Skip to main content

Full text of "The Rainbow Vol. 01 No 1 - Vol 8 No 11"

See other formats


0° 




Canada $4.95 U.S. $3.95 




# 




o 



I 



44254"00001 



0 2 




ction Co 



Still pounding away at that keyboard? 





SAVE up to 1 9% _ 

when you buy a joint sub- 
scription to the magazine and 
either rainbow on tape or 
rainbow on disk! A one-year 
subscription to the rainbow 
and rainbow on tape is only 
$91 in the U.S., $108 in Can- 
ada, $153 foreign surface rate 
and $188 foreign airmail. A 
one-year subscription to the 
rainbow and RAINBOW on 
disk is only $115 in the U.S., 
$138 in Canada, $183 foreign 
surface rate and $218 foreign 
airmail.* 

Every month, these convenient 
services bring you as many as 24 
ready-to-run programs. Using the 
current issue of the rainbow as 
documentation, all you have to do is 
load and run them. A one-year com- 
bination subscription to the rain- 



bow and rainbow on tape or rain- 
bow on disk give you more than 230 
new programs! The typing time you 
save can be spent enjoying your 
CoCo! 



RAINBOW ON TAPE 
For No-Fuss Fun 

Back issues of rainbow on tape 
are available beginning with the 
April 1982 issue. A single copy of 
rainbow on tape is $10 within the 
United States; U.S. $12 in all other 
countries. The annual subscription 
rate for rainbow on tape is $80 
within the U.S.; U.S. $90 in Canada; 
and U.S. $105 for all other coun- 
tries.* 



RAINBOW ON DISK 

Offers OS-9 Programs 

In addition to all the programs 
offered on tape, part of one side of 
rainbow on disk is formatted for the 
OS-9 operating system. That means 
you can now get all the OS-9 pro- 
grams from the magazine — pro- 
grams that cannot be put on tape. 
Back issues of rainbow on disk are 
available beginning with October 
1986. Subscriptions to rainbow on 
disk are $99 a year in the U.S. Cana- 
dian rate is U.S. $115. All other 
countries, U.S. $130. Single copy 
rate is $12 in the U.S.; U.S. $14 in 
Canada; and U.S. $16 in all other 
countries.* 



To order by phone (credit card orders only), call (800) 847- 
0309, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. All other inquiries call (502) 228- 
4492. 

Look for our envelope located between pages 66 and 67 for 
ordering individual subscriptions to the rainbow, rainbow on 

TAPE and RAINBOW ON DISK. 



YES! Sign me up for a joint 1-year subscription (12 issues) to: 



□ THE RAINBOW and RAINBOW ON TAPE 

□ THE RAINBOW and RAINBOW ON DISK 

□ NEW □ RENEWAL (attach labels) 



Payment Enclosed □ ('payment must accompany order) 

Charge: □ VISA □ MasterCard □ Am. Express 
Account Number 

City State ZIP Signature Exp 

*U.S. currency only, please. In order to hold down costs, we do not bill. Kentucky residents add 5% sales tax. Please allow 6 to 8 weeks 
for delivery of first copies. Joint subscriptions to the rainbow and rainbow on tape or rainbow on disk begin with the current issue. 

Please note: While group purchases of rainbow on tape and rainbow ON DISK are permitted (and multiple subscriptions are even discounted, if purchased in one 
order from a club), no license to make copies is conveyed or implied. Yes, your group may even purchase a subscription to our disk/tape services, but such purchase 
in no way authorizes that any copies be made of that original disk/tape. Specifically, this means that the original disk/tape itself may indeed be kept in a club library 
for use by members. However, a group purchase does not entitle club members, individually or as a group, to copy that disk/tape. 
Unauthorized copying of any copyright product is strictly illegal. The copyright (right to make copies) is in no way conveyed in the purchase transaction. 



Name _ 
Address 



1 



From Computer Plus to YOi 





Tandy 1400 LT$1369 
Tandy 102 32K $439 
Tandy 200 24K$429* 



,«*r##* rum *» «< w»»$s»isfe 

3 ^ &!f .< :i K ■ * r's <£.« St* *Ss >; g i& *XK m m 



Color Computer 3 
W/128K Ext. Basic $159 







BIG SAVINGS ON A FULL 

COMPUTERS 

Tandy 1000 HX 1 Drive 256K 439.00' 

Tandy 1000 TX 1 Drive 640K 799.00' 

Tandy 3000 NL 1 Drive 51 2K 1279.00 

Tandy 4000 1 Drive 1 Meg.Ram 1959.00 

Tandy 5000 MC 2 Meg. Ram 3799.00 

PRINTERS 

Radio Shack DMP-106 80 CPS 145.00* 

Radio Shack DMP-132 120 CPS 289.00 

Radio Shack DMP-440 300 CPS 549.00 
Radio Shack DWP-230 Daisy Wheel349.00 

Tandy LP-1000 Laser Printer 1899.00 

Star MicronicsNX-1000 144 CPS 199.00 
Star Micronics NX-1000 Rainbow 269.00 

Panasonic P-1080i 144CPS 199.00 

Panasonic P-109H 194 CPS 249.00 

Panasonic P-1092i 240 CPS 369.00 

Okidata320 300 CPS 369.00 

Okidata 390 270 CPS 24 Wire Hd 515.00 

NEC Pinwriter P-2200 170 CPS 399.00 

MODEMS 

Radio Shack DCM-6 52.00 

Radio Shack DCM-7 85.00 

Practical Peripheral 2400 Baud 229.00 

Practical Peripheral 1200 Baud 149.00 



COMPLEMENT OF RADIO SHACK COMPUTER PRODUCTS 



14.95 
119.00 
59.95 
26.95 
299.00 



COLOR COMPUTER MISC. 

Radio Shack Drive Controller 99.00 
Extended Basic Rom Kit (28 pin) 14.95 
64K Ram Upgrade Kit (2 or 8 chip) 39.00 
Radio Shack Deluxe Keyboard Kit 24.95 
HI-RES Joystick Interface 8.95 
Color Computer Deluxe Mouse 44.00 
Multi Pak Pal Chip for COCO 3 
PBH Converter with 64K Buffer 
Serial to Parallel Converter 
Radio Shack Deluxe Joystick 
Magnavox 8515 RGB Monitor 
Magnavox Green or Amber Monitor99.00 
Radio Shack CM-8 RGB Monitor 249.00 
Radio Shack VM-4 Green Monitor 99.00 
PBJ OK COCO 3 Upgrade Board 1 9.95 
PBJ 51 2K COCO 3 Upgrade 159.00 
Tandy OK COCO 3 Upgrade Board 24.95 
Tandy 512K COCO 3 Upgrade 149.00 

COLOR COMPUTER SOFTWARE 

TAPE DISK 

The Wild West(CoCo3) 
Worlds Of Flight 
Mustang P-51 Flight Simul. 
Flight 16 Flight Simul. 



25.95 
34.95 34.95 
34.95 34.95 
34.95 34.95 



COCO Uti 1 1 1 by Mar k Data 39.95 
COCO Max III by Colorware 79.95 
Max 1 0 by Colorware 79.95 
AutoTerm by PXE Computing 29.95 39.95 
TW-80 by Spectrum (CoCo3) 39.95 
Telewriter 64 49.95 59.95 

Telewriter 128 79.95 
Elite Word 80 79.95 
Elite Calc 3.0 69.95 
CoCo 3 512K Super Ram Disk 19.95 
Home Publisher by Tandy (CoCo3) 35.95 
Sub Battle Sim. by Epyx (CoCo3) 26.95 
Thexder by Sierra (CoCo3) 22.45 
Kings Quest III by Sierra (CoCo3) 31 .45 
Flight Sim.ll by SubLogic (CoCo3) 31 .45 
OS-9 Level II by Tandy 71 .95 

OS-9 Development System 89.95 
Multi-View by Tandy 44.95 
VIP Writer (disk only) 69.95 
VIP Integrated Library (disk) 149.95 

Prices are subject to change without notice. 
Please call for shipping charges. Prices In our re- 
tail store may be higher. Send tor complete 
catalog 

*Sale prices through 1/30/89 



CALL TOLL FREE 
1-800-343-8124 

• LOWEST POSSIBLE PRICES 

• BEST POSSIBLE WARRANTY 

• KNOWLEDGEABLE SALES STAFF 

• TIMELY DELIVERY 

• SHOPPING CONVENIENCE 




P.O. Box 1094 
480 King Street 
Littleton, MA 01460 



SINCE 1973 



IN MASSACHUSETTS CALL (508) 486-3193 




Table of Cont e nts 




58 



-Fe atur e s 



28 ^ 

Tangled Tiles ^ 

Gay Crawford 

How many tiles do you want 

scrambled? 

36 % 

The Do-lt-Yourself 
Database 

Richard Perlman 
Subroutines and program 
code for home management 



43 

It's a Toad's Life 

Christopher Dunn 

Some days it doesn't pay to 

leave the lily pad 

50 q» 

Just One Touch — 
Just One Breath 

Eric Mims 

CoCo makes calculations 
easier for the disabled 

43 



58 

Hands-Free 
Computing 

Dennis H. Weide 
A program using computer- 
operated equipment for 
paralyzed persons 

80 % 

A Patch for a Patch 

Randall Reid 

Do your assembly language 
programming on the wide, 
80-column screen 



96 

And More Math 

William P. Nee 

Part VIII: Machine language 

made BASIC 



101 

The RAINBOWfest 
Reporter 

Lauren Willoughby 

The scoop on the Princeton 

scene 



February 1989 
Vol. VII No. 6 



106 ^ 

I'm Late! I'm Late! 

Mary and James Lamonica 
Feel like there's never 
enough time? 

110 * 

More Than a House 

Richard K. Johnson 
Let CoCo organize your 
search for the right home 

112 * 

How Much? ^ 

Kenneth W. Johnson 
Calculate the monthly 
payments for any loan 
amount 

142 * 

What Day Is It? 

Richard Ries 

If OS-9 date entries seem a 
little backward, this utility 
can help 

110 





4 THE RAINBOW February 1989 



9 



'Novices Nich e 
87 

Keeping Your Balance 

Jerry Yates 

88 

Applying Labels 

Ana M. Rodriguez 

88 

Custom Cassette Labels 

Travis Halbrook 

89 

Knee-High to a Growth 
Chart 

Gay Crawford 

89 

CoCo Says . . . 

Warren Massie 

90 

Towers of Hanoi 

Dan O'Brien 

91 

Boggling Your Mind 

Russell Riley, Jr. 

91 

The Building Blocks of 
Graphics 

Keiran Kenny 



jm| The cassette tape/disk sym- 
bois beside features and col- 
umns Indicatethat the program listings 
with those articles are on this month's 

RAINBOW ON TAPE and RAIN- 
BOW on disk. Those with only the 
disk symbol are not available on 
rainbow on tape. For details; 
check the rainbow on tape and 
rainbow on disk ad on the 
inside front cover, 




Advertisers Index 
Back Issue Info _ 

CoCo Gallery 

Corrections 



160 

149 

26 

76 

Letters to Rainbow 6 

One-Liner Contest 

Information 63 

Racksellers 158 

Rainbow Info 14 



Received & Certified 

Submitting Material 
to Rainbow 



Subscription Info. 



.141 

. 72 
. 64 




46 

BASICally Speaking 

Bill Bernico 

BASIC problems solved here 

92 

CoCo Consultations 

Marty Goodman 

Just what the doctor ordered 



99 

Doctor ASCII 

Richard Esposito 
The question fixer 

105 <^ 

Education Notes 

Steve Blyn 

The blink of an eye 



BASIC Training, Delphi Bureau 
and Turn of the Screw will 
return next month. 



10 

PRINT#-2, 

Lawrence C. Falk 
Editor's Notes 

82 

Wishing Well 

Fred Scerbo 
Count on CoCo 



Ra i nbowt c ch 



144 <t 

Barden's Buffer 

William Barden, Jr. 
Food for worms 

152 * 

KISSable OS-9 

Dale L. Puckett 

Advances in OS-9 technology 

Accessible Applications 
will return next month. 



'Product Reviews 



Arizona's Hard Drives/Arizona 

Small Computer Peripherals 

Bash/Game Point Software 



Buried Buxx/JR & JR Softstuff. 



Deluxe Icon EdWor/Puritas Springs Software. 

Diskman U/Tothian Software 

Frogday Afternoon/K-So/f 

MacPlay/CoCoIec/7 



MAESTRO/Marc Campbell Innovations 

Pokes, Peeks 'n Execs/M/crocom Software 
Rad Warrior/Tandy Corporation 



TypeMate/ Tandy Corporation 

Warrior Klng/Sundog Systems 

Warp Fighter 3-D/Game Point Software. 
Window Master/Cer-Comp, Ltd. 



.138 
.130 
.129 
.136 
.139 
.136 
.126 
.127 
.126 
.134 
.130 
.131 
.134 
.124 



THE RAINBOW is published every month of the year by FALSOFT, Inc., The 
Falsoft Building, 9509 U.S. Highway 42, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059, 
phone (502) 228-4492. THE RAINBOW, RAINBOWfest and THE RAINBOW and 
RAINBOWfest logotypes are registered ® trademarks of FALSOFT, Inc. • 
Second class postage paid Prospect, KY and additional offices. USPS N. 705- 
050 (ISSN No. 0746-4797). POSTMASTER: Send address changes to the 
RAINBOW, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. Authorized as second class 
postage paid from Hamilton, Ontario by Canada Post, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. 
• Entire contents copyright © by FALSOFT, Inc, 1988. THE RAINBOW is intended 
for the private use and pleasure of its subscribers and purchasers and 
reproduction by any means is prohibited. Use of information herein is for the 
single end use of purchasers and any other use is expressly prohibited. All 
programs herein are distributed in an "as is" basis, without warranty of any kind 
whatsoever. • Tandy, Color basic, Extended Color basic and Program Pak are 
registered ® trademarks of the Tandy Corp. • Subscriptions to THE rainbow 
are $31 per year in the United States. Canadian rates are U.S. $38. Surface mail 
to other countries is U.S. $68, air mail U.S. $103. All subscriptions begin with 
next available issue. • Limited back issues are available. Please see notice for 
issues that are in print and their costs. Payment accepted by VISA, MasterCard, 
American Express, cash, check or money order in U.S. currency only. Full 
refund after mailing of one issue. A refund of 10/12ths the subscription amount 
after two issues are mailed. No refund after mailing of three or more magazines. 



1 



The Rainbow 



Editor and Publisher 

Lawrence C. Falk 

Managing Editor Jutta Kapfhammer 

Associate Editor Sue Fomby 

Reviews Editor Lauren Wifloughby 

Submissions Editor Tony Olive 

Copy Editor Beth Haendiges 

Technical Editors Cray Augsburg, 
Ed Ellers 

Technical Assistant David Horrar 

Editorial Assistants Wendy Falk Barsky, 
Sue H. Evans 

Contributing Editors 

William Barden, Jr., Bill Bernico, 
Steve Blyn, Tony DiStefano, 
Richard Esposito, 
Martin Goodman, M.D., 
:■ Joseph Kolar, Dale Puckett, 
Fred Scerbo, Richard White. 

Art Director Heidi Maxedon 

Designers Sharon Adams, 
Teri Kays, Denise Webb 

Typesetters Linda Gower, 
Renee Hutch ins 

Falsoft, Inc. 



President Lawrence C. Falk 
General Manager Bonnie Frowenfeld 
Asst. General Mgr. for Finance 

Donna Shuck 
Admin. Asst. to the Publisher 

Sarah Levin 
Editorial Director John Crawley 
Asst. Editorial Director Judi Hutchinson 
Senior Editor T. Kevin Nickols 
Director of Production Jim Cleveland 
Chief Bookkeeper Diane Moore 
Dealer Accounts Judy Quashnock 
Asst. General Manager For Administration 

Sandy Apple 
Word Processor Manager 

Patricia Eaton 
Customer Service Manager 

Beverly Bearden 
Customer Service Representative 

Carolyn Fenwick 
Development Coordinator Ira Barsky 
Chief of Printing Services Meiba Smith 
Dispatch Michael Willis 
Business Assistants Laurie Falk, 

Vivian Turbeviile 
Chief of Building Security 
and Maintenance 

Jessie Brooks 
Advertising Coordinator Doris Taylor 
Advertising Representatives 

Belinda Kirby, Kim Vincent 
Advertising Assistant Debbie Baxter 
(502) 228-4492 



For RAINBOW Advertising and 
Marketing Office information, 
see Page 160 



Cover photograph copyright © 1989 
by John R. Longino 



Art direction by Heidi Maxedon 



February 1 989 THE RAINBOW 5 



OS-9 Pride 



Editor: 

Several years ago I bought my first CoCo 
— a 16K CoCo 2 with ECB and a CCR 81. 
Getting started was an ordeal — so much to 
learn and no one who shared my interests. 
Later I got a CoCo 3, and soon after that 
I was introduced to THE RAINBOW. 

When I first saw THE RAINBOW in the 
bookstore, it was a sight for sore eyes. I 
could find no one in the local Radio Shack 
stores who knew about CoCos. The articles, 
ads and particularly the information on OS- 
9 opened up my world. I started adding to 
my machine — slowly. 

By the time I had read a few months of 
THE RAINBOW (particularly Dale Puckett's 
column), I was ready to go for broke with 
OS-9. 1 was overwhelmed by the amount of 
information to digest, but soon I was in- 
volved in The Complete Rainbow Guide to 
OS-9 and OS-9 Level II: A Beginner's Guide 
to Windows. 

Once I had my system up and running, 
things really started to click. Now I feel like 
I'm in a whole new world. I quit my job and 
I'm back in school — taking computer 
programming courses. I love your advertis- 
ers and my new vocation. My only gripe is 
that I use MS-DOS machines at school. 
Those computers are like souped-up chain 
saws with dull chains. By comparison, OS- 
9 is so much more . . . everything. Those 16- 
bit tools may get the job done a little faster, 
but I have more fun with my CoCo 3. Many 
of you may say that OS-9 is difficult to learn, 
and maybe it is. But it's an affordable system 
that is very powerful. In a lot of ways it 
makes MS-DOS hide its head in shame. Just 
think: All this from a little 8-bit game 
machine. 

Shan J. Gil 
Poison, Montana 



HINTS & TIPS 

Editor: 

Just wanted to pass on a little help. I have 
finally found the printer codes I needed to 
get William J. Holdorfs Appointment 
Calendar (January '88, Page 100) to work 
with my system. If there are any other CoCo 
users with a SG-10 who are having trouble 
with the head controls in lines 2290 and 
2340, my fix involves the "Skip V Print 
Position." Modify lines 2290 and 2340 in the 
following manner: 

2290 PRINTtt- 2 , CHRS ( 27 ) CHR$ ( 9B ) CHR$ ( 3 ) 
2340 PRINTtt - 2 , CHRS ( 27 ) CHR$ ( SB ) CHRS ( 11 ) 



You must also modify the DATA statements 
in lines 1690 and 1700 to center the month 
over the calendar. 

If anyone has a fix to DIR Print, (Feb- 
ruary '88, Page 80) that works like mine, 
please let me know. My prints are still single- 
column (or double-column if I substitute CAT 
for DIR). All my printer codes check out. 

Jerry R Ryals 
HHC DISCOM, Box 151 
Third Infantry Division 
APO NY 09701 

Need More Time? 

Editor: 

I enjoyed Mark Webb's Stock Ticker 
(November '88, Page 45), I felt that I would 
enjoy it more if the bar chart remained on 
the screen a little longer. I'd like to share the 
following modification that Mark sent me: 

1130 FDR PAU5E=1 TO 1500:NEXT PAUSE 

1130 RENUM TO 1131 

1131 RENUM TO 1132 

1132 RENUM TO 1133 

I sure hope Mark will continue to contrib- 
ute programs to THE RAINBOW. Does he 
have any more good material up his sleeve? 

Allen Clark 
St. Donat, Quebec 

BACK TALK 

Editor: 

In answer to Andrew Martin's request for 
a patch to get Profile to run on Level II, here 
are patches for both the Profile and MGT 
programs. Both programs try to link to the 
SysGo, which is called CC3G0 in Level II and 
does a checksum on the module and then on 
the shell. I got around the first problem by 
renaming CC3G0, but the checksum on the 
shell gave me a "This is not a Color Com- 
puter" message. 

The following patches change the execu- 
tion offset of the modules past the checksum 
and move the first two instructions of the 
program to this new starting point. Use these 
patches on backup copies only. The Level II 
package does not include a SAVE command. 
However, the Level II developer's package 
does. You can also use Level I's SAVE com- 
mand. 

Use the build command to create these 
files. Enter each line as shown: 

1 profile 
c 09 11 12 
c 1227 Bl 32 
c 1228 59 c9 



c 1229 26 04 
c 122a f 5 13 
c 122b 35 9f 
c 122c 70 09 

1 mgt 

c 0a 00 43 
c 543 81 32 
c 544 59 c9 
c 545 2S 04 
c 54S f 5 13 
c 547 35 9f 
c 54B 70 09 

Then enter the following command lines: 

load prof i le 

modpatch propatch 

save /d0 / cmds / prof i le profile 

unlink prof i le 

load mgt 

save /d0 / cmds/mgt mgt 
unlink mgt 

Follow these lines and your profile disk 
will work on Level II. The only problem I 
have found with this patch is that on the 
startup screen the listing of address files does 
not always include all files. However, if you 
type the files' names, they will be loaded into 
memory properly. The program will work on 
an 80-column screen. 

John Kwiatkowski 
Wilmington, Delaware 

INFORMATION PLEASE 

Editor: 

Is there anyone out there with an RS 
DMP-105 printer who has gotten the two 
January '88 programs, Appointment Cal- 
endar (Page 1 00) and Job Description (Page 
106), to print properly? If so, I would 
appreciate some help. 

In addition, I'd like to hear from anyone 
in the Las Vegas, Nevada, area who has a 
CoCo 2 or 3 and a DMP-105. There are no 
clubs in this area; maybe we can start one. 

Carl Rexrode 
6500 W. Charleston, #76 
Las Vegas, NV 89102 

For CRLENDRR, change CHR$(3) to 
chrs (2), and change CHRtt(45) in the same 
line to CHR$ ( 155 ) . This will correct the head 
positioning. 

For J0BDE5C, delete Line 900 and replace 
it with 900 GOTO 920. This will defeat the 
printer-online test. Otherwise, the program 
should run fine on the DMP-105. 



6 THE RAINBOW February 1989 




AUTOTERM 

TURNS YOUR COLOR COMPUTER INTO THE 

WORLD'S {* 
SMARTEST TERMINAL! 

YOU'LL ALSO USE AUTOTERM FOR SIMPLE 
WORD PROCESSING & RECORD KEEPING 

EXTRA FEATURES ON COCO 3 DISK 

80 char, screen, 2400 baud thru serial port, 
95,000 to 475,000 character buffer. 



EASY COMMUNICATION + WORD PROCESSING + TOTAL AUTOMATION 



Full prompting and error checking. 
Step-by-step manual has examples. 
Scroll text backward and forward. No 
split words on screen or printout. 
Save, load, delete files while on line. 
Print, save all or any part of text. 300 
or 1200 baud. All 128 ASCII 
characters. Works with D.C. Hayes or 
any modem. Screen widths of 32, 40, 
42, 51, 64. 

DISK VERSION SUPPORTS RS232 
PAK, XMODEM and SPLIT SCREEN 
FOR PACKET RADIO. 



Please hire the mentally retarded. 

They are sincere, hard working and 

appreciative. Thanks! rt . ... 

Phyllis. 



Editing is super simple with the 
cursor. Find strings instantly too! 
Insert printer control codes. Specify 
page size and margins. Switch 
quickly between word processing 
and intelligent terminal action. Create 
text, correct your typing errors; then 
connect to the other computer, 
upload your text or files, download 
information, file it, and sign-off; then 
edit the receive data, print it in an 
attractive format, and/or save it on 
file. Compatible with TELEWRITER. 

CASSETTE $29.95 
DISKETTE $39.95 

Add $3 shipping and handling 

MC/VISA/C.O.D. 



Advanced system of keystroke 
macros lets you automate any 
activity, such as dial via modem, 
sign-on, interact, sign-off, print, save. 
Perform entire session. Act as 
message taker. At start-up, disk 
version can automatically set 
parameters, dial, sign-on, interact, 
read/write disk, sign-off, etc. Timed 
execution lets AUTOTERM work 
while you sleep or play. No other 
computer can match your COCO's 
intelligence as a terminal. 

PXE Computing 

11 Vicksburg Lane 
Richardson, Texas 75080 

214/699-7273 



REQUEST HOTLINE 

Editor: 

As a faithful reader of THE RAINBOW 
since September, 1982, 1 must say that your 
magazine has always been the best Color 
Computer magazine. In addition to its good 
articles, its reviews and comments have 
always helped me when buying both soft- 
ware and hardware. 

Since 1989 will probably be the year for 
hard drives, it would be good to have a 
comprehensive article on this — comparing 
hardware and offering help about partition- 
ing OS-9 and BASIC. 

I hope to see such an article soon. Keep 
up the good work. 

Eduardo S. Prado, Jr. 
San Paulo, Brazil 



Dr. Martin Goodman, M.D. has been 
diligently working on such an article. Expect 
to see it in next month's "More Power to 
Yaf" issue. 



Let's Compare 

Editor: 

I like THE RAINBOW'S reviews of hard- 
ware and software, but is it possible to add 
some comparison of the various programs 



and hardware available? You could test the 
most-used printers, disk drives, word proc- 
essors, etc. and compare their features. 
Maybe you could compile a table that 
identifies the features of various hardware or 
software. 

Serge Cote 
Hull, Quebec 

See the upcoming issues of the RAINBOW 
for more comparative-type features of this 
sort. 



KUDOS 

Editor: 

Five years ago I stood before a computer 
display and found myself unable to turn the 
unit on — much less have it do something 
useful. A couple of 10-year-olds not only 
turned it on but also managed to make it 
write their names and do whatever they 
chose. It was then that I decided I would not 
allow this technology to intimidate me any 
longer. I purchased my first CoCo. Slowly 
I became comfortable with computers both 
at home and at work. RAINBOW and RAIN- 
BOW ON TAPE and DISK made my educa- 
tion joyful and easy. 

Games and programs like VIP and Word 
Power get regular use in our family, and my 
wife and our children are also computer- 



literate. Thank you and keep up the good 
work. 

Herb Cober 
Thedford, Ontario 

Author! Author! 

Editor: 

I would just like to tell you how much my 
husband and I enjoy your magazine. I have 
enjoyed keying in some of the programs 
listed in your magazine. I have also bought 
one month of RAINBOW ON DISK and really 
enjoyed all the programs on the disk. 

I especially want to thank Arthur Hallock 
for his program Letter Writer (April '88, 
Page 48). When I could not use the program 
with my printer, I wrote Mr. Hallock, and 
he immediately wrote to tell me where to 
make changes in the program. I have written 
to him since with more questions, and he has 
answered each query within a week. 

I also want to thank Rick Cooper, who 
contributed the program States (September 
'88, Page 60). After I entered that program, 
I couldn't get it to run. When I wrote to Mr. 
Cooper, he was most helpful. 

It is so surprising to get help from 
strangers, especially when they are not 
getting paid extra for it. Thanks to all. 

Eileen M. Huggins 
Salem, New Hampshire 



THE RAINBOW 



CONSUMER ALERT 

Editor: 

I understand that you make the money 
to publish your magazine from advertise- 
ments. However, I feel that I must write 
in reference to one of your advertisers: 
Hard Drive Specialist, of Houston, 
Texas. I placed an order with this com- 
pany and charged it to my credit card. 
After two weeks and no merchandise, I 
called HDS. I got a real fast Texas Two- 
Step about back orders and availability, 
I waited another two weeks; still no 
merchandise. I called again. This time I 
was told that it would ship within one 
week. 

Two days later, I found out that the 
order had been charged to my credit card 
36 days prior to my last call. I called again 
and spoke with three people, the last one 
stating that she was the individual in 
charge of shipping. She started Two 
Stepping again about shipping within a 
week. I requested that the order be 
cancelled immediately and that the 
money be credited back to my credit 
card. 

It has been 14 days since then, but I still 
have not received a credit back on my 
charge card. 

As I have said, I understand that your 
magazine depends on advertisers. I just 
wish you had some way of eliminating 
companies like this. 

Thank you for listening. 

Melvin E. Mitts 
Hinesville, GA 

We have received a number of com- 
plaints from readers recently regarding 
Hard Drive Specialist The company's 
advertising has been suspended from 

both THE RAINBOW and pur sister 
publication, PCM, until improvement in 
its service is indicated. 

A CoCo Success Story 

Editor: 

I suspect almost all of us have heard the 
condescending comments about the "Trash- 
80" Color Computer we own, about its 
limited memory, limited speed, limited 
everything. I'd like to comment on this. 

I won a medal in national speech compe- 
tition with a speech I wrote, edited, rewrote 
and formatted on a CoCo 2 (with the 
original software, no less). I'm 30 years old. 
Although I nearly did not graduate from 
high school and had been unemployed for 
three years, I graduated from a Commercial 
Foods and Management course as one of the 
top students because of the computer and 
math skills I gained on a CoCo 2. 

I wrote a neat, two-page resume and 
printed 50 copies on my CoCo 2. Then I 
wrote two different forms of cover letters 
and wrote programs to insert the various 
addresses in them. Right out of school, I got 



six interviews, three job offers (one in 
management) and a a job. Of course, edu- 
cation made a big difference, but without my 
CoCo I would not have medals, self respect, 
new friends and a satisfying job. 

Would another computer have served? I 
couldn't afford a different computer as a 
vocational student, so the point is moot. My 
CoCo was capable and paid for. 

If people tell you that your CoCo isn't 
good enough, send them to me. 

David B. Smith 
Grand Portage, Minnesota 



PENPALS 



• I am a 17-year-old Grade 12 student at St. 
Jerome's High School in Kitchener and 
would like to have pen pals from anywhere, 
but preferably close so we can meet some- 
times. I have a 64K CoCo 2, one disk drive, 
a tape recorder and a DMP-130A printer. I 
like writing special-purpose programs and 
would like to help anyone with problems. 

Anton Peter Milardovic 
8 S me tana Dr. 
Kitchener, ON 
Canada N2B 3 B8 

• I am a 16-year-old male and would like to 
hear from anyone in the United States. I 
prefer someone around my age, but I will 
answer anyone. I have a 64 K CoCo 2, CoCo 
3, disk drive, cassette recorder, Multi-Pak, 
DMP-130, RS Speech & Sound Pak and 
Orchestra 90. I an interested in music, 
graphics, machine language, Adventures 
and games. 

Orman Beckles 
45 Meridian St. 
Maiden, MA 02148 

• I am 16 years old and looking for pen pals 
aged 14 to 21. I am interested in everything 
about my computer. I have a 64K CoCo 2, 
one FD 500 drive and a DMP-110. I wel- 
come letters from all over the world. 

Bednarek Luc 
Hanebergstr. 62 
3960 Beverlo 
Belgium 

• lam 16 years old and have a CoCo 2 and 
3. 1 use a cassette recorder but will soon add 
disk drives. My hobbies include computing, 
drawing and weight lifting. I prefer pen pals 
my own age. 

Donald Kempton 
P. O. Box 425 
Athens, OH 45701 

• I am 19 years old and have a 64K ECB 
CoCo 2, a disk drive, cassette recorder, and 
several printers. I would like to have a pen 
pal from anywhere in the United States, any 
age, any CoCo configuration. 

Albert Noah 
P.O. Box 1142 
Marshall, NC 28753 



• My brother and I are looking for pen pals 
from all over the country. We are: Scott, age 
13, and Andy, age W/ 2 . We have an ECB 
CoCo 2, DM P- 105 and DMP-230 printers, 
DCM-3 modem, FD 502 disk drive, and a 
CCR-81 cassette recorder. We will do our 
best to respond to all letters. 

Andy and Scott Brady 
51 Barberton Road 
Lake Worth, FL 33467 

• I am 13 years old and would like some pen 
pals from all over the world. I own upgraded 
CoCos 1 and 2, a DMP-105, FD 502 and a 
Multi-Pak Interface. 1 love Adventure 
games and science. I will answer all letters 
— no age limits. 

Juli Williams 
Star Rt. 24-2 A 
Graford, TX 76045 

• I am looking for a pen pal who has the 
same setup as my system. So far, I have a 
64K CoCo 2 and a cassette recorder. I am 
looking for someone who is a novice like 
myself who might be able to teach me more 
about this new computer of mine. 

Patti French 
Rt. 2, Box 9 
Grafton, ND 

• I am 30 years old, and I would like a few 
pen pals. I have a CoCo 2, a CoCo 3, a FD 
501 disk drive and a tape recorder. I like all 
games, especially Adventures, war and 
karate games. I would especially welcome 
hearing from ladies. 

Steven Smith 
1625 Parkside Dr. #B-5 
Bowling Green, KY 42101 



• I'm 31 years old and own a CoCo 2, tape 
recorder and a DWP-230. My interests are 
basic and assembly programming (practical 
programs for me and games for my kids) and 
word processing. My other interests are 
history, literature, politics and religion. 1 
will answer all letters. 

Dan Weaver 
66 Bunn St. 
Amsterdam, NY 12010 



the rainbow welcomes letters to 
the editor. Mail should be addressed 
to: Letters to Rainbow, The Falsoft 
Building, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, K Y 
40059. Letters should include the 
writer's full name and address. Letters 
may be edited for purposes of clarity 
or to conserve space. 

Letters to the editor may also be 
sent to us through our Delphi CoCo 
SIG. From the CoCo SIG> prompt, 
type Rfl I to take you into the Rainbow 
Magazine Services area of the SIG. At 
the RAINBOW> prompt, type LET to 
reach the LETTERS> prompt and 
then select Letters for Publication. Be 
sure to include your complete name 
and address. 



8 THE RAINBOW February 1 989 



Word 
Power 3.2 



More Versatile • More Powerful With 
Spooler # Calculator • Split-Screen • 2-Column Printing 



"... friendly,.. amazing execu- 
tion speed...much easier to use 
than VIP software & 2 other 
word processing systems I've 
tried...very user-friendly... mas- 
sive text storage capacity 
...highest among word proces- 
sors..." - Rainbow Oct. 88 
Review for Word Power 



Unparalleled Power packed in this 100% ML Word Processor 
written from scratch for the CoCo 3! No other word processor 
offers such a wide array of features that are easy to learn & use. 



DISPLAY & SPEED 



' /A ' . ' . 1 '.'.'AWAV 



•»»:•:•» 



'.WAV.'. 




Word Power 3.2 runs at double-clock speed 
and uses the true 80-column display with 
lowercase instead of the graphics screen. The 
result is lightning fast screen reformatting and 
added speed! All prompts are displayed in 
plain English in neat colored windows . The current column num- 
ber, line number, page number, percentage of free memory is dis- 
played at all times. Even the page break is displayed so you know 
where one page ends and the other begins. The Setup program 
allows you to change fore/background colors as well as (in)visible 
carriage returns. Word Power 3.2 can be used with RGB/Com- 
posite/Monochrome monitors as well as TV. 



MAXIMUM MEMORY 



5iii!i:ri:iyiyi?rtViV»Yi^^ 




Word Power 3.2 gives you over 72 K on 128K anicl over 
450K on 512K CoCo 3 for Text Storage - more 
memory than any other CoCo word-processor. 
Period. 



EFFORTLESS EDITING 

Word Power 3.2 has one of the most powerful and user-friendly 
full-screen editor with word-wrap. All you do is type. Word 
Power takes care of the text arrangement. The unique Auto-Save 
feature saves text to disk at regular intervals for peace of mind. 

Insert/Overstrike Mode (Cursor Style Changes to indicate mode);OOPS Recall 
during delete;Type -ahead Buffer for fast typers;Key-Repeat (adjustable); Key- 
Click; 4-way cursor and scrolling; Cursor to beginning/end of text, beginning/end 
of line, top/bottom of screen, next/previous word; Page up/down; Delete charac- 
ter, previous/next word, to beginning/end of line, complete line, text before/after 
cursor; Locate/Replace with Wild-Card Search with auto/manual replace; Block 
Mark, Unmark, Copy, Move & Delete; Line Positioning (Center/Right Jus- 
tified); Set/Reset 120 programmable tab stops; Word-Count; Define Top/Bot- 
tom/Le ft/Right margins & page length. You can also highlight text 
(underline-with on-screen underlining, bold, italics, superscripts, etc.). Word 
Power even has a HELP screen which an be accessed any time during edit. 



SPLIT-SCREEN EDITING 

Splits the screen in half so you can view one portion of your text 
while you edit another. You'll love it! 




Li 



r.y.-.-.-.-.-.-.VY^.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-^ 

Ever try mailing out the same letter to 50 different 
1 people? Could be quite a chore. Not with Word 
Power 3.2! Using this feature, you can type a letter, 
follow it with a list of addresses and have Word Power 
print out personalized letters. It's that easy! 



□ 




CALCULATOR 

Pop-up a 4- function calculator while you edit! Great for tables! 



SAVING/LOADING TEXT 

Word Power 3.2 creates ASCII format files which are compatible 
with almost all terminal/spell-checking & other word-processing 
programs. Allows you to Display Free Space, Load, Save, Ap- 
pend & Kill files. The ARE YOU SURE? prompt prevents ac- 
cidental overwriting & deletion. You can select files by simply 
cursoring through the disk directory. Supports double-sided 
drives & step-rates. 



58 



PRINTING 

Word Power 3.2 drives almost any printer (DMP, EPSON, 
GEMINI, OKIDATA, etc). Allows options such as baud rates, 
line spacing, page/print pause, partial print, page number- 
ing/placement, linefeeds, multi-line headers/footers, right jus- 
tification & number of copies. The values of these parameters & 
margins can be changed anytime in the text by embedding Printer 
Option Codes. The WHAT YOU SEE IS WHAT YOU GET fea- 
ture allows you to preview the text on the screen as it will appear 
in print. You can view margins, page breaks, justification & more. 



:-**x^*;*x:::w::^ 



PRINT SPOOLER 

Why buy a hardware Print Spooler? Word Power 3.2 has a built- 
in Spooler which allows you to simultaneously edit one document 
& print another. 



TWO-COLUMN PRINTING IMM^MIIMIII 



This unique feature allows you to print all or portion of your text 
in two columns! Create professional documents without hours 
of aligning text. 

SPELLING CHECKER 




Word Power 3.2 comes with spelling checker/dic- 
tionary which finds & corrects mistakes in your 
text. You can add words to /delete words from 
dictionary. 



PUNCTUATION CHECKER 

This checker will proofread your text for punctuation errors such 
as capitalization, double-words, spaces after periods/commas, 
and more. Its the perfect addition to any word processor. 



n. ■ ■ _ m m. ■ w> m . .M. a ■ ^^VAV.VA^^V.WAVAW«V.VAW.V.V.V.V.^V.V.VAV.VAVAW.W.V.VA^W.VAWA ' . ' , 

DOCUMENTATION IMaMi^MBIilliilil 



Word Power 3.2 comes with a well-written instruction manual & 
reference card which makes writing with Word 
Power a piece of cake! Word Power 3.2 comes on an 
UNPROTECTED disk and is compatible with 
RSDOS. Only $79.95 

(Word Power 3.1 owners can get Word Power 3.2 Upgrade FREE by sending 
proof of purchase & $5.00 to cover S&H costs & instructions) 




DUGtVtt 



Jhdf MICROCOM SOFTWARE 

All Word Power 3.2 orders shipped by UPS Next Day Air at no extra charge within 
the Continental US. Offer good thru January 15, 1989. 

To Order & for info on FREE Gifts: Refer to Page 17 of our 6-page Ad series(Pg$. 9-17) 
Credit Card Toll Free Orderline 1-800-654-5244 (9am-8pm 7days/week) 

Order Status, Info, Technical Info: 716-383-8830 



i 









hrAiR 





f 



Here to 



Las Vegas — I am pretty worn out right now. It's someone's fault, 
but I am not sure exactly whose fault it is. I think it is Frank Hogg's 
fault, but he denies responsibility. If Frank is right, which does 
happen on occasion, it could be Gordon Monnier's fault. Of course, I have 
yet to see Gordon here this time. 

A fine Texas gentleman, Dick Hatcher, is really ultimately to blame. It 
was Dick — when he worked with a Color Computer software company 
called ANTECO — who lured me to this desert town for the Consumer 
Electronics Show about six or seven years ago. But Dick fled to Thailand. 
And while he is back in this country (and a renewed subscriber to rainbow 
and a new one to PCM), it is hard to cast the blame at his feet. 

No, either Frank or Gordon talked me into coming to COMDEX for 
the first time. 

Frank denies it because he says he has never come to COMDEX, only 
to the now-gone and not-too-lamented National Computer Conference. 
But I seem to recall his egging me on to go, so I am not sure that he did 
not send me out as a scout one time. 

Gordon, of course, has been here a lot. In fact, Falsoft and MichTron 
have shared booths on occasion here. Gordon sold software, and we sold 
magazines (although not too many of them). At least not at COMDEX. 

As many of you know, COMDEX is the computer show of the year. 
This is the 10th annual running of this attraction, which now covers entire 
exhibit halls in five major hotels and the Las Vegas Convention Center. 
The famous West Hall of the Convention Center was built by COMDEX 
(so the story goes) for Las Vegas, so there would be adequate space. There 
are also some exhibits in something called the "Cashman Field Center," 
which I guess I will find before I head back to Kentucky. 





Best Desktop Publishing / Document 
Creator for the CoCo 3. Features Pull 
Down Menus, What You See Is What You 
Get , UNDO, integrated text & graphics 
capability , multiple fonts & more. 
Graphics can be imported from CoCo 
Max I,n,III, MGE, MGF, 5 Level DS-69, 
PMODE 4, HSCREEN 2/3 pictures. Sup- 
ports: DMP 105/130, EPSON 
MX/FX/RXLX/ Gemini 10 Series, CGP- 
220 and OKI-92. Only $79.95 




Create distinctive bright yellow diamond 
shaped car signs. Includes 2 resuable 
clear plastic sign holders with suction 
cups, and 50 sheets of bright yellow fan- 
fold paper. Printer Requirements are the 
same as for the CoCo Graphics Designer. 
Only $29.95 

Font Disk #1,#2 for CoCo Graphics 
Designer: $19.95 each 



COLOR 
(SCHEMATIC 




By Prakash Mishra 

An excellent Circuit Schematic Design 
Software Package for CoCo 3. Features: 

* Runs in 640x192 at 1.8 Mhz 

* Pull Down Menus 

* Keyboard/Mouse/Joystck Support 

* RGB/ Composite/Monochrome 
Monitor Support 

* 72 Modifiable Symbols 

* Multiple Hi-Res Fonts 

* Multiple UNDO Command 

* Symbol Rotate/Line/Box Draw 

* Supports 3 Layers of Circuits 

* Powerful Screen Print Command 
DMP/Gemini/Epson Printers 

* Complete Documentation 



Only $39.95 



for 






RSB 



A Revolutionary Program that allows 
you to use Basic Programs from OS9! 

OS9 Level 2 is the future of the CoCo. 
Unfortunately, most Basic Program- 
mers are "afraid" of using OS9 because 
it is completely different from Basic. 

Introducing RSB from Burke & 
Burke, It converts RS-DOS into an 
OS9 "shell" and allows you to program 
in Basic from under OS9! You can 
even take advantage of the OS-9 "built- 
in" windows to run several BASIC 
programs at once! And RSB always 
runs at the full 2 Mhz speed of the 
CoCo! 

If you're new to OS9 or you simply 
want to take advantage of the ad- 
vanced features of the OS9 operating 
system, RSB is for you. Req. OS9 L II. 
Only $39.95 

ULTRAPATCH SYSTEM 

by Randall Reid 
Patches the Superpatch EDTASM + ® 
for 80 columns, 47K Buffer (ap- 
proximately 3000 lines!) & more. Req 
CoCo 3. Only $19.95 



GAMES 

(Disk only) 

(CoCo 1,2 & 3 except where mentioned) 

WARRIOR KING (CoCo 3): $29.95 
IN QUEST OF STAR LORD(Animated Graphics Adventure 
for CoCo 3): $34.95 Hint Sheet: $3.95 
HALL OF THE KING 1,2,3: $29.95 Each Trilogy: $74.95 
FLIGHT 16: $34.95 

P-51 MUSTANG SIMULATION: $34.95 
WORLDS OF FLIGHT: $34.95 
PYRAMIX(Cubix for CoCo 3): $24.95 
KUNG FU DUDE: $24.95 CHAMPION: $19.95 

WHITE FIRE OF ETERNITY: $19.95 
QUEST FOR THE SPIRIT STONE (CoCo 3): $18 
WARGAME DESIGNER (CoCo 3): $29 
TREASURY PACK#1: Lunar Rover Patrol* Cubix, Declathon, 
Qix, keys of Wizard, Module Man, Pengon, & Roller Con- 
troller.Only $29.95 

TREASURY PACK #2: Lancer, Ms. Gobbler, Froggie, Mad- 
ness & Minotaur, Ice Castles, Galagon, Devious. Only $29.95 
SPACE PAC: Color Zap, Invaders, Planet Invasion, Space 
Race, Space War, Galax Attax, Anaroid Attack, Whirlybird, 
Space Sentry & Storm Arrows.Only $29.95 
WIZARD'S CASTLE: A hi-res graphics adventure game filled 
with traps, tricks, treasures. Only $19.95 
CLASSIC PAK: Treasury Pack 1, 2, Space Pac & Wizards 
Castle: Only $59.95 



XENOCOPY-PC 

An amazingly versatile program that allows you to Format/Duplicate / Read/ 
Write disks from over 300 different computers. For example you could trans- 
ferprograms between CoCo, IBM, PC-DOS, TRS-80 Model 3, TRS-80 Model 
4, TRS-80 Model 100, Xerox 820, Zenith, Kaypro II, Novell , NEC DOS and 
much much more!! Send for FREE List. Requires an IBM Compatible with 2 
drives. Disk $79.95. 

51 2K BACKUP LIGHTNING 

(From Colorventure) 

The ultimate CoCo 3 disk copying utility!! Reads your master diskette once 
and then makes as many copies as you want. It automatically formats an un- 
formatted disk while copying! Supports 35, 40 or 80 track drives with various 
step rates. A must for any disk user!! Only $19.95 

PRINTER LIGHTNING 

(From Colorventure) 

Never wait for your printer again!! This Print Spooler allows you to print to 
your printer and simultaneously continue with your programming. No need to 
wait for those long printouts! Disk Only $19.95 

BASIC FREEDOM 

A Full Screen Editor for Basic Programs! ! A Must for anyone who writes Basic 
Programs. Only $24.95 

VOCAL FREEDOM 

Turn your computer into a digital voice / sound recorder. Produces natural 
voices/ sound effects. Req. inexpensive RS Amplifier (#277-1008) & any 
microphone. Only $34.95 

HACKER'S PAC 

Allows you to incorporate voices created by Vocal Freedom into your own 
Basic and ML programs. Only $14.95 ^ 




DIKOVER 



MICROCOM SOFTWARE 

To Order & for info on FREE Gifts: Refer to Page 17 of our 6-page Ad series(Pgs. 9-17) 

Credit Card Toll Free Orderline 1-800-654-5244 (9am-8pm 7days/week) 

Order Status, Info, Technical Info: 716-383-8830 





It has always been a mammoth job 
covering this show. The Las Vegas 
Convention Center itself, which is all 
there was in the early stages, is so huge 
that it takes a couple of days to cover 
— as long as you don't stop to look too 
long at things. This makes your legs 
hurt, your feet ache, your arms sore 
from carrying literature and (worst of 
all) gives you Las Vegas Throat. You 
see, this is the desert — no sand dunes 
or anything, but desert nevertheless. 
And desert means dry. If you talk a lot, 
you dry out your throat. Some of the 
professional entertainers have little 
steam machines attached to their mi- 
crophones; when they inhale, they get 
moisture. The closest you get to mois- 
ture at the Las Vegas Convention Cen- 
ter during COMDEX is the refreshment 
stand. And there's a line. 

All this is leading up to what I was 
going to write about, but it would not 
be fair if you did not know of the terrible 
privation I am now going through in 
order to bring you this news. Ah, the 
woes of a correspondent on assignment! 

* * * 



What I was going to write about is 
this: When we did come to COMDEX 
in the early years, we used to bemoan 
the fact that only three or four Color 
Computer software companies ever 
exhibited anything. 

There was, indeed, quite a mishmash 
of just about everything. As the so- 
called IBM Standard began to develop 
with the introduction of the IBM PC, 
however, there were fewer and fewer 
alternate computer systems. 

About three years ago, Gordon and 
I were the only ones who had booths 
that had anything to do with the CoCo. 
What was interesting, however, was 
that out of the increasingly pin-striped, 
button-down crowd, we attracted a 
hundred or so people who did, indeed, 
have CoCo's. 

They are with us still. Though there 
is no practical reason for us to have a 
booth here any more, it is amazing how 
many people you come to meet in a 
business over the years, even one as 
ever-changing as the computer busi- 
ness. Walking around today, getting 
sore feet, aching legs and the oncoming 
symptoms of Las Vegas Throat, I was 



stopped by a good dozen or so people 
who wanted to talk about their CoCos 
and THE RAINBOW. 

A small ripple, you say? Yes, of 
course. But the truth of the matter is 
that you would have to be at COMDEX 
to see the overwhelming hold the so- 
called IBM Standard has on the overall 
computer industry (and the overwhelm- 
ing amount of money you could spend 
on these systems). 

Yet here we are. Not seeking out 
members of the CoCo Community, but 
finding them everywhere. More inter- 
esting, I really do not see, among 1700- 
plus exhibitors, many products that 
cannot be run on some version of our 
Color Computer. I won't even mention 
the cost of doing so on anything else. 

In 1998, I expect to be at the 20th 
COMDEX and to need a power scooter 
to see the whole thing. I also expect 
there to be a thriving CoCo Community 
and a RAINBOW to support it. 

There is something unique about the 
Color Computer, and I happen to think 
it is wonderful. I am sure you agree. 

— Lonnie Falk 




Real BASIC for 
OS9! 

R.S.B. I* • complete, OSO-compatible version of Disk Extended 
Color BASIC. Burke & Burke has added new software to give you 
OS9-atyle graphics, sound, printer, and disk I/O. The BASIC you 
know and love Is now running under Level 2 OS9 window* I 

R.S.B. loads and saves files using OS9's file formal. The H.S.B. 
package includes utility programs that let you transfer BASIC 
programs and data files between OS9 and BASIC disks. Of 
course, you can't use R.S.B. to run machine language programs, 
and aome BASIC commands work slightly differently under R.S.B. 

Your BASIC programs can take full advantage of great OS9 
features like hard disks, no-halt floppies, multitasking, and 2 
MHz operation. 

R.S.B. requires s CoCo 3 with st least 128K RAM, a floppy disk 
controller with either Tandy Disk Extended Color BASIC or 
DISTO CoCo 3 CDOS ROM, and Level 2 0S9. 



RAINBOW 

CCTTlflCATCN 
SEAL 



Works with alt hard A, floppy disk systems/ 



R.S.B. $39. 9 5 



Runs In 12&K; 5I2K preferred. 




ZcsolutioxiB 

I) learn 6#$ 
2) *uy a f)svo 

3) Clean ©aragej 



CoCo XT Facts 

Answers to common ques- 
tions about the CoCo XT 



Hard Disk Interfaces 

We've sold hundreds of our 
affordable, high-performance hard 
disk interfaces to Color Computer 
enthusiasts worldwidel 



rim 

RAINBOW 

CERT FtCAf ION 
SEAL 



Vs. 



A true "NO HALT hard disk 
system 

Controls 1 or 2 hard drives > 
Full ECC / CRC error correction 
Average access 30% faster than SASI 
Uses PC-type hard disk controllers & 
hard drives 

Does not use or disable interrupts 
Compatible with most RS-232 
interfaces 

20 Meg system cost: under $450 
Requires Mutti-PAK or "electric" Y-cable 



Each includes an anodized housing, 100 page 
user manual, and software for use with OS9. 
The CoCo XT-RTC add a a battery-powered 
real time clock / calendar for OS9 and BASIC. 

CoCo XT $69.95 
CoCo XT-RTC $99.95 

XT-ROM: Install XT-ROM in your hard disk 
controller's BIOS ROM socket. It 
automatically boots and reboots OS9 from 
your hard disk. $19.95 



Buy s drive, Western Digital 
controller, and case from the PC 

dealer of your choice. Plug 
them into the CoCo XT, plug the 
CoCo XT Into your Mutti-PAK, 
and Install the OS9 or BASIC 
software. Presto! 



Wild & MV Version 2.1 

Use "wildcards" with most OS9 
commands, or rearrange your 
directory tree. Features recursive 
directory searches. A hard disk 
must! $19.95 



QS9 Utilities 



EZGen Version 1.04 

Powerful OS9 bootfile editor. 
Change module names, add or 
delete modules, patch bytes, or 
rearrange modules. Works on 
other files, too. $19.95 




P.O. Box 12B3 Palatine, IL 60078-1 2B3 (312) 397-2898 



HYPFR-I /D Now BAStc runs nard drives, 
n I r C/TI/ V/ frjg floppies, and morel 

HYPER-I/O modifies the RS-DOS BASIC in your CoCo 1, 2, or 3 to 
provide a "Dynamic Disk Interface". Use your existing BASIC and 
RS-DOS software with hard disk interfaces (CoCo XT. DISTO, I R), 
RAM Disks, and any mix of floppy drives from 160K to 720K each. 
Fully RESET protected, user configurable, expandable, EPROM- 
abte HYPER-I/O V2.6 is the most versatile hard / floppy disk DOS 
available. Please specify HYPER- I/O, DISTO HYPER-I/O, or 
LR HYPER-I/O when ordering. Wmmmm 



HYPER- III (Adds RAM Disk and Print Spooler to 
HYPER-I/O on the CoCo 3) $12.95 



f M.l? (<-lC.il -I J 

waa^^aam 



ILLINOIS RESIDENTS PLEASE ADD 7% SALES TAX. COD'm add $2.20. Shipping (within tha USA) $2.00 pt CoCo XT; $1.50 por dfak or ROM. 
Plaaaa allow 2 waaka lor dallvary (ovarnlght dallvary afao avatlabta lor ln-atoek Hama). Talaphona ordara aooaptad (312) 397-2898. 




1 2 THE RAINBOW February 1989 




j .4 .h o 

, . .j>. ; ■ , 







(CoCo 2 Versions Included where specified) 



SUPER TAPE/DISK 
TRANSFER 





* Disk-to-Disk Copy * Tape-to-Disk Copy 

* Tape-to-Disk Auto Relocate 

* Disk-to-Tape Copy * Tape-to-Tape Copy 
Copies Basic/ML/Data Files. CoCo 1,2 or 3. 
Req. min. 64K Disk System. Disk Only $24.95 



COMPUTERIZED 
CHECKBOOK 



COCO CHECKER 




Something possibly wrong with your CoCo? 
CoCo Checker is the answer. Will test your 
ROMs, RAMs, Disk Drives & Controller, 
Printer, Keyboard, Cassette, Joysticks, Sound, 
PIAs, VDG, Internal Clock Speed, Multi-Pak 
Interface and more! Only $24.95 




Why bother with balancing your checkbook? 
Let the CoCo do it for you. Allows you to add, 
view, search, edit, change, delete and printout 
(in a table/individual entry format) checkbook 
entries. Updates balance after each entry. Al- 
lows files for checking, savings, and other ac- 
counts. Disk $19.95. (CoCo2 version included) 



DISK UTILITY 2.1A 



A multi-featured tool for USER FRIENDLY 
disk handling. Utilize a directory window to 
selectively sort, move, rename & kill file entries. 
Lightning fast Disk I/O for format, copy & back- 
up. Single key execution of Basic/ML programs. 
This will become your MOST USED program ! ! 
CoCo 1,2 or 3. Req. Min. 64K. Disk Only $24.95 




BOWLING SCORE 
KEEPER 



An excellent utility to keep track of your bowl- 
ing scores. Allows you to save scores under in- 
dividuals or teams. You can edit change, delete, 
and compare scores. A must for anyone who 
wants to keep track of his or her bowling perfor- 
mance. Disk $19.95 (CoCo 2 version included) 




MAILLIST PRO 



The ultimate mailing list program. Allows you 
to add, edit, view, delete, change, sort (by zip- 
code or name) and print labels. Its indispen- 
siblel'.Disk $19.95 (CoCo 2 version included) 



VCR TAPE ORGANIZER 




Organize your videotapes with this program. 
Allows you to index tapes by title, rating, type, 
play time and comments. Also allows you to sort 
titles alphabetically & view/print selected tapes. 
If you own a VCR, this program is a MUST! ! 
Disk $19.95 (CoCo 2 version included) 



DISK LABEL MAKER 

Allows you to design professional disk labels! 
Allows elongated, normal and condensed for- 
mat for text. Double Strike, Border Creation, 
and multiple label printing. Its a MUST for any 
user with a disk drive. Supports DMP 
105/106/110/120/ 130/430, GEMINI, STAR, 
EPSON and compatibles. (CoCo 2 version in- 
cluded). Only $19.95 



COCO 3 SCREEN DUMP 



32, 40, 80 column text dump, PMODE 4 
Graphics Dump. Single Keystroke Operation al- 
lows you to take snapshots of your screens even 
when programs are running! Works on DMP's, 
Epson, Gemini and compatibles. CoCo 1, 2 and 
3. Disk $24,95 




HOME BILL MANAGER ™^ 



TT 



Let the CoCo keep track of your bills. Allows 
you to enter bills under various categories and 
reminds you when they are due. Disk $19.95 



COCO UTILII^ 

(Latest Version): Transfer CoCo Disk files to 
IBM compatible computer and vica -versa. Re- 
quires 2-Drive IBM Compatible. Disk $39.95 



CALENDAR MAKER 



i „ a m ■ n m 



Generate monthly calendars on your printer for 
any year in the 20th century. Disk Only $19,95 
(CoCo 2 version included) 



Start OS9 

An Enjoyable, Hands-on Guide to OS9 Level II. In- 
cludes step-by-step tutorials, articles by OS9 ex- 
perts, free software disk includes examples & great 
OS-9 utilities! Req. 512K, OS9 Level II, 2 drives & 
monitor. The Hottest OS9 Package. Disk 4- Book: 

$32.95 



I he Zapper: Patch Disk Errors.$19.95 

Disk Manager Tree: Change, create & 
delete directories quickly. Req. 512K Ul. $29.95 

Level II Tools : Wildcards.tree commands, 
windowing & 22 more utilities. 128K Req.$24.95 

Warp One: Complete Lll Windowing Ter- 
minal. Auto dial, macros,file transfers.cap- 
ture,timer,chat, etc. 512K Req. $34.95 



WIZ 

Best LII Terminal Package with 300-19200 baud 
rate/windowing. Req. 512K & RS-232 Pack. $79.95 



DYNASTAR 

Best OS9 Editor/Word Processor. Has Macros, sup- 
ports terminals & windows simultaneously, con- 
figurable, auto-indent for C/Pascal programming, 
mail-merge. New Manual makes it easier than ever. 

Only $99.95. DynaSpell: $74.95. Both 
Dynastar and Dynaspell: Only $124.95 

DYNACALC Spreadsheet: $99.95 



OS9 LEVEL II BBS Rel 2.0 

BBS program that supports multiple users & sysop 
definable menus. Tsmon, Login, Chat, Message 
Retrieval, Mail Retrieval, Uloadx, Dloadx, and 
much more! Req.512K. New Version! Only $29.95 



RGB PATCH 



Displays most games in color on RGB monitors. 
CoCo 3 Disk $24.95 



ADOS 3 

Advanced disk operating system for CoCo 3. 
Comes on disk and is EPROMable!! Disk 
$34.95. ADOS (for CoCo 1,2): $27.95 



GSC File Transfer Utilities 

Nowyou can transfer files to & from PC (MS DOS), 
RSDOS/FLEX disks into your CoCo (OS9) system. 
Options: Single/Double sided disks, 40/80 tracks, 8/9 
sectors & more! Req. OS9 (Level 2 for MultiVue 
version), 2 drives, SDISK/SDISK 3. Standard Ver- 
sion: $44.95; MultiVue Versio n: $54.95 

PC-Xfer UTILITIES 

Programs to format and transfer files to/from MS 
DOS diskettes on CoCo Under OS9 Level 1 and 2. 
Requires SDISK or SDISK 3. Only $44.95 

SDISK3 

Standard disk drive module replacement allows full 
use of 40/80 track double-sided drives. Req. OS9 
Level II. Only $29.95. SDISK: $29.95 




l3U-"dElt.<lt ,, *tni| , 'ii. 



SOFTWARE 






American] 











OS9 LEVEL II RAMDISK 

Lightning Fast Ramdisk. A must for any OS9 Level 
II user. Req 512K. Only $2 9.9g. 



to Order & for info on FREE Gifts: Refer to Page 17 of our 6-page Ad series(Pgs, 9-17) 



Credit Card Toll Free Orderline 1- 

ler Status, Info, Technical Info; 716-383-8830 




... •.=••%,. ^9*H!." r.~. j ■',"*■■»£ k :>•• 11 



How To Read Rainbow 



When we use the term CoCo, we refer to an affection- 
ate name that was first given to the Tandy Color 
Computer by its many fans, users and owners. 

The basic program listings printed in the rain- 
bow are formatted for a 32-character screen — so they 
show up just as they do on your CoCo screen. One easy 
way to check on the accuracy of your typing is to com- 
pare what character "goes under" what. If the charac- 
ters match — and your line endings come out the same 
— you have a pretty good way of knowing that your 
typing is accurate. 

We also have "key boxes" to show you the minimum 
system a program needs. But, do read the text before 
you start typing. 

Finally, the little disk and/or cassette symbols on the 
table of contents and at the beginning of articles 
indicate that the program is available through our 
rainbow on disk or rainbow on tape service. 



Using Machine Language 



The easiest way to "put" a machine language program 
into memory is to use an editor/assembler, a program 
you can purchase from a number of sources. All you 
have to do, essentially, is copy the relevant instructions 
from the rainbow's listing into CoCo. 

Another method of putting an ML listing into CoCo 
is called "hand assembly" - assembly by hand, which 
sometimes causes problems with OR I G I N or equrte 
statements. You ought to know something about 
assembly to try this. 

Use the following program if you want to hand- 
assemble ML listings: 

10 CLERR200,&H3F00:I=&H3F80 

20 PRINT "RDDRESS:";HEX$(I); 

30 INPUT "BYTE";B$ 

40 POKE I, VAL("&H"+B$) 

50 I=I+l:GOTO 20 

This program assumes you have a 16K CoCo. If you 
have 32K, change the &H3F00 in Line 10 to &H7F00 
and change the value of I to &H7FB0. 



OS-9 and RAINBOW ON DISK 



The OS-9 side of rainbow on disk contains two 
directories: CMDS and SOURCE. It also contains a file, 
read . me . f i rs t, which explains the division of the 
two directories. The CMDS directory contains executa- 
ble programs and the source directory contains the 
ASCII source code for these programs. BASIC09 
programs will only be offered in source form so they will 
only be found in the source directory. 

OS-9 is a very powerful operating system. Because 
of this, it is not easy to learn at first. However, while we 
can give specific instructions for using the OS-9 



programs, you will find that the OS-9 programs will be 
of little use unless you are familiar with the operating 
system. For this reason, if you haven't "learned" OS-9 
or are not comfortable with it, we suggest you read The 
Complete Rainbow Guide to OS-9 by Dale Puckett and 
Peter Dibble. 

The following is not intended as a course in OS-9. It 
merely states how to get the OS-9 programs from 
rainbow on disk to your OS-9 system disk. Use 
the procedures appropriate for your system. Before 
doing so, however, boot the OS-9 operating system 
according to the documentation from Radio Shack. 

1) Type load dir list copy and press enter. 

2) If you have only one disk drive, remove the OS-9 
system disk from Drive 0 and replace it with the OS- 
9 side of rainbow on disk. Then type chd/d0 
and press enter. If you have two disk drives, leave 
the sytem master in Drive 0 and put the rainbow 
on disk in Drive 1. Then type chd/dl and press 
enter. 

3) List the read . me . f i rs t file to the screen by typing 
l ist read. me. first and pressing ENTER. 

4) Entering dir will give you a directory of the OS-9 
side of rainbow on disk. To see what programs 
are in the CMDS directory, enter di r cmds. Follow 
a similar method to see what source files are in the 
SOURCE directory. 

5) When you find a program you want to use, copy it 
to the CMDS directory on your system disk with one 
of the following commands: 

One-drive system: copy /d0/cmds/ filename /d0/ 
cmds /filename -s 

The system will prompt you to alternately place the 
source disk (rainbow on disk) or the destination 
disk (system disk) in Drive 0. 
Two-drive system: copy /d 1 / cmds / filename /d0/ 
cmds/ filename 

Once you have copied the program, you execute it 
from your system master by placing that disk in Drive 
0 and entering the name of the file. 



The Rainbow Seal 




RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 



The Rainbow Certification Seal is our way of helping 
you, the consumer. The purpose of the Seal is to certify 
to you that any product that carries the Seal has actually 
been seen by us, that it does, indeed, exist and that we 
have a sample copy here at the rainbow. 

Manufacturers of products — hardware, software and 
firmware — are encouraged by us to submit their prod- 
ucts to the rainbow for certification. 

The Seal is not a "guarantee of satisfaction." The 
certification process is different from the review 
process. You are encouraged to read our reviews to 
determine whether the product is right for your needs. 

There is absolutely no relationship between advertis- 
ing in THE rainbow and the certification process. 
Certification is open and available to any product per- 



taining to CoCo. A Seal will be awarded to any com- 
mercial product, regardless of whether the firm adver- 
tises or not. 

We will appreciate knowing of instances of violation 
of Seal use. 



Rainbow Check Plus 



ST 



The small box accompanying a program listing in 
the rainbow is a "check sum" system, which is 
designed to help you type in programs accurately. 

Rainbow Check PLUS counts the number and values 
of characters you type in. You can then compare the 
number you get to those printed in the rainbow. 
On longer programs, some benchmark lines are given. 
When you reach the end of one of those lines with your 
typing, simply check to see if the numbers match. 

To use Rainbow Check PLUS, type in the program 
and save it for later use, then type in the command RUN 
and press enter. Once the program has run, type NEW 
and press enter to remove it from the area where the 
program you're typing in will go. 

Now, while keying in a listing from the rainbow, 
whenever you press the down arrow key, your CoCo 
gives the check sum based on the length and content 
of the program in memory. This is to check against the 
numbers printed in the rainbow. If your number is 
different, check the listing carefully to be sure you typed 
in the correct basic program code. For more details 
on this helpful utility, refer to H. Allen Curtis' article on 
Page 21 of the February 1984 rainbow. 

Since Rainbow Check PLUS counts spaces and 
punctuation, be sure to type in the fisting exactly the 
way it's given in the magazine. 

10 CLS:X=256*PEEI<(35)+178 

20 CLERR 25,X-1 

30 X=256*PEEI< (35)+178 

40 FDR Z=X TO X+77 

50 RERD Y:W=W+Y:PRINT Z,Y;W 

G0 POKE Z,Y:NEXT 

70 IFW=7985THENB0ELSEPRINT 

"DfiTA ERROR":STOP 
B0 EXEC X:END 

90 DRTR 1B2, 1, 106, 167, 140, 60, 134 
100 DRTR 126, 183, l t 106, 190, 1, 107 
110 DRTR 175, 140, 50, 4B, 140, 4, 191 
120 DRTR 1, 107, 57, 129, 10, 38, 38 
130 DRTR 52, 22, 79, 15B, 25, 230, 129 
140 DRTR 39, 12, 171, 12B, 171, 128 
150 DRTR 230, 132, 3B, 250, 48, 1, 32 
160 DRTR 240, 1B3, 2, 222, 48, 140, 14 
170 DRTR 159, 166, 166, 132, 28, 254 
1B0 DRTR 189, 173, 198, 53, 22, 126, 0 
190 DRTR 0, 135, 255, 134, 40, 55 
200 DRTR 51, 52, 41, 0 



1 4 THE RAINBOW February 1989 



Books That Can Launch A 1000 Programs!! 

Pokes, Peeks and Execs are your guides into the jungle of computer programming. These commands give you the power of 
Machine Language without leaving the security of BASIC. Each book is a collection of "inside" information, with explanations 
and examples to help you immediately put it to use. Everyone from the novice to the professional will find these handy books a 
wealth of information. cqq pQKES 

PEEKS, 'N EXECS 



300 POKES, 
PEEKS, 'N EXECS 
for COCO III 



*40/80 column Screen Text Dump 
*Save Text/Graphics Screen to Disk 
•Command/Functions Disables 
♦Enhancements for CoCo3 BASIC 
♦128K/512K RAM Test Program 
*HPRINT Character Modifier 




Only $19.95 



* Autostart your BASIC programs 

* Disable Color BASIC/ECB/Disk BASIC 
commands 

* Disable Break Key/ Clear Key/ Reset Button 
•Generate a Repeat-key 

♦Transfer ROMPAKs to tape 
*Set 23 different GRAPHIC modes 

* Merge two BASIC programs 
*And much much more!!! 

For CoCo 1,2 and 3. Only $16.95 
ALL 3 BOOKS for $39.95 



SUPPLEMENT TO 500 
POKES,PEEKS, 'N EXECS 



200 additional Pokes,Peeks and Execs (500 
Pokes Pecks *N Execs is a prerequisite) 
*ROMPAK transfer to disk 

* PAINT with 65000 styles 

*Use of 40 track single/double sided drives 
•High-speed Cassette Operation 
'Telewriter, CoCo Max enhancements 

* Graphics Dump (for DMP printers) /Text 
Screen Dump 



For CoCo 1,2 or 3. Only $9.95 




UNRAVELLED SERIES 




COCO LIBRARY 



An invaluable aid for Basic and Machine Language programmers, these 
books provide a complete disassembly and annotated listing of the 
BASIC/ECB and Disk ROMs. These listings give complete, uninterupted 
memory maps of the four ROMs. Gain complete control over all versions of 
the color computer. 

EXTENDED COLOR BASIC UNRAVELLED: COLOR 
BASIC and EXTENDED BASIC ROM Disassembly: $39.95 
DISK BASIC UNRAVELLED: DISK BASIC ROM 1.1 and 
1.0 Disassembly : $19.95 

BOTH ECB AND DISK BASIC UNRAVELLED: $49.95 
SUPER EXTENDED BASIC UNRAVELLED: SUPER EX- 
TENDED BASIC ROM Disassembly for CoCo 3. $24.95 
COMPLETE UNRAVELLED SERIES (all 3 books): $59.95 



CoCo 3 Service Manual: $39.95 
CoCo 2 Service Manual: $29.95 
Inside OS9 Level II: $39.95 
Rainbow Guide To OS9 Level II: $19.95 
Rainbow Guide To OS9 II (disk): $19.95 
Complete Guide To OS9 (Level 1): $19.95 
Complete Guide To OS9 (2 Disk): $29.95 
CoCo 3 Secrets Revealed: $19.95 
Basic Programming Tricks: $12.95 
Assembly Language Programming(tepco): $18 

Addendum For CoCo3 (tepco). $12 
Color Computer Disk Manual (with ref card): $29.95 
Start OS-9 (Book & Disk): $32.99 




OTHER SOFTWARE ... 

COCO MAX III (with hi-res interface): $79.95 
COCO MAX II: Disk $77.95 Tape $67.95 
MAXFONTS #1,.#2,#3,#4: Disk $19.95 Each 
NX1000 Rainbow Driver for CoCo Max III: $19.95 
MAXPATCH: Run COCO MAX II on COCO 3. $24.95 

EDT/ASM 64D: Editor-assembler (specify 1,2,3) $59.95 
SOURCE: CoCo Disassembler $34.95 SOURCE HI: $49.95 
CBASIC: Best Basic compiler $149.95 CBASIC III: $149.95 

TELEWRITER 64 (COCO 1&2) :Best Word Processor for 
CoCo 1 & 2. Disk $57.95 Tape $47.95 

AUTOTERM : Modem software Disk $39.95 Cas $29.95 
PRO-COLOR FILE *ENHANCED*: $59.95 

VIP DATABASE III 
Best Database for CoCo 3. Features 40/64/80 columns, size 
limited only by disk space, easy to understand menu system 
LIGHTNING FAST in-memory sort, multiple search, built- 
in mail merge, built-in MATH PACKAGE, print spooler and 
report generator, unlimited print formats & more. $69.95 



MJF 



WINDOW MASTER 

The hottest program for your CoCo 31! Imagine using Win- 
dows, Pull-Down Menus, Buttons, Icons, Edit Field, and 
Mouse Functions in your Basic Programs. No need to use 
OS9. It uses the 640x255 (or 320x255) hires graphics mode 
for the highest resolution. Up to 31 windows can appear on 
the screen at one time. Need extra character sets? Window 
Master supports 5 fonts in 54 sizes! How about an enhanced 
Editor for Basic? It gives you a superb Basic Editor which 
leaves the standard EDIT command in the cold. And don't 
forget that many existing Basic/ML programs will operate 
under Window Master with little or no changes. In fact, it 
does NOT take up any memory from Basic, Requires 1 Disk 
Drive, RS Hi-res Interface & Joystick or Mouse. Includes 
128K & 512K Version. $69. 95 Window Master & Hi-Res In- 
terface. Only $79.95 

FKEYSIII 

A user friendly, user programmable function key utility that 
creates up to 20 function keys. Includes EDITOR, DOS 
mods, DISABLE, and its EPROMable! Disk $19.95 

SIXDRIVE 

Allows the use of 3 double-sided drives from RSDOS or 
ADOS. Only $16.95 





m 9 



"AMERICAN, 

[EXPRESS 



DI/CCVEft 



MICROCOM SOFTWARE 

To Order & for info on FREE Gifts: Refer to Page 17 of our 6-page Ad series(Pgs. 9-17) 
Credit Card Toll Free Orderline 1-800-654-5244 (9am-8pm 7days/week) 

Order Status, Info, Technical Info: 716-383-8830 




512K BASIC 

(For 128K & 512K Computers) 

From the authors of Word Power 3.2, the best-selling Word Processor for CoCo 3, comes a revolutionary programming tool! 

Do you have a 128K or 512K CoCo 3? Are you being told that Basic will even run at double clock-speed and automatically slow 
you could only use 22K from Basic?? Don't believe it!! down for printer and disk operations. 



Lets face it. You bought your CoCo 3 so you could get better 
graphics, more speed and more MEMORY. Unfortunately as it 
comes, the CoCo 3 only allows you to use 22K for Basic 
Programs. A big disappointment for Basic Programmers. 

Introducing the revolutionary 512K Basic. It gives you up to 80K 
Basic program/variable space (64K for Basic Program/16K for 
variables) on a 128K CoCo and over 400K (384K Basic Program 
Space & 16K Variable Space) on a 512K CoCo! There are no 
new commands to remember and approximately 90-95% of the 
existing Basic Software will run without any modifications. 512K 
Basic is completely transparent to the user. You won't even know 
its there until you realize that you were able to type in a massive 
Basic program without the dreaded ?OM Error. And 512K 



Step up to 512K Basic. It's the tool you need to tap the full poten- 
tial of your CoCo 3. 512K Basic Requires a 128K or 512K CoCo 
3 with a disk drive. OS9 is NOT required. Only $39.95 

51 2K Upgrades for CoCo 3. 

(Only $160 with purchase of 512K Basic) 

Fully assembled, tested and ready to be shipped now. Comes 
with $100 worth of 512K Software: 

• 512K Backup Lightning m512K Print Spooler ^^^^ dR^fe 

• 512K Memory Test • 512K Ramdisk ^kt^ 

• OS9 Level II Ramdisk. 

No soldering. Comes with all instruction manuals. 90 day war- 
ranty. Only $188 
OK Upgrade Board: $39.95 




KEYBOARDS , ETC 

KEYBOARD EXTENSION CABLE: 
Move your keyboard away from the com- 
puter & type with ease. Use your existing 
keyboard with this ^ 
cable or leave your 
present keyboard in- ^ 
tact and use a second tzz^ 
keyboard. Only 
$39.95. 

Cable with CoCo 2 Keyboard: $49.95 
Cable with CoCo 3 Keyboard: $69.95 
CoCo 3 Keyboard (with free FUNCTION 
KEYS software value $14.95) :$39.95 

CoCo 2 Keyboard: $19.95 

ACCESORIES 



5 1/4" DS/DD Disks: $.40 each 
3 1/2" DS/DD Disks: $1.49 each 
5 1/4" Disk Case (for 70 disks): $9.95 
3 1/2" Disk Case (for 40 disks): $7.50 

Curtis Printer Stand: $19.95 
Surge Supresser Strip w/ 6 outlets: 
$14.95 

Curtis Static Mat: $24.95 



RIBBONS 



NX1000 Color Ribbon: $12.95 
NX1000 Black Ribbon: $8.50 
Seikosha, EPSON, DMP, 
Panasonic, Okidata, Gemini Rib- 
bons: $8.50 each 



COMMUNICATIONS 
EXTRAVAGANZA 

1) Avatex 1200e Modem: Fully Hayes 
compatible 300/1200 w/ speaker, Auto- 
Dial/Answer/Redial. 

2) MODEM CABLE: 4 pin/DB 25 (Reg, 
$19.95) 

3) Autoterm Software: (Reg $39,95) 

4) FREE Compuserve Offer & Acess Time 

5) UPS 2nd Day Air Shipping 

Only $129.95 
With Avatex 2400e instead of I200e: $229.95 




Avatex 1200e Modem Only: $85 
Avatex 2400e Modem Only: $189 / <<- 




EPROM 



INTRONICS EPROM PROGRAMMER 

(for CoCo): Programs 2516-27512 & 
more! Includes software & complete 
documentation. Latest version. Lowest 
Price Anywhere! Only $137.95 
EPROM ERASERFast erase of 24/28 pin 
EPROMs. Only $49.95 
BOTH EPROM PROGRAMMER & 
ERASER: $179.95 
EPROMS: 2764-$8 27128-$9 
ROMPAK (w/ Blank PC Board 27xx 
Series): $12.95 

BLANK CARTRIDGE (Disk Controller 
Size): $10.95 




CABLES 

MAGNAVOX 8505/8515/8CM643 Analog RGB 
Cable: $24.95 

SERIAL-TO-PARALLEL INTERFACE: Use your 
parallel printer at high speed (300-9600 baud) with CoCo, Comes 
willall cables. No software compatibility problems. Only $44,95 
15 M MULTIPAK/ROMPAK EXTENDER CABLE: 
$29.95 

VIDEO DRIVER: Use a monochrome/color monitor with 

your CoCo. Comes with audio/video cables. Specify CoCo 1 or 2. 

Excellent picture quality/resolution! $34.95 

RS232 Y CABLE: Hook 2 Devices to the serial port. Only 

$18.95 

Y CABLE: Use your disk system with Speech Pak,CoCo Max, 
DS69, etc. $27.95 

RGB Analog Extender Cable:$19.95 
SONY Monitor Cable: $29.95 

VIDEO CLEAR:Reduce TV interference»$19.95 
MODEM CABLE:4 pin to DB25,Only $19.95 
3-POSITION SWITCHER: $37.95 
HI-RES JOYSTICK INTERFACE: $11.99 




MICROCOM SOFTWARE ™* 



m '3 





CHIPS, ETC 

Disk Basic Rom 1.1 (Needed for CoCo 
3): $29.95 ECB ROM 1.1:$29.95 
68B09E or 6809E Chip: $14.95 
MultiPak PAL Chip for CoCo 3: 
$19.95 

PAL Switcher: Now you can switch be- 
tween the CoCo 2 and 3 modes when using 
the Multi-Pak. You need the OLDER & 
NEW PAL chip for the 26-3024 Multipak. 
Only $39.95. With NEW PAL Chip: 
$49.95. 

UPGRADES 

64K Upgrade for CoCo 1% CoCo 
IPs with Cat #26-3026/27, 26-3134, 
26-3136: $29.95 

64K Upgrade for 26-3134 A/B 
CoCo II: $39.95 

(Free 64K Software incl. with 64K Upgr.) 



To Order & for info on FREE Gifts: Refer to Page 17 of our 6-page Ad series(Pgs. 9^17) 
Credit Card Toll Free Orderline 1-800-654-5244 (9am-8pm 7days/week) 

Order Status, Info, Technical Info: 716-383-8830 





.' .<■>;/*■■ 



i ^MiiapftMMiii Hi ' i ii i nimmmmmt*^ 

m COCO 3 : 

' .■; ■ " . V;,,,.. ■.,,.> ■ , , .• ■ : v/*- - • ■■ s , "..i i fish 



CoCo 3 Combo Package 



• 128K Color Computer 3 

• 500 Pokes Peeks 'n Execs Book 

• CoCo 3 Secrets Revealed Book 

• Basic Pro^amming Tricks Book 

• Utility Routines Volume 1 Book 

• $10 our JM^e 0 systetl 



CoCo 3 Combo Package: $169 

(Pleasi add $8 S&H in US/^pin 
Canada) tif | fpl 



MULTIPAKS 



Allows you to ihook up I Torn- 
paks/controllers/RS^32 Padfc etc. 
Seeded for most hard drive system, 

Multipak (26-3124) for CoCo 2: $89 
Multipak (26-3124) upgraded for 
COCO 3: $99 

have limits (paati)^ of t h ese-- (fcg^tlH|o^-v 
MPI Locking Plate (Specify Cat #): $8 

•SjSiSv**.. -v? ■■s.ssrv.ii^.'^ <-i ; s;..;y''.:.- ? V".; 

:i><S^>v*>-^ : ^^V-^.^-- -'-x i-^V-V'ViJ). KrjSi'V'^-'* '-.^i-'.'vf <: >'''i4^ ; ■■•>' i v; : :;:°:.: 



-fiy<:.' «t Tift 



•: . • >" ><-:■. " 




| MONITOR 

Raz6t||}iarp picture |; 
quality for your CoCo! 
Has 14" screen, 
Analog/TTL RGB, 
Composite Inputs for 
CoCo 2/3, Speaker, tilt- - 
stand & 2 year warranty! ; < 
Only $265 (add $12 S&H/$40 in Canada) 




'■ : " >.■ i;i.a/K 



Magnavox RGB Cable CoCo ^jand 
Composite Video / Audio Cable Set with 
purchase of monitor: $19.95 



§»ISK DRIVES for CoCo 2 « 



1 1 



There are a lot of dealers selling disk drives for the CoCo. Why buy from us? 
First, all our drives are Brand New and made by Fujitsu. They are sleek, 
quiet and have a reputation of superb reliability. Second, our Drive 0 sys- 
tems come with the acclaimed DISTO Controller - with gold-plated con- 
tact|||hird, our Drive 0 systems come with the official 200 page Radio Shack 
Disk Manual with floppy disks; everything you need to get started. Fourth, 
you get $60 worth of our utility software (Disk Util 2.1A & Super Tape/Disk 
Transfer) & our DISKMAX software which allows you to acess BOTH sid^s 
of our drives. Our drive systems are head & shoulders above the rest. 

Drive 0 (With Disto Controller, Case, Power Supply, 1 Drive Cable, Manual, Software): 

$209 g-^ 

Drive 1 (with Case, Power Supply & software): $129 Bare 5 1/4" Drive: $89 

2 Drive System (With Disto Controller, Case, Power Supply, 2 Drive able, Manual & 

1 Drive Cable: $16,95 IfDrive Cable: f i!2<95 4 Drive Cat&>i:34.95 



• : «!:;c:^::?f:rvv3:; 







- 



- 



■■■-i. m: 




Complete w/ Hard DriygiWestefit Digital Con- 
troller, B&B Interface, Cables, Case, Power Supply, 
Software (HYPER IO) & Instruction manuals. As- 
sembled/tested/formatted. Just PIugWRun. This is 
the best hard drive deal for the CoCo* 




Seagate 20 Meg System: $509 
Seagate 30 Meg System: $539 

CoCo XT: Use 2 5-120 Meg Drives with your CoCo. 
Only $69-95 w/ Real Time Clock: $99,95 
CoCo XT ROM: Boots OS9 from hard/floppy. $19.95 
HYPERIO: Allows Hard Drive Use with RSDOS, 
Only $29.95 HYPERIO: Disto Version:If you have a 
DISTO Controller w/ Hard Drive Interface, this 
program will allow you to use your Hard Drive from 
RSDOSH Only $29.95 



ov. ,i; : '.',.\-...\0v : . -s : 

m i n i 



,%"J. 1 ... J 1 -, 1 - l .- u " I 'J:.'".".'" !"..!" "!.Wi .UU r ' ! „ J. i .iun i I M I U II ' . . ' 



■MM 



ff'.r ■ •■.'•ii-.' 1 



'y*??^."^'^ v.. . 



AlIid|^Printei?Sptems include Serial-to-Parallel Interface. 

NX10W) Rainbow System: NX1000 Color Printer w/144 CPS draft # Friction/Trac- 
tor Felly • Epson/IBM Compatible # 1 Year Warranty. Only $289 



NX1000 System: NX1000 Printer w/ 144 cps Draft # Fi^^ 
• Epson/IBM Compatible • 1 Year Warranty. Only 



Panasonic KX-ip80i II System: Panasonic Printer 
w/ 144 cps Draft •Tractor/Friction Feed 
• Epson/IBM Compatible • 2 Year Warranty. Only 
$18$ 



w/216 cps Draft • 16.5" Wide Carriage • 2 Year Warranty: $399 




■ M ■■!■ ■■■■ 




IPsto Super Controilen $79.95 Disto 
Jlljier Controller II: $129.95 

Ill Mini Eprom Programmer Add on: $54.95 
• Hard Disk Add On: $49.95 
# RT Clock & Parallel Interface: $39.95 
• MEB Adapter Add On: $24.95 

MULTI-BOARD ADAPTER. Printer Port, 
Faster RT Clock & true RS-232 Serial Port. 

■ ^Sil^'-' ? ' ■ v5»i ■ J>%3>Sv" v"J ■-'■> i '' S ,'.. • • ■ • 'Jeff.*. V**' !,'«■* ■■.■**. ^ ■" • .** * ( . ■■*■'. ' 

$59.95 



Port for your CoCo, Compatible with Tandy® 
Deluxe RS232 Pack. Includes DB25 Cable. Re- 
quires Multipak. Only $54.95 





OtJC«VER 



MICROCOM SOFTWARE. 2900 Monroe Avenue • Rochester, NY 14618 
To Order: All orders $50 & above (except Printers, Monitors, Drives, Computers) shipped by UPS 2nd Day Air in the Continental 
US. We accept Visa,MC, Amex,Discover,Check & MO. FREE GIFTS: All Orders $99 & above also recieve a FREE 1989 Diaiy & 
X-MAS Card. Please add $3.00 for S&H (Drives/Printers add $10 S&H); foreign add 10% S&H (min $5). NYS Residents add sales 
tax. Our Australian Agent: Aust. Peripheral Development Ph: 07-208-7820 v V ■ ■ 





Order Status, Info, Technical Info: (716) 383-8830. FAX: 716-383-0026 



■K''>;>:i' ; 



■'v-V '-Vw J' -A'. "< .f. 




HOW DO YOU GIVE A RAINBOW? 

It's simple — Give a rainbow gift certificate . . . 

Let a gift subscription to the I 

rainbow carry the premier Color I 

Computer magazine right to j 

your friend's doorsteps, the | 

rainbow is the information i 

source for the Tandy Color Com- I 

puter. j 

Each month, your friends will j 

enjoy the intelligent programs, | 

reviews and articles written ex- I 

clusively for their CoCo. j 

First, your gift will be an- [ 

nounced in a handsome card. | 

Then, all year 'round, they'll re- I 

member you and your thought- 1 

fulness when they get each edi- j 

tion of the rainbow — pages J 

loaded with delightful programs, i 

regular columns and plenty of I 

helpful hints and tips. j 

Generosity benefits the giver, j 

too. There'll be no more tracking | 

down borrowed copies of the I 

rainbow. Your collection will be I 

safe at home. J 

Give a rainbow gift certificate j 

and let your friends in on the fun. | 

the rainbow is the perfect com- I 

panion for the Color Computer! j 

Get your order to us by Febru- j 

ary 25 and we'll begin your i 

friends' subscriptions with the I 

April issue of rainbow. j 

I 

I 



Please begin a one-year (12 issues) gift subscription to 

THE RAINBOW for: 

Name 

Address 

City State ZIP 

From: 

Name 

Address 

City State ZIP 

□ My payment is enclosed. 

Bill to: □ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 
Acct. # Exp. date 

Signature 

Mail to: 

Rainbow Gift Certificate, The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, 
KY 40059 

For credit card orders call (800) 847-0309, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. 
All other inquiries call (502) 228-4492. 



Subscriptions to THE rainbow are $31 in the United States; U.S. $38 in Canada. The surface rate 
to other countries is U.S. $68; the air rate, U.S. $103. Kentucky residents add 5% sales tax. U.S. 
currency on/y, please. All subscriptions begin with the current issue. Please allow 6 to 8 weeks for 
delivery. In order to hold down non-editorial costs, we do not bill. 




Save $80.00 



Max-1 0+ 

Now with online 40,000 word 
spellchecker 

Regularly $79.95 

The latest in CoCo word processors 
and the only one with true 
WYSIWYG (What You See Is What 
You Get) output. Mix graphics with 
text. Max-1 0 is great for anything 
from greeting cards up to newsletters. 
Just turn the next page for a full list 
of Max-1 0's unbelievable features. 

File Edit search* Layout Font Style k v 



. i! i . i . i . l?i . i . i .J?. . i . i . i 1 ?] . i . i . l?i , i . i . 1 . i , i . i . l?i . i .A 



Fiilh Law of Unreliability: lo err it human, tut to reilly foul thing; 
up requires a computer 

Hartley's First Law: Tflu can lead a horse to vster. tut if you ca& make 
him float on hi: tack you're jot something. 

Ducharm's AxiOCQ: If one vievt hi) proMen closely enough he vil! 
reco{Ds:e biiuelf as part of the problem 

PertlSSel'S Law: There is no jot so simple that it can't te done vrong 



pxge: ± 



Max-1 0 Font Set 

Regularly $29.95 

36 fonts on 2 disks. Can all be used 
easily and quickly with Max-1 0. 

Lonqfiand 24 

HllllV IS Milt 



Frontier IB point 
Bthens 18 paint 

(rvtne 12 point 



Rome 3 paint' 
Rom* 12 point 

Sfr.i il ill point 

Futura 24 

Courier 12 point 

Erookhaven 48 

ftjjaraes IS point 

sa n f?ra n oiJco 18 
Century 24 

All these and 14 more! 



Irvine 24 

Ellesmere 12 point 

Ellesmere U point 
Ellesmere Bold 24 

Digital IZ paint 



CoCo Max III 

Regularly $79,95 

The ultimate graphics creation 
program. See the list of features on 
the next page. Also read the superb 
review in The Rainbow, Apr/7 7988. 

File Edit options colors Font Size style 



s 



□ 

5 

* 
5 



\ 



L? 



Fill 



zoom 



undo 



Ibis is the Coco Max. screen with 
its pull down menus{abowe), its 
tool box(/eftl its palette, (below). 




Vou can draw with: 




w 



THE PENCIL -THE 40 BRUSHES -THE SPRAY CAM OR ORAM 




LINES RECTANGLES RATS CIRCLES POLYGONS CUBES 



CHOOSE BORDER 
I OPTtOHAL FILL 



THEESE ARE JUSJ A FEW OF 
COCO MAX III BASIC FUNCTIONS ! 



ilHllliiiii! iirf ninKzn • jmbrs 



CoCo Max Fonts 

Regularly $49 95 

Almost 100 fonts for incredible 
headlines and text. Four disks full -of 
fonts. Use CoCo Max styles (Bold, 
Italic, 3-D, Shadow ...), sizing and 
colors for absolutely wonderful 
effects. Thousands of combinations 
are possible. Here are some of the 
fonts: 



Koloif 



m 



iMfl»lUll|DSl(lKlfoEilflG»l»0!l 



PciquaT SmaK 
PEiqNOT LARC|f 

Fnrunnn atmtiL 

prdgfuiti meaium 
PfHLJtiHHIil LHFICE 

I'm I urn lllnck Kinnll 

m i mtA iiL.it. i.» 

LIQUID CRySTfiL 

Maeao* Chs.1.1 

Mocnofl -/lap re 
011(1 

POIDT OUT 

Pririfuulf Smell 

PRIHTDLIT LRRBE 



Digital niaciikjm 

Digital Large 
Futura 

mips 

13I3IEEIB5IISI 



<i T i) R i) I <\ t J E >> H <> U •) 



victory 

B.bl T..tk m*mil 

BABY TILTH LC 



mm 



C«.rtwhBol 

'inrmindi Small 

Normande Medium 

NORMANDE LG. 

Piano 



30 DAY TRIAL OFFER 

AND OUR 
NO-RISK GUARANTEE 

We understand perfectly that you 
have no reason to believe anything 
you read. Including this ad. (Or the 
rave reviews) 

So we invite you to evaluate The 
Works yourself. Call and order it. 
We'll send it with detailed, clear 
instructions. Use it with your own 
CoCo 3, on your own work, for 30 
days. Try it for brilliant presentation 
graphics, outstanding word proces- 
sing. Wring it out 

After 30 days, if it isn't for you, 
for any reason, we'll take it back 
and write you a check imme- 
diately for your full purchase 
price. 

The risk is all ours. But we urge 
you not to wait, this deal may end 
soon. We can guarantee this price 
only if you order now. 

Call today. You have 
nothing to lose. 

(203) 348-9436 

Order line open weekdays 9 to 5 Eastern time 
See next page for more ordering info. 



COLOR WARE 



A division of Sigma Industries. Inc. 



^ REAL DESKTOP 





AND 



File Edit options colors Font Size style 



iHBBj 
WIS®- 

mm® 




CoCo Max III is absolutely the best drawing package 
available for the CoCo 3, and it does more than just let 
you draw. CoCo Max III includes animation, text, color 
mixing and more features than you would think 
possible. It combines incredible speed with dazzling 
graphics and it is a joy to use even its most powerful 
features. 

Pictures, graphs, flyers, cards, signs, school projects, 
labels, buttons and anything else you might dream of 
creating is now possible with CoCo Max III. Is it any 
wonder that the majority of CoCo Gallery pictures in the 
last five months were created with CoCo Max? 

Thousands of CoCo users have found that you don't 
have to be an artist to have fun with CoCo Max. You'll 
wonder why you waited so long to get the incredible 
CoCo Max 



CoCo Max III is the best because it includes: 

- a huge picture area (two full hhres 320x192 screens) - a large 
editing window - Zoom mode for detail work - 28 drawing tools 
which you just point and click on * shrink and stretch - rotation at 
any angle (1.5 degree steps) - 51 2K memory support (all features 
work with 128K too) - an Undo feature to correct mistakes -you 
can even Undo an "Undo" - Animation - special effects - color 
sequencing (8 colors, variable speed) - thirteen fonts (more 
available) - each font has eight different sizes - five style options 
(bold, italic, 3D, etc.) for thousands of font/size/style combination 
possibilities. - the CoCo Show "slide show" program - color 
editing of patterns - automatic pattern alignment - prints in single 
and double size - smart lasso (move text over a background...) 

- advanced tools: arc/ray, cube. etc. - select 16 of the 64 colors (all 
64 colors are displayed at once for selection!) - picture converter 
(CoCo Max II, MGE, BASIC) - extensive prompting - "glyphic" 
clipbook of rubber stamps - double click shortcuts - color mixing 
(additive/subtractive/none) - money back guarantee - sophisticated 
data compression saves disk space - pull down menus (no 
commands to remember) - forty paintbrush shapes - two color 
lettering - spray can - scrapbooks of pictures - error free 

- Y-cable or multipack not required - high speed hi-res interface 
included (plugs into joystick port) - disk is not copy protected 

- amazing "flowbrush" - RGB and composite monitor support 

- replace color - printing on black and white printers in five shades 
of gray - full color printing with optional drivers for the NX-1000 
Rainbow and CGP220 - entirely rewritten for the CoCo 3 



can 



do 



th th» 5 



are 



no 



sp ee , 



CoCo-" ntoo *te; 



ESS f*$> fej-6S i2S 



CO 



bulou 5 
\ot* 



ultimate 



in 
pro 



gram 



for 



the 



CoCo Max III: $79.95 

Max- 10 owners: deduct $10 

System Requirements: 

CoCo 3 disk system and a Joystick 
or Mouse 

Printer drivers included: 

IBM/Epson and compatibles. GEMINI, 
DMP1 05/1 06/1 30.OK1 182/1 92, CGP220 
(B&W), DMP110. DMP200 

Color printer drivers (prints 125 
different colors) Star NX-1000, CGP- 

220, or Okimate 20 each $1 9.95 



For all CoCo Max Versions 

Max Edit Font Editor: a font is a set of 

characters of a particular style. With Max Edityou can 
create new fonts or modify the existing ones.$1 9.95 

Max Font disks (send for list) each $1 9.95 

Max Font Set (95 fonts on 4 disks) $49.95 

DS69/69B Digitizers: allows you to capture the 
image from a VCR or video camera and bring it into 
your computer. CoCo Max will let you load digitized 
pictures and modify them. 

DS-69 (2 images per second. Requires 

multipak) $99.95 
DS-69B (8 images/second) $1 49.95 



CoCo 1 & 2 Owners 

Still Available: 

(See previous ads or 
write for information) 

CoCo Max II (works on 
all disk CoCos) $69.95 
CoCo Max Tape 
(CoCol & 2 only) $59.95 
Y-Cable $24.95 
CoCo Max II Picture 
Disk Set 

set of 3 disks: $29.95 



Guaranteed Satisfaction 

Use CoCo Max or Max-1 0 for a full month. 
If you are not delighted with either of them, 
we will refund every penny. 



COLORWARE 



A division of Sigma Industries, Inc. 




^ TO ORDER 

(203) 656-1806 M0N-FRI 9 to 5 EST^ 

Visa or Mastercard accepted. C.O.D. orders $3 extra 
Check or M.0. to Cokxware. 242- W West Ave. Darien CT 06820 
Add $3 per order for shipping ($5 to Canada. 10% to overseas) 
CT residents add 7.5% sales tax 



PUBLISHING 



[COLORWARE 




THE DAZZLING WORD PROCESSOR 

You probably already have a word processor, and you 
probably wish it had these features: 

► Fully menu driven (CoCo Max style) with point and 
click marking of text. You dorft need the arrow keys! 

► True WYSIWYG (What You See Is What You Get) 
including variable size fonts, styles (bold, italics, etc.) 
and graphics. 

► Can print multiple columns on a page. 

► Not limited by printer capabilities: fonts up to 24 
points (1/3") high, superscripts, small print, etc. 

► Fully integrated spelling checker (incredibly fast), no 
need to exit program to check spelling. 

► Graphics can be imported from just about anything 
(CoCo Max; MGE; BASIC; even Macintosh pictures 
from a BBS) and resized to fit your document. 

► Full screen preview including graphics. 

Max-10 has all these unique features, plus all the 
features you are used to in your current word 
processor. Even with all this, you don't give up anything. 
Max-10 is easier to use, more intuitive, faster and more 
powerful than anything else. It's not just a word 
processor, it's a desktop publisher. 



U MWI V^-Jubiii or 



im m w for 

lht noil « n0V CoC0 J. 
proo«(*or for 




, M •or"* • 

pari* 



— 7:,. 
col ° , h . ccq 

tailor, <■>>• 
er .,lor ! % dd •ordt 



chmn" of »" ^.iwfiA 

IS. 



Max-10: $79.95 

CoCo Max III owners: deduct $10 
Max-10 requires a CoCo 3. at least 1 disk, & joystick or mouse 
Printer drivers included: IBM/Epson and compatibles: DMP 
105, DMP106, DMP130: CGP220 (B&W); Gemini/Star 



TM 



File Edit Search* Layout Font 



il i2 , i3 i4 .✓Plain Tent 

1 1 ■ ■ I 'j^' I B »* 1 1 1 , . i ... i i gQ|u 




style 



CP 

cB 



Hiiiiiiiiiiiiii! 

jjjijjiijjjnjjiijilj! 
iUKiiiiiiHi 



Italics 


. CI 


Underlined 


k CU 


superscript 


CH 


Subscript 


CL 







WYSIWIG adj. (wiz-ee-wig) L What 
You See Is What You Get (acronym) 

k like tboite if Ugjji fonts and x^/«. 



