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Telewriter 64 49.95 59.95 

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103 




18 

UP Ole Interest, ^ 
Revisited 

Duke Norris 

Modifying an old favtirite for 
use on the CoCo 3 



26 

Deciding What's 
Write For You 

Staff 

A comparative look at the 
word processors available on 
the CoCo market 

118 




41 

Copyright Law 
Update 

Edward Samuels 
A significant change 
in the federal law 

44 . 

Invoice Innovation^ 

David L Clapper 
Create professional-looking 
invoices and labels to ship 
with customers* orders 

52 

Make a Note of It! % 

William Souser 

Print neat-looking telephone 

message pads 



April 1989 
Vol. VIII No. 9 



58 

OS-9 Resistance 

Dennis Skala 

Once you get to know it, 

OS-9 is a great system 

Two-Dimensional *w 
Rotation 

William P. Nee 

Part X: Machine Language 

made BASIC 

101 

The Color 
Coordinator 

Bill Bernico 

This program helps children 
develop good fashion sense 

103 # 

Stretch it to the Limit 

Mary and James Lamonica 
Keep track of credit card 
balances and transactions 

112 

CoCo Tour ^ 

Marc Gagnon 

Surround your programs with 
this brightly-colored border 

118 % 

Decisions, Decisions 

Willis Stanley 

Measuring those gut feelings 



J^Sk The cassette tape/disk sym- 
SSSsm bols beside features and col- 
umns indicate that the program listings 
with those articles are on this month's 

RAINBOW ON TAPE and RAIN- 
BOW on disk. Those with only the 
disk symbol are not available on 
rainbow on tape. For details, 
check the rainbow on tape and 
rainbow on disk ad on the inside 
front cover. 




4 THE RAINBOW April 1989 




-Novt 

79 

Pieces of the Pie 

Bill Bernico 

80 

Who Ya Gonna Write 

Keiran Kenny 

81 

An Uncommon View 

Kenneth R. Hill 

82 

Mil Move You 

Timothy Dueck 

82 

Today's Forecast 

Rick Cooper 

83 

For the Birds 

Keiran Kenny 



1 Rainbow teefr 



152 

Accessible Applications 

Richard A. White 
Data Processing with 
BASIC09 

143 

Barden's Buffer 

William Barden, Jr. 
April foolishness and the 
pentomino contest winners 

148 

KISSable OS-9 

Dale L. Puckett 

In quest of new technology 



Departments 

Advertisers Index 160 

Back Issue Info 107 

Corrections 48 

Letters to Rainbow .... 6 

One-Liners 124 

One-Liner Contest 
Information 74 

Racksellers 158 

Rainbow Info 14 

Rainbow Scoreboard 86 
Received & Certified ... 142 
Scoreboard Pointers ... 88 
Submitting Material 
to Rainbow 150 

Subscription Info 76 




64 

BASIC Training 

Joseph Kolar 
Computer animation takes 
flight 

84 

BASICally Speaking 

Bill Bernico 

BASIC problems solved here 

54 

CoCo Cosultations 

Marty Goodman 

Just what the doctor ordered 

50 

Delphi Bureau 

Don Hutchison 
What's new on Delphi 
and the database report 



m . . ■ M 



92 

Doctor ASCII 

Richard Esposito 
The question fixer 

99 

Education Notes 

Steve Blyn 
Break it up 

10 

Print #-2, 

Lawrence C. Falk 
Editor's Notes 

96 

Turn of the Screw 

Tony DiStefano 
Lights Out! 



89 

Wishing Well 

Fred Scerbo 
Measure your life 
in bits and bytes 




The Aussie Collection/The Public Domain 

Software Copying Company 

Da Vinci3/OvW- Ware 



Ghost Hunters/ SPORTS ware 

Ironsides and Crimson Sai\s/Softwar 

Technologies 



Memory/RAM Electronics 

Picture Puzzle/Jfl & JR Softstuff. 



Rupert Rythym/Game Point Software 

Simply Better/S/mp/y Better Software 

Space Intruders/Game Point Software 

Star NX-1000 Rainbow/Dayton Associates. 

Start OS-9/Kenneth Leigh Enterprises 

Telepak/Or/on Technologies 

TeMs/Spectrum HoloByte 



VIP Writer III, Version 2.0/SD Enterprises 



-128 
_130 
.136 

,138 
.132 
.137 
.140 
.134 
.135 
.126 
.140 
.136 
.138 
.132 



the rainbow is published every month of the year by FALSOFT, Inc., The 
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phone (502) 228-4492. THE RAINBOW, RAINBOWfest and THE RAINBOW and 
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• Entire contents copyright * by FALSOFT, Inc., 1989. THE rainbow Is intended 
for the private use and pleasure of its subscribers and purchasers and 
reproduction by any means is prohibited. Use of information herein is for the 
single end use of purchasers and any other use is expressly prohibited. All 
programs herein are distributed In an "as is" basis, without warranty of any kind 
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Rainbow 



Editor and Publisher 

Lawrence C. Falk 

Managing Editor Jutta Kapfhammer 

Associate Editor Sue Fomby 

Reviews Editor Lauren Wiiloughby 

Submissions Editor tony Olive 

Copy Editor Kelly. Goff 

Technical Editors Cray Augsburg, 
Ed Ellers 

Technical Assistant David Horrar 
Editorial Assistants Wendy Falk Barsky, 

Contributing Editors 

William Barden, Jr., Bill Bernico, 
Steve Blyn, Tony DiStefano, 
Richard Esposito, 
Martin Goodman, M,D„ 
Joseph Kolar, Dale Puckett, 
Fred Scerbo, Richard White 

Art Director Heidi Maxedon 

Designers Sharon Adams, 
Teri Kays, Denise Webb 

Typesetters Linda Gower, 
Renee Hutchins 

Falsoft, Inc. 



President Lawrence C. Falk 
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Asst. General Mgr. for Finance 

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Sarah Levin 
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Dealer Accounts Judy Quashnock 
Asst. General Manager For Administration 

Sandy Apple 
Word Processor Manager 

Patricia Eaton 
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Beverly Bearden 
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and Maintenance 

Jessie Brooks 
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Advertising Assistant Debbie Baxter 
(502) 228-4492 



For RAINBOW Advertising and 
Marketing Office Information, 
seepage 160 



Cover illustration 
by Heidi Maxedon 



April 1989 THE RAINBOW 



BACK TALK 

Editor: 

Your editorial in the March 1988 issue of 
RAINBOW was intended to reassure the 
CoCo Community that the CoCo is alive 
and well. You pointed out that the CoCo is 
Tandy's hottest selling item and has outsold 
all other products for several years. Appar- 
ently Radio Shack business people here in 
Canada do not read your editorial with the 
same enthusiasm. 

Two weeks prior to Christmas, Radio 
Shack stores in the Toronto area had a 
clearance sale of CoCo hardware and soft- 
ware. CoCo 3s were sold for $95 and soft- 
ware at ridiculously low prices as well. 
Customers have been informed that items 
will not be restocked. 

My son is left with a CoCo 3 from Christ- 
mas with no place to purchase a CM-8 
monitor. Please offer me some reassurance 
that there is still hope for the CoCo. 

John W. Ivory 
Scarborough, Ontario 

See Lonnie Folk's "Print #-2, "on Page 10 
of this issue. 

What's All the Excitement About? 

Editor: 

I want to comment on Richard White's 
OS-9 memory discussion in the January 
1988 issue [Page 152]. 

In discussing MS-DOS comparisons, it's 
interesting to note that the INTEL-8088 is 
segmented in much the same way as the 
GIME segmentation. But INTEL left out 
the DAT electronics. Most MS-DOS users 
don't know that the application software 
often handles the large-scale memory man- 
agement. So what's all the excitement 
about? The point is, our operating system 
manages the memory, and since most pro- 
grams are smaller in our systems than 
comparable MS-DOS systems, we rarely 
have to make special memory concessions. 
When necessary though, it's not inconven- 
ient to multiple-load segments into other 
64K-byte pages or make use of user memory 
RAM disks for large programs. 

Paul Pollock 
(PA U LB ELL) 
Sepulveda, California 

Foolish Pleasure? 

Editor: 

This letter concerns Don Hutchison's 
Database Report in the January 1989 issue. 
I have been very pleased in the past by the 
constructive articles found in the pages of 
RAINBOW, but I found a section of the 



Database Report that, in my opinion, is 
destructive to the CoCo Community. 

In this report Mr. Hutchison describes the 
RAINBOW CoCo SIG's constructing of a 
benign Trojan horse as playful and interest- 
ing but fails to mention the foolishness and 
consequences of such a project. 

Mr. Hutchison condones the construction 
of a program that leads to the vandalization 
and destruction of other users' disks. The 
Macintosh Trojan horses are examples of 
this project's outcome. 

For the sake of all CoCo users, I hope we 
will cease support of the project and, in- 
stead, reinforce our trust in programs 
offered by Delphi. 

Charles W. Blair 
Brossard, Quebec 

See the following response from CoCo 
SIG Database Manager Don Hutchison. 

Woe! Charles 

Editor: 

It was certainly not the intent of my 
column nor the RAINBOW CoCo SIG to 
support the creation of a harmful virus or 
Trojan horse program. In actuality, I was 
simply reporting what others were discuss- 
ing in the CoCo SIG's Forum: the creation 
of a pseudo-virus program, i.e., one innoc- 
uous in nature. The ultimate goal of such 
pursuits would be increased knowledge of 
how to protect oneself from harmful virus 
programs. 

We cordially invite you, Charles, to join 
us online on Delphi to support your position 
with those originally involved in the virus 
discussion: Steve Bjork, Art Flexser, Marty 
Goodman, Mike Ward and others. I'm sure 
that you will then understand that no one 
is supporting the creation of a dangerous 
virus or Trojan horse program. 

Don Hutchison 
CoCo SIG Database Manager 

Help for Milton 

Editor: 

1 have just discovered Marty Goodman's 
set of programs to transfer text files from the 
CoCo to MS-DOS in the July 1986 issue of 
RAINBOW. 

After having successfully used them for 
the past two weeks, I remembered reading 
a request from Milton Simpson of Big Flats, 
New York, asking for help with this prob- 
lem. Your reply was to suggest two programs 
from Microcom Software at $79.95 and 
$39.95. 

If Milton has dual single-sided drives on 
his CoCo capable of accessing 40 tracks and 
at least one 5i4-inch drive to run on his 1000 



SX, he might be interested in Marty's 
programs. After all, they are practically free 
for the asking. All it takes is a back issue of 
the magazine or RAINBOW ON TAPE or 
DISK. It would be beneficial, however, to 
have a copy of the issue for the documen- 
tation. 

John C. Schulz 
Merritt Island, Florida 

HINTS AND TIPS 

Editor: 

Thank you for publishing Dr. Marty 
Goodman's hardware fix for FD-500 and 
FD-502 disk drives [October '88, Page 58]. 
Because of its importance I wish to restate 
the problem: When any drive is accessed, all 
drive motors should be running. 

It seems, from our customers' feedback, 
that other brands of dual drives are also in 
need of the same wiring change described in 
Dr. Goodman's article. If users have more 
than a single disk drive, they should perform 
the following steps to see if the drives are 
wired properly: 

1. Open all drive doors and remove all 
disks from the drives. 

2. Turn the computer on, type DIR and 
press ENTER. 

3. While the first drive motor is spinning, 
check to see that all other drive motors are 
spinning. 

If all drive motors are spinning, then your 
disk drives are wired properly. 

If only the first drive motor is spinning, 
then your other drives are improperly wired. 
Contact the store where you purchased the 
drives to have them repaired. 

There seems to be another real potential 
for trouble using modified or different disk 
operating system (DOS) ROMs and 
doubled-sided drives set up as follows: 

Drive 0 front as Drive 0; back as Drive 2. 
Drive 1 front as Drive 1; back as Drive 3. 

The trouble is a mis-read of data on the 
disk and seems to stem from the way the 
head position of each drive is kept track of. 
The DOS can use either a two- or four- byte 
head position table for this purpose. 

The following BASIC program allows 
double-sided drive users to determine the 
way their DOS handles the drive table. Type 
it in and insert a scratch disk, formatted on 
both sides, into Drive 0 and run the pro- 
gram: 

10 POKE 2430,0: 'DRIVE 0 HERD POS 
20 POKE 2431,0: 'DRIVE 1 HERD POS 



6 THE RAINBOW April 1989 




AUTOTERM 

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Step-by-step manual has examples. 
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Save, load, delete files while on line. 
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DISK VERSION SUPPORTS RS232 
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Please hire the mentally retarded. 

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Phyllis. 



Editing is super simple with the 
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Advanced system of keystroke 
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version can automatically set 
parameters, dial, sign-on, interact, 
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PXE Computing 

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Richardson, Texas 75080 

214/699-7273 



30 POKE 2432,0: 'DRIVE 2 HERD POS 

40 POKE 2433, 0: 'DRIVE 3 HEAD PDS 

50 PR INT "INSERT SCRATCH DISK FDR 

MATTED ON BOTH SIDES (DRIVE 0 AN 

D2)" 

60 PRINT"THEN PRESS ANY KEY" 
70 A$=INKEY$:IFA$="" THEN70 
B0 DIR0: 'READ DRIVE 0 DIRECTORY 
S0 DIR2: 'READ DRIVE 2 DIRECTORY 
100 PRINT 

110 IF (PEEI<(2432) ) = 17 THEN PR 
INT"4 BYTE HEAD TABLE": END 
120 IF (PEEK (2432) ) = 0 THEN PR 
INT"2 BYTE HEAD TABLE": END 

The trouble seems to occur if a four-byte 
table is used with double-sided drives. The 
correct way to keep track of a double-sided 
disk drive's head is to have one byte per drive 
representing both sides, as opposed to two 
bytes per drive, one byte representing each 
side. Since the heads of a double-sided drive 
move together, they will each always be in 
the same position. Therefore, only one byte 
is needed to represent both heads. 

If you have a four-byte head table, the 
following program will indicate if the mis- 
read trouble occurs with your DOS or not. 
Type it in, using the same procedure as 
above: 

10 CLEAR 1000 

20 PRINT "INSERT SCRATCH DISK FOR 
MATTED ON BOTH SIDES (DRIVE 0 AN 



D2)" 

30 PRINT"THEN PRESS ANY KEY" 
40 PRINT 

50 A$=INKEY$:IF A$= "" THEN 50 

G0 A$="READ OKI" 

70 DSK0S 2, 17.1, AS. B$ 

B0 A$="READ BAD!" 

90 0SK0S 2,0,1,A$,B$ 

100 DSKIS 2, 4,1, AS, B$ 

110 DSKIS 0,1,1,A$,B$ 

120 DSKIS 2,17,1,A$,B$ 

130 PRINTAS 

The program writes "Read OK" on Drive 
2, Track 17, and writes "Read Bad!" on 
Drive 2, Track 0. It then reads Drive 2, Track 
34, followed by Drive 0, Track 1. Finally, it 
attempts to read the data stored on Drive 2, 
Track 1. If the DOS is working properly, 
"Read OK!" stored on Track 1, should 
appear. If "Read Bad!" stored on Track 0 
appears, there is a serious problem with the 
DOS using double- sided drives. 

This mis-read trouble was discovered 
when a user sent us a set of VIP Database 
data disks that spanned across two double- 
sided drives. When VIP Database searched 
for a file on the back side of Drive 0 (Drive 
2), the file was not found. He was using a 
DOS ROM he bought from a well-known 
Color Computer disk-drive vendor (not 
Radio Shack). 

This mis-read can be duplicated if you 
have a CoCo 3 and RS-DOS 1.1 (or 2.1) and 



double-sided drives set up as outlined above. 
Poke the following locations to enable the 
double-sided drives. Format a disk on both 
sides (DSKINI0 and DSKINI2). Then run the 
second listing and watch it fail for yourself: 

POKE 55453,1 
POKE 55454,2 
POKE 55455,65 
POKE 55456,66 

The cure was found when we tried the 
disks using RGB-DOS from RGB Comput- 
er Systems. RGB-DOS uses a two-byte head 
table instead of a four-byte head table and 
does not fail the mis-read test. If your DOS 
fails, you should contact the supplier and 
request an updated DOS ROM, which will 
not fail the above test. 

Other double-sided drive configurations 
may also fail in a similar manner. But until 
the cause is found and cured, these double- 
sided drive users cannot be assured of proper 
disk operation. 

Paul Anderson 
SD Enterprises 
Gresham, Oregon 

INFO PLEASE 

Editor: 

I am not able to accumulate numerical 
data using Radio Shack's Color Profile, I 
want to calculate my history grade in per- 



April 1989 THE RAINBOW 7 



centage form. 

The following datas were entered: assign- 
ment name, possible points and points 
received. To calculate the percentile, I need 
to accumulate the total possible points and 
total points received, then divide the total 
points received by total possible points. This 
is where my problem lies: I can't accumulate 
the total points received or the total possible 
points. Color Profile does not allow the use 
of an item number to calculate itself. Can 
anyone help me? 

Also, what's the advantage of using OS- 
9? What can this operating system do that 
Disk BASIC can't do? 

Hinh Phansavath 
9267 Via Vista 
Buena Park, California 90620 

See Dennis Skala's "OS-9: Time for a 
Change" beginning on Page 58 of this issue. 

Cyrus Chess for CoCo 3 

Editor: 

Ever since our initial subscription to 
RAINBOW last February 1988, my wife Fran 
and I eagerly look forward to receiving each 
issue of the magazine. 

We are relatively new to the world of 
CoCo and have just purchased a CoCo 3. We 
enjoy many games, one being Cyrus Chess 
by Tandy (Cat. No. 26-3064). It worked fine 
on our CoCo 2 but not so with CoCo 3. Do 
you know of a patch or some way of making 
it compatible with our new CoCo 3? We 
appreciate any information you can give us. 

George R. Freitag 
4501 S. Ocean Blvd., D-2 
Palm Beach, Florida 33480 

REQUEST HOTLINE 

Editor: 

While cleaning my desk off, I found the 
128K RAM chips left over from my 512K 
upgrade. I began thinking about how I could 
make use of these rather than let them sit in 
storage. When I am programming in C, I 
load the compiler into memory and put the 
source files in a RAM disk supplied with the 
Development Pak. Because of memory 
restrictions, I can only have the 96K driver. 
I would like both a bigger RAM drive and 
more internal memory (Multi- Vue requires 
a good size portion of memory). 

Just a few days ago I was going through 
my back issues of RAINBOW and saw your 
article on clever uses for memory. How 
about the same type of project: 256- or 512- 
byte memory area that would work as a 
RAM disk under OS-9 Level II? I sketched 
out some rough schematics for one, but I 
lack the skill, money and resource materials 
for the various chips. It seems a workable 
idea either as an expansion board for Disto's 
Super Controllers or the MPI. I don't have 
either, though, so I would prefer it to be 
hard-wired in. 



It is just another idea that may be of use 
to someone. Thanks for your time, and keep 
up the good work. 

Jason McCampbell 
St. Johns, Michigan 

Golf or Pool Anyone? 

Editor: 

I own a 512K CoCo 3 with an RGB 
monitor, two FD-501 disk drives, a Multi- 
pak Interface, a DMP-105 printer and am 
also a subscriber to the best computer 
magazine money can buy — RAINBOW. 

I have upgraded my computer to 512K 
and would like some software that will take 
full advantage of it, I'm specifically inter- 
ested in golf and pool games, which are not 
as popular as space, Pac-Man and maze 
games, etc. I simply want to suggest to 
advertisers and program writers that it 
would be nice to have some different games. 

I speak on behalf of several members of 
the Cornwall Color Computer Club in 
thanking RAINBOW for a priceless maga- 
zine. 

Dave Malyon 
Cornwall, Ontario 

KUDOS 

Editor: 

I would like to express my gratitude to 
two companies who advertise in your mag- 
azine. First, my hat is off to Dayton Asso- 
ciates for its fast service. After placing my 
order by phone, I was told that the order 
would be in about a week after Thanksgiv- 
ing. Well, lo and behold, two days before 
Thanksgiving, my printer was at my door. 
And I received no problems with the mer- 
chandise. 

Secondly, I would like to thank Computer 
Plus for its fine service. During the past two 
years, I have purchased two CoCo 3s and a 
CM-8 monitor there. Each time I ordered, 
my product arrived promptly and in good 
condition. 

I believe good, friendly and fast service is 
what makes people come back for more. 
Thanks again, Dayton Associates and Com- 
puter Plus! 

Boisy Pitre 
Brookhaven, Mississippi 

Quick Fix 

Editor: 

I've bought your magazine every month 
now for the past two years, and it's helped 
me in so many ways. Well, youVe done it 
again, RAINBOW. Thank you. 

This past Christmas I received Tandy's 
Home Publisher software program. I 
couldn't wait to try it out, but to my dismay, 
the program would not print out on a DMP- 
130 printer. I then picked up January's issue 
of the RAINBOW and on Page 6 in Letters 
to the RAINBOW was a letter describing the 



same problem. 

I received the fix the following Monday, 
patched it in and the Home Publishers 
program works just fine. 

Once again this proves that your maga- 
zine is not only entertaining, but it keeps us 
all well informed. Thank you for your help. 

I would also like to thank Tandy for the 
fix and the fast service. 

Ronald H. Roberts 
Brandon, Wisconsin 

Keep Those Back Issues 

Editor: 

When I got my CoCo 2 about three years 
ago, I immediately began buying RAINBOW 
magazines. I was completely lost on every- 
thing in the magazine short of the advertise- 
ments for games. Slowly I learned BASIC 
and began going over old issues looking for 
things to type in. With your help I began to 
learn more about the CoCo, and as I did I 
found myself continually going back over 
old issues looking for articles to apply my 
new-found knowledge. 

Surprisingly, this cycle never stops. Re- 
cently I found myself poring over RAIN- 
BOWS searching for articles on machine 
language and am just beginning to under- 
stand and apply some simple projects from 
the "Turn of the Screw" column. Just last 
week I opened up my new CoCo 3 and find 
myself today grabbing those old issues, 
looking for tips and software to apply to my 
new machine. The future of my old maga- 
zines looks bright as I move to new horizons 
such as OS-9 and other aspects that today 
only bring confusion. 

Many thanks to the THE RAINBOW for 
the vast volumes of information that you 
work so hard to bring the experts and those 
of us who will one day be experts. 

Douglas Berry 
Nitro, West Virginia 



THE rainbow welcomes letters to 
the editor. Mail should be addressed 
to: Letters to Rainbow, The Falsoft 
Building, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 
40059. Letters should include the 
writer's full name and address. Letters 
may be edited for purposes of clarity 
or to conserve space. 

Letters to the editor may also be 
sent to us through our Delphi CoCo 
SIG. From the CoCo SIG> prompt, 
type Rfl I to take you into the Rainbow 
Magazine Services area of the SIG. At 
the R AINBO W> prompt, type LET to 
reach the LETTERS> prompt and 
then select Letters for Publication. Be 
sure to include your complete name 
and address. 



8 THE RAINBOW April 1989 



Word 
Power 3.2 



More Versatile • More Powerful With 
Spooler • Calculator • Split-screen • 2-Column Printing 



"... friendfy...amazing execu- 
tion speed...much easier to use 
than VIP software & 2 other 
word processing systems I've 
tried...very user-friendly... mas- 
sive text storage capacity 
...highest among word proces- 
sors..." - Rainbow Oct. 88 
Review for Word Power 



Unparalleled Power packed in this 100% ML Word Processor 
written from scratch for the CoCo 3! No other word processor 
offers such a wide array of features that are easy to learn & use. 





Word Power 3.2 runs at double-clock speed 
and uses the true 80-column display with 
lowercase instead of the graphics screen. The 
result is lightning fast screen reformatting and 
added speed! All prompts are displayed in 
plain English in neat colored windows. The current column num- 
ber, line number, page number, percentage of free memory is dis- 
played at all times. Even the page break is displayed so you know 
where one page ends and the other begins. The Setup program 
allows you to change fore/background colors as well as (in) visible 
carriage returns. Word Power 3.2 can be used with RGB/Com- 
posite/Monochrome monitors as well as TV. 



MAXIMUM MEMORY 




Word Power 3.2 gives you over 72K on 128K and over 
450K on 512K CoCo 3 for Text Storage - more 
memory than any other CoCo word-processor. 
Period. 



Ti'*'ffi*ft*^r*''''*******'**»*'*^^ 



EFFORTLESS EDITING 

Word Power 3.2 has one of the most powerful and user-friendly 
full-screen editor with word-wrap. All you do is type. Word 
Power takes care of the text arrangement. The unique Auto-Save 
feature saves text to disk at regular intervals for peace of mind. 

Insert/Overstrike Mode (Cursor Style Changes to indicate mode);OOPS Recall 
during delete;Type-ahead Buffer for fast typers;Key-Repeat (adjustable); Key- 
Click; 4-way cursorand scrolling; Cursor to beginning/end of text, beginning/end 
of line, top/bottom of screen, next/previous word; Page up/down; Delete charac- 
ter, previous/next word, to beginning/end of line, complete line, text before/after 
cursor; Locate/Replace with Wild-Card Search with auto/manual replace; Block 
Mark, Unmark, Copy, Move & Delete; Line Positioning (Center/Right Jus- 
tified); Set/Reset 120 programmable tab stops; Word-Count; Define Top/Bot- 
tom/Le ft/Right margins & page length. You can also highlight text 
(underline-with on-screen underlining, bold, italics, superscripts, etc.). Word 
Power even has a HELP screen which an be accessed any time during edit. 



SPLIT-SCREEN EDITING 

Splits the screen in half so you can view one portion of your text 
while you edit another. You'll love it! 



MAIL- MERGE 

> ;*ra;*;* ;-;-;-fr^ 



□ 



Ever try mailing out the same letter to 50 different 
people? Could be quite a chore. Not with Word 
Power 3.2! Using this feature, you can type a letter, 
follow it with a list of addresses and have Word Power 
print out personalized letters. It's that easy! 



' .W. ' .'.'.TO. ' l C' . ' iWA'A ' A ' .'. 1 :*.*.' ' J ' ''' W 



CALCULATOR 

Pop-up a 4-function calculator while you edit! Great for tables! 



SAVING/LOADING TEXT WMBMBBBSMBM 



Word Power 3.2 creates ASCII format files which are compatible 
with almost all terminal/spell-checking & other word-processing 
programs. Allows you to Display Free Space, Load, Save, Ap- 
pend & Kill files. The ARE YOU SURE? prompt prevents ac- 
cidental overwriting & deletion. You can select fdes by simply 
cursoring through the disk directory. Supports double-sided 
drives & step-rates. 



PRINTING 

Word Power 3.2 drives almost any printer (DMP, EPSON, 
GEMINI, OKIDATA, etc). Allows options such as baud rates, 
line spacing, page/print pause, partial print, page number- 
ing/placement, linefeeds, multi-line headers/footers, right jus- 
tification & number of copies. The values of these parameters & 
margins can be changed anytime in the text by embedding Printer 
Option Codes. The WHAT YOU SEE IS WHAT YOU GET fea- 
ture allows you to preview the text on the screen as it will appear 
in print. You can view margins, page breaks, justification & more. 



y.'.'.'.v.v.y.y.v.v. 



ft*:*:*:*: 



PRINT SPOOLER 

Why buy a hardware Print Spooler? Word Power 3.2 has a built- 
in Spooler which allows you to simultaneously edit one document 
& print another. 



TWO-COLUMN PRINTING ^^^^^^^^^mm 



This unique feature allows you to print all or portion of your text 
in two columns! Create professional documents without hours 
of aligning text. 

•■ ■• : ■: .• ■ : ■ ■: ■ : :■ ■. .■ ■ .- •. .• ■ . . •. •: 



SPELLING CHECKER 

Word Power 3.2 comes with spelling checker/dic- 
tionary which finds & corrects mistakes in your 
text. You can add words to /delete words from 
dictionary. 




PUNCTUATION CHECKER 

This checker will proofread your text for punctuation errors such 
as capitalization, double-words, spaces after periods/commas, 
and more. Its the perfect addition to any word processor. 



■:«;«.'.'.u.'.«aw.'.'.'.».'.w.'.'.'.«.v 



W.'.VIWI'.'AW. ' .W.V. ' . ' . 



DOCUMENTATION 

Word Power 3.2 comes with a well-written instruction manual & 
reference card which makes writing with Word 
Power a piece of cake! Word Power 3.2 comes on an 
UNPROTECTED disk and is compatible with 
RSDOS. Only $79.95 

(Word Power 3.1 owners can get Word Power 3.2 Upgrade FREE by sending 
proof of purchase & $5.00 to cover S&H costs & instructions) 





DI/CtVER 



JhJF MICROCOM SOFTWARE 

All Word Power 3.2 orders shipped by UPS Next Day Air at no extra charge within 
the Continental US. Offer good thru January 15, 1989. 

To Order: Refer to rage 17 of our 6-page ad scries: (Pgs. 9-17) 

Credit Card Toll Free Orderline 1-800-654-5244 (9am-8pm 7days/week) 





r 




CoCo's 

Canadian Future 



^ f Tnless you live in Canada, you may not know that Radio Shack 
intends to end sales of our favorite computer in that country as 
-L- ! ' soon as supplies are gone. During the holiday season a special sale 
was held at which CoCo 3s went for $99.95 Canadian — so cheap it defies 
description. 

(As I write this, a Canadian dollar is worth 85 cents U.S., which is 
stronger than it has been. This means, of course, the price of a Canadian 
CoCo is about $84 U.S. However, the reverse applies when you buy an 
American product — which the CoCo is — in Canada. And INTERTAN, 
the company that operates Radio Shack in Canada now, has to pay in U.S. 
dollars for CoCos. Thus, the price of a Color Computer (or any computer, 
for that matter) is higher in Canada than in the United States.) 

I have received letters from some concerned readers and have been 
making replies as quickly as possible. To put this into perspective, I thought 
you would be interested in seeing one of the replies. 

Please note the points I make about continued support, probable 
continued software product development (through the United States) and, 
perhaps most important, the address of INTERTAN in Canada. If you 
are unhappy with this decision, it is your right to let them know. 

Dear Tony: 

The information you have from your local Radio Shack authorized 
dealer is right: INTERTAN — not Tandy Corporation — is clearing out 
all Color Computers in Canada for $99.95 in your funds. 

More than a year ago t INTERTAN came into being. Before that, Tandy 
in Canada and Tandy in the United States were the same company, 
although the Canadian part was a subsidiary. Then Tandy spun off a 
company called INTERTAN, which has its own officers and its own stock 
and makes its own decisions. One of those decisions was to end sales of 
the Color Computer in Canada. 

One of the main reasons for this is that Canadians have long been able 
to buy Color Computers in the United States much less expensively than 



10 



THE RAINBOW April 1989 





COLOR 
(SCHEMATIC 





Best Desktop Publishing / Document 
Creator for the CoCo 3. Features Pull 
Down Menus, What You See Is What You 
Get , UNDO, integrated text & graphics 
capability , multiple fonts & more. 
Graphics can be imported from CoCo 
Max I,mn, MGE, MGF, 5 Level DS-69, 
PMODE 4, HSCREEN 2/3 pictures. Sup- 
ports: DMP 105/130, EPSON 
MX/FX/RXLX/ Gemini 10 Series, CGP- 
220 and OKI-92. Only $79.95 

VIP CALC III 

Best Spreadsheet for your CoCo 3. 
Features 4 color menus, 
32/40/64/80 column display, 2 Mhz 
speed & more. Allows up to 1024 
rows x 512 columns. VIP Calc III 
also has up to 16 windows, trig, 
averaging, sorting, algebraic & 
sorting functions. Locate, block 
move/copy commands & limitless 
programmable functions. Works 
with any printer. Only $69.95 

Font Disk #1,#2 for CoCo Graphics 
Designer: $19.95 each 

GAMES 

(Disk only) 

(CoCo 1,2 & 3 except where mentioned) 



WARRIOR KING (CoCo 3): $29.95 
IN QUEST OF STAR LORD(Animatcd Graphics Adventure 
for CoCo 3): $34.95 Hint Sheet: $3.95 
HALL OF THE KING 1,2,3: $29.95 Each Trilogy: $74.95 
FLIGHT 16: $34.95 
I>YRAMIX(Cubbc for CoCo 3): $24.95 
KUNG FU DUDE: $24.95 
DRAGON BLADE: $19.95 
CHAMPION: $19.95 
WHITE FIRE OF ETERNITY: $19.95 
QUEST FOR THE SPIRIT STONE (CoCo 3): $18 
WARGAME DESIGNER (CoCo 3): $29 
TREASURY PACK#1: Lunnr Rover Patrol, Cubix, Declathon, 
Qix, keys of Wizard, Module Man, Pengon, & Roller Con- 
troller.Only $29.95 

TREASURY PACK #2: Lancer, Ms. Gobbler, Froggie, Mad^ 
ness & Minotaur, Ice Castles, Galagon, Devious. Only $29.95 
SPACE PAC: Color Zap, Invaders, Planet Invasion, Space 
Race, Space War, Galax Attax, Anaroid Attack, Whirlybird, 
Space Sentry & Storm Arrows. Only $29.95 
VVIZARD'S CASTLE: A hi-res graphics adventure game filled 
with traps, tricks, treasures. Only $19.95 



By Prakash Mishra 

An excellent Circuit Schematic Design 
Software Package for CoCo 3. Features: 

* Runs in 640x192 at 1.8 Mhz 

* Pull Down Menus 

* Keyboard/Mouse/Joystck Support 

* RGB/ Composite/Monochrome 
Monitor Support 

* 72 Modifiable Symbols 

* Multiple Hi-Res Fonts 

* Multiple UNDO Command 

* Symbol Rotate/Line/Box Draw 

* Supports 3 Layers of Circuits 

* Powerful Screen Print Command 
DMP/Gemini/Epson Printers 

* Complete Documentation 



Only $39.95 



for 





RSB 



A Revolutionary Program lhal allows you 
to use Basic Programs from OS9! 

OS9 Level 2 is the future of the CoCo. Un- 
fortunately, most Basic Programmers are 
"afraid" of using OS9 because it is dif- 
ferent from Basic. Introducing RSB! It al- 
lows you to run Basic from OS9 and take 
advantage of features such as multitask- 
ing, no-halt floppies and high speed 
operation. RSB is your first step intoOS9l 
Req. OS9 Level II. Only $39.95 




The ancient game of strategy moves into 
the future. HSCREEN 2 for normal play, 
HSCREEN 4 for triple level play. Move 
your pieces through time as well as space. 
Req. RSDOS 128K CoCo 3 and 2 Players. 
Disk Only $24.95 



ULTRAPATCH SYSTEM 

by Randall Reid 

Patches the Superpatch EDT ASM + ® 
for 80 columns, 47K Buffer (ap- 
proximately 3000 lines!) & more. Req 
CoCo 3. Only $19.95 



XENOCOPY-PC 

An amazingly versatile program that allows you to Format/Duplicate / Read/ 
Write disks from over 300 different computers. For example you could trans- 
ferprograms between CoCo, IBM, PC-DOS, TRS-80 Model 3, TRS-80 Model 
4, TRS-80 Model 100, Xerox 820, Zenith, Kaypro II, Novell , NEC DOS and 
much much more!! Send for FREE List. Requires an IBM Compatible with 2 
drives. Disk $79.95. 

512K BACKUP LIGHTNING 

(From Colorventure) 

The ultimate CoCo 3 disk copying utility!! Reads your master diskette once 
and then makes as many copies as you want. It automatically formats an un- 
formatted disk while copying! Supports 35, 40 or 80 track drives with various 
step rates. A must for any disk user!! Only $19.95 

PRINTER LIGHTNING 

(From Colorventure) 

Never wait for your printer again!! This Print Spooler allows you to print to 
your printer and simultaneously continue with your programming. No need to 
wait for those long printouts! Disk Only $19.95 

BASIC FREEDOM 

A Full Screen Editor for Basic Programs! ! A Must foranyone who writes Basic 
Programs. Only $24.95 

VOCAL FREEDOM 

Turn your computer into a digital voice / sound recorder. Produces natural 
voices/ sound effects. Req. inexpensive RS Amplifier (#277-1008) & any 
microphone. Only $34.95 

HACKER'S PAC 

Allows you to incorporate voices created by Vocal Freedom into your own 
Basic and ML programs. Only $14.95 



MICROCOM SOFTWARE 




"A MERICA 

[EXPRESS! 



To Order: Refer to Page 17 of our 6-page ad series: (Pgs. 9-17) 

Credit Card Toll Free Orderline 1-800-654-5244 (9am-8pm 7days/week) 

Order Status, Info, Technical Info: 716-383-8830 





in Canada because of the difference in 
the value of currency. (That, by the way, 
is one of the reasons we have to charge 
more for Canadian subscriptions than 
those in the United States.) Because of 
this, actual "in- Canada" sales (as op- 
posed to sales to Canadians) have 
always lagged behind those in the Unit- 
ed States. 

Although you will not be able to buy 
a Color Computer from an official 
Radio Shack dealer in Canada after the 
inventory is gone, you will, of course, 
be able to buy one through an author- 
ized dealer or Radio Shack store in the 
United States. Further, I feel certain 
support — in the form of more hard- 
ware and software — for your Color 
Computer will continue in Canada, 
certainly from the third-party advertis- 
ers you see in THE RAINBOW, but also 
from INTERTAN. 

INTERTAN is experimenting with a 
number of marketing proposals at this 
time. This is but one decision it has 
made that is very different from that of 
Tandy Corporation in the United 
States. Indeed, Tandy is not only con- 
tinuing to sell our Co Co but is also 
manufacturing more of them for sale in 
the future. 



I really want to emphasize this to you, 
Tony, and to anyone you may happen 
to discuss it with: The CoCo is not only 
still being sold, but is still being manu- 
factured in the United States by Tandy 
for sale in the future. But, even were — 
and I must emphasize the word were — 
the CoCo no longer to be manufactured 
even in the United States, the history of 
Tandy Corporation is to continue to 
support computers which it no longer 
actively sells. This means several things: 
support, software and hardware prod- 
ucts, and — most important — service. 
I would assume INTERTAN will follow 
this policy. 

Finally, since Tandy is still making 
CoCos, INTERTAN might well at 
some time in the future buy them from 
Tandy again (which is where it gets 
them) and sell them again. If you want 
to encourage INTERTAN to do this, 
you can write to the company at 279 
Bayview Drive, P. O. Box 34000, Bar- 
rie, ONL4M4W5, Canada. 

You will get good use from your 
CoCo for a long time to come! 

Sincerely, 

Lawrence C. Folk 



As a footnote to all this, Tandy's 
"overseas" operations (now INTER- 
TAN) have always been somewhat 
different, and they appear to be getting 
more so. We hear reports that some 
places are "experimenting" with items 
such as refrigerators and washing ma- 
chines in their stores. Others, we hear, 
are selling such products as JVC and 
RCA video and audio equipment — 
some in addition to Tandy equipment, 
some in place of it. 

It will be interesting to see whether 
making the overseas Radio Shack 
stores different works out for Tandy 
and INTERTAN — and whether the 
agreement between Canada and the 
United States to lower trade barriers 
between the two countries has a signif- 
icant effect on computer hardware and 
software sales. Personally I think they 
will, and my comment in the letter 
above, that INTERTAN may well begin 
to sell the CoCo again, is not merely 
wishful thinking. 



— Lonnie Falk 



METRIC INDUSTRIES, INC. 





i.1j**^t \ *\r -pit ^^^^^m. 
Q >n Mnum«M<u © 



I 




nam. »» w«» 













'JUKI. »"K}»Tl<«9 UTtunv 

! !!! P*;? ^WMtvrsI 1 : C*BSET7E$. : 








ri£- 
txata 












b 


9 




•j 



Model 101 

Serial to Parallel Printer Interface 

* Works with any COCO 

* Compatible with "Centronics" Parallel Input Printers 

* Just turn the knob to select any one of 6 baud rates 300-9600 

* Comes complete with cables to connect to your printer 
and computer 

* Can be powered by most printers 

Model 104 Deluxe Interface 
with "Modem Switch" 

* Same Features as 1 01 Plus 

* Built in Serial Port for your Modem or other serial device 

* Switch between Serial Output and Parallel Output 

* Comes with cables to connect to your computer and printer 

* Can be powered by most printers 

Model 105 Serial Switch 

* Connects to your COCO to give you 2 switch selectable 
Serial Ports 

* Comes with a 3 foot cable to connect to your computer 

* Now you can connect your Printer (or printer interface) 
and your Modem (or other serial device) to your COCO 
and flip the switch to use either device 

* Does not require power 

Cassette Label Printing Program 

* New Version 2.1 prints 7 lines of information 
on Cassette labels 

* Comes on Tape with instructions to transfer to disk 

* Menu driven, very easy to use 

* Save and Load Labels from Tape and Disk 

* Uses the features of your printer to print standard, 
expanded, and condensed characters 

* Automatically Centers Each Line of Text 

* Allows editing of label before printing 

* Program comes with 24 labels to get you started 

* 16KECB required 



Some of the Printers 
That Can - 

Supply power for the 101 and 
104 are Radio Shack, Star, 
Okidata, Brother, Juki, and 
Smith Corona. 

Some of the Printers 
That Cannot - 

Supply power for the interfaces 
are Epson, Seikosha, 
Panasonic, Silver Reed and 
NEC. If your printer cannot 
supply power to the interface 
you can order your interface 
with the "P" option or you can 
supply your own AC adapter. 
We recommend the Radio 
Shack 273-1431 AC adapter 
with a 274-328 connector 
adapter. 

Write or call for more 
information or for technical 
assistance. 



Price List 

Model 101 35.95 
Model 1 01 P 41.95 
Model 104 44.95 
Model 104P 51.95 
Model 105 14.95 
Cassette Label Program 6.95 
Pin Feed Cassette Labels: 
White 3.00/100 
Colors (specify) 3.60/C 
Red-Blue-Yellow-Tan 



4 Pin Din Serial 
COCO Cables: 

Male/Male 6 foot 
Male/Female 6 foot 
Female/Female 6 foot 
Other Lengths Available. 

All items covered by a 
1 year warranty 



4.49 
4.49 
4.49 



Ordering Info 



* Free Shipping in the 

U.S.A. (except AK and HI) 
on all orders over $50 

* On orders under $50 
please add $2.50 for 
shipping and handling 

* On orders outside the 
U.S.A. please write or call 
for shipping charges 



You Can Pay By: 

★ VISA or MasterCard 

★ C.O.D.-add$2.25 

★ Or send check or money 
order payable in U.S. funds 



Metric Industries Inc. 
P.O. Box 42396 
Cincinnati, OH 45242 

(513) 677-0796 



12 



THE RAINBOW April 1 989 



CoCo 3 Utilities Galore 

(CoCo 2 Versions included where specified) 
(All Programs are for RSDOS unless specified) 



SUPER TAPE/DISK 
TRANSFER 





* Disk-to-Disk Copy * Tape-to-Disk Copy 

* Tape-to-Disk Auto Relocate 

* Disk-to-Tape Copy * Tape-to-Tape Copy 
Copies Basic/ML/Data Files. CoCo 1,2 or 3. 
Req. min. 64K Disk System. Disk Only $24.95 



CEBBS 

Best DBS for CoCo 3. Xmodem Up/Downloading, 
unlimited menus, login, message base, built-in 
clock/calendar, execution of external programs. 
Sysop has full control of user's accss to menus, lime 
on system & remote system access. Full Error Trap- 
ping. IlypcrlO Compatible! Reg. $59.95. Intro. Spe- 
cial $49.95. Min Req CoCo 3, 1 Drive, RS232 Pack. 



DISK UTILITY 2.1 A 



n 



A multi-featured tool for USER FRIENDLY 
disk handling. Utilize a directory window to 
selectively sort, move, rename & kill file entries. 
Lightning fast Disk I/O for format, copy& back- 
up. Single key execution of Basic/ML programs. 
This will become your MOST USED program ! ! 
CoCo 1,2 or 3. Req. Min. 64K. Disk Only $24.95 




MAILLIST PRO 



The ultimate mailing list program. Allows you 
to add, edit, view, delete, change, sort (by zip- 
code or name) and print labels. Its indispen- 
sible!! Disk $19.95 (CoCo 2 version included) 



DISK LABEL MAKER 

Allows you to design professional disk labels! 
Allows elongated, normal and condensed for- 
mat for text. Double Strike, Border Creation, 
and multiple label printing. Its a MUST for any 
user with a disk drive. Supports DMP 
105/106/110/120/ 130/430, GEMINI, STAR, 
EPSON and compatibles. (CoCo 2 version in- 
cluded). Only $19.95 




COCO UTILIIrco^ 



(Latest Version): Transfer CoCo Disk files to 
IBM compatible computer and vica-versa. Re- 
quires 2-Drive IBM Compatible. Disk $39.95 



RGB PATCH 



Displays most games in color on RGB monitors. 
CoCo 3 Disk $24.95 



COMPUTERIZED 
CHECKBOOK ir 



ma 



Why bother with balancing your checkbook? 
Let the CoCo do it for you. Allows you to add, 
view, search, edit, change, delete and printout 
(in a table/individual entry format) checkbook 
entries. Updates balance after each entry. Al- 
lows files for checking, savings, and other ac- 
counts. Disk $19.95. (CoCo2 version included) 




BOWLING SCORE 
KEEPER 



An excellent utility to keep track of your bowl- 
ing scores. Allows you to save scores under in- 
dividuals or teams. You can edit change, delete, 
and compare scores. A must for anyone who 
wants to keep track of his or her bowling perfor- 
mance. Disk $19.95 (CoCo 2 version included) 



VCR TAPE ORGANIZER 




Organize your videotapes with this progiam. 
Allows you to index tapes by title, rating, type, 
play time and comments. Also allows you to sort 
titles alphabetically & view/print selected tapes. 
If you own a VCR, this program is a MUST!! 
Disk $19.95 (CoCo 2 version included) 



COCO 3 SCREEN DUMP 



32, 40, 80 column text dump, PMODE 4 
Graphics Dump. Single Keystroke Operation al - 
lows you to take snapshots of your screens even 
when programs are running! Works on DMP's, 
Epson, Gemini and compatibles. CoCo 1, 2 and 
3. Disk $24.95 



HOME BILL MANAGER mz 




Let the CoCo keep track of your bills. Allows 
you to enter bills under various categories and 
reminds you when they are due. Disk $19.95 



CALENDAR MAKER 



- - 
■ 

«»«'»»*» 
i ■ n « a « ; 

M a u m M tl M 



Generate monthly calendars on your printer for 
any year in the 20th century. Disk Only $19.95 
(CoCo 2 version included) 



ADOS 3 

Advanced disk operating system for CoCo 3. 
Comes on disk and is EPROMable!! Disk 
$34.95. ADOS (for CoCo 1,2): $27.95 




FAMERiCA 




EXPRESS 



0llt#/ER 



Start OS9 

An Enjoyable Hands-on Guide to OS9 Level II. In- 
cludes step-by-step tutorials, articles. Free disk in- 
cludes examples & utilities. Req. 512K, Level 11,2 
drives & monitor. Book + Disk: $32.95 



The Zapper: Patch Disk Errors. $19.95 
Disk Manager Tree: Change, create & delete 
directories quickfy. Req. 512KLII. $29.95 
Level II Tools: Wildcards, tree commands, win- 
dowing & 22 more utilities. 128K Req. $24.95 
Warp One: Complete LII Windowing, Terminal, 
Auto Dial, macros, file transfer, capture,timer,chat, 
etc. Req. 512K. Only $34.95 

Multi-Menu: Create your own pull-down menus. 
Req. 512K & OS9 Level II. $19.95 
OS9 Level II BBS 2.0: Supports multiple users. 
Tsnion, Login, chat, Message/Mail Retrieval, 
Uloadx,Dloadx & much more! Req. 512K. $29.95 



XWord: Best OS9 Word Processor with true 
character oriented editing & more. $69.95 
XMerge: Mail Merge for Xword: $24.95 
Xs pell: Spelling Checker, 40000 words. $39.95 
XEd: OS9 Full Screen Editor. $39.95 
XI) is: OS-9 Disassembler. $34.95 
XTerm: Communications pro. w/ Up/download, 
xmodem,serial /RS232 pack support. $49.95 
XDir & XCal: Hierarchial Dir. & Caic. $24.95 




OS9 Level II RAMDISK: Must for any Level 
II user. Req512K. $29.95 



GSC File Transfer Utilities: Transfer files 

to & from MSDOS/OS9/RSDOS & Flex. Req. OS9 
(LII for Multivue Version),2 drives, 
SDISK/SDISK3. Standard Version: $44.95. Multi- 
vue Version: $54.95 



PC-Xfer Utilities: Programs to format/transfer 
files to/from MSDOS diskettes to CoCo Under 
Level 1 & 2. Requires SDISK or SDISK 3. $44.95 
SD1SK 3: Standard drive module replacement al- 
lows full use of 40/80 track double -sided drives. Req. 
OS9 Level II. $29.95. SDISK: $29.95 



Wild & MV Version 2.1: Use "wildcards" with 
OS9 & re-arrange directory tree, $19.95 
EZGen Version 1.04: Powerful OS9 bootfile 
editor. Change names, add/delete modules, patch 
bylcs, etc. $19.95 



WIZ: Terminal Package with 300-19200 baud 
rates/windowing. Req 512K & RS232 Pack. $79.95 



DYNASTAR: Word Processor with Macros, ter- 
niina Is/windows, mail-merge & more. Only $99.95 
DYNASPELL: S79.95 
Both Dynastar & DynaSpell: $124.95 



MICROCOM SOFTWARE 

To Order: Refer to Page 17 of our 6-pagc ad scries: (Pgs. 947) 

Credit Card Toll Free Orderline 1-800-654-5244 (9am-8pm 7days/week) 

Order Status, Info, Technical Info: 716-383-8830 





Odd ff© 



How To Read Rainbow 



When we use the term CoCo, we refer to an affection- 
ate name that was first given to the Tandy Color 
Computer by its many fans, users and owners. 

The basic program listings printed in the rain- 
bow are formatted for a 32-character screen — so they 
show up just as they do on your CoCo screen. One easy 
way to check on the accuracy of your typing is to com- 
pare what character "goes under" what. If the charac- 
ters match — and your line endings come out the same 
— you have a pretty good way of knowing that your 
typing is accurate. 

We also have "key boxes" to show you the minimum 
system a program needs. But, do read the text before 
you start typing. 

Finally, the little disk and/or cassette symbols on the 
table of contents and at the beginning of articles 
indicate that the program is available through our 

RAINBOW ON DISKOrRAINBOWON TAPE service. 



Using Machine Language 



The easiest way to "put" a machine language program 
into memory is to use an editor/assembler, a program 
you can purchase from a number of sources. All you 
have to do, essentially, is copy the relevant instructions 
from the rainbow's listing into CoCo. 

Another method of putting an ML listing into CoCo 
is called "hand assembly" — assembly by hand, which 
sometimes causes problems with ORlGlNor EQUATE 
statements. You ought to know something about 
assembly to try this. 

Use the following program if you want to hand- 
assemble ML listings: 

10 CLEAR200,&H3F00:I=&H3FB0 

20 PRINT "ADDRE55:~;HEX$(I); 

30 INPUT "BYTE";B$ 

40 POKE I, VAL("&H"+B$) 

50 I=I+l:GOTO 20 

This program assumes you have a 16K CoCo. If you 
have 32K, change the &H3F00 in Line 10 to &H7F00 
and change the value of I to &H7F80. 



OS-9 and RAINBOW ON DISK 



The OS-9 side of rainbow on disk contains two 
directories: cmds and source. It also contains a file, 
read . me . f i rs t, which explains the division of the 
two directories. The cmds directory contains executa- 
ble programs and the source directory contains the 
ASCII source code for these programs. BASicog 
programs will only be offered in source form so they will 
only be found in the source directory. 

OS-9 is a very powerful operating system. Because 
of this, it is not easy to learn at first. However, while we 
can give specific instructions for using the OS-9 



programs, you will find that the OS-9 programs will be 
of little use unless you are familiar with the operating 
system. For this reason, if you haven't "learned" OS-9 
or are not comfortable with it, we suggest you read The 
Complete Rainbow Guide to OS-9 by Dale Puckett and 
Peter Dibble. 

The following is not intended as a course in OS-9. It 
merely states how to get the OS-9 programs from 
rainbow on disk to your OS-9 system disk. Use 
the procedures appropriate for your system. Before 
doing so, however, boot the OS-9 operating system 
according to the documentation from Radio Shack. 

1 ) Type load d i r l i s t copy and press enter. 

2) If you have only one disk drive, remove the OS-9 
system disk from Drive 0 and replace it with the OS- 
9 side of rainbow on disk. Then type chd/d0 
and press enter. If you have two disk drives, leave 
the sytem master in Drive 0 and put the rainbow 
on disk in Drive 1. Then type chd/dl and press 

ENTER. 

3) List the read . me . f i rs t file to the screen by typing 
list read.me.f irst and pressing ENTER. 

4) Entering dir will give you a directory of the OS-9 
side of rainbow ON disk. To see what programs 
are in the CMDS directory, enter di r cmds. Follow 
a similar method to see what source files are in the 
SOURCE directory. 

5) When you find a program you want to use, copy it 
to the CMDS directory on your system disk with one 
of the following commands: 

One-drive system: copy /d0/cmds/ filename 'd0/ 
cmds/filename -s 

The system will prompt you to alternately place the 
source disk (rainbow on disk) or the destination 
disk (system disk) in Drive 0. 
Two-drive system: copy /di /cmds/ filename /d0/ 
cmds/ filename 

Once you have copied the program, you execute it 
from your system master by placing that disk in Drive 
0 and entering the name of the file. 



The Rainbow Seal 




RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 



The Rainbow Certification Seal is our way of helping 
you, the consumer. The purpose of the Seal is to certify 
to you that any product that carries the Seal has actually 
been seen by us, that it does, indeed, exist and that we 
have a sample copy here at the rainbow. 

Manufacturers of products— hardware, software and 
firmware — are encouraged by us to submit their prod- 
ucts to the rainbow for certification. 

The Seal is not a "guarantee of satisfaction." The 
certification process is different from the review 
process. You are encouraged to read our reviews to 
determine whether the product is right for your needs. 

There is absolutely no relationship between advertis- 
ing in the rainbow and the certification process. 
Certification is open and available to any product per- 



taining to CoCo. A Seal will be awarded to any com- 
mercial product, regardless of whether the firm adver- 
tises or not. 

We will appreciate knowing of instances of violation 
of Seal use. 



Rainbow Check Plus 



The small box accompanying a program listing in 
the rainbow is a "check sum" system, which is 
designed to help you type in programs accurately. 

Rainbow Check PLUS counts the number and values 
of characters you type in. You can then compare the 
number you get to those printed in the rainbow. 
On longer programs, some benchmark lines are given. 
When you reach the end of one of those lines with your 
typing, simply check to see if the numbers match. 

To use Rainbow Check PLUS, type in the program 
and save it for later use, then type in the command RUN 
and press enter. Once the program has run, type NEW 
and press enter to remove it from the area where the 
program you're typing in will go. 

Now, while keying in a listing from the rainbow, 
whenever you press the down arrow key, your CoCo 
gives the check sum based on the length and content 
of the program in memory. This is to check against the 
numbers printed in the rainbow. If your number is 
different, check the listing carefully to be sure you typed 
in the correct basic program code. For more details 
on this helpful utility, refer to H. Allen Curtis' article on 
Page 21 of the February 1984 rainbow. 

Since Rainbow Check PLUS counts spaces and 
punctuation, be sure to type in the listing exactly the 
way it's given in the magazine. 

10 CLS:X=256*PEEK(35)+17B 

20 CLEAR 25,X-1 

30 X=256*PEEI< (35J+17B 

40 FOR Z=X TO X+77 

50 READ Y:W=W+Y:PRINT Z,Y;U 

60 POKE Z,Y:NEXT 

70 IFU=7985THEN80ELSEPRINT 

"DATA ERROR": STOP 
B0 EXEC X:END 

90 DATA 182, 1, 106, 167, 140, 60, 134 
100 DATA 126, 183, 1, 106, 190, 1, 107 
110 DATA 175, 140, 50, 4B, 140, 4, 191 
120 DATA 1, 107, 57, 129, 10, 38, 38 
130 DATA 52, 22, 79, 158, 25, 230, 129 
140 DATA 39, 12, 171, 12B, 171, 128 
150 DATA 230, 132, 3B, 250, 4B, 1, 32 
160 DATA 240, 183, 2, 222, 48, 140, 14 
170 DATA 159, 166, 166, 132, 2B, 254 
180 DATA 189, 173, 198, 53, 22, 126, 0 
190 DATA 0, 135, 255, 134, 40, 55 
200 DATA 51, 52, 41, 0 



14 THE RAINBOW April 1 989 



Books That Can Launch A 1000 Programs!! 

Pokes, Peeks and Execs are your guides into the jungle of computer programming. These commands give you the power of 
Machine Language without leaving the security of BASIC. Each book is a collection of "inside" information, with explanations 
and examples to help you immediately put it to use. Everyone from the novice to the professional will find these handy books a 
wealth of information. pQ|^£g 

PEEKS,'N EXECS 



300 POKES, 
PEEKS, 'N EXECS 
for COCO III 



*40/80 column Screen Text Dump 
*Save Text/Graphics Screen to Disk 
•Command/Functions Disables 
•Enhancements for CoCo3 BASIC 
♦128K/512K RAM Test Program 
•HPRINT Character Modifier 




Only $19.95 



•Autostart your BASIC programs 
•Disable Color BASIC/ECB/Disk BASIC 
commands 

•Disable Break Key/ Clear Key/ Reset Button 
•Generate a Repeat -key 
•Transfer ROMPAKs to tape 
•Set 23 different GRAPHIC modes 
•Merge two BASIC programs 
•And much much more!!! 

For CoCo 1,2 and 3. Only $16.95 
ALL 3 BOOKS for $39,95 



SUPPLEMENT TO 500 
POKES,PEEKS 5 'N EXECS 

200 additional Pokes,Peeks and Execs (500 

Pokes Peeks 'N Execs is a prerequisite) 

•ROMPAK transfer to disk 

•PAINT with 65000 styles 

•Use of 40 track single/double sided drives 

•High-speed Cassette Operation 

•Telewriter, CoCo Max enhancements 

* Graphics Dump (for DMP printers) /Text 

Screen Dump 



For CoCo 1,2 or 3. Only $9.95 





COCO LIBRARY 



An invaluable aid for Basic and Machine Language programmers, these 
books provide a complete disassembly and annotated listing of the 
BASIC/ECB and Disk ROMs. These listings give complete, uninterupted 
memory maps of the four ROMs. Gain complete control over all versions of 
the color computer. 

EXTENDED COLOR BASIC UNRAVELLED: COLOR 
BASIC and EXTENDED BASIC ROM Disassembly: $39.95 
DISK BASIC UNRAVELLED: DISK BASIC ROM 1.1 and 
1.0 Disassembly : $19.95 

BOTH ECB AND DISK BASIC UNRAVELLED: $49.95 
SUPER EXTENDED BASIC UNRAVELLED: SUPER EX- 
TENDED BASIC ROM Disassembly for CoCo 3. $24.95 
COMPLETE UNRAVELLED SERIES (all 3 books): $59.95 



CoCo 3 Service Manual: $39.95 
CoCo 2 Service Manual: $29.95 
Inside OS9 Level II: $39.95 %g. 
Rainbow Guide To OS9 Level H: $19.95 
Rainbow Guide To OS9 II (disk): $19.95 
Complete Guide To OS9 (Level 1): $19.95 
Complete Guide To OS9 (2 Disk): $29.95 
CoCo 3 Secrets Revealed: $19.95 
Basic Programming Tricks: $12.95 
Assembly Language Programming(tepco): $18 

Addendum For CoCo3 (tepco): $12 
Color Computer Disk Manual (with ref card): $29.95 
Start OS-9 (Book & Disk): $32.99 




OTHER SOFTWARE ... 

COCO MAX III (with hi-res interface): $79.95 
COCO MAX II: Disk $77.95 Tape $67.95 
MAXFONTS #1,.#2,#3,#4: Disk $19.95 Each 
NX1000 Rainbow Driver for CoCo Max III: $19.95 
MAXPATCH: Run COCO MAX II on COCO 3. $24.95 

EDT/ASM 64D: Editor-assembler (specify 1,2,3) $59.95 
SOURCE: CoCo Disassembler $34.95 SOURCE III: $49.95 
CBASIC: Best Basic compiler $149.95 CBASIC III: $149.95 

TELEWRITER 64 (COCO 1&2) :Best Word Processor for 
CoCo 1 & 2. Disk $57.95 Tape $47.95 

AUTOTERM:Modem software Disk $39.95 Cas $29.95 
PRO-COLOR FILE *ENHANCED*: $59.95 

VIP DATABASE III 
Best Database for CoCo 3. Features 40/64/80 columns, size 
limited only by disk space, easy to understand menu system, 
LIGHTNING FAST in-memory sort, multiple search, built- 
in mail merge, built-in MATH PACKAGE, print spooler and 
report generator, unlimited print formats & more. $69.95 



WINDOW MASTER 

The hottest program for your CoCo 3!! Imagine using Win- 
dows, Pull-Down Menus, Buttons, Icons, Edit Field, and 
Mouse Functions in your Basic Programs. No need to use 
OS9. It uses the 640x255 (or 320x255) hires graphics mode 
for the highest resolution. Up to 31 windows can appear on 
the screen at one time. Need extra character sets? Window 
Master supports 5 fonts in 54 sizes! How about an enhanced 
Editor for Basic? It gives you a superb Basic Editor which 
leaves the standard EDIT command in the cold. And don't 
forget that many existing Basic/ML programs will operate 
under Window Master with little or no changes. In fact, it 
does NOT take up any memory from Basic. Requires 1 Disk 
Drive, RS Hi-res Interface & Joystick or Mouse. Includes 
128K & 512K Version. $69. 95 Window Master & Hi-Res In- 
terface. Only $79.95 

FKEYS III 

A user friendly, user programmable function key utility that 
creates up to 20 function keys. Includes EDITOR, DOS 
mods, DISABLE, and its EPROMable! Disk $19.95 

SIXDRIVE 

Allows the use of 3 double-sided drives from RSDOS or 
ADOS. Only $16.95 



MICROCOM SOFTWARE 




[AMERICAN, 
TlXPRESS 



OUCCVER 



To Order: Refer to rage 17 of our 6-pagc ad series: (Pgs. 9-17) 

Credit Card Toll Free Orderline 1-800-654-5244 (9am-8pm 7days/week) 

Order Status, Info. Technical Info: 716-383-8830 




512K BASIC 



(For 128K & 512K Computers) 

From the authors of Word Power 3.2, the best-selling Word Processor for CoCo 3, comes a revolutionary programming tool! 



Do you have a 128K or 512K CoCo 3? Are you being told that 
you could only use 22K from Basic?? Don't believe it!! 

Lets face it. You bought your CoCo 3 so you could get better 
graphics, more speed and more MEMORY. Unfortunately as it 
comes, the CoCo 3 only allows you to use 22K for Basic 
Programs. A big disappointment for Basic Programmers. 

Introducing the revolutionary 512K Basic. It gives you up to 80K 
Basic program/variable space (64K for Basic Program/16K for 
variables) on a 128K CoCo and over 400K (384K Basic Program 
Space & 16K Variable Space) on a 512K CoCo! There are no 
new commands to remember and approximately 90-95% of the 
existing Basic Software will run without any modifications. 512K 
Basic is completely transparent to the user. You won't even know 
its there until you realize that you were able to type in a massive 
Basic program without the dreaded ?OM Error. And 512 K 



Basic will even run at double clock-speed and automatically slow 
down for printer and disk operations. 

Step up to 512 K Basic. It's the tool you need to tap the full poten- 
tial of your CoCo 3. 512K Basic Requires a 128K or 512K CoCo 
3 with a disk drive. OS9 is NOT required. Only $39.95 

51 2K Upgrades for CoCo 3. 

(Only $160 with purchase of 512K Basic) 

Fully assembled, tested and ready to be shipped now. Comes 
with $100 worth of 512K Software: 

• 512K Backup Lightning «512K Print Spooler djfe^fe 

• 512K Memory Test • 512K Ramdisk 

• OS9 Level II Ramdisk. 

No soldering. Comes with all instruction manuals^O day war- 
ranty. Only $188 

OK Upgrade Board: $39.95 ^^T^^ teS 7\ 



KEYBOARDS , ETC. 

KEYBOARD EXTENSION CABLE: 
Move your keyboard away from the com- 
puter & type with ease. Use your existing 
keyboard with this g . 
cable or leave your -J? y. 
present keyboard in- <SH^2^3fo£j 
tact and use a second gl^^y 
keyboard. Only o?f* L 
$39.95. 

Cable with CoCo 2 Keyboard: $49.95 
Cable with CoCo 3 Keyboard: $69.95 
CoCo 3 Keyboard (with free FUNCTION 
KEYS software value $14.95) :$39.95 
CoCo 2 Keyboard: $19.95 

ACCESORIES 



COMMUNICATIONS 
EXTRAVAGANZA 

1) Avatex 1200e Modem: Fully Hayes 
compatible 300/1200 w/ speaker, Auto- 
Dial/Answer/Redial. 

2) MODEM CABLE: 4 pin/DB 25 (Reg. 
$19.95) 

3) Autoterm Software: (Reg $39.95) 

4) FREE Compuserve Offer & Acess Time 

5) UPS 2nd Day Air Shipping 

Only $129.95 
With Avatex 2400e instead of I200e: $229.95 




Avatex 1200e Modem Only: $85 
Avatex 2400e Modem Only: $189>X> 



Datarase 

■ •■ill- I li' In 



EPROM 



INTRONICS EPROM PROGRAMMER 

(for CoCo): Programs 2516-27512 & 
more! Includes software & complete 
documentation. Latest version. Lowest 
Price Anywhere! Only $137.95 
EPROM ERASERiFast erase of 24/28 pin 
EPROMs. Only $49.95 
BOTH EPROM PROGRAMMER & 
ERASER: $179.95 
EPROMS: 2764-$8 27128-$9 
ROMPAK (w/ Blank PC Board 27xx 
Series): $12.95 

BLANK CARTRIDGE (Disk Controller 
Size): $10.95 



5 1/4" DS/DD Disks: $.40 each 
3 1IT DS/DD Disks: $1.49 each 
5 1/4" Disk Case (for 70 disks): $9.95 
3 1/2" Disk Case (for 40 disks): $7.50 

Curtis Printer Stand: $19.95 
Surge Supresser Strip w/ 6 outlets: 
$14.95 

Curtis Static Mat: $24.95 



RIBBONS 



NX1000 Color Ribbon: $12.95 
NX1000 Black Ribbon: $8.50 
Seikosha, EPSON, DMP, 
Panasonic, Okidata, Gemini Rib- 
bons: $8.50 each 




CABLES 

MAGNAVOX 8505/8515/8CM643 Analog RGB 
Cable: $24.95 

SERIAL-TO-PARALLEL INTERFACE: Use your 
parallel printer at high speed (300-9600 baud) with CoCo. Comes 
willall cables. Nosoftware compatibility problems. Only $44.95 
15" M ULTI PAK/ROM PAK EXTENDER CABLE: 
$29.95 

VIDEO DRIVER: Use a monochrome/color monitor with 
your CoCo 2. Comes with audio/video cables. Excellent picture 
quality/resolution 1 $34.95 

RS232 Y CABLE: Hook 2 Devices to the serial port. Only 
$24.95 

Y CABLE: Use your disk system with Speech Pak.CoCo Max, 
DS69, etc. $27.95 

RGB Analog Extender Cable:$19.95 M 
SONY Monitor Cable: $29.95 W 
MODEM CABLE:4 pin to DD25.0nly $19.95 
2-POSITION SWITCHER: $29.95 
HI RES JOYSTICK INTERFACE: $11.99 





DI/CCVER 



MICROCOM SOFTWARE 

To Order: Refer to Page 17 of our 6-pagc ad scries: (Pgs. 9-17) 

Credit Card Toll Free Orderline 1-800-654-5244 (9am-8pm 7days/week) 

Order Status, Info, Technical Info: 716-383-8830 




CHIPS, ETC 

Disk Basic Rom 1.1 (Needed for CoCo 
3): $29.95 ECB ROM 1.1:$29.95 
68B09E or 6809E Chip: $14.95 
MultiPak PAL Chip for CoCo 3: 
$19.95 

PAL Switcher: Now you can switch be- 
tween the CoCo 2 and 3 modes when using 
the Multi-Pak. You need the OLDER & 
NEW PAL chip for the 26-3024 Multipak. 

Only $39.95. With NEW PAL Chip: 
$49.95. 

UPGRADES 

64K Upgrade for CoCo Vs, CoCo 
IFs with Cat #26-3026/27, 26-3134, 
26-3136: $29.95 

64K Upgrade for 26-3134 A/B 
CoCo II: $39.95 

(Free 64K Software incl. with 64K Upgr.) 





New OS9 Products 

(For B&B HyperlO System) 



Hard Drive Utilities: MSA Backup, 
Copy/Kill/Rename, Hard Disk 
Backup to Floppies (vica versa), 
wild card & more. Only $21.95 » 
Disk Doctor: Checks/locks out bad 
sectors. Only $17.95 
Hard Drive Zap: View tracks, sec- 
tors, modify data on your hard disk. 
Only $21.95 



DS69B Digitizer: Use your CoCo 3 to 
display pictures from your VCR or video 
camera. Includes C-SEE 3.3 software. 
Only $149.95 

Gravis Joystick: The BEST joystick for 
your CoCo. Tension, rotary,center- 
ing,free-floating controls with 3 buttons: 
$59.95 

MPI Locking Plate (Specify Cat #):$8 

Coming Soon: ROMPAK Wild card: 
Lets you transfer ANY Rompak to disk. 



MAGNAVOX 8CM515 RGB 
MONITOR 

Razor-sharp picture 
quality for your CoCo! 
Has 14" screen, 
Analog/TTL RGB, 
Composite Inputs for 
CoCo 2/3, Speaker, tilt- 
stand & 2 year warranty! 
Only $265 (add $12 S&H/$40 in Canada) 

Magnavox RGB Cable for CoCo 3 and 
Composite Video / Audio Cable Set with 
purchase of monitor: $19.95 




DISK DRIVES for CoCo 2 & 3 


HARD DRIVE SYSTEMS/ 


There are a lot of dealers selling disk drives for the CoCo. Why buy from us? 
First, all our drives are Brand New and made by Fujitsu. They are sleek, 
quiet and have a reputation of superb reliability. Second, our Drive 0 sys- 
tems come with the acclaimed DISTO Controller - with gold-plated con- 
tacts. Third, our Drive 0 systems come with the official 200 page Radio Shack 
Disk Manual with floppy disks; everything you need to get started. Fourth, 
you get $60 worth of our utility software (Disk Util 2.1A & Super Tape/Disk 
Transfer) & our DISKMAX software which allows you to access BOTH sides 
of our drives. Our drive systems are head & shoulders above the rest. 


INTERFACES 


Complete w/ Hard Drive, Western Digital Con- 
troller, B&B Interface, Cables, Case, Power Supply, 
Software (HYPER IO) & Instruction manuals. As- 
sembled/tested/formatted. Just Plug'N'Run. This is 
the best hard drive deal for the CoCo. 

Seagate 20 Meg System: $509 C&jH^^. 
Seagate 30 Meg System: $539 


Drive 0 (With Disto Controller, Case, Power Supply, 1 Drive Cable, Manual, Software): 
$209 

Drive 1 (with Case, Power Supply & software): $129 Bare 5 1/4" Drive: $89 

2 Drive System (With Disto Controller, Case, Power Supply, 2 Drive Cable, Manual & 

Software): $309 

1 Drive Cable: $16.95 2 Drive Cable: $ 22.95 4 Drive Cable:$ 34.95 
FD501 Upgrade Kit: Bare Drive, 2 Drive Cable & Instructions: $109 


CoCo XT: Use 2 5-120 Meg Drives with your CoCo. 
Only $69.95 w/ Real Time Clock: $99.95 
CoCo XT ROM: Boots OS9 from hard/floppy. $19.95 
HYPERIO: Allows Hard Drive Use with RSDOS. 
Only $29.95 HYPERIO: Disto Versiomlf you have a 
DISTO Controller w/ Hard Drive Interface, this 
program will allow you to use your Hard Drive from 
RSDOS!! Only $29.95 



PRINTERS 



1000 Sheets of paper included FREE with every printer 

NX1000 Rainbow System: NX1000 Color Printer w/144 CPS draft • Friction/Trac- 
tor Feed • Epson/IBM Compatible • 1 Year Warranty. Only $289 



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• Epson/IBM Compatible • 1 Year Warranty. Only 
$199 



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w/ 144 cps Draft •Tractor/Friction Feed 
• Epson/IBM Compatible • 2 Year Warranty. Only 
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w/216 cps Draft • 16.5" Wide Carriage • 2 Year Warranty: $399 



Friction/Tractor Feed 




DISTO PRODUCTS ... 



Disto Super Controller: $99.95 Disto 
Super Controller II: $129.95 

• Mini Eprom Programmer Add on: $54.95 
• Hard Disk Add On: $49.95 
• RT Clock & Parallel Interface: $39.95 
• MEB Adapter Add On: $24.95 

MULTI-BOARD ADAPTER* Printer Port, 
Faster RT Clock & true RS-232 Serial Port. 
$59.95 

RS232 SUPER PACK: Here it is! True RS-232 
Port for your CoCo. Compatible with Tandy® 
Deluxe RS232 Pack. Includes DB25 Cable. Re- 
quires Multipak. Only $54.95 



. MICROCOM SOFTWARE 2900 Monroe Avenue • Rochester, NY 14618 




DI/C#VER 



To Order: All Orders $50 & above (except Printers, Monitors, Drives, Computers) shipped by UPS 2nd Day Air in Continental US. 
We accept Visa,MC, Amex,Discover, Check & MO. Please add $3.00 S&H ($10 for Drives/Printers) in continental US; foreign add 
10% S&H (Min $5). NYS Residents please add sales tax. Our Australian Agent: Aust. Peripheral Development. Ph: 07-208-7820 

Credit Card Toll Free Order line 1-800-654-5244 (9am-8pm 7 days/week) 



21* 



Lit' Ole Interest, Revisited 



iVOle Interest Monitor, by Fran- 
cis S. Kalinowski, is a program 
that first appeared in the Sep- 
tember 1984 issue of RAINBOW. It gives 
a detailed printout and /or display of 
how your various bank accounts are 
growing. 

As originally written, the program 
requires at least a 16K CoCo with 
Extended Color BASIC, accepts user 
inputs for up to 1 1 money accounts and 
the interest rates, and calculates and 
prints accounts and earnings informa- 
tion for each day of a selected com- 
pounding period. 

Because in the computer world, 
change is the norm, monotony the 
exception, I have taken a good program 



Duke Norris has been working with 
computers for over 20 years. His first 
home computer was a 4K Co Co 1 and 
he is the SysOp of Shelby County 
Indiana's oldest BBS. Hobbies include 
computers and restoring classic cars 
and trucks. 



EBy Dulk® Norris 

and made it better. The program now 
displays on the CM-8 monitor's screen 
either 40- or 80-column widths and fully 
utilizes the DMP-132 printer features. 
The user also no longer needs to worry 
about memory constraints. 

The modified program requires a 
CoCo 3, cassette or disk drive and an 
RGB monitor. A printer is optional. It 
begins with a graphics title display and 
prompts you for three items: 

• Screen Width? Enter 4 or 8. (4 is for 
a 40-column display and 8 is for an 80- 
column display.) 

• Do you want a printout? Enter Y or 
N. 

• Press the space bar when you are 
ready to begin. 

Now you are ready to enter answers 
to a series of prompts so the program 
can do it's work: 

• The starting date, if a printout was 
selected. 

• The account owner's name. 



• The number of accounts to calculate. 
(The program will calculate from 1 to 
11 accounts.) 

• The number of compounding days for 
all the accounts. 

• The starting balance of each account. 

• The interest rate calculated on each 
account. 

After you have seen the results of 
what you have entered, you are then 
prompted for: 

• Calculate more account(s)? Enter Y or 
N. 

• Do you want a printout? Enter Y or 
N. 

User Modifications 

As you key in the program, there are 
three program areas where you might 
have to make modifications to this 
version of the program to best fit your 
CoCo system configuration: 

• Program Line 190 by POKEing the 
value of 18 in location 150 to operate 
the DMP-132 printer at 2400 baud. You 




1 8 THE RAINBOW April 1989 



duces 





»»Vout 



CoCo 




in 



Desktop 



pu 



he 



VVorUs 



Max-1 0+ 

Now with online 40,000 word 
spellchecker 

Regularly $79.95 

The latest in CoCo word processors 
and the only one with true 
WYSIWYG (What You See Is What 
You Get) output. Mix graphics with 
text. Max-1 0 is great for anything 
from greeting cards up to newsletters. 
Just turn the next page for a full list 
of Max-1 0's unbelievable features. 



File Edit Search* layout Font Style 

s \\ • . t . i . )?t . i . i . i . ■ . S i ' ■ ' i is i * - * • S I ' i ■ i s i ' 3 ~ 



HE] GEI EUl 



Law Of Unreliability: to ttt ii human, M to really foul tbiogt I 

up requires t computer 

Hartley's First Law: Too cso lead a hone to valer, out if you can mate |§ 
bin float oo bn back you've jot ronething 

Ducharm's AliOCfl: If one litn bit proWen closely enougb be Till 
recognize biaielf ai part of the problem 

PeruSSel'S Law: There it so job to simple that it cao't be done vronj. 



imge: x 



Max-1 0 Font Set 

Regularly $29.95 

36 fonts on 2 disks. Can all be used 
easily and quickly with Max-1 0. 

Lonqhawi 24 



Frontier IB point 

Rthens 18 point 

/ r vtr,e tZ point 



Irvine 24 

fwdfl Song 12 pajnj 



Rome 9 point' 
Rom* 12 point 



Sicacil III pniif 

Futura 24 

Courier 12 point 

Erooktiaven 4& 

ZUms IS point 

Sa n FrancUeo 18 

Century 24 
All these and 14 more! 



Eliesmere 12 point 

Ellesmere 24 point 
Eliesmere Bold U 

Digital IS point 



CoCo Max III 

Regularly $79.95 

The ultimate graphics creation 
program. See the list of features on 
the next page. Also read the superb 
review in The Rainbow, April 7965. 

File Edit Options colors Font Size Style 



p 


*" ■ 
i ■ 




0EJH 




\ 




□ 


■1 


o 




a 






T 






& 






Fill 


Zoom 


undo 




1 — j 








1 1; 



This is the Coco Ma% screen with 
its pu/t down menus (above), its 
too! box(feftl its palette, (below). 

You can dram with: 





THE PEHC1L-THE 46 BRUSHES -THE SPRAY CAM OR DRAU : 




LINES RECTANGLES RAYS CIRCLES POLYGONS CUBES 



CHOOSE BORDER 
t OPTIONAL FILL 



THEESE ARE JUST A FEW OF 
COCO MAX ill BASIC FUNCTIONS I 



CoCo Max Fonts 

Regularly $49.95 

Almost 100 fonts for incredible 
headlines and text Four disks full of 
fonts. Use CoCo Max styles (Bold, 
Italic, 3-D, Shadow ...), sizing and 
colors for absolutely wonderful 
effects. Thousands of combinations 
are possible. Here are some of the 
fonts: 



m 



cftatiow 

Koloii 

F*cif)»oT SmxII 
PciCfMOT L ARC,l 
I I I U> (11 I J.IHIHL 

PFOGFnm riEaium 
PFDEFHWl LFIFIGE 

I*h i nr n lllnclt Nmnll 

ni l mtA iilic. i.o 



Digitr*. (Dadium 

Digital Large 
Futura 

SiieiDLflRGE 
in jjffliLuifl! hum] in 

innnfinr^itin 

victory 

■ TaaU Bm.II 

BABY TklTR LC 



LIQUID O&STflL 
Mocnofl Jlapre 

POIIIT OUT 

Prinifuutf Smell 

PRiriTDUT LARGE 



C.rtwh..l 

Normanda Small 



Mormande Medium 

NORM ANDE LG. 

Plono 




All for 



$149* 

Save $80.00 



30 DAY TRIAL OFFER 

AND OUR 
NO-RISK GUARANTEE 

We understand perfectly that you 
have no reason to believe anything 
you read. Including this ad. (Or the 
rave reviews) 

So we invite you to evaluate The 
Works yourself. Call and order it 
We'll send it with detailed, clear 
instructions. Use it with your own 
CoCo 3, on your own work, for 30 
days. Try it for brilliant presentation 
graphics, outstanding word proces- 
sing. Wring it out 

After 30 days, if it isn't for you, 
for any reason, we'll take it back 
and write you a check imme- 
diately for your full purchase 
price. 

The risk is all ours. But we urge 
you not to wait, this deal may end 
soon. We can guarantee this price 
only if you order now. 

Call today. You have 
nothing to lose. 

(203) 348-9436 

Order line open weekdays 9 to 5 Eastern time 
See next page for more ordering info. 



COLORWARE 



A division of Sigma Industries, fnc 




REAL DESKTOP 




File Edit Options colors Font Size style 





ii 




AND 



CoCo Max III is absolutely the best drawing package 
available for the CoCo 3. and it does more than just let 
you draw. CoCo Max III includes animation, text, color 
mixing and more features than you would think 
possible. It combines incredible speed with dazzling 
graphics and it is a joy to use even its most powerful 
features. 

Pictures, graphs, flyers, cards, signs, school projects, 
labels, buttons and anything else you might dream of 
creating is now possible with CoCo Max III. Is it any 
wonder that the majority of CoCo Gallery pictures in the 
last five months were created with CoCo Max? 

Thousands of CoCo users have found that you don't 
have to be an artist to have fun with CoCo Max. You'll 
wonder why you waited so long to get the incredible 
CoCo Max III. 



CoCo Max III is the best because it includes: 

- a huge picture area (two full hi-res 320x192 screens) - a large 
editing window - Zoom mode for detail work - 28 drawing tools 
which you just point and click on - shrink and stretch - rotation at 
any angle (1.5 degree steps) - 51 2K memory support (all features 
work with 128K too) - an Undo feature to correct mistakes - you 
can even Undo an "Undo" - Animation - special effects - color 
sequencing (8 colors, variable speed) - thirteen fonts (more 
available) ~ each font has eight different sizes - five style options 
(bold, italic, 3D, etc.) for thousands of font/size/style combination 
possibilities, - the CoCo Show "slide show" program - color 
editing of patterns - automatic pattern alignment - prints in single 
and double size - smart lasso (move text over a background...) 

- advanced tools: arc, ray, cube. etc. - select 16 of the 64 colors (all 
64 colors are displayed at once for selection!) - picture converter 
(CoCo Max II. MGE. BASIC) - extensive prompting - "glyphic" 
clipbook of rubber stamps - double click shortcuts - color mixing 
(additive/subtractive/none) ~ money back guarantee - sophisticated 
data compression saves disk space - pull down menus (no 
commands to remember) - forty paintbrush shapes -? two color 
lettering - spray can - scrapbooks of pictures - error free 

- Y-cable or multipack not required - high speed hi-res interface 
included (plugs into joystick port) - disk is not copy protected 

- amazing "flowbrush" r RGB and composite monitor support 

- replace color ~ printing on black and white printers in five shades 
of gray - full color printing with optional drivers for the NX- 1000 
Rainbow and CGP220 - entirely rewritten for the CoCo 3 



can 



do 



VN/I 



th th' 5 



are 



no 



inVits 



to 



ed 



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co 



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the 



CoCo Max III: $79.95 

Max-10 owners: deduct $10 

System Requirements: 

CoCo 3 disk system and a Joystick 
or Mouse 

Printer drivers Included: 

IBM/Epson and compatibles, GEMINI, 
DMP1 05/1 06/1 30.OKI1 82/1 92. CGP220 
(B&W). DMP110. DMP200 

Color printer drivers (prints 125 
different colors) Star IMX-1 000, CGP- 
220, or Okimate 20 each $1 9.95 



For all CoCo Max Versions 

Max Edit Font Editor: A font is a set of 
characters of a particular style. With Max Edit you can 
create new fonts or modify the existing ones.$1 9.95 

Max Font disks (send for list) each $1 9.95 
Max Font Set (95 fonts on 4 disks) $49.95 

DS69/69B Digitizers: allows you to capture the 

image from a VCR or video camera and bring it into 

your computer. CoCo Max will let you load digitized 

pictures and modify them. 

DS-69 (2 images per second. Requires 

muttipak) $99.95 

DS-69B (8 images/second) $1 49.95 



CoCo 1 & 2 Owners 

Still Available: 

(See previous ads or 
write for information) 

CoCo Max il (works on 

all disk CoCos) $69.95 

CoCo Max Tape 

(CoCol & 2 only) $59.95 

Y-Cabie $24.95 

CoCo Max II Picture 

Disk Set 

set of 3 disks: $29.95 



Guaranteed Satisfaction 

Use CoCo Max or Max-10 for a full month. 
If you are not delighted with either of them, 
we will refund every penny. 



COLORWARE 



A division of Sigma Industries, Inc. 




TO ORDER ^ 

(203) 656-1806 MON-FRI 9 to 5 EST^ 

Visa or Mastercard accepted. C.O.D. orders $3 extra 
Check or M.0. to: Cokmre, 242- W West Ave. Darien CT 06820 
Add $3 per order for shipping ($5 to Canada, 10% to overseas) 
CT residents add 7.5% sales tax 



PUBLISHING 



COLORWARE 




THE DAZZLING WORD PROCESSOR 

You probably already have a word processor, and you 
probably wish it had these features: 

► Fully menu driven (CoCo Max style) with point and 
click marking of text. You don't need the arrow keys! 

► True WYSIWYG (What You See Is What You Get) 
including variable size fonts, styles (bold, italics, etc.) 
and graphics. 

► Can print multiple columns on a page. 

Not limited by printer capabilities: fonts up to 24 
points (1/3") high, superscripts, small print, etc. 
Fully integrated spelling checker (incredibly fast), no 
need to exit program to check spelling. 

► Graphics can be imported from just about anything 
(CoCo Max; MGE: BASIC: even Macintosh pictures 
from a BBS) and resized to fit your document. 

Full screen preview including graphics. 
Max-10 has all these unique features, plus all the 
features you are used to in your current word 
processor. Even with all this, you don't give up anything. 
Max-10 is easier to use, more intuitive, faster and more 
powerful than anything else. It's not just a word 
processor, it's a desktop publisher. 

I 



conta»* 



Vh* ' ..tor ror th. 



COCO 




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plrtttfi 



iter* 



flurr»» Ton0 rr»» 



rtth 



^Ir*? "is 

"""or |f .phic 



111 



to UPP* 1 "' 

r ,ttal «■•» „t 

infof«* lwn 



Ait adltoft 



Max-10: $79.95 

CoCo Max III owners: deduct $10 
Max-10 requires a CoCo 3, at least 1 disk, & joystick or mouse 
Printer drivers Included: IBM/Epson and compatibles; DMP 
105. DMP106. DMP130; CGP220 (B&W); Gemini/Star 



TM 



File Edit Search* Lauout Font 



'4' " ' ' 1 'A' ' ' ' ' 'J^' * ' ' ' ' ' 



style 




✓ Plain Tent 
Bold 



italics 



CP 
CB 



underlined * cu 
Superscript cH 
subscript cl 



fiiiiii'rtiiitiji 



t hiuuiiiiu ' h 



WYSIWIG adj. (wiz-ee-wig) I What 
You See Is What You Get (acronym) I 

a ukc choice if jMUj fonts and x/f/w. 



R4GE: 2 



Some of the many features of Max-1 0: 

- Blinding speed - printing in multiple columns - online dictionary 

- spell checking - graphics can be mixed with text - full justification 
of proportionally sized characters - bold, italic, underline 
superscript and subscript type styles - superb file support, just point 
and click - "Undo" lets you correct mistakes - easy to use, no 
commands to remember - any graphics program can be used 

- pictures can be shrunk or stretched to fit - right and left alignment 
~ centering - variable line spacing - page numbering - current 
page number displayed on the screen - variable tab stops - left and 
right margins - tabs and margins can vary in the same document 

- cut and paste text and graphics anywhere in the file - page break 
shows on the screen - pull down menus are quick and simple to use 

- lightning fast access to any point in the document with the scroll 
box - twenty fonts (styles and sizes), more available - any number 
of character sizes and styles can be mixed on the same line - up to 
more than 120 characters per line, depending on font size, style and 
letters - headers and footers, even with graphics - file compatibility 
with other word processors - right, left, bottom and top margins 

- word wrap - set starting page - type ahead - key repeat - key 
click - scroll up and down - ASCII file output for compatibility 

- disk directory - kill files- block cut, copy and move - global 
search and replace - paragraph indent - clipboard - merge 

- show file (on disk) - free memory display - page count 

- paragraph count - word count - graphics can be resized and 
moved ~ multiple fonts - error recovery - true lowercase -512K 
memory support (ail features work with 128K too) - complete point 
and click cursor control - moving, clearing and changing blocks of 
text is ridiculously easy, just point and click at each end of the text 
block - onscreen ruler - preview file before loading - search and 
replace - disk is not copy protected - more than 35 pages of text 

CoCo Max III and Max-10 
Perfect Together 

You do not need CoCo Max IN to insert and print 
graphics in Max-10. Max-10 works with any graphics 
creation program, and you can also use graphics 
downloaded from bulletin boards. 

Similarly, you do not need Max-1 0 to create graphics 
with text in CoCo Max III. There are tremendous 
lettering capabilities in CoCo Max III, with its many 
fonts, styles, and sizes. 

Together Max-10 and CoCo Max III are an unbeatable 
combination. This desktop publishing system is better 
than anything youVe ever seen on a CoCo. We are so 
confident that you will use, and enjoy using the two 
software packages, that we offer an unconditional 
money back guarantee* Stop wasting your time and 
effort using inferior or obsolete products. Move up to 
the new generation of CoCo software now. 



Lil» Ole Person's GOLDPILE 
for THE COCO III on 12/12/88. 

No. Accnt 1 Accnt 2 Accnt 3 Accnt 4 Accnt 5 Today* s Accumltd Grand 

.063 % .075 % .098 % .054 % Interest Interest Total 



Days . 055 



Start 
1 
2 
3 
4 
5 



100. 00 
100. 02 
100. 03 
100. 05 
100. 06 
100. 08 



200. 00 
200. 03 
200. 07 
200. 10 
200. 14 
200. 17 



300.00 400.00 

300.06 400.11 

300. 12 400. 21 

300. 18 400. 32 

300.25 400.43 

300.31 400.54 



500. 00 
500. 07 
500, 15 
500. 22 
500. 30 
500. 37 



0. 0000 
0. 2926 
0. 2927 
0. 2927 
0. 2928 
0. 2928 



0. 00 
0. 29 
0. 59 

0. 88 

1. 17 
1. 46 

SI. 46 



1500. 00 
1500. 29 
1500. 59 
1500. 88 
1501. 17 
1501. 46 



this way Lil' Ole THE COCO III can earn 
and end up with SI, 501. 46 in Just 5 days. 

sssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssss 



may change this POKE to a value that you 
use or just modify it to a BASIC REMark 
statement. 

• Line 960 contains the famous 
speed-up POKE. If your CoCo 3 cannot 
execute at the fast speed or if you are 
using the program with a print spooler, 
change line 960 to a RETURN. If you do 
not modify this statement, be sure to 



always POKE65496,0 before you access 
the cassette or disk. 

• Program lines 1020 through 1060 
are the appropriate DMP-132 printer 
codes to force it to skip to the top of the 
paper form, print in different fonts 
(depending on how many accounts are 
processed) and sound the printer's bell 
when the printout is complete. If you 
are not using a DMP-132 printer you 



will have to modify these lines accord- 
ing to your printer's requirements or 
you may just change the lines to the 
BASIC return statement. 
Happy Saving! 

(Questions or comments regarding 
this program may be directed to the 
author at P.O. Box 241, Shelbyville, IN 
46176. Please enclose an SASE when 
requesting a reply.) □ 



r 












/ 160. . , 


, . .154 


690 .. . 


. .192 




300 


. . .13 




. .101 




400 . . 


2 


940 


. .65 




500 .. . 


. .163 


END . , 


, . .23 




610 . . 


. . .28 







'$ MODIFIED FOR THE COCO III 
'$ BY: DUKE NORRIS 



'$ 



The Listing: INTEREST 

ft • COPYRIGHT 1989 FALSOFT, INC 
10 '$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ 

$ 

20 '$ LIL OLE PERSON • S GOLDPILE 
$ 

30 '$ FOR 16K COCO WITH ECB 
$ 

40 •$ (C)1983 BY: F. KALINOWSKI 
$ 

50 '$ 16 N. ALDER DRIVE 

$ 

60 '$ 
$ 

70 '$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ 
$ 

80 1 
90 ' 

100 ■$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ 
$$ 

110 •$ FIRST APPEARED IN PAINBOW 
$ 

120 '$ SEPTEMBER 1984, PAGE 51 
$ 



P.O. BOX 241, 
SHELBYVILLE, IN 46176 
'$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ 



ORLANDO, FL 32807 



130 

$ 
140 

$ 
150 

$ 
160 

$ 
170 

$$ 

180 TROFF:CLS0:ON BRK GOTO 450 :C 
LEAR300 : PALETTERGB : PALETTE 2 , 1 
190 POKE150,18 'POKE 2400 BAUD R 
ATE FOR PRINTER 
200 GOTO500 

210 GT=0:FORX=0TO10:GT=GT+AA(X) : 
NEXT : RETURN 

220 IFPS=0THENRETURNELSEPRINT#-2 

,STRING$( (Y*9)+32,C) : RETURN 

230 FORX=0TOY-1:IE(X)=DR(X) *AA(X 

) :AA(X)=AA(X)+IE(X) :NEXT 

240 DI=0:FORX=0TO10:DI=DI+IE(X) : 

NEXT 

250 TI=TI+DI:GOSUB210:IFTI>I THE 
N I=I+U 

2 60 IFPS=0THEN310 

270 X=0:IFFL=0THENPRINT#-2, "Star 
t" ; : FL=1 : X=0 : ELSEPRINT#-2 , USING" 
### ";D; 

280 PRINT#-2,USING"#####.## ";AA 

(X) ; 

290 X=X+1:IF X<Y THEN280 

300 PRINT #-2, USING" ##.#### ";DI 



22 



THE RAINBOW April 1989 



; : PRINT#-2 /USING" ##### . ## " ; TI ; 
: PRINT#-2 , USING" #####.##" ;GT 
310 LOCATEj3,04:Q$="Day ###":GOSU 
B930: PRINTTAB (WA) " " ; : PRINTUSING 
Q$ ;D: LOCATE J3 ,J36 :Q$="Grand Total 

$$#,###,###.## ":GOSUB930:PR 
INTTAB (WA) " » ; : PRINTUSING Q$ ;GT 
320 LOCATEj3,08 :Q$="Daily Interes 

t $$#,###, ###.####'• :GOSUB930:FRI 

NTTAB (WA) " " 7 : PRINTUSING Q$ ; DI : LO 

CATE0,10:Q$="Total Interest $$#, 

###,###.## " : GOSUB93.0 : PRINTTAB ( 

WA) " " ; : PRINTUS ING Q $ ; TI 

330 D=D+1:IFD<DD+1THEN230ELSED=D 

-1 

340 IFPT<8THENPT=8 
350 C=61:GOSUB220 

3 60 LOCATED , 13 : ATTR5 , 2 : PRINTSTRI 
NG$(80,32) :LOCATE0, 14:Q$="This w 
ay, Lil 1 Ole "+A$:ATTR5,2:GOSUB9 
20:Q$="can earn: $$#,###.## Tota 
1 Interest" :GOSUB9 30: LOCATE0, 15: 

PRINTTAB (WA) " " ; : PRINTUSING Q$ ;TI 

370 IFPS=0THEN4J30 

380 PRINT#-2 , TAB (PT-8) "this way 

Lil 1 Ole "A$" can earn ";:PRINT# 

-2,USING"$$#,###.##";TI 

39,0 PRINT #-2, TAB (PT-8) "and end U 

p with ";:PRINT#-2,USING"$$,###. 
##";GT; :PRINT#-2, " in just"D"day 



s. 



ii 



S+G 



See you at Rainbowfest Chicago! i 

NO HYPE! JUST QUALITY 0S9 
SOFTWARE AND HARDWARE 

€WMWjW9 Urn* 



Goldstar 2400 Buud Modem (1 200 Baud - $ 1 00) SI 50 

100% hayes computable, steel case, stores five numbers 
Parameters stored in non-volatile ram using AT commonds 

5UPERC0MM 2.0 by Dove Phlllpsen $30 

Xmodem CHK,CRC &. Ymodem botch transfer with buffering 
Autodial ond redial with keyboard macros, auto log on 
ANSI and OS9 terminal emulation / Access to 0S9 Shell 
ASCII file capture and send / Split screen conference 
Reliable with T2 or ony other device even at 2400 baud 
will work with only 12BK and a black ond white monitor 
Pop-up windows w/Help and eosy to use ALT-KEY commands 
done in 100% assembly language for effecient operation 
Not necessary to build new boot disk - just load and run! 
Proven faster & more reliable than other terminal programs 



0S9 Level 2 Login/BBS Package 



$50 



Auto-Baud Tsmon with command passing and optional hours 
Login with DES password encryption, logs access attempts 
Group ond Net Accounts con be set-up, new users verified 
Configurable Menu w/User-select ANSI, 0S9, or no graphics 
Mail, public News, and Net Mail (exchonge w/other systems) 
BLAZE included for ultra-fast bidirectional Net transfers 
Chat, Xmodem/Ymodem transfers. Help, multi-user conference 
Chown, FindFile, Pop/Lobel (for windows), other utilities 
Any 0S9 command can be run from login, no doors required 
0S9 Level 2, 512k, Hard drive or NO-Holt controller req d 
Limited free updates-modlf Icatlons available upon request 
(call or write for details on OSK version of this package) 

CDI-Carrier Detect Interface Only $ t 5 w/logln $20 

Hardware which allows baud rate detection w/login package 

VEF Printer Dump for Star NX- 1 000 Rainbow $20 
has fast and slow dump modes, matches DS9 palettes 

Indiana residents add 5% soles tax. COD Add $3. No credit cords. 
Shipping & handling included. Send check or money order to: 
StG Computers, Inc. - P.O. Box 242B5 - Speedway IN 46224 
(317) 241-6401 (voice) - (317) 244-3159 (modem, 3/12/2400) 



400 LOCATED, 16: Q$="and end up wi 
th at least: $$###,###. ##»:GOSUB 
930 : PRINTTAB (WA) 11 " ; z PRINTUSING Q 
$ ;GT: LOCATE0 , 17 : PRINTS TRING $ (79 , 
32) :LOCATE0, 17 :Q$="in just»+STR$ 
(D)+" days. » :GOSUB920 
410 C=36:GOSUB220:IFPS=0THEN430 
420 F0RX=1T04:PRINT#-2:NEXT:G0SU 
B1060 

430 PRINT :GOSUB950:LOCATE0 / 22 :Q$ 
="Want To Run More Accounts (Y/N 
) " : ATTR4 , 5 : GOSUB920 : SOUND1 , 1 
440 S$=INKEY$ : IFS$="Y"THEN460ELS 
EIFS$O"N"THEN440 
450 GOSUB970:GOSUB950:CLS5:END 
460 FORX=0TO10:AA(X)=0:AN(X)=0:I 
E (X) =0 : IR (X) =0 :NEXT 
470 GOSUB970:ATTR3 ,2:Q$="Do You 
Want A Printout (Y/N) ?": LOCATE 
0 , 22 : : G0SUB9 2 0 : S0UND1 ,1:3$=" " 
480 GOSUB950 : S$=INKEY$ : IFS$="Y"T 
HEN PS=1:GOSUB970:GOSUB910 ELSE 
IF S$= ,M, THEN480 ELSE GOSUB960:PS 

=0 

490 D=0:TI=0: :DI=0:IE=0:FL=0:C=2 

2 : W=0 : CLS5 : GOTO590 

500 HSCREEN2:HC0L0R2,1:HCLS6:HW= 

40 : FORBN=0TO10 : HPRINT (0 , BN) , STRI 

NG$(40,"$") :NEXTBN:Q$="Lil' Ole" 

:Q=12:GOSUB940 

510 Q$=» Person 1 s" : Q=»14 : GOSUB940 

520 HCOLOR1 , 2 : Q$= M GOLDPILE" : Q=16 

: GOSUB940 : HCOLOR2 , 1 
530 GOSUB970:HCOLOR5 / 6:Q$="Do Yo 
u Want A Printout (Y/N) ?":Q=18: 
GOSUB9 4 0 : S0UND1 , 1 

540 S$=INKEY$:IFS$= H N"THEN PS=0: 
GOSUB960 : GOTO550ELSEIFS$="Y !I THEN 

PS=1 : GOSUB970ELSE540 
550 HC0L0R1, 6:Q$="Screen Width 4 
=40 8=80 (4/8) ?":SOUNDl,l:Q=2 
0 : GOSUB940 : SOUND1 , 1 
560 S$=INKEY$:IFS$="4 If THEN HS=40 

ELSE IF S$="8"THEN HS=80 ELSE G 
OTO560 

570 HC0L0R4 , 6 : Q$="PRESS <SPACEBA 
R> TO START.":Q=22:GOSUB940:SOUN 




The Dazzling Word Processor and Document 
Creator for the CoCo 3. 
Nothing else comes close. 



fcotoaw»«f ' 



April 1989 THE RAINBOW 23 



D2,l 

580 F=RND(7):IF F=6THEN580ELSE S 
$=INKEY$:HCOLOR F , 7 : HPRINT (RND ( 8 

0) -l,RND(ll)-l) ,"$":IF S$<>" "TH 
EN580 ELSE HW=HS 

590 WIDTHHW : HSCREEN0 : CLS5 : ATTR4 , 
l:Q$="Lil' Ole Person's GOLDPILE 
":LOCATE0,0:GOSUB920:IF HW=80 TH 
EN Q$=STRING$(78,36)ELSE Q$=STRI 
NG$(38,36) 

600 ATTR3,3:LOCATE0,1:GOSUB920:G 
OSUB950 

610 IFPS=0THEN630 

620 LOCATE0,3:Q$="What's The Sta 

rt Date (MM/DD/YY) " : GOSUB920 : INP 

UT" H ;B$: IF B$=""THENSOUNDl,l:C 

LS5:GOTO590 

630 LOCATE0,5:Q$="What's The Acc 

ount Owner's Name" :GOSUB920: INPU 

T" ";A$:IF A$=" "THEN SOUNDl,l:GO 
TO630 

640 LOCATE0,8:Q$="How Many ACCOU 

nts For Processing" :GOSUB920 

650 INPUT" ";Y:IFY<10RY>11THENS0 
UND1 , 1 : LOCATE0 , 8 : PRINTSTRING$ (16 
0," ") :GOTO640ELSE IF PS=1THEN G 
OSUB910 

660 IF PS=1 THEN IF Y<6THEN GOSU 
B1030 ELSE IF Y>5 AND Y<8 THEN G 
OSUB1040 ELSE IF Y>7 THEN GOSUB1 
050 

670 LOCATE0,ll:Q$="How Many Comp 
ounding Days" :GOSUB920: INPUT" " ; 
DD$:DD=VAL(DD$) : IF DD=0 OR DD>36 
50 THEN LOCATE0 , 11 : PRINTSTRING$ ( 
160,32) :SOUND1,1:GOTO670 
680 LL=15:FORX=1TOY:LOCATE0,LL:P 
RINTSTRING$(160, " " ) : IF HW=80THE 
NLOCATE0 , LL+3 : PRINTSTRING$ ( 160 , " 

") 

690 LOCATE0,LL:Q$=" Account "+STR$ 
(X)+" Starting Amount ($$.$$) ":G 
OSUB920 

700 INPUT" ";AA(X-1):IF AA(X-1)= 
0THEN SOUND1,1:GOTO690 ELSE LL=L 
L+3 

710 LOCATE0,LL:Q$="Account"+STR$ 
(X)+" Interest Rate (00.0000) ":G 

OSUB920 

720 INPUT" ";IR(X-1):IF IR(X-1)= 
0THEN SOUND1,1:GOTO710ELSE IR(X- 

1) =IR(X-1) *.01 

730 LL=LL-3 : NEXT : CLS5 
740 ATTR4,l:LOCATE0,0:Q$="Lil' 0 
le Person's GOLDPILE" :GOSUB920: A 
TTR3 , 3 : LOCATE0 , 1 : Q$=" (WATCH IT G 
ROW! ) " :GOSUB920 

750 IF HW=80THEN Q$=STRING$ (78 , 3 
6) ELSE Q$=STRING$(38,36) 
760 ATTR7,1:GOSUB920:GOSUB950 
770 IFPS=0THEN880 



780 PT=INT( (Y*9)+6)/2 

790 PRINT#-2,TAB(PT-1) "Lil 1 Ole 

Person's GOLDPILE" 

800 PRINT#-2,TAB(PT-1) "for "A$" 

on »B$"." 

