


1840 


CLS^ 


13 80 W(1)=1000:W(2)=1000:W(3)=10 


1850 


'the race the race the race 


00:W(4)=1000 

if * 9 wit 


1860 


PL=J3 


1390 ! main scoreboard and bettin 


1870 


PMODE4 , 1 : PCLS : SCREEN1 , 1 


g 


1880 


LINE(j3,24)-(255,24) ,PSET 


1400 CLS 


1890 


LINE (0,60) -(255, 60) , PSET 


1410 PRINT "NAME WALLET HORSE 


1900 


LINE(0,96)-(255,96) ,PSET 


BET" 


1910 


LINE (j3, 132) -('255, 132) ,PSET 




1920 


LINE(^,168)-(255,168) ,PSET 


ii 


1930 


LINE(248,24)-(248,168) ,PSET 


143J3 PRINT@64,P$(1) ; : PRINT@71, W ( 


1940 


LINE (249, 24) -(249, 168) ,PSET 


i) ; 


1950 


F0RX=1T04 : X (X) =2 : NEXTX 


1440 PRINT§96,P$(2) ; : PRINT@103 , W 


1960 


Y(l)=38:Y(2)=74:Y(3)=llj3:Y( 


(2) ; 


4)=146 


145J3 PRINT@128,P$(3) ; :PRINT@135. 

W 9 w \ § 9 ™ J 


1970 


IF RN=1 THEN V=2 ELSE V=l 


W(3) ; 


1980 


GOSUB253J3 


1460 PRINT@160,P$(4) ; : PRINT@167 , 


1990 


F0RX=1T04 


W(4) ; 


2000 


PUT(X(X) ,Y(X) )-(X(X)+18,Y(X 


1470 PRINT@192," 


)+8) ,H,PSET 




2010 


PLAY"T401B" 


1480 IF RN>R THEN 2400 


2020 


NEXTX 


14 90 PRINT 


2030 


FOR T=l TO 92J3:NEXT T 


1500 PRINT@416, "BETTING FOR RACE 


2040 


' start running 


NO. "RN; 


2050 


IF Q$="Y" OR Q$="YES" THEN 


1510 FOR X=l TO P 


P0KE65495, 0 


1520 IFW(X)=0THEN1570 


2060 


PLAY " T2 5 501CFA02 CFA03 CFA04C 


1530 PRINT@256,P$(X) ", WHAT HORS 


FA05CFA" 


E (1-4) "; :INPUTHR(X) 


2070 


X=RND(4) 


1540 PLAY"T25505AEC" 


2080 


IF X(X)=j3THEN2j37j3 


1550 IF HR(X)<1 OR HR(X)>4 THEN 


2090 


X(X)=X(X)+1 


1530 


2100 


IF(X(X) )/2=INT(X(X)/2)THEN2 


15 60 PRINTS ( (X*32)+15)+3 2 / HR(X) ; 


130 




1570 NEXTX 


211J3 


PUT(X(X) ,Y(X) )-(X(X)+18,Y(X 


1580 FORT=1TO4 60:NEXTT 


)+8) ,I,PSET 


1590 IFP=>4THEN1660 


2120 


GOT0214^ 


1600 FORT=1TO460:NEXTT 


2130 


PUT(X(X) ,Y(X) ) -(X(X)+18, Y(X 


1610 F0RX=P+1T04 


)+8) ,H,PSET 


1620 HR(X)=RND(4) 


214J3 


IF(X(X)+18) >=248THENGOSUB21 


163 0 PRINT@ ( (X*32) +15} +3 2 . HR(X^ : 


60 


1640 PLAY"T4CE" 


2150 


GOT02j37^ 



44 



THE RAINBOW May 1989 



216J3 


PLAY !f T202CGF ff : 'winnings 


2390 RETURN 


217)3 


X(X)=0 




2400 "end of game 


218)3 


FORT=1TO500 : NEXTT 




2410 IFW(1)>W(2)ANDW(1)>W(3)ANDW 


219J8 


PL=PL+1 




(1)>W(4)THENWN=1 


22J3J3 


IFPL>1THEN2260 




2420 IFW(2)>W(1)ANDW(2)>W(3)ANDW 


221)3 


i 




(2)>W(4)THENWN=2 


222)3 


WN=X 




2430 IFW(3)>W(1)ANDW(3)>W(2)ANDW 


223)3 


F=X 




(3)>W(4)THENWN=3 


224)3 


GOSUB2340 




2440 IFW(4)>W(1)ANDW(4)>W(2)ANDW 


225)3 


GOTO2270 




(4)>W(3)THENWN=4 


226)3 


F=X 




2450 IF WN=0THENPRINT@256 , "THERE 


2270 


S$=STR$(Y(F) ) :T$="BM200, "+S 


IS NO WINNER! "ELSEPRINT@256 , »TH 


$ 






E WINNER IS "P$(WN) ", f, :PRINT@288 


2280 


IFPL=1THENDRAW"XT$ ; 


D8" 


, "PLAYER NUMBER 11 WN 11 ! " 


2290 


I FPL= 2 THENDRAW " XT $ ; 


R5D4L5D4 


2460 PRINT© 3 5 2, "THANK YOU FOR PL 


R5" 






AYING NEW DERBY 2 1 11 


23j3j3 


IFPL=3THENDRAW lf XT$ ; 


R5D4NL5D 


2470 PLAY"T203CCF" 


4L5" 






2480 END 


2310 


IFPL=4THENDRAW"XT$ ; 


D4R5U4D8 


2490 FORT=1TO600: NEXTT: PLAY" 03 T4 


if 






FP4T8CCP6T6DCP4T4EF" 


2320 


IF PL=4THENRN=RN+1: 


GOSUB2 49 


2500 IFINKEY$=""THEN2500 


j3:POKE65494 f j3:GOT014j8j3 




2 510 RETURN 


2330 


SCREEN1,1: RETURN 




2520 'call to the post 


2340 


'wallet reducing 




2530 PLAY"T4P1" :F0RT=1T0V:PLAY"V 


2350 


FOR X=1T04 




3 1T403L8CFA04CL8CCCCL8C03AL8AAAA 


2360 


IFHR(X)=WN THEN W(X 


)=W(X)+B 


L8AFAFL1CL8CFA04CL8CCCCL8C03CL8C 


(X) :ELSEW(X)=W(X)-B(X) 




CCCL8CL1FP8 " : NEXTT 


2370 


IFW (X) <=0THENB (X) =0 


:HR(X)=0 


2540 PLAY"L4V25" 


2380 


NEXTX 




2 550 RETURN ^ 





MUTANT MINERS 

Battle mutant uranium miners in a run for your life, action-packed, 

arcade style game. 10 levels with 10 screens per level! 
100% Machine Language (CoCo 1 , 2 or 3 and Joystick) $19.95 

BURIED BUXX 

Fly your helicopter into enemy territory, dig 1$$*** 
up the loot and return to base. 
Watch out for the ever-present patrol aircraft and 
ground based missiles. 
100% Machine Language (CoCo 1 , 2 or 3 and Joystick) $19.95 

See Review 'Rainbow' 2/89 

REVENGE of the 
MUTANT MINERS 

CoCo 3 owners rejoice! Muntant Miners is back with game 
configuration mode and much more! 
Joystick required. $19.95 



Many more programs available Including: 
Milestones, Font gen, Distesse, Picture Puzzles, 
Quantum Leap and more. 



JR & JR SOFTSTUFF 

P.O. BOX 1 18 • Lompoc, CA • 93438 • (805) 735-3889 

Orders Accepted 24 Hours a Day. 
All Programs on Diskette Only. 

All orders add $3.00 shipping. C.O.D. orders $4.00 additional 
You can usually get us in person from 5-9 PM PST. 
If you get the machine, leave a message 
and we will call back at your convenience. 

CALL OR WRITE FOR A COMPLETE LIST OF AVAILABLE PROGRAMS, 





"I cannot imagine the CoCo 3 without ADOS-3; 
it would not be a complete machine." 

The RAINBOW, July 1987 

You've moved up to a CoCo 3. A powerful new machine. Now, It's time to 
give BASIC a shot in the arm. with ADOS-3. Wouldn't it be nice to turn on your 
machine and be greeted by on 80-column display, in the colors of your 
choice, with your own custom startup message? To run routinely at 2 MHz 
(double speed) without having to slow down for disk and printer operations? 
This and much, much more is possible with ADOS-3, our CoCo 3 adaptation 
of the acclaimed original ADOS, which shares the original's virtual 100% 
compatibility with commercial software. After customizing ADOS-3 using the 
provided configuring utility, you can have it burned into an EPROM that plugs 
Into the Disk BASIC ROM socket, or just use it In RAM as a disk utility. (EPROM 
+ burning will cost S 15-20; we provide Information concerning how you can 
have this done,) Supports double-sided drives (35, 40, or 80 tracks). FAST and 
SLOW commands, auto line number prompts, RUNM command, keystroke 
macros, arrow-key scroll through BASIC programs, auto-edit of error line, and 
many more valuable features, 

"ON A SCALE OF 1 TO 10, I RATE ADOS-3 A SOLID 15." RAINBOW, 7/87 

Disk . , , $34,95 Original ADOS for CoCo 1 or 2 . . . S27.95 (See 6/87 RAINBOW review) 

Original ADOS plus ADOS-3 $50.00 

THE PEEPER 

ML program tracer that multitasks with the target program. An excellent 
learning tool for the ML novice; on invaluable debugging aid for the expert. 
CoCo 1, 2, or 3 compatible, 

Disk , . .. S23.95 Assembler source listing . . . Add S3, 00 



MONITOR CABLES for CoCo 3 

Magnavox8CM515/8CM505/8CM643 , , 



S 19.95 



SonyKV1311CR 



$29.95 



SPECTROSYSJEMS 




11111 N. Kendall Drive, 
Suite A 108 
Miami, Florida 33176 
(305) 274 -3899 Day or Eve. 



V No delay on personal checks •Please add $2.00 shipping • Sorry no credit cards or COO's 



May 1989 THE RAINBOW 45 



Print invitations, flyers, classified ads, etc. 
in any style you want 



Having a 



Party? 



By R.J. McCorkle 




/Invite is a program that lets you 
create a series of 33 lines of text, 
choose the print style for each line, 
print four copies per page (with or 
without names), and save the "invita- 
tion" to tape or disk. 

Either type in and CSAVE the program 
(SfiVE for disk) or CLORD it from tape 
(LOAD for disk), then type RUN and press 
ENTER. The screen asks what type of 
printer you are using; answer by press- 
ing the letter A, B or C of your choice. 
If you don't have a DMP-105, DMP- 
130 or Epson RX.-80, there are tips later 
in the article for modifying the program 
to match your printer. 

The main menu should now be on the 
screen. To create the invitation, press C. 
When it is printed, the invitation starts 
at the top line of the page and ends at 
the last line of the page, so you may 
want to leave the first and last few lines 
blank by pressing ENTER when asked 
for' a line. 

There are 33 lines available. Type in 
the words you want on the line, then 
press ENTER. The font (size and style) 
menu appears with the line at the top 
of the page. Press the number of the font 
you want and a graphics block appears 



■ t " 



RJ. McCorkle went into "semi- 
retirement" three years ago to concen- 
trate on programming. He is also a 
"high-tech" fix-it mart, who tries to 
replace blown fuses in cash registers, 
video games, cable TV equipment, etc. 



46 THE RAINBOW May 1989 



by the number. To turn off a font when 
the graphics block is on, press the 
number again and the graphics block is 
erased. You can use as many of the fonts 
as you want, but only one of pica, elite 
or compressed will appear. If ndiie of 
these three is chosen, pica is selected. 

Press N or E when you are finished 
with that line (the E choice is used 
during editing so that you don't have to 
go through all 33 lines). If you want to 
re-enter the line, press R. When you get 
33 lines in memory, the program goes 
back to the main menu. The invitation 
can now be saved to tape or disk, edited, 
viewed on the screen or printed. Press 
the letter of your choice. If you choose 



Lines 

9-90 

100-187 
200-250 
300-335 
400-480 
500-550 
600-615 
620-635 



700-710 
800-815 



900-997 



'8000-9020 



Descriptions 

Initialize variables; define 
printer; main menu 
Create invitation 
Retrieve from tape or disk 
Edit invitation 
Print invitation 
Save to tape or disk 
View invitation on screen 
View ASCII codes of a line; 
used as a desk check if prob- 
lems occur; used in imme- 
diate command mode 
Quit program 

Subroutine used for mark- 
ing font menu while retriev- 
ing from tape or disk 
Various subroutines for in- 
puts 

Printer codes 




Table 1: Program Description 



|to print, the screen asks if you want it 
f |)rihted with names or without. Press N 
for names or W for without. If you want 
it without names, you are prompted to 
enter the number of pages you want. 

Four copies are printed per page. Get 
the paper perforation just above where 
the first line will be printed. The pro- 
gram uses all 66 lines usually available 
per page. Each line of print should come 
out centered in its section of the page. 

If you choose to have names printed 
; in the invitation, you are prompted to 
! $nter the line number (1 to 33) where 
you want the names printed. The names 
will replace anything already on that 
line, so be careful of your choice. Enter 
each name, then enter XX and the print- 
ing begins, putting a different name in 
each invitation. 

The major working part of the pro- 



gram is in lines 100 to 187. (See Table 
1.) This portion is used during creating, 
editing and loading to determine what 
fonts are to be used and to add the 
printer codes and spacing to the words 
on each line. The font menu works by 
peeking the video-screen memory loca- 
tion to the right of the number pressed 
and poking a graphics block (169) if the 
space is blank, or poking a blank video 
code (96) if it is not blank. When E or 
N is pressed, or if loading, the memory 
location by each number is peeked. If 
it has (169) (the graphics block) in it the 
printer codes and spacing for that 
choice are added to the words, Then the 
choice's flag, F( 1-9,1-33), is set to 1. 

The first part of the variable corre- 
sponds to the font number choice and 



A Number of pages of invitations 
without names to be printed 

B 96; Character code for blank 
space 

C Line counter for number of lines 

in invitation 
D FOR/NEXT counter when printing 

33 lines of invitation 
E$ CHR$(27); Printer escape code 
F FOR/NEXT counting variable 
F$ (1-9, 0 or 1) Printer control codes 

for font choice 1-9; F$( 1-9,0) turns 

off; F$(l-9;1) turns on the choice 
, F( 1-9; 1-33) 1 or 0; indicates 
l whether line 1-33 uses font choice 
' 1-9; 1 indicates yes FT$(l-9) labels 

for type font choices 1-9 
H Number of names to be printed 
J for/next counter 



Table 2: Variable Descriptions 

l< val(K$) ; Number value of key 
pressed 

l<$ INKEYS result; what key was just 
pressed 

L Length of invitation line without 
printer codes 

LC Line length checker 

LN Number of the line chosen to hold 
the names 

N$ (1 -33) 33 Lines of invitation with- 
out printer codes 

NI$ Filename of invitation used when 
saving or retrieving 

NJ$ (1-33) 33 lines of invitation with 
printer codes 

NNJ () Individual names 

P& H421; Video screen memory ad- 
dress one line above choice menu 

P$ First part of printer code for each 



line as it is put into memory 
Pis Second part of printer codes; 
contains the spaces to the right 
margin 

P2S Third part of printer codes; turns 
off the special fonts Q video me- 
mory location of menu choice 
when creating or editing invita- 
tion 

T32;Number of . spaces between the 
start of a line on the screen and the 
start of the next line 
T.$ Tabbing variable; adds spaces 
Tls Tabbing variable; adds spaces 
W Flag showing 1 for editing and 2 
for retrieving in 'CREATE INVITA- 
TION' section 
Z 169; Graphics character indicat- 
ing choice 



May 1 989 THE RAINBOW 47 



the second part to the line number. (See 
Table 2.) The text is saved in one 
variable matrix, N$( 1-33), and the line 
with printer codes and spacing are 
stored in another, NJ$(l-33). The 
words, variables and font flag variables 
are used for saving the invitation to tape 
or disk. 

The printer codes are kept in lines 
8000 to 9020. F$ ( l , l ) is the code to turn 
pica on and F$(l,0) turns it off. 
F$(2,i) turns elite on and F$(2,8) 
turns elite off and so on. The labels for 
the fonts are stored in FT$ ( 1 -9 ) . Line 22 
establishes the labels common to the 
three printers used. The other labels are 
in the lines with the printer codes (8000 
onward). As an example, to change 

NLQ-PICfl to NLQ-ELITE for the DMP- 

130, edit Line 9015 to read: 

9015 F$(5,1)=F$+CHR$(29) :F$(5,3) 
=E$+CHR$(19) :FT$(5)="5 NLQ-ELITE. 

To change one of the printer types, 
change one of the names in Line 25, then 
change the appropriate subroutine to 
the proper codes: Sub 8050 for DMP- 
105, Sub 9000 for DMP-130, and Sub 
8000 for RX-80. If you want to speed 
up the program a little and you have 
Extended Color BASIC, change the 
following lines: 

151 IF PEEK(P+T)=Z THEN IFL>38 
THENLC=L : GQTD1B3ELSE P$=STRING$ 
( 19 - L/2 , 32 ) : P1$=STR I NG$ ( 40 -L , 32 ) : 
F(1,C)=1 

154 IFPEEK(P+T*2)=Z THENLC=L/1 .2 : 
I FL03BTHEN1B3ELSE P$=STRING$ 
(23-L/2):P$=F$(2,l) + P$=Pl$=STRING$ 
(4B-L,32) :P2$=F$(2,0) :F(2,C)=1 
157 IFPEEK(P+T*3)=Z THENLC=L/1. 
GB : I FLC>3BTHEN1B3EL5EP$= STRINGS 
(32 -L/2, 32) :P$=F$( 3,1)+P$:P1$= 
STRING$(69-L,32) :P2$=F$(3,0) :F 
(3,C)=1 



i 

THIS IS A TEST Of- mm 

EL I IE 
COMPRESSED 
PICA EMPHASIZED 
ELITE EMPHASIZED. 
C0^f.ES3E3 EHFr«SIZ£D 
PICA DOUBLE 



ELITE DOUBLE 
COMPRESSED DOUBLE 

W jr £.;»•••••« £2 x 'F'"M r--.fi ii:.> ie: d 

E LITE EXPANDED 
COMPRESSED EXPANDED 

t LITE llAUC-s 

mmmv nMM 

P J. ■:. ft JMyfcKL j r-f::: v 

tL 1 TE UNDERLINED 
COHPRESEED UNDERLINED 



ELI 1 fc. SUPER QCR £ Pt 
COMPRESSED SUPERSCRIPT 

PICA EMPHASIZED DOUBLE 
I CA EMP DEL EXP 

ELITE DBL EXP ITAL UND 

L I T LI M DERI. I N U 8 UPE R 3 C f IP T 



■ ri : L. t 



Table 3: Styles available using the Epson option 



These changes exchange the slow 
FOR/NEXT loops for the Extended func- 
tion STRINGS. Listing 2 is a short pro- 
gram for printing a worksheet for 
developing the text and choices. (See 
Figure 1.) 



(Questions or comments concerning 
this article may be directed to the author 
at Box 790, Big Pine Key, FL 33043. 
Please include an SASE when request- 
ing a reply.) □ 




Listing 1: INVITE 



80 11 

124 79 

157 161 

200 160 

315 134 



445 132 

540 139 

900 166 

8025 47 

END 248 



| 1 COPYRIGHT 198 9 FALSOFT, INC 
9 CLS : PRINT " f invite 1 BY 
R.J .MCCORKLE 1-25-87 
Ifi CLEAR3 5j30:DIMN$(33) ,F(9,33) ,N 



J$(33) ,F$(9,2) ,NN$(60) 

15 Z-169:B=96:T=32:P=&H421 

2j3 E$=CHR$(27) 1 PRNTR. ESCAPE CODE 

22 FT$(1)="1 PICA":FT$(2)="2 ELI 

TE":FT$(8)="8 UNDERLINE" 

2 5 PRINT @ 19 6, » A) DMP 10 5 PRINTE 

R "; :PRINT@260, " B) DMP 130 PRIN 

TER M ; : PRINT@324 , " C) EPSON RX-8 

jS' PRINTER 11 ; 

3J0 K$=INKEY$:IFK$< ,l A ,l ORK$> n C ,, THE 



35 ON INS TR ( 1 , 1 v ABC " , K $ ) G 0 S U B 8 0 5 0 
,90j3j3 ,8000 

40 CLS: PRINT" BAUD" : PRINT: PRINT" 



48 



THE RAINBOW May 1989 



1) 9600 ,f :PRINT H 2) 48,0$ 11 : PRINT" 
3) 240£ M : PRINT" 4) 12j3p" : PRINT" 
5) 6j30" 

45 K$=INKEY$:IFK$=""THEN45ELSEK== 
VAL ( K$ ) : I FK< 10RK> 5 THEN4 5 ELS E I FK= 
1THENF=1ELSEIFK=2THENF=7ELSEIFK= 
3THENF=18ELSEIFK=4THENF=4^ELSEF= 
87 

5J3 POKE149,j3:POKE150,F 

75 CLS: PRINT" •INVITE 1 MAIN 

MENU" : PRINT 

8,0 PRINT" C) CREATE INVITATION": 
PRINT: PRINT" R) RETRIEVE FROM TA 
PE/DISK" : PRINT: PRINT" E) EDIT IN 
VITATION": PRINT: PRINT" P) PRINT 
INVITATION" : PRINT : PRINT" S ) SAVE 
ON TAPE/DISK" : PRINT: PRINT" V) V 
IEW INVITATION 

82 PRINT: PRINT" Q) QUIT PROGRAM" 
85 K$=INKEY$:IF K$="" THEN85 
9p ON INSTR(1 ; "CREPSVQ",K$) GOTO 
1^,2^,3^,4^,500, 60J3, 700: SOUN 
D4,4:GOT085 

100 CLS3: PRINT" CREATE INVITAT 
ION" : GOSUB900 : IFK$="N"THEN75 

102 CLS 3 

103 C=C+l:IF C=3 4 THEN PRINT"END 
OF INVITATION SPACE" : C=3 3 : GOSUB 

960:GOTO75 

106 LC=0 : PRINT "LINE "C ;: INPUT N$ ( 
C) 

109 IF N$(C)="" THEN NJ$ (C)="":G 
OTO103 

112 CLS 3 : PRINTC ; : PRINTN$ ( C ) : L=LE 
N(N$(C)) 

115 PRINT@64,""; :FORF=l TO 9 : PRI 
NTFT$ (F) : NEXTF 

118 PRINT"n NEXT LINE" : PRINT" e E 

ND" : PRINT"R RE-ENTER LINE 

121 ONW GOTO 315,805 

124 K$=INKEY$:K=VAL(K$) : IF K$="" 

THEN124 
127 IF K$="R" THEN 10 6 
130 Q=P+K*32;IF PEEK(Q) =33 THEN P 
OKEQ,Z ELSE POKEQ, B 'MARK MENU 
13 3 IF K=l THENPOKEQ+T , B : POKEQ+6 



IF K=2 THENPOKEQ-T , B : POKEQ+T 
IF K=3 THENPOKEQ-64 , B: POKEQ- 



4,1 
136 
,B 
139 
T,B 

142 IF PEEK(P+T)OZ AND PEEK(P+6 
4)<>Z AND PEEK(P+B)OZ THEN POKE 
P+T,Z 

145 IF K$<>"E" AND K$<>"N" THEN1 
24 

148 IF PEEK(P+192)=Z THEN 3>L*2 

150 FORF=1TO9:F(F,C)=0: NEXTF 

151 IF PEEK(P+T)=Z THEN IFL>38TH 
ENLC=L:GOT018 3 ELSE F0RF=1T019-L 
/2:PRINT@458,F; :P$=P$+" ": NEXTF: 



The 




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50 THE RAINBOW May 1989 



FORF=1TO40-L: PRINT@458 , F ; : P1$=P1 
$+" M :NEXTF:F(1,C)=1 
154 IFPEEK(P+T*2)=Z THENLC=L/1 . 2 
: IFLC>3 8THEN18 3ELSEF0RF=1T02 3-L/ 
2:PRINT§458,F; :P$=P$+" ":NEXTF:P 
$«F$ (2 , 1) +P$ : F0RF=1T048-L: PRINTS 
458 ,F; :P1$=P1$+ H " :NEXTF:P2$=F$( 

2.0) :F(2,C)=1 

157 IFPEEK(P+T*3)=Z THENLC=L/1.6 
8 : IFLC>38THEN183ELSEF0RF=1T032-L 
/2:PRINT@458,F; :P$=P$+" " : NEXTF : 
P$=F$ (3 , 1) +P$ : F0RF=1T069-L: PRINT 
@458,F; :P1$=P1$+" " : NEXTF : P2$=F$ 
(3,0) :F(3,C) =1 

160 IF PEEK(P+T*4)=Z THEN P$=F$ ( 

4 . 1) +P$ : P2$=P2$+F$ (4 ,0) : F (4 , C) =1 
163 IF PEEK(P+T*5)=Z THEN P$=P$+ 
F$(5,l) :P2$=P2$+F$(5,0) :F(5,C)=1 
166 IF PEEK(P+T*6)=Z THEN P$=P$+ 
F$(6,l) :P1$=F$(6,0)+P1$+F$(6,1) : 
P2$=P2$+F$(6,0) :F(6,C)=1 

169 IF PEEK(P+T*7)=Z THEN P$=P$+ 
F$(7,l) :P2$=P2$+F$(7,0) :F(7,C)=1 
172 IF PEEK(P+T*8)=Z THEN P$=P$+ 
F$(8,l) :P1$=F$(8,0)+P1$+F$(8,1) : 
P2$=P2$+F$(8,0) :F(8,C)==1 
175 IF PEEK(P+T*9)=Z THEN P$=P$+ 
F$(9,l) :P2$=P2$+F$(9,0) :F(9,C)=1 
178 NJ$(C)=P$+N$(C)+Pl$+N$(C)-fP2 
$ 

181 P$ = !,M :Pl$= fM, :P2$= !fM :IF N$(C) 
= I,M THEN NJ$(C)= M " 

183 IFL03 8THENPRINT : PRINT n THIS 
LINE IS TOO LONG" :PRINT M ENTER IT 

AGAIN (TRY USING COMP . ) " : G0SUB9 
60:CLS3 :PRINTN$ (C) : PRINT: GOTO 10 6 

184 ONW GOTO 330,815 

187 IF 033 THEN75 ELSE102 

200 CLS3: PRINT" RETRIEVE FROM 

TAPE/DISK" : GOSUB900 : IFK$="N"THEN 

75 

203 GOSUB940 : IFK$="D"THEN230 
205 PRINT :PRINT"POSITION TAPE":P 
RINT : PRINT" PRESS play" : PRINT : GOS 
UB990 : IFNI$="S"THEN200ELSEGOSUB9 
95 

210 0PEN"I",-1,NI$ 

215 IF EOF(-l) THEN225 

220 C=C+1:INPUT#-1,N$(C) ,F(1,C) , 

F(2,C) ,F(3,C) ,F(4,C) ,F(5,C) ,F(6, 

C) ,F(7,C) ,F(8,C) ,F(9,C) :GOSUB800 

:GOT0215 

2 25 CLOSE :CLS7: PRINT" PRESS STOP" 

: PRINT : GOSUB9 6 0 : GOT07 5 

230 CLS3: PRINT" INSERT DISK IN D 

RIVE 0" : PRINT: GOSUB980:IFNI$="S" 

THEN200 

235 0PEN"I" , l,NI$+"/INV" :GOSUB99 
5 

240 IF E0F(1) THEN250 

245 C=C+1:INPUT#1,N$(C) ,F(1,C) ,F 



(2,C) ,F(3,C) ,F(4,C) ,F(5,C) ,F(6,C 
) ,F(7,C) ,F(8,C) ,F(9,C) :GOSUB800: 
GOTO 2 40 

250 CL0SE1: PRINT: GOSUB960:GOTO75 

300 CLS3: PRINT" EDIT INVITAT 

ION" : GOSUB900 : 1 FK $ = f 1 N 11 THE N7 5 

305 W«1:F0R C=l TO 3 3 

310 NJ$(C)= I,M :G0T0112 

315 FOR J=l TO 9: IF F(J,C)=1 THE 

N POKEP+3 2*J,Z 

3 20 NEXT J 

325 GOT0124 

330 IFK$="E ,! THENC=33 

335 NEXTC:W=0:GOTO7 5 

400 CLS3: PRINT" PRINT INVITAT 

ION" : GOSUB900 : IFK$="N"THEN75 

402 IFC=0THENPRINT: PRINT" THERE 

IS NO INVITATION IN YET": PRINT :G 

OSUB960:GOTO75 

405 PRINT "ALLIGN PAPER PERFORATI 
ON" : PRINT"WITH TOP OF PRINT LINE 



it 



410 PRINT: PRINT" N) NAMES OR W 
) WITHOUT NAMES" 

415 K$=INKEY$:IFK$=""THEN415 ELS 
EONINSTR ( 1 , "NW" , K$ ) G0T04 2 5 , 4 65 : S 
OUND4,2:GOT0415 

425 CLS3:INPUT"0N WHAT LINE NUMB 
ER DO YOU WANT THE NAME TO APPEA 
R (1-33) " ;LN: IFLN<10RLN>3 3THEN42 
5 

430 H=H+1: INPUT "NAME OR XX TO EN 
D";NN$(H) :IF NN$(H)o"XX" THEN43 

0 

435 NN$(H)=" tf :H=H-1:IF H/2<>INT( 
H/2) THEN H=H+1 

440 CLS3 : PRINT@2 3 3 , "PRINTING" ; 
445 F0RJ=1 TO H/2 : T$=" " : Tl$=" " : F 
0RF=1T019-LEN (NN$ (J) ) /% : T$=T$+CH 
R$ (32) : NEXTF 

447 FORF=1TO40-LEN (NN$ (J) ) /2-LEN 
(NN$(J+H/2) )/2:Tl$=Tl$+CHR$(32) : 
NEXTF 

448 NJ$(LN)=T$+NN$(J)+T1$+NN$(J+ 
H/2) 

450 FOR D-l TO 3 3 : PRINT #-2 , NJ$ (D 
) : NEXT D 
45 5 NEXT J 
460 G0T075 

4 65 CLS3 1 PRINT NO NAMES 

470 INPUT"HOW MANY PAGES" ; A: PRIN 

T: PRINT"PRINTING" 

475 F0RG=1 TO A*2:F0RJ=1 TO 33 :P 
RINT#-2,NJ$(J) :NEXTJ:NEXTG 
4 80 G0T075 

500 CLS3: PRINT" SAVE TO TAPE/D 
ISK" : GOSUB900 : IFK$="N"THEN75 
503 GOSUB940:IFK$="D"THEN540 
505 PRINT"POSITION TAPE" : PRINT : P 
RINT"PRESS PLAY & RECORD" : PRINT 



510 GOSUB990:IFNI$="S"THEN500 
515 0PEN"0",-1,NI$ 
520 GOSUB997 

525 F0RJ=1 TO 33 : PRINT#-1 # N$ (J) , 
F(1,J) ,F(2,J) ,F(3,J) ,F(4,J) ,F(5, 
J) ,F(6,J) ,F(7,J) ,F(8,J) ,F(9,J) :N 
EXT J 

530 CLOSE : CLS0 : PRINT"PRESS STOP" 

: PRINT : G0SUB9 60 : G0T07 5 

540 PRINT"DISK" : GOSUB980 : IFNI$=" 

S !, THEN500 

545 OPEN"0" , l,NI$+"/INV" ; F0RJ=1 
TO 33:PRINT#1,N$(J)CHR$(13) ; :FOR 
G=1T09:PRINT#1 / F(G,J)CHR$(13) ; :N 
EXTG : NEXT J 
550 CLOSE :GOT075 

600 CLS3: PRINT" VIEW INVITATIO 
N" : GOSUB900 : IFK$="N"THEN75 
605 F0RJ=1T033 :IF LEN (N$ (J) ) <31 
THENPRINTTAB ( (32-LEN (N$ (J) ) )/2) ; 
610 PRINTN$ ( J) : FORG=1TO200 : NEXTG 
: NEXT 

615 GOSUB960:GOTO75 

620 CLS3 1 DESK CHECK STRING 

62 5 INPUT "LINE #";U 

630 F0RFJ=1 TO LEN (NJ$ (U) ): PRINT 

ASC(MID$(NJ$(U) ,FJ,1) ) ? : NEXTFJ 

635 GOT0625 



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Check or M.O. accepted (US Funds only) 

Please add $4.00 for S & H 

Phone Orders are welcomed! 

Call 1-716-837-9168 (24 hr. order line) 




KEN-TON 
ELECTRONICS 

187 GREEN ACRES RD. 
TONAWANDA, NY 14150 



May 1989 THE RAINBOW 51 



700 CLS: PRINT: PRINT 11 DO YOU WANT 
TO SAVE THE" : PRINT: PRINT" INVI 
TATION ? "; :GOSUB910:IFK$="N"THE 
NSTOP 

710 GOTO500 

8j3p W=2:NJ$(C)="":GOT0112 

805 F0RJ=1T09:IFF(J,C)=1THEN POK 

EP+32*J,Z 

810 NEXTJ:GOT0148 

815 W=0: RETURN 

900 PRINT: PRINT" CONTINUE ?"; 

910 PRINT" Y / N" 

915 K$=INKEY$ : IFK$o !l Y n ANDK$<>"N 

"THEN9 15ELSERETURN 

940 PRINT: PRINT" T = TAPE D 

= DISK" 

950 K$=INKEY$ : IFK$<>"T"ANDK$<>"D 

"THEN950ELSERETURN 

960 PRINT" HIT ANY KEY TO CONTI 

NUE " : EXEC4 4539: RETURN 

980 PRINT 

990 PRINT: PRINT" ENTER NAME OF I 
NVITATION OR": PRINT" ENTER 'S' 
TO STOP" : PRINT: INPUTNI$: RETURN 

995 C=0:CLS3 :PRINT@198, " RETRIEV 
INCJ "; 

996 PRINT@2 65,NI$; : PRINT@320, "" ; 
: RETURN 

997 CLS3:PRINT@198, " RECORDING " 
; :GOT0996 

8000 1 EPSON RX-80 

8005 F$(1,1)="":F$(1,0)="" ■PIC 



8010 F$ (2 , 1) =E$+"M" : F$ ( 2 ,0 ) =E$+" 
P" 'ELITE 

8015 F$(3,1)=E$+"F"+CHR$(15) : F$ ( 
3,0)=CHR$(18) :FT$(3)="3 COMPRESS 
ED" 

8020 F$ (4 , 1) =E$+"E" : F$ (4 ,0) =E$+" 
F":FT$(4)="4 EMPHASIZED" 



F$(1,0) 
F$(2,0) 



8025 F$(5,1)=E$+"G":F$(5,0)=E$+" 

H":FT$(5)^"5 DOUBLESTRIKE" 

8030 F$(6,1)«CHR$(14) :F$(6,0)=CH 

R$(20) :FT$(6)="6 EXPANDED" 

8035 F$(7, 1)=E$+"4":F$ (7,0)=E$+" 

5" :FT$(7)="7 ITALICS" 

8040 F$(8,l)=E$+"-l":F$(8,0)=E$+ 

"-0"' UNDERLINE 

8045 F$ (9,1)=E$+"S0" :F$(9,0)=E$+ 

"T" : FT$ (9) ="9 SUPERSCRIPT" 

8047 RETURN 

8050 1 DMP 105 

8055 F$(1,1)=E$+CHR$(19) 

= "" 1 PICA 

8060 F$(2>1)»E$+CHR$(23) 

=E$+CHR$ (19) 1 ELITE 

8065 F$(3,1)=E$+CHR$(20) :F$(3,0) 

=E$+CHR$(19) :FT$(3)="3 CONDENSED 
it 

8070 F$(4,1)=E$+CHR$(31) :F$(4,0) 
=E$+CHR$(32) :FT$(4)="4 BOLD" 

8075 F$(5,1)="":F$ (5,0)= ,MI :FT$(5 
) =ii ii 

8080 F$(6,1)=E$+CHR$(32)+E$+CHR$ 
(14) :F$(6,0)=E$+CHR$(15) :FT$(6)= 
"6 ELONGATED" 

8090 F$(8,1)=CHR$(15) :F$(8,0)=CH 

R$(14) 1 UNDERLINE 

8095 F$(9,1)="":F$ (9 , 0) «" " : FT$ (9 
) = ii it 

8097 RETURN 

9000 GOSUB8050' DMP 130 

9005 F$(9,1)=E$+CHR$(83)+CHR$(0) 
:F$(9,0)=E$+CHR$(88) :FT$(9)="9 S 
UPERSCRIPT" 

9010 F$(7,1)=E$+CHR$(66)+CHR$(1) 
: F$ ( 7 , 0 ) =E$+CHR$ ( 66 ) +CHR$ (0 ) : FT$ 
(7) «H7 ITALICS" 

9015 F$(5,1)=E$+CHR$(18) :F$(5,0) 
=E$+CHR$(19) :FT$(5)="5 NLQ-PICA" 
9020 RETURN 



Listing 2: INVIFORM 



0 1 COPYRIGHT 1989 FALSOFT, INC 
10 1 1 INVIFORM 1 R.J.MCCORKLE 12 
-15-86 

20 CLS: PRINT: PRINT" INVITE FORM 

PRINTING PROGRAM FOR RX80" 
30 PRINT: PRINT: PRINT" GET THE 
PRINTER READY" 

40 PRINT .'PRINT: PRINT" HIT ANY 



KEY WHEN READY" 
50 EXEC44539 
60 PRINT#-2," 

PICA ELITE COMP 
EMPH DBL EXP ITALIC UNDR SUP" 
70 FOR F=l TO 3 3 

80 PRINT#-2 / F" 

! — 2 — 3 — 4- 

- 5— 6 — 7 — 8 — 9~" 

90 NEXT F 

100 1 FOR DMP130 CHANGE DBL TO B 
LD AND EXP TO NLQ IN LINE 60 



52 THE RAINBOW May 1989 



"Warrior King 





Become RASTANN, Warrior King, on the quest 
to regain his rightfui crown, hidden deep within a 
sinister land. Battle monsters, gain magic and 
weapons, and travel through harsh wilderness 
and dark castle dungeons in this medieval realm. 
From the creator of Kung-Fu Dude comes this 
awesome arcade game for the CoCo III! Warrior 
King uses the most detailed 320x200 1 6 color 
graphics and high speed machine code to vault 
you into a world of fantasy. Dare ye challenge 
the many perils ahead in order to become WAR- 
RIOR KING? Req. 128K CoCo ill, disk drive, and 
joystick. Only $29.95. 




mm \ 



I an Jn«ld» *|i© cabin. A nan 1 5 trafwd 
at a moll tab I* to the sidt, I he- aafrin 
oppton well Fifrn f aftrd and csnstrwoted, 



oppton m#i 1 ru 
Vau >ipp r n rt rn T 



This is THE graphic adventure for the CoCo 
III! Unparalleled 320x200 animated 
graphics will leave you gasping for more! 
You quest for the Phoenix Crossbow in this 
post-holocaust world of science and fan- 
tasy. In Quest of the Star Lord is a full 4 disk 
sides of mind-numbing adventure! Req. 
128K CoCo ill and disk drive. Only $34.95. 
Hint Sheet: $3.95. 

"A dynamite program! The best graphics 
I've seen to date on the CoCo III. You have 
to see it to believe it. " 

— 8/88 Rainbow review 



An exciting arcade game. The BEST karate 
game ever created for the CoCo! Destroy 
opponents and evade obstacles as you 
grow ever closer to your ultimate objective. 
Spectacular graphics, sound effects, and 
animation! Req. 64K CoCo, disk drive, and 
joystick. Only $24.95. 

"The CoCo karate gap has been filled 
and Kung-Fu Dude does it excellently. I 
highly recommend it! " 

— 2/88 Rainbow review 

All programs CoCo 1, 2, 3 compatible, unless otherwise stated 





aigpoa 

systems CJ 



Sundog Systems 

21 Edinburg Drive 
Pittsburgh, PA 15235 
(412) 372-5674 




TRILOGY 



The epic adventure is backl The largest adven- 
ture campaign ever seen for the CoCo is again 
available! A total of six disks of intense graphic 
adventure will have you playing for weeks! Each 
section is a two-disk stand alone adventure, but 
all three together form an epic saga. Quest for 
the legendary Earthstone in the ancient dwelling 
of the dwarves while you enjoy the classic 
graphics that made this trilogy famous! Each 
adventure can be purchased separately for 
$29.95, the lowest price ever, or you can pur- 
chase the entire set for only $74.95 I Req. 64K 
CoCo and disk drive. 

"One of the best adventures I have experienc- 
ed to date! " — 6/86 Rainbow review 

"The animated graphics are dramatic, detail- 
ed, and excellent! " —11/87 Rainbow review 

"The adventure of a lifetime. Don't miss out I " 
— 7/88 Gamer's Connection review 





Become a super- 
hero in this 
unique 64K ac- 
tion adventure. 
Great graphics 
and sound ef- 
fects! See 5/87 
Rainbow review. 
Disk $19.95. 



DRAGON BLADE 



Another great 
64K animated 
adventure! Can 
you obtain the 
enchanted sword 
to slay the evil 
dragon? See 11/86 
Rainbow review. 
Disk $19.95. 





*5 



tewsmffl 



Enter the era of 
monsters and 
magic in this 
splendid 64 K an- 
imated adven- 
ture! See 12/86 
Rainbow review. 
Disk $19,95. 



Personal checks, money orders, and Amer- 
ican C.O.D. orders accepted. Include $2.50 
for S/H. $3.00 extra for C.O.D. orders. PA 
residents add 6% sales tax. Authorship and 
dealer inquires welcome. 



Build this adapter to use Wo Co Cos 
with one disk drive 

Wow! 



One Disk Drive, Two CoCos 



By Jeff Baier 



For many CoCo 3 buyers, their 
purchase means stashing away 
the CoCo 2, leaving it untouched 
in the dark corner of a closet to gather 
dust. After all, most folks usually have 
only one disk drive, and it is now 
plugged into the CoCo 3. Well, the time 
has come to fish out the old CoCo or 



even buy one. 




You can now use one disk controller 
with two computers by transferring files 
via the cassette jacks of the two comput- 
ers. It's not as simple as its sounds, 
though. The input is 1 to 5 volts and the 
output of the cassette port is only 800 
mv. I first made an amplifier that would 
raise the 800-mv signal to the required 
5 volts, but the corresponding circuit 
did not work. This problem was even- 
tually solved by removing the amplifier 
from the circuit. 

Figure 1 shows how simple the circuit 
is. It has two distinct, identical sides. 
Resistors 1 and 2 are the most important 



Jeff Baier is an electronics technician 
who lives in Ballston Lake, New York. 
In his spare time, he likes building small 
circuits and writing programs for him- 
self and his family. 



components in the circuit, providing 
matching input impedance for the 
cassette output. They actually boost the 
ouput so much that the signal must be 
reduced a little prior to being sent to the 
other computer. The other resisters, R3 
and R4, reduce the signal to the oper- 
ating level of the other cassette input. 
CI and C2 are used for coupling to 
prevent DC connection of the two 
computers. Finally, Jl and J2 are 5-pin 
DIN plugs referenced to a view of the 
port on the back of the CoCo. (If you 
have problems figuring this out, see 
Introducing Your Color Computer, the 
manual enclosed with your CoCo 3.) 

Construction of the adapter is easy, 
requiring very few parts. All the items 
in Table 1 can be found at your local 
Radio Shack and purchased at low cost. 
I used electrolytic capacitors and can't 
guarantee that film capacitors will 
work. Any circuit board will work. I 
recommend buying the smallest and 
cheapest you can find. When construct- 
ing the circuit, give yourself enough 
wire to make the distance between your 
computers. Also, be sure the wire you 
use gets wrapped together from the plug 
to the circuit board. This will save you 
a lot of problems by preventing a spa- 
ghetti of wires from collecting behind 
your computers. Four-conducter phone 
cable will eliminate this problem, too. 

After constructing the adapter, there 
is not much more to know before 
transferring programs from one to the 
other. Loading and saving files can be 
broken into three categories: 1) BASIC 
programs, 2) machine code and 3) 



May 1989 



interfacing the computers with OPEN and 
CLOSE statements. 

Have the adapter plugged into both 
CoCos and your disk drive plugged in 
to the CoCo 3 and we will transfer to 
CoCo2. (BASIC programs are some of 
the easiest to load as long as they don't 
interface with disk files or load other 
programs.) To transfer a program, load 
it from disk to your CoCo 3. Once the 
program is loaded, go to your CoCo 2 
and type CLOflD and then press ENTER. 
Now go to your CoCo 3 and type CSflVE. 
It's that simple. After a short time the 
program will be in your CoCo 2's 
memory, and you can run it. Then you 
can go back to work on your CoCo 3. 



Part 


Quantity 


capacitor 470uf 


2 


resistor 680ohm 


2 


resistor lOOOohm 


2 


ckt board 


1 


5*pin 




wire 


as required 


Table 1: Parts List 



Machine-language programs are a bit 
more complicated. In order to save a 
machine-language program, you must 
know its start, end and execution ad- 
dresses. This is not a big problem if you 
wrote the program yourself. If not, read 
the disk one byte at a time to figure out 
those three addresses. [For more infor- 
mation see "Follow The Bread Crumbs" 
(February 1988, Page 108), by Dennis 
Weide.] Then type CLOfiDM on your 
CoCo 2 and use the CSflVEM" filename", 
Start, End, Execute command on your 



R4 



C2 
470 



J1 




V v 



680 



K 



R2 ( 



1000 



J2 



{ 



1000 



1 



R1 



R3 
680 

\ A. 




V" v 



470 
C1 



Note: All capacitance in micro-farads; all resistance in ohms 



Figure 1 



CoCo 3 to send a machine-language 
program to it. Autoexecuting pro- 
grams, however, do not provide for any 
BA*S1C statements except the L0ADM and 
then the program takes over. I have not 
come up with a solution for this prob- 
lem yet but am working on it. 

The last category is interfacing two 
computers. This is simple as long as you 
try to open a file on the reading com- 
puter prior to trying to open it on the 
sending computer. The reading comput- 
er will wait for a file to be present, while 
the sending computer assumes that its 
writing media is ready. Once the file is 
open, the same rule applies. Use timing 
loops between reads that ensure it. 

Once you start transferring files, 
you'll be amazed at the uses. One exam- 



ple is an interactive game, written in 
BASIC, between two computers that pits 
two people against each other. You can 
transfer any variable used by either 
computer. This tends to program a lot 
easier than a null modem. Keep in mind, 
too, that this project will work for 
transferring files between any two 
CoCos. 

I plan to come up with some software 
to utilize this option more fully as well 
as speed it up. It's a little work for a real 
bargain. □ 

(Questions or comments regarding 
this project may be directed to the 
author at 6A Fremont Way, Balstar 
Lake, NY 12019. Please enclose an 
SASE when requesting a reply.) /55v 








THE BEST COCO ASSEMBLY LANGUAGE PROGRAMMING BOOKS IN 'PRINT 





"Assembly Language Programming for the CoCo" (The Book) and the CoCo 3 (The Addendum). 
Professionally produced (not just skimpy technical specifications). THE CoCo reference books. 



THE BOOK - 289 pages of teaching 
assembly language for the CoCo 1 & 2. 
It's used as a school text and is an 
intro to Computer Science. It describes 
the 6809E instructions, subroutines, 
interrupts, stacks, programming 
philosophy, and many examples. Also 
covered are PIAs, VDG, SAM, kybd, 
jystk, sound, serial port, and using 
cassette and disk. $18.00 + $1.50 s/h. 



THE ADDENDUM - Picks up 

where the BOOK left off. Describes 
ALL the CoCo 3 enhancements & how 
to use them with assembly language. 
The most complete GIME spec. 
WOW - Super-Res Graphics, 
Virtual Memory, New Interrupts, 
and more information not available 
elsewhere. Find out what the CoCo 3 
can really do. $12.00 + $1.00 s/h. 



COCO 3 SPECIAL 

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US check or money 
order. RI orders 
add 6% sales tax 



TEPCO 

68 James Court 
Portsmouth, RI 02871 

See Us On DELPHI 



May 1 989 THE RAINBOW 55 



Educat i on M otes 




This month's article addresses students 
above the fourth grade level, though it's not 
necessarily a kid's program. It concerns 
fractions, those mathematical obstacles we 
were introduced to in the early grades, and 
tripped over throughout high school. 

There are students naturally inclined 
toward math, like ducks to water; and those 
who have phobias about it — sweaty palms, 
shortness of breath, migrains. Advanced 
math students may easily alter this program 
to provide more challenge, while more 
timid students, on the other hand, may 
discover that practicing and reviewing 
examples on the computer is a refreshing 
and non-threatening experience. 

A short review of fractions is included 
and is helpful before beginning the lessons. 

There are two main rules for solving 
these problems. 

Principle 1: If fractions have the same 
numerator, the fraction with the smallest 
denominator has the greater value. For 
example: 

3/5 is greater than 3/7 
4/9 is less than 4/5 

Principle 2: If fractions have the same 

Steve Blyn teaches both exceptional and 
gifted children, holds two master s degrees 
and has won awards for the design of 
programs to aid the handicapped. He owns 
Computer Island and lives in Staten Island, 
New York. 



A refreshing way to 
confront fractional fears 



Fraction 
Action 



By Steve Blyn 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 



denominator, the fraction with the larger 
numerator is the greator. For example: 

7/10 is greater than 3/10 
3/8 is less than 5/8 

Most of the time, the fractions will not 
immediately fall into either of the above 
categories. To compare the value of such 
fractions, both must have common denomi- 
nators. This new denominator should be a 
number which both of the original denomi- 
nators will divide into evenly. One possible 
denominator can always be found by find- 
ing the product of the two original denomi- 



nators. For example: 

Compare 2/3 and 4/5. A common de- 
nominator is the product of 3 and 5, which 
is 15. Therefore: 

2/3=10/15 and 4/5=12/15 



Since 12 is greater than 10,4/5 is greater 
than 2/3. 

Also included is a third rule, which is 
really a shortcut that 1 teach to more 
advanced students . By examination, one of 
the fractions may clearly be less than 1/2 
and the other clearly greater. For example, 
3/7 is less than 1/2 since half of seven 
is three and one half. Seven-tenths is more 
than 1/2 since half of ten is five. Thus, 3/7 
is determined to be less than 7/10 by this 
inspection alone. 

The program contains 10 examples of 
how to compare fractions. The student 
determines if the two fractions are equal or 
whether one is greater than the other. To 
indicate an answer, press the =, < or > sign 
on the keyboard. After the 10th example is 
completed, a scorecard is displayed, help- 
ing the student keep track of progress. 
Lines 280 and 290 may be deleted if you 
prefer to omit scoring. 

The student can work out problems 
mentally or on paper. Because the denomi- 
nators are no larger than tenths, after prac- 
tice, it should be easy to work them out 
mentally. To increase or decrease the range, 
simply change the random limits of the four 
variables A, B, C and D accordingly. 



The Listing: RATION 


OKE T, 202: NEXT T 
170 PRINT@303,"?"; 
180 EN$=INKEY$ 




10 REM" COMPARING FRACTIONS " 


190 IF EN$=">" OR EN$="<" OR EN$ 




20 REM"STEVE BLYN, COMPUTER ISLAN 


="=" THEN 200 ELSE 180 




^STATEN ISLAND , NY , 19 8 9 " 


200 PRINTS 303, EN$ ; 




30 CLS0:CT«CT-f-l 


210 E=A/C:F~B/D 




40 IF CT~ii THEN 280 


220 IF E=F THEN A$="=" ELSE IF E 




50 PRINT @ 6 , "COMPARING FRACTIONS 


>F THEN A$=">" ELSE A$«"<" 






230 IF EN$=A$ THEN PRINT@428 , "CO 




60 PRINT@64 f "PLACE THE RIGHT SIG 


RRECT"; :RT=RT+1 ^4 




N IN THE BOX."? 


240 IF EN$OA$ THEN PRINT@421, "5 




70 PRINT@I3 3,"USE EITHER < OR > 


ORRY,";A$;" IS THE ANSWER"; 




OR ="? 


250 PRINT @ 4 8 4 , " PRESS ENTER TO CO 




80 A=RND ( 6 ) :B=RND(6) 


NTINUE"; 




90 C-A+RND ( 4} : D«B+ RND ( 4) 


260 E$=INKEY$ 




100 PRINTS 2 64 ,A; :PRINT<§276 , B ; 


270 IF E$«CHR$(13) THEN 30 ELSE 




110 PRINT@296 , " — » ; : PRINT(§308 , " 


260 






280 CLS : PRINT@10 , " S CORE CARD" ; 




120 PRINT <§ 3 2 8 , C ; : PRINT @ 3 40 , D ,* 


290 PRINT@9 6 , "YOUR SCORE THIS RO 




130 FOR T= 12 60 TO 12 66 : POKE T , .2? 


UND WAS" ;RT*10 ;"%" 




04 :NEXT T 


300 PRINTS 19 2, "PRESS e TO END OR 




140 FOR T=1388 TO 1394: POKE T,19 


g TO GO AGAIN" 




5: NEXT T 


310 G$=INKEY$ 




150 FOR 14*12 60 3 88 STEP 32 :P 


320 IF G$«"E» THEN 330 ELSE IF A£ 




OKE T r iS^*&EXT T 


$«"G" THEN RUN ELSE 310 




160 FOR T^1266 TO 1394 S1?fp 32 : P 


3 30 CLS: END 





56 



THE RAINBOW May 1989 




s 



W A 



THIS MONTHS 



by Nickolas Ma rentes 

Help Rupert infiltrate "Music Box Records' 1 and collect 
all of his stolen notes which are scattered throughout 
the complex. Ride the crazy elevators and beware of the 
security robots on patrol. 

Rupert Rythym is a strategy arcade game featuring 17 
different, 16 color graphic screens and some of the hottest 
digitized percussion music and vocals you've ever heard 
on your Tandy Color Computer 3. 

Available on Disk or Tape. . .$24.95 

ALL PROGRAMS REQUIRE A COLOR COMPUTER 3 DISK OR TAPE SYSTEM. 

Personal checks, money orders, and American C.O.D. orders accepted. Include $3.00 for S/H. $2.50 extra 
for CO. D. orders. (Cal. res. add 6.5 % tax.) 

ATTENTION PROGRAMMERS*. Game Point Software is looking for talented writers. Top royalties guaranteed. 



uiarr neuter 



3'B 





by Steve Bjork 



Blast in to Hyper-Drive with 
this fun- filled starship shoot- 
em-up! You 'II have a cap- 
tains ' eye view out of your 
3-D cockpit as you try to rid 
the galaxy of the evil enemy 
forces. Game includes 3-D 
glasses and works on any 
Color T. V. , Composite or 
RGB monitor. 

$24.95 

(Extra Glasses $2.95) 




by Steve Bjork 

Based on a popular arcade game which we can 7 mention (But 
sounds like ' 'Art Gannoyed"). BASH challenges you to clear 
the screen by "BASHING" 
your ball through multiple 
brick layers. Of course you 'II 
have help getting through 
this 20 level game by activ- 
ating options like, Slow Ball, 
Expanded Paddle, Multi-Ball, 

and more! 

$24.95 




Enemy alien creatures have 
been identified entering our 
solar system, their destina- 
tion: our home planet! Their 
goal: the total annihilation 
of our race. They must not 
be allowed to land! 
An action arcade game fea- 
turing high quality 16 color 
graphics and sound effects. 

$24.95 



by Nickolas Marentes 



"71 



Unit: COC70 



kick seven < jiff 



$ ift A 

mm'mm 




F-Nvar I Hlfh 
i-5 T 

tli- ffk m m » 



E by Steve Bjork 

A terrible mine disaster has just occured and it will be up 

to you and your talents to 
enter the mine, jump the pits, 
avoid the spikes, fight off the 
bats and other creepy crawlers 
and get air to the needy 
victims. Mine rescue features 
over 2 megabytes of arcade- 
style graphics, real time music 
and multiple mine levels. 

$24.95 





Post Office Box 6907 
Burbank, California 91510-6907 
(818) 566-3571 • BBS: (818) 772-8890 



printed, or "published" document, produced 
on a personal computer. The format is most 
likely arranged in a columnar format, con- 
taining a series of graphic images (pictures, 
charts or designs) that have been integrated 
into the body of the document along with 
the text. (See this and the following page 
for samples.) 



Desktop Publishing 
Comes to the CoCo 



By Jeffrey S. Parker 



In 1984, with the introduction of the 
Macintosh, desktop publishing became an 
affordable reality for both businesses and 

Jeffrey S. Parker has been involved with 
computers since 1976 and CoCos since 
1981. He is the Director of Computer 
Education at The Parker Academy in Sud- 
bury, Massachusetts. He is also a lecturer 
at Northeastern University in technical 
communications. A noted freelance writer 
and editor, Mr. Parker is a Certified 
Computer Professional and holds degrees 
from The University of Massachusetts at 
Amherst and Trinity College of Oxford 
University in England. 



the individual user. The CoCo, busy be- 
coming smaller outside and bigger inside, 
was being used for graphics, adventures, 
arcades and simulations, full-featured word 
processors, RAiNBowfests and more. 

Now desktop publishing has arrived in 
earnest for the CoCo. Not only can we print 
fabulous graphics designs, we can mix them 
with text in different styles,types and sizes. 

What is Desktop Publishing? 

The first thing most people think of 
when you say "desktop publishing" is a 
newsletter. However, desktop publishing 
is not a "thing" at all. It is a process, or 
series of processes by which we arrive at a 



THE HEWSFAPER PLUS 

HKITTEN BY ERIC R. HOLF 
CHFYfttGHT <C> 1188 HOLF 50F I HAKF 
IICFMSED 10 SECOND CITV SDTTMnur 
Ml RIGHTS RESERVED 




The colorful, menu-driven display of 
Newspaper Plus. 

These are only typical examples of the 
concept of desktop publishing. Let's as- 
sume for this article that this is our descrip- 
tion of desktop publishing. Cut down to its 
very basics, it is publishing using a per- 
sonal computer. Publishing involves many 
different elements, the overall goal being a 
printed document. Typesetting is one of 
those key elements. Both the type of print 
(font) and its height and width (point size) 
are important too. Layout, or positioning 
on a page, is also important and must work 
in conjunction with the fonts being used. 
There is also the question of graphics. 
Graphics are anything other than text. They 
can be drawings, photos, digitized images, 
sketches, cartoons, diagrams, anything that 
is not pure text. Most desktop publishing 




The Works 

These samples were produced with the combined efforts of CoCo 
Max III and Max-10. The photos below (left) show the WYSIWYG 
display of Max-10 and the full-page preview (right) of the sample 
document. 





58 THE RAINBOW May 1989 



requires some form of artwork or graphics 
to make a completed document. 

One of the great advantages of desktop 
publishing over word processing packages 
has been its ability to combine text with 
graphics and to create multiple columns on 
one page, like a newspaper. 

Only a few years ago, there was no easy 
way to do that with the popular word proc- 
essing packages available on the CoCo 
market. One had to obtain expensive soft- 
ware that was usually short on all the fea- 
tures that you needed, except that particular 
one of making columns. Now, many good 
word processing programs will do that rela- 
tively quickly and easily. 

Columns alone are not enough though. 
The software must be flexible enough to 
wrap text around graphics within and out- 



side columns, and even have blocks of text, 
such as headings, that are not within those 
columns. It's a tall order! 

For serious desktop publishing, options 
supplied with many packages are rarely 
enough. There are a few more clip art 
images needed to get that special point 
across; one more font to make it perfect. So, 
if you want to use artwork or fonts from 
other packages, the import/export feature 
is needed, which allows you to import or 
export fonts, clip art and text to or from 
other programs. 

But what if you want to incorporate text, 
fonts or graphics from a different com- 
puter, like a Macintosh or PC? Then you 
need the ASCII save/load feature as well. 
ASCII is the American Standard Code for 
Information Interchange and it allows any 



computer to save a file of a given font, text 
or graphics in ASCII format, so other 
computers with the ability to save ASCII 
files can read it. 

Just as important is the feature that al- 
lows you to see the finished document on 
screen before printing. WYSIWYG (pro- 
nounced wi-see-wig), an acronym for What 
You See Is What You Get, describes the 
process of viewing on screen — either 
continuously, or in the display mode — 
what your finished document will look 
like. How can this be done? The computer 
actually thinks of the screen as a device 
(printers, disk drives and modems are 
devices, too), so when you ask to view your 
document, the computer prints it to the 
screen instead of to the printer or to a file. 
No desktop publishing software is worth 



Newspaper Plus 



The Hi-Res preview option of Newspaper Plus (below, left) gives a 
full-page view of your work, but with some loss of text legibility. It is 
great, though, for getting a feel for what the document will look like. The 
Lo-Res option (below, right) increases legibility and allows scrolling 
through the document. 





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Home Publisher 

Tandy's Home Publisher is a popular desktop publishing package, 
especially among OS-9 addicts. At right is a sample printout from Home 
Publisher, The photo below shows the screen display of the same docu- 
ment. As with other recent software, Home Publisher makes extensive use 
of pull-down menus during document preparation. 



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May 1989 THE RAINBOW 



its salt without some form of this feature. 

Lastly, and certainly quite important, is 
the actual printout of the document. The 
question here is not so much what kind of 
printer you have, but does the software 
communicate with or drive your printer? 
Of course, the type of printer you have will 
make a difference in the quality of the 
document and how fast you can print it. 

If you intend to pursue desktop publish- 
ing, you cannot use a letter quality printer 
(LQP) such as one of the Tandy DWP 
series printers, also called daisy -wheel 
printers. A printer with a wheel or thimble- 
like print head can only print letter quality 
documents like a typewriter — no graph- 
ics, no fancy fonts. So be sure that you have 
a laser, color or dot-matrix printer. 

Does the software need all of these fea- 
tures to be desktop publishing? No, not by 
some standards, but yes by mine. 



The Works 
from Color ware 




What It Does: The Works is a desktop 
publishing teamup of the Max-10 
word processor and the Co Co Max 
III graphics editor, along with a large 
variety of supporting font sets. 
Analysis: This package is feature-rich, 
extremely fast, easy to use and has a 
true WYSIWYG display. It's a power 
package that can outperform the 
Macintosh in speed and features. 
Requirements: 128K CoCo 3, one 
disk drive, and mouse or joystick. A 
second disk drive and an RGB mon- 
itor are recommended. 
CoCoConclusions: An excellent 
package overall for Color Computer 
desktop publishing, but it is also three 
times as expensive as its nearest com- 
petitor. It is well-suited for ad layouts 
and graphic design. 
Pricing: The Works, including Co Co 
Max Max-10, Max-10 Font Set 
and CoCo Max Font3, $149.95. 
For more information, see the review 
of Max-10 in the January '89 RAIN- 
BOW, Page 118 and the review of 
CoCo Max III in the April '88 issue, 
Page 129. 



The Power of the Printed Word 

For the Color Computer there are only 
three packages that meet the criterion for 
complete desktop publishing packages — 
The Works from Colorware, Newspaper 
Plus from Second City Software and Home 
Publisher from Tandy. 

The Works 

The Works package includes Max-10, a 
full-featured word processor and CoCo Max 
III, a graphics creation program. Packaged 
together, it forms the most powerful desk- 
top publishing package available for the 
Color Computer. 

Max-10 has pull-down menus, dialog 
boxes, full mouse control and instant re- 
sponse. It has full-display capacity, a spell 
checker, text wrap, multiple columns, lock 
protection, global search and replace and 
the capability to import all types of files. 



The Newspaper Plus 
from Second City Software 




What It Does: The Newspaper Plus is 
a desktop publishing program that 
uses a structured layout to let users 
produce newsletter-type documents. 
Analysis: The program is easy to use 
and versatile. It is supported by exten- 
sive clip art and fonts. It includes a 
graphics conversion program, but the 
size of an image to be converted is 
limited. 

Requirements: 128K CoCo 3 and one 
disk drive. An RGB monitor and two 
disk drives are recommended. 
CoCoConclusions: The Newspaper 
Plus is a full-featured desktop pub- 
lishing package that, on the whole, is 
very reliable. 

Pricing: The Newspaper Plus, $48.95; 
Graphics Disk I, $19.95; News Art 
disks A through Z, $9.95 each or $100 
for 26-disk set. Registered owners of 
CoCo Newsroom may upgrade to 
Newspaper Plus for $19.95. 
For more information, see the upcom- 
ing review of The Newspaper Plus in 
the July 89 issue of THE RAINBOW. 



You can find out how much memory 
you have left by looking at the "gas gauge" 
type display. It is a good idea to check this 
before bringing in a graphics file, as mem- 
ory goes quickly with all those pixels. 

CoCo Max HI, on the other hand, is a 
graphics design package that incorporates 
sophisticated text formatting capabilities, 
but is primarily designed for graphics de- 
sign. It includes 28 tools, 16 colors, 14 
initial fonts, plus template tools, from ver- 
tical arcs to the regular and irregular quad- 
rilaterals, ellipses on and off, and your run- 
of-the-mill rays, boxes, circles, lines drawn 
in any width, animation and color cycling. 
CoCo Max 111 has graphics capabilities to 
paste files or pictures of nearly any type 
into the body of a document, resize the 
image and wrap text around it. You can 
import/export graphics files in almost any 
format you can name. It has 40 brush shapes 



Home Publisher 
from Tandy 




What It Does: Home Publisher is the 
only OS-9 desktop publishing soft- 
ware for the CoCo. No OS-9 expe- 
rience is needed. It will run under 
Multi- Vue. 

Analysis: It has flexible configura- 
tion, 14 fonts, 37 graphics images and 
64 colors. The user interface for 
controlling screen viewing and text 
entry is a bit clumsy, and the program 
is somewhat limited. However, it is 
capable of impressive results. 
Requirements: 128K CoCo 3 and one 
disk drive. Performance is enhanced 
with 512K RAM and a mouse or 
joystick. An RGB monitor is recom- 
mended. 

CoCoConclusions: Home Publisher 
works in the Multi- Vue environment, 
which means you can edit several 
documents at the same time. 
Pricing: Home Publisher, $39,95; 
additional printer drivers, $19.95. 
For more information, see the review 
of Home Publisher in the July '88 
RAINBOW, Page 122. 



60 



THE RAINBOW May 1 989 



and dozens of fill patterns that you can 
change or create. 

CoCo Max III allows you to use hun- 
dreds of fonts, four disks full of them, plus 
what comes with the program, and any 
others you care to buy and translate to 
CoCo Max III. As part of The Works pack- 
age, Color ware is offering the 100-font set 
for CoCo Max III at no extra cost, and the 
36 Max-10 fonts, as well. 

As an option, color printer drivers are 
available for CoCo M ax II I for the Star NX- 
1000 Rainbow, the CGP-220 and Okimate 
20 at $19.95 each. These will drive 125 
colors in the above printers. Otherwise, the 
drivers included support IBM/Epson com- 
patible; Radio Shack, including black and 
white CGP-220; Gemini; andOkidata 182/ 
192 printers. 

CoCo Max III includes and requires the 
use of a modified Hi-Res Interface for its 
operation. This allows fine control over the 
screen with a mouse or joystick. Max-10 
uses the modified interface, too, but also 
requires a hardware key ("clicker") to be 
plugged into the cassette port. This later 
item is a form of copy protection. Both the 
interface and the "clicker" are included 
with The Works. 

The Works package gives more graph- 
ics, text, import and export capability, lay- 
out and text/graphics integration than any 
other software product for the CoCo. 

It sounds as though The Works is like an 
MS-DOS desktop publishing system be- 
cause it is modeled after one. It raises a 
serious question about why to buy a $2000 
Macintosh with Macwrite, MacPaint and 
MacPublish just to match it. I like chal- 
lenges, so I brought in a respected friend, 
who is a Mac user, and he nearly fell off his 
chair when I showed him The Works. He 
kept shaking his head and moaning quietly, 
"My Mac can't do that.. .no, it can't do that 
either." 

But does this mean you should buy it? 



The Men Behind the Max 



Born in Paris, John Monin moved to 
the United States some 13 years ago.You 
could say he has a European perspective 
on marketing software: "I wouldn't buy 
junk, and I will not sell it," he says. "We 
spend the money until the product is to 
my satisfaction." 

John has put his money where his 
mouth is in this case. With the introduc- 
tion of CoCo Max /// and Max-10, 
bundled together with extra font sets, 
Colorware has introduced what appears 
to be perfectionist's software — The 
Works. 

Both CoCo Max III and Max-10 were 
written by Dave Stampe, who tackled the 
projects in his early twenties but has since 
returned to school to pursue engineering 
degrees. According to Monin, Stampe 
would revise and revise the software until 
he was happy with it. Even after pro- 
nouncing a project finished, Stampe 
would spend a weekend writing arid 
rewriting 100 pages of code, just to add 
one more feature. "I was really afraid that 
he'd burn out," said Monin. "But he 
really wanted to dohis personal best, and 
he produced a program that is nearly 
perfect." 

John Monin's pride in Dave Stampe is 
evident. "It is not how big a company you 
have, or how majiy people you have 
working for yoU — It is hoW thorough 
you are. We are really pleased at Color- 
ware that CoCo Max ///and Max-10 are 
as good as they are." 

Monin founded Colorware after the 
emergence of the Color Computer in 
1982, Originally, his Alpha Products 



company supplied hardware interfaces 
like clocks and speech synthesizers for 
the TRS-80 Model I and III computers. 
When Monin saw the CoCo gaining in 
strength and popularity, his company 
went all out to produce quality products 
for it. 