R4GES 2 



Some of the many features of Max-10: 

^Blinding speed - printing in multiple columns - online dictionary 
~ spell checking - graphics can be mixed with text - full justification 
of proportionally sized characters - bold, italic, underline 
superscript and subscript type styles - superb file support, just point 
and click ~ "Undo" lets you correct mistakes - easy to use, no 
commands to remember - any graphics program can be used 

- pictures can be shrunk or stretched to fit - right and left alignment 

- centering - variable line spacing - page numbering - current 
page number displayed on the screen - variable tab stops - left and 
right margins - tabs and margins can vary in the same document 

- cut and paste text and graphics anywhere in the file - page break 
shows on the screen - pull down menus are quick and simple to use 

- lightning fast access to any point in the document with the scroll 
box - twenty fonts (styles and sizes), more available - any number 
of character sizes and styles can be mixed on the same line - up to 
more than 120 characters per line, depending on font size, style and 
letters - headers and footers, even with graphics - file compatibility 
with other word processors - right, left, bottom and top margins 

- word wrap - set starting page - type ahead - key repeat - key 
click - scroll up and down - ASCII file output for compatibility 

- disk directory - kill files- block cut, copy and move - global 
search and replace ~ paragraph indent clipboard - merge 

- show file (on disk) - free memory display - page count 

- paragraph count - word count - graphics can be resized and 
moved - multiple fonts - error recovery - true lowercase - 512K 
memory support (all features work with 128K too) - complete point 
and click cursor control - moving, clearing and changing blocks of 
text is ridiculously easy, just point and click at each end of the text 
block - onscreen ruler - preview file before loading - search and 
replace - disk is not copy protected - more than 35 pages o1 text 



CoCo Max III and Max-10 
Perfect Together 

You do not need CoCo Max III to insert and print 
graphics in Max-10. Max-10 works with any graphics 
creation program, and you can also use graphics 
downloaded from bulletin boards. 

Similarly, you do not need Max-1 0 to create graphics 
with text in CoCo Max III. There are tremendous 
lettering capabilities in CoCo Max III, with its many 
fonts, styles, and sizes. 

Together Max-10 and CoCo Max III are an unbeatable 
combination. This desktop publishing system is better 
than anything you've ever seen on a CoCo. We are so 
confident that you will use, and enjoy using *he two 
software packages, that we offer an unconditional 
money back guarantee. Stop wasting your time and 
effort using inferior or obsolete products. Move up to 
the new generation of CoCo software now. 




«< GIWJESOFT »> 

A new generation of Color Computer products 




[ 



RAINBOW 

cairincflfK* 



•EM. 



MAXSOUND 

A High Quality Digital Audio Sampler and Sequencer 

Turn your CoCo III into a REAL digital audio sampler with HIGH quality audio reproduction. Easily 
add exotic effects, ECHO, stuttering, speed shifting, sequencing, and reverse audio to BASIC or ML 
programs or GRAPHICS! Now includes Data Compression. Imagine recording any Voice, Music, or 
Sound effect and being able to use these DIGITAL recordings in your own programs! 3 disk sides 
includes: INTERFACT/BIN - ML driver for sound effects. G&M/BAS - Adds sound effects to 
Graphics. SHOWTIME and DEMO disks. SCOPE/BAS - Turns CRT into a Digital Oscilloscope to 
look at MAXSOUND waveforms. Version 3.0 upgrade (Includes improved ECHO and the ability to 
print NAMETAGS and locations to the screen and/or printer) $6.95 + Shipping & Handling 

"Maxsound... bringing a new era to the CoCo Community " 
-Cray Augsburg, June *88 Rainbow Review 

CALL TO HEAR 'OVER THE PHONE* DEMO (128k or 512k CoCo DO only) DISK .... $59.95 

Maxsound Soundtracks & Graphics 

These exciting disks are samples of what can be created with MAXSOUND and CoCo Max III! 
These unbelievable soundstracks w/graphics DO NOT require the MAXSOUND program to run. 



Airwolf 
Knight Rider 
Startrek 



128k $5.95 

128k $5.95 

128k $5.95 



War of the Worlds 



Probe 



5 in 1 Demo (Airwolf, Startrek, Knight Rider, Probe, Other World) 



512k, , 


.,$5.95 


512k, 


..$5.95 


512k... 


..$5.95 


512k. . 


,..$9.95 


RAINBOW 



CERTirmAiifx 



V-Term Terminal Emulator 

Communicate with VAX, UNIX, Mainframe, and BBS Systems! 

-VT-100, VT-52, Vidtex (includes RLE graphics display), and standard CRT emulations. 
-Developed and tested on a UNIX system using the EMACS and VI full-screen editors. 
•All 128 ASCII characters accessible from the keyboard. 

-Uses a high-resolution graphics screen to implement a highly readable 80-column screen. 

-Menus can be operated concurrently with other terminal functions. (Disk Basic!) 

•Full 28 line by 80 column screen, with 3 bottom lines protected for menus. 

-Serial port up to 2400 baud, RS-232 Pak up to 9600 baud, DCModem Pak at 300 baud. 

-XModem, XModem-CRC, Y-Modem, and ASCII file transfers directly to disk or memory. 

-Prints disk or buffer files with settable margins, baud rate and word wrap* 

•Full 128k or 512k support with a RAMDISK like buffer. Monochrome monitor support. 

•Capture buffer, Snapshot, Conference mode, 35/40/80 Tracks, and over 56 pages of docs! 

"...one of the most versatile and full featured terminal emulators for the CoCo 3.* 

-Bryan Gridley, November '88 Rainbow Review 

>n 02.00.00 upgrade $6.95 + S&H Disk (128k or 512k CoCo m only) $39.95 



Toll Free 



1^800441-GIME 



Line 



Technical assistance: 7pm to 9pm 
Orders: 9am to 9pm Eastern time 
On-line orders and up to date 
information: Delphi's CoCo Sig 



G1MMESOFT 
P.O. Box 421 
Perry Hall, MD 21128 
301256-7558 or 301-256 2953 



Add $3.00 for shipping and handling 
Add $2.50 for COD (USA only) 
MD residents add 5% sales tax 
VISA /MC/ Check /Money Order/COD 




«< GIMJESOFT »> 

A new generation of Color Computer products 




TelePak + <coc 0 i/u/m) 



A TRULY COMPATIBLE RS-232 INTERFACE! 



Now, from Orion Technologies, comes the answer to the continuing demand for an RS-232 interface. No 
compatibility hasslesl Uses standard DB25 cable. Compatible with RS-DOS & OS-9 software. Baud rates up to 19,2001 
Enhances the Multi-tasking capabilities of the V-Term Terminal Emulator found on the opposite page. Only 149.95 



CoCo Max III < CoC o 111 on, y) 

THE BEST Graphics Package 

See April '88 review. Disk ... $74.95 



BOTH 
$129.95 



MAX-10 < CoC ° 1,1 ° nl v) 

THE DAZZLING Desktop Publisher 
CM3 owners -110 Disk ... $74.95 



Great with MAXSOUND and/or CoCo Max ffl! 

Up to 25 ONBOARD HIRES SCREENS! Six new BASIC commands. Fast & Smooth 
Graphics animation. Save and Load graphics screens to and from disk. See September 1988 Rainbow review. Disk $19.95 



JTJ V^O £.\3 u t0 25 ONBOARD 



MULTI-LABEL HI (CoCo IB only) See July '87 review. An easy to use, versatile label creating program 
including many new CoCo III features. Print multiple fonts on each labell This one's a MUST for the CoCo Hit! Disk .... $16.95 



FKEYS IIX(CoCo l/ll/Ill) See April '87 review. A user friendly , programmable function key utility that creates up to 20 
function keys. EDITOR, DOS mods, Single or Double sided, 35/40 tracks* DISABLE, and it's EPROMable!. Disk .. $19.95 

SIXDRIVE (CoCo I/O/Ill) This machine language utility modifies DECB 1.0, 1.1, FKEYS ID, or ADOS to allow the 
use of 3 double-sided drives (or 2 D/S drives and J&R's RAM DISKS) as 6 S/S drives. Disk $16.95 



AUTO DIM (CoCo III only) See Jan. '88 review. This hardware device protects your monitor, or TV from IMAGE 
BURN after a few minutes of inactivity from your keyboard. Illustrated and easy to install. Hardware $29.95 

MPI-CoCO LOCkillg Plate (CoCo III only) See Sept '88 review. Protects your CoCo III and Multi 
Pak Interface from destroying each other! Please specify MPI number 26-3024 or 26-3124 when ordering! SALE $7.95 




(CoCo HI only) Become Rastann, Warrior King, on the quest to regain his rightful 

crown hidden deep within a sinister land. Battle monsters, gain magic & weapons, and travel thru harsh wilderness & 
dark castle dungeons in this medieval realm. From the creator of Kung*Fu Dude comes this awesome arcade game for the 
CoCo M! Uses the most detailed 320 x 200 16 color graphics & high speed ML code to vault you into a world of fantasy! Dare 
ye challange the many perils ahead to become Warrior King? Requires 128k CoCo III, Disk drive, and Joystick .... $29.95 



HALL OF THE KING TRILOGY (CoCo I/II/IH) See December 1988 Rainbow review. The epic 

adventure is back! The largest adventure campaign ever seen for the CoCo is again available. A total of 6 DISK SIDES of 
intense graphics adventure will have you playing for weeks! Each section is a 2 disk stand alone adventure, but all 3 together 
form an epic saga! Quest for the legendary Earthstone in the ancient dwelling of the dwarves while you enjoy the classic 
graphics that made this trilogy famous! Each adventure can be purchased separately for only $29.95, the lowest price ever , or 
you can SAVE and purchase the entire set for only $74.95. Requires 64k, Disk drive, (and composite monitor for the CoCo III). 
Please specify HALL of the King I, II, or III $29.95 each or the entire 6 DISK Trilogy for only $74.95 



In Quest of the Star Lord (CoCo III only) See Aug '88 review. This is THE graphics 

adventure for the CoCo HI! Unparalleled 320 x 200 animated graphics will leave you gasping for more! You quest for the 
Phoenix Crossbow in this post-holocaust world of science and fantasy. Full 4 Disk sides of mind-numbing adventure! 
Requires 128k CoCo HI and Disk drive. HINT SHEET $3.95 ( + $1.00 S&H by itself) Disk $34.95 



KUNG-FU DUDE (CoCo 1/11/111) See Feb. '88 review. An exciting arcade game. The BEST karate game ever for 
the CoCo! Destroy opponents and evade obstacles as you grow ever closer to your ultimate objective! Spectacular graphics, 
sound effects, and animation! Requires 64k, Disk drive, and Joystick. Now displays color on CM8. Disk ..... $24.95 

PYRAMDC (CoCo III only) See Dec. '87 review. Brilliant colors, sharp graphics, and hot action in this 100% ML arcade 
game. You'll enjoy hopping Kubix around the pyramid, avoiding Kaderf, Smack, Smuck, & the Death Square! Disk .. $19.95 



Jiltt LAD&D Character's Companion (CoCo 1/n/in) This great timesaving 

i^^^^. utility helps create compatible AD&D characters. Includes dice rolling routine, pick ability, race & class. Buy from 
the Players Handbook, magic items & spell materials. Save, load, and print character info. 3 Disk sides .... $24.95 



White Fire of Eternity (CoCo 1/11/ 111) See Dec '86 review. Enter the era of monsters & magic. Search for the 
legendary power of White Fire throughout the Forbidden Wood & Dark Caverns in this 64k animated adventure! Disk.. $19. 95 

Champion (CoCo I/U/III) See May '87 review. Become a superhero in this action adventure! Disk.. $19.95 

DragOn Blade (CoCo I/II/lII) See Nov '86 review. Slay evil dragon in this 64k animated adventure! Disk.. $19.95 



The excitement continues! 



e Fourth Rainbow Book of Adventures 



Fourteen fascinating new Adventures from the winners of our fourth Adventure competition. Rely on your wits 
to escape a hostile military installation, try to stop the Nazi plan to invade Great Britain, or manage to reinstate 
our defense system before the enemy launches a massive missile attack — and that's only the beginning! 



The Park of Mystery — You overhear a gang of robbers 
discussing where they've hidden their loot. Can you find 
it — and battle greed and confusion at the same time? 

Superspy — You awaken from a horrifying nightmare 
of chases, inexplicable scenery changes and sickening 
f reefalls into space. Or was it a dream? You be the judge 
— and determine your own fate! 

Term Paper — A real nightmare; Someone's stolen your 
freshman midterm paper and hidden its pages all over 
CoCo State's campus. Are you smart enough to find 
them before you miss the due date and flunk the 
course? 



House Adventure — Try to find your way out of a 
mysterious abandoned house that keeps sprouting new 
rooms just as you think you've found an exit. 

Life: An Everyday Adventure — Just getting up in the 
morning in time to do last-minute chores before 
catching a plane to a family reunion proves you don't 
have to leave home to find adventure, 

The Earth's Foundations — A mysterious maze inside 
a deep crevice near your village is having a devastating 
effect on the entire area. You've been chosen to 
investigate, and promised great riches — if you survive! 




Experience other traditional and contemporary challenges from these winning authors: Mike Anderson, Tio 
Babich, David Bartrness, Stephen Berry, Eugene Carver, Charles Farris, Jeff Hillison, Jeff Johnson, Richard 
Kottke, Ken Lie, Andre Needham, Fred Provoncha, Paul Ruby Jr. and Eric Santanen. 



The Fourth Rainbow Book of 
Adventures is only $10.95! 

Tape $9.95, Two-Disk Set $14.95 



The tape and disks are adjuncts and complements to the book; the book is necessary 
for introductory material and loading (Instructions. 



Please send me: 

The Fourth Rainbow Book of Adventures $10.95* 
The Fourth Rainbow Adventures Tape $9.95 



The Fourth Rainbow Adventures Disk Set $14.95 



Name 



Address 
1 City 



State 



ZIP 




i □ My check in the amount of 

enclosed* 

Please charge to my: □ VISA □ MasterCard 

□ American Express 

Acct. No. 

Exp. Date 



is 



E Signature 



i Mail to: The Fourth Rainbow Book of Adventures, The 
j Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059 

^ *Add $2.00 per book for shipping and handling in the U.S. Outside the 
| U.S. add $4 per book (U.S. currency only). Kentucky residents add 5% 
1 sales tax. In order to hold down costs, we do not bill. Please allow 6-8 
I weeks for delivery. 

{ To order by phone (credit card orders only), call (800) 847-0309, 8 a.m. 
to 5 p.m. EST. For other inquiries, call (502) 228-4492. 



^J^^^JfW^^-W^* '^^F'^^^'^^^ I^W 




VIP Writer III 2.0 

49 5 K Total Text Space * EASY 4 Color MENUS 



In the beginning there was VIP Writer and users saw that it was good, But it's not the best anymore. There's a 
new word processor to claim the crown.. VIP Writer III -Setting the Standard' 1 -RAINBOW Sept 1988 



MORE SCREEN DISPLAY OPTIONS 

VIP Writer III offers screen widths of 32, 40, 64 & 80 all with 24 lines and actual lower 
case letters using the CoCo 3's hardware display. It runs at double clock speed and has 4- 
color menus making VIP Writer III FAST and EASY to use! You can choose foreground, 
background, hilite and cursor colors from up to 64 hues. Color can be turned ON or OFF 
for the best possible display using a monochrome monitor or TV set. VIP Writer III has a 
context sensitive help facility to display command usage in easy to read colored windows. 

CUSTOMIZER & PRINTER INSTALLER 

VIP Writer III comes with a configuration / printer installation program which lets you 
customize VIP Writer 111 to suit your own liking. You can set screen width and colors as well 
as margins and more. You can also install your own printer and set interface type (serial, 
parallel or J&M), baud rate, line feeds, etc. Once done, you never have to enter these 
parameters againl VIP Writer III will load n* go with your custom configuration every time! 

MORE TOTAL TEXT STORAGE 

VIP Writer III has 106K total text storage in a 128K CoCo 3 (495K in 51 2K). VIP Writer 
III creates ASCII text files which are compatible with all other VIP Programs as well as 
other programs which use ASCII files. You can use VIP Writer III to even type BASIC 
programs! There is a 48K text buffer (438K in a 51 2K CoCo 3) and disk file linking 
allowing virtually unlimited text space. VlP Writer III works with up to four disk drives and 
lets you display directories and free space as well as rename or kill disk files. In addition 
VIP Writer III is 100% compatible with the RGB Computer Systems Hard Disk. 

POWERFUL EDITING FEATURES 

VIP Writer III has a full featured screen editor which can be used to edit text with lines up 
to 240 characters long with or without automatic word wrap around. You can select 
type-over mode or insert mode. There is even an OOPS command to recall a cleared text 
buffer. Other editing features include: Type-ahead • typamatic key repeat and key beep 
for flawless text entry * end of line bell • full four way cursor control with scrolling • top 
of textfile • bottom of textfile • page up • page down • top of screen • bottom of screen • 
beginning of line • end of line • left one word • right one word « DELETE character, to 
beginning or end of line, word to the left or right, or entire line • INSERT character or line 
• LOCATE and/or CHANGE or DELETE single or multiple occurrence using wildcards • 
BLOCK copy, move or delete with up to TEN simultaneous block manipulations • TAB key 
and programmable tab stops • word count • line restore • three PROGRAMMABLE 
FUNCTIONS to perform tasks such as auto column creation and multiple copy printing. 



AUTOMATIC TEXT FORMATTING 

VIP Writer III automatically formats your text for you or allows you to format your text in 
any way you wish. You can change the top, bottom, left or riqht margin and page length. 
You can set your text flush left, center or flush right. You can turn right hand 
justification on or off. You can have headers, footers, page numbers and TWO auxiliary 
lines which can appear on odd, even or all pages. You can also select the line on which they 
appear! You can even change the line spacing! Parameters can be altered ANYWHERE I 

PREVIEW PRINT FORMAT WINDOW 

VIP Writer III features an exclusive format window which allows you to preview your 
document BEFORE PRINTING IT! You are able to move up, down, left and right to see 
centered and justified text, margins, page breaks, broken paragraphs, orphan lines etc. 

PRINTING VERSATILITY 

VIP Writer III prints TWICE as fast as any other CoCo word processor! It supports most 
serial or parallel printers using J&M JFD-CP or Rainbow interface and gives you the 
ability to select baud rates from 110 to 19,200. You can imbed printer control codes 
anywhere in your text file EVEN WITHIN JUSTIFIED TEXT! VIP Writer III also has 
TWENTY programmable printer macros which allow you to easily control all of your 
printers capabilities such as bold, underline, italics and superscript using simple key 
strokes. Other features include: multiple copy printing • single sheet pause • line feeds. 

BUILT IN PRINT SPOOLING 

VIP Writer III has a print spooler with a 57,000 character buffer which allows you to print 
one document WHILE you are editing another. You don't have to wait until your printer is 
done before starting another job! Some word processors DO NOT include this feature! 

50,000 WORD SPELLING CHECKER 

VIP Writer III includes VIP Speller (not FREEWARE) to check your text for misspelled 
words It has a 50,000 (not 20,000) word dictionary that can be added to or edited. 

QUALITY DOCUMENTATION 

VIP Writer III comes with a well written 125 page manual which is Laser printed, not dot- 
matrix like the competition. It includes a tutorial, glossary of terms and examples for the 
beginner as well as a complete index! VIP Writer III is truly the BEST you can buy. 

VIP Writer III includes VIP Speller 1.1. DISK $79.95 

Available through Radio Shack Express Order Cat. #900-0908 



Writer III or Library /W owners: Upgrade to the VIP Writer III 
2,0 for $10 + $3 S/H. Send ORIGINAL disk and 



VIP Writer owners: Upgrade to the VIP Writer III 2.0 for 
$49.95 + $3 S/H. Send ORIGINAL disk and $52.95 total. 



VIP Database III 

VIP Database III features selectable screen displays of 40, 64 or 80 characters by 24 
lines with choice of 64 foreground, background, hilite and cursor colors for EASY DATA 
ENTRY. It uses the CoCo 3's hardware screen and double clock speed to be the 
FASTEST database available! VIP Database III will handle as many records as will fit on 
your disks and is structured in a simple and easy to understand menu system with full 
prompting for easy operation. Your data is stored in records of your own design. All files 
are fully indexed for speed and efficiency. IN-MEMORY SORT of records is LIGHTNING 
FAST and provides for easy listing of names, figures, addresses, etc., in ascending or 
descending alphabetical or numeric order. Records can be searched for specific entries 
using multiple search criteria The built-in mail-merge lets you sort and print mailing lists, 
print form letters, address envelopes - the list is endless. The built-in MATH PACKAGE 
even performs arithmetic operations and updates other fields. VIP Database III also has a 
print spooler and report generator which uses print forms you create. DISK $69.95 

Available through Radio Shack Express Order Cat. #900-0915 



VIP Database owners: Upgrade to the VIP Database III for 
$39.95 + $3 S/H. Send ORIGINAL disk and $42.95 total. 



VIP Library /WDCE 

The VIP Library /WDCE combines all six popular VIP application programs - 
VIP Database III, VIP Writer III, VIP Speller, VIP Calc III, VIP Terminal and VIP 
Disk-ZAP - into one program on one disk! The program Is called VIP Desktop. 
From the desktop you have instant access to word processing with a spelling 
checker always in attendance, data management with mail merge, spreadsheet 
financial analysis, telecommunications and disk maintenance. DISK $179.95 
For VIP Library shipping please add $4 USA. $5 Canada. $10 Foreign. 



VIP Library owners: Upgrade to the VIP Library /WDCE for 
$99.95 + $3 S/H. Send ORIGINAL disk and $102.95 total. 



VIP Calc III 

FAST 4 color POPUP menus • PRINT SPOOLER 
32, 40, 64 and 80 Column HARDWARE display 

Runs VERY FAST at double clock speed! 

Now every CoCo 3 owner has access to a calculating and planning tool 
better than VisiCalc™, containing all its features and commands and 
then some. VIP Calc III allows a large worksheet with up to 512 columns 
by 1024 rows! In addition, VIP Calc III has up to 16 windows which allow 
you to compare and contrast results of changes. Other features include 
8 AND 16 digit precision • trig, functions • averaging • algebraic 
functions • column and row ascending and descending SORTS • locate 
formulas or titles in cells • block move and replicate • global or local 
column width ■ limitless programmable functions • create BAR charts. 
Embed printer control codes for customized printing. Combine 
spreadsheet data with VIP Writer documents to create ledgers, 
projections, statistical & financial budgets and reports. DISK $69.95 



VIP Calc owners: Upgrade to the VIP Calc III for $29.95 + 
$3 S/H. Send ORIGINAL disk and $32.95 total. 



All products run under RSDOS and are not copy protected. 



VISA" 




©(503) 663-2865 J^POB 1233 Gresham OR 97030 

Non VIP Library orders add $3 tor shipping and handling in USA. Canada $4. Foreign 
$6. COD orders add an additional $2.25. Checks allow 3 weeks for delivery. Money order 
and VISA / MASTERCARD orders are shipped the same day. 



a,,er y Octo6en,2f-23. ?9XX 





SHOWCASE YOUR BEST! You are invited to nominate 
original work for inclusion in upcoming showings of "CoCo 
Gallery ."Share your creations with the CoCo Community! 
Be sure to send a cover letter with your name, address and 
phone number, detailing how you created your picture 
(what programs you used, etc.) and how to display it. Also 
please include a few facts about yourself. 

Don't send us anything owned by someone else; this 
means no game screens, digitized images from TV pro- 
grams or material that's already been submitted elsewhere. 
A digitized copy of a picture that appears in a book or 
magazine is not an original work. 

We will forward two first prizes of $25, one for the CoCo 
3 and one for the CoCo 1 and 2; one second prize of $15 
and one third prize of $10. Honorable Mentions may also 
be given. 

Please send your entry on either tape or disk to the CoCo 
Gallery, THE RAINBOW, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. 
Remember, this is a contest and your entry will not be 
returned. 

— Tony Olive, Curator 



26 THE RAINBOW February 1989 



See Page 33 for the next CoCo 
Gallery Live exhibition at 
RAINBOWfest in Chicago! 



(1) 1st Place 

Evil Unleashed by Lori Dies 

Lori, of Milton, Ontario, drew this nightmare 
creature using The Rat, It was the decisive winner 
at the show. 

(2) 2nd Place 

Seaside City by Howard C. Rouse 

Where's the beach? Imagine sleeping on this 
tranquil, private beach far from the bustling city in 
the foreground. Howard lives in Ocala, Florida, and 
produced this graphic with CoCo Max III. 




(3) 3rd Place 

Red Sails by Howard C. Rouse 

Those of us facing the cold winter will enjoy this 
ocean view. Howard is retired and finds the time 
to create wonderful graphics combining the best 
features of CoCo Max III and Color Max 3. 

(4) Honorable Mention 

Bit Bucket by Tracy Lammardo 

Tracy, of Clifton Park, New York, used Max 9 (OS- 
9) to draw this abstract creation. She is a graphic 
designer and uses computer graphics and desktop 
publishing in her work. 

(5) Honorable Mention 
The King by Logan Ward 

NASCAR fans will recognize this car, which was 
sent to us by the creator of CoCo Cat and Maxwell 
Mouse. Logan lives in Memphis, Tennessee, and 
generated this design with Color Max 3. 





L U 14** 



February 1989 THE RAINBOW 



How many tiles 
did you want scrambled? 





gled Tiles 



By Gay Crawford 



lue Void is both a game and 
m^L puzzle written for the Color 
JL& Computer 3. The puzzle may 
look simple, but it is challenging enough 
to make you tear out your hair. The 
program will run on any 128K CoCo 3, 
with or without disk drives. I wrote the 
program with an RGB monitor in mind, 
so if you are using a composite monitor 
or TV, you may want to change the 
color values in lines 1480 through 1530. 
Remember: The display will not be as 



Gay Crawford was president of the 
Kansas City Color Computer Users 
Group for two years and is the Co- 
SysOp of the BBS, The Frisky Co Co, 
She lives in Olathe s Kansas, with her 
husband, Torn, and spends her time 
caring for her two daughters, three 
Co Cos and her cat, Macro. 



clear without an RGB monitor. 

To begin, just load the program from 
disk or tape and run. The computer will 
create a four-tiered game board. The 
computer will place 63 colored tiles on 
this board. No tile is placed at one 
corner of the last tier; this area is the 
"blue void." Once the tiles are on the 
screen, the computer will display brief 
instructions. When you are ready to 
play, press any key to begin. 

You are asked for the number of times 
you would like random tiles to be 
moved. You may choose any number 
from one to 999; however, I suggest that 
you start with a number less than 10, 
Your CoCo will scramble tiles and 
display a diagram showing the keys 
used to make all possible moves. Your 
goal is to unscramble the tiles by mov- 
ing them, one by one, into the empty 
space, or void. You can move a tile to 



the front, back, left or right of each tier, 
and from one tier to another. However, 
you can move only one tile at a time, 
and that tile can move only one space 
at a time. When a tile is moved, its 
original location becomes the void. 

There is neither a time limit nor a 
score for your efforts. Take your time 
to avoid scrambling the tiles further. If 
you become frustrated, press BREAK to 
exit the game. The tiles will be reposi- 
tioned, and you can either start again or 
end the game entirely. \ 

The program starts by setting up 
necessary arrays, variables, and data 
strings and creating the display (lines 10 
through 470). By mixing initialization 
program lines with the lines that draw 
the screen, you make the beginning 
smoother. This keeps you from staring 
at a still screen while the computer gets 
ready. 



28 THE RAINBOW February 1 989 



Telewriter-128 

the Color Computer 3 Word Processor 



TELEWRITER: UNDISPUTED #1 



If you've read the other word processor ads, 
you've probably had your fill of cold lists of 
features, and claims of ultimate speed, power, 
and ease of use. So let's try to get past the 
overblown claims and empty buzz words— with 2 
simple facts: 

Fact 1: Telewriter is undisputedly the #1 most 
popular word processor on the Tandy Color 
Computers. 

Fact 2: Telewriter's exemplary ease of use and 
power have been acclaimed in numerous maga- 
zine reviews and in thousands of letters and calls 
from end users. 



THE OTHERS DON'T UNDERSTAND 



So why has Telewriter gained such a large and 
loyal following, while other Color Computer 
word processors have come and gone? Ironically, 
our competitors' ads tell you exactly why. 

For them, word processing is nothing more than 
features and numbers. The longer the list of 
features, and the bigger the numbers, the better 
the word processor. Or so they think. 

They just don't understand that power and ease of 
use are not gained by tacking on random features 
or throwing in freebie utilities or forcing you to 
use a cumbersome mouse. 

Real Power, true Ease of Use, and genuine Speed 
can only be attained through thoughtful, logical, 
intelligent design, attention to detail, and a com- 
mitment to the act and the art of writing. That's 
the Telewriter tradition, and that's the reason for 
Telewriter's phenomenal success. 



TELEWRITER-128: INTELLIGENT 
DESIGN PERFECTED 



And now, Telewriter-128, the latest Telewriter, 
uses the added hardware power of the Color 
Computer 3 to bring this intelligent design to its 
logical perfection. 

Telewriter-128 adds unsurpassed speed and 
important new features to the already impressive 
arsenal of Telewriter-64. Not just speed for 
speed's sake, or features for the sake of 
advertising— but speed where it counts and fea- 
tures that make you a more efficient, more effec- 
tive writer. 

Rainbow magazine put it this way: "Tele- 
writer-128 will set the word processing standard 
for the Color Computer 3 because it is so simple 
and user friendly. ... The 81 -page tutorial/user's 
manual is nicely done. It is written in easy to 
understand language but the program itself is so 
easy. . . . Most people will be able to use the 
software right out of the package." 



TELEWRITER-128 OR DESKTOP 
PUBLISHING 



Desktop publishing is nice for adding pictures 
and fancy fonts to newsletters or business 
presentations— but its graphics orientation sacri- 
fices some important capabilities when it comes to 
working with words. 

If your main concern is expressing ideas through 
words (notes, letters, reports, papers, novels, 
etc.), the dedicated word processing power of 
Telewriter-128 still provides the most efficient tool 
for the job. Each tool has its place— desktop 
publishing for striking visuals, Telewriter-128, for 
effective writing. 



TELEWRITER-l 28 OR TELEWRITER-64 



You can no longer afford to be without the ease, 
power, and efficiency, that Telewriter brings to 
everything you write. 



Telewriter-128 for the Color Computer 3 costs 
$79.95 on disk, $69.95 on cassette. 

For the Color Computer 1&2, Telewriter-64 costs 
$59.95 on disk, $49.95 on cassette. 

To order by MasterCard or Visa, 

call (619) 755-1258 anytime, or send check to: 

COGNITEC 

704 Nob Avenue 
Del Mar, CA 92014 

(Add $2 S&H. Californians add 6% tax. To upgrade 
from TW-64 to TW-128 send original TW-64 disk and 
$41.95.) 

Telewriter is also available through your nearby 
Radio Shack Computer Center and participating 
Radio Shack stores and dealers— or order direct 
from Express Order by dialing 1-800-321-3133. 

Ask for: Telewriter-128 (disk) ... cat #90-0909 
Telewriter-64 (disk) .... cat #90-0254 
Telewriter-64 (cass) cat #90-0253 



FEATURES THAT MATTER: Telewriter's out- 
standing design and its complete set of features, put 
it in a class by itself, for smooth, efficient writing 
and letter perfect printed documents. Telewriter-128 
includes: 

Unbeatable SCREEN PERFORMANCE: lightning 
fast paging and scrolling, on-screen text that never 
lags behind your typing, and a response that is 
always instantaneous, no matter how much text is in 
the buffer, or where you are in the document. 

26 User definable MACRO KEYS type your often 
used phrases and titles with a single keypress— saving 
you time and freeing your concentration for writing. 
User settable DUAL SPEED CURSOR moves you 
anywhere on the line, on the page, or in the docu- 
ment, fast or slow— you decide, with the touch of a 
finger. Fast PRINT PREVIEW MODE shows you 
text as it will print: headers, footers, margins, page 
breaks, page numbers, justification— saves time and 
paper and guarantees perfect looking documents 
everytime. 

Instant, ON-LINE HELP summarizes all Tele- 
writer-128 commands and special symbols. The On- 
line OPTIONS MENU lets you instantly customize 
the writing environment at any time to suit your 
precise needs (Screen/character color, Monochrome 
on/off, Key repeat/delay rate, 2 Cursor repeat/delay 
rates, Case-sensitivity of search, Auto file backup 
on/off, and more). A SINGLE FUNCTION KEY 
takes you instantly to any menu, so you never have 
to stop and think. 

The 24, 25 or 28 LINE SCREEN DISPLAY option 
lets you see 16% more on-screen text (28), or wider 
line spacing (25). The auto-loading OPTIONS FILE 
stores all your Macros, Print Format settings, and 
Options Menu settings, so they are always there 
everytime you run Telewriter-128. 3 pop-up STATUS 
WINDOWS tell you cursor position, word count, 



free space, etc. 

The QUICK SAVE feature lets you instantly save 
your current document with just 2 keystrokes and 
without leaving the editor. CURSOR THROUGH 
DIRECTORY to Load, Append, Rename and Kill 
files— so you'll never type a filename after the first 
time. HANGING INDENTS help you organize ideas 
on the page more effectively. Also: Footers, Multiple 
Print, Print to Disk, Key Click, Key Repeat, 40/80 
Column Option, Overstrike, Word Delete, Nested 
Macros, Definable Foreign and Math Symbols and 
more. . . . 

And, of course, Telewriter-128 incorporates all the 
Features of TELEWRITER-64, like: Works with 
absolutely any printer that works with your Color 
Computer (I, 2, or 3). Uses simple Embedded Con- 
trol Codes so all intelligent features of your printer 
are easily accessed, including: Underlining, 
Boldface, variable Fonts, Sub-script, Super-script, 
Italics etc. 

Format commands allow dynamically changing 
Margins, Headers, Spacing, Centering, etc., any- 
where in the document. Format menu sets Margins, 
Spacing, Page numbering, Baud rate, Lines per 
page. Justification. Chain Printing means the size of 
your printed document is unlimited. Also Single 
page and Partial Print. 

Fast full-screen editor with wordwrap, text align- 
ment, block copy/move/delele, global search and 
replace, wild card search, fast 4-way auto-repeat 
cursor, fast scrolling, forward and backward paging, 
settable tabs, word and line counter, full error pro- 
tection. Insert or delete anywhere on screen. Simple, 
easy to remember, "mnemonic" Editor Commands. 
Load, Save, Append, Partial Save files to disk or 
cassette. Kill, rename and list disk files. ASCII file 
compatibility. 



After laying out the tiles, the comput- 
er displays the instructions. Lines 590 
through 610 display the text for a 
certain amount of time and wait for a 
key to be pressed. The length of time is 
determined by Variable L and can be 
changed by altering the value 1000 in 
Line 610. This routine allows the com- 
puter to wait if the users do nothing, but 
also allows users to continue if they do 
not want to wait. 

Line 1030 contains the values of the 
keys the computer recognizes. Every 
time a key is pressed during the game, 
the key is compared with the values 
contained in l<$. If no matching value is 
found, that keystroke is ignored. 

Arrays are used to keep track of the 
data for the numbers on the tiles, the tile 
positions and valid moves. Array 
R(216) contains codes that identify 
whether or not a position is legal. 
Without this ability, you could move 
tiles off the edge of the board or to 
nonexistent levels. Array WY(64) iden- 
tifies the position of each tile. Array 



Dl(lS) contains codes for each tile 
shape on any level. Although all the tiles 
may appear the same at first glance, a 
tile in the back is of a different shape 
from one in the front because the entire 
tile cannot be seen. Finally, Array N$ ( 3 ) 
holds the data for drawing the numer- 
als, for they must be redrawn each time 
a tile is moved. 

I use subroutines extensively in the 
program. They are a good way to do 
similar tasks many times while keeping 
the program compact. For example, 
one main subroutine handles the actual 
moving of the tiles (located in lines 1550 
through 1640). This subroutine in turn 
calls other subroutines that take care of 
calculating the position for a tile (lines 
2310 through 2380), erasing a tile (lines 
2130 through 2220), and redrawing a 
tile in a different location (lines 1730 
through 1850). Some of these subrou- 
tines even jump to other subroutines, so 
following this program can get rather 
complicated. Although complicated, 
this method let me use the same routines 



to play the game, lay out the tiles at the 
beginning of the game and replace them 
for each new game. Lines that begin 
with an apostrophe are REMRRK state- 
ments. Do not remove these lines, for 
without them the computer would not 
know where to go. 

Generally, I place all subroutines and 
DPTR statements near the end of my 
program. Since I write lots of programs, 
this consistency keeps things neat and 
makes debugging the program easier. 

My greatest computing thrill comes 
from using my CoCo to create some- 
thing and watching other people enjoy 
what I have created. Perhaps this game 
will provide you some enjoyment and 
offer some ideas you can use to expe- 
rience that same thrill. 



(Questions or comments concerning 
this program may be directed to the 
author at 1001 Fredrickson, Olathe, KS 
66061. Please include an SASE when 
requesting a reply.) □ 




220 56 1650 

280 94 1930 

680 89 2150 

950 56 2430 

1160 229 END 

1410 123 



195 
153 
125 
129 
200 



The Listing: BLUEVOID 

2 f * THE BLUE VOID * 

3 »* COPYRIGHT (C) 1987 * 

4 '* BY GAY D. CRAWFORD * 

5 i **************************** 

6 1 

10 CLEAR400 

20 DIM A(216) ,WY(64) ,D1(16) ,N$(9 
) 

30 RGB : POKE &HFFD9 , 0 : HSCREEN2 

40 CLS:B=44:GOSUB1480 

50 HDRAW"BM13, 13C5G12R122E12L122 

II 

60 HPAINT(15,14) ,5,5 

70 HDRAW H BM14 / 14C1G10R118E10L118 
ii 

80 HPAINT(32,16) ,1,1 
90 ONBRKGOTO2500:ONERRGOTO2500 
100 FORL=l TO 216:A(L)=0:NEXTL 
110 HCOLOR0 



120 HPRINT(2,2) , "The Blue Void" 

130 FORL=l TO 64 : WY (L) =L: NEXTL 

140 FORJ=l TO 4 

150 FORK=l TO 4 

160 FORL=l TO 4 

170 A(B)=1:B=B+1:NEXTL 

180 B=B+2:NEXTK:B=B+12:NEXTJ 

190 HCOLOR1 . 

200 HPRINT (1, 23 ), "Copyright (c) 

1987" 

210 FORL=lTO 16 :READ Dl (L) : NEXTL 

220 A$="by Gay Crawford" :Y=3 

230 FORL=l TO LEN (A$) 
240 H$=MID$(A$,L,1) 
250 HPRINT (38, Y) ,H$:Y=Y+1 
2 60 NEXTL 

"L3G4R3E4" 
"G2NG2L3E2" 
"BL2LRG4" 
"NL3G2L3G2R3" 
"NL3G2NL2G2L3" 
"L3G2R3G2L3 " 
"BL3G4R3E2L3 11 
"BL3R3G4" 
"L3G4R3E2NL3E2" 
"BG4E4L3G2R3 " 
370 P$="L120G40R40ND5R80E40D4 6" 
380 E$="C0L16G8DR15D6RE8U6" 
390 DP$="L16G8ND2R16D6NLE8U6" 
400 DW$="L16G8D6R16E8U6" 
410 HDRAW"BM292 , 12C1XP$ ;XP$ ;XP$; 
L120G40R120E40" 



270 N$(0)= 
280 N$(4)= 
290 N$(l)= 
300 N$(2)= 
310 N$(3)= 
320 N$(5)= 
330 N$(6)= 
340 N$(7)= 
350 N$(8)= 
360 N$(9)= 



30 THE RAINBOW February 1989 



42 0 


1 lav tiles 


S=LEFT$ ( SS , CLEN CSS ) -1) ) : X=X-1 


43 0 


F0RL=1T063 : BN=L: G0SUB2 310 


780 HCOLOR0 :HLINE (X*8 , 87) - fX*8+7 


440 

"I JL/ 


F=INT (S/16^ +3 

J. — — • i< .1 ^ hj i —Lb VJ V I .J 


,95) ,PSET,BF 

/ W J # fcw/ J—J _— . ^ J— J JU 


450 


H$="BM lf +STR$ fX 1 ) +" , n +STR$ (Y) 


790 GOTO690 


460 


GOSUB1810 

VJ VJ Vj W —J VJ -L> JG/ 


800 IFVALfSS)<l THEN620 

VJ K/ JL X V X* XJ I — ' *f J X XlXjll VJ 4w JL* 


470 


NEXT 


810 SS=VALfSS) :HCOLOR0 


48 0 

* VJ XJ 


HPRINT (2. 6} "The obiect of" 


82 0 HLINE (8.56)-fll8 96).PSET.BF 

w — j> txix x i xj i w * «j w y i — x> \j j s \j i § x kj xj x / xj x 


490 


HPRTNT M 7^ "the aaitie is to" 


83 0 F0RSL=1T0SS 

<4_ -L X baa f 1 J <__ • J— X_# kJ -— ' 


500 


HPRTNT (1 8^ "unscramble the" 


840 R=RND (6) 

\_r X Jk V JL \J> V 1— r V v — ' / 


510 


HPRTNT (1. 9) "colored tiles." 


850 ONR GOSUB1660 , 1670 , 1680 , 1690 


520 
— / _ it/ 


HPRTNT T 2 . 11 i . "Use the arrow" 

ill —X -_14Xl_fX.X.J , VJ — • w wll w U X X VJ »• 


, 1700 , 1710 


•J .J X/ 


HPRINT ( 1 , 12 ) , "keys , as well 


860 IF AfB+V)=0 THEN 840 

V— / w X/ -— > X V U 1 V / JLy JL _ J—J JL 1 V— # ^1 JL/ 


II 




870 IF WYfVP+M)=LM THEN 840 

W # JU X IvXIVX I X X 1 XJX X XI lUll w * 1/ 


54 0 


HPRINT fl . 13^ "as the Fl & F2 

llXTXv J.11 X I X. , — -J J , L11C X X SI X — 


880 GOSUB1550 


II 


89 0 NEXTSL 

\J mS fJ 11 XJ JX X kJ XJ 


550 


HPRINT (1 . 14 ^ . "to move a tile 

11XJL\X>11 X I X> , X> — J , V— w lllw V ^— * U V— ■ X X w 


900 HDRAW"BM58 . 68C9R8U16L16D16R8 

«/ t/ fJ 1 1 l/l\il 1 » Ul 1 »J w f \J \J >w X \W w -X VJ XJ ^L VJ U iX \J 1\ U 


it 




D16R8D16L8D16R8D16L32U16R8NR16U1 

A— r * SV JJ» \ X^ ^_ i \^ A ^ X^ — W ^— ' A X ^J' *— ^ ^— h «_ i J «v Arf XV M r XV Jk X XV A l X \ ^— . XV XV — _ t 


560 

«J VJ JL* 


HPRINT fl. 15} . "into the emntv 

1 1 X X V JL 11 X I ^L / X- J f ^L 1 1 w VJ Wll w » fcJ W* Y 


6L8U16R8U16R8 " 

VJ «LJ VJ w X w XV W w X VJ XV VJ 


II 




910 HPAINT f 50 . 71) .10 9 

_> J_ XJ 11X XX JL 11 X V — i* JL/ / / JV / # .— JJ f — ' 


57 0 

~J 1 XJ 


HPRTNT fl 16^ "snace or the" 

llXTX\JLli XIX./ X. \J 1 f >j yuv C f wX L11C 


920 HPATNTf38 119) 2 9 

jv — ill n xii i iju^xxj j j j m* 


580 

x*j \j 


HPRINTf 1. 17K "Blue Void." 


93 0 HPAINT f 5 6 , 5 6 ) .8.9 

JL/ JL JL J_ 4*X J>1 JV> V ^v w # XV I # XV f *V 


590 

<p-^ MS 


L=l 


940 HDRAW"BM58 . 84C9L8NL8D16NL8NR 

^V A ^V JL J— i (F «V X— J* ■ 1 J— V Jk X ^V XV f XV X XV — — XV A * — — J XV 4V «V_ • ■— ' X 1 — — J v_ ' 1 « 1 V 


600 


IFINKEYSo" "THEN62 0 

JL X «X X 1 X\X_ X *f ^ ^ XX __l _ 1 w «J JU ' 


8BD16D16" 

VJ XJ XJ w X^ w 


610 


L=L+1: IFL=1000 THEN62 0 ELSE6 


950 HDRAW"BM50 , 73C9NG2NF2D6BD13B 






L4L6NE2NF2BR14R6NH2NG2BL10RD1^D6 

XJ — XJ VJ 11 XJ Xi 11 X — XJXv X> *T XV VJ 11 11—11 VJ — XJ XJ JL xJ XJ X> >J XJ VJ 


62j3 


HCOLOR0 : HLINE (0,32)-(128,144 


NH2NE2" 

JL 1 JV JL Ari JL » I I X— 


) ,PSET,BF 


960 HDRAW"BM40 12 6C9U2NR2UP*RP RR? 

\> fj iiuxvjrxiv xji i*s ^ Xavj\«ju6 1i i\x wj — 1\6 xjxv _ 


63j3 


'start to play 


RD4BR10U2NR2U2R2BR2R2nPL2nPP9 " 

1 vXJ * XJX v X, K/ VJ X> 11 Xvx» VJ _ 1\ _ XJ 1\ — Xv — U — XJ XJ — l\x 




HC0L0R9 : B=173 : VP=64 : LM=0 : SV= 


970 HPRINT f 9 , 7) , "Quit" 

f *V — A J— > AX -— » A • JW V fit XV XV4 ^_ i X^ 






980 HPRINT f 8 , 9) . "Backward" 

•V XV JL/ JV JL Jk JL V «k> JL 1 Jm V Xv f ~* M f J_ V V-Jx X^ J X If X«4* JL» XVx 




HPRINT (1, 7) ,"How many tiles" 


990 HPRINT f0 , 11) , "Left Riaht 

JL/ JL JL Jk JL X — — JL 1 JW V JL/ / ^L> ^k> / g <UW Jk> W Jk V— L XwJ JL X w 


660 


HPRINT (1/8) , "would you like" 


II 


67j3 


HPRINT (1,9)," scrambled? " 


1000 HPRINTf 8. 13) "Forward" 

^ fj xj ii x i\xii i ^ <j ^ i j y ^ x vj x w Lx x vx 


68)3 


HC0L0R1 : X=7 : S$=" " 


1010 HPRINT f 2 . 15) . "Utd Down" 

X 1/ X V XXX IVXii X v x< » X> «^ J » VJ UVJVV11 


69J3 


I$=INKEY$ : IFI$=" "THEN690 


1020 'make moves 

^_ i Jk/ ^V Jk/ Jt^bxV4 J kW Alt X_ r V X™* k_f 


700 


IFI$=CHR$(13) THEN 800 


1030 KS=CHR$ f 10) +CHRS f 8) +CHRS f 94 

^ w ju xv fcfi win v ^ i "X »/ j i wx xxv fcj \ w j * win\ y i * 


710 


IFI$=CHR$(8) THEN 770 


) +CHRS f 9 ) +CHRS f 4) +CHR$ f 103) 

J x_i X /x.JL X XV V -V J Xv 111 V XV t X i I xv JL JLX X xV I JkV «J* J 


720 


IFI$<"0"ORI$>"9"THEN690 


104 0 ONBRK GOTO12 3 0 

JL/ r Jk/ xv JW 1 Jk. J Jr x Jl x x_ t xv Jk XV ^L> «v *v 5L/ 


730 


IFX>9 THEN 6 90 


1050 I$=INKEYS : IFIS=" "THEN 1050 

x> vJ 1 ju ju •|' xii xvxj i y • ^ x >x> >>j x iixjii X jl/ »j Xj 


740 


S$=S$+I$ 


1060 K=INSTR f KS .IS) 

•J* xj vj jfcj xv j» xi w* xxv i ivy ^ jb *i» i 


750 


HC0L0R1 : HPRINT ( X , 1 1 ) , I $ 


107j3 IFK=j3 THENlj35j3 


760 


X=X+1:GOTO690 


Ij38j3 ONK GOSUB166j3 ,167)3, 168^,169 


770 


IFLEN(S$)=0 THEN S$="" ELSES 


j3, 1700,1710 




"Assembly Language Programming for the CoCo" (The Book) and the CoCo 3 (The Addendum). 
Professionally produced (not just skimpy technical specifications). THE CoCo reference books. 



THE BOOK - 289 pages of teaching 
assembly language for the CoCo 1 & 2. 
It's used as a school text and is an 
intro to Computer Science. It describes 
the 6809E instructions, subroutines, 
interrupts, stacks, programming 
philosophy, and many examples. Also 
covered are PIAs, VDG, SAM, kybd, 
jystk, sound, serial port, and using 
cassette and disk. $18.00 + $1.50 s/h. 



THE ADDENDUM - Picks up 

where the BOOK left off. Describes 
ALL the CoCo 3 enhancements & how 
to use them with assembly language. 
The most complete GIME spec. 
WOW - Super-Res Graphics, 
Virtual Memory, New Interrupts, 
and more information not available 
elsewhere. Find out what the CoCo 3 
can really do. $12.00 + $1.00 s/h. 



COCO 3 SPECIAL us check or money 

Start your CoCo order. RI orders 

library right. add 6% sates tax 
See what the CoCo 

can really do and ——__—,—. 

save money - buy I LrLU 

the BOOK and 68 James Court 

ADDENDUM Portsmouth, RI 02871 

for only $27.00 + 

$2.00 s/h. See Us On DELPHI 



February 1 989 THE RAINBOW 31 



1090 IF A(B+V)=0 THENSQUND120 , 1 : 

GOTO1050 

1100 GOSUB1550 

1110 WC=64 

1120 IFWY(WC)OWC THEN GOTO1050 
1130 WC=WC-1:IF WC=0 THEN 1140 E 
LSE 1120 

1140 HCOLOR8:SV=l 

1150 HPRINT (1,5) /'Congratulation 

s" 

1160 ONBRKGOTO2500 
1170 F0RL=1T012 

1180 FORK=3T06:PALETTEK,RND(63) 

1190 PLAY"L16T1604CG":NEXTK,L 

1200 GOSUB1480:HCOLOR0 

1210 HLINE(0,50)-(128,132) ,PSET, 

BF 

1220 HCOLOR9 

12 30 HCOLOR0 : HLINE (0 , 40 ) - ( 12 6 , 13 
2) ,PSET,BF 
1240 HCOLOR9 

12 50 HPRINT (1,7) /'Would you like 
h 

12 60 HPRINT (1, 8) , "to play anothe 
r» 

1270 HPRINT (1, 9) , "game? (Y/N) " 
1280 I$=INKEY$:IFI$=""THEN1280 
1290 IFI$="N"THENGOTO2500 
1300 IFI$O"Y"THEN1280 

1310 'reset tiles 

1320 HCOLOR0:HLINE(8, 40) -(126,80 
) ,PSET,BF 

1330 IFSV=1 THEN 6 40 

1340 IFWY(64)=64 THEN1370 

1350 L=64 :GOSUB2310 

1360 GOSUB2100:WY(64)=64 

1370 FORL=63 TO 1 STEP-1 

1380 IFWY(L)OL THENGOSUB1400 

1390 NEXTL:GOTO640 

1400 BN=L:GOSUB2 310 

1410 F=S/16+3:WY(L)=L 

1420 H$="BM"+STR$ (X) + " , "+STR$ (Y) 

1430 V=0:R=D1(D) 

1440 ON R GOSUB 1730,1730,1810,1 

730,1730,1810 

1450 RETURN 

1460 'end of main routine 
1470 'subroutines 

1480 PALETTE0, 29: PALETTE 1,8 
1490 PALETTE2 , 63 :PALETTE3 , 38 
1500 PALETTE 4, 43: PALETTE 5, 5 2 
1510 PALETTE6 , 16 : PALETTE7 , 63 
1520 PALETTE 8, 36: PALETTE 10, 62 
1530 PALETTE 9,0: RE TURN 
1540 'swap tile 

1550 WY(VP)=WY(VP+M) :BN=WY(VP) :L 
M=WY(VP) :B=B+V 

1560 L=VP+M:GOSUB2 310:R=D1(D) 
1570 F=HPOINT (X-l,Y+2) 'get color 
1580 ON R GOSUB1870, 1920,1970, 20 

20, 2070 , 2100 ' erase & recnstr 



1590 L=VP:GOSUB2 310:R=D1(D) 
1600 H$="BM"+STR$ (X) +» , "+STR$ (Y) 
1610 ON R GOSUB 1730,1730,1810,1 

730, 1730, 1810'draw whl or parti 

1620 PLAY"L16T1604AB" 

1630 VP=VP+M:WY(VP) =64 

1640 RETURN 

1650 'pick a direction 

1660 V=-l : M=-l : RETURN 

1670 V=6 : M= s 4 : RETURN 

1680 V«l:M»l: RETURN 

1690 V=-6 :M=- 4 : RETURN 

1700 V=- 3 6 : M=- 1 6 : RETURN 

1710 V=3 6 :M=16: RETURN 

1720 'draw partial tile 

1730 IF V=l THEN GOSUB18 10 : RETUR 

N 

1740 HDRAW"XH$;C7XDP$;" 

1750 HPAINT(X-2, Y+2) ,F,7 

1760 HDRAW"XH$;C2XDP$;G8" 

1770 HPAINT(X-9,Y+13) ,F,2 

1780 GOSUB2400 

1790 RETURN 

1800 'draw whole tile 

1810 HDRAW"XH$;C7XDW$;" 

1820 HPAINT(X-4,Y+2) ,F,7 

1830 HDRAW"XH$;C2XDW$;G3NL16D6" 

1840 GOSUB2400 

1850 RETURN 

18 60 'rear left corner d=l 

1870 GOSUB2130 

1880 H$="BM"+STR$ (X+l) +" , "+STR$ ( 
Y+5) 

18 90 IF L=l THEN HDRAW"XH$ / C1L19 

G4" ELSE HDRAW"XH$;C1L19NU5G4" 

1900 RETURN 

1910 'side tile d=2 

1920 GOSUB2130:IF V<>1 THENGOSUB 

2240 

1930 H$«"BM"+STR$ (X) +" , "+STR$ (Y) 
1940 IF V=-l THEN HDRAW"XH$ ? C1BL 
13BG2G9" ELSE HDRAW"XH$ ; C1BL13BG 
2G7" 

1950 RETURN 

1960 'front left corner d=3 

1970 GOSUB2190:GOSUB2240 

1980 H$="BM !I +STR$ (X+l) +" , "+STR$ ( 

Y+2) 

1990 IF V=l THEN HDRAW"XH$ ; C1BL1 
6NE2G10" ELSE HDRAW"XH$ ; C1BL16G1 
0" 

2000 RETURN 

2010 'rear tile d=4 

2020 GOSUB2130 

2030 H$="BM"+STR$ (X+l) +" , "+STR$ ( 
Y+5) 

2040 HDRAW"XH$;C1L22" 
2050 RETURN 

2060 'middle tile d=5 
2070 GOSUB2130:GOSUB2240 
2080 RETURN 



32 THE RAINBOW February 1989 



2090 
2100 
2110 
2120 
2130 
RN 

2140 
2150 
2160 
2170 
2180 
2190 
2200 
2210 
2220 
2230 
2240 
2250 
2260 

Y-l) 
2270 
2280 
2290 
2300 
e 

2310 
2320 
2330 



1 front tile d=6 

G0SUB2 190 : GOSUB22 4 0 
RETURN 

'erase partial tile 

IF V=-l THEN GOSUB2190:RETU 

H$="BM"+STR$ (X) +" , "+STR$ (Y) 
HDRAW"XH$;XE$;" 
HPAINT (X-2 , Y+2 ) , 0 , 0 
RETURN 

•erase whole tile 
H$="BM"+STR$ (X) +« , "+STR$ (Y) 
HDRAW"XH$;C0L16G8D6R16E8U6" 
HPAINT (X-2, Y+2) ,0,0 
RETURN 

•redraw rear tile 

IF V=l THEN RETURN 
C=HPOINT(X-2,Y-3) 
H$="BM"+STR$ (X+2) +" , "+STR$ ( 

HDRAW"XH$;C2D5L16U5" 
HPAINT (X,Y) ,C,2 
RETURN 

'calculate x,y for each til 
S=L-1 

Xl=(S/4-INT(S/4) ) *-40+190 
X2=INT( ( (S/16)-INT(S/16) ) *4 



) 

2340 
2350 
2360 
2370 
2380 
2390 
2400 
2410 
2420 
2430 
2440 
2450 

(DS) 

2460 

2470 

2480 

2490 

6,4,5 

2500 

2510 

2520 

2530 

2540 

2550 

2560 

2570 

RGB 



X2=X2*32:X=X1+X2 
Yl=(S/4-INT(S/4) ) *40+7 
Y2=INT(S/16) :Y=Y1+(Y2*46) 
D= ( (S/16-INT (S/16) ) *16) +1 
RETURN 

'draw numbers 
L$=STR$(BN) :DL=LEN(L$) -1 
D=VAL(RIGHT$(L$,1) ) 
D$=N$ (D) 

HDRAW"XH$;C9BL6BD2XD$;" 

D$=MID$(L$,DL,1) 

IFD$=" "THEN2480 ELSE D=VAL 

D$=N$(D) 

HDRAW"XH$ ; C9BL12BD2XD$ ; " 
RETURN 

DATA 1,2,2,3,4,5,5,6,4,5,5, 
,5,6 

WIDTH40:HSCREEN0 
P0KE&HFFD8 , 0 : CLS0 
LOCATE 9 , 10 
ATTR 1,0 

PRINT"Thanks for playing" 

LOCATE12 , 12 

PRINT "The Blue Void" 

FORL=1TO2000 : NEXTL : WIDTH 3 2 : 



SPLCIAL LVtNT? 



COCO GALLERY LIVE 
SHOWCASE YOUR BEST AT RAINBOWFEST 

We are taking the popular "CoCo Gallery" on the road to RAINBOWfest Chicago — and we'd like you to 
submit your own graphics creations to be exhibited at the show! 



RVLfct 



• You can enter color or black-and-white photographs or printouts of your original artwork produced on 
the CoCo 1 , 2 or 3. Entries must be framed, mounted or matted, and may not be smaller than 5-by-7 inches 
or larger than 1 1-by-14 inches. 

• Don't send us anything owned by someone else; this means no game screens, digitized images from TV 
programs or material that's already been submitted elsewhere. A digitized copy of a picture that appears 
in a book or magazine is not an original work. 

• Along with your entry, send a cover letter with your name, address and phone number, detailing how you 
created your picture (what programs you used, etc.). Please include a few facts about yourself, too! 

• Your name, address and phone number, along with the title of your work, must be clearly marked on the 
back of each entry, and a disk copy of each piece must also be included. 

• Entries must be mailed to THE RAINBOW before March 31 , 1 989, or brought to the RAINBOWfest registration 
booth by 10 a.m., Saturday, April 15th. 

• All entries to CoCo Gallery Live become the property of Falsoft, Inc., all rights are reserved. 

There will be two categories: one for graphics produced on the CoCo 1 and 2, and one for CoCo 3 graphics. 
Several awards will be made in each category. Winners will be determined by votes from RAINBOWfest 
attendees. In case of any ties, winners will be determined by our chief judge, CoCo Cat. 

Prizes and ribbons will be presented Sunday, April 16, 1989, and winning entries will be published in the 
August '89 issue of THE RAINBOW. Send your entry to "CoCo Gallery Live," THE RAINBOW, 9509 U.S. Highway 
42, Prospect, KY 40059. 



February 1989 THE RAINBOW 33 






•i »4. ■ ■ 



ft 









i' V v w - 







i, ) . 







CHICAGO 



Aoril 14-16 




® 




ft, 
M 
I 



2 



AINBOWfest is the only computer show dedicated 
exclusively to your Tandy Color Computer. 
Nowhere else will you see as many CoCo-related 
products or be able to attend free seminars conducted 
by the top Color Computer experts. It's like receiving the 
latest issue of the rainbow in your mailbox! 

RAINBOWfest is a great opportunity for commercial 
programmers to show off new and innovative products 
for the first time. Chicago is the show to get information 
on capabilities for the CoCo, along with a terrific 
selection of the latest CoCo software. In exhibit after 
exhibit, there will be demonstrations, opportunities to 
experiment with software and hardware, and special 
RAINBOWfest prices. 
Set your own pace between visiting exhibits and 
ttending the valuable, free seminars on all aspects of 
your CoCo — from improving basic skills to working with 
the sophisticated OS-9 operating system. 

Many people who write for the rainbow — as 
well as those who are written about — are there 
to meet you and answer questions. You'll also 
meet lots of other people who share your interest 
in the Color Computer. It's a person-to-person 
event and a tremendous learning experience in 
a fun and relaxed atmosphere. 

A special feature of RAINBOWfest is the 
CoCo Gallery Live Showcase, where 
CoCo artists enter their own graphics 
creations for display at the show. Cash 
prizes are presented and winning 
entries are decided by 
votes from RAINBOWfest attendees. 
(See the following page for more. 



■ 




details.) As an additional treat for CoCo Kids of all ages, 
we've invited frisky feline CoCo Cat to join us for the show. 
RAINBOWfest has something for everyone in the family! 

If you missed the fun at our last RAINBOWfest in Princeton, 
why don't you make plans now to join us in Chicago? 
For members of the family who don't share your 
affinity for CoCo, there are many other attractions in 
the Chicago area. 

The Hyatt Regency Woodfield — Schaumburg, 
Illinois offers special rates f or R A I N BO Wf est. The show 
opens Friday evening with a session from 7 p.m. to 10 
p.m. It's a daytime show Saturday — the CoCo Com- 
munity Breakfast (separate tickets required) is at 8 
a.m., then the exhibit hall opens promptly at 10a.m. and 
runs until 6 p.m. On Sunday, the exhibit hall opens at 
11 a.m. and closes at 3 p.m. 

Tickets for RAINBOWfest may be obtained directly 
from the rainbow. We'll also send you a reserva- 
tion form so you can get a special room rate. 

The POSH way to go. You can have your travel 
arrangements and hotel reservations handled 
through rainbow affiliate, POSH Travel Assist- 
ance, Inc., of Louisville. For the same POSH 
treatment many of our exhibitors enjoy, call POSH at 
(502) 893-331 1 . All POSH services are available at no 
charge to RAINBOWfest attendees. 

3fa THbitt? 




/ 



It 



X 



p 







FRLb StMINARS 



Cray Augsburg 

RAINBOW Technical Editor 
OS-9 For Absolute Beginners 

Bill Bernico 

RAINBOW Contributing Editor 
BASICally Speaking 

Steve Bjork 

SRB Software 

Writing Game Software 

Chris Burke 

Burke & Burke 
Hard Drive Systems 

Kevin Darling 

Independent Programmer 
Overview of OS-9 



Art Flexser 

SpectroSystems 

Extending the Capabilities of 
BASIC 

Dr. Martin Goodman, M.D. 

RAINBOW Contributing Editor 
Two CoCo Consultations Live 

Ed Hathaway 

Glenside CoCo Club 
Organizing a CoCo Club 

Cecil Houk 

Rulaford Research 
Music, MIDI and the CoCo 

Jutta Kapfhammer 

RAINBOW Managing Editor 
Writing for Publication 



ۥۥ COMMUNITY Sit b A K FAST 

Rick Adams — Software Developer 

Our keynote speaker for the traditional CoCo Community Breakfast 
is Rick Adams, who is the founder of Color Central Software and the 
author of programs like DELPHIterm, Tandy's Temple of ROM and 
Activision's CoCo 3 version of Shanghai. 

Mr. Adams will describe his life as a programmer on the "front lines" 
of the ongoing efforts to program software for the CoCo 3, including 
humorous "war stories" from some of his software developments. 



Don't forget . . . 



If youfs is one of the first 500 ticket orders, a coupon for a complimentary 
issue of The Second RAINBOW book of Simulations will be enclosed with 
your tickets — if yours is one of the first five orders received from your state, 
a coupon for a complimentary RAINBOWfest T-shirt will be enclosed with 
your tickets. So hurry up and place your order to take advantage of this offer. 




William Nee 

Independent Programmer 
Machine Language Made BASIC 

Dale Puckett 

RAINBOW Contributing Editor 
Overview of BASIC09 



Dick White 

RAINBOW Contributing Editor 
Spreadsheets for the CoCo 

Sister Berdelle Wiese 

Community Computer Consultant 
CoCo and the Teacher 



RAINBOWfest - Chicago, Illinois 
Dates: April 14-16, 1989 
Hotel: Hyatt Regency Woodfield 
Rooms: $66 per night, 
single or double 

Advance Ticket Deadline: March 31, 
1989 

Join us at a future RAINBOWfest! 

RAINBOWfest - Somerset, New Jersey 

Dates: October 20-22, 1989 

Hotel: The Somerset Hilton 

Rooms: Single, $65 per night; 

Double, $75 per night 

Advance Ticket Deadline: October 6, 

1989 

FREE T-Shirt to first five ticket orders re- 
ceived from each state. 

First 500 ticket orders received get The 
Rainbow Book of Simulations. 



YES, I'm coming to Chicago! I want to save by buying tic 
advance sale price. Breakfast tickets require advance reservatio 



kets now at the specia 
ns. 



Please send me: 



Three-day ticket(s) at $9 each total 

One-day ticket(s) at $7 each total 

Circle one: Friday Saturday Sunday 



Name 

(please print) 

Address 



Saturday CoCo Breakfast 
at $12 each 

RAINBOWfest T-shirt(s) 

at $6 each 

Specify size: 

S M L . 



City 



State 



total 



total 



Telephone 
Company . 



ZIP 



XL 



(T-shirts must be picked up at the door) 
Handling Charge $1 

TOTAL ENCLOSED 

(U.S. Currency Only, Please) 
□ Also send me a hotel reservation card for the 



□ Payment Enclosed, or Charge to: 
□ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 

Account Number 



Exp. Date 



Hyatt Regency Woodfield ($66, single or double 5j Qnature 
room). ° 

Advance ticket deadline: March 31, 1989. Orders received less than two weeks prior to show opening will be held for you 
at the door. Tickets will also be available at the door at a slightly higher price. Tickets will be mailed six weeks prior to show. 
Children 4 and under, free; over 4, full price. 

Make checks payable to: The RAINBOW. Mail to: RAINBOWfest, The Falsoft Building, 9509 U.S. Highway 42, P.O. 
Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. To make reservations by phone, in Kentucky call (502) 228-4492, or outside Kentucky 
ill (800) 847-0309. 



1 F e atur e 




The first in a series of tutorials to help 
you create your own database system 



The Do-It- Yourself Database: 
Subroutines and Program Code 



By Richard Perlman 



Your Color Computer is a power- 
ful piece of hardware that can be 
used for more than game playing 
and word processing. You can use it to 
keep track of finances, important dates, 
appointments, collections, catalogs, 
things loaned and borrowed, and so on. 



For this, you need a database and a disk 
on which to store the information. 

To set up a database, you don't have 
to know much about the system or 
disks. You don't need to use assembly 
language, and you don't have to be an 
experienced BASIC programmer. All you 



must do is follow the steps described 
here. I will demonstrate the coding and 
programming techniques you need. 
When we're done, you'll have a working 
database you can use to manage money, 
pay bills and balance a checkbook. And 
if that isn't to your liking, you can 
modify your database any way you 
choose. (I have one version that keeps 
track of my videotape collection.) 

If you already have a disk drive, you 
can code and run all my examples. If 
you don't own a disk, you can try many 
of them and learn more about your 
CoCo. Although I won't bombard you 
with lots of super-technical informa- 
tion, I would like to offer some useful 
programming tips before we begin our 
database. 

What Is a Database? 

A database is information stored by 
following a set of rules. When most of 
us think of databases, we think of 
computers. A database doesn't have to 
be on a computer, however. We are all 
familiar with the telephone book, and 
that list of names, phone numbers and 
addresses is a database. The telephone 
book is a database because it follows a 
set of rules — the data is kept in alpha- 



Richard Perlman spends his time at 
work helping others use their PCs. At 
home, he shares his Co Co 2 with his 
wife and two children. 




36 



THE RAINBOW February 1989 



betical order by name, and the name is 
followed by the appropriate address 
and telephone number. If the telephone 
company chose not to follow these 
rules, it would be more difficult — 
perhaps impossible — to use the infor- 
mation at all. And it wouldn't be a 
database. 

A computerized database uses the 
computer's disk memory to store infor- 
mation. It also uses programmable logic 
to add information to the database 
(front-end) and to retrieve information 
(output- writer). Remember: If you can't 
easily add data to or retrieve data from 
your system, you don't have a useful 
database. 

Many computer systems use a menu 
format for both the front-end and 
output-writer. A menu is a list of choices 
displayed on the screen. You choose one 
from the list, and the system takes it 
from there. The system may need to 
display several menus to narrow your 
choices and figure out precisely what 
you want Sometimes the program must 
also ask you to enter information, but 
the system should not allow you to give 
it information or instructions it cannot 
process properly. This is messy and 
disregards the rules followed by any 



self-respecting database system (espe- 
cially ours). 

Where Do We Begin? 

We must first encode the menus and 
information requests. Let's begin by 
looking at some programming tech- 
niques that will help us do those things 
more easily — subroutines, loops and 
and Computed GOTOs. These routines 
will be used throughout our system. 
Don't be put off by their unusual names. 
Computer languages include many 
unfamiliar terms, but these terms will be 
easier to understand as we proceed. 

A subroutine is a special set of in- 
structions that does something specific 
(like converting hours and minutes into 
seconds). You write these instructions 
once in a program and return to them 
any time you want those instructions 
followed. This shortens your program 
and lessens the possibility of an error. 
Because we will use menus in several 
sections of our program, the subroutine 
technique will be quite useful. Listing 1 
includes a subroutine that displays a 
menu with one to four choices. 

When Listing 1 is run, it clears the 
screen, displays four lines at the top of 
the screen and then stops at Line 40. The 



entire program is not a subroutine. The 
program starts at Line 10 and ends at 
Line 600. On the other hand, the sub- 
routine begins at Line 500 and ends on 
Line 550. Line 40's G0SUB 500 lets us use 
(or call) this subroutine. At the end of 
the subroutine, Line 550's RETURN state- 
ment returns us to the statement imme- 
diately following the gosub. Thus, the 
program returns to the STOP statement 
in Line 40, and the program stops. 

The subroutine was written to be 
flexible. With only minor changes, you 
can display fewer lines or change the 
text. The actions of the subroutine 
depend upon conditions you set up 
before you call it. By changing the 
setup, you change the subroutine's 
response. This makes using the subrou- 
tine in other parts of the program 
simpler. In this subroutine, you control 
the number of lines displayed by placing 
that value in Variable NL. The text is 
placed in variables Lis through L4$. 
The GOSUB statement calls the subrou- 
tine, and RETURN restores you to Line 40; 
Although you must have a RETURN 
statement at the end of the subroutine, 
be careful not to use RETURN if you are 
not writing a subroutine. If you do, your 
program will stop running at the RETURN 




METRIC INDUSTRIES, INC 













7 


ran 

* 




i 

9 






Model 101 

Serial to Parallel Printer Interface 

* Works with any COCO 

* Compatible with "Centronics" Parallel Input Printers 

* Just turn the knob to select any one of 6 baud rates 300-9600 

* Comes complete with cables to connect to your printer 
and computer 

* Can be powered by most printers 

Model 104 Deluxe Interface 
with "Modem Switch" 

* Same Features as 1 01 Plus 

* Built in Serial Port for your Modem or other serial device 

* Switch between Serial Output and Parallel Output 

* Comes with cables to connect to your computer and printer 

* Can be powered by most printers 

Model 105 Serial Switch 

* Connects to your COCO to give you 2 switch selectable 
Serial Ports 

* Comes with a 3 foot cable to connect to your computer 

* Now you can connect your Printer (or printer interface) 
and your Modem (or other serial device) to your COCO 
and flip the switch to use either device 

* Does not require power 



Cassette Label Printing Program 



New Version 2.1 prints 7 lines of information 
on Cassette labels 

Comes on Tape with instructions to transfer to disk 
Menu driven, very easy to use 
Save and Load Labels from Tape and Disk 
Uses the features of your printer to print standard, 
expanded, and condensed characters 
Automatically Centers Each Line of Text 
Allows editing of label before printing 
Program comes with 24 labels to get you started 
1 6K ECB required 



Some of the Printers 
That Can - 

Supply power for the 101 and 
1 04 are Radio Shack, Star, 
Okidata, Brother, Juki, and 
Smith Corona. 

Some of the Printers 
That Cannot - 

Supply power for the interfaces 
are Epson, Seikosha, 
Panasonic, Silver Reed and 
NEC. If your printer cannot 
supply power to the interface 
you can order your interface 
with the "P" option or you can 
supply your own AC adapter. 
We recommend the Radio 
Shack 273-1431 AC adapter 
with a 274-328 connector 
adapter. 

Write or call for more 
information or for technical 
assistance. 



Price List 



35.95 

41.95 
44.95 
51 .95 
14.95 



Model 101 

Model 1 01 P 

Model 104 

Model 104P 

Model 105 

Cassette Label Program 6.95 

Pin Feed Cassette Labels: 
White 3.00/100 
Colors (specify) 3.60/C 
Red-Blue- Yellow-Tan 



4 Pin Din Serial 
COCO Cables: 

Male/Male 6 foot 
Male/Female 6 foot 
Female/Female 6 foot 
Other Lengths Available. 

All items covered by a 
1 year warranty 



4.49 
4.49 
4.49 



Ordering Info 



Free Shipping in the 

U.S.A. (except AK and HI) 
on all orders over $50 
On orders under $50 
please add $2.50 for 
shipping and handling 
On orders outside the 
U.S.A. please write or call 
for shipping charges 



You Can Pay By: 

★ VISA or MasterCard 

★ C.O.D.- add $2.25 

★ Or send check or money 
order payable in U.S. funds 



Metric Industries Inc. 
P.O. Box 42396 
Cincinnati, OH 45242 

(513) 677-0796 



February 1989 THE RAINBOW 37 



statement because it has nowhere to 
return. 

To demonstrate the flexibility of the 
subroutine, let's display only three lines 
this time. To do this, I changed the value 
in NL before calling the subroutine again 
and entered CQNT, which lets the pro- 
gram resume running after the STOP in 
Line 40. 

The FOR/NEXT Loop 

There are four PRINT and three IF 
statements in our subroutine. We can 
eliminate most of them by using FDR/ 
NEXT loops. A FDR/NEXT loop is a set of 
instructions that repeats itself (or loops 
back) for a specific number of times. We 
can use a for/next loop to add three to 
itself five times and display the result 
after each addition. In Figure 1, this 
procedure is completed first with a FDR/ 
NEXT loop and then without it. 

Both sets of code do the same thing, 
but the FDR/NEXT loop requires much 
less program code. In both examples, 
Line 100 includes Variable I, the index. 
The FOR instruction in Line 100 does 
two things. It sets up the loop, and it 
tells the computer that I is the index, its 
starting value is 1, and its ending value 
will be 5. The FDR instruction runs all 
instructions between itself and the NEXT 
statement. It also adds one to the index 
during each pass. Until I is equal to five, 
the FDR instruction will run the instruc- 
tions between itself and the NEXT state- 
ment. Therefore, this group of FOR/NEXT 
statements will run five times, and then 
the loop will be over. When the loop is 
over, the statement following NEXT I will 
run, and the program will stop. 



Lists Made Easy: The Array 

In addition to GOSUBs and FOR/NEXT 
loops, we will use arrays in our data- 
base. An array is a useful method of 
holding lists of information — some- 
thing a computer does well. The lists 
will have names, and each item in each 
list will have an item number. We can 
then refer to each item by using its array 
name and item number. In our menu 
subroutine, we stored the lines we 
wanted to display in the variables Ll$, 
L2$, L3$ and L4$. However, we would 
have problems if we tried to display 10 
or more items because array names can 
include no more than three characters. 
To remedy this problem, we will use an 
L$ array and store the lines in the 
variables L$(l), L$(2), L$(3) and 
L$(4). The item numbers (1 to 4) are 
subscripts, and an array can have thou- 
sands of them. The following example 
takes our original subroutine and re- 
codes it to use both a loop and an array: 

100 CLEAR 500 
110 DIM L$(10) 

200 L$(l) - "1- FIRST CHOICE ON THE MENU 
210 L$(2) - "2- SECOND CHOICE ON THE MENU 
22? L$(3) - "3- THIRD CHOICE ON THE MENU 
240 L$(4) - "4- FOURTH CHOICE OF MENU 
250 NL - 4 'NUMBER OF CHOICES 
260 GOSUB 500 
270 STOP 

500 CLS:FOR I - 1 TO NL 
510 PRINT L$(I) 
515 NEXT I 
520 RETURN 

Compare this routine with our orig- 
inal example. We still must place a value 
in NL and place the display lines in the 
L$ array. The recoded subroutine is 
three lines shorter and much simpler, 
however, because the FOR/NEXT loop 



does all the checking for us. The index 
is used to pick out the items to display. 

However, the computer isn't all that 
smart. We must tell it (in a separate 
statement) that L$ is an array, and we 
must identify the maximum size of the 
list. To do this we use a DIM statement 
on Line 110. The DIM statement tells the 
computer that L$ is an array and that 
it should be set up so we can use sub- 
scripts from zero to 10 when we work 
with it. Although we are using only four 
items, our array can hold a maximum 
of 11 items. You can use as few items 
as you want — just don't exceed the 
maximum. 

Our First Real Menu 

It is easier to use a menu if we know 
the menu's purpose and the expected 
response to the menu. So before we 
display the choices, we will clear the 
screen, put a brief explanation on the 
top line and place instructions on the 
next display line. That will leave us with 
a proper menu. 

Because we will now use the first two 
lines to display something other than 
menu choices, we must display these 
items lower on the screen. CoCo's BASIC 
comes to our aid by giving us a PRINT 
statement ("PRINT @ xx") that allows us 
to control the placement of our display 
on the screen. In this statement, xx is 
the display position on the video screen. 
The 512 possible display positions are 
divided into lines of 32 characters each. 
The first character position of the first 
line is Display Position 0, the first 
character position of the second line is 
32, etc. To position the information we 
placed in Array l_$ ( 2 ) on the left margin 
of the third line, we would enter "PRINT 
@SG,L$(2)". We can also use the PRINT 
B statement to "blank out" an entire 
line. To do this, enter PRINT ©32," ". 

Time to Type 

After it displays the menu lines, our 
subroutine should let us press a single 
key to indicate our choice. We can do 
this by using the INKEY$ instruction. 
IN«EV$ allows the computer to identify 
which key was pressed or to indicate 
that no key was pressed. When we use 
INKEY$, the screen will not display the 
key that was pressed, nor is it necessary 
to press ENTER to indicate that your 
typing is complete. The following rou- 
tine shows that you pressed a key: 

100 CLS: PRINT WAS ANYTHING TYPED? — » 

110 A$ - INKEY$:IP A$ - nH GOTO 110 
120 PRINT @64 , "YES , SOMETHING WAS TYPED" 
130 GOTO 110 



FOR/NEXT Code 


Normal Code 


100 FOR 1= 1 TO 5 


100 1-0 


200 N - N + 3 


101 1=1+1 


250 PRINT N 


102 IF I>5 THEN GOTO 301 ELSE N-N+3 


300 NEXT I 


103 PRINT N:G0T0 101 


301 STOP 


301 STOP 




Figure 1: Adding 3 



Computed GOTO Code Normal Code 




200 GOSUB 9020 200 GOSUB 9020 




201 ON A GOTO 300,400,500,600 201 IF A - 1 GOTO 


300 


210 STOP 202 IF A - 2 GOTO 


400 


203 IF A = 3 GOTO 


500 


204 IF A - 4 GOTO 


600 


210 STOP 




Figure 2: GOTOs 





38 THE RAINBOW February 1989 



This program will stay on Line 110 
until you type something. When a key 
is pressed, the program will print a 
message on the third display line. Look 
at Line 110. The two quotation marks 
with nothing between represent a null 
character. Therefore, the statement IF 
fl$ = "" ..." tells the program that if 
nothing was typed, then Line 1 10 must 
be redone. Fve included this technique 
in Listing 2. 

When this program is run, the menu 
display begins Position 96 (5L) and will 
display four lines of information (NL). 
You then type a number to indicate your 
choice. If your choice is accepted, it is 
displayed on the screen, and you get to 
press another key. If you press 4, the 
program will stop. If your choice is not 
accepted, you must press another key. 

The subroutine starts at Line 9000. 
While lines 9000 to 9001 display the 
menu lines, lines 9005 through 9010 
place the message "Select from the 
following " on the second display line 
and cause it to blink on and off until you 
press a key. The blink rate is determined 
by the highest value for I in the FOR 
statements on lines 9006 and 9008. Try 
changing these values, and see what you 
get. As soon as you type a character, the 
program will go to Line 9012. Lines 
9012 and 901 3 ensure that the value you 
have entered is a number between one 
and four (the value of NL). If these 
requirements are met, then the RETURN 
statement in Line 9012 resumes the 
program at Line 270. When the subrou- 
tine returns, the value in Variable R will 
be the number you entered. This 
number will be used in Line 270 to 
determine what will be displayed and in 
280 to determine what action will be 
taken. 

If the subroutine didn't check our 
typing, then the program could stop 
running, since Line 270 will not work if 
the value of A is not between one and 
four. We also used the value of fl in Line 
280 to determine whether the program 
will stop or ask for another choice. In 
a real menu, there could be more than 
four choices, and we would have a lot 
of checking to do after the subroutine 
returns. 

The Computed GOTO 

BASIC has a nice feature to help us 
check our subroutine called the Com- 
puted GOTO. Figure 2 shows how this 
statement works and what we would 
need to enter if it didn't exist. (Don't 
enter this yourself since it is not a 
complete program.) 

The Computed GOTO on Line 201 puts 



four instructions on a single line, and 
that's far from the limit. You can put 
many more instructions in a Computed 
GOTO. I haven't figured out what the 
limit is, but I've never exceeded it. And 
unless you do some fancy program- 
ming, you won't either. 

Multiple Menus for Marbles 

Listing 3 shows how we can use the 
techniques we have described to employ 
more than one menu in a program. This 
program doesn't do anything useful, but 
it does work. The program maintains a 
database containing information about 
my marble collection. To save time and 
space, only some of the choices have 
been programmed, but I've includ- 
ed enough working code for you to see 
menu switching at work. Where a 
choice is not programmed, I will display 
the choice made and allow another 
choice. The first menu will give us five 
options: 

1. Add marbles to the database. 

2. Change the database. 

3. Delete from the database. 

4. Report from the database. 

5. End the session. 

The menus that follow allow other 
options, but we must return to the first 
menu to end the session. Enter Listing 
3 and see if it works. Try each option 
on each menu. Then change the pro- 
gram by putting in your own descrip- 
tions and experiment with moving the 
display lower on the screen. But don't 
change the subroutine. We will use it 
later. I used CL50 to create the dark 
screen, but you can use CLS if you prefer. 

No! No! We Won't GIGO! 

As mentioned before, it is important 
to keep incorrect information out of 
your database. This is difficult because 
you have to decide beforehand what is 
correct and what is not. Numbers are 
fairly easy to check because we usually 
have a good idea what the highest and 
lowest acceptable values will be. The 
following program code will determine 
whether or not a number is too high: 

PRINT @32 , "ENTER A NUMBER FROM 1 TO 2000" 
110 INPUT A 

120 IF A < - 2000 AND A - > I THEN GOTO 150 
130 PRINT A;" IS OUT OF RANGE" : GOTO 100 
150 PRINT A;" IS IN RANGE" :GOTO 100 

But what about money? This pro- 
gram code would not prevent you from 
entering 1.275 or 1275, when you 
wanted to enter 12.75. It would also 
move the display farther and farther 



THE BEST 

GOT BETTER 



WARGAME DESIGNER SYSTEM $29 

The best selling COC03 games and game 
design system just got BETTER. A new icon 
editor, faster design, and more! If you haven't 
got it, get it. Upgrades - Registered Sw 
customers, send original disks & $7 to cover 
postage & disks cost. See August 88 Review! 

WARGAME DESIGNER ACCESSORY: 

WGD ICON DISK #7 $15 

528 NEW ICONS! 8 complete sets of unit & 
terrain icons ready to view, identify and 
transfer to your game disks. Even get a 
printout listing colors used & identifying each 
icon in the set. A MUST HAVE WGD flippy. 
Combine to add 64 new sets! 

WGD STAND ALONES each just $15 

INVASION NORTH 

Land, air & water. 9 objectives. 

ATTACK ON MOSCOW 

A WW2 recreation of the German assult. 

ROBOT COMMAND 

Trouble in Detroit, 1995 AD. 

DUNGEON WARRIOR 

Help! Damsel in distress. 

GHOST HUNTERS 

These spirits are deadly. 

ORC AMBUSH 

Recover the wizard's treasured herbs. 
ZULU REVENGE 
Pits British against Africa's finest. 
DESERT RATS 

Fight for oil in the sands of Africa. 
ISLAND DOMINATION 
2 tribes battle for control land & sea. 
FORT APACHE 

Cowboys & Indians in the old West. 
TECH WARS 

Machine vs. machine in the year 2500 AD. 
ROTC 

Classic combat training. Board gamers 
dream. 

m 

MORE FUN FROM SPORTSware 

GRIDIRON STRATEGY $21 
IMPROVED version adds a 1 player option. 
Play against a friend or just open the box and 
take on the computer. Upgrades - return 
original disk & $5 for new disk & mailing 
costs. 

WEEKLY WINNER 2.0 only $15 

It's a winner! Nov. 16, 1988 WW2.0 got 5 of 
6 in the Ohio Super Lotto. We have proof on 
file. Now for COC02 & 3 on disk & tape. 

CATALOG ON DISK Just $3 

See them all on this packed flippy disk. 
Deduct $3 from any product ordered from the 
disk. Many more products than seen here. 
Great graphics. Get it! COC03 only. 

FEBRUARY FREEBY 

Get MAIL MASTER free with any order 
placed this month. A $25 value FREE! 
(catalog orders excluded) 

VISA & MASTERCARD orders accepted. 
We pay shipping always. 



SPORTSware 

1251 S. Reynolds Road, Suite 414 
Toledo, Ohio 43615 
(419) 389-1515 



February 1989 THE RAINBOW 39 



down the screen if you entered some- 
thing that wasn't a number, which isn't 
good if you are trying to format an input 
screen. To make sure that the entry is 
a number having two (and only two) 
decimal places and that it will be entered 
on the same line, you need a routine 
something like the following: 

95 CLS 

IflJ PRINT @32 , "ENTER 1.0JJ TO 99.00" 

110 INPUT A$ 

112 L-LEH(A$) 

114 IF L < 3 GOTO 135 

116 IF MID$(A$,L-2.1) O GOTO 135 

118 A - VAL(A$> 

12JI IF A < - 99 AND A - > 1 THEN GOTO 150 
130 PRINT A; M IS OUT OF RANGE": GOTO 100 
135 PRINT A$;" IS OUT OF RANGE": GOTO 100 
150 PRINT A;" IS IN RANGE": GOTO 100 

New BASIC Statements 

In our last example, we used the 
BASIC statements INPUT (Line 1 10), LEN 
(Line 112), MID$ (Line 116) and VRL 
(Line 118). Let's review their uses: 

INPUT Lets you enter as many char- 
acters as you need, unlike 
INKEYS, which only accepts 
one character. INPUT also 
shows you what you are typ- 
ing, lets you backspace and 
type over and waits for you 
to press ENTER before con- 
tinuing. 

LEN Tells you how many charac- 

ters there are in a character 
variable. 

MID$ Lets you examine and 
change specific characters. 

VRL Turns a character variable 

into a numeric one. If the 
character variable is not a 
number, then your result is 
zero. 

Now we need to check character 
variable entries like names and ad- 
dresses. These can contain any combi- 
nation of letters, numbers and punctua- 
tion, and they are difficult to check with 
the same precision as numbers. Our 
only reasonable test on this data would 
determine whether or not it is too long 
for the program to use properly. We can 
use the LEN instruction for this and 
combine all these checks into one sub- 
routine. The subroutine will check three 
types of information: numbers without 
decimals, decimal numbers with two 
decimal places and alpha-numeric char- 
acter strings such as names or addresses. 
The subroutine will print a message 
requesting data, enter the response, 
check to make sure it is within a range 
of values and allow re-entry if we have 
made a mistake. Listing 4 shows how we 
would use such a subroutine. 



Mwtino 1* SI IRnFMn 




10 CLEAR 500 




15 Ll$ = "FIRST ITEM ON THE MENU 




20 L2$ = "SECOND ITEM ON THE MENU 




25 L3$ = "THIRD ITEM ON THE MENU 




30 L4$ = "FOURTH ITEM ON THE MENU 




35 NL = 4 1 NUMBER OF CHOICES 




40 GOSUB 500: STOP 




50 NL=3: GOSUB 500: GOTO 600 




500 CLS: PRINT Ll$ 




510 NL = NL - 1 




515 IF NL - 0 GOTO 550 




520 PRINT L2$:NL=NL-1:IF NL = 0 GOTO 


550 


530 PRINT L3$:NL=NL-1:IF NL = 0 GOTO 


550 

r 


540 PRINT L4$ 




550 RETURN 




600 END 





Listing 2: REflLMENU 

100 CLEAR 500 
105 DIM L$(10) 

110 CLS: PRINT (§0," FIRST MENU 

200 L$(l) = "1= FIRST CHOICE ON THE MENU 
210 L$(2) = "2= SECOND CHOICE ON THE MENU 
220 L$(3) « "3= THIRD CHOICE ON THE MENU 
240 L$(4) = "4= STOP THE PROGRAM 
250 NL = 4:SL=96 
260 GOSUB 9000 

270 PRINT (§352, L$ (A) , "WAS CHOSEN 
280 IF A= 4 THEN STOP ELSE GOTO 250 

9000 FOR 1= 1 TO NL: PRINT @SL,L$(I) 

9001 SL« SL+32:NEXT I 

9005 PRINT @32,"* SELECT FROM THE FOLLOWING 

9006 FOR I = 1 TO 200 

9007 A$ = INKEY$ : IF A$ O "" GOTO 9012 ELSE NEXT I 

9008 PRINT @32," ":FOR I = 1 TO 65 

9009 A$ = INKEY$ : IF A$ O GOTO 9012 ELSE NEXT I 

9010 GOTO 9005 

9012 A « VAL(A$):IF A > 0 AND A < NL+1 THEN RETURN 

9013 GOTO 9005 



Listing 3: MARBLEl 




100 CLEAR 500 




110 DIM LI$(6) 




120 CLS0: PRINT 


"-- MARBLE DATABASE OPTIONS 


130 LI$(1)-"1= 


ADD MARBLES TO THE DATABASE 


132 LI$(2)="2= 


CHANGE WHAT'S IN THE DATABASE 


134 LI$(3)="3= 


DELETE MARBLES FROM DATABASE 


136 LI$(4)="4= 


REPORT FROM THE DATABASE 


138 LI$(5)«"5= 


END THIS SESSION 


140 SL=96:NL=5 


: GOSUB 9000 



40 THE RAINBOW Febr uary 1 989 



OUR LATEST 30 ISSUES 



ISSUE #47 , MAY 1986 


ISSUE #52, OCT. 1986 


ISSUE #57, MAR. 1987 


ISSUE #62, AUG. 1987 


ISSUE #67, JAN. 1988 


ISSUE #72, JUNE 1988 


CHRISTMAS LIST 


ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE 


THE BAKERY 


PENSION MANAGEMENT 


AUDIO LIBRARY 


MARKET WATCHER 


BLACK HOLE 


WORKMATE SERIES 


ENCHANGED VALLEY ADV, 


HERB GROWING 


SAVE THE EARTH 


THREE STOOGES 


PITCHING MANAGER 


CALENDAR 


SAFE KEEPER 


CATOLOGER UTILITY 


WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 


HOSTAGE 


SYMBOLIC DIFF. 


INVASION 


WAR 1 


RAIDERS 


LOW RES PICTURES 


PROGRAM TRIO 


BUG SPRAY 


THE TRIP ADVENTURE 


BOMB DISABLE 


ALPHABETIZING 


WORD COUNTER 


GLADIATOR 


OWARE CAPTURE 


FOOT RACE 


PIANO PLAYER 


O.F.O. 


BACARAT 


US & CAN QUIZ 


EASY GRAPHICS 


FLIPPY THE SEAL 


SPREAD SHEET 


ELECTRONICS 5 


BATTLE SHIP 


JEOPARDY 


DESERT JOURNEY 


SCREEN CALCULATOR 


SLOT MANEUVER 


RAMBO ADVENTURE 


ELECTRONICS 10 


ELECTRONICS 15 


SCREEN CONTROL 


ABIE BUILDERS 


LIVING MAZE 


BLOCKS 


TAPE CONVENIENCE 


COCO 3 PRINT 


FULL ERROR MESSAGE 


SUPER ERR0R2 


GEM SEARCH 


MULTI SCREEN CAVES 


PENQUIN 


CTTY COMMUNICATOR 


ISSUE #48, JUNE 1986 


ISSUE #53, NOV. 1986 


ISSUE #56, APRIL 1987 


ISSUE #63, SEPT, 1987 


ISSUE #68, FEB. 1988 


ISSUE #73, JULY 1988 


CHESTER 


CORE KILL 


ACGOUNTS PAYABLE 


GENEOLOGIST HELPER 


COINFILE 


FOREIGN OBJECTS 


TV SCHEDULE 


LUCKY MONEY 


PRINTER GRAPHICS 


SMART COPY 


WORD COUNTER 


CHESS FUNDAMENTALS 


BASE RACE 


COOKIES ADVENTURE 


SIMON 


MAINTENANCE REPORTING 


SQUIRREL ADVENTURE 


WATERFOWL QUIZ 


ROMAN NUMERALS 


NICE LIST 


PANELING HELPER 


C0C03-C0C0 2 HELPER 


AREA CODES 


WHAMMY 3 


ASTRO OODGE 


SPANISH QUIZZES 


MULTI CAKES 


DIRECTORY PICTURE 


DRAW POKER 


ADVENTURE TUTORIAL 


HIRED AND FIRED 


PAINT EDITOR 


CAR RACE 


SUB ATTACK 


TURTLE RACES 


CIRCLE 3 


MULTI COPY 


CARVERN CRUISER 


ELECTRONICS I 


SAVE THE MAIDEN 


ELECTRONICS 11 


EDUCATIONAL TRIO 


AUTO MATE 


SNAP SHOT 


BATTLE TANK 


CAVIATOR 


MULTI SCREEN 


WRITE-UP EDITOR 


SCROLL PROJECT 


MEGA RACE 


DISKETTE VERIFY 


ELECTRONICS 6 


CANON PRINT 


PICTURE PACKER 


NOISE GENERATOR 


1 r i ry \j A/ ill 

KICK GUY 


WEIRDO 


MONKEY SHINE 


COCO TENNIS 


AIR ATTACK 


ISSUE #49, JULY 1986 


ISSUE #54, DEC. 1986 


ISSUE #59, MAY 1987 


ISSUE #64, OCT. 1987 


ISSUE #69, MAR. 1988 


ISSUE #74, AUGUST 1988 


COMPUTER LO U. 


JOB LDG 


GENEOLOGY 


GARDEN PLANTS 


POLICE CADET 


VIDEO CATALOG 3 


DISK DISASSEMBLER 


PEGS 


HOME PLANT SELECTION 


FORT KNOX 


STAMP COLLECTION 


ONE EYE WILLIE 


BAKCHEK 


DIGITAL SAMPLING 


CHECK WRITER 


ELECTRONICS FORMULAS 


BARRACKS ADVENTURE 


JAVA 


PACHINKO 


JUNGLE ADVENTURE 


HELIRESCUE 


SNAKE IN THE GRASS 


CITY/TIME 


GAME TRIO 


STOCK CHARTING 


PAINT COCO 3 


KABOOM 


CYCLE JUMP 


HM.O/CRAPS 


CRIONAUT WARRIOR 


HAUNTED STAIRCASE 


CONVERT 3 


NEW PONG 


GEOMETRY TUTOR 


OLYMPICS 


ENVELOPE PRINT 


CANYON BOMBERS 


COMPUTER TYPE 


CROQUET 


WIZARD 


Hl-RES CHESS 


RAM DRIVE 3 


DRAGONS 1 & 2 


PANZER TANKS 


FUNCTION KEYS 


GAME OF LIFE 


ELECTRONICS 12 


MODE 2 UTILITY 


GRAPHIC SCROLL ROUTINE 


MRS PAQ 


ZOOM 

ELECTRONICS 2 


ELECTRONICS f 


DOUBLE EDITOR 


XMODEM TRANSFER 


AUTQ BORDER 


BIG NUM 


FLIGHT SIMULATOR 


DOUBLE BREAKOUT 


CAVE II 


ISSUE #50, AUG. 1986 


ISSUE #55, JAN. 1987 


ISSUE #60, JUNE 1987 


ISSUE #65, NOV. 1987 


ISSUE #70, APRIL 1988 


ISSUE #75, SEPT. 1988 


BUSINESS INVENTORY 


GRADE BOOK 


JOB COSTING 


TAXMAN 


BLOTTO DICE 


DRACULA HUNT 


D & D ARENA 


MAIL LIST, 


LABELS 


DAISY WHEEL PICTURES 


SUPER COM 


HELP TRIO 


OISK CLERK 


DOWN HILL 


CATCH A CAKE 


CHILDSTONE ADVENTURE 


GENESIS ADVENTURE 


SHOWDOWN DICE 


PC SURVEY 


FIRE FOX 


COCO MATCH 


SIR EGGBERT 


PLANETS 


TARZAR 1 ADVENTURE 


TREASURE HUNT 


JETS CONTROL 


ROBOTS 


CROWN QUEST 


PHK/WAR 


ARAKNON 


SCREEN GENERATOR 


GALLOWS 


STREET RACERS 


GYM KHANA 


SIGN LANGUAGE 


CASHFLOW REPORTING 


ASTRO SMASH 


DIR MANAGER 


BOWLING 3 


COCO 3 DRAWER 


ARX SHOOTOUT 


GRAPHIC LETTER 


NFL SCORES 


FIRE RUNNER 


ELECTRONICS 3 


FOOTBALL 


ELECTRONICS .13 


GRAPHIC EDITOR 


BARN STORMING 


GRAPHICS BORDER 


GRAFIX 


ELECTRONICS 8 


MAGIC KEY 


ADDRESS BOOK 


SMASH GAME 


COSMIC RAYS 


KRON 


CHOP 


SNAP PRINT 


SQUARES 


ISSUE #51, SEPT. 1986 


ISSUE #56, FEB. 1987 


ISSUE #61, JULY 1987 


ISSUE #66, DEC. 1987 


ISSUE #71, MAY 1988 


ISSUE #76, OCT. 1988 


ASSET MANAGER 


CALENDAR PRINT 


EZ ORDER 


ONE ROOM ADVENTURE 


SUPER LOTTD 


SUPER BLITZ 3 


MONEY CHASE 


CRUSH 


SUBMISSION WRITER 


0S9 TUTORIAL 


ROBOT ADVENTURE 


CHAMBERS 


FISHING CONTEST 


GALACTA 


KEYS ADVENTURE 


RIVER CAPTAIN 


MAZE 


TRIO RACE 


RIP OFF 


OCEAN DIVER 


WALLPAPER 


SOUND EFFECTS 


YAHTZEE 3 


EARTH TROOPER 


HAND OFE 


CLUE SUSPECT 


CHOPPER COMMAND 


BETTING POOL 


PHASER 


STARGATE 


BUDGET 51 


WORD EDITOR 


UNDERSTANDING OPPOSITES 


ADVANCE 


SHAPES & PLATES 


BOWLING SCORE KEEP 


VAN GAR 


ALIEN HUNT 


BIT CODE PLOTTING 


MATH TABLES 


STAR WARS 


JOYSTICK TO KEYBOARD 


DOS EMULATOR 


DEMON'S CASTLE 


ELECTRONICS -4 


ELECTRONICS 9 


ELECTRONICS 14 


KEYBOARD TO JOYSTICK 


MEM DISK 


PICTURE DRAW 


KING PEDE 


LOWER TO UPPER 


PRINTER CONTROL 


DISK TUTORIAL 


VARIABLE REFERENCE 


die . • 


RAIDER 


NDIDS 


MAZE 2 


SAILORMAN 




EACH ISSUE CONTAINS 10 PROGRAMS 
READY TO LOAD. AVAILABLE ON TAPE OR DISK. 
SEE NOVEMBER '88 RAINBOW FOR EARLIER ISSUES 



VISA 




RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 



SUPER SAVINGS 

SINGLE ISSUE « 8°° 

2-5 ISSUES * 6«o EA 

6-10 ISSUES $ 5 00 EA 

11 OR MORE ISSUES. ... * 4 50 EA 
ALL 76 ISSUES *199°° 

PURCHASE 20 OR MORE ISSUES AND 
RECEIVE A FREE 6 MONTH 
SUBSCRIPTION 



COCO I, II, and III 

★ All Programs Include 
Documentation. 