810 C=36:GOSUB220:PRINT#-2," No. 

" ; : X=l : FORT=6TOY*9STEP9 

820 PRINT#-2,TAB(T) "Accnt"X; :X=X 

+1:NEXT 

830 PRINT#-2,TAB(T) "Today • s" ;TAB 
(T+9) "Accumltd" ;TAB(T+19) "Grand" 
8"40 PRINT#-2 , "Days" ; :X=0 : FORT=5T 
0Y*9STEP9 

850 PRINT#-2,TAB(T)IR(X) "%"; :X=*X 
+1:NEXT 

860 PRINT#-2, TAB (T+l) "Interest I 
nterest" ;TAB(T+20) "Total" 
870 C=61:GOSUB220 

880 FORX=0TOY-l:DR(X)=IR(X)/365: 
NEXT:GOSUB210 

890 U=INT(GT/4400) :IFU<1THENU=1 
900 I=U:GOTO260 

910 LOCATE0,22:IF(PEEK(&HFF22)AN 

Dl) THEN HCOLOR4 , 6 : Q=22 : Q$=" PRINT 

ER NOT READY" : GOSUB920 : GOTO910 E 

LSE GOSUB1020:LOCATE0,22:PRINTST 

RING$ (78," " ) ; : RETURN 

920 IFLEN(Q$)> HW THENRETURNELSE 

PRINTTAB ( (HW/2) - (LEN(Q$) /2) ) ;Q$: 

RETURN 

' CENTERIT 

930 IFLEN(Q$)> HW THENRETURNELSE 
WA=( (HW/2) -(LEN(Q$)/2) ) : RETURN 

940 IFLEN(Q$)> HW THENRETURNELSE 
QQ=(HW/2) -(LEN(Q$)/2) : HPRINT ( QQ 

,Q) ,Q$: RETURN 

950 ATTR0 , 4 : RETURN 

960 POKE65497,0: RETURN 'SPEED-UP 

970 POKE65496,0:RETURN 'SLOW-DOW 

N 

980 ' 

990 'ALL PRINT CODES ARE FOR A 
DMP-132 

1000 'CHANGE TO RETURNS IF NOT 
WANTED OR CHANGE THE CHR$ 
CODES 

1010 • 

1020 PRINT#-2,CHR$ (12) : RETURN 

'SKIP TO TOP-OF-FORM 
1030 PRINT#-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(18) : 
RETURN 

' CORRESPONDENCE-10 
1040 PRINT#-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(29) : 
RETURN 

' CORRESPONDENCE-12 
1050 PRINT#-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(77) : 
RETURN 

'MICROFONT 
1060 PRINT # -2 , CHR$ ( 7 ) : RETURN 

'SOUND PRINTER BELL END-OF-PRIN 
T OPERATION 



24 THE RAINBOW April 1969 



"In the beginning there was VIP Writer and users saw that it was good, But it's 
not the best anymore. There's a new word processor to claim the crown... 

VIP Writer III -Setting the Standard" -rainbow sept. 1988 



MORE SCREEN DISPLAY OPTIONS 

VIP Writer 111 offers screen widths of 32, 40, 64 & 80 - all with 24 lines and actual lower 
case letters using the CoCo 3's hardware display. It runs at double dock speed and has 4- 
color menus making VIP Writer 111 FAST and EASY to usel You can choose foreground, 
background, hilite and cursor colors from up to 64 hues. Color can be turned ON or OFF 
for the best possible display using a monochrome monitor or TV set. VIP Writer III has a 
context sensitive help facility to display command usage in easy to read colored windows. 

CUSTOMIZER & PRINTER INSTALLER 

VIP Writer III comes with a configuration / printer installation program which lets you 
customize VIP Writer III to suit your own liking. You can set screen width and colors as well 
as margins and more. You can also install your own printer and set interface type (serial, 
parallel or J&M), baud rate, line feeds, etc. Once done, you never have to enter these 
parameters again! VIP Writer III will load n' go with your custom configuration every time! 

MORE TOTAL TEXT STORAGE 

VIP Writer III has 106K total text storage in a 128K CoCo 3 (495K in 51 2K). VIP Writer 
III creates ASCII text files which are compatible with all other VIP Programs as well as 
other programs which use ASCII files. You can use VIP Writer III to even type BASIC 
programs! There is a 48K text buffer (438K in a 51 2K CoCo 3) and disk file linking 
allowing virtually unlimited text space. VIP Writer III works with up to four disk drives and 
lets you display directories and free space as well as rename or kill disk files. In addition 
VIP Writer III is 100% compatible with the RGB Computer Systems Hard Disk. 

POWERFUL EDITING FEATURES 

VIP Writer III has a full featured screen editor which can be used to edit text with lines up 
to 240 characters long with or without automatic word wrap around. You can select 
type-over mode or insert mode. There is even an OOPS command to recall a cleared text 
buffer. Other editing features include: Type-ahead • typamatic key repeat and key beep 
for flawless text entry • end of line bell • full four way cursor control with scrolling • top 
of textfile • bottom of textfile • page up • page down • top of screen • bottom of screen • 
beginning of line • end of line • left one word • right one word • DELETE character, to 
beginning or end of line, word to the left or right, or entire line • INSERT character or line 
• LOCATE and/or CHANGE or DELETE single or multiple occurrence using wildcards • 
BLOCK copy, move or delete with up to TEN simultaneous block manipulations • TAB key 
and proarammable tab stops • word count • line restore • three PROGRAMMABLE 
FUNCTIONS to perform taste such as auto column creation and multiple copy printing. 



AUTOMATIC TEXT FORMATTING 

VIP Writer III automatically formats your text for you or allows you to format your text in 
any way you wish. You can chanqe the top, bottom, left or right margin and page length. 
You can set your text flush left, center or flush right. You can turn right hand 
justification on or off. You can have headers, footers, page numbers and TWO auxiliary 
lines which can appear on odd, even or all pages. You can also select the line on which they 
appear! You can even change the line spacing I Parameters can be altered ANYWHERE I 

PREVIEW PRINT FORMAT WINDOW 

VIP Writer 111 features an exclusive format window which allows you to preview your 
document BEFORE PRINTING IT! You are able to move up, down, left and right to see 
centered and justified text, margins, page breaks, broken paragraphs, orphan lines etc. 

PRINTING VERSATILITY 

VIP Writer III prints TWICE as fast as any other CoCo word processor! It supports most 
serial or parallel printers using J&M JFD-CP or Rainbow interface and gives you the 
ability to select baud rates from 110 to 19,200. You can imbed printer control codes 
anywhere in your text file EVEN WITHIN JUSTIFIED TEXT! # Writer III also has 
TWENTY programmable printer macros which allow you to easily control all of your 
printers capabilities such as bold, underline, italics and superscript using simple key 
strokes. Other features include: multiple copy printing • single sheet pause • line feeds. 

BUILT IN PRINT SPOOLING 

VIP Writer III has a print spooler with a 57,000 character buffer which allows you to print 
one document WHILE you are editing another. You don't have to wait until your printer is 
done before starting another job! Some word processors DO NOT include this feature! 

50,000 WORD SPELLING CHECKER 

VIP Writer III includes VIP Speller (not FREEWARE) to check your text for misspelled 
words It has a 50,000 (not 20,000) word dictionary that can be added to or edited. 

QUALITY DOCUMENTATION 

VIP Writer III comes with a well written 1 25 page manual which is Laser printed, not dot- 
matrix like the competition. It includes a tutorial, glossary of terms and examples for the 
beginner as well as a complete index) VIP Writer III is truly the BEST you can buy. 

VIP Writer 111 includes VIP Speller 1.1. DISK $79.95 

Available through Radio Shack Express Order Cat. #900-0908 



Writer III or Library /W owners: Upgrade to the VIP Writer III 2.0 
for $10 + $3 S/H. Send ORIGINAL disk and $13 total. 



VIP Writer owners: Upgrade to the Writer III 2.0 for $49.95 + $3 
S/H. Send original disk and $52,95 totaL 



VIP Database III 

VIP Database III features selectable screen displays of 40, 64 or 80 characters by 24 
lines with choice of 64 foreground, background, hilite and cursor colors for EASY DATA 
ENTRY. It uses the CoCo 3's hardware screen and double clock speed to be the 
FASTEST database available! VIP Database III will handle as many records as will fit on 
your disks and is structured in a simple and easy to understand menu system with full 
prompting for easy operation. Your data is stored in records of your own design. All files 
are fully indexed for speed and efficiency. IN-MEMORY SORT of records is LIGHTNING 
FAST and provides for easy listing of names, figures, addresses, etc., in ascending or 
descending alphabetical or numeric order. Records can be searched for specific entries 
using multiple search criteria. The built-in mail-merge lets you sort and print mailing lists, 
print form letters, address envelopes - the list is endless. The built-in MATH PACKAGE 
even performs arithmetic operations and updates other fields. VIP Database III also has a 
print spooler and report generator which uses print forms you create. DISK $69.95 
Available through Radio Shack Express Order Cat #900-0915 



VIP Database owners: Upgrade to the VIP Database III for 
$39.95 + $3 S/H. Send ORIGINAL disk and $42.95 total. 



VIP Library /WDCE 

The VIP Library /WDCE combines all six popular VIP application programs - VIP 
Database III, VIP Writer III, VIP Speller, VIP Calc III, VIP Terminal and VIP Disk-ZAP 



into one integrated program on one disk called VIP Desktop. 
For VIP Library shipping please add $4 USA. $5 Canada. $10 Foreign. 



DISK $179.95 



VIP Library owners: Upgrade to the VIP Library /WDCE for $99.95 
+ $3 S/H. Send ORIGINAL disk and $102.95 total. 



VIP Library A/VDE owners: Upgrade to the VIP Library /WDCE for 
$10 + $3 S/H. Send ORIGINAL disk and $13 total. 



_ UD IE m ti ® Dp tr I s ® s 

©(503) 663-2865 ^POB 1233 Gresham. OR 97030 

We accept VISA / MAS I LHCARL) and C.O.B. orders by phone. 

Non VIP Library orders add $3 for shipping and handling in USA. Canada $4. Foreign 
$6. COD orders add an additional $2.75. Checks allow 3 weeks for delivery. 



VIP Calc 




FAST 4-color POPUP menus • PRINT SPOOLER 
32, 40, 64 and 80 Column HARDWARE display! 
Runs VERY VERY FAST at double clock speed! 

Now every CoCo 3 owner has access to a calculating and planning tool better than 
VisiCalc™, containing all its features and commands and then some. VIP Calc III allows a 
large worksheet with up to 51 2 columns by 1024 rowsl In addition, VIP Calc III has up to 1 6 
windows which allow you to compare and contrast results of changes. Other features 
include 8 AND 16 digit precision • trig, functions • averaging • algebraic functions • column 
and row ascending and descending SORTS • locate formulas or titles in cells • block move 
and replicate • global or local column width * limitless programmable functions * create 
BAR charts. Embed printer control codes for customized printing. Combine spreadsheet 
data with VIP Writer documents to create ledgers, projections, statistical & financial 
budgets and reports. DISK $69.95 

Available through Radio Shack Express Order Cat. #900-0916 



VIP Calc owners: Upgrade to the VIP Calc III for $29.95 + $3 S/H. 

Send original disk and $32.95 total, 



Buy RGB-DOS for $29.95, 

Get Hard Disk support, new commands and a Disk Drive FREE!* 
Sounds too good to be true? If you own a Radio Shack FD 502 or other 
double sided Disk Drive, using RGB-DOS, you can access the other side 
of your Disk Drive giving a second disk drive absolutely free!* RGB- 
DOS also supports up to 2 Hard Drives that can be used by DISK 
BASIC as well as OS-9. RGB-DOS works with CoCo 1, 2 and 3 and 
supports double sided drives and faster stepping rates. Other 
features include: Full screen directory display shows drive #, free 
space and even a disk name! • RUNM command and FLEXIKEY Last 
Command Recall and Edit system • EPROM version executes any 
program when CoCo is turned on for hands free start-up. 64K Req'd. 

All products run under RSDOS and are not copy protected. 



A comparative-look at the various word processors 
available on the CoCo market 



Deciding What's 

WriteforYo 



u 




|hoosing a word processor will 
probably be the most important 
and difficult software decision 
you make in your computing life. You 
had better choose well, because if you're 
a typical user, the word processor will 
become the most-used program in your 
software collection. There is a wide 
variety of word processors on the CoCo 
market. Some are relatively expensive, 
some dirt cheap — but all handle the 
basic features of disk or tape I/O, etc. 
The decision will be based on the fea- 
tures you want — a spelling checker, 
table of contents generator, large buffer 
size, etc. Be sure to take some time and 
give a lot of thought to the one you 
select, because word processors are not 
like games; you do not buy a new one 
every month. And once you invest the 
time it takes to thoroughly learn a 
system and grow comfortable with it, 
you are not likely going to want to 
change. You'll have to live with it for a 
long time, and you'll grow to love it. 

When it comes to word processors, 
people tend to be rather subjective. 
Here at Falsoft, we use Tandy's MS- 
DOS computers for production because 
our typesetting system is set up to work 
with them. Which means, of course, 
that for production we use MS-DOS 
word processors. Managing Editor 
Jutta Kapfhammer's favorite MS-DOS 
word processor is Telecommuter. Tech- 
nical Editor Cray Augsburg's favorite is 
WordStar 2000. Reviews Editor Lauren 
Willoughby favors Xy Write III Plus. 



Lonnie's favorite (you all know who he 
is, right?) is WordPerfect 5.0. 

Because we are moving to a new 
typesetting system (Linotype) that is 
geared toward total electronic publish- 
ing, it has been decided that the editorial 
department standardize on word pro- 
cessors, using only one for production. 
And guess whose personal preference it 
is that we are all adopting? You guessed 
it — Lonnie's! In less than a week, we 
are all supposed to be editing and 
generating copy on WordPerfect 5.0. As 
you can probably tell, we are not at all 
thrilled with the idea. As a matter of 
fact, some of us will make the change 
kicking and screaming all the way. You 
see, word processors are personal kinds 
of things. You get very attached to the 
one you've been using. It's like getting 
accustomed to and driving what you 
feel is a Ferrari for years and one 
morning finding a Cadillac in your 
driveway. Cadillacs are nice, but . . . 

Sorry, back to personal preferences 
and the CoCo. 

Cray's personal favorite in the CoCo 
realm is Simply Better, a new CoCo 3 
word processor that is a little like VIP 
Writer III Version 1. It lets you do all 
sorts of neat things — including sorts! 
Jutta's personal favorite is Telewriter- 
64, which lets her accomplish writing 
and editing tasks with menu-driven 
ease. And Lauren favors VIP Writer III, 
especially the new Version 2, because of 
its speedy command-driven operation 
and its new backspace key. 



In a review a few months ago, Lauren 
sang the praises of VIP Writer II I to the 
high heavens, even going so far as to say 
that it was "setting the standard for 
CoCo 3 word processing." That may or 
may not be true, but it should be noted 
that she was under the influence of 
subjectivitis. (Actually, Telewriter- 128 
for the CoCo 3 came out about the same 
time as VIP Writer III, and the two are 
pretty much neck-and-neck with perfor- 
mance and operation — except that 
Telewriter-128 is menu-driven — so 
maybe it set the standard.) If she 
stepped on some toes, she apologizes. 
We all are guilty of favoritism. 

Here on the staff we've driven the 
various word processors around the 
block, but we hadn't taken them out on 
a road trip. Now that we have, here is 
a revelation, the most important thing 
we've learned in life: At the baseline, all 
word processors are pretty much alike. 

All word processors let you type in 
text, edit it, store it, print it, call it back 
up and delete it. Primarily, the ability 
to save text is what makes word proces- 
sors so wonderful. 

In light of this revelation, we are 
going to have to amend our reviews 
editor's brash proclamation of VIP as 
the be-all and end-all of CoCo word 
processors. Now that we have test- 
driven all these programs, we are tho- 
roughly confused. So, if you're reading 
this to find out what's the absolute best 
word processor available, you won't 
find that answer here. First you have to 



26 



THE RAINBOW April 1989 



ask yourself what kind of person you 
are, and then you'll know which word 
processor is right for you. (More on this 
later.) 

What Can You Do With Them? 

If you've read this far wondering 
what all the fuss was about, and you 
have no earthly idea what a word pro- 
cessor is, where have you been? No 
doubt most of you already know what 
a word processor is. Maybe word pro- 
cessing is the reason you purchased 
your Color Computer in the first place. 
Simply, very simply, a word processor 
is like a magic typewriter that lets you 
change what you type after you type it. 
Then it lets you print out what you 
typed — as many times as you want. No 
more duplication of effort. 

It gives you a way to come clean, at 
least with copy. If your handwriting is 
lousy and your typing is worse, word 
processors are the only way to go! It 
doesn't matter how badly you type, 
because you can always retype. And 
retype and retype until you get it right 



— but only the part you keep messing 
up. Never again will you have to key in 
the same information over and over. 
Your word processor (provided you 
have a storage device such as a cassette 
recorder or a disk drive) can store your 
work for you and spit it out on demand. 

Word processors are the ultimate 
writing tools, and they are flexible. You 
can write novels, research papers and 
letters, or you could use them merely to 
automate your grocery list-making 
process. You can leave notes to yourself 
in a file that you call up every day. 
Because all a word processor does is 
store information. 

Would You Believe ... a "Wordbase"? 

Databases are designed to store infor- 
mation, but they are structured so that 
you have to know exactly what kind of 
information you're going to fill them 
with before you get around to entering 
any. Reviews Editor Lauren Willoughby 
uses her word processor as a "free- 
form" database all the time, and she 
says the "search" part of the universal 



search-and-replace feature serves her 
better than a standard database. She 
knows this because she's tried data- 
bases, both of the MS-DOS variety and 
the CoCo kind, and using the word 
processor is faster for her. 

As reviews editor, she has to keep 
track of reviewers and their assorted 
equipment. If the information were kept 
in a database, there 'd have to be at least 
40 fields to contain it. But most review- 
ers do not have 40 pieces of equipment 
— say, 10 things on a list of 40, at the 
most. So when entering data on her 
reviewers, she'd be entering a lot of 
"no"s in fields pertaining to equipment 
they do not have. 

Instead, all the reviewers are kept in 
an ASCII file. Lauren merely types the 
name of the reviewer, then just types the 
equipment that he or she does have (and 
if this gets tedious, macros can be called 
upon to type in repetitive material — to 
type in "modem" every time ALT-M is 
pressed, for example). If she needs to 
find a reviewer who has a modem, she 
goes to the top of the file and initiates 



CoCo 3 Word Processors 



Elite* Word/ 80 




Advantages: It is a mature, easy-to- 
learn word processor with a suitable 
range of commands. All the options 
available are at the top of the screen in 
a command line. There is mail merge 
and support for the 512K CoCo 3. 
Disadvantages: It lacks some of the 
"new" word processing features such as 
print spooling and auto-saving. The 
spelling checker is not included with the 
package, but is available separately. 
CoCoNutshell: It makes a good word 
processor for business and school use, 
and is easy to learn. The ever-present 
menu interface should make it simple 
even for a child to use. 
For more information, see the review in 
March 1987's RAINBOW, Page 134. 



Simply Better 




Advantages: It's got features, speed and 
ease of use. It can do sorts, line num- 
bering, mail merge, and even generate 
an index and table of contents. There 
are "tasks," or macros, that can auto- 
mate a lot of your work. 
Disadvantages: There is no supplied 
spelling checker, though it can work 
with generic spelling checkers that 
accept ASCII files. There is no backs- 
pace key. 

CoCoNutshell: With all its features, it 
is ideal for the word processing power 
user. It's also good for anybody else. It's 
simple to learn, yet the power is there 
for those who wish to delve deeper. 
Business users will appreciate mail 
merge and forms fill-in. 
For more information, see the review in 
this issue o/THE RAINBOW, Page 134. 



Telewriter~128 




Advantages: The extensive use of dia- 
log boxes and windows results in very 
clean, efficient and smooth operation. 
A Help screen is available, and docu- 
ments can be previewed onscreen. 
There are 26 macros that can each be 
used to store up to 127 characters of 
often-used text. There is also a conver- 
sion program that lets TW-64 .BIN files 
work on TW-128. 

Disadvantages: There is neither mail 
merge nor a spelling checker, but any 
ASCII-based spelling checker should 
work. 

CoCoNutshell: It is a full-blown word 
processor, offering virtually all the 
features you would expect to need for 
most applications. 

For more information, see the review in 
May 1988 's RAINBOW, Page 133. 



April 1989 THE RAINBOW 27 



a search for the text string "modem." 
The word processor will then zip 
through every occurrence of the word. 

Granted, this procedure might get a 
little tedious if there were thousands of 
reviewers to keep track of — a database 
might be the best bet then — however, 
there are only about 100. But one thing 
traditional databases will let you do that 
you cannot replicate in a word proces- 
sor is print out lists of indexed items. 

Outward Bound 

In conjunction with a desktop pub- 
lishing program, a word processor lets 
you build your own typesetting opera- 
tion. Yes, many desktop publishing 
programs are designed to let you gener- 
ate copy (like CoCo Newsroom), but it 
is infinitely easier to prepare the text in 
a program that was designed for prepar- 
ing text, then import the file into the 
desktop publishing program (as Home 
Publisher recommends you do). Desk- 
top publishers are designed to coordi- 
nate text and graphics in a pleasing 
combination. 



You can create family or club newslet- 
ters with your word processor alone, 
but if you want to get fancy with fonts 
and the like, you really need a desktop 
publisher. If it's got to do with the 
dissemination of information of any 
kind whatsoever — whether it's a club 
bulletin, a song, a newscast, a novel, a 
play, a movie, etc. — chances are very 
likely that at one time it was just a 
collection of thoughts typed into a 
computer keyboard and stored in a 
word processing file. 

Getting Technical 

You can even program with word 
processors! If BASIC'S EDIT feature 
leaves you wanting more editing abili- 
ties, try typing in and editing your 
programs in your word processor. You 
must first convert the binary file into 
ASCII (S9HZ"filename'\n) before you 
can import the file, though. 

One of the first uses Technical Editor 
Cray Augsburg found for his word 
processor was creating return address 
labels. Using programmable tasks, it 



was a simple matter to enter his name 
and address just one time and print as 
many labels as needed. He would set the 
top margin to zero and the bottom 
margin and page length to 6 for use with 
1-inch labels, making sure the text was 
centered in a six-line range and the 
function was programmed to print a 
single label. When asked for the number 
of times the task was to be executed, he 
just entered the number of labels he 
wanted. During the holidays, he adds a 
season's greetings message in a special 
font. 

Programming is another area in 
which Cray uses his word processor. 
Full- screen editing makes it a breeze to 
enter and edit programs. And the global 
search and replace feature sure helps 
when you want to change all those 
PRINT statements to PRINTtt-2. Also, 
with the "auto-numbering" feature 
found in many new word processors, 
you don't have to enter the line 
numbers. The only drawback is that you 
have to exit the word processor to take 
the program on a test drive. 



CoCo 3 Word Processors (continued) 



TextPro IV 



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Advantages: It's a power user's dream 
come true. If we Ye talking features, this 
is the final word. It can display up to 
212 columns by 24 lines, with onscreen 
display of bold, italics and underlining. 
It includes nine Hi-Res screen fonts and 
does mail merge. 

Disadvantages: It works mainly as a 
line editor, so writing text can be 
tedious. There is an auto-line- 
numbering function, but even using 
that can be tedious. It is difficult to 
learn, and you have to think like a 
programmer. 

CoCoNutshell: If you are a power- 
hungry user and don't mind entering 
your text as lines, then this would be the 
word processor for you. It makes a 
good editor for programming. 
For more information, look for a re- 
view in an upcoming issue of THE 
RAINBOW. 



VIP Writer III, V. 2 




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Advantages: It's fast and colorful. The 
native 80 columns make screen updates 
relatively speedy. The print spooler 
frees up the machine when you're print- 
ing long files. The addition of the 
backspace key makes cursor movement 
more intuitive. A help menu pops up 
over text when the user exits the text 
mode to go up to the command line. 
Disadvantages: To get mail merge, you 
need VIP Database, a companion pro- 
duct. 

CoCoNutshell: It's a good general- 
purpose word processor, fit for hard- 
core users and especially for users who 
also work with word processing on 
other machines. It is part of a library 
of companion programs. 
For more information, see the review in 
this issue of TUB RAINBOW, Page 132. 



Word Power 3.2 




Advantages: It offers lots of features, 
incorporating pluses such as a calcula- 
tor and a split-screen window. The 
initial menu is intuitive and is very easy 
to use. It offers a spelling checker and 
a style checker and supports 5 1 2K. The 
configuration program is simple to run. 
Disadvantages: Text can be displayed 
at 80 columns only, which may cause 
eyestrain for people accustomed to the 
larger 40-column characters. 
CoCoNutshell: Mail merge and the 
calculator make it an excellent word 
processor for business. Its ease of use 
and intuitive interface also make it 
good for a general-purpose word pro- 
cessor. Students will appreciate the 
spelling and style checkers. 
For more information, see the review of 
WordPower 3.1 in October 1988's 
RAINBOW, Page 120. 



28 THE RAINBOW April 1989 



Telewriter-128 

the Color Computer 3 Word Processor 



TELEWRITER: UNDISPUTED #1 



If you've read the other word processor ads, 
you've probably had your fill of cold lists of 
features, and claims of ultimate speed, power, 
and ease of use. So let's try to get past the 
overblown claims and empty buzz words— with 2 
simple facts: 

Fact 1: Telewriter is undisputedly the #1 most 
popular word processor on the Tandy Color 
Computers. 

Fact 2: Telewriter's exemplary ease of use and 
power have been acclaimed in numerous maga- 
zine reviews and in thousands of letters and calls 
from end users. 



THE OTHERS DON'T UNDERSTAND 



So why has Telewriter gained such a large and 
loyal following, while other Color Computer 
word processors have come and gone? Ironically, 
our competitors' ads tell you exactly why. 

For them, word processing is nothing more than 
features and numbers. The longer the list of 
features, and the bigger the numbers, the better 
the word processor. Or so they think. 

They just don't understand that power and ease of 
use are not gained by tacking on random features 
or throwing in freebie utilities or forcing you to 
use a cumbersome mouse. 

Real Power, true Ease of Use, and genuine Speed 
can only be attained through thoughtful, logical, 
intelligent design, attention to detail, and a com- 
mitment to the act and the art of writing. That's 
the Telewriter tradition, and that's the reason for 
Telewriter's phenomenal success. 



TELEWRITER-128: INTELLIGENT 
DESIGN PERFECTED 



And now, Telewriter-128, the latest Telewriter, 
uses the added hardware power of the Color 
Computer 3 to bring this intelligent design to its 
logical perfection. 

Telewriter-128 adds unsurpassed speed and 
important new features to the already impressive 
arsenal of Telewriter-64. Not just speed for 
speed's sake, or features for the sake of 
advertising— but speed where it counts and fea- 
tures that make you a more efficient, more effec- 
tive writer. 

Rainbow magazine put it this way: "Tele- 
writer-128 will set the word processing standard 
for the Color Computer 3 because it is so simple 
and user friendly. ... The 81-page tutorial/user's 
manual is nicely done. It is written in easy to 
understand language but the program itself is so 
easy. . . . Most people will be able to use the 
software right out of the package." 



TELEWRITER-128 OR DESKTOP 
PUBLISHING 



Desktop publishing is nice for adding pictures 
and fancy fonts to newsletters or business 
presentations— but its graphics orientation sacri- 
fices some important capabilities when it comes to 
working with words. 

If your main concern is expressing ideas through 
words (notes, letters, reports, papers, novels, 
etc.), the dedicated word processing power of 
Telewriter-128 still provides the most efficient tool 
for the job. Each tool has its place— desktop 
publishing for striking visuals, Telewriter-128, for 
effective writing. 



TELEWRITER-1 28 OR TELEWRITER-64 



You can no longer affon' io be without the ease, 
power, and efficiency, that Telewriter brings to 
everything you write. 



Telewriter-128 for the Color Computer 3 costs 
$79.95 on disk, $69.95 on cassette. 

For the Color Computer 1&2, Telewriter-64 costs 
$59.95 on disk, $49.95 on cassette. 

To order by MasterCard or Visa, 

call (619) 755-1258 anytime, or send check to: 

COGNITEC 

704 Nob Avenue 
Del Mar, CA 92014 

(Add $2 S&H. Californians add 6% tax. To upgrade 
from TW-64 to TW-I28 send original TW-64 disk and 
$41.95.) 

Telewriter is also available through your nearby 
Radio Shack Computer Center and participating 
Radio Shack stores and dealers— or order direct 
from Express Order by dialing 1-800-321-3133. 

Ask for: Telewriter-128 (disk) ... cat #90-0909 
Telewriter-64 (disk) .... cat #90-0254 
Telewriter-64 (cass) cat #90-0253 



FEATURES THAT MATTER: Telewriter's out- 
standing design and its complete set of features, put 
it in a class by itself, for smooth, efficient writing 
and letter perfect printed documents. Telewriter-128 
includes: 

Unbeatable SCREEN PERFORMANCE: lightning 
fast paging and scrolling, on-screen text that never 
lags behind your typing, and a response that is 
always instantaneous, no matter how much text is in 
the buffer, or where you are in the document. 

26 User definable MACRO KEYS type your often 
used phrases and titles with a single keypress— saving 
you time and freeing your concentration for writing. 
User settabie DUAL SPEED CURSOR moves you 
anywhere on the line, on the page, or in the docu- 
ment, fast or slow—you decide, with the touch of a 
finger. Fast PRINT PREVIEW MODE shows you 
text as it will print: headers, footers, margins, page 
breaks, page numbers, justification— saves time and 
paper and guarantees perfect looking documents 
everytime. 

Instant, ON-LINE HELP summarizes all Tele- 
writer-128 commands and special symbols. The On- 
line OPTIONS MENU lets you instantly customize 
the writing environment at any time to suit your 
precise needs (Screen/character color, Monochrome 
on/off, Key repeat/delay rate, 2 Cursor repeat/delay 
rates, Case-sensitivity of search, Auto file backup 
on/off, and more). A SINGLE FUNCTION KEY 
takes you instantly to any menu, so you never have 
to stop and think. 

The 24, 25 or 28 LINE SCREEN DISPLAY option 
lets you see 16% more on-screen text (28), or wider 
line spacing (25). The auto-loading OPTIONS FILE 
stores all your Macros, Print Format settings, and 
Options Menu settings, so they are always there 
everytime you run Telewriter-128. 3 pop-up STATUS 
WINDOWS tell you cursor position, word count, 



free space, etc. 

The QUICK SAVE feature lets you instantly save 
your current document with just 2 keystrokes and 
without leaving the editor. CURSOR THROUGH 
DIRECTORY to Load, Append, Rename and Kill 
files— so you'll never type a filename after the first 
time. HANGING INDENTS help you organize ideas 
on the page more effectively. Also: Footers, Multiple 
Print, Print to Disk, Key Click, Key Repeat, 40/80 
Column Option, Overstrike, Word Delete, Nested 
Macros, Definable Foreign and Math Symbols and 
more. , , . 

And, of course, Telewriter-128 incorporates all the 
Features of TELEWRITER-64, like: Works with 
absolutely any printer that works with your Color 
Computer (1, 2, or 3). Uses simple Embedded Con- 
trol Codes so all intelligent features of your printer 
are easily accessed, including: Underlining, 
Boldface, variable Fonts, Sub-script, Super-script, 
Italics etc. 

Format commands allow dynamically changing 
Margins, Headers, Spacing, Centering, etc., any- 
where in the document. Format menu sets Margins, 
Spacing, Page numbering, Baud rate, Lines per 
page, Justification. Chain Printing means the size of 
your printed document is unlimited. Also Single 
page and Partial Print. 

Fast full-screen editor with wordwrap, text align- 
ment, block copy/move/delete, global search and 
replace, wild card search, fast 4-way auto-repeat 
cursor, fast scrolling, forward and backward paging, 
settabie tabs, word and line counter, full error pro- 
tection. Insert or delete anywhere on screen. Simple, 
easy to remember, "mnemonic" Editor Commands. 
Load, Save, Append, Partial Save files to disk or 
cassette. Kill, rename and list disk files. ASCII file 
compatibility. 



VISA 





rj-nr i/TfiirTCM 



«< GIWIESOFT »> 

A new generation of Color Computer products 

MAXSOUND 

A High Quality Digital Audio Sampler and Sequencer 

Turn your CoCo III into a REAL digital audio sampler with HIGH quality audio reproduction. Easily 
add exotic effects, ECHO, stuttering, speed shifting, sequencing, and reverse audio to BASIC or ML 
programs or GRAPHICS! Now includes Data Compression. Imagine recording any Voice, Music, or 
Sound effect and being able to use these DIGITAL recordings in your own programs! 3 disk sides 
includes: INTERFACT/BIN • ML driver for sound effects. G&M/BAS - Adds sound effects to 
Graphics. SHOWTIME and DEMO disks. SCOPE/BAS - Turns CRT into a Digital Oscilloscope to 
look at MAXSOUND waveforms. Version 3.0 upgrade (Includes improved ECHO and the ability 
to print NAMETAGS and locations to the screen and/or printer) $6.95 + Shipping & Handling 

"Maxaound. . .bringing a new era to the CoCo Community" 
•Cray Augsburg, June '88 Rainbow Review 

Call to hear 'OVER THE PHONE" Demo - 9am to 9pm VOICE only. 
DOWNLOAD Demo Files 300/1200/2400 24 hrs * 301-675-7626 MODEM only. 
Requirements * ™™ (128k or 512k CoCo IH only) DISK — $59»95 



Maxsound Soundtracks & Graphics 

These exciting disks are samples of what can be created with MAXSOUND and CoCo Max III! 
These unbelievable soundstracks w/graphics DO NOT require the MAXSOUND program to run. 



Airwolf 
Knight Rider 
Startrek 



128k $5.95 

128k $5.95 

128k $5.95 



Probe 



5 in 1 Demo (Airwolf, Startrek, Knight Rider, Probe, Other World) 



512k.., 


..$5.95 


512k. 


..$5.95 


512k 


..$5.95 


512k. . , 


,..$9.95 








Hfl IHBOW 
-CEM1 irCUPlfln 



V-Terrn Terminal Emulator 

Communicate with VAX, UNIX, Mainframe, and BBS Systems! 

-VT-100, VT-52, Vidtex (includes RLE graphics display), and standard CRT emulations. 
-Developed and tested on a UNIX system using the EMACS and VI full-screen editors. 
•All 128 ASCII characters accessible from the keyboard. 

-Uses a high-resolution graphics screen to implement a highly readable 80-column screen. 

-Menus can be operated concurrently with other terminal functions. (Disk Basic!) 

-Full 28 line by 80 column screen, with 3 bottom lines protected for menus. 

-Serial port up to 2400 baud, RS-232 Pak up to 9600 baud, DCModem Pak at 300 baud. 

•XModem, XModem-CRC, Y-Modem, and ASCII file transfers directly to disk or memory. 

-Prints disk or buffer files with settable margins, baud rate and word wrap. 

-Full 128k or 512k support with a RAMDISK like buffer. Monochrome monitor support. 

-Capture buffer, Snapshot, Conference mode, 35/40/80 Tracks, and over 56 pages of docs! 

"...one of the most versatile and full featured terminal emulators lor the CoCo 3." 

-Bryan Gridley, November '88 Rainbow Review 

Version 02,00,00 upgrade $6.95 + S&H Disk (128k or 512k CoCo III only) |§f|i $39.95 



Toll Free 



1-800-441-GIME 



Order line 



] 



Technical assistance: 7pm to 9pm 
Orders: 9am to 9pm Eastern time 
On-line orders and up to date 
Information: Delphi's CoCo Slg 



GIMMESOFT 
P.O. Box 421 
Perry Hall. MD 21128 
301-256-7558 or 301-256-2953 



Add $3.00 for shipping and handling 
Add $3.00 for COD (USA only) 
MD residents add 5% sales tax 
VISA/ MC/ Check / Money Order/COD 




«< GJM1ES0FT »> 

A new generation of Color Computer products 




Ms- 



TelePak* vr/hd 



A TRU L Y COMPATIBLE RS-232 INTERFACE! 



Now, from Orion Technologies, comes the answer to the continuing demand for an RS-232 Interface. No 
compatibility hassles! Uses standard DB25 cable. Compatible with RS-DOS 8c OS-9 software. Baud rates up to 19,200! 
Enhances the Multi-tasking capabilities of the V-Term Terminal Emulator found on the opposite page. Only $49.95 



COCO MaX III only) 

THE BEST Graphics Package 
See April '88 review. Disk ... $74.95 



BOTH 
$129.95 



MAX-1 0 + (CoCo 111 only) 

THE DAZZLING Desktop Publisher 
CMS owners deduct $10. Disk ... $74.95 



rj?4PWrQ OK < 512k 0000 m OIU V> Great with MAXSOUND and/or CoCo Max HI! 

KJM%n*MMM OO^cJ up to 25 ONBOARD HIRES SCREENS! Six new BASIC commands. Fast & Smooth 
Graphics animation. Save and Load graphics screens to and from disk. See September 1988 Rainbow review. Disk .. $19.95 

MULTI-LABEL H 1 (Co Co 111 only) See July '87 review. An easy to use, versatile label creating program 
including many new CoCo 111 features. Print multiple fonts on each label! This one's a MUST for the CoCo HI!! Disk .... $16.95 



J 1 JVC IJ JJJ(CoCo 1/ 11/111} See April '87 review. A user friendly, programmable function key utility that creates up to 20 
function keys. EDITOR, DOS mods, Single or Double sided, 35/40 tracks, DISABLE, and it's EPROMable!. Disk .. $19.95 

SIXDRTVE (CoCo I/U/m) This machine language utility modifies DECB 1.0, 1.1, FKEYS m, or ADOS to allow the 
use of 3 double-sided drives (or 2 D/S drives and J&R's RAMD1SKS) as 6 S/S drives. Disk $16.95 



AUTO DEM (CoCo III only) See Jan. '88 review. This hardware device protects your monitor, or TV from IMAGE 
BURN after a few minutes of inactivity from your keyboard. Illustrated and easy to install. Hardware $29.95 

MPl-CoCo LOCklllg Plate (CoCo in only) See Sept '88 review. Protects your CoCo III and MultJ 
Pak Interface from destroying each other! Please specify MPI number 26*3024 or 26*3124 when ordering! SALE $7.95 




(CoCo III only) Become Rastann, Warrior King, on the quest to regain his rightful 

crown hidden deep within a sinister land. Battle monsters, gain magic & weapons, and travel thru harsh wilderness 8c 
dark castle dungeons in this medieval realm. From the creator of Kung-Fu Dude comes this awesome arcade game for the 
CoCo ID! Uses the most detailed 320 x 200 16 color graphics 8c high speed ML code to vault you into a world of fantasy! Dare 
ye challange the many perils ahead to become Warrior King? Requires 128k CoCo III, Disk drive, and Joystick .... $29.95 



HALL OF THE KING TRILOGY (CoCo I/II/1II) See December 1988 Rainbow review. The epic 

adventure is back! The largest adventure campaign ever seen for the CoCo is again available. A total of 6 DISK SIDES of 
intense graphics adventure will have you playing for weeks! Each section is a 2 disk stand alone adventure, but all 3 together 
form an epic saga! Quest for the legendary Earthstone in the ancient dwelling of the dwarves while you enjoy the classic 
graphics that made this trilogy famous! Each adventure can be purchased separately for only $29.95, the lowest price ever , or 
you can SAVE and purchase the entire set for only $74.95. Requires 64k, Disk drive, (and composite monitor for the CoCo 111). 
Please specify HALL of the King 1, II, or III $29.95 each or the entire 6 DISK Trilogy for only $74.95 



In Quest of the Star Lord (CoCo III only) See Aug '88 review. This is THE graphics 

adventure for the CoCo HI! Unparalleled 320 x 200 animated graphics will leave you gasping for more! You quest for the 
Phoenix Crossbow in this post-holocaust world of science and fantasy. Full 4 Disk sides of mind-numbing adventure! 
Requires 128k CoCo in and Disk drive. HINT SHEET $3.95 (+ $1.00 S&H by itself) Disk $34.95 



KUNG-FU DUDB(CoCo l/n/Ul) See Feb. '88 review. An exciting arcade game. The BEST karate game ever for 
the CoCo! Destroy opponents and evade obstacles as you grow ever closer to your ultimate objective! Spectacular graphics, 
sound effects, and animation! Requires 64k, Disk drive, and Joystick. Now displays color on CM8. Disk $24.95 

FYRAMIX(CoCo Ul only) See Dec. '87 review. Brilliant colors, sharp graphics, and hot action in this 100% ML arcade 
game. You'll enjoy hopping Kubix around the pyramid, avoiding Kaderf, Smack, Smuck, 8c the Death Square! Disk .. $19.95 



brirf ^AD&D Character's Companion ( coco I/n/m) This great timesaving 

TP^^^ utility helps create compatible AD&D characters. Includes dice rolling routine, pick ability, race 8c class. Buy from 
the Players Handbook, magic items 8c spell materials. Save, load, and print character info. 3 Disk sides .... $24.95 



White Fire of Eternity jT(CoCo l/n/Ul) See Dec '86 review. Enter the era of monsters 8c magic. Search for the 
legendary power of White Fire throughout the Forbidden Wood 8c Dark Caverns in this 64k animated adventure! Disk.. $19.95 

ChampiOIl (CoCo l/n/lll) See May '87 review. Become a superhero in this action adventure! Disk.. $19.95 

DraQTOIl Blad€5( CoCo I/U/IU) See Nov '86 review. Slay evil dragon in this 64k animated adventure) Disk.. $19.95 



Cray also finds his word processor 
useful for cataloging books and records. 
And the word processor was a godsend 
for technical reports. Using CoCo Max 
II, he created figures and equations for 
engineering school assignments. Then 
he would set the margins and text 
blocks to leave room for the figures. 
After printing the text, he would run the 
paper through the printer a second time, 
using Hardcopy to embed the figures in 
his text. This process resulted in some 
professional-looking reports. 

Along this line, Cray would like to see 
software producers provide a simple 
way to use the IBM character set mode 
of many printers to create graphics. On 
an MS-DOS machine, special mathe- 
matics and graphics symbols are avail- 
able using the ALT key and numbers 
from 160 to 254. Providing a means to 
do the same thing in a CoCo word 
processor would allow users who own 
printers with the IBM character set to 
create professional results easily. 

Word Processing Comes Home 

For home use, word processors are 
handy for helping you type up and send 
out letters. Back to the limited database 
motif, they can help you keep lists, your 
household inventories, etc. You can 
type up and print out messages for 
family members. You can keep track of 
addresses and telephone numbers. For 
club meetings you can print multiple 
copies of newsletters or agendas or 
minutes. Word processing sure beats 
copying or typing multiple copies man- 
ually! 

Parents, imagine this: You could type 
in your weekly grocery list and print out 
several copies, one for each of your 
children. Say, Johnny goes after the 
fresh produce, Billy rounds up canned 
fruit and veggies, Mary gathers the eggs 
and the dairy products, and you can 
choose the meat and then examine the 
wares on the magazine rack. You could 
keep a grocery list template on disk to 
pull up every time you wanted to go to 
the store, and just fill in the blanks. 

Word Processing Plans a Party 

At home, Managing Editor Jutta 
Kapfhammer uses Telewriter-64 to 
store her favorite recipes and to plan 
weekly menus, dinner parties and small 
get-togethers. Each recipe is stored in a 
separate disk file, with separate disks 
containing different food categories — 
Appetizers, Beef, Chicken, Desserts, 
Salads, Vegetables, etc. When she needs 
a particular recipe in the kitchen, she 
prints out a copy to refer to while 



cooking. When the dish is done, she 
simply discards the printout. No more 
sticky recipe cards! 

She organizes her menu planning in 
separate files, too. A core file named 
WEEKLY is set up for weekly menu plans: 
Sunday through Saturday. She checks 
her weekly schedule to determine which 
nights she will be home for dinner, plans 
meals accordingly, and reads in food 
dishes from her recipe disks. She re- 
views the printed weekly menus to see 
if she is nutritionally on track, and also 
to avoid duplication when planning the 
following week's daily menus. The 
printed weekly menus are also benefi- 
cial for checking food inventory and 
making out weekly shopping lists. 

For small get-togethers and dinner 
parties, Jutta has another set of menu 
disks, which are categorized by the type 
of menu she plans to serve — American, 
Chinese, Mexican, Menus on a Shoe- 
string, Parties for Four, Parties for 30 
or More, Get-Ready-Quick Parties, 
Snacks, etc. 

For example, if she's having friends 
over for an evening of card playing, she 
might choose something from her 
Snacks' menu disk, which includes 
various menus of recipes for finger 
foods, like Mexican Food Lover's De- 
light — Mexican Pizza, Chile Con 
Queso, Hot Picante Sauce and Guaca- 
mole Dip served with side dishes of 
nacho chips, sliced Monterey Jack and 
pepper cheese, crackers and jalapeno 
peppers. She simply selects the type of 
party she wants to have, prints out the 
recipes and lists of items for the menu, 
and plans her shopping accordingly. 

During the evening, if one of her 
guests asks for a particular recipe, 
making a printout is much less of a 
chore than copying the entire recipe by 
hand. After the party, she goes back to 
her Snacks' disk and edits her menu for 
Mexican Food Lover's Delight, indicat- 
ing who attended the party (to avoid 
duplication of menu items the next time 
the same people are invited to dinner), 
preparation time, amount of leftovers, 
etc. 

Word Processing Goes to School 

Have you ever typed up a 10-page 
term paper and realized about an hour 
before class that in your sleepy careless- 
ness you left out two important para- 
graphs on Page 8? If you typed up the 
paper using a typewriter, you'd be in 
trouble indeed. But if you had used a 
word processor, a problem like this 
would be no sweat. You'd just reopen 
your document and add in those two 



missing paragraphs, print out a new 
copy, and then dash off to class to earn 
your good grade. 

As everyone knows, teachers prefer 
typed copy over handwritten assign- 
ments. In fact, some demand it. And 
they prefer clean pages over heavily 
edited copy. Word processors give you 
that clean copy. If you notice a mistake 
on your work, instead of drawing in 
editing or proofreading marks, you can 
just make the change and print out a 
new copy. 

Also, teachers prefer to read words 
that are correctly spelled. Some word 
processors come with spelling checkers, 
which check your document for errors. 
Spelling checkers vnU notice only mis- 
spellings of common words. Words that 
are not in its dictionary are assumed to 
be incorrect. Usually they will tell you 
that you misspelled your name, but they 
won't tell you that you used then when 
you should have used than. Of the word 
processors that do not have a spelling 
checker built in, most likely you can run 
a generic spelling checker on them, one 



CoCo 3 Word Processors (continued) 



Max-10 




Advantages: In a word — graphics. In 
two words ~ graphics, fonts. It gives 
true WYSIWYG display The point- 
and-click operation is effortless and 
speedy. A Hi-Res interface is provided. 
There is an integrated, internal spelling 
checker. Even downloaded Mac graph- 
ics can be imported. 
Disadvantages: Its graphics make it 
slower than the programs that use the 
80-column display. For the business end 
of business, it lacks — no mail merge. 
Though there is no copy-protection on 
the disks, the required hardware 
"clicker" on early versions can become 
annoying. 

CoCoNutshell: If you already own 
CoCo Max graphics software, you 
must have this companion program. 
Desktop publishing can be accomp- 
lished. 

For more information, see the review in 
January 1989 $ s RAINBOW, Page 118. 



32 THE RAINBOW April 1969 




w 



THIS MONTHS 




by Nickolas Ma rentes 



Help Rupert infiltrate 1 'Music Box Records ' ' and collect 
all of his stolen notes which are scattered throughout 
the complex. Ride the crazy elevators and beware of the 
security robots on patrol. 

Rupert Rythym is a strategy arcade game featuring 1 7 
different 16 color graphic screens and some of the hottest 
digitized percussion music and vocals you Ve ever heard 
on your Tandy Color Computer 3. 

Available on Disk or Tape. . .$24.95 

ALL PROGRAMS REQUIRE A COLOR COMPUTER 3 DISK OR TAPE SYSTEM. 

Personal checks, money orders, and American C.O.D. orders accepted. Include $3.00 for S/H. $2.50 extra 
for C.O.D. orders. (Cal. res. add 6.5 % tax.) 

ATTENTION PROGRAMMERS: Game Point Software is looking for talented writers. Top royalties guaranteed. 



warp Fimbor 



3D 




by Steve Bjork 



Blast in to Hyper-Drive with 
this fun-filied starship shoot- 
em-up! You 'II have a cap- 
tains' eye view out of your 
3-D cockpit as you try to rid 
the galaxy of the evil enemy 
forces. Game includes 3-D 
glasses and works on any 
Color T. V. , Composite or 
RGB monitor. 

$24.95 

(Extra Glasses $2.95) 




by Steve Bjork 

Based on a popular arcade game which we can t mention (But 
sounds like ' 'Art Gannoyed' '). BASH challenges you to clear 
the screen by "BASHING" 
your ball through multiple 
brick layers. Of course you II 
have help getting through 
this 20 level game by activ- 
ating options like, Slow Ball, 
Expanded Paddle, Multi-Bali, 

and more! 

$24.95 




Enemy alien creatures have 
been identified entering our 
solar system, their destina- 
tion: our home planet! Their 
goal: the total annihilation 
of our race. They must not 
be allowed to land! 
An action arcade game fea- 
turing high quality 16 color 
graphics and sound effects. 

$24.95 



by Nickolas Marentes 



A f* fa f* f* & ** ft #» fn 
i^i i^fe ^Rf ifii ffli fRf (Ri 

MM*!**** Mf«M 

m I* m m 




by Steve Bjork 

A terrible mine disaster has just occured and it will be up 

to you and your talents to 
enter the mine, jump the pits, 
i avoid the spikes, fight off the 
•i bats and other creepy crawlers 
1 1 and get air to the needy 

victims. Mine rescue features 
over 2 megabytes of arcade- 
style graphics, real time music 
and multiple mine levels. 

|l $24.95 




Post Office Box 6907 
__ Burbank, California 91510-6907 

GAMEVPOINT (818) 556-357! . BBS: (818) 772-8890 




that accepts ASCII text (provided your 
program can output ASCII text — most 
can). One CoCo word processor, Word- 
Power, even has a rudimentary gram- 
mar checker. 

Finally, most professors prefer text 
output on a daisy-wheel printer (which 
produces copy that looks like it rolled 
out of a typewriter) over a dot-matrix 
printer (which composes its letters as 
patterns of dots). But professors can't 
have everything. 

Getting Down to Business 

Again along the limited database line, 
you could use your word processor to 
keep track of addresses and contacts, 
etc. If you write to the same companies 
over and over regarding the same types 
of things, you could just keep a copy of 
the letter you use on file (disk file) and 
later add in things like the date. The 
benefit of word processing is the auto- 
mation of your writing process. You can 
store templates of frequently-used let- 
ters and memos. When you're ready to 



print out your correspondence and send 
it, you call up the letter shell and type 
in the name and address and any other 
pertinent information. 

If your word processor has a feature 
called mail merge, you can automate 
your correspondence even more by 
printing out all your letters at once in 
a batch. Mail merge lets you join a 
template letter or document with a list 
of information — a mailing list of 
names and addresses you've purchased 
from a business associate, for example. 
Think of the letter as a constant and the 
list of information as variables; your 
printer will join them in a brief marriage 
that produces one customized and 
personal document for every item of 
information on your "variable" list. 

Mail merge is a handy feature if you 
do a lot of repetitive, routine correspon- 
dence. Our reviews editor uses it a lot, 
especially for requesting software and 
hardware from companies. 

Some people make and fill out forms 
with their word processors. 



What's Available? 

Quite a few word processors, actually. 
There are even different versions of the 
same program for the different models 
of the machine. VIP, Telewriter and 
Elite* Word, for example, have two 
versions each: one for CoCos 1 and 2, 
and one for the CoCo 3. 

CoCo 1 and 2 Word Processors 

One of the oldest of all the CoCo 
word processors, Scripsit is still around 
and kicking as Color Scripsit II, and it 
is still on a ROM pack, which means 
that to store files with it you need a 
cassette recorder. But you're limited to 
32-column format and no true lower- 
case. 

VIP Writer is another standard; it 
was one of the first word processors to 
break away from the limiting 32- 
column screen, expanding users' horiz- 
ons with 64 columns. And it also shows 
lowercase as true lowercase. Of course, 
as it creates graphics characters to serve 
as letters, instead of using the native 



OS-9 Word Processors 



DeskMate & DeskMate 3 




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Advantages: The word processors are 
packaged with several other useful 
applications, giving the programs a 
rounded feel overall. They are easy to 
learn and are a good gateway into OS- 
9 for beginners. 

Disadvantages: They are heavily lack- 
ing in features. The software is hard- 
coded to allow a maximum output 
baud rate of only 1200. You cannot 
embed printer codes to give a more 
professional look to the output. 
CoGoNutshell: The two are good for 
newcomers and those who only want to 
produce informal letters and memos. 
Others may want to steer clear unless 
they absolutely need an integrated 
package under OS-9. 
For more information, see reviews in 
the April 1986 (Page 198) and De- 
cember 1987 (Page 129) RAINBOW s. 



DynaStar 




Advantages: The oldest of the OS-9 
word processors, it includes versions 
for both Level I and Level II OS-9. It's 
filled with features and is relatively easy 
to use. It allows index and table of 
contents generation. 
Disadvantages: The manual lacks tu- 
torial material. The cursor is controlled 
with control key combinations rather 
than the arrow keys, making movement 
through the text somewhat awkward, 
especially for beginners. The spelling 
checker costs extra. 
CoCoNutshell: It is an excellent word 
processor for business and home use, 
whether for clerical or programming 
work. 

For more information, see the review in 
July 1984 s RAINBOW, Page 220. 



Xword 




Advantages: It offers full support for 
use on Level I and Level II systems. 
And it supports any Word-Pak for 80- 
column editing on any CoCo. It's full- 
featured, including proportional justifi- 
cation for professional-looking reports 
and other work. The print formatter 
includes initialization files for several 
common printers. It has a high feature- 
to-dollar ratio, and it uses the arrow 
keys for movement through the text. 
Disadvantages: The manual lacks tu- 
torial material. The mail merge and 
spelling checker cost extra. It was 
sometimes difficult to get through 
Microtech's answering/ ordering ser- 
vice to obtain support. 
CoCoNutshell: Again, it is great for any 
application and is an excellent deal for 
anyone using OS^9. 
For more information, see the review in 
July 1986's RAINBOW, Page 170. 



34 THE RAINBOW April 1989 



letters themselves, the program is a bit 
slow. But at the time of its introduction 
VIP Writer was truly revolutionary. 
VIP Writer is part of an integrated 
package that includes a database, a 
spelling checker, telecommunications, 
spreadsheet and disk repair programs. 

Another word processor that broke 
new ground for CoCo word processing 
is Tele writ et '-64, which can also show 
text at greater than 32 columns. Tele- 
writer saves its files by default in a 
binary file format instead of ASCII, 
which conserves disk space. While 
you're entering text in the text mode, 
the screen seems similar to VIP Writer, 
but Telewriter is menu-driven. You can 
toggle back and forth between text and 
menu modes. 

Both VIP Writer and Telewriter have 
been upgraded, or "patched," for var- 
ious features. Telepatch is an important 
accessory for Telewriter-64, giving it 
such features as key repeat. VIP Writer 
has been patched to allow it to work on 
the CoCo 3. 

Elite* Word is another of the early 
word processors. As far as user inter- 
faces go in its class, Elite's is probably 
the easiest to navigate. The commands 
available are always visible at the top of 
the screen; 32 columns are not enough 
to contain them all, but the ENTER key 
cycles through them while in the "com- 
mand" mode. To initiate a command 
from the menu, you press the first letter 
of the command. Elite* Word is also 
part of an integrated family of programs 
that includes a spelling checker, a 
terminal program, a spreadsheet and a 
database manager. 

CoCo 3 Word Processors j 

The birth of the CoCo 3 saw a ver- 
itable explosion of word processors 
written especially to take advantage of 
the machine's enhanced features. Power 
begat power, and now we users have a 
field of excellent CoCo 3 word proces- 
sors to choose from. 

One of the first of the older word 
processors to break from the pack into 
the CoCo 3 realm was Telewriter-64, 
which became Telewriter- 128. The 64- 
column display expanded into 80 co- 
lumns onscreen at a time, which is 
native to the machine. So Telewriter 
became much faster — it no longer had 
to translate typed characters into graph- 
ics characters and then perform all the 
calculations and screen redrawing ne- 
cessary to reflect changes made as a user 
typed in or manipulated text. Going 
from the top to the bottom of a docu- 
ment became almost instantaneous. 



And moving up and down screen pages 
required no time-consuming redrawing 
of pages. By default Telewriter-128 now 
saves files as ASCII files rather than 
binary. 

Like Telewriter's transformation into 
Telewriter-128, VIP Writer had gone 
turbo. It could also naturally display 80 
columns on the CoCo screen. Which 
means, of course, that screen updates 
are a whole lot faster. Other improve- 
ments include a print spooler. Version 
2 is yet another major revision for VIP 
Writer III, adding a configuration 
program, a popup help window and a 
backspace key. 

Elite* Word also made the move from 
CoCo 1 and 2 to CoCo 3. Like VIP and 
Telewriter, it also moved to the CoCo 
3's native 40 and 80 columns. The screen 
format is retained, but now more of the 
available options can fit at the top of the 
screen at one time; in 80 columns, they 
all can. 

WordPower 3.2 is another powerful 
contender in the CoCo 3 word process- 
ing arena. Just think of any word 
processing feature — chances are very 
likely that WordPower has it. Word- 
Power packs a lot of features. Though 
its origins are with the CoCo 3, it has 
already gone through a couple of up- 
grades, and Version 3.3 is in the works. 
WordPower already includes the now- 
standard 80-column screen, and it even 
has spelling and grammar checkers. 

WordPower is in a perpetual process 
of evolution. The people at Microcom 
welcome your comments. In fact, if you 
call them up and tell them you wish 
WordPower had such-and-such 
feature, chances are that you will see 
that feature in the program's next 
incarnation. They have even been 
known to customize the program for 
their registered users. 

A newcomer, Simply Better is a word 
processor that might make the market 
sit up and take notice. It looks a lot like 
VIP Writer III Version 1, but it adds 
such things as sorting abilities and index 
generation. This is another program 
brimming with features, yet it's sold at 
rock-bottom prices. 

Simply Better's "Window" com- 
mand, which splits the screen in two, in 
effect opens up another independent 
word processor on the screen. You can 
work on two documents at the same 
time, switching back and forth between 
them with the CLEAR key. The feature 
supports the cutting and pasting of text 
between documents. 

If you're a serious-minded power user 
with an eye toward complex document 



formatting, TextPro from Cer-Comp 
may be the way to go. With its 
command-driven line editor operation, 
it seems more like a programming 
environment than a word processor. In 
fact, it's marketed equally as a text 
editor, which means you can use it for 
programming. But it's not easy to learn. 
Cer-Comp tells you that up front — it 
was not designed for the casual comput- 
erist. TextPro's typical user would be a 
hacker or someone who wants to write 
and format a long document, such as a 
manual. 

With its formatting commands, Text- 
Pro can display up to 212 characters 
onscreen, although it is advised that for 
clarity 160 characters is the visual upper 
limit (on a Hi-Res monochrome mon- 
itor). It can also show onscreen bold, 
italics and underlining. There are con- 
figurations for several printers, includ- 
ing the Okidata Laserline 6, a laser 
printer that Cer-Comp used to print its 
typeset-quality manual. 

Max-10 is a new breed of word pro- 
cessor. It is a word processor, yet it's 
more, and maybe, less. It goes back to 
the old method of displaying its char- 
acters — as graphics characters, which 
makes it slower. But its benefit is that 
it allows you to choose from a wide 
variety of fonts, almost like a desktop 
publisher. You can even incorporate 
graphics as picture files. You could 
either consider it a word processor with 
desktop publishing features, or a desk- 
top publisher with word processing 
features. 

The interface is exciting — mouse- or 
joystick-driven with pull-down menus 
and dialog boxes. It offers a true WY- 




Be amazed or your money back, 

\ ^ See big ad around page 18, &!*0 RW *"J. 



April 1989 THE RAINBOW 35 



SIWYG (What You See Is What You 
Get) display! Another plus is the spell- 
ing checker, which is integrated, allow- 
ing you to access the dictionary from 
within the program. 

OS-9 Word Processors 

In terms of editing features, there is 
really little difference between Disk 
BASIC and OS-9 word processors. The 
exception is that the full-featured OS- 
9 word processors are more modular: 
One program is used to enter and edit 
the text file and another is used to 
format and print it out. All codes for 
margins, headers, print styles, etc., to be 
read by the formatter are entered within 
the text by the editor. 

This arrangement stems from the 
days of Level 1, when having both 
programs in memory severely reduced 
the text buffer size as well as limited the 
system's resources for other processes. 
This has carried over into Level II. The 
main disadvantage to this setup is that 
you don't get any form of WYSIWYG 
display of your text before printing. 



CoCo 1 & 2 Word Processors 



Color Scripsit II 




Advantages: It's an entry-level, menu- 
driven word processor with some sur- 
prisingly complex features. It works for 
CoCo Is to CoCo 3s and does not 
require much in the way of equipment. 
Disadvantages; There is only tape I/O, 
no disk drives allowed. Even though it 
can run on a CoCo 3, it can display only 
38 columns onscreen at a time; Some of 
the commands issued from within the 
text mode are difficult to remember, 
nonintuitive. There is no true lower- 
case. 

CoCoNutshell: This is a good first word 
processor and does not require exten- 
sive cash outlay. It's primitivism may 
bother you if youVe ever used another 
word processor. 

For more information, look for the 
review in an upcoming issue o/ THE 
RAINBOW. 



Still, if you spend a great deal of time 
in OS-9, you wouldn't want to be 
switching back and forth to Disk BASIC 
just to write some text. 

The two OS-9 word processing sys- 
tems currently being marketed through 
THE rainbow are DynaStar from 
Frank Hogg Laboratories and Xword 
from Microtech Consultants. In addi- 
tion, limited text editing/ printing facil- 
ities are provided by Tandy's DeskMate 
and DeskMate 3. Let's look at the latter 
two products first. 

DeskMate and DeskMate 3 offer 
excellent value for newcomers to the 
Color Computer. For one price you get 
some hands-on experience with several 
different computer applications (word 
processor, spreadsheet, database and 
graphics). Each application is limited — 
by no means do you get feature-packed 
programs. But you do get a feel for each 
particular application and are better 
armed when the time comes to seek 
more power. Also, some people find the 
DeskMate programs provide all the 
features they want. 



Elite*Word 




Advantages: It is a well-rounded, easy- 
to-learn word processor for the CoCo 
1, 2 and 3 that can run in as little as 32K. 
At the top of the screen in the 
command-line area are "buffer" indica- 
tors that keep you constantly informed 
on how many characters you have 
typed. 

Disadvantages: The spelling checker 
comes extra. The menu-driven interface 
may irritate users more comfortable 
with command-driven interfaces. 
CoCoNutshell: It makes a very easy-to- 
use mainstream word processor that 
should be adequate for general and 
school use. The menu, which is always 
visible onscreen, makes the program 
especially appropriate for beginners. 
For more information, see the review in 
March 1984's RAINBOW, Page 260. 



While the software operates in the 
OS-9 environment, little knowledge of 
OS-9 is required to use the programs. 
In fact, this minor exposure to OS-9 can 
help should the user decide to make the 
jump into the operating system. As with 
all things computer, it is merely a matter 
of choice. 

DeskMate's text editor allows the 
user to save, load, copy and delete 
blocks of text. You can merge files at 
any point in the text. It also features 
some limited search and replace capa- 
bility. The main disappointment is that 
it provides no means by which to embed 
printer control codes; you can't change 
type styles while printing. The software 
works fine for printing casual letters, 
memos and general text work. If you are 
at all serious about how your text looks, 
however, it won't be long before you are 
looking elsewhere. 

Both DynaStar and Xword are full- 
featured word processors that have 
been around for a while and stood the 
test of time. Both allow block manipu- 
lations, insert/ overstrike, wordwrap, 



Telewriter~64 



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USE & ■ * 







Advantages: Totally menu-driven, it is 
extremely easy to use. A counter keeps 
track of the number of words typed, as 
well as the number of lines. Embedding 
commands in your text for printer 
control is easily accomplished. 
Disadvantages: There is no spelling 
checker. While it does provide true 
upper-/ lowercase screen display, there 
are no true lowercase descenders; how- 
ever, this is a function of the screen 
display only. 

CoCoNutshell: As written, the program 
runs perfectly fine on the CoCo 3, so if 
you buy a CoCo 3 later, upgrading is 
not absolutely necessary unless you 
prefer the 80-column display and the 
added features of Tele writer- 1 28. 
For more information, see reviews in 
RAINBOW issues June 1983 (Page 216) 
and August 1987 (Page 143). 



36 THE RAINBOW April 1989 



etc. Each uses a stand-alone formatter 
for printing. And both work under OS- 
9 Level I or II. 

DynaStar works much like the older 
versions of WordStar for the MS-DOS 
machines. The main files are intended 
for Level II, but the Level I versions are 
included on the disk. The differences 
here are the screen layout, pop-up 
menus in Level II windows, and stand- 
ard advantages of Level II over Level I. 
It's a command-driven system in which 
menus can turn on and off. 

When you start, the menus will be 
turned on. To access the various fea- 
tures, you first enter a control sequence. 
An example would be CTRL-B to access 
the Block menu. Then you press a single 
key corresponding to the function you 
want performed. On the Block menu, 
you might press C to copy a marked 
block to another location in your text. 
After you have used the system for a 
while and have learned how to use its 
features, you can turn the menus off. 
Otherwise, a menu will always appear 
at the top of the screen. 



To issue formatting, style and other 
commands for printing, you use dot 
commands within the text file. These 
are simply two- or three-character 
commands, preceded by a period and 
appearing on their own line in the text 
file. When you print the file through 
DynaForm, the print formatter in- 
cluded with DynaStar, these commands 
are interpreted and your text will be 
printed as you like. At first you might 
not like working with dot commands. 
There are a lot of them and it may seem 
hard to remember. In actuality, after 
minimal use you'll find they make sense 
and memorization is natural. The Dy- 
naStar I DynaForm system offers mar- 
gin control, headers and footers, print- 
ing macros, variables, generation of 
index/ table of contents and more. It 
even provides excellent mail-merge 
capability. 

Not included with DynaStar, but 
available at extra cost, is DynaSpell, a 
spelling checker written by Dale Puck- 
ett. This system includes both 102,000- 
word and 20,000-word dictionaries. It 
works with both Level I and Level II. 

Xword is another system originally 
designed for OS-9 Level I. Xword really 
consists of Microtech Consultants' Xed 
full-screen editor, a display module 
called xcodes and xp, a print formatter. 
When you boot Xed, it looks for the 
xcodes modules to tell it what type of 
screen you are using. The system in- 
cludes modules for the standard 32- 
column screen, an OPak Hi-Res screen, 
an Xscreen Hi-Res screen, all Word-Pak 
80-column screens and Level II win- 
dows. The manual included is written 
for Level I and indicates that the CLEAR 
key is used as a control key. Of course, 
under Level II the CLEAR key is used to 
change windows: You must keep in 
mind that you should use the CTRL key 
in place of the CLEAR key when using 
the manual. 

Xword is command-driven. It utilizes 
a command mode and a block mode, 
both of which work similarly to Dyna- 
Star. First, enter CTRL-C (or CTRL-B for 
blocks). Then press a single key corres- 
ponding to the command you want 
performed. No menu appears. If you 
need help, however, you can just press 
a question mark at the prompt. Xword 
allows quick and easy movement 
through text and supports indexing, 
auto-indentation, programmable keys 
and macros, and more. 

The print formatter included with 
Xword is not much different from that 
described for DynaStar. One very useful 
feature, though, is its support for pro- 



portional justification. If your printer 
features a proportional mode and in- 
cludes a table of dot widths for each 
character, you can provide these dot 
widths to the formatter for proportional 
justification. This means that very small 
spaces are inserted between characters 
rather than extra whole spaces being 
added between words for justification. 
This is also known as microjustifica- 
tion, and it results in great-looking hard 
copy. 

As with DynaStar, Xword does not 
include a spelling checker. Also, it does 
not include mail-merge capability. 
However, both a 40,000-word spelling 
checker (Xspell) and a mail-merge 
utility (Xmerge) are available from 
Microtech Consultants. 

The one truly disappointing aspect of 
the OS-9 packages we looked at is that 
the manuals do not include much in the 
way of tutorial instruction or examples. 
All the features are explained quite well, 
but the user is not given much idea 
where and when he might want to use 
each feature in his work. If you have 
been around computers and word pro- 
cessors for a while, your "getting 
started"time will be drastically reduced. 
Otherwise, the packages work well and 
provide OS-9 users with excellent word 
processing capability. A really impor- 
tant aspect of these systems is that as 
full-screen editors they are also great for 
writing and editing source code for your 
own programming. If you regularly use 
OS-9, you should have one of these 
programs. Or, perhaps, you could con- 
sider one of them as a reason for getting 
into OS-9. 

Our Feature Presentation 

Flipping through the pages of THE 
RAINBOW, you might think there's a 
features war going on between the 
various vendors of word processors. Is 
there some overkill here? How much is 
too much? For some people, there can 
never be too much. But for people who 
have gotten used to less, lots of features 
will seem like needless extravagances. 
Often, one company will come out with 
a feature that is so popular that all other 
vendors copy it, users clamor for it, and 
it quickly becomes standard. The 64- 
column screens on the CoCo 1 and 2 are 
an example. Now it's looking like mail 
merges and split-screen editing are some 
of the hot items. If you feel like you need 
a map just to keep up with the features 
war, see our chart on Page 38. 

Plain-vanilla word processing 
(churning out letters and the occasional 
report) requires little in the way of 



VIP Writer 



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Advantages: Its command-driven user 
interface allows speedy operation. The 
buffer size is fairly large, permitting 
larger documents. A spelling checker is 
included. More than the normal 32 
columns can be displayed onscreen at 
once. There are a wide variety of cursor 
movement commands. 
Disadvantages: It has to be patched for 
operation on the CoCo 3. Subsequent 
patching and upgrading fees can be 
substantial. Screen updating can make 
operation slow. Commands are not 
intuitive and can be difficult to re- 
member. 

CoCoNutshell: It makes a good editor's 
word processor and is practical for 
those who spend a lot of time writing. 
For more information, see the review in 
October 1983 's RAINBOW, Page 280. 
VIP Writer was formerly known as 
Super Color Writerll. 



April 1989 THE RAINBOW 37 



features. Most people use only a few 
commands in their everyday use of a 
word processor. But it's nice to know 
that those little extras are there for 
special occasions. 

Buffer size is a highly touted feature 
— the bigger the buffer the longer the 
document can be. For CoCo 1 and 2 
word processors this can range from 
about 13K to 49K. On the 128K CoCo 
3, this figure can range from 48K to 
72K; on the 512K CoCo 3, up to 460K. 
Be wary, though, of a buffer size that 
seems too high — if a word processor 
for the 128K CoCo 3 has a buffer of 
124K, for example, you might ask 
yourself if you want to risk buying a 
word processor that runs in only 4K. 
(Gross exaggeration!) Elite* Word and 
Elite* Word/ 80 have a handy feature 
that shows you how much buffer space 
you have left as you type, character for 
character. 

If you get eyestrain squinting at 64- 
or 80-column text, you might want to 
check and see if your prospective word 
processor supports text in 32 or 64 
columns. Of the CoCo 3 word proces- 
sors, all but Word Power 3.2 support the 
40-column screen. Conversely, if you 
are a CoCo 1 or 2 owner and you like 
teeny-tiny text characters, check to 
make sure that the word processor you 
buy can do the 64-column mode or 
better. Of the four CoCo 1 and 2 pro- 
grams we are discussing, only Color 
Scripsit //cannot display more than 32, 

If you hate wasting printer paper, 
onscreen preview is a must feature for 
you. Fortunately, most word processors 
have this feature, which shows you page 
breaks and margins, etc., as they will 
appear when printed. On less-than-80- 
column displays, the previewed text 
often extends past the right margin, but 
is scrollable. 

Spelling checkers are a must if you 
produce documents for public con- 
sumption. Imagine how embarrassing it 
would be to have coworkers snicker at 
you over misspellings in your memos. 
Max-10, the Elite and the VIP pro- 
grams have "customized" spelling 
checkers (optional/ extra cost for Elite, 
but included with purchase for VIP and 
Max-10). WordPower and TextPro 
both include a public domain/ share- 
ware spelling checker, Spell *n Fix (it's 
posted on Delphi), with the purchase of 
their word processors. Generic spelling 
checkers like Spell 'n'Fix will work with 
most word processors that generate 
ASCII files. 

To perform a spelling check on your 
document, you save your text, exit the 



word processor, then boot the spelling 
checker. Of all the spelling checkers 
we've covered, only one works inside 
the program — Max-10's. You do not 
have to exit the program to access the 
dictionary and perform spelling checks. 

Most spelling checkers allow their 
users to create customized dictionaries 
— files that will contain names and 
other words you type frequently that are 
not in the spelling checker's dictionary. 

Of all the CoCo word processors 
discussed, only one gives you a "win- 
dowing" ability, letting you work on 
more than one file at a time — Simply 
Better. (WordPower 3.2 has a similar 
feature called splitscreen editing; it lets 
you "freeze" one portion of your doc- 
ument and "glue" it to an area of the 
screen, where you can view it for refer- 
ence while working on another part.) 
Other interesting features that seem to 
be Simply Better's exclusive properties 



include sorting capabilities and table of 
contents and index generation. This is 
pretty heavy stuff. 

Say you're writing an essay on pop 
stars of the last 20 years and you realize 
you misspelled "Engelbert Humper- 
dinck" 15 times as "Ingelburt Humper- 
dink" — at least you were consistent. 
An easy way to fix the problem would 
be to search for the incorrect spelling 
and replace it with the correct one. The 
search-and-replace feature can save you 
a lot of time, and it can skip you quickly 
through your document to exactly 
where you want to be. Fortunately, all 
the word processors we've talked about 
can do search and replace. Telewriter 
can even handle wildcard searches 
(perform a search in which one or more 
letters are missing: searching for "p*t" 
might yield "pat," "part," "planet," 
"pet," "print," etc.). 

Macros let you assign functions to 



Features 
Comparison 


Requirements 


Price $ 


I/O (T)ape, (D)isk 


(C)ommand-, 
(M)enu-driven 


Supplied on (T)ape, 
(D)isk, (R)OM pack 


Maximum file length 


Columns displayed 
onscreen 


Onscreen preview 


Spelling checker 


Windows for editing 


Save block as file 




CoCo 1 & 2 
























Scripsit 


16K 


29.95 


T 


M 


R 


20K 


32.0 


Y 




1 


y 


Elite*Word 


32K 


69.95 


T,D a 


M 


T,D 


22K d 


32,64 


y 


y 


1 




Telewriter-64 


16K 


59.95 


T,D a 


M 


T,D 


25K e 


51 ,64,85 






1 


y 


VIP Writer 


32K 


69.95 


T,D 


C 


T,D 


49K 


51,64,85 h 


y 


y 


1 


y 


CoCo 3 
























Elite*Word/80 


128K 


79.95 


D 


M 


D 


48K 


40,80 


y 


y 


1 


y 


Max-10 


128K 


79.95 


D 


M 


D 


64K 


NA 


NA 


_y_ 


1 


Y 


Simply Better 


128K 


29.95 


D 


C 


D 


80K 


40,80 


y 




2 


y 


Telewriter-128 


128K 


79.95 


T,D 


M 


T,D 


48K 


40,80 


Y 




t 


y 


TextPro 


128K 


89.95 


D 


C 


D 


50K 


80...212 


y 




1 




VIP Writer III V.2 


128K 


79.95 


T,D 


C 


T,D 


48K 


40,64,80 h 


y 


y 


1 


y 


Word Power 3.2 


128K 


79.95 


D 


M 


D 


72K 


80 


y 


y 


1 




OS-9 
























DeskMate 


64K 


59.95 b 


D 


M 


D 


23K 


32,40,80 






1 


y 


DvnaStar 


Ll.ll 


99.95 c 


D 


C 


D 


t 


80 






1 


_y_ 


XWord 


LUI 


69.95 


D 


C 


D 


f 


80 




Y 


1 


y 


a tape I/O is for tape only, disk I/O for disk only o 38 columns are possible on the CoCo 3 

b $69.95 for DeskMate 3 h 32-column displays are also supported 

c special price ' optional and at extra cost 

d .°. n a 3 ^ machine j 0 \^ er versions are protected by a hardware key 

1 1 ?6 > IS t h C ^ ette , k with TelePa tch 
f limited by disk size only 



38 THE RAINBOW April 1989 



programmable keys. For example, the 
setting of a print format code could be 
reduced to one keystroke. Or, fre- 
quently typed text can be assigned to a 
macro; If you're a partner in the firm of 
Finkelstein, Kriek, Bach, Anderson, 
Burns and Newby, you could type that 
mouthful of a company name in your 
business correspondence with just one 
keystroke combination. This is a power 
user feature and very useful. 

Even though our Color Computers 
had color all along, it was with the 
arrival of the CoCo 3 that the software 
really began to get into the hue of 
things. Now practically every CoCo 3 
word processor on the market (with the 
exception of Max-10 and TextPro) 
comes with support for designer colors 
that you select, and you can make your 
selections stick in a configuration pro- 
gram. Besides color, things such as baud 
rates and printer codes can be config- 



ured. After you make your choices and 
answer all the prompts, the word pro- 
cessor will boot with all the specifica- 
tions made. The changes don't have to 
be permanent — the configuration 
program can always be run again. 

Print spooling is another of the power 
user's features. It frees the computer 
from being tied to the printer while long 
documents print out. 

Auto-saving is a feature that is sure 
to elicit a vehement opinion from most 
any computer user. Those opposed 
recount tales of brilliant inspiration lost 
to the void: The computer's tendency to 
halt everything and save text while the 
computerist is in the middle of a typing 
frenzy can be very disturbing. On the 
other hand, those in favor of it tell of 
miracles in which their computer saved 
the research paper, the report and the 
short story from the dark clutches of the 
power surge. If you are ordinarily a 



Search & replace 


Table of contents 
generation 


Index generation 


Sorting 


Math 


Macros 


Online help 


Copy-protected 


Tutorial 


Configuration 


Key repeat 


Print spooler 


Auto saving 


51 2K support 


Mail merge 


Block functions 


Columns 


Page break 








































Y 
















y 




y 










y 






y 
















y 


y 


y 








y 


y 




y 


y 
















y 


n k 


n k 










y 




y 


y 










y 


y 




y 


y 


y 


y 


y 






y 




y 










































































y 
















y 


y 


y 






y 


y 


y 




y 

















rV 


y 


y 


y 






y 




y 


y 


y 


y 


y 


y 


y 




y 


y 




y 


y 


y 


y 


y 


y 


y 


y 




y 


y 










y 


y 




y 


y 


y 










y 




y 


y 










y 




y 


y 


y 


y 






y 


y 


y 


yP 


y 


y 










y 


y 




y 


y 


y 


y 




y 




y 




y 


y 








y 




y 




y 


y 


y 


y 


y 


y 


y 


y 


y 


y 










































































y 












y 




y 




y 


y 




y 




y 




y 


Y 


Y 








y 


y 








y 


y 1 




y 


y 


y 






y 




y 






y 


y 








y 


y' 




y 


y° 


y 




y 


1 print spooling is a function of OS-9 

m manual "quick saves" are possible 

n mail merge is possible with VIP Database 

0 comes at extra cost 

p coiumns are a function of the printer 



cautious or paranoid person — or one 
who forgets to make frequent saves — 
this feature is for you. 

For business use, maiJ merge is a 
must-have feature. Many of the word 
processors we've discussed support it. 
Neither VIP Writer nor VIP Writer III 
have mail merge by themselves: In 
conjunction with VIP Database and 
VIP Database III, VIP Writer can 
perform mail merge functions. 

Other basic, common, various and 
sundry features that pretty much all 
word processors have are wordwrap, 
key repeat and insert/ overstrike modes. 
Thanks to word wrap, word processor 
users do not have to press RETURN or 
ENTER until they reach the end of a 
paragraph; unlike with a typewriter, 
you do not have to press RETURN at the 
end of every line. Key repeat is a bless- 
ing when you want to create long strings 
of characters for whatever reason — or 
if you want to hold down the space bar 
and get somewhere in a hurry. In the 
insert mode, text entered at an insertion 
point pushes text that follows the cursor 
to the right. In the overwrite mode, you 
can type over and "wipe out" text. 

Some features that are less common 
but very useful are word counts, print- 
ing in multiple columns and the display 
of page breaks. Word counts help wri- 
ters stay within limits. Printing in 
multiple columns comes in handy if you 
are in charge of printing informal 
newsletters. And page breaks provide 
you with a little bit of formatting 
information. 

And for our final feature, let's talk 
about support for 512K on CoCo 3s: 
Most of our CoCo 3 word processors 
support it (all but one). Obviously, if 
you haven't made the 512K upgrade and 
are still putting along at 1 28K, this is not 
an issue for you. Of course, if you have, 
power user, then you will want to take 
advantage of all the memory you can. 



User Interfaces 

What kind of car do you like to drive, 
manual transmission or automatic? The 
answer to that question will probably 
determine which kind of interface you 
are more suited for, command-driven or 
menu-driven. As you can probably 
guess, command-driven interfaces 
equate to manual transmission, auto- 
matic to menu-driven. 

Command-driven interfaces let you 
issue your commands directly, putting 
you closer, perhaps, to the guts of the 
program. They also seem faster and 
more powerful (you can initiate a com- 



April 1989 THE RAINBOW 39 



mand with one keystroke or a two- 
keystroke combination rather than 
wade through a menu), and they let you 
feel you're controlling the show. 

Menu-driven programs let you give 
commands by presenting you with a 
choice of options and asking for a 
selection. This is great for beginners 
who know little or nothing about the 
program they're trying to operate, but 
menus get in the way of users who 
already know what they're going to do. 
(That's why menu-driven programs like 
WordPerfect have dozens and dozens of 
books and programs published to pro- 
vide macros for power-hungry users.) 
The disadvantage to command-driven 
programs is that they are more difficult 
to learn, as they do not prompt you 
along. (But that is what help screens and 
manuals are for, right, power user?) 

Some CoCo word processors seem to 
be a curious hybrid of the two inter- 
faces, though. There is an initial, short 
menu, but within the text mode you can 
issue direct commands. Color Scripsit 
II and WordPower fall into this cate- 
gory. 

Summing up, frequent, heavy-duty 
users should go with the command- 
driven interface, and beginning or 
occasional users should stick with the 
menu driven. 

What Is ASCII? 

Acronymically, ASCII is the Amer- 
ican Standard Code for Information 
Interchange. As it says, it's a standard. 
What this means is, you could prepare 
a document in WordPower and call it 
up inside Telewriter. You can share 
documents with a friend who has a 
different word processor. If the file is 
saved in ASCII, it's portable. In fact, if 
you have the correct null-modem con- 
nection or access to an online database, 
you can share a text file with all 
manners of computers — even Commo- 
dores and MS-DOS machines. 

If you ever decide to change word 
processors, you better hope that the one 
you're changing from can output ASCII 
files, else you 11 have to type important 
files in all over again. With ASCII, you 
won't have to trash your files or rekey 
data. The early version of Telewriter 
saved its files in a binary format by 
default though it could save files in 
ASCII, which can be hairy. Imagine 
you're a poor editor who has just re- 
ceived a 25-page document to edit, and 
the disk file is prepared in non-ASCII 
format, and you don't have access to a 
word processor capable of reading it — 
it happens, folks. 



The Printed Word 

The most commonly used printers in 
the CoCo Community are the Radio 
Shack DMP series and Epson/ Epson- 
compatibles. Of course, each printer, 
even within a single company's product 
line, will have its own special way of 
handling things. Control codes and 
features will vary from model to model. 
The word processors we looked at are 
very flexible in terms of which printers 
they will use, and most companies will 
do their best to help you with "non- 
standard" printers. 

Daisy-wheel printers produce excel- 
lent hard copy. At the same time, it is 
often difficult to use various type styles 
because it is necessary to change the 
print wheel to do this. Many users who 
want the quality of type produced by 
daisy-wheel systems are choosing to go 
with one of the many new typewriters 
on the market. These units often include 
(or have available) a parallel interface 
that can be connected to the CoCo via 
a serial/ parallel converter. This way, 
these users have the added advantage of 
owning a typewriter for small jobs. 

Most dot-matrix printers offer a 
near-letter-quality (NLQ) mode that 
looks quite good. A consideration here 
is the number of pins in the head. Low- 
end printers use nine pins and produce 
characters that look choppier than 
those produced by printers with 18 or 
24 pins. In addition, for those who want 
to be able to print graphics in addition 
to text, dot matrix is a must. Since most 
CoCo users will want to buy only one 
printer, the dot-matrix system is prob- 
ably the way to go. You will need to 
check with the dealer to determine the 
features (type styles, character sizing, 
etc.) available. Of course, there are 
always exceptions. If your main or only 
concern is writing text, you will want to 
go with a daisy-wheel system. 

At a minimum, you want a printer 
that is capable of backspacing, bold 
type (often called double-strike) and 
underlining. For the purpose of clerical 
work, it is often advantageous to have 
a printer that supports friction feed 
(used for single-sheet printing) as well 
as tractor-feed mechanisms. Another 
consideration is the pushfeed (where 
tractor-feed paper is pushed rather than 
pulled across the platen). This reduces 
paper waste. Finally, some newer prin- 
ters now support paper parking to ease 
the transition between using fanfold 
paper and single sheets. 

With the exception of DeskMate and 
DeskMate 3, the software we looked at 
allows baud rate settings as high as 9600 



baud. Therefore, using a printer's paral- 
lel port with a serial/ parallel converter 
allows quicker printing. Without a 
serial/ parallel converter, using any- 
thing other than a Radio Shack DMP 
model is very difficult. Even if the non- 
Tandy printer sports a serial interface, 
designing a cable to connect the printer 
to the CoCo is often very tedious work. 

What's Best for You? 

Again, that's best decided by analyz- 
ing yourself, what kind of person you 
are and the uses you will be putting your 
word processor to. (For help in making 
an intelligent choice, see Willis Stanley's 
AHP program featured in "Decisions, 
Decisions," Page 118 of this issue.) If 
you're a stick-shift person, then you 
might consider VIP Writer, Simply 
Better or Text Pro IV. If you like the ease 
of menus, then maybe you should try 
WordPower, Max-10, Telewriter, Elite- 
* Word or Color Scripsit II. If you are 
going to be using your word processor 
for business, then youll definitely want 
mail merge and a spelling checker. If 
you are going to be using it for school, 
you are really going to want a spelling 
checker. 

Those with an artistic bent should 
lean toward Max-10, and those who are 
serious hackers should seriously con- 
sider Text Pro IV. Hobbyist writers and 
wordsmiths might want to check out 
WordPower. People who will be using 
their word processors for business 
should consider Simply Better, VIP 
Writer and also WordPower. People 
interested in easy and friendly word 
processors should look at Elite* Word 
or Telewriter, and those who feel more 
at home with Tandy products should 
check out ColorScripsit II. 

Also, think about how long your 
documents are going to be — two pages 
or 200? Some word processors have a 
limited buffer area that allows you to 
type in and manage only so much text 
at a time. 

If you're a person whose friends 
despair over what to get you for your 
birthday because you already have 
everything, then it's probably safe to 
assume that you're a features person 
and would do best with a feature- 
packed word processor. If mainstream 
word processing is more in your line, 
and you find an abundance of features 
extravagant and useless, then a plain- 
vanilla program may be the ticket for 
you. 

So you see, it depends on the kind of 
user you are, occasional or intensive. 
WhatH it be, Cadillac or Ferrari? /«s 



40 THE RAINBOW April 1989 



1 Featur e 



Under the new law, when you write a 
program, it is automatically protected by copyright 



Copyright Law Update: 

Congress Alters Rules of Copyright Notice 



A significant change was made in 
the federal copyright law on 
March 1, 1988. Since that date 
a person can get a copyright in a com- 
puter program — or in any other work 
of authorship — without any formali- 
ties whatsoever. The requirement of 
copyright notice (for example, "© Co- 
pyright 1988 by Edward Samuels") has 
been abolished. When you write a 
program, it is automatically protected 
by copyright; when you publish it, it 
remains copyrighted even if you don't 
use the copyright notice. And you need 
not register your claim anywhere for it 
to be effective. For reasons I will explain 
here, you may still want to add copy- 
right notice to your programs — and 
even register important programs with 
the Copyright Office — in order to get 
maximum benefit under the statute. But 
you don't have to do anything except 
create a program in order to have a 
copyright in it. 

Copyright Protection Since 1978 

In order to understand the new copy- 
right law and why it was enacted, it is 
first necessary to take a look at the old 
law as it has been in effect since 1978. 
This law is explained in my article, 
"Computer Program Copyrights: A 
How-to Guide," published in the April 
1987 issue of THE RAINBOW. In sum- 
mary, since 1978 it has not been neces- 
sary to do anything to obtain a copy- 



Edward Samuels, a professor of law at 
New York Law School, has taught 
copyright and other legal subjects for 
more than 10 years. An avid reader of 
RAINBOW, Professor Samuels enjoys 
sharing his CoCo with his children, 8- 
year-old Richard and 4-year-old Claire. 



By Edward Samuels 

right in a computer program except to 
fix it in some material form such as a 
printed listing, tape or disk. When and 
if you published the computer program 
by making copies available to others, it 
was necessary to place the copyright 
notice somewhere in the listing of the 
program, on the tape or disk, or on the 
screen display. This notice consisted of 
writing the symbol © or the word copy- 
right, the date of publication and the 
name of the copyright owner. Although 
there were some provisions for adding 
the notice even after a publication that 
omitted it, the notice requirement was 
most easily satisfied by simply including 
the notice in all published copies of the 
work. It was not necessary to register 
the work with the copyright office, al- 
though such registration was recom- 
mended to preserve the maximum be- 
nefit under the statute. 

The Berne International Copyright 
Treaty 

The trouble with copyright notice 
was that hardly any other country in the 
world required it. Indeed, the United 
States requirement of copyright notice 
on all copies of published works caused 
friction between the United States and 
many other countries. Since 1886, the 
most effective international copyright 
treaty recognizing copyright in authors 
from other countries was the Berne 
Treaty. That treaty stated that no par- 
ticipating country could require any 
"formalities" in order to obtain copy- 
right protection within that country. 
The United States copyright law clearly 
failed to meet the test of Berne in this 
and several other respects. 

In 1954 the United States persuaded 
many other countries to agree to a 
second international treaty, the Univer- 
sal Copyright Convention, with less 



stringent standards that the United 
States copyright law could meet. This 
provided some protection in foreign 
countries for U.S. authors and in the 
United States for foreign authors. But 
it has remained an international embar- 
rassment that the United States' copy- 
right laws did not measure up to the 
higher standards of Berne. Particularly 
in recent years, as the United States has 
argued strenuously that other countries 
should improve their copyright laws 
(for example, by expanding them to 
cover computer programs), other coun- 
tries have asked why we are not up to 
the generally accepted standards of 
Berne. 

Finally, after several reforms in the 
1978 copyright law and in the new 1988 
amendments, the remaining obstacles 
to our adopting the Berne Treaty have 
been removed, and indeed the Senate 
formally ratified the Berne Treaty. The 



You spent $60 to $80 for 
o u r CoCo 3 Word 
rocessor and now the 
incredible Max- 10 comes 
along! 

We know the feeling, so we 
have a special offer for you, 
but you have to find the 
"GOOD NEWS" ad 
somewhere in this issue. 
Do you know that with 
Max-10, word processing is 
actually fun? (Hard to 
believe, huh?) 



i 



April 1989 THE RAINBOW 41 



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most important change, for our pur- 
poses, is the elimination of all formal- 
ities in obtaining copyrights, including 
the notice requirement. 

Effective Date 

Although the Berne Treaty was rat- 
ified by the Senate, and the copyright 
amendments implementing it were 
passed in October 1988, the new amend- 
ments didn't go into effect until the 
United States formally deposited a copy 
of the ratification with the World Intel- 
lectual Property Organization on No- 
vember 16, 1988. Under that document, 
the effective date of the treaty and of the 
new amendments to the copyright law 
was March 1, 1988. 

Getting The Best Copyright Protection 

You don't have to do anything to get 
copyright protection of a computer 
program except write it down or store 
it in a physical form from which it can 
be copied. However, copyright notice 
and registration are recommended in 
order to get the best protection. 

Notice 

The new statute says that copyright 
notice may be placed on all published 
copies of a work. If such a notice is used, 
then "no weight shall be given" to a 
claim by someone who copies your 
program based on "innocent infringe- 
ment" to reduce the amount of money 
the user might have to pay in damages. 
Although the statute doesn't precisely 
say so, this implies that if you don't use 
the notice and if people making a copy 
of your program are not able to contact 
you to get your permission because they 
can't find out who owns the copyright, 
then they may appeal to the court to 
reduce the amount of money they have 
to pay in damages. "Innocent infringe- 
ment" is thus a partial defense — but 
not a complete defense — to a copyright 



suit, but only if there is no copyright 
notice. Accordingly, I encourage you to 
continue to use the copyright notice on 
all copies of your computer programs or 
other works, since it costs absolutely 
nothing to write the magic words — the 
symbol © or the word copyright, the 
year of publication and the name of the 
author. 

Registration 

I still recommend that you register 
your work with the copyright office if 
you have a realistic expectation of 
receiving money for it. Just as under the 
old law, registration proves you wrote 
the program when you say you did. 
Also, the certificate you get from the 
copyright office will be presumed valid 
in any infringement suit you bring. 
Further, you will be able to recover a 
certain amount of money even if you 
can't prove you were damaged (the 
range was increased under the 1988 
amendment to between $500 and 
$20,000, at the discretion of the judge). 
Finally, if you win a lawsuit, you will 
be able to recover your attorney's fees, 
which can often exceed the amount you 
are suing for. Registration requires 
paying a $10 registration fee, sending a 
written copy of the program (source 
code), and filling out a form that can be 
obtained from the Publications Section, 
LM-455, Copyright Office, Library of 
Congress, Washington, D.C. 20559. (Or 
call the "Forms Hotline" at (202) 287- 
9100 and leave a message with your 
name and address asking for Form TX). 
Further information about how and 
when to register, all of which still 
applies, is contained in my article in the 
April 1987 rainbow. 

The User's Perspective 

In my article, "Who's Gonna Know?" 
published in the July 1987 issue of THE 
rainbow, I looked at the copyright law 



from the point of view of the user or 
copier of computer programs. Most of 
what was said in that article is still true. 
However, one particular problem re- 
quires more discussion now. I pointed 
out the difficulty of figuring out if a 
copyrighted work is in the public do- 
main or not. That's no longer difficult: 
The work is not in the public domain 
just because there is no notice. For 
works published after 1988, unless there 
is specific language by the copyright 
owner authorizing the making of cop- 
ies, you have to assume that a work is 
not in the public domain. The problem 
now is how to figure out who the copy- 
right owner is, if there is no notice. You 
can contact the copyright office in 
Washington to find out if the work has 
been registered; but if it's not registered, 
you might have a lot of trouble finding 
the author. 

This won't be too big a problem if 
most people continue to use the "per- 
missive" copyright notice, as recom- 
mended. European and other countries 
seem to have managed for years without 
a copyright notice requirement, and I 
can only assume we will be able to do 
so too. There may be a little more 
trouble for users of copyrighted works 
if notice and registration aren't used, 
but this is the trade-off we must make 
for protecting authors against losing 
their copyrights, perhaps inadvertently. 

(Questions or comments about this 
article may be addressed to the New 
York Law School, 57 Worth Street, 
New York, NY 10013. Although Profes- 
sor Samuels is interested in discussing 
copyright matters of general interest to 
computer programmers and users, he is 
not currently engaged in the practice of 
law and will not give specific legal 
advice. If you have a serious copyright 
problem, you should consult an attor- 
ney who specializes in the field.) /£v 



Jcin the MIDI revolution... 

turn your synthesizer into a recording studio! 

If you've never heard what a CoCo and a MIDI synthesizer can do together, you're in for a real treat! Your CoCo 
can act as a sophisticated music controller. Use it to compose music on a graphics screen that looks just like printed 
music, and then play it on your synthesizer for incredible 8-part music. Or use it as a ten track tape recorder, 
advanced programming then lets you edit and modify to perfect your performance as much as you wish. 

We carry some of the best music products you can buy for your Color 
Computer. Products that professionals and hobbyists alike use and love. 

Call or write for our complete product listing. We're in this business 
because we enjoy it. We want you to be pleased with what you get! 




Riilaford Research 

P.O,BcHci43 

Imperial Beach, CA 92032 
(619) 690-3648 (evenings 6-10 PT) 



April 1989 THE RAINBOW 43 



* F o atur o 



16K ECB 




Create professional-looking invoices 
and labels to ship with orders 



Invoice Innovation 



6fi 



«1, 



By David L. Clapper 



>*0 



\A0 




0© 



I had been in the mail-order printing 
business for more than a year when 
Santa was kind enough to present 
me with a brand-new 64K CoCo 2 with 
disk drive and DMP-105 printer. It 
wasn't long before Pd tried most of 
Radio Shack's programs for files and 
finances and found little that pertained 
to my small business. Office is a simple 
program I created to make official- 
looking invoices to enclose with my 
orders. I have since added options for 
printing both UPS shipping record 
forms and package shipping labels. 
The program is in BASIC and is menu- 



David Clapper is a retired public school 
music teacher. He now builds church 
pipe organs and runs a mail-order 
printing business catering to model 
railroaders and railroad enthusiasts, 

^ 

44 THE RAINBOW April 1989 



driven. Obviously, you will have to 
substitute the name of your business in 
lines 30, 150, 440, 1170, 1450 and 1580. 
If you are required to charge your 
customers sales tax, Line 350 computes 
the tax. The combined state and local 
sales taxes are seven percent for my 
purposes. You may have to substitute 
another percentage, depending on 
where your business is located. The 
program also uses the customer's state 
in his address as a flag to decide if the 
tax will be charged. Line 340 takes care 
of this. Substitute your state here. 

I have included provision for only 
two purchases since that is the most my 
customers have printed at one time. You 
can easily set up more by copying the 
input routine in lines 300 through 320. 
Then add appropriate print lines as 
shown by lines 570 and 580. If neces- 
sary, you might even decide to dimen- 



sion and use an array to hold the prod- 
ucts ordered. 

The UPS form printer uses the cus- 
tomer's name and address information 
already entered to print the shipping 
form. I do have to insert the forms 
manually into my printer, but I don't 
have to type or write all that informa- 
tion again. 

The package shipping label works the 
same way. I ususally print it out on 
regular printer paper, but self-stick 
labels can easily be used. 

Try this program for your invoice 
printing, and make your small business 
look like BIG business. 

(Questions or comments regarding 
this program may be directed to the 
author at 85 Glenwood Blvd., Hudson, 
NY 12534. Please enclose an SASE 
when requesting a reply.) □ 




. . . has relocated to Renton, Washington. We pledge to continue to offer Color 
Computer owners the high quality, affordable, and innovative products that 
have built our reputation. 



To order, use our NEW TOLL FREE ORDER HOTLINE: 1-800-237-2409 




Real BASIC for OS9! 

There is nothing wrong with your Coior Computer. 
Do not attempt to adjust it 

Burke & Burke's new R.S.B. program gives you a complete, 089- 
compatible version of Disk Extended Color BASIC. We've added new 
software for OS9-style graphics, sound, printer, and disk I/O. The BASIC 
you know and love is now running under Level 2 OS9 windows! 