"Colorware was founded because I 
wanted to bring the products we had 
developed for the Model I and III to the 
Color Computer," John said, reflecting 
on the light pen interface and the Atari 
joystick adapter that were the company's 
first CoCo products. 

CoCo Max and CoCo Max II were 
written by Tim Jenison. Tim left Col- 
orware to strike out on his own after the 
development of CoCo Max II and is 
now developing products for Amiga 
computers* 

Monin has pledged support to the 
CoCo Community, saying that "as long 
as there is a RAINBOW, there will be a 
Colorware." He would not release infor- 
mation on new products being devel- 
oped, but he did hint at new pricing 
structures for CoCo Max III and Max- 
10 soon to be released, as well as a 
rumored release of his products with no 
copy protection schemes at all 

"I use CoCo Max and Max-10 myself. 
In fact, the next advertisements in RAIN- 
BOW will be done completely using 
Max" said Monin. 

He went on to say that he had received 
calls from a number of clients who are 
using The Works to run their businesses 
— doing ad and layout work, fliers and 
newsletters. □ 



Not if all you want to do is make greeting 
cards and signs. If you don't need all that 
muscle, and you don't want to be an artist, 
there are other alternatives. I like to use this 
formula: The need must justify the cost. 



The Works is the best, but at $149.95, it is 
also the most expensive. Keep in mind 
what you want and need as you make your 
choices. If you want a more structured 
layout to work with than Max-10 can give 













• l 














Support for Tandy, IBM/ 
Epson/Star/Gemini printers 


c5 








UJ 
UJ 






&■ 










Desktop 

Publisher 

Comparison 


& 

s, . 

' '23 
O'. 

s 


| Special hardware reqi 


Ji 

1 

• © 

O ■ 


j No. of fonts included 
with base package 


8 I 

is i 

"5 "§ 
d H 


No of fill patterns 
with base package 


CD 

■o a. 
o to 

o 

6 i 


| No. of attributes 
| that cart be changed 


Support for RGB and 
composite video 


IS 

CM 

c 

D 
lA 
c 
a 

cc 


512K support 


Support for color print 
in color 


j Colored display 


WYSIWYG display 


Support for laser printi 


Support lor both HSCF 
and PM0DE4 files 


W 

xz 
o 

1 

o 

J§ 


Support tor multiple 
columns 


Text wrap around grap 


Graphics resizing 


Ability to change 
text attributes 


Spelling checker 


n 

cr> 
tn 
o 


The Works 


'% 


y 


y 


13 


0 


64' 


NA 


5 


y 


y 


y 


y 


n 2 


y 


y 


■ If 


y 


y 


y 




y 


y 


y 


n 


Newspaper Plus 


n 


n 


n 


22 


50 


10 


NA 


0 


y 


y 


n 


y 


n 




y 4 


V 


5 5 


y 


y 


y 


n 


n 


n 


n 


Home Publisher 


y 


n 




14 


37 


0 


8 


4 


y 


y 


y 


y 


n 


y 


n 4 


n 


n 


y 6 


y 


y 


f 


y 


n 


y 


1 64 fill patterns at one time, including colors; has fill pattern editor some files are too big and must be truncated or cut into sections 

* optional $1 9,95 driver for Okimate 20, Star Rainbow NX1 000, CGP-220 * set to read in text files only; graphics importing is possible but not available 

3 some menus are in color; working screens are in monochrome 7 three sizes to choose from; no dynamic figure sizing 

4 limited or partial WYSIWYG; only one document section is displayed at a time 



May 1989 THE RAINBOW 61 



you, The Works will not work for you. Let' s 
take a look at why. 

Newspaper Plus! 

If you want to produce a newsletter for 
your Boy or Girl Scouts, packed with infor- 
mation and including a subtle graphics 
punch, then the structured environment of 
Newspaper Plus fits the bill. 

The program comes with 22 fonts and 
50 clip art pictures. There is a graphics disk 
you can purchasefor $19.95 with 10 new 
fill patterns, three new font sets and 50 new 
graphics picture files. 

Newspaper Plus is operated solely from 
the keyboard, no mouse or joystick inter- 
face is required. A conversion utility al- 
lows changing graphics and font formats 
into the Newspaper Plus format, but there 
are size limitations on the imported graph- 
ics image. Larger images must be cut into 
sections or only a part of them may be 
captured and used. One nice feature is a 
utility called Grabber, which serves to grab 
graphics images off a screen to be stored for 
later use in a document. 

Newspaper Plus is written mostly in 
BASIC and gets it speed from machine 
language subroutines. Newspaper Plus also 
utilizes a structured environment, differing 
from The Works, but similar to Tandy's 
Home Publisher and with more options. To 
use it, you must choose a layout from a 
menu, which gets loaded into memory. A 
typical layout might be two columns bro- 
ken into four sections each, with a full-page 
banner across the top, such as the newslet- 



ter shown on Page 59. There is no free-form 
environment; the document is built one 
section at a time and then compiled for 
saving, viewing and printing. Of course 
this has some interesting mix and match ca- 



Block 

IBroadwau 
mcjll tSusini 

j£?V-»i a f T it 2 h e eft s 

mall C*>1«1 fii**> 4* 

": : >rn all ||< -itici n 
Roman Complex 
Roman Triplex 



Italtc Complex 
Italic Tvvplex 

Figure 1: A few samples of the 
many fonts available for both the 
OS-9 and CoCo Calligrapher. 



pabilities since you always select which 
panels the newsletter or document will be 
built from. 

I had one major problem with Newspa- 
perPlus.When it hits a disk error on asave, 
it crashes. So if you just spent an hour 
designing the perfect section of your news- 
letter, and there is a disk error, you are 
unable to exit to the Type Up II program to 
save the memory buffer to restart the pro- 
gram. (I lost my work. I was so upset by 
this, I tried the program on three different 
CoCos, three different drive systems, and I 
had the same problem time after time.) Ed 
Hathaway of Second City Software is aware 
of this and has indicated that a patch to fix 
this problem will be available very soon, 
and will be sent to all registered Newspaper 
Plus owners. 

Newspaper Plus supports a wide assort- 
ment of printers, including the Radio Shack 
printers along with the CGP-220, and un- 
like any of the other packages we are look- 
ing at, the Tandy LP- 1000 laser printer. 
Support for Gemini, Star NX 1000 and IBM/ 
Epson compatibles is also included. There 
is also a utility that allows you to design 
printer drivers. 

It has the best documentation for desk- 
top publishing on the CoCo I have seen. It 
includes a thorough manual and a begin- 
ner's tutorial. 

Home Publisher 

Tandy 's Home Publisher is a modest in- 
troduction to desktop publishing for the 
128K Color Computer, but works much 



The Chief Editor of Newspaper Plus 



The CoCo Community at large can 
bear witness to yet another "Local Boy 
Makes It Big" story — that of 16-year- 
old Eric Wolf. Eric is sole owner and 
operator of EAW Software, a company 
formed to market his innovative software 
creations. 

Eric has been writing software for the 
Color Computer for several years. His 
first published program, Out In Font, 
was published in the "Hot CoCo" section 
of 80 Micro (now defunct) in 1986. This 
was a program to generate new type 
styles and fonts for creative printer 
output. Could it have been a precursor 
to Newspaper Plusl It may very well have 
been. 

A 10th grade sophomore at Lasalle 
High School in South Bend, Indiana, 
Eric stands over 6 feet tall and enjoys 
basketball and a quiet family life with his 
parents and three brothers and sisters. 
Not yet certain where he plans to attend 
college, Eric wants to pursue a degree in 



computer software engineering or pro- 
gramming. He has expressed a strong 
interest in artificial intelligence, which he 
studies in his spare time, and has taught 
himself BASIC, machine language and 
Apple Pascal. 

Eric started programming on an old 
gray CoCo 1 that his Dad brought home 
when he was 10 years old. From there he 
became interested in reading THE RAIN- 
BOW and keying in programs, eventually 
trying some programming on his own. 
When he discovered that he had a talent 
for it, he set out to write exciting soft- 
ware. 

Eric wrote one of the first commercial 
products for the CoCo 3 when it came 
out, CoCo Newsroom (now the updated 
Newpaper Plus) — he was only 14 years 
old at the time, incredible as it seems. 
Originally marketed through Spectrum 
Projects and Microcom Software, exclu- 
sive rights are now owned by Second City 
Software of Roselle, Illinois. Along with 



Newspaper Plus and the accompanying 
graphics disk, also written by Eric, 
Second City sells other popular CoCo 
software. Just released is another News- 
paper Plus companion, News Art 
which is scheduled for release at RAIN- 
BOWfest Chicago. 

Ed Hathaway, co-owner of Second 
City Software with David Barnes, an 
OS-9 analyst and programmer, is very 
proud of Eric and his accomplishments, 
and very pleased with the Newspaper 
Plus product. He is generously publish- 
ing a quarterly newsletter free of charge 
to registered Newspaper Plus owners, 
which includes sample newsletter 
layouts, patches, fixes, upgrades and new 
product announcements. 

David is SysOp of the Second City 
Software BBS, (312) 307-1519, which 
lends additional support to the com- 
pany's clients and serves as a local CoCo 
club BBS. 

□ 



62 THE RAINBOW May 1989 



better on a 512K Color Computer using a 
mouse or joystick. Of the three programs, 
this one runs the best on a monochrome 
monitor. {Newspaper Plus is difficult to 
read on some screens and Max-10, while 
sufficient, loses something in the transla- 
tion without color.) Remember, software 
must be configured before it can be used 
properly. If you just loaded up a program 
and it looks strange, check the settings for 
the monitor, printer, input device, drives, 
etc. 

Tandy Home Publisher operates in the 
OS-9 level II environment, though you 
don't need to own it or be familiar with it to 
operate the program. It has flexible con- 
figuration, 14 fonts, 37 graphics images 
and 64 foreground and background colors 
to set your RGB or Composite screen to and 
has all the common word processing fea- 
tures. The fonts are varied in size and style, 
not as well done as some other packages. 
The 37 images are well done. 

This is the only Color Computer desk- 
top publishing package under OS-9, but is 
also the only one with no file translation 
utility. The biggest problem is the speed at 
which it operates. It is unbearably slow to 
update, draw screens, draw pages, and so 
forth, yet it is a good example of desktop 
publishing. Its interesting user interface 
enables the user to work with one portion of 
the document at a time. Like Newspaper 
Plus it has a structured but far more limited 
range of layout patterns. There is some 
compatibility and a program like OS-9 Cal- 
ligrapher might come in handy here. 

Printer support for Home Publisher is 
limited to several of the Tandy DMP series 
printers and an Epson RX-compatible 
printer. In addition, there is a printer driver 
disk available from Tandy for $19.95, which 
has the following popular printer drivers: 
Tandy CGP-220, C. Itoh 85 1 0 AP, Epson 
MX-80, Okidata 20, Panasonic KX-P1090, 
and the Star SG-10. 

Tandy Home Publisher also works in 
the Multi-Vue environment, which in the- 
ory means you can edit several desktop 
publishing documents at the same time. 
However, there is a problem of keeping 
track of where you are on the screen. You 
may input some text, but it does not show 
up because you are looking at a different 
area of the document than where you are 
putting the text. This program is also set up 
to import text from any OS-9 word process- 
ing program, though it's a good idea to 
write it on something else and then import 
it into the Home Publisher. Simple lines, 
however, can be done within the program. 

Extra, Extra! 

There are many programs for the CoCo 
1, 2 and 3 that will do great drawings or 



Nancy Ewart on Desktop Publishing 



Meet Nancy Ewart, freelance writer on 
computer topics and CoCo user extraor- 
dinaire. Nancy insists that she is a user, 
not a programmer, and takes time out 
from her busy schedule to talk to a 
reporter from RAINBOW. When asked 
about CoCo's desktop publishing pro- 
grams, she confides, "I have used them 
all, and I have started working on MS- 
DOS machines, too." She adds, *Tm a 
novice Ventura Publisher user really, and 
all Fuse at home is the CoCo. 1 * 

A relative newcomer to computers at 
age 58, Nancy started on computers 
about five years ago when she bought one 
for her nephew. She found that she 
became interested in them herself, and 
now she owns four CoCos. *Tm an 
OS-9 advocate,*' she says, "and the main 
thing I've been seeing is what l would 
have liked to have seen all along with the 
CoCo. There ought to be an easier way 
to run OS-9." 

Nancy says she is disappointed that 
there is not a better desktop publisher for 
OS-9. "Home Publisher is very slow,"she 
said. "There are none of the more usual 
typefaces. The smallest type isn't small 
enough, and you have no control of the 



leading, which is the spaces between the 
lines." Nevertheless, she insists that she 
has learned a lot from using Home 
Publisher and that the program has been 
very important to her. She has taken the 
experience gained and applied it to her 
MS-DOS work. "A lot of what I've 
learned in Home Publisher, Newspaper 
Plus, and The Works crosses over to 
Ventura, and vice- versa." 

When asked what she thought about 
Newspaper Plus, she said she thought it 
was good, but she missed the mouse. "It's 
a very good middle-of-the-road pack- 
age," she commented, then added "CoCo 
Max HI and Max- 10 are much easier to 
use. 1 wouldn't fool around with anything 
else." She also added that the combina- 
tion sets of fonts you use with MaxAQ are 
like the style sheets in Ventura Publisher 
for the PC. 

When asked if she used her CoCos for 
any business or professional work, she 
explained that she had done prayer 
books, yearbooks, and page layouts for 
national Girl Scout handbooks, adding 
that she had recently taken art courses to 
learn more about graphics design. 

□ 



make fantastic fonts but, as mentioned al- 
ready, unless they meet your needs they are 
not practical. 

I talked to several desktop publishing 
users, and found a wide range of needs — 
newsletters for clubs or organizations; 
business or professional documents; and 
for just pure fun, greeting cards, invitations 
and banners. And for many of these proj- 
ects, full-fledged desktop publishing pro- 
grams are not needed. In such cases, sup- 
plementary programs provide enough fea- 
tures. 

Calligrapher from Sugar Software, for 
example, is designed to work only with 
text. The Calligrapher programs include: 
OS-9 Calligrapher, CoCo Calligrapher and 
OS-9 Font Massager. 

CoCo Calligrapher is a powerful font 
filter, but is limited under our definition of 
desktop publishing. Running under Disk 
BASIC, you can type up to 17 lines of text 
in one-half inch letters in one of three fonts: 
Gay Nineties, Old English and Cartoon. 
The editing capabilities are limited, de- 
signed primarily to make flyers, invita- 
tions, announcements, etc. It is compatible 
with IBM, Epson, Gemini and Radio Shack 
dot-matrix printers. OS-9 Calligrapher can 
load multiple files and fonts (See Figure 
1.), set margins, change directories, print 
files to disk or to the printer, view files, 
wrap text, justify left, right or center, print 



in columns, etc. — a fairly full-featured 
word processor. 

OS-9 Font Massager is a package that 
allows you to create new fonts, invert fonts, 
double the width or height of a font, halve 
the height or width, and convert fonts be- 
tween OS-9 and Disk BASIC, to ASCII or 
binary. And it works on a CoCo. 

Of the three packages, the OS-9 pro- 
grams clearly have more power and flexi- 
bility. They include well-written manuals 
and require only a very basic knowledge of 
OS-9. Any individual package is short of 
being a complete desktop publishing pro- 
gram, but provides good typesetting and 
font generation. There is always the option 
to use the additional fonts available from 
Sugar Software or fonts from other pro- 
grams. The Calligrapher programs are 
outstanding values if you have text-only 
needs. 

Get The Picture? 

The Digisector DS69B and C-See 3.3 
software from Micro Works is also more of 
a sideline to desktop publishing. It has the 
ability to create computer-readable images 
using a video camera and special conver- 
sion device. To understand how the Digisec- 
tor works, think of it as taking a picture,then 
converting it to a series of numbers that the 
CoCo understands, reading it into the CoCo 
memory and having the CoCo display what 



May 1989 THE RAINBOW 63 



Logan Ward's 
Specialty Projects 

Everybody seeMs to kno^ Logan 
Ward for something. Whether it is for his 
work at the Computer Center of Mem- 
phis, Tennessee, his CoCo Cat and Max- 
well Mouse cartoons from RAINBOW, or 
the "world's only CoCo PC" at RAIN- 
BOWfest, everybody gets a chance to 
bump into Logan Ward sooner or later. 

Logan's latest venture is clip art for the 
CoCo, in the form of a package marketed 
by Specialty Projects, a company he 
helped form with a local Color Computer 
users group. The package is called Art 
Deli Library and is an assortment of 440 
clip art images, sorted by theme, on 10 
disks for $99. 

Logan refuses to take full credit for this 
release. "This was a real team effort,'* he 
says. "It was mostly put together by 
myself and my wife, Stacy Ward, and B.J. 
Setton and his wife, Theresa, and also by 
Bill and Terry Peck. We got together from 
a local users group, just decided that 
someone should do some real serious clip 
art for the CoCo and make it available 
to the general public." 

While Art Deli has no documentation, 
it does include a printout of each of the 
digitized PM0DE4 images. These are ar- 
ranged by theme on both sides of 10 
disks. The themes include holidays, pets, 
travel, love, sports and silly sports. "All 
you do is convert them to whatever 
graphics program you have," says Ward. 
The images are all professionally ren- 
dered high-quality drawings, and do in 
fact convert readily to the different 
desktop publishing packages included in 
this article. 

Specialty Projects will soon release a 
utility disk for transferring the images 
among different program formats, such 
as Newspaper Plus, Home Publisher, 
CoCo Max /// and Max- 10. The disk will 



each of those coded numbers stands for, 
much as a modem works. 

Best results come from using a CoCo 3, 
though the system works with other Co- 
Cos. There are 64 levels of gray, and the 
software changes the amount of gray in 
different light intensity sections to give an 
enhanced image. 

The Digisector comes in a ROM pack, 
but requires special software to run. Be sure 
your Multi-Pak has the required CoCo 3 
upgrade, or you may get some strange 
results. Once you are finished editing your 
image, you can save the image on disk. 
Programs like Magigraph, CoCo Max III 
or Graphicom can then edit the images and 
bring them into various programs for fur- 
ther editing. 

It supports Radio Shack and IBM/Ep- 
son-compatible printers. The reviewer rec- 
ommends a four-head HQ VCR or a high- 
quality Camcorder for capturing the video 
images to get crisp, clear resolution. How- 
ever, any video source, even a TV can be 
used and still produce good results. (See 
Figure 2.) 




MAGAZINE PRINTS 
PHOTO TO SELL 
MORE COPIES 

Figure 2: A digitized image cap- 
tured with Micro Work's Digisec- 
tor DS69B and Max-10. 



What makes this program so valuable to 
desktop publishing is that it can be used to 
make clip art or graphics images. An image 
can be imported into a desktop publishing 
program and integrated into a document. 
There are enough conversion utility pro- 
grams available so that once you have the 
image translated into one of the C-See 
software formats, it can be grabbed and 
translated into many of the other formats. If 
what you want is an inexpensive way to 
handle digitized pictures, the Digisector 
can't be beat. 

Graphics du Jour 

The Art Deli Library from Specialty 
Projects is a compendium of PM0DE4 graph- 



ics images that you can import into graph- 
ics design or desktop publishing packages. 
It comes in a package with a spiral-bound 
book containing printouts of each of the 
440 graphics images enclosed in the 10- 
disk package. The images include every- 
thing from animals, sports and holidays to 
seasons, travel and more. A program on the 
disks called SHOW loads each of the images 
on a disk one after the other. There is no 
documentation, however. It also has no 
printer drivers. You can load a screen dump 
program configured already for your printer 
to accomplish this task. The more out- 
standing feature of Art Deli is its ability to 
transfer the images into desktop publishers 
with file translation utilities or graphics de- 
signs packages as clip art. The images are 
categorized, high quality and professional. 
(See Figure 3.) 

There will be documentation included 
in the next release of Art Deli, along with 
the availability of a utility disk enabling 
people to convert the Art Deli Library 
images into other formats for incorporation 
in desktop publishing documents. The 
utility disk will sell for $14.95, and will be 
available soon from Specialty Projects. 
Specialty Projects has also released Art 
Deli 11, which has 220 images on five disks. 

You be the Judge 

CoCo Graphics Designer Plus is a pro- 
gram that makes banners, cards and signs 
for 8 1/2-by-l 1-inch paper. It comes with 
16 borders, five fonts and 32 pictures. There 
are no word processing features and no 
word wrap, but you can delete your mis- 
takes readily enough. There is a preview 
screen that gives an overview and allows 
you to scroll around to specific areas. 

It runs on any 64K CoCo or the CoCo 3 
and requires a mouse or joystick. It is fast, 
complete and has additional graphics, font 
and special border disks available for $14.95. 
You can convert the fonts and graphics into 




Just ask this happy httt* fellow what hi thinks about Max- 10' 

Figure 3: Max-10 screen with Art 
Deli image of a dog. 



sell for $14.95. Users will also be inter- 
ested in Art Deli II from Specialty 
Projects, which is 220 images on five 
disks for $49.95. 



a variety of formats for other desktop pub- 
lishing programs. It is limited to two differ- 
ent images per page and only as much text 
for a card or sign. There are limited styles 
and capabilities for moving, changing, 
rearranging and so forth. 

It has a good number of printer drivers, 
and produces excellent documents. One 
nice extra about CGDP is its built-in card 
formatter to make cards in two different 
layouts. The program can make a card 
cover and an inside page, and will print 
them in such a way that you can fold the 



64 THE RAINBOW May 1989 




Give your kids a head 
with the affordable, expandable 
Tandy* Color Computer 3* 




Why buy a TV game when you can 
have a powerful computer instead? Ju^r 
connect the Tandy Color Computer 3 to 
your TV for an extraordinarily low-priced 
home computer system. 

With the educational software available 
for the Color Computer 3, your ehUdr4.ni 
can study math, reading; typing— a variety 
of subjects— all while learning how to use 
a real computer 

The Color Computer 3 provides impress 
sive computing power for grownups,, tor:. 
There's a library of useful software availa- 
ble. Choose from word processing, .spread- 
sheet and database, programs,, in addition 
to games the whole family can enjoy- 

Expand anytime, with a printer, disk 
drives, a telephone modem and more.. 
Add a CM-8 high-resolution monitor 
to create colorful, razor-sharp graphics. 

The Color Computer 3 offers uncompro- 
mising performance at a terrific price— .see. 
it today. 



Radio /haek 



■^■■w n iii 



Sir 



The Technology Store 

A DIVISION OF TANDY CWFORATIQN , 




" A program for generating fonts, a graphics design program, a set of disks full of clip art, a 
word processor — all have something in common. ... if you take these elements and combine 
them to create integrated text and graphics, you've got desktop publishing." 




Figure 4: CoCo Graphics Designer Plus has a built-in greeting card layout and 
makes designing cards, signs and banners a snap. 

t 

66 THE RAINBOW May 1989 



Art Deli 

from Specialty Projects 




What It Does: Art Deli consists of 440 
pictures on 10 disks. It is a graphics 
library with no internal programmed 
capabilities. 

Analysis: The images can be con- 
verted to the appropriate format and 
incorporated in a graphics program or 
desktop publishing document. 
Requirements: CoCo I, 2 or 3 and a 
disk drive (is compatible with any 
program that can translate binary, 
PMDDE 4 or HSCREEN 2 or 3 files). 
CoCoConclusions: Art Deli would be 
a good investment for people who 
make heavy use of high-quality graph- 
ics designs in their desktop publishing 
programs. 

Pricing: $12.95 per disk or $99.95 for 
a complete 10-disk set. 

For more information, see the review 
of Art-Deli in the October *87 RAIN- 
BOW, Page 134. 



paper several different ways to create a 
greeting card. (See Figure 4.) While lim- 
ited to two images per page, the images can 
be stamped in three different sizes and 
locations on the page, giving more flexibil- 
ity. The documentation includes a brief 
tutorial and is well written. 

It supports almost all Radio Shack print- 
ers, Panasonic, Star and NX1000 printers, 
Epson and IBM. 

Finding the Right Software 

This has been a general overview of 
what is available in CoCo desktop publish- 
ing. It might be pointed out that one thing 
missing from all but one (Newspaper Plus) 
of the CoCo desktop publishing packages 
is a driver for a laser printer. Laser printers 
yield the highest speed, highest resolution 
and highest quality print overall with the 
least amount of noise. They are also quite 
expensive. If, however, your business has a 



DS69B Digisector 

With C-See 3 3 

from The Micro Works 




What It Does: The DS69B Digisector 
is a tool on a ROM pack for convert- 
ing television pictures into a savable, 
printable format. 

Analysis: Pictures captured by the 
DS69B can be converted into formats 
that graphics and desktop publishing 
programs can manipulate. In itself, it 
is inexpensive, but it requires addi- 
tional hardware that can be costly 
Requirements: 64K CoCo 1, 2 or 3, 
one disk drive, a Multi-Pak, video 
camera or video source. 
CoCoConclusions: This is a valuable, 
full-featured enhancement to a desk- 
top publishing or graphics design 
software package. If you have the 
necessary equipment, its low price 
makes it a very good value. 
Pricing: DS69B Digisector including 
C-SeeJJ, $149.95. 

For more information, see the review 
ofDS69B in this issue of THE RAIN- 
BOW, Page 121. 



laser printer, there is a good possibility that 
it emulates one of the CoCo desktop pub- 
lishing supported printers. In the descrip- 
tion boxes you will find references to re- 
view articles that have appeared in Rain- 
bow for most of these products, a good 
source for an in-depth look at these prod- 
ucts. 

What is most important in making your 
selection is that you make it based on what 
is right for your needs. Know what it is you 
want, need and what you are gel l ing before 
you spend those hard-earned dollars. There 
are many programs out there for the CoCo 
1 ,2 and 3 that will do great drawings or will 
make fantastic fonts. But unless they meet 
your needs, they are not what you should be 
getting. Don't be wooed by what it does do, 
ask what is missing. What is wrong with 
this product? What doesn't it do that I need 
it to do? 

A program for generating fonts, a graph- 



CoCo Graphics 
Designer Plus 
from Zebra Systems 




What It Does: CoCo Graphics De- 
signer Plus is an elegant program 
designed solely for the creation of 
signs, cards and banners. 
Analysis: Although, it is good at what 
it does, this program is not truly a 
desktop publishing program. It is 
supported by accessory font, picture 
and border disks, which provide for 
variety and flexibility. 
Requirements: 64K CoCo 1, 2 or 3, 
one disk drive, and mouse or joystick. 
CoCo Conclusions: Co Co Graph ics 
Designer Plus is a nice, fun, easy-to- 
use program that does a good job on 
signs, banners and cards. It has a card 
formatter built in. 

Pricing: CoCo Graphics Designer 
Plus, $29.95; additional font, border 
and picture disks, $14.95 each. 

For more information, see the review 
of CoCo Graphics Designer Plus in 
this issue of THE RAINBOW, Page 
110, 



ics design program, a set of disks full of clip 
art, a word processor — all have something 
in common. Can you guess what it is? 
Right, none of them are desktop publishers. 
However, if you can take these elements 
and combine them to create integrated text 
and graphics, you've got desktop publish- 
ing. Armed with some questions and some 
knowledge as to what you need, you can 
find a CoCo desktop publishing package 
that is right for you. 

As we evaluate and judge, we must 
evaluate and judge ourselves. We are all 
different and unique as people, and we all 
have different needs. What desktop pub- 
lishing package works for one, might not 
work for another. What one can afford to 
spend, another might not. At THE RAIN- 
BOW, we can help with expertise and 
experience, tell you of problems and pos- 
sible solutions, and present the products 
fairly for all to see and judge. 



CoCo Calligrapher and 
OS -9 Calligrapher 
from Sugar Software 



ftii li a taali d attHf fa KM d ■ Um a tl (<*•, fjU (nttflodn U a. 



I it acinic lit JilUpiiiir 
llltriri li till laitijt, It 
lltllai hi till nfrai, Um 
hut Ij fa tii uifivB *a 
il Oa SW ml. al fa mmi 

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£1 mtla. 

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((lit), tjfti hjln, xt ! Dut in 
pUW in Uattul, 

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rfarthal, 



What It Does: These products work 
as filters to create text files in many 
different fonts, sizes and styles, with 
hundreds of type styles to choose 



Analysis: Although excellent at what 
they do, these programs have no 
inherent way to create graphics or 
integrate them; they are text-only. It 
is possible after creating a graphics 
text file with OS-9 Calligrapher to 
merge a graphics file into a text file, 
but this would require outside soft- 
ware. 

Requirements: CoCo Calligrapher 
requires a 64K RAM CoCo 1 , 2 or 3 
(cassette or disk). OS~9 Calligrapher 
requires at least one disk drive, 64K 
and Level I or II OS-9. 
CoCoConclusions: These are very 
powerful tools for producing a wide 
variety of fonts and typeset docu- 
ments and is an excellent value. 
Pricing: CoCo Calligrapher or OS-9 
Calligrapher, $24.95; Font Sets, 
$14.95 each; Economy Font Packages 
with 25 to 30 fonts, $29.95 each; all 
three Economy Font Packages pur- 
chased as a set, $59.95; OS-9 Font 
Massager, $19.95 or $14,95 with Cal- 
ligrapher purchase. 
For more information, see the review 
of CoCo Calligrapher in the October 
'85 RAINBOW, Page 215, and OS-9 
Calligrapher in the February '86 
RAINBOW, Page 206. 



Haw you used any of tlwe fur tuher) 
desktop publishing programs orpapk* 
ages to create documents (newshner^ 
irtvnaiii>m, greeting vardi\ ctfhoftm, 
banners, signs, etc. J oft y&ur CoCp 1. 
2 or 3 ? If so,, send us a prititoui ami 
a disk copy of your work! Be sure io 
what programs (rvrnpteteprn k- 
age$ m word processors, graphics de~ 
signers, clip art, font creators, etc.) 
and printer you used to design it. 
When .space permits, w'/f share your 
creations with the Cm Co Commumt v- 



I 



May 1989 THE RAINBOW 67 



CoCo3 



1 SK ECB Mod. I £5* . 



F e atur e 






'V: 





1 j £ '• c'£ 



By Edward Jones 



How many times have you wanted to 
set your printer for a particular 
font or style, but didn't because 
you hated to enter all those CHR$ 
codes? My program, Font Setter, was 
written to make printer font selection 
considerably easier. Although it was 
designed for use with a CoCo 3 and the 
Tandy DMP-130 printer, it can be 
modified for the CoCo 2 and other 
printers. 

Edward W. Jones is a retired F.A.A. air 
traffic control and radar operator who 
lives in Mobile, Alabama. 




On running Font Setter, it first re- 
minds you to have your printer turned 
on, followed by a menu that allows you 
to select the font or style you want to 
use. After you have chosen the combi- 
nation of fonts or styles you want, press 
R, and you will be asked if you would 
like to print a test message. If your 
response is yes, you may enter a message 
of up to 255 characters. 

Next you are asked if you want to 
change any of the printer settings. If you 
respond with 'Y\ you will be returned 
to the main menu, where you can 
change whatever needs changing. If you 
respond with 'N\ the program ends and 
your printer remains set for the style 
you selected until it is turned off. I use 
this program to alter my printer fonts 
for LLISTs and other printing chores. 1 
find the test message section handy for 
writing short notes in selected fonts. 

If you want to use this program with 
a CoCo 2, change Line 20 so that it 
contains only the CLS statement. Re- 
move Line 220 completely. You can also 
change all occurrences of CHR$ ( 21G ) to 
"*" in lines 270 through 440, which will 
then indicate menu selections with a star 
rather than an ASCII color block. This 
last change is not necessary for opera- 
tion on the CoCo 2, but it makes the 
screen look a little better. 

In Line 20, POKE 150,18 sets the 
computer to operate with the printer at 
2400 baud. If you run your DMP-130 
printer at 600 baud, remove this state- 
ment. 

Font Setter's menu does not allow for 
all possible printer settings, but includes 
those I find are used most often. If you 
have a Tandy printer other than a 
DMP-130, check your operator's man- 
ual and change the CHR$ codes in lines 
520 through 690 accordingly. 

(Questions or comments about this 
program may be directed to the author 
at 281 Lakeview Drive, Mobile, AL 
36609. Please enclose an SASE when 
writing for a reply.) □ 



68 



THE RAINBOW May 1989 



as 




No Better System is Available at Any Price (But the Price is G^eat, !<?o!) 





DISK 
CONTROLLER 

We at OWL-WARE are 
pleased to announce that we 
have purchased the rights to all 
of the Color Computer 
Products of J&M Systems. 
J&M has had more experience 
with CoCo controllers than any 
other supplier (except for 
Radio Shack® itself) and we 
are proud to add them to our 
nest! OWL- WARE will now be 
producing J&M controllers 
under the OWL brand. These 
controllers all use J&M's 
proven designs, with some 
minor improvements, and they 
will serve you for years to come. 

• All gold contacts 

• Works with all CoCo 
models (1,2,3) 

• Holds 2 switchable ROMS 

• Positive switching by 
simple jumper or optional 
external switch (No erratic 
software or pokes re- 
quired) 

• Buffered I/O lines to help 
prevent burn-out if unit 
accidentally pulled out 
with the system on 

• Latching chips are sock- 
eted to speed repairs 

• Does not use the WD 1773 
chip which caused 
problems with many CoCo 
3 systems and is now dis- 
continued 

• Attractive all metal case 

• Dealer inquiries now in- 
vited 



CONTROLLER only 
(Md $14.95 for RSDOS 



See the next 2 pages for more 
drive and software specials 
from OWL-WARE 




Disk drives are not our only business, but they sure are our 
main business! We have been selling hard and floppy drives for 
the CoCo longer than any other Rainbow advertiser. Our double 
sided drives are brand new, half-heights with a full one year 
warranty! The full-height drives offered cheap by our competi- 
tion are used or surplus! 



QUICKIE 






jiiii 

the e arly version. Requires 80 column monitor. 

$49. untit May is. Normal price $59. 



CASE AND 
POWER 
SUPPLY 

In recent months it has be- 
come very difficult to obtain de- 
pendable, safe power supply 
and cases for floppy drive sys- 
tems. They just couldn't pass 
our quality control. OWL- 
WARE has now produced a 
case and power supply that you 
can be proud to own and use. 
We believe that this is the best 
and most attractive drive case 
available for any computer. 

• Built in surge protector! 
(we believe that this fea- 
ture is unique in CoCo 
drive cases) 

• Sleek, modern design 

• Heavy-duty power supply 

• Fully shielded data cable 

• Modular power supply 
construction for ease of 
repairs 

• Stackable case design 

• Dealer inquiries now in- 
vited 





SliU 



More 




OWL-WCNRI 



P.O. Boxll6-A 
Mertztown, PA 19539 
• ORDER LINES (only) — 
(800) 245-6228 
(21 5) 682-6855 (PA) 



Pro ven 

On the Razor's Edge of 



Basic and OS-9 Hard 
Drive Systems 

Proven Performance for Demanding Home or 

Business Users 




Every hard drive which has been 
produced by OWL- WARE during the 
last 3 years is complete. A system con- 
sists of software, hard drive, controller, 
heavy-duty power supply, and LR Tech 
Interface. There are no hidden costs for 
assembly or testing. When a drive sys- 
tem is ordered, we fully assemble, test, 
and burn-in the system for 3 full days. 
This ensures dependability and op- 
timum performance. 

We have now been supplying CoCo 
hard drive systems and parts for more 
than 3 years. This is the longest history 
in the CoCo market of any* system. 
Some other advertisers are stating that 
they have one of the most reliable sys- 
tems for the CoCo with all of 4 months 
history in the CoCo hard drive marketl 
We have reached our position in the 
hard drive market by providing our cus- 
tomers with a quality product that they 
(and we) can be proud to own and use. 



Because of many requests for a lower 
price system in kit form, we are now 
selling a kit of all parts at a significant 
discount compared to our regular 
prices. We recommend this kit (or any 
kits offered by any other supplier) only 
to those who have experience in 
electronic assembly and OS-9. 

We have LR Tech and Burke & Burke 



For OS-9 
Levels 1 
and % 




OWL Hard Drive BASIC 3 

There have been several ads in this 
magazine about BASIC for Color 
Computer hard drive systems. These 
ads sometimes only tell a part of the 
story. Our BASIC system price in- 
cludes assembly, testing, and 3-day 
burn-in period. We do not require a 
Multi-pak to operate. 

Our hard drive systems are fast, reli- 
able, and reasonable in price. This has 
been proven by hundreds of users over 
the past 3 years. We do not have to turn 
off error checking for speed. We 
achieve high speed BASIC from a uni- 
que indexing method. 

The table below will summarize some 
of the key points about our BASIC hard 
drive system and the B&B system. We 
believe that we have the best BASIC in- 
terface for CoCo hard drives available. 

BASIC Hard Drive Systems* 

Feature OWL B&B 

Drive Portion Entire Partial (4 
Available at sections) 
One Time 

User Sets YES Yes 

BASIC/OS-9 

Partitions 

Add to Exist- YES No(?) 

ing OS-9 
Drive Without 

Reformat 

Drives 0-3 YES No 
Hard/Floppy 

Built in Park YES No 

Speed* FAST Fast 

All feature details are believed to be 
true at time of writing and are subject 
to change. We believe that our BASIC 
hard drives are the fastest due to our in- 
dexing method, but both systems are 
fast and we sell both. On ours all 
BASIC commands work including 
DSKINI, DSKIS, and DSKOS. 

Prices: With/Without Hard 

Drive 

$35./$79. 







liBlllilfH 













Kit Prices: (As above but using Burke & Burke bus adapter) 









Technolog y 



the Color Computer Frontier 




Bonus! 

Special 

Bundled 

Software 

with any 

Disk Drive 

Purchase! 




Floppy Drive Systems 

The Highest Quality for Years of Service 

(We have located a number of unused, surplus single sided drives for 
those who wish a quality, inexpensive system.) 

Drive 0 Systems (Half Height, Double Sided, Direct 

Drives) $199. (Same but Single sided) $185 

Drive 0 systems complete with drive, controller, legal DOS, 

cable, case, power supply, and manual 

Drive 1 Systems (Half Height, Double Sided, Direct 

Drives) $129. (Same but Single sided) $115. 

New 3.5", 720K Drives for OS-9 with case & 

Power Supply $179. 

Drive 1 Systems have drive, case, power supply. (You may 
require optional cable and/or DOS chip to use) 

Special for 0/1 Combos (Drives 0,1 ,2,3) $295. 



iliililipllliliil 



Hill 

501 or 502 





All drives are new and fully assembled. 
We ship only FULLY TESTED and 
CERTIFIED at these low prices. We 
use Fuji, YE Data, and other fine 
brands. No drives are used or surplus 
unless otherwise stated to you when 
you order. We appear to be the one of 
the few advertisers in Rainbow who 
can truly make this claim. We have 5 
years experience in the CoCo disk 
drive market! We are able to provide 
support when you have a problem. 



Drives 1 Year Warranty 





ilililliii^ 



OWL WARE Software Bundle 



Disk Tutorial/Utilities/Games 
DISK TUTOR Ver 1.1 

Learn how to use your disk drive from 
this multi-lesson, machine language 
program. This tutor takes you through 
your lessons and corrects your mistakes 
for a quick, painless disk drive introduc- 
tion. (This professionally written tutor 
is easily worth the bundle's total price.) 

OWL DOS 

An operating system that gives faster 
disk access and allows the use of 
double-sided drives. Corrects a floating 
point number error on early CoCo sys- 
tems. 

COPY-IT 

Quickly copies selected programs be- 
tween disks. A wild card option selects 
groups of programs to copy. 

VERIFY 

Verifies reading of each sector. Bad 
sectors are listed on the screen. 

2 GAMES 

We will select 2 games from our stock. 
These sold for more than $20 each. 

If sold separately this is more than $125 
worth of software!! 

Do not mistake this software with 
cheap, non-professional "Public 
Domain" software which is being of- 
fered by others. All of this software is 
copyrighted and professional in quality. 
The tutor is unique with us and has 
helped thousands of new users learn 
their disk drive. 

only $27.95 
(or even better) 
only $6.95 with 
any Disk Drive Purchase!! 

Our .prices, include ja. discount for cash 
but cro not mclude snipping. 

OWL-WARE has a libera! warranty policy. During the warran- 
ty period, all defective items will be repaired or replaced at our 
option at no cost to the buyer except for shipping costs. Call 
our tech number for return. Return of n on -defective or un- 
authorized returns are subject to a service charge. 



HlHIlk"". 

Mertztpwn , PA 1 9539 




290 
390 



■» .♦' ♦ • ♦ 



132 
.70 
,82 



490 . 
650 . 
END 



♦ « « • 



200 
.30 
210 



The Listing: FONTSETR 

0 1 COPYRIGHT 1989 FALSOFT, INC 
10 "DMP-130 PRINTER FONT AND STY 
LE SETTER BY EDWARD JONES 
20 WIDTH3 2:POKE150,18:CLS:PALETT 
E13 , 0 : PALETTE12 , 37 : PALETTE8 , 3 2 : P 
ALETTE9 , 48 

30 PRINT@160,STRING$ (32,243) ;:PR 
INT 

40 PRINT" DMP-130 CHARACTER STYL 

E SETTER 11 : PRINT" 

50 PRINTSTRING$(32,243) ; 

60 FORX=1TO800:NEXT 

70 PRINT @ 4 8 1 , " TURN ON PRINTER & 

PRESS A KEY"; 

80 A$=INKEY$:IFA$=""THEN80 
90 CLS: PRINT" <A> NORMAL TEXT 

<R> QUIT" 
100 PRINT" <B> COMPRESSED TEXT"; 
: PRINT@55 , STRING$ ( 8 , 156 ) 
110 PRINT" <C> CONDENCED TEXT" 
120 PRINT" <D> PROPORTIONALLY SP 
ACED TEXT 

130 PRINT" <E> CORRESPONDENCE NO 
RMAL TEXT" 

140 PRINT" <F> CORRESPONDENCE CO 
MPRESSED" 

150 PRINT" <G> START ITALICS 

-<H> STOP" 

160 PRINT" <I> START SUBSCRIPT — 
-<K> STOP" 

170 PRINT" <J> START SUPERSCRIPT 
-<K> STOP" 

180 PRINT" <L> MICROFONT TEXT" 

190 PRINT" <M> START ELONGATE 

-<N> STOP" 

200 PRINT" <0> START BOLD 

-<P> STOP" 

210 PRINT" <Q> UNDERLINE 



-<S> STOP" 
220 PALETTE8 ,0 : PALETTE 9 , 48 
230 PRINTSTRING$(3 2,243) ; 
240 PRINT@481, "SELECT LETTERS TO 

SET PRINTER"; 
250 C$=INKEY$: IFC$=""THEN250 
260 IFC$=" "THENCLS : PRINT© 161 , "P 
RINTER FONT AND STYLE IS SET ,f :PR 
INT; LINEINPUT" WANT TO PRINT A TE 
ST?' <Y/N>; :T$ 

270 IFC$="A"THENPRINT@4 , CHR$ (216 
) ; :PRINT@292, " " ? : PRINT@3 6 , » ";: 
PRINT@68," "; :PRINT@132, " " ; : PRI 
NT0164, " " ; :GOSUB520:GOTO240 
280 IFC$="B"THENPRINT@3 6, CHR$ (21 
6 J ; :PRINT@292 , " " ; : PRINT@4 , " ";: 



PRINT§ 68," "; :PRINT@13 2, " ";:PRI 
NT@164," " ; :GOSUB530:GOTO240 
290 IFC$="C"THENPRINT@68,CHR$ (21 
6) ; :PRINT@292, " " ; : PRINT@4 , " ";: 
PRINT@36," ";:PRINT@132," ";:PRI 
NT@164," "; :GOSUB540:GOTO240 
300 IFC$="D"THENPRINT@100,CHR$ (2 
16) ; :GOSUB550:GOTO240 
310 IFC$="E"THENPRINT@132,CHR$ (2 



16) ; :PRINT@292, 



it it 



:PRINT@4, " 



ii 



:PRINT§3 6," "; :PRINT§68," ";:PRI 

NT@164," " ; :GOSUB570:GOTO240 
320 IFC$="F"THENPRINT@164,CHR$ (2 



16) ; :PRINT@292, 



ii ii 



: PRINT @ 4," 



ii 



:PRINT@36," »■ ;:PRINT@68," ";:PRI 
NT@132," " ; :GOSUB560:GOTO240 
330 IFC$="G"THENPRINT@196,CHR$ (2 
16) ; :PRINT@218, " " ; : GOSUB580 : GOT 
0240 

340 IFC$="H"THENPRINT@2 18 , CHR$ (2 
16) ; :PRINT@19 6, " 11 ; :GOSUB590:GOT 
0240 

350 IFC$="I"THENPRINT@228,CHR$(2 
16) ; :PRINT@2 60, " " ; : PRINT@250 , " 
»; :PRINT@282," "; : GOSUB600 : GOT02 
40 

360 IFC$="J"THENPRINT@260,CHR$(2 
16) ; :PRINT@228, " " ; : PRINT@250 , " 
"; :PRINT@282, " " ; :GOSUB610:GOTO2 
40 

370 IFC$="K"THENPRINT@250,CHR$(2 
16) ; :PRINT@282,CHR$(216) ; :PRINT@ 
260," "; :PRINT@2 28, " ";:GOSUB620 
:GOTO2 40 

380 IFC$="L"THENPRINT@292 , CHR$ (2 
16) ; :PRINT@4, " " ; : PRINT@3 6, " ";: 
PRINT@68," "; :PRINT@13 2," " ; : PRI 
NT@164," " ; :GOSUB630:GOTO240 
390 IFC$="M"THENPRINT@324,CHR$ (2 
16) ;:PRINT@346," " ; : GOSUB640 : GOT 
0240 

400 IFC$="N"THENPRINT@346,CHR$ (2 
16) ; :PRINT@324, " " ; : GOSUB650 : GOT 
0240 

410 IFC$="0"THENPRINT@356,CHR$(2 
16) ; :PRINT@378, 11 " ; : GOSUB660 : GOT 
0240 

420 IFC$="P"THENPRINT@378,CHR$ (2 
16) ; :PRINT@356, " "; :GOSUB670:GOT 
0240 

430 IFC$="Q"THENPRINT@388 / CHR$ (2 
16) ; :PRINT@410, " "; :GOSUB680 :GOT 
0240 

440 IFC$=" S " THENPRINT @ 4 10 , CHR$ ( 2 
16) ; :PRINT§388, " "; :GOSUB690:GOT 
0240 

445 IFC$<"A"ORC$>"R"THEN240 
450 IFC$="R"THENCLS:PRINT@161 / " 
PRINTER FONT AND STYLE IS SET":F 
ORX=1TO800 : NEXT : SOUND 5 , 1 : PRINT : P 
RINT 

460 PRINT" WANT TO PRINT A TES 



72 



THE RAINBOW May 1589 



- 



63j3 PKINT#-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(77) ; : 
RETURN 1 MICRO FONT 

64j3 PRINT#-2 / CHR$(27) ;CHR$(14) ;: 
RETURN 1 START ELONGATE . 

65J3 PRINT#-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(15) ;: 

RETURN' STOP ELONGATE 

66J3 PRINT#-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(31) ;: 

RETURN' START BOLD 

67J3 PRINT#-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(32) ;: 

RETURN 1 STOP BOLD 

68J3 PRINT#-2 , CHR$ (15) ; : RETURN 1 UN 
DERLINE 

69j3 PRINT#-2 , CHR$ (14 ) ; : RETURN 1 S 
TOP UNDERLINE 

7J3J3 CLS: PRINT" ENTER TEST MESSAG 
E" : PRINTSTRING$ (32, 243) ; : PRINT 
71J3 LINEINPUT TM$ 
72j3 PRINT#-2,TM$ 

730 PRINT@481, "PRINT THE MESSAGE 

AGAIN? <Y/N>"; 
740. R$=INKEY$ : IFR$=" "THENGOT074J3 
750 IF R$="Y"THEN720 
760 IF R$="N"THEN780 
770 GOTO740 

780 PRINT @ 4 8 1 , " CHANGE THE PRINT 
CODES? <Y/N>"; 

790 PC$=INKEY$:IFPC$=""THEN790 
800 IF PC$="Y"THENCLS:GOTO90 
810 IF PC$="N"THENCLS:END 
820 GOTO790 /S\ 



T? <Y/N>" 

470 T$=INKEY$:IF T$=""THEN470 
480 IF T$-"N"THEN CLS: END 

490 IF T$="Y"THEN700 
500 GOTO470 

520 PRINT#-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(19) ;: 

RETURN 1 NORMAL (10 CPI) 

530 PRINT#-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(23) ; : 

RETURN 1 COMPRESSED (12 CPI) 

540 PRINT#-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(20) ; : 

RETURN 1 CONDENCED (17 CPI) 

550 PRINT#-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(17) ; : 

RETURN 1 PROPORTIONALLY SPACED 

560 PRINT#-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(29) ; : 

RETURN 1 CORRESPONDENCE COMPRESSE 

D (12 CPI) 

570 PRINT#-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(18) ; : 
RETURN 1 CORRENPONDENCE NORMAL (1 
0 CPI) 

580 PRINT#-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(66) ;C 
HR$ ( 1) ; : RETURN 1 START ITALICS 
590 PRINT#-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(66) ;C 
HR$ (0 ) ; : RETURN 1 STOP ITALICS 
600 PRINT#-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(83) ;C 
HR$(1) ; -.RETURN' START SUBSCRIPT 
610 PRINT#-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(83) ;C 
HR$ (0 ) ; : RETURN 1 START SUPERSCRIP 
T 

620 PRINT#-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(88) ; : 
RETURN 1 STOP SUPER/ SUBSCRIPT 



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FOR A COMPLETE 
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RAINBOW 

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#1 Home Mgmt I 

Budget 

Checkbook Balancer 
Cost of Living 
Tinycalc Spreadsheet 
Electronic Datebook 
Account Manager 
Stock Market 
Word Processor 
Lottery Analyst 
Coco Database 
Coco Terminal 
Bartender 

#4 Busines s Helper 

Workmate 
Word Processor 
Spreadsheet 
Calendar 

Accounts Receivable 
Accounts Payable 
Income Property 
Mail List 

Small Business Helper 
Stock Charting 
Job Log 
Asset Manager 

#7 Machine Lang. Tut. 

Basic Compiler 

ML Tutorial Pt. 1 

ML Tutorial Pt. 2 

ML Tutorial Pt. 3A. 38 

ML Tutorial Pt. 4 

ML Tutorial Pt. 5 

ML Tutorial Pt. 6 

ML Tutorial Pt. 7 

ML Tutorial Pt. 8 

MLT Dictionary 

Coco Technical Look 

Coco Technical Look Pts. 1-3 



#2 Education 

Flash Card 
Spanish Lessons 
Typing Tutor 
Creativity Test 
Arith. Football 
Cost of Living 
Math Tutors t, 2 
Trigonometry Tutor 
Typing Game 
Word Tests 
Talking Alphabet 
Clown Dunk Math 

#5 Games 



Sandy Rover ^ 
Gray Lady 
Flippy The Seal 
Abie Builders 
Panzer 
Mrs. Pac 
Fire Runner 
Cosmic Rays 
Dig 

Battle Tank 
Kron 

King Pede 



#3 Adventures II 

Dungeon Master ^ 
Hired, Tired, Fired 
Iceworld 
Jungle 
Keys 

Amulet of Power 
The Trip 
Cookies 
Barracks 
Genesis Project 
Rambo 

Zigma Experiment 

#6 Electronics Tutorial 



\ / / Electronics 1+2 
' / Electronics 3 + 4 
'VA^tjt* ^ Electronics 5 + 6 
/ *~Vlr' Electronics 7 
/ i > Electronics 9 
/ J Electronics 

Electronics 13 
Electronics 14 
Electronics 15 
Electronics 16 
Electronics 17 
Electronics 18 



7 ♦ G 

9 + 10 / 
11 + 12 / 



\ 



#8 Gamble Issue #9 Coco 3 Only 



Horse Racing 

Rack Track 

Black Jack 
Slot Machine 
Lottery Analyst 
Coco Keeno 
Lucky Money 
Betting Pool 
Baccarat 
Draw Poker 
Turtle Races 
Hi-Lo'Craps 



\ 



4£ 



Paint Coco 3 
Convert Coco 3 
Demon's Castle 
Function Keys 
Bowling 3 
Coco 3 % Coco 2 
Wizard 
Coco 3 Drawer 
H-Res Chess 
FYR-Draca 3 
Whammy 3 
Coco 3 Screen Print 




SOQ95 cAru cct * Special This Month ★ 

tAUn 2>t l Buy 2 Packages and get 1 FREE 



T&D SUBSCRIPTION SOFTWARE, 2490 MILES STANDISH DR., HOLLAND, Ml 49424 (616) 399-9648 



May^9fi9 THE RAINBOW 73 



the rainbow is a teaching environment and we realize that the 
majority of our readers will always be beginners. In our 
continuing effort to always keep the new user in mind, and in 
addition to the many beginner feature articles and programs 
published in every issue, "Novices Niche" contains shorter 
basic program listings that entertain as well as help the new 
user gain expertise in all aspects of the Color Computer: 
graphics, music, games, utilities, education, programming, etc. 



Hi-Res Screen Dump 

By Shane Messer 



CoCo 3 



If you're like me, the first thing you think about when you 
get a printer is graphics. However, the only screen dumps I've 
seen are for the PMODE graphics, which turn out squashed — 
and if you try to dump the 320/191 screen, it is about the 
width of the page but the same height as the PMODE screen. 
So I figured it out. If you take a 640/ 191 screen and dump 
it sideways, it should take up most of the paper. If you have 
a 320/ 191 screen and use the H5CREEN 4 command, it switches 
your screen to 640/ 191 to dump it. This works fine; however, 
when using the 640/ 191 screen, you must use Color 0 for the 
foreground and Color 1 for the background. Once you type 
in and run the program, it will draw a small design and print 
it. It takes a while, so if you have a lot of draw statements 
you can merge them into this program. I used a DMP-132 
for this screen dump. 

The Listing: DUMP132 

0 ! COPYRIGHT 1989 FALSOFT, INC 

* * HI -RES SCREEN DUMP 

* * ROUTINE 

* * BY 

* * SHANE MESSER 

* **************************** 

* 

20 PALETTE 
30 HSCREEN 4 

40 POKE 65434, 63 : POKE &HFF98,128 
:POKE &HFF99,61:POKE &HE7BA,201 

74 THE RAINBOW May 1989 




50 HCLS1: PALETTE 1,63 
60 PALETTE 2,63: PALETTE 3,63 
70 GOSUB 1000 
80 PRINT#-2,CHR$(18) 
90 PRINT#-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(16) ;CH 

R$(0) ; 

100 PRINT#-2,CHR$ (39) ; 

110 FOR H=0 TO 640 STEP 6 

120 PRINT#-2,CHR$(18) 

130 PRINT #-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(16) ; 

CHR$(0) ; 

140 PRINT#-2,CHR$(39) ; 

150 FOR Y=198 TO 0 STEP -1 

160 D=128 

170 IF HPOINT (H,Y)=0 THEN D=D+1 
180 IF HPOINT (H+l, Y)=0 THEN D=D+ 
2 

190 IF HPOINT (H+2 , Y) =0THEND=D+4 
200 IF HPOINT (H+3,Y)=0THEN D=D+8 
210 IF HPOINT (H+4, Y) =0THEND=D+16 
220 IF HPOINT (H+5 , Y) =0THEND=D+3 2 



23J3 IF. HPOINT(H+6,Y)=j3THEND=D+64 
24j3 PRINT #-2,CHR$(D) ;CHR$(D) ; 
25 jS NEXT Y : NEXTH 
260 END 

'SCREEN DRAW ROUTINE 
1010 POKE 65497,j3:HCOLORj3:FOR T= 
100 TO 54J3 STEP 25:HLINE (T, 40) - ( 
T+10,45) , PSET, BF:NEXT 
1020 HBUFF l,900:HGET(100,40)-(5 



40,45) ,l:FOR T=20 TO 185 STEP12 : 

HPUT(100,T) -(540,T+5) , 1:HPUT(90, 

T+6)-(530,T+12) ,1:NEXT 

1)33)3 HCIRCLE(320, 99) ,150,3 

1)340 HPAINT (140,90) ,1,3 

1)350 HCOLOR0:HLINE(0,0) -(640, 198 

) ,PSET,B 

1060 POKE 65496,0 
10000 RETURN 



The Timer 

By Wayne Hufford 




This program is a timekeeper. It can be used for games or 
any activity that has a time limit. At the first prompt, type 
in how many minutes you want to count down, followed by 
the number of seconds. There will be a one-second pause, 
then the top of the screen shows the amount of time you 
entered. Note: The time displayed is one second less than the 
number you typed in because the one-second pause starts the 
countdown. When the timer gets to zero, a low tone will 
sound and the program will end. 

The Listing: SOUNDOFF 

0 1 COPYRIGHT 1989 FALSOFT, INC 

1 CLS 

2 PRINT"HOW MANY MINUTES?" 

3 PRINT"HOW MANY SECONDS?" 
5 INPUT B 



6 INPUT C 

7 IF C=0 THEN GOSUB 150 
20 FOR M=B TO 0 STEP -1 
30 FOR S=C TO 0 STEP -1 
40 CLS 

50 PRINT M":"S 

60 IF S<10 THEN CLS : PRINTM" :0"S 

65 IF S=0THEN 175 

70 FOR T=l TO 405 

80 NEXT T 

90 NEXT S . 

100 NEXT M 

120 IF .B>0 THEN B=B-1 : GOT02J3 
130 SOUND 1,70: END 
150 IF B=0 THEN130ELSE155 
155 B=B-1 

160 FOR R=l TO 405:NEXTR:C=59 
170 GOTO20 

175 IF M=0 THEN 130 ELSE 180 
180 M=M-1 

185 FOR R=l TO 405 : NEXTR: S=59 
190 GOTO40 



BeamSD 

By Joseph Pendell 




Beam3D is a short program that allows you to animate 
three-dimensional pictures. After you type in the program 
and run it, a small box appears on the screen. Use the right 
joystick to move it around. Press any key and the box 
becomes fixed. The right joystick then moves a larger box. 
Notice that the four corners of the two boxes are connected 
to give the appearance of three dimensions. Press a key to 
clear the screen and place the smaller box at a different 
position. The variables Si and 52 in Line 10 are the sizes of 
the two boxes, whereas lines 20 and 30 calculate a multiplying 
factor. The product of a joystick reading and its factor give 
a position on the screen. Multiplying factors are chosen so 
that the boxes do not go off the screen. Lines 90 and 200 check 
to see if the joystick has been moved since the last time it 
was read. If it is the same, the graphics are not redrawn. Lines 
140 to 160 do the actual drawing of the image. An easy 
modification to the program is to change the box sizes in Line 
10. 



The Listing: BEAM3D 

0 1 BEAM3D 

1 1 BY JOSEPH PENDELL 

2 1 COPYRIGHT 198 9 FALSOFT, INC 
10 S1=10:S2=40 

20 Ml=(255-Sl)/63:M2=(191-Sl)/63 
30 M3=(255-S2)/63 :M4= (191-S2 ) /63 
40 PMODE4,l:PCLS:SCREENl,l 
50 X=JOYSTK(0) *M1 
60 Y=JOYSTK(l) *M2 

70 LINE (X, Y) - (X+Sl , Y+Sl) ,PSET,B 

80 IFINKEY$<>""THEN100 

90 IF (JOYSTK(jJ) *MK>X) OR (JOYS 

TK(1)*M2<>Y) THEN PCLS:GOTO50 EL 

SE GOTO 80 

100 X1=X:Y1=Y 

110 LINE(X1,Y1) -(Xl+Sl, Yl+Sl) ,PS 
ET,B 

120 X=JOYSTK(0) *M3 
130 Y=JOYSTK(l) *M4 
140 LINE(X, Y) -(X+S2, Y+S2) ,PSET,B 

# 

May 1989 THE RAINBOW 75 



15J8 LINE (XI, Yl) - (X, Y) , PSET 
16J3 LINE(X1+S1,Y1)-(X+S2,Y) , PSET 
17J3 LINE (XI , Yl+Sl) - (X, Y+S2 ), PSET 
180 LINE (Xl+Sl, Yl+Sl) -(X+S2,Y+S2 
) ,PSET 



19j3 IFINKEY$<>" "THENPCLS : GOT05j3 
2j3j3 IF ( JOYSTK ( jzj ) *M3 OX OR JOYST 
K(1)*M4<>Y) THEN PCLS : G0T011j3 EL 
SE 190 





Hot Stuff 

By Ric Pucella 

This little game will keep you entertained for hours. It's 
a version of a popular game many played when young, where 
someone hides an object and others have to find it while the 
"hider" clues the players by telling them they are either "hot" 
— if they are close to the object's location — or "cold" — 
if they are far from it. 

In this game the "hider" is the computer and you must find 
the object in a 30-by-30 square grid. (The size of the grid can 
be changed by changing the value of D in Line 14 of the 
listing.) To help you remember where you have looked, type 
-1,0 at the prompt, and the computer will display all your 
moves. 

The Listing: HOTCOLD 

0 1 COPYRIGHT 1989 FALSOFT, INC 

5 «*** HOT STUFF 

6 '*** BY RIC PUCELLA 

7 **** (C) 1988 DEBBIE SOFTWARE 

13 CLEAR5000 

14 D=30 

15 DIMP$(100) 

20 FORX=0TO5 rREADA, A$ : A$ (X) =CHR$ 



(A)+'» "+A$:NEXTX:CLS:PRINT"HOT S 
TUFF": PRINT "BY RIC PUCELLA" : PRIN 
T"(C) 1988 DEBBIE SOFTWARE" : PRIN 
T:S=0:X=RND(D) : Y=RND (D) :FORZ=0TO 
1 : Z=0 : INPUT "X, Y" ; A, B 
22 IF (A>30) OR(B>30) THENNEXTZ ELS 
ES=S+1 : T=ABS (X-A) +ABS ( Y-B) : IFT=0 
THEN100 

25 IFA=-1ANDB=0 THEN S=S-l:FORYl 
=0TO5 : FORXl=lTOS : IFMID$ (P$ (XI) , 9 
, 1) =LEFT$ (A$ (Yl) , 1) THEN PRINTP$ ( 
XI) :NEXTX1, Y1,Z :ELSENEXTX1,Y1, Z 
3j3 N=INT(SQR(D) )/T+l:IFN>5 THEN 
N=5 

4j3 IFT>SQR(D)+2 THEN N=p 

5j3 PRINTA$ (N) : PRINT 

6j3 P$ (S)=RIGHT$ (" "+STR$(A) ; 2) 

+ " "+RIGHT$(" "+STR$(B) , 2)+" 

"+A$ (N) :NEXTZ 
1J8)3 PRINT" YOU GOT IT IN" ;S; "MOVE 

e ii 

lip DATA 17 5," YOU' RE FREEZING" ,2 
39, "YOU'RE COLD. . . " , 2j37 , "YOU 'RE 
WARM. . .",159, "YOU'RE HOT. . .",255 
, "YOU 'RE VERY HOT" , 191 , "YOU ' RE B 
URNING ..." 



Math Drill 

By William A. Queen, 111 




Math Drill quizzes students in addition, subtraction, 
multiplication and division. The program is menu-driven and 
keeps track of the number of correct and incorrect answers. 
You may change the type of problem drilled without losing 
your score totals. 

The Listing: MRTHDRIL 



j3 1 COPYRIGHT 198 9 F ALSO FT, INC 
lj3 REM *** MATH DRILL 
2J3 REM *** <C> 1988, W.A. QUEEN 
III 



3j3 CLS:GOSUB 480 

40 PRINT @ 22 6, "YOUR NAME: " 

50 INPUT NAME$ 

60 CLS:GOSUB 480 



ADDITION" 
SUBTRACTION" 
MULTIPLICATI 



"D DIVISION" 



70 PRINT @ 169, "A 
80 PRINT @ 201, "S 
90 PRINT @ 23 3, "M 
ON" 

100 PRINT @ 2 65, 
110 PRINT @ 3 30, "SELECT ONE" 
120 AN$ = INKEY$ 

130 IFAN$="A"THEN150ELSEIFAN$="S 

"THEN150ELSEIFAN$="M"THEN150ELSE 

IFAN$="D"THEN150 

140 GOTO 120 

150 CLS:GOSUB 480 

160 T = T + 1: X = RND(12) : Y = 



76 THE RAINBOW May 1989 



RND(12) 

170 IF AN$ = "A" THEN PRINT § 22 

8, "WHAT IS" X"+"Y; 

180 IF AN$ = "S" THEN PRINT § 22 

8, "WHAT IS" X"-"Y; 

190 IF AN$ = "M" THEN PRINT @ 2 2 

8, "WHAT IS" X"*"Y; 

200 IF AN$ = "D" THEN PRINT @ 22 

8, "WHAT IS" X"/"Y; 

21)3 INPUT ANSWER 

220 IF AN$ = "A" THEN IF ANSWER 
= X+Y THEN 310 
230 IF AN$ = "S" 
= X-Y THEN 310 
240 IF AN$ = "M" 
- X*Y THEN 310 
250 IF AN$ - "D" 
= X/Y THEN 310 
260 IF AN$ = "A" 



THEN IF ANSWER 

THEN IF ANSWER 

THEN IF ANSWER 

THEN PRINT @ 3 2 
6, "THE ANSWER IS" X+Y 

270 IF AN$ = "S" THEN PRINT @ 32 
6, "THE ANSWER IS" X-Y 

2 80 IF AN$ = "M" THEN PRINT @ 3 2 
6, "THE ANSWER IS" X*Y 

290 IF AN$ = "D" THEN PRINT @ 3 2 
6, "THE ANSWER IS" X/Y 
300 GOTO 410 
310 CLS(3) 




$Chores$ for Dollars 



By Steve Paul 




$Chores$ for Dollars is a handy program to inspire the 
younger members of the family to help out with the daily 
tasks around the home, $Chores$ is written in two sections. 
Lines 2 through 8 handle the inputs while lines 10 through 
15 print the chore list. 

When you run $Chores$, the program asks for a list of 
chores and their respective money amounts, allowing from 
one to nine entries. When the list is complete, the program 
automatically goes to the print mode in Line 6. $Chores$ 
prints two lists per page and as many pages as you want. Just 
line up the printer ribbon with the top of the page and start 
printing. It's amazing how ambitious my son became with 
this approach to the chore problem. 

The Listing: CHORES 

0 • COPYRIGHT 19 89 FALSOFT,INC 

1 »** STEVE PAUL** 

** BYRON, MI.** 

2 CLEAR 400: DIM Sl$(9) 

3 '***INPUT ITEMS & AMOUNTS*** 

4 CLS3 :PRINT@3 2*3+1, "ALIGN PAPER 
WITH TOP OF RIBBON" ; :PRINT@32*4 



"THAT IS" 
C "OUT OF" 



"% 



T "C 



CORR 



3 20 FOR M = 1 TO 4 

330 SOUND 175,1: SOUND 200,1 

3 40 NEXT M 

350 CLS 

3 60 PRINT @ 168, "CORRECT, " NAM 
E$ "! ! !" 
370 C=C +1 
380 PRINT @ 235, 
390 PRINT @ 258, 
ORRECT ANSWERS" 
400 PRINT @ 298, 
ECT" 

410 PRINT @ 356, 
WHEN READY" 
420 PRINT @ 386, 

<R> TO RETURN" 
430 PRINT I 426, 
440 A$ = INKEY$ 
450 IF A$ = CHR$(13) THEN 150 
460 IF A$ = "R" THEN 60 
470 GOTO 440 
480 PRINT § 10, 
490 PRINT @ 35, 
QUEEN III 
500 PRINT "==== 

=========== I' • 

510 RETURN 



C/T*100 
"PRESS <ENTER> 
"FOR ANOTHER OR 
TO THE MENU"; 



it 



"MATH DRILL" 
"<C> 1988, W.A. 



r-r Loy ^^o Rr . — 

» -^2 RE *»* ~rr eeGIA , wr 

:' «*sh zsrr- i 7: -Tr: miNQ 



— S!z N *ne . Z 

— _Z 0l $He s ; • _ ; n '> t : w , T 



' ■ — - , 

°-2S: : 



- T * ft I:": — — 



0.00 / 
0.00;' 



* * 



I 

t ' • 



°.oo: 



+8, "TURN PRINTER ON" ; 

5 Y=l: PRINT© 32*6+2, "CHILDS FIRST 
NAME : " ; : LINEINPUTCFN$ : IFLEN (CF 

N$ ) >9THENCLS4 : GOSUB17 : GOT05 

6 CLS3 :PRINT@32*8+2, "CHORE NAME: 
"7 :LINEINPUTS1$ (Y) : IF LEN(S1$(Y 

) ) >14THENCLS4GOSUB17 : GOT06 

7 PRINT@3 2* 10+2, "MONEY VALUE"; :I 
NPUTS (Y) : PRINT: IF S1$(Y)= "" THE 
N GOTO 11 

8 IF Y=9 THEN GOTOll 

9 Y=Y+l:GOT06 



May 1989 THE RAINBOW 77 



10 » ****PRINTER**** 

11 CLS6:PRINT(§32*8+8, 11 NOW PRIN 
TING ";:FOR LF=1T05 : PRINT#-2 

12 NEXTLF: FOR ZZ=1 TO 2:PRINT#- 
2,TAB(10) ;CFN$;"'S CHORE & ALLOW 
ANCE REPORT: WEEK BEGINNING 
— / — " : PRINT#-2 : T$=STRING$ ( 58 , »- 
" ) : PRINT#-2 , TAB ( 10 ) T$ : PRINT#-2 , T 
AB(10)" : CHORE NAME : $AMT : 
S: M: T: W: T: F: S: TOTAL AMT . 