★ We Send 1st Class- 
No Charge! 

★ For Information on 
Subscription Prices 
Turn to Page 153 



NAME 



ADDRESS 



CITY 



STATE 



CREDIT CARD # 



MAIL TO 

T&D SUBSCRIPTION SOFTWARE 

2490 MILES STANDISH DR. 
HOLLAND, Ml 49424 
(616) 399-9648 

CIRCLE ISSUES DESIRED 
1 9 17 25 33 41 49 57 65 73 

2 10 18 26 34 42 50 58 66 74 
3 11 19 27 35 43 51 59 67 75 

4 12 20 28 36 44 52 60 68 76 
5 13 21 29 37 45 53 61 69 

6 14 22 30 38 46 54 62 70 

7 16 23 31 30 47 65 63 71 

8 16 24 32 40 48 56 64 72 



ZIP 



TOTAL AMOUNT 



PLEASE CIRCLE 

TAPE OR DISK 



Enter Listing 4 and try to fool the 
subroutine by entering incorrect infor- 
mation. The subroutine is only 15 lines 
long, but it does everything we need. It 
displays a line of instructions at the 
screen position we specify (9020), telling 
us what we should be typing in next. 
Then it accepts our data on the next line 
(9026), checks it to see that it is within 
the range of values (9038, 9040, 9046) 
or length (9032) we are looking for, and 
demands that we type it in again if it is 
not an acceptable response. 

If you look at the program statements 
before GOSUB 9020, you will see that I 
placed setup values in the variables P$, 
VT$, LV, HV and SL before calling the 
subroutine. These values are used by the 
subroutine to direct its actions. They are 
used as follows: 

P$ The line of instructions. It 

should be 32 characters or 
less in length. 

SL The position we want to 

start the display of the line 
of instructions. It should be 
a multiple of 32. 

VT$ The variable type — N is for 

a number without decimals; 
D, for a decimal number with 
two decimal places; and A, 
for alpha-numeric informa- 
tion. 

LV The lowest acceptable value. 

HV The highest acceptable 

value, or maximum length 

for VT$=n. 

We used the LINE INPUT instruction 
(Line 9026) to get our information from 
the keyboard. The LINE INPUT instruc- 
tion lets us enter commas, semicolons or 
special characters that might cause the 
INPUT statement trouble. 

Try writing your own program using 
the subroutine to enter something with 
which you are familiar, such as your 
telephone number. You can test for a 
specific number by setting both HV and 
LV to that number before calling the 
subroutine. This subroutine will be used 
in our database's front-end to make sure 
that no unwanted information is ac- 
cepted. 

That's all for this month. It will take 
some time to get our database set up, 
but don't give up. Next time we'll set up 
a Money Manager database and create 
menus and data inputs to do this. 

(Questions or comments about this 
tutorial may be directed to the author 
at 83-34 169 Street, Jamaica, NY 11432. 
Please include an SASE when request- 
ing a reply.) □ 



142 ON A GOTO 150, 300 , 144 , 146 , 148 

144 PRINT @320, "OPTION #3 DELETE WAS CHOSEN": GOTO 130 
146 PRINT @320, "OPTION #4 REPORT WAS CHOSEN": GOTO 130 
148 END 

150 CLS0: PRINT " ADDING A MARBLE 

152 LI$(1)="1« SIZE OF THE MARBLE 

153 LI$(2)«"2= COLOR OF THE MARBLE 

154 LI$(3)="3= DESCRIPTION OF THE MARBLE 

155 LI$(4)="4= RETURN TO THE PREVIOUS MENU 
160 SL =96 :NL=4: GOSUB 9000 

162 ON A GOTO 170,170,170,120 

170 PRINT @320,A;" CHOSEN" :GOTO 152 

300 CLS0: PRINT "- CHANGE EXISTING INFORMATION - 

302 LI$(1)="1= CHANGE THE SIZE 

304 LI$(2)="2= CHANGE THE COLOR 

306 LI$(3)="3. CHANGE THE DESCRIPTION 

308 LI$(4)="4. RETURN TO PREVIOUS MENU" 

310 SL=64 : NL=4 : GOSUB 9000 

314 ON A GOTO 320,320,320,120 

320 PRINT @320,A;" CHOSEN": GOTO 302 

9000 FOR 1= 1 TO NL: PRINT @SL,LI$(I) 

9001 SL= SL+32:NEXT I 

9005 PRINT @32,"* SELECT FROM THE FOLLOWING" 

9006 FOR I = 1 TO 200 

9007 A$ = INKEY$ : IF A$ O "" GOTO 9012 ELSE NEXT I 

9008 PRINT @32," ":FOR I = 1 TO 65 

9009 A$ m INKEY$ : IF A$ O "" GOTO 9012 ELSE NEXT I 

9010 GOTO 9005 

9012 A - VAL(A$):IF A > 0 AND A < NL+1 THEN RETURN 
9113 GOTO 9005 



Listing 4: MARBLE2 

100 CLEAR 500 
105 CLS 

110 P$="ENTER A NUMBER FROM 1 TO 99":VT$="N" 
120 HV=99 : LV=1 : SL=64 : GOSUB 9020 

130 P$="ENTER MARBLE SIZE: 0.25 TO 5 . 50" : VT$="D" 

140 HV=5.50:LV=0.25:SL=128:GOSUB 9020 

150 P$="MARBLE DESCRIPTION < 32 CHARS" : VT$="A" 

160 HV=32:SL=192: GOSUB 9020 

170 GOTO 105 

9020 PRINT @SL,P$ 'PROMPT FOR VARIABLE 

9022 PRINT @SL+32," " 'CLEAR THE NEXT LINE 

9024 PRINT @SL+32,""; 'REPOSITION CURSOR 

9026 LINE INPUT "==> ";VA$ 'INPUT THE VARIABLE 

9028 LA= LEN(VA$):IF VT$ = "D" GOTO 9044 

9030 IF VT$ = "N" GOTO 9036 

9032 IF LA > INT(HV) GOTO 9020 

9034 RETURN 'VARIABLE IS IN RANGE 

9036 VV= VAL(VA$) 'GET NUMERIC VALUE 

9038 IF VV < LV GOTO 9020 

9040 IF VV > HV GOTO 9020 

9042 GOTO 9034 

9044 IF LA > 9 OR LA < 3 GOTO 9020 

9046 IF MID$(VA$,LA-2,1) O "." GOTO 9020 

9048 GOTO 9036 /Rs 



42 THE RAINBOW February 1989 



F e ature 



Some days it doesn 't pay 
to leave the lily pad 



It's a 




By Christopher Dunn 





re your fingers cramped from entering page after page of listings, or have you just looked in horror at the length 
of most entertaining programs? If so, I have a game for you. Toader needs your help to return to the lily pads. 
iWith the help of a 16K ECB CoCo and one joystick, you can give this poor little toad the guidance it needs. 
Use the joystick to guide Toader to its home at the top of the screen. You must avoid cars and trucks on the road and 
get your toad across the water by making him hop on the floating logs and swimming turtles. Once there is a toad on 
each of the five lily pads at the top of the screen, you'll advance to a more challenging level. Be careful with your little 
friend. You start with only three toads at the bottom of the screen. You've also got to keep an eye on the timer. Toader 
only has so much time to get home before he croaks. 

You may not believe that a short program can do all this. However, using one of BASIC'S better tricks (string manipulation), 
you can create a short program that's fun. BASIC is an interpreted language. When a line is executed, the interpreter must 
translate what it sees before following the instruction — a slow process. Strings offer a way around this repeated 
interpretation. When the computer locates a string, the entire line is interpreted once. However, an assembly language routine 
generates a string's characters (which are stored as consecutive bytes in an area of RAM located by a string pointer) in 
a fraction of the time required to print each character separately in BASIC. 

Toader uses this idea to draw the rows of cars, logs and turtles. Each row is assigned a 60-character string. As a pointer 
(P) counts from one to 30, a 30-character portion of each string is printed using the MID$ function. You can make a row 
appear to move backwards by using 32-P as the pointer value. 

The rows are printed beginning at Line 1049. Notice the inclusion of P*2 in Line 1 120. This instruction makes the pointer 
move twice as fast, which in turn makes the row move twice as fast as the others. Initially, this row consist only of ASCII 
code 143 (grass for our toad). However, cars materialize at Level 3. (In fact, several challenges become apparent beyond 
Level 1. Watch for them.) 

A timer at the bottom of the screen serves both to warn you of Toader\ impending demise and to record the score. 
The equation for increasing the score is in Line 3005. Line 1350 includes a sound for our toad's jump; however, I have 
masked that line with a REN statement to increase program speed and joystick responsiveness. Try the program with the 
sound and make any modifications you want. (I am no Mozart, and I'd be happy to learn that someone has come up with 
a better tune for the PLAY statements.) 

The DATA statements at the end contain the information for the logs, cars and turtles (Logs = 255, Turtles = 42, and Cars 
= 175, 207 and 223). While only the given character codes are available, you might try experimenting with the width of 
each obstacle (up to 30) and the space between them. Since the obstacles are placed randomly within the intervals (see 
Line 2112), the value simply identifies at what section of the row the obstacle will appear. 

The EXEC statement, Line 1300, is the JOY IN routine listed in the Color Computer manual (JOYIN=[A00A]). Check this 
number by peeking addresses &HA00A and &HA00B. You should find the values 169 and 222 [(169*26)+222=43486]. If 
the values you find at these addresses are different, multiply the first value by 256 and add that total to the second value. 
That will be your EXEC address. Be careful with this equation. If you EXEC the wrong address, the computer may freeze. 
I suggest that you save the program before running it. 



Christopher Dunn is a 19-year-old college freshman who attends the California Institute of Technology. 

February 1989 THE RAINBOW 43 



You are given an extra toad at 2500 
points. Variable X5 represents the score 
at which an extra toad is awarded. After 
you receive the first toad, X5 will be- 
come 7500, then 15,000, etc. 

When you play, you must move 



quickly through the cars. (Remember: 
They move at twice the speed of the logs 
and turtles.) However, crossing the 
water requires more concentration than 
speed, so move carefully over the water. 
Enjoy the game, but remember that 



Toader's life depends on you. 

(Questions or comments about this 
program may be directed to the author 
at Lloyd House, 1-54 Cal Tech, Pasa- 
dena, CA 91126. Include an SASE 
when requesting a reply.) □ 




000 236 

1350 85 

2110 55 



2290 83 

3006 104 

END 6 



The Listing: TOflDER 

0 i ***TOADER*** 

1 1 ** (ALMOST FROGGER)** 

2 'BY CHRISTOPHER DUNN 
10 CLEAR 1000 

400 D$ (1) ="SPLAT" : D$ (2 ) ="OOPPS" : 
D$ (3) =" CROAK" : D$ (4) =" THANKS" : D$ ( 
5)=" BYE ":D$(6)="HELP" 

401 D$ (7 ) ="WHOMP" : D$ ( 8 ) ="SQUASH 
:D$(9)="RIBBIT" 
700 '***INITIALIZATION 

800 SC=0: 1 SCORE 

810 XS=2 500: 'EXTRA TOAD AT 2500 
820 NT=3 : ' # OF TOADS 
830 ST=32: 'START TIMER VALUE 
840 LV=1:'GAME LEVEL 

899 '***NEW SCREEN 

900 GOSUB 2100:GOSUB 2200 

950 P=RND (30) : 'OBSTACLE SHIFT 

951 T=1424:'TOAD POS . (POKE) 

952 T0=1424 : 'LAST TOAD POS. 

953 L=143:'LAST VAL (UNDER TOAD) 

954 NL=5:'# OF LILLY PADS LEFT 

955 TM=ST: 'TIMER 

960 PRINT@480, STRINGS (TM-1, 191) ; 
970 PRINT@448,STRING$(16,143) ; :P 
RINT§448, "LEVEL" ;LV; :GOSUB2310 
980 GOSUB 2300 

995 PLAY"03T3L8CL16EL4E#L8D#L16F 
L8GL4FT2" 

999 i ***BEGINNING. OF MAIN LOOP 

1000 P=P+1:IF P>30THEN P=l 
1010 TM=TM-.5:IF TM<=0THEN2000 
1020 POKE1504+TM,128 

1040 POKE T,L 

1049 'LOGS, CARS, TURTLES 

1050 PRINT@65,MID$(A$(0) ,P,30) : 
1060 PRINT@97,MID$(A$(1) 

) ; 

1070 PRINT@129,MID$(A$(2 
1080 PRINT@161,MID$(A$(3 

0) ; 

1090 PRINT@257,MID$(A$(4 

P) ; 

11)30 PRINT@289,MID$(A$(5 
1110 PRINT@321,MID$ (A$ (6 
0) ; 

1120 PRINT@353,MID$(A$(7) ,P*2,30 



32-P,30 

,P/30) ; 
,32-P,3 

,32-P,3 

/P.30) ; 
,32-P,3 



) 



1130 PRINT@193,MID$(A$(8) ,P,30) ; 

1199 'TOAD MOVEMENT 

1200 L=PEEK(T) :T0=T:POKE T,159 
1300 EXEC43486: J0=PEEK(346) : J1=P 
EEK(347):IF J0=0 THEN T=T-1 ELSE 
IF J0=63 THEN T=T+1 ELSEIF J1=0 
THEN T=T-32ELSEIF Jl=63 THEN T=T 
+32 

1350 IF T0OT THEN POKE T0,L:L=P 
EEK(T) : POKE T f 159 :REM PLAY"L70O3 
V20CEO4V30FA" 

1360 IF L=106 THEN Ll=9 ELSE Ll= 
INT( (L-127)/16) 

1399 'MOVES TOAD ON LOGS OR RUNS 
HIM OVER WITH CAR 

1400 ON LI GOTO 1500,2000,2000,3 
000,2000,2000,2090,2050,2060 
1500 GOTO 1000 

1995 'END OF MAIN LOOP 

1999 '***CRUSHED TOAD 

2000 PRINT @4 93 , D$ (RND ( 9 ) ) ; : PLAY" 
O1V20L8GL20V25FL4V30D":POKE T,L 
2020 NT=NT~1:IF NT=0THEN4000 
2022 TM=ST:PRINT@4 80,STRING$ (TM- 
1,191) ; 

2025 GOSUB 2300 
2030 L=143:T=1424 
2035 GOSUB 2310 
2040 GOTO 1000 

2049 '***MOVE TOAD 

2050 T=T-1:L=PEEK(T) :GOTO1500 
2060 T=T+1:L=PEEK(T) :GOTO1500 
2090 POKE T,L:T=T-32:L=143:GOTO 
1500 

2099 »***SET UP OBSTACLES 

2100 FOR Q=0TO3 

2101 A$(Q)=STRING$(30,175) :A$(Q+ 
4 ) =STRING$ ( 30 , 12 8 ) : NEXT Q 

2105 A$(8)=STRING$(30,175) 

2110 FOR Q=0TO8:READ A,B,C 

2111 A$=STRING$ (B, A) 

2112 FOR QQ=1 TO 30 STEP C:MID$( 
A$(Q) ,QQ+RND(1+C-B)-1,B)=A$ 

2113 NEXT QQ,Q 

2120 IF LV=3 THEN A$ (7 ) =STRING$ ( 
6,175) +STRING$ (24,128) ELSEIF LV 
<3 THEN A$(7)=STRING$(30,143) 
2125 IF LV=1 THEN A$ ( 8 ) =STRING$ ( 
30,143) 

2127 FOR Q=0 TO 8 : A$ (Q) =A$ (Q) +A$ 
(Q) :NEXT Q 

2128 A$(7)=A$(7)+A$(7) 
2130 RESTORE 

2140 RETURN 

2199 '***DRAW SCREEN 



44 THE RAINBOW February 1989 



22j3j3 FOR Q=l TO 16 : PRINT@4 8j3 , STR 
ING$ (32, 128) ; : NEXTQ 
22£1 CLS jt 

22j32 PRINTS^ , STRING$ ( 64 , 2J37 ) ; 
2203 PRINT@64,STRING$(192,175) ; 
2210 FOR Q=33 TO 61 STEP 7 : PRINT 
@Q,CHR$(191) ;CHR$(191) ; : NEXTQ 
2220 PRINT@224,STRING$(32, 143) ; 
2230 PRINT@3 8 4,STRING$(3 2, 143) ; 
2240 PRINT@416,STRING$(32,239) ; 
2250 FOR Q=2 TO 12 : PRINT@Q*32 , CH 
R$(207) ; :PRINT@Q*32+31,CHR$(207) 
; : NEXTQ 
22 90 RETURN 

2299 f ***SHOW # OF TOADS 

2300 GOSUB 2305 :PRINT@463, STRING 
$(14,128) ; 

2301 IF NT<=1 THEN RETURN ELSE F 
OR Q« 464 TO 464+ (NT-2 ) *2 STEP 2 
:POKE Q+1024,159:NEXT Q: RETURN 
2305 IF NT>8 THEN NT=8 

2307 RETURN 

2309 f ***SHOW SCORE/EXTRA TOAD? 

2310 SC=INT(SC) :PRINT@455, USING" 

###,### ";sc ; 

2311 IF SO=XS THEN PLAY"V3104L2 
0GP10GP10G f, :XS=XS+2*SQR(XS*1340) 
+1340:NT=NT+l:GOSUB 2300 

2315 RETURN 

2999 1 ***TOAD IN LILLY PAD!!! 

3000 POKE T,159:IF PEEK(T-l) =191 



THEN POKE T-1,159 ELSE POKE T+l 
,159 

3005 SC=SC + TM*TM*LV + 100*LV 

3006 TM=ST : PRINT© 4 80, STRING$ (TM- 

1,191) ; 

3007 GOSUB 2310 

3009 PLAY ff T7O3V25L6FL4EV15L10AV2 
0L4GT2" 

3010 NL=NL-1:IF NL=0 THEN 3200 
3050 T=1424:L=143:GOTO 1500 

3199 '***GO TO NEXT LEVEL 

3200 ST=ST-1:IF ST<=18 THEN ST=1 
8 

3 205 LV=LV+1 
3210 GOTO 900 

3999 «***END OF GAME (OF COURSE) 

4000 PRINT§225," GAME 
OVER » ; 

4010 FOR Q=l TO 2000: NEXT Q:GOTO 
700 

8998 ! ***OBSTACLE DATA 

8999 'AS CI I, WIDTH, SEPARATION 

9000 DATA 255,6,15 
9010 DATA 42,3,10 
9020 DATA 255,8,15 
9030 DATA 42,3,6 
9040 DATA 207,4,10 
9050 DATA 175,2,6 
9060 DATA 223,3,10 
9070 DATA 175,5,10 

9080 DATA 255,5,10 ^ 



If you write checks, use credit cards, have a bank account or pay taxes, then.... 

You Need CoCo- Accountant III 



Since 1983, CoCo-Account- 

ant has been leading the pack in 
home and small business financial 
programs for the Color Computer. 
Now we've made it even better, with a brand new CoCo- 
Accountant just for the Color Computer 3. Take advan- 
tage of. all the new machine has to offer in a program that 
will make managing your money a snap! 

CoCo-Accountant III answers the big three ques- 
tions we all have about our finances: Where did the 
money come from? Where did it go? And what can I 
deduct from my taxes? 

CoCo-Accountant III doesn't require any knowledge 
of accounting. It's a single-entry system that thinks the 
way you do. Just set up a list of accounts and start 
entering your transactions. Checks, credit cards, cash 
receipts, payroll stubs, electronic fund transfers, whatever. 
You toss it in and CoCo-Accountant sorts it out. Here's 
what CoCo-Accountant does: 

• Lists and totals all transactions for any calendar 
period. 

• Lists and totals transactions by account, payee or 
income source for any calendar period. 

• Instant account and monthly summaries with net cash 
flow. 



NEW for the CoCo 3 



•Tracks, lists and totals 
deductible expenses . 
• Tracks uncleared checks 
and balances your check- 
book. Makes that monthly chore a breeze! 
• Produces a printed spreadsheet showing transactions by 
month and account for the whole year! Seeing this one is 
believing. 

CoCo-Accountant III stores up to 2,000 transactions and 72 
accounts (depending on disk space). Almost every feature has 
been improved. It will run on any CoCo 3 with a disk drive. And 
best yet, it's only $39.95. 

You say you don't have a CoCo 3? You can stiff order our 
best-selling CoCo-Accountant II with many of these features for 
only $34.95. 

Join our list of satisfied customers who say CoCo- 
Accountant is the most useful program they own! Send check, 
money order or VISA/MasterCard information to the address 
below, or call our handy, toll-free order line. 

Federal Hill Software 
8134 Scotts Level Road 
Baltimore, Md. 21208 
301-521-4886 
Toll-free Orders 800-628-2828 Ext. 850 



February 1989 THE RAINBOW 45 



B ASICa fl y Sp e ak i ng 



Locating Typos 

Dear Bill: 

My wife and I typed in the program 
Big Bad Wolf from the September '88 
issue (Page 34), and we can't get it to 
run. Every time we type RUN, all we see 
is the small figure of the pig and the wolf 
being drawn. After that, the screen goes 
blank and the OK prompt appears. 
How can we get this to run properly? 

Warren & Jean Schulze 
Manitowoc, Wisconsin 

I looked at the listing, and Fd like to 
share a few hints with you. These hints 
will save you some frustration and time 
looking for your typos. Even when you 
think you typed in each line correctly, 
very small mistakes can creep in. It 
takes only one typographical error to 
crash the program with a syntax error. 

In this particular case, the author has 
added an error trap routine in Line 20, 
which says ON ERR GOTO 2290. That's 
a new feature for the CoCo 3, and while 
it may have its advantages in the fin- 
ished product, it will not help you find 
your typos while you are in the de- 
bugging process. As a matter of fact, if 
your error is caused by a typographical 
error and you try to run the program 
with that error in place, the DN ERR GOTO 
routine will simply end the program 
without telling you where the error 
occurred. 

To temporarily remedy this condi- 
tion, you'll need to by-pass that routine. 
You can either omit Line 20, replacing 
it after you have a working copy, or you 
can edit Line 20 and place an apos- 
trophe (SHIFT-7) in front of the line, 
rendering it useless. Just remember to 
remove the apostrophe or replace the 
line when you are finished de-bugging. 

When Line 20 is deactivated, you can 
run your program. Now, when the 
program encounters an error, it will 
halt, and the error will appear along 
with the line number. In your particular 
case, you not only omitted the comma 
between P5ET and BF in Line 1360, but 
you also had a 2 at the end of Line 2220. 
That probably resulted from not shift- 
ing the 2 key to get your closing quote. 



Bill Be mi co, rainbow's newest col- 
umnist, is the author of more than 300 
Color Computer programs. He founded 
Bill Bernico Software in 1987 and 
enjoys writing and recording his own 
music. 

46 THE RAINBOW February 1989 



BASIC ally 




Speaking 

By Bill Bernico 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 

Now that you can see where the errors 
have occurred and can correct them, try 
running the program again. When it 
works the way the author says it is 
supposed to, you can replace Line 20 or 
remove the apostrophe. Then you'll be 
ready to enjoy the program. 

Out of Range 

Dear Bill: 

I have a 64 K CoCo 2 Model 26-3127 
with a cassette system. I have had it for 
almost four years, but now it won't 
accept GET /PUT statements. Every time 
I try to use GET/PUT, I get a BS Error. 
Why has this happened, and how can I 
fix it? 

Bill Cathey 
Kings Mountain, North Carolina 

I don't think your machine is at fault, 
Bill. If it is, youll have to take it to 
Radio Shack for a checkup. If you have 
a program that will run a check on your 
system, you could help the technician 
locate the problem. 

If, on the other hand, your problem 
is in your programming, maybe I can 
help. To begin with, a BS Error means 
that you have a Bad Subscript, or a 
subscript out of range. In other words, 
you have to use a subscripted variable 
to define the areas to be used in the GET 
and PUT commands. Suppose you are 
trying to move a part of the graphics 
screen 15-by-15 pixels in area. That 
graphics area will be stored in a sub- 



scripted array, which we will call Array 
G$. In this case, G$ must be dimensioned 
early in the program. As you may 
remember, any subscripted variable 
larger than nine must be dimensioned. 
If you didn't allot enough space for 
Array G$, you'll get a BS Error. 

Type in this short sample program 
and run it: 

10 PM0DE 4,1:PCL5 1 

20 SCREEN 1,1:C0L0R 0,1 

30 DIM G(10) 

40 DRAW"BM10,10R15NG15D15L15U1 
5F15 

50 GET (10,10)-(25,25),G 
60 FDR XI TO 750 : NEXT X 
70 PCL51 

B0 PUT (100,100)-(115,H5) ,G 
90 GDTD 90 

If this program works, the problem is 
not in your machine. However, if this 
sample produces a BS Error, you may 
have other subscripted variables in your 
program that have nothing to do with 
GET and PUT. The program may be 
crashing in another area altogether. 

Fading Away 

Dear Bill: 
I'm writing a CoCo 3 program in 

BASIC using HSCREEN 2 and HPRINT 

statements to display my instructions 
on the graphics screen. The way the 
screen is set up, I have to use the last 
line for text, so one of my commands 
looks like this: 

HPRINT (1,23), "Instructions" 

/ have problems when there are letters 
with descenders (g f p, q, y) on this line. 
The descending part of the letter fades 
into the black border, and it's difficult 
to read at a glance. Any solutions? 

Eddie Lewis 
Lockport, Illinois 

There is a simple fix that will let you 
read that last line easily and clearly. All 
you have to do is make the surrounding 
border color the same as the rest of your 
text screen. For my example, Til use 
black letters on a white background. To 
get this, I use the following: 

HSCREEN 2:HCL5 4:HC0L0R 8,4 

Color 8 is black and Color 4 is white. 
With these values, my white screen 



HINDOO VI/VTFMV 



^atriorKing 





Become RASTANN, Warrior King, on the quest 
to regain his rightful crown, hidden deep within a 
sinister land, Battle monsters, gain magic and 
weapons, and travel through harsh wilderness 
and dark castle dungeons in this medieval realm. 
From the creator of Kung-Fu Dude comes this 
awesome arcade game for the CoCo ill! Warrior 
King uses the most detailed 320x200 16 color 
graphics and high speed machine code to vault 
you into a world of fantasy. Dare ye challenge 
the many perils ahead in order to become WAR- 
RIOR KING? Req. 128K CoCo III. disk drive, and 
joystick. Only $29.95. 



In Q^ es * of tlje^tar^J^ord 




I J n-i Id* tht cab i ft. rt nan i -i iveslud 
ot a moll tab I* fn The »td* r fhv pot»it 

Vttu ***: HAN, JJfif|' 5 U £ r 



This is THE graphic adventure for the CoCo 
111! Unparalleled 320x200 animated 
graphics will leave you gasping for more! 
You quest for the Phoenix Crossbow in this 
post-holocaust world of science and fan- 
tasy. In Quest of the Star Lord is a full 4 disk 
sides of mind-numbing adventure! Req. 
128K CoCo IN and disk drive. Only $34.95. 
Hint Sheet: $3.95. 

"A dynamite program! The best graphics 
I've seen to date on the CoCo III. You have 
to see it to believe it. " 

— 8/88 Rainbow review 



Kuriy-ru Dude 



An exciting arcade game. The BEST karate 
game ever created for the CoCo! Destroy 
opponents and evade obstacles as you 
grow ever closer to your ultimate objective. 
Spectacular graphics, sound effects, and 
animation! Req. 64K CoCo, disk drive, and 
joystick. Only $24.95. 

"The CoCo karate gap has been filled 
and Kung-Fu Dude does it excellently. I 
highly recommend it! " 

— 2/88 Rainbow review 

All programs CoCo 1, 2, 3 compatible, unless otherwise stated 





systems CJ 



Sundog Systems 

21 Edinburg Drive 
Pittsburgh, PA 15235 
(412) 372-5674 




TRILOGY 



The epic adventure is back! The largest adven- 
ture campaign ever seen for the CoCo is again 
available! A total of six disks of intense graphic 
adventure will have you playing for weeks! Each 
section is a two-disk stand alone adventure, but 
all three together form an epic saga. Quest for 
the legendary Earthstone in the ancient dwelling 
of the dwarves while you enjoy the classic 
graphics that made this trilogy famous! Each 
adventure can be purchased separately for 
$29.95, the lowest price ever, or you can pur- 
chase the entire set for only $74.95! Req. 64K 
CoCo and disk drive. 

"One of the best adventures I have experienc- 
ed to date !" — 6/86 Rainbow review 

"The animated graphics are dramatic, detail- 
ed, and excellent! " — 11/87 Rainbow review 

"The adventure of a lifetime. Don 't miss out/ " 
— 7/88 Gamer's Connection review 




^ - 




Become a super- 
hero in this 
unique 64 K ac- 
tion adventure. 
Great graphics 
and sound ef- 
fects! See 5/87 
Rainbow review. 
Disk $19.95. 



DRAGON BLADE 



Another great 
64 K animated 
adventure! Can 
you obtain the 
enchanted sword 
to slay the evil 
dragon? See 11/86 
Rainbow review. 
Disk $19.95. 






■K*W5 '■'<< 



Enter the era of 
monsters and 
magic in this 
splendid 64K an- 
imated adven- 
ture! See 12/86 
Rainbow review. 
Disk $19.95. 



Personal checks, money orders, and Amer- 
ican C.O.D. orders accepted. Include $2.50 
for S/H. $3.00 extra for C.O.D. orders. PA 
residents add 6% sales tax. Authorship and 
dealer inquires welcome. 



will have a black border unless I change 
it by poking a value to make the border 
the same color as the rest of the screen. 
For a white border, I will want to poke 
a value of 63 (the palette color for white) 
into Location 65434. Your best bet is to 
include this poke in the same line with 
your other graphics screen commands, 
immediately after HCOLOR 8,4. 

If your graphics screen color is any- 
thing other than white, simply change 
the poke value to match the color you're 
using. For example, if your graphics 
screen is blue and you're using white 
letters, poke Location 65434 with 9, 
since 9 is the palette value for that shade 
of blue. Your other graphics commands 

would be HSCREEN 2:HCL5 2:HC0L0R 

4,2. Now you will have a completely 
blue screen with white letters. 



The Old Red, White and Blue 

Dear Bill: 

I've seen procedures that create the 
artifact colors red and blue on a PMODE 
4 screen by poking 178 with either a 1 
for red or a 2 for blue. Is there a way 
to get these colors without poking these 
values? 

Jeff Gatzke 
Glendale, California 

There is another way to get these 
colors on the PMDDE 4 screen; however, 
this technique depends on which lines 
are being drawn on the screen. That is, 
if you draw lines on an even-numbered 
coordinate, you'll get one color — 
provided that your series of lines is 
spaced two lines apart. The artifacting 
appears when these two lines are next 
to each other without touching. When 
you draw on the odd coordinates, you'll 
get the other color. The color you get 
will vary each time because your com- 
puter may not default to the right color 
set when you power up. 

When you overlap these lines, you get 
white if you start on a black screen. 
When you run the program shown in 
the listing you will see three colors — 
red, white and blue. The red is produced 
by the series of lines drawn on the even 
coordinates and drawn on every other 
line. The blue is produced when the lines 
are drawn at odd coordinates and 
drawn on every other line. The shite in 
the middle is produced when the lines 
are drawn right next to each other. 

This method is limited because you 
may want to fill odd-shaped areas. 
While you could draw lines within your 
area, it would be tedious and a waste of 



time. Using the POKE 178 , l method with 
your PRINT command would be more 
efficient and space saving. Just re- 
member that a regular PRINT command 
looks like this: 

PRINT (128, 96), 1,1 

With the artifact color method, your 
PRINT command would look like this: 

POKE 178,1:PRINT (128,96) , ,0 

The regular PRINT command shows 
the two coordinates followed by the 
paint color, a comma and the border 
color. The artifact method has two 
commas followed by a zero instead. 

The Listing: 

10 PMODE4 , 1 : PCLS : SCREEN1 , 1 

20 FORX=1TO250STEP2 

30 LINE(2+X ; 2)-(2+X,115) , PSET 

40 LINE(3+X,75)-(3+X,189) ,PSET 

50 NEXT X 

60 GOTO60 

Creations Font 

Dear Bill: 

I enjoyed your English Font program 
in the May '88 issue C'Ye Olde Font, " 
Page 36), I even ordered your disk with 
the other dozen or so fonts on it. They 
are all well done, but I'd like to know 
how you knew where to DRRUI each 
character to get it to look like it does. 
How do you visualize what each char- 
acter will look like before you define it, 
and how can I convert some of my 
CoCo Max fonts to BASIC strings? 

Chuck Dobbs 
Fayette, Alabama 

It's funny that you mention the Co Co 
Max fonts. My fonts were created in 
BASIC using those fonts as a basis. That 
is, I ran Co Co Max, loaded in the font 
that I wanted to convert and viewed it 
in the Fat Bits mode. A picture shown 
in this mode screen is magnified, and 
each pixel is then represented as a 
square on a grid. 

It took me a long time to convert each 
font, or set of characters. My first step 
was to count the squares in the grid and 
determine the size of each character. 1 
decided to start each character at the 
upper left-hand corner of that grid and 
end at the upper right-hand corner. 
That way, when a character needed to 
be displayed on the screen, its position 
would line up with the next character. 

Starting at that upper left-hand 
corner, 1 looked over the character, 
which was now represented by a series 



of filled in squares, and determined my 
shortest route for covering the entire 
character in as few steps as possible. For 
example, if the letter A took up an area 
8-by-8 squares in dimension, I would 
enter the following: 

fi$ ( 65 )="BRND8R5D4NL5D4U8BR2" 

Since there are 90 possible R$ combi- 
nations (32 through 122), each charac- 
ter must be defined in its own sub- 
scripted variable. A capital letter A has 
an ASCII value of 65, so that draw 
string is stored in fl$(65). A capital 
letter B would be stored in R$(66), and 
so on until you have defined each 
character with its own variable. 

With all the characters defined, you 
can place them on the graphics screen 
by drawing the string containing that 
particular letter. For example, the 
following command line: 

DRRW"BM10,10"+R$(6S)+R$(66)+R$(67) 

will result in the appearance of "ABC" 
on the graphics screen at Location 10 
across and 10 down. Knowing that each 
letter is 8-by-8 squares, you can space 
your lines 10 pixels apart and be able 
to display 19 lines of text on a PMODE 4 
screen. 

Saving Graphics 

Dear Bill: 

I used DRRW statements to create a 
PMODE 4 picture. How can I save this to 
disk for later use? 

Vic Roberts 
Lexington, Kentucky 

Once your BASIC program is finished 
with your PMODE A masterpiece, save the 
picture to disk by entering 5RVEM" 

///erta/n*r ,&H0E00,&H2SFF,&HR027. 

This assumes your picture was created 
using PMODE 4,1. Save the picture to 
tape by entering LS&MW filename" , 
&H0600,&H1DFF,&HR027. To view your 
creation, (C)LORDM it and run the follow- 
ing program: 

10 PM0DE4,1 
20 SCREEN 1,1 
30 GOTO 30 

Questions about specific basic program- 
ming problems can be addressed to BASIC- 
ally Speaking, the rainbow, P.O. Box 385, 
Prospect KY 40059. 

We reserve the right to publish only 
questions of general interest and to edit for 
brevity and clarity. We are unable to answer 
letters individually. 



48 



THE RAINBOW February 1989 



Radio Shack Has the Best in Color Computer Software* 




Choose from a library of popular titles in 
entertainment, education and productivity 



At Radio Shack, we're dedicated 
to making sure that you never run 
out of ways to use and enjoy your 
Color Computer, We've got a ter- 
rific line of software of all types. 

Let your Color Computer open 
the door to a world of fun. Choose 
from a dazzling selection of popular 
and challenging games, including 
Nintendo™ classics. 

One of the most valuable poten- 
tials of your Color Computer is in 
providing your children a head 
start in their education. We've got 



learning programs for children of 
all ages that will provide hours of 
productive fun! With this selec- 
tion, you'll find programs that help 
develop hundreds of useful skills. 

No matter what your personal 
needs, we've got programs that'll 
put your Color Computer to work 
where you need it most— like per- 
sonal filing, word processing, 
spreadsheets and communications. 

Send in the coupon for a free 
copy of our 1989 Software Buyer's 
Guide. Or pick one up at Radio 



Send me a new 1989 Software Guide. 

Mail to: Radio Shack, Dept. 89-A-710 
300 One Tandy Center, Fort Worth, TX 76102 



Radio Shack— your one-stop 
neighborhood software center. 

m 
i 

■ 

B Name 

I 
I 
1 

k 




1 

I 



Address 
City 



State 
ZIP_ 



Phone 



I 

I 

J 



Radio /haeK 



Nintendo/TM Nintendo of America, Inc. J^g TeChl10lOC|y StOPB™ 

A DIVISION OF TANDY CORPORATION 



. . -■ ■ --i-^-^-^—^j' ^— —■ frf — TlCTir' TUn - *!^!! - l ^_^.i_^.^ J .^ l i^^L.l.t—t..-,—^.^-., ^■•^■^^.^v ; ,, ., v .... / - ■■• ' ■ ■■■ ■- ■■ . .'. >. 



1 F ea tur e 



. i n muu mt—, 







ii. 



i n - i i« ■ 







So Co makes calculations easier for the disabled 



'ji ? '\.y."'-'t- 



By Eric Ryan Minis 




ost people do not think about the 
physical abilities required to use 
a computer keyboard, many of 
which have up to 90 keys. However, 
those who have either limited or no use 
of their hands may find such a keyboard 
difficult or even impossible to use. A 
person whose phusical handicap inhib- 





■ I: — '..v.: 



Just One Breath 



its all the fingers may not be able to 
operate even a calculator. 

Single Key Calculator has six func- 
tions with memory and can be operated 
by a person who has lost the use of 
hands or fingers. In addition to the four 
basic vunctions of a calculator — addi- 
tion, subtraction, multiplication and 
division — it can handle both square 
and square root functions. The use can 
also clear the screen or exit the program 
at any time. 

The program was written on a 64K 
Extended Color basic CoCo 2 with one 
disk drive; however, the program would 
work with a 16K CoCo using a cassette 
player. The primary functions of this 
program could be adapted to be used 
with any computer using basic, but 
major changes may be needed to modify 
the graphics. 

The right joystick's fire button is the 
only input device used for this calcula- 
tor. Because the joystick is used, other 
types of buttons or switches can be 
connected to the computer through the 

Eric Mints is a sophomore at BEE 
County College in Beeville, Texas. His 
Single Key Calculator project won 
several awards in the Alamo Regional 
Science Fair in San Antonio, Texas. 




e r if ail joystick scans were combined iii 
one subroutine at the program's ettd. §8; 

The first r o\^ ^tttai ns keys for the 
following func tip us : clear , square ; 
square root and exit. The second row of 
the calculator contains these memory 
functions: memory memory -., mem- 
ory recall and memory clear. Rows 3 
through 5 include the numbers one td; 
tline and the basic functions of division 
(/), multiplication (*) and subtraction 
(-). Finally, the sixth row contains 0, the 
decimal (.), the equal sign (=) Md tfe 
addition function (+). 

When one of the four basic functions 
is selected, the variable 5 is assigned 
htj mker corres po nding )to t hat 
When the equal sign is selected, the 
program instructs the computer to 
ciheck the value of S andi de^ 
the value, perform the selected opera- 
tion. The functions and their corre- 
sponding values are as follows: 



Calculator simulator during operation; 



^Joystick port. This way, each user can 
^hoose the appropriate input device. \§ 

Program Operation 

J • During operation;, the program dis- 
plays a facsimile of a calculator key- 
board. A small arrow points to the first 
row of keys for a few seconds and then 
moves to the next row. After pointing 
to each row, the arrow moves back to 
the top row and the process is repeated. 

As the arrow pauses at each row, the 
computer checks one of its joystick 
ports to see if the user has closed an on/ 
off switch (connected in place of the fire 
button) to select the row containing a 
desired function. If so, the computer's 
arrx^w wilVippint to each key in a col- 
umn, beginning with the left-most key 
iand moving to the right. At each key, 
computed mil pause for a few 
seconds to gi\ftfc$he user time to choose 
that key. 

The first 14 lines of Single Key Cal- 
culator &6nt 

tions. Line 160 begins the actual pro- 
gram by clearing the screen and 
changing the background color to blue . 
Lines 170, 180, 220 arid 230 set all the 
variables for the 0 
through 270 display the keyboard, while 
lines 280 and 290 display the memory 
sign and the selected numbers. 



After the program has been started 
and the display cleared, two zeroes will 
appear at the botfor^ 
memory is being used, an 4 M' will 
appear in inverse video at thei tipper- 
right corner Lines ! 2 1 0, 140, 1650 and 
1900 display the function being used.. In 
this manner, the user is always re^ 
minded of the calculation beinglp^r- 
formed. 

Lines 320 through 430 form a routine 
that scans each row of the simulator's 
keyboard while waiting for the user to 
respond by pressing either the joystick's 
fire button or another switch connected 
to that port. Line 60 assigns the tit^ 
arrow curso r (dispkyed on the screen in 
inverse video) to P$ and a blue square 
(to cover the cursor) to Q$. Finally, the 
PRINT location for the function being 
used is assigned to E, |g| 

The joystick scan is in- 
eluded in each section 
of the program 
that scans either 
rows or keys. 
While this al- 
lows the 
program 
to run 

faster* the 
program 
would be short- 



Vahie: 

•S; ='T/- 
S •■= 2 
5 == 3 
W 4 



Function: 

no function assigned 
division 
multiplication 
subtraction 
addition illfet 



To prevent a Division by 0(70) Error 
from stopping the operation of the 
ebmputer, Line 1870 checks Variable 5 
to see if division has been requested- If 
it has, the computer looks a t the seep nd 
number variable, N2, to see if 
it is zero. If both these 
conditions are met, 
t3he program 




February 1989 THE RAINBOW |ff 



to line 1930 and displays the message, 
"/ O En or. 11 The program then assigns 0 
to S- but does nor erase the flrsl number 
Variable, Nl.'The user may continue by 
selecting another function. 




Puff/sip switch. 



User Response 

As mentioned earlier, the joystick 
•port is used as the only input device so 
ih&t<ithcr switches, which might heUer 
serve the user, may be connected to the 
•eomputeh The joystick bint cm was used 
in develop and this hut ton, Later, 
s| breath-activated pu0~s witch was used. 
The puff switch allocs the user io 
Operate the keys of the simulator by 
kghlJv breathing into or sipping from a 
plastic tube connected to. the device, 

The puff switch used with this pro- 
gram is a Honeywell Model PS F tOOA T 
purchased from Edmund" Scientific. 
The switch, which has two. ports, is 
closed when the difference in air pres- 
sure between- the two pons is at least 
0,02 pounds per square inch, The switch 
can b& 'activated in two ways by using 
the iW0 openings., The. opening marked 
"High'' is activated by high, pressure 
(Jight breathing}, while the opening 
marked "Low** delects low pressure 
(sipping). 

fa test the swiieh, [ opened a Radio 
Shack j oys ti ck (Cat. No, 26-3008) and 
connected alligator clips to the fire 



but ton switch. The two wires from the 
clips were drawn out of the joy stick case 
through the same hole used for the 
joystick cabic. The puff switch was then - 
connected to the clips and the program 
was run. 

When a straw was used to extend the 
openings, the puff switch was triggered 
with iiule effort if the usur\s mouth 
completely covered the end of the straw. 
For best results, the port extension tuhc 
should be long enough to rest on a table, 
dtssk or the lap of the user. 

Conclusion 

Single Key Calculator is a useful tool 
for the physicaSly disabled- With this 
program, a person previously unable to 
use .a calculator can now use one with 
little or no help. In addition, this appli- 
cation is just one demonstration of the 
GoCo + s usefulness for the disabled. 

Of course, the program does have 
some drawbacks. First, lone calcuJa* 



tions take a long time, Second, 1 he 
computer must be set up, the program 
loaded and th.e appropriate switch 
connected to the computer before '£ 
disabled person can use the program. 

Ideally, a computer designed for the: 
quadriplegic user would not need 
a no l her person to set up and turn pn the 
computer each time it is to be used- 
Instead, the computer should be de- 
signed to be turned on and off with | 
puff switch. Ln -addition to my program, 
$uch a computer could add to the 
person's freedom by including other 
single- key programs. Home computers 
like the CoCo have the potential to 
simplify the lives of rciany disabled 
persons. Single Key Cttk-uht&r lakes 
one step in thai direct i tin. 

(Questions or moments about ikjS 
program may he directed to the author 
at 433 Twin OaL Segjtin, TX 
■Please imfuele bh SASE when request- 



ing a reply.) 



□ 




Puff/sip switch connected to the Color Computer 2 through a joystick. 




.80 
.151 
.♦26 
.,71 
.207 



1 280 ....... 8 

1530 129 

1750 29 

END .. ...244 



The Listing: CRLCLRTR 



10 CLS 

20 PRINT "ONE KEY CALCULATOR" 
3fS PRINT "FOR SCIENCE FAIR 1985- 
86" 

40 PRINT "COPYRIGHT 1985 BY ERIC 
RYAN MIMS" 



50 FOR X=0 TO 200:NEXT 
60 CLS 

70 PRINTS 6, "ONE KEY CALCULATOR" 
80 PRINT: PRINT" THIS SINGLE-KEY 
CALCULATOR SIMULATOR WAS CRE 
ATED FOR USE BYDISABLED PERSONS 
WHO DO NOT HAVETHE ABILITY TO OP 
ERATE A CONVENTIONAL CALC 

ULATOR."; 

90 PRINT" THE SIMULATOR IS A 
SIX FUNCTION CALCULATOR WITH 

MEMORY WHICH CANBE OPERATED WIT 
H A SINGLE SWITCH, THE SWITCH C 
AN BE A STANDARD PUSH-BUTTON DEV 
ICE OR A BREATH- OPERATED 'PUFF 1 

SWITCH. press thef irebutton to 



52 



THE RAINB Off February 1 809 



start" ; 


280 


IF M<>0 THEN PRINT@62,"m";EL 


1J3J3 IF PEEK(6528j3) = (127 OR 255) 


SE PRINT <§62,Q$; 


THEN 100 


O Q /A 

Z9p 


irKX^l Jb'KXrJ 1(54 oO , riZ , 


110 1 ONE KEY CALCULATOR 


JPP 


t 


12j3 1 FOR SCIENCE FAIR 1985-86 




• "DOW QPAW 


13)8 1 COPYRIGHT 1985 BY ERIC RYA 




A — AO- 1 


N MIMS 




XI ri^O JLXlJCili X\L01UXvu • UVJIW J-OjCt 


14)3 • 


^ A CI 
J Hip 




15)3 1 VERIABLE DEFINITION 


J DJ0 




160 CLS3 


^ nl 

360 


GOSUB 390 


17)3 CLEAR 


a /t 

37)3 


PRINT @B, CHR? (175) 7 


18)3 X=J3:A*)3:B=)3: C*)3:D«0: SOUND 1, 


*N A 

38)3 


>hb> *m\ m /•* 

GOTO 320 


1 


390 


FOR W^TO 25 


19)3 1 


400 


P=PEEK( 65280) 


200 1 CREATE KEYBOARD 




IF P<> ( 255 OR 127) THEN 460 


21)3 X=X+1 


420 


NEXT W 


220 DATA CLEAR # 67 , SQR, 75 , A 2 , 82 ,E 


430 


RETURN 


XIT, 87,M+, 133 ,M-,140,RM,146,CM,1 

B» B> BBI BB V F _« -BB BS V BBW ^BB' ^BB 1 V W BB M BBW B> ^BF M ^B W ^» W ^^r^m ^B W 


440 


i 


52 ,7,197,8,204,9, 210 ./, 216. 4.261 


450 


• VARIABLE DEFINITION OF ARR 


,5, 268 ,6, 274,*, 2 80, 1,325,2,332,3 


OW, 


BLUE SQUARE, AND LOCATION OF 


,338, -,344, 0,3 89 ,.,396, =,402, +,4 


SIGNS 


08 


460 


P$=CHR$(126) :Q$=CHR$(175) :E= 


230 DATA 92,1.156,2,220,3,284,4, 

M *bF *bF «bbT * bb> «*j •» bb ibB' mm m «bbb v bbb* w w F mm mm w m # WW 


476 




348,5,412,6 


470 


FOR X=0 TO 150: NEXT 


240 IF X>24 THEN 280 

B^B. B. ^BB' BB^B B> B. B BBV ^™ ^^^V ^B ™ ^F^F 


480 


RESTORE: ON C GOTO 520,770,10 


25)3 READ A$,B 


40,1270,1480,1690 
490 » 


260 PRINT @B,A$; 


270 GOTO 210 


500 


• FIRST LINE 



S+6 



NO HYPE! 
JUST QUALITY 
0S9 SOFTWARE 



SUPERCOnn 2.0 by Dave Philipsen $30 

- Xmodem CHK,CRC St Ymodem batch transfer with buffering 

- Autodial and redial with keyboard macros, auto log on 

- ANSI and 0S9 terminal emulation / Access to 0S9 Shell 

- ASCII file capture and send / Split screen conference 

- Unattended remote file access with password protection 

- Reliable with T2 or any other device even at 2400 baud 

- will work with only 12BK end a black and white monitor 

- Pop-up windows w/Help and easy to use ALT-KEY commands 

- done in 100% assembly language for effecient operation 

- Not necessary to build new boot disk - just load and run! 

0S9 Level 2 Login/BBS Package $50 

- Auto-Baud Tsmon with command passing and optional hours 

- Login with DES password encryption, logs access attempts 

- Group and Net Accounts can be set-up, new users verified 

- Configurable Menu w/User-select ANSI, 0S9, or no graphics 

- Mail, public News, and Net Mail (exchange w/other systems) 

- BLAST included for ultra-fast bidirectional Net transfers 

- Chat, Xmodem/Ymodem transfers. Help, multi-user conference 

- Chown, FindFile, Pop/Label (for windows), other utilities 

- Any 0S9 command can be run from login, no doors required 

- 0S9 Level 2, 512k, Hard drive or NO-Halt controller req'd 

- Limited free updates-modiff cations available upon request 
(call or write for details on 0SK version ol this package) 

VEF Printer Dump for Star NX- 1000 Rainbow $20 

- has fast and slow dump modes, matches 0S9 palettes 

COMING ATTRACTIONS 

- Hard disk backup-epic and incremental, partial restore option. 

Indiana residents add 5% sales tax. COD Add $3. No credit cards. 
Shipping &. handling included. Send check or money order to: 
StG Computers, Inc. - P.O. Box 242B5 - Speedway IN 46224 
(317) 241-6401 (voice) - (317) 244-3159 (modem, 3/12/2400) 



Armchair Admiral jj^jjP 

"Avast ye swabbitsl" %pars Captain 
(BfacfcSeard. "9-Coist tfit Jotty f Kp£tr! "Whin 
I gives tht word, give 'em a broadside!" 
!As (Btackbeards flotUCa doses upon 
it's prey, a Coofcjput suddenly cries, 
"Captain, a British Man- of -War!" 



The time-honored parlor game of Battleship, 
enhanced by intelligent computer opponents, 
comes to your Coco3 complete with sloops and 
galleons. Up to eight opponents, any mix of human 
or computer. For the Coco3, please specify tape or 
disk when ordering. $14.95 + $2 S&H. 
WA residents please add 7.6% sales tax. 



RAINBOW 

CERKFICAIION 
StAl 



Eversoft Games, Ltd. 
P.O. Box 3354 
Arlington, Wa 98223-3354 
(206) 653-5263 
10 am to6pmPST 



RAINBOW 

CERTIUCAHON 
SEAL 



Personal check, money orders, and COD orders 

welcome. 
GEnie mailbox: EVERSOFT 

NOW FOR TV AND MONITOR 
TAPE OR ONE DISK DRIVE 




February 1 989 THE RAINBOW 53 



Frank Hogg Laboratory 

1 2 Years of Service, Support, and Friendly Help! 

After Christmas SALE 



THE ELIMINATOR 



TM 



NEWS!! MULTI I/O CARD FOR THE COCO 
2 Serial Ports, 1 Parallel, Clock, Disk Interface! 

This mulii I/O card is called ihe "Eliminator" because it provides all the I/O capability 
under OS-9 that most people want without the need for a Multi-Pak Interface. If de- 
sired, it is possible to use one or more Eliminators in a MPI or other bus expander, with 
or without other hardware. 

The Eliminator is completely address decoded, and does not depend on any of the slot 
select capabilities of the MPI for device selection. 

The typical power consumption is well within the 300 mA at +5 VDC rating of all 
COCO models. Other voltages (+/- 1 2 VDC) are not required by the Eliminator. 
2 Serial (RS-232C) Ports 

- 15 software selectable baud rates from 50 to 38,400 baud - with alternate crystal can 
function as dual MIDI ports (31 .25 KHz) 

1 Parallel Printer Port 
Real Time Clock 

- built in battery backup (1 0 years) 

- 1 00 year clock (automatically compensates for leap year) 

- 50 bytes of battery backed scratchpad RAM 
WD 1002-05 HD/FD Interface 

- high speed (fastest COCO HD interface) 

- WD 1002-05 supports up to 3 HDs and/or 4 FDs 

- runs both HDs and FDs in "no-halt" mode (no lost keystrokes) 

- new WDDisk OS-9 driver allows non OS-9 (MSDOS, RSDOS) disk access 
EPROM - OS-9 auto-boot EPROM 

Reg 199.95 Special Offer 179.95 

Clock Chip add 30.00 

Auto-boot EPROM with software for disk add 30.00 

(HCA users contact FHL for special low upgrade price.) 



FHL High Speed Hard Drive Kits 
Featuring The Eliminator™ 



Our top of the line system features Bruce Isted's new interface The Eliminator' for the 
Western Digital WD 1002-05 high speed controller. Features; fastest system available, 
1 megabyte transfer in only 37 seconds!! Twice as fast as other systems! Supports 4 
floppy and 3 hard drives, type ahead for both floppy and hard disk, autobool OS9 LI or 
L2 from hard or floppy disk, 2 serial ports, I parallel port and Real Time Clock 
socket. Disadvantage; does not support DECH. This is the system for the serious OS9 
user. 

KIT INCLUDES: The Eliminator', Hard drive with WD 1002-05 controller, ST506 
cable set, 3 foot 40 pin cable. Hard Drive Case with 60 watt power supply and £afl, OS9 
software for LI and LI I with source . Complete instructions. Easy one evening assembly. 

1 YEAR MANUFACTURES WARRANTY ON ALL SYSTEMS! 



20 Meg High Speed Kit Complete 


♦799.00 


40 Meg High Speed Kit Complete 


*899.00 


70 Meg High Speed Kit Complete 


*1335.00 


Assemble & Test any of the above add 


60.00 


OPTIONS: 




Real Time Clock chip 


30.00 


Serial cable set (2DB25) 


30.00 


Parallel cable (Centronics) 


30.00 


Floppy Drive (Mounted in case) 


128.00 


Floppy Cable Int & Ext 


25.00 


FBU Fast Hard disk Back Up 


75.00 


R.S.B. RS Disk Basic Under OS9 


30.95 



Hard Drive Kits 

Featuring the 
Burke & Burke Interface 



These systems features the Burke & Burke XT or XT RTC interface. The hottest 
selling hard disk interlace! It uses popular and inexpensive IBM PC type drives and 
controllers. The drives and controller can be used in a PC at a later date if you want. For 
this reason it is the least expensive hard disk system available today. Not as fast as the 
Eliminator system but faster than any other system available. Note: Disk Extended 
Color Basic support and other software options are listed below. Disadvantage; requires 
a multi-pak. 

KIT INCLUDES: Burke & Burke (B&B) XT PC interface. Hard drive with controller, 3 
foot ST506 cable set. I lard Drive Case with 60 watt power supply and fan. Includes OS9 
LI and LII software. 1 megabyte transfer in 45 seconds! Type ahead under OS9. 

Complete instructions. Easy one evening assembly. 

1 YEAR MANUFACTURES WARRANTY ON ALL SYSTEMS! 



20 Meg Kit Complete 60MS 

30 Meg Kit Complete 60MS RLL 

40 Meg Kit Complete 60MS 

Assemble and lest any of the above add 

OPTIONS: 

Ii&B Real Time Clock (add to above) 
B&B XT ROM Auto Boot from hard disk 
B&B Hyper I/O run DECB on hard drive 
B&B Hyper III Ramdisk/spooler for above 
FBU Fast Hard disk Back Up 
R.S.B. RS Disk Basic under OS9 



Hard Drive Bits and Pieces 



*498.00 
*548.00 
*618.00 
50.00 



30.00 
19.95 
29.95 
19.95 
75.00 
39.95 



B&B XT PC style interface 69.95 

B&B XT RTC interface w/clock/calendar 99.95 

WD 1002-05 High Speed ctrler for the Eliminator *199.95 

(Supports both Hard and Floppy drives) 

Hard Drive case with 60W P/S and Fan *99.95 

SPECIFICATIONS: size 16" deep, 5.5" high, 7" wide. 60 Watt power supply with 
3 drive type power connectors, quiet 12 volt DC fan, LED power indicator, color 
matches CoCo. Molds 2 1/2 height hard or floppy drives and has card guided 
space for a PCB the size of a drive (like the WD 1 002-05 controller) 



Floppy Drives (5.25" and 3.5" FLOPPY DISKS) 
TEAC High Quality Drives - 1 Year Wan. 
FD55B 360K 40 Track DS 5.25" 
FD55F 720K 80 Track DS 5.25: 
FD35F 720K 80 Track DS 3.5" 

(Bare drives, requires case and power supply) 



118.00 
151.00 
147.00 



ORDERING INFORMATION VISA and M/C. NY residents add 7% sales tax. US 
shipping add S3. 50 for soft ware. Hardware is more. Please call for Air Express shipping. 

Call or send for FREE FHL NewsLetter and catalog. 
**Most of our software requires OS9 LII and 512K. 
* New LOWER PRICES!!! 

Frank Hogg Laboratory, Inc. 

Since 1976 

770 James Street - Syracuse, NY 13203 

Fax 315/474-8225 

Call 315/474-7856 



START OS9 

The EASY way to learn OS9 LII 
ONLY 32.95 



Book and Disk 



Frank Hogg Laboratory 



1 2 Years of Service, Support, and Friendly Help! 

After Christmas SALE 



t 



Inside OS9 Level II 



The Book by Kevin Darling $39.95 

SPECIAL ONLY 19.95 



Arc your tired of playing games wilh Level II? Do you want to find out what's going on 
inside OS9? This is the book for you! Over 200 pages of hints, kinks, bugs, source list- 
ings and much more. Written by the well known Compuserve SysOp, Kevin Darling. 
'Must reading' says Dale Puckett in Rainbow! 



DynaStar 



Used by more OS9 users than any other! 

FEATURES: Best OS9 editor/word process or/ text formatter, has everything you 
would expect and more, supports terminals and windows simultaneously, auto- 
configurable, auto-indent for C and Pascal programming, mail merge for form letters, 
bug free, solid. New manual makes it easier to use than ever. Most popular word pro- 
cessor since 1 982! Uses CoCo 3's windows for pop-up help menus, can be disabled. 
Two key sequence to move from anywhere to anywhere in your text. WordStar 
command style. Will work wilh files larger than memory. Merge function allows 
stringing many files together at print lime. Full block manipulation, mark, move, copy, 
delete, read from disk, write to disk. Keyboard Macros: Define or redefine any control 
key (up to 29) to reproduce any key sequences, including commands! Macros can be 
read in at startup automatically or created on the fly as needed. Printer Control: Supports 
multiple printers via a print control file that transforms imbedded control characters to 
printer control characters. Changing printers is easy. Formatting Commands: 
Justification, word wrap, centering, headers, footers, macros, odd and even support, 
multiple index generation, multiple table of contents generation and more! DynaSlar is 
the lasi word processor you will ever have lo buy! Level I version also included on disk. 



DynaStar word processor/formatter 



150,00 



SPECIAL ONLY 99,95 



DynaSpell 



by DaJc Puckett 

102,000 and 20,000 word dictionaries included. Supports both Level I and II. Fast, slick, 
the best spelling checker available for OS9. Written by RainbowTcch columnist Dale 
ftjukmi. 



DynuSpefl spelling checker 

SPI-CIAL WHEN PURCHASED WITH DYNASTAR 



75.00 
25.00 



The WIZ 



• . V' . ill. 



Did you ever wonder why there is only one really good communications package for 
OS9? The WIZ is so good that no one has been able to better it in over a year on the 
market! Simply the best package there is for OS9 and the CoCo III. 
FEATURES: Mac-Like interface wilh windows, text and binary upload/download with 
xmodem, kermit, on line IIELP, 

AUTOLOGGING lets you dial up and log on to your favorite service, Macros, VT52 
emulation, Usage log and much more. 

The Wiz requires a RS232 Pak or similar device, LII and 5 12K. 
Supports the Owl- Ware Super I/O board. 



The WIZ 




DlStO RS-232 Pak (Compatible with Tandy RS-232 Pak) 



49.95 



Sculptor 



Is it a Database? 
Is it a Programming Language? 

Is it easy to use? 
Will it run on other computers? 
Is it the best program available? 
YES! The New Version 1.16 is it! 
100% Object Code Compatible 
100% Data File Compatible 
for over 100 Computer/OS combinations 

Sculptor, a 4th Generation Language, is an applications 
generator, a database, and a programming language. Basic, C, 
Pascal, etc. arc 3rd gcncralion languages and assembly language is 
2nd gcncralion. In Sculptor you can develop an application in one 
tenth the time over Basic or one of the other 3rd generation 
languages. Sculptor brings the power of high level programming to 
the less experienced individual. If you cannot do what you want to 
do in a 3rd generation language, then Sculptor will open doors for 
you. In conventional programming 1/2 of your time is spent 
deciding what you want to do and 1/2 writing the code. With 
Sculptor most of your time is spent deciding what to do because it 
takes so little time to turn your dream into reality 

In 1988 we sold an incredible number of Sculptors at the special 
price of $149. We proved that the market was there if the price was 
right. Version L16 lists for S695 on the IBM PC and goes up to 
$17,000 on a DEC VAX. Because of our success last year, thru a 
special arrangement we are now able to offer Sculptor version 1.16 
to you for only $249.95. Now you can take applications created on 
your CoCo and run them on PC's, Unix machines etc. (with the 
proper runtime) Sculptor is ihc most powerful program available for 
the CoCo. 

But wait... During this special introduction of version 1.16 we 
have reduced the price to ONLY $199.95! 

Requires OS 9 Level II and 512K. Works on floppies or hard disks. 





Sculptor \IM $249.< 

*•*■* ■ ■,«.-JIW^-n..,.,..,. J „.£L!S.. M -,ii?.„.>-J mSli.^r.. 


§ SPECIAL 199.95 






Existing Sculptor users can 


update to v 1.1 6 for 60.00 







ORDERING INFORMATION VISA and M/C. NY residents add 7% sales tax. US 
software shipping add $3.50. Please call for Air Express shipping. 

Send for FREE FHL NewsLetter and catalog. 
**Most of our software requires OS9 LII and 512K. 

Frank Hogg Laboratory, Inc. 

Since 1976 

770 James Street - Syracuse, NY 13203 

Fax 315/474-8225 

Call 315/474-7856 



:X=1:G0SUB 610: PR 
:X=2:G0SUB 6 10: PR 



:X=4:G0SUB 6 10: PR 



510/ SCAN OF CLEAR, SQR, A 2, EX 
IT 

520 A=101:B=108:C=114:D=120 
530 PRINT@92,CHR$(175) 
540 PRINT@A,P$ 
INT@A,Q$; 
550 PRINT@B,P$ 
INT@B,Q$; 

560 PRINT@C,P$; :X=3:GOSUB 610: PR 
INT@C,Q$; 
570 PRINT@D,P$ 
INT@D,Q$; 
580 GOTO 180 
590 • 

600 ' SCAN OF JOYSTICK BUTTON 

610 FOR W=0 TO 25 

620 P=PEEK( 65280) 

630 IF P<>(255 OR 127) THEN 670 

640 NEXT W 

650 FOR Y=0 TO 80:NEXT 
660 RETURN 

670 ON X GOTO 680,690,710,730 
680 N1=0 : N2=0 : N$=" " : S=0 : CLS3 : SOU 
ND 200, 5: GOTO 180 

690 IF S=0 THEN N1=SQR(N1) ELSE N 
2=SQR(N2) 

700 PRINT @B,Q$;:GOTO 180 

710 IF S=0 THEN N1=N1 A 2ELSE N2=N 

2 A 2 

720 PRINT@C,Q$; :GOTO 180 
730 END 
740 • 

750 • SECOND LINE 
760 ' SCAN OF M+, M-, RM, CM 
770 A=165:B=172:C=178:D=184 
780 PRINT@156,CHR$(175) ; 
790 PRINT@A,P$; :X=l:GOSUB 840: PR 
INT@A,Q$; 
800 PRINT@B,P$; 
INT@B,Q$; 
810 PRINT@C,P$; 
INT@C,Q$; 
820 PRINT@D,P$; 
INT@D,Q$; 
830 GOTO 180 
840 FOR W=0 TO 
850 P=PEEK(65280) 
860 IF P<>(255 OR 127) THEN 900 
870 NEXT W 

880 FOR Y=0 TO 80:NEXT 
890 RETURN 
900 IF S=0 THEN 960 
910 ON X GOTO 920,930,940,950 
920 M=M+N2 : PRINT® A, Q$ ;: GOTO 180 
930 M=M-N2: PRINT @B,Q$; :GOTO 180 
940 N2=M:PRINT@C,Q$; :GOTO 180 
950 GOTO 1000 

960 ON X GOTO 970,980,990,1000 
970 M=M+N1 : PRINT @A , Q$ ;: GOTO 180 



:X=2:GOSUB 840: PR 
:X=3:GOSUB 840: PR 
:X=4:GOSUB 840: PR 

25 



980 M=M-N1:PRINT@B,Q$; :GOTO 180 
990 N1=M:PRINT@C,Q$; :GOTO 180 
1000 M=0:PRINT@D,Q$; :GOTO 180 
1010 » 

1020 ' THIRD LINE 
1030 SCAN OF 7,8,9,/ 
1040 A=229:B=236:C=242:D=248 
1050 PRINT@220,CHR$(175) ; 

1060 PRINT@A,P$ "" * 

PRINT @A,Q$; 



:X=l:GOSUB 1110: 
:X=2:GOSUB 1110: 
:X=3:GOSUB 1110: 
:X=4:GOSUB 1110: 



1070 PRINT@B,P$ 
PRINT@B,Q$; 
1080 PRINT@C,P$ 
PRINT@C,Q$; 
1090 PRINT@D,P$ 
PRINT@D,Q$; 
1100 GOTO 180 
1110 FOR W=0 TO 25 
1120 P=PEEK(65280) 
1130 IF P<>(255 OR 127) THEN 117 

1140 NEXT W 

1150 FOR Y=0TO80:NEXT 

1160 RETURN 

1170 ON X GOTO 1180,1190,1200,12 
10 

1180 N$=N$+"7":GOSUB 1220:PRINT@ 

A, Q$;:GOTO 180 

1190 N$=N$+"8":GOSUB 1220:PRINT@ 

B, Q$;:GOTO 180 

1200 N$=N$+"9":GOSUB 1220:PRINT@ 

C, Q$;:GOTO 180 

1210 S=l: SOUND 100, 1:PRINT@E, "/" 
; :N$="":PRINT@D,Q$; :GOTO 180 
1220 IF S=0 THEN N1=VAL(N$) ELSE 

N2=VAL(N$) : RETURN 
1230 RETURN 
1240 ' 

1250 ' FOURTH LINE 
1260 • 4,5,6,* 
1270 A=293:B=300 
1280 PRINT@284,Q$; 
1290 PRINT@A,P$ 
PRINT@A,Q$; 



C=306:D=312 

t 

X=l:GOSUB 1340: 
X=2:GOSUB 1340: 
X=3:GOSUB 1340: 
X=4:G0SUB 1340: 



1300 PRINT@B,P$ 
PRINT@B,Q$; 
1310 PRINT@C,P$ 
PRINT@C,Q$; 
1320 PRINTED, P$ 
PRINT@D,Q$; 
1330 GOTO 180 
1340 FOR W=0 TO 25 
1350 P=PEEK(65280) 
1360 IF P<>(255 OR 127) THEN 140 

1370 NEXT W 

1380 FOR Y=0 TO 80: NEXT 
1390 RETURN 

1400 ON X GOTO 1410,1420,1430,14 



56 THE RAINBOW February 1989 



40 

1410 rt$=N$+"4 M :G0SUB 122j3:PRINT@ 

A, Q$;:GOTO 180 

1420 N$=N$+"5":G0SUB 1220:PRINT@ 

B, Q$;:GOTO 180 

1430 N$=N$+"6":G0SUB 1220:PRINT@ 

C, Q$;:GOTO 180 

1440 S=2:S0UND 100 , 1 : PRINT@E, 

; :N$="":PRINT@D,Q$; :GOTO 180 

1450 ' 

1460 ' FITH LINE 
1470 • 1,2,3,- 
1480 A=357:B=364 
1490 PRINT@348,Q$; 
1500 PRINT@A,P$ 
PRINT@A,Q$; 
1510 PRINT@B,P$ 
PRINT@B,Q$; 
1520 PRINT@C,P$ 



C=370:D=376 
X=1:G0SUB 1550: 
X=2:G0SUB 1550: 
X=3:G0SUB 1550: 
X=4:G0SUB 1550: 



PRINT@C,Q$; 
1530 PRINT@D,P$ 
PRINT@D,Q$; 
1540 GOTO 180 
1550 FOR W=0 TO 25 
1560 P=PEEK(65280) 
1570 IF P<>(255 OR 127) THEN 161 

0 

1580 NEXT W 

1590 FOR Y=0 TO 80 

1600 RETURN 

1610 ON X GOTO 1620,1630,1640,16 
50 

1620 N$=N$+"l":GOSUB 1220 : PRINTS 

A, Q$;:GOTO 180 

1630 N$=N$+"2" :GOSUB 1220: PRINT© 

B, Q$;:GOTO 180 

1640 N$=N$+"3":GOSUB 1220:PRINT@ 

C, Q$;:GOTO 180 

1650 S=3:SOUND 100 , 1 : PRINT@E , 
;:N$="":PRINT@D,Q$;:GOTO 180 
1660 • 

1670 « SIXTH LINE 
1680 • 0,.,=,+ 
1690 A=421:B=428 
1700 PRINT@412,Q$; 
1710 PRINT@A,P$ 
PRINT@A,Q$; 
1720 PRINT@B,P$ 
PRINT@B,Q$; 
1730 PRINT@C,P$ 



C==434 :D=440 
X=l:GOSUB 1760: 
X=2:GOSUB 1760: 
X=3:GOSUB 1760: 
X=4:GOSUB 1760: 



PRINT@C,Q$; 
1740 PRINT@D,P$ 
PRINT@D,Q$; 
1750 GOTO 180 
1760 FOR W=0 TO 25 
1770 P=PEEK(65280) 
1780 IF P<>(255 OR 127) THEN 182 

% 

1790 NEXT W 



1800 FOR Y=0 TO 80 
1810 RETURN 

1820 ON X GOTO 1830,1840,1870,19 
00 

1830 N$=N$+"0":GOSUB 1220: PRINT© 

A, Q$; :GOTO 180 

1840 N$=N$+" . ":GOSUB 1220: PRINT© 

B, Q$;:GOTO 180 
1850 • 

1860 ' /0 ERROR TRAPPING 

1870 IF (S=l AND N2=0) THEN GOSU 

B 1930: GOTO 1890 

1880 IF S=0 THEN 1810 ELSE IF S- 
1 THEN N1=N1/N2 ELSE IF S=2 THEN 
N1=N1*N2 ELSE IF S=3 THEN N1=N1 
-N2 ELSE IF S=4 THEN N1=N1+N2 
1890 S=0: SOUND 100, 1:PRINT@E,Q$; 
:N$="":N2=0:PRINT@C,Q$; :GOTO 180 
1900 S=4: SOUND 100 , 1: PRINT@E, "+•• 
; :N$="": PRINTED, Q$; : GOTO 180 
1910 ' 

1920 ' ERROR SUBROUTINE 
1930 PRINT@503,"/0 ERROR" ;: PLAY" 
V20O1T7DDDD":FOR F=0TO 2 50: NEXT: 
PRINT @503, ""; :FOR F=0TO 7: PRINT 
Q$; -.NEXT: RETURN 




P.O. Box. 63X96 
W I .:h I I. r± , KS 6T203 
316—946—0440 



°For 



°CoCo 1 



0 

n URCB 



Multi-pak 

industry standard 



th 



Compatible with ANY RSDOS 



T= 

ffiotmipai't ilbl® 
BMSi Faust 

DB25 connector. Baud 
or 0S9 RoTUare that 




Configuration § 



rates of SO - 19,200 baud 1 
uses the Deluxe KS232 Pak , 



n 

Q 

o 

0 
0 

0 
0 

0 
0 

0 
0 

u 

0 

0 
0 

Q 
Q 

0 
0 

D 
0 
0 

a 

a 
o 

0 
0 

0 
Q 
0 
0 
0 
0 
0 

a 

Q 
n 

o 

D 



MiL$Ih Pirn®® B]FB&klh]kiP®w$Ik 2 



2400 Baud Mod 6ID w/cable (State DB25 or 4 Pin).., SI 49 

coaaand set ** Full 1 year warranty •* 
3J, 212A, and CCITT V.22 BIS/V.23 ** 



. 9«5 



*• Hayes "AT" 
•» Bell 10: 



Autoterm . . . 
Level IX OU 
Wa».i~i> One ... 
XTKUM ...... 

The W ± si . . . . 

The T E2 L.I2 £»/V K. 
Wave proven 
omi>#». t i bi 1 JL 
#=i-l 1 the a.bo 
V — TERM em 

* MIKKYTKRM 

* Greg — 1*1 — T"e 
*•* liickoyte r- 

UlLjmater 



$39 
$ 2 9 
* 2 9 
$ 4 9 
$59 



9 S 
9 55 
9 5 
9 5 
9 5 



8 V. I . P. Sex-i.es: 
jWriter III. . - * V 9 
3 D«.t n.t>n»e III. $69 
8 Ca. 1 <= III. . . . .$69 

8 



. 9 
. 9 
. 9 



5 

r> 



t 

ve 

AA 1 



PLUS 
he _L i* 
■w i th 
AND : 
«. t o r 



i 

8 DB25 M — M 
8 4 n — 

8 ( S t a. t e w 
8 M o cl o m o r 
8 For- Magtn 
8 M o n a. t o r- . 



m m + m m m *t 

ID 13 S£ R . . $9 
Wether- ±~ 
Printer 
avox. SOM 
$14 



gCall or- Write 

8 for your- CUSTOM 

8 cable needs ! 



tTF*. 



. 9i 
. 9 
o r 
> 

5 1 
. 9 



DOS From ESP $14 
"=i2S2T Uaer/Pro*rAmmer Friendly DOS 

■ •* ESP-Key . . . Coaaand repeat and edit function! 
Power up your CoCo in any screen width or color combination! 
Printer and Disk reliability at high speed - 35/40 track and double sided 
Multiple coluan PAQED DIRECTORIES - Edit even BASIC line nuabers 
Automatic boot of any prograa or OS-9 - Pits in a standard 8K EPHOH 
New Graphics Coaaand e - HVIEV MLOAD HSAVE - Choose CHS or M0E Loads/Saves 
Configure to your tastes with a aenu driven, eaay to use H/L prograa! 

Requires 128K CoCo 3 and difik. 

10X discount on TELEPAK or TELE PAK + and terainal package order! 
Call or Write for lore Package Discounts 
Add $3.00 shpg./hndl. per order - C.O.D. an additional $3.00 
No delay for personal checks 



Q 
D 
0 
0 

0 

0 

Q 
0 

,= o 

0 
0 
0 

0 
0 

0 

a 

o 

0 

a 

u 

o 

0 

a 

D 

0 
0 

D 

D 
D 
0 

0 
0 

0 

a 

a 
o 

0 

n 
o 
□ 

a 
o 



February 1989 THE RAINBOW 57 




-Fea ture 



A system to 

in controlling au 




mally handicapped people 
ci ions 






COHPP is an aeronynrL for Com- 
puter Opera ted Equipment lor 
Paraly/cd Persons. In short, il 
provides a means for quadriplegics and 
other people who liay.e limited phys- 
ical movcmcriL to coinrol automated 
functions around their hmftcs :.u 
offices, Simple things, like turnup 
Sights un<1 appliances on and off, ai!0 
tiften impossible for disabled per- 
sons. Computerized systems co$t 
in tire than I hose requiring; 
can afford Lb spend. So, 1 
. oped COEPB^jt'S nothing \pefe 
nieu 1 ur i I per f o r in s o n iy sim p le 
^E|;sks and functiona but il 
l|#n give a new outlook on liU j 
for this* wtio use it. 

One CO E P P sys ( e m i s now lii 

use, and I'm currently 
on two more. Each s^ll^xn ^ 
designed to mee< the .specific 
nee ds of the i nd i vid ua I The 
gystbm described here consists 
of- a centra] processing unit, a 




58 



THE RAINBOW Februaiv I3H9 




I 



Dennis ffieitte is u comtmuiiah 
fions twhnicitm jf&I- A T& T in 
Aibuquerqut\ A-W A/^rcr' 
I'.itere lie progranjs A T&T unu 
//it/ PCs: He enjoys making 
joys dad ieacking vowputi'r 
■ . .prtig.ramtfiing. 



# Function 

1 Toggle Outlet #1 

2 Toggle Outlet #2 

3 Toggle Outlet #3 

4 Toggle Outlet #4 

5 Toggle Outlet #5 

6 Toggle Outlet #6 

7 Place a phone call 

8 Answer/Disconnect call 

9 Reset system 

Figure 1: COEPP Functions 





OEPP imcrhce controller (CIC) ai 
an ouilet interface circnil (QIC) thai 
provide the use-r with ih.e ability to 
automatically dial one of ten- prepro- 
grammed telephone numbers and conv 
rn'unicate via a speaker-phone; The 
system also Sets, the user answer m 
HU'oining CLktl and hang up when the call 
emupleted. Other fund ions include 
timing lights and appliances on and tiff 
and automatically resinning the system; 

The U5.i"r oi' Lhe first system is a young 
01 with muscular J '0 trophy who : :j$ 
confined Lo a wheelchair. Access to the 



computer ii provided via a radii) trims- 
tiiitter, located on. the wheelchair, and 
a receiver in the CIC. By operating a 
joystick connected lo the transmit ler, 
the user cm setecjj and execute nciy of 
the nine functions shown in l-ip.ure I. 
For a uprtidriplegic, the joystick can he 
[CpkiLt'd - with * l sip switches/' 

How th£ System Works 

I he COEPP system is easy ui use 
once you understand how it works. 
Figure 2 is a simplified block diagram 
q| i he system, flit; CIC provides I lie 
means by Which the CPU communi- 
cates with the OIC and I. I P disphi> 
unit. Interconnecting cables are shown 
as lints in Figure 2 and arc labeled' 
according lo their function. Acklrcssus 
are shown in hexadecimal (i.e H FF40), 
and bit positions are ah own in paren- 
theses. Therefore the iine labeled FH4fi 
(0-7) represents eight wires, that connect 
address SKF40 biLs 0 through 7 t<3 the 
outlet interlace, All signals between the 
QIC and Lhe CPU mis st through 
the CIC . 

The OIC contain?; the outltM relay 



drivers, the telephone relay driven, the 
radio receiver, the low voltage power 
.supply and the AC outlets and bus, 

The display unit provides ti visinil 
display for the. C?IL while the speaks - 
plume provide?! a hands-free audible 
link to the: telephone. 

LetV diicnss the operation ol the 
system. The raftf'O transmitter (nol 
shown in pigpfe'2J ? which if* fastened 
the 'wheelchair* is connected to an Alari- 
stylc joystick that has been modified 4$ 
allow only forward and backward 
nioy^j^jsL. The eurrenl lunelioij 
number is displayed on the LED dlspia.j' 
uiiil. Pushing the joystick forutird 
advances the function number, while 
pulling it back executes the function. As 
jn eKaffipk\ <t.sM.rme 0t have ,j desk 
lamp plugged into 'Outtet Number 5 $nd 
the lamp is currently, off. Select Func- 
tion 5 by pushing the joystick forward 
until the number 5 is displayed onSfch# 
.display unit. Execute ihe CuTictum "by 
pulling the joystick back, The number 
5 will Hash onlue display u ml/indicat- 
ing flincilon has been executed; the 
desk (artrtp will light. When the display 



COEPP 
INTERFACE 
CIRCUIT 



SPEAKER 
PHONE 



DISPLAY UNfT 



FF40 (0-7) 



FF4I (0-7) 



FF42 (0*3) 



FF42 (4-7) RESERVED 



+5V0C TO ROM PORT (OPTIONAL) 



GND 



TO PHONE 
WALL JACK-*- 




FF4I (0-3) (BCD INPUT) 



FF40 (7) (DISPLAY BLANKING) 



+I2VDC 



GND 



AC 
OUTLET^ 



1 



+I2V<* 



FF40 (0-5) 



PHONE LINE 



+ I2V 



FF40 (6) 



IK 



RELAY 
DRIVER 




PHONE 
RELAY 



+ 5VDC 



GND 



FF42 (0-1) 



POWER 
SUPPLY 




TO 
AC 
BUS 



3T* OUTLET 



LED 



IK 



\k PHONE 
LED 



IK 



RECEIVER 



^OUTLET INTERFACE 



Figure 2; COEPP System Simplified Block Diagram 



F l -f jru w y i THE DW 59 



Expanding Horizons 

Take your CoCo beyond the 
limits of floppy diskettes — 
connect to DELPHI, your 
complete online business 
and personal resource. 
With your modem and a local 
phone call, select from tens of 
thousands of downloadable 
programs, meet friends from 
across the globe, or tap into the 
world's most comprehensive 
databases to expand the 
horizons of your CoCo. 

Your Resource for 
Color Computers 

DELPHI'S special 
group for owners of 
Tandy Color 
Computers is sup- 
ported by the people 
who bring you RAINBOW 

Access extensive databases 
where you can upload your 
favorite files and download 
programs written by other 
personal computer enthusiasts. 
Chat with other members and 
resident experts in Conference, 
use electronic mail, and post or 
respond to messages in Forum. 

OS-9 Online 

In OS-9 Online, DELPHI'S 
interest group for fans of the 
OS-9 operating system, you'll 
meet other members, download 
files, and get tips to help you 
make the most of your CoCo. 




What 
your CoCo 

was really 

meant 
for. 



RAINBOW Online 

DELPHI is your online connection to 
RAINBOW. You can renew your 
subscription, meet other 
Color Computer owners, 
order software or hard- 
ware, or inquire about 
products. You can even 
download programs pub- 
lished in RAINBOW. 




Wallet-Friendly 

You can access DELPHI with a local 
phone call from almost anywhere in 
the United States. There is NO extra 
charge for using Tymnet or Telenet, 
NO monthly minimum, NO 
premium for 1200 or 2400 bps, and 
connect rates are a low $7.20/hour. 



FREE L ifetime Membership 

As sl RAINBOW subscriber, you 
get a FREE lifetime DELPHI mem- 
bership ($29.95 value) which in- 
cludes a credit worth one evening 
hour of usage ($7.20). 
If you don't already subscribe to 
RAINBOW, just request a subscrip- 
tion when you sign-up to DELPHI, 
and, for the $31 subscription fee, 
you'll get the same great deal! 

Sign up now ■ Online ! 

With your CoCo and modem: 

1. Dial 1-617-576-2981.* 

2 . Once connected, 
press RETURN once 
or twice. 

3. At Username:, type 
JOINDELPHI 

4. At Password:, type 
RAINBOW, if 
you already subscribe to 
RAINBOW. 

Type SENDRAINBOW, if you 
do not yet subscribe and wish to 
do so. 

5. Have credit information ready. 

* Or call DELPHI Member Services 
by voice at (800)544-4005 to 
obtain a local access phone 
number. 




No Risk 



With DELPHI there is no risk. You 
can cancel your membership within 
30 days and pay only for your usage 
beyond the initial one-hour credit. 



DELPH I 



The World's Premier Online Information Service 

General Videotex Corporation • Three Blackstone St • Cambridge MA 02139 

800-544-4005 • 617-491-3393 




unit stops flashing, you can select 
another function or execute Function 5 
again. If the lamp is on, executing 
Function 5 again will turn it off. 

Functions 1 through 6 and Function 
8 all work the same way. Function 9 is 
a safety and convenience feature that 
turns everything off. 

Placing a Phone Call 

Function 7 is a special function for 
placing phone calls using a speaker- 
phone. You can program up to 10 
telephone numbers into the computer, 
which can then be dialed using Function 
7. If a TV or monitor is connected to 
the computer, the telephone numbers 
assigned to memory slots 0 through 9 
will be displayed, as shown in Figure 3. 

Here's how to place a call. First, select 
Function 7 by pushing the joystick 
forward until 7 is displayed, then exe- 
cute it by pulling the joystick back. 
When the function has been executed, 
a zero will be displayed. This is the first 
of 10 preprogrammed telephone 
numbers (slots 0 through 9). Select the 
number you want to dial by pushing the 
joystick forward again until the slot 
number you want is displayed. For 
example, the telephone number for the 



Telephone Book 




5551212 


#1 


2431371 


#2 


1 8002223000 


#3 


2471611 


#4 


911 


#5 


13122556400 


#6 


12123389900 


#7 


8656210 


#8 


8429900 


#9- 


0 


Note: Your numbers will be differ- 


ent from these. 


Figure 3: Visual Phone Number Display 



local time and temperature in Albu- 
querque is 247-1611. In Figure 3, this 
phone number is assigned to Memory 
Slot 3. Push the joystick forward until 
3 is displayed, then pull the joystick 
back. The computer will seize the phone 
line, and you'll hear a dial tone. The 
computer will then dial the number. As 
each number is dialed, it will be shown 
on the display unit. When dialing is 
completed, the display unit will flash 
Function 8. You are now ready to hang 
up the phone when the call is finished. 
Function 8 is also used to answer in- 



coming calls. Functions can be selected 
and executed in any order. That is, you 
can place a phone call, then turn any 
outlet on or off while talking on the 
phone. 

A CoCo 

By now, you've probably guessed that 
the CPU used for the COEPP is actually 
a CoCo 1 , 2 or 3. While the CoCo 3 has 
replaced the CoCo 1 and 2, the older 
versions are a long way from being 
extinct. In fact, for the first COEPP 
system, I purchased a 64K CoCo 2 from 
a pawn shop for $50, It was in fine 
working condition and is now being 
used to make someone's life a little 
easier. 

Why use a CoCo? Because it's a 
powerful 8-bit microcomputer that's 
easy to program and interface to the 
outside world. All necessary signals are 
available on the ROM port, which can 
be addressed directly via machine lan- 
guage or BASIC routines. 

The System 

It's important to understand that the 
system described here should be used as 
an example. The schematics shown are 
the final drawings for the first system. 



GAME POINT SOFTWARE 



Plawgr I Niftfc 

t=f t 




- 












1 Niws 




MINE RESCUE by Steve Bjork 



A terrible mine disaster has just occurred and it will be up to you and your talents to enter the 
mine, jump the pits, avoid the spikes, fight off the bats and other creepy crawlers and get air to 
the need/ victims. Mine Rescue features over 2 megabytes of arcade style graphics, real time 
music and multiple mine levels. Hours of fun! Requires a CoCo III and is available on Disk or 
Tape. ONLY $24.95. 

Write the words 1 am a terrific Home Manager!" with your order and pick this game up for only 
$19.95 now through the end of February 1989!! 

"The graphics are very sharp and action is smooth ..." 

1/89 Rainbow Magazine Review 

ALSO AVAILABLE: BASH, RUPERT RYTHYM, WARP FIGHTER 3-D and SPACE INTRUDERS. 
FOR THE COLOR COMPUTER 3 DISK OR TAPE SYSTEM. JUST $24.95 EACH. 

ATTENTION PROGRAMMERS: GAME POINT SOFTWARE IS LOOKING FOR TALENTED 
WRITERS. TOP ROYALTIES GUARANTEED. 

ADD $3.00 S/H SEND CHECK OR MONEY ORDER TO: 

C.O.D. $2.50 EXTRA GAME POINT SOFTWARE 

CALIFORNIA RESIDENTS PLEASE IN- P.O. BOX 6907 
CLUDE 6.5% SALES TAX BURBANK, CA 91510-6907 

(818) 566-3571 



( COCO Stuff) 

Hardware & Software 

Specia l - Bare SSDD Half Height Drives - $69.95 
Drive 1 Upgrades (26-3129 or 3131) - $99.95 
2 Drive System* (2 DSDD, 6ms) - $299.95 
COCO 1 & 2 64K Upgrade - $1 9.95 
Serial to Parallel Interface - $54.95 
COCO 3 51 2K Upgrade - $1 89.95 
ADOS - $29.95 ADOS 3 - $39.95 
In Quest of the Star Lord - $34.95 
Gauntlet - $28.95 Pyramix - $24.95 
Art Deli (440 Pix on 10 Disks) - $99.95 
Art Deli II (220 Pix on 5 Disks) - $49.95 
Coco Max III - $79.95 Max 10 - $79.95 
Dragonblade - $19.95 Sixdrive - $19.95 
Kung Fu Dude - $24.95 Telewriter 64 - $59.95 

I "Drive System furnished with Disto Controller I 
J and carries a 90 day warranty. I 

The Computer Center 

551 2 Poplar Ave. Memphis, TN 381 1 9 

901-761-4565 



Add $4.90 for Shipping. Visa, Master Card, and Money Orders Accepted. 
Allow 3 Weeks for Personal Checks. Prices may change without notice. 
NO CODS. Orders outside 48 States please double Shipping Charge. 



February 1989 THE RAINBOW 61 



I haven't included a parts list, since each 
system is specially designed. This infor- 
mation is provided to show the different 
methods used so you can design your 
own peripheral equipment. 

First, let's look at the power supply 
used to power the peripheral interface 
equipment. Figure 4 shows a simple, 
easy-to-construct power supply. The 
most important thing to remember is to 
use adequate supply and ground leads. 
Use a ground bus system and lots of 
filtering to ensure clean power for the 
project. Bypass each 1C power lead with 
a 0.1 MFD. capacitor to ground. The 
+5VDC output is not necessary if you 
power the CIC from the computer. But 
the cost of the additional regulator 
(7805) is low enough to justify po wering 
the CIC from this supply. 

Figure 5 is the schematic drawing for 
the light emitting diode (LED) display 
unit. It works the same as a standard 
seven-segment display and can be re- 
placed with one if a smaller display is 
acceptable to you. I chose an LED 
display over a CRT (television or mon- 
itor) because of the lower cost and the 
fact that the LED display is small (the 
numbers are 4 inches high) and yet can 



still be seen from anywhere in the room. 
The LEDs are mounted in l 4-inch holes 
drilled in a piece of l/g-inch clear plex- 
iglass and covered with a piece of red 
plexiglass to provide a professional 
appearance. 

The display segment layout is shown 
at the bottom of Figure 5. Each segment 
(A through G) has its own current- 
limiting resistor. Segments A, D and G 
each have five LEDs and use a 220-ohm 
resistor. The other four segments each 
have four LEDs and use a 330-ohm 
resistor. This arrangement produces a 
uniform brightness for all display seg- 
ments. 

The 7447 integrated circuit (IC) is a 
BCD-to-7 segment decoder IC. It takes 
a binary-coded-decimal (BCD) input 
(IN1-1N4) and lights the proper output 
segments (A through G) to display a 
single-digit number. 

The 7805 voltage regulator chip uses 
the +12 VDC input from the power 
supply in the outlet interface to provide 
the +5 V DC output required by the 7447 
IC. This arrangement eliminates the 
need to run two seperate voltages to the 
display unit and allows you to use a 
smaller diameter cable. 



FUSE 

■TV 

/.5A 



Tl 



1 20 VAC 



2A. 



18 VAC 




IN 



7812 



^=1000 



4=1000 
IN 



OUT 



GND 



•+I2VDC 



^=1.0 



^=1.0 -±z 



GND 



7805 



OUT 



GND 



-+5VDC 



Figure 4: Dual Voltage Power Supply 



+ I2VDC 



4 ^4. '4 ^4, 220 



OUT 



4 4 4 4 



330 



330 
MM C 




B 



13 



12 



I I 



330 P 
_MAA_L 



15 



330 
^AAAA. 



4, Jts ^< Jt. J$ t 220 



7805 



1.0 



IN 



GND 



+ I2VDC 



12 



A 
8 

C 
D 
€ 

r 

G 



VCC 



IN I 
K IN2 
IN3 
IN4 
BLANK 



GND 



8 



7 


FF4I 


(0) 


1 


FF4I 


in 


2 


FF4I 


<2> 


6 


FF4I 


(3) 


4 


FF40 


(7) 



SEGMENT LAYOUT 
A 



Figure 5: LED Display Unit 




Pin 4 of the 7447 is the blanking lead 
and is used to flash the display. When 
this lead goes low, the display will be 
blanked out. 

The Radio Link 

The radio link uses a radio-controlled 
(R/C) car transmitter and receiver to 
link the user with the computer. Til 
show you here a general idea of how you 
might use R/C equipment for a radio 
link. It is very unlikely that you'll be 
able to find the same model transmitter 
and receiver that I used. But using a 
little common sense and electrical 
knowledge, you should be able to mod- 
ify your radio. The only modification to 
the transmitter is to replace the unit 
controls with a standard Atari-style 
joystick. This allows the user to send 
one of two signals (joystick forward and 
joystick backward) to the receiver 
located in the outlet interface. 

The receiver is a little more difficult 
to modify (see Figure 6). The blue and 
grey wires connected to the drive mo- 
tors are used to reverse the 5VDC 
polarity to the drive motors. This allows 
the motors to be operated in the for- 
ward and reverse direction. I used 
optoeouplers to convert the voltage 
polarity reversal into two digital logic 
signals. Operating the transmitter joy- 
stick in the forward direction causes one 
optocoupler LED to conduct, while 
operating the joystick in the reverse 
direction reverses the voltage polarity 
and causes the other optocoupler LED 
to conduct. The output of the two logic 
signals are of the wrong state, so a 
74LS04 IC (IC3B shown in Figure 7) is 
used on the CIC board to invert the 
signals. 

The receiver requires +9 VDC to 
operate and 5 VDC to power the mo- 
tors. The +9 VDC is supplied by drop- 
ping the +12 VDC across four diodes. 
Each diode drops about .7 volts, provid- 
ing an output of approximately 9.2 
VDC. A 7805 voltage regulator IC 
provides the +5 VDC from the + 1 2 VDC 
input. 

The Interface Circuit 

Figure 7 shows the CIC used to 
interface the peripheral equipment to 
the computer. The heart of this circuit 
is IC2, the 8255 Programmable Periph- 
eral Interface (PPI) chip. This chip 
provides three programmable 8-bit 
parallel ports. For this project, ports A 
and B are programmed as output ports 
and port C as an input port by loading 
the PPI internal register (SFF43) with 
decimal 129. 



62 THE RAINBOW February 1989 



& 



o 

to 

a 

E 

o 
cj 

o 
o 
O 

O 

CD 
i 

CO 

PS 




„ — 



pm^ ■ 



■Ms 



Figure 6: Radio Control Receiver 



— 



R/W 



AO 
A I 

scs 

07 
06 
+ 5V 



GND 
D5 
D4 

D3 
02 
Dl 

DO 



18 



+ 5V 



— 0.1 



14 



> 



74LS00 
IC I 



> 



36 







7 




19 






9 


20 






8 


36 






6 


17 






27 


16 






28 


9 






26 




1 


> 








_0,l 




33 


1 


i 


7 


15 






29 


14 






30 


13 






31 


12 






32 


II 






33 


10 






34 



8255 PPI 
FF43 



RD 



wR 



PA6 



O 

Ll 
Id- 



AO 

Al 

CS 



07 
D6 
VCC 



GND 

D5 

D4 

D3 

D2 
Dl 
DO 



CJ 



IC2 



PAS 
PA 4 
PA3 
PA2 
PA I 
■ PA0 

PB7 
PB6 
PB5 
PB4 
PB3 
PB2 
PBI 
\PB0 



/PC 7 
PC 6 
PC 5 
PC 4 
PC 3 
PC 2 
PC I 
\PC0 



37 



38 



39 



40 



25 



24 



23 



22 



21 



20 



19 



10 



10 



12 



13 



FF42 (I) 



4.7 K 
FF42 (0) 




+ I2VDC 



GND 



IC3A 



10 



BLANK 



PHONE RELAY 



0UTLET6 



OUTLETS 



0UTLET4 



0UTLET3 



0UTLET2 



0UTLETI 



RESERVED 



RESERVED 



RESERVED 



RESERVED 



LEDDR3 



LEDDR2 



LEDDRI 



LED0R0 



RESERVED 



RESERVED 



RESERVED 



RESERVED 



74LS04 



17 



16 



15 



14 



8 



^1 



IC3B J7 



+ 5V 



14 



RESERVED 



3 RESE RVED 
•- 



EXEC 



SEL 



47K 



Figure 7: COEPP Interface Circuit 



X 



■■1 



&Zj' : C: 0 V . j> ; Vi'f p^gjftivi 



" 




• to 



■I; Si*?? 



„ — i" 



....... -. 




About 
The One-Liner 
Contest . . 



the rainbow's One-Liner 
Contest has now been ex- 
panded to include programs 
of either one or two lines. 
This means a new dimen- 
sion and new opportunity 
for those who have "really 
neat" programs that simply 
just won't fit in one line. 

Here are the guidelines: 
The program must work in 
Extended basic, have only 
one or two line num bers and 
be entirely self-contained — 
no loading other programs, 
n o calling ROM routines, no 
poked-in machine language 
code. The program has to 
run when typed in directly 
(since that's how our read- 
ers will use it). Make sure 
your line, or lines, aren't 
packed so tightly that the 
program won't list com- 
pletely. Finally, any instruc- 
tions needed should be very 
short. 

Send your entry (prefera- 
bly on cassette or disk) to: 

THE RAINBOW 

One-Liner Contest 

P.O. Box 385 
Prospect, KY 40059 




February i 989 THE RAINBOW 63 



,. - : ,v ,. 




About 
Your 
Subscription 



Your copy of $HE ; bainbowXis; 
sent second class mail. YotJ 
must not i f y us of a' n ew add re s s 
when you imove. Not ification 
should reac ti ; tir§ M o r t ha n 
the 15th of the month prior to 
the mo nt h i n which you c h an ge 
your address. Sorry, we cannot 
be responsible iter; sending 
another copy when you fail to 
notify us. 

Your mailing label also 
shows an account number and 
the subscription expiration 
date. Please indicate this ac- 
count number whe n renewing 
or correspondin g with us. It 
will help us help you better and 
faster. ";; Vi *.; 

For Canadian and other noi> 
U.S; subscribers, there may be 
a mailing address shown thatjs 
different from our editorial of- 
fice address. Do not send any 
correspondence to that mail- 
ing address. Send it to our edi- 
torial offices at Falsoft, inc.. 
The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 
385, Prospect, KY 40059. This 
a pplies to everyone except 
those whose subscriptions are 
through our distributor in Aus- 
tralia. 