OS-0 LEVEL TWO VR. 

COPYRIGHT 1086 BY 
MICROWARE SYSTEMS CORP 
LICENSED TO TANDY CORP 
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 

July 11, 1988 1437:30 

Shall 

OS9: xmode /«5 typc=0 

OS9: Inlz /w5 

OS9: r»b o»»/w5 * 

4007 



^:Qnl^ 1988 BURKE k BURKE 

- u n sik fc " r rET4D6D COLOR BASIC 2.1 





COPR. 1982, 1986 BY TANDY 
UNDER LICENSE FROM MICROSOFT 
AND MICROWARE SYSTEMS CORP. 

OK 

LOAD "DEMO" 

OK 

LIST 

10 PMODE 4:SCREEN 1,1 

20 X=RND(256H:Y=RND(102}-1 

30 A=RND(256-XH:B=RND(192-Y)-1 
40 LINE (X,YHX+A,Y+B),PSET,BF 



R.S.B. loads and saves files using OS9's file format, so we've also 

included utilities to transfer BASIC programs and data files betwen OS9 and BASIC disks. Of course, you can't use R.S.B. to run machine language 
programa, and some BASIC commands work slightly differently under R.S.B. 

Your BASIC programs can take full advantage of great OS9 features like hard disks, no-halt floppies, multi-tasking, and 2 MHz operation. 



R.S.B. requires a CoCo 3 with at least 128K RAM (51 2K recommended), a floppy controller 
with either Tandy Disk Extended Coior BASIC or DISTO CoCo 3 CDOS, and Level 2 OS9. 



R . S . B 



Version 



S39.95 



Co Co-XT Hard Disk Interfaces 

We've sold hundreds of our affordable, high-performance hard disk 
interfaces to Color Computer enthusiasts worldwide! 

Each includes a durable, fully enclosed metal housing, 100 page user 
manual, and software for use with OS9. The CoCo XT-RTC adds a 
battery-powered real time clock / calendar for OS9 and BASIC. 



A true "NO HALT hard disk 
system 

Controls 1 or 2 hard drives, which 
may be different sizes 
Full ECC / CRC error correction 
Average acceas 30% faster than 
SASI systems 

Uses PC-type hard disk drives & 
controllers 

Full 5 Meg to 120 Meg storage per 
hard drive 

Does not use or disable Interrupts 
Compatible with most RS-232 
interfaces 

20 Meg system cost: under $450 
Requires Multi-PAK or "electric" 
Y-cable 

EZGen Boot File Editor software 
included with each interface 
Use with HYPER-I/O to share your 
hard disk between BASIC and OS9 



Buy a hard disk kit and a 
case/power supply from the PC 

dealer of your choice. Plug 
them into the CoCo XT, plug the 
CoCo XT into your Multi-PAK, 
and install the OS9 or BASIC 
software. Presto! 

CoCo XT $69.95 
CoCo XT-RTC $99.95 

Handyman's note: A hard disk 
kit includes a hard drive, cable 
set, and Western Dig its I, DTC, 
Adaptec, or equivalent 
PC-compatible hard disk 
controller. 



The Profesional Touch: XT-ROM 2.3 

Inatall XT-ROM in your CoCo XT hard disk controller's BIOS ROM socket, 
automatically boots and reboots OS9 from your hard disk. 



It 



f XT-R 
I $19. 



ROM 

95 



Select among any of two different hard disk boot files, two 
different floppy boot files, or your BASIC ROM st power-up. 
XT-ROM gives your system that "professional touch". Great for 
unattended BBS, home security, or other fail-safe CoCo applications. 



J 



Wild & MV Version 2.1 

Use "wildcards" with most OS9 
commands, or rearrange your 
directory tree. Features 
recursive directory searches. 
A hard disk must! $19.95 



EZGen Version 1.06 

Powerful OS9 bootfile editor. 
Change module names, add or 
delete modules, patch bytes, or 
rearrange modules. Works on 
other files, too. $19.95 



OS9 Utilities 



LJ YPF 17-1 /O Now BAS!C run$ nard drives, 
I* * rLfi'i/U big floppies, and more! 

HYPER-I/O modifies the Disk BASIC in your CoCo 1, 2, or 3 to provide a 
"Dynamic Disk Interface". Use your existing BASIC and M/L software 
with hard disk interfaces (CoCo XT, DISTO, LR), RAM Disks, and any mix 
of floppy drives from 160K to 720K each. Fully RESET protected, user 
configurable, expandable, EPROM- able HYPER-I/O V2.6 is the most 
versatile hard / floppy disk DOS available. Please specify HYPER-I/O, 
DISTO HYPER-I/O, or LR HYPER-1/O when ordering. 



$29.95 



HYPER-III (Adds RAM Disk and Print Spooler to CoCo 3 HYPER-I/O. 

$12.95 

HYPER-I/O & HYPER-III work with your 
B&B, RGB, LR, or DISTO Hard Disk 

HYPER-I/Q 1^F^™3E^ 

by Kevin Berner copy, delete, and sesrch operations 

on your HYPER-I/O directories. Great timesaver for moving data from 
floppy disk to hard disk, or for BBS maintenance. Kevin's DISK DOCTOR 
will lock out bad sectors on your hsrd or floppy disks, and includes a 
diak-zap utility designed specifically for use with HYPER-I/O. 

DISK Doctor $17.95 HYPER-I/O Hard Disk Utilities $21.95 
WOW! Both Great Utility Packages $37.95 



PERTASCII is a multi-user word game 
for Level 2 OS9. The players are 
yourself, the computer, other users 
on your system, or even friends that 
call in on a modem. 




PERTASCII $19.95 



The game is played in timed rounds, until a certain score Is reached. 
Players can join or leave the game at the beginning of any round. The 
players make words from random letters during each 3 minute round, 
and then argue over whether or not to accept each other's words. 

Greet for BBS end multi-user systems ... or play practice rounds 
against the computer to hone your skills! 

Includes a user-expandable 3500 word dictionary. 



51 2K CoCo 3, Level 2 OS9, and one disk 
drive required. CoCo 2 and 128K owners: 
watch for our 128K / 64K version I 



Hardware, or What? 

68B09E 2MHz Microprocessor $14.95 
4' Hsrd Disk Cable Set $17.50 
Blank 27128 EPROM $9.95 
(for HYPER-I/O) 

Hard Disk BIOS Socket Installed $7.50 



Don't be afraid of the dungeons . 



Ymt anothmr doma not twturnt 



s 














if" *V1 

I • 4 1 






I • « i 











DAGGORPATCH puts the thrill back into your Dyna Micro Dungeons of Daggorath™ 
game cartridge by patching H to run from disk. Includes disk load & save, 
auto-repeat command, pause, DMP-100 screen dump, tape-to-disk, and morel 




HE 



ftcto ffcar's tea* 



l) Zearn 6&9 
2) #uy a J)av* 





P.O. Box 58342 Renton, WA 98058 
(206) 235-0917 



■ll i. r. >< 




WASHINGTON RESIDENTS PLEASE ADD 7% 

SALES TAX. COD's add $2.20. Shipping 
(within the USA) $2.50 per CoCo XT; $2.00 per 
disk or ROM. Pleas* allow 2 weeks for delivery 
(overnight delivery also available for In-stock 
Items). Telephone orders oall (800) 237-240S. 
Teohnical support (206) 235-0917. 



RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 



Burke & Burke Advertisement The RAINBOW April, 1989 (Composite B/W) 
Copyright 1 989 by Burke & Burke 




220 98 1070 157 

460 176 1330 53 

610 167 1570 132 

840 88 END 182 



The Listing: OFFICE 

0 1 COPYRIGHT 1989 FALSOFT, INC 
10 'DAVID'S PRESS STATEMENT, UPS 
SLIP, LABEL PRINTER 
20 CLS 

30 PRINT: PRINT" davids press 

office" 

40 PRINT: PRINT" <1> STATEMEN 

ip it 

50 PRINT" <2> UPS SLIP" 

60 PRINT" <3> PACKAGE LABEL 

70 PRINT" <4> QUIT 

80 PRINT: PRINT" <YOUR CHOI 

CE>? 

90 AN$=INKEY$ 

100 ON VAL(AN$) GOTO 120,980,141 

0,1800 

110 GOTO90 




Fast Delivery... 
Friendly Service 

Now in our 7th year! 



* NEW LOW PRICES * 




Avatex 1200e $79 



with Coco Cable 



Reviewed in 
April, 1988 
Rainbow! 



Avatex 1200e, Cable 
AUTOTERM... $119 



Avatex 2400 




$169 
179 



with Coco Cable 
(Coco 3 only) 

with RS-232 Cable* 185 



RAINBOW 

KM 



Avatex 2400, Cable 
AUTOTERM . . . $209 



"Coco t. 2 requires Deluxe RS-232 Pak 




• Can* 
513-396 SOFT 



• Shop by Modem • 

513-396 SHOP 




2235 LOSarvtiville. Cincinnati. OH 45237 

SHIPPING will he charmed si our ACTUAL COST 
Ohio resident ,-idd S.S% Sales Tax COD add 3.00 




120 CLS 
130 PRINT 
140 PRINT " 



ii 



150 PRINT " 
ATEMENT" 
160 PRINT " 



DAVID'S PRESS ST 



ii 



170 INPUT "NAME" ;N$ 

180 INPUT "ADDRESS" ;A$ 

190 INPUT "CITY ";C$ 

200 INPUT "STATE" ;W$ 

210 INPUT "ZIP";Z$ 

220 INPUT "DATE REC'D";D$ 

230 INPUT "AMOUNT PAID: (CK-M0) " 

;R$ 

240 INPUT "BALANCE OWED: ";0$ 

250 INPUT "DATE SHIPPED" ;G$ 

260 INPUT "QUANTITY" ;Q$ 

270 INPUT "ITEM"; I $ 

280 INPUT "PRICE" ;A 

290 PRINT USING "$$###.##" ;A 

300 INPUT "2ND QUANTITY" ;J$ 

310 INPUT "2ND ITEM";K$ 

320 INPUT "2ND PRICE" ; B : PRINT US 

ING "$$###. ##";B 

330 S=(A)+(B) : PRINT USING "$$### 

. # # " ; s 

340 IF W$="NY" THEN 350 ELSE 370 
350 M=S*.07 

360 PRINT USING"$$###. ##";M 
370 PRINT "SHIPPING CHARGE Y/N" 
380 AN$=INKEY$ 

390 IF AN$="Y"THEN U=2:GOTO420 
400 IF AN$="N" THEN U=0:GOTO 420 
410 GOTO 380 

420 PRINT USING "$$###. ##";U 
430 T=S+M+U : PRINT USING"$$### . ## 
" ;T 

440 PRINT#-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(14) ;T 

AB( 14) "DAVID'S PRESS" 

450 PRINT#-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(28) 

460 PRINT#-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(15) ;T 
AB(22)"85 Glenwood Blvd. Hudso 
n, NY 12534" 

470 PRINT#-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(54) 

480 PRINT#-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(54) 

490 PRINT#-2,TAB(30) ;N$ 

500 PRINT#-2,TAB(30) ;A$ 

510 PRINT#-2,TAB(30) ;C$;", ";W$; 

" ";Z$ 

520 PRINT#-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(54) 
530 PRINT#-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(54) 
535 PRINT #-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(28) 
540 PRINT#-2,CHR$(28) ;CHR$(80) ;C 
HR$(241)' 

550 PRINT#-2,"REC'D: ";D$;" ";C 
HR$(245);" PAID: ";R$;" ";CHR$ 
(245);" ";"BAL DUE: ";0$;:PRINT 



46 THE RAINBOW April 1989 



#-2,TAB(63) "SHIPPED: ";G$ 
560 PRINT#-2,CHR$(28) ;CHR$(80) ;C 
HR$(241) 




TAB (71) 
###.##" ;b 
590 PRINT#-2, 
60,0 PRINT#-2, 



ii it 
ii ii 



620 PRINTft-2,CttKS?(27) 

630 PRINT#-2 f CHR$(27) f w-x Y l -, 
640 PRINT #-2 , TAB (63) " SUBTOTAL 
: PRINT#-2 , USING" $$ # ##.##"; S 
650 PRINT#-2 ,TAB (60) "NY SALESTAX 

" ; : PRINT#-2 , USING" $$ # ##.##" ;M 
660 PRINT#-2, TAB (63) "SHIPPING "; 
:PRINT#-2 ,USING"$$### . ##" ;U 
670 PRINT#-2, TAB (63) "TOTAL "; 
:PRINT#-2,USING"$$###. ##";T 
680 PRINT#-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(22) 
690 PRINT#-2," " 



700 CLS 

710 PRINT: PRINT "HAS THIS BILL 



B 



THEN 760 
THEN 830 



EEN PAID? Y/N 
720 AN$=INKEY$ 
730 IF AN$="Y" 
740 IF AN$="N" 
750 GOTO 720 
760 PRINT#-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(14) ;T 

AB( 18) "Thank You" 

770 PRINT#-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(28) 
780 PRINT* -2, TAB (17) "P A I D" 
790 PRINT#-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(15) 
800 PRINT#-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(54) 
810 PRINT#-2," " 
820 PRINT* -2," » 

830 PRINT" PRINT SECOND COPY? <Y 
> OR <N>" 



840 AN$=INKEY$ 
850 IF AN$="Y" 
860 IF AN$="N" 
870 GOTO 840 
880 CLS 
890 PRINT: PRINT" 
0 MENU" 
900 PRINT" 



GOTO 440 
GOTO 880 



<1> RETURN T 



ii 



910 PRINT" 
LABEL" 

920 PRINT: PRINT" 
OICE>? 



<2> GO TO UPS LABE 
<3> GO TO PACKAGE 



<YOUR CH 



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*Over 30 adventures including Rambo, Haunted House, 
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Individual issues sell for s 9°° each or $ 450°° 
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TURN TO 
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FOR A COMPLETE 
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RAINBOW 

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#1 Home Mgmt I 

Budget 

Checkbook Balancer 
Cost of Living 
Tinycalc Spreadsheet 
Electronic Datebook 
Account Manager 
Stock Market 
Word Processor 
Lottery Analyst 
Coco Database 
Coco Terminal 
Bartender 

#4 Busines s Helper 

Workmate 
Word Processor 
Spreadsheet 
Calendar 

Accounts Receivable 
Accounts Payable 
Income Property 
Mail List 

Smalt Business Helper 
Stock Charting 
Job Log 
Asset Manager 

#7 Machine Lang. Tut. 

Basic Compiler 

ML Tutorial Pt. 1 

ML Tutorial Pt. 2 

ML Tutorial Pt. 3A, 3B 

ML Tutorial Pt. 4 

ML Tutorial Pt. 5 

ML Tutorial Pt. 6 

ML Tutorial Pt. 7 

ML Tutorial Pt. 8 

MLT Dictionary 

Coco Technical Look 

Coco Technical Look Pts. 1-3 



#2 Education 

Flash Card 
Spanish Lessons 
Typing Tutor 
Creativity Test 
Arith. Football 
Cost of Living 
Math Tutors 1, 2 
Trigonometry Tutor 
Typing Game 
Word Tests 
Talking Alphabet 
Clown Dunk Math 

#5 Games III 

Sandy Rover ^ \ / / 
Gray Lady *A»L ' 

Flippy The Seal 'VA'tm^, 
Abie Builders / W. 
Panzer S / i 

Mrs. Pac / | 

Fire Runner 
Cosmic Rays 
Dig 

Battle Tank 
Kron 

King Pede 

#8 Gamble Issue 



#3 AdventuresJI 

J / 



Dungeon Master . 
Hired, Tired, Fired 
Iceworld 

Jungle " 
Keys 

Amulet of Power 
The Trip 
Cookies 
Barracks 
Genesis Project 
Rambo 

Zigma Experiment 

#6 Electronics Tutorial 



Horse Racing 

Rack Track 

Black Jack 
Slot Machine 
Lottery Analyst 
Coco Keeno 
Lucky Money 
Betting Pool 
Baccarat 
Draw Poker 
Turtle Races 
Hi-Lo/Craps 



Electronics 1+2 
Electronics 3 + 4 s » 
Electronics 5 + 6 
Electronics 7 + 8 / 
\ Electronics 9 + 10 
Electronics 11 + 12 
Electronics 13 
Electronics 14 
Electronics 15 
Electronics 16 
Electronics 17 
Electronics 18 

#9 Coco 3 Only 

Paint Coco 3 



/ I \ 



\ i / 

_ *Ag^f y Convert Coco 3 
^ ' ^i/lss Demon's Castle 
^ . * ^ Function Keys — * 
/ / \ Bowling 3 
/ I \ Coco 3 * Coco 2 
Wizard 

Coco 3 Drawer 
H-Res Chess 
FYR-Draca 3 
Whammy 3 
Coco 3 Screen Print 




s 29 95 EACH SET 



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April 1989 THE RAINBOW 47 



— 



93j3 AN$=INKEY$ 
94J3 ON VAL (AN$ ) GOTO 1J3, 1090,152 

950 GOT093j3 
96J3 M=j3 
970 GOT012J3 

980 ' UPS TICKET PRINTER 
990 CLS 

1000 PRINT " ********* 
***•• 

1010 PRINT 
p *" 

1020 PRINT 
***•' 

1030 PRINT 
G$ 

1040 PRINT 
1050 PRINT 
1060 INPUT 
1070 INPUT 
1080 INPUT 
1090 CLS 
1100 PRINT 
1110 PRINT 



ii 



ii 



* UPS SLI 



********* 



"DATE SHIPPED": INPUT 

"NAME" : INPUT N$ 
"ADDRESS": INPUT A$ 
"CITY";C$ 
"STATE" ;W$ 
"ZIP" ;Z$ 

"VALUE": INPUT V$ 
"PACKAGE CONTENTS": IN 



PUT P$ 

1120 PRINT: PRINT" 
RINTER" 

113J3 PRINT: PRINT" 

EN READY 

1140 AN$=INKEY$ 



PREPARE P 



PRESS <P> WH 



1150 IF AN$="P" GOTO 1170 
1160 GOTO 1140 

1170 PRINT #-2, "DAVID'S PRESS 

";G$ 



1180 PRINT#-2 



1190 PRINT#-2 



II II 
II II 
II 

II II 
II 



1200 PRINT#-2 
1210 PRINT#-2 
1220 PRINT#-2 
1230 PRINT#-2 
1240 PRINT#-2 
1250 PRINT#-2 
1260 PRINT#-2 
1270 PRINT#-2 
1280 PRINT#-2 
1290 PRINT#-2 
1300 PRINT#-2 
1310 CLS 

1320 PRINT: PRINT 
1330 PRINT" 
PS SLIPS" 
13 40 PRINT" 
NU" 

1350 PRINT" 
KAGE LABEL" 
13 60 PRINT" 
1370 PRINT: PRINT" 
>?» 



"85 GLENWOOD BLVD. 



"HUDSON, NY 12534 



it it 
ii ii 

N$ 
A$ 
C$;" 

II II 



";W$;" ";Z$ 



";v$ 



";P$ 



<1> PRINT MORE U 

<2> RETURN TO ME 

<3> GO ON TO PAC 

<4> QUIT" 

<YOUR CHOICE 




"Level II Patch for Profile" (Letters To The Editor, 
February 1989, Page 6): The first patch file listed in 
the letter should be titled PROPATCH. Also, insert the 
Line c 0a e4 27 between the second and third existing 
lines. The second listing should be called MGTPATCK 
Finally, in the command lines section, you should 
insert the command line modpatch mgtpatch just 
after load mgt; 



1 ' 



"Program a RAM Disk" (January 1989, Page 110:) 

The following changes to RRMDI5K (Listing I) will 
allow the use of the 40-and 80-column screens. 



"For the Love of Gold" (December 1988, Page 
58): The line numbers from 100 on in PRDS1 and 
PR0S2 are numbered incorrectly. Instead of by tens, 
they should increment by one. The best way to correct 
the problem is to type each program as is. Then 
renumber them by entering RENUM 100,100,;!. 

"All the Right Moves" (December 1988, Page 116.): 

Table 1 incorrectly states that Line 49 optionally 
deletes Line 48. This should read that Line 49 
optionally deletes lines 0 through 48. 



60 CLEAR 300,&H?DFF 

171 INPIJT"D0 YOU MRNT TO USE 40/ 

80 COLUMNS (V/N)";R$ 

$72 IF R$0"Y" THEN 1B0 

173 DSKI$ B,17,2,R$,8$ 

174 MID$(R$,54,2 )=STRI NB$(2, 0| 

175 DSI<0$ B,17,2,R$,8$ 



For quicker reference, Corrections will be posted on 
Delphi as soon as they are available in the Info on 
Rainbow topic area of the database. Just type DftTR 
at the CoCo SIG> prompt and INFO at the TOPIO 
prompt. 



48 THE RAINBOW April 1989 



138j3 AN$=INKEY$ 

139J3 ON VAL(AN$) GOTO 980,10,152 
0, 180)3 

1400 GOTO 13 80 

1410 • DAVID'S PRESS MAILING LAB 
EL 

1420 CLS 

1430 PRINT: PRINT 

1440 PRINT " ******************* 
************* 

1450 PRINT " * DAVID'S PRESS MAI 
LING LABEL*" 

1460 PRINT " ******************* 
***********" 

1470 INPUT "NAME" ;N$ 
1480 INPUT "ADDRESS" ;A$ 
1490 INPUT "CITY";C$ 
1500 INPUT "STATE" ;W$ 
1510 INPUT "ZIP";Z$ 
1520 CLS 

1530 PRINT: PRINT" PREPARE PR 

INTER" 

1540 PRINT" PRESS <P> WHEN RE 
ADY" 

1550 AN$=INKEY$ 

1560 IF AN$="P"GOTO1580 ELSE 155 
0 

1570 GOTO1550 

1580 PRINT#-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(14) 7 
" DAVID'S PRESS" 
1590 PRINT#-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(28) 
1600 PRINT#-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(15) ; 
" 85 Glenwood Blvd. Hudson, 

NY 12534" 
1610 PRINT#-2,'»" 

1620 PRINT#-2," 



ii 



1630 PRINT#-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(54) 
1640 PRINT#-2,"" 
1650 PRINT#-2,"" 

1660 PRINT#-2," TO: ";N$ 

1670 PRINT#-2," ";A$ 
1680 PRINT#-2," ";C$; 

", ";W$;" ";Z$ 

1690 PRINT#-2,"" 
1700 PRINT#-2,"" 
1710 CLS 

1720 PRINT: PRINT 

1730 PRINT" <1> PRINT MORE L 

ABELS" 

1740 PRINT" <2> RETURN TO ME 

NU" 

1750 PRINT" <3> QUIT" 

1760 PRINT: PRINT" <YOUR CHOICE 

>?" 

1770 AN$=INKEY$ 

1780 ON VAL(AN$) GOTO 1410,10,18 
00 

1790 GOTO 1770 

1800 END /» 



VIP Writer 1.1 

RATED "BEST" IN SEPT '88 "RAINBOW" 

VIP Writer has all the features of VIP Writer III described elsewhere in this 
magazine except the screen widths are 32, 51 , 64 & 85. Screen cofors are black, 
green & white, double clock speed is not supported, Spooler and menus are 
unavailable because of memory limitations. Even so, VIP Writer is the BEST word 
processor for the CoCo 1 & 21 Version 1.1 includes the configuration program 
and RGB Hard Disk support. Includes VIP Speller 1.1 DISK $69.95 

Available through Radio Shack Express Order Cat. #90-141 

Writer owners: upgrade to Writer 1 .1 for $20 + $3 S/H. Send only original disk and $23 total. 



VIP Speller 1.1 

INCLUDES 50,000 WORD DICTIONARY 

VIP Speller works with ANY ASCII file created by most popular word processors - 
even Telewriter 64. It automatically checks text files for words to be corrected, 
marked for special attention or even added to the 50,000 word Dictionary. You 
can even view the word in context. Words can be added to or deleted from the 
dictionary or you can create your own dictionary I New features of version 1 .1 are 
FASTER and more reliable disk access and printing at 9600 baud. DISK $34.95 
Spelter owners: upgrade to Speller 1 .1 tor $10 + $3 S/H. Send original disk and $13 Total. 



VIP Calc 1.1 



"MORE USEABLE FEATURES" FEB. 1985 "RAINBOW" 

VIP Calc has all the features of VIP Calc III described elsewhere in this magazine 
except the screen widths are 32, 51, 64 & 85. Screen colors are black, green and 
white, double clock speed and Spooler are not supported. Even so, VIP Calc is the 
most complete calc for the CoCo 1 & 2! Version 1 .1 has faster and more reliable 
disk access and improved display speed. DISK $59.95 

Calc owners: upgrade to Calc 1.1 for $10 + $3 S/H. Send only original disk and $13 total. 



VIP Database 1.1 

"ONE OF THE BEST" JUL '84 "RAINBOW" 

VIP Database has all the features of VIP Database III described elsewhere in this 
magazine except the screen widths are 51 , 64 & 85. Screen colors are black, 

green and white, double clock speed and Spooler are not supported. Even so, VIP 
latabase is the most complete database for the CoCo 1 & 21 Version 1 .1 has 
faster and more reliable disk access and single spaced reports. D ISK $49.95 
Database owners: upgrade to Database 1 .1 for $1 0 + $3 S/H. Send only disk and $1 3 total. 



VIP Disk-ZAP 1.1 

RAVED ABOUT IN THE APRIL 1983 "RAINBOW" 

Now you can retrieve lost data on any disk. VIP Disk-Zap is the ultimate repair 
utility for repair of most disk errors. VIP Disk-Zap verifies diskettes, reads and 
writes any sector and lets you retrieve all types of bashed text files, BASIC and 
ML programs. VIP Disk-Zap includes an informative 50 page tutorial manual. 
New features of version 1 .1 are FASTER and more RELIABLE disk access and 
printing at up to 9600 BAUD. DISK $24.95 

Disk-Zap owners: upgrade to Disk-Zap 1.1 for $10 + $3 S/H. Send original disk and $13 Total 



VIP Terminal 



RATED BEST IN JANUARY 1984 "RAINBOW" 

For your important communications needs you've got to go beyond software that 
only lets you chaL You need a smart terminal so that you can send and receive 
programs and messages and print them! The VIP Terminal features 32, 51 , 64 or 
85 characters by 21 or 24 lines on the screen and has a 43K byte buffer to store 
information. DISK $29.95 



VIP Integrated Library 

Outperforms ALL OTHER Integrated programs! 

The VIP Integrated Library 1.2 combines all six popular VIP 
programs - Writer 1.1, Speller 1.1, Calc 1.1, Database 1.1, 
Terminal and Disk-Zap 1.1 - into one program on one disk. The 
program is called VIP Desktop. From the desktop you have 
instant access to word processing with a spelling checker 
always in attendance, data management with mail merge, 
spreadsheet financial analysis, telecommunications and disk 
maintenance. 64K required. DISK $1 49.95 

Available through Radio Shack Express Order Cat. #90-213. 
VIP Library orders add $4 S/H USA, $5 Canada & $10 Foreign 

VIP Integrated Library owners: upgrade to the VIP Integrated Library 
1 .2 for $45 + $3 S/H. Send only ORIGINAL disk and $48 total. 



SD ENTERPRISES 

(503) 663-2865 P.O. Box 1233. Gresham, OR 97030 

We accept VISA / MASTERCARD and C.O.D. orders by phone. 
Non Library orders add $3 S/H in USA, $4 Canada, $6 Foreign. COD orders 
add an additional $2.75. Personal checks allow 3 weeks for delivery. 



April 1989 THE RAINBOW 49 



New users frequently ask, "Can I run 
PC-compatible software on my CoCo?" 
While that might be nice in some cases, 
it is not practical to attempt to run PC 
programs on a CoCo. 

The problem is that the CoCo uses a 
6809 processor while the PC uses an 
8088, 8086, 80286 or 80386 processor. 
These microprocessors use totally dif- 
ferent instruction sets that cannot be 
translated easily. There are no magic 
peeks or pokes to remedy the situation, 
either. While conversions are theoreti- 
cally possible, the resulting emulation 
would be much slower than the corre- 
sponding software running on a PC. 

If source code for a particular pro- 
gram is available, it may be possible to 
recompile or reassemble the code on the 
CoCo in order to produce a usable 
program. However, this is rarely the 
case except in the area of OS-9 software, 
where UNIX utilities are frequently 
available and modifiable for the CoCo. 

Actually, many BASIC programs can 
be converted to run on the CoCo if you 
are sufficiently determined. BASIC pro- 
grams in ASCII format can be ported 
over from one machine to another, 
where the necessary modifications may 
be made. Machine-language utilities 
have been available for the Radio Shack 
Models I, II and III to enable MS-DOS 
BASIC programs to be passed between 
the two machines with the necessary 
conversions made automatically How- 
ever, I know of no such utilities for the 
CoCo or MS-DOS machines. 

Naturally, text files may be freely 
transferred between the two computer 
types with no modifications. It's usually 
only in binary programs that problems 
arise. 

New Forum Software 

The forum has been modified to 
support the following new features: 

• New qualifiers since and BEFORE 
apply on the directory and rerd com- 
mands. You can now enter a command 
such as RERD SINCE DEC 5 to read mes- 
sages starting with December 5. The 
syntax of all RERD and directory qual- 

Dori Hutchison is an electrical engineer 
and lives in Atlanta, Georgia. He works 
as a senior project engineer involved in 
the design of industrial control systems. 
On Delphi, Don is the Database Man- 
ager of the rainbow CoCo SIG. His 
Delphi username is DONHUTCHISON. 



What's new on Delphi 



CoCo 

DOS? 



By Don Hutchison 

CoCo SIG Database Manager 



ifiers has been relaxed so that they can 
begin with a slash mark (/) and have an 
equal sign (=) before values. This way, 
a command such as DIR/5IN=5-DEC 
works just as it does in Mail, and does 

RERD/NEW 

• If a user has only one accessible topic 
in the forum, the prompt for the topic 
in which to save a new message is 
skipped. 

• The default addressee of a message is 
now shown at the To: prompt enclosed 



in brackets. This change makes it easier 
and faster to reply to a forum message. 

• More characters are displayed in the 
subject field of a message in a directory 
display. 

2400-bps Access 

When accessing Delphi via 2400 bps 
and Telenet, be sure to press the "at" 
(@) symbol and ENTER when your 
modem connects to Telenet. You will 
have to type this command blindly since 
it won't be echoed back to you, but 
you'll be able to see everything that 
follows. 

Also be sure you access Telenet using 
the correct local access number for 
2400-bps service. Otherwise you will not 
be able to connect with the service. As 
usual, there is no surcharge for 2400-bps 
service while on Delphi. 

GETerm Version 2.5 

Great news! Version 2.5 of the pop- 
ular terminal program GETerm is now 
available in the Utilities topic of the 
CoCo SIG's database. This version of 
GETerm is very similar to the one many 
have used before. A few bugs have been 
fixed and a few new features have been 
added, such as: 

• 2400-bps support for the CoCo 3's 
serial port 

• 9600-bps support for the RS232 Pak 

• Y- and Xmodem-CRC protocols 



Database Report 



Even as we begin to think about nice 
weather and getting outside again, we're 
still very busy and active on the CoCo 
SIG. Here's some of the new material 
people have provided for us this past 
month. 

OS-9 Online 

In the Utilities topic of the database, 
Jim Hickle (JIMHICKLE) sent us a new 
copy utility, Ronald Cliborne (CO- 
CORON) uploaded a directory utility. 
Zack Sessions (ZACKSESSIONS) posted 
a C program for use with a RAM disk. 
Marc Genois (MARCGENOIS) posted a 
disk ID-changer utility. Roger Krupski 
(HARDWAREHACK) uploaded his 
palette program. 

The Patches topic included Chris- 
topher Burke (COCOXT), who uploaded 



several Utilities for RSB users, mostly 
concerned with better cursor positioning 
and joystick response. 

In the Telcom topic, Rick Adams 
(RICK ADAMS) uploaded a graphics 
interface for the popular Delphi Othello- 
like game, Fliplt. Rick's program pro- 
vides a joystick interface with the game. 
Originally programmed by Dan Bruns, 
president of Delphi, it was demonstrated 
at the Princeton RAINBOWfest. 

In the Graphics & Music topic, I 
(DONHUTCHISON) uploaded the pic- 
tures from the February CoCo Gallery. 
Glen Hathaway (HATHAWAY) posted his 
program MTMIDL Steve Clark (STE- 
VECLARK) uploaded Version 2 of his 
analog clock program. Mark O'Pella 
(MDODELPHI) uploaded his collection 
of Christmas-related items. 



50 THE RAINBOW April 1989 



• Direct to/ from disk Xmodem and 
Ymodem file transfers 

• longer macros 

• definable filter characters 



Greg Miller, the program's author, 
offers a configuration program for a 
small ($15 to $20) contribution toward 
his college fund. The configuration 
program isn't required since the user 
may always change his terminal pa- 
rameters by following the built-in 
menus, but Greg offers the program for 
the convenience of those who want 
theirs to be the default values. 

Many users have begun using Ymo- 
dem file transfers because they are 
generally faster than Xmodem. (This is 
not the case if you are plagued with 
noisy phone lines, however.) To achieve 
its faster transfer speeds, Ymodem relies 
on larger block sizes, or chunks of data. 
Where Xmodem would send data to 
your CoCo in 128-byte chunks, Ymo- 
dem sends the data in 1024-byte blocks. 
It is this reduction in the amount of 
communications overhead between the 
blocks that makes Ymodem generally 
faster than Xmodem. If you consis- 
tently experience retries with Ymodem, 
though, it's unlikely that the transfer 
time will be decreased — telephone line 
noise is the usual culprit. In this case, 
it's probably best to stick with Xmo- 
dem, and I might even recommend 



Xmodem-CRC because of its greater 
error-detection capablities. 

To initiate a Ymodem transfer from 
Delphi, enter GETerm's Terminal 
mode, then press CTRL-? to display the 
menu of options. Relevant commands 
for new file transfer methods are: 



CTRL-7 

CTRL-8 
CTRL-9 



Ymodem/Xmodem to 
disk 

Ymodem from disk 
Xmodem from disk 



To start a Ymodem transfer from 
Delphi, enter YM at the Action prompt 
in the database; to use Xmodem pro- 
tocol, enter XM. (Delphi automatically 
determines if your terminal program 
wants checksums or CRC error- 
checking.) Then issue the appropriate 
control-key command from the table 
above when Delphi says, "OK, Re- 
ceive!" and you're on your way. 

By the way, after the initial Ymodem 
transfer Delphi asks if you want to 
make Ymodem your default file- 
transfer method. If you enter yes, 
Delphi saves this parameter in your 
profile. Simply typing DOW at the Action 
prompt in the future will automatically 
initiate your file transfer in Ymodem 
protocol. 

Delphi and Linefeeds 

Several readers have written regard- 
ing a funny-looking letter at the start of 



each line in their buffer after they 
complete a download. That phenom- 
enon is caused by linefeeds being sent 
to you from Delphi. Most computers 
need linefeeds, but our CoCo is one 
computer that doesnt. In our case, it's 
okay to tell Delphi not to send them to 
you. You can do that by entering /DOW 
CAR at any prompt except the Mail 
prompt. That tells Delphi to skip send- 
ing the linefeeds to you, and from then 
on you'll receive downloads with only 
carriage returns at line endings. Enter / 
SAVE to make the change to your default 
setting. 

Download Counts 

The database software in the CoCo 
SIG also contains the facility for dis- 
playing what's called a download count. 
The download count is simply a count 
of the number of times a program or file 
has been downloaded. If you upload a 
program to the database, the download 
count is also a measure of how popular 
your program has been with SIG 
members. The download count is dis- 
played in the field labeled Count; youll 
see it whenever you read a description 
in the database. Frequent uploaders are 
always proud to be able to watch their 
programs' download counts grow. 

That's about it for this month. We on 
the Rainbow CoCo SIG hope you'll join 
us in the fun and excitement online on 
Delphi! □ 



The Programmers Den topic gave us 
Mike Stute (GRIDBUG), who posted 
Volume J of his Hitch Hiker *s Guide to C, 
Ken Heist (MKJ) also posted his C 
tutorial. 

CoCo SIG 

In CoCo 3 Graphics I uploaded the 
pictures from the January and February 
CoCo Galleries. Dan Shargel (TRI- 
UMPH) posted a 1989 calendar for us. 
Richard Trasborg (TRAS) posted an 
outstanding picture of Santa's daughter 
as drawn by Mike Trammell. Ronald 
Roden (TREKKER) uploaded three fa- 
vorite pictures of the Enterprise, Robert 
Combs (ROBCOMBS) sent us a line- 
drawing program. Mike Stute posted a 
cynical cartoon called "Nicky the 
Mouse." Josh Alkire (HEYDUDE) up- 
loaded several Macintosh pictures. Bob 
Workman (BOBWORKMAN) uploaded a 
screen dump for the DMP-1 10 and Max- 
10. Brian White (BRIANWHITE) posted 



more information about Max-10. John 
Malon (JOHNLM) uploaded several fine 
pictures in GIF format. 

The Utilities & Applications topic 
included Dave Leebrick (TWINSDAD- 
TOO), who uploaded a tax program for 
1988. Matthew Hunt (MATTHE WHUNT) 
posted his Hi-Res screen designer pro- 
gram. Pierre Salvail (PSALVAIL) up- 
loaded a directory utility program. Ro- 
bert Louden (KURSE) posted his 
colorization system. John Borowski 
(ROKO) posted a program for generating 
random passwords. Merle Kemmerly 
(TOOK3) uploaded an FDOS program, 
while Eric Parish (ERICPAR) provided a 
"fish 6 n' sharks" game and a revision to 
his Sky and Planets program. Don Jer- 
eczek (DONJERE) gave us a financial 
calculator, and Donald Schmitz 
(DNSCHMITZ) provided a way to use the 
DMP-130 in IBM mode, as well as some 
of his favorite electronics programs. 

In the Games topic, Matthew Hunt 
posted a Warrior King patch. Bruce Bell 



(BRUCEBELL) gave us Volume 1 of his 
Puzzlemania series. Eric Parish uploaded 
four of his favorite games, including his 
popular checker game. 

In Classic Graphics, I uploaded the 
pictures from the January CoCo Gallery. 
George McCashin (GMCC) posted a 
screen dump program. Chuck Wiltgen 
(ROGERRABBIT) uploaded Pro- Draw, a 
BASIC graphics editor. 

From Music & Sound come George 
Hoffman (HOFFBERGER), who posted 
his favorite Lyra songs, and Don Jerec- 
zek, who uploaded several Christmas 
songs. Ken Furlow (SAPPHIRE2) also 
posted a Christmas Musica collection. 

In Telecommunications Bill Haesslein 
(BILLH) uploaded a GETerm parameter 
loader program. Tom Taylor (TOMMIE- 
TAYLOR) posted the StarBBS package 
for you future SysOps. 

As you can see, we have some out- 
standing new software in the database. 
Join us online on Delphi and get in on 
the fun! ^ 



April 1989 THE RAINBOW 51 



Now I know I wrote it down 
somewhere 



Make a Note 

of It 



By William Souser 



/5% 



** 



* 



** 



** 



1 v 



vest 



** 



**■ 



•Kb* 



1 ver make a note to yourself as a 
reminder, only to find later that 

iyou've forgotten where you put 
it? That's what happens when you jot 
those phone messages down on the 
corners of napkins and dry-cleaning 
receipts. 

Here's a program that lets you print 
telephone message notepaper so per- 
haps youH be less prone to pitch that 
important note informing you where to 
pick up the lottery money, or to realize 
that you wiped up Mikey's milk with the 
note stating the tax auditor's date of 
arrival. 

CallMemo was created using a CoCo 
2, disk drive, and a DMP-105 printer. 
Line 130 sets the printer rate to 2400 
baud. It can be changed, however, to 
suit your printer. The printer controls, 
prefaced by CHR$(27] are: CHR$(14), 
expanded on; CHR$(15), expanded off; 
CHR$(20), compressed; and DHR$fl9|, 
return to standard. 

After the title screen, the program 
prompts for number of copies per page 
and asks how many pages you want 
printed. After you answer the prompt, 
it prints the number of pages asked for. 

(Questions or comments regarding 
this program may be directed to the 
author at 13 E Hillside Rd., Greenbelu 
MD 20770. Please enclose an SASE 
when requesting a reply.) □ 

William Souser is a 57-year-old self- 
taught BASIC programmer. 



52 THE RAINBOW April 1989 



The Listing: CRLLMEMO 



0 1 COPYRIGHT 1989 FALSOFT , INC 

10 CLS4 : PRINT® 13 5 , " 
ii • 



20 PRINTS 167.^" 



ii 



30 PRINTS 19 9 , " 



CALL MEMO 
BY 



ii 



40 PRINTS 2 31, 11 WILLIAM SOUSER 



ii 



50 PRINTS263," 



ii 



60 PRINTS 2 9 5," 
ii . 

70 PRINTS327," 
ii . 



COPYRIGHT 
NOV. ,1988 



80 ' * * 

90 * ***************;*** 

100 FOR 1=1 TO 2500:NEXTI 
110 CLS:PRINTS165, "THIS PRINTS F 
OUR CALL" ; PRINTS 200, "MEMOS TO A 
PAGE . " 

120 PRINTS261, "HOW MANY PAGES DO 
YOU": PRINTS 2 9 6, "WANT TO PRINT"; 
: INPUTA 

130 POKE150,18 

140 A$=STRING$(37,42) :B$=STRING$ 
(37,45) 

150 FOR H=l TO A 
160 F0RI=1T02 

170 PRINT#-2:PRINT#-2,CHR$(27) ;C 
HR$ (14) ;TAB(7) "CALL MEMO 

CALL MEMO":PRINT#-2,CHR$(27 
) ;CHR$(15) 

180 GOSUB 340:PRINT#-2,"TO 



TO":GOSUB350 
190 PRINT #-2, "FROM 



FROM" : GO 



) 

TEL. NO ( 
"!GOS 



SUB 3 50 

200 PRINT#-2,"TEL.NO. ( 

EXT. 

) EXT, 
UB340 

2 10 PRINT#-2,CHR$ (27 ) ; CHR$ ( 20 ) "U 
RGENT CALLE 
D-NO MESSAGE 
URGENT 

CALLED-NO MESSAGE" 
220 PRINT #-2, "PLEASE CALL 

WILL CALL LATER 

PLEASE CALL 
WILL CALL 



LATER" 

230 PRINT# -2, "RETURNED YOUR CALL 

WAS HERE 

RETURNED YOU 
R CALL WAS HERE" ; 

:PRINT| -2, CHR$ ( 27) ; CHR$ (19) 
240 GOSUB340 

250 PRINT#-2 ,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(20) "R 
ED'D BY DATE 

TIME 
REC'D BY 
DATE TIME"; : PRINT #-2 

,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(19) 
260 GOSUB340 

270 FOR J-1TO 8:PRINT#-2:GOSUB35 

0:NEXTJ 

2«p PRINT #-2 

290 NEXT I 

300 NEXT H 

3 10 PRINT #-2 , CHR$ ( 27) ; CHR$ ( 19 ) 
320 END' 

330 REM PRINT SUB ROUTINES 

340 PRINT#-2,A$" " A$ : RETURN 

350 PRINT#-2,B$" "B$: RETURN 



0S9 POWER 0S9 POWER OS9 POWER OS9 POWER 0S9 POWER 
Move into the Forefront of Power with 4M0ST! 



Release the full potential of 0S9! Imagine being 
able to use WILDCARDS on any command line. This 
is only one of the benefits you will enjoy with 
our professional shell. You get four powerful 
programs designed to make using 0S9 Level I and 
Level II even easier! 

SHELL 

Replaces existing shell. Wildcard substitution *anywhere* 
in the pathlist - works with existing programs! Pass 
parameters to procedure files. Includes more built-in 
shel 1 commands. 



COPY 

More versatile than old copy command, 
files to a directory . Sort filesi 
files, or copy only newest versions. 



Copy one or more 
overwr i te existing 



MOVE 

Reorganize your files. Uses same options 
Optimized for speed! Also replaces OS? RENAfE. 



as COPY. 



PRINT 

Get neat, organized printouts every time' Provides headers 
with date and time ! numbered pages ; set length , width , 
margins , and title . Complete control of all features! 

Get 4M0ST ! - ONLY *24.95 US < +*2 shipping). 
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0S9 POWER OS9 POWER 0S9 POWER OS9 POWER 0S9 POWER 



April 1989 THE RAINBOW 53 



1 CoCo Consultation s 



] 



Torn Apart 

I'm having trouble connecting an 
Atari brand RGB analog monitor to the 
CoCo 3. / paid a commercial cable 
maker to devise a cable that would solve 
the problem, but instead, the image was 
shifted to the lower-right section of the 
Lo-Res screen, and unreadably torn 
apart when I selected a 40-or 80-column 
Hi-Res screen. 

Lonnie McClure 
Chattanooga, Tennessee 

The problem is that while the R,G 
and B lines going to the Atari monitor 
accept the same signal as that produced 
by the CoCo 3, the horizontal and 
vertical sync signals expected by the 
Atari monitor are supposed to be neg- 
ative (down-going), but the CoCo is 
sending positive (up-going) H and V 
sync signals. You must invert both the 
H and V sync signals as they come out 
of the CoCo 3 before sending them to 
the H and V sync pins of the Atari 
monitor's input. 

I recently made such a cable for 
Lonnie. In order to obtain a source of 
+5 volts to power the inverter gate used 
to invert the H and V sync signals, a 
minor internal modification in the 
CoCo 3 was required, but after that 
mod was made, the cable worked per- 
fectly and produced an excellent image 
on the Atari monitor. 

The Great Pretender 

/ noticed that there are both 720K 
and 1.44 Meg capacity 3 l /2-inch drives 
advertised in various computer equip- 
ment magazines. The price difference 
between them is small . . . often as little 
as $20. Can you advise me whether I 
should get the 1.44 Meg variety or the 
720 K variety? 

Chuck Cilgen 

(ROGERRABBIT) 

Dubuque, Iowa 

Martin H. Goodman, M.D., a physi- 
cian trained in anesthesiology, is a 
longtime electronics tinkerer and out- 
spoken commentator — sort of the 
Howard Cosell of the CoCo world. On 
Delphi, Marty is the SIGop of rain- 
bow's CoCo SIG and database man- 
ager of OS-9 Online. His non-computer 
passions include running, mountaineer- 
ing and outdoor photography. Marty 
lives in San Pablo, California. 




By Marty Goodman 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 



As long as the costs are comparable, 
Fd say buy the 1.44 Meg variety. Note, 
however, that you will not be able to use 
them as 1.44 Meg drives if you are 
hooked up to a normal Radio Shack 
disk controller. You can use the 1.44 
Meg drives as if they are 720K drives, 
and use them with the less expensive 
720K-capable diskettes. The 1.44 Meg 
drives will behave as if they are 720K 
drives, without compatibility problems. 

A single pin on the drive's connector 
is tied to the ground to put the drive into 
"720K mode." (The pin is usually auto- 
matically grounded when hooking up 
an ordinary controller and cable.) Only 
the Frank Hogg Labs Deluxe System 
(engineered by Bruce Isted) will support 
the use of 1.44 Meg drives as 1.44 Meg 
drives. But the system can be used only 
under OS-9 because the floppy- 
controller portion of the system will not 
support Radio Shack Disk BASIC. 

Down the line the 1.44 Meg-type 
drives will have a considerably greater 
resale value, and will be more useable 
with the current and future crop of MS- 
DOS engines. 

Used and Cheap is Best Bet 

/ would like to buy one or more 
floppy-disk drives for my CoCo 3 that 
can read the standard 35-track single- 
sided format but offer double-sided 40- 



or possibly 80-track capability. I'm 
interested in using them under OS-9. 
What do you suggest? 

Dave Took 

(DA VIDZ) 

Chicago, Illinois 

You obviously are asking about Sc- 
inch size floppies. All 360K (40-track, 
double-sided, 48-track per inch, 514- 
inch size) "IBM-style" floppies are 
totally "backward compatible" with the 
obsolete CoCo 35-track single-sided 
formats. This compatibility extends to 
both reads and writes. 

When you go to 80-track (96 TPI 
variety) drives, the picture gets more 
complicated. There are two completely 
different types of 80-track 5!4-inch 
drives. The first is the 720K capacity 80- 
track drive. It was used under some of 
the last CPM systems made, and by the 
Tandy 2000 and some other machines. 
It is not a standard drive in the current 
MS-DOS engine world. Most are sold 
used and are very inexpensive. The 
drive is used by some CoCo OS-9 users 
because it works nicely with standard 
Radio Shack type controllers (Radio 
Shack, HDS, J&M, Disto, etc.). These 
drives, when driven by proper software, 
have no trouble reading disks written 
with 40- or 35-track drives. However, 
they cannot reliably write to a disk 
formatted or written by a 35- or 40- 
track drive. Attempting it risks destroy- 
ing the information on the disk. Also, 
because many programs and operating 
systems do a lot of writing to disk 
automatically, you need to put write 
protect tabs on any 40-track diskette 
you plan to read using an 80-track drive. 
Note that the 80-track, 5!4-inch drive I 
am discussing is electronically the same 
as the (now industry standard) 80-track, 
720K, 3 l / 2 -inch disk drives. 

The current industry standard in the 
MS-DOS engine world for 514-inch, 80- 
track drives is the AT style 1.2 Meg 
capacity drive. This drive is of no use 
to you because it cannot operate with 
ordinary Radio Shack style controllers. 
AT style is more similar in design with 
double-sided 8-inch drives than with 
other 5 l /4-inch or 3i4-inch type drives. 
They even rotate at a different speed 
from other 5 Va -inch drives. 

At the Flick of a Switch 

I have a Tandy lOOOEXanda CoCo 
3 hooked to the same DWP-230 printer. 



54 



THE RAINBOW April 1989 



The 1000EX hooks to the parallel 
printer port and the CoCo to the serial 
printer port When the Co Co is hooked 
up, I can still use the 1000EX just fine, 
but when the cable from the 1000EX is 
hooked up, the serial port will not work. 
Is there a hardware or software fix for 
this? 

Also what is meant by the term head- 
banging on disk drives? 

Dan Weaver 
Amsterdam, New York 

The only fix I know of is a hardware 
one. Buy an A/ B printer switch box and 
a spare cable to hook the output of one 
side of the box to your printer. These 
sell for $25-$50 at stores that vend IBM 
PC / MS-DOS engine accessories. Be 
sure to buy the box and the cable at the 
same time, and get connectors on the 
cable to match the box and the printer. 
With the switch box you can disconnect 
your parallel port cable at the flick of 
a switch. 

Headbanging refers to a bug in code 
in Microsoft's Disk BASIC, resulting in 
the disk drive's head "getting lost" and 
slamming into its stops each time you 
access the disk after a power up or a cold 
start. The cause is a simple error in the 
Disk BASIC code. Several people, in- 
cluding myself, wrote Tandy about it 
when Disk BASIC 1.0 was released but 
Tandy refused to acknowledge that 
there was a problem. 

Art Flexser solves the problem in his 
enhanced Disk BASIC ADOS product. 
Repeated slamming of the head into the 
stops can damage some drives. The 
manufacturer's specifications on some 
makes of disk drive explicitly warn 
software writers of this danger. The only 
proper fix for the head-banging bug in 
Disk BASIC involves buring an EPROM 
with a modified Disk BASIC code that 
automatically forces a return to track 
zero whenever the drive is accessed after 
a cold start or power up. 

For Tinkerers Only 

/ have a Seikosha serial printer de- 
signed for a Commodore computer. It 
has a six-pin DIN connector on it. Can 
I hook it to my Co Co 3? 

Salvador Flores 
Yauco, Puerto Rico 

If you are a hardware tinkerer you 
may succeed in making the hook-up. 
Commodore type serial ports are differ- 
ent from industry standard RS-232 
ports in several respects. You need to 
make up a circuit board using 1488 and 



1489 chips powered by a three voltage 
power supply (+12, -12, and +5 volts) to 
do level conversion from the 0 to 5 volt 
TTL signal levels sent and expected by 
the Commodore type serial port to the 
+ 12 / -12 volt levels expected by the 
(industry standard) RS-232 type port 
on the CoCo. 

Modify Those Modifications! 

I'd like to modify your program in the 
June 1986 Rainbow for MS-DOS to 
CoCo conversion to support double- 
sided drives and sub-directories on the 
MS-DOS disk. Can you help? 

Carey Bloodworth 
Swink, Oklahoma 

Vm afraid the project amounts to a 
nearly total rewrite of my program, and 
would take tens (possibly hundreds) of 
hours of skilled programming time. My 
advice to you is to forget about doing 
that unless you are planning to market 
it as a commercial product, and instead 
do one of the following: 

(a) Buy CoCo Util or Xenocopy from 
Microcom. These two programs run on 
an MS-DOS machine and provide for 
conversion to or from CoCo type Disk 
BASIC disks. Xenocopy also supports 
over 300 other alien formats. 

(b) Use serial communications to 
transfer the files. Put the two machines 
side by side and send the files in ques- 
tion from one to the other using com- 
munication programs on both machines 
and Xmodem and a null modem cable, 
or if the machines are not in the same 
place, use a telephone line to upload the 
files in question to your Delphi work 
space, then download them with the 
other computer. (Another option is to 
have a person on each machine,using 
modems, linking the two machines over 
the phone line and transfering the file 
using Xmodem.) 

Mix and Match 

(1) Can I put a half-height hard drive 
into the same case with a floppy drive? 

(2) Can I partition a hard drive so 
that I can use it with both Radio Shack 
Disk BASIC and with OS-9? 

(3) Does ADOS-3 allow me to use 
both 80- and 40-track drives in the same 
system? 

Larry Harris 
Clemson, South Carolina 

(1) A half-height hard drive will 
physically fit in the same case with a 
half-height floppy, but the problem is 



the power supply. Hard drives usually 
require considerably more power, espe- 
cially in the first few seconds,than is 
required by a floppy drive. Most floppy 
drive power supplies are unable to 
operate hard drives, so unless the power 
supply you are using is designed for the 
load of a hard drive during start up, it 
will not work. Either the drive will not 
function, or it will not work reliably, or 
the power supply will eventually over- 
heat and burn out. 

(2) In an extensive article about hard 
drive systems, published in the March 
1989 issue of RAINBOW, I describe in 
some detail the support of Disk BASIC 
and OS-9 by various makers of hard- 
drive systems. Different hard-drive 
systems vary in handling the matter of 
putting Disk BASIC and OS-9 files on 
the same drives. Currently the software 
included in or sold as an option with the 
RGB, Burke and Burke, Disto and Owl- 
Ware systems allow you to make such 
partitions. Burke and Burke's Hyper-I/ 
O software for Color BASIC and RGB 
Computer Systems' Color basic soft- 
ware for hard-drive systems operate 
with a variety of different physical hard- 
drive set-ups, allowing one to mix and 
match. 

(3) ADOS-3 allows some support of 
40-track drives when configured as an 
80-track system. That is, if you hook a 
40-track drive to a system with ADOS- 
3 that is set up for 80-track drives, you 
can read data written on the disk by 
other 35- or 40-track drives. Be careful 
if writing to a disk that is nearly full; you 
may destroy data. Also, do not use this 
system to format 35- or 40-track disks, 
because the dskini command under an 
ADOS-3 system configured for 80- 
tracks will try to format a full 80-tracks, 
and when it gets beyond 36 or 42 tracks 
it will start slamming the drive head 
against its stops. Obviously this is not 
good for the drive. 

Your technical questions are wel- 
comed. Please address them to CoCo 
Consultations, the rainbow, P.O. Box 
385, Prospect, KY 40059. 

We reserve the right to publish only 
questions of general interest and to edit 
for brevity and clarity. Due to the large 
volume of mail we receive, we are unable 
to answer letters individually. 

Questions can also be sent to Marty 
through the Delphi CoCo SIG. From the 
CoCo SIG> prompt, pick Rainbow 
Magazine Services, then, at the RAIN- 
BOW> prompt, type ASK (for Ask the 
Experts) to arrive at the EXPERTS> 
prompt, where you can select the "CoCo 
Consultations" online form which has 
complete instructions. 



April 1989 THE RAINBOW 55 



Frank Hogg Laboratory 

Over 12 Years of Service, Support, and Friendly Help! 

SPRING SALE 










mmm 



From the workbench of Frank Hogg 

April 1989 
Dear Friend. 

Seven years ago, in April of 1 982, Reagan had been in 
office two years, and our first advertisement appeared in 
Rainbow! At that point, we had been in business for six 
years. Today, only three other companies from that issue 
still advertise in Rainbow: Computer Island, Computer Plus 
and Sugar Software. Many companies have come and gone 
in these past seven years, yet it seems like only yesterday 
to me. Here are some interesting facts. We have been in 
business as long or longer than any computer magazine 
published today! We have supported OS-9 longer than any 
other company. Many of you were not born when we started 
business in 1976! That makes me feel old! We are now 
approaching our 14th year of business, and I think the 
reason we're still here is because I love what I'm doing. I 
enjoy helping people with their problems. I feel that I am 
someone you can call when you need help, a question 
answered, or something for your computer. I'm surprised 
when people who call FHL with a problem are themselves 
surprised to find out it's often me they are talking to. I'm 
here if you need me, always happy to help a friend. 

Thank you for supporting us all these years. I'll continue 
working to bring you products that will make using your 
computer as fun and rewarding as it has been for me. 



Your Frii 



Frank Hogg* 



In the March 1 989 issue of Rainbow, Marty Goodman wrote a 
very good article on hard drive systems for the coco. Here is 
some of what he said about FHL. "Frank Hogg Laboratories 
has been selling hard-drive systems longer than any other 
RAINBOW advertiser", "FHL and Burke and Burke systems 
are twice as fast as all the other systems. " We've been 
selling systems with hard drives for almost 5 years. We sell 
Burke and Burke as well as our own system, The Eliminator, 
designed by Bruce Isted. With either of these two systems 
you have the best that money can buy. Remember, there are 
only two reasons to buy a hard drive: speed and mass 
storage. All the systems will give you the storage, only FHL 
will give you the speed. FHL will be there in the future if you 
need help, as we have been for almost 14 years. We will sell 
you the whole system or the smallest piece. We'll help you 
work with what you have and advise you on what's best for 
you. Remember, we're here to help. 



Hard Drive Systems/Kits/Pieces 



1 YEAR MANUFACTURES WARRANTY ON ALL SYSTEMS! 

Burke & Burke based kit includes: Burke & Burke (B&B) XT PC interface. Hard 
drive with controller, 3 foot ST506 cable set. Hard Drive Case with 60 watt 
power supply and fan. Includes OS9 LI and Lll software. 1 megabyte transfer 
in only 45 seconds!! Twice as fast as other systemsType ahead under OS9. (No 
halt) Complete instructions. Easy one evening assembly. 



April Special; 20 Meg Kit 
Complete ONLY 449.00 



20 Meg Kit Complete 
30 Meg Kit Complete 
40 Meg Kit Complete 
Assemble format & test any of the above add 
B&B OPTIONS: 

B&B Real Time Clock (add to above) 
B&B XT ROM Auto Boot from hard disk 
B&B Hyper I/O run DECB on hard drive 
B&B Hyper III Ramdisk/spooler for above 



4 0 8 .00 
548.00 
618.00 
50.00 

30.00 
19.95 
29.95 
19.95 



The Eliminator based kit includes Bruce Isted's new interface The Eliminator' 
the Western Digital WD 1002-05 high speed controller. Features; fastest system 
available, 1 megabyte transfer in only 37 seconds!! Twice as fast as other 
systems! Supports 4 floppy and 3 hard drives, type ahead (No halt) for both 
floppy and hard disk, auto boot OS9 L1 or L2 from hard or floppy disk, 2 serial 
ports, 1 parallel port and Real Time Clock socket. Hard drive with WD 
1002-05 controller, ST506 cable set, 3 foot 40 pin cable, Hard Drive Case with 
60 watt power supply and fan, OS9 software for LI and Lll with source, 
Complete instructions. Easy one evening assembly. 

20 Meg High Speed Kit Complete 799.00 

40 Meg High Speed Kit Complete 899.00 

70 Meg High Speed Kit Complete 1335.00 

Assemble format & Test any of the above add 60.00 
Eliminator OPTIONS: 

Real Time Clock chip 30.00 

Serial cable set (2 DB25) 30.00 

Parallel cable (Centronics) 30.00 

Floppy Cable Int & Ext 25.00 



Hard Drive Bits and Pieces 



The Eliminator Special 179.95 

See Eliminator OPTIONS also 

WD1 002-05 Controller 

B&B XT PC style interface 

B&B XT RTC interface w/clock/calendar 

See B&B OPTIONS also 

Hard Drive case with 60W P/S and Fan 



1 99.95 



199.95 
69.95 
99.95 

99.95 



SPECIFICATIONS: size 16" deep, 5.5" high, T wide. 60 Watt power supply with 3 
drive type power connectors, quiet 1 2 volt DC fan, LEO power indicator, color 
matches CoCo. Holds 2 1/2 height hard or floppy drives and has card guided space 
for a PCB the size of a drive (like the WD 1002-05 controller) 

FBU Fast Hard disk Back Up 75.00 
R.S.B. RS Disk Basic under OS9 39.95 

Floppy Drives (5.25" and 3.5" FLOPPY DISKS) 
TEAC High Quality Drives - 1 Year Warr. 
FD55B 360K 40 Track DS 5.25" 1 1 8.00 

FD55F 720K 80 Track DS 5.25: 1 51 .00 

FD35F 720K 80 Track DS 3.5" 1 47.00 

(Bare drives, requires case and power supply 



Frank Hogg Laboratory 

Over 12 Years of Service, Support, and Friendly Help! 

SPRING SALE 

\EW VERSION! 







Inside OS9 Level II 





The Book by Kevin Darling $39.96 






SPECIAL ONLY 19.95 




Are your tired of playing games with Level II? Do you want to find out whafs 
going on inside 0S9? This is the book for you! Over 200 pages of hints, kinks, 
bugs, source listings and much more. Written by the well known Compuserve 
SysOp, Kevin Darfing. 'Must reading' says Dale Puckett in Rainbow! 




1 

i 


START OS-9 





An Enjoyable, Hands-On Guide To 05-9 Level II 



$32.95 Book and Disk 



If you have OS-9 Level 2 or are thinking ofgetting it, this book and disk will get 
you started in an enjoyable way. It makes OS-9 fun. The disk contains utilities 
and tutorials that are worth the price alone. Now there is a reason to get OS-9 



DynaStar 



THE Most Popular OS-9 Word Processor! 

FEATURES: Best OS9 editor/word processor/text formatter, has everything you 
would expect and more, supports terminals and windows simultaneously, auto- 
configurable, auto-indent for C and Pascal programming, mail merge for form 
letters. Most popular word processor since 1982! Pop-up help menus that can 
be disabled. WordStar command style. Works with files larger than memory. 
Merge function. Block manipulation, mark, move, copy, delete, read from disk, 
write to disk. Keyboard Macros: Define or redefine any control key (up to 29) to 
reproduce any key sequences, including commands! Supports multiple printers 
via a print control file. Formatting Commands: Justification, word wrap, 
centering, headers, footers, macros, odd and even support, multiple index 
generation, multiple table of contents generation and more! DynaStar is the last 
word processor you will ever have to buyl 

DynaStar word processor/formatter 150.00 



- J*% ft f A I 








DynaSpell 



by Dale Puckett 

20,000+ word dictionary included. Fast, slick.the best spelling checker available 
for OS9. Written by RainbowTech columnist Dale Puckett. 

DynaSpell spelling checker 75.00 
SPECIAL WHEN PURCHASED WITH DYNASTAR 25.00 



The WIZ 



Simply the best communications/terminal package for OS9 and the CoCo III. 
FEATURES: Mac-Like interface with windows, text and binary upload/download 
with xmodem, kermit, on line HELP, AUTOLOGGING lets you dial up and log on 
to your favorite service, Macros, VT52 emulation, Usage log and much more. 

The Wiz requires a RS-232 Pak or similar device, LII and 512K. 
The WIZ WAS 

r.'V- ■•. E 



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49.95 
199.95 




Sculptor 



Is it a Database? 
Is it a Programming Language? 

Is it easy to use? 
Will it run on other computers? 
Is it the best program available? 
YES! The New Version 1.16 is it! 
100% Object Code Compatible 
100% Data File Compatible 
for over 100 Computer/OS combinations 

Sculptor, a 4th Generation Language, is an applications generator, 
a database, and a programming language. Basic, C, Pascal, etc. are 
3rd generation languages and assembly language is 2nd generation. 
In Sculptor you can develop an application in one tenth the time over 
Basic or one of the other 3rd generation languages. Sculptor brings 
the power of high level programming to the less experienced 
individual. If you cannot do what you want to do in a 3rd generation 
language, then Sculptor will open doors for you. In conventional 
programming 1/2 of your time is spent deciding what you want to do 
and 1/2 writing the code. With Sculptor most of your time is spent 
deciding what to do because it takes so little time to turn your dream 
into reality 

In 1988 we sold an incredible number of Sculptors at the special 
price of $149. We proved that the market was there if the price was 
right Version 1.16 lists for $695 on the IBM PC and goes up to 
$17,000 on a DEC VAX. Because of our success last year, thru a 
special arrangement we are now able to offer Sculp tor version 1.16 
to you for only $249.95. Now you can take applications created on 
your CoCo and run them on PC's, Unix machines etc. (with the 
proper runtime) Sculptor is the most powerful program available for 
the CoCo. 

But wait... During this special introduction of version 1.16 we have 
reduced the price to ONLY $199,951 

Requires OS9 Level II and 51 2K. Works on floppies or hard disks. 



: ' 



TTT! 



Sculptorv1A6 SPECIAL ONLY 199.95 



Existing Sculptor users can update to v1 ,16 for 60.00 



ORDERING INFORMATION VISA and M/C, check and COD. NY residents add 7% 
sales tax. Contenual US software shipping add $3.50 Ground $6.00 2nd Day Air. 
Hardware (drives) add $1 1 ground, $22 2nd Day Air. Please call for Next Day Air costs 
and COD. Foreign add 10% S&H (Min $5). Send for FREE FHL NewsLetter/Catalog. 

**Most of our software requires OS9 LII and 512K. 

Frank Hogg Laboratory, Inc. 

Since 1976 




Street - Syracuse, NY 13203 
Fax 315/474-8225 

Call 315/474-7856 



' $Y / *5s: s .-' 



Once you get to know it, OS-9 is a 
great system 

OS-9: Time for 

a Change 



1am a frequent visitor to the CoCo 
and OS-9 SIGs on Delphi. Over the 
past year, I have noticed a general 
resistance to OS-9 among the CoCo 
SIG members. As a confirmed OS-9 
user, I find this disturbing. Since I was 
looking at this from a biased viewpoint, 
I decided to step back and try to under- 
stand this phenomenon. Why do many 
CoCo users consider OS-9 something to 
be feared and avoided? 

Some CoCo users have little incentive 
to use or learn OS-9. These are the users 
who are content using Disk basic and 
do not need OS-9's features. Other users 
may see advantages in OS-9 but are 
afraid to make the plunge because they 
have heard that OS-9 is user-hostile and 
hard to learn. While OS-9 can indeed be 
complex, "it ain't necessarily so." Many 
CoCo users believe that OS-9 is user- 
hostile when they compare it to Disk 
BASIC. This is as fair as comparing a 747 
to a small stunt plane? Of course the 747 
is more difficult to fly, but it is (in most 
ways) more capable than the stunt 
plane. However, I doubt that either is 
inherently more difficult to operate or 
understand when comparing similar 



Dennis Skala, who holds a master's 
degree in physics, works in the area of 
composite materials engineering and 
development. Dennis lives in Fairview, 
Pennsylvania, and is the author of 
Microcom's OS-9 RAMdisk Package. 



By Dennis Skala 

tasks. 

Let me begin with the obligatory 
statement that OS-9 is an operating 
system — no more, no less. Disk BASIC 
may be characterized as a pseudo- 
operating system. It is essentially an 
extension of the Extended BASIC inter- 
preter command table to include rudi- 
mentary disk I/O capability. OS-9 is an 
operating environment — an interface 
between you and the computer. Disk 
BASIC is a language. Both are just 
software. 

Level I vs. Level II 

OS-9 Level I has been around for 10 
years. It was originally written to pro- 
vide a powerful operating system for 
6809 microcomputers with 64K mem- 
ory. The system sacrificed user friend- 
liness for the power it gave the 64K 
machine. Level I keeps few or no util- 
ities in memory in order to maximize 
the memory available for programs. 
Commonly used utilities (Dir, Copy, 
etc.) are kept on disk and loaded into 
memory when needed. This makes 
Level I a little tricky to use — especially 
with only one disk drive. 

Level IPs additional memory alle- 
viates most of these difficulties. Most 
Level II users keep frequently used 
utilities in memory, which makes it 
easier to switch disks without causing 
errors. In addition, Level II windows 
make multitasking much easier than it 
is with Level I. Under Level I, it is 
difficult to run more than one interac- 



tive program, and trying to run several 
programs can make a mess of your 
screen. Level II windows eliminate this 
limitation. 

Level I comes with an assembler. 
Many CoCo users bought the package 
and learned how to navigate the system. 
However, if they weren't interested in 
assembly programming, there was little 
else to do with OS-9 except purchase 
commercial programs or program lan- 
guages. Fortunately, Tandy chose to 
include BASIC09 in the Level II package. 
More CoCo users are familiar with and 
interested in BASIC programming than 
in assembly-language programming. 
The Level II users can use this system 
in the same ways they use Disk BASIC. 
If you're one of those users turned off 
by Level I, you'll find that Level II is 
different — it's aimed at the casual user. 

The Myth of OS-9 User-Hostility 

Let's compare Disk BASIC with OS- 
9. Table 1 lists all the Disk BASIC 
commands as presented in Appendix H 
of Radio Shack's Color Computer Disk 
System Owners Manual and Program- 
ming Guide. Next to each command is 
the OS-9 or BASIC09 equivalent. 

The majority of the Disk BASIC com- 
mands are not system commands but 
have to do with handling files and 
buffers from interpreted BASIC. These 
commands are compared to the closest 
applicable OS-9 commands. When 
comparing the system and file-handling 
commands, the OS-9 commands seem 



58 THE RAINBOW April 1989 



Table 1: Comparison of Disk BASIC, OS-9 and BASIC09 Commands 


Disk BASIC 

,-. .•■ ' ['■' " ■ 


OS-9 ' -||f" 


BASIC09 


BACKUP 0 TU 1 


backup ^d0 yul 




CLubL wl 




pi rrcr mi 
LLL-bL PL 


CUPY rILtl.EXi:0 


copy '□0' r r iiei 




TU rILL£.LAT:l 


/■Ol' r 1 IB*: 




nt /Li /" /-s ttr \ 

CVN[n$ ) 




n^a t:i,j. 


DIR 0 


air 'd0 




DRIVE 1 


_ t_ _i >_j , 
c-tia ' dl 


nun v.-i i 


D5KINI 0 


r u r itife t. ^uG 




D5KIS 0,12,3,N*,N* 






UbKD* 0,l£, J,n»,N$ 


r'Va 


n^a 


Eur (1) 




EOF [1) 


r TCI r> HI 1 A ftC net 

FIELD 81,10 nb H3>» 




n^a [l] 


12 R5 B$ 






C" T 1 ITC 1 1 AAA 

r ILta 1 1 1000 




n>A f 1 1 

n' a \ l j 


r KLt i 0 J 


TTBS 'd0 




' bL 1 Hi , 3 




3LLN H± ,3 


T kini tT HI QC 

INPul H1,H5 




T MDI IT H 1 Oct 


KILL FILE1.EXT:0 


i . i j / c ■ ii a 'i 


DELETE ^dw^T 11 81 


1 Tkir TklDI (T HI 

LINt, 1NPUI Ml,H3> 




□rori hi ot 
KEHU »1 ,HS 


LUHU rILLl.LXi:0 ,K 


ILIhJ S^Y • v 


LUHU dW^rllBl \4] 


I nonM TTI C" 1 C"VT»A" 1 AAA 

LUHUn rlLLl»LAl;0 ,1000 


load / u0'rllBl 






» » < * « 




LUF(1) 




n^a j 


LSET H$=B$ 





n /a (1) 


MERGE TILE1.EXT:0" ? R 


merge ^d0^f lie! 


h^a 




^d0/ f 1 1 82P*/ d 0' f X 1 83 




N<N$(1000) 




n/a (1) 


□PEN "D " , tU f T ILEX , EXT" 




□PEN Hl^^/fllel'* 






, UPDATE iki ,lp 


ran t lit k 1 
PRINT Hl,H5 




PRINT WltRS 


PRINT 81, USING "*.*";fi 


.V* < » 4 


PRINT ttl USING 


PUT 81,3 


* • ft » • 


n/a [1] 


RENRnE FILE1.EXT:0 TO 


rename ^ov^f I lal f I Ib£ 




FILEZ.EXT:0 
R5ET HS-d* 




n'a (lj 


RUN TILEl.EXT:0 vy ,R 


/d0/'Filel 


RUN procedure 


SAVE VD0/F I LEI, EXT :0",fl 


save /d0/f ilel modi (3) 


SAVE MODI /D0/FILE1 


SflVEM "FILEl.EXT:0 / ' f 


sav/e ^d0/Fllel modi (3) 


(2) 

SAVt MODI /O0/FILE1 


1000,2000,1000 




(2) 


UNLOAD 0 




CLOSE HI 


VERIFY ON (OFF) 






WRITE ttl,R$ 


r - - - ■ 


WRITE Hl,ft£ 


Notes: 






1. BASIC09 files do not offer field capability and do not use explicit 


buffers. You can get Disk BASIC field's effect in BASIC09 by using 


typed variables. 






2. These are BASIC09 workspace commands. 




3. Supplied with Level I OS-9, but not with Level II. 




4. Disk-write verify on or off in OS-9 is contained in the device 


descriptor, and is not easily modified* 




5. n/a means not applicable 





as easy to understand as the corre- 
sponding Disk BASIC commands. In 
fact, BASiC09's file-handling commands 
are more user-friendly than Disk BAS- 
IC'S counterparts. BASIC09 lets OS-9 
handle file buffers — Disk BASIC re- 
quires programmers to manipulate 
these. 

Some OS-9 commands are complex. 
For example, Dsave copies whole direc- 
tories to other directories. This utility is 
more complex than Disk BASIC. It first 
acts on a subdirectory or a logical part 
of a disk file. Then it creates a procedure 
file, which is piped to another shell. The 
new shell (a command interpreter) has 
a different default directory and runs 
concurrently with the Dsave command 
(multitasking). Disk basic doesn't have 
subdirectories, procedure files, pipes or 
multitasking. It is not surprising that 
such a command line would look a little 
formidable to a Disk basic user. How- 
ever, although a little cryptic, it's en- 
tirely logical and understandable when 
you know the details. 

Does the novice OS-9 user need to 
understand all these technical details to 
use OS-9 profitably? Of course not. 
When using Dsave, the same effect can 
be achieved by a series of simple com- 
mand lines of the following type: 

copy /d0/JUNKDIR/f ilBl /dl/ 
fllel 

copy /d0/JUNKDIR/f ile2 /dl/ 
file2 

(etc.) 

This is more tedious but quite 
straightforward (and it's the only way to 
do it in Disk basic). 

Level IFs windowing system can be 
intimidating to the novice. Windows are 
selected and configured by sending 
escape sequences to the screen. There 
are lots of permutations here and lots 
of details. Who can remember all this 
stuff? Even worse, who wants to look it 
up every time you want to set up a 
window? There is a user-friendly way 
around this — procedure files. 

Procedure (or script) files are ASCII 
text files containing one or more OS-9 
commands. When you type the name of 
a procedure file, OS-9 reads in the file 
and executes the commands one by one, 
just as if you had typed them in. The 
easiest way to create an OS-9 window 
is to make a procedure file to do it. 
Choose your size and favorite colors, 
get out the manual, look up the com- 
mand formats and create a procedure 
file to create a window and start a shell. 
You only need do this once. Put the file 



in the root directory on your boot disk, 
and you're in business. I keep a file 
called Window. tB0.u7 on my boot disk, 
which starts an 80-column text window 
in window /u7 with black letters on a 
yellow background and starts a com- 
mand interpreter. It looks like this: 

echo Creating 80 column tBxt window 

* Create a B0 column text window using 
descriptor /w7 

* using black letters on a yellow 



background 

wcreate /w7 -s=2 0 0 80 24 2 5 5 
iniz /w7 
shell i=/w7& 

Procedure files are a convenient way 
to do repetitive things involving tedious 
detail. To start my 80-column text 
window, I just enter Window - tB0 . w7 and 
let OS-9 take care of the details for me. 

Most CoCo users are hobbyists. We 
tend to use our computers for personal 
enjoyment. I think there is a tendency 



April 1989 THE RAINBOW 59 



to want immediate gratification from 
each new piece of hardware or software 
— like a small child who gets a new, very 
complex, toy and wants to use it to its 
fullest immediately. Because OS-9 is a 
more complex piece of software than 
Disk basic, there is a longer learn- 
ing curve, but the novice can ease into 
OS-9 without knowing every detail. It 
is possible to learn as you go along. As 
the novice becomes more proficient, 
shortcuts can be used, and OS-9 fea- 
tures like pipes and multitasking can be 
manipulated. 

Naturally, there are some basics to 
learn before using OS-9 — even the 
novice must be aware of default direc- 
tories and realize all commands are not 
necessarily memory-resident. If not in 
memory, these commands are loaded 
from disk. There is a search pattern for 
such loads. From what I have seen on 
the online forums, about 95 percent of 
the problems novice OS-9 users have 
result from not knowing their default 
directories and not realizing that a 
command line with a program name 
needs the program either to be in mem- 
ory or in the current default execution 
directory. 

OS-9 is more user-friendly than Disk 
BASIC in several respects. To change the 
default baud rate of the bit-banger RS- 
232 printer port to 1200 baud under 
Disk BASIC, one uses POKE &H9G,&H29. 
OS-9 provides a utility to do this task. 
To do the same under OS-9, just enter 
xmode /p baud=3. The OS-9 command 
is more straightforward and mnemonic. 

OS-9 is also more user-friendly when 
listing text files. To list the text file 
Readme in the default directory to the 
screen, just type list readme. To list to 
the printer, type list readme >/p. To do 
the same under Disk BASIC, you must 
write a BASIC program; or text files must 
be self printing; or files must be exam- 
ined with a word processor — rather 
awkward when compared to the OS-9 
List command. 

Several years ago, I customized my 
Disk BASIC system based on a series of 
rainbow articles by Colin Stearman, 
which added several basic commands, 
faster double-sided disk access, etc. This 
involved considerable assembly pro- 
gramming and burning an EPROM for 
my disk controller. Customizing my 
OS-9 system, on the other hand, took 
a couple of hours and involved no 
programming or hardware modifica- 
tions. OS-9 is modular — it is intended 
to be customized for each user. 

One area in which Disk BASIC is more 
user-friendly than OS-9 is in error 



reporting. There are fewer Disk basic 
error messages, and they are two-letter 
mnemonics. OS-9 error messages are 
numbers, and in a long command line, 
the error's cause is not always obvious. 
(The OS-9 Error utility will give you an 
explanation, however.) 

OS-9 can be run under the control of 
Multi- Vue, a graphics shell. Multi- Vue 
acts like a visual interface between the 
user and OS-9. It offers some system 
control and point-and-click program 
selection. As an experienced user, I find 
Multi- Vue limiting, but many novice 
users think it makes the system easier to 
use. To my knowledge, no similar inter- 
face exists for Disk basic. 

The Pros and Cons of OS-9 

For the sake of discussion, let's categ- 
orize CoCo users into three groups: 
Group A uses the machine to play 
games or run third-party software but 
does no programming. Group B uses 
the machine for games and other appli- 
cations, but also programs — primarily 
in interpreted basic. Group C includes 
the heavy-duty users. They program in 
various languages — including assem- 
bly — and are familiar with the internal 
mechanics of the computer. 

This is an over-simplified but service- 
able split. Group A users will notice no 
difference between the user-friendliness 
of OS-9 and Disk BASIC. In either case, 
these users will just insert disks and 
follow simple load and execute com- 
mands. 

Most rainbow readers would fall 
into Group B. Such users should have 
no problem with BASIC09 or OS-9 soft- 
ware. There are a few difficulties with 
OS-9 — learning how to properly load 
modules, learning the commands, etc. 
However, the speed the user gains may 
make the system worthwhile. 

Group C users will find OS-9 more 
complex than Disk BASIC — there's 
more to it. On the other hand, once 
learned, OS-9 offers a number of bene- 
fits to the more advanced programmer. 
Because it is a true operating system, it 
offers easy access to low-level services 
such as legal-name checking, creating 
directories, and reading/ writing to the 
printer, screen, disk files, etc. These 
functions are accessed with simple 
system calls from assembly language or 
from higher level languages. Moreover, 
such calls will work on all future up- 
grades of OS-9 and the CoCo. Ad- 
vanced Disk basic programmers use 
ROM calls for many of these services. 
Of the disk-related ROM calls, only the 
DSKCON call is documented. Any other 



ROM call may or may not work on 
Disk basic upgrades. This means to be 
entirely safe the Disk basic assembly 
programmer must "re-invent the wheel" 
within each program. Such details as 
printing to the screen and reading the 
keyboard should be contained in each 
program. This is tedious detail that 
diverts the programmer's attention 
from the more important parts of the 
program. 

On the CoCo, high-level languages 
run more efficiently under OS-9 Level 
II than under Disk basic. Tandy sells 
a good C compiler (written by Micro- 
ware, the authors of OS-9) that runs 
under OS-9. C programs (source code) 
tend to be quite portable — programs 
written on the CoCo usually run on 
other machines with little modification. 

One disadvantage to the use of OS- 
9 is that you give up some measure of 
control of the machine. The OS-9 pro- 
grammer must remember that other 
programs may be running concurrently. 
Certain restrictions apply to program- 
ming techniques (using relative address- 
ing in assembly language for instance). 
Special tricks, such as writing to two 
disks at once, cannot be done legally. 
OS-9 is not a particularly good envi- 
ronment for real-time action games 
since a program's timing is under OS- 
9's control rather than the pro- 
grammer's. Timing may be affected by 
other things happening concurrently. 
There are ways of dealing with this, but 
these tend to "hog" the machine, negat- 
ing the advantages of OS-9. 

The Utility of Multitasking 

One of the most useful features of 
OS-9 is multitasking. As I write this, I 
have another copy of my word proces- 
sor running in another window, display- 
ing an outline of this article for refer- 
ence. When responding to Delphi 
forum messages, I often display pre- 
downloaded messages in one window, 
and compose my replies in another. 
Also, while downloading a message 
base from Delphi, rather than just 
sitting there and waiting for the down- 
load to complete (perhaps 10 minutes), 
I do something in another window. 
Often when running a program, I forget 
what filename I wanted to use or some 
other information I need. Rather than 
exiting the program, I toggle to another 
window to get the information. Rather 
trivial uses of multitasking — but 
convenient. 

Some time ago, I wanted to do some 
heavy-duty calculations involving gra- 
phic displays of some mathematical 



60 THE RAINBOW April 1989 



patterns. These would typically take 
hours to complete. Without multitask- 
ing, I would be denied the use of my 
machine for this time. As it was, I just 
started the program, adjusted its prior- 
ity down a little, and I went on to other 
tasks. The graphics calculation pro- 
gram proceeded automatically, a bit at 
a time, whenever the computer wasn't 
busy doing something else. OS-9 took 
care of the scheduling automatically, 
and I wasn't aware that the graphics 
program was running. 

The price of multitasking is surpris- 
ingly small. I did some crude timing 
tests that timed a simple program with 
several shells (command interpreters) 
running. So long as each of these was 
idling (waiting for a key press), there 
was virtually no measurable difference 
in the speed of the program. OS-9 is 
very efficient in this regard — when a 
program isn't doing anything, it "goes 
to sleep" and uses almost no CPU time. 
Of course when more than one program 
is really doing something, each will slow 
down accordingly. (After all, you can't 
get something for nothing.) 

Some of the most popular MS-DOS 
programs are TSR (Terminate-and- 
Stay-Resident) utilities. MS-DOS users 



consider these programs convenient. 
All OS-9 programs have the ability to 
work this way: Not only will they stay 
resident, but they may also run concur- 
rently. In addition, although many MS- 
DOS TSR utilities have compatibility 
problems, OS-9 works well in this mode 
because it was designed with this ability. 

OS-9 Abilities in Disk BASIC? 

OS-9 is just software. Theoretically, 
anything it does can be duplicated in 
Disk BASIC. For instance, the OS-9 
windowing environment could be re- 
created under Disk basic. However, 
almost no commercial software would 
take advantage of it. In fact, many 
programs would conflict with the win- 
dows and crash the machine. Like 
windows, multitasking is possible under 
Disk BASIC, but it would be difficult, 
limited and likely to crash the computer. 
Disk BASIC is a closed standard system 
that is difficult to modify. OS-9, on the 
other hand, is an open, modular stand- 
ard originally designed to be added to 
and modified. 

A standard software interface like 
OS-9 gives the CoCo user a future. An 
upgraded CoCo with different hard- 
ware will be able to run current OS-9 



software. Programmers can write in the 
OS-9 environment and be confident 
their programs will run on future 
CoCos. 

Summary 

OS-9 is not more user-hostile than 
Disk BASIC, but it is more capable — 
hence more complex. However, when 
comparing features both systems share, 
neither seems more or less easy. Novice 
users can do the same things with OS- 
9 that are done with Disk BASIC — with 
the same ease. In addition, as users grow 
more capable, they can use OS-9 to 
increase their use of the CoCo. 

Disk BASIC is a very usable system 
that is adequate for running one pro- 
gram at a time. However, OS-9 is the 
way to go for CoCo users who want to 
get more from their machines. As the 
base of OS-9 users increases, more 
software vendors have the incentive to 
enter the OS-9 market. This will benefit 
us all. Of course, moving to OS-9 
doesn't mean that you've given up Disk 
BASIC — it will always be there for you. 
However, if you're like me, once you get 
used to OS-9 working with Disk BASIC 
(or MS-DOS for that matter) is like 
typing with boxing gloves. /R\ 



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April 1989 THE RAINBOW 61 



************ COLOR COMPUTER III SOFTWARE *** *** *** *** 



CBASIC III EDITOR/COMPILER 

The ULTIMATE Color Computer III BASIC COMPILER!!! 

If you want to write fast efficient machine language programs and you don't 
want to spend the next few years trying to leam how to write them in Assembly 
language or with a cheap compiler, then CBASIC III is the answer!!! 

CBASIC III is the only fully integrated Basic Compiler and Program Editing 
System available for the Color Computer 3. It will allow you to take full advantage 
of all the capabilities available in your CoCo-3 including 512K RAM, without 
having to spend years trying to leam assembly language programming. CBASIC 
III allows you to create, edit and convert programs from a language you are 
already familiar with Enhanced Disk Color Basic, into fast efficient machine 
language programs easily and quickly. CBASIC III supports all the enhanced 
hardware available in the CoCo-3, including Hi-Res Graphics, & Screen displays, 
Extended Memory and Interrupts (Keyboard, Timer, Serial & Clock). We even 
added advanced commands not available in Basic to give you a level of control 
only avialable to very advanced Machine Language Programmers. Plus we made it 
exceptionally easy to use, not like some other compilers. CBASIC III is the 
friendliest and easiest compiler available for the Color Computer III. 

CBASIC III is a powerful tool for the Beginner as well as the Advanced Basic 
or Machine Language programmer You can write programs without having to 
worry about the Stack, DP Register, memory allocations and so on, because 
CBASIC III will handle it for you automatically. For Advanced users, CBASIC III 
will let you control every aspect of your program, even generating machine code 
directly in a program easily. 

CBASIC III features well over 150 Compiled Basic Commands and Functions 
that fully support Disk Sequential and Direct access files, Tape, Printer and 
Screen I/O. It supports ALL the High and Low Resolution Graphics, Sound, Play 
and String Operations available in Enhanced Color Basic, including Graphics 
H/GET, H/Put, H/Play and H/DRAW, all with 99.9% syntax compatibility. 
CBASIC III also supports the built in Serial I/O port with separate programmable 
printer & serial I/O baud rates. You can send and receive data with easy to use 
PRINT, INPUT, INKEY, GETCHAR and PUTCHAR commands. 

CBASIC makes full use of the powerful and flexible GIMI chip in the Color 
Computer 3. It will fully utilize the 128K of RAM available and install 2 Ultra 
Fast Ramdisks if 512K is available, for program Creation, Editing and 
Compilation. You can easily access all 5 12K of memory in a Compiled program 
thru several extended memory commands that can access it in 32K or 8K blocks 
and single or double bytes. 

CBASIC has its own completely integrated Basic Program Editor which allows 
you to load, edit or create programs for the compiler. It is a full featured editor 
designed specifically for writing Basic programs. It has block move and copy, 
program renumbering, automatic line number generation, screen editing, printer 
control and much more. 

The documentation provided with CBASIC III is an 8 1/2 by 11 Spiral Bound 
book which contains approximatly 120 pages of real information. We went to 
great lengths to provide a manual that is not only easy to use and understand, but 
complete and comprehensive enough for even the most sophisticated user. 

CBASIC III is the most expensive Color Basic Compiler on the market, and 
well worth the investment. You can buy a less expensive compiler for your 
CoCo-3, and then find out how difficult it is to use, or how limited its features are. 
Then you v H wish you had bought CBASIC III in the first place. Dollar for dollar, 
CBASIC III gives you more than any other compiler available. If you can find a 
better CoCo-3 Basic Compiler then buy it!!! 

Requires 128K & Disk $149.00 

DATAPACK III PLUS V1.1 

SUPER SMART TERMINAL PROGRAM 

AUTOPILOT & AUTO-LOG PROCESSORS 
X-MODEM DIRECT DISK FILE TRANSFER 
VT-100 & VT-52 TERMINAL EMULATION 

• No lost data even at 2400 Baud on the COCO-3 Serial I/O port. 

• 8 Display Formats, 32/40/64/80 columns at 192 or 225 Res. 

• 50K Text Buffer when using the Hi-Res Text Display & Disk. 

• ASCII & BINARY disk file transfer support via XMODEM. 

• Directly record receive data to a disk file (Data Logging). 

• VT-100 terminal emulation for VAX, UNIX and other systems. 

• VT-100/52 cursor keys, position, insert/delete, PF & Alt. keys. 

• Programmable Word Length, Parity, Stop Bits and baud rates. 

• Complete Full and Half Duplex operation, with no garbled data. 

• 9 Variable length, Programmable Macro Key buffers. 

• Programmable Printer rates from 110 to 9600 baud. 

• Send Files directly from the Buffer, Macro Keys or Disk. 

• Display on Screen or Print the contents of the Buffer. 

• Freeze Display & Review information On Line with no data loss. 

• Built in Command Menu (Help) Display. 

• Built in 2 Drive Ramdisk for 512K RAM support and much more. 
Supports: R.S. Modem- Pak & Deluxe RS-232 Pak, even with Disk. 

Requires 128K & Disk, $59.95 

EDT/ASM III 

128/512K DISK EDITOR ASSEMBLER 

EDT/ASM III is a Disk based co-resident Text Editor & Assembler. It is 
designed to take advantage of the new features available in the CoCo-3 with either 
128K or 512K of memory. It has 8 display formats from 32/40/64/80 columns by 24 
lines in 192 or 225 Resolution, so you use the best display mode whether you are 
using an RGB or Composite monitor or even a TV for your display. Plus you can 
select any foreground or background colors or even monochrome display modes. 
It will even support 512K by adding an automatic 2 drive Ultra Fast Ramdisk for 
lightning fast assembly of program source code larger than memory. There is also 
a free standing ML Debug Monitor, to help you debug your assembled programs. 
EDT/ASM III has the most powerful, easy to use Text Editor available in any 
Editor/Assembler package for the Color Computer. 

• Supports Local and Global string search and/or replace. 

• Full Screen line editing with immediate line update. 

• Easy to use Single keystroke editing commands. 

• Load & Save standard ASCII formatted file formats. 

• Block Move & Copy, Insert, Delete, Overtype. 

• Create and Edit files larger than memory. 

The Assembler portion of EDT/ASM III features include: 

• Supports the full 6809 instruction set & cross assembles 6800 code. 

• Supports Conditional IF/THEN/ELSE assembly. 

• Supports Disk Library file (include) up to 9 levels deep. 

• Supports standard Motorola assembler directives. 

" Allows multiple values for FCB & FDB directives (unlike R.S. EDT/ASM) 

• Allows assembly from the Editor Buffer, Disk or both. 

Requires 128K & Disk $59.95 



TEXTPRO IV 

"The ADVANCED COCO-3 Word Processing System" 

• 9 Hi-Res Displays from 58 to 212 columns by 24 lines in 225 Res. 

• On Screen Display of Bold, Italic, Underline & Double Width print. 

• Up to 8 Proportional Character Sets Supported with Justification. 

• Up to 80 Programmable Function Keys & Loadable Function key sets. 

• Fully Buffered keyboard accepts data even duiring disk access. 

• Autoexecute Startup files for easy printer & system configuration. 

• 8 Pre-Defined Printer function commands & 10 Programmable ones. 

• Supports Library files for unlimited printing & configurations. 

• Disk file record access for Mail Merge & Boiler Plate printing. 

• Completely Automatic Justification, Centering, Flush left & right. 
" Change indents, margins, line length, etc. anytime in the text. 

• Create and Edit files larger than memory, up to a full disk. 

• Easily imbed any number of printer format and control codes. 

• Built in Ultra Fast 2 drive RAMDISK for 5 12K support. 

TEXTPRO IV is the most advanced word processing system available for the 
COCO-3, designed for speed, flexability and extensive document processing. It is 
not like most of the other word processing programs available for the Color 
Computer. If you are looking for a simple word processor to write letters or other 
short documents, and never expect to use multiple fonts or proportional spacing, 
then most likely you'll be better offwithoneof the other simpler word processors. 
But, if you want a powerful word processor with extensive document formatting 
features to handle large documents, term papers, manuals, complex formatting 
problems and letter writing, then TEXTPRO IV is what your looking for. It works 
in a totally different way than most word processing programs. It uses simple 2 
character abbreviations of words or phrases for commands and formatting 
information that you imbed directly in your text. There are over 70 different 
formatting commands you can use without ever leaving the text your working on. 
There are no time comsuming, and often frustrating menu chases, you are in total 
control at all times. You can see what the formatted document will look like 
before a single word is ever printed on your printer. Including margins, headers, 
footers, page numbers, page breaks, column formatting, justification, and Bold, 
Italic, Underline, Double Width, Superscript and Subscript characters right on the 
screen. 

TEXTPRO IV can even support LASER PRINTERS with proportional fonts. 
take a good look at this AD? It was done with TEXTPRO IV on an OKJDATA 
LASERLINE-6 laser printer!!! All the character sets used on this AD are 
proportional spaced characters, all centering, justification, and text printing was 
performed automatically by TEXTPRO IV. 

Requires 128K & Disk $89.95 

HI- RES III Screen Commander 

The DISPLAY you wanted but didn't get on your CoCo-3 

• 54 Different Character Sizes available from 14 to 212 cpl. 

• Bold, Italic, Underline, Subscript, Superscript and Plain character styles. 

• Double Width, Double Height and Quad width characters. 

• Scroll Protect form 1 to 23 lines on the screen. 

• Mixed Text & Graphics in HSCREEN 3 mode. 

• PRINT @ is available in all character sizes & styles. 

• Programmable Automatic Key repeat for fast editing. 

• Full Control Code Keyboard supported. 

" Selectable Character & Background color. 

• Uses only 4K of Extended (2nd 64K) or Basic RAM. 

• Written in Ultra Fast Machine Language. 

HI-RES III will improve the standard display capabilities of the Color 
Computer 3, even the 40 and 80 column displays have several features missing. 
For example, you can't use PRINT @ or have different character sizes on the same 
screen, even when mixing text and graphics with the HPRINT command. Hi-RES 
III can give you the kind of display you always dreamed about having on your 
CoCo-3, with a wide variety of display options that you can easily use with your 
Basic or ML programs. 

HI-RES III is totally compatible with Enhanced Color Basic and its operation 
is invisible to Basic. It simply replaces the normal screen display with an 
extremely versatile display package. With the full control code keyboard, you can 
control many of HI-RES III extended functions with just a couple of simple 
keystrokes. 

Requires 128K Tape or Disk $34.95 

512K RAMDISK & MEMORY TESTER 

RAMDISK is an ALL Machine Language program that will give you 2 ULTRA 
High Speed Ram Disks in you CoCo-3. It does not need or require the OS-9 
operating system. It works with R.S. DOS Vl'.O or VI. 1 and it is completely 
compatible with Enhanced Color Disk Basic! Plus it allows your CoCo-3 to run at 
double speed all the time even for floppy disk access!!! It will not disappear when 
you press reset like some other ramdisk programs. The MEMORY tester is a fast 
ML program to test the 512K ram. It performs several bit tests as well as an 
address test so you know that your 512K of memory is working perfectly. 

Requires 512K & Disk $19.95 

The SOURCE III" 

DISASSEMBLER & SOURCE CODE GENERATOR 

The SOURCE III will allow you to easily Disassemble Color Computer 
machine language programs Directly from Disk and generate beautiful, Assembler 
compatible Source code. 

• Automatic label generation and allows specifying FCB, FDB and FCC areas. 

• Disassemble programs Directly from disk, unlike other disassemblers. 

• Automatically locates Begin, End and Execution address. 

• Output Disassembled listing with labels to the Printer, Screen or both. 

• Generates Assembler source files directly to disk or printer. 

• Built in Hex/Ascii dump/display to locate FCB, FCC & FDB areas. 
" 8 Selectable Display formats 32/40/64/80 columns in 192 or 225 Res. 

• Selectable Foreground & Background colors & Printer Baud rates. 

• Built in Disk Directory an Kill file commands. 

• Menu display with single key commands for smooth, Easy operation. 
" Written in Ultra Fast Machine Language. 

Requires 128K & Disk $49.95 

To order products by mail, send check or money order for the amount of 

purchase, plus $3.00 for shipping & handling to the address below. 
To Order by VISA, MASTERCARD or COD call us at (702) 452-0632 
(Monday thru Saturday, 8am to 5pm PST) 

CER-COMP LTD. 

5566 Ricochet Avenue 
Las Vegas, Nevada 89110 

(702) 452-0632 



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lisplay Keys 



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OPEN 255,7 



Window Master Features 



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CONFIG BAS 
CHECK BAS 
AUTOEXEC BAS 
CONFIG SYS 



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Copyright <c> 1388 by Cor-Comp Ltd 



Multiple Windows 



Window Master supports multiple window displays with up to 
a maximum of 31 windows on the screen. Overlapping windows 
are supported, and any window can be made active or brought to 
the top of the screen. Windows can be picked up and moved 
anywhere on the screen with the mouse. There are 6 different 
Window styles to choose from and the window text, border and 
background color is selectable. 



Pull Down Menus 



Screen Display Fonts 



Window Master supports up to 54 different character sizes on 
the screen with 5 different character styles. You can have Bold, 
Italic, Underlined, Super-Script, Sub-script or Plain character 
styles or any combination of them in any character size. You 
can also change the text color and background at any time to get 
really colorful displays. 

Fully Basic Compatible 

Window Master is fully compatible with Enhanced Color 
Disk basic with over 50 Commands & functions added to fully 
support the Point & Click Window System. Window Master 
does not take any memory away from Basic, so you still have all 
the Basic Program memory available. 

Hi-Resolution Displays 

Window Master uses the full potential of the Color 
Computer 3 display by using the 225 vertical resolution display 
modes instead of the 192 or 200 resolution modes like most 
other programs. It uses either the 320/16 color mode or the 
640/4 color display to give you the best display resolution 
possible, and can be switched to either mode at any time. 

Mixed Text & Graphics 



Window Master fully supports both Text & Graphics displays 
and even has a Graphics Pen that can be used with HLINE, 
HCIRCLE, HSET and more. You can change the Pen width & 
depth and turn it on or off with simple commands. We also 
added Enhanced Graphics Attributes that allow graphics 
statements to use And, Or, Xor and Copy modes to display 
graphic information. With the Graphics enhancements added 
by Window Master, you could write a "COCOMAX" type 
program in Basic! In fact we provide a small graphics demo 
program written in Basic. 

Event Processing 

Window Master adds a powerful new programming feature to 
Basic that enables you to do "Real Time" Programming in Basic. 
It's called Event Trapping, and it allows a program to detect and 
respond to certain "events" as they occur. You can trap Dialog 
activity, Time passage, Menu Selections, Keyboard activity and 
Mouse Activity with simple On Gosub statements, and when the 
specified event occurs, program control is automatically routed 
to the event handling routine, just like a Basic Gosub. After 
servicing the event, the sub-routine executes a Return statement 
and the program resumes execution at the statement where the 
event occured. 



Enhanced Editing Features 



Window Master adds an enhanced editor to Basic that allows 
you to see what you edit. It allows you to insert & delete by 
character or word, move left or right a word or character at a 
time, move to begin or end of line, toggle automatic insert 
on/off or just type over to replace characters. The editor can 
also recall the last line entered or edited with a single key stroke. 
You can even change the line number in line to copy it to a new 
location in the program. 



Disk contains 
128K & 512K 

version 
of program. 



Menus are completely programmable with up to 16 menus 
available. They can be added or deleted at any time in a 
program. Menu items can be enabled, disabled, checked or 
cleared easily under program control. Menu selection is 
automatically handled by Window Master & all you have to do 
is read a function variable to find out which menu was selected. 

Buttons, Icons & Edit Fields 

Each Window can have up to 128 buttons, Icons or Edit fields 
active, if you can fit that many. Buttons, Icons and Edit field 
selection is handled automatically by Window Master when the 
mouse is clicked on one. All you have to do is read a Dialog 
function to find out which Button, Icon, or Edit field was 
selected, its very simple. 

Mouse & Keyboard Functions 

Window Master automatically handles the Mouse pointer 
movement, display and button clicks. It will tell you the current 
screen coordinate, the local window coordinate, window number 
the mouse is in, the number of times the button was pressed, 
which window number it was clicked in and more. The 
Keyboard is completely buffered, and supports up to 80 
programmable Function keys that can contain any kind of 
information or command sequences you can imagine. You can 
load and save function key sets at any time. So, you can have 
special sets of function keys for different tasks. The "Ctrl" key is 
supported so that you have a full control code keyboard 
available. 