• 

13 FOR X=l TO Y-l STEP 9 : FOR Z=X 
TO X+8:PRINT#-2,TAB(10) ": 



• • • 

14 PRINT#-2, USING 11 : % 



: : : : : M ;S1$(Z) ; 

S(Z) : NEXT Z:NEXT X 

15 T$=STRING$ (57, »-») :PRINT#-2,T 
AB(10)T$;":" 

16 PRINT#-2,TAB(33) ": ALLOWANCE 
EARNED : : ,f :T$=STRI 

NG$ (34, "-") :PRINT#-2 ,TAB(33)T$; " 
1 11 : PRINT#-2 : PRINT#-2 : PRINT#-2 : NE 
XTZZ:PRINT !, PRINT AGAIN? (Y/N) ,f : 
INPUT PG$:IF PG$ = ,t Y l, THEN GOSUB1 
8:GOT011 ELSEEND 

17 PRINT@32*8+5, ,f **TO LONG DO 0 
VER** ";:FORAA=l TO 1000: NEXT AA 
:CLS 3: RETURN 

18 FOR LF=1T05 : PRINT#-2 : NEXTLF : R 
ETURN 



Note Card 

By Darrin Seats 




Being a high-school English student, I have found how 
unenjoyable giving speeches is. Making neatly-written note 
cards for each speech simply adds to the misery. This program 
prints a 3-by-5-inch note card by taking the information you 
type in and dumping it to your printer. When the program 
is done, cut out the note card along the dotted lines. Note 
Card was written using a DMP-1 10; if you have a different 
printer, just change the appropriate code in Line 150. 

The Listing: NDTECARD 



20 
30 
40 



1 COPYRIGHT 198 9 FALSOFT ,.INC 
•NOTE CARD MADE BY: 
1 DARRIN SEATS 
1 P.O. BOX 252 
1 SMITHSHIRE, IL. 61478 



50 1 

60 POKE 150,41 "12)3)3 BAUD PRINTE 
R 

70 CLEAR 12)3)3 

8) 3 DIM A$(26) 

9) 3 CLS: PRINT "INPUT TEXT THAT YOU 
WANT ON YOURNOTE CARD. MAXIMUM 

LINE LENGTH IS 4)3 CHARACTERS. W 
ITH A MAXIMUMOF 26 LINES." 

I) 30 A=A+1 

II) 3 PRINTA ; : LINE INPUT A$ (A) 

120 IF LEN ( A$ (A) ) >40 THEN PRINT" 

REDO-TOO LONG!": GOTO 110 

130 IF A<26 THEN 100 

140 PLAY" A" -.PRINT "PRINTING NOTE 

CARD" 

150 PRINT#-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(20) 1 
CONDENSED 

160 GOSUB 190:PRINT#-2:GOSUB 200 
:FOR Q=l TO 26 : PRINT #-2,": " 
; :PRINT#-2,A$(Q) ; :W=LEN(A$(Q) ) :P 
=40-W:FOR E=l TO P:PRINT#-2," "; 
:NEXTE:PRINT#-2, " :":NEXTQ:G 



* 



» 



0S-S 4. 

can VQrk ^ °ns 



OSUB 200: GOSUB 190 

170 PRINT#-2,CHR$ (27) ;CHR$(19) 

180 END 

190 FOR Q=l TO 52:PRINT#-2,"."; : 
NEXT Q: RETURN 

200 PRINT#-2, " : " ; :FOR Q=l TO 50: 
PRINT#-2 , " " ; : NEXTQ : PRINT#-2 , " : ' 
: RETURN 



Submissions to "Novices Niche" are welcome from everyone. We 
like to run a variety of short programs that can be typed in at one 
screen sitting and are useful, educational and fun. Keep in mind, 
although the short programs are limited in scope, many novice 
programmers find it enjoyable and quite educational to improve 
the software written by others. 

Program submissions must be on tape or disk. We're sorry, but 
we cannot key in program listings. All programs should be 
supported by some editorial commentary, explaining how the 
program works. If your submission is accepted for publication, the 
payment rate will be established and agreed upon prior to 
publication. 



78 THE RAINBOW May 1 989 



DIGISECTOR 

DS-69B 



i 



» VIDEO 



S 



DIGITIZER 
FOR THE 
COCO 3 

(AND ALL OTHER COCOS . . .) 




COCO 3 SCREEN 



USE YOUR COCO 3 TO ITS FULL POTENTIAL! 

Use The Micro Works' DIGISECTOR™ DS-69 or 
DS-69B and your COCO 3's high resolution graphics 
to capture and display television pictures from your 
VCR or video camera. The DIGISECTOR™ systems are 
the only COCO video digitizers available that 
accurately capture and reproduce the subtle shades of 
gray in TV pictures! 

• COLOR: Add color to your screen for dramatic 

special effects. 

• HIGH RESOLUTION: 256 by 256 spatial resolution. 

• PRECISION: 64 levels of grey scale. 

• SPEED! 8 images per second on DS-69B, 

2 images per second DS-69. 

• COMPACTNESS: Self contained in a plug-in 

Rompack. 

• EASY TO USE: Software on disk will get you up and 

running fast! 

• COMPATIBLE: Use with a black and white or color 

camera, a VCR or tuner. 

• INEXPENSIVE: Our low price puts this within 

everyone's reach. 

POWERFUL C-SEE 3.3 SOFTWARE 

This menu-driven software 
will provide 5 and 16 shades 
of gray to the screen and to 
the printer with simple 
joystick control of 
brightness and contrast. 
Pictures taken by the 
DIGISECTOR™ may be 
saved on disk by C-SEE 3.3 
and then edited by our 
optional MAGIGRAPH, or by COCO MAX or 
GRAPHICOM. This versatile new software is included 
in both DIGISECTORS™ 




DS-69B and C-SEE 3.3 
DS-69 and C-SEE 3.3 



$149.95 
$ 99.95 



ITM 



TRADE IN YOUR OLD DIGISECTOR 

If you already have one of The Micro Works' DS-69 or 
DS-69A DIGISECTORS™, you may return it to us and 
we will upgrade your unit to a DS-69B. 



UPGRADE DS-69A to DS-69B 
UPGRADE DS-69 to DS-69B 



$49.95 
$69.95 



The DS-69B comes with a one year warranty. Cameras 
and other accessories are available from The Micro 
Works. DS-88 version available for IBM PC. 

NO RISK GUARANTEE 

If you are not completely satisfied with the performance of your new 
DS-69B, you may return it, undamaged, within ten days for a full 
refund of the purchase price. We'll even pay the return shipping. If 
you can get any of our competitors to give you the same guarantee, 
buy both and return the one you don't like. We know which one 
you'll keep. 



Terms: Visa, Mastercard, Check or C.O.D. 



Purveyors of Fine Video Digitizers Since 1977. W©0^0<^ 



P.O. Box 1110 Del Mar, CA 92014 (619)942-2400 



Turn of th e Scr e w 



For many enthusiastic computer 
users, understanding the mechanics of 
their hardware is as essential as pen and 
paper to a writer. The following article 
will begin a basic explanation of the 40- 
track disk drive. Articles to follow will 
elaborate on various other drives. 

First, to define a disk drive: A disk 
is similar to a cassette tape and a drive 
is like a cassette player. Both systems 
use the principal of magnetism, and in 
both cases the media is made of plastic 
material coated on one or both sides 
with a substance containing iron oxide. 
This makes it sensitive to an electro- 
magnet, called a head. Both cassette 
players and disk drives have heads. 

In a cassette player the tape is 
dragged across the head by a motorized 
mechanism. In the record mode, a 
magnetic field is created by the record 
electronics. This field varies in intensity 
proportional to the signal it is record- 
ing. The varying intensity leaves iron 
particles in the tape aligned in a specific 
order. Simply stated, the tape is magnet- 
ized while in the record mode. Then the 
tape dragging across the play head 
makes tiny magnetic fields that are 
transfered to electrical signals. These 
are then amplified to an audible level. 

A disk drive's electronics works much 
the same way. The mechanism, ob- 
viously, is different in that it is made 
with a computer in mind. A cassette is 
made for continuous music, which 
makes it inconvenient when you want a 
small piece of data at the end of a tape. 
A disk drive, though, is made with the 
ability to access any part of it quickly. 

Let's take a closer look at a disk. It 
is commonly known as a floppy disk, 
because of its flexibility. The disk most 
used by the GoCo community is Sc- 
inch square and consists of four parts. 

The first is the actual media. It is a 
round piece of plastic, a little over 5 
inches in diameter, with a IVfc-inch hole 
in the center. Better-quality disks have 
a second piece of plastic glued to the 
inner side of the disk to reinforce the 
mechanism that holds and spins the 
disk. More on that later. It also has a 
second hole, about 1/16 inch in diame- 



Tony DiStefano is a well-known spe- 
cialist in computer hardware projects. 
He lives in Laval Ouest, Quebec. Tony *s 
username on Delphi is DISTO. 

80 THE RAINBOW May 1989 



Heads, sleeves, jackets 
and index pulses . . . 

The 
ABCs 
of Disk 
Drives 

By Tony DiStefano 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 



ter, that is about a half-inch from the 
edge of the inside hole. This is called the 
index hole. 

The third part of the disk is called the 
jacket. The jacket serves two purposes. 
First, it is a protective cover for the 
media. Touching or bending the media 
can damage it or completely destroy 
data. Except for one slot, the jacket 
completely covers the media. This slot 
has to be left open so that the read/ write 
head can access the media. The jacket 
also has a hole on both sides to expose 
the index hole and another hole to 
expose that part of the media pinched 
by the mechanism. 

The second purpose is to protect the 
media from being erased. In the upper 
right-hand corner of the disk is a small 
notch. When this notch is left uncov- 
ered, the disk drive is able to write to 
the disk whenever the software "tells" it 
to. When it is covered with opaque tape 
the disk drive cannot write to the media, 
even if the software "tells" it to. 

The fourth part of a disk is the sleeve, 
a paper envelope that protects the 
media from fingers or dust and cigarette 
smoke. Most people don't realize it, but 
cigarette smoke creates a thin film of tar 



that attracts dust, putting extra wear on 
the drive heads. Sleeves cover every- 
thing from the index hole to the access 
hole. Whenever a disk is not being used, 
it should be stored in its sleeve. Never 
leave a disk in a drive with the door 
closed over a long period of time. It puts 
a dent in the media. 

Now let's discuss the drive. It is a 
mechanism used to read and write data 
to the disk. The first thing a drive does 
is spin the disk inside the jacket. When 
you close the door of a disk drive, a 
plastic hub pinches the disk to the metal 
hub and shaft of a motor. Older drives 
had a capstan and were belt driven by 
a separate motor. Now drives have the 
motor built right into the hub. When the 
drive is selected, the motor spins the 
disk at about 300 rpm (revolutions per 
minute), give or take 5 rpm. Older 
drives took up to five seconds to come 
up to speed; the newer drives can come 
up to speed within two revs. That's 
about two-fifths of a second. 

The next responsibility of the drive is 
to properly move the head. The read/ 
write head is mounted on a movable 
assembly that can move across the 
access hole in the disk jacket. The heads 
rub on the moving media. Open the 
door of a drive and peek in just after a 
DIR and you will see the back-and-forth 
motion. The assembly moves with the 
help of a stepping motor. The head 
movement is done in steps, with each 
step being called a track. 

With 40 of these tracks on each side 
of its disk, the 360K drive is today's 
most commonly used drive. The drive 
is double-sided, meaning that there are 
two read/ write heads, one for each side 
of the disk. Tracks are numbered from 
0 to 39, Track 0 being on the outermost 
area of the disk and counting up as 
tracks move toward the center. The 
head can move back and forth on a pair 
of rails controlled by a stepper motor 
that receives one of two signals from the 
controlling hardware. 

The two signals are "step" and "direc- 
tion." The direction is set according to 
where the head is and where you want 
it to go. Then the step pulse is applied, 
and the head moves the distance of one 
track in the specified direction. In the 
case of the 360K drive, the distance 
between two tracks is about one-forty- 
eigth inch. That is 48 tracks per inch. 

A hardware switch positioned to turn 
on when the heads are at Track 0 tells 



the controller where the head is. The 
proper way to position the head to 
Track 0 is to give the controller a restore 
command or to step and test for the 
switch until Track 0 is detected. Some 
software steps in 40 times without 
testing; but if the head is not at Track 
40, then it bangs against the Track 0 
stopper and can possibly become mis- 
aligned. A register in the controller 
keeps track of where the head is. If the 
controller confuses where the heads are, 
it restores to Track 0 and then steps to 
the desired track. 

Another duty of the drive is detecting 
index pulse. The little hole in the disk 
is used to give the controller a reference 
point. Inside the drive on one side of the 
hole is an IR (infra-red) LED. On the 
other side there is an IR detector. When 
the disk is spinning, most of the time the 
light emitted by the LED is blocked by 
the disk. Every revolution of the disk, 
the hole appears in the path of the LED 
and detector. This in turn gives a short 
pulse to the controller. By this signal the 
controller can determine a reference 
point to the rotational position of the 
disk. 

This position reference is used when 
formatting new disks. Formatting di- 
vides the disk into small blocks called 
sectors. Each sector has a unique ad- 
dress or ID number. They are assigned 
by track number, sector number and 
side. Some controllers, however, do not 
use side but, instead, have greater sector 
numbers. 

As mentioned earlier, tracks are 
numbered 0 to 39. In CoCo's case, 
sectors contain 256 bytes of data each. 
There are 18 sectors per track per side. 
Radio Shack DOS is written to handle 
a single-sided drive with 35 tracks at 18 
sectors per track. That gives you a total 
of 256 bytes x 18 sectors x 35 tracks = 
161,280 bytes per disk. 

Since most drives today can step 40- 
tracks and are double-sided. This is a 
waste of data area. Some third-party 
DOSs get around this by changing it to 
handle double-sided and 40 tracks. 

When formatting, the controller does 
one complete track at a time. The index 
pulse is used to start the writing head 
up and then to shut it off. This keeps 
the write head from writing over the 
part already written on. 

So far, I have been talking about the 
mechanical parts of a disk drive, but 
there is more — the electronics part. 



A disk drive has several electronic 
sections in it. Though the actual elec- 
tronics varies, there are standard pro- 
tocols that make drives made by differ- 
ent companies compatible. This is 
called the interface. All drives use a 34- 
pin edge connector to transfer all elec- 
tronic information to and from the 
controller. All the pins do basically the 
same thing. You can virtually unplug a 
Panasonic 360K drive and plug in a 
Tandem without any problems.Table 1 
shows a pin list of the standard 360K 
drive connector. 



Pin# 


Function 


2 


N/C 


4 


N/C 


6 


D4 Select 


8 


Index Pulse 


10 


DO Select 


nm. 


Dl Select 


14 


D2 Select 




Motor On 


18 


Direction 


Mh 


Step 

Write Data 


w 


Write Gate 


26 


Track 00 


28 


Write Prot 


30 


Read Data 


m 


Side Select 


34 


N/C 


Table 1: Standard Connector for 




a 360K Drive 



All odd pins are ground returns. 
These signals completely control the 
drive. The electronics needed for this 
task are speed regulation for the spin- 
ning of the drive, stepping the head in 
and out, electronics to power the write 
head and erase head, and amplifiers to 
read the small signal of the read head 
and to light the "drive in use" LED. 

Now you should have a good idea of 
how a disk drive works. Next time, I'll 
discuss how an 80-track drive is differ- 
ent and include a circuit on how to 
double-step the drives so it can read 
standard 40-track disks. 



MORE BAUD 
LESS BUCKS 



Save Time and Money with a Surprisingly 
Affordable 2400/1200/300 BPS Hayes • 
Compatible Modem for any Computer. 

Don't be fooled by the low cost of these 2400 baud 
modems. These are high quality modems made in the 
USA, with performance features unmatched by 
competitors costing three times as much. 

This is full-featured Hayes compatible modem that 
works with any computer. It features superior Hayes 
compatibility, advanced digital signal processing, and 
adaptive equalization for great performance and 
reliability. All of this in a compact, attractive go- 
anywhere package thafs not not much larger than a 
paperback book. 

Convenience features like call progress tone detection, 
auto-dial and auto-answer, a call progress speaker with 
volume control, a second jack for a local phone, on 
board diagnostics. 

Money saving premiums for sign-up and connect time 
for Delphi, The Source, CompuServ, etc. Software 
available: ProcComm (PC) + 5; QuickLink (Mac) + 5; 
WizPro is free (shareware). 

Backed by two year mfg. warrantee, so you can buy 
with confidence that comes with 1 1 years of 
telecommunication experience. 

2400/1200/300 BPS modem $125.00 

(Please add 2.50 shipping and handling) 
Dealer inquiries welcome. 

GCS FILE TRANSFER UTILITIES 

See: Review - December Rainbow. 

Dale Puckett - November Rainbow. 

The GCS File Transfer Utilities provide a simple 
and quick method to transfer text and binary files from 
and to a variety of floppy disk formats. 

Just place the PC (MSDOS), RSDOS, FLEX or 
MINI-FLEX disk into your disk drive - enter a simple 
command and the file is copied into a OS-9 file. File 
transfer back is just as simple. Under Multi-Vue 
version, just select command from one of three menus. 
Commands Dir of PC, RS or FLEX disk 

Dump disk sector of PC, RS or FLEX 
Read file from PC, RS or FLEX disk 
Write file to PC, RS or FLEX disk 
Rename file on PC disk 
Delete file from PC disk 
Format PC disk 
Single, Double sided disks. 

Single, double density disks. 
35, 40 or 80 track floppy drives. 
8 or 9 sectors (PC). 
First level sub-directories (PC). 
Binary files. Use pipes for direct 
and multiple transfers 
OS-9. 2 drives (one can be hard or 
ramdisk - one floppy 40 T DD DS). 
Multi-Vue for Multi-Vue version. 
SDISK (SDISK3 for COCO 111). 



Extensive 
Options 



Requires 



GCS File Transfer Utilities for CoCo 



Multi-Vue 
Standard 
SDISK or 



version 
version 

SDISK3 



$54.95 
$44.95 
$29.95 



Standard diskettes are OS-9 format (5.25") add $2.50 tor 3.5". 
Orders must be prepaid or COD. VISA/MC. Add $1 .75 S&H, 
COD is additional. 

GRANITE COMPUTER SYSTEMS 

Route 2 Box 445 Hillsboro, NH 03244 
(603) 464-3850 

OS-9 is a trademark of Microware Systems Corporation and 
Motorola Inc. MS-DOS is a trademark of Microsoft Corp. 
FLEX Is a trademark of TSC, Inc. 



May 1989 THE RAINBOW 81 



1 Feature 



32K ECB 



|_RA)NBgW ( 



eleventh in a series of tutorials for the beginner 
to intermediate machine language programmer 



Machine Language Made BASIC 

Part XI: 3-D Without Glasses 



By William P.Nee 



In last month's article about 2-D 
rotation, everything was plotted 
symmetrically and we didn't have to 
pay any attention to location. Now we 
will be discussing 3-D, and it becomes 
more important to visualize where we 
are actually plotting our points. 

Think of the center of the screen as 
0,0,0 — that is, zero x, zero j>, and zero 
z. Numbers or bits to the right of the 
center are +* and those to the left of the 
center are -x. Numbers or bits above the 
center are +_y and below the center are 
-y Numbers or bits between you and the 
screen are -z, and behind the screen are 
+z. The z numbers or bits, of course, are 
not really there, but they must be taken 
into consideration when rotating 
points. We still only PSET the x and y 
coordinates. 




Bill Nee bucked the "snowbird" trend 
by retiring to Wisconsin from a banking 
career in Florida. He spends the long, 
cold winters writing programs for his 
Co Co. 



ROTATE AROUND X AXIS 


ROTATE AROUND Y AXIS 


ROTATE AROUND Z 


Yl = Y*CDS - Z*SIN 


21 = Z*C0S - X*SIN 


XI = X*C0S - Y*SIN 


Zl = Y*5IN + Z*C0S 


XI = Z*SIN + X*C0S 


Yl = X*SIN + Y*C0S 


XI - X 


Yl - Y 


Zl = Z 




Figure 1 





Listing 1: R0TATE3D 












4F00 






00100 


ORG 


$4F00 






4F00 108E 


5200 


00110 START 


LDY 


#§5200 






4FJJ4 


10BF 


5080 


00120 


STY 


COORD 


START OF COORDINATES 




4F08 F6 


5085 


00130 


LDB 


NUMBER 


HOW MANY DOTS TO SET 




4F0B F7 


5082 


00140 


STB 


COUNT 






4F0E 


C6 


32 


00150 RNDX 


LDB 


#50 






4F10 BD 


BC7C 


00160 


JSR 


§BC7C 


REGISTER B TO FP1 




4F13 


BD 


BF1F 


00170 


JSR 


$BF1F 


RND (50) 




4F16 


BD 


B3ED 


00180 


JSR 


$B3ED 


PUT IT BACK IN REGISTER 


B 


4F19 


IE 


89 


00190 


EXG 


A, B 


MAKE IT A 2 -BYTE NUMBER 




4F1B 


ED 


A4 


00200 


STD 


,Y 


+X 




4F1D 


ED 


26 


00210 


STD 


6,Y 


+X 




4F1F 


ED 


2C 


00220 


STD 


12,Y 


+x 




4F21 


ED 


A8 12 


00230 


STD 


18 ,Y 


+x 




4F24 


40 




00240 


NEGA 








4F25 


ED 


A8 18 


00250 


STD 


24, Y 


-X 




4F28 


ED 


AS IE 


00260 


STD 


30, Y 


-X 




4F2B 


ED 


A8 24 


00270 


STD 


36, Y 


-X 




4F2E 


ED 


A8 2A 


00280 


STD 


42, Y 


-X 




4F31 


C6 


32 


00290 RNDY 


LDB 


#50 






4F33 


BD 


BC7C 


00300 


JSR 


$BC7C 


BEGISTER B TO FP1 




4F36 


BD 


BF1F 


00310 


JSR 


$BF1F 


RND(50) 




4F39 


BD 


B3ED 


00320 


JSR 


$B3ED 


PUT IT BACK IN REGISTER 


B 


4F3C 


IE 


89 


00330 


EXG 


A,B 


HAKE IT A 2 -BYTE NUMBER 




4F3E 


ED 


22 


00340 


STD 


2,Y 


+Y 




4F40 ED 


28 


00350 


STD 


8,Y 


+Y 




4F42 


ED 


A8 1A 


00360 


STD 


26, Y 


+Y 




4F45 


ED 


A8 20 


00370 


STD 


32, Y 






4F48 


40 




00380 


NEGA 








4F49 


ED 


2E 


00390 


STD 


14 ;y 


-Y 




4F4B 


ED 


A8 14 


00400 


STD 


20, Y 


-Y 




4F4E 


ED 


A8 26 


00410 


STD 


38, Y 


*X 




4F51 


ED 


A8 2C 


00420 


STD 


44,Y 


-Y 




4F54 


C6 


32 


00430 RNDZ 


LDB 


#50 






4F56 


BD 


BC7C 


00440 


JSR 


$BC7C 


BEGISTER B TO FP1 




4F59 


BD 


BF1F 


00450 


JSR 


$BF1F 


RND(50) 




4F5C 


BD 


B3ED 


00460 


JSR 


$B3ED 


PUT IT BACK IN REGISTER 


B 


4F5F 


IE 


89 


00470 


EXG 


A,B 


MAKE IT A 2 -BYTE NUMBER 




4F61 


ED 


24 


00480 


STD 


4,Y 


+Z 




4F63 


ED 


A8 10 


00490 


STD 


16, Y 


+Z 





82 THE RAINBOW May 1989 



4766 


ED 


AS ic 


0^500 




mm 




4F69 


ED 




005X0 


STD 


■MM' 


+z 


4F6C 


40 




00520 


NEGA 






4F6D 


ED 


Zk 


00530 


STD 




-2 


4F6F 


ED 


AS 16 


00540 


STD 


22 ,Y 


-z 


4F72 


ED 


A8 22 


00550 


STD 


34, Y 


«Z 


4F75 


ED 


A8 2E 


00560 


STD 


46. Y 


-Z 


4F78 


31 j 


A8 30 


00570 


LEAY 


48, S 


NEXT COORDINATE LOCATION 


4F7B 


7A 


5?82 


00580 


DEC 


COUNT 


.FINISHED ALL THE DOTS YET? 


4F7E 


26 V 


OE 


00590 


BNE 


RNDX 




4FQ0 


C6 v 




00600 PAGES 


LDB 


#5 




4F82 


BD 




00610 


JSfc 


$9653 ,, 




4F85 


BD 




00620 


JSR 


$9542 ^ 


piCLs 


4F88 


8D ; 


LF 


00630 


BSR 


PICK 


WHICH AXIS TO ROTATE AROUND? 


4F8A 


8D 


48 


00640 


BSR 


LOOP5 


COMPUTE AND SET POINTS 


4F8C 


C6 


91 


00650 


LDB 


#1 


GRAPHICS SCREEN 


4F8E 


BD 


95AA 


00660 


JSS. 


$95AA 




4F91 


C6 


01 


00670 PAGE! 


LDB 


#1'.- . 




4F93 


BD 


9653 


00680 


JSR 


$9653 




4F96 


BD 


9542 


00690 


JSR 


$9542 


pcls ?■; 


4F99 


8D 


0E 


00700 


BSR 


PICK 


WHICH AXIS TO ROTATE AROUND? 


4F9B 


8D 


37 


00710 


BSR 


LOOP5 


COMPUTE AND SET POINTS 


4F9D 


C6 




00720 


LDB 


#1 


GRAPHICS SCREEN 


4F9F 


BD 


95AA 


00730 


JSR 


$95AA 




4FA2 


AD 


j?FA000 


00740 FIN 


JSR 


t$A000] 


ANY INPUT? 


4FA6 


27 




00750 


BEQ 


PAGES 


IF NOT, BACK TO PAGE5 


4FA8 


39 




00760 


RTS 




END OF THE PROGRAM 


4FA9 


C6 


03 ? 


00770 PICK 


LDB 


#3 


THERE ARE 3 AXIS 


4FAB 


BD 


BC7C 


00780 


JSR 


$BC7C 


REGISTER B TO FP1 


4FAE 


BD 


BF1F 


00790 


JSR 


$BF1F 


RND(3) 


4FB1 


BD 


B3ED 


00800 


JSR 


$B3ED 


PUT IT BACK IN REGISTER B 


4FB4 


CI 


01 


00810 


CMPB 


#1 


IS IT X ROTATION 


4FB6 


26 


08 


00620 


BNE 


YROTAT 


BRANCH IF NOT 


4FB8 


8E 


5202 


00830 


LDX 


#$5202 


FIRST Y COORDINATE 


4FBB 


108E 5204 


00840 


LDY 


#$5204 


FIRST Z COORDINATE 


4FBF 


39 




00850 


RTS 






4FC0 


CI 


02 


00860 YROTAT 


CMPB 


#2 


IS IT Y ROTATION 


4FC2 


26 


08 


098 7(7 




7 ROT AT 


RRANCH TP NOT 


4FC4 


8E 


5204 


0088 0 


LDX 


#$5204 


FIRST Z COORDINATE 


4FC7 


108E 52jJj? 


00890 


LDY 


#$5200 


FIRST X COORDINATE 



Since the Color Computer numbers 
from the top of the screen down, we 
change the y direction a little. Look at 
the following diagram: 

If you want to set a point (xl,yl) at 
coordinates (+12, +16), what is the 
actual screen location? Since the x\ 
location is to the right of the center, it's 
location is 128+xl; since the >>1 location 
is above the center, it's location is 96- 
yl. The screen location is then 140,80. 
If x2 is -20 and y2 is -30, its screen 
location is 128+(-20),96-(-30), or 
108,126. It is the x,y (and z) coordinates 
that are stored and rotated, not the 
screen locations. 

In last month's article we actually 
revolved points around the z axis al- 
though we just called it rotating. Now 
we need a formula to rotate around the 
x axis, a horizontal line through the 
center of the screen, and the y axis, a 
vertical line through the center of the 
screen. As before, x, y and z are the old 
locations and xl 9 yl and zl are the new 
rotated locations. (See Figure 1.) 

Since we are using the same angle of 
rotation in all three cases (see last 
month's article), all three formulas are 
the same — just the x, y and z are 




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1-514-967-0195 



May 1989 THE RAINBOW 83 



different. Again, it is only the x and y 
screen locations that are actually PSET. 

The machine-language program 
picks a set of 25 random coordinates 
between 1 and 50 for x 9 y and z. Since 
the pattern is symmetrical, there are 
actually eight coordinate points com- 
puted and rotated: 

x,y,z x r y, -x,y,z -x,-y,z 
x,y,-z x,-y r z -x,y r z -x,-y,-z 




g an axis 
f ? of rotation, the pro- 
SB gram computes the 
H other two coordinate's 
; rotated position, but 
the axis coordinate 
remains unchanged." 



Our coordinate table, which is two 
bytes for each x 9 y 9 and z coordinate, 
starts at $5200. The first x coordinate 
is stored in locations $5200 +0, +6, +12 
and +18; the negative x coordinate is 
stored at $5200 +24, +30, +36 and +42. 
The first y coordinate is stored at $5200 
+2, +8, +26 and +32; the negative y 
coordinate is stored at $5200 +14, +20, 
+38 and +44. The first z coordinate is 
stored at $5200 +4, +16, +28 and +40; 
the negative z coordinate is stored at 
$5200 +10, +22, +34 and +46. 

So starting at $5200 we have: +jc, 0, 
+y 9 0, +z, 0, +*, 0, +y 9 0, -z, 0, +*, 0, - 
y 9 0, +z, 0, +*, 0, -y t 0, -z, 0, 0, +y 9 
0, +z, 0, -, 0, +y 9 0,-z, 0, 0, -y, 0, +z, 
0, 0, -y 9 0, -z, 0. The coordinate table 
is then increased by 48 to get the start 
of the next group at $5230. The amount 
in NUMBER (FCB 25) is the number of 
initial sets of coordinates, and eight 
times this number is stored and plotted. 
You can make the amount higher or 
lower as you want. 

Since we run the program from 
BASIC, we do not need to set the PMODE 
or color. After setting Page 5, the 
computer randomly selects the axis of 
rotation. Remember that $5200 is the 
location of the first x coordinate, $5202 



4FCB 39 


00900 


RTS 






4FCC 8E 5200 


00910 ZROTAT 


LDX 


#$5200 


FIRST X LOCATION 


4FCF 108E 5202 


00920 


LDY 


#$5202 


FIRST Y LOCATION 


4FD3 39 


00930 


RTS 






4FD4 CE 7000 


00940 LOOPS 


LDU 


#$7000 


LOCATION OF "SCRATCH PAD" 


4FD7 F6 5085 


00950 


LDB 


NUMBER 




4FDA 86 08 


00960 


LDA 


#8 


SET 8: POINTS PER COORDINATE 


4FDC 3D 


00970 


HUL 






4FDD FD 5083 


00980 L00P3 


STD 


COUNT! ' 




4FE0 EC 84 


00990 


LDD 






4FE2 ED C4 


01000 


STD 






4FE4 ED 44 


01010 


STD 


4,U 




4FE6 47 


01020 


ASRA 






4FE7 56 


01030 


RORB 






4FE8 47 


01040 


ASRA 






4FE9 56 


01050 


RORB 






4FEA 47 


01060 


ASRA 






4 FEB 56 


01070 


RORB 






4FEC 47 


01080 


ASRA 






4FED 56 


01090 


RORB 






4FEE 47 


01100 


ASRA 






4FEF 56 


01110. 


RORB 






4FF0 47 


01120 


ASRA 






4FFL 56 


01130 


RORB 






4FF2 47 


01140 


ASRA 






4FF3 56 


01150 


RORB 






4FF4 ED 42 


01160 


STD 


2,U 




4FF6 EC C4 


01170 


LDD 


§ 




4FF8 A3 42 


01180 


SUBD 


2,U 




4FFA ED C4 


01190 


STD 


>u 




4FFC EC A4 


01200 


LDD 






4FFE 47 


01210 


ASRA 






4FFF 56 


01220 


RORB 






5000 47 


01230 


ASRA 






5001 56 


01240 


RORB 






5002 47 


01250 


ASRA 






5003 56 


01260 


RORB 






5004 ED 42 


01270 


STD 


2,U 




5006 EC C4 


01280 


LDD 


,u 




5008 A3 42 


01290 


SUBD 






500A ED 84 


01300 


STD 


X 




500C EC A4 


01310 NEWY 


LDD 






500E ED 46 


01320 


STD 


6 , a 




5010 ED 48 


01330 


STD 


8,U 




5012 EC 44 


01340 


LDD 


4,U 




5014 47 


01350 


ASRA 






5015 56 


01360 


RORB 






5016 47 


01370 


ASRA 






5017 56 


01380 


RORB 






5018 47 


01390 


ASRA 






5019 56 


01400 


RORB 






501A ED 44 


01410 


STD 


4,U 




501C EC 48 


01420 


LDD 


8,tJ 




501E 47 


01430 


ASRA 






501F 56 


01440 


RORB 






5020 47 


01450 


ASRA 






5021 56 


01460 


RORB 






5022 47 


01470 


ASRA 






5023 56 


01480 


RORB 






5024 47 


01490 


ASRA 






5025 56 


01500 


RORB 






5026 47 


01510 


ASRA 






5027 56 


01520 


RORB 






5028 47 


01530 


ASRA 






5029 56 


01540 


RORB 






502A 47 


01550 


ASRA 






502B 56 


01560 


RORB 






502C ED 48 


01570 


STD 


8,U 




502E EC 46 


01580 


LDD 


6..U 




5030 A3 48 


01590 


SUBD 


8,U 




5032 E3 44 


01600 


ADDD 


4,U 




5034 ED A4 


01610 


STD 


,Y 




5036 30 06 


01620 


LEAX 


6,X 




5038 31 26 


01630 


LEAY 






503A FC 5083 


01640 


LDD 


COUNTl 




503D 83 0001 


01650 


SUBD 


#1 




5040 1026 FF99 


01660 


LBNE 


LO0P3 




5044 CE 5200 


01670 GET 


LDU 


#$5200 




5047 F6 5085 


01680 


LDB 


NUMBER 




504A 86 08 


01690 


LDA 


#8 


SET 8 POINTS PER COORDINATE 


504G 3D 


01700 


MUL 






504D FD 5083 


01710 L00P6 


STD 


COUNT1 




5050 86 60 


01720 


LDA 


#96 




5052 A0 42 


01730 


SUBA 


2,U 


GET ACTUAL Y COORDINATE 


5054 C6 20 


01740 


LDB 


#32 


BYTES PER LINE 



84 THE RAINBOW May 1989 



5056 3D 




01750 


MUL 






5057 9B 


BA 


01760 


ADDA 


$BA 


GRAPHICS START 


5059 IF 


01 


01770 


TFR 


D,X 


REGISTER D TO REGISTER X 


505B E6 


C4 


01780 


LDB 


,u 


ROTATED X COORDINATE 


505D CB 


80 


01790 


ADDB 


#128 


ACTUAL X COORDINATE ON SCREEN 


505F 54 




01800 


LSRB 




8 BITS PER BYTE 


5060 54 




01810 


LSRB 






5061 54 




01820 


LSRB 






5062 3A 




01830 


ABX 




ADD TO REGISTER X; - BYTE 


5063 86 


80 


01840 BIT 


LDA 


#128 




5(365 AB 


C4 


01850 


ADDA 




GET ACTUAL X COORDINATE 


5067 84 


07 


01860 


AKDA 


#7 


CONVERT TO A NUMBER 0-7 


5069 108E 


92DD 


01870 


LDY 


#$92DD 


OR TABLE LOCATION IN ROM 


506D E6 


84 


01880 


LDB 


,x 


GET CURRENT BYTE CONTENTS 


506F EA 


A6 


01890 


ORB 




OR IT WITH OR TABLE 


5071 E7 


84 


01900 


STB 


,x 


PSET NEW BYTE CONTENTS 


5073 33 


46 


01910 


LEAU 


6, II 


NEXT COORDINATE LOCATION 


5075 FC 


5083 


01920 FINISH 


LDD 


COUNT1 




5078 83 


0001 


01930 


SUBD 


#1 




507B 1026 


FFCE 


01940 


LBNE 


LOOP6 


ALL DONE YET 7 


507F 39 




01950 


RTS 






5080 




01960 COORD 


RHB 


2 




5082 




01970 COUNT 


RKB 


\ 










PUR 


4, 




5085 


19 


01990 NUMBER 


FCB 


25 






4F00 


02000 


Tl \T T> 

END 


START 




00000 TOTAL ERRORS 











is the location of the first y coordinate, 
and $5204 is the location of the first z 
coordinate. 

After picking an axis of rotation, the 
program computes the other two coor- 
dinate's rotated position, but the axis 
coordinate remains unchanged. The 
end of the program PSETS the x and y 
screen locations. Pressing any key stops 
the program and returns to BASIC. 

Instead of using the machine lan- 
guage program to pick the x 9 y and z 
coordinates, you can use your own 
program. The BASIC Alternate 3-D 
program is an example of this. Just 
remember to poke the following loca- 
tions with: 

&H50B5 - NUMBER OF DOTS (ND) 
&H5200 - STRRT OF COORDINATES 
&H4FB0 - NEW EXECUTION ADDRESS 

□ 



Listing 2: DRIVER 










X=RND ( -TIMER) 


0 1 COPYRIGHT 1989 FALSOFT, INC 


3/3 


PMODE 4 , 1 : PCLS : SCREEN 1,1 


5 REM DRIVER PROGRAM 


4/3 


EXEC &H4F00 


1/3 PCLEAR8:CLEAR20j3,&H4F0j3-l 


5/3 


GOTO 50 



Listing 3: ALTROTAT 

/3 1 COPYRIGHT 1989 FALSOFT, INC 
5 REM ALTERNATE 3 D PROGRAM 
1)3 PC LEAR 8 : CLEAR2/3/3 , &H4F8/3-1 
2/3 X=RND ( -TIMER) :ND=3j3 : P=&H52j30 
3/3 CLS:POKE &H5j385,ND;PRINT@2/3/3 / 
"CLEARING -« 

4/3 FOR N-/3 TO ND* 8: POKE P+N,/3:NE 
XT : CLS 

5/3 PRINTS 2/3/3 , "COUNTING DOWN 

6/3 FOR T=l TO ND : PRINT® 2 1 6 , ND-T+ 

1 

7/3 X=6/3*COS(T) :Y=60*SIN(T) :Z=6/3* 

TAN(T*ATN(l)/45) 

80 X=ABS (X) : Y=ABS (Y) :Z-ABS (Z) 

9 /3 XX=2 5 6 -X : YY=*2 5 6-Y : Z Z=2 5 6 -Z 

1/3/3 POKE P,X:POKE P+6,X;POKE P+l 

2, X: POKE P+18,X 

110 POKE P+2,Y: POKE P+8, Y:POKE P 
+26, Y: POKE P+32,Y 
120 POKE P+4,Z:POKE P+16,Z:POKE 
P+28,Z:POKE P+40,Z 
130 POKE P+24,XX:POKE P+3J3,XX:P0 
KE P+36,XX:POKE P+42,XX 
140 POKE P+14,YY:POKE P+20 # YY:PO 
KE P+38 7 YY:POKE P+44,YY 
150 POKE P+10 r ZZ:POKE P+22/ZZ:PO 
KE P+34,ZZ:POKE P+46,ZZ 
160 P=P+48:NEXT 
170 PMODE 4 , l iSPCLS : SCREEN 1,1 
180 EXEC &H4F80 
190 GOTO 




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FEATURES! Supports D/S 
and 40 track drives. 
Power-up in any screen 
colors (or monochrome), 
width, and palettes (RGB 
or CMP) you wish! More 
options than you can 
shake a joystick at! See 
Rainbow Review JUNE 87 



RAINBOW 

£1 



HAWKSof t 

P.O. Box 7112 
Elgin, 11. 60121-7112 
312-742-3084 
S/H always included 
Check COD or MO accepted 
11 orders add 7% sales tax 



HAWKSoft KEYBOARD 
CABLE $25 

UNCHAIN YOUR KEYBOARD! 
Five foot extender cable 
for Coco II and 3. Move 
your keyboard where you 
want it! Installation 
instructions and tips 
included! Custom lengths 

available. 



May 1989 THE RAINBOW 85 



A lime -saver for Color Computer 3 users 




c < 



■n 



if L f 




■n 




09 




/^^>omputer users have become ac- 
( I customed to the timesaving lux- 
V^^luries a computer provides — so 
much so that many of us are driven mad 
when we must wait for our printer to 
finish before continuing to edit or 
running the program. So I have made 
a spooler using the 6809's IRQ and a 
non-used 8K block of the CoCo 3. 

The program works on any CoCo 3, 
128 or 512K, and at any baud rate. Just 
type the program BASIC in and save it 
to a disk. Then run it and type EXEC 
&HFC80. The program asks you for the 
printer baud rate, after which the pro- 
gram becomes transparent to BASIC. 

When you make an LLIST with a 
program under 8K, the screen shows 
"OK" after two or three seconds and 
then the cursor reappears while the 
printer lists the program. Now you can 
edit or run your program while printing. 
If your program is longer than 8K — for 
example, 13K — wait for the first 5K. 



Marc Genois is a French-speaking 
Canadian who studies Computer 
Science in Quebec. He also operates a 
french BBS in Quebec. 



The cursor reappears and the last 8K is 
buffered. 

To stop printing, type EXEC. How- 
ever, if you have loaded another ML 
program, type EXEC &HFDQ7. Otherwise 
you will execute the other ML program. 

With my DMP-130 and a serial/ 
parallel interface at 9600 baud, there is 
no speed difference in the BASIC and the 
printer going at the same speed as a 
normal LLIST. In fact, I have tested it 
at all baud rates and at 1200 bps or 
faster I see no difference. At 600 baud 
BASIC runs a bit slower, but the key- 
board response is good. Occasionally at 
300 bps BASIC does not get the key you 
have pressed. 

The program uses none of BASIC 
memory and is located in a lost space 
after the new BASIC A fairly expe- 
rienced assembly programmer can put 
it after the RS-DOS (at $D8DO) and 
burn it on EPROM. But I have not 
located it after the DOS for compatibil- 
ity with other DOSs that use this space. 

(Questions or comments concerning 
this article may be directed to the author 
at 319 Roisard, Beauport, Quebec, 
Canada G1C5K5. Please include an 
SASE when requesting a reply.) □ 



86 THE RAINBOW May 1 989 



I Editor's Note: In addition to the BASIC driver, 
I the assembled program SPDDLBIN is included on 
this month's RAINBOW and DISK. 



Listing It 5PDDLBR5 

1 CLS! PRIST" CO CO 3 PRINTER SPOOL" 
.ER VI ..El" J PRINT" BY KABC GZNOIS {C 
) 87 " : PRINT" POKING DATA : 11 

2 FOR I = GH"FC00 TO £ KFDA5 : £E AD A: 
C=£+A:FOKE I,JViPRraT877 f HEXSfI) : 

NEXT; IF C<>41296 THEN PRINT 11 CHE": 
KSUM ERROR IN DATA LINES,"; STOP 

3 PRINT :FHrNT 11 NOW, TtfFE t w : PRINT 
"(C) SAVEM 1 SPOOI.HR * , £HFCp£ , SHFDA5 
^HFCjB^'iEKD 

4 DATA 52 ,13,4.8,141,^ 126,189, IB 
5,156, 1B9 

5 DATA 161,177,129,49,37,249,129 
,54,34,245 

DATA 1S9, 163, 10 ,120,49, IB J, 252 
,119,72, 4B 

7 DATA 141,^, 87,16,174, 114, lfi # 15 
9, 149,19j3 

fi DATA 1,1^4,131,252,115,46,141, 
231, 191 

9 DATA 1,104, 134, 126,163,1, 103,2 
6,8J3,1^ 

lfl DATA 1 ^ 13 r 151,252, 117 r 4S, 141, 
1,20,191 

11 DATA 1, 13, 1S3, 1,12,142,64 ,J3,1 
31,253 

12 DATA 97 p 191 p 253, 85,142,162,19 
3, 134, 13, 1*7 

13 DATA 12S, 14,0, 162,2^1, 3S, 249,1 
42 r 16^p239 p 167 

14 DATA 128,140, 162, 249, 3 8, 24 9,1 
42, 253,7,159 

15 DATA 157,26,175,53,146,56,16, 
16,32,64 

IS DATA p t 190, 0, S7,J3, 41, p, 18, p, 7 

17 DATA 0,1,13,13,67,111,67,111, 
32,73 

18 DATA 73,73,32,00,114 ,105, 110, 
lie, 101, 114 

19 DATA 32 ,33, 112,111,111,103, 10 
1,114,32,32 

20 DATA 118,49, 4G , 4£ ,13 , SB, 121,3 
2,77,97 



21 DATA 114, £9,32, 71, 101, 110 ,111 
,105,115,32 

22 DATA 32, 4j0, 99,41, 32,49,57,55, 
55,13 

23 DATA 13 ,42, 61,51,45,48,44,32, 
50,61 

24 DATA 54, 4 &, 4£, 44, 32, 51 P 51,49 f 
50 ,48 

25 DATA 48, 13, 52 ,61, 5£ # 52,43,46, 
44,32 

26 DATA 53,61,52,56,48,48,44,32, 
54 ,61 

27 DATA 57,54,45,48,13,69,110,11 
6,101,114 

28 DATA 32,112,114,1^5,110,116,1 
01,114,32,93 

29 DATA 97,117,1^,32,114,97,116 
,101,32,61 

3£ DATA S2, 32, 0,52, 16,26^80, 142, 
64, p 

31 DATA 191, 253, 85, 151, 253 ,B7, 28 
, 175,53, 144 

32 DATA 52^,214,111,92,53,4,43, 

33 DATA 15 9, 252, 115, 50, 9S, 52 ,23, 
190,253,85 

34 DATA 49,1,188,253,87,39,251,2 
6 , 80 , 2 4 6 

35 DATA 255,162,52,4,198,55,247, 
255,162, 4 8 

36 DATA 31,167 i 128,140, 96,0,38,3 
,142,64 

37 DATA 0,191,253,85,53,4,247, 25 

5,162,53 

33 DATA 151,68,60,0, 16, 15*0, 253, S 
7,188,253 

39 DATA 85,39, 59, 246,255, 162,52, 
4,196,55 

40 DATA 247,255,162,49,141,0,49, 
246,252,119 

41 DATA 166,165,52,2,166,128,246 
,255, 34, S4 

42 DATA 37,23,139,162,191,140,96 
,0,38,3 

43 DATA 142,64, 0,191,253, 87, 188, 
2 53,85,39 

44 DATA 4,106,226,38,225,50,97,5 
3^4,247 

4 5 DATA 255,182,110,159,252,117, 
46 DATA 3,6 



Join the MIDI revolution... 

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• FBEDIT (Edit and create new voices for the FB-01) $29.95 



May 1989 THE RAINBOW 87 



1 B AS I C Training 



This article employs various atti- 
tudes used during the last lesson 
in which we created the figure of 
a bird. The following instructions will 
allow you to run this bird through some 
simple flight and behavior patterns and 
will provide you a foundation upon 
which to create more complex patterns. 

The graph-paper utility is not needed 
since we have developed enough raw 
material to illustrate additional anima- 
tion techniques. Refer to Listing 1. 
Lines 0 to 290 are very similar to last 
month's program. If you saved it, load 
it and enter DEL300-. 

Line 1 10 is different. It has the second 
screen, SCREEN 1, and PCLS because all 
six attitudes were unveiled for refer- 
ence. This is the reason Line 290 is 
masked. 

If you did not save the program, 
simply key in lines 0 to 290 from Listing 
1. Enter 1B1 GOTO 181, then run the 
program. You can see the six attitudes; 
from left to right, the variable names are 
fl, 8, C, D, RR and BB. 

In assigning variables, try using a 
sequence that is easy to remember. Here 
is a list of my attitudes and correspond- 
ing variables: 

Wing up attitudes R&B 

Wings down C&D 

Wings partly up RR 

Wings partly down BB 

With these you can make a tentative 
flight plan. My strategy for returning to 
the up-wing position is to use C, a 
variant of D, to give a different time- 
lapse impression. To move the head up, 
BB continues the impression, followed 
by RR, passing the horizontal plane in an 
upward direction and ending in the full 
up-wing position using B. Use any 
position or sequence you like. Be crea- 
tive. You should have no trouble rough- 
ing out a variety of possible attitudes on 
graph paper. Here is a possible config- 
uration: 

BDM+3, -2M+3 , -2M+3 , -2M+3,2 

A straight-line horizontal plane atti- 
tude was not created because although 
the bird travels through the horizontal 



Florida-based Joseph Kolar is a veter- 
an writer and programmer who special- 
izes in introducing beginners to the 
powers of the Color Computer. 



Some homegrown 
animation 

BASIC 

Bird 

Watching 



By Joseph Kolar 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 



plane on each flap, a straight line would 
be too distracting. 

Enter DEL1B1, then key in lines 300 
and 320 to 430. Attitude R is located 
from (12,12) to (2, 4, IB). Key in Line 
320. In the same location, replace R with 

RR. 

To make this transformation less 
abrupt, put a pause between the atti- 
tudes. Key in Line 310. (We're using a 
G05UB routine because we will use it 
several times.) Note PCLS0. Add 325 
GDTD 325. Type EDIT430, then press 
ENTER. Press the space bar until the 
cursor is under P. Enter GD to delete 
PCLS0, then run the program. Then type 
DEL325, but don't run the program. 

Our next pair of flaps are in lines 340 
and 360 so key them in. They move to 
the right, +6 and down, +6. Enter 345 
GOTO 345, then run the program. Notice 
that R vanished but not RR. To correct 
things enter EDIT430 and press ENTER. 
Then press the space bar until the cursor 
is under R. Type I (for Insert) PCL50 : 
and press enter. 

Key in lines 330 and 440. To make the 
pause longer in duration, we added a 
shorter pause. An example is the short 
pause between flaps at Line 310 and the 
longer pause while moving to a new 
location at Line 330. Now run the 
program. 

As soon as the bird location changes, 
our reference group of attitudes is 
erased, as well as the bird, RR, at the old 
location. Do you know what erased fl? 

Mask Line 310. You are asked how 



CoCo erases the lines in this situation. 
Lines 300 and 320 (with pause and erase 
masked) erased fl. R and RR are in the 
same location, as were all the PUTS in the 
last tutorial. Each new PUT prints a new 
frame over the previous one, destroying 
it. 

Unmask Line 310. Enter DEL345 and 
key in lines 350 and 370, the short and 
longer pauses. 

Key in lines 380 to 410. Note that we 
move each pair of frames, C, BB and RR, 
B, (+6,+6). 

If you want to save the program, 
enter CSAVE. Experiment by substituting 
your home-grown bird attitudes and by 
changing locations. This is a good time 
to take a breather and go over what 
you've read so far. 

To continue, look at Listing 2. If you 
saved your copy of Listing 1, load it by 
entering CLQRD, then type DEL420- and 
key in lines 420 to 510. Carefully com- 
pare lines 300 to 410 and change the 
GQTQs and GOSUBs to reflect those in 
Listing 2. Then run the program. 

We are creating different flight pat- 
terns, but they aren't logical. Our prime 
purpose is to continue exploring how to 
locate various attitudes. 

You recall that in lines 300 to 410 the 
bird was at one location in a pair of 
attitudes before moving to the next 
location. His flight downwards is not 
the same as his return trip. Press BREAK 
and enter LIST-4B0. The six attitudes 
return it to its original position. They 
are, in order, RR, BB, C, D, BB, RR. There 
is no change in the sequence of pauses: 
a short pause, a long pause and repeat 
sequence. 

Here is how lines 430 to 480 are 
actually set up: The chosen attitudes are 
selected and listed on scratch paper. The 
coordinates in Line 410 are noted and 
written down. The first of the six lines 
is 430, and its variable was added to the 
coordinates pulled from Line 410. On 
the work paper copy it looks like this: 

430 (30,30) - [42,36) ,RR 

The coordinates from Line 300 are 
written about two inches below. The 
sixth line is designated as Line 480, and 
its preassigned attitude is RR. It looks 
like this: 

4B0 (12,12)-(24,18) , RR 

Line 480 is printed over the attitude 
in Line 410 to avoid jerky motion in 



88 THE RAINBOW May 1989 



flight. Line 480 should be printed at the 
same location as Line 300. This blends 
the movement of frames. 

On the work-sheet, between the start- 
ing and ending move, write in: 

440 ( )-( ),BB 

450 ( )-( ),C 

4G0 ( )-( ),D 

470 ( )-( ),BB 

All you need now are some coordi- 
nates in the four lines. Each line's 
starting coordinates are the most im- 
portant. The ending coordinates are 
predicated on the starting ones, 
(+12,+6). 

I decided to use coordinates (24,24) 
in lines 440 and 450; (18,18) in lines 460 
and 470. These figures are written on the 
worksheet. It doesn't take a genius to 
add +12,+6 to each to get the ending 
locations of each frame. 

Even though we are working upwards 
and to the left, our ending locations are 
always higher figures than the starting 
coordinates. Think of it as hanging a 
canvas in a location of your choice that 
is set with the beginning coordinates. 
The actual picture takes up the area that 
is defined by the ending coordinates. 



Fill them in on your work-sheet. You 
know how to make PUT lines. At this 
point, it is pretty much a copying chore 
to transfer the data you accumulate into 
the program to create a flying loop. Line 
4,80 also has the instructions to loop 
back to Line 300. Modify anything you 
feel could be improved to create other 
flight plans. 

We use a somewhat different method 
in Listing 3. Load your copy of Listing 
2 and enter DEL300-. In Line 110, chop 
off Screen 1,1. We don't want the 
attitudes created and stored by unmask- 
ing Line 290 to remove them from the 
screen. Key in lines 300 to 460 and run 
the program. 

The bird cycles across the screen a few 
times, first downward and upwards 
without seeming to change direction, 
then undulating as it advances from left 
to right. (In this tutorial, x,y are the 
horizontal and vertical coordinates 
respectively.) Line 300 allows CoCo to 
begin its flight path at a location ran- 
domly chosen from 0,60 to 0,120. 

Begin a worksheet by listing the 
scoop on the first line. For example: 

320 (X,Y)-(X+12,Y+G). 



Our attitudes will probably change 
until we get a smooth movement plot- 
ted. Expect to make eight frames in a 
downward direction and about six 
frames for wavy lines, 14 frames to a 
cycle. 

Add on your paper places for lines 
330 to 460: 

330 (X+, Y+)-(X+, Y+) 

tt tt tt tt 

tt tt tt tt 

460 (X+, Y+)-(X+, Y+) 

In the first eight lines on your work- 
sheet, you will progress by in-place 
pairs, creating the starting location, 
(+6,+6). The ending locations will be 
increased by (+12,+6). As a result, lines 
320 and 330 are the same. The starting 
locations for Line 330 are y+0 or 
x,y. 

Add +6,+6 to lines 340 and 350, then 
enter the info on the worksheet. Con- 
tinue the same increment pattern for 
lines 360 and 370 to begin at 
(x+12,y+12). Guess what the starting 
coordinates are for lines 380 and 390? 

All the ending coordinates are + 1 2, +6 
more than the starting coordinates. 



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May 1989 THE RAINBOW 89 



Calculate them and enter them in the 
appropriate places on the worksheet. 

Line 400 is a masked reference line to 
indicate that the system is changed and 
we are preparing to move up and to the 
right. Therefore, cross out Line 400 on 
your worksheet. 

In order to give an uneven aspect to 
the flight, the attitudes used in lines 410 
to 460 are not paired. 

Look at lines 410 to 460. The x 
forward motion increases by +6 each 
time, y decreases by -6 except in Line 
440. 

Line 410 takes a quantum drop at 
+6,+ 18. This simulates a sudden drop in 
an air pocket to add a glitch to the flight 
track. Note Line 440. It wasn't moved 
on the vertical coordinate, giving it a 
more erratic flight. Copy these offsets 
and then calculate and enter the ending 
coordinates, based on the beginning 
coordinates. 

Now variables are chosen and as- 
signed to each PUT line to make a viable 
flight. 

Gather the info and key in one pro- 
gram line at a time, without the GOSUB 
routines and yanking PCL50: out of 
Line 500, to see how the pattern shapes 
up. This is of limited value. You see 
where the frames progress but the proof 
is in the pudding — that is, how it looks 
in flight. Since you are also manipulat- 
ing locations and time pauses, the 
interplay of attitude, location and pause 
has significant visual effects. 

After you finalize your choice of 
attitudes and enter the PUTS, add 



multiple-line gosub pause routines, etc. 
Ultimately you must use trial and error 
to wind up with your desired effect. 

A FOR/NEXT loop at Line 310 to 470 
allows the flight curve to run across the 
screen four times. 

Line 480 gives a hint of the bird as it 
flies off the screen. Note that X+259 did 
not bomb out the program. What value 
would? Try X+969. You can even change 
the value to X+G5000 and C0C0 will still 
cooperate. 

Line 480 is really a nonsense line. The 
last frame set by Line 460 PUTs x at 240. 
AT equals (240+247). The value in Line 
480 equals 487. The only thing that 
saves it is that y is a good value. C0C0 
sets the y and gives up on frame, if you 
are quick enough. Press break and 
enter PRINT X,Y. Then run the program. 

If you use 4B0 PUT (247, Y)- 

(259,Y+6), B, P5ET, you get a traffic 
jam at the right edge. C0C0 can't find 
a place to put the frame because the 
ending coordinates are off the screen, so 
it dutifully backs up and tries to get it 
all on. The result is one big mess. 

One of the hazards of using GET-PUT 
is a bunched-up or junk frame. This 
malfunction is caused by off-the-screen 
location or DIN not allowing storage of 
the full canvas. But more frequently, 
improper calculations result in a PUT 
area that is not the same as the GET area. 
This error resides in the ending coordi- 
nates. 

The coordinates to give the closest 
full picture without a pile-up are 
(243,Y)-(255,Y+16). The bird looks 



like it is flying across the screen but is 
really flying sideways. Now make a 
copy of your final program. 

The conventional way to show a bit 
of bird would be to DRRW one wing in a 
6-by-6 area, enter DIN and GET, then 
enter PUT at the edge of the screen at 249. 

Add to Line 120: 

,CC(2) 

1B1 DRAW"BN120,OBDGN+3,-2E2N+l,2" 

(a wing with a bend.) 

2B1 GET (120,0) - (126,6) , CC,G 
480 PUT(29,Y)-(255,Y+6) , CC, 
P5ET:GOSUB510:GDTQ300. 

Then run the program. 

You may use the (x,y) system to begin 
at any location as long as you designate 
the values of x and y in the program PUT 
line: 

DEL300- 

300 X=50;Y=50 

310 PUT (X,Y)-(X+12,Y+6) ,C,P5ET 
320 PUT (X-10,Y-10)-(X+2,Y-4) ,D, 
P5ET 

330 GOTO 330 

Then run the program. 
Line 320 translates to: 

PUT (50-10, 50-10)-(50+2, 50-4) 
Or PUT (40,40)-(52,46) 

Hope this gives you food for thought 
and an itch to try your hand at anima- 
tion. □ 



Listing 1: FLIGHTS1 

0 "LISTINGl 

100 ' 
110 

120 

E(2;, hh^; , dd^) 
130 DRAW'»BM0,0M+3,2F2M+l,2M+l,-2 
E2M+3,-2 M 

140 DRAW ,f BM20,0M+2,3F2M+2,lM+2,- 
lE2M+2,-3" 

150 DRAW"BM40,0BD6M+l,-2E2M+3,-2 
M+3,2F2M+1,2" 

160 DRAW f, BM60,0BD6M+3,-2E2M+l,-2 
M+l / 2F2M+3 / 2 M 

170 DRAW M BM80,0F3M+3,lM+3,-lE3" 
180 DRAW"BM100,0BD6M+6,-4M+6,4 M 
230 GET(0,0)-(12,6) ,A,G 
240 GET (20,0) -(32, 6) ,B,G 
250 GET(40,0)-(52,6) ,C,G 
260 GET (60,0)-(72,6) ,D,G 
270 GET (80,0)-(92,6) , AA , G 



280 GET (100,0)-(112,6) ,BB,G 
290 'PCLS:SCREEN1,1 
300 PUT(12,12)-(24,18) ,A, PSET 
310 GOSUB430 

320 PUT(12,12)-(24,18) ,AA,PSET 
330 GOSUB440:GOSUB430 
340 PUT(18,18)-(30,24) ,BB,PSET 
350 GOSUB430 

360 PUT(18,18)-(30,24) ,D,PSET 
370 GOSUB440:GOSUB430 
380 PUT(24,24)-(36,30) ,C,PSET:GO 
SUB4 30 

390 PUT(24,24)-(36,30) ,BB,PSET:G 
OSUB440:GOSUB430 

400 PUT(30,30)-(42,36) ,AA,PSET:G 
OSUB430 

410 PUT (30, 30) -(42,3 6) ,B, PSET: GO 
SUB440 : GOSUB430 : GOTO420 
420 GOTO420 

430 FOR Z=1TO100:NEXT:PCLS0:RETU 
RN 

440 FORZ=1TO50: NEXT: RETURN 



90 



THE RAINBOW May 1989 



Listing 2: FLIBHTS2 

0 1 LISTING2 
100 ' 

110 PM0DE4,1:PCLS:SCREEN1,1 

120 DIM A(2), B(2), C(2), D(2) , 

E(2) , AA(2) , BB(2) 

13'0 DRAW"BM0,0M+3,2F2M+l,2M+l,-2 

E2M+3,-2" 

140 DRAW"BM20,0M+2,3F2M+2,lM+2,- 
lE2M+2,-3" 

150 DRAW"BM40,0BD6M+l,-2E2M+3,-2 
M+3,2F2M+1,2" 

160 DRAW"BM60,0BD6M+3,-2E2M+l,-2 
M+l,2F2M+3,2" 

170 DRAW"BM80,0F3M+3, lM+3,-lE3" 

180 DRAW ,l BMlj3p / j3BD6M+6,-4M+6 / 4" 

230 GET(0,0)-(12,6) ,A,G 

240 GET (20,0)-(32,6) ,B,G 

250 GET(40,0)-(52,6) ,C,G 

260 GET (60,0) -(72,6) ,D,G 

270 GET (80 ,0) - ( 92 , 6 ) , AA,G 

280 GET ( 100 ,0 ) -.(112 , 6) , BB, G 

290 'PCLSlSCREENl, 1 

300 PUT(12,12)-(24,18) ,A, PSET 

310 GOSUB500 

320 PUT(12,12)-(24,18) ,A,PSET 

330 GOSUB510:GOSUB500 

340 PUT(18, 18) -(30,24) ,BB, PSET 



Listing 3: FLIBHTS3 

0 1 LISTING3 
100 • 

110 PM0DE4,1:PCLS 

120 DIM A(2), B(2), C(2), D(2), 

E(2) , AA(2) , BB(2) 

130 DRAW»'BM0,0M+3,2F2M+l,2M+l,-2 

E2M+3,-2" 

140 DRAW"BM20,0M+2,3F2M+2,lM+2,- 
lE2M+2,-3" 

150 DRAW"BM40,0BD6M+l,-2E2M+3,-2 
M+3,2F2M+1,2" 

160 DRAW"BM60,0BD6M+3,-2E2M+l,-2 
M+l,2F2M+3,2" 

170 DRAW"BM80,0F3M+3,lM+3,-lE3" 

180 DRAW"BM100,0BD6M+6,-4M+6,4" 

230 GET(0,0)-(12,6) ,A,G 

240 GET (20,0)-(32,6) ,B,G 

250 GET(40,0) -(52,6) ,C,G 

260 GET (60,0)-(72,6) ,D,G 

270 GET (80,0)-(92,6) , AA , G 

280 GET (100 ,0) - (112 , 6) , BB, G 

290 PCLS:SCREEN1,1 

300 Y=RND(60)+60 

310 FOR X=0 TO 2 40 STEP62 

320 PUT(X,Y)-(X+12,Y+6) ,A,PSET:G 

OSUB500 

330 PUT(X,Y)-(X+12,Y+6) ,AA,PSET: 

GOSUB5 10 : GOSUB500 v 

340 PUT (X+6 , Y+6) - (X+18 , Y+12) , BB, 



350 GOSUB500 

360 PUT(18,18)-(30,24) ,D,PSET 

370 GOSUB510:GOSUB500 

380 PUT (24, 24) -(36,30) ,C, PSET: GO 

SUB500 

390 PUT(24,24)-(36,30) ,BB,PSET:G 
OSUB510 : GOSUB500 

400 PUT(30, 30) -(42,36) ,AA,PSET:G 
OSUB500 

410 PUT (30, 30) -(42, 36) ,B,PSET:GO 
SUB510:GOSUB500 

420 *************************** 

430 PUT(30,30)-(42,36) ,AA,PSET:G 
OSUB500 

440 PUT(24,24)-(36,30) ,BB,PSET:G 
OSUB510 : GOSUB500 

450 PUT(24,24)-(36,30) ,C,PSET:GO 
SUB500 

460 PUT(18,18)-(30,24) ,D,PSET:GO 
SUB510:GOSUB500 

470 PUT(18,18)-(30,24) ,BB,PSET:G 
OSUB500 

480 PUT(12,12)-(24,18) ,AA,PSET:G 
OSUB5 10 : GOSUB500 : GOTO300 
490 GOTO4 90 

500 FOR Z=1TO100:NEXT:PCLS0:RETU 
RN 

510 FORZ=1TO50: NEXT: RETURN 



PSET:GOSUB500 

3 50 PUT (X+6, Y+6) -(X+18, Y+12) ,D,P 

SET : GOSUB5 10 : GOSUB500 

3 60 PUT (X+12, Y+12 ) -(X+24,Y+18) ,C 

,PSET:GOSUB500 

370 PUT (X+12, Y+12) -(X+24,Y+18) ,B 
B, PSET : GOSUB510 : GOSUB500 

380 PUT (X+18, Y+18)-(X+30,Y+24) ,A 
A,PSET:GOSUB500 

390 PUT (X+18, Y+18) -(X+30,Y+24) ,B 

, PSET : GOSUB510 : GOSUB500 

400 *************************** 

410 PUT(X+24,Y+30)-(X+36,Y+36) ,A 
A, PSET : GOSUB500 

420 PUT(X+30,Y+24)-(X+42,Y+30) ,B 
, PSET : GOSUB5 10 : GOSUB500 

430 PUT(X+36,Y+18) -(X+48,Y+24) ,A 

A, PSET:GOSUB500 

440 PUT(X+42,Y+18)-(X+54,Y+24) ,C 
, PSET : GOSUB5 10 : GOSUB500 

450 PUT (X+48, Y+12 )-(X+60, Y+18) ,B 

B, PSET:GOSUB500 

460 PUT (X+54 , Y+6) - (X+66 , Y+12 ) , BB 

,PSET:GOSUB500 

470 NEXTX 

480 PUT(X+247,Y) -(X+255,Y+6) ,B,P 
SET : GOSUB5 10 : GOTO300 
490 GOTO4 90 

500 FOR Z=1TO60:NEXT:PCLS0:RETUR 
N 

510 FORZ=1TO50: NEXT: RETURN /R\ 



May 1989 THE RAINBOW 91 



) Wi s hing W eil 



16KECB 




If you have an idea for the "Wishing 
Well/' submit it to Fred c/o THE 
RAINBOW. Remember, keep your 
ideas specific, and don't forget this is 
BASIC. All programs resulting from 
your wishes are for your use, but 
remain the property of the author. 

Let me tell you, it's no easy task 
coming up with a new program every 
month of the yean Strangely enough, 
inspiration always finds its way to my 
door. While agonizing over what to 
write this month, someone suggested a 
program about the twelve months of the 
year. 

Lo and behold, Calendar was born. 
Now there's an early childhood pro- 
gram to help students learn the order, 
names and climates of each month. So 
you see, "twelve months" solved the 
problem for one. 

Since first introducing the programs 
Opposites and Count on Me, I have 
received very positive responses to 
early-childhood educational programs 
for the CoCo. When many families buy 
a Color Computer, "having it help the 
kids" is a good justification for the 
money spent. But it is often hard to 
fulfill due to the lack of good youngster- 
oriented software. Calendar is one step 
in the right direction. 

This program is designed to use the 
same basic format as introduced in 
Opposites and Count on Me, with a 
graphics representation for each month. 
This is a good starting point — famil- 
iarizing the child with the order of the 
months and an illustration to associate 
with each one. (For example, a snow- 
man for January, a Valentine for Feb- 
ruary, etc. . . .) 

Next, the program asks questions 
about each month. By pressing the 
space bar, the user can advance to the 
correct response and then press ENTER, 
allowing the program to continue ask- 
ing questions. If the response is correct, 
the screen shows the correct match. If 
incorrect, the screen flashes and the 
student is given a chance to try again. 

Fred Seer bo is a special needs instructor 
for the North Adams Public Schools in 
North Adams, Massachusetts. He holds 
a master's in education and has pub- 
lished some of the first software avail- 
able for the Color Computer through 
his software firm, Illustrated Memory 
Banks. 