64 



ijirlAINBOW February 1989 




JIM 74LS00 (ie J) provides 
proper Read and Write signals for 
PPL All other I/ O lines connect direc 
from the ROM port to the PPI ehi 
This configuration assigns the four 



addresses ' $FF40 

through SFF43, as shown in Figure 8. 



Hexadecimal 


Port 


Address 


Assignment 


FF40 


A 


FF41 


B 


FF42 


C 


FF43 


PPI Internal 


Figure 8: COEPP Peripheral Addresses 



Bit Assignments 

Bits 0 through 5 of Port A (PA0-PA5, 
address SFF40) are used to toggle 
outlets 1 through 6 (see figures 7 and 9). 
Each bit drives a 2N2222 NPN transis- 
tor through a l-Kilohm bias resistor. A 
"high" on the base of the transistor will 
operate the relay in the collector circuit 
to turn on the outlet; a "low" will release 
it to turn the outlet off (i.e., POKE 
&HFF40 , PEEK ( ) or 8 andfresSr 
ing enter would turn Outlet 3 on.) 

Bit 6 of Port A (PA6, SFF40) operates 
and releases the telephone relay in the 
same manner. Operating the relay $ot\< 



PHONE LINE (TIP) 



PHONE LINE (TIP) 



+ I2VDC 



r^PHONE RELAY 




— * i 



IK 



2N2222 -±: | N 40CH K7 



RED 



OUTLETS 




IK 



2N2222 



OUTLET 5 



IN400I K6 



RED 



OUTLETS 



o 

£ 

■4ft- 
V) 

cn 

QC 
Q 
O 
< 

J_ 0UTLET4 

2 

CL 
C 

<T> 
lO 
CVJ 

CO 
o 

K OUTLET3 




2N2222 



OUTLET 4 



IN4O0I K5 



IK 

RED 




-• r 



IK 



2N2222 




— 1 12V— » • ^ 1 

nZi 1 



IN400I K4 



1— W — AAAA 1|, 

RED 



OUTLET 3 



OUTLET 2 



OUTLET2 




IN400I K2 



L_^M_)| 
RED 



OUTLET I 



OUTLET I 



IN400I K 



RED 



Figure 9: Outlet Interface Circuit 




< 



to 

Z) 
CD 

o 
< 



FUSE 
10 A. 




7 COMPUTER CENTER 



MicroWorld II 
PO Box 5330 
Clinton, NJ 08891 



Since 1982 



[ MicroNorld j 



l f).-. J fx ;1 

rLi ft f~ , * ^ 

x i ft Flti-f i . i . 




call: In Pa: (215) 8 


63 8911 


: In NJ: (201)7: 


55 6138 



Free Shipping* 



26-3334 
26-3215 
26-3133 
26-2802 
26-2814 
26-1208 
26-3008 
26-3025 
26-3125 
26-3012 
26-3028 



CQeSin,i28K 

CM-8 

FD-502DrO, CoCo 
DMP-106 
DM P- 132 
CCr-81 

Joysticks (Pair) 
Color Mouse 
Del u xe Color Mouse 
Joystix DELUXE 



$248.00 
S179.00 
$149.00 
$245.00 
$43.00 
$10.00 
$33.00 
$38,00 
$24.00 




Hi -Res Joystick Intfce $8.00 



$199.00 
$12.00 
$12.00 



AXX-7117CoCoIII,5l2K Bd 
AXX-7123 Multi-pk Up-Old 
AXX-7124 Multi-pkUp-New 




26-3031 OS-9 Level U 
26-3032 OS-9 Devcl Sys. 
26-3035 Mullivue 

COMPUTERS 

25-1053 TANDY 1000HX 

25-1600 TANDY lOOOTX 
25-1401 TANDY 1000SL 
25-1601 TANDY 1000TL 
25-3500 TANDY 1400LT 
25-4071 TANDY 30001 IL 
25-4072 TANDY 3000NL 
25-5000 TANDY 4000 
25-5100 TANDY 4000 LX 

MONITORS 

25-1020 VM-4 Mono. Mon. 
25-1023 CM -5 RGB Mon: 
25-1024 CM- 11 RGB Mon. 
25-4035 EGM-1 Monitor 

25- 3011 VM-5 Mono. Mon. 

26- 3215 CM -8 



$64.00 
$82.00 
$40.00 

$445.00 
$819.00 

$699,00 
$969.00 
$1375.00 
$1135.00 
$1299.00 
$1979.00 
$2999.00 



$95.00 
$220.00 
$310.00 
$525.00 
$115.00 
$248.00 



HARD CARDS 




20 Meg Hard Card 


$439.00 


30 Meg ZUCKER 


$499.00 


HARD DISKS 




Seagate 20 Mg Kit 


$299.00 


Seagate 30 Mg Kit 


$349.00 


Seagate 40 Mg Kit (no Ctrl) 


$399.00 




FLOPPY DRIVES 


TEAC 5 1/4 Disk- 360 kb 


S99,00 


TEAC 3 1/2 Disk-720kb 


$119.00 






5 1/4 Ext. Drive- MX /EX 


$180.00 


3 1/2 Ext. Drive-HX/EX 


$199.00 


5 l/4 Disk-360kb 


$125.00 


3 l/2Disk-720kb 


$125.00 


3 1/2 to 5 1/4 Adapter 


S24.00 


3 1/2 Disk- 720kb *TL* 


$125.00 


31/2-51/4 Adapter *TL* 


$24.00 


5 1/4 1.2M FDD Kit 


$215.00 


5 1/4 360K FDD Kit 


$140.00 


PRINTERS 




DMP-106 


$149.00 


DMP-132 


$245.00 


DWP-230 


$345.00 


OMP 440 


$545.00 


DMP2120 


$1199.00 


LP1000 Laser 


$1899.00 


BOARDS 




Smart Watch 


$30.00 


Plus Upgrade Adapter Hoard 


$12.50 


Memory Plus Expansion BD 


$110.00 


PlusRS-232 


$45.00 


256K RAM Kit 


$110.00 


2 Port Serial Baord 


$79,00 


EGA Adapter 


$185.00 





0^ CVffipJ^A 

MicroWorld 
PO Box 69 
Wind Gap, Pa. 



Since 1982 



1 8091 



100% TANDY Products* 




MODEMS 




1200 Baud Tc Modem 
9d.nn \\a\u\ Hair ( d 


$79.00 

si Woo 


i'iUU DaUU I lall V- Li .VlUUvUI 

Pln« 190.0. Ranri PC Mndom 


51 SO 00 


MISC 

Serial M(,mw; 


$36.00 


Joystick- DELUXE 


$24.00 


Monitor Platform 


$24.00 


Ribbons - DMP-130 


$8.00 






Mips - R/S 


rf* i i f\f\ 

$1 1.00 


Disk Clean Kits 


$5.00 


Cover - DM P- 105/6 


$3.00 


Cover - CoCoII/ni 


$3.00 


v"v...s»«. r\\ii n tin 


jj.UU 


Bulk Erasers 


$12.00 


Flip n' Files w/lock 


$11.00 


3- 1 '2 or 5 - 1/ 4 


$i-50 


Library Case-Black 
Library Case-Ta n 


$2.00 


Paper- Mini 20# 


$4,00 


Paper #15 


$14.00 


Paper # 20 

DISKS 


$10.00 


Tandy SS 5 1/4 Disks 


$9.00 


Tandy IXS 5 1/4 Disks 


$10.00 


Tandy DS 3 1/2 Disks 


$28.00 


Win ncrs DS / DD W/Lib case 


$7.50 


Winners SS/DD W /Lib case 


$7.00 


r r ~~ ~. > Wjimmm ~ ' - 4 
1 5% Maslw hhuk Ha/uLh 


m 






?0% aj! {fcadia htmk h<^lwi 





* 100% TANDY Warranty on TANDY products - Manufacturer's Warranty applies on all other items. 

* FREE UPS shipping on orders over $50 (In the Continental US) - under $50 add $5 for shipping. 

* The above prices are CASH prices - add 3% for credit cards. No COD's wi U be taken. Prices 

may be slightly higher in our retail stores. 

* All returns must have prior authorization and are subject to a re-stocking fee. 



HOWARD MEDICAL COMPUTERS 

I 1690 N. Elston • Chicago, IL 60622 ORDERS (800) 443-1444 * INQUIRIES AND ORDER STATUS (312) 278-1440 

U r - Showroom Hours 8-5 M-F. 10-3 SAT 



in 



!* " 



f « 



9' 



* 5 STAR FINAL 



FEBRUARY '89 



VERY COLD 



HMC CUTS 515 to »266 



• « 



Hundreds of $ off Monitors sighted as Major Factor. HMC is reported to 
have made a special purchase on Magnavox monitors. These items, listed, 
are being offered at remarkable savings. 

MAGNAVOX 7622 12" Amber Screen offers 900 dots x 350 lines resolu- 
tion at 20 MHz on a dark glass anti-glare CRT with built-in audio and 1 year 
warranty. ($7 shipping) $ 88 7652 green screen also available $88 

MAGNAVOX 8 CM 515 has analog RGB for CoCo 3, TTL RGB for 
Tandy 1000 or IBM PC's, and composite color for CoCo 2 and 3. Built-in 
speaker. 14" screen with 640 dot x 240 line resolution. Plus 2 years parts 
and labor warranty, reg. list $499 was $298 $266 + $14 Shipping 

CC-3 Magnavox RGB cable only $ 19.95 with Magnavox Monitor 
order. $29.95 w/o monitor. 






••• • 



K 

* • 

/.." 



7622 8CM515 123A 

123A 12" This 12" green screen high resolution monitor offers 80 column 
capability, Zenith quality and a 90-day warranty valid at any of Zenith's 1200 
locations. Retail $199. Our price $67.50 ($7 shipping) REPACK 

VA-1 for monochrome and color monitors delivers video interface for CoCo's 
1 & 2 $29.45 ($2 shipping) 

DRIVE 0 +. Howards Drive 0 
gives you a DD-3 MPI drive, a CA-1 
cable and a HDS DC-5 Disk Control- 
ler for only $ 178. 45. Double sided 
double density 360K. ($5 shipping) 

No charge for Disto DC-3 upgrade 




HMCs Guarantee- 
A Promise you can take to the Bank. 



w • 



Howard Medical's 30-day guarantee 
is meant to eliminate the uncertainty 
of dealing with a company through 
the mail. Once you receive our hard- 
ware, try it out; test it for compat- 
ibility. If you're not happy with it for 
•.'* '.'•' * • *. . • • . 



any reason, return it in 30 days and 
we'll give you your money back (less 
shipping.) Shipping charges are for 
48 states. APO, Canada and Puerto 
Rico orders are higher. 



Price Break on DISTO 
Disk Controllers 

Includes controller and C-DOS 4.0 
ROM Chip. DISTO $ 75 DC-3 [J 
($2 shipping on all DISTO products) 

ADD-ON BOARDS 

DC-3P Mini Eprom programmer 
includes all software to program 
2764 or 27128 chips [B] $ 55 
DC-3C Clock Calendar and parallel 
printer port[C] $ 40 




RS-232 $49.95 

Replaces R.S. RS-232 board. Plugs in 
drive port or multi pack. 2 MHz 
operation works with OS-9.($2 ship) 

3 in 1 Board $59.45 

Clock calendar at 2 MHz parallel 
printer port pack requires DISTO 
Controller or MEB($2 ship) 



MEB 



$30 ($2 ship) 



Plugs into multi pak to expand 
DISTO DC-3 bus. Use clock in DC- 
3 and eprom programmer in MEB. 

24 HOUR ORDER LIKE 

DON'T MISS OUT. 
D0NT MISS OUT, ORDER T6DAY! 



800 / 443-1444 

WE ACCEPT VISA . MASTERCARD : 
. AMERICAN EXPRESS . C.O.D. OR.'-' 
CHECKS . SCHOOL P.O. 
NEW - DISCOVER CARD 




Use our 800 number! 



For credit card orders, you may want to phone in your subscription. Our 

credit card order number is (800) 847-0309, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. All other 

inquiries please call (502) 228-4492. 

We accept VISA, MasterCard and American Express. 

Subscriptions to the rainbow are $31 a year in the United States. Canadian 

rate is $38 (U.S. funds only). Surface rate elsewhere is $68 (U.S.). Airmail 

is $103 (U.S.). All subscriptions begin with the current issue. Please allow 

6 to 8 weeks for the first copy. Kentucky residents add 5% sales tax. 

In order to hold down non-editorial costs, we do not bill. 



Send Me Rainbow Magazine! 

Which Tandy Color Computer do you use? □ CoCo 1 □ CoCo 2 □ CoCo 3 

Here's your chance to have a Pot O' Gold full of programs, articles and information about 
CoCo every month of the year! 

As the premier magazine for the Tandy Color Computer, THE RAINBOW has more of 
everything — and greater variety, too. Do yourself and your CoCo a favor and subscribe to 
THE RAINBOW today! 

YES! Sign me up for a year (12 issues) of THE RAINBOW. 

□ NEW □ RENEW (attach label) 

Name 

Address 

City State ZIP 

□ Payment Enclosed (payment must accompany order) 
Charge: □ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 

Account Number 

Signature Card Expiration Date 



Our 800 number is also good for ordering 

RAINBOW ON TAPE or RAINBOW ON DISK! 

Just call (800) 847-0309 anytime from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. Credit card orders only. 
Subscriptions to rainbow on tape are $80 a year in the United States, $90 (U.S. 
funds) in Canada and $105 (U.S.) in all other countries. 

rainbow on disk is $99 a year in the United States, $115 (U.S.) in Canada and $130 
(U.S.) in all other countries. 

Individual issues of rainbow on tape are $10 in the U.S., $12 (U.S.) in Canada and 
all other countries. Individual issues of rainbow on disk are $12 in the U.S., $14 
(U.S.) in Canada, and $16 (U.S.) in all other countries. Kentucky residents please 
add 5% sales tax. 

rainbow on tape and rainbow on disk are not stand-alone products; you need the 
magazine for loading and operating instructions and the necessary documentation. 
the rainbow magazine is a separate purchase. 



Give Your Fingers A Break! 

YES! Sign me up: □ NEW □ RENEW (attach label) 

□ RAINBOW ON TAPE □ RAINBOW ON DISK 

(Available beginning with the October 
1986 issue) 

□ A Full Year □ Single Issue (specify month & year) 

Name — 

Address — 

City State ZIP 

□ Payment Enclosed (payment must accompany order) 
Charge: □ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 

Account Number . — _ _ 

Signature Card Expiration Date 




-o 

O 
co 

o 

m 



00 

m 

5 



5 

> 
O 

o 
u 
m 

CO 

co 
m 
m 



§ 00 

CO 



o CO 



> 

CO 

w m 

TJ CO 

3 CO 
s 

§ m 



T) 
ID 

o 

CO 
"D 

m 
O 



-< 



J3 
D 





O 
CO 

t 

m 



03 

m 

5 



5 

> 
O 

o 
m 

CO 
CO 

rn 
rn 



^00 

CO 



o CO 

CO Z 

w m 

CO 

s CO 

s 

§ m 

- "0 



"0 
JO 

o 

CO 
TJ 

m 

o 



-< 



9 

J3 
D 




The Biggest 
The Best 
Th e indispensable 




The 

THE COOK COMPUTER MONTHLY MAGAZINE 



THE RAINBOW is the biggest, best, brightest and 
most comprehensive publication a happy CoCo 
ever had! THE RAINBOW features more programs, 
more information and more in-depth treatment of 
the Tandy Coior Computer than any other source. 

A monthly issue contains nearly 200 pages and 
up to two dozen programs, 14 regular columns and 
as many as 12 new product reviews. And advertise- 
ments: THE RAINBOW is known as the medium for 
advertisers — which means every month it has a 
wealth of information unavailable anywhere else 
about new products! Hundreds of programs are 
advertised in its pages each month. 

Every single issue of THE RAINBOW covers the 
wide spectrum t>f interests in the Tandy Color 
Computer — from beginners' tutorials and arcade 
games to telecommunications and business and 
finance programs. Helpful utilities and do-it- 
yourself hardware projects make it easy and fun to 
expand your CoCo's capabilities. And, monthly 
reviews by independent reader reviewers take the 
guesswork out of buying new software and hard- 
ware products. 

Join the tens of thousands who have found THE 
RAINBOW to be an absolute necessity for their 
CoCo. With all this going for it, is it surprising that 
more than 90 percent of THE RAINBOW subscrib- 
ers renew their subscriptions? We're willing to bet 
that, a year from now, you'll be doing the same. 



Rainbow On Tape 

& Rainbow On Disk! 



— great ways to bring THE RAINBOW into your life. 
Each month, all you do is pop the tape into your 
cassette player or the disk into your drive. No more 
lost weekends. As soon as you read an article about 
a program in THE RAINBOW, it's ready to load and 
run. No work. No wait. 

Just think how your software library will grow. 
With your first year's subscription, you'll get almost 
250 new programs: games, utilities, business 
programs, home applications. And, with RAINBOW 
ON DISK, you'll also get all the OS-9 programs. 

RAINBOW ON TAPE and RAINBOW ON DISK — 
they're the "meat" of THE RAINBOW at a price that's 
"small potatoes." And now you even have a choice 
about how it should be served up to you. 

To get your first heaping helping, just fill out and 
return the attached reply card. No postage neces- 
sary. 



nects the speaker-phone to the tele- 
phone line to answer an incoming call 
or to get a dial tone when a call is placed. 
Pulsing the relay simulates rotary dial- 
ing. Rotary dialing will work on both 
rotary and Touch-Tone (TM) telephone 
lines and eliminates the need to inter- 
face a Touch-Tone chip to the phone 
line. To simulate rotary dialing, it is 
necessary to open the telephone line at 
a rate of 10 pulses per second with 50 
percent break. That means that for each 
pulse, the relay contacts must be closed 
50 percent of the time and open the 
other 50 percent. 

Bit 7 of Port A (PA7, $FF40) is used 
to blank the display unit when a func- 
tion has been executed. Setting the bit 
high will blank the display. The 74LS04 
inverts the signal to the 7447 to provide 
the low required for display blanking. 

Bits 0 through 3 of Port B (PB0-PB3, 
SFF41) provide the BCD output to 
drive the display unit. Bits 4 through 7 
(PB4-PB7, SFF41) are reserved for 
future expansion. 

Bits 0 and 1 of Port C (PC0-PC1, 
SFF42) are used as inputs. Bits 2 
through 7 are reserved. Although only 
two of the inputs are used to select and 
execute joystick functions, four are 



inverted by the 74LS04. Since the four 
inputs to the 74LS04 are tied high 
through the 4.7K resistors, the outputs 
to the PPI (PC0-PC3) are all held low 
for a no-signal condition. When the 
joystick is operated in either direction, 
the appropriate bit to the PPI (EXEC or 
SEL) will go high. 

The Program 

Let's look at the program and give 
you some ideas on how to write your 
own. The program shown in Listing 1 
is the Pascal source code for the COEPP 
program. As you'll see shortly, Pascal 
was chosen to allow the program to 
automatically execute when power is 
applied to the computer. For BASIC, 
reading the radio receiver output is 
accomplished with peeks, while operat- 
ing the peripheral equipment is accom- 
plished with pokes. Understanding the 
Pascal source code will help you write 
a BASIC version. 

Refer to Listing 1 for a brief expla- 
nation. Five constants are declared at 
the beginning of the program. The first 
one, Phonenumber, is the start address 
of the telephone number memory slots. 
Each slot is twelve bytes long, one byte 
for each digit. Unused bytes are poked 



with values greater than 10. The pro- 
gram uses the Phonenumber constant 
plus the slot number (0 through 9) to 
find the start address of the number you 
select. PORTA, PDRTB and PORTC are 
assigned the addresses of the 8255 ports, 
while PPI is assigned the address of the 
8255 internal register (I REG, $FF43). 

Next all variables are declared. 
LRSTPDRTA is an eight-element Boolean 
array used to keep track of the last state 
of the eight bits of Port A ($FF40). If 
the selected bit is high, the array element 
will be true. If the bit is low, the array 
element will be false. 

CURRENTPDRTR, LRSTPDRTB, LRST- 
PDRTC and LRSTDISPLfiY keep track of 
the state of the three PPI port values 
and the current function number. 
JDYSTK stores the results of reading the 
radio receiver output. 

The program actually begins at the 
BEGIN statement. First, the program 
initializes program variables. Then the 
PPIIREGis loaded with Decimal 1 29 to 
set up the input and output ports of the 
8255 PPI. PQRTR is loaded with zero to 
turn everything off, and PQRTB is loaded 
with 1 to display the first function 
number. 

The next section of the program reads 



CoCo 2 Owners J Still using ju3t RS-DOS? 
MO MORE EXCUSES ! 

Start OS-9 

Aa Eajoyiblc Huds-On Guide To 
OS-9 Level 2 On tne Coior Computer 3 

By Paaii X Ward 



At Princeton RAINBOWfeat, we sold out of our show stoefc. Then we 
sold out of the ENTIRE First Edition. Now, 
GET THE LATEST , the SECOND EDITION 1 

KEY? — Exclusive Delphi Sign-up Offer: One hour free on-line 
time (S7.20 value!) and free "Delphi: The Official Guide" 
JlQiLE — More examples than before I More pages I 
STTLT, T VCLUDES — Articles by Dale Puckett, Marty Goodman, 

Bill Brady, and Kevin Darling! 
ADDED VALUE — free disk with hands-on examples and lightning- 
fast utilities from Steve Goldberg! 

Requires 5 1 ZK CoCo 3, OS-9 Level 2. two disk drives, 
and 30-coiumn monitor 



Kenneth-Leigh Enterprises is proud to announce an exclusive 
arrangement with Stepnen Goldberg to distribute his famous 
OS-9 utilities. For pros and novices. 

The Goldberg Utilities, Volume I 
From FBN Software 

Includes 15 utilities Append. Cls. Copy, Count; D, Crep. Lower, Upper, 

Sort. Zcooy ana others 
Sorry, Dsort is aot available at this time sorrv tor anv inconvenience! 



"Start OS-9: An EnfovabLe Hands-On Guide - US 
"The Goldbere Utilities. Volume L" -- S24.95 US 
Our famous 'NO MORE EXCUSES - Start OS-9" T-shirt -- S8.95 US 
Please add iZ,:<) 5/H Personal checks, major credit cards, money orders welcome. 



Kenneth-Leieh Enterprises liM) Bihmore Street NW Suite 10 
Washington DC 20009 202/232-4246 9:30 - o:30 EST 



TANDY COMPUTER 
DISCOUNTS 



COLOR COMPUTERS 



26-3334 CoCo 3 

26-3215 CM-8 color monitor 

PRINTERS 

26-2802 D MP 106 
26-2808 DMP440 
26-2814 DMP-132 

Complete line of Tandy (Daisy Wheel) print wheels 

MSDOS COMPUTERS 

25-1053 TANDY 1000 HX 
25-1401 TANDY 1000 SL 
25-1601 TANDY 1000 TL 
25-4072 TANDY 3000 NL 
25-1023 CM-5 color monitor 
25-1020 VM-4 Monochrome monitor 



165.00 
259.95 



179.95 
599.00 
299.95 



599.00 
799.00 
1,050.00 
1,500.00 
249.95 
110.00 



We Carry the Complete Line of Tandy 
Computer Products at Discount Prices 

CALL FOR A FREE PRICE LIST 800-257-5556 
IN N.J. CALL 609-769-0551 

WOODSTOWN ELECTRONICS 

Rt. 40 E. WOODSTOWN, N.J. 08098 



February 1989 THE RAINBOW 67 









Start 




Program 




Start End Execute 


Address 




Name 


Version 


All All All 

Address Address Address 


of Tel. # 




CDEPPRRM/BIN 


RAM 


$3000 $4878 $3000 


$4800 




COEPPROIVBIN 


ROM 


$C000 $D878 $C000 


SD800 




Figure 10: Program Memory Requirements 








21 
22 



23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
26 



A2 / 
^A3_/ 
.A4 > 



A5 / 
A6 / 

A7_y 
A8 / 

A9 / 

an/ 



30- 
3l« 
37- 
38- 
39- 
10- 



( AI2 
,AI3 
t AI4 

,AI5 
,DO 



I I 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 

33*» 



t D2 / 

t D3 / 

t D4 , 

.05 1 



D6 / 
D7 , 



32 «« 



CTS 



10 



0 



V 
V 



V 



25 



\ 24 



V_2I 



\ 23 
k 2 



AO 

Al 

A2 

A3 

A4 

A5 

A6 

A7 

A6 

A9 

AIO 
Al I 
AI2 



28 
VCC 

2764 
EPROM 



PGM 



CE 



DO 
Dl 
D2 
D3 

D4 
D5 
D6 
D7 

OE 



GND 



14" 



27 



20 



12 



13 



15 



16 



17 



18 



19 



22 



SI 



Figure 11: EPROM Circuit 



the telephone number memory slots and 
displays the phone numbers on the 
optional TV screen. Next comes the 
main program loop. The program will 
loop through this section until the 
computer is reset or power is turned off. 
The comments explain what the pro- 
gram is doing, so it isn't necessary to go 
into great detail here. There are a couple 
of things Td like to explain, though. 

First, the software compensates for 
the inequities of the radio and relay 
drivers by reading the receiver output 75 
consecutive times to ensure that the 
signal is valid. After a valid read is 
completed, the program loops for 
15,000 instruction cycles to allow the 
receiver ample time to settle down. 

The second explanation is about 
cliiilmg. A zero on the telephone dial or 
button is actually equal to 10 and is 
stored as such in the computer memory. 
The program dials 10 pulses but dis- 
plays a zero. Two program loops are 
used to complete dialing. The first loop 
is executed once for each pulse required. 
The number six requires six pulses, so 
the loop is executed six times. The 
second loop is a time-delay loop, which 
is executed for the remainder of the ten 
pulses. In the above example, the sec- 
ond loop is executed four times (i.e., 10- 
6=4). This allows all digits dialed to be 
shown on the display unit an equal 
length of time. 

The telephone numbers are stored in 
memory at the end of the compiled 
program by poking telephone number 
digits into consecutive memory ad- 
dresses in RAM. For the EPROM 
version shown, the program starts at 
Address $C000 and the telephone 
numbers at SD800. For an all-RAM 
version, you can load the program at 
$3000 and the telephone numbers at 
$4800. Make sure you change the 
Phonenumber constant in the program 
source code. 

If the program is burned into ROM, 
you must poke the telephone numbers 
into memory before burning the ROM 
chip. Each phone number is allowed 12 
bytes of memory. Unused bytes will 
contain values greater than 10. Zeroes 
are always stored as 10s and displayed 
as zeros. 

Two versions of the compiled pro- 
gram are provided for RAINBOW ON 
TAPE and RAINBOW ON DISK. Figure 10 
lists the program addresses for each 
version. 

Auto Execute 

Because the system was designed for 
disabled persons, it wouldn't make 



sense for the user to have to load system 
software from tape or disk. So the 
logical choice is to program an EPROM 
chip in machine language and have the 
computer execute the program every 
time the reset button is pressed or the 
power is turned on. That's why Pascal 
was chosen. The program can be loaded 
anywhere into memory, so it's ideal for 
an EPROM. 

Figure 1 1 shows the EPROM circuit 
for a CoCo. IC1 is a 2764, 8K-by-8-bit 
EPROM that is connected to the CoCo 
ROM port. Pins 7 and 8 of the ROM 
port are tied together through Switch 
S 1 . When S 1 is closed , the program will 
automatically execute on reset or power 
up. When SI is open, the computer 
functions in the normal fashion and the 



program can be executed by typing 
EXEC 49152 and pressing ENTER. For 
those who wish to use all ROM memory 
available, refer to the schematic of the 
Static RAM Interface circuit on Page 
152 of the May '88 issue of THE rain- 
bow. This circuit is directly compatible 
with 2764 EPROMs, and you can re- 
place the SRAMs of the SRI circuit 
with 2764 EPROMs. If you want to 
program an EPROM but don't have an 
EPROM programmer, ask your local 
CoCo club for assistance. 



(Questions or comments regarding 
this project may be directed to the 
author at 14201 Marquette N.E., Albu- 
querque, NM 87123. Please enclose an 
SASE when requesting a reply.) □ 



68 THE RAINBOW February 1 989 





DISK 
CONTROLLER 

We at OWL-WARE are 
pleased to announce that we 
have purchased the rights to all 
of the Color Computer 
Products of J&M Systems. 
J&M has had more experience 
with CoCo controllers than any 
other supplier (except for 
Radio Shack® itself) and we 
are proud to add them to our 
nest! OWL-WARE will now be 
producing J&M controllers 
under the OWL brand. These 
controllers all use J&M's 
proven designs, with some 
minor improvements, and they 
will serve you for years to come. 

• All gold contacts 

• Works with all CoCo 
models (1,2,3) 

• Holds 2 switchable ROMS 

• Positive switching by 
simple jumper or optional 
external switch (No erratic 
software or pokes re- 
quired) 

• Buffered I/O lines to help 
prevent burn-out if unit 
accidentally pulled out 
with the system on 

• Latching chips are sock- 
eted to speed repairs 

• Does not use the WD1773 
chip which caused 
problems with many CoCo 
3 systems and is now dis- 
continued 

• Attractive all metal case 

• Dealer inquiries now in- 
vited 




liffliiiiil 

iiiilplllli 



ipiiiiiiiiiiilii 



See.the next 2 pages for more 
drive and software specials 
from OWL-WARE 




m 



mmmyMBM'mm: 





Disk drives are not our only business, but they sure are our 
main business! We have been selling hard and floppy drives for 
the CoCo longer than any other Rainbow advertiser. Our double 
sided drives are brand new, half-heights with a full one year 
warranty! The full-height drives offered cheap by our competi- 
tion are used or surplus/ 




^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 



CASE AND 
POWER 
SUPPLY 

In recent months it has be- 
come very difficult to obtain de- 
pendable, safe power supply 
and cases for floppy drive sys- 
tems. They just couldn't pass 
our quality control. OWL- 
WARE has now produced a 
case and power supply that you 
can be proud to own and use. 
We believe that this is the best 
and most attractive drive case 
available for any computer. 

• Built in surge protector! 
(we believe that this fea- 
ture is unique in CoCo 
drive cases) 

• Sleek, modern design 

• Heavy-duty power supply 

• Fully shielded data cable 

• Modular power supply 
construction for ease of 
repairs 

• Stackable case design 

• Dealer inquiries now in- 
vited 




■:-: 




More 




OWL-WARE 

P.O. Box 116-A 
Mertztown, PA 19539 
— ORDER LINES (only) — 

(800) 245-6228 
(21 5) 682-6855 (PA) 




Pro ven 



On the Razor's Edge of 



Basic and OS-9 Hard 
Drive Systems 

Proven Performance for Demanding Home or 

Business Users 



Every hard drive which has been 
produced by OWL-WARE during the 
last 3 years is complete. A system con- 
sists of software, hard drive, controller, 
heavy-duty power supply, and LR Tech 
Interface. There are no hidden costs for 
assembly or testing. When a drive sys- 
tem is ordered, we fully assemble, test, 
and burn-in the system for 3 full days. 
This ensures dependability and op- 
timum performance. 

We have now been supplying CoCo 
hard drive systems and parts for more 
than 3 years. This is the longest history 
in the CoCo market of any system. 
Some other advertisers are stating that 
they have one of the most reliable sys- 
tems for the CoCo with all of 4 months 
history in the CoCo hard drive marketl 
We have reached our position in the 
hard drive market by providing our cus- 
tomers with a quality product that they 
(and we) can be proud to own and use. 



Because of many requests for a lower 
price system in kit form, we are now 
selling a kit of all parts at a significant 
discount compared to our regular 
prices. We recommend this kit (or any 
kits offered by any other supplier) only 
to those who have experience in 
electronic assembly and OS-9. 

We have LR Tech and Burke & Burke 



For OS-9 
Levels 1 

and % 



18 





••* '•.. r . ':: 


























OWL Hard Drive BASIC 3 

There have been several ads in this 
magazine about BASIC for Color 
Computer hard drive systems. These 
ads sometimes only tell a part of the 
story. Our BASIC system price in- 
cludes assembly, testing, and 3-day 
burn-in period. We do not require a 
Multi-pak to operate. 

Our hard drive systems are fast, reli- 
able, and reasonable in price. This has 
been proven by hundreds of users over 
the past 3 years. We do not have to turn 
off error checking for speed. We 
achieve high speed BASIC from a uni- 
que indexing method. 

The table below will summarize some 
of the key points about our BASIC hard 
drive system and the B&B system. We 
believe that we have the best BASIC in- 
terface for CoCo hard drives available. 



BASIC Hard Drive Systems 

Feature OWL B&B 



Drive Portion 
Available at 
One Time 



Entire 



Partial (4 
sections) 



User Sets 

BASIC/OS-9 

Partitions 



YES 



Yes 



Add to Exist- 
ing OS-9 
Drive Without 
Reformat 



YES 



No(?) 



Drives 0-3 
Hard/Floppy 



YES 



No 



Built in Park 



YES 



No 



Speed 



FAST 



Fast 



All feature details are believed to be 
true at time of writing and are subject 
to change. We believe that our BASIC 
hard drives are the fastest due to our in- 
dexing method, but both systems are 
fast and we sell both. On ours all 
BASIC commands work including 
DSKINI, DSKIS, and DSKOl 



Prices: With/Without Hard 

Drive 

$35./$79. 



Technology 



the Color Computer Frontier 




Bonus! 

Special 

Bundled 

Software 

with any 

Disk Drive 

Purchase! 




Floppy Drive Systems 

The Highest Quality for Years of Service 

(We have located a number of unused, surplus single sided drives for 
those who wish a quality, inexpensive system.) 

Drive 0 Systems (Half Height, Double Sided, Direct 
Drives) $199. (Same but Single sided) $185 

Drive 0 systems complete with drive, controller, legal DOS, 

cable, case, power supply, and manual 

Drive 1 Systems (Half Height, Double Sided, Direct 

Drives) $129. (Same but Single sided) $115. 

New 3.5", 720K Drives for OS-9 with case & 

Power Supply $179. 

Drive 1 Systems have drive, case, power supply. (You may 
require optional cable and/or DOS chip to use) 

Special for 0/1 Combos (Drives 0,1,2,3) $295. 



■■■■■■■■ 

ipi§§i 

: !§|§l|; 

lil^BllllBl 




All drives are new and fully assembled. 
We ship only FULLY TESTED and 
CERTIFIED at these low prices. We 
use Fuji, YE Data, and other fine 
brands. No drives are used or surplus 
unless otherwise stated to you when 
you order. We appear to be the one of 
the few advertisers in Rainbow who 
can truly make this claim. We have 5 
years experience in the CoCo disk 
drive market! We are able to provide 
support when you have a problem. 




Order Numbers (only) 

1-880-245*6228 

■■■HB2-6855 




OWL WARE Software Bundle 



Disk Tutorial/Utilities/Games 
DISK TUTOR Ver 1.1 

Learn how to use your disk drive from 
this multi-lesson, machine language 
program. This tutor takes you through 
your lessons and corrects your mistakes 
for a quick, painless disk drive introduc- 
tion. (This professionally written tutor 
is easily worth the bundle's total price.) 

OWL DOS 

An operating system that gives faster 
disk access and allows the use of 
double-sided drives. Corrects a floating 
point number error on early CoCo sys- 
tems. 

COPY-IT 

Quickly copies selected programs be- 
tween disks. A wild card option selects 
groups of programs to copy. 

VERIFY 

Verifies reading of each sector. Bad 
sectors are listed on the screen. 

2 GAMES 

We will select 2 games from our stock. 
These sold for more than $20 each. 

If sold separately this is more than $125 
worth of software!! 

Do not mistake this software with 
cheap, non-professional "Public 
Domain" software which is being of- 
fered by others. All of this software is 
copyrighted and professional in quality. 
The tutor is unique with us and has 
helped thousands of new users learn 
their disk drive. 

only $27.95 
(or even better) 
only $6.95 with 
any Disk Drive Purchase!! 

Our prices, include ja. discount for cash 
out do not mciuae snipping. 

OWL-WARE has a liberal warranty policy. During the warran- 
ty period, all defective items will be repaired or replaced at our 
option at no cost to the buyer except for shipping costs. Call 
our tech number for return. Return of non-defective or un- 
authorized returns are subject to a service charge. 



Drives 1 Year Warranty 



immmmmmmmmi 

^^pHBIillill 

pa lllll 




Submitting 

Material 
To Rainbow 

Contributions to the rainbow 
are welcome from everyone. We 
like to run a variety of programs 
that are useful/helpful/fun for 
other CoCo owners. 

WHAT TO WRITE: We are inter- 
ested in what you may wish to tell 
our readers. We accept for consid- 
eration anything that is well- 
written and has a practical appli- 
cation for the Tandy Color Com- 
puter. If it interests you, it will 
probably interest lots of others. 
However, we vastly prefer articles 
with accompanying programs 
which can be entered and run. The 
more unique the idea, the more the 
appeal. We have a continuing need 
for short articles with short list- 
ings. These are especially appeal- 
ing to our many beginners. 

FORMAT: Program submis- 
sions must be on tape or disk, and 
it is best to make several saves, at 
least one of them in ASCII format. 
We're sorry, but we do not have 
time to key in programs and debug 
our typing errors. All programs 
should be supported by some ed- 
itorial commentary explaining 
how the program works. We also 
prefer that editorial copy be in- 
cluded on the tape or disk using 
any of the word processors cur- 
rently available for the Color Com- 
puter. Also, please include a 
double-spaced printout of your 
editorial material and program 
listing. Do not send text in all 
capital letters; use upper- and 
lowercase. 

COMPENSATION: We do pay 
for submissions, based on a 
number of criteria. Those wishing 
remuneration should so state 
when making submissions. 

For the benefit of those who 
wish more detailed information on 
making submissions, please send 
a self-addressed, stamped enve- 
lope (SASE) to: Submission 
Guidelines, the rainbow, The Fal- 
soft Building, P.O. Box 385, Pros- 
pect, KY 40059. We will send you 
comprehensive guidelines. 

Please do not submit material 
currently submitted to another 
publication. 



Listing 1: CDEPPRAM 
PROGRAM COEPP (INPUT, OUTPUT) ; 

(* COEPP VERSION 1.0 NOV. 6,1987 *) 
(* WRITTEN BY DENNIS H. WEIDE *) 
(* COPYRIGHT 1987 *) 

(* THIS VERSION IS FOR *) 

(* 16K STATIC RAM *) 

CONST PHONENUMBER=$E000; 
PORTA=$FF40; 
P0RTB=$FF41; 
P0RTC=$FF42 ; 
PPI=$FF43; 

VAR LASTPORTA : ARRAY [ 1 . . 8 ] OF BOOLEAN; 
CURRENTPORTA, 
LASTPORTB, 
LASTPORTC, 
LASTDISPLAY, 
NUMBER , SCRAP , JOYSTK , A , B,C,D,E,F,G,H: INTEGER ; 
DUMMY , ANSWER : STRING ( 12 ) ; 

BEGIN 
PAGE; 

FOR A:»l TO 8 DO LASTPORTA [A] :=FALSE; 
CURRENTPORTA :=0; 
LASTDISPLAY :=1 
BYTEfPPI] :-129 
BYTE [PORTA] :=0 
BYTE[PORTB] : =LASTDISPLAY ; 
WRITELN ( f TELEPHONE BOOK 1 ) ; 

WRITELN(» 1 ); 

FOR A:=0 TO 9 DO BEGIN 

SCRAP :=PH0NENUMBER+(12*A) ; 

WRITE(»# ? ,A:1, 1 ') ; 

FOR B:=l TO 12 DO BEGIN 
C:=BYTE[ SCRAP] ; 
IF C=10 THEN C:=0; 
IF C<11 THEN WRITE(C:1); 
SCRAP :=SUCC (SCRAP) ; 

END; (*FOR*) 

WRITELN ; 
END; (*F0R*) 
CURS0R(448) ; 

WRITE ('ADD PHONE NUMBERS (Y/N)? T ); 
READLN (ANSWER) ; 
WHILE ANSWERS Y f DO BEGIN 

CURS0R(448) ; 

WRITELN; 

CURSOR(448) ; 

WRITE ('ENTER PAGE NUMBER (0-9)>'); 
READLN (NUMBER) ; 
CURSOR(448) ; 
WRITELN ; 
CURSOR(448) ; 

WRITE ('ENTER PHONE NUMBER >'); 
READLN (ANSWER) ; 



72 THE RAINBOW February 1989 



ANSWER : =ANSWER+ 1 ************ ' ; 
SCRAP : =PH0NENUMBER+(12*NUMBER) ; 
BUFFER*) 

FOR B:=l TO 12 DO BEGIN 

STRINGCOPY (ANSWER , B , 1 , DUMMY) ; 

C:=ENCODE (DUMMY) ; 

IF DUMMY='* ! THEN C:=255; 

IF C=0 THEN C:=10; 

BYTE [SCRAP] :=C; 

SCRAP :=SUCC (SCRAP) ; 
END; (*FOR*) 

SCRAP : =PHONENUMBER+(12*NUMBER) ; 
CURSOR((NUMBER*32)+68) ; 
REPEAT 

A : =BYTE [SCRAP ] ; 

IF A=10 THEN A:=0; 

IF A<11 THEN WRITE(A:1); 

SCRAP:=SUCC(SCRAP) ; 
UNTIL A>10; 

WRITE(' ? ); 
CURSOR(448) ; 
WRITELN; 
CURSOR(448) ; 

WRITE ( 'ENTER ANOTHER NUMBER (Y/N)? f ); 
READLN (ANSWER) ; 
END; (*WHILE*) 



(*FIND START ADDR OF PHONE 



(* MAIN PROGRAM LOOP *) 




PAOGAAMS • PI atPHf Ail S • SUPPLK S • Sf RVICC 




Fast Delivery... 
Friendly Service 

Now in our 7th year! 



* NEW LOW PRICES * 

Avatex1200e $79 Avatex 2400 $169 

with Coco Cable 89 with Coco Cable 179 

— (Coco 3 only) 

Reviewed in fX. with RS232 Cable* 205 

April, 1988 \ \\ 
Rainbow! \ \L 

Avatex 2400, Cable 
AUTOTERM . . . $209 



Avatex 1200e, Cable 
AUTOTERM... $119 



HI 



'Coco 1. 2 requires Deluxe RS-232 Pak 



• Call • 

513-396 SOFT 



• Shop by Modem • 

513-396 SHOP 





22 35 Losanhwille, Cincinnati, OH 45237 

iHiPPIFtfj Mill b* fniifM KhfU TUAL C DVT 
OWar*iM*nl4l(W5.5%$pr« T« COOrnddZSU 



I 



OS*? POWER 0S9 POWER 0S9 POWER 0S9 POWER 0S9 POWER 
Move into the Forefront of Power with AMOST ! 



Release the full potential of 0S9 ! Imagine being 
able to use WILDCARDS on any command line. This 
is only one of the benefits you will enjoy with 
our professional shell. You get four powerful 
programs designed to make using 0S9 Level I and 
Level II even easier! 

ShCLL 

Replaces existing shell. Wildcard substitution #anywhere* 
in the pathlist - works with existing programs! Pass 
parameters to procedure files. Includes more bu l 1 t-in 
shell commands. 



COPY 

More versatile than old copy command, 
files to a directory . Sor t files* 
filesi or copy only newest versions. 



Copy one or more 
overwr 1 te existing 



MOVE 

Reorganize your files. Uses same options as COPY. 
Optimized for speed' Also replaces 059 RENAME. 

PRINT 

Get neati organized printouts every time 1 Provides headers 

with date and time i numbered pages ; set length , width s 

margins , and title . Complete control of all features' 



Get 4M0ST 



i _ 



ONLY «24.95 US < +*2 shipping). 



SATISFACTION GUARANTEED ! 

Send cheque or money order payable toi 

MAGUS SYSTEMS ENGINEERING 

33A Woodvale Green, 
Nepean , Ontario, CANADA 

0S9 POWER 0S9 POWER 0S9 POWER 0S9 POWER 0S9 POWER 



February 1989 THE RAINBOW 73 



*> 



CURSOR(448) ; 
WRITELN ; 

WHILE TRUE DO BEGIN 
JOYSTK : =BYTE [ PORTG ] ; 
A:=JOYSTK AND 3; 

C:=l; 

FOR SCRAP :=1 TO 75 DO BEGIN 

JOYSTK :=BYTE[PORTC] ; 

B:=JOYSTK AND 3; 

IF B=A THEN C:=SUGC(G); 
END; (*FOR*) 
IF COSCRAP THEN A:=0; 
CASE A OF 

1: BEGIN 

LASTDISPLAY:=SUCC(LASTDISPLAY) ; 

IF LASTDISPLAY>9 THEN LASTDISPLAY: =1 ; 

BYTE[PORTB] : =LASTDI SPLAY ; 

FOR SCRAP :=1 TO 15000 DO ; 
END; (*BEGIN*) 
2: BEGIN 

CASE LASTDISPLAY OF 
1: SCRAP :-l; 



c* 
(* 
<* 
(* 
(* 
<* 
(* 
(* 



READ JOYSTK FOR *) 
INPUT REQUEST *) 
IGNORE ALL BITS *) 
EXCEPT 0 AND 1. *) 
READ JOYSTK 75 *) 
TIMES TO ENSURE *) 
THAT THIS IS A *) 
VALID REQUEST. *) 



<* 
(* 



IF INPUT=1, THEN *) 
INCREMENT DISPLAY *) 



(* 
(* 



DELAY PROGRAM SO *) 
IT WON'T RUN AWAY *) 



2:SCRAP:=2; 

3: SCRAP: =4; 
4:SCRAP:=8; 
5: SCRAP: =16; 
6:SCRAP:=32; 
7: BEGIN 

NUMBER :=0; 

BYTE[PORTB] : =NUMBER; 
FOR SCRAP :=1 TO 15000 DO 
D:=0; 

WHILE D<2 DO BEGIN 
JOYSTK :=BYTE[PORTC] ; 
D:=JOYSTK AND 3; 
F:-l; 



(* SET BITS TO REQUIRED VALUES 
(* TO TOGGLE OUTLETS OR RELAYS 



(* GIVE OFF-HK AND DIAL OUT *) 
(* SET DISPLAY TO ZERO *) 



(* 
(* 
<* 



(* 

(* 
(* 



FOR SCRAP :«1 TO 75 DO BEGIN 
JOYSTK :=BYTE[PORTC] ; 
E:=JOYSTK AND 3; 
IF E=D THEN F:=SUCC(F); 
END; (*FOR*) 
IF FO SCRAP THEN D:=0; 
CASE D OF 
1: BEGIN 

NUMBER: -SUCC (NUMBER) ; 
IF NUMBER>9 THEN NUMBER :=0; 
BYTE[PORTB] :=NUMBER; 
FOR SCRAP :=1 TO 15000 DO ; 
END; (*BEGIN*) 
2: BEGIN 

BYTE [PORTA] : =CURRENTPORTA+192 ; 
FOR SCRAP :=1 TO 30000 DO ; 
SCRAP : =PHONENUMBER+(12*NUMBER) 
FOR ©:-l TO 12 DO BEGIN 
E:=BYTE[ SCRAP] ; 



READ JOYSTK TO DETERMINE *) 
IF DIALLING OR SELECTING *) 
NUMBER. *) 

READ 75 CONSECUTIVE TIMES *) 
TO DETERMINE IF REQUEST *) 
IS VALID. *) 



(* ADVANCE DISPLAY NUMBER *) 



(* DIAL NUMBER *) 

(* GIVE OFF-HK *) 

(* WAIT FOR DIAL TONE 

(* FIND START *) 

(* READ 12 NUMBERS AND *) 



74 THE RAINBOW February 1989 



*) 
*) 
*) 
*) 



IF E<11 THEN BEGIN 

IF E«10 THEN BYTE[PORTB] :=0 

ELSE BYTE[PORTB] :=E; 
FOR P:-l, TO E DO BEGIN 

BYTE [PORTA] : =CURRENTPORTA ; 

FOR H:=l TO 1000 DO ; 

BYTE [PORTA] : =CURRENTPORTA+64 ; 

FOR H:=l TO 1000 DO ; 
END; (*FOR*) 

FOR F:=l TO 10-E DO FOR H:=l TO 1000 DO 
BYTE [PORTA] : =CURRENTPORTA+192 ; 
FOR H:=l TO 10000 DO ; 

END; (*IF*) 

SCRAP :=SUCC(SCRAP) ; 
END; (*FOR*) 



(* DIAL ONLY IF NUMBER *) 
(* EQUALS 1 TO 10. IF *) 
(* NUMBER=10 , DISPLAY *) 
(* A ZERO *) 
(* ON HOOK *) 

(* OFF HOOK *) 



CURRENTPORTA : -CURRENTPORTA+6 4 ; 
BYTE [PORTA] : =CURRENTPORTA+128 ; 



LASTDISPLAY:=8; 



BYTEfPORTB] : =LASTDISPLAY ; 



(* UPDATE PORTA FOR OFF-HK 

(* DELETE THIS LINE IF TBL 

(* SET DISPLAY TO 8 FOR 

(* DISCONNECT (ON-HK) 



FOR SCRAP : =1 
END (*WHILE*) 
END; (*CASE*) 
END; (*WHILE*) 



TO 15000 DO 



Arc you having trouble learning machine language? 
Are you tired oi depending on Ba^ic subroutines? 
Then this program is for you: 

ROOTS 

A machine language source file with over 100 subroutines. You can easily 
append it tc vour own source files and be free of Basic. You can send 
characters to the screen or printer, read and write sectors to disk, 
convert registers into ASCII numbers, generate sound, create and read 
disk files, transfer data through a ooden, generate random numbers, put 
ASCII characters on hi-res screens, read joysticks, INPUT strings and 
numbers, use 32/40/64/80 columns, and many more. On the CoCo III you 
can use the extra keys, speed, graphics, and memory. Best of all, you 
can change Roots to fit j our needs and learn more about machine 
language. Most routines work on a Cod II. Disk only. 125 

DIASM 

A powerful disassembler that can disassemble files even If they overlap 
Diasm or Basic, ^ou can print the entire file or part of it. Editing 
features mciuae: find, insert, ana delete a byte; toggle between decimal 
and hexadecimal base: jump to an address, and much more. Works with 
auto-executinE, programs. Many other features. CoCo I, II. or III, disk 
onlv. S20 



OMNI UTILITY 

The ultimate CoCo III disk file-nandling utility program. An on-screen 
directory allows you to copy, kill, list, oxecute. display inlormaGon 
about, and rename files at the touch of a key. You can also alphabetize 
and move directory entries, and tormat. backup, verily . and pnnt tne 
directory of disks. There is a fuil-ieatured sector editor, and other 
features. $20 



GAT BACKUP 



The ultimate CoCo III disk backup utility. It gives you the options to 
backup thr entire disk, a section, or only the granules in use. It makes 
multiple copies, and copies 35 tracks in two passes — fast. It formats 
and gives d:re-~tnnes. $15 



JUBILEX 

A fast-paced game that requires skill and quick thinking. Pilot your 
ship nver the planet Jubilex. Avoid cannon shots and roci;ets from the 
ground while you battie their aircraft. You can modify and improve your 
weapon system. Requires joystick, CoCo III, and aisk drive. 525 

All programs are 100% machine language. For an extra $5 you can get 
the source file with the program t price of ROOTS includes source file). 
We pay shipping and sales tax. Write far more information, or send 
check or money order to: 

GSW Software 
8345 Glenwood 
Overland Park, KS 66212 





WE'VE CHOSEN THE BEST OF OVER 760 PROGRAMS (OVER 6 YEARS 
OF ACCUMULATING FINE SOFTWARE), AND PACKAGED THEM FOR 
YOU. 12 PROGRAMS EACH PACKAGE. COLOR COMPUTER I, II or III, 
SPECIFYTAPE OR DISK. ONLY $29.95 EACH PACKAGE! 5 NEW ONES! 



#1 Home Mgmt I 

Budget 

Checkbook Balancer 
Cost of Living 
Tinycalc Spreadsheet 
Electronic Datebook 
Account Manager 
Stock Market 
Word Processor 
Lottery Analyst 
Coco Database 
Coco Terminal 
Bartender 

#4 Busines s Helper 

Workmate 
Word Processor 
Spreadsheet 
Calendar 

Accounts Receivable 
Accounts Payable 
Income Property 
Mail List 

Small Business Helper 
Stock Charting 
Job Log 
Asset Manager 

#7 Machine Lang. Tut. 

Basic Compiler 

ML Tutorial Pt. 1 

ML Tutorial Pt. 2 

ML Tutorial Pt. 3A. 3B 

ML Tutorial Pt 4 

ML Tutonal Pt 5 

ML Tutorial Pt. 6 

ML Tutorial Pt 7 

ML Tutorial Pt. 8 

MLT Dictionary 

Coco Technical Look 

Coco Technical Look Pts. 1-3 




#2 Education 

Flash Card 
Spanish Lessons 
Typing Tutor 
Creativity Test 
Afrth. Football 
Cost of Living 
Math Tutors 1. 2 
Trigonometry Tutor 
Typing Game 
Word Tests 
Talking Alphabet 
Ctown Dunk Math 

#5 Games III 



#3 Adventures II 



\ 



Dungeon Master 
Hired. Tired. Fired 
Iceworld 
Jungle 
Keys 

Amulet of Power 
The Trip 
Cookies 
Barracks 
Genests Protect 
Rambo 

Zigma Experiment 

#6 Electronics Tutorial 



Sandy Rover v, 
Gray Lady 
Flippy The Seal 
Abie Builders / 
Panzer «r / 

Mrs. Pac / 
Fire Runner 
Cosmic Rays 
Dig 

Battle Tank 
Kron 

King Pede 

#8 Gamble Issue 



12 



Electronics 1+2 
Electronics 3 + 4 
Electronics 5 + 6 
Electronics 7 + 8 
\ Electronics 9+10 
Electronics 11 + 
Electronics 13 
Electronics 14 
Electronics 15 
Electronics 16 
Electronics 17 
Electronics 18 



i 



#9 Coco 3 



Only \ 



Horse Racing 

Rack Track 

Black Jack 
Sbt Machine 
Lottery Analyst 
Coco Keeno 
Lucky Money 
Betting Pool 
Baccarat 
Draw Poker 
Turtle Races 
Hi-Lo Craps 



/ 



Paint Coco 3 
y Convert Coco 3 



Demon's Castle 
Function Keys 
Bowling 3 
Coco 3 » Coco 2 
Wizard 

Coco 3 Drawer 
H-Res Chess 
FYR-Draca 3 
Whammy 3 
Coco 3 Screen Print 



/ 1 v 



\ 



29 95 EACH SET 

* Special This Month * 
Buy 2 Packages and get 1 
FREE 



RAINBOW 



TURN TO 
PAGES 41 & 137 
FOR A 

COMPLETE LISTING OF 
ALL OUR PROGRAMS. 



T&D Subscription Software • 2490 Miles Standish Dr. • Holland, Ml 49424 • (616) 399-9648 



February 1989 THE RAINBOW 75 



SCRAP :=0 ; 
END; (*BEGIN*) 
8: SCRAP: =64; 
9: BEGIN 

CURRENTPORTA : =0 ; 

BYTE [PORTA] : =CURRENTPORTA ; 

FOR SCRAP :=1 TO 8 DO LASTPORTA [ SCRAP ]: -FALSE; 
END (*BEGIN*) 
END; (*CASE*) 

IF (LASTDISPLAY07) AND (LASTDISPLAY<9) THEN BEGIN 
IF LASTPORTA[LASTDISPLAY]=FALSE THEN BEGIN 



(* OFF-HK OR ON-HK *) 



CURRENTPORTA : =CURRENTPORTA+SCRAP ; 

BYTE [ PORTA] : =CURRENTPORTA ; 

LASTPORTA[LASTDISPLAY] :=TRUE; 
END (*IF*) 
ELSE BEGIN 

CURRENTPORTA : =CURRENTPORTA- SCRAP ; 

BYTE [PORTA] : =CURRENTPORTA ; 

LASTPORTA[LASTDISPLAY] :=FALSE; 
END; (*ELSE*) 
END; (*IF*) 

FOR SCRAP :=1 TO 3 DO BEGIN 

BYTE [ PORTA] : =CURRENTP0RTA+128 ; 

FOR C:=l TO 8000 DO ; 

BYTE [PORTA] : ^CURRENTPORTA; 

FOR C:=l TO 8000 DO ; 
END; (*FOR*) 

FOR SCRAP :=1 TO 15000 DO ; 
END (*BEGIN*) 
END; (*CASE*) 
END (*WHILE*) 
END. (*BEGIN*) 



(* CALCULATE NEW PORT *) 
(* VALUE *) 
(* SET FLAG *) 



(* CALCULATE NEW PORT *) 



(* VALUE 

(* RESET FLAG 



*) 
*> 



(* BLINK THE DISPLAY 
(* AFTER EXECUTING 
(* COMMAND 



*) 

*) 
*) 



Listing 2: CDEPPROM 

PROGRAM COEPP ( INPUT , OUTPUT) ; 

(* COEPP VERSION 2.0 NOV. 21,1987 *) 
(* WRITTEN BY DENNIS H. WEIDE *) 
C* COPYRIGHT 1987 *) 

(* THIS VERSION IS FOR 8K ROM *) 

CONST PHONENUMBER=$D800; 
PORTA=$FF40; 
P0RTB=$FF41; 
PORTC=$FF42 ; 
PPI=$FF43; 

VAR LASTPORTA : ARRAY [ 1 . . 8 ] OF BOOLEAN; 
CURRENTPORTA, 
LASTPORTB, 
LASTPORTC, 
LASTDISPLAY, 
NUMBER , SCRAP , JOYSTK ,A,B,C,D,E,F,G,H: INTEGER ; 
DUMMY, ANSWER: STRING (12) ; 



Corrections 



"News Flash! News Flash!" (De- 
cember 1988, Page 92): To make 
the program run more efficiently 
the following corrections to NEWS- 
REEL were submitted by the au- 
thor. Add a semicolon to the end 
of Line 50. Delete Line 70. Also, 
change the word increase in the 
last sentence of the text to de- 
crease. 

"Received & Certified" (No- 
vember 1988, Page 139): The pro- 
gram The Answer was incorrectly 
described as working only on the 
CoCo 3. The Answer works on all 
versions of the Color Computer. 

"Bingo the CoCo Way" (August 
1988, Page 38): In order to allow 
BING0TLK to work properly on a 
tape-only system, readers should 
change each occurence of the 

(continued on Page77) 



76 



THE RAINBOW February 1989 



BEGIN 
PAGE; 

FOR A:=l TO 8 DO LASTPORTA[A] :=FALSE; 

CURRENTPORTA : =0 ; 

LASTDISPLAY:=1; 

BYTE [PPI ]: =129; 

BYTE [PORTA] :=0; 

BYTE[PORTB] :=LASTDISPLAY; 

WRITELN ( » TELEPHONE BOOK 1 ) ; 

WRITELNC 1 »); 

FOR A:=0 TO 9 DO BEGIN 

SCRAP :=PHONENUMBER+(12*A) ; 
WRITE (»#■ ,A:1, ■ ') ; 
FOR B:=l TO 12 DO BEGIN 
C:=BYTE[ SCRAP] ; 
IF C=10 THEN C:=0; 
IF C<11 THEN WRITE(C:1); 
SCRAP :=SUCC (SCRAP) ; 
END; (*FOR*) 
WRITELN ; 
END; (*FOR*) 
CURSOR(448) ; 

(* MAIN PROGRAM LOOP *) 

WRITELN; 

WHILE TRUE DO BEGIN 
JOYSTK : =BYTE [ PORTC ] ; 
A:=J0YSTK AND 3; 
C:-l; 

FOR SCRAP :=1 TO 75 DO BEGIN 

JOYSTK :=BYTE[ PORTC] ; 

B:=JOYSTK AND 3; 

IF B=A THEN C:=SUCC(C); 

END; (*FOR*) 

IF COSCRAP THEN A:=0; 

CASE A OF 

1 : BEGIN 

LASTDISPLAY:=SUCC(LASTDISPLAY) ; 

IF LASTDISPLAY>9 THEN LASTDISPLAY: 

BYTE[PORTB] : =LASTDISPLAY; 

FOR SCRAP :=1 TO 15000 DO ; 
END; (*BEGIN*) 
2 : BEGIN 

CASE LASTDISPLAY OF 
1: SCRAP 



*) 
*> 



2 .-SCRAP: =2; 

3:SCRAP:=4; 
4: SCRAP: =8; 
5: SCRAP: =16; 
6: SCRAP: =32; 
7 : BEGIN 

NUMBER :=0; 

BYTE [ PORTB ] : =NUMBER ; 
FOR^SCRAP:=l TO 15000 DO 



number 3584 to the phrase 
PEEK ( IBB )*256 in lines 5, 100 and 
105. 

"CoCo's Current Companion" 
(July 1988, Page 34): Marc Camp- 
bell, author of BUDDY, has supplied 
the following corrections: First in 
Line 51, GOTOlOG should be 
changed to GDTO105. In Line 73, 
the formula EE=LL( (Q-5)/249)~l 
should be changed to EE=LL((Q- 
S)/2S0)i-iv The tape merge rou- 
tine at the end of the article should 
read DPEN"l",tt-l instead of just 
DPENtt-A. Finally, if you have 
experienced lock-up when an 
error is encountered, add LD- 
CfiTE0,0:PRINT: to the beginning 
of Line 48. 

For quicker reference, Correc- 
tions will be posted on Delphi as 
soon as they are available in the 
Info on Rainbow topic area of the 
database. Just type DATfi at the 
CoCo SIG> prompt and INFO at 
the TOPIO prompt. 



(* READ JOYSTK FOR *) 

(* INPUT REQUEST *) 

(* IGNORE ALL BITS *) 

(* EXCEPT 0 AND 1. *) 

(* READ JOYSTK 75 *) 

(* TIMES TO ENSURE *) 
(* THAT THIS IS A *) 

(* VALID REQUEST. *) 



(* IF INPUT=1, THEN *) 
(* INCREMENT DISPLAY *) 



(* DELAY PROGRAM SO *) 
(* IT WON'T RUN AWAY *) 



(* SET BITS TO REQUIRED VALUES 
(* TO TOGGLE OUTLETS OR RELAYS 



(* GIVE OFF-HK AND DIAL OUT *) 
(* SET DISPLAY TO ZERO *) 



February 1989 THE RAINBOW 77 



*> 
*) 
*) 
*) 



D:«0; 

WHILE D<2 DO BEGIN 
JOYSTK : =BYTE [ PORTC ] 
D:=JOYSTK AND 3; 
F:=l; 



(* READ JOYSTK TO DETERMINE *) 
(* IF DIALLING OR SELECTING *) 
(* NUMBER. *) 



FOR SCRAP :=1 TO 75 DO BEGIN 
JOYSTK :=BYTE[ PORTC] ; 
E:=JOYSTK AND 3; 
IF E=D THEN F:=SUCC(F); 
END; (*FOR*) 
IF FO SCRAP THEN D:=0; 
CASE D OF 
1: BEGIN 

NUMBER :=SUCC (NUMBER) ; 
IF NUMBER>9 THEN NUMBER :=0; 
BYTE [PORTB] :=NUMBER; 
FOR SCRAP :=1 TO 15000 DO ; 
END; (*BEGIN*) 
2: BEGIN 

BYTE [PORTA] : =CURRENTPORTA+192 ; 
FOR SCRAP :=1 TO 30000 DO ; 
SCRAP :=PHONENUMBER+(12*NUMBER) ; 
FOR G:=l TO 12 DO BEGIN 
E:=BYTE[ SCRAP] ; 
IF E<11 THEN BEGIN 

IF E=10 THEN BYTE [ PORTB ] :=0 

ELSE BYTE [PORTB] :=E; 
FOR F:=l TO E DO BEGIN 

BYTE [PORTA] : -CURRENTPORTA ; 



(* READ 75 CONSECUTIVE TIMES *) 
(* TO DETERMINE IF REQUEST *) 
(* IS VALID. *) 



(* ADVANCE DISPLAY NUMBER *) 



* DIAL NUMBER *) 

* GIVE OFF-HK *) 

* WAIT FOR DIAL TONE *) 

* FIND START *) 

* READ 12 NUMBERS AND *) 

* DIAL ONLY IF NUMBER *) 

* EQUALS 1 TO 10. IF *) 

* NUMBER=10, DISPLAY *) 

* A ZERO *) 

(* ON HOOK *) 



(* OFF HOOK *) 



FOR H:=l TO 1000 DO ; 
BYTE [PORTA] : -CURRENTPORTA+6 4 ; 
FOR H:=l TO 1000 DO ; 
END; (*FOR*) 

FOR F:=l TO 10-E DO FOR H:=l TO 1000 DO ; 

BYTE [PORTA] : =CURRENTPORTA+192 ; 

FOR H:=l TO 10000 DO ; 
END; (*IF*) 
SCRAP :=SUCC (SCRAP) ; 
END; (*FOR*) 

CURRENTPORTA : =CURRENTPORTA+6 4 ; (* UPDATE PORTA FOR OFF-HK 



BYTE [PORTA] := CURRENT PORT A+12 8 ; 

LASTDISPLAY:=8; 

BYTE [PORTB] : =LASTDISPLAY ; 



FOR SCRAP:=1 TO 15000 DO 
END (*WHILE*) 
END; (*CASE*) 
END; (*WHILE*) 
SCRAP :=0; 
END; (*BEGIN*) 
8:SCRAP:=64; 
9: BEGIN 

CURRENTPORTA :-0; 

BYTE [PORTA] :=CURRENTPORTA; 



(* DELETE THIS LINE IF TBL 
(* SET DISPLAY TO 8 FOR 



(* DISCONNECT (ON-HK) 



(* OFF-HK OR ON-HK *) 



78 THE RAINBOW February 1 989 



FOR SCRAP:=1 TO 8 DO LASTPORTA [ SCRAP ] :=FALSE ; 






END (*BEGIN*) 










END; (*CASE*) 










IF (LASTDISPLAY07) AND (LASTDISPLAY<9) 


THEN BEGIN 






IF LASTPORTA [LASTDISPLAY] =FALSE THEN 


BEGIN 








CURRENT PORTA : =CURRENT PORTA+S CRAP ; 


(* 


CALCULATE NEW PORT 


*) 




BYTE [PORTA] : =CURRENTPORTA; 


(* 


VALUE 


*) 




LASTPORTA [LASTDISPLAY] :=TRUE; 


(* 


SET FLAG 


*) 




END (*IF*) 










ELSE BEGIN 










CURRENTPORTA : =CURRENTPORTA- SCRAP ; 


(* 


CALCULATE NEW PORT 


*) 




BYTE [PORTA] : =CURRENT PORTA; 


(* 


VALUE 


*) 




LASTPORTA [LASTDISPLAY] :=FALSE; 


(* 


RESET FLAG 


*) 




END; (*ELSE*) 










END; (*IF*) 










FOR SCRAP :=1 TO 3 DO BEGIN 


(* 


BLINK THE DISPLAY 


*) 




BYTE [ PORTA] : =CURRENTPORTA+128 ; 


(* 


AFTER EXECUTING 


*) 




FOR C:=l TO 8000 DO ; 


(* 


COMMAND 


*) 




BYTE [PORTA] : =CURRENT PORTA; 










FOR C:=l TO 8000 DO ; 










END; (*FOR*) 










FOR SCRAP :=1 TO 15000 DO ; 










END (*BEGIN*) 










END; (*CASE*) 










END (*WHILE*) 










END . (*BEGIN*) 








/3\ 




ARK ROYAL GAMES is drastically 
cutting prices and reducing our in- 
ventory on most of our CoCo prod- 
ucts. Prices have been slashed on 
even our new programs. Send a 
ARK 1^ SASE for complete price listing or 

ROYAL Ik $1 * 00 for 0313,09 ( refunded with 

GAMES A fjrst order) ' 

Better hurry. When item is de- 

pleted it will not be restocked. 

EXAMPLES 

ACES (64K Disk) WWI Flight/Combat simulator $15 

DOUGHBOY (64K Disk) WWI Real Time Combat $14 

COMPANY COMMANDER (32K) Tactical War Game ... $15 

ALL MODULES FOR COMPANY COMMANDER $10 

COMPANY COMMANDER SCENARIO CREATOR (32K) . . $12 

OKINAWA (64K Disk) WWI Marine Invasion $12 

LUFTFLOTTE (32K) Battle of Britain $14 

FIRE ONE! (CoCo 3 Disk) Sub Warfare in WWII $15 

PRO FOOTBALL (CoCo 3) 1 or 2 players $12 

BATAAN (64K Disk] Two games in one $10 

TUNIS (32K) Battle in North Africa $ 8 

GUADALCANAL (32K) America Strikes Back $ 7 

BOMBER COMMAND (32K) $ 6 

And more! Almost all prices have been cut. Call or write for 
price list. 

ARK ROYAL GAMES 
Post Office Box 14806 • Jacksonville, FL 32238 

(904) 221-5712 

Include 50 cents per program shipping and handling. 
Florida residents add 6% sales tax. 




VIP Terminal 

RATED BEST IN JANUARY 

1984 "RAINBOW" 

For your important communications needs 

you've got to go beyond software that only 
lets you chat. You need a smart terminal 
so that you can send and receive 
programs and messages and print them! 
The VIP Terminal features 32, 51 , 64 or 85 
characters by 21 or 24 lines on the screen 
and has a 43K byte buffer to store 
information. DISK $29.95 



VIP Disk-ZAP 1.1 

RAVED ABOUT IN THE 
APRIL 1983 "RAINBOW" 

Now you can retrieve lost data on any disk. VIP 
Disk-Zap is the ultimate repair utility for repair of 
most disk errors. ViP Disk-Zap verities diskettes, 
reads and writes any sector and lets you retrieve all 
types of bashed text files, BASIC and ML programs. 
VIP Disk-Zap includes an informative 50 page tutorial 
manual. New features of version 1.1 are FASTER 
and more RELIABLE disk access and printing at up 
to 9600 BAUD. DISK $24.95 




< 

2 

i 



VIP Disk-Zap owners: upgrade to VIP Disk-Zap 1 .1 for 
$10 + $3 S/H. Send only ORIGINAL disk and $13 Total. 




February 1989 THE RAINBOW 79 



F ea tur e 



CoCo 3 Disk 




Do your assembly language 
programming on the wide screen 



A Patch for a Patch 

By Randall Reid 



Are you tired of writing assembly 
language programs using the 
little 32-by-16 window while 
your 80-column screen sleeps in the 
background? Well, help has arrived. 
Roger Schrag freed us from our cassette 
players with Super Patch in September 
1983 ("Superpatch for EDTASTM+" 
Page 66). Now using my program, 
EDPalch, we can move to the big screen 
and actually see our listings without 
listing each line. 

My patch performs about the same as 
the patch for Disk EDTASM+ found in 
Doctor ASCIFs January '88 column 
(Page 154), with the same limitations. 
The main differences are a larger buffer 
in Super Patched EDTASM+ and the 
additions Roger built in (i.e., key repeat 
and the ability to call a directory with- 
out exiting the program). One word of 
caution: My program will crash if you 
exceed the buffer. It will also crash if a 
disk error occurs. (In this case, however, 
the program can be restarted without 
losing your data.) 

The buffer is between &H38FF and 
&H7FFF — a little over 16K. There is 
no end-of-buffer signal, so if you exceed 
the buffer while loading or editing, you 



Randall Reid is a self-employed com- 
mercial artist and an electronics techni- 
cian. He has several Co Cos including a 
Co Co 2 that runs his heating system and 
records weather information. 



will crash and lose your data perma- 
nently. The buffer will hold about 1000 
lines of lightly commented code. That 
is equivalent to three times the code 
Roger used to write Super Patch (with- 
out his comments) and should be ample 
for most routines, but that monster 
arcade game won't fit. You can still 
write the code in 80-column format and 
save it in blocks to load in your original 
Super Patched EDTASM. My program 
automatically appends files, so you load 
them in the order you want them and 
renumber to reconstruct your monster. 

I do not recommend in-memory as- 
sembly unless you want to alter your 
operating system or are very careful 
about where you assemble it. Assem- 
bling to disk works as usual and is a 
better idea. No matter what assembler 
you use, it's a good idea to use the W 
command frequently to make sure you 
have your file in case of crash. 

If you do crash during disk I/O, type 
EXEC&H2D88 and press ENTER twice. 
This takes you to ZBUG with all files 
closed and your original buffers intact. 

To patch Super Patched EDTASM+, 
initialize a disk. Once you have your 
disk ready, copy Super Patched ED- 
TASM* to the disk and rename it ED+/ 
BIN. Once you have done this, copy 
EDPRTCH and EDLDRDER to the disk. Now 
cold start your CoCo 3 and enter RUN 
EDPRTCH. When EDPRTCH returns an OK 
prompt, cold start your computer 
again. Now enter ldrdm"SLIPERED",&hi 
000. When SUPERED has loaded, enter 
the following: 



SfiVEM "5UPERED1 " , &H1E00 , &H47FP , &H1 
E00 

You are now ready to run EDLORDER 
and explore assembly language pro- 
gramming on an 80-column screen. 
Please note: EDLORDER offset loads 
SuperEDl to &HE00, which may make 
my final two instructions seem a little 
ridiculous. However, CoCo 3 will not 
let the program load directly to &HE00. 
The stack or buffers overwrite some 
code. SuperEDl can be loaded and 
executed at &H1E00, but you will lose 
1 K from the buffer. Those final instruc- 
tions must be entered directly from the 
keyboard and cannot be included in a 
program line. 

You can rename SUPERED1 to some- 
thing easier to type. (I call mine ED.) 
However, you must also edit EDLORDER 
to accept the new filename. 

So what are you waiting for? Wake up 
your 80-column screen and start pro- 
gramming. 

Editors Note: For your convenience 
the assembled Super Patch routine 
from the September 1983 issue is in- 
cluded on this month's RAINBOW ON 
DISK. You will need to refer to the 
September '83 issue for instructions on 
running Super Patch. 

(Questions and comments about 
these programs may be directed to the 
author at R.R.4, Wiarton, ON, Canada 
NOH 2 TO. Please include an SASE 
when requesting a reply.) □ 



80 THE RAINBOW February 1989 



Listing 1: EDPRTCH 

0 WIDTH3 2 : PCLEAR8 : G0T01J3 

5 SAVE"EDPATCH3 " : END 

1J0 PRINT "LOADING 11 : LOADM"ED+" 

20 CLS : PRINT" PATCHING" 

30 FORX=&HE00 TO &H37FF 

40 PRINT@25,HEX$(X) 

50 IF PEEK(X)<>&H7F THEN llj3 

60 IF PEEK(X+1)<>&HFF THEN 110 

70 IF PEEK(X+2)=&HDF OR PEEK(X+2 

)=&HDE THEN 90 ELSE 110 

80 GOTO 110 



90 PRINTHEX$ (X) 

100 FORY=0TO2 : POKEX+Y , &H12 : NEXTY 
110 NEXTX 

120 SAVEM" SUPERED" , &HE00, &H37FF, 
&HE00 

130 PRINT: PRINT "YOU MUST NOW COL 
DSTART AND TYPE LOADM" ;CHR$ (34) ; 
"SUPERED" ; CHR$ (34);", &H1000 " 
140 PRINT :PRINT"WHEN SUPERED HAS 
LOADED TYPE SAVEM" ; CHR$ ( 3 4 ) ; " SU 
PERED1 " ; CHR$ (34);", &H1E00 , &H47FF 
/ &H1E00" 
150 END 



Listing 2: EDLOADER 

0 PCLEAR8:WIDTH32:GOTO10 

1 »*****COPYRIGHT 1988 RANDALL R 
EID 

5 SAVE " EDLOADER" : END 

10 FORA=0TO5 : READ A$:POKE VAL("& 

H"+A$) ,&HC0:NEXT 

20 POKE&HF66B,&HC7:POKE&HF688,&H 
CF : POKE&HF866 , &HC7 : POKE&HF875 , &H 
CE 

30 POKE&HE0C0,6:POKE&HE0C8,6:POK 



E&HE0C6,&H3E 

40 WIDTH80:CLS5:PRINT"LOADING SU 

PERPATCHED EDTASM+ PROGRAM" 

50 PRINT: PRINT" IF YOU CRASH OUT 

OF THE PROGRAM DURING DISK I/O T 

RY TYPING EXEC&H2D88 AND YOU M 

AY GET THE PROGRAM BACK WITH BUF 

FERS INTACT" : PRINT 

60 LOADM" SUPERED1" , &HE00-&H1E00+ 

65536:EXEC 

70 DATA F68D,F6A3,F6D5,F7BC,F857 
,F90D /«\ 



FILE TRANSFER UTILITIES 

XXX: Reviews - December Flainbcw Dale Puckell - November Rainbow. XXX 

The GCS File Transfer Utilities provide a simple and quick method to transfer 
text and binary files from and to a variety of floppy disk formats. 

Need to transfer files to and from FC (MSDOS), RSDOS, FLEX and MINI-FLEX 
disks on your OS-9 system? Have text files on a PC {MSDOS} system at work 
and wanl to work on them at home? Have source programs (BASIC, C, Pascal, 
etc.) which you wish to port to anotner system? 

With GCS File Transfer Utilities, just place the PC (MSDOS), RSDOS, FLEX or 
MINI-FLEX disk into you disk drive • enter a simple command and the file is 
copied into a OS-9 file. File transfer back is just as simple. With Mutti-Vue 
version, just select command from cne of three menus. 



PCDJR 
PCDUMP 
PCREAD 
PCWRITE 



directory of PC disk 
display PC disk seder 
read file from PC disk 
write file to PC disk 



PCRENAME rename PC file 
PCDELETE delete PC file 
PCFORMAT format PC disk 



RSD1R 
RSDUMP 
RSREAD 
RSWRITE 

FLEXDIR 
FLEXDUMP 
FLEXREAD 
FLEXWRITE 



directory of RSDOS disk 
display RSDOS disk sector 
read file from RSDOS disk 
write file to RSDOS disk 

directory of FLEX disk 
display FLEX disk sector 
read FLEX file 
write file to FLEX disk 



Extensive Single, double sided disks. Single, double density disks. 35, 40 
options or 80 track floppy drives. 8 or 9 sectors (PC), First level sub- 

directories (PC). Binary files. Use pipes for direct and multiple 
transfers. 

Requires OS-9. 2 drives (one can be hard or ramdisk). Mulli-Vue for Multi-Vue 
version. SDISK (SDISK3 for COCO III). 

GCS File Transfer Utilities for CoCo - Multi-Vue version $54.95 

- Standard version $44.95 



SDISK or SDISK 3 



$29.95 



Standard diskettes are OS-9 format (5.25") - add $2.50 for 3.5". Orders must be prepaid or COD, 
VISA/MC accepted. Add $1.75 S&H, COD "o additional. 

GRANITE COMPUTER SYSTEMS 

Route 2 Box 445 Hillsboro, N.H. 03244 
(603) 464-3850 

OS-9 Is a trademark of Miowax» Systems Corporation and Motorola Inc. 
MS-DOS is a trademark or Ucro*ofl Corp. FLEX Is a trademark of TSC, fcTC. 




< 

> 



VIP Calc 1.1 

"MORE USEABLE FEATURES" 
FEBRUARY 1985 "RAINBOW" 

VIP Calc has all the features of VIP Calc III described 
elsewhere in this magazine except the screen widths 
are 32, 51, 64 & 85. Screen colors are black, green 
and white, double clock speed and Spooler are not 
supported. Even so, VIP Calc is the most complete 
calc for the CoCo 1 & 2! Version 1.1 has FASTER 
and more RELIABLE disk access and vastly 
improved display speed. DISK $59.95 

VIP Calc owners: upgrade to VIP Calc 1.1 for $10 + 
$3 S/H. Send only ORIGINAL disk and $13 total. 



VIP Speller 1.1 

INCLUDES 50,000 WORD DICTIONARY 

VIP Speller works with ANY ASCII file created by 
most popular word processors - even Telewriter 64. 
It automatically checks text files for words to be 
corrected, marked for special attention or even 
added to the 50,000 word Dictionary. You can even 
view the word in context. Words can be added to or 
deleted from the dictionary or you can create your 
own dictionary! New features of version 1.1 are 
FASTER and more RELIABLE disk access and 
printing at 9600 BAUD. DISK $34.95 




r 



VIP Speller owners: upgrade to VIP Speller 1.1 for $10 
+ $3 S/H. Send only ORIGINAL disk and $13 Total. 




February 1989 THE RAINBOW 81 



I Wishin g W ell 



32K ECB 




If you have an idea for the ''Wishing 
Well, " submit it to Fred §|a THE 
RA IN BOW, Remember, keep your 
ideas specific, and don't forget this is 
BASIC. All programs resulting from 
your wishes are for your use, but 
remain the property of the author. 



A program designed to 
teach fundamental math 
skills to new students 



Several months ago, I ventured into 
the world of early childhood education 
with a series of programs — Opposites 
Concepts 1 (August '88, Page 92), 
Opposite Concepts 2 (October '88, Page 
90) and Match Game of Opposites 
(September '88, Page 92). Judging from 
my mail and the comments from those 
who have used them, my programs seem 
to be meeting a need in an area where 
there is little software. 

Because of this need, I have written 
another educational program, Count 
on Me, designed for use by young and 
special-needs students. It allows hands- 
on counting experience and tests these 
skills in a manner even the youngest 
Color Computer user can handle. 

Why Counting? 

There is little educational software 
dealing with even the most basic child- 
hood skills. Our school has an early- 
childhood program, which deals with 
special-needs students as young as two 
years old. We have difficulty finding any 
software for these young children. 

Parental pressure has resulted in a 
computer being placed in this classroom 
(not a Color Computer — that other 
kind), and there's almost no software 
for the darn thing. What can a two-year- 
old do on a computer without appro- 
priate software? To be honest, almost 



Fred Scerbo is a special needs instructor 
for the North Adams Public Schools in 
North Adams, Massachusetts. He holds 
a masters in education and has pub- 
lished some of the first software avail- 
able for the Color Computer through 
his software firm, Illustrated Memory 
Banks. 



Count on 
CoCo 



By Fred B. Scerbo 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 



nothing of value. Still, some parents 
think that the computer is the only 
solution, so the thing sits there, collect- 
ing dust. 

Since some of you have been kind 
enough to donate your old CoCo Is and 
2s to our school system, I will be adding 
one of these CoCos to our preschool 
class. For it to be useful though, I need 
some software to use with this CoCo. 
That's how Count on Me came about. 

Count on Me uses only the spacebar 
and the ENTER key for student response. 
Most small children can use these keys 
without too much trouble. Although 
this may be too much for some of our 
youngest children, the program can be 
quite useful when dealing with older 
special-needs students. 

Another nice feature about the pro- 
gram is that young students can use 
their fingers to count the large objects 
on the screen. This physical contact in 
the counting process helps to reinforce 
the number being taught. Naturally, 
this is not a program in which you 
would leave a young child alone at the 
computer. The program does require an 
adult to guide the child throughout the 
process. 

Using the Program 

When you run Count on Me, you will 
see a standard title card. Press ENTER 



and the following menu will appear: 

A) REVIEW NUMBERS 

B) QUIZ GRAPHICS 

C) QUIZ NUMBERS 

«<SELECT YOUR CHOICE»> 



The program operates exactly like the 
Opposites series. Press A to review the 
numbers. The number is shown as an 
Arabic numeral and in its written form 
next to the item or items corresponding 
to that number. Pressing ENTER advanc- 
es the program to the next item. 

To test the child on the numbers, 
press B. An inverted screen will show 
the number written in white on black. 
The child may advance the flashing 
cursor to the picture matching the 
number by pressing the spacebar. The 
child presses ENTER when the cursor is 
on the right choice. The ENTER key is 
then used to advance to the next screen. 

You may press @ at any time to check 
the score and then press C to continue 
the program from the scorecard. If you 
press C at the main menu, you will be 
tested on matching Arabic numbers 
with the number in written form. Again, 
this quiz works like my other programs. 
Press the letter (A,B or C) correspond- 
ing to the correct choice, press @ to 
check your progress and ENTER to 
proceed to the next question. 

Since there are only ten numbers 
introduced, the quiz is rather short. 
However, this fits the attention span of 
young and many special-needs students. 
In addition, the program is useful as an 
introduction to computers for any 
child. You be the judge, and let me know 
how useful you think it is. 

Conclusion 

I don't need to say much about Count 
on Me. Like any program meant to help 
teach fundamental skills to students 
with limited abilities, the instructions 
are simple. I would appreciate any 
suggestions you can give for other 
program ideas that could fit into this 
same genre. 

Also, let me again thank all those 
kind folks who have sent in used Color 
Computer Is and 2s for our special- 
needs students. Every one has found a 
home in a classroom, which has made 
our Resource Rooms the envy of other 
schools. 

See you next month. □ 



82 THE RAINBOW February 1989 




45 205 

95 38 

170 15 

260 109 

340 159 

405 229 

460 54 



505 138 

560 222 

595 26 

630 125 

760 250 

END 15 



The listing: COUNTME 

1 REM*************************** 



2 REM* 

3 REM* 

4 REM* 

5 REM* 

6 REM* 



* 
* 
* 
* 
* 



COUNT ON ME 
COPYRIGHT (C) 1988 
BY FRED B. SCERBO 
60 HARDING AVENUE 
NORTH ADAMS, MA 01247 
7 REM*************************** 
1J3 CLEAR300J3 

15 CLSj3:PRINTSTRING$(32,188) ;STR 
ING$(32,156) ; :FORI=1TO160:READA: 
PRINTCHR$ (A+128) ; :NEXT 
20 PRINTSTRING$(3 2 / 195) ;STRING$( 
32,179) ; 

25 PRINT@358, lf AN INTRODUCTION T 
O "; :PRINT@390, » COUNTING NUMBE 

RS " ; 

30 PRINT@422, " BY FRED B. SCERBO 
"; :PRINT@454," COPYRIGHT (C) 1 
988 

35 DATA126 / 124, 125, 117,124, 124,1 



22,122, ,117,117,114, ,122,126,125 
,124, 122,94,92,93,85,82, ,90,30,2 
9,28,26,30,28,28 

40 DATA122, ,116,117, , ,122,122, ,1 
17 , 117 ,12 5, 114 , 122 , 120 , 117 , , 120 , 
90, ,85,85,93,82,90,26,21, ,26,26, 
16, 

45 DATA122, , ,117, , ,122,122, ,117, 
117, ,12 5,122, ,117, , ,90, ,85,85, ,9 
3,90,26,21, ,26,30,28, 
50 DATA122, ,117,117, , ,122,122, ,1 
17,117, , ,122, ,117, , ,90, ,85,85, , , 
90,26, , ,26,26,16, 

55 DATA124, 124, 124, 116,124,124,1 
20,124,124, 124,116, , ,120, ,124,12 
0, ,92,92,92,84, , ,88,24, , ,24,28,2 
8,28 

60 X$=INKEY$:IFX$OCHR$(13)THEN6 

65 DIM P$(10,3) ,A$(6) ,B$(20) ,C$( 
20) ,A(20) ,N(20) ,B(4) ,C(4) ,D(4) ,E 
(4) ,F(4) ,AO(20) 

70 FORI=lT03 :READ C (I) , D (I) ,E (I) 
,F(I) :NEXT:FORI=lT06:READA$(I) :N 
EXT : FORI=1TO10 : READP$ (1,1) , B$ (I) 
,P$(I,2) ,P$(I,3) ,C$(I) :NEXT 
75 COLOR1,0 

80 CLS:PRINTSTRING$(32,"=") ;:PRI 
NT@74, "COUNT ON ME 11 : PRINTS 13 4 , " 







088 Loyl II BBS R«I«m« 3.Q 

The best BBS lystem Km just gotten better! System comes complete and ready to run in less than 
5 minutes! Use the built in menus or create your own, you can even run your 
own programs or games on-line! Complete message system allows easy 
message posting and retrieving. Complete file transfer system supports 
Xmodem and Ymodem as well as keyword searching single line and 

paragraph file descriptions. System runs completely in the background, allowing you full use 
of your computer! Also comes with it's own Terminal program Quikterm" Free! 
512k OS9 Level II and RS-232 Pak Required S29.95 

Tha 2apoOT 

This wonderful utility allows you to patch anything! Patch commands 
directly on the disk and fix CRCs automatically! Even allows you to patch the 
OS9boot file without making a new boot disk! Save files that have been lost or 
deleted! Fix crashed disks! Hundreds of uses! 
64k OS9 Level I or II required $19.95 

Diak Manager Tr«« 

This versatile utility will make your OS9 life a breeze! No more will you 
have to fight with complicated directory structures. No more searching 
for files and typing long path names. All of this ia displayed using 
windows. A trw wuidow allows you to change, create, and delete 
directories quickly. A files window allows you to copy, view and delete 
filet easily. Perfect for the OS9 beginner! Multi-Vue compatibility makes 
it perfect for Multi-Vue users! 

512k OS9 Level II Required $29.95 

Lavel n Tools 

Finally OS9 life becomes easy! With these great utilities you'll be 
using OS9 like a pro! Complete wildcard commands make file 
manipulation simple and easy! Tree commands make directory 
manipulation a breeze! Windowing utilities make changing colors 
and creating and maintaining windows a snap! Many other useful 
utilities make your OS9 life more pleasant! 25 great utilities for only 
$24.95, lhats less than Si. 00 per utility! 

128k OS9 Level II Required $24.95 

Wuro One 

Finally a complete OS9 Level II windowing terminal that you can afford! 
The program's many features include Auto-dial, Auto-macro, File transfers, 
buffer capture, on-line timer, chat-mode and much, much more! Menu and 
dialog windows make it super simple to use! All you'll ever need in a terminal 
program! Comes complete with ICON for Multi-Vue compatibility. 
512k OS9 Level II and RS-232 Pak Required , $34.95 

Mnlti-M+aa 

Easily create your own pop-down menus with this great utility! No 

Srogramming experience necceasary! With this utility you can run any 
IS9 command or program from a menu. Menu creation is super-simple 
and super easy! Actually see the menu as it develops. A must for any 
Multi-Vue user! 

£~U^ 512k OS9 Level II and Multi-Vue required ■-, *19 98 

Send check or money order to: Alpha Software Technologies fff\\ 

^ m -_~ P O. BOX 16522 RAINBOW 
Or catfc (601) 266-2773 49 S HcrrHesburg MS. 39402 c^.o. 

Pleose add $3.00 Shipping and handling C.O.D. Orders odd on additional $2.00 







VIP Database 1.1 

"ONE OF THE BEST" JUL '84 "RAINBOW 

VIP Database has all the features of VIP Database III 
described elsewhere in this magazine except the 
screen widths are 51, 64 & 85. Screen colors are 
black, green and white, double clock speed and 
Spooler are not supported. Even so, VIP Database is 
the most complete database for the CoCo 1 & 2! 
Version 1.1 has FASTER and more RELIABLE disk 
access and single spaced reports. DISK $49.95 

VIP Database owners: upgrade to VIP Database 1.1 
for $10 + $3 S/H. Send original disk and $13 total. 



VIP Writer 1.1 

RATED "BEST" IN SEPT '88 "RAINBOW" 

VIP Writer has all the features of VIP Writer III 
described elsewhere in this magazine except the 
screen widths are 32, 51 , 64 & 85. Screen colors are 
black, green & white, double clock speed is not 
supported, Spooler and menus are unavailable 
because of memory limitations. Even so, VIP Writer 
is the BEST word processor for the CoCo 1 & 2! 
Version 1.1 includes the configuration/ printer 
installation program and RGB Hard Disk support. 
Available thru Radio Shack Express Order #90-141. 

Includes VIP Speller 1 .1 DISK $69.95 




< 

50 



VIP Writer owners: upgrade to VIP Writer 1.1 for $20 
+ $3 S/H. Send only ORIGINAL disk and $23 total. 




February 1989 THE RAINBOW 83 



A) REVIEW NUMBERS" :PRINT@198,"B) 
QUIZ GRAPHICS" :PRINT@262,"C) QU 
IZ NUMBERS" 

85 PRINT@324, "«<SELECT YOUR CHO 
ICE»>" 

90 PRINT : PRINTSTRING$ ( 3 2 ,"=");: P 
RINT@420 , "DEDICATED TO THE STUDE 
NTS " : PRINTTAB ( 6 ) "OF CONTE MIDDLE 
SCHOOL" 

95 X$=INKEY$:X=RND( -TIMER) :IFX$= 

"A"THEN350ELSEIFX$="B"THEN100ELS 

EIFX$="C"THEN630ELSE95 

100 CLS0:PMODE0,1:PCLS1 

105 LINE(0,0) - (254 , 170) , PRESET, B 

110 LINE (6, 4) -(122,82) , PRESET, BF 

115 LINE (128, 4) -(248,82) , PRESET, 

B 

120 LINE(6, 86)-(122, 164) , PRESET, 
B 

125 LINE(128,86)-(248,164) , PRESE 
T,B 

130 DRAW"BM26,188C0NU10R10NU10BR 
6R10U6L10U4R10BR6NR10D4NR10D6R10 
BR12BU6NE4D2F4BR6R10U6L10U4R10BR 
6ND10R10D4NL10BR6NR10D6U10R10D10 
BR6NR10U10R10BR6NR10D4NR10D6R10B 
R10U10NL4R10D4NL10D6NL14BR6U10R1 
0D4NL10D6BR6U10R10D4L10R4F6BR6E4 
U2H4" 

135 DATA130,6,246,80,6,86,120,16 

2,130,86,246,162 

140 PAINT ( 2 , 2 ) , 0 , 0 : PCOPY1T03 

145 PMODE0,4:PCLS1 

150 LINE (0,0) -(254, 170) , PRESET, B 

F 

155 LINE(8, 6) -(120,80) ,PSET,BF 
160 PCOPY4TO2:PMODE0,1:SCREEN1,1 
165 DATA"BM2 , 8C1" , "BM130 , 8C0" , "B 
M2 , 90C0" , "BM130 , 90C0" , "BM2 , 48C0" 
,"BM130,48C0" 
170 FORI=1TO10 

175 A(I)=RND(10) :IFN(A(I) )=1THEN 
175 

180 N(A(I) )=1:NEXTI:FORY=1TO20:C 

OLOR1 , 0 

185 FORI=2T04 

190 B(I)=RND(3)+l:IFN(B(I) )=0THE 
N190 

195 N(B(I) )=0:NEXTI:FORI=1TO4:N( 
I) =1: NEXT 

200 B=RND(10) :IFB=A( (Y) ) THEN200 
205 C=RND(10) :IFC=B OR C=A((Y))T 
HEN205 

210 DRAW A$(l) :DRAWP$(A(Y) ,1) 
215 DRAW A$ ( B ( 2 ) ) : DRAWP$ ( B , 2 ) : DR 
AWP$(B,3) 

220 DRAW A$(B(3) ) :DRAWP$(C,2) :DR 
AWP$(C,3) 

225 DRAW A$(B(4) ) :DRAWP$(A(Y) ,2) 
:DRAWP$(A(Y) ,3) 
230 COLOR1,0 



235 Z=0 

240 PMODE0,4 

245 DRAW A$(1)+"C0":DRAWP$(A(Y) , 
1) 

250 DRAW A$(B(2) )+"Cl":DRAWP$(B, 
2) :DRAWP$(B,3) 

255 DRAW A$ (B (3 ) ) +"C1" : DRAWP$ (C, 
2) :DRAWP$(C,3) 

260 DRAW A$(B(4) )+"Cl":DRAWP$(A( 
Y) ,2) :DRAWP$(A(Y) ,3) 
265 PMODE0 , 1 : SCREEN1 , 1 

270 LINE(8,6)-(120,80) ,PSET,B 
275 X$=INKEY$:IFX$=" "THEN285ELS 
EIFX$="@"THEN800 

280 COLOR1, 0:LINE(8, 6) -(120,80) , 

PRESET, B:GOT02 70 

285 Z=Z+1:IFZ=4THENZ=1 

290 COLOR1,0:LINE(C(Z) ,D(Z) )-(E( 

Z) ,F(Z) ) ,PSET,B 

295 X$=INKEY$:IFX$=" "THEN285ELS 
EIFX$=CHR$ ( 13 ) THEN305ELSEIFX$=" @ 
"THEN800 

300 COLOR1,0:LINE(C(Z) ,D(Z) )-(E( 
Z) ,F(Z) ) , PRESET, B:GOT02 90 
305 IFZ+1=B(4)THEN315 
3 10 NW=NW+1 : F0RK=1T05 : PMODE0 , 4 : S 
CREEN1 , 1 : SOUND 10 , 3 : PMODE0 , 1 : SCRE 
EN1 , 1 : SOUND1 , 3 : NEXTK : GOT02 9 0 
315 NC=NC+1:PMODE0,4:PCLS1:LINE( 
0,40) -(256, 126) , PRESET, B: LINE (6, 
44) -(124,122) , PRESET, B: LINE (130, 
44) -(248,122) , PRESET, B: PAINT (2 , 4 
2) ,0,0 

320 DRAW A$(5) :DRAWP$(A(Y) ,1) 
325 DRAW A$(6) :DRAWP$(A(Y) ,2) :DR 
AWP$(A(Y) ,3) 
330 SCREEN1,1 

33 5 X$=INKEY$:IFX$<>CHR$(13)THEN 
335 

340 PMODE0,1 

345 PCOPY3T01ISCREEN1, l:PCOPY2TO 
4:NEXTY:GOTO800 

350 PMODE0,2:PCLS1:SCREEN1,1:LIN 
E (0,40) -(256,126) , PRESET, B: LINE ( 
6,44)-(124,122) , PRESET, B: LINE (13 
0,44) -(248, 122) , PRESET, B: PAINT ( 2 
, 42 ) ,0,0 

355 FORI=1TO10:DRAW A$(5):DRAWP$ 
(1,1) 

360 DRAW A$ (6) :DRAWP$ (1,2) :DRAWP 
$(1,3) 

365 X$=INKEY$:IFX$OCHR$(13)THEN 
365 

370 COLOR1,0:LINE(8,46) -(122, 120 
) ,PSET,BF: LINE (132, 46) -(246,120) 
,PSET,BF:NEXTI 
375 RUN 

380 DATA"BR56BD44R16U6L4U26L8G8D 
2R6D16L4D6BD10BL10D10R10U10NL10B 
R6ND10F10NU10BR6NR6U6NR6U4R6" 
385 DATA ONE 



84 THE RAINBOW February 1989 



390 DATA"BR58BD48R8E4U12R4U6L4U6 
H4L16G4D6L4D6R4D12F4R8BU8NE4NH4B 
U8NLNR2 BU6 BL4NR2 BR6R2 11 
395 DATA BR 
4j3j3 DATA 1 

4j35 DATA"BR48BD44R28U12L6D4L14U4 

E4Rl£E4U8H4L18G4D4R6E2R8F2D2Llj3G 

8D12BD12BL6NL6NR6Dlj3BR12NUlj3R6NU 

10R6U10BR6Rlj3Dlj3Llj3Ulj3" 

4 1)3 DATA TWO 

415 DATA"BR36BD48R8E4U12R4U6L4U6 
H4L16G4D6L4D6R4D12F4R8BU8NE4NH4B 
U8NLNR2BU6BL4NR2BR6R2BR3 8BD22R8E 
4U12R4U6L4U6H4L16G4D6L4D6R4D12F4 
R8BU8NE4NH4BU8NLNR2 BU6BL4NR2BR6R 
2" 

42j3 DATA BR 
425 DATA 2 

430 DATA"BR70BD28E4U8H4L18G4D4R6 
E2R8F2D4L10G4F4R10D4G2L8H2L6D4F4 
R18E4U8H2BL48BD24R6ND10R6BR6D10U 
6R10U4Dlj3BR6U10Rlj3D4Llj3R4F6BR6NR 
lj3U6NRlJ3U4RlpBR6NR10D4NR10D6Rli3 ,l 
435 DATA THREE 

440 DATA"BR24BD48R6E4U12R4U6L4U6 

H4L12G4D6L4D6R4D12F4R6BU8NE4NH4B 

U8NLNR2BU6BL4NR2BR6R2BR32BD22R6E 

4U12R4U6L4U6H4L12G4D6L4D6R4D12F4 

R6BU8NE4NH4BU8NLNR2BU6BL4NR2BR6R 

2BR32BD22R6E4U12R4U6L4U6H4L12G4D 

6L4D6R4D12F4R6BU8NE4NH4BU8NLNR2B 

U6BL4NR2BR6R2" 

445 DATA BR 

450 DATA 3 

455 DATA"BR74BD28NR8U14L8D14L10U 

14L8D22R18D8R8U8R8U8BD24BL48NR10 

D4NR10D6BR16U10R10D10NL10BR6NU10 

R10NU10BR6U10R10D4L10R4F6" 

4 60 DATA FOUR 

465 DATA"BR48BD3 4BU4NG2U2H2L2G2D 
2NF2L14NG2U2H2L2G2D2NF2L10U20R28 
D6R6D6R8D8L4BR50BD4BU4NG2U2H2L2G 
2D2NF2L14NG2U2H2L2G2D2NF2L10U20R 
28D6R6D6R8D8L4BD3 2BL54NG2U2H2L2G 
2D2NF2L14NG2U2H2L2G2D2NF2L10U20R 
28D6R6D6R8D8L4" 

470 DATA"BR50BD4BU4NG2U2H2L2G2D2 
NF2L14NG2U2H2L2G2D2NF2L10U20R28D 
6R6D6R8D8L4 " 
475 DATA 4 

480 DATA fl BR46BD14R30D8L22D6R18F4 
D8G4L24H2U4R20U4L20U18BD3 6BL12NR 
10D4NR10D6BR16NU10BR12H4U6BR8D6G 
4BR12NR10U6NR10U4R10" 
485 DATA FIVE 

490 DATA"BR32BD28U6L10E6L4E6L4E8 
F8L4F6L4F6L10D6L2BR46U6L10E6L4E6 
L4E8F8L4F6L4F6L10D6L2BL26BD20U6L 
10E6L4E6L4E8F8L4F6L4F6L10D6L2BD2 
0BL2 6U6L10E6L4E6L4E8F8L4F6L4F6L1 
0D6L2BR46U6L10E6L4E6L4E8F8L4F6L4 



F6L10D6L2 11 
495 DATA BR 
500 DATA 5 

505 DATA"BR46BD14R30D8L22D6R18F4 
D8G4L2 4H2NU2 6BE4BR4R14U4L14D4BD1 
4BL12NR10D4R10D6NL10BR8NU10BR8E6 

NH4NE4F6" 
510 DATA SIX 

515 DATA"BR10BD26R102L18E10M-8 / + 
4L6U4H2L2G4R4D4F4L2 6E10M-8 f +4L6U 
4H2L2G4R4D4F4L2 6E10M-8 f +4L6U4H2L 
2G4R4D4F4BD2 6BL20R102L18E10M-8,+ 
4L6U4H2L2G4R4D4F4L26E10M-8,+4L6U 
4H2L2G4R4D4F4L26E10M-8 / +4L6U4H2L 
2G4R4D4F4" 
520 DATA BR 
525 DATA 6 

530 DATA"BR4 6BD14R30D8M-12,+22L1 
2M+12 f -22L20U8BD38BL8L10D4R10D6N 
L10BR6NR10U6NR10U4R10BR6D6F4E4U6 
BR6NR10D4NR10D6R10BR6U10F10U10" 
53 5 DATA SEVEN 

540 DATA"BR34BD10D10R12U6L4D6R12 
U10NF2H10G12E2NR20BR30D10R12U6L4 
D6R12U10NF2H10G12E2NR20BL46BD24D 
10R12U6L4D6R12U10NF2H10G12E2NR20 
BR30D10R12U6L4D6R12U10NF2H10G12E 
2NR20BR30D10R12U6L4D6R12U10NF2H1 
0G12E2NR20" 




The VIP Integrated Library 1 ,2 combines all six popular VIP programs ♦ Writer 
1 .1 , Speller 1 .1 , Calc 1.1, Databasel .1 , Terminal and Disk-Zap 1 .1 - into one pro- 
gram on one disk. The program is called VIP Desktop. From the desktop you have| 
instant access to word processing with a spelling checker always in attendance, 
data management with mailmerge, spreadsheet financial analysis, telecommuni- 
cations and disk maintenance. Just move the hand to the volume on the bookshelf 
and the application is there. 64K req'd. $149.95 + $4 S/H US, $5 Canada, 
$10 Foreign. VIP Library is available thru Radio Shack Express Order #90-213. 