Window Master Applications 

Window Master pushs the Color Computer 3 far beyond its 
normal capabilities, into the world of a "User Friendly" 
operating enviornment. We are already planning several new 
programs for use with Window Master. So you don't have to 
worry about having to write all your own programs. And don't 
forget that many existing Basic and M.L. programs will run 
under Window Master with little or no changes. The 
Possibilities for Application programs are endless: Spread 
Sheets, Word Processing, Communications, Education, Games, 
Graphic Design, Desk Top Publishing and on and on. 

Hardware Requirements 

Window Master requires 512K of memory, at least 1 Disk 
Drive, a Hi-Res Joystick Interface and a Mouse or Joystick. 

Technical Assistance 



If you run into difficulty trying to use some of Window 
Master's features, we will be happy to assist you in any way 
possible. You can write to us at the address below or call us 
between 10am and 2pm Pacific Standard Time for a more timely 
response. Sorry, no collect calls will be accepted. 

Ordering Information 

To order WINDOW MASTER by mail, send check or money 

order for $69.95, plus $3.00 for shipping & handling to the 
address below. To order by VISA, MASTERCARD or COD 

call us at (702)^52-0632 
(Monday thru Saturday, 8am to 5pm PST) 

CER-COMP Ltd. 

5566 R icochet Avenue 
Las Vegas, Nevada 89110 
(702)-452-0632 



I BAS I C Trai nir^ 



Animation is fun to watch and create. 
This tutorial is an overview of simple 
animation techniques using GET and 
PUT. It does not attempt to get into the 
nitty-gritty of creating program lines 
but introduces you to the world of 
CoCo graphics and provides you with 
the basic knowledge to create your own 
cartoon. 

Let's get started by typing in the 
listing. First of all, turn down the sound 
on your computer and notice the effect 
it has on the screen's action. It looks 
slower (notice the free-fall) even though 
it is actually not. Sound enhances 
animation by helping the action to flow. 
Notice also that after the air-burst 
explodes, the bird, plane and ejected egg 
appear to move simultaneously. Simul- 
taneous action heightens the illusion of 
motion. 

In the last frame only half of the bird 
is formed to enhance its smooth move- 
ment off the screen. The bird continues 
down after it releases the egg, then up 
and away. The egg arcs forward, and 
each time there is greater distance 
between eggs from frame to frame. 

This all sounds trivial but small 
enhancements make the final product. 
Experiment to develop something 
uniquely your own. 

I've created several birds and a plane 
drawn, dimensioned and stored in GET 
lines. To see these, press BREAK. Add 
( :5CREENl,l)to Line 10, and enter Line 
60 as 60 GOTO 60. Now run the program. 

There are five bird attitudes, two 
having a shortened wing to add a 
heightened sense of wheeling. Egg and 
plane are self-evident. The x is PRESET 
to make the ejected material different 
from the bomb. The clustered area in 
the corner demonstrates that the picture 
elements can be drawn in an area over 
which the animation evolves without 
disrupting the display. The bird dips and 
releases the egg in the cluttered area. 

Restore Line 10 to its original state. 
Also delete Line 60 by typing DEL60. 
You may have already notice the sim- 
ilarity between this system and the one 
used in the GET-PUT tutorial. 

S4C1 is the default mode for size and 
color. 

The stationary house is drawn di- 



Florida-based Joseph Kolar is a veter- 
an writer and programmer who special- 
izes in introducing beginners to the 
powers of the Color Computer. 



Computer animation 
takes flight 

Count Your 
Eggs Before 
They Drop 

By Joseph Kolar 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 



rectly at Line 90. Line 50 uses a CIRCLE- 
PRINT combo to store the egg. Line 30, 
the DIM line, is reduced to single arrays 
with a value of 2. 

Note DIM C(2). There is a DRAW LINE 
52 creating nothing at (10,10), but 
there is no GET statement to store any- 
thing. Nevertheless, using Variable C in 
the PUT statements erases what we want 
to get rid of. 

Let's investigate. The first instance of 
using C is in Line 115. Type EDIT115 
then press X to extend the line. Press the 
left arrow until the cursor is under the 
S in PSET. Type RESET and press ENTER. 
Then run the program. By changing 
PSET to PRESET, we change the color to 
0. The backgound is in the 2-color mode 
in PMODE 4. 

See the wipe-out area? How big is it? 
It is the same size area called for in Line 
51, which immediately precedes our 
questionable nothing line. 

We told CoCo in Line 1 15 to put the 
background overlay at locations 
(12,12) to (24, IB). Masking Line 52 
proves we don't need it. What would 
happen if we yanked DIM C(2) or low- 
ered the value to C ( l ) ? FC Error in 1 1 5 
would appear on the screen, that's what! 
So we must dimension C. 

As long as we dimension C large 
enough, the PUT coordinates will deter- 
mine the size. Doubling the coordinates 
to 24-by-12 zonks it out. As long as the 
dimensioned value is large enough, 
(single array mode), the "nothing" value 



16K ECB 




must be assigned a variable and dimen- 
sion. If no DRRW line is used, the previous 
stored value is used. PUT uses the coor- 
dinates that include an area equal in size 
to what it can handle. The two-array 
DIM can be set to a specifically sized area 
to be erased by entering I.E. at 

C(12,6). 

In the next tutorial another way to 
erase will be discussed. 

Observe the plane explosion while 
turning up the sound. After the last 
plane frame, the egg appears. A slight 
pause is used so the impact is distinct. 
Line 400 initiates a small circle expand- 
ing within the FDR/NEXT loop to indicate 
the initial stage of the explosion with a 
discordant sound. Following is a larger 
CIRCLE routine at Line 500, simulating 
an image of a blasted plane. 

You don't need to erase this bit of 
activity because the action phase of the 
program is terminated at Line 1000 and 
returned to Line 80. The PCLS in Line 
80 does double duty, erasing the explo- 
sion and wiping out the scene to be 
recycled. 

Notice the air-burst over the farm 
complex. The GOSUB routine begins at 
Line 2000 with the outer rings giving 
depth to the explosion. The egg accel- 
erates by widening the distance between 
the objects from frame to frame. For 
added impact it travels a short distance 
to strike the target plane. 

Because Line 1 reads GD5UB5000, we 
know the title page was formed after all 
the artwork was completed. Entering 
POKE 359,60 puts one letter of text at a 
time onto the screen, making it look 
more polished. Entering EXEC 44539 
allows you to press any key to continue. 
Press ENTER. 

Entering P0KE359 restores normal 
speed. The reason is that if POKE 359,60 
is in force and you press BREAK, the 
program gets hung up, requiring you to 
press the reset button to correct it. And, 
also, if you are deeply engaged in 
working on the program and you enter 
LIST, the listing appears one letter at a 
time. This is of value when reading a 
listing but frustrating when you are 
eager to make program changes. You 
can delete both pokes, but it takes away 
some of the picture's flair. (Note: Delete 
POKE 359 , 60 in Line 5000 to run the title 
screen on a CoCo 3.) 

The listing is straightforward and 
easy to understand. You may want to 
research what Lines 50 to 58 consist of 



64 THE RAINBOW April 1989 



Make Signs, Banners, and Greeting Cards! 




SQUARE 
DANCE 



5 7PM 

;h M ^hool 











The Coco Graphics Designer Plus $29.95 



Super easy-to- 
use point and 
click graphical 
interface, fea- 
tures windows, 
scroll bars, radio 
buttons, and joy- 
stick or mouse 
control. 




Max Compatible 

Zebra's Picture disks 2, 3, 
and 4 include a simple for- 
mat conversion utility 
making them easy to use 
with Colorware's MAX-10, 
CoCo MAX II and III. 



The CoCo Graphics Designer Plus (CGDP) is CoCo 2 and 
3 Compatible. It allows pictures, and text in up to 4 sizes 
and 16 fonts, per page or banner. The cards & signs fea- 
ture hi-resolution borders and complete on-screen pre- 
views. The CGDP comes with 16 borders, 5 fonts, and 32 
pictures. It's 100% machine language for fast execution. 

Printer Support Radio Shack DMP105, 106, 110,120, 130, 132, 200, 400, 420, 430, 
440, 500, Epson FX/RX/LX/EX/LQ, Gemini 10X, Star SG10, NX10, NX1000, Panasonic 
KXP1080, 1090, 1091, 1092, Prowriter, C. itoh 8510 & more., Call for complete list. 

Requirements: 64K CoCo ll or III, disk drive with RSDOS, mouse or joystick. 

In addition to the font, border, and picture collections that come with the CoCo Graph- 
ics Designer Plus, the following optional disks are available for $14.95 each. 

Border Disk #1 Contains 176 High resolution borders, great variety from simple to ornate. 
Font Disk A 10 Fonts: Western, Stencil, Banner, Shadow, Variety, Type, Stripes, Digital, Bold3, Object 
Font Disk B 10 Fonts: Arcade, Circle, Alien, Cube, Baroque, Deco, Block, Gray, Computer, Script 
Picture Disk #2 4 sets of 30 pictures each: Sports, America, Party, Office, Total 120 pictures. 
Picture Disk #3 4 sets of 30 pictures each: Animals, Nature, Religion, Travel, Total 120 pictures. 
Picture Disk #4 120 holiday pictures: Christmas, Thanksgiving, New Year's, Easter, Halloween, etc. 





Disk 
Controller 



Zebra's disk controllers feature Gold 
Plated Edge Cards, Dual Selectable 
ROM sockets, 120 Day Warranty. 

Zebra Disk Controller 

Completed and tested controller with Radio 
Shack Disk ROM and manual 



Radio Shack Disk 1.1 ROM 
Drive 0 System Complete 
Drive 1 Add-on 
2 Drive System Complete 



$ 99.00 

$ 24.95 
$209.00 
$139.95 
$319.00 



All drives are new half height DSDD fast step. 
Less expensive drives also available, please call. 



Zebra E-x-p-a-n-d-s 

Zebra now sells quality products from many CoCo vendors including: 

Elite Software • Federal Hill • Michtron 
Spectro Systems • Sundog • Game Point ■ 
Avatex Modems • Star Micronics Printers I 
■ Metric Industries Interfaces • Magnavox Montiors I 

We plan to introduce exciting new Zebra designed software and hard- 
ware products at the April Rainbowfest in Chicago. Visit our booth! 



r Call, or mail us your address for a copy of our FREE CoCo Catalog!" 1 

Namp I 



Name_ 
I Address. 



I 



I 
I 



City. 



State 



Zip. 



have (Please circle what you have.): Rainbow Subscription Y N 
CoCo 1 2 3, Disk drives. 0 1 2 more, Display B&W Color 



Woodhaven is located in the borough of Queens in New York City, just 
30 minutes from Manhattan and 15 minutes from LaGuardia & Kenne- 
dy Airports. Stop by our store Monday through Friday 9-5. 

Ordering Instructions: All orders add $3.00 Shipping & Handling. UPS COD add $3.00. VISA/MC Accepted. NY residents add sales tax. 

Zebra Systems, Inc., 78-06 Jamaica Ave., Woodhaven, NY 11421 (718) 296-2385 



The Rainbow Bookshelf 




Fill out your 
with these 



The Complete Rainbow Guide to OS-9 

Authors Dale Puckett and Peter Dibble show how to take 
advantage of OS-9's multitasking and multiuser features. An easy- 
to-read, step-by-step guide packed with hints, tips, tutorials and free 
software in the form of program listings. 
Book $19.95, Disk Package $31 (2 disks, book not included) 






The Rainbow Book of Simulations 1 |i 

20 award-winning entries from THE RAINBOW'S first Simulations 
contest. You are a Civil War Commander, an air traffic controller, 
a civil defense coordinator, or a scientist on Mars j . . your wits are 
on the line. 

Book $9.95, Tape $9.95 



The Complete Rainbow Guide to OS-9 Level II 
Vol. I: A Beginners Guide to Windows 

Puckett and Dibble have done it again! They uncover the 
mysteries of the new windowing environment and demonstrate 
clever new applications. More hints, tips and plenty of program 
listings. Book $19.95, Disk $19.95 

The Rainbow Introductory Guide to Statistics 

Dr. Michael Plog and Dr. Norman Stenzel give a solid introduction 
to the realm of statistical processes and thinking for both the 
beginner and the professional. (80-column printer required.) 
Book $6.95, Tape or Disk $5.95, Package $11.95 

The First Rainbow Book of Adventures 

Contains 14 winning programs from our first Adventure contest. 
Includes Sir Randolph of the Moors, Horror House, One Room, Dr. 
Avaloe and more. Plus hints, tips on solving Adventures. 
Book $3.50, Tape $3.50 

The Second Rainbow Book of Adventures 

Featuring 24 of the most challenging Adventure games ever 
compiled. Meet the Beatles and battle the Blue Meanies, find a 
hidden fortune, or win the heart of a mysterious princess. Ring 
Quest, Secret Agent Man, Dark Castle, Curse of Karos and more! 
Book $13.95, Tape $13.95 

The Third Rainbow Book of Adventures 

The excitement continues with 19 new Adventures. Discover 
backstage Intrigue at the London Theatre, attempt a daring space 
rescue, or defeat evil in the year 2091 as a genetic android. Evil 
Crypt, Spymaster, Time Machine, The Amulet, and that's only the 
beginning! Book $1 1.95, Tape $9.95, Two-Disk Set $14.95 

The Fourth Rainbow Book of Adventures 

Fourteen fascinating new Adventures from the winners of our 
fourth Adventure competition. Rely on your wits to escape a hostile 
military installation, try to stop the Nazi plan to invade Great Britain, 
manage to reinstate our defense system before the enemy launches 
a massive missile attack, and more! 
Book $10.95, Tape $9.95, Two- Disk Set $14.95 



The Second Rainbow Book of Simulations 

The 16 winners from our second Simulations contest. Fly through 
dense African jungle, bull your way down Wall Street, lead a bomb 
squad, or try your hand at Olympic events. Test your skills and 
talents. Book $9.95, Tape $9.95, Disk $10.95 



r 
i 
i 
i 

| City 
I State 



/ want to start my own Rainbow Bookshelf! 

Name 

Address 



ZIP 



■j □ Payment Enclosed, or □ Charge to: 
I □ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 

I Account Number 

1 



I 



Card Expiration Date 



| Signature 

Please send me: 

□ The Rainbow Book of Simulations 

I □ Rainbow Simulations Tape 

□ The Second Rainbow Book of Simulations 

□ Second Rainbow Simulations Tape 
I □ Second Rainbow Simulations Disk 

□ The Complete Rainbow Guide to 0S-9 (book only) 



£t "ft * 



□ Rainbow Guide to OS-9 Disk Package (2 disks) 

□ The Windows & Applications Disk for 

The Complete Rainbow Guide to 0S-9 Level II, Vol. I 

□ The Rainbow Book of Adventures (first) 

□ Rainbow Adventures Tape (first) 

□ The Second Rainbow Book of Adventures 

□ Second Rainbow Adventures Tape 

□ The Third Rainbow Book of Adventures 

□ Third Adventures Tape 

□ Third Adventures Disk Set (2 disks) 

□ The Fourth Rainbow Book of Adventures 

□ Fourth Adventures Tape 

□ Fourth Adventures Disk Set (2 disks) 

□ introductory Guide to Statistics 

□ Guide to Statistics Tape or Disk (indicate choice) 

□ Guide to Statistics Package (indicate choice of tape or disk) 
'Add $2 per book Shipping and Handling in U.S. 
'Outside U.S., add $4 per book 

'Kentucky residents add 5% sales tax 

(Allow 6 to 8 weeks for delivery) Total 



$ 9.95 . 
$ 9.95 . 
$ 9.95 . 
$ 9.95 . 
$10.95. 
$19.95. 
$31.00. 

$19.95. 
$ 7.95 . 
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$13.95. 
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$11.95. 
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$10.95 
$ 9.95 
$14.95 
$ 6.95 
$ 5.95 
$11.95 



j Mail to: Rainbow Bookshelf, The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 385, 
I Prospect, KY 40059 

I To order by phone (credit card orders only) call (800)847- 
I 0309, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. For other inquiries call (502) 
j 228-4492. 

I Please note: The tapes and disks offered by The Rainbow Bookshelf are not stand-alone products. 
| That is, they are intended to be an adjunct and complement to the books. Even if you buy the tape 
j or disk, you will still need the appropriate book. OS-9® is a registered trademark of the Microware 
I Systems Corporation. 



Use our 800 number! 



For credit card orders, you may want to phone in your subscription. Our 

credit card order number is (800) 847-0309, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. All other 

inquiries please call (502) 228-4492. 

We accept VISA, MasterCard and American Express. 

Subscriptions to the rainbow are $31 a year in the United States. Canadian 

rate is $38 (U.S. funds only). Surface rate elsewhere is $68 (U.S.). Airmail 

is $103 (U.S.). All subscriptions begin with the current issue. Please allow 

6 to 8 weeks for the first copy. Kentucky residents add 5% sales tax. 

In order to hold down non-editorial costs, we do not bill. 



Send Me Rainbow Magazine! 

Which Tandy Color Computer do you use? □ CoCo 1 □ CoCo 2 □ CoCo 3 

Here's your chance to have a Pot O' Gold full of programs, articles and information about 
CoCo every month of the year! 

As the premier magazine for the Tandy Color Computer, THE RAINBOW has more of 
everything — and greater variety, too. Do yourself and your CoCo a favor and subscribe to 
THE RAINBOW today! 

YES! Sign me up for a year (12 issues) of THE RAINBOW. 

□ NEW □ RENEW (attach label) 

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RAINBOW ON TAPE or RAINBOW ON DISK! 

Just call (800) 847-0309 anytime from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. Credit card orders only. 
Subscriptions to rainbow on tape are $80 a year in the United States, $90 (U.S. 
funds) in Canada and $105 (U.S.) in all other countries. 

rainbow on disk is $99 a year in the United States, $115 (U.S.) in Canada and $130 
(U.S.) in all other countries. 

Individual issues of rainbow on tape are $10 in the U.S., $1 2 (U.S.) in Canada and 
all other countries. Individual issues of rainbow on disk are $12 in the U.S., $14 
(U.S.) in Canada, and $16 (U.S.) in all other countries. Kentucky residents please 
add 5% sales tax. 

rainbow on tape and rainbow on disk are not stand-alone products; you need the 
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the rainbow magazine is a separate purchase. 



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YES! Sign me up: □ NEW □ RENEW (attach label) 

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The B«99e st 
The Best 
The indispensable 




The 

THE COLOR COMPUTER A40NWyV1>V^Z^ 



THE RAINBOW is the biggest, best, brightest and 
most comprehensive publication a happy CoCo 
ever had! THE RAINBOW features more programs, 
more information and more in-depth treatment of 
the Tandy Color Computer than any other source. 

A monthly issue contains nearly 200 pages and 
up to two dozen programs, 14 regular columns and 
as many as 12 new product reviews. And advertise- 
ments: THE RAINBOW is known as the medium for 
advertisers — which means every month it has a 
wealth of information unavailable anywhere else 
about new products! Hundreds of programs are 
advertised in its pages each month. 

Every single issue of THE RAINBOW covers the 
wide spectrum of interests in the Tandy Color 
Computer — from beginners' tutorials and arcade 
games to telecommunications and business and 
finance programs. Helpful utilities and do-it- 
yourself hardware projects make it easy and fun to 
expand your CoCo's capabilities. And, monthly 
reviews by independent reader reviewers take the 
guesswork out of buying new software and hard- 
ware products. 

Join the tens of thousands who have found THE 
RAINBOW to be an absolute necessity for their 
CoCo. With all this going for it, is it surprising that 
more than 90 percent of THE RAINBOW subscrib- 
ers renew their subscriptions? We're willing to bet 
that, a year from now, you'll be doing the same. 



Rainbow On Tape 

& Rainbow On Disk! 



— great ways to bring THE RAINBOW into your life. 
Each month, all you do is pop the tape into your 
cassette player or the disk into your drive. No more 
lost weekends. As soon as you read an article about 
a program in THE RAINBOW, it's ready to load and 
run. No work. No wait. 

Just think how your software library will grow. 
With your first year's subscription, you'll get almost 
250 new programs; games, utilities, business 
programs, home applications. And, with RAINBOW 
ON DISK, you'll also get all the OS-9 programs. 

RAINBOW ON TAPE and RAINBOW ON DISK — 
they're the "meat" of THE RAINBOW at a price that's 
"small potatoes." And now you even have a choice 
about how it should be served up to you. 

To get your first heaping helping, just fill out and 
return the attached reply card. No postage neces- 
sary. 



and put an explanatory remark after 
each GET in lines 70 to 79 so you will 
know what each PUT line is doing. 
Manipulate the lines' coordinates and 
keep altering them until you get a 
location that pleases you. I call this free- 
hand programming. You initially locate 
an object, check it, change and/ or 
relocate, check it again, and when 
satisfied with the frame, move on to the 
next. Don't erase the old form but leave 
it on the screen, even if it distorts a 
previously set frame. It is much easier 
to work out movement paths with tell- 
tale tracks of the objects on the screen. 
Mask the first six C PUT lines. Run 



lines 115, 116, 135, 136, 155 and 156. 
Now, mask lines 175, 176, 195 and 196 
and run the program. The bird distorts 
frames that it overrides. If the birds in 
each frame are too far apart, they won't 
overlap and you lose the birds' slower 
action as they change direction. Instead, 
the action is stiff and unrealistic. 

Be sure to read the next tutorial for 
some new ideas. Chances are you will 
make more elegant birds than this artist. 

Here's a final idea to keep you going. 
Re-enter the following line: 

53 DRRW"BM13,10M+3,2F2M+1,2M+1, 
-2E2M+3,-2" 



Practice using the M option com- 
mands. Use the same-sized canvas for 
all the objects — 12-by-6 on graph 
paper. Plot the picture and box it in. Go 
over it in red. Then, in black, make the 
bird you displaced by entering F6E6. 
Your new bird in Line 53 has a more 
gentle and natural curve. Add Line 161 
by entering goto 161. Then run the 
program. Looks better doesn't it? Plot 
lines 51, 54, 55, 56 and 57, the half-bird, 
onto graph paper, making them bend 
gently. When you get something nice, 
try it out on your program and replace 
the old birds with your new and im- 
proved ones. □ 



The Listing: BIGBIRD 


52 


DRAWBM0, 10 " 




53 


DRAW"BM13,10F6E6" 


j3 ' <BIGBIRD> 


54 


DRAW"BM0,20F6R6" 


1 


55 


DRAW"BM0,30R6F6" 


lj3 PMODE4 , 1 : PCLS 


56 


DRAW" BM2 4 , 2 4 F6BU6G6 " 


30 DIM A(2), B(2), C(2) , D(2), E 


57 


DRAW"BM30,3E3BR6F3" 


(2), F(2), H(2), J(2), K(2) 


58 


DRAW"BM50,50 BD5R14BL5G2H2E2U 


50 CIRCLE (3,3) ,3,3 : PAINT (3,3) ,1, 


NUNRNLBDF2 " 


1 ■'■"'"^ ' 


70 


GET (0,0) -(12, 6) , A, G 


51 DRAW"BM13,0BD6E6F6" 


71 


GET(13,0)-(25,6) ,B,G 



If you write checks, use credit cards, have a bank account or pay taxes, then.... 

You Need CoCo- Accountant III 



Since 1983, CoCo-Account- 
ant has been leading the pack in 
home and small business financial 
programs for the Color Computer. 
Now we've made it even better, with a brand new CoCo- 
Accountant just for the Color Computer 3. Take advan- 
tage of all the new machine has to offer in a program that 
will make managing your money a snap! 

CoCo-Accountant III answers the big three ques- 
tions we all have about our finances: Where did the 
money come from? Where did it go? And what can I 
deduct from my taxes? 

CoCo-Accountant III doesn't require any knowledge 
of accounting. It's a single-entry system that thinks the 
way you do. Just set up a list of accounts and start 
entering your transactions. Checks, credit cards, cash 
receipts, payroll stubs, electronic fund transfers, whatever. 
You toss it in and CoCo-Accountant sorts it out. Here's 
what CoCo-Accountant does: 

• Lists and totals all transactions for any calendar 
period. 

• Lists and totals transactions by account, payee or 
income source for any calendar period. 

• Instant account and monthly summaries with net cash 
flow. 



•Tracks, lists and totals 
deductible expenses . 
• Tracks uncleared checks 
and balances your check- 
book. Makes that monthly chore a breeze! 
• Produces a printed spreadsheet showing transactions by 
month and account for the whole year! Seeing this one is 
believing. 

CoCo-Accountant III stores up to 2,000 transactions and 72 
accounts (depending on disk space). Almost every feature has 
been improved. It will run on any CoCo 3 with a disk drive. And 
best yet, it's only $39.95. 

You say you donl have a CoCo 3? You can still order our 
best-selling CoCo-Accountant li with many of these features for 
only $34.95. 

Join our list of satisfied customers who say CoCo- 
Accountant is the most useful program they own! Send check, 
money order or VISA/MasterCard information to the address 
below, or call our handy, toll-free order line. 

Federal Hill Software 
8134 Scotts Level Road 
Baltimore, Md. 21208 
301-521-4886 
Toll-free Orders 800-628-2828 Ext. 850 



NEW for the CoCo 3 



April 1989 THE RAINBOW 67 



72 GET(0,20)-(12,26) ,E,G 

73 GET(0,30)-fl2,36) ,F,G 

74 GET(13,10)-(25,16) ,D,G 

75 GET (24, 24) -(30/3^) ,H,G 

78 GET(50,50)-(64,56) ,J,G 

79 GET(30,0) -(42,3) ,K,G 

80 PCLS : SCREEN1 , 1 

90 DRAW"BM40 , 191U10R4D6R6U2R2D4R 
6U8R2D8R4U4R6D2R2D4" 

91 PAINT (42, 189) ,1,1 





PUT (12 , 12 ) - 


(24 , 18) , E, 


p PSET 


lip 


PUT (12 , 2p) - 


(24,26) / A i 


f PSET 


111 


GOSUB3j3pp 






115 


PUT (12 , 12) - 


(24/ 18) , 


r PSET 


116 


PUT (12 , 2,0) - 


(24,26) , C, 


r PSET 


12p 


PUT (14 ., 18) - 


(26,24) >Bi 


f PSET 


13)3 


PUT ( 14 / 3p ) 


(26,36), Aj 


r PSET 


13 1 


GOoUdJPPP 








FU 1 ( 14 r lo ) — 


(26,24) ,0, 




136 


PUT (14/ 3p) ^ 


(2 6 , 36) f C i 


r PSET 


1 A ft 

14 p 


PUT (18 , 2 4 ) 


' f ft ft V O 

(3p,3p) ,3, 


r PSET 


lop 


PUT ( lo , 42 ) — 


(3j5, 48) , Aj 


r PSET 


151 


GOSuBj ppp 






ICC 

loo 


FU 1 ( lo , ^ 4 J ~ 


(3)3, 3p) , C 1 


r rbilX 


156 


PUT ( 18 , 42 ) r 


(30,48) ,C ( 


t> 0 Tim 

r PSET 


16)3 


PUT ( 2 4 , 24 ) — 


(36 , 30) ^D, 


r PSbl 




PTTT f 9 9 R A ^ — 






171 


GOSUB3000 






175 


PUT f 24 . 24 


f 3 6 . 3 0 ^ iC, 


, PSET 


17 6 


PUT (22 5 4 \ - 




PSET 




PTTT 7 7 0 9 \ — 


y a 9 ^ 9 v n 






PTTT f 9 8 7 01 \ — 








ijwoud j ppp 


/ 4 9 ^ 9 V P 




1 OK 
1? O 


PTTT f 1 01 9 — 




19 6 


rUl ( Zo , / p ) ™ 


(40, 76) > C, 


"DC "ITT 
p Pb£il 


r% rA 


irU 1 ( Jb^ z ) ^ 


l4o, Zo) , r , 




Zip 


IrU 1^4, yp 


^ 46,3 O J , A , 




211 


GOSUB3j3j3j3 






2 lo 


PUT(36 f 22)r 


(48,28) ,C, 


f PSET 


216 


PUT (34 ,9p)~ 


(46,96) ,C, 


F PSET 


220 


PUT(4j3 7 2j3)- 


(52,26) ,D, 


r PSET 


230 


PUT(42,114) 


"(54,120) , 


A, PSET 


231 


G0SUB3p^fp 






235 


PUT(4j3,2j3)- 


(52,26) ,C, 


PSET 


236 


PUT(42,114) 


-(54,120) , 


C,PSET 


241 


PUT(44 # 16)- 


(56,22) ,D, 


PSET 


250 


PUT(48,14^| 


-(60,146) , 


A, PSET 


251 


G0SUB3^p 






255 


PUT(44,16) - 


(56,22) ,C, 


PSET 


256 


PUT(48,14j3) 


-(60,146) , 


C , PSET 


260 


PUT (48 f 


(60,16) ,F, 


,PSET 


270 


PUT(52 / 175) 


-(64,181) ( 


r A, PSET 


271 


PLAY " 0 1L8 0GBDBGDDGBDGB" 


275 


PUTj[48 f lj3)- 


(60,16) ,C, 


r PSET 


276 


PUT(52,17 5) 


-(64,181) , 


, C , PSET 


277 


GOSUB2j3j3^l 




280 


PUT ( 54 , 6 ) - ( 66 , 12 ) , F , PSET 


290 
T 


PUT(8J3>15^) 


-(86,156) ,H,PRESE 



291 
295 
296 
300 
305 
310 
SET 
311 
315 
316 



T 

320 
321 
330 
T 

331 
335 
336 
337 
340 
341 
T 

342 

345 
346 

360 



GOSUB4000 

PUT (54, 6) -(66, 12) ,C,PSET 
PUT (80, 150) -(86, 156) ,C,PSET 
PUT(60,0)-(72,6) ,B,PSET 
PUT(150,0)-(164,6) , J, PSET 
PUT ( 110 , 110 ) - ( 116 , 116) , H, PRE 

GOSUB4000 

PUT (60,0)- (72,6) ,C , PSET 
PUT ( 1 50 , 0 ) - ( 1 6 4, 6 ) , C , PSET 
PUT (110 ,110) - (116, 116) ,C,PSE 



PSET 
PSET 

PRESE 



PUT(160,6)-(174,12) ,J,E 
PUT ( 6 6 , 0 ) - ( 78, 3 ) ,K , PS El 
PUT(140,70)-(146,76) ,H, 

GOSUB4000 
PUT(160,6)-(174,12) ,C,PSET 
PUT (140,70) - ( 14 6 , 7 6 ) , C , PSET 
PUT(66,0)-(78,3) ,C,PSET 
PUT ( 170 , 16 ) - ( 184 , 2 2 ) , J , PSET 
PUT(170, 40) -(176,46) ,H,PRESE 



T 

370 
400 
410 

420 
500 
510 
511 
520 



GOSUB4000 
PUT (170, 16) 
PUT (170, 40) 
PUT (184, 28) 
PUT (18 6 ,30) 



(184,22) ,C,PSET 
(176,46) ,C, PSET 
(198,34) , J, PSET 
(192, 36) ,H, PRESE 



GOSUB4000 
FOR X=l TO 6 
CIRCLE (190, 32) ,X, 1 
PLAY"O2V30L32DEG" 
NEXT X 

FOR X=10 TO 24STEP2 
CIRCLE ( 190 , 32) ,X,1 
PLAY "01V25L32GED" 
NEXTX 



STEP3 



1000 GOTO80 

2000 FOR X=l TO 6 

2001 CIRCLE (5 6, 180) ,X,1 

2002 NEXT 

2003 FOR X=9 TO 15 

2004 CIRCLE (56, 180) ,X,1 

2005 NEXT: RETURN 

3000 FOR Z=1T0 40: NEXT: RETURN 
4000 FORZ=1TO30:NEXT:PLAY"O1V30L 
6 4 FACEECAF " : RETURN 

5000 POKE 3 5 9 , 60 : CLS : PRINT : PRINT : 
PRINT: PRINT" THE BIG BIRD DROPS 

AN ATOMIC BIRD EGG ON THE FARM 
COMPLEX. WHEN IT EXPLODES AN 

EGG CARTON IS HURLED SKYWARD TO 
INTERCEPT AND DESTROY A PESTIC 

IDE-CARRYINGCROP-DUSTER. " 

5001 PRINT: PRINT" PRESS <ENTER> 
TO SEE THIS TIDBIT IN MOTIO 

N. ":EXEC44539:POKE359,126 

5002 GOTO10 



68 THE RAINBOW April 1989 



iliiiiiii 




No Better System is Available at Any Price (But the Price is Great, t<?p!| 





DISK 
CONTROLLER 

We at OWL- WARE are 
pleased to announce that we 
have purchased the rights to all 
of the Color Computer 
Products of J&M Systems. 
J&M has had more experience 
with CoCo controllers than any 
other supplier (except for 
Radio Shack® itself) and we 
are proud to add them to our 
nest! OWL-WARE will now be 
producing J&M controllers 
under the OWL brand. These 
controllers all use J&M's 
proven designs, with some 
minor improvements, and they 
will serve you for years to come. 

• All gold contacts 

• Works with all CoCo 
models (1,2,3) 

• Holds 2 switchable ROMS 

• Positive switching by 
simple jumper or optional 
external switch (No erratic 
software or pokes re- 
quired) 

• Buffered I/O lines to help 
prevent burn-out if unit 
accidentally pulled out 
with the system on 

• Latching chips are sock- 
eted to speed repairs 

• Does not use the WD 1773 
chip which caused 
problems with many CoCo 
3 systems and is now dis- 
continued 

• Attractive all metal case 

• Dealer inquiries now in- 
vited 



CONTROLLER ortly 

''Ifff^ 

Ipiiilillllliliiiill 



See the next 2 nages for more 
drive and software specials 
from OWL-WARE 




Disk drives are not our only business, but they sure are our 
main business! We have been selling hard and floppy drives for 
the CoCo longer than any other Rainbow advertiser. Our double 
sided drives are brand new, half-heights with a full one year 
warranty! The full-height drives offered cheap by our competi- 
tion are used or surplus! 



lllllllllll;!^ 




^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 



CASE AND 
POWER 
SUPPLY 

In recent months it has be- 
come very difficult to obtain de- 
pendable, safe power supply 
and cases for floppy drive sys- 
tems. They just couldn't pass 
our quality control. OWL- 
WARE has now produced a 
case and power supply that you 
can be proud to own and use. 
We believe that this is the best 
and most attractive drive case 
available for any computer. 

• Built in surge protector! 
(we believe that this fea- 
ture is unique in CoCo 
drive cases) 

• Sleek, modern design 

• Heavy-duty power supply 

• Fully shielded data cable 

• Modular power supply 
construction for ease of 
repairs 

• Stackable case design 

• Dealer inquiries now in- 
vited 



i^^BiiiiMiii 





More 




OWLrWARI 



P.O. Boxll6-A 
Mcrtztown, PA 19539 
- ORDER LINES (only) — 
(800) 245-6228 
(215) 682-6855 (PA) 



Pro ven 

On the Razor's Edge of 



Basic and OS-9 Hard 
Drive Systems 

Proven Performance for Demanding Home or 

Business Users 




Every hard drive which has been 
produced by OWL- WARE during the 
last 3 years is complete. A system con- 
sists of software, hard drive, controller, 
heavy-duty power supply, and LR Tech 
Interface. There are no hidden costs for 
assembly or testing. When a drive sys- 
tem is ordered, we fully assemble, test, 
and burn-in the system for 3 full days. 
This ensures dependability and op- 
timum performance. 

We have now been supplying CoCo 
hard drive systems and parts for more 
than 3 years. This is the longest history 
in the CoCo market of any system. 
Some other advertisers are stating that 
they have one of the most reliable sys- 
tems for the CoCo with all of 4 months 
history in the CoCo hard drive market] 
We have reached our position in the 
hard drive market by providing our cus- 
tomers with a quality product that they 
(and we) can be proud to own and use. 



Because of many requests for a lower 
price system in kit form, we are now 
selling a kit of all parts at a significant 
discount compared to our regular 
prices. We recommend this kit (or any 
kits offered by any other supplier) only 
to those who have experience in 
electronic assembly and OS-9. 

We have LR Tech and Burke & Burke 



For OS-9 
Levels 1 
and 2 




OWL Hard Drive BASIC 3 

There have been several ads in this 
magazine about BASIC for Color 
Computer hard drive systems. These 
ads sometimes only tell a part of the 
story. Our BASIC system price in- 
cludes assembly, testing, and 3-day 
burn-in period. We do not require a 
Multi-pak to operate. 

Our hard drive systems are fast, reli- 
able, and reasonable in price. This has 
been proven by hundreds of users over 
the past 3 years. We do not have to turn 
off error checking for speed. We 
achieve high speed BASIC from a uni- 
que indexing method. 

The table below will summarize some 
of the key points about our BASIC hard 
drive system and the B&B system. We 
believe that we have the best BASIC in- 
terface for CoCo hard drives available. 



BASIC Hard Drive Systems 

Feature OWL B&B 


Drive Portion 
Avaiiabie at 
One Time 


Entire 


Partial (4 
sections) 


User Sets 

BASIC/OS-9 

Partitions 


YES 


Yes 


Add to Exist- 
ing OS-9 
Drive Without 
Reformat 


YES 


No(?) 


Drives 0-3 
Hard/Floppy 


YES 


No 


Built in Park 


YES 


No 


Speed* 


FAST 


Fast 



All feature details are believed to be 
true at time of writing and are subject 
to change. We believe that our BASIC 
hard drives are the fastest due to our in- 
dexing method, but both systems are 
fast and we sell both. On ours all 
BASIC commands work including 
DSKINI, DSKI$, and DSKO$. 

Prices: With/Without Hard 

Drive 

$35./$79. 

























Technology 



the Color Computer Frontier 




Bonus! 

Special 

Bundled 

Software 

with any 

Disk Drive 

Purchase! 




Floppy Drive Systems 

The Highest Quality for Years of Service 

(We have located a number of unused, surplus single sided drives for 
those who wish a quality, inexpensive system.) 

Drive 0 Systems (Half Height, Double Sided, Direct 

Drives) $199. (Same but Single sided) $185 

Drive 0 systems complete with drive, controller, legal DOS, 

cable, case, power supply, and manual 

Drive 1 Systems (Half Height, Double Sided, Direct 

Drives) $129. (Same but Single sided) $115. 

New 3.5", 720K Drives for OS-9 with case & 

Power Supply $179. 

Drive 1 Systems have drive, case, power supply. (You may 
require optional cable and/or DOS chip to use) 

Special for 0/1 Combos (Drives 0,1,2,3) $295. 





All drives are new and fully assembled. 
We ship only FULLY TESTED and 
CERTIFIED at these low prices. We 
use Fuji, YE Data, and other fine 
brands. No drives are used or surplus 
unless otherwise stated to you when 
you order. We appear to be the one of 
the few advertisers in Rainbow who 
can truly make this claim. We have 5 
years experience in the CoCo disk 
drive market! We are able to provide 
support when you have a problem. 



Drives 1 Year Warranty [ 




Order ^ 



OWL WARE Software Bundle 



Disk Tutorial/Utilities/Games 
DISK TUTOR Ver 1.1 

Learn how to use your disk drive from 
this multi-lesson, machine language 
program. This tutor takes you through 
your lessons and corrects your mistakes 
for a quick, painless disk drive introduc- 
tion. (This professionally written tutor 
is easily worth the bundle's total price.) 

OWL DOS 

An operating system that gives faster 
disk access and allows the use of 
double-sided drives. Corrects a floating 
point number error on early CoCo sys- 
tems. 

COPY-IT 

Quickly copies selected programs be- 
tween disks. A wild card option selects 
groups of programs to copy. 

VERIFY 

Verifies reading of each sector. Bad 
sectors are listed on the screen. 

2 GAMES 

We will select 2 games from our stock. 
These sold for more than $20 each. 

If sold separately this is more than $125 
worth of software!! 

Do not mistake this software with 
cheap, non-professional "Public 
Domain" software which is being of- 
fered by others. All of this software is 
copyrighted and professional in quality. 
The tutor is unique with us and has 
helped thousands of new users learn 
their disk drive. 

only $27.95 
(or even better) 
only $6.95 with 
any Disk Drive Purchase!! 

Dur prices, include a. discount for cash 
but do not include snipping. 

OWL-WARE has a liberal warranty policy. During the warran- 
ty period, all defective items will be repaired or replaced at our 
option at no cost to the buyer except for shipping costs. Call 
our tech number for return. Return of non-defective or un- 
authorized returns are subject to a service charge. 



wmmmmmmmm 

lllllilllBllll 
iiiiiiiiiiiii 




The tenth in a series of tutorials for 
the beginner to intermediate machine 
language programmer 



Machine Language Made BASIC 

Part X: Two-Dimensional Rotation 



By William P. Nee 



Rotating a point around the 
screen is a slow but not too 
complicated process. It mainly 
involves computing new x and y loca- 
tions, and machine language is great at 
using math for doing just that. If we 
avoid using ROM routines and the FP 
registers, this process is considerably 
faster. 

In this article we take a point at an 
old x and y location and revolve it to 
get a new x and y location. This involves 
switching to the old location while the 
new locations are plotted. 

The center of the screen (128,96) is the 
starting point (0,0) for all coordinates. 
If the angle of rotation is called A, the 
formulas for a new Xi and yi are as 
follows: 

Xi = x.cos(a) - y.sin(a) 
yi = x.sin(a) + y.cos(a) 

This rotates the old x,y counter- 
clockwise A degrees to the new Xi,yi; 
new x ls y, is PSET(12B+X1,96-Y1). 

Unfortunately, using sines and co- 
sines slows down a graphics program. 
The BASIC program at the end of this 
article gives you an idea of this problem. 
The more points, the longer the compu- 



Bill Nee bucked the "snowbird" trend 
by retiring to Wisconsin from a banking 
career in Florida. He spends the long, 
cold winters writing programs for his 
Co Co. 



tation time, so we will use an alternative 
method. 

Say our angle of rotation is roughly 
7. 1 73 degrees. The sine of 7. 1 73 is about 
1/8, and the cosine is about 127/128. 
Both figures can be calculated quickly 
by using shift commands. 

If Register A contains the old x 
locations then these ML commands will 
divide the old location by eight and 
produce the same result as multiplying 
by the sine: 

RSRfl (Divide by 2) 
RSRfl (Divide by 4) 
ASRA (Divide by 8) 

This also retains the plus or minus 
value. 

If Register B contains the old y loca- 
tion, then a subroutine like the follow- 
ing will compute the cosine: 

TFR B,A (Save Y into Register A) 

ASRB (Divide by 2) 

R5RB (Divide by 4) 

ASRB (Divide by 8) 

ASRB (Divide by 16) 

ASRB (Divide by 32) 

ASRB (Divide by 64) 

ASRB (Divide by 128) 

PSHS B 

SUB A ,S+ (the number minus 1 / 128 of 
the number = 1 27/ 1 28 of the 
number) 

Register A will contain 127/128 times 
the old number (the same as the old 



number times the cosine). Adding and 
subtracting the results of both opera- 
tions gives us the new x t ,yi locations. 
Since we use signed numbers, no coor- 
dinate can be greater than 127 or less 
than -128. 

However, because we use just one 
byte for each coodinate, the computer 
continually rounds off the results and 
eventually produces a large error. 
Therefore, we store each coordinate in 
two bytes; the first byte is the whole 
number, and the second byte is the two- 
place decimal. We use only the first byte 
to PSET the point. This means all of our 
shifts are actually shifts of Register D 
— remember, a right shift of Register D 
is ASRA, RORB. This gives us more than 
enough accuracy to continue plotting 
without causing a rounding-off error. 

There is also a new way to PSET a 
given point: by converting an x,y loca- 
tion to the byte containing the location 
and then PSETting the actual bit. Let's 
see how this is done in PMODE 4. 

In PMDDE 4 there are 192 rows (0 to 
191) of 32 bytes each. (Location $B9 
gives the bytes per line for the current 
PMODE). Multiplying the y coordinate by 
32 gives you the start of the row con- 
taining the byte you want. Add to that 
the start of the graphics page (in Loca- 
tion $BA/$BB). Next, figure how far 
over into the row we need to go. The x 
location can range from 0 to 255, but 
since there are eight bits to a byte, divide 
the x location by eight. Adding this to 
the beginning of the row location gives 
us the desired byte location. 



72 



THE RAINBOW April 1989 



ftware 



New!!! Another Package of New Calligrapher Fonts! "O 
Save $10.00 when you order the new Calligrapher Economy Font 
Package #3. See the samples below. The introductory price of just 
$19.95 is available through March 31, 1989, Specify RSDQS or 0S9. 



CALLIGRAPHER 

CoCo Call i graph er - Turn your 
CoCo and dot-matrix printer into 
a calligrapher's quill. Make beau- 
tiful invitations, flyers, certif- 
icates, labels and more. Includes 
three Vz inch high fonts. Works 
with many printers such as Ep- 
son, Gemini and Radio Shack. 
Over 135 additional fonts are 
available (see below). Tape /Disk; 
$24.95. 

OS9 Calligrapher - Prints all the 
same fonts as the CoCo Calligra- 
pher. It reads a standard text file 
which contains text and format- 
ting codes. You may specify the 
font to use, change fonts at any 
time, centering, left, right or full 
justify, line nil, margin, line 
width, page size, page break and 
indentation. Similar to troff on 
UNIX systems. Includes the 
same 3 fonts with additional 
fonts available below. Disk only; 
OS9 Level I or II; $24.95. 

Calligrapher Fonts - Requires 
Calligrapher above. Each set on 
tape or disk with 8 to 10 fonts; 
specify RSDOS or OS9 version; 
$14.95 each: 

Set#l Reduced and reversed originals; 

Set #2 Old Style and Broadway; 

Set #3 Antique and Business; 

Set #4 Wild West and Checkers; 

Set #5 Stars, Hebrew and Victorian; 

Set #6 Block and Computer; 

Set #7 Small: Roman, Italics, Cubes, etc; 

Set #8 Novelty fonts; NEW 

Set #9 Gallant and Spartan; NEW 

Set #10 Several Roman fonts; 

Set #11 Gothic and Script; 

Set #12 More Roman and Italic; 

Set #13 Several Courier fonts; NEW 

Set #14 Modern and Screen; NEW 

Set #15 Tektron and Prestige. NEW 

Economy Font Packages avail- 
able on disk only, with 25 to 30 
fonts; specify RSDOS or OS9: 
29.95 each or $59.95 for all 

three: 

Pkg #1 - Above font sets 1, 2 and 3; 
Pkg #2 - Above font sets 4, 5 and 6; 
Pkg #3 - Above font sets 7, 8 and 9; 
Pkg #4 - Above font sets 10, 11 and 12; 
Pkg #5 - Above font sets 13, 14 and 15. 



Calligrapher Combo Pa 

and Economy Font Pac 
specify RSDOS or OS9: J 


ickage - Includes the Calligrapher 
sages #1 and #2, 54 fonts in all: 
569.95. 





For the Calligrapher! 

These two new font sets along with font set #7 now complete the 
Economy Font Package #3. As displayed below, each set contains 
several styles of the fonts in different sizes and boldness, regular 
and reversed. Set #7 includes 10 small fonts. Set #8 includes 10 
novelty Jonta. Set #9 includes 10 Gallant and Spartan fonts. Each 
set is $14.05. Sets 7, 8 and 9 on one disk make up the Economy 
Font Pkg #3, (30 fonts) for $29.95. See special offer above. 




Oh 



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lhe OS9 Font Massager - This 
OS9 utility program allows you 
to do many things to Calligra- 
pher font files. You may create 
new fonts, modify existing 
fonts, invert fonts, compress 
fonts, double the height and/or 
width, halve the height and/or 
width and convert between OS9 
and RSDOS formats. $19.95. 



This i8 a Saropls of 
0S5 CalligpaphSP With 
ths H~p0int Child 
font from 6hs font set 
#& Cpk g #3) 8st to 

fUU-juetUy thS tSxt, 



For a complete catalog of Sugar Software products and fonts, send a stamp and a label. 



RAINBOW 

CERTIFtCATiON 
SEAL 



TRS-80 is a trademark of Tandy Corp. 



SUGAR SOFTWARE 

P.O. Box 7446 
Hollywood, Florida 33081 
(305) 981-1241 



All programs run on the CoCo i, 2 and $, S2K 
Extended Basic, unless otherwise noted. Add 
$1.50 per tape or disk for shipping and han- 
dling. Florida residents add 6% sales tax. COD 
orders add $5. Dealer inquiries invited. Orders 
generally shipped in 24-48 hours. No refunds 
or exchanges without prior authorization. 




About 
The One-Liner 
Contest . . 



the rainbow's One-Liner 
Contest has now been ex- 
panded to include programs 
of either one or two lines. 
This means a new dimen- 
sion and new opportunity 
for those who have "really 
neat" programs that simply 
just won't fit in one line. 

Here are the guidelines: 
The program must work in 
Extended basic, have only 
oneortwo line numbers and 
be entirely self-contained — 
no loading other programs, 
no calling ROM routines, no 
poked-in machine language 
code. The program has to 
run when typed in directly 
(since that's how our read- 
ers will use it). Make sure 
your line, or lines, aren't 
packed so tightly that the 
program won't list com- 
pletely. Finally, any instruc- 
tions needed should be very 
short. 

r 

Send your entry (prefera- 
bly on cassette or disk) to: 

THE RAINBOW 

One-Liner Contest 

P.O. Box 385 
Prospect, KY 40059 











Let's do that for the center of the 
screen at 128,96 ($80,$60 in Hex). First, 
the desired row is Y times 32, or in Hex, 
$60 times $20, which is $C00. If we are 
in PMODE 4, without disk, graphics begin 
at Location $600. Adding $600 to $C00 
gives us $1200. The x location is 128, 
and 128 divided by 8 is 16. So the 
desired byte is 16 (Hex 10) more bytes. 
Adding $ 1 200 to $ 1 0 gives us $ 1 21 0. The 
byte containing Location 128,96 is 
$1210. 

Now, what bit represents the x,y 
location? Our x location could be 0 to 
255, but there are only 8 bits (Bit 7 
through Bit 0) in each byte. We need to 
change our x location to a number 
between 0 and 7. This is done by AND u?. 
Any number RND H7 will always be 
between 0 and 7. A zero means the left- 
most bit; a 7 means the right-most bit. 
We must also be sure not to erase 
anything already set in the byte. The OR 
command does this since it keeps any 
number already in the byte and sets only 
the new bits. 

If our AND 87 gives us 0, we need to 
set the left-most bit. Do this by ORing 
the contents of the byte with #128 
(10000000 in Base 2). This will always 
set the left bit (Bit 7) and keep all other 
bits as they are. If our rnd »7 was 1, we 
would set the next bit over by ORing the 
contents of the byte with #64 (01000000 
in Base 2). If RND ti? results in 7, set the 
right bit (Bit 0) by ORing #1 (00000001 
in Base 2). The following table lists the 
RND n? results and the number used to 
OR the byte contents: 



AND #7 


OR BYTE 


(HEX) 


0 


128 


#$80 


1 


64 


#$40 


2 


32 


#$20 


3 


16 


#$10 


4 


8 


#$08 


5 


4 


#$04 


6 


2 


#$02 


7 


1 


#$01 



These OR numbers are already stored 
in the computer starting at $92DD. So 
all we need to do is load Register A with 
the x location and RNDR n?\ load Reg- 
ister y with #$92DD and load Register 
B with the contents of the byte (in 
Register x). Finally, OR Register B with 
the "A'th" number in the table and put 
the results (PSET) back into the byte. 
Let's follow the subroutine all the way 
through: 



BYTE 



LDR 
LDB 
MUL 



tt$ xx xx y coordinate 
832 bytes per line 



BIT 



RDDD $BR 

TFR D,X 

LDB 8$ xx 

L5RB 

L5RB 

L5RB 

RBX 

LDR 8$ xx 

RNDR 87 

LDY 8$92DD 

PSET LDB ,X 

□RB R, Y 



STB ,X 



add page start (or 
ADDA $BA) 
byte row to Register 
x 

xx x location 



divide by 8 

add it to Register x 

(now has the byte) 

xx x location 

change it to 0 

through 7 

or table location 

get current byte 

contents 

OR B with 0 through 
7th number of the 
OR table 

reload byte with 
new contents 



Perform this routine with the 
computer at $92A6 (PMODE 4/2/0) or at 
$92C2 (PMODE 3/1) when you execute a 
PSET command. Follow through these 
routines in ZBug The difference be- 
tween the two routines is due to the 
number of bytes per line in each PMODE 
and because the four-color modes take 
two bits to set colors. Our program will 
not need to use locations $BE and $C0 
for x and y, and since it is in PMODE 4, 
we will not need to scale. All of this 
helps the program to run more quickly. 

Start off with the BASIC driver pro- 
gram, which P5ET5 a series of random 
dots. Modify this part any way you 
want — the more complex, however, 
the longer it will take to compute and 
run, and the more jumbled it will look 
on the screen. 

The machine language program first 
checks all the points inside a box from 
screen locations 65,33 to 191,159. This 
ensures that no point is more than 63 
bits from the center of the screen at 
128,96. If a bit is set, its coordinates (x- 
128,y-96) are stored in a table of coor- 
dinates beginning at $5200. The coordi- 
nates are stored as two-byte numbers 
and as each pair is stored, the count 
location increases by one. Depending 
on how many points you set, this section 
may take several seconds. 

The program then sets up graphics 
Page 5. We do not have to specify the 
PMODE or color set since the BASIC driver 
program did that for us. LOOPS will load 
Stack U with a scratch-pad beginning at 
$7000. Then it loads Register X with the 
start of the coordinate table at $5200 
and loads Register D with the number 
of dots to be set, which is also put in 
counti. L00P3 to GET computes all of 



74 



THE RAINBOW 



the new x l9 yi rotated coordinates and 
puts them back as two-byte numbers. 
GET to finish restores the counter and 
PSETs all of the coordinates as: 

(12B-X1,9G-Y1),(12B-Y1,9G-X1) 
(12B-X1, 96+Y1 ) , 12B- Yl , 9G+X1 ) 



( 128+X1 , 9G- Yl ) , ( 12B+Y1 , 96-X1 ) 
( 128+X1 , 96+Y1 ) , ( 12B+Y1 , 9G+X1 ) 



The video screen now allows you to 
see the new dots while new x iy yi loca- 
tions are being plotted to continue the 



cycle. Pressing any key breaks the 
program and returns you to BASIC. It's 
a long program, but thanks to the Color 
Computer's ability, it executes with 
amazing speed. That's 320 dot coordi- 
nates being computed and plotted with 
every pass! □ 



Listing 1: DEMO 


T t% t% TTI f*\T\ it /% fTI/""\ \TT> ■ TV _ V / \T \ a TS 

1J3J3 FOR N=J3 TO ND:A=X(N) :B 


=Y(N) 


lip X (N) =A*127/128-B/8 






120 Y (N; =A/8+B*127/128 




20 PCLEAR8 : PMODE 4,1: PCLS : SCREEN 


130 NEXT 




1,1:ND=4 


140 FOR N=0 TO ND 




30 DIM X(ND) ,Y(ND) 


150 PSET(128-X(N) ,96-Y(N) ) 


: PSET ( 


40 FOR N=0 TO ND 


128-Y(N) ,96-X(N) ) 




50 X(N)=RND(63) :Y(N)=RND(X(N) ) 


160 PSET(128-X(N) ,96+Y(N) ) 


:PSET( 


60 PSET(128+X(N) ,96-Y(N) ) :NEXT 


128-Y(N) ,96+X(N) ) 




70 PMODE , 5 : PCLS : GOSUB 100: SCREE 


170 PSET(128+X(N) ,96-Y(N) ) 


:PSET( 


N 1 


• 128+Y(N) ,96-X(N) ) 




80 PMODE ,1: PCLS: GOSUB 100: SCREE 


180 PSET(128+X(N) ,96+Y(N) ) 


: PSET ( 


N 1 


128+Y(N) ,96+X(N) ) 




90 GOTO 70 


190 NEXT: RETURN 





Listing 2: DRIVER 

10 REM DRIVER PROGRAM 

20 PCLEAR 8:CLEAR200, &H4F00-1 

30 PMODE 4,1: PCLS: SCREEN 1,1 



40 FOR N=0 TO 40 : 1 NUMBER OF DOTS 
50 X=RND(63) :Y=RND(X) 
60 PSET(128+X,96-Y) 
70 NEXT 

80 EXEC &H4F00 



The COCO hardware store 






Fantastic 

Super Controller Q 



A Superb Controller. Along with the included C-DOS, plug-in three more software 
selectable DOSes or 2764 or 27128 EPFIOMs burned to your liking. The Internal 
M.E.B. lets you add Disto incredible Super Add-ons. 




1 



Multi-Board 
Adapter 





This Muti-Board is an adapter that plugs 
in any Disto Super Controller, Ramdisk or MEB Adapter. 

It includes a new and improved Printer Port (Centronics compatible), 

a faster Real Time Clock (works at 2MHz.) and a true RS-232 

Serial Port (external 12 volt AC adapter required). DB25 cable included. 

It fits neatly Inside the metal case and is still within Tandy's power 
limits. It also works with or without a Multi-Pak. _ 



• Under 0S-9: 

• Buffered Read/Write sector achieved without halting the CPU. 

• Continual use of keyboard wen while reading or writing to disk. 

• System's clock no longer looses time during Read & Write. 

• NmI is blocked and transferred to IRQ in software for low CPU overhead. 

• Completely Interrupt driven for fast & smooth Multi-Tasking operations. 

• Drivers written by KEVIN DARLING 

• Now Available at your Local Radio Shack store PN 90-2009 




Mini Contr 





• Radio ShackyTandy controller compatible 

• Works on all COCOs with or without Multi-Pack 
*2 DOS switcher 

• Accepts 24 or 28 pin EPROMs 

• Low power draw and Gold plated edge connectors 

• DOS Included 




RS-232 SuperPack 

A Stand-Alone (Multi-Pak required) adapter 
that gives the user a true RS-232 Serial Port. 
Completely compatible with 0S9's ACIA software. 
Compatible with software that requires 
the Tandy Deluxe RS-232 Pack. 
DB-25 cable included. 



SUPER ADD-ONS 



Real Time Clock 
& Printer interface 



Mini EPROM Programmer 
Hard Disk interface 

Hani Disk Interface 
with RS-232 

Super RAM 3 ZeroK Board 
Adapter 





C R C 

COMPUTERS INC 



Master Card and Visa Accepted 



1*514*383- 5293 





10802 Lajeunesse, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3L 2E8 



We accept phone orders • Call for Canadian Prices 
Include S&H of $4 or $8 if order exceeds $75 

Sorry: No personal cheques 



April 1989 THE RAINBOW 75 



Listing 3: ROTATION 



About 
Your 
Subscription 

Your copy of the rainbow is 
sent second class mail. You 
must notify us of a new address 
when you move. Notification 
should reach us no later than 
the 15th of the month prior to 
the month in which you change 
your address. Sorry, we cannot 
be responsible for sending 
another copy when you fail to 
notify us. 

Your mailing label also 
shows an account number and 
the subscription expiration 
date. Please indicate this ac- 
count number when renewing 
or corresponding with us. It 
will help us help you better and 
faster. 

For Canadian and other non- 
U.S. subscribers, there may be 
a mailing address shown that is 
different from our editorial of- 
fice address. Do not send any 
correspondence to that mail- 
ing address. Send it to our edi- 
torial offices at Falsoft, Inc., 
The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 
385, Prospect, KY 40059. This 
applies to everyone except 
those whose subscriptions are 
through our distributor in Aus- 
tralia. 




4F00 




00100 


ORG 


4F00 CC 


5200 


00110 START 


LDD 


4F03 FD 


5107 


00120 


STD 


4F06 CC 


9m 


00130 


LDD 


4F09 FD 


5109 


00140 


STD 


4F0C 86 


21 


00150 


LDA 


4F0E 97 


C0 


00160 L00P2 


STA 


4F10 C6 


41 


00170 


LDB 


4F12 D7 


BE 


00180 L00P1 


STB 


4F14 BD 


933C 


00190 


JSR 


4F17 BD 


B3ED 


00200 


JSR 


4F1A 5D 




00210 


TSTB 


4F1B 27 


ID 


00220 


BEQ 


4F1D 96 


BE 


00230 STORE 


LDA 


4F1F 80 


80 


00240 


SUBA 


4F21 5F 




00250 


CLRB 


4F22 BE 


5107 


00260 


LDX 


4F25 ED 


81 


00270 


STD 


4F27 86 


60 


00280 


LDA 


4F29 90 


C0 


00290 


SUBA 


4F2B 5F 




00300 


CLRB 


4F2C ED 


81 


00310 


STD 


4F2E BF 


5107 


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STX 


4F31 FC 


5109 


00330 


LDD 


4F34 C3 


0001 


00340 


ADDD 


4F37 FD 


5109 


00350 


STD 


4F3A D6 


BE 


00360 CONT 


LDB 


4F3C 5C 




00370 


INCB 


4F3D CI 


BF 


00380 


CMPB 


4F3F 23 


Dl 


00390 


BLS 


4F41 96 


C0 


00400 


LDA 


4F43 4C 




00410 


INCA 


4F44 81 


9F 


00420 


CMPA 


4F46 23 


C6 


00430 


BLS 


4F48 C6 


05 


00440 PAGE 5 


LDB 


4F4A BD 


9653 


00450 


JSR 


4F4D BD 


9542 


00460 


JSR 


4F50 8D 


IB 


00470 


BSR 


4F52 C6 




00480 


LDB 


4F54 BD 


95AA 


00490 


JSR 


4F57 C6 


n 


00500 PA6E1 


LDB 


4F59 BD 


9653 


00510 


JSR 


4F5C BD 


9542 


00520 


JSR 


4F5F 8D 


0C 


00530 


BSR 


4F61 C6 




00540 


LDB 


4F63 BD 


95AA 


00550 


JSR 


4F66 AD 


9F A000 


00560 


JSR 


4F6A 27 


DC 


00570 


BEQ 


4F6C 39 




00580 


RTS 


4F6D CE 


7000 


00590 L00P5 


LDU 


4F70 8E 


5200 


00600 


LDX 


4F73 FC 


5109 


00610 


LDD 


4F76 FD 


510B 


00620 L00P3 


STD 


4F79 EC 


84 


00630 


LDD 


4F7B ED 


C4 


00640 


STD 


4F7D ED 


44 


00650 


STD 


4F7F 47 




00660 


ASRA 


4F80 56 




00670 


RORB 


4F81 47 




00680 


ASRA 


4F82 56 




00690 


RORB 


4F83 47 




00700 


ASRA 


4F84 56 




00710 


RORB 


4F85 47 




00720 


ASRA 


4F86 56 




00730 


RORB 


4F87 47 




00740 


ASRA 


4F88 56 




00750 


RORB 


4F89 47 




00760 


ASRA 


4F8A 56 




00770 


RORB 


4F8B 47 




00780 


ASRA 


4F8C 56 




00790 


RORB 


4F8D ED 


42 


00800 


STD 


4F8F EC 


C4 


00810 


LDD 


4F91 A3 


42 


00820 


SUBD 


4F93 ED 


C4 


00830 


STD 


4F95 EC 


02 


00840 


LDD 


4F97 47 




00850 


ASRA 


4F98 56 




00860 


RORB 


4F99 47 




00870 


ASRA 


4F9A 56 




00880 


RORB 


4F9B 47 




00890 


ASRA 


4F9C 56 




00900 


RORB 


4F9D ED 


42 


00910 


STD 



$4F00 
#$5200 
COORD 
#0 

COUNT 

#33 Y START 
$C0 

#65 X START 
$BE 

$933C PP0INT(X,Y) 
$B3ED RESULTS TO REGISTER D 
IS THE POINT SET? 

CONT 
$BE 

#128 X DISTANCE FROM SCREEN CENTER 
COORD 

,X++ STORE 2 -BYTE X COORDINATE 
#96 

$C0 Y DISTANCE FROM SCREEN CENTER 

,X++ STORE 2 -BYTE Y COORDINATE 

COORD 

COUNT 

#1 ONE MORE POINT 

COUNT 

$BE 

#191 REACHED MAXIMUM X COORDINATE? 

L00P1 

$C0 

#159 REACHED MAXIMUM Y COORDINATE? 

L00P2 

#5 

$9653 

$9542 PCLS 

L00P5 

#1 

$95AA 
#1 

$9653 

$9542 PCLS 

LOOP 5 

#1 

$95AA 

[$A000] ANY INPUT? 
PAGE 5 IF NOT, REPEAT 

END OF THE PROGRAM 
#$7000 START OF "SCRATCH PAD" 
#$5200 
COUNT 

C0UNT1 TEMPORARY COUNTER 

,X OLD 2 -BYTE X COORDINATE 

,U 

4,U 

REGISTER D / 128 



2,U 

,U 

2,U 

,U 

2,X OLD 2 -BYTE Y COORDINATE 
REGISTER D / 8 



2,U 



THE RAINBOW April 1989 



4F9F EC 


C4 


00920 

rr ' T 


LDD 


.U 




4FA1 A3 


42 


00930 

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SUBD 


2 U 




4FA3 ED 


81 


00940 

rr J r 


STD 


X++ 


AUiniuU t Bill A UUUIVU J-Wrti n 


4FA5 EC 


84 


00950 NEtfY 


LDD 




OLD 2-BYTP Y fifinRnTNATF 


4FA7 ED 


46 


00960 

rr * r 


STD 


6 , U 




4FA9 ED 


48 


00970 

rr ' r 


STD 


8.U 




4FAB EC 


44 


00980 

rr * r 


LDD 


4.U 
> 




4FAD 47 




00990 

rr*~r 


ASRA 




REGISTER D / 8 


4FAE 56 




01000 

r*-rrr 


RORB 






4FAF 47 




01010 

r*-r^r 


ASRA 






4FBp 56 




01020 


RORB 






4FB1 47 




01030 

r r r 


ASRA 






4FB2 56 




01040 

r*-r^r 


RORB 






4FB3 ED 


44 


01050 

r^r r 


STD 


4.U 




4FB5 EC 


48 


01060 

r ^r w r 


LDD 


8.U 


OLD 2 -BYTE Y COORDINATE 


4FB7 47 




01070 

r*-r ' r 


ASRA 




REGISTER D / 128 

iVAJ \Ji -A- kri> A A^4V\ / dl> W 


4FB8 56 




01080 

r r r 


RORB 






4FB9 47 




r r " r 


ASRA 






4FBA 56 




01100 

r r r 


RORB 






4FBB 47 




01110 

r r 


ASRA 






4FBC 56 




01120 


RORB 






Avon An 












tr DC J D 




en 1 lq 


POP R 






HT DC HI 






AQP A 






4FC0 56 




01160 


RORB 






4FC1 47 




01170 

r r 


ASRA 






4FC2 56 




01180 


RORB 






4FC3 47 




01190 

r^^ * r 


ASRA 






4FC4 56 




91299 

r^*-rr 


RORB 






4FC5 ED 


48 


91219 


STD 


8 .U 




4FC7 EC 


46 


01220 


LDD 


6.U 




4FC9 A3 


48 


01230 

r **r 


SUBD 


8 .U 




4FCB E3 


44 


01240 

r r 


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4.U 




4FCD ED 


81 


01250 

r* r 


STD 


.X++ 


ROTATED 2 -BYTE Y COORDTNATF 


4FCF FC 


510B 


01260 


LDD 


COUNT 1 




4FD2 83 


0001 


01270 

r r 


SUBD 


#1 


DECREASE TEMPORARY COUNTER 


4FD5 1026 FF9D 


01280 


LBNE 


L00P3 




4FD9 CE 


5200 


01290 GET 


LDU 


#55200 

rry J ^rr 


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WAlt!GAME 
DESIGNER II 



Introducing this NEW enhanced version of 
our most popular COCO 3 product! 

Here are just a few of the new features; 
Choose from keyboard or joystick control. 
Now you can control every phase of design 
and play by joystick! We've added a new 
enhanced icon design system. Work on new 
icons at 5 times actual size. No more eye 
strain! There's a new terrain modifier menu 
with default values to speed up input. New 
menus, more visual and audio 
enhancements & a super fast screen loader 
& more! 

Wargaming & game design have never been 
so much fun. If you haven't tried it, 
NOW is your chancel 

WARGAME DESIGNER II 

Introductory sale priced at ONLY $25 

WGD ICON DISK #1 528 ready made, easy 
to use WGD II compatible unit and terrain 
icons. Just $15 

WGD STAND ALONE SCENARIOS ONLY $15 each 



INVASION NORTH 
ROBOT COMMAND 
GHOST HUNTERS 
ZULU REVENGE 
ISLAND DOMINATION 
TECH WARS 



ATTACK ON MOSCOW 
DUNGEON WARRIOR 
ORC AMBUSH 
DESERT RATS 
FORT APACHE 
ROTC 



GRIDIRON STRATEGY Sale price at $18 

100% ML football strategy for 1 or 2 players. 
The first & still the best! 

WEEKLY WINNER 2.0 just $15 

The only lotto program we know of that has pro- 
duced winning numbers. 100% ML COCO 2 & 
3 disk or tape. A proven winner 

CATALOG ON DISK A good investment $3 

Skeptical? See before you buy. Then deduct 
$3.00 from your first order. 

CC3FLAGS A "risky" game. only $21 

Graphics oriented and definately addictive! A 
game of world conquest for 1 to 6 players. 
COCO 3 disk only. 

BLACK GRID $21 

An intriguing graphics puzzel for the COCO 3. 
Find the hidden boxes inside the black grid. 3 
play modes. 

MAIL MASTER Sale priced at just $10 

Get your mailing lists organized. All ML 

CC3CRAM Introductory sale $12.00 

Stop wasting valuable disk space with COCO 
3 graphic pages. Cut most files to just 4 
granules! A real space saver. 

*** APRIL SPECIAL*** 

Order any product listed above & get the 
WGD stand alone game of your choice FREE 

Catalog orders excluded. 
★★★★★★★★★★★★★*★★★★★ 
VISA & MASTERCARD accepted FREE shipping 



SPORTSware 

1251 S. Reynolds Road, Suite 414 
Toledo, Ohio 43615 
(419) 389-1515 



April 1989 THE RAINBOW 77 



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1ft 



New Max-10 Fonts 

Futura 24 point 2 disks: $29.95 
Century 24 Digital EM 
longfcood 24 Mempbis 24 

Athens 18 Barnes 18 1010© flU 
Ft. Worth 18 point 14 point 12 point 

And 19 More! See "The Works" ad on page 19. 

Note: Actual font size is 40% larger than shown here. {coISrware 



FLOPPY FILER 
Creates an alphabetized 3-colum cross- 
referenced list of files on your disks. 
Find the files you need, fast! <32K DECB, Printer) 

MENU MAKER 
Let the CoCo wite the »enu routine for your next 
program! Just enter the text for titles and sel- 
ections and CoCo does the rest! (16K Disk) 

Each is $8 US, $11 Canada, Postpaid 

FREE joystick directory menu prograa with order. 



\ Bo 



Gregory Software 
Box 573 







(MiiilwCnfrt ] 

■ ■ 


• 





rkland IL 60146 (815) 522-3593 



78 



THE RAINBOW April 1989 





the rainbow is a teaching environment and we realize that the 
majority of our readers will always be beginners. In our 
continuing effort to always keep the new user in mind, and in 
addition to the many beginner feature articles and programs 
published in every issue, "Novices Niche" contains shorter 
basic program listings that entertain as well as help the new 
user gain expertise in all aspects of the Color Computer: 
graphics, music, games, utilities, education, programming, etc. 



CoCo3 



Pieces of the Pie 

By Bill Bernico 

Turn your ordinary presentations into lively and colorful 
displays with CC3 Graph, a pie chart generator. Pie charts are 
about the best graphic devices around to help in visualizing 
ratios and proportions, and they're useful in education as well 
as business. CC3 Graph generates charts of up to 16 elements 
or pieces (16 because each slice of the pie is a different color 
— one for each PALETTE color). The program is user- 
prompted, so just type it in and follow the onscreen 
directions. 

The Listing: CC3GRRPH 

1 COPYRIGHT 1989 FALSOFT,INC 

1 'COCO 3 COLOR GRAPH (C) 1988 

FROM BILL BERNICO SOFTWARE 

2 WIDTH32:RGB:INPUT"HOW MANY PIE 
CES (1-16) ";P:IFP>16THEN2ELSEDIM 
S ( P , 14 ) : P=P-1 : CLS : FORJ==j3TOP : PRIN 
T" VALUE FOR PIECE #" ; J+l ; : INPUTT 
:S(J,13)=S(J,13)+T: NEXT J : HSCREEN 
2 : HCLS4 : HCOLOR8 , 4 : RGB': HPRINT (8,1 
), "RAINBOW MAGAZINE PRESENTS" :HL 
INE(j3,21)-(319,34) ,PSET,BF 

3 HC0L0R3:HPRINT(1,3) , "COCO 3 CO 
LOR PIE GRAPH by Bill Bernico" :H 
DRAW"BM233 , 55C8D128R15U128L15" : F 
0RV=1T016 :HDRAW"NR15D8" : NEXTV: FO 




iecz 

IECE 
IECE 
ItCt 
IECE 
IECE 




JJ. 



RTX=7T022:HPRINT(19,TX) , "PIECE 1f 
"+STR$ ( TX-6 ) : NEXTTX : GOSUB6 : K=J3 : F 
ORJ=j3TOP : K=K+S ( J, 13 ) : NEXT J : FORJ= 
J3T0P:S(J,14)=S(J,13)/K 

4 NEXT J : X=7 6 : Y=115 : F=J3 : FORJ=j3TOP 
:S=F:F=F+S(J,14) :HCIRCLE (X,Y) ,75 
:HLINE(X,Y)-(X+74*COS(6.283* ) ,Y 
+74*SIN(6.283*S) ) , PSETrHLINE ( ',Y 
)-(X+74*COS(6.283*F) ,Y+74*SIN(6. 
283*F) ) ,PSET:HPAINT(X+68*COS(6.2 
83* ( (F+S)/2) ) , Y+68*SIN(6.283* ( (F 
+S)/2) ) ) ,J, 8:NEXTJ 

5 HCOLOR2 : HPRINT (35,12) , "HIT" : PL 
AY"02T5B" : HPRINT (35,14), "ANY" : PL 
AY " 0 3 B " : HPRINT ( 3 5 , 1 6 ) , " KE Y " : PLAY 
" 04 B " : EXEC4 4539: CMP : RUN 

6 PALETTE 7 , 52 : PALETTE 9 ,56: PALETT 
Elp , 32 : PALETTE 11,20 : PALETTE12 , 41 
: PALETTE 13 , 12 : PALETTE 14 , 60 : PALET 
TE15 , 48 : Q=2 40 : HPAINT ( Q , 58) ,0, 8 :H 
PAINT (Q, 66) , 1, 8: HPAINT (Q, 74) ,2,8 

April 1989 THE RAINBOW 79 



■ 



:HPAINT(Q,82) , 3 , 8 :HPAINT (Q, 98) ,5 
,8:HPAINT(Q,106) , 6 , 8 :HPAINT(Q, 11 
4) ,7,8 

7 HPAINT(Q,122) , 8 , 8 rHPAINT (Q, 130 
) ,9,8:HPAINT(Q,138) , 10 , 8 : HPAINT ( 
Q,146) , 11, 8 : HPAINT (Q, 154) ,12,8:H 
PAINT (Q, 162) , 13, 8: HPAINT (Q, 170) , 
14, 8 : HPAINT (Q, 178) ,15,8 

8 IFP=1THENCL=72ELSEIFP=2THENCL= 
8J3ELSEIFP=3THENCL=88ELSEIFP=4THE 



NCL=96ELSEIFP=5THENCL=104ELSEIFP 
=6THENCL=112ELSEIFP=7THENCL=120E 
LSEIFP=8THENCL=128ELSEIFP=9THENC 
L=13 6ELSEIFP=10THENCL=144ELSEIFP 
=11THENCL=152ELSEIFP=12THENCL=16 
J3ELSEIFP=13THENCL=1C6C8 

9 IFP=14THENCL=176ELSEIFP=15THEN 
CL=184ELSEIFP=16THENRETURN 

10 HLINE(151,CL)-(250,184) , PRESE 
T, BF : RETURN 



Who Ya Gonna Write? ™ 

ECB 

By Keiran Kenny ' 

At my age (seven years into retirement) I have found I do 
not need anything very elaborate in the way of software to 
keep addresses for mailing labels, so I wrote this short 
program to provide a simple and convenient way for my 
limited number of addresses. EZLabel prints labels in two 
ways — one at a time or in a batch — and the menu lets you 
decide how you want to do it. 

Addresses I use fairly often are kept in DflTfi statements as 
in the examples in lines 1000 to 1020. Select Option 1 (batch 
printing) and the addresses in the DfiTA lines are listed on the 
screen one at a time. If your printer is ready, you can press 
Y to print the address on display or N to skip it. 

There is room for nine lines on 4-by-l 1 /2-inch labels, but 
you can have a maximum of seven lines per label. Line 1020 
contains only one line (the program could also be used to 
make labels for books, etc.). I like to end each line in an 
address with a comma (hence the data items between quotes), 
but this is optional. 

If you want to put your own data into lines 1000 and up, 
note that each address ends with a flag, XX, and that your 
last data line must read zz, as Line 2000. 

If you select Option 2 from the menu in order to print out 
addresses that are not in DfiTfi statements — i.e., "on the fly" 
— you can type and enter up to seven lines. If you have less 
than seven lines, enter a shifted up arrow, CHR$ ( 95 ) , after you 
have entered the last line in an address. This prints a little 
left arrow on the screen. 

Whichever option you choose, your label is printed 
centered horizontally and vertically on a 4-by-l !/2-inch label. 
The entry in Line 20 sets the tab position at 20, and the longest 
line in the address is centered under this tab position. Lines 
320 to 350 establish which line is the longest line. Lines 310, 
360 and 400 set blank lines at the top and bottom of each 
label according to the number of lines in the address to be 
printed. The printer control codes in Line 150 are for a DMP- 
130 printer. 

The on-the-fly routine in lines 270 to 300 uses LINEINPUT, 
but if you do not have Extended Color BASIC, you can 
substitute INPUT in Line 280. You will then be unable to use 
commas or colons in your addresses. 

The Listing: EZLflBELS- 

J2) 1 COPYRIGHT 1989 FALSOFT,INC 

5 1 EZELABLS 1 by Keiran Kenny, 
Sydney, 1988. 

10 CLS:DIMN$(8) 

20 TB=20 »TAB(20) 

30 POKE150,18 '2400 baud. 




4J3 PRINT@64 , "DO YOU WANT TO:": PR 
INT 

50 PRINTTAB ( 2 ) " 1 ♦ PRINT ADDRESSE 
S IN DATA? ": PRINT 

60 PRINTTAB (2) "2. TYPE AND PRINT 
ONE-OFF" , TAB ( 5 ) "ADDRESSES?" : PRI 
NT 

70 PRINTTAB (2) "3. END PROGRAM? " : 
PRINT 

80 PRINTTAB (8) "PRESS 1, 2 OR 3 . 11 

90 K$=INKEY$:IFK$="»THEN90 

100 IFK$="1"THEN140 

110 IFK$="2"THEN140 

120 IFK$=" 3 "THENCLS : END 

130 GOTO90 

140 PRINT: PRINT "PRINTER READY? - 

PRESS ANY KEY. ":EXEC44539 
150 PRINT#-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(18) ;C 
HR$(27) ;CHR$(31) ; 1 NLQ Bold 
160 I FK$ m " 2 11 THENCLS : PRINT @ 3 2 , " T Y 
PE ADDRESS : " : PRINT@64 : GOTO270 
170 N=N+l:READN$(N) : IFN$ (N) ="ZZ" 
THENCLS : RESTORE : N=0 : PRINT" DATA E 
ND. ":GOTO40ELSEIFN$ (N) ="XX"THENN 
=N-1 : CLS : GOTO180ELSE170 
180 PRINT@128 
190 FORT=lTON 
200 PRINTTAB (3 )N$(T) 
210 NEXT 

220 PRINT : PRINTTAB ( 3 ) " PRINT? Y/N 
ii 

230 C$=INKEY$:IFC$=""THEN230 

240 IFC$="Y"THEN310 

250 IFC$="N f, THENN=0:GOTO170 

260 GOTO230 

270 FORN=lT07 



80 THE RAINBOW April 1989 



280 PRINT" LINE "N ; CHR$ ( 8 ) " : " ; : LIN 
EINPUTN$ (N) 

290 IFN=7THEN310ELSEIFN$(N)=CHR$ 
( 95 ) THENN=N-1 : GOTO 3 10 
300 NEXT 

310 TM=INT( (9-N)/2) 
320 FORT=lTON 

330 IFLEN(N$(T) ) >Z THEN340ELSE35 
P 

340 Z=LEN(N$(T) ) 
350 NEXT 

360 FORD=lTOTM: PRINT#-2 : NEXT 
370 FORT=lTON 

380 PRINT#-2,TAB(TB-(Z/2) )N$(T) 



390 NEXT 

400 FORD=lT09-N-TM:PRINT#-2 :NEXT 

410 N=0:IFK$="1"THEN170ELSE40 

420 DATA "Keiran Kenny, "2/45 C 

remorne Road, " , Cremorne N.S.W. 2 
090. , XX 

1000 DATA "The Submissions Edito 
r ,", "RAINBOW, ","P.O. Box 385,"," 
Prospect KY,", U.S. A. 40059., XX 
1010 DATA "The Editor, "/'Austral 
ian CoCo Magazine, ", "P.O. Box 17 
42, ",Southport Q'ld. 4215, XX 
1020 DATA MR. William P. Nutt,XX 
2000 DATA ZZ 





An Uncommon View 

By Kenneth R. 

Very few people have had the opportunity to view the 
constellation of Orion as it is depicted here — through a 
spaceship window. But with the 21st century about to burst 
onto the scene, this sort of sight might soon become common 
in daily life. Picture the typical next-generation CoCophile 
floating past his living room porthole, talking out a bug in 
a Hyper Extended BASIC program to the CoCo 7 on his wrist. 

The Listing: STflRVlEW 

0 • COPYRIGHT 198 9 FALSOFT, INC 

1 'STARVIEW 

5 'Draws a view of "Orion" as se 

en thru a spaceship window - wit 

h sound effects. K.R.Hill. 

10 PMODE 4,1:PCLEAR 4 

20 PCLS 

30 SCREEN 1,1 

40 FOR N=l TO 22 

50 READ X,Y 

60 PSET(X,Y) 

70 NEXT N 

80 DATA 128,96,120,96,136,96,126 

, 105, 125 , 106, 125 , 108 , 112 , 72 

90 DATA 148,120,115,128,175,112, 

147,128, 143,105,48,80,8 6, 68 

100 DATA 164,80,88,100,68,40,92, 

3 6,13 6,25,181,45,200,73,216,76 

110 CIRCLE (128, 96) ,60, , .8 

120 CIRCLE (128, 96) ,100, , .8, .5, .6 

0 

130 CIRCLE (128, 96) ,65, , .8, .50, .6 
0 

140 LINE(28,96)-(63,96) ,PSET 
150 LINE(45,51)-(75,67) , PSET 
160 CIRCLE (128, 96) ,100, , .8, .62, . 
70 

170 CIRCLE (128, 96) ,65, , .8, .62, .7 




0 

180 

190 

200 

81 

210 

1 

220 

230 

240 

90 

250 

260 
270 
271 

•0 

272 

273 
274 
280 
290 
300 
310 
320 
330 
340 
350 
360 
370 
380 
390 



LINE (53, 45) -(78, 64) ,PSET 
LINE (90, 21) -(106,51) ,PSET 
CIRCLE (128, 96) ,100, , .8, .71, . 

CIRCLE (128, 96) , 65 , , . 8 , . 71, . 8 

LINE (101, 20) -(113,49) , PSET 
LINE (145, 49) -(158,20) ,PSET 
CIRCLE (128, 96) ,100, , .8, .82, . 

CIRCLE (128, 96) , 65 , , . 8 , . 82 , . 9 

LINE (151, 50) -(166, 21) , PSET 
LINE (17 8, 63) -(205, 44) , PSET 
CIRCLE (128, 96) ,100, , .8, .91,1 

CIRCLE (128, 96) ,65, ,.8, .91,1. 

LINE (211, 52) -(183,68) ,PSET 

LINE (193, 96) -(228, 96) , PSET 

PAINT (128,0) ,5,5 

SO=65312 

POKE 65315,63 

ST=4 

EN=2 40 

S=2 

FOR X=ST TO EN STEP S 

POKE SO,X 

POKE SO,EN-X 

NEXT X 

GOTO 340 

STOP 



April 1989 THE RAINBOW 81 




It'll Move You 

By Timothy Dueck 

If the cartoonist in you is yearning to break free, do your 
creative conscious a favor and type in this short animation- 
creation program. Animator lets you draw up to seven 
screens in PMODE 0. When you have finished, the program 
cycles through the drawings, creating the effect of motion. 
The "control" keys for drawing (R for up, C for down, etc.) 
are listed upon program bootup, and the program is self- 
explanatory. 

Animator is easily changed to suit your needs. For 
example, you can alter the speed of the animation by 
changing the FDR J=l to 25 in Line 75 to FOR J=l to n. If 
n is less than 25, the animation is faster; higher than 25, the 
animation is slower. Also, you hackers might try adding new 
features like drawing commands (CIRCLE, PRINT, etc.). 

The Listing: rnimator 

0 1 COPYRIGHT 1989 FALSOFT,INC 

1 PCLEAR8 

5 CLS : PRINT© 12 , "ANIMATOR" : PRINT : 
PRINT: PRINT" LIMIT 8 SCREENS" :PRI 
NT : PRINT" COMMANDS : " : PRINT"R-UP" : 
PRINT "D-LEFT" : PRINT "F-RIGHT" : PRI 
NT"C-DOWN" : PRINT"5-DRAW" : PRINT"6 
-ERASE" :PRINT"E-EXIT SCREEN" :D=1 

:S=1 

10 PRINT"PRESS A KEY TO DRAW ON 
SCREEN "S 



15 A$=INKEY$ : IFA$=" "THEN15ELSEPM 
ODE0 , S : PCLS : SCREEN 1 , 1 : X=0 : Y=0 
2J3 DO$=INKEY$ : IFDO$="R"ORDO$=»D" 
ORDO $ = " F " ORDO $ = " C " THENGOS UB 3 J3ELS 
EIFDO$=" 5 "THEND=1ELSEIFD0$=" 6 "TH 
END=0ELSEIFDO$="E"THENGOTO50 
25 PRESET (X, Y) :PSET(X,Y) :GOTO20 
30 IFDO$="R"ANDY-2<0THENRETURNEL 
SEIFDO $= " D " ANDX- 2 < 0THENRETURNELS 
E I FDO $ « " F " ANDX+ 2 > 2 5 4 THENRETURNEL 
SEIFDO$="C"ANDY+2>190THENRETURN 
35 IFD=1THENPSET (X, Y) ELSEPRESET ( 
X, Y) 

40 IFDO$="R"THENY=Y-2ELSEIFDO$=" 
D " THENX=X- 2 ELS E I FDO $ = " F " THENX=X+ 
2 ELS E I FDO $ = " C " THENY=Y+ 2 
45 RETURN 

5J3 IFD=1THENPSET (X, Y) ELSEPRESET ( 
X,Y) 

55 SCREEN0 , 0 : IFS=8THEN65ELSECLS : 

PRINT "ANOTHER SCREEN? (Y/N) " 

60 A$=INKEY$:IFA$="Y"THENS=S+l:G 

OTO10ELSEIFA$="N"THENSL=S : GOT065 

ELSE6J3 

65 PRINT"PRESS A KEY TO SEE ANIM 
AT I ON" 

70 A$=INKEY$:IFA$=""THEN70 

75 FORI=lTOSL: PMODE0 , I : SCREEN1 , 1 

: F0RJ=1T025 : NEXT J , I : GOT075 



Today's Forecast r— " 

By Rick Cooper L__ 

Mary, Mary, quite contrary, how does your garden grow? 
Quite well, probably, if it drinks in as much precipitation as 
this C0C0 3 program ladles out. Type in WhenRain? and 
watch April's torrents coax the grass into greening. But be 
patient while the clouds gather — storms take a while to brew, 
you know. 

The Listing: WHENRAIN 

0 1 COPYRIGHT 1989 FALSOFT, INC 

100 REM WHEN WILL IT RAIN? 

110 REM BY RICK COOPER 

120 REM PO BOX 276 

130 REM LIBERTY, KY 42539 

140 REM COPYRIGHT JULY 1988 

150 ON BRK GOTO 570 

160 ON ERR GOTO 570 

170 HBUFF 1/2000 

175 HBUFF 2,1000 

177 HBUFF 3,2000 

180 POKE &HFFD9,0 

190 FOR X=0 TO 15 : READ A: PALETTE 



X,A:NEXT X 
200 DATA 0,63,17,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 
,0,0,0,0,0 

210 HCOLOR 1,0:HSCREEN2 

220 L1$="F15D3C5F18D2C9F20D1C12F 

5" 

230 HDRAW"C1BM248 , 48 ;U2E2R2E2R3U 

2R3E2R7E2R9F2R5F2R5D2R4F2R3F2D3F 

2G2D2G2L3G2L4D2L5G2L5G2L9G2L7H2L 

3U2L3H2L2H2U4H3E3 » 

240 A=244:B=3 6 

250 HPAINT(A+20,B+15) ,1,1 

260 L2$="WHEN WILL IT RAIN?" 

2 62 HCOLOR 0,0 

264 HPRINT(10,1) ,L2$ 

266 HGET(78,8)-(228,16) ,2 

268 HCOLOR 1,0 

270 HPRINT(10,1) ,L2$ 

275 PALETTE 2,0 

280 HCOLOR 2,0 

290 HPRINT(28,15) ," 'RAIN BY 1 11 : HP 
RINT(28,17) , lf RICK COOPER" 

293 HGET(224,120)-(312,144) ,3 

294 HCOLOR 0,0 



82 THE RAINBOW April 1989 



295 HPRINT (28,15),"' RAIN BY 1 ": HP 
RINT(28,17) ,"RICK COOPER" 
298 PALETTE 2,17 
300 J=3 

3 1) 3 FOR X=95 TO 145 

32) 3 HGET(A,B)-(A+68,B+32) ,1 
330 A=A-3 

340 HPUT(A,B)-(A+68,B+32) ,1 
350 FOR Y=70 TO 189 
360 R=RND ( 3 ) 

370 IF R<=2 THEN HSET(X, Y, J) :IF 
J<15 THEN J=J+1 ELSE J=3 
380 NEXT Y 

390 IF X=125 THEN PALETTE 1,25 
400 IF X=135 THEN PALETTE 1,7 
410 NEXT X 

420 FOR X=3 T015: PALETTE X,0:NEX 
TX 

430 HDRAW"C3BM170,20;"+L1$ 




For the Birds 

By Keiran Kenny 

Very young children can soon become discouraged by 
games in which they have to get a score, especially if big 
brother is kibitzing from nearby. In this program, "birdseed" 
is scattered at random over the screen, and a wing-flapping 
bird appears at the top. All the child has to do is use the right 
joystick to move the bird around the screen until it has 
"eaten" all the birdseed. Each "grain" it touches will 
disappear. For more birdseed and another bird, press the 
firebutton. 

I hope you find the animation technique convincing. Line 
30 draws the bird wings-down, and Line 50 draws it wings- 
up. The GET statements in lines 40 and 60 store the image in 
arrays (16 by 16) labelled fl and B. Line 70 stores a 16-by- 
16 area of blank screen, labelled C, for use as an eraser. These 
are "speed" GET-PUTs. The images are put onto the screen and 
erased alternately in lines 100 to 220. The delay loop 
subroutine in Line 350 regulates the speed at which the bird 
flaps its wings. 

This program was a hit with 5- and 6-year-old neighbors, 
but the 2-year-old just grunted and said, "Let's see the listing." 

The Listing: BIRDSEED 

0 1 BIRDSEED 1 by Keiran Kenny, 

Sydney, 1988. 

1 1 COPYRIGHT 1989 FALSOFT,INC 
1J3 DIMA(6) ,B(6) ,C(6) 

20 PMODE4 / l:PCLS 

30 DRAW"BM0 , 8BD4E4R2BR4R2F4" : CIR 
CLE(8,8) ,2 

40 GET(0,0)-(15,15) ,A 

50 DRAWBM24 , 8BU4F4R2BR4R2E4" : CI 

RCLE(32,8) ,2 

60 GET(24,0)-(39,15) ,B 

70 GET(240,0)-(255,15) ,C 

80 PCLS:SCREEN1,1 

90 FORT=1TO50 

100 X=40+RND(176) 

110 Y=40+RND(111) 

120 IFPPOINT(X,Y)<>0THEN100 



440 HPUT(78,8)-(228,16) ,2 

450 Y=191 

460 FOR Z=l TO 60 

470 FOR X=3 TO 15 

480 REM IF RND(2)=1 THEN POKE &H 

FFD9,0 ELSE POKE &HFFD8,0 

490 IF RND(3)=1 THEN PALETTE X,6 

3 ELSE PALETTE X,25 

500 PALETTE X,0 

510 NEXT X 

520 HSET(RND(57)+90,Y,2) 

530 IF Z=10 THEN HPUT ( 224 , 120) - ( 

312,144) ,3 

540 NEXT Z 

550 Y=Y-1 

560 GOTO 460 

570 RGB 

580 POKE &HFFD8,0 
590 END 




130 PSET(X,Y) 

140 NEXT 

150 X=120:Y=8 

160 PUT (X, Y) - (X+15 , Y+15) , A 

170 GOSUB350 

180 PUT(X,Y)-(X+15,Y+15) ,C 

190 GOSUB350 

200 PUT(X,Y) -(X+15, Y+15) ,B 

210 GOSUB350 

220 PUT(X,Y) -(X+15, Y+15) ,C 

230 GOSUB350 

240 J0=JOYSTK(0) : Jl=JOYSTK(l) 

250 IFJ0<63THENX=X-8 

260 IFJ0>0THENX=X+8 

270 IFJK31THENY=Y-8 

280 IFJl>0THENY=Y+8 

290 IFX<8THENX=8 

300 IFX>2 32THENX=232 

310 IFY<8THENY=8 

320 IFY>176THENY=176 

330 IFPEEK(65280)=126ORPEEK(6528 

0)=254THENPCLS:GOTO90 

340 GOTO160 

350 FORD=1TO50: NEXT: RETURN 

Submissions to "Novices Niche" are welcome from everyone. We 
like to run a variety of short programs that can be typed in at one 
sitting and are useful, educational and fun. Keep in mind, although 
the short programs are limited in scope, many novice programmers 
find it enjoyable and quite educational to improve the software 
written by others. 

Program submissions must be on tape or disk. We're sorry, but 
we cannot key in program listings. All programs should be 
supported by some editorial commentary, explaining how the 
program works. If your submission is accepted for publication, the 
payment rate will be established and agreed upon prior to 
publication. 



April 1989 THE RAINBOW 83 



BASICal l y Speaking 



Puzzled Programming 

Dear Bill, 

Below are lines from two fine pro- 
grams from rainbow that have always 
puzzled me. I hope you can help me. 

From Calendar by Roger Bouchard, 
January 1987, Page 47: 

140 IFY>1582THENIFY=INT(Y/4)*4TH 
ENM ( 1 ) =29 : IFY=INT ( Y/100 J *100ANDY 
OINT(Y/400)*400THENM(1)=2BEL5EE 
LSEELSEGDSUBG50:GDTO120 

From Poker by Robert Brimmer, 
March 1987, Page 100: 

26 IFB$="A"THENB=D ELSEIFB$="H"T 
HENB=INT(D/2)ELSEIFB$="Q"THENB=I 
NT(D/4)ELSEIFB$="T"THENB=INT(D*3 
/4 ) ELSEB=VAL ( B$ ) : I FB$<"0 "DRB$>"9 
"THENELSEIFB=0THENB=10 

The THENELSEIF at the end of Line 26 
has me puzzled. 

Keiran Kenny 
Cremorne, Austrailia 

BASIC does not use the most elegant 
nesting of logic statements, sometimes 
known as logic constructs. Let's pretend 
that BASIC is a bit more free-flowing. 
Take a look at how the statement shown 
in Figure 1 might be taken apart and 
notice how it works. 

Now look at this statement and notice 
that at each level of logic, I indented the 
lines. This makes it easier to read. 
Remember that ELSE gives an alternate 
option if the logic test (for example, IF 
y >15B2) is false. So the ELSE statements 
simply move the BASIC interpreter out 
of the nest of IF/ THEN statements. 

As for the second problem, a more 
logical way to write the statement: 

IF B$<"0" OR B$>"9" THENELSEIFB= 
0 THEN B=10 



Bill Bernico is the author of over 200 
Color Computer programs and is a 
frequent RAINBOW contributor whose 
hobbies include golf writing music and 
programming. Bill is a drummer in a 
rock band and lives in Sheboygan, 
Wisconsin. 

Larry Boeldt has programmed on the 
Color Computer for five years. He has 
experience in BASIC, Pascal and FOR- 
TRAN IV. He runs a software custom- 
izing business for the Co Co market. 



BASICally 




peaking 

By Bill Bernico 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 
with Larry Boeldt 



would be to reverse the logic during the 
test: 

IF NOT(B<"0" OR B$>"9") THEN IF 
B=0 THEN B=10 

Notice how much more readable this is. 
basic is a wonderful language, but it 
unfortunately adapts itself to some less 
readable programming techniques. 
None the less, BASIC remains one of my 
all time favorites. Keep those questions 
coming! 

Correction Please 

Dear Bill: 

I'm having a bit of trouble with your 
program on page 144 of the December 



'88 issue. The moving cursor motion is 
either down or to the right, but I can't 
move it one way then the other. When 
I try to move up or left, the cursor 
simply erases itself. 

I double-checked the program, but I 
don't have the know-how to make the 
needed adjustments. I'm wondering if 
anyone else has this problem. 

Walter R. Coggan 
Seattle 

The only error I could find in the 
"BASICally Speaking" column of De- 
cember 1988 was under the title Repeat 
After Me. The first example was incor- 
rectly ordered. You should get the 
proper results, if you type it as follows: 

10 CLS 

20 F0RX=33BT0345 : POKEX , 255 : NEXTX 
30 A$=INKEY$: IF A$="" THEN 20 
40 PRINT A$; 
50 GOTO 20 

The locations must be poked before 
running the INKEYS command. 



Questions about specific BASIC program- 
ming problems can be addressed to BASIC- 
ally Speaking, the rainbow, P.O. Box 385, 
Prospect KY 40059. 

We reserve the right to publish only 
questions of general interest and to edit for 
brevity and clarity. We are unable to answer 
letters individually. 

For a quicker response, your questions 
may also be submitted through rainbow's 
CoCo SIG on Delphi. From the CoCo 
SlOprompt, type ASK for "Ask the Ex- 
perts." At the EXPERTS>prompt, select 
the "BASICally Speaking" online form, 
which has complete instructions. 



140 

If Y>1582 THEN 

IF Y=INT(Y/4)*4 THEN 
f1(l)=29 

IF Y=INT(Y/100)*100 AND YOINT( Y'400 ) *400 THEN 
M(1)=2B 

ELSE 
ELSE 

ELSE 

GOSUB G50 
GOTO 120 

150 

Figure 1 ^ 




84 THE RAINBOW April 1989 



MM 





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$59.95 

ACCOUNTS PAYABLE 

Designed for the maintenance of vendor 
and A/P invoice files. The system prints 
checks, voids checks, cancels checks, de- 
letes cancelled checks, and deletes paid A/P 
invokes. The user can run a Vendor List, 
Vendor Status report, Vendor Aged report, 
and an A/P Check Register. This package 
can be used either as a standalone A/P sys- 
tem or can be integrated with the Small 
Business Accounting Package. 

$59.95 




INC 




Ordering Information 

Add $3.00 shipping & handling, MN residents add 6% sales tax. 
Visa, Mastercard, COD (add $3.50), personal checks. 



633-6161 




ffl 

m 




J \ 

Give us your best: Join the ranks of these courageous CoCoists in showing the Color Computer world your 
high score at your favorite micro-diversion. We want to put your best effort on record in the rainbow's bi- 
monthly "Scoreboard" column. All entries must be received 60 days prior to publication. Entries should be 
printed — legibly — and must include your full name, address, game title, company name and, of course, your 
high score. Each individual is limited to three score entries per month. Send your entries to Scoreboard, 

C/O THE RAINBOW. 

For greater convenience, your high scores may also be sent to us through the MAIL section of our Delphi 
CoCo SIG. From the CoCo SIG> prompt, pick MAIL, then type SEND and address to: EDITORS. 