Learning the order, name 
and climate of each 
month 

Twelve 
Months 
of Fun 



By Fred B. Scerbo 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 



A scorecard may be seen by pressing the 
@ key. Pressing C from the scorecard 
will allow you to continue with the quiz. 

The written quiz section asks ques- 
tions like, "Which month comes be- 
tween January and March?" This helps 
train and quiz students on the order of 
the months. The information, though 
quite basic, is essential to all young 
children and this is a new and fun way 
of learning it. In addition, it works to 
familiarize the child with the computer, 
laying a good foundation for using 
more advanced programs as the child 
gets older. 



The graphics are drawn in bold black 
and white since many beginners use a 
black and white television with their 
first CoCo. Be careful when typing in 
the listing, which can be very long 
because of the graphic strings involved. 
(In the past I have shown you ways to 
merge these graphics to Match Game, 
but this program uses more strings to 
draw the pictures. I need to come up 
with a few more changes before I can 
give you alterations for using that 
program with these pictures.) 

I hope all of you have someone in 
your family or among your friends who 
can benefit from Calendar. 

Thanks to the many people who have 
continued to send old gray CoCos for 
us to distribute in our special needs 
classes throughout our school system. I 
am expecting our local news media to 
run some coverage on these new com- 
puter stations, which were donated 
from my many kind readers. If I can 
reprint anything from those articles, or 
any pictures, I will try to do so. 

We do have several donated disk 
drives with no controllers. If any of you 
have an old controller that is collecting 
dust and you would like to donate it, 
you may contact me in care of Drury 
Senior High School, S. Church St., 
North Adams, MA 01247. The same 
goes for any older graphics Adventures 
you have solved and for which you have 
no further use. (Please, no pirated 
copies. That only hurts those of us who 
are trying to help create new software 
for you!) 

Until next month, good luck in your 
CoCo dealings! □ 




The Listing: CALENDAR 



50 181 500 248 

95 59 560 75 

165 .......71 600 135 

255 ....... 92 670 ...... 78 



330 116 770 191 

395 ......231 END .....120 

450 ......195 



1 REM ************* * * * * ********* * 



2 REM* 

3 REM* 

4 REM* 

5 REM* 

6 REM* 



THE 12 MONTHS 
COPYRIGHT (C) 1989 
BY FRED B. SCERBO * 
6j0 HARDING AVENUE * 
NORTH ADAMS, MA 01247 % 



* 



7 REM* ******* ****************** * 
10 CLEAR30J30 

15 CLS0: PRINTS TRING$ ( 32, 220) ; STR 



92 THE RAINBOW May 1989 



ING $(32,156);: FQRI-1T0 192 : READA : 

PRINTCHR? (A+128) ; :NEXT 

2p PRINTSTRING$ (32, 195) ; STRING $ ( 

32,211); 

25 PRINT@358 , " AN INTRODUCTION T 
0 »;: PRINT® 39 j3," THE 12 MONTHS 



ii . 



30 PRINT@422, " BY FRED B.SCERBO 
" ; : PRINT@454 , " COPYRIGHT (C) 1 
989 '•; 

35 DATAllj3,lj38,lj39,lj31,lj38, 108,1 
J39 , Ij3j3 , 110 , , 9 6 , 1J39 , 1 J3 8 , 10 9 , Ipft , 1 
11 , , 100 , 110 , 100 ,110 , 108 ,105 , 101 , 
108 , 108 , 109 , 100 , 110, 108 ,108 ,109 
40 DATA106, , ,101, , ,101, ,106, , ,10 
1, ,, ,110,106, ,106, ,106, ,101,101, 
,,101,, 106,,, 101 

45 DATA106, , , 101 , 99 , 99 , 103 , , 106 , 
,,101,99,103, ,106,109, ,106, ,106, 
, 101 ,101 , 99 , 99,103 , , 107 , 99,99,10 
3 

50 DATA106,,,101,,,101,,106,,,10 

1, ,100, ,106, 100, 106, 106,, 106, ,10 

1,101, ,,101, ,106, 100, 98, 

55 DATA106 , , , 101, , , 101, , 106, , , 10 

1, ,96, , 106, ,108,106, ,106, ,101, 10 

1, , ,101, ,106, ,100,98 

60 DATA107, 99 ,103, 101, 98, ,103,97 

,107, 99, 106, 103, 99, 103, 97, 107,, 9 

7,107,97,107,99,102,101,98,96,10 

3, 97, 107,,, 101 

65 X$=INKEY$ : IFX$<>CHR$ (13) THEN 6 
5 

70 DIM P$(12,3) ,A$(6) ,B$(20) ,C$( 
20) ,A(20) ,N(20) ,B(4) ,C(4) ,D(4) ,E 
(4),F(4),AO(20) 

75 F0RI=1T03 : READ C( I ) , D(I) , E (I ) 
, F ( I) : NEXT : F0RI=1T06 : READA $ (I) : N 
EXT : FORI= 1T01 2 : READP $ ( 1,1 ) , B$ ( I ) 
,P$(I,2) > C$ (I) : NEXT 
80 F0RI=1T012 :P$ (1,3) ="BR12ND8R4 
ND8R4D8BR4U8R6D8NL6BR4U8F8U8BR4R 
4ND8R4BR4D8U4R6U4D8 " : NEXT! 
85 COLOR!, 0 

90 CLS : PRINTSTRINGS (32 , "=") ; : PRI 
NT@72, "THE 12 MONTHS " : PRINT @ 1 3 4 , 
"A) REVIEW MONTHS " : PRINT® 19 8 , "B) 
QUIZ GRAPHICS":PRINT@2 62,"C) QU 
IZ WRITTEN" 

95 PRINT@324 , "«<SELECT YOUR . CHO 
ICE>»" ":^m : i 
100 PRINT : PRINTSTRING$ (32, '•=" ) ; : 
PRINTS 4 20, "DEDICATED TO THE STUD 
ENTS" : PRINTTAB (6) "OF CONTE MIDDL 
E SCHOOL" 

105 X$=INKEY$ : X=RND ( -TIMER) : IFX$ 

=»A"THEN360ELSEIFX$="B"THEN110EL 

SEIFX$="C"THEN630ELSE105 

110 CLS0:PMODE0, 1:PCLS1 

115 LINE(0, 0)-(254, 170) , PRESET, B 

120 LINE ( 6 , 4 ) - ( 122, 82), PRESET , BF 



VIP Writer 1.1 

RATED "BEST" IN SEPT '88 "RAINBOW" 

VIP Writer has all the features oi VIP Writer III described elsewhere in this 
magazine except the screen widths are 32, 51 , 64 & 85. Screen colors are black, 
green & white, double clock speed is not supported, Spooler and menus are 
unavailable because of memory limitations. Even so, VIP Writer is the BEST word 
processor for the CoCo 1 & 21 Version 1.1 includes the configuration program 
and RGB Hard Disk support. Includes VIP Speller 1.1 DISK $69.95 

Available through Radio Shack Express Order Cat. #90-141 

Writer owners: upgrade to Writer 1 .1 for $20 + $3 S/H. Send only original disk and $23 total. 



VIP Speller 1.1 

INCLUDES 50,000 WORD DICTIONARY 

VIP Speller works with ANY ASCII file created by most popular word processors - 
even Telewriter 64. It automatically checks text files for words to be corrected, 
marked for special attention or even added to the 50,000 word Dictionary. You 
can even view the word in context. Words can be added to or deleted from the 
dictionary or you can create your own dictionary I New features of version 1.1 are 
FASTER and more reliable disk access and pnnting at 9600 baud. DISK $34.95 
Speller owners: upgrade to Speller 1 .1 for $10 + $3 S/H. Send original disk and $13 Total. 



VIP Calc 1.1 



"MORE USEABLE FEATURES" FEB. 1985 "RAINBOW" 

VIP Calc has all the features of VIP Calc III described elsewhere in this magazine 
except the screen widths are 32, 51 , 64 & 85. Screen colors are black, areen and 
white, double clock speed and Spooler are not supported. Even so, VIP Calc is the 
most complete calc for the CoCo 1 & 2! Version 1 .1 has faster and more reliable 
disk access and improved display speed. DISK $59.95 

Calc owners: upgrade to Calc 1.1 for $10 + $3 S/H. Send only original disk and $13 total. 



VIP Database 1.1 



"4 



ONE OF THE BEST" JUL '84 "RAINBOW" 

VIP Database has all the features of VIP Database III described elsewhere in this 
magazine except the screen widths are 51, 64 & 85. Screen colors are black, 
green and white, double clock speed and Spooler are not supported. Even so, VIP 
Database is the most complete database for the CoCo 1 & 2! Version 1.1 has 
faster and more reliable disk access and single spaced reports. DISK $49.95 

Database owners: upgrade to Database 1 .1 for $10 + $3 S/H. Send only disk and $13 total. 



VIP Disk-ZAP 1.1 

RAVED ABOUT IN THE APRIL 1983 "RAINBOW" 

Now you can retrieve lost data on any disk. VIP Disk-Zap is the ultimate repair 
utility for repair of most disk errors. VIP Disk-Zap verifies diskettes, reads and 
writes any sector and lets you retrieve all types of bashed text Tiles, BASIC and 
ML programs. VIP Disk-Zap includes an informative 50 page tutorial manual. 
New features of version 1 .1 are FASTER and more RELIABLE disk access and 
printing at up to 9600 BAUD. DISK $24.95 

Disk-Zap owners: upgrade to Disk-Zap 1.1 for $10 + $3 S/H. Send original disk and $13 Total I 



VIP Terminal 



RATED BEST IN JANUARY 1984 "RAINBOW" 

For your important communications needs youVe got to go beyond software that 
only lets you chat You need a smart terminal so that you can send and receive 
programs and messages and print them I The VIP Terminal features 32, 51 , 64 or 
85 characters by 21 or 24 lines on the screen and has a 43K byte buffer to store 
information. DISK $29.95 



VIP Integrated Library 

Outperforms ALL OTHER Integrated programs! 

The VIP Integrated Library 1.2 combines all six popular VIP 
programs - Writer 1.1, Speller 1.1, Calc 1.1, Database 1.1, 
Terminal and Disk-Zap 1.1- into one program on one disk. The 
program is called VIP Desktop. From the desktop you have 
instant access to word processing with a spelling checker 
always in attendance, data management with mail merge, 
spreadsheet financial analysis, telecommunications and disk 
maintenance. 64K required. DISK $149.95 

Available through Radio Shack Express Order Cat. #90-213. 
VIP Library orders add $4 S/H USA, $5 Canada & $10 Foreign 

VIP Integrated Library owners: upgrade to the VIP Integrated Library 
1 .2 for $45 + $3 S/H. Send only ORIGINAL disk and $48 total. 



SD ENTERPRISES 

(503) 663-2865 P.O. Box 1233. Gresham, OR 97030 

We accept VISA / MASTERCARD and C.O.D. orders by phone. 
Non Library orders add $3 S/H in USA, $4 Canada, $6 Foreign. COD orders 
add an additional $2.75. Personal checks allow 3 weeks for delivery. 



May 1989 THE RAINBOW 93 



125 LINE (128 , 4) - (248 , 82) , PRESET, 
B 

130 LINE (6, 86) -(122 ,164) , PRESET, 
B 

135 LINE (128 ,86) -(248, 164) ,PRESE 
T, B 

140 DRAW"BM26,188C0NU10R10NU10BR 
6R10U6L10U4R10BR6NR10D4NR10D6R10 
BR12BU6NE4D2F4BR6R10U6L10U4R10BR 
6ND10R10D4NL10BR6NR10D6U10R10D10 
BR6NR10U10R10BR6NR10D4NR10D6R10B 
R10U10NL4R10D4NL10D6NL14BR6U10R1 
0D4NL10D6BR6U10R10D4L10R4F6BR6E4 
U2H4" 

145 DATA130,6,246,80,6,86,120,16 

2,13)3,86,246, 162 

150 PAINT(2,2) ,0,0:PCOPY1TO3 

155 PMODE0,4:PCLS1 

160 LINE(0,0)-(254,170) , PRESET, B 

F 

165 LINE (8 , 6) - (120 ,80) , PSET, BF 
17J3 PCOPY4T02 : PMODE0 , 1 : SCREEN1 , 1 
175 DATA"BM2 , 8 CI" , "BM130 , 8C0" , "B 
M2 , 90C0" , "BM130, 90C0" , "BM2 , 48C0" 
,"BM130,48C0 M 
18J3 F0RI=1T012 

185 A(I)=RND(12) :IFN(A(I) )=1THEN 
185 

190 N(A(I) )=1:NEXTI:F0RY=1T012:C 

0L0R1 , 0 

195 FORI=2T04 

200 B(I)=RND(3)+1:IFN(B(I) ) =0THE 
N200 

205 N(B(I) )=0:NEXTI:FORI=1TO4:N( 

1) =1:NEXT 

210 B=RND(10) :IFB=A( (Y) )THEN210 
215 C=RND(10) :IFC=B OR C=A((Y))T 
HEN215 

220 DRAW A$(l) :DRAWP$(A(Y) ,1) 
225 DRAW A$ (B(2) ) :DRAWP$ (B,2) :DR 
AWP$(B,3) 

230 DRAW A$ (B(3) ) :DRAWP$ ( C , 2 ) : DR 
AWP$ (C, 3 ) 

235 DRAW A$(B(4) ) :DRAWP$(A(Y) ,2) 

: DRAWP$(A(Y) ,3) 

240 COLOR1,0 

245 Z=0 

250 PMODE0,4 

255 DRAW A$(1)+"C0":DRAWP$(A(Y) , 
1) 

260 DRAW A$(B(2) )+"Cl":DRAWP$(B, 

2) :DRAWP$ (B,3) 

265 DRAW A$(B(3) )+"Cl" :DRAWP$(C, 
2) :DRAWP$(G,3) 

270 DRAW A$(B(4) )+"Cl":DRAWP$(A( 

Y) , 2) : DRAWPS (A (Y) , 3 ) 

275 PMODE0 , 1 : SCREEN1 , 1 

280 LINE(8, 6) ^-(120,80) ,PSET,B 

285 X$=INKEY$ : IFX$=" "THEN295ELS 

EIFX$="@"THEN800 

290 COLOR1,0:LINE(8, 6) -(120,80) , 



PRESET , B : GOTO280 

295 Z=Z+1:IFZ=4THENZ=1 

300 COLOR1 , 0 : LINE ( C ( Z ) ,D(Z) ) -(E( 

Z) ,F(Z) ) ,PSET,B 

305 X$=INKEY$:IFX$=" "THEN295ELS 
EIFX$=CHR$ ( 13) THEN3 15ELSEIFX$=" @ 
"THEN800 

310 COLOR1,0:LINE(C(Z) ,D(Z))-(E( 
Z) ,F(Z) ) , PRESET, B:GOTO300 
315 IFZ+1=B(4)THEN325 
320 NW=NW+1:FORK=1TO5:PMODE0,4:S 
CREEN1 , 1 : SOUND 10 , 3 : PMODE0 , 1 : SCRE 
EN1 , 1 : SOUND1 , 3 : NEXTK : GOTO300 
325 NC=NC+1:PMODE0,4:PCLS1:LINE( 
0,40) -(256,126) ,PRESET,B:LINE(6, 
44) -(124, 122) , PRESET, B: LINE (130, 
4 4 ) - ( 2 4 8 , 1 2 2 ) , PRESET , B : PAINT (2,4 
2) ,0,0 

330 DRAW A$ (5) :DRAWP$ (A(Y) , 1) 
335 DRAW A$(6) :DRAWP$(A(Y) ,2) :DR 
AWP$(A(Y),3) 
340 SCREEN1,1 

345 X$=INKEY$ :TFX$<>GHR$ ( 13 ) THEN 
345 

350 PMODE0,1 

355 PCOPY3T01:SCREENl,l:PCOPY2TO 
4:NEXTY:GOTO800 

3 60 PMODE0 , 2 : PCLS1 : SCREEN1 , 1 : LIN 
E (0,40) -(256,126) , PRESET, B: LINE ( 
6 , 44) - ( 124 , 122) , PRESET, B: LINE (13 
0 , 4 4 ) - ( 2 4 8 , 122 ) , PRESET , B : PAINT ( 2 
,42), 0,0 

365 F0RI=1T012:DRAW A$(5):DRAWP$ 
(I,D 

370 DRAW A$(6) :DRAWP$(I,2) : DRAWP 
$(1,3) 

375 X$=INKEY$:IFX$OCHR$(13)THEN 
375 

380 COLOR1,0:LINE(8,46)-(122, 120 
) , PSET , BF : LINE ( 13 2 , 4 6 ) - ( 2 4 6 , 120 ) 
,PSET,BF:NEXTI 
385 RUN 

390 DATA "BR14BD28R12L6D12NL6BR1 
0U12R8D6NL8D6BR6U12M+8 , +12U12BR6 
D12R8U12BR6ND12R8D6NL8D6BR6U12R8 
D6L6F6BR12U6NH6E6BE4BU4NL104BD28 
L104" 

395 DATA JANUARY 

400 DATA"BR10BD4 6R100L58H4U6E4R1 
2F4D6NG4BU10BL6E4U4H4L8G4D4F2BU1 
0BR2H2U4E2R8F2D4G2BU10NR4NU8L2NU 
8L2NU8L2NU8L2NU8L4BD16NG8BR16F8B 
D30BL58U8NG2BR6NR6D4R6D4NL6BR8U8 
L4R8" 

405 DATA DECEMBER AND FEBRUARY 

410 DATA "BR14BD28NR8D6NR8D6BR12 

NR8U6NR8U6R8BR4R10D6L8U6D12L2R10 

NU4BR4U12R8D6L6F6BR4BU12D12R8U12 

BR4ND12R8D6NL8D6BR4U12R8D6L6F6BR 

10U6NH6E6BE4BU4NL104BD28L104" 

415 DATA FEBRUARY 



94 



THE RAINBOW May 1989 





XTERM 



OS-9 Communications program 

• Menu oriented • Definable macro keys 

• Upload/download Ascil • Works with standard serial port, RS232 
or XMODEM protocol Pak, or PBJ 2SP Pack, Includes all drivers 

• Execute OS-9 commands ■ Works with standard screen, Xscreen 
from within XTERM WORDPAK or DISTO 80 column board 

$49.95 with source $89.95 







ECONOMIST 

Perform economic analysis to compare differ- 
ent cost and income alternatives! Compute 
present and future Life Cycle Worths for var- 
ious combinations of single, series and gradi- 
ent dollar amounts. Quickly edit and recom- 
pute for sensitivity analysis! Display line 
graphs. Printout data and results. Pull-down 
menus, windows and prompts. Requires os-9 
level II and Basic09. 

$39.95 WITH SOURCE $79.95 



HARDWARE 



512k memory upgrade 

Ram Software 
Ram Disk 
Print Spooler 
Quick Backup 



$134.95 



All three for only 
$19.95 




•Software by ColarVcnluro 



i .i.t.i i . i .i it . i . i . i . i i.t.i i . i i .i. i . i i. i .i. i . 



XWORD 

OS-9 word processing system 

• Works with standard text screen, XSCREEN, WORDPAK, or DISTO 

• True character oriented full screen editing 
- Full block commands 

■ Find and Replace commands 

• Proportional spacing supported 

• Full printer control, character size, emphasized, italics, overstrike, 
underline, super/sub-scripts 

• 10 header/footers 

• Margins and headers can be set different for even and odd pages 

$69.95 with source $124.95 

XMERGE Mail merge capabilities for XWORD 

$24.95 with source $49.95 

XSPELL OS-9 spelling checker, with 40000 word dictionaries 

$39.95 

XTRIO XWORD/XMERGE/XSPELL 

$114.95 with source $199.95 

XED OS-9 full screen editor 

$39.95 with source $79.95 

XDIS OS-9 disassembler 

$34.95 with source $54.95 
XDIR & XCAL Hierarchial directory, OS-9 calculator 

$24.95 with source $49.95 



W^TWW^WWWtWWT<WWWH!W I 1 1 I H, I IHUIIum w Il l n lllll I I Illlli 



THE DIRECTOR 

Produces hires picture sound and color animation shows. Completely menu 
driven with full editing. Great for presentations and vcr's. Requires COCO HI 
only. $39.95 



I I I I I I I I H I I I I I . I 







■ ■" * " 







SMAT.L BUSINESS ACCOUTING 



This sales-based accounting package is de- 
signed for the non-accountant oriented busi- 
nessman. It also contains the flexibility for 
the accounting oriented user to set up a double 
entry journal with an almost unlimited chart 
of accounts. Includes Sales Entry, transaction 
driven Accounts Receivable and Accounts Pay- 
able, Journal Entry, Payroll Disbursement, 
and Record Maintenance programs. System 
outputs include Balance Sheet, Income State- 
ment, Customer and Vender status Reports, 
Accounts Receivable and Payable Aging Re- 
ports, Check Register, Sales Reports, Account 
Status Lists, and a Journal Posting List. 

$79.95 

INVENTORY CONTROL/SALES ANALYSIS 

This module is designed to handle inventory 
control, with user defined product codes, and 
produce a detailed analysis of the business' 
sales and the sales force. One may enter/update 
inventory data, enter sales, run five sales anal- 
ysis reports, run five inventory reports, set up 
product codes, enter/update salesman records, 
and update the SBAP inventory. 



PAYROLL 

Designed for maintaining personnel and 
payroll data for up to 200 hourly and salar- 
ied employees with 8 deductions each. Cal- 
culates payroll and tax amounts, prints 
checks and maintains year-to-date totals 
which can be automatically transferred to 
the SBA package. Computes each pay peri- 
od's totals for straight time, overtime and 
bonus pay and determines taxes to be with- 
held. Aditional outputs include mailing list, 
listing of employees, year-to-date federal 
and/or state tax listing, and a listing of cur- 
rent misc. deductions. Suited for use in all 
states except Oklahoma and Delaware 

$59.95 



PERSONAL BOOKKEEPING 2000 
Handles 45 accounts. Enters cash expenses as 
easily as checks. Handles 26 expense catego- 
riesK. Menu driven and user friendly. 

$39.95 



$59.95 



ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE 

Includes detailed audit trails and history 
reports for each customer, perpares in- 
voices and monthly statements, mailing la- 
bels, aging lists, and an alphabetized cus- 
tomer listing. The user can define net 
terms for commercial accounts or finance 
charges for revolving accounts. This pack- 
age functions as a standalone A/R system or 
integrates with the Small Business Accting 
package. 

$59.95 

ACCOUNTS PAYABLE 

Designed for the maintenance of vendor 
and A/P invoice files. The system prints 
checks, voids checks, cancels checks, de- 
letes cancelled checks, and deletes paid A/P 
invoices. The user can run a Vendor List, 
Vendor Status report, Vendor Aged report, 
and an A/P Check Register. This package 
can be used either as a standalone A/P sys- 
tem or can be integrated with the Small 
Business Accounting Package. 

$59.95 



IHHBBH 

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Ordering Information 

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420 DATA" BR60 BD4 6M+18 , -22U4H2U2H 

2L2H2L4G2L2G4ND2H4L2H2L4G2L2G2D2 

G2D4M+18 ,+22FEBH16BR6M-12 ,+6NH4N 

D4L2NH4ND4BM+3 6,-18BD4M+16,-10NL 

6ND4BD44BL74R6D4L6D4R6BR6U8F8U8B 

R4R2D8L2R6U8NL4 11 

425 DATA JANUARY AND MARCH 

430 DATA H BR2 6BD28ND12R6ND12R6D1 

2BR6U12R8D6NL8D6BR6U12R8D6L6F6BR 

6NR8U12R8BR6D12U6R8U6ND12BR22BU8 

NL104BD28L104" 

435 DATA MARCH 

440 DATA ,f BR58BD20U8E4R10F8D4G4NL 
12F4D4G8L10H4NU8G4L10H8U4E4NR12H 
4U4E8R10NF4BD32G6L4BL28BD10R6D4N 
L6D4NL6BR6U8R6D4L4F4BR4R2NU8R4U8 
NL6" 

445 DATA FEBRUARY AND APRIL 

450 DATA "BR32BD28ND12R8D6NL8D6B 

R6U12R8D6NL6BR6D6U12R8D6L6F6BR8U 

12BR8D12R8BR24BU20NL104BD28L104" 

455 DATA APRIL 

460 DATA" BR58BD28F4R20E4NU4F2R8E 

6U10H6L20G8ND6E4H8L16G8E2L10G6L6 

G6D8F4R18E8G4R12E6BGI0BR4NG12BL8 

G14BL8E10BR24NG12E2BR8NG10BR8NG1 

2BR8NG10BR8G12BL66BD8D4R6D4U8BR6 

R4ND8R4BR4D8U4R6U4ND8" 

465 DATA MARCH AND MAY 

470 DATA " BR38BD2 8ND12R8ND12R8ND 

12BR6ND12R8D6NL8D6BR12U6NH6E6BR3 

0BU8NL104BD28L104" 

475 DATA MAY 

480 DATA ,, BR10BD4 6R100L74U10H14U4 

D10F16R2U8E14U4D10G16U20E6U6G2H2 

G2H2G2H2D6F6BD22BR42U10H14U4D10F 

16R2U8E14U4D10G16U20E6U6G2H2G2H2 

G2H2D6F6BD3 2BL68NR6D4R6D4NL6BR10 

U8L4R8BR4D8U4R6D4U8" 

485 DATA APRIL AND JUNE 

490 DATA "BR32BD28R12L6D12NL6BR1 

2NU12R8NU12BR6U12F12U12BR6NR8D6N 

R8D6R8BR2 6BU2 0NL10 4BD28L104" 

495 DATA JUNE 

500 DATA n BR28BD20R64D2L64R6D12NG 
2NF2BD4NG2NF2BD4NG2F2BE12R30U2L3 
0U2R30U2L30U2R30BD3 2BL58L6D8U4R6 

D4NL6BR10U8L4R8BR4D8U4R6D4U8" 

505 DATA MAY AND JULY 

510 DATA " BR3 2 BD2 8R12 L6D12NL6BR1 

2NU12R8NU12BR8NU12R8BR8U6NH6E6BR 

28BU8NL104BD28L104" 

515 DATA JULY 

520 DATA"BR20BD22D16R50U16NL50D8 

R10E2R2E2R2E2U2E2U2BU6NU4BF2BR2N 

E4BD2BR4NR4BG2BD2NF4BL12NG2BU4NL 

4BE2BU2NH2BD44BL74ND2R6D4G2D2BR1 

2U8L4R8BR4D8U4R6D4U8" 

525 DATA JUNE AND AUGUST 



530 DATA "BR22BD28ND12R8D6NL8D6B 

R6NU12R8NU12BR6NR8U12R8BD6NL4D6B 

R6NU12R8NU12BR6R8U6L8U6R8BR4R6ND 

12R6BR14BU8NL104BD28L104" 

535 DATA AUGUST 

540 DATA" BR3 2 BD4 6H6R3 2U3 8 G2 8R2 8U 

28R4ND28D8F22L22D8L4R3 6G6BR20G4L 

4H4G4L4H4G4L4H4G4L4H4G4L4H4G4L4H 

4G4L4H4G4L4H4BD10BR4ND8R6D4NL6D4 

NL6BR8U8L4R8BR4D8U4R6D4U8" 

545 DATA JULY AND SEPTEMBER 

550 DATA "BR12BD28NR6D6R6D6NL6BR 

6NR6U6NR6U6R6BR6D12U6NR6U6R6ND6B 

R4R4ND12R4BR4NR6D6NR6D6R6BR6U12R 

4ND12R4ND12BR6NL2ND12R6D6NL6D6NL 

8BR6NR6U6NR6U6R6BR6ND12R6D6L6F6B 

U20NL104BD28L104 f, 

555 DATA SEPTEMBER 

560 DATA 1 1 BR4 0 BD2 0 L4 D4 R4 D4NL4 BR 4 

NR4U8R4BR4D8U4R4U4D8BR4U8R4D8NL4 

BR4U8R4D8NL4BR4NU8R4BR8R6H20L32G 

20R6D16R58NU16L8U10L6ND10BL8L4D4 

R4U4BL12L4D4R4U4BL12L4D4R4U4BD22 

BL24ND4R6D4NL4D4BR8U8L4R8BR4D8U4 

R6D4U8 11 

565 DATA AUGUST AND OCTOBER 

570 DATA "BR16BD28ND12R8D12NL8BR 

6NR8U12R8BR4R6ND12R6BR4NR8D12R8U 

12BR4R2ND12R8D6NL8D6NL10BR6NR8U6 

NR8U6R8BR6ND12R8D6L6F6BR8BU20NL1 

04BD28L104" 

575 DATA OCTOBER 

580 DATA M BR56BD14ND30R8F4D22G4L1 

6H4U22E4NR8G2L6G4D18F4R6L12H6U14 

E6R6BR28R6F4D18G4NL6R6E6U14H6L6B 

L16BU4U4E6L4G6D4BD14L8E4ND2F4BR4 

R8H4ND2G4L2D2NG4F4NL8BD6L10NH2R1 

2E2BD20BL52NG2ND8BR4ND8R6D8NL6BR 

10U8L4R8BR4D8U4R6D4U8" 

585 DATA SEPTEMBER AND NOVEMBER 

590 DATA"BR14BD28ND12M+8 / +12U12B 

R4NR8D12R8U12BR4D8F4E4U8BR4NR6D6 

NR6D6R6BR4U12R6ND12R6D12BR4R2U12 

L2R10D6NL8D6NL8BR4NR8U6NR8U6R8BR 

4ND12R8D6L6F6BR4BU20NL104BD28L10 

4" ' , " < : 

595 DATA NOVEMBER 

600 DATA"BR20BD40R80U4L80ND4R8U6 
R4E2U2E2U2E2R2E2R2E2R16NE6G8D4F4 
R8E4U4H4E8NG4H4U4R4F4D2G2L2BD4NL 
4F4R2F2R2F2D2F2D2F4BL80BD2 2NG2ND 
8BR8NG2ND8BR6R4ND8R4BR4D8U4R6D4U 
8" 

605 DATA OCTOBER AND DECEMBER 
610 DATA M BR14BD28R2ND12R8D12NL10 
BR4NR6U6NR6U6R6BR4NR8D12R8BR4NR6 
U6NR6U6R6BR6ND12R6ND12R6D12BR4R2 
U12L2R10D6NL8D6NL8BR4NR8U6NR8U6R 
8BR4ND12R8D6L6F6BR4BU20NL104BD2 8 



96 



THE RAINBOW May 1989 



II 



DATA 
DATA" 



BD2 



ii 



625 DATA NOVEMBER AND JANUARY 



5 F0RI=1T012 
64J3 AO(I)=RND(12) 
645 IF N(AO(I) )=1 THEN 64)3 
650 N(AO(I) )=l:NEXTI 
655 FOR P=1T012 



665 PRINT® 68 , "WHICH MONTH COMES 
BETWEEN" 

67j3 PRINT@132,C$ (AO(P) )+" ?" 
675 FOR Q*1T62 

68J3 C(Q)«RND(10) :IF C(Q)=AO(P) T 
HEN680 * 
685 FOR K=Q-1 TO j3STEP-l:IF C(K) 
=C(Q) THEN 6 8 j3 
69j3 NEXTK 

6 95 NEXTQ : C ( 3 )=AO(P) 
7j3j3 FOR E=1T03 
7j35 F(E)=RND(3) 

71J3 FOR K-E-l TO J3 STEP-IMF F(K 
)=F(E) THEN7J35 
715 NEXTK : NEXTE 
7 2 j3 PRINT 

725 PRINTTAB ( 8 ) "A- "+B$ ( C ( F (1) ) ) : 



•.<'7--:".-.:\V. 



730 PRINTTAB (8) "B-"+B$(C(F ( 2) ) ) : 
PRINT 

735 PRINTTAB ( 8 ) "C-"+B$ (C (F (3 ) ) ) : 
PRINT . 

740 G$=INKEY$ : IFG$=" ©"THEN800 

750 G=ASC(G$) -64 
755 IF G<1 THEN 740 
760 IF G>5 THEN 740 
765 IF C (F(G) ) <>AO(P) THEN7 



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ANSW 



(13 ) THEN 



77J3 PRINT : PRINT" RIGHT i THE ANSW 
ER IS: "+B$(A0(P) ) 
775 NC=NC-r-l:GOTO790 
78J3 PRINT: PRINT" SORRY 
ER IS: "+B$ (AO(P) ) ■ 
785 NW=NW+1 
79J3 X$=INKEY$ : IFX$ 
790 
795 NEXT P 

8(5(5 CLS : PRINT @1J31, "YOU TRIED"NC+ 
NW'TIMES &" : PRINT§165 , "ANSWERED" 
NC" CORRECTLY" 

8J35 PRINTH229 , "WHILE DOING "NW"WR 

ong . " '■ ' ; iiig 

81J3 NQ=NC+NW:IF NQ=0THEN NQ=1 

815 MS=INT (NC/NQ*lj30) 

82j3 PRINT© 2 9 3, "YOUR SCORE IS "MS" 

%." 

825 PRINT© 3 5 7, "ANOTHER TRY (Y/N/ 
C) ?" ; 

830 X$=INKEY$ : IFX$="Y"THEN RUN 

835 IFX$="N"THENCLS : END 

84j3 IFX$="C"THEN85P 

845 GOTO830 

85j3 IFV=1THEN66J3 

855 IFV=J3THEN275 



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May 1989 THE RAINBOW 97 



BAS I Ca ll y Sp e aking 



Editor's Note: This issue marks Larry 
Boeldt's solo debut as editor of rain- 
bow's "BASICally Speaking" column, 
an assignment handed over to him by 
the rainbow and an extremely busy Bill 
Bernico. As previously, "BASICally 
Speaking" will continue to address and 
solve your programming problems. 



Dear Larry: 

I'm an amateur radio operator and 
have been the proud owner of a Co Co 
3 for the past five months. I would like 
to know if the CoCo 3 is capable of 
receiving international Morse code 
through some means of decoder circuit 
and print text on the screen. What ports 
would I have to use, and how would the 
sofware be written? 

Dwayne Fitzgerald 
Wilson 's Beach, New Brunswick 

Dear Dwayne: 

To my knowledge there is no such 
device for the Color Computer. You 
might try to contact a hardware pro- 
ducer or even Tandy to find out if such 
a product is available. 

Dear Larry: 

Is there an easy way to change graph- 
ics statements like LINE, DRRW and 
CIRCLE in a Co Co 2 program to HLINE, 
HDRRW and HCIRCLE statements on the 
Co Co 3? 

Danna Aschenbach 
Rock Springs, Wyoming 

Dear Danna: 

This could not be more timely. You 
can convert the program in this column 
[See the following letter.] that changes 
PRINT statements to PRlNTtt-2, state- 
ments to work for graphics commands 
as well. The graphics, of course, would 
only show up on the left portion of the 
screen, but it saves a lot of typing. The 
same rules apply for the graphics con- 
versions. Don't forget to save the pro- 
gram in the ASCII format. 



Larry Boeldt has five years of expe- 
rience on the Color Computer and owns 
a CoCo-based company geared toward 
customizing software for businesses. 




Speaking 



By Larry Boeldt 



Just change the lines in the program 
as follows: 

72 INPUT"ENTER THE COLOR COMPUTE 

R 2 C0MMRND;"C2$ 

220 0F=IN5TR(0F,R$,C2$) 

240 fi$=LEFT$ ( fi$ , OF-1 ) +"H"+RIGHT$ 

( R$ , L5- OF ) : 0F=0F+LEN ( C2$ ) 

Don't forget that you must select the 
proper HSCREEN before the graphics are 
drawn. You must run this program for 
each command you want to convert. It 
saves a lot of time compared to search- 
ing for each command individually. 

Dear Larry: 

There is a program in the February 
1983 RAINBOW that converts PRINT 
statements to PRINT a -2, statements. I 
am having trouble using this program 
on a disk system. Could you convert the 
program to work on a Co Co with disk? 

Earl Jesse Foster 
Lynchburg, Virginia 

Dear Earl: 

According to the program's writer, 
the program should work fine on a disk 
system — except for the CSflVEM com- 
mand, which should be replaced with a 
SflVEM command. 

Here is a program written in basic 
that will do the same thing. As with both 



programs, the assumption is made that 
each line of a BASIC program contains 
no more than 240 characters. To be 
converted the program must be saved in 
the ASCII format SAVE" filename ",fi. 

The Listing: CONVERT 

10 ' BASIC STATEMENT CONVERTER 

20 ' WRITTEN BY LARRY BOELDT FOR 

30 ' RAINBOW MAGAZINE BASICALLY 

40 ' SPEAKING COLUMN. 

50 ' COPYRIGHT (C) 19B9 

60 ' 65 CLEAR 14000:DIM L$(500) 

70 INPUT"ENTER THE PROGRAM NAME;"F$ 

B0 OPEN"D",ttl,F$,l 

90 FIELD 81,1 AS A$ 

100 X=0:B=1 

110 GET ttl,B:B=B+l 

120 IF B=L0F(1) THEN CLOSE: GOTO200 

130 IF A$=CHR$(13) THEN 150 

140 L$(X)=L$(X)+A$:G0T0 110 

150 X=X+1:G0T0 110 

160 ' 

200 FOR R=l TO X:A$=L$(R) :0F=1 

210 LS=LEN(A$):IF LS>240 THEN PRI 

NT "LINE ";LEFT$(A$,INSTR(A$," ")) 

;" IS TOO LONG: "GOTO 300 

220 0F=INSTR(0F, A$, "PRINT") 

230 IF OF=0 THEN 300 

240 0F=0F+4 : A$=LEFT$ ( A$ , OF )+"tt-2 , 

"+RIGHT$(A$,LS-0F) 

260 GOTO 210 

300 L$(R)=A$:NEXT R 

310 0PEN"0",ttl,F$ 

320 FOR R=l TO X 

330 PRINT 81,L$(R) 

340 NEXT R 

350 CLOSE ttl 

Thanks for the questions. Keep 'em 
coming! 



Questions about specific basic 
programming problems can be ad- 
dressed to BASICally Speaking, the 
rainbow, P.O. Box 385, Prospect KY 
40059. 

We reserve the right to publish only 
questions of general interest and to 
edit for brevity and clarity. We are 
unable to answer letters individually. 

For a quicker response, your ques- 
tions may also be submitted through 
rainbow's CoGo SIG on Delphi. 
From the CoCo SlOprompt, type 
RSK for "Ask the Experts." At the 
EXPERTS>prompt, select the 
"BASICally Speaking" online form, 
which has complete instructions. 



98 THE RAINBOW May 1989 



Use our 800 number! 

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In order to hold down non-editorial costs, we do not bill. 

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Here's your chance to have a Pot O* Gold full of programs, articles and information about CoCo every 
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As the premier magazine of the Tandy Color Computer, the rainbow has more of everything — and 
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The Biggest 
The Best 
The indispensable 




The 

7HE COLOR COMPUTER MONTHLY MAGAZINE 



THE RAINBOW is the biggest, best, brightest and 
most comprehensive publication a happy CoCo 
ever had! THE RAINBOW features more programs, 
more information and more in-depth treatment of 
the Tandy Color Computer than any other source. 

A monthly issue contains nearly 200 pages and 
up to two dozen programs, 14 regular columns and 
as many as 12 new product reviews. And advertise- 
ments: THE RAINBOW is known as the medium for 
advertisers — which means every month it has a 
wealth of information unavailable anywhere else 
about new products! Hundreds of programs are 
advertised in its pages each month. 

Every single issue of THE RAINBOW covers the 
wide spectrum of interests in the Tandy Color 
Computer — from beginners' tutorials and arcade 
games to telecommunications and business and 
finance programs. Helpful utilities and do-it- 
yourself hardware projects make it easy and fun to 
expand your CoCo's capabilities. And, monthly 
reviews by independent reader reviewers take the 
guesswork out of buying new software and hard- 
ware products. 

Join the tens of thousands who have found THE 
RAINBOW to be an absolute necessity for their 
CoCo. With all this going for it, is it surprising that 
more than 90 percent of THE RAINBOW subscrib- 
ers renew their subscriptions? We're willing to bet 
that, a year from now, you'll be doing the same. 



Rainbow On Tape 

& Rainbow On Disk! 



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Each month, all you do is pop the tape into your 
cassette player or the disk into your drive. No more 
lost weekends. As soon as you read an article about 
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run. No work. No wait. 

Just think how your software library will grow. 
With your first year's subscription, you'll get almost 
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ON DISK, you'll also get all the OS-9 programs. 

RAINBOW ON TAPE and RAINBOW ON DISK — 
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To get your first heaping helping, just fill out and 
return the attached reply card. No postage neces- 
sary. 



Dr. Preble s Programs 

Since 1983 



Pyramix 

This fascinating CoCo 3 game continues 
to be one of our best sellers. Pyramix is 
100% machine language written 
exclusively to take advantage of all the 
power in your 128K CoCo 3. The Colors 
are brilliant, the graphics sharp, the 
action fast. Written by Jordan Tsvetkoff 
and a product of ColorVenture. 

The Freedom Series 

Vocal Freedom 

I've got to admit, this is one nifty 
computer program. Vocal Freedom turns 
your computer into a digital voice 
recorder. The optioaal Hackir's Pat lets 
you incorporate voices or sounds that you 
record into your own BASIC or ML 
programs. This is not a synthesizer. 
Sounds are digitized directly into 
computer memory so that voices or 
sound effects sound very natural. One 
"off-the-shelf" application for Vocal 
Freedom is an automatic message minder. 
Record a message for your family into 
memory. Set Vocal Freedom on 
automatic. When Vocal Freedom "hears" 
any noise in the room, it plays the pre- 
recorded message! Disk operations are 
supported. VF also tests memory to take 
advantage of from 64K up to a full 
512K. Requires low cost amplifier (KS 
cat. *277-1008) and any microphone. 

Mental Freedom 

Would your friends be impressed if your 
computer could read their minds? Mental 
Freedom uses the techniques of 
Biofeedback to control video game action 
on the screen .Telekinesis? Yes. you 
control the action with your thoughts and 
emotions. And, oh yes. it talks in a 
perfectly natural voice without using a 




speech synthesizer! Requires Radio 
Shack's low cost Biofeedback monitor, 
Cat. «63-675. 

BASIC Freedom 

Do you ever type in BASIC programs, 
manually? If you do. you know it can 
be a real chore. Basic Freedom changes 
all that. It gives you a full screen editor 
just like a word processor, but for 
BASIC programs. Once loaded in, it is 
always on-line. It hides invisibly until 
you call it forth with a single keypress! 
This program is a must for programers 
or anyone who types in programs. By 
Chris Babcock and a product of 
ColorVenture. 

Lightning Series 

These three utilities give real power to 
your CoCo 3. 

Ram disk Lightning 

This is the best Ramdisk available, It 
lets you have up to 4 mechanical disk 
drives and 2 Ram drives on-line and is 
fully compatible with our printer spooler 

below. 

Printer Lightning 

High capacity print spooler for CoCo 3. 

Load it and forget it- -except for the 
versatility it gives you. Never wait for 
your printer again! Printer runs at high 
speed while you continue to work at the 
keyboard! Will operate with any printer 
you have already hooked to your CoCo. 

Backup Lightning 

This utility requires 512K. Reads your 
master disk once and then makes 
superfast multiple disk backups on all 
your drives! No need to format blank 
disks first! Supports 35. 40 or 80 track 
drives. 

COCO Bra Me 

Produce standard grade 2 Braille on a 
Brother daisy wheel printer. Easy to use 
for sighted or blind user. No knowledge 
of Braille is necessary. Call for free 
sample. The raised dots produced are 
easily touch readable by the blind. The 
print-to-braille algorithm is robust with 




errors rarely being made — and. it has the 
ability to learn! 

Prices 

CoCo 3 only 



Mam Disk Lightning. Disk $19.95 

Printer Lightning Disk $19.95 

Backmp Lightning, Disk $19.95 

All three. Disk $49.95 

Pyramix, Disk $24.95 

CoCo 1,2, or 3 

Vocal Freedom, Disk $34.95 

Vocal Freedom Hackers Fax $14.95 

COCO Braille $69.95 

CoCo 2 or 3 only 

Mental Freedom Disk. $24.95 



Basic Freedom, Disk $24.95 

CoCo 1 or 2 only 

VDOS, The tin disk, a menu operated 
ramdisk for the CoCo 1 or 2. LOAD. 
SAVE, KILL, DIRECTORY, are all 
supported. Tape , $24.95 

VDUMP. backup Undisk files to single 
tape file. Tape $14.95 

VPMINT. Print Undisk directory. 
Tape $9.95 

We Ship FAST! 

Add $2.50 shipping/handling 
in USA or CANADA 
Add $5.00 to ship to other 
countries 

Dr. Preble's Programs 
6540 Outer Loop 
Louisville, KY 40228 
24 Hour Order Line 

Visa, MasterCard, COD. Check 

(502) 969-1818 




High-density printer enhancements for 
the shoestring desktop publisher 



High Capacity 
Screen Dumps 

for the Shoestring 
Desktop Publisher, Part I 



By H. Allen Curtis 



^ ver since "A Desktop Publisher 
^ on a Shoestring" appeared in 
^THE rainbow (October '87 Page 



58), I have been continually striving to 
upgrade, improve and enhance the 
original shoestring desktop publisher 

programs. 

The quality of any desktop publisher 
is reflected directly and crucially with 
the quality of its screen dumps. The 
purpose of this article is to present high- 
quality, high-capacity screen dumps 
that maximize the capabilities of print- 
ers most commonly used by CoCo 
owners. Let me assure those who own 
screen dumps that those presented here 
are meant to augment rather than to 
replace them. 

The screen dumps formerly devel- 
oped to work with Desktop Low (DESK- 
TOP!.) and Desktop High (DESKTDPH), 
the desktop publisher programs for the 
CoCos 1 , 2 and 3, print two screens-per- 
page. The new screen dumps dramati- 
cally increase the screen-per-page ca- 
pacity to six, eight and 12 screen dump 
prints at a dot density of 240 dots-per- 
inch. This density approaches the 300 



H. Allen Curtis lives in Williamsburg, 
Virginia. He is interested in 17th and 
I8th century history and enjoys biking 
through the colonial capital. He balan- 
ces past and present with his computer 
work. 




dots-per-inch capabilities of most laser 
printers. The six- and eight-screens-per- 
page screen dumps produce two- 
column printouts with three and four 
screen dumps per column. The 12- 
screens-per-page screen dumps yield 
three-column printouts with four 
screens per column. 

The low-capacity, two-screens-per- 
page screen dumps, especially for DESK- 
TDPL often require the use of the 
smaller-sized fonts because of the print- 
out magnification. The high-capacity 
screen dumps condense the character 
printout size and thereby significantly 
increase the versatility and flexibility of 
the shoestring desktop publisher in the 
utilization of a wide variety of fonts. 

The high-capacity screen dumps re- 
quire more time to print per page. 
However, the printout time per screen 
is reduced considerably. Thus, the new 
screen dumps are also time savers. 

These screen dumps were also de- 
signed to act primarily in conjunction 
with the word processor input file 
feature introduced in "The Desktop 
Publisher: A Reprise" (September '88, 
Page 102). Nevertheless, they can be 
employed, but with less convenience 
without that feature. 



There are eight different high capac- 
ity screen dumps presented here. Half of 
them were written to work with the 
Tandy DMP series of dot-matrix print- 
ers. From my correspondence with 
shoestring desktop publisher users, it 
appears that most have DMP- 105 and 
-106 printers, the least expensive of the 
DMP printers but with of the greatest 
graphics capabilities. All four screen 
dumps meant for DMP printers can be 
employed to their utmost with the 
DMP-105 and -106 printers. 

Closely following in graphics capabil- 
ities are the DMP-1 10 and -200 printers, 
which can be used with all four of the 
screen dumps and with three of them to 
their utmost. The DMP printers with 
the least graphics capabilities are the 
100, 130 and 130 A, able to be employed 
with only one of the four screen dumps. 
Screen dumps ordinarily print eight 
screens per page, but with those three 
printers it is limited to six. Owners of 
DMP-130 and -130A printers should 
note that with a parallel-to-serial- 
interface connection the two printers 



1 00 THE RAINBOW May 1 989 



can emulate IBM printers. Under this 
emulation the other four high-capacity 
screen dumps can be used by the DMP- 
130 and -130 A printers. 

Four screen dumps were designed to 
work with Epson printers and the com- 
monly used Epson-compatible printers. 
All printers used with the screen dumps 
SCRNDMP and SCRNDMPS of "Screen 
Dump Extraordinaire" (October '87, 
Page 30) are Epson-compatible insofar 
as their graphics capabilities are con- 
cerned. 

For desktopl there are two BASIC 
driver programs, each servicing two 
high-capacity screen dumps, one for 
DMP printers, the other for Epson 
compatible printers. There are also two 
BASIC driver programs with similar 
functions for DE5KTDPH. Both DESKTOPL 
and desktqph will be modified to give 
their O commands a high-capacity 
screen dump option. 

After the screens — six, eight or 12 
— intended for a printed page are 
generated and saved, the high-capacity 
screen dump option of the O command 
should be chosen. This causes the auto- 
matic loading and running of the ap- 
propriate BASIC driver program. After 
the driver-initiated printout is com- 
pleted, the driver optionally allows 
another printout, program termination, 
or an automatic loading and running of 

DESKTOPL or DESKTQPH. 

Desktop Low Printouts 

The BASIC printer drivers used in 
conjunction with DESKTOPL are shown in 
listings 1 and 2. DRIVERLT, the program 
of Listing 1, is the driver for DESKTOPL 
and Tandy DMP printers. Likewise, 
DRIVERLE, the program of Listing 2, is 
the driver for DESKTOPL and Epson- 
compatible printers. 

DESKTOPL must be altered to work 
with DRIVERLT or DRIVERLE by merging 
to it one of four patch programs, LAL- 

TER, LALTERD, LALTERE and LALtERDE, of 

listings 3, 4, 5 and 6 respectively. Which 
patch program to merge with DESKTOPL 
depends on the version of the program 
used. Presently there are effectively four 
versions of DESKTOPL, which are an 
outgrowth of selling many DESKTOPL 
users built-in screen dumps, enhance- 
ments or both. 

Table 1 shows with which version of 
DESKTOPL each program of listings 3 to 
6 is associated. Any of the four effective 
versions of DESKTOPL may or may not 
include the word processor input file 
feature. Moreover, these four versions 
may accommodate two, 10 or 19 fonts, 
depending on whether additional fonts 



were purchased. If you use the version 
of DESKTQPH published in RAINBOW use 
the LALTER patch file from Listing 3. 

Each patch program gives the O 
command of desktopl the ability to 
transfer control to DRIVERLT or DRIVE- 
RLE. Those with Epson-compatible 
printers need to change Line 645 of the 
patch program associated with their 
version of DESKTOPL by replacing 

DRIVERLT with DRIVERLE. 

The powers of the O command are 
expanded further by each patch pro- 
gram. It adds an option to the O com- 
mand allowing you to look at the direc- 
tory of the disk in Drive O. For later 
printing, you can save six, eight or 12 
screens on disk by means of the O 
command using the save screen option. 
To keep track of files already on disk 
you can occasionally use the directory 
option of the O command. If you have 
more than one drive and have fonts, 
DESKTOPL has the ability to address 
drives when saving screens. You may in 
such a case save screen files on a disk 
in a drive other than Drive O. You 
should then append to DIR in Line 645 
a drive number one, two or three cor- 
responding to the drive used. 

When the patch program for DESK- 
TOPL version is typed, if you have made 
any changes in Line 645, save it in 
ASCII form. If you choose to save 
LALTERD, for instance, in ASCII form, 
type save "LALTERD", A and press 

ENTER. 

To alter DESKTOPL, do the following: 
Get out the disk containing DESKTOPL 
and its font files; Make a backup copy 
of the disk; and put away the original 
and work with the backup copy. For 
compatibility with DRIVERLT or DRIVE- 
RLE, DESKTOPL must have the filename 
DL. 

Therefore, insert DESKTOPL in the disk 
drive and type: RENAME "DESKTOPL' 
BAS"T0"DL/BA5" and press ENTER. 
Next, type L0AD"DL" and press ENTER. 
Then, insert the disk containing patch 

program LALTER, LALTERD, LALTERE, or 

LALTERDE. If the program is LALTERDE, 



VAxy.-:- 



for example, then type: merge" LAL- 
TERDE" and press enter. 

You would do similarly for any one 
of the other three patch programs but 
with its name instead of LALTERDE. 
Finally, insert the disk containing DL in 
your drive and type 5AVE"DL" and press 
enter. 

Depending on the printer, you may 
need to change some lines of the driver 
program DRIVERLT or DRIVERLE. The 
poke command in Line 5 of each of 
these programs is employed to set the 
baud rate of each particular printer. If 
the printer operates at 600 baud, you 
don't need to change Line 5. Otherwise, 
delete the apostrophe from Line 5 and 
replace the question mark with the 
value associated with the baud rate of 
your printer. 



Baud Rate 


Value 


1200 


41 


2400 


18 


4800 


6 or 7 


9600 


1 



If you have a DMP-110 or -200 
printer, change lines 720 and 740 of 
DRIVERLT to include "elongation on" 
and "elongation off" printer control 
codes. In particular, replace CHR$(19) 
with CHR$(14) in Line 720. Also insert, 
CHR$(27);CHR$(15) between 2 and : in 
Line 740. 

Line 680 was written for the 800 dots- 
per-line graphics mode of the DMP-105 
and -106 printers. If your printer has a 
960 dots-per-line graphics mode, delete 
Line 680. 

If you have a printer that is Epson- 
compatible but is not an Epson, you 
may need to tailor DRIVERLE to fit the 
needs of your printer. The tailor- 
making process, though somewhat 
tedious, is well worth the effort. 

It involves changing eight DATA state- 
ments containing Epson printer control 
code sequences. Lines 570 through 600 
contain the control codes for a two- 
column printout. Similarly, lines 650 
through 680 hold the control codes 
needed for a three-column printout. 



DESKTOPL Version 

Neither Dump nor Enhancements 
Dump 

Enhancements 

Both Dump and Enhancements 



Patch Program 

LALTER 
LALTERD 
LALTERE 
LALTERDE 



Table 1 



May 1989 THE RAINBOW 101 



The first DfiTfi value in each of the lines 
specifies the number of values in the 
control code sequence represented by 
the remainder of the DfiTR statement. 
Lines 570 and 650 are identical and 
specify the control code sequence for 
line spacing. 

For ordinary printing, the printer 
provides a line spacing of 1 / 6 inch that 
produces six lines of print per inch. For 
the printer graphics modes, the line 
spacing must be a closer 7/72 inch. The 
Epson control code sequence that yields 
the required line spacing is 2, 27, 49. In 
lines 570 and 650 the initial value of 2 
indicates that the following two values 
27 and 49 represent the control code 
sequence. Check your printer manual to 
see whether or not 27, 49 is the control 
code sequence for a line spacing of 7/ 
72 inch. If not, modify lines 570 and 650 
accordingly. If it has three values, for 
instance, in addition to changing the 
control code sequence, you need to alter 
the initial value to 3. In such a case the 
DflTR statement ends with four 0 values 
instead of five required for the Epson 
printer. 

Your printer may automatically ad- 
just the line spacing to fit the graphics 
modes, wherein you just need to replace 
the initial value 2 in lines 570 and 650 
with 0. However, if your printer does 
not have automatic line spacing adjust- 
ment and you make the 0 for 2 substi- 
tution, your printout will show notice- 
able gaps between lines. 

BASIC lines 600 and 680 also deal with 
line spacing, holding control code 
sequences for the return to 1 / 6 inch line 
spacing. Therefore, check the manual 
for a 27, 50 control code sequence, and, 
if needed, make changes in lines 600 and 
680 analogous to those in lines 570 and 
650. The control code sequences in lines 
580 and 660 differ only in their final 
value; 5 and 9, indicating a left margin 
five and nine characters wide. Check 
your manual for a control code se- 
quence 27, 108, n where n is a value to 
indicate the character width of the left 
margin, making any needed modifica- 
tions in lines 580 and 660. 

Lines 590 and 670 contain the Epson 
control code sequences for specifying 
the graphic modes. The mode desig- 
nated by Line 590 is the one with a dot 
density of 576 dots per line (72 dots per 
inch). The last two values of that code 
sequence indicate a maximum of 
2*256=512 dots (the width of two 
screens) that are to be printed per line. 
If your printer manual has a different 
control code sequence for this graphics 
mode, change line 590 so that the code 



jt inai i vtu ^naraciura 


screen image 


oi riicnaine 


jrTinioui uesunaiion 


i i 
LI 


iop if. j oi i^eii v^oiumn 




9nH 1 t% nf T pft Pnliimn 


L J 


Urttfnm 1 7 Trif T f»ft Pnlnmn 
DUllUIIl I j J VI LCI I V^UJUuHl 


Ri 


Top 1/3 of Right Column 


R2 


2nd 1/ 3 of Right Column 


R3 


Bottom 1/ 3 of Right Column 


Table 2. Filename Structure for 


Two-Column, Six-Screen Printout 




Final Two Characters 


Screen Image 


of Filename 


Printout Destination 


Ll 


Top 1/4 of Left Column 


L2 


2nd l/4of Left Column 


L3 


3rd 1/4 of Left Column 


L4 


Bottom 1/4 of Left Column 


Rl 


Top 1/4 of Right Column 


R2 


2nd 1/4 of Right Column 


R3 


3rd 1/4 of Right Column 


R4 


Bottom 1/ 4 of Right Column 


Table 3. Filename Structure for Two-Column, Eight-Screen Printout 



■" '.' .' "" . 1 „ , . 1 !>., \ 1 , '."J .",'l 1 1 - i 

Final Two Characters 


Screen Image 


of Filename 


Printout Destination 


LX 


Top 1/4 of Left Column 




2nd 1/4 of Left Column 


L3 


3rd 1/4 of Left Column 




Bottom 1/4 of Left Column 


Hi 


Top 1 / 4 of Middle Column 


: ' : ' :V:: W"- M2 


2nd 1/4 of Middle Column 


M3 


3rd 1/4 of Middle Column 


m 


Bottom 1/4 of Middle Column 




Top 1/4 of Right Column 


•7 R2 


2nd 1 /4 of Right Column 


R3 


3rd 1/4 of Right Column 


R4.. 

• 


Bottom 1/4 of Right Column 


Table 4. Filename Structu: 


re for Three-Column, 12-Screen Printout 



specifies a maximum of 5 12 dots printed 
per line. 

Line 670 holds the control code 
sequence for the graphics mode with a 
dot density of 960 dots per line (120 dots 
per inch). The last two values of the 
Epson control code sequence specify a 
maximum of 3*256=768 dots to be 
printed per line. Again, if your printer 
requires another control code sequence 
for the 960 dots per line mode, modify 
Line 670 accordingly, making the 
change in such a way that the code 
provides for a maximum of 768 dots 
printed per line. 

A few tips on the typing of the driver 
program, DR I verlt or DR I VERLE, should 
prove helpful. Before you run the driver 
being typed, save it on disk. Each driver 
contains some pokes to memory, which, 
if involved in a typing error, can cause 



the loss of the whole program when it 
is run. After saving the driver in its 
entirety, run it, and when asked for a 
two- or three-column printout, press 3. 
If you made an error in the difficult-to- 
type DR I VERLT lines 80 through 220 or 
DRIVERLE lines 80 through 140, the 
program will stop and report the 
number of the line in which the error 
occurs. Respond to the error report by 
comparing your erroneous line with the 
correct rendition in the listing and 
rectify the error. Rerun the program and 
correcting process until the driver 
executes the screen replaced with 
another prompt screen. Press BREAK to 
stop the program. 

Next, run the program and press 2 for 
a two-column printout. DR I VERLT will 
follow with another prompt, which you 
may answer by pressing 1 or 2. Then the 



102 



THE RAINBOW May 1989 



xL*ix\.n uvi veil utaiimu 


Each Screen Destined 


for the Left Column Printout 

IV/I til v liVAl VUIUIIIJJ A 1 111 V \J %M %■ 


for Right Column Printout 


Margins 


Margins 


Top Left Right 


Top Left Right 


0 16 237 
Table 5. Margin Settings for Ti 


0 3 224 
*o*Column, Six-Screen Printout 



Each Screen Destined 


Each Screen Destined 


for Left Column Printout 


for Right column Printout 


Margins 


Margins 


Top Left Right 


Top Left Right 


0 0 252 


0 3 256 


Table 6. Margin Settings for Two-Column, Eight-Screen Printout 



request for a few moments wait occurs. 
If DRIVERLT was mistyped, lines 380 
through 500 or DRIVERLE lines 290 
through 340, the program will stop and 
report the errored line, allowing you to 
correct it. Repeat running and correct- 
ing the program until it can execute 
beyond the screen containing the few 
moments wait request. Finally, save the 
driver program on disk. 

Each of DRIVERLT and DRIVERLE pro- 
vides prompts and messages to lead you 
through the program in effecting the 
desired two- or three-column printout. 
You must, however, have ready on disk 
the required screen files previously 
saved by the desktop publisher program 
DL. The eight or less character filename 
of each screen file must adhere to the 
structure described in Tables 2, 3, or 4. 
In the three tables, the heading Screen 
Image Printout Destination refers to 
the location on the printed page of the 
screen image. 

The patch programs of listings 3, 4, 
5 and 6 have given the program DL a 
handy new feature that promotes pleas- 
ing two- and three-column printouts. DL 
now positions every character of any 
font within a vertical distance of eight, 
12, 16 or 24 dots on the screen with each 
distance divided evenly into the 192 dot 
vertical size of a DL screen. This means 
that with a top margin setting of zero 
via the M command of DL, each screen 
will hold exactly 24, 16, 12 or eight lines 
of characters depending on the font in 
use. This guarantees that in a printout 
of two screen images, one above the 
other in a column, the spacing between 
screen images will be indistinguishable 



from the spacing between lines of either 
screen image written with the same font. 

Tables 5, 6, and 7 give the margin 
settings specified by DL's M and W 
commands that produce pleasingly 
spaced two- and three-column high 
capacity printouts. It must be pointed 
out that the right margin setting for the 
screens intended for a two-column, six- 
screen printout must not exceed 240. 
The reason is that for such a printout, 
a 480 dots-per-line graphics mode must 
be used and each column of the printout 
cannot exceed 240 dots of the 480 dots 
per line. 

A typical session for producing a two- 
column printout is as follows: It is 
assumed that you will be making use of 
the word processor input file feature of 
DL. If your copy of DL does not have this 
feature, you will have to write a screen 
when others are employing the feature. 
It is also assumed that you have on a 
disk the word processor file in proper 
form for input. The disk should other- 
wise be blank. 

Suppose the filename of the file is 
mydoc. Your printer should be ready to 
use. Load and run DL. Select a font most 
suitable for your prospective two- 
columned document. If you have a 
DMP-105, DMP-106 or Epson com- 
patible printer, make the left-column 
margin settings in accordance with 
Table 6; otherwise, according to Table 
5. If you have only one disk drive or if 
your copy of DL cannot address drives 
when saving screens, there's no need to 
swap the DL disk with the one containing 

MYDOC. 

Next, by means of the ASCII input 



option of the I command, employ the 
word processor input feature to fill a 
screen. When the screen is full, opt to 
have the remainder of the MYDOC file 
recorded in a file called REST. Take this 
option every time you fill a screen and 
employ the O command to save the 
screen on disk. 

Choose a filename that is six or less 
characters in length, for example, DUMP. 
Then, when saving the screen, type the 
filename as dumpli, where the final two 
characters indicate that the screen 
image is to be printed as the top part of 
the left column of the page. If your disk 
containing mydoc is in a drive other than 
0, you must append to the filename the 
usual colon and drive number. 

Now, clear the screen and use the 
word processor input feature to bring in 
information from REST. Save the screen 
as previously, but this time use the 
filename DUMPL2, repeating the process 
used to obtain the second screen file. 
Save the third screen as DUMPL3. If you 
used Table 6 to make the margin set- 
tings, repeat the process again to save 
another screen as DUMPL4. After saving 
a full column of screens, make the right 
margin settings in accordance with 
Table 5 or 6 again. Clear the screen and 
input another, saving it as DUMPRl. 
Continuing the process analogously 
until all six or eight screens have been 
saved. 

Suppose REST becomes empty before 
all the required screens have been filled 
and saved. Nevertheless, you need a full 
complement of screens saved on disk. 
Suppose that you were able to save 
seven screens of an eight-screen print- 
out. In such a case, clear the screen and 
save it as DUMPR4. At this point, make 
certain that the disk containing DRI- 
VERLT or DRIVERLE is in Drive 0. (It is 
convenient to have that program re- 
corded on the disk containing DL.) 

Select the high capacity screen dump 
option of the O command to load and 
run the program. Answer the two- or 
three-column prompt by pressing 2. 
DRIVERLT will ask you to press 1 if you 
have a DMP-105 or -106, otherwise 
press 2. Type the appropriate number 
and you will be asked if you need 
reminders about file and filename re- 
quirements, after which, you are given 
three options. Take the option to load 
screens for dumping. If you do not have 
more than one disk drive, now insert the 
disk containing the screen files you just 
saved. When asked for a filename, enter 
DUMP if the screen file disk is in Drive 0; 
otherwise, enter DUMP; and the appro- 
priate disk drive number. The driver 



May 1 989 THE RAINBOW 1 03 



Screen Destined 
for Left 



Screen Destined 
for Middle 



Screen Destined 
for Right 



( uJuriui Printout: Column Printout Column Printout 



Margins 
Top Left Right 
0 G 251 



Margins 
Top Left Right 
0 3 253 



Margins 
Top Left Right 
0 5 




TdbJe 7. -Margin Sellings fbir- r ^B^i^^^^^|ft«B(»tti l&Scr&jii Printout 



program will load DUMPLl and DUMPRl, 
initiating the appropriate screen dump 
and printing will ensue. When the 
screens of DUMPLl and DUMPRl are 
printed, the driver loads DUMPL2 and 
DUMPR2 and printing resumes. This 
process continues until the two-column 
printout is complete, at which time 
there is given three options. If choosing 
the option to return to DL, check that the 
DL disk is in Drive 0, which loads and 
runs DL. If the file REST contains more 
information, prepare screen files for a 
second two-column printout. 

If writing a newsletter, for instance, 



it's possible to have the newsletter name 
span the two or three columns of the 
printout. The following example indi- 
cates how this is done. 

Select a large sized font, say Font 1. 
Suppose your newsletter, The Co Co- 
Nut Chronicle, requires a two-column 
printout. Clear the screen. Press the 
space-bar and then type The CoCoNu. By 
means of the T command, set both tabs 
to either 240 or 250, depending on 
whether the printout requires six or 
eight screens. Then press the down- 
arrow key to move the cursor to the 
right (at 240 or 250). Augmenting the 



word processor input feature is the 
ability to move a printed line left or 
right. Make use of that ability by press- 
ing Shift-up Arrow until the u of The 
CoCoNu is almost touching the cursor at 
240 or about a third of the way past the 
cursor if it is at 250. Select a suitable 
font. Make the left margin settings 
according to Table 5 or 6. Then press 
enter twice. Use the word processor 
feature to fill the rest of the screen and 
save it as the top left column screen. 

After saving all the screens for the left 
column; clear the screen; choose Font 1; 
using the M command, set the top and 
left margins to 0; and type t Chronicle. 
Select the text font again; make the 
right margin settings in accordance with 
Table 5 or 6; position down from the 
newsletter name by pressing ENTER 
twice; and fill the rest of the screen and 
save it as the top right column screen. 

If you do not have a word processor, 
install the word processor input feature 
in DL to acquire the ability to move 
printed lines. (See September '88 issue, 
Page 102.) 