VIP Integrated Library owners: upgrade to the VIP Integrated Library 
1.2 for $45 + $3 S/H. Send only ORIGINAL disk and $48 Total. 



m SD ENTERPRISES S3 

(503)663-2865 P. O. BOX 1233. Gresham, OR. 97030 
Non VIP Library orders add $3 for shipping in USA, Canada $4, 
Foreign $6. COD orders add an additional $2.25. Personal checks| 
allow 3 weeks for delivery. All other orders shipped the same day. 



February 1989 THE RAINBOW 85 



545 DATA "BL46BD24D10R12U6L4D6R1 


635 


FORI=1TO10 


2U10NF2H10G12E2NR20BR30D10R12U6L 


640 


AO(I)=RND(10) 


4D6R12U10NF2H10G12E2NR20" 


645 


IF N(A0(I))=1 THEN 640 

^™ ^ m « ^ B BW » ^^B B B ^^B B B BBB B> B BB B ^p 


550 DATA 7 

^bb ^bb BBb ^B B ^BB bb BB 


650 


N(AO(I) )=1:NEXTI 

•» * \ \ * _f J BBB • B B BBBJ 4> B BB BBB 


555 DATA"BR50BD14R26F4D6G4F4D8G4 


655 


FOR P=1TO10 


L26H4U8E4H4U6E4BD4BR4R18D6L18U6B 


66p 


CLS 


D14R18D6L18U6BD20BL24NR10D4NR10D 


665 


PRINTQ68, "WHICH WRITTEN NUMB 


6R10BR6U10BR6NR10D10R10U6NL6BR6N 


ER IS" 


U4ND6R10D6U10BR6R6ND10R6 " 


670 


PRINT@132,C$(AO(P) )+" ?" 


560 DATA EIGHT 


675 


FOR Q=1T02 


565 DATA"BR12BD10D6G2D6R6U4F4R10 


680 


C(Q)=RND(10) :IF C(Q)=AO(P) T 


H2U2H2L4H2U6L6BR24D6G2D6R6U4F4R1 


HEN68 0 


0H2U2H2L4H2U6L6BR24D6G2D6R6U4F4R 


685 


FOR K=Q-1 TO 0STEP-1:IF C(K) 


10H2U2H2L4H2U6L6BR24D6G2D6R6U4F4 


=C(Q) THEN680 


R10H2U2H2L4H2U6L6BL90BD20" 


69J3 


NEXTK 


570 DATA"BR12BD10D6G2D6R6U4F4R10 


695 


NEXTQ:C(3)=A0(P) 


H2U2H2L4H2U6L6BR24D6G2D6R6U4F4R1 




FOR E=1T03 


0H2U2H2L4H2U6L6BR24D6G2D6R6U4F4R 


705 


F(E)=RND(3) 


10H2U2H2L4H2U6L6BR24D6G2D6R6U4F4 

BBB ^B ^B BIB ^V^r BBB7 BB BBB ^^^^P B Bi ^B BBP BB B^^^P BB S^^B ^B B ^^B ^P ^^^B ^^B B^^P B^B BB ^B V B^F B ^^P ^p 


710 


FOR K=E-1 TO 0 STEP-1:IF F(K 


R10H2U2H2L4H2U6L6" 


)=F(E) THEN705 


575 DATA 8 

BBF p BBB BBB B BB BB B> BB 


715 


NEXTK: NEXTE 


58J3 DATA"BR50BD14R26F4D22G4L26H4 


720 


PRINT 


U2R26U8L22H4U8E2BD4BR6R18D4L18U4 


725 


PRINTTAB ( 8 ) "A-"+B$ (C(F(1) ) ) : 


BD32BL14ND10F10U10BR6D10BR6U10F1 

BBBF ^BF BB BMP BB" BBB 1 B^B ™ ■ — WB B^B ^™ ^^"^B»^ ^P" ^^^f ^b b — ^P™^ ^ ^» ■ ^ ^^^^ M ^BJ 


PRINT 


0U10BR6NR10D4NR10D6R10 " 


730 


PRINTTAB ( 8 ) "B-"+B$ (C (F (2 ) ) ) : 


585 DATA NINE 

BjB^ bb 7 ^BB BBF BP SB BP BF BB B BB^B BB ■ ^^^B 


PRINT 


590 DATA"BR8BD10D4R4D4L4D12R16U1 


735 


PRINTTAB (8) "C-"+B$ (C (F (3 ) ) ) : 


2L4U4R4NL16U4NL16BR6D4R4D4L4D12R 


PRINT 


16U12L4U4R4NL16U4NL16BR6D4R4D4L4 


740 


G$=INKEY$ : IFG$=" @ "THEN800 


D12R16U12L4U4R4NL16U4NL16BR6D4R4 


745 


IF G$=""THEN740 ! 


D4L4D12R16U12L4U4R4NL16U4NL16BRC 


750 


G=ASC(G$)-64 


D4R4D4L4D12R16U12L4U4R4NL16U4NL1 

BBF B ^B Ifc A BBB B> MB • BBr B^B ^^BJ ^B B* BBBB BB BB" BBB> BB1 ^^^B ^P BP Bp b B ^B s ^^^B ^^B ^B B » ^^^B ^^B 


755 


IF G<1 THEN 740 


6" 


760 


IF G>5 THEN 740 


595 DATA"BL94BD2 6D4R4D4L4D12R16U 


765 


IF C(F(G) )<>AO(P) THEN780 


12L4U4R4NL16U4NL16BR6D4R4D4L4D12 


770 


PRINT: PRINT" RIGHT! THE ANS 


R16U12L4U4R4NL16U4NL16BR6D4R4D4L 


WER 


IS: "+B$(AO(P)) 


4D12R16U12L4U4R4NL16U4NL16BR6D4R 


775 


NC=NC+1:GOTO790 


4D4L4D12R16U12L4U4R4NL16U4NL16" 


780 


PRINT: PRINT" SORRY I THE AN 


600 DATA 9 


SWER IS: H +B$(AO(P)) 


6^5 DATA"BR36BD44R16U6L4U26L8G8D 


785 


NW=NW+1 


2R6D16L4D6BR30H4U24E4R20F4D24G4L 


790 


X$=INKEY$ : IFX$oCHR$ ( 13 ) THEN 


20BU6BR4R12U20L12D20BD14BL30R6ND 


790 




10R6BR6NR10D4NR10D6R10BR6U10F10U 

™* ^BB MB B BB BBB* BB B Bp* B B BB B BBP BB BJBf B BB B BB B BB ^B«P T PBT BB BB B BB* ^PB 4 * BJp* BB ^BBB BB BBB BB ^BT 


795 


NEXT P 


10" 


800 


CLS : PRINT @ 101 , "YOU TRIED"NC+ 


610 DATA TEN 

BB7 BBB ^^^f BV BB BB ^B ^B BB ^^^B ^B 


NW"TIMES &" : PRINT@165 , "ANSWERED" 


615 DATA" BR3 8 BD1 6H4 L4U2NR4 D2 L4NU 


NC" CORRECTLY" 


ND4L4U2L4D2R4NH6L2G4BR54H4L4U2NR 

^B BV B 4^BB Bl BB BBB BBBB ^B ^^B^ BBB ^B B B ^B * ^B ^B BB ^BV ^^B ^B^B ^B ^^^^ m ^^P' ^P ^B ^B ^P BBBB ^P ^^P^ ^B B ^B w 


805 


PRINT@229, "WHILE DOING"NW"WR 


4D2L4NUND4L4U2L4D2R4NH6L2G4BR54H 

B> BB* BBB BBP BB BB ■ ^B B ^B^r B> BB B> ^B^» BB BBIM B> BB BB BP ™ B> Bl B BB BB ^B BBB BBB ^B B) BBB BP •* B> BB BB 


ONG. 


ii 


4L4U2NR4D2L4NUND4L4U2L4D2R4NH6L2 

B> BBBB* B> *BB* BBB «B B bV V B> BB BBB BBBbV B> B ™ W BB B 4BBF * BBBB B> BBF BP BBBB B> BT BP BB V A B B B B ^B» BMB> U 


810 


NQ=NC+NW:IF NQ=0THEN NQ=1 


G4BL42BD16H4L4U2NR4D2L4NUND4L4U2 

^BP X BB BBBB X BB BBBB BBB* BBB V#* Bb bV » BBBB BB *BB* BBB B B B V ■ BBB BBB BBBB BB BB " BBB* BB B BJB X BBBB BB W BB 


815 


MS=INT ( NC/NQ* 100 ) 


L4D2R4NH6L2G4BR54H4L4U2NR4D2L4NU 

BBB S B7 BBS Bj T» B> B B BB B> >B BBBBT BBB Bi ^Unf A tB BBP* * BB bV BBBB B> *BB* B>at B 1 Bl \ Bk BBB BP BB* BBB VbT 


820 


PRINT@293,"YOUR SCORE IS "MS" 


ND4L4U2L4D2R4NH6L2G4BR54" 

b H i>r Jt bI X ^bf bW bbbJ X iV bb) bV X X B 1 B B W bbbbI bbbJ NbJ b BBBB* b \bt bV 


%." 




620 DATA"H4L4U2NR4D2L4NUND4L4U2L 

V^/ BB) IP BB B B BBB BB BP BBB BBBB B BbB BBBJ B B B> B> B> BB BBBJ BBBB B BP B BBP SB ■ BBB B> BB B BBB BBB BBB 


825 


PRINT@357 , "ANOTHER TRY (Y/N/ 


4D2R4NH6L2G4BL42BD16H4L4U2NR4D2L 

B BBB BB B> ^ 4B SB ■ B> )B> BBl BbB ^B» B BBF BBF B BB BT BB BB ^B' B» B B Bl B ^B BBJ B B B> BJ B BB BBB BBB 


C) ?"; 


4NUND4L4U2L4D2R4NH6L2G4BR54H4L4U 

B SB B Br SB B BB B BPV B BB BBB BpB B BBBF BBB B B B B B B B BB BBBB BB BBB B BBP BB B BP B B> B> B BBB B B 


830 


X$=INKEY$:IFX$="Y"THEN RUN 


2NR4D2L4NUND4L4U2L4D2R4NH6L2G4BR 

BB B B B B B BBF BB BBB B B B BBF SB B BB B ^^^B B BB ^^B ^^^B B Bl^B BB B> B B ^B ■ B> SB BB BBBB BBB BBB B BBB SB B 


835 


IFX$="N"THENCLS : END 


54H4L4U2NR4D2L4NUND4L4U2L4D2R4NH 


840 


IFX$="C"THEN850 


6L2G4BL10BD16H4L4U2NR4D2L4NUND4L 


845 


GOTO8 30 


4U2L4D2R4NH6L2G4" 


850 


IFV=1THEN660 


BB* #\ f» BBB. «B BBBB B BB _BJ# 

625 DATA 10 


855 


IFV=0THEN265 


630 CLS:V=1 




ITS 



86 THE RAINBOW February 1 989 



THE rainbow is a teaching environment and we realize that the 
majority of our readers will always be beginners. In our 
continuing effort to always keep the new user in mind, and in 
addition to the many beginner feature articles and programs 
published in every issue, "Novices Niche" contains shorter 
basic program listings that entertain as well as help the new 
user gain expertise in all aspects of the Color Computer: 
graphics, music, games, utilities, education, programming, etc. 



Keeping Your Balance 

By Jerry Yates 



CoCo 3 



At a recent club meeting, a new member asked me if I knew 
of a program to help him see if he had made a mistake in 
balancing his checkbook. I remembered a program I had 
written several years ago that could be of help, Checkbook 
Checker. 

Checkbook Checker is very simple to use, and it even has 
instructions printed on the title screen. On booting the 
program and pressing a key to clear the intro, you are 
prompted for a beginning balance. Then you are asked for 
the check number and the amount in the format of Check 
#, Amount (the two are separated by a comma — e.g., 
1001,250 would indicate that Check No. 1001 was written for 
the amount of $250). Enter deposits or checks paid to you 
as "negative payments:" 2000,-500 would indicate that you 
received $500. Along with the last 12 transaction records, the 
screen displays the current balance. 

The Listing: CHEKBOOK 

0 POKE65497,0:RGB 

10 CLS0:GOSUB 180 : PRINT@69 , CHR$ ( 

142) ;STRING$(20,140) ;CHR$(141) ; 

20 PRINT@101,CHR$ (138) ;" CHECKBO 

OK CHECKER " ; CHR$ ( 133 ) ; 

30 PRINT@133,CHR$(138) ;" BY JE 

RRY YATES " ;CHR$ (133) ; 

40 PRINT@165,CHR$ (138) ;" AUGUST 

20, 1988 ";CHR$(133); 
50 PRINT@197,CHR$(138)+STRING$(2 
0,134)+CHR$(133) ; 

60 PRINT@229,CHR$(13"8) " TO ENTER 
A DEPOSIT ";CHR$(133); 



ii 



it 



/ 



-500.00 
99999 



70 PRINT@2 61,CHR$(138) ; "USE NEGA 
TIVE (-) NO.";CHR$(133) 
80 PRINT@293,CHR$(138) ; 

ENTER CK.# «';CHR$(133) 
85 PRINT@325,CHR$(138) ; 
9 TO EXIT ";CHR$(133) . 
90 PRINT@3 57,CHR$(139) ;STRING$(2 
0,131) ;CHR$(135) ; 

95 FOR T=1TO5:GOSUB180:NEXT 

96 PALETTE 12 , 63 : PALETTE 13,0 
100 FOR C=1TO3:SOUNDRND(200) ,2:N 
EXT : PRINT @ 4 2 1 , " " ; : INPUT " BEGINNIN 
G BALLANCE " ; BAL : CLS 

110 PRINT@0, USING" CURRENT BALLA 

NCE =$$#####. ##";BAL 

120 PRINTSTRING$(32,131) ; 

130 PRINT@448 , STRINGS (32, 140) ; 

140 INPUT" CHECK #, AMOUNT" ;CN,C 

K 

150 IF CN=999999 THEN GOTO 230 E 
LSE BAL=BAL-CK 

160 PRINT@416,USING"##### $$#### 

.## =$$####. ##";CN;CK;BAL 

170 GOTO 110 

180 FOR X=1T062:SET(X, Y,RND(9-1) 
) :NEXT 

190 FOR Y=1TO30:SET(X,Y,RND(9-1) 
) : NEXT 

200 FOR X=63T01STEP-1:SET(X,Y,RN 
D(9-l) ) :NEXT 

205 FOR Y=30TO1STEP-1 : SET (X, Y, RN 
D(9-l) ) :NEXT 
210 RETURN 

230 CLS0:PRINT"I HOPE CHECKBOOK 
CHECKER HAS BEEN HELPFUL. " : E 

ND 



February 1 989 THE RAINBOW 87 



Applying Labels 4K 

By Ana M. Rodriguez 

If you don't have the time to type up multiple address labels 
on the typewriter, and if you have a DMP-105 printer, this 
short program is for you. Just type it in and run, supplying 
the appropriate information when prompted (name, address, 
city, state and ZIP code). The program next will ask how 
many labels you want printed; make sure your printer is 
online with labels at the ready. If address labels aren't the kind 
of labels you need, you can modify the program in lines 50, 
60 and 70. 

The Listing: flDLABELS 

10 REM ** LABELS ** 

20 REM ** BY ** 

30 REM ** ANA M. RODRIGUEZ ** 
40 CLS :PRINTTAB( 13 ); "LABELS" 



50 PRINT"ENTER NAME": INPUT N$ 
60 PRINT "ENTER NUMBER & STREET": 
INPUT S$ 

70 PRINT "ENTER CITY, STATE & ZIP 

CODE": INPUT C$ 
80 CLS: PRINT "REMEMBER: TURN ON 
YOUR PRINTER" 

90 INPUT "HOW MANY LABELS" ;L 
100 REM PRINT LABELS 
110 FOR A=1T0L 

115 PRINT#-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(19) 
120 PRINT#-2,TAB(3) ;N$ : PRINT#-2 , 
TAB (3) ;S$:PRINT#-2,TAB(3) ;C$ 
130 PRINT#-2:PRINT#-2 
140 NEXT A 

150 CLS:INPUT"DO YOU WANT TO PRI 
NT NEW LABELS (Y-N)";A$ 
160 IF A$="Y" THEN 40 
170 END 



CoCo 3 



Custom Cassette Labels 

By Travis Halbrook 

If you love music as I do, then you probably make your 
own "party mix" tapes. Putting your favorite songs on one 
tape allows you to listen to the music you want without 
having to constantly switch cassettes. Unfortunately, the 
labels you stick on homemade tapes have to be made by hand, 
which gives them a very sloppy appearance. Let Cassette 
Labeler make neat, professional-looking cassette jackets for 
you. 

After typing in and saving the program, type RUN and press 
ENTER. A model of a cassette label should appear onscreen, 
with a flashing, auto-repeating cursor in the middle. Just 
move the cursor wherever you want and type in the pertinent 
information. To print, press the SHIFT and down arrow keys 
at the same time. 

The rectangle at the top of the screen represents the front 
of the label. This is where I put the names of the songs. The 
rectangle at the bottom represents the "spine" of the cassette 
label; I put the title of my tape in this part. Of course, it goes 
without saying that this program is not restricted just to 
creating jackets for music tapes. Run it for some of your 
custom "party mix" CoCo program tapes! 



The Listing: CfiSSLBLR 

10 1 "CASSETTE LABELER" BY TRAVIS 

HALBROOK COPYRIGHT 
1988 

20 ON BRK GOTO 3 60 

30 POKE 65497,0: WIDTH 40: PALETTE 

0,0: PALETTE 8, 63: CLS 1 
40 PRINT STRING$(40,"-") ; 
50 FOR A=l TO 17 
60 PRINT 



ii 



• it • 



70 NEXT A 

80 PRINT STRING$(40,"-") ; 

90 LOCATE 0,15 

100 PRINT STRING$(39, "-") 



110 LPOKE 443646, ASC("-") 

120 LOCATE 8, 21: PRINT" SHIFT/DOWN 

ARROW TO PRINT" 
130 X=20:Y=12 
140 LOCATE X,Y 

150 IF PEEK(341)=247 THEN Y=Y-1 
ELSE IF PEEK(342)=247 THEN Y=Y+1 
ELSE IF PEEK (3 43) =247 THEN X=X- 
1 ELSE IF PEEK (344) =247 THEN X=X 
+1 

160 A$=INKEY$ : IF A$<>"" AND A$<> 
,IA " AND A$OCHR$(9) AND A$OCHR$ 
(10) AND A$OCHR$(3) AND A$<>"[" 
THEN LPOKE 442368+X*2+Y*80 , ASC ( 
A$) :X=X+1 

170 IF A$="[" THEN 210 

180 IF X>3 9 THEN X=0:Y=Y+1 ELSE 

IF X<0 THEN X=39:Y=Y-1 

190 IF Y<0 THEN Y=0 ELSE IF Y>18 

THEN Y=18 
200 GOTO 140 
210 A$=»» 

220 LOCATE 7, 20: PRINT" PR 

INTING " 

230 POKE 150,176: 'DOUBLE BAUD RA 

TE FOR HIGH SPEED 

240 FOR Y=0 TO 18 

250 FOR X=0 TO 39 

260 A=LPEEK(442368+X*2+Y*80) 

270 A$=A$+CHR$ (A) 

280 NEXT X 

290 PRINT #-2,A$ 

300 A$="" 

310 NEXT Y 

320 FOR A=l TO 3 

330 PRINT #-2,": 



• it 



340 NEXT A 

350 PRINT#-2,STRING$(40,"-") 
360 POKE 65496,0 

370 POKE 150,88 'RETURN BAUD RAT 
E TO NORMAL SPEED 



88 THE RAINBOW February 1989 



Knee-High to a Growth Chart I 1 E 6 C K B 

By Gay Crawford 1 

Growth Chart is a handy program for those who are 
parents of young children. With a Gemini 10X printer and 
this program, you can print out an accurate height chart that 
will allow you to track your child's ascent into maturity. 

If you don't have a Gemini, change the baud rate in Line 
20 to that of your printer. The value is currently set as 150, 
18 for 2400 baud. Poke these values in Line 20 for the 
following baud rates: 150,87 for 600 baud, 150,41 for 1200 
baud, 150,7 for 4800 baud, and 150,1 for 9600 baud. You'll 
most likely need 600 baud because that is how fast CoCo is 
set to "talk" on power-up. Also, if your printer is not a 
Gemini, refer to your printer manual to replace the code in 
Line 30 with the proper code to change linefeeds to !4 inch 
(but check the accuracy with a ruler or a yardstick). 

Use tractor-feed paper, and consider reinforcing the page 
breaks with tape, or perhaps cover the entire chrirt with clear 
contact paper. Hang the chart on a wall so that the 2-foot 
mark is exactly 24 inches above the floor, have the youngster 
stand straight against the wall (no tippytoeing), make a mark 
at the youngster's head level, and write the day's date out to 



the side. There is plenty of room on the chart for comments, 
and you may want to let your child decorate it. 

The Listing: GRDCHflRT 

1J3 'HEIGHT CHART PRINTER FOR GEM 
INI 10X 

20 POKE 150,18 

30 PRINT#-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(65) ;CH 
R$(18);' 1/4 INCH LINEFEEDS 
40 CLS 

50 LINEINPUT "ENTER NAME OF CHILD 

: ";CN$ 

60 PRINT#-2, "Height Growth Chart 
for ";CN$ 

70 PRINT#-2:PRINT#-2 
80 F=5:I=0 

90 PRINT#-2,F" Feet "I "inches" 

;TAB(22) ;" " 

100 PRINT#-2,TAB(22) ;»-■■ 

110 PRINT#-2,TAB(22) ;" — " 

120 PRINT#-2,TAB(22) ;"-" 

130 1=1-1 :IFI<0 THENI=11:F=F-1 

140 IFF>1 THEN 90 

150 END 



16K 
ECB 



CoCo says . . . select the blue box in the lower-left corner. 
CoCo says . . . pick the red box in the lower-right corner. 
CoCo says . . . test your short-term memory with CoCo 
Simon. 

CoCo Simon divides the screen up into four sections, each 
displaying a different color and sound. The top-left corner 
corresponds to the Q key, top-right to the W, bottom-left to 
A and bottom-right to S. The computer will flash one of the 
sections. Your job is to press the appropriate key. If your 
response is correct, it will add another sequence to the 
previous one, laying down a pattern for you to duplicate. 

When run, the game begins immediately, so pay attention. 
After it finishes its display, there is a "dead" time in which 
it waits for your response. If you press the correct keys, the 
program adds another bit to the sequence. See how far you 
can go — most people run into a snag at about 10 items. 

The Listing: SIMON 

10 CLS 8:PRINT"COCO SIMON" 
20 PRINT" BY W.MASSIE" 

30 FORX=1TO20: SOUND 100,1:SOUND9 
0,1: NEXTX 

40 PMODE 3,1: SCREEN 1,0:PCLS 
50 1 *************************** 

60 P=l:' FOR SOUND DELAY 

70 DIM M$(99) :C=0:CH=0 

80 R=RND ( 4 ) : A$="QWAS " : C=C+1 



90 M$(C)=MID$(A$,R,1) 
100 C1=0:C2=0 

lljg <************************** 

120 C1=C1+1:PCLS 
130 IF M$(C1)="Q" THEN 190 
140 IF M$(C1)="W" THEN 220 
150 IF M$(C1)="A" THEN 250 
160 IF M$(C1)="S" THEN 280 
170 IF C1=C THEN 320 
180 GOTO 120 
190 COLOR 3,5 

200 LINE(0,0)-(100,75) ,PSET,B 
210 SOUND 100, P: GOTO 170 
220 COLOR 2,5 

230 LINE(100,0)-(200,75) ,PSET,BF 
240 SOUND 125, P: GOTO 170 
250 COLOR 3,5 

260 LINE(0,75)-(100,150) ,PSET,BF 
270 SOUND 150, P: GOTO 170 
280 COLOR 4,5 

290 LINE(100,75)-(200,150) ,PSET, 
BF 

300 SOUND 200,P:GOTO 170 

310 '*************************** 

320 C2=C2+1:PCLS 

3 30 K$=INKEY$ 

340 IF CH<C2 THEN CH=C2 

350 IF C2=C+1 THEN PCLS 2:FORX=l 

TO20 : NEXTX : GOTO 8 0 

360 IF K$="Q" OR K$="W" OR K$="A 
" OR K$="S" THEN 370 ELSE 330 




CoCo Says . . . 

By Warren Massie 



February 1989 THE RAINBOW 89 



370 IF K$OM$(C2) THEN CLS:G0T04 
30 

380 IF K$— "Q"THEN COLOR 3 , 5 : LINE 
(0,0) -(100,75) ,PSET,B:SOUND100,P 
390 IF K$="W"THEN COLOR 2 , 5 : LINE 
(100,0) -(200,75) ,PSET,BF:SOUND12 
5 P 

400 IF K$="A !I THEN COLOR 3 , 5 : LINE 
(0,75) -(100, 150) ,PSET,BF:SOUND15 

0,P 

410 IF K$= ,, S I, THEN COLOR 4 , 5 : LINE 
(100,75) -(200,150) ,PSET,BF: SOUND 
200, P 



420 PCLS:GOTO 320 

430 PRINT "WRONG, IT WAS THE ";M$ 
(C2) ; "-KEY." : SOUND 1,15 
440 PRINT :PRINT"HIGHEST NUMBER 0 
F SEQUENCE (S) " 

450 PRINT " REMEMBERE D IS:";CH-1 

460 PRINT: PRINT "DO YOU WANT TO P 

LAY AGAIN (Y/N)?"; 

470 R$=INKEY$:IF R$="Y" THEN C=0 

:CH=0:PMODE 3,1: SCREEN 1,0:PCLS: 

GOTO80 

480 IF R$="N" THEN END ELSE 470 



Towers of Hanoi 

By Dan O'Brien 




Towers of Hanoi is a graphic brain-teaser that will surely 
get your mental gears to grinding. There are three "pegs"; on 
the peg on the left is a "pyramid" of discs, each disc being 
smaller than the one it rests on. The object is to move all the 
discs from the left peg to the right peg. 

Three conditions: 1) only one disc can be moved at a time, 
2) only the top disc of a stack can be moved, and 3) a disc 
cannot be stacked onto any disc that is smaller than itself. 
To play, use the 1, 2 and 3 keys (which represent pegs 1, 2 
and 3). 

Just press the number of the peg you want to move the 
disc from, then press the number of the peg you want to move 
the disc to. If a wrong number is pressed, or if you get the 
feeling the computer is locked up, press the zero (0) key and 
try again; the previous move will be ignored. The only advice 
I can give you is to be patient. 



The Listing: HANOI 




50 IFI$<>"1" AND I$<: 
>"3" OR I$="0"THEN40 
60 A=VAL(I$) 
70 I$=INKEY$:IFI$=""THEN70 
80 IFI$<>"1" AND I$<>"2" AND I$- 
>"3" OR I$="0"THEN 40 
90 B=VAL(I$) 
100 IF (A)=(B) THEN40 
110 IF L(A)=0THEN40 
120 R=LEV(A,L(A) ) 
130 IF L(B) <>0THENS=LEV (B, L(B) ) 




IF (R)>(S) THEN 40 
140 MOV=MOV+l 

IF R=l THEN D=4 ELSE D=(R-1) 

IFA=1THEN P=44 

IFA=2THEN P=128 

IFA=3THEN P=212 

i H=100-(8*(L(A)-1) ) 

I LINE(P-D,H-1) -(P-D,H-8) ,PRES 

LINE-(P+D,H-8) , PRESET: LINE- (P 

H-l) , PRESET 

L(B)=L(B)+1 

IF B=1THENP=44 

IF B=2 THEN P=128 

IF B=3 THEN P=212 
v—i ant — f q* /t. /u\ — l \ 



150 
*8 
160 
170 
180 
190 

200 
ET 
+D 
210 
220 
230 
240 
250 

2 60 LINE 
270 LEV(„,_,_, , 
280 LEV(A, L(A) ) =0 
290 L(A)=L(A)-1 
300 IF L(3) <>6 THEN40 
310 



H=100-(8*(L(B)-1) ) 
LINE(P-D,H) -(P+D,H-8) , 
LEV(B,L(B) )=R 



PSET,B 



300 IF L(3) <>6 THEN40 
310 CLS: PRINT "YOU HAVE DONE IT I 

N:";MOV;" MOVES! 
315 PRINT "ONLY : " ; MOV- 6 3 ; " MOVES 
TILL PERFECT" 

320 PRINT "PRESS ANY KEY TO PLAY 
AGAIN" 

330 I$=INKEY$:IFI$=""THEN330 
340 RUN 



90 THE RAINBOW February 1989 



Boggling Your Mind 4K 

By Russell Riley, Jr. 1 

In Heads Up, players compete against time and each other 
to come up with as many words as possible from a grid of 
random letters appearing onscreen. The letters can be used 
only once and must touch! Each player should use a notepad 
and a pencil to jot down his or her words. When time runs 
out, a tone sounds and players compare their lists of words. 
Words that appear on other players' lists are cancelled out. 

The Listing: HERDSUP 

j3 REM RUSSELL RILEY JR COPYRIGHT 

1988 
1 CLS 

3 DIM A$(1J3J3) 

5 FOR X=l TO 16 

6 RESTORE 

7 Y=j3 

10 Z=RND(7J3) 

15 READ A$(X):Y=Y+1 

16 IF Z=Y THEN NEXT X ELSE 15 
2)3 FOR P=J3 TO 169: NEXT P 

5p PRINT @ 170,A$(1) M ;A$(2);" 



";A$(3) ;" ";A$(4) 

51 FOR P=177 TO 2)31: PRINT @ P,CH 
R$(TR) 

52 NEXT P 

55 PRINT @ 2j32,A$ (5) ; " ";A$(6);" 
";A$(7) ;■• ";A$(8) 

56 FOR P=2J39 TO 233: PRINT @ P,CH 
R$(TR) :NEXT P 

57 PRINT § 234, A$ (9) ; 11 ";A$(10); 
" ";A$(11) ;" M ;A$(12) 

58 FOR P=241 TO 265: PRINT @ P,CH 
R$(TR) :NEXT P 

59 PRINT 6 266,A$(13);" ";A$(14) 
;" ";A$(15) ;" ";A$(16) 

6j3 FOR P=273 TO M: PRINT § P,CHR$ 
(TR) 

61 NEXT P 
65 T=T+1 

7j3 IF T=18j3j3j3 THEN SOUND 1,1)8 
75 GOTO 65 

Ij3j3 DATA A,A,A,A,A,B,B,C,C,C,D,D 
^E/E^E / E / E / E / E,E / F / F / G / G A G / H / H / I 
,1,1,1, J, J,K,K,L,L,M,M,N,N,0,0,0 
,0,0,P,P,P,Q,R,R,R,R,S,S,S,T,T,T 
,U,U,U,U,V,V,W,W,X,Y,Z 



The Building Blocks ol Graphics I 16K 

By Keiran Kenny 

Color Blocks is a nice, short program suitable to introduce 
beginners to Lo-Res graphics. It uses Color BASIC'S block 
graphics characters. After you load and run, you see an up- 
arrow cursor centered at the bottom of the screen. Press the 
appropriate arrow key and auto-repeating action will take 
you in whatever direction you want to go. 

When you come to a good place to drop off a block, press 
a number key from 1 to 8, and CoCo will draw a block there 
in the color of the number you chose (1 is green, 2 is red, 
3 is blue, etc.). The cursor will then reappear at the bottom 
of the screen, ready to travel to another position and place 
a block there. If you place the cursor over an existing color 
block, the block will be deleted. 

Don't be dismayed if the cursor shoots off the top of the 
screen — it wraps around. Press the arrow key and it 
reappears at bottom center. With a little patience you can 
create attractive patterns. I drew a really impressive 
Christmas tree. 

The Listing: CLRBLQKS 

J3 1 COLRBLKS 1 by Keiran Kenny, 

Sydney, 1988. 
1J3 CLSJ3 
2j3 P=152j3 
3j3 POKEP,3j3 



4j3 IFPEEK(341)=2 47THENP=P-32:POK 

E(P) ,3j3:POKEP+3 2, 12 8:GOT01j3j3 

5j3 IFPEEK(342)=247THENP=P+32:POK 

EP, 3j3 : POKEP-32 , 12 8 : GOT01j3j3 

6j3 IFPEEK(343)=247THENP=P-l:POKE 

P, 3J3 : POKEP+1 , 128 : GOT01j3j3 

7J3 IFPEEK(344)=247THENP=P+l:POKE 

P, 3j3 : POKEP-1 , 12 8 : GOT01j3j3 

8J3 K$=INKEY$:IFK$=<"j3 f 'ORK$>"8"TH 

ENlljS 

9j3 POKEP / 127+16*VAL(K$) :GOT02j3 
1J3J3 IFP<lj3240RP>1535THENP=152j3 
110 FORD=lT05j3:NEXT:GOT04j3 



Submissions to "Novices Niche" are welcome from everyone. We 
like to run a variety of short programs that can be typed in at one 
sitting and are useful, educational and fun. Keep in mind, although 
the short programs are limited in scope, many novice programmers 
find it enjoyable and quite educational to improve the software 
written by others. 

Program submissions must be on tape or disk. We're sorry, but 
we cannot key in program listings. All programs should be 
supported by some editorial commentary, explaining how the 
program works. If your submission is accepted for publication, the 
payment rate will be established and agreed upon prior to 
publication. 



February 1989 THE RAINBOW 91 



CoCo Consultat i ons 



Out of Sync 

/ would like to hook a 12-inch Sam- 
sung TTL (IBM type) monochrome 
monitor to my CoCo 3. This is a mon- 
itor with a 9-pin DB connector on the 
back, with provisions for intensity, 
video, H sync and V sync on pins 6, 7, 
8 and 9 respectively. Pin 1 is ground. 

Donald Bullock 
Camden, Alabama 

That monitor is rather hard to use 
with a CoCo 3 for two reasons. First, 
the monitor requires a digital TTL 
signal-level input (0 to 5 volts), while the 
CoCo uses an analog signal ranging 
from 0 to .9 volts. Second, that monitor 
is set up to work properly only when it 
receives a sync frequency of about 19 
KHz. The CoCo sends out its video at 
a sync frequency of 15.75 KHz. It would 
require some special circuitry to get a 
decent image on that monitor. Even 
then, you'd only get three intensity 
levels at best (black, dim and bright). In 
addition, your picture would probably 
be small — occupying only the center 
portion of the screen — because of the 
discrepancy in the H sync frequencies. 
Someone with a good knowledge of 
analog and digital video and a moderate 
amount of time to tinker might be able 
to make such a converter circuit, but 
none is currently offered on the CoCo 
market. For all practical purposes, you 
cannot use that monitor with the CoCo 
at this time. 

All or Nothing 

/ have a Disto 512K Co Co-upgrade 
board with no chips in it. Is it possible 
to temporarily populate it with 256 K of 
memory? 

Roger Wilkins 
Sexsmith, Alberta 

There is no intermediate amount of 
memory that can work on the CoCo 3. 
You must have either 128K or the full 
512K. While in theory it might be 



Martin H. Goodman, M.D., a physi- 
cian trained in anesthesiology, is a 
longtime electronics tinkerer and out- 
spoken commentator — sort of the 
Howard Cosell of the CoCo world. On 
Delphi, Marty is the SIGop of RAIN- 
BOW'S CoCo SIG and database man- 
ager of OS-9 Online. His non-computer 
passions include running, mountaineer- 
ing and outdoor photography. Marty 
lives in San Pablo, California. 




CONSULTATIONS 

By Marty Goodman 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 



possible to make a board that can be 
partially populated (probably using 
4464-type chips), no one has bothered 
to do so. Such a board would be very 
expensive because it would need a 
number of chips in addition to the 
memory chips. 

Solder Solution 

/ have found and solved the same 
nasty problem in two of my Tandon TM 
100 series full-height drives. The prob- 
lem involved intermittent failure of the 
drives. The drive motor-spindle would 
spin too fast, occasionally resulting in 
a crashed disk. When the drives failed, 
a sharp rap on the case would tempo- 
rarily fix the problem. In both drives, 
the problem was caused by cold-solder 
joints between the motor-speed poten- 
tiometer (a rectangular blue component 
on the small motor-speed PC circuit 
board in the rear of the drive) and its 
circuit board. Remelting the solder 
joints for the potentiometer cured the 
problem. I suspect that other Tandon 
series 100 (TM 100-1, 100-2 and 100-4) 
drives might suffer from the same 
problem and be just as easy to fix. 

Steve Goldberg 
(W21MF) 
Bethpage, New York 

Thanks for the solution. The Tandon 
TM 100 series drives (apart from that 
problem) are among the more reliable 



of the older technology full-height 
floppy drives. 1 used two of them for 
many years. While 1 never encountered 
that problem, perhaps others have. 

Read Before You Write 

How do I use the memory- 
management unit (MMU) of the CoCo 
3 in writing assembly language pro- 
grams? 

H. Peters 

Lantzville, British Columbia 

First, you need a good reference on 
the GIME chip. Spectral Associates 5 
Super Extended BASIC Unraveled 
(available from Microcom) is a good 
reference on the GIME chip. The book 
includes full specs on the chip and 
disassembly of the CoCo 3's ROM, 
including numerous examples of chip 
programming. The Tandy service man- 
ual for the CoCo 3, another good 
reference, can be purchased from either 
Microcom or your local Radio Shack 
store. (Radio Shack will have to order 
the book from National Parts in Texas.) 

With these references in front of you, 
note that the memory manager is pro- 
grammed by 6-bit data values written to 
registers SFFAO through SFFAF. These 
sixteen registers set up two tasks, or 
masks, for mapping memory. The task 
being used (if any) is controlled by the 
task-select bit (Bit 0 of FF9I) and the 
M M U-enable bit (Bit 6 of SFF90). If the 
MMU is disabled, then a third canned 
task is implemented, and the 6809's 
memory is mapped to the top 64K of the 
machine's physical memory (as if seg- 
ments $38 through S3F were pro- 
grammed into a select set of eight task 
registers). 

A Moving Experience 

Can I use an FD 501 and an FD 502 
drive in the same cabinet as drives 0 and 
1? 

Oscar Dias 
Aibonito, Puerto Rico 

You can use the drives in the way you 
describe, but there are several difficul- 
ties in doing so. First, the FD 502 drive's 
power supply connector is physically 
different from that of the FD 501 drive. 
To use both in the same case, you would 
have to adapt or change the power 
supply connector on one or the other. 
Both use the same (+5 and + 12) voltages 
at about the same amount of current, 
but the physical connector is different. 



92 THE RAINBOW February 1989 



Second, if both the FD 501 and the 
FD 502 drive were originally Drive 0, 
you must remove a terminator resistor 
pack from one or the other. All drive 
systems have only one terminator re- 
sistor. (These resistor packs vary in their 
appearance. They may look like an 
integrated circuit in a socket, or a blob 
of epoxy with a single row of pins, also 
socketted.) In addition you need to alter 
the position of the drive-select jumpers 
on one or the other drive if both were 
originally Drive 0. Look for jumpers 
labeled DSO, DSI, etc. Change a 
jumper from DSO to DS I on one of the 
drives. On some brands of drives, the 
change will be from DS 1 to DS2. While 
on some brands these jumpers can be 
moved by hand, on others you need to 
cut and resolder wires. 

Back to Disk BASIC 

1 cannot get CoCo Max \\\ to work 
with my Co Co 3 and Disto Super Disk 
Controller whether I use my Disk BASIC 
ROM or CDOS-3. 

Art St. Amant 
Elliot Lake, Ontario 

CoCo Max III needs an almost to- 
tally standard disk ROM, so I am not 
surprised that it did not work with 
CDOS-3. I know of only one modified 
DOS that is compatible with CoCo 
Max III the current release of 
ADOS-3. (To use that version, you 
must use the optional Disable feature.) 
I see no reason why it should not work 
properly if you are using a vanilla, 
unmodified Radio Shack Disk BASIC 
ROM. 

However, since you say you are using 
a Disto Super Controller, 1 assume your 
Disk BASIC ROM is a 28-pin EPROM, 
which means that anyone could have 
altered it subtly. You need to try what 
you know is a completely unaltered 
version of Disk basic in the controller. 
If that doesn't work, call Colorware, 
which sells the product. It's worth the 
trouble. CoCo Max III is a fine product. 

Analog vs. Digital 

I just purchased a Tandy 1000 HX 
computer and discovered that my CM- 
8 RGB monitor would not work with it. 
Is there any way to fix this? Also, can 
I use a couple of old gray full-height 
drives with my Tandy FD 501 two-drive 
system? 

W.J. Martin 
Key Largo, Florida 

The CM-8 accepts only an analog 
signal. The PC-compatible you bought 



puts out a CG A (a four-bit digital RGB) 
signal. The two signal protocols are not 
really compatible because they work at 
different voltage levels and select colors 
in different ways. This is one of the 
reasons 1 have suggested to readers that 
they consider getting a Magnavox or 
Sony monitor instead of the CM-8. 
Those monitors offer compatibility 
with both types of signal protocol. 

I have heard from one user who 
hooked his Tandy 1000's R, G and B 
lines and H and V sync lines to the 
corresponding input lines on his CM-8 
and got a usable picture. Remember: 
Because the CM-8 cannot handle the 
intensity line from the Tandy 1000, you 
can only get six colors and black and 
white this way. In addition, when using 
the CM-8 in this fashion, you are driv- 
ing inputs designed for signal levels of 
0 to .9 volts with signals that go as high 
as 4 volts. Prolonged use might damage 
the input chip on the CM-8. The user 
who reported this experiment said 
things had been fine for a few months. 
To make this modification, you need to 
be comfortable cutting on the CM-8 
cable and arranging for your own con- 
nectors. In effect, you need to be a 
hardware tinkerer of at least modest 
ability. 

As for using the old gray drives, I 
recommend you just forget about them. 
Those particular drives are notoriously 
unreliable machines. It is possible to do 
as you suggest. However, the old Tandy 
full-height drives were selected via 
missing teeth in the connector, while the 
new half-height drives are selected via 
jumpers on the drive's circuit board. 
This makes it necessary to do some 
tinkering to put together the system you 
describe. And, of course, you'd have to 
yank the terminator resistor from your 
gray Drive 0. 

CoCo 3 Inputs 

A note to hardware hackers looking 
for inputs to the CoCo 3: Unlike on the 
CoCo I and 2, there are four unused 
pins on the CoCo 3's IC4 (the 68B21 
PI A) that can be used as inputs if the 
bits are set as such. These lines were 
used to drive the VDG chip on the older 
CoCos, but that function is now done 
inside the GfME chip. You can't use 
those lines as outputs. If you do that, 
you will be writing to registers inside the 
GIME chip that mimic the functions of 
the old VDG chip. However, if used as 
inputs, these lines constitute four valid 
TTL inputs. The lines in question are 
PB 4 through PB 7. Note that PB 3 t 
wired to a pull-up system and Pin 10 of 



the RGB port, is not used by any hard- 
ware or software made by Tandy or 
anyone else. Hackers may want to free 
that line to get a fifth PI A line. (This line 
could be used as either an input or an 
output.) Use Pin 10 of the RGB port to 
supply +5 volts to sync converters or to 
output composite sync generated with 
your own circuit. 

Hackers should also beware: There 
have been reports of several devices that 
worked on the CoCo 1 and 2 but don't 
work properly on the CoCo 3. This may 
include some releases of the FD 501 and 
FD 502 shortie controller from Tandy. 
Problems have been traced to an appar- 
ent difference in the timing of the SCS 
(Spare Cartridge Select) line on the 
CoCo 2 and CoCo 3. The problems 
appear to be cured if one gates the SCS 
line with the high part of the E clock 
line. One NOR and two inverter gates 
could be used to accomplish this. 

Steve Bjork 

(6809 ER) 

SRB Software 
Palmdale, California 

Thanks for those tips, Steve. I have 
been using Pin 10 of the RGB port for 
composite sync (which I generate using 
a 74LS02 chip I piggy-backed on the 
74LS04 in the CoCo) for about a year 
now. I encountered the same problem 
you describe when a device I was pro- 
totyping worked fine on a CoCo 1 and 
2 but not on a CoCo 3. The problem was 
cured when I gated the SCS line with 
the E clock, as you suggest. So my 
experience indicates there are real 
timing differences between the SCS line 
on the CoCo 1 and 2 and the CoCo 3. 
Does anyone out there have a nice high- 
frequency scope and want to report 
more conclusive details? 



Your technical questions are wel- 
comed. Please address them to CoCo 
Consultations, the rainbow, P.O. Box 
385, Prospect, KY 40059. 

We reserve the right to publish only 
questions of general interest and to edit 
for brevity and clarity. Due to the large 
volume of mail we receive, we are unable 
to answer letters individually. 

Questions can also be sent to Marty 
through the Delphi CoCo SIG. From the 
CoCo SIG> prompt, pick Rainbow 
Magazine Services, then, at the RAIN- 
BOWS prompt, type R5K (for Ask the 
Experts) to arrive at the EXPERTS> 
prompt, where you can select the "CoCo 
Consultations" online form which has 
complete instructions. 



February 1989 THE RAINBOW 93 



*** *** *** *** COLOR COMPUTER III SOFTWARE *** *** *** *** 



CBASIC III EDITOR/COMPILER 

The ULTIMATE Color Computer III BASIC COMPILER!!! 

If you want to write fast efficient machine language programs and you don't 
want to spend the next few years trying to learn how to write them in Assembly 
language or with a cheap compiler, then CBASIC III is the answer!!! 

CBASIC III is the only fully integrated Basic Compiler and Program Editing 
System available for the Color Computer 3. It will allow you to take full advantage 
of all the capabilities available in your CoCo-3 including 512K RAM, without 
having to spend years trying to leam assembly language programming. CBASIC 
III allows you to create, edit and convert programs from a language you are 
already familiar with Enhanced Disk Color Basic, into fast efficient machine 
language programs easily and quickly. CBASIC III supports all the enhanced 
hardware available in the CoCo-3, including Hi-Res Graphics, & Screen displays, 
Extended Memory and Interrupts (Keyboard, Timer, Serial & Clock). We even 
added advanced commands not available in Basic to give you a level of control 
only avialable to very advanced Machine Language Programmers. Plus we made it 
exceptionally easy to use, not like some other compilers. CBASIC III is the 
friendliest and easiest compiler available for the Color Computer III. 

CBASIC III is a powerful tool for the Beginner as well as the Advanced Basic 
or Machine Language programmer. You can write programs without having to 
worry about the Stack, DP Register, memory allocations and so on, because 
CBASIC III will handle it for you automatically. For Advanced users, CBASIC III 
will let you control every aspect of your program, even generating machine code 
directly in a program easily. 

CBASIC III features well over ISO Compiled Basic Commands and Functions 
that fully support Disk Sequential and Direct access files, Tape, Printer and 
Screen I/O. It supports ALL the High and Low Resolution Graphics, Sound, Play 
and String Operations available in Enhanced Color Basic, including Graphics 
H/GET, H/Put, H/PIay and H/DRAW, all with 99.9% syntax compatibility. 
CBASIC III also supports the built in Serial I/O port with separate programmable 
printer & serial I/O baud rates. You can send and receive data with easy to use 
PRINT, INPUT, INKEY, GETCHAR and PUTCHAR commands. 

CBASIC makes full use of the powerful and flexible GIMI chip in the Color 
Computer 3. It will fully utilize the 128K of RAM available and install 2 Ultra 
Fast Ramdisks if 512K is available, for program Creation, Editing and 
Compilation. You can easily access all 51 2K of memory in a Compiled program 
thru several extended memory commands that can access it in 32K or 8K blocks 
and single or double bytes. 

CBASIC has its own completely integrated Basic Program Editor which allows 
you to ldad, edit or create programs for the compiler. It is a full featured editor 
designed specifically for writing Basic programs. It has block move and copy, 
program renumbering, automatic line number generation, screen editing, printer 
control and much more. 

The documentation provided with CBASIC III is an 8 1/2 by 11 Spiral Bound 
book which contains approximatly 120 pages of real information. We went to 
great lengths to provide a manual that is not only easy to use and understand, but 
complete and comprehensive enough for even the most sophisticated user. 

CBASIC III is the most expensive Color Basic Compiler on the market, and 
well worth the investment. You can buy a less expensive compiler for your 
CoCo-3, and then find out how difficult it is to use, or how limited its features are. 
Then you v lI wish you had bought CBASIC III in the first place. Dollar for dollar, 
CBASIC III gives you more than any other compiler available. If you can find a 
better Co Co- 3 Basic Compiler then buy it!!! 

Requires 128K & Disk $149.00 

DATAPACK III PLUS V1.1 

SUPER SMART TERMINAL PROGRAM 

AUTOPILOT & AUTO-LOG PROCESSORS 
X- MOD EM DIRECT DISK FILE TRANSFER 
VT-100 & VT-52 TERMINAL EMULATION 

• No lost data even at 2400 Baud on the COCO-3 Serial I/O port. 

• 8 Display Formats, 32/40/64/80 columns at 192 or 225 Res. 

• 50K Text Buffer when using the Hi-Res Text Display & Disk. 

• ASCII & BINARY disk file transfer support via XMODEM. 
■ Directly record receive data to a disk file (Data Logging). 

• VT-100 terminal emulation for VAX, UNIX and other systems. 

• VT- 100/52 cursor keys, position, insert/delete, PF & Alt. keys. 
" Programmable Word Length, Parity, Stop Bits and baud rates. 

• Complete Full and Half Duplex operation, with no garbled data. 

• 9 Variable length, Programmable Macro Key buffers. 

• Programmable Printer rates from 110 to 9600 baud. 

• Send Files directly from the Buffer, Macro Keys or Disk. 

• Display on Screen or Print the contents of the Buffer. 

• Freeze Display & Review information On Line with no data loss. 

• Built in Command Menu (Help) Display. 

• Built in 2 Drive Ramdisk for 512K RAM support and much more. 
Supports: R.S. Modem- Pak & Deluxe RS-232 Pak, even with Disk. 

Requires 128K & Disk, $59.95 

EDT/ASM III 

128/512K DISK EDITOR ASSEMBLER 

EDT/ASM III is a Disk based co-resident Text Editor & Assembler. It is 
designed to take advantage of the new features available in the CoCo-3 with either 
128K or 512K of memory. It has 8 display formats from 32/40/64/80 columns by 24 
lines in 192 or 225 Resolution, so you use the best display mode whether you are 
using an RGB or Composite monitor or even a TV for your display. Plus you can 
select any foreground or background colors or even monochrome display modes. 
It will even support 512K by adding an automatic 2 drive Ultra Fast Ramdisk for 
lightning fast assembly of program source code larger than memory. There is also 
a free standing ML Debug Monitor, to help you debug your assembled programs. 
EDT/ASM III has the most powerful, easy to use Text Editor available in any 
Editor/Assembler package for the Color Computer. 

• Supports Local and Global string search and/or replace. 

• Full Screen line editing with immediate line update. 

• Easy to use Single keystroke editing commands. 

• Load & Save standard ASCII formatted file formats. 

• Block Move & Copy, Insert, Delete, Overtype, 

• Create and Edit files larger than memory. 

The Assembler portion of EDT/ASM III features include: 

• Supports the full 6809 instruction set & cross assembles 6800 code. 
" Supports Conditional IF/THEN/ELSE assembly. 

• Supports Disk Library file (include) up to 9 levels deep. 

• Supports standard Motorola assembler directives. 

• Allows multiple values for FCB & FDB directives (unlike R.S. EDT/ASM) 

• Allows assembly from the Editor Buffer, Disk or both. 

Requires 128K & Disk $59.95 



TEXTPRO IV 

"The ADVANCED COCO-3 Word Processing System" 

• 9 Hi-Res Displays from 58 to 212 columns by 24 lines in 225 Res. 

• On Screen Display of Bold, Italic, Underline & Double Width print. 

• Up to 8 Proportional Character Sets Supported with Justification. 

• Up to 80 Programmable Function Keys & Loadable Function keysets. 

• Fully Buffered keyboard accepts data even duiring disk access. 

• Autoexecute Startup files for easy printer & system configuration. 

• 8 Pre-Defined Printer function commands & 10 Programmable ones. 

• Supports Library files for unlimited printing & configurations. 
' Disk file record access for Mail Merge & Boiler Plate printing. 

• Completely Automatic Justification, Centering. Flush left & right. 
" Change indents, margins, line length, etc. anytime in the text. 

• Create and Edit files larger than memory, up to a full disk, 

• Easily imbed any number of printer format and control codes. 

• Built in Ultra Fast 2 drive RAMDISK for 512K support. 

TEXTPRO IV is the most advanced word processing system available for the 
COCO-3, designed for speed, flcxability and extensive document processing. It is 
not like most of the other word processing programs available for the Color 
Computer. If you are looking for a simple word processor to write letters or other 
short documents, and never expect to use multiple fonts or proportional spacing, 
then most likely you'll be better off with one of the other simpler word processors. 
But, if you want a powerful word processor with extensive document formatting 
features to handle large documents, term papers, manuals, complex formatting 
problems and letter writing, then TEXTPRO IV is what your looking for. It works 
in a totally different way than most word processing programs. It uses simple 2 
character abbreviations of words or phrases for commands and formatting 
information that you imbed directly in your text. There are over 70 different 
formatting commands you can use without ever leaving the text your working on. 
There are no time comsuming, and often frustrating menu chases, you are in total 
control at all times. You can see what the formatted document will look like 
before a single word is ever printed on your printer. Including margins, headers, 
footers, page numbers, page breaks, column formatting, justification, and Bold, 
Italic, Underline, Double Width, Superscript and Subscript characters right on the 
screen. 

TEXTPRO IV can even support LASER PRINTERS with proportional fonts. 
take a good look at this AD? It was done with TEXTPRO IV on an OKJDATA 
LASERLINE-6 laser printer!!! All the character sets used on this AD are 
proportional spaced characters, all centering, justification, and text printing was 
performed automatically by TEXTPRO IV. 

Requires 128K & Disk $89.95 

HI- RES III Screen Commander 

The DISPLAY you wanted but didn't get on your CoCo-3 

• 54 Different Character Sizes available from 14 to 212 cpl. 

• Bold, Italic, Underline, Subscript, Superscript and Plain character styles. 

• Double Width, Double Height and Quad width characters. 

• Scroll Protect form 1 to 23 lines on the screen. 

• Mixed Text & Graphics in HSCREEN 3 mode. 

• PRINT @ is available in all character sizes & styles. 

• Programmable Automatic Key repeat for fast editing. 

• Full Control Code Keyboard supported. 

• Selectable Character & Background color. 

• Uses only 4K of Extended (2nd 64K) or Basic RAM. 

• Written in Ultra Fast Machine Language. 

HI-RES III will improve the standard display capabilities of the Color 
Computer 3, even the 40 and 80 column displays have several features missing. 
For example, you can't use PRINT @ or have different character sizes on the same 
screen, even when mixing text and graphics with the HPRINT command. Hi-RES 
III can give you the kind of display you always dreamed about having on your 
CoCo-3, with a wide variety of display options that you can easily use with your 
Basic or ML programs. 

HI-RES III is totally compatible with Enhanced Color Basic and its operation 
is invisible to Basic. It simply replaces the normal screen display with an 
extremely versatile display package. With the full control code keyboard, you can 
control many of HI-RES III cxlcnded functions with just a couple of simple 
keystrokes. 

Requires 128K Tape or Disk $34,95 

512K RAMDISK & MEMORY TESTER 

RAMDISK is an ALL Machine Language program that will give you 2 ULTRA 
High Speed Ram Disks in you CoCo-3. It does not need or require the OS-9 
operating system. It works with R.S. DOS Vl'.O or VI. 1 and it is completely 
compatible with Enhanced Color Disk Basic! Plus it allows your CoCo-3 to run at 
double speed all the time even for floppy disk access!!! It will not disappear when 
you press reset like some other ramdisk programs. The MEMORY tester is a fast 
ML program to test the 512K ram. It performs several bit tests as well as an 
address test so you know that your 512K of memory is working perfectly. 

Requires 512K & Disk $19.95 

"The SOURCE III" 

DISASSEMBLER & SOURCE CODE GENERATOR 

The SOURCE III will allow you to easily Disassemble Color Computer 
machine language programs Directly from Disk and generate beautiful, Assembler 
compatible Source code. 

" Automatic label generation and allows specifying FCB, FDB and FCC areas. 
" Disassemble programs Directly from disk, unlike other disassemblers. 

• Automatically locates Begin, End and Execution address. 

• Output Disassembled listing with labels to the Printer, Screen or both. 

• Generates Assembler source files directly to disk or printer. 

• Built in Hex/Ascii dump/display to locate FCB, FCC & FDB areas. 
" 8 Selectable Display formats 32/40/64/80 columns in 192 or 225 Res. 

• Selectable Foreground & Background colors & Printer Baud rates. 

• Built in Disk Directory an Kill file commands. 

• Menu display with single key commands for smooth, Easy operation. 

• Written in Ultra Fast Machine Language. 

Requires 128K & Disk $49.95 

To order products by mail, send check or money order for the amount of 

purchase, plus $3.00 for shipping & handling to the address below. 
To Order by VISA, MASTERCARD or COD call us at (702) 452-0632 
(Monday thru Saturday, 8am to 5pm PST) 

CER-COMP LTD. 
5566 Ricochet Avenue 
Las Vegas, Nevada 89110 
(702) 452-0632 




ndow 



Ma 




ter 



it 





Prograi Ke 



leleie Key 
Display Keys 

Save Keys 
Load Keys 



ojrfti Keys Used 

QP£N:?CHl W^ >y r i j l1 



Window Master Features 



i 



AIT 0= UT 



BUTTON 
OPEN 255,7 



ONNENUi BAS 
CONFIG BAS 
CHECK BAS 
AUTOEXEC BAS 
CONFIG SYS 



DRIVE 1 

0 B £ 

8 B £ 

6 B 

0 B 



1 



i 

1 A 1 



DRIVE 3 



Hi ndov Master 
Finder Vl.B 



tint ten by Bill 
Copyright (cl by Cer-Comp Ltd 



Screen Display Fonts 



Window Master supports up to 54 different character sizes on 
the screen with 5 different character styles. You can have Bold, 
Italic, Underlined, Super-Script, Sub-script or Plain character 
styles or any combination of them in any character size. You 
can also change the text color and background at any time to get 
really colorful displays. 

Fully Basic Compatible 

Window Master is fully compatible with Enhanced Color 
Disk basic with over 50 Commands & functions added to fully 
support the Point & Click Window System. Window Master 
does not take any memory away from Basic, so you still have all 
the Basic Program memory available. 

Hi-Resolution Displays 

Window Master uses the full potential of the Color 
Computer 3 display by using the 225 vertical resolution display 
modes instead of the 192 or 200 resolution modes like most 
other programs. It uses either the 320/16 color mode or the 
640/4 color display to give you the best display resolution 
possible, and can be switched to either mode at any time. 

Mixed Text & Graphics 

Window Master fully supports both Text & Graphics displays 
and even has a Graphics Pen that can be used with HLINE, 
HCIRCLE, HSET and more. You can change the Pen width & 
depth and turn it on or off with simple commands. We also 
added Enhanced Graphics Attributes that allow graphics 
statements to use And, Or, Xor and Copy modes to display 
graphic information. With the Graphics enhancements added 
by Window Master, you could write a "COCOMAX" type 
program in Basic! In fact we provide a small graphics demo 
program written in Basic. 

Event Processing 

Window Master adds a powerful new programming feature to 
Basic that enables you to do "Real Time" Programming in Basic. 
It's called Event Trapping, and it allows a program to detect and 
respond to certain "events" as they occur. You can trap Dialog 
activity, Time passage, Menu Selections, Keyboard activity and 
Mouse Activity with simple On Gosub statements, and when the 
specified event occurs, program control is automatically routed 
to the event handling routine, just like a Basic Gosub. After 
servicing the event, the sub-routine executes a Return statement 
and the program resumes execution at the statement where the 
event occured. 

Enhanced Editing Features 

Window Master adds an enhanced editor to Basic that allows 
you to see what you edit. It allows you to insert & delete by 
character or word, move left or right a word or character at a 
time, move to begin or end of line, toggle automatic insert 
on/off or just type over to replace characters. The editor can 
also recall the last line entered or edited with a single key stroke. 
You can even change the line number in line to copy it to a new 
location in the program. 



Multiple Windows 



Window Master supports multiple window displays with up to 
a maximum of 31 windows on the screen. Overlapping windows 
are supported, and any window can be made active or brought to 
the top of the screen. Windows can be picked up and moved 
anywhere on the screen with the mouse. There are 6 different 
Window styles to choose from and the window text, border and 
background color is selectable. 

Pull Down Menus 

- — ■ — — 

Menus are completely programmable with up to 16 menus 
available. They can be added or deleted at any time in a 
program. Menu items can be enabled, disabled, checked or 
cleared easily under program control. Menu selection is 
automatically handled by Window Master & all you have to do 
is read a function variable to find out which menu was selected. 

Buttons, Icons & Edit Fields 

Each Window can have up to 128 buttons, Icons or Edit fields 
active, if you can fit that many. Buttons, Icons and Edit field 
selection is handled automatically by Window Master when the 
mouse is clicked on one. All you have to do is read a Dialog 
function to find out which Button, Icon, or Edit field was 
selected, its very simple. 

Mouse & Keyboard Functions 

Window Master automatically handles the Mouse pointer 
movement, display and button clicks. It will tell you the current 
screen coordinate, the local window coordinate, window number 
the mouse is in, the number of times the button was pressed, 
which window number it was clicked in and more. The 
Keyboard is completely buffered, and supports up to 80 
programmable Function keys that can contain any kind of 
information or command sequences you can imagine. You can 
load and save function key sets at any time. So, you can have 
special sets of function keys for different tasks. The "Ctrl" key is 
supported so that you have a full control code keyboard 
available. 

Window Master Applications 

Window Master pushs the Color Computer 3 far beyond its 
normal capabilities, into the world of a "User Friendly" 
operating enviornment. We are already planning several new 
programs for use with Window Master. So you don't have to 
worry about having to write all your own programs. And don't 
forget that many existing Basic and M.L. programs will run 
under Window Master with little or no changes. The 
Possibilities for Application programs are endless: Spread 
Sheets, Word Processing, Communications, Education, Games, 
Graphic Design, DeskTop Publishing and on and on. 

Hardware Requirements 

Window Master requires 512K of memory, at least 1 Disk 
Drive, a Hi-Res Joystick Interface and a Mouse or Joystick. 

Technical Assistance 

If you run into difficulty trying to use some of Window 
Master's features, we will be happy to assist you in any way 
possible. You can write to us at the address below or call us 
between 10am and 2pm Pacific Standard Time for a more timely 
response. Sorry, no collect calls will be accepted. 

Ordering Information 

To order WINDOW MASTER by mail, send check or money 

order for $69.95, plus $3.00 for shipping & handling to the 
address below. To order by VISA, MASTERCARD or COD 

call us at (702)-452-0632 
(Monday thru Saturday, 8am to 5pm PST) 

CER-COMP Ltd. 

5566 Ricochet Avenue 
Las Vegas, Nevada 89110 
(702)-452-0632 



1 F e at we 



16K ECB 



The eighth in a series of tutorials for the beginner 
to intermediate machine language programmer 



Machine Language Made BASIC: 

Part VIII: And More Math 



By William P. Nee 



ecause the computer uses the 
Base 2 system, math problems 
involving multiplying or dividing 
by two are very easy. Shifts are a quick 
way to multiply or divide registers A, B, 
or D by two. The LSR (logical shift 
right) command will shift each bit in 
registers A or B to the right, effectively 
dividing either by two; however, any 
remainder is lost. As the following 
example illustrates, the right bit (Bit 0) 
of the register goes to the carry bit of 
the CC register, and the left bit (Bit 7) 
becomes a zero: 



Instead, it is stored in the carry bit, as 
shown by the following: 



Register A 
LSR A 
Carry Bit 



10101010 = 170 
01010101 = 85 
0 



Notice that the carry bit of the CC 
register is now a zero. When signed 
numbers are used, the ASR (arithmetic 
shift right) works the same way as LSR 
except that Bit 7 (the sign bit) stays the 
same, so the sign of the number will 
remain unchanged. 

An LSL (logical shift left) will mul- 
tiply register A or B by two. This time, 
Bit 0 will become a zero and Bit 7 will 
be stored in the carry bit of the CC 
register. An ASL (arithmetic shift left) 
does exactly the same function as an 
LSL; neither will retain the sign bit. 

Bill Nee bucked the "snowbird" trend 
by retiring to Wisconsin from a banking 
career in Florida. He spends the long, 
cold winters writing programs for his 
Co Co. 



Register B 
LSLB 
Carry Bit 



01010101 = 85 
10101010 = 170 
0 



The following two branch commands 
are useful if you want to check the carry 
bit: 

BCC — branch if the carry bit is clear 
(-0) 

BCS — branch if the carry bit is set (=1) 

There is no specific command to shift 
Register D. Therefore, if your number 
uses both registers A and B, to shift 
Register D you must use both shift and 
rotate functions. Rotating (ROR, 
ROL) either register A or B will shift all 
of the bits one space. The empty bit will 
be filled by the value in the carry bit, and 
the bit that is lost will go to the carry 
bit. To perform a right shift on Register 
D, you must complete the following 
functions: 



(For Unsigned 
Numbers) 
LSRA 
RORB 



(For Signed 
Numbers) 
ASRA 
RORB 



Let's try an example. If we load 
Register D with #938, our computer will 
follow these instructions: 



Register Carry 

Bit: 

00000011 
LSRA 00000001 1 
RORB 00000001 



Register 

10101010 
10101010 
11010101 



The one in Bit 0 of Register A went 
to the carry bit after the LSRA opera- 
tion and then to Bit 7 of Register B after 
the RORB function. These two opera- 
tions have divided the number in Reg- 
ister D by two. Repeating will continue 
to divide the number by two. To mul- 
tiply Register D by two, perform a 
logical shift left on Register B (LSLB), 
and then rotate Register A to the left 
(ROLA). 

These two routines perform the func- 
tion opposite that of the routines in the 
division example. Continued opera- 
tions will continue doubling the 
number. Of course, in either multiplica- 
tion or division, if you keep repeating 
the same routine, you will get an incor- 
rect result. Not only can registers A, B 
and D be shifted and rotated, but 
memory locations can be shifted or 
rotated to the right or left as well 

You may also use the floating point 
format (FP1) to multiply or divide. 
Location $4F is the exponent of the 
number in FPI, and changing this will 
change the number. Adding one to $4F 
is the same as multiplying that number 
by two to the first power; adding an 
eight would multiply the number by two 
to the eighth power, or 256. Subtracting 
two from $4F would divide the number 
by four. You can do these operations by 
performing the following operations: 



LDA $4F 

ADDA #8 
STA $4F 



exponent of the number 
in FPI 

multiply by 256 
new number is in FPI 



96 THE RAINBOW February 1989 




ar. 



(Iware 



£T So, what is the Calligrapher anyhow? 

The Calligrapher is a program that allows you to print signs, labels and 
other things, using ornate, decorative and fancy type-styles (fonts) on a 
dotrmatrix printer. The Calligrapher comes with 3 fonts but many more 
are available. The Calligrapher runs on either RSDOS (simple and easy) 
or OS9 (powerful and complex). The OS9 FontMassager lets you create 
your own fonts or modify existing fonts. See below for more info. 



CALLIGRAPHER 

CoCo Calligrapher - Turn your 
Co Co and dotrmatrix printer into 
a calligrapher's quill. Make beau- 
tiful invitations, flyers, 
certificates, labels and more. In- 
cludes 3 fonts: Gay Nineties, Old 
English and Cartoon. The letters 
are x k inch high and variably 
spaced. Works with many 
printers such as Epson, Gemini 
and Radio Shack. Additional 
fonts are available (see below), 
Tape/Disk; $24.95. 

OS 9 Calligrapher - Prints all the 
same fonts as the CoCo Calligra- 
pher. It reads a standard text file 
which contains text and formats 
ting codes. You may specify the 
font to use, change fonts at anv 
time, centering, left, right or full 
justify, line fill, margin, line 
width, page size, page break and 
indentation. Similar to troff on 
UNIX systems. Includes the 
same 3 fonts and additional fonts 
are available (see below). Disk 
only; OS9 Level I or II; $24.95. 

Calligrapher Fonts - Requires 
Calligrapner above. Each set on 
tape or disk; specify RSDOS or 
OS9 version* $14.95 each. Set 
#1 (9 fonte) Reduced and re- 
versed versions of Gay Nineties, 
Old English and Cartoon; Set #2 
(8 fontsY Old Style and Broadway: 
Set #3 (8 fonts) Antique ana 
Business; Set #4 (8 fonts) Wild 
West and Checkers; Set #5 (10 
fonts) Stars, Hebrew and Victori- 
an; Set #6 (8 fonts) Block and 
Computer; Set #7 (5 small fonts) 
Roman, Italics, Cubes, Digital 
and Old World, cr NEW: Set 
#10 (8 fonts) several Roman 
styles- Set #11 (10 fonts) Gothic 
and Script; Set #12 (10 fonts) 
more Roman and Italic. 

Economy Font Packages on 

disk; specify RSDOS or OS9* 
29,95 each or $59.95 for all 
three: Font Package #1 - Above 
font sets 1, 2 and 3 (25 fonts). 
Font Package #2 - Above font 
sets 4, 5 and 6 (26 fonts). Font 
Package #4 (also known as the 
Hershey fonts) - Above font sets 
10, 11 and 12 (28 fonts). 



Calligrapher Combo Package - Includes the Calligrapher 
and Economy Font Packages Si and #2, 54 fonts in all 
$69.95, or $84.90 to also include Package S4 (82 fonts). 



Sample Calligrapher Hershey Fonts 



NEW! OS9 Font Massager - 
This OS9 utility program allows 
you to do all sorts of things to 
Calligrapher font files. You may 
create new fonts, modify exist- 
ing fonts. invert fonts, 
compress fonts, double the 
height and/or width, halve the 
height and/or width and con- 
vert between OS9 and RSDOS 
formats. $19.95 (or only $14.95 
if ordered with any other Calli- 
grapher item). A listing of the 
<J source code for the Font 
Massager is available for an ad- 
ditional $14.95. 



EDUCATIONAL 

Trig Attack - Ages 9 and up. An 
educational arcade game where 
players learn important math 
concepts as they play. Sound 
effects, colorful graphics. Excel- 
lent manual includes an introduc- 
tion to trigonometry. Tape /Disk; 
$19.95. 



INFORMATION MGT. 

TIMS (The Information 
Management System) - Tape or 
disk, last and simple general data 
base program. Create files of 
records that can be quickly sort- 
ed, searched, deleted and update 
ed. Powerful printer formatting. 
Up to 8 user fields, sort on up to 
3 fields. Tape/Disk; $19.95. 

TIMS Mail - Tape or Disk based 
mailing list management pro- 
gram. Files are compatible with 
TIMS. Fast and simple to use. 
Supports labels 1, 2 or 3 across, 
2 l k to 4 inches wide. Tape /Disk; 
$19.95. 

TIMS Utility - Utility compan- 
ion for TIMS and TIMS Mail for 
multi-term search (AND and OR 
logic), global change and delete, 
split large files and more! 
Tape/Disk; $14.95. 



The Educational Combo - The 

Combo includes these educa- 
tional (and entertaining) games: 

Silly Syntax (ages 5 and up) 
story creation game with 2 
stories 

Galactic Hangman (ages 7 and 
up) animated graphics, with a 
700 word vocabulary 
The Presidents of the USA 
(ages 10 and up) a presidential 
trivia game 

The Great USA (aees 9 and 
up) a trivia game oi the states 
Trig Attack (ages 9 and up) 
Zap those Trigs 

All five programs on one disk; 
$49.95 (save $501). 



TIMS Combo Package - Ail 

three of the above programs: 
TIMS, TIMS Mail and TIMS 
Utility on one disk - $34.95. 



SPECIAL INTEREST 

Rental Property Income and Ex- 
pense Management Package - 
Maintain rental property income 
and expense records ana print re- 
ports. 28 expense categories. This 
program may be tax deductible. 
Disk only; $29.95. 

CoCo Knitter - Easy to use pro- 
gram to display or print instruc- 
tions to knit a sweater: Cardigan 
or Pullover; Round or V-neck; 
Raglan or Set-in Sleeve* 3 
weights of yarn; 8 sizes from 
baby to man. Tape /Disk; $19.95. 



RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 



*TRS-80 is a trademark of Tandy Corp. 



SUGAR SOFTWARE 

P.O. Box 7446 
Hollywood, Florida 33081 
(305) 981-1241 



All programs run on the CoCo 1, 2 and S, S2K 
Extended Basic, unless otherwise noted. Add 
$1.60 per tape or disk for shipping and han- 
dling. Florida residents add 6% sales tax. COD 
orders add $5. Dealer inquiries invited. Orders 
generally shipped in 24-48 hours. No refunds 
or exchanges without prior authorization. 



I l! 



There is no division command in 
either BASIC or machine language that 
does not use FPJ. The program at the 
end of this article will divide a one-byte 
unsigned number by another unsigned 
one-byte number. The result will be a 
two-byte number in Register D. Regis- 
ter A will hold the whole number, and 



Register B will hold the decimal. Re- 
member, they both are Hex numbers. A 
.8 in Hex is 8/ 16 (or .5 in Base 10). A 
.C is 12/ 16 in Hex (or .75 in Base 10). 

We will use the second half of this 
program in a future article to compute 
the slope of a line. Load Register A (the 
dividend) and Register B (the divisor) 



with different numbers to make sure 
you understand the results. 
(Questions and comments concerning 
this tutorial may be directed to the 
author at Route 2, Box 216 C, Mason, 
WI 54846-9302. Please include a self- 
addressed, stamped-envelope when 
requesting a reply.) □ 



The Listing: SHIFTS 



3000 




00100 


ORG 


$3000 




S\ jm-y *m-f mm — ■ 

3000 7F 


3053 


00110 START 


fm. mm TV 

CLR 


fttT AT T~t 

WHOLE 




_r-_r A -mm *0 

3003 86 


FF 


00120 


LDA 


a _ f\ mm mm 

#255 


*mmm mm mm Wmm «h mmm* V mi mmm, mmm W A * VW *V mmm 

DIVIDEND EXAMPLE 


3005 C6 


mmm — — ' 

7F 


00130 


T TV TV 

LDB 


#127 


TV m T m TT m T /\ TV T| f T A ■» Mf TV T TV 

DIVISOR EXAMPLE 


3007 F7 


mt\ m+M 9" # 

3054 


00140 


m++M HI TV 

STB 


TV ■WW^^ TV 

DIVSR 


SAVE THE DIVISOR 


300A Bl 


3054 


00150 


CMPA 


DIVSR 




300D 25 


23 


00160 


TV T ✓V 

BLO 


TV mmm> T T TV ^\ 

DIVID2 


mmmt ■ ■ ■ aj a T1T4 ' A, ^V fTI ^P" ^V V T ' 

IT'S A FRACTION 


300F 27 


3D 


00170 


BEQ 


SAME 


IT'S — 1 


m*\ sm—m mm mm m , 

3011 C6 


mfmm Am*. 

08 


#*# 4 * m m' mmmm mm mm -va « 

00180 DIVID1 


LDB 


#8 


DO IT 8 TIMES 


3013 F7 


3052 


00190 


STB 


COUNT 




3016 IF 


89 


00200 


TFR 


A,B 


PUT DIVIDEND IN REGISTER B 


3018 4F 




00210 


CLRA 






3^T19 58 




^mmm ^mm m%m. 4m. mmm ^mm ^m± 

00220 L00P1 


ASLB 




^mm\ mm mm mmmm mmmm mmm. mm*^ ■-, mm M mmmrn^ Mmmm ^^^h ^^^^ 

SHIFT REGISTER B TO THE LEFT 


301A 49 




00230 


ROLA 




mmm mm mm m mm^m mmm mmm mmm OT * mmmm mm mm «n» ^| 

SHIFT REGISTER A TO THE LEFT 


3priB Bl 


3054 


00240 


CMPA 


DIVSR 




301E 25 


04 


00250 


BLO 


C0NT1 




3020 B0 


3054 


00260 


SUBA 


DIVSR 




3J3T23 5C 




00270 


INCB 




INCREASE THE QUOTIENT 


3^24 7A 


3052 


00280 C0NT1 


DEC 


COUNT 


FILLED THE BYTE YET? 


3027 26 


F0 


00290 


BNE 


L0OP1 




3029 F7 


3053 


00300 


STB 


WHOLE 


SAVE THE WHOLE NUMBER 


3^2C 4D 




00310 


TSTA 




ANY REMAINDER? 


302D 26 


03 


00320 


BNE 


DIVID2 


IF SO, COUNTINUE DIVIDING 


302F IE 


89 


00330 


EX6 


A, B 


REGISTER D HAS THE RESULTS 


3031 3F 




00340 


SWI 






3032 C6 


08 


00350 DIVID2 


LDB 


#8 


DO IT 8 MORE TIMES 


3034 F7 


3052 


00360 


STB 


COUNT 




3037 5F 




00370 


CLRB 




LEAVE ROOM FOR THE QUOTIENT 


3038 58 




00380 L00P2 


ASLB 




MOVE QUOTIENT OVER 


3039 49 




00390 


ROLA 




SHIFT REGISTER A TO THE LEFT 


303A 25 




00400 


BCS 


L00P3 


BRANCH IF THERE'S A CARRY 


303 C Bl 


3054 


00410 


CMPA 


DIVSR 




303F 25 


04 


00420 


BLO 


L00P4 




3041 B0 


3054 


00430 L00P3 


SUBA 


DIVSR 




3044 5C 




00440 


INCB 




INCREASE THE QUOTIENT 


3045 7A 


3052 


00450 L00P4 


DEC 


COUNT 


FINISHED DIVIDING YET? 


3048 26 


EE 


00460 


BNE 


L00P2 




304A B6 


3053 


00470 


LDA 


WHOLE 


GET THE WHOLE NUMBER 


304D 3F 




00480 


SWI 




REGISTER D HAS THE RESULTS 


304E CC 


0100 


00490 SAME 


LDD 


#$0100 




3051 3F 




00500 


SWI 






3052 




00510 COUNT 


RMB 






3053 




00520 WHOLE 


RMB 


l 




3054 


3000 


00530 DIVSR 
00540 


RMB 
END 


l 

START 





00000 TOTAL ERRORS 



98 



THE RAINBOW February 1 989 



Train for a High -Paying 
Career as a Computer 
Service Technician 



Only NRI teaches 
you to service all 
computers as you 
build your own fully 
XT-compatible 
micro— now 
with 51 2K RAM 
and 20 meg hard drive! 

Jobs for computer service technicians will almost double 
in the next 1 0 years according to Department of Labor 
projections, making computer service one of the top 10 
growth fields in the nation. 

Now you can cash in on this opportunity— either as 
a full-time industry technician or in a computer service 
business of your own— once you've mastered electronics 
and computers the NRI way. 

Get inside the powerful fully XT-compatible 
Packard Bell computer system 
lb give you hands-on training with the absolute in state-of- 
the-art computer technology, NRI includes the powerful new 
Packard Bell VX88 computer as the centerpiece of your 
training. You build this 512K, fully IBM PC/XT-compatible 
computer from the keyboard up, plus you now go on to in- 
stall a 20 megabyte hard disk drive to complete your total 
computer system. 

Understanding you get only through experience 
You need no previous background in electronics to succeed 
with NRI. You start with the basics, rapidly building on the 
fundamentals of electronics with 
bite-size lessons. You perform 
hands-on experiments with your 
NRI Discovery Lab® and then move 
on to master such advanced con- 
cepts as digital logic, microproc- 
essors, and computer memories. 




Your incomparable hands-on training includes 
all this: 

NRI's unique Discovery Lab® lets you design and modify 
circuits, diagnose and repair faults • Hand-held digital 
multimeter, complete with "talk-you-through" instruc- 
tions on audio cassette • Digital logic probe lets you 
visually examine computer circuits • The latest Packard 
Bell VX88 computer with "intelligent" keyboard and 
b l A " floppy disk drive • 20 megabyte hard disk drive you 
install internally • 16K ROM, 512K RAM • MS-DOS, 
GW-B ASIC, and exclusive word processing, database, 
and spreadsheet software • Reference manuals, 
programming guidelines, and schematics. 



See other side for highlights of NRI "hands-on 
computer training ► 



SEND CARD TODAY FOR FREE NRI CATALOG 



ELECTRONICS 



Learn at home in your 
spare time 

With NRI, you learn at your own 
convenience in your own home. 
No classroom pressures, no night 
school, no need to quit your present 
job until you're ready to make your 
move. And all throughout your 
training you've got the full support 
of your personal NRI instructor 
and the entire NRI technical and 
support staff. They're always 
ready to answer your questions 
and help you whenever you need it. 

Get all the facts from NRI's 
free 100-page catalog. Send today! 



■- |i»Mf<- -i ■ . - 1.-1 
ill >l 1 »*w* 




W Check one FREE catalog only. 

□ Computers and Microprocessors □ Security Electronics 

□ TV/ Video/ Audio Servicing □ Electronic Music Technology 

□ Robotics □ Basic Electronics 



COMPUTERS AND 
| MICROPROCESSORS 

H This training prepares you to service all 
I computers as you build your own fully 
B IBM PC/XT-compatible computer. 
I Total systems training includes 5*4 " 

9 floppy disk drive, 20 meg hard disk 
drive, monitor, test equipment, soft* 
ware, and the NRI Discovery Lab®. 





Name 


{Please print) 

( ) 


Age 


Address 


Telephone 




City 


State 


Zip 



For career courses approved under 
Gl Bill □ check for details. 



205-029 

Accredited by the Accrediting Commission of the National Home Study Council 



Get In-Demand Computer Servicing 
Skills With NRI "Hands-On" Training 




Using NRI's unique Action Audio 
Cassette, you're talked through the 
operation and practical applications of 
your handheld digital multimeter— the 
basic, indispensable tool for the 
computer specialist. 




You set up and perform electronics ; 
experiments and demonstrationsiising 
your NRI Discovery Lab 9 . You even 
interface the lab with your computer to 
"see" keyboard-generated data. 




After you build this digital logic probe, 
you explore the operation of the Packard 
Bell detached "Intelligent" keyboard and 
its dedicated microprocessor. 




Next, you install the 5 V floppy disk 
drive, learning disk drive operation and 
adjustment. You later improve your data 
storage capacity dramatically by 
installing a powerful 20 meg hard drive. 



Total Computer Systems Training, Only From NRI 

No computer stands alone . . . it's part of a total 
system. So ifyou want to learn to service and 
repair computers, you have to understand 
today's computer systems. And only NRI 
builds meaningful training around just 
such a powerful computer system— 
the new Packard Bell VX88 com- 
puter, complete with monitor, floppy 
disk drive, hard disk drive, and 
valuable software— all yours to train 
with and keep. 

The VX88 features full IBM 
PC/XT compatibility, the breakneck 
speed of an advanced CMOS V40 
CPU, and big-system raw power: 
512K RAM and full expandability 
for future system growth. 





NO POSTAGE 
NECESSARY 
IF MAILED 
IN THE 
UNITED STATES 



BUSINESS REPLY MAIL 

FIRST CLASS MAIL PERMIT NO. 10008 WASHINGTON, D.C. 



POSTAGE WILL BE PAID BY ADDRESSEE 

School of 
Electronics 

McGraw-Hill Continuing Education Center 
4401 Connecticut Avenue, NW 
Washington, DC 20077-3543 




Mastery Is "Built-in" 

You assemble the Packard Bell 
* 'intelligent" keyboard, install the 
power supply and 514 " 
floppy disk drive, and 
attach the higliTresolution 
monitor. You then go on to 
install a powerful 20 meg 
m hard drive— today 's most- 
wanted computer periph- 
■now included as part of your NRI 
hands-on training. 

The many demonstrations and ex- 
periments you perform as you build your 
Packard Bell computer system give you a 
total mastery of computer operation, 
based on a thorough knowledge of 
the intricacies of computer theory. 



100-Page Free Catalog Tells 
More.. .Send Today! 

Send the postage-paid card 
today for NRI's free 100-page 
catalog that gives all the facts 
about NRI computer training, 
plus career training in robotics, 
TV/video/ audio servicing, 
electronic music technology, and 
many other fields. If the card is 
missing, write to NRI at the 
address below. 



i 
i 
i 
i 

i 
i 
i 
i 
i 

i 



IBM is a registered trademark of International 
Business Machines Corp. 



School of 
Electronics 

McGraw-Hill Continuing 

Education Center 
4401 Connecticut Avenue, NW 
Washington, DC 20008 




Doctor AS Gti 



Moving Files 

/ recently purchased a Tandy 1000 
SX, and would like to transfer many 
of my CoCo files to it. How can I do 
this? 

Milton Simpson 
Big Flats, New York 

O A really versatile transfer pro- 
gram, Xenocopy-PC, can be used 
to copy floppy disk files to your 1000 
from Color Computers, TRS-80 Model 
Ills and 4s, Kay pros, etc. It is priced at 
$79.95 plus $3 S/H from Microcom 
Software, 2900 Monroe Ave, Roches- 
ter, NY 14618 (716) 383-8830. Micro- 
com also sells Co Co Util II, a less 
expensive program limited to CoCo 
disks ($39.95 plus $3 S/H). 



A ProComm Workalike 

Is there a program like ProComm 
available for the CoCo 3, now that 
it has 80 columns with color? 

Jonathon Graff 
Bronx, New York 



13 Telstar 3.2 is virtually ProComm 
/L for the CoCo 3 under OS-9 Level 
11. Like ProComm, it has an auto- 
dialer, help menus, direct download to 
disk with both Xmodem and Ymodem, 
chat mode, etc. It does not have a 
programming language for unattended 
operation, or VT-100 emulation, but 
unlike ProComm, you have the CoCo's 
magic CLEAR key to switch windows 
while online. One of the best features of 
this program is that you can download 
it from Delphi or get it from the author 
for $10 plus return postage. Please 
include a formatted disk. Requests may 
be directed to Merle Kemmerly 111 at 
2213 Shed Road #250, Bossier City, LA 
71111. 



A Radio Shack Cure 

Is there any way to get OS-9 's Profile 
(Cat. No. 26-3247) to run under OS- 
9 Level II? 

David Bacus 
Detroit, Michigan 



Richard Esposito is the principal engi- 
neer for BDM Corporation. He holds 
bachelor's, master's and doctorate 
degrees from Polytechnic Institute of 
Brooklyn. He has been writing about 
microcomputers since 1980. 

Richard Libra is a simulator test 
operator for Singer Link Simulation 
Systems Division. 




By Richard E. Esposito 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 
with Richard W. Libra 

O The following fix is prescribed by 
Radio Shack Computer Custom- 
er Service in Ft. Worth, Texas (817-390- 
3861): First boot OS-9 Level II, then 
format a blank disk in /dl. Type LOAD 
BACKUP and then use that command to 
back up your original copy of OS-9 
Profile. Bring up BASIC09 and at the B: 
prompt, type the following: e f ixpro- 
f ile and press ENTER. Then using the 
built-in editor, enter the following 
program: 

DIM path,neuval :INTEGER 

DIM prof ilecrc(3) ,mgtcrc(3) : 

BYTE 
neuval :=$2041 

DATA $8A,$E5,$C0,$6B,$75,$A9 

FDR count:=l TD 3 

READ prof ilecrc(count) 

READ mgtcrc ( count ) 

NEXT count 

OPEN ttpath, "/d0/cmds/prof ile": 

UPDATE 
SEEK ttpath, SllEfi 
PUT ttpath, neuval 
SEEK ttpath, S64E4 
PUT ttpath, prof ilecrc 
CLOSE ttpath 

OPEN ttpath, "/d0/cmds/mgt": 

UPDATE 
SEEK ttpath, $0506 
PUT ttpath, neuval 
SEEK ttpath, $1D55 
PUT ttpath, mgtcrc 
CLOSE ttpath^ 



With the previously backed-up copy 
of OS-9 Profile in Drive 0, run the 
program to make the required patches. 

Automation Routine 

* Is there any way to automatically 
have my programs PCLEAR0 with 



Disk BASIC? 



Mary Willingham 
Omaha, Nebraska 



Place the following routine at the 
/L beginning of your program. It will 
cause the program to relocate itself to 
Location &H0E01. 



10 GOTO 5000 

20 DRTfi BD.B3.ED.1F.02.7E.96.A7 

30 RESTORE :FQR X=0 TO 7: REfiDE$:NEXT 
40 ****************************** 

50 ' PLFICE YOUR PROGRRM HERE 

g0 ****************************** 

5000 CLERR200:FOR 1=0 TO 7' :RERD E$ 
5010 PDKE&HE01=I,VAL ("&H"=E$):NE 
XT 

5020 DEFUSR0=&H01:X=USR0(&HE09) 
5030 GOTO 30 



This is equivalent to POKE 
25,14:P0KE &HE00,0:NEW, which 
increases the RAM directly available to 
BASIC from Locations 22824 to 28968. 
The CoCo 2 graphic modes are not 
available after these pokes; however, on 
a CoCo 3, the new graphic modes are 
still available. 

Parent/Child Conflict 

/ am having a problem using the 
system call osSfork. / experience 
the problem only when I do not 
follow it with a wait statement. What is 
the problem? 

Herve R. Bernier 
Aulnaies, Quebec 

With both parent and child pro- 
/C cesses running in parallel, be sure 
that they don't both try to access the 
same I/O paths. 

Gaining Access 

How can I access the second side of 
a double-sided disk drive under OS- 
t^j 9 Level II? I have a CoCo 3 with an 
FD 501 drive. Drive I is my double- 
sided drive. ADOS 3 under Disk BASIC 
accesses the drive, but under OS-9 there 
doesn't seem to be any instructions for 



February 1989 THE RAINBOW 99 



adding the proper device descriptor to 
boot the drive. I have seen references to 
such a descriptor from time to time in 
manuals and in RAINBOW, but I'm 
stumped. I would like to change the 
drive step rates as well, but again I 
cannot find the necessary information. 

William Charles Sam 
Barrington, Rhode Island 

There are more elegant ways to do 
this, but here's one way to access 
Side 2 of your double-sided drive: Boot 
up by typing DPS while your 35-track 
system disk is in Drive 0 and a freshly 
formatted disk is in Drive 1. After 
entering the date, type the following: 

MDDPflTCH -5 
L 01 

C 18 23 50 
C 19 1 2 
M 

Press CTRL, then BREAK, and then type 
the following: 

CHD /D0 

COBBLER /Dl 

DSflVE /D0 /D1ISHELL 

You now have a 35-track bootable 
system disk in Drive 1 that will access 
Drive 1 as a 40-track double-sided disk 
drive. With the new system disk, you 
can read 35- or 40-track single- or 
double-sided disks with your 40-track 
double-sided drive. By adding an addi- 
tional line to this Modpatch procedure, 
you could also change the step rate of 
your drive from 30ms to 20ms, 12ms or 
6ms. Just change the value at Offset 14 
from 0 to 1, 2 or 3 respectively. 

Keyboard Alterations 

Can my Co Co 2's HJL keyboard be 
installed directly into a Co Co 3? I 
kJ have used my HJL for years and love 
the feel of a "regulation " keyboard. I 
plan to buy a CoCo 3 soon and would 
like to know if the keyboards are inter- 
changeable. 

Larry Donovan 
Stonington, Connecticut 

I am currently using my old HJL 
/C keyboard with my CoCo 3 for 
much the same reason. You can break 
the plastic latch from under the F2 key 
so it doesn^t lock. I swapped the keycaps 
so Fl and F2 are on the right. This is 
where HJL electrically puts the CoCo 
3's Fi and F2. The two function keys on 



the left are the CoCo 3's ALT and CTRL 
keys, which 1 repainted. 



A Modified Boot 

Is there a way to get OS-9 Level II 
to boot up in 80 columns in RGB 
mode? 

Ralph Ramhoff 
Columbia, Maryland 



Patches are needed for Term (80 
/C columns, blue on white) and 
CC3ID (RGB on boot). The Modpatch 
scripts are as follows: 

L Term 
C 2C 28 50 
C 30 01 02 
C 33 02 01 
C 34 03 08 
C 35 03 0B 
V 

L CC3ID 
C 90 86 CC 
C 92 78 
C 93 88 ED 
C 94 3D 88 
C 95 86 3D 
C 96 78 12 
C 97 R7 B7 
C 98 8B 10 
C 99 3E 09 
V 

Use Cobbler to save the modified 
□59boot to disk. As an alternative, load 
PMPT5 from your Mulii-Vue disk. This 
file contains the 5RVE command. After 
running a Modpatch script, SAVE lets 
you save the modified code to disk. 



Gain Control 

/ have a CoCo 3, and none of the 
control keys seem to work. Is there 
anything I can do? 

Marty Mitchell 
Covina, California 



X? The keys ALT, CTRL, Fl and F2 
/C occupy addresses 341, 342, 343 
and 344 of the keyboard roll-over table. 
When any one of these keys is de- 
pressed, the value at its corresponding 
address in the keyboard roll-over table 
changes from 255 to 191. You can use 
this fact in writing your own programs 
by using the PEEK function to detect 
when one of these keys is pressed. 

Are They Compatible? 

/ have recently purchased a new 
Color Computer 3. I hooked up my 
RS-232 pack to it, expecting them to 
be compatible. However, when I typed 
in EXEC&HC000, the computer refused 



to operate the interface. When testing 
the connection and the dip switches, I 
noticed that the pack worked only 
during the computer's first cold start. 

I thought that all of Radio Shack 
hardware is compatible with the CoCo 
3. Is there any way I can fix the Radio 
Shack Deluxe RS-232 Pak so thai it 
won 't lock up on me after the first cold 
start? 

Daryl Fortney 
Lancaster, Philadelphia 

O That program pack will run with 
the command statement EX- 
EC&HE010 instead of &HC000. The best 
way to utilize your RS-232 Pak with the 
CoCo 3 is with a Multi-Pak Interface 
(upgraded for CoCo 3 use) and a real 
terminal program with 80 column sup- 
port and Xmodem upload/download 
protocol. There are many of these 
available, and they will bring much 
more satisfaction. 

Harmless Bug 

/ keep getting a Retry prompt while 
formatting or verifying all disks on 
OS-9 Level II. This prompt occurs 
only on doubled-sided 80-track opera- 
tions on tracks 70 and 71 (HEX). I've 
tried three different disk controllers and 
removed the Multi-Pak. The Retry 
prompt occurs on both 'd0 and /dl, 
and it does not occur under single-sided 
operation on Levels I or II or with 80 
TRK patches under Disk BASIC. The 
prompt doesn't seem to hurt anything, 
only occurs once, and the process al- 
ways continues past the error. Is this a 
bug in OS-9 Level II software? 

O It's not really a Retry. A Retry is 
/L when an I/O error occurs and the 
disk is reread or rewritten. In this case, 
OS-9 is temporarily going back to 
Track 0 to allocate another sector for 
the sector allocation table. Technically 
you could call this a bug, because the 
Format command does not anticipate 
the need for the extra space with 80- 
track double-sided disks. But it's a 
harmless one. 

For a quicker response, your ques- 
tions may also be submitted through 
rainbow's CoCo SIG on Delphi. 
From the CoCo SIG> prompt, pick 
Rainbow Magazine Services, then, 
at the RAINBOW> prompt, type 
ASK for "Ask the Experts" to arrive 
at the EXPERTS> prompt, where 
you can select the "Doctor ASCII" 
online form which has complete 
instructions. 



1 00 THE RAINBOW February 1989 



Prospect, Kentucky 



Reporter: Lauren Wiiloughby 









©Falsoft Inc.. All Rights Reserved 



RAINBOWfest16 Marks Year of the Hard Drive 



Where were you the weekend of 
Friday, October 21? If you were in 
Princeton, New Jersey, you were in the 
right place for the 16th edition of 
RAINBOWfest, a biannual bash of 
CoCo community — and the biggest 
collection of CoConuts under one roof. 