ADVANCED STAR*TRENCH (THE RAINBOW, 7/86) 
4,750 ★Stephane Martel, Lavaf, Quebec 
4,500 Frankie DiGiovanni, Oiney, MD 
4,475 David Schaller, Ciarkston, WA 
AN DRONE (Radio Shack) 

20,820 ★Gary Budzak, Westerville, OH 
ASTRO BLAST (Mark Data) 

49,356 * Brian S. Brame, Lakeside, CA 
48,825 Tony Bacon, Mt. Vernon, IN 
24,980 Matthew Smith, Courtenay, British 
Columbia 
ATOM (Radio Shack), 

Round 2 James Donegan, Saurgerties, NY 



15,785 
12,825 



1,627,500 
1,002,700 
437,200 
436,200 



BASH (SRB Software) 

744,900 *Andy Carter, North Charleston, SC 
BEE ZAPPER (THE RAINBOW, 9/87) 

28,275 ★William Currie, Bryans Road, MD 
David Hartmann, Osoyops, British 

Columbia 
Frederick Lajoie, Middleton, Nova 
Scotia 

BIOSPHERE (Radio Shack) 

64,000 *Ty Stocksdale, Racine, Wl 
BLITZ (THE RAINBOW, 6/88) 

126,400 ★Jerry Anderson, Jacksonville, FL 
69,150 Ryun Schlecht, Gackle, ND 
38,775 Jon Hobson, Plainfield, Wl 
BOUNCING BOULDERS (Diecom Products) 
24,186 ★Dennis Zobel, Centereach, NY 
16,874 Michael Zobel, Centereach, NY 
10,930 Patrick Garneau, Ste-Croix, Quebec 
BREWMASTER (NOVASOFT) 

51,925 *Wendy Staub, Moundsville, WV 
CANYON CLIMBER (Radio Shack) 
1 ,725,100 ★John Guptill, Columbia, MO 
Matthew Fumich, Munford, TN 
Chris Kremo, Bethel, CT 
Jack Rowe, Fenton, MO 
Sam Hanson, Inkom, ID 
CASHMAN (MichTron) 

9,870 * Martin Parada, Arcadia, CA 
CAVEWALKER (Radio Shack) 

209,870 *Todd Von Natta, Isle of Palms, SC 
34,720 Chris Kremo, Bethel, CT 
30,309 Cathy England Kimble, Glendale, AZ 
CLOWNS & BALLOONS (Radio Shack) 
688,960 *Faye Keefer, Augusta, GA 
217,500 Frankie DiGiovanni, Olney, MD 
70,1 80 Charles Andrews, Delta Jet, AK 
COLOR BASEBALL (Radio Shack) 

596-0 ★•Frank C. D'Amato, Brooklyn, NY 
•Tom Cherubino, Brooklyn, NY 
•Brian S. Brame, Lakeside, CA 
•Wes Latimer, GrangeviMe, ID 
•Joel Stocksdale, Racine, Wl 
•Kevin Wannemacher, Payne, OH 
•John Valentine, Marlborough, CT 
•Ryan Murray, Herrln, 1L 
•John Brecket, Wilmington, OH 
•Scott Galvao, Tiverton, R I 
•Jennifer Johnson, Meriden, CT 
•Karen Rimiller, Adams, NY 
•Matthew Snider, Pinehurst, TX 

Greg Allen, Atwater, CA 
•Jason Trammel, Murphysboro, IL 
•Chris Donato, Euclid, OH 
COLOR CAR (NOVASOFT) 

343,075 *Duncan Cameron, Chippewa Falls, 
Wl 

318,550 Alan Martin, Cornwall, Ontario 



85 
85 

86 
86 
86 



702,520 
282,070 
174,410 
152,220 



★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★^ 
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¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
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¥ 
¥ 
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¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
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★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★^ 



595-0 
412-0 
389-0 
387-0 
276-0 
238-0 
172-0 
149-0 
137-0 
137-0 
132-0 
130-0 
130-2 
126-0 
113-0 



* Current Record Holder • Shutout 

COLOR POKER (THE RAINBOW, 4/83) 
70,557,600 ★Earl Foster, Lynchburg, VA 
THE CONTROLLERS (THE RAINBOW, 2/88) 
365 *Roger Ranee, Charleston, SC 
308 Erin Carlton, Charleston, SC 
CRYSTAL CASTLES (Thunder Vision) 

516,220 *Jason Trammel, Murphysboro, IL 
DALLAS QUEST (Radio Shack) 

81 *Brad Wilson. Lithia Springs, GA 
Paul Summers, Orange Park, FL 
David and Shirley Johnson, Leicester, 
NC 

Roy Grant, Toledo, OH 
Melanie Moor, Florence, AL 
Curtis Trammel, Murphysboro, IL 
DEF MOV (THE RAINBOW, 1/87) 

50,566 *Frankie DiGiovanni, Oiney, MD 
43,808 Domingo Martinez, Miami, FL 
39,320 Matthew Smith, Courtenay, British 
Columbia 
DEMOLITION DERBY (Radio Shack) 

113,200 *Gary Budzak, Westerville, OH 
100,500 Richard Winkelbauer, Bronx, NY 
DEMON ATTACK (Imagic) 

279,435 *Jon Hobson, Plainfield, Wl 
202,260 Tom Briggs, Hillsdale, NY 
89,285 Upton Thomas, Arnold, MD 
DESERT PATROL (Arcade Animation) 
631 ,450 ★Chris Lucero, Denver, CO 
505,250 Ricky Turkett, Marlow, OK 
234,300 Steven Turcotte, Matane, Quebec 
DESERT RIDER (Radio Shack) 

80,703 ★Thomas Payton, Anderson, SC 
68,353 Mike Alt, San Juan Caplstrano, CA 
65,351 Jason Hackley, Clinton, CT 
DEVIL ASSAULT (Tom Mix) 
1,868,100 ★Stephane Martel, Laval, Quebec 
823,550 Dale Krueger, Maple Ridge, 
British Columbia 
DOWNHILL (THE RAINBOW, 1/89) 

10 *James Donegan, Saugerties, NY 
DOWNLAND (Radio Shack) 

125,450 ★Pat Norris, O'Fallon, MO 
99,982 Eric Mellon, Newark, DE 
99,980 Danny Wimett, Rome, NY 
DRACONIAN (Tom Mix) 

137,810 ★Chris Lucero, Denver, CO 
127,870 Michael Mullen, Buffalo, NY 
DRAGON FIRE (Radio Shack) 

160,835 *Eric Olson, Wheaton, IL 
146,325 Stephane Martel, Laval, Quebec 
FIRESTORM (THE RAINBOW, 1/86) 
22,505 *Chad Presley, Luseiand, 
Saskatchewan 
Stephane Martel, Laval, Quebec 
Kathy Rumpel, Arcadia, Wl 
Mark Brissie, Nashville, TN 
GALACTIC ATTACK (Radio Shack) 

31 ,1 00 ★Upton Thomas, Arnold, MD 
29,030 David Czarnecki, Northampton, MA 
26,370 Jeff Remick, Warren, Ml 
GALAGON (Spectral Associates) 

751 ,020 *Sofia Giorgi, Brasilia, Brazil 
357,890 Jason Clough, Houston, TX 
328,820 Bernard Burke, Lee's Summit, MO 
GANTELET (Diecom Products) 
65,398,298 ★Phil Wooding, Renovo, PA 
45,235,820 Ken Hubbard, Madison, Wl 
23,643,720 Geran Stalker, Rivordalo, GA 
GANTELET II (Diecom Products) 
65,399,289 *Corey Kepler, Renovo, PA 



11,250 
5,680 
5,180 



GANTELET II (continued) 
17,701,060 oryan Bell, Manassas, VA 

55,015 Andy Freeman, Turtle Lake, Wl 
GFL CHAMPIONSHIP FOOTBALL II (Tandy) 
1 ,046-0 *Mark E. Wentroble, Tyler, TX 
825-0 Ryan Grady, Newbury Park, GA 
83-3 Charies Reve de Cotret, Laurent, 
Quebec 

GHANA BWANA (Radio Shack) 
2,350,750 ★Michael Heitz, Chicago, IL 

Joseph Deianey, Augusta, GA 
Kelly Jones, West Salem, OH 
Caraann Jentzsch, Dufur, OR 
Roger Ranee, Charleston, SC 
GIN CHAMPION (Radio Shack) 

2,224-0 ★•Lee Deueil, Shell Rock, (A 
1 ,602-0 «Jimmy Garner, Ft. Worth, TX 
1 ,1 20-0 •Kim Johns, Port Cog., British 
Columbia 

GRANDPRIX CHALLENGE (Diecom Products) 

67,710 *H. Dingweil, Litchlield, CT 
G ROBOT (Children's Computer Workshop) 

9,665 *Wendy Staub, Moundsville, WV 
8,090 Curt Lebei, Louisville, KY 
HELICOPTER HERO (THE RAINBOW, 3/88) 

4,608 *Jerry Anderson, Jacksonville, FL 
103 Phil Holsten, Moraga, CA 
HITCHHIKER'S GUIDE TO THE GALAXY (infocom) 
400/359 ★Roy Grant, Toledo, OH 
400/422 Jeff Holtham, Waterloo. Ontario 
400/510 Brad Wilson, Lithia Springs, GA 
IRON FOREST (Diecom Products) 
5,671,500 ★Douglas Paulson, Richfield, ID 
Gabriel Riley, Richfield, ID 
Charles Boyd, Amarillo, TX 
Janet Boyd, Amarillo, TX 
Ricky Turkett, Marlow, OK 
JOKER POKER (THE RAINBOW, 3/87) 
62,067,906 ★Carole Rueckert, Mansfield, OH 
21 ,733,284 Jon Fogarty, Yale, Ml 
8,179,710 Brenda Kim, Athens, OH 
JUNIOR'S REVENGE (Computerware) 
2,503,000 ★Stephens Martel, Laval, Quebec 
257,600 Keith Cohen, Rocky Mount, NC 
JUNKFOOD (THE RAINBOW, 11/84) 

535,760 ★Charlie Ginn, Augusta, GA 
356,850 Jon Hobson, Plainfield, Wl 
18,990 Joel Klein, Indianapolis, IN 
KING PEDE (T & D Software) 

83,855 *Mike Snyder, Allen, OK 
KNOCK OUT (Diecom Products) 

472,995 *Frank D'Amato, Brooklyn, NY 
1 83,675 Rush Caiey, Port Orchard. WA 
KORONIS RIFT (Epyx) 

1 88,250 ★Mario Zuvieta, McAllen, TX 
186,710 Tony Harbin, Cullman, AL 
KUNG-FU DUDE (Sundog Systems) 

32,000 *Tony Geitgey, University Park, PA 
14,305 David Schulze, San Antonio, TX 
12,150 CodyDeegan, Fallon, NV 
THE LAIR (Freebooter Software) 

1 12,940 ★James Walton, Pittsburgh, PA 
LANDER (T&D Software) 

780 ★Ari Enkin, Neapen, Ontario 
LASER SURGEON: THE MICROSCOPIC 
MISSION (Actlvision) 

42,767 *Joe Stanley, Harrisburg, IL 
LUNAR-ROVER PATROL (Spectral Associates) 
45,700 ★Kameron Pence, Little Rock, AR 
37,900 Michael Little, Acme Aita, Canada 
37,890 Dave Staub, Moundsville. WV 



4,088,000 
3,173,200 
2,676,300 
1,376.850 



86 



THE RAINBOW April 1989 






MARBLE MAZE (Diecom Products) 

353,220 *David Boland, Dubuque, IA 
30,650 Amber Reynolds, White City, 
Saskatchewan 

A MAZING WORLD OF MALCOLM MORTAR (Radio Shack) 
7,035 *Thomas S. Corbitt III, Yaupon Beach, 
NC 

6,125 Stephen McJohnathan, Key mar, MD 
5,030 Jeanne Henning, Quincy, IL 
MEGA-BUG (Radio Shack) 

12,000 *Matthew Smith, Courtenay, British 

Columbia, Canada 
10,044 Douglas Bacon, Middletown, CT 
9,309 Alan Kramer, Cooksville, MD !■ 
MEMOCARDS (THE RAINBOW, 8/87) 

3,1 20 *Lise Gagne, St-David, Quebec 
1 ,964 Scott Walotkiewicz, Tworivers, Wl 
1 ,640 Sara Mittelstaedt, Kief, Wl 
MISSION: F-16 ASSAULT (Diecom Products) 
565,395 *Tony Bacon, Mt. Vernon, IN 
468,750 Karen Jessen, Cleveland, OH 
355,570 Stirling Dell, Dundalk, Ontario 
MISSION: RUSH'N ASSAULT (Diecom Products) 
787,300 *Tony Bacon, Mt. Vernon, IN 
361,750 Clay Jones, Wooster, OH 
212,500 Kelly Jones, West Salem, OH 
195,250 Kelly Jones, West Salem, OH 
86,350 Alan Lindabery, Thorndale, PA 
MONSTER MAZE (Radio Shack) 

52,510 *Chris Kremo, Bethel, CT 
12,950 Paul DeVita, Vallejo, CA 
ONE-ON-ONE (Radio Shack) 

1 ,31 0-0 *• Jon Brocket, Wilmington, OH 
1,302-0 •Thomas Payton, Anderson, SC 
1,276-0 •Jonathan Dorris, Indianapolis, IN 
1,260-0 »Brandon Reece, Chickamauga, GA 
1,248-0 •Kevin Hilton, Conway, AZ 
OUTHOUSE (MichTron) 

534,060 *Kay Foxe, Kansas City, MO 
59,641 Sam Zehel, Coal Center, PA 
38,640 Dave Staub, Moundsville, WV 
PAPER ROUTE (Diecom Products) 

248,400 *Cathy E. Kimble, Glendale, AZ 
150,560 Heather Hamblen, Bar Harbor, ME 
PITFALL II (Activision) 
1,568,500 *Sandy Baker, Martin City, Montana 
1,519,500 Jim Hammons, Martin City, Montana 
1 ,085,500 Tracey Lee Slack, Atwood, Ontario 
871,500 Aaron Florence, English, IN 
5B6.500 Jonathan Toloski, Torrington, CT 
POO VAN (Datasoft) 

626,700 *Charles Rene de Cotret, Saint- 
Laurent, Quebec 
566,850 Lois Crowson, East Alton, IL 
POPCORN (Radio Shack) 

150,560 *Tom Cherubino. Brooklyn, NY 
105,560 Heather Condlt, Grafton, ND 
26,889 Claude Jalbert, Matane, Quebec 
25,450 Dianne Mozzetti, Pittsburgh, PA 
PROSPECTOR (THE RAINBOW, 12/88) 
16,100 ★Sara Mittelstaedt, Kiel, Wl 
15,150 Cray Augsburg 
4,100 Angle Mittelstaedt, Kiel, Wl 
4,050 Jutta Kapfhammer 
3,550 Lauren Willoughby 
PYRAMID 2000 (Radio Shack) 

220 *Darren King, Yorkton, Saskatchewan 
220 *Mike Snyder, Allen, OK 
PYRAMIX (Color Venture) 

68,550 *Andy Freeman, Turtle Lake, Wl 
67,850 Richard Winkelbauer, Bronx, NY 



QUI* (Tom Mix) 

8,407,772 *John Haldane, Tempe, AZ 
RAD WARRIOR (Epyx) 

3,936 *Matthew Smith, Courtenay, British 
Columbia 
RADIO BALL (Radio Shack) 
1,780,870 *Jocelyn Gagne, St-David, Quebec 
1,761,030 Eric Mellon, Newark, DE 
1,666,670 Lise Gagne, St-David, Qeubec 
REACTOID (Radio Shack) 

8,055 *Gary Budzak, Westerville, OH 
RED WARRIOR (Radio Shack) 

5,488 *Scott Godfrey, Nashua, NH 
4,164 Roger Ranee, Charleston, SC 
4,01 1 Erin Carlton, Charleston, SC 
RESCUE ON FRACTALUS (Epyx) 
1 ,000,948 *Steven Ujvary, Calgary, Alberta 
323,167 Kenneth Hill, Severna Park, MD 
RETURN OF JUNIOR'S REVENGE (Coiorware) 
1,792,800 *Chad Presley, Luseland, 
Saskatchewan 

ROGUE (Epyx) 

71,833 *Jon Fogarty, Yale, Ml 
65,529 Joseph H. Campbell, Norfolk, VA 
SAILOR MAN (Tom Mix) 

427,700 *Marnie Schalm, Edson, Alberta 
231 ,900 Jessica Wilkins, Seymour* TN 
231,700 Luis Camino, Lima, Peru 
SANDS OF EGYPT (Radio Shack) 

67 ^Tristan Terkuc, Richmond, Ontario 
82 Edward Rocha, Cobleskill, NY 
SAUCER DEFENSE ( THE RAINBOW, 4/87) 
95,000 *Kevin Hilton, Conway, AZ 
40,000 David Hartmann, Osoyoos, British 
Columbia 
SHAMUS (Radio Shack) 

50,840 *Chris Kremo, Bethel, CT 
30,515 Scott Galvao, Tiverton, Rl 
SHOOTING GALLERY (Radio Shack) 

36,830 ★Patricia Strakey, Littleton, CO 
27,270 Jocelyn Hellyer, Montgomery, IL 
25,510 Donald Knudson. Minot, ND 
SHOOT'N RANGE (THE RAINBOW, 8/87) 
55,623 *Paul Robbins, Picayune, MS 
14,702 Richard Winkelbauer, Bronx, NY 
13,794 Phillip Holsten, Modesto, CA 
SILPHEED (Game Arts) 

80,603 *Frankie DiGiovanni, Olney, MD 
SLAY THE NERIUS (Radio Shack) 

73,091 *Jeff Remick, Warren, Ml 
65,921 Chris Lucero, Denver, CO 
63,476 Chris Kremo, Bethel, CT 
21,410 Scott Severtson, Jamestown, NY 
SNEAKY SNAKE (THE RAINBOW, 8/87) 

102 *Mike Alt, San Juan Capistrano, CA 
63 Matthew Smith, Courtenay, British 
Columbia 
SPACE ASSAULT (Radio Shack) 

13,110 *Jeff Remick, Warren, Ml 
7,280 Jason Kopp, Downs, IL 
6,200 John Weaver, Amsterdam, NY 
SPACE INVADERS (Spectral Associates) 

3,920 *Ari Enkin, Neapen, Ontario 
SPEED RACER (MichTron) 

103,120 *Rlcky Turkett, Marlow, OK 
97,400 Jeff Morrison, Marlow, OK 
96,420 Karen Rimiller, Adams, NY 
96,000 Amber Reynolds, White City, 
Saskatchewan 
SPEEDSTER (THE RAINBOW 8/87) 

250,500 *Kevin Hilton, Conway, AZ 



SPEEDSTER (continued) 

21 1 ,300 Paul Robbins, Picayune, MS 
117,080 Bill Millington, Meriden, CT 
SPIDERCIDE (Radio Shack) 

27,730 *Mike LeBrun, Cornwall, Ontario 
SPRINGSTER (Radio Shack) 

303,520 *Mavis Hartmann, Osoyoos, British 
Columbia 

200,670 Denise Root, Thorndale, PA 
41,230 Jason Trammel, Murphysboro, IL 
STAR BLAZE (Radio Shack) 

8,950 *Richard Durksen, Grunthal, Manitoba 
6,550 Flint Weller, Swarthmore, PA *Wt 
STRATA (THE RAINBOW, 5/88) ^ 
2,992 *Alan Lindaberry, Thorndale, PA 
2,888 Paul Robbins, Picayune, MS Ly 
2,768 H. Dingwell, Litchfield, CT -m 
SUPER PITFALL (Radio Shack) 

1,293,500 *Jimmy Campanella, DuQuoin, IL 
TEMPLE OF ROM (Radio Shack) 

604,000 *Troy Graham, Arnold, MD 
507,700 Adam Broughton, Morris, PA 
303,600 Tim Hennon, Highland, IN 
THEXDER (Sierra On-Line) 
2,033,000 *Frankie DiGiovanni, Olney, MD 
1,823,900 Tom Gauwitz, Roanoke, IL 
1 ,41 1 ,700 Steve Hallin, Biloxi, MS 
TIME BANDIT (MichTron) , 

76.030 *Brent Morgan, Centerville, OH 
59,020 Stephanie Morgan, Centerville, OH 
TREKBOER (Mark Data) ^ 
1 23 * Roy Grant, Toledo, OH 
132 Matthew Fumich, Munford, TN 
TRIG ATTACK (Sugar Software) ^ 

196,000 *Cassaundra Stewart, Sacramento, CA 
TUTS TOMB (THE RAINBOW, 7/88) t- 
54,344 ★ Brian Brame, Lakeside, CA 4 4£ 
53,280 William Currie, Bryans Road, MD 
VARLOC (Radio Shack) *M 
2,502 *Frank D'Amato, Brooklyn, NY 
2,032 Tony Harbin, Cullman, AL 
2,032 Edward Rocha, Cobleskill, NY 
VICIOUS VIC (THE RAINBOW, 7/86) 
18,813 *Talib Khan, Bronx, NY 
15,063 John Conley, Everett, WA ^ 
WILDWESTfTom Mix) 

35 *Paul Summers, Orange Park, FL 
WISHBR1NGER (Infocom) « 

400/201 *Brad Wilson, Lithia Springs, GA 
WIZARD'S DEN (Tom Mix) Jbf 
593,950 *Richard Winkelbauer, Bronx, NY 
425,350 Leif Smedberg, Columbia City, IN J* 
195,050 Mark Touchette, Preston, CT 
WRESTLE MANIAC (Diecom) ^ 
956,971 *Marc RBiter, Cincinnati, OH 
546,315 Louis Bouchard, Gatineau, Quebec 
ZAKSUND (Elite Software) 

557,900 *Tom Cherubino, Brooklyn, NY I 
357,550 Martin Parada, Arcadia, CA 
268,350 Tony Bacon, Mt. Vernon, IN 
ZAXXON (Datasoft) 
2,061 ,000 *Byron Alford, Raytown, MO 
1,950,000 Blake Cadmus, Reading, PA 
ZONERUNNER (Radio Shack) 

65,535 *Scott Godfrey, Nashua, NH ^ 
65,535 *Mike Woycheshen, Coqultlam, Brftfsh*^^ 
Columbia 

ZORK l(lnfocom) 

350/328 *Kpnnie Grant, Toledo, OH I 
350/587 Matthew Yarrows, Easthampton, MA 



★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★ 



April 1989 THE RAINBOW 87 



★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★^ 




0 




I 




In conjunction with the rainbow's Scoreboard, we offer this bi-monthly 
column of pointers for our game-playing readers' benefit. If you have some 
interesting hints, tips or responses to questions, or want help yourself, we 
encourage you to write to the Scoreboard, c/o the rainbow. 



response to questions 



•Danielle Ramsey: In Dallas Quest \ once 
you are in the cave you must hatch the 
eggs over the torch. Be sure to have the 
flashlight in your possession or you will 
get stuck. 

In White Fire of Eternity, how do you 
get the pick from the statue's hands? 
What is the ring used for? 

Michael Duvall 
Zanesville, Ohio 

•Floyd Kiernan: In a Greek myth, Atlan- 
ta's competitor rolled golden apples in 
front of Atlanta to distract her. Perhaps 
this is your solution in Mythology. 

In Koronis Rift, how do I find the 
home base of the saucer guardians in Rift 
20? " 

In Dungeons of Daggorath, what is the 
correct incantation for the Supreme ring? 

In The Gantelet IJ V how do you pass 
the nineteenth level? When I get there, I 
am in a room without doors, destructible 
or movable walls, teleporters, or passages 
out. However, I can see monsters in other 
rooms. How do I leave the beginning 
room? 

Frankie DiGiovanni 
Olney, Maryland 



it'? 



•Duane Whitlock: In Madness and the 
Minotaur , to kill the Hydra you must 
have either the dagger or the sword. 
Then, type STAB HYDRfi and you can 
retrieve the rope. You Will probably find 
the fourth spell on the second level 
(below the level with the pool). 

James Stakelin 
Cyn thiana, Kentucky 

•Floyd Resler: In In Search of the Star 
Lord, you will find the circuit board 
(microchip) in the laser panel. Don't 
forget the wedge. 

•Andrea Jenkins: To get out of the tree 
in Dallas Quest, open the pouch (ob- 
tained from the desk) and give it to the 
monkey, then drop the parachute. 
•H. James Herchek: In Wishbringer, to 
get past the troll, give it the can, but be 
sure to get it back again. In Dallas Quest, 
in order to leave the trading post, you 
must feed the monkey. He will open the 



secret door, but you will need a flashlight. 
•Angela Aldred: To get past the rats in 
Sam Diamond P.L, feed them. But to do 
that you will need money to buy food in 
the diner. 

Dianne Piper 
Beloiu Wisconsin 

•Chris Franson: In Pyramid, to get the 
statue of the bird god, you must first have 
the box. Then drop the scepter and get 
the statue; Later in the Pharoah's 
chamber, to get past the serpent, type 
THROW STATUE. It will attack the serpent 
and drive it away. Then drop the scepter 
and get the statue. 

Robert Reed 
Albequerque, New Mexico 

•John Knight: In Hitchhiker's Guide to 
the Galaxy, to open the screening door, 
get the real tea (not the substitute), then 
go to the screening door and open it. 
Drink the tea before you go inside, or else 
you will die of immense depression. To 
open the hatch you will need to eat the 
fruit to discover which topi you'll need. 
Then, go to the hatch room and enter the 
access space with only the tool in your 
possession. Enter the space and wait for 
Marvin and give him the tool when he 
asks for it. 

In One-on-Qne, some interesting facts: 
If you press S you will get a shadow of 
the ball which will help you rebound. Are 
you going to make a fantastic shot? Press 
2 for slow motion, press 1 to resume 
normal play. Does anyone know how to 
do a behind-the-backboard shot or a 
three-pointer? 

In Wizard's Castle, where is the prin- 
cess and how do I free her? The hints are 
absolutely no help at all. 

Eric Reitz 
Mendham, New Jersey 

•Chris Franson: In Pyramid, to get the 
statue of the bird god, you must first have 
the box. Then drop the scepter and get 
the statue, Later in the Pharoah's 
chamber, to get past the serpent, type 
THROW STATUE, It will attack the serpent 
and drive it away. Then drop the scepter 
and get the statue. 

Robert Reed 
Albequerque, New Mexico 



In The Interbank Incident, where is the 
cartridge and the special IBC card? 

David Ring 
Lyman, Nebraska 

In Hall of the King, I've moved the 
rubble and covered the rock, but I can't 
cross the river. 

pctfid Schulze 
San Afflgkfo; Texas 



In Shenanigans, where is the trap door 
in the cave? 

Eddy So las 
San Antonio, Texas 

In Sands of Egypt, how do you get in 
the boat drain? 

In Dallas Quest, how do you bribe the 
parrot into helping you? 

Darrel Hoffman 
The Colny, Texas 

How do you get across the rug in 
Raaka-Tul 

In Madness and the Minotaur, T can- 
not figure out how to get the shield or 
how to jump it. 

Peter Menning 
Albuquerque, New Mexico 

In The Castle of Narios, at the sign it 
requests that you say the password. What 
is the password? 

In The Hero of Lonesome Valley, what 
is the combination vials for the crystal? 

R. Phar 

Baton Rouge, Louisiana 



To respond to other readers' inquiries 
and requests for assistance, reply to 
"Scoreboard Pointers,'' c/o THE RAIN- 
BOW, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 
40059. We will share your reply with all 
"Scoreboard" readers in an upcoming 
issue. 

For greater convenience, "Scoreboard 
Pointers" and requests for assistance may 
also be sent to us through the MAIL 
section of our Delphi CoCo SIG. From 
the CoCo S1G> prompt, pick MAIL, 
then type SEND and address to: EDITORS. 
Be sure to include your complete name 
and address. 



**★* *★* ** ********* * * * * 



88 THE RAINBOW April 1969 



1 Wishing Well 



If you have an idea for the " Wishing 
Well, " submit it to Fred c/o THE 
RAINBOW. Remember, keep your 
ideas specific, and don't forget this is 
basic. All programs resulting from 
your wishes are for your use, but 




Last month we examined a pro- 
gram that turned your Color 
Computer into an easy-to-use 
calculator. This month, we will take that 
idea one step further by introducing 
Time Card, a program to do a task that 
few, if any, calculators are designed to 
do — add time. 

This program is intended as a small- 
business utility and is not an educa- 
tional program. It can be adapted for 
any of the Tandy 1000 line of comput- 
ers. (More on that later.) 

Pressing Need 

Have you ever tried adding time or 
figuring out the difference between two 



Fred Scerbo is a special needs instructor 
for the North Adams Public Schools in 
North Adams, Massachusetts. He holds 
a master's in education and has pub- 
lished some of the first software avail- 
able for the Color Computer through 
his software firm, Illustrated Memory 
Banks. 



Measure your life in bits 
and bytes 



How Much 

Time? 



By Fred B. Scerbo 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 



times, such as a starting and finishing 
time? If you have, you have noticed it's 
different from regular addition and 
subtraction, where we are working with 
a Base 10 number system. Every tenth 
digit clicks over a digit in the next 
column. However, time is based on a 
Base 60 system. The digit in the minute 
column does not click until you have 
passed sixty in the seconds column. The 
same holds true for hours and minutes. 

If we were to add time on a Base 10 
system, the following problem would 
work out this way: 

2:45 
+ 3:45 



5:90 



However, on a Base 60 number system, 
the 90 would equal one and a half hours. 
Therefore, a one would be carried to the 
hour column and 30 minutes would 
remain. This is shown in the following 
example: 

2:45 
+ 3:45 

6:30 

The same holds true when you sub- 
tract time. When you borrow from the 
hour's column, you borrow 60 minutes, 
not 10. Thus the following would be 
true: 

4:15 = 3:75 
- 1:57 - 1:57 
2:18 

Practical Uses 

If you have ever tried to calculate the 
hours an employee has worked based on 
his or her time card, you know how 
frustrating it can be. When do you 
round off a period of time? Does eight 
minutes equal a full quarter of an hour? 
Is seven minutes too little? 

Time Card solves this problem by 
letting you figure out the differences 
between two punched times and total- 
ing the accumulated hours. If you want 
to have an eight-minute period rounded 
to a quarter of an hour, it also does that. 

I won't go into the details of how the 
program works. Let it suffice that the 
subroutines involved translate the time 
into Base 60 math. It does all the 
necessary borrowing or carrying with- 
out losing its accuracy. Since it also 
keeps a running total of the hours 
worked, it will be a real bonus to any 




"Assembly Language Programming for the CoCo" (The Book) and the CoCo 3 (The Addendum). 
Professionally produced (not just skimpy technical specifications). THE CoCo reference books. 



THE BOOK - 289 pages of teaching 
assembly language for the CoCo 1 & 2. 
It's used as a school text and is an 
intro to Computer Science. It describes 
the 6809E instructions, subroutines, 
interrupts, stacks, programming 
philosophy, and many examples. Also 
covered are PIAs, VDG, SAM, kybd, 
jystk, sound, serial port, and using 
cassette and disk. $18.00 + $1.50 s/h. 



THE ADDENDUM - Picks up 

where the BOOK left off. Describes 
ALL the CoCo 3 enhancements & how 
to use them with assembly language. 
The most complete GIME spec. 
WOW - Super-Res Graphics, 
Virtual Memory, New Interrupts, 
and more information not available 
elsewhere. Find out what the CoCo 3 
can really do. $12.00 + $1.00 s/h. 



US check or money 
order. RI orders 
add 6% sales tax 



COCO 3 SPECIAL 

Start your CoCo 
library right. 
See what the CoCo 

can really do and _ _ ^ ^ 

save money - buy I tr LU 

the BOOK and 68 James Court 

ADDENDUM Portsmouth, RI 02871 

for only $27.00 + 

$2.00 s/h. See Us On DELPHI 



April 1989 THE RAINBOW 89 



small company or "Mom and Pop" 
business. 

Using the Program 

When you run the program, the title 
screen appears. You can advance the 
program by answering the following 
question: "Round Off (Y/N)?" A 
round-off will make any eight-minute 
period equal a full fifteen minutes of 
work. 

The work screen then appears. Enter 
the starting time by pressing the digits 
required. For example, the time 3:45 is 
entered by typing 345. This time ap- 



pears on the screen as 3:45. You then 
press ENTER to move to the ending time. 
If the time entered is four digits, such 
as 12:45, do not press ENTER. You also 
do not need to worry about a.m. or p.m. 
times. 

Once the ending time has been en- 
tered, the calculation appears as "Time 
Elapsed" and "Total Work Time." If 
you want to clear the total and start 
again, press CLEAR, and the totals revert 
to zero. Pressing the space bar adds the 
next time to the total time. This way, 
you can do a whole week's worth of 
calculations for one worker. 



Conclusion 

That's all there is to it. If you want 
to alter this program for the Tandy 
1000, be my guest. YouH need to refor- 
mat for the screen size, but otherwise 
everything else should work. Let me 
know what luck you have with it. 

Thanks again to those who even now 
are sending old CoCos to our special- 
needs department. They are put to good 
use helping our resource students 
throughout the city. Keep sending in 
your ideas and suggestions. Next 
month, we'll try something new. □ 




50 88 325 . 

140 33 END 

265 115 



142 
219 



The Listing TIMECARD 

1 REM*************************** 

2 REM* TIMECARD CALCULATOR * 

3 REM* COPYRIGHT (C) 1988 * 

4 REM* BY FRED B. SCERBO * 

5 REM* 60 HARDING AVENUE * 

6 REM* NORTH ADAMS, MA 01247 * 

7 REM*************************** 

8 CLEAR1000 

9 CLS0 

10 PRINTSTRING$(32,188)STRING$(3 
2,204) ; 

15 FORI=lTO 160 :READ A : PRINTCHR 
$(A+128) ; :NEXT 

20 PRINTSTRING$(32 / 195)STRING$(3 
2,179) ; 

2 5 PRINT@358," TIMECARD CALCULAT 
OR »■ ; 

30 PRINTQ390 , " BY FRED B. SCERB 

O »; 

35 PRINTQ422 , " COPYRIGHT (C) 198 

8 "; 

40 DATA94,92,94,92,90,93,88,93,9 
2,93,92 ,93 ,88,93,92,92 ,90,21,28, 
28,2 6, 30,28, 2 9,20,30,28,29,20,30 
,28,29 

45 DATA88,80,90, ,88,85, ,85, ,85, , 
85, ,85, ,80,82,21, ,,,26, ,21, ,26,, 
21, ,26, ,21 

50 DATA, ,90, , ,85, ,85, ,85, ,85, ,85 
,92,92,90,21, ,, ,30,28,29, ,30,29, 
28, f 26 f i 2 X 

55 DATA, ,90, , ,85, ,85, ,85, ,85, ,85 
, , ,80,21, , , ,26, ,21, ,26,21,18, ,26 
,,21 

60 DATA,81,91, , ,87,82,87,82, , ,87 
,82,87,83,83,90,21,19,19,26,27,1 
6,23,17,27, ,27,17,27,19,23 



65 IFINKEY$OCHR$(13)THEN65 
70 CLS 

75 PRINT§232, "ROUND-OFF (Y/N) ?" 

• 

80 X$=INKEY$:IFX$=""THEN80 
85 IFX$="Y"THENR=1:GOTO100 
90 IFX$="N"THENR=0:GOTO100 
95 GOTO80 
100 A$(4)="00:00" 
105 A$ (1) ="00 : 00" : A$ (2) ="00 :00" : 
A$(3)="00:00" 
110 GOSUB115:GOT0185 
115 PRINT @0, "";: PRINT: PRINT 
120 PRINTTAB (5) "TIME CLOCK CALCU 
LATOR" 
125 PRINT 
130 PRINTTAB ( 5 

"A$(l) 
135 PRINT 
140 PRINTTAB (5 

"A$(2) 
145 PRINT 
150 PRINTTAB (5 

"A$(3) 
155 PRINT 
160 PRINTTAB (5 

"A$(4) 
165 PRINT 
170 PRINTTAB (5 
OR MORE" 
175 PRINTTAB (5 
RESTART" 
180 RETURN 

185 REM START CALCULATIONS 
190 FORQ=lT02 
195 FORt=lT04 

200 X$=INKEY$:IFX$=""THEN200 

205 IFX$=CHR$(13) AND I=4THEN2 60 

210 IFX$=" "THEN105 

215 IFX$=CHR$(12)THEN70 

220 X=ASC(X$)-48:IFX<0THEN200 

225 IFX>9THEN200 

230 Z$=Z$+X$ 

235 IFI=1THENA$(Q)="00:0"+Z$ 
240 IFI=2THENA$(Q)="00:"+Z$ 



"STARTING TIME: 



"ENDING TIME: 



"TIME ELAPSED: 



"TOTAL WORK TIME: 



"PRESS SPACEBAR F 
"PRESS CLEAR FOR 



90 THE RAINBOW April 1989 



245 IFI=3THENA$ (Q) ="0"+LEFT$ (Z$, 

l)+":"+RIGHT$(Z$,2) 

250 IFI=4THENA$ (Q) =LEFT$ (Z$ , 2) +" 

:"+RIGHT$(Z$,2) 

255 G0SUB115:NEXTI 

260 Z$= ,MI 

265 CH=VAL(MID$(A$(Q) ,4,1) ) : IF C 
H=> 6THEN Z $= » " : A$ ( Q ) = n fijj : 00 " : GOS 
UB115:GOT0195 
270 NEXTQ 

275 A(2,2)=VAL(LEFT$(A$(2) ,2) ) :A 

(2,1)=VAL(RIGHT$(A$(2) ,2) ) 

280 A(1,2)=VAL(LEFT$(A$(1) ,2) ) :A 

(1,1)=VAL(RIGHT$(A$(1) ,2) ) 

285 IFA(2,1)<A(1,1)THEN A(2,1)=A 

(2.1) +60:A(2,2)=A(2,2)-1 
290 A(3,1)=A(2,1)-A(1,1) 
295 IF R=0THEN320 

300 IF A(3,l)=>8 AND A(3,l)<15 
THEN A (3,1) =15 

305 IF A(3,l)=>23 AND A(3,l)<30 
THEN A(3,l)=30 

310 IF A(3,l)=>38 AND A(3,l)<45 
THEN A(3,l)=45 

315 IF A(3,l)=>53 AND A(3,l)<60 
THEN A(3,l)=j3:A(2,2)=A(2,2)+l 
320 IFA(2,2)<A(1,2)THEN A(2,2)=A 

(2.2) +12 



325 A(3,2)=A(2,2)-A(1,2) 
330 C$=STR$(A(3,2) ) :IF LEN(C$)=2 
THEN C$="0"+RIGHT$(C$,1) ELSE C 
$=RIGHT$(C$,2) 

335 D$=STR$(A(3,1) ) :IF LEN(D$)=2 
THEN D$="0"+RIGHT$ (D$,l) ELSE D 
$=RIGHT$(D$,2) 
340 A$ (3)=C$+" : "+D$ 
345 GOSUB115 

350 C(1)=VAL(C$) :D(1)=VAL(D$) 

355 C(2)=VAL(LEFT$(A$(4) ,2) ) :D(2 

)=VAL(RIGHT$(A$(4) ,2) ) 

360 D(3)=D(1)+D(2) : IF D(3)=>60 T 

HEN D(3)=D(3)-60:C(1)=C(1)+1 

365 C(3)=C(1)+C(2) 

370 C$=STR$(C(3) ) :IFLEN(C$)=2 TH 

EN C$="0"+RIGHT$(C$, 1) ELSE C$=R 

IGHT$(C$,2) 

375 D$=STR$ (D(3) ) :IFLEN(D$)=2 TH 

EN D$="0"+RIGHT$(D$,1) ELSE D$=R 

IGHT$(D$,2) 

380 A$(4)=C$+":»+D$ 

385 GOStjB115 

390 X$=INKEY$:IFX$=""THEN390 
395 IFX$=" "THEN105 
400 IFX$=CHR$(12)THEN70 
405 GOTO390 
410 GOTO410 



1988 COCO FEDERAL TAX 

BY PURITAS SPRINGS SOFTWARE 

In his review of last year's edition, Ted Paul wrote: "This is an excellent program and 
manual and I was In awe when the mall carrier handed me this huge bundle." CoCo 
ClipBoard Magazine, Mar/Apr 1 988 

"100+ page manual 'For the 64K CoCo 1 2 or 3 w/1 Disk Drive, 'machine language 
user interlace *3 diskettes 'menu driven, 'loads & saves files to disk, 'prints to screen 
or prepares forms acceptable to IRS, 'easy to use format follows IRS lorms. 
'built-in calculator, 'self-checking for common errors and ommisions. 
'complete directory system for easy editing, 'disk directory lunction, 'Price • $49.95 



Form 1040 
Schedule C 
Schedule SE 
Form 8615 
Social Security 



Schedule A 
Schedule D 
Form 2441 
State/Local Tax 
IRA 



Schedule B 
Schedule E 
Form 4562 
Pension/Annuity 
And More 



IRONSIDES & CRIMSON SAILS 

softWAR Technologies 

A two player naval game for the 51 2K CoCo running OS9 Level 2. It utilizes the 
640x192 high resolution screen for brilliant graphic displays. It comes on a single 
diskette which contains 5 different naval battles, therefore. I&CS is really 5 completely 
separate games in one. Different game maps with different set-ups requiring different 
aspects of play, l&CS also has a game save or load feature, In addition to the master 
game system disk. 5 other collections each containing 8 other individual battle simula- 
tions are available. 

I&CS is offered at a special rate of only P8.95. Reviewer Ted Paul called it "a steal 
at this price ... one of the most interesting programs I've seen from a third party 
vendor ... a fine example of what third party vendors can produce to take advan- 
tage of the CoCo's graphics abilities in conjunction with the OS9 Operating 
System." Computer Shopper, 11/88 

Puritas Springs Software/softWAR Technologies 
Ameritrust Building 
17140 Lorain Avenue 
Cleveland, Ohio 441 1 1 
(216) 251-8085 



□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□ 

When Tandy introduced OS-9 Level 2. 
you bought it. Now, no more excuses. 



START 




An Enjoyable. Hands-On Guide To OS-9 Level 2 
On The Color Compuer 3 
$32.95 + $2.50 P&H. US funds 
Includes disk. Over 280 pages of lessons, essays & tips. 
Requires 2 drives, 512K, 80-column monitor. 

Turbocharge your OS-9 system! 

THE GOLDBERG 
UTILITIES 

Power-packed disk with tutorial- style documentation! 

Save disk space (Pk)QFind lost files (Grep)QCopy 
multiple files (Zcopy)QSort long lists (Sort)Qclear 
screen with ease (Cls)QConvert between hex, decimal, 
and binary (Val)Q FIFTEEN COMMANDS IN ALL! 

$24.95 + $2.50 S&H. 

Kenneth-Leigh Enterprises 

1840 Biltmore Street NW Suite 10 
Washington DC 20009 202/232-4246 
Personal check & money order welcome. 

□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□ 



April 1989 THE RAINBOW 91 



Doctor ASC Ii 



Speedier Operations 

i| / would like to know if the Co Co 3 
^ always operates at the faster clock 
j speed of 2 MHz during BASIC pro- 
grams, machine language programs or 
just a normal listing of a directory on 
a screen. Is there a command that is 
used in BASIC and ML programs that 
makes the Co Co operate at the faster 
speed? I have the older disk controller 
catalog (Cat.#26-3029). Will this con- 
troller allow the computer to operate at 
the faster speed for disk input /output? 
I also have the Multi-Pak interface that 
is not upgraded with the new PAL chip. 
By the way t everything seems to work 
fine without the PAL chip upgrade. 

Edward G. Stroh 
Thornton, Illinois 

y) The CoCo 3 on boot-up to Disk 
Color BASIC runs at 1 MHz. To 
switch it into 2-MHz operation, type 
POKE 65497,0. OS-9 Level II has this 
poke embedded in the machine lan- 
guage that boots it up. The CoCo 1 disk 
controllers required 12 volts in addition 
to the 5 volts supplied on the expansion 
connector by the CoCo 2 and CoCo 3. 
These controllers have proven unrelia- 
ble at 2 MHz. 

An Unbootable Disk 

H / have a CoCo 3 with double-sided 
jiii drive as jdO and jd2 and a single- 
& sided drive as Drive 1. I just bought 
OS-9 Level II, followed the directions 
in the Radio Shack manual and The 
Complete Rainbow Guide to OS-9 
Level II and used Conf ig to enable my 
double-sided drive. I wound up with an 
unbootable disk. Where did I go wrong? 

Wayne B. Sylyis 
Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania 

O One possibility is that your 
jC double-sided drive is hardware- 
configured to act as two single-sided 
drives. If this is true, you need to disable 
this hardware patch for true two-sided 
operation in OS-9 Level II. On the 
"Down-Under" controllers, formerly 

Richard Esposito is the principal engi- 
neer for BDM Corporation. He holds 
bachelor's, master's and doctorate 
degrees from Polytechnic Institute of 
Brooklyn. He has been writing about 
microcomputers since 1980. 

Richard Libra is a simulator test 
operator for Singer Link Simulation 
Systems Division. 




By Richard £. Esposito 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 
with Richard W. Libra 

sold by J&R, the hardware patch con- 
sisted of a jumper wire connecting two 
lands on the edge connector. Removing 
the jumper wire disabled the patch on 
it. Your controller may have a similar 
patch wire. 



3VHnch Floppies 

What hardware /software do I need 
to use a 3V2~inch floppy drive with 
my CoCo? 

Leon Price 
Manchester, Connecticut 



A S^-inch floppy is electrically 
/L equivalent to a 514-inch one. The 
only real problem is transferring soft- 
ware to the smaller media since the 
CoCo standard is still 5!4-inch media. 

The Mind-Boggling Joystick 

I have a CoCo 3 that has developed 
a problem I can't figure out. Re- 
cently, in the middle of a game (any 
game) my Deluxe Joystick ceases to 
fire. The left /right, up /down works 
fine, but there is no action on the fire 
button of either joystick. However, 
when I replace them with my little 
"cheapie" that I got originally, the fire 
button works fine. I cannot believe that 
the fire button on both joysticks would 
pick the exact same moment to quit. 
Often, when the computer's been off for 
awhile, the Deluxe Joystick works 
again. Any ideas? By the way, I am 



using RGB Patch for a CM-8 before 
loading the game. 

Garth V. Hunt 
Campbellville, Ontario 

1? Since the machine works fine with 
/L the "cheapie" joysticks, your com- 
puter is probably OK. If one of your 
joysticks has its fire button shorted or 
stuck in the pressed position, it could 
affect the operation of the other one. Fd 
check the joystick's wiring for a short 
and check the fire button for proper 
operation with a voltmeter. 

Compatible Drivers 

Max- 10 by Colorware does not sup- 
port the DMP-I00. I have a printer 
driver for CoCo Max II that will 
drive the DMP-I00 on my CoCo 3. Are 
the drivers on my CoCo Max II com- 
patible with the drivers on the CoCo 
Max 3 and Max-10? 

Robert L. Johnson 
New- Orleans 

1? No, the newer software uses the 
/L super Hi-Res graphics screens of 
the CoCo 3 while your old drivers access 
the older PMODE display. 

True Lowercase 

Recently, I bought an old Line Print- 
er VII (Radio Shack Cat. #26-1167) 
from a friend. For the most part, it 
works fine except it won 't print what I 
like to call "hung lowercase letters 
(examples — g,j,p, q> andy). Normally, 
I would expect these lowercase letters to 
be printed halfway below the line. Is this 
normal? The service manual doesn't 
say. If this is normal, and I suspect it 
is, is there any way to fix it or is there 
a company I can send it to for repairs? 

Wesley Evans 
Denver 



I? Fortunately (or unfortunately), 
/C there is nothing wrong with your 
printer. These older 7-pin printers do 
not support lowercase descenders, 
which were introduced with the 9-pin 
variety. 

DEFUSR, CHROUT and CSRDON 

I have two questions, both relating to 
information (or lack thereof) given in 
the CoCo 3 Extended BASIC manual. 
I am not clear on how the DEFUSR 
command operates. When data is 
passed from BASIC to the ML subrou- 
tine, what register or address does it go 



it 



92 



THE RAINBOW April 1989 



Dr. Preble's Programs 

Since 1983 



Pyramix 



This fascinating CoCo 3 game continues 
to be one of our best sellers. Pyramix is 
100% machine language written 
exclusively to take advantage of all the 
power in your 128K CoCo 3. The Colors 
are brilliant, the graphics sharp, the 
action fast. Written by Jordan Tsvetkoff 
and a product of ColorVenture. 

The Freedom Series 

Vocal Freedom 

I've got to admit, this is one nifty 
computer program. Vocal freedom turns 
your computer into a digital voice 
recorder. The optional Hacker's Pac lets 
you incorporate voices or sounds that you 
record into your own BASIC or ML 
programs. This is not a synthesizer. 
Sounds are digitized directly into 
computer memory so that voices or 
sound effects sound very natural. One 
"off-the-shelf" application for Vocal 
Freedom is an automatic message minder. 
Record a message for your family into 
memory. Set Vocal Freedom on 
automatic. When Vocal Freedom "hears" 
any noise in the room, it plays the pre- 
recorded message! Disk operations are 
supported. VF also tests memory to take 
advantage of from 64K up to a full 
512K. Requires low cost amplifier (RS 
cat. *277-1008) and any microphone. 

Mental Freedom 

Would your friends be impressed if your 
computer could read their minds? Mental 
Freedom uses the techniques of 
Biofeedback to control video game action 
on the screen. Telekinesis? Yes, you 
control the action with your thoughts and 
emotions. And, oh yes. it talks in a 
perfectly natural voice without using a 




speech synthesizer! Requires Radio 
Shack's low cost Biofeedback monitor, 
Cat. *63-675. 

BASIC Freedom 

Do you ever type in BASIC programs, 
manually? If you do, you know it can 
be a real chore. Basic Freedom changes 
all that. It gives you a fall screen editor 
just like a word processor, but for 
BASIC programs. Once loaded in. it is 
always on-line. It hides invisibly until 
you call it forth with a single keypress! 
This program is a must for programers 
or anyone who types in programs. By 
Chris Babcock and a product of 
ColorVenture. 

Lightning Series 

These three utilities give real power to 
your CoCo 3. 

Ramdisk Lightning 

This is the best Ramdisk available. It 
lets you have up to 4 mechanical disk 
drives and 2 Ram drives on-line and is 
fully compatible with our printer spooler 

below. 

Printer Lightning 

High capacity print spooler for CoCo 3. 

Load it and forget it--except for the 
versatility it gives you. Never wait for 
your printer again! Printer runs at high 
speed while you continue to work at the 
keyboard! Will operate with any printer 
you have already hooked to your CoCo. 

Backup Lightning 

This utility requires 512K. Reads your 
master disk once and then makes 
superfast multiple disk backups on all 
your drives! No need to format blank 
disks first! Supports 35. 40 or 80 track 
drives. 

COCO Bra We 

Produce standard grade 2 Braille on a 
Brother daisy wheel printer. Easy to use 
for sighted or blind user. No knowledge 
of Braille is necessary. Call for free 
sample. The raised dots produced are 
easily touch readable by the blind. The 
print-to-braille algorithm is robust with 




errors rarely being made—and, it hat the 
ability to learn! 

Prices 

CoCo 3 only 

Mam Disk Lightning. Disk**. $19.95 

Printer Lightning Disk $19.95 

Backnp Lightning. Disk $19.95 

Aii three. Disk., $49.95 

Pyramix. Disk.. $24.95 

CoCo 1,2, or 3 

Vocai freedom. Disk $34.95 

Vocai freedom Hackers Pac $14.95 

COCO Braille $69.95 

CoCo 2 or 3 only 

Mental freedom Disk. $24.95 

Basic freedom. Disk $24.95 

CoCo 1 or 2 only 

VDOS. The Undisk. a menu operated 
ramdisk for the CoCo 1 or 2. LOAD. 
SAVE, KILL, DIRECTORY , are all 
supported. Tape .$24.95 

VDUMP. backup Undisk files to single 
tape file. Tape $14.95 

TPMlrVr. Print Undisk directory. 
Tape $9.95 

We Ship FAST! 

Add $2.50 shipping/handling 
in USA or CANADA 
Add $5.00 to ship to other 
countries 



Dr. Preble's Programs 
6540 Outer Loop 
Louisville, KY 40228 
24 Hour Order Line 

Visa. MasterCard, COD, Check 

(502) 969-1818 



to? Are the ROM routines as listed on 
pages 315 to 317 correct and complete 
as they stand? I have tried to use the 
CHROUT(%4002J and the C5RDQH($A004) 
subroutines without success. The 
CSRDDN subroutine is particularly baf- 
fling because the entry condition is 
specified as "none/* Yet according to 
my ROM dump, $A004 contains $A7, 
which is a STfl code. How can this be? 
Is the book off or am I? I have an 
IMC6809 data sheet that I've used to 
write simple machine language pro- 
grams, so I am knowledgeable to that 
extent. 

Charles M. Kay 
Cheraw, South Carolina 

The information in the BASIC 
/C manual is sketchy at best. When 
data is passed as an argument for one 
of the USRn ( VALUE ) functions, a value in 
the range -32768 to 32767 (16 bits) can 
be passed to the 6809E's S stack as an 
argument. A JSR $B3ED instruction can 
be used to retrieve this value from the 
S stack to the D register. The ROM 
routines in the BASIC manual list the 
indirect addresses. For example, to use 
the CHROUT routine (similar in function 
to INKEVS in BASIC), you use the instruc- 
tion JSR [SF1002]. In my CoCo 3, this 
statement is logically equivalent to JSR 
$A2B2 (note the absence of the square 
brackets in this case). In both cases, the 
CHROUT routine takes the character in 
the A register and puts it to the screen. 
With regard to CSRDON, if you look at 
addresses $A004 and $A005,you will 
discover that the "real" or direct address 
is $A77C. The reason for specification 
of these routines via indirect addresses 
is that it gives Tandy and Microsoft the 
flexibility to alter ROM routine entry 
points in different versions of ROMs 
without causing assembly language 
programmers the anxiety of having to 
alter code written for previous ROM 
versions. 



Terminal Trouble 

I own a CoCo 3, Multi-Pak, 2 drives, 
CM-8 monitor, two printers and an 
RS-232 Pak. Therein lies the prob- 
lem; I like the ability to use a modem 
and a printer at the same time. How- 
ever, the 32-character screen width used 
by the RS-232 Pak is less than adequate 
for most host systems, especially with 
the 40- and 80-character screen availa- 
ble with the CoCo 3 software. Is there 
communications software available 
that will utilize the 40- and 80-character 
screens and the RS-232 's hardware 
while bypassing its software, or is there 



a way to burn a software package into 
an EPROM and replace the Pak's 
software chip? I have also had a prob- 
lem while attempting to download using 
the Pak. Most BBSs I have used require 
a carriage return to start the download. 
However, when I set the Pak for down- 
loading and hit the BREAK key, lean no 
longer give the host it's carriage return. 
Can you suggest a solution? 

Kerry L. Moline 
Denver 

Three Shareware programs that 
/C can accomplish your desires are 
Mikeyterm, Greg-E-Term, and Rickey- 
Term. All are available for $10 each 
from their authors. The authors' ad- 
dresses are: 

Michael D. Ward 
1 807 Cortez 
Coral Gables, FL 33134 

Greg Miller 
9575 Roston Road 
Grandledge, MI 48837 

Rick Adams 
712 Brett Ave. 
Rohnert Park, CA 94928 

Two- Way Commmunications 

I have a CoCo 3 with 512K, 1 DSDD 
drive, CM-8 monitor, a CGP-220 
printer, OS-9, and Multi-Vue. I also 
own an Amiga 500 with a VT100 em- 
ulation package. This setup works well 
and I have used it successfully with 
many host systems. My problem is that 
I cannot receive characters through the 
RS-232 's port from the Amiga; the 
moment I type tsmon /tl my CoCo 
aborts and responds to nothing except 
the CLEAR key, which still changes me 
between windows (if I have any open), 
lean output data at any speed (300-9600 
baud) with no problem by typing dir / 
tl. This works fine at any speed, but I 
read in The Complete Rainbow Guide 
to OS-9 that the terminals accessing 
OS-9 through the internal RS-232 port 
should have a baud of 300. 1 have tried 
it at 300 baud but it still doesn 't work. 
If I type buiid afile </tl, the CoCo 
also stops. Also, when the CoCo stops, 
even on the previous command where 
only the input is redirected, periods are 
sent out the RS-232 and are displayed 
on the Amiga screen. All the above still 
happens even if I have no cable con- 
nected to the CoCo's RS-232 port. I 
have also tried this on my brother's 
CoCo 3 (128 K) with the rest of the 
system configuration the same, with the 



same results. Is there a problem with my 
hardware setup or the serial driver, or 
what? Also, I purchased Multi-Vue 
because it is advertised to be used to 
create user-friendly interfaces for your 
developed programs. After opening the 
package, however, I find that this is not 
the case. I find that there are no tools 
for creating icons. Can you suggest a 
way lean create my own "user-friendly 
interface icons? 

Walter Zambotti 
Perth, Australia 

Tj The current CoCo 3 version 
A X (2.0 LOO) of OS-9 as distributed by 
Tandy does not support two-way com- 
munication over /tl. Two-way com- 
munication requires /t2 and a RS-232 
Pak. It is possible to write a graphical 
icon editor in C, BASIC09 or assembly 
language; two have appeared on Del- 
phi. If you have a file-zapping program 
such as the Level I Debug, you can use 
it to modify copies of the provided 
icons, hence defining your own. 



Monitor Connections 

/ own a CoCo 3 and I would like to 
connect it to a composite monitor. It 
was used with my IBM PC, for which 
I now have an EGA monitor. Is there 
a way to do that? 

Robert Dagenais 
Quebec 



A composite video monitor usu- 
/L ally has one or two phono-jack 
inputs, one for composite video and 
possibly a second for audio. The CoCo 
3 has corresponding jacks on its back so 
a patch cord of the type normally used 
to connect VCRs is all you need. 



For a quicker response, your 
questions may also be submitted 
through rainbow's CoCo SIG 
on Delphi. From the CoCo 
SIG> prompt, pick RAINBOW 
Magazine Services, then, at the 
RAINBOW> prompt, type ASK 
for "Ask the Experts" to arrive 
at the EXPERTS> prompt, 
where you can select the "Doctor 
ASCII" online form which has 
complete instructions. 



94 THE RAINBOW April 1989 



DIGISECTOR 

DS-69B 




» VIDEO 



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FOR THE 

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(AND ALL OTHER COCOS . . .) 




COCO 3 SCREEN 



USE YOUR COCO 3 TO ITS FULL POTENTIAL! 

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This menu-driven software 
will provide 5 and 16 shades 
of gray to the screen and to 
the printer with simple 
joystick control of 
brightness and contrast. 
Pictures taken by the 
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saved on disk by C-SEE 3.3 
and then edited by our 
optional MAGIGRAPH, or by COCO MAX or 
GRAPHICOM. This versatile new software is included 
in both DIGISECTORS™ 




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DS-69 and C-SEE 3.3 



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Turn of the Screw 



This is the end of our project. 
Remember, though, we've just 
touched the surface of CoCo's 
abilities. You can go beyond this simple 
project — the possibilities are endless. 
This time Til show you how to connect 
a few more inputs. To do this, well delve 
into the world of optics — light. We can 
use light to monitor time or trespassers 
(i.e., determine when it grows dark 
outside or when someone walks into the 
light). 

Let's start with some electronic the- 
ory. Look at Figure 1. Ql is a symbol 
for a photo transistor. This one is an 
NPN. (The N stands for Negative and 
the P for Positive.) A transistor has 
three pins — a base, a collector and an 
emitter. Figure 2 shows a typical NPN 
transistor switching circuit. I use the 
term switching because we use it as a 
simple transistor switch. A simple 
switch is an SPST (Single-Pole, Single- 
Throw). The two contacts are the col- 
lector and the emitter. Current can only 
flow from the collector, through the 
transistor, to the emitter. Examine the 
circuit in Figure 2. If Point A were 
connected to ground, there would be no 
base current flowing from the base of 
the transistor to the emitter. This causes 
a high impedance between the collector 
and the emitter of the transistor (no 
collector-emitter current). The voltage 
at Point B would be about the same as 

vcc. 

We'll introduce a base current by 
raising Point A to VCC. Current will 
now flow through Resistor R5 and the 
transistor base and out the emitter, 
which causes the transistor to conduct. 
The impedance of the collector-emitter 
will lower, and current will flow from 
the collector to the emitter. When this 
happens, the voltage at Point B lowers 
as well. If there were enough current 
flow through the transistor, the voltage 
at B would drop to 0 volts. The amount 
of collector current depends on the 
amount of base current and the gain of 
the transistor. The gain of a transistor 
is the amplification factor. 

The transistors and opto-isolators we 
will use work in the saturation mode, 



Tony DiStefano is a well-known early 
specialist in computer hardware proj- 
ects. He lives in Laval Ouest, Quebec. 
Tony 's username on Delphi is DISTO. 



Light detectors really 
brighten this final 

modification 

Lights 
Out! 



By Tony DiStefano 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 



where we design the transistor to be 
either fully on or fully off. Look at 
Figure 2 again. When you ground Point 
A (no base flow), point B is high. When 
you make Point A high (when base 
current flows), Point B is low. 

Now that we understand the switch- 
ing transistor, let's look at the photo 
transistor. The photo transistor is like 
a regular transistor. It has two pins and 
a window. The two pins are the collector 
and the emitter, and the window is like 
the base of a regular transistor. Exam- 
ine the circuit surrounding Ql. It looks 
like the transistor circuit in Figure 2 but 
has a window instead of a base circuit. 
This window acts like the base circuit 
but uses light instead of current. When 
there is no light in the window, there is 
no base current; when there's no base 
current, there's no collector current. 
The point at which the photo transistor 
and resistor meet is high. When there is 
light, that same point is low. We now 
have a light-activated switch. 

The output of this light switch is 
connected to Pin 2 of U6 (one of eight 
inputs of a 74LS244). The circuit in 
Figure 1 is similar to the circuits in the 
previous three parts. I just deleted a few 
ICs to make room for the new circuits. 
U2 is the same; I just added another 
74LS244 chip to Pin 9. The software 
created in the previous parts of this 
project is also the same. However, 
today's additions will use different 
addresses. 



Now that we have the photo transmit- 
ter, we need an opto-isolator. An opto- 
isolator is a photo transistor and an 
LED (Light Emitting Diode) together 
in one package. As the name implies, 
this device is used to isolate an incoming 
signal. This device is used in many 
places. The most common is in televi- 
sions with separate video and audio 
inputs. In today's TVs, there are no line- 
voltage transformers. Therefore, many 
components inside a modern TV can 
have the potential of 117 volts. This is 
dangerous and can shock you. Any 
connection made to the TV is made 
using isolators similar to the one used 
here. Electrical signals are converted to 
light signals by an LED and are re- 
turned to electrical signals by a photo 
transistor. 

As in all TVs, my circuit is powered 
by a separate supply. This supply has to 
be isolated from the 117-volt AC via a 
transformer. The circuit surrounding 
ISOl in Figure 1 is used in places 
requiring isolation. It is just a switch 
(SW1) isolated from the rest of the 
Color Computer. This switch can be 
used outside or over long distances of 
wire without the worry that static 
electricity or lightning will damage the 
CoCo. The DC adapter is a standard 
toy adapter found almost anywhere. If 
you use more than one opto-isolator, 
you can use the same adapter. I used a 
IK resistor in R3, but this resister may 
be a different value, depending on the 
maximum current for the LED inside 
the opto-isolator and the voltage of the 
adapter. To calculate the resistor value, 
use the equation R = V/I. In this equa- 
tion, R is the value of the resistor 
needed; V is the voltage of the adapter; 
and I is the current needed to turn on 
the LED. You will get this value from 
the specs on the opto-isolator. When the 
isolator is wired up, close the switch. 
This causes current to flow through the 
LED, which in turn activates the photo 
transistor. When on, the output is low. 
When the switch is open, the LED is off 
and the output is high. 

There are many photo transistors and 
opto-isolators on today's market, and 
they all work the same. You may have 
to change the values of resistors to 
match the different types, but youll 
need only a volt meter to make sure it's 
running right. A wide variety of transis- 
tors and isolators are on the market; 
pick one for yourself. They come in 



96 THE RAINBOW April 1989 




IS. 



1 4 



12L 



QSl 



f 



ZS 



is: 

















■23 




36 








r % 









A 
8 

C 



G1 

G2A 

G28 



YD 

Y1 

Y2 

Y3 

Y4 

Y5 

YB 

Y7 



74LS138 



15 



;i a 

5x 



fit 



7 
8~ 



14 



3Z 



is: 



TJT 

01 
D2 
□3 
□4 
□S 
□6 
D7 
□8 



1 1 



Q1 

Q2 

Q3 

Q4 

□5 

Q6 

Q7 

□8 



>CLK 
CLR 

74LS273 



6 



12. 



SEE TEXT 



±9_ 







U4 










1 8 


1 Y1 
1 Y2 
1 Y3 
1 Y4 
2Y1 
2Y2 
2Y3 
2Y4 


1 A1 
1 A2 
1 A3 
1 A4 
2A1 
2A2 
2A3 
2A4 




2 


VD1 


1 6 


4 




1 4 


















11 ; 




-f- 


13 




g 


1| ' 




3 


17" 
















1 G 
2G 




1 
























74LS244 







SEE 
TEXT 



fit 



\Q1 

ST 



N 



1A. 




1 Y1 
1 Y2 
1 Y3 
1 Y4 
2Y1 
2Y2 
2Y3 
2Y4 



1 A1 
1 A2 
1 A3 
1 A4 
2A1 
2A2 
2A3 
2A4 

1G 
2G 



74LS244 



i 



H 



15 



<1S53 33 - 



vcc 

#UF 10 V 

sV>V.V/^ .-V - V- i^^fc^fc 



R1 
1 OK 



X 



Q1 

PHOTO 



NPN 



vcc 



R2 
1 OK 



OC ADAPTER 
3 to 14 V 



SW1 



R3 
1 K 



SOT . , 
OPTO ISOLATOR 



SW SPST 



-•> -'--> 1'.. 



Figure l:The Circuit Board 



different shapes and sizes. Some have 
built-in lenses or tubes. Some can be 
mounted on doors or motors, and some 
come with reflective mirrors. Choose 
the one you need or want to try. There 
is an entire series of infrared photo 
transistors and LEDs. You can build a 
gadget and write software that reads 
your television's remote control and 
duplicates it, so your computer controls 
your television or VCR. Wire your 
house for security. You can use a couple 
of IR pairs and have two CoCos talk to 
each other without wires — your imag- 
ination is the only limit. 

Now we need only to create the 
software. Since we are still using the 
same SCS pin on the CoCo, the ad- 
dressing area remains from SFF40 to 
SFF5F. U6 is a read-only device, so only 
the PEEK command will work in BASIC. 
If it is connected to Y6 of U2, U6 is 
located at SFF42. The same software 
that read the other locations works 
here. The same condition applies with 
the bit positions. In Figure 1, Ql is 
connected to DO, and ISOl is connected 
to Dl. Mix and match these inputs as 
you like. If eight inputs are not enough, 
you can use another 74LS244 and get 



vcc 



R4 

RESISTOR 



R6 

AAA 



RES I STOR 



Col 1 eotor 

Q2 
NPN 

Em I ttar 



Typical NPN Transistor 

C I rou I t 

Figure #2 



Figure 2: Typical NPN 
Transistor Circuit 



another eight inputs. With U2, you can 
have 32 (4 x 8) inputs and 32 (4 x 8) 
outputs. If you need more, add another 
74LS138 and an inverter. 

Constructing the project is simple — 
just add to the existing board. Add 
more sockets and chips as you need 
them. Many electronics stores carry 
photo transistors and opto-isolators. 
Radio Shack stores have a limited 
selection. 

In Part 1 of this project, I told you 
to keep things neat and tight, and this 
is why. If you have many wires coming 
off the board, look into a multiwire 
connector. It helps prevent wires from 
breaking when you turn the board 
upside down to work on it. You may 
want to start again. Design your own 
circuit to suit your needs. With the 
experience you now have, you can make 
it the perfect size. If you are having 
trouble reading the photo transistors, 
use a volt meter to measure the output. 
Make sure the voltage on the collector 
is at least 3 volts when no light shines 
on them and no more than .5 volts when 
there is light. If this is not the case, use 
a different value resistor between the 
collector and the VCC. ^ 



April 1989 THE RAINBOW 97 



Edueatlon-Wotes 




This month's article presents a com- 
puterized dictionary skill. It is especially 
useful to young students who need to 
look up spelling and definitions for long 
lists of vocabulary words. 

One learning trick that I have often 
taught to students is to "Break It Up!." 
It applies in this case by dividing the 
dictionary into four sections, each of 
similar length. We have found that in 
the majority of dictionaries, the four 
quarters break up in the following 
order: 

Words beginning with letters A-C. 
Words beginning with letters D-L 
Words beginning with letters M-R 
Words beginning with letters S-Z 

Locating words is accomplished 
more quickly if the child first decides in 
which of the above dictionary parts an 
individual word is contained. 

To reinforce this concept, create a 
game with the child or class of students. 

Steve Blyn teaches both exceptional 
and gifted children, holds two master's 
degrees and has won awards for the 
design of programs to aid the handi- 
capped. He owns Computer Island and 
lives in Staten Island \ New York. 



A dictionary skills 
program 

Break 
It Up 



By Steve Blyn 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 



Place a list of words on the chalkboard 
or on a piece of paper, then, have 
students indicate next to each word 
whether it would be found in the first, 
second, third or fourth part of the 
dictionary. They may find it easiest to 
just choose and write a number from 
one to four. 
This game is contained in the pro- 



gram that follows. We have selected 25 
practice words. These are contained in 
the data lines at the end of the program. 
The program will be more meaningful 
to the children if either they or you 
chose the words. Spelling, social studies 
or science lists are also possibilities. 

You are not limited to 25 words. This 
is, however, a logical number to begin 
with for the purpose of playing a game. 
You may change the amount of words 
in the data lines to any amount you 
desire. It is important to change the 
number of Variable L at the beginning 
of the program on Line 30 to match the 
number of words that you include. 
Variable L alerts the computer to the 
number of data items to be read and 
used throughout the program. 

Another programming technique 
that needs explanation is the routine 
contained in lines 90 to 1 10. This proce- 
dure is necessary to insure that the 
words do not repeat in any group of 10 
randomly selected words. A similar 
routine is in most of our commercially 
sold programs. 

Please feel free to alter the program 
to suit your students' needs. We, at 
Computer Island, are always happy to 
hear of your uses and successes with our 
programs. 



The listing: DICTNRRY 



10 REM "BREAK-IT-UP! DICTIONARY 
SKILL" 

20 REM" STEVE BLYN , COMPUTER ISLAN 
D , STATEN ISLAND, NY, 1989" 
30 L=25:Z=RND (-TIMER) 
40 DIM A$(L) 

50 FOR W=l TO L:READ A$ (W) :NEXT 
W 

60 CLS0 : PRINTS 9 / "BREAK IT UP!" 
• 

70 R=RND(L) 

80 C=C+1:IF C>1J3 THEN 230 

90 A$=A$(R) 

100 A$(R)=A$(L) 

110 L=L-1 

120 B$=LEFT$(A$,1) 

130 B=ASC(B$) 

140 IF B<68 THEN D=l 

150 IF B>67 AND B<77 THEN D=2 

160 IF B>76 AND B<83 THEN D=3 

170 IF B>82 THEN D=4 

180 PRINT@32*C+64 , C; " . " ; A$ ,"1,2, 



3 OR 4 "; 

190 PRINT@32*C+91,""; : INPUT E 
200 IF E=D THEN PLAY"L100CDEFGGG 

": J=J+1 

210 IF EOD THEN PLAY"L4C#" : PRIN 

T@32*C+91,D 

220 RESTORE: GOTO 70 

230 FOR T=l TO 3 : PLAY"L50GFEDCCC 

11 : NEXT T 

240 PRINT© 4 5 5, "YOUR SCORE IS ";J 

*10;"%" ; 

250 EN$=INKEY$ 

260 IF EN$="E" THEN END 

270 IF EN$=CHR$(13) THEN RUN 

280 GOTO 250 

290 DATA ALGAE, AMEBA, BACILLI ,BAC 
TERIA, CELLS 

300 DATA DISEASE, DRUG, ECOLOGY, FL 
OWERS, GENES 

310 DATA HABIT , IMAGE , LARVA , MAMMA 
L, NEURON 

320 DATA NUCLEUS, ORGAN PEPSIN, RE 
FLEX, SALIVA 

330 DATA SEPALS, THEORY, VEIN ,XYLE 
M, YEAST 



98 THE RAINBOW April 1989 



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The excitement continues! 



The Fourth Rainbow Book of Adventures 



Fourteen fascinating new Adventures from the winners of our fourth Adventure competition. Rely on your wits 
to escape a hostile military installation, try to stop the Nazi plan to invade Great Britain, or manage to reinstate 
our defense system before the enemy launches a massive missile attack — and that's only the beginning! 



The Park of Mystery — You overhear a gang of robbers 
discussing where they've hidden their loot. Can you find 
it — and battle greed and confusion at the same time? 

Superspy — You awaken from a horrifying nightmare 
of chases, inexplicable scenery changes and sickening 
freefalls into space. Or was it a dream? You be the judge 
— and determine your own fate! 

Term Paper — A real nightmare: Someone's stolen your 
freshman midterm paper and hidden its pages all over 
CoCo State's campus. Are you smart enough to find 
them before you miss the due date and flunk the 
course? 



House Adventure — Try to find your way out of a 
mysterious abandoned house that keeps sprouting new 
rooms just as you think you've found an exit. 

Life: An Everyday Adventure — Just getting up in the 
morning in time to do last-minute chores before 
catching a plane to a family reunion proves you don't 
have to leave home to find adventure. 

The Earth's Foundations — A mysterious maze inside 
a deep crevice near your village is having a devastating 
effect on the entire area. You've been chosen to 
investigate, and promised great riches — if you survive! 



Experience other traditional and contemporary challenges from these winning authors: Mike Anderson, Tio 
Babich, David Bartmess, Stephen Berry, Eugene Carver, Charles Farris, Jeff Hillison, Jeff Johnson, Richard 
Kottke, Ken Lie, Andre Needham, Fred Provoncha, Paul Ruby Jr. and Eric Santanen. 



The Fourth Rainbow Book of 
Adventures is only $10.95! 

Tape $9.95, Two-Disk Set $14.95 



The tape and disks are adjuncts and complements to the book; the book is necessary 
(or introductory material and loading instructions, 




Please send me: 

The Fourth Rainbow Book of Adventures $10.95* 
The Fourth Rainbow Adventures Tape $9.95 




The Fourth Rainbow Adventures Disk Set $14.95 



I Name 



Address 
City 



State 



ZIP 




J □ My check in the amount of 

enclosed* 

Please charge to my: □ VISA □ MasterCard 

□ American Express 
Acct. No. 



is 




J Exp. Date 
Signature 



i Mail to: The Fourth Rainbow Book of Adventures, The 
Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059 

*Add $2.00 per book for shipping and handling in the U.S. Outside the 
U.S. add $4 per book (U.S. currency only). Kentucky residents add 5% 

5 sales tax. In order to hold down costs, we do not bill. Please allow 6-8 
weeks for delivery. 

f To order by phone (credit card orders only), call (800) 847-0309, 8 a.m. 
J to 5 p.m. EST. For other inquiries, call (502) 228-4492. 




This program helps children develop 
good fashion sense 




eing an observer of people, I've 
noticed how fashion-conscious 
society is today, though a partic- 
ular subgroup appears blindly uncons- 
cious of acceptable dress codes. There's 
no nice way to say it: Some people just 
don't know how to dress. 

With this in mind, I designed Color 
Coordinator to give children a helping 
hand with fashion sense. The program 
lets them picture what certain color 
combinations look like before trying on 
dozens of outfits. 

By selecting the color for articles of 
clothing (hat, sweater, pants, boots, 
mittens, cape and umbrella), the com- 
puter displays the outfit on CoCo Kid, 
a handsome figure serving as a mimic 
for the child, and with whom he or she 

Bill Bernico is the author of over 200 
Color Computer programs and is a 
frequent RAINBOW contributor whose 
hobbies include golf writing music and 
programming. Bill is a drummer in a 
rock band and lives in Sheboygan, 
Wisconsin. 



will perform fashion experiments. Once 
an article is selected, a color chart 
appears, offering sixteen choices. Color 
choices are numbered 0 through 9 and 
A through F. To alter the represented 
colors, simply change the PALETTE 
values in Line 3. 

One important note on changing 
colors. An already colored article of 
clothing can be changed simply by 
pressing that number or letter, and the 
program will paint over the section. The 
only exception is that if you color 
something black, it will remain black 
until you restart the program by press- 
ing R from the menu. To quit the menu 
press Q. 

If you'd like to change or enhance the 
program or add additional articles of 
clothing like socks, earmuffs, belt, etc., 
simply add their letter to the menu and 
branch off accordingly. 

(Questions or comments regarding 
this program may be directed to the 
author at 708 Michigan Ave., Sheboy- 
gan, WI 53081. Please enclose an SASE 
when requesting a reply.) 




Apr!) 1989 THE RAINBOW 101 



Listing 1: ORDINATE 



0 'COPYRIGHT 1989 FALSOFT, INC 

1 'CC3CCC 

CoCo3 Clothes Color Co-ordinator 

2 1 (C) 1988 FROM 

BILL BERNICO SOFTWARE 

3 CLEAR 300: POKE 65497,0: ON BRK 
GOTO 48:HSCREEN 2:HCLS 4:HCOLOR 
8,4: RGB : R$="NUNDNRNLNGNF" : L$="S8 
L4HU8ER4FD2 L2UL2 D6R2UR2 D2GS4" : PA 
LETTE 9, 56: PALETTE 10, 6: PALETTE 
11, 53: PALETTE 12 , 61 : PALETTE 13,5 
2: PALETTE 14 , 3 9 : PALETTE 15,35 

4 HDRAW"BM180 ,0D191BM60 , 50L40D10 
R40G50NR40E50D40U8R30U32F50L40BL 
15NL20BR15R40H50R40U10L40BL30BD1 
0D40G40L15D10R30U10NL15E40F40D10 
R30U10L30R15H40U40BU10G15H15F3E3 
BR17F3BU2 1R15L50U5R14U15R2 1D15R1 
5D5BM79,88"+L$:HDRAW"BM111,23R56 
L29ND25LD25BD14D8RNU8" 

5 HDRAWRU8BU14U25 " : HCIRCLE (139, 
30) ,30,8,1, .55, .96: HCIRCLE (75, 37 
) ,15,8,1, .96, .55: HCIRCLE (12, 55) , 
8: HCIRCLE (13 8, 55) , 8 :HDRAW"BM69 , 3 
5 "+R$+ " BR12 " +R$+ " BM7 5,40" +R$ : HCI 
RCLE(75,47) ,5,8, . 5 :HPRINT (24 , 5) , 
"COLOR" : HPRINT (24,6), "WHICH" : HPR 
INT (24, 8) ,"H=Hat" 

6 HPRINT (2 4, 9) , "S=Sweater" :HPRIN 
T ( 2 4 , 10 ) , " P=Pants " : HPRINT (24,11) 
, "M=Mittens" : HPRINT (24,12), "B=Bo 
ots" : HPRINT (24 , 13 ) , "C=Cape" :HPRI 
NT ( 2 4 , 1 4 ) , " L=Lett er " : HPRINT (24,1 
5) ,"U=Umbrella":HPRINT(24,17) , "R 
=Restart" : HPRINT (24, 18) , "Q=Quit" 
:PLAY"O4T20F" 

7 HPRINT(1,21) ,"The CoCo 3 Cloth 
es": HPRINT (1,22) ,"Color Co-ordin 
ator" 

8 I$=INKEY$:IF I$=""THEN 8 



9 IF I$="H"THEN GOSUB 27 

10 IF I$="S"THEN GOSUB27 

11 IF I$="P"THEN GOSUB27 

12 IF I$="B"THEN GOSUB27 

13 IF I$="M"THEN GOSUB27 

14 IF I$="C"THEN GOSUB27 

15 IF I$="L"THEN GOSUB27 

16 IF I$="U"THEN GOSUB27 



GOT019 
GOTO20 
GOT02 1 
GOT022 
GOT023 
GOT024 
GOT025 
GOT026 



17 IF I$=»R"THEN RUN 

18 IF I$="Q"THEN 48 ELSE 8 

19 GOSUB 29:HPAINT(75,31) ,C,8:GO 
SUB 47: GOTO 4 

20 GOSUB 29:HPAINT(75,67) ,C,8:GO 
SUB 47: GOTO 4 

21 GOSUB 29:HPAINT(75,97) ,C,8:GO 
SUB 47: GOTO 4 

22 GOSUB29:HPAINT(25,145) ,C,8:HP 

AINT(140,145) ,C,8:GOSUB47:GOT04 

23 GOSUB 29:HPAINT(12,55) ,C,8:HP 
AINT(138,55) ,C,8:GOSUB 47:GOTO 4 

24 GOSUB 29:HPAINT(50,105) ,C,8:H 
PAINT (75, 105) ,C,8:HPAINT(115,105 
),C,8:GOSUB 47: GOTO 4 

25 GOSUB 29:HPAINT(71,85) ,C,8:GO 
SUB 47: GOTO 4 

26 GOSUB 29:HPAINT(125,22) ,C,8:G 
OSUB 47: GOTO 4 

27 HLINE(192,40)-(269,150) ,PRESE 
T,BF:Y=32:HCOLOR8:FOR X=0 TO 18 
STEP 2:HPRINT(22,X+4) ,X/2:NEXT X 
:S$="R25D11L25U11BD16":HDRAW"BM1 
95, 30": FOR X=l TO 10 :HDRAWS$ :HPA 
INT(197,Y) ,X-1,8: Y=Y+17:NEXT X 

28 HPAINT(197,178) , 9 , 8 : Y=32 : HDRA 
W"BM233,30":FORX=10TO15:HDRAWS$: 
HPAINT(235,Y) , X, 8 : Y=Y+17 :NEXTX:H 
PRINT(33,4) , "A" '.HPRINT (33, 6) , "B" 
:HPRINT(33,8) , "C" .-HPRINT (33 , 10) , 
" D " : HPRINT ( 3 3 , 12 ) , " E " : HPRINT (33, 
14) , "F": HPRINT (23,1) , "WHICH COLO 
R? " : PLAY"O5T20F" : RETURN 

29 C$=INKEY$:IF C$=""THEN 29 

30 IF C$="0"THEN C=0 

31 IF C$="1"THEN C=l 

32 IF C$="2"THEN C=2 

33 IF C$="3"THEN C=3 

34 IF C$="4"THEN C=4 

35 IF C$="5"THEN C=5 

36 IF C$="6"THEN C=6 

37 IF C$="7"THEN C=7 

38 IF C$="8"THEN C=8 

39 IF C$="9"THEN C=9 

40 IF C$="A"THEN C=10: RETURN 

41 IF C$="B"THEN C=ll: RETURN 

42 IF C$="C"THEN C=12: RETURN 

43 IF C$="D"THEN C=l 3 : RETURN 

44 IF C$="E"THEN C=14: RETURN 

45 IF C$="F"THEN C=15: RETURN 

46 GOTO 29 

47 HLINE (184, 7) -(278,185) , PRESET 
, BF : RETURN 

48 POKE65496,0:RGB:WIDTH32:END 



RETURN 
RETURN 
RETURN 
RETURN 
RETURN 
RETURN 
RETURN 
RETURN 
RETURN 
RETURN 



102 THE RAINBOW April 1989 



This program is about limits. 
Here's a scenario: You find 
yourself in Radio Shack in the 
middle of a spectacular sale and finally 
decide to get that new piece of hardware 
you've always wanted. You walk to the 
counter to pay and hand the clerk your 
credit card. After a few minutes, to your 
shocked surprise the clerk says those 
five embarrassing words, "You are over 
your limit!" 

Credit Card Balance can't raise your 
credit limit, but it can help you keep 





chit 



The Lamonicas live in El Paso, Texas, 
where Mary teaches algebra and consu- 
mer math at Irvin High School. James 
teaches social studies at Henderson 
Middle School. 



heXimit 



By Mary and James Lamonica 



track of credit card transactions and 
balances. The program allows you to 
keep track of up to ten credit accounts 
of up to 300 transactions each. It auto- 
matically figures your balance and 
projects the monthly interest for that 
account. 

Ten accounts of 300 transactions 
each, with each transaction giving the 
date, place and amount, requires over 
108K of memory, obviously greater 
than the CoCo 2's capacity. However, if 
you have a disk drive, you can use it for 
additional memory. This is done by 
creating record files on the disk and 
only accessing those records needed at 
any one time. Line 6140 gives an exam- 
ple of how to open a direct access file. 

The DPEN"D" command tells the com- 
puter to open a direct access file. When 



you use the OPEhri" or QPEN"0" com- 
mands, you are opening for input or 
output of a sequential file. Data is saved 
one piece after another. With a direct 
access file, data is saved in parts called 
records. You can enter and call up any 
part of the file at any time. In a se- 
quential file, you must read in the entire 
file. 

The number 2 tells the computer you 
are using Buffer 2 to input and output 
data. F$ is the filename, or in this case, 
the name of the credit card. The file- 
name may not be longer than eight 
characters, so we shorten it by using 
the LEFTS command in Line 6130. 
The file must have the extension 
/DAT. The ,36 at the end of the line tells 
the computer that each record is 36 
characters long. 



April 1 989 THE RAINBOW 1 03 



In Line 6160 the record divides into 
three fields using the FIELD command. 
You must tell the computer how long 
each field is going to be. 

Once again the number 2 refers to 
Buffer 2. The command BflSTDS ( 1 ) tells 
the computer to reserve eight characters 
of space for the command TD$(l), 
which in this case is the date. 
20RSTD$(2) reserves 20 characters for 
the transaction. And bastd$ (3) re- 
serves eight characters for the amount 
of each transaction. It is important to 
save numeric values as strings for this 
type of filing system. The GET and PUT 
commands get or put records onto the 
disk. 

Your Tandy CoCo disk drive divides 
data into 68 granules of 2,304 bytes each 
for a total of 156,672 bytes. At 36 
characters per record, we can save 64 
records per granule or 4352 records per 
disk. Unfortunately, we need room for 
the program and an organizing file 
called accounts. 

For more information on this type of 
data storage, refer to Page 49 of Tandy's 
Color Computer Disk System, Owners 
Manual & Programming Guide, 

The one major drawback to this 
system is its slowness. Every time you 
need data, the CoCo must go to the disk 
rather than to its own memory. It is 
worthwhile, though, if you've reached 
the limit of your computer memory. 

Getting Started 

First you need a blank formatted 
disk, which must remain in the drive 
while you are using the program. Enter 
the program into your CoCo. If you 
have only a 16K machine, change lines 
2, 3 and 4099 to the following: 

2 CLEAR4700 

3 DIMT$(100,3) 
4099 IFTN>100THEN4200 



This allows only 100 transactions for 
each account. Save the program to the 
new disk. The program is 5.8K long, but 
it uses over 26K so Line 1 clears out the 
graphics pages. 

When you run the program, press Y 
if you have no existing accounts on the 
disk. This takes you to the subroutine 
that allows you to establish up to 1 0 new 
accounts. When asked for the account 
number, choose from 1 to 10. Whenever 
you are asked for an account or trans- 
action number, entering 0 will return 
you to the menu. You will then be asked 
to enter the account name, its credit 
limit, the beginning balance, the 
monthly interest rate (if you have only 
the yearly interest rate, divide that by 
12), and the phone number to call to 
report a lost card. This information is 
then automatically saved into a sequen- 
tial file called accounts/DAT. 

If you already have accounts on file, 
press N at the first screen. This takes 
you to the main menu. You can return 
here by pressing 0 any time you are 
asked for an account number. Here you 
are given five choices: 



View Data 


(1) 


Print Data 


(2) 


Add Accounts 


(3) 


Add Data 


(4) 


Edit Data 


(5) 



View Data allows you to see the 
transactions for each account. You can 
choose which transaction you want to 
see and then move through all of them 
with the up- and down-arrow keys. At 
the bottom of the screen a summary of 
the account is given. This is done for 
each function. 

Print Data allows you to print out all 
or any part of 



OKIE 
2 \lfl»f*> 



fi$ Array for the account data 
Account name 
Account phone number 
A Array for the numeric 
account data 
Account limit 
Beginning balance 
Monthly periodic interest rate 
T$ Array for transaction data 
Date of transaction 
Place of transaction 
Amount of transaction 
RN Account number 
TN Transaction or record number 
CU Credit used 
IP Projected interest payment 
C Credits to accounts 
TP Total payments 
TC Total credits 
Tl Total interest 
T Total charges 

Variable List 

1-34 Set up the program and 
creates main menu 
1000-1200 Allow for viewing data 
2000-2240 Print routine 
3000-3150 Allow for adding new ac- 
counts 

4000-4215 Allow for adding transac- 
tions 

5000-5280 Allow for editing of transac- 
tions 

6000-6050 Routine to print accounts on 

the screen 
6060-6090 Rountine to print account 

summary on the screen 
6100-6250 Get account data from the 

disk 

Program Line Summary 

the transaction you want. It asks you 
which transaction to start and end with, 
allowing the computer to create a prin- 
tout to compare with your monthly 
statement. The totals printed at the bot- 
tom are for the transaction set you 
choose. This allows for monthly or 
yearly totals. 

The Add Accounts function allows 
the addititon of more accounts to the 
system with a maximum number of 10. 
You can also use this screen to delete an 
account. Simply choose an account 
number already in use, and enter "" 
when asked for the account name. If 
you accidentally choose the wrong 
account number, enter Q in the account 
name and start over. As soon as you 
enter a new account name, it appears on 
the screen next to its number. 
The Add Data function is the heart 
of the program. Here, you can add 
individual transactions as they 



occur, providing a current account of 
your available credit. 

There are three key words to be aware 
of. When the program asks for place, 
put the name of the business where you 
used the credit card. To deduct pay- 
ments or credits from your account, 



type PRYMENT or CREDIT for the place. 
You do not need to enter a negative 
amount. To enter interest charges, type 

INTEREST. 

Edit Data allows you to make correc- 
tions if you enter an incorrect amount, 
date or place. The program will even 



adjust to changing charges to credits or 
payments. 

(Questions or comments may be 
directed to the authors at 10456 Or- 
pheus, El Paso, TX 79924. Please en- 
close an SASE when requesting a 
reply.) □ 




30 * :> :* » 


...239 


4170 .. 


...223 


1140 ,v 


45 


5110 


45 


2140 


...201 


5240 


216 


2214 , . 


137 


6100 


, 86 


2228 . . 


...183 


END 


231 


3130 , . 


10 







The Listing: CREDIT 

0 1 COPYRIGHT 1989 FALSOFT, INC 

1 PMODE0 : PCLEAR1 

2 CLEAR14J30J3 

3 DIMT$(300,3) 

5 DIMA$ ( 10 , 2 ) : DIMA ( 10 , 3 ) 

6 DATA DATE , PLACE , AMOUNT 

10 CLS(0) :PRINT@64, " H :PRINT§64, " 
IF YOU HAVE NO ACCOUNTS ON FILE, 
PRESS <Y> AND YOU WILL GO TO THE 
ADD ACCOUNTS SUBROUTINE. 

PRESS <N> TO GO TO MAIN MENU" 

11 I$=INKEY$ 

12 IFI$="Y"ORI$="y"THENGOSUB30j30 
:GOT015 

13 IFI$="N"THEN15 

14 IFI$O ,, Y ,, 0RI$O l, N"THENll 

15 OPEN " I ",#1," ACCOUNTS/ DAT" 

16 FORX=1TO10:FORY=1TO2:INPUT#1, 
A$ (X, Y) i NEXTY : FORZ=lT03 : INPUT#1 , 
A(X,Z) :NEXTZ:NEXTX 

17 CLOSE#l 

19 CLS(0) :PRINT@73,"credit";:PRI 
NT @ 80, "cards" ; 

20 PRINT @ 16 8, "VIEW DATA (1)";: 
PRINT6 200, "PRINT DATA (2)";:PRI 
NT@232,"ADD ACCOUNT (3) " ; : PRINT @ 
264, "ADD DATA (4) " ; :PRINT@296 
,"EDIT DATA (5) " ,* : PRINT@359 , "C 
HOOSE A FUNCTION"; 

30 I$=INKEY$ 



Ma 

SPECIAL OFFER 

for owners of VIP Writer. Telewriter. Texlpro and 
Word Power. You can step up to the dazzling 
MAX-10 for only $49.95. Send proof of purchase 
(original disk or first page of original manual) with 
your order. 

Max-10: the only super fast word processor with 
"What You See Is What You Get" and Graphics. 
See around page 19 for full details and ordering 

info. VIP Writer. Telewriter. Textpro and Word Power are trademarks of 
SD Enterprise*. Cognltoc. Car-Comp, and Mlcrocom Software, respectively. 



31 IFI$=""THEN30 

3 2 ONVAL ( I $ ) GOSUB1000 ,2000, 3000, 
4000,5000 

34 GOT019 

1000 CLS(6) : PRINT© 11, "view" ; :PRI 
NT@16,"data"; 

1005 CLOSE#2 
1010 GOSUB 6000 
1020 GOSUB6100 

1025 IFAN=0THENCLOSE#2: RETURN 
1030 CLS(6) :PRINT@ll,"view";:PRI 
NT@16, "data" ; 

1040 GOSUB6060 

1050 PRINT @ 160, "INPUT TRANSACTIO 
N NUMBER" ; : INPUTVT 
1055 IFVT=0THEN1190 
1060 IF VT<0 OR VT>TN THEN 1050 
1070 PRINT@160, 1111 :PRINT@160, "UP 
& DOWN ARROWS TO VIEW Q=QUIT"; 
1080 FOR X=1T03 
1090 RE ADD $ 



REVIEWED: 
JAN 1989 



MJK & MJK3 DOS 
WHY BUY ADOS 3 
WHEN YOU CAN HAVE THIS! 



REVIEWED 
JAN 1989 

RAINBOW 

MM 



New: 



MJK DOS for COCO I & 2 $29.95 
MJK3DOSforCOC03 $39.95 
MOST POWERFUL OPERATING SYSTEM FOR THE COCO EVER! Allows up to 3 DS-80 track drives 
or 35/40T drives. The DS-80 drives are software configurable too. 

••••"Standard Radio Shack* 35T format"*" • 

in order to maintain compatibility. Wildcard DIR, COPY, & KILL in one run or one at a time upon user 
prompt. All the files can be displayed alphabetically, including the date that the file was saved. Use the 
powerful CHAIN command to use programs of any length. FULL SCREEN EDITOR & FULLY 
SPELLED OUT ERROR NAMES. Hit one key to repeat the last command. 

40 NEW COMMANDS k FUNCTIONS CHAIN, AUTO, DATE, CAT (two columns of directory with 
only the filenames & extensions). WAIT RUNM, BAUD, FIND, OLD, DATE$, (string in basic program). 
LCOPY (groups of basic lines). REPL (to replace a string). TYPE (list a text file on screen/ printer). SPLIT 
or JOIN basic lines. SAY for real spoken text, word peek & poke and many more . . . 
•ALLOWS YOU TO READ/ WRITE/FORMAT 35/40 DISKS ON AN 80T DRIVE* 

*•• EPROMABLE •**••* **♦• FREE UPDATES FOR I YEAR •••• 



MJK512 DOS(COC03-512K) 

BUILT IN RAM DISK k RAM TEST COMMANDS + 5 MORE 



$49.95 



MONITOR-DISASSEMBLER (COCO 1, 2 & 3) $29.95 

SOURCE-CODE/ LABEL GENERATOR (COCO 1, 2 & 3) $39.95 

JB REMOTE RS-232 PACK DRIVER FOR BBS etc. (COCO 1, 2 & 3) $19.95 

NEWKEY (COCO 3) NEW KEY SCAN - gives you true ALT & CTRL $15.00 

NEWKEY 232 (COCO 3) - JB REMOTE and NEWKEY in one package $25.00 

RTC - REAL TIME HARDWARE CLOCK for the COCO 1, 2 & 3 $35.00 

ROM PACK - FOR RTC CLOCK $15.00 

LIMITED TIME OFFER! 
RETURN YOUR OLD ADOS OR AD0S3 DISK AND DOC'S AND GET $15.00 OFF YOUR MJK512 
DOS. I GIYE YOU CREDIT FOR THEIR DOS. DO THEY DO THE SAME? (original disks k doc's 
only *no copies*) 

CALL OR WRITE (COD ORDERS OK) 

COCO CONNECTION OF PHILA, PA. 
5003 B ST. 
PHILA., PA. 19120-3929 
PHONE= 215-457-1809 VOICE 
BBS PHONE* 215-457-7478 (300/1200) (8,N,1) 
COMPUSERVE ID= 72317,437 (LEAVE PHONE ft) 
DELPHI ID= COCOCONNECT 



April 1989 THE RAINBOW 105 



1100 PRINT@192+(X*32) , D$+"="+T$ ( 
VT,X) 

1105 PRINT02 40, "TRANSACTION" ;VT 

1110 NEXTX 

1120 RESTORE 

1130 I$=INKEY$ 

1140 IF I$="Q" THEN 1190 

1150 IF I$=CHR$(10) THEN VT=VT-1 

1155 IF VT<1 THEN VT=TN 

1160 IF I$=CHR$(94) THEN VT=VT+1 

1165 IF VT>TN THEN VT-1 

1170 IFI$=CHR$(10) OR I$=CHR$(94 

) THEN 1080 

1180 GOTO 1130 

1190 CLOSE#2:TN=0:VT=0 

1200 GOTO 1000 

2000 REM PRINT ROUTINE 

2010 CLS(2) : PRINT® 12 , "print" ; : PR 
INT@18,"data"; 

2020 GOSUB6000 
2030 GOSUB6100 

2040 IFAN=0THENCLOSE#2: RETURN 

2050 CLS(2) : PRINT @ 1 2 ^ "print " ; ; PR 

INTO 18, "data" 7 
2060 GOSUB6060 
2070 CLOSE#2 

2080 PRINT© 160 , "ENTER THE RANGE 
OF TRANSACTIONS" 

2090 PRINT @ 2 2 4 , "START AT=" ; : INPU 
TS T : PRINT @ 2 4 0 , " END WITH= lf ; : INPUT 
ET 

2095 IFST<1 OR ET>TN THEN 2090 
2100 PRINT#-2,CHR$(27)CHR$(23) 
2110 PU$="$#####.##" 
2120 PRINT#-2,A$(AN, 1) 
2130 PRINT#-2,A$(AN,2) 
2135 PRINT #-2,"" 
2140 PRINT # -2 f "ACCOUNT LIMIT 
="? : PRINTj-2 , USINGPU$ ; A (AN, 1 ) 
2150 PRINT #-2," BEGINNING BALANCE 
■ " ; : PRINT # - 2 , US INGPU$ ; A ( AN , 2 ) 
2160 PRINT #-2, "MONTHLY PER. RATE 
=";: PRINT # - 2 , US ING "#####.###"; A ( 
AN, 3) 

2170 PRINT #-2, "CURRENT BALANCE 
=" ; : PRINT # -2 , US INGPU$ ; A ( AN , 2 ) +CU 
2180 PRINT#-2, "AVAILABLE CREDIT 
=" 7 : PRINT#-2 , USINGPU$ ,*A(AN, 1) - (A 
(AN, 2 ) +CU) 

2184 PRINT #-2 , 

2185 H$=" DATE PLACE 

AMOUNT DAT 
E PLACE AMOU 

NT" 

2186 PRINT#-2,H$ 

2190 FOR X=ST TO ET STEP 2 
2195 IF(X+1)=82 OR (X+l)=162 OR 
(X+l) =242 THENPRINT#-2 , CHR$ (12) : 
PRINT#-2 , »" : PRINT#-2 , " " : PRINT#-2 



,H$H$ 

2200 PRINT#-2,USING"###"7X; :PRIN 
T#-2," "?T$(X,1)7" "7T$(X,2)7" 
" ? : PRINT#-2 ,USINGPU$ ,'VAL(T$ (X, 3) 

); 

2213 Y=X+1 

2214 IF Y>TN THEN PRINT#-2 , " " : GO 
T02216 

2215 PRINT #-2 , " " 7 : PRINT#-2 ,U 
S ING" # # # " 7 Y 7 : PRINT* -2 , " " ;T$ (Y, 1 
) 7 " " 7 T $ ( Y , 2 ) 7 " " 7 7 PRINT# - 2 , US I 
NGPU$7VAL(T$(Y,3) ) 

2216 IFLEFT$ (T$ (X, 2) ,7) =" PAYMENT 
"THENTP=TP+VAL(T$(X,3) ) 

2217 IFLEFT$(T$(Y,2) ,7)="PAYMENT 
"THENTP=TP+VAL(T$(Y,3) ) 

2218 IFLEFT$ (T$ (X, 2) , 6) ="CREDIT" 
THENTC=TC+VAL(T$ (X, 3) ) 

2219 IFLEFT$ (T$ (Y, 2) , 6) ="CREDIT" 
THENTC=TC+VAL (T$ ( Y ,3 ) ) 

2220 IFLEFT$(T$(X,2) ,8)="INTERES 
T"THENTI=TI+VAL(T$ (X, 3) ) 

2221 IFLEFT$(T$(Y,2) ,8)="INTERES 
T"THENTI=TI+VAL(T$ (Y, 3) ) 

2222 IF VAL(T$(X,3) )>0 THEN T=T+ 
VAL(T$(X,3)) 

2223 IF VAL(T$ (Y, 3) ) >0 THEN T=T+ 
VAL(T$(Y,3)) 

2224 NEXTX 

2225 PRINT # - 2 , " " : PRINT # - 2 , " TOTAL 
PAYMENTS PRINT#-2 ,USINGPU$ 

7 TP 

2226 PRINT #-2, "TOTAL CREDITS 
" 7 : PRINT #-2 ,USINGPU$ ,'TC 

2227 PRINT#-2, "TOTAL INTEREST = 
» ,• : PRINT#-2 ,USINGPU$ ,'TI 

2228 PRINT #-2, "TOTAL CHARGES 
" 7 : PRINT#-2 ,USINGPU$ ,'T-TI 
2230 PRINT#-2,CHR$(12) 

2240 TP=0 : TC=0 : TI=0 : T=0 : GOTO2000 
3000 CLS(3) :I$="" 

3005 PRINT@11, "add accounts" 7 

3010 GOSUB6000 

3020 PRINT© 3 8 4, "INPUT THE ACCOUN 

T NUMBER" 7 MNPUTAN 

3025 IFAN=0THENRETURN 

3030 PRINT@384 , " " : PRINT@384 , "ACC 

OUNT NAME" 7 : INPUTA$ (AN, 1) 

3035 GOSUB6000 

3040 PRINT@384 , "" : PRINT@384 , "ACC 
OUNT LIMIT",' :INPUTA( AN, 1) 
3050 PRINT @ 3 8 4 , " " : PRINT @ 3 8 4 , " BEG 
INNING BALANCE " 7 : INPUTA ( AN , 2 ) 
30 60 PRINT @ 3 8 4 , " " : PRINT @ 3 8 4 , "MON 
THLY INTEREST % " 7 : INPUTA (AN , 3 ) 
3070 PRINT@3 84 , " " : PRINT0384 , "LOS 
T CARD PHONE # " 7 : INPUTA$ (AN , 2 ) 
3080 PRINT@384, " " : PRINTQ384 , "ADD 
ANOTHER ACOUNT (Y/N) " 7 ! INPUTY$ 



106 THE RAINBOW April 1989 



*> f% Q f% 


tttv<5 — M v nrpttTrvn ft/% ft 

lr x 9— x lnh£i 3ppp 




*5 1 ft ft 


OPEN"0" / #1, "ACCOUNTS/ DAT" 




311)3 


FORX^lTOlja 




312)3 


F0RY : =1T02 : WRITE # 1 , A? (X/ x) 


• XT 

I N 


EXTY 






313)3 


rORZ=lT03 I WRITEtf 1 / A(X/ Z) : 


NE 


vm'7 

XTZ 






3 14)3 


NLAl A 




315j3 


CLOSE # 1 : RETURN 




A /t ft /V 

4j3j3j3 


CLS(4) :GOSUB6)3j3j3 




4J31J3 


PRINT@13 , "aaa" ; : PRINTelv, 


it j 

"a 


ata" ; 






yl /Tf »"\ /H 

4j32>3 


GOSUB6100 




4)33)3 


IFAN=0THENCLOSE#2 : RETURN 




4)39)3 


CLS (4 ) : PRINTS 13 , "add" ; : PRIN 


T@17 / 


"data"; 




a ft r\ 

4j398 


GOSUB6060 




4099 


IFTN> 3 00THEN4 2 0 0 




4100 


PRINT @ 9 6, "ENTER DATA FOR 


TR 


ANS ACTION ";TN+1 




4103 


FIELD#2 , 8ASTD$(1) , 20ASTD$ (2 


) ,8ASTD$(3) 




4105 


TN=TN+1 




4 11J3 


F0RX=1T03 




4120 


READD$ 




4130 


PRINT@128+(X*32) , "ENTER THE 




os» Mai » *» g tumm * B 

System comes complete and ready to run. Use the built in menus or area 
Run your own programs or games on-line! Complete message systemA 
included. File transfer system supports Xmodem and Ymodem as 
well as keyword searching! Even comes with it's own Terminal program 

512k 0S9 Level II and RS-232 Pak Required-. 129.96 

Thm Itpptf ( Multi-Vu» compatible ) 

£&^f7 This wonderful utility allows you to patch anything! Patch commands 
directly on the disk and fix CRCn automatically! Even allows you to 
patch the 0S9booi file without making a new boot disk! Save files that 
have been lost or deleted! Fix crashed disks! Hundreds of uses! 
64k OS9 Level I or II required $19.96 

Disk Mmim Tt— ( MulH-Vu» compatible-! ) 

This versatile utility makes your 0S9 life a breeze! No more fighting with complex 
directory structures. No more searching for files and typing long 
path names. Everything is displayed using windows. Allows you to , A"* ' ^>7 
change, create, and delete directories quickly. Also allows you to copy, /S^jfj^sa^ 
view and delete files easily. Great for the 0S9 beginner! "J i * • 

512k OS9 Level II Required $29.95 

Laval II Tools 

Finally OS9 life becomes easy! With these great utilities you'll be 
using OS9 like a pro! Complete wildcard, Tree , and Windowing 
utilities make 0S9 easy to use. 25 great utilities for only $24.95! 