110 78 

200 102 

310 66 

390 103 



500 2 

620 183 

720 198 

END 46 



Listing 1: DRIVERLT 

5 'POKE150,? 
10 GOTO30 

20 CLEAR200,&H62FF:GOTO40 
30 PCLEAR8 :GOTO20 

40 CLS: PRINT© 67, "HIGH CAPACITY S 

CREEN DUMPS": PRINTS 10 3, "FOR TAND 

Y PRINTERS " : PRINT© 13 4 , "BY H . ALL 

EN CURTIS" : PRINTS 16 7 , "FOR FALSOF 

T, INC" : PRINT© 2 3- 3 , "COPYRIGHT 1989 
it 

50 PRINT© 3 21, "TYPE 2 OR 3 DEPEND 
ING ON WHETHER YOU WANT A 

2 OR 3 COLUMN PRINTOUT, R 

ESPECTIVELY »■ 

60 DIMS$(14) ,C(14) :C=0:X=&H6300: 
W$ (0 ) ="12 " 2 W$ (1) ="TRIO" : W$ ( 2 ) «»1 
/4":W$(3)=", Ml": :M$="PRESS SPAC 
E TO CONTINUE 

70 L$ (1) =" LI" : L$ ( 2 ) ="L2 " : L$ ( 3 ) =" 
L3 " : L$ (4 ) ="L4 " : M$ ( 1) ="M1" :M$ (2 ) * 
"M2 " : M$ ( 3 ) m «M3 " s M-$ ( 4 ) « "M4 " : R$ ( 1 ) 
= "R1" : R$ ( 2 ) ="R2 " : R$ ( 3 ) ="R3 " : R$ ( 4 
)="R4":K=1 

80 S$ (0)="1F318 60F8D222 702 8A108D 
1927028A208D132 7028A40437EA285C6 



80D750" :C(0)=2488 

90 S$ (1)="8DE0045026FA39308820E6 

84D4503 91F314F8DF627028A018DED2 7 
028A02":C(1)=3006 

100 S$ (2)="8DE727028A048DE127028 

A08 8DDB20BAC680D7508DDB045026FA3 

9861B97":C(2)=3408 

110 S$ (3)="52108E67FA8D0D8D2D8D1 

D8D1B8D190A522 6EE398 60D8D0D8 61B8 

D098610" :C(3)=2624 

12 0 S$ (4) = " 8D054F8D0286 607EA2 8 5E 

EA48DC63 3 410A512 6F8 3 301EFA1C620D 

751398D":C(4)=3429 

130 S$ (5)="DB8DF7108E67FA8D068D0 

48D02 20B2EEA417FF703 3 410A5126F7 2 

0DA8D09":C(5)«3447 

140 S$ (6)="8DDF860D21C50F6F39C6F 

ED7 6F8 6128DBA8E67FACE6800EF81DEB 

CEF8133" :C(6)=4183 

150 S$ (7) ="C91800EF81398DE38D968 

DB217FF76C6608D0AC6608D14C6608D1 

820C78E":C(7)=3756 

160 S$ (8)="6500FE67FAA6C0A7805A2 

6F93 98E6 600FE67FC20F08E6700FE67F 

E20E88D":C(8)=4181 

170 S$ (9)="AEC6808E65608DDC3440C 
6808E66608DE13 440C6808E67608DE03 
4408D20":C(9)=3785 

180 S$ (10)="3540FF67FE3540FF67FC 

3540FF67FA8 61A17FF19C6C08DABC6C0 

8DB5C6C0":C(10)=4448 

190 S$ (11) ="209FCE6500FF67FACE66 

00FF67FCCE6700FF67FE8 60117FEF639 

17FF56C6" :C (11) =4222 



1 04 THE RAINBOW May 1989 



200 S$(12)=T M 2 < 08E65Cj33D84 3 440C620 
8E66CJ38D89344J3C6208E67C.08D88344J3 
WmM§i^W( 12) *343 4 
210 S$(13)=»FF 6 7FE3540 FF67FC354J3 
FF67FA17FEC18E6 54j3C6Ep 8D19 C64J317 
FF4rDS64,0" LCifil.) =4 3 j38/ ; : : " 
;22JC:^$W )="17FF5 6 C 6 4017FF5 98D9E 
8 6 1EBDA2 8 51 6FF0J3 8 6FFA7 80 A7 8j3A780 
^ 5A26F739":C(14 ) = 3 9 S^'-i; 
2 3J3 K$=INKEY$ : IFK$= " "THEN23 J0ELSE 
IFK$="2 "THEN3 5PELSEIFK$<>» 3 "THEN 
SOUND 60 , 3 : GOT02 3 0 n>i. S3 4 

24 0 CLS : PRINT@98 , "ONLY A PRINTER 
(SUCH AS 'BMP"; 105, 106 , 110 , 
& 200) WITH AN 800 OR MORE DO 
TS PER LINE GRAPHICS MODE 

CAN PRODUCE PROPER 3 COL 

UMN PRINTOUT. " : PRINT© 3 26, "A FEW 

250 FORI=0TO14 : FORJ=1TO30 : A$=MID 
$ (S $ ( I) : ,$$$rti:i$*i A^VAL ( " &H " +A$ ) : 
C=C+A:POKEX , A: X=X+1 : NEXT : IFCoC ( 
I) THENCLS : PRINT@22 6 , "TYPING ERRO 
R IN LINE" ; 80+10*1 : ENDELSEC=0 : NE 
XT 

260 GOSUB7 60 ^'CQs M&i Mt:^S'-. 
27 jd K$=INKEY$ : IFK$=" "THEN2 7 0ELSE 
IFK$="N"THEN610 
280 GOSUB770 



290 K$=INKEY$ : IFK$=" "THEN2 9 0 
GOSUB790 



810 PRINT" 
NDICATE : 
D RIGHT 



A TRIO OF FILES I 
THE LEFT:, MIDDLE, AN 
PARTS OF THE TOP 1/4 
PRINTOUT . L2 , M2 AN 
INDICATE THE NEXT 1/ 
EXCEPT FOR THE LAST 



n • 



D R2 
4, ETC. 

■2' 

320 PRINT "CHARACTERS, THE F I LENA 
ME OF ALL FILES MUST BE THE 

SAME . " : PRINT §4 85, M$; . 
330 K$=INKEY$:IFK$=" "THEN330 
340 GOTO 6 10 

350; CLS : PRINT§162 , "IF YOU HAVE A 
.PRINTER WITH A 576 DOTS PER 

LINE GRAPHICS MODE (SUCH AS 

THE DMP105 AND DMP106) , THEN 
PRES S I', OTHERWISE , PR 

ESS 2."^" 

360 K$=INKEY$ : IFK$=" "THEN 3 60ELSE 
W$(1)="PAIR":W$(3)=" ":IFK$=" 
1"THENK=4 : W$ (0) ="8"ELSEIFK$="2"T 
HENK=3 : W$ (0) ="6" :W$ (2) ="1/3"ELSE 
SOUND60 , 3 : GOT03 60 

370 PRINT§422,"A FEW MOMENTS PLE 



m 



380 S$ (0 )=" 1F3 1860F8D2227028A108 
D 19 2 70 28 A20 8 Dl 32702 8A4043 7EA2 8 5 C 



The Pak is Back again 

and it's better than ever. 



INTRODUCING. 





Telecommunicating has become painless with our latest 
version of an old favorite. 

INCLUDING: 

• GOLD Connectors. 
•The latest in microchip technology. 

• Includes a 3 foot DIV25 cable. 
•Does NOT require a multipack interface. 

• Still compatible with your favorite software. 



■ ■ ■■ 

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$49.95 



2400 baud modem.... $149.95 

I jiayes compatible • includes cable (Either Coco or RS232^ 



Cables for your Coco needs 
DB25 M M .... $9-95 
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(Specify Modem or printer) 
Magnavox RGB. .$14.95 

call for special cable needs 

-> 

New from G1MMESOFT! 



CoCo Software 

Autotcrm $39-95 

The Wiz $49-95 

X-tcrm $49.95 

Warp One $29-95 

OS-9 L II BBS....$29-95 
.V-term $49-95 



■x-v -v^ m.m.m. m ■ m »*» m m. * 'V- » ft I ■ 

The latest from SJU>)6ntcrpriscs 


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COMING SOON... 


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(P.O. <Bo?c63196 
"Wichita, %§. 67203 



All orders add 3.00 shpg/hdlg. 

C.O.D. additional 3.00 
No delay for personal checks 
(316) 946-0440 





Your 0S9 Solution 

^Vr^ Pr««to-P»rta«r (Multl-Vue compotlbleT) 
This is what you have been waiting for! Finally RAM-ReBident software 
for your COCO 3! Runs in the background while you do other work! Includes 
a note-pad that does automatic number calculations, a calendar with alarm 
> feature, a phone book that can auto-dial your phone, a real-time clock and 
much, much, more! This program will organize your entire life! 
512k OS9 Level II Required Only $29.95! 

Q8ft Lmvl II BBS SllUJtf 3.0 

System comes complete and ready to run. Use the built in menus or create your own. 
Run your own programs or games on-line! Complete message system Mff£, *Sjh 
included. File transfer system supports Xmodem and Ymodem as fee* 
well as keyword searching! Even comes with it's own Terminal program! 
Now includes ANSI graphics menus and editor! See the board while it runs! 
For a DEMO call (504)734-0192 (300/1200 baud) or (508)675-0912 (3/12/2400 baud). 
512k OS9 Level II and RS-232 Pak Required $29.95 

Without the right tools, OS9 is difficult... These ARE the right tools! With 
^ these great utilities you'll be using OS9 like a pro! Complete wildcard, Tree 
. . and Windowing utilities make OS9 easy to use. If you want to use OS9, This 
\0t is what you need! 25 great utilities for only $24.95! Stop fighting with OS9I 
128k OS9 Level II Required. . $24 .95 ...^> ; 

Disk Mintwr Tree (Multl-Vue compotlbleP) 

No more fighting with directories. Change, create, and delete directories, copy, view 
and delete files. A MUST for the OS9 beginner! Great for ANY OS9 useri 
512k OS9 Level II Required $29.95 

1 Warn Ona (Multl-Vue compotlbleT) 

Finally a complete OS9 Level II windowing terminal! Many features include Auto 
Dial & Macro, X & Ymodem, ANSI graphics, buffer capture, on-line timer, chat- 
mode, windows and much, much more! Perfect for any BBS user! 
512k OS9 Level II and RS-232 Pak Req uired $34.95 

Tha Ziddw (Multl-Vue compatlblel J 

This wonderful utility allows you to patch anything! Patch commands on"diak and fix 
CRCs automatically! Patch the OS9boot file! Save lost files! Fix crashed disks! 
64k OS9 Level I or II required $19.96 

Multi-Menu (Multl-Vue compotlbleT) 

Easily create your own pop-down menus with this great utility! No programming 

Needed! Run any OS9 command from a menu. A must for any Multi-Vuuoser! 

512k OS9 Level II and Multi-Vue required $19.95 

Send check or money order to: Alpha Software Technologies 
Or cat (601) 266-2773 (voice) P.O. Box 16522 ^» mgm RAINBOW 

(508) 675-0912 (modem) Hatttesburg MS. 39402 Jhl CWT ^ T *" 

^Me«ejjjdd^3£0^hlpj5j^^ 







May 1989 THE RAINBOW 105 



6S0D750" ; 0(0} =2488 

39^ S£[lJ= lt 9DE0045026FA3930B62£lE 

6B4D450391F314FBDF627J&2SA01BDED2 
7028Afi2":C{l)*3006 

400 S? (2) = M BDE72702BA£4SDE12702B 
A08BDDB20BAC5S0D750SDDB04502 6FA3 
9361297" :C (2)=340S 

410 S$ (3)= l! 52BDIBSD53eDEE33410A5 

126FBSD45BDE133410A512 6FBBD3B0A5 

226E43£":C(3)=3027 

420 S$ (4}= it SG0DSD0DS6LBSD093G10& 

D054FGD02B6207EA2B5DEBe31C91B00& 

DEBBDlC"iC(4)-2943 

43,0 S$(5) = I1 17FFB133410A5I26F7&D0 

D17FF7633410A512GF7BDj0220A93 3j511 

E32CS20 w sC(5)-2647 

440 S? (6) ~ 1T D75139CGFZD76FB612aDC 
AS DC BB 60D2 1C40 FSF3 9 3 D19 &DB0 B DE4 1 
7FFflGC6" J C(6)~399l 

450 3$ (7)~ ,P G0303D0129SQL5C66030B 
D0221BD1520DECGFE:D7eFDEBC31CSlB0 
,03 9 AS C0 ,T i C ( 7 ) -3 300 

460 $5 [ A ) ="A7 B 0 5A2 6F9 3 9AGAJ0A7 B 05 
A2£Fg39BDE3CGB030BD015ABDESC6B03 
JJ5:>P252 lr SC(B)-3 723 

470 S$ (9)-"BD118GlA17FF44C6C0ipB 

D00E5B DD1C6C0 20 BAB DD3 3 46033 1 D00D 

731C901* I :C(9)=358S 

4BJ3 55(Lj3)= r, 008 60117FF27 3560338D 

ACC620308D01838DAFC62J5 3030027880 

DAI 7FF£ D" sC{10) =3j53 2 

490 S$(11)="30SD00F2C6D03D1DC640 

3 J 0BD00A8BDS4C64030BD01A0SDBFS60D 

17FF22S6" :C(12.}=3452 

Sja^S £&(12)= T, 1E17FF1D0F6,F3 98£FFA7 

B0A7805A2SF939C690BDF2C6C030ftb01 

7D20D3AC":C(12)=3786 

5l| FO3H=pTO12;FOEJ=lTO3 ( 0rA$^ID 

$(5$ (I) , 3*J-1,2) :A=VAL{"&H"-i-A$) : 

C=C+Ai FOKEX j A; X-X+l ; NEXT s IFCoC ( 

I) THEHOLS;PRIHT|3226 f "TYPING ERRO 

K Of LINE";3a0410*I;ENDELSEC-0:N 

EXT 

520 GO5DB760 

530 K$-INKEY9iIFK$= ,tM TEEN530ELSE 

IFK$-"N"THEN610 

540 GOSUB770 

550 K$=INKEY$I IFK5= ,rM TKEN55j3 
56,0 GOSTJB730 

570 PRINT" OF A FAIR OF FILES I 
N DIC ATE THE LEFT AND RIGHT P 

ARTS OF THE TOP M ftf$(2)f" OF 

THE PRINTOUT, L2 AND R2 INDI 
CATS THE NEXT » ; V7$ (2 ) ; " > ETC 

i EXCEPT FOR THE - 

5S0 PRINT » LAST 2 CHARACTERS, T 
HE FILENAMES OF ALL FIL 

ES MUST BE THE SAME - 11 

590 PHIKT@4B5,K5f 

6£0 K$=XNKEY$:IFX$-""THEN600 



610 GGSITB750 

62£ K$— INKEY $ i lFK$= n n THEN620 

G30 IFK$*="3"THENCLEAR200, &K7FFF* 
POLE Aft 0 l EN DELS EIFK$="2" TEEN C LEAR 
200 , ii!7FFF: PCLEAR4 : RUN 11 DL "ELSEXF 
K5<>"1" THEN 620 

640 CIS :PRINT&9S, "ENTER PART OF 
FILENAME COMMON TO ALL FILES, 

(IF YOU HAVE MORE THAN 1 OR 

IVE, YOU MAY ADDRESS A DRIV 

E BY APPENDING A COLON FOLLOW 
ED BY THE DRIVE NUMBER TO THE 
FILENAME PART. J 

6 50 PHI NT @ 3 2 4 r " » > ,T f i LINE I ffPUT 
F$ 

S 60 A=INSTR f 1 1 F S t " : " } £ IFA>0TKEND 
$=RI GHT S ( F$ , LEN ( F $ ) -A-rl ) : F$=LEFT 
$(F$ P A-i)ELSED?=" ii 

670 IFK>lT>;EN710ELSEX-&R6300rXf 1 
} =X+1 7 B ; X [ 2 } =X-+2 16 : X (3 ) -X+2 5 9 ; X ( 

6S0 PRINT#-2,Cf!R5{27) ?CHR£[20);; 
POKE£H63 7E,16 

F0RI=1T04: LOADM F$+L$(I)4^/L 
H m tD$ , 23040 : LOADM F$+M$ fIJ+'VLR" 
-D$ s LOADM P$+E5 (I) +»/LR M +DS r £144 
sEXECX(l) ;NEXT 
70£ PRINT^-2:GOTO610 

7 10 6 3 00 : X ( 1) -X+18 3 ! X ( 2 ) -X+2 
PJ3 iX (3}~X+2 54 lX(4) -X+3,09 

7 20 IFK- 3 THENPO KEX^ 9 3 , 3 1 : FO KEX+ 1 
24 f 57 t P0KEX+175 , 3 I PQKEX+179 , 30 :P 
OKEX+19 5,33: POKEX+ 2 fl S , 86 : PRINT#- 
2 / CHR$f27) pCHR$(l^} ; ELS E PRINT if - 2 
r CHRS(27) ?CHR?(3^) f CHR$ ( 27 ) ; CEHS 
(23) ; 

730 FORI=1TOK: LOADM Pg+L$ 

R T|, + D? s LOADM F5+R$ (I) -K"/LR H +D$ t 61 

44:EXECX (I) ! NEXT 

740 PRINT #-2: GOTO 6 10 

750 CLS:PRINT@19B, "1 LOAD FOR DD 

UP" :FRIHT@230 # "2 RETURN TO DE5KT 

OPL 1 ' : PRINTS 252 , " 3 EXIT PROGRAM 1 ' : 

RETURN 

7 60 CL3: PRINTS 134, "DO YOU KEED I 
0 REVIEW FILE AND FILENAME 

REQUIREMENTS FOR EXECUTING 

THIS SCREEN DUMP? (Y/N) 

" ; S RETUR1T 
770 CLS; ?RINT@ 66 , « YOU SHOULD HAV 
E READY " ?WS(0) :PRINT69S, "FILES 
{SCREEN IMAGES) FOR LOAD IN 

G . THE IMAGES OF ONE ",*W$(X 
) ; fl OF FILES SHOULD CQRRE- S 
POND TO THE TOP M fWS(2)f" OF 

THE PRINTOUT. « ; 
78^ PR INT "ANOTHER ";WS(1}? 11 
SHOULD CORRESPOND TO THE NEXT 
fl t ( 2 ) ; ,f OF TEE PRI NT OUT ^ ETC . 
'^PRINTe453 ,M$ ; : RETURN 



1 06 THE RAINBOW May 1 989 



790 CLS:PRINT@34,"THE LAST 2 CHA 
RACTERS OF EACH FILENAME MUST 

INDICATE WHERE THE SCREEN IMA 
^l s # 'IS TO BE PRINTED. FOR 

EXAMPLE, LI" ;W$ (3) ; " AND Rl EN 
DING THE FILENAMES": RETURN 





yf no ... 


...186 


520 .. . 


....71 




m 200 . . < 


234 


610 


16 




330 . 


... 91 


END 


....85 




420 , 


109 







Listing 2: OR I VERLE 



5 'POKE15J3,? 
10 GOT03J3 

20 CLEAR2j3j3,*H66FF:GOT04j3 
30 PCLEAR8:G0T02J3 

40 CLS:PRINT@67, "HIGH CAPACITY S 
CREEN DUMPS" : PRINT@98 , "FOR EPSON 
COMPATIBLE PRINTERS " : PRINT &13 4 , 
"BY Hv ALLEN CURTIS" : PRINT@167 , " 
FOR FALSOFT, INC" : PRINTS 2 3 3 , "COPY 
RIGHT 1989" 

50 PRINT© 3 21, "TYPE 2 OR 3 DEPEND 
ING ON WHETHER YOU WANT A 

2 OR 3 COLUMN PRINTOUT, R 

ESPECTIVELY. 

60 C-J3 : X=&H67J3J3 : W$ (0 ) - w 12 : W$ ( 1 ) 
="TRIO" :.W$ (2) ="1/4" : W$ (3)=» , Ml" 
:M$=" PRESS SPACE TO CONTINUE 
70 L$ ( 1 ) ="L1" : L$ ( 2 ) ="L2 ":L$ ( 3) =» 
L3" :L$ ( 4 ) =»L4" : M$ (I) ="M1 " :M$ (2 )=* 
"M2":M$ ( 3 ) ="M3 " : M$ ( 4 ) ="M4 " :R$(1) 
="R1":R$(2)="R2":R$ (3) ="R3":R$ (4 
)="R4":K=1 

80 S$(j3)="lF314F8D4j327j328A8j38D37 
27028A408D3127j32 8A2j38D2B27028A10 
8D25":C(j3)=2j368 

90 S$(1)="27J328A£88D1F27J328A048D 
1927j328Aj328D1327028A01437EA285C6 
80D7":C(1)=2258 

100 S$ (2)=s"5#8DC3£45026FA3930882 
0E684D450398 6189752 8D5A8D21108E6 
7FA8D" :C(2)-322j5 ■ ■ 

110 S$ (3)="j3D8Dj3B8Dj398 6j3D8DD4j3A5 
22 6EA3 9EEA4 8DCE3 3 4 10K5 12 6F8 3 30 IE 
FA1C6":C(3)=3128 

120 S $ ( 4 ) =" 20D75139 C6FED7 6F8D1B8 

D238E67FACE680J3EF81DEBCEF8133C91; 

8&0EF":C(4)=3973 

13J3 S$ (5)="818DB68D1B0F6F3934103 



ARIZONA SMALL COMPUTER PERIPHERALS 
930 W. 23rd St. Suite 26 
Tempe Az. 85282 
(602)-829-8028 
M - F 8:00am - 6:00pm MST 

1 ) HARD DRIVE SYSTEMS 

30Meg SYSTEM $425.00 

20Meg SYSTEM $350.00 

System consists of a CMI 6000 
Series hard drive, WD1002-SHD 
controller , DISTO HD Interface, 
power supply, case, and all 
necessary cables ready to plug in 
to an MPI and run. Drive is 
formatted with OS9 and contains 
1Meg+ of OS9 public domain 
software . 

2) HARD DRIVE KITS 

5, 8 & 10Meg Kits include a CMI 
5000 Series hard drive, WD1002-SHD 
controller, power supply and 
necessary cables. 
PRICED FROM $120.00 

DISTO HARD DRIVE INTERFACE .... $50 . 00 
(when order3d with kits above) 

3) FLOPPY DRIVES FROM $60.00 

4) EAGLE KEYBOARD W/ADAPTER . . $ 1 00 . 00 
Use a 105 key IBM style keyboard 
with your CoCo 1, 2, or 3. 22 RS 
Basic Keywords and 22 OS9 Commands 
with onl'y 2 keystrokes. Keyboard 
Reset. 

Hardware & firmware by Bob Puppo 

5) 512K MEMORY UPGRADES $160.00 

6) MODEMS 

1200 BAUD $40.00 

2400 BAUD $125.00 

7) COMPLETE LINE OF DISTO PRODUCTS 

8) COLOR COMPUTER & PERIPHERAL 
REPAIR 

9) ASK ABOUT OUR TRADE-IN POLICY 

10) WARRANTY 

All product sold with 180 day 
repair / replacement warranty. 



Add $8.00 S/H. All Prices US$. 



May 1989 THE RAINBOW 1 07 



p3C27SDlS3 51J339341 i 03jaBC253jSF43 4l 
j»308C":C{5)*2ai4 

24;0 3$ (6}= ,I 362?ED341JB3 J 0SC292PE6E 
6802 70 B A6 8J3 BDA2 855A2 6FS 3 90000000 
0000ja i, :C(e)*4'«2 

15 0 K S = INKEV S £ IPK$ = IT "THEN 150ELSE 
IFKS= M 2 l1 THEN280EL£EIFK3<>"3 "THEN 
SOUND60,3;GOTO150 

Ifija CLS: PRINTS 230 , If A FEW MOMENTS 
PLEASE <f 

170 FQRI=0TO6 1 FORJ=1T02 3 : A? -MID$ 
fS$(I) f 2*J-1,2) r A=VAL ( M 11 +A5 ) sC 
=C+A: FCKEX, A : X-X+l I NEXT: IFCOC (I 
) THENCLS: PRINT@2 2 6 f 11 TYPING ERROR 
IN LIME"; 80+10*1 :ENDELSEC=0!NEX 

T 

180 F03I=1T03 4 % READA J NEXT : X^=X-6 i 
FORI— 1TQ3 4 1 READA i POKEX , A i X=X+ 1 ; N 
EXT 

130 GOSUB610 
200 K$=INKEVS<IFK$= n ''THEN200EL3E 
IFK$^"N r 'THEN4 3,0 
210 GOSU3620 

220 K $ = INKE Y $ : IF K $ = 11 11 THEN2 2 0 
230 GOSUB640 

24 0 PRINT 11 OF A TRIO DP FILES I 
NDICATE THE LEFT, MIDDLE, AN 

D RIGHT PARTS OF THE TOP 1/4 

OF THE PRINTOUT. L2 t M2 , A 

ND R2 INDICATE THE NEXT 1/ 

4, ETC. EXCEPT FOR THE LAST 

z 

250 PRINT 1 ' CHARACTERS, THE FILENA 
ME OP ALL FILES >HJST BE THE 

same, 11 : prints a 5, m$; 

2 6 0 K ?=XNKE Y $ i I FX? * 1 n 1 THEN2 6 0 
27 0 GOTO* 80 

230 K=2 : WS (0) ="8" : W$ ( 1) =»PAIR" : W 

» : CLS : prints 2 3 0 , 11 A 

MOMENTS PLEASE" 
290 f0)= ,l lF314FSD4027jd2aAa08D3 
72702aA408D31270BSA20BD2B2 70:tSAl 
08D252702' 1 : C fja ) ~2109 
300 S$(l}= il BA03SDlF2702GA043D192 
702 8A028D1327J028A014 3 7EA285C6S0D 
75pSDCj04 p *;C(l)=2637 
310 S$(2)= ll 502£FA3B3 i 03B20EGS4D4 5 
0398 61S97523D4EBD218DE3 33 410A512 
6FaSD13SD ,t :C{2)=3298 

32,0 S% (3)= |, D933410A5l2SF8BDj39S50 
D3DCA0A52 26E03 9 3 3^11S32C62 J 0D7513 
9C5FED76F 1I :C(3)=3254 
330 S$ £4 J = w BD0FBD17DE3C3lC9lS0pa 
DC23D1E0F£F19 3410305027 8D1B 3 5103 
9341^3j3aC 11 : 0(4)^2532 
340 S$ (5)="2520F43410308C2 62J9ED3 
4l030aC2920E6EG30270aA680BDAa855 
A26F83900 " :C(S)=3p51 
350 FO»I>0 TO 5 ; FOR J= ITG3 1 1 A$^MID$ 
(fl$(I) , 2*J-1, 2) * A= VAL ( " SH H + A$ ) £C 
=C+A ^ POKEX , A : X-X+l liJSljiT s IFCOC (I 
THENCLS : PRINT? 2 2 6 f "TYPING ERROR 




IN LIIfE " ; 2 90 + 10 * I : E LTD ELS E C=0 I ME 

XT 

3 60 X=X»1:F0H.I=1T034: READA: POKEX 
, A:X=X+1:KEXT 

370 SOSBBSljS 

38p K$=INKEYS:IFK$= H1I THEN3E0ELSE 
IFKS-"N t, THEN4B0 

39J3 CLS I PR I NT 966, " YOU SHOULD HAV 
E READY a FILES (SCREEN IMAGES 
) FOR LOADING. 

400 PRINT 11 THE SCREEN IMAGES OF 
ONE PAIR OF FILES SHOULD CORR 
E 5 FOND TO THE TOP FOURTH PART 
OF THE PRINTED PAGE. AflQTH 

ER PAIR 

410 PRINT" SHOULD CORRESPOND TO 
THE NEXT FOURTH PART OF THE" P 
AGE M ETC. n rPRINT'34 5 3,M$r 
420 K$=INKEY$;IFXS= 1M 'THEK420 
430 CLS:PRINT@3 4 P "THE LAST 2 CSA 
RACT2RS OF EACH FILENAME MUST 
INDICATE WHERE THE SCREEN IMA 
GE IS TO BE PRINTED. FOR 

INSTANCE , LI AND Rl ENDING 

THE FILENAMES 

440 PRINT" OF A PAXR OF FILES I 
NDICATE THE LEFT MID RIGHT P 

CRT IONS OF THE TOP FOURTH OF 

THE PAGE . L2 AND R2 I3TD 

10 ATE THE. NEXT FOURTH, ETC 

n EXCEPT 

PRINT rl FOR THE LAST 2 CHARA 
CTERS I THHl FILENAMES OF ALL 

FILES KOfST BE THE SAME." 

4'£| PRlNT@48S f HS? 
HP K$"INKEY$ ^ lFK$- lftl THEN47j3 
48,0 GOSUBBS^ 

4 3 £ K$= I NKE Y $ i 1 FK $= « » THEN 4 9 & 

IFKS =tl 3 fl THENCLEAR2^p f fiH7 FFF S 
PCLEAR4 i ENDELSEI FK$ = fi 2 fl THEN CLEAR 
200 , SH7FFF: PCLEAE:4 I RUN 1F BL fl ELSE IF 
K$<> ,l l lt THEN49^ 

51,0 CLS : PRINTS 9 fi , 11 ENTER PART OF 
FILENAME COMMON TO ALL FILES, 

(IF YOU HAVE MORE THAN 1 DR 

IVE , YOU MAY ADDRESS A DRIV 

E BY APPENDING A COLON FOLLOW 
ED BY THE DRIVE NUMBER TO THE 
FILENAME PART, ) 

52p PRINT@3 24/ t >.» " ; : LIKEINPCJT 

53^ A-INSTR ( I, F$ , 11 * " ) : IFA>^THEND 
5=RIGHT$ (F$/LEN(F$)-A-hI) ;F5=LEFT 
5(FS,A-1}ELSED5= H " 

54^5 IFK^lTH2WFORX»lTO4iL0ADW F$+ 
LS(I)+V1*"+DS, fiHSA^^jLOADM F$+M 

5 f I ) +" /LR"+D$ : LOADM F$+R$ £ I) + V L 
R«-arDS , 6144 i EXECSHS778 sNEXTELSEFO 
RI^1TQ4 2 LOADM F$+L$ <I) +"/LR"+D3 ! 
LOADM F5^R$(I)+ T| /LR ,, +D$ I £144: EXE 

C&H677 8SNBXS 
55^ GOTO490 



1 08 THE RAINBOW May 1 989 



560 CLS:FRINT@19 8, "1 LOAD FOR DU 
MP 11 s PRINTS 2 3 J3 r "2 RETURN TO DESKT 
QPL" :PRINT@2 62, M 3 EXIT PROGRAM" 1 
RETURN 

570 DATA 2,27,49,0,0,0,0,0 
5S0 DATA 3,27,108,5,0,0,0,0 
590 DATA 5,27,42,5,0,2,0,0,0,0 
£00 DATA 2,27,50,0,0,0,0,0 
610 CLS : PRINTS 19 4 J "DO YOU NEED T 
G REVIEW FILE AND FILENAME 

REQUIREMENTS FOR EXECUTING 

THIS SCREEN DUMP? (i/N) 

11 ; : RETURN 
£20 CLS: PRINTS 6, "YOU SHOULD HAV 
E READY ";W$(0) :PRINT398, "FILES 
(SCREEN IMAGES ) FOR LOADIH 
G* THE IMAGES OF ONE ";WS(1 
) f* OF FILES SHOULD CORRE- S 
POND TO THE TOP " ;W${2]; ,f OF 



l^tiitg 3^ LHi TER 

240 IFK$~ n <j^ OR K$="o ,f THENCLS:PR 

INT @ 1 9 6 > V 1 V HI C SCREEN DUMP" : PR 

INT" 2: SAVE SCREEN ON DISK": 

PRINT" 3: DIR":GOT0645 

330 INPUT # 1, D, S ; CLOSE # 1 : IFD>7 AN 

D D< 1 1THEN D= 1 1ELSE I FD> 1 1 AND D<1 

5THEND=15ELSEIFD>15THEND===23 

645 K$=INKEY$:IFK$=""THEN645ELSE 
I FK$ = " 1 " THENRUN " DRI VERLT " ELSE I FK 
$«" 2 "THENGOSUB15 : GOTO200ELSEIFK$ 
~* 3 "THENCLS : DIR: PRINT" PRESS 
SPACE TO CONTINUE"ELSESOUND60, 10 
; GOTO 200 

646 K$=INKEY$ : IFK$= " "THEN64 6ELSE 

200 " : " 



THE PRINTOUT- 
630 PRINT "ANOTHER "^$(1)?" 
SHOULD CORRESPOND TO THE NEXT 
";W$(2);' T OF THE PRINTOUT , ETC 
■■;PRINT@4S3,M$; t RETURN 
6 40 CLS l PRINTS 3 4 , "THE LAST 2 CHA 
RACTERS OF EACH FILENAME MUST 
INDICATE WHERE THE SCREEN IMA 
GE IS TO BE PRINTED. FOR 

EXAMPLE, Ll";W$(3)f" AND Rl EN 
DING THE FILENAMES " t RETURN 
650 DATA 2,27,49,0,0,0,0,0 
650 DATA 3,27,103,9,0,0,0,0 
670 DATA 5,27,42,1,0,3,0,0,0,0 
630 DATA 2,27,50,0,0,0,0,0 



Listing 5: lrltere 

**T$-«0» OR K$="o"THENCLS:PR 



3: DIR" : GOT0645 
INPUT #1 , D, S : CLOSE#l : IFD>7 AN 
D D<11THEND=11ELSEIFD>11 AND, D<1 
5THEND= 1 5ELSEI FD> 15THEND=2 3 
331 D=SF*D: S=SF*S S M 

645 K$=INKEY$: IFK§=" "THEN645ELSE 
IFK$=" 1 " THENRUN" DRIVERLT"ELSEIFK 
$="2"THENG0SUB15 : G0T02j3JJELSEIFK$ 
="3 "THENCLS : DIR: PRINT" PRESS 
SPACE TO CONTINUE "ELSESQUND60 , 10 
;G0T02j3j3 



G4 6 K$=INKEYS : IFKS=" "THEN646ELSE 



I Mi ng 4 : LPtTEGg 

240 IFK$= |T 0" OR K$ = " o "THENCLS S PR 
INT B 19 6, "1: SCREEN DUMP 11 1 PRINT M 

2: SAVE SCREEN ON DISK" i PRINT 
M 3: HI C SCREEN DUMP" ; PRINT" 

4 : DIR 1,1 SGOT064S 
3 30 INPUT#l,D,S:CLOSE#l:IFD>7 AN 
D D<11THEND=11ELSEIFD>11 AND D<1 
5THEND-15ELSEIFD>15THEND=23 
64 5 K$=INKEY$ I IFK$=" l1 THEN645ELSE 
I FK$= 11 3 "THENRUN" DRIVEKLT" ELSEIFK 
5= 1, l tl THENG50ELSEIFK$="2"THEHGOSU 
015 : GOTO200ELS EIFKS- " 4 " THENCLS : D 
IR: PRINT" PRESS SPACE TO CONT 
I1WE"ELSESOUHD60, 10 :GOTO200 
64 6 K$ = INKEY $ 1 1 FK$ = " « THEN 64 6ELSE 
200 . 



Lifting 6: lrlteede 



240 IFK$-"0" OR K$= Tl o"THENCLS:PR 
INT@196,"1: SCREEN DUMP" ; PRINT 11 

2; SAVE SCREEN ON DISK" : PRINT 
» 3; HI C SCREEN DUMP" : PRINT" 

4: DIR":GOT0645 
3 30 INPUT#l,D,S:CLOSE#l:IFD>7 AN 
D D<11THEND^11ELSEIFD>11 AND D<1 
5THEND=15ELSElFD>15THEND-23 
331 D=SF*D: S=SF*S :K(0) =SF* (D ( CD) 
+2) -2 

645 K$=INKEY$ : IFK$ = " lr THEN64 5ELSE 
I FK $= " 3 « THENRUN 1 * DRI VERLT 11 E LS E I F K 
" 1 "THEN6 5 0ELSEI FK$= » 2 "THENGOSU 
B15 iGOTO200ELSEIFK$= TI 4 "THENCLS t,'D 
IR: PRINT" PRESS SPACE TO CONT 
I2JUE H ELSESOUND60 r 10:GOTO200 
64 6 KS =INKE YS : IFK$= TI "THEN 6 4 6 ELSE 

2 ^ ^ 



May 1 989 THE RAINBOW 1 09 





Software 



CoCo1,2& 3 



CoCo Graphics Designer Plus- 
Signs of the Times 



Every Tuesday is "Computer Day" at 
my young son's school, and he regularly 
brings home output from the day's session 
at the keyboard. Not too many Tuesdays 
ago, I walked into his room after work to 
find a prominent addition to his decor: a 
computer-generated banner hanging on the 
wall, proudly announcing "JASON LOVES 
MOMMY." A bit-image teddy bear rounded 
out the proclamation, apparently serving 
as the necessary link between human sen- 
timent and hi-tech wizardry. My wife, 
who helps out at the school regularly, 
assured me that Jason had come up with 
the text of his banner without any maternal 
coaching. Obviously pleased with the day's 
lesson, though, she wondered aloud why 



we didn't have such a program for our 
computer. 

I'm happy to report that there is a de- 
lightful program available for the CoCo 
that does banners and much more. CoCo 
Graphics Designer Plus, from Zebra Sys- 
tems, Inc., provides the capability for 
producing banners, signs and greeting cards 
via an elegant point-and-click interface. 

This program runs on any Color Com- 
puter with at least 64K of memory. Yes, 
that is correct: any Color Computer 1, 2 or 
3. When I read the system requirements 
page in the manual, I was amazed to see 
that the program could also run on my old 
silver 64K CoCo 1 as well as my CoCo 3. 
It worked perfectly. 



Upon running CoCo Graphics Designer 
Plus, the user arrives at the main menu, 
which is clear and simple (as main menus 
should be). Your choices are Make Sign, 
Make Banner, Make Card, Set Up Printer 
and Set Up Data Drives. 

A selection is made from among these 
by directing an onscreen arrow with either 
a joystick or mouse, and then clicking the 
button. If you have never used this type of 
interface before, you needn't worry: After 
working with it for 1 5 seconds you' 11 know 
everything you need. 

Selecting Set Up Printer allows you to 
configure your program disk for the type 
of printer you have and the baud rate you 
are using. This needs to be done only once 
(assuming you don't change printers or 
baud rates). The array of printers sup- 
ported by CoCo Graphics Designer Plus is 
nothing short of astounding. The list would 
never fit on a single screen; it is accessed 
by scrolling through a window and click- 
ing on the appropriate printer. 



110 



THE RAINBOW May 1989 



Having established that bit of trivia, the 
other setup command enables you to spec- 
ify which disk drives you will use to hold 
collections of pictures, fonts (a font is a 
particular way of shaping letters and 
numbers) and border patterns. If you have 
only one disk drive, you can completely 
skip this step, and the program will assume 
all of the above will be stored on Drive 0. 
The program disk as purchased has six 
different fonts, a collection of 32 pictures 
and 16 font borders, all of which fit on the 
program disk. However, the company sells 
additional disks of fonts, pictures and 
borders. 

Once the setup procedures are taken 
care of, you can proceed to any of the three 
creative functions. Make Sign enables you 
to create a one-page (8^-by- 1 1-inch) sign, 
consisting of a combination of up to 14 
lines of text, up to two pictures and an 
optional border. For this function, the screen 
is oriented around two activities. The right 
side of the screen displays the current 
border and the pictures being used for the 
sign. The left side of the screen contains 
menu items (or "buttons"), which can be 
clicked on to do specific actions. 

Buttons on the Make Sign screen in- 
clude Select Picture, Place Picture, Select 
Border, Edit Text and Preview Sign. Each 
of these leads to an additional screen dis- 
play. Also, there are buttons for Print Sign, 
Save Sign and Load Sign. 

Select Picture asks which of the al- 
lowed two pictures you are selecting 
(Number 1 or 2), and which set of pictures 
you want to select it from. (Unless you 
purchase additional picture disks, there is 
only one set. See the sidebar "Clip Art for 
Your Creations" for more information on 
the picture disks.) It then loads the picture 
set and allows you to scroll through it and 
click on the picture you want. 




Once you have selected a picture, you 
can place it on the sign using Place Picture. 
You have a choice of small, medium or 
large pictures on the sign, although choos- 



ing large limits you to one nearly full-page 
picture. If you select small or medium, you 
can use both of the allowable two pictures, 
but both must be the same size. 

The Place Picture function displays a 
three-by-three grid for medium-sized pic- 
tures, or a six-by-six grid for small pic- 
tures. By clicking on a grid location, you 
can place or erase either of the two pictures 
at that location. You also have buttons for 
filling the whole grid with one picture, 
staggering them in every other location or 
clearing the entire sign. 

In addition to pictures, a sign can have 
one of 1 6 borders around the edge. (Many 
more borders are available on the optional 
border disk.) The Select Border function 
enables you to specify which collection of 
borders you want to select from, loads that 
collection, and lets you scroll through them 
and select. 

Select Picture, Place Picture and Select 



Border are all implemented very smoothly, 
and the commands and buttons function 
intuitively. The pictures and borders are 
shown onscreen as you select and place 
them, which is a major improvement over 
many programs of this type, which merely 
name them, without letting you see what 
they look like until print time. 

The next function for making a sign is 
Edit Text. The implementation here is not 
quite as smooth as the picture and border 
functions, although my outlook may be 
biased by my extensive use over the last 
few years of several point-and-click word 
processing programs. CoCo Graphics 
Designer Plus is not intended to be a word 
processor, and thus only the most basic 
capability is provided within the Edit Text 
option. 

Text editing is done in a 14-line win- 
dow on the right side of the screen; buttons 
on the left side allow you to specify posi- 



In the Zebra Zone 



When the CoCo 3 was released, there 
was a sudden flurry of activity among Color 
Computer enthusiasts. It was quite interest- 
ing to watch. Photocopied technical manu- 
als were in hot demand, hardware hackers 
were dissecting circuit boards, and soft- 
ware developers were scrambling to crank 
out products that would take advantage of 
all the new features. It's only natural, of 
course, to want to investigate the new and 
exciting. 

For satisfied CoCo 2 owners, however, 
there was understandable concern over the 
fate of their faithful machine. Would any* 
one continue to develop new products ca- 
pable of running on the CoCo 2? 

The answer, fortunately, is an unquali- 
fied "Yes!" and Zebra Systems v Inc, is one 
such company. The philosophy at Zebra 
Systems, according to founder Stewart 
Newfeld, is not to write for the most power- 
ful machine, but to take popular concepts 
and make them available in a quality pack- 
age to the entire CoCo Community. 

"We feel we can introduce half a dozen 
products a year which will not require an 
upgrade to the CoCo 3," said Newfeld. "We 
will continue to support the CoCo 2," 

Incorporated in February 1983, Zebra 
Systems has a history of providing high-end 
capability to computers on the low end of 
the price scale. Their original product line 
boasted a 48-page catalog, including joy- 
sticks, light pens and voice synthesizers, all 
for the Timex Sinclair. 

As the Sinclair market dwindled, the 
company probed the IBM software market 
but found it difficult to get distribution. 



Retrenching, Newfeld investigated many 
microcomputers before settling on the 
Color Computer. Zebra Systems remains in 
the surplus market, as well, buying periph- 
eral devices in bulk and adapting them to 
run on various; computers. It even has an 
inventory of Timex Sinclair kits, sold pri- 
marily to schools for training in soldering 
skills and basic electronics. 

Zebra Systems uses a variety of micros 
in its business and has seen many changes in 
the personal computer market over the 
years. "People's expectations have 
changed," Newfeld explained. "A light pen 
today has to be really extraordinary or 
people don't have much interest in it." The 
interaction between man and machine has 
changed, too, and the current trend is to- 
ward easy-to-use, point-and-click graphic 
interfaces. The original CoCo Graphics 
Designer, released several years ago, was 
entirely keyboard-driven. It took Newfeld 
and programmer Jeff Street over a year to 
rewrite it to provide the type of interface 
and flexibility users are growing to expect. 

The key to making future graphic inter- 
faces more responsive, says Newfeld, with 
his electrical engineering background, is 
"supporting a precision mouse and generat- 
ing sound without slowing down the 
CoCo." To that end, he is working on a 
CoCo peripheral that contains its own mi- 
croprocessor, and is tentatively dubbed the 
Turbo-Port. 

"We want the CoCo 2 to really sing," he 
says. If CoCo Graphics Designer Plus is 
any indication, the music has already be- 
gun, □ 



May 1 989 THE RAINBOW 111 



Clip Art for Your Creations 



] urn one of (hose pea-pic with absolutely no 
arlislie la I um whatsoever. You know the type 
— can T l draw a straight line wllh a ruler. I was 
absolutely delighted, therefore, when graph- 
its editors began proliferating. With a good 
graph ics program, 1 e. an not on I y d raw su a i ^1 1 1 
lines, bin squares, circles and all sorts of 
ibin^s lhar always eluded me in Ihe ps'tsi. 

For a I ime I was dialed . E^enl 1 1 m I ly A In > ■ a jlz 1 1 , 
j| bftpiatrie appa-rem eIlul Lilill hi\\] a prolan i. 
Allliough J could now- draw (lie basic shapes^ 
patting ill em all together into something thai 
looked like more lhan just a jumble of shapes, 
was still beyond mo. 

Clip art to the rescue! Clip art enables a 
non-art isl such as my.se If (or anyone else, for 
I hat matler) to take tidvantage of pictures 
a I reaily eresi led by someone w bo rea I ly k nows 
how to draw, 

Zchra Syslcms offers three different pic- 
ture disks (sold separately), eaehconlaining 
I'diir toilet;! ions of pielures- The pictures are 
^ lored on disk in a format eonipalihle wiih 

/x\ 1 11 <L ' S (, '{ if "ft { i" r i/j f( ■ iJf v/if.'.'d T pro£Olll. 

Now,, ii certainly makes sense for a tym- 
pany lo.sella prod i n: i ibafs compatible with 
other of its of I cringe and ll i.s no| surprising 
Lh*U Zebra has included a simple conversion 
I iTO^ntEii ib at enafrlus you id convert the pic- 
tures for use with another Zebra product — 
Qrt-'it Graphics Designer Plus. However, Zebra 
has also included conversion! programs lo 
make the pictures compatible with Cotorware's 
CuCft Atfur. CoCo Max $L Cf>Co Max lit and 
Mit.X'iO programs, 

All of ihe conversion pro-grams are ex - 
ireutefy easy so use and arc well-documenli'd 
iLi the manual and onscreen. The conversion 
programs write ihe converted pictures io a 



new disk: Zebra includes: preprinted disk 
labels, which are immensely helpful in keep- 
ing track of your clip art collection. 

Each Picture Disk contains collections til 
pies arcs in tour categories. Each collection 
has 32 pictures in i(, for a tola! of I 28 pictures 
per disk. 

Picture Disk 2 (Picture Disk i has been 
discontinued) includes "Sports/ 1 tL America.'" 
"Party" and "Gffiee" coiled ions. The wide 
variety includes ainletes and sports equip- 
ment; patriotic symbols, cowlioys. Native 
Americans and space vehicles; wedding cakes, 
balloons and party hats: and pencils, phones 
ami paper clips. 

Picture Disk J contains "Religion/' ^AnU 
mals," "Nature" and "Travel" categories. 
You can choose from an amazing array of 
religious artifacts, clergy men and buildings" 
animals from frogs to rhinos, cows lo vul- 
tures: nuls. trees, sunsets and flowers; ships, 
camp fires, i rains, planes and automobiles. 

Picture Disk Jin a holiday disk. Coll eel ion 
I is I dled with seenes of Christinas, includ- 
ing Santa, reindeer. snowmen, Wise: Men and 
elve& rolled ioti 2 covers Jewish holidays, 
with pictures of menorahs. Iatke. torah and 
the Sterol' David. Col Jeer In u 3 covers f-a^ier, 
Thanksgiving, Si, Patrick's Dny and Valen- 
tine's Day. Collection 4 has pk lures for New- 
Year's Day, Independence (Day, Halloween 
and parades. 

All of the pictures were created by profes- 
sional graphic artists, and arc remarkably 
detailed yel simple and elegant. The assort- 
ment of pictures is sure lo provide for every 
Utsie — evert if your favorite animal isn't 
there, your second or third choice almost 
*:<=miiniv will bf! 



I used m variety of pictures from the disks 
with CttOt GfOpfiks Designer Pfus, CoCo 
M,f.\ Hi and Mux-ifh The conversion pro- 
grams gave me no trouble ai all. and ihe labels 
provided with | lit: pi dure disks kepi me from 
getting disorganized r Once convened, the 
pictures can be pulled into any of those 
programs with incredible ease. Tlie docu- 
mentation includes sections on each of the 
programs the pictures can be used with, 
explaining precisely how to import the pic- 
tures into each program, Also included in the 
manual wiili ench disk as a reference sheet 
Hi at illustrates the pictures in each collection. 

I have only iwo minor complaints with 
Zoom's Piattrtr Di.tks. First, I Fie reference 
s heels Ulustraie only 30 pictures in each 
collection. It was quite by accident thin I 
discovered that there are aetuMl$ 32, J don 'I 
know rf this was intensions I, or if (he addi- 
tional pictures were an afterthought subse- 
quent to the completion of the documenta- 
tion. It certainly docsrTl hurt anylhing, but 1 
have a tendency to get nervous when write- 
ups don't accurately reflect reaJity, 

My otherminor gripe is that the conversion 
programs require disk swapping, even if you 
have two disk drives, as [ do, I realise ! can't 
expect much sympathy fordiisone, but I do 
find ii annoy inc. 

Regardless of whether you are a total non- 
artlst as I am, or an accomplished graphics 
designer, if you own any of (he ^upporkd 
graphics programs yon should consider pur- 
chasing one or more of these clip art collec- 
tions. 'They represent high-quality work at an 
eaecHenE price. 



□ 



tioning (left, right or centered), size (one 
of four) and font (any from the designated 
collection) for each line of text. It takes a 
bit of practice to feel comfortable with this 
editor, but all you're editing are 14 lines, 
so it is not a major problem. 

The Preview Sign function enables you 
to see, either actual size or reduced, pre- 
cisely what your finished product will look 
like when printed. This can save lots of 
time and paper if you haven't properly 
aligned the text and pictures, or if the 
desired effect isn't what materialized. 

The Print, Save and Load functions are 
totally straightforward. The only draw- 
back is that the Save must be made to 
Drive 0. No provision was made in the Set 
Up Data Drives function at the main menu 
for specifying which drive should hold 
your finished product. This is rather an- 
noy ing, since the program disk must reside 
in Drive 0 and it is very close to being full 
when you get it. There isn't room for much 
more, so you have to resort to swapping 



disks. I always get snippy when I am 
forced to swap disks after I spent good 
money on a second disk drive specifically 
to avoid swapping! 




The Make Card function works almost 
identically to Make Sign. The basic differ- 
ence is that you create two different pages 
— one for the front of the card and one for 
the inside. There is an additional button, 
Select Page, that allows you to toggle 
between the two while preparing the end 
result. When printing a card, the first page 



is printed upside-down in the upper-left 
quarter of the paper, and the second page is 
printed normally in the bottom right quar- 
ter. By folding the paper in half twice, a 4 , /4- 
by-5Vi inch card is produced. 

The Make Banner function is consid- 
erably simpler than the other two. The 
available buttons are Select Picture, Edit 
Text and Print. You can have one leading 
picture and another picture to follow the 
text. The Edit Text function is identical to 
that in Make Sign and Make Card, and the 
Print function has no hidden complexity. 
There is no provision for saving banners to 
disk, which is reasonable since they are so 
easy to create. 

I made a number of signs, cards and 
banners with CoCo Graphics Designer 
Plus and was thrilled with them all. I was 
also fortunate to be able to try the addi- 
tional font, picture and border disks. The 
variety is awesome, and programs are 
included that will convert the pictures to 
CoCo Max /, //, /// and Max- 10 formats. 



112 THE RAINBOW May 1 989 



CoCo Graphics Designer Plus comes 
with a 63-page users manual, which in- 
cludes extensive appendices, a thorough 
tutorial and a quick reference guide. It is 
clear, easy to follow and complete. It is 
also lavishly illustrated with sample screens 
and contains a glossary that defines terms 
such as "point" and "click." 

CoCo Graphics Designer Plus is a top- 
notch program. The graphics are superb; 
the documentation excellent; the user inter- 
face simple, easy to use and efficient; and 
the price makes it a steal. I thoroughly 
despise reviews that end with "Your soft- 
ware library won't be complete without 
it," but this really is one program that 
everyone can use. 

(Zebra Systems, Inc., 78-06 Jamaica Ave., 
Woodhaven, NY 11421, 718-296-2385; $29.95 
plus $3 S/H; picture disks available at $14.95 
each) 

— Jim Issel 



1 Software 



CoCo 1 , 2 & 3 



Math Tutor- 
Math Practice 
and Educational 
Arcade Action 

Why should students give their teach- 
ers Apples when they can give them a 
CoCo and some educational software to go 
along with it? Tandy's new educational 
program on a ROM pack, Math Tutor, is 
not only great for home use but could also 
enhance an elementary math class. 

I happen to be a serious person and like 
to see computers used for serious pur- 
poses. Education ranks high with me as a 
reason for purchasing and using a com- 
puter. Unfortunately, it ranks low with my 
children. It's hard to tear them away from 
the excitement of Color Baseball and the 
shoot-'em-up action of games like Space 
Assault in order to play some mundane 
educational game. 

I'm not of the opinion that all education 
should be tremendously exciting, but when 
made exciting learning becomes that much 
easier. Most educational math programs 
tend to be monotonous: The user is pre- 
sented with a math problem; he gives the 
answer; the computer rewards him with a 
cheer or a raspberry; the user moves on to 
the next question. The programmers of 
Math Tutor have pretty much stuck to this 
formula, but they have added something 
more exciting called The Math Gallery. 

The Math Gallery combines the action 
of a video game with an educational drill. 
The player stands at a shooting gallery in 



the midway of a carnival. A balloon trav- 
els across the top of a booth while a math 
problem is presented. At the bottom of the 
screen, the player has a gun that follows 
the movement of the balloon. If the player 
answers the question correctly before the 
balloon reaches the other side of the screen, 
the gun fires and the balloon pops. While 
the game is going on, carnival music plays 
in the background. If you haven't been to 
a fair or carnival in years, the music is 
guaranteed to bring on nostalgia. 

Math Tutor not only covers addition, 
subtraction, multiplication and division, 
but it also covers fractions and algebra, 
thus making it more extensive than other 
math programs I've seen. In all of the 
areas, with the exception of algebra, the 
user has the option of choosing compari- 
son problems. These problems require the 
user to determine if two whole numbers or 
fractions are less than, greater than or 
equal to each other. 

There is no multiplication or division in 
either of the fraction or algebra problems. 
However, in order to make the algebra 
problems more difficult, you can choose 
problems that mix addition and subtrac- 
tion. 

Within Math Tutor you can get help in 
two ways. If you are absolutely stumped 
on a problem you can press the ? key and 
the answer will be given to you. There is 
also a built-in scratch pad; you can access 
this at any time by pressing the S key. This 
is especially useful if you are doing diffi- 
cult problems that involve carrying or more 
than one operation. 

There are five levels of play. The higher 
levels increase the range of numbers and 
include negative numbers. In the higher 
levels of division, the answers may have 
remainders; and in the higher levels of 
fractions, the fractions may have different 
denominators. Things can be made even 
more difficult in the shooting gallery by 
increasing the speed at which the balloon 
travels across the screen. 




The user not only has control over the 
levels of difficulty but can set the lesson 
size to 10, 20, 30, 40 or 50 problems. You 
can also choose to have the problems pre- 
sented in either a vertical or a horizontal 



WARGAME 
DESIGNER II 



Introducing this NEW enhanced version of 
our most popular COCO 3 product! 

Here are just a few of the new features; 
Choose from keyboard or joystick control. 
Now you can control every phase of design 
and play by joystick! We've added a new 
enhanced icon design system. Work on new 
icons at 5 times actual size. No more eye 
strain! There's a new terrain modifier menu 
with default values to speed up input. New 
menus, more visual and audio 
enhancements & a super fast screen loader 
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ZULU REVENGE 
ISLAND DOMINATION 
TECH WARS 



ATTACK ON MOSCOW 
DUNGEON WARRIOR 
ORC AMBUSH 
DESERT RATS 
FORT APACHE 
ROTC 



GRIDIRON STRATEGY Sale price at $18 

100% ML football strategy for 1 or 2 players. 
The first & still the best! 

WEEKLY WINNER 2.0 just $15 

The only lotto program we know of that has pro- 
duced winning numbers. 100% ML COCO 2 & 
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CATALOG ON DISK A good investment $3 

Skeptical? See before you buy. Then deduct 
$3.00 from your first order. 

CC3FLAGS A "risky" game. only $21 

Graphics oriented and definately addictive! A 
game of world conquest for 1 to 6 players. 
COCO 3 disk only. 

BLACK GRID $21 

An intriguing graphics puzzel for the COCO 3. 
Find the hidden boxes inside the black grid. 3 
play modes. 

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SPORTSware 

1251 S. Reynolds Road, Suite 414 
Toledo, Ohio 43615 
(419) 389-1515 



May 1 989 THE RAINBOW 113 



format. If you want you can choose both: 
Some of the problems will appear in a 
horizontal format and some in a vertical 
format. At the end of each lesson, you can 
decide whether to repeat the lesson, repeat 
your errors only or go on to the Math 
Gallery. 

Math Tutor is very easy to use. I was 
able to run most of the program without 
using the manual. When I did have to 
consult the manual, I found it very easy to 
understand. For those who have used other 
programs licensed by ZCT Systems to 
Tandy, Math Tutor will be even easier 
because it uses menus and formats that you 
have used in other programs. For example, 
the BREAK key always takes you back to 
the last step. 

An additional feature of Math Tutor is 
the homework option. This is especially 
useful for parents or teachers who want 
their child or student to concentrate on 
certain problems. The adult can create a 
homework assignment and then save it to 
tape for future use. I only wish it were 
possible to print out the homework assign- 
ments. 

Other than the lack of a printer option, 
Math Tutor is a fairly complete program, 
and I have few complaints with it. All 
single-digit numbers have leading zeros, 
which may confuse children at first, but 
my boys quickly adapted to it. One of my 
sons wished that the program could time 
him on his math problems and give the 
percentage of correctly answered prob- 
lems at the end of each lesson. Following 
the Math Gallery you are given the per- 
centage of correct answers given for ques- 
tions asked in the Gallery, but you are not 
given percentages on the questions an- 
swered in your regular lesson. One other 
problem is that there are no answers greater 
than 99. This means that there is no three- 
or four-column math, which my kids are 
already doing in school. However, this 
doesn't mean that Math Tutor is easy. Try 
the Math Gallery in Level 5; I guarantee 
that you won't pop too many balloons — 
especially if you have chosen the high- 
speed option. 

On a scale of 1 to 10, one son rated this 
program a 10, while my wife, my other son 
and I each gave it a 9. If you have elemen- 
tary school-age children and a CoCo with 
at least 1 6K of RAM (a cassette recorder is 
optional), then you should consider 
purchasing Math Tutor. 

(ZCT Systems, dist. by Tandy Corporation, 
1700 One Tandy Center, Fort Worth, TX 
76102; $24.95: Available in Radio Shack 
stores nationwide.) 

— Dan Weaver 

114 THE RAINBOW May 1989 



1 Softwar e 

Ore Ambush — 
A Fight to the Death 

Visit a bookstore and you'll probably 
find a section devoted to novels about 
heroes and heroines battling for good in a 
land of sorcery. On other shelves you 
might find role-playing games that let 
players experience such adventures first- 
hand. Through the magic of computers, 
the pads of paper, charts and dice needed 
to play these games have been eliminated. 

SPORTSware, makers of War game De- 
signer, also produce many different sce- 
narios to complement their program. One 
of these is Ore Ambush, a wargame set in 
the Forest of Lynn, home of evil Ores, 
good humans and elves. The goal is to 
conquer the Ores, who have stolen the 
chest of herbs belonging to the wizard 
Shanndar. Exiting the forest, crossing the 
river, entering the fort and defeating the 
Ores are a few of the many challenges to 
surmount in this game. The program does 
not require the Wargame Designer to run, 
as Ore Ambush is self-contained. How- 
ever, those who own Wargame Designer 
or Wargame Designer II can modify all of 
the existing characteristics of this sce- 
nario. 

Ore Ambush requires a CoCo 3 and one 
disk drive. Like numerous high-resolution 
graphics-oriented programs for the CoCo 
3, an RGB monitor is required to enjoy 
Ore Ambush to the fullest. Many different 
modules for various portions of the game 
are loaded separately from disk. As no 
copy protection is employed, making a 
backup copy of the original is a must. 

Loading the program is simple, requir- 
ing the user only to type RUN"M". The 
main menu then appears with six available 
choices. If you don't own Wargame De- 
signer, you will be able to invoke only two 
of the options: Playing Ore Ambush and 
Exiting to BASIC. The other selections are 
obtained after copying certain modules 
from the Wargame Designer master disk 
to the Ore Ambush disk. 

Play commences after the player desig- 
nates the number of players (one or two) 
and whether the game is new or previously 
saved. The two main modes for the partici- 
pants are movement and combat. The four 
arrow keys as well as the P, O, K and L 
keys control direction. Different terrain 
squares have varying movement costs. Each 
character in the scenario has a certain 
range of movement and attack. This attack 
is not necessarily successful and, as in real 
battle, conditions can hurt the cause in- 



stead of helping. Each turn ends after the 
attack damage has been calculated for 
each piece. If a unit does not attack for two 
turns, a "resting " message flashes on the 
screen, and the strength counter increases 
in value for that character. 

The Ores are normally invisible in the 
one-player mode, but pressing SHIFT-3 
during the human attack mode will put the 
green and black monsters on the screen. 
The first few times you play, you'll find 
this mode very helpful in preventing an 
embarrassing defeat. Selecting a two-player 
game allows only one side's fighters to be 
displayed at a time, with the other player 
knowing the location but not the identity 
of each character. The manual states that 
Ore Ambush was designed to be a one- 
player game. Novices may find it more fun 
to play against a person of similar skill, for 
the computer is a challenging opponent. 

Game play ends when either side has all 
of its units destroyed, the human side 
occupies the treasure chest, or the player 
presses Q to quit playing. The goal is to 
occupy the representation of the treasure 
chest in the upper-right comer of the screen. 
Killing all the Ores is next to impossible, 
and this kind of victory will take much 
more time than usual. At any rate, destroy- 
ing the monsters is not the way to run a 
successful war. 




Even expert gamers will find that the 
computer-controlled Ores can be very tricky, 
so don't count on winning until after you've 
had some practice. The game save feature 
is a necessity because one full game can 
run into many hours (depending on your 
skill). 

The manual to Ore Ambush is relatively 
short and requires only a brief amount of 
study to understand. Hints and tips are 
provided, although only experience will 
allow the player to determine the best 
strategies for victory. Also included is a 
step-by-step process allowing Wargame 
Designer to modify the maps, characters 
and graphics. 

At $15, Ore Ambush is inexpensive for 
a stand-alone game with such attention to 
detail. The RGB graphics are very good, 
with a fair amount of detail and razor 
sharpness. The composite screen, on the 



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n/21 6" Line Feeds, Absolute or Relative Vert. & Horz. Tabs, Left, 
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r extra durability. 

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Type Selection/Tutorial 

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ods to incorporate them into your 
programs. 

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to printer 8"x11" hardcopy. Black/white, white/ 
black or grey level shading for color. 

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OtHer Your System Today... Call (513) 885-5999 



DAYTON ASSOCIATES 



of W.R. 
Hall 



INC. 



9644 Quailwood Trail • Spring Valley, Ohio 45370 

(513) 885-5999 



Visa & Master accepted within 

the continental U.S. 

Ohio residents add 6% sales tax 

COD add $3.00 

Shipping charges to Canada, P.R., HI, AK, APO, FPO 
are double. Triple charge to all other countries. 




Submitting 

Material 
To Rainbow 



Contributions to the rainbow 
are welcome from everyone. We 
like to run a variety of programs 
that are useful/helpful/fun for 
other CoCo owners. 

WHAT TO WRITE: We are inter- 
ested in what you may wish to tell 
ou r readers. We accept for consid- 
eration anything that is well- 
written and has a practical appli- 
cation for the Tandy Color Com- 
puter. If it interests you, it will 
probably interest lots of others. 
However, we vastly prefer articles 
with accompanying programs 
which can be entered and run. The 
more unique the idea, the more the 
appeal. We have a continuing need 
for short articles with short list- 
ings. These are especially appeal- 
ing to our many beginners. 

FORMAT: Program submis- 
sions must be on tape or disk, and 
it is best to make several saves, at 
least one of them in ASCII format. 
We're sorry, but we do not have 
time to key in programs and debug 
our typing errors. All programs 
should be supported by some ev 
itorial commentary explaining 
how the program works. We also 
prefer that editorial copy be in- 
cluded on the tape or disk using 
any of the word processors cur- 
rently available for the Color Com- 
puter. Also, please include a 
double-spaced printout of your 
editorial material and program 
listing. Do not send text in all 
capital letters; use upper- and 
lowercase. 

COMPENSATION: We do pay 
for submissions, based on a 
number of criteria. Those wishing 
remuneration should so state 
when making submissions. 

For the benefit of those who 
wish more detailed information on 
making submissions, please send 
a self-addressed, stamped enve- 
lope (SASE) to: Submission 
Guidelines, the rainbow, The Fal- 
soft Building, P.O. Box 385, Pros- 
pect, KY 40059. We will send you 
comprehensive guidelines. 

Please do not submit material 
currently submitted to another 
publication. 




other hand, does not do justice to the game. 
My only complaints are with the speed in 
loading and operation. It seems to take 
forever for your turn to come up. 

SPORTSware deserves congratulations 
for filling a demand in the CoCo 
Community. Ore Ambush is a program 
that will provide many hours of entertain- 
ment, and it won't catch dust on the shelf. 

(SPORTSware, 1251 S. Reynolds Road, Suite 
414, Toledo, OH 43615, 419-389-1515; $15) 

—Fred A. Miller 



1 Softwar e 



CoCo 1 , 2 & 3 



Revenge 
of the Germs — 
What Your Mother 
Never Told You! 



Do you remember your mother telling 
you to wash your hands, leave the candy 
on the sidewalk, and to wipe your nose on 
a tissue, not your sleeve, so you wouldn't 
"get germs"? And didn't you think that 
germs spread by sort of cloning them- 
selves? And I bet you thought germs were 
little microscopic things, right? 

Revenge of the Germs is a graphics 
Adventure game (although when I saw the 
title I figured it for an arcade game or anti- 
virus program for sure) that will change 
how you look at germs from now on. 

After my precautionary backup, I booted 
the game. I got to the part where it asked 
"Read the objective?" (the background 
info on the game) and got stuck. I pushed 
every key on the keyboard and got no 
response. Hmmmm. OK, I can't review a 
game I can't get into, can I? I sent off a 
note to the author, who called me with the 
fix, and he promised to fix his master 
copies also. T found this author to be like 
most, willing to go the extra mile with 
support. Now, onto the game! 

I seem to be in a hospital bed. I can see 
my feet sticking out, anyway. What in 
Sam Hill happened? The door to my room 
is trashed. Guess I'd better get up and see 
what happened here. 

Wandering through the hospital, I didn't 
find anybody around and the doors were 
locked. What I did find was this gigantic 
blob, with hands, feet and head. That's a 
germ, and it's too big to fit through the 
door, but it seems to keep finding me — 
usually if I happen to stay in a room too 
long. It's definitely out to get me. The 
germ is a random feature, and, oh yes, it 



can kill you! I have to get out of here, but 
I have to kill some of them on my way. 
(Trust me! Hitting them does not work!) 

The graphics are well done, with detail. 
The objects disappear as you take them 
and reappear if you drop them. This hospi- 
tal comes complete with lobby, lab, wait- 
ing room and operating room, along with 
some rooms a hospital patient normally 
doesn 't see. Did I mention that the elevator 
disappears as soon as you step off? 

The game accepts most standard com- 
mands, except for the USE and HELP 
commands. It also incorporates a few words 
that weren't in my first-grade reading book. 
Since you won't be able to finish this game 
in one sitting, you'll be able to use the 
SAVE and LOAD features that are included. 

When I play Adventure games, I have 
this habit of picking up every object I can, 
and I absolutely hate to drop anything 
because you never know if you're going to 
need it later. This game accommodates my 
habit. You should see how much stuff you 
can carry! And for those who don't know 
which way is north, the directions in this 
game are left, right, forward and back. The 
only thing I really found lacking in it was 
a SCORE command. I like to gauge my 
progress by the points I have accumulated. 
For those of you who like to be surprised, 
the lack of a score won't bother you. 

Included with Revenge of the Germs 
are three pages of very complete instruc- 
tions. The instructions cover startup of the 
game, making backups, sample text, and 
the conditional guarantee from The Soft- 
ware Systems. It's recommended for ages 
10 and up, and I suspect that's because it 
requires some logical thought and creativ- 
ity to solve. If you happen to get stuck 
while playing the game, just grab a couple 
of friends or family members. You'll get 
plenty of suggestions. 




Revenge of the Germs will work on 
your Color Computer 1, 2 or 3. A single 
disk drive is also required. The game fits 
on one disk, so there is no disk-swapping. 
If your original disk doesn't work for some 
reason, send it with $1 for handling charges 
back to The Software Systems for a re- 
placement. 

I really enjoyed this game. I'm a sucker 



116 THE RAINBOW May 1 989 



for graphics, and I always get anxious to 
see "the next scene." This game didn't 
disappoint me in that respect. Once I 
remembered a few basic rules about ad- 
venturing, I was able to solve it. At $9.95, 
it's a real bargain, affordable even on a 
paper carrier's salary. Also, while you're 
killing germs, you'll be saving not only 
yourself but also real beasties, because 25 
percent of all profits from the game will be 
donated to the Nature Conservancy. I 
commend the author for this concern. And 
his donations. 

(The Software Systems, 5576 Oak Vista Drive, 
Cincinnati, OH 45227, 513-561-1272; $9.95: 
■ ri*vww lor this eompaw 




pcsiring til THE RAINBOW.) 



— Gail Allore 



CoCo3 



Printer Drivers 
for Home Publisher- 
More Support 
for the OS-9 
Desktop Publisher 

Did you buy the Home Publisher OS-9 
desktop publishing program from Radio 
Shack only to find that you would have to 
purchase a new printer just to get a hard 
copy of your efforts — Tandy did not 
provide drivers for many of its own print- 
ers. And isn't that the whole point of 
desktop publishing — making printouts? 

Fortunately, Tandy later provided driv- 
ers for the DMP printers free for the asking 
to registered Home Publisher users. 