From 7 p.m. Friday until 3 p.m. 
Sunday, the show hall buzzed with 
constant activity as CoCoists and Color 
Computer software programmers, 
hardware designers, RAINBOW per- 
sonalities and vendors came together in 
celebration of our favorite computer. 

People who came looking for bar- 
gains weren't disappointed, and neither 
were those who came in search of en- 
lightenment Fourteen Color Computer 
notables — including Dr. Martin H. 
Goodman, M.D., Dale Puckett, Steve 
Bjork and Rick Adams — gave semi- 
nars on topics ranging from program- 



ming and marketing commercial soft- 
ware to windowing under the Multi- 
Vue environment. Anyone with a CoCo 
question was sure to find an answer 
from the think tank assembled there. 

People who came looking for suste- 
nance in addition to 6809-oriented fel- 
lowship found it at the traditional CoCo 
Community Breakfast. Keynote 
speaker Richard White talked on the 
evolution of the CoCo, calling on his 
acquaintance of the machine from its 
4K fledgling stage to the full-blown 
power user's tool it is today. 

People who came looking for excite- 
ment experienced sensory overload — 
there were at least 27 CoCos up and 
running the latest in CoCo software. 
From desktop publishers to hot new 
ML games to MIDI to the newest rage, 
hard drives, it was all on display at 
RAINBOWfest Princeton. 




Thousands turned out for RAINBOWfest Princeton. 




Dick Whhe: A man whose 
spectacle* defy gravity. 



Digging In at the CoCo Community Breakfast 



If you were asked to write down a list 
of all the biggest names in the world of 
the Color Computer today, you would 
probably have found most of those 
people seated at a breakfast table in 
Princeton, New Jersey, October 22, 
8:15 a.m., partaking of bacon, eggs, 
donuts and coffee. 

Dignitaries at that head table 
included Barry Thompson, Srlnl 
Vasan and Mark Slegel of Tandy, 
Marty Goodman, Dale Puckett, 



Richard White, Rick Adams and 
Lawrence C. Falk, a.k.a. "Lonnie." As 
coffee was making its second round 
through the room, Dick White stood up 
to speak on the CoCo's coming of age. 

White was up-front with the objec- 
tives of his speech: "I want to talk long 
enough so that Lonnie won't feel the 
need to lead a sing-along." (White was 
successful in this.) Putting the jokes 
aside, White — his glasses perched at 
that impossible angle on his forehead, 



as usual — dove into the subject at 
hand: where the Color Computer has 
been and where it is going. 

He reminisced about the good old 
days back in 1981 when upgrading to 
16K from 4K cost $124, when there 
was no problem with piracy "because 
there was nothing to pirate." Conclud- 
ing with praise for the possibilities OS- 
9 Level II has opened, Dick White 
proclaimed 1988 the year of the hard 
drive. 



February 1 989 THE RAINBOW 101 




Premiere Performances 




At left, David Esleck of Kenneth-Leigh Enterprises: This man means business! 
Microcom's Manohar Santwani,at right, deinoes Color Schematic Designer to 
Martin SplUer and his son, Jeremy, who is a frequent RAINBOW contributor. 



What was new at the show? Quite a 
lot, thank you. Nearly every booth fea- 
tured a new utility or game. 

Manohar Sa at want of Microcom 
Software sold out of his new Color 
Schematic Designer. A newcomer to 
the 'fest, Game Point Software drew 
in crowds with two new games, Rupert 
Rhythm and Space Intruders. 

Rulaford Research's Cecil Houk, 
his CoCo and six of his scintillating 
synths were on hand to entertain 'fest 
goers. He sold his new program for the 
FB-OI sound generator, FBOlCalc, in 
addition to Lyra and Lyra Lybrary. 

Art Flexser of SpectroSystems 
dcmoed Extended ADOS3 , which gives 
users point-and-click program selec- 
lion, two RAM disks and access to six 
physical drives. 

New items at the Frank Hogg Labo- 
ratories booth included the Eliminator 
all-in-one card (hard and floppy drive 
interfaces, a clock, two serial ports and 
one parallel) and a prototype of a 



68000, OS-9-capable system. 

Tom Roginskl and Owl- Ware intro- 
duced three new products: a version of 
BASIC for hard drives, a word proces- 
sor (Window Writer) and a program- 
mable interface that connects an IBM 
keyboard to a CoCo. Also for sale was 
DaVinci3, Owl- Ware's entry into the 
CoCo 3 graphics market. 

Jon Gilbert of Delphi and 
programmer Rick Adams demon- 
strated two new programs that will soon 
be available in the CoCo SIG on 
Delphi: Flip-It (an online "Othello") 
and DelphiTerm y an enhanced version 
of Rickey term featuring graphics, one- 
key logon and a larger buffer. 

Chris Rochon and Tony DiStefano 
were on hand to premiere C.R.C./ 
Disto's new three-in-one board, which 
holds parallel and serial ports and a 
battery-backed, real-time clock. Also at 
the C.R.C, booth were the four-in-one 
(adds a hard disk adapter) and the inex- 
pensive "mini controller." 



Ross Litton of Howard Medical in- 
troduced PC-ROM, a chip he says "re- 
places CoCo 3's BASIC ROM, allow- 
ing boot-ups with pictures of yourself, 
which we digitize." 

Chris and Trisha Burke of Burke 
& Burke have come up with a multi- 
user word game for OS-9 called Pert- 
ASCII. The big seller at the booth, how- 
ever, was R.S.B., which simulates Disk 
BASIC in OS-9. 



The new "CoCo Crazy" CoCo Cat 
T-shirt, sold at the Mercer County 
CoCo Club booth, proved to be popu- 
lar. Thanks again, Mercer County! 

The Public Domain Software 
Copying Company offered a new six- 
disk set of public domain programs 
from Australia. 

At the RAINBOW booth t lie re was 
brisk trade in The Fourth Rainbow 
Book of Adventures . 




OS-9 Out in Force 



At the OS-9 User's Group booth, 
BUI Brady and Mark Griffith were on 
hand to sell memberships and Brady's 
shareware program The Wiz Profes- 
sional — a much- praised telecommu- 
nications program. Brady tends to be 
wittily modest about his work: "Some- 
body called me a third-rate program- 
mer — I'ma fifth-rate programmer." 

Granite Computer Systems sold 
GCS File Transfer, a program that 
converts files among Disk BASIC, 
FLEX, OS-9 and MS-DOS formats. 

Paul Ward and David Esleck of 
Kenneth-Leigh Enterprises cracked 
up the show with their "No more ex- 
cuses! Start OS-9" T-shirts. They also 
were selling copies of their user- 



friendly new book, Start OS-9: An 
Enjoyable Hands-On Guide to OS-9 on 
(he Color Computer 3. Ward claims 
that the book sports the world's longest 
subtitle. 




In his BASIC09 seminar, 
Puckett "performs an event." 



Dale 



Gossip, Gossip, Gossip 



You heard right! There was free food 
and refreshments for Delphi members 
at Delphi Saturday Night, a little bash 
Delphi put together so that online 
friends could meet each other offline 
("in real time <grin>"). 

Steve BJork took time off from his 
honeymoon to come to RAINBOWfest 
and lead a much-appreciated seminar. 
Thanks, Mr. and Mrs. B., and congratu- 
lations! 

Unfortunately, not everybody made 
it to the 'fest; three Falsoft personnel 
were struck down by vicious viruses — 
including RAINBOW 's managing edi- 
tor, Jutta Kapfhammer — and a 
fourth broke a finger. 

Jim Wald and Robert Warner of 
Micro Master said they had luck sell- 
ing "generic" stuff, like externa] mo- 
dems. The most distinguishing feature 
of their booth, however, was an MS- 
DOS machine displaying VGA graph- 
ics. "We're the heretics," Jim said, 
laughing. 

Speaking of radical, was that a 
(gasp!) MS-DOS computer at the Owl- 
Ware booth displaying digitized Star 
Trek pictures? Say it ain't so. 

If you happened to mosey past the 
Public Domain booth, pal, you could 
have met Don Johnson, live and in 
person. Really. 

Howard C. Rouse wins the "Most 
Prolific Artist" award for entering 18 
pictures in CoCo Gallery Live. He also 
wins second and third places for entries 
"Seaside City" and "Red Sails." First 
prize went to Lorl Dies for "Evil Un- 
leashed." First prize in the CoCo 1 and 
2 category went to Randy Adams for 
"Pyramids." Honorable mentions were 
awarded to Logan Ward for 'The 
King" and to Tracy Lammardo for her 



entry, "Bit Bucket." 

If you're ever at a 'fest and see 
Marty Goodman's wooden CoCo at 
the Delphi booth, don't ask Paul Ho- 
dosh, because he doesn't know a thing 
about it. 

Manohar Santwanl said of the cur- 
rent version of Microcom's word proc- 
essor, "WordPower 3.2 is selling like 
hotcakes." With more sequels than tlie 
Rocky flicks, WordPower is yet again in 
the process of revision. But, hey, we're 
not complaining! 

Frank Hogg deserves the "Euphe- 
mism With Tongue in Cheek" award 
for his sign describing the wonderful, 
spectacular, "optical-to-digital transfer 
method for setting the computer's 
time" — LCD stick-on clocks! 

Joe Huber, assistant to Bill Ver- 
gona of Cer-Comp, lost his voice — 
presumably from answering questions 
about the company's new program- 
ming environment, Window Master. If 
you attended the 'fest and were left with 
questions about this program unan- 
swered due to "technical difficulties," 
turn to the reviews section of this issue. 




Offline conferencing with Jon 
Gilbert, Rick Adams, Marty 
Goodman and Paul Hodosh. 



102 THE RAINBOW February 1989 




At left/Robert Warner nod Jim Waid, the "heretics" of Micro Muster. At 
right, brother and sister have a little family argument over who gets to 
carry the new CoCo 3 home. 




To be a good space pilot* yon need a lot of advance training* This 
youngster logs In some light years with Silpheed t a space fighter 
simulation from Tandy, 



Fun and Games 



At Glmmesoft, Tom DlMarco and 
son had a demo of MaxSound running 
creepy dialogue from the movie The 
War of the Worlds. Gimmesoft played 
host to Glen Dahlgr en of Sundog Sys- 
tems, providing a setup for Sundog 's 
hot new game, Warrior King, 

Dlecom was on hand with its new 
phase r game, Medieval Madness. At 



Game Point, Mine Rescue, Warp 
Fighter 3-D and Dash were selling well. 
MichTron had a few of the older (pre 
CoCo 3) games for sale, including 
Speed Racer and Outhouse. 

Steve Blyn and Computer Island 
filled a niche with their educational 
programs and the booth's best seller, 
CoCo 3 Wheel of Fortune. 



Desktop Publishing 



Second City Software attended the 
'fest with exclusive rights to The News- 
paper Plus, which was soid for $39.95 . 

John Monln and Color ware were 
doing a brisk business with Max-IO, a 
WYSIWYG word processor that, when 
combined with CoCo Max III, gives 
CoCoists desktop publishing powers. 
Colorware sold a package of 30 new 
Max-10 fonts (in sizes from 6 to 24 
points) for $29.95 — "That's 75 cents a 
font," added Monin. 

Zebra Software's booth had a 
packed house with Graphics Designer 
Plus, a printer-oriented WYSIWYG 
program that prints banners and signs. 
It includes an onscreen preview. 




Srini Vasan, left, software buyer for 
Tandy, talks to Ed Hathaway of 
Second City Software. 



CoCo 101 Through 599 



Class was in session at RAIN- 
BO Wfest as 14 CoCo specialists con- 
vened to hold seminars on topics of 
interest to beginning, intermediate and 
advanced CoCoists. Many of the dis- 
cussions were standing-room-only. 

Rick Adams, author of Rickeyterm 
and Shanghai, talked to beginning as- 
sembly language programmers about 
the CoCo 3 's hardware, focusing on the 
GIME chip. Steve BJork, programmer 
of Pitfall II and Warp Fighter 3-D, gave 
advice to a full house on writing game 
software. For would-be assembly pro- 
grammers he offered this advice: 
"Learn on the Z80, 6809 or 6502." 
Nancy Ewart conducted a session for 
those interested in learning to program 
in C. 

It was a packed house at the im- 
promptu "Talking to Tandy" seminar, 
which was led by Mark Slegel, senior 
engineer, Barry Thompson, buyer for 
the Color Computer, and Srinl Vasan, 
buyer for software. 

Dale Puckett gave two seminars — 
"Overview of OS-9" and "Overview of 
BASIC09" — using parts of his 
KISSDraw code as examples. Marty 
Goodman and his famous T-shirt pro- 
vided CoConuts with another double- 
header — two presentations of his 
"CoCo Consultations Live" seminar, 
complete with surprise guests (Steve 
Bjork and Rick Adams). Besides an- 
swering technical questions, Marty 
posed one of his own: "Does anyone 
know the plural of 'Olympus'?" 
RAINBOW'S Cray Augsburg led two 
sessions of "OS-9 for Absolute Begin- 
ners," focusing on OS-9's directory 
structure. 

Paul Hodosh, Delphi's marketing 
manager, talked on the development of 
Delphi and of online services in 
general. Cecil Honk of Rulaford Re- 
search took a break from entertaining 
to give a seminar on music, MIDI and 
the CoCo. 

Ed Samuels, a professor at New 
York Law School, talked on ramifica- 



tions of the new copyright law on 
commercial and public domain pro- 
grams. Under the new law, you don't 
have to put copyright notices on a pro- 
gram, because anything distributed has 
an assumed copyright "In essence, this 
blanks out the public domain," he said. 

Chris Burke of Burke & Burke ted 
a popular, informative, two-hour-long 
seminar on hard drives. In addition to 
describing how to add a hard drive to a 
CoCo setup, Burke discussed optical 
storage devices and high-density 
floppy drives. Logan Ward, who 
writes and illustrates RAINBOW 's 
CoCo Cat and Maxwell Mouse comic 
strips, demonstrated creative uses for 
CoCo Max — making calendars, cards, 
certificates, comic strips and bro- 
chures. Also, he served as "curator" of 
CoCo Gallery Live. Thanks, Logan! 

Bruce Bell, a two-time winner of the 
RAINBOW Adventure Contest, con- 
ducted a seminar on writing both 
graphics and text-only Adventure 
games for CoCos 1 , 2 and 3. 

Ben Btirnette and Wayne Smith of 
CY-BURNET-ICS, both elementary 
school principals, discussed computers 
as pertaining to educators, touching on 
networking, word processing and of- 
fice management. 




Cecil Houk of Rulaford Research: 
Master of the Syntbs. 



I v 




George Beggs of Tally u Communications congratulates the lucky winner 
of a 2400-baud modem raffle. 



-4_ 







February 1 989 THE RAINBOW 1 03 




At left, six years of Color Computer history on sale at the RAINBOW booth. At right, discriminating art connoisseurs 
check out the CoCo Gallery Live exhibition. 



Saying Hello to Good Buys 



If RAINBOWfest could be consid- 
ered a thermometer of the CoCo cli- 
mate, we would see that the Commu- 
nity has developed a fever for three 
tilings: hard drives, 2400-baud mo- 
dems and desktop publishing software. 
Vendors carrying these types of items 
soon found themselves swamped. 

There was a little friendly competi- 
tion for the microphone — announcing 
a drawing at one's booth became the 
thing to do. Items given away included 
modems and T-shirts. But 'fest goers 
didn't have to wait for a raffle to take 
advantage of some good deals. 

Microworld and Microworld II 
soon sold out of Shanghai at its $5.99 







ii t 1 < 


m 





Barry Thompson, buyer for Tandy, 
caught In clinch with CoCo Cat (It's 
true love). 



price; CoCo 3s went for $115. Also 
selling CoCo 3s for $115 was Fran 
Purcell of Computer Plus, who sold 
80. At that booth, Tandy educational 
software went for $5 . Frank Hogg sold 
Sculptor at a 'fest price of $ 1 20. 

Don Johnson and Robert 
Vervoordt of Public Domain Soft- 
ware Copying Company were selling 
600 public domain programs on 42 
disks for the CoCo 2 and 3. If you 
bought the whole library, they threw in 
a plastic bucket (red, ye How or orange ): 
"You can store about 100 disks in it," 
Vervoordt said. In a brilliant stroke of 
marketing, they advertised the buckets 
as $19.95 each — or free with a $10 
purchase. Funny fellows, 

2400-baud modems were hot com- 
modities at the show, and they could be 
purchased for as low as $169 (Micro- 
corn price). By Saturday night, Frank 
Hogg had sold out of his $150, speed- 
upgradable 1200-baud modems, on 
which he offers a five-year warranty. 
For a limited time, the people at the 
Delphi booth were selling DELPHI: 
The Official Guide and one hour of 
connect time for $14.95. 

Richard and Sharlie Gros of Per- 
formance Peripherals were selling the 



dual-mode No-Halt DMC controller — 
"which reads a diskette in one revolu- 
tion as opposed to three" — for $99. 

Ross Litton of Howard Medical 
did a brisk trade in monitors and disk 
drives. A double-sided Drive 0 package 
with controller wentfor$l 78.45. Litton 
said his best seller was a Magnavox 
8CM515 monitor. 

Zebra Software drew ceaseless 
crowds with Wico trackballs, 300-baud 
modems for $29.95 and copies of The 
Graphics Designer Pius at a RAIN- 
BOWfest special price of $24.95. 

For those with T-shirts, printers — or 
crayons — and imaginations, Foto- 
Wear offered "Print 'n Wear" iron-on 
T-shirt transfers. 

BUI Vergona of Cer-Comp had a 
5 1 2K CoCo 3 set up with Wimlow Mas- 
ter, an environment that lets CoCo 
programmers take advantage of 
windows without OS-9. Also featured 
at the Cer-Comp booth was TextProfV, 
a WYSIWYG word processor. 

Lonnie, himself, has been known, 
on occasion, to commandeer die micro- 
phone and announce immediate "five- 
minute specials" on certain RAIN- 
BOW Bookshelf items. But don't tell 
anybody! 



What's Next? 

Vendors talked excitedly about 
new projects in the works, drop* 
ping tantalizing hints, but most 
would retreat to hasty "no com- 
ments" when pressed for more in- 
formation. "If I didn't have any 
competitors...." was die stock re- 
sponse. 

Most were like Glmmesoft's 
Tom DlMarco, Sr», who said lie 
had two — maybe four — projects 
in development, but would not 
reveal any more than that. 
(DiMarco did, however, say that 
they would be ready by the Chi- 
cago 'fest in April.) 

Considering all die hints, "no 
comments" and off-the-record ap- 
petizers, the next 'fest looks to be a 
feast. 

See you in Chicago! 



The Hard Drive 
Phenomenon 

For the first few hours of the 'fest, 
there were hard drives everywhere you 
looked. Then you blinked, and they 
were gone. Investigation into this mat- 
ter revealed an inverse relationship in 
the price of hard drives to the number of 
hard drives purchased <I/$=HD). Fall- 
ing prices have truly made 1 988 — and 
1 989 — the years of the hard drive. 

Howard Medical offered a 20-Meg 
Seagate hard drive package for $495 — 
this included a Western Digital control- 
ler and a Burke & Burke interface. "All 
you have to do is plug it in and it's ready 
to drive," said Ross Litton. 

Frank Hogg did well selling the 
"Cadillac of hard drives," as he called 
it. "We sold out in two hours." Kevin 
Franclottl of Hard Drive Specialist 
sold out of 30- Meg hard drive kits Fri- 
day night. 

Arizona Small Computers* James 
Blandon reported selling 14 hard drive 
kits. Blandon offers hard drives starting 
at $120 for 5-Meg kits — you supply 
the case and the interface. He offers a 
"club special" of $350 for complete 20- 
Meg systems. 

Hard drive interfaces were popular, 
as well. Trtsha Burke of Burke & 
Burke said that she and husband Chris 
had sold out of almost all their 
interfaces. C.R.C./Dlsto was also a 
popular source for interfaces. 




Frank Hogg holds a little hard drive 
seminar of his own. 




Lonnie Falk and Gordon Monnler of 
MlchTron. 




Chris Uurkr uf Burke & Burke demontf rates R.SS- t a program Ihni 
simulates Disk BASIC In the OS-9 environment. 



104 THE RAINBOW February 1989 



Education Not e s 

A tachistoscope is an apparatus that 
exposes visual stimuli (words, symbols, 
pictures, etc.) for a brief period of 
time.This device regulates the exposure 
time by an interruption of light, drop- 
ping a screen, closing a camera shutter, 
and so on. The tachistoscope was first 
used by experimental psychologists for 
experiments involving visual percep- 
tion. A number of more famous exper- 
iments involved the effect of visual 
suggestions transmitted by the tachisto- 
scope on the persons being tested. 

Later, the tachistoscope was used in 
the study of learning, attention and 
perception. We have found this device 
especially helpful for teaching students 
spelling words. This month's program, 
Tachistoscope, creates a computer 
version of this device. 

Our program gives students an op- 
portunity to study their weekly spelling 
lists independently and in a new way. 
Users will first be asked to enter their 
spelling words and conclude the list by 
entering END. This final statement sig- 
nals the computer that the word list is 
complete. Students may enter any 
number of words up to 50 for this 
exercise. Sometimes review tests and 
midterm exams contain more than 50 
words. If you need to increase this total, 
change the DIM statement in Line 30. 

Once students have entered their 
word lists, the program asks them to 
select the appropriate speed. The 
number requested represents the ap- 



Steve Blyn teaches both exceptional 
and gifted children, holds two master's 
degrees and has won awards for the 
design of programs to aid the handi- 
capped. He owns Computer Island and 
lives in Staten Island, New York. 



The Listing: TACHI5T0 

10 REM"TACHISTOSCOPE" 

20 REM" STEVE BLYN , COMPUTER ISLAN 

D , STATEN ISLAND, NY, 1989" 

30 DIM A$(50) 

40 CLS5:N=1:C$=STRING$(28," ") 

50 PRINTS 0 PRINT @0 , "ENTER WOR 

D #" ;N; : INPUT A$(N) 

60 SOUND 200, 2: IF A$(N)="END" TH 

ZN PRINT @0, " " :PLAY"L2A":GOTO 90 

70 N=N+1 

80 GOTO 50 

90 PRINT@0," " : PRINT @0 , "ENTER SP 
EED IN SECONDS"; : INPUT S 
100 SOUND150,2:IF S<0 OR S>10 TH 
EN 90 

110 PRINT@0,"DO YOU WANT TO SEE 
aLL OR pART OF THE WORDS "; 



Increase students 9 
memorization abilities 

The Blink 

of an Eye 

By Steve Blyn 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 



proximate time in seconds that each 
word should be displayed. One second 
is a good place to begin, but some 
fraction of a second is more realistic for 
middle-school students. Fractions of a 
second should be entered as decimals. 
For example, one-half second would be 
identified as .5. (One-half second is a 
good speed for middle-school students 
who are completing last-minute reviews 
the day before an examination.) 

At first younger or slower children 
should practice at much slower speeds 
(two, three or even four seconds) to 
guarantee positive results and to avoid 
frustration. We would not want to have 
any student give up without giving the 
program a chance. Students' speeds can 
be built up gradually before any testing 
takes place. 

For students who want or need addi- 
tional challenge, we have included the 
option of displaying only the first part 



120 LINE INPUT Q$ 

130 IF Q$="A" THEN 170 ELSE IF Q 
$="p« THEN 140 ELSE 110 
140 PRINT@0, "HOW MANY LETTERS OF 
EACH WORD WOULD YOU LIKE TO S 
HOW "; 
150 INPUT Q 

160 IF Q<2 OR Q>5 THEN SOUND 10, 
4; GOTO 140 

170 PRINT@0, »*★*** TACHISTOS 
COPE 

180 FOR T=1152 TO 1183: POKE T,12 
8:NEXT T: FOR T=1312 TO 1343:POKE 

T,128:NEXT T 
190 POKE1184,128:POKE1185 / 128:PO 
KE1216, 128:POKE1217,128:POKE1248 
, 128 : POKE1249 , 128 : POKE1280 , 128 : P 
OKE1281,128 

200 POKE1215,128:POKE1214,128:PO 
KE1247, 128:POKE1246, 128:POKE1279 



16K ECB 




of each word. Line 1 10 of the program 
asks whether students want to see all or 
part of the words. If A is pressed, the 
program will begin, and an entire word 
will be selected at random and displayed 
for the chosen amount of time. If P is 
selected, the program then asks for the 
number of letters to be displayed for 
each word. Once the user has identified 
this total, the program continues in the 
same manner as described earlier. 

The Part option is useful for students 
who memorize words easily and need 
only brief exposure to them. This op- 
tion encourages students to master the 
complete spelling of all the words and 
can be used as a game to see how few 
letters need to be shown to guess the 
word and spell it correctly. Line 160 lets 
the student choose between two and five 
letters for this option. We felt this would 
be practical in most situations, but it 
should be altered if your students will 
be spelling longer words. 

After the word has been displayed, 
the student is asked to spell it. The 
program then identifies whether or not 
the answer is correct. If the spelling is 
incorrect, the program displays the 
correct spelling next to the student's 
response for comparison. To proceed to 
the next word, the student must press 
ENTER. To end the session, the student 
may press E. 

This program is not limited to spell- 
ing. You may use or alter the program 
for history exams, multiplication tables 
— anything that requires memoriza- 
tion. We at Computer Island would be 
delighted to hear from anyone who 
comes up with applications for this 
program other than spelling. Enjoy the 
program, and we'll see you next 
month. □ 



, 128:POKE1278, 128 : POKE1311 , 128 : P 
OKE1310, 128 

210 R-RND(N-l) :TIMER=0:PRINT@194 

,C$;:PRINT@226,C$; 

220 IF Q$="A" THEN Q=LEN (A$ (R) ) 

230 PRINT@204,LEFT$(A$(R) ,Q) ? 

240 IF TIMER>60*S THEN 250 ELSE 

230 

250 SOUND240, 1 : PRINT0194 , C$ ; : PRI 
NT@202,"? "; 

2 60 LINE INPUT B$ 

270 POKE 1247,128:POKE 1246,128 
280 IF B$=A$(R) THEN PRINT@236," 
CORRECT" ; : PLAY"L200CDECDECDEGGG" 
290 IF B$<>A$(R) THEN PLAY"D-":P 
RINTG232 , "SORRY, "A$ (R) ; 
300 EN$=INKEY$ 

310 IF EN$=CHR$(13) THEN 210 ELS 
E IF EN$="E" THEN 320 ELSE 300 

3 20 CLS : END ^ 



February 1989 THE RAINBOW 105 



I F e ature 



32K Disk Cassette Modification 




I'm Late! 

I'm Late! 

By Mary and James Lamonica 



If you never seem to have 
enough time, use this 
program to organize your 
schedule 



Life is complicated. We are bom- 
barded by a multitude of com- 
mitments, and every day we are 
asked to fit just "one more thing" into 
our busy schedules. Requests come 
from friends, relatives and coworkers. 
While at work we are expected to 
remember meetings, deadlines and 
appointments, at home we must keep 
track of everything from bills to birth- 
days. In our spare moments, we promise 
to get together with friends and "do 
lunch." How can we keep track of all 
these plans? More important, how can 
we ease the stress that such schedules 
can produce? 

Organizing our plans can relieve part 
of the burden. If we have a list of the 
day's events, we are less likely to forget 
plans and commitments. We are also 
less likely to overburden ourselves if we 
can refer to an itinerary before making 
additional plans. The ability to see a 
layout of the day can help us set more 
realistic goals for ourselves. 

Daily Planner helps us organize our 
scheduled lesson plans for our classes in 
a less stressful — more productive — 
manner. You can use the program to 
better plan your own schedule as well. 
The program will accept a list of 10 
items for each day of the week. You can 
organize this list in a number of ways. 
If you have many appointments and 
commitments, you may want to list the 
day's events chronologically — includ- 
ing the time and place for each meeting 
or commitment. If, however, your time 
is flexible but the number of responsi- 
bilities is great, you can list the day's 
duties by order of importance. 

Several variables are used in the 
program. The following table will help 
you better understand the options 



The Lamonicas live in ElPaso, Texas, 
where Mary teaches algebra and con- 
sumer math at Irvin High and James 
teaches social studies at Henderson 
Middle School. 



available and help you modify the 
program as necessary. 



V ariable Description 



D$ 


A two-dimensional array for 




the day of the week and the 




items for that day. 


H$ 


A one-dimensional array for 




the printed headlines. 


1$ 


Used for all INKEYS state- 




ments. 


KL$ 


Used for the filename in the 




KILL FILE function. 


F$ 


Used for the filename in the 




SAVE and LORD functions. 


R$ 


Used for the days of the 




week stored in the DRTR line. 


DW$ 


Same as R$. 


L$ 


The LEFTS of D$. 


M$ 


The MID$ of D$. 


DM$ 


The MID$ of D$, used to find 




a blank space. 


Z 


Used to count the length of 




D$. 


LE 


Same as z. 


X, Y, 




P and 




H 


Used as general counters. 



Table 1: Program Variables 



As written, Daily Planner requires a 
Color Computer with 32K ECB and a 
disk drive. However, the program will 
run on a cassette-based system if the 



following lines are substituted for those 
in the listing: 

34 CLS:PRINT"":PRINTTRB(10) "CSRVE 
DRTR" 

35 []PEN"0" t tt-l, "PLRNDRTR" 
38 PRINTtt-l,D$(X,Y) 

41 CLOSEtt-1 

44 CLS:PRINT"":PRINTTR8(10) "CLORD 
DRTR" 

45 DPEN"I",tt-l, "PLRNDRTR" 
48 INPUTtt-l,D$(X,Y) 

51 CLOSEtt-1 

At the opening screen, Daily Planner 
offers you eight options, each chosen by 
selecting its corresponding number. The 
first option takes you to a Data Entry 
menu. From that menu, choose the 
appropriate day of the week and enter 
up to 10 items — appointments, plans 
or reminders — for that day. The LINE- 
INPUT command is used, so you can 
include appropriate punctuation. Each 
item can be up to 140 characters long. 
If you exceed the character limit, the 
program will ask you to re-enter the 
line. When you finish an item, press Q 
to return to the Data menu. If you have 
made a mistake, press the up arrow and 
ENTER. This will return you to the last 
item you entered. 

Options 2 and 3 let you save and load 
schedules from disk, respectively. The 
Save option lets you choose the file- 
name for each schedule. The program 
attaches the extension /DRT to your 



106 THE RAINBOW February 1989 





■^'■illl'i 



XTERM 

OS-9 Communications program 
Menu oriented • Definable macro keys 

Upload/download Ascii • Works with standard serial port, RS232 
or XMODEM protocol Pak, or PBJ 2SP Pack, Includes all drivers 
Execute OS-9 commands • Works with standard screen, Xscreen 
from within XTERM WORDPAK or DISTO 80 column board 

$49.95 with source $89.95 



M.WiTiY 



■iAu-.m.v ■ • i • i ir in ■ ii 1 1 r it • f 1 1 



iihlili'iliiiiiHII 



ECONOMIST 

Perform economic analysis to compare differ- 
ent cost and income alternatives! Compute 
present and future Life Cycle Worths for var- 
ious combinations of single, series and gradi- 
ent dollar amounts. Quickly edit and recom- 
pute for sensitivity analysis! Display line 
graphs. Printout data and results. Pull-down 
menus, windows and prompts. Requires os-9 
level II and Basic09. 

$39.95 WITH SOURCE $79.95 



HARDWARE 



5 1 2k memory upgrade 

Ram Software 
Ram Disk 
Print Spooler 
Quick Backup 



$134.95 



All three for only 
$19.95 



•Software by Col or Venture 



XWORD 

OS-9 word processing system 

• Works with standard text screen, XSCREEN, WORDPAK, or DISTO 

• True character oriented full screen editing 

• Full block commands 

• Find and Replace commands 

• Proportional spacing supported 

• Full printer control, character size, emphasized, italics, overstrlke, 
underline, super/sub-scripts 

• 10 header/footers 

• Margins and headers can be set different for even and odd pages 

$69.95 with source $124.95 

XMERGE Mail merge capabilities for XWORD 

$24.95 with source $49.9 5 

XSPELL OS-9 spelling checker, with 40000 word dictionaries 

$39.95 

XTRIO XWORD/XMERGE/XSPELL 

$114.95 with source $199.95 

XED OS-9 full screen editor 

$39.95 with source $79.95 

XDIS OS-9 disassembler 

$34.95 with source $54.95 
XDIR & XCAL Hierarchial directory, OS-9 calculator 

$24.95 with source $49.95 



THE DIRECTOR 

Produces hires picture sound and color animation shows. Completely menu 
driven with full editing. Great for presentations and vcr's. Requires COCO HI 
only. $39.95 




SMAT.L BUSINESS ACCOUTING 



This sales-based accounting package is de- 
signed for the non-accountant oriented busi- 
nessman. It also contains the flexibility for 
the accounting oriented user to set up a double 
entry Journal with an almost unlimited chart 
of accounts. Includes Sales Entry, transaction 
driven Accounts Receivable and Accounts Pay- 
able, Journal Entry, Payroll Disbursement, 
and Record Maintenance programs. System 
outputs include Balance Sheet, Income State- 
ment, Customer and Vender status Reports, 
Accounts Receivable and Payable Aging Re- 
ports, Check Register, Sales Reports, Account 
Status Lists, and a Journal Posting List. 

$79.95 

INVENTORY CONTROL/SALES ANALYSIS 

This module is designed to handle inventory 
control, with user defined product codes, and 
produce a detailed analysis of the business 1 
sales and the sales force. One may enter/update 
inventory data, enter sales, run five sales anal- 
ysis reports, run rive Inventory reports, set up 
product codes, enter/update salesman records, 
and update the SBAP inventory. 

$59.95 



PAYROLL 



Designed for maintaining personnel and 
payroll data for up to 200 hourly and salar- 
ied employees with 8 deductions each. Cal- 
culates payroll and tax amounts, prints 
checks and maintains year-to-date totals 
which can be automatically transferred to 
the SBA package. Computes each pay peri- 
od's totals for straight time, overtime and 
bonus pay and determines taxes to be with- 
held. Adilional outputs include mailing list, 
listing of employees, year-to-date federal 
and/or state tax listing, and a listing of cur- 
rent misc. deductions. Suited for use In all 
states except Oklahoma and Delaware 

$59.95 



PERSONAL BOOKKEEPING 2000 
Handles 45 accounts. Enters cash expenses as 
easily as checks. Handles 26 expense catego- 
ricsK. Menu driven and user friendly. 

$39.95 



ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE 



Includes detailed audit trails and history 
reports for each customer, perpares in- 
voices and monthly statements, mailing la- 
bels, aging lists, and an alphabetized cus- 
tomer listing. The user can define net 
terms for commercial accounts or finance 
charges for revolving accounts. This pack- 
age functions as a standalone A/R system or 
integrates with the Small Business Accting 
package. 

$59.95 

ACCOUNTS PAYABLE 

Designed for the maintenance of vendor 
and A/P invoice Tiles. The system prints 
checks, voids checks, cancels checks, de- 
letes cancelled checks, and deletes paid A/P 
invoices. The user can run a Vendor List, 
Vendor Status report, Vendor Aged report, 
and an A/P Check Register. This package 
can be used either as a standalone A/P sys- 
tem or can be integrated with the Small 
Business Accounting Package. 

$59.95 



IV!|I;1*M 

CONSULTANTS 
INC. 



iiliffiliiiKliili 




Ordering Information 

Add $3.00 shipping & handling, MN residents add 6% sales tax. 
Visa, Mastercard, COD (add $3.50), personal checks. 



filename, so you don't need to include 
an extension when saving a file to or 
loading a file from disk. In addition, 
you don't need to remember filenames 
when retrieving a data file. The Load 
function lists the disk directory for you. 

The fourth option, the Print function, 
is the heart of the program. When you 
indicate that you are ready to print a 
file, the computer will ask for a four-line 
heading. Once you have entered that 
information, the computer will begin 
printing. Line 56 includes special print- 
er codes for a DMP-110 printer. The 
code (27) and (17) tells the DMP-110 
to print with proportional elite type. 
You must change this code to fit your 
printer or delete the code. In addition, 
Line 68 includes the printer code (12). 
This code is almost universal for ad- 
vancing the paper. However, you 
should check your printer manual and 
delete the code if necessary. 



The Print function includes a word- 
wrap routine. Variable Z is the maxi- 
mum line length. Variable LE is the item 
length. If LE is greater than 2, the 
program begins a routine that will end 
the line as close to 70 characters as 
possible without breaking a word. 

The program will print all items saved 
for each day. If it determines that 
nothing has been saved in an item 
string, the program will advance three 
lines and then move to the next day of 
the week. When the program completes 
the items for Friday, the program ends. 
Use the eighth function to advance the 
paper to remove your week's schedule. 

Finally, two options are offered for 
clearing data. The sixth function clears 
a file from your disk. On the other hand, 
the seventh function clears the screen 
and then erases the program from 
memory. Make sure you're ready to quit 
before you choose Option 7. 



If you are like us, no day's schedule 
is carved in stone. We edit our lists 
several times before the week begins, 
and we generally edit them more during 
the week. We try to keep a copy of our 
week's schedules with us at home and 
at work. We refer to the copy when 
making or changing any plans, and we 
add these changes to the week's file in 
the evening. We like to start the day with 
a clean copy of our schedules. After all, 
an organized list is a good step toward 
an organized week. 

Our lives are complicated, but that 
does not mean that they should be 
disorganized and stressful. We hope 
that Daily Planner can help you plan 
your busy schedule in a positive way. 

(Questions and comments may be 
directed to the authors at 10456 Or- 
pheus Drive, El Paso, TX 79924. Please 
include an SASE when requesting a 
reply.) □ 




17 


33 


34 


15 


58 , , 


136 


END 


...231 



The Listing: DAYPLflN 

1 DIMD$(5,10) :CLEAR7000 

2 DIMH$(5) 

3 CLS : PRINT" »: PRINTTAB ( 10) "(1) E 
NTER DATA" 

4 PRINTTAB ( 10 ) " ( 2 ) SAVE DATA" : PR 
INTTAB (10) " (3) LOAD DATA" : PRINTT 
AB(10)"(4) PRINT DATA" : PRINTTAB ( 
10)" (5) KILL FILE" : PRINTTAB (10) " 
(6) CLEAR MEMORY": PRINTTAB ( 10) "( 
7) QUIT": PRINTTAB (10) "(8) ADVANC 
E PAPER" 

5 I$=INKEY$:IFVAL(I$)<10RVAL(I$) 
>8THEN5 

6 IFVAL(I$)=7THENCLS:NEW 

7 ONVAL(I$)GOSUB15, 33, 43,53, 9,75 
,,78 

8 GOT03 

9 CLS: PRINTTAB (10) "KILL FILE":DI 
R: PRINTTAB (10) "ENTER FILE NAME": 
PRINTTAB ( 10 ) " " ; : INPUTKL$ 

10 PRINT"": PRINT"": PRINTTAB (5) "A 
RE YOU SURE (Y/N) " 

11 I$=INKEY$ 

12 IF I$-"N" THEN RETURN 

13 IF I$««Y" THEN KI LLKL$+ " / DAT " 
: RETURN 



14 GOTOll 

15 REM ENTER DATA 

16 CLS : PRINT "FILE=" ; F$ : PRINT" " : P 
RINT"" 

17 PRINT" ": PRINTTAB (10) "(1) MOND 
AY" : PRINTTAB (10) " (2) TUESDAY": PR 
INTTAB (10) "(3) WEDNESDAY" : PRINTT 
AB(10) " (4) THURSDAY": PRINTTAB (10 
)"(5) FRIDAY": PRINTTAB (10) "(6) R 
ETURN" 

18 I$=INKEY$:IFVAL(I$)<10RVAL(I$ 
)>6THEN18 

19 IFVAL ( I $ ) =6THENRETURN 

20 X=VAL(I$) 

2 1 CLS : PRINT"FILE=" ; F$ : PRINT" " : P 
RINT" » 

22 PRINTTAB (10) "PRESS Q TO QUIT" 
: PRINTTAB (10) "ENTER DATA FOR" 

23 FORR=lTOX : READR$ : NEXTR 

2 4 PRINTTAB ( 13 )R$ 

25 FORY=1TO10 

26 IFLEN(D$(X,Y) ) >1THENPRINTY ; "- 
11 ;D$ (X, Y) :GOT031 

27 PRINTY;"-"; : LINEINPUTD$ (X, Y) 

28 IFLEN(D$(X,Y) ) >140THENPRINT"E 
NTRY EXCEEDS LIMIT" : GOT027 

29 IFD$ (X, Y)="Q"THEN32 

30 IFD$ (X, Y)="' N "THENY=Y-l:GOT027 

31 NEXTY 

3 2 RESTORE :G0T015 
3 3 REM SAVE DATA 

34 CLS : PRINT" ": PRINTTAB (10) "SAVE 
DATA": PRINTTAB (10) "ENTER FILE N 

AME BELOW" : PRINTTAB ( 10 ) 11 " ; : INPUT 
F$ 

35 OPEN"0" ,#l,F$+"/DAT" 

36 F0RX=1T05 



108 THE RAINBOW February 1989 



37 F0RY=lT01p 

38 WRITE#1,D$(X,Y) 

39 NEXTY 

40 NEXTX 

41 CL0SE#1 

42 RETURN 

43 REM LOAD DATA 

44 CLS : PRINT" " : PRINTTAB ( 10 ) "LOAD 
DATA" : DIR: PRINTTAB ( 10 ) "ENTER FI 

LE NAME BELOW" : PRINTTAB ( 10 ) ; : INP 
UTF$ 

45 OPEN"I",#l,F$+"/DAT" 

46 F0RX=1T05 

47 FORY=1TO10 

48 INPUT#1,D$(X,Y) 

49 NEXTY 

50 NEXTX 

51 CLOSE#l 

52 RETURN 

53 REM PRINT DATA 

54 CLS:PRINT@64,"ENTER 4 LINE HE 
ADING BELOW" 

55 PRINT"" : F0RH=1T04 : PRINTH; "-" ; 
:INPUTH$(H) : NEXTH 

56 PRINT"" : PRINT"" : PRI NT " WORKING 
TO PRINT OUT YOUR DATA! ": PRINT # 

-2,CHR$(27)CHR$(17) 

57 PRINT#-2 , " " : F0RH=1T04 : PRINT#- 
2," ";H$(H) : NEXTH 



58 PRINT#-2, "":PRINT#-2, "" 

59 F0RX=1T05 

60 READDW$:PRINT#-2, " ";DW$ 

61 FORY=1TO10 

62 IFLEN (D$ (X, Y) ) >70THENGOSUB69 

63 IFLEN (D$ (X,Y) ) <2THENGOT067 

64 IFLEN (D$ (X, Y) ) >70THENPRINT#-2 
," ";Y;L$:PRINT#-2," 

";M$:GOT066 

65 PRINT#-2," ";Y;D$(X 

66 NEXTY 

67 F0RP=1T03 : PRINT #-2, "":NEXTP 

68 NEXTX : PRINT #-2 , CHR$ ( 12 ) : CLOSE 
1 : RESTORE : RETURN 

69 Z=70:LE=LEN(D$(X,Y) ) :Z=70 

70 DM$=MID$(D$(X,Y) ,Z,1) 

71 IFDM$=" "THENGOT072ELSEZ=Z-l: 
GOTO70 

72 L$=LEFT$(D$(X,Y) ,Z) :Z=Z+1:M$= 
MID$ (D$ (X, Y) ,Z,LE) 

73 RETURN 

74 DATAMOND AY, TUESDAY, WEDNESDAY, 
THURSDAY, FRIDAY 

75 PRINTTAB (10) "CLEARING MEMORY" 

76 F0RX=1T05 : H$ (X) =" " : FORY=1TO10 
:D$(X,Y)="" : NEXTY: NEXTX 

77 F$="": RETURN 

78 PRINT#-2, CHR$( 12 ): RETURN 



^ ' MM.MAMAWAM.M.W.W 

■ ■ ■ * m m * * » - - - - » - - - - . 



BYTE BACK 
AT TAXES 
WITH TRY-O-TAX 



available for CoCo, MSDOS, TRS-80 



revised for '88 law changes 



prompts for easy guided use 



calculates 1040, 1040A, 2441, 2106, 6502 



calculates schedules A-F, SE 



computer generated substitute forms 



FREE TAX ESTIMATE PROGRAM 



PERSONAL SHORT FORM ONLY $15.00 NO CREDIT 
CHECKS WELCOME CARDS, C.O.D 

+ 3.00 
SHIPPING 



$44.99 



TRY-O-BYTE, 1008 Alton Circle, Florence, S.C. 29501, (803) 662-9500 



mm, 

■"VVW.V 
.V.V.V- _ 

>:•:*:•>» 

•.•.v.v.;, 
w.j 



•:•:•:•>•>: 



mm5 



COMPUTER ISLAND EDUCATIONAL SOFTWARE 

Tape or Disk 
STREET MAP $19.95 

KNOW YOUR STATES 19.95 

FRENCH BASEBALL 19.95 

SPANISH BASEBALL 19.95 

HISTORY GAME 19.95 

STATES AND CAPITALS 19.95 

EXPLORERS AND SETTLERS.. 19.95 

COMPUTER LITERACY 19.95 




ZtJ Hampton Greets 
Stateti IsJaodjNY WStZ 



Add $1.00 postage, NY res. add tax 
VISA, MC - Send for free catalog 




"tffl 



mm 

Kvivv. 

.■V.'.V.V. 

%m 
mm 
mm 

mm 
mm 

■:-XwX 

mm 



I I i I I I U I I 1 I II I I I I 1 I I I I I I I I I I I I 1 I II I ■ . I I I 1 I I I I I 



1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 . 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 IT 



•iTiVrSMi'll 



February 1 989 THE RAINBOW 1 09 



Feature 




nyone who has ever purchased a 
house knows the excitement and 
the fear of house hunting. The 
decision to buy a house is an important 
step, but it's just the beginning. This 
purchase is probably the biggest invest- 
ment you will make; you can't go into 
the purchase blind. There are a multi- 
tude of questions to be answered and 
decisions to be made. Is this a good 
neighborhood? How far is the house 
from work and school? Is the house in 
good repair? How much are its taxes? 
The list goes on and on. If this isn't 
enough to unsettle you, consider the 
number of houses that the average 
buyer must look at before this decision 
can be made. 

True, house hunting is a formidable 
task, but don't despair. My programs, 
Drive By and House, can make your 
search easier (or at least a little more 
organized). The programs act as both a 
checklist of the many questions that 
must be asked and as a method of 
organizing and comparing the informa- 
tion about each house you consider. The 
programs require 16K ECB and can be 
used with either tape or disk systems. 

The first step in buying a house is 
looking for one. You can look in the 
newspaper or in multiple listings (gener- 
ally called Homes books), which are 
published by the Board of Realtors. 
These publications list all houses for 
sale in your area and give you basic 
information about the house. 

Before contacting a realtor, most 
people like to ride by a house, making 
initial decisions about location and 
general conditions before hearing the 
sales pitch. My first program, Drive By, 
can help you make these preliminary 
observations. This program lists ques- 
tions you can answer from your first 
inspection. The form does ask for some 
information not available at one glance. 
However, if you like the outside of the 
house and its location, you can use this 



Richard Johnson is a machine operator 
at Corhart Refractories. He is married 
and has two children, Julie and Ricky. 
Richard has been writing programs for 
his Co Co 2 since 1985. 



form to guide your questions when 
talking to the realtor. 

When you run Drive By, you are 
shown an opening graphics screen. 
After a few seconds, the program will 
prompt you to turn on your printer and 
prepare the paper. When you have done 
this, press ENTER. You will then be 
prompted for the number of copies you 
want (one to 10). 

The second program, House, asks for 
information about the inside of the 
house like carpet color, size of water 
heater, appliances and their condition, 
and a basic description of each room. 
House's form uses letters to denote 



certain qualities. The following is a list 
of these letters and their meanings: 



Letter 

E 
G 
O 
S 
WB 



Definition 

Electric 
Gas 
Oil 
Solar 

Wood-burning 



1 also included blank columns, so you 
can add features of importance to you 
(i.e., number of electrical outlets, fire- 
place, etc.). 

Once you have found the perfect 
house, you must make one final deci- 






ST *-E: <*Wh ()BI) ~ e ^ r ^ 

tf* —LEVEL 

&"WMOJ» WALL8! , *"-fiI- LEVEL ,, Co 

— or exterior WALLS (MLU „ " 

- n - OCARPonr SIZE " 

0F eUTT ; fis y 0 — » , EEC3 REPLflc v ^ — 






February 1989 THE RAINBOW 111 




3 zj+j~~- — / j ~ —7; 



Disposal 

-'J? • n PAN li^^ 5 -^ 




I INSOLATION. g bLtu.^-^^ Sl»M . j*£<Ljfi^?^^^' 



CONCISE- 




V 





sion: Can you afford it? For most of us, 
this decision will include looking at the 
necessary down payment, considering 
interest rates and applying for (and 
getting) a loan. Loart Z)a/tf has been 
included to help you with this decision. 
(For more information, see the sidebar 
"How Much?" by Kenneth Johnson.) 

When I began writing these pro- 
grams, I tried to include everything. 
However, I soon realized this was 
neither practical nor possible. Both 
programs are straightforward; custom- 
ize them to fit your own specifications. 

The programs were written for the 
DMP-105 printer and use the following 
printer codes: 



Printer Codes 

CHR$(27) 

CHR$(27) ;CHR$(14) 
CHR$[27) ;CHR$(15) 
CHR$[27) ;CHR$[19) 
CHR$(15) 
CHR$(14) 



Description 

Escape 

Start Elongation 
End Elongation 
Standard Print 
Start Underline 
End Underline 



If you have a disk system, you can 
merge the programs by completing the 
following steps: Delete lines 1030 and 
1040 of Drive By and save the program 
in ASCII format. Delete lines 10 
through 260 of the second program. 
Enter RENUM 1030 and then save the 
second program in ASCII. Now load 
the first program again and enter MERGE 
"HOUSE". Save the merged program as 
HOUSHUNT. The merged program will 
print out the forms for both Drive By 
and House. Each form will use one sheet 
of paper. 

Buying a house is more than just a 
financial investment. For most of us, the 
houses we purchase will be our homes. 
I hope my programs can make such an 
important step a little easier. 

(Questions or comments about these 
programs may be directed to the author 
at 826 Elmwood Ave., New Albany, IN 
47150. Please include an SASE when 
requesting a reply.) 



How Much? 

By Kenneth Johnson 



You've found the perfect house. You 
want it; you're going to buy it. But how are 
you going to pay for it? You'll get a loan, 
of course, but what kind of loan? How 
much will the interest be, and how long will 
you make payments? Finally, how much 
will this cost? Loan Data (shown in Listing 
3) can help you calculate the monthly 
payments for any loan amount, at any 
interest rate and for any time period. It also 
displays the amount of interest you will 
pay during the life of the loan and lets you 
alter the variables to find the best loan for 
you. [Please note: Taxes and insurance 
premiums vary from state to state and are 
usually included in the monthly payment 
on mortgages. Be sure to take these ex- 
penses into consideration when figuring 
the amount you can afford to spend on 
purchasing a home.] 

Loan Data requires 4K of memory and 
can be loaded from either cassette or disk. 
My program will consider delayed- 
payment loans and identify the interest you 
are charged while your payments are 
deferred. If you have such a loan, enter the 
number of days from the day you signed 
the loan to day of your first payment. The 
program will consider this data and give 
you an accurate amortization schedule. If 
this condition does not apply to you, press 
ENTER at the prompt. The program will 
calculate interest rates for balloon pay- 
ment loans and for short term loans and 
provide an accurate payment schedule. 

The program determines your monthly 
payments and totals your interest for the 
life of the loan. Once you get over the 
shock of seeing how much interest you are 
paying for your home, you can change the 
interest rate variable in the program. In 
this way, you can see what a difference a 
few percentage points can make in the total 
of a 30-year loan but how little difference 
it makes in your monthly payments. Please 
note: There is a slight delay when calculat- 
ing the total interest for long-term (25- to 
40-year) loans. 

Once you have found the best choice for 
your own loan-payment plan, you will be 
able to talk to the bank more intelligently 
about your expectations about the loan. 
You will also be able to determine if this 
is the best time for you to buy a house. 

□ 



[ 



Ken Johnson is a retired air force pilot who 
purchased a Co Co six years ago to keep 
up with his grandchildren's computer 
skills. He hasn't been able to stop using it 
since. 



112 THE RAINBOW February 1989 



Color Computer I, II, III 
Free Software for Drive 0 Systems 

CoCo Checker.. .Test roms, rams, disk drives and A controller printer, keyboard cassette A more. 
Tape/Disk Utility-Transfers disk to tape and tape to disk. 



159 



95 



Drive 0 



179 



95 



Drive 0 



269 



95 



Drive 0 & 1 



• Full Ht Drive 
•Single Case 

• Heavy Duty Power Supply 

• 2 Drive Cable 

• Gold plated contacts 

• Controller & manuals 



• Double Sided Slim Line Drive 

• Case holds 2 slim line drives 

• Heavy Duty Power Supply 

• 2 Drive Cable 

• Gold plated contacts 

• Controller & Manuals 



• 2 Double Sided Slim Line Drive 

• Case holds 2 slim line drives 

• Heavy Duty Power Supply 

• 2 Drive Cable 

• Gold plated contacts 

• Controller & Manuals 



Other Drive Specials 



119 



95 



2nd Drive 

for new Radio Shack 
includes: 

• Slim Line DS/DD Drive 

• Cabling & Instructions 

• Mounting Hardware 



Full Ht Drive 89 95 

Full Ht Drive Ps/Case 1 29 95 

Slim Line Drive 99 95 

Slim Line Drive Ps/Case... 139 95 

2 Slim Drives Ps/Case 239 95 

Disk Controller 59 



95 




Single Ps & Case 

Dual 1 / 2 ht Ps & Case 



Dual Full Ht. Ps & Case 
Disk Controller 



10 Diskettes 

with free library case 



4^95 

54 95 
79 95 
59 95 



9 



95 



Quality Add-On's for Tandy 1000, SX, TX, SL, TL, 3000, 4000 

HARD CARDS 




1 0 meg 259.95 40 meg 399.95 

20 meg 299.95 49 meg 499.95 

30 meg 349.95 64 meg 599.95 

HARD DRIVE KITS 



10 meg kit 249.95 

20 meg kit 299.95 

30 meg kit 339.95 



40 meg kit 399.95 

60 meg kit 539.95 



1000, 1000A, 

Memory Cards 

Zucker Memory 

• DMA & 512K CALL 

Zucker Multifunction 



• Serial 

• Real Time Clock 

• 512KDMA 

• Software 



CALL 



TANDY 1000 

1000, SX, TX, 3000, 4000 

2nd Floppy 

360K TEAC $119.95 
720K Mitsubishi $99.95 

31/2" Mitsubishi $119.95 



1000, 1000A, SX, TX, SL, TL 

Hard Drive 
Controller 

Will run 1 or 2 
Hard Drives 
Supports drives up to 120 megabytes 



$99.95 



— 



J 



QUALITY 
CUSTOMER SERVICE 
506-278-6555 

TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE 
508-278-6556 



IF 



TOLL FREE ORDER LINE 

1-800-635-0300 

TRUE DATA PRODUCTS 

115 MAIN ST., P.O. BOX 347 
UXBRIDGE, MA 01569 
508-278-6555 
HOURS: MON-FRI. 9-6, SAT. 10-4 (EST) 



CORPORATE P.O.'S WELCOMED 

ALL PACKAGES SHIPPED UPS 
EXCEPT CANADA AND A.P.O.'s 
C.O.D.'S ADD $2.30 
MASTER CHARGE/VISA ADD 3% 
1 YEAR WARRANTY UNLESS 
OTHERWISE NOTED 
PRICES TERMS CONDrTIONS 
SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT 
NOTICE 




210 4 

340 214 

440 225 

540 186 



630 214 

700 159 

760 107 

END 186 



Listing 1: DRIVEBY 

10 REM $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ 
20 REM $ DRIVE BY $ 

30 REM $ BY $ 

40 REM $ RICHARD K.JOHNSON $ 
50 REM $ 826 ELMWOOD AVE. $ 
60 REM $ NEW ALBANY, IN. $ 

70 REM $ 47150 $ 

80 REM $ COPYRIGHT (C) JULY 88 $ 
90 REM $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ 
100 PMODE4,l 
110 PCLS 
120 SCREEN1,1 
130 REM ROAD 

140 DRAW"BM4,16;D160R28U68R188D6 

8R28U160L28D68L188U68L28" 

150 REM SIGN 

160 DRAW"BM60 ,80 ;U60R16D60L16" : D 

RAWBM196 , 80 ; L16U60R16D60" : DRAW" 

BM7 6 , 3 2 ; R104 " : DRAW" BM180 ,68; L1J34 
ii 

170 REM HOUSE 

180 LINE(116,116)-(76,132) ,PSET 
190 LINE (116, 116) -(156, 132) ,PSET 
2J30 LINE(152,132)-(152,144) ,PSET 
210 LINE(152,144)-(192,152) ,PSET 
220 LINE(80,132)-(80,144) ,PSET 
230 LINE(80,144)-(64,148) ,PSET 
240 DRAW"BM68,148;D24R120U20" 
250 DRAW"BM96 , 152 ;L2j3D12R2j3U12" : 
DRAWBM104 ,152 ; D20R16U20L16" : DRA 
W"BM132 , 152 ;R12D12L12U12" :DRAW"B 
M152 , 172 ;U20R32D20" : DRAW"BM112 , 1 
28;R12D12L12U12" 
260 DRAW"BM148,128;U8R12D26" 
27J3 CIRCLE (19 5, 130) ,10 
280 DRAW"BM195,120;U1J3BD20BR1J3R1 
0BL20BD10D10BU20BL10L10BR20BH10H 

5BF15BE10E5BG15BF10F5BH15BG10G5" 
290 REM RAINBOW DR. 

300 DRAW"BM16 , 36 ;U7R6F1D2G1L6R4F 
3" 

310 DRAW"BM16,50;U6E2R3F2D3L7R7D 
3" 

320 DRAW"BM16 , 66 ;R4U7L4R8BD7L4" 

330 DRAW"BM16,82;U7F7U7" 

340 DRAW"BM16 , 98 ;U7R6F1D1G1L6R6F 

1D2G1L6" 

350 DRAW"BM18 , 114 ;H2U3E2R4F2D3G2 
L4" 

360 DRAW"BM16,130;BU7D7E4F4U7" 
370 DRAW"BM16 , 152 ;U7R5F2D3G2L5" 
380 DRAW"BM16 , 168 ;U7R5F1D2G1L5R3 



F3" 

390 REM COCO LANE 

400 DRAWBM238 , 36 ;G1L4H2U4E2R4F1 
ii 

410 DRAW"BM233,51;H2U4E2R4F2D4G2 
L4" 

420 DRAW"BM23 8,66;G1L4H2U4E2R4F1 
ii 

43J3 DRAW"BM233 , 82 ;H2U4E2R4F2D4G2 
L4" 

440 DRAW"BM232,114;U7D7R7" 

450 DRAWBM232 , 130 ;U5E2R3F2D2L5R 

5D3" 

460 DRAW"BM232,146;U7F7U7" 

4 70 DRAW" BM2 32,161; U7R7BD4 BL2 L5 D 

4R7" 

480 REM HOUSE HUNTING 

490 DRAWBM100 , 44 ;U7D3R7U3D7BR8H 

2U3E2R3F2D3G2L3BR10BU7D5F2R2E3D3 

U7BR6BD5F2R3E1U2H1L3H1U1E1R3F1BR 

6BD6U7R6BD3BL2L4D4R6" 

500 DRAWBM90 , 60 ;U7D3R7U3D7BR4BU 

7D5F2R2E3D3U7BR4BD7U7F7U7BR4R8L4 

D7BR8R6L3U7L3R6BR4BD7U7F7U7BR12B 

D1H1L4G2D3F2R4E2U2L3" 

510 REM RICHARD 

520 DRAW"BM40,100;U7R5F1D2G1L4R3 

F3BR6BU7R6L3D7L3R6BR10BU1G1L4H2U 

3E2R4F1BR4BU1D7U4R7U3D7BR6U6E1R5 

F1D3L5R5D3BR6U7R5F1D2G1L5R3F3BR6 

U7R4F2D3G2L4" 

53J3 REM JOHNSON 

540 DRAW"BM135,98;DF1R3E1U6L4R8B 
R6R3F2D3G2L3H2U3E2BR10D7U4R7D4U7 
BR5BD7U7F7U7BR5BD5F2R3E1U2H1L3H1 
U1E1R3F1BR7BD6H2U3E2R3F2D3G2L3BR 
9U7F7U7" 

550 DRAW"BM112 ,82 ;U11R26D11L2 6" : 

DRAW"BM116 , 80 ;U7R5F1D1G1L5R5F1D2 

G1L5BR14U3H4F4E4 " 

560 FORP=1TO4500:NEXTP 

570 PCLS1 

580 CLS:PRINT"SET PAPER TO TOP O 
F PRINTER HEAD" 

590 PRINT" WHEN PRINTER IS ON L 
INE PRESS «<ENTER»>" 
600 EXEC44539 

610 IF INKEY$=CHR$ ( 13 ) THEN 620EL 
SE580 

620 CLS:INPUT"HOW MANY COPIES (1 
-10) ";C 

630 IFC<1 OR C>10 THEN620 ELSE64 
0 

640 PR=1 

650 POKE150, 87 'POKE FOR 600 BAUD 
RATE FOR RADIO SHACK DMP 105 PR 
INTER 

660 FORPR=l TO C 

670 CLS : PRINT@234 , "NOW PRINTING" 
680 A$=" DRIVE BY" 

690 PRINT#-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(14);T 



114 THE RAINBOW February 1989 



AB( (45-LEN(A$) )/2) ; A$ : PRINT#-2 : P 
RINT#-2 

700 PRINT#-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(15) ;C 
HR$(27) ;CHR$(19) ; "ASKING PRICE" ; 
CHR$(15);+" ";CHR$ 

(14) ; :PRINT#-2,TAB(57) /"APPRAISE 
D VAL.";CHR$(15) ;+" 

";CHR$(14) 
71J3 PRINT#-2:PRINT#-2,CHR$(27) ;C 
HR$(15) ;CHR$(27) ;CHR$(19) ; "OWNER 
";CHR$(15) ;+" 

11 ; CHR$ ( 14 ) ; + "REALTO 
R";CHR$(15) ;+" 

" ;CHR$(14) 
72J3 PRINT#-2:PRINT#-2 , "ADDRESS" ; 
CHR$(15) ;+" 

" ; CHR$ ( 14 ) ; + "AGENT" ; CHR 

$(15) ;+" 

";CHR$(14) 
73J3 PRINT #-2 : PRINT* -2 , "TEL" ;CHR$ 

(15) ;+" 

" ; CHR$ ( 14 ) ; +"TEL" ; CHR$ ( 

15) ;+" 

H ;CHR$(14) 
74j3 PRINT #-2: PRINT #-2," SQUARE FO 
OTAGE " ; CHR$ ( 1 5 ) ; + " " ; CHR 

$(14);+" LOT SIZE";CHR$(15) ;+" 

";CHR$(14) ;+" AGE";C 
HR$(15);+" ";CHR$(14) ;+" 



TAXES ";CHR$( 15) 
";CHR$(14) 
750 PRINT#-2:PRINT#-2,"DIST. FRO 
M EMPLOYMENT" ;CHR$ (15) ;+" 

" ; CHR$ ( 14 ) ; + " SHOPPING" ; CHR 
$(15);+" ";CHR$(14) ;+" 

PUBLIC TRANS. ";CHR$ (15) ;+" 
";CHR$(14) » 
760 PRINT#-2:PRINT#-2,CHR$(14) ; " 
SCHOOLS AND CHURCHES IN AREA" ;CH 
RS(15) ;+» 

II • Q 

HR$(14) 

770 PRINT #-2 : PRINTf -2 / "NEIGHBORH 
OOD * PLUSES *";CHR$(15) ;+" 

";CHR$(14) 
780 PRINT#-2:PRINT#-2, "NEIGHBORH 
OOD * MINUSES *";CHR$(15) ;+" 



790 
800 
810 
R$(2 

/2) ; 

820 
HR$( 

: 0 



" ;CHR$(14) 

PRINT#-2 

B$="EXTERIOR OBSERVATIONS" 
PRINT #-2 : PRINT #-2 , CHR$ (14) CH 
7) ;CHR$(14) ;TAB ( (45-LEN (B$) ) 
B$:PRINT#-2 

PRINT#-2:PRINT#-2,CHR$(27) ;C 
15) ;CHR$(27) ;CHR$(19) ; "STYLE 
RANCH () B 1 _LEVEL QTRI-LEV 




The COCO hardware store 





$130. 



Super Controller J 



Fantastic 

Super Controller Q 



$99.95 



A Superb Controller. Along with the included C-DOS, plug-in three more software 
selectable DOSes or 2764 or 271 28 EPROMs burned to your liking. The I nternal 
M.E.B. lets you add Disto incredible Super Add-ons. 




Multi-Board 
Adapter 




$59.95 




Mini Contr 



• Radio Shack/Tandy controller compatible 

• Works on ail COCOs with or without Multi-Pack 

• 2 DOS switcher 

• Accepts 24 or 28 pin EPROMs 

• Low power draw and Gold plated edge connectors 



This Muti-Board is an adapter that plugs 
in any Disto Super Controller, Ramdisk or MEB Adapter. 

It includes a new and improved Printer Port (Centronics compatible), 

a faster Real Time Clock (works at 2MHz.) and a true RS-232 

Serial Port (external 12 volt AC adapter required). DB25 cable included 

It fits neatly inside the metal case and is still within Tandy's power 
limits. It also works with or without a Multi-Pak. 



• Under OS-9: 

• Buffered Read/Write sector achieved without halting the CPU. 

• Continual use of keyboard even while reading or writing to disk. 

• System's clock no longer looses time during Read & Write. 

• NMI is blocked and transferred to IRQ in software for low CPU overhead. 

• Completely Interrupt driven for fast & smooth Multi-Tasking operations. 

• Drivers written by KEVIN DARLING 

• Now Available at your Local Radio Shack store PN 90-2009 






RS-232 SuperPack 

A Stand-Alone (Multi-Pak required) adapter 
that gives the user a true RS-232 Serial Port. 
Completely compatible with 0S9's ACIA software. 
Compatible with software that requires 
the Tandy Deluxe RS-232 Pack. 
DB-25 cable included. 



SUPER ADD-ONS 

• Real Time Clock 
& Printer Interface 

• Mini EPROM Programmer 

• Hard Disk Interface 

• Hard Disk Interface 
with RS-232 

• Super RAM 3 ZeroK Board 

• MEB Adapter 






$43.95 



ft <:y:-: : ::S:X< 



CRC 

COMPUTERS INC. 



10802 Lajeunesse, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3L 2E8 



Master Card and Visa Accepted 



1-514*383-5293 We accept phone orders • Call for Canadian Prices 
wmmmmmmmmm ^ m Include S&H of $4 or $8 if order exceeds $75 

Sorry: No personal cheques 



February 1 989 THE RAINBOW 115 



EL () COLONIAL () OTHER ";CHR$(1 
5)7+" ";CHR$(1 

4) 

830 PRINT#-2 :PRINT#-2 , "EXTERIOR 
WALLS: () BRICK ()WOOD () VINYLS 
IDING ( ) ALUM SIDING () OTHER" ;C 
HR$(15);+" ";CHR$(14) 
840 PRINT* -2: PRINT* -2, "COLOR OF 

EXTERIOR WALLS " ; CHR$ ( 15) ; +" 

" ; CHR$ (14) i+ " TRIM" ; C 
HR$(15) ;+" " ; CHR$ ( 

14);+" ROOF";CHR$(15) ;+" 

»;CHR$(14) 
850 PRINT* -2: PRINT* -2, "() GARAGE 
ATT/DET SIZE" ,* CHR$ ( 15) ; +" 
CAR" ; CHR$ ( 14 ) ;+" ( ) CARPORT SI 
ZE";CHR$(15) ;+" CAR";CHR$(1 
4);+" () SHED SIZE";CHR$(15) ;+" 

";CHR$(14j 
860 PRINT#-2 : PRINT#-2 , "( ) DRIVEWA 
Y SIZE" ; CHR$ (15) ;+ " " ; CHR$ 

(14) ;;" () CONCRETE ( ) AS PHALT 
() GRAVEL CONDITION" ;CHR$ (15) 

";CHR$(14) 
870 PRINT#-2 : PRINT#-2 , "ROOF COND 
ITION ()NEW QfiOOD ( ) FAIR () 
NEEDS REPLACING AGE OF ROOF" } 
CHR$ ( 15 ) ; + » " ; CHR$ ( 14.) 

880 PRINT#-2 : PRINT#-2 , "CONDITION 
S OF GUTTERS AND DOWNSPOUTS ()NE 
W ()GOOD ( ) FAIR () NEEDS REPLA 
CING" 

890 PRINT#-2:PRINT#-2, "TYPE OF F 
OUNDATION ()SLAB () CRAWLS PACE 
( ) BASEMENT ? SUMP PUMP ( ) YES 
)NO" 

900 PRINT#-2 : PRINT#-2 , " ( ) SIDEWAL 
K ON PROPERTY () PUBLIC SIDEWA 
LKS ( ) STEPPING STONES" 
910 PRINT#-2:PRINT#-2, "WINDOW TY 
PE ()ALUM ( ) WOOD () PICTURE WIN 
DOW ( ) BAY WINDOW () OTHER" ; CHR$ 

(15) ;+" «;CHR$(14) 
920 PRINT #-2 : PRINT #-2 , "STORM WIN 
DOWS & DOORS () YES QNO COMMEN 



( 



TS";CHR$(15) ;+» 

";CHR$(14) 
93J3 PRINT* -2 : PRINT#-2 , " ( ) STOOPS 

() PORCH ( ) PATIO ( ) DECK SIZE" 
; CHR$ ( 15 ) ; +" " ; CHR$ (14) 

;+» ( ) RAILING TYPE" ;CHR$ (15) ;+ 
" »;CHR$(14) 
94)3 PRINT#-2:PRINT#-2 , "FENCE ()Y 
ES ()NO TYPE () CHAIN LINK ()W 
OOD ( ) PRIVACY NO . OF GATES " ; CH 
R$(15) ;+" ";CHR$(14) 
950 PRINT#-2 : PRINT #-2 , "LANDSCAPE 

CONDITION" ;CHR$ (15) ;+" 

» ; CHR$ ( 14 ) 
960 PRINT#-2 : PRINT#-2 , "SHRUBBERY 
TYPE" ; CHR$ (15) ;+" " 
; CHR$ ( 14.) ;+" SHADE TREES " ; CHR$ ( 1 
5);+" ";CHR$(14);+ 
11 FRUIT TREES " ; CHR$ ( 15 ) ; +" 

";CHR$(14) 
970 PRINT #-2 :PRINT#-2 , CHR$ (15) ;" 
COMMENTS 



•i 



980 PRINT #-2 : PRINT .#-2 , « 



ii 



990 PRINT #- 2 : PRINT # - 2 , " 



ii 



1000 PRINT#-2 : PRINT* -2 , " 



ii 



1010 PRINT #-2 : PRINT #-2 , " 



■■> <:iiO". r._'A-.. 



" ; CHR$ ( 14 ) 
1020 PRINT* - 2 : PRINT # - 2 

1030 NEXTPR 

1040 CLS: PRINTg 2 31, "GOOD HOUSE H 
UNTING" 













IV 


1 250 


...244 


840 . . 


« . » 1 87 




420 


. 19 


900 


36 




540 ,„« 


.167 


970 


,129 




700 , , , 


, ...18 


END 


....191 




750 


v171 







Listing 2: HOUSE 
10 CLS 

20 REM $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ 
30 REM $ HOUSE HUNTING $ 

40 REM $ BY $ 



50 REM $ RICHARD K.JOHNSON $ 
60 REM $ 826 ELMWOOD AVE. $ 
70 REM $ NEW ALBANY, IN. $ 

80 REM $ 47150 $ 

90 REM $ COPYRIGHT (C) JULY 88 $ 
100 REM $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ 

$ 

110 PRINTS 166 ,"$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ 
$$$$" 



120 PRINT@198,"$ 
$" 

130 PRINT@230,"$ 
$" 



HOUSE HUNTING 



BY 



116 THE RAINBOW February 1989 



140 PRINT@262,"$ RICHARD JOHNSO 
N $" 

150 PRINT@294, "$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ 
$$$$" 

160 FORP=1TO3000:NEXTP 

170 CLS:PRINT"SET PAPER TO TOP 0 

F PRINTER HEAD" 

180 PRINT" WHEN PRINTER IS ON L 
INE PRESS «<ENTER»>" 
190 EXEC44539 

200 IF INKEY$=CHR$ ( 13 ) THEN 210EL 
SE170 

210 CLS: INPUT "HOW MANY COPIES (1 

-10) ";c 

220 IFC<1 OR C>10 THEN 2 10 ELSE 2 3 
P 

23 0 PR=1 

240 POKE150,87'POKE FOR 600 BAUD 
RATE FOR RADIO SHACK DMP 105 PR 
INTER 

250 FORPR=l TO C 

260 CLS:PRINT@234,"NOW PRINTING" 
270 C$="HOUSE HUNTING" 
280 PRINT#-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(14) ;T 
AB( (45-LEN(C$) )/2) ;C$:PRINT#-2 
290 D$="INTERIOR INSPECTION" 
300 PRINT #-2, TAB ( (42-LEN(D$) )/2) 
/ D$ 

310 PRINT#-2,CHR$(15) 



it 



;CHR$(14) 

320 PRINT#-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(15) ;C 
HR$(27) ;CHR$(19) ;" 

1/2/B # OF # OF TEL. WALL WA 
LL FLOOR FLOOR CEILING"" 
330 PRINT#-2,CHR$(27) ;CHR$(15) ;C 
HR$(27) ;CHR$(19) ;CHR$(15) ; "ROOMS 

SIZE LEVEL WND. CLOS. OUT. 
COLOR DESC. TYPE COLOR FAN 



340 PRINT #-2, "FOYER / 

/ / / / 

/ / / 

350 PRINT* -2, "LIVING / 

/ / / / 





/ 


/ 


/ 


/ 


/" 




/ 


/ 


/ 



/ / / 

360 PRINT#-2, "DINING / 



/ / 
/ 

370 PRINT#-2 



/ / 
/ 

tl 

















380 


PRINT # 


-2,"1 


BED 


/ 




/ 


/ 


/ 


/ 


/ 


/ 


/ 




/ 


/ 


/ 




/ 


/" 


390 


PRINT* 


-2, "2 


BED 


/ 




/ 


/ 


/ 


/ 


/ 


/ 


/ 




/ 


/ 


/ 




/ 


/" 


400 


PRINT* 


-2, "3 


BED 


/ 




/ 


/ 


/ 


/ 


/ 




/ 


/ 




/ 


/ 


/ 




/ 


/" 


410 


PRINT* 


-2 ,"4 


BED 


/ 




/ 


/ 


/ 


/ 


/ 


/ 


/ 




/ 


/ 


/ 




/ 


/" 


420 


PRINT* 


-2," 











430 PRINT#-2 

/ / / 

/ / 
440 PRINT#-2 



450 PRINT*-2 

/ / / 

/ / 
460 PRINT#-2 

/ / / 

/ / 
470 PRINT#-2 

/ / / 

/ / 
480 PRINT#-2 

/ / / 

/ / 
490 PRINT#-2 

/ / / 

/ / 
500 PRINT #-2 

/ / / 



/ 



/ 

/ 
/ 



"KIT. 
/ 



/ 



II 



/ 



/ 
/ 



"UTILITY/ 
/ 

/ 

"MUD / 
/ 

/ 

"FAMILY / 
/ 

/ 

"BASEMT / 
/ 

/ 

/ 

/ 

/ 

/ 

/ 



II 



/ 
/ 

/ 
/ 

/ 
/ 

/ 
/ 

/ 
/ 

/ 



/ 



/ 
/" 



II 



/ 



/ 
/" 



II 



/ 



/ 



/ 



/ 



/ 



/ 
/" 

/ 



/ 



/ 



/ 



/ 
/ 



Andante 

5 2 



Introducing CoCo MIDI 3! The familiar MIDI sequencer is more powerful than ever! No othej 
sequencer program for the Color Computer can rival the ease of use and powerful editing capabilities. 
In addition to high performance recording and playback, CoCo MIDI 3 has extensive editing 
capabilities. Such as block cut, copy, and paste. Quantize a block; scale velocities or a controller value; 
change the channel assignment of a block. Multipak or Y cable required. Includes a hardware MIDI 
interface and cables. $149.95. CoCo MIDI hardware interface available separately $99.95. CoCo MIDI 2 
software also available $34.95. 

Introducing FB01EDIT... our new FB-01 voice editor! Edit and creat new FB-01 voices on your CoCo 
3. Full 80 column display makes it easy to see all the data at once. Save banks to disk. Receive data from 
FB-01 and send it back. Requires CoCo MIDI hardware pack. $29.95. FB-01 Calc creates custom 
configurations for your FB-01 and Lyra. $19.95, Music Library is a collection of music to play on your 
CoCo (no extras needed!). Each disk $5.00. Musica 2, the companion music composition program, is only $24.95. • 

Lyra Lybrary is an extensive collection of music to use with your MIDI synthesizer. See 
review in December 1988 Rainbow magazine. Each disk $14.95. Lyra is a powerful yet 
easy-to-use MIDI music composition program. Comes with MIDI cable. Only $59.95. 
Ordering information: send check or money order. Sorry, no credit cards. COD is ok. 
Shipping and handling included in price. CA residents add 6% tax. 




Rulaford Research 

P.O. Box 143 

Imperial Beach, CA 92032 
(619) 690-3648 (evenings 6-10 PT) 



February 1989 THE RAINBOW 117 



We Cannot Tell A Lie 

Lonnie's gone nuts!! He's chopped down prices on 
Rainbow Bookshelf items! 





The Complete Rainbow Guide to OS-9 

Authors Dale Puckett and Peter Dibble show how to 
take advantage of OS-9's multitasking and multiuser 
features. An easy-to-read, step-by-step guide packed 
with hints, tips, tutorials and free software in the form 
of program listings. 

Book $12.95, Disk Package $19.95 (2 disks, book not 
included) — a savings of up to 36%! 

SAVE 38%! Book and disks only $29.95 





The Rainbow Book of Simulations 

20 award-winning entries from THE RAINBOW'S first 
Simulations contest. You are a Civil War Commander, 
an air traffic controller, a civil defense coordinator, or 
a scientist on Mars . . . your wits are on the line. 
Book $3.50, Tape $3.50 — a savings of 65%! 



SAVE 70%! Book and tape only $6 






The Second Rainbow Book of Simulations 

The 16 winners Irom our second Simulations contest. 
Fly through dense African jungle, bull your way down 
Wall Street, lead a bomb squad, or try your hand at 
Olympic events. Test your skills and talents. 
Book $4.95, Tape or Disk $4.95 — a 50% savings! 

SAVE 55%! Book and tape only $8.95 
SAVE 57%! Book and disk only $8.95 










The First Rainbow Book of Adventures 

Contains 14 winning programs from our first Adven- 
ture contest. Includes Sir Randolph of the Moors, 
Horror House, One Room, Dr. Avaloe and more. Plus 
hints, tips on solving Adventures. 
Book $2, Tape $2 — a 43% savings! 

SAVE 50%! Book and tape only $3.50 




The Second Rainbow Book of Adventures 

Featuring 24 of the most challenging Adventure 
games ever compiled. Meet the Beatles and battle the 
Blue Meanies, find a hidden fortune, or win the heart 
of a mysterious princess. Ring Quest, Secret Agent 
Man, Dark Castie, Curse of Karos and more! 
Book $6.95, Tape $6.95 — a 50% savings! 

SAVE 57%! Book and tape only $11.95 





The Third Rainbow Book of Adventures 

The excitement continues with 19 new Adventures. 
Discover backstage intrigue at the London Theatre, 
attempt a daring space rescue, or defeat evil in the year 
2091 as a genetic android. Evil Crypt, Spy master, Time 
Machine, The Amulet, and that's only the beginning! 
Book $6.95, Tape $6.95, Two-Disk Set $7.95 — a 
savings of up to 47%! 

SAVE 45%! Book and tape only $11.95 
SAVE 52%! Book and disk only $12.95 




The Rainbow 
Introductory Guide to Statistics 

Dr. Michael Plog and Dr. Norman Stenzel give a solid 
introduction to the realm of statistical processes and 
thinking for both the beginner and the professional. 
(80-column printer required.) 
Book $2.95, Tape or Disk $2.95 — a savings of 54%! 

SAVE 62%! Book and tape or disk only $4.95 



Name 



Address 
City _ 
State _ 



□ Payment Enclosed, or □ Charge to: 

□ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 
Account Number 



ZIP 



Card Expiration Date 
Signature 



Please send me: 

□ The Rainbow Book ot Simulations (first) 

□ Rainbow Simulations Tape(first) 

□ First Simulations Package 

□ The Second Rainbow Book of Simulations 

□ Second Rainbow Simulations Tape 

□ Second Rainbow Simulations Disk 

□ Second Simulations Package with Tape 

□ Second Simulations Package with Disk 

□ The Complete Rainbow Guide to OS-9 

□ Rainbow Guide to OS-9 Disk Set (2 disks) 

□ Rainbow Guide to OS-9 Package 

□ The Windows & Applications Disk for 

The Complete Rainbow Guide 
to OS-9 Level II, Vol. I 

□ The Rainbow Book of Adventures (first) 

□ Rainbow Adventures Tape (first) 

□ First Adventure Package 

□ The Second Rainbow Book of Adventures 

□ Second Rainbow Adventures Tape 

□ Second Adventure Package 

□ The Third Rainbow Book of Adventures 

□ Third Adventures Tape 

□ Third Adventures Disk Set (2 disks) 

□ Third Adventure Package with Tape 

□ Third Adventure Package with Disk 

□ Introductory Guide to Statistics 

□ Guide to Statistics Tape or Disk (indicate choice) 

□ Guide to Statistics Package 
(indicate choice of tape or disk) 

Add $1.50 per book Shipping and Handling in U.S. 
Outside U.S., add $4 per book 
Kentucky residents add 5% sales tax 

(Allow 6 to 8 weeks for delivery) 



-H35-$ 3.50 
3.50 

$10.00 $11.05 $ 6.00 
4r-935-$4.95 
•H35-$ 4.95, 
•£rfr95-$ 4.95 
$10.00 $12.05 $ 8.95 
$20.00 $13.05 $ 8.95 

$10.05 $16.05 $12.95 
«■ $19.95 
$ 4 7.05 $3 6 .05 $29.95 



$19.95 

$ 7.05 $ 3.50 $ 2.00 
$ 7.90 $ 3.50 $ 2.00 
$15.00 $ 7.00 $ 3.50 

$13. 9 0 $ 6.95 
»| 6.95 
$27.00 $17.05 $11.95 

-$44r0&-$ 6.95 
-$-9*$ 6.95 
$4445- $ 7.95 
$21.90 $15.05 $11.95 
$20. 9 0 $10. 9 5 $12.95 

$ 2.95 . 
■$-535-$ 2.95. 

$12.00 $ 0.05 $ 4.95 



Total 



Mail to: Rainbow Bookshelf, The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 385, 
Prospect, KY 40059. To order by phone (credit card orders only) 
call (800) 847-0309, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. For other inquiries call 
(502) 228-4492. 

Please note: The tapes and disks offered by The Rainbow Bookshelf are not 6tand-alone products. That is, 
they are intended to be an adjunct ana complement to the books, Even if you buy the tape or disk, you will 
still need the appropriate book for loading and operating instructions. OS-9® is a registered trademark of the 
Microware Systems Corporation. 





■ ) 




/ / 

510 PRINT#-2," 



/ 



520 PRINT#-2,"1 BATH / 

/ / / / 

/ / / 

530 PRINT #-2/ "2 BATH / 

/ / / / 

/ / / 

540 PRINT#-2,"3 BATH / 

/ / / / 

/ / / 

550 PRINT#-2,"4 BATH / 

/ / / / 

/ / / 

560 PRINT# -2," 



/ 






II 




/ 

/ 




/ 




/" 

/ 






/ 

f 


/ 


/ 


/" 




/ 


/ 


/ 


/ 


/ 




/ 


/ 


/ 


/ 


/" 



II 



FULL 
SIZE MED. V 



CHR$(14) 

570 PRINT#-2 / " 

TILE SINK 

ENT SIZE " 

580 PRINT#-2,CHR$(15) ;" 

HALF TUB SHOWER COLOR COLOR VANI 

TY CAB FAN MIRROR 
ii 

590 PRINT#-2 / "l BATH / 

/ / / 

/ / / / 

600 PRINT#-2,"2 BATH / 

/ / / 

/ / / / 

610 PRINT#-2,"3 BATH / 

/ / / 

/ / / / 

620 PRINT#-2,"4 BATH / 

/ / / 

/ / / / 

630 PRINT#-2," 

ii . 

CHR$(14) 

640 PRINT #-2, "KITCHEN APPLIANCES 
INCLUDED : COMMENTS " ; CHR$ ( 15 ) ,* + 

ii 

M ;CHR$(14) 
650 PRINT#-2," () REFRIGERATOR () 
RANGE E/G ()OVEN E/G ()COOKTOP 

E/G () DISPOSAL () COMPACTOR" 
660 PRINT#-2, CHR$ (15) "() FREEZER 

() MICROWAVE ()HOOD FAN ( ) WATE 

R SOFTNER () DISHWASHER () 
ii 

670 PRINT#-2,CHR$(15)" 



/ / 
/ / 

/ / 
/ / 

/ / 
/ / 
/" 

/ / 
/ / 



HR$(14) ;+"COUNTER SPACE" ; CHR$ (15 
) ;+" FT.";CHR$(14) ;+" COND." 
;CHR$(15);+" ";CHR$( 
14) 

690 PRINT#-2,"() PANTRY () BAR ( 
)WORK ISLAND *SINK SIZE" ; CHR$ ( 15 
) ; + " " ; CHR$ ( 14 ) ; + "TYPE " 

;CHR$(15);+" ";CHR$(14) 
;+"COLOR";CHR$(15) ;+" 11 
i CHR$ ( X4 ) 

700 PRINT#-2," () WASHER/DRYER CON 

NECTIONS E/G LOCATIONS" ;CHR$ (1 
5);+" ";CHR$(14) ;+" *( 

) WASHER () DRYER E/G" 
710 PRINT#-2, "WATER HEATER E/G/ 
S SIZE";CHR$(15) ;+" GALS.";C 
HR$(14);+" AGE";CHR$(15) ;+" 

YRS.";CHR$(14) ;+" *() SEWER ( 
) SEPTIC TANK" 

720 PRINT#-2,"HEAT: E/G/S/O/WB T 
YPE" ;CHR$ (15) ;+" " ;CHR$ 

(14);+" SIZE";CHR$(15) ;+" 
BTU" ;CHR$ (14) ;+" AGE" ;CHR$ (15) ; 
+" ";CHR$(14) ;+" ()AIR CL 

EANER SYSTEM" 

730 PRINT#-2,"()HEAT PUMP AIR C 
ONDITIONING: TYPE () CENTRAL ()W 
INDOW SIZE" ;CHR$ (15) ;+" 
" ;CHR$ (14) ;+" AGE" ;CHR$ (15) ;+•• 
" ; CHR$ ( 14 ) 



CHR$(14),. ^v*-,,, 

IN . » ; CHR$ ( 14 ) ; +" COMMENTS " ; CH 
R$(15);+" ";CHR$( 
14) 

750 PRINT#-2,"AVG. UTILITY BILLS 
ELEC . » ; CHR$ ( 15 ) ; + " " ; C 

HR$(14) ;+" GAS";CHR$(15) ;+•» 

" ; CHR$ ( 14 ) ; +" WATER" ; CHR$ ( 1 
5 ) ; +" " ; CHR$ ( 14 ) ; +" SEW 

ER" ; CHR$ (15);+" « ; chr$ ( 

14) 

760 PRINT#-2, "ELECTRIC PANEL: () 
FUSE ( ) BREAKER SIZE" ;CHR$ (15) ; 
+" AMP.";CHR$(14) ;+" LOCATI 

ON";CHR$(15) ;+" 
»;CHR$(14) 
770 PRINT#-2:PRINT#-2 / CHR$(15) ;" 
COMMENTS 



780 PRINT#-2:PRINT#-2," 



";CHR$(14) 
680 PRINT #-2, "CABINETS: #OF DOOR 

S";CHR$(15) ;+" ";CHR$(14) ;+" 
#OF DRAWERS " ; CHR$ ( 15 ) ; + " " ; C 



ii 



790 PRINT#-2:PRINT#-2 / " 



ii 



120 THE RAINBOW February 1989 



800 PRINT#-2:PRINT#-2," 



it 



830 PRINT#-2:PRINT#-2," 



it 



810 PRINT#-2:PRINT#-2, " 



ti 



82j3 PRINT#-2:PRINT#-2," 



";CHR$(14) 
840 PRINT#-2:PRINT#-2:PRINT#-2 
850 NEXTPR 

860 CLS: PRINTS 2 31, "GOOD HOUSE HU 
NTING" 




260 64 

420 235 

630 151 



750 98 

890 3 

END .5 



Listing 3: LORN DfiTfl 



10 CLS4:C=2:X=3 

20 IF C>3 THEN C=2 : IF X<2 THEN X 
=3 

30 FOR H=0 TO 63 STEP 4 : FOR V=0 
TO 1 

40 SET (H,V,C) :SET(H+1 / V / C) 
50 SET (H+2,V,X) : SET (H+3 , V,X) 
60 NEXT V,H 

70 FOR H= 62 TO 63: FOR V= 2 TO 2 
9 STEP 4 

80 SET (H,V,C) : SET (H, V+l, C) 
90 SET (H,V+2,X) : SET (H, V+3 , X) 
100 NEXT V,H 

110 FOR H=63 TO 0 STEP -4 : FOR V= 
30 TO 31 

120 SET(H,V,C) :SET(H-1,V,C) 
130 SET(H-2,V,X) : SET (H-3 , V, X) 
140 NEXT V,H 

150 FOR H=0 TO l:FOR V=29 TO 2 S 
TEP -4 

160 SET (H,V,C) : SET (H, V-l, C) 
170 SET (H,V-2,X) :SET(H,V-3,X) 
180 NEXT V,H 

190 PRINTS (138)," LOAN DATA " ; 
200 PRINTS (237) ," BY: " ; 



(C) ALCULATE PAYM 



210 PRINTS (329) ," KEN JOHNSON "; 

220 PRINTS(364) ," 1985 "; 

230 FOR DLAY=1 TO 1500: NEXT DLAY 

240 u$=»######.##":V$=" 

250 CLS : PRINTS (72 ) ,"<«LOAN DATA 

»>": PRINT 

2 60 PRINTS (140) , "-MENU-": PRINT: P 
RINT 

270 PRINT" 
ENT": PRINT 
280 PRINT" (S) CHEDULE PRINT 

OUT": PRINT: PRINT 
290 PRINT" MAKE SELECTION: 

C/S" 

300 I$=INKEY$:IF I$="C" THEN 310 
ELSE IF I$="S" THEN 600 ELSE 30 

3 10 CLS : PRINT : PRINT : PRINT" 

DATA ENTRIES : " : PRINT 
320 L=0 :IT=0 :P=0 :W=0 
330 INPUT" LOAN BALANCE" ;A 
340 INPUT" INTEREST RATE" ;B 
350 INPUT" TERM IN MONTHS" ;C 

3 60 PRINT : PRINT : PRINT " 
ECK ENTRIES . . . . " 

370 PRINT: PRINT" PRESS (C)ONTI 
NUE OR (R) EDO" 

380 CE$=INKEY$: IF CE$="C"THEN 39 
0 ELSE IF CE$="R" THEN 310 ELSE 
380 

390 IF B<1 THEN B=B*100 

400 I=(B/100)/12 

410 M=I/( (1+1) A (C)-1)+I:D=M*A 

420 CLS: PRINT: PRINT: PRINT" LOAN: 

$";: PRINT USINGU$;A 



CH 



February 1989 THE RAINBOW 121 



4 30 PRINT" RATE:";B;"%" 

440 PRINT" TERM: ";C; "MONTHS" 

450 PRINT" PYMT: $";: PRINT USING 

U$;D 

460 PRINT: PRINT" CALCULATING TOT 
AL INTEREST. ..." 
470 K=A 

480 FORY=l TO C 
490 R=B/100:DD=D 
500 I=(K*R)/12 
510 W=W+I 
520 IT=W 

530 P=DD-I:NB=K-P 
540 K=NB 
550 NEXT Y 

560 PRINT: PRINT " TOTAL INTEREST 

: $";: PRINT USINGU$;IT 

570 PRINT: PRINT: PRINT" (T)RY ANO 

THER (M)AKE PRINTOUT" 

580 PRINT" (E)ND PROGRAM (R)ETUR 

N TO MENU" 

590 I$=INKEY$:IF I$="T"THEN 310 
ELSE IF I$="M" THEN 710 ELSE IF 
I$="R" THEN 250 ELSE IF I$="E" T 
HEN CLS : END ELSE 590 
600 CLS: PRINT: PRINT: PRINT" A 
MORTIZATION SCHEDULE" : PRINT 
610 PRINT 

620 INPUT" ENTER LOAN BALANCE "; 
A 

630 input" enter interest rate " 
;b 

640 input" enter term in months 

" ; C 

650 INPUT" ENTER AMOUNT OF PYMT. 

";D 

660 PRINT" DAYS FIRST PYMT DELAY 
ED." 

670 INPUT" IF N/A PRESS <ENTER>" 

;E 

CH 



PRESS (C)ONTI 



6 80 PRINT : PRINT : PRINT " 
ECK ENTRIES 
690 PRINT: PRINT" 
NUE OR (REDO) 11 
700 CP$=INKEY$ : IF CP$="C"THEN 71 
0 ELSE IF CP$="R" THEN 600 ELSE 
700 

710 CLS:PRINT§ (102), "MAKE PRINT 
ER READY I ": PRINT : PRINT 
720 PRINT" PRESS: (P)RINT (R)E-E 
NTER DATA" 
730 PRINT" 
PROGRAM" 

740 I$=INKEY$:IFI$="P"THEN 750EL 
SE IF I$="R"THENCLS:GOTO600ELSE 
IFI$="A"THEN GOTO250 ELSE IF I$= 
"E"THEN END ELSE 740 
750 QQ=PEEK(65314) : IF QQ><4 THEN 
CLS:PRINT@ (102) , "PRINTER NOT R 
EADY !" 

7 60 PRINT#-2:PRINT#-2:L=2:PN=1 



(A)BORT (E)ND 



770 CLS:PRINT#-2," 

<« AMORTIZATION SCHE 
DULE »>":PRINT#-2:PRINT#-2:PRIN 
T#-2:L=L+4:Y=0 

780 CLS:PRINT@ (103), "PRINTING 
SCHEDULE" 

790 PRINT #-2," LOAN: ";:PRINT#- 
2,USINGU$;A; :PRINT#-2," INT.R 
ATE:"B; :PRINT#-2,"%"; :PRINT#-2," 
TERM: "C; : PRINT#-2 , "MONTHS" ; 
: PRINT#-2 , " PAYMENT : " ; : PRINT 

#-2 , USINGU$ ; D ; : PRINT#-2 : PRINT#-2 
:L=L+3:GOSUB 970 
800 K=A:IF B<1 THEN B=B*100 
810 FOR Y= 1 TO C 
820 R=B/100:DD=D 

830 IF Y=l AND E<>0 THEN I=((R*A 

)/365)*E ELSE I=(K*R)/12 

840 P=DD-I:NB=K-(DD-I) 

850 IF Y=C THEN DD=K+I : P=K: NB=0 : 

GOTO8 80 

860 K=NB 

870 IF Y=C THEN DD=NB+I :P=NB:NB= 

880 PRINT#-2,USING"###. ";Y;:PRI 

NT #-2," <....... > ";:PRIN 

T#-2,USINGU$;DD; :PRINT#-2,V$; :PR 
INT#-2 ,USINGU$ ; I ; : PRINT#-2 , V$ ; : P 
RINT#-2,USINGU$;P; : PRINT#-2 , V$ ; : 
PRINT#-2 , USINGU$ ; NB : L=L+1 
890 IF C<25 THEN PRINT#-2 : L=L+1 

900 IF L=*62 AND Y<C THEN GOSUB 1 
010 

910 NEXT Y 

920 PRINT#-2:PRINT#-2:PRINT#-2,T 

AB(34) "<LAST PAGE>" 

930 CLS : PRINT : PRINT : PRINT : PRINT : 

PRINT"PRESS: (A) NOTHER COPY" 

940 PRINT" (R)E-RUN PROGRA 

M" 

950 PRINT" (Q)UIT; CLEAR M 

EMORY" 

960 I$=INKEY$:IF I$="A" THEN CLS 

:GOTO 720 ELSE IF I$="R" THEN RU 

N ELSE IF I$="Q" THEN POKE 113,0 

:EXEC 40999 ELSE 960 

970 IF Y=0 THEN 980 ELSE IF Y>1 

THEN PRINT#-2:PRINT#-2:PRINT#-2: 

L=L+3 

980 PRINT#-2,STRING$(80,45) :L=L+ 
1 

990 PRINT#-2," PYMT.# PYMT. DA 
TE AMOUNT INT . 

PRINCIPLE BALANCE" : L=L 

+1 

1000 PRINT#-2,STRING$(80,45) : PRI 

NT #-2 :L=L+2: RETURN 

1010 PRINT#-2:PRINT#-2:PRINT#-2, 

TAB (36)" PAGE " PN : PN=PN+1 : PRINT # - 2 
: PRINT # -2: PRINT # -2 :L=2: GOSUB 970 
: RETURN /» 



122 THE RAINBOW February 1989 



Tandy 

Users Un ite ! 

This year Tandy users like 
you came together on 
GEnie™ to get their Tandy 
questions answered by 
experts, their Tandy games 
won, their Tandy systems 
updated and their online 
Tandy opinions confirmed, 
researched, and applauded 

140,008 times. 




Join the Revolution. 



GEnie. 

For the people, 
by the people. 

You've never been a follower. You want 
your voice heard. You want straight, unbiased 
information about your hardware and software. 
You want independent news. Opinions. 
And control. 

GEnie understands. In the Tandy 
RoundTable on GEnie, the people determine 
what is discussed. And since GEnie is not a 
hardware or software developer, you'll get the 
most objective information about what's new 
on the market. That's why smart Tandy users 
like yourself turned to us over 100,000 times 
this year. That's why you should too. 

GEnie makes sure you have access to all 
kinds of great Tandy software-including thou- 
sands of games, education and business pro- 
ductivity programs as well as hard-working 
utilities to expand your Tandy. And the experts 
you trust will be online when you log on. Plus 
news, shopping, travel and reference data. Al| 
for only 8t a minute . 

Sign-up is just $29.95, and your first 2 
hours are free * There are no hidden charges 
or monthly minimums. Now it's your call. 

Here's how easy it is to sign-up 
from your keyboard now. 

* Have your major credit card or checking 
1 . account number ready. 

n Set your modem for local echo (half- 
L. duplex)-300 or 1200 baud. 

Q Dial 1-800-638-8369. When con- 
u- nected, enter HHH 

A At the U#=prompt enter 

4. XJM11712,GEniethen RETURN. 

Need help or more information? No modem 
yet? We can help. In the U.S. or Canada call 
1-800-638-9636. Join the online Revolu- 
tion and let your voice be heard. 




We bring good things to life. 



"Basic rates and services in effect 9/88 apply in US. only. 
Non-prime time rates apply Mon.-Fri. 6PM- 8AM local time and all 
day Sat., Sun., and nat'l. holidays, Subject to service availability. 
Some services offered on GEnie may include additional charges. 
*$10 credit applies. Offer good for 30 days from sign-up. 

€'1988 General Electric Company, U.S.A. 