128k OS9 Level II Required $24.95 

Win» Om (Multi-Vus> compatible! J 

Finally a complete OS9 Level II windowing terminal! Many features 
include Auto Dial & Macro, File transfers, buffer capture, on-line timer, 
chat- mode and much, much more! windows make it super easy to use] 

512k OS9 Level II and RS-232 Pak Req uired * $34.95 -~ 

Haiti -Mann ( Mult1-Vu# compotiblol) 

Easily create your own pop-down menus with this great utility! No 
programming experience neccessary! Run any OS9 command 
or program from a menu. Menu creation is simple and easy! See 
^rtUf '^Fl the menu as it develops. A must for any Multi-Vue user! 

TX/P 512k OS9 Level II and Multi-V ue required $1 9.95 

^5ew> Pr«sto-Parfo*f Q Multi-Vue compatible I ) 

The first RAM-resident software for the COCO 3! Many features include 

A Note-pad with auto- calculator, a calendar with alarm, and a phone book 

with auto-dial! This program will organize your entire life! 

512k 0S9 Level II Required $29.9 

Send check or money order to: Alpha Software Technologies 

1 1 n P.O. Box 16522 

Orcafc C60J) 266-2773 W Hattie 
Pleoto add $3.00 Shipping ana nandhng 







Mbyra MS. 39402 _ "TZ-7V 

q C.O.D. Orders add an additional $2.00 



The 




THE COLOR COMPUTER MONTHLY MAGAZINE 



Back Issue 
Availability 




BACK ISSUES STILL AVAILABLE 

Have you explored the wealth of informa- 
tion in our past issues? From our very first, 
four-page issue to many with more than 300 
pages of material, it's all just for CoCo users 
— a great way to expand your library! 

A WORLD OF INFO AT A BARGAIN PRICE 

All back issues sell for the single issue 
cover price. In addition, there is a $3.50 
charge for the first issue, plus 50 cents for 
each additional issue for postage and han- 
dling if sent by United Parcel Service. There 
is a $5 charge for the first issue, plus a $1 
charge for each additional issue on orders 
sent by U.S. Mail. UPS will not deliver to a 
post office box or to another country. 

MOST ISSUES STILL AVAILABLE 

Issues July 1981 through June 1982 are 
available on white paper in a reprint form. All 
others are in regular magazine form. VISA, 
MasterCard and American Express ac- 
cepted. Kentucky residents please add 5 
percent state sales tax. I n order to hold down 
costs, we do not bill, and no C.O.D. orders 
are accepted. 

Due to heavy demand, we suggest you 
order the back issues you want now while 
supplies last. 

To check availability and order, review and 
fill out the form on the next page and mail 
it with your payment to: 

THE RAINBOW 

The Falsoft Building 
P.O. Box 385 
Prospect, KY 40059 



April 1989 THE RAINBOW 107 



BACK ISSUE ORDER FORM 

(See overleaf for instructions.) 

Please send me the following back issues: 



MONTH/YEAR 


PRICE 


MONTH/YEAR 


PRICE 






VOLUME 1 








VOLUME 5 






JUL "81 


Premier Issue 


$200 


□ 


AUG '85 


Games 


$3.95 


□ 


AUG '81 




$2.00 


□ 


SEP '85 


Education 


10.30 


l_l 


SEP '81 


Education 


$200 


□ 


OCT '85 


Graphics 


$o.bo 


n 
l_l 


OCT *81 


Printer 


$200 


□ 


NOV '85 


Data Comm. 


■>J-yo 


n 
U 


NOV '81 




$200 


□ 


JAN '86 


Beginners 


$0.90 


n 
l_l 


DEC '81 


Holiday 


$200 


□ 


FEB '86 


Utilities 


CO QC 


i_i 


JAN '82 




$200 


□ 


MAR '86 


Business 


<pd.sO 


i i 


FEB '82 




$200 


□ 


APR '86 


Home Help 


r-j cv: 

■>j.yo 


i_i 


APR '82 




$250 


□ 


MAY '86 


Printer 




r— 1 
LJ 


JUN '82 




$250 


□ 


JUN '86 


Music 




r— 1 
U 










JUL '86 


Anniversary 


COCK 


n 
LJ 




VOLUME 2 








VOLUME 6 






II IN "R3 


Printpr*? 


$295 


n 

1 — 1 






$395 


n 


JUL '83 


Anniversary 


$295 


□ 


SEP 'nfi 


Education 


$3.95 


□ 




VOLUME 3 






OCT '86 


Graohics 


$3.95 


□ 


AUG '83 


Games 


$295 


□ 


NOV '86 


Data Comm 

U IV VrS \y 1 ■ 1 • 1 1 • 


$395 


□ 


SEP '83 


Education 


$295 


□ 


DEC '8fi 


Holidav 


$395 


□ 


OCT '83 


Graohics 


$3.95 


□ 


JAN '87 


Beginners 


$3.95 


□ 


DEC '83 


Holidav 


$3.95 


□ 


FEB '87 

1 L_ LJ O / 


Utilities 


$3.95 


□ 


MAR '84 

ivi r^n U" 


UUOII IwOg 


$395 


n 


MAR *A7 

IVI AA M O I 


Business 


$395 


□ 


APR 'fl4 


fiflminn 


$395 


n 


APR 'A7 

nrn Of 


Hnmfi Hfiln 


$3.95 


□ 


MAY '84 


Printfir 

1 Mil IQI 


$395 


n 

i— -J 


MAY 'A7 

Wiry 1 Of 


Printer 

1 VIII IDI 


$3.95 


□ 


JliN '84 


Mu^ir* 

if lualu 


$3.95 


n 

i— — i 


II IN 'A7 

JUli Of 


Music 


$3.95 


□ 


JUL '84 


Annivfir<?flfv 


$395 


n 


llll *A7 

JUL Of 


Annivftrsarv 

1 \ 1 II IIVOI gu| y 


$395 


□ 




VOLUME 4 








VOLUME 7 






AUG '84 


Games 


$395 


□ 


AUG '87 


Games 


$395 


n 


SEP '84 


Education 


$3.95 


□ 


SEP '87 


Education 


$3.95 


□ 


npT 'A/1 
1 OH 


orapnics 




n 
i_i 


f*\f*T IQ7 
UC 1 Of 


orapntcs 




n 
i i 


INVJV OH 


Dal a L/UITIII1. 


<fj lie 


n 

i_i 


Kir\\/ '07 

NUV 8/ 


Data Oomm. 


$3.95 


□ 


npp 'R4 




co qc 


n 
i_i 


DEC 87 


i i — i; j... 

Holiday 


$3.95 


□ 


1 AM >QC 
JnIM OO 


Dan i n no rc 

□oy iiinars 


$0.90 


n 


■ All Inn 

JAN 88 


Beginners 


$3.95 


□ 


1 CD OO 


1 Itilitinc 
KJ III llloo 


$3 OF. 


n 


CCD 'QQ 

rtb OO 


utMiiies 


$3.95 


□ 


MAR 'AS 
rvi n oo 




t3QR 


n 


ti A □ 'DO 

MAM OO 


Business 


$395 


□ 


APR 'AS 


oiiiiuiaiiuiis 




n 
i— i 


A DD 'QQ 

Arn OO 


none noip 


$395 


□ 


MAY '85 

IVIM 1 OO 


Pri ntor 

r 1 II MCI 




n 


MAY 00 


Printer 


$3.95 


□ 


JUM '85 

(JUIN OO 




$395 


n 


II IM 'QQ 

JUN OO 


Music 


$3.95 


□ 


JUL '85 


Anniversary 


$3.95 


□ 


JUL '88 


Anniversary 


$3.95 


□ 












VOLUMES 














AUG '88 


Games 


$3.95 


□ 










SEP '88 


Education 


$3.95 


□ 










OCT '88 


Graphics 


$3.95 


□ 










NOV '88 


Data Comm. 


$3.95 


□ 










DEC '88 


Holiday 


$3.95 


□ 










JAN '89 


Beginners 


$3.95 


□ 










FEB '89 


Home Help 


$3.95 


□ 










MAR '89 


Hardware 


$3.95 


□ 










APR '89 


Business 


$3.95 


□ 



RAINBOW INDEX A complete index to the first three years, July 1981 through June 
1984, is printed in the July 1984 issue. Separate copies are available for $2.50 □ 

The Fourth, Fifth and Sixth Year Indexes including rainbow on tape are printed 
in the July 1985, 1986 and 1987 issues, respectively. The Seventh Year Index is 
printed in the July 1988 issue. 

TOTAL 



KY RESIDENTS ADD 5% 



U.S. MAIL CHARGE 

SHIPPING & HANDLING 

U.P.S. CHARGE 

TOTAL AMOUNT 

ENCLOSED 

Article Reprints 

In instances where a given issue is now out of print and not available for purchase, 
we do provide photocopies of specific articles. The cost for this service is $1.50 
plus 50 cents S/H per article. This service is provided only in the case of out-of- 
stock issues. 

Name 



Address 
City 



State 



ZIP 



□ Payment Enclosed, or 

Charge to my: □ VISA □ MC □ AE 

CARD # 



EXPIRATION DATE 
SIGNATURE 



PHONE ( ) 



TO ORDER BY PHONE (credit card orders only) call (800) 847-0309, 8 a.m. to 5 
p.m. EST. All other inquiries call (502) 228-4492. 



" ; D$ ; : INPUTT$ (TN, X) 
4132 IFT$(TN,X)= H Q" THENRES TORE : G 
OT042J3J3 

4134 IFT$ (TN, 2 ) ="PAYMENT"0RT$ (TN 
,2)="CREDIT"THENC=VAL(T$(TN,3) ) : 
C=C*-1 : T$ (TN, 3 ) =STR$ ( C) 
4140 LSETTD$(X)=T$(TN,X) 
4150 NEXTX 
4152 RESTORE 
4154 PUT#2,TN 
4156 GOSUB6060 

4160 PRINT @ 3 20 , " ENTER ANOTHER TR 
ANSACTI0N (Y/N) " 
4170 I$=INKEY$ 

4180 IFI$="Y ,I THEN4090 ■ 

4190 IFI$="N"THEN4200 

4195 IFI$O' I Y ,I ORI$O"N"THEN4170 

4200 CU==0:TN=O:CLOSE#2 

4210 GOTO4000 

4215 GOSUB6000 

5000 CLS(5) : PRINT© 12, "edit" ;: PRI 
NT@17,"data"; 

5010 GOSUB6000 
5020 GOSUB6100 

5025 IFAN=0THENCLOSE#2: RETURN 
5030 CLS(5) : PRINTS 12, "edit" ;: PRI 

NT@17,"data"; 

5040 GOSUB6060 

5050 PRINT @ 160, "INPUT TRANSACTI0 

N # TO EDIT" ; : INPUTVT 

5060 IF VT<0 OR VT>TN THEN 5050 

5065 IFVT=0THEN5270 

5070 PRINTO160, "PRESS 1 2 OR 3 T 

0 EDIT OR Q=QUIT"; 

5080 F0RX=1T03 

5090 RE ADD $ 

5100 PRINT@192+(X*32) ,"<";X;">"; 

d $ + ii=h +T $(VT,X) 

5110 NEXTX 

5120 RESTORE 

5130 I$=INKEY$ 

5140 IF I$="Q" THENRETURN 

5150 IF VAL(I$)<1 OR VAL(I$)>3 T 

HEN 5130 ELSE 5160 

5160 F0RX=1T03:PRINT@192+(X*32) , 

"": NEXTX 

5170 F0RX=1T0VAL(I$) :READD$:NEXT 
X 

5180 PRINT@224, "CURRENT "+D$+"=" 
+T$(VT,VAL(I$) ) 

5190 PRINT@289, "CHANGE T0=" ; : INP 
UTT$(VT,VAL(I$) ) 

5200 IFT$(VT,VAL(I$) )="Q"THEN500 

5203 IFVAL(T$(VT,3) )<0ANDLEFT$(T 
$ (VT , 2 ) , 7 ) =" PAYMENT "0RVAL (T$ (VT, 
3) ) <0ANDLEFT$ (T$ (VT, 2) ,6)="CREDI 
T"THEN5210 

5205 IFLEFT$ (T$ (VT,2) ,7)="PAYMEN 
T" OR LEFT$(T$(VT,2) , 6)="CREDIT" 
THEN C=VAL(T$ (VT,3) ) :C=C*-1:T$( 



108 



THE RAINBOW April 1989 




VT,3)=STR$(C) :GOTO5210 

52)36 IFLEFT$(T$(VT,2) ,7)<>"PAYME 

NT"ORLEFT$ (T$ (VT, 2) , 6) <>" CREDIT" 

THENC=ABS(VAL(T$(VT,3) ) ) :T$(VT,3 

)=STR$(C) 

5210 GOSUB6.060 

524) 3 FIELD#2,8ASTD$(1) ,20ASTD$(2 
) , 8 ASTD$ ( 3 ) 

525) 3 F0RX=1T03 : LSETTD$ (X)=T$(VT, 
X) tNEXTX 

526) 3 PUT#2,VT 

527) 3 RESTORE :TN=)3:VT=£: CLOSE* 2 

528) 3 GOTO500J8 

REM PRINTS ACCOUNTS ON SCRE 

EN 

6)31)3 F0RX=1T05 

6)32)3 PRINT@(2+(64*X) ) ,X;LEFT$(A$ 
(X,l) ,1)3) ; 

6030 PRINT© (16+ (64*X) ) / (X+5) ;LEF 
T$(A$(X+5,1) ,ip) ; 
6040 NEXTX 
6050 RETURN 

6)3 6)3 CU=0 : P.ORX- 1TOTN : CU=CU+VAL ( T 
$(X,3) ) :NEXTX 

6)365 IP=(A(AN,3)/100) *(A(AN,2)+C 
U) 

6)370 PRINT@384,"CREDIT LINE=";A( 
AN , 1) : PRINT"USED=" ; A ( AN , 2 ) +CU: PR 
INT"AVAILABLE=" . INT (A (AN , 1 ) - (A (A 



N,2)+CU) ) 

6075 PRINT "APPROXIMATE INTEREST* 

" ; : PRINTUS ING" ####.##"; IP; 

6)38)3 PRINT© 3 2 , TN; "TRANSACTIONS 0 
N ";A$(AN,1) 
6)390 RETURN 

6100 TN=0:PRINT@384, "INPUT THE A 

CCOUNT NUMBER"; INPUT AN 

6110 IFAN<0 OR AN>10 THEN 6100 

6112 IF AN=0 THEN RETURN 

6115 IFA$(AN,1)=""THEN6100 

6120 PRINTQ384, "" :PRINT@384, "LOA 

DING DATA FOR ";A$(AN,1) 

6130 IFLEN(A$ (AN, 1) ) >8THENF$=LEF 

T$ (A$ (AN, 1) , 8) ELSEF$=A$ ( AN , 1 ) 

6135 FORX= 1TO 300 : T $ ( X , 3 ) = " »• : NEXT 

X 

6140 OPEN"D", #2,F$+"/DAT",36 

6150 IFLOF ( 2 ) =0THENRETURN 

6160 FIELD#2,8ASTD$(1) ,20ASTD$(2 

) ,8ASTD$(3) 

6170 TN=TN+1 

6180 GET#2 , TN 

6190 F0RX=1T03 

6200 T$(TN,X)=TD$(X) 

6210 NEXTX 

6230 PRINT@480, "RECORD #";TN; 
6240 IF LOF(2) <> TN THEN 6170 
6250 RETURN _ 



SrbCIAL fcYbNT? 

COCO GALLERY LIVE 
SHOWCASE YOUR BEST AT RAINBOWFEST 

We are taking the popular "CoCo Gallery" on the road to RAINBOWfest Chicago — and we'd like you to 
submit your own graphics creations to be exhibited at the show! 

MJLbS 



• You can enter color or black-and-white photographs or printouts of your original artwork produced on 
the CoCo 1 , 2 or 3. Entries must be framed, mounted or matted, and may not be smaller than 5-by-7 inches 
or larger than 11-by-14 inches. 

• Don't send us anything owned by someone else; this means no game screens, digitized images from TV 
programs or material that's already been submitted elsewhere. A digitized copy of a picture that appears 
in a book or magazine is not an original work. 

• Along with your entry, send a cover letter with your name, address and phone number, detailing how you 
created your picture (what programs you used, etc.). Please include a few facts about yourself, tool 

• Your name, address and phone number, along with the title of your work, must be clearly marked on the 
back of each entry, and a disk copy of each piece must also be included. 

• Entries must be mailed to THE RAINBOW before March 31 , 1 989, or brought to the RAINBOWfest registration 
booth by 10 a.m., Saturday, April 15th. 

• All entries to CoCo Gallery Live become the property of Falsoft, Inc., all rights are reserved. 

There will be two categories: one for graphics produced on the CoCo 1 and 2, and one for CoCo 3 graphics. 
Several awards will be made in each category. Winners will be determined by votes from RAINBOWfest 
attendees. In case of any ties, winners will be determined by our chief judge, CoCo Cat. 

Prizes and ribbons will be presented Sunday, April 16, 1989, and winning entries will be published in the 
August '89 issue of THE RAINBOW. Send your entry to "CoCo Gallery Live," THE RAINBOW, 9509 U.S. Highway 
42, Prospect, KY 40059. 



April 1989 THE RAINBOW 109 




ml 



CHICAGO 



April 14-16 




AINBOWfest is the only computer show dedicated 
exclusively to your Tandy Color Computer. 
Nowhere else will you see as many CoCo-related 
products or be able to attend free seminars conducted 
by the top Color Computer experts. It's like receiving the 
(latest issue of the rainbow in your mailbox! 

RAINBOWfest is a great opportunity for commercial 
programmers to show off new and innovative products 
for the first time. Chicago is the show to get information 
on capabilities for the CoCo, along with a terrific 
selection of the latest CoCo software. In exhibit after 
exhibit, there will be demonstrations, opportunities to 
experiment with software and hardware, and special 
>RAINBOWfest prices. 

Set your own pace between visiting exhibits and 
ittending the valuable, free seminars on all aspects of 
'your CoCo — from improving basic skills to working with 
the sophisticated OS-9 operating system. 

Many people who write for the rainbow — as 
well as those who are written about — are there 
to meet you and answer questions. You'll also 
meet lots of other people who share your interest 
in the Color Computer. It's a person-to-person 
event and a tremendous learning experience in 
a fun and relaxed atmosphere. 

A special feature of RAINBOWfest is the 
CoCo Gallery Live Showcase, where 
CoCo artists enter their own graphics 
creations for display at the show. Cash 
prizes are presented and winning 
entries are decided by 
votes from RAINBOWfest attendees. 
(See the previous page for more 




details.) As an additional treat for CoCo Kids of all ages, 
we've invited frisky feline CoCo Cat to join us for the show. 
RAINBOWfest has something for everyone in the family! 

If you missed the fun at our last RAINBOWfest in Princeton, 
why don't you make plans now to join us in Chicago? 
For members of the family who don't share your 
affinity for CoCo, there are many other attractions in 
the Chicago area. 

The Hyatt Regency Woodfield — Schaumburg, 
Illinois offers special rates for RAINBOWfest. The show 
opens Friday evening with a session from 7 p.m. to 10 
p.m. It's a daytime show Saturday — the CoCo Com- 
munity Breakfast (separate tickets required) is at 8 
a.m., then theexhibit hall opens promptly at 10 a.m. and 
runs until 6 p.m. On Sunday, the exhibit hall opens at 
11 a.m. and closes at 3 p.m. 

Tickets for RAINBOWfest may be obtained directly, 
from the rainbow. We'll also send you a reserva- 
tion form so you can get a special room rate. 

The POSH way to go. You can have your travel 
arrangements and hotel reservations handled 
through rainbow affiliate, POSH Travel Assist- 
ance, Inc., of Louisville. For the same POSH 
treatment many of our exhibitors enjoy, call POSH at 
(502) 893-331 1 . All POSH services are available at no 
charge to RAINBOWfest attendees. 





3b TNMfa? 




FRU SbMINAM 



Cray Augsburg 

RAINBOW Technical Editor 
OS-9 For Absolute Beginners 

Bill Bernico 

RAINBOW Contributing Editor 
BASICally Speaking 

Steve Bjork 

SRB Software 

Writing Game Software 

Chris Burke 

Burke & Burke 
Hard Drive Systems 

Kevin Darling 

Independent Programmer 
Overview of OS-9 



Art Flexser 

SpectroSystems 

Extending the Capabilities of 
BASIC 

Dr. Martin Goodman, M.D. 

RAINBOW Contributing Editor 
Two CoCo Consultations Live 

Ed Hathaway 

Glenside CoCo Club 
Organizing a CoCo Club 

Cecil Houk 

Rulaford Research 
Music, MIDI and the CoCo 

Jutta Kapfhammer 

RAINBOW Managing Editor 
Writing for Publication 



William Nee 

Independent Programmer 
Machine Language Made BASIC 

Dale Puckett 

RAINBOW Contributing Editor 
Overview of BASIC09 

Dick White 

RAINBOW Contributing Editor 
Spreadsheets for the CoCo 

Sister Berdelle Wiese 

Community Computer Consultant 
CoCo and the Teacher 



ۥۥ COMMUNITY MLAKFAf T 

Rick Adams — Software Developer 

Our keynote speaker for the traditional CoCo Community Breakfast 
is Rick Adams, who is the founder of Color Central Software and the 
author of programs like DELPHIterm, Tandy's Temple of ROM and 
Activision's CoCo 3 version of Shanghai. 

Mr. Adams will describe his life as a programmer on the "front lines" 
of the ongoing efforts to program software for the CoCo 3, including 
humorous "war stories" from some of his software developments. 

Don't forget . . . 

If yours is one of the first 500 ticket orders, a coupon for a complimentary 
issue of The Second RAINBOW book of Simulations will be enclosed with 
your tickets — if yours is one of the first five orders received from your state, 
a coupon for a complimentary RAINBOWfest T-shirt will be enclosed with 
your tickets. So hurry up and place your order to take advantage of this offer. 



RAINBOWfest - Chicago, Illinois 
Dates: April 14-16, 1989 
Hotel: Hyatt Regency Woodfield 
Rooms: $66 per night, 
single or double 

Advance Ticket Deadline: March 31, 
1989 

Join us at a future RAINBOWfest! 

RAINBOWfest - Somerset, New Jersey 

Dates: October 20-22, 1989 

Hotel: The Somerset Hilton 

Rooms: Single, $65 per night; 

Double, $75 per night 

Advance Ticket Deadline: October 6, 

1989 

FREE T-Shirt to first five ticket orders re- 
ceived from each state. 

First 500 ticket orders received get The 
Rainbow Book of Simulations. 



I 



YES, I'm coming to Chicago! I want to save by buying tickets now at the special 
advance sale price. Breakfast tickets require advance reservations. 

Please send me: 



Three-day ticket(s) at $9 each total 

One-day ticket(s) at $7 each total 

Circle one: Friday Saturday Sunday 



Name 

(please print) 

Address 



Saturday CoCo Breakfast 
at $12 each 

RAINBOWfest T-shirt(s) 

at $6 each 

Specify size: 

S M . L „ 



City 



State 



total 



total 



Telephone 
Company . 



ZIP 



XL 



(T-shirts must be picked up at the door) 
Handling Charge $1 

TOTAL ENCLOSED 

(U.S. Currency Only, Please) 



□ Payment Enclosed, or Charge to: 
□ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 

Account Number 



Exp. Date 



□ Also send me a hotel reservation card for the 

Hyatt Regency Woodfield ($66, single or double oj anature 
room). 9 

Advance ticket deadline: March 31, 1989. Orders received less than two weeks prior to show opening will be held for you 
at the door. Tickets will also be available at the door at a slightly higher price. Tickets will be mailed six weeks prior to show. 
Children 4 and under, free; over 4, full price. 

Make checks payable to: The RAINBOW. Mail to: RAINBOWfest, The Falsoft Building, 9509 U.S. Highway 42, P.O. 
Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. To make reservations by phone, in Kentucky call (502) 228-4492, or outside Kentucky 
(800) 847-0309. 




1 F e atur e 



16K ECB 




Surround your favorite program with 
this bright border 




A Moving Rainbow Border 



By Marc Gagnon 



A are your programs looking a 
little dull? Do they lack the 
visual impact you think they 
deserve? Help is on the way. This little 
number is designed to spruce up that 
intellectually stimulating — but visually 
barren — program. CoCo Tour will 
help you brighten your programs by 
adding a flashing, multicolored border. 

This machine language routine, used 
with a BASIC program, outlines the 
screen with a moving rainbow border. 
Although the program will run on a 
CoCo 1, 2 or 3, the CoCos 1 and 2 allow 
only a 32-column screen. CoCo 3, on 
the other hand, offers a 32-, 40- or 80- 
column screen. The program will adjust 
itself to run on the various screen 
widths. 

First, type in and save Listing 1 
containing data statements. Now, run 
the program. After this program is 
finished poking in the necessary ma- 
chine language routine, it will prompt 
you for saving the routine to tape or 
disk. 

The default address, &HE00, is writ- 



ten in a position-independent code. If 
you want to load it at a different ad- 
dress, just use the appropriate offset. 
Before using the program, define the 
entry address. Unless you. use an offset, 
type DEFUSR=&HE00. 

In this program, the format is 
Pi=U5R(xjc) ,yy, where A is the ASCII 
code returned by the function, xx is the 
speed and yy is the direction. If the 
speed is zero, the function will not wait 
for a key. It will flash onto the screen 
one time and then return to BASIC. If the 
speed is not zero, the function will 
determine the turning speedy and the 
screen will turn until you press a key. 
The direction of the turn, yy, can be 0 
(turn left), 1 (turn right) or 2 (do not 
turn). 

The format may be used in the follow- 
ing manner: 

R=U5R(100) ,1 Turns the screen to the 

right until you press a 
key. 



fl=USR(l) ,1 



Turns in the same 
manner, but faster. 



Marc Gagnon, a university student, is 
a self-taught programmer, who enjoys 
assembly language programming. 



A=USR(100),0 Turns the screen to the 

left until you press a 
key. 



112 THE RAINBOW April 1989 



R=USR ( 0 ) , 2 Draws a border with- 
out turning and re- 
turns. 

Notice that 10 R=USR(1) ,1 has the 
same effect as the following: 

10 A=USR(0),1 
20 IF fl=0 THEN 10 

The xx and yy do not need to be 
constants. Use variables to create spe- 
cial effects. If you would like to center 
a line at a specified point, there is a 
built-in function to create this effect. 

The format used to print a line is 
Afl$=USR and {"xx string-to-print"), 
where Fi$ is a dummy variable (not used) 
and xx is present as the vertical coor- 
dinate. If this coordinate is outside the 
sreen (Le., if xx is greater than 15 on a 
32-column screen, or greater than 23 on 



a 40- or 80-column screen), the string 
will be printed on the last available line 
(i.e., 15 or 23). If xx is not present, the 
line will be printed at the last position 
used. (See the demo program). String- 
to-print is the line you want to print. If 
this variable is not present, this function 
will only set the new position. (Note: 
Leading spaces of the string are 
skipped. If you want to use a number 
for the first character of the string, begin 
the string with a space (i.e., to print "10 

Hi!," use fi$=USR(" 10 Hi!")). 

Some examples of use are as follows: 

R$=USR("10 SRLUT LES RMIS") 
prints "SALUT LES AMIS" at Line 
10. 

R$=USR( "10 SRLUT LES RM 



IS") does the same thing. 

R$=USR( "9") causes Line 9 to be 
used in the next call unless another 
coordinate is specified. 

R$=L)5R( "SRLUT") prints "SALUT" 
on the current line. 

R$=USR( " ") is not an error; 
nothing will happen. 

More examples are included in the 
program, CoCo Tour Demo. 

(Questions or comments about these 
programs may be directed to the author 
at 1105 Thibeau, Cap-de-la- Madeleine, 
Quebec, Canada G8T 7 B3. Please 
enclose an SASE when requesting a 
reply.) □ 




170 ... 


. 81 


250 


69 


290 . . . 


113 


340 


196 


END .. 


...251 



Listing 1: CDCDTOUR 
0 1 COPYRIGHT 1989 F ALSO FT, INC 



10 
20 
30 
40 
50 



**************************** 

» * COCOTOUR * 

1 * by marc gagnon * 
**************************** 

PC LEAR 1 

DK= PEEK(&HBA)=14 
*7j0 CLS:PRINTSTRING$(32,175) ;"COC 
OTOUR - BY MARC GAGNON" ; CHR$ ( 13 ) 
/"COPYRIGHT (C) JUNE 1987";CHR$( 
13) ;STRING$(3 2, 175) 
80 PRINT " THERE ARE 17 LINES, WA 
IT!" 

90 AD=&HE00 

100 PRINT"READING FROM LINE: ";: 

PO=PEEK(136) *256+PEEK(137) -1024 

110 ' FOR T=l TO 17 

120 CS=0:READ CK,NU:PRINT@PO,PEE 

K(49)*256+PEEK(50) ; 

130 FOR Y=l TO NU: READ A$ : POKE 

AD , VAL ( " &H"+A$ ) : CS=CS+VAL ( " &H"+A 

$) : AD=AD+1 : NEXT Y 

140 IF CSOCK THEN PRINT" ERROR! 

" : END ELSE NEXT T 

150 PRINT: PRINT: PRINT" START : &H 

E00 DECIMAL: 3584" 

160 PRINT "END : &H1224 DECIMA 



L: 4644" 

170 IF DK THEN PRINT "READY DISK 
IN DRIVE 0" ELSE PRINT "READY CAS 
SETTE" 

INPUT"PRESS ENTER" ;A 
IF DK THEN SAVEM" COCOTOUR" , & 
l,&H12 24,&HE00:GOTO 210 
CSAVEM" COCOTOUR" , &HE00 , &H122 
"-10 

jS : PRINT" COCOTOUR IS READY 
USED": END 

5889,64,4D,10,2B,1,15,B 

A7' 
E7 
10 



180 

190 IF 
HE00 
200 ™ 
4,&HE00 
210 CLS 
TO 
220 
D,B3 
6,86, 
/0/F0 
30, 8B 
10,5D,27 
,FF 

230 DATA 
, 1,AF, Dn 
F,81,2, 
1,E7,10, 
,D6,D,E7 
,D0,27,6 
240 DATA 



April 1989 THE RAINBOW 113 



260 DATA 6691,64,F5,1A,50,C6,36, 
F7 ,FF,A4 , 39 , C6 , 3C, F7 , FF, A4 ,39,86 
,E2,BD,81,32,26,1,39,F,E7,39,8D, 
F3,AE,2,5D,10,27,0,F4,E7,8D,1,23 
,A6,84,17,1,6,26,39,6A,8D,1,18,3 
0,1,80,30^7,80,1,12^6,84,17,0, 
F3,26 

270 DATA 5693, 64,26, 6A,8D, 1,5,30 

, 1, 80, 30 , 34 , 2 , A6, 8D, J3 , FD, C6, A, 3D 

,EB,E0,D,E7,27,4,C1,17,20,2,C1,F 

,23,3,5A,20,F1,E7 / 8D,0,E5 / 6D,8D, 

0,DF,10,27,0,A8,86,20,A1,84,26,8 

,6A,8D,0,D1, 30, 1, 20, EA, 34, 10, 30 

280 DATA 8569,64,8D,1,E1,96,E7,E 

6,86,E0,8D,0,BF,54,E7,8D,0,BB,96 

,E7,27,3E,4F,E6,8D,0,B2,BD,B4,F4 

,BD,BD,D9,8E,3,DA,31,8D,0,A9,17, 

0,82,86,2C,A7,3F,10,AF,8D,0,9B,4 

F,E6,8D,0,95,BD,B4,F4,BD,BD,D9,8 

E, 3,DA 

290 DATA 6285, 64, 10,AE,8D, 0,88,8 
D / 64,31 / 8D / 0,84,CE,F8,D2,8D,48,2 
0,21 / A6,8D,0,76,C6,20,3D,8E,4,0, 
30,8B,E6,8D,0,69,3A,8C,4,0,10,25 
,A4 / 60 / 8C / 5,FF,10,22,A4,59,9F,88 

,35, 10, 31 ,80,0,6b, E6 f 8D,0,4D, A6 f 
80, A7 

300 DATA 6497,64,A0,5A,26,F9,86, 

22,A7,A0,86,3B,A7,A0,6F,20,31,8D 

,0,51,CE,B8 ,F7,20,1,39,9E,A6,34, 

10,31,3F,10,9F,A6,9D,9F,AD,40,35 

,10,9F,A6,E,A5,A6,80,A7,A0,26,FA 

,39,81,30,25,7,81,39,22,3,^,4,3 

9,1C,FB,39 

310 DATA 7942,64,FF,FF,0,0,0,0,F 

F, FF,FF,3 ,0,0,0,0,FF,FF,FF,FF,0, 
0,0,0,FF,FF,FF,FF,0,0,0,0,FF,FF, 
FF,FF,0,22,0,0,FF,FF,FF,FF,0,0,0 
,0,FF,PF,FF,FF,0,0,0,0,FF,FF,FF, 
FF,0,0,0,0,FF,FF 



320 DATA 8160,64,FF,FF,0,0,0,0,F 
F,FF,FF,FF,0,0,0,0,FF,FF,FF,FF,0 
,0,0,0,FF,FF,FF,FF,0,0,0,0,FF,FF 
; FF,PF,0 / 0,0 f 0,FF f FF, PF, FF, 0,0,0 
,0 ; FF,FF,FF,FF, 0,0,0, 0,FF,FF,FF, 
FF,0,0,0,0,FF,FF 

330 DATA 8160 / 64,FF,FF,0,0,0,0,F 
F , FF , FF , FF , 0 , 0 , 0 , 0 , FF , FF , FF , FF , 0 
,0,0,0,FF,FF,FF,FF,0,0,0,0,FF,FF 
,FF,FF,0,0,0,0,FF,FF,FF,FF, 0,0,0 
, 0 , FF , FF , FF , FF , 0 , 0 , 0 , 0 , FF , FF ,FF, 
FF,0,0,0,0,FF,FF 

340 DATA 8160,64,FF,FF,0,0,0,0,F 
F,FF,FF,FF,0,0,0,0,FF,FF,FF,FF,0 
,0,0,0,FF,FF,FF,FF,0,0,0,0,FF,FF 
,FF,FF,0,0,0,0,FF,FF,FF,FF, 0,0,0 
, 0 , FF , FF , FF , FF , 0 , 0 , 0 , 0 , FF , FF , FF , 
FF,0,0,0,0,FF,FF 

350 DATA 6851,64,FF,FF,0,0,0,0,F 
F , FF , FF , FF , 0 , 0 , 0 , 0 , FF , FF , FF , FF , 0 
,0,0,0,FF,FF,FF,FF,0,0,0,0,FF,FF 
,FF,FF, 0,0, 20, 28, 50, 4, 0,4, IF, 0,1 
,4,3F,5,FF,0,20,5,FE,5,E0,FF,FF, 
5,C0,4,20,FF,E0,0 

360 DATA 7161, 64, 80,0, 80, 4E, 0,2, 

80,9E,87,7E,0,50,87,7C,87,30,FF, 

FE,86,E0,80,50,FF,B0,0,80,0,80,9 

C,0,4,81,3C,8E,FC,0,A0,8E,F8,8E, 

60,FF,FC,8D,C0,80,A0,FF,60,0,4,0 

,5,E0,0,20,5,E1,5,FF,0,1,5,DF 

370 DATA 6743,64,4,1F,FF,E0,4,1E 

,4,1,FF,FF,0,80,0,87,30,0,50,87, 

32,87,7E,0,2,87,2E,80,4E,FF,B0,8 

0,4C,80,2,FF,FE,0,80,0,8E,60,0,~A 

0,8E,64,8E,FC,0,4,8E,5C,80,9C,FF 

,60,80,98,80,4,FF,FC,0,43,4F,50 

380 DATA 2268,36,59,52,49,47,48, 

54, 20, 28, 43, 29, 20, 4A, 55, 4E, 45, 20 

, 31, 39, 38, 37, 20, 42, 59, 20, 4D, 41, 5 

2,43,20,47,41,47,4E,4F,4E / 2E 




280 ......159 

520 .......54 

730 175 

930 ......253 

1140 14 



1340 81 

1560 22 

1760 65 

END 82 



Listing 2: CCTDEMO 

0 ' COPYRIGHT 1989 FALSOFT, INC 



10 
20 
30 
40 
50 
60 
70 
80 



*************************** 

* COCOTOUR DEMO PROGRAM * 

* BY MARC GAGNON * 

* COPYRIGHT (C) JUNE 1987 * 
*************************** 



load & define 



90 

100 
110 

120 
130 
140 
150 
160 
170 
180 
190 

200 
210 
220 
230 
EN 

) 

240 



PCLEAR1 
•USE CLOADM WITH TAPE 
LOADM" COCOTOUR" 
POKE&HFF40 ,0 : 'FOR DISK ONLY 
DEFUSR=&HE00 

•IF COC03 C3=-l ELSE C3=0 
C3=(PEEK(&HE2BD)=ASC("2") ) 

SA$=STRING$ ( 30 , " * " ) 

GOTO 520: 'PRESENTATION 
» 



• subroutines 



IF NOT C3 OR PEEK(&HE7)=0 TH 
A$=USR("14") ELSE A$=USR ( " 2 2 " 

A$=USR( "PRESS ANY KEY") 



114 THE RAINBOW April 1989 



25j3 RETURN 
260 ' 
270 ■ 
280 CLS 

290 A$=USR("01 LET'S TURN !") 
300 RETURN 
310 « 
320 1 

330 GOSUB 280 : 'MESSAGE 

340 A$=USR("05 TO TURN RIGHT SLO 

WLY USE :») 

350 A$=USR("07 A=USR(200) , 1") 

360 GOSUB230: 'WAITKEY 

370 A=USR(200) ,1 

380 GOSUB 280: 'MESSAGE 

390 A$=USR("05 TO TURN LEFT FAST 

ER USE :") 

400 A$=USR("07 A=USR(50) ,0") 

410 GOSUB 230:'WAITKEY 

420 A=USR(50) ,0 

430 GOSUB280: 'MESSAGE 

440 A$=USR("05 IF YOU DO NOT WAN 

T THE") 

4 50 A$=USR("07 SCREEN TO TURN US 
E :") 

460 A$=USR("10 A=USR(60) ,2") 
470 GOSUB 230:'WAITKEY 
480 A=USR(60) ,2 
490 RETURN 



500 ' 

510 ' presentation 
520 IF C3 THEN WIDTH40:CLS5 ELSE 
CLS 

530 A$=USR("5"+SA$) 
540 A$=USR("7"+SA$) 
550 A$=USR("6 COCOTOUR - BY MARC 
GAGNON") 

560 A$=USR("10 A RAINBOW SCREEN 
FOR YOUR") 

570 A$=USR("12 COCO 1,2 OR 3") 
580 GOSUB 230:'WAITKEY 
590 A=USR(100) ,1 
600 ' 

610 'features 
620 CLS 

630 A$=USR("01 WHAT TO DO WITH C 
OCOTOUR ?") 

640 A$=USR("03 YOU CAN MAKE YOUR 
SCREEN") 

650 A$=USR("04 TURN IN ANY MODE 
32,40 OR 80") 

660 A$=USR("05 YOU SPECIFY TO TU 
RN LEFT") 

670 A$=USR("06 OR RIGHT... 11 ) 

680 A$=USR("07 YOU ALSO CHOOSE T 

HE SPEED.") 

690 A$=USR("09 AND MORE : A BUIL 
D IN") 



★ ★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★a-*** 



* 
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* 
★ 
* 
★ 
* 
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* 
* 
* 
* 
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SEND CHECK OR MONEY ORDER TO: 

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keyboard. 22 RS Basic Keywords 22 QS9 Commands available with only 2 
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A. 40 track D8DD NEW «73.00 

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You ship your computer ta us UPS 2nd Day Air we do the upgrade, test it 
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51_PWOT_I2»/^^p^, ii ,. ia ^ iix « ai , mi , iiim= . m « :it .,*^„,, Ail ., i ,, iX f4C i O«3 
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We'll see you at Chicago RainbowFEST. 



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April 1989 THE RAINBOW 115 



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1 /I fll 01 I 

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ii \ 

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1 i i rt | Ci AXTfTITXTTT'd C fTTTft TXT A C 

14 ip 'CONTINUE STRINGS 


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1 /I 1 01 at e 

14 2)0 CLb 


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14 3)9 Ay— U5R("pi IF XX ' IS OMXTT 


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pn mTTri CmT^TXTAII \ 

ED, THE STRING") 


ljo3p A$=USR("1J9 THIS WILL TURN T 


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ON THE SAME") 


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PRESS A KEY") 


METIME USE FULL: " ) 


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DE OF THE J\EY") 


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147)9 Ay=USK ( "po " ) • ' SEX LINE 


*l f* ft f*\ n TTTi o ft * I t.t *r* pn trn t r 

1)96^ GOSUB 23J3: 'WAIT KEY 


148j3 A5=INKEY§ :' CLEAR KEY 


*1 ft *1 ft TV TTP / 1 ri \ <l 

Ip/p A=USR(lJ9p) ,1 


149)9 A$=USR( "PRESS A KEY") 


^ ft n ft ■ 

lp8p 1 


lopp FOR T—l TO ipp:NEXT T 


T fTfft/Tl 1 T?VTVTAJTT>T U» 

1)99)9 1 EXAMPLE 


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t cr ft /n riAn m— t pn r\ ^ ft ft 

lozjS FOR T=l TO 1J3J3 


111J3 A$=USR( M )33 I WILL CALL COCO 


153p IF INKEY$<>»" THEN 1550 


TOUR AND WHEN") 


1540 NEXT T:G0T0 1490 


112)3 A$=USR("j35 I'LL COME BACK, 


1550 A$=USR("07 SEE BETWEEN LINE 



116 THE RAINBOW April 1989 



THE L 
EI 



S 1490-1550") 

1560 A$=USR("08 TO SEE WHAT HAS 
JUST HAPPENED" ) 

1570 A$=USR("10 IF THE NUMBER IS 

OUTSIDE THE") 
1580 A$=USR("11 SCREEN, THE STRI 
NG WILL BE") 

1590 A$=USR("12 PRINTED ON TH" * 
AST LINE") 

1600 A$=USR("13 SO IT WILL BE 
THER 15 OR 23") 
1610 GOSUB 230:'WAITKEY 
1620 A=USR(60) ,0 
1630 ' 
1640 CLS 

1650 A$=USR("01 ONE LAST THING A 
BOUT STRINGS:") 

1660 A$=USR("03 LEADING SPACES A 

RE SKIPPED") 

1670 GOSUB230: 1 WAIT KEY 

1680 A=USR ( 1 ) ,2 

1690 1 

1700 • 

1710 'now, the trick 

1720 CLS 

1730 A$=USR("02 NOW TAKE A LOOK 
AT THIS") 

1740 A$=USR("04 SPECIAL EFFECT") 
1750 A$=USR("08 THAT IS 'PAS MAL 



' AS WE SAYi") 

1760 GOSUB 230:'WAITKEY 

1770 FOR T=l TO 8:A=USR(0),1 

1780 IF A<>0 THEN 1860 
1790 FOR Y=l TO 10: NEXT Y 
1800 NEXT T 

1810 FOR T=l TO 8:A=USR(0),0 
1820 IF A<>0 THEN 1860 
1830 FOR Y=l TO 10: NEXT Y 
1840 NEXT T 
1850 GOTO 1770 

1860 A$=USR("12 THIS WAS IN LINE 

S 1770-1850") 

1870 GOSUB 230:'WAITKEY 

1880 A=USR(90) ,0 

1890 • 

1900 'conclusion 

1910 CLS 

1920 A$=USR("03 OTHER APPLICATIO 
NS") 

1930 A$=USR("05 IS UP TO YOU 
1940 A$=USR("09 HAVE FUN") 
1950 A$=USR("08 **********") 
1960 A$=USR("10 **********«) 
1970 GOSUB 230:'WAITKEY 
1980 A=USR(100) ,1 
1990 CLS 
2000 END 

as 



i ii 



) 



FILE TRANSFER UTILITIES 

XXX: Reviews - December Rainbow Dale Puckelt - November Rainbow. XXX 

The GCS File Transfer Utilities provide a simple and quick method to transfer 
text and binary files from 2nd to 2 variety of floppy disk formats. 

Need to transfer files to and from PC (MSDOS), RSDOS, FLEX and MINI-FLEX 
disks on your OS-9 system? Have text files on a PC (MSDOS) system at work 
and v/ant to work on them at home? Have source programs (BASIC, C, Pascal, 
etc.) which you wish to port to ano:ner system? 

With GCS File Transfer Utilities, just place the PC (MSDOS), RSDOS, FLEX or 
MINI-FLEX disk Into you disk drive - enter a simple command and the file is 
copied into a OS-9 file. File transfer back is just as simple. With Multi-Vue 
version, just select command from one of three menus. 



PCDIR 
PCDUMP 
PCREAD 
PCWRITE 



directory of PC disk 
display PC disk seder 
read file from PC disk 
write file to PC disk 



PCRENAME rename PC file 
PCDELETE delete PC file 
PCFORMAT format PC disk 



RSDIR 
RSDUMP 
RSREAD 
RSWRITE 

FLEXDIR 
FLEXDUMP 
FLEXREAD 
FLEXWRITE 



directory of RSDOS disk 
display RSDOS disk sector 
read file from RSDOS disk 
write file to RSDOS disk 

directory of FLEX disk 
display FLEX disk sector 
read FLEX tile 
write file to FLEX disk 



Extensive Single, double sided disks. Single, double density disks. 35, 40 
options or BO track floppy drives. 8 or 9 sectors (PC). First level sub- 

directories (PC). Binary files. Use pipes tor direct and multiple 
transfers. 

Requires OS-9. 2 drives (one can be hard or ramdisk). Multi-Vue for Multi-Vue 
version. SDISK (SDISK3 for COCO III). 

GCS File Transfer Utilities for C0C0 - Multi-Vue version $54.95 

- Standard version $44.95 



SDISK or SDISK 3 



$29.95 



Standard diskettes are OS-9 lormat {5.25*} - add 52.50 lor 3.5". Orders must be prepaid or COO. 
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TRY-O-BYTE, 1008 Alton Circle, Florence, S.C. 29501, (803) 662-9500 



April 1989 THE RAINBOW 117 



Featur e 



Measuring those gut feelings 



Decisions 



Decisions 



By Willis Stanley 



Whether you are a small- 
business person looking for 
the right spreadsheet to man- 
age your business or a recent college 
graduate trying to choose the best of 
several job offers, right decisions often 
require weighing more than a couple of 
factors. This program, A HP, helps you 
with multifactor decisions. 

Take for example the case of a bud- 
ding writer thinking of buying a word 
processor for that shiny new Color 
Computer. Besides cost, there are sev- 
eral features of a word processor to 
consider — memory buffers, printer 
compatibility and so forth. [See "Decid- 
ing What's Write For You," Page 26, for 
an in-depth look at comparing word 
processors.] Which factors are most 
important? Which program has more of 
the factors you consider important? 
This is where AHP is useful. 

The program applies a decision- 
making tool called the Analytic Hi- 
erarchy Process developed in 1980 by 
Thomas L. Saaty and published in 
his book The Analytic Hierarchy 
Process. AHP allows the user to 
(a) quantify his feelings about 
the possible choices for each 
factor he considers important; 



Willis Stanley is a graduate 
student at George Washing- 
ton University. He is inter- 
ested in serious Co Co ap- 
plications despite his 
continuing addiction to 
Thexder. 




CoCo 3 16K ECB Modification 




(b) make sure his expressions of prefer- 
ence are logically consistent with one 
another; (c) assign relative measures of 
importance for each factor under con- 
sideration; and (d) produce a mathe- 
matical representation of his preference 
for each of the alternatives in question. 
The program does this for problems 
dealing with three to five alternatives 
and three to^five factors of importance. 
It attempts to provide an expression of 
the user's preference and is one of many 
techniques designed for that purpose. 
For this reason, it is best to think of 
AHP as a tool rather than an oracle. 
With that in mind, no user should make 
a decision based solely on the program's 
recommendation. 

Using AHP, let's take the word pro- 
cessor example used earlier and walk 
through the process. 

Suppose you have narrowed your 
choice down to three software pack- 
ages: Word 7, Word 2, and Word 3. 
Now load and run AHP. First you are 
asked for the number of alternatives in 
the problem. Enter 3. Next the program 
asks for the number of factors in the 
problem. We identified cost, printer 
compatibility and memory-buffer size 
so enter 3 for this also. Now name each 
alternative and factor. (Short names 
keep the screen neat, so try to use them 
whenever possible.) 

AHP then asks you several questions 
comparing your preferences for each 
alternative in consideration of the 
factors you listed as important for your 
decision. For example, "In terms of 
cost, how does Word 1 compare to 
Word 2 using the scale below?" Using 
the scale on the screen, ranging from . 1 1 



to 9, enter the number most closely 
corresponding with your feelings. If you 
strongly prefer Word i's cost compared 
to Word 2's cost enter a 6. A strong 
dislike of Word 7's cost compared with 
Word 2's cost earns a .166. The program 
continues asking questions until it has 
enough information to compare alter- 
natives for that particular fact. 

Before continuing, the program 
checks your answers for consistency by 
running your responses through a 
mathematical process, which deter- 
mines if your answers have a clear 
correlation to make a meaningful anal- 
ysis. If there is not a logical relationship, 
the program prompts you to either 
reanswer the questions for that factor or 
end the program and rethink your 
responses. 

An example of inconsistency is rating 
Word 1 as extremely preferred over 
Word 2, Word 2 extremely preferred 
over Word 3, and Word 3 extremely 
preferred over Word L There is no 
logical relationship between the 
answers, and any conclusion based on 
them is faulty. If the relationships are 
consistent, you proceed to questions for 
the next factor — in this case, printer 
compatibility. The process repeats itself 
until all factors are exhausted. 

Once factors are exhausted, you 
judge the relative importance of each 
factor. For example, we might rate cost 
as "slightly preferred" over printer 
compatibility and as "unquestionably 
preferred" over memory-buffer size, 
while printer compatibility is "strongly 
preferred" over memory-buffer size. 
These responses are checked for consis- 
tency and then factored into a final 



report, which offers a numerical rank- 
ing of the three word processors, with 
the highest number as the recom- 
mended choice. 

Although AHP was written on a 
CoCo 3, it should be relatively easy to 
adapt it for use on older CoCos. Simply 
delete Line 10 and reformat the infor- 
mation that prints to the screen, keeping 
in mind your screen width. 

The program helps you to understand 
the mathematics behind the process. 
But for those interested in application 
of the technique or program modifica- 
tion (please feel free to do so), I strongly 
recommend consulting one of many 
management science textbooks availa- 
ble in most college bookstores and 
libraries. If you are confident in mod- 
ifying the program to allow use of a 
wider range of alternatives and factors, 
you'll need the following information 
for the set of n values in the Rl=l/« 
equation (lines 1 190, 2240 and 3280 are 
examples). 



Number of alternatives 

2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 



Value for n 

.00 

.58 

.90 
1.12 
1.24 
1.32 
1.41 



(Questions or comments regarding 
this program may be directed to the 
author at 115 D Street, Apt. 103, Wash- 
ington, DC 20003. Please enclose an 
SASE when requesting a reply.) □ 




70 


149 


2180 


197 


300 


111 


3090 


174 


410 


222 


3230 


..,.87 


1030 , , 


219 


END 


186 


2040 . . 


227 







Listing 1: AHP 



0 
1 

2 

3 

4 



•COPYRIGHT 1989 FALSOFT, INC 
1 AHP . BAS 

•BY WILLIS STANLEY 
•23 NOV 1988 

'USE OF THE ANALYTIC HIERARCHY 



PROCESS IN 
5 "MULTI-FACTOR DECISION MAKING 
(3-5 FACTORS) 
1/3 WIDTH80 

20 DIM R$(5) ,J$(5) ,P(5) ,D$(5) ,N( 
25) ,G(5) ,AV(5) ,V(5,5) ,T(5) ,S(25) 
40 CLS 

45 PRINT "THE ALTERNATIVES ARE TH 
E DIFFERENT CHOICES YOU COULD MA 
KE" 

46 PRINT"IN THIS PROBLEM." 

47 PRINT 

50 INPUT"NUMBER OF ALTERNATIVES 
BEING CONSIDERED" ;C 
60 IFC<3 THEN GOTO 50: IF C>5 TH 
EN GOTO 50 



April 1 989 THE RAINBOW 119 



64 PRINT : PRINT 

65 PRINT" THE FACTORS ARE THE THI 
NGS YOU THINK ARE IMPORTANT IN J 
UDGING WHICH" 

66 PRINT" ALTERNATIVE YOU PREFER, 
ii 

67 PRINT 

70 INPUT" NUMBER OF FACTORS TO BE 

ING CONSIDERED" ;W 

80 IFW<3 THEN GOTO70:IF W>5THEN 

GOTO70 

90 CLS : FORX=lTOC 

100 INPUT "ENTER NAME FOR ALTERNA 

TIVE "?R$(X) : NEXTX 

110 CLS:FORX=lTOW 

120 INPUT" ENTER NAME FOR FACTOR 

M ;J$(X) :NEXTX 

130 FORX=lTOC:D$(X)=R$(X) :NEXTX 

140 IF H*13 THEN GOTO 530 

150 IF F<>1 THEN B«W ELSE B=l 

160 IFF=1THENA=W ELSE A=C 

170 IFFOITHEN GOTO 200 

180 FOR X=1T0W 

190 D$(X)=J$(X): NEXTX 

200 CLS 

210 FORK=lTOB 

220 CF=0 

230 Z=0 



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240 FOR Y=l TO A 
250 FOR X= 1 TO A 
260 2=2+1 

270 IF X<=Y THEN GOTO450 
280 IFF S =1THENU$="THE FACTORS' RE 
LATIVE IMPORTANCE" ELSE U$=J$ (X) 
290 CLS: PRINT" IN TERMS OF »U$ 
300 PRINT: PRINT"HOW DOES "D$ (Y) " 
COMPARE TO "D$(X) " USING THE S 
CALE BELOW? " 
310 PRINT: PRINT 

320 PRINT" 1— EQUAL" i PRINT" 2— VER 
Y SLIGHT PREFERENCE", : PRINT" .5 
—VERY SLIGHT DISLIKE" 
330 PRINT "3— SLIGHT PREFERENCE", 
: PRINT" .33--SLIGHT DISLIK 

E" 

340 PRINT "4 —MODERATE PREFERENCE 
" , : PRINT" .25— MODERATE DISL 

IKE" 

350 PRINT" 5— DEFINITE PREFERENCE 
" , : PRINT" , 20— DEFINITE DISL 

IKE" M&i 
360 PRINT " 6 ■ — STRONG PREFERENCE' 1 , 
•.PRINT" .166— STRONG DISLI 

KE" : . ■ - : ' 

370 PRINT "7— VERY STRONG PREFERE 
NCE « , : PRINT" . 14 —VERY STRONG D 
ISLIKE" 

380 PRINT" 8— EXTREME PREFERENCE" 
, : PRINT" . 125— EXTREME DISL 

IKE" 

390 PRINT"9 — UNQUESTIONED PREFER 
ENCE" , : PRINT" . 11 — UNQUESTIONED 
DISLIKE" 

400 PRINT : PRINT : PRINT "ENTER THE 
NUMERICAL VALUE THAT REPRESENTS 
YOUR PERCEPTION OF" 

401 PRINT D$(Y) H WHEN COMPARED W 
ITH "D$(X) 

410 INPUT"??" ;N(Z) 
420 IF N(Z)>9 THEN GOTO 410 
430 IFN(Z)<.1 THEN GOTO 410 
440 CLS 

450 NEXTX : NEXT Y 

460 IFA=3 THEN GOSUB1000 

470 IFA=4 THEN GOSUB2000 

480 IFA=5 THEN GOSUB3000 

490 IF CF=1 THEN GOTO 230 

500 NEXT K 

510 IFF=1THENH=13 

520 F=1:GOTO140 

530 FORX=lTOC : FORY=lTOW 

540 0=V(Y,X) *AV(Y) 

550 P(X)=P(X)+0 

560 NEXTY : NEXTX 

570 CLS : PRINT"TOTAL WEIGHTED EVA 

LUATION : " : PRINT : PRINT 

580 FORX=lTOC 

590 PRINTR$(X) , :PRINTP(X) 



120 THE RAINBOW April 1989 



6j3j3 NEXTX 

610 PRINT: PRINT: PRINT"HIGHEST VA 

LUE IS RECOMENDED CHOICE" 

62J3 PRINT "OK, YOU'RE BACK IN BAS 

IC.":END 

'PROCESS FOR 3 ALTERNATIVES 
101J3 N ( 1 ) =1 : N (4) =1/N (2) :N( 5) =1 IN 

(7) =1/N(3) :N(8)=1/N(6) :N(9)=1 
102)3 FORX=lTOA:G(X)=j3: NEXTX 
1J330 FOR X=l TO A: FOR Y= X TO 2 

STEP A 

1)340 G(X)=G(X)+N(Y) : NEXT Y : NEXTX 
105j3 S(1)=N(1)/G(1) :S(4)=N(4)/G( 

1) :S(7)=N(7)/G(1) 

1060 S(2)=N(2)/G(2) :S(5)=N(5)/G( 

2) :S(8)=N(8)/G(2) 

1070 S(3)=N(3)/G(3) :S(6)=N(6)/G( 

3) :S(9)=N(9)/G(3) 

1080 AV (1) = (S ( 1) +S ( 2 ) +S (3) )/3 

1090 AV(2)=(S(4)+S(5)+S(6) )/3 

1100 AV ( 3 ) - ( S ( 7 ) +S ( 8 ) +S ( 9 ) ) /3 

1110 IFFOITHEN V(K,1)=AV(1) 

1120 IFFOITHEN V(K,2)=AV(2) 

1130 IFFOITHEN V(K, 3 ) =AV( 3) 

1140 T(1)=((AV(1) *N(1) )+(AV(2)*N 

(2))+(AV(3)*N(3)))/AV(l) 

1150 T ( 2 ) = ( ( AV ( 1 ) *N (4) )+(AV(2) *N 

(5))+(AV(3)*N(6)))/AV(2) 

1160 T(3)=((AV(1)*N(7) )+(AV(2)*N 

(8) )+(AV(3)*N(9) ) )/AV(3) 
1170 L=(T(1)+T(2)+T(3) )/3 
1180 I=(L-3)/(3-l) 

1190 RI=I/.58 
1200 GOSUB4000 
1210 RETURN 

2000 'PROCESS FOR 4 ALTERNATIVES 
2010 N(l)=l:N(5)=l/N(2) :N(6)=1:N 

(9) =1/N(3) :N(10)=1/N(7) :N(11)=1 
2020 N(13)=l/N(4) :N(14) =1/N(8) :N 
(15)=1/N(12) :N(16)=1 

2030 F0RX=1 TO A: G (X) =0 : NEXT X 
2040 FOR X=l TO A: FOR Y=X TO Z S 
TEP A 

2050 G(X)=G(X)+N(Y) :NEXT Y : NEXT 
X 



With Max-10: 
Word Processing 

becomes fun or 
your money back, 

See around page 1 9 for info. I^olo/mare 



2060 S(1)=N (1)/G (1) S S (2 ) =N(2 ) /G ( 
2) :S(3)=N(3)/G(3) :S(4)=N(4)/G(4) 
2070 S(5)=N(5)/G(1) : S (6) =N (6) /G ( 
2 ) : S ( 7 ) =N ( 7 ) /G(3) : S ( 8 ) =N ( 8)/G ( 4 ) 
2080 S(9)=N(9)/G(1) :S (10)=N(10)/ 
G(2) :S(11)=N(11)/G(3) :S(12)=N(12 
)/G(4) 

2090 S(13)=N(13)/G(1) :S(14)=N(14 
)/G(2) :S(15)=N(15)/G(3) :S(16)=N( 
16)/G(4) 

2100 AV(1) = (S(1)+S(2)+S(3)+S(4) ) 
/4 

2110 AV(2)=(S(5)+S(6)+S(7)+S(8) ) 
/4 

2120 AV(3)=(S(9)+S(10)+S(11)+S(1 
2)1/4 

2130 AV(4)=(S(13)+S(14)+S(15)+S( 
16))/4 

2140 IF FOl THEN V(K>1) =AV(1) 
2150 IF FOl THEN V(K,2)=AV(2) 
2160 IF FOl THEN V(K,3)=AV(3) 
2170 IF FOl THEN V(K,4)=AV(4) 
2180 T(l) = ( (AV(1) *N(1) ) + (AV(2) *N 
(2))+(AV(3)*N(3))+(AV(4)*N(4)))/ 
AV(1) 

2190 T(2) = ((AV(1) *N(5) ) + (AV(2) *N 
( 6 ) ) + ( AV ( 3 ) *N( 7) ) + (AV(4) *N (8) ) )/ 





MUTANT MINERS 

Battle mutant uranium miners in a run for your life, action-packed, 

arcade style game. 10 levels with 10 screens per level! 
100% Machine Language (CoCo 1 , 2 or 3 and Joystick) $19.95 

BURIED BUXX 

Fly your helicopter into enemy territory, dig 
up the loot and return to base. 
Watch out for the ever-present patrol aircraft and 
ground based missiles. 
100% Machine Language (CoCo 1, 2 or 3 and Joystick) $19.95 

See Review 'Rainbow' 2/89 

REVENGE of the 
MUTANT MINERS 

CoCo 3 owners rejoice! Muntant Miners is back with game 
configuration mode and much more! 
Joystick required, $19.95 



Many more programs available including: 

Milestones, Fontgerv Dtskaase, Picture Puzztes, 





JR & JR SOFTSTUFF 

P.O. BOX 1 1 8 • Lompoc, CA • 93438 • (805) 735-3889 

Orders Accepted 24 Hours a Day. 
All Programs on Diskette Only. 

Alt orders add $3.00 shipping. C.O.D. orders $4.00 additional 

You can usually get us in person from 5-9 PM PST. 
If you get the machine, leave a message 
and we will call back at your convenience. 
CALL OR WRITE FOR A COMPLETE LIST OF AVAILABLE PROGRAMS. 



April 1989 THE RAINBOW 121 



T & D SOFTWARE PRICE 



ISSUE #1, JULY 1982 


ISSUE #8, FEB., 1983 


ISSUE #15, SEPT. 1983 


ISSUE #22, APRIL 1984 


ISSUE #29, NOV. 1984 


ISSUE #36, JUNE 1985 


COVER I 


COVER 8 


MYSTERY COVER PT.2 


HEALTH HINTS 


DISK ROLL OUT 


SELECT A GAME 2 


RACE TRACK 


DEFEND 


GOLD VALUES 


GLIBLIBS 


ROBDT ON 


VIDEO COMPUTER 


HANGMAN 


3 DIMENSIONAL MAZE 


TREK INSTRUCTIONS 

V IIIbIX II ^ w III <mf W | (V 1 1 w 


CLOTHER SLITHER 

WL>W 1 1 1 1— ■ 1 WLrl 1 1 1 I— • 1 


MULTIP0NG 

1*1 U Lb 1 II w 1 * W 


SPEECH SYNTHESIS 

Wl LLWI 1 W 11*11 ILWIU 


MUSIC ALBUM 


COCO CONCENTRATION 


TREK 


BIBLE 1 & 2 

wlULL 1 U. Cm 


ADVENTURE GENERATOR 

nu « Lii i u< il uliili mi v 1 1 


SPEECH RECOGNITION 

Ul LLWIP § IL WW W P * I ItWP* 


LIFE EXPECTANCY 


AUTO LINE NUMBERING 


HIGH TEXT MODIFICATION 

1 1 1 W 1 1 1 mm f * 1 ITI W mJ I 1 1 Vfl 1 1 V_/ I « 


BIBLE 3 & 4 

UIULL %J LX ~ 


QUEST ADVENTURE 

u u Vm w i nu V Lll i w i ■ l 


SPACE LAB 

Ul fiWL LOU 


WORD TESTS 


ML TUTORIAL PT 3A 

ITI mam f P V Ml 1 mm 1 1 * V > * 


ASTRO OODGE 

nu i ■ i\/ uv^ul 


CATCH ALL 

Wrl 1 Wl 1 r>L_ L. 


QUARTER BOUNCE 

UUnlll Lll U W Wl wL 


AUTO COMMAND 

»»u i u. uuimi'iniiw 


KILLER MANSION 


ML TUTORIAL PT 3B 


DR COCO 

Wl 1 • wwww 


INVADER 


DUAL OUTPUT 

WWI*k» WW | 1 U 1 


COMPUTER MATCHMAKER 

WWIill W 1 L' 1 inn 1 W I II wlfii \L i I 


BARTENDER 

mm ft 99 9 9 p.. " - m \r mm • V 


NUCLEAR POWER PLANT 

1 m \mf ^mf III i w W mm 99 % 11^ 1 


PEG JUMP 

1 k> \mt \J Km* 1 W I 1 


ALIEN RAID 

• 1 i— 1 LI* 1 If 1 J W 


KEY REPEAT 

1 > L 1 1 IL 1 mm f \ 1 


KNIGHT & THE LABYRINTH 

P\P*fUI 1 1 Wi 1 1 IL LOW 1 1 III* | 1 1 


CALENDAR 


DUAL BARRIER 


MORSE CODE 

■ ■ 1 S-f ■ 99mf mm \m* mf U 


MOON ROVER 

1 * IVw t m *» W * v ' * 


FULL EDITOR 

1 U LL 1— Wf P W ■ 1 


STAR SIEGE 

W 1 Ol I WILWL 


ROBOT WAR ' • 


BRICKS 


PURGE UTILITY 

I Wl <W^ W 1 II— 1 1 1 


10 ERROR IGNORER 

IV fc»l 11 Ivl ^ lUlfvl ILI 1 


METEOR 

l*IL 1 LWI 1 


TALKING SPELLING QUIZ 

1 OL'VlllU Wl LLLHiw UUIL 


ISSUE #2, AUG. 1982 


ISSUE #9, MARCH 1983 


ISSUE #16, OCT. 1983 


ISSUE #23, MAY 1984 


ISSUE #30, DEC. 1984 


ISSUE #37, JULY 1985 


UFO COVER PT: j 


TIME MACHINE COVER 


MYSTERY COVER 


MONEY SAVERS 1 & 2 


MATH HELP 


CHESS MASTER 


BIORYTHM 


TRIG DEMO 


BOPOTRON 


STOCKS OR BOMBS 


ZECTOR ADVENTURE 


BIBLE 5-7 


BOMBARDMENT 


PYRAMIO OF CHEOPS 

1 II IMIIUU .VI VI ILyl w 


DIRECTORY RECALL 

U|l II.V 1 V' M 1 1 mm W™ L_ -m 


WAI I AROUND 


W0RI D CONQUEST 


SHIP WREK ADVENTURE 

Willi 9*1 ILI V nU * Lll t Ul *L 


BLACK JACK 


PROGRAM PACKER 


VECTOR GRAPHICS INST 

V mm w 1 W II Ul 1/ *l 1 1 1 WW 1 1 m W P « 


COCO TECHNICAL LOOK PT 1 

wwww 1 LUI IlilwrlU LUU|\ T I * I. 


DRAG RACE 

\mJ } InU 1 lnuL 


FILE TRANSFER 

1 ILL 1 tiniiUIL-ll, 


COST OF LIVING 


BUDGET 

*mf V** mm* \*9 mm 1 


VECTOR GRAPHICS 

* bVW 1 Wl ■ Wl l/*l 1 |IWW 


NUCLEAR WAR INST 


MINE FIELD 

lv1M*L 1 ILLU 


FOUR IN A ROW 

- 1 UU< 1 U» O HUtl 


FRENZY y-::. -.s-M 


ELECTRONIC DATE BOOK 

mm mm \m9 9 1 ■ \J 1 * • W mmf * * 1 M ^* *mf I \ 


SKYDIVER 

\m* 1 ^ 1 mm* t m mm 1 1 


THERMONUCLEAR WAR 

1 F ILI M 11 w i » w ui-L.ni i n ni 1 


T-N0TES TUTORIAL 

1 1 * U 1 LW 1 U 1 UI HHL 


MARSHY 

iTtril IU* 1 1 - 


BUSINESS LETTER 


ML TUTORIAL PT 4 

III L 1 V 1 Wl 1 * fl Lm 1 | » ■ 


SWERVE AND DODGE 

uf ivl ni i w ww w w>— 


CIRCUIT BREAKER 

w 1 1 1 ww J i unL-nr\L.n 


T A D PROGRAM INDEXER 


TAPE CONTROLLER 

1 HI L UUI * 1 MvLLLI 1 


QUICK THINK 

VI *^ 1 w f ^ 1 1 '(111* ... 


TAPE DIRECTORY 

1 «« 1 mm Utl IUW 1 VI 1 1 


NIMBO BATTLE 

IIHTIUW WO 1 | J— 1— 


MOUSE RACES 

iviuuwl I InvLU 


SYSTEM STATUS 

u I u I li vi u i n i uu 


CATACOMB 

WO 1 oww»*iw 


QUEST INSTRUCTIONS 


BLOCK-STIR 

U 1 II 1 


TAPE ANALYSIS UTILITY 

1 nl Lm nllnL 1 Wlw U 1 IL. 1 1 1 


SUPER S0IIEF7F 


FRROR TRAP 


AUTO TALK 

O U 1 U 1 OL| V 


QUEST FOR LENORE 

x* *m* UU ■ ■ Wl 1 LI— 1 * U I lb 


COCO ADDING MACHINE 


LIFE GENERATIONS 


DATA FALL 


DROLL ATTACK 

UllULL *9 \ I "Ul\ 


SGR8PAK 

WL1I 1 wl Ol S 


ISSUE #3, SEPT. 1982 


ISSUE #19, APRIL 1983 


ISSUE #17, NOV. 1983 


ISSUE #24, JUNE 1984 


ISSUE #31, JAN. 1985 


ISSUE #38, AUG. 1985 


UFO COVER PT.2 


TENTH COVER 


THANKSGIVING COVER 


DIR PACK & SORT 


TREASURES OF BARSOOM 


GDLF PARS 


BASKETBALL 


PYRAMID OF OANGER 


3-D TIC-TAC-TOE 


BRICK OUT 


BATTLEGROUND 


WIZARD ADVENTURE 


CHUCKLUCK 


TYPING TUTOR 

1 ' 1 1 f »J W ■ U ■ V<l 


INDY 500 

1 1 * L ' | JU \mt 


COCO TECHNICAL LOOK PT 2 


STRUCT COMPILED LANG 

W l 1 lUy 1 * UUIVJI ILLU LnllU. 


KITE DESIGN 

1*1 1 L ULUlUr* 


SLOT MACHINE 


ML TUTORIAL PT 5 

l¥IL- 1 1 Ik/I URL r 1 »V 


COLLEGE ADVENTURE 


USA SI IDF PU77I F 


MINIATURE GOLF 


ROBOTS 

nuuu i w 


ALPHABETIZER 

nki 1 I' «UL 1 tLLI ■ 


TINYCALC 

■ Mil UnLU 


MEMORY GAME 

PVILIVIW7 i ■ univiL 


51 *24 SCRFFN FDIT0R 


STAR DUEL 

U 1 nil u u L L 


G0M0KU 

UUIilUI\ u 


NFL PREDICTIONS 


STOCK MARKET COMP 


DUNGEON MASTER 

uuiiuluii iiinu i ui l 


51 *24 SCRFFN EDITOR 

UI l t UuHLLIl LUl 1 UN 


ARITHMETIC FOOTBALL 

r\\ \\ 1 1 UYIL 1 IU 1 UU 1 UnLL 


AMULET DF POWER 

Ol TIULLI Ul 1 Uf*L|| 


FLAG CAPTURE 


YAH'HOO 


WEATHER FORECASTER 


CITY INVADFRS 

wl 1 I lli vnULliO 


GRID RUN 


LINE COPY UTILITY 

LHiL UUI 1 KJ 1 IL* 1 1 


ROBOT BOMBER 


MISSILE ATTACK 


GRID FACTOR INST 

w.i ltw i nu i ui i htw i > 


PRINTER SP00LFR 

r 1 lill 1 mmlA Jl UULLII 


SPIRAL ATTACK 

uiJI IHL n 1 I nui> 


DISK PLUMBER 

UIUI\ 1 LUIVJWLI I 




SCREEN PRINT 

WWl 1fcaL>IV 1 1 HIH 1 


GRID FACTOR 

\J 1 i < W 1 < \ w 1 wl 1 


STEPS 

u | Lru 


FAST SORT 

\ ~ W 1 UUI \ 1 


SUPER RAM CHECKER 

UUI Lll 1 iOIWI U| ILUIVLI 1 




BRIKPONG 


DRAW 

W ■ in J » 


SNAKE 


MUNCHMAN 

IVPUMUl IllflOl* 


GRAPHIC HORSE RACE 

Vil In! 1 l*W 1 * Wl lUL 1 IOUL 


ISSUE #4, OCT. 1332 


ISSUE #11, MAY 1983 


ISSUE #18, OEC. 1983 


ISSUE #25, JULY 1984 


ISSUE #32, FEB. 1985 


ISSUE #39, SEPT. 1985 


UFO RESCUE 


ELEVENTH COVER 


CHRISTMAS CDVER 


CLOCK 


DR. SIGMUND 


0RUNK DRIVING 


*»■ 1 | 1. i mm m «B> 

TANK BATTLE 


ARCHERY 


CLIMBER 


COCO TECHNICAL LOOK PT.3 


ICE WORLD ADVENTURE 


CAR MANAGER 


DRIVEWAY 


FROG JUMP 


GALACTIC CONQUEST 


SKID ROW ADVENTURE 

mm* I XI %0 9 9 9mf WW f ■ mm* W L 1 W 9 \mf * 9 L 


LOTTERY ANALYST 

L— 9mJ 1 1 LI 1 1 f \f Wf \ L 1 9mW 1 


SQUEEZE PLAY 

V'UwLLbL 1 LI » 1 


SOUNDS 


ML TUTORIAL PT.6 


WARLORDS 

w w 1 il ■ i— X-/ i ■ mm* *— ' 


MONEY MAKER 

9 W f 1 W mm 9 l"|i 11 V- 1 ■ 


BASIC COMPILER 

W»»W l W W \m* III! I L LI 1 


SUPER BACKUP 

lm-* *— ' | mm | 1 mS fl 1 V ■ 1 - — * 1 


BALLOON DROP 


MLT DICTIONARY 


STATES REVIEW 


PIN-HEAD CLEANING 

1 111 1 ILnU ULLmilMU 


MUSIC CREATOR 

■ * i w w i w wi iLn i wi i 


RECIPE MACHINE 

■ ilwii l innui ll|*L 


MIND BOGGLE 


BASIC SPEED UP TOT 

• mw . V# mmw 1 W m0 Sm* I f 1 * 


MATH TUTOR 

III fl III 1 W 1 W 1 1 


LINE EDITOR INST 

LI|VL LWI | Wl 1 fIVW 1 • 


MEANIE PATROL 

in uni V f L 1 f \ 1 1 IVL 


ANTI-AIRCRAFT 

nu i • nu iw i ini i 


COCO-TERRESTRIAL AoV< 


METRIC CONVERTOR 


MACHINE LANGUAGE DATA 

* m*r > W 1 1 I • 1 9—1 brill V*^' 1 1 *mt mm mm* f 1 1 9 | 


LINE EDITOR 

LllvL LUI 1 UI 1 


TRI-C0L0R CARDS 

i i ii \j u lu i l uni iuu 


UNREASON ADVENTURE 

Ulll IL OW W 1 w nu V L 1 * ■ W IIL 


CALORIE COUNTER 


GRAPHIC QUAD ANTENNA 

a- 1 1 " il 1 1 1 W \M9mf9 9lm* 11] 1 | L.f 1| <f 1 


PRINTER UTILITY INST 

1 1 III* 1 LI t V ML) | | IIIU 1 • 


BOOMERANG 

wwwivili iniiu 


SHAPE RECOGNITION 

U' lltl L 1 ILUvUltl 1 IU'1 


TALKING ALPHABET 

1 nL|\lliU OLI 1 IflWL ■ 


JAGK-O-LANTERN 

f \\f r \ %b* 9m9 ■ 11 * I 


GRAPHICS PROGRAM 

9mW P If %m9 mm 9 II m* ^mM 9 H • | 


PRINTER UTILITY 

1 llllvl fc« 1 I mA 1 ILI 1 f 


BUBBLE BUSTER 

WWWWLIn WWW ' L 1 1 


DISK BACKUP 

uiui\ unw i > w i 


SUPER VADERS 

WW| LI I TOWLI IW 




CATERPILLAR CAVE 

*S ' > 1 mm III 1 lw 11 • \.f t \ w mm 


MUTANT WAFFLES 

|*l W 1 * '1 I.I » * f^l | 1 1— Im 


R0C0CHET 

1 IWWW^WI ILI 


SPACE PROTECTOR 

UI. ' ' W -m 1 1 1 W P LW 1 Wl 1 


AUTOMATIC EDITOR 

n W 1 W ITI f ' 1 1 W L W 1 ■ W l » 


ISSUE #5, NOV. 1982 


ISSUE #12, JUNE 1983 


ISSUE #19, JAN. 1984 


ISSUE #26, AUG. 1984 


ISSUE #33, MAR. 1985 


ISSUE #40, OCT. 1985 


CATALOG COVER 


TWELFTH COVER 


BANNER 


PEEK POKE & EXECUTE 


LIGHT CYCLE 


STAR TREK 


BOWLING 


SHOOTING GALLERY 


PROBE 


SAUCER RESCUE 


PAINT 


HAM RADIO LOG 


PROGRAM INVENTORY 


BOMB STOPPER 


DISK DIR PROTECTOR 

1 t f \m* 9 \ \m* 1| | || ^mT 1 V-/ 1 \j 1 1 


YOUNG TYPER TUTOR 

1 \J W 1 v \JI 1 1 1 L 1 1 | W 1 w 1 1 


SKEET SHOOTING 

W ItLL 1 Wl IUU 1 1P*U 


COCO WAR 

wwww uni i 


PROMISSORY-LOANS 


VALLEY BOMBER 

■ ■ I mm mm mm i WWI>< Wbl 1 


OPTICAL CONFUSION 

\m* 9 9 9 V IL \m* 9mf 1 V 1 1/ U 1 — ' 1 1 


0-TEL'O 

W ILL W 


GUITAR NOTES 

w w i i ni i i * w i l w 


DISK LABELER 

uiun lmullli i 


CHECKBOOK BALANCER 


STAR FIGHTER 


WORO PROCESSOR 

* * I IW 1 1 IV/ WL wwv ■ < 


OLYMPIC EVENTS 

W Vm ' 'III t W 1— V LI 1 1 W 


Ml DISK ANALYZER 

i * 1 1 w i w I \ nimu i lli i 


SHIP WAR 

ui in f ini i 


TRIGONOMETRY TUTOR 


WHEEL OF FORTUNE 

II 1 1 ^ mm 1 — V-/ 1 9 \m* 111 W * 1 


WORD SEARCH 

■ I I VjF 1 11/ W bl 1 1 1 W 1 | 


00UBLE DICE 

WWWWLL Km* IV L 


PERSONAL DIRECTORY 

1 LI IwUlinL Uip ILW ■ Wl I 1 


ELECTRIC COST 

L LL W 1 1 IIW WWW 1 


CONVOY 

9mr \& 1 m ■ V* " 


ML TUTORIAL PT 7 

1 V 1 ■ — 1 W 1 W 1 Mil la 1 Is* 


ASTRONAUT RESCUE 

nij i i i w i ifi w i i i l> ww w l 


COCO DATABASE 

wwww un i nunwk 


NAUGHA ADVENTURE 

unuui in nuv lii i ui il 


MULTIKEY BUFFER 

JVIUL 1 Pl\L 1 ' UUI 1 LI \ 


BAG" IT 


MERGE UTILITY 


STAR TRAP 

w i rn.i i i ini 


BATTLE STAR 

Un I I LL W 1 nl I 


EGGS GAME 

LUUU Unlll L , t 


NUKE AVENGER 

l*U|\L H V LI1WLM 


SPECTRA SOUND 

«— * 1 l . ■ 11*" 1^/ "-m* lw* ' ■ 


RAM TEST 

I inm i V- w i 


PIE CHART 

1 > Lb w I i n 1 1 1 


C0C0-PIN BALL 

w U WU 1 < 1 w UnLL 


DISK DIRECTORY PRINT 

U IUl\ UI 1 ILU 1 U 1 1 I 11 H|l) 


CURSOR KING 


CONVEYOR BELT 

U vl ' 1 k | 1 ULi^ ■ 


LANDER 


FORCE FIELD 

1 W 1 1W1— 1 >LLU 


M0NTEZUMAS DUNGEONS 

IVIUI* 1 LLUIfing UUIIULUIiv 


SPEED KEv 

Ul L_ L U lAL j 


SAND ROVER 

Uni * w ilUVLIi 


ISSUE #6, DEC. 1982 


ISSUE #13, JULY 1983 


ISSUE #20, FEB. 1984 


ISSUE #27, SEPT. 1984 


ISSUE #34, APRIL 1985 


ISSUE #41, NOV. 1985 


CHRISTMAS COVER 


THIRTEENTH COVER 


INTRODUCTION 


COCO TO COM 64 


HOVER TANK 


GRUMPS 


RAINDROPS 


FLASH CARD 


HINTS FOR YOUR COCO 


GALACTIC SMUGGLER 


POWER SWORD 


DISK DRIVE SPEED TEST 


STOCK MARKET 


ICE BLOCK 


ESCAPE ADVENTURE 

l. wwO! L» nu v i—J * | UnL 


INDY RACE 


TERMITE INVASION 

i Lnivif i l ii* v nuiu i * 


SOLAR CONQUEST 

UULOl 1 UUIlUULU 1 


ADVANCE PONG 


COSMIC FflRTRFSR 

uuuiviiu I v>< i nuoo 


CFFKFR^ 


APPPjIINT MANARFR 


SPFI 1 INfi PHFPKFR 


RAS POST 


nF^TROY 


MAtl 1 1RT 

IVIHIL LlO 1 


MA^TFR RRAIN 


PASSFTTF MFRRF IITll ITV 

UnOOL 1 1 L IVlLnuL U 1 ILI 1 T 




RIMF IA/DRI n MISRIDM 


eni iKin AWAI V7PR 

OUUliU nlMHLT4.Cn 


nni i arq a pfmt*; 


1 IQT PnNTBnl 1 FD 


QTDIMfJ DAPK'IMf; TIITPiDIAI 
olnllMu rMUMIMu lUIUnlML 


WIMF PAQn PUDIPF 


IA/I IIUIPI IQ 


PRFATMTV TF^T 


Ml TUTHRIAI PT R 
IV] L. 1 U 1 UnlnL D.O 


niQVFTTF PFPTICIFD 
Ulol^F 1 It otnllrltn 


CPAPF nilFI 


MIIQIP ^FMFRATHR 
ivlUalU utlMtnMlUn 


PWARAPTFR FniTPiR 
brlAnMulCn tUllUn 


i/nipp nATA 

VU10C UH | H 


OUOI\ OUrT 


nUIVl UUrT 


Rl IRC 


CVD nDAPA 


nQADUIP TECT 
orlArnHj Itol 


Ml TIITHRIAI PT 1 
lyll- lUIUrUML rl..I 


MII^IP QVNTHFQ^PR 
IVIUOIU OT rl i ncoii.cn 


DACIP DAM 

dMoIIj nnlvl 


TRAD RAI 1 
1 nrtr-DMLL 


UniVt Itol 


f^DADMIP 1 PHDV 
unMrnlU LUUrT 




PRAWI FR 


QMAFI IC 
oNnrUo 


QAI i nnM FIDE 
OMLLUUIM Tint 


PDADUIIP THIID 
unMrrllo lUUn 


Qni n DDIMT 
dULU rntIM 1 


ISSUE #7 JAN 1983 


ISSUE #14 AUG 1983 


ISSUE #21 MAR 19R4 


ISSUE #2R ORT 1Q84 

luuUL rr&u, Ubi ■ loot 


ISSUE #35 MAY 

II) JUL Trk/tf, llin 1 I3UJ 


ISSUE #42 DEC 1QRS 


NEW YEARS COVER 


MYSTFRY COVER 

liMUILIil VJ\-/ • LI 1 


BASIC CONVERSIONS 


HANGING TREE 


SELECT A GAME 1 

ulllw i n umvi l. \ 


HOME PRODUCT EVALUATION 

I IWIVlL 1 ItUUwU 1 LVOLUO \ IU|| 


LIST ENHANCER 


ROW BOAT 


FINANCIAL ADVISE 


CHECKERS 


TAPE PROBLEMS 


YAHTZEE 


SUPER PRECISION DIV. 


COMPUTER TUTL PT. T 


CASTLE STORM 


FOOTBALL 


STROLL TRIVIA 


DISK UTILITY 


BOMB DIFFUSE 


INDEX DATA BASE 


DOS HEAD CLEANER 


MORE PEEKS & POKES 


SOFTBALL MANAGER^ 


MACH II 


SPACE STATION 


DISK ZAPPER 


COCO TERMINAL 


SPELLING CHECKER 


FONTS DEMO 


ELECTRONIC BILLBOARD 


ML TUTORIAL PT. Z 


COCD-MONITOR 


SNAKE CRAWLER 


SOUND DEVELOPMENT 


CLOWN DUNK MATH 


CAR CHASE 


SHOOT OUT 


COCO-ARTIST 


WAR CASTLE 


WORD GAME 


ALPHA MISSION 


SUPER MANSION ADVENTURE 


FIND UTILITY 


ROBOT COMMAND 


SKY FIRE 


SCREEN REVERSE 


DOS ENHANCER 


SLOT MACHINE GIVE AWAY 


CYBORG INS. 


TEST SCREEN PRINT 


EASY BASIC 


AUTD COPY 


KNOCK OUT 


TEXT BUFFER 


CYBORG FACES 


HIGH RESOLUTION TEXT 


DOTS 3-0 


RAT ATTACK 


HAUNTED HOUSE 


TUNNEL RUN 





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RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
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BLOWOUT 



ISSUE #43, JAN. 1986 

DUELING CANNONS 
WATER COST 
ZIGMA EXPERIMENT 
MUSICAL CHORDS 
SAFE PASSAGE 
PASSWORD SCRAMBLER 
GUNFIGHT 
KEYPAD ENTRY 
STYX GAME 
PRINTER DIVERT 

ISSUE #44, FEB. 1986 

.HQ1£ INVENTORY ^ 
NiNEBAtU 
PRINTER REVIEW: 
EXPLORER ADVENTURE 
SPANISH LESSONS 
CROSS FIRE 

•J3rtAY;lADY 
JOYSTICK ptlfe^' 
COSMIC SWEEPEBJ 

ISSUE #45, MAR. 1986 

INCOME PROPERTY MGMT. 
ELECTRONIC BILLBOARD 2 
MOUNTAIN BATTLE 
THE FIGHT 
COCO KEENO 
HOCKEY 

LOGICAL PATTERNS 
ON SCALE SCREEN 



ISSUE #50, AUG. 1986 

BUSINESS INVENTORY 

iD-&C AF|ENA ;: ;i 'M 
DISK CLERft'^p^ 
PC SURVEY^M^ 
TREASURE HUNT ^ 
SCREEN GENERATOR 
ASTRO SMASH V 
NFL SCORES,^ ,, 
BARN STORMING 
SMASH GAMEK 



ISSUE #51; SEPfc 1986 

ASSET MANAGER 
MONEY CHASE 
.FISHING CONTEST: 
RIP OFF ; 
HAND OFF 

OOS EMULATOR 
MEM DISK 

VARIABLE REFERENCE 



ISSUE #52, OCT. 1986 

ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE 
WORKMATE SERIES 
CALENDAR 

INVASIONS r ,;,rvv: : 
THE TRIP ADVENTURE' 
FOOT RAfcfp 
FLIPPY THE SES 
SCREEN CALCULATOR 



ISSUE #57, MAR, 1987 

THE BAKERY 

ENCHANGED VALLEY ADV. 
SAFE KEEPER 
WAR 1 

BOMB DISABLE 
PIANO PLAYER 
SPREAD SHEET 
SLOT MANEUVER 
LIVING MAZE 
GEM SEARCH 

ISSUE #58, APRIL 1987 

ACCOUNTS PAYABLE 
PRINTER GRAPHICS 
SIMON 

PANELING HELPER 
MULTI CAKES 
CAR RACE 
ELECTRONICS I 
BATTLE TANK 
DISKETTE VERIFY 
WEIRDO 

ISSUE #59, MAY 1987 

GENEOLOGY 

HOME PLANT SELECTION 
CHECK WRITER 
HELIRESCUE 
KABOOM 

NEW PONG-. 

CROQUET 
FUNCTION KEYS 



ISSUE #64, OCT. 1987 

GARDEN PLANTS 
FORT KNOX 

ELECTRONICS FORMULAS 
SNAKE IN THE GRASS 
CYCLE JUMP 
GEOMETRY TUTOR 
WIZARO 
GAME OF LIFE 
ELECTRONICS 7 
FLIGHT SIMULATOR 

ISSUE #65, NOV. 1987 

TAXMAN 

DAISY WHEEL PICTURES 
CHILDSTONE ADVENTURE 
SIR EGGBERT 
CRDWN QUEST 
GYM KHANA 
COCO 3 DRAWER 
FOOTBALL 
ELECTRONICS 8 
CHOP 

ISSUE #66, DEC. 1987 
ONE ROOM ADVENTURE 
0S9 TUTORIAL 
RIVER CAPTAIN 
SOUND EFFECTS 
BETTING POOL 
ADVANCE 
MATH TABLES 
ELECTRONICS 9 



LIBERTY SHIP 


ABLE BUILDERS 


ZOOM 


LOWER TO UPPER 


SINGLE STEP RUN 


SUPER ERR0R2 i 


ELECTRONICS 2 


NOIDS 


ISSUE #46, APRIL 1986 


' 'm Mm mm* * m fllk X." ■ j mm *m. * ■ -L'H * m l m 4m mm M - 

ISSUE #53, NOV. 1986 


% V. . • _ d_ * « _ » . mm mm lllii mm -_i jk Jh_ 

ISSUE #60, JUNE 1987 


ISSUE #67, JAN. 1988 


SPECIAL EVENTS REMINDER 


CORE KILL 


JOB COSTING 


AUDIO LIBRARY 


DISK LOCK 


LUCKY MONEY 


LABELS 


SAVE THE EARTH 


SMALL BUSINESS MANAGER 


COOKIES ADVENTURE 


CATCH A CAKE 


WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 


BOMB RUN 


NICE LIST 


COCO MATCH 


LOW RES PICTURES 


TANKS 


SPANISH QUIZZES 


ROBOTS 


WORD COUNTER 


TAR PITS 


PAINT EDITOR 


STREET RACERS 


BACARAT 


BASEBALL 


SARVERN CRUISER 


BOWLING 3 


BATTLE SHIP 


NUMBER RELATIONSHIPS 


SNAPSHOT 


ELECTRONICS 3 


ELECTRONICS 10 


ROULETTE 


MEGA RACE 


GRAFIX 


TAPE CONVENIENCE 


GLOBAL EDITOR 


KICK GUY 


; KRON 


PENQUIN 


ISSUE #47, MAY 1986 


ISSUE #54, DEC. 1986 


ISSUE #61, JULY 1987 


ISSUE #68, FEB. 1980 


CHRISTMAS LIST 


JOB LOG 


EZ ORDER 


COINFILE 


BLACK HOLE 


PEGS 


SUBMISSION WRITER 


WORD COUNTER 


PITCHING MANAGER 


DIGITAL SAMPLING 


KEYS ADVENTURE 


SQUIRREL ADVENTURE 


SYMBOLIC DIFF. 


JUNGLE ADVENTURE 


WALLPAPER 


AREA CODES 


BUG SPRAY 


PAINT COCO 3 


CHOPPER COMMAND 


DRAW POKER 


OWARE CAPTURE 


CONVERT 3 


UNDERSTANDING OPPOSITES 


TURTLE RACES 


EASY GRAPHICS 


COMPUTER TYPE 


BIT CODE PLOTTING 


ELECTRONICS 11 


DESERT JOURNEY 


PANZER TANKS 


ELECTRONICS 4 


MULTI SCREEN 


SCREEN CONTROL 


MRS PAC 


KING PEDE 


CANON PRINT 


FULL ERROR MESSAGE 


BIG NUM 


RAIDER 


COCO TENNIS 


ISSUE #48, JUNE 1986 


ISSUE #55, JAN. 1987 


ISSUE #62, AUG. 1987 


ISSUE #69, MAR. 1988 


CHESTER 


GRADE BOOK 


PENSION MANAGEMENT 


POLICE CADET 


TV SCHEDULE 


MAIL LIST 


HERB GROWING 


STAMP COLLECTION 


BASE RACE 


DOWN HILL 


CATOLOGER UTILITY 


BARRACKS ADVENTURE 


ROMAN NUMERALS 


FIRE FOX 


RAIDERS 


CITY/TIME 


.ASTRO-DODGE 


JETS CONTROL 


ALPHABETIZING 


HI-LO/CRAPS 


HIRED AND FIRED 


GALLOWS 


U.F.O. 


OLYMPICS 


MULTICOPY 


DIR MANAGER 


ELECTRONICS 5 


HI-RES CHESS 


AUTO MATE 


FIRE RUNNER 


RAMBO ADVENTURE 


ELECTRONICS 12 


SCROLL PROJECT 


GRAPHICS BORDER 


BLOCKS 


DOUBLE EDITOR 


NOISE GENERATOR 


COSMIC RAYS 


MULTI SCREEN CAVES 


DOUBLE BREAKOUT 


ISSUE #49, JULY 1986 


ISSUE #56, FEB. 1987 


ISSUE #63, SEPT. 1987 


ISSUE #70, APRIL 1988 


COMPUTER LO.U. 


CALENOAR PRINT 


GENEQLOGIST HELPER 


BLOTTO DICE 


DISK DISASSEMBLER 


CRUSH 


SMART COPY 


SUPER COM 


BAKCHEK 


GALACTA 


MAINTENANCE REPORTING 


GENESIS ADVENTURE 


PACHINKO 


OCEAN DIVER < 


C0C03-C0CQ 2 HELPER 


PLANETS 


STOCK CHARTING 


GLUE SUSPECT 


DIRECTORY PICTURE 


PHK/WAR 


HAUNTED STAIRCASE 


WORD EDITOR 


SUB ATTACK 


SIGN LANGUAGE 


CANYON BOMBERS 


ALIEN HUNT? 


SAVE THE MAIDEN 


ARX SHOOTOUT 


DRAGONS 1 & 2 


DEMON'S CASTLE 


CAVIATOR 


ELECTRONICS 13 


GRAPHIC SCROLL ROUTINE 


PICTURE DRAW 


ELECTRONICS 6 


MAGIC KEY 


AUTO BORDER 


DIG 


MONKEY SHINE 


SNAP PRINT 



ISSUE #71, MAY 1988 

SUPER LOTTO 
ROBOT ADVENTURE 



ISSUE #78, DEC, 1988 

POLICE CADET #3 
TANK TURRET 

?V.':;Xx' it-": IVi- 




PHASER 
SHAPES & PLATES 
STAR WARS 
ELECTRONICS 14 



COCO SIZE 
SIGN MAKER 
LEGAL DEDUCTIONS 
BOOKKEEPING 




ISSUE #72, JUNE 1988 
FLYING OBJECTS 



ISSUE #79, JAN. 1989 



POLICE CADET #4 
POKER 3 



HOSTAGE TILER TEX 

PROGRAM TRIO BATTLE l:s 

GLADIATOR INSIDE THE COCO 

US & CAN QUIZ COCO B.B.S, 



HOT DIRECTORY 



JEOPARDY 

ELECTRONICS 15 VCR TUTORIAL 

COCO 3 PRINT PRINTER CONTROLLER 

CTTY COMMUNICATOR THE KING 



ISSUE #73, JULY 1988 ISU 

FOREIGN OBJECTS SCRABBLE 

CHESS FUNDAMENTALS SPELLING CHECKER 

WATERFOWL QUIZ SANDSTONE 

WHAMMY 3 FAMILY FEUD 

ADVENTURE TUTORIAL HARNESS RACING 

CIRCLE 3 MINI GOLF 3 

EDUCATIONAL TRIO ULTIMATE TERMINAL 3 

WRITE-UP EDITOR NETWORK TUTORIAL 

PICTURE PACKER THE NETWORK 
AIR ATTACK 



ISSUE #74, r 

VIDEO CATALOG 3 
ONE EYE WILLIE 
JAVA 

ramp mm : , 



GAME TRIO 
CRIONAUT WARRIOR 
ENVELOPE PRINT 
RAM DRIVE 3 
MODE 2 UTILITY 
XMODEM TRANSFER 



ISSUE #75, SEPT. 1988 

DRACULA HUNT 
HELP TRIO 
SHOWDOWN DICE 
TARZAR 1 ADVENTURE 
ARAKNON 

CASHFLOW REPORTING 
GRAPHIC LETTER 
GRAPHIC EDITOR 
ADDRESS BOOK 
SQUARES 

ISSUE #76, OCT. 1988 
SUPER BLITZ 3 
CHAMBERS 
TRIO RACE 
EARTH TROOPER 
STARGATE 

BOWLING SCORE KEEP 
JOYSTICK TO KEYBOARD 
KEYBOARD TO JOYSTICK 
DISK TUTORIAL 
SAILORMAN 




ISSUE #77, NOV. 1988 
POLICE CADET #2 
STARSHIP SHOWDOWN 
MUSIC COMPOSER 
COUPONS/REBATES 
PROGRAM LIBRARY 
BOY SCOUT SEMAFORE 
HOUSEHOLD CHORES 
MAXOMAR ADVENTURE 
CHUCK LUCK 3 
BUZZARD BATE 



'7 Mst S 



£tec.k pr all l/ic wmv 




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r 



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qmlitif is excellent!' '' 



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PLEASE CIRCLE 

TAPE or DISK 



AV(2) 

2200 T(3) = ((AV(1)*N(9)) + (AV(2)*N 

(10) )+(AV(3) *N(11) )+(AV(4) *N(12) 
))/AV(3) 

2210 T(4)=( (AV(1) *N(13) )+(AV(2) * 
N ( 14 ) ) + ( AV (3)*N ( 15) ) + (AV ( 4 ) *N ( 16 
)))/AV(4) -a 

2220 L=(T(1)+T(2)+T(3)+T(4) )/4 
2230 I=(L-4)/(4-l) 
2240 RI=I/.9 
2250 GOSUB 4000 
2260 RETURN 

3000 'PROCESS FOR 5 ALTERNATIVES 
3010 N(1)=1:N(6)=1/N(2) :N(7)=1:N 

(11) =1/N(3) :N(12)=1/N(8) :N(13)=1 
3020 N(16)=l/N(4) :N(17)=1/N(9) :N 
(18)=1/N(14) :N(19)=1 

3030 N(21)=l/N(5) :N(22)=1/N(10) : 
N(23)=l/N(15) :N(24)=1/N(20) :N(25 
)=1 

3040 FORX=l TO A:G(X) =0 :NEXTX 
3050 FORX=l TO A:FORY=X TO Z STE 
P A 

3060 G(X)=G(X)+N(Y) :NEXTY:NEXTX 
3070 S(1)=N(1)/G(1) :S(2)=N(2)/G( 
2) :S(3)=N(3)/G(3) :S(4)=N(4)/G(4) 
:S(5)=N(5)/G(5) 

3080 S(6)=N(6)/G(1) : S (7 ) =N (7)/G ( 
2) :S(8)=N(8)/G(3) :S (9) =N(9)/G(4) 
:S(10)=N(10)/G(5) 

3090 S(11)=N(11)/G(1) :S(12)=N(12 

)/G(2) :S(13)=N(13)/G(3) :S(14)=N( 

14)/G(4) :S(15)=N(15)/G(5) 

3100 S(16)=N(16)/G(1) :S(17)=N(17 

)/G(2) :S(18)=N(18)/G(3) :S(19)=N( 

19)/G(4) :S(20)=N(20)/G(5) 

3110 S(21)=N(21)/G(1) :S(22)=N(22 

)/G(2) :S(23)=N(23)/G(3) :S(24)=N( 

24)/G(4) :S(25)=N(25)/G(5) 

3120 AV ( 1) =(S(1)+S ( 2 ) +S (3 ) +S (4 ) + 

S(5))/5 

3130 AV (2 ) = (S(6 ) +S ( 7 ) +S ( 8 ) +S ( 9 ) + 
S(10))/5 

3140 AV ( 3 ) =(S(11)+S ( 12 ) +S ( 13 ) +S ( 
14)+S(15) )/5 

3150 AV(4)=(S(16)+S(17)+S(18)+S( 
19)+S(20))/5 

3160 AV(5) = (S(21)+S(22)+S(23)+S( 
24)+S(25) )/5 

3170 IFFOl THEN V(K,1)=AV(1) 
3180 IFFOl THEN V(K,2)=AV(2) 
3190 IF FOl THEN V(K,3)=AV(3) 
3200 IFFOl THEN V(K,4)=AV(4) 
3210 IFFOl THEN V(K,5)=AV(5) 
3220 T(l) = ( (AV(lj *N ( 1 ) ) + ( AV ( 2 ) *N 
( 2 ) ) + ( AV ( 3) *N (3 ) ) + (AV ( 4 ) *N ( 4 ) ) + ( 
AV(5)*N(5)))/AV(1) 
3230 T(2)=( (AV(1) *N(6) ) + (AV(2) *N 
(7)) + (AV(3) *N(8) ) + (AV(4) *N(9) ) + ( 
AV(5) *N(10) ) )/AV(2) 



3240 T(3) = ((AV(1)*N(11) ) + (AV(2)* 

N(12) )+(AV(3)*N(13) )+(AV(4)*N(14 

))+(AV(5)*N(15)))/AV(3) 

3250 T(4)=( (AV(1)*N(16) )+(AV(2)* 

N(17) )+(AV(3) *N(18) )+(AV(4) *N(19 

))+(AV(5)*N(20)))/AV(4) 

3260 T ( 5 ) = ( ( AV ( 1) *N ( 2 1 ) ) + ( AV ( 2 ) * 

N(22) )+(AV(3)*N(23) )+(AV(4) *N(24 

) ) + ( AV ( 5 ) *N ( 2 5 ) ) ) /AV ( 5 ) 

3265 L=(T(1)+T(2)+T(3)+T(4)+T(5) 

)/5 

3270 I=(L-5)/(5-l) 
3280 RI=I/1.12 
3290 GOSUB4000 
3300 RETURN 

4000 IFRK .1 THEN CF=0 : IFRK . 1 T 
HEN GOTO 4090 

40 10 SOUND 4 5,3: SOUND 2 , 8 : PRINT" YO 
UR ANSWERS ARE NOT CONSISTENT! ! ! 