I loved Home Publisher so much that I 
went out and bought a new Star NX 1000 
Rainbow color printer, which was compat- 
ible. Having purchased three printers over 
the years from Radio Shack, I too was 
disappointed that Home Publisher did not 
support the CGP-220 color printer. Well, 
wish no more, for Home Publisher has new 
drivers for seven popular printers. Please 
note that the disk of add-on drivers is an 
Express Order item and may not be stocked 
by your local Radio Shack store. (Also, 
note that Home Publisher is for the CoCo 
3 with a disk drive and a compatible printer.) 

While I have only one printer supported 
by this package of printer drivers, I will 
note for you the special considerations you 
should be aware of from the instructions 
included. Although the documentation is 
only three pages of information, it seems 
to be complete and all that is needed. The 
Home Publisher add-on diskette includes 



drivers for these printers: Tandy CGP-220 
and DMP-1 10, C.Itoh 8510, Epson MX- 
80, Okidata 20, Panasonic KX-P1090 and 
Star SG- 10. 

The instructions indicate that no spe- 
cial considerations need to be made for the 
C.Itoh 85 10, Okidata 20 and the Panasonic 
KX-P1090. If you are using the Epson 
MX-80, the printout will be only 5!4 inches 
wide. The reason for the narrow printout is 
the 960-dot line of this printer. For the Star 
SG-10, DIP switch settings are noted. 

Two drivers are included for the DMP- 
1 10 because a full-screen printout is 1 inch 
longer than will fit on standard paper. 
DMP-1 10N is the full-screen version, and 
several options are available to you. You 
could have it overlap two pages of stan- 
dard paper, use continuous paper or load 
your printer with a sheet of 14-inch paper 
to avoid using two sheets. The second 
driver for the DMP- 1 10 is the DMP-1 10S y 
which will truncate the bottom 10 percent 
of the page so that it will fit entirely on a 
single page of standard paper. 

The only special consideration for the 
CGP-220 is that if you want to use the 
printed borders you should set the left and 
right margins to .09. This allows eight dots 
plus one blank dot for the border pattern on 
each side. If you think I saved the best for 
last, you are right! If you read the first line 
of info for the CGP-220 where it says 
"will only print in black and white," don't 
believe it! If you want the page to print in 
other than black, even in multi-color — you 
can! 

How to Get Color on the CGP-220 

To print in a color other than black, just 
send the color commands to the printer 
using the OS-9 display command (yes, 
it is in there and available for you to use) 
before starting Home Publisher for print- 
ing; the software will not reset the printer 
to black. 

To print the page using green, enter 
display IB 54 32 >/P from the OS- 
9 prompt and press ENTER. Then start up 
Home Publisher as usual. When you print 
the page it will be printed in green and 
white. To print in another color just change 
the 32 in the display command to the 
Hex value of the color you want. For a 
multi-color page you will have to do a 
little more work and planning. 

If you only want the border a different 
color, this is how it's done. First, set the 
printer with the border color from OS-9 
using the di spl ay command. Next, print 
a blank page from Home Publisher, select- 
ing the desired border pattern. Then exit to 
OS-9 and set the color for the rest of the 
document. Bring up Home Publisher again, 
then load/create the page; reset the paper 




About 
Your 
Subscription 



Your copy of the rainbow is 
sent second class mail. You 
must notify usof a new address 
when you move. Notification 
should reach us no later than 
the 15th of the month prior to 
the month in which you change 
your address. Sorry, we cannot 
be responsible for sending 
another copy when you fail to 
notify us. 

Your mailing label also 
shows an account number and 
the subscription expiration 
date. Please indicate this ac- 
count number when renewing 
or corresponding with us. It 
will help us help you better and 
faster. 

For Canadian and othernon- 
U.S. subscribers, there may be 
a mailing address shown that is 
different from our editorial of- 
fice address. Do not send any 
correspondence to that mail- 
ing address. Send it to our edi- 
torial offices at Falsoft, lnc M 
The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 
385, Prospect, KY 40059. This 
applies to everyone except 
those whose subscriptions are 
through our distributor in Aus- 
tralia. 




May 1 989 THE RAINBOW 11 7 



in the printer back to the top of the page 
before printing the second color. 

The easiest way for me to realign the 
paper for the second color was to tear the 
roll paper off even with the tear bar on the 
printer. When I said multi-color that's just 
what I meant! 

To print a page in more colors you 
would create a separate page for each 
color, saving each of them in a separate 
file. To print the page you have to set the 
print color from OS-9, restart Home Pub- 
lisher , and load and print the color, repeat- 
ing this for each color until your master- 
piece is done. It's a lot easier than it sounds 
— try it! If you have a color printer other 
than the CGP-220, you could do it the 
same way: just send the color commands 
for the printer you are using to get the same 
results (using the proper printer driver for 
the printer you are using). For those of you 
who do not have a color printer but have 
different color ribbons, you could merely 
change the ribbon for the printing of each 
color. 

I hope this information will be of help 
to you even if you do not need the drivers 
on this disk. Home Publisher is a very 
good system made even better with this 
add-on set of printer drivers. Personally, I 
feel that users should not have to pay 20 
bucks extra to get drivers that should have 
been in the original package. But it's nice 
that Tandy got around to providing them. 

(Tandy Corporation, 1700 One Tandy Cen- 
ter, Fort Worth, TX 76102; $19.95: Avail- 
able in Radio Shack stores nationwide, Cat. 
No. 90-0911) 

—J.D.Walker 




HAWKSoft's 
Keyboard Extender — 
Expand Your CoCo's 
Horizons 

I'm extremely fortunate to have my 
CoCo on its own table. I have almost 
enough room for everything, and I'm able 
to type pretty much as my typing instructor 
in high school taught me. 

I also know that not everyone is as 
fortunate as I am. Your computer table 
may be too small or cluttered. If it is, I bet 
that you 've wished you could arrange your 
equipment more comfortably for the times 
when you type in those long BASIC list- 
ings from THE RAINBOW. There may be 
some hope for you. 

118 THE RAINBOW May 1989 



HAWKSoft can provide you with a 
keyboard cable that allows you to remove 
the keyboard from the CoCo case and use 
it within a 5-foot radius. You could put the 
keyboard in your lap, or you could put it on 
the computer table, leaving the CoCo on 
the floor. Or you could try another ar- 
rangement. Of course, all this freedom 
comes at a price, and I don't mean money 
— you have to open your CoCo. The dreaded 
warranty seal needs to be violated! 

Fortunately, the procedure to install the 
keyboard cable is fairly straightforward. If 
you are familiar with the operation of a 
screwdriver, you probably won't have too 
much trouble. And if you do, you can give 
the company a call. They were friendly 
when I called for a little advice. The single 
sheet of instructions was a little confusing. 
I talked to Chris Hawks of HAWKSoft and 
he assured me he would try to make them 
a little clearer, maybe even adding a dia- 
gram or two. 

Opening the case is simple: Remove six 
screws from the bottom of the computer 
case (the sixth screw is under the warranty 
label, which means you have to poke a 
hole through it to get this screw out). After 
vou lift the lid from the CoCo and its 
innards are exposed, you unplug the key- 
board cable. Then you carefully insert the 
leading edge of the dual in-line plug into 
the keyboard connector. Stretch out the 5- 
foot extender cable and plug the keyboard 
into the card edge connector. Put every- 
thing back together on the CoCo and ex- 
tend your reach. 

If you are worried about damaging your 
keyboard, don't be. With a little care, the 
keyboard should last just as long out of the 
computer case as in it. Tandy enclosed it in 
a protective case. The cable itself is a flat 
ribbon cable that, with a little care, should 
last a long time. In fact, the whole key- 
board cable assembly is made from indus- 
trial-grade parts. There is gold plating on 
the connectors, which means reliability. 
This cable can be used on any CoCo 2 or 3, 
and the sample I received was 5!/2 feet long. 

A few things need to be considered 
before installing this product. Once the 
keyboard is removed from the CoCo, all 
its guts are exposed, and they are very 
fragile. The parts are especially sensitive 
to static electricity and loose paper clips, 
etc. It would be wise to cover the hole with 
something or to buy a spare keyboard to 
use with the extender cable. The mylar 
connector on the keyboard scratches eas- 
ily, a fact that's mentioned in the manual 
but cannot be emphasized enough: You 
should be extremely careful not to damage 
this cable, or you will be buying yourself a 
new keyboard. 

One complaint I have with HAWKSoft's 



Keyboard Extender is an unused row of 
pins on the plug that goes into the key- 
board connector. This makes the plug sit at 
an angle on top of several other compo- 
nents near the connector. I think cutting 
off the unused row of pins would eliminate 
any potential problems. Another complaint 
I had was with the instructions, but Mr. 
Hawks assured me he will work on them. 
They were adequate for a hardware hacker, 
but I think they would have confused the 
neophyte. [Chris Hawkes reported that he 
has rewritten the instructions, and also that 
he has cut off the unused row of pins on the 
plug of his unsold cables.] 

Should you buy this product? If you 
have a need to move your keyboard around, 
this well-made extender cable will do the 
job nicely for you. 

(HAWKSoft, P.O. Box 7112, Elgin, IL 60121, 
312-742-3084; $25) 

— C.L. Pilipauskas 



Book 1 

BASIC Unravelled 
Series — 

Learning the Ropes 

Imagine having complete control over 
the BASIC in your Color Computer, know- 
ing the intricacies of its operation at every 
point as it runs your programs. Now imag- 
ine being able to change BASIC to work as 
you want it to, adding and improving 
commands as you desire, and being able to 
easily interface your own machine lan- 
guage routines with BASIC to perform 
special functions. 

With the BASIC Unravelled series these 
things don't have to be limited to your 
imagination. BASIC Unravelled is a three- 
part series containing commented source 
code (assembly language code used to 
create machine language programs) of all 
of the ROMs in the Color Computers 1 , 2 
and 3. This is a disassembly of all the 
instructions the CoCo uses to operate Color 
BASIC, Extended Color BASIC and Su- 
per Extended BASIC. These disassem- 
blies are extremely well-commented and 
include meaningful labels. 

The three books in the series are %Vi by 
1 1 inches, softbound and average 162 pages 
each. I was sent the newest versions of 
each of the books, and they look great. 
These latest publications contain some 
additional information not available in the 
older ones and have crisp tables and a 
typeface I really like. 



The Rainbow Bookshelf 



Fill out your CoCo library 
with these selections 



The Complete Rainbow Guide to OS-9 

Authors Dale Puckett and Peter Dibble show how to take 
advantage of OS-9's multitasking and multiuser features. An easy- 
to-read, step-by-step guide packed with hints, tips, tutorials and free 
software in the form of program listings. 
Book $19.95, Disk Package $31 (2 disks, book not included) 



The Rainbow Book of Simulations 

20 award-winning entries from THE RAINBOW'S first Simulations 
contest. You are a Civil War Commander, an air traffic controller, 
a civil defense coordinator, or a scientist on Mars . , . your wits are 
on the line. 

Book $9.95, Tape $9.95 



The Complete Rainbow Guide to OS-9 Level II 
Vol. I: A Beginners Guide to Windows 

Puckett and Dibble have done it again! They uncover the 
mysteries of the new windowing environment and demonstrate 
clever new applications. More hints, tips and plenty of program 
listings. Book $19.95, Disk $19.95 

The Rainbow Introductory Guide to Statistics 

Dr. Michael Piog and Dr. Norman Stenzel give a solid introduction 
to the realm of statistical processes and thinking for both the 
beginner and the professional. (80-column printer required.) 
Book $6.95, Tape or Disk $5.95, Package $1 1 .95 

The First Rainbow Book of Adventures 

Contains 14 winning programs from our first Adventure contest. 
Includes Sir Randolph of the Moors* Horror House, One Room, Dr. 
Avaloe and more. Plus hints, tips on solving Adventures. 
Book $3.50, Tape $3.50 

The Second Rainbow Book of Adventures 

Featuring 24 of the most challenging Adventure games ever 
compiled. Meet the Beatles and battle the Blue Meanies, find a 
hidden fortune, or win the heart of a mysterious princess. Ring 
Quest, Secret Agent Man, Dark Castle, Curse of Karos and more! 
Book $13.95, Tape $13.95 

The Third Rainbow Book of Adventures 

The excitement continues with 19 new Adventures. Discover 
backstage intrigue at the London Theatre, attempt a daring space 
rescue, or defeat evil in the year 2091 as a genetic android. Evil 
Crypt, Spymaster, Time Machine, The Amulet, and that's only the 
beginning! Book $11.95, Tape $9.95, Two-Disk Set $14.95 

The Fourth Rainbow Book of Adventures 

Fourteen fascinating new Adventures from the winners of our 
fourth Adventure competition. Rely on your wits to escape a hostile 
military installation, try to stop the Nazi plan to invade Great Britain, 
manage to reinstate our defense system before the enemy launches 
a massive missile attack, and more! 
Book $10.95, Tape $9.95, Two-Disk Set $14.95 



The Second Rainbow Book of Simulations 

The 1 6 winners from our second Simulations contest. Fly through 
dense African jungle, bull your way down Wall Street, lead a bomb 
squad, or try your hand at Olympic events. Test your skills and 
talents. Book $9.95, Tape $9.95, Disk $10.95 



I 
| 



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Please send me: 

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□ Rainbow Simulations Tape 

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□ Second Rainbow Simulations Tape 

□ Second Rainbow Simulations Disk 

□ The Complete Rainbow Guide to 0S-9 (book only) 

□ Rainbow Guide to OS-9 Disk Package {2 disks) 

□ The Windows & Applications Disk for 

The Complete Rainbow Guide to 0S-9 Level II, Vol. I 

□ The Rainbow Book of Adventures (first) 

□ Rainbow Adventures Tape (first) 

□ The Second Rainbow Book of Adventures 

□ Second Rainbow Adventures Tape 

□ The Third Rainbow Book of Adventures 

□ Third Adventures Tape 

□ Third Adventures Disk Set (2 disks) 

□ The Fourth Rainbow Book of Adventures 

□ Fourth Adventures Tape 

□ Fourth Adventures Disk Set (2 disks) 

□ Introductory Guide to Statistics 

□ Guide to Statistics Tape or Disk (indicate choice) 

□ Guide to Statistics Package (indicate choice of tape or disk) 
*Add $2 per book Shipping and Handling in U.S. 
'Outside U.S., add $4 per book 

*Kentucky residents add 5% sales tax 



$ 9.95 
$ 9.95 . 
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$31.00 

$19.95 
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(Allow 6 to 8 weeks for delivery) 



Total 



I Mail to: Rainbow Bookshelf, The Faisoft Building, P.O. Box 385, 
I Prospect, KY 40059 

I To order by phone (credit card orders only) call (800) 847- 
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] 228-4492. 

I Please note; The tapes and disks offered by The Rainbow Bookshelf are not stand-alone products. 
| That is, they are intended to be an adjunct and complement to the books. Even if you buy the tape 
| or disk, you will still need the appropriate book. OS-9® is a registered trademark of the Microware 



I 



Systems Corporation. 



The excitement continues! 



e 




oo 



t 



e 



Fourteen fascinating new Adventures from the winners of our fourth Adventure competition. Rely on your wits 
to escape a hostile military installation, try to stop the Nazi plan to invade Great Britain, or manage to reinstate 
our defense system before the enemy launches a massive missile attack — and that's only the beginning! 

The Park of Mystery — You overhear a gang of robbers 
discussing where they've hidden their loot. Can you find 
it — and battle greed and confusion at the same time? 

Superspy — You awaken from a horrifying nightmare 
of chases, inexplicable scenery changes and sickening 
f reefalls into space. Or was it a dream? You be the judge 
— and determine your own fate! 

Term Paper — A real nightmare: Someone's stolen your 
freshman midterm paper and hidden its pages all over 
CoCo State's campus. Are you smart enough to find 
them before you miss the due date and flunk the 
course? 



House Adventure — Try to find your way out of a 
mysterious abandoned house that keeps sprouting new 
rooms just as you think you've found an exit. 

Life: An Everyday Adventure — Just getting up in the 
morning in time to do last-minute chores before 
catching a plane to a family reunion proves you don't 
have to leave home to find adventure. 

The Earth's Foundations — A mysterious maze inside 
a deep crevice near your village is having a devastating 
effect on the entire area. You've been chosen to 
investigate, and promised great riches — if you survive! 



Experience other traditional and contemporary challenges from these winning authors: Mike Anderson, Tio 
Babich, David Bartmess, Stephen Berry, Eugene Carver, Charles Farris, Jeff Hillison, Jeff Johnson, Richard 
Kottke, Ken Lie, Andre Needham, Fred Provoncha, Paul Ruby Jr. and Eric Santanen. 



The Fourth Rainbow Book of 
Adventures is only $10.95! 

Tape $9.95, Two-Disk Set $14.95 



The tape and disks are adjuncts and complements to the book; the book is necessary 
for introductory material and loading Instructions; 



r 

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n 
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Please send me: 

The Fourth Rainbow Book of Adventures $10.95* 
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I U.S. add $4 per book (U.S. currency only). Kentucky residents add 5% 
1 sales tax. In order to hold down costs, we do not bill. Please allow 6-8 
I weeks for delivery. 

To order by phone (credit card orders only), call (800) 847-0309, 8 a.m. 
J to 5 p.m. EST. For other inquiries, call (502) 228-4492. 

u--— --- ----- ----- 




Before I go any further, let me mention 
that these books are not for everyone. The 
best use of them can be made by someone 
who understands assembly language on 
the CoCo. I would recommend at least a 
general knowledge of assembly, but it 
isn't necessary for you to actually be a 
hard-core assembly language programmer. 
These books are not instruction manuals 
for programming, but rather are reference 
manuals. And they are extremely useful 
reference manuals. 

Each of the books contains not only the 
disassemblies but also specific informa- 
tion dealing with certain features of BA- 
SIC that the particular book covers. The 
first book, Extended Color BASIC Unrav- 
elled, covers both Color BASIC and Ex- 
tended Color BASIC (which were joined 
into one chip on the CoCo 3). It contains 
the source listings for both of those BA- 
SICS. Also covered are the various 
"Equates" and BASIC'S direct page, inter- 
rupt vector tables, command interpreta- 
tion tables, RAM vectors, and variables 
that BASIC uses. In the beginning of the 
book is a general description of how the 
BASIC interpreter works and how vari- 
ables are stored. Several ROM routine 
entry points are listed, along with the reg- 
isters that are affected by them. Also shown 
are the changes made to Color BASIC 1 .2 
and Extended BASIC 1.1 when the CoCo 
3 powers up. Some things the new version 
doesn't have are the differences among 
Color BASIC 1.0, 1.1 and 1 .2, and also the 
differences between Extended Color BASIC 
1 .0 and 1,1. Those with the older versions 
will find some anomalies in this new book. 

The second book is Disk BASIC Unrav- 
elled, It covers Disk BASIC for all ver- 
sions of the CoCo and even has separate 
disassemblies for Disk BASIC 1 .0 and 1.1, 
making it much easier to follow them than 
to check a listing of the differences. This 
book also explains how the FCB (File 
Control Block) of Disk BASIC is set up, 
and it offers details of the FAT (File Allo- 
cation Table), the way the directory is 
organized, and on communication with 
the floppy disk controller. It also contains 
a listing of the direct page and variables. 

The last book, Super Extended BASIC 
Unravelled, deals with the new BASIC of 
the CoCo 3. The disassembly in this book 
is especially well-communicated and was 
very understandable. Some of the addi- 
tional information in this book deals with 
the hardware differences between the CoCo 
3 and the earlier CoCos, the Memory 
Management Unit, super high-resolution 
graphics (including color generation and 
palette use), new CoCo 3 interrupts, and a 
chart showing the equivalent colors be- 
tween composite and RGB monitors. 



The possibilities these books present 
are almost limitless. Just by looking at the 
direct-page variables, you can see hun- 
dreds of peeks and pokes to monitor and 
alter BASIC. Knowing what BASIC is 
doing and when it is doing it can open all 
kinds of areas in your programs. When I 
was working on a remote terminal driver 
program (which is similar to REMOTE 2 
but uses the RS 232 pack) for my BBS, I 
was able to incorporate many extremely 
useful features into it by referring to these 
books. Assembly language programmers 
have a huge source for information on how 
certain functions can be performed, and 
this programming information can be in- 
valuable. 

The books are available separately for 
$39.95, $19.95 and $24.95 for Extended 
Color BASIC Unravelled, Disk BASIC Un- 
ravelled and Super Extended BASIC Un- 
ravelled, respectively. Or, you can buy the 
first two for $49.95 or all three for $59.95. 

These books have been called "defini- 
tive" by a well-known CoCo programmer, 
I say they are that and more. 

(Microcom Software, 2900 Monroe Ave., 
Rochester, NY 14618, 716-383-8830; $59.95 
for the set) 

— Michael G. Toepke 



1 H ardwar e 1 

DS-69B Digisector— 
Capture Video 
Images 

The Micro Works DS-69 Digisector 
was first introduced in 1 984, making it one 
of the first video digitizers to become 
available for the Color Computer. In the 
nearly five years that the Digisector has 
been on the market it has been updated 
twice, first to the DS-69A and then to the 
current DS-69B; the software has been 
updated several times, and is now at Ver- 
sion 3.3 — Micro Works calls it III.III! By 
any standard, the Digisector is still holding 
its end up and remains one of the best 
choices in its field. 

The Digisector itself is a cartridge that 
goes in one slot of the Multi-Pak Interface 
or a PBJ C-C Bus. The only control is for 
width; all other adjustments are handled 
by the C-See software. The video input 
takes the signals put out by TV cameras 
(black-and-white or color, including most 
camcorders), VCRs, videodisc players and 
other video sources. There is a filter to 
remove the color "subcarrier" signal so 



that it won't interfere with the digitizer's 
operation. 

Once you've run the setup program to 
specify your system (a CoCo 1 , 2 or 3 can 
be used), printer and expansion bus, you 
just RUN "C-SEE" to start the program. 
From this point you can run the program 
two ways — either using the keyboard, or 
with a joystick or Color Mouse. Each 
option on the main menu has a letter; each 
option on the submenus is numbered. So, 
to print a 16-level image you'd press P 
(Printer menu) and then 2. With the joys- 
tick you'd move a black bar to the printer 
entry, press the firebutton, then go to the 
Print 16 level entry and fire again. The 
joystick lets you work the Digisector from 
behind the TV camera, which should save 
quite a bit of running back and forth. 

Pressing G will start the fast five-level 
scan, which uses the 256-by-192 graphics 
mode but scans a 128-by-128 image; you'll 
see the output of your camera (or what- 
ever) on the CoCo screen. At this point 
there are two ways to adjust the picture; 
you can either adjust brightness and con- 
trast individually, or you can adjust con- 
trast (with C-See taking care of the bright- 
ness) and then play with the vertical and 
horizontal dithering to get the best results 
before saving the picture file. 

The DS-69B 's major attraction to many 
users (including me) is its 16-level capa- 
bility; you can grab an image at either 1 28- 
by- 1 28 or 256-by-256 resolution, save it to 
disk and print it on a variety of printers. 
These include Tandy's DMP- 100, 105, 
120, 200, 400 and 500 as well as Epson, 
Star Micronics and other dot-matrix print- 
ers. 

The 1 6-level mode is almost as easy to 
use as the five-level; you get a fast scan 
screen and set the brightness and contrast, 
then press the ENTER key or firebutton to 
start the scan. On the CoCo 1 or 2 you'll 
then see a five- level dithered picture; on 
the CoCo 3 you'll get a much better dis- 
play using the 3's gray-scale capabilities 
along with some dithering. (This display 
will be quite a bit taller than usual; an RGB 
monitor should be able to handle it with no 
difficulty, but some TV sets may cut it off 
at the top or bottom.) There's also a 16- 
color mode available, which produces a 
rather bizarre effect but is actually useful 
for gray-scale differentiation; similar tech- 
niques are used for weather radar, satellite 
photos and medical imaging systems. 

There's a catch to the 16-level capture 
modes; they're slow. The 256-by-256 mode 
takes 15 seconds to scan the image; the 
1 28-by- 1 28 mode takes three seconds, and 
your subject must be absolutely motion- 
less during this period. This makes the 
Digisector more suited to use with a cam- 



May 1989 THE RAINBOW 121 



era than for grabbing frames from TV 
programs. If you want to use a VCR to 
display still frames, it has to be capable of 
doing it without any noise or sync prob- 
lems; if your still picture jiggles up and 
down the screen, or if you see noise bars, 
the Digisector will be unable to handle it 
because it deals with the video signal much 
differently than a TV set does. (If you have 
a LaserVision player, the "CAV" discs 
that play for 30 minutes on a side will 
provide good freeze frames.) 

The 1 6-level pictures print very nicely 
on most printers; the 256-by-256 mode 
provides especially good results. The only 
difficulty here (a common one with pro- 
grams that print graphics) is that you will 
need a fresh ribbon to get a good result in 
dark areas; if the ribbon is somewhat worn 
you'll get a washed-out picture. The heavy 
printing load also wears out ribbons rather 
quickly, simply because of the high den- 
sity involved. 

Overall, the DS-69B Digisector is a 
winner in its field and still the champion in 
the CoCo frame-grabber business. 

(The Micro Works, P.O. Box 1110, Del Mar, 
CA 92014, 619-942-2400; $149.95) 

—Ed Ellers 

1 Software CoCo3 1 

Dino DataBase — 
Yabba Dabba Doo, 
Fred and Dino, Too 

Well, maybe only Dino and a few of his 
buddies, cousins, aunts and uncles, etc. 
Dino DataBase is a disk-based database 
containing all the classified types of dino- 
saurs (193) and information on how each 
name is pronounced (like a dictionary list- 
ing, and it includes the Latin meaning of 
the name), the dinosaur's order and fam- 
ily, the time period in which it lived, two 
or three places where it was discovered 
(shown on a graphic world map), its length 
from head to tail, and to top it off, a 
"picture" of the animal. 

Dino DataBase is a static database in 
that you cannot add or delete entries, but 
since it covers all the known classifica- 
tions of dinosaurs it should not become 
outdated — barring some new discovery. 
It works on the Color Computer 3 with at 
least one disk drive. 

Getting started is as easy as turning on 
the machine, slipping the disk into Drive 0 
and typing RUN"D". You will be asked if 
you are using an RGB or composite moni- 



tor or TV, and the introductory screen will 
appear. 

The screen is divided into four "win- 
dows," each of which holds some type of 
information on the current dinosaur. The 
upper-left window lists the name of the 
dinosaur and its correct pronunciation, 
followed by the Latin meaning of its name. 
This is interesting because many times 
you can look at the picture and see how the 
dinosaur got its name. For example, Had- 
rosaurus means "big lizard." It looks like 
a lizard and is 30 feet long (that's big in 
my book). 

Following next are the animal's order 
and family. The manual devotes two pages 
to talking about how classifications are 
made, making it as educational as the 
program itself. Next, the listing gives the 
time period in which the animal lived, 
such as the Late Triassic. A simple time- 
line would help immensely. (I had a chance 
to talk to the programmer of Dino Data- 
Base, and he said he is considering adding 
a timeline to the manual.) 

The last two pieces of information tell 
two places the dinosaur was discovered 
and its length in feet. The upper-right 
window shows a line drawing of the dino- 
saur. 

The lower-left window lists other dino- 
saurs related (in the same family) to the 
current dinosaur. The "main" dinosaur of 
the family is highlighted. Through experi- 
mentation it seems that the "main" dino- 
saurs are the only graphic entries in the 
database. The lower-right window displays 
a world map with crosses to indicate the 
two locations where the dinosaurs were 
found. The layout of the windows is pleas- 
ing and consistent, so younger users will 
always know where to find specific infor- 
mation. 

The commands are listed onscreen in a 
pull-down menu. Pressing any key will 
page a cursor through the seven com- 
mands. You can "Shut" the pull-down 
menu off to see the full screen. "Next" and 
"Back" page through the database, for- 
ward and backward, respectively. "Help" 
explains the commands in the pull-down 
window, and "Quit" exits to BASIC. 

The meat of the program lies in the 
"Find" and "View" commands. Find 
searches for a specific dinosaur. If the 
correct spelling is not known, the first two 
or three letters will get you close. If you 
don't get the desired dinosaur right away, 
you can type in the first four letters and 
search the database again. After finding 
the dinosaur you want, you can go to the 
View screen to see the entry's informa- 
tion. My only suggestion here is that I 
would like to see the database alphabet- 
ized. This would allow me to type in the 



first three letters, then page forward or 
backward, alphabetically, to find the spe- 
cific dinosaur I am looking for rather than 
struggling with a fourth letter. For those of 
us who have trouble spelling, the manual 
provides a list of all dinosaurs in the data- 
base. 

The View command works like Find, 

H . . ♦ Not only does Dino 
DataBase teach students 
about dinosaurs, it will also 
introduce many of them to 
online searching and the 
necessary skills for finding 
information within a 
database structure. " 

allowing you to type in the name, or as 
many letters as you know, to locate a 
specific dinosaur. This is called "rapid 
view" because it involves no graphics. By 
paging through the database you can dump 
any entry you want to your printer. Each 
entry is five lines long, allowing about 1 1 
entries per page. When exiting the View 
function, you return to the main screen, 
but not the entry located with the view 
command. You return to the same entry 
you left when entering View. (View is a 
faster search, containing text information 
on all dinosaurs in the database — but no 
graphics. Search allows you to view only 
the main members of a family, but it does 
show graphic information.) 

The manual, 1 1 pages long, is educa- 
tional. The introduction briefly describes 
what happens when a dinosaur is discov- 
ered. The manual also goes briefly into 
how dinosaurs are classified. The remain- 
der tells how to use the program. The 
manual is easy to read, and getting up and 
running takes only about 20 minutes. 

Overall, my only suggestion is that the 
user be informed of how the database is 
ordered. If I know how a database is or- 
dered I can determine how to find an 
entry. As it stands, I have no idea as to 
why one dinosaur follows another in the 
graphics window. The reason I mention 
this is because not only does Dino Data- 
Base teach students about dinosaurs, it 
will also introduce many of them to online 
searching and the necessary skills for find- 
ing information within a database struc- 
ture. 

I give Dino DataBase a big Yabba Dabba 
Doo! It's educational and has a very im- 
pressive user interface. It's easy for young- 
sters to use and simple to learn. Dinosaurs 
are a hot item with kids today — just look 
around the malls. And if your child is 
crazy about them, this might be the best 



1 22 THE RAINBOW May 1 989 



ftware 



C^ 3 Sugar Software Annual White Sale "O 

It's Spring, and time to put some fresh new software in your CoCo. 
Order anything and take off 15%from the total!. Phone in your order 
and I will take off an additional dollar! Good through April 30, 1989. 



The OS9 Font Massager - This 
OS9 utility program allows you 
to do many things to Calligra- 
pher font files. You may create 
new fonts, modify existing 
fonts, invert fonts, compress 
fonts, double the h eight and/or 
width, halve the -height and/or 
width and convert between OS9 
andRSDOS formate. $19.95. 



CALLI GRAPH ER 

CoCo Calligrapher - Turn your 
CoCo and dot-matrix printer into 
a calligrapher's quill. Make beau- 
tiful invitations, flyers, certif- 
icates, labels and more. Includes 
three % inch high fonte. Works 
with many printers such as Ep- 
son, Gemini and Radio Shack. 
Over 135 additional fonts are 
available (see below). Tape /Disk; 
$24.95. 

OS 9 Calligrapher - Prints all the 
same fonts as the CoCo Calligra- 
pher. It reads a standard text file 
which contains text and format- 
ting codes. You may specify the 
font to use, change fonts at any 
time, centering, left, right or full 
justify, line nil, margin, line 
width, page size, page break and 
indentation. Similar to troff on 
UNIX systems. Includes the 
same 3 fonts with additional 
fonts available below. Disk only; 
OS9 Level I or II; $24.95. 

Calligrapher Fonts - Requires 
Calligrapher above. Each set on 
tape or disk with 8 to 10 fonts; 
specify RSDOS or OS9 version; 
$14.95 each: 

Set#l Reduced and reversed originals; 
Set #2 Old Style and Broadway; 
Set #3 Antique and Business; 
Set #4 Wild West and Checkers; 
Set #5 Stars, Hebrew and Victorian; 
Set #6 Block and Computer; 
Set #7 Small: Roman, Italics, Cubes, etc; 
Set #8 Novelty fonts; NEW 
Set #0 Gallant and Spartan; NEW 
Set #10 Several Roman fonts; 
Set #11 Gothic and Script; 
Set #12 More Roman and Italic; 
Set #13 Several Courier fonts; NEW 
Set #14 Modern and Screen; NEW 
Set #15 Tektron and Prestige. NEW 

Economy Font Packages avail- 
able on disk only, with 25 to 30 
fonte; specify RSDOS or OS9; 
29.95 for any one or save by 
buying two or more at $19.95 
each: 

Pkg #1 - Above font sets 1, 2 and 3; 
Pkg #2 - Above font sets 4, 5 and 6;. 
Pkg #3 - Above font sets 7, 8 and 9; 
Pkg #4 - Above font sets 10, 11 and 12; 
Pkg #5 - Above font sets 13, 14 and 15. 

For a complete catalog of Sugar Software products and fonts, 



Calligrapher Combo Package - Includes the Calligrapher 
and any two Economy Font Packages (your choice) for 
only $59.95. ^ New Low Price! Specify RSDOS or OS9. 




EDUCATIONAL 

Trig Attack - Ages 9 and up. An 
educational arcade game where 
players learn important math 
concepts as they play. Sound 
effects, colorful graphics. Excel- 
lent manual includes an introduc- 
tion to trigonometry. Tape/Disk; 
$19.95. 



INFORMATION MGT. 

TIMS ( The | Information 
Management System) - Tape or 
disk, fast and simple general data 
base program./ Create files of 
records that can be quickly sort- 
ed, searched,, deleted and update 
ed. Powerful printer formatting. 
Up to 8 user fields, sort on up to 
3 fields. Tape/Disk; $19.95. 

TIMS Mail - Tape or Disk based 
mailing list management pro- 
gram. Files are compatible with 
TIMS. Fast and simple to use. 
Supports labels 1, 2 or 3 across, 
2% to 4 inches wide. Tape /Disk; 
$19.95. 

TIMS Utility - Utility compan- 
ion for TIMS and TIMS Mail for 
multi-term search (AND and OR 
logic), global change and delete, 
split large files and more! 
Tape/Disk; $14.95. 



The Educational Combo - The 

Combo includes these educa- 
tional (and entertaining) games: 

Silly Syntax (ages 5 and up) 
story creation game with 2 
stories 

Galactic Hangman (ages 7 and 
up) animated graphics, with a 
700 word vocabulary 
The Presidents of the USA 
(ages 10 and up) a presidential 
trivia game 

Hie Great USA (ages 9 and 
up) a trivia game of the states 
Trig Attack (ages 9 and up) 
Zap those Trigs 

All five programs on one disk; 
$49.95 (save $50!). 



TIMS Combo Package - All 

three of the above programs: 
TIMS, TIMS Mail and TIMS 
Utility on one disk - $34.95. 



SPECIAL INTEREST 

Rental Property Income and Ex- 
pense Management Package - 
Maintain rental property income 
and expense re cords and print re- 
ports. 28 expense categories. 77m 
program may be tax deductible. 
Disk only; $29.95. 

CoCo Knitter - Easy to use pro- 
gram to display or print instruc- 
tions to knit a sweater: Cardigan 
or Pullover; Round or V-neck; 
Raglan or Set-in Sleeve- 3 
weights of yarn; 8 sizes from 
baby to man. Tape /Disk; $19.95. 

send a stamp and a label. 



RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 











. 









*TRS-80 is a trademark of Tandy Corp. 



SUGAR SOFTWARE 

P.O. Box 7446 
Hollywood, Florida 33081 
(305) 981-1241 



All programs run on the CoCo 1, 2 and 8, S2K 
Extended Basic, unless otherwise noted. Add 
$1.60 per tape or disk for shipping and han- 
dling. Florida residents add 6% sales tax. COD 
orders add $5. Dealer inquiries invited. Orders 
generally shipped in 24-48 hours. No refunds 
or exchanges without prior authorization. 



introduce them to computers and the con- 
cept of databases. It would also be a great 
program for science teachers who have 
access to the Color Computer in their 
classrooms. 

(RAM Electronics, 814 Josephine St., Mon- 
mouth, OR 97361, 503-838-0139; $19.95) 

— Kay Cornwell 



1 Softwar e 



CoCo3 



CoCo 3 Wheel- 
Out for a Spin 

Welly I wonder what's in the oV mailbox 
today? Bills, junk mail, newspaper, pack- 
age from RAINBOW. . .Hold on! What's 
this (rip, rip, tear)? Oh boy! My next 
review assignment! What did I get this 
time? CoCo3 Wheel — a Wheel of Fortune 
game? Yuck! 1 hate that game! 

That was my initial reaction to CoCo 3 
Wheel. I may be the only person alive who 
never really understood why anyone would 
want to buy a vowel — so to be honest, I 
wasn't immediately thrilled with the pro- 
gram in front of me. 

Well, let's fire it up anyway and see 
what happens. Where are the instructions? 
No instructions? Either someone fouled up 
or this is incredibly easy to run. Okay, I'll 
do a DIR. Hmmmm, one BASIC file, one 
ml file. RUN"WHEEL". Ah! A title page 
and some instructions, good. I guess 1 
should have read the label where it says 
RUN" WHEEL". 

As you may have guessed, from this 
point game play is very much like the TV 
version of the show. You are presented 
with a puzzle consisting of blanks instead 
of letters, and you must guess letters and 
eventually guess the puzzle. This version 
does not have Vanna walk over and turn 
the letters for you. I've seen a version with 
that feature: It's cute the first few times but 
gets old real quick and slows up the game. 
I did not miss her. 

Wheel requires a CoCo 3 and a disk 
drive. The only disk-specific command I 
found in my listing was a LOADM com- 
mand, but no indication was given as to 
whether or not a tape version is available. 
Because it uses the 3's Hi-Res screen, it 
will not run on CoCo 1 or 2, but a version 
is available for those machines. Two hundred 
puzzles are included in the program, 50 in 
each of the four categories of persons, 
places, things and phrases. That should 
keep you busy for a while. But if it doesn 't, 
instructions are included in the listing of 
the program for adding your own. 



After playing a round or two, Becky 
and Lori, my daughters, had discovered 
the new toy. The usual question came: 
"Daddy, can we play?" Not being a Wheel 
fan, after a few instructions, I willingly 
surrendered the keyboard and went to see 
what was happening on the ball game. An 
hour later I realized they were still playing 
the game. My team was losing, so I parked 
behind them to watch. They seemed to be 
stuck on a rather lengthy phrase and asked 
me for help. Since the used letter board 
showed that my two letters had already 
been guessed, we decided to buy a vowel. 
(I'm so ashamed.) The E's provided just 
enough of a clue for a correct guess. They 
wanted to play again, this time the two of 
them against me. They beat me! Twice! 

Wait a minute! I thought I hated this 
game. Maybe it's just Pat and Vanna I 
don't like because this is fun. And if you 
think I'm going to stop just because a 12- 
and a 9-year-old cleaned my clock for me, 
you're crazy! Seriously, as I stated, I am 
not a "Wheel Watcher." I don't like the 
show. But this is a fascinating game, and I 
enjoyed playing it. A friend and I plugged 
in some (how should I phrase this?) adults- 
only puzzles. That was a real riot. Now for 
the "howevers." 

Game play is very impersonal. I prefer 
to be called Randy rather than Player 1 or 
Player 6. Since the program is written in 
BASIC, a short input statement can take 
care of that. 

The game spins the wheel by using a 
palette-switching routine. It apparently uses 
15 of the 16 available palettes, which 
makes for a colorful wheel but also causes 
the lettering on the screen to change colors 
as the wheel spins. Once it stops, the 
writing on the screen returns to a preset 
color except for the place holders for unre- 
vealed letters. This sometimes creates eye- 
straining color combinations, like yellow 
on white. A better idea may have been to 
use only eight palettes for the wheel and 
reserve the other eight palettes to fancy up 
the text display. 



j'. u<jri,!-. 21)8 p«iTnt.B:. ' 














1 '™ 


p 3 EICBBE 


BBSS 














, 






TOT fit .1ft! 



A handy feature is the ability to give up 
on a puzzle. This is quite nice when the 
children play and have never heard of the 
person, phrase or whatever. This feature 



could have been enhanced by the addition 
of a "vowels only remaining" signal. 

Also missing is the bonus round. I was 
able to plug in a routine that lets you select 
five consonants and a vowel, and gives 
you one guess at the puzzle. 

Multiple-round play would have been a 
big plus. As is, if you elect to play again, 
all scores are reset to zero. A grand total 
score, at the end of, say, three rounds, 
would be great. 

The program comes to us from 
SPORTS ware and sells for $21, which I 
feel is just a bit high for the game as 
presented. CoCo 3 Wheel for the CoCo 3 is 
fun and habit-forming. With just a few 
minor improvements it would be an excel- 
lent addition to your games library, and at 
the current price, more than a bargain. 

(SPORTSware, 1251 S. Reynolds Road, Suite 
414, Toledo, OH 43615, 419-389-1515; $21) 

— Randy Cassel 



1 Softwar e 



CoCo 1 , 2 & 3 



KJV on Disk- 
Books of the Bible 
on Your CoCo 

KJV on Disk is for anyone who studies 
the Bible. The two disks 1 reviewed con- 
tain the text of the books of Luke and John 
in the King James Version of the Bible in 
ASCII code. One of the disks divides the 
24 chapters of Luke into seven files. The 
author's intentions are, eventually, to have 
available the entire Bible on disk, starting 
with the New Testament. Matthew and 
Mark are also available. 

A README file on each disk explains 
that the files were created with Telewriter- 
64 and that a word processor is necessary 
to make any practical use of them. How- 
ever, a file called TYPE allows the view- 
ing of the files a line at a time, which can 
be really ugly on a CoCo 2 with no lower- 
case option. 

Since a program review ought to help 
potential buyers judge how to utilize the 
program, I'll offer some thought about 
how this program might be used. 

First, the obvious purpose is to read 
verses off the screen. Unless you are really 
into hi-tech, this doesn't seem to have any 
advantages over reading them out of your 
own Bible. I do see that this might be an 
application for the seeing- impaired. The 
larger screen letter sizes could be chosen. 
In this case, the TYPE program, which 
produces text on the 32-character CoCo 
screen, might find further utility. 



1 24 THE RAINBOW May 1 989 



But there are possibilities other than 
simply reading the file. Students of the 
Bible are often ministers and Bible teach- 
ers preparing sermons and lessons to be 
delivered orally or included in material for 
publication. A not-too-involved procedure 
can be used to import portions of these 
files for use in another word processing 
document. For Telewriter-64, first save 
the quotation under a unique name, then 
read in the file (under "Append") at the 
point in your own document where you 
want the quotation to appear. Many other 
CoCo word processors support block saves 
and reads. 

Another application would be to find 
words and phrases using your word proc- 
essor's search function, much the same 
way a concordance does. You are limited, 
however, by the portions of each book 
contained in memory at any one time. A 
similar idea is to gather such facts as how 
often the name "Jesus" or the word "sav- 
ior" is used in any given portion of these 
books. 

Another use that might not appear 
obvious is to print the text or portions of it 
to have scriptures you can read and anno- 
tate. Many people like to highlight and 
comment on the printed page when they 
read. It helps them concentrate on themes 
within the work or save flashes of ideas 
before they fade away. Writing all over 
one's personal Bible, however, is not a 
good idea for a number of reasons. An 
easily made printout provides a good alter- 
native. 

I am sure that many of you are able to 
think of more inventive ways to employ 
these text files. Other word processors, 
especially those available on a CoCo 3, are 
also likely to increase the possibilities for 
these files. 

One of the restrictions you may face is 
on the longer text files. The documenta- 
tion says that 24K of buffer space is neces- 
sary. The unpatched version ofTelewriter- 
64 is able to handle this. However, if you 
are using a CoCo 2 with Telepatch, you 
must make a new patched version of TW- 
64 that does not include the disk I/O menu 
routines in RAM. This frees 4K of RAM 
that is needed on five of the files on these 
two disks. No modifications are necessary 
if you're using Ultra-Telepatch. 

Using TW-64, the 61 -character screen 
offers the least problem with wordwrap 
although there is an occasional blank line 
on the text screen. 

If you purchase any of the programs in 
this series, I suggest you make a label for 
each disk jacket that tells the chapters 
contained in each disk file. This informa- 
tion is found on the disks in a README file. 

Each disk in the KJV on Disk series 



costs $3, a quite reasonable sum if you feel 
that these Bible books would be at all 
useful to you. 

(BDS Software, PO Box 485, Glenview, IL 
60025, 312-998-1656; $3 each) 

—Dennis Church 



1 Softwar e 



CoCo1,2&3 



Vehicle Cost 
Printout — 

Time for a Trade-in? 

* 

Have you ever wondered how much it 
really costs to operate your car? Is it really 
running the same after all these years? 
Would you be better off keeping the fam- 
ily "klunker" or buying a new car? Ve- 
hicle Cost Printout can help you deter- 
mine the answers. 

" Vehicle Cost 
Printout is intended 
mainly to provide an 

annual report 
printouty but it can 
also be used to 
obtain monthly 
and/or quarterly 
printouts if you so 
desired 



Vehicle Cost Printout will run on any 
Color Computer 1 , 2 or 3 with Extended 
BASIC and 64K of memory. This program 
is available for either a cassette- or disk- 
based system. You also need a "smart" 
printer capable of underlined, condensed 
and elongated printing in order to have a 
hard copy of your car's cost statistics, 
including cost per mile. 

The first thing you should do after load- 
ing the program is to configure it to your 
printer (it comes configured for a C. Itoh 
8510). Therefore, you should be familiar 
with your printer's baud rates, a few of its 
function codes and Extended BASIC'S 
EDIT command. There are only a few 
lines to edit, and the manual gives you a 
complete description of the codes and line 
numbers, so this should be no problem for 
most people. Configure the program, make 
a backup for your own use, then put the 
original in a safe place. 



The program itself is relatively easy to 
operate as it is menu-driven, and the menus 
are self-explanatory. Vehicle Cost Print- 
out allows you to input data, save/load 
data files, scan/modify or insert/delete 
entries, and, of course, send data to your 
printer for a hard copy. There is enough 
room in the program's database for an 
average of about 20 entries per month, 
which should be plenty for anyone. You 
have to make a separate data file for each 
vehicle. Categories of data include date, 
cost of fuel (per gallon), total cost of fuel 
(full tank), mileage, other expenses and 
mileage at the time you incur these ex- 
penses. There is even a line for invoice 
numbers. 

Vehicle Cost Printout is intended mainly 
to provide an annual report printout, but it 
can also be used to obtain monthly and/or 
quarterly printouts if you so desire. The 
program allows you to decide if you want 
a grand total for any of these time periods. 
If you want to carry the annual total over 
into another year, as you have to keep a 
separate data file for each year, you must 
change a few variables in the program 
itself. The manual provides adequate docu- 
mentation in order for you to accomplish 
this. 

There's one problem I encountered while 
using this program. The manual states that 
"The first entry is for setup only and will 
not give a full printout, nor will the dollar 
amount for fuel be added to any totals." 
Simple enough, right? Well, I had input 
my first entry (the setup screen), then 
entered my second entry using the same 
mileage figure as in the first entry. Ex- 
ample: For the first entry, the odometer 
mileage equalled 100 miles; the second 
odometer entry had mileage at 100 miles 
also. Anxious to see the printout on paper, 
I directed the program to begin printing, 
but before it could finish the program was 
stopped by a "/0" Error (can't divide by 
zero). This happened because the program 
calculates that 100-100=0, which is cor- 
rect, but when it goes on to divide total 
costs by mileage to get the cost per mile — 
it can't because, as stated before, the 
computer cannot divide by zero. 

This is a minor problem, I'll admit, 
because most people will not use the pro- 
gram in this fashion. But I was a bit con- 
fused until I looked at the program and 
found out how it carried out its calcula- 
tions. Therefore, I think the manual should 
go a little further in explaining the purpose 
or function of the setup entry. Other than 
this one exception, the program performed 
flawlessly in all areas. 

The manual is well-written in that it is 
straightforward, takes the user through each 
function step-by-step and offers some good 



May 1 989 THE RAINBOW 1 25 




«< GIWIESOFT »> 

A new generation of Color Computer products 




[ 



MAXSOUND 

A High Quality Digital Audio Sampler and Sequencer 



RAINBOW 

cenrirxcAf mi 



Turn your CoCo III into a REAL digital audio sampler with HIGH quality audio reproduction* Easily 
add exotic effects, ECHO, stuttering, speed shifting, sequencing, and reverse audio to BASIC or ML 
programs or GRAPHICS! Now includes Data Compression. Imagine recording any Voice, Music, or 
Sound effect and being able to use these DIGITAL recordings in your own programs! 3 disk sides 
includes: INTERFACT/BIN - ML driver for sound effects. G&M/BAS - Adds sound effects to 
Graphics. SHOWTIME and DEMO disks. SCOPE/BAS - Turns CRT into a Digital Oscilloscope to 
look at MAXSOUND waveforms. Version 3.0 upgrade (Includes improved ECHO and the ability 
to print NAM ET AGS and locations to the screen and/or printer) ..... $6.95 + Shipping & Handling 

"Max&ound.. .bringing a new era to the CoCo Community 19 ' 
•Cray Augsburg, June *88 Rainbow Review 

Call to hear "OVER THE PHONE* Demo - 9am to 9pm VOICE only. 
DOWNLOAD Demo Files 300/1200/2400 24 hrs * 301-675-7626 MODEM only. 
Requirements ««™ ™„™ ™„ (128k or 512k CoCo m odJy) DISK ™ $59*95 



Maxsound Soundtracks & Graphics 

These exciting disks are samples of what can be created with MAXSOUND and CoCo Max III! 
These unbelievable soundstracks w/ graphics DO NOT require the MAXSOUND program to run. 



Airwolf 
Knight Rider 
Startrek 



128k $5.95 

128k $5.95 

128k $5.95 



Probe 



512k... 


..$5.95 


512k. . . 


..$5.95 


512k... 


..$5.95 


512k. . , 


..$9.95 








RAINBOW 

CBtTtrXCMXBH 



5 in 1 Demo (Airwolf, Startrek, Knight Rider, Probe, Other World) 

V~Term Terminal Emulator 

Communicate with VAX, UNIX, Mainframe, and BBS Systems! 

-VT-100, VT-52, Vidtex (includes RLE graphics display), and standard CRT emulations. 
-Developed and tested on a UNIX system using the EMACS and VI full-screen editors. 
•All 128 ASCII characters accessible from the keyboard. 

•Uses a high-resolution graphics screen to implement a highly readable 80-column screen. 

-Menus can be operated concurrently with other terminal functions. (Disk Basic!) 

-Full 28 line by 80 column screen, with 3 bottom lines protected for menus. 

-Serial port up to 2400 baud, RS-232 Pak up to 9600 baud, DCModem Pak at 300 baud. 

-XModem, XModem-CRC, Y-Modem, and ASCII file transfers directly to disk or memory. 

-Prints disk or buffer files with settable margins, baud rate and word wrap. 

-Full 128k or 512k support with a RAMDISK like buffer. Monochrome monitor support. 

•Capture buffer, Snapshot, Conference mode, 35/40/80 Tracks, and over 56 pages of docs! 

"'...one of the most versatile and full featured terminal emulators for the CoCo 3." 

-Bryan Gridley, November '88 Rainbow Review 

$6.95 + S&H Disk (128k or 512k CoCo 1X1 only) $39.95 



Toll Free 



l-«0O441-<JIME 



Order line 



i 



Technical assistance: 7pm to 9pm 
Orders: 9am to 9pm Eastern time 
On-line orders and up to date 
information: ftelphfft CoCo Sig 



GIMMES OFT 
P.O. Box 421 
Perry Hall, MD 21128 
301-256-7558 or 301-256-2953 



Add $3.00 for shipping and handling 
Add $3.00 for COD (USA only) 
MD residents add 5% sales tax 
UlSA/MC/Check/ Money Order /COD 




«< GIMMESOFT »> 

A new generation of Color Computer products 




TelePak* (coco./n/m. 



A TRULY COMPATIBLE RS^232 INTERFACE! 



Now, from Orion Technologies, comes the answer to the continuing demand for an RS-232 interface. No 
compatibility hassles! Uses standard DB25 cable. Compatible with RS-DOS & OS -9 software. Baud rates up to 19,200! 
Enhances the Multi-tasking capabilities of the V.Term Terminal Emulator found on the opposite page. Only $49.95 



CoCo Max HI t 0000 111 on, y) 

THE BEST Graphics Package 
See April '88 review. Disk ... $74.95 



BOTH 
$129.95 



i 



MAX-10 + 111 o"*) 

THE DAZZLING Desktop Publisher 
CMS owners deduct $10. Disk ... $74.95 



f^tiA PWr/^Q-^l (512k CoCo m only) Great with MAXSOUND and/or CoCo Max HI! 

IM*/** MEM UJ"A|| Up to 25 ONBOARD HIRES SCREENS! Six new BASIC commands. Fast & Smooth 
Graphics animation. Save and Load graphics screens to and from disk. See September 1988 Rainbow review. Disk $19.95 

MULTI-LABEL H 1 (CoCo 111 only) See July '87 review. An easy to use, versatile label creating program 
including many new CoCo III features. Print multiple fonts on each label! This one's a MUST for the CoCo 111!! Disk .... $16.95 



EKEYS JU(CoCo l/n/in) See April '87 review. A user friendly, programmable function key utility that creates up to 20 
function keys. EDITOR, DOS mods, Single or Double sided, 35/40 tracks, DISABLE, and it's EPROMable!. Disk $19.95 

SIXOKIVE (CoCo I/n/Hl) This machine language utility modifies DECB 1.0, 1.1, FKEYS III, or ADOS to allow the 
use of 3 double-sided drives (or 2 D/S drives and J&R's RAM DISKS) as 6 S/S drives. Disk $16.95 



AUTO DIM (coco III only) See Jan. '88 review. This hardware device protects your monitor, or TV from IMAGE 
BURN after a few minutes of inactivity from your keyboard. Illustrated and easy to install. Hardware $29.95 

MPI-CoCo Locking Plate (CoCo 111 only) See Sept '88 review. Protects your CoCo HI and Muiti 

Pak Interface from destroying each other) Please specify MPI number 26-3024 or 26-3124 when ordering! SALE $7.95 




(CoCo III only) Become Rastann, Warrior King, on the quest to regain his rightful 

crown hidden deep within a sinister land. Battle monsters, gain magic & weapons, and travel thru harsh wilderness & 
dark castle dungeons in this medieval realm. From the creator of Kung-Fu Dude comes this awesome arcade game for the 
CoCo HI! Uses the most detailed 320 x 200 16 color graphics & high speed ML code to vault you into a world of fantasy! Dare 
ye challange the many perils ahead to become Warrior King? Requires 128k CoCo III, Disk drive, and Joystick .... $29.95 



HALL OF TELE KING TRILOGY (CoCo 1/n/IIl) See December 1988 Rainbow review. The epic 

adventure is back! The largest adventure campaign ever seen for the CoCo is again available. A total of 6 DISK SIDES of 
intense graphics adventure will have you playing for weeks! Each section is a 2 disk stand alone adventure, but all 3 together 
form an epic saga! Quest for the legendary Earthstone in the ancient dwelling of the dwarves while you enjoy the classic 
graphics that made this trilogy famous! Each adventure can be purchased separately for only $29.95, the lowest price ever , or 
you can SAVE and purchase the entire set for only $74.95. Requires 64k, Disk drive, (and composite monitor for the CoCo III). 
Please specify HALL of the King I, II, or HI $29.95 each or the entire 6 DISK Trilogy for only $74.95 



In Quest of the Star Lord (CoCo IB only) See Aug '88 review. This is THE graphics 

adventure for the CoCo III) Unparalleled 320 x 200 animated graphics will leave you gasping for more! You quest for the 
Phoenix Crossbow in this post-holocaust world of science and fantasy. Full 4 Disk sides of mind-numbing adventure! 
Requires 128k CoCo III and Disk drive. HINT SHEET $3.95 (+ $1.00 S&H by itself) Disk $34.95 



KUNG-FU DUDE(coCo l/Il/III) See Feb. '88 review. An exciting arcade game. The BEST karate game ever for 
the CoCo! Destroy opponents and evade obstacles as you grow ever closer to your ultimate objective! Spectacular graphics, 
sound effects, and animation! Requires 64k, Disk drive, and Joystick. Now displays color on CM8. Disk $24.95 

FYRAMDQcoCo III only) See Dec. '87 review. Brilliant colors, sharp graphics, and hot action in this 100% ML arcade 
game. You'll enjoy hopping Kubix around the pyramid, avoiding Kaderf, Smack, Smuck, & the Death Square! Disk $19.95 



jjm^LAD&D Character's Compi lfllOft(CoCo 1/n/m) This great timesaving 

TP B f^^ utility helps create compatible AD&D characters. Includes dice rolling routine, pick ability, race & class. Buy from 
the Players Handbook, magic items & spell materials. Save, load, and print character info. 3 Disk sides .... $24.95 



White Fire of Eternity fflCoCo I/n/m) See Dec '86 review. Enter the era of monsters $ magic. Search for the 
legendary power of White Fire throughout the Forbidden Wood & Dark Caverns in this 64k animated adventure! Disk.. $19.95 

ChailipiOll (CoCo I/n/III) See May '87 review. Become a superhero in this action adventure! Disk.. $19.95 

Dragon Bladetcoco I/n/IU) See Nov '86 review. Slay evil dragon in this 64k animated adventure! Disk.. $19.95 



advice such as saving your data after you 
modify it, something I fail to do at times. 
This can save people from losing their data 
and having to re-enter it. The author offers 
support for any problems you might en- 
counter, and the program comes with a 
demonstration data file. 

As an experienced programmer and user, 
I feel the price is a little high for this type 
of program. Don't get me wrong — this is 
a very, very useful program, especially 
with the way the economy is, and many 
people will feel the price is justified. But I 
also feel that the author could expand his 
potential market by dropping the price a 
few dollars. 

All in all, if you wonder if your car is 
costing you more now than it did, or if you 
just want to keep track of how much your 
car costs to operate, then take a look at 
Vehicle Cost Printout. 

(Alan Hanusiak, 37 Grand Ave., Rockville, 
CT 06066, 203-875-2027; $18: First product 
review from this company appearing in THE 
RAINBOW.) 

— Richard L. McNabb 



1 Softwar e 



CoCo3 



Fontgen — 

CoCo 3 Fonts, Icons 

and Borders 



Hi-Res graphics been a little boring 
lately? Need some nice frilly borders to 
impress your significant other? Want to 
make a big bold statement to the world? 
Do DRAW statements make you break out 
in hives? Well then, maybe Fontgen from 
JR & JR Softstuff is what you need. 

Fontgen is a collection of screen dis- 
play fonts, icons and borders that can be 
used to replace or supplement the standard 
CoCo 3 BASIC Hi-Res graphic font. It 
comes packaged with a font editor, a 
machine language subroutine used to load 
four fonts at one time, BASIC subroutines 
to print the larger-than-standard fonts 
(including icons and borders) and a demo 
program. 

The package takes advantage of the 
fact that the Hi-Res display font (and the 
rest of BASIC) resides in RAM. Standard 
size fonts replace the Tandy-provided font 
on a one-to-one basis. Larger fonts, icons 
and borders require multiple positions to 
store a character. For example, "Bigfont" 
requires nine characters in a three-by-three 
group to form one Bigfont letter. For this 



reason, the Bigfont alphabet is stored across 
three font datasets, which makes the abil- 
ity to have more than one font in memory 
important. 

The supplied font editor allows you to 
create or edit standard fonts in an eight-by- 
eight matrix. The larger fonts require plan- 
ning because only part of the character 
(eight-by-eight out of 24-by-24) is avail- 
able for editing at a time and is thus harder 
to visualize. Except for overly sensitive 
cursor keys, the program works as it should. 
Functions are provided to aid in creating or 
modifying character fonts. While some of 
the functions may be a little confusing to 
those of us used to paint programs ("Ro- 
tate" shifts and "Mirror" flips), they are 
useful. 

The font editor also has a function to 
allow you to manipulate the palette. It 
allows you to set the color in the 16 palette 
cells to any one of the 64 available colors. 
You can then save your selections as BASIC 
statements to be included in your own 
program. This feature is nice but seems to 
me to be only distantly related to fonts. 

The standard size fonts can be used 
directly with HPRINT by loading them 
into memory, but the large fonts (includ- 
ing icons and borders) require special 
methods to display. JR & JR Softstuff 
provides BASIC subroutines that can be 
used to print these larger characters. You 
can also use them as examples to write 
your own routines, if you prefer. 

For the large fonts, or if you want to use 
multiple fonts without a lot of disk access, 
a machine language program is provided 
to store up to four font datasets in memory 
at one time. Your BASIC program trans- 
fers the fonts back and forth in memory via 
DEFUSR calls. 

All in all, the package is fairly easy to 
use and the program easy to follow. This is 
fortunate because the documentation is 



not. I received a dozen loose sheets of 
paper, printed on both sides. Except for the 
cover, there are no graphics or illustra- 
tions. Details that would have been easy to 
pick out in a table are buried in the text. 
Indentation is nonexistent, and no index is 
provided. The best that can be said is that 
most of the information you need is there. 
You just have to dig it out. 



mmrrrn select 



54 e* j^^^^^^^^V <ns W a* fi m if 



M H M it 



Even so, if you would like to spice up 
your Hi-Res displays, the package will 
save you some time, and the price won't 
break you. However, if you're just starting 
out in programming, some of the features 
may have to wait until you have a little 
more experience. 

I had no major problems with Fontgen, 
but JR & JR Softstuff does provide a 
number for technical assistance. No hours 
are listed, but I did reach the order number 
Saturday afternoon. You pay for any calls 
you make. 

Fontgen requires a Color Computer 3 
with 128K and at least one disk drive. The 
package will work with a TV or a compos- 
ite monitor, but you won't be pleased with 
the results. An RGB monitor is a much 
better choice. 



(JR & JR Softstuff, P.O. Box 118, Lompoc, 
CA 93438, 805-735-3889; $24.95 + $3 S/H) 



— Jesse R. Strawbridge 



Maxwell 
Mouse 

By Logan Ward 



33 
Q 




/m A YBE i SHOULDN'T \ 

have double clicked 
. I on the paint icon \) 



y 



OB 
tin 

t IL 



1, 



:5 'fJ 





• i 



D 

n 

CfQOODKiaDQElDnDIlOQIIDQDEiaDDCi 



1 28 THE RAINBOW May 1 989 



9 y — *v i-i n n n 





ml 






The following products have recently been received by THE RAINBOW, examined by 
our magazine staff and issued the Rainbow Seal of Certification, your assurance that we 
have seen the product and have ascertained that it is what it purports to be. 



Border Disk #1, a disk containing more than 175 
borders, supplementing the CoCo Graphics Designer 
Plus desktop publishing package. Border graphics 
elements include floppy disks, dogs, musical notes, 
stars and more. For the CoCo 3 and Graphics De- 
signer Plus. Zebra Systems, Inc., 78-06 Jamaica Ave., 
Woodhaven, NY 11421, (781 ) 297-2385; $14.95 plus 
$3 S/H. 

CoCo Calligrapher, a font package that printer 
owners can use to create invitations, flyers, newslet- 
ters and more. Three te-inch fonts are included, and 
more than 135 additional fonts are available. Comes 
on tape or disk for the CoCo 1 , 2 and 3 and requires a 
dot-matrix printer capable of bit image printing. 
Sugar Software, P.O. Box 7466, Hollywood, FL 
33081, (305) 981-1241; $24.95 plus $1.50 S/H. 

Fast Formatter, a machine language utility that for- 
mats floppy disks in both Drive 0 and Drive 1. For the 
CoCo 1, 2 or 3, requiring two disk drives. BDS Soft- 
ware, P.O. Box 485, Glenview, IL 60025, (312) 998- 
1656; $5. 

Font Disks A & B, two font collections to supplement 
CoCo Graphics Designer Plus. Font Disk A contains 
Banner, Bold3, Digital, Shadow, Stencil, Stripes, 
Type, Variety, Western and two symbol fonts. Font 
Disk B contains these fonts: Arcade, Alien, Baroque, 
Baroque 2, Block, Computer, Circle, Circle2, Cube, 
Cube2, Deco, Gray, Script and Script 2. Requires a 
CoCo 3 and CoCo Graphics Designer Plus. Zebra 
Systems, Inc., 78-06 Jamaica Ave., Woodhaven, NY 
11421, (718) 296-2385; $14.95 each, plus $3 S/H. 

KJV on Disk: Romans, I Corinthians and II 
Corinthians, three books of The King James version 
of the Bible on disk in ASCII files for the CoCo I, 2 
and 3. BDS Software, P.O. Box 485, Glenview, IL 
60025, (312) 998-1656; $3. 

Lesson Planner, a program to help teachers of any 
grade level create and print lesson plans, covering 
materials, objectives, procedures and evaluation. 
Plans can be created new or saved and edited. Re- 
quires a disk drive, a printer, and a CoCo 1 , 2 or 3 with 
at least 32 K. Tothian Software, P.O. Box663, Rimers- 
burg, PA 16248; $24.95. 

♦ 

Lock Master, a utility that locks normal Disk BASIC 
disks so that a "disk zapper" cannot break them. It 
locks the directory and the DOS track. Users unlock 
the disk with a password. For CoCos 1, 2 and 3. Right 
Brothers Software, 1173 Niagara St., Denver, CO 
80220, (303) 377-3409; $14.95. 

Master Code, a game of logic and luck in which users 
try to solve a code of four colors using clues provided 
by the computer. There are six colors possible. It 
works by "branching," a form of artificial intelli- 
gence. The program is written in BASIC, and a listing 
is included. Requires a CoCo 1 , 2 or 3 with a minimum 



of 16K. High Altitude Software, 339 32 1/2 Road, 
Palisade, CO 81526, (303) 434-7825; $19.95. 

Max Font Set, a four-disk assortment of more than 
100 type styles for use with Colorware's graphics 
programs CoCo Max /, // and ///. Colorware, 242-W 
West Ave., Darien, CT 06820, (203) 656-1806; 
$49.95 plus $3 S/H. 

Max- 10 Font Set, a collection of 36 fonts for use with 
the Max- 10 word processor/desktop publisher. Fonts 
include Frontier, Swan Song, Memphis, Futura and 
San Francisco. Requires a CoCo 3 and Max-10. Col- 
orware, 242-W West Ave., Darien, CT 06820, (203) 
656-1806; $29.95 plus $3 S/H. 

Mutant Miners, a machine language arcade game in 
which your character is trapped in a uranium mine 
deep within the earth. To reach the surface, you must 
battle your way up through the ranks of those who 
have suffered a similar fate, but over time have mu- 
tated into monsters. For the Color Computer 1 , 2 or 3. 
JR & JR Softstujf, P.O. Box 1 18, Lompoc, CA 93438, 
(805) 735-3889; $19.95 plus $3 S/H. 

Ne wsArt A thru Z, a collection of 26 clip art disks for 
the Newspaper Plus CoCo 3 desktop publisher. Each 
disk contains an assortment of graphics. Images range 
from sports to religious depictions. Second City Soft- 
ware, P.O. Box 72956, Roselle, IL 60172, 312-653- 
5610; $9.95 each disk, or complete set for $100 plus 
$2.50 S/H. 

Newspaper Plus, a CoCo 3 desktop publishing pack- 
age that includes a font disk with 22 fonts and a 
graphics disk with 50 clip art pictures. Users can 
create banners, newsletters and signs. Requires a 
CoCo 3 and a disk drive. Owners of The Newspaper 
can upgrade by sending in their original system disk 
and $1 9.95 plus $2.50 shipping; those who purchased 
The Newspaper directly from Second City Software 
can upgrade free of charge. Second City Software, 
P.O. Box 72956, Roselle, IL 60172, 312-653-5610; 
$48.95 plus $2.50 S/H. 



Newspaper Plus Graphics Disk I, a supplement for 
Newspaper Plus, this disk contains 50 clip art files, 
three fonts and 10 fill patterns. Second City Software, 
P.O. Box 72956, Roselle, IL 60172, 312-653-5610; 
$19.95 plus $2.50 S/H. 

NX- 1000 Rainbow Printer Driver Kit, a printer 
driver for the NX- 1000 Rainbow color printer. It 
prints out CoCo Max 111 or other HSCREEN 2 pic- 
tures. Up to 125 colors can be reproduced in a palette 
of 64 at a time. Requires a CoCo 3, an NX- 1000 
Rainbow and CoCo Max 111. Colorware, 242-W West 
Ave., Darien, CT 06820, (203) 656-1806; $19.95 plus 
$3 S/H. 

OS-9 Calligrapher, a program similar to the Disk 
BASIC CoCo Calligrapher, but written for OS-9 
Level I or II. It comes with three fonts to allow users 
to print newsletters, flyers and more. Standard text can 
be read in and printed out in the user's choice of fonts. 
Requires a dot-matrix printer capable of bit image 
printing. Other fonts are available. Sugar Software, 
P.O. Box 7466, Hollywood, FL 33081, (305) 981- 
1241; $24.95 plus $1.50 S/H. 

PertASCII, a one-player or multiuser word game for 
OS-9 levels I and II. Up to 1 5 people can play at once 
when accessing a 512K machine via modem or re- 
mote terminal. On 64K or 1 28K machines, two people 
can play. The goal is to outscore opponents in making 
words out of random letters. Includes a built-in dic- 
tionary. Requires a CoCo 1 , 2 or 3 with at least 64K 
memory, OS-9 Level I or II, and a disk drive. Burke & 
Burke, P.O. Box 58342, Renton, WA 90058, (206) 
235-0917; $19.95 plus $1.50 S/H. 