'Software — 

Window Master — 
Advanced Features 

Have you ever seen a product adver- 
tisement you couldn't believe? You know 
the kind — "... it slices, it dices... all for 
$19.95." We've all seen unbelievable ones. 
When I saw the advertisement for Window 
Master, I believed about half of what I 
read. However, seeing is believing, and 
once I saw this program in action, I be- 
came a believer. 

Window Master is a point-and-click 
graphics operating environment that uses 
either a 320-by-225 screen with 16 colors 
or a 640-by-225 screen with four colors. 
The program requires a Color Computer 3; 
512K is recommended. (There is a 128K 
version, which works well, but it has a 
limited range of features. In this review I 



CoCo 3 



—Without OS-9 

will discuss only the 512K version.) The 
program also requires a disk drive, a Hi- 
Res joystick adapter, a color or mono- 
chrome monitor, and a mouse or joystick. 

The program provides the user with a 
wide range of new features through Win- 
dow BASIC, an extension of Disk Ex- 
tended BASIC that uses normal BASIC 
commands to control windows, pull-down 
menus, buttons, icons, edit fields, etc. This 
version of BASIC is automatically installed 
in your system when the program is loaded 
into the CoCo 3. In addition, the program 
is fully compatible with Disk Extended 
BASIC and takes none of CoCo's BASIC 
memory. 

Window Master is easy to load — just 



type RUN"W" and the BASIC program 
will load and execute Window Master's in- 
stallation code. In a 512K system, the 
program installs two RAM disks. 

Using this program, you can create 
BASIC applications that use multiple 
windows. Window Master supports a 
maximum of 31 windows onscreen at 
once. Overlapping windows are also sup- 
ported. You have a choice of six different 
window styles and any window size or 
screen position. You use your mouse to 
move the windows anywhere on the screen. 
Didn't they say only OS-9 could do all 
that? Move over, Multi-Vue. 

Window Master features true event- 
trapping — a capability that allows a pro- 
gram to detect and respond to certain events 
and branch to the appropriate routine. 
Events that can be trapped include time 
passage, selection of a menu item or a 
keyboard key, etc. The program also in- 
cludes a set of menu statements and func- 
tions that give you all the tools needed to 



1 24 THE RAINBOW February 1 989 



create custom menu-bar options and sub- 
topics under these new headings. 

The Mouse statements let you incorpo- 
rate the mouse into any program. These 
statements can identify the location of a 
mouse on the screen — including the win- 
dow number — and whether or not the 
mouse has been clicked. In addition, the 
Mouse statements let you enable or dis- 
able the mouse and set the type of mouse 
pointer displayed. 

Other Window Master statements in- 
clude Edit Field statements (useful for 
those of us who must create forms), the 
Pen Size statement, a Protect statement 
and WEdit. The Protect statement is used 
to protect a specified number of lines in the 
current window, which can keep the top of 
the window from scrolling off the screen. 
The WEdit statement allows the use of a 
built-in screen editor for editing BASIC 
program lines. Although you can still use 
the regular Edit command, I found WEdit 
much easier to use. 

The program features a fully buffered 
keyboard that allows you to type ahead of 
the display — even when inserting text. 
You can also enter commands or answers 
to prompts when the system is busy load- 
ing or saving files to disk or printing to the 
printer. The buffer will hold up to 48 
characters, including ENTER. (Remem- 
ber, this is Disk BASIC.) 

The program's large number of pro- 



Surprisingiy enough, Cer-Comp was 
formed before the Color Computer was 
ever produced. Bill Vergona, owner of Cer- 
Comp, began programming software for 
other 6800 and 6809 computers. When the 
Color Computer was introduced, Vergona 
immediately saw this new computer's power 
and directed Cer-Comp toward this remark- 
able new machine. Cer-Comp began pro- 
ducing new software for the Color Com- 
puter — introducing H i-Res //, Textpro III, 
Data Pack II and CBASIC, all powerful 
machine language programs. 

These Cer-Comp programs supplied 
the CoCo user with many needed features 
that Tandy had not included. Hi-Res II 
Screen Utility gave the CoCo user a high- 
resolution screen capable of displaying up 
to 255 characters per line, true lowercase, 
mixed text and graphics, auto key repeat 
and an ON ERROR GOTO function. 

When Tandy announced another new 
computer, the CoCo 3, Vergona directed 
Cer-Comp toward this new, more powerful, 
Color Computer. Some of the new software 



grammable function keys can be used for 
anything from complex command sequences 
to a single word or phrase, all at the touch 
of a key. Window Master automatically 
loads a set of function keys when it starts 
up, all of which can be changed, deleted, 
loaded or saved. So you can save your own 
customized function key set. 




You can display up to 212 characters 
per line, in eight different character-en- 
hancement modes — bold, italic, under- 
line, double width and height, quad width, 
super and subscript, and regular charac- 
ters. Any of these features can be selected 
at any time, and more than one feature can 
be enabled at the same time. In addition, 
the program has a built-in graphics charac- 
ter font for printing special symbols. The 
system includes several printer drivers and 
allows the user to print either the current 
window or the entire screen. 



reflected earlier work by Cer-Comp. The 
old favorites were modified and enhanced 
to fully use the power of the CoCo 3. 
However, Cer-Comp does more than updat- 
ing established software. It produces Win- 
dow Master, a powerful new software pack- 
age for the CoCo 3 that pushes the ma- 
chine *s hardware far beyond its normal 
capabilities. 

Cer-Comp takes great pride in the 
technically oriented software it offers its 
customers. Vergona loves to make the CoCo 
3 do more than the expected. Programs like 
CBASIC III and Window Master do just 
that. Both systems were expensive projects 
for Cer-Comp — each requiring more than 
a year to produce. But Vergona feels it's all 
worthwhile. Indeed, he says that "Window 
Master is the greatest thing since sliced 
bread." 

The people at Cer-Comp pledge to 
continue on a technically oriented path; 
they enjoy stretching the Color Computer 
3*s hardware capability, and making the 
impossible possible. □ 



Window Master comes with over 30 
pages of understandable documentation. 
With the information provided, I was able 
to produce a program utilizing eight win- 
dows on my screen. In fact, I was so 
fascinated that I wrote several programs. 
The system is a delight to use I 

The I*pwer Within 

Wfouht w M Hate r 

Window Master has an extensive set of 
commands, which are an extension of the 
original Extended Disk BASIC commands. 
I was impressed with some of these power- 
ful statements, and I would like to give you 
a preview of some of the functions offered 
by this sy stem. 

Hie Window Open statement creates 
an output window of a specified type and 
size on the screen. It will automatically 
become the current active window. You 
have the option of creating either a centered 
or uncentered title. In contrast, the Window 
Close statement removes a specified win- 
dow from the screen. However, all the 
information contained in the window is 
saved and can be re-displayed later. 

The Window Active statement makes a 
specified window currently active. If this 
window is hidden beneath another, Window 
Master will rearrange the window layers to 
bring your specified window to the screen. 

You use the Window Button statement 
to display one of the various types of but- 
tons on the active window along with text 
next to the button (The buttons allow the 
user to define various screen areas.) The 
Window Button Close statement removes a 
specified button from the display. 

While Window Icon statements let you 
display an icon image in your current win- 
dow, Window Attr statements are used to 
choose how graphic data will be placed in 
the window. Disk BASIC allows the use of 
a copy function, which automatically re- 
places any existing data on the screen. This 
window statement lets you select three al- 
ternative ways to put the data on the screen. 

Using the Window Color statement, 
you can change colors after a window has 
been opened. Buttons, icons and text are 
displayed in the current text color. Edit field 
boxes are displayed in the current border 
colon 

These are just a few of the commands 
available for manipulating the windows in 
the programs you develop, just a brief glimpse 
of the options available. Window Master 
also has an extensive command list for 
manipulating the mouse, keyboard, menus 
and much more. It is up to you and your 
imagination to test the limitations of this 
system. □ 




February 1989 THE RAINBOW 125 



Window Master comes on a somewhat 
copy-protected disk. You can make backup 
copies with the BACKUPcommand, but the 
backup isn't bootable. You must boot up 
with the original disk and then replace the 
original with your backup. If the original 
disk is damaged within a year of the pur- 
chase date, it will be replaced free of 
charge. The program disk comes with many 
demonstration programs, like a calendar 
program, an MGE graphics viewer and a 
graphics editor. Cer-Comp promises more 
in the future. The company is also produc- 
ing an advanced programming guide de- 
signed for Window Master users, and the 
company would like to hear from those of 
you using this product. If you produce 
some great software with Window Master, 
Cer-Comp might want to make you an 
offer. 




The program has made Disk Extended 
BASIC very powerful. Window Master is 
reasonably priced and (dare I say it?) offers 
so many features that it is probably under- 
priced. I recommend this software to all 
CoCo 3 owners. 

(Cer-Comp, Ltd., 5566 Ricochet Ave., Las 
Vegas, N V 89110, 702-452-0632; $69.95 plus 
$3S/H) 

— Brian R.Smith 




CoCo 3 



MacPlay — 

Can You Hear It? 

MacPlay is a machine language, disk- 
based utility that allows the CoCo 3 to play 
digitized MacSound files, which are found 
on most Macintosh BBSs as well as Com- 
puServe and Delphi. MacPlay requires a 
128K or 5 12K CoCo 3 and one disk drive. 
You will need a 512K CoCo 3 to take 
advantage of some of the larger digitized 
sound files. Although a modem with re- 
lated communications software is required 
to download MacSound files, you don't 
need a modem to listen to the files. The 
sounds are played through the monitor 

1 26 THE RAINBOW February 1 989 



speaker via the CoCo 3's output jack. 

MacPlay comes on two disks. The first 
disk contains the program and several 
sample MacSound files; the second con- 
tains additional sample files. MacPlay runs 
under Disk BASIC, and the manufacturer 
says it will run on any of the Disk B ASIC- 
compatible operating systems. MacPlay 
is not copy-protected, so you should make 
copies of the original disks and work from 
the backup copies. 

When you boot the program, you '11 see 
a single menu that presents a list of op- 
tions, which are selected by pressing the 
corresponding number key. In the default 
drive, the Directory option lets you view 
the program files, and the Load option 
allows you to load a file and then view it. 
Another option lets you load files into 
memory sequentially and then play them 
in the order they were loaded. The speed at 
which sounds are played is controlled via 
a set of values (one to 32), which are 
selected using the left and right arrow 
keys. A final Quit option lets you quit the 
program and return to Disk BASIC. 

The sample files included with MacPlay 
are actual digitized sound files created 
originally for the Macintosh computer. If 
you download additional files from a BBS, 
no file conversion is necessary. However, 
each file should be given the extension 
. mas, or the program will not recognize it. 
In addition, MacPlay cannot play archived 
or compressed files. 

While the duration of a digitized sound 
varies according to file size and playing 
speed, each of the sample files included 
lasts between one and five seconds. Hav- 
ing never heard the CoCo produce digi- 
tized sound, I was surprised by the high 
quality of the sound files. To CoCo users 
who have heard only the buzzes and squeaks 
available from BASIC, MacPlay will make 
the files sound like records played on a 
phonograph. The sample files include the 
Roadrunner's famous "meep-meep," the 
final bars of the theme song from The 
Three Stooges, the opening trumpet call of 
F -Troop as well as assorted spoken words 
and sentences. Each file was realistic. (I 
even expected to see the Roadrunner race 
up behind me.) 

The program makes no provisions for 
recording your own sound files, nor can 
MacSound files be played or manipulated 
by any other CoCo sound digitizer. 

Overall, I was impressed by the pro- 
gram *s convenience. The menu is straight- 
forward and works logically. I liked the 
ability to make menu selections with a 
single keystroke. However, the Load and 
Directory commands are somewhat lim- 
ited: You cannot load a MacSound file 
while viewing the file directory. In order 



to load a file, you must return to the main 
menu — losing the directory. Therefore, 
you must either memorize or write down 
the names of the files you want to load. In 
addition, you can access only one disk 
drive while using the program. 

These are minor faults for a program 
that gives the CoCo Community a whole 
new world of digitized sound. One of the 
biggest difficulties faced by computer users 
today is communication between different 
systems; MacPlay is helping to unite our 
community. If you would like to hear what 
Macintosh users have been hearing, 
MacPlay is for you. 

(CoCoTech, 208 Cathy Ann Drive, Reading, 
PA 19606, 215-779-7768; $19.95: First prod- 
uct review for this company appearing in 
THE RAINBOW «) 

— Waiter Myers 

Book 

PokeSy Peeks 
y n Execs — 
A Series of Helpful 
Hints and Tips 

Do you remember looking through the 
programs and articles in THE RAINBOW 
and wondering where all those intriguing 
peeks, pokes and execs came from? Do 
you jot down interesting CoCo tidbits for 
later use but want some way to organize 
lhatinformation? Have you always wanted 
to really stretch the power of your CoCo? 

If the answer to any one of these ques- 
tions is yes, you should look at the Pokes, 
Peeks 'n Execs series sold by Microcom 
Software. This series consists of three 
8 l/2-by-5 1/2-inch soft-cover booklets, 
containing more than 1,000 peeks, pokes 
and execs. 

Each of the books is organized into 
general sections, dealing with disks, print- 
ers, cassettes, 64K-mode operation, etc. 
After each command is presented, com- 
ments are given about its use and result. 
The format is clear, easy-to-follow and 
concise enough not to slow down the more 
experienced user. 

These books can improve your pro- 
gramming skills by giving you access to 
many functions normally unavailable. The 
information can be used straight from the 
books to increase the power and flexibility 
of your computer. In addition, this wealth 
of information is available in one organ- 
ized source, which will be appreciated by 
both novice and expert. 



The first book in the series, 500 Pokes, 
Peeks 'n Execs for the TRS-80 Color 
Computer, contains a wide range of com- 
mands, including those for disabling keys 
or commands, determining either com- 
puter memory size or the type of BASIC 
used, etc. The book also contains utilities, 
like key-beep, reset protection and recov- 
ering a BASIC program after the com- 
mand new. 

The second book, Supplement to 500 
Pokes, Peeks *n Execs for the TRS-80 
Color Computer, offers 500 more useful 
commands and utilities, including some 
for text and graphics dumps, and has fixes 
for a few bugs. The book includes some 
modifications for a few well-known pro- 
grams and shows you how to get extra 
lives in some of your favorite games. In 
addition, it includes a section describing 
changes to make some of the commands in 
the book work on the CoCo 3. 

The final book in the series, 300 Pokes, 
Peeks 'n Execs for the CoCo 3, has some 
excellent information for the CoCo 3 that 
I have already put to use. The book in- 
cludes information on changing border 
colors, memory management registers, true 
lowercase, fixes for CoCo 3 bugs, etc. 

I was impressed with the accuracy of 
all three books and found very few errors 



in the command lines. I did notice that a 
few peeks and pokes found their way into 
more than one book, but that was a rarity. 

The information found in these books is 
valuable. I have seen programs based 
solely on one or two of these peeks and 
pokes. Imagine what you could do with the 
entire series at your fingertips. 

(Microcom Software, 2900 Monroe Ave., 
Rochester, NY 14618, 800-654-5244; $19.95 
for first book; $16.95 for second; $9.95 for 
third; $39.95 for set, $3 S/H) 

— Michael G. Toepke 

1 Softwar e I 

MAESTRO — 
The Complete 
Disk Manager 

MAESTRO is advertised as "the com- 
plete disk manager for the Tandy Color 
Computer System!" The utility will work 
on any 32K CoCo with at least one disk 
drive and Disk BASIC. The program is 
written in BASIC, so there are no problems 



with making backup copies for your own 
protection. The BASIC listing also makes 
it easy to study the author's work and make 
changes or modifications as you want. 
MAESTRO is easy to use, even for non- 
programmers. With it, I was able to mod- 
ify a number of disk programs and even fix 
some that crash on me. 

MAESTRO is easy to load. The direc- 
tory contains both the main program and 
two loaders: one for the CoCos 1 and 2, 
and another for the CoCo 3. To bring up 
the Hi-Res screen, just type run "coco 
3" and press ENTER. From that point, the 
actual editor screen can be invoked by 
pressing any key. 

The disk index is shown in the upper 
third of the editor screen. This section of 
the screen displays the contents of the disk 
being edited. In the middle of the disk 
index area, three numbers representing the 
disk drive, track and sector are displayed. 
A block to the right of these numbers 
contains the decimal and Hex values of the 
byte at the cursor location. The bottom 
half of the screen, the command window, 
is used to display various messages for the 
32 commands available with MAESTRO. 
The following commands are performed 
by pressing the appropriate key in con- 
junction with the CLEAR key: 



1} HARD 



ARIZONA SMALL COMPUTER PERIPHERALS 
930 W. 23rd St. Suite 26 
Tempe Az . 83282 
<602>-B29-8028 
M-F B:OOam - 6:OODm MST 

DRIVES 

A. Complete 20Meq Symtem »350.00 

Svstem consists o+ 20Meci CMI hard drive. 
WDluo2-SHD controller; DIBTO HD INTERFACE 
power supply, case and all necessary cables 
readv to pluq into MULT 1 -PA* INTERFACE and run. 
Drive is formatted with 0B9 and has lMecj + 
Ditblic: domain software. 
&. KITS FOR HACKERS 

1 - 5Mea * 1 20 . OO 

2. 8Meq *i40„oo 

Z. lOMeq »t6t».0G 

Kits include a CMI hard drive. WD1<XC~SHD 
SA5I controller, power supply and necessary 
cables. i 
C DISTO HD INTERFACE (when ordered with kit>,»50.00 



2> 6RAPH ICS 

A. SOFTWARE i e: PAT. CJOCOMAX III MA K 10 

B. DIGITIZER D5-fr9 and C— BEE 5.3 «9*».«»5 

and C-SEE 3.3 *149.95 

C. COMPLETE SVSTEM w/ CAMERA C ALL 

3) FLOPPY DRIVES 

A. 40 tracl DSDD NEW *75.00 

B. Reconditioned and tested.. DSDD $6'.».O0 

SSDD * 40.00 



4) 



MEMORY UPGRADES 

A. 512K uoqrade for COCO III (installed onJv> tl60.<X» 

you ship vour computer to us UPS 2nd Dav Air 
We do the upqrade. test it and return it to 
you by UPS 2nd Day Air. Total time 1 WEE! 



5) 



1200/300 BALD - 

Lowest once to qet into Tel e-Commum cat l cms 
TOO / 1 2 r> '.> baud Auto answer w/software 



»40. OO 



6) COMPLETE Lift OF DISTO PRODUCTS 

7) OS? DRIVERS AM) DESCRIPTORS INSTALLED ON YOUR BOOT DISK 

A service to our customers that enables them to start 
using their new devices as soon as the receive them. 



81 



COLOR COMPUTER AM) PERIPTERAL REPAIR 

We have comolete repair facilities jncludinq a class 
clean area tor repair of hard drives, a hard drive 
diaqnostic tester, floppy drive test station and a 
technical staff with over loo years experience. 



1 OO 



9) 



WARRANTY 

Al 1 oroduct 
warrant v 



is sold with a 18o day repai r fr ep 1 acement 



MUTANT MINERS 



Battle mutant uranium miners in a run for your life, action-packed, arcade 
Style game. 10 levels with ID soreens per levell 
100% Machine Language (CoCo 1, 2 or 3 and Joystick) £19.95 



BURIED BUXX & 



Fly your helicopter into enemy territory, dig up the loot and return to base. 
Watch out for the ever-present patrol aircraft and ground based missiles. 
100% Machine Language (CoCo 1, 2 or 3 and Joystick) £19.9; 



MILESTONES 



Use hazards and safety techniques to outsmart the computer in this 
long-distance road rally simulation. Attempt to be the first to complete a 
1,000 mile race. Joystick or keyboard. 100% BASIC (CoCo 3 only} £19.95 



FONTGEN 



Using the HIRES graphics modes (HSCREENS I-4) create standard, medium and 
LARGE sized fonts, borders and unique icons. Use up to 4 fonts in BASIC!! 
Also customize palette colors. Al! supporting software provided. 
100% Machine Language (CoCo 3 only) £24-95 



EISKEASE $ 



COPV, KILL and RENAME multiple files with one keystroke! Backup and restore 
directories. Print a directory map. Use maps to reconstruct damaged 
directories. BAS IC/Machine Language hybrid. (CoCo 3 only) £24.9!) 



PICTURE PUZZLES & 



The ultimata in puzzledom. The computer scrambles 'em and you gotta put 'em 
back together 10 puzzles with varying degrees of difficulty. 
100% Machine Language. (CoCo 3 only) £19.99 



QUANTUM LEAP 



A fast-paced spin off from yAHTZZZ. Six dice and unique roll combinations 
make for a highly addictive game. 1-4 players. . .joystlok or keyboard. 
100% Machine Language. (CoCo 3 only) £19.93 




VISA 1 JR & JR SOFTSTUFF 

wj^f P.O. BOX 118, LOMPOC, CA 93438 (805) 735-3889 




ORDERS ACCEPTED 24 HOURS A D A V. ALL PROGRAMS ON DISKETTE ONLV. 

MDNEV ORDERS, CERTIFIED & PERSONAL CHECKS, C.O.D., UISA AND MASTER CARD 
ACCEPTED. (PERSONAL CHECKS MUST CLEAR BEFORE PRODUCT IS SHIPPED). 
ALL ORDERS ADD S3. DO SHIPPING. C.O.D. ORDERS 13. OD ADDITIONAL. 

YOU CAN USUALLY GET US IN PERSON FROM 5:00 - 9:00 P.M. PST. IF YOU GET 
THE MACHINE, LEAVE A MESSAGE AND WE WILL CALL BACK AT YOUR CONVENIENCE . 

CALL OR WRITE FOR A COMPLETE LIST OF AVAILABLE PROGRAMS. 



February 1 989 THE RAINBOW 1 27 



up arrow Reads the current sector of the 
following track into the editor. 

down arrow Reads the current sector of 
the preceding track into the editor. 

right arrow Reads the following sector of 
the current track into the editor. 

left arrow Reads the preceding sector of 
the current track into the editor. 

@ (Position Cursor) Relocates the cursor 
to any byte in the sector. 

0 (No. of Tracks) Changes the number of 
tracks to 35, 40 or 80. 

A (Change Drive Default) Changes the 
number of the disk drive accessed for input 
and output functions (0 to 3). 



B (Toggle Background Color) Switches 
between green and buff. 

C (Copy Sector) Writes the contents of 
the editor to the specified track and sector. 

D (Decimal Mode) Allows you to enter a 
three-digit number. One- or two-digit 
numbers must be preceded by a 0 or fol- 
lowed by spaces. 

E (Exit) Returns to BASIC. 

F (Read File) Reads the first sector of a 
specified file into the editor. 

G (Clear Buffer) Erases the decimal or 
hexadecimal number in memory. 

H (Hexadecimal Mode) Allows you to 
enter a two-digit Hex number. One-digit 



numbers must be preceded by a 0 or fol- 
lowed by a space. 

I (Disk Directory) Displays the disk 
directory. 

J (Toggle Inverse Display) Reverses the 
current foreground and background col- 
ors. 

K (Kill File) Kills a file on disk. 

L (Encode MSB/LSB) Translates a number 
into most significant byte/least significant 
byte code. 

M (Fill Sector) Fills the sector with any 
character you specify. 

N (Normal Mode) Allows direct iiiput 
from the keyboard. 

O (Decode MSB/LSB) Translates a most 
significant by teAeast significant byte code 
into a decimal number. 

P (Search Disk) Searches each half-sec- 
tor on the disk for a given target string. 

Q (Current Granule) Displays the cur- 
rent granule. 

R (Rename File) Renames a file on disk. 

S (Read Sector) Reads the sector of the 
track you designate into the editor. 

T (Trace File) Traces a file on the disk 
after reading it into the editor. You will see 
the current granule, track and sector of the 
file. 

U (Undo Sector Mods) Restores the origi- 
nal sector by erasing any changes you 
made. 

V (Verify Disk) Makes sure the disk is 
free of I/O errors. 

W (Write Sector) Writes the contents of 
the editor to the current track and sector. 

X (Reinitialize) Restarts the program. 

Y (Fill Before Cursor) Fills every byte 
before and after the cursor with any char- 
acter you select. 

Z (Fill After Cursor) Fills (he byte under 
and after the cursor with any character you 
select. 

I used MAESTRO to fix a disk that kept 
giving me I/O errors. All I had to do was 
scan the sector containing the I/O Error 




MUL TI-FONT PRINTER 

NX-1000 



NEW 



The NX-1000 gives you plenty of print 
options for attractive printing. Four 
typestyles. Four pitch sizes, in standard 
and italics for a total of 32 NLQ modes. The 
NX-1000 Rainbow gives you all these 
features plus online access to 7 color 
printing and graphics. Black, blue, red, 
yellow, green, violet, and orange. Both 
models have a 1 year warranty, nationwide 
service and a 30 day online trial. 




NX-1000 SPECS: 144 cps Draft, 36 cps NLQ (18 x 23 dot matrix), 
4 NLQ Fonts, Italics, Sub & Superscripts, Emphasized, Dou- 
blestrike, Proportional, Condensed, International, Downloadable, 
QuadTafl, Double Tall, Underline, 9+ PHchs, Forward and Reverse 
n/216" Line Feeds, Absolute or Relative Vert. & Horz. Tabs, Left, 
Center or Rigrrt Justification, 8 Graphics Modes to 1920dpi, Macro 
Instruction, Bidirection, Adjustable Tractor Feed, 200+ Printable 
Characters, Semi Auto Sheet Feed, Front Panel Soft Touch 
Control, Epson and IBM Emulate, 4k Data Butter, Hex Dump. 
Rainbow: Same plus color. 



NX-1000 SYSTEM INCLUDES: * 

• Star NX-1000 Printer $1 QQ^ 

• Blue Streak Ultima * *? ** 

• Software Support Trio + $ 10Sh W n 3 and Insurance 

COMPLETE 

NX-1000 RAINBOW SYSTEM INCLUDES: 

95 



$ 284 



• Star NX-1000 
Colour Printer 

• Blue Streak Ultima +* 10 Shjppin9 and lnsurance 

• Software Trio COMPLETE 

• Color Super Gemprint 




oftware 



ort Trio 



SUPER 
GEMPRINT 



TYPE 
SELECTION/ 
TUTORIAL 

Online instructional program Will transfer a Pmode 0, 1, 2, 3, or 

that will select 24 special features 4 picture screen to printer 8"x1 1 ' 

of your printer or display methods hardcopy. Black/white, white/black 

to incorporate them into your or grey level shading for color. 



HI-RES 
SUPER 
GEMPRINT 

Disk software that will 
transfer a Hscreen 1,2,3 or 4 

picture screen to printer. 
Grey level shading for color. 



Software Trio 

$-fQ95 



programs. 

Price, availability and specifications subject to change without notice. 



FREE 

with purchase of any 
NX>1 000 Printer 



DAYTON ASSOCIATES VS: , INC. 

9644 QUAILWOOD TRAIL 
SPRING VALLEY, OHIO 45370 
OHIO RESIDENTS ADD 6% SALES TAX • C.O.D. ADD $2.00 



PERSONAL SERVICE 

(513) 885-5999 

Visa & MasterCard 
within the continental U.S. 



1 28 THE RAINBOW February 1 989 



and look for the byte that was out of place. 
The program's 15-page instruction man- 
ual devotes an entire section to this proc- 
ess. Instructions are also provided for patch- 
ing, rather than fixing, a bad sector if you 
don't understand the sector's contents. In 
addition, MAESTRO can fix FS errors. 
The program disk contains a utility called 
Crash Buster, which makes an extra copy 
of the disk directory on an unused track. 
This utility is simple to use and menu- 
driven. 

MAESTRO is a fine disk repair utility, 
and its ease of use rates as one of the best 
I've seen. The program is straightforward; 
the author treats this usually complicated 
subject matter with a good deal of practi- 
cality. Although not intended for the novice, 
MAESTRO provides the serious CoCo 
hacker with an excellent tool for program- 
ming and debugging. The program sup- 
ports a printer, so you can make printouts 
for later reference and filing. 

(Marc Campbell Innovations, 266 River- 
view Drive, Ephrata, PA 17522, 717-733- 
2998; $16.95 plus $2 S/H: First product 
review for this company appearing in THE 
RAINBOW.) 

— Robert Gray 



CoCo 1,2 &3 



1 Softwar e — 

Buried Buxx — 
Digging for Dollars 

Buried Buxx is an action, shoot-em-up, 
machine language game that requires a 
CoCo with 32K ECB, one disk drive and a 
joystick. The game runs fine on the CoCo 
3, but you will get a black-and-white game 
screen if you use an RGB monitor. On the 
CoCo 3, the screens look best on a com- 
posite color monitor. 






• # 

V 





The game is simple to load; just type 
loadm "buxx", press ENTER and then 
enter exec. You will be greeted with the 
title screen, which includes a color test. 
Press the reset button on the back of the 



CoCo until the test blocks are the correct 
color. 

To play the game, use a joystick to 
maneuver a small helicopter over buried 
dollar signs ($). You must shoot holes into 
the ground and descend into the holes to 
retrieve the dollar signs. At the same time, 
you must avoid the bombs dropped by the 
ever-present airplane above you. r rhe bombs 
will also fill the holes you have blasted. To 
make matters worse, there are missiles 
hidden beneath the ground, and if you 
uncover them while shooting, you must 
move quickly to avoid destruction. 

Once you have successfully captured a 
dollar sign, you must fly to the landing pad 
on the left side of the screen and land, A 
tone indicating that you have off-loaded 
the dollar sign will sound, and you can 
continue your search for the buried dollar 
signs. Don't get greedy and try to carry 



more than one dollar sign at a time — your 
helicopter will explode. 

Once you have retrieved all the buried 
dollar signs, you will advance to the next 
screen, At each new level, an additional 
dollar sign is added. (By the way, the 
number of dollar signs is equal to the 
number of hidden missiles.) 

Each dollar sign you deli ver to the land- 
ing pad is worth $2,000. Your score is 
shown at the bottom left of the screen, and 
the number of remaining helicopters is 
displayed at the bottom center of the screen. 
For every 20,000 points you earn, you get 
an extra helicopter. Helicopters get 25 
rounds of ammunition, and extra ammuni- 
tion is available at the landing pad. How- 
ever, you lose 10 points every time you 
fire, so it's wise to conserve that ammo. 
Your ammunition count is displayed at the 
bottom right of the screen. 



The Ultimate 

Serial " 



7 Switchableipiy Rates 

300 * 600 * 121)0 * 2400 ■ 4800 * 9600 * 19; 

U$& this m $m$f £M~to conned a Ganifvnfcs 0SfsM 
printer to any wrslon CoCq or us& it to improve 
performance of $}ur current printer. 
Try it ao yoitt sj 





14/ 





Color Screen Dump Software 

Use your favorite program to create a pmode or hi-res graphic image, but don 't 
stop there! Run our color graphics software and print a color image using a 
pallette of 81+ colors on your NX-WOO Rainbow from a CoCo 1, 2, or 3. This 
system superimposes 4 graphic screen dumps (black, blue, yellow & red), The 
colors mix and add to give you your own color masterpiece. 

$1Q95 

FREE with purchase of 

Price, sBedlicalions subject to change without notice. nx-woo Rainbow Printer 



System Requirements: 32k ECB Disk, Blue Streak J ,2, 3 or Ultima 



DAYTON ASSOCIATES fift, INC. 

9644 QUAILWOOD TRAIL 
SPRING VALLEY, OHIO 45370 
OHIO RESIDENTS ADD 6% SALES TAX • C.O.D. ADD $2.00 



PERSONAL SERVICE 

(513) 885-5999 

Visa & MasterCard 
within the continental U.S. 



February 1 989 THE RAINBOW 1 29 



Buried Buxx is a lot of fun to play. It has 
a simple theme but challenges your skills. 
The disk has a one-year warranty and can 
be replaced for $5. In addition, the disk is 
not copy-protected, so you can make backup 
copies. I would like to see a version avail- 
able for the CoCo 3 and an RGB monitor, 
so those users can enjoy the colors and 
graphics. The game is suitable for all ages, 
and its tame theme does not promote vio- 
lence. 

(JR & JR Softstuff, P.O. Box 118, Lompoc, 
CA 93438, 805-735-3889; $19.95: First prod- 
uct review for this company appearing in 
THE RAINBOW.) 

— Jerry Semones 

1 Softwar e CoCo3 1 
Bash — 

Breaking Away 

Bash is an action game in which players 
attempt to clear vacant lots (screens) of 
debris for the construction of new build- 
ings. To do this, you must move a girder 
back and forth across the lot in order to 
bounce a wrecking ball off the debris. If 
you fail to hit the ball with the girder, the 
ball is lost and a new one is put into play. 
When the screen is cleared of debris, the 
player advances to a more difficult lot. 
The game is over when a player either 
successfully clears all 20 lots or exhausts 
the limited supply of wrecking balls. 

My first impression of Bash was that it 
would be another one of those Breakout- 
type games. But I think the author, Steve 
Bjork, has made it different and more 
challenging. As in most Breakout games, 
the speed of the ball continues to increase. 
But in this version, when certain pieces of 
the debris are hit, treasures are revealed 
and "fall to the ground." 




These treasures must be caught by the 
girder in order to be collected. Some of the 
treasures cause the ball to slow down or 
make the girder wider. Other treasures 
produce more balls — it can become quite 



1 30 THE RAINBOW February 1 989 



a challenge trying to keep all those extra 
balls in play. You must learn to catch the 
treasures with the girder while not losing 
the wrecking ball. 

Bash makes very good use of the colors 
available on the CoCo 3 and is especially 
nice on an RGB monitor. This is important 
because it allows for extended playing 
time without the video eye-aches. Another 
feature is one that allows you to choose to 
start anywhere from Lot 1 to 15. The 
game's pause feature comes in handy when 
you're right in the middle of a game and 
the phone rings! 

Bash is essentially bug-free, and all of 
the action elements are close to real-life 
movements; e.g., the ball's behavior is 
realistic as demonstrated by the way it 
bounces off the objects on the screen. The 
game was very enjoyable and worthwhile 
to play. 

(Game Point Software, P.O. Box 6907, Bur- 
bank, CA 91510, 818-566-3571; $24.95 plus 
$3 S/H; $4.95 for demo disk) 

— Christopher Doll berg 

■ Software I 

TypeMate — 

Teach Your Fingers 

More Than Walking 

Speed is a major concern of many 
computer users. We spend hundreds of 
dollars on utilities like RAM disk pro- 
grams to speed up our computing. We 
listen with interest as software publishers 
brag about the lightning speed of their 
programs. Even with RAM disks, hard 
disks and faster microprocessors, our 
computing is still often slowed down by 
the slowest and often forgotten component 
— the operator. Using a word processor 
with a RAM disk and print spooler is great, 
but it leaves something to be desired if the 
person sitting in front of the computer is 
still typing manuscripts by the hunt-and- 
peck method. 

A recent search through THE RAIN- 
BOW showed only one typing tutor pro- 
gram for sale. It seems that keyboarding 
skills have been neglected by CoCo pro- 
grammers. Tandy, however, is attempting 
to rectify this situation by releasing a new 
program pack intended to teach typing 
skills — TypeMate \ which will work with 
any CoCo 1, 2 or 3 that has at least 32K of 
memory. No other equipment is neces- 
sary; a printer and cassette recorder, how- 
ever, are optional. 



It doesn't take long to learn how to use 
TypeMate. Simple menus guide users 
through the program. Selections are made 
by pressing the up and down arrow keys 
followed by the ENTER key. The BREAK ' 
key is always used to escape from one 
level of the program back to the previous 
one. The opening menu is called "What 
shall we do?" and contains five selec- . 
tions: Fingers and Keys, Exercises, Les- | 
sons, Graphs, and Controls. 




The first thing people must learn about 
keyboarding is how to place their fingers 
on the keyboard and which finger to use 
for each key. TypeMate is not a conven- 
tional, full-fledged typing tutorial: It does 
not contain lessons that begin with the 
home-row keys (A through L) and then 
continue on to the more exotic keys. It 
does have a chart in the back of its simple 
but adequate 28-page manual that shows 
you where to place your lingers. From 
there you must learn how each key works 
by selecting the Fingers and Keys option 
on the menu. 

Fingers and Keys prompts you to press 
any key. When you do, the computer tells 
you which key you have pressed and which 
finger or combination of fingers should be 
used to make that key press. The accompa- 
nying manual provides a suggested plan 
for going through each key press in order 
to learn them. 

The Exercises and Lessons options are 
useful and similar to each other. Here is 
where you begin to practice typing. When 
you choose the Exercises option, the 
computer produces random lessons made 
up of nonsense words and times you as you 
type them. You can choose short, medium 
or long exercises for your left hand, right 
hand, both hands or problem fingers. Of 
course, you cannot choose problem fin- 
gers until you have completed at least one 
exercise — which allows the computer to 
determine which fingers are causing you 
trouble. 

As you type, your words per minute 
(wpm), number of errors, adjusted wpm 
and the percentage of the exercise com- 
pleted are shown onscreen. It is tempting 
to look at these displays as you type, but 
this only slows you down. Whenever you 



The Coco Graphics Designer Plus $29.95 




SDURRE 
DHHCE 



NE 5 7PM 
RAMUS 

GH SCHOOL * 






Makes Signs, Banners, Greeting Cards 



Super easy-to- 
use point and j 
click graphical 
interface, fea- 
tures windows, 
scroll bars, radio 
buttons, and joy- 
stick or mouse 
control. 



COCO SIGN DESIGNER 



PLACt 



SELEC 



ED 



PREU 



PRI 



PICSETl 



* "... ..nt.."r.,ri 




w 



TS 



LOAD SIGN 



Picture Disks Now, 

CoCoMAX 
&MAX-10 

Compatible 

In response to the many requests' 
we received, our picture disks now 
include a simple format conversion 
utility making them easy to use 
with Colorware's MAX-10 and 
CoCo MAX II and III. 



Samples From 

Picture Disk #2 



The CoCo Graphics Designer Plus (CGDP) is CoCo 2 and 
3 Compatible. It allows pictures, and text in up to 4 sizes 
and 16 fonts, per page or banner. The cards & signs fea- 
ture hi-resolution borders and complete on-screen pre- 
views. The CGDP comes with 16 borders, 5 fonts, and 32 
pictures. It f s 100% machine language for fast execution. 

Printer Support Radio shack dmpios, 106, 110,120, 130, 132, 200, 400, 420, 430, 

440, 500, Epson FX/RX/LX/EX, LQ, Star 10X, SG10, NX10, NX1000, Panasonic 
KXP1080, 1090, 1091, 1092, Prowriter, C. Itoh 8510 & more.. Call for complete list. 

Requirements: 64K CoCo ll or III, disk drive with RSDOS, mouse or joystick. 



Samples From 

Picture Disk #4 



Samples From 

Picture Disk #3 





Party 



Offl 






Christmas, Eastar, Thanksgiving, 
Jswlsh Holidays, Naw Yaars, July 
4th, Hallowaan, Paradas, Saint 
Patrick s, Saint Valantlnas Day 



These two optional font col- 
lections supplement the 
fonts built into the CGDP. 
Font Disk A 10 fonts $14.95 
Font Disk B10 fonts $14.95 



Font Disk A 



B0LD3 

Qiiji i > <L 

STEICIL 

3 i H I P h 3 

TYPE 
VARIETY 
UESTERH 




ALIEN 

6f\A0QU£2 

0DDQD 

CMPUTER 

©®@©©© 

8008039 

EJEJlIJiJ 



ID IE C 0 
GRAY 



GREAT COCO CLIP-ART! disks 2, 3, and 4, sup- 

plement the pictures that come with the CGDP. Each disk 
has 120 pictures arranged by subject. A few samples are 
shown above. Besides being compatible with Zebra's CGD 
and CGDP, each disk contains a utility to easily transform 
our pictures into CoCo Max pages, CoCo Max II clip book 
pages, CoCo Max III scrap books, and Max-10 clip art files. 
Order your picture disks today and use our great clip art 
with your favorite graphics programs! 
Zebra's Picture disks 2, 3, and 4 are priced at $14,95 each. 



UPGRADE POLICY (GOOD TILL FEBRUARY 28, 1989) 
CGD to CGDP Upgrade: Send $20 (check, or credit card authorization, no COD's), with 
your original serial numbered CGD disk in any envelope - (we don't care if the disk gets 
bent). We'll send you the new CGDP. Remember to keep a backup CGD copy for your 
continued use, and that the CGDP requires a mouse or joystick. Also make sure the new 
CGDP supports your printer! For example, the CGP220 is not supported. Call if in doubt. 
Picture Disk Upgrade: If you want to use your early picture disks 2, 3, and 4 with the 
Colorware products mentioned above, return your original serial numbered disks with 
$5.00 per disk and include our standard $3 per order shipping & handling charge. We'll 
send you the latest version of your picture disks, including new manuals and a set of 15 spe- 
cial labels to make working CGD, CGDP, CoCo Max, II, III and Max-10 picture disks. 



CALL OR WRITE FOR OUR FREE COCO PRODUCTS CATALOG! 
Ordering Instructions: All orders add $3.00 Shipping & Handling. UPS COD add $3.00. VISA/MC Accepted. NY residents add sales tax. 

Zebra Systems, Inc., 78-06 Jamaica Ave., Woodhaven, NY 11421 (718) 296-2385 



make a mistake, the computer beeps. If 
you find this annoying, as I did, simply 
turn down the volume on your monitor. 

The Lessons option allows you to cre- 
ate and edit your own typing exercises, 
execute them and save them on tape for 
future use. This option is helpful because it 
enables you to create typing exercises that 
are more like the actual manuscripts that 
you type in real life. After all, how many of 
us find ourselves typing such phrases as 
"zzyk lper syncu." You will find that your 
typing speed will be much better when 
typing actual English words. 

There are some limitations when using 
a cassette recorder. First, all lessons that 
you create are saved under the same 
filename, typemate. You cannot give 
them filenames of your own. Second, I 
was hoping I would be able to load in 
manuscripts that I had prepared previously 
on a word processor. Although I tried 
many times, I couldn't do it. TypeMate 
seems to save files in its own unique way, 
which is incompatible with word process- 
ing and straight ASCII files. If Tandy 
upgrades this program, I would recom- 
mend they add the capability of reading in 
existing ASCII files so that users won't 
have to spend time creating files. 

TypeMate also allows you to print out 
lessons that you can type in, as you might 
ordinarily. This option, like the cassette 
option, is excellent; however, it too has 
limitations. TypeMate sends data to the 
printer at the normal default rate of 600 
baud, a fact not documentedin the manual. 
I have my printer set at 4800 baud and had 
to reset the DIP switches before printing 
my lesson. Also, TypeMate does not allow 
you to format your lesson before your print 
it out. Spaces and margins will have to be 
put into your document as you type it. 

It is possible to transfer the program 
from pack to tape so that you can change 
the baud rate before executing the pro- 
gram . This, however, is probably not w orth 
the effort. If you should do it, you may 
have problems getting TypeMate to run 
from tape. 

It is essential to have feedback when 
learning typing skills. This is where Type- 
Mate really shines. Not only does it keep 
track of your speed and errors, it also 
illustrates those errors with bar charts. The 
Graphics option will illustrate your errors 
by hand and finger, and by keyboard char- 
acter. Once you know what fingers and 
keys are giving you trouble, you can give 
them special attention. 

The final option on the main menu is 
called Controls, and it allows you to change 
the color of your screen from black on 
white (with artifact red and blue) to dark 
green on light green. You can also change 

1 32 THE RAINBOW February 1 989 



from typewriter to word processor mode, 
which simply means you won't have to use 
carriage returns at the end of lines, andyou 
can use the backspace key to make correc- 
tions while working on a lesson. Finally, 
you can remove the labels from the keys 
that appear on the screen. 

Although I would recommend this pro- 
gram to anyone, I think it is best suited for 
someone who already has a little experi- 
ence with the keyboard. A person who has 
no keyboarding skills might need a step- 
by-step tutorial that works on one key at a 
time. However, for anyone who knows 
some of the keyboard but is slow and 
makes a lot of errors, TypeMate is an 
excellent tool. It is also an excellent tool 
for a good typist who simply wants to 
increase speed I enjoyed using TypeMate, 
and it was comforting to find out that my 
typing skills have not diminished since I 
took a personal typing course back in 
1973. 

(Tandy Corporation, 1700 One Tandy Cen- 
ter, Fort Worth, TX 76102; $24.95: Avail- 
able in Radio Shack stores nationwide.) 

— Dan Weaver 



1 Softwar e 

Warrior King — 
Reclaiming 
a Kingdom 

Rastann is alone. His armies have de- 
serted him. Only his sword, his bravery 
and his wits can save his life and his 
kingdom. 




The kingdom, Aqualone, is properly 
named because there is a lot of water in 
Warrior King, Sundog Systems' latest 
cardiac-arrest game for the CoCo 3. At 
times I felt as if I were back on the golf 
course, what with all the water hazards 
facing me as Rastann* s controller. Fortu- 
nately for golfers, there aren't any pits 
filled with molten lava on the greens as 



there are in this game. 

You need a good joystick, 128 or 5 12K 
and a disk drive — plus a strong heart and 
maybe a goodly supply of deodorant — to 
play. There were times when I wondered 
about both (plus the wisdom of using a 
week's supply of adrenalin in five min- 
utes) after battling lizard-men, skeletons 
and various other unfriendly inhabitants of 
Faerendor on my way to retrieve Ras- 
tann' s crown and thus save his kingdom. 

The double-sided disk can be backed 
up. However, you cannot play from the 
backup copy; it's only to restore the regu- 
lar disk in case you goof it up. One side is 
the game and the other side the graphics, 
which, by the way, are excellent. 

You load up the game disk, at which 
time the screen will ask if you have an 
RGB monitor. You're then told to flip the 
disk to the graphics side. 

My disk drive made littlesqueaks every 
once in a while when the graphics disk was 
loading, but it was nothing to worry about. 
Leave the graphics disk in the drive. 

At the beginning you see an elaborately 
carved gate with a sword over it (is there a 
face at the base of the blade or do I need 
new glasses?). You begin the game by 
pressing the joystick firebutton; as the 
gates slide back, you hear the sinister 
"sniiick" of a sword being drawn from its 
scabbard. 

You then see a side view of Rastann as 
he proceeds on his perilous quest. Using 
the joystick and its firebutton, you slash at 
the enemy (while the computer produces 
realistic metal-on-metal noises), climb 
ropes, jump hazards and pick up helpful 
items. This is not easy, because you are 
also facing a time limit for each level you 
have to pass through. Thus, you can't be 
mucking about slicing up foes instead of 
getting on with it. The screen advises you 
of how much time you have left, any 
objects you might have picked up, and 
how much life energy you still have. 

When you die — and you will — eve- 
rything goes black. Well, the screen goes 
black, anyway. You then return to the 
starting point for that level. Three lives 
gone and you end up back at the gate, 
unless you've picked up one or two bonus 
lives. Those you collect at every other 
level. The trick is surviving long enough. 

Rastann must have some body armor 
because he can survive melee-type close 
combat, but at a cumulative cost to his life 
energy. Unfortunately, this same armor 
gives him the swimming ability of a depth 
charge, so stay out of the water and the 
lava. The best thing is to slash the oppo- 
nent, kneeling if you have to in order to get 
under his sword — and get moving. 

Like a lot of good advice, it wasn't that 



DIGISECTOR 

DS-69B 




» VIDEO 



DIGITIZER 
FOR THE 
COCO 3 

(AND ALL OTHER COCOS . . .) 




COCO 3 SCREEN 



USE YOUR COCO 3 TO ITS FULL POTENTIAL! 

Use The Micro Works' DIGISECTOR™ DS-69 or 
DS-69B and your COCO 3's high resolution graphics 
to capture and display television pictures from your 
VCR or video camera. The DIGISECTOR™ systems are 
the only COCO video digitizers available that 
accurately capture and reproduce the subtle shades of 
gray in TV pictures! 

• COLOR: Add color to your screen for dramatic 

special effects. 

• HIGH RESOLUTION: 256 by 256 spatial resolution. 

• PRECISION: 64 levels of grey scale. 

• SPEED! 8 images per second on DS-69B, 

2 images per second DS-69. 

• COMPACTNESS: Self contained in a plug-in 

Rompack. 

• EASY TO USE: Software on disk will get you up and 

running fast! 

• COMPATIBLE: Use with a black and white or color 

camera, a VCR or tuner. 

• INEXPENSIVE: Our low price puts this within 

everyone's reach. 

POWERFUL C-SEE 3.3 SOFTWARE 

This menu-driven software m m 

will provide 5 and 16 shades 
of gray to the screen and to 
the printer with simple 
joystick control of 
brightness and contrast. 
Pictures taken by the 
DIGISECTOR™ may be 
saved on disk by C-SEE 3.3 
and then edited by our 
optional MAGIGRAPH, or by COCO MAX or 
GRAPHICOM. This versatile new software is included 
in both DIGISECTORS 1 




'TM 



DS-69B and C-SEE 3.3 
DS-69 and C-SEE 3.3 



$149.95 
$ 99.95 



TRADE IN YOUR OLD DIGISECTOR™ 

If you already have one of The Micro Works' DS-69 or 
DS-69A DIGISECTORS™, you may return it to us and 
we will upgrade your unit to a DS-69B. 



UPGRADE DS-69A to DS-69B 
UPGRADE DS-69 to DS-69B 



$49.95 
$69.95 



The DS-69B comes with a one year warranty. Cameras 
and other accessories are available from The Micro 
Works. DS-88 version available for IBM PC. 

NO RISK GUARANTEE 

If you are not completely satisfied with the performance of your new 
DS-69B, you may return it, undamaged, within ten days for a full 
refund of the purchase price. We'll even pay the return shipping. If 
you can get any of our competitors to give you the same guarantee, 
buy both and return the one you don't like. We know which one 
you'll keep. 



Terms: Visa, Mastercard, Check or C.O.D. 



TH mo©iB® 

Purveyors of Fine Video Digitizers Since 1977. ^^©[R^J?^ 



P.O. Box 1110 Del Mar, CA 92014 (619)942-2400 



easy to follow. After drowning often, I 
called Glen Dahlgren, the wizard who 
programmed Warrior King. He gave me 
some good advice, which was easy to 
follow. Swing the sword before jumping, 
because sometimes you will push the joy- 
stick through another command area on 
the way to the upper-right corner to pro- 
duce a jump, This hint saved me from the 
previous embarrassment of watching my 
hero look like an armored hopscotch player, 
having just made a 6-inch jump straight 
into the water. 

Another hint was to ease up to the edge 
of where you want to jump from by tap- 
ping the joystick. "Ease" and "tap" are 
the right words; more than once Rastann 
had eased his way right into the water 
thanks to my trying to gently move the 
joystick instead of tapping it. 

Another thing to remember is that you 
can't move forward or backward when 
swinging the sword. This is important 
because if you're flailing away at an en- 
emy while standing on his toes, you're not 
getting away from him and you're not 
going to kill him, either. In the meantime, 
he'll be turning you into self-propelled 
hash. 

The instructions for this electronic 
mayhem are clear, concise, easy-to-follow 
and well-made. Sundog Systems has al- 
ready produced a modified version of the 
instructions, which are much classier than 
the original. In addition, Glen Dahlgren 
said that he'd eliminated a gremlin that 
appeared about once in every 1 ,000 games. 

Don't laugh. If you were to keep track, 
1,000 games would happen sooner than 
you think. There is an obsessive tendency 
to try just one more time before going to 
bed, to work or to dinner. 

My only suggestion might be to make 
things just a little easier at the beginning so 
you can get used to the way things work. 
You may spend a lot of time dying while 
learning the basics. On the other hand, if 
you apply the above hints, you'll have an 
easier time than I did before calling for 
help. 

So, if you want something other than 
mindless blasting of alien spacecraft from 
the galaxy, and thrive on feeling your heart 
pound in your chest while your forehead 
gets damp, have a go at Warrior King. 
What with winter settled in, you can get 
your exercise swinging a sword/joystick 
rather than a golf club or bat. You might 
get to the fabled Crown of Aqualone by 
spring. 

(Sundog Systems, 21 Edtnburg Drive, Pitts- 
burgh, PA 15235, 412-372-5674; $29.95 plus 
$2.50 S/H) 

— John M. Hebert 



1 Softwar e 



CoCo 3 



Rad Warrior- 
Life in the Rad Years 

It wasn't always like this. The elders 
talk of a time before the space invaders 
attacked, a time of blue skies and green 
forests. All that is gone now — lost in an 
alien attack. The remnants of humanity are 
slaves, mining ore deep in the earth. It is 
the worst of times. 

But there is hope. The elders know of 
weapons that — if found — would destroy 
the aliens. You have been trained from 
birth to find these weapons and destroy the 
aliens. You are earth's last hope. 

First, insert the Rad Warrior ROM pack 
into your CoCo 3. Select your tools (either 
an RGB monitor or color television, and 
either your joystick or keyboard), and face 
the opening screen. The graphics and ani- 
mation in this arcade game are excellent. 

Begin your quest by searching for the 
energy suit, which is vital in protecting 
you from the radiation. The suit also has a 
control panel, so you can keep tabs on the 
radiation level, weapon status and other 
information necessary for your survival. 

It's not easy. The enemies appear end- 
less — mutant flies, jugoids and subtains 
bar your way. Although these creatures are 
easy to destroy, killing them saps your 
strength. Acid rain drips from the ceiling 
of the mines. Lethal and indestructible 
sloths wait to ambush you in the forest, and 
hidden hydraulic spikes add to the danger. 



Your weapons and equipment are scat- 
tered throughout an underground forest, 
the ruined city and the volcanic rubble. 
The weapons you must find include the 
energy suit, gravity displacers, pulsar 
weapons (used to shoot the enemy), im- 
plosion mines and a particle negator (used 
to protect you from the intense radiation). 
Of course, as a last resort, you can also use 
your fists and throw rocks. 

Once you have gotten your weapons, 
you must fight your way through the alien 
defenses. You will learn that you can't 
fight the bomber droids, but you can de- 



stroy their bombs. You can do nothing 
against the calibrated gunners and their 
plasma bolts, so fight around them. Just 
when you think it can't get worse, it does. 
Flame dragons attack with fire. Will these 
aliens stop at nothing? 

You must remember your goal: Find 
the aliens' generator rooms and destroy 
the central generator. You must not fail. 
Failure means the eternal enslavement of 
the human race. 

Some day, people will sings songs about 
your bravery. They will shudder with hor- 
ror as they tell tales of the Rad time. 

(Tandy Corporation, Fort Worth, TX; $29.95: 
Available in Radio Shack stores nationwide.) 

— Thomas M.TaulU 



1 Softwar e 



CoCo 3 



Warp Fighter 3-D — 
Spacing Out Into the 
Third Dimension 

There she stood, complete with the 
Federation's newest warp drive and the 
latest technological advances known to 
mankind — the Warp Fighter. Like an old 
monument, I stood fixed and motionless, 
gazing in awe at the splendor of her design 
and workmanship. Suddenly, my concen- 
tration was shattered by the realization 
that the Akaire were out there, waiting to 
test the years spent sweating, studying and 
training at the Academy. 

Stepping onto the anti-gravitational 
boarding platform, I couldn't help but feel 
insignificant compared to the size and 
complexity of this technological work of 
art. I slid into the cockpit and lowered 
myself down into the custom-fit combat 
pilot's seat, which was manufactured to fit 
my body like my own skin. I secured 
myself so as not to be tossed around like a 
satellite in a meteor shower. The instru- 
ment panel looked cold and uninviting. 
The monitor was lifeless. Eagerly I donned 
ihe advanced 3-D visor and reached for the 
power switch. As power surged through 
the electrical veins of the ship, the monitor 
flickered to life. The sound of the drives 
was soothing, almost hypnotizing. 

I activated the long-range scanner. There 
they were! The Akaire ships. I selected 
Sector 5.2, which indicated one enemy 
vessel. I engaged the warp drive and, with 
a blinding flash of light, almost instantly 
was transported into the heat of battle. I 
maneuvered into firing position. The track- 
ing computer locked on. I fired! A direct 



1 34 THE RAINBOW February 1 989 



hit! One sector cleared. Consulting the 
long-range scanner, I drew a deep breath 
and prepared for another warp. 

Warp Fighter 3-D, programmed by Steve 
Bjork (distributed by Game Point Soft- 
ware), is a three-dimensional graphics space 
fighter simulation complete with 3-D 
glasses. It requires a CoCo 3 with at least 
128K, a joystick, a disk drive and a moni- 
tor. Although a color TV or a composite 
monitor can be used, an RGB color moni- 
tor is preferred for best results. 

Operation of Warp Figluer 3-D is simple, 
controlled almost entirely by the joystick. 
The video display is simple and easy to 
read, unhampered by confiising, cluttered 
graphics. The main display, also the larg- 
est, is where all the action is. Above it is 
one line of strategic information and be- 
low are three lines of the same. When 
requested, a sector display will appear to 
show enemy-held sectors, starbases and 
your relative position. 

The simulation reacted to input as fast 
as I could act. In order to lock onto an 
enemy vessel, you must center the cross 
hairs on the enemy ship. When this is 
accomplished, the "on-board tracking 
computer" will stay locked on unless one 
of several things happens: 1) The enemy 
ship maneuvers too fast (I found this hap- 



pening frequently at the higher difficulty 
levels), 2) The enemy vessel leaves the 
screen, or 3) The enemy ship is destroyed. 

One characteristic that cannot only be 
annoying but also fatal is the tracking 
computer's inability to distinguish between 
asteroids and ships. In the fury of battle, I 
don't like wasting time shooting asteroids 
in order to get a shot at the enemy. The 
tracking computer can't unlock from a 
target unless the target is destroyed or 
moves off the screen. 




fasti. t»i r- MSBrTi- 



In the middle of play, I heard a beeping/ 
buzzing sound. Once I figured out what it 
was, it was too late. That sound was a 
warning that my shields were depleting to 
a dangerous level. Shield level is compro- 
mised by taking hits from enemy fire and 



running into asteroids. If you notice the 
condition in time, warping to a sector with 
a starbase and then docking with it will 
recharge the shield. However, be warned: 
Recharging the shields costs expensive 
points. Also take notice that if the shield 
level drops to the nonexistent, the simula- 
tion is over. This was an aspect of the game 
that I liked. As long as the shield holds up, 
the game will continue (unlike some other 
games that depend on fuel level). 

The longer I played, the more I noticed 
that the increase in difficulty in the highest 
level is derived not only from an increase 
in speed but primarily from an increase in 
enemy ships per sector. There are three 
difficulty levels: Ensign (easiest), Captain 
(medium) and Admiral (hardest). I found 
the Admiral level fairly easy and accom- 
plished it on my second or third try (I don't 
remember which). Had I the determina- 
tion and the stamina, I could have played 
as long as the computer held up. After you 
reach the level of Admiral, 40 enemy ships 
(total combined sectors) are all you '11 have 
to fight. The object after mastering the 
Admiral level is to clear all sectors without 
having to recharge the shield. In theory, 
this means that it is possible to achieve a 
maximum score and not be able to do any 
better. I'll let you discover the maximum 




Conquer the 
World! 



TZHL 



DOMINATION $18 

MULTI-PLAYER STRATEGY 
CAME! 

Try to take over the 
planet of YCNAN. Battle 
other players armies to 
take control of their 
provinces and defend yours. 
Play on a Hi-res map of 
the planet. Take the "RISK" 
and be a planet-lord 
today!!! Requires 1 disk and 
joystick or mouse. See 
Rainbow Review JULY 88 



RAINBOW 

CHKUIOi 
111 



MYDOS S15 

EPROM ABLE! CUSTOMIZABLE! 

MYDOS is an enhancement 
to Disk Extended Basic 2.1 
on the CoCo 3. Screen echo 
and SAY command for RS 
Speech Pak. Point and click 
mouse directory. NEW 
FEATURES! Supports D/S 
and 40 track drives. 
Power-up in any screen 
colors (or monochrome], 
width, and palettes (RGB 
or CMP) you wish! More 
options than you can 
shake a joystick at! See 
Rainbow Review JUNE 87 



HAVKSof t 

P.O. Box 7112 
Elgin, II. 60121-7112 
312-742-3084 
S/H always included 
Check COD or MO accepted 
II orders add 7% sales tax 



HAWKSoft KEYBOARD 
CABLE $25 

UNCHAIN YOUR KEYBOARD! 
Five foot extender cable 
for Coco II and 3. Move 
your keyboard where you 
want it! Installation 
instructions and tips 
included! Custom lengths 

avai lable. 



"I cannot imagine the CoCo 3 without ADOS-3; 
It would not be a complete machine." 

The RAINBOW, July 1987 

You've moved up to a CoCo 3. A powerful new machine. Now, it's time to 
give BASIC a shot in the arm, with ADOS-3. Wouldn't it be nice to turn on your 
machine and be greeted by an 80-column display, in the colors of your 
choice, with your own custom startup message? To run routinely at 2 MHz 
(double speed) without having to slow down for disk and printer operations? 
This and much, much more is possible with ADOS-3, our CoCo 3 adaptation 
of the acclaimed original ADOS, which shares the original's virtual 100% 
compatibility with commercial software. After customizing ADOS-3 using the 
provided configuring utility, you can have it burned into an EPROM that plugs 
into the Disk BASIC ROM socket, or just use it in RAM as a disk utility. (EPROM 
+ burning will cost S 15-20; we provide Information concerning how you can 
have this done.) Supports double-sided drives (35. 40, or 80 tracks). FAST and 
SLOW commands, auto line number prompts, RUNM command, keystroke 
macros, arrow-key scroll through BASIC programs, auto-edit of error line, and 
many more valuable features. 

"ON A SCALE OF 1 TO 10, I RATE ADOS-3 A SOLID 15." RAINBOW, 7/87 

Disk ., . . S34.95 Original ADOS for CoCo 1 or 2 . . , S27.95 (See 6/87 RAINBOW review) 

Original ADOS plus ADOS-3 $50.00 

THE PEEPER 

ML program tracer that multitasks with the target program. An excellent 
learning tool for the ML novice; an invaluable debugging aid for the expert. 
CoCo 1, 2. or 3 compatible, 

Disk . . . $23.95 Assembler source listing . . . Add S3.00 



MONITOR CABLES for CoCo 3 

Magnavox8CM515/8CM505/8CM643 . , 



S 19.95 



SonyKV1311CR 



S 29.95 



SPECTROSYSJEMS 



No delay on personal checks 



, . , , \ "11111 N. Kendall Drive. 

I \\ft I I 1 \\_ Suite A108 

/ V^ " Miami, Florida 33176 

(305) 274-3899Day or Eve 

Please add $2.00 shipping • Sorry no credit cards or COD's. 



February 1 989 THE RAINBOW 1 35 



■ 



score, if it exists, for yourself. 

Warp Fighter 3-D has a pause feature 
(for when Mom calls you to dinner) that 
changes the screen color every few sec- 
onds to help prevent screen burn-in. I like 
this feature and wish all software had it. 

A veteran of several different space 
fighter simulations, I feel this one has 
some limitations. But I have enjoyed play- 
ing it. Warp Fighter 3-D is easy to play, 
which allows younger children to partici- 
pate and does not require memorizing a lot 
of keyboard commands or controls. Like- 
wise, the manual is simple and to the point. 
It outlines basic game play and directions 
andprovides warranty information. It even 
tells you how to get another pair of 3-D 
glasses to replace the ones you '11 probably 
wear out. And if you purchase Warp Fighter 
3-D, you will very likely have to purchase 
another pair. 

This is the first 3-D Simulation I tried; 
the 3-D aspect is a new twist on an old 
theme. The monitor actually shows a three- 
dimensional picture using the blue and red 
color scheme; the cross hairs and enemy 
ships are the primary objects that really 
stand out (the manual recommends adjust- 
ing the brightness to help bring out the 3- 
D aspect). However, I discovered that once 
I got deeply involved with the game, I 
wasn't really aware (consciously, at least) 
of the 3-D graphics. It is difficult for me to 
describe to you. It's one of those things 
that you have to see for yourself. I played 
Warp Fighter 3-D both with and without 
the 3-D glasses and the 3-D option, and 
enjoyed game play either way. I think you 
will, too. 

(Game Point Software, P.O. Box 6907, Bur- 
bank, CA 91510, 818-566-3571; $24.95 plus 
$3S/H) 

— Greg Snow 




CoCo 3 



Deluxe Icon Editor — 
A Must for Multi-Vue 

As the "new" CoCo 3 continues to 
mature, we are beginning to see new and 
exciting programs enter the market. With 
the introduction of Multi-Vue for OS-9 
Level II, we gained a graphic interface for 
our CoCo. Now we have a utility that helps 
us use this new interface without having to 
be programmers. 

Deluxe Icon Editor from Puritas Springs 
Software is for the CoCo 3 with 512K of 
memory, one or more disk or hard drives, 
and a TV or monitor. Use of a mouse and 
an RGB monitor is optional but recom- 



mended. It runs under OS-9 Level II with 
Multi-Vue. 

I, for one, am really glad to see a 
program that makes some use of all this 
hardware and software I have invested in, 
especially Multi-Vue. Deluxe Icon Editor 
allows you to easily create original icons 
for your programs and to run them with a 
touch of the mouse. This allows you to set 
up an icon for any OS-9 program that can 
easily be run by anyone. No longer will the 
novices in the house refuse to look at 
BASIC09 or DynaCalc because it is diffi- 
cult to learn the OS-9 menu system. Now 
they won't have to. 

Deluxe Icon Editor is a machine lan- 
guage utility that comes on a disk. The 
instructions are included in a file on the 
disk. This may not be as nice as having a 
manual, but I'm sure it helps hold down 
the cost. The manual prints out to slightly 
more than seven pages and clearly de- 
scribes the operation of the program. I was 
able to create and run an icon for Dy- 
naCalc in a short time. There is also an 
icon for BASIC09 supplied on the disk 
that worked well with my copy of BA- 
SIC09. 

The main screen or window used by 
Deluxe Icon Editor is divided into five 
parts. First, there is the menu bar, which 
functions much the same as the Multi-Vue 
bar. It consists of a Files menu, which 
allows you to create new files, open exist- 
ing files, save files, abandon files, delete 
files, or quit the program. Second, there is 
a Disk menu, which allows you to change 
working or data directories or to see the 
current directories. Third, there is a Colors 
menu, which allows you to choose your 
current color. Fourth, there is the AIF 
section, which allows you to specify the 
name for the application along with the 
parameters for the window it is to use. 

Last is the Color Bar, Icon Window and 
Icon Work Area part that allows you to 
create the icon. Color Bar works in a 
similar fashion to Color Menu and allows 
color selection. Icon Work Area is a 24- 
by-24 grid that allows the icon to be drawn 
dot by dot. The icon is displayed in Icon 
Window as it is being drawn to show the 
actual size of your work. 

If you have the right setup, Deluxe Icon 
Editor is one good utility to add to your 
collection. At the price Puritas Springs 
Software is asking for this program, it is 
quite a bargain. 

(Puritas Springs Software, Amerltrust Build- 
ing, 17140 Lorain Ave., Cleveland, OH 44111, 
216-251-8085; $10.95: First product review 
for this company appearing in THE RAIN- 
BOW.) 

— Barry Pottinger 



1 Softwar e CoCo31 

Frogday Afternoon — 
Adventures of an 
Underwater Courier 

Frogday Afternoon from K-Soft is an 
arcade-style game of action on the ocean 
floor. The scenario involves protecting a 
solitary frogman as he swims to and fro 
carrying crystals to the generator of an 
underwater city. All is well and good except 
for the obligatory bad guys, who really 
don't want the frogman to succeed in de- 
livering his parcel. 




Frogday Afternoon begins with some 
very flashy title screens and then prompts 
for either an RGB monitor or a color TV 
(this adds a lot to the program, because 
many CoCo 3 owners don't yet own an 
RGB monitor). The game screen appears 
and you are set to defend your frogman 
from subs, squid and torpedoes. The object 
is to give the frogman enough time and 
protection to get to the other side of the 
screen. As enemy subs cruise by overhead, 
taking potshots at your hero, you take 
potshots at them. 

The program is written in machine 
language and uses some really good sound 
effects and graphics, compliments of the 
CoCo 3. However, I would not say that the 
game offers a good challenge to anyone 
above 12 years of age. I was able to get to 
Level 6 out of 8 the day I received the 
program to review. I admit that after Level 
4 things do get more difficult, but with a 
few days' practice, Frogday Afternoon 
can easily be mastered. I did not notice any 
errors in the program, which is a plus in its 
favor. 

The most challenging aspect of the 
program is its joystick operation. You don't 
just point and shoot. Rather, you must 
adjust for how faraway the enemy is. Your 
"gun" seems almost like a whip: You 
control how far the "rope" travels, and 
only the "tip" does any damage. So, in 
order to destroy squid and enemy subs, 



1 36 THE RAINBOW February 1 989 



TOM "SANTA" DYKEMA'S 
SPECIAL FOR GOOD 
LITTLE BOYS & GIRLS! 



Get 76 disks or tapes full of over 760 quality 
programs. Here's what you will receive: 



* Over 380 Utility/Home Application programs, including word 
processors, spreadsheets, disk utilities, business software, 
electronic and machine language series, education programs 
for kids, plus much more! 



★ Over 300 exciting games including Battle Tank, Mrs. PAC, 
Star Trek, Flight Simulator, Wizard, Football, Moon Rover, 
Plus Much More! MANY Machine Language! 

★ Over 50 adventures, including Dungeon Master, Genesis, 
Hostage, Rambo, Dracula, plus 32K graphic adventures! 





REG. $608oo 



$<iggoo 



/ 



Holiday Bonus: Order This month and receive a 
FREE 6 Month Subscription! 




Individual Issues Sell For $ 8 00 Each 

or *608°° For All 76. 
We Slashed the Price To Only *199! 



VISA 



RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 



* Includes Documentation. 

* Available For COCO 1, 2, and 3. 

* We Pay Shipping 

* Personal Checks Welcomed. 

* Please Specify Tape or Disk. 




For Naughty 
Boys and Girls 
See Page 41. 



T&O SUBSCRIPTION SOFTWARE • 2490 MILES STANDISH DR. • HOLLAND, Ml 49424 • (616) 399-9648 



you take your aim and then estimate how 
far away the target is. 

The documentation is rather short, but 
it does give most of the necessary informa- 
tion needed to play the game. The program 
will run only on a CoCo 3 and requires a 
joystick. A TV may be used. However, I 
would highly recommend an RGB moni- 
tor, because Frogday Afternoon gives great 
detail to the graphics and sound portion of 
the Color Computer 3. 

(K-Soft, 300 13th N.E., E. Wenatchee, WA 
98802, 509-884-0338; $24.95) 

— Corrle Bender 



1 Hardware — ^ 

Arizona's 
Hard Drives — 
Inexpensive Hard 
Drives for OS-9 

The advertisement reads "Hard Drives 
for the Price of Floppies." Well, I can tell 
you that this is no ploy and, in fact, is true. 
Arizona Small Computer Peripherals has 
OS-9-capable hard drives for your CoCo 
for as little as $120 for a 5-megabyte 
version or $160 for the 10-megabyte ver- 
sion. These prices include the drive, con- 
troller, power supply and cables. You must 
provide a cabinet of your choice and a hard 
drive interface to the CoCo. 




This Arizona hard drive is shown in a case 
with a Dlsto controller attached. 



The unit furnished for this review con- 
sisted of a 20-Meg CMI 6426 hard drive 
with a Western Digital WD-1002-SHD 
controller. The drive, controller and power 
supply were all installed in an attractive 
case. Also included in the review package 
was the Disto/CRC Hard Drive Interface 
attached to the end of a 32-inch flat ribbon 
cable, which terminated inside the hard 
drive case. The drives are full-height, so 
they are bulkier than the newer half-height 



variety. However, the lower cost makes up 
for this small inconvenience. This neat 20- 
Meg package sells for $350 and is an 
excellent buy if you are serious about 
adding a hard drive to your CoCo OS-9 
system. 



"If you have not 
experienced the 
sheer joy of owning 
a hard disk, I can 
recommend this 
Arizona unit with- 
out reservation." 



I was impressed with the quality of the 
hardware package except for one thing: 
The drive has no ON/OFF switch. Perhaps 
this is of little consequence to users with 
plug-in power strips and main power 
switches, but I object to the lack of such a 
switch because I don't want the hard drive 
running when Fm using Disk BASIC and 
floppies. It seems to me that needless wear 
and tear on the drive's bearings could be 
avoided with the addition of an inexpen- 
sive switch. However, Arizona Small 
Computer Peripherals boasts extensive 
quality checks on their hard drives and 
warrants them for 180 days. 

The completed unit is heavy, weighing 
in at a mighty 1 1 pounds, which includes 
case, power supply and the Disto inter- 
face. It measured 7 inches wide by 4 3/4 
inches high by 1 1 1/2 inches deep, making 
it just a little smaller than a shoe box. A 
little red LED (light emitting diode) on the 
front panel flickers when the drive is read- 
ing or writing. 

Booting the system is easy. Instructions 
are provided to help you through the proc- 
ess of making a boot disk. The unit sup- 
plied for the review already had the boot 
disk, so it was an easy matter to insert it in 
Drive 0 and just type Dos. This boot disk 
can be configured for any slot in your 
Multi-Pak Interface, or it can go directly 
into the CoCo's expansion slot. 

If you wanted to start from scratch, the 
following procedure will build a new boot 
disk for incorporating the hard disk into 
your system. Level I OS-9 users need only 
change their startup file to load 
ascp .harddisk from the Disto disk and 



link ho and cchdisk as shown here: 

load /dl/ascp .harddisk 
link hO cchdisk 

Level II users have to build a new boot 
disk to include ho and cchdisk in this 
manner (assuming two floppy drives): 

merge/d0/os9boot 

/dl /ascp . harddisk 

/d0/newboot 
attr newboot e pe 
copy /dl / cmds / dmode 

/ dO / cmds / dmode 

Remove the Disto disk from Drive 1 
and replace it with a newly formatted disk. 
Type this: 

os9gen /dl 
/dO /newboot 

Check the modules in the newly created 
os9boot file in Drive 1: 

ident /dl/os9boot 

Check that all module crc's are good, 
then copy all files from your system diskin 
Drive 0 to the new boot disk in Drive 1: 

dsave -s48 /dO /dl ! shell 

After doing all this, you can now do a 
reboot of OS-9 from a cold start using the 
new boot disk. It will take about 30 sec- 
onds for the hard drive to get up to speed . 
If you watch the hard drive's LED, you 
will see it flicker at about the same time 
the OS-9 sign-on message appears. Fur- 
ther instructions are provided to format the 
hard disk. The unit supplied for this review 
was already formatted and even contained 
a number of OS-9 public domain pro- 
grams. Arizona Small Computer Peripher- 
als gives its customers these programs 
with an offer to make the boot disk from a 
customer-supplied OS-9 disk with the 
cmds, grf drv and shell modules. 

If you have not experienced the sheer 
joy of owning a hard disk, I can recom- 
mend this Arizona unit without reserva- 
tion. If you are into OS-9, you will find 
your investment well justified. The access 
speed and mass storage capability make 
this hard disk drive a natural. 

(Arizona Small Computer Peripherals, 930 
W. 23rd St., Suite 26, Tempe, AZ 85282, 602- 
829-8028; $120 for 5-Meg kit, $140 for 8- 
Meg, $160 for 10- Meg, $350 for complete 20- 
Meg system: First product review for this 
company appearing in THE RAINBOW.) 

— David Miller 



1 38 THE RAINBOW February 1 989 



1 Softwar e 

Diskman II — 
Preventive Mainte- 
nance for Floppies 

InMay I987's RAINBOW (Page 134), 
I wrote a favorable review of the original 
version of Diskman, This program was 
designed to protect the computer user from 
garbled directories by backing up the di- 
rectories on either the original disk or a 
second disk. Since the directory track is 
the most used portion of a disk, it is the 
most likely source of trouble. In addition 
to the ability to back up directories, the 
program also allowed examination and 
change in any sector on a disk — inter- 
changing or alphabetizing directory files, 
scanning and printing out directories. 

Now Tothian Software has revised the 
program and renamed it Diskman IL The 
program requires a 32K CoCo, at least one 
disk drive and a printer if printouts are 
desired. The changes include the addition 
of a multiple-disk drive mode and the 
support of CoCo speed-up pokes.Diskman 
//uses machine language where appropri- 



ate to prevent crashes and includes three 
new options. 

When you boot the program, you will 
see a menu of options. Option 0, the disk 
drive mode, allows the user to choose 
between one- and two-drive operation. 
Option 1 reads disk directories and makes 
a backup on the same or a different disk. 
Option 2 restores a lost directory from the 
backup copy. Option 3 examines and/or 
changes any sector on a disk. (Note: This 
option requires detailed knowledge of 
computer language and can cause serious 
damage to a program. A warning sounds 
when Option 3 is chosen.) 

Option 4 reorganizes a directory, and 
Option 5 alphabetizes it. Option 6 displays 
stored directories on the screen if the di- 
rectories are stored on a separate disk. 
Option 7 displays the directory currently 
in use. Option 8 prints out a directory 
catalog showing the number of free gran- 
ules on each disk, filenames and exten- 
sions, types of files, etc. Option 9 searches 
for a particular file if you have a separate 
disk for your directories. 

Option U removes a backup directory 
from a disk. Finally, Option C checks the 
readability of a disk, granule by granule. 
Bad granules can be blocked out, and this 
option lets you identify the current use of 



each granule. Note: Like Option 3, this 
option is for the experienced programmer. 

In addition to these options, Diskman II 
comes with a companion program, File- 
Copy, which aids in reviving files that are 
unreadable because of I/O errors. 

"Diskman II pro- 
vides the ability to 
scan a disk and ei- 
ther block out or 
change any sector. " 



Diskman II offers several useful addi- 
tions to the original version. For the expe- 
rienced programmer, if provides the abil- 
ity to scan a disk and either block out or 
change any sector. The program is user- 
friendly and comes with five pages of clear 
instructions. Dishnan II and its compan- 
ion program are useful utilities and well 
worth their price. 

(Tothian Software, Box 663, Rimersburg, 
PA 16248; $24.95) 

— Mel Siegel 



s 



3 

I 
1 



a 

s 

1 

1 



■ZlrzJ-zJ BlrzJiz) (ZM rzJrzJ raj [a 



®S3(sl!jpil^© TO by Vldtcom Corp 



a"™ - a ramdisk 
that doesn't forget! Fullg 
Static, batterg backed CITlos 
ram makes SolidDrive 1 " 
ready to use instantly. You 
can forget formatting and 
copying mork files to 
ramdisk then copying back 
your changes to floppy. You 
can forget fear of power 
failures. The instant poiuer 
loss occurs, l®H5(2l!irSv© ,M 
turile-protects itself and 
your valuable mork. 
iEaflSisra^Q™ gives you 
state-of-the-art surface 
mount technology. That's 
tuny we have the best 
guarantee in the industry - 
Two years limited repair or 
replacement I ItBBSiSfeito©" 
is compatible with ITlulti— 
Pak® and comes complete 
with 059® Level 1 or II 

device driver, formatter and self-test software. Available in 512K 
and 1 megabyte versions. Factory upgrades available for 512K 
version. RSDos Driver now available, treats il@Ml!rfto@ UB as 3 or 6 

SSSD RS devices (4-6,4-9). Disk 
loaded version free on request! 
27C64 EProm version $19.00 

l®ll^ls i a , 5'@ ,n is the fastest , most 
reliable long-term storage available 
to the small computer user! 

Vid^om Corp 20 E. main St. Suite 710 
mesa, HZ 85201 (602) 827-0107 
Hours m-F 9:00 am - 5:00 pm II1ST 




a 

I 

I 



!®M!iJW© m by Vidicom Corp 
512K (524,288 byles) §395.00 

1 meg (1. 048.576 bytes) $695.00 
Please add $1.00 shipping 
Arizona Hesidienls add 5.5% Sales tax 
Visa masterCard orders welcome 



OS9 Is the trademark of Micro ware 
Systems inc and Motorola Inc. 
Multi-pak is the trademark of 
Tandy Corp. 



i 



j 

a 

1 
| 



Play The Game Better 
On Your Tandy! 



If you want to get the best out 
of games on your Tandy computer, 
then you'll want to get your hands 
on The Gravis Joystick Controller. 

Today's games demand speed, 
accuracy and precise control. Of 
you and your equipment. The 
Gravis Joystick will make you a 
much better player. Exclusive 
Gravis features include: 

• Full-size pistol grip handle 

• Handle fire button 

• 8-position centering 
tension control 

• 3 independent 
microswitch 
fire buttons 

• Unique rugged 
construction 

• One year 
warranty 

Advanced 

GRAVIS 

Computer Technology Ltd. 



The Gravis Joystick — it 
outperforms all other Tandy 
Joysticks. 

Order yours today from: 
Game Point Software, 
P.O. Box 6907, Burbank, 
CA. 91510-6907, 
Tel 818-556-3571. 
Price $M.95 plus $100 shipping 




February 1989 THE RAINBOW 



Protect and highlight 
gour important 
magazine collection 

with sturdy 
RAINBOW binders 





the rainbow is a vital resource to be referred to 
again and again. Keep your copies of the rainbow safe 
in our quality, distinctive binders that provide com- 
plete protection. 

These attractive red vinyl binders showcase you r 
collection and ensure your rainbows are in mint 
condition for future use. Each binder is richly *jrn^ 
bossed with the magazine's name in gold o n the fr|nt 
and spine. They make a h^hdsome addition toih^ 
room. 

Put an End to Clutter 

Organize your workspace with these tasteful bind- 
ers. Spend more time with your CoCo and eliminate 
those frustrating searches for misplaced magazines. 

A set of two binders, which holds a full 12 issues of 
the rainbow, is only $13.50 (plus $2.50 shipping and 
handling). 

Special Discounts on Past Issues 

To help you complete your collection of the rain- 
bow, we're offering a special discount on past issues 
of the magazine. 

When you p lace an order for six or mo re back issues 
of the rainbow at the same time you order binders, 
you are entitled to $1 off the regular back issue price. 
To order, please see the "Back Issue Information" 
page in this issue. 

Know Where to Look 

You may purchase the "Official And Compleat Index 
To THE RAINBOW" for $1 when you purchase a set 
of binders. This comprehensive index of rainbow's 
first three years (July 1981 through July 1984) is 
usually priced at $2.50. 



YES. Please send me 



set(s) of RAINBOW binders 




Take advantage of these special offers with your binder purchase: 

Save $1 off the single issue cover price for back issues. Minimum order of 6 magazines. Please 
enclose a back issue order form from a recent issue indicating magazines wanted. 

Purchase the "Official and Compleat Index to THE RAINBOW" for $1. (Regular price $2.50.) 

(These offers good only with the purchase of a rainbow binder set) 

Name : 

Address 

City 



State 



ZIP 



□ My check in the amount of is enclosed. (In order to hold down costs, we do not bill.) 

Charge to: □ VISA □ MasterCard □ American Express 

Account Number Expiration Date 

Signature 

Mail to: Rainbow Binders, The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 40059. 

Binders are $13.50 per two-binder set plus $2.50 shipping and handling. If your order is to be sent via U.S. mail to 
a post office box or foreign country, please add $2. Kentucky residents add 5% sales tax. U.S. currency only, please. 
In order to hold down non-editorial costs, we do not bill. 

For credit card orders call (800) 847-0309, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST 

All other inquiries call (502) 228-4492. 





The following products have recently been received by THE RAINBOW, examined 
by our magazine staff and issued the Rainbow Seal of Certification, your assurance 
that we have seen the product and have ascertained that it is what it purports to be. 



Ghost Hunters, a one- or two-player game in 
which it is up to you to destroy four plasma 
disrupter wave generators in order to send 50 
troublesome ghosts back to their own plane. 
Ghost Hunters is a scenario created under 
SPORTSware's Wargame Designerand can be 
modified by those who own Wargame De- 
signer. Requires a CoCo 3 and a disk drive. 
SPORTSware, 1251 S. Reynolds Road, Suite 
414, Toledo, OH 43615, (419) 389-1515; $15. 

Graphics Designer Plus, an upgrade to CoCo 
Graphics Designer that's rewritten in assem- 
bly language to incorporate a point-and-click 
graphical interface with windows, scroll bars, 
buttons, dialog boxes and WYSIWYG on- 
screen previews. "Produces signs, banners and 
greeting cards on most popular dot-matrix 
printers." New features include higher resolu- 
tion borders and support for more fonts and 
pictures on each creation. Includes border, font 
and picture collections. Requires 64K and a 
CoCo 2 or 3, disk drive, a joystick or mouse and 
a compatible printer. Zebra Systems, Inc., 78- 
06 Jamaica Ave . , Wo odhaven ,NY 11421,(718) 
296-2385; $29.95 plus $3 S/H, upgrade avail- 
able for $20 and original Graphics Designer 
disk. 

$ Hard Drive Utilities Program, a disk of 
utilities designed to run under the Burke & 
Burke Hyper-IlO operating system. The pro- 
gram allows users to copy and kill selected 
files, back up the hard drive to floppies, restore 
a hard drive from floppies, search for files and 
more. Requires a CoCo 3, OS-9 Level II and 
Burke & Burke's Hyper-llO KB Enterprises, 
435 Brightwaters Drive, CoCoa Beach, FL 
32931 , (407) 799-3253; $21 .95 plus $1 .50 SIH. 

<^> Kcal, a calendar-generation program writ- 
ten partly in machine language that bases all its 
calculations on January I, 1988 (it will create 
calendars only from this date forward). DMP- 
compatible printers can be used to print a 
calendar 7 inches high by 8 inches wide. Re- 
quires a 32K Extended Color BASIC com- 
puter, a disk drive or cassette and a DMP- 
compatible printer. King Cottage Industries, 
1814 Valley St. NE, Poulsbo, WA 98370, (206) 
697-5576; $6. 

Keyboard Extension Cable, a 5-foot extender 
cable that lets users back off from their setup. 
It requires opening up the CoCo. The cable is 
available in custom lengths, as well. HAWKSoft, 
P.O. Box 7112, Elgin, IL 60121, (312) 742- 
3084; $25. 



Math Tutor, an educational math program 
that's part "private drill coach" and part arcade 
game. The display appears as a shooting gal- 
lery. Three lesson types are available: arithme- 
tic, fractions and algebra. Comes on a ROM 
pack for any Color Computer that has at least 
16K. Tandy Corporation, 1700 One Tandy 
Center, Fort Worth, TX 76102; $24.95; Avail- 
able in Radio Shack stores nationwide. 

Ore Ambush, a game in which you and your 
elven friends must retrieve a wizards' s treasure 
chest of magic herbs from the devious Ores. 
Ore Ambush is a stand-alone scenario created 
with Wargame Designer for the Color Com- 
puter 3. SPORTSware, 1251 S. Reynolds Road, 
Suite 414, Toledo, OH 43615, (419)389-1515; 
$15. 

4^ Rustler, a Hangman-type game in which 
you are the only hope of saving an innocent 
cowpoke from swinging at the town scaffold. 
Requires a 32K ECB Color Computer and a 
cassette player or disk drive. King Cottage 
Industries, 1814 Valley St. NE, Poulsbo, WA 
98370, (206) 697-5576; $5. 

Space Intruders, a Space Invaders, arcade- 
type game that features 16-color graphics and 
sound on the Color Computer 3. The goal is to 
destroy the intruders with a "particle beam 
laser cannon" before they reach the ground. 
Requires a CoCo 3. Game Point Software, P.O. 
Box 6907, Burbank, CA 91510, (818) 566- 
3571; $24.95 plus $3 S/H. 

SPORTSware's Catalog on Disk, a flippy 
disk with graphics files that illustrate some of 
SPORTSware's products. Runs on the CoCo 3 
only, although it covers some CoCo 2 software. 
SPORTSware, 1251 S. Reynolds Road, Suite 
414, Toledo, OH 43615, (419) 389-1515; $3, 
but refundable on the purchase of a SPORTS- 
ware product. 



Tetris, a game of spatial skill from Russia that 
requires users to rotate and place shapes com- 
posed of four blocks. When a row is completely 
filled up, it disappears. As more lines disap- 
pear, the skill level increases and the shapes 
drop at a faster rate. Requires a CoCo with a 
minimum of 32K, or a CoCo 2 with 64K, or a 
CoCo 3. Tandy Corporation, 1700 One Tandy 
Center, Ft. Worth, TX 76102; $29.95: Avail- 
able in Radio Shack stores nationwide. 

TextPro IV, a text editing/word processing 
program written in machine language for the 
CoCo 3. Features include search-and-replace, 
automatic line numbering and justification, 
variable fonts, footers, onscreen display of 
character special effects, suppoits for laser 
printers with proportional fonts and more. 
Requires a 128K or 512K CoCo 3 and disk 
drive. On 5 12K systems, TextPro IV automati- 
cally installs two RAM disks as drives 2 and 3. 
Cer-Comp, 5566 Ricochet Ave., Las Vegas,NV 
89110, (702) 452-0632; $89.95. 

UPDOS, an EPROMable Disk Extended 
Color BASIC enhancement for the Color 
Computer 3 that includes command line recall 
and editing routines, commands that manipu- 
late graphics compatible with Color Max 3/ 
Deluxe, and that invoke the DOS command on 
power-up to boot OS-9 automatically. Requires 
a CoCo 3. ESP, P.O. Box 63065, Wichita, KS 
67203, (316) 946-0440; $24.95. 

Wargame Designer Icon Disk #1, a Wargame 
Designer system accessory that contains eight 
sets of 66 icons, including humans, elves, 
standard military symbols, ghosts, robots, desert 
armies, British and Zulu soldiers, cowboys and 
Indians, and more. Icons can be viewed at five 
times their actual size. Requires a CoCo 3 and 
Wargame Designer. SPORTSware, 1251 S. 
Reynolds Road, Suite 414, Toledo, OH 43615, 
(419) 389-1515; $10. 



First product received from this company 



The Seal of Certification is open to all manufacturers of products for the Tandy 
Color Computer, regardless of whether they advertise in THE RAINBOW. 

By awarding a Seal , the magazine certifies the program does exist — that we have 
examined it and have a sample copy — but this does not constitute any guarantee 
of satisfaction. As soon as possible, these hardware or software items will be 
forwaided to THE RAINBOW reviewers for evaluation. 

— Lauren Willoughby 



February 1989 THE RAINBOW 141 



If OS-9 seems a little backward, this 
utility can help 



What Day Is It? 



By Richard Ries 



When I was in school, I was 
taught to write the date in the 
following order: month-date- 
yean I've grown accustomed to that 
order, and I use it in all situations — 
except one. When I use OS-9, I am 
prompted to enter the date in this order: 
year-month-day. I never get that right. 
I always have to back up and re-enter 
the date. (This can be rather dishearten- 
ing at the beginning of a programming 
session.) Maybe I should adjust, but I 
don't want to change my habits. 

Finally, I decided that the computer 
and I would both be happier if I wrote 
a small program that let OS-9 accept the 
date in the format I preferred. The result 
of this decision is Set Date, a utility that 
you can add to your Startup file. 

To use Set Date, type it in and save 
it. Next enter pack, and BASIC09 will 
compile the program into a machine- 
usable program in the CMDS directory. 
After the program is written and 
packed, edit your Startup file by replac- 
ing the following line: 

setime < /term 
with this line: 

setdate < /term 



Richard Ries is an electronics techni- 
cian who integrates hardware and soft- 
ware at work. In his spare time, Richard 
enjoys programming on his Co Co. 



The next time you boot up OS-9, you 
will be prompted to enter the date (in 
month-date-year format) and then the 
hour, minute and second. Set Date then 
switches the date's order to the format 
OS-9 uses and runs Setime to set OS- 
9's clock/ calendar. One note of caution: 
Set Date should be the last line in your 
Startup file. For some reason (which 
probably has to do with "forking 
shells") any lines after the SETDATE 
command are lost. 



I hope this program will be as useful 
to you as it is to me. If you have any 
questions about BASIC09, I suggest you 
read Dale Puckett's book, The Official 
BASIC09 Tour Guide. It explains 
things in a clearer manner than the 
manual that comes with BASIC09. 

{Questions or comments about this 
utility may be directed to the author at 
361 Deauville Blvd., Copiague, NY 
11726. Please include an SASE when 
requesting a reply.) □ 



The Listing: SetOate 




PROCEDURE 


setdate 




9999 


(* Copyright 1988 *.) 




991k 


(* Richard J. Ries *) 




992* 


DIM date, time :STRING[8] 




0038 


DIM oldate: STRING 




003F 


DIM ipath: INTEGER 




0046 


ipath ;»0 




004D 






004E 


PRINT "Please enter the date* w 




0069 


PRINT « (mra/dd/yy) n ; 




007A 


INPUT #ipath,date 




0084 






0085 


PRINT "Please enter the time: :i M 




00A0 


PRINT " <hh:mm:ss) »; 




00B1 


INPUT #ipath,time 




00BB 


(* pack out missing seconds. *> 




00DA 


IF LEN(time)<8 THEN 




00E7 


FOR n«LEN(time)+l TO 8 




00FE 


time«time+ ,, £" 




010A 


NEXT n 




0115 


ENDIF 




0117 






0118 


oldate-" setime "+RIGHT$(date ,2) 


+" "+LEFT$(date,LEN(date)-3 




)+ M "+time 




0146 


(* set the clock *) 




0159 


SHELL oldate 


£3i 



1 42 THE RAINBOW February 1 989 




jBr. $reW*'0 programs 



For Color Computer Software 
Since 1983 




1 1 1 
in 
1 1 1 




Pyramix 

This fascinating CoCo 3 game 
continues to be one of our best 
sellers. Pyramix is 100% 
machine language written 
exclusively to take 
advantage of all the 
power in your 
128K CoCo 3. The 
Colors are bril- 
liant, the graphics 
sharp, the action fast. Written by 
Jordon Tsvetkoff and a product of 
ColorYenture. 

The Freedom Series 
Vocal Freedom 

I've got to admit, this is one nifty 
computer program. Vocal Free- 
dom turns your computer into a 
digital voice recorder. The 
optional Hacker's Pac lets you 
incorporate voices or sounds that 
you record into your own 
BASIC or ML programs. 
This is not 
a synthe- 
sizer. Sounds 
are digi- 
tized dir- 
ectly into computer 
so that voices 
sound very natural. One 
"off-the-shelf" application for 
Vocal Freedom is an automatic 
message minder. Record a message 
for your family into memory. Set 
Vocal Freedom on automatic. When 
Vocal Freedom "hears" any noise in 
the room, it plays the pre- 
recorded message! Disk operations 
are supported. VF also tests 
memory to take advantage of from 
64K up to a full 512K 
Requires low cost 
amplifier (RS cat 
*277-1008) 
any microphone. 

Mental 
Freedom 

Would your friends be 
impressed if your 



\ 




computer could read their 
minds? Mental Freedom 

uses the techniques of 
Biofeedback to control video 
game action on the 
screen. Telekinesis? 
Yes, you control the 
action with your 
thoughts and emotions. 
And, oh yes, it talks in a perfectly 
natural voice without using a 
s peec h s y nt hesi ze r ! Req ui res 
Radio Shack's low cost Biofeedback 
monitor, Cat. *63-675. 

BASIC Freedom 

Do you ever type in BASIC 
programs, manually? If you do, 
you know it can be a real chore. 
Basic Freedom changes all that. 
It gives you a full screen editor 
just like a word processor, but for 
BASIC programs. Once loaded in, it 
ways on-line. It hides 
nvisibly until you call it 
forth with a single 

program 
must for 
progra 
mers or 
nyone 
ho types 

programs. By Chris Babcock and a 
product of ColorVenture. 

Lightning Series 

These three utilities give real 
power to your CoCo 3. 

Ramdisk Lightning 

This is the best Ramdisk available. 

It lets you have up to 4 mechanical 
disk drives and 2 Ram drives 
- on-line and is fully 
C #w compatible with our printer 

spooler below 

Printer 
Lightning 

Load it and forget 
it- -except for the 
versatility it gives you. 
Never wait for your printer again! 




^\ * I jrlyntf keypress! This 

mputer memory MTUT^* 1 I Jvl 

s or sound effects §^ ^/ i 



Printer runs at high speed while 
you continue to work at the 
keyboard! 

Backup Lightning 

This utility requires 51 2K Reads 
your master disk once and then 
makes superfast multiple disk 
backups on all your dirves! No 
need to format blank disks 
first! Supports 35, 40 
or 80 track drives. 

COCO Braille 

Produce standard grade 2 Braille 
on a Brother daisy wheel printer. 
Easy to use ■ ■ ■ 
for sighted ■ ■ ■ ■ 
■ ■ ■ ■ 

or blind user. No knowledge of 
Braille is necessary. Call for free 
sample. 

Prices 

CoCo 3 only 

Ram Disk Lightning, Disk $19.95 

Printer Lightning Disk $19.95 

Backup Lightning, Disk $19.95 

All three, Disk $49.95 

Pyramix, Disk $24.95 

CoCo 1,2, or 3 

Vocal Freedom, Disk $34.95 

Vocal Freedom Hackers Pac... $14.95 
COCO Braille $69 95 

CoCo 2 or 3 only 

Mental Freedom, Disk $24.95 

Basic Freedom, Disk $24.95 

CoCo 1 or 2 only 

VDOS, The Undisk, ramdisk for the 

CoCo 1 or 2 only , Tape $24.95 

VDUMP, backup Undisk files to single 

tape file, Tape $14.95 

VPRINT, Print Undisk directory, 
Tape $9.95 

Add $2.50 shipping/handling 

in USA or CANADA 

Add $5.00 to ship to other 

countries 



Dr. Preble's Programs 
6540 Outer Loop 

Louisville, KY 40228 
24 Hour Hot Line 
(502) 969-1818 

Visa, tie, COD, Check 




The worm that ate Fort Worth and 
other Co Co stories 



Food for Worms 

By William Barden, Jr. 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 



With all the talk about neural networks these days, 
I thought it might be nice to emulate life on a CoCo. 
Why not try a lower form of life? Perhaps a 
programmer or life insurance salesman? No, I decided these 
life forms were too complex. (I still don't understand 
annuities.) Maybe a orangutan or a chimp? Nope. Much too 
complicated. A dog? Since I can't understand why my dog 
barks at me when I enter a room, I thought I'd never be able 
to emulate his mind. 

Eventually, after passing through lower mammals, birds 
and reptiles, I settled on a worm. After all, worms seem to 
lead leisurely lives, munching their way through a seemingly 
endless supply of food. They also leave trails when moving 
through earth, wood or paper — easy to simulate on the 
screen of the CoCo. 

A First Attempt 

Suppose our CoCo screen contains a phosphor worm. This 
worm lives on screen phosphor, just as a bookworm 
consumes paper. The phosphor worm contentedly munches 
its way through the CoCo screen phosphor until the phosphor 
is gone. At that point the worm dies. 

The basic simulation for this is shown in Figure 1. It's a 
256-by-192 CoCo 1, 2 or 3 graphics screen with a border. The 
border is drawn by a LINE(0,0) - (255,191) , PRESET, B 
command. We'll assume the border contains an electric 
charge that keeps the worm from moving past it. 

My first attempt at creating this simple life form (Quick, 
Igor, the switch!) obeyed these simple rules: 



Bill Barden has written 27 books and over 100 magazine 
articles on various computer topics. His 20 years* experience 
in the industry covers a wide background: programming, 
systems analysis and managing projects for computers 
ranging from mainframes to micros. 



• The worm can travel up, down, right or left, but can't move 
diagonally across the screen. 

• The worm travels in the same direction until it senses that 
the next pixel contains no food (i.e., if it has already passed 
over a pixel or is at a border). 

• If the worm cannot travel straight, it turns to the right, if 
there's food (a pixel) there. If there is no food to the right, 
the worm turns to the left. If there is no food there, the worm 
dies (its return path contains no food — just phosphor 
droppings). 

• The worm starts at the screen center and moves up. 

Figure 2 shows the result of this simple life. The worm first 
heads straight up, tracing a vertical line as it goes. At the 
border, the worm senses no food and turns right. It continues 
right until the right-hand border is encountered, at which 
point it follows that border to the bottom of the screen. At 
the bottom border, the worm turns right and continues across 
the bottom of the screen to the left-hand border where it 
begins moving up again. At the top border the worm turns 
right again, marching across the screen until it reaches the 
vertical line in the center. Then the worm moves down until 
it reaches the bottom (no food) border. The worm turns to 
its right (left on the screen) and continues around the border 
until it eats its way into the center and dies. 