II ; CF— 1 

4020 PRINT "HERE IS ANOTHER CHANC 
E TO EXPRESS YOUR PREFERENCE." 
4030 PRINT "PERHAPS YOU SHOULD EN 
D THE PROGRAM AND RETHINK YOUR V 
IEWS ABOUT" 

4040 PRINTU$: PRINT" CHOOSE <Y> TO 

CONTINUE <N> TO ABORT PROGRAM" 
4050 P$=INKEY$:IFP$=""GOTO4050 
4060 IFP$="N"THENGOTO620 
4070 IFP$="Y"THENGOTO4090 
4080 PRINT"??? TRY AGAIN ???":G0 
TO4050 
4090 RETURN 



Two-Liner Contest Winner . . . 

This shortie prints a screen PRINTS work sheet like 
the one on Page 176 of Radio Shack's BASIC manual. 
Just type in and run, and two tables will be printed 
on 814-by-ll inch paper. 

The listing: 

1 CLS:P=PEEK(65314)AND1:IF P>0 T 
HENPRINT@201, "printer offline" :G 
0T01 ELSEPRINT§199, "PRINTING 2 T 
ABLES " : F0RX=1T03 3 : P$=P$+" +" : NEX 
TX : FORZ=lT02 : PRINT#-2 , STRING $ (7 , 
13 )' ; " » ; : F0RX=1T03 : PRINT #- 
2 , STRING$ ( 17 , " " ) ; X ; : NEXTX 

2 PRINT#-2 ,CHR$ (13) ; " ";:FORX 
=1T03 : FORY=0TO9 : PRINT#-2 , STR$ (Y) 
; :NEXTY,X:PRINT#-2, " 0 1":PRINT# 
-2," ";P$:FORX=0TO480 STEP32:P 
RINT#-2 , USING" # # # " ; X ; : PRINT#-2 , P 
$ : NEXTX, Z 

Sam Mony 
Kalamazoo, Ml 

(For this winning two-liner contest entry, the author has been sent copies 
of both The Third Rainbow Book of Adventures and its companion The 
Third Rainbow Adventures Tape.) 



124 THE RAINBOW April 1989 



Give your kids a head start 

with the affordable, 

Tandy Color 






Fingers and Keys 

;Vou should use tti* Index Finder 
on your Ri$hl hand. 




Get real computing pow^fe^l'tb 
Tandy Color Comput&*3L ( ct If 
your I V and you ll have youi 
computer system— -for just $1?IS| 

With the educational softwares 
for the Color Computer 3 , your chtldrt 
can study math, reading, typing— a vwi 
of subjects— all while learning I tow t 
a real computer. 

The Color Computer 3 provides impress 
sive computing power for grownups, t^p. 
There's a library of useful Color Computer 
software available — choose from word 
processing, spreadsheet, database and, of 
course, games the whole family can enjoy. 

Make your computer more versatile with 
opt ional accessor ies such as a printer, disk 
drives, a telephone modem and more. 
Add a CM -8 high -resolution monitor to 
create colorful, razor-sharp graphics. 

The Color Computer 3 offers uncompro- 
mising performance at a terrific price. 
And it's available now — visit Radio Shack 
today for a demonstration! 



Radio Shack 



Price applies at Radio Shack Computer Centers and participating stores 
and dealers. Monitor, platform and Program Pale™ sold separately. 



The Technology Store™ 



A DIVISION OF TANDY CORPORATION 



1 



to 



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text W^hfiiZ? - 



x 1 * 



1 Hardwar e 



CoCo 3 



Star NX-1000 Rainbow Printer- 
Let theTrue Colors Shine Through 



It wasn't long after I bought my first 
CoCo that I began to realize the power of 
the machine. And I quickly realized I was 
going to need more than just a cassette 
recorder to harness that power. So, a few 
months later I got my first disk drive. This 
worked well until I wanted to share the 
results of my computing with others. The 
next major investment was a printer. I was 
happy with my purchase, a DMP-200 from 
Radio Shack for just $499. Since that time, 
the flexibility and power of dot-matrix 
printers has increased explosively. And 
one printer that stands up there in the front 
line is the Star NX-1000 Rainbow. 

The Star NX-1000 Rainbow printer is 
an enhancement of another Star printer, 



the NX-1000. The only difference (an $85 
difference) is that the NX-1000 Rainbow 
adds color. The NX-1000 Rainbow offers 
quite a bevy of features. Using a four-color 
(red, blue, yellow and black) ribbon, the 
NX- 1 000 Rainbow will print text in any of 
seven colors right out of the box: black, 
red, blue, violet, yellow, orange and green. 
It is a simple matter to send the proper 
codes to select any of these colors at nearly 
any time. 

In addition to the color capability, the 
NX-1000 Rainbow offers five type styles: 
Courier, Sans Serif, Orator using small 
capitals, Orator with lowercase, and Draft. 
Each of these is available in standard or 
italic. With the exception of the draft mode, 



all styles are printed in the NLQ (Near- 
Letter-Quality) mode. 

To offer even more choices, these styles 
can be printed in any of six pitches: pica, 
elite, condensed pica or elite, and propor- 
tional pica or elite. Finally, characters are 
printable in standard size or double-height, 
double-width, double-height and -width, 
and quad-height and -width. While I proba- 
bly wouldn't use all of these possibilities, 
it is good to know the printer has the 
capability. It's almost like having a type- 
setting machine next to the computer table. 

The NX-1000 Rainbow is average in 
terms of printing speed. It will print at 120 
cps (characters per second) in the draft 
mode and 30 cps in any of the NLQ modes. 
This isn't all that impressive. At the same 
time, it pretty much matches most simi- 
larly priced printers in this department. 

In addition to the standard character set 
(96 ASCII characters) and the IBM set 
(244) characters, the NX-1000 Rainbow 
offers up to 192 draft or 78 NLQ download 



126 



THE RAINBOW April 1989 



characters. These characters are user-de- 
fined and allow the creation of small graph- 
ics or special symbols — handy for mathe- 
matics work. The only drawback, and it is 
a minor and very common one, to using 
download characters is the occupation of 
the normally active 8K text buffer, which 
leaves only a single-line buffer for re- 
ceived text in its place. 

Over the past few years, more and more 
printer developers have moved toward 
allowing more complete control of the 
printer from the front panel. I like this 
trend and believe it reflects growing sup- 
port of beginning/intermediate users. The 
NX- 1000 Rainbow offers front-panel control 
of type style (including italics), print pitch 
and right and left margins. It also allows 
the user to clear the buffer, perform for- 
ward and reverse micro-feed (vertical paper 
movement in very small increments), and 
to park the paper. This is a long way from 
the standard linefeed/formfeed and on- 
line/offline buttons of just a couple of 
years ago. 

One aspect I have not seen before is the 
front-panel lock. By pressing the front- 
panel NLQ button during power-up, you 
prevent software from altering printer style 
settings when it boots. Similarly, pressing 
the Print Pitch button during power-up 
locks out software changes to the pitch 
control. In either case, the settings can still 
be altered using the front panel. This "stay- 
in-panel" feature can prevent software 
designed for other printers from interfer- 
ing with the NX- 1000 Rainbow's settings. 
I imagine it was designed primarily for 
MS-DOS systems, but this feature deserves 
mention in the CoCo Community, as well. 

Speaking of MS-DOS, the NX- 1000 
Rainbow features an IBM mode in which 
it emulates the IBM Proprinter II. This 
makes the machine quite versatile in an 
ever-changing world of computer systems. 
This emulation is available through a DIP 
switch setting. The printer can also emu- 
late the Epson LX-800. 

The NX- 1000 Rainbow allows a great 
deal of flexibility through its use of both 
tractor-feed and friction-feed mechanisms. 
While these features are commonly of- 
fered together on other printers, the NX- 
1000 Rainbow takes them a step further. 
Like printers costing much more, the NX- 
1000 Rainbow features paper-parking. In 
a nutshell, this means the paper loaded into 
the tractor feed can be moved out of the 
way, by the printer, without removing it 
from the printer. After this is done, single 
sheets can be printed using friction feed. 



Later, it is a simple matter to "reload" the 
tractor feed paper. You see, by pressing 
two buttons on the front panel, you tell the 
printer to pull the paper loaded into the 
tractor feed back away from the platen to 
make room for single sheets. This can be 
especially useful for correspondence in a 
business setting. 

You might want to keep mailing labels 
loaded into the tractor feed. To do a letter, 
you would park the paper (labels), write 
and print your letter, unpark the labels and 




print one, then repark them. No more hassle 
repeatedly loading and unloading the print- 
er. Another advantage to this approach is 
the tractor-feed being a push-feed system. 
In other words, the feed mechanism is lo- 
cated behind the platen; it pushes the pa- 
per through the printer instead of pulling 
it, reducing paper waste. 

Another thing I really like about the 
Star NX- 1000 Rainbow is the ease with 
which the features can be selected from 
inside word processors. Type style, char- 
acter size, the seven standard colors, and 



the bold and italic modes can be accessed 
simply by placing a command between 
double parentheses. For example, entering 
the characters ( ( S ) ) 2 right in the mid- 
dle of your word processing document will 
cause the text, when printed, to come out 
in double height. When itreceives a double 
open parentheses, the NX- 1000 Rainbow 
looks at what follows, determines if it is a 
valid command, and if it is then executes 
it. You can even set up these commands in 
macros, if macros are supported by your 
word processor. This sure beats wading 
through a bunch of control codes. The 
following commands are accepted: 



((F)) 0 


Courier 


((F)) 1 


Sans Serif 


((F))2 


Orator, small caps 


((F))3 


Orator, lowercase 


((F))9 


Draft 


((S))0 


Standard size 


((S))l 


Double width 


((S))2 


Double height 


((S))3 


Double width and height 


((C))0 


Black 


((C)) 1 


Red 


((C))2 


Blue 


((C))3 


Violet 


((C))4 


Yellow 


((C))5 


Orange 


((C))6 


Green 


((B))0 


Bold off 


((B)) 1 


Bold on 


(d))0 


Italics off 


((D) 1 


Italics on 



Dayton Associates of W. R, Hall, Inc. 



Dayton, Ohio, quickly becoming a high- 
technology city in the Midwest, is home for 
three large technical centers — NCR, Wright 
State University and Wright Patterson Air 
Force Base. Since Dayton is a growing, 
technical city, it seemed the appropriate 
place for the birth of Dayton Associates of 
W.R. Hall, Inc. 

Dayton Associates was founded in 1983 
by William R. Hall, a graduate from the 
Pennsylvania Institute of Technology. Hall 
is currently technical director of his com- 
pany. The idea for Day ton Associates came 
under consideration when he was designing 
computer interfaces under contract for ihe 
Air Force. When the contract was complete, 
Hall decided to use his knowledge to design 
and provide interfaces for the CoCo. 

Dayton Associates believes in the Color 
Computer, as exhibited by its exclusive use 



of Color Computers. In addition to design 
work, Dayton Associates prides itself in 
delivering complete printer packages (printer, 
interface and software), or "turn key" sys- 
tems, to other CoCo users. In addition to the 
full product support offered, customers have 
the added security of knowing Star Micron- 
ics (the company that produces the printers 
sold by Dayton Associates) offers full sup- 
port nationwide. 

The success of Dayton Associates of 
W.R. Hall, Inc. can be attributed to Hall's 
easy accessibility, gaining him customers 
from five continents. Although the cus- 
tomer base ranges from commercial sources 
in America to American embassies and 
government agencies here and abroad, Hall 
claims that home computer users are his 
main customers. As a bonus, technical support 
extends even into the evening hours. □ 



April 1989 THE RAINBOW 127 



The Blue Streak Ultima Serial/Parallel Interface 



The Color Computer is designed to 
send data serially to a printer, Because of 
the special format used in the CoCo's serial 
port, this somewhat limits users to Radio 
Shack printers; after all, they are the only 
ones marketed with an identical port. Most 
other computers arid printers are: designed 
to communicate in a parallel fashion. 




Ultima with the printers it sells, giving the 
buyer a great deal of flexibility. 

The Ultima is switch-selectable for 300, 
600, 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600 and 19,200 
baud data reception. All you need to do is 
set the switch and make sure your CoCo is 
transmitting at the same speed. This is ac- 
complished via pokes to memory location 
150 of the CoCo as follows; 



POKE150, 180 
2OKE150, 87 
POKE! 5 Q, 41 
POKE 15 0,18 
POKE15Q, 7 
POKE 15 0,1 



300 baud 
600 baud 
1200 baud 
2400 baud 
4800 baud 
9600 baud 



In aerial eommunic&tioii^earii charac- 
ter is sent down a single wire, one bit at a 
time, In parallel communications, all bits 
making up a single character are sent down 
several wires at the same time. This results 
in much faster, and usually more reliable, 
operation, A serial/parallel interface fits 
between a serial and a parallel port and 
allows these systems to communicate prop- 
erly. Since most every printer has a parallel 
port, these interfaces have been very popu- 
lar in the CoCo Community as a way to use 
other printers with the CoCo. 

The Blue Streak Ultima is the latest in 
a long line of products from Dayton Asso- 
ciates, It is a serial/parallel interface that 
allows transmission up to 19,200 baud. 
Therefore, it receives serial data from the 
CoCo at up to 19,200 bits-per-second and 
presents that data to the parallel port of your 
printer, Dayton includes the Blue Streak 



In order to send from the CoCo at 
19,200 baud, you must issue the poke for 
9600 baud and then poke the CoCo for high 
speed. This is not recommended for those 
who don't understand it. And, in truth, it 
really isn't necessary — except, perhaps, 
when performing a color dump of a CoCo 3 
screen. 

The ability to switch the interface be- 
tween baud rates is necessary with some 
software that is "hard-coded" and doesn't 
allow the user to alter the rate. 

The interface is solidly built, yet looks 
good when placed in a system. It can be used 
in conjunction with a Y cable for those users 
wanting to share the serial port with a 
modem. Because of its high-impedance ( 1 5 
kilohms) input, it doesn't require a serial 
s witcher as long as it is used with a modem 
also having a Hi-Z input, The interface is 
available from Dayton Associates as a stand- 
alone item for $39*95, but is included with 
their printer systems. D 



The nine-pin printer features a standard 
Centronics interface and 240 dpi (dot-per- 
inch) resolution in the quad-density graph- 
ics mode. The NX- 1000 Rainbow is well- 
suited for use with the Blue Streak Ultima 
serial/parallel interface packaged with it 
by Dayton Associates. Dayton also sells 
the color ribbons for $10. To avoid waste 
during non-colored text printing, black 
ribbons are available from Dayton for $6. 

While color printing can be useful in 
some text applications, the printer really 
shows its stuff with color graphics. See the 
photos for samples of what it can do. 

To provide access to the color graphics 
abilities of the printer, Dayton Associates 
includes the Color Imaging System with 
the printer package. This software gives 
you a way to print PMODE and H SCREEN 
images in full color. Let's follow the proc- 
ess for a typical HSCREEN image. 

The picture I wanted to print is an MGE, 
HSCREEN2 image. I first loaded the image 
into Color Max 3 and pressed Reset. This 



exited Color Max 3 but left the image in 
memory. Then I ran HRCSGP . BAS from 
the imaging system disk. I followed some 
relatively simple prompts to a point where 
I was asked if I wanted to use the default 
colors or define my own. I chose to define 
the colors. This is done by selecting just 
how much of each color ink you want for 
a given palette slot You see, for HSCREEN2 , 
the artist has 16 slots available. With 
HRCSGP, you define how each of these 
slots will be printed by entering how much 
black, blue, red and yellow you want printed 
for that slot. You can select none, light and 
solid for each color in each slot — 81 
different shades at your fingertips. 

This color-definition capability has the 
advantage of allowing the user to redefine 
screen colors. You have complete control 
over what colors are printed. One example 
where this could come in handy is sche- 
matic work. If you have a color schematic 
done in CoCo Max III and you want it 
printed in black and white, you might set 



all slots to black except the ones control- 
ling background color. 

However, I find Dayton's implementa- 
tion of this capability to be awkward and 
incomplete. In translating the colors, it is 
necessary to use a pad of paper to keep 
track of the colors in the 16 slots. And you 
really have no way of knowing how a 
particular mix is going to look on paper. I 
would like to see a utility in the package 
that prints out a color chart of all 81 vari- 
ations. Then you could compare this chart 
with the actual screen color and know the 
best definition to use for each slot. 

It is important to note Colorware offers 
a Star NX- 1 000 Rainbow driver for CoCo 
Max III. This new item was unavailable 
for this review. Still, for $19.95, it would 
seem to be the way to go when using CoCo 
Max III with the Star NX- 1000 Rainbow. 

As sold by Dayton Associates, the Star 
NX- 1000 Rainbow includes the Blue Streak 
Ultima interface, the Color Imaging Sys- 
tem and the software support disk. This 
latter disk includes tutorials on how to use 
your printer and to select its many fea- 
tures, as well as black-and-white screen 
dump routines for PMODE and HSCREEN 
images. The complete package sells for 
$279.95 plus $10 shipping. At that price, I 
think it is one of the best deals around, an 
excellent package at an excellent price. 1 
suggest you give it serious consideration 
when you are looking for a printer system. 

(Dayton Associates of W.R. Hall, Inc., 9644 
Quailwood Trail, Spring Valley, OH 45370, 
513-885-5999; $279.95 plus $10 S/H) 

— Cray Augsburg 



CoCo 1 , 2 & 3 



ware 

The Aussie 
Collection — 
A Public Domain 
Six-Pack From the 
Land Down Under 

Ever wish you could travel nearly half- 
way around the world without leaving 
your CoCo keyboard? With the Aussie 
Collection you can do just that. This inter- 
esting six-pack has something for every- 
one — music, games, speech, graphics and 
more. The Aussie Collection runs on any 
CoCo, from an old gray battleship to the 
newer CoCo 3, using the 32-character text 
screen and compatible graphics screen. 

While most of the programs ran great, 
some of them had syntax or other errors. 
Most of the programs are written in simple 



128 THE RAINBOW April 1989 



h- Pre-Rainbowfest Sale, 



We Pay Shipping! 



MULTI-FONT PRINTER 

NX-1000 



NEW 



7 Color Printer 
for Your CoCo 

The NX-1 000 gives you 
plenty of print options for 
attractive printing. 
Four typestyles. 
Four pitch sizes, 
in standard A 
and italics jf^ 
for a total X: 
of 32 

NLQ ^ 
modes. -M* 
The NX- 
1000 Rainbow 

gives you all these features plus 
online access to 7 color printing and graphics 
Black, blue, red, yellow, green, violet, and 
orange. Both models have a 1 year warranty 
and a 30 day online trial. 




NX-1000 SPECS: 1 44 cps Draft, 36 cps NLQ {18 x 23 dot matrix), 
4 NLQ Fonts, Italics, Sub & Superscripts, Emphasized, Dou- 
blestrike, Proportional, Condensed, International, Downloadable, 
Quad Tall, Double Tall, Underlined Pitchs, Forward and Reverse 
n/216" Line Feeds, Absolute or Relative Vert. & Horz. Tabs, Left, 
Center or Right Justification, 8 Graphics Modes to 1 920 dpi, Macro 
Instruction, Bidirection, Adjustable Tractor Feed, 200+ Printable 
Characters, Semi Auto Sheet Feed, Front Panel Soft Touch 
Control, Epson and IBM Emulate, 4k Data Buffer, Hex Dump. 
Rainbow: Same plus color. 



95 



NX-1000 SYSTEM INCLUDES: 

• Star NX-1 000 Printer tJAA 

• Blue Streak Ultima v | 

• Software Support Trio +$10 shipping & ins. 

COMPLETE 



$ 279 



95 



NX-1000 RAINBOW SYSTEM 

INCLUDES: 

• Star NX-1000 
Colour Printer + $ 1 0 shipping & ins. 

• Blue Streak ^^COMPLETE 

• Software Trio 

• Color Super Gemprint 



The Smallest, Sleekest, 
Fastest Serial To Parallel 
Converter You Can Buy! 

7 Switchabel Baud Rates 

300 • 600 • 1 200 • 2400 • 
4800 • 9600 • 1 9200 

Use this "smart" cable to con- 
nect a Centronics parallel printer 
to any version CoCo or use it to 
improve performance of you 
current printer. The 
cables are long-life, high 
quality shielded cables 
with moulded plugs for 
extra durability. 

Try a Blue Streak Ultima on 
your system for 30 days R IS K 
FREE. One year warranty. 

The Blue 
Streak Ultima 



Powered version 
add $6.00. 



$3995 

+$2 Shipping 



Software 

Support Trio 

Type Selection/Tutorial 

Online instructional program that will select 24 
special features of your printer or display meth- 
ods to incorporate them into your 
programs. 

Super Gemprint 

Will transfer Pmode 0, 1 , 2, 3, or 4 picture screen 
to printer 8"x1T hardcopy. Black/white, white/ 
black or grey level shading for color. 

Hi-Res Super Gemprint 

Disk software that will transfer a Hscreen 1,2,3, 
or 4 picture screen to printer. Grey level shading 
for color. 

^^A^t^ All Three 





Color Super 
Gemprint 

Print your Graphics Screen 
in Color on your NX-1000 
Rainbow! 



Use your favorite program to create a 
pmode or hi-res graphic image, but 
don't stop there! Run our colorgraph- 
ics software and print a color image 
using a palette of 81 + colors on your 
NX-1 000 Rainbow from a CoCo 1 , 2, 
or 3. Requires 32k ECB Disk. 




Price, availability and specifications 
subject to change without notice. 



Order Your System Today... Call (513) 885-5999 



DAYTON ASSOCIATES 



of W.R. 
Hall 



INC 



Visa & Master accepted within 

the continental U.S. 
Ohio residents add 6% sales tax 
COD add $3.00 

* Shipping paid only in Continental U.S. Normal shipping charges to Canada, P.R., HI, AK, APO, FPO are double. Triple charge to all other countries. These areas can take advantage of show 
special by deducting the continental U.S. shipping amount from their normal shipping costs. Offer expires April 14, 1989. 



9644 Quailwood Trail • Spring Valley, Ohio 45370 



Disk BASIC and can be edited by the user. 
There are no printed instructions, but you 
will find them in the programs when needed. 
Just remember that the English used is not 
American English. If you are told you will 
have ten "goes," that's 10 turns; even 
reading the text can be a lot of fun. For 
most of the files you can just type 
RUN" 'filename" or, in the case of . BIN 
files, LOADM" filename" : EXEC. Some of 
the files are intended to be run or used by 
another program, as with the excellent 
geography lesson files on Disk 6. 

"Music, Music, Music" is the theme of 
Disk 1, and it really is varied. You will 
discover everything from children's songs 
to national anthems, from bush songs to 
Scottish reels. Some of the songs are done 
with simple PLAY commands, but many 
are very nicely done in machine language. 
The ML songs sound as if they were pro- 
grammed in at least four-part harmony and 
are quite impressive. I had almost as much 
fun with some of the titles as I did with the 
songs. I found the TV speaker did not do 
the ML songs justice and used my stereo to 
listen to them. I often found myself want- 
ing to hear more when they ended. You 
may be surprised at just how good your 
CoCo can sound without MIDI or a music 
pack. 

The novice CoCo user may find Disk 
2's graphics and music tutorials helpful in 
learning more about CoCo's PMODE graph- 
ics and the PLAY command. Math fans 
may have fun with QUADSOLV, and I 
couldn't resist trying BIGMONEY. Who 
could? You may have a problem using 
FUELCHEK unless you have an odometer 
that reads kilometers and a gas station that 
serves "petro" by the liter; but if you do run 
the program, you can convert the results to 
miles per gallon. While the serious game 
player may scoff at MATES, I found that 
many of us may have forgotten just what 
fun a simple game can be. 

On to Disk 3 we go. The first file, 
HEADS, is not a game of pictures of bath- 
rooms for you sailors out there, but an 
information file about using the disk. Disk 
3 has 30 PMODE picture files and a couple 
of BASIC programs to print the pictures as 
letterheads. The printer programs cover 
the DMP-105, 110 and 130 Radio Shack 
printers and are written in BASIC. While I 
was not able to use the printer programs, 
the pictures are exceptional; in fact, I may 
write a driver for one of my three printers 
just to be able to use them. None of my 
printers are compatible with the DMP print- 
ers. If you want only to view these pic- 
tures, you can type LOADM "filename" , 
then enter 10 PMODE4 : SCREEN1 , 1 : 
GOTO10 and run to see them. 

Disk 4 was disappointing because both 



JO YD I SK programs and all three shooting 
games had errors and would not run. The 
kids had fun with SHIP SUB but the 
UFOMAZE game was too hard, even for 
me. But then I'm not a die-hard game 
player. If you want to play SKELQUIZ, 
you had better study up on the names of 
your body's bones first! All the games on 
this disk are written in BASIC, and I found 
the play much better with the speed-up 
poke. 

If you don't believe me when I say Disk 
5 is alive, just run HELLO! You will be 
greeted by the author of this disk through 
your speaker, Australian accent and all. 
Want to learn about what they eat in the 
Land Down Under, run SHOP, a grocery 
database program that will print a list for 
you. While SHOP may not be fancy — do 
not expect pretty formatting of the screen 
or printed listings — it was interesting 
reading for this Yankee. 

CANON is a challenge of setting a can- 
non's angle to hit your target, and LLIST32 
is for printing program listings in a 32- 
column format. DIGI is a utility for digit- 
izing sound (remember HELLO?) and to 
play it back via the TV speaker. D I G I can 
also save or load digitized sound to or from 
disk or tape. MCBASE is a mini name and 
address database program. Some of the 
programs were very simple but informa- 
tive. LOWRCASE was of limited value on 
my CoCo 3; it's intended for the newer 
CoCo 2s, to give you a true lowercase 
display on the 32-character screen. 

Last, but not by any means least, is Disk 
6. This disk contains a collection of five 
files that make up a geography program. 
GEOG can be used as a tutorial or quiz 
about Australia. The program uses PMODE 

3 for its graphic displays and is well-done. 
I found it both educational and interesting 
to learn about the Land Down Under. Text 
screens are used to give a lot of informa- 
tion about everything from rainfall to in- 
dustry, while maps of Australia graphi- 
cally show where these regions are lo- 
cated. 

While I could not cover every program 
on all the disks here, I hope I've given you 
a good idea of what is in the A ussie Collec- 
tion. On the whole I found the set enter- 
taining, fun and educational. My personal 
favorites were the music, letterhead graph- 
ics and geography disks. Although disks 2, 

4 and 5 might not be of great interest to the 
more experienced CoCoist, disks 2 and 5 
could be fun and helpful to the beginner. A 
few of the programs (five out of 1 1 pro- 
gram files on Disk 4) had errors and would 
not run. 

The company offering Aussie Collec- 
tion, The Public Domain Software Copy- 
ing Company, offers some extras to its 



programming customers. If a user returns 
an improved version of a company pro- 
gram (provided there's a note of explana- 
tion of the modification), that user re- 
ceives credit for a free disk on his or her 
next purchase. People who donate original 
or downloaded programs receive two free 
disks on their next purchase (but they must 
include a letter of origin). Also, students 
and users group club members receive a 15 
percent discount on any order. 

(The Public Domain Software Copying 
Company, 33 Gold St., Suite L3, New York, 
NY 10038, 800-221-7372; $39.95 for the set 
or $10 each, $4.50 S/H: First product review 
for this company appearing in THE RAIN- 
BOW.) ™ MTrri " 

— J.D. Walker 

1 Softwar e CoCo3 1 

DaVinci3 — 

An Environment for 

Your Masterpieces 

DaVincU is a low-priced, high-resolu- 
tion (320-by- 1 92, 1 6-color) graphics crea- 
tion and editing program for the Color 
Computer 3 that offers most of the features 
available in its higher-priced competitors. 
DaVinci3 requires at least one disk drive 
and some type of input device (a joystick, 
x-pad or mouse). It should be noted that a 
Hi-Res interface, or any other hardware 
device, is not required. A printer, of course, 
is optional. I found DaVinci3 ran equally 
well under Disk BASIC 1.0/1.1 and ADOS3 
(as long as the ADOS disable command 
was used). 

The program is unprotected, and the 
user is encouraged to back up the disk to 
create a working copy. The working copy 
must not have a write-protect tab on it, as 
the program will write to disk from time to 
time during its normal operation. 

DaVinci3 comes with a 13-page man- 
ual, which is well-written and leads you 
through all the features of the program 
applications and the included "convert" 
utility — it transfers standard PMODE 3 or 
4 pictures saved in binary format (load- 
able with a LOADM command) to a format 
you can then load into DaVinci3. 

DaVinci3 supports a lot of features, but 
it tends to run a bit slowly at times. For the 
most part, though, operation is smooth and 
timely. The program has a rather unique 
method of implementing Hi-Res control: 
By pressing the space bar, you toggle 
between "fine" and "regular" modes. In 
the fine mode, the travel of the cursor is 



1 30 THE RAINBOW April 1 989 



limited, but the ratio of joystick motion to 
screen motion changes to allow for de- 
tailed work. 

DaVinci3 will create one full graphic 
screen (320-by- 192); there is no two-page, 
double-screen feature. The printouts I made 
took up roughly one -half of a standard 
piece of printer paper. Printers supported 
include the Star NX- 10 and the DMP 105, 
1 1 0 and 1 30. The CGP-220 is supported in 
color, which is quite impressive. Color 
replication from screen to paper is fairly 
accurate. The one problem with printing 
seems to be a slight flattening of the pic- 
ture. 

Both RGB and composite monitors are 
selectable upon boot up. More detail is 
provided, of course, with an RGB monitor, 
but I was impressed with the look on a 
composite monitor, as well as with that of 
a regular color TV. At any rate, the pro- 
gram can be used with whatever type of 
display you may have. 

As soon as you have booted up and 
chosen your display type, you will be in 
the drawing screen. From here you can 
select any of the program's drawing op- 
tions, the disk access menu, the printing 
menu, etc. When you press the CLEAR 
key the borders disappear, and you are 
given full editing capabilities of the entire 



screen. The CTRL key also has its own 
special function, toggling Zoom — al- 
ways a welcome feature in any graphics 
editor. DaVincB has a 400-percent Zoom 
feature, which is more than adequate for 
the finest of detailed work. 




Text (40 columns by 24 lines) can be 
entered in your graphic in six fonts: Stan- 
dard, Mac, Roman, Italic, Old English and 
Bold Italic. Upper- and lowercase letters 
are supported via the SHIFT-0 combina- 
tion. 

DaVinci3 supports an "Oops*' function 
that will restore the top 80 percent of the 
screen. The bottom 20 percent remains as 
it was prior to the Oops command. To 
avoid this, two special keys, Fl and F2, 
can be used before making drastic changes 
to your picture. The Fl key, when pressed, 



will force the saving of the full screen to 
the Undo buffer. When the F2 key is pressed, 
it will restore the picture saved by pressing 
the Fl key. You can also capture screens 
from other graphics creation programs, 
games, etc., that use the Hi -Res screen by 
pressing the F2 key before making any 
menu selection when you start the pro- 
gram. Provided the previous program's 
screen is still in memory, this is accom- 
plished usually by exiting the other pro- 
gram via the Reset button. When DaVinci3 
starts, it automatically saves whatever was 
left on the Hi-Res screen. 

After you select a color from the color 
bar, the arrow keys allow you to tune it. 
For composite mom tors/TVs, the left ar- 
row key will change the color in sort of the 
order of the spectrum: red, orange, yellow, 
green, black/grey, blue-green, blue, purple, 
etc. The right arrow adjusts the color in the 
opposite direction: red, purple, blue, blue- 
green, black/grey, green, yellow, orange, 
red, etc. 

There are four intensity settings (dark 
to light) for each of the 16 available hues. 
The up arrow will make the color lighter 
until it is as light as it can get. The down 
arrow will make it darker until it reaches 
its darkest shade. Brown tones are achieved 
by using dark oranges or yellows. 





Conquer the 
World! 



DOMINATION $18 

MULTI-PLAYER STRATEGY 
GAME! 

Try to take over the 
planet of YCNAN. Battle 
other players armies to 
take control of their 
provinces and defend yours. 
Play on a Hi-res map of 
the planet. Take the "RISK" 
and be a planet-lord 
today!!! Requires 1 disk and 
joystick or mouse. See 
Rainbow Review JULY 88 



MY DOS S15 

EPR0MABLE! CUSTOMIZABLE! 

MYD0S is an enhancement 
to Disk Extended Basic 2.1 
on the CoCo 3. Screen echo 
3nd SAY command for RS 
Speech Pak. Point and click 
mouse directory. NEW 
FEATURES! Supports D/S 
and 40 track drives. 
Power-up in any screen 
colors (or monochrome), 
width, and palettes (RGB 
•or CMP) you wish! More 
options than you can 
shake a joystick at! See 
Rainbow Review JUNE 87 



RAINBOW 

MM 



HAVKSof t 

P.O. Box 7112 
Elgin, II. 60121-7112 
312-742-3084 
S/H always included. 
Check COD or M0 accepted 
11 orders add 7% sales tax 



HAWKSoft KEYBOARD 
CABLE $25 

UNCHAIN YOUR KEYBOARD! 
Five foot extender cable 
for Coco I! and 3. Move 
your keyboard where you 
want it! Installation 
instructions and tips 
included! Custom lengths 

available. 



"I cannot imagine the CoCo 3 without ADOS-3; 
it would not be a complete machine." 

The RAINBOW, July 1987 

You've moved up to a CoCo 3. A powerful new machine. Now, it's time to 
give BASIC a shot In the arm, with ADOS-3. Wouldn't it be nice to turn on your 
machine and be greeted by an 80-column display, in the colors of your 
choice, with your own custom startup message? To run routinely at 2 MHz 
(double speed) without having to slow down for disk and printer operations? 
This and much, much more is possible with ADOS-3, our CoCo 3 adaptation 
of the acclaimed original ADOS, which shares the original's virtual 100% 
compatibility with commercial software. After customizing ADOS-3 using the 
provided configuring utility, you can have it burned into an EPROM that plugs 
Into the Disk BASIC ROM socket, or Just use It in RAM as a disk utility. (EPROM 
+ burning will cost S 15-20; we provide Information concerning how you can 
have this done,) Supports double-sided drives (35, 40, or 80 tracks). FAST and 
SLOW commands, auto line number prompts, RUNM command, keystroke 
macros, arrow-key scroll through BASIC progroms, auto-edit of error line, and 
many more valuable features. 

"ON A SCALE OF 1 TO 10, I RATE ADOS-3 A SOLID 15." RAINBOW, 7/87 

Disk . . , $34,95 Original ADOS for CoCo 1 or 2 . . S27.95 (See 6/87 RAINBOW review) 

Original ADOS plus ADOS-3 $50.00 

THE PEEPER 

ML program tracer that multltasks with the target program. An excellent 
learning tool for the ML novice; an invaluable debugging aid for the expert. 
CoCo 1, 2, or 3 compatible. 

Disk . . . S23.95 Assembler source listing . , . Add S3. 00 



MONITOR CABLES for CoCo 3 

Magnavox8CM515/BCM505/8CM643 . , 



SonyKV1311CR 



SPECTROSYSTEMS/^^= s 1 uJ: i A N 108 Kenda " Drive ' 

Z. \" — ' Miami, Florida 33176 

. — (305) 274-3899Day or Eve. 

\ No delay on jwrawifil efwths # Pic dm add QQ shtouftu * km no credit cards or COD's 

I Ml ■ 



April 1989 THE RAINBOW 131 



Analog RGB color control differs from 
the method used in composite mode. In 
RGB mode, the left arrow controls the red 
component of the color, the up arrow controls 
the green, and the right arrow the blue 
component. Each of these components has 
four intensities: off, dark, medium and 
light. Color tuning takes a bit of getting 
used to; but after a bit of experimentation 
you will end up with the palette of colors 
you want. 

In summary, I find DaVinci3 to be an 
enjoyable, easy-to-use and extremely af- 
fordable graphics editing program. It runs 
very well under 128K, but I would like to 
see it support more features at 512K. The 
low price is refreshing. 

(Owl-Ware, P.O. Box 116-A, Mertztown, 
PA 19539, 800-245-6228; $37.95) 

— Dan Hagarty 



1 Software 



CoCo3 



Memory — 
Test Your 
Concentration 

Think quickly — was the star in the 
upper left-hand corner? Or maybe some- 
where in the middle? Memory is a Concen- 
tration-like game in which you match pairs 
of shapes or pictures by turning over cards 
on the game screen. It runs on any CoCo 3 
with a disk drive and joystick. RGB, 
composite video and television displays 
are supported. 

Each game screen has 1 8 pairs of hid- 
den objects for the players to match. Using 
a joystick, players move the flashing cur- 
sor to the desired card. Next they press the 
joystick button to display it. This process 
is repeated to choose a second card. When 
players make a match, they earn a point 
and their turn continues. If there is no 
match, the cards are flipped over and the 
game continues with the next player. 

Memory will accommodate up to four 
players. The players enter their names on 
the screen before starting the game; each 
name is marked in a different color, which 
comes in handy later. Cards that are matched 
are framed in the player's color. 

A one-player game is also available; 
the player competes against a clock that is 
displayed at the top of the screen. In single- 
player rounds, the goal is to match all the 
objects in the least amount of time. 

At any time during a game, a player can 
press the space bar to pull down the com- 
bination Help/Menu window. The current 
player has five options. "Show" uncovers 



all the cards so the player can see what is 
under them. However, the show can't be 
undone. This is unfortunate since younger 
children would benefit from a quick "show" 
of the objects prior to play. 

"Clue" is available to players who have 
scored at least one match. When it is 
chosen, five cards are uncovered at ran- 
dom. This feature costs one point to use 
but can be advantageous in the latter por- 
tion of the game. It can help a player make 
multiple matches, 

"Help" only explains the options in the 
Help menu. It doesn't deal with game 
rules. "New" starts a new game, and "Quit" 
exits to BASIC. 

The game is hardly an original concept, 
but one of the most impressive features of 
the program is that it shows off the CoCo 
3's graphics capabilities. In the opening 
screen, for example, the programmer util- 
izes multiple colors and flashing text. A 
pull-down menu is available during the 
game. Graphics are detailed and colorful 
when viewed on an RGB monitor. All of 
the above are accomplished primarily with 
the CoCo 3's Extended BASIC. 

Documentation consists of a single folded 
page that briefly outlines game rules and 
loading instructions. Since the game is 
familiar to almost everyone, a detailed 
manual isn't necessary. 

Memory is simple and straightforward. 
A young child who has some basic shape 
discrimination skills can play with mini- 
mal direction. Although it appears to be 
most appropriate for preschool through 
second grade, adults and older children 
can easily get hooked. My 5-year-old 
daughter brought in the kitchen timer to 
make sure everyone in our family got 
equal turns using the program. 




In games such as these, familiarity can 
breed boredom in the form of repeating 
screens. Apparently the program's author 
considered this problem. Each Memory 
round is built from a pool of more than 46 
pictures, which appropriately include an 
integrated circuit chip and a rainbow (it's 
too bad the author didn't also think to 
include a picture of a CoCo). Although 
some of the shapes will reappear in each 



game, it's very unlikely that they'll be in 
the same order. 

If you're interested in a good Concen- 
tration-type game at a reasonable price, 
you'll enjoy Memory. I've reviewed three 
games of this type over the last few years, 
and this one is the best so far. 

(RAM Electronics, 814 Josephine, Monmouth, 
OR 97361, 503-838-4144; $19.95) 

— Mark Haverstock 



1 Softwar e 



CoCo 3 



VIP Writer III, 
Version 2.0 — 
Another Step 
Toward Perfection 

I should preface this review by telling 
you that I use a word processor a great deal 
in my profession. Most often I use it to 
draft legal documents, to review and edit 
the work of others and to write computer 
programs. Parents with foresight encour- 
aged me to take a typing class before I 
entered high school, and consequently I 
came to depend on my typing abilities 
throughout college and after. It was natu- 
ral, then, that word processing would be- 
come the principal use of my first personal 
computer — a 4K CoCo in May of 1982. 

A lot of word processors have been 
available in the history of the Color Com- 
puter. Tandy's original Color Scripsit ROM 
pack, with its 32-by-I6 screen format, 
fascinated me at first, but really only whet 
my appetite for word processors yet to 
come. Of all the other word processors that 
have come and gone, Telewriter and VIP 
Writer seem to be top-ranked among user 
favorites. Early versions of these programs 
broke the 32-column barrier and made 
word processing on the CoCo much more 
palatable. 

Having never used Telewriter, I can't 
comment much about it. I can say, how- 
ever, that prior to the release of Telewriter 
1 28, it seemed patches were frequently 
published to give it features that VIP Writer 
already had. The truth is I have owned and 
used VIP Writer for a number of years and 
always was and still am more than per- 
fectly satisfied with its near flawless per- 
formance. Once I became acquainted with 
its many features, I often remarked to my 
associates that VIP Writer had moved word 
processing from the realm of being a type- 
writer substitute to near-typesetting. With 
the advent of the CoCo 3 I hoped word 



132 THE RAINBOW April 1989 



processing would be taking another leap 
forward in sophistication. 

Enter VIP Writer III, Version 2. My 
wife says it doesn't take much to get me 
excited. When I received RAINBOW'S 
review package at the office in the morn- 
ing mail, I couldn't wait to get home to try 
the program out. I went to lunch alone so I 
could read the users manual uninterrupted. 
I even started thinking of excuses to cancel 
my late afternoon appointment. Common 
sense eventually prevailed on this last point 
and I stayed the day. 

When I finally got Version 2 home and 
looked at the disk's directory, my attention 
was first drawn to a configuration program 
included. This program permits you to 
alter a number of default parameters: fore- 
ground, background and cursor colors; baud 
rate; page length; top, bottom, left and 
right margins; printing to the serial or 
parallel port; linefeeds; justification; file- 
name extension; the programmable keys; 
etc. 

Being able to set all these items mini- 
mizes much of the startup ritual one goes 
through every time the word processor is 
loaded. I found it easy to make one custom 
copy of VIP Writer III for each printer or 
special job. Another new feature is the 



"work space" command. It permits 512K 
users to access nine 48K work areas in 
memory. To and from these areas, sepa- 
rate files can be saved and loaded much 
like a RAM disk. Switching between areas 
is instantaneous. 

What else is new? Well, the authors of 
Version 2 must have taken some hints 
from Lauren Willoughby 's review of VIP 
Writer III (Version 1) in the September 
1988 issue of THE RAINBOW. Version 2 
now has two save commands, one that 
saves the entire document to disk regard- 
less of cursor position within the file and 
the second that saves from the current 
cursor position to the end of the file. Also, 
the F2 key has been given the function of 
a true backspace/delete key to avoid the 
old two-step process. 

Other additions include a help menu 
that appears on boot-up; it is banished 
when you press the BREAK key to enter 
the text area. For those who confuse the 
CTRL key for the CLEAR key — which 
actually is VIP Writer's "control" key — 
you will be happy to know that CTRL now 
functions just as the CLEAR key does, 
with the exception that CTRL invokes the 
pop-up help menu. The last of the major 
additions is a command that lets you des- 



ignate whether printing will be directed to 
the serial or parallel port. 

I noticed that it has been over five years 
since VIP Writer (then known as Super 
Color Writer II) received its fine review in 
the October 1983 issue of THE RAIN- 
BOW. The reviewer, Stuart Hawkinson, 
called it ". . .one of the best word proces- 
sors available for the Color Computer, or 
any computer for that matter." I'd say Mr. 
Hawkinson' s original assessment still 
applies. However, lest I get too carried 
away with all the enhancements, potential 
first-time purchasers ought to know that 
VIP Writer III, Version 2, has almost every 
conceivable feature one could ask for in a 
word processor. There is simply not enough 
room in this review to discuss each of the 
VIP Writer's many features. It should suf- 
fice to say that I have used several $500 
word processors at my office and that VIP 
Writer outshines them all in power and 
versatility. In addition, it comes with a free 
50,000-word dictionary program for auto- 
matic spell-checking. 

I greatly appreciate programs with clearly 
written instructions and documentation. In 
this regard you'll find VIP Writer's 125- 
page tutorial a real prize and profession- 
ally packaged. It's also nice to know that if 



I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 

J 



Sol id Drive™ doesn't forqet! Built in 
battery power kicks in when you turn 
off your CoCo to keep all your files 
safe and ready for use instantly the 
next time you power-up. Unlike 
dynamic ramdisks that require lots of 
power and constant refreshing, our 
CMos static rams consume so little 
power that SolidDrive™ will retain it's 
information for years. No more 
floppy to ramdisk file copying just to 
get ready to work. If power failures 
are your problem SolidDrive™ is for 
you! The instant power loss occurs 
your valuable work is protected. 
SolidDrive™ works with OS9®, 
RSDos or can be accessed from 
machine language programs. You 
can even use part of SolidDrive™ 
from OS9 and part from RSDos. No 
matter how you use SolidDrive™ we 
think you'll be amazed at how fast it 
works. There simply isn't any faster 
long term storage device available s 
for the CoCo. SolidDrive™ is 
compatible with Multi-Pak®, or may 
be used with a "Y" cable and comes 
complete with OS9® Level l/ll device 

driver and formatter software. Available in 51 2K and 1 Megabyte versions. Factory 
upgrades available for 512K version. Also available RSDos Driver treats 
SolidDrive™ as 3 or 6 SSSD RS devices, 27C64 EProm $19.00 Includes software 
to partition SolidDrive for use by OS9® and RSDos, and Solid Boot© software to 

allow auto boot direct to OS9® 

SolidDrive™ is the fastest , 
most reliable long-term 
storage available to the 
small computer user! 

2 Year Limited 
Guarantee 




SolidDrive™ by Vidicom Corp 
51 2K (524,288 bytes) $395.00 
1 Meg (1,048,576 bytes) $695.00 
Please add $4.00 shipping 
Arizona Residents add 5.5% Sales tax 
Visa MasterCard orders welcome 



VidlCOm Corp 20 E. Main St. a Suite 710 

Mesa, AZ 85201 (602) 827-0107 
^ours M-F 9:00 am - 5:00 pm MST 



OS9 is the trademark of 
Microware Systems Inc 
and Motorola Inc. Mufti- 
pak is the trademark of 
Tandy Corp. 







RAINBOW 








EVEN IF YOU DON'T HAVE A 

HARD DISK 

YOU CAN STILL SUPERCHARGE YOUR COCO 1,2, OR 3 WITH 

RGB-DOS(HD) 

HERE ARE JUST SOME OF THE FEATURES OF RGB-DOS(HD): 

* FULLY COMPATIBLE WITH RS-DOS 

* WILL RUN TWO HARD DISK DRIVES 

* WILL AUTO-EXECUTE ANY PROGRAM 

* FULL SCREEN DIRECTORY DISPLAY 

* ELECTRONIC DISK LABELING 

* IMPROVED "COPY" COMMAND 

* "RUNM" COMMAND FOR M/L PROGRAMS 

* ...AND MUCH MUCH MORE! 

RGB-DOS(HD) COMBINES ALL THESE FEATURES WITH THE 
ABILITY TO RUN ANY SIZE HARD DISK DRIVE IN BASIC! 

DO YOUR COCO A FAVOR- SUPERCHARGE IT WITH RGB-DOS! 

System Disk with User's Manual $29.95 

-Oh R 

SYSTEMS 






294 STILLWELL AVE 
KENMORE, N Y 14217 



(716) 876-7538 





April 1989 THE RAINBOW 133 



your interests go beyond word processing, 
VIP Writer is part of an integrated library. 
For a lot of people, it's quite possible that 
the library may be as complete a software 
package as they'll ever need! 

(SD Enterprises, P.O. Box 1233, Gresham, 
OR 97030, 503-663-2865; $79.95) 

— Ernest Zore 

1 Software CoCo3 1 

Simply Better — 
The Most Bang 
for Your Buck 

At one point or another, most Color 
Computer users develop a need or desire to 
do word processing with their computers. 
Unfortunately, when the time comes to 
purchase the software, many of us go into 
the process unarmed. We know only that 
we want to be able to type text into the 
computer and have it printed on paper. 
And, of course, we are looking for a good 
deal. So, we often choose the least expen- 
sive package on the market. And we end 
up cursing that day. Well, times are 
changing! Simply Better, the newest entry 
in the vast array of Color Computer word 
processors, is an excellent choice at an 
unbelievable price. 

For those who have been a part of the 
CoCo Community for some time, Simply 
Better will seem to be a variation on VIP 
Writer III. In fact, many of the commands 
work identically. For these people, the 
transition will be natural. For those who 
have never seen VIP Writer, this system 
contains all the features necessary to pro- 
duce text quickly, efficiently and profes- 
sionally. 

Simply Better is a complete word proc- 
essing system for the Color Computer 3. It 
comes on a nonprotected disk and includes 
a comprehensive manual. Written entirely 
in machine language, the program is fast. 
1 consider the super low price to be plenty 
of protection. And with the support of- 
fered, it would be foolish not to purchase 
and register the package legally. The sys- 
tem offers a total buffer size of 472K and, 
through the use of a window, features 
optional print spooling. In addition to stan- 
dard full-screen editing abilities, this sys- 
tem allows you to create a table of contents 
or index for your text on the fly. It includes 
mail-merge capability and even allows 
editing of multiple documents. Let's dig in 
a little deeper. 

Simply Better is command-driven. By 
this I mean you enter commands rather 



than select options from a menu to tell the 
system what you want it to do. Some 
people do not like a command-driven 
operating environment; in the case of word 
processors I prefer it. 

There are two major modes of program 
operation. In the Command mode, you can 
enter abbreviated commands to control 
the system: save files, load files, alter 
parameters, etc. For the most part you will 
use the Command mode for disk I/O and to 
alter the text format, onscreen and printed. 
Of course, the Text mode is where you will 
spend most of your time with Simply Bet- 
ter. This is where you enter and edit your 
text, and the capabilities of the system 
really shine. In this mode, commands are 
entered, or initiated, by pressing control 
and function key combinations. Exten- 
sions of the Text mode are the Window 
mode and View mode. In the Window 
mode, you essentially have two identical 
word processors on the screen at one time. 
The View mode (just press CTRL-V) shows 
you onscreen pretty much how your text 
will look when printed, including margins, 
fonts and page breaks. 

Simply Better allows the definition of 
up to five different printed fonts. These 
might include condensed, italic, bold, 
elongated or any other font supported by 
your printer. The definitions can be changed 
at any time. Obviously, in the interest of 
saving memory and increasing speed, these 
fonts do not appear on the screen. In other 
words, when you select italics, your text 
onscreen won't appear in italics. Instead, 
each font can be set to show in your choice 
of screen colors (foreground and back- 
ground) to make it easier to tell them apart. 
Because the hardware uses 40- and 80- 
column screens (built into the GIME chip), 
cursor movement through the text is very 
rapid. In addition to the defined fonts, the 
system offers underlining, which does appear 
properly on the screen. On the flip side, 
Simply Better features a "Clean" com- 
mand that will quickly remove all print 
font and underline markers from your text. 

To gain access to other features specific 
to your printer, Simply Better allows 
embedded control codes. This gives you 
complete control over your hardware in- 
stead of limiting you to the five defined 
fonts. I like the way this feature is handled. 
First, you enter a "begin printer codes" 
marker. Then, using the ALT key for val- 
ues from 1 to 31, you enter the ASCII 
characters for the control code you want to 
send. For example, to send the escape 
character you would just press ALT-1. 
Finally, you'd close the code with the "end 
printer codes" marker. When the file is 
printed, the printer will accept the control 
codes and print the text accordingly. 



Items in your text can be sorted alpha- 
betically using Simply Better's Sort com- 
mand. You place a Sort marker (press Fl 
followed by S) by each item you want 
sorted and press CTRL-S. Voila! And the 
sort is designed in such a way that any font 
designation for a given item stays with that 
item throughout. 

Block manipulation is a breeze on Simply 
Better. And the system supports over 79,000 
blocks on a 5 12K CoCo 3! This should be 
enough for most applications (I know 
somebody will disagree). You can copy, 
delete, move, sort, save and load blocks of 
text. More important for me is the ability 
to copy blocks of text from one window to 
the other. Let's take a closer look at Simply 
Better's multi-document abilities. 

Simply Better uses a dual buffer sys- 
tem; the primary text buffer is where you 
normally enter your text. However, by 
jumping to the Command mode and enter- 
ing WINDOW, you open the alternate text 
buffer. This creates two windows for text 
editing, both of which are visible onscreen. 
The alternate window appears beneath the 
primary window, and you have control 
over just how big each window is in rela- 
tion to the other. Each window can have a 
different text file in it. To move from one 
window to the other, just press the CLEAR 
key (as in OS-9). I particularly like this 
feature. It allows me to refer to one docu- 
ment while editing a second. It also allows 
me to copy blocks of text from one to the 
other. This is also the means by which 
Simply Better offers print spooling. Start 
printing from one window, press CLEAR 
and edit another file in the other window. 
The window feature is a writer's dream 
come true. 

One thing I have always found tedious 
in writing is the creation of a table of 
contents and an index. Simply Better does 
these things on the fly by providing the 
user with index and table of contents 
markers. After you print the text, you will 
find the newly created table of contents or 
the new index at the end of the file in your 
buffer. These tables can then be edited as 
you see fit and placed at the beginning of 
your text. 

Because of memory requirements, both 
of these features cannot be used simulta- 
neously. Yet I find the method suggested 
in the manual for using these features to 
work best in the long run. You enter your 
text and save it without any such markers, 
then go through and place the contents 
markers (just press Fl then T) and create 
that table. Once finished, save the table by 
itself. Now, reload the file, create the 
index (this time use Fl and I for the mark- 
ers) and save it. All that remains is to load 
the original file and append the constants 



1 34 THE RAINBOW April 1 989 



and index pages to it. 

Anyone who completes forms on a 
regular basis will appreciate Simply Bet- 
ter's print-fill feature, which lets you cre- 
ate a computerized copy of the form and 
save it. To print an actual form, load your 
printer with the preprinted form, fill in the 
blanks on the screen and print. Only the 
information necessary will be printed, and 
you will have a crisp, neat printed form. 
This feature eliminates most of the guess- 
work in using a computer for pre-printed 
forms, and it makes the typewriter unnec- 
essary. 

To round out clerical work, Simply Bet- 
ter can be used for mail merging, which is 
a great way to make fast work of form 
letters and the like. First, you create a file 
containing a list of the information to be 
included in the merge (a set of addresses, 
for example). Then you write your form 
letter and append the list to the end. A few 
quick keystrokes are all that's needed. 
And the information file can be updated as 
necessary. 

Another powerful feature is the inclu- 
sion of tasks (macros). A task is an often- 
repeated series of keystrokes that's been 
reduced down to a one-keystroke combi- 
nation. For example, let's say you have a 
table of numbers, each with a leading zero 
in screen Column 4. To delete this charac- 
ter from 25 successive lines, you would 
have to move to that position on each line 
and then delete the character. But you 
could program a task with the same key- 
strokes it takes you to manually delete the 
zero in one line, then tell the system on 
how many lines you want this same task 
performed. Press CTRL and the number 
key assigned to your task, and your work 
will be done for you. We all know the 
computer can do our work much faster if 
we let it. And what I've just described is 
only a small example of what tasks can do. 
Simply Better allows for up to 10 simulta- 
neous tasks, and each task can be altered at 
your discretion. The tasks are very easy to 
create and use, and you can even save 
them to disk for use during later editing 
sessions. 

Another handy item is the "next num- 
ber out" feature. You can use this to create 
numbered lists in a flash. Just use the 
Number command to set up the starting 
number and increment (or decrement, if 
you wish). Then, when you press CTRL- 
N, the software will generate the starting 
number. A second press of CTRL-N pro- 
duces the next number in the series, based 
on the chosen increment. Just keep press- 
ing CTRL-N (or use SHIFT-®, Simply 
Better's function-repeat keys) and you'll 
get successive numbers on the screen. This 
is great for writing B ASIC programs using 



a word processor. And it has 101 other 
uses, too. Combined with the power of 
tasks, it is easy to produce checklists of 
nearly any length. 

Other more standard features include 
complete control of justification (left, right, 
center or both), headers and footers, auxil- 
iary text lines and pagination. Not so stan- 
dard is the "insert page number" command 
that causes the current page number, 
whatever it might be, to be printed any- 
where in your text. 

Simply Better is designed with customi- 
zation in mind. Once the main program is 
loaded, you have the option of overlaying 
the parameters section with a configura- 
tion file. Included are files for green screen 
and amber screen monochrome monitors 
as well as one for RGB monitors. And by 
running the included CONFIG program, 
you can create your own custom setup. 
Upon running CONFIG, you are greeted 
with a screen that allows you to select the 
startup size for the primary and alternate 
buffers on 1 28K and 5 1 2K machines. You 
can also select screen width, the number of 
tracks per disk, word wrap on or off, verify 
on or off, whether the program starts in the 
insert or overstrike mode and more. The 
second page of CONFIG lets you custom- 
ize the print fonts for your printer. This is 
also where you choose the foreground and 
background colors for how these fonts will 
appear on the screen. The final page of 
CONFIG lets you determine default para- 
meters for justification, pagination, head- 
ers and footers, margins and much more. 
Of course, any defaults can be changed 
quickly during actual editing, as well. 

The 138-page manual accompanying 
Simply Better is well-written and liberally 
sprinkled with excellent examples of how 
each feature is used. Once you have some 
understanding, you can call up help screens 
in any mode to give you that last nudge 
during editing. It is obvious every care was 
taken to make sure this package is com- 
plete. For example, the system uses beeps 
to alert the user that input is required or 
that an error has occurred. For the hearing- 
impaired, Simply Better includes an "eyes" 
option that flashes the screen border in- 
stead of beeping. The flash is very notice- 
able, even from across the room. This 
option is just one of many useful and 
thoughtful touches by the author, Dale 
Rickert. 

In addition, Mr. Rickert is starting a 
newsletter to support the system. This 
publication is intended as a medium for 
Simply Better users to help each other by 
providing hints, tips, fixes and other useful 
information about the software. I applaud 
Simply Better Software for its complete 
support of its fine product. 



Simply Better includes other features 
too numerous to be described in depth 
here. The system does more than most 
people will ever want. But it is really nice 
to have the capabilities available when 
you do need them. The features don't get 
in the way or make the program difficult to 
use. The program is easy to use and, in my 
estimation, rates high in efficiency and 
productivity. At $29.95 for the complete 
package, I don't believe you can get a 
bigger or better bang for your buck any- 
where else. 

(Simply Better Software, P.O. Box 20726, 
Portland, OR 97220, 503-254-7225; $29.95: 
First product review for this company ap- 
pearing in THE RAINBOW.) 

— Cray Augsburg 



1 Softwar e 



CoCo3 



Space Intruders- 
A Space Invasion 

For anyone out there who has never 
played a Space Invaders-type game, it 
goes like this: You command a laser sta- 
tion that moves horizontally along the 
bottom of the screen. Above your gun are 
four bunkers that serve as protection. Above 
these bunkers are five rows of aliens. The 
object of the game is to prevent the "in- 
truders" from landing. You accomplish 
this by blasting them as they move back 
and forth across the screen. 

Space Intruders is a classic Space In- 
vaders game for your Color Computer 3. It 
works with both RGB (including Euro- 
pean 50 Hz RGB) and composite moni- 
tors, and can be played with either a joy- 
stick or the keyboard. 



It ISM SCG*et HIM 



A A A A A A A A 
AAAAAAAAA 

99 9]9 99 99 99 

* mm 

"^^n 11 j 1 1 n i. ■ jjiraiiimtiuu»mii. rr i vb. in mm i ii »ii 



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The game comes on a tape or copy- 
protected disk with a four-page manual, 
which really provides all anyone needs to 
know to play the game. The graphics are 
excellent. The bunkers and creatures are 
shaded to give a pleasing three-dimen- 
sional look, and the gun barrel recoils 
when it fires. The game also maintains a 



April 1989 THE RAINBOW 135 



list of high scores during play (but doesn't 
save them on disk). When it's not being 
played, the game alternates between the 
title screen and a demo mode. 

Game Point Software offers free re- 
placement during the first 90 days and 
charges only $3.50 thereafter. Although 
copy protection is really annoying, you 
don't have to worry about wiping out your 
game disk, because replacements are easy 
to obtain. 

If you like Space Invaders, Space In- 
truders is a must. The graphics and music 
easily match the best you'd find in an 
arcade hall. 

(Game Point Software, P.O. Box 6907, Bur- 
bank, CA 91510, 818-566-3571; $24.95 plus 
$3 S/H) 

— Robert Marsa 



1 Softwar e 

Ghost Hunters — 
Ugly surprises for 
the Faint of Heart 

Here we go again, just like in the horror 
movies. Doctor Blankman and four of his 
associates (two men, two women), are 
wandering about in a ramshackle old place 
that would give Dracula the creeps. Do 
they have a platoon of Army Rangers or 
the L.A. SWAT Team with them? No, no, 
no. They're going to rely on themselves. 
As a consequence, they are going to en- 
counter numerous ugly surprises as they 
plow through ankle-deep dust and brush 
cobwebs as big as fishing nets out of the 
way. Some of them will not survive the 
experience. 

I happen to hate ugly surprises. 
SPORTSware's latest disk-based game for 
the CoCo 3, Ghost Hunters, is full of them 
— part of the design, old chap. 

This is a stand-alone game, independ- 
ent of SPORTS ware 's War game Designer 
system (see my review in the August '88 
RAINBOW, Page 126). However, since 
Americans love to fiddle with and adjust 
things, you could also consider it "priming 
the pump," making you want to buy War- 
game Designer, After all, most of us are 
like Oscar Wilde: "I can resist everything 
except temptation." Especially us CoCo- 
nuts. 

Ghost Hunters is excellent as a stand- 
alone for the non-fiddlers. There are five 
of you attempting to save the planet from 
demonic possession and enslavement. All 
you have to do is collect four plasma 
disruptors from various parts of the old 



Steadman place and use them to close the 
portal — to the Abyss. What could be 
more straightforward? 

Think again, Poopsie. The old Stead- 
man place (the game presents a side view 
of the four-story house) is overrun with 
ugly surprises such as skull-and-crossbones 
symbols, specters that look like rabid rock 
stars, green spiders with red legs, and other 
assorted hostile spirits. I mean, these things 
are ug-L7. You can tell that because of the 
superb graphics, which are especially bril- 
liant on an RGB monitor. They are also 
nice on a color TV, but refer to the quota- 
tion above about temptation. In fact, after 
reviewing War game Designer last year, I 
bought an RGB monitor. 

You don't see the ghosties and beasties 
and things that go scritch in the night until 
they're right on top of you. Oh, sure, you 
get quick flashes of the demonic reserves 
now and then, but all ghostly movement is 
hidden (unless you cheat by pressing a 
shifted 3 during the combat phase). During 
the ghosts' movement phase, you can hear 
little sly "scritch" noises, like what small, 
sharp claws might make on a chalkboard. 
That's followed by a slight "tink," like 
cheap glass being tapped. I don't know 
what that means, but it doesn't sound good. 

Although the game is designed for one 
player, it does have a two-player option. 
There's also a game save capability, and 
it's not a bad idea to take advantage of it 
every once in a while. That way you don't 
have to start from scritch every time you 
get overwhelmed by the spirits. The four 
pages of instructions also say to stick to- 
gether so that the demons can't chip away 
at your strength. Heed the warning! Once 
I forgot to pick up one of the plasma 
disruptors and sent poor old Dr. Aggon 
(he's the one that looks like Joe Stalin) 
back after it. He never made it. After being 
attacked by three or four demons he just 
disappeared. Pity; he was always a lot of 
fun on May Day. 

Also, watch your route from one plasma 
disruptor to another. The brown trapdoor 
things can be opened, as can the doors (at 
a cost to your movement points), but other 
holes can't be used. This complicates things, 
especially when you see brief (brief!) flashes 
of the spirits' reserves and you may have to 
fight your way through them. With prac- 
tice, you'll also figure out how to move 
your people without one blocking another's 
path. Until then they'll tend to jam up in 
doorways, which just makes the leading 
one that much more vulnerable to getting 
attacked by several demons at once. 

Ghost Hunters is a fun game, one in 
which you not only get to use some tactics 
but also to exercise some planning. It's not 
easily mastered, so for $ 15 it's a good buy. 



And in case you either already have War- 
game Designer, or decide to buy it, the 
instructions have specific and easy-to-read 
steps to add the basic (pun intended) Ghost 
Hunters "do it yourself modification 
programs. 

(SPORTSware, 1251 S. Reynolds Road, Suite 
414, Toledo, OH 43615; 419-389-1515; $15) 

— John M. Hebert 



1 H ardwar e 1 

TelePak— 

A Replacement 

for the RS-232 Pak 

The CoCo market is amazing. No sooner 
does one product or supplier disappear 
when another steps in to take its place. 
That's the way it is with Orion Technolo- 
gies and its products, TelePak and Tele- 
Pak*. Tandy dropped the Deluxe RS-232 
Program Pak some time ago. Most Radio 
Shacks no longer stock this item. Yet it's 
necessary for reliable serial communica- 
tion — especially when speeds exceed 300 
or 1 200 baud. The two versions of TelePak 
serve as a replacement for the Tandy Pak. 
One is essentially a functional duplicate of 
the original; the other adds a power supply 
to the cartridge. Neither has the internal 
ROM-based communications program; but 
since it was really useless, that's no loss. 

The only difference between the two 
versions of TelePak is in the power re- 
quirements. The TelePak uses the 12-volt 
power supplies built into the original CoCo 
1 and all Multi-Paks. The TelePak+ can be 
used with any CoCo because it has voltage 
converter circuitry built in. Each version 
comes in a case that is the same size as 
Tandy's newer disk drive controllers. In 
addition to the Pak itself, Orion includes a 
minimal, but adequate, manual. The man- 
ual includes wiring diagrams for connect- 
ing TelePak to other RS-232 devices and 
to a null-modem adapter. It also contains 
programming information for the hard- 
ware registers. This information is com- 
plete and correct, but rather sparse. 

A device such as this either works cor- 
rectly or it doesn't. TelePak works exactly 
as it was designed to work. I tested it with 
several communications programs using a 
modem at 1200 baud and using a direct, 
null-modem connection to another com- 
puter at speeds up to 19,200 baud. It worked 
exactly the way the original Tandy unit 
worked. Orion claims compatibility with 
Autoterm, XTerm, The Wiz, V-Term, 
Mikeyterm, Greg-E-Term, Rickeyterm and 



136 THE RAINBOW April 1989 



Ultimaterm, 1 have no reason to doubt 
these claims. My tests were done using 
Kermit, XCom-9, Datapak //+ and a pro- 
gram of my own. 

Construction of the TelePak is clean 
and solid. There is little more to say about 
the device. It doesn't require any special 
programming because it duplicates all the 
functions of the Tandy Pak. 

Orion warrants the equipment for 30 
days. After that time, it will repair or 
replace defective equipment for a reason- 
able fee for up to six months after pur- 
chase. If you are in the market for an RS- 
232 pack, TelePak is one of few choices. 
It's fortunate that Orion chose to produce 
this device and did the job right. The 
equipment is solid and performs well, the 
manual is adequate and correct, the war- 
ranty is good, and the price is reasonable. 
What more could we ask for? I, for one, am 
looking forward to seeing more of Orion's 
offerings. 

(Orion Technologies, P.O. Box 63196, Wich- 
ita, KS 67203, 316-946-0440; $44.95 for 
TelePak, $49.95 for Te!ePak+, $3 for S/H: 
First product review for this company ap- 
pearing in THE RAINBOW.) 

— Donald L. McGarry 




CoCo3 



Picture Puzzles- 
A New Twist 
to an Old Favorite 

When I was a kid, almost every Christ- 
mas I would get one of those little puzzles 
in my stocking — the kind with 1 5 num- 
bered tiles arranged in a four-by-four grid 
(one tile missing). With the tiles thor- 
oughly scrambled, the object was to slide 
them around and restore them to the proper 
numeric sequence. 

Picture Puzzles, a program from JR & 
JR Softstuff for the Color Computer 3, is 
very similar in concept, except that it uses 
a six-by-six grid. And instead of numbers, 
the "tiles" are pieces of a graphic design. 
The arrow keys are used to slide the puzzle 
pieces around on the screen in order to 
reassemble the picture in its original form. 
If what I have described so far does not 
have you clamoring to order this program, 
I certainly understand. When I opened my 
review package and looked at the docu- 
mentation, I wasn't exactly thrilled either. 
I confess I didn't even bother to verify that 
I could load the program for two days after 
receiving it. When I did decide to do so, I 



figured I would spend 10 or 15 minutes 
with the thing, and then ignore it for a few 
days until I felt ready to deal with a boring 
program. 

Four-and-a-half hours later it was 2 
a.m., and I reluctantly realized I should 
stop playing Picture Puzzles and go to bed 
before it was time to get up. 

The following night I set out to write 
my review, reasoning that I had doubtless 
spent enough time with the program to 
proceed with the real task at hand. Some- 
how, my "one more game" stretched into 
several hours, and I did not get anything 
written. A similar thing happened the next 
night. And the next. 

Tonight, though, through astonishing 
self-discipline, I managed to put Picture 
Puzzles aside after a mere 30 minutes, 
leaving ample time to get my thoughts 
down on paper — or rather, onscreen. As 
you may have noticed, I found Picture 
Puzzles to be quite addictive! 

On startup it asks you what type of 
monitor you have (RGB or composite) and 
then presents a menu of 10 different puzzles, 
including circles, squares, stars and "ab- 
stracts." After you select a puzzle, another 
menu is displayed, which allows you to 
select which of the three modes of play 
you want to use. 

In the first play mode, you set a time 
limit (from one to 15 minutes) for solving 
the puzzle. I got toasted in this mode every 
time, and abandoned it after the first night. 

Mode 2 enables you to set a move limit, 
from 100 to 1000, in steps of 25. I did 
better here, but found it so agonizing to 
make 1 000 moves and then lose that I gave 
up on this one, too. 

The third mode is for me. It gives you 
limitless play, and simply counts the number 
of moves you take to solve the puzzle. My 
best effort was 317 moves for the square. 
One of the abstracts was my worst neme- 
sis. I don't recall precisely the number of 
moves I needed, but it exceeded my best 
score by more than a factor of 10! 

Once you enter the desired mode, the 
puzzle is displayed. Pressing ENTER 
scrambles the picture, and you are under 
way. Reassembling the puzzle is not easy, 
but you can ask for help as often as you 
like. When you do, the program highlights 
the next tile to be positioned, assuming 
you are assembling them from left to right, 
beginning with the upper-left tile. If you 
are not using this approach, the Help func- 
tion is not nearly as useful. There is also a 
penalty for asking for help. In a timed 
game (Mode 1), asking for help costs 10 
seconds and in the other two modes adds 
25 moves to your total. 

In addition to the help function, a swap 
command can be used once per puzzle to 



interchange the position of two adjacent 
tiles. It is usually possible, with some 
determined manipulation, to complete the 
puzzle without using this feature; being 
notoriously stubborn about such things, I 
made it a rule not to use it at all. On that 
one abstract, though, I finally resorted to a 
swap after more than 3200 moves. I might 
still be working on it if I hadn't! 




Should you totally lose hope, the Re- 
store command puts the puzzle back to- 
gether again and returns you to the main 
menu. 

In addition to being oodles of fun, Pic- 
ture Puzzles is an exemplary bit of pro- 
gramming. The puzzles are bright and 
colorful, and with 10 to choose from there 
is sufficient variety to keep the game from 
getting repetitive. The movement of the 
tiles is smooth, and they do not move 
either so quickly or so slowly as to be 
distracting. The sound effects are well- 
blended. The noise of a sliding tile can be 
turned off, but it's one of those "appropri- 
ate" sounds, and I never felt inclined to 
squelch it. The "hoopla" when you solve a 
puzzle is sufficiently gratifying without 
forcing you to sit through a long reward 
sequence. 



If you own Telewriter, VIP 
Writer, Word Power, or 
Textpro, you can upgrade to 
Max-10for only $49.95 
Send proof of purchase (first 
page of original manual or 
original disk) with your 
order for this special offer. 
Be amazed or your money back. 

See big ad on page 19 for ordering info. 

VIP Writer. Telewriter. Textpro and Word Power are 
trademarks of SO Enterprises. Cognitec. Cer-Comp. 
and Mlcrocom Software, respectively. 



C0L0RWARE 

242-W West Avenue 
Darien, CT 06820 



( 203) 656-1806 

fcOLORWARE 



April 1989 THE RAINBOW 137 



The documentation for this package is 
very clear and complete, and it even in- 
cludes screen dumps of all the puzzles 
should you need additional help in solving 
them. The disk is non-protected and car- 
ries a one-year warranty against defects. 

The only annoying facet of Picture 
Puzzles is the lack of a joystick interface. 
After several hours of using arrow keys, I 
found myself wishing I could lean back in 
my chair, prop my feet up on my desk, and 
push tiles with a joystick for a while. 
Instead, I went to bed. Hmmm, maybe 
what we have here is just a built-in safety 
feature! 

Picture Puzzles is a quality package 
that provides many hours of simple yet 
challenging fun. If you are looking for yet 
another reason to spend hours glued to 
your CoCo, look no further! As for me, I'm 
finished with this review, and it's only a 
few minutes past midnight — plenty of 
time for one or two more games.... 

(JR & JR Softstuff, P.O. Box 118, Lompoc, 
CA 93438, 805-735-3889; $19.95 + $3 S/H) 

— Jim K. Issel 



1 Softwar e 



CoCo3&OS-9 Level II 



Ironsides and 
Crimson Sails- 
Fire a Broadside 
at the Enemy 

It is a quiet, sunny day in Sao Luis. The 
harbor is waking to morning activities; the 
ships creak quietly at anchor. Suddenly, a 
lookout from the top of a mast calls out, 
"Crimson Sails, Crimson Sails!" 

Bleary-eyed Commander of the Sao 
Luis Fleet, you step from your cabin and 
squint out into the morning haze past the 
island's rocky outcrops. There! Out past 
the breakers! No less then 1 1 four-masters 
are poised for attack! Rubbing the sleep 
from your eyes, you shout for the quarter- 
master to sound the alarm as you hurry to 
prepare for the battle that will determine 
the fate of Sao Luis. 

Ironsides and Crimson Sails from Soft- 
war Technologies is a two-player game for 
the 5 1 2K Color Computer 3 running OS-9 
Level II. Each player assumes the role of 
commander — one player commands the 
fleet of attacking crimson ships, and the 
other commands a defending black fleet of 
ships. If yours are the crimson ships, your 
goal is to occupy the home port being 
defended by the black ships. If you are 



heading the black ships, or "Ironsides," it 
is your job to sink all of the Crimson Sails. 
It is possible to tie the game: Each oppo- 
nent may be able sink all of the other's 
ships. 

Single players can attempt to play the 
game for both sides, but this would be for 
practice only to learn the strategy of the 
game. There are several nice features. 
Ironsides and Crimson Sails has context- 
sensitive help windows that pop up if you 
press the wrong key. There is also online 
help available that lists complete game 
rules and commands at the press of the 
question mark (?) key. A game save and 
load feature also is available from any- 
where in the game. It's a good idea to print 
out the help file so that you can have a hard 
copy of the directions, because the only 
"hard-copy" instructions that come with 
the game consist of a single page on load- 
ing and setting up. 

Most of the setup is automated, so you 
really don't need to know anything about 
OS-9 to run Ironsides. Just follow the 
directions on the sheet, and you shouldn't 
encounter any problems. A note of caution 
— after the game loads and displays its 
banner screen, the display will become 
blank and y ou ' 11 hear beeping for about 1 5 
seconds while the game is initialized. This 
is normal, and in a few seconds the de- 
scription of the battle will appear, and then 
play begins. RGB monitor users, remem- 
ber to set MONTYPE RGB or you will get 
false colors on the screen. 

Ironsides and Crimson Sails comes with 
five completely different naval battle sce- 
narios, and five different maps, as well. 
This game will not overwhelm you with 
dazzling graphics. While the map setup is 
crisp and clear, particularly on an RGB 
monitor, it has limited, non-animated 
graphic representations of a map screen 
with the red and black ships on it. The 
sound is limited to a soft beep when the 
game loads and initializes and when a key 
is pressed. The action is limited to ships 
traveling in a straight line, sails disappear- 
ing, (each ship has four initially, which are 
lost by combat, storms, serpents or rocks) 
a storm moving through, and serpents 
squirming around. This is a strategy game 
first and foremost. In spite of the limited 
graphics and sound, the game is engaging, 
and can be very challenging and absorb- 
ing. It can get downright exciting from 
time to time if you have a challenging 
opponent. 

In addition to the five scenarios that 
accompany Ironsides and Crimson Sails, 
Softwar Technologies is also offering 
scenario disks. The disks cost $8.95 each, 
and each contain eight additional scenar- 
ios. Currently being offered are Greek and 



Roman Sea Conflicts, Battles of the British 
Fleet, American Sea Battles 1775-1895, 
Sea Battles of the Civil War and mythical 
and fantasy-based battles. Each battle has 
its own descriptive page to set the stage for 
the given battle. Each battle involves 
completely different situations and requires 
completely different strategies. The game 
play is straightforward, but the strategy 
can be difficult to master. All in all, Iron- 
sides and Crimson Sails gives a good basic 
simulation of combat between sailing 
vessels. At $8.95 it is an excellent value. 

(Softwar Technologies, Ameritrust Build- 
ing, 17140 Lorain Avenue, Cleveland, OH 
44111, 216-251-8085; $8.95: First product 
review for this company appearing in THE 
RAINBOW.) 

— Jeffrey S. Parker 



1 Softwar e 



CoCo 1 , 2 & 3 



Tetris- 
From Russia, 
With Love 

Put down your weapons! Tetris, the 
"Soviet Challenge," is a non-violent, chal- 
lenging game of strategy and skill that so 
far just might be the best thing to come out 
of glasnost. Yes, it originated in Russia, 
invented by computer researcher Alexi 
Paszitnov and programmed by student 
Vagim Gerasimov. From their computers 
to your CoCo it has gone through five 
companies — one Soviet, one British and 
three American. Plug the cartridge into 
your 32K or greater CoCo — you don't 
need a disk drive for this one — and let's 
go! 



fP#M- £jdrttMu- 
nists were 




to take over the 
world (at least in 
the software field ), 
they succeeded with 
Tetris . It is very ad- 
dictive." 



Tetris at first seems ridiculously simple, 
but its complexity will amaze you. It is an 
addictive "thinkers" game that will stretch 
your spacial abilities. You cannot "win" at 



138 THE RAINBOW April 1989 



Tetris, for the game has no ending — it just 
keeps going for as long as you can keep up. 

On the game screen there is a rectangu- 
lar black "pit." Pieces composed of four 
blocks (tetra meaning "four") fall from the 
top of the screen into the pit. It is your job 
to fill it with these symmetrical and asym- 
metrical pieces in such a way that you 
create solid rows, leaving no gaps: You 
can move the pieces left and right and 
r6tate them in 90-degree increments. When 
you have formed a solid row, that row 
disappears, and the unfinished row above 
drops to fill its place. If you let the pieces 
pile up all the way to the top of the screen, 
the game is over. 

As long as you can keep filling rows, 
the pieces will keep dropping. But the 
better you get, the faster they fall. Your 
score is based on how many pieces fall into 
the pit and how many lines are cleared. So, 
of course, the strategy is to keep clearing 
out the blocks at the bottom so that there is 
room for more to fall. You must plan your 
strategy ahead — making the best possible 
move for the moment may not be the best 
in the long run. After the title screen (and 
between games) there is a demo that's 
truly fascinating, even hypnotic! It's in- 
structional, too; beginners would do well 
to study the technique. 



Tetris actually comes in two versions, 
both of which are included in the ROM 
pack: one for 32K CoCos 1 and 2, and one 
for the CoCo 3. It knows what kind of 
CoCo it's been plugged into. For the CoCo 
3 there is an RGB/composite option. User 
interaction is via the keyboard or a joy- 
stick, but the joystick operation is awk- 
ward. There are 10 skill levels, which are 
based on speed. With keyboard operation, 
the J and L keys are used to move pieces 
left and right, and the K key is for rotation. 
Both the comma (,) key and the space bar 
can be used to drop a piece if you're in a 
hurry. The arrow keys can also be used for 
the J, K, L and comma pieces. If you're in 
a really big hurry, pressing the I key will 
advance you to the next higher (faster) 
level. Levels under 5 are rather slow, but 
Level 9 really whizzes! If the phone rings, 
press the BREAK key to pause. 

CoCo 3 users have extra options in that 
they can call up a help menu and statistic 
and level displays. One option any CoCo 
user can take advantage of is the "Next" 
feature. "Next" will display the next piece 
to fall, before it's on the screen. This gives 
you a little time to plan your strategy, but 
the down side is that it also affects scoring 
— negatively. 

Tetris is a fun game that a single player 



or the whole family should enjoy and 
consider well worth having. Actually, it's 
a good game to teach children shape per- 
ception as well as coordination. 




If the Communists were plotting to take 
over the world (at least in the software 
field), they succeeded with Tetris. It is 
very addictive. So just make very, very 
sure, if you buy Tetris, that you have 
nothing better to do, that your job is not 
tied in any way to national security, that 
you don't have to eat or sleep..,. 

(Spectrum HoloByte, dist. by the Tandy 
Corporation, 1700 One Tandy Center, Fort 
Worth, TX 76102; $29.95: Available in Radio 
Shack stores nationwide.) 

— Audrey DeLisle 



TOTHI AN 
SOF THflRE 

^ — 3 ' 



BASIC UTILITY DISKETTE 

A real time saver for the person who develops 
software using COCO Basic. 

— DUMPDIR: Prints a hard copy of a disk's 
directory. No more searching one disk after 
another looking for a lost file. 

— DUMPCRT: Copies text from the screen to the 
printer. Versions included for 40 and 80 column 
COCO 3 text screens. 

— DUMPFILE: Dumps any disk file to the printer. 
Printout can be in either decimal or in hex values. 

— CROSSREF: Prints cross reference of source 
and destination line numbers for basic jump 
instructions (GOTO, GOSUB, etc.). 

— COMPARE: Reads two BASIC Programs from 
diskette and compares them line by line. Lists all 
lines that are not identical. 

Requires COCO 2 or 3, disk and printer. 
Order at $19.95 plus $2 p&h. 
Calif, residents add $1.20 tax. 

T.E.M. of California Uf\v\ 

Box 4311 RAINBOW 

_ .. - - mr% . CERTIFICATION 

Fullerton, CA 92634-4311 seal 



THIS 18 ONE OF 
OUR CUSTOMERS. 

AND THIS IS NOT. 

WRITE US AND ASK THAT 
YOUR NAME BE PLACED ON 
OUR FREE NAILING LIST. 
NO OBLIGATION. 



TOTHI AN SOFTWARE, INC. 

BOX 663 
RIHERSBURG, PA. 16248 



(SINCE 1985> 



April 1989 THE RAINBOW 139 



1 Software 

Rupert Rythym — 
Tap, Tap, Do-Do-Do- 
Do Bop Bap Hey! 

Imagine waking up one morning to find 
that the scheming manager of Music Box 
Records has stolen all your original musi- 
cal manuscripts and plans to release your 
songs under his name! You must get your 
manuscripts back, but this means entering 
the Music Box Records building after hours 
and searching all the rooms. Sound easy? 
It would be a snap, crackle and pop if it 
weren't for the building's night-time staff 
of roaming security robots, eternally vig- 
ilant and ever ready to put a swift end to an 
honest intruder's quest. And then there are 
all those crazy elevators.... 




A musician's life is not an easy one in 
Rupert Rythym, an arcade-style action game 
for one player. (Yes, Rythym. The pro- 
grammer, Nickolas Marentes, is an Aussie; 
apparently that's the way they spell the 
word Down Under.) To play you'll need a 
CoCo 3 with a disk drive and a joystick 
(you'll definitely want to use a joystick 
rather than a mouse). Rupert Rythym can 
easily be configured for a composite monitor, 
but you'll need an RGB color monitor to 
really appreciate the program's quality 
and 16-color graphics. And then there's 
the sound: real, digitized percussion sounds 
that will have you thinking your CoCo has 
turned into a rocking rhythm machine. 

With a simple LOADM" RUPERT", the 
all-machine-language, copy-protected pro- 
gram boots quickly. There is a 90-day war- 
ranty offering free replacement of a failed 
disk; after that a replacement disk will cost 
$3.50. 

Once Rupert Rythym is running you are 
greeted by a sharp-looking title screen. 
You are also treated to the cleverly orches- 
trated percussion sounds of Rupert Rythym' 's 
humorous opening theme (Tap, Tap, Do- 
Do-Do-Do Bop Bap Hey! The "Hey!" is a 
digitized voice). When you've heard enough, 
you can begin game play with a simple 
click of the joystick button. 



Upon entering the world of Rupert 
Rythym you'll find yourself in Music Box 
Record's "Master Hall" with 16 doors to 
choose from. Rupert ' s "world" is basically 
a high-quality, two-dimensional game grid; 
Rupert can move left or right and up or 
down, but there is no third dimension, i.e., 
Rupert cannot move toward or away from 
the screen. With another click of the joy- 
stick button you can enter any of the 16 
rooms from the Master Hall. 

Each of the 1 6 rooms consists of a series 
of suspended platforms, all interconnected 
by automated elevators. Each room has a 
different configuration of platforms. You 
move your alter ego, "Rupert," about the 
rooms with your joystick, making short 
jumps from platform to platform and rid- 
ing the elevators to the more inaccessible 
levels. But you must be careful: A careless 
step will send Rupert into a fatal free-fall 
to the bottom of the screen. 

The goal of Rupert Rythym is to enter 
each of Music Box Records' 16 rooms, 
walk upon all of the platforms and collect 
all 16 of Rupert's stolen music manu- 
scripts. The manuscripts are actually indi- 
vidual segments of a complete, digitized 
"rhythm" percussion concert. Once you've 
collected all 16 rhythm segments — and 
assuming Rupert is still alive and rapping 
— you must arrange them in their proper 
playing order. When all the rhythm seg- 
ments are correctly ordered, Rupert then 
leaves the Master Hall and performs a 
unique concert (randomized for each game), 
which is accompanied by a graphic dis- 
play. Points are awarded based upon the 
number of rooms toured and how long it 
takes you to play the game. 

Of course, as I'm sure you've guessed, 
rounding up all those rhythm segments 
requires more than a simple soft- shoe 
performance. While you must be careful 
not to let Rupert fall off the edge of a 
platform or elevator, you must also avoid 
encounters with the lurking security ro- 
bots; meet cheek-to-cheek with one of 
them and it's "Taps" for Rupert. Fortu- 
nately, Rupert has nine lives, so he is 
allowed a few missteps. Luckily, too, Rupert 
is not without defenses; a supply of fire- 
crackers and pep pills, used effectively, 
can ward off even the most menacing of 
robot assaults. 

From tKe opening title screen to little 
Rupert and his firecrackers, I was very 
impressed with the quality of the graphics 
and animation. The graphics are a pleasure 
to watch, and I particularly appreciated the 
smooth scene transitions that would, for 
example, make the title screen appear to 
cross-dissolve into the game screen (in- 
volving, among other things, some clever 
palette manipulation). The high-quality 



sound was very nicely married to the graph- 
ics, each enhancing the other. I found the 
joystick controls had a good, intuitive feel, 
and there was no need to be constantly 
returning to the keyboard during play. 
There is a pause option, and it is very easy 
to abort and restart the game at any time. 
On the surface, Rupert Rythym is a really 
smooth production. 

I enjoyed Rupert Rythym for its look, 
sound and ease of use, but what I missed 
was more variety and a sense of immediate 
reward. While each of Rupert Rythym' s 16 
rooms is unique, there is only a total of 16 
different platform layouts in all (not count- 
ing the single platform layout in the Mas- 
ter Hall), and the different layouts are just 
distributed randomly among the rooms 
with each start of the game. Basically, 
Rupert Rythym offers 16 similar puzzles to 
solve (requiring some note- taking, as well). 
The focus is on strategy as much as on 
arcade skills, 

A choice of skill levels, or an option to 
save a partially completed game to disk, 
would have added some flexibility. 

Even though it could use some variety, 
Rupert Rythym offers fine graphics, some 
entertaining challenges and the funkiest 
sound I' ve ever heard come out of a CoCo. 

(Game Point Software, P.O. Box 6907, Bur- 
bank, CA 91510, 818-566-3571; $24.95 plus 
$3 S/H for tape or disk) 

— Walter Myers 

1 Book ^ 

Start OS-9— 
A Painless 
Introduction to the 
Power Environment 

Probably one of the major reasons CoCo 
users tend to shy away from OS-9 is the 
rather formidable technical manual that 
comes with the Level II version. This 
coupled with the nice, friendly environ- 
ment of Disk BASIC leads one to the 
conclusion — "Why bother?" Being an 
OS-9 user since its first appearance in 
1983, I can tell you that it is definitely 
worth the effort. One of the major prob- 
lems in learning OS-9 is the limited amount 
of books available (especially as com- 
pared to the volumes for MS-DOS). The 
books available are excellent, but tend to 
cater more to an intermediate level. Paul 
Ward of Kenneth-Leigh Enterprises has 
just published a book, Start OS-9: An En- 
joyable Hands-On Guide to OS-9 on the 
Color Computer 3, which addresses the 
new user with a CoCo 3 and OS-9 Level II. 



140 THE RAINBOW April 1989 



Start OS-9 is written in tutorial style 
and includes a disk of several utilities that 
were written by Stephen Goldberg, who 
has contributed a number of utilities to the 
"KISSable OS-9" column in THE RAIN- 
BOW. The book is in 8 1/2-by-l 1 format 
and is bound with a plastic spiral binder 
that allows the book to lie flat next to the 
computer, making it easy to work through 
the tutorials. Included in the book are 10 
tutorials plus explanatory material, as well 
as several very interesting appendices. 

The material covered in the book is 
organized into 14 chapters, which are set 
up in such a way that the reader can work 
on a chapter a day and complete the "course" 
in two* weeks. I'm sure that some will be 
able to go faster, while others will take 
their time. The book contains good de- 
scriptions of the OS-9 modules that create 
the operating system. Ward's discussion 
of this material is presented at a basic 
level, making it interesting reading for the 
new user. Other chapters include discus- 
sions on the following: making new sys- 
tem boots; command syntax; paths and 
directories; creating, renaming and delet- 
ing directories; printer setup; basics of the 
OS-9 line editor; merging files; loading 
and unloading executable modules in 
memory; customizing the startup file; 



redirection and pipes; and of course, win- 
dows. These are but a few of the topics that 
are covered. All of the material is pre- 
sented at the beginner's level and is suffi- 
cient to give the new user a well-rounded 
foundation in OS-9. 

Seven appendices are included in the 
book. These are written by well-known 
authors who appear in the pages of THE 
RAINBOW. Included in the appendices 
are the topics Hardware for the CoCo by 
Marty Goodman, Telecomputing by Wil- 
liam Brady, Hard Drive Systems by Kevin 
Darling, BASIC09 by Dale Puckett, Utili- 
ties by Stephen Goldberg, and Music by 
Paul Ward. 

The utilities provided with Start OS-9 
are quite useful and illustrate the power 
and modularity of OS-9. Several of these 
utilities are used in the book in conjunc- 
tion with the development of a phone list 
database. The utilities include the follow- 
ing: Cls — clears the screen; Copy — a 
revision of the Tandy copy command that 
allows overwriting of an existing file; 
Count — gives a count of the number of 
characters, words and lines in a file; D — 
provides an unformatted list of files in a 
directory (useful with pipes); GRep — a 
pattern-searching utility; Sort — an in- 
memory ASCII file-sorting routine; and 



Uniq — a utility that deletes repetitive 
entries from sorted lists. In addition, the 
disk contains modules to create a RAM 
disk. Finally, some sheJl scripts are pro- 
vided to illustrate how to set up various 
types of windows. The disk also contains 
files necessary for several of the tutorials. 

Overall, the book is well-written and is 
an excellent beginners resource. The soft- 
ware included provides the new user with 
some applications commands that demon- 
strate the ease of using OS-9 as well as the 
power of the operating system. There are a 
number of typos in the book, as well as 
some bad sentence structure; however, the 
author indicates that these have been cor- 
rected in the soon-to-be-released second 
edition. Two additional appendices were 
planned but did not make it to the first 
edition; these were on compact disc inter- 
action and bootlists. Owners of the first 
edition may upgrade for the cost of $10. 1 
definitely recommend this book to new 
users and perhaps those not so new. 

(Kenneth-Leigh Enterprises, 1840 Biltmore 
St. NW, Suite 10, Washington, D.C. 20009, 
202-232-4246; $32.95 plus $2.50 S/H: First 
product review for this company appearing 
in THE RAINBOW.) 

— Donald D. Dollberg 



mm. 



WM 







COMPUTER ISLAND EDUCATIONAL SOFTWARE 



PROGRAMS ON SALE THIS MONTH 



$15 each-tape or disk 



TITLE 



GRADE LEVEL 



Distance Problems 5 - 8 

Area and Perimeter 5 - 8 

Sales and Bargains 5 - 8 

Comparison Shopping .... 4 - 7 

Linear Equations 7 - 9 

Quadratic Equations .... 8 - 11 

Trigonometry Tutor 8 - 10 

Fractions - Addition... 4 - 8 
Fractions-Subtraction. .4 - 8 

Fractions-Multiply 4 - 8 

Factors Tutor... 5 - 8 

Math Invaders 1 - adult 

Binary Dice Game 4 - adult 



:<*n 





Add $1.00 postage, NY res. add tax 
VISA, MC - Send for free catalog 



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KEN-TON ELECTRONICS 

PRESENTS 

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$89 or $119 (with RTC) 

Real-Time Clock Battery-backed 
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H-D0S Compatible 
0S-9 Compatible 
28 Pin Rom Socket 



DUAL COMM 
BOARD 

$74 (single) $89 (Dual) 

Replaces RS-232 PAK 
2-6551 A.C.I.A/S 
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Jumper Selectable for up to 4 
(Four) Channels (with 2nd board) 
Ultra low power draw 
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Build your Hard Drive the RIGHT way with a REAL SCSI Interface. All 
our products are MIL-Specification Quality P.C. Boards and carry a full 
90 day warranty. Both the Dual Comm and the SCSI Interface work 
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187 GREEN ACRES RD. 
TONAWANDA, NY 14150 



April 1989 THE RAINBOW 141 




The following products have recently been received by 
THE RAINBOW, examined by our magazine staff and 
issued the Rainbow Seal of Certification y your assurance 
that we have seen the product and have ascertained that it 



Caladuril II: Weatherstone's End, a CoCo 3 
sequel to the Adventure Caladuril Flame of 
Light. Monstrous storms threaten King Jamer- 
end's valley, and the court sages send his 
young son, Olin, on a quest to determine the 
reason. But Olin is waylaid and finds himself 
on an unfamiliar shore in a land that is held by 
the enemy. A 100-percent machine-language 
program, the game supports 16-color graphics 
on the CoCo 3. It comes on a two-disk set and 
includes a map and a 20-page manual. Oblique 
Triad, 32 Church St., Georgetown, Ontario, 
Canada L7G 2A7, (416) 877-8149; $32 US, 
$38 Cdn. 

Chess Made Easy, a menu-driven chess 
tutorial for the CoCo 3. The program includes 
seven individual lessons: Chessboard identi- 
fies the squares on the board; Chessmen shows 
how the pieces are moved; Notation teaches 
you how to record your moves for later review; 
Playing the Game covers the rules of chess and 
setting up the chessboard; Chess Opening 
provides instructions for developing your pieces 
in preparation for the Middle Game; Middle 
Game exploits the weaknesses of your oppo- 
nents; and The End Game explains a Check- 
mate and Coup-de-grace. Requires a CoCo 3 
and a disk drive. CoCo Chess/Ware, P.O. Box 
542, Starkville, MS 39759, Contact Donald 
Villiard at (601 ) 323-9081; $20. 

Disk Doctor, a disk utility designed for use 
with Burke & Burke's Hyper-110. It allows the 
user to check a specified device forbad sectors. 
If a bad sector is found, the user has the option 
of blocking out the granule relating to that 
sector in the GAT. Included is a provision for 
printing a hard copy of trouble spots on the 
device. Requires 64 K and Hy per -I/O. For the 
CoCo 1, 2 and 3. KB Enterprises, 435 Bright- 
waters Drive, Cocoa Beach, FL 32931, (407) 
799-3253; $17.95 plus $1.50 SIH. 

Hard Drive Utilities 2.0, an upgrade of the 
hard disk drive utility designed for use with 
Burke and Burke's Hyper-IIO. It will back up 
device to device and hard drive to disk, select 
files for operation, search for filenames and 
restore the hard drive to and from the disk. 
Requires 64K and Hyper-IIO. For the CoCo 1, 
2 and 3. KB Enterprises, 435 Brightwaters 
Drive, Cocoa Beach, FL 32931, (407) 799- 
3253; $21.95 plus $1.50 SIH. 

1 42 THE RAINBOW April 1 989 



Hard Drive Zap, a disk zap utility designed 
for use with Burke & Burke's Hyper-IIO. It 
includes a seven-page tutorial on various file 
recovery techniques and allows the user to: 
move to any section on the device or a specific 
track or sector directly; move around the cur- 
rent sector being accessed and modify the data 
in it; write out a modified sector to the device; 
list a device directory to the screen or printer; 
access the GAT and view the entire sector in 
hexadecimal format; print the data of the cur- 
rent sector in ASCII format; and switch to 
another device within the program. Requires 
64K and Hyper-IIO. For the CoCo 1, 2 and 3. 
KB Enterprises, 435 Brightwaters Drive, Co- 
coa Beach, FL 32931 , (407) 799-3253; $21.95 
plus $1.50 SIH. 

Lock Master, a disk utility that allows you to 
lock your disks with or without a password so 
that no directory entries can be seen. It locks 
the DOS track and the directory, so that pro- 
grams loaded using the DOS command no 
longer function and an attempted save to disk 
will be thwarted with a DF (Disk Full) Error. 
For the CoCo 1 , 2 and 3. Right Brothers Soft- 
ware ,1173 Niagara Street, Denver, CO 80220 ; 
$14.95 plus $2 SIH. 

Notes, a menu-driven music editor for the 
CoCo 2 and 3 that allows you to write and edit 
musical notation, including orchestral and solo 
parts or scores, and print eight lines of music 
per page on a dot-matrix printer. (Not suitable 
for piano copy.) Robert Fori, 137 Wingfoot 
Court, Aptos, CA 95003, (408) 688-01 15; $45. 



Roots, a machine language source file contain- 
ing over 100 subroutines to add to your own 
programs. The package includes FONT . DAT, 
which allows you to send characters to the 
screen or printer, read and write sectors to disk, 
convert registers into ASCII numbers, gener- 
ate random numbers, put ASCII characters on 
Hi-Res screens, read joysticks, input strings 
and numbers, etc. Uses the extra keys, speed, 
graphics and memory of the CoCo 3. For the 
CoCo 1, 2 and 3. GSW Software 8345 Glen- 
wood, Overland Park, KS 66212; $25, disk 
only. 

R.S.B. V. 1.2, an upgrade of the OS-9 program 
that emulates the Disk BASIC environment. 
New features include support for basic pro- 
grams as large as 32K, support for auto-line- 
feed printers, and revised PALETTE and CLS 
commands that match Disk BASIC operation 
more closely. Requires a CoCo 3 and OS-9 
Level II. Burke & Burke, P.O. Box 1283, 
Palatine, IL 60078, (312)397-2898; $39.95. 