Ultra-Merge, a program that lets users create person- 
alized letters, forms, etc., using database files created 
by Ultra-Base and any word processor that can save 
files in ASCII formal. Comes on disk only for 64K 
CoCos 1, 2 and 3. Tothian Software, Inc., P.O. Box 
663, Rimersburg, PA 16248; $24.95; $39.95 for both 
Ultra-Base and Ultra-Merge. 



The Seal of Certification is open to all manufacturers of products for the Tandy 
Color Computer, regardless of whether they advertise in THE RAINBOW. 

By awarding a Seal, the magazine certifies the program does exist — that we have 
examined it and have a sample copy — but this does not constitute any guarantee 
of satisfaction. As soon as possible, these hardware or software items will be 
forwarded to THE RAINBOW reviewers for evaluation. 

— Lauren Willoughby 



May 1989 THE RAINBOW 129 



Get your modem to work 

with OS-9 Level II for under $20 



The Forgotten Chip 

By Carl Austin Bennett 



While a Serial I/O port appears 
on the back of every CoCo, it 
appears to be unusable in any 
OS-9 communication program. It is 
suited only to use with a serial printer; 
a modem connected to it is not even 
usable with Radio Shack's own Desk- 
Mate 3 software. 

Radio Shack suggested a Multi-raK 
interface and a Deluxe RS-232 Pak as 
a suitable replacement for the "bit- 
banger." Although this entailed a cost 
quite a bit higher than the CoCo 3 
modifications I am about to describe, it 
did offer a second serial port. Unfortu- 
nately, both of these items have been 
discontinued. Some alternatives to the 
RS-232 Pak are offered by CRC Com- 
puters in Montreal, but these require 
either a Multi-Pak or a Disto Super 
Controller. 

Unless you need two serial ports, it 
may be more economical to upgrade the 
existing serial interface for OS-9 oper- 
ation. Only one chip, a crystal, two 



- ' ' — ■ 



Car/ /4. Bennett is an electrical engineer- 
ing student from Kingston, Ontario. He 
owns a 512K CoCo 3 with a 1200-baud 
modem, a modified electronic typewri- 
ter as a printer, and OS-9 Level II. He 
also once had the misfortune of having 
to write a terminal program using the 
infamous "bit-banger" serial port. 



diodes and a resistor are required. You 
must make 22 connections to the CoCo 
3 printed circuit board. Some electron- 
ics experience helps, and the project can 
be completed in one weekend for under 
$20. Only one byte of the OS-9 Boot file 
needs to be changed to make this chip 
operate with any OS-9 program, and 
existing commands such as PRINT 8-2 
(in Disk BASIC) are not affected in any 
way. 

All of these upgrades use a special 
chip to convert the information being 
sent from the parallel format (eight bits 
at a time) used by the 6809 to a serial 
format (in which all bits are sent, one 
at a time on a single wire). This chip is 
the Rockwell R6551 Asynchronous 
Communication Interface Adapter, 
described in more detail in Turn of the 
Screw — All About Serial Packs by 
Tony DeStefano (RAINBOW, August 
'88) or in data sheets published by the 
manufacturer. It is capable of sending 
and receiving data at up to 19,200 bits 
per second (19,200 bits of transmitted 
data is equivalent to one full 80-by-24 
text screen). 

OS-9 already contains the instruc- 
tions needed to make this chip work (the 
flCIPPPK driver and /t2 descriptor). It 
need only be told where the chip is 
located. This is done by using the 
Modpatch command to change one byte 
of /t2. At the OS-9 prompt, type: 

modpatch /t2 
c 10 68 30 



Press CTRL-BREAK to end the process. 
The change can then be saved to a new 
disk using Cobbler (described in the 
OS-9 Level II manual). 

That's the easy part — now some- 
thing more difficult: the task of adding 
the 655 1 chip to the computer. All of the 
usual warnings apply here: Precautions 
must be taken against damage due to 
static electricity; any modification to 
the computer will void the Radio Shack 
warranty; some errors in construction 
may damage your computer or cause 
the system to crash; all connections 
should be verified before applying 
power; and an ohmmeter should be 
used to check for short circuits. 

Also, all connections and measure- 
ments must be made with the power 
disconnected. Reversal of the power 
leads or connection of any lead to 
voltages less than zero or more than five 
volts will destroy the chip. While this 
modification has been tested in a CoCo 
3 and works fine, there is no guarantee 
if you choose to use information con- 
tained in the article. 

The 655 1 works best placed in a 28- 
pin socket on a small circuit-board of 
its own. The crystal should be placed 
near 6551 pins 6 and 7; the diodes and 
resistor are best placed near Pin 10. The 
board may be hidden in the space 
underneath the CoCo 3 keyboard. It 
may be best to wait until all connections 
are made (and correct operation of the 
CoCo 3 observed) before plugging in 
the 6551. 

Sixteen connections are made to the 



130 



THE RAINBOW May 1989 



underside of the expansion connector 
(at the right-hand side of the computer). 
These are shown in Figure 1 . 

As these connection points are spaced 
relatively closely, it may be best to make 
the connections using a 4- or 8- 
conductor ribbon cable of relatively 
small size, to make the connections to 
the expansion connector before making 
the connections to the 6551, and to deal 
with all connections to odd-numbered 
pins first. After making the first eight 
connections, verify proper operation 
(i.e., no short circuits and the computer 
working normally) before proceeding 
with the remaining eight. This makes 
location of any mistakes much easier. 

Once these 16 connections have been 
made and verified, there are six more 
connections to make to the computer. 
These are: 

1) from Pin 4 (Receive Data) on ICR 
(the 77527 SALT chip, on the lower left 
corner of the CoCo 3 circuit board) to 
Pin 12 of the 6551. 

2) from Pin 5 (Carrier Detect) on IC8 
(SALT) to Pin 16 of the 6551. 

3) from Pin 6 (Transmit Data) on IC8 
(SALT) to the anodes of the two diodes 
(1N4148) and to one side of the 10K 
resistor connected to +5 volts. 

4) the previously-existing connection 
from IC4 (68B21 PI A) Pin 3 to IC8 
(SALT) Pin 6 must be removed — 
connect IC4 Pin 3 to the cathode of one 
of the diodes. Connect the cathode of 
the other diode to Pin 10 (Transmit 
Data) of the 651. 

5) from Pin 12 (*Chip Select) of IC9 
(74LS138 Address Decoder — located 
near the ACVC [Advanced Color Video 
Chip]) to Pin 3 of the 6551. 

6) from Pin 3 (*Int) of the CPU (IC1 — 
68B09E, or Pin 37 or 38 of the 
LSC81001 PIA [IC5]) to Pin 26 (♦Inter- 
rupt Request) of the 6551. 

A 1.8432 MHz crystal is to be con- 
nected directly to pins 6 and 7 of the 
6551 chip. At this point, the circuit is 
ready to be tested. 

Making a Serial Cable for the CoCo 3 

To connect the serial port of your 
computer to a modem, a four-wire cable 
is needed. This cable may be made from 
several feet of telephone wire with a 4- 
pin DIN connector (Radio Shack Cat. 
No. 274-007) on one end and a DB25 
connector (Radio Shack Cat. No. 256- 
1547) on the other. 

Note that the cable for use with 
modem may not be the same as that 
used with a serial printer. For a modem, 



(top) 6551 
ACIA 



cn1 pin 24 
741s 138 pin 12 
cn1 pin 5 



1.8432MHz 



SALT pin 6 
pin 3 from 6821 PIA — flf 

SALT pin 4 
cn1 pin 19 
cn1 pin 20 




cn 1 is the 40-pin expansion connector 
SALT is IC8 (77527) 
CPU is IC1 (68B09E) 
PIA is IC4 (68B21) 

The existing trace between PIA pin 3, SALT pin 6 must be removed. 



ision Connector 


6551 


Signal 


Pin 5 


Pin 4 


♦Reset 


Pin 6 


Pin 27 


E (enable) clock 


Pin 9 


Pin 15 


+5 volts 


Pin 10 


Pin 18 


Data bit dO 


Pin 11 


Pin 19 


Data bit dl 


Pin 12 


Pin 20 


Data bit d2 


Pin 13 


Pin 21 


Data bit d3 


Pin 14 


Pin 22 


Data bit d4 


Pin 15 


Pin 23 


Data bit d5 


Pin 16 


Pin 24 


Data bit d6 


Pin 17 


Pin 25 


Data bit d7 


Pin 18 


Pin 28 


Read/* write 


Pin 19 


Pin 13 


Address bit aO 


Pin 20 


Pin 14 


Address bit al 


Pin 24 


Pin 2 


Address bit a5 


Pin 33 


Pin 1 


Ground 




Pin 9 


Clear to send 




Pin 17 


Data set ready 



Figure 1: Connecting the 6551 



May 1989 THE RAINBOW 131 



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Special Discounts on Past Issues 

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All other inquiries call (502) 228-4492. 





Window Master V2.2 

The hottest new program available for the 
Color Computer 111! Now you can have 
Windows, Icons, Buttons, Pull-Down Menus, Edit 
Fields and Mouse Functions built into your Basic 
or Machine Language Programs easily and 
quickly, without the need for OS9. 

It supports up to 31 Windows on the display, 
multiple fonts in 54 possible sizes and styles, 
Enhanced Basic Editing and much more. It adds 
over SO Commands and Functions to Basic to 
fully support the Point & Click Window System. 
In fact it has so many features it would take 
several pages to to describe them all. 

It is completely compatible with existing Basic 
programs and takes absolutely no memory 
away from Basic. It contains a built in Ram Disk 
which is completely transparent to Basic (512k 
version) for enhanced operation. 

It requires 1 Disk Drive, R.S. Hi-Res Interface & 
Joystick or Mouse. Includes both the 128k & 
512k versions for only $69.95 

Window- Ware 

Window Writer - A Point & Click Word 
Processor, features both Mouse & Keyboard 
type editing, proportional printer support, 
powerful formatting capability, works with any 
printer. Requires Window Master & 512k- 
$59.95 

Window Basic Compiler - A Basic Compiler 
similar to CBASIC only it compiles all the 
Window Basic statements to create super fast 
M.L. programs & Desk Accessory programs for 
Window Master $99.00 
Window EDT/ASM - A full featured 
Editor/Assembler and Debugger for the Window 
Master System $49.95 
Font/Icon Editors - A utility disk with the 
Font & Icon Editors so you can edit or create 
your own, includes Basic & M.L. versions $19.95 
Advanced Programmers Guide- A 
manual for the Advanced Basic & M.L. 
Programmer with information on interfacing to 
Window Masters complete system including 
System Calls, Memory Map, Interrupt handling 
& Extended Memory access. $24.95 

512K RAM UPGRADE 

Give your COCO 3 all the power it deserves with 
this easy to install (no soldering/plug in) 100% 
Tandy compatible 512K memory upgrade. 
Completely assembled and tested. Includes 
Ramdisk & Memory Test software described 
below. $159.95, Upgrade + Window Master $199 

512K RAMDISK & TESTER 

RAMDISK is an ALL Machine Language 
program that will give you 2 ULTRA High Speed 
Ram Disks in you CoCo-3. It does not need or 
require the OS-9 operating system. It works 
with R.S. DOS V1.0 or V 1.1 and it is completely 
compatible with Enhanced Color Disk Basic! Plus 
it allows your CoCo-3 to run at double speed all 
the time even for floppy disk access! 1! It will not 
disappear when you press reset like some other 
ramdisk programs. The MEMORY tester is a fast 
ML program to test the 512K ram. It performs 
several bit tests as well as an address test so you 
know that your 512K of memory is working 
perfectly. 

Requires 512K & Disk $19.95 



CBASIC Editor/Compiler 

The ULTIMATE Color 
Computer BASIC COMPILER!!! 

If you want to write fast efficient machine 
language programs and you don't want to spend 
the next few years trying to learn how to write 
them in Assembly language or with a cheap 
compiler, then CBASIC is the answerll! 

CBASIC is the only fully integrated Basic 
Compiler and Program Editing System available 
for the Color Computer. It will allow you to take 
full advantage of all the capabilities available in 
your CoCo without having to spend years 
trying to learn assembly language 
programming. CBASIC allows you to create, edit 
and convert programs from a language you are 
already familiar with Enhanced Disk Color Basic, 
into fast efficient machine language programs 
easily and quickly. 

CBASIC supports all the enhanced hardware 
available in the CoCo 2 & 3, including Hi-Res 
Graphics, & Screen displays, Extended Memory 
and Interrupts. We even added advanced 
commands not available in Basic to give you a 
level of control only available to very advanced 
Machine Language Programmers. Plus we made 
it exceptionally easy to use, not like some other 
compilers. CBASIC is the friendliest and easiest 
compiler available for the Color Computer. 

CBASIC is a powerful tool for the Beginner as 
well as the Advanced Basic or Machine Language 
programmer. CBASIC features well over 150 
Compiled Basic Commands and Functions that 
fully support Disk Sequential and Direct access 
files, Tape, Printer and Screen I/O. It supports 
ALL the High and Low Resolution Graphics, 
Sound, Play and String Operations available in 
Enhanced Color Basic, including Graphics H/GET, 
H/Put, H/Play and H/DRAW, all with 99.9% 
syntax compatibility. 

CBASIC makes full use of the powerful and 
flexible GIMI chip in the Color Computer 3. It 
will fully utilize the 128K of RAM available and 
install 2 Ultra Fast Ramdisks if 512K is available, 
for program Creation, Editing and Compilation. 
You can easily access all 512K of memory in a 
Compiled program thru several extended 
memory commands that can access it in 32K or 
8K blocks and single or double bytes. 

CBASIC has its own completely integrated 
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writing Basic programs. It has block move and 
copy, program renumbering, automatic line 
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control and much more. 

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Programmable Word Length, Parity, Stop Bits . 
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Send full 128 character set from Keyboard 
Complete Editor, Insert, Delete, Change or Add. 

9 Variable length, Programmable Macro Key buffers. 
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EDT/ASM III is a Disk based co-resident Text 
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It has 8 display formats from 32/40/64/80 
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• Block Move & Copy, Insert, Delete, Overtype. 

• Create and Edit files larger than memory. 
The Assembler features include: 

• Supports Conditional IF/THEN/ELSE assembly. 
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• Supports standard Motorola directives. 

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• Allows assembly from the Buffer, Disk or both. 

Coco 1, 2 or 3 Disk $59.95 



Address 


Bits 


Contents 


"bit-banger:" 






65312 


1 


Transmit data, 


65313 


7 


Carrier detect 


65314 


0 


Receive data 


6551. AO A: 






65328 


0-7 


data 


65329 


0 


1 if parity error 


(status) 


1 


1 if framing error 




2 


1 if overrun 




3 


1 if receive buffer full 




4 


1 if transmit buffer empty 




5 


0 if carrier detected 




6 


0 if data set ready (not used) 




7 


1 if interrupt occurred 


65330 


0 


1 enables DTR output (not used) 


(command) 


1 

3,2 


0 enables interrupt 

01 enables transmit interrupt, else 10 




4 


1 for echo 




7-5 


parity (000=none 01 l=even 001=odd) 


65331 


3-0 


Speed (0110=300 bps 1000 =1200 bps 


(control) 




1010=200 bps) 




4 


1 for internal clock 




6,5 


Word length (00=8 bits 01=7 bits) 




7 


0 if one stop bit 



Figure 2: Communication Addresses 



Useful References: 

1) All About Serial Paks (Turn of the Screw, Tony DiStefano, August '88 

RAINBOW) 

2) Color Computer Service Manual (Radio Shack #26-3334) 

3) Inside OS-9 Level II (Kevin Darling, Frank Hogg Lab, Syracuse, NY, 
1987). 



the following connections must be 
made: 

1) Connect Pin 1 (Carrier Detect) on 
the computer to Pin 8 on the modem. 

2) Connect Pin 2 (Receive Data) on the 
computer to Pin 3 on the modem 

3) Connect Pin 3 (Signal Ground) on 
the computer to Pin 7 on the modem. 

4) Connect Pin 4 (Transmit Data) on 
the computer to Pin 2 on the modem. 

Testing This Circuit 

Due to the risk of creating a short 
circuit between neighboring data or 
address lines, it is best to check for such 
errors at various intervals during the 
construction of this circuit. An ohmme- 
ter will quickly detect any pairs of 
adjacent pins that may be shorted to 
each other. Any short circuit in the 
system bus lines will also cause a screen- 
ful of garbage to appear instead of the 
Super Extended Color BASIC message if 
you attempt to use the computer. The 
655 1 need not be plugged in to check for 
either shorts or continued system oper- 
ation — the computer will start without 
it. If you are unable to obtain normal 
operation with the 6551 socket empty, 
recheck your connections (a good idea 
in any case) and check for short circuits. 

If all connections are in place and 
verified (with the system operating 
normally), you are ready to plug in the 
6551. The pins of a new chip will gener- 
ally need to be bent slightly inward 
before the chip can be plugged into its 
socket. The edge of a tabletop works 
well for this. Once the 6551 is in place, 
software may be use to check for proper 
operation. 

If OS-9 is able to use the serial port 
at this point, the project is complete. If 
not (with the computer working), there 
are some simple tests that may be run 
under Disk BASIC. 

The simplest (if your modem has 
"send data" and "receive data" indica- 
tors) is to turn on these indicators using 

POKE 65330,12. Use POKE 65330,0 to 

turn them off. If this does not give 
consistent results, one of the connec- 
tions to the address, data or control 
lines may be at fault. (See Figure 2.) 

If this works, the eight connections to 
the data bus may be verified by running 
a program such as FOR 1=0 TO 255: POKE 

65331 , I : PRINT PEEK ( 65331 ): NEXT, 

which will print numbers 0 through 255 
if the 6551 is connected. 

If the 6551 will transmit but will not 
receive, check both the receive data and 
carrier detect signals. If carrier detect is 
not active, all received data is ignored. 



If the 6551 registers (as displayed by 

PRINT PEEK(6532B); PEEI<(65329); 
PEEK(G5330); PEEK(G5331)) all appear 

to contain 255, then recheck the chip 
select inputs (pins 2 and 3 on the 6551). 

Theory of Operation 

Assume that a user, while running a 
computer communication program, 
presses the A key. What happens? 

The computer, after scanning the 
keyboard, finds a key pressed and 
represents this by a number (A becomes 
97, or 01 100001 in binary). It must then 
send this information to another com- 
puter. A telephone line (or any serial 
link) cannot send eight Is or 0s simul- 
taneously — but it can send one bit of 
information at a time — a one or a zero. 

When there is information to send, it 
sends a zero to indicate the start of one 
character of transmitted information. It 
then must send eight Is or 0s represent- 



ing the information being sent, one at 
a time, with the far right one being sent 
first. Each of these must be present for 
a constant and minimum length of time, 
as modems can only go so quickly. It 
then sends a 1 to indicate that it has 
finished sending this character. For a 
2400-baud modem, all of this must 
occur within 1/240 of a second. But the 
computer has more to do than simply 
send information. 

If your CoCo is sending data to 
another computer, it is very likely that 
the other computer is immediately 
sending this information back, so that 
it will appear on your screen. You must 
therefore be able to transmit and receive 
information at the same time, and (as 
if that weren't enough) if you're using 
OS-9, you may want to run other pro- 
grams while you're sending and receiv- 
ing characters. The "bit-banger" Serial 
I/O port requires that the program 



1 34 THE RAINBOW May 1 989 



individually wait for and handle each 
one or zero being sent or received — at 
some point, it just doesn't have time to 
do all of this. 

This is where a chip like the 6551 
comes in. A program need only tell it 
how many bits of information to send 
(and at which speed), check to see that 
it's ready, then give it all eight Is and 
Os at the same time. The 6551 takes care 
of the rest. It can send and receive 
information at the same times, and it 
leaves the computer free to do other 
things while a character is being sent. 
When nothing is available to be sent, it 
simply sends Is. 

The 655 1 looks like four locations of 
memory to the computer, but which 
four? The computer can find this out by 
looking in the /t2 module, which it 
reads from disk when you type DOS. 
The 6551 also needs a signal (Chip 
Select) to tell it that information is 
intended for it and not for another part 
of memory. A Multi-Pak Interface can 
provide a circuit to separate informa- 
tion intended for the disk-drive con- 
troller from that intended for the RS- 
232 Pak or some other cartridge. In the 
CoCo 3, however, there already exists 
a signal (not currently used for any- 



thing) that can be used to serve much 
the same purpose. By using this signal 
(and by putting the 6551 inside the 
computer itself), no Multi-Pak is re- 
quired, reducing costs considerably. 

Also, the RS-232 standard requires 
that +5 or + 1 2 volts be used to represent 
a zero, and -5 or -12 volts be used to 
represent a one. These voltages cannot 
be connected directly to the 6551 with- 
out damaging it. They must instead be 
changed to levels that the 6551 can use 
directly: 0 volts for a 0, 5 volts for a 1. 
Any serial port that plugs into the 
expansion slot must contain extra chips 
to convert between these two sets of 
voltages. In the CoCo 3, the SALT 
(Supply And Level Translator) chip 
already performs this function, along 
with other functions related to the 
cassette recorder and the power supply. 
SALT is already being used by the 
existing bit-banger port, but it is quite 
possible to upgrade to the 6551 chip 
while leaving the existing port in oper- 
ating condition. The inputs to the 6551 
can be directly connected to their coun- 
terparts in the existing circuit without 
any problems. The output (Transmit 
Data) must be treated a little differently, 
so that no harm occurs if the 6551 tries 



to send a zero while the bit-banger is 
trying to send a one. This is the purpose 
of the resistor and diodes. A zero from 
the 6551 causes a diode to conduct, 
sending a zero to the SALT chip. A zero 
from the existing output has the same 
effect. If neither chip is active, the 
resistor pulls the input to the SALT chip 
high, causing ones to be sent. The 
operation is the same as that of an AND 
gate. 

By using these existing circuits, this 
modification provides access to a 
higher-speed serial port with one chip 
(the 6551 itself) at a cost of under $20. 
Software written for the existing bit- 
banger serial port (such as Disk BASIC) 
operates as if the modification were not 
even present, while this does not pro- 
vide a system with two serial ports, it 
offers most (if not all) of the other 
benefits of an improved serial interface 
for OS-9. 



(Questions or comments regarding 
this article may be directed to the author 
at 493 Princess St,, Apt. 604, Kingston, 
Ontario K7L 1C3. Please enclose an 
SASE when requesting a reply.) /£\ 




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May 1 989 THE RAINBOW 1 35 



Do ctor ASC II 



Mini-Phono Jacks 

3 / own a CoCo 3 and would like to 
connect it to a composite monitor. It 
was used with my IBM PC, for which 
I now have an EGA monitor. Is there 
a way to do that? 

Robert Dagenais 
Quebec 

\\j The CoCo 3 has two female mini- 
/C phono jacks at its back. One is 
labeled audio and the other video. Use 
a cable with male mini-phono jacks 
(such as the one that comes with the 
CoCo 3 to make the video connection). 
If your monitor also supports audio, 
you will need a second cable. 

BASIC Trouble 

H I got the back issue of rainbow, as 
~ recommended by Bill Barden on 
j Page 157 of the September '88 issue, 
and have successfully gotten ED- 
TASM+ to work on my I28K CoCo 3 
except for one thing; lean V go to BASIC. 
It seems to go, but locks up as soon as 
I press ENTER. I think the trouble is that 
Line 227 of Roger Schrag's original 
article sends it to $A027, which is Disk 
Extended Color BASIC l.L And I have 
a CoCo 3 that is Disk Extended Color 
BASIC 2. 1. Can you give me the correct 
address for 2 A? 

W.E. Veenschoten 
Birmingham, Alabama 

A soft boot of the CoCo 3 requires 
a jump to $E010. 



Mikeyterm to the Rescue 

/ received a modem DCM-6 and I 
need to know if it is possible to use 
the CoCo 3 without the RS-232 Pak. 
If so, can I use my disk drive with the 
modem and use a Y cable with the CoCo 
3? I heard that the CoCo 3 will get too 
hot with this cable. Can you tell me if 
there is software for a modem? 

George Leal 
Victoria, Texas 



Richard Esposito is the principal engi- 
neer for BDM Corporation. He holds 
bachelor's, master's and doctorate 
degrees from Polytechnic Institute of 
Brooklyn. He has been writing about 
microcomputers since 1980. 

Richard Libra is a simulator test 
operator for Singer Link Simulation 
Systems Division. 




By Richard E. Esposito 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 

with Richard W. Libra 



\\j The hardware in the Tandy De- 
luxe RS-232 Pak is of poor quality 
and unsuitable for downloading soft- 
ware from BBSs and services like Del- 
phi. One such product that has the 
capabilities you desire is Mikeyterm. It 
is available from its author, Michael 
Ward, at 1807 Cortez, Coral Gables, FL 
33134 for $10. Also, it is not wise to use 
a Y cable with the CoCo since it can 
cause too much current draw and over- 
heat the power supply 

Using Hardware, Bypassing Software 

B / own a CoCo 3, Multi-Pak, two 
^ drives, CM -8 monitor, two printers 
0 and an RS-232 Pak. Therein lies the 
problem: I like the ability to use a 
modem and a printer at the same time, 
but the 32-character screen width used 
by the RS-232 Pak is less than adequate 
for most host systems, especially with 
the 40- and 80-character screen availa- 
ble with the CoCo 3 software. Is there 
communications software available 
that uses the 40- and 80-character 
screens and the RS-232 's hardware 
while bypassing its software, or is there 
a way to burn a software package into 
an EPROM and replace the Pak's 
software chip? I have also had a prob- 
lem while attempting to download using 
the Pak. Most BBSs I have used require 



a carriage return to start the download, 
but when I set the Pak for downloading 
and press the BREAK key, I can no 
longer give the host its carriage return. 
Can you suggest a solution? 

Kerry L. Moline 
Denver 

T) The 300-baud DCM-6 connects to 
/C a serial port, not the cartridge 
expansion port. It can be connected 
with a 4-pin DIN to DB25 cable. The 
pin connections for the serial port on 
the back of the color computer (clock- 
wise from the notch) are: 

Pin 1 CD 
Pin 2 RS-232 In 
Pin 3 Ground 
Pin 4 RS-232 Out 

To make the four- wire cable, connect 
Pin 1 to Pin 1 on the DB25, Pin 2 to 
Pin 2 on the DB25, Pin 3 to Pin 7 on 
the DB25, and Pin 4 to Pin 3 on the 
DB25. On the DB25 end, also wire pins 
4, 5 and 8 together and wire pins 6 and 
20 together. There are many commun- 
ications programs for the CoCo. Mi- 
keyterm is available in both tape and 
disk versions and supports 80 columns 
on the CoCo 3. 



Scattered Pokes and Patches 

Recently I bought the program ED- 
TASM+ and would like to switch it 
over to disk but find that the pokes 
and patches necessary seem to be scat- 
tered over a number of different RAIN- 
BOW issues that I unfortunately don't 
have. I wonder if you could reprint 
those pokes with detailed instructions 
on how to implement them. Having a 
CoCo 3, I would also like to use the 
patch for an 80-column screen in your 
column of January '88 by Roger 
Krupski, providing it is compatible with 
EDTASM+ as well as Disk EDTASM. 

Also, in trying to copy the program 
tptodsk in the February '87 issue, Page 
73, using EDTASM+, / get a missing 
operand error in Line 277, which is a 
routine for checking for the version 
(either 1.0 or I.I) of ROM. Because of 
the CoCo 3 version I suspect this may 
be the problem. Being a novice in 
assembly language, I wonder if you 
could suggest a way around this if you 
also believe it may be the cause. 

M. Hooper 
Ontario 



136 



THE RAINBOW May 1989 



O When the CoCo 3 copies the 
ROM code to RAM on boot up, 
one of the things it does is change the 
1 on the sign-on screen of the Disk 
BASIC ROM 1.0 or 1.1 to a 2. These are 
the only ROMs ever sold by Tandy. The 
patches you desire are too extensive for 
a column of this type. THE rainbow 
offers article reprints for $2 each, even 
if the magazine is out of print. RAINBOW- 
ON-TAPE/DISK is also available. 



Out of Characters 

/ have a Co Co 3 with 512K, one 
DSDD drive, CM-8 monitor, a 
CGP-220 printer, OS-9 and Multi- 
Vue. / also own an Amiga 500 with a 
VTI00 emulation package. This setup 
works well and I have used it success- 
fully with many host systems. My prob- 
lem is that I cannot receive characters 
through the RS-232's port from the 
Amiga; the moment I type tsmon /tl, 
my Co Co aborts and responds to no- 
thing except the CLEAR key, which still 
changes me between windows (if I have 
any open). I can output data at any 
speed (300 to 9600 Baud) with no prob- 
lem by typing dir/tl. This works fine 
at any speed, but I read in the Complete 
OS-9 Guide that the terminals accessing 
OS-9 through the internal RS-232 port 
should have a baud of 300. I have tried 
it at 300 baud but it still doesn I work. 
If I type build afile <'tl, the CoCo 
also stops. And when the CoCo stops, 
even on the previous command where 
only the input is redirected, periods are 
sent out the RS-232 and are displayed 
on the Amiga screen. All the above still 
happens even if I have no cable con- 
nected to the CoCos RS-232 port. I 
have also tried this on my brothers 
CoCo 3 (I28K) with the rest of the 
system configuration the same, with the 
same results. Is there a problem with my 
hardware setup, the serial driver or 
what? Also, I purchased Multi-Vue 
because it advertised that Multi-Vue 
can be used to create user-friendly 
interfaces for your developed programs, 
but after opening the package (and 
therefore voiding any chance of return- 
ing it), I find that this is not the case 
because there are no tools for creating 
ICONs. Can you suggest a way I can 
create my own (< user-friendly " interface 
ICONs? 

Walter Zambotti 
Perth, Australia 

13 The port ftl in OS-9 Level II is 
/C unsuitable for two-way commun- 
ication since it accesses the CoCo 3's bit- 



banger serial port, which was designed 
for printers. To connect two computers 
for communication, you need a hard- 
ware serial port like the one supplied in 
Tandy's Deluxe RS-232 Pak or one of 
its clones. A number of mouse-based 
icon editors have been posted on the 
Delphi OS-9 SIG. To date, none of the 
authors have volunteered a deal where- 
by one can be purchased by mail. 



Mods on Delphi 

I own a CoCo 3, FD-500 disk drive 
and OS-9 Level II. I am planning to 
purchase an upgraded Multi-Pak 
interface and an Owl-Ware 3 l /2'inch 
drive. Do you know where I could get 
a driver for the 3V2~inch drive to run it 
under OS-9? Will OS-9 know if I have 
my FD-500 drive in one slot of the 
Multi-Pak and the other drive in 
another slot? How can I use my Radio 
Shack Speech /Sound Pak under OS-9? 

Don Vaillancourt 
Mississauga, Ontario 

T) A 720K 3!/ 2 -inch drive is electri- 
A X cally equivalent to a 720K 80- 
track DSDD 5 ! /rinch drive, for which 
OS-9 Level II includes a device descrip- 
tor in the modules directory. Both 314- 
inch drives and 5!4-inch drives can 
share a common controller, so only one 
Multi-Pak slot would be used. To enable 
a Speech/ Sound Pak to work with OS- 
9 Level II requires replacement of one 
transistor. You will also need new soft- 
ware drivers. Both the drivers and the 
hardware mods are posted on Delphi. 
At the moment, I know of no other 
source. 

Unfamiliar Codes 

r:* How can I send codes to my printer 
with OS-9 to tell my printer to print 
in condensed-character mode? It is 
very easy in BASIC. I tried to build a 
startup and a patch file with those 
codes, and OS-9 doesn't want to recog- 
nize the codes. What can I do? 

Pierre Lortie 
La Tugue, Quebec 

D Use the DISPLAY command. For 
- /L example, DISPLAY xx xx xx >sp 
would send the three hexadecimal codes 
xx xx xx to your printer. 



CoCo del Artiste 

Is there a paint set for the CoCo 2 
that has a plug-in pen so that when 
you put it on your color monitor 
screen, it draws on the screen like 



drawing on paper without using the 
joystick or keyboard? Is there a pro- 
gram that would allow me to use a 
mouse to draw and save to tape in BASIC 
format? Can you use the text graphics 
fCHR$, etc.) instead of the regular PMDDE 
screen to enter in the CoCo Gallery 
contest entry? 

James Ruth 
Newark, New Jersey 

\<, While there were a few companies 
marketing light pens for the CoCo 
1 and 2 a few years back, I know of no 
one doing so now On a CoCo 1 or 2, 
simply CSAVEM the 6144 bytes from 
&H600 to &H1DFF to tape to save a PMDDE3 
or A screen. CLDADM can be used to 
restore a graphic to the screen. 



DC to 1200 

Is it possible to modify Radio 
Shacks DC Modem Pak to operate 
at 1200 baud? 

William F. Irwin 
Toledo, Ohio 



While nothing can be done with 
X the built-in modem, some elec- 
tronics hackers have managed to con- 
vert it to an RS-232 Pak via its ACIA. 
The resulting RS-232 Pak is then used 
with an external modem with baud rates 
up to 9600. 

Using Telcom With DeskMate 

Is there any way to use Telecom in 
Deskmate 3? I also have OS-9 Level 
II. Iam trying to use the 1/ O port in 
the back of my computer. 

Thomas R. Moody 
Mt. Morris, Michigan 

ID The 'tl device descriptor and 
/C associated device driver is unsuit- 
able for two-way communication. The 
ways to use Telecom in Deskmate 3 are 
either with /.t2 and a RS-232 Pak or 
with /ml and a Modem Pak. 



For a quicker response, your ques- 
tions may also be submitted through 
rainbow's CoCo SIG on Delphi. 
From the CoCo SIG> prompt, pick 
Rainbow Magazine Services, then, 
at the RAINBOW> prompt, type 
ASK for "Ask the Experts" to arrive 
at the EXPERTS> prompt, where 
you can select the "Doctor ASCII" 
online form which has complete 
instructions. 



May 1989 THE RAINBOW 137 



F e atur e 



OS-9 Level II 



Using Syscall to enhance BASIC09 



Tools for 
Programming BASIC09 



By Philip Brown 



It's time to overcome the great weak- 
ness of BASIC09 — we will pass 
variables both ways between simul- 
taneously running programs. In the 
process, this article has become a tuto- 
rial in how to use Syscall. 

While working this method out, I 
discovered an error in the Technical 
Section of Level IPs manual: The func- 
tion SS.MpGPB is not a function of 

Get5tt(suscall($BD)), but a function 

of SetStt. Correct this before proced- 
ing with this article's instructions. 

Before we go any further, here's what 
SS.fipGPB does: It passes variables 
through what are commonly called Ge f 
Put buffers, using the BASIC09 routine 
Syscall. What does that mean? Well, 
for starters, Get /Put buffers are areas in 
memory that OS-9 Level II usually uses 
for defining fonts and graphics pointers 
patterns and getting areas of a graphics 
screen. For example, with Gfx2, to use 
GET like the BASIC command GET, you 
have to give a group and buffer number. 
The group number can be anything 

Philip Brown is 17 years old, and has 
been programming for seven years. He 
has learned LOGO and has taught 
himself OS-9 Level th BASIC, BASIC09 
and Assembly language. 



from 1 to 199. The operating system 
itself uses the others. The group number 
puts aside an 8K block for your use, 
which you then have to give a buffer 
number. This buffer is a subdivision of 
that block. It can be any size, from one 
to two bytes, to almost the entire 8K. 

The reason I say almost is because the 
system uses 32 bytes per buffer in the 8K 
block to define size. There are only 
sixty-four 8K blocks in 512K of mem- 
ory. The system brings one into exist- 
ence and permanently determines the 
size of the buffer(s) whenever you load 
a font, pattern or an area of a graphics 
screen. That means, if you want to store 
a greater amount of material, you have 
to kill the buffer (Gfx2("killbuf f")) 
before attempting to get anything 
bigger. Alternately, you can define the 
size of the buffer before you start to do 
anything with Gfx2( "defbuf f Re- 
member also that this is system-wide. If 
you continually do this and don't kill 
them afterwards, you will lose memory 
(8K block per group) without realizing 
it. 

An alternate method is using Display 
with the codes listed in the windowing 
section in the Level II manual. Most of 
it is very comprehensible. For a detailed 
look at Get /Put buffers, read pages 3- 



138 



THE RAINBOW May 1989 



7 to 3-8, DfnGPBuf (define Get/Put 
buffer). 

Now the hard part — Syscall. Sys- 
call is an incredibly useful function. 1 
advise merging it. with BASIC09, if you 
haven't already (then attr basic89 E 
PE). You can do things in Level II that 
you cannot do any other way. It calls for 
various OS-9 machine language sub- 
routines, but don't worry: The proce- 
dure is simple once you understand it. 

There are about 90 system calls listed 
in the technical reference under System 
Calls (Chapter 8). Most of them are too 
technical for easy use — two that can 
be used often are Get Status and Set 
Status (GetStt and Setstt).. They are 
really a compilation of smaller subrou- 
tines, listed on pages 8-112 through 8- 
1 50. All these subroutines are listed with 
55.--, the -- being the actual name of 
the subroutine. 

The line of demarcation between 
GetStt and Setstt routines is 8-131. 
As noted above, the subroutine 
SS„MpGPB(map Get'Put buffer) is on the 
wrong side of that line. When you are 
looking through them, it is important to 
note which side you are on because 
some of the function codes are the same 
but do different things under GetStt 



and Setstt. For instance, Function 88 
under GetStt reads 32 bytes of informa- 
tion from a "path descriptor," whereas 
Function 80, under Setstt, writes 32 
bytes of information. Therefore, SetStt 
Function 80 could crash a window, a 
disk drive, a hard drive, or the whole 
system. I lost count of the times I was 
experimenting, and suddenly the screen 
went haywire while everything locked 
up system-wide. 

Get Status generally only reads the 
status of something, whereas Set Status 
changes it. So Setstt is the one to watch 
out for. As long as you are careful, you 
should be all right. But save everything 
you are working on at least once every 
half hour. 

In using Sysca 11, first define a special 
variable type. Syscall is expecting 
information in that format. The stand- 
ard way to use it, according to the 
section in BASIC09's manual is: Type 
registers=cc,a, b,dp:byte; x,y,u: 
integer DIM regs: registers. 

The cc,a,b . , etc., stand for some 
of the different data registers in the 6809 
chip. Once you have defined the varia- 
ble type, load it with the data asked for 
by the system call you wish to make, 

e.g.: regs.a=l\regs.b=$B3. How do 



you know what to put in? Here's a 
specific example (F$SUser Page 8-39, 
technical reference): If you want a user 
ID of 4, use: 

regs . y=4 

RUN Syscall ($lc, regs) 

The $1C tells Syscall to execute 
F$SUser. The $1C comes from FSSUser 
I03f lc at the top of page 8-39. The I03f 
is a machine language 5WI2 instruction 
you can ignore since you are using 
Syscall. After running Syscall, 
regs.b gives the code of any errors, 
regs.cc is the Condition Code register, 
which involves a knowledge of machine 
language. 

To get to Get Status, or ISGetStt 
(page 8-54), requires a path number to 
be in Register A and the function code 
in Register B. Because of using 
SS.MpGPB, regs. a can be zero and 
regs.b=$84. Additional entry condi- 
tions are given by 5S.MpGP8 (Page 8- 
122): x must have the group number and 
buffer number of a G/P buffer, and y 
must have 1 or 0, telling whether we 
want to map or unmap. If mapping it, 
regs.x will have a memory location as 
the start of the buffer, and regs.y tells 



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A two player naval game for the 512K CoCo3 running OS9 Level 2 It utilizes the 640x 192 high 
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May 1 989 THE RAINBOW 1 39 



how long it is. You can then poke it to 
your heart's content. 

In mapping the system makes a copy 
of the actual buffer into an area your 
program can access. Then whatever you 
do to that area will be done to the 
original until you unmap it. 

This sample program is simple, its 
purpose being only to show that the 
method works. The "core" either prints, 
modifies and prints, or just modifies the 
appropriate buffer. This procedure is 
ideal for forking one main program 
with another and exchanging data. 

Shell basic09 prog(tt)& is one way, 

where 8 is the group buffer number and 
prog is a packed program in the execu- 
tion directory. 

As a reminder, the workhorse for 
these programs is ss.MpGPB, of Sets tt. 
The value of regs . x before the call is the 
group number (anything from 1 to 200) 
*25G +, the actual buffer number. After 
the call, the value of regs.x tells where 
the buffer has been copied to. You can 
then peek and poke those locations 
freely. 

An interesting point on how powerful 
the procedure is as a tool is that after 
I perfected this method, 1 came across 
a reference stating that the system itself 
uses Buffer Group #0 to keep track of 
error messages (you cannot map the 
same buffer into the user space twice). 
This means that if the program has an 
error in the middle, you have to run 
unmap before trying it again. Then run 
l<ill_buff when you've finished with 
the buffer (8K). 

And now directions to the most 
powerful BAS1C09 programming tool 
since Syscall: 

Given are two listings, Core and 
Start. Type very carefully to avoid a 
total system crash of OS-9. Rebooting 
is a pain, so if you can spare the mem- 
ory, keep the main / term window run- 
ning to get out of minor messes and 
operate from windows I and 2. Forget 
about compiling your pet program at 
the same time, though. 

First merge BASIC09, Syscall and 
Gfx2 into one file, attrepe the new file, 
and load it. Gf x2 isn't strictly necessary 
using Syscall, but it makes things 
simpler. Type in the first listing, Core, 
and save* it. Then get back to the OS- 
9 level, build Listing 2, and start and 
execute it (or type it in directly). Get 
into BASIC09 and load Core. Then clear 
and load it on Window I. Run def- 
_buf f . Next, edit Core until it becomes 
Core 2. This involves deleting the line 
with run mod_buf f . You can do it on the 
other window since the buffer can be 



modified by either program. Now run 
Core on both windows. The one without 
the run modJDuff is now subordinate 
because all it does is simply read the 
other's information. 

Switch to the one you left alone, and 
pause it. The numbers on the other 
window will not change because the 
modJDuf f program has been paused on 
the dominant window. If you want, 
retype the line you erased in the subor- 
dinate window and delete it in the 
dominant window, then run both. The 



flow of information is reversed, but it 
doesn't have to be just one way. You can 
have each work on its own separate part 
of the buffer. Each can have different 
buffer numbers to work on, also but 
with the same group number. 

This may sound like a lot of trouble, 
but it's not. Once going, it will never 
screw up again unless something else 
uses the same group and buffer number, 
A way around this is to use the original 
process's ID number for a group 
number using Syscall, although it's 



Listing 1: CORE 
PROCEDURE Core 



0000 SHELL "tmode -pause" 
0010 1 RUN printjmff 

0017 RUN modjmff 
001B PRINT 

001D GOTO 1 

0021 END 
PROCEDURE modjmff 

0000 DIM r : BYTE 

0007 TYPE registers— cc,a,b f dp: BYTE; x,y,u: INTEGER 

002C DIM regs: registers 

0035 DIM d: INTEGER 

003C regs.a«0 

0047 regs,y-l 

0052 regs.b=$84 

005E regs.x«25601 \REM group 100, buffer #1 

0080 (* map buffer 

008D RUN syscall($8E, regs) 

009B IF regs.y*=l THEN 

00AA PRINT "error with syscall" 

00C0 PRINT regs.b 

00C8 PAUSE 

00CA END IF 

00CC FOR d=0 TO 9 

00DC r=INT(RND(99)) 

00E7 POKE regs.x+d,r 

00F7 NEXT d 

0102 PRINT 

0104 regs.y=0 

010F regs.x«25601 \REM group 100,buffer #1 

0131 (* Unmap 

0139 RUN syscall($8E,regs) 

0147 END 
PROCEDURE defjmff 

0000 RUN gf x2 ("defbuf f " , 100 , 1 , 10) 

0018 (* define buffer as 10 bytes long 

0039 RUN gfx2("get'\100, 1,1, 1,1,10) 
0056 END 

PROCEDURE print Jmff- 

0000 TYPE registers=cc,a,b,dp:BYTE; x,y,u: INTEGER 

0025 DIM regs : registers 

002E DIM d: INTEGER 

0035 regs.a~0 

0040 regs.b=$84 



1 40 THE RAINBOW May 1 989 





regs.x=25601 \REM group 100, buffer #1 




regs.y«l 


0079 


RUN sy s call ($8E, regs) 


0087 


(* if it has worked, y==10 ; length of buffer 


00B1 


IF regs.y«l THEN 


00C0 


PRINT "error with syscall" 


00D6 


PRINT regs.b 


00DE 


PAUSE 


00E0 


ENDIF 


00E2 1 


FOR d«0 TO 9 


00F5 


PRINT PEEK(regs ,x+d) ; 


0103 


NEXT d 


01-0E ; 


PRINT 


pup 


regs.y=*0 


011B 


regs, x«25 601 


0127 


RUN syscall($8E,regs) 


0135 


END 


PROCEDURE 


kill buff 


9999 


RUN gfx2("killbuff" l 100,1) 


0016 


END 


PROCEDURE 


unmap 


9999 


TYPE registers=cc,a,b,dp:BYTE; x,y,u: INTEGER 


0025 


DIM regs : registers 


002E 


regs.a-0 


0039 


regs.b=$84 


0045 


regs.y~0 


0050 


regs.x=25601 


005C 


RUN syscaii Q 9oh , regs^ 


006A 


END 



rather complex. You can get it with the 
information you have learned involving 
Syscall. (F$ID, Page 8-22). RUN Sys- 
call ( $0C , regs ) will get it in regs . a. 

The applications are limitless. I'm 
going to use it in a game to keep the 
character-handling routines separate 
from the monsters, so the player doesn't 
slow down when a lot of monsters are 
on the screen. Another use is for a split- 
screen or multiterminal, real-time game 
so you don't have to wait while your 
opponent refuels or whatever. The 
buffer can be any length (to a little 
under 8K). It's a whole new super 
variable type. Work with it carefully, 
until the basics are down. See what you 
can come up with. 

(Questions or comments concerning 
this article may be directed to the author 
at 199 Devon Drive, San Rafael, CA 
94903. Please include an SASE when 
requesting a reply.) □ 



Listing 2: START 




iniz wl 




echo Hi>/wl 




basic09o»/wl& 


r7S 



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CoCo Consultations 



That's One Great Chip! 

I have an old Multi-Pak (Cat No. 26- 
3024) and the upgrade PAL chip for it. 
I also own both CoCo Is and 3s. Can 
I upgrade the Multi-Pak in such a 
fashion that it will work with both the 
older and the newer Color Computers 
that I own? 

Also, can you tell me what the 
jumpers on a Tandon TM-100 series 
drive do, so I can set them to use the 
drive with my CoCo? 

David Johnstone 
Torrington, Connecticut 

After you install the upgrade PAL 
chip in your Multi-Pak, it will work fine 
with the RS-232 pak, disk controller, 
and all other currently sold cards that 
plug into the Multi-Pak, regardless of 
what model CoCo you have. However, 
if you want to use CoCo Max II y the old 
PBJ Word Pak Model I or II, or other 
older pieces of hardware, you need to 
buy a PAL switcher from Microcom to 
allow you to switch back to the older 
PAL chip. 

As far as the jumpers on a Tandon 
TM-100, its 16-pin socket for drive 
select jumpers has an assignment of pins 
to functions as follows: 

1 — 16 HS (not used). 

2 — 15 Drive Select 0. 
3—14 Drive Select 1. 
4 — 13 Drive Select 2. 
5—12 Drive Select 3. 

6 — 11 Multiplex (don't use). 

7 — 10 Spare (don't use). 

8 — 9 HM (not used). 

Only a single jumper in the correct 
drive select position is needed to make 
the drive work with a CoCo. Of course, 
you must also have one and only one 
terminator resistor pak in your drive 
system. That is, the other socket on the 
drive must have a terminator resistor 
pak in it if none of the other drives on 
that cable have one, or (if you are 
adding the drive to a system that already 



Martin H. Goodman, M.D., a physi- 
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142 THE RAINBOW May 1989 




By Marty Goodman 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 



has drives on it) you must remove the 
terminator resistor pak from the other 
socket before adding the drive to the 
system. 



Mount Fujitsu 

Where can I get the screws used to 
mount Fujitsu half-height drives in an 
FD-501 case? 

Scott McCall 
Jacksonville, Florida 

You need to specify what kind of 
screws are required. I will assume that 
the particular drive you are asking 
about uses metric screws, probably 
standard 3 millimeter type. Any decent 
hardware store stocks various sizes of 
metric screws. 

As an alternative, you can use a tap 
to convert the holes in the drive which 
makes it possible to use American S AE 
type 6-32 screws. 

Keep Plugging Away 

Vm tired of plugging and unplugging 
ROM paks from my disk-based Color 
Computer. How can I copy them to disk 
and run them off my disk system? 

Geoff Hall 
Casselberry, Florida 



I have been asked this question liter- 
ally hundreds of times. I have also 
helped fix literally dozens of computers 
that were burned out by folks who 
carelessly unplugged a disk controller 
or ROM pak while the power was on. 
So your question is certainly a pressing 
and legitimate one. The other side of the 
coin is that makers of ROM paks want 
to discourage privacy, and so use the 
fact that their program is in a ROM to 
try to physically prevent making copies. 
This is especially true of the most recent 
releases of ROM pak game software 
from Tandy, which tend to be heavily 
protected against running a RAM en- 
vironment. The older ROM paks can be 
copied to and run from disk using a 
program called Multi-Pak Crack, plus 
added patches. The program may be 
available from Microcom or Second 
City Software. But the new version of 
the program cannot be effectively cop- 
ied to and run from the disk. 

Phone Home CoCo 

I need to know the addresses used by 
various Co Co hardware paks to aid me 
in choosing an address for a hardware 
project. 

Winston Pike 
Escanaba, Michigan 

Currently I don't have a complete 
updated table of such addresses. The 
information is constantly changing as 
new paks are added and others become 
obsolete. I suggest making the project 
in such a way that you can, by moving 
jumpers or changing trace cuts, re- 
address the project's ports to accommo- 
date a range of two or three ports. You 
can also design the device to use the 
SCS line to decode its addresses, plac- 
ing it in the $FF50 to $FF5F range. This 
requires using a slot-dependent device 
with a Multi-Pak. 

Consider whether or not the project 
is likely to be used on a system with, say, 
a Speech/ Sound pak. If not, then don't 
worry about address conflicts. A partial 
list of addresses used by popularly 
available paks is as follows: 

SFF60 Tandy X-Pad (obso- 

— SFF63 lete and rare . . . con- 

sider that space avail- 
able!). 
SFF64 Free (?). 

— $FF67 



SFF68 


Tandy and other RS- 


— SFF6B 


232 paks (Do not use). 


SFF6B 


Tandy DC Modem 


— SFF6F 


Pak and some third 




party RS-232 Pak sec- 




ond ports. (Do not 




use.) 


SFF70 


Speech Systems stereo 


— SFF73 


pak. 


SFF74 


Owl- Ware, L&R Tech, 


— SFF77 


RGB and Ken-Ton 




hard drive system 




ports, and Speech Sys- 




tems SC-01 voice pak. 


SFF78 


Speech System's 


— SFF7B 


EARS. 


$FF7A,B 


Orchestra 90. 


$FF7D,E 


Radio Shack Speech/ 




Sound Pak. 



Note that Disto's Mini Expansion 
Bus uses addressing in the range of 
SFF50 through SFF5F. Hope this helps! 

Who Are Those Guys? 

How do I save to disk pictures I have 
made on the Hi- Res Screen of the Co Co 
3? And who are those guys that pop up 
on the Coco 3 screen when I hit 

CONTROL-ALT-RESET? 

Eric Pike 
Gun Lake, Michigan 

BASIC on the CoCo 3 does not pro- 
vide any means of saving Hi-Res 
screens. You need to write, download 
from Delphi or buy utility programs to 
help you with this. Those guys who pop 
up on the screen during cold starts 
wrote the patches to the old CoCo 
BASIC to make it work on the CoCo 3. 
Delphi users call them the Three Mug- 
ateers, among other things. 

The story goes that a group of pro- 
grammers put the picture in without 
Tandy knowing it until moments before 
the ROM was mass produced. Faced 
with the choice of either further delay- 
ing the release of CoCo 3 or leaving it 
in, Tandy chose to leave it in. The 
picture takes up a full 6K of space in the 
CoCo 3's Extended BASIC ROM, which 
is more than enough space for saving 
Hi-Res picture screens, a full screen 
editor in BASIC, and much more. In- 
stead, we have a not-so-lovely picture. 

An Ideal Picture 

I'm thinking of marketing a product 
and service that will allow users to 
customize their CoCo 3 BASIC ROM by 
having their picture (not that of Micro- 
ware) appear on the screen when they 



hit control - ALT - RESET. However, 
as you know, this involves replacing the 
28-pin ROM chip in the CoCo, which 
is soldered into the CoCo 3 circuit 
board. Is there any way to disable the 
chip without actually removing the 
mother board and desoldering the chip? 

David Barnes 
Second City Software 
Chicago, Illinois 

Yes! All you need do is have your 
customer clip Pin 20 of the ROM on the 
CoCo and solder to the stump of the pin 
as it enters the chip, a IK pull-up 
resistor that goes to +5 volts. That will 
disable the ROM in the CoCo. Then, 
you simply piggy-back on the new 
EPROM, and carefully wire the pad 
previously used with Pin 20 of the old 
ROM to Pin 20 of the new one, which 
you have bent out. Now, while doing 
this is much easier and safer than 
desoldering the entire ROM chip, the 
task can still be difficult for some 
people. Good Luck! 

A Printer of a Different Color 

I have a Quadjet QJ-9000 color print- 
er, which is similar to the Canon PJ- 
1080a and CGP-220 printer. But its 
colors appear to be set differently from 
the way the colors are set using the 
CGP-220. Can I set its DIP switches to 
make it work like a CGP-220? 

John H. Opheim 
Burlington, Kansas 

There were almost a dozen varient 
printers made around the Canon four- 
color-ink jet printer mechanism. Unfor- 
tunately, all of them use slightly differ- 
ent on-board ROM software, and the 
codes for setting colors varies signifi- 
cantly among different printers in that 
family. You need to experiment with the 
codes to find correct ones for your 
printer. As for setting DIP switches, I 
have no way of knowing without the 
documentation for that printer. Do you 
have it? 

Switching Switches Not Good 

/ am having trouble using a ROM 
switcher on DOS ROM chips. Is there 
a difference between Color BASIC and 
DOS ROMs? 

Robert Vernon 
College Station, Texas 

The 24-pin ROMs used in older 
CoCo Is and 2s and in all disk con- 
trollers up until the FD-502 controller • 



system are electrically the same. These 
are 8K-by-8 chips compatible with the 
(now no longer made) Motorola 67866 
and 68764 EPROMs. The 28-pin ROM 
used in the later model CoCo 2s and 
current CoCo 3s are electrically differ- 
ent. Actually, making a ROM switcher 
that switches between two different 
ROMs is not a good idea. Today, with 
16K-by-8, 32K-by-8 and 64K-by-8 
EPROMs so inexpensive and widely 
available, the best way to switch be- 
tween two varient ROMs is to burn 
them into the same bigger EPROM, 
then send +5v or ground the high order 
address lines in a way that appropriately 
selects which 8K, 16K or 32K band on 
the ROM will be active. This approach 
costs less, takes up less space and uses 
less power. Old physical ROM 
switchers are now obsolete, previously 
used when big size EPROMs were 
either unavailable or too expensive. 

Add, Supply and Remove 

How can I use an IBM disk drive on 
my Color Computer? 

Ron Cank 
Missouri City, Texas 

With a 180K or 360K type drive, an 
IBM disk drive works easily on a Color 
Computer. A 720K or 1.2 megabyte 
drive, however, would probably not 
work. 

To add the drive to your existing 
cable, merely add a connector to the 
cable, and supply the drive with its 
required power (+5 volts at .3 amps and 
+ 12 volts at .6 amps) from any appro- 
priate power supply. Also, be sure to 
remove the terminator resistor from the 
drive (if it has one) and select the 
jumpers to indicate what drive number 
you want. IBM's are used as Drive 1 by 
most CoCo users. 

Your technical questions are wel- 
comed. Please address them to CoCo 
Consultations, THE rainbow, P.O. Box 
385, Prospect, KY 40059. 

We reserve the right to publish only 
questions of general interest and to edit 
for brevity and clarity. Due to the large 
volume of mail we receive, we are unable 
to answer fetters individually. 

Questions can also be sent to Marty 
through the Delphi CoCo SIG. From the 
CoCo SIG> prompt, pick Rainbow 
Magazine Services, then, at the RAIN- 
BOW> prompt, type RSK (for Ask the 
Experts) to arrive at the EXPERTS> 
prompt, where you can select the "CoCo 
Consultations" online form which has 
complete instructions. 



May 1989 THE RAINBOW 143 



Learn to share . . 



Chown 



By Evan Robinson 



The program Chown was modeled 
after a program on an Altos 
UNIX System V machine. It 
provides a way of giving other users on 
your system files. I found the need to 
write this when a number of my users 
wanted ownership to some test files I 
had downloaded from systems they had 
no accounts on (primarily because the 
boards I called were long-distance). 

What this program does is simple. 
When you execute it, it searches the 
argv vector for two strings. If not 
found, the usage form is displayed. 
After this, it converts the User ID 
supplied in the first argument to an 
integer via the atoi ( ) function. Then it 
passes the filename and new User ID to 
the choun ( ) call. If an error is detected 
for any reason (the file is a directory file 
or cannot be accessed), it aborts with a 
message. 

The only real problems I have en- 
countered is that only the superuser of 
the system (UID 0) can change owner- 
ship. Not a big problem, but it does 
differentiate from the UNIX equivalent 
that allows user-to-user chowning. 

I recently received as gifts both OS- 
9 and a disk drive. I upgraded the 
system with a second drive and was 
given my own telephone line (I made so 



Evan Robinson is a 12-year-old, self- 
taught programmer who attended Duke 
University's program for verbally- and 
mathematically-gifted youth. 



many modem calls, my mom went 
crazy.). Now I am running a time shar- 
ing system. It's amazing how well a 6809 
can handle concurrent processes. Give 
it a call if you have the time. The 
number is: (407)/686-4833. Login: 
'GUEST' (no password). I started using 
UNIX in June and must say it is great. 



For avid OS-9 users, Chown makes 
adaptation beautiful. 

(Questions or comments concerning 
this article may be directed to the author 
at 1931 Embassy Drive, West Palm 
Beach, FL 33401. Please enclose an 
SASE when requesting a reply.) □ 



The Listing: Chown 



/* 
/* 
/* 
/* 
/* 
/* 
/* 
/* 
/* 
/* 
/* 



Chown 
Modeled 
0S9 



*/ 

Change Ownership of OS-9 Files (Not Directories) 



-after the UNIX equivalent 
chown UID FILESPEC 



UNIX- TM (AT&T) 



Compile with the Microware C Compiler: CCl chown. c 
Submitted by: 



Evan Robinson 
1931 Embassy Drive 
Vest Palm Beach, FL 33401 

#include <stdio.h> 
main(argc r argv) 
int argc ; 
char *argv[ ] ; 
( 

char *fname; 
int uid; 



*/ 
*/ 

*z 

*/ 

*/ 

*/ 

*/ 
*/ 
*/ 
*/ 



if (--argc H 2) { 



} 



helpO ; 
exit(JJ) ; 



uid - atoi(argv[l] ) ; 

fnarae - argv[2] ; 

if (chown (fnarae, uid) ! 



i 

e iror ( " tiiown ! Can't access given file") I 

exit(P) ; 

) 



) 

help() 
( 



exit(P); 



puts( "Usage :\n M ); 

puts < " chown UID FILE") ; 

puts ("Makes UID owner of FILE") ; 



144 THE RAINBOW May 1989 



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RAINBOWTECH 




OS-9 



More BASIC09 
Programming 



By Richard A. White 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 



Last issue, we began a discussion of 
a BASIC09 program to enter and 
analyze data from a small local 

survey. While the program is not some- 
thing many people will have a use for, 
it does provide good illustrations of 
BAS1C09 programming that will help 
people to write their own. Whether you 
use a programming language, spread- 
sheet program, a database manager or 
some more specialized piece of soft- 
ware, you need to give the computer 
exact details of what you want to do. 
This is programming. 

For a general programming lan- 
guage, BASIC09 is particularly easy to 
work with. It is similar to conventional 
BASIC languages that many people 
already know. BASIC09 differs substan- 
tially, however, in how it deals with 
variables. Initially, this can be a prob- 
lem to an inexperienced programmer. 
But, once one has developed an under- 
standing of BASIC09 variables, the pro- 
gram is less difficult. There also comes 
a greater appreciation of the program's 
power. 

Accordingly, a substantial portion of 
last month's column discussed defining 

Richard White lives in Fairfield, Ohio, 
has a long background with microcom- 
puters and specializes in basic pro- 
gramming. With Don Dollberg, he is 
the co-author of the TIMS database 
management program. 



variables used in a survey analysis 
program. Another major topic of the 
last month's column was setting up the 
disk files. If you have not read that 
article, it is a good idea to do so before 
proceeding with this article. 

We will now move into the data entry 
part of the program. To reset the stage, 
I have 350 of 3500 survey response 
forms. Each form has a dozen items, 
one or more of which can be checked. 

The simplest way from a program- 
ming standpoint is to write a series of 
INPUT statements, each of which asks a 
"yes" or "no" question. One problem is 
that I need to read each one each time 
to stay synchronized in choosing an 
appropriate keystroke. 

Another is that this approach does 
not provide for corrections after a 
question is answered. The input screen 
has a menu showing each possible 
choice. A pointer can be moved up or 
down with the arrow keys. Choices are 
selected by moving the pointer and 
pressing ENTER. 

REPERT 

( * Input Screen * ) 

PRINT CHR$(12); 
SHELL "tmode -1 echo" 
SHELL "tmode .1 -pause" 

Since the data-entry process takes 
quite a bit of time, the program needs 



to loop through the code for each form 
until it receives a signal to quit. BASIC09 
provides a number of control structures 
to facilitate this. REPERT . . UNTIL serves 
our purposes best. When it gets to the 
end, the condition is tested and, if true, 
the loop is exited. If the condition is not 
true, program control is returned to the 
line below the REPERT. 

BASIC09 does not have a cis com- 
mand like Color BASIC. ASCII Charac- 
ter 12, at the top of the form, starts a 
new page on a printer, but also clears 
the screen and puts the cursor at the 
upper left corner. 

BAS1C09 makes full use of OS-9 serv- 
ices and expects the programmer to do 
so as well. One of these services is 
writing to the screen. When you boot 
OS-9, three standard, numbered, I/O 
paths are opened. These are input from 
Keyboard 0, normal output to Screen 1, 
and error output to Screen 2. These 
paths can be redirected so that errors 
can be sent to the printer or to a file. 

After you have booted, OS-9 handles 
special characters sent along these 
paths. For example, the ASCII Charac- 
ter 12 clears the screen. The keyboard 
up arrow normally sends this character. 
When you are working at the OS-9 
prompt, the ASCII 12 is trapped by 
Shell if you press the up arrow, and 
OS-9 displays a period instead. When 
you are in a BASIC09 program, Shell is 
not in use, and OS-9 will normally send 



146 



THE RAINBOW May 1989 



or echo all keystroke characters to the 
screen and program. 

Sometimes there is a problem with 
this. Say, I want to move the up arrow 
up one line. If I don't do something 
when I press the up arrow, OS-9 clears 
the screen and the program prints the 
cursor at a line that has been erased. 
BAS1C09 can send a message to OS-9 to 
turn the echo off so when I press the up 
arrow, the ASCII 12 character goes 
only to the program that does my 
bidding. This is fine until, for instance, 
I type in a ZIP code and want to see 
what I am typing. If echo is off, turn it 
back on by typing shell "tmade .1 - 
echo". This line is in the program just 
before I start to use the arrow keys to 
move the cursor. Now when the pro- 
gram loops back for the next form's 
data, echo is off so I add shell "tmode 
.1 echo" to turn it back on for the ZIP 
code entry. 

OS-9 also prints the screen in pages 
and then stops for you to read what was 
printed. When you press a key, OS-9 
continues with the next page. This 
feature is called pause. You can set this 
to however many lines you want using 



Xmode and then immediately make a 
new boot using Cobbler. The settings in 
your computer will be the settings when 
you boot again using the new boot disk. 
To manage paging with the program 
instead of OS-9, shell "tmode .1 - 
pause" turns pause off. Note that under 
Level II, Tmode only affects the window 
where it is used and not other active or 
future windows. 

PRINT 

PRINT TAB (10); "CINCINNRTI DIVISION 
5HQW SURVEY" 

PRINT TRB(15); "FILENAME "; fname 

PRINT 

PRINT 

PRINT 

PRINT TRB(15) ; c(l) 
PRINT TRB(15) ; c(2) 
PRINT TAB(15); c(3) 
PRINT TRB(15) ; c(4) 
PRINT TRB(15) ; c(5) 
PRINT TRB(15) ; c(G) 
PRINT TRB(15) ; c(7) 
PRINT TRB(15) ; c(B) 
PRINT 

PRINT TRB(15) ; c(10) 
PRINT TRB(15) ; c(ll) 



PRINT TRB(15) ; c(12) 
PRINT TRB(15); c(13) 

This section of code prints our screen 
to look like a menu. In last month's 
column, I explained setting up an array 

of strings, DIM c(13) :STRING[20], and 

showed assigning text to each array 
member. Here we use that array to print 
the menu entries. I assume that most of 
you have used PRINT TRB(xx) under 
Color BASIC. It works the same under 

BASIC09. 
PRINT 

PRINT TRB(20) ; "Q to Quit" 
PRINT 

PRINT TRB(15); "QUE5TI0NNRIRES EN- 
TERED = "; countl 

As a reminder, quit by pressing the Q 
key. Printing "QUESTIONNAIRE ENTERED 
= "; countl is like Color BASIC except 
the delimiter, ; , between the string and 
variable is required, where it is optional 
in Color basic. If you forget, BASIC09 
will remind you when you try to enter 
a line with this error in it. 



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May 1 989 THE RAINBOW 1 47 




About 
The One-Liner 
Contest . . . 

the rainbow's One-Liner 
Contest has now been ex- 
panded to include programs 
of either one or two lines. 
This means a new dimen- 
sion and new opportunity 
for those who have "really 
neat" programs that simply 
just won't fit in one line. 

Here are the guidelines: 
The program must work in 
Extended basic, have only 
one or two line numbers and 
be entirely self-contained — 
no loading other programs, 
no calling ROM routines, no 
poked-in machine language 
code. The program has to 
run when typed in directly 
(since that's how our read- 
ers will use it). Make sure 
your line, or lines, aren't 
packed so tightly that the 
program won't list com- 
pletely. Finally, any instruc- 
tions needed should be very 
short. 

Send your entry (prefera- 
bly on cassette or disk) to: 

THE RAINBOW 

One-Liner Contest 

P.O. Box 385 
Prospect, KY 40059 




RUN printat(15,4) 

countl=countl+l 

INPUT "ZIP CODE: ",zip(countl) 

Printat is a separate function that 
moves the cursor to a specific column 
and row in other columns. The INPUT 
statement is conventional. You can use 
, or ; for the delimiter. 

RUN printat(9,G) 
PRINT ">;" 

With the ZIP code entered, you can 
now enter the other data. The > is 
printed pointing to the top choice on the 
list. 

(* Data Input *) 

SHELL "tmode .1 -echo" 

rou=G 

flag=l 

Now the echo is turned off so we 
avoid the CHR$(12) screen-clearing 
problem. You will see why we set f lag=l 
after the next code block. 

WHILE flag=l OR answerOCHRS ( 13 ) DO 
GET 80 , answer 
RUN isupper ( answer ) 

This loop cycles back until all choices 
have been made. Since WHILE. .DO tests 
for specified condition at its beginning, 
I set f lag=l to assure entry, though on 
checking back I see the answer must be 
either I or L to have gotten this far. 
These things happen in quickly written 
programs where sometimes things are 
done locally to ensure power that may 
not be needed. 

The command BET tto works better 
than IN KEY. It waits for a keystroke 
rather than making the programmer 
write a loop to keep checking for input. 
In this case, the answer was DlMensioned 
as STRING[1], so any keystroke, includ- 
ing ENTER, satisfies BET and allows the 
program to move on. If the answer had 
been DlMensioned for more than one 
character, you would have needed to 
either enter the number of characters or 
press ENTER to terminate the entry. 

The keystroke Q can be entered to 
terminate data entry. This can come in 
lowercase SO isupper ( answer ) is run to 
promote the character to caps if needed. 



(* MOVE CURSOR UP *) 
IF answer=CHR$(12) THEN 
IF row>G THEN 

RUN printat(9,row) 



PRINT " 

row=row-l 

RUN printat(9,row) 

PRINT ">;" 

fJLagri 
ENDIF 

When you key an up arrow, the first 
IF. . THEN statement is satisfied and the 
cursor-up routine is entered. If the 
cursor is positioned below Row 6, there 
is room to move up and the second 
IF.. THEN statement is satisfied. The 
program then erases the cursor on the 
screen by printing a space on top of it 
and printing a new one on the row 
above. The flag is set to 1 to show that 
the last operation was a cursor move 
rather that a selection of a list item. 
Note that if the cursor is pointing to the 
top list entry, nothing happens. 