OK. It's not a remarkable life; it's a pretty boring picture, 
to say the least. However, if the rules of the life are changed 
slightly, the worm's life gets more interesting. Suppose that 
instead of always being on the straight and narrow, the worm 
turns to the right when there is a food supply in that direction. 
In the first case the worm lived an SRL (straight, right, left) 
existence. The new worm — after est, Dianetics, and a few 
therapy sessions — becomes a little kinky and develops an 
RLS life. The worm's new pattern is shown in Figure 3. 

Our worm's food path is now diamond-shaped and begins 
at the center of the screen. Another variation, an RSL worm, 
produces a similar rotten-to-t he-core display, but creates a 
center square instead of diamond. (See Figure 3.) 



1 44 THE RAINBOW February 1 989 



x = 0 



x - 255 



Y = 0 



Y = 191 




BORDER 

(ELECTRICALLY 
CHARGED) 



Figure 1: The Land of the Phosphor Worm 



fa 



(END) 



Y 



STARTING 
POINT 



Figure 2: An S(1)R(1)L(1) Worm's Life 



RLS WORM 



PREMIUM COC03 512K UPGRADE 

•Made in USA by J&R Electronics • Memory chips socketed, user replaceable 

•Rugged, long life construction •Top mounted Memory for cooling 

•Heavy duty POWER and GROUND planes to minimize memory errors due to noise 

•High performance design, permits use of less expensive 150ns memory chips 

•We supply Prime memory chips, not inferior pulls or fallouts* 

•Includes RAMDISK, Spooler and Memory Test software on disk with 28 page User's 
Manual (We set the standard for 51 2K support software. We believe our software 
is uniquely powerful, as opposed to these 'Me, too' companies that charge extra 
for software with much less power!) 

SPECIAL PRICES 

#1010-29.95 JramR bare board plus connectors and software 

101 4-39. 95 JramR assembled & tested 0K (No memory chips) and software 
•CALL (for latest price of #1014 with memory chips and other products) 
To place an order, write to: J&R Electronics, P.O. Box 2572, Columbia, MD 21045, 
OR call (301) 987-9067-Jesse or (301) 788-0861 -Ray 




WORM 

EATING 
HERE 



WORM 
EATING 
HERE 



RSL WORM 



Figure 3: The Eating Patterns of RLS and RSL Worms 



February 1 989 THE RAINBOW 1 45 





UP 



LEFT 




RIGHT 



DOWN 



Figure 6: Octagonal Worm Travel 



WORM PATTERNS 

Right-Angled Worms 

The pattern traced by the worm in these figures is not 
obvious from the figure. To get a better idea of the worm's 
path, I increased the distance the worm traveled by a factor 
of nine. The rules of life remain the same, but the worm 
disregards whole sections of phosphor, traveling nine pixels 
instead of one. The result is shown in Figure 4, where a 
diamond (RLS) figure is traced. The worm's life is more 
interesting when viewed at this scale. 

The path of travel goes like this: The worm travels right 
for nine pixels after sensing food in that direction. It then 
turns right again, heading down, after sensing nine pixels of 
food in that direction. After determining food to the left, it 
turns again. It then turns right again, and moves up. At this 
point, the worm is one pixel to the right of the starting point. 
There's no food to the right — it's been eaten. Therefore, the 
worm turns left. Nine pixels later, the worm turns right (up) 
again, placing it eight pixels above the starting point. There's 
only eight pixels' worth of phosphor in the down direction, 
so the worm turns left (up). You can see how the worm traces 
a diamond shape until it reaches a point where there's not 
enough food in any direction and the worm dies. 

If we magnify the RSL worm's path, we see that it generates 
a large spiral. (See Figure 5.) 

Octagonal Worms 

The worm concept can be extended to worm paths in any 
direction. However, it becomes quite a chore to maintain the 
travel of a worm that can go in any direction. A more 
reasonable model is a worm that can travel up, right, down, 
left, and in the four directions that run between these four 
possibilities. We'll use the same letters (E, F, G and H) to 
identify these directions as are used by the Extended BASIC 
DRAW command. The directions are shown in Figure 6. 

The first worm we'll try is an EES worm, which tries to 
turn to the right by 45 degrees. (The EHS refers to the worm's 
heading up, but the worm can go in any of eight directions.) 
If there is not enough food in that direction, the worm will 
try 45 degrees in the other direction. If that path doesn't 
supply food, the worm will go straight. If that path doesn't 
have food, the worm will die. The path of the worm that 
follows these rules is shown in Figure 7. 

This is a complex path, and it leads to an important 
question: If the worm must be guaranteed of food along each 
segment of its path, how can the path intersect existing lines? 
The worm can munch away at each pixel and cross diagonal 
lines without conflict. Diagonal lines are like the lines shown 
in Figure 8. The diagonal lines can be crossed as long as the 



START 




x 



X X 





XXX* 



XX \ 



Figure i: An Octagonal Worm Path 



146 THE RAINBOW February 1989 



worm path does not intersect a pixel that has been eaten. 

In the path shown in Figure 7, the worm dies on the right- 
hand side of the screen after checking the food 45 degrees 
to the right, 45 degrees to the left, and straight ahead. (Never 
mind that there's some food to eat. It's less than what is 
necessary to survive, and this is a philosophic worm that 
meets its end without qualms.) To save the worms, we can 
change the rules and offer them more options. After all, there 
are seven possible directions for the worm — any valid 
direction less the one from which the worm just came. The 
path shown in Figure 9 follows this rule: Turn to the right 
45 degrees at a step, taking the first path that offers food. 
If none of the seven directions offer food, meet the worm deity 
of your choice. 

The path shown in Figure 9 is quite complicated. When 
the worm encounters the top border, it follows that border 
until it's on the right side of the main path. Then it starts 
down the screen again. The worm traverses the left side of 
the main path until it reaches the bottom and finally dies at 
the upper-left corner of the screen. 

Designer Worms 

By now you get the idea — there are some interesting 
designs to be produced on the screen by a few simple, 
repetitive rules. And we've just touched the surface here. 
What if you assume the worm does not have to eat continually 
and allow it to travel through areas that contain no food for 
a short period of time? To provide a tool for experimentation, 
I offer the program shown in Listing 1. It's a Worm Driver. 
You define the rules, and the driver does the rest. 

I've also included an example of a Calling program in 
Listing 2. 

You must provide four things for the Worm Driver: 

• The starting position on the screen. X and Y specify a valid 
x,y coordinate for the 256-by-192 mode. 

• The actions to be taken for up, right, down, left, E, F, G 
and H directions are coded as the string constants U$, R$, D$, 
L$, E$, F$, G$ and H$, respectively. The first two characters 
of the string are a zero followed by the number of actions. 
The remaining characters specify the actions to be taken. In 
other words, if U$ is "07E5R5F5D5G5L5H5", we know that there 
are seven actions if the worm is going up (U): Move five pixels 
in the E direction if food is found, or move five pixels in the 
R direction if food is found, or move five pixels in the F 
direction if food is found, or ...you get the idea. If your worm 
reaches the action, moves five pixels in the H direction, and 
cannot act, it will die. For right-angled worms, only the up, 
down, right and left strings need to be specified. It's all right 
to use fewer than seven actions. You may want only two or 
three actions — provided you can get a decent pattern with 
that number. 

The LA variable looks for food. It counts the number of 
pixels in every possible direction. Generally, this value should 
match the value in the actions (e.g., if E5 is used to specify 
a move of five pixels, then LR5 should be used). However, 
you may make Lfi larger than any of the pixel values for 
actions (up to 9). In this case the worm will cross lines (eaten 
areas), provided there's food on the other side. 

The starting direction is specified in DI$. Use U, R, D, L, 
E, F, G or H. Save the Worm Driver as an ASCII file (do 
a save "WF",A) and then merge Worm Driver with your four 
or five lines of code defining the rules and starting conditions 
of the worm path. The parameters used in my previous 
example are shown in Listing 2. 



DIAGONAL 
LINE 1 



DIAGONAL 
LINE 2 



Figure 8: Crossing Worm Lines 











START 





xjxL 





Figure 9: The Path of an ERFDGLH Worm 



February 1989 THE RAINBOW 147 



Please Send Me Worm Trails 

Strange as it seems, I'd be interested in the worm trails you 
generate. If there's enough interest, I'll list them in this 
column with appropriate credit. 

Old Business — Can the CoCo Learn? 

My July '88 RAINBOW column (Page 160) discussed a 
learning tic-tac-toe program. I asked for volunteers to help 
the program learn how to play a serious game of tic-tac-toe. 
This month I'd like to tell you the results of that teaching. 

First, let me recap what I presented in that July column: 
The concept came from a description of MENACE, a 
Matchbox Educable Naughts and Crosses Engine, described 



6 00 
0 « 4« 

a 

o « o 

' 0. « 00 • 

% Won or 000 # 9 

m - 0 0 0 

Drawn _ 0 

0 0 
0 0 



mm O 
0 0 

0 0 0 00 0 

0 0 
O 0 

OO 0 

o 

O 0 
0 

l i nn i i iii iiiini i H) i n ii n i n i i ii ii ii [ iiiiii H iii imi i 

Increments of 30 Games 
TIC-TAC-TOE PROGRESS 

Figure 10: Plotting the Results 

by Donald Michie, a biologist at the University of Edinburgh. 
Michie's matchboxes have a copy of a tic-tac-toe position on 
their covers. Inside each matchbox are beads of different 
colors, each bead representing a move. There's a hole in each 
matchbox so that one bead can be randomly selected from 
all beads. The color of the bead selected determines the move. 

The machine makes the first move (this is done by someone 
shaking the matchbox with the empty tic-tac-toe matrix on 
the cover and noting the color of the bead). This matchbox 
is then left open to indicate that a move of that configuration 
has taken place. A human opponent makes odd moves — 
1, 3, 5, 7 and 9. 

At the end of the game, there are several open matchboxes 
representing the moves that occurred. Each open matchbox 
has a selected color bead that determined the next move. If 
the machine won the game, more beads of that color are 
added to each open matchbox. If there was a draw game, only 
one bead of that color is added to the matchboxes. If the 
machine lost the game, one bead of that color is taken from 
each matchbox. 

Over many games, the matchboxes accumulate more beads 
representing winning moves than non-winning moves. The 
chance of selecting a winning bead (move) is much greater 
than of selecting a losing or drawing bead. Gradually, the 
machine becomes smarter. I tried to emulate that strategy in 
the tic-tac-toe learning program. 

Tic-Tac-Toe Positions 

The tic-tac-toe matrix was represented by assigning each 
square a number of 1 through 9 and using a nine-character 
string to represent an O, X or hyphen (no move yet). The 
string -X-O— XXO, for example, represents the following: 

- X - 
0 - - 
XXO 



There are 19,683 possible strings of X's, O's and hyphens, 
but only those strings with an equal number of X's and O's 
represent valid tic-tac-toe configurations. There are 3,139 
possible configurations with an equal number of X's and O's, 
such as XXXXO-OOO (19,535), XXXXOO-OO (19,553), 
XXXXOOO-O (19,559), and XXXXOOOO- (19,561). The 
number in parentheses is the number of the original 19,683 
configuration and represents the Base 3 (ternary) number 
derived by assigning digits of 0, 1 and 2 in place of the X's, 
O's and hyphens. The ternary number makes it easier to 
convert a tic-tac-toe configuration to a value that can be 
found in a table holding the 3,139 possible configurations. 

Selecting the Next Move 

The next move in Michie 's MENACE was made by shaking 
up the matchbox and choosing a colored bead at random. 
Michie started out with four beads in each of nine colors for 
the first-move matchbox, three beads of each color for the 
third-move matchboxes, two beads of each color for the fifth- 
move matchboxes, and one bead of each color for the 
seventh-move matchboxes (the ninth move has only one 
possibility). We used counts of five, four, three, two and one. 
The count represents the number of colored beads. The 
configuration 00— X-X— is a fifth move configuration with 
five possible next moves by the machine. We'll put three beads 
in our figurative matchbox for each of the five possible 
moves: 

OO-X-X- 0,0,3,3,0,3,0,3,3 

The impossible moves (those already occupied by an X or 
O) are initialized with a count of zero. Possible moves are 
initialized with a count of three. 

The next move can be selected at random by adding up 
all of the counts (3+3+3+3+3=15) and then generating a 
random number from one to 15. The machine will accumulate 
counts from left to right and stop when the total is equal to 
the random number of zero through 15. The machine will 
then use the square represented by the position of that count. 
In this example, if the number generated was eight, the 
machine would use the third count (tic-tac-toe Sq uare 6). The 
person would respond with another move creating a new 
configuration, and the machine would use the same algorithm 
to compute the next move. The game would continue until 
a player won the game or a draw occurred. 

At the end of the game adjustments are made to the active 
configurations (those used in the game sequence). If the game 
was won by the machine, three counts are added to each 
position. Similar adjustments would be made for draws (one 
would be added) and losses (one would be subtracted). The 
process emulates a reward and punishment training method. 

Recording the Counts 

The counts are held in a random disk file with records of 
18 bytes. The first nine bytes hold the configuration, a string 
of hyphens, O's and X's. The next nine bytes are nine fields, 
each field containing a count of zero through 255. An initial 
file is generated by an initialization program, which 
eliminates invalid end-game conditions for a total of 2423 
configurations and the 43,614-byte file of configurations. 

The actual tic-tac-toe program draws the diagram, checks 
for an end condition, and rewards or punishes the tic-tac-toe 
data in the file as the program learns. Each time the machine 
plays, a record is made of the entry number and the position 
in which the response was made. (This corresponds to 



1 48 THE RAINBOW February 1 989 



opening the box in Michie's MENACE.) At the end of the 
game, each entry is adjusted by adding or subtracting counts 
from the entry position. Three is added for a win, one is added 
for a draw, and one is subtracted for a loss. The updated 
entries for the data are written to disk, so that the data file 
always reflects the accumulated knowledge of the machine. 

A history file is also updated at the end of the game. This 
file is another random file with one-byte records. For each 
game, a new letter is added to the end of the file — either 
a W, D or L. 

User Response 

Reader response to this project was enthusiastic. The 
following 25 people volunteered information first: 



Heath Dingwell, Litchfield, Connecticut 

Tom Seagrove, North Charleston, South Carolina 

Daniel Montalvo, Baltimore, Maryland 

H.C. Mehlenbacher, Grand Marais, Michigan 

John L. Malon, Loring AEB, Maine 

Louis Knoepp, Jr., Spartanburg, South Carolina 

Russell C. Obbink, Lower Burrell, Pennsylvania 

Duane Schwartz, Merrill, Wisconsin 

Jim DeStafeno, Wyoming, Delaware 

John Stanford, Baldwyn, Mississippi 

Steve Ostrom, Minneapolis, Minnesota 

William A. Queen III, Bessemer City, North Carolina 

Eric Parish, Vista, California 

F. Bruhns, Fallbrook, California 

Jack Bowman, Jr., Piqua, Ohio 

Kevin Sloan, Meridian, Mississippi 

Rommel Bruehl, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 

Mf Byers, Creve Coeur, Illinois 

John . Collins, Oceanside, California 

Clayton B. Shaffer, Visalia, California 

Vern Clark, Redondo Beach, California 

H.D. Vaughn, Virginia Beach, Virginia 

John Marshall, Willits, California 

Joel M> DeYoung, Manson, Manitoba 

Steven Moreno, Stockton, California 



Although I had estimated a month's worth of time to play 
three or four thousand games, I had underestimated the time 
lag for mail delivery to a volunteer and back to me. After 
four months, we had accumulated about 1754 games. 
However, those games were enough to prove the basic 
premise — the CoCo can indeed learn to play a reasonable 
game of tic-tac-toe. 

A chronological plot of the first 1754 games is shown in 
Figure 10. The CoCo's losses were heavy initially, but its wins 
begin to increase dramatically. Halfway through, the CoCo 
was winning or drawing over one-half the games. At the end 
of the 1754 games, the CoCo was winning or drawing about 
90 percent of the games played. 

If you would like to have the programs and accumulated 
1754 games for your own research, they're available. To make 
it as easy on your columnist as possible, please send a self- 
addressed envelope with 45 cents postage and a formatted 
CoCo disk to me at P.O. Box 3568, Mission Viejo, CA 92692. 

See you next month with more CoCo topics. □ 



The 




THE COLOR COMPUTER MONTHLY MAGAZINE 



Back Issue 
Availability 




BACK ISSUES STILL AVAILABLE 

Have you explored the wealth of informa- 
tion in our past issues? From our very first, 
four-page issue to many with more than 300 
pages of material, it's all just for CoCo users 
— a great way to expand your library! 

A WORLD OF INFO AT A BARGAIN PRICE 

All back issues sell for the single issue 
cover price. In addition, there is a $3.50 
charge for the first issue, plus 50 cents for 
each additional issue for postage and han- 
dling if sent by United Parcel Service. There 
is a $5 charge for the first issue, plus a $1 
charge for each additional issue on orders 
sent by U.S. Mail. UPS will not deliver to a 
post office box or to another country. 

MOST ISSUES STILL AVAILABLE 

Issues July 1981 through June 1982 are 
available on white paper in a reprint form. All 
others are in regular magazine form. VISA, 
MasterCard and American Express ac- 
cepted. Kentucky residents please add 5 
percent state sales tax. In order to hold down 
costs, we do not bill, and no C.O.D. orders 
are accepted. 

Due to heavy demand, we suggest you 
order the back issues you want now while 
supplies last. 

To check availability and order, review and 
fill out the form on the next page and mail 
it with your payment to: 

THE RAINBOW 

The Falsoft Building 
P.O. Box 385 
Prospect, KY 40059 



February 1989 THE RAINBOW 149 



» 



BACK ISSUE ORDER FORM 

(See overleaf for instructions.) 

Please send me the following back issues: 



MONTH/YEAR 


PRICE 




MONTH/YEAR 


PRICE 






VOLUME 1 








VOLUME 5 






JUL '81 


Premier Issue 


$2.00 


□ 


AUG '85 


Games 


$3.95 


□ 


AUG '81 




$2.00 


□ 


SEP '85 


Education 


$3.95 


□ 


SEP '81 


Education 


$2.00 


□ 


OCT '85 


Graphics 


$3.95 


□ 


OCT '81 


Printer 


$2.00 


□ 


NOV '85 


Data Comm. 


$3.95 


□ 


NOV '81 




$200 


□ 


JAN '86 


Beginners 


$3.95 


□ 


DEC '81 


Holiday 


$200 


□ 


FEB '86 


Utilities 


$3.95 


□ 


JAN '82 




$200 


□ 


MAR '86 


Business 


$3.95 


□ 


FEB '82 




$200 


□ 


APR '86 


Home Help 


$395 


□ 


MAR '82 




$250 


□ 


MAY '86 


Printer 


$3.95 


□ 


APR '82 




$250 


□ 


JUN '86 


Music 


$3.95 


□ 


JUN '82 




$250 


□ 


JUL '86 


Anniversary 


$3.96 


□ 













VOLIIMF R 






JUN '83 


Printers 


$2.95 


□ 


AUG '86 


Games 


$3.95 


□ 


ii it 

JUL 83 


Anniversary 


rf*0 HIS 

$295 


□ 


SEP 86 


Education 




i_i 




VOLUME 3 






OCT '86 


Graphics 


$396 


□ 


AUG "83 


Games 


$295 


□ 


NOV '86 


Data Comm. 


fro rkc 

$3.95 


□ 


CCD 'Q1 


baucation 




n 
I— I 


UfcU 86 


nojiaay 




n 


OCT 83 


Graphics 




i — i 
u 


JAN 87 


beginners 




n 


DEC 83 


Hoiiaay 




l_l 


FEB 87 


1 1 1 il it i no 

uuiiiies 




n 


MAR 84 


Business 




i — i 
U 


AAA n t rt "T 

MAR 87 


business 




n 
i i 


APR 84 


Gaming 


$3.95 


i — i 


APR 87 


Unmn U A | n 

nome neip 


CO (V, 

s>J.»U 


n 


11 A V 'OA 

MAY 84 


Printer 




1 — 1 

u 


k A A v/ im 

MAY 87 


Printer 




n 
i i 


JUN '84 


Music 


$3.95 


□ 


JUN '87 


Music 


$3.95 


□ 


It 11 'QA 
J UL 04 


Anniversary 




n 
i i 


II 11 '07 

JUL of 


AAnn i v t?r bdry 


S3 95 


n 

1 — 1 




VOLUME 4 








VOLUME 7 






AUG '84 


Games 


$3.95 


□ 


AUG '87 


Games 


$3.95 


□ 


SEP "84 


Education 


$3.95 


□ 


SEP '87 


Education 


$3.95 


□ 


OCT '84 


Graphics 


$3.95 


□ 


OCT '87 


Graphics 


$3.95 


□ 


NOV '84 


Data Comm. 


$3.96 


□ 


NOV '87 


Data Comm. 


$3.95 


□ 


DEC '84 


Holiday 


$395 


□ 


DEC '87 


Holiday 


$3.95 


□ 


JAN '85 


Beginners 


$3.95 


□ 


JAN '88 


Beginners 


$3.95 


□ 


FEB '85 


Utilities 


$3.95 


□ 


FEB '88 


Utilities 


$3.95 


□ 


MAR '85 


Business 


$3.95 


□ 


MAR '88 


Business 


$3.95 


□ 


APR '85 


Simulations 


$3.95 


□ 


APR '88 


Home Help 


$3.95 


□ 


MAY '85 


Printer 


$3.95 


□ 


MAY '88 


Printer 


$3.95 


□ 


JUN '85 


Music 


$3.95 


□ 


JUN '88 


Music 


$3.95 


□ 


JUL '85 


Anniversary 


$395 


□ 


JUL '88 


Anniversary 


$3.95 


□ 












VOLUME 6 














AUG '88 


Games 


$3.95 


□ 










SEP '88 


Education 


$3.95 


□ 










OCT '88 


Graphics 


$3.95 


□ 










NOV '88 


Data Comm. 


$3.95 


□ 










DEC 88 


Holiday 


$3.95 


□ 










JAN '89 


Beginners 


$3.95 


□ 










FEB '89 


Home Help 


$3.95 


□ 



RAINBOW INDEX A complete index to the first three years, July 1981 through June 
1984, is printed in the July 1984 issue. Separate copies are available for $2.50 □ 

The Fourth, Fifth and Sixth Year Indexes including RAINBOW on tape are printed 
in the July 1985, 1986 and 1987 issues, respectively. The Seventh Year Index is 
printed in the July 1988 issue. 

TOTAL 



KY RESIDENTS ADD 5% 



U.S. MAIL CHARGE 

SHIPPING & HANDLING 

U.P.S. CHARGE 

TOTAL AMOUNT 

ENCLOSED 

Article Reprints 

In instances where a given issue is now out of print and not available for purchase, 
we do provide photocopies of specific articles. The cost for this service is $1.50 
plus 50 cents S/H per article. This service is provided only in the case of out-of- 
stock issues. 



Name 



Address 
City 



State 



ZIP 



D Payment Enclosed, or 

Charge to my: □ VISA □ MC DAE 

CARD # 



EXPIRATION DATE 
SIGNATURE 



PHONE ( ) 



TO ORDER BY PHONE (credit card orders only) call (800) 847-0309, 8 a.m. to 5 
p.m. EST. All other inquiries call (502) 228-4492. 



Listing 1: W0RMDRVR 

100 1 WORM DRIVER PROGRAM FOR CO 
CO 1, 2, OR 3 IN 256 BY 192 MODE 
110 WIDTH 32 
120 PMODE 4,1 
130 PCLS 1 
140 SCREEN 1,0 

150 LINE (0 ,0) - (255 , 195) , PRESET, 
B 

160 GOSUB 360 

170 IF DI$="U" THEN A$=U$ ELSE I 
F DI$="R" THEN A$=R$ ELSE IF DI$ 
="D" THEN A$=D$ ~ ELSE IF DI$= 
"L" THEN A$=L$ ELSE IF DI$="E" T 
HEN A$=E$ ELSE IF 01$='^" THEN 

A$=F$ ELSE IF DI$="G" THEN A 
$=G$ ELSE A$=H$ 
180 J=VAL(MID$(A$,1,2) ) 
190 FOR 1=1 TO J:ND$=MID$(A$,I*2 
+1,1) :NF=VAL(MID$(A$, 1*2+2,1) ) 
200 IF ND$="U lf THEN IF FU>=NF TH 
EN XD=0: YD=-1: GOTO 300 
210 IF ND$= M E M THEN IF FE>=NF TH 



EN XD=1 



YD=-1: 



TH 



TH 



TH 



TH 



TH 



TH 



GOTO 300 
220 IF ND$= ,I R" THEN IF FR>=NF 

YD=0: GOTO 300 
230 IF ND$="F" THEN IF FF>=NF 

GOTO 300 
240 IF ND$="D" THEN IF FD>=NF 

GOTO 300 
250 IF ND$= M G" THEN IF FG>=NF 
EN XD=-1: YD=1: GOTO 300 
260 IF ND$="L" THEN IF FL>=NF 
EN XD=-1: YD=0: GOTO 300 
270 IF ND$="H H THEN IF FH>=NF 
EN XD=-1: YD=-1: GOTO 300 
280 NEXT 

XD=0: YD=0 
DI$=ND$ 
FOR 1=1 TO NF 
X=X+XD: Y=Y+YD 
PRESET (X, Y) 
NEXT 
GOTO 160 
'FIND FOOD 

FU=0:FOR 1=1 TO LA:YN=Y-I:IF 
YN<1 THEN GOTO 390 ELSE FU=FU+P 
POINT (X,YN) 
3 80 NEXT 

390 FE=0:FOR 1=1 TO LA:XN=X+I:YN 
=Y-I:IF (XN>254 OR YN<1) THEN GO 
TO 410 ELSE FE= FE+PPOINT(XN 
/YN) 

400 NEXT 

410 FR=0:FOR 1=1 TO LA:XN=X+I:IF 
X>254 THEN GOTO 430 ELSE FR=FR+ 
PPOINT(XN,Y) 
420 NEXT 

430 FF=0:FOR 1=1 TO LA:XN=X+I:YN 
=Y+I:IF (XN>254 OR YN>190) THEN 



290 
300 
310 
320 
330 
340 
350 
360 
370 



150 



THE RAINBOW February 1989 



GOTO 450 ELSE 

(XN,YN) 

440 NEXT 

450 FD=0:FOR 1=1 
Y>190 THEN GOTO 
PPOINT(X,YN) 
460 NEXT 

470 FG=0 : FOR 1=1 
=Y+I:IF (XN<1 OR 
TO 490 ELSE FG= 
,YN) 



FF=FF+PPOINT 



TO LA:YN=Y+I:IF 
470 ELSE FD=FD+ 



TO LA:XN=X-I:YN 
YN>190) THEN GO 
FG+PPOINT(XN 



480 NEXT 

490 FL=0:FOR 1=1 TCT LA:XN=X-I:IF 
XN<1 THEN GOTO 510 ELSE FL=FL+P 
POINT (XN,Y) 
500 NEXT 

510 FH=0:FOR 1=1 TO LA:XN=X-I:YN 
=Y-I:IF (XN<1 OR YN<1) THEN GOTO 
530 ELSE FH=FH+ PPOINT(XN,YN 

) 

520 NEXT 
530 RETURN 



Listing 2: WORMSMPL 

10 'SRL WORM 

11 X=128: Y=96 

12 LA=1 

13 U$="03U1R1L1": R$="03R1D1U1": 
D$="03D1L1R1": L$="03L1U1D1" 

14 DI$="U" 

15 ' MERGE WORM DRIVER HERE 

16 1 

20 'RLS WORM 

21 X=128: Y=96 

22 LA=1 

23 U$="03R1U1L1": R$="03D1R1U1" : 
D$="03L1D1R1": L$="03U1L1D1" 

24 DI$="U" 

25 'MERGE WORM DRIVER HERE 

26 • 

30 'RSL WORM 

31 X=128: Y=96 

32 LA=1 

33 U$="03R1U1L1": R$="03D1R1U1" : 
D$="03L1D1R1": L$="03U1L1D1" 

34 DI$="U" 

35 'MERGE WORM DRIVER HERE 

36 1 

40 'NINE PIXEL RLS WORM 

41 X=128: Y=96 

42 LA=9 

43 U$="03R9L9U9" : R$="03D9U9R9" : 
D$="03L9R9D9": L$="03U9D9L9" 

44 DI$="U" 

45 'MERGE WORM DRIVER HERE 

46 ' 

50 'NINE PIXEL RLS WORM 

51 X=128: Y=96 

52 LA=9 

53 U$="03R9U9L9": R$="03D9R9U9" : 
D$="03L9D9R9": L$="03U9L9D9" 

54 DI$="U" 

55 'MERGE WORM DRIVER HERE 

56 ' 

60 ' EHS OCTAGONAL WORM 

61 LA=5 

62 X=20: Y=96 

63 U$="03E5H5U5": R$="03F5E5R5 M : 
D$="03G5F5D5": L$="03H5G5L5" 

64 E$="03R5U5E5" : F$="03D5R5F5" : 
G$="03L5D5G5": H$="03U5L5H5" 



65 DI$="E" 

66 'MERGE WORM DRIVER HERE 

67 ' 

70 ' ERFDGLH OCTAGONAL WORM 

71 LA=5 

72 X=128: Y=96 

73 U$="07E5R5F5D5G5L5H5" : R$="07 
F5D5G5L5H5U5E5" : D$="07G5L5H5U5E 
5R5F5": L$="07H5U5E5R 
5F5D5G5" 

74 E$="07R5F5D5G5L5H5U5": F$="07 
D5G5L5H5U5E5R5" : G$="07L5H5U5E5R 

5F5D5": H$="07U5R5F5D 
5G5L5" 

75 DI$="E" 

76 'MERGE WORM DRIVER HERE 

77 ' 




Commano rue. GRAPHICS, 

OF fH«£ CoCo 3 H 



ww~a<ys 



-tpaintbo 





THE AUTOMATIC GRAPHICS PROGRAMMER^ 

Jftctually writes graphics programs I i I 
Simply use a joystick to pickjrom 64 colors, 
draw, paint, it even add pixet-lnpptxd detail! 
Thengive thecommatid to SAVE a short rou- 
tine that recreates ucuraraphicexacduasifou 
did it originally ConL much faster)! <T)o all 
kinds of graphics, titles, diagrams which can 
be merged Into \four programs or used alone I 
for CoCo 3 with diskScselfcenterifm joystick. 

$29.95 S pecial intro price $2695 +$/h ! 

r 3777Tf^ 1 1 8 Corlics Avenue 
TJ ' =S? Poughkecpsie, NY 12601 

$1.50 S/H ON AIL ORDERS 6914) 4- 8 5- 81 SO 

NY RESIDENTS INCLUDE SALES TAX 




February 1989 THE RAINBOW 151 




Advances in OS-9 

Technology 

h 



I noticed several exciting advances in 
both hardware and software at 
Princeton's RAINBOWfest. While 
Owl- Ware's Window Writer offered the 
most sophisticated advances in OS-9 
software, Tony Distefano (CRC/Disto) 
and Bruce Isted (FHL) presented their 
latest plug-in cards — designed to 
eliminate the need for the Tandy Multi- 
Pak Interface. This month's column will 
feature interviews with Owl- Ware's Tom 
Roginski and Bruce Navarre, Jr., 
CRC's Tony DiStefano, and FHL's 
Bruce Isted. 

In this column, I will discuss icons 
and buffers and pass on a few tricks I 
discovered recently. In addition, I will 
present an OS-9 program by Don Hitko 
and discuss Paul Ward's new book, 
Start OS-9. 

Window Writer on the Way 

Tom Roginski at Owl-Ware heard 
about Window Writer last February 
when he received the first version in the 
mail from Rojah (pronounced Roger) 
Dash at RAM International, Inc. Dash 
is a Chicago-area OS-9 user. A college 



Dale L. Puckett, a freelance writer and 
programmer, serves as director-at-large 
of the OS-9 Users Group and is a 
member of the Computer Press Associ- 
ation. His username on Delphi is 
DALEP: on packet-radio, KOHYD @ 
N4QQ; on GEnie, D.PUCKETT2; and 
on CIS, 71446,736. 



By Dale L. Puckett 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 

student at the University of Illinois, 
Dash visited Roginski in the Spring and 
brought another early version with him. 
Roginski was impressed with the word 
processor's speed and its ability to run 
effectively on a floppy disk, a hard drive 
or a RAM disk. Roginski explained, 
"With 512K of memory, you can work 
with nearly 40 pages of text. If you run 
from a hard drive, the size of the file is 
limited only by the size of your hard 
disk drive. That's impressive, even when 
you compare it to IBM standards." 

In addition, thanks to OS-9's multi- 
tasking environment, if you start Win- 
dow Writer with multiple windows, you 
can have more than one iteration of the 
program running at the same time. This 
means you can edit two files at once, 
moving back and forth between the 
windows — cutting and pasting be- 
tween the two versions of your prose 
along the way You can do this because 
Window Writer maintains a common 
buffer — a clipboard of sorts — that 
makes it possible. 

Roginski had nothing but praise for 
Dash's efforts. He compared the system 
to several popular word processors 
running in the IBM and Macintosh 
environments. Roginski had obtained 
the early beta release only a week before 
he came to RAINBOWfest, but he was 
planning a production release in early 
1989. He said the users guide would be 
laser printed. The program will sell for 
$59, but Roginski plans to introduce it 
at a special price of $49. Window Writer 
will work with both TS Spell and Dy- 
naSpell and comes with a large selection 



of configuration files that match it to 
most popular printers. 

Bruce Navarre, Jr., the Chief Techni- 
cian at Owl-Ware, has also worked with 
Window Writer since February 1988. 
He believes that the system compares to 
the best MS-DOS word processors on 
the market. It has all the popular fea- 
tures built in, including support for a 
laser printer. 

The first version of Window Writer 
doesn't support graphics, but Roginski 
says Dash is working on it. He told us 
that Dash's ultimate goal was to put out 
something comparable to the latest 
version of WordPerfect. That's a lofty 
goal and one that will be a true chal- 
lenge on the 6809-based Color Comput- 
er. Roginski says the big disadvantage 
of graphics-based word processors 
centers on the limitations of their 
printed resolution. However, Window 
Writer's pull-down menus can use the 
cursor control keys or the mouse. 

Dash's word processor uses a built-in 
map that lets you set up the special 
codes needed by your printer. You can 
determine the form in which your text 
will be printed by glancing at the screen. 
While the approach is not pure WY- 
SIWYG, it does use characters of var- 
ious colors to indicate what the final 
print looks like. When using Window 
Writer, you enter a single character. The 
printer driver translates it to the right 
code sequence for your printer. 

While Roginski works with both the 
Color Computer and the IBM crowd, 
Navarre spends all of his time helping 
Color Computer users. I asked Navarre 



1 52 THE RAINBOW February 1 989 



why Owl- Ware was making such a big 
investment in OS-9 Level II software. 
Navarre explained, "We felt we needed 
to do something to help our users reach 
the potential of the more expensive 
software packages running on other 
computers like the IBM PC and Macin- 
tosh. OS-9 makes it possible to do this 
kind of program, but no one has made 
the investment needed to pull it off." 
Navarre believes that in the past most 
third-party vendors could not afford the 
time or the money to effectively use the 
OS-9 environment. 

As a student, Dash has been able to 
invest more than a year on Window 
Writer. Navarre said that Dash came to 
Owl- Ware because he had seen its ads 
for years and wanted the company to 
market his product. Window Writer 
was developed in BAS1C09; however, 
Dash used assembly language subrou- 
tines where speed is needed. The pro- 
gram was written on a standard Color 
Computer 3. 

"One of the biggest problems I've run 
into as a software publisher is that you 
cannot buy a run-time OS-9 Level II 
package," Roginski said. "For a time, 
you could do this with OS-9 Level I 
software. I believe that OS-9 is going to 



die undeveloped because programmers 
are unable to produce a program that 
will run out of the box. I almost made 
the decision not to market this software 
package because of this problem. " 

Both Roginski and Navarre support 
OS-9. Roginski feels that OS-9 helped 
him learn MS-DOS without the ex- 
pected problems. In addition, OS-9 is a 
more powerful operating system than 
Disk BASIC. 

Navarre believes that the OS-9 
market is growing and that most users 
who are serious about the Color Com- 
puter are now using this system. "In the 
last year, the interest in our OS-9 
programs has tripled," Navarre said. 
"It's still not a high percentage of the 
Color Computer market, but that goes 
right back to the need to be able to buy 
software that runs out of the box. 

"The knowledge our Color Computer 
users have is incredible. When I first 
came to Owl- Ware, Tom said, 'you will 
learn OS-9.' Before long, I had picked 
it up and was put in charge of the LR 
Tech hard-drive support. OS-9 un- 
leashes the power of the Color Comput- 
er. CoCo doesn't have nearly as much 
power under Disk basic." 

Some of Roginski's customers are 



testing the beta version of Window 
Writer, and he is asking them for sug- 
gestions regarding features and im- 
provements. 1 also had the opportunity 
to work with the program for several 
hours before I started this column. 

My initial reaction? Dash is on the 
right track with Window Writer. Since 
I use MS Word at work, I noticed 
several actions that were not as intuitive 
as they should be. I also suggested that 
Dash make his menu interface work the 
same as all other Mu/ti-Vue-based 
programs and cautioned him to follow 
OS-9's rules religiously to avoid any 
problems that might occur in a multi- 
tasking environment. I also suggested 
he make it possible for two edit win- 
dows to be open in the same screen. 
That enhancement alone would make a 
cut-and-paste editor's day. If these guys 
take these suggestions to heart and 
continue to enhance the program after 
its release, Window Writer may be the 
OS-9 word processor we've all been 
waiting for. 

On the Hardware Front 

While Roginski and Navarre were 
busy telling RAINBOWfest visitors 
about Window Writer, Bruce Isted and 




A GREAT 

HOLIDAY GIFT! 

Get 12 Disks or Tapes a year containing over 120 quality programs. 
A subscription to T & D Software consists of 10 ready-to- run pro- 
grams delivered first class mail every month. 



2 Years 
1 Year 
6 mo's 



PRICES 

Tape Holiday 
or Disk Savings 
£140oe~ $ioo 00 
60 00 

^£m~ 35 00 



★ COCO 1, 2, and 3 
★ Includes Documentation 
★ Please Specify Tape or Disk 



HOLIDAY BONUS: Subscribe for 
a year, receive our latest 
2 Back Issues FREE! 
Subscribe for 2 years, 
receive 4 FREE! 



RAINBOW 

ccnnrtCATOH 

KAL 




T&D SUBSCRIPTION SOFTWARE, 2490 MILES STANDISH DR., HOLLAND, Ml 49424 (61 6) 399-9648 



February 1989 THE RAINBOW 153 



Tony DiStefano were busy talking 
about the new hardware add-ons they 
had completed. I talked to Isted first as 
he presented his new Eliminator card at 
the FHL booth. 

Bruce lsted hails from Calgary, Al- 
berta, and works for Madis Engineer- 
ing. These days, he stays busy keeping 
the company's computers running. He 
also designs circuits and OS-9 software 
used in many microcontroller applica- 
tions. His products are found in mon- 
itor stations used by security compan- 
ies, burglar alarms, phone dialers and 
radio alarms. He builds real-time appli- 
cations, and that's why he likes OS-9. 
lsted has worked with OS-9 for about 
five years and has started doing some 
design work for the Color Computer. 

"I guess you could say it's gone 
beyond a hobby, but it's not yet a 
business," he said. To produce his 
existing hard-disk interface, Isted has 
the circuit boards etched and then 
builds the units himself. He has the 
market cornered, from soldering to 
marketing. When his new Eliminator 
card reaches the market, he hopes to 
farm out the board assembly. Isted saw 
a lot of interest at Princeton. Many 
people filled out tentative order forms, 
and he will get in touch with them when 
the board is ready. 

Isted's first commercial product was 
the hard-disk controller. He started that 
project because his Pro System hard 
disk wouldn't work on the Color Com- 
puter 3. He decided to make it work, 
and a new hard disk interface was born, 
lsted designed his own interface because 
he wanted one controller to run his hard 
disk and floppy disks in a no-halt mode. 
After he had his new design working, he 
sold it to people with Pro System hard 
disks who wanted more from the sys- 
tem. Then, when Dennis Welby pur- 
chased one, he called Frank Hogg. Isted 
has been in business ever since. He sold 
the controllers for a year on his own and 
then began shipping them to FHL in 
early January, 1988. 

lsted wrote The Eliminator's OS-9 
software himself. The name for his new 
product was Frank Hogg's idea. Essen- 
tially, Hogg thinks Isted's card should 
eliminate the need for a Multi-Pak 
Interface. It features a hard disk inter- 
face, a real-time clock, parallel printer, 
two serial ports and an EPROM socket 
for booting automatically to OS-9. You 
can also plug in a Disk BAS1C- 
compatible ROM if you like. 

lsted had The Eliminator working at 
Princeton, but he felt it still needed 
some polish. The only comparable 

1 54 THE RAINBOW February 1 989 



interface card is the Four-in-One from 
CRC, which provides identical func- 
tions but has one serial port instead of 
two. Because it is an expansion card 
that plugs on top of the Disto Super 
Controller 11, it uses separate floppy- 
and hard-disk controllers, lsted said 
that DiStefano has an advantage here 
because the regular floppy controller 
lets you use all available Disk BASIO 
based software. 



"A nyone just starting 
with the Color 
Computer will 
discover that you 
need more than just a 

disk to go beyond 
playing a few games. " 




"Regardless of what his ROM does, 
if a Disk BASIC program disk is plugged 
in, it is going to work," Isted said. "My 
card is not as compatible as his. Pro- 
grams like VIP software that do their 
own disk I/O will not work because the 
controllers are different." 

I then asked Isted to comment on OS- 
9 in general. "I think the new Four-in- 
One controller and The Eliminator are 
necessary for the Color Computer to 
keep growing because there's no longer 
a Multi-Pak," he said. "Anyone just 
starting with the Color Computer will 
discover that you need more than just 
a disk to go beyond playing a few 
games. Communications is also impor- 
tant because you can live 500 miles away 
from the next user and still use a BBS 
system to get all the help you need." 

Isted feels that getting rid of the 
Multi-Pak is good because to keep it 
reliable you need to clean the connec- 
tors every two or three months. Both 
new cards eliminate the need for slot 
switching. The Multi-Pak had the car- 
tridge interrupts separated. To use more 
than one card that generates an inter- 
rupt, you had to modify the Multi-Pak. 
With the new all-in-one cards, you can 
have all of the devices on the card 
interrupt driven. This is important 
especially when dealing with commun- 
ications. 



Disto Four-in-One Card 

"By 1995, 1 should have 1 1 devices on 
a card," Tony DiStefano said with a 
slight grin. "Don't call to ask when the 
CoCo-on-a-card will be ready until 
1994." Disto's Three-in-One card is 
already out. It features a serial port, 
parallel port and a real-time clock. Tony 
was selling it at the CRC booth at 
Princeton, and it had a good reception. 
When 1 asked DiStefano to list the 
advantages of his Four-in-One card, he 
said that it gives the Color Computer 
something it wasn't born with. Its four 
devices deliver the capabilities needed 
under OS-9. 

All of the new devices work well at 
the Color Computer 3's 2MHz clock 
speed. This was a problem with some of 
the older clocks, which had been de- 
signed for the CoCo 2. The Three-in- 
One cards sold for $55 at Princeton. 
Their regular price will run $60 to $65. 
The exact price of the Four-in-One card 
isn't known at present, but Tony expects 
it to be under $100. The Four-in-One 
card has everything found in the Three- 
in-One card and a hard-disk adapter. Its 
beta-test copy caused a stir at Princeton. 
DiStefano believes that his new card is 
everything you need. He promises the 
card will be out before you read this 
column. 

Distefano feels that his card's com- 
patibility with Disk BASIC is its main 
selling point. When asked what is next, 
he said that the CoCo market still needs 
a high-density, floppy-disk controller. 
However, he noted that this product is 
still on the drawing board. 

Displaying Icons 

Radio buttons are becoming more 
common as the visual interface in new 
software today. These buttons highlight 
an area on the screen and show us where 
to push the mouse button when we want 
to start an action. At first, the action we 
expected when we pushed the button 
was printed on the button itself in plain 
English. Today, however, many of the 
buttons take the shape of an intuitive 
icon that describes without words the 
action initiated by the button. Some 
contain both a picture and a word or 
two. 

One day while thinking about the 
design of a new piece of software, I 
considered using graphic icons as but- 
tons that would let me navigate through 
the program visually. This led to a 
logical question: How could I display an 
icon as a radio button? Research began 
immediately. 

I decided to first determine how 



Multi-Vue's standard icons could be 
displayed on an OS-9 graphics window. 
Several public-domain icon editors are 
available on Delphi, CompuServe and 
GEnie, in addition to those found on 
many local Color Computer BBSs. If I 
could display these standard icons, I 
could create my own radio button icons 
with the standard-icon editors and let 
the program display them in the proper 
window at the proper time. 

1 had wondered about this problem 
before, but — as usual — need was the 
mother of invention. I found that there 
are system calls built into OS-9 that do 
what I wanted. And fortunately, I found 
that I could make these calls by sending 
the proper series of display codes to the 
window or screen in question. 

My first problem was to find the 
proper display codes, so I looked up 
icon in the index to the Windowing 
section of OS-9's technical reference 
manual — the last section of the 3-inch- 
thick documentation supplied with OS- 
9 Level II. Unfortunately, that wasn't 
the place to look. I found the answer 
under PutBlk — OS-9's name for the 
Put Block system call. Before I solved 
that puzzle, I had looked under GPLoad 
(Get/ Put Buffer Load), and KHBuf 



(Kill Get/ Put Buffer). 

The PutBlk system call is used to 
move a bit pattern from a buffer used 
internally by OS-9 to your Color Com- 
puter screen. But before you can move 
a bit pattern to the screen, you must 
create a buffer and load it with the 
graphics images you want to display. 
This can be accomplished by creating a 
buffer and moving a bit pattern from 
the screen into the buffer or by loading 
a. bit pattern from a file into a buffer. 
Since my goal was to display the bit 
pattern stored in the standard icon files, 
I took the second approach. 

A Step-by-Step Approach 

Once I located the proper section of 
the OS-9 manual, I began to experi- 
ment. When I started, my / term device 
was a40-column text window. I also had 
another Shell running in Window De- 
vice /u7 — an 80-column text window. 
My first step was to create a graphics 
window where I could run some tests. 
I had set up Window Device /w4 with 
the Iniz utility by including the line 
iniz u4 in the startup file. I then started 
a Shell in that window by typing shell 

Because I used the standard window 



device descriptors supplied with OS-9 
Level IPs production copy, my Shell 
appeared in a small window in the 
upper-left corner of a new screen. My 
next step was to turn that small window 
into an 80-by-24, four-color (Type 7) 
graphics window To do this, 1 used the 
CLEAR key to move to that window and 
typed merge /dd/mgw4. The desired 
screen popped into place as the Merge 
utility finished its work. 

Once I had a proper graphics screen, 
I loaded an icon into an OS-9 buffer. 1 
then entered a command line like the 
following: 

display lb2b 50 1 7 0018 0018 If ff ; 
merge /dd/cmds/icons'icon . telecom 

In this command line, Display is the 
standard OS-9 utility command used to 
send non-printing characters to a win- 
dow or other device. The Hex code lb2b 
means GPLoad (Get / Put Buffer Load) to 
OS-9. Next, the parameters needed by 
GPLoad include the buffer's group 
number, 50, and the buffer number, I. 
I used a Type 7 window to get an 80- 
by-24 screen with four colors. As de- 
fined in the command line, the icon is 
an l8-by-18-hex square. 



NEW FOR OS-9 : FORTH09 ™ 

from D. P. JOHNSON 

FORTH09 is a FORTH-83 Standard implementation specially taylored for OS-9. Includes the double number extension 
word set, system extension word set, complete forth 6809 assembler and more. Programs written in forth can instantly be 
saved as compact executable machine language modules. The FORTH09 system runs on any level I or level II OS-9 (6809) 
machine with at least 32k of available memory and one disk drive. Saved Forth09 application code is romable, reentrant and 
fully position independent, requiring as little as 3k for a small program. Where maximum speed is required the user can force 
small code words to be automatically compiled as in line code rather than subroutines. Supplied with complete printed docu- 
mentation. $150.00 (+ $3 S&H) Specify disk format if other than CoCo OS-9 format desired. 

Other OS-9 SOFTWARE from D. P. JOHNSON 

L1 UTILITY PAK - Contains 40 useful utilities that run under both level I and II OS-9. Included are a complete set of "wild card" file handling 
utilities, a disassembler, a disk sector editor, and the MacGen command language compiler. MacGen will allow you to generate many useful 
command macros in minutes, much more useful than procedure files. Macro source is included for a macro to implement an archival backup 
type function. $49.95 

L2 UTILITY PAK - Contains a Level II "printerr" function that also shows the pathname being searched for when "not found" or per- 
mission type errors occur. Also contains level II software ram disk driver. Ten other utilities included, some useful for level I also . $39.95 

L1+L2 COMBINATION PAK both of above together for $75.00 

SDISK - Standard disk driver module replacement allows full use of 40 or 80 track double sided drives with OS-9 Level I. Full compatibility with 
CoCo 35 track format and access all other OS-9 non-CoCo formats. Easy installation. $29.95 

SDISK+BOOTFIX - As above plus boot directly from a double sided diskette. $35.95 

SDISK3 - Level II version of SDISK driver. Same features as level I (except bootfix not required to boot from double sided). $29.95 

PC-XFER UTILITIES - Programs to format and transfer files to/from MS-DOS tm diskettes on CoCo under OS-9. (Requires either SDISK or 
SDISK3 to run depending on which level of OS-9 you are using) $45.00 

MSF - MS-DOS disk format file manager. More complete file transfer capabiltites for level II only. (Requires SDISK3 to operate). 
Now supports 720K 5-1/4" and 3-1/2" MS-DOS Formats. $45.00 MSF+SDISK3 together $65.00 

All diskettes are in CoCo OS-9 format unless otherwise requested; other OS-9 formats can be supplied for $2.00 additional charge. All orders must be prepaid or 
COD, VISA/MC accepted, add $1.75 S&H for first software item, + .25 for each additional item, additional charge for COD. 

D. P. Johnson, 7655 S.W. Cedarcrest St., Portland, OR 97223 (503) 244-8152 (For best service call between 9-11 

AM Pacific Time. Mon.-Fri.) 

OS-9 is a trademark of Microware and Motorola Inc.. MS-DOS is a trademark of Microsoft, Inc., FORTH09 is a trademark of D. P. Johnson 



February 1 989 THE RAINBOW 1 55 



On this command line, I reserved 8K 
of memory for the buffer — enough to 
store 56 icons. The following table lists 
the values and their abbreviations used 
in my Display command line: 



Code = lb2b 
GRP = 50 
BFN = 1 
STY = 7 
HSX = 00 
LSX = 18 
HSY = 00 
LSY = 18 
HBL = If 
LBL = ff 

The second half of the command line 
merged the data that describes (draws) 
the icon on the screen into the buffer. 

The buffer group number for this 
experiment was chosen at random. If 
you use these techniques in an actual 
program, you must make the proper 
OS-9 system call to get the process 
number for your program and use this 
number as the group number. Because 
OS-9 allows only one process to run at 
a given time for each finite process 
number, this technique avoids problems 
that occur when more than one user is 
logged on to your computer at one time. 
In other words, if two people try to 
create a Buffer Group Number 50, the 
second person will get an error message. 

Your experiments here will work best 
if you take advantage of your ability to 
issue more than one command on the 
same line in OS-9. When you use two 
commands on the same line, OS-9 
merges the icon data stored in the file 
icon, telecom (make sure that an icon 
file with the name you type exists) with 
the preliminary data issued by the 
display command. When you issue the 
commands as shown in the sample line, 
the result will be a buffer in memory 
with the Group Number 50 and a bit 
pattern in which the Buffer Number 1 
is stored. 

If you press ENTER after you type the 
first half of the command line, you can 
run into problems. The only way to 
recover is to go to another window and 
issue the merge command while redi- 
recting its output to Window Device / 
w4. However, you can only do this if you 
are running the OS-9 Users Group's 
Shell+ Version 2.0 or later, which has a 
special no-block mode. You can break 
the command line into two separate 
lines if you run them from an OS-9 
procedure file. The method used in the 
example above is the easiest however. 

If you accidentally press ENTER, the 

1 56 THE RAINBOW February 1 989 



easiest thing to do is to use the CLEAR 
key to move to another window where 
Shell is running. Once there, you can 
kill the Shell in which you were exper- 
imenting. You can then deiniz the 
window, run iniz again and start 
another Shell. This is the easiest way to 
get out of this trap. 



"Your experiments 
here will work best if 
you take advantage of 
your ability to issue 
more than one 
command on the 
same line in " 



Printing the Icon 

Now that you have the image of an 
icon loaded into your buffer, you can 
print it to your screen. To do this, use 
the following command line: 

display lb 2d 50 1 0050 0050 

In this command line, lb2d means 
PutBlk to OS-9. While the 50 and the 
1 point to the buffer group and group 
number created above, the 0050 tells 
OS-9 where to print the icon on your 
screen. This command line will place the 
icon 80 pixels — 50 Hex — to the right 
and 80 pixels down from the upper-left 
corner of your screen. You may load 
more than one icon or other graphics 
image into a buffer as long as you give 
each one a unique buffer number and 
have enough room in the buffer. That's 
why I made the buffer 8K long in the 
first command line. 

If you do have more than one image 
loaded into your buffer, you can use the 
same command line to display all of 
them at one time. To do this, type 
something like the following: 

display lb2d 50 1 0050 0050 lb2d 50 2 
00B0 0050 lb2d 50 3 00b0 0050 

Now that you know the secret to 



printing an icon on your Color 
Computer screen, 1 hope you'll take 
some time to experiment with your own 
icons. You'll soon have an incentive to 
download one of the public domain 
icon editors, so you can create your 
own. The next step will be to let OS-9 
know when someone has punched the 
mouse button while the pointer was 
over the icon. Sound like fun? 

Charter 

This month's listing was contributed 
by Don Hitko of Burton, Michigan. 
Hitko wrote a BASIC09 program, Char- 
ter, that adds to the functionality of the 
Scratch Pad screen editor written by 
Peter Dibble for The Complete Rain- 
bow Guide to OS-9 Level H: A Be- 
ginner's Guide to Windows. The pro- 
gram uses two Scratch Pad modules, 
ReadFile and ClearBuf. 

To run the program, load the four 
procedures into BAS1C09 and enter run 
charter. You can also pack and merge 
the files to run them from the OS-9 
command line. You can adapt Don's 
listing to your own printer by changing 
the data lines in the listing. He submit- 
ted it as an "idea starter," hoping you 
may get some enjoyment and educa- 
tional benefit from it. Thanks, Don. 

Don does caution you to start print- 
ing a long document before you go to 
bed. "It may be done before you wake," 
he quipped. 

Start OS-9 

Paul Ward introduced a new book 
designed for OS-9 beginners at the 
October RAINBOWfest. His book, 
Start OS-9, contains many tutorials and 
several useful essays. It comes with a 
disk containing a number of Steve 
Goldberg's excellent OS-9 utility pro- 
grams. Paul called today to say that 
people who bought the preliminary 
copies at Princeton can get a copy of the 
final printing by sending him $10 plus 
$2.50 for postage and handling. 

As I close this month's column, here's 
the latest on Shell+. Ron Lammardo 
was distributing copies of Version 2. 1 at 
RAINBOWfest. In the not-too-distant 
future Ron hopes to add an environ- 
ment file to Shell+ like the one used by 
Multi-Vue. He is also planning a new 
version that would use Get/Put buffers 
to store all the Shell+ variables. The 
buffers would make Shell+ variables 
global. 

That's it for another month. Enjoy 
your experiments with OS-9's Get'Put 
buffers while I think up something neat 
for March. □ 



Listing 1: Charter 


PROCEDURE 


charter 


0000 

r r r r 


BASE 1 


0002 

r r r 


DIM ScreenData(100) :STRING[80] 


0013 


DIM filename ( cur_line: STRING [80] 


0023 


DIM cur let: STRING [1] 


002F 


DIM line, letter .printer: INTEGER 






003F 


PRINT "Enter the pathlist of the file to use:" 




INPUT filename 




RUN ReadFile(f ilenarae ,ScreenData) 


007D 




007E 


OPEN #printer l "/p" 


0089 


PRINT #printer,CHR$($lB)+CHR$($lC); 


009A 

r r 






FOR line:=l TO 100 




cur_line :»ScreenData(line) 


00B6 


FOR letter :=1 TO 80 


00C6 


curdle t :=MID$(cur_line , letter ,1) 


00D4 


RUN trans late (cur_let) 


00DE 


PRINT #pr inter ,cur_let ; 


00E9 


NEXT letter 


00F4 


NEXT line 






0100 


CLOSE #printer 


0106 


END 




Listing 2: Translate 


PROCEDURE 


translate 


rt ft fin 

0000 


faram cur let : s iking [L\ 


ft ft ft f* 

000C 


DIM char : STRING [ 1 J 


*m ff 4 A 

0018 


DIM print er2 , counter .number : INTEGER 


0027 




ft fl fi O 

0028 


OPEN #printerZ , /p 


rt ft 

0033 


IF cur let="b" THEN 


0040 


PRINT #pr int er2 , CHR$ ( $ IB ) +CHR$ ( $ IF) ; 


3051 


ELSE IF cur let^'c" THEN 


3061 


PRINT #printer2 , CHR$ ($1B)+CHR$($20) ; 


3072 


ELSE IF cur let-"e" THEN 


3^82 


PRINT #printer2 . CHR$ ($1B)+CHR$ ($0E) ; 


0093 


ELSE IF cur let-"f" THEN 


30A3 


PRINT #pr in t er 2 , CHR$ ( $ 1 B ) +CHR$ ( $ 0F) ; 


30B4 


ELSE ENDIF 


30B9 


ENDIF 


&0BB 


ENDIF 


30BD 


ENDIF 


30BF 


IF cur_let~"b" OR curJLef-"^ 1 OR cur_let-="e" OR cur__let="f " 




THEN 


00E4 


cur_let:« M " 


00EC 


ELSE ENDIF 


J?J?F1 


CLOSE #printer2 


00F7 




00F8 


IF ASC(cur_let)<91 AND ASC(cur_let)>45 THEN END 


010E 


ELSE ENDIF 


0113 




0114 


FOR counter :«1 TO 31 


0124 


READ char 


0129 


READ number 


01 2E 


IF cur_let«char THEN 


013B 


cur let :»=CHR$ (number) 


0144 


ELSE ENDIF 


0149 


NEXT counter 




RESTORE 


0156 


END 


0158 




0159 


DATA « i" , 224 , » j " , 225 , "k" , 226 f H 1" , 227 


0179 


DATA "m" , 228 , "n" , 229 , M o w , 230 , "p" , 231 


0199 


DATA "q" , 232 , "r" , 233 , "s" ,234 , "t" , 235 


01B9 


DATA "u" , 236 , "v" , 237 , "x" , 238 , , 239 


01D9 


DATA »' [",240. "-",241,"] ",242, M v", 243 


01F9 


DATA " } " ,244 , " | " , 245 , " (" , 246 , ") " ,247 


0219 


DATA " A " , 248 , " ( " , 249 , "+" , 250 , "g" ,251 


0239 


DATA "h", 252, "y", 253, "z", 254 ^ 



TANDY COMPUTERS 

Tandy 1000-HX 256K 5 1/4"D. 535.00 

Tandy 1 000-SL 384K 5 WD. 675.00 

Tandy 1 000-TL 640K 3 1/2"D. 955.00 

Tandy 3000-NL 512K 3 1/2"D. 1 275.00 

Tandy 4000-LX 2 Meg 3 1/2"D. 2999.00 

Tandy 4000 1 Meg 3 1/2" D. 1890.00 

Tandy 5000MC 2 Meg 1 Drive 3825.00 

Tandy 5000MC 2 Meg 40 Meg 4955.00 

Tandy 5000MC 2 Meg 84 Meg 5395.00 

Tandy 1400LT 768K 2 Drives 1335.00 

Tandy 102 24K 430.00 

Tandy Color 3 1 28K 1 55.00 



MONITORS & BOARDS 

VM-4 Monochrome Green 
VM-5 Monochrome Green 
CM-5 Color RGB 
CM-1 1 Color RGB 
EGM-1 Color RGB (EGA) 
VGM-100 Monochrome Analog 
VGM-200 Color Analog 
VGM-300 Color Analog 
Video 7 Vega Deluxe Card 
Video 7 Vega Vga Card 
Tandy EGA Card 
Paradise Basic EGA Card 

DRIVES 

Color Computer Drive 0 
5 1/4" External Drive 1000EX 
Tandy 20 Meg Hardcard 
30 Meg Hardcard 
20 Meg Hard Drive 1400LT 
5 1/4" External for Tandy 1400 
Seagate 20 MegHard Drive 
Tandy 1000/SX/TX Controller 

ZUCKER BOARDS 

Zucker Serial Board 
Zucker OK Memory Board 1000 
Zucker MFB OK for 1000 
Zucker 1200 Baud Modem Card 75.00 



95.00 
1 1 5.00 
220.00 
315.00 
510.00 
169.00 
425.00 
535.00 
230.00 
295.00 
205.00 
185.00 



175.00 
180.00 
450.00 
395.00 
775.00 
215.00 
219.00 
69.00 



45.00 
45.00 
106.00 



PRINTERS 

DMP-106 Dot-Matrix 165.00 

DMP-1 32 Dot-Matrix 285.00 

DWP-230 Daisy Wheel 345.00 

Panasonic KX-P1080! Dot-Matrix 179.00 

Panasonic KX-P1091I Dot-Matrix 199.00 

Panasonic KX-P1092! Dot-Matrix 349.00 

Panasonic KX-P1 124 Dot-Matrix 369.00 

Panasonic KX-P1524 Dot-Matrix 595.00 

Please write for complete price list. 
We carry more items than listed here. 

All pi ices and offers may be changed or withdrawn without notice Adver 
Used prices are cash prices COD acceplnd add 2% (minimum charge 
$10 00) M.C , Visa add 2%. All non detechve items require return 
merchandise authorization Call for RMA Number before returning 
Delivery is subject to product availability Add t '/»% for shipping and 
handling, 55 00 minimum charge 

TM - Registered Trademark of Tandy, Epson, and IBM 
Monday thru Friday 9am - 5pm EST. 

□ □□□□ 

□ □□□□ 
■ 

□□□□□ 
□□□□□ 

124 South Main Street, Perry, Ml 48872 
CALL 1-517-625-4161 or TOLL-FREE 
1-800-248-3823 



1 


"E 

Tin 


n 


in 


19 


1 









February 1989 THE RAINBOW 1 57 



Racksellers 

0 

The retail stores listed below carry THE RAINBOW on a regular basis and 
may have other products of interest to Tandy Color Computer users. We 
suggest you patronize those in your area. 



ALABAMA 

Birmingham 

Brewton 

Florence 

Greenville 

Madison 

Montgomery 

Tuscaloosa 

ALASKA 

Fairbanks 

ARIZONA 

Cottonwood 
Lake Havasu 

City 
Phoenix 
Tempe 

Tucson 

ARKANSAS 

Fayetteville 
Ft. Smith 
Little Rock 

CALIFORNIA 

Berkeley 
Citrus Heights 
Hollywood 

La Jofla 

Los Angeles 

Marysville 

Napa 

Oakland 

Rancho 

Murieta 
Sacramento 

San Francisco 



Santa Monica 
San Jose 
Santa Rosa 
Stockton 

Sunnyvale 
Torrance 

COLORADO 

Aurora 
Colorado 

Springs 
Denver 
Glenwood 

Springs 
Grand 

Junction 
Longmont 

DELAWARE 

Mlddletown 

Newark 

Wilmington 



Jefferson News Co. 
McDowell Electronics 
Anderson News Co. 
M & B Electronics 
Madison Books 
Trade 'N' Books 
Injun John's, Inc. 

Arrow Appliance/Radio Shack 

A & W Graphics Co. 

Book Nook 
TRWTEK Computers 
Books, Etc. 
Computer Library 
Anderson News Co. 

Vaughn Electronics/Radio Shack 
Hot Off the Press Newsstand 
Anderson News Co. 

Lyon Enterprises 
Software Plus 
Levity Distributors 
Stef-Jen. Inc. 

Butler & Mayes Booksellers 
Circus of Books (2 Locations) 
Bookland 

Bookends Bookstore 
DeLauer's News Agency 

Software Plus 
Deibert's Readerama 
Tower Magazine 
Booksmith 
Bookworks 
Castro Kiosk 

Midnight Special Bookstore 
Computer Literacy Bookshops 
Sawyer's News, Inc. 
Harding Way News 
Paperbacks Unlimited 
Computer Literacy 
El Camino College Bookstore 

Aurora Newsstand 

Hathaway's 
News Gallery 

The Book Train 

Readmore Book & Magazine 
City Newsstand 

DeimarCo. 

Newark Newsstand 

Normar, Inc.— The Smoke Shop 



DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 

Washington, 
DC 



FLORIDA 

Boca Raton 

Clearwater 

Cocoa 

Dania 

Davie 

Ft. Lauderdale 



Gainesville 
Jacksonville 
North Miami 

Beach 
Panama City 
Pensacola 
Pinellas Park 
South 

Pasadena 
Starke 

Sunrise 
Tallahassee 



Titusvilfe 



Chronichles 
News Room 
World News, Inc. 



Great American .Book Co. 
The Avid Reader 
The Open Door 
Dania News & Books 
Software Pius More 
Bob's News & Book-Store 
Clarks Out of Town News 
Mike's Electronics Distributor 
Paper Chase 
Book Co. 

Almar Bookstore 
Boyd-Ebert Corp. 
Anderson News Co, 
Wolfs Newsstand 

Poling Race Bookstore 
Record Junction, Inc. 
Radio Shack Dealer 
Sunn/s at Sunset 
Anderson News Co. 
DuBey's News Center 
Computrac 



GEORGIA 

Atlanta 

Bremen 

Forest Park 

Jesup 

Thomasviile 

Toccoa 

IDAHO 

Boise 
Moscow 

ILLINOIS 

Belleville 
Champaign 
Chicago 
Decatur 



East Moline 
Evanston 
Kewanee 
Lisle 

Lombard 
Newton 
Paris 
Peoria 



Springfield 



Sunnyland 
West Frankfort 
Wheeling 

INDIANA 

Angola 

Berne 

Bloomington 

Columbus 

Crawfordsville 

Dyer 

Franklin 

Ft. Wayne 

Garrett 

Indianapolis 



Lebanon 
Martinsville 
Richmond 
Wabash 

IOWA 

Davenport 
Des Moines 
Fairfield 

KANSAS 

Hutchinson 
Tapeka 

Wellington 
Wichita 

KENTUCKY 

Hazard 

Henderson 

Hopkinsville 

Louisville 

Mlddletown 

Paducah 

LOUISIANA 

Baton Rouge 
Lockport 
New Orleans 
Monroe 

MAINE 

Bangor 

Brockton 

Caribou 

Oxford 

Sanford 

MARYLAND 

College Park 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Boston 
Brockton 
Cambridge 
Ipswich 



Border's 

Bremen Electronics/Radio Shack 
EHers News Center 
Radio Shack 
Smokehouse Newsstand 
Martin Music Radia Shack 

Book Shelf, Inc. 
Johnson News Agency 

Software or Systems 
Bookmark 

B. Dalton Booksellers 
Book Emporium 

K-Mart Plaza 

Northgate Mall 
Book Emporium 
Norrls Center Bookstore 
Book Emporium 
Book Nook 
Empire Periodicals 
Bill's TV Radio Shack 
Book Emporium 
Book Emporium 

Sheridan Village 

Westlake Shopping Center 
Illinois News Service 
Book Emporium 

Sangamon Center North 

Town & Country Shopping Ctr. 
Book Emporium 
Paper Place 
North Shore Distributors 

D & D Electronics 
Radio Shack 

White Cottage Electronics 
Book Corner 

Micro Computer Systems, Inc. 
Koch's Books 
Miles Books 
Gallery Book Shop 
Michiana News Service 
Finn News Agency, Inc. 
Bookland, Inc. 
Borders Bookshop 
Indiana News 
Southside News 
Gallery Book Shop 
Radio Shack 

Voyles News Agency. Inc. 
Mitting's Electronics 

Interstate Book Store 
Thackery's Books, Inc. 
Kramers Books & Gifts 

Crossroads, Inc. 

Palmer News, Inc. 

Town Crier of Topeka. Inc. 

Dandy's/Radio Shack Dealer 

Lloyd's Radio 

Daniel Boone Gulf Mart 
Mart's News & Gifts 
Hobby Shap 

Hawley-Cooke Booksellers (2 Locations) 
Software City 
Radio Shack 



City News Stand 
TV Doctor/Radio Shack 
Sidney's News Stand Uptown 
The Book Rack 



MASSACHUSETTS (cont'd) 

Littleton Computer Plus 



Magazines, Inc. 
Voyager Bookstore 
Radio Shack 
Books-N~Things 
Radio Shack 



University Bookstore 

Eastern Newsstand 
Voyager Bookstore 
Out Of Town News 
Ipswich News 



Lynn 

Swansea 

MICHIGAN 

Allen Park 

Birmingham 

Durand 

E. Detroit 

Hillsdale 

Holland 

Kalamazoo 

Lowell 

Muskegon 

Niles 

Perry 

Riverview 

Roseville 

MINNESOTA 

Burnsville 

Crystal 

Edina 

Minneapolis 
Minnetonka 
Roseville 
St. Paul 



Willmar 

MISSOURI 

Farmington 
Flat River 
Florissant 

Jefferson City 
Ktrksville 
St, Louis 

MONTANA 

Butte 

NEBRASKA 

Lincoln 
Omaha 

NEVADA 

Carson City 
Las Vegas 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Keene 
Manchester 
West Lebanon 

NEW JERSEY 

Atlantic City 
Cedar Knolls 
Clinton 
Pennsvflle 
Rockaway 

NEW MEXICO 

Alamogordo 
Albuquerque 
Santa Fe 



NEW YORK 

Amherst 
Brockport 
Brooklyn 
Elmira Heights 
Fredonla 
Hudson Falls 
Huntington 
Johnson City 
New York 



Pawling 
Rochester 



North Shore News Co. 
Newsbreak, inc. 

Book Nook, Inc. 

Border's Book Shop 

Robbins Electronics 

Merit Book Center 

Electronics Express/Radio Shack 

Fris News Company 

The Book Raft 

Lowell Electronics 

The Eight Bit Corner 

Michiana News Service 

Perry Computers 

Riverview Book Store 

New Horizons Book Shop 

Shinder's Burnsville 
Shinder's Crystal Gallery 
Shinder's Leisure Lane 
Shinder's (2 Locations) 
Shinder's Ridge Square 
Shinder's Roseville 
Shinder's Annex 
Shinder's Maplewood 
Shinder's St. Pauls 
The Photo Shop 

Ray's TV & Radio Shack 
Ray's TV & Radio Shack 
Book Brokers Unlimited 
Cowley Distributing 
T&R Electronics 
Book Emporium 

Plaza Books 

Nebraska Bookstore 
Nelson News 

Bookceliar 

HUrley Electronics 

Steve's Books & Magazines 

Radio Shack Associate Stare 

Bookwrtghts 

Verham News Corp, 

Atlantic City News Agency 
Village Computer & Software 
Micro World II 

Dave's Elect Radio Shack . 
Software Station 

New Horizons Computer Systems 
Page One Newsstand 
Downtown Subscription 



village Green-Buffalo Books 

Lift Bridge Book Shop, Inc. 

Cromland, Inc. 

Southern Tier News Co., Inc. 

On Line: Computer Access Center 

GA West & Co. 

Oscar's Bookshop 

Unicorn Electronics 

Barnes & Noble— Sales Annex 

Coliseum Books 

Eastern Newsstand 

Grand Central Station. Track 37 

200 Park Ave.. (Pan Am #1) 

55 Water Street 

World Trade Center #2 
First Stop News 
Idle Hours Bookstore 
International Smoke Shop 
Jonil Smoke 
Penn Book 
Software City 
State News 
Walden Books 
World Wide Media Services 
Universal Computer Service 
Microcom Software 
Village Green 
World Wide News 



158 THE RAINBOW February 1989 



NORTH CAROLINA 



Cary 

Chapel Hill 

Charlotte 

Hickory 

Jacksonville 

Kemersville 

Marlon 

Winston-Salem 

OHIO 

Akron 

Canton 

Chardon 

Cincinnati 

Cleveland 

Columbiana 

Columbus 



Dayton 



Dublin 
Fairborn 

Rndtey 
Kent 

Lakewood 
Lima 

Miamisburg 

Parma 

Toledo 

Warren 

Xenfa 

Youngstown 

OKLAHOMA 

Oklahoma 

City 
Taklequah 
Tulsa 

OREGON 

Eugene 
Portland 



Salem 

PENNSYLVANIA 

Allentown 
Altoona 
BrynMawr 
Corry 

Feasterville 
King of Prussia 
Malvern 
Reading 
Temple 
West Chester 
Wind Gap 
York 

RHODE ISLAND 

Newport 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

Charleston Hts. 
Clemson 
Florence 
Greenville 
Spartanburg 

TENNESSEE 

Brentwood 
Chattanooga 

Dickson 
Knoxville 

Memphis 
Nashville 



News Center in Cary Village 
University News & Sundry 
Newsstand inf 1 
C 2 Books & Comics 
Mlchele's, Inc. 
K&S Newsstand 
Boomers Rhythm Center 
K&.S Newsstand (3 Locations) 
Rainbow News Ltd. 

Churchill News & Tobacco 

Little Professor Book Center 

Thrasher Radio & TV 

Cinsoft 

ErieviewNews 

Fidelity Sound & Electronics 

B5 Software 

Micro Center 

The Newsstand 

Books & Co. 

Huber Heights 

Book & Card 

Wifke News 

Wright News & Books 

Book Barn 

News-Readers 

Wilke's University Shoppe 

Open Book 

The News Shop 

Lakewood International News 

Edu-Caterers 

Wilke News 

Bookmark Newscenter 

Leo's Book & Wine Shop 

Book Nook, Inc. 

Fine Print Books 

Piaza Book & Smoke Shop 



Merit Micro Software 

Thomas Sales, Inc. dba Radio Shack 

Steve's Book Store 



Libra Books — Book Mark 
Fifth Avenue News 
Rich Cigar Store, Inc. 
Sixth & Washington News 
Capitol News Center 
Checkmate Book 



Smyrna 

TEXAS 

Big Spring 
Desoto 
Elgin 
Ft. Worth 
Hartington 



Owl Services 

Newborn Enterprises 

Bryn Mawr News 

Corry Books & Cards 

Global Books 

Gene's Books 

Personal Software 

Smith's News & Card Center 

Software Corner 

Chester County Book Co. 

Micro World 

The Computer Center of York 
Tollgate Bookstore 

Bellevue News 

Software Haus, Inc. 
Clemson Newsstand 
Ray's #1 

Palmetto News Co. 
Software City 

Bookworld #5 
Anderson News Co. 
Guild Books & Periodicals 
Highland Electronics 
Anderson News Co. 
Davis-Kidd Bookseller 
Computer Center 
Davis-Kidd Booksellers 
Mosko's Place 
R.M. Mills Bookstore 
Delker Electronics 

Poncho's News 
Maxwell Books 
The Homing Pigeon 
TrtnffyNews 
Book Mark 



UTAH 




Provo 


Valley Book Center 


VIRGINIA 




Danville 


K&S Newsstand 


Hampton 


Benders 


Lynchburg 


Self Serve Software 


Norfolk 


l-O Computers 




Turn The Page 


Richmond 


Volume I Bookstore 


WASHINGTON 




Port Angeles 


Port Book & News 


Seattle 


Adams News Co.. Inc. 


Tacoma 


Bulldog News 


B & 1 Magazines & Books 




ft. 1 1_ t - 1 _ _ t Ml I rV. i i_» li . 

Nybbles N Bytes 


WEST VIRGINIA 




Huntington 


Nick's News 


Logan 


Stan s Electronics « Radio Shack 


Mcifiknn 


Com mi inipntinrK 1TD 






South 




Chorleston 


SDrina Hili News 

\JfmJltl 1 fill 1 1VT*J 


WISCONSIN 




Appletan 


Badger Periodicals 


Cudahy 


Cudahy News & Hobby 


Kenosha 


R.K. News, inc. 


Madison 


Pic A Book 




University Bookstore 


Milw* - ukee 


Juneau Village Reader 


Waukesha 


Holt Variety 


nKvCri f 1 rtn 






lnfckrmfit!f\n Tolo^nmmi mi/~/-ittonc 

II II Ull I IUIIUI 1 lOtfcJ^UI Mil IUI MlAJ 1 IUI It 


AUSTRALIA 




Blaxland 


Blaxland Computers 


Kingsford 


Paris Radio Electronics 


fAM AHA- 




Al RCDTA 




DUI in 


Qj~\r\H D/-iHi/^i Chn^-ly 

Dunn Kauiu onacK 


DKJi li lyviite 


p*-ii it Tor/Hew 


Riw\L"c 


L/UUUIcS U rtO.L/. KUU[U JIIUtK 


LAjigary 


Dllly s (News 


v^iaiesnoiiii 


Kuaio onacK Mssociaiea oTores 


uiayron vaney 


Langara tiecironics 


tamonron 


lmu rviicro 


Edson 


kquio onacK, asa 


rairview 


Pl M D Ei irr-itti \ra St TW 

u.in.k. rurntiure oc iv 




Ft»y Cltv Pnlnr 9t Qoi inH 
v\JK V-.1I y v_/Uiui OC Ovjui iKJ 






Ft, Saskatche- 




wan 


Ft. Mall Radio Shack. ASC 


Grande 




Cache 


The Stereo Hut 


Grande 


Centre 


The Book Nook 


Hinton 


Jim Cooper 


Innisfail 


L&S Stereo 


Lecombe 


Brian's Electronics 


Leduc 


Radio Shack Associated Stores 


Leth bridge 


Datatron 


Lloydminster 


Lloyd Radio Shack 


Okotoks 


Okotoks Radio Shack 


Peace River 


Radio Shack Associated Stores 




Tavener Software 


St. Paul 


Walter's Electronics 


Stettler 


Stettler Radio Shack 


Srrathmore 


Wheatland Electronics 


Taber 


Pynewood Sight & Sound 


Westlock 


Westlock Stereo 


Wetaskiwin 


Radio Shack 


BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Burnaby 


Compulit 


Bums Lake 


VT. Video Works 


Campbell 




River 


TRS Electronics 



BRITISH COLUMBIA (cont'd) 



Chilliwack 
Coquitlam 
Coortenay 
Dawson Creek 
Golden 
Keiowna 
Langley 
Nelson 
New West- 
minster 
Parksville 
Penticton 

Sidney 
Smlthers 
Squamish 
Vancouver 



100 Mile 
House 

MANITOBA 

Altono 

Lundar 

Morden 

The Pas 

Selkirk 

Vtrden 

Winnipeg 

NEW BRUNSWICK 

Moncton 
Sussex 



Charles Parker 
Cody Books LTD 
Rick's Music & Stereo 
Beil Radio & TV 
Taks Home Furnishings 
Telesoft Marketing 
Langley Radio Shack 
Oliver's Books 

Cody Books LTD 
Parksville TV 
DJ.'s 

Four Corner Grocery 
Sidney Electronics 
Wall's Home Furniture 
Kotyk Electronics 
Active Components 
Friendlyware Computers 
Granville Book Co. 
Siliconnections Books LTD 

Tip Top Radio & TV 

L.A. Wiebr Ltd. 
Goranson Elec. 
Central Sound 
Jodi's Sight & Sound 
G.L Enns Elec. 
Archer Enterprises 
J & J Electronics Ltd. 



Jeffries Enterprises 
Dewitt Elec. 



NEWFOUNDLAND 

Botwood Seaport Elec. 

Carbonear Slade Realties 



NOVA SCOTIA 

Halifax 

ONTARIO 

Angus 

Aurora 

Concord 

Exceter 

Hanover 

Huntsvilfe 

Kenora 

Kingston 

Listowel 

South River 

Toronto 

QUEBEC 

LaSalle 
Pont, Rouge 

SASKATCHEWAN 

Assiniboia 
Estevan 
Moose Jaw 
Nipiwan 

Reginqto= 

Saskatoon 
Shellbrooke 
Tisdale 
Unity 

YUKON 

Whitehorse 

JAPAN 

Tokyo 

PUERTO RICO 

East Isid Verde 
San Juan 



Atlantic News 

Micro Computer Services 

Compu Vision 

Ingram Software 

J. Macleane & Sons 

Modern Appliance Centre 

Hunrsville Elec. 

Donny "B" 

T.M. Computers 

Modern Appliance Centre 

Max TV 

Dennis TV 

Gordon and Gotch 

Messagertes de Presse Benjamin Enr. 
Bautique Bruno Laroche 

Telstor News 
Kotyk Electronics 
D&S Computer Place 
Cornerstone Sound 
Regina CoCo Club 
Software Supermarket 
Everybody's Software Library 
Gee. Laberge Radio Shack 
Paul's Service 
Grant's House of Sound 

H& O Holdings 



America Ado, Inc. 

The Color Computer Store 
Software City 



Also available at all B. Dalton Booksellers, and 
selected Coles and W.H. Smith in Canada, 
Waldenbooks, Pickwick Books, Encore Books, 
Barnes & Noble, Little Professors, Tower Book & 
Records, Kroch's & Brentano's, and Community 
Newscenters. 



February 1989 THE RAINBOW 159 



Advertisers Index 



We encourage you to patronize our advertisers — • all of whom support the Tandy Color 
Computer. We will appreciate your mentioning the rainbow when you contact these firms. 



Alpha Software Technologies . . .83 
Arizona Small Computer 



Company 127 

Ark Royal Games 79 

Burke & Burke . ..,.12 

Cer-Comp > .94, 95 

in soft .»«*.».*««*.« \»;<« .».»..♦»» 73 

Cognitec 29 

Colorware 19, 20, 21 

Computer Center 61 

Computer Island 109 

Computer Plus 3 

CRC/Disto .........115 

D.P. Johnson 1 55 

Dayton Associates of 

W. R. Hall, Inc ...128, 129 

Delphi 60 

Dr. Preble's Programs . . .143 

E-Z Friendly Software .151 

Eversoft . .53 

Federal Hill Software ,» . . . , . .45 

Frank Hogg Laboratories 54, 55 

Game Point Software ..... .61, 139 

Genie ...123 

Gimmesoft 22, 23 

Granite Computer Systems 81 

GSW Software ,...>...... 75 

HawkSoft, Inc. . .... . . , . . , , . ... 1 35 

Howard Medical .66, 162 

ICR Futuresoft Outsert 

J & R Electronics 145 

JR & JR Softstuff 127 



Kenneth Leigh Enterprises 67 

Magus Systems Engineering ... .73 

Metric Industries .,. .37 

Michtron BC 

Micro Works, The 133 

Microcom Software 9, 11, 13, 

15,16,17, 
Microtech Consultants 



Inc 107 

Micro World ...65 

NRI Schools Between 

130 & 131 

Orion Technologies .57 

Owl-Ware. 69, 70, 71 



1 60 THE RAINBOW February 1 989 





157 




7 


Rainbow Adventure 




Book IV 


...14 




,.140 




..118, 119 


Rainbow Gift Subscription . ... . .18 




, 33, 34, 35 


Rainbow on Tape & Disk 


;, ,. IFC 




117 




25, 79, 81, 


83, 85 




Second City Software . . , 


161 



SpectroSystems 135 

SPORTSWARE ...39 

STG Computers, Inc . . .53 

Sugar Software 97 

Sundog Systems . . , ♦ . * 47 

T & D Software ... .41, 75, 137, 153 

Tandy/Radio Shack 49 

Tepco .... 31 

True Data Products 113 

Try-O-Byte 109 

Vidicom Corporation 139 

Woodstown Electronics ...67 

Zebra Systems . . 1 31 



Call: 

Belinda Kirby 
Advertising Representative 

(502) 228-4497 



Call: 

Kim Vincent 

Advertising Representative 
(502) 228-4492 



The Falsoft Building 
9509 U.S. Highway 42 
P.O. Box 385 
Prospect, KY 40059 

FAX (502) 228-5121 




MasterCard VISA C.O.D. CHECKS 




ORDER 



CoCo CALENDER DELUXE : 
Organize all of your appointments with this 365 day 
Calender. Now with Hi-Res print driver for the 
DMP, CGP, Epson MX-80 and Star Gemini 10X 
printer. Please specify printer. 64k DISK. $19.95 

BLACKJACK RO YALE : 
Even your casino odds with this Blackjack card 
simulation and tutor! Program can be edited for 
different house rules. 64k DISK. $16.95 

BSE - BASIC SCREEN EDITOR: 
Gives Basic a full-screen editor to supplement the 
regular EDIT commands. Works on the CoCo 1&2 
and with the CoCo 3, WIDTH 32, 40 or 80 is sup- 
ported! Complete screen cursor control with the 
arrow keys plus features to make EDITing Basic 
programs a snap! BSE, a must have CoCo utility. |OS-9 SOLUTION: 
Our low price was the only corner that was cut on 
this quality program. 64k DISK. .$19.95 



TcJewrttoM into the 
SrMorthe CoCo l&StimOTATCTIs^ompar-l 
fblcwith^ll CoCo's. Comes with complete docu- 
mentations for easy upgrading and changes* 



ing diagrams using a 480i640pixel screen with 6 
tewing windows! Over W electronic symbols 
with 10 definable symbols* Even supports Logic 
gates & Multipin chips! Print hardcopy or save 
to disk for later editing. NOW CoCo3€QKfr 
PATIBLE 64k DISK,;. 



CHECK-09MV - Version 2.0 : 
Finally^ a program that interacts with MultiVue for 
FAST and EASY check balancing. CHECK-09MV 
and you can now take control of your bank checking 
account. No more waiting on your bank statement 
for an ending balance. CHECK-09MV will provide 
a check-by-check balance in an easy to use format 
that eliminates those monthly surprizes! Bring your 
money and you closer together and have the buck 
STOP HERE! Featuring an all new EDITING 
command. 512k DISK $25.95 

CoCoMAX II : By Colorware 
The 'CLASSIC CoCo graphic program. Draw great 
works of art with the program that set a standard for 
all others to follow. Supported bya Hi-Res interface 
and numerous printer drivers for complete set-up. 
64k DISK. $78.45 1 

CoCoMAX III : By Colorware 
All new program based off the 'CLASSIC* CoCo- 
Max II software. Allows for full animation, select 16 
colors from a 64 color palette, fast & easy to use w/ 
pull down menus in a point-and-click environment. 
1281c or 5 121c E^ISl^- * •» »••+••»« •*•»»••«••« ***•••••«•••* »$78*45 

DISK UTILITY 2.1A PLUS : 
A complete disk utility package for all CoCo's. Full 
Disk I/O for FORMAT, COPY, and BACKUP. 
Supports single or double sided 35 or 40 track 
drives. With DISK UTILITY 2.1A PLUS from 
SCS, you get TWO programs for ONE low price. 
DISK UTILITY for the CoCo 1 & 2 and DISK 
UTILITY for the CoCo 3. 64k DISK $23.95 I 

CoCo KEYBOARD : 

Program allows the user to utilize the function keys 
on the HJL-57 Pro-fessional, Deluxe CoCo, & 
Micronix keyboard. 32k DISK. $6.95 

WARRIOR KING : By Sundog Systems 
Battle monsters, gain magic & weapons, and travel 
through harsh wilderness and dark castle dun- 
geons in this medieval realm. An outstanding ar- 
cadegame forthe CoCo3! 128kDISK $29.95 



SOLUTION! Replaces 20 of the command 
alls with single keystroke, menu driven com- 
inds. No mote long and ramplcx j«athnamcs|| 
rsyntaxestoremember!Wor1cswithettherOS- 



Roselle, IL 60172 
Voice: 312-653-5610 
[BBS: 31Z-307-L5N 

| A/dd 2A new d Lsk com inandsw i ih 2 1 1 i - Res Screens? 
. Supports 40 track & Double Sided drives, 6ms 
stepping, auto disk search, error trapping and 
burnable into an EPROM. 64k DISK $24.95 

MY DOS : By Chris Hawks 
Supports accesses to double sided drives, able to 
use the J&M Controller with the CoCo 3, DIR 
commands simplified and a host of other special 
fo£i t u ros» 641c C^ISFt* •**•*««•*«•«•«•**•••««••■••#•«»*«•»•«« f *$ 14*95 

A-DOS 3 : 

The popular Disk Operating System from Spec- 
troSystems for the CoCo 3. 128k DISK $34.95 

SCS can custom 'burn' your purchased DOS pro- 
gram foronly $15.00! This includes the price of the 
EPROM chip and the BURN charge. Call orwrite 
for details. 



•.••'V', 



U\ utility package that transacts TAPE to DIS1 
tor DISK tb TAPE automatically. tfyoujust gotl 
knur first disk drive, TAPE/DISK is a MXJSM 
pIAVB program. Witt print tape A disk directo- 
nestoanysuppojrtedprinter«64kDISlCw.$19*90 



This popular 'intergraded' package includes, VIP 
Writer, Terminal, Data Base, Calc and Disk Zap 
which can fix a diskette with I/O errors. SCS 
special price. 64k DISK. $149.95 



VIP WRITER III w/SPELL CHECKER - 
All new and completely up-graded with expanded 
memory and pop-up main menus. You can also 
have up to 8 - 48k working text screens that will 
allow you to create 8 separate documents! Settle 
for only the best 100% ML word processor for the 
CoCo 3. 128k DISK. $79.95 



DISCOUNT SOFTWARE By CoIorVenture 

]RAMt>I!^ DISK.,.. $X6$S 

|PRLCN'X33*R \ JlijUJTJ^P^ 1 ^}* . » < ♦«.♦»»»»»«»»*♦.* (•«*»>• 

mm 

j?v^ A^X. PATCJ'J..«>.««T«.*fi««.*»»^«.«»». ********** 



SPECIAL: Order any VIP program fromSCS,and 
receive an additional program at NO EXTRA 
CHARGE! Call orwrite for full details. 



|Prcxluce hardcopy graphic files with your DMP 
tnd COP (B&W) piiflter;CoCpl,2 <&3compat- 
|tble.64kDISK. 



I***************************** ********* ******* 



MULll^AK CRACK: ; 
|AHows you to save your ROM-PAK progiaois 
;er to disI^WHERE THEY BELONG! In- 
ludes POKES for problem PAKs and the new 
ll 6k PAjKs^ 64k lEH^ilC**^*-^^ 

|MAXrlO : By Colorware 

ie 'Dazzling Word Processor & Document 
Creator for the CoCo3*. You asked for it and 
tow it is available at an SCS special price. 



SECOND CITY SOFTWARE 



Accepts MasterCard, Visa, C.O.D. and 
Check orders. Please add $2.50 for ship- 
ping ($4.50 for Canada orders) & allow 1 to 
3 weeks for delivery. C.O.D. orders, add 
an additional $2.50. 



THE NEWSPAPER PLUS : 
DeskTop Publishing for the CoCo 3? With the 
ALL NEW NEWSPAPER PLUS, you now can 
create complete and sophisticated Banners, 
Headlines along wit h Text Colu mns and G raph ics. 
THE NEWSPAPER PLUS allows for importing 
different pictures, fonts and fill patterns fromdisk 
for that pro-look. Comes complete with 22 fonts 
and 50 clip art pictures. THE NEWSPAPER 
PLUS is an all new upgraded program based on 
the original NEWSPAPER program. SCS is the 
ONLY company authorized to handle THE 
NEWSPAPER PLUSprogram. Why buy the old, 
overpriced and outdated program when you can 
get the newest release for less! 
128k DISK. '* $48.95 

THE NEWSPAPER GRAPHICS DISK I : 
The FIRST OFFICIAL supplementary program 
disk for THE NEWSPAPER. Contains '50' NEW 
PICTURE FILES, '10' NEW FILL PATTERNS 
and '3' ADDITIONAL FONT SETS! GRAPH- 
ICS DISK I is available only from Second City 
Software for $19.95 



I 

ll ft 



i 



y 



V 



» i 



* n * 



HOWARD MEDICAL COMPUTERS 

1690 N. Elston • Chicago, IL 60622 • orders (800) 443-1444 • inquiries and order status (31 2) 278-1440 

Showroom Hours 8-5 M-F. 10-3 SAT 



* 5 STAR FINAL 



FEBRUARY '89 



VERY COLD 



24 HOUR ORDER LINE 




* » 

0 



DC-5 CONTROLLER 

from Hard Drive Specialist gives 
great Radio Shack compatability 
and double sided access to DSDD 
Drives like Howard's DD-3. Two 
ROM sockets, one 24 pin and one 
28 pin allows use of RS l.l ROM 
by jumper selection. Gold plated 
contacts reduce I/O Errors. 
$75 ($2 Shipping) 

NX- 1000 STAR printer 

. forward and backward tractor 
. 4K input buffer $189 
. 144 CPS 

NX- 1000 RAINBOW 
color printer $289 

. four-color ribbon 
. front panel font select 

• single sheet and tractor feed at 
same time 

Howard SP-C $68.45 

• serial-to-parallel converter 
. 300 - 9600 baud 

Howard introductory 
special 

.good until 2/16/89 

. SP-C $29.95 with printer order 

• Free coupon for newspaper plus 
($48.95) with any other $15 
order from Second City Soft- 
ware 

. FREE shipping 



are lost when disk is reading or writ- 
ing. Especially useful with OS-9, but 
also works with BASIC. 

MONITOR 

Sony KV-1311CR $ 499 

Regular $625 ($15 shipping) 

• Vivid Color • Vertically flat 13" 
screen • Monitor/Trinitron TV with 
remote control • 640 x 240 reso- 
lution at 15MHZ .37 mm Dot pitch 

• RGB analog & digital; TTL; and 
composite inputs • VCR inputs 

• Cable to CoCo 3 $36 





HARD DRIVE ACCESSORIES 

3' Hard Drive Cable »20 
Burke & Burke Interface 78.45 
Clock Upgrade *20 
RSB *39.95 
TEAC 55B*118 
Hard Drive ROM Boot *20 




it 



Guarantee" As 



Howard Medical's 30-day guarantee 
is meant to eliminate the uncertainty 
of dealing with a company through 
the mail. Once you receive our hard- 
ware, try it out; test it for compat- 
ibility. If you're not happy with it for 




good as Gold. 

any reason, return it in 30 days and 
we'll give you your money back (less 
shipping.) Shipping charges are for 
48 states- APO, Canada and Puerto 
Rico orders are higher/ 



Hard Drive— Ready to Run! 

20,000,000 Bytes or the equivalent to 
a 125 R.S. 501's on line are packed 
into this hard drive, pre installed and 
ready to run. All you need to do is 
plug it in and go! This complete easy 
to use package includes a Seagate 20 
Meg Hard Drive, a Western Digital 
WD 1002-WX 1 Controller and 
interface* that plugs into slot #3 of 
multipack interface, plus the case & 
power supply. You even get a 1 year 
warranty. This 20 meg Hard Drive 
will work with IBM & clone. Basic 
driver, $29.95, lets you access this 
hard drive without need for OS-9. 



*499 

($9 Shipping) 



HD-1 

* Burke & Burke 

Four free coupons from T & D subscrip- 
tions with hard drive order. 
Offer ends 2/16/89 

PAL UPGRADE 
FOR MULTI-PAK 



i 



i 



* 1 



i 



specify for 26-3024 or 26-3124 
14.95 ($2 ship) 

24 HOUR ORDER LINE 

800 / 443-1444 

WE ACCEPT VISA • MASTERCARD •;; 
. AMERICAN EXPRESS . C.O.D. OR 
CHECKS • SCHOOL P.O. 
NEW - DISCOVER CARD 




Welcome to 
the PCM 




Are you the proud owner of one of the popular 
1000s or any of the other great MS-DOS 
computers from Tandy? If so, you can welcome 
this new member into your family without giving 
up the support you and your Color Computer 
have always enjoyed from THE RAINBOW. 

In case you haven't heard, the same people who 
bring you THE RAINBOW also publish PCM, the 
Premier Personal Computer Magazine for Tandy 
Computer Users. Each month of the ^ear PCM 
offers 164 pages of feature articles, tutorials, 
product reviews and type-and-run software — jiiiti 
like THE RAINBOW, but specifically for users of the 
complete line of Tandy MS-DOS compters. 

If youVe been concerned about how you were 
going to learn to take care of that newlbaby, worry 
no more. PCM has the support you've grown 
accustomed to. PCM has the support you need. 

To order, use the handy form below !t*call toR- 
free, (800) 847-0309. At only $28fdr a full y< 
subscription, it's the perfect gift fp^ilt ne; 
arrival from Tandy. 




a 




°7y 





OS 




SUBSCRIBE NOW and save up to 35% off the regular newsstand cost of PCM! 



□ I year (12 issues) $28* — 22% off the cover price 
Please check one □ 2 years (24 issues) $51* — 29% off the cover price 

□ 3 years (36 issues) $71* — 35% off the cover price 

NAME 



PCM 



The Premier Personal Computer Magazine 
for Tandy ® Computer Users 



i 



ADDRESS 
CITY 



STATE 



ZIP 



□ New Address Subscription # . 

□ Charge my subscription to: □ Visa 
Account # 



□ MasterCard □ American Express 
Card Exp. Date 



Signature 



•Subscriptions to PCM are $28 a year in the United States. Canadian rate U.S. $38. Surface rate 
to other countries U.S. $65. Air mail U.S. $85. Canadian and foreign subscribers. Inquire about 
multiple-year rates. Allow 6 to 8 weeks for first copy. U.S. currency only, please. In order to hold 
down non-editorial cost, we do not bill. Kentucky residents add 5% sales tax. 



VISA* 



MasterCard 




7T 
r 



—wr 



■X ' 

< r \ 
i * > 



0. gf r $P? ».< 



Speed Racer 

As the checkered flag drops your pulse rises in this lively arcade 
game. The road twists to the horizon on the 3-D panorama that sets 
the stage for exciting racing. Vie for time as you glide through the 
curves at incredible speeds. Step through the gears to stay ahead of 
the pack, but be quick! Some will stop at nothing to see the end of 
the race, or the end of you! Four challenging raceways, complete 
with obstacles and colorful 3-D scenery test your skills in this Pole 
Position™ type game. 

32K Color Computer required... $34.95 




Pinball Factory 

Video games come full circle in this tribute to the original arcade 
game, Pinball. Classic pinball springs to life as never before, with 
fresh new angles that only a computer can offer. Crisp graphics, 
sound, and fast smooth action give this machine-language arcade 
game a realistic, responsive feel you'll hardly believe. There are 
even "tilt" buttons that let you "bump" the machine. In addition to 
playing a great game of pinball, you can enjoy hours of creative 
pleasure as you design, build, edit, and play your own screens. 





0^ 



PINBALL 

FACTORY! 






KARY 



riCFADDEN 

PLAYER 2 



8*188381 i'YZHrlA 



PLAYER 



PLAYER 



8ff»881 18266561 



64K Color Computer re 



Demon Seed 

The first waves of flying, diving, bloodthirsty bats are arriving. 
Move, fire, and move again. It's a never ending battle. If you are 
lucky enough to defeat the bats, be ready for a much greater 
challenge, The Evil Demons themselves. Destroy a wing and 
another takes its place. Only a direct hit can save you now. It will 
take great skill to triumph. If you do, then you better be ready for 
the End. The Demon Flag Ship descends to destroy your remaining 
ships. Your only hope is to penetrate the hull, break through the 
shield, and destroy the dreaded Gargoyle. 



MichTron is always looking for programmers and programs. If you are interested in working with one 

of the most respected company's in the computer software field please give us a call. $ 

• 1 




j For more information 576 S. Telegraph Dealer inquiries welcome. 

on these or other fine products Pontiac, MI 48053 Visa and Mastercard accepted. 
| call our knowledgeable staff! (313) 334-5700