VIP Calc III, an update of the VIP spreadsheet 
that's been written for the CoCo 3. A worksheet 
with up to 5 12 columns and 1024 rows can be 
drawn, and 16 windows can be called up for 
comparisons. Features include block functions, 
sorts, programmable functions, algebraic and 
trig functions, and eight- and 16-digit preci- 
sion. On disk for the CoCo 3. SD Enterprises, 
P.O. Box 1233, Gresham, OR 97030, (503) 
663-2865; $69.95. 



^ First product received from this company 



The Seal of Certification is open to all manufacturers of products for the Tandy 
Color Computer, regardless of whether they advertise in THE RAINBOW. 

By awarding a Seal , the magazine certifies the program does exist — that we have 
examined it and have a sample copy — but this does not constitute any guarantee 
of satisfaction. As soon as possible, these hardware or software items will be 
forwarded to THE RAINBOW reviewers for evaluation. 

— Lauren Willoughby 



RAINBOWTECH 




16K ECB 



It's April again, and you know what that 
brings — fools in computers and fools in love, 



April Foolishness and 
Pentomino Contest Winners 



By William Barden, Jr. 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 



In keeping with the first part of the month I'm going to 
present some recent questions received in THE RAINBOW 
mailbag — a potpourri of hardware, software and 
operational queries. The second part of this column 
announces the winners of the Pentomino Contest and shares 
some interesting correspondence regarding pentominoes. 
First, the Q&A . . . 

April's Questions and Answers 

/ recently went to my Radio Shack store and told the 
salesman that I was looking for an inexpensive, capable 
computer system with an operating system similar to Xenix, 
lots of game-oriented software, and inexpensive, powerful 
peripherals that could be used with it. Oh, yes, I told him 
that it must have a Motorola microprocessor — something 
like the 6800, but better. He told me that a Tandy 3000 with 
a Tandy laser printer was just what I needed and guided me 
toward the front of the store. On the way, I stumbled over 
a box marked "Color Computer 3. " On inspection, it seemed 
to be just what I was looking for and I bought it over the 
saleman's objections. Did I make a mistake? 

— Puzzled in Omaha 

Dear Puzzled: 

The CoCo 3 has an entry-level price of about one-fifth that 
of an MS-DOS system, a great variety of inexpensive 
software and hardware available for it, a sophisticated 
operating system called OS-9 for a very reasonable cost, and 
a powerful 6809 microprocessor. In spite of those factors, 
however, the CoCo 3 is probably not a bad system, and you 
may be happy with it. Let me know how this turns out. 



Bill Barden has written 27 books and over 100 magazine 
articles on various computer topics. His 20 years' experience 
in the industry covers a wide background: programming, 
systems analysis and managing projects for computers 
ranging from mainframes to micros. 



I keep reading not only about the CoCo 1, 2 and 3 systems, 
but various revision boards as well. What's the straight story 
on this? 

— Too Many Revisions 

Dear Too Many: 

The original CoCo 1 was first introduced in 1946 when 
Radio Shack was selling through Allied radio in Chicago. Far 
ahead of its time, the system prompted many returns with 
refunds after irate customers found they could not receive 
The BBC Overseas Service, Radio Netherlands or Voice of 
America on the package. Radio Shack put the system on ice. 

In 1980 the CoCo 1 was reintroduced and became an 
overnight success. By this time Radio Shack had retrofitted 
the system to include short wave circuitry. 

Early versions of the CoCo 1 were assembled in Fort Worth 
by a work force of itinerant rodeo performers. If you can 
obtain these early systems (they are now collector's items), 
you will see the signatures of many of the original fabricators 
etched inside the case in the plastic — names like Billy Joe 
Bob Eikens, Bobby Joe Bob Calkins, Freddy Joe Bob Smith, 
and Lester Caxton Grunwald-Smyth, III. 

Later versions of the CoCo 1 were manufactured in the 
Orient. The Model A revision board corrected a minor flaw 
in the circuitry — not being able to write text characters to 
the screen. The Model A revision was followed by revisions 
B through MN, each correcting minor flaws and reducing the 
chip count to lower the expense. 

The CoCo 2 brought a new keyboard to replace the 
"chiclet"- style keys of the CoCo 1, made out of dessicated, 
molded Central American gum. By this time Radio Shack 
had fine-tuned the CoCo and reduced the board revisions 
over the life of the CoCo 2 to only revisions A through Q. 

The CoCo 3 brought 640-by-192 graphics and 512K of 
memory. Always looking for low-cost solutions, Radio Shack 
had incorporated all of the CoCo logic into one humongous 
chip — the so-called GIMEDOLLAH chip. The CoCo 3 
system currently has only one board revision, but 32 revisions 



April 1 989 THE RAINBOW 1 43 



to the GIMEDOLLAH chip itself, revisions A through AF. 
Also by this time, manufacturing had reverted to the United 
States, where labor was less expensive than in the Orient. 
I hope this answers your question. 

I like "Bar den's Buffer", but find many of your program 
descriptions long-winded and overly complex. For example, 
in the November issue, you discuss several sorts. Could you 
explain in simple terms how the Quick Sort works? 

— Tired of Complexity 

Certainly, Tired: 

I looked over the column and it did read tediously. Here's 
a new writeup on the Quick Sort: 

"The Quick Sort is a recursive sort that partitions each file 
into right and left subfiles in such a way that the new 
partitions have reduced the original sorting problem to two 
simpler partitions that can now be recursively processed by 
a call to the Quick Sort subprogram again, applying the same 
sorting technique to the two component parts until they are 
sorted by the same method, but with the usual tests for 
completion of recursion, in this case being a test that two 
pointers (one to the right and one to the left partition) have 
net crossed — an indication that the partition has been 
successfully sorted." 

I think that will make things more lucid for you. 

Hike Tony DiStefano's "Turn of the Screw" column, but 
am awed by the complicated circuitry required. Aren't there 
simpler circuits? 

— Tired of Complexity 

Dear Tired: 

Haven't we met before? Tony has some new beginner's 
projects coming up that are perfect. I saw a preview of one 
of them — a simple CoCo interface to a research hospital 
PET scanner. It requires less than 2000 discrete components, 
most of which are available at any Radio Shack store. 

What are the advantages ofOS-9 RS DOS (Disk Extended 
Color BASIC)? 

— Perplexed in Pittsburgh 

Dear Perp: 

None that I can see. I asked Dale Puckett about this and 
he admitted that as well. 

Is there any way to convert my 1961 17-inch Packard Bell 
black-and-white television for use on my CoCo 3 in 640-by- 
192 color mode? 

For this question well defer to rainbow's television and 
monitor expert, Marty Goodman: 

"You haven't given me enough data to go on! I don't know 
from your desription whether you have the Packard Bell 
17CRG set or the Packard Bell 17CRM set. It's very difficult 
to answer questions of this type without having all the facts. 
However, let me try. 

If your set has a 1000 ohm, i^-watt resistor in Location 
M23 of the flyback transformer casing, chances are it's a 
17CRG. Otherwise it's probably a 17CRM. If your set is a 
17CRG, carefully remove the flyback transformer casing. 
You will see a connector underneath the rear edge labeled 
"Color Connector." Insert a Color VDG chip (sold by many 
rainbow advertisers, or available from Radio Shack 



National Parts) into the connector and bend back Pin 24. 
Using rainbow cable, connect pins 1 through 23 of the Color 
VDG chip to the corresponding pins of the RGB connector 
on the CoCo 3. Replace the flyback transformer casing. You 
should now see full color on your Packard Bell. 

If your set is a 17CRM, I would not recommend modi- 
fication of the set. It is simply not reasonable to do so — 
the modifications would far exceed the cost of a CM-8 
monitor. You must get such a monitor if you want high- 
resolution color for CoCo 3." 

Thanks, Marty 

/ am an 11 -year-old boy very interested in computers. 1 
have built my own Color Computer 2 from scrap parts found 
in the dumpster in back of the Radio Shack store in my 
neighborhood. Iusedacar battery to program an old PROM. 
It works fine. I want to use the Color Computer 2 to do a 
science fair project on care of the aged by computer. But I 
have a problem. I can't locate the EDTASM assembler 
anywhere. I need to do the program in assembly language 
because that's what I do best. Can you help me? (I think I 
can win the science fair scholarship if I can get this working). 

— Donny 

Dear Donny: 

Sorry to have to tell you this, but federal law prohibits 
copying software such as EDTASM. This column simply 
cannot condone such activity and I would suggest that unless 
you can buy a copy of EDTASM that you pick another 
project! 

Where can I find graphics pictures that I can display on 
the screen of my CoCo 3? 

— Visual Vick 

Dear VV: 

Try using Delphi and the Color Computer Special Interest 
Group (SIG). Here's a sample of what's currently offered: 



GIRLS 11 

SPACESH 

MICKEY 

ROACH 

NUDES23 



COWBOYC 

XRATED 
XXRATED 



XXXRATED 



Eleven 640-by-192 pictures from the 
swimsuit issue of RAINBOW 
Five pictures of the space shuttle 
Two pictures of Mickey and Minnie 
Three pictures of Tandy's John Roach 
and Minnie 

Twenty-three high-resolution pictures 
showing Brooke Shields, Jessica Hahn 
and playmates 

Thirteen pictures of the Dallas Cowboy 
cheerleaders 

Back view of Microware developers 
Three high-resolution, colored pictures 
of a Revision B board of the Color 
Computer 2 from various angles 
Front view of an Apple Macintosh 



There are many more pictures that can be downloaded, but 
don't expect renditions from the Louvre, VV. 

First we had the Color Computer 1, then the Color 
Computer 2, then the Color Computer 3. I'm eagerly awaiting 
what's going to happen next. Have you heard any rumors? 

— Anxious 

Dear Anxious: 
As a matter of fact, I have. I was down in Fort Worth not 



144 THE RAINBOW April 1989 



too long ago, and here's what I heard: The new CoCo 4 will 
dispense with a keyboard and add two more joysticks. The 
Shack felt that the keyboard was a needless frill — their 
surveys show that only 2 percent of the CoCo users — about 
100,000 people — actually use the keyboard. The remainder 
simply plug in cartridges. As a result, the new CoCo 4 will 
have an additional cartridge slot. Because of the high royalty 
rates paid to Microsoft and Microware, the new CoCo 4 will 
do away with both Microsoft BASIC and OS-9. A new 
operating system from Digital Research, CP-MC, will be 
used in its place. Available languages are FORTRAN, COBOL 
and jovial. Source code will have to be ported to the CoCo 
4 through the RS-232-C interface. Sounds like an interesting 
system and I can hardly wait! 

I'm a 78-year old great-grandfather of 46 who 's just getting 
interested in computers. Although I have a scientific 
background (PhD in physics, Nobel Laureate) I'm just 
wondering if I'll be able to learn anything about this new- 
fangled technology. Do you think CoCo computing is a good 
hobby to get into? Will I be able to pick any of this up? 

— Zachary 

Dear Zach: 
No. 

I've read a lot about clock speed-up for the CoCo 2 and 
3. What is the maximum clock rate at which the CoCo can 
run? 

— Speed Demon 

Dear Speedy: 

Although you can double the clock rate of the CoCo 2 and 
3 by pokes, it's a little-known fact that you can actually get 
an effective clock rate of 144 MHz — hundreds of times faster 
than normal — by using an external clock generator and 
feeding it into the 6809B chip. At least one CoCo advertiser, 
Darn Fast of Pudd, Wyoming, sells a kit for this ($59.95, 152 
pounds with waveguides, shipped rail freight). The down side 
is that not too many programs, including RS DOS, will run 
with the upgrade. 

The Puzzling Pentominoes 

In the December '88 issue of RAINBOW, I proposed a contest 
to see how many readers could figure out how to construct 
3-by-20, 4-by-15, 5-by-12 and 6-by-10 blocks out of 12 figures 
called pentominoes, shown in Figure 1. I also provided a 
program that would allow you to move the figures around 
on the screen. The program was written for the CoCo 3 to 
take advantage of the computer's colors and high-resolution 
screen. In retrospect, I really should have provided versions 
for CoCo I and 2 users, although I thought that those readers 
who were interested might cut the figures out of cardboard 

In fact, many readers did use manual methods for this, 
although some keyed in the program and used that. In this 
month's column I'll name the winners of the Pentomino 
Contest. Grand Prize for the contest, as you recall, was $M 
50,000,000, where the "$M" stands for Microdollars, a 
standard unit of currency used for the CoCo series worth (at 
this time of writing, although the Microdollar is weakening...) 
one-millionth of a U.S. dollar. 

Reader Response 

Dr. Norm Barson of East Brunswick, New Jersey was kind 
enough to send a thick volume of pentomino configurations 




Hole in shape 
of pentomino 

















IL 


















m 


























1 






























1 




i 1 




II 









9 Pieces 









































1 






1 






























































1 











8-by-8 Square 
with 2-by-2 
Hole 



Figure 2: Other Pentomino Problems 



he has done over the years. It includes the two answers to 
the 3-by-20 puzzle, six answers to the 4-by-15 puzzle, 17 
answers to the 5-by-12 puzzle, and several hundred answers 
to the 6-by-10 puzzle. There are also pentomino puzzles 
relating to shapes other than rectangles that can be made (a 
few are shown in Figure 2) and Dr. Barson sent some of those 
as well. Dr. Barson is a man after my own heart — wiling 
away countless hours on puzzles such as this, just because 
. . . well . . . they're there. 

I also got a nice letter from Arthur Hallock of Deming, 
New Mexico. Arthur included, as did Dr. Barson, a reference 
to a program first done in May, 1984 by Jim Butterfield. This 
BASIC program runs through all possible combinations of 
pentominoes to solve the 3-by-20, 4-by-15, 5-by-12 and 6-by- 
10 puzzles. I obtained a copy of the program and ran it. It 



April 1989 THE RAINBOW 145 


























































































































Figure 3: 3-by-20 Solutions 
















































































































































































































































































































































































































i 


























































_ 






























































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































Figure 4: 4-by-15 Solutions 











I 






































































































1 





















I 










1 











































































































Jl 

















































































































1 
















































































1 

















































































































I! 








































































































































Figure 5: 5-by-12 Solutions 



1 46 THE RAINBOW April 1 989 



■ 



w 



uses the CoCo text screen and displays the individual 
pentominoes as text characters. A typical display is: 

IVVVWW 
IVTWWX 
IVTWXXX ... 
ITTTLXY 
ILLLLYYYY 

You can see how the pentominoes are made up of the same 
letters as their names. The program arbitrarily starts with a 
single pentomino, then tries another pentomino that fits, and 
then keeps trying pentominoes until either successful or 
unsuccessful. If unsuccessful, it "backs up" to try any 
remaining pentominoes. The program works very well, but 
is somewhat slow. As Norm Barson says, "I once left my 
CoCo running continuously for over two weeks to get these 
solutions and they all still had the same piece (T) in the upper- 
lefthand corner." 

Tim Cummings of Palmdale used some valid and interest- 
ing logic to solve the 3-by-20 puzzle, finding out which 
pentominoes were limited in position and working on from 
there. Here are some other interesting comments from 
readers: 

"After working five solid hours ... I just could not give 
up." Edd Hollingsworth 

"I have found three solutions. ..." Marc-Antoine Chabot 

"I used paper cutouts of the 12 pentominoes and trans- 
cribed them to arrays." Gregory W. Long 

"I had never heard of pentominoes before and now I am 
virtually hooked on them. ..." Buel R. Thomasson 

"After three days of tearing my hair out ..." Brian 
Davidson 

"After all, how hard could a puzzle with only 12 pieces be 
to work. . . . Boy, was I surprised!" Lee Walker 

"What a relief after two weeks at 1 Vi hours per day, to see 
the grid flash . . . Fun!" James Posporelis 

"Not having seen your pentomino puzzle before, I figured 
I'd spend a few minutes playing with them. After all, how 
difficult could it be?" George Aftamonow 

"The puzzle took me about 20 minutes, but I attribute most 
of this short time to luck. . . ." Christopher J. Gerber 

"It took me about two hours." John Mosley 



















































































































































































































































































































































































































— 
















































































































































































































































































































































































Figure 6: 6-by-10 Solutions 





". . . this one has got me hooked. ... I have prom- 
ised myself to write a program that will solve this puzzle in 
all its variations. . . ."John Schott 

". . . well it's six days later and I'm no further ahead. . . ." 
Joel F. Klein (went on to solve many puzzles) 

Pentomino Answers 

As it turns out, there are two answers to the 3-by-20 puzzle, 
except for rotations (turning the answer upside down) and 
reflections (observing the answer in the mirror). There are 
1010 answers to the 4-by-15 and to the 5-by-12, and 2339 
answers to the 6-by-10. Hard to believe, isn't it? 

The two answers to the 3-by-20 are shown in Figure 3. 
Selected answers to the 4-by-15, 5-by-12 and 6-by-10 are 
shown in Figures 4, 5 and 6, respectively. 

May I have the Printout, Please . . . 

I picked up mail from my post office box on January 5, 
1989, and found a notice for a certified letter from an Iowa 
ZIP, postmarked in December. Sure enough, this turned out 
to be the winning entry, with an astounding 1420 points. "I 
would like to have put the program on my computer but 
didn't have time to convert the program for my CoCo 2. 
Maybe Santa will bring me a CoCo 3 for Xmas. These were 
done by trial and error with paper and pencil. I like working 
puzzles. Regards, Dale Luense". 

Dale receives fifty million microdollars ($M 50,000,000 ) 
— about $50 at current exchange rates at the Fort Worth 
Currency Exchange. The second- and third-place winners 
each receive a copy of my Radio Shack book Shortwave 
Listening Guide and a diskette containing the Hershey font 
character set and programs. The second- and third-place 
winners are: 

Jason Cornez of Springfield, Ohio, with 290 points 
Lee Walker of Richmond, Virginia, with 230 points 

I assume here that the entries from Jeff Stall of Naperville, 
Illinois, were not to be counted. If I misunderstood, please 
let me know, Jeff. 

Honorable mention (with significant work) in no special 
order: 

Edd Hollingsworth, Marion, Indiana 

A. Prosky. Pgh, Pennsylvania 

Marc Chabot, Carignan, Quebec 

Gregory Long, Walnut Creek, California 

Hermann Lorenz, Burford, Ontario 

Tim Cummings, Palmdale, California 

Buel R. Thomasson, Poplar Bluff, Missouri 

Brian Davidson, Idaho Falls, Idaho 

James Posporelis, Troy, New York 

George Aftamonow, Milford, Connecticut 

Christopher Gerber, East Lyme, Connecticut 

John Mosley, Portland, Connecticut 

James J. Wright, Kennett Square, Pennsylvania 

John Schott, Blakely, Pennsylvania 

Joel F. Klein, Indianapolis, Indiana 

Leroy Guse, Greenleaf, Wisconsin 

Other entries either solved the 3-by-20 puzzle alone or one 
or two of the other configurations. I still appreciate the 
response, however, and hope you enjoyed the challenge. 

And that's it for this month. Next month, more foolishness 
on the CoCo. /5?\ 



April 1989 THE RAINBOW 147 



RAINBOWTECH 




OS-9 Level II 



Continued support for OS-9 users 



In Quest Of New 
Technology 



Moving into the second quarter 
of 1989, dedicated OS-9 
hackers continue to carry the 
load. In fact, at this writing they appear 
to be the only group of people pushing 
the Color Computer OS-9 Community 
forward in its quest for new technology 
and techniques. This month well high- 
light some of the ideas they've been 
throwing around during the past several 
months. Hopefully, one of their ideas 
will help you solve a pressing problem. 

First, how would you like to be able 
to turn on your computer and have it 
boot OS-9 for you automatically. You 
can now, thanks to the work of OS-9 
Users Group Vice President Pete Lyall. 
Lyall created an OS-9 autoboot 
EPROM after hearing that many peo- 
ple at RAINBOWfest Princeton were 
interested in one. 

Lyall's EPROM will boot OS-9 on 
power-up or following a cold reset. It 
takes you to Tandy's Disk BASIC if you 
press a key during the boot sequence. 
Lyall had already developed the 
EPROM for a few friends, but hadn't 
realized there was any general interest 
until he received the feedback from 
Chicago. 

After RAINBOWfest, people on the 
CompuServe OS-9 SIG where Lyall is 

Dale L. Puckett, a freelance writer and 
programmer, serves as director-at-large 
of the OS-9 Users Group and is a 
member of the Computer Press Associ- 
ation. His username on Delphi is 
DALE?: on packet-radio, KOHYD @ 
N4QQ; on GEnie, D.PUCKETT2; and 
on CIS, 71446,736. 



By Dale L. Puckett 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 

an assistant SysOp told him they were 
very interested in his EPROM. Many 
said they needed it to protect remote 
unattended OS-9 systems. Others 
wanted to make it easier for children 
and spouses to run OS-9 games and 
applications. 

Lyall will program a 24-pin 68764/6 
EPROM and send it to you for $3 1 . The 
EPROM costs him $17, and he charges 
$10 to burn it. The rest goes toward 
shipping. He'll program a 28-pin 2764 
EPROM and send it to you for only 
$18. 

If you supply a blank EPROM, Lyall 
will program it and ship it back to you 
for $14. But you must make sure it is 
really blank. He recommends the 250- 
nanosecond versions for the 2764 
EPROMs used in the J & M and Disto 
controllers. 

If you're not sure which EPROM you 
need, you'll need to open your con- 
troller and count the pins on the second 
largest chip inside. If you have a Radio 
Shack controller, you 11 usually see a 24- 
pin EPROM. Most third-party manu- 
facturers use 28-pin EPROMs. 

Lyall requires that you send him a 
signed statement that indicates you are 
a legitimate owner of Radio Shack Disk 
BASIC and prefers that you send him a 
copy made with your SflVEM command. 
Here's the command line you need to do 
the job. 

SflVEM "DBASICBIN'\&HC000, &HDFFF, 
&HA027 

Send a check or money order made 
payable to Pete Lyall, 1040 Stern Lane, 



Oxnard, CA 93035. If you have ques- 
tions you can reach him on Compu- 
Serve at 76703,4230. On Delphi you can 
leave him a message to OS9UGVP. 

Pease Designing 68K Computer 

Another hard-charging OS-9 hacker 
is Kevin Pease. He's working on a single 
board design of a 68K computer. Pease's 
board will hold 2 megabytes of 256K- 
by-4 memory — eight megabytes if you 
use one-megabyte chips. 

The board will support 3 l /2-inch flop- 
pies and use direct memory access 
transfers. It will also have a SCSI 
interface for hard disk support. The 
hard disk will use DMA to obtain a 
maximum transfer rate of 1.6 Meg per 
second. Four serial ports and a video 
graphics interface supporting 256 colors 
and 640-by-240 dot resolution will be on 
board. It can use a CM-8 monitor. The 
board will measure 4 1 / 4-by-9 inches and 
use an IBM keyboard. 

Pease plans to use a Signetics 10- 
Megahertz SCC68070, which is com- 
patible with the Motorola 68000 series. 
It has a built-in memory management 
unit and a built-in dual channel DMA 
controller as well as a dual timer and 
UART. Pease welcomes your com- 
ments, which you can send to 
70516,1633 on CompuServe. 

QT-K System from FHL 

It seems like almost everyone is 
interested in a 6&xxx computer these 
days. At RAINBOWfest Princeton, OS- 
9 Users Group officers were showing off 
a single board system they may offer to 
members. In another aisle, at the FHL 



148 THE RAINBOW April 1989 



booth, Frank Hogg was asking for your 
ideas for the latest addition to his QT 
line. His newest computer is a bus-based 
system that gives you a way to expand 
your computer. 

This is a major change in approach 
since most of the earlier 6&xxx comput- 
ers have been single-board systems. 
Hogg showed a basic five-board system 
at Princeton, after recognizing the need 
for a low-cost 6&xxx system that owners 
can customize and expand to suit their 
needs. 

With Hogg's new entry, you can start 
with a floppy-based 68000 system with 
minimal memory and expand to a 
DMA SCSI hard disk system contain- 
ing 16 megabytes of memory and a 
68020 or 68030 or later. His K-BUS has 
12 slots, a 16-megahertz zero wait state 
bus, a PC-style power supply and three 
DMA modes. The price of a basic 68000 
system with 256K of memory is $649.95. 
The cost with OS-9 68K goes up to 
$999.95. 

Options include a wire-wrap board 
for $59.95, a SCSI board for $149, a 
timer card with 6840 and Epson Seiko 
clock and battery backup for $129, a 
two-megabyte Dynamic memory card 
using one megabyte chips for $99 and 
a DMA board for $199. 

A 68020 CPU card can be purchased 
for $599. A 68030 will cost you $799. 
The optional math coprocessor costs 
$99. Other boards being considered 
include an analog-to-digital and digital- 
to-analog interface, a MIDI interface 
for music, several graphics boards, an 
IEEE488 bus adapter and a PC bus 
adapter. 

The FHL software side became the 
exclusive distributor of all OS-9 ver- 
sions of Sculptor on January 1. The 
license was issued by Sculptor's Lon- 
don, England-based developers follow- 
ing several years that saw FHL sell more 



copies of the fourth-generation data- 
base program than any other distribu- 
tor in the United States. Hogg said he 
sold 60 copies of Sculptor for IBM 
systems to people who own CoCo OS- 
9 Sculptor. 

In early January, Hogg was prepar- 
ing to give away disks containing the 
runtime package for Sculptor Version 
1.14 and three or four useful programs. 
He planned to include a menu that can 
be used to drive any OS-9 based com- 
puter. 

Having a copy of the Sculptor run- 
time package is similar to having a copy 
of BASlC09's runtime package, RunB. If 
you have RunB, you can run any 
packed BASIC09 program. Many pro- 
gram authors sell their programs in this 
form. Likewise, if you have a copy of 
the Sculptor runtime package, you can 
run any Sculptor program written by a 
third party. It looks like Frank has come 
up with a tremendous idea. Well have 
more details about how you can get a 
disk or where you can download the 
runtime package and utility programs 
when they become available. 

Hogg would like to hear your com- 
ments about his bus. Write him at 770 
James St., Syracuse NY 13205. 

A Call for True DMA 

Paul B. Pollock, PAULBELL on Del- 
phi, is also looking for your ideas. We 
had a long conversation with him at 
RAINBOWfest Chicago last year and 
the day after Christmas we received a 
lengthy description of a new approach 
to CoCo OS-9 disk access. If you're 
interested in this subject or would like 
to help convince a hardware designer to 
tackle the project, please contact Paul 
at 8330 Haskell Ave., Sepulveda, CA 
91343. You can also contact him on 
Delphi or on his own "Hound and Lion 
BBS" at 818-895-1016. 



Pollock's note offered a detailed 
comparison of true direct memory 
access and the track/ sector reading with 
interrupt processing methods that is 
used on the current crop of OS-9 disk 
controllers. The newer controllers are a 
definite step in the right direction, but 
Pollock feels we need to do better. While 
the current approach yields a 100 per- 
cent improvement over the original 
controllers, he believes that communi- 
cations software, multi-drive access and 
process descriptor service routines 
handling inter-window communica- 
tions all slow down the system and 
reduce the improvement to a point far 
below 100 percent. 

Pollock is proposing a slave proces- 
sor that operates with "dead clock" 
access to the bus in a manner similar to 
that used by the Color Computer 3's 
GIME chip. He's calling for a "piggy- 
back" card that will hold the 6809E and 
bring out the BA and BS lines from the 
system bus. He believes the "slave" 
processor must be a true CPU and 
suggests a Motorola MC68008. The 
68008 could do "smart" file transfers, 
disk formatting, disk backup and file 
copying with no help from the host 
Color Computer. 

There are many software considera- 
tions that must be addressed during the 
design phase of a project like this. It was 
an extremely interesting letter that 
ended with Pollock's prediction that a 
controller using this approach could be 
built for about the same price of the 
current crop of "no halt" controllers. In- 
deed, I've wondered for a long time why 
a third-party hardware designer doesn't 
come up with a slave processor to 
handle all the OS-9 graphics functions 
while the main 6809E does the comput- 
ing. With CoCo's 6809E and two or 
three slave processors, OS-9 could 
really soar! 



OS9: SOFTWARE <D_P_Johnson 

SDISK - Standard disk driver module replacement allows full use of 
40 or 80 track double sided drives with OS-9 Level I. Full compatibili- 
ty with CoCo 35 track format and access all other OS-9 non-CoCo 
formats. Easy installation. $29.95 

SDISK+BOOTFIX - As above plus boot directly from a double sid- 
ed diskette.$35.95 LEVEL 1 OS-9 ONLY 

LEVEL 2 OS-9 ONLY 
SDISK3 - Level II version of SDISK driver. Same features as level I 
(except bootfix not required to boot from double sided). $29.95 

MSF - MS-DOS file manager. Complete file transfer capabiltites. 
REQUIRES SD1SK3 $45.00 or with SDISK3 for $65.00 

L1 UTILITY PAK 40 utilities including MACGEN $49.95 

L2 UTILITY PAK Level 2 Ram Disk and Printerr driver plus 10 
more $39.95 BOTH L1+L2 Paks for $75.00 

PC-XFER File transfer utilities read/write/format MS-DOS format 



>my_system »no_errors #51 2K & 

disks under COCO OS-9, REQUIRES SDISK or SDISK3. $45.00 
FORTH09 A FORTH-83 Standard implementation specially taylored 
for OS-9. Includes complete forth 6809 assembler and more. Pro- 
grams written in forth can instantly be saved as compact executable 
machine language modules. Supplied with complete printed documen- 
tation. $150.00 (+$3 S&H) . 
SEND S.A.S.E FOR LATEST CATALOG 

All diskettes are in CoCo OS-9 format unless otherwise requested; other OS-9 for- 
mats can be supplied for $2.00 additional charge. All orders must be prepaid or 
COD, VISA/MC accepted, add $2 S&H for first software item, + .50 for each addi- 
tional item, additional charge for COD. 

D. P. Johnson, 7655 S.W. Cedarcrest St. 
Portland, OR 97223 (503) 244-8152 

(You may best reach us between 9AM-NOON Pacific Time, Mon.-Fri.) 
OS-9 is a trademark of Microware and Motorola Inc., MS-DOS is a trademark of Microsoft, 
Inc., FORTH09 is a trademark of D. P. Johnson 



April 1989 THE RAINBOW 149 




Submitting 

Material 
To Rainbow 

Contributions to the rainbow 
are welcome from everyone. We 
like to run a variety of programs 
that are useful/helpful/fun for 
other CoCo owners. 

WHAT TO WRITE: We are inter- 
ested in what you may wish to tell 
our readers. We accept for consid- 
eration anything that is well- 
written and has a practical appli- 
cation for the Tandy Color Com- 
puter. If it interests you, it will 
probably interest lots of others. 
However, we vastly prefer articles 
with accompanying programs 
which can be entered and run. The 
more unique the idea, the more the 
appeal. We have a continuing need 
for short articles with short list- 
ings. These are especially appeal- 
ing to our many beginners. 

FORMAT: Program submis- 
sions must be on tape or disk, and 
it is best to make several saves, at 
least one of them in ASCII format. 
We're sorry, but we do not have 
time to key in programs and debug 
our typing errors. All programs 
should be supported by some ed- 
itorial commentary explaining 
how the program works. We also 
prefer that editorial copy be in- 
cluded on the tape or disk using 
any of the word processors cur- 
rently available for the Color Com- 
puter. Also, please include a 
double-spaced printout of your 
editorial material and program 
listing. Do not send text in all 
capital letters; use upper- and 
lowercase. 

COMPENSATION: We do pay 
for submissions, based on a 
number of criteria. Those wishing 
remuneration should so state 
when making submissions. 

For the benefit of those who 
wish more detailed information on 
making submissions, please send 
a self-addressed, stamped enve- 
lope (SASE) to: Submission 
Guidelines, the rainbow, The Fal- 
soft Building, P.O. Box 385, Pros- 
pect, KY 40059. We will send you 
comprehensive guidelines. 

Please do not submit material 
currently submitted to another 
publication. 




150 THE RAINBOW April 1989 



What do you think? If you would like 
to pursue a project of this nature or en- 
courage someone else, contact Pollock 
via Delphi or U.S. mail. 

OS-9 Virus Reported 

OS-9 hackers are scratching their 
heads and wondering how to prevent 
the spread of a computer virus on OS- 
9 systems after hearing that someone in 
Oregon uploaded an infected copy of a 
Dmode utility to a bulletin board there. 
One safeguard against these viruses may 
be the module checksum. Any change 
to a module will almost certainly change 
its checksum, even if its size is un- 
changed. 

The modified Dmode reportedly 
claimed to add the ability to change a 
disk's interleave without destroying any 
data. A curious user downloaded it and 
soon realized it contained a surprise. 
Two days later, he learned a virus had 
already infected his computer. 

The reported virus allegedly attached 
itself to the CC3Disl< module in memory 
and replicated itself by adding CC3Disl< 
to an 0S9Boot file on any drive. It 
reportedly has a trigger that causes it to 
wreck your system after you have made 
60 disk accesses. It reportedly will also 
attack your RAM and hard disk drives. 

Mike Stute, GRIDBUG on Delphi, 
who first reported the virus, said the 
infected file was uploaded to a local 
BBS by a John Alan Basgill. When he 
and the BBS SysOp tried to call him 
they reached a grocery store in Port- 
land, Oregon. 

Why Not PAK It? 

I received a note via amateur packet 
radio recently from a ham operator who 
was working temporarily at the U. S. 
Naval Academy in Annapolis, Mary- 
land. He had downloaded an OS-9 
program from UseNet but it had been 
compressed in the PAK format, so I 
offered to jump online and pull down 
a copy of G. B. Janssen's OS-9 archive 
utility. PAK is available on Compu- 
Serve, Delphi and GEnie. You may 
want to download it and take a look. 

PAK does the same job as the AR 
utility found in the OS-9 User Group 
Library and the three major online 
services. It may, however, offer a few 
advantages. PAKs main advantage is 
the fact that in many cases it compresses 
binary as well as text data. This could 
save you a lot of space if you are 
transferring a lot of picture or sound 
files. AR, on the other hand, com- 
presses only text files. 

PAK uses Huffman squeezing, run- 



length character compression and 
Lempel-Zev compression to do the job. 
It was developed on a CoCo OS-9 Level 
II system with the Tandy C compiler. It 
runs on both Level I and Level II 
systems. 

Here's an example of PAfCs effec- 
tiveness. A Color Max file available on 
Delphi was 21,248 bytes long in its 
original form. PAKs output from the 
same file was only 10,575 bytes long — 
a 50 percent savings in disk storage and 
communications line charges. 

Like AR, PAK is very handy for 
distributing multiple binary, picture, 
text, sound and source files since it can 
group them into one file and eliminate 
the need for multiple transfers. It also 
solves the often-discussed problem of 
needing special protocols to eliminate 
characters added by Xmodem. 

S/S Pak Can Talk With Level II 

If you own a Tandy Speech/ Sound 
Pak, you may want to fire it up under 
OS-9 Level II on your Color Computer 
3. When I first got my CoCo 3, I was 
very disappointed that my Speech/ 
Sound Pak was no longer usable. But 
today, thanks to Bruce Isted, Bill Boo- 
gaart and Mario Dilallo, my CoCo 3 
can now use the Speech/ Sound Pak. 

Isted released a program to the public 
domain a long time ago that lets you use 
the Speech Pak with both OS-9 Level 
I on the CoCo 1 and CoCo 2 or OS-9 
Level II on the CoCo 3. He also helped 
Boogaart and Dilallo come up with the 
hardware mods. Since weVe never seen 
this mod mentioned outside the na- 
tional data libraries, we thought we 
should pass along some of the informa- 
tion here. If you would like complete 
details, download the file SSPflK.flR 
from the DL-10 library on Compu- 
Serve's OS-9 SIG. 

SSPflK.AR contains a text file that 
gives you a step-by-step guide to modify 
your Speech/ Sound Pak along with a 
new S/S Pak driver and S/S Pak des- 
criptor that works with either OS-9 
Level I or Level II. The modifications 
are needed because the Pak was de- 
signed to work with the CoCo 1 and 
CoCo 2 running OS-9 Level I, which 
runs at a .89-megahertz clock rate. On 
the other hand, OS-9 Level II on the 
Color Computer 3 uses a 1.78-mega- 
hertz clock. To make the Speech / Sound 
Pak work with OS-9 Level II then, you 
must modify it so it can handle a clock 
rate of 1.78 megahertz. 

You must also change a transistor 
because the higher clock rate of the 
CoCo 3 causes the input signal from the 



bus E clock to drop to approximately 
-2.5 volts. The original 2N2907 transis- 
tor needs at least -5 volts to work 
properly. Isted's mod substitutes a 
2N3906 in its place. 

There is one more hitch. Before you 
can begin, you must determine which 
model of Speech/ Sound Pak you own. 
Two different models, the 26-3144 and 
the 26-3 144 A, have been reported on 
the market. The first appears to have a 
Radio Shack label. The latter has a 
Tandy label. 

You'll find a 2N2907 serving as a 
voltage inverter alongside an inductor 
in an axial package in the 26-3144. If 
you have the 26-3 144 A, you'll see a 
different transistor near an inductor in 
a small plastic box. In both models, 
youll find the transistor and coil near 
the post hole in the circuit board. 

The 2N2907 in the 26-3 144 model Pak 
has the same pinout as the replacement 
2N3906, a PNP transistor. On the other 
hand, you must reverse the Base and 
Collector leads of the 2N3906 when you 
replace the transistor in the 26-34 144 A 
model Pak. The transistor in this pak 
has a pinout of Emitter, Collector, Base 
when viewed in the same manner as the 
2N3906. 

To fix the low-voltage problem you 
must replace the 2N2907 in the model 
26-3144 Pak or the anonymous transis- 
tor in the model 26-3 144A Pak with a 
2N3906. If you have the latter model, 
don't forget to reverse the leads of the 
Base and Collector. 

The other half of the Speech/ Sound 
Pak modification concerns itself with 
the clock rate used by the speech syn- 
thesizer. To change it you first cut the 
trace connected to Pin 9 of the 74LS86 
chip. After you cut this trace, ground 
Pin 9 of the chip. Your Speech/ Sound 
Pak will now work properly at 1.78 
megahertz. If you want to be able to use 
the Pak in your CoCo 1 at .89 mega- 
hertz, you can install a single-pole, 
double-throw switch to turn your mod- 
ification on and off. 

Speech synthesizers encourage me to 
experiment and have fun. I hope youll 
try these mods and enjoy the results. 

CoCo OS-9 Joins Packet Radio and the 
National Weather Service to Track 
Oklahoma Tornados 

For several years J. Frank Fields, 
who has been very active in the OS-9 
User Group, and fellow amateur radio 
operators have worked with the Na- 
tional Weather Service to track thun- 
derstorms and tornadoes across Okla- 
homa. Working with Dr. Kenneth 



Crawford, Gary Skaggs and Larry 
Mooney from the Oklahoma City 
Weather Office at Will Rogers Airport, 
Fields helped develop a packet radio 
network that delivers late-breaking 
weather information from Oklahoma 
City to civil defense offices across the 
state. Because of the low cost of the 
Color Computer, many of the civil 
defense offices are using it to receive 
information from the amateur radio 
packet network. 

Now Fields is striving to push the 
edge of CoCo OS-9 technology forward 
again. His network is expanding and 
will soon have several 223-megahertz 
nodes transferring messages at 19,200 
baud. He hopes to drive this network 
with a protocol known as TCP/IP. 
Operating on this network, which is 
used by the defense department as well 
as many government agencies and uni- 
versities, is like owning an automatic 
bulletin board. 

With a standard bulletin board sys- 
tem, like the Color Computer BBS 
systems in local communities (or the 
large national databases like Delphi, 
CompuServe and GEnie), you must go 
to the library and get the information 
you want. With a TCP/IP network, the 
information comes to you automati- 
cally. For example, as long as I leave my 
amateur radio station on the air, I will 
automatically receive any mail sent to 
my unique TCP/IP address. This mail 
could have been routed via amateur 
radio, been shot across the country via 
a satellite or transferred through a 
standard telephone modem. My station 
doesn't care, it just automatically re- 
cords the mail for me when it arrives. 
It's a fascinating concept and Fields is 
pushing hard to make the CoCo OS-9 
community part of the action. 

We introduced him to another ama- 
teur radio operator in New Jersey who 
is working hard to port Phil Karn's C 
implementation of TCP/IP to CoCo 
OS-9. We also put him back in touch 
with George Dorner, OS-9 User Group 
Treasurer, who belongs to a Chicago 
group that is charging forward on the 
same frontier. These guys are onto 
something big. 

By the way, Fields reports that the 
National Severe Storms Laboratory 
team in Oklahoma owns a chase van 
that carries a lot of exotic electronic 
equipment, including a device called 
"Toto." They drive the van as close as 
possible to the path of a developing 
tornado. A radio in the van sends back 
a signal generated by NEXRAD, a 
Next-Generation Doppler Radar, to 



any packet radio station within 50 
miles. In the past, pay telephones were 
then used to relay the latest radar data 
to help guide the placement of Toto. 
Now, thanks to Fields and other CoCo 
and amateur radio buffs, it can be 
relayed to anywhere, from anywhere, in 
the state — even while the van is mov- 
ing. Fascinating! 

Window Writer Update 

We talked to Tom Roginski at Owl- 
Ware just before we hit the deadline for 
this column and learned that Window 
Writer, the Microsoft Word line word 
processor for Color Computer OS-9, is 
very close to shipping. Tom and his 
technical assistant, Bruce Navarre, were 
putting the final beta version through its 
paces when we called (early January). 
He hoped to be ready to advertise it in 
this issue of RAINBOW. If he doesn't 
make the advertising deadline, you're 
sure to hear about it in the May issue. 

Roginski reported that Window 
Writer author Roger Dash, a student at 
the University of Illinois, had taken our 
earlier comments to heart and had 
firmed up the editor's user interface to 
bring it closer to the standards estab- 
lished by programs like Microsoft 
Word. He said Window Writer and the 
IBM-like keyboard sold by Owl- Ware 
now have a perfect marriage. 

With this look back to the future we 
must end this month's column. The 
"find file" project is still cooking and we 
hope to take a close personal look at 
Window Writer in May. 

Keep on hacking! /W\ 



Real Desktop Publishing with 
THE WORKS. See page 19 




April 1989 THE RAINBOW 151 



RAINBOWTECH 




Data Processing With 

BASIC09 



By Richard A. White 

Contributing Editor 



When OS-9 first appeared for 
the CoCo, one question many 
asked was, "Now that I have 
it running, what do I do with it?" A 
variant of that question can be asked 
about any computer. In the early 1980's, 
we had to write programs ourselves 
using BASIC to get many things done. 
The appearance of word processors, 
spreadsheets and file programs simpli- 
fied things considerably so that most 
common tasks can be done with easily 
obtained software. 

However, some applications do not 
lend themselves to easy solutions in 
standard application software. For 
these, special programs must still be 
written. A spreadsheet provides a pro- 
gramming language of sorts. Simpler 
spreadsheets, like the one in Deskmate, 
handle the most frequently used numer- 
ical calculations and little more. Dyna- 
Calc and VIP are considerably more 
powerful but limited. Lotus 1-2-3 and 
now its many competitors that run on 
MS-DOS machines like the Tandy 
1000s have very powerful macro capa- 



Richard White lives in Fairfield, Ohio, 
has a long background with microcom- 
puters and specializes in BASIC pro- 
gramming. With Don Dollberg, he is 
the co-author of the TIMS database 
management program. 



bilities built in. These are really pro- 
gramming languages that allow the user 
to do most of what can be done in 
conventional programming languages. 

The most powerful database manager 
programs, like dBASE, RBASE, Fox- 
BASE and others on MS-DOS ma- 
chines and Sculptor under OS-9, have 
extensive built-in programming capa- 
bilities. In fact, most new business data 
applications written today are done, at 
least in part, using a database manager. 

The home user may not wish to invest 
in a full-featured database manager 
program since there are the options of 
using Disk BASIC or BASIC09. Of the 
two, BASIC09 is by far easier to work 
with, faster and more powerful. I rou- 
tinely use two applications that I wrote 
using BASIC09. One keeps records of 
rank, skill awards and merit badges for 
a Scout Troop. This requires nearly 150 
fields per record. That is beyond the 
reasonable capabilities of all CoCo 
database programs that I own, with the 
exception of Sculptor. One or two other 
OS-9 based database managers that I 
am unfamiliar with may do the job. 

The other program is a survey analy- 
sis program, which I will discuss here 
and in next month's column. I became 
involved in writing survey analysis 
programs five years ago when Professor 
Sam Sherrill of the University of Cin- 
cinnati asked my help with a project. He 



had been retained to devise and admin- 
ister a survey of about 50 questions to 
less than 200 people. The survey was 
somewhat complex, and Sherrill be- 
lieved he could analyze the results of the 
data using his CoCo. We programmed 
the project using Disk BASIC and the 
results were sufficient, producing better 
results faster and with less manual 
calculation than typically required. We 
subsequently programmed a number of 
other surveys with the CoCo and ported 
the software to an IBM PC. 

The surveys are not major by any 
means. They benefit local social service 
agencies that need information about 
their services and clients, but who are 
neither knowledgeable in survey meth- 
od or microcomputers. Small surveys of 
this nature are valuable to groups such 
as churches, schools and computer user 
groups. The survey application we will 
discuss deals with model railroading. 

For over twenty years, the Cincinnati 
division of the National Model Rail- 
road Association has sponsored an 
annual public show in November. The 
objective of these shows is to promote 
the hobby and provide a major revenue 
source for the sponsor. Attendance is 
over 5000 and production costs are 
approaching $10,000 per year. To pub- 
licize the show effectively, there was a 
need for a pool of information about the 
people who attend. 



152 THE RAINBOW April 1989 



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A few years ago, the committee dis- 
tributed surveys to attendees, resulting 
in 3000 forms. To analyze the results 
using a computer, we don't need to enter 
data from every form. This is the whole 
basis of the polling theory. Answers 
applicable to an entire population can 
be obtained from a small group as long 
as those responding are representative 
of the principal groups making up the 
whole population. 

My plan was to write a program to 
input and analyze data from the forms. 
Sherrill recommended using only 10 
percent of the forms for sufficient data. 
It is important to select them uniformly 
throughout the bag — say every tenth 
form. 

Next we defined the data's structure. 
Each survey response form constituted 
a record, with each piece of data clas- 
sified to a particular field in the record. 
Because it is difficult to analyze essay- 
type answers, we chose multiple choice 
questions as follows: 

1. Please tell us how your heard 
about this year's show. Check as many 
as apply. 

city newspaper flyer at 

flyer at hobby shop friends 

suburban paper other 

radio 

television 

2. Which best describes your interest 
in model railroading? 

active; inactive, but in- 
terested 

inactive no real interest. 

When the survey forms are in and a 
sample selected, it is time to put the 
computer to work. A record is set up in 
the program for each form. Individually 
stored responses provide maximum 
analysis flexibility. 

Familiarity with BASIC09 or access to 
reference material is helpful in discuss- 
ing this program. 

One principal difference between 
conventional BASIC and BASIC09 is in 
handling variables. While BASIC09 pro- 
vides simple string and numeric variable 
defaults, the user has powerful options 
to tailor variables for memory conser- 
vation, execution speed, disk file speed 
and space conservation, and for pro- 
gram readability and maintainance. 
This is done by dimensioning variables 
at the very beginning of the program 

module. 



The DIM statement tells BASIC09 the 
type of variable and how much memory 
to reserve for that variable. There are 
five predefined variable types in 

BASIC09; BYTE, INTEGER, REAL, STRING 

and boolean. Byte, integer and real 
variables handle numbers. A byte var- 
iable stores a whole number between 0 
and 255 in one byte of memory. An 
integer variable uses two bytes to store 
whole numbers in the range between 
-32,768 and 32,767. A real variable uses 
five bytes to store a floating point 
number that can be in the range Jl. 
1*10^+38. Like the numeric variable 
used in Color BASIC, this type supports 
decimal numbers. Our program only 
uses byte and integer variables, which 
are dimensioned as follows: 

DIM court tl , coun t2 , court t3 , pa th : INT 
EGER 

DIM rou: INTEGER 
DIM flagrBYTE 

Note that long variable names work 
and are encouraged for program read- 
ability and later maintainance. If you 
pack the procedure, variable names are 
stripped out, saving memory. A number 
of variable names can be strung to- 
gether with comma separators to save 
typing. 

The string variable type stores char- 
acters. Its length is fixed by the number 
provided in its DIM statement, or at a 
default 32 characters. The statement 

DIM filename:STRING[lG] allocates 16 

bytes for the name of the string that will 
hold the name of the file in which the 
program will store data. Here is where 
BASIC09 follows the more conventional 
compiled languages like FORTRAN, 
Pascal and C; 16 bytes only are set aside 
for the string. If you try to assign a 
longer string to the variable, its excess 
over 16 bytes is lost. Here are examples 
of dimensioning string variables from 
our program: 

DIM answer:5TRING[l] 
DIM filename:STRING[16] 

No decimal numbers are used in the 
program, but if there were, a dimension 
statement would look like this: 

DIM f loating:REAL 

I seldom use the boolean type, but it is 
dimensioned in a similar way to the 
examples already shown. 

Arrays allow you to group a number 
of pieces of data under one variable 
name and to access each data item by 



its number in the array. As each survey 
form is entered into the computer, it is 
numbered. That number refers to the 
member of the data array that contains 
the raw data entered. The simplest 
example from the survey program is the 
ZIP code array shown here: 

DIM zip(500) :STRING[5] 

Since I will use the ZIP code data to 
determine where show attendees live: in 
town, out of town, which side of town 
etc.. Only five digits are needed. ZIP 
codes in my area are in the 4xxxx series, 
41 xx* for Northern Kentucky, 43 xxx to 
ASxxx for Southwestern Ohio and 
47 xxx for Eastern Indiana. So I cannot 
use the integer type. Since I only need 
to sort and compare the ZIP code 
values, a five-character string will work 
well. The 500 in parentheses right after 
the variable name zip tells BASIC09 to 
reserve memory for 500 entries. BASIC09 
then reserves a 2500 byte block (5 * 500) 
of memory for the array. It finds which 
five bytes it needs to deal with by a 
simple calculation of byte count into the 
2500-byte data block. Here is an exam- 
ple of another string array: 

DIM c(13):STRING[20]. 

Arrays can be of any variable type, 
including complex, user-defined types. 

Complex variables contribute much 
to the power of BASOC09 in dealing with 
data handling chores like compiling 
survey data. The TYPE statement com- 
municates to BASIC09 a user-defined 
variable type that is a collection of 
variables of possibly mixed basic types. 
Here is a look at the type statement used 
in the survey program: 

TYPE dat = ar,cneus,sneijs, radio, 
tv,hfly,efly,fr,oth,act,iai,la, 
ni:BYTE 

Following the TYPE keyword is the type 
name data I assigned. The = is followed 
by names of the variables in the state- 
ment. The TYPE statement is fairly 
simple, containing only byte-type vari- 
ables. You can mix all basic variable 
types in a TYPE statement. At this point, 
BASIC09 treats the type statement as 
information only. We still need to di- 
mension a variable using the new var- 
iable type. Here's an example: 

DIM rec(500) :dat 

Here a variable array named rec has 
been dimensioned using our new type 



154 THE RAINBOW April 1989 



dat. Each member of the rec array 
contains all the variables defined in the 
type statement for dat. Since there are 
12 byte-type variables, the DIM state- 
ment will allocate 6000 (500 * 12) bytes 
for the array. This stores data as eco- 
nomically as possible without tweaking 
individual bits. Bit manipulations are 
possible but are considerably more 
complex. 

That constitutes all the variables used 
in the program. They are all dimen- 
sioned up front so BASIC09 can assign 
needed memory immediately and so we 
can easily find the DIM and type state- 
ments if we need to change something. 

Next, it is good practice to initialize 
variables. Most basics automatically 
initialize variables when they are dimen- 
sioned or first used. BASIC09 does not. 
All it does is allocate memory space. 
What is in the variable is what was in 
those bytes beforehand. This can be of 
harm in a number of ways not always 
apparent from an error message. 

It will contain some number, depend- 
ing what the bytes in its assigned mem- 
ory area were used for before you ran 
the program. This may not cause an 
error, but your results will be wrong. A 
string variable will contain garbage that 
also may or may not cause an error. 
Here is the initialization section of our 
survey program: 

(* Initialization *) 

c(l)="CITY NEWSPAPER" 

c(2) = "SUBURBRN NEWSPRPER" 

c(3)="RRDICT 

c(4) = "TELE\/ISI0N" 

c(5)="H0BBY SHDP FLYER" 

c(6) = "FLYER ELSEWHERE" 

c(7)="FRIENDS" 

c(8)="DTHER" 

c(9)=" " 

c(10)="RCTIVE" 

c(ll)="INRCTIVE, INTERESTED" 

c(12)="INRCTIVE" 

c(13) = "N0 INTEREST" 

rec( 1 ) .ar=0 

rec( 1) -cn9us=0 

rec(l) ,sneus = 0 

rec(l) . radio = 0 

rec (1 ) - tv=0 

rec(l) .hf ly=0 

rec(l) .ef ly=0 

rec(l) ,fr=0 

rec(l) -oth=0 

rec(l) . act = 0 

rec(l) • iai=0 

rec(l) . ia=0 

rec(l) .ni=0 

zip(l)="" 

This is a good example of how to 



access individual members of an array 
(eg. c(5) =). Note how the variables in 
our user-defined type dat are accessed 
(- rec( ) -cnews). The period connects 
the subvariable cneus to the dimen- 
sioned variable name rec, Note also 
that I initialized only the first member 
of the rec array. We will use that initial- 
ized member to initialize the other array 
members if we need to start a new file. 
If an existing file is used, that file will 
have been initialized when it was first 
created; loading it into the computer 
will fully initialize the array in memory. 

If no data file exists, BASIC09 will not 
create one when you try to open the file 
as many basics will. Rather, you must 
use the CRERTE statement to start the 
file. I generally have the program ask if 
a new file is to be started, though the 
ON ERROR GOTO command can be made 
to do it automatically in a round-about 
way. If I were writing a program for 
others, I would probably automate the 
operation in some cases. But I don't like 
to deal with the complexity when writ- 
ing for my own use. In any case, follow- 
ing is the code to determine if a new file 
is to be made or an existing one loaded. 
I will present it piece by piece with 
comments on code pieces along the way. 



(* Existing File or Initialize *) 

PRINT CHR$(12) 

RUN printat(10,10) 

PRINT "I Initialize Rrray" 

PRINT 

PRINT TAB (11) ; "L Load Rrray" 
RUN printat(10,14) 



BASIC09 does not contain a CLS com- 
mand to clear the screen, but PRINT 
CHR$(12) does the same thing. 

Printat is a separate small program to 
position the cursor on the screen. It is 
called by name using the RUN command. 
It needs two parameters: the column 
and the row where the cursor is to be 
placed. These are included in that order 
within the parentheses. These could be 
variable names rather than numbers. 
Here is the module in its entirety: 



PROCEDURE printat 

0000 PRRRM col , row: INTEGER 

000B PRINT CHR$(2); CHR$(col32); 

CHR$(rou32); 
0021 END 



In the Printat procedure, the PRRRM 




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keyword is used instead of DIM to indi- 
cate that values for the variables col 
and row will be sent when the procedure 
is called. In our example these were just 
numbers. If they had been in variables 
in the calling program, Printat would 
have been given addresses in the data 
space where those variable values were 
being stored. No new variable storage 
space would be involved in this case. 

If I wanted to put some functions that 
work on values in our rec array in a 
separate procedure called special - 
-jwork, I could let that procedure access 
the whole array with the simple call RUN 

special— work (rec). The complete 

TYPE statement would need to be dupli- 
cated in the called procedure, but in- 
stead of dim rec(500) :dat, the state- 
ment PARAM rec ( 500 ): da t would be 

used. 

The question of whether the user 
wants to start a new file (Initialize 
array) or load an existing file was asked. 
Here is how the answer (an I or L 
keyboard response) is handled: 



WHILE answer"!" AND answer"L" DO 

GET 80, answer 

RUN isupper (answer ) 

ENDWHILE 



First we only want to move on if an 
I or an L is keyed. The WHILE. . . 
DO. . .ENDWHILE makes this test and 
loops back if it is not met. You will like 

GET 80, answer. Note above that answer 

is dimensioned as a one-character- 
long string. GET 80, answer then goes to 
Path 0 to get one character and waits 
until that condition is met or until a 
carriage return is found. Path 0 is the 
keyboard so the GET statement waits 
until the user presses one key and then 
lets the program process the key. In this 
case GET is much nicer than Inkey, 
which lets the program go on whether 
there is a keystroke or not and where 
one must write a loop to keep looking 
at the keyboard. 

If you have the keyboard in lower- 
case mode, you are not likely to re- 
member that the program is looking for 
an uppercase response. The procedure 
isupper takes care of this by promoting 
all lowercase letters to uppercase. It also 
is relatively short, but long enough that 
one would not want to include it repeat- 
edly in a program. I load it into BASIC09 
whenever I am writing a program that 
will need it and call it as a separate 
named procedure. When you have a 



number of separate procedures in 
BASIC09 as you write a program, re- 
member to save them all out into one 
file together with SAVE* your filename. 
Then when you reload the file all the 
procedures will load in together. Note 
also that isupper is set up to handle 
longer strings (40 characters as shown), 
but that it works for single characters 
as well. 

PROCEDURE isupper 

0000 DIM count, line__length: INTEGER 

000B PflRflM ansuer:STRING[40] 

0017 DIM ascii: INTEGER 

001E DIM char:5TRING[l] 

002A DIM work_string:STRING[40] 

003G 

0037 count:=l 

003E line_length:=LEN(answer) 

0047 work_string="" 

004E 

004F WHILE count<line_length+l DO 
005F asci i : =ASC ( MID$ ( answer , 
count, 1 ) ) 

006E IF asciiOG THEN 

007R char=CHR$(ascii) 

00B3 work str ing=work_string+char 

008F count:=cqunt+l 

009A ELSE 

009E char=CHR$(ascii-32) 

00AA work string=work_string+char 

008G count: = count+l 

00C1 ENDIF 

00C3 ENDWHILE 

00C7 

00CB answer=work_s tring 
00D0 END 

If we need to make a new file, the 
following if statement is true and its 
contained code is executed. 

IF answer="I" THEN 
FDR countl=2 TO 500 
rec ( coun tl ) = rec ( 1 ) 
zip(countl)="" 
NEXT countl 
countl=0 

RUN printat(10,14) 
PRINT "FILENAME: "; 
INPUT fname 

CREATE ttpath, fname:UIRITE 

PUT ttpath, rec 

PUT ttpath, zip 

CLOSE ttpath 

ENDIF 

Remember that we initialized all 
variables in member rec(l) so all we 
need to do is assign rec(l) to all the 
other members of the array. We also 
initialized zip (1) to a null, — , but it 
is easier and more readable to repeat the 
null than reference zip(i). The state- 



ment countl=0 resets countl so I don't 
get a surprise later. The remaining code 
gets the new filename, creates the file, 
stores the arrays and closes the files. We 
will need the file again in the program, 
but I always assume a file is closed; then 
I open it, use it and close it to prevent 
surprises. 

The PUT ttpath, rec and PUT 

ttpath, zip statements store both entire 
arrays, read individual variables or 
records to a file and then read them 
back in individually. This is also much 
faster since the computer needs to only 
dump 6000-byte and 2500-byte blocks 
of memory directly to the file. No time 
is wasted finding individual values. 
Recovery of the arrays is just as simple 
and fast. Here is the code block to load 
the arrays back into the program: 

IF ansuer="L" THEN 
RUN printat(10,14) 
PRINT "Filename: 
INPUT fname 
OPEN ttpath, fname:READ 
GET ttpath, rec 
GET ttpath, zip 
CLOSE ttpath 

About the only thing different here 
from the code to save the arrays is the 
use of GET rather than PUT. We used GET 
before to get a character from the 
keyboard. Here we use it to get a whole 
array from a disk file. OS-9 was de- 
signed to be device-independent, and 
Here we see one of the payoffs. 

countl=0 
REPEAT 

countl=countl+l 
PRINT countl; " "\ 
UNTIL rec(countl ) -ar=0 
countl=countl-l 
ENDIF 

Since we need numbers to access 
array members, we need to have a count 
of how many have been used. One way 
is to save the count used into a variable 
in the file. That also saves memory and 
disk space. In the input section, I put the 
array member number into the variable 
rec( ) .ar, so it is easy to hunt through 
this variable in the array members until 
I find a zero. Countl then is the member 
number of the first empty member. 
Since the input loop increments countl 
at its beginning, we need to subtract one 
so it represents the last used member at 
that point. 

Next month we'll take up the data 
entry section and get into the data 
analysis. ^ 



1 56 THE RAINBOW April 1989 



Color Computer I, II, III 
Free Software for Drive 0 Systems 

CoCo Checker.. .Test roms, rams, disk drives and & controller printer, keyboard cassette & more. 
Tape/Disk Utility...Transfers disk to tape and tape to disk. 



159 



95 



Drive 0 



179 



95 



Drive 0 



269 



95 



Drive 0 & 1 



• Full Ht Drive 

• Single Case 

• Heavy Duty Power Supply 

• 2 Drive Cable 

• Gold plated contacts 

• Controller & manuals 



• Double Sided Slim Line Drive 

• Case holds 2 slim line drives 

• Heavy Duty Power Supply 

• 2 Drive Cable 

• Gold plated contacts 

• Controller & Manuals 



• 2 Double Sided Slim Line Drive 

• Case holds 2 slim line drives 

• Heavy Duty Power Supply 

• 2 Drive Cable 

• Gold plated contacts 

• Controller & Manuals 



Other Drive Specials 



119 



95 



2nd Drive 

for new Radio Shack 
includes: 

•Slim Line DS/DD Drive 

• Cabling & Instructions 

• Mounting Hardware 



Full Ht Drive 89 95 

Full Ht Drive Ps/Case 1 29 95 

Slim Line Drive 99 95 

Slim Line Drive Ps/Case... 139 95 

2 Slim Drives Ps/Case 239 95 

Disk Controller 59 



95 




i s 



Single Ps & Case 44 95 



Dual Vzht Ps & Case 

Dual Full Ht. Ps & Case 
Disk Controller 



54 95 
79 95 

59 95 



10 Diskettes 

with free library uasei 



9 



95 



Quality Add-On's for Tandy 1000, SX, TX, SL, TL, 3000, 4000 

HARD CARDS 




1 0 meg 259.95 40 meg 399.95 

20 meg 299.95 49 meg 499.95 

30 meg 349.95 64 meg 599.95 

HARD DRIVE KITS 



1 0 meg kit 249.95 

20 meg kit 299.95 

30 meg kit 339.95 



40 meg kit 399.95 

60 meg kit 539.95 



1000, 1000A, 

Memory Cards 

Zucker Memory 

• DMA & 512K CALL 

Zucker Multifunction 



Serial 

Real Time Clock 
51 2K DMA 
Software 



CALL 



TANDY 1000 

1000, SX, TX, 3000, 4000 

2nd Floppy 

360K TEAC $119.95 

720K Mitsubishi $99.95 

31/2" Mitsubishi $119.95 



1000, 1000A, SX, TX, SL, TL 

Hard Drive 
Controller 

Will run 1 or 2 
Hard Drives 
Supports drives up to 120 megabytes 



$99.95 



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CUSTOMER SERVICE 
508-278-6655 

TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE 
508-278-6556 



TOLL FREE ORDER LINE 

1-800-635-0300 

TRUE DATA PRODUCTS 

115 MAIN ST., P.O. BOX 347 
UXBRIDGE, MA 01569 
508-278-6555 

HOURS: MON-FRI. 9-6, SAT. 10-4 (EST) 



CORPORATE P.O.'S WELCOMED 

ALL PACKAGES SHIPPED UPS 
EXCEPT CANADA AND A.P.O.'s 
C.O.D.'S ADD $2.30 
MASTER CHARGE/VISA ADD 3% 
1 YEAR WARRANTY UNLESS 
OTHERWISE NOTED 
PRICES TERMS CONDITIONS 
SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT 
NOTICE 



Racksellers 



The retail stores listed below carry THE RAINBOW on a regular basis and 
may have other products of interest to Tandy Color Computer users. We 
suggest you patronize those in your area. 



ALABAMA 

Birmingham 

Brewton 

Florence 

Greenville 

Madison 

Montgomery 

Tuscaloosa 

ALASKA 

Fairbanks 

ARIZONA 

Cottonwood 
Lake Havasu 

City 
Phoenix 
Tempe 

Tucson 

ARKANSAS 

Fayettevllle 
Ft. Smith 
Little Rock 



CALIFORNIA 

Berkeley 
Citrus Heights 
Hollywood 

La Jofla 

Los Angeles 

Marysville 

Napa 

Oakland 

Rancho 

Murleta 
Sacramento 

San Francisco 



Santa Monica 
San Jose 
Santa Rosa 
Stockton 

Sunnyvale 
Torrance 

COLORADO 

Aurora 
Colorado 

Springs 
Denver 
Glenwood 

Springs 
Grand 

Junction 
Longmont 

DELAWARE 

Mfddletown 
Newark 
Wilmington 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 

Washington. 
DC Chronlchles 
News Room 
World News, Inc. 



Jefferson News Co. 
McDowell Electronics 
Anderson News Co. 
M & B Electronics 
Madison Books 
Trade 'N' Books 
Injun John's, Inc. 

Arrow Appliance/Radio Shack 

A & W Graphics Co. 

Book Nook 
TRI-TEK Computers 
Books, Etc. 
Computer Library 
Anderson News Co. 

Vaughn Electronics/Radio Shack 
Hot Off the Press Newsstand 
Anderson News Co. 

Lyon Enterprises 
Software Plus 
Levity Distributors 
Stef-Jen, Inc. 

Butler & Mayes Booksellers 
Circus of Books (2 Locations) 
Bookland 

Bookends Bookstore 
DeLauefs News Agency 

Software Plus 
Delberf s Readerama 
Tower Magazine 
Booksmlth 
Bookworks 
Castro Kiosk 

Midnight Special Bookstore 
Computer Literacy Bookshops 
Sawyer's News. Inc. 
Harding Way News 
Paperbacks Unlimited 
Computer Literacy 
El Camino College Bookstore 

Aurora Newsstand 

Hathaway's 
News Gallery 

The Book Train 

Read more Book & Magazine 
City Newsstand 

DelmarCo. 
Newark Newsstand 
Normar. Inc.— The Smoke Shop 



FLORIDA 

Boca Raton 

Clearwater 

Cocoa 

Dania 

Davie 

Ft. Lauderdale 



Gainesville 
Jacksonville 
North Miami 

Beach 
Panama City 
Pensocola 
Pinellas Park 
South 

Pasadena 
Starke 

Sunrise 
Tallahassee 



Tltusville 



Great American Book Co. 
The Avid Reader 
The Open Door 
Dania News & Books 
Software Plus More 
Bob's News & Book-Store 
Clarks Out of Town News 
Mike's Electronics Distributor 
Paper Chase 
Book Co. 

Almar Bookstore 
Boyd-Ebert Corp. 
Anderson News Co. 
Wolfs Newsstand 

Poling Place Bookstore 
Record Junction, Inc. 
Radio Shack Dealer 
Sunn/s at Sunset 
Anderson News Co. 
DuBe/s News Center 
Computrac 



GEORGIA 




ATianta 


Boraers 


Bremen 


Bremen tieciTonics/Kaaio onacK 


roresT rarx 


titers iNews v^enier 


J© sup 


i<aaio onucK 


inomasviiie 


omoKenous6 iNewssTuno 


Toccoa 


Manin music i<aaiu onacx 


IDAHO 




Boise 


Book Shelf, Inc. 


Moscow 


Johnson News Agency 


ILLINOIS 




Belleville 


oOTiware or oysTems 


ChamDalan 


Bookmark 


Chicago 


B. Dal ton Booksellers 


Decatur 


Book Emporium 




K-Mart Plaza 




Northgate Mall 


East Mollne 


Book Emporium 


Evanston 


Norrls Center Bookstore 


Kewanee 


Book Emporium 


Lisle 


Book Nook 


Lombard 


Empire Periodicals 


Newton 


Bill's TV Radio Shack 


Paris 


Book Emporium 


Peoria 


Book Emporium 




Sheridan village 




Westlake Shopping Center 




Illinois News Service 


Springfield 


Book Emporium 


Sangamon Center North 




Town & Country Shopping Ctr. 


Sunnyiand 


Book Emporium 


West Frankfort 


Paper Place 


Wheeling 


North Shore Distributors 


INDIANA 




Angola 


D & D Electronics 


Radio Shack 


Beme 


White Cottage Electronics 


Bloomlngton 


Book Comer 


Columbus 


Micro Computer Systems, Inc. 


Crawfordsvllle 


Koch's Books 



MASSACHUSETTS (cont'd) 



Dyer 
Franklin 
Ft. Wayne 
Garrett 
Indianapolis 



Lebanon 
Martinsville 
Richmond 
Wabash 

IOWA 

Davenport 
Des Moines 
Fairfield 

KANSAS 

Hutchinson 
Topeka 

Wellington 
Wichita 

KENTUCKY 

Hazard 

Henderson 

Hopkinsville 

Louisville 

Mlddletown 

Newport 

Paducah 

LOUISIANA 

Baton Rouge 
Lockport 
New Orleans 
Monroe 

MAINE 

Bangor 

Brockton 

Caribou 

Oxford 

Sanford 

MARYLAND 

College Park 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Boston 

Brockton 

Cambridge 



Miles Books 
Gallery Book Shop 
Mlchlana News Service 
Finn News Agency. Inc. 
Bookland, Inc. 
Borders Bookshop 
Indiana News 
Southside News 
Gallery Book Shop 
Radio Shack 
Voyles News Agency, Inc. 
Mlttlng's Electronics 

Interstate Book Store 
mockery's Books, Inc. 
Kramers Books & Gifts 

Crossroads, Inc. 
Palmer News, inc. 
Town Crier of Topeka, Inc. 
Da nays/ Radio Shack Dealer 
Lloyd's Radio 

Daniel Boone Gulf Mart 
Matfs News & Gifts 
Hobby Shop 

Hawley-Cooke Booksellers (2 Locations) 
Software City 
Simon's Castle News 
Radio Shack 



City News Stand 
TV Doctor/Radio Shack 
Sidney's News Stand Uptown 
The Book Rack 

Magazines, Inc, 
Voyager Bookstore 
Radio Shack 
Books- N-Things 
Radio Shack 



Ipswich 
Littleton 
Lynn 
Swansea 

MICHIGAN 

Allen Park 

Birmingham 

Durand 

E. Detroit 

Hillsdale 

Holland 

Kalamazoo 

Lowell 

Muskegon 

Nile* 

Perry 

Riverview 

Roseville 

MINNESOTA 

Bumsville 

Crystal 

Edina 

Minneapolis 
Mlnnetonka 
Roseville 
St. Paul 



Wllimar 

MISSOURI 

Farmlngton 
Rat River 
Florissant 
Jefferson City 
Klrksvllle 
St. Louis 

MONTANA 

Butte 

NEBRASKA 

Lincoln 
Omaha 

NEVADA 

Carson City 
Las Vegas 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Keene 
Manchester 
West Lebanon 

NEW JERSEY 

Atlantic City 
Cedar Knolls 
Clinton 
Pennsvllle 
Rockaway 

NEW MEXICO 

Alamogordo 
Albuquerque 
Santa Fe 

NEW YORK 

Amherst 
Brockport 
Brooklyn 
Elmlra Heights 
Fredonla 
Hudson Falls 
Huntington 
Johnson City 
New York 



University Bookstore 

Eastern Newsstand 
Voyager Bookstore 
Out Of Town News 



Pawling 
Rochester 



Ipswich News 
Computer Plus 
North Shore News Co. 
Newsbreak. inc. 

Book Nook, Inc. 

Border's Book Shop 

Robblns Electronics 

Merit Book Center 

Electronics Express/Radio Shack 

Fris News Company 

The Book Raft 

Lowell Electronics 

The Eight Bit Corner 

Mlchlana News Service 

Perry Computers 

Riverview Book Store 

New Horizons Book Shop 

Shlnder's Bumsville 
Shinder's Crystal Gallery 
Shlnder's Leisure Lane 
Shinder's (2 Locations) 
Shlnder's Ridge Square 
Shlnder's Roseville 
Shlnder's Annex 
Shlnder's Maplewcod 
Shinder's St. Pauls 
The Photo Shop 

Ray's TV & Radio Shack 
Ray's TV & Radio Shack 
Book Brokers Unlimited 
Cowley Distributing 
T&R Electronics 
Book Emporium 

Raza Books 

Nebraska Bookstore 
Nelson News 

Book cellar 

Hurley Electronics 

Steve's Books & Magazines 

Radio Shack Associate Store 

Bookwrights 

Verham News Corp. 

Atlantic City News Agency 
Village Computer & Software 
Micro World II 
Dave's Elect. Radio Shack 
Software Station 

New Horizons Computer Systems 
Page One Newsstand 
Downtown Subscription 

village Green-Buffalo Books 

Uft Bridge Book Shop, inc. 

Cromiand, Inc. 

Southern Tier News Co., Inc. 

On Line: Computer Access Center 

G A West & Co. 

Oscar's Bookshop 

Unicom Electronics 

Barnes & Noble— Sales Annex 

Coliseum Books 

Eastern Newsstand 

Grand Central Station, Track 37 

200 Park Ave., (Pan Am #1 ) 

55 Water Street 

World Trade Center #2 
First Stop News 
Idle Hours Bookstore 
International Smoke Shop 
Jonli Smoke 
Penn Book 
Software City 
State News 
Walden Books 
Worid Wide Media Services 
Universal Computer Service 
Microcom Software 
Village Green 



1 58 THE RAINBOW April 1 989 



NEW YORK (cont'd) 
World Wide News 
NORTH CAROLINA 



Caiy 

Chapel Hill 

Charlotte 

Hickory 

Jacksonville 

Kemersville 

Lexington 

Marion 

Winston-Salem 

OHIO 

Akron 

Canton 

Chardon 

Cincinnati 

Cleveland 

Columbiana 

Columbus 



Dayton 



Dublin 
Falrborn 



Hndley 
Kent 

Lakewood 
Lima 

Mlamlsburg 

Parma 

Toledo 

Warren 

Xenia 

Youngstown 

OKLAHOMA 

Oklahoma 

City 
Taklequah 
Tulsa 

OREGON 

Eugene 
Portland 



Salem 

PENNSYLVANIA 

Allentown 
AJtoona 
Bryn Mawr 
Cony 

Feastervllle 
King of Prussia 
Malvern 
Reading 
Temple 
West Chester 
Wind Gap 
York 

RHODE ISLAND 

Newport 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

Charleston Hts. 
Clemson 
Florence 
Greenville 
Spartanburg 

TENNESSEE 

Brentwood 
Chattanooga 

Dickson 
Knoxville 

Memphis 
Nashville 



Smyrna 

TEXAS 

Big Spring 
Desoto 
Elgin 
Ft. Worth 
Hartlngton 



News Center In Cory Village 
University News & Sundry 
Newsstand intl 
C 2 Books & Comics 
Mlchele's, Inc. 
K&S Newsstand 
Martin's News Stand 
Boomers Rhythm Center 
K&S Newsstand (3 Locations) 
Rainbow News Ltd. 

Churchill News & Tobacco 
Little Professor Book Center 

Thrasher Radio & TV 

Clnsoft 

Erieview News 

Fidelity Sound & Electronics 

B5 Software 

Micro Center 

The Newsstand 

Books & Co. 

Huber Heights Book & Card 

WllkeNews 

Wright News & Books 

Book Bam 

News-Readers 

Sandbox Microsystems 

Wllke's University Shoppe 

Open Book 

The News Shop 

Lakewood international News 

Edu-Caterefs 

Wltke News 

Bookmark Newscenter 

Leo's Book & Wine Shop 

Book Nook, Inc. 

Fine Print Books 

Plaza Book & Smoke Shop 



Merit Micro Software 

Thomas Sales, Inc. dba Radio Shack 

Steve's Book Store 

Libra Books M Book Mark 
Fifth Avenue News 
Rich Cigar Store, Inc. 
Sixth & Washington News 
Capitol News Center 
Checkmate Book 

Owi Services 

Newborn Enterprises 

Bryn Mawr News 

Corry Books & Cards 

Global Books 

Gene's Books 

Personal Software 

Smith's News & Cord Center ; % 

Software Comer 

Chester County Book Co. 

Micro World 

The Computer Center of York 
Tollgate Bookstore 

Bellevue News 

Software Haus, inc. 
Clemson Newsstand 
Ray's #1 

Palmetto News Co. 
Software City 

Bookworid #5 
Anderson News Co. 
Guild Books & Periodicals 
Highland Electronics 
Anderson News Co. 
Davls-KIdd Bookseller 
Computer Center 
Davls-KIdd Booksellers 
Mosko's Place 
RM Mills Bookstore 
Delker Electronics 



UTAH 

Provo 

VIRGINIA 

Danville 
Hampton 
Lynchburg 
Norfolk 

Richmond 

WASHINGTON 

Port Angeles 
Seattle 

Tacoma 

WEST VIRGINIA 

Huntington 
Logan 
Madison 
Parkersburg 
South 
Charleston 

WISCONSIN 

Appleton 
Cudahy 
Kenosha 
Madison 

Milwaukee 
Waukesha 

ARGENTINA 

Cordoba 

AUSTRALIA 

Blaxland 
Klngsford 

CANADA: 
ALBERTA 

Banff 

Bonnyvllle 

Brooks 

Calgary 

Claresholm 

Drayton Valley 

Edmonton 

Edson 

Fdlrvlew 

Fox Creek 

Ft. Saskatche- 
wan 
Grande 

Cache 
Grande 

Centre 
Hlnton 
Innlsfail 
Lecombe 
leduc 
Lethbrldge 
Uoydmlnster 
Okotoks 
Peace River 

St. Paul 

Stettler 

Strathmore 

Taber 

Westlock 

Wetasklwin 



BRITISH COLUMBIA (cont'd) 



Valley Book Center 

K&S Newsstand 
Benders 

Self Serve Software 
l-O Computers 
Turn The Page 
Volume I Bookstore 

Port Book & News 
Adams News Co., Inc. 
Bulldog News 
B & I Magazines & Books 
Nybbles 'N Bytes 

Nick's News 

Stan's Electronics & Radio Shack 
Communications, LTD 
Valley News Service 

Spring Hill News 

Badger Periodicals 
Cudahy News & Hobby 
R.K. News, Inc. 
Pic A Book 
University Bookstore 
Juneau Village Reader 
Holt Variety 



Irtformqtlon Telecommunlcatlones 

Blaxland Computers 
Parts Radio Electronics 



Banff Radio Shack 
Paul Tercler 

Double "D" A.S.C Radio Shack 
Billy's News 

Radio Shack Associated Stores 
Langard Electronics 
CMD Micro 
Radio Shack, asd 
D.N.R. Furniture & TV 
Fox City Color & Sound 
A.S.C. Radio Shack 

Ft. Mall Radio Shack, ASC 

The Stereo Hut 

The Book Nook 

Jim Cooper 

L & S Stereo 

Brian's Electronics 

Radio Shack Associated Stores 

Datatron 

Uoyd Radio Shack 
Okotoks Radio Shack 
Radio Shack Associated Stores 
Tavener Software 
Walter's Electronics 
Stettler Radio Shack 
Wheatland Electronics 
Pynewood Sight & Sound 
Westlock Stereo 
Radio Shack 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 

Bumaby Compullt 
Bums Lake VT. video Works 
Campbell 
River TRS Electronics 



Chilliwack 
Coquftlam 
Coortenay 
Dawson Creek 
Golden 
Kelowna 
Langley 
Nelson 
New West- 
minster 
Parksvllle 
Penficton 

Sidney 
Smlrhers 
Squamlsh 
Vancouver 



100 Mile 
House : 

MANITOBA 

Altona 

Lundar 

Morden 

The Pas 

Selkirk 

VIrden 

Winnipeg 

NEW BRUNSWICK 

Moncton 
Sussex 



Charles Parker 
Cody Books LTD 
Rick's Music & Stereo 
Bell Radio & TV 
Taks Home Furnishings 
Telesoft Marketing 
Langley Radio Shack 
Oliver's Books 

Cody Books LTD 
Parksvllle TV 
DJ.'s 

Four Comer Grocery 
Sidney Electronics 
Wall's Home Furniture 
Kotyk Electronics 
Active Components 
Ftiendlyware Computers 
Granville Book Co, 
Siliconnections Books LTD 

Tip Top Radio & TV 

LAWIebrLtd. 
Goranson Eiec. 
Central Sound 
Jodi's Sight & Sound 
G.L Enns Elec. 
Archer Enterprises 
J & J Electronics Ltd. 



Jeffries Enterprises 
Dewfrt Elec. 



NEWFOUNDLAND 

Bofwood Seaport Elec. 

Carbonear Slade Realties 



NOVA SCOTIA 

Halifax 

ONTARIO 

Angus : 

Aurora 

Concord 

Exceter 

Hanover 

Huntsvllle 

Kenoro 

Kingston 

Ustowei 

South River 

Toronto 

QUEBEC 

LaSalle 
Pont. Rouge 

SASKATCHEWAN 

Asslniboia 
Estevan 
Moose Jaw 
Nipiwan 
Regina 

Saskatoon 
Shellbrooke 
Tlsdate 
Unity 

YUKON 

Whftehorse 

JAPAN 

Tokyo 

PUERTO RICO 

East Isla Verde 
San Juan 



Atlantic News 

Micro Computer Services 

Compu Vision 

Ingram Software 

J. Macleane & Sons 

Modem Appliance Centre 

Huntsvllle Elec. 

Donny M B" 

T.M. Computers 

Modem Appliance Centre 

Max TV 

Dennis TV 

Gordon and Gotch 

Messagerles de Presse Benjamin Enr. 
Boutique Bruno Laroche 

Telstar News 
Kotyk Electronics 
D&S Computer Place 
Cornerstone Sound 
Regina CoCo Club 
Software Supermarket 
Everybody's Software Library 
Gee Laberge Radio Shack 
Paul's Service 
Granf s House of Sound 

H & O Holdings 



America Ado, Inc. 

The Color Computer Store 
Software City 



Poncho's News 
Maxwell Books 
The Homing Pigeon 
Trinity News 
Book Mark 



Also available at all B. Dalton Booksellers, and 
selected Coles and W.H. Smith in Canada, 
Waldenbooks, Pickwick Books, Encore Books, 
Barnes & Noble, Little Professors, Tower Book & 
Records, Kroch J s & Brentano's, and Community 
Newscenters. 



April 1989 THE RAINBOW 1 59 



Advertisers Index 



We encourage you to patronize our advertisers — all of whom support the Tandy Color 
Computer* We will appreciate your mentioning the rainbow when you contact these firms. 



Alpha Software Technologies 107 
Arizona Small Computer ; ; 3 

Company , . .. * 1 1 5 

Burke & Burke . . . - -|S 

Cer-Comp. + +<. . . . . » .62, 63 

^yinSOft ••■-». r + . 4 i 1 1 .j. i'i. #- 1 ■ *" ;■ -f ? » ♦ 46 

C0C0 Connection. < * ... 105 

COQntteC . » . |. r » r + + + «•••• ■ ♦ • • V:» 29 

Colorware . . ... . . . . . 1 9, 20, 21 , 23, 

35,41,78, 105, 121, 137, 151 

Computer Island 141 

Computer Plus + . . . . . .3 

D.P. Johnson * . ■ , + + H 1 49 

Dayton Associates of 

W. R. Hall, Inc. . .129 

Dr. Preble's Programs . . . . .... . .93 

Dynamic Storage Products ... . .61 

Federal Hill Software . . . . . . . . ... .67 

Frank Hogg Laboratories . . . .56, 57 

Fraser Instrument . . . .... . . . .... .115 

Game Point Software ...... . . . . .33 

Gimmesoft . . . . .... H < 30, 31 

Granite Computer Systems . . . ,117 
G regory Software . . . . ... . . . , .78 

HawkSoft, Inc. . . ... ..... ... ... .1 31 

Howard Medical . . .162, IBC 

JR & JR Softstuff . . . . ..121 

JWT Enterprises .>.... ..... ♦ . .120 

Kenneth Leigh Enterprises. . ♦ .....91 

Ken-Ton Electronics ......... .141 

Magus Systems Engineering -53 
Metric I ndustries . , . . . . .,. .1 2 

MichTron , , , . , ... ,>..;.*.... . .BG 

Micro Works, The ............. .95 

Microcom Software . ► , . . .9, 11,13, 

15 r 1$,;17* 
Microtech Consultants 

NRI Schools * ,99 

Owl-Ware ....... .69, 70 

PXE Computing r . ., ;>-.,. 7 

Perry ..... + 155 

ff- x". '-'-" r : ; --.-.. J ,"- : i "■ . -'^T s ?\y-,~J-'&f /si j^i^i"^. 

1 60 THE RAINBOW ApriJ 1 9Q9 



Puritas Springs Software/ 

SoftWAR Technologies . . . ... .91 

Rainbow Book of 

Adventures IV + , .. . . . ,100 
Rainbow Binder , , . , ... < , m . . & m .42 
Rainbow Bookshelf ....... ... . .66 

Rainbowfest . . . . ,109, 110, 111 

RGB Computer Systems.*;. . . . .133 
Rainbow on Tape & Disk .......... J FC 

Rulaford Research ., f r 43 

SD Enterprises . , ► . . . .25, 49 

STG Computers, Inc. + + a . . :S :; , , . . .23 

Second City Software 161 

Simply Better Software . ; .61 



Call: 

Belinda Kirby 
Advertising Representative 
(502) 228-4497 



SpectroSystems . . . * , , 
SPORTSWARE. r . . .171 

Sugar Software , . ., .73 

Sundog Systems . .*^.153 

T & D Software . ...... .122, 123, 47 

T.E.M. of California . . , ,139 

Tandy/Radio Shack . > ,125 

T*e pco . ........ ....«,. > > 4. .«. »;.•: . . • . .89 

Tothian Software . . . , >■ , > . 1 39 
True Data Products . . ^. S . .157 
Try-O-Byte . . , , : > \, . ... . .117 

Vidicom Corporation . . . . . , H < , < 1 33 

Zebra Systems . . ..... . , , < , .* < + .65 



Call: 

Kim Vincent 

Advertising Representative 
(502) 228-4492 



The Falsoft Building 
9509 U.S. Highway 42 
P.O. Box 385 
Prospect, KY 40059 

FAX (502) 228-5121 




[Second City Soitwar 



MasterCard VISA C.O.D. CHECKS 



CoCo CALENDER DELUXE: 




ORDER 



P.O.Box 72956 
Roselle, IL 60172 
Voice: 312-653-5610 
BBS: 312-307-1519 



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BSE - BASIC SCREEN EDITOR: 



different house rules. 64k DISK. $16.95 |DRAFTING PROCESSOR. Create pro-look»| commands simplified and a host of other special 

lingdiagrams using a 480x540 pixel screen with 61 features. 64k DISK. $14.95 

[viewing windows! Over '30* electronic symbols] 
Gives Basic a full-screen editor to supplement the Iwith 10 definable symbols. Even supports Logic! A-DOS 3 : 

regular EDIT commands. Works on the CoCo 1&2 Igates & Multipin chips! Print hardcopy or savel The popular Disk Operating System from Spec- 

and with the CoCo 3, WIDTH 32, 40 or 80 is sup- Itp disk for later editing. NOW CoCo 3 COM J troSystems for the CoCo 3. 128k DISK $34.95 

ported! Complete screen cursor control with the IPATIBLE. 64k DISK ......,..$22,951 



arrow keys plus features to make EDITing Basic 
programs a snap! BSE, a must have CoCo utility. IOS-9 SOLTOON: 
Our low price was the only corner that was cut on (Tame the hostile environment of OS-9 with OS- 
thisqualityprogram. 64k DISK $19.95 19 SOLUTION! Replaces 20 of the command! 



SCScan custom 'burn 1 your purchased DOS pro- 
gram for only $15.00! This includes the price of the 
EPROM chip and the BURN charge. Call or write 
for details. 



CHECK-09MV - Version 2.0: 



Icalls with single keystroke, menu driven com- 
mands. No more long and complex pathnames! VIP LIBRARY: 



Finally, a program that interacts with MultiVue for ■orsynlaxes to remember! Works with either OS- 



FAST and EASY check balancing. CHECK-09MV 
and you can now take control of your bank checking 
account. No more waiting on your bank statement 
for an ending balance. CHECK-09MV will provide 
a check-by-check balance in an easy to use format 
that eliminates those monthly surprizes! Bring your 
money and you closer together and have the buck 
STOP HERE! Featuring an all new EDITING 
command. 512k DISKL $25.95 



PLevel OnebrTwo.,..^.©:. ...;,..,..$24.95 



[TAPE/DISK UTILITY: 
U utility package that transfers TAPE to DISK 
lor DISK to TAPE automatically. If you just got 
Uur first disk drive, TAPE/DISK is a MUST 
HAVE program. Will print tape <& disk directo- 
ries to any supported prin ter. 64k DISK., 



This popular 'intergraded' package includes, VIP 
Writer, Terminal, Data Base, Calc and Disk Zap 
which can fix a diskette with I/O errors. SCS 
special price. 64k DISK. $149.95 



CoCoMAX II : By Colorware 



VIP WRITER III w/SPELL CHECKER : 
All new and completely up-graded with expanded 
memory and pop-up main menus. You can also 
have up to 8 - 48k working text screens that will 
allow you to create 8 separate documents! Settle 
&$| for only the best 100% ML word processor for the 
CoCo 3. 128k DISK $79.95 



HI-RESJOYSTICK DRIVER. 
MAX PATCH...... »»«.».«<»♦«»«»».»»»«♦»•»«»».*♦»»««» .95 

The'CLASSIC CoCo graphic program. Draw great |SUYBOTH FORONLY \ 

works of art with the program that set a standard for 
allothers to follow. Supported bya Hi-Resinterface IHGRXDUMP: 

and numerous printer drivers for complete set-up. Iproduce hardcopy graphic files with your DMPl SPECIAL: Order any VIP program from SCS,and 

land CGP (B&W) printer. CoCo l,2& 3compat^| receive an additional program at NO EXTRA 
iblc. 64k DISK..,,.,,.,,, 



64k DISK $78.45 



CoCoMAX III . By Colorware 
All new program based off the 'CLASSIC CoCo- 
MaxII software. Allows for full animation, select 16 
colors from a 64 color palette, fast & easy to use w/ 
pull down menus in a point-and-click environment. 
128k or512k DISK. $78.45 

DISK UTILITY 2.1A PLUS : 
A complete disk utilitypackage for all CoCo's. Full 
Disk I/O for FORMAT, COPY, and BACKUP. 
Supports single or double sided 35 or 40 track 
drives. With DISK UTILITY 2.1 A PLUS from 



Allows you to hard copy graphic pictures using 
the Star Gemini 10X, Epson MX-80 or any other 
Epson compatible printS&l|k DISK.,,., $9,95 

MUL1WAK CRACK: 



SCS, you get TWO progra 
DISK UTIL 
UTILI 



low price. 
- d DISK 

..$23.95 



CoCo SCREEN DUMP: 



Allows you to save your ROM-PAK programs 
over to disk...WIIERE THEY BELONG! In- 
cludes POKES for problem PAKs and the new 
16kPAKs.64k DISK; $24.95 



MAX40: By Colorware 




The 'Dazzling Word Processor & Document | 
Creator for the CoCo3\ You asked for it and 
now it is available at an SCS special price. 
128k DISK, $78.45 



SECOND CITY SOFTWARE 




Accepts MasterCard, Visa, C.O.D. and 
Check orders. Please add $2.50 for ship- 
ping ($4.50 for Canada orders) & allow 1 to 
3 weeks for delivery. C.O.D. orders, add 
additional $2.50. 



CHARGE! Call or write for full details. 

THE NEWSPAPER PLUS . 
DeskTop Publishing for the CoCo 3? With the 
ALL NEW NEWSPAPER PLUS, you now can 
create complete and sophisticated Banners, 
Headlines along with Text Columnsand Graphics. 
THE NEWSPAPER PLUS allows for importing 
different pictures, fonts and fill patterns from disk 
for that pro-look. Comes complete with 22 fonts 
and 50 clip art pictures. THE NEWSPAPER 
PLUS is an all new upgraded program based on 
the original NEWSPAPER program. SCS is the 
ONLY company authorized to handle THE 
NEWSPAPER PLUS program. Why buy the old, 
overpriced and outdated program when you can 
get the newest release for less! 
128k DISK.... $48.95 

THE NEWSPAPER GRAPHICS DISK I: 
The FIRST OFFICIAL supplementary program 
disk for THENEWSPAPER. Contains '50' NEW 
PICTURE FILES, '10' NEW FILL PATTERNS 
and '3' ADDITIONAL FONT SETS! GRAPH- 
ICS DISK I is available only from Second City 
Software for $19.95 



► « 



HOWARD MEDICAL COMPUTERS 

1690 N. Elston • Chicago, IL 60622 • orders (800) 443-1444 • inquiries and order status (312) 278-1440 

Showroom Hours 8-5 M-F. 10-3 SAT u 



y 
i 



* 5 STAR FINAL 



APRIL '89 



CLOUDY 



> * 



i. 



* • 



.. * 



NX-1000R 



COLOR 



$249 



:t « 

i 

♦ ♦ 
. i 



DC-6 DISTO SUPER 
CONTROLLER 

Gives Radio Shack compatability 
and double-sided access to drives 
like our DD-4. A buffer collects 
keystrokes in memory so nothing 
is lost when disk is reading or 
writing. Especially useful with 
OS-9, multi tasking or multi user. 

$129 ($2 ship) 

NX- 1000 STAR printer 

• forward and backward tractor 

. 4K input buffer $189 
. 144 CPS ($7 ship) 

NX- 1000 RAINBOW 
color printer $249 

. four-color ribbon slu P) 

• front panel font select 

. single sheet and tractor feed at 
same time 

Howard SP-C $35.49 

. serial-to-parallel converter 

. 300 - 9600 baud ($2 ship) 

Drive 0 and Drive 1+ 
Double Drive 0+ 

. two 360K { / 2 height Teac 55-B 

• one case and double power 
supply 

• DISTO DC-3 expandable con- 
troller DD-4 $310 

• CA-2 double cable $j sh j p ) 

• Free T&D coupon 



MONITOR 

Sony KV-1311 CR $499 

Regular $625 ($15 shipping) 
• Vivid Color • Vertically flat 
13" screen • Monitor/ Trini- 
tron TV with remote control • 
640 x 240 resolution at 
15MHZ 37 mm Dot pitch • 
RGB analog & digital; TTL; 
and composite inputs • Cable 
to CoCo 3 $36 




HARD DRIVE ACCESSORIES 

3' Hard Drive Cable $ 20 

Clock Upgrade $ 20 

HYPER I/0 $ 29.95 

RSB $ 39.95 

TEAC 55B $ 118 

Hard Drive ROM Boot $ 20 



"Guarantee" As good as Gold. 



Howard Medical's 30-day guarantee 
is meant to eliminate the uncertainty 
of dealing with a company through 

the mail. Once you receive our hard 

ware, try it out; test it for compat- 
ibility. If you're not happy with it for 



any reason, return it in 30 days and 
we'll give you your money back (less 
shipping.) Shipping charges are for 
48 states. APO, Canada and Puerto 
Rico orders are higher. 




Hard Drive— Ready to Run! 

20,000,000 Bytes or the equivalent to 
a 125 R.S. 501 's on line are packed 
into this hard drive, pre installed and 
ready to run. All you need to do is 
plug it in and go! This complete easy 
to use package includes a Seagate 
ST-225 hard drive, a DTC 5150 
controller, a Burke & Burke interface 
that plugs into slot 3 of the multi pak 
interface, plus a case & power supply 
AND a 1 year warranty. The Seagate 
and controller can also be used in a 
TANDY 1000, IBM-XT or clone. 

HD-2 20 meg ®498 
HD-3 30 meg ®548 
HD-4 40 meg "598 

Free 3' hard drive cable with orders 
thru 4/ 16/89 



PAL UPGRADE 
FOR MULTI-PAK 

specify for 26-3024 or 26-3124 
14.95 ($2 ship) 

24 HOUR ORDER LINE 

800 / 443-1444 

WE ACCEPT VISA . MASTERCARD 
• AMERICAN EXPRESS • C.O.D. OR 
CHECKS . SCHOOL P.O. 
NEW - DISCOVER CARD 




OWARD MEDICAL COMPUTERS 



r 1690 N. Elston • Chicago, IL 60622 • orders (800) 443-1444 • inquiries and order status (312) 278-1440 

£' Showroom Hours 8-5 M-F. 10-3 SAT 

* 5 STAR FINAL APRIL '89 VERY DRY 




w 



515 SALE ENDS 4/15 



Due to price increases Howard Medical will end its super sale on Magnavox 
monitors at midnight April 15, 1989. These changes effect the 8CM5 15 color, 
7622 amber, and 7652 green. Present pricing will be honored only on orders 
placed prior to 4/ 16/89. 

MAGNAVOX 7622 12" Amber Screen offers 900 dots x 350 lines resolu- 
tion at 20 MHz on a dark glass anti-glare CRT with built-in audio and 1 year 
warranty. ($7 shipping) $ 88 7652 green screen also available $88 

MAGNAVOX 8 CM 515 has analog RGB for CoCo 3, TTL RGB for 
Tandy 1000 or IBM PC's, and composite color for CoCo 2 and 3. Built-in 
speaker. 14" screen with 640 dot x 240 line resolution. Plus 2 years parts 
and labor warranty, reg. list $499 was $298 $266 + $14 Shipping 

CC-3 Magnavox RGB cable for CoCo 3 only s 19,95 with Magnavox 
Monitor order. $29.95 w/o monitor. 



« i 






8CM515 123A 

123A 12" This 12" green screen high resolution monitor offers 80 column 
capability, Zenith quality and a 90-day warranty valid at any of Zenith's 
1200 locations. Retail $199. Our price $49.50 ($7 shipping) REPACK 

VA-1 for monochrome and color monitors delivers video interface for CoCo's 
1 & 2 $ 29.45 ($2 shipping) 

DRIVE 0 +. Howards Drive 0 
gives you a DD-3 MPI drive, a CA- 
1 cable and DISTO DC-3 Disk Con- 
troller for only $178.45. Double 
sided double density 360K. ($5 ship- 
ping) 




HMC's Guarantee- 
A Promise you can take to the Bank. 



Howard Medical's 30-day guarantee 
is meant to eliminate the uncertainty 
of dealing with a company through 
the mail. Once you receive our hard- 
ware, try it out; test it for compat- 
ibility. If you're not happy with it for 




any reason, return it in 30 days and 
we'll give you your money back (less 
shipping.) Shipping charges are for 
48 states. APO, Canada and Puerto 
Rico orders are higher. 



Price Break on DISTO 
Disk Controllers 

Includes controller and C-DOS 4.0 
ROM Chip. DISTO *75 DC-3[aJ \ 
($2 shipping on all DISTO products) 

ADD-ON BOARDS 

DC-3P Mini Eprom programmer 
includes all software to program 
2764 or 27128 chips [S] $ 55 
DC-3C Clock Calendar and parallel 
printer port[C] $ 40 




fi 



RS-232 $49.95 

Replaces R.S. RS-232 board. Plugs in 
drive port or multi pack. 2 MHz 
operation works with OS-9.($2 ship) 

3 in 1 Board $59.45 

Clock calendar at 2 MHz parallel 
printer port pack requires DISTO 
Controller or MEB ($2 ship) 

MEB $30 ($2 ship) 

Plugs into multi pak to expand 
DISTO DC-3 bus. Use clock in DC- 
3 and eprom programmer in MEB. 



i3> 



1 1 



24 HOUR ORDER LINE 

DON'T MISS OUT. 
DON'T MISS OUT, ORDER TODAY! 

800 / 443-1444 

WE ACCEPT VISA . MASTERCARD . 
. AMERICAN EXPRESS . C.O.D. OR:" 
CHECKS . SCHOOL P.O. 
NEW - DISCOVER CARD 



l do V 




<V«r *» » 
»•»•; \mu 

k «V« 



few '4 



S$eed Racer 



I I M 



m m 

v i • 



As the checkered Hag dijops 1 your* pulse ris^s in this lively arcade 
game. The road twists to the horizon on the 3-D panorama that sets 
r tl?e stage for exciting racing. Vie for time as you glide through the 
curves at incredible speeds. Step through the gears to stay ahead of 
the pack, but H)e quick! Some will stop at nothing to see the end of 
| the race, or the end of ^ou! Four challenging raceways conjplete 
| with obstacles and colorful 3-D scenery test your skills in this Pole 
Position™ type game. . ^ 

32K Color Computer required... $34.95 



k fQVB 



PINBALL 

FACTORY! 





i: KfiFV MCFADOEM 

PUY&R 1 2 




Pinball Factory 

| Video games come full circle in this tribute to the original arcade 
game, PjnbalL Classic! pinball springs to life as never before, with 

| fresh new angles that only a computer can offer. Crisp graphics, 
sound, and fast smooth action givfe this machine-language arcade 
g|une a realistic, responsive feel you'll hardly believe. There are 
even "tilt" buttons that'let you "bump" the machine. In addition to 
playing a great game of pinball, you can enjoy hours of creative 
pleasure as you design - build, edit, and play your own screens. 

V ■ M " f t 

.... V^J I lM 




o4K. Color Computer required. . .5>34.y5 



Demon Seed 



The first waves of flying, diving, bloodthirsty bats &fe arriving. 
Move, fire, and move again. It's a never ending battle. If you are 
lucky enough to defeat the bats, be ready for a much greater 
challenge, The Evil Demons themselves. Destrby a wing and 
another takes its place. Only a direct hit Can save you now. It will 
take great skill to triumph. If you do, then you better be ready for 
the End. The Demon Flag Ship descends to destroy your remaining 
ships. Your only hope is to penetrate the hull, breakthrough the 
shield, and destroy the dreaded Gargoyle, t ' 



•i 



32K Color Computer required. . .$1 9.95 



1HJ.0 




t MichTron is always looking for programmers and programs. If you are interested in working with one 

of the most respected company's in the computer software field please give us a call. 



) * 




For more information 

on these or other fine products 

call our knowledgeable statff ! 



■i 



Nichlion 

576 S. Telegraph 
Pontiac, MI 48053 
(313) 334-5700 




.T 



Dealer inquiries welcome. 
Visa and Mastercard accepted. 



is