(* JUMP EMPTY ROW *) 
IF row=14 THEN 

RUN printat(9,row) 

PRINT " "; 

row = row-l 

RUN printat(9,row) 

PRINT ">;" 
ENDIF 
ENDIF 

We have to deal with a blank line in 
the list separating two types of data. If 
the cursor is moved to Line 14, the 
blank, this ctide simply moves it up to 
Line 13. The flag has already been set 
to get to Line 14 so it does not need to 
be reset. The final ENDIF statement 
terminates the cursor-up code. 

(* MOVE CURSOR DOWN *) 
IF answer=CHR$(10) THEN 
IF row<lB THEN 

RUN printat (9, row) 

PRINT " 

row=row+l 

RUN printat(9,row) 

PRINT ">;" 

flag=l 
ENDIF 

(* JUMP EMPTY ROW DOWN *) 
IF row=14 THEN 

RUN printat(9,row) 

PRINT " "; 

row=row+l 

RUN printat(9,row) 

PRINT ">;" 
ENDIF 
ENDIF 

The cursor-down code almost mir- 
rors the cursor-up code. 



1 48 THE RAINBOW May 1989 



(* RESET FLAG FOR ADDED SELECTION 

*) 

IF flag=0 AND ansuerOCHRS ( 13 ) 
THEN 

flag=l 
ENDIF 

A situation can occur where the 
cursor is at the top or bottom of the list, 
and the user presses the arrow that 
moves the cursor beyond the list. In this 
case nothing happens, and the flag is not 
set to I. The code above assumes the 
user wants to make another choice and 
sets the flag so that pressing ENTER will 
not terminate data input. 

(* ADD SELECTION TD RECORD *) 

IF flag=l AND answer=CHR$( 13) THEN 

ON rou-5 GOSUB 6,7,8,9,10,11,12, 

13, 14, 15, 16, 17, IB 

f lag=0 

ansuier="" 

rec(countl) .ar=l 
ENDIF 

To select or deselect a choice, move 
the cursor to the choice and press 
ENTER. Moving the cursor sets the flag 
to 1 and ENTER lets the program enter 
the code piece. 

ON x GOSUB uses the value in X to count 
to a line number right of the GOSUB and 
then sends the program to that line. 
Counting starts with 1, while the first 
entry on the list is in Row 6. Subtracting 
5 from the row gives us the needed item 
number in the list. 

The line-numbered subroutines fol- 
low the END statement. Now the pro- 
gram can never get to them except by 
being specifically sent by a GOSUB or 
GOTO. Lines 13 and 14 are given as an 
example: 

13 RUN printat(ll,row) 



IF rec(countl) .oth=0 THEN 
rec ( count 1 ) . othFl 
PRINT 

ELSE 

rec(countl) .oth=0 
PRINT " "; 
ENDIF 

RUN printat(9,rou) 

RETURN 

14 RETURN 



"A data selection 
subroutine must deal with 
both selection and 
deselection of a specific 
data point* The process is 
essentially binary for this 
program since the 
respondent either checks or 
does not check the item." 



A data selection subroutine must deal 
with both selection and deselection of a 
specific data point. The process is 
essentially binary for this program since 
the respondent either checks or does not 
check the item. Also, a mark next to the 
item on the screen shows it was selected. 

The printat process is run to locate 
the cursor for marking or unmarking. 
Next, the variable in the record pertain- 
ing to this choice, rec(countl) .oth, is 
checked to see if it is zero (not selected). 
In that case, rec(cauntl) .oth is set to 
1, indicating selection, and an O is 
printed to mark selection on the screen. 
If the item had been previously selected, 



the code after ELSE would be used to 
deselect the item and remove the selec- 
tion mark from the screen. The print- 
at ( 9 , row ) moves the cursor back where 
it was before the subroutine was en- 
tered. 

Remember that Line 14 was blank. If 
you accidentally select it, simply press 

ENTER. 

EXITIF ansuier="Q" THEN 
ENDEXIT 

ENDWHILE UNTIL ansuer="Q" 

Right now the program sits at the end 

Of a WHILE. .DO. -ENDWHILE loop that is 

inside a REPEAT. .UNTIL loop. Each time 
entry of a survey form's data is com- 
plete, the program exits the WHILE loop 

since f lag=0 and ansuer=CHR$(13), but 

it jumps right in to start the next form. 
Q to quit is not part of the loop exit 
conditions, but we can add this with the 
statement EXITIF .. THEN .. ENDEXIT. 

This is simply a special IF.. then 
. .ELSE. .ENDIF statement allowing the 
programmer certain actions only when 
exiting a loop and then getting out. 

When ansuei — "Q" and the WHILE loop 

are exited, the conditions are met to 
leave the REPEAT. .UNTIL loop exited as 
well. 

(* SfiVE RECORDS TO FILE *) 
OPEN ttpath,fname:WRITE 
PUT ttpath , rec 
PUT ttpath, zip 
CLOSE ttpath 

Immediately on exit, the records are 
saved to a file and that file is closed. 

Following this is the tabulation of 
data and a printed report of the results. 
I will not go into that now — you have 
enough to think about for one month. 



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SDISK+BOOTFIX - As above plus boot directly from a double sid- 
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REQUIRES SDISK3 $45.00 or with SDISK3 for $65.00 

L1 UTILITY PAK 40 utilities including MACGEN $49.95 

L2 UTILITY PAK Level 2 Ram Disk and Printerr driver plus 10 
more $39.95 BOTH L1+L2 Paks for $75.00 

PC-XFER File transfer utilities read/write/format MS-DOS format 



>my_system »no_errors #51 2K & 

disks under COCO OS-9, REQUIRES SDISK or SDISK3. $45.00 
FORTH09 A FORTH-83 Standard implementation specially taylored 
for OS-9. Includes complete forth 6809 assembler and more. Pro- 
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SEND S.A.S.E FOR LATEST CATALOG 

All diskettes are in CoCo OS-9 format unless otherwise requested; other OS-9 for- 
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OS-9 is a trademark of Microware and Motorola Inc., MS-DOS is a trademark of Microsoft, 
Inc., FORTH09 is a trademark of D. P. Johnson 



May 1989 THE RAINBOW 149 



RAINBOWTECH 




Simple CoCo interfacing for the all- thumbs Co Co Nut 



Dev ces, Unlimite 

By William Barden, Jr. 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 



Stop! Don't turn that page! Even if you've never held 
a soldering iron, even if you don't know what a 
transistor looks like, I'm going to show you how to 
do some amazing things with your CoCo 1, 2 or 3. For under 
$20 and for about one hour's work, you'll be able to do these 
things (and more): 

• Detect night and day 

• Detect when room lights are turned on or off 

• Measure wind direction 

• Make a sensitive light meter 

• Measure inside and outside temperature 

• Count the customers coming through your shop's door 

• Make a multi-circuit burglar alarm 

• Make a water-level detector 

• Sound an alarm when your mail is delivered 

Does this sound like hype? It isn't. Does it sound as if you'll 
need a master's degree in electrical engineering? You won't. 
I'll show you how to do these things and more with little cost, 
no modifications to your CoCo, easy-to-obtain parts, no 
dangerous voltages and no experience whatsoever. Inter- 
ested? Read on . . . 

The Simplest CoCo Interface 

To do these things on the CoCo, you will use the joystick 
inputs as a simple interface and use simple, low-cost switches 
and devices available at your local Radio Shack or other 
electronic parts store. There are two joystick inputs on every 
CoCo, whether you have a CoCo 1, 2 or 3. Normally they 
are meant to be used with joysticks for games or screen 



Bill Barden has written 27 books and over 100 magazine 
articles on various computer topics. His 20 years* experience 
in the industry covers a wide background: programming, 
systems analysis and managing projects for computers 
ranging from mainframes to micros. 



drawing programs. However, the inputs can be used for other 
purposes. 

You don't really need to know how the joysticks work to 
hook up some of the devices I'm going to show you, but let 
me give you a thumbnail sketch anyway. The joystick 
internals are shown in Figure 1 . 

It's a simple electrical device, consisting of two potentiome- 
ters and two switches. 

The potentiometers are variable resistors that change a 
resistance value from about 0 to 100,000 ohms. Resistance 
is an electrical quantity similar to friction in a water pipe — 
increase the resistance and less current flows, just as less water 
flows in a hose when you squeeze it. When you manipulate 
the joystick control of your CoCo, the resistance of the two 
potentiometers are changed according to the joystick's 
position. 

One potentiometer is affected by the up/down motion of 
the joystick while the other is affected by the left/ right 
motion. The resistance values of both joysticks are read by 
the special circuitry within the CoCo. The resistance values 
are then read by the JOYSTK command in BASIC, which returns 
values of 0 to 63, representing resistance values of 0 to about 
100,000 ohms. Here's a simple BASIC routine to read the right 
joystick: 

* 

100 fl=JOYSTI<(0) 
110 B=J0YSTI<(1) 
140 PRINT ft;B 
150 GOTO 100 

To see the results, enter NEW 

Enter lines 100 through 150. Then enter RUN. You'll see two 
columns of values — A followed by B. The A value changes 
from 0 to 63 as the joystick is moved from left to right while 
B changes from 0 to 63 as the joystick is moved from top 
to bottom. 

Of course, you have two joystick plugs on all CoCos. The 



150 



THE RAINBOW May 1989 



Up/Down >■ 
Left/Right > 



Ground >- 



Potentiometer 



+5V > 



Potentiometer 



Button 1 >- 



Switch 



Button 2 >- 
(Some Models) 



Switch 



Figure 1: Joystick Diagram 



JOYSTK command in BASIC also reads the left joystick in this 
manner: 

100 R=JOYSTI<(0) 
110 B=JDYSTK(1) 
120 C- JOYSTK ( 2 ) 
130 D=J0YSTI<(3) 
140 PRINT fl;B 
150 GOTO 100 

To see how this code works, enter lines 120 and 130 and 
enter RUN. You'll see four columns representing the two 
joysticks' X and Y values. 

In addition to the movable lever on the joystick, there's 
also a button or two to zap alien invaders or to mark screen 
positions. This button is a simple, normally open switch. (See 
Figure 1.) Normally open means no connection is made while 
the switch is not pushed. When the switch is pushed, a 
connection is made, and the CoCo can detect the change. 

CoCo 3's BASIC has a special command not found in the 
other CoCos that detects joystick-button pushes. Appro- 
priately, it's called BUTTON and works like this: 

200 E=BUTTON(0) 
210 F=BUTT0N(1) 
220 G=BUTTDN(2) 
230 H=BUTT0N(3) 
240 PRINT E;F;G;H 
250 GOTO 200 

To see how this works, enter OK and NEW and then lines 200 
through 250. Finally, enter RUN and you'll see 0 0 0 0 on the 
screen until you press buttons on the right or left joystick. 
Then you'll see the number 1 in the position corresponding 
to the joystick switch. The 1 will remain there until the button 
is released. 

If you have a CoCo 1 or 2, use the following code to read 
the buttons on the right and left joysticks: 

200 E=(PEEIC(&HFF00) AND 1) 

210 G=(PEEK(&HFF00) AND 2) 

220 IF E=0 THEN PRINT 1; ELSE PRINT 0; 

230 IF G=0 THEN PRINT 1 ELSE PRINT 0 

240 GDTD 200 

The code above goes further into the hardware to read the 
input bits for each joystick button since there isn't a BUTTON 



Light Bulb 



SPST 




SPDT 



Switch 



Circuit A 



Circuit B 



DPDT 



Momentary 




®-c ( j „ 



Figure 2: Switch Types 



command in this BASIC. Here's the vital thing about the 
joystick ports on the CoCo: The CoCo doesn't really know 
whether it's reading an official joystick value or button push 
or if it's reading another resistance or switch. You can, for 
example, substitute a 0- to 100,000-ohm resistance value for 
one or both ports and any type of switch — even one located 
hundreds of feet away from the CoCo. The CoCo software 
will still return a value of 0 to 63 for the resistance and a 0 
or 1 for the switch position — open or closed. Are there 
devices we can substitute for the official joysticks? You bet, 
and many will do wonderful things. 

Substitute Switches 

Let's talk about switches first. There's no reason you 
cannot hook two wires to the pins of the joystick plug and 
run them up to 50 feet away. When you touch them together, 
the CoCo will detect the switch closure. Bare wire will work, 
but there are all kinds of inexpensive switches available. 

Figure 2 shows the simplest type of switch, called SPST 
(Single Pole, Single Throw). Once thrown, it remains in that 
position until thrown back the other way. A variation on this 
type is a momentary switch, which closes as long as your 
finger is on the button but opens when the switch is released. 
Momentary switches come in normally open and normally 
closed. For our purposes, normally open is probably best. 

Another type of switch, the SPDT (Single Pole, Double 
Throw) is shown in Figure 2. This switch has two positions 
— A and B. It can be used the same way as the SPST by 
not connecting the other position. A DPDT switch uses 
another circuit enabled by the same mechanical switch. It's 
overkill for our purposes, but it can be used. 



May 1989 THE RAINBOW 151 



□raw-Switch 
Dull ins 




Switch 
Leads 



Tinloil 



Cut Out Hole 




Make irttqlf:: 
5-Layer Sandwich 



Press to 

Activate 




Glue 



Figure 3: Homemade Switch 



j 



Norrnalty Closed in Series 



(Opening any 
switch Opens- 
entire circuit \ 



l^onrMiiy Open in Parallel 



(Closing any 
switch clasps 
anlira circuit) 



Figure 4l Switches in Series and Para I lei 



Many varieties of switches are momentary switches that 
operate when you step on a mat, push a button, use a lever, 
bring a magnet close (for security systems), etc. Almost any 
switch will work with this application since the voltages and 
currents are low and not dangerous. You can even make your 
own switch by using two pieces of tinfoil separated by a piece 
of cardboard with a cutout in the center. (See Figure 3.) 
Although you wouldn't want to use it to switch 700,000 volts, 
it is fine for CoCo joystick use. 

Figure 4 offers another hint on switches. Switches can be 
put in series if they are normally closed. In this case, 
activating one or more switches will open the circuit. If you 
are using normally open switches, they can be put in parallel, 
so activating one or more switches will close the circuit. That 
way many switches can be joined together (e.g., for a burglar 
alarm circuit that uses a switch at each window). 



Many electronic devices act as switches. Radio Shack car- 
ries such devices as opto-isolators and analog switches that 
can be connected to joystick inputs. These are out of the realm 
of this article, however, so we won't go into the details here. 

Substitute Resistors 

Besides the millions of switches lining those parts partitions 
at your local Radio Shack, there are many devices that can 
be used in place of the joystick potentiometers. These are a 
few we'll be using in this article: 

• Thermistor: A resistor whose resistance varies according to 
temperature — a kind of thermal resistor. Using a thermistor, 
we can measure temperature reading. 

• Cadmium Sulfide Photocell: A resistor whose resistance 
varies with the amount of light it receives. Used to measure 
the intensity of sunlight or room lights, or to detect when 
lights are turned off or on in a room. (See Figure 5.) 

• Standard Potentiometer: A typical pot, or potentiometer, 
can be used in place of the one found in the CoCo joystick. 
Like switches, there are a million varieties of pots that range 
in ohms and may be either linear or audio taper. For our 
purposes, use a 100,000-ohm pot (100K) with a linear taper. 
The linear taper ensures that a rotation of one half turn will 
change the resistance by one half. (See Figure 5.) 

How to Measure the World with Your CoCo 

The first step in using your CoCo for the applications 
mentioned above is to replace one or more joysticks with a 
special cable. You can leave one joystick connected and plug 
the cable into the other joystick plug. Or you can unplug a 
joystick and replace it with a special cable. 

One way to get a special cable is to sacrifice a joystick or 



152 THE RAINBOW May 1989 



Thermistor 



1/10" 




(271-110) 



Leads 



Cadmium 

Sulfide 

Photocell 




(276-1 16A) 



Leads 



1/2" \ — 



Potentiometer 

Rotating Shaft 
\ 





Terminals are: 
A—av— B 

2 & t 

B C 



(271-092) 



2%" 



Figure 5: Resistive Devices Substituted for 
Joystick Potentiometer 



high-resolution joystick interface ($19.95 or $9.95). Cut the 
cable, getting as much length as possible. Strip the outer 
covering with scissors or wire cutters and expose two inches 
of each wire. Then cut off about one-half inch of covering 
on each wire to expose the bare wire. 

You can also buy an Archer 6-Pin DIN Plug (Cat. No. 274- 
020). This plug fits the CoCo joystick connector. The bare 
DIN plugs require soldering five or six wires — no great chore 
if you're handy with tools. Use rosin-core solder and a small 
soldering iron. Use any general, stranded hookup wire. (Solid 
wire breaks easily after repeated bending.) Any gauge from 
18 to 24 will do nicely. 

The ideal cable has a 5- or 6-pin DIN plug on one end to 
fit the right joystick connector and five or six wires on the 
other end. Connect alligator clips (Cat. No. 270-1545) to the 
five or six ends. The result will look like Figure 6. 

Find and mark the function of each wire. To do this, trace 
the wires from the connector end either visually or by a 
continuity tester. (The pin-out and a simple continuity tester 
are shown in Figure 7.) Put a piece of masking tape around 
each lead as it is identified. (By the way, as I write this, I am 
connecting each lead to all other leads. There's no blinding 
flash of light as the CoCo keyboard melts down into a slag 
of plastic and Tandy labels.) Don't be too concerned about 
getting the leads all correctly identified. 

Are the leads identified and marked? Good, now we can 
get down to business. 

Dark and Light Detector 

A cadmium sulfide photocell (Cat. No.276-116A) can be 
used to detect light or dark conditions. Connect the photocell 
to a 15K-ohm, [4-watt resistor (Cat. No. 271-1337) and to 



5- or 6-Pin DIN Plug 
(274-003 or 274-020) 



To CoCo 
Joystick ' 
Jack 




Cut From 
Existing 
Joystick, or 
Assembled 



Five or Six 
Alligator 
Clips 

(270-1545) 
Attach to Wires 



Figure 6: CoCo Joystick Special Cable 



Joystick-Jack Pin Out 

(As Seen Looking at Jack on CoCo) 



Pin 5: 
+5 volts 

Pin 4 
Button 1 



Pin 6: (Not found on 
CoCo 1s and 2s) 
Button 2 



Pin 1: Left-Right 
Pin 2: Up-Down 



Pin 3: Ground 




Simple-continuity Tester 

(Either lead 
can be 
connected) 



Buzzer 

(273-055) 





6-Volt Lantern 
Battery (23-016) 



(Put one end on 
pin, other end 
on wire. Buzzer 
sounds if they 
are the same wire.) 



Figure 7: Pin Out and Continuity Tester 



May 1989 THE RAINBOW 153 



ToCoCo . 
Joystick Connector^^ 



Unused 
Pin 




Unused 
(To Pin 4) 



Ground 
(Pin 3) 



15K, 1/4-W 

Resistor 

(271-1337) 



Input for Left/Right 
(Pin 1) 



Cadmium Sulfide 
Photocell (276-1 16A) 



(Twist leads 
together) 



Figure 8: A Dark- and Light-Detector 



three leads from the special cable as shown in Figure 8. This 
brings in the photocell value as Variable A in the following 
routine: 



100 A=JOYSTl<(0) 
140 IF R > .35 THEN PRINT "LIGHT" ELSE PRINT "DfiRK" 
150 GOTO 100 

Now the photocell can be used to measure dark or light. 
The limit, value can be changed depending upon your 
interpretation of dark or light. In our test oh a CoCo 3, the 
value shown was between a darkened room and a room in 
overcast daylight. Some potential uses for this application 
include sounding an alarm (with the BASIC SOUND command), 
signaling light leakage in a photo darkroom, or triggering a 
wake-up program that plays music when the sun comes up k 

The photocell can be located hundreds of feet away from 
the CoCo — the resistance of the wire will be small in 
comparison to the photocell. The value of A will determine 
just what you want to do with the photocell. 

A Sensitive Light Meter 

The CdS photocell is capable of more than determining 
dark- and light-limit values. It can be used to discern 
differences in up to 64 shades of lighting. Use an inexpensive 
potentiometer as shown in Figure 9 to get a wide range of 
lighting values. Adjust the potentiometer for the best 
sensitivity under the lighting conditions you want to measure. 
In our test, a lOOK-ohm potentiometer, adjusted to about 
mid-scale, measured lighting conditions inside a house. 

You can scale the value measured by multiplying by a 
constant. This may change the measured value into more 
useful units. You can also establish as many limit values as 
you want based on these results: 

1000 IF A<30 THEN PRINT "CLOUDY" ELSE IF R<40 THEN PRINT 
"PARTLY CLOUDY" ELSE PRINT "SUNNY" 



To CoCo 
Joystick Connector 



Unused 




Unused 
(To Pin 4) 



Ground 

(Pin 3) ^ Scrap Pieces 



Unused 10QK 
Potentiometer 
(271-092) 



Cadmium 
Photocell 
(276-1 16A) 



{Twist loads 
together) 



{Rotate shaft 
to change 
resistance; 



Figure 9: A Sensitive Light Meter 



Some potential uses for this application include a photo- 
graphic contrast meter, ambient light measurement, weather 
conditions or a light pen. Use up to four inputs (two channels 
on each joystick connector) to measure light intensity at four 
locations. 

A Thermometer 

A thermistor (Cat. No. 271-110) can be used to measure 
temperature; however, since the maximum number of values 
is 64 (0 to 63), it may be difficult to get within a degree of 
the temperature. Use the thermistor for an approximation of 
temperature. Like the photocell, this application can do a 
limit check to test for high versus low temperatures or 
measure a range of temperatures. The software is identical 
to the code for the photocell. 

I calibrated the thermistor by immersing it in ice water and 
allowing it to reach room temperature (about 68 degrees in 
chilly California) and then measuring the body temperature ' 
of a Shetland sheepdog (by a procedure I won't document). 
The reading with the setup in Figure 10 was 17 for ice water, 
25 for room temperature, and 32 for the Sheltie. Unfortu- 
nately, intermediate readings are not linear (i.e., halfway 
between 32 degrees and 68 degrees — 49 degrees — will not 
necessarily give a value of 21). You might have to get a value 
and convert it in the following manner: 



1000 IF A=XX THEN A=XX ELSE IF A=XX THEN R=XX ELSE IF R=XX 
THEN FFXX ELSE . . . 



* 

Like the photocell, the thermistor may be located hundreds 
of feet aWay and connected by a pair of wires. Use up to four 
inputs (two channels on each joystick connector) to measure 
temperatures at four locations. Potential uses for this 
application include fire detection, attic overheating, or 
freezing-point detection. 



154 



THE RAINBOW May 1989 



To CoCo 
Joystick Connector 




Unused 
(To Pin 4) 



Thermistor 
(271-110) 



Ground 
(Pin 3) 



- 10K.1/4-W 
Resistor ■ 
(271-1335) 

\ Input for Left/Right 
(Twist leads ( pin1 ) 
together) 



Figure 10: A Thermometer 



Glue Shaft 



Cardboard 
or Wood 
Wind Vane 




• ! 






to Cable 



Figure 12; Measuring Wind Direction 



Back With 
Cover 
Removed 




Cut off 
This Tab 



Figure 11: Modifying a Potentiometer 



Measuring Wind Direction 

A wind-direction measuring device may be made from a 
Radio Shack 100K linear taper potentiometer (Cat. No. 271- 
092). The pot can be opened by bending back the side tabs. 
Inside you'll find a stop that limits the rotation of the shaft. 
Break off this tab (see Figure 11) and put the pot together 
again. You now have a pot that will rotate clockwise or 
counterclockwise without limit. It takes some force to rotate 
the shaft; however, a large wind vane (shown in Figure 12) 
will do the job — even for slight winds. 

The value returned will have to be converted to direction. 
The setup I used is shown in Figure 13. This can be; done 
with the following routine: 

1000 IF R=0 THEN D$="N" 
1010 IF R>0 RND R<=5 THEN D$="NE" 
1020 IF R>5 RND R<=14 THEN D$="E" 
1030 IF R>14 RND R<=2G THEN D$="5E" 
1040 IF R>26 RND R<=37 THEN D$="S" 
1050 IF R>37 RND R<=47 THEN D$="SW" 
10G0 IF R>47 RND R<=57 THEN D$="W" 
1070 IF R>57 RND R<=63 THEN D$="NW" 



To CoCo 
Joystick Connector 



Unused 
(To Pin 2) 



Unused 
(To Pin 4) 




+5V 
(Pin 5) 



100K Potentiometer 
Modified 
(271-092) 



Wind Vane 
Rotates Pot 



Figure 13: Wind Direction Indicator 



May 1989 THE RAINBOW 155 




Room 2 




Room 3 
4 



0 



rr 



6-Conductor Telephone 
Gable (278-374) 

To Pin 6 



£ To Pin 4 } L e^- J °y st ' ck Jack 

^ Jo Pin 6 }Rjght-Joystick Jack 
* To Pm 4 J 



± 



One Wire Not Used 



f » To Pin 3, Right-Joystick Jack 
To Pin 3, Left-Joystick Jack 



Figure 14; Burglar Alarm System 



Switch Mounted 
to Front of Mailbox 



Roller 





Ground 



raen 

'200 N.S. Memory Lane 
Computer City; C A 
92692 




To CoCo Ground, Joystick Jack 
To CoCo Button 1 , Joystick Jack 



Figure 15: Mail-Delivery Sensor 



There is a discontinuity in the pot's operation. When the 
pot is in the region where the stop was removed, it will read 
zero. Compensate for this by orienting the pot in a north- 
western direction. Zero will then be read from northwest to 
northeast. 

A Burglar Alarm 

A burglar alarm can use one to four button inputs on one 
or both joystick connectors. Wire normally open switches in 
parallel and normally closed switches in series. The alarm 
may detect either one or zero (normally closed or normally 
open). Radio Shack and other stores have a host of security 
devices, many of which are switches — magnetic door 
switches, window switches, mat switches, etc. For more 
information on security, buy How to Hook Up High-Tech 
Electronics (Cat. No. 62-1088) at Radio Shack. A sample 



Roller Switch Fastened to 
Side of Tank Activated 
by Rising or Falling of Water 




.Water 
Level 



Figure 16: Water-Level Detector 



security setup is shown in Figure 14. Use the following code 
for the CoCo 3: 

100 R=BUTTDN(0) 
110 B=BUTT0N(1) 
120 C=BUTTDN(2) 
130 D=BUTTDN( 3) 

140 IF FF0 AND B=0 RND C=l RND D=0 THEN GOTO 150 
145 5OUND(100,100) : GOTO 145 
150 GDTD 100 

Naturally, the switches can be located dozens of feet from 
the CoCo. This is not generally recommended procedure for 
this electronic connection, but I experienced no difficulties 
and no false readings on inputs from 60 feet away using 
intercom cable. Any size wire from about 18- to 24-gauge may 
be used. Stranded wire is best because it is less susceptible 
to breakage after bending, but solid wire can be used in a 
permanent installation. 

Roller-Switch Applications 

Radio Shack sells a switch (Cat. No. 275-017) with a roller 
arm, which triggers with very light pressure. It can be used 
in an application such as detecting mail delivery. (See Figure 
15.) Opening the mail box opens the switch, which can then 
be detected remotely by your CoCo. The roller switch can 
also be used in a burglar alarm application — when an object 
is lifted, the switch will spring open. To do this, use the code 
from above. 

A water-level detector can be made by a toilet-bowl float 
and arm, as shown in Figure 16. Rising or falling water of 
a certain limit will trigger the switch. 

If you would like to see another column with these 
applications, please write to me with your thoughts, 
comments, hopes, dreams and political views at P.O. Box 
3568, Mission Viejo, CA 92692. 

See you next month with more CoCo tips. /R\ 



156 



THE RAINBOW May 1989 



. . . has relocated to Renton, Washington. We pledge to continue to offer Color Computer 
owners the high quality, affordable, and innovative products that have built our reputation. 




4 4 4 



INTERNATIONAL ORDERS. 
206-235-0917 



TOLL-FREE U.S. ORDER HOTLINE: 
1-800-A DS-AHQY 1-800-237-2409 



TECHNICAL SUPPORT: 
1-206-235-0917 




Real BASIC for OS9! 

There is nothing wrong with your Color Computer. 
Do not attempt to adjust it. 

Burke & Burke's new R.S.B. program gives you a complete, 039- 
compatible version of Disk Extended Color BASIC. We've added new 
software for OS9-style graphics, sound, printer, and disk I/O. The BASIC 
you know and love is now running under Level 2 OS9 windows! 



r 



OS-9 LEVEL TWO VR, 

COPYRIGHT 1flB6 BY 
MtCROWARE SYSTEMS CORP 
LICENSED TO TANDY CORP 
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 

July 11, 1988 14:37:30 

Shell 

OS9: xmods /wS lype=0 

OS9: Inlz /wS 

OS9: rsb <»>/w5 & 

&007 



Only $39.95<^gr 





19BB BURKE & BURKE 
DED COLOR BASIC 2.1 
COPR. 19S2, 1986 BY TANDY 
UNDER LICENSE FROM MICROSOFT 
AND MiCROWARE SYSTEMS CORP. 

OK 

LOAD "DEMO" 

OK 

LIST 

10 PMODE 4:SCREEN 1,1 

20 X=RND{256)-1 : Y=RNO{1 92)-1 

30 A=RND(256-X)-1:B = RND(192-Y)-1 

40 LINE (X.YMX+A.Y+BJ.PSET.BF 



R.S.B. loads and saves files using OS9's file format, so we've also 

included utilities to transfer BASIC programs and data files betwen OS9 and BASIC disks. Of course, you can't use R.S.B. to run machine language 
programs, and some BASIC commands work slightly differently under R.S.B. 

Your BASIC programs can take full advantage of great OS9 features like hard disks, no-halt floppies, multi-tasking, and 2 MHz operation. 



R.S.B. requires a CoCo 3 with at least 128K RAM (51 2K recommended), a floppy controller 
with either Tandy Disk Extended Color BASIC or DISTO CoCo 3 CDOS, and Level 2 OS9. 



R.S & Version 12 S39.95 



CoCo-XT Hard Disk Interfaces 

We've sold hundreds of our affordable, high-performance hard disk 
interfaces to Color Computer enthusiasts worldwide! 

Each includes a durable, fully enclosed metal housing, 100 page user 
manual, and software for use with OS9. The CoCo XT-RTC adds a 
battery-powered real time clock / calendar for OS9 and BASIC. 

. A true "NO HALT" hard disk ^ 

system 

• Controls 1 or 2 hard drives, which 
may be different sizes 

» Full ECC / CRC error correction 

• Average access 30% faster than 
SASI systems 

• Uses PC-type hard disk drives & 
controllers 

• Full 5 Meg to 120 Meg storage per 
hard drive 

• Does not use or disable interrupts 

• Compatible with most RS-232 
interfaces 

• 20 Meg system cost: under $450 

• Multi-PAK recommended. Also 
works with 12 Volt Y-cables 

• EZGen Boot File Editor software 
included with each interface 

• Use with HYPER-I/O to share your 
hard disk between BASIC and OS9 



Buy a hard disk kit and a 
case/power supply from the PC 

dealer of your choice. Plug 
them into the CoCo XT, plug the 
CoCo XT into your Multi-PAK, 
and install the OS9 or BASIC 
software. Presto! 



CoCo XT 
CoCo XT-RTC 



$69.95 
$99.95 



Handyman's note: A hard disk 
kit includes a hard drive, cable 
set, and Western Digital, DTC, 
Adaptec, or equivalent 
PC-compatible hard disk 
controller. 



The Profesional Touch: XT-ROM 2.3 

Install XT-ROM in your CoCo XT hard disk controller's BIOS ROM socket, 
automatically boots and reboots OS9 from your hard disk. ^ 1 

XT-ROM 

$19.95 



it 



Select among any of two different hard disk boot files, two 
different floppy boot files, or your BASIC ROM at power-up. 
XT-ROM gives your system that "professional touch". Great for 
unattended BBS, home security, or other fail-safe CoCo applications. 



Wild & MV Version 2.1 

Use "wildcards" with most OS9 
commands, or rearrange your 
directory tree. Features 
recursive directory searches. 
A hard disk must! $19.95 



EZGen Version 1.06 

Powerful OS9 bootfile editor. 
Change module names, add or 
delete modules, patch bytes, or 
rearrange modules. Works on 
other files, too. $19.95 



OS9 Utilities 



HYPER-I/O 



Now BASIC runs hard drives, 
big floppies, and more! 



HYPER-I/O modifies the Disk BASIC in your CoCo 1, 2, or 3 to provide a 
"Dynamic Disk Interface". Use your existing BASIC and M/L software 
with hard disk interfaces (CoCo XT, DISTO, LR), RAM Disks, and any mix 
of floppy drives from 160K to 720K each. Fully RESET protected, user 
configurable, expandable, EPROM- able HYPER-I/O V2.6 is the most 
versatile hard / floppy disk DOS available. Please specify HYPER-I/O, 
DISTO HYPER- I/O, or LR HYPER-I/O when ordering. 



$29.95 



HYPER-III (Adds RAM Disk and Print Spooler to CoCo 3 HYPER-I/O. 

$12.95 

HYPER-I/O & HYPER-III work with your 
B&B, RGB, LR, or DISTO Hard Disk 

HYPER-I/O Utilities 

by Kevin Berner copy, delete, and search operations 

on your HYPER-I/O directories. Great timesaver for moving data from 
floppy disk to hard disk, or for BBS maintenance. Kevin's DISK DOCTOR 
will lock out bad sectors on your hard or floppy disks, and includes a 
disk-zap utility designed specifically for use with HYPER-I/O. 

DISK Doctor $17.95 HYPER-I/O Hard Disk Utilities $21.95 
WOW! Both Great Utility Packages $37.95 



PERTASCII is a multi-user word game 
for Level 2 OS9. The players are 
yourself, the computer, other users 
on your system, or even friends that 
call in on a modem. 




PERTASCII $19.95 



The game is played in timed rounds, until a certain score is reached. 
Players can join or leave the game at the beginning of any round. The 
players make words from random letters during each 3 minute round, 
and then argue over whether or not to accept each other's words. 

Great for BBS and multi-user systems ... or play practice rounds 
against the computer to hone your skills! 

Includes a user-expandable 15,000 word dictionary. 



51 2K CoCo 3, Level 2 OS9, and one disk 
drive required. CoCo 2 and 128K owners: 
watch for our 128K / 64K version! 



M &££SlUlfcM 



Hardware, or What? 

68B09E 2MHz Microprocessor $14.95 
4' Hard Disk Cable Set $17.50 
Blank 27128 EPROM $9.95 
(for HYPER-I/O) 

Hard Disk BIOS Socket Installed $7.50 



Don't be afraid of the dungeons 



Yet another does not return! 



DAGGORPATCH puts the thrill back into your Dyna Micro Dungeons of Daggorath™ 
game cartridge by patching it to run from disk. Includes disk load & save, 
auto-repeat command, pause, DMP-100 screen dump, tape-to-disk, and more! 



2) J$uy a J;avt 
Z ) Clean Saragc 




3SBurk* & ffluvkt 




P.O. Box 58342 Renton, WA 98058 
(206) 235-0917 




WASHINGTON RESIDENTS PLEASE ADD 8.1% 
SALES TAX. COD's add $2.50. 
Minimum U.S. shipping & handling $3.00. 
$4.00 minimum shipping to Canada. 
Please allow 2 weeks for delivery. Overnight or 
3-day delivery available for in-etook ftome. 
Telephone orders call (BOO) 237-2409 



RAINBOW 

Cl Hill IGAt ION 
SEAL 



Burke & Burke Advertisement The RAINBOW May, 1989 (Composite BAA/) 
Copyright 1989 by Burke & Burke 



Racksellers 



The retail stores listed below carry THE RAINBOW on a regular basis and 
may have other products of interest to Tandy Color Computer users. We 
suggest you patronize those in your area. 



ALABAMA 




GEORGIA 




Birmingham 


Jefferson News Co. 


Atfanta 


Border's 


Brewton 


McDowell Electronics 


Bremen 


Bremen Electronics/Rodlo Shack 


Florence 


Anderson News Co. 


Forest Park 


Ellers News Center 


Greenville 


M & B Electronics 


Jesup 


Radio Shack 


Madison 


Madison Books 


Thomasville 


Smokehouse Newsstand 


Montgomery 


Trade *N' Books 


Toccoa 


Martin Music Radio Shack 


Tuscaloosa 


Injun John's. Inc. 


IDAHO 




ALASKA 




Boise 


Book Shelf. Inc. 


Fairbanks 


Arrow Apptlance/Radio Shack 


Moscow 


Johnson News Agency 


ARIZONA 




ILLINOIS 




Cottonwood 


A&W Graphics Co- 


Belleville 


Software or Systems 


Lake Havasu 


Centralia 


Books & Co., Inc. 


City 


Book Nook 


Champaign 


Bookmark 


Phoenix 


TRI-TEK Computers 


Chicago 


B. Dalton Booksellers 


Tempe 


Books, Etc. 


Decatur 


Book Emporium 



MASSACHUSETTS (cont'd) 

Littleton Computer Plus 



Tucson 

ARKANSAS 

Fayetteville 
Ft. Smith 
Little Rock 

CALIFORNIA 

Berkeley 
Citrus Heights 
Hollywood 

La Jolla 

Los Angeles 

Marysville 

Napa 

Oakland 

Rancho 

Murieta 
Sacramento 

San Francisco 



Santa Monica 
San Jose 
Santa Rosa 
Stockton 

Sunnyvale 
Torrance 

COLORADO 

Aurora 
Colorado 

Springs 
Denver 
Glen wood 

Springs 
Grand 

Junction 
Longmont 



Computer Library 
Anderson News Co. 

Vaughn Electronics/Radio Shack 
Hot Off the Press Newsstand 
Anderson News Co. 



Lyon Enterprises 
Software Plus 
Levity Distributors 
Stef-Jen, Inc. 

Butler & Mayes Booksellers 
Circus of Books (2 Locations) 
Bookland 

Bookends Bookstore 
DeLauer*s News Agency 

Software Plus 
Deibert's Readerama 
Tower Magazine 
Booksmith 
Bookworks 
Castro Kiosk 

Midnight Special Bookstore 
Computer Literacy Bookshops 
Sawyer's News, Inc. 
Harding Way News 
Paperbacks Unlimited 
Computer Literacy 
El Camino College Bookstore 

Aurora Newsstand 

Hathaway's 
News Gallery 

The Book Train 

Readmore Book & Magazine 
City Newsstand 



DELAWARE 

Newark 
Wilmington 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 

Washington, 
DC 



Newark Newsstand 
Normar, Inc. —The Smoke Shop 



FLORIDA 

Boca Raton 

Clearwater 

Cocoa 

Dania 

Davie 

Ft. Lauderdale 

Gainesville 
Jacksonville 
North Miami 

Beach 
Panama City 
Pensacola 
Pinellas Park 
South 

Pasadena 
Starke 

Sunrise 
Tallahassee 

Titusville 



Chronichles 
News Room 
World News, Inc. 

Great American Book Co. 
The Avid Reader 
The Open Door 
Dania News & Books 
Software Plus More 
Bob's News & Book-Store 
Clarks Out of Town News 
Paper Chase 
Book Co. 

Almar Bookstore 
Boyd-Ebert Corp, 
Anderson News Co. 
Wolfs Newsstand 

Poling Place Bookstore 
Record Junction, Inc. 
Rodfa Shack Oeater 
Sunn/s at Sunset 
Anderson News Co. 
DuBey's News Center 
Computrac 



East Moline 
Evanston 
Kewanee 
Lisle 

Lombard 
Newton 
Paris 
Peoria 



Springfield 



Sunnyland 
West Frankfort 
Wheeling 

INDIANA 

Angola 

Berne 

Bloom ington 

Crawfordsville 

Dyer 

Franklin 

Ft. Wayne 

Garrett 

Indianapolis 



K-Mart Plaza 
Northgate Mall 
Book Emporium 
Norrls Center Bookstore 
Book Emporium 
Book Nook 
Empire Periodicals 
Bill's TV Radio Shock 
Book Emporium 
Book Emporium 
Sheridan Village 
Westlake Shopping Center 
Illinois News Service 
Book Emporium 
Sangamon Center North 
Town & Country Shopping Ctr. 
Book Emporium 
Paper Place 
North Shore Distributors 

D & D Electronics 
Radio Shack 

White Cottage Electronics 
Book Comer 
Koch's Books 
Miles Books 
Gallery Book Shop 
Michlana News Service 
Finn News Agency, Inc. 
Bookland, Inc. 
Borders Bookshop 
Indiana News 





Southside News 


Lebanon 


Gallery Book Shop 


Martinsville 


Radio Shack 


Richmond 


Voyles News Agency, Inc. 


IOWA 




Davenport 


Interstate Book Store 


Des Moines 


mockery's Books, Inc. 


Fairfield 


Kramers Books & Gifts 


KANSAS 




Hutchinson 


Crossroads, Inc. 


Topeka 


Palmer News, Inc. 


Town Crier of Tapeka, Inc. 


Wellington 


Dandy's/Radio Shack Dealer 


Wichita 


Lloyd's Radio 


KENTUCKY 




Hazard 


Daniel Boone Gulf Mart 


Henderson 


Mart's News & Gifts 


Hopkinsville 


Hobby Shop 


Louisville 


Hawley-Cooke Booksellers (2 Locations) 


Mlddletown 


Software City 


Newport 


Simon's Castle News 


LOUISIANA 




Baton Rouge 


City Newsstand 


Lockport 


TV Doctor/Radio Shack 


New Orleans 


Sidney's News Stand Uptown 


Monroe 


The Book Rack 


MAINE 




Bangor 


Magazines, Inc. 


Brockton 


Voyager Bookstore 


Caribou 


Radio Shack 


Oxford 


Books-N-Things 


Sanford 


Radio Shack 


MARYLAND 




College Park 


University Bookstore 


MASSACHUSETTS 




Boston 


Eastern Newsstand 


Brockton 


Voyager Bookstore 


Cambridge 


Out Of Town News 


Ipswich 


Ipswich News 



Lynn 

Swansea 

MICHIGAN 

Alien Park 

Birmingham 

Durand 

E. Detroit 

Hillsdale 

Holland 

Kalamazoo 

Lowell 

Muskegon 

Niles 

Perry 

Rrverview 

Rosevilie 

MINNESOTA 

Burnsville 

Crystal 

Edina 

Minneapolis 
Minnetonka 
Rosevilie 
St, Paul 



Willmar 

MISSOURI 

Farmington 
Flat River 
Florissant 
Jefferson City 
Kirksville 
St. Louis 

MONTANA 

Butte 

NEBRASKA 

Lincoln 
Omaha 



North Shore News Co. 
Newsbreak, Itic; 

Book Nook, Inc. 

Border's Book Shop 

Robblns Electronics 

Merit Book Center 

Electronics Express/Radio Shack 

Fris News Company 

The Book Raft 

Lowell Electronics 

The Eight Bit Corner 

Michiana News Service 

Perry Computers 

Riverview Book Store 

New Horizons Book Shop 

Shindefs Burnsville 
Shinder's Crystal Gallery 
Shinder's Leisure Lane 
Shinder's (2 Locations) 
Shinder's Ridge Square 
Shinder's Rosevilie 
Shinder's Annex 
Shinder's Maplewood 
Shinder's St. Pauls 
The Photo Shop 

Ray's TV & Radio Shack 
Ray's TV & Radio Shack 
Book Brokers Unlimited 
Cowley Distributing 
T&R Electronics 
Book Emporium 

Plaza Books 

^r^y^'H^-f- • •-.>• 

Nebraska Bookstore 
Nelson News 



NEVADA 

Carson City Bookcellar 

Las Vegas Hurley Electronics 

Books & Magazines 



NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Manchester 
West Lebanon 

NEW JERSEY 

Atlantic City 
Cedar Knolls 
Clinton 
NEW MEXICO 
Albuquerque 
Santa Fe 

NEW YORK 

Amherst 
Brockport 
Brooklyn 
Elmlra Heights 
Fredonia 
Hudson Falls 
Huntington 
Johnson City 
New York 



Rochester 



NORTH CAROLINA 



Cary 

Chapel Hill 



Bookwrights 
Verham News Corp. 

Atlantic City News Agency 
Village Computer & Software 
Micro World II 

Page One Newsstand 
Downtown Subscription 

Village Green-Buffalo Books 

Lift Bridge Book Shop, Inc. 

Cromland, Inc. 

Southern Tier News Co., Inc. 

On Line: Computer Access Center 

G A West & Co. 

Oscar's Bookshop 

Unicom Electronics 

Barnes & Noble— Sales Annex 

Coliseum Books 

Eastern Newsstand 

Grand Central Station, Track 37 

200 Park Ave., (Pan Am #1) 

55 Water Street 

World Trade Center #2 
First Stop News 
Idle Hours Bookstore 
International Smoke Shop 
Jonfl Smoke 
Penn Book 
State News 
Walden Books 
World Wide Media Services 
Microcom Software 
Tandy Users Group 
Village Green 
World Wide News 

News Center in Cary Village 
University News & Sundry 



158 THE RAINBOW May 1989 



NORTH CAROLINA (cont'd) 



Charlotte 

Hickory 

Jacksonville 

Kernersvllle 

Lexington 

Marion 

Winston-Salem 

OHIO 

Akron 

Canton 

Chardon 

Cincinnati 

Cleveland 

Columbiana 

Columbus 



Dayton^ 



Dublin 
Fairborn 



Findley 

Lakewood 

Lima 

Miamisburg 
Parmo 
Warren 
Xehio 

Youngstown 

OKLAHOMA 

Oklahoma 

City 
Taklequah 
Tulsa 

OREGON 

Eugene 
Portland 



Salem 

PENNSYLVANIA 

Allentown 

Altoona 

Bryn Mawr 

Feasterville 

King of Prussia 

Malvern 

Reading 

Temple 

West Chester 

Wind Gap 

York 



Newsstand tnt'l 
C? Books & Comics 
Mlchele's, Inc. 
K& S Newsstand 
Martin's News Stand 
Boomers Rhythm Center 
K & S Newsstand (3 Locations) 
Rainbow News Ltd. 

Churchill News & Tobacco 
Little Professor Book Center 
Thrasher Radio & TV 
Cinsoft 

Erieview News 
Fidelity Sound & Electronics 
35 Software 
Micro Center 
The Newsstand 
Books & Co. 
Wilke News 
Wright News & Books 
Book Barn 
News-Readers 
Sandbox Micro Systems 
Wilke's University Shoppe 
Open Book 

Lakewood International News 

Edu-Caterers 

Wllke News 

Bookmark Newscenter 

Book Nook, Inc. 

Fine Print Books 

Plaza Book & Smoke Shop 



Merit Micro Software '" i ... % \ K\ 7 
Thomas Sates, fe dba Radio Shack . 
Steve's Book Store - ' 

Libra Books — Book Mark 
Fifth Avenue News 
Rich Cigar Store, Inc. 
Sixth & Washington News 
Capitol News Center 
Checkmate Book 

Owl Services 

Newborn Enterprises 

Bryn Mawr News 

Global Books 

Gene's Books 

Personal Software 

Smith's News & Card Center 

Software Corner 

Chester County Book Co. 

Micro World 

The Computer Center of York 
Tollgate Bookstore 



RHODE ISLAND 




Newport 


Bellevue News 


SOUTH CAROLINA 


Charleston Hts. 


Software Haus, Inc. 


Clemson 


Clemson Newsstand 


Florence 


Ra/s #1 


Greenville 


Palmetto News Co, 


Spartanburg 


Software City 


TENNESSEE 




Brentwood 


Bookworld #5 


Chattanooga 


Anderson News Co. 


Guild Books & Periodicals 


KnoxviJIe 


Anderson News Co, 




Davis-Kidd Bookseller 


Memphis 


Computer Center 


Nashville 


Davis-Kidd Booksellers 


Mosko's Place 




R.M. Mills Bookstore 


Smyrna 


Delker Electronics 


TEXAS 




Big Spring 


Poncho's News 


Desoto 


Maxwell Books \ 


Elgin 


The Homing Pigeon 


Ft Worth 


Trinity News 


Harlington 


Book Mark 


UTAH 




Provo 


Valley Book Center 



VIRGINIA 

Danville 
Hampton 
Lynchburg 
Norfolk 

Richmond 

WASHINGTON 

Port Angeles 
Seattle 

Tacoma 

WEST VIRGINIA 

Huntington 
Madison 
Parkersburg 
South 
Charleston 

WISCONSIN 

Appleton 
Cudahy 
Kenosha 
Madison 

Milwaukee 
Waukesha 

ARGENTINA 

Cordoba 

AUSTRALIA 



K & S Newsstand 
Benders 

Self Serve Software 
l-O Computers 
Turn The Page 
Volume I Bookstore 

Port Book & News 
Adams News Co., inc. 
Bulldog News 
B & I Magazines & Books 
Nybbles 'N Bytes 

Nick's News 
Communications, LTD 
Valley News Service 

Spring Hill News 

Badger Periodicals 
Cudahy News & Hobby 
R,K. News, inc. 
Pic A Book 
University Bookstore 
Juneau Village Reader 
Holt Variety 

Information Telecommunlcationes 



BRITISH COLUMBIA (cont'd) 



Blaxland 


Blaxland Computers 


Kingsford 


Paris Radio Electronics 


CANADA: 




ALBERTA 




Banff 


Banff Radio Shack 


Bonnyvlile 


Paul Tercier 


Brooks 


Double "D" A.S.C. Radio Shack 


Calgary 


Billy's News 


Claresholm 


Radio Shack Associated Stores 


Drayton Valley 


Langard Electronics 


Edmonton 


CMD Micro 


Fairview 


D.N.R. Furniture & TV 


Fox Creek 


Fox City Color & Sound 




A.S.C. Radio Shack 


Ft. Saskatche- 




wan 


Ft. Mall Radio Shack, ASC 


Grande 




Cache 


The Stereo Hut 


Grande 




Centre 


The Book Nook 


Hinton 


Jim Cooper 


Innisfail 


L & S Stereo 


Leduc 


Radio Shack Associated Stores 


Lethbrldge 


Datatron 


Lloydminster 


Lloyd Radio Shack 


Okotoks 


Okotoks Radio Shack 


Peace River 


Radio Shack Associated Stores 




Tavener Software 


St. Paul 


Walter's Electronics 


Startler 


Stettler Radio Shack 


Strathmore 


Wheatland Electronics 


Taber 


Pynewood Sight & Sound 


Westlock 


Westlock Stereo 


Wetasklwin 


Radio Shack 


BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Burnaby 


Computit 


Bums Lake 


VT. Video Works 


Campbell 




River 


TRS Electronics 


Chilliwack 


Charles Parker 


Coquitlam 


Cody Books LTD 



Coortenay 
Dowson Creek 
Golden 
Langley 
Nelson 
New West- 
minster 
Parksvllle 
Penticton 

Sidney 
Smithers 
Squamish 
Vancouver 



100 Mile 
House 

MANITOBA 

Altona 

Lundar 

Morden 

The Pas 

Selkirk 

Virden 

NEW BRUNSWICK 

Moncton 
Sussex 

NEWFOUNDLAND 

Botwood 
Carbonear 
Labrador City 

NOVA SCOTIA 

Halifax 

ONTARIO 

Angus 

Aurora 

Concord 

Exceter 

Honover 

Huntsville 

Kenora 

Kingston 

Listowel 

South River 

Toronto 

QUEBEC 

LaSalle . 
Pont. Rouge 

SASKATCHEWAN 

Assiniboia 
Estevan 
Moose Jaw 
Nipiwan 
Regina 

Saskatoon 
Shellbrooke 
Tisdale 
Unity 

YUKON 

Whitehorse 



Rick's Music & Stereo 
Bell Radio & TV 
Toks Home Furnishings 
Langley Radio Shack 
Oliver's Books 

Cody Books LID 
Parksville TV 

D.J/s 

Four Corner Grocery 
Sidney Electronics 
Wall's Home Furniture 
Kotyk Electronics 
Active Components 
Friendlyware Computers 
Granville Book Co. 
Siliconnections Books LTD 

Tip Top Radio & TV 

LA. Wiebr Ltd. 
Goranson Elec. 
Central Sound 
Jodi's Sight & Sound 
G,L. Enns Elec. 
Archer Enterprises 

Jeffries Enterprises 
Dewitt Elec. 



Seaport Elec. 
Slade Realties 

RP. Investments (Mall Drugs) 
■Atlantic News 

Micro Computer Services 

Compu Vision 

Ingram Software 

J. Macleane & Sons 

Modern Appliance Centre 

Huntsville Elec. 

Donny "B" 

T.M. Computers 

Modem Appliance Centre 

Max TV 

Dennis TV 

Gordon and Gotch 

Messageries de Presse Benjamin Ehr. 
Boutique Bruno Laroehe 

Telstar News 
Kotyk Electronics 
DScS Computer Race 
Cornerstone Sound 
Regina CoCo Club 
Software Supermarket 
Everybody's Software Library 
Gee. Laberge Radio Shack 
Paul's Service 
Grant's House of Sound 

H & O Holdings 



America Ado, Inc. 



JAPAN 

Tokyo 

PUERTO RICO 

East Isla Verde The Color Computer Store 



Also available at all S. Dalton Booksellers, and 
selected Coles and W. H. Smith in Canada, 
Waldenbooks, Pickwick Books, Encore Books, 
Barnes & Noble, Little Professors, Tower Book & 
Records, Kroch's & Brentano's, and Community 
Newscenters. 



May 1989 THE RAINBOW 159 



Advertisers Index 



We encourage you to patronize our advertisers — all of whom support the Tandy Color 
Computer. We will appreciate your mentioning the rainbow when you contact these firms. 



Alpha Software Technologies . .105 
Arizona Small Computer 

Company ;•, . U . .> . .107 

Burke & Burke , . * . , , . . . , , . . .157 
Ger-Comp 1 33 

CoCo Connection . . . .. .. 139 

^^ognitec « * ... .,-**. . . . . . » » * . , . 29 

Colorware — v ,., . , H . f , . .. . ., . .19 

Computer Island * . . ^, > . ,.37 

Computer Plus . + , , : + ? ft < .3 

CRC/Disto . , . . -. * ; >. t . . * . » i * * * * . 83 
D.P. Johnson ....... , * .149 

Dayton Associates of 

W. R. Hall, Inc. . ... ,..,115 

Dorsett Educational Systems 147 
Dr. Preble's Programs . >. .99 
EZ Friendly . . . . , . t . ...... „ ,135 

Frank Hogg Laboratories ...... .33 

Game Point Software ,57 

Gimmesoft ... .126, 127 

Granite Computer Systems . , .81 
HawkSoft, I nc. » j . .. , ... . .... S;^ ... 85 

Howard Medical. . . ...... . . .162, IBC 

ICR Futuresoft . . . >. . Outsert 

J & R Electronics. . - .*v£§7 
JR & JR Softstuff... i*, m >*.^ ...45 

JWT Enterprises . > t .89 

Ken-Ton Electronics . . . . . . .51 

Kenneth Leigh Enterprises . 89 

Magus Systems Engineering . . v!47 
Metric Industries ^&:* B + . ... * .12 
MichTron ...... . . i , . .. . , . L , . . BC 

Micro Works, The . . . , . * , .79 

Microcom Software . . 9, 11, 13, 

15,16,17 
Microtech Consultants, 

InC. • • • «. ♦ ..,»•, « i ■ ■ ■ ■ r r r I 9"5 

Orion Technologies , . . , .1 05 
Owl-Ware . . . * . . . .... . . . ,69, 70, 71 

160 THE RAINBOW May 1989 



PXE Computing ....... *.7 

Perry Computers .41 

Puritas Springs 
Software/SoftWAR Tech .1 39 

C) u est ro n ........... , . *. , . • » >• . . . 21 

RGB Computer System . , ...... ,21 

Rainbow Binder. . . .. ..... . •,. ,,132 

Rainbow Book of 
Adventures IV ........ , . U . . 1 20 

Rainbow Bookshelf ....... . ... .119 

Rainbow Gift Subscription , . . . . .1^: 

Rainbow on Tape & Disk . . . .JFC 
Renco Computer Supplies . . .135 
Rulaford Research . . . . u 87 



SD Enterprises . ... 


. • , . 25, 93 


Second City Software . . 


. , . . . « 1 61 


Simply Better Software . . 


......141 


SpectroSystems ... .-. . . . 




SPORTSware , . ......... 


... ...113 


Sugar Software , ... r . . . 


*;.... 1 23 


Sundog Systems ........ 


....... 53 


T & D Software 22, 


23, 31, 73 


Tandy/Radio Shack . . , , . 


fi5 


repCO » . .♦ * * • « ♦ ;,/ » L L 1. L 1 .. 1 . . 


■ ...... 55 


True Data Products 


:• ■ * .... 39 


Try-O-Byte , «V- ■ •> ♦ . **** 


97 


Wasatch ware , . >> . . . 


......141 


Zebra Systems. . . . . 


.... 145 




9509 U.S. Highway 42 
P.O. Box 385 
Prospect, KY 40059 

FAX (502) 228-5121 



MasterCard VISA COD. CHECKS 




Co Co CALENDER DELUXE : 
Organize all of your appointments with this 365 day 
Calender. Now with Hi-Res print driver for the 
DMP, CGP, Epson MX-80 and Star Gemini 10X 
printer. Please specifyprinter. 64k DISK $19.95 

BIACKJACK ROYALE : 
Even your casino odds with this Blackjack card 
simulation and tutor! Program can be edited for 
different house rules. 64k DISK $16.95 1 

BSE - BASIC SCREEN EDITOR: 
Gives Basic a full-screen editor to supplement the 
regular EDIT commands. Works on the CoCo 1&2 
and with the CoCo 3, WIDTH 32, 40 or 80 is sup-| 
ported! Complete screen cursor control with the 
arrow keys plus features to make EDITing Basic 
programs a snap! BSE, a must have CoCo utility. 
Our low price was the only corner that was cut on 
thisquality program. 64 k DISK $19.95 

CHECK-09MV : Version 2.0 : 
Finally, a program that interacts with MultiVue fori 
FAST and EASY check balancing. CHECK-09MV 
and you can now take control of your bank checking | 
account. No more waiting on your bank statement 
for an ending balance. CHECK-09MV will provide 
a check-by-check balance in an easy to use format 
that eliminates those monthly surprizes! Bringyour 
money and you closer together and have the buck 
STOP HERE! Featuring an all new EDITING 
command. 512k DISK $25.95 

CoCoMAX II : By Colorware 
The 'CLASSIC CoCo graphic program. Draw great 
works of art with the program that set a standard fori 
all others to follow. Supported by a Hi-Res interface 
and numerous printer drivers for complete set-up. 
64k DISK. , $78.45 

CoCoMAX III : By Colorware 
All new program based off the 'CLASSIC CoCo- 
Max II software. Allows for full animation, select 16 
colors from a 64 color palette, fast & easy to use w/ 
pull down menus in a point-and-click environment, j 
128k or 5 12k DISK. $78.45 1 

DISK UTILITY 2.1A PLUS: 



A complete disk utilitypackagc fo^all CoCo's. Full 



TELEPATCH: 



Turn Telewriter 64 into the best Word Proces- 
sor for the CoCo 1&2! TELEPATCH is compat- 
ible wit hall CoCo's. Comes with complete docu- 
mentations for easy upgrading and changes. 
64k DISK $24.95 

SCHEMATIC DRAFTING PROCESSOR: 



Disk I/O for FORMAL 
Supports si i 
drivj 



BACKUP, 
r 40 track 
US from 
:>w price, 
d DISK 
.$23.95 




LA 'FAST and 'EASYTOUSE' ELECTRONIC 
DRAFTING PROCESSOR. Create pro-look- 
ing diagrams using a 480x540 pixel screen with 6 
viewing windows! Over ( 30' electronic symbol 
with 10 definable symbols. Even supports Logic 
gates & Multipin chips! Print hardcopy or save 
to disk for later editing. NOW CoCo 3 COM- 
PATIBLE. 64k DISK $22.95 

OS-9 SOLUTION: 



Tame the hostile environment of OS-9 with OS- 
9 SOLUTION! Replaces 20 of the command 
calls with single keystroke, menu driven com- 
mands. No more long and complex pathnames 
or syntaxes to remember! Works with either OS- 
9 Level One orTwo $24.95 

TAPE/DISK UTILITY : 



A utility package that transfers TAPE to DISK 
or DISK to TAPE automatically. If you just got 
your first disk drive, TAPE/DISK is a MUST 
HAVE program. Will print tape & disk directo 
ries to any supported printer, 64k DISK.. ..$19.95 

DISCOUNT SOFTWARE By CoIorVenture 

RAM DISK LIGHTNING DISK. $16.95 

PRINTER LIGHTNING $16.95 

BACKUP LIGHTNING $16.95 

BUY ALLTI I REE FOR ONLY $42.95 

HI-RES JOYSTICK DRIVER. $19.95 

MAX PATCH $19.95 

BUY BOTI I FOR ONLY $34.95 

IIGRXDUMP: 



Produce hardcopy graphic files with your DMl 
and CG P (B&W) printer. CoCo 1, 2 & 3 compat- 
ible. 64k DISK $19.95 

MULTI-PA K CRACK: 



Allows you to save your ROM-PAK programs 
over to disk...\VHERE THEY BELONG! In- 
cludes POKES for problem PAKs and the new 
16k PAKs. 64k DISK $24.95 

MAX-10 : By Colorware 



The 'Dazzling Word Processor & Document 
Creator for the CoCo3\ You asked for it and 
now it is available at an SCS special price. 
128k DISK $78.45 



SCS DOS: 



ORDER 



P.O. Box 72956 
Roselle, IL 60172 
Voice: 312-653-5610 
BBS: 312-307-1519 J 



SECOND CITY SOFTWARE 



Accepts MasterCard, Visa, C.O.D. and 
Check orders. Please add $2.50 for ship- 
ping ($4.50 for Canada orders) & allow 1 to 
3 weeks for delivery. C.O.D. orders, add 
an additional $2.50. 



Add 24 new diskcommands with 2 Hi-Res Screens! 
Supports 40 track & Double Sided drives, 6ms 
stepping, auto disk search, error trapping and 
burnable into an EPROM. 64k DISK $24.95 

MY DOS : By Chris Hawks 
Supports accesses to double sided drives, able to 
use the J&M Controller with the CoCo 3, DIR 
commands simplified and a host of other special 
features. 64k DISK...... $14.95 

A-DOS 3 : 

The popular Disk Operating System from Spec- 
troSystems for the CoCo 3. 128k DISK $34.95 

SCS can custom 'burn* your purchased DOS pro- 
gram for only $15.00! This includes the price of the 
EPROM chipand the BURN charge. Call orwrite 
for details. 

VIP LIBRARY : 

This popular 'intergraded' package includes, VIP 
Writer, Terminal, Data Base, Calc and Disk Zap 
which can fix a diskette with I/O errors. SCS 
specialprice. 64k DISK. $149.95 

VIP WRITER HI w/SPELL CHECKER: 
All new and completely up-graded with expanded 
memory and pop-up main menus. You can also 
have up to 8 - 48k working text screens that will 
allow you to create 8 separate documents! Settle 
for only the best 100% ML word processor for the 
CoCo 3. 128k DISK $79.9$ 

VIP DATABASE III $69.95 

VIP CALC III $69.95 

SPECIAL: Order any VIP program fromSCS,and 
receive an additional program at NO EXTRA 
CHARGE! Call orwrite for full details. 

THE NEWSPAPER PLUS : 
DeskTop Publishing for the CoCo 3? With the 
ALL NEW NEWSPAPER PLUS, you now can 
create complete and sophisticated Banners, 
Headlinesalong with Text Columns and Graphics. 
THE NEWSPAPER PLUS allows for importing 
differentpictures, fonts and fill patterns from disk 
for that pro-look. Comes complete with 22 fonts 
and 50 clip art pictures. THE NEWSPAPER 
PLUS is an all new upgraded program based on 
the original NEWSPAPER program. SCS is the 
ONLY company authorized to handle THE 
NEWSPAPER PLUS program. Why buy the old, 
overpriced and outdated program when you can 
get the newest release for less! 
128k DISK $48.95 

THE NEWSPAPER GRAPHICS DISK...$19.95 
News Art A thru Z : 

The most complete set of useable Glip Art for 
ANY CoCo DeskTop publishing program. 
NewsArt was designed just for Newspaper 
Plus. $9.95 each or $100.00 for set of 26 disks. 




MAGNAVOX 8CM515 COLOR 

• 80 Column 

• Use with Coco, Tandy 1000's, IBM PC 
CC-3 RGB cable 19.95^^^ 

$279(i4ship) 




DRIVE 0 PLUS 

• Double sided 360K MPI 52 

• Disto Controller and cable 

$178.45 (sship) 



JS S> '> v* »> ' 




I A. 


DISTO 3 in 1 Board 


$59.45 


I B ' 


DISTO MEB 


$30.00 


I C " 


DISTO RS-232 


$49.95 









VIDEO AMPLIFIER VA-1 

required in CoCo 1 or 2 to drive 
monitor $29.45 (2 ship) 



MAGNAVOX 7622 AMBER 

• 80 Column 

• Built in Speaker 



$98 (7 ship) 



DOUBLE DRIVE 0 + 

Two double side 360K Teac 55B 
Disto controller & cable 

$310(8ship) 





STAR NX-1000R COLOR 

• Built in back tractor paper feed 

• 1 44 cps,4K input buffer 

$249 (Sship) 



Z^~^ \Z-<±« ^S&SsSS^ 



aJP* 



PAL UPGRADE PAL - 1 or 2 

Makes m ulti-pack interface work with 
Coco 3. Specify 26-3024 or 26-31 2W 

$14.95 (2 ship) 



! i,.. 1 : { ; i :.S'VA5i--..^ i ^ 

• ■• i -N'.:-*:^ i - 



swill 








Hard Drive — Complete! 

20,000,000 Bytes or the equivalent 
to 125 R.S. 501 's on line are packed 
into this hard drive, pre installed and 
ready to run. This complete, easy to 
use package includes a Seagate 20 
Meg Hard Drive, a DTC 5150 Con- 
troller and interface*, heavy duty 
case & power supply, and a 1 year 
warranty. This 20 meg Hard Drive 
will also work with Tandy and IBM 
clones. Basic driver, $29.95, lets you 
access this hard drive without need 
for OS-9. 
(9 ship) 



30 Day Money Back Guarantee 

Howard Medical's 30-day guarantee 
is meant to eliminate the uncertainty 
of dealing with a company through 
the mail. Once you receive our 
hardware, try it out; test it for 
compatability. If you're not happy 
with itforany reason, return it in 30 
days and we'll give your your money 
back (less shipping.) Shipping 
charges are for 48 states. APO, 
Canada and Puerto Rico orders are 
higher. 



HD-1 20 Meg 
HD-2 30 Meg 
HD-3 40 Meg 

*Burke& Burke 



$499 
$549 
$598 




I 




Howard Medical Computers 

1690 N. Elston 
Chicago, Illinois 60622 

Order Status and Inquiries 
312-278-1440 

Show Room Hours 
8:00-5:00 M-F 
10:00-3:00 Sat. 

24 Hour Order Line 

800-443-1444 




Speed Racer 

As the checkered flag drops your pulse rises in this lively arcade 
game. The road twists to the horizon on the 3-D panorama that sets 
the stage for exciting racing. Vie for time as you glide through the 
curves at incredible speeds. Step through the gears to stay ahead of 
the pack, but be quick! Some will stop at nothing to see the end of 
the race, or the end of you! Four challenging raceways, complete 
with obstacles and colorful 3-D scenery test your skills in this Pole 
Position™ type game. 

32K Color Computer required . . . $34.95 





4* %4M3 



/ 







PI MB ALL 

FACTORY! 



Pinball Factory 






6V KfiRY MCFADOEN 

PLAYER 1 PLAYER 2 

8^5838) IrlLVl l 



PLAYER 3 PLAYER 4 

leesesei 19284561 



Video games come full circle in this tribute to the original arcade 
game, Pinball, Classic pinball springs to life as never before, with 
fresh new angles that only a computer can offer. Crisp graphics, 
sound, and fast smooth action give this machine-language arcade, 
game a realistic, responsive feel you'll hardly believe. There are 
even "tilt" buttons that let you "bump" the machine. In addition to 
playing a great game of pinball, you can enjoy hours of creative 
pleasure as you design, build, edit, and play your own screens. 




64K Color Computer required. . .$34.95 



Demon Seed 



The first waves of flying, diving, bloodthirsty bats are arriving. 
Move, fire, and move again,, It's a never ending battle. If you are 
lucky enough to defeat the bats, be ready for a much greater 
challenge, The Evil Demons themselves. Destroy a wing and 
another takes its place. Only a direct hit can save you now. It will 
take great skill to triumph. If you do, then you better be ready for 
the End. The Demon Flag Ship descends to destroy youf remaining 
ships. Your only hope is to penetrate the hull, break through the 
shield^ and destroy the dreaded Gargoyle. v 



.. ..hl.(?.ljQ ■ -LIli. 



MichTron is always looking for programmers and programs. If you are interested in working with one 
> of the most respected company's in the computer software field please give us a call. j . 




Michfrori 




For more information 576 S. Telegraph Dealer inquiries welcome, 

on these qr other fine products Pontiac, MI 48053 Visa and Mastercard accepted, 
call our knowledgeable staff! (313) 334-5700